Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
i







\
\

ESTABLISHED 1895





U.S. DID NOT USE J

Red China important to So

GEN. MARSHAL L TELLS
SENATE COMMITTEE

WASHINGTON, May 9.
GENERAL GEORGE MARSHALL, United

States Defence Secretary, said to-day that the
possibility of Soviet intervention had restrained
the United States Government from using Japanese
troops in Korea.

He recalled the Mutual Assistance Pact be-
tween Communist China and the Soviet Union
which directly referred to the Japanese.

He was continuing his replies to Senators of
the Foreign Relations and the Armed Services Com-
mittees’ investigation of the American Far East

policy which had earlier cross-examined General

MacArthur.

Marshall said the Mutual As—
sistance Pact directly referred to
the Japanese and possible inter-
vention on the mainland of Asia
had controlled the action of the
United States Government in not
using Japanese troops in Korea.

Marshall was asked “why is it
assumed that Russian intentions
and planning may be so different

Rritain Protests
To Argentina
LONDON, May 9.
Britain has formally protested

against the establishment of two
more Argentine bases in British

in the Far East from the plans P A howe ;
end intentions in Burope.” Antarctic territory, a Foreign
Marshall replied that actual] Office spokesman disclosed here
fighting was continuing in the] to-day. . : ;
Far East and Communist China] The protest was believed in

Buenos Aires on April 30 by
British Ambassador Sir William
Henry Mack, the spokesman said.
The protest follows a similar
note to Chile against the establish-
ment of a new Chilean base,
These three bases were erected

was a very important factor tc
the Soviet Union. China provided
forces to carry out the Soviet
Union's aggressive designs while
Russian forces suffered no losses.
He said the factor there—and
it was not one in Europe—was I 2
“whether or not the Soviet Gov-|during the Antartic summer of
ernment can afford to have China\1950—51. The present Antarctic
defeated decisively by the Allies, Winter is expected to curb further
and put in a position where the territorial or diplomatic moves in
reaction of China towards the;tbe area for some months,
Parliamentary opinion here has

Soviet Plan
Outrageous

WASHINGTON, May 9.

At his weekly Press Conference
to-day Secretary of State Dean
Acheson referred in scathing terms
to the strategy being followed by
Andrei Gromyko at the talks

Acheson defined the Russian
delegate’s attitude throughout the
Paris meeting as meaning that the
Soviet Union weuld not permit a
meeting of Big Four Foreign Min-
isters unless Western powers ac-
-epted a formulation of the agenda
which would commit Western
Powers before the meeting to
reduction of their armaments,



Acheson said this proposal by
the Soviet Deputy Foreign Minis-
ter was outrageous.

He added that nobody could
contemplate doing any such thing
If the Soviet Union saw it fit that
Western Powers should suspend
their defence programmes, that
price could not be paid.

Acheson was also asked to com-
ment on charges made by General
MacArthur that Britain and other
countries had been sending strate-
gic materials to Cgmmunist China
throughout the Korean war.

He declined to be drawn into
a discussion of these charges. But
he said he was having a full study
made of them: He would go into
the subject at some length if he
was called to testify before the
Senate Committee,

—Reuter.







THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1951

—_—_———



FIG



line up following their capture.

THE KOREAN WAR flares up again and a United Nations solder
stands guard at a prisoner-of-war enclosure, where Communist troops





ITING FLARES UP AGAI

Ramet r

Panamanians Want

President Ousted

SHOOTING BROKE OUT in Panama during a general
strike to-day and crowds attacked the radio station which | year

NEW YORK, May 9

dborate



Ma

“

| Canada Will

Buy 75,000
Tons Sugar

OTTAWA, Ma» 9.
Trade Minister Howe on Tues-
day night announced a new trade
deal with Cuba under which Can-
ada agrees to purchase 75,000 tons
of raw sugar yearly for a three-
period. The sugar agree-

had supported President Arnulfo Arias, according to New | ment was made outside the terms
York radio stations.



The Panamanian Charge D’Af-
faires in Washington, Guillermo

of Torquay agreements, but it will
| have the effect of trimming some
‘of the tariff preference, tradition-





PRICE: FIVE CENTS



PANESE TROOPS

viet Union | Allied Planes Wipe

Out Red Airstrip

By JULIAN BATES.
TOKYO, May 9
MORE THAN three hundred Allied warplanes
swooping on a secret Communist air base in
the north of Korea today, struck their heaviest
blow of the war.

Wave after wave of jet and piston-engined air-
craft, attacking according to a split second time.
table, and each with a specific task to perform,
made an “obliteration’’ assault on an elaborately
camouflaged 2,000-yards long airstrip near Sinuiju,
just south of the Yalu delta which forms the

frontier with Manchuria.

They plastered the
rockets, jellied-petrol
cannon fire and bullets,

In low level sweeps reminiscent
of “train-"busting” raids on Nazi-

-
Russia Does
Not Want War crestor, ey, lastes

‘ground, fuel dumps of anti-air-
LONDON, May 9. jcraft pits and lorries. They shat-
Patrick Gordon Walker, Secre.\‘ered runways, barracks and
ary of State for Commonwealth! hangars.
telations to-day said: “Although | The raid lasted several hours.
Russia wants to expand as tar!'The last Allied pilots to leave the
nd as fast as possible, she does|target reported smoke and flame
jot want in my view to bel] over an area of nine square miles.
nvolved in a world war herself Swarms of Communist jet fight-
But she has shown herself ready, ers came up to challenge Allied
to take gambles that involve thé) pilots, But most of them fled after

strip with
bombs,



isk of world war. The Berlin |brief dog fights.

jlockade was one example. The Today’s attack was made in two

ittack on Korea another, and ajphases, one in the morning, the

much more dangerous one.” other in the afternoon. American
Addressing a Labour Party|Air Foree Officers said to-night

meeting here, that the camouflaged airfield

yordon Walker oat

three western powers had shown|attacked to-day was only one of

patience and readiness for a com- several disguised Communist
promise and a readiness to miss no)}strips in North Korea.
pportunity for genuine discus Seven airstrips had been attack-
sion, ed during the past month, they
Gordon Walker added: “We are | added Near Pyongyang alone,
not alarmists. We do not feel) there were five strips. Air Force
that war is inevitable or just] Sbservers said the Chinese air

around the corner but the dangers] build-up was still going on.
ire real enough to make it neces

sary for us to prepare to defend On the grouna United Nations

Soviet Government might be one uy Y ; : ar ‘ ert ally allowed to Commonwealth | ourselves.” patrols pushed far north through
of deep mistrust because they|recently shown itself to be ex: U.S. Soldiers IN OUR TOWN Pr ee kes by (the | sugar suppliers. Britain had two great duties to| the still and deserted No Man's
bain ice: Rene si malen bP Argentina and Chile on iritsn Ki ht Ea h Oth phened him that the ‘present | ,,,anada usually imports about lfulfil—defence of Britain and of}Land on the western front
; by Argentina and Chile on Britis” tg c er | Heard to-day in Broad trouble was started by Camara, 600,000 tons of raw sugar a.wvear Western Europe ‘| Throughout today, they could find
A paraphrased version. of ajheld territory, and pressure on | Street through a megaphone: nists and their “terrorist acts” mostly from Commor galth) “we must collaborate with ouc|°Mly two Communists, one they
letter from Truman to MacAr-|Government for stronger action is KARLIKUSE, U.S. ZONE, “Come to-night to Queen's were intended to “disrupt Pana. S0Utces. These eountries5 ich 85! neighbours in Western Europe”,|illed, the other was taken pris-
thur last January showed why | increasing. : Germany, May 9. Park by the thousands to hear | mia’s solidarity with the United Australia, Trinidad ar, ymaica|tne Minister said. “If ever any | Ne?
the President objected to mili-| Argentina and Chile have both} Nine United States soldiers Busta-Alexander-Mante speak States,” bring their sugar into ("ada at | onom whould amin. + h “he The tank force which stabbed
tary measures which under dif-|laid claims to large parts ofj/were injured when about | Pre t Arnulfo Ariag an-! ‘y tariff of about 26 ceils a hun- Chanwel port: vith, ar ‘immediately north of Seoul reach-
ferent circumstances he might|British held territory in the]100 American white and coloured * * bial ‘on. Pipatar nig, ae dredweight. - ports. new and) ao point north of Liijongbu, but

have approved.

The letter said that while the
United States was building its
strength, great prudence must be

exercised to avoid extension of
the Korean war.
“Steps which might, in them

selves, be fully justified and which
might lend some assistance to the
campaign in Korea, would not be
beneficial if they would involve
Japan or western Europe in
Jargeseale hostilities” it said.

The paraphrased version said
the President recognised that
continued resistance might not be
militarily possible with the limi-
ted resourcés available to Gen-
eral MacArthur,

In any event, United Nations
forces must be preserved as an
effective instrument for the de-
fence of Japan and elsewhere.

“Successful resistance in Korea
however, would serve the follow-
ing purposes.”

The Senator, who read the
paraphrased version into the
record, sald the letter listed ten
purposes which would be served.

He said the first of these was

Antarctic and Falkland Islands

dependencies. —Reuter.

Two Perish In
Rum Explesion
KINGSTON, J’ca, May 9,
Two men burned to death:

two others were seriously injur-
ed when 82 hogshead's of rum ex-

ploded on a truck yesterday after-| sufficiently

servicemen fought one another
in a cafe here last night, an Ameri-
can army announcement said to-

night.

The announcement added that
as investigation. of the incident
was not yet complete “all facts
of the case have not yet been
ascertained.

The army said that the nine
injured men were treated at a
local army dispensary. None was

injured to be taken

noon, causing the complete de-}to hospital.

struction of the vehicle, For a
few minutes the truck’s brakes
failed to act when coming off a
long steep hill: the truck hit a



According to German sources
a dispute between white and
negro soldiers developed into a
wild melee in which all the

bank and the explosion followed.|cafe’s furniture was smashed to

A doctor while attending
injured was struck down by a
burning tree which fe!l across the
road; he is now in hospital suffer~
ing from head and arm injuries.

—(CP)

CANES BURNT
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 9,
One hundred and sixty tons of

canes of an area of approximately
eight acres burnt at Cassada Gar-
‘dens last night.

to
would
free, world.”

PERSIA REJECTS U.K.
MOVE IN OIL DISPUTE

(By LEOPOLD HERMAN)
TEHERAN, May 9.

PERSIA to-day declared that the oil in her vast fields
was hers and told Britain she could not agree to the latest
moves made to stay nationalisation.

The Persian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister
announced that Persia could not accept “force or bluff or
intimidation” in settling the future of her oil industry.

{

“demonstrate that aggression
not be accepted by the
—Reuter.





“The oii is ours. We must use
it tor the benefit of the nation
and for the benefit of world
peace” it was stated.

There was no reference to the
request yesterday by the Anglo-
Tranian Oil Company that the
matter should be referred to ar-
bitration .

â„¢~ .
Grinding Completed
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 9.
Antigua sugar factory's
yard was cleared by 8 o'clock
lest night when an emergency
staff of engineers, estate mana-
gers, overseers and clerks com-
pleted grinding operations
To-day estate managers and
overseers returned to their
respective estates as cattle mind-
evs and women labourers had
yvone out on a sympathy strike.
Volunteers from city firms are
to-day assisting in the boiling
and bagging of sugar. Tomlinson’s

The

in a letter to Herbert Morrison,
British Foreign Secretary, said
that nationalisation of an indus-
try was the sovereign ‘right of
every nation.

Though agreements or conces-
sions might have been made or
granted, he asserted, and though



eran

workshop of the Antigua Syndi-|these might be legal in every
cate Estates came to a standstill] respect, they could not impede
yesterday morning when workers|the exercise of national sover-

approach or, eign rights.

the manage-

ceased ‘without any
representations to
ment.

RESTRICTIONS OFF
PARIS, May 9.
The Cabinct to-day decided to
suspend existing restrictions on
import beef because of the “ab-
normal rise in the price of beef

activities
Anglo-

Moseddegh gaid “the
and behaviour” of the
Tranian oil company had led to
discontent among the Persian
people. These causes of discon-
tent, he added, would be ‘elimin-
ated by the enforcement of the
law for carrving out the nation-
alisation of the oil industry

—_

a




Dr, Moseddazh, Prime Minister, General ief,
| telligence Officer, for infofmation

ihe | pieces.

Strong military police squads
eventually restored order and
removed battling soldiers in army
trucks. No one to-night appeared
to know the cause of the original
dispute.

Relations between white and
coloured soldiers in ‘the United
States zone of Germany are nor-
mally very good and last night's
incident was one of a very small



number of this type since the
occupation,
—Reuter.



Twelve Arrested

BUENOS AIRES, May 9.
Twelve persons including prom
inent Conservatives and Nation-
alists have been arrested and!
held on charges of “disrespect”
against the President. Though
police action was taken some
fortnight ago, official disclosure
was only made to-day through
Federal Judge Rivas Arguello
Among the arrested is forme:
President of the Conservative
Party and former Senator Antonic

Santa Marina.
—Keuter.



WILLOUGHBY SUMMONED

WASHINGTON, May 9,
The House of Representatives
un-American Activities Commit-
tee said to-day it had subpoenaed
Major General C. A. Willoughby,
MacArthur's chief, In-

on Russian espionage in Japan.
—Reuter.



HULL IMPROVES

BETHESDA, Maryland, May.9.
The United States Naval hos-
pital here said to-day that the
former Secretary of States, Mr
Cordell Hull, who has been criti-
ezly ill, has shown significan‘
improvement”, Reuter.

GUATEMALA, May 9
Panic spread again today in the







in the last two months.” . His governrrent wished to wsey Government hopes to alleviate! the income from oil to strength-; Salvador—devastated by an earth.
the present shortage end bring}en Persia’s cconomy and put an{Quake on Sunday—when a_ vol-
down vrices for the consumer bv] end to poverty, distress and dis -ano showed signs of eruption
importing foreign beef ;content | Confirmed casualties resulted
Another decision ag ts t mixed Parliamentary Cor-|]from the earthquake were nearly
to Parliament a bill to subs ssion would be elected shortly} 2,000 by tonight and official esti
French ] » enable t to carry out oil ationalisatic 1] mates suggested they may even
to mee ijnal conipetition| throughout the country tually re: 4,000 '
on an equal footing. —Reuter —Reuter, Earth tremors were diminishing








“There's one thing in Bar-
bados I’ve found better than
in Jamaica” said Mr. Busta-
mante in a Broad Street store

* yesterday.

“It is the rum,’ he laughed.

“You've some really good
rum here.”

oprtocmn ae ‘ r i
“USTA™ SPOKE

of € wc

FOR 3 HOURS

Over ten thousand people as-
sembled at Queen’s Park last
ntght to hear Hon, W. A. Busta-
mante speak. A Public Meeting,
at which Mr. W. A. Crawford,
M.C.P., was Chairman, was held
in the Queen’s Park steel shed in
honour of Mr, Bustamante. Mr.
Bustamante addressed the crowd
for over three hours. At the con
clusion of the meeting the crowd
was treated to free dancing and
entertainment.







Customs Union

Not Yet Accepted
LONDON, May 9.

Mr. John Dugdale, Minister of

State for the Colonies, told the
House of Commons to-day that

the report of the Commission on
the establishment of a Customs
Union in the British Caribbean

area has not yet been discussed
by any of the Legislatures,

The Minister was answering 4
question put by Mr. Thomas Reid

ei, heaters iss et el ngs toaeyan atirnsrmssnanesnaisiait

(Labour). Asked what progress
had been made in respect of
federation, the Minister said the

position was unchanged from |
when he replied to a question =
March 14.

On that oceasion, Mr. Dugdale
said the report of the Standing)
Closer Association Committee,
which recommended federation
had been accepted by the Legisla-
tures of Trinidad, the four colonies;
of the Windward Islands and the!
Presidencies of Antiguo, St. Kitts|
and, with one reservation, Mont
serrat, in the Leeward Islands

—Reuter.



Ridgway Promoted

WASHINGTON, May 9
President Truman to-day
Lieutenant General Matthew Lv
Ridgway, General Douglas Mac-
Arthur’s successor in the Far East
to the rank of full General.

The President sent to the Senate
for confirmation of the promotion
which will give General Ridgway
a fourth star.




—Reuter.

2,000 DEAD IN

but there was great fear that the
volcano near the town of Chiha-
meca might blow its head off.
Rescue workers and Red Cross
teams were searching among the
ruins of El Salvador’s towns and

villages for bodies of hundreds
who perished on Sunday
port from San _ Salvador



of




the Republic. said
injured and distress
were streaming into



phe would eall a national pe
cite Wednesday to permit the
‘people ta choose by voting be
, tween the 1946 Constitution he}
abolished Monday night and the}
1941 Charter which he substituted

The speech climaxed a day of
tension and followed a demon-}
stration by thousands of Pana-|

manians who marched on Nation- |
al Police Headquarters ‘Tuesday |
night — clamouring for the oust-
ing of the President and seeking |
police aid to effect it.

Arias said: “If the people want
us to leave the Presidency, we}
would do so.” He also said be
would call elections for a new
National Assembly to meet next
October, {

Demonstrators outside Police
Headquarters were counselled by
Colonel Jose Antonio Remon,
Chief of National Police to be
calm. He said the country’s
armed forces would guarantee
the people’s rights.

Arias aroused protests by
abolishing the 1946 Constitution
Monday night. He said he was
acting to fulfi] Panama’s commit-
ments for defence of the hemis
phere and the Panama Canal,

The cancelled constitution “pro-
tected the Communist doctrine,”
he claimed,

His opponents called his act an
assumption of dictatorial powers
by a virtual coup d'etat.

—(C.P.)

—_———— '

Attempt To Invite
Ike Again Rejected

STRASBOURG, May 9

The European Parliament to
night rejected, by a big majority,
the second Italian attempt to in
vite General Dwight D. Eisen
hower, Commander of the Atlan
tic army in Europe to attend it
debate on Saturday on ihe de
fence of Europe.



Despite repeated appeals from
the President, from the 125 mem
ber-Assembly grouping of 15 na-
tions, and from many of its mem
bers Ugo La Malfa, Italian Minis- |
ter for Foreign Trade, insisted on



|

maintaining his proposition firs |

smothered yesterday. |
f ; 0! gama
The Italian Minister said Eis

enhower’s presence at the debate |
would greatly increase the im |
portance attached to in the}
United States.
Parliamentary representatives |
from Belgium, France, Italy and
Britain joined in urging La Mal

it

fa to withdraw his proposa} and!
allow the Assembly more time a |
consider it —Reuter.

EL SAL

the city from the devastated area
90 miles to the south-east.
Disruption of communications
had held up full details of death
and destruction, but official esti-
mates said 1,000 were killed at
Jucuapa, a town of about 12,000
in the first shock on Sunday night.

ihameca
also badls

quake

(population
hit by the ¢

but no casualty

Ch 17,000)
w irth-

has



figure

have suffered in the earthquake
| in San Salvador, it was announced
today

In addition the Pope instructed
; American

Cuba ated other non«Cornmon-
wealth countries are charged a
tariff rate of about $1.28 a hun- |
dredweight. Trade officials said
the preference was great enough
to allow Commonwealth suppliers
to cut their sugar prices by about
85 cents or $1 a hundredweight,

Instead they tended to lower
their price by about 15 cents a
hundredweight sufficient to under-
sell non-Commonwealth suppliers

Under the Cuba agreement,
sugar will enter Canada at the old
$1.28 a hundredweight tariff rate,
but refiners buying sugar will be
aliowed a rebate to bring =

the price they paid for Cuban

; sugar to the rate they would have

paid had they purchased Common-
wealth supplies

Cywnada encountered extreme
rading difficulties in the British
West Indies which only recently
relaxed import controls, Howe
said

In feturn for the sugar deal
Cuba had undertaken to renew
nntil 1954, tariff concessions
sranted in 1947 to Canada, These
include reductions for codfish,
wheat, flour and potatoes.

Howe added that Canada was
prepared to extend her sugar deal

to other non-Commonwealth
countries up to a total of 150,000
tons a year.—(CP)

2! Cops Charged

NEW YORK, May 9
Twenty-one policemen were
detained today on an indictment
charging conspiracy to protect a
$20,000,000 per year book-making
racket, They inelude two in-
spectors, one captain and two

Ueutenants who have retired

—Reuter,

Special Blessing

VATICAN CITY, May 9
Pius XII has sent his
blessing and a “generous
money” to people who

Pope
epecial
sum of

the Nuncio in the Central
Republic to express t
the Government the Pope's
at the sad_ plight
San Salvador.”
—Reuter

Papal

“deep

of the

orrow

people of

SYMPATHY

WASHINGTON, May
President Truman and Secre

|
tary of State Acheson to-day ;



9.

méssages to the Government of
El Salvador expressing deep sor
row’ at the death
week's earthquake,

roll in this

—Reuter.

VADOR

yet been received from there
Two other towns further south,

Santiago Maia and Belin, shaken |

by the first tremors, had further;





shocks yesterday. THe devastated |
area was closed off after Red
Cross and Government medical]
and hea! teams started relief
vork Government intends to!
burn the wrecked towns to pre-|
vent the spread of disease ae
cording to reports.—Reuter.

modern weapons we woul bé in
“a very grave state indeed”.
—Reuter,



Israeli Forces Pound
Arab Village

DAMASCUS, May 9
A Syrian military spokesman
said Israeli forces today pounded
an Arab village in the demilitar.
ised Israeli-Syrian border zone
despite the Security Council's eal)
for a cease-fire last night,

The attack on the village lasted
several hours, he said,

It was made with mortars and
machine guns and a few shells
fell ear the Syrian frontier post
of El Hasel,

Syria has protested to the head
of the mixed Armistice Commis
sion,—-Reuter



encountered only tight and Seats
tered resistance.—Reuter,

Withdraw Votes

VIENNA, May 9.
Four “iron curtain” countries
Russia, Poland, Hungary and
Czechoslovakia to-day with
drew the votes they had given
yesterday in favour of West Ger
many’s being admitted to the In-
ternational Olympic Commit-—
tee —Reuter.



THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night





WARNING

Our Customers and Friends are reminded that:

STARTENA
GROWENA

AND

LAYENA

are registered Brand Names of the
RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
of St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A.

Always insist on getting genuine
STARTENA, GROWENA & LAYENA

as we have received complaints that
other Poultry Feeds are being sold

as Startena, Growena and Layena.

H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.

Agents and Distributors.















PAGE TWO

IS EXCERLENCY the Gov-

ernor and ec, Savage, and

Sir George and QLady Seel, will

attend the oper performance

of Bernard Sh ygmalion” at

the British Coupe! V's Pocket
Theatre at Wakefield. House,

Wandering Wainwrights
R, AND MRS, “TIBI” WAIN-
WRIGHT who had been hol
idaying in Barbados since Novem-
ber, left last night by the Lady
Rodney. Their home in Canada is
in Montreal.

Mutt and Jeff
CIVIL SERVANT whose wife
~ presented him with twins—
two boys--took his four-year-old
daughter to the Tercentenary Ward
at the General Hospital to see her
two new brothers,

The Sister on duty asked if she
was proud of them and she said
“ves.”” The Sister asked what she
would like them ealled.

This was the reply—‘No non-

sense, give them good names, call
them MUTT AND JEFF.”
Commerce
AY ARGAREI GILL, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs, F. F. C. Gill
ot Regan Lodge, St. Michael, has
returned from. the U.S., whexe

she took a commerce course, Her

uncle Mr. Norton Deane of New
York, wiio is a brother of Mr.
Nicholas Deane of Locust Hall

Plantation, arrived by the same
plane, He plans to spend a month
in Barbados,

Continuing Holiday

ON. MRS. EVELYN BERTIN,

who left for B.G. on April
-ith, returned on Tuesday via
Trinidad to resume her Barbados

holiday, She first arrived from
B.G. on April Gth, but had to
return unexpectedly on a om
visit,

Martinique and Trinidad
RIK OHLSSON, Inspector Gen-
eral of a Swedish typewriter.

adding and calculating machine
company, who arrived here April
3rd, has gone to Martinique His
headquarters are in Rio de
Janeiro . Miss Carim Oldby
who came in the same day and is
a member of the same company,
has left for Trinidad . . Mrs.
Suire de Kuttel, Dr. Barbara
Lioydstill’s daughter has igone to
Trinidad on a short visit, She

flew there by B.W.1.A. yesterday
afternoon.

Back to Montserrat

RS. GILL, wife of Mr. G. A.
Gill, Manager of the Royal
Bank of Canada in Montserrat,

was among the passengers leaving
by the Lady Rodney last night,
Mrs. Gill was on a six weeks’ visit

staying with her daughter and
son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs, Fred
Marshail of Kensington, Fonta-
belle.

From Trinidad
RS, FRANK DE BOEHMLER
came in on B.W.LA.’s flight
from Trinidad yesterday afternoon
to spend a few days holiday with
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Kellman of St.
Anns Court, Garrison. Her son
Rodney has beew holidaying with
thé Kellmans and will be return-

ing with her to Trinidad.

_ ADVENTURES: OF

‘gy

te erence





“ Are they going to call
that high one the cost of
living ?””



Holidaying With Parents

R. AND MRS. ARTHUR

LEWIS and their three
children, Margot, Gordon and baby
Suzanne arrived from Trinidad
yesterday by B. W.I.A. to spend
six weeks’ holiday staying with
Mr, Lewis’ parents in Barbarees.

He is the assistant manager of
Cannings Grocery in Frederick
Street, Port-of-Spain.

Moved

R. NEVILLE SCHULER, eye

specialist in Georgetown,
B.G., who used to have his office
on Main Street near the Church
of the Sacred Heart, tells me that
he has moved to Lamaha Street,
and has opened a drug store as
well. Dr, Schuler arrived here on
Monday from Trinidad and had
been staying at the Marine Hotel.
Yesterday he left for B.G. by
B.W.I.A.

Leewards Trip
M* and Mrs. Colin Bellamy
and their young son have
gone for a trip through the Lee-
ward islands and will get off in
St. Kitts. They expect to be back
in Barbados by May 25th.
Mr. Bellamy’s trip is in connec-

tion with the Barbados Mutual
Life Assurance.

For Carib Talks
R. STEHLE, Director General
of Agriculture for the French
West Indies, arrived yesterday
from Guadeloupe by B.W.LA. to
attend the Twelfth Meeting of the
Caribbean Commission.
Dr. Stehle is a member of the
French Section of the Caribbean
Commission.

On Long Leave
FF to England on Saturday
by the Gaseogne go Mr. and
Mrs. Courtenay Reece who have
been holidaying im Barbados for
the past five and a half weeks.
Mr. Reece is a Puisne Judge of
Nigeria. He is on long leave. Be-
fore coming to Barbados, Mr.
and Mrs. Reece visited their
daughter Daphne in Cambertae,
Massachusetts .
In England, they will see their
ether daughter Rosemary.

Carub Calling

R wer ens
Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Tay-
lor of Worthing, is engaged to
Miss Rosemarie Pape, daughter
cf Major G. W. Pape of Fyza-~-
bad, Trinidad. The engagement
was annownced a short time ago
in Trinidad where Keith at
present living.

Short Holid
M*: PRANK iets
Fb

was at Seawell yesterday
to meet his wife and son Oscar.

son of

is

Mrs. Nothnagel has come over
for a short holiday, Oscar, who
was in Trimidad for the Easter

holidays,
School
Mr
guests
Club.

has returned to Lodge
for the summer term.
and Mrs. Nothnagel are
at the Barbados Aquatic

isters

N their way home to, New-
foundland are Dr. and Mrs.
D, J. O'Regan and their daugh-
ter Sheila who left last night by
the Lady Rodney for Halifax.
They had been spending two
weeks’ holiday with Mr. and
Mrs. Bill Grace of the Garrison.
Mrs. O'Regan and Mrs. Graee

are sisters.

With Apex Oilfields

MONG the passengers com-

ing im from Trinidad yes-
terday by BWIA. were Mr.
and Mrs. Vietor Gill and
baby daughter. Here on three
months’ holiday they are staying
at a bungalow in St. Lawrence
Gap. Mr. Gill works with Apex
Oilfields at Fyzabad, Trinidad.

New Manager
R. and MRS. CYRIL VOL-
NEY and famify were

among the passengers leaving by
the y last night. Mr.
and Mrs. Volney are on their

way to Montserrat. The children}

will get off in Dominica. Mr
Volney will shortly be taking
over the managership of Cable
and Wireless’ Branch in Montser-
rat from Mr. P. W. Croney who is
retiring. '

During May

RANS CANADA AIRLINES
weekly flight to Barbados is
due in at 5.10 this morning from
Canada. For the month of y it
will continue to coffe im every
Thursday. It will be returning to
Barbados on its northbound trip
later to-day. From June the
schedule will once mote operate

through here on Saturdays.

Eye Surgeon

R. VIVIAN METIVIER,

surgeon of Port-of-Spain.
has joined his wife over here for
a week's holiday. He flew in
from Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. They are staying at
the Ocean View Hotel.

ntserrat Holiday
NN Penchoen re 4 last

n by the Lady
to spen weeks’ holiday in
Montserr: Leaving with pat
were Mrs. Paul Hollender

Miss Betty Hollender. Mrs, Hoe
lender and Miss Penchoen are sis-
ters.

IPA





BY THE WAY »

AINTY as thistledown, light

as the fairy dancers Grog-

blessom and Quartbottle, a hover-

plane “landed on four saucers in

the midle of a lake.” Not one of

the saucers was broken or even
chipped.

If a smaller hoverplane filled
with tea could land on a saucer
in the middle of a tea-shop, ten
to one there would be no spoon

to stir it with. “What was that
faint sound I heard, Elvira?”
“Why, Raoul, a hoverplane has

just landed on your umbrella.”

Kooluk at Fatti

OOLUKATFATTI explored
London yesterday. At Ox-
ford Circus he said he was

surprised that all the old colleges
looked so new, At Cambridge Cir-
cus he asked how the students
managed to carry their boats down
to the river through all that traffic.
When he saw St. Paul’s he ex-
claimed: “Dome of Discovery!” In
the evening he asked to see an
English music-hall, and was taken
to the House of Commons. He
was interested to note that it was
the performers who laughed at the
jokes. He said that all the prayers
about cheese proved how religious
the English still were.

Leading Article
WHILE MAKING every
allowance for Miss Slopcorner’s
somewhat acute sense of pro-
priety, one cannot but regret the
undignified behaviour of Council-
lor Tudmarsh. Anything that, at



TAN & NAVY

DIAL 4606

such a time as this, tends to dis-
eredit such ceremonies as the
christening of gas - containers
makes us a laughing-stock in the
eyes of foreign natians. It might
be well if, on future occasions
ladies were not invited to perform
tasks which a man is quite capable
of carrying out successfully. We
do not suggest that those who at-
tempt to exaggerate what occurs
into a kind of pagan orgy are ne-
cessarily right. But we do deplore
the introduction of this personal
note into what should be an im-

Beachcomber

personal oceasion. The gas-con-
tainers of the nation must-not be
made the subject of vulgar bick-

oe
ime. MeGurgla
Ao why hash had begun.to
appear on her menus as
“le hash” Mrs. MecGurgle said:
“French is the international lan-
guage of food. I want my French
tourists to feel at home in gay
Paree when they come here.
Hence, also, the tiny tricolour flag
stuck in the Pudding Auriol.”





JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in

a humorous essay, story or poem

on the subject of “A TOP HAT.”

The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-

cate, and the winner will receive a
books or stationery. Entries must
Advocate Co, Ltd., City, not later

NOTE: Stories must not be c

prize to the value of 7/6 in either
reach The Children’s Editor, The
than Wednesday every week,

‘opied,

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR COMPETITION

POS Gite aeidal yaaa eed g

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BARBADOS

The Woman Who |
Didn't Know Attlee

(By FREDERICK COOK)
HE walls of Miss Helen |
Sioussat’s 14th floor office!
in Madison Avenue, New York,
are lined with the autographed
pictures of famous men and
women whom she taught to
speak on the radio,

There are Anthony Eden,
Margaret Truman, Herbert
Hoover, Walter geon — and
Clement Attlee,

The Prime Minimer was ec

innocent cause of the worst faux
pas ever committed by week
Helen Sioussat, boss of all the

talks for one of America’s biggest
radio networks.

During his first post-war visit
to the United States, he had
agreed to take part in a broad-
east with Miss Frances Perkins,
FDR’s Labour Secretary. Miss
Sioussat (pronounced Soosahy
was to see that all went weltx

Frances Perkins arrived first. |
Behind her came three or spur

To make him feel at

iG vone heed at te.
‘Ts very kind
Fat 5 Santis Reet t ces ee |

the sweetest way—‘Please don’t
worry! You know it was not the
first time I’@ been taken for a
brief-case r=

800 and 900
year, reads their scripts, schools
them in the arts of broadcasting.

She “Ainks men better broad-
casters than women.
WORLD COPYRIGHT = e



Women Turn On
Tax Man

From R, M, MacCOLL
NEW YORK,
The normal man quails before
cold, beady eye of the tax
collector, Just now it is the tax
) collectors who are quailing no-
ticeably before the hot, angry
eyes of America’s women,

The row started when Wash-
ington told housewives that they
would have to start “withholding”
taxes from the money they paid
out to part-time maids and “‘baby-



sitters.”
eye

Led by traditionally independ-
Went Texas (“Don’t fence me in’),
the Riders of the Kitchen Range
poured im a torrent of protest on
the Treasury officials.

Who is behind the revolt? None
other th our old friend, acid-
tongued Vivien Kellems, the
Connecticut cable manufacturer.

Last year she won her own suit
against the Internal Revenue
Bureau for the return of $6,133
80c, seized by the Government

se she refused to deduct
income tax from her workers’
ay-packets,
faced by the avalanche, Wash-
ington is already displaying a
most unwonted leniency in apply-
ing the law.

THE “clear aim of American
peliey” was stated in clear terms
‘by " aesthetic-looking Averell
Harriman, former ambassador to
Britain, in a speech at Los
Angeles. “There can be victory
—and glorious victory—in pre-
venting another world conflict,”
'

|: THE RABBIT is far more calm
1 and collected than man in a crisis
says one of America’s top scien-
tists, Dr. Roy Forster, of Dart-
mouth College. Faced with danger,
man gets all hot and bothered.
But the rabbit just “goes into a
quiescent state.” Hats off to
I Harvey,




| THE stern voice of the sergeant
was growling out its routine
messages over the radios of Phila-
delphia’s police cars, Suddenly
came the crooning of “The Ten-
essee Waltz.” Explained the red-
faced police: A joker must have
found a police car unattended.

EDWARD DONNELLY of New
York does not believe in wasted

motion. His method of disposing||

of an old chair is to toss it out
of the windew, Now Eq is in
jail, The chair landed on the
head of Mrs. Vera Brautigarn—.
who now has 18 stitches,

TEN YEARS ago Sam Goldwyn
bought the film rights of Somer-
set Ma ’s story ‘“Mackin-
tosh.” ow he is going to pro-
duce it to Title: “South of Samoa,”










CROSSWORD



Across
. Fish may rest on stone rugs.
self-evident trutn. (4)
en from 4 (tdtess canister. (4)
of thing you map ous. (4)

(9)

a

rt oO
i Be exclaim suddent
ueation.

io)

Driven insane ¥ ‘8)
ay Ag es mot grantea (Y)
is is gross, (6)

bown

1, Acted as agent mo doubt. (5)
24. Loosened m cue-land. (7)
%. Sorrowful sort of streev. (3)
4 e whole extent, ay
5. = OT)
6. & Boiling Ses bd
Te a @ is for India

the erly room >) b)
a — one there's nothing but 4
12. fe 4h we fina tm fresh style.
1% Ma Sve ugnt net. (6)
16. death. (4)
L mugs may wear. (4)

8. ared. (4)
ide-arms have the answer. (4)
s oe
renee 9
a orsern yunts. ta
q 17 : Soe 20, Banner

hee . Trays 3 Dinner & #3
fe ee ve

Across
Preaco. 10
1m

15, Idler: 17, cam 18. Cue

ADV


























Â¥
THURSDAY MAY 10, 195
OCATE THURSDAY, MAY , L
3 COO SSOS,
3 4
B.B.C. Radio Pro ramme 4
4 DAYS SERVICE 2
>
THURSDAY MAY 10 1951 sno, 6.00 p.m. Listeners’ Digest. 6.30 4 . ‘ 4 2
6.30 m.—I2.15 pm. — 19 66 m Pp Orchestral Music of Bizet, 5 p.m. 7"
——— : . Programme Parade @ Our Expert English Watch Repairer guarantees to
6.30 6.45 am. Sport a
ing Reco The Ne 7.10] G.A5—11,00 pom repair your watch satisfactorily. ‘
am. New 1 4 r e - = eee ;
Editorials, 7.25 a.m ogramm 7.00 pan. Th p.m. News ; R
1.30 a.m. Festival Fun Pair, 7 | Anatvsis. 7.15 p.m. We See Britain, 2.45 i @ A big shipment of SWISS Sante for every type 3
Land i Livestock, 8.15 Yr rs p.m Festival Fun Fair, 8.00 p.m. adio ‘ eiv: "
Cholee, 3 0 a. m i Margaret d t Newsreel, #15 p.m. The Adventures of ; of watch has just been rec
#45 a.m. Engineering Achie P.C. 49, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m .
am. The News, 9.10 a.m From the Editorials, - pn See
f Britain, 9.15 a.m Clo Dispatch, 9.15 p.m Valk ‘ogee’ ri > 1
1115 aw Progaeunene Parade, 12 Chiliun, 946 p.m. Do aa Pen 3 ALFONSO w. De LIMA & q 0.
teners’ Cheice, 11.45 a.m Specia 16.00 pm. The News, 10.10 p.m. Li »
Listeners 12.00 «moony The News, 12.10] Music, 10.46 p.m, On. the Farm, 11.00 Opposite Goddard's
pm. News Analysis, 12.15 pm, Close] pm. From the Third Programme.
Dewn
iat .
h—-6 45 pm — 9. m. C.B.C.
. HURSDAY MAY 10, 1951 LA :
438 p.m. Top Score, 5.00 pan. Com-| 14 4) TRUBS Dm. News, 10.18 p.m, Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
Does OF the WeeR, oo Oe ee the | 10.90 p.m. ‘Tile Week in Canada. LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY — 445 & 8.30 P.M
Magazine, 545 p.m. Semprini at th





| Rupert and the Iee-flower —24



With rhe dim,

greemsm fight is a rustling sound.and from asatioe

pelping him, Rupert ens me way the bracken appears the ee ee of
e ward § Surprited ary old pram LF As ubbing
the Ke of the cave if cover a his eyes. ° e. whe was

that tripping over my legs? And

what month isi ? And....

yiacious, it's a little bear! How

id vou get here?” he growls.
RVED

‘code masses of dried brackem, All
at once something seems te move
under ins feet and he for-
ward. Ac che same moimerne phere

ain 8G



voppies








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renter es
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“ran Tov. Hardie bcd kits Ivan DESNY
A J. Arthur Rank Presentation - A Universal-International Release

STARTING TO-MORROW AT 8.30

EMPIRE THEATRE

999524. oes
EE EEO











RODD E TELS OE TE

GLOBE THEATRE

LAST SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 P.M.
“MA AND PA KETTLE”
AND
“SECRET BEYOND THE DOOR”
Joan BENNETT & Michael REDGRAVE



AQUATIC CLUB C INEMA {Members Only)
TONIGHT AT
Special Matinee: SATURDAY MORNING AT 9.30 o'clock

DANA ANDREWS :o: JEANNE CRAIN :o; DICK HAYMES
in The Technicolor Musical

“STATE FAIR” *

20th CENTURY-FOX PICTURE
ry Suterraining for both Adults and Children.



A



This Picture i



Commencing F RIL
ROSAL IND’ RU SSELL,
in “MOURNING

MICHAEL REDGRAVE
BECOMES ELECTRA”

CASUARINA CLUB

NOW SITUATED AT

“ILFRACOMBE”
MAXWELL COAST ROAD
Telephone 8378
6





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POOL AGE eG Et EG NES














RKO Radio Double Bill! !

1ST.“A SONG IS BORN”
Color by Tec ee
Plus:— hue Kahstnone Benny GoopMaN and Others
2ND “BODYGUARD” Lawrence Tierney
“SODAY (Phurs.) 1.30 P.M.

Charlie Chan in

LAZA DIAL
Samaan 8404

RKO Double ! !
“PARZAN TRIUMPHS”
Johnny Weissmuller and
“WEST OF THE PECOS”

Robert Mitchum

Ps MY Sun. 5 & 8.30 p.m.
DE GOES WEST”
Eddie “albert, Gale Storm &

“BLUE GRASS of KENTUCKY”

Bill Williams, Jane Nigh ‘Buzz’ Hen:

SSS

MIDNITE SATURDAY 12
BY REQUEST
— ALSO —
MON. 9.30 A.M. & 1.30 P.M.
“LOUISIANA" AND
SONG oF THE WASTELAND




















— and —

+



















Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

TOMORROW := 2.30=
445 & 8.30 p.m. and
Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

TODAY LAST SHOWS — 4.45 and 8.15 P.M.

: ‘tau. WENDELL cone RANE PAGE

“THE SUN NEVER SETS”
Basil RATHBONE and Doug FAIRBANKS

OPENING TOMORROW — 5 and 8.15 P.M,



THE GOLDEN EYE & DRIFTIN’ KID



{ mS
_ r
GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30
Man FROM. HEADQUARTERS”
with Frank Albertson

“JSIGGS & MAGGIE IN COURT”
with Joe YULE & Renie RIANO

FRIDAY to SUNDAY 8.30 p.m.
Mat. Sunday — 5 p.m.

“Step Lively” & “TARZAN &
t the Slave Girt
Frank Sinatra Lak Tacker





















































20,000,000 readers
called this the
(ast electrifying
adyenting ever
lived!













A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL 2Ei¢



























Rha CONTE Glen GRAY F 2. §

ond Inteducing
Story and Screenplay by JO EISINGER: Directed

FRANK AUSTIN..........
DENNIS CLARKE
REGGIE CASEY
EDDIE CLARKE
DORIAN THOMSON......
MALCOLM MURRAY

| EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and
Continuing

20th CENTURY FOX
Presents . >

“ID CLIMB THE
HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”



Opening Friday May 1th
at 830

** MADELEINE”

ROXY |

TO-DAY and TOMORROW
4.30 and 8,15

Columbia Big Double - -

Robert YOUNG and

Marguerite CHAPMAN in

“ RELENTLESS ”
: and :

“LUST FOR
GOLD”

Starring:
Glen FORD & Ida LUPINO



A Universab International Picture

ae es
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

Guest Stars — GERALD DAISLEY & WILLIE IFILL
Tickets on Sale FRIDAY NITE from 7 p.m.

——————————








by weet SHERMAN:Praduced by MONARO GOLDSTEIN







“4 Winds and 7 Seas”
“My Love Loves Me”
“Count Every Star”



“You Can Do No Wrong”
“Time After Time”

























ROYAL

TO-DAY Last Two Shows
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Smashing Double

Virginia GREY and
Paul KELLY in .

‘GRISSLY’S MILLIONS’
AND

“BELL OF ROSERITA”™

Starring...

Roy ROGERS,
Sunset CARSON and
Allan “Rocky” LANE

OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows TO-DAY
4.30 and 8.15

M-G-M and Fox Big Double



Edmund Gwenn and Donald

Crisp in
“HILLS OF HOME”
and
“SOMETHING FOR
THE BOYS”
Starring |
Carmen Miranda and Michael |

ea







THURSDAY, MAY 10,

i951



WI Students Doing
Well At Puerto
Rico Varsity

Says Pinero

Mr. J. T. Pinero, former
ernor of Puerto Rico, told
Advocate yesterday

the ten West Indian students a:
the Metropolitan Vocational
Training School in Puerto Rico
were most encouraging.

He said fhat those students

were the best among the whole

alumni at the school and they
were glad to have them and were
also grateful that they were get-
ting some more.

Mr, Pinero who was the first
native of Puerto Rico to become
Governor of that Territory, is »
farmer by trade, and is engai@a
in the growing of sugar cane
and rearing of dairy cattle.
He said that the Metropolitan

Vocational School is located next
to the University of Puerto Rico
in the city of Rio Piedras.

The school is capable of in-
strueting 7,500 students and is
equipped with ‘the latest machin.
ery and techniques to teach
young men different trades which
are needed when a country is on

the verge of contemplating in-

dustrial development.
Scholarship

Last year he said that the

Government of Puerto Rico had
alloeated money for a number of
scholarships, inviting students
from the Caribbean area who
were desirous of taking up train-
ing in the different subjects
taught in the school. This train-
ing when completed would be of
great benefit to them when they
returned to their respective ter—
ritories.

Mr. Pinero said that members
of the Caribbean Commission were
very pleased to be able to further
enlarge the scholarship pro-
gramme at the Metropolitan
School through assistance given
by the Technical Co-operation
Administration of the U.S. Gov-
ernment.

They were offering through
the Caribbean Commission 30
scholarships for students of the
Caribbean area to study at the
Metropolitan Vocational Schoo!
and he -hoped that the young
men and women of the various
territories, would take full ad-
vantage of this opportunity to
get the necessary training,
Since the Metropolitan School

was established in 1947, they in
Puerio Rico had already got bet~
ter trade people and the country
had benefited a great deal from
the training of the students who
took various courses lasting from
ten months to 14 years,

They had developed an indus~
trial programme which had al-
ready brought to the island 106
new” industries and they hoped
te have 200 more in the course of
a few years.

Appointed Vicar Of
St. Silas, St. Jude

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE’S, May 7
Rev, Frederick E. Layne, Rector
of St. Andrew's, has accepted an
appointment as Vicar of St. Silas
and St, Jude, Barbados. He leaves
for his new duties at the end of
June. He has been Rector of St.
Andrew’s for the past six years
and also Headmaster of an Angli-
ean Secondary School in Gren-
ville, He has served here in St
Paul’s, St. John’s and Carriacou,







T’dad helicemen
Plan To Visit B’dos

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7.

Members of the Trinidad Police
Force plan to visit Barbados next
month, This is the second in a
series of West [Indian tours
planned by some of its members.
They will leave here around June
20,



“MOST SERIOUS”
BRIDEGROOM

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7

All Saints Church, St. Clairs,
was thrown into excitement on
Sunday, when a young couse
were about to be married, he
bridegroom arrived in the usual
way, followed by guests and the
bride. Before the ceremony be-~-
gan, the bridegroom decided that
he was not going to get married.
The guests left the Church, and
the two kneeling pads were re-
moved from the altar rails, The
bride fainted and had to be given
water.

Qn Monday the couple were
matried, however, at another
church at which Canon Ramkee-
soon performed the ceremony.
“The most serious bridegroom I
have ever met,” commented the
Canon after the ceremony, The
bridegroom is a young teacher of
Port-of-Spain,

"BARRY" RENWICK
RETURNS HOME

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, May 7
Mr. “Barry” Renwick, son of
Hon. and Mrs, J. B. Renwick, has
returned to Grenada from Eng-
land where he was recently called
to the Bar after taking his B.A.
at Keble College, Oxford. He was
accompanied by his wife and two
children.

Will Handle Agency

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7
The agency ,for the British
Guiana Airways Service to St.
Vincent and Dominica, will be
handled in Trinidad by Gordon
Grant & Co., Ltd. Passenger fares
and freight rates remain = un-
changed.

SULPHUR FROM
MICROBES

LONDON

British scientists battling the
world sulphur shortage are pro-
ducing sulphur with microbes
imported from North Africa’s
warm lakes. The tiny organisms
turn sulphates and sulphides into
sulphur’ by a process of oxidation.
—(CP) r







Gov-
the
that the re-
ports which members of the Carib-
bean Commission got coneerning

“We don't

let a

little mud hold up our



Canes Burnt At
Hanson Plantation

& CANE FIRE at Hanson Plan-—
tation, St. George, early
yesterday morning burnt four
acres of second crop ripe canes,
They are the property of W. A.
Harewood and were insured.
‘Another fire at Wiltshire Plan-
tation, St. Philip, on Monday
burnt four acres of first crop
ripe canes, property of E. A.
Skeete. They were also insured.
OSE HEWITT of Black Rock
reported that a basket’ was
stolen from her while at Messrs.
Cc. F. Harrison’s Store. It con~
tained $30 in cash and a nickel
watch,
WO MEN have been chosen
to fill the vaeancies in the
Fire Brigade. They aré expected
to take up duties at the begin-—
ning of next month.
| ag ARCHER of Haggatt Hill,
St. Andrew. told the Police
that he gave a man $3.00 to buy
a piece of cloth for him. On
Tuesday he saw the man, who
denied knowing him.

HE NEW ROOF at St. An-
drew’s Church has been
completed. Work on this roof
Jasted for four months. The

frame is of steel with an asbestos
covering.

Other repairs were also done
to the Church and a new gallery
built on at the western end, The
organ has been placed fp this
gallery.

The Church is expected to be
reopened for services from May
24. The contractor was Mr. C.
Skinner.
prorte OF lower Belleplaine

met with a disappointment
when they visited the stall of a
well known butcher over the
week-end and found it closed.
This stall supplies meat to nearly
the whole of the Belleplaine
area, This meant a “meatless
Sunday”. ,

LLIANCE FRANCAISE will

entertain the visiting French
Commissioners to a cock-tail party
at Goddard's Restaurant at 6 pan.
to-morrow night. This party was
originally scheduled for to-night
but had to be postponed due to
other arrangements made for the
Commissioners,

Will Relax Controls

BONN, May 8.

Western Allies today announced
they would relax controls on
German activity in the fields of
electronics, chemicals and metals
relating to atomic energy.

The Allied High Commission
said relaxations would be pub-
lished in the next issue of its of-
ficial Gazette. The decision fol-
lowed study by Allied Military
Security Board of existing leg-
islation relating to atomic energy
and reflected the “High Commis-
sion’s policy to reduce controls in
the security field wherever pos-
sible, so as not to impede Ger-
many’s technological progress di-
rected to a peaceful end.”



Reuter



Suspend Duty

WASHINGTON, May 8.
The United States Senate today
passed a bill to suspend the two

cent a pound import duty on for-
eign copper.

The bill passed by the Senate
was a compromise measure
worked out by the Senate and
House of Representatives confer-
ences and is retroactive to April 1,
1951. ' —Reuter.

GARLIC GOES UP

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7
The retail price of garlic in
Trinidad has been increased from
20 cents to 50% cents per pound,



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



festival



like them London people.”

London Express Service



Jacob Epstein Gets
Place Of Honour

Among Modern Sculptors

LONDON, May 9.

CURIOUS VISITORS crowded into London’s Batter-
sea Park to-day to see an exhibition of the latest works,

most of them of surrealist modern sculptors.

Canadian Given
Important Post
In Empire Unit

, OTTAWA, May.

The news that a Commonwealth
division would be formed in
Korea, first of its kind in history,
was followed by announcement
here that a Canadian has been
assigned to one of the key posts
in the division,

The Commonwealth division
consisting of Canadian, British,
Australian, New Zealand and
Indian units will be commanded
by Major-General A. J. H. Cas-
sels, formerly of the British Sea-
forth Highlanders, The Canadian
is Lt.-Col, Ernest D. Danby, 35,
of New Westminster, B.C., who
has been named General Staff
Officer No. 1, In this post he is
Cassel’s top adviser on battle ad-
vice and planning, and Canada’s
spokesman at division headquar-
ters, South Africa, which has had
a fighter squadron in Korea for
many months, is sending five offi-
cers to the Commonwealth
division,



Lt.-Col. Danby was educated in
Vancouver and commissioned
there in the Seaforth Highlanders
in 1936, He was severely wounded
in September, 1944, while com-
manding the Carleton and York
regiment from New Brunswick in
Italy. Later he was ranking Staff
Officer at 1st Canadian Corp and
then at First Canadian Army
headquarters.

Since the last war Danby has
served at army headquarters here
and the army staff college, and his
latest post was deputy command-~
ant of the joint air training centre
at Rivers, Manitoba, where para-
troopers are trained. He holds the
D.S.O. for the Italian campaign

Division Plan Welcomed

Announcement that a Com-
monwealth division was _ being
formed was warmly welcomed
here. Defence Minister Claxton
said “all Canadians will be
pleased that our 25th Infantry
Brigade (now: crossing the Pacific
to Korea) will be joined with
formations with which the Prin-
cess Patricias have already distin-
guished themselves, all to form a
unit in which forces of the Com-
monwealth countries will be fight-
ing shoulder to shoulder to resist
aggression in accordance with the
aims of the United Nations.”

The 2nd battalion of the Prin-
cess Patricias Canadian Light
Infantry has been in Korea since
last December, and was with the
other Commonwealth units in
stemming the latest Communist
offensive. When the 25th Cana-
dian infantry Brigade arrives in
Korea shortly it will go into the
line with minimum of delay, Al-
together the Canadians are ex-
pected to comprise about one-
third of the Commonwealth
division, which may total 21,000
men.

The Canadian brigade itself is
expected to remain under com-
mand of Brig. John M. Rocking-
ham, although other Canadians
may join the divisional staff as
Lt.-Col. Danby is doing.—(CP)

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
between the ages of 12—19 to send in a humorous essay, story or poem
on the subject of “MICE.” Entries must reach the Short Story Editor,
Advocate Co., Ltd,, City, not later than Wednesday every week. The
best composition each week will be published in the Evening Advocate

and the winner will receive a prize of books or Stationery to the
value of 12/6. ;

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR COMPETITION

Just across
the Park,

the other side of
showmen were com—
pleting the ereetion of switch-
backs, roundabouts and crazy
miniature railways for the Fes-
tival of Britain gardens and fun
fair.

But at the exhibition of seulp-
ture, everything was on a more
serious plane, That was obvious
as visitors came away scratching

their heads, blinking hard and
looking a little wiser.
The sculptors, they agreed,

were probably brilliant. But their
message might be a little hazy.

Finest Ever

To the expert this was one of
the finest ever exhibitions of
modern forms of sculpture de-
veloped during the past 50 years.
But what the goggle-eyed lay—
man saw were 44 of the most
remarkable works that ever came
from any sculptor’s chisel. Some
of them were so complicated that
eyen the workmen who put them
there could not tell the right
way up. The sculptors themselves
had to switch them round so that
they were just right.

There were many sizes and a
vast array of weird shapes, There
were in .bronze,

some some. in
stone and some in marble. Con-
crete, iron and processed steel

played its part,
beautiful, some spectacular, some
grotesque, but most to the un-
initiated were just plain baffling.
Place of Honour went to Jacob
Epstein, sensation of a decade
ago. His “Lazarus”, a massive
stone figure, had the Place of
Honour,
Henry
“Standing

showed his
Figure.” It had ab-
stract arms and legs in bronze
but instead of a chin’ and
shoulders there were just two
angles.

Moore

Puzzling

From the United
Alexander Calder’s ‘Maneater
with Pennants” lent by New
York’s Museum of Modern Art.
It looked like a pair of old-
fashioned weighing scales. An-
other American exhibit ‘Mother
and Child” was contributed by
Russian-born Jacques Lipchitz,
Both mother and offspring seem-
ed awfully like tortoises to puz-
zled London viewers,

Canadian Louis Archambault
sent his version of an “Iron Bird”
made from welded steel plates.

“Head in Green and Brown”
by Irishman FitzWilliam was in
two parts with a gap between the
nose and right eye.

States came

Reg Builder’s “Torso 1950”
looked to some Philistian spec~
tators to be a_ twiste | television
aerial or a badly dented skeleton.
But the workman who put it up
had other ideas.

“It looks like a squashed park
chair to me” he gaid in a dis-
couraged voice.

—Reuter.

There were some ,

Britain, Russia
Vote Against U.S.

GENEVA, May 8.
British and Soviet delegates
here today voted against the Uni-
ted States resolution which claim-
ed that right to own property
should be “included in the cove-
nant of Human Rights

United Nations Commission on
Human Rights adopted the Dan-
ish resolution which excluded
from the covenant any clause
dealing with right to own pro-
perty.

Britain, Russia, Yugoslavia and
Chile voted in favour. The Unia
‘ted States, France and Pakistan
opposed it. Lebanon and Uru-
guay abstained.

The Danish resolution was
moved by Dr. M. Sorensen, af-
ter delegates had suggested that
the right to own property was
not a fundamental human right.

Reuter

2,577 More Tons
Of Rubber
SINGAPORE, May 8.

Russia and China ty gent re-
ceived 2,577 more tons of rubber
from Malaya in April than in
March, aceording to official statis-
tics published here to-day.

Destinational control of rubber
exports from Malaya came into
effect only on April 9.

A Singapore Government offi-
cial commented that the effect of
destinational control would be-
come obvious only in returns for
May.

Taking exports for Russia,
China and Hong Kong together,
exports in April were 321 tons
Jess than final figures for March,

Shipments to Russia totalled
6,324 tons in April compared with
nil in March; to China 3,265 tons
in April against 7,012 tons in
Maieh; to Hong Kong 5,846 tons
compared with 8,744 tons.

—Reuter,







No Progress

PARIS, May 8.

Big Four Deputy Foreign Min-|!
isters met for the 46th time this}
afternoon for one hour and con-
tinued their wrangle over the
agenda for their chiefs. Wes-
tern spokesman said that no new
proposals were put forward and
no progress was made.

Dr, Jessup, American Deputy,
asked Gromyko, Soviet Deputy,
if the Soviet Government wanted
a Foreign Ministers meeting,

Gromyk® said that the views of
his Goverament were well known,

Reuter

Steel Split |

BONN, May 8,

The Allied High Commission
today announced that they were
going ahead with forming the
first of 24 companies into whicn
they have split West Germany’s
eteel industry.

