t irW | 3a R e ._ Miaas kiilriiisd .._. MAN \m M t leapatrai at I t la* her ni'.lpii( with I %  •-.! afcuri IHM %  I grr. nataslin drew, and bark in. >.--H*rr hair li.n.f. > %  hee,i bUi* aavr> wrll Wt.n mSTM aUPl : I :lU %  upper >Mai MI *I tin rpstttc in a rlrr '<• i*r 01IVH-< divwms -room ihr .l.imMcr Mr I fold MANCHESTER UST before mm night Vivien Leigh -. • hpr hotel consider the tint Ol the two Cleopatras she will play m .. .V: l'l( The first, at Manchester tonight wan the sly, squeolmg 16-year-old coquette S ir I in si C i-.ar And leopa'.:.. In M week she u ma: ur ps'ncain uren m -:. -, %  % %  .•%  ; %  : rr palm." t-oadon next mon:.i trie KID lollow each otiur jn successive nights. It U R Ijrmidable assignment nmr : %  i.-. ruatvtuon tv put to Sir Laurence Olivier Hall as a lest. I( nas Decjir.e the most II double tlrsi o' nil %  i. ear-old :!#' career >*;•* "Cert*.nly -Jit dangers are tnere.' u i Lcnoi '.oa.aiii "I nave to lace n '%  u*> turning asld*. Hut :i > %  lUraUfcUing. *n laor.comparisons *un ar'ras^aa win riavetned one or •lie utner rule bororp—oui never tceUier Edltb Ivaaa. Peuv Aajwrort. even Uq. PMU.CK i-My. oaw (rom the other. Por Sbafeaapeaf* with lia greater opportune** Tor changiug emotions—and greater penalH iii lailurc—she will wear a mi wig use a deeper voice. Always Olivier will oe there to guidr and advLse her. Ho* doe* the tee Cleopaira ? She ihoufht a tninu'e 'hen 'he sa.d rue ffennu ol temir.n (\ in all in cuisei She should be ati.r TO preseni 'itAi Atth (ago. Bu; aiie also rui to make Tun o'rii-r linr r.iintnw tha wnicn BMMapeaN gag %  4 Ira qaeea -S#I UCNfltM fi4f* Hrt %  „ cuUom tlale llei tnHn>tr in'irty II Vivien l.i-ign can eitaOliah T*aK laani''ar:e* the will bavr pulled off tiei douote flrai all r. K a%  ven m 'he middle ol flratnifht iirn-i ran ^cii.iig UK lutd UM for a (oke. 1W Ria* pla> rtaeda a rerMriBf atatr lectnrallv dnveo "That.* the dtfricql'v." aaid Vivien Lelfh Wtvorvrr Um and I touch elee-.neitv tt fori wrong. . ." With the two tempting Cto> paLrai it all) b*> Quite a vear. For her film version ol 8 msnii LfTTLI BROTHCR J_ mi WM E.-..1 it iMootne Bruadivay's Un>ther BeUe I* I-Mtle Katfsarinr %  i-Jtarta Jwa> (•ail.ind Dunn Kate 'iita we--* Bai. Haae ... me lisi grows. Wha' ck'tin i 'lir\ *tilr in I Aril, among other '•'*! a list ol the right r tin to d,-after work. . I k for antiques DUagas i Hf bos-. 1 ilv* hKuraa and m' i • tax Coskaider Hrituui Cafg. *n,l anadu late liwk lo u. .\r.ui, ornce oil i'-cc*dir.\ la r-gisfer MirlrRfDirltlrh prrter> to fltaik hri oati a-aL—t.na ulim amcrlaw her rookinc on sl.rav.rl WMtac. Kvaryona angie> u •BIIIWT uit'iiauoo irom litr (*U>.-:n:ooni VMUITI alter the %  nuv.'. iv>t trie rtrst-ntght awarm ilhiiiv .>B^ i ow 'innuniners in 'ha u.ud w.*n of the rim rogtwifal udvloe thry ao i the rtoven it saeou an odd wgr.i -o uppiv u> him '-of
|>hr i. Hvatr* w. .iir,.< %  aaaaaf t tir 'i aag ... uil utei rat a-* law -tr it* r.w %  ; BN P I. HI II Kill Jw. BBMI Ii Are -• As now' iiorii in London I undon. *.>rkl centre of style in rnrrw I | nada **I*IRI <-ion and atadtal -iv,iail> atlmed s litrngn, ihee at,no* . %  I U mi Oi Ihr \\ ,, k FLAGSTAD SaUs Through The Storm By EVELYN IRONS MA.IF-STIC ;i^ the Queon Mary, blonde. Junoesque Kiisten FU^sitd, reputedly U i I %  I Wit* prano of all time, nailed through ii 24-ttong recital it the Albert H;ill tbif week, welcomed back to London I thualBBtip audience. Next month nt Covent (;-rden BO tiesjins the lo^t Wagner sea%  BH of her BO T awr, Fifty-fix next July \2. Flagstad has decided to take no chances with time's rangae, sht* maana to relinquish tier mighty Wagnerian roles while sh<. is still at the apex of her fame and form It was announced a few week* back that she was lotirliig from opera altogether. But she changed . %  %  mind. Sho will aflatall be haaird again ;it tinNew York Mel next vi-ai not In Isolde i>nd her othei* celebrated Wagner pHrls. hut In the loss exacting oJ Oluek. Thera will be (cwt-r pparatk roles, and she will become a me7/o-soprano giving Uedei inticerts. She Is Rich YF.T the quality of that golden voice is still as fresh as'a summer morning. Golden uokM it is. Flagstad 1^ QM of thy world's wealthiest musicians, paid anything up to 11.200 for :i single i-vnnnr'appearance in a strictly limetabled round Of singing in New York, London, Paris. Barcelona. Brussels, Amsterdam, Zurich Milan, Salrburg. Drama and controversy lay bahifid her recent return to New Yotk's Metropolitan Opera. Sne had to f i alt her way back there agaimt bitter opposition from Americans who alleged that she collaborated with the Nazis In Norway during the war. It started In 1042 when she left the Metropolitan, where she had been a member of the company tor six and a half years, to go to i er Umber-merchant husband. rHtirj .lohansen, ill in Germanoccupied Oslo. She stayed with him through the rest of the w:ir. In 1945 he was arrested on %  charge oi i oil.ibur.ition and the fouOWUtR year h died before he could be orought to trial. nntaa^inlsm Ir I made h BBd She met "here **e made her tint CO&aa-baek after the war with an Albert Hall concert early in 1047. But although she had a document .signed by the Norwegian Chief Justice stating that she had maintained a "steadfast patriotic attitude" during the occupation, there was a terrific 1o-do when she went on a nine-city tour ol the United States the same year. rarnegie Hall bawled "Boycott the Quisling'" while she sang there At I^ilatfaaphta, lighting broke out and strnk-bombs flew inside the concert hail. The criUcs were sharply split into Flagstad for* and against s. The againsts tore her to pieces. riaartaat faced the alarm rada it out. returning ta An in successive year* la !•* the trustee* of the San Tranci-co Opera banned her because of protestl against her record by the American Legion. 'Provocative' BUT a lew weeks later they lifted tlie ban. Last year, when the Butish impresario. Rudolf Bmg. new general manager of the New York Metropolitan Opera signed on Flagstad for the I9al Maaoo that has Just ended, his decision was called "provocative." But there were no picket*, no stink bombs, this time. Nevertheless, she has not sung in Norway since before the war, and It Is unlikely that she ever will ulthough she returns there for a short summer holiday at her house in sea-girt KristIan sand. "Noble" is the word the critics nowadays use for her performances, and everything about Flagstad is on the grand *cale But there ne v e r was a prim a donna who behaved less like ono than this buxom rollicking Nordic. A colleague confessed that he had wept only twice in 10 years both limes at Flagstad's Isolde. Then he met her. "She was very ji>\-ml." he reported, surprised anci alieMIy disappointed. Champagne Too I HAVE seen her. after going through Brustnhilde's last harrowing moments of immolation in the Twilight of the Coda, laughing inexhaustibly (she is ready Why Have They Barm&ti Clievalier? By SAM WHITE for a joke at any lime), and setting out to enjoy a hearty champagne supper. She arrives at rehearsals punctually to the minute, throws na aemperamenls, turns on her Niagara of a voice like n tap as required. Most singers spend many hours dressing for a concert Tint not so Flagstad. She gets ready as quickly ata man and sjevi r ptinka in the mirror oftei-WBrfls. She could afford lo dress lavishly But she is not much interested in fashion although the diamonds she wears are bj no means unassuming Her perso' preferences are for good food, oatmeal, sloul. knitting and conversation. Among her closest friends an* Bernard Miles, the actor aim producer, and his wife and three children With them she has entered into a ^untract to give 90 performances next September as Dido rr .h-l SpaiM I. ., ,i .. n>n Spatlan ilail Tu kill pan I Not.a IU>w WU laa n,... M '.-ii aaa Oi tiw JjnkaUai. ntvuaa a aai R i *.. feart -••II nirrt l Saaaall Thu morning aboul naSU Well all meat Bu-' fitting for men Cicner.tl Ai'-n.\ t , i II nb.i,| ( >) I ul certain declarations, ngreed lo lend their talents to Party cause. The.* control a |x.werful Pi Trust. It runs two big cirrulu.) Hon. sMrningViiper* in 'Ports ( popular Paris evening i do/ei provincial dailie %  .,; cUTulatlon weakl ei miles, ineludln and S'freii reviews Tha i %  • I ful C mniunlst Press will Batter only those who support the Part) j and attack those who don't, la] short, a popular French gut who does not j>lny ball' with the Party risks getting bad i .i ;,,rge siftion "i the Freni h Press. F.nally. there i(re those stars— a small minority—who are con. vi need Coramunists. Among lb em i : ei Yvca Montand. He asU an example by singing songs with a strung propagandist favour. Montand'• most popular song at the moment is a ballad lellmg Hie sad story of n singer Snho regtaOM U> aing the kind ol songs "that please the rich." Die i Und raid* with Montabd brokk/i. unemployed, Montand is a long way from tlie breadline yel He i among Ow three top paid mushhall and cabaret stars in France. Other popular themes with fellow-travelling singers deali with anil American or anli-wai tlM-mes. A Communist him recently ptsMisbed a Ual Freneh stars who havr stajiuxl ll Stockholm apja-al They num. beetd 84. ,'lli/ woaiu sponsored by J&R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J&R RUM Ik'I. %  %  HI K | Till** IM Djaart A aU .... i .t^. ,, ,. '"1 1 %  %  I .-"-< sasar |.ravr..l il.r r.K i, ,, l,,,^,,,,,, ,,,„. '•*' * Af Uiil, ..,,ia V MIKF.\ST -TO.Mf \VI.\K • THE ,i; }ni WHMWW, aag rut: uu ATBIMTK mxrtno To .(.ud ITIII.I iil.n paUaa and la keep up your stride s.imiiii. THE GREAT I'AINKILLEK • on aale a KNIGHTS Hill <• STORES •BENNETT COLLEGE wit/ set you on the right amis:' for success \ planned prograii in ih c, You mil you let Collage In (he world coach *< in the enter oi your (box* whan noil iiKa ipaoatord knowledgS indiiidual inHnM we equip t you invt lii.a (or a wall -pud. ley poutlon. Make (ho fini moac TO-DAY— poit the coupon below IS YOUR CAREER HERE ? 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ESTABLISHED 1895 ^karate BARBAOOS. MAY I, 1-f.l U.N. FORCES CROSS DEFENCE LINE Reds Not Contacted Uijongbu Left Deserted L.S., Britain TOKYO, May 5 I )l a< llo' to recent report* that a Brita squad to-day. Allied lank patrol* again en-' tered Uijongbu. ll miles north of| Seoul, and found Iha town empty %  'nii.itcd two Communi>t regiments skirmished %  11 .\' lied patrols northwest ol the South Korc.m capital. Nine t | < %  of them in new .summer unify.m*. were .-i.pn.ittl during the In the same arts, United Nations enjuriiers abandoned an attempi to lid „ c'miHse minefield when O i ,-tt tombs began to till among than A la i if Task Force probed several miles north < f the United Nations line on the contra! Front meeting only sporadic lire from small Commut. in nearby hills. On the cast Central front Allied paliolreached almost to the 38th parallel. Everywhere Communists seemed to have pulled their main forces back leavi i at i.croon 'i. % %  -t.Large South Korean forces attacked about 500 Communists near Inje nn the Eastern front but withdrew after a hard nifht. 79(1 Red f*— 111— As the weather cleared aftet yesterday's rain. United States il.it Itoppod up their *up|>ort and reconnaissance operations. 1bo> Uaeksd a big Communist supply dump north of the parallel starling two Bras. The air force claimed 80 Communist! killed or wounded and 24 vehicles, 35 railway wagon*, and 230 buildings destroyed or damaged during the day Eighth Army Headquarters estimated yesterday's Communist casualties for around icctan nt 790. 'diln.tr;. uliNcixcrs here believed the Chinese might he preparing to ront-wthoir spring often. TT7*Y'-ct IwO We*ifJ i^-f-cIk* start *f the r*ln> lit it they did not think '.here would be as much power behind the Communists' punch eg there was in the first six do\ • > ( then iiflensivc. The Allied Commands exped to try to sei*o Seoul again for its propaganda value The big question among military • boorvon was whether the United Nations would continue to hold a firm defence line or go over to a limited offensive.—IteuUv. Nine Point Plan STHASBOUHG. May 5. A nine point plan for keeping Europe financially stable and hard at work was presented to tbe Council of Europe'* Con-ull ilive Assembly when it < psfMd i. ten-day session in Strasbourg to-day. It proposed among other thing, the creation of a European Intnl limk to aid under developed countries in th e Council. Heater. Vital Airfield TRIPOLI, Libya, May The L\S. An Force || 8 diplomatic tight rope here, the United StaU's prepares nctfotiate for continued use of this vital airfield. L'.S. bombers could i". time of war deliver atom bombs to any target in Europe liussia from thli Right now. the field, operated b> Military Air Service, is one of Uncle Sam's biggest internationa bargains. He pays less thar. S5.000 rent per year to upwards Ol 1,000 individual Arab fan this 1335 acre toe-hold in tho Middle East.—I* P. U.K.—Cuba Pact Attacked By DAILY EXPRESS • FIOI.I Our Own OMflOBH Ol LONDON. Maj 8 A further editorial atl tho impending U K -Cuba pact, app> this momim Daflj 1 \ptesH under the heading Secret and Shai I.I The paper acc us es the British Government of a "shock'ng lack Ol eandoui m its relations with the AH Commonwealth". ild get the post, officials of both ish Admiral according t nations. The aigument has been going on for months and it has held up the formal naming of the American Admii.il William M r-Vteh. teler as Supreme Commander for the Atlantic. The British argua that if ther e is any spot outside thoir coastal water* where lhe> rho Id cmmind. it is the Ml Utc ranean. They point to their UfeSw nd In the Middle East, the fortress of Gibraltar and (he key bastion of Malta. The Arnaracaiai rashly that the strength they tn now pouring into the Mediterranean area, the much larger I'S Sixth Fleet and their contributions to Greece. Turkey and Italy entitle them to nd Dealing first with the position L A !*! emanate.! reeentlv of Queensland, the editorial r. I from l-ondon saying flatly that a 11s the viMt to london last I Br " n Admiral would get the NovemberDecember of Premier' P fi '. u ' not correct, and ion the trade talks vv|tii ''" ,l "* d considerable consternatioi Cuba had started. "He wa a ovcrl 1 Washington where Government here to talk about sugar", the, '* v *> discussions on the command Express says, -yet not a word of| nart bwn and re s, "l underway. Britain V negotiations with Cuba! I'.S. Deputy wag mentioned. Waa this the way] French. British and United %  Dominion? State-, servica ie|insentatives in The editorial continues "Empire Washington are discussing the preference i^ to lie thrown ovor< board to the extent of 500.000 tons i Riga* ., ft .1 The Cuba pact is shameful, and should never be signed. The cucumstances in which it is been negotiated, are even imofttl. Neither Ihe WoM i .(ins not Mauritius nor QueensInnd hove been consulted ab.>ut They have merely been not! fled — when the document mi alriost ready for signing" Ii'titis Rum Attracts AU.nliou AtB.LL. ISVom O.tr Own CurfaponJann i 1XJNDON. May 5. Barb;Kios Rum attracted the attention of visitors to the British Industries Fair to-day. Attendwas its highest lice -de Op l %  There i Uvity at We-t Indies stalls. A nf| In 01 • p'aced i unnad mdtt; rlea on -i ... tl I rlti h buyers' Itanl Mr. J. A, Bade, Director of the Bank of Augtralaaii Sydney, Aus%  ralia who iie l i %  • %  lia's Interests tha Britain M Fan, met We** Indian Alan llae an-i Arthur Wint at the Jam They took a group photograph with ether West Indian Raftr ring to the forthcoming Test natches between the West indies ,nd Australia, Mr. Back said: "I think you West Indian* are good to beat us." West Ind.ans in the, nail smiled aprovingly; Alan Rae smiled non-comnutudly and ephed: "I have no comment? to make." United States' plan to give the Supreme Command to a Briton with an American deputy, usually well informed circles said here today. The proposal would make the United States' Admiral. %  ftUUl It. Carney, subordinate to a British Commander, and would divine ihe whole Mediteranean area Into four i tmiinnnds. one of which would be m the French sphere. If the three representatives approve of the plan, it will the have to come before the Militarv Committee of th e North Atlantic Treaty and Defence Ministers of the countries concerned — tKeuter* L'aT.) IRFNCH REBEL STRIKE A' HIDEOUT SAIGON. May 5. Flench troops to-day struck at i.nother pro-Comi.iuiiisl rebel hideout in the Tougkmg delta bridgehead in a sweep through the junde and ricefleld. They aimed to wipe out imtil thousand rebels who were yester L ( >irted to hav. French partisan troop positions end villiges in the Kesat region about 25 miles southeast o R | A poet In Daloc village fell l< the rebels after bitter lighting -Keuter. Workers Coase Work It has conie to the notice of the Bureau of Employment and Emigration that a few worker* have ceased working with tlio object of registering at the Bureau an unemployed. Thejr have stated that this has been do is so that they may get tl.e opportunity of going to work in the United Btats* of America. Only men who are genuinely unable to find work need register. There will be no naw rtgls tration* of unemployed men during the coming week. DKAX HALL 8t. Qeorge, one Df the olrteet • %  •'• (Story on pape 7). the Islnnd. taken from the top of the old wind "Britain Forced To Rearm"—Attlt'e LONDON, May 5. Prime Minister Clement Attire '.old a May Day rally here to-day that Britain had been forced to rearm against her will 'But we have t 0 ibow that wc can defend ouriclves and thai wa have a better system What Britain had achieved could be destroyed by BeUOfl from outssde or from inside. Attlee *ui>| thai the d between democratic Socialism and Communism was "tolerance". These totalitarian Communist countries of to-day are really a pitiful result to come from %  movement that started with such deals. s< dalln movement is not a movement merely out to change things It is out to change people. We have in this counlrv democratic Socialism that did not ring itself to an economic formula." —Renter W.I. Cotton L Industry Needs Special Help SAYS TEMPAttY LONDON. May 5 The West Indian Sea Uland Cotton Association is trying it* ivejg here to get Ihe governmeM t„ lower the high pur. li. M t IK on nuuiulactured good* •Old IT this country. till Harold Tempany. I of the Association's AdVtMr) CoOH mlttee In England tatd w -day that n -'.,. coagsMol that In the long run the industry would ge. relief In uric w.ty or IBSttaai Un Ihe Advisory Committee art represented growers, spinners, the West Indian Committee of Planters and Mcichai.U and 0*1**1 other .tfflclal orgnisntlons Tin, week Sir Harold took the delegation to the Board of Trade bl the difficulties the trwtasTnan are npai tan % %  ling -ei Island cotton in Britain ihiefly I ton and high purehase UtX lie eiii|i)),r i>el that .1 stroll! export Irude niiuiretl the "filth toning* 1 of a %  OUBd home trudo. w< txplauM i %  ih T ;"le". he [Old Reut^ to-d .y. 'thnt the outlook lor the COtl i industry in the Islands i gOttl m rather worrying." He pointed out that if the Industry disappeared, or had to religre its output, this would hava serious effects on tbe ir^ I im not which ..re slraody grunt aided. —Beater. ike Asks Britain To increase Military Aid BRITAIN SAYS "NO" LONDON. MM f> -IXFORMKI) SOURCES said that General Bisenhowei ad Britain for a bigyi-r military contribution to the .Nnrth Allaniic Treaty OrKanisatinn, but Itul.nn hj eta cured to increase the live Divisions promised to thi Si.i lerrte Cunini'jnder — Kiscnhowci *>•?, ,"'1 ippggls" r<.i f m TWO M-*£\Mi* liealei BeittSh elToii to cncOUragi xswjma M Ul ., btggei afbrt b) Ihe othai Bui r m^yi •' lembaia ot tha North Atlsn into (Jtiiro „. %  ,. FOR FAKQUK MacArthur Want* Abolition Of War WASHINGTON, May 5 (^ENERAL MacARTHUR to day ileaded for world wide abolition of war and said "Time is running out "I said a i tne end of World War II that we have had our 1. st chance tod I believe it firmly," he added I believe that !W perc* it of the pi-oj l<* of the world helie\e that. I' e tiencr.il i-. making his third iipi^aranre hefnrr 'he jutiit Senate (otnniittre investigaling C'nited States poli. %  in the Far Bffeal .:.! il was quile podaiblg his plan would call for addii' 'tis lo air and naval ilranjttfa in the Y>u East, and ha believed these additions wa ild be readily ailable wiihout prejudice to any other area or operation .-MM tern plated. — i While UMOeneral was giving his evtdet moi ml Banatoi irn as having ii.n. rejfuaed lo dtansg the %  r • •<•• %  Troou to Europe" dispute on tho ( | J I I l*>l I I 11 "f I ; (rounds that il Involved political -SH/NWEU WAWIrKITON, Crigland, Ma Dafonca Minister H Shinwell in a .speech -aid that Britain was not being dragged the U.S. tail, and COBed foi id to irilieism ,.f Aniet I. % Hey. Addressing a mass n mere at thi* ooaJl in ihe county of Durham, Bh .veil %  ,HM ll),„ ., .,-, lieparaglio; the cs ths l--e U.S. Mission To China Works Out Programme TAIPEH. Formosa. May 5. Stan* ortKers of the Uottad States military mission to Nation ali.'t China, plunged ahead at top speed in working out the pro gram of the organisation whic-i will determine the final dM of tha %  :. eupe of it' "..irk. ml '. ha a chk I ol the mission, and I'S Mmisler Karl L. Ranklne, dttacuy under whom the mission will operate, t vn l "it I OsOUUj -enes of con •erem—. with Chinese nHlltary a. Naval and Mill l.iry and Air attache t.> prepare working order* ,vhich will be folI graduallv extending the work.— VJt, nn w.i. i.mi I.IIIIIS EIGHT KILLED IN JOHORE SINGAPORE, May S. Six (Ihurka gOtdtan and two Malav policemen were ir ported killed and four other Ghurka> wounded Wednesday in a clash with Communist guerillas in Johore. .—(W.P I E\PM.M:D PARIS, May 5. Ths French Mlnaitn -.f tha Intermi In-day t-xp-ll 1 .. former Persian Minisu i of Industry and Commorta —ReaUr. i-AIRO. May .'. rivalling Arobine Nights" selling, pervaded Cairo M fabulous gift* poured int.. tho Royal Pnlh.-e un the r-ve of Ku* FArouk's wedding to hi The Kins Narrlman Sadek lined Bl I! a.m. on Sunlaj In i %  onj whu b %  I %  %  not attend. The man.nie D< i .iv nf Karouk'i : thi throm Tiie marriage ... raroul %  %  in and win pi perform i I Mdiiamed Ibrahim Ba %  dent of tinSharla lliith Court, EgypTi hi %  %  | I .U S|-ee, ,| deh' K ..'ionh bearing' i 1 "" 1 'f -"i" ehiet. of Area | .,, ; have bean asked b% Bta'as nave ieen converging en plaeohowei to Incroaai fof IM pan three day.|tln. mil It-n all up Jordan. K.IIK Alullali sent. lie -aid '.> have made "ev Parouk the Ruaacn Ihn Alt Kyar. ion. hi B eounti7*i highest docoralion ll. MM tinbrides, eownetie Rtl <.r pure gold studded with (parklr'g i SH IV ii Treat) t ngunisation Elsenhower's raquagta tn have been made uuough rtii machinery, and the British repl* was said lo have been a "eategoi ical rejection." I v.i understood that Brltaii I ; %  II l I., i-iiiitribiile ti\. Illvlslon& to Eivenh.)er. the Sn I tenie I'lmiiiiandei. nn Ihe Inn tinent I ifi rm i thai arhei B hewtr compltaad his Euroiii in January, he ,tii he iould reiy on at ttan totalling about thirteen Dlvtaloni inv lime, dissalisfartloi id | ..-.,;, td ll %  n about amal arart ISQliatS t'ni of Belgium, H itsatv n t Denmark. It' IglUm ,aid l" have beer i lor allowing strategi uh Russia llollaix! appeals" to all Europea .,t Hie North AtlanU Treaty for greater oootrlbuUon in ii,.iii. him I" build ,i fores of deterrent to Bggragl U.S. Grilieisin ijuslified %  MaeArlbur asid his polk) to hit i China and win the war In Korea could be cat without prejudice t" anj other gll that might inmada on the I'lvtcd Stated armed forces. i it would take aath la relatively small fraction" of the) United States overall strength to any on the ram|>aign he had in oJnd The InereaaM in Par East '.length would not he aa gren' i fai BS xrnund troops were inn%  ined .aid the General "1 wish poop!* who indulge Ii %  Mtiei-m of iha i's would sbo* more con %  %  aanoi Ws are noi being dragged at ths tail of ihe U s Thara i* no *vld< %  whatsoevei %  Shin well alsa, attneked t..r \ o ns si v atlva Laedi i Wlneton Churchill, charging lum artth apraedlng the notion th i • i .-'-.ik m da : .i ma him a ihe -rude.Ht nan" In tt %  ii of Commons. "There he .tits „u the front Dl Iha Oppoaltlon bemch, muttating to himself, and aotm lines audibly indulging in th rudest poartbla TIM* r-asoii why home paupj and sumo countries regard M. weak Is not because we are weal bul beentaW Churchill and com pOJiy have dirparnged Ihg gDl ernmetit. and orary 'niaadventure* he said Rriiler Alert For Demonstration GRENADA, May & \ st i.u-ijt police detachment of 20 arrived to-day as a precai, UOnafj measure with a new I M 11 %  'Ifludi I'oeking of the capital. Therr will H no surprise, however, if other %  %  nt upo'i the ii R morning. SupTintendent of Police James anting Protest Parade JOrlANNRSBURO, May 5 i .ii. of ex sarvhsme pSl i ara la througl 1 liurg la night in pruteel against tha geutl Afrlcen I tovaiasmant i eolstafed| votini policy. The proti %  aid ll Fort Elizabeth. Th. .litiiinnesbusg demonstrator marched to the City Hall wher u. pa ad rsso HOB ^ro testing in the strongest possible I terms again.st the action of lbs prasant Oovi • %  I It prepoi \n$ to violab the -pint of the tonsil n Retiter IMPRISONED BERLIN. May S. A West Berlin court to-day MI. tenced 45-year^ild Industtiul salesman Erich Kaeding to 111 months imprisonment for illegalg) i i Oen man steel products Into Iris Soviet Zone —Reuter 1,000,000 TON SULPHUR SHORTAGE WASHINGTON, M..v 5 anal Sulphur ivm mlttee reported to-day that t". free woii : .ilphur ir 19..1 was (all Short ol i requirernenta by "at len.i geuter Sill (ii;TT>i:H. I.um toe West ladles, now on vi-it to I^ndon are seen with two RngUsh OoldM at the London Olrl Oaldes Headquarters in Bucklnflisni Falace Road. Eecond from left l< Ml-. Marjertc (Joey) Penbertoo of Barbados. — Erp*e*Fire Guts Kingston Business Houses Damage IvstimuUd At $.~>00.000 1 floor as nremen made tn ns the new third political party KINOSTON, Jamafcj May 0 ... r -,,mmg stand shortly ..Ce V M A M.nager, D. J. Verity. The Jamaica SugBi aaanufac| m ,„ prevent it taking the %  uv i. destroyed. ,-uren. Association and the rader, ]0or liners of the %  an, loat their III idq i • lag valuable ofnec e