Giant stee] concerns
Nazi times are bein,
agreement with the West German
Government, into some 28 com-
panies to prevent steel becoming
again a dangerous concentration
of economic power,

The Allies said they were about
to publish in the next issue of
the High Commission’s Gazette
regulations for the formation of
companics known ag “unit com-
panies.”

They were working out pro
visions for the other four cases
with the West German Govern-
ment,—Re™ter,



of the
split, in



KEEP FIT ON

’
os terruption twice more during the i i
day.
The swyppage was ordered bj AND

Christian Democrat Socialists

and Communist Labour a-

tions because of the Government's

PAGE THREE

{ Reject Red Plan Support For Russia





1,600,000 Strike

















ROME, May WASHINGTON, May 8 NEW DELHI, May 8.

Italy’s 1,600,000 le emp - ed Indian quar ers here
ees today be 2 ! The United States today rejecte tha India. is bound
strike for h pé Russia’s proposal to transfer } Russia's de ind that
Government machinery task of drafting a Japanese Peac nist China _ussociated
oul the country rreaty to four Pacific powers in ith the drawing up of a Japan-

Government desks tre de~| cluding Communist China ese peace treaty. ;
serted. Postmen left pil of let a E These sources also considered
ters and parcels in the post off The State Department said Rus- reasonable the Russian contention

Primary schools remained ck ia S$ purpose in advancing the 1a he treaty should re spect the
ed. State-run hospitals proposal yesverday was to obtair 43 Cairo conferen © leciaration
ed only skeleton staffs a “double veto” over the Japanese th Formosa -should be given
staffs struck work for four h Peace Settlement. to China
until noon. Trains stopped fo: —Reuter Reuter

half an hour in
day, and were to repeat this

stations early to





rejection of their wage der ds + om,
The walkout was to be « cu- Specialized Medication drops of Vicks veer 4 each
cussed today by the Cabinet Helps Prevent Many nostril to help prevent the cold from
Fhe Premier has _ threatenec Colds from Developing! taking hold.
disciplinary measures against s mn P YOU CAN FEEL IT WORK!
state employees taking part it : f
today’s strike. This specialized medication works
First reports said 80 to 90 per fast, right where the trouble is, and
eent of the Government worker: you can feel it. That stuffy, sneezy
obeyed the 24-hour strike call iy feeling vanishes, your head clears,
Rome. irritation is soothed, and many a
etn only a ¥ : the meat cold is stopped right then and there.
* Aron SRE at ‘ e sore and Vae-tro-nol is expressly designed to
Interior ministries Telephone ‘ . late N Ra mn di .
communications north from Rom Colds are doubly dangerous now; stimulate Nature's own defences

or worse! So against colds, Use it in time!

viexs WA-TRO-HOL

NOSE DROPS

may lead to “flu”
take every precaution, and
at the FIRST warning sniffle
or sneeze, quick |—put a few

were cut.

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY

M.V. Sedgefield, Seh
selior, Sch. Marea Henrietta
Maria Catharina, Sch
Wolfe, Sch, Gardenia W.,
Sch. Emeline, Sch, Cyril
Brterprise 8.



Wonderful Coun

Yacht

Marion Belie
Sch. Zen
Smitn, Sct



ARRIVALS
Schooner Timothy A, H
76 «tens net Capt
British Guiana
S.S. Student, 4443 to ret Capt
Pemberton, from St, Kitt
5.S, Sun Valley, 4.318 t& net, Capt
David Cook, from Newport vi
Schooner Island Star, 37 tor
Capt. Joseph, Trinidad
DEPARTURES
$.S. Mormactand, 4,521 toms net, Capt
Hansen, for Rio de Janeir
Schooner Blue Nose Mac, SW tons net,
Copt. McFarlane, for British Guida
SS. Defender, 5,011 ton net, Capt
Penston, for St. Lucia
S.S. Folke Bernadotte, 4,580 to
Block, for New Brunswick

Vansiluytman

Ovid Stoll fron

from

Capt

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

































Cable and Wireless (WT) Lid se
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbado:
Coast Station
S.S. Brasil, S.S. Regent Leopard $ S&S
El Gallo, 8S Folke Bernadotte, SS
Mormacland, $.S. Cottica S. Defende
S$ Atlantic Exporter Ss. dame
Lykes, S88. S. Adolfo, S.S, Esso Welr
Emilia, SS Barroso, 8S 8
ss Lolde Cuba, SS Fort
Amherst, $.8, Durango, 8.5 Argentina, |
8 8 Francesco Morosini, SS. Chungting
5. Samana, 8 S_ Steel Architect, SS y
wave, SS. Polyglory, 38.3 i
sasus, S.S. Michael, S S El Gallo, § i
Alcoa Patriot, SS. Gerona, 8 8 ; 4 eu.
+S Hyalina, SS Loide Peru fat i th
Fisher itll, @.8. Hercules, SS ene i \ MONE TE Se
nare, SS Regent Caribou, SS washiy atup y \ wl
tar, 8S Latirus, $ § Golfilo if mY)
oF ey oy) All your coloured clothes are so
easter ; :
RATES OF EXCHANGE wae much brighter when washed
at with Rinso—and your whites are
AY 9, 1951 | fs : ,
CANADA | whiter too! Rinso’s rich suds
1224/10% pr. Cheques on :
ie Bankers 605/100 pr soak out the dirt so thoroughly,
Demand
“Drafts — G0.8% pr so quickly—yet so gently! For
Sight Draft 60 2/16 pr. | i
624/10% pr. Cable , | easier washing, and a cleaner,
i 2 mney \9' > 1 .
Oe, pee Geuobe 584/10 pr. | gayer cesult, always use Rinse.
Thr
ere RINSO for all
Mails for, Trinidad by the Sch] by rng use ‘or
Gardenia W. will be |elosed ot wu ¥V\ in washing =<
Jereral Post OM a mmder | machines f
Pareel Mail, Registered On |
dail ot 2.40 pom. on the Tith May, 1 |

your wash!

x-R 244-800



luse LIFEBUOY TOILET SOA

; 4
Don’t let weariness make your day seem long ! : ffi

Wash regularly with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap oC
\\ $Y

—'P>
and you'll feel fresh and free of weariness. =
Its deep-cleansing lather keeps you fresher a

so much longer. So keep a tablet of Lifebuoy ~y \

handy —for day-long fresliness !

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS

HART Og2-H 1105S








ALWAYS

BOVRIL

Dont get nervous






ERY VANS

nd



about

INFLUENZA

$2,135.00 Usual Fleet Owner's Discount

COURTESY GARAGE
ROBERT THOM, LTD. White Park Rd. me Dial
V peppers SSIES SS Sass

4391




















PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PHURSDAY, MAY 10, 1951

The Inconstant Lover (The Peril 0f The New Tiny | Pee Spncraeetting





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown

Thursday, May 10, 1951

Roads

| THE condition of tenantry roads is a
subject of perennial discussion. The Legis-
lature has from time to time voted large
sums of money for their upkeep and has
undertaken the responsibility of several
parishes. What is the duty of the Govern-
ment with regard to roads in residential



areas? ete,

The matter'was recently discussed by the
General Board of Health. It was suggested
that the Public Health Act, under which
the Board grants permission to owners to
divide and sell land in lots, be amended so
as to provide for the inspection and ap-
proval of proposed roads by the Engineer
of Transport and Highways before the land
ean be sold.

|. There can be little objection to the sug-
gestion when it is considered that roads are
a-necessity and that in Barbados for many
years land owners have been allowed to
build roads of marl and any rubbish avail-
able, in order to sell the land adjoining
them. Soon after the land has been sold,
the true condition of the road is revealed.
There has been no proper drainage and
people who pay high prices for house spots
suffer great inconvenience. The Govern-
ment is then attacked and asked to main-
tain these roads in proper order.

Tenantry roads should be subject to
specifications set out by the Transport and
Highways Authority who are responsible
for the major roads of the island,

This would mean either that the owner
of land who sells at a profit should be re-
sponsible for the provision of part of the
roads or the buyer is sold land at a price

I OUGHT to have known by the
light in George’s eyes when I said,
“What's yours?”, that something
more potent than alcoholic antici-
pation was at work in his mind
But it was only when I saw the
absent-minded way in which he
tossed off his drink as if it was a
matter of secondary importance,
that I realised that he was in the
throes of another amorous break-
down and was dying to tell me
about it. So I tried to ring a beil
by asking, “Seen Diana lately?”

“Diana—Diana?” he asked, as if
it were the first time he had heard
the name. So I had another try
and said, “Or Beryl?”.

When he exclaimed, “Beryl!
Beryl who?”, and then before I
could answer went on, “Oh, you
mean Beryl. Dark-eyed, lanky girl
who plays tennis, isn’t she? No, I
don’t remember seeing her lately,”
I realised that the heart storm
from which he was now suffering
was even more severe than those
which Diana or Beryl or even
Rosalie had aroused, So I ordered
another drink and tried again.

“By the way, old top,” I said. “I
saw Phyllis at the Brown’s cock-
tail party and she asked after
you.”

He came out of his pipe dream
long enough to say, “Did she? Nice
girl—Phyllis. Pity she’s growing
more like that old bottle of vin-
egar, her mother, every day”, and
then slipped into a world in which
none of the girls he had previously
chased off their feet had any ex-
istence. It was only after our
second one for the road, when
George was idly drumming on the
table with his fingers and gazing
at nothing in the middle distance,
that I said:

“Come on, George, spill it”.

“Spill what? How d@’ya mean.. ”

“You know perfectly well what
I mean,” I interrupted firmly
“Spill the beans, Come clean, Get
it off your chest. Who is she?
What’s she like?”

That did it. and the moment LI
saw the sheepish look that came
over his face, | began to regret
having been so curious,

“Well, if you must know, her
name is Phoebe,” he began, in the
hushed tone of one speaking on
holy ground, and then let himself
go. First of all, having explained
that there were no words in our
inadequate language fit to describe
her, he used several hundreds of

By Cc. G.

which followed, I gathered that
she was like a flower. A sort of
cross between a rose, a daffodil
and a violet, coupled with distinct
traces of many of the more attrac-
tive blooms found in the best
gardens. Also, that apart from the
fact that she had more arms than
the Venus de Milo, her figure had
that of Venus beaten to a frazzle
from every point that really mat-
tered. [ was about to ring the bell
for the waiter, when George toid
me that Phoebe’s people, who
didn’t approve of him, had packed
her off to England to train to be *
nurse.

“What a pity it should end like
that,” I said.

“End!” he exclaimed, his lips
curling in scorn, “Don’t be an ass,
Bertie. Surely you ought to know
me better than that. Pah! If they
think a few thousand miles can kiil
a love like ours, they’ve got an-
other guess coming. Why, we’ve
sworn to wait for each other and
we shall get married the moment
she returns,”

About three months later, I went
to the Crane for a few days. And
the first person I ran into was
George coming up from the beach
with a girl, who, as they got nearer,
I recognised as Angela Smith. It
was some time after I had gone to
bed when George came to my room
and turned on the light, “What the
devil do you want? “What’s
wrong?”, I said sleepily.

“Everything’s wrong! Wake up,
Bertie. I want your advice about
a rather difficult matter,”

After a good deal of shuifiing
and beating about the bush, hs
told me he had found out that his
feelings for Phoebe had changed
“The awful part of it is, I don’t
know now to break it to her,” he
went on, “After all, a fellow can’t
write to a girl like Phoebe and
say, I don’t love you any more
What shall I do? I must do some-
thing.”

So I sat up in bed and told him:
“Why not write a nice despairing
letter and tell her you love her too
much to let her waste the best
years of her life waiting for you,
and release her from her prom-
ise.”

“By Jove, the vey thing!’’, he
said, and buzzed off, leaving the
light on,

The next day, when he could

one his renunciation was so magni-
ficent that it made hirn appear the
sort of heroic lover no sensible
girl would relinquish. And the
other was obviously such a mean
attempt to get out of keeping his
vows, that he tore both of them
up, and said he would try again.
After tea the following afternoon.
I was in my room reading some
letters that had come by the Eng~
lish mail, when George burst ii
furiously, waving a letter. “Read
that!”, he said, throwing it at me
I picked it up and found it was
from Phoebe, telling him that by
ihe time it reached him, she would
be married to a man named Har-
rington, but would always remem-
ber the happy days of their boy
and girl affair.

“Boy and girl affair, she calls it,”
he raged. “After being faithful to
that girl all these months, this is
my reward. I’ll never trust anofthe?
woman again, Never. If it wasn’t
for Angela "



“Yes, go on. If it wasn’t for
Angela, what would you do? Tt’s
what you wanted, wasn’t it? And
anyway, what's Angela to do with
it?”

“No,” he snapped. “It isn’t what
I wanted. What I wanted was to
end the thing decently. Let it come
to a natural end with regret an@
esteem on both sides. This is the
sort of thing that’s enough to break
a man’s heart and make him-———”

“Go to Angela to get it mended,”
IT said, finishing the sentence for
him.

Grumbling about ruddy fouls
who knew nothing about what
real love was like, George stamped
out of the room, slamming the
door. I finished my packing ard

ner,

When I next went to the club for
my usual, I did not see George
until he greeted me with a violent
slap on the back and a cheerful,
“Hullo, hullo, old fruit, well met!”
and pulled up a chair. When, after
looking round to make sure he
could not be overheard, be began
registering his famous imitation of
a sick sheep, I knew what was
coming.

‘Bertie, old man,” he said, “I
want you to be the first to kaow

”

“Don’t tell mé,” I broke in hast-
ily, as I got up to go, “I know
When is it to be? I’ve sti'l got the
toast rack I bought when it was
Rosatie, and the butter Gish when

got back to town in time for a




Atom Bomb

By the Military Correspondent
THE new lightweight atomic bomb, the!

basic method of making which was disclosed |
last week, has altered American, British, and}
Western European strategic plans.

First news of the bomb was given in the

report of the U.S. Atomic Energy Congress |

Committee on Soviet Atomic Espionage.

This report discloses not only that America}
has the bomb but that Russia will have it in

service soon,
LIGHTWEIGHT

Drawings of the bomb are known to have |

been passed by U.S. Army technician and spy
David Greenglass to a second spy, Julius
Rosenberg, who in turn gave them to the
Soviet Vice-Consul in New York.

The new bomb, most important military
development since the original atom bomb,
is much lighter than the first bomb’s 44 tons.

And these bombs can be carried by fight-
ers. A light bomber might carry enough to
devastate a city and a heavy bomber might
knock out a dozen cities in one mission.

They could also be used in the warheads of
V2 rockets,

On Friday the air chiefs of staff of the U.S.,
Canada, Great Britain and France met in
Washington for a ten-day conference.

They will have now to realign top air
policy and overhaul the aircraft production

of the North Atlantic Powers. Until the new in rr

bomb, atomic air warfare was tied to the big,

long-range bomber because of the bomb-

weight and the long distances to reach tar-

gets.

TWO FORCES
Result was the creation of the world’s two

great long-range bombing forces :—

In the West, the U.S.A.F.’s Strategic’ Air

Command, equipped with 10,000-mile-range
Consolidated B.36’s and _ 6,000-mile-range
Boeing B.50 Superforts.

In the East, the Soviet Air Force’s Long

Range Air Force, equipped with 3,000-mile-
range copies of the American Boeing B.29

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FOR ENTERTAINING PLEASURE










ea ild- them to tell me what her cyes sg inute fr Angela, it wes Beryl, Which d@’you think Superfort. That's why—YOU SHOULD SELECT
gions + Pee en oo were like. In the spate of words Gaotwe anoweed me twee diate. In Angee would prefer? via i The whole of Europe is within range of the
ne an Russian atom bombers.
allowed to divide land, pocket all the profit RING OF BASES > RADIOGRAMS
except that which he pays for surveying " Th i A‘ :

; or] ’ . siiiilal ere are only 200 American B.36’s cap-|%

and laying out and the provision of water, New Hooks by ... George, Malcolm Thomson able of atom bombing Russia direct from] e
and then the Government be called upon to a America .

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H.M.V. RADIOS and |
:
;

If in the initial stages tenantry roads
were properly built according to specifi-

A Nation’s Morals

highly mobile and rely on a ring of bases







cations by a qualified engineer, it would
ensure that they would have proper drain-
age and last longer. When or if they were
eventually taken over by the Government
they would be basically sound and would
cost less to maintain them,

' The taking over of marl roads has been
the subject of much controversy in the
House of Assembly, and the representatives
of the various parishes have not been spar-
ing in their criticisms of the Government,
who have not been able to take over all
the roads as fast as they would like, or as
fast as would accommodate the ever-
increasing number of tenantries.

It should now be comparatively easy for
the Government in amending the Public
Health Act, to provide for the building of
roads in accordance with certain specifica-
tions laid down by the Engineer of High-
ways and Transport, who should also be
called upon under the act to give a certifi-
cate before the roads could be approved by
the General Board of Health. In fact, since
there is this public insistence that these

een ee ee

SAMUEL BUTLER’S
NOTEBOOKS
Cape. 12s, 6d, 327 pages.

SAMUEL BUTLER was an ec-
centric Victorien who wrote one
book to attack Christianity,
another to attack Darwinism and
a third to prove that Homer was
a woman, He was a genius, a
bachelor and a card,

He never went anywhere with—
out carrying a small notebook in
his waistcoat pocket. He might
say something witty or profound
—and then forget it. Somebody
else might oblige with a memorable
remark; Mrs. Boss his landlady,
for instance, or Alfred his man.
The notebook must be there ready
to save those treasures for
posterity!

And here they are, Mrs. Boss,
a grotesque out of Dickens, Alfred,
quietly but éonsciously humorous,
Butler himself delivering some sly
dig at religion — in a curious
melange of flippaney, fun and
penetration, edited anew by
ane Keynes and Brian C.

* * * *
Naturally there is much in the

book about Butler’s friends, For
while there was no room in his

preserved, e,g,, of Gladstone, that

he had not one redeeming vice.
Once a week they had tea to-
gether. Later, when she was dead,
Butler congratulated himself on
not marrying her. Brilliance
could become boring.
* a

*

He had a mistress, and shared
her with Jones, Each paid
Madame Dumas a pound a week
even when they were not in
town, Jones visited her each
Tuesday, Butler each Wednesday,
“Oh bother, Alfred,’ he would say,
“its Wednesday to-day, and I’ve
got to go to Handel Street” (where
madame lived).

“A fine woman,” Alfred con—
ceded, “Dark, large, not a regular
street—walker, but receiving
gentlemen in her room, I took
her out once or twice myself.”

Alfred was a card too,

Butler visited her for 15 years
before he dared to tell her his
name, When she died, Butler
did not replace her. Jones did,

In the closing years of his life,
Butler was pursued by the zealous
admiration of Bernard Shaw, for
whom he formed an acute nervous
dislike, “He’s a beast, he’s a
beast!” he would ery to Alfred
when he came back from seeing
Shaw.

words? “Have you brought the

cheque book, Alfred?”

OF FORMER LOVE. By Emma
Lairad. Hamish Hamilton.
12s. 6d. 471 pages.

SULPHURIC acid is in short
supply, everywhere, except in
Emma Laird’s pages, where she
uses it to etch the portrait of a
cad. Mark, the hero, or villain,
or maybe victim, of her novel, is
presented by Kathie, the narrator,
as one who has flat feet, and a
paunch; picks his nose, doesn’t
brush his teeth; hag dirty nails;
likes perfume and sleeps with the
window shut.

He is an advanced thinker who
exacts complete obedience from
his women, whom he calls
“darlink.” He is masterful and
feminine; a sadist and a masochist,
In 1939, he discovers that his name
is high on the Gestapo list and
leaves these shores for the United
States,

Kathie has good reason to ob-
serve these details of person and
character, She falls madly in love
with Mark and remains in this
condition through the 471 pages of
this novel. Long as it is, far too
long, Of Former Love is a power-
ful record of a delirious, wretched,
enchaining experience. Mark is
profoundly unattractive, yet his







round the Asian central land mass—of which
Europe is geographically a part.

The rapid creation of a large Russian fight-
er force equipped with some 2,500 jet fighters
has worried the United States Air Force.

It is now doubtful whether Lieut.-General
Curtis E. LeMay, commander of the Strate-
gic Air Command, could guarantee to deliver
his atom bombs to their targets in his high-
flying but comparatively slow bombers.

Possibility of slinging the new lightweight
bomb on to short-range light bombers and
fighter-bombers has made it feasible to send
raiders into Russia, flying fast and low to
avoid defending fighters.

But it has also opened up the possibilities
of the Russians doing the same thing.

And the shorter ranges bring the atomic
V2 into the picture.

Range of the V2 is about 200 miles and
there is no known protection. It is launched
from mobile and easily hidden bases which
are very difficult to attack.

ARMY’S TASK

If Western Europe and Great Britain are
to be adequately protected against this kind
of warfare it is therefore essential :—

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roads be taken over by the Government, it | Prim existence for love, wife or Shaw cried up Wagner (which ability to attract is etched aS} First, that a land army should prevent the in 7. 8.9 and 10 pts.
‘ family, there was room for friend- was bad) and cried down Handel deeply on this plate as his less ee ; : ng
s the duty of the Government to demand | ship. ‘With Pauli, for instance, a (which wags the blackest crime in agreeable habits, Russian armies from sweeping to the Chan- e

that they conform to certain standards and
provide for proper drainage.



No Shrug

'_ THE blocking of the St. James coastal
road on Tuesday night reflects no credit on
the island of Barbados. It is a common
eecurrence for traffic to be held up in the
island because of the time taken for police-
men to reach the scene of the accident and
the time taken to make their required

handsome charming barrister
whom Butler met in New Zea-—
land, he divided his private in-
come. He dipped into his capital
to finance Pauli’s wildcat com—
mercial sechemes—only to find out
that, all along, Pauli had been a
richer man than he. It was a sad
disappointment,

Pauli was succeeded in Butler’s
life by Henry Festing Jones, The
two men wrote, composed music,
painted and took week-end walks
together, Sometimes Jones had
attacks of hysteria. As Alfred
the man-servant said contempt-
uously, “He was always crying,
erying. The governor would ex-

the Butler calendar).

The notebooks are a rag—bag of
the funny things he heard, the
silly things he said and the deeply
original things he thought.

“IT have been to see the
Rossetti exhibition and am
pleased to find it more odious
than I had even dared to hope.
I met Rossetti once; there
were three besides myself. I
disliked them all very much,
but Rossetti the most.”

Butler’s ear for the comic,
which might have made him a
novelist, caught this:

“IT heard a man say to
another at Abbey Wood: I
went to live down there just

@ HERE’S ENGLAND may be
aimed at American visitors. Let
me recommend it as a_ witty,
good-natured guide to English
scene and history, Ruth McKen-
ney and Richard Bransten are
enchanted by England, in which
they found only six good hotels.
(Rupert Hart-Davis. 21s.).

@ How competent Americans
are in the unromantic, authentic
and gripping. story of crime is
shown anew by THE PEOPLE
AGAINST O'HARA, Eleazar Lip-
sky's novel of a murder case, pub-
lished by Wingate, at 10s. 6d.

I Compton-Burnett is an
acquired taste, which more people

nel coast, from which Britain could be
attacked with close-range atomic bombard-
ment.

Second, that Western Europe’s air forces
should not depend on local industries that
could be knocked out in the first few days,
but should be keyed into British aircraft pro-
duction.

Third, that the R.A.F. should not rely en- x
tirely on home-produced aircraft, but should |}
be able also to count on American and Ca-|%

%,

nadian production,
In any war it would be essential to the sur-



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cuse him ‘Alfred, he’s Welsh.’ ” about the tim teat ae ‘

: fo ’ > time : vival of Britain and Western Europe that a %

measurements. The important thing is for Butler’s relations with women Goren ou Mme ae —— A a edge age gg. pe Ah Pp %
ve : were businesslike and cautious. ‘Th ; : ; po + , d ; *»!swift and successful counter-attack could be Ss

the authorities to acept road-blocking as an , : at will give you an idea 10s. 6d.) gives the wider public : . %
Tee aiteaes nk oho in this He was a little in love with Miss when it was,” an opportunity to sample this ex-|!aunched against Russia herself. x
ae ere eer , ring Ann ne _ whe — This Victorian oddity, who did ponent of astringent, not to say{ The atom bomb is not just the best weapon &
island are these situations faced by a sim- | in love with him. © was lame as much as any man to undermine venomous, dialogue, Saas ; : é °
shout but brilliant, responsible for some the Victorian’ system of morals, Siem cih eta « eabaicias for achieving this : it is the only one. S g

ple shrug of the shoulders. of the remarks that Butler has died in 1902, aged 67. His last LES cLEs. |% { %
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1 busines in |S Oe Mand ! LIQUORS OF THE §
By DONALD SEAMAN _ Over his shoulders was flung a traces back to the poet's family; handed over a 600—word Latin Oil Barnetos, ‘hin Gli ter cie FINEST BRANDS) ¢$
THEY held a rehearsal recent- light brown tweed coat. and Caroline Clay, a secretary speech for a college dinner ora-| 7° The Editor, The Advocate— glen ee A Se pe nie x
ly—the self-appointed young , He was standing-ing as a from London who will be a volun- tion, another aspect of the Tours} S!R,—Several times in the Press The B.U.O.C. had leases over 70% | ams in tins (3 sizes) Gola Braid Rum z
men and women who are out to “Smarty” (“a man who sets’ teer guide for the Tours. service. recently there have been state- Of the total area, or 78% aur $ pa Bron) eh ata Top Notch Rum 8
show overseas tourists “the hum- clothes-fashions and throws par- They took coffee in Antony Said Tom Stacey: “We intend to ments which gave the impression drillable area, of this Island. nat ® Leg Hams cut or who Senate haan x
ming life” of Eton and Oxford, _ ties”) For aa No. 1, Roger Blond’s rooms, against a latticed show tourists the cultural side of | that the British Union Oil Co,, Ltd., they asked Government for was 2 | % Picnic Hams‘ Vielle Curé ‘ $
For in just a week the curtain Longrigg, was laid up. background of japonica and bud- Oxford life. Don’t misunderstand| @d asked Government for a ae re © vents SS) yee eh : Sandeman’s Wines x
goes up on Undergrad Tours. In his rooms—“exquisitely fur- ng trees. ; ., us. We have the deepest respect the right to hold halt of that area Ox Tongues In tins Gilbey’s Wines %
And rolling into Eton and on nished,” says the Tours brochure ,, Miss Pakenham, in a grey suit, for college traditions and honour, Read tine’ tha vw . } te in ti 2 Guinness Stout
towards Oxford's dreaming spires, —sightseers will take sherry. blue pixie hat, crimson blouse, and And we’ think this is a fine thing ate whe write letlers | tinder’ tha lense.aiter Geenshrge % Cheese im tins 12-oz. and 51b Bass’s Ale g
will go two coach-loads of sight- Focus of the rehearsal was a a double row of pearls, lit up a for the Festival of Britain.” bi al ey af thr a Roma ats eS | * Vienna Sausages Worthington’s Ale z
oe “~~ hes ney gs: preview janchem neers vie ape oe | Se Absent from the rehearsal was note that this Sid a have had jensen on 50% oof the tota} $ ae Golden Tree Beer $
jolars cents, or ree guineas, beer and cigarettes, in the fee for “I must say I think cigars are 20-year-old Lora Stormont ‘,

for a day’s introduction to English the day-trip).
academic ways.

does not normally publish
letters which are not exclu.

4 a . 3 *
area, instead’ of the leases on 70%, % Frankfurter Sausages s

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topping,” she said} “Of course (“who,” says the brochure, “will which they had to begin with SWEETS for the %







it’s rather difficult, M arents show you how a gentleman lives sive wspa) is i i be 6S that % . . -
The seo of the amet Trae Coffee— do not approve. But they are in Oxford’s most famous college, oo oe wre oe sa eee ee x Kiddies and YOU! $
Sere. A tom Stacey ‘On Wor They sat down to soup, turkey, jolly good, aren’t they? Christ Church.”) nnnwibuters to OUR Séked fur a monopoly of the ofl & 3 ; x
a College and formerly of the sweet, cheese and biscuits, with “I ‘haven’t smoked one for six | He has broken a leg ski-ing. pn goa SAY who write business in Barbados. = tS Chocolates in Boxes 8
Guards beer or cider, in the shadow of months, not since the Carlton “Temporarily indisposed, old neaindan nom-de_plume are . & Chocolate Bars : x
m one respect, anyway, it was one of those dreaming spires, affair"—when she made Oxford chap,” said Tom Stacey, “and he’s * be that their names I am, i Carr's Cream Biscuits xR
i indeed a dress rehearsal. Magdalen Tower. news by smoking “an inconspicu- simply furious about it,” mus' sent to the Editor yours faithfully tS Carr’s Chocolate Lunch ¥
z ‘or there, in a dark-blue suit, _ In addition to Messrs Stacey and ©us Havana” in the Carlton Club, Out of the rehedrsal cast, too, ll Toe of good faith. . , Br s &
with a blood-red carnation in his Blond, there were present the Hon, centre of Oxford Toryism, were the boys of Eton, They are ut a tae se ped disclosed E. E. MACINTYRE, Xs g
lapel, was Antony Blond (actually, Antonia Pakenham, 18-year-old still on holiday. They will be back tial by the E as confiden- Attorney and Manager es s x
he’s black-haired). His cutaway daughter of Lord Pakenham, the —and Culture by the time those dollar coaches y the Editor, except in The British Union Oil Co. Lta.;® P , DELIV ER s
white collar set off a biscuit-col- Minister of Civil Aviation; dapper Into the rooms strolled John move west out of London. Signed letters. Barbados, . ? ae x
oured tie. .. = John William Shakespeare, who Proctor classical _ scholar He —LES.! aa May 7, 1951 1 $56556550d05990996996996999999999909999605905690000
i a





THURSDAY, MAY 10,



195



Case Of Aircraft
Landing Examined

By Chamber

MR. D. G. LEACOCK
Commerce at their meeting

Of Commerce

(Jnr.), told the Chamber of
yesterday of the Colonial Sec-

retary’s explanation of the Government’s position as
regards the T.C.A. plane having been refused landing at

Seawell Airport on the night
One of the reasons why

of April 14.
the plane was refused landing

was because there was the danger of placing undue strain

on the existing staff.

CARIBBEAN
COMMISSION

The Caribbean Commission re-
sumed ‘its plenary session yester-
day afternoon at Hastings House
when the major portion of the
session was devoted to Reports of
the Committees to which the va-
rious items on the Commission's
Agenda had been referred.

These Committees had reported
among other things, on recom-
mendations made by various tech-
nical meetings previously held
under Commission sponsorship.
The decisions taken include the
implementation of standardisation
of trade statistics in the various
territories which hitherto have
been far from uniform.

The Commission also moved to
make it possible .o make training
in methods available to the Carib-
bean territories, Another decision
taken was a move to secure the
services of a specialist in rural
co-operatives, fluent in French
and English, to work ih the Carib-
bean promoting the formation of
societies and credit unions.

The Commission supported the
recommendations made by the
Trinidad Statistical Conference
and instructed the Secretary Gen-
eral to circularise member and
territorial Governments in order
to ensure their implementation,
and in addition, the Commission
has decided to explore the facili-
ties for training available in the
various technical assistance pro-
grammes in order to train Carib-
bean personnel.

Memorandum

The Commission noted a memo-
randum prepared by Mr, J. E.
Helsterman, Consultant for Indus-
trial Development and decided
that a joint meeting of the Re-
search Committees on agriculture
and industrial development should
be convened as early as possible
to consider the nature of the
studies to be presented to the Fifth
Session of the West Indian Con-

ference.
It was further decided that the
main consideration of the Fifth

Session of the West Indian Con-

ference should be based on the
more important agricultural and
industrial items which were not
sufficiently explored at previous
sessions,

Pu eg?
Essay Competition
Mr. Jesus T. Pinero, former
Governor of Puerto Rico now in
Barbados for the Caribbean

Commission Talks. has offered a
prize of $100 for the best essuy
on a subject relating to the
accomplishments or objectives of
the Caribbean Commission. This
will be competed for among school
children of the Caribbean area.
The essay will be written in
any one of the languages spoken
in the territories with which the
Commission is concerned,

Escaped Convict
Recaptured



Forty-year-old Dudley But-
cher, aliss “Francis”, of Nurse
Land, who escaped Police cus—

tody at Central Police Station on
April 19, was captured yesterday
evening up Rockley Hill.

Dudley took a dagger from his
pocket when he was surrounded
by the police and cut his throat.
He was taken to the General
Hospital where he is guarded.

How Aladdin’s Lamp
won the Princess

ia
o



Ci
S

Once a poor yourg man named Aladdin



yp. Whenever h
snii would appea

ic la
pag



ery wish. Now Aladdin



King Smiler commands the use of Cow & Gate Milk Food throughout the world.

Mr. Leacock, President of the
Chamber, and Mr. G. H, King had
been appointed by the Chamber to
interview the Colonial Secretary,
Hon, R. N. Turner, and talk it over
with him.

It will be suggested to Govern-
ment that when the necessary
staff has been trained, the air-
port should then be made avail-
able for night flight if there was
reasonable notice or in case of an
emergency. This suggestion
came from Mr. A. S. Bryden.
Mr. Leacock said that Mr. King

and he had _ interviewed the
Colonial Secretary. The Colonial
Secretary had already prepared a
memorandum, on the matter and
had been considering releasing it
to the Press, He, however, thought
that it might be better if they dis-
cussed it first.

Mr. Turner, he said, went into
the matter most thoroughly with
them and displayed every will-
ingness to co-operate.

The Colonial Secretary's state-
ment of Government’s position,
Mr. Leacock said, was as follows:

Lighting Staff
The airport is normally open
from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. In view of
the unreliability of the existing
lighting plant and the inadequacy
ot the staff, the committee under

the chairmanship of the Hon,
F. C. Hutson which was appoint-
ed to prepare a comprehensive

plan for the central development
of the airport was unable to recom-
mend that the airport should be
kept open for regular night opera-
tion at present.

The estimates for the establish-
ment of improved) supply of elec-
tricity was approved by Legisla-
ture. Work would be put in hand
as soon as possible.

Other recommendations which
were made by the committee,
including provision of extra
staff and the matter of increas-
ing landing charges for night
operations, were still under
consideration.

Several months at least were
expected to elapse before the
airport would be ready for reg-
ular night operations, It had
not been the intention of Gov-
ernment to permit such opera-
tions until the work on the! —
regular lights supply has been
completed and the staff brought
up to the proper strength,

At the request of B.W.1A., and
with their assistance in carrying
cut what must necessarily be
make-shift arrangements, permis-
sion had been granted to that
company to operate certain flights
after 6 p.m,

Make-Shift

Arrangements had been made
whereby make - shift facilities
could be extended to Trans Can-
eda airlines in the event of its
seeking permission for its aircraft
to make emergency landing after
the usual hours of operation,

As to the facts of April 14, not
long after the Colonial Secretary's
arrival at his office, the Airport
Manager telephoned from Seawell
and said that T.C.A. were asking
permission tg land an aircraft be-
tween 8 and 8.30 p.m., and to make
their return landing in the small
hours of the morning.

A few minutes later the local
Manager of T.C.A. also tele-
phoned from Seawell and repeated
the two requests. He asked for an
immediate yes or no decision.

The Colonial Secretary replied
agreeing that the aircraft could
land any time before 10 p.m., but
to keep the airport open until the
small hours of the morning would
impose a strain on the operational
staff which was not justified under
the circumstances,

@ On page 7.

ie
r

One day Aladdin asked the genii how he
could get the Princess to marry him.
“Here, Master,”’ said the genii,and hand-
ed him a package of Royal Pudding.

Cow & GAT

De

FOOD*



of AROYALB

Handicraft
Industry Needs
Development

~LEIGHTON

Mr. Fred Leighton, Vice
President of the National
Council of American Import-
ers and a member of the
Advisory Committee on Im-
ports to the U.S. Department
of Commerce in Washington,
told the Advocate yesterday
that there seems to be a con-
siderable opportunity in Bar-
bados for the development of
interesting ceramic products,
small articles made of tropi-
cal woods, shell work of vari-
ous kinds, needlework and
basketry.

He arrived here over the week-
end accompanied by his wife and
is staying at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. and Mrs. Leighton are
inaking a survey of handicraft
rroducts in the various islands of
the British Caribbean Area, with
a view to studying their export
possibility.

_He said that Barbados is par-
ticularly fortunate in having a
very active port, bringing in many
visitors from foreign countries
who are always interested in
beautiful and useful things of a
native character.

Cottage Industries

Cottage industries are a form of
small industry which can give em-
ployment to large numbers of
people, especially in the time of
the year ‘when other employment
is low, and as such, can be an im-
portant economic asset to the
island,

At present, there does not seem
to be a sufficient organization of
handicraft production in Barbados
to permit of any active commer-
cial exportation, but it would ap-
pear to him that an application
of local, public and private initia
tive would, undoubtedly develop
some successful export items in
the handicraft field.

He thought that the example
of Jamaica where the Jamaican
Government, through its Welfare
Commission has, for many years,
carried on an extensive training
programme of cottage crafts in the
rural centres, could be followed
in Barbados in the development
of exportable handicraft.

Mr. Leighton said that his wife
and he were greatly impressed
with the very interesting exhibits

of regional fish at the Barbados
Museum, They noted that a
marine motif had been used in

some of the local craft work
embroidery and in basketry.

Arawak-Method
They had learned that an an-
cient Arawak method of preparing
hats from sugar cane leaves hau
been re-discovered recently, This

i

might potentially become the
basis of an extensive rural in-
dustry in Barbados where sugar

cane is everywhere.

He said that his company had
been importing handicrafts from
Latin America for the last 25
years. They operated from New
York where they maintained
warehouses selling to retail
stores. In the U.S.A., they also
operated five retail stores of their
own dealing exclusively in im-~
ported Latin American and
Caribbean handicraft merchan
dise,

Up to date from the Caribbean,
they have handled products from
the American Virgin Islands,
from Puerto Rico, Haiti and from
Jamaica, They have found that the
American public is very much in-
terested in the . Caribbean pro-
ducts such ag hats, bags and mats
from Jamaica.

They thought that the British
Islands had a considerable op-
portunity to increase the pro
duction and sale of cottage in-
dustry products whereby they
could give interesting employ-
ment to many people, enabling
them to improve their standard
of living; making useful and
beautiful things for their own
homes as well as for the in
creased tourist travel which is



The Princess had refused many suitors.
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Royal Pudding, she cried, “It’s delicious!
I will marry jim if he promises to serve
me Royal Pudding every aay.”



seeing
by his

of their



©
Yes, everyone loves Royal Puddings.
They’re so rich and smooth, So nutritious,
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-
nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today.

Obviously a wise and far-

popular one.
world today Cow & Gate is
recognised

interested personnel to join one

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Viecount:
Elibank

Viscount Elibank, a former
president of the West India Com-
mittee, died at Capetown, where
he had been living since August
last, on March 12th. He was the
third son of the first Viscount
Elibank and was born in 1877.

Viscount Elibank is still remem-
bered in the West Indies, where

as Mr. Gideon Murray he was Ad-,
Vincent from,

ministrator of St.
1909 to 1915 and of St. Lucia for
the two following years, acting as
Governor of the Windward Islands
for some months in 1916. Before
going out to the West Indies he
had served for

Cd two years as as-
sistant private secretary to the
Permanent Under-Secretary of

State for the Colonies (Sir Francis
Hopwood) and prior to that had
served in New Guinea and the
Transvaal.

After returning home from St.
Lucia in 1917 he was appointed
Food Commissioner for Glasgow
and the Western Counties of Scot-
land, and at the end of the war
stood for Parliament and was
elected for the St. Rollox Division
of Glasgow as a Unionist support-
er of the Coalition Government
His association with the Ulster
leaders brought him into close
touch with Lord Salisbury and
Colenel Gretton, the leaders of
the “diehard’’ movement. It was
he who,*on February Ist, 1922,
precipitated matters by a letter to
the chief Unionist Whip protesting
against the “dictatorship” of the
Prime Minister, Mr. Lloyd George,
and declaring that the time had
come to “reform the Conservative
Party upon its own basis.” A
menth later the diehard group
was already constituting a solid
blec of Unionist members to end
the Lloyd George régime, and it
was not long before the main
strength of the party was on their
side, as became evident at the
famous Cariton Club meeting.

On the death of his father in
1927 he became a member of the
House of Lords, where he showed
a lively and practical interest in
Imperial affairs and_ especially
everything that affected the wel-
fare of the West Indian colonies.
He became the centre of a number
of controversial issues. In the
late twenties and early thirties he
played a prominent part in the
campaign which had for its object
the maintefiance of the British
West Indian sugar industry,

Viscount Elibank was appointed
president of the West India Com-
mittee in 1930. He resigned in
1936 and at the annual meeting
that year proposed Sir Eliot de
Pass, who was duly elected, as his
successor, Viscount Elibank was
president of the Federation of
Chambers of Commerce of the
Empire from 1934 to 1937 and
presided at the Empire Chambers
of Commerce Congress held in
New Zealand in 1936, He was also
a director of several insurance and
investment companies,

His publications included United
West Indies and A Man's Life.

—WIC.c,

"GASCOGNE" DUE
ON SATURDAY
The French steamship Gas-

cogne is expected to call at Har-
bados from Trinidad on Satur



day. She will be leaving port
around 10 a.m. the same day for
England,

Eleven passengers have 2!

ready booked passages with her
agents. She is consigned to
Messrs R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd



Potatoes Arrive

The Saguenay Terminals Sun
Valley landed 600 bags of English
potatoes among other general
cargo here yesterday. The cargo
arrived from Glasgow and Liver
pool,

Included in her cargo for Bai

badcs were cod liver oil, stout,
beer, linseed oil, cement, cocton
piece goods, polishing powder,

stationery and sewing machines
The Sun Valley is consigned to
Messrs. Plantations Ltd.





ecming steadily to these islands;
and for export to other islands
in the Caribbean; and to various
parts of the British Empire and
the United States.

Ruler —and judging
happy subjects a very
All over the

and welcomed.

Something a little better —
something alittle different —
have made the Food pre-

emine it. j
x * * (

Cow & Gate Ltd., Guildford,

issue a hearty invitation to

visiting doctors, nurses and

overseas parties to their

West Country Factories during
the summer of 1951.





|

Small Holders Gan’t Get \\—>

Workers To



Reap Canes

BARBADOS IS REAPING the greatest sugar crop in

its history—estimated at 173,000 tons.

But peasant farmers

are having no easy time getting their canes cut.

Peasant farmers and

smallholders

are experiencing

the most difficult period in years in their efforts to harvest
their own crop and if the situation does not iinprove, the
total tonnage reaped might fall considerably short of the
170,000 tons mark, the Advocate was yesterday informed

The present situation is
estate workers receive 73
per ton for cutting canes and 73
eents per ton for heading them
enerally This has been laid
down in an agreement between
the Barbados Workers’ Union
and the Sugar Producers’ Fed
eration.

In addition to this, these lab
®urers will receive at the end of
the crop season a bonus based on
the percentage of tons harvested
@s compared with the entire
island's crop.

The Complaint

This, the peasant proprietors
complain, results in the fittest
‘nd most competent estate lab
ourers being absorbed by the
sugar estates.

The only labour then avail
able to the peasant proprietor
4nd the small holders, are cither
taecse too lazy to make use of the
anore remunerative employment
at sugar estates or those physi-
cally incapable of working at the

pace that would) make it re-
munerative, d
They then charge a fiat
of $2 a day for cutting and $2 per
day for heading the canes but
they cannot cut nor head the
canes at an economic rate. But
tne small-holder has no choice

It is they or no one

Some plantations, the Advocate
was informed, have even had to
employ children during the last
long vacation to help harvest the
crop although they took a chance

with the law at employing this
sort of labour.

Most of them have now gone
hack to school.
“Go Slow” Attitude

The Advocate also heard com
plaints that there was a sort of
“go slow” attitude on some of the
estates,

Interviewed on these points,
the Labour Commissioner said
that with regard to the shortage
cf labour on the small holdings
he knew that workers preferred

to work on the estates where they

were sure of longer and more
1egular employment and then a
bonus at the end of crop.

With regard to the “go slow’
report, he had ~ keen informed
that labourers were working very
well on the estates, He thought
they would be foolish to cut o1
head the minimum amount oi
‘anes if they were going to be
paid by the ton and also given ¢«

bonus based on the amount ¢
tons individually handled by
them



‘Hawk’ Gets Radio
| Telephone Set

The Police launch Hawk is the

island’s second up — to— date
launch, Radio telephone hag re
cently been installed into her.
The first launch in Barbados to

have radio telephone wag Mes
Gardiner Austin's Patricia.

The Harbour Police who patrol
Carlisle Bay in this trim little
white launch are always in con
stant contact with their statior
at Bay Street. Just a touch of a
button and they are receiving
orders, wherever they are, from
the shore station,

On the other hand, when the
patrol wants to get in contact
with the office, they can call them
up and transmit their message
The newly installed equipment
is a great asset to the Harbour
Police Department. They have
not yet got a code and the mes
gages are transmitted in English

In casé you want the Harbour
Police launch, you can vin, the
Bridge Police Post and you have
her,



rs

IMPERIAL LEATHER e



SPARE

GET



rate Free









:
tS f,
a Ne ET
y |
se be

LIND. N BLOSSOM

555552, IIIA AA AAA AAA ANA SL AED yt tpt tt ts
FEEL LEAL ALAC LLL LMG >

| FOR THE

_ ALLEN MOTOR SCYTHE

REQUIREMENTS Now



~~
vom
>
=
-
—
Saeed
o
Zz
D
*
=
J
oe
S

by three peasant proprietors.
that
cents

For Regional Trade
Union Talks

Mr. F. Le» Walcott, M.C.P., is
due to leave Barbados’ by
8.W.LA, to-day for Trinidad ‘to
attend a Regional Trade Union
Conference on May 11. He is ex
pected to return on Sunday

The Cenference is sponsored
by the Inter-American Regional
Organization of workers in

Cuba, an affiliated organ of
Internationa! Confederation
Trade Unions.

the
of

|

|
|
|
|
|
}

Free

Adams Due For
T.U. Congress

Mr. G. H. Adams, Leader oi
the House of Assembly, will at-
‘end the Second Congress of the
nternational Conferderation of
Trade Unions which will
take place in Milan, Italy, from
July 4—12





Animal Feed Comes |

The 76-ton schooner Timothy
A, H. Vansluytman arrived in
port from British Guiana yester
day with over a thousand bags ot
rice bran from British Guiana
She also brought supplies of fire
wood and heavy charcoal



The rice bran is used as animal
feed. It was consigned to Messrs.
Da Costa & Co, Ltd, The Van-
sluytman usually brings rice to
Barbados, but she has brought
none this trip Her agents are
Messrs. Schooner Owners’ Asso
ciation,





OOOO LOPES ADO PO oe

LET US DISPENSE
YOUR DOCTORS’

+, 4,

APPEAL AAL LEIA ADDN)

‘,

.

‘,
* s
: . ‘
% PRESCRIPTIONS %
x x
y e %
x In Liness 3
% you need two friends %
¥ »,
% your DOCTOR ana by
% your DRUGGIST. %
% To ensure that your R
‘ doctor’s wishes are accom- %
ss plished, take your next
x Prescription to «Uh x
* WEATHERHEAD'S DRUG %
% STORE x
% where you can be sure of %
x obtaining drugs of high
& quality, accurately dis. %
s pensed in minimum § time %
xX and at a moderate price 4
%,
sy Remember—we serve you x
% DAY and NIGHT x
- >
* e %
, ~
* °
é +
: Bruce $
* s
Ww
* Weatiierhead Lud. 3
* Weatherhead Lid. §
% Tel Nos.—Day 2164, 2165, %
* Night: 3144, 3240, 4189. %
a
2)

a

LUXURY,
‘SOAPS

ie

BLUE HYACINTH

GOTT

i) ARRIVED !!

PARTS

YOUR



PAGE FIVE











|
Presto

COOKER
SRITISH PATENT APRLITO FOR
ate Us par ore

THERE’S PLEASURE and Health for all the family in a
PRESTO PRESSURE COOKER. For this modern,
scientific saucepan prepares food for the table in such a
remarkably short time that veteran cooks are amazed by

the magic-like speed. The very

small amount of water used in

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

the losses of vitamins and min-
10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

erals. Each Cooker carries 3
containers,













|

IO”

\

\\
qi ij)



Y ssa
GWLAND
WOUEEN

[his sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of fldvour
which will claim your allegiance from the first sip.

AGHLAND
OWEEN

SCOTCH WHISKY

Sole Importers :—
~ W.S, MONROE & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

MACDONALO & MUIR

m1) WIISEY i}



q
AN abla (Elias lig
pure oni scone

gore






TO DISTILLERS © LEITH © §



MARMITE

The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food

So tasty and so good for you / Tasty because Marmite
gives that rich, appetising flavour. Good because the
B2 vitamins are contained in Marmite — essential
elements to keeping the body fit and free from
illness. Marmite is just as delicious in sandwi¢hes—
watch how children love them!—also in soups,
stews, gravies and all savoury dishes. You only need

a little and what’s left in the'jar keeps for ages,
Made in England

SERB RBeeUuBBaeaaees
“PURINA”

PIGEON CHOW

See





ail. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pistributors.
Bee sueneaacueruep

PLL PPLPL PLP AO
;

COP

NO DEPRESSING EFFECTS,
BUT MARKED RELIEF.

“QPTALIDON TABLETS”

‘,
8
S
For Relief of Menstrual Pains and Sick %
f ¢ a” . . .
Headaches also Pains following Minor
Operations, Sinusitis etc.
%,
®
a ¥
Hotiles of 10s and 25s x
‘
e $
¢
$
5
KNIGHTS’ LTD. S
OOOO OOOO LLL LLCO SESEE.





PAGE SIX

HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON





SUZE! YOU SHOULD SEE ON
Lit Tits —~; BIG ONES!
RECEPTION? IZ











QUIET LITTLE
RECEPTION!



THE GAMBOLS__

BY BARRY APPLEBY

Bi WON'T BOTHER ABOUT THAT
APPOINTMENT , DEAR you
NEED GLASSES



BY FRANK STRIKER

| PICKED UP YOUR TRAIL) THEN YOU 1
BEHIND THE BANK AND fy,
FOLLOWED IT HERE/ f/

@ay YOURE ix0
f MAN/

|



AS
Wie

BRINGING UP

ate =);

|

SURE I DO... IT'S AN UNUSUAL — Maan
KEY... I MADE IT FORA fe
WOMAN WHO RUNS A
BOARDING HOUSE

Sa. JUST A BLOCK

I'VE HAD
ENOUGH ! T/LL
LEAD YOU TO
THE MONEY !

THAT'S
My ALL WE NEED,
KIRBY | LET'S

ae
wy

HERE'S
YOUR MAN,
MR, KIRBY... JACK
MINCH, THE
LOCKSMITH,

PHANTOM

THE

| | (74 GRAB THE STUFF “AND
g (GET OUT OF HERE, FACTS
ein



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THURSDAY,

4

LIFEGUARD ©

THE WONDERFUL BRITISH
| DISCOVERY

A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic

MAY 10,



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH |

That NEW WYVERN PEN that





is causing a sensation at the Festi-






) val of Britain, is at - -

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
—_—

ENAMEL-IT PAINTS for your
Pet Furniture is at - - -
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

SHOP

HERE!

LADIES!
DRESS GOODS

Sharkskin, Romaine Crepe,
Jersey, Plain & Striped,
Silver & Gold Tinsel Crepe
& Georgette, Plain & Print-
ed Crepe-de-Chine, Satins,
Satins, Tafetas, Spuns, Etc.
Hats, Shoes, Nylons.

GENTS!

Taffetas, Spyns, Etc , Hats,













* FOR PERSONAL HYGIENE

LITE,

‘i PEE
Vg sk TO STERILIZE CUTS AND
GRAZES



* TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS

*% SAFETY AND RELIEF FOR BITES
AND STINGS











Oe ee

Waris Fy.

SS This wonderful new “ Lifeguard” used in tens of
thousands of homes is the most powerful protection
At the same time it is quite safe for
all to handle and pleasantly fragrant and non-staining.

you can use,

No home with small children dare be without it.

Shoes, Nylons.

LET US SERVE YOU.

THANI's

Pr. Wm Henry &
Swan Sts.



°

;

PPLE LEE PLEO SLL LEELL LCCC TCAD

+, % x ; ee
s {LPO OOOO LOLLIPOP IOI OD OOOO OOOO TD

NEW BOOKS SCHOOL
ELEPHANT BILL by Lt.-Col. J. H. Williams BOOKS

ROYAL READERS
3, 4, 6

“

GSS PI EID EOL

VENUS THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskine

SHAW by Desmond McCarthy

ROYAL SCHOOL

ISLANDS OF THE SUN by Rosita Forbes PRIMER

THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELBRECHT

by Maurice Richardson WEST INDIAN

READER

CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHTING 1&2



ee

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

«




‘

4

*

“s x

Â¥, *
2 ‘ : s i
LPP APPLE LLLP LLL LLL OOO LLL ILS OX







SS SS

DEAL HERE



me
<=

| I, PAYS YOU TO

—

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only









































USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
i MOIRS CHOCOLATES PLANTERS PEANUTS
} per PKG. a es A apie ee TINS 96 85
ROWNTREES COCOA GREEN SEAL RUM
TINS 3 Seema eee 20 BOTS. (large) 1.08 838
CARR'S CHEESE CRISPS & HEINEKENS BEER
CLUB CHEESE BISCUITS tins 1.20 96 BOTS. 26 21












DUNLOP
UNIVERSAL

MOTOR CYCLE TYRES

AT LAST?!

e
A Cane Trailer

Manufactured by the well-known Brockhouse organization and
specially designed to meet the exacting requirement of plan-
tation work in the West Indies, where contouring and draining
of land is practised.

These Cane Trailers are equipped with large diameter 10
ply rear tyres, and positive brakes, and are capable of carrying
a 5-ton pay load with safety.

Specifications: —5-ton 4—wheeled Sugar Cane Trailer.

Main Frame:—10’—0” long x 4/—6” wide, from steel

members electrically welded.

Gooseneck, Assembly:—of 4” I.D. hgavy service tubing.

Side Frames:—of steel channel with bolt fixing.

Drawbar:—of steel channel, cross-braced and electrically

welded.

Rear Axle Equipment:—3” sq. bed, straight-through axle,

with journals; fitted 6-stud roller-bearing
hubs. All steel disc wheels, 8.00 x 28.
Front Azle Equipment:—2%” sq. bed, straight-through
axle, with journals, fitted 5-stud roller-
bearing hubs. All steel disc wheel.
4.00 x 16.
PRICE $1,750.00





“We khow that there are cheaper trailers on the market,
but if you are interested in a unit whieh will give entire satis-
faction in both WET & DRY WEATHER, we invite you to come
in and examine these “specially” designed trailers.”

BROTHERS

DIAL 4269

‘Reliability *

|
|
DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING |
COMPANY LIMITED oor



2

ON

REEL LEE









THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS. |. rs

TELEPHONE 2508

_

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
anfouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents pe> word for each
edditional word. Terms ¢ash. Phone 2508
3113 for Death





DIED

DRAYTCN—On the Sth of May 1951
David Clifford Drayton (late retired

Road Inspector of Christ Church). The}

funeral leaves his late rs sidence
“Olearia” Enterprise Road, Christ
Church, at 4.15 o’elock this evening

for Christ. Church Parish Church.
Friends are imvited.
Elien Drayton (Widow), Calvir

(Son), Adina Holder, Olive Drayton
(Sisters}, Cleveland Drayton (Ne-
phew). 10.5.51—1m

——<——_
CUMMINS—Mrs. Cummins:— In loving
remembrance of our mother Albertine
Cummins who departed this life 10th

of May, 1943.
“Time passes, shadows fall, ;
But love and remembrance outlasts
all.”
Armintha (Daughter), Gwen, Clementy
Mellis (Grands). 10.5.51—19



TAKE NOTICE

That FORT GARRY FLOUR MILLS
CO, LIMITED, a
under the laws of the Province of Sas-
katchewan in the Dominion of Canada,
whose trade or business address is in

the City of Saskatoon, Province of Sas-}

katchewan, Canada, has applied for the
registration of a wade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of flour, feed and
cereals, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 9th
day of May, 1951, unless some person;
shall in the meantime give notice in;
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of sueh registration, The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.
The applicant disclaims all exclusive use
of the words ‘Milled from Selected Hard
Spring Wheat" as well as the name ot
the applicant as part of the trade mark
to_be registered.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1961.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

9.5.51—8n

TAKE NOTICE
CELOTEX

That THE CELOTEX CORPORATION, a
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United
States of America, whose trade or busi-
ness address is City of Chicago, state of
Illinois, U.S.A., has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of wall board and
similar building material, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day.og{ May, 1951,
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office,

Dated this 16th day of April 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
9. S651—3n

~ ‘TAKE NOTICE

FLYING FISH

That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-







ED, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a_ British
Company, whose trade or business
address is Calcutta House, Goulstom

Street, Aldgate, London, E., England, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and chi-
cony, coffee essence, and coffee and chi-
cory essence, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from.
the 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppos-
ition of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5. 51—3n.

REAL ESTATE
JOHN
M4.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD



A





FOR SALE

“LOCKERBIE HOUSE”, Brit-
tons Cross Road—A distinetive and
welling, ese $06 stone ae
set well n groun
approx. one acre in extent. The
gardens are well matured and
\\ there is complete privacy from the

roadway and adjoining property.
There is a covered entrance porch
for cars, wide airy verandahs,
large lounge with a central stair-
way making an attractive feature,
dining room, four good bedrooms,
kitchen, butler’s , _ Store-
rooms and usual ; Outside
there is a large garage, servant's
quarters, éte. An extremely inter-
esting and desirable property.