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PAGE I 1 \ SLNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. MAY 6. 1M1 Thieves Get iwsj With f900 T im .* -• M \i I \i i,s totsll>n b t.M'r three hundred _ol%  t at_M %  house of li'ian Drakes n biuke and en' .-red between T.4B pi'i and 104< p m. on Friday. A pocket hue com linln,. $*.*.. a penkntfe ajyi pan u( spevimle" vslued S3 wen From U t of AiThm Searles .it Garden. St. James. *. thief stol a quantity of articles and cash The store was broken and entered between 8 0" l''" "' %  Tuc=dav and 5.45 a in. an to Chiiiles Small of Porey Sprin*. SI. Thomas repnite-l thai his hou-e wa* broken and •-mered at about 1.00 a.m. on Thursday pear) necklace, thi aft rings, a gold watch and a rha.n. total value W5.8U were stolen While Robert Tubbi Collymore Rock witVBaiathisj sK" tht"; MOM road during the aarly hours of Tuesday momma. tie was attacked IM DMte_ l>y U) unknown man wbo Usoh *2 n tin Friii.iv .unl rn"i ;imi total value S5m;3. Molstl 1 si RVKt: will be held at Government House grounds %  4 'A o'clock this evening It | that over 2.000 >uiths Michael and Chrlit Church arc expected to attend ihiHis Excellency OH I will read the Royal Message to lb* youth of Kmpirc Rapi_tattn_ the various denomination* of the island will be IVan Mandevllle, Jtav. B-Crosby. Rev, D. C. M and Major A. E M..(T.-if The Police Hand, .mwi Capl C r Rjison will be in attendancr. The s,rrvnr will ;ie broadcast over ItrdifTii-nm. If rain falls, tha ssjnrtca will be held at the Globe Theatre O N TUESDAY the I stage the Musical RMa bj I M Mounted Police and the BaaUfll of the Retreit. by members of Pie Police Band, at District "A" Station foe members of tha Caribbean Commission. Apait from these there will be a Drill Display. The squad taking part in this will drill for ten m; iutcs without a word of con There will ,iK, he a Mr* D I given by the Fire Brigade. THIRST TRIZE || th* 1. show at the Globe Theatre on Friday night was awarded ba Willie IlUl who sang 'Stardust." Waller Burke who sing "SD VOUIIK ratoons The damage is covered by insurance. Neighbours, %  tfiflted | I lea, put out the fire The ratoons belong to R. E. Gill of "Coini-ic". St. Michael. *THMIE WAS plenty of meat in %  *• the Public Market yesterday morning. Housewives hid no worry In getting some. Many women who make pudding and souse could inscon purchasing the Intestines of t h %  slaughtered uniinal*. Large quantities „| WTt also paid in the market vc-sterday I.MIIl IHMOWIIIA 'MIIIS Gairy Claims His Charges Were Planned From Our Own Cur respondent GRENADA, May 5. WKAKIN'fi a red cape i>vcr his shoulders, his customaatlve Karb, Gairy last nlxht told wildly cheering and i.mutually loyal thousands pothered in the Market Square. Ilial the chai'if*"3 he i* due U> answer to at u Magistrate's oourl "ii Monday wenplatted and planned by certain member*; of the Legislative Council, but they "were only waiting Iheir damned time. I dmalion "As Urgent As Fire Alarm" Work HagtltS On Girls' High School '" %  '" Oar Oa-a Carmtaaaaal) ST. GEORC.fS May 3 Work has begun on the foundiitlon of the new Anglican Girls' more High School Last Thursday the first The ban nn (us vlalUlUJ Trinidad and St. Vim-eni was also due to %  very great exicnt to the manufactured mischief of certain people in Hut th r fnct that Trinidad with Its powerful Government, and slronj; Police Force was also a party to I|M ban showed that they feared him. Greater Power Claiming thai he hod doui fur Civnadians in a short* than any other in yesi.s,and pos. wore formally turned by Archseased grvatar power than any in dtaoon H. G. Pigolt and Mis*. the island, herald who did not like Mah flertrand, Headmistress of Grenada his way. could ge-t out. tha School He aaid he understood that a party ot Auditors was coming out WHS a quiet and simple etnn Knglaml to auinUH thrner toi will be laid DJ Id pie at the top miBht be involved Lordship the Bishop of the Wind%  ad ha understood thiv hud n w rd Il"nd*. plan w 'lh a brilliant morning sun "If vim get disturbances again, I burning down on the .site at TnnUsaaaTStand that certain people teen > a ma11 group stood ill bum the Treasury so that the bared head Audit* i i jimot see the nc bared heads as the Archdeacon raad %  few short prayers of .m not predicting that there will thanksgiving and dedication. be a lire in Grenada but I say if Afterwards he took an agrlcul%  I u time there's i lire lav oft '" r "l '"•* and turned a few : odi. If at any "time • B*aad followed. there'* H Are in thnl Government dcpaitmenl. il will not be carel Galry called on worker, to"de8450,000 SllgUr Lost lust from work on Monday baoaun ._ ii Oar Oo_ I'.riMgajBSsBM FORTOF-St-AIN. As a result of a lire ot unknown origin at Uslnc Ste. M letelt Sugar Company Soutb Vrlnutnil, $450,000 worth of !u^.< r hj lS l-een lout. Mr. Brlc Johnson. Central Manager of the Company in an interview with the GaarUc said thai tha dama.it> arafl COM as the store-house had :ib>>ul Mono tang of %  • il thai tltm Huodradi of %  ileh had been packed i.. eUher p.irli hnd to bo quick).. i i v. , r fear that Lbsy ml-ihi rum perthe larges: thoir lender will be no trial and asked them to fast on Sunday, foregoing th Arsfc meal of tht dav He would seek a postponement in %  wait Mr Sinanan lo defend bkn. Teacher Turned Back Wiv.ifing to the b_n from St Vlncant, he said that anex-tauchei. Charles Bleasdlll was turned bick froni Si Vlncant on Wedne day on the ground that he was out understood that the people there shouted "we want Gairy." a* the plane look ofT with him. (Miry wound up Ih. mwim H,'d "TW",' f'^l £."S5i&f S5 """ S* Srlft**i* liuuc. luindrcd per'cen, S"* BrtS* ," S* %£ loyally, and mentioned his regiet control %  t'-encefrom the platform oj CatBradea Itlm/*aiul Lowe. The front rows crowd, however, A fciiw Hlaizc dramitieally appear < n the scene with a Napoleonlil.e fold on his muscular arm Ing to Ihe in.laught. and UUi „ proaebad Gairy with the gpfsirni request tot an Dpportu—Hy to uw l'urrM^ Siialchril '^OD/Vfr DUE TUESDAY The Udy Rodaev vill be arriving henon Tuesday morni i^ from British Guiana via THnld J Grenada and St Vllll I I will be taking passengers ;..ui cargo fcr Canada. The Rodney will leave on Wednedsay night for Bermuda. Boston. Halifax and Montreal via the British Northern Islands Her agentan Messrs. Gardiner Austin 4 Co.. Ltd. (From Our Own CitrrrspontMiiU ST. GEORGE'S, May S. htl B itashiim, a r iiind-tripper the mike, but Gairy read i PWI.I 1.''"'' ,toS "i n ." Ul C NS l *** y Another o.nn'MlcVl IhJ Union ?£-"*/ .Jg*..^ B n _.-gg "1 fall and the mealing ended .,. W1 .„ M (tamu(I ng h ,, oir II u..s reported In a recent atm-y n p!lU ,,„ Io ururta! %  if jin executive meeting that Gnlry GEOKGETOWN. Uae I The iiiptil inciTaae of population and Uw steep ris.in Ihe numbers of .-hiUirvn of the 5 u14 school-ago group have created BO acifta situation which call(oi aeiion .is urgently aa a _!•alarm or aa an S.O.S.. from a ship in distress, declared Mi James L. Nicol. Education Adviser to the Comptroller for Development and Welfare in tha West Indies on Monday in his i.penlng remarks to members of UW IViiiKii. Eduiation Committee now sitting in British Cui.iii.i The CommilKK'. with Mr. NleeJ aa Chairman, has bi pointed by iho Governor K gn Inti the futuie policy of edui-tlon in the Colony will nfiwoi to the provision of schools and teachers Larkinu "For the hordes of children who seek and will continue m aw increasing,nnmlxirs to seek ad< mission to already over-crowded schools, adequate aeeommodaUon and staff are lacking, nor can these be provided on the scale required from the available financial resources in this or in anv &f the West Indian Colonies." declared Mr. Nicol. "To ignore these facts.** he continued, is to run the risk of with-holdmg primary education from largo numberof children of school-age Palliatives "Until economic conditions Improve we shall have accomplished something if wa can sJfMM palliative* for dealing with the oea*acta and educational naads n 'v confronting us. It may be that tho remedies suggested may not be found readily acceptable to those who are prcj.smt C .jt mment to provide more und letter educational facilities. For Ihe present al least. t mever. we must cut our coats aci*ording to the cloth available to us "1 feel sure that our alms will bo unified if we keep ir. mind the following words spoken ID the House of Commons also 80 years ago: "fpo'i Ihe cdiirafirti oj the people of (his countrj,. ffie fate of This country depends." and il Is as true in Bm-n <;uiana to-day as It Is In i>ny mi of Executive Committee There vill be a meeting of tn.-Cxccutive Committee of ihe island Council at Scout H.g. to-morrow. M'.nday 7th, al J BOB, Members are earnestly asked to % %  ak> every efTort to attend. Headquarters News A"* Ironi Tuesday 1st May, Scout II Cj wa* opened and will rnnimuc '.. be opened J S follow*:— Monday Friday: 3 30 to 9.30 p.m Saturday 1.00 to 9 30 p.m. Consequent on this change, Scouters. Rovers, Senior Scouts and Scouts art asked to volunteer for assisting ut H.Q The Honorary Secretary will also be glid to hear any Ideas for general improvement, proM.immcs, etc, any dav between tha ssStsfl of 4 30 and B 30 p.m M II Q Table Tennis Tournament The second Inter-troop Table Tt nnls Tournament among Groups in the South Western V^trict will pen on Friday next, llth Majr. at 130 p.m. at Scout HQ Fixtures for the week-end are as follows:— Friday — 1st Sea Scouts vs. Conv bcrmere. Saturday -Gill's Memorial vs •fames Street. Inter-Troop Competition The Annual S.W. Inter-troop Competition will t>k*> place on Thursday 24th May (Empire Day*. IT.CHING INFLAMED SKIN Coughinft. Strangling Asthma, Bronchitis Curbed in 3 Minnies D. ,c •_*. staMaa A^am.,.. n !" c—_u. jas i-t • % %  ;ff V r ^. c 12LT and Bl.li/.had • fi liner not hit %  rbal clash, the ail i n his favour ONLY SON >V 11 II, 1, Along the wharf front a man snatched her purse whn i 01 tulncti SSO und when s>v raise \ an alarm a shot was tired into the ground near her. i look particular.or U I Incident but no arrest has yet been made. Capt. Kelly of tho Rodney has also written a itri.th*. BSJ i.uk Dr n.iiii, only nn ol |hi i.'i. SM tlUT-klTlOli OFFICFR (Prom Our Own CoirciGHENADA. May 3 Miss Louise Horne. formerly if the Health Diwrlanent, Trlnilad. has srrUnsd in the eolony lo takimi rstW duties as NUtnttgtl Onirei. Windward Islands In 1947 Miss Horne was awarded n CD. & W course In Nutrition and studied ut the Edinburgh Itoyal Inllrmary. She later spent sis months with ihe Mi Food and toured Holland and Switzerland observing nutritional practices in hospitals thenQueen's College Guides Camp ( :tm|'iii". 1st Barbados Rangers. (Queen's College! with Miss ~. Nurse ai Commandant, camped in Hie grounds of the Alexandra School from ?th—13th April This oamn was followed by another, U>ied as she has gone to St. Vincent with her husband. Rev. .1 Broomes. who has l>een transferred to the Methodist Church in'Kingstown. Mi' Broomea will be greatly ralssWd in Ihe Guides for sna DM dona good and very valuable work lor Guiding during her 12 years' residence in Barbados There were mi Guinea in St PnlM| when Mis Broomes went to hve al Ebe na tOI and Wf now have 9 Guide Companies in that Parish. At the last Executive Committee meeting th. Island Cummissione'* presentee the Good Ran log D rUocata to her for the splendid work she had iioee for tha oirl Ousda Movement in this Island. Vottth Service 200 Bangers and Guides, under District Commissioners Mrs. Skin ner nnd Mrs Scott, will attend Ihe Youth Service to be held in the grounds of Government Hou.-1o-day. Rangers and Guides who .ire going tn this Service will fall in at Pax Hill at 3 IS p.m. The C.irl Guides Fair Calling all Rangers. Guides and lliiiKiins !'Jt; i.-,. j-,.!Mcml*.'i that there nre only %  • weeks bafora the 2nd June—the day if our Fair. Ill asked to go "Bit out' to make this Fair a biggn MK (I lhan In previous years, beeaualthough we have our own Headqu&rtai there are bwrtalB awrj SBHkBssary improvements, whn i must be carried out as soon as possible. WANTED: More books and DUg.-i/.mes. (Kindly phone Misg Noia Burton who will call and fetch them.) Articles for the Dipv (These -nay be left frith MiFrank at the Guide Department. Messrs. Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.). Let Us Show You the'S-STAR'car rui; CONSUL 'fir*"Star' \l*ti*m-iitii M'litHt-sl al l.ifsl I„sl KARDOMAH TIFS TEA IV.WW// CHARLES Mr F.NEARNEV & CO. LTD. V***tMV+++'S,*SS,'s t %'S,'&SS&4W**S* &^ .kltls*M BIM TO* *a*b> and %  lf_m aod (il •~l T OB *U fBti MM n. r**l Uk* r—i ••• bwnsi IMaf l S_ (Ml W..S. .MWf l s*a_yM'l)-crnl*I MUti %  > rnl -at r.nl loo_i* No matlM *** Mas **• %  !•• BuSrai %  MI ou _•• oia. W • %  ?i la* M a Daura AU y laaa uwu •< % %  •— %  >—pr %  •= %  • %  —•" lu ..nl.h Ilk_•*!.In J ntlnuti-n ->• %  (> •lull •urhln* ihiou|li *iu htood -i.ltni —i|yr> lo dlamlv* slW r.OV. .lr-n*0i. %  aailm Sno* n** Nl brraihiPS %  c Mai HKind al[i th* Srs* nlM > Uw •aTa Aithsala 2 Tears tlaooaco "< o" 1 WlnaTi alntOM Immfcli in comlurl ai— t"* b**alhl"S ou Uw afatani 10 wsrd c.lt luti i' %  RckautM athiaa—B_sd I'OSM wtdct tse s_s. saessUT "~P — * Untam>s piBtp— sad epea ions uoksi checked Tboutaada of tkta tuflciiis bars pro*d UMl uwie — iHhi"| Dtoec MIN la muJrt lhan D.D.D. PmcnpaoB. Ttaii fssnous bqiud bssatr SMI peot-su iW miurcJ >kic uaauo, aila^i the lenenni I'. ini I dnve out lbs infecnoa W—kUrs* for en of Win trouble u gmn* <* psio ud distteu ECZEMA, PSORIASISBOILS. BKUPTIONS. PBICKI.V HPA1, MALARIA SORES or RINGWOKM liun %  few sppUcsuOes of woad*if_ ODD. Prsscripikoo "n" e sastaiH i_Mf. Perswere. snd die Bod uB will be _st—. nmiai" *'* J ."*TTT* H fki* A k S fc— %  #> % %  %  art niaiW •"' .. h-4 iKin* il* •••• '•> •• %  Maraiav sswaafc Oaai % % % % % %  > r..nc*' Try •••••*• rti mmi kaek >_traniM You ba you Son'l 7l antlroly n. Ii -AkiV'hi'riHm'ii ** -— M* rw iw. You ba i iw 1—W n..i -*n. iik* a MW .ad Is—* i Macaco luai %  lutn il.nWy (kchli and lb* full rm-'"'' one* will • rofvndod Oai Manaace from your CfckjaWl today aad ••* Sow aa ou NB -nltil aad Saw fnue*a*ter yoa lUWd i.ania|!ttT isssaT-if ^_l^a-d>is_ Mm Paaaa BRUSH... UP... YOUR... -SMILE... WITH fHE CORRECT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH F.sVArmstrongLtd.. Brldfstewr DDD ^PRESCRIPTION^ RHEUMATIC PAINS Hare is REAL rattaf. . For re^ relief from rheumatic pains it is nerntaal to correct tbaV aauasWhm they are du to Ose accumulation of bodily imparities it means that voar kidneys which stkookl tlta* away these harmful impunhcs arc sliiRRish and need a mrdiciiir to tone them up. f> Witt's Kidney and Bladder Pills arc specially prepared (or that purpose. The* soothe and tone up disordered kidneys so rttectivt-ly that these vital organs speedily i etui n to their normal function of clearing the system of impurities. D' wit: Pills have seen IJ rrhrving rhetHnatK suflerers I in many parts of the world ^ with great sac cess. This Doe BSSssksM may be )nst what you neod. Co to your theiinst and obtain a suppJyof DeWitt i PilU right now. (V^ v VM>V'#Vb4^OiV#^^ OUR GUARANTEE Da Witt's n—omfaclurrd under strictly hygienit condmoos and die uigredicnts K'dn) *nd Bl.tddv In ittll SPECIALS FROM THE LAND OF STARS AND STRIPES FLOWERED FLATTERY SPUN. -$1.75 yd. FLOWERED KUA-KUA SPUN$1.60 yd. CREPE ROMAINE a full assoitment of shades including Helio $2.25 yd. _S SEE THEM ON DISPLAY AT LASHLEYS LTD. Swan Sliwt — Prince Wm. Ilenry St ^pjm m j iw r My! My!! Wli ii a line aaborlmenl of LADIES' HKi ••MATI1KIAL. and at saeh blr prices tao. AME WE AT THE HHMTMSH l\IH STIII IL -Il doe* seem >o!" So ssy most of the Isdies shopping at . WILSON'S And lo the ladies keen on knowini; Ihe oriyjn ( Ihe material they buy, after spending $20.IH1 and answering 4 out of II questions mrrecllv. they heroine the recipient of a DRESS LENC.T1I OF THEIR OWN CHOICE FREE Now, ladies, conic out in large numbers and test your lalenl. Tell ut. ihe origin u( 4 of ihe billowing :— l.l'NA FAILLE JEWEL PRINCESS 46" wide 16 gorgeous shades (a. S2.18 per yd. 36" 1IAI.CREPON FLOWERED MEMOSA I LOWERED LAMLEF, FLOWERED TAFFETA in While & popular shades with sequins $3.25 per yd. 3%" .. in Floral & Pastel designs (a S2.IH) pr yd 3S" .. Hi SJ.39 A J2.7II per yd. 4" n S1.6H per yd. 36" .. $1.27 per yd. PLAIN MAROCAIN in 15 charming shades 36" wide (u $1,411 per vd. JERSEY SILK 54" wide in Blue, Black. Lemon. Peach. Pink. liold. While. Turquoise A $1.25 per yd. CREPE de CHINE 36" wide in 17 shades n $1.32 per yd. NANCY CREPE in 25 shades 36" wide Q $1.16 per vd. SHOT SILK 3 6" wide ffl fl.88 per yd. "• TAFFETA PLAID M" „ from $1.20 to $1.68 per vd. RAYON PLAID 3" ,. .. S4c. lo $1.08 per vd. SPUN in several shndes 3" wide (it $1.00 per yd. CREPE KOMAIN 46" wide in several interesting shades. SATIN & TAFFETA of the hesl qualitv 36" wide In all shades from 7c. to $140 per vd. SKFKSl'CKER 36" wide ffl> $1.14 & SI.24 per vd. CHAMBRAY (good qualitv) 36" wide (ST $1.46 & $1.56 per yd. PRINTED PERCALES .. 36" wide 88c. to $1.18 per vdV A fine assortment of Printed COTTONS 36" wide from 55c. per yd up. A 111 A A SIMMS PLEASt: \OTF_ JI'ST OPFN'FD. A FIM: .sSSOKTMFNT OF TllksF IV ALL -SlZtS AND COLOI'KS. IIFRRV WIIILL 1HH' i i-r iii'sli shipments just received Price : 3Sc. per 'ilk pkt. Now. rememher. when >ou cannot gel it clseuhcri' vou cun get il af — N. E. WILSON & CO* HEADQIARTEKS FOR LADIES' SHOES AM) DRESS MATERIALS 31, Swan Street. DIAL 3676



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lAl MAI I IKI SI'NIIAS .nun .11 PACE SEVEN IIMVUMMX. HOtllW. MY l.%\ HAW. DRAX HALL, ST. AlthlMI Admiral Hon. Sir Reginald A\ Ime. Reniurlj PI..Dnx. Kin. i the foundation f the Drax %  %  %  p i ..Iii ,i DM I ,. %  p| Mi Col. Ji.mci Drax. created %  Cliafnhl II. -it In the i ihis Island, H %  •pols of ground to be cleared and cultivated, and he was i i ; %  1 |>SOple reap Ctf turning B a "HgU i In I!arb;ido* ttfc i ient con Ilnulng for a gener..'. %  I'llo.i indigo and ginger together with fowl ratsnva. beans and corn c\ii:%  smallholder., a rendition which %  %  Uw appcarant f I capitallsi ; d the ena> iliolder. 1 ll n o dad thai for several .i bailing renwlned %  sacrat, known only to Drax and a few other gentlemen. .v o had amal >< d %  Dutt i. m Brail] la tend their works. 1WV willing i %  '•' % %  WU tha Bret iii.it made u,ar is Barbados, but it came to Uttlc till tha great industry thriving genius of Sir James Drax engaged in that mil work." Tln'Mlno record of wheii actually built, but tradition fixes It at ^boui 1650. The archtt* ami • %  though School* burgk did oof likr it. •eying tiifl'. MTipnrls a gloomy to tha whole londacape around," 1 found it a charming manxiim. Tha house is Eurrounded by rergraana, tamarind* and ; whan tha windmill was. worldnc Drax Hi i must haw !...>-. { \vi\ ;.,. Tha entrance to tha house is off centra to tha west, and at the Cast there Is a Square room, To t!.. .". .. i .i range of three equiil rooms, the centre MM the magnUlcant stair T usual location ol dM atair In a i house. Tha 'air hall opens into the hall through a broad nrch In UII odwo-'h Tha wood< .til ma. have baan Inv nil ii its beat. v. b i nan, li ixcalli cample f the boat %  tha period T ini ol the liouao i> le en i" tin* atair There hi n v other example cm this side of tlio Atlantic that display' eMI pletcly t h e character I to :ne last century. -K said of Drax Hall The (nrest attache.! kg the leemi to t. I neat i Ktem and •famed for ntadttlonal tali related bi th. >i i. % % %  tha ureclpituiu height*, and the level ground foot of the elilf. wttch wag form.' iy covered with trees has proved tn-> valuable to be allowed t Q re main u.ergrown onlv by br-t,h wood with here and there tha Ml ber ifa fustic tree." It is said thai the mastlck timber frum the ongin.-l forest fu.-med Ihc beams of Drax Hall and was used to make tnc stair. In the lofi i MTV those old beams, tough hown with an adz. Tha ttato %  tar heads of the nv.iuicn is 1758, and one of the outbuilding* bears the date 1771 Like St. Nicholas Abbey. Drax Hall has a lire-place, but it we"! built up many years ago During IU existence, Drax Hall ha* weathered several severe hunt I it is said that either the graal hurricane of 17flj or that of 1831 swept away tinupper pai i of the south facade of the mansion. Sir James Drax wmto have lived like a prince. Occasionally he used to kill an ox. an example Few of his fellow planters could afford to follow since oxen were used in cultivating the land He used to eat extremely wail FVM P %  tartcS this is the second course at one of his banquets: A dish of marrow bones, potato pudding. a leg of pork, fhcasse of pork, a Picturea by CYPRIAN LaTOUCHE THE -fair hsll c arch. THE 9ITTIN0 ROOM with the dining room in ttie background. Whan Sir J.line* Dra* hald Ids bSKtiuat* Uie table usad to stretch the whoU length of the two rooms. rtUJi of boiled chickens, shoulder of a young goat dressed ith nil own blogd and thyme, a kid with a pudding In its bally, I -fc witli ,,,,: %  % %  1 M mutton, .i the side of a young goat, a loin of veal, throe young turkeys, iv, two hang with eggs in n dish, four ducklings, ei.'i I I dov.-. three rabbits, and two Mui -cvv dtieks larded and inanpand well with pepper and salt. The means of recreation how ever—snort from eating — were Sther hunt iiig nor hawking, to win. n th* had bee < add •inii and. All that Drax teems to ave been able i. do f• J> make some of his neajroe i u it rapier and dagger, which tl.ev lid very skilfully He also got -ome amusement by putting Muscovy duck Into a pond, and e of the best swimmers • negroes to try to catch he duck in the water. FOR THE BEST 1 MilllFIl WMIUlll lUXlX COVERING 'SILVER STAR' CONGOLEUM DRAX HALL boast* the Bnaat Jacobean sUircasa this side of the Atlantic. INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  "PI'IIIXA" MIIUK I.ICOU I \ \ I %  wee JH. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD. D* m*m. m %  %  %  %  %  % % % % %  %  %  %  %  %  II VIMilSOV s ItllOM) STRKKT DECORATED or AIM I CLASS K.ir WINDOWS, BOOB PANKI.S. H(c. AVAILABLE IN KIVK AITRACTIVE DESIGNS Each hi Tin. aim 1B*lt* "ii M" ,G DURINU ritlirr the grtu p:ul of the iootb facade Met Death Through Negligent Directions A NINE MAN JURY agreed that Reynald Brewster. n labuur.r ol Hnll'a ltood. St. Michael,'met his death lhi~ou^h the nculiyeTice of Vernori Goodiitg. a labourer of Hanson Mill. St. (Storm, who directed FitzHerbert Douglas to reverse the lorry G 253 which crushed Brewster to death. Tha IpQuaat Into Bra w tart ai^o under HIP truck and the diMiii was held at i>i-: B ind wan eoverad with tnish. Court, si. Oaorga raatarclav mom. inn. Thi Ooronar was Mr. c. w. Sheltered Under Lorry Rudder. Reynald Brewster a IVDouglas who was driving the year-old labourer of Halls Road lorry told them to come from unwas killed on the spot on April 2? der'the truck and she did so. when the motor lorry G.253 rolled After Douglas spoke to them he over.him while hiw:. working-ot rC versed the truck and then she Itancla Plantation. St. George heard Gooding said "Skipper. %  bout J.30 pan. The driver of the Iook ^ u „„,, th i 9 fcUow." lorry WU FiUHeroert LVniRlas ri „. v U5Ufl Uy ra ll Douglas who U also owner. '-Skipper. Douglas got out of A post mortem a x a mlnw io n waa the truck and went tn the pot rmed at the District "B" where Brewster was lying. and this fhowad thai n rrwil i or appeared uneonseious "' and was lying between the front the deceased died from shock haemorrhage from Injuries I.'IV'I and rear wheels of the truck She could not remember hen run: Whan tha Inquiry which lasted unv bodv telling Douglas to re %  /erac the truck Edson Hardinir, a truck hnnd of Kew Road. St. Michael said thai April 'J7 be was loading cane the lorry C. 253 for over three hours was started n Itness called was Jennie W i-iurer of i. .s< Michael Sh> that on April '.". ol Fl..: helplna with the loading I'lantation catietnld. bt OOprfC .,( eanm on UM torrj O.Sal. other men were aasisting him Sometime In the afternoon the with this job and Brewster was rain began to fall and she took OM of the men. About 3-3(1 p.m. shelter under the platform <.f the the same day a heavy fall of rain lorry. came and he took sheiui andat I I bar workers went under the the platform of the lorry. n of the lorry with her. While under there he noticed Two men she recognised were (.coding and Brewster. After : looping nOKt to her whom she a time Douglas the driver and knowi by Ihe names of Harding owner of the truck told them to and Gooding. The deceased was come from under the lorry. He .^r///////-v////V,v//,v//////////-r///////>^^^^ rushed from under the lorry and ahOTtly after Douglas rewi lad DM lorry. While the lorry was reversing he noticed that one of the rear wheel* had rolled over Brewster's body. There were about three tons of cane on the platform of the truck. To the Coroner: Harding said that the lorry had travelled BDOUl six feet eight Inchm baforo It had pilled over the body of the deceased who was lying on the ground. Fit/Herbert Ecklcy Douglas, the owner of the motor lorn G ttl and who lives at Dash Valley. St George said that on April 27 he was hauling cane from a field lit Francla Plantation. St George About 3 p.m. the same day there was a heavy rainfall and the labourers that were working in the Held ran under the platform of the lorry to lake shelter This is a habit of theirs vhen the rain is falling. "Come Back, Skipper" After the rain had ma.k finished he told them to vat from under the platform of the truck a he was going to nun.' It, Ho started the engine and when I voice told him "Come back Skipper" he levcrsed the truck. He had not reversed the truck very far when he heard a man MM "Hold Skipper, a IM>V get mash." He atoppad the truck and on going to Ihe side of the lorry saw Brewster who hod l>cen working with them for about three days in the field, lying in an unconscious stale on the ground • There were about two tons of cane on the platform of the lorry. To the Jury; Douglas said that the man who told him to reverse was Vernon Gooding who usually directs him when he I' revervin | the truck m caneflclds. As far a& he knows Brewster was not cm uiih anybody arorfclnai on the truck. Douglas said thai ha driving lorries lor %  bout After this c\ uteme v. .i h.-.i Cap) Qrani 'hen Informed the Coroner that he had no n witnesses to produce 1 ner then summed up ind after I L'O-1rni..11 < %  %  turned their verdtet AiiM'rirjiii Coliiiiiii A FRIEND SPEAKS FOR BRITAIN 3 IN HOSPITAL AFT£R DANCB ii'iorn Our i>" i ST Gl Three men were taken t<. hOBpl till after a dam. Iiel the M M.W.U.s wage vlctoi-y celebrations. The polka Bra % %  take action. Mr. M* A. G* Honaehell. new Director of Agriculture, arrived in the colony last Sundav i\from St. Vincent where he was formerly Superintenden! culture. Mr. Hanschell. %  eaond of Mrs. Ilansehell of "Bosvig..' Barbados has served in British and Sierra I-cone VISITING GRENADA S'l GEOHGEb Ma I Mr. o w Ho kill, an Ind Conaultanl rrow tha United King ildm, is mi a second Qrai di ..ftei vbritlng st Vln cent, where he Wi by Mr. Alistair McLcod -Smith, Financial and Economic AdVisel 10 U I Windward I.li.n.U He i* holding further talks with the Economic Development Comint. tee of the legislative Co I the possibility of estahli^ industries in the colony. drum It. M. M..eC€H.l.i NEW YGUK. %  %  % %  ii %  'M il a staunia Britain tvai raise.i taaiu rhan than I niue'i ii'n lam ol 1!Italn In Anarioa, i-*wi>. i)i lainaiatrtni arad In lha Wai-i..rf-A"iMii.. Grand Ballroom. "The altitude of caution which Brtti at toin proposal, m the Far last hi mused a certain numbei ol i" pa %  "There are vBI | what has appeared bi Brltlan caution. It parll> rcfltcUl an attitude rnmmon to Btveral members %  t the foiniiionwi-iltli. iiicllidini' <'.iri;ii)a and Australia.*' And l)i Uflai added Britain %  nd Ihe United Btataa need earh .. than at an) time la then hfa I %  a i B B R I be United States in Ihe W. -! 111 ituoi raUabla bastion of strength between the inn Curtain and ".u own hun HI baarcuhthV Naa V rl Dally NaWI doe* not ofien compllItain Hut us iTi.nn edl< lotial admires us for i< wiser and more M>l, \ gambling" than the Americans. ii rival Britain unstinti for the way we do It, an I end) How lot,' do you wpp %  %  before wa gat u nmi rl i Ariti ih '" BUT lha Hoaret nowapapoi Wh) anBritish propagandisttailing (iii IIS lust now III" I ptSfU BU gu there I' an Enallhman to maka as thouori we ried Instruction Tha polnl i da era have to n'ei |0 them?" IN MKiiifiAN tbare plete t'in up f sale its name : %  Nahma and Itl POPUlal %  i \ |ti .i i only iiniu-ii>. .. lumbei • ompany. is closing I'nee. Includ.c aitpm t and golf tourse a dollar* VMIHM \ i laughing at th. waggon <; i who, mindful i i urmy anxiety about being sent p tha I owing dog%  Korean pole:— With Harry if you laasnM oi'i back. v "i d..-( ihioii U'l ffsje? Then : a*k Olv Mar'" AtTKIl the Cambridge rowlni v ryborty is now hoping iat Oxford with Iheir stai miler". 22-year-old Hoger Ban. liister—will do it again Hunnislei rare* against America's best. Don Gehrmann ind Fred Wi'i In PhU. delphia on Saturday !?• I We are in a position lo t^uule ver> favtui ralile MNePlume 2:164 \\ A It I II Ol SI Till IKK I.Mill Ihs. (apurlly) WITH CSNttB HRAL STHAIANI> KUBBKK TVIIKI) WBBBU WM WITH HI lllll K TOKO minU BUT WITHOUT LSN'101 METAL STHAI' SH.M SIMII.AK TBUCKS WITH MUD IRON WHEELS ;. \W ll\\: I.AKI.F STOCKS Ol! ARDATH CORKTIPPED CIGARETTES X r*ackacei of I0\ & 30's which am x r.-e 11 %  !*i %  iiiS Original prlee I0— 19e now lCc. ( Mieaa of ie for sj.ee \ i ligareUe guaranteed in ' pi. ft it nn.dltion. • KMIIIITS DKMi STORES •: '" lff^%o^ C-^ CHILDREN'S PRINT DRESSES SbM 2d I" 24 I .i< ii •i I ( HII.HRKN'S hlllivmi l>SI'N BONNETS Very rule. Kuril S I.SI SUN BONNETS in Plain While anil Plain Cream Each $1.47 llMllls lilM'ER BAI.S In Pink anil Hlui Pla.li. raieh CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LtJ. 10 — 13. Broad St. < AMI'IIFLLS CANADIAN SOIL'S per tin %  ' % %  • NBILLSON8 CANADIAN CHOCOLATES ptr bal I'r. per box *!.s; MAKVF.N'S CANADIAN WIDA WATER8 pel lln MM SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEQ ivnil CEREAL p.-i lln S7 SWIFTS CHEESE .47 %  IUSACI '.II . %  KHAFT CIIFKSK A MAI AII1NI per I In .31 9 v %  %  PAPII II v per It* .tt HEINZ SPACHFTTI IV CHEKSE-lfe Im HEINZ OVEN HAKKIi BEANS WHH I'OliK .H IMPERIAL SLICED CUNO PEACHES per tin ,, .14 SOUTH AFItll'AN C.CAVAS. Lar-e — per tin ",'l i AHi.ToN PEARS i pet tin ,it PLANTERS SALTED I'F.ANHTS pel IU M SINCAI'OltF I'lNKApl'I.F sliced fi| SINGAPORE PINEAPPLE Cube. ,5S PEBLSTEBS HKEK „, v > IH/ A BOTTLE %  ', 81.(1(1 A CARTON Mi (2-s. STANSFEU SCOT! ,v (.. J III. IMMMMM



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SUNDAY, M VA 6. 1H1 M Ml \> I1MM Ml I'M.I MSI \LIB1L\RY OF FILMS FOR CHILDREN The !_,' I! %  k*ll by %  M SStBi r..i.,,.. • ru %  BBS 1 t-.ll If. %  ,.t childr-rv < %  > KARL G. rtElFFtl) iFnun IMM1 XMIIHI ) ,:jrday throughout the [ at %  pprwdnmi i %  i huaren r'.\< >v Mm pro grainn i , ., i, %  I brtorv : Befall) %  %  woman hava viewed it. oiMuisru ipproval, and 100 New York school children. ; age 8 lo 12. have emphatically agreed that tl is a film they | like. A relatively recent feature of I coonunltj life, 'hesc |,rogrammes u au \e poolbta by A new. nan "g orgmisnI i, ! :uv Moiun Picture jtaaoclation ol America and at %  resent Administrator of the V s %  onomic Stubjllzation Agency. ffhilc with the film industry Mr. holm.ton. u parent himself, felt children, wh<> make up a share nf the motion picture .< won not getting the M deration duo Ihotn (ram the % %  try. Children ctijov only i few of each year's film release... jriglnaHy most films went Inm Mlremonl as soon us they hau glffOII .',ution tilinn generations of children <> opportunity to MO the few • %  s which had a pcrenni.il %  st for thm Motion picture icers' vaults lont.nned dor.cn; ii as The Adveii,if Huckleberry Finn" imd ft in Wonderland." but only atlon Children who had been the .;,,i,jijt v learly eight. She usx corn-gold i and a smile like an angel's. She h n> FRANCES SIOST0N i £10.000. That Is the compsnsation decided upon by %  Judge of Hie High Court whom -he sat beside this week while lawyers discussed a bus accident In which *ho was terribly injured That is the compilation for the fact she does not appreciate It yet -that she will never play and run and Jump like other girls. France* has already undergone 12 operations in IB mouths and faces another In two years' Unit The Judge refuted to accept a settlement In Court for £8.000 but agreed to l Kt.i'iKi which, un o m i. will bring Frances £12,850 when she Is 21. Her lather can obtain permission to draw ou the money for her education or a holiday overseas. In order to assist the little girl to keep up with her school work, hospital nurses have often stayed after duties to read to her. Al I IK i MM in.i : •ID CLIMB THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN" %  y li. . This week-end. drama both light and heavy seems to be the keyrtofc oi tht now films being shown. At the Empire "!> CUMB TOT HIGHEST MOUNTAIN is a simple and of en humourous drama of life m an Amciiran rural con Btwn in the early days of thai etnlun EDGE OF >' > t .,f the Plaza is heavy fare involving the M oi ,i Catholic Priest by *> young boy, while AM yi iK'i (IN THE WESTERN FRONT which labainji revived at iha Otoba is an eutaundlisg war film oj thai I9M 18 eonflaoi iinatoly, i eras imsMo ti iv toad the! Lbs chureti OBUUSOI .si illm. but at the end ol alTi.nl hn give hi> mother an e* D n I will guolr from the pensive funeral Nets 'i e'i review Filled with terror, hopelessness Lot tart with I'D CUMB THE and despair, he turns aeafaafl inui '.sr MOUNTAIN u has a everyone in the struggle with hi* umplicit) and genuine slneortrj eeeactenca ana i ultimately led that ire moat appealing The io repentance through lbs !*•> tlory i enter;, lining and the drapathy and understanding of a u arlso an *oung priest .mil assays* human—Just Filmed against the authentic i.r .list's, that uudoubtiia.-kgrnund of lx Angeles slums ski in the UVOS Ot lh> and "Skul How" it people .i small rural settlement, sUrk drami depreesing but .ibly do t" this das estpwilj Beted : riea (lunger, a* on the novel "Clrcull #ril (roriilod oewilAerssd boj |ivws Ail. i i'..i.a H.ttn,, ,,,,.. ,„,(,„„,.„.,, i. luiKlii .. prewilu-i' ife. it IN the n„,[,. while Duna Andrews is %  too Dl young methodtst mmlX cellent as the young parish i WUC who prkwrt, w bo ueciclenlallv Itumbloi a small eummunlty in „ n h0 boy', ,,. iluBlue Ri.lgc Mountains of thShowing with EIXJF. OF DOOM i. if his %  oiutregation and ts an interesting and tlmob ihoti young wife to make the THE MacARTHUR STORY Thii BTtments to her newdocumentary rovers all aspects ot tfo makes delightful enthe career of one of Am.i..' tertattiment, Htl tir-t termon, moot brilliant generals, from hi< the en Rj tlsi dayi as a cadet at West Point. School picnic and bis anal through two Woii.i Wars, Mi. farewell to hi> congregation are iM-t-ppation of Japan, hi* %  Mattel .11 high spoU in %  •'vmp:ithetlc mom a-, the flrjl Supreme Tn-..' Nations t'ommandcr. tinKorean Willi.iii Luiuligan as the ..jripaign and hi, final dismiss*'. is an excelienl cMtcs liy ihe president ef the United %  > doing .ill ti" aaetaa Under tho etreun things othei ri.en do as a"all M thii ahon > %  tadtod ".*' dlapnylng .i person.d pen it Ion interest In ngrssjirlon as individuals, r simpLv a group of people h. pie.ich to on Sund.us -.ill theae characteristics are aoaUy and naturally porlr>*i l>> M" In n role that Is a fi" eceait Hu-wanl pUya the rntrUsteri „.;-t lussplilaneaMd, though she portrayi convlnc ingi>* ,iil the douhts and hope*. as well .ithe eftorti lo help hei which Uireatens tho practically everything, the Com children's reactions 1* the speed nu8 ban• %  wild with good and indeed. • number of had n chance to sec them, duce real fear. On the other h.md. their word.-. ConaaauenU} i i mt, Iht next they wiggle them .ire the residents of the JPondcrlng this situation Mr. some psychologists soy that preCommittee developed the "Wiggle with boredom. Too mu:h consmall town of Demurest, when** V *",. *"'" ****" ^Khnshm concelvad Hie idea'of the tended fear does not hum a child. Test" based on long observation vernation in a motion picture inthe picture was made. The-., -re or the hills, and the bush ^ .^nlriirsii with, nee Th.' |i i^ble for them. loIy. Many of the situations to picture. When they are enjoying strenuously to sentimental love green foliage find rcl soil ol %  uiwwrtnln the T.. uroblem to be solved was which parents object, because they %  Aim they may yell, junm up and scenes, Such scenes make them Ceo,,;., deserve specul meniion of[ abrupt ami the But of determining WtUcfa Itlrn. 'xcitc and apparently ovcrstimudown or JI! h .,.„, „,. wiggle, and slouch in their < u ^ictiiresque selling for a g^^gorneUmes mon'ot, Euldren would like. In 192s a '*te the child, are only arousing when it begins u. ben %  -...em. the. ;1>I V betuveXU which psychowsrtnl Immin story Isiinii..!plan for •• Children 1 Film thU pretended fear. invariably squirm and wiggle m bmists explain a rejection of an I ..iled In the autumn Hut it i* neither Ihe Children's their seals. The children .ire DO tvperianpi (Ol which thev are not %  of that year 1400 motion picture Library Committee nor the exlonger asked what they Uk at* ,..,!, : in the United Btatea P* 1 sdesatra on child psychology do not like. \l.l, QUIET ON Till: WhSTr-KS KKOXT frxeerpt from the review In 'he NOW Yorker Magazine All Oriel en the Western Front, g m is rii-t released in nm still ptcki , rnoman tu. wallop, and its buttle scene aic right up thenwith UM beat OVai mads In all probability. its paciftstic message will carry U little weight now MS it carried in the past, for although it has been estimated thai u hundred million people hav hnd to look Instead. Committee ng unobtrusively %  seeWd -I *ho deserve most credit for the members sitt IK-CMI ;,up,-ai f.n children, success of the Children's Film the audience watch the children , Dutbj inVfoUowlngJunoooJ) two Library. The-censors." who best reactions lo th e mm. ami from tbeatres W*r cc*Vtoulng the plan know Juvenile taste and unerringthat determine the degree of exThe failure proved that adults ly turn down what the customers citement or of boredom it arouses. dwavi K ^ii ludgesoC what •*•" not like, are an unselccted linmhiblted by the pi. rnldn,.iiko%cnUhad be*- rou P of New York City school adults children usinliy speak UP without consuWni the Ctvugren who see the films and. freely during the showing of l customers themselves, by their reactions, make it possible piclure. When Annie Get /our Kuder the pieeant alan children for the committee to determine fiun" was 'Wiggle-Tested reKnake the Ihia deci-ion md if their lUlUblllty centlv. Anme's unkempt appearThere are now nomc 37 titles In Itnevri not ilk. %  ? nidUm nicture Since, when questioned about mice in the early sequences was the Children'-. Film l.ihrary. In 1 nV,?.tg. ,^ntt-rw whole the Smi ihe, see, children usually sharply reproved by the children no two years Is the repertolr. Lente! iS^Sca^XScSi Seal, up freel) >y ihw, III a The mo-l surprising thing ah,,, the Librae, e-ectl, the un. The Commlltes also hai neflnite conclusions regarding what Children bke. Action and movement are most Important. Children ward , uoud story with a clear plot and itrung mutation* reusing %  uspaesc oi laughtei broad comedy, "slapstick." and when a doorway I* used ovei ami I-.IK1K OF IHMIM OVSS again to fi-me the llgurcs llarn-*! on the novel of the same ol marching men But in detitle b l-eo Brady. BlH.K ti s.iibing the horrors of actual DOOM ph.ving at the I'ln/n I* th. remuat. !- %  Milestone th.%  ,„ | ., pooc boy, who naurdlreetor, got down on celluloid a l(k ., , ,v|, i 1 when he great deal of impressive stuff ot their elders rate it. However, adults detennine what films will — be shown the children in the first place. Before a picture is shown to the junior critics, it Is Jjrevieweu by the Children'Film Library Committee, n group mi representatives from II women's organizations. The Him must meet the Committee's requirements for suitability before it is shown to iui ., imciicc „f children, Some 20 gjhrai %  yenare selected as Library SJaW. Tii" fare offered on a children's profciamme Is usually made up of a title from the Library plus n current motion picture rated suitable for children. Tho Library is not big enough to supply continuously the usual demand for two pictures for each showing, nor would it be to do so even If it were j possible, for children like to see the new motion pictures as well as the best of the old ones. DARTWORDS HI E R g'fi this eek's leaser— range '.he 50 words in the circle so that they lead from BOTANY to CARESS ID such a way thai the relationship between any one word and the nest to It is governed by one of sis rules. No rule may be invoked more than twice consecutively. RULES Whenever the Children -l-'ilm library Committee is doubtful about a film, it calls in a panel of experts irnm the neld of child guidance. Psychologists sometimes take a different view from parent-. on the question of what is good for young people. They do not believe that getting excited is necessarily bad for children, and they distinguish between two kinds of fear—real fear and "pretended fejr Itenl fear, they point out, Is bad for the child. Any situ%  leUai B 1. The word may be an anagram ot 'he word that precedes it2. I: may be a synonym of the word that precedes it. S. u may be sch.evea bv addmg one letter IO subtracting one loiter irom. or char-ting the preceding word. 4. It may be associated with the preceding word In a saying simile, metaphor, or association of Ideas. 5. It may form, with Ue pre ceding word. Ihe name uf a wellknown person or place in fact oi fiction. 6. It may be associated with the preceding word in the t;tl or action of a book. play, or othei composition. A typical succession of vords current uicluics have iiual, lied and will go in as soon as they complete their commercial runs. A few of the original list have been discontinued. Among the most popular recent additions are The Wizard of Oz". "Adventureof Robin Hood." und u Blecl BaaUt,." TinLibrary constitutes a treasury of the best i dims available in the United States — films which h chosen wild the help i ehUd and will continue lo delight future generations of i hiidren iiupert and the Ice-flower — 21 -— Ml .Ii MI-.V .oin*. Hjt*u n ,\ ol .a *!>*! Imk .ii.-i. h# hjlS jo.nraia *f oin, growing i I C I. .r.n'i >h*y lov.ly bi*.i)^ Muff-II t he .ov#i 'o p rtwn | BM |hl ,o'. t.1 ihl h* put on am WusABWi l>o irll n morr IDCUT ihaOl But ihfl luf .n jnothtrhiiky i.iood. h boun.'i i*... "Oh de.r. th inaSUl quiir dony." sight Hup". "i %  'I intoln mt how to %  \V/#V^^MV/#VMV/^///V7V//TA'/'///^/>*'V^*' IVrfumo Always Attract Women NEW YORK: Bus advertise menu In a Tennessee town have blotters soaked in perfume attached to attract women' tion. Some women are so attract'ed that they teai to use as sachet) ITOKALON off the blotter -',*.-,',',:'.'<. FACE POWDERS. CREAM. LIPSTICK *>&% Ma you *iaii| to look young and vlvaelou*? isi: iiikuiix Io you want lo be captivating? I'SE lOkVION In short. I uli.do wni want all men folk, and women folk too to sa> of >u : "There noes grare. rharm and loveliness ?" Then : nm TOKAI.O.V As used by lh r warlg's mod faacuistmg women !: WM. FOGARTY JkiA L\ l/u (Dai}—G V goh i/u (Di&cAeat fcl&qanai off EDGE WATER HOTEL RATIKIIFIIA Redurrd Rate, l.t Mft> I'l JIM <>• : i lor vUlU ol • e> LONGER LASTWGf o*ait*i r i N*> —• ih* mm •wawasaVe • *•"•. i.m )•••• than CUTIK. as awaseaws -I i b a Ilutin* .01 reasala aa raei aeBta lot dl' >. Ho rhlfsalaa. aa [i--rlin. M fadlag. > Ii'""Iron in*%  unit sassiaiaM lidil^n tluaV>. Gate • h>aWai I /..../. ..n't i gM I ISaSanh mm, ,n ih r latest MUsn assess rA N I Hith your MI ..in. aafl sssau*. foeigTs l/.f Poawtsn \mti /•<,/../! JYtyvMite mat \wU>yi \^i0WC^Sfm^ GARDENIA by i I.I. ro asan /.-/. u f (, aHaAgV^rae &w*l; with the faithful IM'.l UN The Soap Dl UM I'.KUtiful. I'l.iv sale I e prepared, fcr vour roraanUc ni*memt (let a few eakes of URKAM | Toiu.r gOAP, use it faithfully In rOUl bath. abower and at the wash basil) for a *nft-: riK-ithravllarrl With natural %  %  %  IHtl IN ! available at toilet goods lers throughout the island. eaBaasaal What other COLD remedy does ALL this?i V \ r^\ ^'>* < KN|| E VI'.I.VF 9 X i I MOBS (RKPK Mi '} § T — While und oilier shinies MOIKI-: TAKKETA CaSm KOMAINE KMBKOIDEKKD IIKKSS NET .. OLVJB TINSEL IIKOCADI Will ATIIS. SPRAYS, VEILS ETC. LET FOGARTY'S DHESS YOU WITH LOVELY MATERIALS ALL THE YEAR ROUND •*,-v*,vu'.*.vvvvr.vv^',',*,'..v',-,',^v'..^ ^V^^.V^^Vi-'^V-'-'^W-'^^.VW.'^^'^V,'. ,',-,',' -v>*.^vwv.> CLEARS STUFFY NOSE! SOOTHES SORE THROAT! EASES ACHY CHEST! CALMS PASPY COUGH! r^brf on .t bri-uw A : „.li „u,f •-!" W ? SyTv*oa**wi rubbed on I ggaaej OUTnoi Hi* chest, baxk •'"' ithioatsllaiowr %  „. l( :U*cd and cimV, %  VspoRob"a aseiwaeehuig ja. Feels so gono f tidiness minis IMsiot %  ; • '..-'-.' lhin """". Ibf bolIKi' .j|. *fmpje*&£gXX NOV.ivr rAMIir can afford lo use %  nutiiaal Muc Jar—or asr. fur ihe new. ^ prut!