“WHITEHALL FLATS”,
rington Hill, St. Michael—A well
preserved country home recently
converted into a beg 4 spaci-
ous luxury flats, with all
modern conveniences. The
approx. 5 acres are laid out with
lawns, shrubbery and gardens and
there is a long carriageway ap-
proach flanked with mahogany
trees. An investment property or
suitable for conversion into Guest
House or Nursing Home. 3% miles
from town.

“ELSWICK", 8th Avenue, Belle-
ville — A stone and timber house
on approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed
verandah, 2 reception rooms, 3
bedrooms, kitchen and pantry, Full
information on application.

“RICHELIEU”, Ilith Avenue,
Belleville—Well maintained bunga-
low constructed of stone with
wallaba shingled roof. ac-
commodation consists of an en-
closed gallery, living room, dining
room, four bedrooms, kitchen, ser-
yant's room and aouble garage.
The property has a wide lawn
at one side. a small orchard and
‘s fully enclosed, Central resi-
dental area near town and schools,

“WINSDALE”,

Cod-
i

Cheapside—-Single
storey residence, 3 minutes walk
from town centre. 2 living rooms,
dining room, verandahs, 4 beu-
rooms. Area of pilet approx.
10,000 sq. ft. Open to offers.



“IN CHANCERY”
Silver Sands,

on Const at
Furnished.

“WINDY WILLOWS” —Procpect,
St James, Unfurnished house on
coast, with 3 bedrooms,
verandah, overlooking sea
Immediate possession.

lounge,
ete.

“WAVERLEY”, St. Lawrence—

ST
piece son een eae

—Attractive 3 bedroomed furiiish-
ed seaside bungalow. Availabie
long lease if required.

“SANDY LODGE”. St. James—
Furnished Chvlet with the best
beach and bathing the Island has
to offer.

“WHITSHALL FLATS"— Well
appointed furnished apartments



REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
’Phone 4640





eorporation organized |



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and -

24 words — over 24

96 cents Sundays
| Sects ¢ conte Sword weab—4 cones a

word Sunday«.





AUTOMOTIVE

SSUES!
CAR: Hillman Saloon, first Registered
Feb. 1951. Low mileage, condition as
new. Can be seen arytime at Worthy-
dows, Top Rock. Phone 4683 or 8469
9.5.51—3n

CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
tyres, in good working condition, price
Teasonabie, y F, D. L. Gay, Staple





Grove, Christ ureh. Dial 3207,
1.5.51—t.f.n.
CARS: This week's offer; One 1942

model Mercury Sedan. New tyres and
engine in good condition. Ideal for taxi
No reasonable offer refused. Ring 4908,
E'dos. Agencies Ltd.

8.5.51—6n

CAR—Hiliman Car M--1799. in good
working order. Apply Frank Proverbs
C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd., High
Street. 5.5.51—Sn,

WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

ELECTRICAL

ae schimenprnegameei er vonaamannapinssatrinime
RADIO—One Murphy € tube in good
working order, beautiful tone. Dial
16. 35.51—3n.









RADIO: One Hallicrafter 9-Tube, S40
Radio, almost néw. Phone 3757. L. M
Clarke, James Street. 8.5.51—3y

FURNITURE

FURNITURE— At Ralph's Furniture
Show Reom, Hardwood Alley. A large
selection of new and second-hand fur-
niture all at Bargain Prices, For inquiry
Ring 4683. 9.5.51—3n



LIVESTOCK

COW: One Guernsey-Ayrshire Cow,
soon to calve with 2nd calf. Apply
i. Durant, Grove, St. Philip.

9.5.51—2n
_

MECHANICAL

BICYCLE—One Gent's Silver King
Hercules Bicycle, with light, lock and
good tyres. Phone 4239,











9.5.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES for sale which
Pearl-in-Laid Burmese
(very old) French 2i-day Clock in
lass Case. A number of Barbados
ine Pennies, Chinese and Japanese
Tea Services, Old English Tea Service
(12 cups and saucers) believe to be
Stafford, Old cut glass Decanters, sev-
eral Ivory Jewel Boxes, miniature hand
painted pottery and numerous old plates,
at reasonable prices at Ralph Beard's
furnishing show rooms, Hardwood
Alley. 10,5.51—3n.















include
writing Cobinet

BUTTER: Cooking Butter 11) Tins,
Table Butter 1 lb Tins also Kraft Cheese
in Paekages. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck





Street. Dial 3489, 9.5
BEDSTEADS: Simmons Bedsteads &
Springs. Available in 3 ft. 3 ims. and

4 ft. 6 ins. sizes with or without psnel.

G. W. Hutcl¥nson & Co., Ltd.; Broad

and Roebuck Streets. Dial 4222 or 4843,
9.5.51—4n

CAMERAS: Standard Box Cameras
(usifg 120 film) at only $7.45 each.
Buy yours TODAY at G. W. Hutchin-
son & Co., Ltd. Broad Street. Dial 4222.

9.5.51—3n

GALV ANISE—2% gauge 8 ft. $7.00, 9 ft.
$7.15. Only a limited number at Ralph
Beard’s furnishing show room Hardwood
Alley. 10.5.51—3ne

GALVANISED SHEETS—Best qualitr
new sheets. Cheapest in the Island!
6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; & ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;
10 ft $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry !
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

4.5.51—t.f.n.

GLASS WARE—A few dozen French
black footed Champaigne, Whisky,
Sherry, and water Goublets are for sale.













Champaigne $12.00 a doz
Whisky $10.00 a doz.
Sherry $10.00 a doz
Goublets $13.00 a doz

At Ralph Beard’s ‘furnishing show rooms
Hardwood Alley. 10.5.51—3n

HAMS:



Hams in Tins 71b to 9b, 24
lbs. and 1 tb Tins, also 5 to 6 Ib at
$1.25 per â„¢m Smoked. W. M. Ford,
35 Roebuck Street, Dial 3489,
9.5.61—2n
LUNCH TINS: Available at Hutchin-
sons at 83 cents each. Attractive-Strong
easy to carry, Als White Tumblers at 8
cents each. @. W. Hutchinson & Co.,
Ltd. Broad St. and Roebuck St. Dial 4222

or 4843. 9.5.51~4n
SOUPS: Campbells & Heinz Soup,
Vegetable Consomme, Oxtail, Tomato;

Chicken. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck Street
Dial 3489. 9.5.51—2n

TINNED MEATS: Sausages Large and
Small Vienna Style, Veal Loaf, Muttor
& Peas & Steak & Kidney Pudding
W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck Street, Dial
2489. 9.5.5—2

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Gwendolyn Oxley.
holder of Liquor License No. 988 of
1951 granted to Darnley Jackson in re-
spect of bottom floor of a 2 storey wall
building near Millar Bros. Baxters Rd.,
City for permission to use said License
at said premises, Baxters Road, City.
To: H. A. TALMA, Esa.,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
Dated this 4th day of May, 1951.
GWENDOLYN OXLEY,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Police Court, District “A’ on
Tuesday, the 15th day of May, 1951 at

11 o'clock, a.m
H. A. TALMA,
Poline Magistrate, Dist. “A”
10.5.51—In.







TAKE NOTICE

QUAKER

e



}
'
}
;
| That THE QUAKEn OAYS COMPANY,
a corporaion organized and existing un-
der the laws of the State of New Jersey,
United States of America, inufacturers,
whose trade or business address is Mer-
chandise Mart Plaza, Chicago, Illinois,
U.S.A., has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Regis-
ter in t of cerenl foods and feeds,
and will be efititled to register the same
after one month from the 9th day of
May, 1951, unléss some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen om application at my office.
Dated fhis 25th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
' 9.5,51—3n

9BO5F9665995509605908%,
West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,

Pottery, Hand blocked Beach-
~ werr, Decoration House, 8
% James. Tei. 91-74.

o 144.51—1m. s

* <
LOSSSESOS SOS FCS OOO FOSS



on tf.
Apply to A. E
Street., Diat \ on





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Téa cents per agate line on wee
Py ay ty
o $1.50 on week-days

and $1.00





NOTICE
Applications for one of More vacant St
Michael's Vesiry Exhibition tenable at
the Combermere School, will be reveived

by the Clerk of the Vestry up to “12| Paynes Bay

a NOTICES

@eclock noon on Thursday 22nd day of
May, 1851.

Candidates must: be sons of parishion-
er. in straitened circumstances and must
not be Tess than ten years and four
months nor more than twelve years
old on the Ist day of January 1951, to
be preved by a Baptismal Certificate,
which must accompany the application.
Parents and/or Guardians will be noti-
fed of the time and place of the Exam-
ination.







of June, December. Forms of ication can obtained
Apply Mrs, I. Weatherhead C/o J. N. | from the Westy Chen's ome G
nm 5.5. 51—4n ae e,
ee the » C. REDMAN,
VBRONA—Black Reck, near Deacon's Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.
Road Corner. Newly built bungalow con- 8.5.51—%n
taining open verandah, Drawing and | —————_—$_——_
Dining, 2 bedrooms with running water, | ST. MARY'S OLD BOYS ASSOCIATION
Servants’ room and Garage, Dial 2947. NOTICE
R. Archer McKenzie, Victoria St.
£.5,.51—3n, “THE CHURCH AND THE COM-



TAKE NOTICE |

PABLUM |

That MEAD JOHNSON & COMPANY, |
a corporation duly organized under the +
laws of the State of Indiana, United |
States of America, whose tradé or.
business address is Ohie Street and St.
Joseph Avenue, Evansville, State of In-'
diana, U.S.A., has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of specially prepared
foods for human use and pharmaceutical
preparations which supply nutritional
needs, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 9th
day of May, 1951, unless some rson
7, ~ a meantime give no in
uplica’ me at my office of oppositii
of -e registration. The sade ark
can seen on application at mi:
Dated this 25th Tey of April, ist
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5,51—3n



TAKE NOTICE



That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-
D, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a British
Company, whose trade or business
address is Caleutta House, Goulston
Street, Aldgate, London, B., England, has
appiied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A’ of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and
chicory, coffee essence and coffee and
chicory essence, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.
Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

9.5. 51—3n)



TAKE NOTICE

ey

That THE MAGGI CO., Manufacturers,
a Company incorporated according to the
laws of Switzerland, whose trade or
business address is Kempttal, Zurich,
Switzerland, has applied r the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register In respect of substances used as
food or as ingredients in food, especially
soups, bouillons, and seasonings, and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of May, 1951,
unless some person shail in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registra-
tion, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5.51—3n





TAKE NOTICE





CROSS-STAR

That THE *.AGGI CO., Manufacturers,
a Company incorporated according to the
laws of Switzerland, whose trade or
business address is Kempttal, Zurich,
Switzerland, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of substances used as
food or as ingredients in food, especially
soups, bouillons, and seasonings, and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of May, 1951,
unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registra-
tion. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5.51—3n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The applicatior of Chas. Scott trading
as Scott & Co., holder of Liquor License
282 of 1951 granted to him in respect of
bottom floor of building in Busbey Alley;
City for permission to use said Liquor’
License &c., at ground floor of a 2-sterey
wall building opp. Mason Hall St,
Baxters Rd:, City.

Dated this 9th day of May, 1952.





To: H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District

“An,
W. ALLEYNE,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A on Monday
the 2lst day of May, 1961, at 11 o'clock
a.m,

10.5.51—1ly



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Sydney Beckles
holder of Liquor License, No. 267 of 195)
granted to a wall building at Govern-
ment Hill, St. Michael for permission to
use said Liquor License &c., at a board
and shingle shop at My Lords Hill, St.
Michael :

Dated this 7th day of May
To: FE. A, MeLEBOvD, Esq

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

8S. BECKLES,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A’ on Thursday
the 17th day of May 1951 at f1 o’elock,
a.m

E. A. Mcl£0D,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A™.
0.5.51—1n

H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. |

1951



HAIR BEAUTY

Nothing is more becoming to 9

Lady than a beautiful head of
hair, Special Scalp Treaiments
are given for growing and beau-
tifying it. In six months you
have long hair. Also a_ special
hair Pomade is sold which grows
and keeps it soft and glossy

MADAME EDGHILL,
Dial 3471.

9.5.51—1n



MUNITY” will be the subject of a lec-
ture which will be given by The Rev.
Pother A, I, Johnson, L.Th., to-night,
Thursday, May 10, 1951, at 8.00 o'clock,
at St. Mary's Boys’ School Room, Mason
Hall St. All Old Bays and the general
public aré invited.
EB. deLISUE YEARWOOD,
Hony, Secretaiy;.
10.5.51—1y

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Leonard Beckles
holder of Liquor License No. 894 of
1951 granted to Harcourt Hood in respect
of a board and shingle shop attached
to a house at Bank Hall X Road, St
Michael for permission to use said Liquer
License &c., at a board and galvanize shop
with shedroof attached at Sobers Lane,
St. Michael

Dated this 7th day of May 1951
To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.

LEONARD BECKLES,
Applicant

N.B,--This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Folice Court, Distriet “A” on Thursday







|
|

PURLIC

Ten cents per agate tine on woek-doy,
and 12 cent per agate ne on Sundays.













mimmum charge $1.50 on week-days| words 3 cents a worl week—4 Cents a}?
and $1.80 on Sundays word Sundays. j
me oes ee HELP i
REAL ESTATE _ 5 eS |
exes spateinatninihintdtaemimemtbinniinanniiants 6 LADY for the pest of Stendgstgnse|
| BUILDING SITE—With private Beach [ Typist. Apply i writing to J. N_ Har-i
(Approximately) lia geres, at Derricks,}tman & Co. Lid, Alexander Howe, |
, St. James. For inspection fJames Street $.5.51-<1n
and further information, Dial—2991. | - —_————— a
(Offers received) . 6.5. 33+2n. YOUNG LADY for post of Secretary
~ | Stenographer in our office. Suitable
ee Gate te SUTE: sitwated jselary paid to the right person. Apply
at Ventnor . Ch. Ch. Area 10,978 | i person to Sanitary Laundry Co. Ltd.
sq. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft, road. Dial | Country Road. 8.5.51—t.f.0
2206 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5,.51--t.f.m.
CONFIDENTIAL PRIVATE SECRE-
TARY — English, experienced shorthand-
AUCTION typist requires employment fer one or
two days a week, own typewriter. High-
aie = ce ew: Box No. A.C. C/o
nee ares tions received I will sell saan aus
»’ Publ on spot at Bank Responsible person to take charge of
Hell Main 4th house from All} Commission Department to assume duties
Souls Church, om Thursday next th} not later than ist July—Salary $200 00

i0th May at 2 oa'clock, One
roofed house with out-offices
sold to the highest bidder.
removed,

three-
Wil be
Must be
5.5. 51—in

By instructions of the Insurance Co
1 will sel at Marshall Edwards, 44
Roebuck Street opposite James A. Tudor
& Co., om Friday Ith at 2 p.m.

1 Austin 7 Saloon Car damaged in
weident. Terms CASH R, Archer
McKenzie. 8.5. 51—4n.



SALES |

-canenrarienienreengenieieenecianaeee patie tmanrenEeE.



WANTED
Minimum charge week 72
86 cent Sundays 24 words

cents aul
over %4













+8240. 00 per month depending on qual-
ifeations. Apply in person with written
application to Secretary, Dowding Estates
& Trading Compari’, Ltd

9.5, 51—In

‘MISCELLANEOUS










E One i .iquer License
Apply S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd Dial
4293 10.5.51—tn



CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE

From page 5
He accordingly inrormed the
manager ef T.C.A. that he was
Unable to grant his second request
—-that the aircraft should be
allowed to land on its return flight
in the small hours of the morning.
Undue Strain
The Seawell Airport Committee
has warned in its report against
the danger of placing undue strain

the 17th Gap of Mwy 1951 at 1 o’elock,; 0 the existing staff. Breakcpwns

a.m
E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
10,5, 51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Alexander Sober:
holder of Liquor License No. 980 ef 19)
granted to Edith Burnham in respect of
© one roofed board and shingle shop
attached to residence at Bridge Road, St.
Michael, for permission to use said Liquor
License &c., at a board and shingle shop
with shedroof attached at Halls Poad,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of May 1951.
To:—E. A. McLEOD, Bsq.,

Police Magistrate,
Dist. “A”.
ALEX. SOBERS,
Applicant.



N.B.—This application will be consir-|

ered at a Licensing Court to be heit

| action was unreasonable.
phad

ir. health through over-strain
would cripple the day to day op-
erafions of the airport and the
efficieney of the air traffic con-
troller, the road operator or the
fire and crash attendant. They
could not be guaranteed if they
were called upon to deal with a
genuine emergency after having
already Been on duty for 12 to 20
hours,

The flight in question actually
landed at Seawell at 8.3. p.m. and
left agaim at 9.05 p.m.

Mr. Leacock said thit he did
not think Hon. R. N. Turner's
There
some

been, he undérstood,

at Police Court, District “A’’ on Monday | feeling that the staff was working

the 2ist day of May, 1991, at 11 o'clock,
am
BE, A, McL£EOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
10.5.51—1n0
—_—

Motorist Fined

A District “A” Police Magis-
trate told Cyril Miller of Ivy
Street, St. Miehael: “You've now
got a conviction for speeding re-
corded against you and if you
return here your licence will be
suspended”, when he fined hin
£4 yesterday for speeding on
Constitution Road while driving
the motor lorry M.275. :

The fine is to be paid by in-
stalments of £1 per month or
in default two months’ imprison~
ment and his licence is to be en-
dorsed. Police Constable 349
Lashley who brought the case
said he saw the motor lorry on
Constitution Road on March 1)
and eheeked the speed of the
lorry and found that it was trav~-
elling at over 32 miles per hour

He took the driver’s name and
reported the matter to the Cen-
tral Station. The speed limit on
Constitution Road for lorries is
20 miles per hour.

Also fined for exceeding the
speed limit on March 27 was
Lionel Gill of Welechman Hall
St. Thomas. He was ordered to
bay a fine of £3 by instalments
or two months’ imprisonment
with hard labour, When his of-
fence was committed he was
driving the motor lorry M.2376.

DROVE WITH
FAULTY BRAKES

Carlyle Frederick of Parris
Gap, St. Michael, was fined £2
by a District “A” Police Magis-
trate when he appeared before
him charged with driving the
motor car M.1766 with faults
brakes on February 27.

Cpl. Cyrus attached to the
Traffic Branch at Central Station
said that he reported the condi-
tion of the car to Inspector Far-
num, who found that both brakes
and steering gear were not in
good order.







Dangerous Driving

Gordon Croney of King Street
was ordered to pay a fine of £3
by a City Police Magistrate yes-
terday when he was found guy
of driving the motor car 14)
in a dangerous manner on Bax-
ters Roed on March |.

Cpl. Cyrus who brought the
ease said -that the defendant
“dashed down” Baxters Road
while a funeral was going up the
street. His licence is to be en-
dorsed and the fine to be paid
by monthly instalments.

ee

LA PRENSA WILL
REOPEN SOON

BUENOS AIRES, May 9.

Diego Baamonde, Secretary
General of the Pro-Government
newspapermen’s union said to-
night that La Prensa will be re-
opened soon “as a. daily for
Argentine workers”.

La Prensa, often a severe critic
cf the administration of Presi-

dent Peron, closed 15 weeks ago| bean territories.

by a series of boycotts of it and

strikes by Government-supported | with a copy of the letter

unions, is now in process of being|ed whether they have any pro-
taken over by the Government.|ducts which they would like to
—(CP)

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS



Were You

ENQUIRING

for
A Small Portable Oven?

You Can 7
Get it at your Gas Co. {

Price , aad eae





many hours. yovernment was
trying to get additional staff and
when that was got they were
prepared to consider opening at
night when necessary.

As regards lighting, he under-
stood that there were arrange
ments to take a supply from the
Electrie Company. The gen-
erating plant had been giving a
lot of trouble and they were
afraid of running it at night for
operatidn.

Few Night Landings

Mr. King said that he could
not appreciate the fact that there
was undue strain to the staff if
night landing happened once
every six months. The reason
tor calling for a yes or no decision
wag that the plane was leaving
Montreal and the Manager haa
to know what the position was.

Hon. V. C. Gale said he be-
lieved that B.W.LA. came in late
at night.

Mr. Thomas said that if they
could operate for B.W-.LA. flights

at night fairly regularly, how
could there be such enormous
strain for an irregular T.C.A.

night flight. What was happening
to the equipment in such a case?

Hon. V. C. Gale said he did not
think it was the equipment but
rather the staff,

Mr. Weatherhead
not think Hon. R. N. Turner
could have done anything else
under the circumstances.

Messrs. John Patterson of
Plantations Ltd., Ronald Inniss of
H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd, Frank
Ward of Da Costa & Co., Ltd. and
Kenneth Knaggs of Gordon
Grant & Co., Ltd., were unani-—
mously elected members of the
Chamber.

Messrs. G. H. Kinst, A. H. C
Thomas and Hon. V. C. Gale
were appointed to read and ap-
prove of the Annual Report of
the Chamber as prepared by the
Secretary.

The date for the Annual Gen-
eral Meeting wil) be May 30

Advertising Signs

The Chamber considered the
report on the control of adver~
tising signs. The Secretary was
telq to get in, touch with the
advertisers and ask whether they
weuld signify their agreement by
signing the report.

said he did

The Chamber appointed
Messrs. Kinch, Thomas, Peirce
and Bynoe to draft a letter to
Government on the “Price Con-

trol Committee Report.” This

four-man committee will first
have to get the views of the
various branches of trade and

then draft their findings for the
Council's approval.

The Caribbean Commission,
Central Seeretariat in Trinidad
wrote the chamber to find out
whether business people were

‘interested in a display of Carib-
bean products in San Juan, There
will be a Caribbean Festival,
sponsored by the Caribbean In-
terim Tourism Committee to be
held in 1952.

On display will be works of
art, sculpture, paintings, and
local handicraft from the Carib-

circularised
and ask-

Members will be

display.



Affiliation Rejected

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE’S, May 7
J By a large majority vote the
trenada Union of Teachers last
Saturday rejected a motion urg-
ing affiliation with the Manual
and Mental Workers’ Union which
ne out a large atten-
|
|





very

dance.






BARBADOS
INVESTMENTS
Bought.and Sold
A, M. WEBB
Stockbroker
33 Broad St., Bridgetown
(Over Phoenix Pharmacy)








Inquiry Adjourned |

District “A” Coroner H. A
Talma yesterday adjourned hear-
ing in the inquest touching the

death of Rudolph Jones of Wa-
terford Tenantry, St. Michael
untik May 16, \

Rudolph Jones was admitted

to the General Hospital on April
29 and died there on May 4. A



post mortem examination
performed at the Hospital Mor
tuary at about 2.30 p.m. on

|
May 4 by Dr. E. L. Ward wh
attributed death to toxemia,
pneumonia and anaemia.
The body was identified to Dr
Ward by Eudora Jones, mother
of the deceased.



Overpricing Cost £4 |

A fine of £4 to be paid by in
stalments or in default two}
months’ imprisonment was im
posed on Lennora Small, a hawk-
er of St. Thomas, St. Andrew
yesterday by a City Police Mag-
istrate.

Small sold Christopher Perkine
six bananas for six cents on May
9, one penny more than the sche
dule permitted. The bananas were
not Gros Michels. In case Small
fails to pay the fine there is an
alternative of two months’ im-
prisonment with hard labour

12 Months For Larceny

Sentence of 12 months’ im-
prisonment was yesterday passed
on labourer G, Downes of Thomas
Gap, St. Michael, when he ap-
peared before a District “A” Po-
lice Magistrate on a charge of
larceny of cloth.

The cloth which is valued at
£2 5s is the property of Moham-
med Kola, a merchant of Passage
Road. The offence was commit-
ted on April 6.

Downes has six previovs con-
vietions for larceny recorded
against him. After the sentence
he gave notice of appeal. Mr
E. W. Barrow appeared on be-
half of the defendant



Minister For Tobago

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7

Hon, A, P. T, James, Member
for Tobago made the first move
to get the Colony's six-month-old
Constitution amended, He is mov
ing a resolution urging that the
Constitution amend that any mem
ber of the Executive Council may
be removed by a majority vote of
the Legislative Council, and not
by a vote of two-thirds of all mem-
bers of the Council as required at
present, He is also asking Gov
ernment for an amendment that a
Minister may be created to look
after the “peculiar problems of}
Tobago.”





LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STAR

Neediest Cases Fund

ANNOUNCEMENT

Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June a
Queen’s Park, the undersigned wil)
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume Bands
(b) Steel Bands.

(e) Advertising Bands
(d) Historical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival, the Steering Committe:
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being a8 original as possible.

No entrance fee will be charged

More particulars later

A Carnival Band of thirty wil
he visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade,

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk's Office,

Bridgetown,

For Booths, Stalls, and side-
Shows, contact C. ' MORRIS,
Sobers Lane.



CHOICE

CHINA CABINETS

CHOOSE NOW a Charm of
a CHINA CABINET, New or
renewed, in Mahogany or
mahoganized, Birch or Fir-—-
$39 to $120,

SMART STYLES on cab-
riole legs or bases show up
your ware and glass every
time you pass.

{a Some of these cabinets

are on the simpler graceful
lines equally suitable as your

BOOK CASES

L. S. WILSON

SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069







ee ot

ae



PAGE SEVEN

LOST & FOUND

LOST

‘BANK BOOK: A Royat Bank Depos







wae
PER!

ROSLA: ss
Goliop: ¢ le
4ponsible for







ing credi
NT ELDER

myself

sT4

hold



nee



her or anyor















Se COREE NE ane Sept or depts ip na) | itor’s Bank Book with impertaat docu-
ne : ont if nider hoe
9 cil dite remediate returnit@® ta Mayers, ; ©
ae ce these, | Advertising Dept . or 's.6.0tomn
s Géorge. |
9 5 s1—2 THREE PORTS
" KARACHI

ALREADY LISTED With the port of Chalna now
WINDSOR jin operation, Pakistan has three
The census official who took |ports geared to handle export
the official forms to Windser Cas-}and fmyport traffic. Chalma and
tle did not ask the usual ques-|}Chittagong are in Eastern Pak-
tions about housing accormn~ia-jistan, while West Pakistan’s port
tion. “We already have the in-jof Karachi is an _ historic ‘outlet

formation,” he said.—-€P) lfor the sub-continent .—CP)



On Sale at all Grocers
SIMEON HUNTE & SON LTD. — Agents

SRT eine NOTCH





MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED


















(M.A.N.Z. LINE) ; aks ‘

M.S. “TCNGARIRO” galled Brisbane | 3% ani’ pCarlbbee wilt accept Cwm
ae 24th, Arriving at Barbados May Antitua, Montserrat, Nevis and St.
at. c 3 ,

3.8, “ARABIA” is scheduled to sail Tie, BARE EOSE Hoe
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th MV, Cnetque Det Cart wt
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane accept Gach sad pecaemants e
16th June, Sydney 2rd June, arriving | 4 St. Lucia, St, Vineent, Grenada
at Trinidad during latter half of July, and Aruba, Sailing on or about
and proceeding thereafter to Barbados 18th instant,
and Liverpool,

,

In addition to general cargo this

vessel has ample apace for chilled and

hard frozen cargo B.W.1. SCHOONER OWN-
Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to ERS ASSOC., INC.
British Guiana, Leewerd and Windward -

Islands. Tele, 4047,

For further particulars apply |
FURNESS WITHY & CO, Ltd,, TRINI-

DAD, B.W.T, and A
DA COSTA & CO, LTD, BRIDGE- conhuesciennenineenneseniseiseeie





TOWN, BARBADOS, DB.W.1. '

me Alcoa

NEW YORK SERVICE
April Artives Barbades ath May
May % es 2th .,.

83, “TRYA
A Steamer

failed 7th
Siailg 1th





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE



ALCOA PATRIOT" Ued 18th April Arrives Barbados 4th May
“ALCOA POLARIS 2nd May ” ” th ,,
‘ALCOA ROAMER” Salla 16th May ¥ js 1st June





(eae a ea A TRE

CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND :
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives Bdoa.









“ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May Sth
“ALCOA PIONEER” May ith May 14th May = 24th
"“FOLKE BERNADOTTE" Ma 25th May 2th June ith
SORTUBOUND
8. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” due April 20th, Sails for St. John and Montreal.



1: nae eteneewieene-tegstinreenemenennintn tipinoaenninnee I Ematonttte ae een - *These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO,, LTD-—CANADIAN SERVICE
GLEAN LEAL LIAL ADEE AEG SETTERS,

| PASSAGES TO EUROPE





Contact Antilles Products,
sailing to Europe fortnightly.
Dublin, London, or Rotterdam.
reduction for chidren

Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
The usual ports of call are

fare £70; usual

Single



FYFFES

LINE

THE T.8.S. GOLFITO will he arriving from South-

ampton on Saturday, 12th May, at 8 a.m., and will

be sailing at 5 p.m. the same afternoon for Trinidad

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0., ETD.

@
There is arnple ist Class Accommodation available §
for Trinidad, also one berth for a lady available on ;
24th May for Seuthampton :
3
° 3
Apply... i}
2
i
i



You'll

ind get a better-job done,
@ one of our

“PLECTRIX” VACUUM CLEANERS

save heaps of

if vou t

New just received

shioment





THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

OSI TS OOOO OOO OOOO SS
ROC OOOO PERS So NSIT



PAGE EIGHT







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

U.K. Cricket Season

ENGLAND DEFEAT ARGENTINA 2-1
BRILLIANT FOOTBALL

SEEN AT

WEMBLEY

(By JACK DAVIS)

LONDON, May 9.

WO GOALS by England in the last ten minutes robbed

Argentina of a glorious
bley Stadium.

soccer moment to-day at Wem-

Argentina led by one goal, scored by Bove,

to nil and were within an ace of becoming the first foreign

team to
soil.
Aiter Argentina had been fore-
cd to defend desperately for long
periods of the game, their hope
of victory were wrecked by two
erashing goals by Stanley Mor-
tensen and Jackie Milburn,
These goals were only a jus*
reward for a sustained secon
half pressure, when the ball
rarely left the Argentine goal
area
Shots

win an



were fired in from all
angles, striking the posts and
bar. Argentina were in-

sted for holding out so long ta





their spectacular springheeled
goalkeeper Rugilo.
The Argentine had taken the

lead through Boye after 18 min-
utes, rather against the run o
play. Generally their attack was
disjointed in the second half by
an injury to Bravo who went on
the right wing, and rarely threat
ened danger. Forwards failed tc
produce their noted ball control
and quick accurate inter-passing
Their occasional raids were gen
erally more of a kick-and-fol-
low-up nature

The defence however, with
Pescia Colman—until he was in-
jured—and Filguras played well
in the first half Their clese
marking gave the England for-
wards little space in which tc
work the ball with the result
that England’s attack never real-
ly went smoothly.

Different Story

It was a different story in the
second half howeve! With
wingers showing a fine turn ot
speed, they swung the ball about
and combined brilliantly The
Argentine defence was ofter
spreadeagled and left chasing the
ball hopelessly. The whole for-
ward line moved together in uni-
son and repeatedly swept to the
Argentine goalmouth before at-
tacks ‘were frittered away

Finnay, with his clever be.!
control, and Hassell, Milburn and
Mortensen who showed _ speed
and opportunism, were outstand-
ing. Metcalf combined well with
Hassell but his shooting was woe-
fully weak, and he wasted many
chances when well placed

The Argentine’s customary tactics
of an attacking centre half going



up and leaving the right back
to mark the centre forward was
not a great success. First Col-
man and then Allegri had a
gruelling time. It was not sur-
prising, therefore that Allegri
became very weary, and it

noticeable that England’s

goals came from movemerts on

that side of the field.

As was anticipated, the speed
and thrust in the re-organised
England forward line eventually
paid dividends. It is worth re—
calling that Milburn who snatch-
ed the winning goal was instru-

mental in winning the cup for
Neweastle with two. snap goals
in the space of five minute:
against Blackpool on this same
ground.

Tired
Argentine players were sub-

dued and looked dejected as they
entered the dressing room after
the game. Goalkeeper Rugilo, sat
on a bench holding his head in
anguish. It was bad luck for him
‘that he had finished on the los-
ing side after such a magnificent
display.

His colleagues, standing around
sipping cups of tea commisserat
ed with him,

Guillermo Stabile, tecltiical
director of the team, had no
complaints. “It was a very good

match but I think we deserved a
draw” he added. But the ground
was rather heavy for his players
and he thought the strange cli-
matie conditions affected his
players. “They were very tired
toward the end when England
were pressing strongly” he said

Stabile declined to single wut
any of his players for single men-

tion. “They all played very
weil” he added.
Commenting on tthe Hngland

team, Stabile said their strength
lay in team work rather than
individual efforts.

“They all lived up to what we
expected of them’, he said. “The
crowd too”, he said, “was most
sporting” .

Stabile added that it was too
early yet to say whether Bravo
who has strained a muscle in his
right thigh, and Colman who has
twisted his right knee would be
fit for Sunday’s game against
Hire.

They'll Do It E






international







WHAT A TRIP ss
IT'LL BE GOOD TO
SETTLE DOWN TO

football match on English



Receipts £32,525

Attendance at the match wa
100,000 and receipts £38,525.

At Dinner

The Argentine football team
and officials were entertained at
dinner tonight at Park Lane Ho-
tel Linden, and everybody agreed
that Argentina had played very
well and were unfortunate nol
to hang on to their lead against
England.

“We left it until very late” said
Sir Stanley Rous, Secretary of
the English Football Association
“We were very relieved when
Mortensen scored the equalising
goal and Milburn got the win-
ner for Argentina looked like
holding out for victory. It was
a very good game in parts,”

Evenly Balanced

Iacono, Argentine captain, was
full of praise for the sporting
spirit shown by the English
crowd and players. “It was a
very good game and I thought
we were unlucky not to win af-
ter leading for so long” he said
“IT thought the teams were very
evenly balanced in the first half,
but we sadly missed the services
of Bravo, who was practically a
passenger on the wing

Stanley Mortensen, English in-
side right said: “Thank goodness’
when he scored the equalising
goal while Jack Milburn’s com-
ment about his winning goal wa
“It's just another goal,”

Billy Wright, England’s Cap-
tain said: “Argentina played
really well, particularly in the
first half. I thought we should
have had more goals’’.

—Reuter.

Regatta On
Saturday

The ninth regatta of the cur
rent yachting season will be sail
ed in Carlisle Bay on Saturday,
under the auspices of the Royal
Barbados Yacht Club.









Starting times and handicap
are as follows:—
Class Ne. Yacht Start at Flag
B 13 Ranger
D 4 Seabird 2.30 Red
D 10 Van Thorneirke
D_12 __Painbow 2.32 Yellow
R 3 War Cloud 2.33 Red
A 6 Flirt
B 9 Okapi 2.34 Yellow
B 481 Fantasy
B oT Mera Blair
& 8 ~ Rascal 2.36 Red
ia Buccaneer
tr 9 Olive Blossom 2.37 Yellow
nD 2 Imp
D 7 Sinbad 240 Red
P 1 Gipsy
R 5 Mischief 241











1 2 Invader
6 Eagle 2.43 Yellow
9 Dauntless
K 34 Comet 2.44 Red
Cc iy Magwin 2.45 Yellow
K 3 Edril
1 oi Reen 2.46 Red
2 Scamp
[ 7 Mohawk 2.47 Yellow
1 12 Dawn
¢ 10 Gannet 248 Red
c.f Rogue
{ 1 Gnat 249 Yellow
< 40 Vamoose
I 4 Coronetta 2.51 Red
{ 18 Clytie
K 2A Cyclone 2.52 Yellow
N.B.—The following dat®s have been

‘xed for Regattas:

10th Regatta: Thursday 24th May at
1,90 p.m.
llth Pegatta: Saturday 26th May at

2.20 p.m
12th Regatta
pm
Frontenac Cup:
1.00 p.m,
H. B. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter

Saturday 2nd June at 2.50

Thursday 7th June at



Keenan Wins Title

GLASGOW, May 9.

Peter Keenan of Glasgow won
the British Bantamweight Cham-
pionship here to-night when he
knocked out the holder, Danny
O'Sullivan of London in the sixth
round of their scheduled 15-round
fight.—Reuter,

ye ke
ei? Registered U. 5. Patent Ome |

WE WERE HELD
UP ON ANOTHER
JOBsWE COULDN'T
START THIS LAST
MONTH BUT WE'LL.
HAVE IT READY
FOR YOU IN











ARTHUR MACARTHUR,

BASEBALL

13 year-old son of General

5 be ~ ve

Douglas
MacArthur, displays big league form as he tosses the ball out at the
New York Polo Ground prior to the start of the Giant-Dodger match
at the opening of the American big league baseball season.

Royal Commission Reports

No Fault In Betting Set-Up

LONDON, May.

AFTER TWO YEARS of fact-finding, the Royal Com-
mission on Gaming has given the green light to the little

varn who likes to have

his

occasional “flutter” on the

horses, greyhound or football pools

In its report, a massive volume
of more than 100,000 words, the
Commission has absolved _ the
small-time punter of any taint
of law—breaking or’ moral lapse
It finds, in fact, that four out of
five adults in every walk of life
have gambled at some time, even
if only at such trivial things as

raffles, whist drives or a_ private
sweepstake.
The investigators saw ibso

lutely nothing wrong with that

Answering those who denounce
gembling as leading to juvenile
delinquency, crime, poverty and
diversion from work, the report

says: “It is extremely difficult
to establish by abstract argu
ments that all gambling is in

herently immoral, without adopt
ing views as to the nature of gor
and evil which would pot fin
yeneral acceptance among movi!

vy ists

It agrees, however, that g.m
bling, like other indulgences sucli
as aleoholic~ drink or tobacco,
should be kept within reasonab!

bounds and controlled with pru
dence,

Some eye-opening figures on
the extent of betting in Britain

are contained in the report. It
estimates that more than 15,000
000 people last year wagered
about £150,000,000 on football
pools, horse-racing and the grey

hounds. Of this ameunt, how
ever, approximately £70,000,00/
went to cover profits, operating

costs and taxes

The various gambling
employ around 50.000
workers with 30,000
part-time

venture
full-time

more on

Interest Widespread

It was also shown that mor:
than 6,000,000 persons contribul

nearly £52,000,000 annually t
the football pools alone. Thi
despite the fact that in pcol

offering some of the larger prize
the odds against a
forecast are estimated at 700
000,000 to 1 against the player

Some idea of the difficulty i
picking a winner, was cited to tl!
Commission. A large syndicat
had invested stakes totallir
£120,000 over a period of nin
months. Repayment in prize
came to less than £800,

The inquiry, however, showe
that the total spent on all form
of gambling absarbed only abou
one-half of ong per cent of) th
national income. Dealing wit!



——— 1

By Jimmy Hatlo













HIS OFFICE, DONE
OVER WHILE HE
WAS AWAY +++
THANX TO
ANDY WEILANOT



succcessful:



Champion B.G.
Cyclist For
Barbados Sports

During the week news was re-
ceived from British Guiana that
their champion cyclist Lindsay
Gordon had accepted in part an
invitation from the Athletic Asso-
ciation of Barbados to attend their
Intercolonial Sports meeting due
to open on Monday next, This
means that Gordon will not be
here for the first day but will ride
on the last two days of the meet-
ing on May 17th and 19th,

This is due to the fact that an
intercolonial meeting is being
staged in B.G. on Saturday 12th
nd Monday 14th and Gordon will
have to remain at home for this
fxture However he will leave
B.G. and arrive in Barbados on
Wednesday next week, the 16th
May



The Local Athletic
ilso announced with regret that
Miss Kileen King, Trinidad’s
champion woman sprinter will not
be attending the meeting. How-;
ever, all twelve of the original|
‘oup of Trinidad cyclists who!
decided to come up for the meet-
ing will be arriving next Friday
morning by the S.S. Gascogne, In
addition the three Trinidad Police
athletes O. Pierre, Irving Pierce
and J, Cambridge will be arriving
by plane during this week,

Association

the socia] effects of betting, the
report said it could find no sup
port for the belief that gambling
within moderation did any
ericus harm either to the charac
ter of those who take part in it
or to their family circle and the
community generally It con
cluded that gambling on the scale
in which it is indulged in a
sresént could not
mposing a serious strain on the



be regarded a: |



1ation’s resources or manpower
—(CP)







Opens Much Too Soon

LONDON.

Our cricket season begins, and ends, a fortnight too
early comments Sportsman's Diary. That fact was empha-
sised by the present outburst of arctic weather which had
turned the MCC v. Yorkshire match into a shivering night-
mare, and threatened to do the same by the opening of
the South African tour at Worcester.

September is a more reliable
menth than May—nearly always
drier and warmer. Why then not
end the championship competition

with a match-—Hants v Sussex—
beginning on September 1 and
end the whole programme with

Gentlemen vy Players at Scar-
borough on September 5?

With the existing programme
we say goodbye to summer too
soon.

If the argument be used that
football would take away the
gates well it would not ruin
them nearly as much as does the
present weather.

Repeat in prospect

Dudley Nourse the South Afri-
can captain bulkier now than he
used to be but still his country’s
best batsman and a very pleasant
personality recalled the freezing
experience the South Africans
had when last at Worcester.

There is small chance of im-
provement this time, When I
telephoned the city today I was
told.

“It is bitterly cold, Bring three
sweaters and a top coat. It hasn’t
rained here today yet but looks
like doing so any moment. Lots
of rain has fallen during the
week-end.”

For which advice much thanks.

Handicap
Alan Sexton, of Belgrave Har-
riers, picked to partner McDonald





SPORTS
WINDOW

Carlton and Notre Dame meet
this afternoon at Kensington in a
return First Division fixture

These teams first met in the
opening First Division fixture of
the 1951 season and Carlten won
by three goals to one.

It was obvious that at that time
Notre Dame were finding their
legs. Since then they have played
some wood games, twice holding
B.A.P.A, champions to a draw.

This afternoon's return game
should be a good one.

FOOTBALL (Division U1)

Empire vs. Everton at Bank

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL
Maple vs. Harkliffe at St. Leon-
ard’s. The referee will be Mr. C
Reece, Play starts at 5.00. p m
BASKETBALL (Division 1)
View. vs. Pickwick at
YM PLC,
YMCA vs.
Boys at Y.M.P.C
Division I
Modern High School vs.
Scouts at Modern High School.

Combermere Old

Sea







V hat’s on Today

Caribbean Commission at
Hastings House — 10 a.m.
Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion and Lower Courts —

10 a.m,
CINEMAS
Aquatic Club: “State Fair'’—8.30
p.m

Plaza (Bridgetown); (Ist) “A Song
is Born.” (2nd) “Bodyguard’—
445 & 8.30 p.m,

Piava (Oistin): “Tarzan Triumphs”
and “West of the Pecos” — 5 &









Bailey in the 100 yards in the
AAA vy London University match
at Motspur Park on May 9, won

the AAA junior furlong in the
record time of 22.1 secs. in 1949.
He has taken things easily

simee then, but intends to return
to the track with the 220 yards
as his objeXve.

But he starts with a handicap
Ho fractured a wrist a couple of
months ago while playing rugger,
and this may even_ prevent him
from appearing on May 9.

McCarthy’s guide

How much more vulnerable to
punishment are the lower grades
of professional boxing compared
to the higher amateur ranks?

Former ABA international
Sammy McCarthy gave a guide
in his first professional fight at
the Empress Hall recently by
knocking out Hector MceCrow in
the first round. S

Now McCarthy is no recognised
k.o. specialist. One of the most
stylish post-war amateurs, in the
season 1948—49 he won three of
his 12 bouts inside the distance.
In 1949—50 his only short-cut
victory in 11 contests was when
his opponent retired with an
ankle injury. Before turning
professional — this season his
nine wins were all on points

The batter bit

Did you ever hear of a_bats-
man having to retire through bit-
ing his own tongue? It happened
at Lord’s to Leadbeater the York-
shireman. Playing a ball from
Jack Martin he hit it on to the
underside of the jaw. The blow
jerked his mouth shut, and teeth
tore tongue. Later he was able to
complete his innings.

Price of fancy

Before the war Tote backers al-
ways favoured Gordon Richards
and the Tote price of his mounts
was invariably less than the start-
ing price quoted by bookmakers.
In time, backers seemed to give
up this practice as if to suggest
they were not willing to accept the
reduced odds. =

Now it is Lester Piggott who
uppeals to Tote backers.

At Worcester yesterday Bridge
of Hellas started at 100-6. For
a 2s. winning ticket the Tote paid
463s. Yet in the next race Palm
Grove, who started at 320-1 only
paid 45s. 9d., despite having not
been placed before. He was rid-
den by Piggott. .

Last week Tote backers of Pig-
gott’s mount Barnacle received
only 15s. 3d. for their 2s. The
starting price was 10-1, and many
got 100-8 about it with bookmak-

ers,

It is disappointing to back a
winner and not receive the odds
one hopes for, but followers of
Piggott know what to expect in

future,
Whitile’s view

AAA quarter-mile hurdles
champion Harry Whittle will de-
fend his national decathlon title
this summer but, he adds, “with-
out much hope of improving my
points total.” (His last year's score
of 6,087 points set a new English
native record.)

Whittle, who was third in the
400 metres hurdles at the Euro-
championships, considers
that the prospects for quarter-mile
hurdling in this country are good.
The event is becoming more popu-
lar, and consequently the standard
is higher.

London Express Service.



8.00 pam,
Empire: “I'd Climb the Highest
Mountain’ — 445 & 8.30 p.m, pean
Reyal “Grissty’s Millions’’ and
“Bell of Roserita’ — 4.30 & 8.50
pm
Olympic: “Hills of Home” and
“Something for the Boys’ —
| 4.0 & 8.15 pum,
;
QO
Q



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THURSDAY, MAY 106, 1951
Thomas Fights NO PLAY
In U. S. For CAMBRIDGE, May 9
The opening day’s play in the

World Title

By GEORGE WHITING

Eddie Thomas, welter-weight
boxing champion of Britain,
Europe and the Empire, is ge'rg
to the United States to fight for
the championship of the werld.

His opponent will be the win-
ner of the fight .n May 13 between
the Chicago negro, Johnny Brat-
ton, and Kid Gavilan, ef Cuba,

Thomas's fight will be the first
major Anglo-American contesi in
the United States since Bruce
Woodcock was knocked cut by
Tami Mauriello in New York in
May 1946,

Lew Burston, here from Madi-
son Square Garden, New York.
completed the deal with ‘Thomas's
manager Sam Burns, in London
to-day and is reporting back to
the States to fix the date and place
for the British champion’s
pearance there, |

ap-

Australian Offer

Burns would like the fight to
take place in June, so .that
Thomas can return before the
year is out, to defend his Europe-
an title against Charles Humez of
France, and his British champion-
ship against any official contend
er.

He has also had an offer to
defend his Empire title against
the Australian
Mickey Tollis, in

Wales.

The Bratton-Gavilan fight is,
part of the “elimination” series
set up by the American National
Boxing Association to find a suc-
cessor to Ray Robinson as world
welter—weight champion. The
NBA. declared the title vacant
when Robinson took the middle-
weight championship from Jake
LaMotta, last February.

The NBA set-up is that Brat-
ton, having beaten Charlie
Fusari, should now fight Gavilan
—the winner to meet Eddie
Thomas.

One point to be ironed out is
that of Thomas’s status in a
championship fight. Burns says
Eddie should have equal rights,
and an equal share of the purse
money, with either Bratton or
Gavilan. ‘To fight as a challenger |

|

champion,
New South,





would mean an appreciable cut in
Thomas’s remuneration,
—L.ES.

BASKETBALL

Carlton Y.M.C.A.
31—0 in game at



defeated
a_ basketball

Beckles Road last night.
Harrison College Old Boys won
from Pirates 19—8.








ERNIES CLUB

This afternoon at 6 p.m.



Members are requested to be
present for the Arima Creole
race problems.















E, B. CARMICHAEL,
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9.5.51.2n.

Remember, a comfortable

sideration.

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South African cricketers’ match
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abandoned at Fenners here with
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AMATEUR ATHLETIC

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ASSOCIATION 3
OF BARBADOS

presents its

BIG 3 DAYS

CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

at
KENSINGTON OVAL
on
Whit-Monday .
‘Thursday . May 17th
& Saturday . . May 19th
beginning at 1 p.m, each day
e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold
Archer, (Nugget) Hunte,

Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin
Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists
and Athletes as well as
\
4

May 14th

Miss Grace Cumberbatch
and Miss Eileen King in
action at the Historic Oval
Gates Open at 12 noon daily
e

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George Challenor

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lll tytn de dd tlt NEGO DOO OOOO GOS ROG IEEE. EPIL LLL LLL LALLA LAA

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACK rocs BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'II RSDAY, M\v 1". 1*31 BARBADOS^ AlA'OftflI rrtated b| OM AftHM .... l.lfl >toM IL. Thursday. Ml) Id. 19.">l llnatls THE condition of tenantry roads is subject of perennial discussion. The frfjftalature has from time to time voted large sums of money for their upkeep and has undertaken the responsibility of several parishes. What is the duty ol the Government with regard to roads in residential areas? j The matter was recently discussed by the General Board of Hoalth. It was suggested that the Public Health Act, under which the Board grants permission to owners to divide and sell land in lots, be amended so as to provide for the inspection and approval of proposed roads by the Engineer of Transport and Highways before the land can be sold. There can be little objection to the suggestion when it is considered that roads are a necessity and th;it in Barbados for manyyears land owners have been allowed to build roads of marl and any rubbish available, in order to sell the land adjoining them. Soon after the land has been sold, the true condition of the road is revealed. There has been no proper drainage and people who pay high prices for house spots suffer great inconvenience. The Government is then attacked and asked to maintain these roads in proper order. Tenantry roads should be subject to specifications set out by the Transport and Highways Authority who are responsible for the major roads of the island. This would mean either that the QOJUnT. of land who sells at a profit should be responsible for the provision of part of the roads or the buyer is sold land at a price which includes an allowance for the building of roads. An owner should not be allowed to divide land, pocket all the profit except that which he pays for surveying and laying out and the provision of water, and then the Government be called upon to build proper roads and keep them in order. If in the initial stages tenantry roads were properly built according to specifications by a qualified engineer it would ensure that they would have proper drainage and last longer. When or if they were eventually taken over by the Government thny would IKbns'enlly jmiml and would cost less to maintain them. The taking over of marl roads has been the subject of much controversy in the House of Assembly, and the representatives of the various parishes have not been sparing in their criticisms of the Government. who have not been able to take over all the roads as fast as they would like, or as fast as would accommodate the everincicasing number of tenantries. It should now be comparatively easy for the Government m amending the Public Health Act, to provide for the building of roads in accordance with certain specifications laid down by the Engineer of Highways and Transport, who should also be called upon und'.T the act to give a certificate before the roads could be appioved by the General Board of Health. In fact, since there is this public insistence that these roads be taken over by the Government, it is the duty of the Government to demand that they conform to certain standards and provide for proper drainage. The Inconstant Lover I\ .Slirii!{ THE blocking of the St. James coastal road on Tuesday night reflects no credit on the island of Barbados. It is a common occurrence for traffic to be held up in the island because of the lime taken for policemen to reach the scene of the accident and the time taken to make their required measurements. The important thing is for the authorities to acept road-blocking as an intolerable nuisance. Too often in this island are these situations faced by %  simple shrug of the shoulders. I 'irOHT to have known by the light in George's eyes when I mid. •What's your*'", that rm.re potent than alcoholic antio• rk ,TI hi* miiul But it was only when I aw the abseil-minded v. ay in which he u.sed off his drink as it It was a matter of secondary (geporuUMO, that 1 realised that he wan in lh< throes of another amorous breakdown and was dying to tell me iit.ui it So I tni by asking. "Seen Diana lately?" "Diana—Diana'"' h. aaked. as if it were the first time he ha the name. So I had another try and said, "Or Bu .1 %  When he exclaimed. 'Beryl: Beryl who"", and then before I could anawei went on, "Oh. you mean Beryl. Dark-eyed, lanky girl who plays tennis, isn't the? No. I don't remember seeing her lately." I realised that the heart storm from which he was now suffering was even more severe than thou* which Diana or Beryl or even Rosalie had aroused. So I ordered another drink and tried again. "By the way. old top." I said. "I saw Phyllis at the Brown's rocktail party and she asked after He came out of his pipe dream Imig enough to say, "Did she? Nice girl—Phyllis I'Uy she' more like that old bottle of vinegar, her molhci. every day", and then slipped into a world In which none of the girls he had previously thall font had any existence It was only after our second one for the road, when George was idly drumming on th" table with Ms tinger* and gazing at nothing in the middle distance. that I said; "Come on, George, spill it". • Spill what' How d'ya mean "You know perfectly well what I mean," I interrupted Armlv Spill the beans. Come clean flat it off your chatt. Who is she? What's she like?" Thai did it and the moment I saw the sheepish look that came over his face, I began to regret having been so curious. "Well, if you must know, bat name is Phoebe." h e began. In the hushed tone of one speaking on holy ground, and then let himself go. First of all, having .-x ,.l.iiri.l.ill ol in Thomson \ Time For loirHut He Upset A Viiion s iHorals MAMl'EL BI'TI.EK'S NOTEBOOKS Cape I.S. lid SH pages. SAMUEL HUTl.EK was an eccentric vtrtorifii win. nrreti ana hook to attack Christianity, another to attack Darwinism and a thud to prove that Homoi oral I a woman. He was a genius, a i bachelor and a card. He never went anywhere without carrying a small notebook in his waistcoat pocket. He might say something witty or profound — and then forget it. Somebody else might oblige with a moaMrablo remurk: Mrs Hoss his landlady, for Instance, or Alfred his mar.. The notebook must be than ic.ui> to save those treusures for posterity! And here they are, Mrs. Boss, a grotesque out of Dickens. Alfred, quietly but consciously humorous, lluller himself delivering some sly dig at religion — In a curious melange of Rippincy, fun and penetration, edited anew by Geoffrey Keynes nnd Brian C Hill. Naturally there is much in the book about Butler's friends. For while there was no room in hi prim existence for love, wife Off family, there was room tor friend ship With Pauli, for Instance, a handsome charming barrister whom Butler met in New Zealand, he divided hla private income. He dipped into his capital to finance Pauh's wildcat commercial schemes only to find out that, all along. Pauli had been a rich** man than he. It was a sad disappointment Paull was succeeded in Butler's life by Henry Fc-ting Jones The two men wrote, composed music, painted and took week-end walks together. Sometimes Jones had ittaaki ol hyvMrli AJ Alfrad the man-servant said I uously, "He was always crying, crying The governor would ex cuse him 'Alfred, he's Welsh'" Butler's relations with women wentmsinesslike and cautious He was u little In love with Miss Mary Ann Savage, who was much In love with him. She was lame but brilliant, responsible for some of the remarks that Butler has pranarvad n, ol Qladatona, that he had not one redeeming vice. Once a week they hid ten together. Later, when she was dead, BuuV r congnudattd himself on not marrying her Brilliance could become boring. He had .. mistress, and shared her with Jones. Eich paid Madame Dumas a pound u week even when they were not in town. Jones visited her each Tuesday, Butler each Wednesday. "Oh bother, Alfred." he would say, "it's Wednesday to-day, and I've gut to go lo Handel Street" (where midame lived). A line woman." Alfred conDMM "Dark, Uigc. not a regular Mi rot walker. but receiving gaaUanMa in her room. I took her out once or twice myself." Alfred was a card too. Butler visited her for 15 years before he dared to tell her his name. When she died, Butler did not replace her. Jones did. In the closing years of his life. Butler was pursued by the zealous admiration of Bernard Shaw, for whom he formed an acute nervous dislike "He's a beast, he's a beastr* he would cry to Alfred when he came back from seeing Show. Shaw cried up Wagner (which was bad) and cried down Handel (which was the blackest crime in (he Ilutler calendar). The notebooks are a raj-bag of the funny things he hoard, the silly things he said and the deeply original things he thought. "I hare been to ace flic Kossrtn crhibitton and an. pleased in find il more odious 'hau / had creii dorcd lo hope. / "iff Rosictri on cr; there were three beside* myself. I disliked thetn all very much, bul Russet U Tinmost." Butler's oar for the comic, which might have made him a novelist, caught this: '7 heard a man sU\i to another at Abbey Wood; J went lo lire doum there Just uboul the MUM thar beer came down from 5d. lo 4d a pot. That will give you an idea when it was." Thlg Victorian oddity, who did as much as any man to undermine the Victorian system of morals, died in 1902. aged 67. His last words? "Have you brought the cheque book, Allied'"' Off FORMER LOVE By Emma I^ird. IlamMh Hamilton i 'fd. 471 page*. sri.iMiuitir acid is in short supply, everywhere, except in Emma Laird's pages, where she uses it to etch the portrait of a cad. Mark, the hero, or villain, in maybe victim, of her novel, is presented by Kathic, the narratoi as one who has flat feet, and a paunch; picks his nose, doesn't brush his teeth; haa dirty nails; likes perfume and sloops with the window shut. Ho is an advanced thinker who exacts complete obedience from his women, whom ho calls "darlink." He is masterful and feminine; a sadist and a masochist. In 1939, he discovers that hii name is high on the Gestapo list and leaves these shores for the United States. K.iilue has good reason to observe these details of person and charucter. She falls madly In love with Mark and remains in this condition through the 471 pages of this novel. Long as it is, far too long. Of Former Love Is a powerful record of a delirious, wretched, enchaining experience. Mark is profoundly unattractive, yet his ability to attract is etched as deeply on this plate as his loss agreeable habits. HERE'S ENGLAND m ly be aimed at American visitors. Let me recommend it as a witty, good-natured guide to English scone and history. Ruth McKcnney and Richard Branstcn arc enchanted by England, in which they found only six good hotels. (Rupert Hart-Davis. 21s ). a) How competent Americans aiv in the umomcntic, authentic and gripping, story of crime is shown anew by THE PEOPLE AGAINST OllARA. EJeazar Lipsky's novel of a murder case, pubirsned by Wingate. at 10*. 6d. a> I Compton-Burnett is an acquired taste, which more people are acquiring. DARKNESS AND DAT, her new novel (Collancz, 10s. ('..I ) gives the wider public an opportunity to sample this exponent of astringent, not to say venomous, dialogue. WOULD COrVRICHT HtMUVED -L.E8. The Peril Of The New I inv Atom Bomb By the Military Correspondent THE new lightweight atomic bomb, the basic method uf making which was dig* I last week, has altered American. British, and" Western European strategic plans. First news of the bomb was given in the report of the U.S. Atomic Energy Congress! Committee on Soviet Atomic Espionage. This report discloses not only that America has the bomb but that Russia will have it in, service soon. LIGHTWEIGHT Drawings of the bomb are known to have been passed by U.S. Army technician and sp\ David Greenglass to a second spy, Julius Rosenberg, who in turn gave them to the %  Soviet Vice-Consul in New York. The new bomb, most important military j development since the original atom bomb.i is much lighter than the first bomb's 4| tons I And those bombs can be carried by fight-, era. A light bomber might carry enough to devastate a city and a heavy bomber might knoek out a dozen cities in one mission. They could also be used in the warheads of V2 rockets. On Friday the air chiefs of staff of the U.S., Canada, Great Britain and France met in Washington for a ten-day conference. They will have now to realign top air policy and overhaul the aircraft production of the North Atlantic Powers. Until the new bomb, atomic air warfare was tied to the big. long-range bomber because of the bombweight and the long distances to reach targets. TWO FORCER Result was the creation of the world's two great long-range bombing forces :— In the West, the U.S.A.F.'s Strategic Air Command, equipped with 10,000-mile-range Consolidated B.36's and 6,000-milc-range Boeing B.50 Super!. :: In the East, the Soviet Air Force's Long Range Air Force, equipped with :t,000-milcrange copies of the American Boeing B.29 Super fort. The whole of Europe is within range of the Russian atom bombers. RING OF BASES There are only 200 American B.36's capable of atom bombing Russia direct from America. The rest of the American atom bomber force consists of the B.50 units, which are highly mobile and rely on a ring of bases round the Asian central land mass—of which Europe is geographically a part. The rapid creation of a large Russian tighter force equipped with some 2,500 jet fighters has worried the United States Air Force. It is now doubtful whether Lieut.-General Curtis E. LeMay, commander of the Strategic Air Command, could guarantee to deliver his atom bombs to their targets in his highflying but comparatively slow bombers. Possibility of slinging the new lightweight bomb on to short-range light bombers and lighter-bombers has made it feasible to send raiders into Russia, flying fast and low to avoid defending fighters. But it has also opened up the possibilities of the Russians doing the same thing. And the shorter ranges bring the atomic V2 into the picture. Range of the V2 is about 200 miles and there is no known protection. It is launched from mobile and easily hidden bases which are very difficult to attack. ARMY'S TASK If Western Europe and Great Britain are to be adequately protected against this kind of warfare it is therefore essential :— First, that a land army should prevent the Russian armies from sweeping to the Channel coast, from which Britain could be attacked with close-range atomic bombardment. Second, that Western Europe's air forces should not depend on local industries that could be knocked out in the first few days, but should be keyed into British aircraft pre duction. Third, that the R.A.F. should not rely entirely on home-produced aircraft, but should be able also to count on American and Canadian production. In any war it would be essential to the survival of Britain and Western Europe that a swift and successful counter-attack could be launched against Russia herself. The atom bomb is not just the best weapon for achieving this : it is the only one. —L.E.S. FOR SCHOOL PHILIPS ATLAS and l.AYM.S MilTIIMETIC %  OVAL KI.ADERS Advocate Stationery No. 35 LIGHT OKI.WITK CURTAIN RAILS I Aluminum Alloy) AND STKKI. PLATED CADMUM HOOKS for hravy or lichl curtains ALSO EXTENSION RODS Plastic in various colours and Steel WILKINSON & BATHES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. "Phonos : 4472 & 4GS7 A SYMBOL OF QUALITY rat t:\T/HIU\l\G PI.EASVRF. ISMA why—YOU SIIOll.lt SELECT H. M. V. RADIOS and RADIOGRAMS • j: DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.—-Ekrlrinl l>tut. %\ Lunch Preview For U.K. Visitors By DONALD SEAMAN THEY held a rehearsal recently—the self-appointed young men and women who are out lo show overseas tourists "the humming Iifi-" of Elon and Oxford. For in just n week the curtain goes up on Undergrad Tours. And rolling into Eton and on toward* Oxford's dreaming spires, wiil go (wo coach-loads of sightseers the first to pay out eight dollar* 50 cents, or three guineas, for a day's Introduction U) BngUsh academic ways. The stars of the show wen railed together before hmeti l>v 11-yemr-oTd Turn SUcey, of Worceater Collage and formerly of th* Guards. In one respect, anyway, it was indeoi For there. In •< dart with i i red i i nation in his laspl. was Antuiiv Blend (actually, ick-halred). His cutaway '.lur set off ;i biscull-co]. ourcd Uf !-•• Over Ml shoulders was tiling a light brown tweed coat. Hiera %  standing -nig as a "smarty" ("a man who s*t. do t hae fa th fa n a and throws parties") For Smarty No. 1. Roger Longrigg. was laid up. In his rooms—"exquisitely furnished." says the Tours brochure sightseers will take sherry. Focus of the rehearsal was a E revan luncheon (included with MT and cigarette, m the rag fm the day-trip). Coffee— il down to soup, turkey, heato and biscuits, with i M* M ekhw, In Iha ihaaVm ol one of those dreaming spires. Magdalen Tower. In addition to Messrs 81 Blond, ihare were present tiuHOT Antonia I'akenham. 18-yaar-oU daughter of I-ord Pakenham, the Minister of Civil Aviation: dapptr John William Si • traces back to the poet's family; and Caroline Clay, a secretary from I*ndon who will be a volunteer guide for the Tours. They look coffee in Antony Blond's rooms, against a latticed background of Japonlca and budding trees. Miss Pakenham. in a grey suit. blue pixie hat, crimson blouse, and a double row of pearls, hi up a seven-inch cigar and puffed gently. "I must say 1 think cigars are topping," she saldj "Of course it's rather difficult. My parents do not approve. But they are Jolly Kood, aren't they? "I "haven't smcked one for six montha, not imra tha Cnrtton affair*'—when she made Oasard -moking "an inmnsplcuii ana" in the Carl inn Club. • lan. —and Culture Into HIP room* -trolled John raolai He landed over H 600—word Latin apeech for a college dinner oration, another aspect of the Tours service. Said Tom Stacey: "Wc Intend to show tourists the cultural side of Oxford life Don't misunderstand us. We have the deepest respect for college traditions and honour. And we think this is a line thing for (he Festival of Britain." Absent from the rehearsal was .'o-v,.,! 1.1,1 i.in ,i Stormonl ("who," says the brochure, "will show you how a gentleman lives In Oxford's most famous college, Christ Church") He has broken a leg ski-lng. 'Temporarily indisposed, old chap," said Tom Stacey. "and he's simply furious about it." Out of the rehearsal cast, too, ware the boys of Eton They still on holiday They will be back by the time those dollar coaches move west out of London. OUR READERS KAY: f' BEST HlYS VISIT OA COSTA S NOW IN STOCK FOR YOUR SELECTION SIMMONS BEDSTEADS IN THI. FOLLOWING SIZES 311. 3IS31B. null in in*. ALSO ALUMINUM SAUCEPANS in 7. U. SI and 10 |il. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. Ilr.i 1.mills III |il % %  :::;'.:;::;:;: w.w^Ay.v.v.'.v/.v////. WHIT-SUN PARTY! I on To The Ediror. The Advocate— SIR.—Several tunes in the Press recently there have been slatemenu which gave the impression that the British Union Oil Co, Ltd had asked Government for a Reader* who write letters to the Editor of the "Advocate" are ashed to i" iff that that newspsnrr does not normally pobllih Irllen which are Dot exclusive to this newspaper. Contributors to OCR READERS SAV who write unit.-r a nomdr plume are reminded that their names moat be sent to the Editor aa a sign or good fallh. Names are nevrr disclosed but are treated as confidential by the Editor, rxrtpt In Signed letters. monopoly of the oil business in I Barbados. This is dcrinltclv not we The B.U.O.C. had lease* ovox 7011 of the total area, or 78' oi th drillable area, of this Island What they asked Government for was •> licence for 3 years to prospect ovei the total urea of the Island, with the right to hold half of that OTM under the lease after the thriH yaars. In other words, M the and of three yoara B.U.O.C, would have had lease* on 50 r : of the tote) area. knStaad of the NMOM on 70*1, which they had to begin will From this will bo B.U.O.C... neither xi%  asked for a monopoh of thr oil business in Bar*. I am, yours faithfully. E. E. MAClNTYKi;. Attorney and Manager. TinBri nagwdoa 1951. KEEP A HAM On II;.nil Hams in nBB Le2 llsnu rut or wfc* 1 | Picnic %  tn OK Tonrurs in Hits Catena* to tins Hot. and 5 lb Vicnn.i Sai.--.-riragdtfntinr Siusare* ;; UeiHow! LIQUORS OF THE FINEST BRANDS (•old I" ii.' Kuni lop N'otrh Ruir l\ uiiii-i HI.IIHI. Virile Cure Sjiidfin.ui %  Wines (.tlbey'k Win GaanaaM stout Hi--'\lr Worth in rton's Ale % %  >i.v i' Tree Beer SWEETS for the Kiddies and YOU! I 'liccolatci in Boxen t noOaMM Bars t tn*t Ortara naaraMs i MTf Chocolate Lunch i GODDARDS DELIVER |



PAGE 1

IIUHsDU MAV l. 15I BARM \DOS ADVOCATE TAGE '-IMS CLASSIFIED ADS. "-" %  ?!! TgLgFHORI 2S0R l l a rr laaai ar EKMMMM t'ar.b Caning IMi ruif* :• SIM (or any niirM of wnrde up to M and will pwword for -e I TrTBf mh. e-wa-r* eSSS I -oi 141 s 1-1 in i< Mils II W OB IMt' I IMC SALE MED DMVtrN On ttc l" David CMHMd U>.>UUt. retired Roa-I Iriiperfur of Chrw Draartan iW**' GalAd ina HoMcr. OHVi M Carvetand Drat tan %  — In Uvm| ara of our moth*' Albatlme Cummin* wfm departed thu lif* 10in rt Uav. law •Till aaaaaa. -h*4om fall. But have and roMmbtaart auUaiti TAKE NOTICE Thai roKP GARHY FLCK/H MILLS CO. LmtTXD. a corpxTjiion omaniara under tha law. of the Pnvinc* of Sa.Matchewan in the Dominion oi Canada. %  W trade or miHnc-a tMraai u in %  -. C %  t Sa-katoon. Province of Sa-.ittlinnc. Canada. ha applied lor the taa fl aa m iB ri ol a uada nW M Pan A of Hiinlrr in le.pect of flour, feed Mid cereal., and will be cunt lad to regUU-r tba aama after ore month from the Sid day of May. IMI. unlata UiOlmiin rr.j*e ueelr Tl oral* and M .enia MKU,I M u-'da — oaar 14 w>eu 3 rente a tcard tee**—4 owl a UOUSLS AlTOTrtJtlVE *2 T^" **"* **" *'* %  ruauiSeai a/Map BE. .352 T ^-iSS ( FI.AT fteaunipnt. HaaUngi unh,,. i iiMhrfl I'niy| and Sitting room I trfd—m*. running water. Kitchen wRh ga* Ml eonvenianee. No vat. o, eh.ldrev *a* Treenit par Ogata nna opa,, < %  . ii ,. p JO.,, „. taaa *.i l mtm rnaepa II so aid 1 M „ (.Uaw NOTICE Appt ration* for ana or aiore varni Martta-4* Vealrv dtuaa-.r, tenahle %  •>.. Cumt*nraio Vhoal. *.)l to r*teivi aythe Clark UAL ESTATE %  ... mam ptagM aapj i CAH— Vauahall II MB with 4 good Umaa. IN i*o warning eoadilaan. prica rea->nbe AppI F. D U Qay. Slap* nrh. Dial laM. CAM Thi> %  teak* Offer: On* IMI model Maraura Sedan MM angina in good wmdlt.on Ideal for to*. Ho raaaaaaaa* ofter fefu*ad mug 4Mg. BVdo* An'.n Lu CAP. -Hnlman Ca. U -lim in ....d rorkuig ordar. Apply Frank Pr>%erb-. : o Harold Piovarb. Co. I<1 mm Kraal. Ji 51—an WAGGON: One It*? V- Ford SUUoi Waegoo in parf( roi.dillon Apply JH a l (In ELECTRICAL -.hi %  luna. J .1Apg4y Mr,, i Weathai liarrman %  v M 'ad of (ha tinTmr fas .' %  %  gar cua-UMatanrwa and ntui in lan yaara and ••*. -aaa man twalva >eat day af January INI. M Cavil Arala. Guardian and place ,• VBRONA-niack Hack, near Deacon lload Corner Newly built bu"falon ccntaming nD an \-arindah, DT.. r a an! nanlpgi 3 blr#/ '.MT.TTV • will ha Ik vubja.1 ol | ta. MM uhh Kill ha avan .The Ha\ I Johnson. 1. Ti rii.ii M rj RADIO One Murphy lube in good "'' order, tuaaulirul lona Kin %  M l J 5I--Jn lull .1 ,!.!.. lha t'e i pan of the trade mark th dav of April. IMI II WILLIAM!!. rfitKai .>( Trade MarkTAKE NOTICE CELOTEX Th.it THE CEI.OTKX COnPORATIOS. i eorporalion organlcad and ra-ting under •ha law* of (be State of Delaware. United JBeta. of Amnica. who* trade or bu.ineit Mdir U rm „f Chkago, atala of lUlnud. U S.A h.ia applied fo. (lie led.-•ration of a Irode mark in Part A g| Hegjtter In —perl of wall board nd .Imilar bulld..ig malnUI. and will t>e IHgMh I i Ihe B, n day_o' Maj. IMI. unlan oma peraon .hall in ifie m*ar,time mve m.n.r in duplWaia to ma at my office of nopootmti of aiich raglrtratmn. The trade marrf can be a*n on applica> at > ~... Oaled thi19th dav of April IMI It WIU.1AMS. Registrar of Trade M.rki %  fcW—an TAKE NOTICE FLYING FISH That linoOKJt. BOND ft CO I 1MIT .1 CofM Deakn. a Britiah t'umpativ. M"". trade or buulne-a addran ICalcutta llowr. fk-uhrton Stare'. Aldgatr. London, E. England, ha* applied In, the regtatratlen of a trada nark In Ptrx "A" of H-gl.ter in re-pect rogy. caflN caaence. and coffee and chi: pa, and will ha anlillad to regW'-r lha wima nfirr one mnnlh fmm lha Pin day of Un \ 1901. unle nome paraon ahall in th manntlma giva n"tlcItt duplicate t.> ma at my offlea of oppoaitlon of aiich i<'gi>1raln 51 Sn REAL ESTATE JOHN hi. HI 1IIOS A F.H., '.V.A. Krprr-tentativp : GERALD WOOD KLRMTUKE KNITL-RX Al Ralph. Furn.Iure Haoni. Hardwood Allay A large lion af new and %  acond-hand futf all at Bargain Pncei For legaj rj LIVESTOCK One Ouainaev-Avrahirw CW -n M. cah-a with 2nd . Durant. Qim.. M. Philip MECHANICAL niCYCLF-One Oant'a s %  .. %  Klnc Harculaa Bicvcla. wttr. light, lo-k and good tyre. Phone ja %  .SSI—3 MISCELLANEOUS ^ANTIQUE* for %  jp'jpMafc" include i vary ohf> French 31-day Clock m gtaaa C-ae A numbar of llarhado' P.ne Pe„nie. Chinaaa and Japarana Taa h-rvicaa. Old Engllari Te.i Sarvice ill cupa and aaucani believe to PC Stafford. Old cut fla-> Decant an varal Ivory Jawal Bo.ea. rmmature hand pax.ieil [Hittery and iiuinarou* old plate* i raaaonabla pncei at Ralph Bcai.i A.mihlng mow room i. Hardwood Alaty 10 S SI-In fUTTF.R Cooking Butter lib Tin., Table Hum* I lb Tin* alao Krafl Chre>H Package* W M. Ford. .f. rtoctii..i: Street DUl MM. %  1 'I !i MF.ISTF-\f>*!Simmon. Badtead. •pring. Available pi 3 ft 3 In* an.1 4 Ii in. Mir. with or ttilbout r-nel r. M PI -tcllnaon A Co Ltd : Bro^d *>.d Roabuck Street. Dial 4313 or 4**1 P 1 SI—4n Standard Bo Camera ...i*. Ii" ftpm' at anly IT 43 n Co Lid Qroad ^tieet Dial I21 1 %  31-31 r.ALVANBB-34 gauga %  ft tTOO. • ft I7.IS Only limited number at R.lpi Bvard'a fumiahlng ahow room Hardwood Afh-y ID ^ "I *> FOR SALE i m mini nottc" H .C-o Road A dtatinaiiva Pod il-bmll two .toray Itavta Muua* well back in urcludad groun .on* acre in asiaot. Thara well raatorad and there n eompleta prlvarv from the roadway and adio nind propertv There la a covered entrance poi> ii |rg. lounge with a central tani>.niabing *n attractive Bkatura, dining room, four good badrooi.,.. hitchan, butlar*. Mfttry. "tore, room* and tarual ofRaaa. Out-.Jr thera I* a large garaakr. aarvan quaiier*. ate An e-ctremelT In'n aatlng and dealrabla property >TV>€l. I I ."to a biock of 4 Ufaciiry flata. fitted with all mivenlencea The gro\ind> approv S acre, an laid out with lawn., (nrubbery and garden* nd tnere I* a long carrlaahrway oproatch flanhad with mahng.i M.ll-1.1tnlo Otk I-, tth Avrnie une and timber l.aM aq. ft. En i.ception roo Tbe low eonilructad of i wallaba abtngaad roof. chr-ed aalterv living room, dining room, four bedrooms kitchen, %  •(• vanfa room and double garage. The propenr ha. n wide lawn *( one (Ida. a .mull orchard and ' fully enclosed Central rr*i. dental area near town and %  chooti %  > l\-.1i\ia:Oe^nnd. Mga> ator-y reiManca. 3 mlnitea walk (,,„. legn .. ire i iiv. i ... %  FOR RENT Sliver Sand' Firm.h.d WINDY WILLOW"/'-Pro "pert, *• Jimri I'nr.irnlahed fewiw on roa*t. with S bedroom., lounar, yeritd.-h o^erliiolrtnf aaa efc. Immediate pcamuvn. -WlVF.irT'. 'ii Lamrenee--. AMracli.e .1 liedroomed ful./-hrd M-a.lde hm,ulo> AvmJabM long laaae if ratrahnrd. •AANDY Ulftr.FSt Jaraa* Purrilahed Ct. let w.th Ihe bed •each and bathing the I land liaa REAL ESTATE AGENT AITTIONEER PLANTATIONS BITLDING Thonr 461P GALVANISED SHEETS U't aulLt. nev. -hret. Chrape.l in Hi1 i ft PSIH: T It SSM: fl It M T3. p It *; *. 10 n H 40 Ffatt caah Belter hurry I A IIAHNFX A CO.. LTD. GLASS WARE A few dot< black footed Cb.mpaigne. Whiaky. *arrv. and water Gmibleti -re for *ale u .ma in Tina .tnd I th Tina, alao %  !S per Th Smoked 1 Uncbu.k Sin-*t lh.il ; WHIPS Campbell* AT He Vrgetnble Conwirome. Oalall Bma I Vienna Slvle. Veal Loaf. Mutm > W M Ford. 3S Roebuck Street. Dial LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Tba application of Gwendolyn Oilrv. holder of Liquor Licenae No M8 ol ll granted to Damley Jack-on In rerpeet of bottom floor of a 1 *torey wall building near Millar Dmn-'rr. Rd City lor parmtaauan to uaa aald Laciii-.al aald uremlae.. Baiter. Road. City To: H A. TALMA. E-q Police Maglatrate. Dlttrlct "A" Dated thl< tth day of Mav. 16^1 GWENDOLYN OXLEY. Applten. will be N D -Tin. appiu-ati -Idcrad at a Lltwralng Court . %  held al Police Court. Dmrlrt "A" on T.eadav. the 15th day of May. ItSl 11 o'clock, a m II A TALMA. K ,.tr.U. Dtat. "A" 10 3 51—In TAKE NOTICE That MEAD JOHNSON m, COMPANY %  corpo*atl..n duly organised .indwr me la*. f t. state of Ind.arjj. I'mir.l tUtaa of America. .i law trad* a. iiuunc addreaa i. Ohia Street and St loaaph Avenue. vana.'IUe. State, of Inv ha. .pplicd far ilia ragtirMlon of a trada mark ,n Part -A" af Raaiatar in raapacl of apaclallv prepare aanaa* uaa and pharmaccmKal pieparation* whach .npply nuUlMamal naa... and will be r'.titled to leglMrr •anaa after muMKHIII. from IMP|h % % %  ..,1 ,„ Si May. ISA). ne m\e notice m ai my .KTica of opposition • iraiiaai. Tw trade mark "ii appLrati'in at my orHc Th day of Apnl. isai ff WILLIAMS Rrglttur of Trade Mark. TAKE NOTICE That BROOKE. BOND A CO LlMrTED. Tea and Coffee Dnun. a llriliih Company, whoae trade or bu.ine* addra-i. la Calcutta Kuitaa. Gouliton BUaga. Aldgata. London. E. Enaland. hg. ai.n..e.i for Hie reai.tialion of a trade k ,n Part "A "of Regi.ter in remeci rtiieagy. eoftae aa^nce and ratlae rhicory a*arnca. and will be entilled n-tcr the Mme after one month frc lha ath dav of May, IMI. unltta aor, ""O" 'hall in the mean time give mill n duplicate to mm at my office of on :*ioti of -uch regir.i ration The Ira. nark can be wen on application al n ofnea. Daiad thw 3-lth dav „f Apnl. l.-.l H WILLIAMS. Registrar of Trade Markami TAKE NOTICE H.'gi.teiIn rripect ot .ub*tantei uagri M food or aIngredient. In fond cperlally .nip*, bouillon., and .ea-.nlni.. and will lie entitled to real.ter Ihe >ania alter one ii.ontn fr.*n Ihe Pth day of May. IMI HI*-' .nme per !" .hall in the moaninn* give notice in duplicate to ma al mv office i>( oppo-nlon ol .nrh registration The trada mark, can be acen on application at my office Dated thi. )Uh dav „f Apr.l 1PM II WIILIAMS llrgidrar .if Trade Mark. %  S.l-3n TAKE NOTICE + CROSS-5TA3 That THF AGOI CO. Mgnufaclurem, a Company mrorporated accordntg to thf law* o( Swu/erlan-l .h< trada or ti.oine !" addrc. |. Kempt ta I. Zurich. Switreiland. ha. applied for the regi.. •ration of a trade mark in Part "A*" of Hrai-'er in raapacl ol .ub.tancoa uiad aa food or o. ingredient, in food, e.prcialry %  ui". lioualkaM. and -eau>nlng>, and will be entitled to rcglater the *ame after one i--i.il! from th. tih gay ot May, IMI. %  inlr uime paraon -hall In Ihe meantime giva notice in dupllrale to mo at mv office of oppoaifion of .uch irgUtrg lion The trada mark can br wan on application at mr office natad tbi. 38Ut day of April, IfAt. H WILLIAMS, Hegi.tra, of Tra-Ir Mark. .^ "5Mjln LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Thd appllraUor of Chaa. Srotl tradma m Sn.lt A> Co.. holder of Liquor l.icenw /ta of IPS) granted to him In re-pect >.f hottom floor of building In Buibey Allay. C.ty for parmlaalon to uar uld IJqun. I.lm.ie lie al ground floor ol a 3-ataao wall building opp. Maaon Hall Bt Ha Uteri Rd City. Dated tin. Pth day ml Mar IMI. To II. A TAIAIA. EM}. i I? H .:-'! ita Dirtrlct A" W AI.LFYNE. N.B —Thi. .ippllratlofi will be considered at a LHrenainc Court to ha hold al Police Court, Dtatriet "A" on Mm.dgthe Z1M day af May. IMI. at II oi loek T'iat THE WUAKEr. OAW COMPANY. a oirporaion organlred and eki.tlng un.ic Ihe law. of the State of Raw Jeney. Cnltadl Slate, of America. Mamifactiirer.. whogg trade or b-rt.na-a addrc.. i. Mer%  .ir.di-e Marl Plaia. Chicago, Illir ii SA. ha. applied Im the regi-tration ol a trade mark In Part "A" of Regi*tar in re*p*ct of cereal food' and feed.. and will br entitled to regi.tar I flee one month from the tth day Mav. ISil. .ml**, aome pemon .hall lha ineantime giva notice in duplicate me at mv nffapa of appodtion of >u re...nation The trada mark can -••" OH .. fflce. Dated rhi. 3Sth day of April, 1*51. H WILLIAM-; Raglnrar of Trade M-rk j West Indian & British K Hand made CrafU. Antlqua*. t> Fottary. Hand blocked Bcach 14 %  : LIQUOR LICENSE NOTK'K The apptkatlon of Sydnrv Heckle holder of Liquor IJconw No M7 of IMI g-anlad to %  wall building M Oover'.irrnt Hill, St. Michael for p. %  Id I kafKar UrgflM A. ;.-d Ua4e D..t 'A S BECKI.ES. Apblarant N H Thi. appuratior will be conatd ared at a LlrenHng Court to be bald a Police Court. Did ret "A" lha Hth da.' of Mav ipsi at (\ n'cloc I H)l o:; LICENSE NOTICE Ttic .pt>lica1 p| laronard R*ckleI nldar of Liquor lacuna No a4 al I.JI ciantad to Han. .<( a board and %  hu.pV d>op attaafian to a houaa at Rank Hall X Road, St M chart for pernutalon to UP 1 laaM Ac at a board and galvanne , f—eBar. *& Jama. %  i further HIMIH tlldPtg u-ork ti '. wo~"t 3 raata a word vrwk • A c#au irvrd SaadavaBafataf sL'tTASfUt BLTtJ>INO frm utuaa. al Yantnar Oardenf Ch If* Area 1. >-, ft land, and l.agg eq ft road Dt ENd Day and MM Ntght T 5 si_ i t M < HUV By inatrurDona raeaived P^iWkr Aurtaar. on ttaa rpot al Bank 1 II Mam Bead 4th Mia from AD loula Chureh. on Ttaur.dn %  ne*t ihi'ih May at 3 ..clack. O-e three-lad han-e with ont-ofKca' Will ha %  id ta the htgheat bidder Muat a> rm—ag]. ttJI-tn Hr ir,rft._-i,.n of lha In. nance Co will •alt at Marwudl fc Fdwatda. < i.-buck Straot oppo-lie Jama. A Tudor Co an Friday llth at 3 p m Au.tm 7 Saloon Car daraagad in ...de.il Term. CASH R Archer Kemw S5 51-4*1 Kfnrto i DI S*etgrapher i uilarv paid I., u Ppaaaai Road taw poet of fkagpgta) our offne e right perCON-IDr-MIM. PR|*AT* SECRE TARY Fr.ali-h. e\pertenced abort hand i traak. own lypewrttor High Pi 0 K r*af*t raPal R... \ \ Advocate Co *1-Ta. kama .. Re.pon.ihie pa-,> !" CAmrruaalon Data-.' .nai laUn tapn <*a*0 * par mo-th dapend.ng i I voplv in parum with arrttl 1 MIS<*ELLANKOUS IM I.SON Al I OS I A I Ol AO LOST %  AlRrTAOY LISTB0 %  . •tr*l BLANK BtMiK A ItOv^ THRcE PORTS KARACHI Wiih Ihtoof on. rptuatan %  ilng arw %  %  „ %  .Miik-' (fr*> LIQUOR UCENSE NOTICE The .ipp4tc.ti.rn of Awxandar S..oer holdar of IJquor IJranae No Mt> af IP51 %  ranted to BUlth Bumham in na prr-t 0> one rooerd board and .".nU Hm altarhed to reakfcica al Bridge Rond. St fapchait, for peimlaakM to uar vald LaquO' I if OHM far at a board and -ningle rhop ith •hedmof attached at l'.:i aVtad %  Hkri . Datad thia Pth day of Mav Ifdl TO FA MelatOD. Eaq POIK K II Tha appuration will I ered at a LicenUng Court ( %  ..• Polara COOft, D.-t... I A ... 1 Motorist Fined A District "A" Police M*istfatf* told Cyril Miller of Iv> StrtMfl. St. Mkhael: "Vou'vix-^ i(ot a conviction for spelin icortltKl against yon and if you etum hrre your lict>nc will ba> ut|-ii IJonel Gill of Wrkhman Hall St. Thomas. He was tu'dricd In pay a fine of £3 by inst.iIntent• %  or two months' Imprison men* •vith hard labour. When his of•I-IKC was commlltetl lie wns driving the motor lorry M 2370 DROVE WITH FAULTY BRAKES Cariylf Frederick of l*arti*. Cap, SI Mk-hael, WH lined l'.! n District "A" Polled Magiinle when he appeared bfrfoic i charged with driving th< motor car M.17M with faul" brakes on February 27 Cpl. Cyrus attached to th* Traffic Branch at Central Statior 'aid that he reported the condi tion of the car to Inspector Far num. who found that :...ih brsfctand sUrering gear were not ir go-xl order. Dangerous Driving Gordon Croney of King Stn-et as ordered to pay a fine of £3 by a City Police Magistrate yesterday when he wag found guilty of driving the motor car X Ml In a dangerous manner on Bxbari Hoed on March I Cpl. Cyrus who brought th • ci.se gBKl that the deferKian' 'dashed down" Baxters Road while a runeral was going up Thr" alrfSft, His licence is to <*• cndor**d and the fliie to he pair 1 by monthly instaltnetits LA PMNSA WILL REOPEN SOON BUENOS AIRES, May 9. Diego Baamoiide, Secretary General ol th* Pro-Government newspapermen's union said tonight that La rTenvt will be te i pened soon "as a daily foi Argentine workers". La Prensa, often a sevrre erttfc f the administration of President Peron. closed IS w ty a series of boycotts of it .intl strikes by Government-supported miens, is now in process of being 'aken over bv the Government —fCPl ( il wiiiin OF COMMERCE He ii.cori.iiigl. iMi.iitieHl the %  •*' i nf T C A. that he wa* I ibtc to sront hi* second request -that the ilnraft should bai allowed to land oi, its return flight HI the small hours of the morning. Undue Strain The Seawell Airport Committee. %  is warned in its report against ;.:• %  danger of placing undue strsm < < the existing stall Bnnkf| am health ihrtititth wnild cripple the day to day op' ami : Ini il.cieti.-y tif the air !t loller. the road operator or the ire and crash attendant. They ould not be guarantee,) if thv\ i.ere called upon to deal with a genuine emergency after having jlrcady rJfcn on duty for 12 to 20 The flight m question actually k.jidcd at Seawell at S.3'. p.m and left again at aHft p m MV Leacoek sitnl th it he did iot think linn R. N Turnei's aitmr. wa< unrea-iiiMibii' There bad been, he tniiler-riod. some feeling that the staff was anvkina many hours Governnieni was trying to get idditimial .tafT and when that wag a>it they were i.rcpati.i t n r.mslder opening at night when necessary. Ag regards liithtinit. IM unttei stood that thenwi-ie arrange -nents to take a supply d -t'l t!i< Klectric Company The an aTwtatag" plant had been giving a lot of trouble ;in d they wrtc afraid nf running If at nielr 4 i leratidfi. Fetv Ni:;iu l.iimlin.s Mr. King said that he QOUld noi appreciate the fact that there was undue strain to the staff if iMgnt landing happened once every six months The rfrason lor calling for a yfs or no division wa s that the plane was lafi*rtll| Montreal and the M magei hau fgj know what the position was. Hon. V. C Oale saitl h.believed that ii w i A canal ii i-' ; > at night. Mr. Thomas said that if they i ould operate "Off llWIA. flights ,it night fairly regularly. BO* HMjlfJ Ihcre Or MIIH .train for un inegtila I night flight What r*aa kappa n l n i to the equipment In im I Hon. V C dale said he did not think u wis the aQuipmaal bui lather the staff. Mr Weatherhead said hy did not think Hn R. N Turm-i could hove done anything fUM •inder the ctrcumstances. Messrs. John Patterson of Plantations Ltd Ronald Itmis.; uf II Jason Jones ft Co Ltd r Ward of Da Cnslu it Co Ltd. and Kenneth Knaggs nf Gordon Grant aV Co, Ltd.. were imam moudly elected member* of lha Chamber. Messrs G. H Kim:. A H ind HOB V C Oili wert> appiiinted to P* "d *nxi prove of the Annuil It-i-M ol the Chamber as prepared by the Secretary '•'he-date for the Annual tienei al Meeting will M Mav 30 Advertising SatM The Chamber considered thr report on the control of advertising Signs. The Secretary w-s ttld to Kt in touch with the advertisers and ask whether they wculd signify their agreemeni by signing the report The Chamber Messrs. Klnch. TtMjrnaJ, I'CIMC and llynne to draft a letter to Ofyvtmunant on the "Price Con Irol Committee Rfipoii rhl four-man committee will Brit have to gat Ike I U %  virimis branches of then draft their findings for the ( lim it's approval. Tba r.mt.br.iti c^fiunisiion. ( entral SectctatMt Ml Tlinldafl A i ote the i hainht'i to %  A'i-ih'i buagsMI i" "pi"' wi'Htad lO %  display M C ll b If in produrls in San Juan There will be a Caribbean Festival. poruhafffd by the Caribbean In •e-im Tourism Committee Ui bg held in 1*52On display will be ararh art, sfMrptura, paintings, and local handicraft from the Carfb lienn territories Members will be circularised with a copy of the letter and asked whether they have anv pro ducts which they would like t' display. Int|iiirv Adjourn District A Cui-mer II A Talma jrasMrda.ii adjCM i ing in the inqueet touchinit tht death of Rudolph Jom laefi rd Penantry, s> !tg> hare than the Mh* %  inaa ware not v.nrM falls to pay the fine tb> < ulternative of two rnoDtlnf U* it i-'niment with hard I' 1 12 Months For Larceny %  of ia not %  %  imiMVll on labourer <: Downes of Tho.naCap. St M..h.iei. anVri iiappearod before a nistrict A" l'o lire Maftati rt* on .< r cloth. Pha Pattth which isvalilf.l |l i .' %  tinproperty of Mohammad Kola, %  merehant of Passage Road The offence araj ,ommittfjd n April 6. |)ownes ha* -ix oi.-vn i < %  vlctlons for larceny recordt-i n"ainst him. After th< mitlct* of .i|.|il Mr I. W Harrow apoeaied on behalf of the defendant MiifiHitT ForTobu^o (hi Sale nl all GrOCCrl SIMEON lU'Ml ft SON LTD. V"i< I..MI (l.r OwB ...a..a Affiliation Reject* ST OEORGI I lotge majority voltGrenada Union of Teachers Saturday .rejected a n Iraj affllialion with the Manual .iod BWdal Work<" Union adrtcii brought out a vi ry PORT OF SPAIN. \;... Hon A P T ItmtW, Member for Tobago nuuBB the hist move to get the Colony's UM ' on aniciidnl Mi .luiion urgini thai tin end 'iiai an) men In r of the Executive Council rnag i %  nii.ov'd by a rnajortty vote of lha ie~gi.|.,tive Council, and no'. b| %  vol. ,.f two-thirds of all mom bers of the CoUjMfJ tg "i d at He is also asking Gov %  i i i %  Minister may be created to look idler the' iieciilist piotilems of '! i baajo' LOYAL BROTHERS OF THE STAR Neediest Catci Fund V air lo Mr (alive to Carnival and br held on "th and nil Jour a yin-.n'. Park, the undrralgned wil melve entries for tne following: (a) Coatume Bands ft) Slerl Bands lllslnri.al Binds In utili i i.i raise Hn -t ui.ln.l %  Carnival, the sterrln = I ommlll" wuuld appreciate the ro-oprralioi •f Firms, (luhs and Ii.dividualbeing a* urleiiial a* pslble No entrance fee will be chargrd %  fan ii.uliMilir l.r \ t arnlval Band of thirty v.11 vlaltlng H.ili-.li-. to take parl llir patadr (lostin; date. Itlh Mav I ^ MM i R RIIKIM e/,. Ve^tr* t'lrrk ^ OHIK. I'.l ill ;. t..v. II tot L'.,oths. Btalls, and slda I %  • contact C MfiRRI'i Baabei Una BARBADOS INVESTMENTS Bought and Sold A. M. WEBB Stockbroker 33 Broad St. Bridgetown 'Over Phoenix Pharmacy < iioif >: CHINA CABINETS MOOSE NOW a Charm of a CHINA CABIN! : rtfeOwcd. In Mahoganv or tn.ihoi,.ni/.l. H.rrh or Fir I3ff to tl20 SMART STVI f rtrtle legs or hare* hOW up .", ir wan *ime von i I 1 i %  %  gi geaful BOOK CASES L S. WILSON SPRY ST. DIAL 4IK-0 SHIPPING NOTICES MONTREAL. At;STRALlA, NEW /I.MASII LINE. i;ii:iin %  I "ARABIA" i< uheduled h) ag|| .MTI Hahart. llth Maj, Adelalda Mill t.v. Meibaunia ti'ii Jui"in June. Sydney Onl June, arrtvplg i ,i during laitat I I I %  1 pla -pi... l..r t .irao aix-epicd nn thimiBh Itilla af i Iir.tlah Oil I.i... lateWgrd aid Wlmlwarrl i'pl W1TIM t 111 Ltd TltlMl IAD, R W PA COSTA a CO III'. ntfiiKirHiWN. IIARBAIKIS. II W f \f Mc SteanuJiip Cfax. NKW YORK SKkUrr ocu \ Steam-1 Rhli NBW QUalANf ^l %  %  Ml ... Mav %  t ALCOA ROAMRR" glN lath Mav arttYHt MR fday Nth l"t Juno CANADIAN KFRVItr lit IIIIIOI SI. Naraa at Ship s.ll. M.alr-al Sail* Hallfa* s -i "ALCOA PaVJASI Nik Apr.l SOth iLCUA I'l.iMIII U .' lim Ma/ Hth --mi.Kfc nrHNAfXiTTF-' M. BHh (day Sath Arrliaa h ia* May Mh V.v II* 3UM h a.RflWII Ml s -roLxl %  >I.m.l-.l PM i. ftail> 1 an and It.inrregl i ... %  iinaa.ua ItOfll-.ItT IHOM LTD Ni:w YflRK AND GULF SERVICE APPLY:DA COSTA CO. LTD -CANADIAN AKKVICP FYFFES LINE IMI. TVS. (.Ol IT( will h< arriving fr-m South• I :; a it; and will be sail.' I | (Ml ItogaTI loi Tfl TI an %  irtfxlation iv %  lor Tt Ii ana i I il B lad) .i\il (!)> '' 24t %  : i | ton. Apply . mmm & mrm HL im ttat job done. t '.f our II.F(IIII.\ VAIIIVI IIIAMKS Mil IIMII1I I tll'Oilll U )



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TlllRM>\\ M\V ht. rMj B \i:r. \IM>S \D\ot ATE 1IIRKE WIStudent* Doing Well At Puerto Rico Varsity Says Pinero Mr. J. T. Pinero. former Governor of Puerto Rico, told the Advocate yesterday mat the reports which members of bemn Commission got concerning the ten West Indian students ... the Metropolitan Vocational School in Pueitu RH-J DM most encouraging. He said that those student" were the best among the whole alumni at the school and they were glad lo have them and were also grateful that they were gelting some more. Mr. Puiero who was the llrst native of Puerto MM to beeomv Governor of lhat Territary, la farmer by trade. |M is etigait,\! in the growing of sugar cane and rearing of dairy cattle. He said that the Metropolitan Vocational School is located next to Ihe University of Puerto Ric > In the city of Rio Piedras. The school is capable of instructing 7.500 students and i equipped with the latest machinery and techniques to teach young men different trades which. are needed when I COUJ the verge of contemplating In • dustrial development. Scholarship Last year he said that Use Government of Puerto atton laid allocated money for a number ul scholarships. Inviting student! from the Caribbean I were desirous of taking up training in the different subjects taught in the school. This training when completed would be of great benefit to them when they returned to their respective territories. Mr. Pinero said that mem'x-rs of the CaflMwajl Commission were very pleased to be able to further enlarge the scholarship programme at the School through 1.000,000 Strike %  %  KU I %  %  I %  ed. State-run >. staffs struck work tor I until DOM Tt half an hour bl :. twice more day. The -..., ,,..,.. %  orgu %  %  i.'.ecii. %  The 1 mee %  laic employe* i Ike i .vnl of Ii %  %  %  I But only a few oj stayed awaj ..• thi i. rnmniutiii %  Reject Red Plan Support For Klusaia V. A81 %  iv 8. I i \ ludiug Coci I %  t "double vet %  Japanes. Peace Settlement. —Xculer V %  %  .. %  %  %  %  II %  I %  AVOID CBUB-IV Spectollzad Medication Helps Prevent Many Harbour Lug IN CARLISLE BAY drops ol Vkka V.i : nostril to hrlp pmn taking hoU. a-not up each 1 the cold from YOU CAN FM IT W0W1 I lashed mcdnalion wotki the mmhk i. and voucjn fa ^ntr; on imd clean, i* soothed, and many n oaMfai Mappedright iUrn and therein --Iv designed le a a. i: n %  vtcKsVA-TRO-NOL NOSt DltOPt* Canes Burnt At lluiison Pluutation A CAN! FIRE at Hanson Plan Utlon, St. George, early morning burnt four acres of second crop ripe cane*. They arc the property of W. A. Harewood and were insured. Another fire at Wiltshire PlanMetropolitan talion. St. Philip, on Monday *M stance given burnt lour acres of first crop Jacob Epstein Gets Place Of Honour by the Technical Co-operation ripe canes, property Administration of ihe US. GovSkeete. They wen alto crnment. They lean offrrins thruush the t'arthhran ( ommiv*ioi. ;1U ^rhoUnhips for student* or Ihe Caribbean area lo study at HIP Metropolitan Vocational School and he hoped lhat Ihe jounc leen and \ n of Ihe R OSE HEWITT reported that A insured f Block Rock a basket was from her while at Messrs. Harrison's Store. It conW0 in cash and a nickel watch. T WO MEN have been :o Ml chosen ... .Ill ihe vacancies in the territories tvotild take full adFire BrlfMs They are expected vantage of aUl opportunity In t(( take up duties i\ Ihe beginl the necessary training nin| nt l]PXt m0nth w!*ld!%3& ST&^uJS tha S£STmfi& |T1S Korea, firs, of its kind in hisWy. e people and the totmiry a phw nf ( Io n fQr n(m <>n wag followcd by nnnoiint ,. rnPIlt ,r "* n Tuaaday he saw the man, who here Ihnt a Canadian has been i^i-, the division. %  1 diew'i. Church has been Hriluin, llu&tia Vote Against U.S. GENEVA. May 8. British and Soviet delesatea here today voted agalut the Uni%  ntaalutlon which .[aimed 'hut hjht to own propart) shntil'l l-e included in the mv.Among Modern Sculptors """ "' "" %  -" RI M United Nations Commission on LONDON Mav 9. Hun^.in Rights adopted tha I'm CURIOUS VISITORS crowded Into London's Batterfraa* iSa lamaaat any clause sea Park to-day to ice an exhibition of the latest works, dealing with right lo <.* %  promost of them of surrealist modern i,i!;>! p*"'o ..... . kCRMi the other side ,,f Hutain. Russia. Jugoslavia ami OH P.ik. showmen were comChile voted in favour. The Uni. pietlM tiuaraatto of nnicb•* States. Fran.,and PaklfUn and oraay * BB *L'V '"•'' %  """ nrt u !" guay abstained. ilhv A M \ BBkeeaei Maad % %  ..(.i JMMJH HI IM I ,. I I Canadian Given Important Post In Empire Unit In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station miniature fan the Festival nf II and fun fair. Hi | at Ihe axhlbrUon of sculpture, everything was on a more ,*_ OTTAWA. May serious plane. Th it w B obvft The news lhat a Commonwealth vlsilc came away scratching I be formed in ,„ Plr h ,. 1(W bUrdtlnf hard and look m u .i little wlaar< n-.ovoil by Dr M ter del'',; I Use rUnt to not a fundan oluthm %  %  propeiiv %  %  thai B " I .CUM %* ...(l.r. was <. s AU*I %  tal human right Keutei %  RINSC washes BRIGHIERquicker! ^easier! %  .. "'' The sculptors they agreed. b1y brilliant Rut their ne ie rmi;hl INfl little ha/y Tiiiesl liver had bonetltexl the training of tn took various curses lastingten momhs to I', raau TUy hsddaveiopad an Indus* ""* s J| n "f cn na s '•''•'; The Commonwealth d.v.sioi. trial programme which had al <""!> '-led. Work on Ihls roof consisting of Canadian. British. _, ready' brought to the island MXi \" UlI. juut icopcncii lor services from May Csssel's top adviser on battle adeven Ihe workmen Iffnai o.. II... DwmtMOMi 2 *TT| e contractor wag Mr. c. vice and planning, and Canada's there could not tell the right ST. GEORGE'S. May 7 Skinner. spokesman at division haaduuarwa up The sculptors themelvi<, Rev Frederick E. Layne, Rector nEOFLi: OF lower Bellcplaim' ten. South Africa, which has had had to switch them round nt St rVaorea/S, ha^ Kcepiad an T met with a disappointment flghter squadron in Korea for xttry werc Ju „ IlHht %  ippointnu-nt as Vicai Of St BUM whni thev visited the 'tall of B many months. sending five oftiThere were main and M. Jude, Barbed Ha Jaaw %  known butcher over the '•" t0 ,he common wealth v ,„. for his new duties at the md of week-end and found it closed division. ;ll i,.., n/1 ^ mp in 2,577 More Tons Of Rubber • bn %  s ii eloped din int; II.' But what the W exp.rti frorr ere 44 June, lie ha, I.-M RactOI ol Si T |.. ,,,,], aupplaM meat to nearly s for the past six yean t i u whole of the BeUepL This meant a "me.it ton and %  and also Headmaster of an Angli ran Secondary School in Orenville. lie has served In Paul's. St. John's and Carriaeou, T'dad Policemen Plan To Visit B'dot PORT-OF-SPAJN, .%!." 7. Mambers of the Trinidad Police Force plan to visit Barbados next month. This is the second in a series of West Indian tours planned by some of its members. They will leave here around June 20. Sunday* A LLIANCE FRANCAISF. entertain the visiting Fren Commissioner* to a cock-tail pai at Ooddard*! Hestaursnl n 0 p. to-morrow night This party Lt.-Col. Danny was educated in """•' • Vancouver and commissioned ( "'" li M :,n B uloceMe J s,w '' there in the Seaforth Hlghl-mie.s \ I •*."• "" in IA36. He was severely wounded heauttrul, some spectacular, some II In September. 1M4. while comroU*que. but must to ihe unh mandmg the Cnrleton and York Iniunttd ara %  |ust plain biffling. I regiment fiom New Brunswick m Pca of Honour went to Jaeol Italv. Ijiter he was ranking Stall "<" %  '< a "ian Coro and *Ko. His 'La/aru.s'V a SINGAPORE, Mav B Ru sia and China together recefved 1,5*7 niorr tonof rubber %  In Apia than In .1 i i. >ording to official ilati-tnpubltsTMld here to-day ju unatlonal control of rubber Malaya came into elle ions in April against 7.012 tons in Marehj to Hong Kong &,B4ti tons compared with 8.74* tons. —Reuter I RATES OF EXCHANGF. MAIL NO nth All your Man ur ed clothes areso %  neb biti'htcr when washed uli RitiMi ,n.J anajf whitmare whiter tool Rinso's rich suds iOdk out it.c diet ho thorouphlv, M> iniivkh vci so gently I For and Ucioer, %  MK..1 ickulaa tuwnyi \^c Kiitao. MNSOforqtt your washf nginally scheduled fnr to—nlght then at Fi but hnd to be postponed due t" headquarters other arrangements made for th> Commissioners. Officer at 1st Canadian Corp J ade massive No Progress Will Rclux Controls "MOST SERIOUS" BRIDEGROOM %  Irom Oar O-B rrf*.p.ndfnt POHT-OF-SPA1N. IU) All Saints Church. St Cl was thrown into excitement Sunday, when a youi g ro were about to be married. at Rivers. Manitoba, where pa BONN. Mav 8 troopers are trained. He hold* the Western Allies today announced D.S.O. for the Italian campaign Ihoy would relax controls on German activity in the fields of Division Plan Welcomed electronics, chemicals and metals relating lo atomic energy. Announcement that a ComThe Allied High Commission monwealth division said relaxations would be pubformed was warmly Canadian Army .-tone tigure. had Ihe Place of Honour. Since the last war Danby has Henry Ifoora -Jiowed his sarved at army headquarters here "Standinn Figure." It had aband the army staff college, and his Mract arm* md legs in bronze latest post was deputy commandbut instead of a chin and pVoposaT ant of the joint an training centre shoulders there were )M two Dflae. Piirr.ling: From the Uniten StaMs Banal Alcxamlei Caliiei'MJIU-.IVI Ailh Pennants" lent by N v. being York's MuM-ani lt l Modern Art welcomed it looked like a pair of oldPAHIS. May H. nig Four Oeiutj Fort.gn Ministers met for the 4tJth lime this afternoon for one hour and continued their wrangle over th .ii' ml." for their chiefs Wi %  %  tern spokesman -aid that 00 D# wen put forward and to progress was made. Dr. Jeasup, American Dewt] aikad Gromykn, Soviet Deputy. if the Soviet (ioveriiiuent wanted .i Fii.nii Ministers meeting. Gromyk > said that the views of his Qw'tajniTit were well known Kruter I in the next Issue of its ofhere. Defancr Minister Claxto iveu:hing 'scali \i sirs, ficial Gazette. The decision folsaid "all Canadians will be other American exhibit "Mo-.hrr on lowed study by Allied Military pleased that our 251h Infantrv >mi child" Wafl COBtribUtad bv jple Security Board of existing legBrigade (now crossing the Pacific ft lJMU n born Jacques Lipchit S'leel SpUl MeUon relating to atomic energyto Korea) will be joined with Roth mother and ing shoulder to shoulder to resist aggression in accordance with the alms of the United Nations." ndegroom arrived in the usual and reflected the "High Commisformations with which the Frtn v ay. followed by guests and the sion's policy to reduce controls in cess Patricias have already distinbnde Before the ceremony bethe securitv field wherever popguished themselves, all to form J gan, the bridegroom decided that sible, so as not to impede Gerunit in which forces of the Comhe was not going to get married, many's technological progress diThe guests left the Church, and reeled to a peaceful end ** the two kneeling pads were re Reuter rr.oved from the altar rails. The bride fair.tc*! and had to be given ^j 1 IV %  water. dUSIH'lHl UlltV The 2n *l baa!'n t the PrinOn Monday the couple were %  cess Patricias Canadian Light married, however, at nnother WASHINGTON, May 8. Infantry has been in Korea since church at which Canon RamkeeThe United States Senate'today last December, and was with the toon pcrformpd the ceremony passed a bill to suspend the two other Commonwealth units in 'The most serious bridegroom t cent n pound import duty on forslamming Ihe latest Communist have ever met," commented the ci^ii copper. offensive. When the 25th CanaCanon after the ceremony. The The bill passed by the Senate dian Infantry Brigade arrives in bridegroom is a young teacher of was a compromise measure Korea shortly it will go into the Port-of-Spa 1951. "BARRY'' REN.WICK RETURNS HOME lorn O.i 0*i> ^*•rr•^•'"t' %  "• ST CEOftGFS. M Mr. "Barry" Renwlck. son of Hon. and Mrs. J. B. Renwick. han returned u Orannda (rom Bng land where he was ftt antlj to the Bar after taking his al Keble College. Oxford. He was worked out by the Senate _„ House of Heprescntalives confertoBetfu encea and is retroactive to April ], pecle d hird —Healer and line with minimum of delay. the Canadians ar i comprise about onef the Commonwealth which may total 21.000 men. The Canadian brigade itself i • iron our On ex petted to remain under comPOHT-OFSPAIN. May 7 mand of Brig. John M. RockingThe retail price of garlic In ham, although other Canadians ,llod Trimdad has been increased from may join the divisional staff a 20 rontr to 501* cents per pound Lt.-Cl Danby u doing—O) BONN. May 8 The Allied High Commission ,IT>!>ring eemtoday announced that they were fully like tortoises lo pen going ahead with forming the iled London viewers. hut of 24 companies Into whici %  BMdlaO Louis Arcltambault "ie v have split West Gc-rmany'; sent his version of an "Iron Bird" •'eel industry. alth countries will be tightma(|1 fr(im we j(icd steel plates Giant steel concerns of th "Head In Green and Brown" N "' ,,m *> *r* being split, u by Irishman Fit/William wag In 'menl with the West Geunai. to parts with a gap between the %  •'vernment. into some 28 comnoae anil Hght eve %  lo Prevent steel becmnng no, Ann ngni eye. >J|||(n m dangerous concentialioTi Reg Builder's "Torso 150" of ,! 0O, J on ^ .P???!looked to some Philistian ipat tutors to be a twlat>l television aerial or a badly lientci skeleton. Hut ihe workman who put it up Ii id other ideas. Il klOfca like a squashed park %  hair to me" he said In a dis The Alex, couraged GARLIC GOES UP —Reuter Allies said they were about l. in the next iaaue of the High Commissions Gazette rcgulationa for the formation of mitipsniu known as "unit companies" They were working out pro visions for the other four cases with the Weal German Governrnaart R**ue rtcOmpaiiied h\ hb wife and two children. SENIOR COMPETITION Will Handle Agency The Evening Advocate invites all school-bovs and school-girls '"SwrfrSTon V<'\***\fZ m, 'i between the ages of 12—18 to send in a humorous essay, story or poem l*s a nr for th. Rnhdi " ,he *** %  wl "MKK Entries must reach the Short Story Editor the Brrttah A-v#CJtp lo Ud \ Cltv> no Ijte thBn Wednesday every week. The best eoninosition each week will be published in the Evening Advocate „_ and the Winner will receive a prize of books or Stationery lo the handled in Trinidad by oordon , . Grant A CoLtd F fares v "' ue ' ia Guiana Airways Ser\-ie to St Vincent and Dominica, will handled in Trinidad by Gordon nd freight changed nttaa renanii SULPHUR FROM MICROBES KDON British scientists battling the world sulphur shortage are producing sulphur with microbes imported from Nortl rVMee' warm lakes. The tlnii lurn sulphates and sulp' sulphur bv a process of oxidation. %  CDSend this coupon with your story. SENIOR COMPETITION NIC At* Srlw.1 Home A. KEEP FIT OK BOVRIL Don"! gel nervous about INFLUENZA I use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP Don't let wear fa I !on^ Wash regularly with I [oikl Soap and you'll led fresh msMI Its deep-, leans ing let w much longer. So keep a tablet of 1 handy — foi day-long trcilincwl FOR PERSOh II. FRESHNESS iLWAYS AVAILABLE!! $2,135.00 Usual Fleet Own, rs DuKOUHt <(IIMI:SV 4.AIC\( B I : I ROBERT THOM, LTD. — White Park Rd. — Dial 4391