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PAG1 FOl'BTEEN SI MIAN AllVIK \ll SUNDAY, MAY C. 151 Tornadoes Favoured By Weather IKK Kighth Hcgali.. weatber %  • Tornadoes. nd WM hchl and the sen kipper* can count .ill ihe i ondnioH j were suitable loJ (bean The rare i was ami*). ..!.; m GrI Blnbowd %  1 i. i...'r II and although •>• the atari Vii Mi f K>t t 11 |BM u able to n carotin*! the baa(!• OrlMir defeated Vmof I %  %  Mm K • tory ir the "H Clan this season. |H il.iIntermediate Class Bertie Clarke sailed in Mol>*k nc and iWi i Ten Ten boats started in the 1 Wizard did MM nw %  lap wan Ranerr 33 seconr r < loud i %  mlnulf Hlrt. mlnuta to War ( laud. onda behind net Fantasy anM fourth, about a minute and l baU l tin ith Itaseal. whteb (IS..I|H *;, .: h i Qlpq ai i %  •jn nijtr be end o( tl Magrra Mali Ihein Miiehlef fflpt*ted UM round ten %  % %  (MPsi in the %  acond ii> Flirt overtook lth Ranaer | \\n < lend She was first > D complete the lap, about i of War (loud lian-trr Kangrr waa now neerb ute behind War dead wh !• • %  < uay came around fourth, about 20 aftet Ranger. Tin i UsSl in order were Rascal. Gipsy, uboul %  I <>( MiHchicf. i 'I Meyra Blalr. Flirt kept the lead ami won minute and 35 seconds ahead of War Claud. She com. pleted the thief, lap* in OH hi 57 minutes arid 20 SOPOPdS, three minute* rind S3 %  ^econd'i belter than War Cloud Third waa Oorgc Simile's Has%  J! nty-flvc seconds ahead of Itlpay whlCB dl taatad Fantasj only live seconds. Kleven In the i. i.entrehoard and i las* alavan iai I includes four Tornadoes, started. Mia* Behavp and I oily nrat L> They given three minutes by Man win i .ini ai ilven three n I i. iiMi.-i Rocue, Cyrlene a n d VamiMisr started scratch, giving two minutes to <*iannel. First to complete the flrt lap was Mis* Behave, about eight sac. onds ahead of Magwln I'eny Nan * third, followed b) Fdril. Scamp with Cyclone only a few secondi behind. Cyclane had given Semanp four minutes, tiaanrt came around next neaily two minutes bdtUDd Cyclone. The OtMCI III 0Tmi were Vamoose Rogue -ml Comet which wm sailing terribly. In the second round Denis Atkinson carried Cyclone into the Kl and won by .. aride Unrsln and uas Vamoose, skippered L> Tony Road, a minute and eight seconds ahead of Maiwin. Cyclone completed the two liips hour. 17 minute* and 13 second;. Ilauntlraa did not si.: Intermediate Class Eight boats raced. Honours went to Clytle which defeat*-,! Coronetta by 27 seconds. Thud araa Dawn, 11 onda behind Coronrlla. At the end of the llrst round Dawn, which started with K< and nvc three minuted to invadrr and Kagie wai laaiHna . i of Mohawk Coronetta was third, followed by Invader, final ..i..I Rren Gnat BVtntUaU] Itnished fourth and Kaglr tlfth 3 Seconds RahiboM won in tha i>" Claai It defeated Imp DJ only thi onda. Tl the closest finishes i (his season and ..i othi i Inti mtli for fifth position was witnessed between srabird and Van Thornd'kr >rjblrd howavar won \' SMPT ON IKHOAY, ell PACKARD and ALTON 17 Jewel ant I 5 Jewel Witrhe* with a 3.year guarsntee at your Jewellers Y. DeLIMA & CO.. LTD. 20, Broad Street I'honr I2U7 fr Ferrocreta rajid-bardfniiu 1 Cwnent in 375 lb. Drums Snowcrete White Cement in 375 lb. Drums Colorerete Cement YELLOW in 375 lb. Drums RED in 375 lb. Drums Everil.Asbestiis-Omrnt Corrugatri Sheets 6 fl.. 7 fl.. It.. ft 10 It. Lengths Everite Trafford Tiles 6 It. and H It. Lengths. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. IMFfJUAL IZATMIJI • UVDKN BLO-.WM • 1 hurrahl "^^^^KT BLAZERS ^ft at last For Ihe first time since the War we can offer Rradymade Blue Blazers lor Girls and Boys. Siies lor children from 10 to 16 years of age. Prices according to sires : $5.42, $5.91, $6.36, $6.82 and $7.41 Isn't that excellent value ? cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd, 10. II. 12 Cc 13 Broad Street. •.V/.V.V.V.'.V.V.'.V.VW. But When! You can't afford to allow the violence of HURRICANES. KARTHQUAKES, FIRE. SEA-WAVE, RIOT and CIVIL COMMOTION to destroy your property. INSURE Against These Perils The lUuttriotla School. Chvlston B, ill Ota) ftllly '-Liped en RthMtlc meat at the Bay Ciounds 10 C H W. Suttle la ilia prlnelpeJ of Uaa The pri? I I billed by Mr, I> Allevne. 11 %  IAI nt %  i %  ii-. %  i A Plsrhmsn l %  II... i. i c i m> rardi il i O */— h i I R t %  aewB lea .-.d. .1* l> I. r Kii 1 B • %  %  II i u w..nh. a r I n saaaarai x >Bri. iVMnan i M WAm D cave, t, a cimiis* -in i4< I s Pa Clarkr 3 K DOKIII a> .vi.iit.r.. i a .[-kail a ) T Dull". S-ck MarrI A G.rn.. I 1 %  *•*• II M.tt.li. tib ..ml. 17 Ml. I II Jtp*iii€l*r K Iki.ill I II U..Ihw-.it,-It ..i,rl.. I. H .' I awharda i: K. s ii ii .'in %  LESLIES offer you a LLOYD'S COMBINED COMPREHENSIVE POLICY Affording full Protection for your Home and Id Contents INSURANCE % %  so ) A_-" • WAS AS eye FOR ee.AjryA GAL rWS TO 86 A


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SUNDAY. MAY t. 1J31 SUNDAY ADVOc.'T PACE THIRTEEN Faiths Barbadians Live By—11 IV New Testament Church of God U? JtnM r. Hralliwailr Thr New Testament Church of God is the nam* of the locsl church which his bren received by and comprises a part of the General Assembly of the Church of God, whose International HMftcjuarter* are at 2503 Montgomery Avenue, Cleveland Tennes**\ U.S.A. The church was incorporated by special Statue of the LcKisloture of this Island on December 30. 1940. It befan its work here In 1936 when Rev. J H. Ingrim made hit first visit to Barbados during his Missionary tour of the West Indies. Rev. Ingrim who said that he had been "led of the spirit %  to call here, met the late Rev J. H. Marshall, and Rev. C. N. Ford These had for mme rears been carrying on Pentteostal Meetings at Eckstein Village, and at River Hoad. They welcomed the visit of Rev. Ingrim and decided l" link up their two Churches, with the American Movement at Cleveland. Tennessee which Rev Ingrim represented From this time the work began to spread rapidly throughout the whole Island. To-day it is being carried on In the eleven parishes. with 33 organised assemblies, and :> communicant membership or just "MI 2.000 persons. The Parent Body at Cleveland. Tennessee, had its beginning as far back as 1886 when the.fiev. Richard G. Rpurlln* was moved upon by the Spirit, and began to search the Bible, and Church History, for God's plan concerning His Church. In the Year 1886 he organised a Church with eight members in the Barney Creek Meeting-house lu east Tennessee. It was from this small group that the denomination started. This lit** organism ion struggled along until January 1906 when they assembled in ;i General Meeting at the home of Rev J. C. Murphy, in the same community, to discuss plans for better Government and methods of expansion. This meeting became known as the first Qeneral Assembly. Co-Incidentally, this was the year that Los Angeles. California, was visited by a great outpouring of the Holv Ghost. The second General Assembly look place at the Union Church House about fourteen miles from Cleveland. Tennessee, in a rural section of Bradley County. At this General Assembly the organization wot named the Church of God. In this fame year 1907. the first evangelistic efforts were matte in the City of Cleveland. Tennessee. The Third General Assembly was held there. Up to this time, the General Overseer who had been moderator at two General Assemblies and was Pastor of the local Church in Cleveland, hod not yet received the Baptism of the Holy Ghost To the Third General Afaembiv Rev. T. G. Cashwell. of North Camlinn. was invited. Rev. Cashwell h.id been to Los Angeles, California, and had received the Baptism cf the Holy Ghost in the great Pentecostal outpouring there. This Evangelist preached on the Saturday night after the Assembly had closed, and on the Sunday morning during the Service the General Overseer Was baptized with the Holy Ghost. From this time the Church at CIe\*eland began a great Revival. The work grew as never before. Jn fact, during the whole year of 1908 there was a revival in the new Church at Cleveland. It was a great time of soul saving, sancUlk-atiun of believers, and Holy Ghost baptisms The sick were healed, and people laid prostrate under the Power of God for hours. Many of the older members still look back on those days with joy. One of the Interesting things In the history of this Church of God movement is the way It started. Many of the Church organizations of today were started by factions splitting off from other churches, usually a group of ministers who sought leadership Other organizations have been born by the uniting of smaller groups into dne body. This movement did not nave Its beginning in either way. God used a small group isolated In the hill* of Eastern Tennessee and Western Carolina and led them step by step to build the Movement which has become world-wide within the last $0 years. There are now Z,2M churches In the U.S.A. 1,010 churches in foreign lands. 8.201 ministers preaching a full Bible Gospel, and fust over 200.000 communicant members. The Church has not forgotten the educational side of its work. The I*e College located in Cleveland, Tennessee, owned and operated by the Church with an enrolment of between six and seven hundred students, has the HighSchool division. Junior college division, and also the religiouseducation division. This Institution provides a four-year fully accredited college, and a fully accredited Bible College course. There are a number of other schools that are training ministers and Christian workers. The work in Barbados has grown steadily and has even extended to some other colonies There are now Assemblies here in every parish of the island, four in St. Vincent, one in St. Lulca. two in Dominica, five in St. Kitts. and one each in the islands of Nevis and St. Martin. The recent vfstt of Rev. J. B. Reesor with his ministry of Faith Healing, has helped the public in general to regard the New Testament Church of Ood, with more respect, and with greater confidence than ever before. CHURCH SERVICES MIIMMOM KWK AMI I III Hi II II a.m. Divine Worship, 3M pin. Suna School: 11S p.in hecepiiofi Holy <\>inn.nnn>n %  ,.'. II a.m. Mr Mr Clean: 7 p.m. R*T V MrCulloueh Holy Communion. SCLAN 11 am. Mr E I. Bannlxer; Ten BRTIRRBA II am Mr O reave*: J p.m. %  T. J\l VMIIIVM nAPTIST T pm. Rventona and Sermon. Evei Sunday. May sublfM of i.„.,.--.„ %  punnhmeni ...,u.,. Ml i E/ekl I10. Repent, aj-.d luin vouri'lvn from all your Iran*er#-lona; •<> fnu*uiiv shall noi be rwiir T. PAt'I/H IV a in. Holy Communion: linivn Solemn Ma*i ana Strmon 3 pm HunHay Re hoil ami Piee>lon to Youth Retvire. J1S pm Bolunn Ilapil-m. 7pm Soinmn Evenaonc, Harmon and Pioce-•-i.in. Pnachar; The Rev a w nth M.D PrieM from ihe> Oioreie of Dethv. Enfland. %  RIIMiKTOWNCBftUI 11 am H.illiif— Meeum; 3 pin Companv Mcrtinn: 7 p.m. Ralvalion Merlin*. Ptrartif Malor Rnath. wri.Ln.-t.TON "TRtrr 11 am llolina*. Meatint: 3pm Company Meeum. 7 pm Salvation Medina Preacher : Sr. Malor Olbtx. Ml CORNFR 11 am Hollne.. Maetina: 3 pm Company Meeting 7 pm Salvation MeellKa Preacher: Hr. Major Hotllnatworth DIAMOND COBNRR It a.m. M ur. Mrelina: 1 pai Company Meetmf; 7 p . Salvalhiii Meeilnt. Preacher: Captain Moore. CABLTON II am. Hollne Meelina. 3 p.m. Companv Meelina; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher %  Captain Bourne rOITB ROAD* II a.m. Hollnaaa Meelina. 1pm. Companv Meelina: 7 p m Ralvaiion Mr-Mna Prearliei Lieutenant Gunlhorpe oisrrs H-iina.. Meatlnc 3 pm. CmB.B.C. RADIO \OTES: West Indians At Festival In "WcM Indiun DiBry" ON Friday next. 11th. Mv %  i MB .Mil b-* a change in the chat actor of the B.B.C. pragramhr•Wesl Indian Diary-' In plM* 0 the previous form of mteiviev. of ihr West Indians in Britain incidentally did you hear iMo West Indian students at Oxforxi on Friday h May?—the programme will consist of a Newsletter. Postscript. Interview ar! Round-up with emphasis or Britain in Festival time and Wes Indians now on holiday in Britain for it. Broadcast continue* at uv regular time of 7 IS p.m. on th< 25 and 31 metre band beams. FMtlval Sidelight* Two B.B.C talks In the coming week will give listeners |D the B.B.C s General Oversea. Service first-hand impressions ot the lesaen-known attractions o, the Festival of Britain now kn it i second week which offers endles treasure-trove to interest*. observers. On Tuesday. 8th mst John Betjeman will talk abou 'Festival Oddities' describing wm. of the more or less orthodox archiurrtural wonders of the ROUII. Bank w.th special reference to "Eccentrics' Corner.' John Betjeman is well known as a writer and broadcaster with a gift of fantasy and a flair for whimsical architecture. On Thursday, ltth inst. Hugh Canon, an architect w-ho has been responsible for the architectural side of the 1WI Exhibition from Its beginnings will talk, not about his brainchild, but on the Fun Fair In the Festival Gardens at Batterec? Park, covering twenty-seven acre.* of the Thames bank Both these talks will be given at 7.45 p.m right after the West Indie* programmes. Remember the dates. Tuesday and Thursday. 8th and 10th inst. A Hardy S,„.,l Taking the place of "Sorrell and Son" on Mondays will be Thomas Hardy's great novel, "The Mayor of Casterbridge." The story has been dramatised for broadcasting by Desmond Hawkins, a feature writer and producer in the B.B.C's West of England Region, who is an authority on Hardy and his beloved Wessex. The music is by Vaughan Williams, another Wessex man whose passion for folklore is as great as Hardy's own nd whose music is infused with Hardy's sense of the forces which struggle for mastery within human beln,' Broadcast will be at the regular time of B.B.C serials, namely 7.15 p.m. on Monday*, beginning on the 7th inst J. B. Priestley J. B. Priestley is much in news of B.B.C programmes in the coming week. On Sunday, 6lh inst. he gives the flrst of his new series of talks called "The Spin of the Moment" reflecting hit impromptu IhoughU and salty, candid, human, homely observations on life and letters. These talks wilt be given at 5 05 p.m. on Sunday* In addition, priestley'* play, 'The Linden Tree' will be broadcast in "Radio Theatre" lieirinning at 8.30 p.m. on Saturday. 12th Inst. Gladys Young and Edward Chapman take the leading parts. "After the war I was tlescnbiux how I nml returned to one of mv favourite lochs and hew I iiuffgled with our of the biggest trout of my life, playing him Fo a standstill. My talk was translated intn Spanish and reached South Arner. ica. Months afterwards I got nn indignant letter from an afilcion ado of the bull ring rebuklm; mo for my cruelty? "Our bulb." |H said, "die in proud lighting, youi trout in cold terror." It was 3 %  trange experience for a ra'hej mild Scotsman to be chlded fcr cruelty by a fan of the bull ring But you know. I think I saw what he meant." MORAY MeLASEN. %  in a BBC Protramme). B.B.C. Radio Programme faBR^gtSYu 1 "' *!?, ail •atari, I • SB am Week^4 Sport! e a m bidv Mac#>hanoi. „. natr OlgM. ? m The Hewa, 7 W a m No. Arulv.i. 7 IS a m "Voiti thl Mrtorwlv T a m Proaramraa. Parad. T m End,* Maa>u.. Ram raiiinr all POrrea. t a.an TheNea, i !? m J 1 "" N J < Briuin, t IS am Clone Down. II II a m. Projr.DJi* ParaOe. II St am tnlerluda. 11 SB a m Pe-nv.i Service. ;: lnooa i The Kwt It 10 pm Nr.< An*lrla. I* IS R m Ctoaa Dawn. '*-*** %  ** %  *• a is p m MUatc MaBMtna. (N TIB. *jmSay Half Hour, t pm BtujX. B m Uataoar.' Cho.re. • p m KendeF,,,.,, KR, • IS pm. Ba>"". a ^* ~" M •-• SSMM SI B M H P "• PmRTamane Parade. 7 p m I The Neva. 7 1Q R m New. Analyatt, v m cariaRtaan Voea, I 4S p m '"' ,l,l| l %  n" the Patllamrntarv Tiao;ition. • p m Radio Newwaai. B \s ,, ,., PealKal of Brlutn. B 4 p m bltavRjBI S-ibn-rmr Jiibiie*. io p'm'*The Nrara MR. CARPENTER!! i.m Iin.II WailiuR for 12' and 2 PLANE IRONS THESE WAVB JISE \lllllt I II a \. B. HUtt I I I Dial UN, II Mill H S || tRDWARl Bnv Slrcct ROYAL CROWN DERBY One of the World's Foremost BONE CHINAS Obtainable onty at LOUIS L. BA\LEY JEWELLERS OF Bollon Lane and Aquatic Club lude. 1 SWopr. 10 at p n P ni Utuil Kenlnri VM.V. PROGBAMMI SUNDAV MAY • pm -10 IS p,„ I.., ,fc,.. > U U am 103. p m Audlet.ee M 11.7a MVa SSS1 M BOSTON ""II 1) B> Mc. \\i>\ %  > II WTU'X 17 ft Mr alONDAV. MAT : I an i • 3. a nv The Bllle Collon Band Sho. T .< m The i*a. 7 10 am New Analxi.. 7 IS a m Prom Ihe KMHoruu %  ""J 1 "V eroRTammr Parade. 7.30 IK Ai rnr Boiioin ( tn* Deep Blue Sr.. • •Sam Cornpoaer ol lha Week. B in< (.•until or Buroi* • IS a m Vofkaalre >Jw.iiali ArricRn.. %  30 a in Pi.. lice nnka* Pertert. %  •Rain Tlie 1%  ..ii Continuaa, Ram TVr Nrai. R 10 r. %  Ion* Newi from Britain, R IS am. lk.e Down. II IS a an Propai .m Parade. 11 J ,.< UMmr..' Cl.lrII 4S a m Commonweolin Survev, II inoofii The Now*, 11 IS p m. New* At!jl,m. ISIS pm Clo-r Dow. l.la—alaS f.Bt I 1* M III Auauali.'o JuUleo Yea.. p m York-hire tS Sotilh African-. 1 OS p m bXarhKt*. t IS p pi The RUrv(eBM> IS pm Gram.irfioiir B-rntd.. S a.m. NiRhtit al Ihr Opera. 0 13 p m .^roRiamm* Parad*. • M— nao p.m. nan SI SI M. 7pm The New*. 7 10 p 111 Neart Anat.ala. leebrid. Ihe Deep Blue Sea %  p m Midi New w eel %  IS p.m. CtaaaRtOriwaal'tl Survey, t JO p m Praeuaa iak-* Petfecl. Ipm Interlude. I %  1m Prom the Bdltorlala. • p m mm-.i Concert Hall. 10 p m. The Newi. m I* p m Interlude. 10 IS p m Tip Top Tvnet 10 il pm BririM-r Hrview. tKLT. MAY 7 w BKICRATlOh TO II. S. *. HAT DO YOU ITAHT TO HAVE YOUR HARD EARNED SAVINGS SPENT ON HAT OR HOUSE I? YOU HILL COKE IN AND SEE US NOW WE WILI ARRANGE TO KEEP YOUR SAVINGS UNTIL YOU RETURN KHIN YOU CAN BUY A H0UE OR TAKE CASH • A. BARNES ft CO.. LTD. Barbados Mutual Bonus Rate Increased from 1* to 2* The Director* or tha Barbados Mutual Life Assurance SBRietv havp recently received the wrv welcome news from the Society* Actuary w England 'hat 011 at count of the splendid result* achieved by the Society durinc the past five years he is in a po*i Hen if recommend the fecluitlon. of a Compound Reversionary Bcnus of 2% per nununi for the Quinquennium ended 31st Dccemlx-r. 19S0. The rate for the pre \ ions Hi years has been 1'a*"* The fact that this Bonus is c*li ulntnl on the Sum Assured plus all previous Bonuses Dial hiW ulrcnHy heeti tdded, nnd therefore iiivHve. a very considerable sum. is evidence 1 OX TONOVI %  AOVAOKS MrAT ROLL VEAL LAF BACON HASHIRS I'LANTEKS M |s MANGOES WALNUTS In Spired Vinegar MELBA SAl'Ct i' i RfANGO IHITNIV C T ONION*. HONEY <)LIVE*J I III Kltlls MA YON VIM „ OOLOIN ARROW RTJM I'lllklNS \ (o.. Lid. Knebuck Street IIIAL 2013 1502 nun Ainu' AY imr.ss siioi' Wh SalUlisd Cuilomsrs Galh.r \n E:\TIU.\II I Al i Oil! >l\\i(,llis van this '" rrquirrnM-nl* IN GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranfiing from l *~ upwards MILD STEEL Flat?. Rounds. Squares in all Sizes BOLTS & NUTS-AII Sinn FILTER CLOTH White Colton Twill Al PRICES l!iat cannot be repealed. ;v '.."?. : ??K';?;??//^^'""" 5 'r' i : c ''""*'' i ^ !" ^ w5 "^^, : 'i'> Myenf Purpose BUY NOW!! Good Stocks of: PAINTS. ENAMELS and VARNISH In all Shades AND FOR ALL PURPOSES AT mi oi i run is. Thf It Milt \ IHUS lOIMHIt 1.1,1. Wl.itr Park lloail. St. Michael 1I1A1. 452S SEARCHINq FOR BEAUTY ? You'll find il in our NEW COSMETIC W DEPT. --it \l's row in; RS LII'STK KS II Ml! HRI'MIIX TOOTH in: i in MANKIHI: SITH I PKatrUHEH I KI'.AMH SIIAMI'OOS BKILLIANTINKB COMBS TOOTH I'ASTE HA/OK SETS JUST RECEIVED "PREMIER" ELECTRIC KETTLES WITH AUTOMATIC THERMAL CUT-OUT AND ELECTRIC TOASTERS A NEW SHIPMENT OF CERAMIC TABLE LAMPS COLOURS.— RESIDA GREEN, PIGEON BLUE, LIGHT BLUE, TURQUOISE, MOTHER-OF-PEARL AND MAHOGANY ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED Tweedside Road Phone 4629 & SI. Michael 4371 PLANTATIONS LIMITED I fuW youJt*cf/APM WITH THE _NEW ' • V "VALCREMA" t*l-uS "I *• 2-WAY BEAUTY TREATMENT mi \inim\ u\i\\] VAL0REMA:RoundatUoPi contal oils that moke your ikni *ofi and Rupplr Spccisl "Oil in • dry Ml Ihe skin A T J *rlect P Owdstf Bss for Nontatl BUM, n HOTlatnal for DRY SKINS Madr bv thr mak^r ShIV vniTii VALCREBfA:— Skin Youth, p—p ing *i..,y niKtil cream for Wom^n of all ;ia Mpenally thOS* OVW 2* Kerp-. kin riu-.'.li. nml rl*an Contains Youth Kit-men' '7F.VESTF0I. to DkBrt you against tell tale aRelln#s. And manv Ml Item'of Inlrre-.t Pay UR a visit tculay. ind m'Ke v.ur Select Ions Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. (TllK ROORR POR RaJMAIHR) No. II, Swan Slml I'hon.: HMi MM "' S5M 'TTbim it'A qood 7m •VAIOEUMA Sk.n Ointment. A poatUVf ne^uiv Trtatitmn, which bi Q %  le at: — Booker's PM* Drug Stores Lid. BPOtD STRUT or ALPHA FIIARMAI V (BAStlNGS) SELECT BRAND POWDERED MILK R Tfct lin.IV I MI HolUnd a Tl b -. • %  ...!.. Ask your Grocer Inr SELECT' PowdVreil Milk AND SET. THAT YOU 0ET IT S. P. MHSSOII. Son & (o.. Ilil-Agen... I I



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\ PAGE TWO -L MSOAV ADVOC ATK Sl/NDAY. MAY C. 1S1 C i. o it i IIIMM mil" MflMlAl aM TI'FSIIAV AU. QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT jbw AVart> lmil. HOI.HHM ii lilrnt \udillon TODAY 5t.S a m. AOI AIM II H IIAiCNA ;M.mb.r.Only| TO-AOH* Tomonnow NIGHT .H to JAMES BTTWAilT in "C AL L N6 RTHSIDE TT7" wlt B(CITAFD COMTT, I.*F I COBB. ir\'*l HW Cnm#nelrwi *VKSDAV IW illlo r DANA ANDKTUB 1IAVM rMAOi Die K IIAVMF1 in "STATE FAIR" in Technicolor. SOW SHOWING AT EMPIRE 4.45 ft. 8.30 Dily PLAZA Theatre— Bridgetown IDiAL 23101 SAAfLin, r.oi.pwY*; i' Dana ANDREWS-J>arky OHAN(JF11 EVANS Paul STC^AKT ""'-THE MAC ARTHUR STORY HnmHcWlN THE BLUE RIDGE HILLS THEY FOUND AND FILMED THIS LOVE STORY I T iHE US Sect"*) ,.. bean Commi' | bean Con i %  | !>!.. | I M |ITeraoa Mist Elirabelli Aniiotronc. Mr Sol Luis i>*cartes and Mr%  r. 8a fa Puerto Iti o'.lork thicvr'.'.. De la ii n fOIMI Chief Justice ••! tuririii and Mr. a ll a r I e > van fTord, Secretary %  t the M lands Rmbaan UIM>. D I> n Washington ol the Dutch Sect Urn I i-sterday. Dr Henrtrik thi Qcudb QaUinq s Engineering and Agriculture Baron Pern de the Frftich Section arrived terday afternoon and Mr. Bin Mr. II Stehle and Mr O, A Ijiethctv. ore due this even' o'clock Members of the Com staff arrlvin* from Trinidad yeaterdav were. Mt C F Beauregard. Miss V I-angc. Mr> M. Dinirr. Mi C K Robinson, Mrs. B %  r MI s .i i %  %  count in engineering ,it :. Yesterday he (lew Ih holldftv* wi'h t buck in Canada In September. Another Barbadian %  -ludent coming i d Don io his close friends "Joe". Joe" f Lodge School \n June he goes to Canada u> 're Interning at the Toronto ay the same <"* n l Hospital. His mother Lavne, better Mrs Rachel Greaves now lives n( Uiin whlc1l llmf hc W J in j amalc a Hamilton. They had heen hea-e wh ere he *a Chemistry and ry 28lh .Icavinn Gymnastic Instructor at Kingsli since Ocean View Hotrl t S I O It THE A Til i: by the aame plane mava, their son Guy, Mr Vfr-; H Majion and Mr Alcx.tii fully qualified State Nurse and has pursued studies in midwifery and pubUr health. NAT f'ARMff'HAEL Stndying Journaliam M RS. M .HARRISON areompanied by her daughter Joan arrived from Canada by T( A ft ..f.lay. Mr. Harrison was at Scawell to meet them. Joan has just llnlshed her first rai at Carleton College in Ottawa. Sne is studying journalism. Sinleft B-nbadn in Aligns! I9&0. and expects to return to Canada in Septi %  Holiday Over M R AND MRS. EDWARD WILKINSON whu had been holidaying in Barbados since April 7th will their baby son Charles, left yesterday tor Canada by T.C.A. en route to England. While in Barbados • hey were sta>tng with Mr*. Wilkinson"* parents. DT and Mrs. G crii! d Manning o( rioddA." Culloden Rmd Six Weekg O FF to Toronto yesterday to spend six weeks holiday Was Mrs Rita TVetzcl also Toronto bound yesterday was Miss Yvonne Wens. Yvonne is to be -nurried in two weeks to Mr. Chris Morely Mr Morely was formerly stationed with B.G Timbers in British Guiana, bin after 'heir marriage they will be leaving Canada for East Africa . Col. and Mrs. Keith Stewart have gone to Bermuda Flying Visit W HO should pop in from Bermuda yesterday by T.C A hut Terry Ryan. Terry has been living in Bermuda for three years. and is Assistant Manager of the Castle Harbour Hotel in TuckerTerry is on his way to Si. sr? in aL** ~T,Z ZZSSR -;, v^-ii'u'i"' He t, T n "IT" 1 u Al iw*n staying at the Cattle [.University where he obHarbour, he told Carib. was Mi Thomas E. Dewcy of New York activators in synthetic rubber \X7' Nfi COMMANDER L also demonstrator and !" EGGLE5 lecturer while there, a bo awarded a scholarthe National Research if Ottawa. Home Economics SS MAUREEN JOHNSON daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Air Tour A. EGGLESFIELD. Director General of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean, leaves to-day for Kan Juan to visit the U.S. Navy Comniand at San Juan To-morrow accompanied bv US Naval Officers he is due to visit Guantanamo. Cuba and Jamaica returning to Son Juin on ilai.dd Johnson of "Ellangowan", Tuesday. After final talks on St. Joseph, was among the pa: sengers coming Wednesday he expects to return iterday by io Barbados on Thursda Firtt Vitit iy|R. AND MRS. EUGENF I! T.C.A. Engineer M R FRED MOORE. T.C.A aero-enginrer accompanied Ocean Vi by his wife have come down to spend a few days In Barbados staying at the Ocean View Hotel. He was Flight Engineer in one of the flights which came here a year ago last February. Yesterday, however, he was I passenger and this time he is on holiday. AKALA of Winnipeg ore in Barbados until May ISth. Mr. Zakala is with T.C.A.'s Traffic Department in Winnipeg. This is their first visit here, and they are staying at the Ocean View Hotel . Arriving by the same plane was Mrs Elsie Davi" of Toronto. Mrs Davis will upend tw 0 weeks staying *t the Hotel. At Baththeba M R. HAROLD "PER" CADOGAN. Spartan and Intercolonial footballer was married recently and thev are spending their honeymoon at Bathshebn AiniMiius or PIPA BY THE WAY BY BCACHCCM6(K Councillor Tudiniimh C OUNCILLOR TUDMARSH aald yesterday: "The suggestion thi.t I would be capable of bestowing an ardent kiss on Miss Slopcorner at the christening A DOG which had been taught to give up its seat in trains to ladles, jumped from a first class corner-seat in a crowded train last night. %  I'm not as old as all that." said the lady. "They dldr.'t say anything about age." replied the dog. "They Just said give up the seat < %  gas-containei El little shorl to a lady "Oh well." said the of outrageous. If I pressed he. lady. "I'm old myself," went arm at the buffet It was merel> on the dog. "You don't suppose r **> K utdc her awa > from a rather like standing. But it's manners. u -" cd P lle of sandwiches, and tuThat's what it is." -You needn't wards the sliced cake. My kist say it ao grudgingly." said the would have been entirely aendemlady. "Oh. go on. take the seat." Ic. and no more significant than growled the dog. "Thank you. n" the annual kiss I am called upon the lady. Td rather stand "More fool you," said the dog, settling himself comfortably in the seat. "I wish you two wouldn't talk so much," snapped a passenger over his newspaper. In the course of duty, to besto on the horse which wins our local %  deeplechaso." Board Condemn* Foreign Seesaw Bottler's Eye VIPW ^,„ ERNEST puu.POWDER. is believed that the CockleO Chairman of the Seesaw carrot Commutaion. after Board, was rather more pompous, hearing enough expert evidence He said: "The essence of seelo deafen a camel, is inclined to saw U its graguriousness, and accept the theory that it would that is why it attracts the clUu be lu-t as easy to sleep In a brimable man. Light-hearted apOnless bowlrr without ventilation tancily and friendly rivalry aro holes as in one with them. In other the keynotes A friendship mad.' and equally fatuous words, these on the seasaw does not end with little vents, for nightwear. are the game Moreover, seesaw purely decorative, whatever their builds character, by developing cooling properties d.uring the day. the team-spirit and encouraging And it must always be remembergive and take. There is no room cd


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PAGE FOl-R SUNDAY ADVOCAM SUNDAY, MAX 6. 1'il "fbr occasronal %  Q0KR@ WOUIfflKE?' Headache. sour uomach. thai sicknh morning-alter" feeling —the. price wr often pj> tot enjoying loo much good loot) and drink! I r> itm and see bus. much belter >ou will Ml Take Alka Seltarr btffc retiring, again — il nt*Jed — in the morning. All* Vlt/er conuin* an analgesic (or toothing henLuho. plu*. alksl>c ingredient, in neutralize ext lime. I>t.ip on* or two tablet, of AlkaStlucr intog glauof w alcr. u *uh ii ii// UaM a n ironing solution — then drink .'(. Pleasant %  taxing AlkaVlUer "ill help *ci ,ou light again. Keep a wpply on band always! AlkaSeltzer kelps millions daily fr.v %  Alka -.Seltzer Th* AMATEUR ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF BARBADOS presents Its BIG THREE DAY CYCLE AND ATHLETIC SPORTS MEETING (under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor Sir Alfred & Lady Savage) at KENSINGTON OVAL Whlt-Mondav May 14th Thursday May 17lh 1 Saturday May ltth beginning at 1 p.m. each ditv • 48 THRILLING EVENTS Si'iKen tarn um. I.ln (Flash) Gordon. Ctrl I rh. h>. Harry Stuart, Mike Turker. The Hojil broth era. < ..-..T . %  Hill. Harold Archer. (Nugget) Hunte. Oswin Hill. Hrldgcman \ Company. The Lewis Twin Brothen. and a -.trlnj of other male HI. CyrlUto and Athlete* a well AM MS*. Grace Cumberbatch and MiEileen King In action at the lllstortr Uval Gates Open at 12 i i daily run l OF ADMISSION : SEASON TICKETS Kensington Stand . $2.16 George Challrnor . $1.H • DAILY TICKETS Kensington Stand . fl.M Genre r Challenor 72r. I'neoverrd Seats . 4Se. Grounda .... "I.. Season Ticket* on Sale daily at Ihe CIVIC. SW;III A High Street. PUERILE ATTACK ON W.I. TEAM B*do8 Preparing for J s ca Footbatters BY O. S. COPPIN /"OBSERVATIONS on the team selected to rcpreV^ wnt the West Indies at cricket against Australia this year have now come lo hand from Jamaica. There is a sort ut freemasonry among newspapermen in the Caribbean, and for ihe most part, 'tie i-.irld over, that prevents us from st tempting to hold one another up to ridicule or to make such observation* a" would tend to undermine any profitable reputation they might have established in their particular phase of journalistic activity. 1 find invself, however, compelled to challenge nmt strongly V — -'--' -•',. Of l ii> -ritini:-of C A "I-tnglielii" Jack Anderson, cricket Jamax %  Daily OI"r. i PAINFUL JT IS painful to me and although this is not intended to be any apologia. I regret to have to take such strong objection since I have |UJ| ntni a nmM enjoyable thru weeks in Jamaica Anderson in criticising the selection of the West Indies team has referred to I*-nis Atkinson* selection in these words: "It is not fair lo Atkinson to le persistently pitch-forked Into company which he doM not belong." He dr.tnot however, sugge-i whom should be played in place ot Atkinson; (.uillcn ol Trinidad he tvouM have %  ubftituuu with Uinns ..! .l.,uii.ie,.. Trim he would not have selected before Johnson also ot Jamaica and Goodridgc. also of Jamaica he would have selected before If perhaps Nunes of Jamaica could be persuaded to go as Manager und High Priest, then "Longneld" would most certainly have selected him iiefure Cyril Merry ut Trinidad This awful itCCkch Ol i mou.s siriuei WHICH .•> UCCKIC aim whien .achievement n trie coming series wun Australia nnoinvr eoinfort: not regnroiil in jama it STENCH ularily is not mipatible with the enorXtcKet has inauu during tne past now (pi.iiihea tnetu lo eompeie in ir worm incKct supremacy, diai tie opinions oi ixwtgneid" are ieimn>K West Inuian cricket Carlton Wins Easy Victory SCORES FIVE GOALS TO Argentine F. BEAT PICKWICK-ROVERS Team Practise At Highbury CARLTON scored a 5—0 victory over Pickwick-Rovers in their first division football fixture at Kensington yesterdav evening. The Carlton front men played 1 their opponents goal and %  %  — — all i LONDON. May Argentina's "Mister HugilQ Reg Parnefl Given World Trophy registered four of their goals du^ BrlUih p^, cf)Us him Ilole ring ihe first half hour Pickwicktnc ^mei-ahf. in all three London Rovers gave a better display duSaturday evening papers with %  ring the second half of th e game Q^, aave lhat m t but failed to penetrate the Carl^on,^,,,, pho tograph. ton defence Miguel Rugilo, practising will.J£ •£* r ,0n #.? x tT .s team mates at Arsen.ls ground S ^Tl 1 *^"' lh SS*hsT h,to ot Highbury this morn'— Oretnidge. Kenny Hutch'""" SlLVE;tSTONE Northamptonshire. May ft, Reg Parnell of Britain was awarded the Inlemstional Trophv Motor Race after the event had been stopped owing to torrentu' rain here to-day. The stewards decided the Trophy on positions gained when the race was iilxindoncd jid Freddie Huftsnlnaon caeb sent in one. Play Carltoi. defended the goal from the screen end and within five minutes of play Greenidge their centre forward, scored to put i..s award am ne UD The Pkkwkk-RQVen icon! line:rted to get past the C Parnell drove an Italian Fennr Duncan Hamilton of T ;.-. ton defence iliae but f-iled endeavour I do French Talbot was second, and %  Ktnr,c<, y and BrigJit. Carlton o( lh KA h ^ full th-*J*lj* ht-nl.iiil lit.. ir.uvl '..; %  caught by cameramen in an almost liorlrontal position, fee-t out. arm* raised in a butterfly breast stroke attitude, ball clenched t n hia left hand. Driving rain showers, fleeting sunshine and "heavy going" greeted the Argentine players who had their first practice match of 45 minutes this morning at the famous; Arsenal Stidium. Tom Whiltaker, the Msnuicer 0 Arsenal, who followed every move Juan Manuel Fanglo on an Argi line Alfa Romeo was third. [DC. race started In bad ovidiUont, and pools of water madi miniature lakes un th while car? left a wake -.imdai to that turned up by speedboaU. as they e.ireerci* round tne course Driven, were soon soaked to the skin, and cars not not full backs proved too good and sent the ball back midneld a me. The from Carlton fulfils point ied up British opinion when he said, "they all look pretty nt and they certainly "Z., i "Ii >T %  >* en)„,ln Ihelr workout and necessarily responsible, anu so tne minimum amount of iiaiin snouid be uone. 1 was priviu-geo to see the Barbados—Trinidad Tests here and ihe Jamaica—bruish Guiana aSl in Jamaica t l-ongneid did not sec botn seiies) anu theie is no question ol u doubt, -onn Trim deserved his selection. He maintained a good pace and direction and always seemed lo be doing somctninu with the ball wneltier il was old or new. I was among mose who thought that he nad earned selection on the laU West Indies team to England DIK ine Selectors thought duterent. GOODKIIH:E NOT GOOD ENOUGH t "*OODRIDGE I was hoping would make the grade, lie WM 0 t Mea.iv and young Iwt absoluioly guileless. Can "Longtielu deny mat never In tne two Tosi aid ne manage to take th c •'"** ' either ol the British Gulanese openers Peter Baytey ana l>csiie Wight, buiely on the strengtn ot his performance ne was not belter man either King or Muilins ana tne ^electors should have no qualms of conscience m leaving him out. Johnson 1 tnink is better and perhaps titter than Jones is to-day j and there is some justification lor suggesting that Jonnson might have I oeen selected in place of Jones. For my part 1 thing that Johnson is the best pace bowler in the West Indies to-day but wno doe? not know thai he gives up far too quickly it conditions are not In b*s favour. Any fool can win but let "LAingneld" observe how some lose. lhcre is not much to choose iwiween Guillen and Binns and as I have already written, I wouia not have questioned the selection ol either of these when once It had ocen established that a seventeenth place had been created specifically lor the inclusion ol a specialist wicket-keeper. I tind little difference in their respective batting ability neither cun be regarded as a star but I tnink tnat Quuien migai gamed the edge and so selection tm tbe place on tnc strengtn tn.it nc nas already had expenence ot keeping WICKH to the wily rtamadhkn. ihe most disgusting part ot tne observations is the roxerence w the fact tnat Atkinson gamed selection because he is rented to John Guduard and will soon he related through marriage No greater insult IOIIIJ imvc been oneied a man who has led ihi West Inaies lo victory in British Guiant, Jamaica, India and u. England, ihe sooner inls is lorgotlen. tnc more time one has to think aboul the cementing ol intercolonial irienaships, ihe most iruitlul medium lor ihe establishment of which is the cricket ftria GOODARD'S WELCOME I WAS st Sabin Park when John Goddard arrived there for the first British Guiana—Jamaica Tesl and I prefer to remembei the spontaneous welcome thc Jamaican crowd afforded him rather than this despicable attempt to drag the grand game ol cricket aown to gutter levels. „ II "Longneld" is thinking of West Indies players being pitchforked Into West Inaies teams when they had no right to be inert, might remind him thai public memory is notoriously short bui not short enough to forget lhat Jamaican players have had more oppoitunity to show that they had no right being selected in Wesi Indies laoiUl than any other inland. Few will lot gel the burlesque performances of R. K. Nunes Una E. A. Hac of the 1828 West Indies team to England, Iviu, barrow in thc 1939 West Indies team to England, and J. Cameron of un 11M8 -49 West Indies team to India. t| „ "* Tarn sure that Atkinson gave a better all-round pSrtQTin SPCa in India und will wager "Longneld" any amount within^reason that n performs satisfactorily by literate standard. Kenny irLTir* Huurhinson registered the second when the goalkeeper Maurice Foster failed to gather. Carlton were now playing all over their opponent' goal and the ^ead'eouid "X! ck i*n HUf^ %  "*'. ^"K '^ Their defence, of course, thing owing to the spray r '* ht '" SrLSS ih'i >Jl!"<, diff ''" ,| ^stem from our English ana ram Eventually, all the cars "* ^ om „> u? ." !'?£,,**, "T 1u style, but they work it very well got away. If somewhat slowly and * Carlton the r ihird R£l, r B,,,,, U1WJ ; H shocls lik ,.|u (lllj it was soon apparent that new re ,l "as not long after this tha. cords could not bexpected. u* 0 Carlton forwards got posse* Aft?r most of the ears had c->m'•'on and Lucas notched the fourth pleted five laps, it was realised lo T C r, lo "- , „_ that conditions were impossiblo Pickwick-Rpveni had their first and the race wai called off. kood shot at the Carlt,.n goal when Fangio who had earlier broken Jones Ihelr _oulslde. right sent ir the lap record In a heat had lust ? ort St,"?'". ""' "" ."t "f^ ia wiihout mull .nd lh. interval navlna not quite completed i:va i n f nV our of Carlton. *Klwp.l'ln..ft.IUU B ,Kl 0n re ^ m p,?o„ H c.rtto„. rre "The weather does not seem to have upset them and it look if their fast positional play and dribbling are as good as one was led tn expect. Their goiilkeeping too >s of a very high standard when he got that goal, the English goalkeeper is going to have a hard %?i^??xX2zz B£a2T!*Sa£? i==J8 ( "MlllIIIHl-, The Argentine Captain comented: "the conditions to-day effort which Warren you can imagine were „ llnle difficult for our boys." "But mayor be we will get longer studs for to decrease this lead their boots if it is really heavy going on Wednesday." "If the conditions are no worse than to-day, they will not affect us at all. The ball Is no heavier than we are accustomed lo. but do make it a little h-irder to keep control of the ball it can be done, and I faith In the boys.' Reuter. iven by Noneti and $£E* JgS^SL on^lKTeS Sanesiflni^ried tenth and sixteenth w)ng (C n tred accurately but respectjyely. Th e Swiss champion. €tnttt toward Greenidge headed nave ">">Pl<* Bi-rrtn Em-nuel, was placed twenMraighi to goalkeeper Foster who m ty-flrst. had no dlfflculty In saving. The leading French driver, Pickwick-Rovers now took over Louis Rosier in a Talbot was fifth, and began to press for sometime, while Johnny Claes of Belgium Jones their outside right tested also in u Talbot finished eignth. on* Warren with a good shot Parnell received the Silver Trowhich the latter saved and later phy and £500, Hamilton £280. Taylor missed the upright by Fangio £ 100, Whitehead £75 and inches. Roster £50 Pickwick-Rovers launched anTh„ Italian rhamn w. <>ri Th* olncr allaclt an d Taylor sent in a fldent of securing the premier thc ball weU down he nel<1( bul centre forward Greenidge, with ily the goalkeeper to overcome, kicked wide From another raid by Carlton, Reynold Hutchlnson centred from thc right wing and his brother -i..rq Ereddie converted from close range to give Carlton their fifth goal. Pickwick-Rovers tried to decrease this lead but their efforts Trontenac Trophy tor the .ecoml "J !" J" ln 'j, J2t|*2fl5S Om. .e.rda. .. the Oe. %  "~ !" [J %  'J^SSTKr Jo.".. thc Auhtralian t> BARBADOS—JAMAICA FOOTBALL W ITH Ihe Jumaica—Barnado* Intercolonial football lour |ut around the corner, the Barbnrlos player, are hard at practice in prepanMon^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ alimal ha. already put Ihe Invitees throuah their pace, in ball control, tackllnn. Iie.iilni. correct kicking ol the ball. charln B and the vanou. phaseii ol trapPU1B tlie ball. So tar there have been two pratll.-e* at HMulngtoti and one at Combennere School .nd to-morrow mornli.pt they rnc.I aKain at Kensington for another .Ttctiee. im*m % % %  In addition to thl. Mr. Will has also circulaled an %  H>at"icj l.onal pamphlet aimed at Instruc In. player, lo carry out neces.ary K "'ln l, thc''wlndlnii up practice, the player, will indulge ,n team tactta "whrtevlUl.X'outcme of ll.c KEj !" ". IJU M that never before ha, there l*en any attempt at lulmng team as uch lo take iirt In any ..oc lournament. Ilarlxdu award. "The weather robbed us. It wu bad luck", one of their driver* said—Heater. Connell Wins Frontenac Trophf Football Results 1.0NDON. M< I IJoncnilrr Rover. 1 SturffWM United 1 Hull City B IJIIOH Town S 1*1. Unitad 1 *iwan**a Town 0 Maiwhe.tr. ni 1 (Jrlin*i. To i. J Nosu County 1 I*i*ei>r City 3 *•>! "'in United 0 Cardiff Cltv 0 Fir it Dlvulon Allot. Villa S Slokn City 1 niarkpool 1 Manchester United I. Charlton AihlKii. l Derbv PSUa4 ChalKN Bolton Wanderer. 0 NT..ILr United I Mlddle-hitnilh I PottanouUi 2 Burnley 1 Sheffield Wrdne*d..v B Cvertni. B aundeiland 0 Wolverhampton Wan Third Division Souther Urltetd 0. notirnenuuth 1 Relin 0 Bristol Rovers I Northampton CoVrhestir United 1 Poet Va lp~li" Issii S Bristol Cll* N*Wpori County J lliiahlnii %  Alder-hot 1 I Hov M.-Col. Connell won tho time yesterday at the Government ie v four ^ but their forwards did everything else except to score. The final Rifle Range. It was tn< occasion the trophy was shot for nnd the previous winders were b \-it "of "the whistle found them Capt C. R. E. Warner. Lt.-Col. J. winners bv five goals to love. Connell H nd Mr. T. A. L. Roberts rt\e Referee was Mr. Ben Hoyos. The trophy was giver, by R. M. The teams were as follow: — JOIICH A Co, agents for Fronlenao Carlton; Warren. Bright. Kenbeer. Ma)or A. IX* V. Chase pre nedy: Marshall. Clairmonte, Cox; sented it to Lt.-Col. Connell. jr_ HutchlDson. R. Hutchlnson, Conditions yesterday were genGreenidge. Lucas. F. Hutchlnson. erally good with a steady breeze PickU'Tcfc-Rorrri: M. FosUt; from the left. Lt.-Col. Connell st Huntc, Lewis; Kelly, Robinson, first tied with Mr. G. F. Pilgrim, Cuke; Jones. Hoad, Wells. Taylor. each scoring HO points out of 150. Foster. Mr. Pilgrim and Lt-Co Connell Norwich CItr 3 Crystal Palace I. Southern! United i Exeter City I Swindoii Town 1 Nottinr.ri.ain Pores* Watford. 1 Walv.ll 3. Third Uivnton Northern Chester Bradford Ol Un CH Alendei ManaAeld Town I Southport Rochdale 0 Darlington 0. Rotlterham United 3 Oldham Athletic I. Hhir-asbury Town 4 New Brlghlon 2 SloiKprnt County 1 H*itl 0 HallfaK Town 0. each had to take an decide the winner. The eight best scorers were Lt-Col. ConneU ... .... 1< O Pll|)lm 1) T A 1. Hobarts i: U B. Msrtin IJ M. K. Dc Varauel II hot to B'dos Friendly Football Association Following are this week's fixtures:— Men,, May 7th Westerners "A" vs. Penrode. Referee; Mr. O. Graham C&claTlr&is. 8 Tmt9 "• i0—Maple vs. Har" kliffe. CIFT OF CRICKET rfe, 2' M i %  %  , Cu "' ;j:> GEAR ARRIVES ^^o^^"""^ B The crate of cricket gear sent Reteree: Mr. J. Archer, lo Barbados by players of Surrey Thurs May Uth Maple vIt..r County hat. arrived in the island kliffe. Y.M.P C. defeated Y.M.C.A. for distribution lo p-or clubs of Referee: Mr. C. Rovce. 5'. points to 5 when they played Barbados. The crate was conrrl.. May 11th—Hangers vs. WestBasket-Ball at Y.M.P.C yestersigned to the Soci.il Welfare enters "A". day evening N. Thomas top Department and arrangements Referee. Mr. Robert Parris. scored for Y.M.P.C. with 21 are being made to distribute the N.B.—All above matches will be point*. Other good scorers were gear in accordance with the played at St. Leonard's L. Greemctge, 16, and D. Alklns. wlshen of thc donors. Grounds, Richmond. Ift. PROVISIONAL PLACES FOR WORLD RACE SILVERSTONE, May 4. Provisional starting grid positions for heats of thc International trophy race were worked out on speeds achieved yesterday. All practice laps to-day were much slower. Fangio gained number On*) position in ihe front line for the first heat by virtue of his 98.10 miles per hour trial run yesterday. In number two place is Robert Manion. with three British drivers making up the front row." —(C P) Y.M.P.C. DEFEATS Y.M.C.A. AT THE CROSS ROADS Racing Must Expand; Breeding Encouraged BY BOOKIE I ACKNOWLEDGE with thank* a copy of the Prey, rortnl Pr grairuns fW i meet, ing due lu come riff next August. The Turf t. luu i to be commended for framing a i rogi in advance of the dates or. the meeting and also for endeavouring to meet present day'needs by drawing up a four-day ilxiuri ng produced a programme at such an early dale and marked il provisional, 1 take it that the Club will 1* open to suggestions for changes, whether same are aventuaUy rJISCardOd r BstOpUO. In (Ml way thev will not be Ql a position to tell OWt* STS that their suggestions were not made in time. B> I reasoning those owners and trainers aith proi be well advised ti> have iM "" %  %  •" the atmosphere to be circul;il<-n N OW one of the chief craslcasaaa being bunted abroad is thut mere are only two races framed fur class G. Therefore it would appear to be an opportune move if the third G class race agitated for were placed on thc programme on tha third day. thus making 29 races in all instead of 28. Such a move could not be reg-.nied auneconomical, first far tinreason stated above, and secondly bS CSU Sa one G class race would cost only 1940.00. As the average profit <.f f extra races, (OVOV and above our usual total of 24) should. I imagine, be more than this amount, It would seem that lu bung in the extra G class races would bs IttMlble nf.er all Thc main criticism against having three G cUkM races is the fact that there are only four horses in Q and M who an likely runners. Actually there are four who might be called certainties, but there are also two more who night run in addition there i" poas ttb Ulty tnal some from Trinidad will come. The next matter which gnsjagasl thg ittasitlosi lhat -Mule lbs programme h:is been fiameil in aucfa .i sVaj U lion both In F class and among Ihe iwo.yeji-ulds, | similar claim cannot be made with retard lo the r class races. V.t, unless a special handicap for C class Muidens Is added, it link. ; % %  .1 Un-vill lx.i condition with which we will have t, pui up. At the cos! of SUOh a race would be far more than thc one fci Ihe Gs it cannot bi* advocated. Consequently w e must be like Iha Turf Club in hoping that all thc likely runners now in C und CS will not Start In one nice if we wish to see safety for life and limb and a fair chance rot i. rt timncr prevailing in every race. C ONSIDERATION of the B.TC. August programme cannot also fait to bring lo mind thoughts alxiut ihe future of racing ami breeding in Barbados Touching on the latter point first, it has been said lhat LOC of the reasons for framing only three (i clasr i. simply that it Is the first move towards the future pollci <-t tl lo exclude all hnlf-bred reces from cur programmes. Thtl mt an thai but for the purposes of producing horses to ndr on the pUintiilnin and polo ponies, breeders ot local half-breds will find no use for their mares. Arc these breeders to be discouraged? On the contrary, they should be given every encouragement. Rut not to go on tin half-breds. They should bi encouraged to breed thoroughbreds infherefore before the B.T.C. scricuslv consider discouraging local i half-bred racing they should go out nf their way to substitute some I thing In its place lest those now interested drop nut of the game for good and all. Nothing could be more attractive lo an OWOel ..f a halfbred mare than the fact that he could rrplace her with a thoroughbred one at the same price. Yet the initial price of those which are through with racing out here seems to be inflated whtn compared with the price Ihey would fetch had they ended their racing days in England. That many of them would do so in the Latter place arfth a maiden certificate still intact is all too obvious. Consequently, n would not be winning mares we would have tn he after to get BOnmhlng equally as good or better than our present importations. T HE obvious policy for the B.TC to follow than, if they do Intend to wipe out G class racing eventually* it to d<> sonvethtng to help local breeders get thoroughbred mares. They have already given more than enough help tn the line of Stallions Therefore If It is loo much to ask for their financial aid. Ihen what about using their good offices? I am sure it would not be asking too much.. Touching on the racing Dart once again it is obvious that the sport in Barbados is now al the crOM roads, li has rea c hed where we must decide whether we are going to continue tPltb it In its limited proportions or make preparations which will aid il* natural and continuing expansion It Fa not sullliicnt to Bay that 20 horses havt raced in one even* nt Arima therefore the same thing ran be undertaken here. Not long ago at the same Arimo track which our officials appear to be inclined to copy there was a spill in Whli horses went down T > of tliom WOM killed, two more were injured and all four Jockeys were hospitalised, two of thc latter being very lucky to Eel awav with their lives This is ihr :.ort of thli: is less likely to occui on a track with long wide stretches. It is Just such a track which is needed here if we continue to see two doien or more two in a ol Ii tun out ti i e each year, III addition to the continued importation of BngUsh thoroughbreds. By its own actions in support of breeding and racing the B.T C ha reached the stake where it compels Itself lo move V abode. This is n tribute tO Hs own ijrMgh'.cdncss which the B-T-l .seems reluctant to accept. If only by such foresight the B.TC. could galvanise Itself into action. Then I believe we would soon find the answer to our problem. T<(HE SWEEPSTAKE meanwhile nmtuuu-s to flourish. Series T" 1 Is on sale now and no doubt another will be cetnii i ts l %  : %  soon. This means that the first prfsa is well on the way to the figure of $44,000 which it was in August last year, while if then Ii %  Uaal minute rush, as Is sometime* the case, we might well see the coveted figure of $50,000 reached Which reminds ma of the number of coveted figures which it has been hoped Ihe first prize would reach since It started somewhere back in the" twentlei First it was $5,000. Then in August 1939 it hit $13,000. It Ihen dropped back, but came again and soon we were looking forward to a Slfi.W' that It continued to mount the rcale and I can remember quoting such figures as twenty thousand, then twenty-live thousand. foUowcq by thirty thousand. Yet when it reached fDfta foil Ihi .and last year. I think we were as surprised as the time in 1939 when it reached thirteen thousand. A sign of the times no doubt. AIM S sign to the B.T.C. that they have the confidence of the publ more could they wish for in esarci. lor J new truck. HERE AT LAST!! • A Cane Trailer ,,., the well-known Brockhotise organisation ontl Uy deigned t" me-at the exacting requirement oT plantation work in the West Indies, where contouring and draining of land Is practised. These Cane Trailers are equipped with large diameter 10 pl> MBI lyn and pos iuvs brakes, and are capable ot carrying a 5-ton pay load Aviata safety Spectflcoiione:—/3-ton 4-wheeled Sugar Cane Trailer. MOi-i Frame:—10'—0" long x 4'—6" wide, from steel members electrically welded. Gooseneck VWarm&ly:—of 4" I.D. heavy service tubing. .Side Frames: -of steel channel with bolt fixing. Drflicbiir:—of steel ihanr.el, cross-flraced and electrically welded. Renr Aile EQuipmenf:—3" sq. bed. straight-through axle, with journals; fitted 6-stud roller-bearing hubs. All steel disc whecus. 8.00x28. Fro-if Axle Ef-iiipinenf:— 2H" s*qbed, straight-through axle, with Journals, fitted B-stud rollerbearing hubs. All steel disc wheel. 4.00 x 18. PRICE M %  ...< % %  %  "We know that there are cheaper trailers on the market. %  in a unit which will give entire sstlsfaction In botll WET i DRY WKATHKK. *r invite you to come in nnd exam is. e these "specially" deaigi BWIA ECKfH KIN BROTHERS i\v SIKEV r I. Moke Busmen Contacts Foifei in *he Caribbean. 2 Hi Cheaper too, then oths' tea or sir troniportotie*.. 3. Take oil ihe Esc.cs. Bogqarjs you Need al NeReduced Rofes — 50 Savi9. 1 YEASTVITE ii VJ The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B, Mobiloil protected the world's fastest automobile DIAL 4269 BWIA 'BtlTISH WEST INDIAN AIBWAYS i If you want tofet QUICK REI.IHF frosQ PAIN, and abo to cm.iy the tvncni. of Viuunin B. you must take YEAST VITB Tablets. There', nothing else like YEASTVITR It is the ONLY pain reliever which ALSO contain, the took Vitamin B.. Don't wango and get some YEAST-vrru Tabkti now. For HEADACHES NERVE PAINS COLDS, CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS HELIfVIS YOUR PAIN and MAMS YOU FtEL WlU • MORiio:r. i cents more ihan other o.l nl enginr was i dition even jf-ri MOBU OIL. %  lew cena r on %  save >.' less f-r lU .i ..!ve Oiher What cheaper insurance repairs, delays and Inefl operation can >i-' S^ JOHN COBB "< W MPH lie ': 'HII.OIL. YEASTVITE Ask for and demand Mobiloil Agenli:—GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Ltd.