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ESTABLISHED 1885 THI'RSDAY. MA PRICK : FIVE CENTS U.S. DID NOT USE JAPANESE TROOPS Red China important to Soviet Union GEN. MARSHALL TELLS SENATE COMMITTEE Soviet Plan Outrageous WASHINGTON, May 9 (JENERAL GEORGE MARSHALL, United States Defence Secretary, said to day that the possibility of Soviet intervention had restrained the United States Government from using Japanese troops in Korea He recalled the Mutual Assistance Pact be tween Communist China and the Soviet Union which directly referred to the Japanese. He was continuing his replies to Senators of the Foreign Relations and the Armed Services Com mittees' investigation of the American Far East policy which had earlier cross-examined General MacArthur Marshall said the Mutual Assistance Pact (Unfitly referred lo the Japanese* and possible vention on the mainland of As:.i had controlled the action of the United States Government in nut u*ing Japanese troop* in Korea Marshall WM asked "why is it assumed that Russian mtenttOM ;.nd planning may be so different In ilie Far East from the pUfll HI Europe." Marshall replied that actual lighting was continuing in the Far East nnd Communist China was ix very Important factor 1c the Soviet Union China provided forces to carry out the Soviet Union 1 aggressive designs whiio Russian forces suffered no losses. He suid the factor there—and it WM not one in Fin "whether 01 not the Soviet Go. crnment can afford to have Chins defeated aecaarvelj by the Alliv %  nd put in n position where ihi reaction of China towards the lu,> "' ea '* Pritain Protests To Argentina I.ONDON. Mo> 9. Britain DM formally protest* against UM %  of Of tWi more Argentine buses i ttrriton •' Foreign Office spokesman disclosed here to-day. The protest was believed in Buenos Aires on April 30 by British Ambassador Sir William Henry Mack, the spokesman said Tlie protest follows .1 limUa Mta to ChM against the establish, mvnt of a new Chilean l>ai These three bases wire ei (during the Antartic lumme .1850—SI. The present Antarctic I winter is expected to curb furthr.Itorritorfal w diplomatic mc Ihs. soviet Government might he one r ,.(.,•, %  mlstrufl bo c auee they wennot fullv supported A paraphrased version nf a letter from Truman to MaeAr1 ,-•. January showed why the President objected to s# t.,i. iiswiui — which under diffcrunt circumstances he might have .ippioved. The letter said thai while the United Slates was building its strength, great prudence must be i-xviciscd to avoid extension ol I 1 K.i in war. which might, m them M-lv. I • fully Justified and which might lend some assistance to the campaign in Korea, would not be 1 if they would involve JaiKin Or western Europe in Jargescalc boolUWoi it said. The paraphruadj version said the President rocognisod that continued resistance nugfal ool bo militarily possible with the limited resources available to GenArthur. In any event. United Nations forces must be preserved as an effective Instrument for the dcfence f Japan nnd elsewhere. "Successful resistance in Korea however, would serve the follow ing purposes." The Senntor. who read tho into 'he record, said the letter listed ten purposes whith would be served. lie said the flist of these was I'M rliamentary opinion here hantly shown itself lo be extremely sensitive to these action? Argentina and Chile on Brttsstl held territory, nnd pressure OH Sovcmment for stronger settee b BOSssksssC Argentina and Chile have boll' laid claims to large parts ol British held territory i M tin Antarctic and Falkland Islam's dependencies. —fleuler. WASHINGTON. M I I -day Secretary of State DOSsB Acheson referred m %  csrixung terms lo the etretego being followed by Andrei Gromyho at the talks. 1 dctimd tin Btl delegate's attitude throughout the Paris meeting as meaning thai the Soviet Union wculd not permit a meeting of lite Four Fon isters unset A I at 1 which would commit Western POsVan before Ihe meeting to reduction of their iflW Acheson said this proposal by th< Bovtet Deputj Foreign Mlnu... %  . %  He added that nobody COUM contemplate doing any such thing If the Soviet Union saw it lit thai Western P oav a ri hould suspend their defence proKranum-s. lhal pine could not I*' paid Acheson was also asked to ct ment on charges made by General MacArthur that Britain and olhir countries had been sending slratcglC material* to Cjmmunisl Chin.1 throughout the Korean war He declined to be drawn into D discussion of these charge*. But he said he was having full study made of ihrtn. He would go into the subject at some length If he was called lo testify before the Senate Committee. —Reuter 1 M. 111 ix. iniiis II \4..\r\ TIIR KOREAN WAR flare> up again stand* guard at a prisoner-of war aiirh Una up following tbtlr captme I Uivted Nations solt*. er where Commiiulst troop* Canada Will Panamanians Want| &£ President Ousted NEW YORK. Mav 9 SHOOTING BROKE nt'Tir. fVmrna durmj a general strike to-day and crowds attacked the radio station which had supported President AmuK" Arias, ftecordinj to New York radio stations. Two Perish In Rum Explosion KINGSTON. J... Hal Two men burned t<> death: two others were ciiou)y injured v.liiii J2 hogsheads of mm OXploded on a truck yestrrd: %  after* noon, causing the completo destruction of the vehicle For %  few minutes the truck's brakes failed to act when coming ol! a long steep hill: the trucH hit %  bank and the explosion followed A doctor while attending the injured was struck down by %  burning tree which Ml acroai lh road; he is now in hospital suffering from head and arm injuries. —Cl> CANES BURNT IF n i OUT 0*l> l.ll'.MIr.|. ANTIGUA. May 9. One hundred and sixty tons of ,. 'demonstrate that aggression jennes of an area of approximately would not be accepted by the | eight acres burnt at Cassad* Garfree world." —Reulrr. dns last night PERSIA REJECTS U.K. MOVE IN OIL DISPUTE (By LEOPOLD HERMAN) TEHERAN. May 9. PERSIA to-day declared that the oil in her vast field 1 ; was hers and told Britain she could not agree to the latest moves made to stay nationalisation. The Persian Prime Minister and Foreign Minish announced that Persia could not accept "force or bluff or intimidation" in settling the future of her oil industry. "Tne oii Is ours. We must use H lor the benefit of the nation and for the benefit of world peace" It was stated There was no reference to the request yesterday by the AnglTranian Oil Company that the matter should be referred to arj tUatfotl Dr. MooeddTjiy Prlmt Minister. In a letter to Herbert Morrison. British Fore-gn Secretaiy, said Oon of an industry was the sovereign right it % %  %  T. itlon Though •*• Mil SIOIK might luive loen made or grunted he a-scriexl. and tBoUgl) those mieht be legal In cverv respect, they could no! impede the exercjaa ol Darteonal woreign rights U.S. Soldiers Fight Each Other KAR1.IKUSF. US ZONE. Germany. May 9. Nine United Slates soldier J were injured when about 100 American whito and colouicd servicetnan fought one nnother In | COiO here !;.ii ( ISlrniig Tiulitaiy police sqund. eventually restored order and removed battling soldiers in arm, trucks. No one to-night appeared to know the cause of the original dispute. Relations between white ami coloured soldiers in -the United States zone of Germany ..: %  1. 1 inaily very good and last night's incident wus one nf a veiy small number of this lype tinee the occupation. —Heater. IN OUR TOWN Heard to-day tn Brojd Street through n nteiauaout: "Come tonight to Qiinrn's Park by the thoii*and to her Bunts-Aloxander-HsnU speak "TtaetP* one thing in Bar bados I've found better than In Jamsica" *aid Mr. Bust*mante in a Broad Street stole >p-tridiy It Ls Ihe riinu' lie laiiRhod Yoi'vWsBt i.-illy ood turn herp OTTAW V H %  Trade Minister HOWO %  mnourtced %  %  %  deal .uth Cuba undot %  1 ada igraoi 'vOOO t ol r ouaai yeai I) f->r a thn raai poriud Phi sugar %  gioj mods outstdo (tie UsnBj 1 .... saroasnonta. hut it win %  ff* i of triinminn some of the tariff pre* 1 .... %  ,|i|suxor suppliers. ranada usually Imperil ibout .. 600.000 tons of raw sugar ssn W.-stern Km .... mostly from Conmor salth w ,,,, ThrMeountrlei .. h as' Austrslia. Trinidad brinj theii nigar Into *, .ado ai '.;,]itT of iboul 28 cei.Il a hun(irnHliii^Complrlf'd ANTIOUA, May The Anligca SUgBr factory's var-l was cleared by 8 o'clock lrst niglit when an emergency Man of 1 %  tjrta manaand clerks completed grindins operations To-da) %  %  %  iruuBBfl anrt %  . returned lo ihch rfspoctivs ittlo mlnd, %  • Bjnd svomoB laboun 1 h* il on a sympathy strike. Volunteersfrom cily firm -ire %  aststini in the boiling and bagging of iar. Tontlinson's 0 of the Antigua Syndi| latos came to a standstill morning when orotkera %  pproad iiatii*n i to the ninnai inent. RESTRICTIONS OFF PARIS Mav 1 The Cabinet today decided to existing restriction %  •' %  r bocauaa of 'he B ob11.-rm.1l rise in the price of beef jn the last two months 0 eornmont hopes to allevl the present shsrtaio the consumer lv. I foreisn beef. %  %  %  %  •o meel on an equal footing. —Renter Twelve Arrested BUENOS AIRES. May 9. Twelve persons I nclu di n g prom ment Conservatives and National' been anestcd and held on charges of "Ml President. Though police aclion was taken BOfni fortnight ago. official d made to-day uarOUgil padaral fudgsj Riras Arguollo tba arrested 1 President of Ihe CO) %  I Party and former Senator Antoou Santa Marina. —Rrutrr. WILLOl C,tlll\ SUStMOJVKD WASHINGTON. May it. The House of Ki or.-!:itiv. piiAmcni-an ActlvtUai Committea said toHav II had subpoenaed Major General C A WiuoUgflby, fJOMral Ma. Ai thin' chief.. Intelligence Officer, for 1 on Russian espionage in Jap;u —Reuter "BUSTA" SPOKE FOR 3 HOURS ptopU % %  sembled Bl Quoan'l Park last filgtrt to hear HOO W A I'.n•: monto sneak. A Public Keating, at nlcn Mr w A Crawford, MCI'. WM Chan-nan. was held m UM Qu Part leal shed In honour of Mr. Bustamante. Mr. Duslamunte Bddn for over three hours. At the con 1 %  the met ting (| %  -•(! to free dancing and entertainment. Customs Union Not Yet Accepted LONDON, sUd 1" Mr. John Dugnalt, MJnanar of State lu, IhO t. 'Ii.rilf. told the HoUM of Commons to-day that 1 ,.f the Cornn %  1 Dt I.I Customs Union :n the British 1 urea has not >''t bOOtl %  1 1 tuna. The Minister w 5 aiiawvring %  ptil by Hi Tiioinas Heid Labour>. Askad what proflrtad baan inade In n %  when he replied i" %  > quasi March 14. " %  in intended 10 "dlsrupl Pana ma'k solidaiiiy with tho United I I'rwssdent Arnulfo Arias i,n -' ,ir*dwei*hl iissgsl on Tuosday night that 0 hl >hrt ^ hrtv nn „ (: (tnmori i.io would call a national pi ,, .-... ,.,.,„.,,, I'ilo Wednesday to permit th" ,. i'i-ople tu choose by votina b-,i„.,iw.'ifht Trad* tween the l4fl Constitution he tn( preference wai Sbolbhed Monday ni|[ht and tl > I IIIH1|IU 1941 Cnartei whwh he nbsittutad t ,, rilt th.-ir sugar prices by about '.iir ipeech (lunaxed a day 1 $1 a hundredweight, tension and followed a demon-j Imlead th.v leaded lo lowei .%  tration tw thousands ol Pana thdi price about 19 cents %  manlani who inarcnaa on KaUan iflldent to under< %  police HeadOjuaratrs Tuesday tell non Commonwealth auppll Allied Planes Wipe Out Red Airstrip By JULIAN BATES TOKYO, May 9 JyJORE THAN three hundred Allied warplanes swooping on a secret Communist air base in the north of Korea today, struck their heaviest blow of the war. Wave after wave of jot and piston engined air craft, attacking according to a split second time table, and each with a specific task to perform, made an "obliteration" issault on an elaborately camouflaged 2,000 yards long airstrip near Sinuiju, just south of the Yalu delta which forms the frontier with Manchuria. Thoy plaslrrtM ihe Mrlp Russia Does Not Want W we LONDON v Patrlefc Ooedon Walker, Seen%  r) of state fo, Commonwealth UlaUonJ to-day said: "Although itutsta wants !o exp.oiil U ht nd as fust M iMMulble. she doaj %  Ol want in my view to i" 1 flWlved m a world war herself Hut she has shown net i D lain gambles thai involve IM isk of werU war HN BerU i." kade •• .< • • > %  • %  I %  ttach on Korea anothee, and i o ii n ore ilangaiiwsi one Addrceaini %  Lai our Parlj ednn Walker said U roe western powei i had shown iMiirtice and readUaoai for %  • eon prenuae and • %  read %  to miaano oportunitj foi genuine dlacua ssOsV OordkM Walk.-, %  dded We tn iM WO .1 t fee! tli.it war is inevitahle or lust around tinon | i "ir she dangeri ire real enough lo iruu}t it neeei sary for u hi prepare te defei d ourselves Britain had two groat duties M • fence of Hnlan horalc wild oui Western Europe", rthtniiiiii Ihe MuiiHter %  nemy Hliould again reach th. Channel i>nrt wiUt new ami modern wenpims *f wmil rerj grave Mate indeed" •hi HULL IMPROVES ItETHEsiJA. Uaryland M B The United St,it.-Navil ho piUil here said to-day that \t former Sc states. Mi Cotoeii Hull, who baa bi ei.lly ill. rttf shown improvement" Beater. Mcscddech faid "'.he activities and behsmsur*' of the Angiolrani.ui nil '(moiny I.ad led to | ops) Tliese causes of dtaeonten', he added would li Vim D ated by the snf i %  %  | %  Hi so*'emwnt wished it uaa, Salvador devasi 1 %  la's eeonofny an end t-> povfrty. disiresi and d eonlent A mi\ v COT mission out oil nationalisatioi id the country -Iriiter itlabt caunouring for the ousti leaking %  ii.lie .oil to w Arias SOld If the DOOpai wunl ii. t,, leave ,Mo l'n^nlency. we o." He also said be For g new National Assembly 1„ n Oetobor, lh-monslratoi nutaloe Police inn lied bj Colonel Jose Antonio Ramon, Chief of Ni.tiun.il POUCs to *' calm. He said the count ry'i armed forces would guarantee the people's rights Arias aroused protests bv abollstiiim Ihe itMft Constitution Monday niRht He said he was ..clinj! to full 1' mania for defence of tne heron phere %  "id the Pari i ( I % %  mstitulli r %  |< reeled the t' 1 mriuuual doeArtoe, hclaimed His opponents clle^ti • %  Anhur's successor in the Far Ea.'l to tho rnnk of full Ci-: The President sen! lo tlxBant b for confirmation of the %  i %  %  a fcurth star. —KeuU-1 I igreemi %  i| the old Iwelght tariff rate. run rennen Duying sugar will be rebate to hrinu down i the) pal< %  % %  rate II I lavt I aid had thev pin ipollei i . %  In the British i. ii only recently %  l pei rear book-making PI i %  mi hi ll two in one captain I i %  ii.,-..rtlred —KruUr r-i ll.il : %  • ,1 Si 3it II him; asauass offli-ials said I greet enough v ,. ., fc Knnli I orn -^ IN milt I ArJ> \ iJla^f DAMASCUS M.i, -i pulll..i> %  pok.-.m..,, Israeli for,., toda; pounded rob vtUagn in id. ,i, %  ..ti. ipJti the Bo urit> c aim I r a •'ease fire last night. The attack oil the liUagjB veral bouti lie iaid. It was made wiili mortar aehlne nun* and .1 fen •'II near thSv.i.u, fnmti. 1 KI Maaal Syria bl %  |h ,„. ; „ call shelb 1 p. d 4 ni Keutrr %  1 \i k-f. (eiluHl-pctrol bombs, cannon lire and bullets. In low level gWOODS reminiscent of -Ii Jin-'busling" ra( n a 1 vMse had been attw k %  1 du • ,:| paol month, they dded Neai I'vongyang alone. 1 re srere Itee itrlpg Air Force .. ,1 iha CWnaag all l ndil up *nu "-"ll noing en. On the around united Nation 1 1 itroli puahed far norm ihiouak MII daaartad No Man'* I.iinl mi the western front Throughout lodes', Inej eould and \\ two I'ommuntsta. one thei kill-ii. the other was taken prisThe lank force which Ubbl inmediatelv north of Bootll reachr.i %  IHH..( IXKUI 'A tlimnshu, DU* %  .1 ..nh r IKIII an-l % %  c.;'Ileuter. w iiiuinnv Votei VIENNA. May P. K< in "iron 1 urtaln" 1 Poland, lliingsry and Cwchosiovaki 1 to di 1 arWi they had given l ,,.,,, ,f W1-1 (in ng %  dmltted to the InOlympte Commll THE -ADVOCATE" payg for NEWS DIAL 3113 Day or Night STRASBOURG, Ma? The Europe ail Parti ament ,: rnaiority, Italian atu irtpt to in -i ai IJwight U R ei . 1'iimander of the Athm ti. irm) in Europe to debate on Saturd < % %  • t aatfnpe repeaiad anpi (, % %  Prealdont, iron Ihe Of IS na %  Ifa. it >i.an Minister for Fon %  terday. The Italian Mil %  would paanhj C attached to it in UM rdtad Slates. 1 SlatAcheson U>d kium, France. Italy and|messages 1. Oovernmenl of Dined in urging La Mai I Ini ex|ire-sln*: oV Use death roll %  i.ie. ii —Keuler. i —Reulrr Speetod Hlr.—ii.-j: VMK \ CSTi auu '' Pope I'n. xu 1... %  • um of mot 1 %  pie who %  %  L-i San Balvador, :i waa ssinounead loda) 1 lion '*"• Top.. fh< Papal Nun* 10 In Uv %  • 1, dee) id pllsbl of the 1 --Reulrr SYMPATHY WASlllN'liTON. M ml Truman 2,000 DEAD IN EL SALVADOR GUATEMAI-A. May 9 hut then Panic spread again today In the volcano near th* i.'.nv Central American state. f'A meci -. iht bio it die the city from tl town of Chiha80 miles to the south j soul .doff. Di'iuption of communications BanttagO Main and Belli .__._-. .. „j _.. earthRescue workers and Red 1 %  'P full details of death by tl (quake on Sunday—when %  vol teams were searching amon nction. but official estishoet owed signs of eruption. ruins of El Salvador's towns and. mates said 1.00" ,t men vrai Confirmed casuallies resulted viUaasji (Or bodies of hundred* Jucuapa. a town of about 12.000 Croai and G frem the earthquake were ne;.I'*d on Sunday 11. the ftfM ahoel Dlght and heoltl 7.000 by tonight and official gatl %  ,> %  fr> m Ban Salvador ,'i-sted they may evencapital of the Re pub 1 %  imeca (population 17.0001 hum Ihe wreck* luatty reach 4.000. snds nf injured and distresswas also badh streaming into quake but no casualty ngurchas'cord!:y I Rrat-r. WARNING Our Customers and Friends are reminded lhat 1 STARTENA GROWENA AND LAYENA are registered Brand Namon ol the RALSTON PURINA COMPANY ol Si. Louis, Mo.. U.S.A.. Always insist on getting genuine, STARTENA, GROWENA 4 LAYENA as we have received complaints lhat other Poultry Foods are being sold as Starlena. Growena and layena. H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. Agents and Distributors.



PAGE 1

I'AI I IIWl 11AKHADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY M \Y 1". INI CaJiib CalUwf H is EX< ll I M V fhc Gov\ I ivagtt, and Sir C. wl attend the i \ finance of Barnard Skaa \ P. gm a lijen al the Rrlti :. '. I %  Wandering Wainwrighta M R AN!) MRS. "TIBr WAIN OHT who had been bet ida>mg in Barbadn tinea November, left last al#bi i-v rag Lad* Rodney, fba I AM I) Cl to Montre.il. Mutt and Jeff A CIVIL SERVANT %  two lioys—'(mil In. daughter u< trie Terci i %  two new brother^ The sister an dote gaM was i U aaftd s,>irr asked what .-he would lia* them called. reply—"No noneood nam, call them .. BffCommerce M AKGAiir.i [.in., daughtar of F r. c. Gin I Raajaa. I i %  ft Michael, has the US whew the took our*?. Her lite Of New %  • ir of Mr. Locutl Hall Plantation, amvad by the same jjlane. Hi> [ilnns u. aaand a month ::..; < Conlinuinp Holiday H ON MRS l-.VKLYN KKItTIN, Mho lean u B r; on April 7th. n-'urned on Tuesday via Trinidad to io>unio her Ifcnbudo* holiday She Rrvl arrived from B.O for. , wo d>Mi.-< Carim Oldby who tame In the same day ;md i* ar of the sunucompa ny htrt led lor Trinidad Mr.. Sinre de Kuttel. Dr. Riirlnira UordaUirs daughtar baa .gone to .sit. She flew UMre ba H W 1 A yesterday i >on. Back to Montierrat M i:s GILL %  tfg 1 Mr. 0 A. Gill. Mai iger of if. !: %  Bank of Caniidn in Mnnt*err.v. %  en leaatwg t v the Lady Rorfnev last night. Mr. G:II U on . li i ka* ekM slaying with her daughter and m Mr and Mr Fn-d Marshail of KanaingtOn, Funta belle. From Trinidad M RS. FRANK DE BOEHMLER r.-ime In mi R.w.I A s fliKht Irom Trinidad yefterdav .iftrrnoon tn spend ,i hnv dayi twliday with Mr and MrJin Kellmnn of St. Anns Court, (..irrnon. Her son r a been htttaaa'ing wris* the Kelt man*: and will hr i-rturn big with her to Trinidad. S> Are theu eontv to caf) that high ore the cost ot tTlna f Enraged Holidaying With Parents '„', M il A N l> MRS ARTHUR i 1 I.KWIS and then thi*. .. ( I'l.ildien. Margot. Gordon and baby ^ Suzanne .irrtvifl fnnn Trinidad M hn hy H W I.A. In spend 8r tix weeks' holiday staying with Mr Lawta' parent in Barberees. He Is the assitt.mt niiiuager Canntnga Grocery in Frcdci Str^t. Port-of Spam M R KEITH TAYLOR, ton of Mr. and Mrs M. V Taylor of Worthing, is engage.! to Miis Rosemarie Pape. daught cf Major G. W. Pape of Fyiabad, Trmidad The engagement mm announced a short time a. in Trinidad wheri> Ke*h is at peaaaag living. Sfiort riofidnj M R PRANK NOTHNAUU. was at Seawell vesterday to meet his wife and son Oscar Mis. Nothnagel has rome over for a short holiday. Oscar, who Was in Trinidad lor the lasteholidays. ha* returned to Lodge School for the summer term Mr and Mrs. Nothnagel are guests at the Barbados Aquatic Club. Sisters O N their way home to_ Newfoundland are Dr. and Mn D J ORegan and ihetr .laugh light by Sheila who left last Lady Kedne? for Halifa r-y hail been --pending two <*ks' holiday with Mr and %  Bill Grace of the Garrison Mrs O'Regan and Mrs (irae < %  ajajgaj With Ap*x OiliUUb A MONG the passengers from Tnrnriad %  terday by B.W.I A. were Mr and Mrs Victor Gill and thahhaby daughter Here on three months' holiday they are staytn* al a bungalow in St Lawrence (i;tp Mr Gill works with Apaa Moved D R. NEVILLE SCHULER e; speclulisl in Georgetow B G .; wh . Ui !? to hav .t "^"'K on Main Street najar the Church Oilnelds at rysabad. Trinhtad of the Sacred Heart, tells ma gnat h< has moved to Lamaha Street. and has opened a drug store as well. Dr. Sctiuher arrired her* Monday from Trinidad and 1 tjrlng at the Marine Hotel. Yesterday he left for BG by 11 W I A. New Manager n^|R. Ml MRS CYRIL VOLM Leewards Trip R. and Mr ; ; Col and their young gone for n trip through the Levward Islands and will get off in St Kilts They expect to lie back In Bar b anoa by May 25th. Mr. Bellomy's trip Is in connee Han with the Hnrh.vtris Mutual l-ife Assurance the Lady Eaga w y last night Mr and Mrs Volney are on their way to Mont sen at. The children Kill, get oft* in Dominica M V-ilney will shortly be taking Bellamy 4V er the managership of Cable have and Wireless' Branch in Montserrat from Mr. retiring. P W (roney who During May '-pRANS CANADA AIRLINE i fk ^ oman V h Didn'l Know AltlttM. IhllilKKh COOK) epHE wallof Mtss Heler. I ntOUaaat'i Mth floor office Madison Avenue. New Y.ak are lined with th e autographi-u picture* ol famous men ann women whom she taught t<.peak un the radio. Ther e are Anthony Eden. Margaret Truman II g r b %  i Hoover, WaMar PUgeon — Clement Atilee. Th Prime Minaatei nucent ciiuM' of the worst tju\ •a* ever oasnmittcd by £gt-a-eek Helen Siouasat. boss of all the alks for one of America's bigacst radio networks During his first post-war vbHt to the Umard Stutes, ike bad ;reed to take part in a brond it with Miss Frances Perlrinv FDR's Labour Secretary. MisSloussat (pronounead Sooeah) >ae to -ee that all went werV Franees Perkins aTrtved firsBehind her came three or four men. one of whom seemed par ttrularry self-effacing. "I thought." said Miss Tlni—i "that hn was a sort of brief-ca*<; carrier. To make him ie**! homo I asked him if he would not like to come mto the control room and watch the broaden"! from there. Thank you so much.' he said 'It's ver v kind of you. Bui I hardly think I can. I shall be broadcasting, you ten, i My name is A tiler "Two years later he came %  gain and rrmenshtrad dreadful moment. He ss the sweetest way—'Please dont worry* Tou know it was not the first time I'd been taken for brief-case earner.' Helen Sioussat. 35. dark-haire -n Sport* DMr>. SU ,i ... %  Uiiorui*. S> a.m. t^*i%  -, JO .. m \ T * m Lnd and Livm.(c-k. n li %  %  Crnlrr. iSim srsni A r* a m Raslneerl'ic Aehta • %  in Th* \. Home Hewa u w : % % % % %  ISMMteh. noe . %  %  1 IS Top bcor pour of iiw wet-it. : BtagBaaaa, 5* p m Pii-, SOS p m |j.-nr' DtB'>. F p m Orrhratral MasK of BaML • 49 p n. riltMiv Parade i,.U— MM S %  > — MA" afc .JI.tg %  liu p.m. Tttr Ne*<, 110 v %  Pair. %  • pm. Radio rfewsretl. "is o T Tn* Ainvnt^rea of i r %  .. n . a li p m From IKa Editorial!. S 0B p in BBMBSSI '•II p m WalM Tosrlh( C'-t-T. 14* p n D* YOJ aM.cfi.Mr. IIM p< Tn* !• %  ., 10W p.m. Ln" C.B.C. Tl'URSDAY MAY 10. In I ,. |< IS pm N*'. 10 1 P %  0 p m TTU* W** In Canada. tiuperl and the Ice-flower — 24 I) For Carib Talk* ,R STEH1.E, Director (^rteral Thursda -t Agriculture for the French Bnrbadi eekly flight to Barbados due In at 5 10 this morning from Canada. For the month of May it continue to %  -. %  me In every It will be returning to ts northiiound trip West Indies, arrived ye-Jerdav %  %  to-day. Trom June the from Guadeloupe hy ll.W.IA. to schedule will once more operate Bttand tw Twelfth Meeting of ll.e "" Coribbean Commission Dr Stehle is a member of the French Section of the Caribbean On Long Leave O FF to England on Bangnftl i Q g Gasooa-ne go Mr. and B.W.I.A Mrs. Courtenay Reeee who have the Oe been holidaying in Barbados foi the past five and a half weeks Mr Reeee is a Puisne Judge o' Nigeria. Ho Is on long leave Before coming to Barbados. Mr. and Mrs. Reeee visited their daughter Daphne In Cambridge MmmrViuaMU. In England, they will see Iber ether daughter Rosemary. through here on Saturdays. Eye Surgeon VIVIAN METIVIEJL ev surgeon of Port-or-Speii has joined has wile over here fo n week's holiday He flew I Trinidad yesterday l They arp slaying -i Hotel. D" rat Holiday NN Penchoen lefl last by the Lady Kodssry weeks' holiday m Leaving with her were Mrs Paul Hollander and Miss Betty tlollender. Mrs. HolIcnrter and Mis* Penchoen ore sisimixTiiiis or PI r\\ / V BY THE WAY tfy Beachcomber D ,AINTY • %  thistledown, light the fairy aanoats Grogblossom and Quartbottle, a hoverplaiie "landed on four saucers in the midie Of a lake.*' Not one Of the saucrrs was broken or even i BSJ pod If n smaller hoverplane Tilled with tea could land on a saucer in the middle uf a U-a-shop. ten to one there would br no spoon to stir it with. "What was that nd 1 heard. Elvira?" "Why. Raonl, a hoverplane has Just landed on your umbrella knotuk al fulls K OOLUKATFATTI explored London yeah rdaj At OxfOrd Cil he was surprised that all the old collrges looked s,, new At CambrI4k4 Cncus he asked bow the students manoged to carry their boata down to the river through all that trathe. When he ggw St. Paul's b exclaimed: "Dome, uf Piaooi I nsked to see an English muatc-haU, and was taken to the House of Cummons Ikwas Interested to note that i: was the performers who laugtl Jokes. He said thnt all the prayers about cheese proved boa the English sUU wen, I i mli a %  \rlirlll . WHILE MAKING every r Ml Uoneomei \ %  %  of propriety, one cannot but regret the iindignii.Hi behaviour ol Councillor Tudmanh Anything that, at niCfl a tune as this, tends to discredit such ceremonies at the christening of gas containers makes us a laughing-stock in the eyes nf foreign mittens. It might be well if. on future occasions Limes ware not Invited to perform tanks which a man is quite capable of carrying out successfully. We do not suggest that those who attempt to exaggerate what occurs Into a kind of pagon orgy are necessarily right. But we do deplore the introduction of this personal note into what should be an impersonal occasion. The gas-containers of the nation mut>t not be made the subject of vulgar bickertpj ring. ihW. McGurgln A SKED why hash had begun to appear on her menus as "le hash" Mrs MrGurgle said: "French is the International langiirige of fund. 1 want my French tourists to feel at homo in gay Pnree when they come here. Hence, also, the tiny tricolour flag stuck In the Pudding Auriol." JUNIOR COMPETITION The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in a humorous eaunv. story or poem on the subject of "A TOP HAT." The best enlrv will be published every Monday in The Evening; Advocate, and the winiui will receive a prize to the value of 7/d in efther books or stationery. Entries, must reach The Children's Editor. The Advecale Co 4 Ltd. City, not later than Wednesday every week. NOTE : Stories must not be copied. Send this coupon with your story. JUNIOR COMPETITION Name Age School Home Address I iirm %  L A D I E S SHOES %  "WtNDSOH tttt.wn%  WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS $ 9.44 TAN. NAVY & BLACK SANDALS $ 8.53 %  TAN & NAVY CASUALS $ 957 SJ TAN & WHITE CASUALS $ 8.50 All ll ill, I'l.illiirm *./• ,i.„l II •#/• Hi—Is Women turn On Tax Man From if M. MaeCOLL NEW YORK. The normal man (mails l>efore the eold, beady eye of the tart (oUector Just now It Is the taw coRectors who are quailing ticeobly before the hot, angry eyes of America's women. The row started when Wash mgton told housewives thnt they wiuld have to start "withholding'' taxes from the money they \>.uout to part-time maids and "baby sitters/' Led bv traditionally independ a-nt Texas ('Don't fence me in"), the Riders of the Kitchen Itangr in tned bt S torrent of protest on the Treasury officials. Who is behind the revolt? Non* other than our old friend, acid tongued Miss Vivien Kellems, th* Connecticut cable manufacturci Last year she won her own sur against the Internal Revenu< Bureau for the retain of $8 133 80c. seized by the Government because she refused to deduct, income uix from her work"ri pay-paekeCi Faced by the avatanche. Washington is already displaying most unwonted leniency in applying the law. THE "clear aim of Amer pelleywas stated In clear terms J liv aesthetic-looking Averafl Harriman. former ambassador to llritain. in a speech at Angeles "There c;in he victory —and glorious victory — in pre renting another world conflict.* THE RABBIT |g far more calrr are] collected than man In a ens says one of America's top scien. tis. Dr. Roy Forster, of Dartmouth CoHege. Faced with danger, nan gets all hot and bothered But the rabbit just "goes into l quiescent state" Hots off "o Harvey. THE stern voice nf the sergeant was growling out its routine messages over the radios of Philadelphia's police cars. Suddenly Banal thr crooning of "The Ten essee Walt?." Explained the red' fnced police: A Joker must have Itund a police car unattended. EDWARD DONNELLY of New York does not believe in wasted motion. His method of disposing of an old chslr is to toss it out of the windew. Now Ed is in .1,1 The chair landed on the head of Mrs. Vera Brautigam — who now hat 18 stitches. TEN YEARS ago Sam Goldwyn bought the film rights of Somerset Maugham's story "Mackintosh.* Now he is going to produce it to Title: 'South ol Samoa." i iosswniiii LJLLJtii I II" *'! t -rT B" ?===?= l -rso p %  %  %  " a m P" EVAN5 fi WHITiiLl.nS Fun mat r*M nn *ioae n A w.I .vlil-ul OHIO ... i nrn irom %  utiim* m> S.rt ot inina ton map mi I lb r..l*Uii |.M,',', i i mere" monif in eflucati A i hanee ol elieoi*. (7| i Dritan moan* • >Sl All due no* nut not trimi Tnla dosen ItroM, nli Acted a* agnii nu do. UnarniM from CHMII. Suitowfiu iri ^i t'w; me vliuip ^n^'ii IM Olid uuL>rrpu-< %  %  uw I i ftsiiia (rum a IKIIIUIS I pa* MI uanuu we flna in leav ate neat :I-IB I W de.il. (4i %  i muaa i DIAL 460b YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 4 DAYS SERVICE Our Expert English Watch Repairer auarantees to repair your watch aatislactorlly. A big shipment ol SWISS PARTS ior every type ol watch has junl been received. IIIOASO II. II. LIMA A 4 O. Opposite Goddard'a PLAZA Theutr*—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) LAST TMO SNOWS ToDAV — i %  %  t 1st PM *KO Batla D-ablr kill I 1ST "A SONG IS BORN" < ah" bl T*luilralar Dnj KAVr Vmtfru MATO Pla% — Leul ABTHSTnONG Dnn* COOBWAir and Others 2ND "BODYGUARD" LAWHENCE TICRNCY TODAY •Thura.l IN P M. THEGOLDEN EYE & Tom DRIFTIN' KID With the dim. great a*lo"i tan. Rup*n o'*a **i | %  %  .. fii rft t kttle bcl How gH nef?" he grawli. New Lovt'IiiKss For Vou •w PAL310LIVE SOAP A'wa.n •Tt !" *rilm. 'rhi. k l V Follow thit Simple Hrauty Plun Tom fare -I'h Pilmnll,* S....p %  If., 1: ,li'.-li. k".lv haihar gfttH.'* i J-> Iff !i %  > MlDNITE SATURDAY 12 BY REOUFST ALSO — MON 930A.M SI 30PM '• LOUISIANA AND SONG OF THE WASTELAND PLAZA BRIDGETOWN COMING HASTY HEART 'OACrClRMICHAEI. .MICHAEL CURTI2 """"Ann TODD • Normnn WOOLAND %  Ivan DESNY A J. Arthur Rank Presentation • A Universal-International Release STARTING TO-MORROW AT 8.30 EMPIRE THEATRE Asy.K'.tv,-,'i,r,w'.r^. v.-.v.v.vs.. %  %  '" '.'S,?X','Z'A -V?Z? GLOBE THEATRE LAST SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.13 P.M. •MA AND M DMir AND •wn HKVIINII im: IMH" liKNNETT & Michael REDGRAVE AO A I II 4 1 I II I I.\|:MA ,M.mb.nOnly! phin %  8378 • COOD FOOD GOOD DHINKS GOOD SEA BATHING GOOD COMPANY union now:2.:m1. I. & H.:0 p.m. mill Continuing Daily 4.45 !c 8.30 p.m. I.I.01(K TODAY LAST SHOWS — 4 IS and .ll P M 20.000.000 uafefS DtW this the r-k**. •"'tl'.a, ilying jft# gnttn ner P wed' X *?> SA^li WENDELL USE"*" I04KNC PAGE and -THE SI'N NEVER SI Is Rastl RATHRONE and Dou(l FAIRBANKS I.IOIII: OPENING TOMORROW — 5 and HIS P M. I'M I RicharrJ CONIE Coleen QKAV ALCT aHCOi JA mej %  sswpiav %  / PnaBot-or^i-., • oiftw va *N A l*v.ia< 'BWaaSorai t %  vt — AITO — LOCAL TALENT ONFRANK AUSTIN DENNIS CLARKE REGGIE CASEY EDDIE CLARKE DORIAN THOMSON MALCOLM MURRAY. -tit.Vt'jQC-JHWH PARADE ."4 Winds anil 7 Seas" .. ."My Love Lovet Me" "Count Every Star" "If "You Can Do No Wrong" 'Time Afti-r Time" Gees* SttVS — GERALD DAISLKY A WILLIE IFILL Tlekeis on Sale FRIDAY NITE from 1 OVERCOME YOUR FEED PROBLEMS We OHer • WHOLE CORN 59.S0 pr bog 100 lbs. SCRATCH GRAIN M.50 par baq 100 Tbl. Obtainable Irom our • • • PLANTATION SUPPLY DEPARTMENT Phone 4657 THE IIASIilAIMIS MMII'I It VIIVI rOTTON nilOlll LTD. EMPIRE To day 4 46 and 8 30 and ConUnulna 20th CENTURY FOX Presents . I'D CLIMB THE IIICIIKST MOW/TAIN" Op"i.i9 F.,da, Mi 11th at 830 MADKI.aiVK" IIOYY TO-DAY and TOMORROW 4 3U and 3.1!i Columbia Ri* Double Roberi YOUNG and MM-itucrite CHAPMAN in *ttxtrrtuas" • %  LUST MM COLD Starring Glen FORD & Ida LUPLNO ROYAL TO-DAY Last Two Show* 4.3* and 8.3fl Republic Smashing Double Virginia GREY and Paul KE3J.Y in . GRISSLY'S MILLIONS' AND •HFJ.I. nrmtsiRll \ SUrring Roy ROGERS. Sunset CARSON and Allan "Rockv" LANE OLYMPIC I-ast Two Show., TO-DAY tie and sUI MOM and Tor Big Donhle Edmund Ow<>nn and Donald Crisp in %  H ILLS OF HOME" and • SOMETHI.\C FOR THE BOYS" starring Oarman Miranda and Mlcbaal O'Shaa



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PAC1 I 11.111 BAKBAOOS ADVOCATE f.iURSIlAY MAY U, 1KI ENGLAND DEFEAT ARGENTINA 2-1 BRILUWT FOOTBALL SEEN AT WEMBLEY [iU l\< K DAYtSI IDI m •? •* r T \Vo QOA1 '*n minute? i Argentina of a glorious soccer moment Co-da %  % %  1 to nil and were within mi ace of becnnn 10 win .in International football match 01 i li\SI ll\l I %  %  %  i.-n hop* ad by two crashing goal* lensen mid Jackie Milburt These goal hall pr* itu ball i.-.reiy tine • Kccc.pt. B38,SZ3 lance it the match wa IOO.OOO und receipt! %  At llinm-r The Argcnlin. %  %  1*. r left il until very late" *, Secreiai j BlgM si Park 1 tel UnaV i' %  *grr J that Argentina had i wall ind AI'IO unf>>iiunato i a_a i #,„_ ,.11 to hang 011 to their lead agci ball nu tingles, striking the post* and "".',, .rtssbar. Argentina were infi Id am, II min' ;';.'." ," ulcs. rather agar their attack nd hall %  • an injury t<> Bravo who went on %  failed li 11 burn got ti. nar fa* AIV>DUIM I lokad hk. holding out for victory It wai I ver) good game In parts," r.venl> li;tl:iitcc '""wed the scrvlo in the Hi .1 l. .It Then tlrse pr Brav < UM England tarpa £f*2f e : .11. in which t%  II control "PWt. and qut I nier-paasing ,, 1 tldi wers gea •rally more of %  Wck-and-lolU practicall) with the ie*uH that England's attack ra 1. went smoothly who mi the Mortanaan, En*Uih In Udfl right *aul "Thank guodm-s-' Whan M %  Cored the equalising goal while Jack Milhiirn'> eon OUl his winning goal WB "It's just another goal." Hilly Wright. England'* Cap i..U.K. Cricket Season Opens Much Too Soon LONDON. I icket season begins, and ends, a fortnight loo %  arty I eminent:. Spot Ismail s Diary. That fact was emphan outburst uf arctic weather which had turned the MCC v. Yorkshire match into a shivering night. rned to do the same by the opening of nth African i"ur at Worcester II ,. IT. Lie reliable Uaiicv in the 100 yard* in the Ham May—nearly always AAA v London University match d warmer. Why then not at Hotspur Park on May 9. won unpetition tie AAA junior furlong In the tX— record time of 22 1 sees, in IMS. m Set ember i and He hae take* things easily %  programme with satire then, but intendIn return %  %  r, v Player, at Scarto the track with the 220 yards i. srpivinbrr 5"' as his objecVve. %  -. Hut he starts with a I. we say giwdbye to su.nmer loo If' fuctured a wrist a couple of soon. rMtga ago while playing rugger. If the argument be used that and thU may even prevent hin. football would take uway the from appearing on May • wall it would not rum McCarthy', iiuidc • ..i l> as much as does the How much more vulnerable la wathet punishment are the lower grade* Kepeat in prospect of professional boxing compared Dudley Nourae the South Afrlto the higher amateur i llklar now than h" Former ABA international be but still Incountry* Sammy McCarthy gave a guide best batsman and a very' pleasant in his first professional tight . ,i le that Eng co-is came from n ovtmeeui on n Hint side of the Held £ As was anticipated, the speed „ nnd thrust U) the re-on: i England forwarV line eventually dividends ll iw nh re, calling Who snatch: .h two snap in the %  pace "f ih %  i ilnutc ,• against ISUKkpOOl 00 thiv ground. t Tired Arge duad and looked dejected B I entered the i Rugllo, aat K I each holding his ni a M wai bad lu> k rot him ihat he had finished on UN i such a magnlfli r His COUaagUeS %  tandUlg around i sipping cups of tea commisscruli H1 with him. GulHercno SUbUa, lecHucal S director of the team, had no c rompiutnts "it ami i very good i mutch but. I Hunk we deserved D ,. draw" he added Hut the ground ( .;.s rather heavy for his playai and he thought the Strange climatic conditions affected his players. "The. ware vary tired toward the end when England were pressing slioimlv" he said Stabile declined to ehuda UUl any of his players for single mention. "They all pi." ,c.r be %  Comrrcr.tini; '.TI the DVUdand team. Stabile said their sliength lay In team work i ather than individual effort*. %  They all lived UP to what W %  M 'The ( iuivd li". %  lag" %  added that II irly vet to nj %  I %  thet Bravo %  right thigh, and Coirnan who hai twisted his right knee lit for Sunday's game again*. Bare. Carlisle Bay under the auspicei o' the Hov. Barbadoe Yacht Cub Sl irUng times ,\nil h are % %  follows: AHTHtTB MACABT1IUB, II year-old son of General Donglft" MacArthur. dlspUys big league form as be tosses the ball out at the New York Polo Ground prior to the start of the Giant-Dodger match at the opening of the American big league baseball season. Royal Commission Reports No Fault in Helling Set-Up LONDON, May AFTER TWO VKAIts of fact-finding, the Royal Comrniaaton on Gaming has given the green light to the little %  i: n who ''!; % %  ; to h;,\-" hi. DO hitter* 1 on thhorsea. greyhound or (ootball pool? in i' je|>ort, a massive votu I (-..,. % %  -. drus Ml TI*-%  IM> Itrtfatio Thurl-' N i llt-i I J. MO. ian> Hi a %  taeurau .tmd-v Md June nt 1 rranUur Cup Ttiurwtev 1th June DO (i.m. II n Pt.AlH HA' SUTMI Kenan Wins TiliV CLASCOW. Ma' It Petal Keennn of OlasflOW "" Ihe British IhrntamweiKhi Cham[ lonship here to-night when he nocked out the holder. Danny O'Sullivan of London In the sixth round of then scheduled IS-round light.—Reuter. Saturday. ol more ihan 100.000 word*, Commission has II. .11 tune punter of any taint iul lapse ii mills, m f ni. thai (OUl rUd Bva adults in every walk of life have gambled at mm t ll Mill. ..' raffles, whist drivepi ——— n aanatake. Yf ow The Investigator! aav KM lulely nothing arm ^^^ Answering those who d* gambling as leading Io "" delin|iiency, erinw, pOVI diversion from work, UV R(d •ays: "It Is eartr" to establish by abStl menu that all gamblin v *""' > herently immoral ing tfl He.1 and evil which would | cap) iwever. that g in nsL hke other Indulgi n %  as gleohollc drink or tobai should lie kept wit vanav li """ '* i :,l,it oontrolled with pro dance. %  Si li • aye ipenlnj %  the extent of betl Yelh.w are COntaUMd in the II estiinale-. Hi..! ni.a. r—\ "O" leople last yaw about £I50,000.ni>'i vno P 00 1 horai i the grej hounds. Of this amount, how ever, approximately ""' went to costs and taxes. v < %  * %  The various ganblin employ around ''0 ooo full-tlmi II,,, •porkers with tttOM part-time v""* Interest Widespread It w is also fchown that RWn than 0.000.000 persons contribute nearly t .12.000,000 annually the loothall pools alone. Tin deaptta Ihe fact Ihat In p 0] oil omc "i the larger prt %  forecast are as) 1100,000 to .... Some idea of the d nicking a winner %  ion. A large 1.1,1 tnvt %  £120,000 over a period raonthi RapaytnaM in prigs came to laai "i m £800. The inquiry, however, showr that Ihe totai ipenl •< %  • all foil 1 nig iibsurbctl only abrti 1 eni of th national uuome Ot I Ch a mpion //. G, Cyclist For HarlHuh>s SporiB the weak news was reG rived from British Qalana thai inn champion cyclhn Lindsay 1 %  pted in par) an 'IUIM II,,At: U Clatlon of Barbados tO attend Iheir Intercolonial Sports meeting due In open on Monday next This means that Gordon will ad be here for the llrst riuy hut will u.i on the last two days of the meeting on May 17th and 10th. Intercolonial meeting is being nd Mondi v 14th and Go have to remain al homa for this ill I. a. I B.G. and arrive In Barbados on the 18th The Local Athletic A also announced with ra I lean King, Trinidad's champion r will not ling the me eti n g; iiow-i twelve of the original oup of Trinidad cyclists wh.i 1 ..me up tor the meet. ,:• will 11 arriving next t DinjJ by ihe S.S "* •• %  %  ll kald Thi. .fir,,,0--. ratsra % %  O....U h, ,..4 an*. FOOTBALL mol.ixi nc M-1.1.. H-ikllfli at SI. I.ra>. ..1 IN. ,.(-,.. -.11 ,,. M, ( %  K.r.. Play Urt> *l IN p n> I \-Klinill ll,.1.,.in li \ m Ti .ISa l sHsa •• mi 1 .OiBrtHtiera ow I'llllIU II .1 ..l..n Hllk %  %  —I •. •• > llia l, al M...1-.U Hl|h Sihaal Whafs mi Today Caribbean CommUslon at lljsliiu:* House — 10 am Court of Original Jurisdiction and Lower Courts — 10 a.m. CINEMAS i int. I a I Hi iMlatn" — I I i.n-.li • Mad>|aard — 1 aw lua. The batter hit pid you ever hear of a batsman having to retire through biting hit own tongue? It happened at Lord's to I-eadbeater the York.hireman. Playing a ball from lack Martin he hit it on Io Ihe underside of Ihe Jaw. The blow jerked his mouth shut, and teeth tore tongue. I-ater he was able to complete his innings. Price of fancy Retnre the war Tote backers alwavs favoured Ciordon Richards and the Tote price of his mounts wai invariably less than the starting price quoted by bookmakers. hi Urne. backers seemed to give no this procticc as if to suggest they were not willing to accept the reduced odds. Now it is Lester Piggott who .appeals to Tote backers. At Worcester yesterday Bridge of Hellas started at 100-6 For %  2s winning ticket the Tote paid 4fl3s Yet in the next rare Palm drove, who started at 320-1 only paid 45s. 9d.. despite having not been placed before. He was ridden by Piggott l.a>t u.ek Tote back.is of IVgott's mount Barnacle received only ISs. 3d. for their 2s. The starting price was 10-1, and many got 100-8 about it with bookmakers. It is disappointing to back a winner and not receive the odds one hopes for, but followers of Pigg know what to expect in future. Whilik-'s view AAA quarter-mile hurdles champion Harry Whittle will defend his natmnnl decathlon title this summer but. he adds, "without much hope of improving my points total." (His last year's score of 6,087 points set a new English native record ) Whittle, who was third in the 400 metres hiudleal the Buropeaii champion 1 that the prospects for .piurier-mile hurdling in this country ..re good. The event Is becoming more popular, and consequently the standard ll higher London Express Sen-ice Thomas Fights In U. S. for World Titio By GEORGE WHITING Eddie Thomas, welter-weight boxing champion of Britain. Europe and the Linpu to the United Sia*-, to fight for the championship o( the Nfcrtd His opponent will l>e the win ncr of the fight M Hay 1.1 between the Chicago negro. Joleu y Hratton. and Kid GaviL.it. af Cuba. Thomas's light will bfl tlw lost major Anglo American contest in Wood cue k was knocked %  at by Taral MaurieUo m New York in May 1946 Lew Burs ton, her" from Madison Square Garden. New York. completed the deal with Thomas's manager Sam Burn:, in London to-day and is reporting buck to the Slides to fix the date and place lor the Briuah QharagaV ihere. Australian Offer Burns would like the fight to take place in June, so .th-t Thomas can return before th" year ia out, to defend his Europe %  gainst Charles Hume/ c4 France, and his British championship against any official contend er. He has also had an offer to defend his Empire title against the Australian champion, Mickey Tolhs. i n New South Wales. The Hralton-Gavilan right is part of the "elimination" aeries set up by the American National Boxing Association to find a successor to Ray Robinson as world welter-weight champion. The 1 NBA declared the title vacant when Robinson took the middleweight championship from Jake LaMntta. last Februnry. The NBA set-up Is that Bratton, having be den Charlie nniild now light Guvilan —the winner to meet Eddie Thomas. One point to be ironed out is that of Thomas's status in a championship fight Burns says Eddie should heve equal rights, und an equal share of the purse money, with either Bratlon or Gavilan. To nght as I challenger Id mean an appreciable cut In Thomas's remuneration. —I..E S NO PL.W CAMB1 : The opening da\'s play in the South African tricksters' match abandone % %  %  ^. out a ball being bowled. I night jnd during the itui ning. but, intarotacted bowlers* ends eoddi — %  teasel ?.**.*.:',-.< AMATEUR ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF BARBADOS 1114. TI IIAVS CYCLE AMI ATHLETIC X SPORTS MEETING (under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governa* Sir Alfred & Lady Savage) al KENSI.NGN.V OVAL MO, Mat Mil They'll \~>o It Every Time *^-T ttlng, tin ild it could (ind no sup... 11 1..1 ihe 1 alii t thai gaipblinj within inoiicratioii did any .urn either to On -,e who 1 dta %  .immunitv genarallj the scale In which it is Indulge tresont could not be regirdcd a; mposing %  —CP' 'nes SHINI0 The quality Metal Polish IOH ELEGANT DRESSES — SEE THE BROADWAY DRESS SHOP 1. 1:1:1 1 \n STliKKT tVhiUMondav May llih Thursday . May nth & Saturday May nth beginning at 1 1 m. eacl 111 y BASKETBALL Cariton /defeated Y.MCA 31—0 in I basketball game a1 lle<'kles Road last night. Harrison College Old Boys WOT from Pirates 19—8. ERNIES CLUBThis afternoon at 6 p.m. Members are requested to be present for the Arlma Creole race problems, E. D. CARMICHAEL, Hon. Secretary. 4H THRILLING BTBfTfl See Ken Farnum. I.tnd'jv 1 Flash) Gordon, Cecil I'helps. Harry St Marl, Mike Tucker. The lload brothers. Qeergi iiiii. Harold i Archer. \ .. %  Hunle, tlawln Hill. Hi i-. %  !! %  gj Company. The Lew 1* Twin Hioilieiv. and a string of other male W.I. < >cll*u and Athletes as well as Mlis Grace Cumberbatch and MU* KDeau Kins in action at the in .1. %  iival tJataa Open at 12 1 1 dally I'KICES OF ADMISSION: SEASON TICKETS Kensington Stand S2 16 George Challrnor S1.6H IIAILY TICKITS Kensington Stand George Challenor I'ncovered Seals Grounds .... si.oa Ite. 4S*. 24e. Season Ticket.s on Sale dallv %  t the Civic, Swan Ar High Street ^^a&yio^/y}} Remembor, a comioilable itttinq SUIT is our first consideration. There ore incieasinq numbers who recognise for themselves the consistently superb cut, tit and linish oi the ... IDEAL TAILORING Wo will welcome the opportunity of provinq this to you in our . TAILORING DEPARTMENT on ihe first floor of CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10—13. BROAD STREET /.