ee ram



}
}
|
|



ESTABLISHED 1895





Reds Not Contacted 7

Uijongbu Left Deserted) U.S., Britain

TOKYO, May 5.

Deadlocked

UNITED NATIONS tank and infantry patrols
roved far ahead of the Allied defence line north| Cver Mediterranean Chief

of Seoul to-day. But they made little contact with |
Communists, and found no evidence of prepara-
tions for a renewed Chinese offensive.

In an area where United Nations patrols had cut three|for the Mediterranean area, con-|

LONDON, May 5.
The Americans and British are
completely deadlocked on _ the
choice of a Supreme Commander

Communist companies to pieces yesterday, they found only { t"ary to recent reports that a Brit-

a squad to-day.

Allied tank patrols again en-!
tered Uijongbu, 11 miles north of}
Seoul, and found the town empty.
But an estimated two Communist
regiments skirmished with A\l-
lied patrols northwest of the
South Korean capital.

Nine Communists, some of them
in new summer unifoims, we
captured during the day.

in the same area, United Na-
tions engineers abandoned an at-
tempt to lift a Chinese minefield
when Communist mortar bombs
began to fall among them. '

A large mechanised Task Force
probed several miles north of the
United Nations line on the cen-
tral front meeting only sporadic
fire from small Communist bands
in nearby hills.

On the east Central front Allied
patrols reached almost to the 38th
parallel. Everywhere Commun-
ists seemed to have pulled their
main forces back leaving behind
only screen troops.

Large South Korean forces at-
tacked about 500 Communists
near Inje on the Eastern front but
withdrew after a hard fight.

790 Red Casualties

As the weather cleared after
yesterday’s rain, United States
planes stepped up their support
and reconnaissance operations.

They attacked a big Communist
supply dump north of the parallel
starting two fires.

The air force claimed 60 Com-



e






munists killed or wounded and 24
vehicles, 35 railway wagons, and
230 buildings destroyed or dam-
aged during the day.

Eighth Army Headquarters
estimated yesterday’s Communist

casualties for ground action § at
790.
Military observers here be-

lieved the Chinese might be pre-
paring to renew peir spring offen-
We wihh. TRO ext two weeks
before the start of the rains.

But they did not think there
would be as much power behind
the Communists’ punch as there
was in the first six days of their
offensive.

The Allied Commanders expect
Chinese to try to seize Seoul again
for its propaganda value.

The big question among military
observers was whether the United
Nations would continue to hold a
firm defence line or go over to a
limited offensive. —Reuter.



Nine Point Plan

STRASBOURG, May 5.

A nine point plan for keeping
Europe financially stable | and
hard at work was presented to
the Council of Europe’s Con-
sultative Assembly when it opened
a ten-day session in Strasbourg
to-day. ;

It proposed among other things
the creation of a European In-
vestment Bank to aid under-de-
veloped countries in the Council.

—Reuter.

Vital Airfield

TRIPOLI, Libya, May 5

The U.S. Air Force is walking
a diplomatic tight rope here, as
the United . States prepares to
negotiate for continued use of this
vital airfield. U.S. bombers could
in time of war deliver atom
bombs to any target in European
Russia from this base.

Right now, the field, operated by
Military Air Service, is one of
Uncle Sam’s biggest international
bargains. He pays less than
$5,000 rent per year to upwards ol
1,000 individual Arab farmers for
this 1,335 acre toe-hold in the
Middle East.—U.P.





GIRL GUIDES,
at the London Girl Guides Headquarters in Buckingham Palace Road, Second from left is Miss Marjorie

(Joey) Pemberton of Barbados.

THE W.1. GIRL GUIDES

‘ish Admiral
according to
nations,

The argument has been going
on for months and it has held up
the formal naming of the Ameri-
can Admiral William M. Fetch.
teler as Supreme Commander for
the Atlantic. The British argue
that if there is any spot outside
their coastal waters where they
shovld command, it is the Mediter
ranean, They paint to their life-
line—the Suez—and in the Middle
East, the fortress of Gibraltar,
and the key bastion of Malta.

The Americans reply that the
strength they are now pouring
into the Mediterranean area, the
much larger U.S, Sixth Fleet and
their contributions to Greece,
Turkey and Italy entitle them to
command.

A report emanated recently
from London saying flatly that a
calls. the visit’ to London last] British Admiral would get the
November - December of Premier |POSt. It was not correct, and
Hanlon when the trade talks with | C2Used considerable consternation
Cuba had started. “He was over|i" Washington where Government
here to talk about sugar”, the level discussions on the command

would get the post,
officials’ of both

UK.—Cuba’
Pact Attacked

By DAILY EXPRESS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 5.
editorial attack
‘the impending U.K.-Cuba pact, ap-
pears in this morning’s Daily
Express under the heading
“Secret and Shameful”.
The paper accuses the



A further on



British
Government of a “shocking lack
of candour in its relations with the
rest of the Commonwealth”. }

Dealing first with the position
of Queensland, the editorial re-

ae

U.N. FORCES CR

Sunday Advocat

BARBADOS, MAY 6, .1°51

eee

.

DRAX HALL, St. George, one ‘o:
mil,



Express says, “yet not a word of |@d been and are still underway.!

Britain's negotiations with Cuba}
was mentioned. Was this the way French, British and United
to treat a Dominion? | States service representatives in

The editorial continues “Empire} Washington are discussing the
preference is to be thrown over-| United States’ plan to give the
board to the extent of 500,000 tons|Supreme Command to a Briton
of sugar a year. j with an American deputy, usually

The Cuba pact is shameful, and| well informed circles said here
should never be signed. today.

The circumstances in which it The proposal would make the
has been negotiated, are even | United States’ Admiral, William
riore shameful. Neither the West | R. Carney, subordinate to a British
indies nor Mauritius nor Queens- |Commander, and would divide the
land have been consulted about | whole Mediteranean area into four
it. They have merely been noti-| commands, one of which would be
fied — when the document was|in the French sphere.
almost ready for signing.” If the three representatives
approve of the plan, it will then
have to come before the Military
Committee of the North Atlantic
Treaty and Defence Ministers of
the countries concerned,

ascceg — (Reuter & U.P.)
Workers
Cease Work

U.S. Deputy



B’dos Rum Attracts
Attention. At.B.LF.

(from Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 5.
Barbados Rum attracted the at-
tention of visitors to the British



Industries Fair to-day, Attend-}
ance, to-day was its highest} It has come to the notice
since the opening cay. of the Bureau of Employment
There was much activity at and Emigration that a few
West Indies stalls. A representa- workers have ceased working
tive of a Swecish firm placed with the object of registering
large orders fcr Jamaica vinned at the Bureau as unemployed.
fruits; rice on show at the Critish They have stated that this
Guiana stall attracted buyers’ has been doue so that they
attention. may get the opportunity of

going to work in the United
States of America. Only men
who are genuinely unable to
find work need register.

There will be no new regis-
trations of unemployed men
during the coming week.

Mr, J. A. Back, Director of the
Bank of Australasia Sydney, Aus-
tralia who is representing Austra-
lia’s interests a the British
Industries Fair, met West Indian
Test cricketer Alnn Rae and
Arthur Wint at the Jamaica stall.

They took a group photograph
with cther West Indians. Refer-
ring to the forthcoming Test
matches between the West Indies
and Australia, Mr, Back said: “I
think you West Indians are good
to beat us.” West Indians in the
stall smiled aprovingly; Alan “4









“Britain Forced To
Rearm”—Attlee

: LONDON, May 5.

Prime Minister Clement Attlee
told a May Day rally here to-day
that Britain had been forced to
rearm against her will.

“But we have to show that we
can defend ourselves and that we
have a better system.”

What Britain had
could be destroyed

smiled non-committally and
replied: “I have no comments to
make.”

FRENCH STRIKE AT
REBEL HIDEQUT

SAIGON, May 5.
French troops to-day struck at



achieved
by action

another pro-Communist rebel} ?' ¢ & SOK n
hideout in the Tongking delta! Communism was “tolerance”. _
bridgehead in a sweep through These totalitarian Communist

countries of to-day are really a

; nf cavern)! Pitiful result to come from a
They aimed to wipe out several) vnovement that started with such

thousand rebels who were yester-{}. :
day reported to have attacked high ideals.
French partisan troop positions
end villages in the Kesat regign, ;
about 25 miles southeast o!
Hanoi,

A post in Daloc village fell to
the rebels after bitter fighting.

—Reuter.

the jungle and ricefield.

“Our Socialist movement is not
a movement merely out to change
things. It is out to change peo-
ple. We have in this country
democratic Socialism that did not
ring itself
formula.”



to an economic

—Reuter.

from tne West Indies, now on a Visit to London are seen with two English Guides

—Express



relief in one way or another,
On the Advisory Committee are
‘

|

from outside or from inside ; z j
: ae mission and detailed scope of its
Attlee said that the difference erie ;
between democratic Socialism and General William C. Chase, chief

W.L. Cotton.
Industry Needs
Special Help |

SAYS TEMPANY
LONDON, May 5.
The West Indian Sea Island
Cotton Association is trying its
hardest over here to get the gov-
ernment to lower the high pur-
chese tax on manufactured goods
sold in this country. ;
Sir Harold Tempany, Chairman
of the Association’s Advisory Com-
mittee in England gaid to-day
that he was confident that in the
long run the industry would ge.

represented growers, spinners, the
West Indian Committee of Plant-
ers and. .Mercharts,,and... cata
other official organisations,

This week Sir Harold took the
delegation to the Board of Trade
the difficulties the
tradesmen are experiencing in sel-
ling sea island cotton in Britain
chiefly beccuse of the cost of cot-
ton and high purchase tax,

He emphasised that a strony
export trade required the “cush
ioning” of a sound home trade.

“We explained to the Board o!

told Reuter to-day,
outlook for the cotton
islands is getting

”

to explain



Trade”, he
“that the
industry in the
rather worrying.

He pointed out that if the in-
dustry disappeared, or had to re-
dgee its output,
serious effects on
the islands
grant aided.

this would have

the inecme of

are already
Reuter.

which



U.S. Mission To
China Works Out

Programme

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 5.
Staff officers of the United
States military mission to Nation-
alist China, plunged ahead at top
speed in working out the pro
gram of the organisation whic
will determine the final size of the

of the mission, and U.S. Minister
Karl L. Rankine, directly under
whom the mission will operate,
have been holding a series of con-
ferences with Chinese miilitary
leaders and U.S. Naval and Mili-
tary and Air attaches to prepare
working orders which will be fol-
lowed in gradually extending the
mission's work.—U.P,



EIGHT KILLED
IN JOHORE

SINGAPORE, May 5.

Six Ghurka soldiers
Malay policemen were
killed and four other
wounded
with
hore.

and two
reported
Ghurkas
Wednesday in a clash
Communist guerillas in Jo-
—(U.P.)

EXPELLED
PARIS, May 5.
of



The French Ministry the
Interior to-day expelled Iradj
Eskandary, former Persian Minis-
ter of Industry and Commerce.



—Reuter. /i5 sitting.

Fire Guts Kingston Business Houses

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica, May 5,
The Jar a Sugar Manufac-
turers Association and the Feder-
ation of Primary Producers of the
Caribbean, lost their Headquar-
ters, valuable office equipment
and documents, as a fire destroyed
the second and third floors of a
new, massive building in the heart
of Kingston to-day, leaving the
damage estimated at half a million







| dollar

jfloor w

|
j

The fire began on the third

air-conditioning







i being
st



enveloped the



i SSE?

a



—-* ~~

DRAX HALL



f the oldest h § in the Island, taken from the top of the old wind-

(Story on page 7).

‘Ike Asks Britain To
increase Military Aid
BRITAIN SAYS “NO”

. LONDON, May 5
sINFORMED SOURCES said that General Bisenhower
esked Britain for a bigger military contribution to the
Novth Atlantic Treaty Organisation, but Biitain has de
ciined to increase the five Divisions promised to thi
Supreme Commander

_ Gifts Pour
‘ Into Cairo

ye FOR FARQUK

CAIRO, May 5

A festive air, rivalling “Arabian
Nights” setting, pervaded Cairo as
fabulous gifts poured into the
Royal Palace on the eve of King
Farouk’s wedding to his 17-year
old commoner fiancee,’ The King
and dark-haired Narriman Sadek
will be married at 11 a.m. on Sun-
day in a Moslem ceremony which
the bride does not attend,

The mafriage coincides with the

_— it was said that Bisenhower
made “several appeals’ for «a
| rreater British effort to encourage
;a bigger effert by the other Euro
pean members of the North Atlan
tic Treaty Organisation,
Eisenhower’s requests are. saic
to have been made through Pac
machinery, and the British reply
was said to have been a “categor-
ical rejection,”

had promised. to contribute five
Divisions to Eisenhower, the Su
preme Commander, on the Con
tinent,

Informed sources said that wher
Eiscuhower completed his Euro.
pean tour in January, he esti-
mated that all he could rely on at
that moment was seattered forces
totalling about thirteen Divisions
Al the same time, dissatisfactior










14th anniversary of Farouk’s! ig said to have been expressed ir
official aec n to the throne.} Washington about what were
The marriage is ‘arouk's second,| described as the “inadequate con
and will be performed by Sheik! tributions” of 3elgium, Holland
Mohamed Ibrahim Salem, Presi-| ana Denmark,
dent of the Sharia High Court,| Belgium is said to have beer
Egypt's highest Islamic Judiciary! criticised for allowing strategic
body, Special delegations bearing’ materials to reach Russia, Holland
presents from. chiefs of Arab|is said to have been asked by
States have been converging on} Fisenhower to increase her rou-
Cairo for the past three days.| tine military call-up,

Jordan's King Abdullah sent: He is said to have made “gev-
Farouk the Hussen Ibn Ali Kyar-jferal appeals” to all Buropear
don, his country’s highest decora- members of the North Atlantic

tion. He sent the; bride a cosmetic Treaty for greater contributions
set of pure gold studded with|to enable him to build a force of
sparkling precious stones,—U,P. }a strength sufficient to art

a to aggression.—U.P,
|

Protest Parade

JOHANNESBURG, May 5
Thousands of ex-serviceme:
made a torchlight parade through
the strects of Johannesburg las
night in protest against the South |
African Government's coloured
voling policy. The protest meet
ing was held at Port Elizabeth, |
The Johannesburg demonstrator;

as f





PRESIDENT PLEADS
FOR ITALY’S RIGHTS

ROME, May 5,

Former Italian President, Hnrico
De Nicola, to-day took over the
Presidency of the Senate with an
impassioned plea that Italy be
restored to her “rightful place ui
honour among the nations.”

De’ Nicola, succeeding late Pre-





] ; marched to the City Hall wher
mier Bonomi, told sénators that} they passed a resolution “pro.!
Italy should be freed from the testing in the strongest possible|
“humiliating and unjust con-|/terms against the action of the}
ditions” of the peace treaty. present Government in proposing}

Italy’s contribution to the final|to violate the spirit of the consti |

Allied victory over Germany and
her long tradition of culture and
glory far outweighed her tempor-
ary misadventures he said.
Reuter.
———

Alert For Demonstration

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 5.
A St. Lucia police detachment
of 20 arrived to-day as a precau
tionary measure with a view to
iudications of Monday’s likely
flocking of the capital, There will
be no surprise, however, if other
tightening up developments ara
consequent upon the meeting at
Government House this morning.
Superintendent of Police James

—Reuter.

IMPRISONED

BERLIN, May 5
A West Berlin court to-day sen. |
tenced 45-year-old industrial |
salesman Erich Kaeding to 18)
months imprisonment for illegal-~'
ly forwarding West German steel

products into the Soviet Zone.
—Reuter.

1,000,000 TON

SULPHUR SHORTAGE
WASHINGTON, May 5.

The International Sulphur Com
mittee reported to-day that the
free world’s supply of sulphur ir
1951 was expected to fall short
of its requirements by “at least
1,000,000 tons."”"—Reuter,

tution



















. : =
e Estimated At $500,000 |
second floor ag firemen made én as the new third political party. |
early morning stand shortly afte M.A’s Manager, D. J. Verity
3 a.m, to prevent it taking the firs! said: “everything ig destroyed; it
floor is quite a blow.” Verity is also
secretary of the rr
Offices which were totally de ag ae - : " rae “g {
Sa ale Wiis valuable paper nial The damage estimated does no
ol Joe eae : fnclude the damage caused by
equipment, were the ‘S.M.A the y to valuable tyre stocks of |
P.P.B.C, United Estates Ltd ate ; g aA nipment |
7 - merchandise and office equipment]
the Central Committee of Primaty py the first floor offices of th
Producers of Anhydrous Alcohol 4. j;qjn, owned by Hon. ¢ AG
Ltd., the Jamaica Imperial Asso- ¢, rphey, M.C., M.L.C., ar ¢
ciation, the Jamaica Cigar Manu- y.),\ch ‘offices now destroyed be}
facturers Association, the Jamaica ved in on Avril} |
Carbolies Ltd., as well ae re
offices proposed for the Farn Fire Chief Reid, and one firema

Federation, which is billed locally were injured

It was understood that Britain! ernment, and our capacity, &nd



-





DEFENCE LINE

MacArthur Wants
Abolition Of War

WASHINGTON, :
GENERAL MacARTHUR today pleaded for
world wide abolition of war and said “Time is
running out.’’ “I said a} the end of World War IT

that we have had our last chance and I believe it

firmly,’’ he added.

‘L believe that 99 percent of the people of the world
believe that.”

The General is making his third aprearance before
the joint Senate Committee investigating United States
policy in the Far East.

He said it was quite possible his plan would call for
additions to air and naval strength in the Far East, and he
believed these additions would be readily available with-
out prejudice to any other area or operation contemplated.

- - While the General was giving his
evidence to-day, Democrat Senator
| Pat MacCarran quoted him as hav-
jing flatly refused to discuss the
| “Troops to Europe” dispute on the
| grounds that it involved political
| controversy
| MacArthur said his policy to hit
--SHINWELL |Communist-China and win the
war in Korea could be carried out
WASHINGTON, England, May 5.,; Without prejudice to any other
Defence Minister Emanue!| operations or demands that might

U.S. Criticism
Unjustified

Shinwell in a speech said that} be made on the United States

Britain was not being dragged «!| armed forces.

the U.S, tail, and called for a He said it would take only “a

end to criticism of America,| relatively small fraction” of the

policy, United States overall strength to
Addressing a mass meeting o | mind on the campaign he had in

miners at this coalmining cent: : ;

in the county of Corie. Shin The increase in Far East

well said “the sooner we stoy trength would not be as. great

disparaging the U.S, the better.’| "5 far as ground troops were con-

cerned, said the General.
“IT wish people who indulge t:
criticism of the U.S. would show

Evacuation

more commonsense. We are not
being dragged at the tail of th The General to-day told the
U.S. There is no evidence of that }Committee that plans had been
whatsoever.” drawn up for the evacuation of
Korea and the withdrawal of
Shinweill also attacked the} United Nations troops .to Japan
Conservative Leader, Winston jin an emergency.
Churchill, charging him with He said all details were never
spreading the notion that Britain! werked out but withdrawal was
was weak, anc’ describing him a? | eontemplated, What might have
the “rudest man” in the Hou fiappened later would have de-
of Commons, pended on the action itself, or the
“There he sits on the front o!| directives he might have re-
the Opposition bench, muttering} ceived
sometimes to himself, and some He said there was no method
dimes audibly indulging in the) of avoiding surprise attack of an

rudest possible ejaculations. cnemy.
| “If you are not ready at the tima
you might well be overwhelmed
before many factors gave you a
‘certain period of time in which

|

The reason why some — peopl
and some countries regard us e4
weak is not because we are weal

but because Churchill, and com} yo.) coukd bulld up to meet attack.
pany have disparaged the gov MacArthur was asked what

course he would recommend tf
as a result people overseas be | after his policy was adopted,

lieve it.”

| Chinese Communists were thrown
back into Manchuria but refused
sign the Peace Treaty.

tie replied that Chinese would
then be unable to launch more
cffensives and he believed they
|} would agree to a rational treaty.
| MacArthur told the Committee
that if the United States failed to
top Communist aggr n in the



15 Pledged to Work
For Common Good
By PATRICK CROSSE









STRASBOURG, May 5 | far Bast, it would be “an invita.
Fifteen Governments, forming! tion’ to Russia to attack in
the Council of Europe, solemnly! gycther area of the world.
pledged themselves today “to —Reuter.
work close together for the com
mon good” in the face of East
West tension. THE “ADVOCATE”
The declaration was contained

pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night

in a mesage delivered to the Euro. |
pean Parliament at Strasbourg by,
the Committee of Ministers form.’
ing an “Upper House” of thé
Council of Europe.”’-—Reuter,



THE. en icvets

A stock of models always on display

and ready for you to take away.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

10, 11, 12 &°13 BROAD STREET.
PAGE TWO









DRED ASS

GLOBE NOW SHOWING
TONITE 8.15 pm. MOND. and TUESDAY
ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT

oF

HE US. Sectiog: of
bean Commissigh including Mr
Wurd M. Candday, Hon.

Puerto Rico, Mr
Jefferson Jones,

AT

oSee













Lew AYRES Louis WOLHEIM ;
—_—— — tertcaepdeacnianittiieitaiiaimivaiet. a Miss Elizabeth
“Talent Au edition TODAY 9.30 a.m. } Armstrong, Mr
* x Sol Luis. Des-
cartes and Mrs
Virgina Lewis,

are.Gue in from
Puerto Rico at 6
o'clock this eve-
ning. Mr. De la
Try Ellis, former
Chief Justice of
Curacao and Mr.
uarles van
fford, Secretary

the Mether-



AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA, (Members Only)

TONIGHT & TOMORROW NIGHT at 8.30
JAMES STEWART

in “CALL NORTHSIDE 777”
with RICHARD CONTE, LEE J. COBB, HELEN WALKER

Commencing TUESDAY 8th at B.30 p.n
DANA ANDREWS, JEANNE. CRAIN, DICK HAYMES

in “STATE FAIR” in Technicolor.







4.45 & 8.30 Daily
















A, ~~

Lae THE

BLUE RIDGE HILLS THEY








at



arrived yesterday. Dr.
Riemens is due this morning.
Baron





Theatre—fridgetown (DIAL 2310)

GOLDWYN Presénts . . TODAY TO TUESDAY

oF 4.45 and 8.30 p.m
nr




terd
Mr.




Stehle and Mr. G. A. Van





with
ANDREWS—Farley GRANGER
Joan EVANS—Paul, STEWART

Plu~THE MAC ARTHUR STORY

ee ae -

WEDNESDAY «& THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m, RKO_ Radig 2-Feat -Featare Hit !
st “BODYGUARD” with Lawrence oo %

Followed by the Technicoior Musical Hit ; SONG IS BORN”

Featuring TOP HEADLINERS»; 2an"i, Kar, Vinginin May

PLAZA DIAL SALE
ZA OWL ||| GATETY

ilies Cisse i. 0 bbe. (THE GARDEN) St. James

Last Last 2 Shows Todhy 5 @ 8.46
(RKO's Bi : ” sie
: eee) ||| Warners Teetinicolér Hit - -





Dana



6 o'clock.

staff arrivin
teftday were,
Miss é: Lange, Sars
Mr. K. Robinson,









M.
Mrs.








iss Lee-Sack-Sioe, Miss M
Urich,
Pouchét and Miss K. Sherwood.

Mr. L. W. Cramer.
























are due in this mornin
Arriving by the samme ie
be Hon. W. A. Bustaman











secretary.









MON. & TUES, 8.30 p.m,
een ae in (Both) r
a CIDE”, _ “DECISION of C ; )HIAYWARI .
& CHRISTOPHER Royal Garage.

E” .

MON. ake 5
George Raft in er _
“NOCTURNE” Nancy

“BETRAYAL ‘aloe -







20th CENTURY FOX proudly present
I's








ae

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30...
& Continuing

20th CENTURY FOX
Presents . .

«ID CLIMB THE

HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”
Color by Technicolor .





Guaranteed

SWISS
WATCHES

Ah terre






Starring Susan Hayward—
William Lundigan
with Rory Calhoun and
Barbara Bates

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15
M.G.M. and Fox Dougle sq,

Dana Andrews and Gene
Tierney in

«“ WHERE THE
SIDEWALK ENDS”

— and —
“BATAAN ”
— Starring —
Robert Taylor and Lloyd
Nolan
“Bataan” not suitable for
Children.

9 Sil acct ana oan A
MONDAY and TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M and Fox Double...
Alice FAYE in
“FALLEN ANGEL”

AND
“ HIDDEN EYE”
with
Edmund ARNOLD &
France RAFFERTY





















have arrived. and ®

are on display o% ;

fevrie
ra

AL



ALFONSO B. DeLINA & CO..

The Jewel Box of Barbados
Corner of Broad & McGregor










Streets





the Carib-

Jesus ‘TT,
Pinero, , first native Governor of



embers of the Commission's
oe ¢ Boe yes-

F, Beauregard,
Durier,

B.
pene, Miss J. Landreth- tsa




Wiss T. Carrington, Mrs. B.

Secretary
General and Mrs. M. Traboulay

ht will
and his

anada after a two weeks’ visit.
Yearwood is with the Fort

= ee ene

lands Embassy in Mr. De in Try Ellis
Washington of the Duteh Section
Hendrik

etit de Beauverger of
the French Section arrived yes-
afternoon and Mr. Blanche,

Laéthem are due this evening at










“Step Livel on,
grick ae ees ia THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT Back Fre Catiad
ate ae rnge Berkar with Shirley Temple; Barry Mitz- ac rom hada
2 r
i: Denise Darcell & Chita. at RE WR R, fe, MRS. JACK YEAR-
00 are back from



ASTOR THEATRE

LAST SHOW TONIGHT 8.30

Tip Top Musical ot - year
You'll Swing into High with -

“PLL GET BY”
ANCES by—J Haver — LOVE by William Lundigan — KISSES by
Gloria Dettaven meso NGS by Dennis Day — Trumpet by Harry James

and over 10 Son# Hits.
This is i MUSICAL you will want to se
OVIES are certainly getting be

MON ¥ ar and. TUESDAY | _ This colossal double ‘from Fox & M.GM
“CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE” & “LUXURY LINER”

TWO Weekend Pictures given you for your midweek pleasure. Can you

afford a trip on the Luxury finer? Well come over to the ASTOR and

sit in on all the Fun asd Grandeur of M.G.M.'
It's Yours jor 18, 24, #0, or 48 cents







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Carb Calling

Engineering and

Agriculture
TANLEY CARRINGTON, son
of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Car-
rington of “Windsor"’, St. George,

Has just finished the third year
of his course in engineering at
McGill Univérsity. Yesterday he
flew in by T.C.A. to spend the
summer holidays with his parents.
He is due back in Canada in Sep-
tember. . Another Barbadian
student coming in by the same
plane was Don Layne, better
known to his close friends as
“Joe”.

“Joe” (I am his close friend) is
the ‘son of Mr. atid Mrs. J. G.
Layne of the W.1l. Rum Refinéry,
Brighton. He is doing agriculture
and has just completed his second
year at Macdonald College. He
too is returning in September.

Sisters
ISS JOAN DE LA BASTIDE
who is with T.C.A’s Public
Relations Office in Montreal left
yesterday by T.C.A. after spend-

- ihe a Week's holiday with her

brother-in-law and sister, Mr, and
Mrs. Harold Kidney. Her mother
if also in Barbados. Prior to her
week's stay here, Miss de La Bas-
tide spent a couple of weeks in
Trinidad.

Station Manager, Ireland

R.HAROLD BAXTER is
T.C.A.’s_ Station Manager
in Shannon Field, Ireland, He

arrived by T.C.A. yesterday to
spend five days’ holiday in Bar-
bados. He is a guest at the
Ocean View Hotel.












> over and over again.
er all the time.









s Luxury Liner.

—_—_—_—_

ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15
Republic Smashing Double,
Robert Rockwell and Bar-
bra Fuller in... .

“TRIAL WITHOUT
JURY”

and
« HOMICIDE

THREE ”
Starring
Audry Long and Warren
Douglas.

FOR

MONDAY and | TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Whole Serial—
«TIGER WOMAN
with Allan LANE
and Linda STERLING

ROXY
TO-DAY to WEDNESDAY
4.50 and 8.15
Columbia Smashing Double

Gene AUTRY &
his Horse CHAMPION
in
“BEYOND THE
PURPLE HILLS”
and
“ CONVICTE!

— Starring —

Glen FORD &
Broderick CRAWFORD

-
.







COMBINATION
YOULL

NEED !!




PHILIPS -ELECTRIC

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5 = 200 WATTS
SCREW & BAYONET

SS

+
%

2



WED. 16th, THURS.
MATINEE:





AND

ELECTRIC LAMP
_ SHADES
BEAUTIFUL COLORS IN



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BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS

PRESENT

THE SHOP AT SLY CORNER

A PLAY IN THREE ACTS BY EDWARD PERCY

under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
The Governor and Lady Savage

AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE

—on —
17th, & FRI. 18th MAY
FRIDAY 18th

ORCHESTRA & BOXES $1.50, CIRCLE $1.20, HOUSE $0.72

Beoking Office Opens Tomorrow at 8.30 a.m.




to 3” Mesh

LTD.
DEPARTMENT

aaa eE=R==_lemlel@@mele_eEEE










Since 1944

R, PATRICK GREAVES left

Barbados in 1944 to study
medicine at London Hospital.
He qualified last April and spent
nine months interning in England.
Dr. Greaves is hére until mid-
June staying with felatives. He
is a former student of Lodge
School.

In June hé goes to Canada to
do mere interning at the Toronto
Genera] Hospital. His mother
Mrs. Rachel Greaves now lives
in Ottawa and he spent a month
with her in Canada, before com-
ing dowh to Barbados.

On Six Months’ Leave
EAVING yesterday by
B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico
en route to the U.S.A. for a
holiday was Mr. G. B. Brahdford
of Navy Gardens, Christ Church.
Mr. Brandford is Clerk of the
Police Magistrate’s Court, Dis-
trict “B” and is on six months’

vacation leave.

Northbound

R. AND MRS. JOSEPH A.
a KITCHEN of Hamilton end-
ed their holiday in Barbados
yesterday when they left Seawell
by T.C.A. for Canada, Their
daughter Sally Ann accompanied
them, Mr, Kitchen is a manu-
facturer of ladies nosiery in
Hamilton. They had been here
since February 28th..... leaving
by the same plane for Canada
were Mr, and Mrs. George Som-
mers, their son Guy, Mrs, M. Lee,
Mrs. H. Mahon and Mrs, M.
Alexander, Radiographer at the
General Hospital. She has gone
to Toronto.

| Handicraft Expert
R, and MRS. FRED LEIGH-
TON flew in from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.1.A., on a five
day visit which has been ar.
ranged by C.D.
various W.I. governments, Mr.
and Mrs. Leighton have already
visited Jamaica and Trinidad and
from here they will visit some of
the other W.I.
Mr. Leighton is President of
Fred Leighton Inc., importers of
hand merchandise and Vice Presi-
dent of the National Counci of
ae Importers of the
He is also a member of
line” Advisory Committee on Im-
ports to the U.S. Department of

and W. and

islands,



Commerce in Washington, Mr
Leighton is the best experts in
the U.S.A. on the marketing of

handicrafts. His wife is a designer
and stylist in handicraft work
Mr, and Mrs, Leighton live in
New York City. ey left the
U.S. April 10th,

Nurse Returns
ETURNING shortly to Gren-
ada, after six years in Britain,
is Miss Monica Manuel. She is a
fully qualified State Nurse and has
pursued studies in midwifery and
public health.





| Across

1. The very man tor the cavern. (4)
4. Lessen what the sailor consumed.

(5). 8. Amphibious rodent. (6)

9. Cheats out of a perfume bag. (6)

2. An abbot’s vestment. (6)

3. Each go to him to charge with

a crime. (3)

4. The common holly. (4)

7. If L entered this youd have a
choice, (5)

19. Lt's am real tapioca pudding. (3)

21. Row without noise.

22. More or less than a unit? (4)
24. Product of a fine can. (7)
25. Such a box holds money. (3)
26. Condition subject to dreams. (5)
Down
1. Vehicle to make rice curi, (8)
2. Loose ott gre t becomes antl-
quated.
3. Provides (4)
5. This rt is di tent youl find.
(6) 6. Change the meat. ane. (4)
7 nen away me Fsto heen aS om
) 10, Turn aaa 2}
11. Always. (7) Hiant, 4)
16. Ball maybe. )
18. He should succeed. (4)
20. J

. Just a quick glance ? (4)
23. United. (3)

1. Mit Ave:

unar: 12 Ore
Waiter: WJ Kea. 29, Vinge
22. Hi Enter. 24.

ue: 23,
Mellow: 2. an undal
Streak: 5.

6.
None: 11. spahauive: 14, Stile:
18, Eke Dab.





JULY 21st.
A MUST DATE

FOR YOU



a

TAN & NAVY

DIAL 4606



TAN & WHITE CASUALS
All erith Platform Soles and Wedge Heels



Mr.

After Eight Years
R. NAT CARMICHAEL who
was on the T.C.A. plane yes-
terday comes to take up an ap-
pointment at Harrison College as
Senior Chemistry lecturer.

Nat has been away from Bar-
bados for eight years during
which time he was ih Jamaica
whéte he was Chemistry and
Gymnastic Instructor at Kingston
College, Jamaica, and Visiting
Science Master at Jamaica Col-
lege, Jamaica. He then went to
McGill University where he ob-
tained his B.Sc. and on to “West-
ern” in London, Ontario for his
M.Sc. There, he did research
in activators in synthetic rubber
and was also demonstrator and
assistant lecturer while there.
He was also awarded a_scholar-
ship of the National Research
Counci) of Ottawa.

NAT CARMICHAEL.

Home Economics
ISS MAUREEN JOHNSON
Â¥ daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
arold Johnson of “Ellangowan”,
St. Joseph, was among the pas-
sengers coming in yesterday by
T.C.A. Accompanying her was
her friend Miss Dorothy Watson,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Her-
bert A, Watson of Welches, St.
Michael. They are both at
MacDonald College doing home
economics. They have just got
through their second year. Now,
they are on holiday unti} about
September.

T.C.A. Engineer

R. FRED MOORE, T.C.A.

aero-engineer accofnpanied
by his wife have come down to
spend a few days in Barbados
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.
He was Flight Engineer in one of
the flights which came here a year
ago last February. Yesterday,
however, he was a passenger and
this time he is on holiday.

ie DOG which had been taught
. to give up its seat in trains
to ladies, jumped from a first class
corner-seat in a crowded train
last night,

“T’m not as old as all that,” said
the lady. “They didn’t say any-
thing about age,” replied the dog.
“They just said give up the seat
to a lady. “Oh well,” said the
lady, “I’m old myself,” went
on the dog. “You don’t suppose [
like standing. But it’s manners.
That’s what it is.’ “You needn’t
say it so grudgingly,” said the
lady. “Oh, go on, take the seat,”
growled the dog. “Thank you, ho!”
said the lady. “I’d rathér stand.”
“More fool you,” said the dog.
settling himself comfortably in
the seat. “I wish you two wouldn’t
talk so much,” snapped a passen-
ger over his newspaper.

A Bowler’s Eye View
T is believed that the Cockle-
carrot. Commission, ‘after
hearing enough expert evidencé
to deafen a camel, is inclined to
accept the theory that it would
be just as easy to sleep in a brim-
less bowler without ventilation
holes as in one with them. In other
and equally fatuous words, thesé
little vents, for nightwear, are
purely decorative, whatever their
cooling properties during the day.
And it must always be remember-
ed (I forget why) that even in
the daytime, if the wearer of a
brimless bowler stands in the
sunshine, the heat of the sun will
penetrate through the vents. Soe
| will rain, hail, or snow. That is
| why the vents are made so laugh~
jably small. “They are but tiny
‘ casements opening on to another
world,” as the man said when he
looked at Saturn through the
crown of his hat.

a CS ee a

ADIES” SHOES

WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS
TAN, NAVY & BLACK SANDALS

CASUALS _



EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

>. BY THE WAY

BRAN

es ee es
—_— a

SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

Studying Journalism

RS. M. wu. HARRISON ac-

companied by her daughter
Joan arrived from Canada _ by
T.C.A. yesierday. Mr. Harrison
was at Seawell to meet them,
Joan has just finished her first
year at Carleton College in Ot-
tawa, She ts stuelying journalism.
She left Barbados in August 1950,
and expects to return to Canada

in September.
Holiday Over .
R. AND MRS. EDWARD
WILKINSON who had been
holidaying in Barbados_ since
Apfil 7th with their baby son
Charles, left yesterday for Cana-
da by A os en route to
England, While in. dh Mrs
they were staying wil Mrs
Wilkinson’s parents, Dr. and
Mrs. Gerald Manning of
“Flodden,” Culloden Road.

Six Weeks
FF to Toronto yesterday to
spend six weeks holiday was
Mrs. Rita Teetzel . . . also Tofon-
to bound yesterday Was Miss
Yvonne Wells. Yvonne is to be
married in two weeks to Mr. Chris
Morely. Mr. Morely was formerly
stationed with B.G. Timbers in
British Guiana, but after their
marriage they will be leaving Can-
ada for East Africa. . . . Col, and
Mrs. Keith Stewart have gone to
Bermuda.
Flying Visit
W JHO should pop in from Ber-
muda yesterday by T.C A
but Terry Ryan. Terry has been
living in Bermuda for three years,
and is Assistant Manager of the
Castle Harbour Hotel in Tuckers
Town. Terry is on his way to St.
Thomas, and may be here until
Friday.
At present staying at the Castle
Harbour, he told Carib, .was Mr.
Thomas E. Dewey of New York.

Air Tour
ING COMMANDER L. A.
EGGLESFIELD, Director
General of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean, leaves to-day for San
Juan to visit the U.S. Navy Com-
mand at San Juan.

To-morrow accompanied by
U.S. Naval Officers he is due to
visit Guantanamo, Cuba and Ja-
maica returning to San Juan on
Tuesday. After final talks on
Wednesday he expects to return

to Barbados on Thursday.

First Visit

R, AND MRS. EUGENE H.
ZAKALA of Winnipeg are

in Barbados until May 18th, Mr.
Zakala is with T.C.A.’s_ Traffic
Department in Winnipeg. This
is their first visit here, and they
are staying at the Ocean View

Hotel Arriving Py. the
same plane was Mrs. Elsie Dayis
of Toronto. Mrs, Davis will

spend two weeks. staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

At Bathsheba
R. HAROLD “PER” CADO-
GAN, Spartan and intercolo-
nial footballer was married re-
cently and they are spending their
honeymoon at Bathsheba.





ADVENTURES OF PIPA



Copyright . P28 . Vax Dias int. Arnsterdam

BY BEACHCOMBER

Councillor Tudmarsh
Replies
OUNCILLOR TUDMARSH
said yesterday: “The sug-
gestion that I would be capable
of bestowing an ardent kiss on
Miss Slopeorner at the christening
of a gas-container is little short
of outrageous. If I pressed her
arm at the buffet it was merely
to guide her away from a rather
used pile of sandwiches, and to-
wards the sliced cake. My kiss
would have been entirely academ-
ic, and no more significant than
the annual kiss I am called upon
in the course of duty, to bestow
on the horse which wins our local
steeplechase.”

Board Condemns
Foreign Seesaw

IR ERNEST FULLPOWDER,
Chairman of the Seesaw
Board, was rather more pompous.
He said: “The essence of see-
saw is its gregariousness, and
that is why it attracts the club.
able man. Light-hearted spon-
taneity and friendly rivalry are
the keynotes. A friendship made
on the seasaw does not end with
the game. Moreover, seesaw
builds character, by developing
the team-spirit and encouraging
give-and-take, There is no room
for the selfish or the quarrel.
some at either end of the plank,
and may I take this opportunity
of saying that my Board has no
intention of recognising the
foreign version of this typically
English game, in which, I under-
stand, the plank is balanced on
the belly of a third player. Such
innovations detract from the
dignity of a game which is a
symbol of life’s ups and downs.”

$9.44
$8.53
$9.37
$8.50

DIAL 4220






SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951



GARDENING HINTS FOR AMATEURS FARM AND

The

Weed on Lawns. Carnations.

The Guava Tree

May is rather an in-between
month in the garden. All annuals
should by now have been planted
out, and most of them will be in
bloom, soi there jis little to be
dene in the way of planting.
There will therefore be a bit of
a lull in the garden until the rainy
weather descends on us a few
weeks from now.

Yet there is always work to be
done in a garden, and now that
the annuals are blooming, cutting
off the dead flower-heads alone is
quite a job in a garden of any
size.

During this slack time, it’s quite
a good idea to tackle the weed on
the lawn. With the grass so short
and with most of the weed with-
ered it will be found comparative-
ly easy to get it out, and the bare
patches left, will quickly get cov-
ered in grass when the rains come.
In taking up the weed, it is un-
avoidable not to take up a certain
amount of mould as well. This
should be replaced by sprinkling
some sifted mould over the bare
patches. Although our Barbados
turf can never hope to reach the
perfection of English turf yet
with proper care we need not be
ashamed of our lawns. But a
lawn should have as much atten-
tion as a flower—bed. Weeds must
he eradicated as soon as they ap-
pear, bare patches and uneven-
ness levelled off with sifted mould,
and mowing, rolling. and water-
ing, done regularly, not just now
and then. As has already been
written in these articles the best
way of controlling the spread of
weed—on a lawn is to keep the

rass properly mowed. If this is
fg the grass never gets long
enough to seed. When coupled
with this, every little bit of weed

Garde

; that appears is dug out, it is poss-

ible in time, to get rid of the
weed altogether.

A nice green lawn, well kept, is
a thing of beauty, and it is poss-
ible to have a green lawn even
during the dry weather if some
trouble over it is taken.

Do it in this way. Sprinkle the
grass evenly with V.G.M. (Vege-
table garden manure), having
done this give the lawn a thor-
ough soaking with the hose, If
the weather continues dry, keep

--the sprinkler on the lawn for

. some time each day.

The result
will be sure to please you.

One of the loveliest of all flow-
ers is the Carnation, not only be-
eause.of its beauty, but because of
its lovely scent, Yet in this

, island, for some strange reason,

Carnation regarded
somewhat in the light of a deli-
cate problem child difficult to
handle, and to be dealt with only

plants are

Cookery

The recipe that I am going to
give you this week comes from a
Soho Chef. This chicken dish only
serves two.

POUSSIN CORONET

1 spring chicken. |

1 medium-sized onion.

2 az. butter.

1-tin mushrooms.

2 slices lean ham or bacon.

4 cup strong stock. ‘

1 sherry glass white wine.

14 teaspoon parsley.

1 tablespoon of grat-

ed cheese.

Salt. Pepper.

Divide the poussin

must be just cooked,
‘still the merest frac-
tion pink around the
leg joints. Lift from
the fat on to a lightly
buttered, fireproof dish and keep
warm without drying.
Fry the onion, diced small,

the fat until tender but not eae
Add the mushrooms and the ham



MM



m in May

by experts. This is a most mis-
taken idea, for if treated correct-
ly, the Carnation is a hardy,
sturdy little plant, that will suc-
ceed as well in the open garden
as in pots. These plants do par-
ticularly well when planted as a
border to @ raised bed, as, in this
positdn they are more likely to
get the good drainage which they
like. Give the plants a well man—
ured but light soil, and a sunny
position. Water lightly, but regu—
larly. When fully grown in an
open bed the plants may need the
support of a short farked stick to
keep them out of the mud of the
hed. Some people advise a
Westerly position. When the
Carnation plant buds, (as a rule
in a cluster )it is best to pick off
some of the buds. leaving only
one or two out of. the cluster.
This will ensure more space for
developing finer blooms.

The Australian seeds give the
best results.
_ Carnations can be grown from
imported seeds, by layering, or by
cutting or slip.

FRUIT TREES (continued)

The Guava Tree

The Guava tree is one of the
small fruit-trees which can easily
be grown in a garden. It is a
low spreading tree, from which
the fruit can, as a rule be easily
picked without climbing, or the
aid of a step-ladder. The Guava
tree bears fruit during the rainy
months (July-Octobaz) but, given
sufficient moisture, it will bear at
other, or almost any time of the
year.

Guavas are among the most
useful and valuable of our Barba-—
dian fruits. They can be made
into delicious Jelly, Stewed and
eaten with milk, custard or cream,
and made into Jam or Guava
Cheese,

For a Garden tree, it is best to
grow the ‘Psidium Pyriferum,
commonly known as the French
Guava, as the fruit of this species
is larger and sweeter than that of
the common Guava, and can be
eaten raw. Give your Guava tree
plenty of manure (fifteen or
twenty pounds of V.G.M. a year)
and plenty of water, and in return
it will give generously of fruit.

The Guava is propagated by
seed, i

Questions

In reply to D. H. Roaeh, I
would say that the Trinidad vine
is certainly one of the pretties:
and most suitable of Arbour
vines. I have never heard of the
idea that it causes Hay-fever and
colds, and would be inclined to
ignore it. Among other suitable
vines for arbours are Black-eye
Susan, Honeysuckle, Stepanotis,
and Onion-vine,

Corner

or bacon, and -cook lightly, Re-

move from pan.

Place ham or bacon under the
poussin halves. Lay a _ whole
mushroom on each breast.
the 4 cup of stock to the pan
and stir thoroughly. Stir in the
wine, add parsley and season,

Coat the poussin with the sauce.
Sprinkle the surface with the fine.
ly grated cheese. Place in a slow
oven for 10 minutes so that the
surface becomes glazed.

With this dish you
ean serve Potatoe
Chipps or Sherried
Sweet Potatoes.

2 medium-sized

sweet potatoes.

1 tablespoon of butter.
Cream to moisten.
Salt. Sherry.

Bake potatoes, scoop
out inside, add_ salt,
butter, and cream.
Flavour with sherry to
taste, Retill ukins and
bake 5 minutes in hot
over,

fuerte

Add these?
fat of spinach plants, e.g. the common

GARDEN

Hy Agricola

(TIMELY HINTS)

Many gardeners with small
gardens may be puzzled as to what
types of crops they should co
centrate on. Obvieusly, owing
limitations of space they cannc
plant everything listed in a seed
catalogue; in any case, to try to
do so may result in little of most
end not
kind to provide an aderuate sup-
ply when required to form part
of a meal,

n
to





We may note that foods can be
classified into three main groups
according to the purpose they
serve in the body: (1) body!
warmers (2) body builders (3){
body protectors. In the first group
the starchy crops (yams, eddoes
sweet potatoes, etc.) are best suited
io large gardens and farms and,
moreover, are not usually in short
supply. We have stressed the im
portance of the second group in
previous notes when we discussed
the proteins or flesh-formers; these
supply material for renewals and
repair to the body. The peas and
beans are in this group and, in
this connection, we strongly re-
commended greater use of the
pigeon pea, utilising it as an
attractive border and also to give

protection from wind. We also
Suggest including the ordinary,
climbing, white lima bean, a

prolific bearer and at the same
time useful for covering up an
old fence or hiding an ugly corner
in the garden. It is advisable to
secure a good strain of these; some
contain a fairly high proportion of
beans with red or reddish seed
coats and should be rejected as
they are liable to prove bitterish.
There is a small, bush lima
suitable for a garden bed and, if
there is room, include this, but it
is not so prolific as the climbing
sort. The climbing bonavist may
also be used for purposes similar
to the climbing lima bean; the
pods should be picked when the
seeds are still quite green and not
too full. Other peas and beans
such as black-eyes, rounceval and
increase peas should not be over-
looked; they come into bearing
quickly and can be used in the
green, snap stage when they make
en excellent addition to the
dietary. Section and cook them as
cone would the stringless beans
from imported seed. Many of the
pods should be left to develop
further for shelling and use as
green peas or in the dry state and
come in very handy when pigeon
peas are not in season,

Now the third group, the body
protectors, are most important
and, as a group, is generally the
one most often lacking in the
average meal, These protective
foods of the plant world are an
absolute must in the small home
garden; if no room for anything
else, concentrate on the so-called
green, leafy vegetables first and
foremost, What are some of
Lettuce, the various kinds



French spinach with thick, shiny

leaves; the species of pigweed
(Amaranth) with large, smocth
Jeaves; Swiss chard, mustard,

Chinese Cabbage and so on. If
beets and carrots are grown, be
careful not to discard the tops:
those of the beet make deliciqus
spinach and carrot tops car
the younger ones at any rate—be
finely cut up and put into sauces
or gravies. And of course, the
hardy okra might find a place in
some odd corner; it is supposed by
some to have properties which
counteract any tendency to peptic
ulcer and, in that sense, is a body
protector. Indeed, it is surprising
what a wide range of plany
material there is available in this
group if we are alert and make
good use of it. The term “wayside
greens” is not an infrequent head-
ing in home magazines these days.
It should be noted that local
types figure largely in the above
list and there is no need to wait
for imported seed to get started





Zz

Every normal skin needs
THESE 2 CREAMS

AAAARAAAALAAAAAAAARA

enough of a particular |



into two equal halves
down the breast. Place
in the hot melted fat
in a frying pan and
cook gently for 12 to
15 minutes. The pieces
’

Lovely Society women all over the
world follow this simple, inexpen-
sive beauty care; one that is
within the reach of everyone of

you.