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HAltllADOs ADVOCATT I HI BSD VI MAY III, lllil I LIFEGUARD THE WONDERFUL BRITISH DISCOVERY A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic /<> STERILIZE CUTS AND GRAZE s TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS AND ST I A :; S Tfah mimjilflll new Lifeguard used in tens ol .! • of Irome* i*. the moM powerful proieclion n ma At the -amc time 11 is quite safe for all to hanulj Had pleasantly flagrant and non-staining. No home with small children dare he without it. TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Th! NEW WTN PEN ihtl u rauttfM a *•• %  at Hi> Ftflvl rtf iVniain. La at JOMNkOXk BTATIONIRT rKMSBL-IT PAINTS far ur MV-CS M ll" IHI & VS^Wk S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD—Agents SHOP HERE! LADIES! DRESS GOODS Sharkikln, Ramaine Crepe Jersey. PUin fc Striped, Silver At Gold Tinsel Crepe i, GeorgctU', Plain I Printed Crepe-de-Chlne, Satins, Saliru. TafeUis, Spuns, Etc. Hats, Shuts, Nylons. GENTS! T.itTeta-;. Spun". Etc Hats. Shoe*. Nylons. LET US SERVE YOU. THANIs Pr. Wm Henry St Swan SU. NEW BOOKS II I I'M ANT BILL by Lt.-Col. J. II. Williams VENDS Till; LONELY' (lODDESS by John F.rskrne SIIAW by Daunond McCarthy ISLANDS OK THE SUM by Ttosita Forbfs THE KXPI.OITS OF EXGELBRECIIT by Maurice Kichardson CHAMPIONSHIP UNITING //.VWW.W.W/-W/W////, SCHOOL BOOKS BOYAL READEBS X 4. BOYAL SCHOOL PBIMF.R WEST INDIAN BEADEB I Ic 2 ADVOCATE STATIONERY ,-. **',-.*. W '.**',**'-'W %  SA*S*S^'S*SSSSSSSSSS+VSSSSS^*^''**'SS*S'*^': IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE 1 SPEQAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY MOIRS CHOCOLATES pe. PKG ROWNTREES COCOA tins i i 25 CARRS CHEESE CRISPS & CLUB CHEESE BISCUITS urn 120 NOW USUALLY NOW PLANTERS PEANUTS 10 3 pit* l TINS -* 0!i GREEN SEAL RUM 20 BOTS (laro*) 108 HEINEKENS BEER BOTS 2 88 21 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street DUNLOP UNIVERSAL MOTOR CYCLE TYRES HERE AT LAST!! • A Cane Trailer For Extra Reliability DOWDING ESTATES & COMPANY LIMITED ManufaTturcd by the well-known Bwkhouw orgnnlM" a 11 •iperlallv designed to meet the exacting requirement of HH* ioUon work In the West indies, where contouring and draining of land is practised. These Cane Trailers ore equipped with large diameter 10 plv rear tyres, and positive brakes, and are capable of earning a 8-ton pay load with safety. Soeciflcations:—5-ton 4-wheeled Sugar Cnne Trailer. Main Frame: —10*—0long x 4'—" wide, from steel members electrically welded. Gooseneck Auemblu.—of 4" ID. heavy service tubing. .Side Frames—of steel channel with bolt fixing. Drawbar:—of steel channel, cross-braced and electrically welded. Rear Axle Equipment:—3" sq. bed, straight-through axle, with ]ournils. filled 6-stud roller-bearing hubs. All ateel disc wheels. 8 on x 28 Front -4xle Equipment:—2H" sq. bed. straight-through axle, with Journals, (itled 5 -tud rollerbearing hubs. All steel disc wheel. 4 00 x 16 PRICE S1.7M.M "We know that there are cheaper trailers on the market, but If vou are interested in a unit which will give entire satisfaction m both WET & DRY WEATHER, we invite you to come in and examine these "specially" designed trailers." ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET s :??^ ? ^ c??ss KS^s s^ssg I





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MVRSDAV, M\\ in. 1951 llUillXOOS \DVO0.\TE I'M.I IIU Case Of Aircraft Landing Examined Ify Chamber Of Commerce MR : < t 'K (Jnr). told Ihi Chamber ol CommerN tf their meeting yesterday uf the Colonial hecition ot the Clovernment'?; pogftfon a> <• T.L'.A. plane having been refused landing at S .well Airport on the night of April 14. i the reasons why the plane was refused landing wai I ffM the danger <-i placing undin on the c xisiing staff. -— % %  —— %  Mr. U-u^.k I'li-uii'iLi i.i the ^ .___,_, Cbj di O. H King had a* 4 HfRRffA l\f tmn appointed i \_4fAS\.Mj>DMJjf\Lv aatarvtaw UM Cceoalal Breratary. -^^-^ _____-_-_ _^-. —, Hen. R. N Turner, and talk It over COMMISSION %  i ikon yestw%  tngl House whan the major i onion of th*Id-ports ol the Con.:. -. thivj... AMI 'M had bei B referred Thi c i reported among other thniK'. on reoom* menuations made by various technical meetings previously held under Commission sponsorship, .ken Include the %  of Iriirii* n hilherln have r.-om II id form. "iiimlsslon also moved to maka il poealbla -n make traininn In method. available to the Caribbean terri t o r ial. Another decision taken was i> move to secure the services of u specialist in rural tUvea, fluent in FVeneh ih, to work in the Carib. bean pr< r ncU lies and u %  The Con ipported the %  ndatlons made by the StaUatlcal Confaranec lary General to circularise member and i ".menls In order to ensure their Implementation, and in aj I '<.m mission led to explore the facilities lor I .iile In the various technical assistance prot rammes In order to train CarlbMi inorandum The Commission noted n memorandum pre p ared by Mr. J B. nan. Consultant for Industrial Development and decided iting of the Re..I'licultuie and Industrial devriopmant should i riad as early as possible dar ihe nature of UM entad to the Fifth -inn Condecided that the tinin consideration of the fifth %  ih Wi -i [n I h-iiild be based 00 thi .. dtural and ..... %  ufflelenUj explored at previous %  Kssa\ (!om|M'liii(Mi .! P. P nero former | I . for the Caribbean i km Talks has prUM ol *!"< for the best es*w.<' ubjacl relating to the iiniiTils M objectives of ihe Carib Ion, This : r..i among scho.il children of the Caribbean i The essay will be written In F tha %  In tha territories with which the Commission •conecmed. Escaped Convict Recaptured Dud]*? ButK'.mcn". of Nurse ho eacapad roUca eua. polka Station <<" April 10. was lapUne.i yesterday waning UP Roekley mil Dudley took a danger from his pocket v.' urrounded by the police and cut his throat. He n taken to the General i arhera he \t guarded. i ill be suggested to Govern BM Ol that when the neee*jr> Lralnad, the air purl should then be made available for night fU{hl f .lile nntic or in case of an emergency. This suggestion ft' m Mi A 8 Bryden Mr Leacoek said that Mr Kmg and he had I Secretary, Tin ; had already pi dUBA on Ihe matter and had been considering n Pi Ha however, (bought that it might be better if the ha* been completed and the staff brought ui to the proper strength. Al the requc-l of H.W.I.A., and With their assistance In I irrjinj rut what must necessarily, bo makeshift arrangements, permission had been .granted to that company to operate certain (lights after 6 p.m. Make-Shift Arrangement* had been made whereby make shift facilities could be extended to Trans Canada airlines in the event of its %  eeklni jwrmission for its aircraft to make emergency landing altar (he usual hour* of operation. As to the facts of April 14. not long after the Colonial Secretary'* arrival at his ofllce. the Airport Mcnager telephoned from Sea well and said that T.C.A. were asking permission to land an aircraft between H and 8 30 p.m., and to make Ibehr return landing in the small licnir."if the morning. A few minutes later the local Manager of T.C A. also telephoned from Seawell and repeated Ihe two requests. He asked for an Immadlata yes or no decision. The Colonial Secretory replied agreeing that the aircraft could land any time before 10 p.m.. but to keep the airport open until the small hours of the morning would impose a strain on the operational stair which was not Justified under the circumstances. § On page 7 Uondkrtiji Industry:\eef American importers and a memlM-r of the AihiMiry Committee on Imports to me t' S Department of Commerce in Washington, told the Adwcate yesleida\ that there seems to he a con* siderable opportunity in Barbados for the dev.'lopiui'iit ol interesting ceramic products, small articles made of tropical woods, shell work of various kinds, needlework and basketry '.he weekend accompanied by his wife and i* staying at the Marine Hotal Mr. and Mrs. Lei^i %  making a survey of handicraft I roducts in the various Islands ol the British Caribbean Area, with a vkra to itudftai 11. %  poaatbUity He said that Barbados is parfortunate in very active port, bringing in many fr tla|>e Industries Cottage industries are a form of small industry which .an give em ployment to large numbers of people, especially in (he tune of ihe year when other employment is low, and as such, ran be an important econonui %  • ha laland At pease: to be a sufficient orajanl iiandicraft production In Barbado to permit of any active commer cial exportation, but it u ubi ap pear to lum thai an applicaUon of local, public and private Initta live would, undoubUsriiN M>me successful export items In Ihe handicraft field. He thought that the example of Jamaica where the Jamaican Government, through its Welfare un has, for many yaors, earned on .in • %  -. > e ir-tining I rogramme uf cottage crafts in th*J lural centres, could be followed in Barbados in tha daw uf exportable handicraft Mr. Leigh ton said that hut wife nnd he were greatly In with the very interesting exhibit., ol regional llsh at the Barbados Museum They noted that .i marine motif had been aged In some of the local cralt work In embroidery and in buskctiy Arawuk-Method They had learned thai i lent A'awak method oi preparing habi from nign cana laavoi hau bean re dl t iy. This might potentially become the bails of an extensive lural industry in Barbados wh %  .inis evarywhara ihid that 'tnpany huu been Importing bandii 11 Lutin America tor the last 2ft years. They operated fnun Nev York where they maint.in.Ki warehouses selling tu re'.a.l sti'ies In the U.S.A., they alt I flva ratall stores of their own daaling exclusively in imPOrtad l-ducts from the American Virgin Uland* from Puerto Hieo. Haiti Jamaica. Tnej havi found that tha Anieiuan DUbUC l| >-rv much :n terestetl in the Ca-ibbcan products such a& hats, bags and mats from Jamaica. Thag thought that the British islands had a eonaktatabl portunity to increase thi i diiit.i-n and sale of cottage Industry products whereby Ihev could give interesting employ menl to many |ieople. i I them to Improve their standard of living; making useful ana beautiful thingfor their own well as for the in ccised tourist travel which II Viscount Elibank former India Committee, died it Capetown, whan be had been living since August last, on March 12th lb third son of tin Kllhank and was born in lg77. Viscount Elibank is still remembered in the W*M tndh ,i> Mi Gideon hbu I St Vincent from 1909 to luift and of St 1 %  icttng as M tha Wfndwai for some montha ni 1916 Baton %  oing OUt to the West II two ,1 ,i, .,> tO tlie Permanent Under-Secret at \ of Slate for the Colonies (Sir Francis Hop*nod > and prior to that had served in New Cluinea and the n.msv.i.d After returning home from St. 1317 he was %  ppolntad Foxt Commissioner tor Glasgow and the Western Counties of Scotland, and at the end of !!:. %  an stood for Parliament and was elected for ihe St RoUoa Divlatoa or ciasgow u ii Unionist auppotter of the Coalition Oovernmaol His association with the V\-u-\ leaders brought him I touch with l-.nl Salisbury und Colonel Gietn.ii. the h the "diehard" movement. It was he who. H Fataruar) 1st. 1922, precipitated m.i'.i the chief Unionist Whip protesUng of the Prune Minister, Mi l.lo>>l George, and declaring that the time had com. lo "lahMIU the Cot Party upon its own basis." A moiilh later the diehard group %  blor of Unionist members lo end thg I loyd ueorfla regime, and it befttn the main strength of the party raj i evident at the iritan Club maettng On the death of his father in 1927 he became a member of the %  Lorda, arhara %  < ihowod : vei gnd i ractb al lnt< raat In Imparlal affairs and eapaclalli everything that iifTeeted fare of the West Indian colonies. He became the centre of a number of controversial Issues. In the Life twenties and early t 1 played B inotnlnent part in the campaign which had for its object the mamt.Tiance of ihe British West Indian sugar Indusu Viscount Elibank was appointed the Wast India Committai In ISM Ha reel 1938 and at the annual meeting i.i.>psed Sir Eliot de iK elected, as his successor Viscount Elibank was presidem of the Federation o' Chambers of Commerce of the Empire from 1034 10 1937 and %  I of Commerce Congress held la New Zealand in 193 He was also .t due. tor of several Insurance and investment companies. His publications included IVif.d iCc! indies and A Man's Life. w i C <' Small Holders (fon m t Gvt Workers To Reap (Janes BARBADOS IS KF its history—estimated at 173.000 tuns. But peasant fg are rmving no aagg cut Peasant farmer?, and sinallhoi %  rtencln] thg gMg) diiVu'ult period in years in their eflOrU to I their own crop and il the situation doea not uoprove, iht tonna r reaped mJ bl (all conridarably ihorl oil the 170,000 toiui mark, the Advocate was yesterday informed hv three peasant %  %  Far Regional Tnnfc I ..ion Talkfl propr.i tio„ i e*(ji< %  wntfl pat -.ot thern %  evil I..,,i iJown in ba t wiaai the UailMdoe gfi I -Hid the Sugar Piuuuvei I I %  haea lab >urrs will receive at tba the crop season a bonu* based on I atagn of toea harvested %  a compared with the entire i crop The C'wiupLiiut This, the peaaanl propneii reaulti m the mu .. ., % % %  rrnrie Un I'cmi absorbed by The only labour then avail abla lo the paaaant airj u< knaka uaa of tie %  at sugar estate, or thoao ph/sl all *; il Adams. I. i. cnUi atM gaabla ol working al tha ttw Rouaa of Aaaambty, wul alpaca thai would make l[ iv jin.i ihe Rocond CongTI %  atarnatlonal Conrerdaratlon ot They then charge %  ''ai .ati Free Trade Unions whieli arlU .lilting and gl par t>ke place in Milan. Italy, from day lor beading the cenoi but Jolv 4 II they eanmit ml nor bead the canes at an economic rate. Bui ^ "^~~~ tna smaM .• Aiiiiiiul veetl l. %  Some plantations, UM Advocate I ion Khoonsi lunaihi employ ohuoran during tha last %  n Vanalaytmun arrived in Long vacation t help tuurveat tha i'" ,rom British c,,,.... >-e one ,1 '" WW| ovei |U with the km ai ampl %  urHn r m B sort of labour She als,, DTOUghl them h,.ve now gOnff "" nv.r--afi | C O O K f I Jhs Wbtkhn Way to Qooh THERE'S PUEASlfftE and Hi i'fi I! thi famfl I r K i s i it I*KI s-.i m i IMIKI K naodetn tail le ill such a %  small amount of a aha I'RI Mil %  ii mka 3 • ontalners. $22.77 Cave Shcphenl & Co.. Ltd 10. II. 12 fc 13 Broad Stieel. "G4SC(0GNf DUf ON SATURDAY back lo school. "Oo Slow" Attitude The Advooate also beard oom plaints ihat inere was a sort of altitude on some ol UM v.* tales Intel viewed mi tbe-, the Labour Conut] m that wilh i-egard t,, the thortag* f lab-iur on ttto sm dl holdiniv no knew that worhaii preferred to work on the estates wliere ibe\ ra of tongjai ind mora legplar ampieyment and then „ i" nus at ihe and of With regard to the "go slow' he hod baan Inf or m e d that lat'ourers were working yar) well on iii,. tatatai He iBOUghl Ihey would be foolish to nil hi "( the minimum amount Ol Uwj wan going to tit .-..ni by the ten and also bonus based on the amount • Ihridually handled bj ihem riio rice bran I laad it u.is eonaignai %  • i la A to. Ltd The Vansluylman geuallj bungs rice to Barbadoi but she has brought nono thli trig Hei igjanti are ... |V n. %  \ The %  neh Steamshi. QVll *.. . expected to call al ,'lar badof from Trinidad 01 day She will be leaving poi I around 10 un Uw same day for England, awvan paaaan#tri have ready booked passages with hf ; (K ''OtShe Messrs M Jones A CO Ltd 'Bowk* Gelt Ratlin Telephone Set da:. Potatoes ArriiHTii' S.iguenay Terminals So" wile, landed ii"t> bags ol English potatoes among other general cargo here The OBTgO aagOW and l.ivi pool. • 1 in lie r cargo '' '' %  arc eodl llvai • piece goods, polishing stationery and aawlng machines The Sun V.'lley iinm l ggH l l : Mespr CLiiilations Lid c ming steadily b, these ialandJ and fur export to oth. parti of the British Emp %  me Unitad I 1 1 Police laum h Baj island's second up launch Radl m utiy bean lesuiued into her. I 1 : launch in Bai. HI tolephona a 1 Ol Austin Patrleia The Uarboui Police who !>.-* %  *> %  Cirllsle Bay in this trim btth white laumh in aiwayi In constant contact with then stalmi at Bay street. Just %  touch of g button and they .ue reieivnu 1 %  nrharevec thay 1 Un sliun On Ihe othei hand, when the patrol wants to gel In eontaol with ihe ott %  %  r can i .dl the.t. up and transmit thalr message Tha newly installed aquipmeni la a groat asset to the Harl LI PoUca Dagggrhnanl The) haet agg yel got a Coda and the maa eages are transmitted li In case you w.int tli. uiich. you can In the irldge %  .: %  p her. t otCHlW 1 rallPulwa • %  r — %  •%  • iti.idi.i.nciioo of Buwae 1 nWfc* ,, w from the %  ngdh ... LET L'S DISPENSI. YOUR DOCTORS PRESCRIPTIONS • In IIlite*. j 1 a need tare friend* reap DOOTOfl ami wiu. DRIGfilNI are that push* „,. sl ipi t u *VI VMIIKIII AllOKI (. BTORg "''' %  '.in I.. lalnlng drugs of high quality, accurati I i" Dead In minimum time* and al a n,, .,1,. ,i. Hrssrmber -ue .ervr yu DAT ami room •' I llruff Weallicrliciid I Id. Nfghl >.\S 'I 1,1 3141. 3>I0 ii'gg ;^ How Aladdin's Lamp won the Princess .meJ AUddin rthcnc*i 0 Id jpr*3i -i s Ni !" AidJdin *** in loic with J tw.'uuffai pnsonailjiljin aslcd the win ho br %  oulJ gci ih Priiwew io nurrv (um 'Hcff.Ma*le'."*idtl>cri''."'d handed him a package of Ro>al Pudding The Pon iC had icfu 1 *! many WIMn But -hen Aladdin offered her a di.h of Ro,al Puddmg. she cned."l: delicious 1 I mil maic* him if he r'omises 10 icce mc Ro>al Pudding e -.~ -li\ II,I;I stUM HIGHLAND Ui S?1SEEN les@ SCOTCH WHISKY Sole Importers:— w.i MOiftoi a co. LID emocrtowN. URIAOOI LBTR I. ffOBw) Biscuits and Butter and MAR MITE The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food Sotastv ind '•.' I ./lor \.>u T.isiv brmisc Mnrmite gives (tin n rlai ui I dbeceuteuw) H^ vioanlDg 11 %  i in Marantc — cuenual elements tO keeping the boJv fit and free from nlnaai Marmli .iiuiwichcs— BMch how children love ibBnt*—also in soup-. aurWtfgrav* ind ill tvoury dishes. Ten onrjf awed "• %  little and whai'i l<"'i ID 'he jar kcepi for sgc. M..IIn Cn|l*nd B OlaVue %  %  %  ivirmisi 11 v. ui i: King Smilcr commands the use of CowS Gate Milk Food throughout the world. COW tCATE K>'iE OtuFOOD\^ROYAL'-BABIES Obwiout!)s wist and fa'seeing Ruler — and judging by his happy subjects a very popular one. All over (be world today Cow A Gate is recognised and welcomed. Something a little better — something a little different — have made the Food preemineit. # * Cow f. Cote ltd.. Cuildford. 'Hue o neo'fy mutation to visiting doctors, nurses and interested personnel to toin ont of (heir overseas parties to their Wett Country factories during the summer of 1951. aggaateei ;:','.:'. -.•.*, -. :::w. v.;::*.::'. •.: :•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.:•.•. vs.ABRIVEMI SPARE PARTS FOR THE ALLEN MOTOR SCYTHE GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS NOW I J B LESLIE CO. LTD —AitnU PLANTATIONS LIMITED | KNIGHTS LTD. ni.iov inow ana |H. JASON JONES'S, CO.. LTD.-Di.tributo,..j NO in i'ili ss/ u. EFFECTS. f j III I III It hi It III IIII "OPTALIDON TABLETS" I For Relief of Menstrual Pains and Sick J Headaches also Pains following Minor Operations. Sinusitis etc. II..nl. ..I Mis mill '.'.". I


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i







\
\

ESTABLISHED 1895





U.S. DID NOT USE J

Red China important to So

GEN. MARSHAL L TELLS
SENATE COMMITTEE

WASHINGTON, May 9.
GENERAL GEORGE MARSHALL, United

States Defence Secretary, said to-day that the
possibility of Soviet intervention had restrained
the United States Government from using Japanese
troops in Korea.

He recalled the Mutual Assistance Pact be-
tween Communist China and the Soviet Union
which directly referred to the Japanese.

He was continuing his replies to Senators of
the Foreign Relations and the Armed Services Com-
mittees’ investigation of the American Far East

policy which had earlier cross-examined General

MacArthur.

Marshall said the Mutual As—
sistance Pact directly referred to
the Japanese and possible inter-
vention on the mainland of Asia
had controlled the action of the
United States Government in not
using Japanese troops in Korea.

Marshall was asked “why is it
assumed that Russian intentions
and planning may be so different

Rritain Protests
To Argentina
LONDON, May 9.
Britain has formally protested

against the establishment of two
more Argentine bases in British

in the Far East from the plans P A howe ;
end intentions in Burope.” Antarctic territory, a Foreign
Marshall replied that actual] Office spokesman disclosed here
fighting was continuing in the] to-day. . : ;
Far East and Communist China] The protest was believed in

Buenos Aires on April 30 by
British Ambassador Sir William
Henry Mack, the spokesman said.
The protest follows a similar
note to Chile against the establish-
ment of a new Chilean base,
These three bases were erected

was a very important factor tc
the Soviet Union. China provided
forces to carry out the Soviet
Union's aggressive designs while
Russian forces suffered no losses.
He said the factor there—and
it was not one in Europe—was I 2
“whether or not the Soviet Gov-|during the Antartic summer of
ernment can afford to have China\1950—51. The present Antarctic
defeated decisively by the Allies, Winter is expected to curb further
and put in a position where the territorial or diplomatic moves in
reaction of China towards the;tbe area for some months,
Parliamentary opinion here has

Soviet Plan
Outrageous

WASHINGTON, May 9.

At his weekly Press Conference
to-day Secretary of State Dean
Acheson referred in scathing terms
to the strategy being followed by
Andrei Gromyko at the talks

Acheson defined the Russian
delegate’s attitude throughout the
Paris meeting as meaning that the
Soviet Union weuld not permit a
meeting of Big Four Foreign Min-
isters unless Western powers ac-
-epted a formulation of the agenda
which would commit Western
Powers before the meeting to
reduction of their armaments,



Acheson said this proposal by
the Soviet Deputy Foreign Minis-
ter was outrageous.

He added that nobody could
contemplate doing any such thing
If the Soviet Union saw it fit that
Western Powers should suspend
their defence programmes, that
price could not be paid.

Acheson was also asked to com-
ment on charges made by General
MacArthur that Britain and other
countries had been sending strate-
gic materials to Cgmmunist China
throughout the Korean war.

He declined to be drawn into
a discussion of these charges. But
he said he was having a full study
made of them: He would go into
the subject at some length if he
was called to testify before the
Senate Committee,

—Reuter.







THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1951

—_—_———



FIG



line up following their capture.

THE KOREAN WAR flares up again and a United Nations solder
stands guard at a prisoner-of-war enclosure, where Communist troops





ITING FLARES UP AGAI

Ramet r

Panamanians Want

President Ousted

SHOOTING BROKE OUT in Panama during a general
strike to-day and crowds attacked the radio station which | year

NEW YORK, May 9

dborate



Ma

“

| Canada Will

Buy 75,000
Tons Sugar

OTTAWA, Ma» 9.
Trade Minister Howe on Tues-
day night announced a new trade
deal with Cuba under which Can-
ada agrees to purchase 75,000 tons
of raw sugar yearly for a three-
period. The sugar agree-

had supported President Arnulfo Arias, according to New | ment was made outside the terms
York radio stations.



The Panamanian Charge D’Af-
faires in Washington, Guillermo

of Torquay agreements, but it will
| have the effect of trimming some
‘of the tariff preference, tradition-





PRICE: FIVE CENTS



PANESE TROOPS

viet Union | Allied Planes Wipe

Out Red Airstrip

By JULIAN BATES.
TOKYO, May 9
MORE THAN three hundred Allied warplanes
swooping on a secret Communist air base in
the north of Korea today, struck their heaviest
blow of the war.

Wave after wave of jet and piston-engined air-
craft, attacking according to a split second time.
table, and each with a specific task to perform,
made an “obliteration’’ assault on an elaborately
camouflaged 2,000-yards long airstrip near Sinuiju,
just south of the Yalu delta which forms the

frontier with Manchuria.

They plastered the
rockets, jellied-petrol
cannon fire and bullets,

In low level sweeps reminiscent
of “train-"busting” raids on Nazi-

-
Russia Does
Not Want War crestor, ey, lastes

‘ground, fuel dumps of anti-air-
LONDON, May 9. jcraft pits and lorries. They shat-
Patrick Gordon Walker, Secre.\‘ered runways, barracks and
ary of State for Commonwealth! hangars.
telations to-day said: “Although | The raid lasted several hours.
Russia wants to expand as tar!'The last Allied pilots to leave the
nd as fast as possible, she does|target reported smoke and flame
jot want in my view to bel] over an area of nine square miles.
nvolved in a world war herself Swarms of Communist jet fight-
But she has shown herself ready, ers came up to challenge Allied
to take gambles that involve thé) pilots, But most of them fled after

strip with
bombs,



isk of world war. The Berlin |brief dog fights.

jlockade was one example. The Today’s attack was made in two

ittack on Korea another, and ajphases, one in the morning, the

much more dangerous one.” other in the afternoon. American
Addressing a Labour Party|Air Foree Officers said to-night

meeting here, that the camouflaged airfield

yordon Walker oat

three western powers had shown|attacked to-day was only one of

patience and readiness for a com- several disguised Communist
promise and a readiness to miss no)}strips in North Korea.
pportunity for genuine discus Seven airstrips had been attack-
sion, ed during the past month, they
Gordon Walker added: “We are | added Near Pyongyang alone,
not alarmists. We do not feel) there were five strips. Air Force
that war is inevitable or just] Sbservers said the Chinese air

around the corner but the dangers] build-up was still going on.
ire real enough to make it neces

sary for us to prepare to defend On the grouna United Nations

Soviet Government might be one uy Y ; : ar ‘ ert ally allowed to Commonwealth | ourselves.” patrols pushed far north through
of deep mistrust because they|recently shown itself to be ex: U.S. Soldiers IN OUR TOWN Pr ee kes by (the | sugar suppliers. Britain had two great duties to| the still and deserted No Man's
bain ice: Rene si malen bP Argentina and Chile on iritsn Ki ht Ea h Oth phened him that the ‘present | ,,,anada usually imports about lfulfil—defence of Britain and of}Land on the western front
; by Argentina and Chile on Britis” tg c er | Heard to-day in Broad trouble was started by Camara, 600,000 tons of raw sugar a.wvear Western Europe ‘| Throughout today, they could find
A paraphrased version. of ajheld territory, and pressure on | Street through a megaphone: nists and their “terrorist acts” mostly from Commor galth) “we must collaborate with ouc|°Mly two Communists, one they
letter from Truman to MacAr-|Government for stronger action is KARLIKUSE, U.S. ZONE, “Come to-night to Queen's were intended to “disrupt Pana. S0Utces. These eountries5 ich 85! neighbours in Western Europe”,|illed, the other was taken pris-
thur last January showed why | increasing. : Germany, May 9. Park by the thousands to hear | mia’s solidarity with the United Australia, Trinidad ar, ymaica|tne Minister said. “If ever any | Ne?
the President objected to mili-| Argentina and Chile have both} Nine United States soldiers Busta-Alexander-Mante speak States,” bring their sugar into ("ada at | onom whould amin. + h “he The tank force which stabbed
tary measures which under dif-|laid claims to large parts ofj/were injured when about | Pre t Arnulfo Ariag an-! ‘y tariff of about 26 ceils a hun- Chanwel port: vith, ar ‘immediately north of Seoul reach-
ferent circumstances he might|British held territory in the]100 American white and coloured * * bial ‘on. Pipatar nig, ae dredweight. - ports. new and) ao point north of Liijongbu, but

have approved.

The letter said that while the
United States was building its
strength, great prudence must be

exercised to avoid extension of
the Korean war.
“Steps which might, in them

selves, be fully justified and which
might lend some assistance to the
campaign in Korea, would not be
beneficial if they would involve
Japan or western Europe in
Jargeseale hostilities” it said.

The paraphrased version said
the President recognised that
continued resistance might not be
militarily possible with the limi-
ted resourcés available to Gen-
eral MacArthur,

In any event, United Nations
forces must be preserved as an
effective instrument for the de-
fence of Japan and elsewhere.

“Successful resistance in Korea
however, would serve the follow-
ing purposes.”

The Senator, who read the
paraphrased version into the
record, sald the letter listed ten
purposes which would be served.

He said the first of these was

Antarctic and Falkland Islands

dependencies. —Reuter.

Two Perish In
Rum Explesion
KINGSTON, J’ca, May 9,
Two men burned to death:

two others were seriously injur-
ed when 82 hogshead's of rum ex-

ploded on a truck yesterday after-| sufficiently

servicemen fought one another
in a cafe here last night, an Ameri-
can army announcement said to-

night.

The announcement added that
as investigation. of the incident
was not yet complete “all facts
of the case have not yet been
ascertained.

The army said that the nine
injured men were treated at a
local army dispensary. None was

injured to be taken

noon, causing the complete de-}to hospital.

struction of the vehicle, For a
few minutes the truck’s brakes
failed to act when coming off a
long steep hill: the truck hit a



According to German sources
a dispute between white and
negro soldiers developed into a
wild melee in which all the

bank and the explosion followed.|cafe’s furniture was smashed to

A doctor while attending
injured was struck down by a
burning tree which fe!l across the
road; he is now in hospital suffer~
ing from head and arm injuries.

—(CP)

CANES BURNT
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 9,
One hundred and sixty tons of

canes of an area of approximately
eight acres burnt at Cassada Gar-
‘dens last night.

to
would
free, world.”

PERSIA REJECTS U.K.
MOVE IN OIL DISPUTE

(By LEOPOLD HERMAN)
TEHERAN, May 9.

PERSIA to-day declared that the oil in her vast fields
was hers and told Britain she could not agree to the latest
moves made to stay nationalisation.

The Persian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister
announced that Persia could not accept “force or bluff or
intimidation” in settling the future of her oil industry.

{

“demonstrate that aggression
not be accepted by the
—Reuter.





“The oii is ours. We must use
it tor the benefit of the nation
and for the benefit of world
peace” it was stated.

There was no reference to the
request yesterday by the Anglo-
Tranian Oil Company that the
matter should be referred to ar-
bitration .

â„¢~ .
Grinding Completed
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 9.
Antigua sugar factory's
yard was cleared by 8 o'clock
lest night when an emergency
staff of engineers, estate mana-
gers, overseers and clerks com-
pleted grinding operations
To-day estate managers and
overseers returned to their
respective estates as cattle mind-
evs and women labourers had
yvone out on a sympathy strike.
Volunteers from city firms are
to-day assisting in the boiling
and bagging of sugar. Tomlinson’s

The

in a letter to Herbert Morrison,
British Foreign Secretary, said
that nationalisation of an indus-
try was the sovereign ‘right of
every nation.

Though agreements or conces-
sions might have been made or
granted, he asserted, and though



eran

workshop of the Antigua Syndi-|these might be legal in every
cate Estates came to a standstill] respect, they could not impede
yesterday morning when workers|the exercise of national sover-

approach or, eign rights.

the manage-

ceased ‘without any
representations to
ment.

RESTRICTIONS OFF
PARIS, May 9.
The Cabinct to-day decided to
suspend existing restrictions on
import beef because of the “ab-
normal rise in the price of beef

activities
Anglo-

Moseddegh gaid “the
and behaviour” of the
Tranian oil company had led to
discontent among the Persian
people. These causes of discon-
tent, he added, would be ‘elimin-
ated by the enforcement of the
law for carrving out the nation-
alisation of the oil industry

—_

a




Dr, Moseddazh, Prime Minister, General ief,
| telligence Officer, for infofmation

ihe | pieces.

Strong military police squads
eventually restored order and
removed battling soldiers in army
trucks. No one to-night appeared
to know the cause of the original
dispute.

Relations between white and
coloured soldiers in ‘the United
States zone of Germany are nor-
mally very good and last night's
incident was one of a very small



number of this type since the
occupation,
—Reuter.



Twelve Arrested

BUENOS AIRES, May 9.
Twelve persons including prom
inent Conservatives and Nation-
alists have been arrested and!
held on charges of “disrespect”
against the President. Though
police action was taken some
fortnight ago, official disclosure
was only made to-day through
Federal Judge Rivas Arguello
Among the arrested is forme:
President of the Conservative
Party and former Senator Antonic

Santa Marina.
—Keuter.



WILLOUGHBY SUMMONED

WASHINGTON, May 9,
The House of Representatives
un-American Activities Commit-
tee said to-day it had subpoenaed
Major General C. A. Willoughby,
MacArthur's chief, In-

on Russian espionage in Japan.
—Reuter.



HULL IMPROVES

BETHESDA, Maryland, May.9.
The United States Naval hos-
pital here said to-day that the
former Secretary of States, Mr
Cordell Hull, who has been criti-
ezly ill, has shown significan‘
improvement”, Reuter.

GUATEMALA, May 9
Panic spread again today in the







in the last two months.” . His governrrent wished to wsey Government hopes to alleviate! the income from oil to strength-; Salvador—devastated by an earth.
the present shortage end bring}en Persia’s cconomy and put an{Quake on Sunday—when a_ vol-
down vrices for the consumer bv] end to poverty, distress and dis -ano showed signs of eruption
importing foreign beef ;content | Confirmed casualties resulted
Another decision ag ts t mixed Parliamentary Cor-|]from the earthquake were nearly
to Parliament a bill to subs ssion would be elected shortly} 2,000 by tonight and official esti
French ] » enable t to carry out oil ationalisatic 1] mates suggested they may even
to mee ijnal conipetition| throughout the country tually re: 4,000 '
on an equal footing. —Reuter —Reuter, Earth tremors were diminishing








“There's one thing in Bar-
bados I’ve found better than
in Jamaica” said Mr. Busta-
mante in a Broad Street store

* yesterday.

“It is the rum,’ he laughed.

“You've some really good
rum here.”

oprtocmn ae ‘ r i
“USTA™ SPOKE

of € wc

FOR 3 HOURS

Over ten thousand people as-
sembled at Queen’s Park last
ntght to hear Hon, W. A. Busta-
mante speak. A Public Meeting,
at which Mr. W. A. Crawford,
M.C.P., was Chairman, was held
in the Queen’s Park steel shed in
honour of Mr, Bustamante. Mr.
Bustamante addressed the crowd
for over three hours. At the con
clusion of the meeting the crowd
was treated to free dancing and
entertainment.







Customs Union

Not Yet Accepted
LONDON, May 9.

Mr. John Dugdale, Minister of

State for the Colonies, told the
House of Commons to-day that

the report of the Commission on
the establishment of a Customs
Union in the British Caribbean

area has not yet been discussed
by any of the Legislatures,

The Minister was answering 4
question put by Mr. Thomas Reid

ei, heaters iss et el ngs toaeyan atirnsrmssnanesnaisiait

(Labour). Asked what progress
had been made in respect of
federation, the Minister said the

position was unchanged from |
when he replied to a question =
March 14.

On that oceasion, Mr. Dugdale
said the report of the Standing)
Closer Association Committee,
which recommended federation
had been accepted by the Legisla-
tures of Trinidad, the four colonies;
of the Windward Islands and the!
Presidencies of Antiguo, St. Kitts|
and, with one reservation, Mont
serrat, in the Leeward Islands

—Reuter.



Ridgway Promoted

WASHINGTON, May 9
President Truman to-day
Lieutenant General Matthew Lv
Ridgway, General Douglas Mac-
Arthur’s successor in the Far East
to the rank of full General.

The President sent to the Senate
for confirmation of the promotion
which will give General Ridgway
a fourth star.




—Reuter.

2,000 DEAD IN

but there was great fear that the
volcano near the town of Chiha-
meca might blow its head off.
Rescue workers and Red Cross
teams were searching among the
ruins of El Salvador’s towns and

villages for bodies of hundreds
who perished on Sunday
port from San _ Salvador



of




the Republic. said
injured and distress
were streaming into



phe would eall a national pe
cite Wednesday to permit the
‘people ta choose by voting be
, tween the 1946 Constitution he}
abolished Monday night and the}
1941 Charter which he substituted

The speech climaxed a day of
tension and followed a demon-}
stration by thousands of Pana-|

manians who marched on Nation- |
al Police Headquarters ‘Tuesday |
night — clamouring for the oust-
ing of the President and seeking |
police aid to effect it.

Arias said: “If the people want
us to leave the Presidency, we}
would do so.” He also said be
would call elections for a new
National Assembly to meet next
October, {

Demonstrators outside Police
Headquarters were counselled by
Colonel Jose Antonio Remon,
Chief of National Police to be
calm. He said the country’s
armed forces would guarantee
the people’s rights.

Arias aroused protests by
abolishing the 1946 Constitution
Monday night. He said he was
acting to fulfi] Panama’s commit-
ments for defence of the hemis
phere and the Panama Canal,

The cancelled constitution “pro-
tected the Communist doctrine,”
he claimed,

His opponents called his act an
assumption of dictatorial powers
by a virtual coup d'etat.

—(C.P.)

—_———— '

Attempt To Invite
Ike Again Rejected

STRASBOURG, May 9

The European Parliament to
night rejected, by a big majority,
the second Italian attempt to in
vite General Dwight D. Eisen
hower, Commander of the Atlan
tic army in Europe to attend it
debate on Saturday on ihe de
fence of Europe.



Despite repeated appeals from
the President, from the 125 mem
ber-Assembly grouping of 15 na-
tions, and from many of its mem
bers Ugo La Malfa, Italian Minis- |
ter for Foreign Trade, insisted on



|

maintaining his proposition firs |

smothered yesterday. |
f ; 0! gama
The Italian Minister said Eis

enhower’s presence at the debate |
would greatly increase the im |
portance attached to in the}
United States.
Parliamentary representatives |
from Belgium, France, Italy and
Britain joined in urging La Mal

it

fa to withdraw his proposa} and!
allow the Assembly more time a |
consider it —Reuter.

EL SAL

the city from the devastated area
90 miles to the south-east.
Disruption of communications
had held up full details of death
and destruction, but official esti-
mates said 1,000 were killed at
Jucuapa, a town of about 12,000
in the first shock on Sunday night.

ihameca
also badls

quake

(population
hit by the ¢

but no casualty

Ch 17,000)
w irth-

has



figure

have suffered in the earthquake
| in San Salvador, it was announced
today

In addition the Pope instructed
; American

Cuba ated other non«Cornmon-
wealth countries are charged a
tariff rate of about $1.28 a hun- |
dredweight. Trade officials said
the preference was great enough
to allow Commonwealth suppliers
to cut their sugar prices by about
85 cents or $1 a hundredweight,

Instead they tended to lower
their price by about 15 cents a
hundredweight sufficient to under-
sell non-Commonwealth suppliers

Under the Cuba agreement,
sugar will enter Canada at the old
$1.28 a hundredweight tariff rate,
but refiners buying sugar will be
aliowed a rebate to bring =

the price they paid for Cuban

; sugar to the rate they would have

paid had they purchased Common-
wealth supplies

Cywnada encountered extreme
rading difficulties in the British
West Indies which only recently
relaxed import controls, Howe
said

In feturn for the sugar deal
Cuba had undertaken to renew
nntil 1954, tariff concessions
sranted in 1947 to Canada, These
include reductions for codfish,
wheat, flour and potatoes.

Howe added that Canada was
prepared to extend her sugar deal

to other non-Commonwealth
countries up to a total of 150,000
tons a year.—(CP)

2! Cops Charged

NEW YORK, May 9
Twenty-one policemen were
detained today on an indictment
charging conspiracy to protect a
$20,000,000 per year book-making
racket, They inelude two in-
spectors, one captain and two

Ueutenants who have retired

—Reuter,

Special Blessing

VATICAN CITY, May 9
Pius XII has sent his
blessing and a “generous
money” to people who

Pope
epecial
sum of

the Nuncio in the Central
Republic to express t
the Government the Pope's
at the sad_ plight
San Salvador.”
—Reuter

Papal

“deep

of the

orrow

people of

SYMPATHY

WASHINGTON, May
President Truman and Secre

|
tary of State Acheson to-day ;



9.

méssages to the Government of
El Salvador expressing deep sor
row’ at the death
week's earthquake,

roll in this

—Reuter.

VADOR

yet been received from there
Two other towns further south,

Santiago Maia and Belin, shaken |

by the first tremors, had further;





shocks yesterday. THe devastated |
area was closed off after Red
Cross and Government medical]
and hea! teams started relief
vork Government intends to!
burn the wrecked towns to pre-|
vent the spread of disease ae
cording to reports.—Reuter.

modern weapons we woul bé in
“a very grave state indeed”.
—Reuter,



Israeli Forces Pound
Arab Village

DAMASCUS, May 9
A Syrian military spokesman
said Israeli forces today pounded
an Arab village in the demilitar.
ised Israeli-Syrian border zone
despite the Security Council's eal)
for a cease-fire last night,

The attack on the village lasted
several hours, he said,

It was made with mortars and
machine guns and a few shells
fell ear the Syrian frontier post
of El Hasel,

Syria has protested to the head
of the mixed Armistice Commis
sion,—-Reuter



encountered only tight and Seats
tered resistance.—Reuter,

Withdraw Votes

VIENNA, May 9.
Four “iron curtain” countries
Russia, Poland, Hungary and
Czechoslovakia to-day with
drew the votes they had given
yesterday in favour of West Ger
many’s being admitted to the In-
ternational Olympic Commit-—
tee —Reuter.



THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night





WARNING

Our Customers and Friends are reminded that:

STARTENA
GROWENA

AND

LAYENA

are registered Brand Names of the
RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
of St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A.

Always insist on getting genuine
STARTENA, GROWENA & LAYENA

as we have received complaints that
other Poultry Feeds are being sold

as Startena, Growena and Layena.

H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.

Agents and Distributors.












PAGE TWO

IS EXCERLENCY the Gov-

ernor and ec, Savage, and

Sir George and QLady Seel, will

attend the oper performance

of Bernard Sh ygmalion” at

the British Coupe! V's Pocket
Theatre at Wakefield. House,

Wandering Wainwrights
R, AND MRS, “TIBI” WAIN-
WRIGHT who had been hol
idaying in Barbados since Novem-
ber, left last night by the Lady
Rodney. Their home in Canada is
in Montreal.

Mutt and Jeff
CIVIL SERVANT whose wife
~ presented him with twins—
two boys--took his four-year-old
daughter to the Tercentenary Ward
at the General Hospital to see her
two new brothers,

The Sister on duty asked if she
was proud of them and she said
“ves.”” The Sister asked what she
would like them ealled.

This was the reply—‘No non-

sense, give them good names, call
them MUTT AND JEFF.”
Commerce
AY ARGAREI GILL, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs, F. F. C. Gill
ot Regan Lodge, St. Michael, has
returned from. the U.S., whexe

she took a commerce course, Her

uncle Mr. Norton Deane of New
York, wiio is a brother of Mr.
Nicholas Deane of Locust Hall

Plantation, arrived by the same
plane, He plans to spend a month
in Barbados,

Continuing Holiday

ON. MRS. EVELYN BERTIN,

who left for B.G. on April
-ith, returned on Tuesday via
Trinidad to resume her Barbados

holiday, She first arrived from
B.G. on April Gth, but had to
return unexpectedly on a om
visit,

Martinique and Trinidad
RIK OHLSSON, Inspector Gen-
eral of a Swedish typewriter.

adding and calculating machine
company, who arrived here April
3rd, has gone to Martinique His
headquarters are in Rio de
Janeiro . Miss Carim Oldby
who came in the same day and is
a member of the same company,
has left for Trinidad . . Mrs.
Suire de Kuttel, Dr. Barbara
Lioydstill’s daughter has igone to
Trinidad on a short visit, She

flew there by B.W.1.A. yesterday
afternoon.

Back to Montserrat

RS. GILL, wife of Mr. G. A.
Gill, Manager of the Royal
Bank of Canada in Montserrat,

was among the passengers leaving
by the Lady Rodney last night,
Mrs. Gill was on a six weeks’ visit

staying with her daughter and
son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs, Fred
Marshail of Kensington, Fonta-
belle.

From Trinidad
RS, FRANK DE BOEHMLER
came in on B.W.LA.’s flight
from Trinidad yesterday afternoon
to spend a few days holiday with
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Kellman of St.
Anns Court, Garrison. Her son
Rodney has beew holidaying with
thé Kellmans and will be return-

ing with her to Trinidad.

_ ADVENTURES: OF

‘gy

te erence





“ Are they going to call
that high one the cost of
living ?””



Holidaying With Parents

R. AND MRS. ARTHUR

LEWIS and their three
children, Margot, Gordon and baby
Suzanne arrived from Trinidad
yesterday by B. W.I.A. to spend
six weeks’ holiday staying with
Mr, Lewis’ parents in Barbarees.

He is the assistant manager of
Cannings Grocery in Frederick
Street, Port-of-Spain.

Moved

R. NEVILLE SCHULER, eye

specialist in Georgetown,
B.G., who used to have his office
on Main Street near the Church
of the Sacred Heart, tells me that
he has moved to Lamaha Street,
and has opened a drug store as
well. Dr, Schuler arrived here on
Monday from Trinidad and had
been staying at the Marine Hotel.
Yesterday he left for B.G. by
B.W.I.A.

Leewards Trip
M* and Mrs. Colin Bellamy
and their young son have
gone for a trip through the Lee-
ward islands and will get off in
St. Kitts. They expect to be back
in Barbados by May 25th.
Mr. Bellamy’s trip is in connec-

tion with the Barbados Mutual
Life Assurance.

For Carib Talks
R. STEHLE, Director General
of Agriculture for the French
West Indies, arrived yesterday
from Guadeloupe by B.W.LA. to
attend the Twelfth Meeting of the
Caribbean Commission.
Dr. Stehle is a member of the
French Section of the Caribbean
Commission.

On Long Leave
FF to England on Saturday
by the Gaseogne go Mr. and
Mrs. Courtenay Reece who have
been holidaying im Barbados for
the past five and a half weeks.
Mr. Reece is a Puisne Judge of
Nigeria. He is on long leave. Be-
fore coming to Barbados, Mr.
and Mrs. Reece visited their
daughter Daphne in Cambertae,
Massachusetts .
In England, they will see their
ether daughter Rosemary.

Carub Calling

R wer ens
Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Tay-
lor of Worthing, is engaged to
Miss Rosemarie Pape, daughter
cf Major G. W. Pape of Fyza-~-
bad, Trinidad. The engagement
was annownced a short time ago
in Trinidad where Keith at
present living.

Short Holid
M*: PRANK iets
Fb

was at Seawell yesterday
to meet his wife and son Oscar.

son of

is

Mrs. Nothnagel has come over
for a short holiday, Oscar, who
was in Trimidad for the Easter

holidays,
School
Mr
guests
Club.

has returned to Lodge
for the summer term.
and Mrs. Nothnagel are
at the Barbados Aquatic

isters

N their way home to, New-
foundland are Dr. and Mrs.
D, J. O'Regan and their daugh-
ter Sheila who left last night by
the Lady Rodney for Halifax.
They had been spending two
weeks’ holiday with Mr. and
Mrs. Bill Grace of the Garrison.
Mrs. O'Regan and Mrs. Graee

are sisters.

With Apex Oilfields

MONG the passengers com-

ing im from Trinidad yes-
terday by BWIA. were Mr.
and Mrs. Vietor Gill and
baby daughter. Here on three
months’ holiday they are staying
at a bungalow in St. Lawrence
Gap. Mr. Gill works with Apex
Oilfields at Fyzabad, Trinidad.

New Manager
R. and MRS. CYRIL VOL-
NEY and famify were

among the passengers leaving by
the y last night. Mr.
and Mrs. Volney are on their

way to Montserrat. The children}

will get off in Dominica. Mr
Volney will shortly be taking
over the managership of Cable
and Wireless’ Branch in Montser-
rat from Mr. P. W. Croney who is
retiring. '

During May

RANS CANADA AIRLINES
weekly flight to Barbados is
due in at 5.10 this morning from
Canada. For the month of y it
will continue to coffe im every
Thursday. It will be returning to
Barbados on its northbound trip
later to-day. From June the
schedule will once mote operate

through here on Saturdays.

Eye Surgeon

R. VIVIAN METIVIER,

surgeon of Port-of-Spain.
has joined his wife over here for
a week's holiday. He flew in
from Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. They are staying at
the Ocean View Hotel.

ntserrat Holiday
NN Penchoen re 4 last

n by the Lady
to spen weeks’ holiday in
Montserr: Leaving with pat
were Mrs. Paul Hollender

Miss Betty Hollender. Mrs, Hoe
lender and Miss Penchoen are sis-
ters.

IPA





BY THE WAY »

AINTY as thistledown, light

as the fairy dancers Grog-

blessom and Quartbottle, a hover-

plane “landed on four saucers in

the midle of a lake.” Not one of

the saucers was broken or even
chipped.

If a smaller hoverplane filled
with tea could land on a saucer
in the middle of a tea-shop, ten
to one there would be no spoon

to stir it with. “What was that
faint sound I heard, Elvira?”
“Why, Raoul, a hoverplane has

just landed on your umbrella.”

Kooluk at Fatti

OOLUKATFATTI explored
London yesterday. At Ox-
ford Circus he said he was

surprised that all the old colleges
looked so new, At Cambridge Cir-
cus he asked how the students
managed to carry their boats down
to the river through all that traffic.
When he saw St. Paul’s he ex-
claimed: “Dome of Discovery!” In
the evening he asked to see an
English music-hall, and was taken
to the House of Commons. He
was interested to note that it was
the performers who laughed at the
jokes. He said that all the prayers
about cheese proved how religious
the English still were.

Leading Article
WHILE MAKING every
allowance for Miss Slopcorner’s
somewhat acute sense of pro-
priety, one cannot but regret the
undignified behaviour of Council-
lor Tudmarsh. Anything that, at



TAN & NAVY

DIAL 4606

such a time as this, tends to dis-
eredit such ceremonies as the
christening of gas - containers
makes us a laughing-stock in the
eyes of foreign natians. It might
be well if, on future occasions
ladies were not invited to perform
tasks which a man is quite capable
of carrying out successfully. We
do not suggest that those who at-
tempt to exaggerate what occurs
into a kind of pagan orgy are ne-
cessarily right. But we do deplore
the introduction of this personal
note into what should be an im-

Beachcomber

personal oceasion. The gas-con-
tainers of the nation must-not be
made the subject of vulgar bick-

oe
ime. MeGurgla
Ao why hash had begun.to
appear on her menus as
“le hash” Mrs. MecGurgle said:
“French is the international lan-
guage of food. I want my French
tourists to feel at home in gay
Paree when they come here.
Hence, also, the tiny tricolour flag
stuck in the Pudding Auriol.”





JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in

a humorous essay, story or poem

on the subject of “A TOP HAT.”

The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-

cate, and the winner will receive a
books or stationery. Entries must
Advocate Co, Ltd., City, not later

NOTE: Stories must not be c

prize to the value of 7/6 in either
reach The Children’s Editor, The
than Wednesday every week,

‘opied,

Send this coupon with your story.

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BARBADOS

The Woman Who |
Didn't Know Attlee

(By FREDERICK COOK)
HE walls of Miss Helen |
Sioussat’s 14th floor office!
in Madison Avenue, New York,
are lined with the autographed
pictures of famous men and
women whom she taught to
speak on the radio,

There are Anthony Eden,
Margaret Truman, Herbert
Hoover, Walter geon — and
Clement Attlee,

The Prime Minimer was ec

innocent cause of the worst faux
pas ever committed by week
Helen Sioussat, boss of all the

talks for one of America’s biggest
radio networks.

During his first post-war visit
to the United States, he had
agreed to take part in a broad-
east with Miss Frances Perkins,
FDR’s Labour Secretary. Miss
Sioussat (pronounced Soosahy
was to see that all went weltx

Frances Perkins arrived first. |
Behind her came three or spur

To make him feel at

iG vone heed at te.
‘Ts very kind
Fat 5 Santis Reet t ces ee |

the sweetest way—‘Please don’t
worry! You know it was not the
first time I’@ been taken for a
brief-case r=

800 and 900
year, reads their scripts, schools
them in the arts of broadcasting.

She “Ainks men better broad-
casters than women.
WORLD COPYRIGHT = e



Women Turn On
Tax Man

From R, M, MacCOLL
NEW YORK,
The normal man quails before
cold, beady eye of the tax
collector, Just now it is the tax
) collectors who are quailing no-
ticeably before the hot, angry
eyes of America’s women,

The row started when Wash-
ington told housewives that they
would have to start “withholding”
taxes from the money they paid
out to part-time maids and “‘baby-



sitters.”
eye

Led by traditionally independ-
Went Texas (“Don’t fence me in’),
the Riders of the Kitchen Range
poured im a torrent of protest on
the Treasury officials.

Who is behind the revolt? None
other th our old friend, acid-
tongued Vivien Kellems, the
Connecticut cable manufacturer.

Last year she won her own suit
against the Internal Revenue
Bureau for the return of $6,133
80c, seized by the Government

se she refused to deduct
income tax from her workers’
ay-packets,
faced by the avalanche, Wash-
ington is already displaying a
most unwonted leniency in apply-
ing the law.

THE “clear aim of American
peliey” was stated in clear terms
‘by " aesthetic-looking Averell
Harriman, former ambassador to
Britain, in a speech at Los
Angeles. “There can be victory
—and glorious victory—in pre-
venting another world conflict,”
'

|: THE RABBIT is far more calm
1 and collected than man in a crisis
says one of America’s top scien-
tists, Dr. Roy Forster, of Dart-
mouth College. Faced with danger,
man gets all hot and bothered.
But the rabbit just “goes into a
quiescent state.” Hats off to
I Harvey,




| THE stern voice of the sergeant
was growling out its routine
messages over the radios of Phila-
delphia’s police cars, Suddenly
came the crooning of “The Ten-
essee Waltz.” Explained the red-
faced police: A joker must have
found a police car unattended.

EDWARD DONNELLY of New
York does not believe in wasted

motion. His method of disposing||

of an old chair is to toss it out
of the windew, Now Eq is in
jail, The chair landed on the
head of Mrs. Vera Brautigarn—.
who now has 18 stitches,

TEN YEARS ago Sam Goldwyn
bought the film rights of Somer-
set Ma ’s story ‘“Mackin-
tosh.” ow he is going to pro-
duce it to Title: “South of Samoa,”










CROSSWORD



Across
. Fish may rest on stone rugs.
self-evident trutn. (4)
en from 4 (tdtess canister. (4)
of thing you map ous. (4)

(9)

a

rt oO
i Be exclaim suddent
ueation.

io)

Driven insane ¥ ‘8)
ay Ag es mot grantea (Y)
is is gross, (6)

bown

1, Acted as agent mo doubt. (5)
24. Loosened m cue-land. (7)
%. Sorrowful sort of streev. (3)
4 e whole extent, ay
5. = OT)
6. & Boiling Ses bd
Te a @ is for India

the erly room >) b)
a — one there's nothing but 4
12. fe 4h we fina tm fresh style.
1% Ma Sve ugnt net. (6)
16. death. (4)
L mugs may wear. (4)

8. ared. (4)
ide-arms have the answer. (4)
s oe
renee 9
a orsern yunts. ta
q 17 : Soe 20, Banner

hee . Trays 3 Dinner & #3
fe ee ve

Across
Preaco. 10
1m

15, Idler: 17, cam 18. Cue

ADV


























Â¥
THURSDAY MAY 10, 195
OCATE THURSDAY, MAY , L
3 COO SSOS,
3 4
B.B.C. Radio Pro ramme 4
4 DAYS SERVICE 2
>
THURSDAY MAY 10 1951 sno, 6.00 p.m. Listeners’ Digest. 6.30 4 . ‘ 4 2
6.30 m.—I2.15 pm. — 19 66 m Pp Orchestral Music of Bizet, 5 p.m. 7"
——— : . Programme Parade @ Our Expert English Watch Repairer guarantees to
6.30 6.45 am. Sport a
ing Reco The Ne 7.10] G.A5—11,00 pom repair your watch satisfactorily. ‘
am. New 1 4 r e - = eee ;
Editorials, 7.25 a.m ogramm 7.00 pan. Th p.m. News ; R
1.30 a.m. Festival Fun Pair, 7 | Anatvsis. 7.15 p.m. We See Britain, 2.45 i @ A big shipment of SWISS Sante for every type 3
Land i Livestock, 8.15 Yr rs p.m Festival Fun Fair, 8.00 p.m. adio ‘ eiv: "
Cholee, 3 0 a. m i Margaret d t Newsreel, #15 p.m. The Adventures of ; of watch has just been rec
#45 a.m. Engineering Achie P.C. 49, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m .
am. The News, 9.10 a.m From the Editorials, - pn See
f Britain, 9.15 a.m Clo Dispatch, 9.15 p.m Valk ‘ogee’ ri > 1
1115 aw Progaeunene Parade, 12 Chiliun, 946 p.m. Do aa Pen 3 ALFONSO w. De LIMA & q 0.
teners’ Cheice, 11.45 a.m Specia 16.00 pm. The News, 10.10 p.m. Li »
Listeners 12.00 «moony The News, 12.10] Music, 10.46 p.m, On. the Farm, 11.00 Opposite Goddard's
pm. News Analysis, 12.15 pm, Close] pm. From the Third Programme.
Dewn
iat .
h—-6 45 pm — 9. m. C.B.C.
. HURSDAY MAY 10, 1951 LA :
438 p.m. Top Score, 5.00 pan. Com-| 14 4) TRUBS Dm. News, 10.18 p.m, Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
Does OF the WeeR, oo Oe ee the | 10.90 p.m. ‘Tile Week in Canada. LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY — 445 & 8.30 P.M
Magazine, 545 p.m. Semprini at th





| Rupert and the Iee-flower —24



With rhe dim,

greemsm fight is a rustling sound.and from asatioe

pelping him, Rupert ens me way the bracken appears the ee ee of
e ward § Surprited ary old pram LF As ubbing
the Ke of the cave if cover a his eyes. ° e. whe was

that tripping over my legs? And

what month isi ? And....

yiacious, it's a little bear! How

id vou get here?” he growls.
RVED

‘code masses of dried brackem, All
at once something seems te move
under ins feet and he for-
ward. Ac che same moimerne phere

ain 8G



voppies








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Awash your face with Palmolive Soap

Bthen, for 60 seconds, massage with
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renter es
CUE ae
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“ran Tov. Hardie bcd kits Ivan DESNY
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STARTING TO-MORROW AT 8.30

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LAST SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 P.M.
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Joan BENNETT & Michael REDGRAVE



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DANA ANDREWS :o: JEANNE CRAIN :o; DICK HAYMES
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20th CENTURY-FOX PICTURE
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A



This Picture i



Commencing F RIL
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Plus:— hue Kahstnone Benny GoopMaN and Others
2ND “BODYGUARD” Lawrence Tierney
“SODAY (Phurs.) 1.30 P.M.

Charlie Chan in

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RKO Double ! !
“PARZAN TRIUMPHS”
Johnny Weissmuller and
“WEST OF THE PECOS”

Robert Mitchum

Ps MY Sun. 5 & 8.30 p.m.
DE GOES WEST”
Eddie “albert, Gale Storm &

“BLUE GRASS of KENTUCKY”

Bill Williams, Jane Nigh ‘Buzz’ Hen:

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MIDNITE SATURDAY 12
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— ALSO —
MON. 9.30 A.M. & 1.30 P.M.
“LOUISIANA" AND
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Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

TOMORROW := 2.30=
445 & 8.30 p.m. and
Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

TODAY LAST SHOWS — 4.45 and 8.15 P.M.

: ‘tau. WENDELL cone RANE PAGE

“THE SUN NEVER SETS”
Basil RATHBONE and Doug FAIRBANKS

OPENING TOMORROW — 5 and 8.15 P.M,



THE GOLDEN EYE & DRIFTIN’ KID



{ mS
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GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30
Man FROM. HEADQUARTERS”
with Frank Albertson

“JSIGGS & MAGGIE IN COURT”
with Joe YULE & Renie RIANO

FRIDAY to SUNDAY 8.30 p.m.
Mat. Sunday — 5 p.m.

“Step Lively” & “TARZAN &
t the Slave Girt
Frank Sinatra Lak Tacker





















































20,000,000 readers
called this the
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A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL 2Ei¢



























Rha CONTE Glen GRAY F 2. §

ond Inteducing
Story and Screenplay by JO EISINGER: Directed

FRANK AUSTIN..........
DENNIS CLARKE
REGGIE CASEY
EDDIE CLARKE
DORIAN THOMSON......
MALCOLM MURRAY

| EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and
Continuing

20th CENTURY FOX
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“ID CLIMB THE
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Opening Friday May 1th
at 830

** MADELEINE”

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TO-DAY and TOMORROW
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Columbia Big Double - -

Robert YOUNG and

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Starring:
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A Universab International Picture

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Guest Stars — GERALD DAISLEY & WILLIE IFILL
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by weet SHERMAN:Praduced by MONARO GOLDSTEIN







“4 Winds and 7 Seas”
“My Love Loves Me”
“Count Every Star”



“You Can Do No Wrong”
“Time After Time”

























ROYAL

TO-DAY Last Two Shows
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Smashing Double

Virginia GREY and
Paul KELLY in .

‘GRISSLY’S MILLIONS’
AND

“BELL OF ROSERITA”™

Starring...

Roy ROGERS,
Sunset CARSON and
Allan “Rocky” LANE

OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows TO-DAY
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M-G-M and Fox Big Double



Edmund Gwenn and Donald

Crisp in
“HILLS OF HOME”
and
“SOMETHING FOR
THE BOYS”
Starring |
Carmen Miranda and Michael |

ea




THURSDAY, MAY 10,

i951



WI Students Doing
Well At Puerto
Rico Varsity

Says Pinero

Mr. J. T. Pinero, former
ernor of Puerto Rico, told
Advocate yesterday

the ten West Indian students a:
the Metropolitan Vocational
Training School in Puerto Rico
were most encouraging.

He said fhat those students

were the best among the whole

alumni at the school and they
were glad to have them and were
also grateful that they were get-
ting some more.

Mr, Pinero who was the first
native of Puerto Rico to become
Governor of that Territory, is »
farmer by trade, and is engai@a
in the growing of sugar cane
and rearing of dairy cattle.
He said that the Metropolitan

Vocational School is located next
to the University of Puerto Rico
in the city of Rio Piedras.

The school is capable of in-
strueting 7,500 students and is
equipped with ‘the latest machin.
ery and techniques to teach
young men different trades which
are needed when a country is on

the verge of contemplating in-

dustrial development.
Scholarship

Last year he said that the

Government of Puerto Rico had
alloeated money for a number of
scholarships, inviting students
from the Caribbean area who
were desirous of taking up train-
ing in the different subjects
taught in the school. This train-
ing when completed would be of
great benefit to them when they
returned to their respective ter—
ritories.

Mr. Pinero said that members
of the Caribbean Commission were
very pleased to be able to further
enlarge the scholarship pro-
gramme at the Metropolitan
School through assistance given
by the Technical Co-operation
Administration of the U.S. Gov-
ernment.

They were offering through
the Caribbean Commission 30
scholarships for students of the
Caribbean area to study at the
Metropolitan Vocational Schoo!
and he -hoped that the young
men and women of the various
territories, would take full ad-
vantage of this opportunity to
get the necessary training,
Since the Metropolitan School

was established in 1947, they in
Puerio Rico had already got bet~
ter trade people and the country
had benefited a great deal from
the training of the students who
took various courses lasting from
ten months to 14 years,

They had developed an indus~
trial programme which had al-
ready brought to the island 106
new” industries and they hoped
te have 200 more in the course of
a few years.

Appointed Vicar Of
St. Silas, St. Jude

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE’S, May 7
Rev, Frederick E. Layne, Rector
of St. Andrew's, has accepted an
appointment as Vicar of St. Silas
and St, Jude, Barbados. He leaves
for his new duties at the end of
June. He has been Rector of St.
Andrew’s for the past six years
and also Headmaster of an Angli-
ean Secondary School in Gren-
ville, He has served here in St
Paul’s, St. John’s and Carriacou,







T’dad helicemen
Plan To Visit B’dos

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7.

Members of the Trinidad Police
Force plan to visit Barbados next
month, This is the second in a
series of West [Indian tours
planned by some of its members.
They will leave here around June
20,



“MOST SERIOUS”
BRIDEGROOM

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7

All Saints Church, St. Clairs,
was thrown into excitement on
Sunday, when a young couse
were about to be married, he
bridegroom arrived in the usual
way, followed by guests and the
bride. Before the ceremony be-~-
gan, the bridegroom decided that
he was not going to get married.
The guests left the Church, and
the two kneeling pads were re-
moved from the altar rails, The
bride fainted and had to be given
water.

Qn Monday the couple were
matried, however, at another
church at which Canon Ramkee-
soon performed the ceremony.
“The most serious bridegroom I
have ever met,” commented the
Canon after the ceremony, The
bridegroom is a young teacher of
Port-of-Spain,

"BARRY" RENWICK
RETURNS HOME

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, May 7
Mr. “Barry” Renwick, son of
Hon. and Mrs, J. B. Renwick, has
returned to Grenada from Eng-
land where he was recently called
to the Bar after taking his B.A.
at Keble College, Oxford. He was
accompanied by his wife and two
children.

Will Handle Agency

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7
The agency ,for the British
Guiana Airways Service to St.
Vincent and Dominica, will be
handled in Trinidad by Gordon
Grant & Co., Ltd. Passenger fares
and freight rates remain = un-
changed.

SULPHUR FROM
MICROBES

LONDON

British scientists battling the
world sulphur shortage are pro-
ducing sulphur with microbes
imported from North Africa’s
warm lakes. The tiny organisms
turn sulphates and sulphides into
sulphur’ by a process of oxidation.
—(CP) r







Gov-
the
that the re-
ports which members of the Carib-
bean Commission got coneerning

“We don't

let a

little mud hold up our



Canes Burnt At
Hanson Plantation

& CANE FIRE at Hanson Plan-—
tation, St. George, early
yesterday morning burnt four
acres of second crop ripe canes,
They are the property of W. A.
Harewood and were insured.
‘Another fire at Wiltshire Plan-
tation, St. Philip, on Monday
burnt four acres of first crop
ripe canes, property of E. A.
Skeete. They were also insured.
OSE HEWITT of Black Rock
reported that a basket’ was
stolen from her while at Messrs.
Cc. F. Harrison’s Store. It con~
tained $30 in cash and a nickel
watch,
WO MEN have been chosen
to fill the vaeancies in the
Fire Brigade. They aré expected
to take up duties at the begin-—
ning of next month.
| ag ARCHER of Haggatt Hill,
St. Andrew. told the Police
that he gave a man $3.00 to buy
a piece of cloth for him. On
Tuesday he saw the man, who
denied knowing him.

HE NEW ROOF at St. An-
drew’s Church has been
completed. Work on this roof
Jasted for four months. The

frame is of steel with an asbestos
covering.

Other repairs were also done
to the Church and a new gallery
built on at the western end, The
organ has been placed fp this
gallery.

The Church is expected to be
reopened for services from May
24. The contractor was Mr. C.
Skinner.
prorte OF lower Belleplaine

met with a disappointment
when they visited the stall of a
well known butcher over the
week-end and found it closed.
This stall supplies meat to nearly
the whole of the Belleplaine
area, This meant a “meatless
Sunday”. ,

LLIANCE FRANCAISE will

entertain the visiting French
Commissioners to a cock-tail party
at Goddard's Restaurant at 6 pan.
to-morrow night. This party was
originally scheduled for to-night
but had to be postponed due to
other arrangements made for the
Commissioners,

Will Relax Controls

BONN, May 8.

Western Allies today announced
they would relax controls on
German activity in the fields of
electronics, chemicals and metals
relating to atomic energy.

The Allied High Commission
said relaxations would be pub-
lished in the next issue of its of-
ficial Gazette. The decision fol-
lowed study by Allied Military
Security Board of existing leg-
islation relating to atomic energy
and reflected the “High Commis-
sion’s policy to reduce controls in
the security field wherever pos-
sible, so as not to impede Ger-
many’s technological progress di-
rected to a peaceful end.”



Reuter



Suspend Duty

WASHINGTON, May 8.
The United States Senate today
passed a bill to suspend the two

cent a pound import duty on for-
eign copper.

The bill passed by the Senate
was a compromise measure
worked out by the Senate and
House of Representatives confer-
ences and is retroactive to April 1,
1951. ' —Reuter.

GARLIC GOES UP

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7
The retail price of garlic in
Trinidad has been increased from
20 cents to 50% cents per pound,



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



festival



like them London people.”

London Express Service



Jacob Epstein Gets
Place Of Honour

Among Modern Sculptors

LONDON, May 9.

CURIOUS VISITORS crowded into London’s Batter-
sea Park to-day to see an exhibition of the latest works,

most of them of surrealist modern sculptors.

Canadian Given
Important Post
In Empire Unit

, OTTAWA, May.

The news that a Commonwealth
division would be formed in
Korea, first of its kind in history,
was followed by announcement
here that a Canadian has been
assigned to one of the key posts
in the division,

The Commonwealth division
consisting of Canadian, British,
Australian, New Zealand and
Indian units will be commanded
by Major-General A. J. H. Cas-
sels, formerly of the British Sea-
forth Highlanders, The Canadian
is Lt.-Col, Ernest D. Danby, 35,
of New Westminster, B.C., who
has been named General Staff
Officer No. 1, In this post he is
Cassel’s top adviser on battle ad-
vice and planning, and Canada’s
spokesman at division headquar-
ters, South Africa, which has had
a fighter squadron in Korea for
many months, is sending five offi-
cers to the Commonwealth
division,



Lt.-Col. Danby was educated in
Vancouver and commissioned
there in the Seaforth Highlanders
in 1936, He was severely wounded
in September, 1944, while com-
manding the Carleton and York
regiment from New Brunswick in
Italy. Later he was ranking Staff
Officer at 1st Canadian Corp and
then at First Canadian Army
headquarters.

Since the last war Danby has
served at army headquarters here
and the army staff college, and his
latest post was deputy command-~
ant of the joint air training centre
at Rivers, Manitoba, where para-
troopers are trained. He holds the
D.S.O. for the Italian campaign

Division Plan Welcomed

Announcement that a Com-
monwealth division was _ being
formed was warmly welcomed
here. Defence Minister Claxton
said “all Canadians will be
pleased that our 25th Infantry
Brigade (now: crossing the Pacific
to Korea) will be joined with
formations with which the Prin-
cess Patricias have already distin-
guished themselves, all to form a
unit in which forces of the Com-
monwealth countries will be fight-
ing shoulder to shoulder to resist
aggression in accordance with the
aims of the United Nations.”

The 2nd battalion of the Prin-
cess Patricias Canadian Light
Infantry has been in Korea since
last December, and was with the
other Commonwealth units in
stemming the latest Communist
offensive. When the 25th Cana-
dian infantry Brigade arrives in
Korea shortly it will go into the
line with minimum of delay, Al-
together the Canadians are ex-
pected to comprise about one-
third of the Commonwealth
division, which may total 21,000
men.

The Canadian brigade itself is
expected to remain under com-
mand of Brig. John M. Rocking-
ham, although other Canadians
may join the divisional staff as
Lt.-Col. Danby is doing.—(CP)

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
between the ages of 12—19 to send in a humorous essay, story or poem
on the subject of “MICE.” Entries must reach the Short Story Editor,
Advocate Co., Ltd,, City, not later than Wednesday every week. The
best composition each week will be published in the Evening Advocate

and the winner will receive a prize of books or Stationery to the
value of 12/6. ;

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR COMPETITION

Just across
the Park,

the other side of
showmen were com—
pleting the ereetion of switch-
backs, roundabouts and crazy
miniature railways for the Fes-
tival of Britain gardens and fun
fair.

But at the exhibition of seulp-
ture, everything was on a more
serious plane, That was obvious
as visitors came away scratching

their heads, blinking hard and
looking a little wiser.
The sculptors, they agreed,

were probably brilliant. But their
message might be a little hazy.

Finest Ever

To the expert this was one of
the finest ever exhibitions of
modern forms of sculpture de-
veloped during the past 50 years.
But what the goggle-eyed lay—
man saw were 44 of the most
remarkable works that ever came
from any sculptor’s chisel. Some
of them were so complicated that
eyen the workmen who put them
there could not tell the right
way up. The sculptors themselves
had to switch them round so that
they were just right.

There were many sizes and a
vast array of weird shapes, There
were in .bronze,

some some. in
stone and some in marble. Con-
crete, iron and processed steel

played its part,
beautiful, some spectacular, some
grotesque, but most to the un-
initiated were just plain baffling.
Place of Honour went to Jacob
Epstein, sensation of a decade
ago. His “Lazarus”, a massive
stone figure, had the Place of
Honour,
Henry
“Standing

showed his
Figure.” It had ab-
stract arms and legs in bronze
but instead of a chin’ and
shoulders there were just two
angles.

Moore

Puzzling

From the United
Alexander Calder’s ‘Maneater
with Pennants” lent by New
York’s Museum of Modern Art.
It looked like a pair of old-
fashioned weighing scales. An-
other American exhibit ‘Mother
and Child” was contributed by
Russian-born Jacques Lipchitz,
Both mother and offspring seem-
ed awfully like tortoises to puz-
zled London viewers,

Canadian Louis Archambault
sent his version of an “Iron Bird”
made from welded steel plates.

“Head in Green and Brown”
by Irishman FitzWilliam was in
two parts with a gap between the
nose and right eye.

States came

Reg Builder’s “Torso 1950”
looked to some Philistian spec~
tators to be a_ twiste | television
aerial or a badly dented skeleton.
But the workman who put it up
had other ideas.

“It looks like a squashed park
chair to me” he gaid in a dis-
couraged voice.

—Reuter.

There were some ,

Britain, Russia
Vote Against U.S.

GENEVA, May 8.
British and Soviet delegates
here today voted against the Uni-
ted States resolution which claim-
ed that right to own property
should be “included in the cove-
nant of Human Rights

United Nations Commission on
Human Rights adopted the Dan-
ish resolution which excluded
from the covenant any clause
dealing with right to own pro-
perty.

Britain, Russia, Yugoslavia and
Chile voted in favour. The Unia
‘ted States, France and Pakistan
opposed it. Lebanon and Uru-
guay abstained.

The Danish resolution was
moved by Dr. M. Sorensen, af-
ter delegates had suggested that
the right to own property was
not a fundamental human right.

Reuter

2,577 More Tons
Of Rubber
SINGAPORE, May 8.

Russia and China ty gent re-
ceived 2,577 more tons of rubber
from Malaya in April than in
March, aceording to official statis-
tics published here to-day.

Destinational control of rubber
exports from Malaya came into
effect only on April 9.

A Singapore Government offi-
cial commented that the effect of
destinational control would be-
come obvious only in returns for
May.

Taking exports for Russia,
China and Hong Kong together,
exports in April were 321 tons
Jess than final figures for March,

Shipments to Russia totalled
6,324 tons in April compared with
nil in March; to China 3,265 tons
in April against 7,012 tons in
Maieh; to Hong Kong 5,846 tons
compared with 8,744 tons.

—Reuter,







No Progress

PARIS, May 8.

Big Four Deputy Foreign Min-|!
isters met for the 46th time this}
afternoon for one hour and con-
tinued their wrangle over the
agenda for their chiefs. Wes-
tern spokesman said that no new
proposals were put forward and
no progress was made.

Dr, Jessup, American Deputy,
asked Gromyko, Soviet Deputy,
if the Soviet Government wanted
a Foreign Ministers meeting,

Gromyk® said that the views of
his Goverament were well known,

Reuter

Steel Split |

BONN, May 8,

The Allied High Commission
today announced that they were
going ahead with forming the
first of 24 companies into whicn
they have split West Germany’s
eteel industry.

Giant stee] concerns
Nazi times are bein,
agreement with the West German
Government, into some 28 com-
panies to prevent steel becoming
again a dangerous concentration
of economic power,

The Allies said they were about
to publish in the next issue of
the High Commission’s Gazette
regulations for the formation of
companics known ag “unit com-
panies.”

They were working out pro
visions for the other four cases
with the West German Govern-
ment,—Re™ter,



of the
split, in



KEEP FIT ON

’
os terruption twice more during the i i
day.
The swyppage was ordered bj AND

Christian Democrat Socialists

and Communist Labour a-

tions because of the Government's

PAGE THREE

{ Reject Red Plan Support For Russia





1,600,000 Strike

















ROME, May WASHINGTON, May 8 NEW DELHI, May 8.

Italy’s 1,600,000 le emp - ed Indian quar ers here
ees today be 2 ! The United States today rejecte tha India. is bound
strike for h pé Russia’s proposal to transfer } Russia's de ind that
Government machinery task of drafting a Japanese Peac nist China _ussociated
oul the country rreaty to four Pacific powers in ith the drawing up of a Japan-

Government desks tre de~| cluding Communist China ese peace treaty. ;
serted. Postmen left pil of let a E These sources also considered
ters and parcels in the post off The State Department said Rus- reasonable the Russian contention

Primary schools remained ck ia S$ purpose in advancing the 1a he treaty should re spect the
ed. State-run hospitals proposal yesverday was to obtair 43 Cairo conferen © leciaration
ed only skeleton staffs a “double veto” over the Japanese th Formosa -should be given
staffs struck work for four h Peace Settlement. to China
until noon. Trains stopped fo: —Reuter Reuter

half an hour in
day, and were to repeat this

stations early to





rejection of their wage der ds + om,
The walkout was to be « cu- Specialized Medication drops of Vicks veer 4 each
cussed today by the Cabinet Helps Prevent Many nostril to help prevent the cold from
Fhe Premier has _ threatenec Colds from Developing! taking hold.
disciplinary measures against s mn P YOU CAN FEEL IT WORK!
state employees taking part it : f
today’s strike. This specialized medication works
First reports said 80 to 90 per fast, right where the trouble is, and
eent of the Government worker: you can feel it. That stuffy, sneezy
obeyed the 24-hour strike call iy feeling vanishes, your head clears,
Rome. irritation is soothed, and many a
etn only a ¥ : the meat cold is stopped right then and there.
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S.S. Brasil, S.S. Regent Leopard $ S&S
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AY 9, 1951 | fs : ,
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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PHURSDAY, MAY 10, 1951

The Inconstant Lover (The Peril 0f The New Tiny | Pee Spncraeetting





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown

Thursday, May 10, 1951

Roads

| THE condition of tenantry roads is a
subject of perennial discussion. The Legis-
lature has from time to time voted large
sums of money for their upkeep and has
undertaken the responsibility of several
parishes. What is the duty of the Govern-
ment with regard to roads in residential



areas? ete,

The matter'was recently discussed by the
General Board of Health. It was suggested
that the Public Health Act, under which
the Board grants permission to owners to
divide and sell land in lots, be amended so
as to provide for the inspection and ap-
proval of proposed roads by the Engineer
of Transport and Highways before the land
ean be sold.

|. There can be little objection to the sug-
gestion when it is considered that roads are
a-necessity and that in Barbados for many
years land owners have been allowed to
build roads of marl and any rubbish avail-
able, in order to sell the land adjoining
them. Soon after the land has been sold,
the true condition of the road is revealed.
There has been no proper drainage and
people who pay high prices for house spots
suffer great inconvenience. The Govern-
ment is then attacked and asked to main-
tain these roads in proper order.

Tenantry roads should be subject to
specifications set out by the Transport and
Highways Authority who are responsible
for the major roads of the island,

This would mean either that the owner
of land who sells at a profit should be re-
sponsible for the provision of part of the
roads or the buyer is sold land at a price

I OUGHT to have known by the
light in George’s eyes when I said,
“What's yours?”, that something
more potent than alcoholic antici-
pation was at work in his mind
But it was only when I saw the
absent-minded way in which he
tossed off his drink as if it was a
matter of secondary importance,
that I realised that he was in the
throes of another amorous break-
down and was dying to tell me
about it. So I tried to ring a beil
by asking, “Seen Diana lately?”

“Diana—Diana?” he asked, as if
it were the first time he had heard
the name. So I had another try
and said, “Or Beryl?”.

When he exclaimed, “Beryl!
Beryl who?”, and then before I
could answer went on, “Oh, you
mean Beryl. Dark-eyed, lanky girl
who plays tennis, isn’t she? No, I
don’t remember seeing her lately,”
I realised that the heart storm
from which he was now suffering
was even more severe than those
which Diana or Beryl or even
Rosalie had aroused, So I ordered
another drink and tried again.

“By the way, old top,” I said. “I
saw Phyllis at the Brown’s cock-
tail party and she asked after
you.”

He came out of his pipe dream
long enough to say, “Did she? Nice
girl—Phyllis. Pity she’s growing
more like that old bottle of vin-
egar, her mother, every day”, and
then slipped into a world in which
none of the girls he had previously
chased off their feet had any ex-
istence. It was only after our
second one for the road, when
George was idly drumming on the
table with his fingers and gazing
at nothing in the middle distance,
that I said:

“Come on, George, spill it”.

“Spill what? How d@’ya mean.. ”

“You know perfectly well what
I mean,” I interrupted firmly
“Spill the beans, Come clean, Get
it off your chest. Who is she?
What’s she like?”

That did it. and the moment LI
saw the sheepish look that came
over his face, | began to regret
having been so curious,

“Well, if you must know, her
name is Phoebe,” he began, in the
hushed tone of one speaking on
holy ground, and then let himself
go. First of all, having explained
that there were no words in our
inadequate language fit to describe
her, he used several hundreds of

By Cc. G.

which followed, I gathered that
she was like a flower. A sort of
cross between a rose, a daffodil
and a violet, coupled with distinct
traces of many of the more attrac-
tive blooms found in the best
gardens. Also, that apart from the
fact that she had more arms than
the Venus de Milo, her figure had
that of Venus beaten to a frazzle
from every point that really mat-
tered. [ was about to ring the bell
for the waiter, when George toid
me that Phoebe’s people, who
didn’t approve of him, had packed
her off to England to train to be *
nurse.

“What a pity it should end like
that,” I said.

“End!” he exclaimed, his lips
curling in scorn, “Don’t be an ass,
Bertie. Surely you ought to know
me better than that. Pah! If they
think a few thousand miles can kiil
a love like ours, they’ve got an-
other guess coming. Why, we’ve
sworn to wait for each other and
we shall get married the moment
she returns,”

About three months later, I went
to the Crane for a few days. And
the first person I ran into was
George coming up from the beach
with a girl, who, as they got nearer,
I recognised as Angela Smith. It
was some time after I had gone to
bed when George came to my room
and turned on the light, “What the
devil do you want? “What’s
wrong?”, I said sleepily.

“Everything’s wrong! Wake up,
Bertie. I want your advice about
a rather difficult matter,”

After a good deal of shuifiing
and beating about the bush, hs
told me he had found out that his
feelings for Phoebe had changed
“The awful part of it is, I don’t
know now to break it to her,” he
went on, “After all, a fellow can’t
write to a girl like Phoebe and
say, I don’t love you any more
What shall I do? I must do some-
thing.”

So I sat up in bed and told him:
“Why not write a nice despairing
letter and tell her you love her too
much to let her waste the best
years of her life waiting for you,
and release her from her prom-
ise.”

“By Jove, the vey thing!’’, he
said, and buzzed off, leaving the
light on,

The next day, when he could

one his renunciation was so magni-
ficent that it made hirn appear the
sort of heroic lover no sensible
girl would relinquish. And the
other was obviously such a mean
attempt to get out of keeping his
vows, that he tore both of them
up, and said he would try again.
After tea the following afternoon.
I was in my room reading some
letters that had come by the Eng~
lish mail, when George burst ii
furiously, waving a letter. “Read
that!”, he said, throwing it at me
I picked it up and found it was
from Phoebe, telling him that by
ihe time it reached him, she would
be married to a man named Har-
rington, but would always remem-
ber the happy days of their boy
and girl affair.

“Boy and girl affair, she calls it,”
he raged. “After being faithful to
that girl all these months, this is
my reward. I’ll never trust anofthe?
woman again, Never. If it wasn’t
for Angela "



“Yes, go on. If it wasn’t for
Angela, what would you do? Tt’s
what you wanted, wasn’t it? And
anyway, what's Angela to do with
it?”

“No,” he snapped. “It isn’t what
I wanted. What I wanted was to
end the thing decently. Let it come
to a natural end with regret an@
esteem on both sides. This is the
sort of thing that’s enough to break
a man’s heart and make him-———”

“Go to Angela to get it mended,”
IT said, finishing the sentence for
him.

Grumbling about ruddy fouls
who knew nothing about what
real love was like, George stamped
out of the room, slamming the
door. I finished my packing ard

ner,

When I next went to the club for
my usual, I did not see George
until he greeted me with a violent
slap on the back and a cheerful,
“Hullo, hullo, old fruit, well met!”
and pulled up a chair. When, after
looking round to make sure he
could not be overheard, be began
registering his famous imitation of
a sick sheep, I knew what was
coming.

‘Bertie, old man,” he said, “I
want you to be the first to kaow

”

“Don’t tell mé,” I broke in hast-
ily, as I got up to go, “I know
When is it to be? I’ve sti'l got the
toast rack I bought when it was
Rosatie, and the butter Gish when

got back to town in time for a




Atom Bomb

By the Military Correspondent
THE new lightweight atomic bomb, the!

basic method of making which was disclosed |
last week, has altered American, British, and}
Western European strategic plans.

First news of the bomb was given in the

report of the U.S. Atomic Energy Congress |

Committee on Soviet Atomic Espionage.

This report discloses not only that America}
has the bomb but that Russia will have it in

service soon,
LIGHTWEIGHT

Drawings of the bomb are known to have |

been passed by U.S. Army technician and spy
David Greenglass to a second spy, Julius
Rosenberg, who in turn gave them to the
Soviet Vice-Consul in New York.

The new bomb, most important military
development since the original atom bomb,
is much lighter than the first bomb’s 44 tons.

And these bombs can be carried by fight-
ers. A light bomber might carry enough to
devastate a city and a heavy bomber might
knock out a dozen cities in one mission.

They could also be used in the warheads of
V2 rockets,

On Friday the air chiefs of staff of the U.S.,
Canada, Great Britain and France met in
Washington for a ten-day conference.

They will have now to realign top air
policy and overhaul the aircraft production

of the North Atlantic Powers. Until the new in rr

bomb, atomic air warfare was tied to the big,

long-range bomber because of the bomb-

weight and the long distances to reach tar-

gets.

TWO FORCES
Result was the creation of the world’s two

great long-range bombing forces :—

In the West, the U.S.A.F.’s Strategic’ Air

Command, equipped with 10,000-mile-range
Consolidated B.36’s and _ 6,000-mile-range
Boeing B.50 Superforts.

In the East, the Soviet Air Force’s Long

Range Air Force, equipped with 3,000-mile-
range copies of the American Boeing B.29

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ea ild- them to tell me what her cyes sg inute fr Angela, it wes Beryl, Which d@’you think Superfort. That's why—YOU SHOULD SELECT
gions + Pee en oo were like. In the spate of words Gaotwe anoweed me twee diate. In Angee would prefer? via i The whole of Europe is within range of the
ne an Russian atom bombers.
allowed to divide land, pocket all the profit RING OF BASES > RADIOGRAMS
except that which he pays for surveying " Th i A‘ :

; or] ’ . siiiilal ere are only 200 American B.36’s cap-|%

and laying out and the provision of water, New Hooks by ... George, Malcolm Thomson able of atom bombing Russia direct from] e
and then the Government be called upon to a America .

. . ‘ x i
build proper roads and keep them in order. No Time For Love= But He Upset The rest of the American atom bomber % DA COSTA & C0., LTD.—Elecirical Dept.

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H.M.V. RADIOS and |
:
;

If in the initial stages tenantry roads
were properly built according to specifi-

A Nation’s Morals

highly mobile and rely on a ring of bases







cations by a qualified engineer, it would
ensure that they would have proper drain-
age and last longer. When or if they were
eventually taken over by the Government
they would be basically sound and would
cost less to maintain them,

' The taking over of marl roads has been
the subject of much controversy in the
House of Assembly, and the representatives
of the various parishes have not been spar-
ing in their criticisms of the Government,
who have not been able to take over all
the roads as fast as they would like, or as
fast as would accommodate the ever-
increasing number of tenantries.

It should now be comparatively easy for
the Government in amending the Public
Health Act, to provide for the building of
roads in accordance with certain specifica-
tions laid down by the Engineer of High-
ways and Transport, who should also be
called upon under the act to give a certifi-
cate before the roads could be approved by
the General Board of Health. In fact, since
there is this public insistence that these

een ee ee

SAMUEL BUTLER’S
NOTEBOOKS
Cape. 12s, 6d, 327 pages.

SAMUEL BUTLER was an ec-
centric Victorien who wrote one
book to attack Christianity,
another to attack Darwinism and
a third to prove that Homer was
a woman, He was a genius, a
bachelor and a card,

He never went anywhere with—
out carrying a small notebook in
his waistcoat pocket. He might
say something witty or profound
—and then forget it. Somebody
else might oblige with a memorable
remark; Mrs. Boss his landlady,
for instance, or Alfred his man.
The notebook must be there ready
to save those treasures for
posterity!

And here they are, Mrs. Boss,
a grotesque out of Dickens, Alfred,
quietly but éonsciously humorous,
Butler himself delivering some sly
dig at religion — in a curious
melange of flippaney, fun and
penetration, edited anew by
ane Keynes and Brian C.

* * * *
Naturally there is much in the

book about Butler’s friends, For
while there was no room in his

preserved, e,g,, of Gladstone, that

he had not one redeeming vice.
Once a week they had tea to-
gether. Later, when she was dead,
Butler congratulated himself on
not marrying her. Brilliance
could become boring.
* a

*

He had a mistress, and shared
her with Jones, Each paid
Madame Dumas a pound a week
even when they were not in
town, Jones visited her each
Tuesday, Butler each Wednesday,
“Oh bother, Alfred,’ he would say,
“its Wednesday to-day, and I’ve
got to go to Handel Street” (where
madame lived).

“A fine woman,” Alfred con—
ceded, “Dark, large, not a regular
street—walker, but receiving
gentlemen in her room, I took
her out once or twice myself.”

Alfred was a card too,

Butler visited her for 15 years
before he dared to tell her his
name, When she died, Butler
did not replace her. Jones did,

In the closing years of his life,
Butler was pursued by the zealous
admiration of Bernard Shaw, for
whom he formed an acute nervous
dislike, “He’s a beast, he’s a
beast!” he would ery to Alfred
when he came back from seeing
Shaw.

words? “Have you brought the

cheque book, Alfred?”

OF FORMER LOVE. By Emma
Lairad. Hamish Hamilton.
12s. 6d. 471 pages.

SULPHURIC acid is in short
supply, everywhere, except in
Emma Laird’s pages, where she
uses it to etch the portrait of a
cad. Mark, the hero, or villain,
or maybe victim, of her novel, is
presented by Kathie, the narrator,
as one who has flat feet, and a
paunch; picks his nose, doesn’t
brush his teeth; hag dirty nails;
likes perfume and sleeps with the
window shut.

He is an advanced thinker who
exacts complete obedience from
his women, whom he calls
“darlink.” He is masterful and
feminine; a sadist and a masochist,
In 1939, he discovers that his name
is high on the Gestapo list and
leaves these shores for the United
States,

Kathie has good reason to ob-
serve these details of person and
character, She falls madly in love
with Mark and remains in this
condition through the 471 pages of
this novel. Long as it is, far too
long, Of Former Love is a power-
ful record of a delirious, wretched,
enchaining experience. Mark is
profoundly unattractive, yet his







round the Asian central land mass—of which
Europe is geographically a part.

The rapid creation of a large Russian fight-
er force equipped with some 2,500 jet fighters
has worried the United States Air Force.

It is now doubtful whether Lieut.-General
Curtis E. LeMay, commander of the Strate-
gic Air Command, could guarantee to deliver
his atom bombs to their targets in his high-
flying but comparatively slow bombers.

Possibility of slinging the new lightweight
bomb on to short-range light bombers and
fighter-bombers has made it feasible to send
raiders into Russia, flying fast and low to
avoid defending fighters.

But it has also opened up the possibilities
of the Russians doing the same thing.

And the shorter ranges bring the atomic
V2 into the picture.

Range of the V2 is about 200 miles and
there is no known protection. It is launched
from mobile and easily hidden bases which
are very difficult to attack.

ARMY’S TASK

If Western Europe and Great Britain are
to be adequately protected against this kind
of warfare it is therefore essential :—

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roads be taken over by the Government, it | Prim existence for love, wife or Shaw cried up Wagner (which ability to attract is etched aS} First, that a land army should prevent the in 7. 8.9 and 10 pts.
‘ family, there was room for friend- was bad) and cried down Handel deeply on this plate as his less ee ; : ng
s the duty of the Government to demand | ship. ‘With Pauli, for instance, a (which wags the blackest crime in agreeable habits, Russian armies from sweeping to the Chan- e

that they conform to certain standards and
provide for proper drainage.



No Shrug

'_ THE blocking of the St. James coastal
road on Tuesday night reflects no credit on
the island of Barbados. It is a common
eecurrence for traffic to be held up in the
island because of the time taken for police-
men to reach the scene of the accident and
the time taken to make their required

handsome charming barrister
whom Butler met in New Zea-—
land, he divided his private in-
come. He dipped into his capital
to finance Pauli’s wildcat com—
mercial sechemes—only to find out
that, all along, Pauli had been a
richer man than he. It was a sad
disappointment,

Pauli was succeeded in Butler’s
life by Henry Festing Jones, The
two men wrote, composed music,
painted and took week-end walks
together, Sometimes Jones had
attacks of hysteria. As Alfred
the man-servant said contempt-
uously, “He was always crying,
erying. The governor would ex-

the Butler calendar).

The notebooks are a rag—bag of
the funny things he heard, the
silly things he said and the deeply
original things he thought.

“IT have been to see the
Rossetti exhibition and am
pleased to find it more odious
than I had even dared to hope.
I met Rossetti once; there
were three besides myself. I
disliked them all very much,
but Rossetti the most.”

Butler’s ear for the comic,
which might have made him a
novelist, caught this:

“IT heard a man say to
another at Abbey Wood: I
went to live down there just

@ HERE’S ENGLAND may be
aimed at American visitors. Let
me recommend it as a_ witty,
good-natured guide to English
scene and history, Ruth McKen-
ney and Richard Bransten are
enchanted by England, in which
they found only six good hotels.
(Rupert Hart-Davis. 21s.).

@ How competent Americans
are in the unromantic, authentic
and gripping. story of crime is
shown anew by THE PEOPLE
AGAINST O'HARA, Eleazar Lip-
sky's novel of a murder case, pub-
lished by Wingate, at 10s. 6d.

I Compton-Burnett is an
acquired taste, which more people

nel coast, from which Britain could be
attacked with close-range atomic bombard-
ment.

Second, that Western Europe’s air forces
should not depend on local industries that
could be knocked out in the first few days,
but should be keyed into British aircraft pro-
duction.

Third, that the R.A.F. should not rely en- x
tirely on home-produced aircraft, but should |}
be able also to count on American and Ca-|%

%,

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In any war it would be essential to the sur-



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cuse him ‘Alfred, he’s Welsh.’ ” about the tim teat ae ‘

: fo ’ > time : vival of Britain and Western Europe that a %

measurements. The important thing is for Butler’s relations with women Goren ou Mme ae —— A a edge age gg. pe Ah Pp %
ve : were businesslike and cautious. ‘Th ; : ; po + , d ; *»!swift and successful counter-attack could be Ss

the authorities to acept road-blocking as an , : at will give you an idea 10s. 6d.) gives the wider public : . %
Tee aiteaes nk oho in this He was a little in love with Miss when it was,” an opportunity to sample this ex-|!aunched against Russia herself. x
ae ere eer , ring Ann ne _ whe — This Victorian oddity, who did ponent of astringent, not to say{ The atom bomb is not just the best weapon &
island are these situations faced by a sim- | in love with him. © was lame as much as any man to undermine venomous, dialogue, Saas ; : é °
shout but brilliant, responsible for some the Victorian’ system of morals, Siem cih eta « eabaicias for achieving this : it is the only one. S g

ple shrug of the shoulders. of the remarks that Butler has died in 1902, aged 67. His last LES cLEs. |% { %
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1 busines in |S Oe Mand ! LIQUORS OF THE §
By DONALD SEAMAN _ Over his shoulders was flung a traces back to the poet's family; handed over a 600—word Latin Oil Barnetos, ‘hin Gli ter cie FINEST BRANDS) ¢$
THEY held a rehearsal recent- light brown tweed coat. and Caroline Clay, a secretary speech for a college dinner ora-| 7° The Editor, The Advocate— glen ee A Se pe nie x
ly—the self-appointed young , He was standing-ing as a from London who will be a volun- tion, another aspect of the Tours} S!R,—Several times in the Press The B.U.O.C. had leases over 70% | ams in tins (3 sizes) Gola Braid Rum z
men and women who are out to “Smarty” (“a man who sets’ teer guide for the Tours. service. recently there have been state- Of the total area, or 78% aur $ pa Bron) eh ata Top Notch Rum 8
show overseas tourists “the hum- clothes-fashions and throws par- They took coffee in Antony Said Tom Stacey: “We intend to ments which gave the impression drillable area, of this Island. nat ® Leg Hams cut or who Senate haan x
ming life” of Eton and Oxford, _ ties”) For aa No. 1, Roger Blond’s rooms, against a latticed show tourists the cultural side of | that the British Union Oil Co,, Ltd., they asked Government for was 2 | % Picnic Hams‘ Vielle Curé ‘ $
For in just a week the curtain Longrigg, was laid up. background of japonica and bud- Oxford life. Don’t misunderstand| @d asked Government for a ae re © vents SS) yee eh : Sandeman’s Wines x
goes up on Undergrad Tours. In his rooms—“exquisitely fur- ng trees. ; ., us. We have the deepest respect the right to hold halt of that area Ox Tongues In tins Gilbey’s Wines %
And rolling into Eton and on nished,” says the Tours brochure ,, Miss Pakenham, in a grey suit, for college traditions and honour, Read tine’ tha vw . } te in ti 2 Guinness Stout
towards Oxford's dreaming spires, —sightseers will take sherry. blue pixie hat, crimson blouse, and And we’ think this is a fine thing ate whe write letlers | tinder’ tha lense.aiter Geenshrge % Cheese im tins 12-oz. and 51b Bass’s Ale g
will go two coach-loads of sight- Focus of the rehearsal was a a double row of pearls, lit up a for the Festival of Britain.” bi al ey af thr a Roma ats eS | * Vienna Sausages Worthington’s Ale z
oe “~~ hes ney gs: preview janchem neers vie ape oe | Se Absent from the rehearsal was note that this Sid a have had jensen on 50% oof the tota} $ ae Golden Tree Beer $
jolars cents, or ree guineas, beer and cigarettes, in the fee for “I must say I think cigars are 20-year-old Lora Stormont ‘,

for a day’s introduction to English the day-trip).
academic ways.

does not normally publish
letters which are not exclu.

4 a . 3 *
area, instead’ of the leases on 70%, % Frankfurter Sausages s

*
topping,” she said} “Of course (“who,” says the brochure, “will which they had to begin with SWEETS for the %







it’s rather difficult, M arents show you how a gentleman lives sive wspa) is i i be 6S that % . . -
The seo of the amet Trae Coffee— do not approve. But they are in Oxford’s most famous college, oo oe wre oe sa eee ee x Kiddies and YOU! $
Sere. A tom Stacey ‘On Wor They sat down to soup, turkey, jolly good, aren’t they? Christ Church.”) nnnwibuters to OUR Séked fur a monopoly of the ofl & 3 ; x
a College and formerly of the sweet, cheese and biscuits, with “I ‘haven’t smoked one for six | He has broken a leg ski-ing. pn goa SAY who write business in Barbados. = tS Chocolates in Boxes 8
Guards beer or cider, in the shadow of months, not since the Carlton “Temporarily indisposed, old neaindan nom-de_plume are . & Chocolate Bars : x
m one respect, anyway, it was one of those dreaming spires, affair"—when she made Oxford chap,” said Tom Stacey, “and he’s * be that their names I am, i Carr's Cream Biscuits xR
i indeed a dress rehearsal. Magdalen Tower. news by smoking “an inconspicu- simply furious about it,” mus' sent to the Editor yours faithfully tS Carr’s Chocolate Lunch ¥
z ‘or there, in a dark-blue suit, _ In addition to Messrs Stacey and ©us Havana” in the Carlton Club, Out of the rehedrsal cast, too, ll Toe of good faith. . , Br s &
with a blood-red carnation in his Blond, there were present the Hon, centre of Oxford Toryism, were the boys of Eton, They are ut a tae se ped disclosed E. E. MACINTYRE, Xs g
lapel, was Antony Blond (actually, Antonia Pakenham, 18-year-old still on holiday. They will be back tial by the E as confiden- Attorney and Manager es s x
he’s black-haired). His cutaway daughter of Lord Pakenham, the —and Culture by the time those dollar coaches y the Editor, except in The British Union Oil Co. Lta.;® P , DELIV ER s
white collar set off a biscuit-col- Minister of Civil Aviation; dapper Into the rooms strolled John move west out of London. Signed letters. Barbados, . ? ae x
oured tie. .. = John William Shakespeare, who Proctor classical _ scholar He —LES.! aa May 7, 1951 1 $56556550d05990996996996999999999909999605905690000
i a


THURSDAY, MAY 10,



195



Case Of Aircraft
Landing Examined

By Chamber

MR. D. G. LEACOCK
Commerce at their meeting

Of Commerce

(Jnr.), told the Chamber of
yesterday of the Colonial Sec-

retary’s explanation of the Government’s position as
regards the T.C.A. plane having been refused landing at

Seawell Airport on the night
One of the reasons why

of April 14.
the plane was refused landing

was because there was the danger of placing undue strain

on the existing staff.

CARIBBEAN
COMMISSION

The Caribbean Commission re-
sumed ‘its plenary session yester-
day afternoon at Hastings House
when the major portion of the
session was devoted to Reports of
the Committees to which the va-
rious items on the Commission's
Agenda had been referred.

These Committees had reported
among other things, on recom-
mendations made by various tech-
nical meetings previously held
under Commission sponsorship.
The decisions taken include the
implementation of standardisation
of trade statistics in the various
territories which hitherto have
been far from uniform.

The Commission also moved to
make it possible .o make training
in methods available to the Carib-
bean territories, Another decision
taken was a move to secure the
services of a specialist in rural
co-operatives, fluent in French
and English, to work ih the Carib-
bean promoting the formation of
societies and credit unions.

The Commission supported the
recommendations made by the
Trinidad Statistical Conference
and instructed the Secretary Gen-
eral to circularise member and
territorial Governments in order
to ensure their implementation,
and in addition, the Commission
has decided to explore the facili-
ties for training available in the
various technical assistance pro-
grammes in order to train Carib-
bean personnel.

Memorandum

The Commission noted a memo-
randum prepared by Mr, J. E.
Helsterman, Consultant for Indus-
trial Development and decided
that a joint meeting of the Re-
search Committees on agriculture
and industrial development should
be convened as early as possible
to consider the nature of the
studies to be presented to the Fifth
Session of the West Indian Con-

ference.
It was further decided that the
main consideration of the Fifth

Session of the West Indian Con-

ference should be based on the
more important agricultural and
industrial items which were not
sufficiently explored at previous
sessions,

Pu eg?
Essay Competition
Mr. Jesus T. Pinero, former
Governor of Puerto Rico now in
Barbados for the Caribbean

Commission Talks. has offered a
prize of $100 for the best essuy
on a subject relating to the
accomplishments or objectives of
the Caribbean Commission. This
will be competed for among school
children of the Caribbean area.
The essay will be written in
any one of the languages spoken
in the territories with which the
Commission is concerned,

Escaped Convict
Recaptured



Forty-year-old Dudley But-
cher, aliss “Francis”, of Nurse
Land, who escaped Police cus—

tody at Central Police Station on
April 19, was captured yesterday
evening up Rockley Hill.

Dudley took a dagger from his
pocket when he was surrounded
by the police and cut his throat.
He was taken to the General
Hospital where he is guarded.

How Aladdin’s Lamp
won the Princess

ia
o



Ci
S

Once a poor yourg man named Aladdin



yp. Whenever h
snii would appea

ic la
pag



ery wish. Now Aladdin



King Smiler commands the use of Cow & Gate Milk Food throughout the world.

Mr. Leacock, President of the
Chamber, and Mr. G. H, King had
been appointed by the Chamber to
interview the Colonial Secretary,
Hon, R. N. Turner, and talk it over
with him.

It will be suggested to Govern-
ment that when the necessary
staff has been trained, the air-
port should then be made avail-
able for night flight if there was
reasonable notice or in case of an
emergency. This suggestion
came from Mr. A. S. Bryden.
Mr. Leacock said that Mr. King

and he had _ interviewed the
Colonial Secretary. The Colonial
Secretary had already prepared a
memorandum, on the matter and
had been considering releasing it
to the Press, He, however, thought
that it might be better if they dis-
cussed it first.

Mr. Turner, he said, went into
the matter most thoroughly with
them and displayed every will-
ingness to co-operate.

The Colonial Secretary's state-
ment of Government’s position,
Mr. Leacock said, was as follows:

Lighting Staff
The airport is normally open
from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. In view of
the unreliability of the existing
lighting plant and the inadequacy
ot the staff, the committee under

the chairmanship of the Hon,
F. C. Hutson which was appoint-
ed to prepare a comprehensive

plan for the central development
of the airport was unable to recom-
mend that the airport should be
kept open for regular night opera-
tion at present.

The estimates for the establish-
ment of improved) supply of elec-
tricity was approved by Legisla-
ture. Work would be put in hand
as soon as possible.

Other recommendations which
were made by the committee,
including provision of extra
staff and the matter of increas-
ing landing charges for night
operations, were still under
consideration.

Several months at least were
expected to elapse before the
airport would be ready for reg-
ular night operations, It had
not been the intention of Gov-
ernment to permit such opera-
tions until the work on the! —
regular lights supply has been
completed and the staff brought
up to the proper strength,

At the request of B.W.1A., and
with their assistance in carrying
cut what must necessarily be
make-shift arrangements, permis-
sion had been granted to that
company to operate certain flights
after 6 p.m,

Make-Shift

Arrangements had been made
whereby make - shift facilities
could be extended to Trans Can-
eda airlines in the event of its
seeking permission for its aircraft
to make emergency landing after
the usual hours of operation,

As to the facts of April 14, not
long after the Colonial Secretary's
arrival at his office, the Airport
Manager telephoned from Seawell
and said that T.C.A. were asking
permission tg land an aircraft be-
tween 8 and 8.30 p.m., and to make
their return landing in the small
hours of the morning.

A few minutes later the local
Manager of T.C.A. also tele-
phoned from Seawell and repeated
the two requests. He asked for an
immediate yes or no decision.

The Colonial Secretary replied
agreeing that the aircraft could
land any time before 10 p.m., but
to keep the airport open until the
small hours of the morning would
impose a strain on the operational
staff which was not justified under
the circumstances,

@ On page 7.

ie
r

One day Aladdin asked the genii how he
could get the Princess to marry him.
“Here, Master,”’ said the genii,and hand-
ed him a package of Royal Pudding.

Cow & GAT

De

FOOD*



of AROYALB

Handicraft
Industry Needs
Development

~LEIGHTON

Mr. Fred Leighton, Vice
President of the National
Council of American Import-
ers and a member of the
Advisory Committee on Im-
ports to the U.S. Department
of Commerce in Washington,
told the Advocate yesterday
that there seems to be a con-
siderable opportunity in Bar-
bados for the development of
interesting ceramic products,
small articles made of tropi-
cal woods, shell work of vari-
ous kinds, needlework and
basketry.

He arrived here over the week-
end accompanied by his wife and
is staying at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. and Mrs. Leighton are
inaking a survey of handicraft
rroducts in the various islands of
the British Caribbean Area, with
a view to studying their export
possibility.

_He said that Barbados is par-
ticularly fortunate in having a
very active port, bringing in many
visitors from foreign countries
who are always interested in
beautiful and useful things of a
native character.

Cottage Industries

Cottage industries are a form of
small industry which can give em-
ployment to large numbers of
people, especially in the time of
the year ‘when other employment
is low, and as such, can be an im-
portant economic asset to the
island,

At present, there does not seem
to be a sufficient organization of
handicraft production in Barbados
to permit of any active commer-
cial exportation, but it would ap-
pear to him that an application
of local, public and private initia
tive would, undoubtedly develop
some successful export items in
the handicraft field.

He thought that the example
of Jamaica where the Jamaican
Government, through its Welfare
Commission has, for many years,
carried on an extensive training
programme of cottage crafts in the
rural centres, could be followed
in Barbados in the development
of exportable handicraft.

Mr. Leighton said that his wife
and he were greatly impressed
with the very interesting exhibits

of regional fish at the Barbados
Museum, They noted that a
marine motif had been used in

some of the local craft work
embroidery and in basketry.

Arawak-Method
They had learned that an an-
cient Arawak method of preparing
hats from sugar cane leaves hau
been re-discovered recently, This

i

might potentially become the
basis of an extensive rural in-
dustry in Barbados where sugar

cane is everywhere.

He said that his company had
been importing handicrafts from
Latin America for the last 25
years. They operated from New
York where they maintained
warehouses selling to retail
stores. In the U.S.A., they also
operated five retail stores of their
own dealing exclusively in im-~
ported Latin American and
Caribbean handicraft merchan
dise,

Up to date from the Caribbean,
they have handled products from
the American Virgin Islands,
from Puerto Rico, Haiti and from
Jamaica, They have found that the
American public is very much in-
terested in the . Caribbean pro-
ducts such ag hats, bags and mats
from Jamaica.

They thought that the British
Islands had a considerable op-
portunity to increase the pro
duction and sale of cottage in-
dustry products whereby they
could give interesting employ-
ment to many people, enabling
them to improve their standard
of living; making useful and
beautiful things for their own
homes as well as for the in
creased tourist travel which is



The Princess had refused many suitors.
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Royal Pudding, she cried, “It’s delicious!
I will marry jim if he promises to serve
me Royal Pudding every aay.”



seeing
by his

of their



©
Yes, everyone loves Royal Puddings.
They’re so rich and smooth, So nutritious,
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-
nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today.

Obviously a wise and far-

popular one.
world today Cow & Gate is
recognised

interested personnel to join one

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Viecount:
Elibank

Viscount Elibank, a former
president of the West India Com-
mittee, died at Capetown, where
he had been living since August
last, on March 12th. He was the
third son of the first Viscount
Elibank and was born in 1877.

Viscount Elibank is still remem-
bered in the West Indies, where

as Mr. Gideon Murray he was Ad-,
Vincent from,

ministrator of St.
1909 to 1915 and of St. Lucia for
the two following years, acting as
Governor of the Windward Islands
for some months in 1916. Before
going out to the West Indies he
had served for

Cd two years as as-
sistant private secretary to the
Permanent Under-Secretary of

State for the Colonies (Sir Francis
Hopwood) and prior to that had
served in New Guinea and the
Transvaal.

After returning home from St.
Lucia in 1917 he was appointed
Food Commissioner for Glasgow
and the Western Counties of Scot-
land, and at the end of the war
stood for Parliament and was
elected for the St. Rollox Division
of Glasgow as a Unionist support-
er of the Coalition Government
His association with the Ulster
leaders brought him into close
touch with Lord Salisbury and
Colenel Gretton, the leaders of
the “diehard’’ movement. It was
he who,*on February Ist, 1922,
precipitated matters by a letter to
the chief Unionist Whip protesting
against the “dictatorship” of the
Prime Minister, Mr. Lloyd George,
and declaring that the time had
come to “reform the Conservative
Party upon its own basis.” A
menth later the diehard group
was already constituting a solid
blec of Unionist members to end
the Lloyd George régime, and it
was not long before the main
strength of the party was on their
side, as became evident at the
famous Cariton Club meeting.

On the death of his father in
1927 he became a member of the
House of Lords, where he showed
a lively and practical interest in
Imperial affairs and_ especially
everything that affected the wel-
fare of the West Indian colonies.
He became the centre of a number
of controversial issues. In the
late twenties and early thirties he
played a prominent part in the
campaign which had for its object
the maintefiance of the British
West Indian sugar industry,

Viscount Elibank was appointed
president of the West India Com-
mittee in 1930. He resigned in
1936 and at the annual meeting
that year proposed Sir Eliot de
Pass, who was duly elected, as his
successor, Viscount Elibank was
president of the Federation of
Chambers of Commerce of the
Empire from 1934 to 1937 and
presided at the Empire Chambers
of Commerce Congress held in
New Zealand in 1936, He was also
a director of several insurance and
investment companies,

His publications included United
West Indies and A Man's Life.

—WIC.c,

"GASCOGNE" DUE
ON SATURDAY
The French steamship Gas-

cogne is expected to call at Har-
bados from Trinidad on Satur



day. She will be leaving port
around 10 a.m. the same day for
England,

Eleven passengers have 2!

ready booked passages with her
agents. She is consigned to
Messrs R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd



Potatoes Arrive

The Saguenay Terminals Sun
Valley landed 600 bags of English
potatoes among other general
cargo here yesterday. The cargo
arrived from Glasgow and Liver
pool,

Included in her cargo for Bai

badcs were cod liver oil, stout,
beer, linseed oil, cement, cocton
piece goods, polishing powder,

stationery and sewing machines
The Sun Valley is consigned to
Messrs. Plantations Ltd.





ecming steadily to these islands;
and for export to other islands
in the Caribbean; and to various
parts of the British Empire and
the United States.

Ruler —and judging
happy subjects a very
All over the

and welcomed.

Something a little better —
something alittle different —
have made the Food pre-

emine it. j
x * * (

Cow & Gate Ltd., Guildford,

issue a hearty invitation to

visiting doctors, nurses and

overseas parties to their

West Country Factories during
the summer of 1951.





|

Small Holders Gan’t Get \\—>

Workers To



Reap Canes

BARBADOS IS REAPING the greatest sugar crop in

its history—estimated at 173,000 tons.

But peasant farmers

are having no easy time getting their canes cut.

Peasant farmers and

smallholders

are experiencing

the most difficult period in years in their efforts to harvest
their own crop and if the situation does not iinprove, the
total tonnage reaped might fall considerably short of the
170,000 tons mark, the Advocate was yesterday informed

The present situation is
estate workers receive 73
per ton for cutting canes and 73
eents per ton for heading them
enerally This has been laid
down in an agreement between
the Barbados Workers’ Union
and the Sugar Producers’ Fed
eration.

In addition to this, these lab
®urers will receive at the end of
the crop season a bonus based on
the percentage of tons harvested
@s compared with the entire
island's crop.

The Complaint

This, the peasant proprietors
complain, results in the fittest
‘nd most competent estate lab
ourers being absorbed by the
sugar estates.

The only labour then avail
able to the peasant proprietor
4nd the small holders, are cither
taecse too lazy to make use of the
anore remunerative employment
at sugar estates or those physi-
cally incapable of working at the

pace that would) make it re-
munerative, d
They then charge a fiat
of $2 a day for cutting and $2 per
day for heading the canes but
they cannot cut nor head the
canes at an economic rate. But
tne small-holder has no choice

It is they or no one

Some plantations, the Advocate
was informed, have even had to
employ children during the last
long vacation to help harvest the
crop although they took a chance

with the law at employing this
sort of labour.

Most of them have now gone
hack to school.
“Go Slow” Attitude

The Advocate also heard com
plaints that there was a sort of
“go slow” attitude on some of the
estates,

Interviewed on these points,
the Labour Commissioner said
that with regard to the shortage
cf labour on the small holdings
he knew that workers preferred

to work on the estates where they

were sure of longer and more
1egular employment and then a
bonus at the end of crop.

With regard to the “go slow’
report, he had ~ keen informed
that labourers were working very
well on the estates, He thought
they would be foolish to cut o1
head the minimum amount oi
‘anes if they were going to be
paid by the ton and also given ¢«

bonus based on the amount ¢
tons individually handled by
them



‘Hawk’ Gets Radio
| Telephone Set

The Police launch Hawk is the

island’s second up — to— date
launch, Radio telephone hag re
cently been installed into her.
The first launch in Barbados to

have radio telephone wag Mes
Gardiner Austin's Patricia.

The Harbour Police who patrol
Carlisle Bay in this trim little
white launch are always in con
stant contact with their statior
at Bay Street. Just a touch of a
button and they are receiving
orders, wherever they are, from
the shore station,

On the other hand, when the
patrol wants to get in contact
with the office, they can call them
up and transmit their message
The newly installed equipment
is a great asset to the Harbour
Police Department. They have
not yet got a code and the mes
gages are transmitted in English

In casé you want the Harbour
Police launch, you can vin, the
Bridge Police Post and you have
her,



rs

IMPERIAL LEATHER e



SPARE

GET



rate Free









:
tS f,
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LIND. N BLOSSOM

555552, IIIA AA AAA AAA ANA SL AED yt tpt tt ts
FEEL LEAL ALAC LLL LMG >

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_ ALLEN MOTOR SCYTHE

REQUIREMENTS Now



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Saeed
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by three peasant proprietors.
that
cents

For Regional Trade
Union Talks

Mr. F. Le» Walcott, M.C.P., is
due to leave Barbados’ by
8.W.LA, to-day for Trinidad ‘to
attend a Regional Trade Union
Conference on May 11. He is ex
pected to return on Sunday

The Cenference is sponsored
by the Inter-American Regional
Organization of workers in

Cuba, an affiliated organ of
Internationa! Confederation
Trade Unions.

the
of

|

|
|
|
|
|
}

Free

Adams Due For
T.U. Congress

Mr. G. H. Adams, Leader oi
the House of Assembly, will at-
‘end the Second Congress of the
nternational Conferderation of
Trade Unions which will
take place in Milan, Italy, from
July 4—12





Animal Feed Comes |

The 76-ton schooner Timothy
A, H. Vansluytman arrived in
port from British Guiana yester
day with over a thousand bags ot
rice bran from British Guiana
She also brought supplies of fire
wood and heavy charcoal



The rice bran is used as animal
feed. It was consigned to Messrs.
Da Costa & Co, Ltd, The Van-
sluytman usually brings rice to
Barbados, but she has brought
none this trip Her agents are
Messrs. Schooner Owners’ Asso
ciation,





OOOO LOPES ADO PO oe

LET US DISPENSE
YOUR DOCTORS’

+, 4,

APPEAL AAL LEIA ADDN)

‘,

.

‘,
* s
: . ‘
% PRESCRIPTIONS %
x x
y e %
x In Liness 3
% you need two friends %
¥ »,
% your DOCTOR ana by
% your DRUGGIST. %
% To ensure that your R
‘ doctor’s wishes are accom- %
ss plished, take your next
x Prescription to «Uh x
* WEATHERHEAD'S DRUG %
% STORE x
% where you can be sure of %
x obtaining drugs of high
& quality, accurately dis. %
s pensed in minimum § time %
xX and at a moderate price 4
%,
sy Remember—we serve you x
% DAY and NIGHT x
- >
* e %
, ~
* °
é +
: Bruce $
* s
Ww
* Weatiierhead Lud. 3
* Weatherhead Lid. §
% Tel Nos.—Day 2164, 2165, %
* Night: 3144, 3240, 4189. %
a
2)

a

LUXURY,
‘SOAPS

ie

BLUE HYACINTH

GOTT

i) ARRIVED !!

PARTS

YOUR



PAGE FIVE











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SRITISH PATENT APRLITO FOR
ate Us par ore

THERE’S PLEASURE and Health for all the family in a
PRESTO PRESSURE COOKER. For this modern,
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the magic-like speed. The very

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the losses of vitamins and min-
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[his sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of fldvour
which will claim your allegiance from the first sip.

AGHLAND
OWEEN

SCOTCH WHISKY

Sole Importers :—
~ W.S, MONROE & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

MACDONALO & MUIR

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gore






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$
5
KNIGHTS’ LTD. S
OOOO OOOO LLL LLCO SESEE.


PAGE SIX

HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON





SUZE! YOU SHOULD SEE ON
Lit Tits —~; BIG ONES!
RECEPTION? IZ











QUIET LITTLE
RECEPTION!



THE GAMBOLS__

BY BARRY APPLEBY

Bi WON'T BOTHER ABOUT THAT
APPOINTMENT , DEAR you
NEED GLASSES



BY FRANK STRIKER

| PICKED UP YOUR TRAIL) THEN YOU 1
BEHIND THE BANK AND fy,
FOLLOWED IT HERE/ f/

@ay YOURE ix0
f MAN/

|



AS
Wie

BRINGING UP

ate =);

|

SURE I DO... IT'S AN UNUSUAL — Maan
KEY... I MADE IT FORA fe
WOMAN WHO RUNS A
BOARDING HOUSE

Sa. JUST A BLOCK

I'VE HAD
ENOUGH ! T/LL
LEAD YOU TO
THE MONEY !

THAT'S
My ALL WE NEED,
KIRBY | LET'S

ae
wy

HERE'S
YOUR MAN,
MR, KIRBY... JACK
MINCH, THE
LOCKSMITH,

PHANTOM

THE

| | (74 GRAB THE STUFF “AND
g (GET OUT OF HERE, FACTS
ein



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THURSDAY,

4

LIFEGUARD ©

THE WONDERFUL BRITISH
| DISCOVERY

A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic

MAY 10,



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH |

That NEW WYVERN PEN that





is causing a sensation at the Festi-






) val of Britain, is at - -

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
—_—

ENAMEL-IT PAINTS for your
Pet Furniture is at - - -
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

SHOP

HERE!

LADIES!
DRESS GOODS

Sharkskin, Romaine Crepe,
Jersey, Plain & Striped,
Silver & Gold Tinsel Crepe
& Georgette, Plain & Print-
ed Crepe-de-Chine, Satins,
Satins, Tafetas, Spuns, Etc.
Hats, Shoes, Nylons.

GENTS!

Taffetas, Spyns, Etc , Hats,













* FOR PERSONAL HYGIENE

LITE,

‘i PEE
Vg sk TO STERILIZE CUTS AND
GRAZES



* TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS

*% SAFETY AND RELIEF FOR BITES
AND STINGS











Oe ee

Waris Fy.

SS This wonderful new “ Lifeguard” used in tens of
thousands of homes is the most powerful protection
At the same time it is quite safe for
all to handle and pleasantly fragrant and non-staining.

you can use,

No home with small children dare be without it.

Shoes, Nylons.

LET US SERVE YOU.

THANI's

Pr. Wm Henry &
Swan Sts.



°

;

PPLE LEE PLEO SLL LEELL LCCC TCAD

+, % x ; ee
s {LPO OOOO LOLLIPOP IOI OD OOOO OOOO TD

NEW BOOKS SCHOOL
ELEPHANT BILL by Lt.-Col. J. H. Williams BOOKS

ROYAL READERS
3, 4, 6

“

GSS PI EID EOL

VENUS THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskine

SHAW by Desmond McCarthy

ROYAL SCHOOL

ISLANDS OF THE SUN by Rosita Forbes PRIMER

THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELBRECHT

by Maurice Richardson WEST INDIAN

READER

CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHTING 1&2



ee

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

«




‘

4

*

“s x

Â¥, *
2 ‘ : s i
LPP APPLE LLLP LLL LLL OOO LLL ILS OX







SS SS

DEAL HERE



me
<=

| I, PAYS YOU TO

—

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only









































USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
i MOIRS CHOCOLATES PLANTERS PEANUTS
} per PKG. a es A apie ee TINS 96 85
ROWNTREES COCOA GREEN SEAL RUM
TINS 3 Seema eee 20 BOTS. (large) 1.08 838
CARR'S CHEESE CRISPS & HEINEKENS BEER
CLUB CHEESE BISCUITS tins 1.20 96 BOTS. 26 21












DUNLOP
UNIVERSAL

MOTOR CYCLE TYRES

AT LAST?!

e
A Cane Trailer

Manufactured by the well-known Brockhouse organization and
specially designed to meet the exacting requirement of plan-
tation work in the West Indies, where contouring and draining
of land is practised.

These Cane Trailers are equipped with large diameter 10
ply rear tyres, and positive brakes, and are capable of carrying
a 5-ton pay load with safety.

Specifications: —5-ton 4—wheeled Sugar Cane Trailer.

Main Frame:—10’—0” long x 4/—6” wide, from steel

members electrically welded.

Gooseneck, Assembly:—of 4” I.D. hgavy service tubing.

Side Frames:—of steel channel with bolt fixing.

Drawbar:—of steel channel, cross-braced and electrically

welded.

Rear Axle Equipment:—3” sq. bed, straight-through axle,

with journals; fitted 6-stud roller-bearing
hubs. All steel disc wheels, 8.00 x 28.
Front Azle Equipment:—2%” sq. bed, straight-through
axle, with journals, fitted 5-stud roller-
bearing hubs. All steel disc wheel.
4.00 x 16.
PRICE $1,750.00





“We khow that there are cheaper trailers on the market,
but if you are interested in a unit whieh will give entire satis-
faction in both WET & DRY WEATHER, we invite you to come
in and examine these “specially” designed trailers.”

BROTHERS

DIAL 4269

‘Reliability *

|
|
DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING |
COMPANY LIMITED oor



2

ON

REEL LEE






THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS. |. rs

TELEPHONE 2508

_

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
anfouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents pe> word for each
edditional word. Terms ¢ash. Phone 2508
3113 for Death





DIED

DRAYTCN—On the Sth of May 1951
David Clifford Drayton (late retired

Road Inspector of Christ Church). The}

funeral leaves his late rs sidence
“Olearia” Enterprise Road, Christ
Church, at 4.15 o’elock this evening

for Christ. Church Parish Church.
Friends are imvited.
Elien Drayton (Widow), Calvir

(Son), Adina Holder, Olive Drayton
(Sisters}, Cleveland Drayton (Ne-
phew). 10.5.51—1m

——<——_
CUMMINS—Mrs. Cummins:— In loving
remembrance of our mother Albertine
Cummins who departed this life 10th

of May, 1943.
“Time passes, shadows fall, ;
But love and remembrance outlasts
all.”
Armintha (Daughter), Gwen, Clementy
Mellis (Grands). 10.5.51—19



TAKE NOTICE

That FORT GARRY FLOUR MILLS
CO, LIMITED, a
under the laws of the Province of Sas-
katchewan in the Dominion of Canada,
whose trade or business address is in

the City of Saskatoon, Province of Sas-}

katchewan, Canada, has applied for the
registration of a wade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of flour, feed and
cereals, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 9th
day of May, 1951, unless some person;
shall in the meantime give notice in;
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of sueh registration, The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.
The applicant disclaims all exclusive use
of the words ‘Milled from Selected Hard
Spring Wheat" as well as the name ot
the applicant as part of the trade mark
to_be registered.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1961.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

9.5.51—8n

TAKE NOTICE
CELOTEX

That THE CELOTEX CORPORATION, a
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United
States of America, whose trade or busi-
ness address is City of Chicago, state of
Illinois, U.S.A., has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of wall board and
similar building material, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day.og{ May, 1951,
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office,

Dated this 16th day of April 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
9. S651—3n

~ ‘TAKE NOTICE

FLYING FISH

That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-







ED, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a_ British
Company, whose trade or business
address is Calcutta House, Goulstom

Street, Aldgate, London, E., England, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and chi-
cony, coffee essence, and coffee and chi-
cory essence, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from.
the 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppos-
ition of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5. 51—3n.

REAL ESTATE
JOHN
M4.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD



A





FOR SALE

“LOCKERBIE HOUSE”, Brit-
tons Cross Road—A distinetive and
welling, ese $06 stone ae
set well n groun
approx. one acre in extent. The
gardens are well matured and
\\ there is complete privacy from the

roadway and adjoining property.
There is a covered entrance porch
for cars, wide airy verandahs,
large lounge with a central stair-
way making an attractive feature,
dining room, four good bedrooms,
kitchen, butler’s , _ Store-
rooms and usual ; Outside
there is a large garage, servant's
quarters, éte. An extremely inter-
esting and desirable property.

“WHITEHALL FLATS”,
rington Hill, St. Michael—A well
preserved country home recently
converted into a beg 4 spaci-
ous luxury flats, with all
modern conveniences. The
approx. 5 acres are laid out with
lawns, shrubbery and gardens and
there is a long carriageway ap-
proach flanked with mahogany
trees. An investment property or
suitable for conversion into Guest
House or Nursing Home. 3% miles
from town.

“ELSWICK", 8th Avenue, Belle-
ville — A stone and timber house
on approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed
verandah, 2 reception rooms, 3
bedrooms, kitchen and pantry, Full
information on application.

“RICHELIEU”, Ilith Avenue,
Belleville—Well maintained bunga-
low constructed of stone with
wallaba shingled roof. ac-
commodation consists of an en-
closed gallery, living room, dining
room, four bedrooms, kitchen, ser-
yant's room and aouble garage.
The property has a wide lawn
at one side. a small orchard and
‘s fully enclosed, Central resi-
dental area near town and schools,

“WINSDALE”,

Cod-
i

Cheapside—-Single
storey residence, 3 minutes walk
from town centre. 2 living rooms,
dining room, verandahs, 4 beu-
rooms. Area of pilet approx.
10,000 sq. ft. Open to offers.



“IN CHANCERY”
Silver Sands,

on Const at
Furnished.

“WINDY WILLOWS” —Procpect,
St James, Unfurnished house on
coast, with 3 bedrooms,
verandah, overlooking sea
Immediate possession.

lounge,
ete.

“WAVERLEY”, St. Lawrence—

ST
piece son een eae

—Attractive 3 bedroomed furiiish-
ed seaside bungalow. Availabie
long lease if required.

“SANDY LODGE”. St. James—
Furnished Chvlet with the best
beach and bathing the Island has
to offer.

“WHITSHALL FLATS"— Well
appointed furnished apartments



REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
’Phone 4640





eorporation organized |



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and -

24 words — over 24

96 cents Sundays
| Sects ¢ conte Sword weab—4 cones a

word Sunday«.





AUTOMOTIVE

SSUES!
CAR: Hillman Saloon, first Registered
Feb. 1951. Low mileage, condition as
new. Can be seen arytime at Worthy-
dows, Top Rock. Phone 4683 or 8469
9.5.51—3n

CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
tyres, in good working condition, price
Teasonabie, y F, D. L. Gay, Staple





Grove, Christ ureh. Dial 3207,
1.5.51—t.f.n.
CARS: This week's offer; One 1942

model Mercury Sedan. New tyres and
engine in good condition. Ideal for taxi
No reasonable offer refused. Ring 4908,
E'dos. Agencies Ltd.

8.5.51—6n

CAR—Hiliman Car M--1799. in good
working order. Apply Frank Proverbs
C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd., High
Street. 5.5.51—Sn,

WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

ELECTRICAL

ae schimenprnegameei er vonaamannapinssatrinime
RADIO—One Murphy € tube in good
working order, beautiful tone. Dial
16. 35.51—3n.









RADIO: One Hallicrafter 9-Tube, S40
Radio, almost néw. Phone 3757. L. M
Clarke, James Street. 8.5.51—3y

FURNITURE

FURNITURE— At Ralph's Furniture
Show Reom, Hardwood Alley. A large
selection of new and second-hand fur-
niture all at Bargain Prices, For inquiry
Ring 4683. 9.5.51—3n



LIVESTOCK

COW: One Guernsey-Ayrshire Cow,
soon to calve with 2nd calf. Apply
i. Durant, Grove, St. Philip.

9.5.51—2n
_

MECHANICAL

BICYCLE—One Gent's Silver King
Hercules Bicycle, with light, lock and
good tyres. Phone 4239,











9.5.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES for sale which
Pearl-in-Laid Burmese
(very old) French 2i-day Clock in
lass Case. A number of Barbados
ine Pennies, Chinese and Japanese
Tea Services, Old English Tea Service
(12 cups and saucers) believe to be
Stafford, Old cut glass Decanters, sev-
eral Ivory Jewel Boxes, miniature hand
painted pottery and numerous old plates,
at reasonable prices at Ralph Beard's
furnishing show rooms, Hardwood
Alley. 10,5.51—3n.















include
writing Cobinet

BUTTER: Cooking Butter 11) Tins,
Table Butter 1 lb Tins also Kraft Cheese
in Paekages. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck





Street. Dial 3489, 9.5
BEDSTEADS: Simmons Bedsteads &
Springs. Available in 3 ft. 3 ims. and

4 ft. 6 ins. sizes with or without psnel.

G. W. Hutcl¥nson & Co., Ltd.; Broad

and Roebuck Streets. Dial 4222 or 4843,
9.5.51—4n

CAMERAS: Standard Box Cameras
(usifg 120 film) at only $7.45 each.
Buy yours TODAY at G. W. Hutchin-
son & Co., Ltd. Broad Street. Dial 4222.

9.5.51—3n

GALV ANISE—2% gauge 8 ft. $7.00, 9 ft.
$7.15. Only a limited number at Ralph
Beard’s furnishing show room Hardwood
Alley. 10.5.51—3ne

GALVANISED SHEETS—Best qualitr
new sheets. Cheapest in the Island!
6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; & ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;
10 ft $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry !
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

4.5.51—t.f.n.

GLASS WARE—A few dozen French
black footed Champaigne, Whisky,
Sherry, and water Goublets are for sale.













Champaigne $12.00 a doz
Whisky $10.00 a doz.
Sherry $10.00 a doz
Goublets $13.00 a doz

At Ralph Beard’s ‘furnishing show rooms
Hardwood Alley. 10.5.51—3n

HAMS:



Hams in Tins 71b to 9b, 24
lbs. and 1 tb Tins, also 5 to 6 Ib at
$1.25 per â„¢m Smoked. W. M. Ford,
35 Roebuck Street, Dial 3489,
9.5.61—2n
LUNCH TINS: Available at Hutchin-
sons at 83 cents each. Attractive-Strong
easy to carry, Als White Tumblers at 8
cents each. @. W. Hutchinson & Co.,
Ltd. Broad St. and Roebuck St. Dial 4222

or 4843. 9.5.51~4n
SOUPS: Campbells & Heinz Soup,
Vegetable Consomme, Oxtail, Tomato;

Chicken. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck Street
Dial 3489. 9.5.51—2n

TINNED MEATS: Sausages Large and
Small Vienna Style, Veal Loaf, Muttor
& Peas & Steak & Kidney Pudding
W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck Street, Dial
2489. 9.5.5—2

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Gwendolyn Oxley.
holder of Liquor License No. 988 of
1951 granted to Darnley Jackson in re-
spect of bottom floor of a 2 storey wall
building near Millar Bros. Baxters Rd.,
City for permission to use said License
at said premises, Baxters Road, City.
To: H. A. TALMA, Esa.,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
Dated this 4th day of May, 1951.
GWENDOLYN OXLEY,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Police Court, District “A’ on
Tuesday, the 15th day of May, 1951 at

11 o'clock, a.m
H. A. TALMA,
Poline Magistrate, Dist. “A”
10.5.51—In.







TAKE NOTICE

QUAKER

e



}
'
}
;
| That THE QUAKEn OAYS COMPANY,
a corporaion organized and existing un-
der the laws of the State of New Jersey,
United States of America, inufacturers,
whose trade or business address is Mer-
chandise Mart Plaza, Chicago, Illinois,
U.S.A., has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Regis-
ter in t of cerenl foods and feeds,
and will be efititled to register the same
after one month from the 9th day of
May, 1951, unléss some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen om application at my office.
Dated fhis 25th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
' 9.5,51—3n

9BO5F9665995509605908%,
West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,

Pottery, Hand blocked Beach-
~ werr, Decoration House, 8
% James. Tei. 91-74.

o 144.51—1m. s

* <
LOSSSESOS SOS FCS OOO FOSS



on tf.
Apply to A. E
Street., Diat \ on





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Téa cents per agate line on wee
Py ay ty
o $1.50 on week-days

and $1.00





NOTICE
Applications for one of More vacant St
Michael's Vesiry Exhibition tenable at
the Combermere School, will be reveived

by the Clerk of the Vestry up to “12| Paynes Bay

a NOTICES

@eclock noon on Thursday 22nd day of
May, 1851.

Candidates must: be sons of parishion-
er. in straitened circumstances and must
not be Tess than ten years and four
months nor more than twelve years
old on the Ist day of January 1951, to
be preved by a Baptismal Certificate,
which must accompany the application.
Parents and/or Guardians will be noti-
fed of the time and place of the Exam-
ination.







of June, December. Forms of ication can obtained
Apply Mrs, I. Weatherhead C/o J. N. | from the Westy Chen's ome G
nm 5.5. 51—4n ae e,
ee the » C. REDMAN,
VBRONA—Black Reck, near Deacon's Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.
Road Corner. Newly built bungalow con- 8.5.51—%n
taining open verandah, Drawing and | —————_—$_——_
Dining, 2 bedrooms with running water, | ST. MARY'S OLD BOYS ASSOCIATION
Servants’ room and Garage, Dial 2947. NOTICE
R. Archer McKenzie, Victoria St.
£.5,.51—3n, “THE CHURCH AND THE COM-



TAKE NOTICE |

PABLUM |

That MEAD JOHNSON & COMPANY, |
a corporation duly organized under the +
laws of the State of Indiana, United |
States of America, whose tradé or.
business address is Ohie Street and St.
Joseph Avenue, Evansville, State of In-'
diana, U.S.A., has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of specially prepared
foods for human use and pharmaceutical
preparations which supply nutritional
needs, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 9th
day of May, 1951, unless some rson
7, ~ a meantime give no in
uplica’ me at my office of oppositii
of -e registration. The sade ark
can seen on application at mi:
Dated this 25th Tey of April, ist
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5,51—3n



TAKE NOTICE



That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-
D, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a British
Company, whose trade or business
address is Caleutta House, Goulston
Street, Aldgate, London, B., England, has
appiied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A’ of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and
chicory, coffee essence and coffee and
chicory essence, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.
Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

9.5. 51—3n)



TAKE NOTICE

ey

That THE MAGGI CO., Manufacturers,
a Company incorporated according to the
laws of Switzerland, whose trade or
business address is Kempttal, Zurich,
Switzerland, has applied r the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register In respect of substances used as
food or as ingredients in food, especially
soups, bouillons, and seasonings, and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of May, 1951,
unless some person shail in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registra-
tion, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5.51—3n





TAKE NOTICE





CROSS-STAR

That THE *.AGGI CO., Manufacturers,
a Company incorporated according to the
laws of Switzerland, whose trade or
business address is Kempttal, Zurich,
Switzerland, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of substances used as
food or as ingredients in food, especially
soups, bouillons, and seasonings, and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of May, 1951,
unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registra-
tion. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5.51—3n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The applicatior of Chas. Scott trading
as Scott & Co., holder of Liquor License
282 of 1951 granted to him in respect of
bottom floor of building in Busbey Alley;
City for permission to use said Liquor’
License &c., at ground floor of a 2-sterey
wall building opp. Mason Hall St,
Baxters Rd:, City.

Dated this 9th day of May, 1952.





To: H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District

“An,
W. ALLEYNE,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A on Monday
the 2lst day of May, 1961, at 11 o'clock
a.m,

10.5.51—1ly



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Sydney Beckles
holder of Liquor License, No. 267 of 195)
granted to a wall building at Govern-
ment Hill, St. Michael for permission to
use said Liquor License &c., at a board
and shingle shop at My Lords Hill, St.
Michael :

Dated this 7th day of May
To: FE. A, MeLEBOvD, Esq

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

8S. BECKLES,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A’ on Thursday
the 17th day of May 1951 at f1 o’elock,
a.m

E. A. Mcl£0D,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A™.
0.5.51—1n

H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. |

1951



HAIR BEAUTY

Nothing is more becoming to 9

Lady than a beautiful head of
hair, Special Scalp Treaiments
are given for growing and beau-
tifying it. In six months you
have long hair. Also a_ special
hair Pomade is sold which grows
and keeps it soft and glossy

MADAME EDGHILL,
Dial 3471.

9.5.51—1n



MUNITY” will be the subject of a lec-
ture which will be given by The Rev.
Pother A, I, Johnson, L.Th., to-night,
Thursday, May 10, 1951, at 8.00 o'clock,
at St. Mary's Boys’ School Room, Mason
Hall St. All Old Bays and the general
public aré invited.
EB. deLISUE YEARWOOD,
Hony, Secretaiy;.
10.5.51—1y

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Leonard Beckles
holder of Liquor License No. 894 of
1951 granted to Harcourt Hood in respect
of a board and shingle shop attached
to a house at Bank Hall X Road, St
Michael for permission to use said Liquer
License &c., at a board and galvanize shop
with shedroof attached at Sobers Lane,
St. Michael

Dated this 7th day of May 1951
To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.

LEONARD BECKLES,
Applicant

N.B,--This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Folice Court, Distriet “A” on Thursday







|
|

PURLIC

Ten cents per agate tine on woek-doy,
and 12 cent per agate ne on Sundays.













mimmum charge $1.50 on week-days| words 3 cents a worl week—4 Cents a}?
and $1.80 on Sundays word Sundays. j
me oes ee HELP i
REAL ESTATE _ 5 eS |
exes spateinatninihintdtaemimemtbinniinanniiants 6 LADY for the pest of Stendgstgnse|
| BUILDING SITE—With private Beach [ Typist. Apply i writing to J. N_ Har-i
(Approximately) lia geres, at Derricks,}tman & Co. Lid, Alexander Howe, |
, St. James. For inspection fJames Street $.5.51-<1n
and further information, Dial—2991. | - —_————— a
(Offers received) . 6.5. 33+2n. YOUNG LADY for post of Secretary
~ | Stenographer in our office. Suitable
ee Gate te SUTE: sitwated jselary paid to the right person. Apply
at Ventnor . Ch. Ch. Area 10,978 | i person to Sanitary Laundry Co. Ltd.
sq. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft, road. Dial | Country Road. 8.5.51—t.f.0
2206 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5,.51--t.f.m.
CONFIDENTIAL PRIVATE SECRE-
TARY — English, experienced shorthand-
AUCTION typist requires employment fer one or
two days a week, own typewriter. High-
aie = ce ew: Box No. A.C. C/o
nee ares tions received I will sell saan aus
»’ Publ on spot at Bank Responsible person to take charge of
Hell Main 4th house from All} Commission Department to assume duties
Souls Church, om Thursday next th} not later than ist July—Salary $200 00

i0th May at 2 oa'clock, One
roofed house with out-offices
sold to the highest bidder.
removed,

three-
Wil be
Must be
5.5. 51—in

By instructions of the Insurance Co
1 will sel at Marshall Edwards, 44
Roebuck Street opposite James A. Tudor
& Co., om Friday Ith at 2 p.m.

1 Austin 7 Saloon Car damaged in
weident. Terms CASH R, Archer
McKenzie. 8.5. 51—4n.



SALES |

-canenrarienienreengenieieenecianaeee patie tmanrenEeE.



WANTED
Minimum charge week 72
86 cent Sundays 24 words

cents aul
over %4













+8240. 00 per month depending on qual-
ifeations. Apply in person with written
application to Secretary, Dowding Estates
& Trading Compari’, Ltd

9.5, 51—In

‘MISCELLANEOUS










E One i .iquer License
Apply S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd Dial
4293 10.5.51—tn



CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE

From page 5
He accordingly inrormed the
manager ef T.C.A. that he was
Unable to grant his second request
—-that the aircraft should be
allowed to land on its return flight
in the small hours of the morning.
Undue Strain
The Seawell Airport Committee
has warned in its report against
the danger of placing undue strain

the 17th Gap of Mwy 1951 at 1 o’elock,; 0 the existing staff. Breakcpwns

a.m
E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
10,5, 51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Alexander Sober:
holder of Liquor License No. 980 ef 19)
granted to Edith Burnham in respect of
© one roofed board and shingle shop
attached to residence at Bridge Road, St.
Michael, for permission to use said Liquor
License &c., at a board and shingle shop
with shedroof attached at Halls Poad,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of May 1951.
To:—E. A. McLEOD, Bsq.,

Police Magistrate,
Dist. “A”.
ALEX. SOBERS,
Applicant.



N.B.—This application will be consir-|

ered at a Licensing Court to be heit

| action was unreasonable.
phad

ir. health through over-strain
would cripple the day to day op-
erafions of the airport and the
efficieney of the air traffic con-
troller, the road operator or the
fire and crash attendant. They
could not be guaranteed if they
were called upon to deal with a
genuine emergency after having
already Been on duty for 12 to 20
hours,

The flight in question actually
landed at Seawell at 8.3. p.m. and
left agaim at 9.05 p.m.

Mr. Leacock said thit he did
not think Hon. R. N. Turner's
There
some

been, he undérstood,

at Police Court, District “A’’ on Monday | feeling that the staff was working

the 2ist day of May, 1991, at 11 o'clock,
am
BE, A, McL£EOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
10.5.51—1n0
—_—

Motorist Fined

A District “A” Police Magis-
trate told Cyril Miller of Ivy
Street, St. Miehael: “You've now
got a conviction for speeding re-
corded against you and if you
return here your licence will be
suspended”, when he fined hin
£4 yesterday for speeding on
Constitution Road while driving
the motor lorry M.275. :

The fine is to be paid by in-
stalments of £1 per month or
in default two months’ imprison~
ment and his licence is to be en-
dorsed. Police Constable 349
Lashley who brought the case
said he saw the motor lorry on
Constitution Road on March 1)
and eheeked the speed of the
lorry and found that it was trav~-
elling at over 32 miles per hour

He took the driver’s name and
reported the matter to the Cen-
tral Station. The speed limit on
Constitution Road for lorries is
20 miles per hour.

Also fined for exceeding the
speed limit on March 27 was
Lionel Gill of Welechman Hall
St. Thomas. He was ordered to
bay a fine of £3 by instalments
or two months’ imprisonment
with hard labour, When his of-
fence was committed he was
driving the motor lorry M.2376.

DROVE WITH
FAULTY BRAKES

Carlyle Frederick of Parris
Gap, St. Michael, was fined £2
by a District “A” Police Magis-
trate when he appeared before
him charged with driving the
motor car M.1766 with faults
brakes on February 27.

Cpl. Cyrus attached to the
Traffic Branch at Central Station
said that he reported the condi-
tion of the car to Inspector Far-
num, who found that both brakes
and steering gear were not in
good order.







Dangerous Driving

Gordon Croney of King Street
was ordered to pay a fine of £3
by a City Police Magistrate yes-
terday when he was found guy
of driving the motor car 14)
in a dangerous manner on Bax-
ters Roed on March |.

Cpl. Cyrus who brought the
ease said -that the defendant
“dashed down” Baxters Road
while a funeral was going up the
street. His licence is to be en-
dorsed and the fine to be paid
by monthly instalments.

ee

LA PRENSA WILL
REOPEN SOON

BUENOS AIRES, May 9.

Diego Baamonde, Secretary
General of the Pro-Government
newspapermen’s union said to-
night that La Prensa will be re-
opened soon “as a. daily for
Argentine workers”.

La Prensa, often a severe critic
cf the administration of Presi-

dent Peron, closed 15 weeks ago| bean territories.

by a series of boycotts of it and

strikes by Government-supported | with a copy of the letter

unions, is now in process of being|ed whether they have any pro-
taken over by the Government.|ducts which they would like to
—(CP)

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS



Were You

ENQUIRING

for
A Small Portable Oven?

You Can 7
Get it at your Gas Co. {

Price , aad eae





many hours. yovernment was
trying to get additional staff and
when that was got they were
prepared to consider opening at
night when necessary.

As regards lighting, he under-
stood that there were arrange
ments to take a supply from the
Electrie Company. The gen-
erating plant had been giving a
lot of trouble and they were
afraid of running it at night for
operatidn.

Few Night Landings

Mr. King said that he could
not appreciate the fact that there
was undue strain to the staff if
night landing happened once
every six months. The reason
tor calling for a yes or no decision
wag that the plane was leaving
Montreal and the Manager haa
to know what the position was.

Hon. V. C. Gale said he be-
lieved that B.W.LA. came in late
at night.

Mr. Thomas said that if they
could operate for B.W-.LA. flights

at night fairly regularly, how
could there be such enormous
strain for an irregular T.C.A.

night flight. What was happening
to the equipment in such a case?

Hon. V. C. Gale said he did not
think it was the equipment but
rather the staff,

Mr. Weatherhead
not think Hon. R. N. Turner
could have done anything else
under the circumstances.

Messrs. John Patterson of
Plantations Ltd., Ronald Inniss of
H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd, Frank
Ward of Da Costa & Co., Ltd. and
Kenneth Knaggs of Gordon
Grant & Co., Ltd., were unani-—
mously elected members of the
Chamber.

Messrs. G. H. Kinst, A. H. C
Thomas and Hon. V. C. Gale
were appointed to read and ap-
prove of the Annual Report of
the Chamber as prepared by the
Secretary.

The date for the Annual Gen-
eral Meeting wil) be May 30

Advertising Signs

The Chamber considered the
report on the control of adver~
tising signs. The Secretary was
telq to get in, touch with the
advertisers and ask whether they
weuld signify their agreement by
signing the report.

said he did

The Chamber appointed
Messrs. Kinch, Thomas, Peirce
and Bynoe to draft a letter to
Government on the “Price Con-

trol Committee Report.” This

four-man committee will first
have to get the views of the
various branches of trade and

then draft their findings for the
Council's approval.

The Caribbean Commission,
Central Seeretariat in Trinidad
wrote the chamber to find out
whether business people were

‘interested in a display of Carib-
bean products in San Juan, There
will be a Caribbean Festival,
sponsored by the Caribbean In-
terim Tourism Committee to be
held in 1952.

On display will be works of
art, sculpture, paintings, and
local handicraft from the Carib-

circularised
and ask-

Members will be

display.



Affiliation Rejected

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE’S, May 7
J By a large majority vote the
trenada Union of Teachers last
Saturday rejected a motion urg-
ing affiliation with the Manual
and Mental Workers’ Union which
ne out a large atten-
|
|





very

dance.






BARBADOS
INVESTMENTS
Bought.and Sold
A, M. WEBB
Stockbroker
33 Broad St., Bridgetown
(Over Phoenix Pharmacy)








Inquiry Adjourned |

District “A” Coroner H. A
Talma yesterday adjourned hear-
ing in the inquest touching the

death of Rudolph Jones of Wa-
terford Tenantry, St. Michael
untik May 16, \

Rudolph Jones was admitted

to the General Hospital on April
29 and died there on May 4. A



post mortem examination
performed at the Hospital Mor
tuary at about 2.30 p.m. on

|
May 4 by Dr. E. L. Ward wh
attributed death to toxemia,
pneumonia and anaemia.
The body was identified to Dr
Ward by Eudora Jones, mother
of the deceased.



Overpricing Cost £4 |

A fine of £4 to be paid by in
stalments or in default two}
months’ imprisonment was im
posed on Lennora Small, a hawk-
er of St. Thomas, St. Andrew
yesterday by a City Police Mag-
istrate.

Small sold Christopher Perkine
six bananas for six cents on May
9, one penny more than the sche
dule permitted. The bananas were
not Gros Michels. In case Small
fails to pay the fine there is an
alternative of two months’ im-
prisonment with hard labour

12 Months For Larceny

Sentence of 12 months’ im-
prisonment was yesterday passed
on labourer G, Downes of Thomas
Gap, St. Michael, when he ap-
peared before a District “A” Po-
lice Magistrate on a charge of
larceny of cloth.

The cloth which is valued at
£2 5s is the property of Moham-
med Kola, a merchant of Passage
Road. The offence was commit-
ted on April 6.

Downes has six previovs con-
vietions for larceny recorded
against him. After the sentence
he gave notice of appeal. Mr
E. W. Barrow appeared on be-
half of the defendant



Minister For Tobago

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7

Hon, A, P. T, James, Member
for Tobago made the first move
to get the Colony's six-month-old
Constitution amended, He is mov
ing a resolution urging that the
Constitution amend that any mem
ber of the Executive Council may
be removed by a majority vote of
the Legislative Council, and not
by a vote of two-thirds of all mem-
bers of the Council as required at
present, He is also asking Gov
ernment for an amendment that a
Minister may be created to look
after the “peculiar problems of}
Tobago.”





LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STAR

Neediest Cases Fund

ANNOUNCEMENT

Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June a
Queen’s Park, the undersigned wil)
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume Bands
(b) Steel Bands.

(e) Advertising Bands
(d) Historical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival, the Steering Committe:
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being a8 original as possible.

No entrance fee will be charged

More particulars later

A Carnival Band of thirty wil
he visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade,

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk's Office,

Bridgetown,

For Booths, Stalls, and side-
Shows, contact C. ' MORRIS,
Sobers Lane.



CHOICE

CHINA CABINETS

CHOOSE NOW a Charm of
a CHINA CABINET, New or
renewed, in Mahogany or
mahoganized, Birch or Fir-—-
$39 to $120,

SMART STYLES on cab-
riole legs or bases show up
your ware and glass every
time you pass.

{a Some of these cabinets

are on the simpler graceful
lines equally suitable as your

BOOK CASES

L. S. WILSON

SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069







ee ot

ae



PAGE SEVEN

LOST & FOUND

LOST

‘BANK BOOK: A Royat Bank Depos







wae
PER!

ROSLA: ss
Goliop: ¢ le
4ponsible for







ing credi
NT ELDER

myself

sT4

hold



nee



her or anyor















Se COREE NE ane Sept or depts ip na) | itor’s Bank Book with impertaat docu-
ne : ont if nider hoe
9 cil dite remediate returnit@® ta Mayers, ; ©
ae ce these, | Advertising Dept . or 's.6.0tomn
s Géorge. |
9 5 s1—2 THREE PORTS
" KARACHI

ALREADY LISTED With the port of Chalna now
WINDSOR jin operation, Pakistan has three
The census official who took |ports geared to handle export
the official forms to Windser Cas-}and fmyport traffic. Chalma and
tle did not ask the usual ques-|}Chittagong are in Eastern Pak-
tions about housing accormn~ia-jistan, while West Pakistan’s port
tion. “We already have the in-jof Karachi is an _ historic ‘outlet

formation,” he said.—-€P) lfor the sub-continent .—CP)



On Sale at all Grocers
SIMEON HUNTE & SON LTD. — Agents

SRT eine NOTCH





MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED


















(M.A.N.Z. LINE) ; aks ‘

M.S. “TCNGARIRO” galled Brisbane | 3% ani’ pCarlbbee wilt accept Cwm
ae 24th, Arriving at Barbados May Antitua, Montserrat, Nevis and St.
at. c 3 ,

3.8, “ARABIA” is scheduled to sail Tie, BARE EOSE Hoe
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th MV, Cnetque Det Cart wt
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane accept Gach sad pecaemants e
16th June, Sydney 2rd June, arriving | 4 St. Lucia, St, Vineent, Grenada
at Trinidad during latter half of July, and Aruba, Sailing on or about
and proceeding thereafter to Barbados 18th instant,
and Liverpool,

,

In addition to general cargo this

vessel has ample apace for chilled and

hard frozen cargo B.W.1. SCHOONER OWN-
Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to ERS ASSOC., INC.
British Guiana, Leewerd and Windward -

Islands. Tele, 4047,

For further particulars apply |
FURNESS WITHY & CO, Ltd,, TRINI-

DAD, B.W.T, and A
DA COSTA & CO, LTD, BRIDGE- conhuesciennenineenneseniseiseeie





TOWN, BARBADOS, DB.W.1. '

me Alcoa

NEW YORK SERVICE
April Artives Barbades ath May
May % es 2th .,.

83, “TRYA
A Steamer

failed 7th
Siailg 1th





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE



ALCOA PATRIOT" Ued 18th April Arrives Barbados 4th May
“ALCOA POLARIS 2nd May ” ” th ,,
‘ALCOA ROAMER” Salla 16th May ¥ js 1st June





(eae a ea A TRE

CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND :
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives Bdoa.









“ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May Sth
“ALCOA PIONEER” May ith May 14th May = 24th
"“FOLKE BERNADOTTE" Ma 25th May 2th June ith
SORTUBOUND
8. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” due April 20th, Sails for St. John and Montreal.



1: nae eteneewieene-tegstinreenemenennintn tipinoaenninnee I Ematonttte ae een - *These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO,, LTD-—CANADIAN SERVICE
GLEAN LEAL LIAL ADEE AEG SETTERS,

| PASSAGES TO EUROPE





Contact Antilles Products,
sailing to Europe fortnightly.
Dublin, London, or Rotterdam.
reduction for chidren

Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
The usual ports of call are

fare £70; usual

Single



FYFFES

LINE

THE T.8.S. GOLFITO will he arriving from South-

ampton on Saturday, 12th May, at 8 a.m., and will

be sailing at 5 p.m. the same afternoon for Trinidad

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0., ETD.

@
There is arnple ist Class Accommodation available §
for Trinidad, also one berth for a lady available on ;
24th May for Seuthampton :
3
° 3
Apply... i}
2
i
i



You'll

ind get a better-job done,
@ one of our

“PLECTRIX” VACUUM CLEANERS

save heaps of

if vou t

New just received

shioment





THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

OSI TS OOOO OOO OOOO SS
ROC OOOO PERS So NSIT
PAGE EIGHT







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

U.K. Cricket Season

ENGLAND DEFEAT ARGENTINA 2-1
BRILLIANT FOOTBALL

SEEN AT

WEMBLEY

(By JACK DAVIS)

LONDON, May 9.

WO GOALS by England in the last ten minutes robbed

Argentina of a glorious
bley Stadium.

soccer moment to-day at Wem-

Argentina led by one goal, scored by Bove,

to nil and were within an ace of becoming the first foreign

team to
soil.
Aiter Argentina had been fore-
cd to defend desperately for long
periods of the game, their hope
of victory were wrecked by two
erashing goals by Stanley Mor-
tensen and Jackie Milburn,
These goals were only a jus*
reward for a sustained secon
half pressure, when the ball
rarely left the Argentine goal
area
Shots

win an



were fired in from all
angles, striking the posts and
bar. Argentina were in-

sted for holding out so long ta





their spectacular springheeled
goalkeeper Rugilo.
The Argentine had taken the

lead through Boye after 18 min-
utes, rather against the run o
play. Generally their attack was
disjointed in the second half by
an injury to Bravo who went on
the right wing, and rarely threat
ened danger. Forwards failed tc
produce their noted ball control
and quick accurate inter-passing
Their occasional raids were gen
erally more of a kick-and-fol-
low-up nature

The defence however, with
Pescia Colman—until he was in-
jured—and Filguras played well
in the first half Their clese
marking gave the England for-
wards little space in which tc
work the ball with the result
that England’s attack never real-
ly went smoothly.

Different Story

It was a different story in the
second half howeve! With
wingers showing a fine turn ot
speed, they swung the ball about
and combined brilliantly The
Argentine defence was ofter
spreadeagled and left chasing the
ball hopelessly. The whole for-
ward line moved together in uni-
son and repeatedly swept to the
Argentine goalmouth before at-
tacks ‘were frittered away

Finnay, with his clever be.!
control, and Hassell, Milburn and
Mortensen who showed _ speed
and opportunism, were outstand-
ing. Metcalf combined well with
Hassell but his shooting was woe-
fully weak, and he wasted many
chances when well placed

The Argentine’s customary tactics
of an attacking centre half going



up and leaving the right back
to mark the centre forward was
not a great success. First Col-
man and then Allegri had a
gruelling time. It was not sur-
prising, therefore that Allegri
became very weary, and it

noticeable that England’s

goals came from movemerts on

that side of the field.

As was anticipated, the speed
and thrust in the re-organised
England forward line eventually
paid dividends. It is worth re—
calling that Milburn who snatch-
ed the winning goal was instru-

mental in winning the cup for
Neweastle with two. snap goals
in the space of five minute:
against Blackpool on this same
ground.

Tired
Argentine players were sub-

dued and looked dejected as they
entered the dressing room after
the game. Goalkeeper Rugilo, sat
on a bench holding his head in
anguish. It was bad luck for him
‘that he had finished on the los-
ing side after such a magnificent
display.

His colleagues, standing around
sipping cups of tea commisserat
ed with him,

Guillermo Stabile, tecltiical
director of the team, had no
complaints. “It was a very good

match but I think we deserved a
draw” he added. But the ground
was rather heavy for his players
and he thought the strange cli-
matie conditions affected his
players. “They were very tired
toward the end when England
were pressing strongly” he said

Stabile declined to single wut
any of his players for single men-

tion. “They all played very
weil” he added.
Commenting on tthe Hngland

team, Stabile said their strength
lay in team work rather than
individual efforts.

“They all lived up to what we
expected of them’, he said. “The
crowd too”, he said, “was most
sporting” .

Stabile added that it was too
early yet to say whether Bravo
who has strained a muscle in his
right thigh, and Colman who has
twisted his right knee would be
fit for Sunday’s game against
Hire.

They'll Do It E






international







WHAT A TRIP ss
IT'LL BE GOOD TO
SETTLE DOWN TO

football match on English



Receipts £32,525

Attendance at the match wa
100,000 and receipts £38,525.

At Dinner

The Argentine football team
and officials were entertained at
dinner tonight at Park Lane Ho-
tel Linden, and everybody agreed
that Argentina had played very
well and were unfortunate nol
to hang on to their lead against
England.

“We left it until very late” said
Sir Stanley Rous, Secretary of
the English Football Association
“We were very relieved when
Mortensen scored the equalising
goal and Milburn got the win-
ner for Argentina looked like
holding out for victory. It was
a very good game in parts,”

Evenly Balanced

Iacono, Argentine captain, was
full of praise for the sporting
spirit shown by the English
crowd and players. “It was a
very good game and I thought
we were unlucky not to win af-
ter leading for so long” he said
“IT thought the teams were very
evenly balanced in the first half,
but we sadly missed the services
of Bravo, who was practically a
passenger on the wing

Stanley Mortensen, English in-
side right said: “Thank goodness’
when he scored the equalising
goal while Jack Milburn’s com-
ment about his winning goal wa
“It's just another goal,”

Billy Wright, England’s Cap-
tain said: “Argentina played
really well, particularly in the
first half. I thought we should
have had more goals’’.

—Reuter.

Regatta On
Saturday

The ninth regatta of the cur
rent yachting season will be sail
ed in Carlisle Bay on Saturday,
under the auspices of the Royal
Barbados Yacht Club.









Starting times and handicap
are as follows:—
Class Ne. Yacht Start at Flag
B 13 Ranger
D 4 Seabird 2.30 Red
D 10 Van Thorneirke
D_12 __Painbow 2.32 Yellow
R 3 War Cloud 2.33 Red
A 6 Flirt
B 9 Okapi 2.34 Yellow
B 481 Fantasy
B oT Mera Blair
& 8 ~ Rascal 2.36 Red
ia Buccaneer
tr 9 Olive Blossom 2.37 Yellow
nD 2 Imp
D 7 Sinbad 240 Red
P 1 Gipsy
R 5 Mischief 241











1 2 Invader
6 Eagle 2.43 Yellow
9 Dauntless
K 34 Comet 2.44 Red
Cc iy Magwin 2.45 Yellow
K 3 Edril
1 oi Reen 2.46 Red
2 Scamp
[ 7 Mohawk 2.47 Yellow
1 12 Dawn
¢ 10 Gannet 248 Red
c.f Rogue
{ 1 Gnat 249 Yellow
< 40 Vamoose
I 4 Coronetta 2.51 Red
{ 18 Clytie
K 2A Cyclone 2.52 Yellow
N.B.—The following dat®s have been

‘xed for Regattas:

10th Regatta: Thursday 24th May at
1,90 p.m.
llth Pegatta: Saturday 26th May at

2.20 p.m
12th Regatta
pm
Frontenac Cup:
1.00 p.m,
H. B. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter

Saturday 2nd June at 2.50

Thursday 7th June at



Keenan Wins Title

GLASGOW, May 9.

Peter Keenan of Glasgow won
the British Bantamweight Cham-
pionship here to-night when he
knocked out the holder, Danny
O'Sullivan of London in the sixth
round of their scheduled 15-round
fight.—Reuter,

ye ke
ei? Registered U. 5. Patent Ome |

WE WERE HELD
UP ON ANOTHER
JOBsWE COULDN'T
START THIS LAST
MONTH BUT WE'LL.
HAVE IT READY
FOR YOU IN











ARTHUR MACARTHUR,

BASEBALL

13 year-old son of General

5 be ~ ve

Douglas
MacArthur, displays big league form as he tosses the ball out at the
New York Polo Ground prior to the start of the Giant-Dodger match
at the opening of the American big league baseball season.

Royal Commission Reports

No Fault In Betting Set-Up

LONDON, May.

AFTER TWO YEARS of fact-finding, the Royal Com-
mission on Gaming has given the green light to the little

varn who likes to have

his

occasional “flutter” on the

horses, greyhound or football pools

In its report, a massive volume
of more than 100,000 words, the
Commission has absolved _ the
small-time punter of any taint
of law—breaking or’ moral lapse
It finds, in fact, that four out of
five adults in every walk of life
have gambled at some time, even
if only at such trivial things as

raffles, whist drives or a_ private
sweepstake.
The investigators saw ibso

lutely nothing wrong with that

Answering those who denounce
gembling as leading to juvenile
delinquency, crime, poverty and
diversion from work, the report

says: “It is extremely difficult
to establish by abstract argu
ments that all gambling is in

herently immoral, without adopt
ing views as to the nature of gor
and evil which would pot fin
yeneral acceptance among movi!

vy ists

It agrees, however, that g.m
bling, like other indulgences sucli
as aleoholic~ drink or tobacco,
should be kept within reasonab!

bounds and controlled with pru
dence,

Some eye-opening figures on
the extent of betting in Britain

are contained in the report. It
estimates that more than 15,000
000 people last year wagered
about £150,000,000 on football
pools, horse-racing and the grey

hounds. Of this ameunt, how
ever, approximately £70,000,00/
went to cover profits, operating

costs and taxes

The various gambling
employ around 50.000
workers with 30,000
part-time

venture
full-time

more on

Interest Widespread

It was also shown that mor:
than 6,000,000 persons contribul

nearly £52,000,000 annually t
the football pools alone. Thi
despite the fact that in pcol

offering some of the larger prize
the odds against a
forecast are estimated at 700
000,000 to 1 against the player

Some idea of the difficulty i
picking a winner, was cited to tl!
Commission. A large syndicat
had invested stakes totallir
£120,000 over a period of nin
months. Repayment in prize
came to less than £800,

The inquiry, however, showe
that the total spent on all form
of gambling absarbed only abou
one-half of ong per cent of) th
national income. Dealing wit!



——— 1

By Jimmy Hatlo













HIS OFFICE, DONE
OVER WHILE HE
WAS AWAY +++
THANX TO
ANDY WEILANOT



succcessful:



Champion B.G.
Cyclist For
Barbados Sports

During the week news was re-
ceived from British Guiana that
their champion cyclist Lindsay
Gordon had accepted in part an
invitation from the Athletic Asso-
ciation of Barbados to attend their
Intercolonial Sports meeting due
to open on Monday next, This
means that Gordon will not be
here for the first day but will ride
on the last two days of the meet-
ing on May 17th and 19th,

This is due to the fact that an
intercolonial meeting is being
staged in B.G. on Saturday 12th
nd Monday 14th and Gordon will
have to remain at home for this
fxture However he will leave
B.G. and arrive in Barbados on
Wednesday next week, the 16th
May



The Local Athletic
ilso announced with regret that
Miss Kileen King, Trinidad’s
champion woman sprinter will not
be attending the meeting. How-;
ever, all twelve of the original|
‘oup of Trinidad cyclists who!
decided to come up for the meet-
ing will be arriving next Friday
morning by the S.S. Gascogne, In
addition the three Trinidad Police
athletes O. Pierre, Irving Pierce
and J, Cambridge will be arriving
by plane during this week,

Association

the socia] effects of betting, the
report said it could find no sup
port for the belief that gambling
within moderation did any
ericus harm either to the charac
ter of those who take part in it
or to their family circle and the
community generally It con
cluded that gambling on the scale
in which it is indulged in a
sresént could not
mposing a serious strain on the



be regarded a: |



1ation’s resources or manpower
—(CP)







Opens Much Too Soon

LONDON.

Our cricket season begins, and ends, a fortnight too
early comments Sportsman's Diary. That fact was empha-
sised by the present outburst of arctic weather which had
turned the MCC v. Yorkshire match into a shivering night-
mare, and threatened to do the same by the opening of
the South African tour at Worcester.

September is a more reliable
menth than May—nearly always
drier and warmer. Why then not
end the championship competition

with a match-—Hants v Sussex—
beginning on September 1 and
end the whole programme with

Gentlemen vy Players at Scar-
borough on September 5?

With the existing programme
we say goodbye to summer too
soon.

If the argument be used that
football would take away the
gates well it would not ruin
them nearly as much as does the
present weather.

Repeat in prospect

Dudley Nourse the South Afri-
can captain bulkier now than he
used to be but still his country’s
best batsman and a very pleasant
personality recalled the freezing
experience the South Africans
had when last at Worcester.

There is small chance of im-
provement this time, When I
telephoned the city today I was
told.

“It is bitterly cold, Bring three
sweaters and a top coat. It hasn’t
rained here today yet but looks
like doing so any moment. Lots
of rain has fallen during the
week-end.”

For which advice much thanks.

Handicap
Alan Sexton, of Belgrave Har-
riers, picked to partner McDonald





SPORTS
WINDOW

Carlton and Notre Dame meet
this afternoon at Kensington in a
return First Division fixture

These teams first met in the
opening First Division fixture of
the 1951 season and Carlten won
by three goals to one.

It was obvious that at that time
Notre Dame were finding their
legs. Since then they have played
some wood games, twice holding
B.A.P.A, champions to a draw.

This afternoon's return game
should be a good one.

FOOTBALL (Division U1)

Empire vs. Everton at Bank

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL
Maple vs. Harkliffe at St. Leon-
ard’s. The referee will be Mr. C
Reece, Play starts at 5.00. p m
BASKETBALL (Division 1)
View. vs. Pickwick at
YM PLC,
YMCA vs.
Boys at Y.M.P.C
Division I
Modern High School vs.
Scouts at Modern High School.

Combermere Old

Sea







V hat’s on Today

Caribbean Commission at
Hastings House — 10 a.m.
Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion and Lower Courts —

10 a.m,
CINEMAS
Aquatic Club: “State Fair'’—8.30
p.m

Plaza (Bridgetown); (Ist) “A Song
is Born.” (2nd) “Bodyguard’—
445 & 8.30 p.m,

Piava (Oistin): “Tarzan Triumphs”
and “West of the Pecos” — 5 &









Bailey in the 100 yards in the
AAA vy London University match
at Motspur Park on May 9, won

the AAA junior furlong in the
record time of 22.1 secs. in 1949.
He has taken things easily

simee then, but intends to return
to the track with the 220 yards
as his objeXve.

But he starts with a handicap
Ho fractured a wrist a couple of
months ago while playing rugger,
and this may even_ prevent him
from appearing on May 9.

McCarthy’s guide

How much more vulnerable to
punishment are the lower grades
of professional boxing compared
to the higher amateur ranks?

Former ABA international
Sammy McCarthy gave a guide
in his first professional fight at
the Empress Hall recently by
knocking out Hector MceCrow in
the first round. S

Now McCarthy is no recognised
k.o. specialist. One of the most
stylish post-war amateurs, in the
season 1948—49 he won three of
his 12 bouts inside the distance.
In 1949—50 his only short-cut
victory in 11 contests was when
his opponent retired with an
ankle injury. Before turning
professional — this season his
nine wins were all on points

The batter bit

Did you ever hear of a_bats-
man having to retire through bit-
ing his own tongue? It happened
at Lord’s to Leadbeater the York-
shireman. Playing a ball from
Jack Martin he hit it on to the
underside of the jaw. The blow
jerked his mouth shut, and teeth
tore tongue. Later he was able to
complete his innings.

Price of fancy

Before the war Tote backers al-
ways favoured Gordon Richards
and the Tote price of his mounts
was invariably less than the start-
ing price quoted by bookmakers.
In time, backers seemed to give
up this practice as if to suggest
they were not willing to accept the
reduced odds. =

Now it is Lester Piggott who
uppeals to Tote backers.

At Worcester yesterday Bridge
of Hellas started at 100-6. For
a 2s. winning ticket the Tote paid
463s. Yet in the next race Palm
Grove, who started at 320-1 only
paid 45s. 9d., despite having not
been placed before. He was rid-
den by Piggott. .

Last week Tote backers of Pig-
gott’s mount Barnacle received
only 15s. 3d. for their 2s. The
starting price was 10-1, and many
got 100-8 about it with bookmak-

ers,

It is disappointing to back a
winner and not receive the odds
one hopes for, but followers of
Piggott know what to expect in

future,
Whitile’s view

AAA quarter-mile hurdles
champion Harry Whittle will de-
fend his national decathlon title
this summer but, he adds, “with-
out much hope of improving my
points total.” (His last year's score
of 6,087 points set a new English
native record.)

Whittle, who was third in the
400 metres hurdles at the Euro-
championships, considers
that the prospects for quarter-mile
hurdling in this country are good.
The event is becoming more popu-
lar, and consequently the standard
is higher.

London Express Service.



8.00 pam,
Empire: “I'd Climb the Highest
Mountain’ — 445 & 8.30 p.m, pean
Reyal “Grissty’s Millions’’ and
“Bell of Roserita’ — 4.30 & 8.50
pm
Olympic: “Hills of Home” and
“Something for the Boys’ —
| 4.0 & 8.15 pum,
;
QO
Q



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THURSDAY, MAY 106, 1951
Thomas Fights NO PLAY
In U. S. For CAMBRIDGE, May 9
The opening day’s play in the

World Title

By GEORGE WHITING

Eddie Thomas, welter-weight
boxing champion of Britain,
Europe and the Empire, is ge'rg
to the United States to fight for
the championship of the werld.

His opponent will be the win-
ner of the fight .n May 13 between
the Chicago negro, Johnny Brat-
ton, and Kid Gavilan, ef Cuba,

Thomas's fight will be the first
major Anglo-American contesi in
the United States since Bruce
Woodcock was knocked cut by
Tami Mauriello in New York in
May 1946,

Lew Burston, here from Madi-
son Square Garden, New York.
completed the deal with ‘Thomas's
manager Sam Burns, in London
to-day and is reporting back to
the States to fix the date and place
for the British champion’s
pearance there, |

ap-

Australian Offer

Burns would like the fight to
take place in June, so .that
Thomas can return before the
year is out, to defend his Europe-
an title against Charles Humez of
France, and his British champion-
ship against any official contend
er.

He has also had an offer to
defend his Empire title against
the Australian
Mickey Tollis, in

Wales.

The Bratton-Gavilan fight is,
part of the “elimination” series
set up by the American National
Boxing Association to find a suc-
cessor to Ray Robinson as world
welter—weight champion. The
NBA. declared the title vacant
when Robinson took the middle-
weight championship from Jake
LaMotta, last February.

The NBA set-up is that Brat-
ton, having beaten Charlie
Fusari, should now fight Gavilan
—the winner to meet Eddie
Thomas.

One point to be ironed out is
that of Thomas’s status in a
championship fight. Burns says
Eddie should have equal rights,
and an equal share of the purse
money, with either Bratton or
Gavilan. ‘To fight as a challenger |

|

champion,
New South,





would mean an appreciable cut in
Thomas’s remuneration,
—L.ES.

BASKETBALL

Carlton Y.M.C.A.
31—0 in game at



defeated
a_ basketball

Beckles Road last night.
Harrison College Old Boys won
from Pirates 19—8.








ERNIES CLUB

This afternoon at 6 p.m.



Members are requested to be
present for the Arima Creole
race problems.















E, B. CARMICHAEL,
Hon. Secretary.

9.5.51.2n.

Remember, a comfortable

sideration.

creasing numbers

IDEAL TAILORING

you in our...




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10—13, BROAD STREET



fitting SUIT is our first con-
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TAILORING DEPARTMENT

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

South African cricketers’ match
against Cambridge University w
abandoned at Fenners here with
out a ball being bowled.

The pitch had been covered last
night and during the morning, but
heavy rain had left the unprotect-





ed bowlers’ ends sodden and
slippery. —Reuvier,

SOO DSO OOOO IOFOTO ER, oO
.

+

pea

AMATEUR ATHLETIC

3

8

ASSOCIATION 3
OF BARBADOS

presents its

BIG 3 DAYS

CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

at
KENSINGTON OVAL
on
Whit-Monday .
‘Thursday . May 17th
& Saturday . . May 19th
beginning at 1 p.m, each day
e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold
Archer, (Nugget) Hunte,

Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin
Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists
and Athletes as well as
\
4

May 14th

Miss Grace Cumberbatch
and Miss Eileen King in
action at the Historic Oval
Gates Open at 12 noon daily
e

PRICES OF ADMISSION :

SEASON TICKETS

$2.16

$1.68

Kensington Stand
George Challenor

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©
DAILY TICKETS
Kensington Stand

George Challenor .

$1.00

Uncovered Seats
Grounds

Season Tickets on Sale daily
at the Civic, Swan & High
Street.