FOLLOW THE BEAUTY

LOVELIEST WOMEN
EVERYWHERE

SOCIETY’S

PEPPER SE

PAAAAAAAAALIAALAAAARY

This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond’s Cold

Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips.

Remove the cream,

and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then “rinse” with more

Cold Cream, for extra-cleansing, extra-softening.
skin will be clearer, smoother, lovelier,
FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION

Very soon, your

By day, use a touch of Pond’s Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This
non-greasy cream will hold your powder matt for hours, and protect

your complexion from sun and wind.

9

POND’S

Vanishing Cream
Cold Cream



Pond’s

Start now to win the loveliness

that can be yours when you use

You'll find the

distinetive opal-white jars at all

the best beauty counters.



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

Sewing Circle

Grain Of Material



PENNY NOLAN

In order to sew really well you
must have a great deal of respect
for your cloth and in order to re-
spect cloth you. must understand

If you have ever fought a
piece of cloth that was cut off
grain trying to make it hang pro-
perly you will realize that rmate-
rial often seems to have a wili of
its own. In fighting its tendency
to wrinkle or pull where it
shouldn't you may lose your iem-
per but if the fault was bad cut-
ting to begin with, you probably
won't be able to correct it short
of recutting that particular sec-
tion. However, if you understand
grain and its importance
you cul you will avoid these fitting
difficulties.

Material is woven on looms. The!
big power looms of today work}
on the same basic principles that

were employed in the home hand
There are,:

loom of pioneer days.

a series of lengthwise threads,
strung on the loom. These are
called warp threads and _ the
crosswise or woof threads are,
woven over and under these
threads. â„¢ pT

In cutting clothes it will be
found that the lengthwise threads
hang better when they are placed
lengthwise on the body. They also
wear better. The crosswise threads
which run at right angles to them
should then be on the horizontal
lines of the body.

The method of achieving this
when cutting fs as follows. In
most styles the centre front and
centre back of the bodice should
be on a lengthwise thread. The
selvage edge, if it is straight, can
'be taken to represent the true
lengthwise grain. If the selvaga
is not straight it can often be
straightened by proper pressing
though some very cheap cloth is
so badly woven that finding the
proper grain is almost impossible.
Fortunately this is the rare ex-
ception rather than the rule,

Placing the centre front and the
centre back of the pattern paral-
lel to the selvage edges will result
in the bodice being cut on the
proper grain. The sleeve pattern
should have a grain or straight
of goods line on it, running from
the notch in the cap to be placed
at the shoulder seam straigh‘
down to the hem. Folding the
sleeve pattern in half from this
notch down will give you this line
which should also be placed paral-
lel to the selvage edge. Sleeves
are ogeasionally cut with this line
on the crosswise grain but gen-
erally they do not hang so well
or wear well.

The bias is not a grain as it is
not a thread. It is the centre of
the right angle formed by the
crossing of the warps and woof
threads, Hence the bias stretches.
This characteristic of the bias



with groups (2) and (3) during
this showery weather

ANSWER TO QUESTION
For the information of cor.
respondent S.H., it should be
stated that transplanted cucurbits,
squash, cucumber, pumpkin
seldom do well, The seeds, prefer.

ably, should be sown direct in
properly tiled and manured
(rotted compost or dung) beds,

the plants require liberal water-
ing and occasional spraying with
Bordeaux mixture against mildew,

ty
SASS

HERE’S
MORE

|
| MR. PLANTER!!

YIELD For

YOU WITH

at a on the bias place this fold

makes it very useful in dressmak -
img and designing. Cowl neck
bocdices for example, are cut with
the centre front on the bias so
that the draped neck will hang
gracefully. Bias cuts are
used for stripes to make them
@ome together in attractive Vs.

WN strips cut from the true
blag ge used for finishing neck-
Tin sleeves and for trim-

ming purposes.
The true bias of material is |
found by folding the width to the |
length, or otherwise the cut edge
of the material te the selvage
edge, forming an angle. The re-
sulting fold is the true bias. Bias
strips may be cut from, this fold
A gauge which attaches to your
scissors points may be purchased
that enables you to cut bias the
same width all along its length
without measuring and marking.

To lay a pattern on the bias it is
more practical to determine a line
that can be placed on the straight
of goods, making the centre front
fall on the bias. This is done by
drawing a line at right angles to
the centre front line on the pat-
tern to represent the crosswise
grain then fqlding thie centre front
line to this line. The resulting
fold in the pattern represents the
bias when the centre front is cut
on the length. To cut the centre

parallel to the selvages. When
cutting on the bias it is advisable
to make a full pattern rather than
a half. opening the material out
to a single thickness.

-_

Miss KEVELOS
Throws a Challenge
To the Mem

By ROBERT WALLING

SOFT. VOICED Olga Kevelos
aged 26, manages a cafe with
a staff of nine. Her father, a
Greek, now naturalised, gave her
the business, She finds her buss
indgor life demands an outdooi
hobby as corrective,

So the customers will miss hey
in Birmingham on Saturdays,

She is a promising car race.
driver. Cyril Kieft, who makes
fleet half-litre and one-litre rae
ing cars, has engaged her for
1951 (“I pay her expenses: she
takes the prize money,’’)

She will drive against men on
the Continent and at home, And
note that these cars are no longe:
in the “baby” elass, One Coope:
1100 ce car lapped the Susse>
circuit in one race at Easter a!
85.89 m.p.h.—two miles an hou
slower than the average speed o!
winner Bira with a 4%-litn
Osear in another event that da:

Miss Kevelos fs one of the fey
women racing this year, “Wha
is the matter with young wome
to-day?” she asks, “If the:
can’t make money, at least it i
a great thrill.”

She sends out this challenge t

men; ‘You always seem t
settle in a procession after thx
first lap in a race, Why no
‘mix it’ a bit?” She is used t

“mixing it’—-overtaking when-
ever possible—in motoreyek
events.

Her first and only car race s
far was last year. She led, Then
—‘‘some man flagged me to ge
slower.” She was beaten.

When she races her new £606
car she will prepare her make-up
carefully before starting—part of
her pre-race drill to get “every
thing right.” She always wear:
a crash helmet, carries no mascot
(“silly things’). Smoking anc
cocktails are not’ dropped be
cause of racing.

Kieft says of her: “She is a
good driver. She changes gear
expertly, makes best use of her
engine, holds her car _ firmly.

She can be aggressive, too.”
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED,
—L.E.S.





ACTUMUS

© The KEY to GROWING POWER

© The KEY to

It is said that extensive
fertility of such land. This is
System.
tility,

SOIL FERTILITY

cropping of land reduces the
only the case with the artificial

in this system developing mineral acids destroy fer-
In the Actumus it is entirely contrary. The more roots

plants throw out, the better will the soil be transversed and
loosened, and consequently there will be left organic residues

from such extended root systems

fertility of the soil.

Actumus also acts as a kind of soil police

which will build up the

More harm is

done to plants by the entry into the plant system of elements

which are not required, than
required
the entry of such elements by
its electronic crystals

The Actumus gardener requir

tools are a teaspoon and
jug or similar

3 preparatory operations:
3
5
5
5
5

(1) Making a standard solution of Actumus
ounces of Actumus, or one ounce of Aectumus “

of water

(2) Keep this standard
every time you use it.

COLERIDGE STREET

OOO OSDeeeeeeoeteeneee “
' 4? SOROS

Se

a watering can.
reeeptacle holding two pints

by lack of elements which are

Unwanted hydrogen, calcium and iron in their ionic
forms cause many dangerous v

irus diseases. Actumus controls
the special features, features of

very little equipment. His
He also requires a
These are the

Dissolve two
L”, in two pints

Let stand for twelve hours,

solution covered, and stir it up

For further information and supplies apply to

H. KEITH ARCHER

DIAL 2999
EOD COS

them



ONLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN

e Your skin will be cooler, sweeter...




dl PERFUMED BEAUTY SO

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BRIDGETOWN,



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J. B. LESLIE & CO, LTD.

MILK
FOOD




AND YOU CANT
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The regular use of
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will, by its action on
the roots agd scalp,
nourish every hair
gland and encourage
richer growth, It
provides nourishment
to the sealp and hair
roots and corrects
such troubles as

DANDRUFF

THIN. & FALLING HAIR
The datly application of this Hair
Food it unfailingly in a really
beautiful glossy head of hair.
LANALOL No.1! With ol! (Yellow
Label) for setlp.
LANALOL No. 2 Without olf (Green
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(Blue Label). A

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aNaLow SOLIDIFIED (Bakelite
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LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Red

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goes 10 THE Roor OF typ inoent





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and as the pain lessens, you feel fit and cheerful,
ready again for work or play. It is good to know
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——" ae ee

PAGE FOUR





ANEMIA

er ces
Tie ia

Headache, sour stomach, that sick-
ish “morning-after” feeling — the
price we often pay for enjoying
too much good food and drink!
Try this and see how much better
you will feel! Take Alka-Seltzer
before retiring, again—if needed
— in the morning.



ro

Alka-Seltzer contains an analgesic
for soothing headaches, plus alka-
lige ingredients to neutralize ex-
cess gastric acidity... two-way
action that brings quick relief,
Not a laxative — you can take
Aika-Seltzer any time.

‘Drop one or two tablets of Alka-
Seltzer into a glass of water, Watch
it fizz into a refreshing solution —
then drink ‘t. Pleasant-tasting
Alka Seltzer will help “set you
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AMATEUR ATHLETIC
~ ASSOCIATION
OF BARBADOS

presents its
BIG THREE-DAY
CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

~» (under the distinguished
‘ patronage of

His Excellency the Governon
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

at
KENSINGTON OVAL

on

Whit-Monday . . May 14th
Thursday . . May 17th
& Saturday . . May 19th

beginning at 1 p.m. each day

e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold
Archer, (Nugget) Hunte,
Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin
Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists
and Athletes as well as
Miss Grace Cumberbatch
and Miss Eileen King in
action at the Historic Oval

“ Gates Open at 12 noon daily
)
PRICES OF ADMISSION :

SEASON TICKETS
Kensington Stand . . $2.16
George Challenor . . $1,68

®
DAILY ‘LICKETS

Kensington Stand . . $1.00
George Challenor . . . 72c.
Uncovered Seats . . . 48c.
Grounds ...... 24e.

e
Season Tickets on Sale daily
sat the Civic, Swan & High
Street.



acinar eens











HERE
AT LAST!!

deny that never in the two Tests aid

ee

PUERILE ATTACK ON
W.1. TEAM
B'dos Preparing For J’ca Footballers
| BY ©.S. COPPIN

Cem vAtion: on the team selected to repre-

sent the West Indies at cricket against Australia
this year have now come to hand from Jamaica.
There is a sort of freemasonry among news-
7 papermen in the Caribbean, and .for the most part,
Â¥ the world over, that prevents us from attempting to
’ hold one another up to ridicule or to make such ob-
se servations as would tend to undermine any profitable
reputation they might have established in their particular phase of
journalistic activity.
I find myself, however, compelled to challenge most strongly the
writings of C. A. “Longfield” Jack Anderson, cricket critic of the
Jamaica Daily Gleaner




PAINFUL

JT IS painful to me and although this is not intended to be any
apologia, I regret to have to take such strong objectjon since I have
just spent a most enjoyable three weeks in Jamaica.

Anderson in criticising the selection of the West Indies team has
referred to Denis Atkinson’s selection in these words: “It is not fair
to Atkinson to be persistently pitch-forked into company which he
does not belong.” i

He does not, however, suggest whom should be played in place of
Atkinson; Guillen of Trinidad he would have substituted with Binns
of Jamaica; Trim he would not have selected before Johnson also of
Jamaica and Goodridge, also of Jamaica he would have selected before
Jones.

If perhaps Nunes of Jamaica could be persuaded to go as Man-
ager and High Priest, then “Longfield” would most certainly have
selected him before Cyril Merry of Trinidad

STENCH

This awful stench of insularity is not compatible with the enor-
mous suriaes wien Wa. amaes cricket has made during tne past
decade and whicn achievement has now qualified tnem to compete in
lhe coming. seriés with Australia tor word cricket supremacy.

Anower comforting fact is that tne opinions o1 “Longheld” are
not regarded in Jamaica and in Me teaaing West Indian cricket com-
muniues as necessarily responsible, and so the minimum amount of
narm snouid be aone.

{ was privilegea to see the Barbados—Trinidad Tests here and
the Jamaica—briuish Guiana ‘lesis in Jamaica (“Longneid’ did not
see botn series) and there is no question of a doubt, vonn Trim de-
served his selection.

He maintainea a good pace und direction and always seemed to
be doing something with the bail wnether it was old or new. 1 was
among those who thought that he nad earned selection on the ly5v
West indies team: to Mngland bu: tne Selectors thougnt duterent.

GOODRIDGE NOT GOOD ENOUGH

OQODRIDGE I was hoping would make the grade. He was so
steady and young but absolutely guileless. Can “Longfield”
ne manage to take the eage of
either of the British GUianése openers Peter Bayley and Lesue Wight?
Surely on the strength of his performance ne was not better than
either King or Mullins and the electors should have no qualms of
conscience in leaving him out. ;

Johnson I tnink is better and perhaps fitter than Jones is to-day
and there is some justification for suggesting that Jonnson might have
peen selected in piace of Jones, 7

For my part I think that Johnson is the best pace bowler in the
West Indies to-day but who does not know that he gives up far too
quickly if conditions are not in has favour. Any fool can win but
1et “Longfleld” observe how some jose.

here is not much to choose between Guillen and Binns and as
I have already written, I would not have questioned the selection
of either of these when once it had been established that a seventeenth
place had been created specificaily for the inclusion of a specialist
wicket-keeper .

I find little difference in their respective batting ability since
neither can be regarded as a star but I tnink that Guinen Migut Lave
gained the edge and so selection for the place on the strengtn that he
nas already had experience of Keeping wicket to the wily stamadhin,

‘the most disgusting part of tne observations is the reierence lv
the fact that Atkimson gained selection because he is related to yohn
Godaard and will soon be related through marriage.

No greater insult could have been omered a man who has led the
West Inaies to victory in ‘British Guiana, Jamaica, india and 1
England. ‘1he sooner unis 1s torgotten, the more time one has to think
about the cemenung of imtercusonia: friendships, the most truitful
medium for the establishment of which is the cricket field.

GODDARD’S WELCOME

I WAS at Sabina Park when John Goddard arrived there for the
first British Guiana—Jiamaica Test and I prefer to remember

the spontaneous welcome the Jamaican crowd afforded him rather
than this despicable attempt to drag the grand game of ericket down
to gutter levels. ; 5

If ‘“Longtield” is thinking of West Indies players being pitch-
forked into West Inaes’ teams when they had no right to be there, I
might remind him that public memory is notoriously short but not
short enough to forget that Jamaican players have had more oppor-
tunity to show that they had no right being selected in West Indies
tearus than any other isiand,

Few will forget the burlesque performances of R. K. Nunes and
BE. A. Rae of the 1928 West Indies team to England, Ivan Barrow
in the 1939 West Indies team to England, and J. Cameron of the
1948—49 West Indies team to India.

“te

- oaeen
a

‘Yam sure that Atkinson gave a better all-round performance in
India and will wager “Longfield” any amount within reason that he
performs satisfactorily by literate standards on the Australian tour,

BARBADOS—JAMAICA FOOTBALL

j ITH the Jamaica—Barbados Intercolonial football tour just
around the corner, the Barbados players are hard at practice
in preparation.
ir. Wilkes in the three weeks at his disposal has already put
the invitees through their paces in, ball control, tackling, heading,
correct kicking of the ball, charging and the various phases of trap-
ping the ball. So far there have been two practices at Kensington
and one at Combermere School «nd to-morrow morning they meet
again at Kensington for another | wactice. ‘ ‘

In addition to this Mr. Willes has also circulated an instruc+
tional pamphlet aimed at instruc ing players to carry out necessary
weet Nha Winding up practices the players will indulge in team
tactics. Whatever is the outcome of the tournament it is true to say
that never before has there been any attempt at teaining a Barbados
team as such to take part in any one tournament.



A Cane Trailer



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Carlton Wins Easy Victory

SCORES FIVE GOALS TO Argentine F.
BEAT PICKWICK-ROVERS Team Practise

_ CARLTON se
in their first divi
i terday evening.

<



‘



SILVERSTONE,
Northamptonshire, May 5,

Reg Parnell of Britain was
awarded the International Trophy
Motor Race after the event had
been stopped owing to torrentia!
rain here to-day,

The stewards decided to award
the Trophy on positions gained
when the race was abandoned

Parnell drove an Italian Ferrari,

Duncan Hamilton of Biitsia oa
a French Talbot was second, and
Juan Manuel Fangio on an Argen-
tine Alfa Romeo was third.

The race started in bad condi-
tions, and pools of water made
miniature lakes on the . track,
while cars left a wake similar to
that turned up by speedboats, as
they careered round the course.

Drivers were soon soaked to the
skin, and cars not in the lead could
not see a thing owing to the spray
and rain. Eventually, all the cars
got away, if somewhat slowly and
it was soon apparent that new re-
cords could not be expected.

After most of the cars had com-
pleted five laps, it was realised
that conditions were impossible
and the race was called off.

Fangio who had earlier broken
the lap record in a heat had just
passed Graham Whitehead of
Britain to enter the sixth
lap when the race was stopped.
Whitehead was placed fourth,
having not quite completed five
laps,

Guiseppe Farina, the Italian and
World champion in an Alfa Romeo
‘was ninth, and the two other Alfa
Romeos driven by Noneti and
Sanesi finished tenth and sixteenth
respectively. The Swiss champion,
Baron Emanuel, was placed twen-
ty-first.

The leading French driver,
Louis Rosier in a Talbot was fifth,
while Johnny Claes of Belgium
also in a Talbot finished eighth.

Parnell received the Silver Tro-
phy and £500, Hamilton £250,
Fangio £100, Whitehead £75 and
Rosier £350.

The Italian champ was sad. The
Alfa Romeo team had been con-
fident of securing the premier
award.

“The weather robbed us. It was
bad luck”, one of their drivers
said.—Reuter.

Connell Wins
Frontenac Trophy

Lt.-Col. J. Connell won the
Frontenac Trophy for the second
time yesterday at the Government
Rifle Range. It was the fourth
occasion the trophy was shot for
and the previous winners were
Capt. C. R. E. Warner, Lt.-Col. J.
Connell and Mr, T, A, L. Roberts.

The trophy was given by R. M.
Jones & Co., agents for Frontenac
beer. Major A. De V. Chase pre.
sented it to Lt.-Col, Connell,

Conditions yesterday were gen-
erally good with a steady breeze
from the left, Lt.-Col, Connell at
first tied with Mr. G. F. Pilgrim,
each scoring 140 points out of 150,

Mr. Pilgrim and Lt.-Col. Connell
each had to take an extra shot to
decide the winner,

The eight best scorers were:





Capt, C. R. BE. Warner .

GIFT OF CRICKET
GEAR ARRIVES

The crate of cricket gear sent
to Barbados by players of Surrey
County has arrived in the island
for distribution to poor clubs of
Barbados. The crate was con-
signed to the Social Welfare
Department and arrangements
are being made to distribute the
gear in accordance with the
wishes of the donors,



BWIA = i:

1. Moke Business Contacts

da 5—0 victory over Pickwick-Rovers
football fixture at Kensington yes-

The Carlton front men played
all over their opponents goal and
registered four of their goals du-
ring the first half hour. Pickwick-
Rovers gave a better display du-
ring the second half of the game
but failed to penetrate the Carl-

"ee.
Carlton, “Brickie” Lucas
registered two of the goals while

Greenidge, Kenny Hutchinson
and Freddie Hutchinson each
sent in one.

Play

Carlton defended the goal from
the screen end and within five
minutes of play Greenidge their
centre forward, scored to put his
team one up.

The Pickwick-Rovers front line
now tried to get past the Carl-
ton defence in an endeavour to
ecualize but failed to do so
as Kennedy and Bright, Carlton
full backs proved too good and
sent the ball back midfield.

The Carlton forwards took over
from this point and Kenny
Hutchinson registered the second
when the goalkeeper Maurice
Foster failed to gather,

Carlton were now playing all

‘over their opponents’ goal and

“Brickie” Lucas after beating the
right full back, sent in a hard
one from just inside the area to
give Carlton their thitd goal.

It was not long after this that
the Carlton forwards got posses-
sion and Lucas notched the fourth
for Carlton,

Pickwick-Rovers had their first
good shot at the Carlton goal when
Jones their outside right sent in
a good effort which Warren
saved.

Pickwick-Rovers made one or
two efforts to decrease this lead
but without result and the interval
was taken with the score at 4—0
in favour of Carlton.

Second Half

On resumption Carlton were
first on the offensive and from a
through pass by Clairmonte,
Freddie Hutchinson on the left
wing centred accurately but
centre forward Greenidge headed
straight to goalkeeper Foster who
had no difficulty in saving.

Pickwick-Rovers now took over
and began to press for sometime.
Jones their outside right tested
out Warren with a good shot
which the latter saved and later
Taylor missed the upright by
inches.

Pickwick-Rovers launched an-
other attack and Taylor sent in a
grounder which Warren saved.
Carlton now took over and carried
the ball well down the. field, but
centre forward Greenidge, with
only the goalkeeper to overcome,
kicked wide.

From another raid by Carlton,
Reynold Hutchinson centred from
the right wing and his brother
Freddie converted from close
range to give Carlton their fifth

‘oal.
Pickwick-Rovers tried to de-
crease this lead but their efforts
were all in vain. The Carlton
front men again got possession and
were still on the hunt for goals,
but their forwards did everything
else except to score. The final
blast of the whistle found them
winners by five goals to love.
The Referee was Mr. Ben Hoyos.
The teams were as follow: —
Carlton: Warren, Bright, Ken-
nedy: Marshall, Clairmonte, Cox;
K. Hutchinson, R. Hutchinson,
Greenidge, Lucas, F. Hutchinson.
Pickwick-Rovers: M. Foster;
Hunte, Lewis; Kelly, Robinson,
Cuke; Jones, Hoad, Wells, Taylor,
Foster.

. ,
B'dos Friendiy Football
Association
Following are this week's fix-
tures:—
Mon,, May %th—Westerners “A”
vs, Penrode,
Referee: Mr, O. Graham
Tues., May 8th—Maple vs. Har-
kliffe.
Referee; Mr. R. O. Culpepper.
Wed., May 9%th—Westerners “B”
vs. Pe irode,
Rereree: Mr. J. Archer,
Thurs. May 10th—Maple vs. Har-
kliffe.
Referee; Mr. C. Reece.
Fri., May 11th—Pangers vs. West-
erners “A"’,



Referee: Mr. Robert Parris.
N.B.—All above matches will be
played at St. Leonard’s
Grounds, Richmond,

\
S

as



wait a}

At Highbury

LONDON, May 5.

Argentina’s “Mister Rugilo” as
the British Press calls him, stole
the limelight in al] three London
Saturday evening papers with a
flying save that made a most
astonishing photograph.

Miguel Rugilo, practising with
his team mates at Arsenal's ground
at Highbury this morning, was
caught by cameramen in an almost
horizontal position, feet out, arms
raised in a butterfly breast stroke
attitude, ball clenched ip his left
hand,

Driving rain showers, fleeting
sunshine and “heavy going” greet-
ed the Argentine players who had
their first practice match of 45
minutes this morning at the
famous Arsenal Stadium.

Tom Whittaker, the Manager of
Arsenal, who followed every move
of the game, summed up British
opinion when he said. “they all
look pretty fit and “they certainly
seem to be enjoying their workout.

“The weather does not seem to
have upset them and it looks as
if their fast positional play and
dribbling are as good as one was
led to expect. Their goalkeeping
too is of a very high standard.
Their defence, of course, is a
different system from our English
style, but they work it very well
If Boya always shoots -like he did
when he got that goal, the English
goalkeeper is going to have a hard
time.”

Conditions

The Argentine Captain com-
mented: “the conditions to-day as
you can imagine were a little
difficult for our boys.” “But may-
be we will get longer studs for
their boots if it is really heavy
going on Wednesday.”

“If the conditions are no worse
than to-day, they will not affect
us at all. The ball is no heavier
than we are accustomed to, but
these conditions do make it a little
harder to keep control of the ball
Still it can be done, and IT
have complete faith in the boys.”

—Reuter.

———————_——

Football Results

LONDON, May 5.
Doncaster Rovers 1 Sheffield United 1.
Hull City 5 Luton Town 3.
Leeds United 2 Swansea Town 0.
Manchester City 2 Grimstyy Town 2.
Notis County 2 Leicester City 3.
West Ham United 0 Cardiff City 0.
First Division: Aston Villa 6 Stoke
City 2.
Blackpool 1 Manchester United 1.
Charlton Athletic 1 Derby County 0.
Chelsea 4 Bolton Wanderers 0.
Newcastle United 1 Middlesbrough 1.
Portsmouth 2 Burnley 1.
Sheffield Wednesday 6 Everton 0,
Sunderland 0 Wolverhampton Wan-
derers 0.
Third Division Southern:
Torquzjy United 0,
Bournemouth 1 Reading 0.
Bristol Rovers 1 Northampton Town 1.
Colchester United 1 Port Vale 1,
Ipswich Town 2 Bristol City 0.
Newport County 3 Brighton and Hove

Aldershot 1

Norwich City 3 Crystal Palace |.
Southend United 5 Exeter City 1.
Swindon Town 2 Nottingham Forest 3.

Watford 1 Walsall 3.

Third Division Northern: Chester 0
Bradford City 2.

Lincoln City 4 Crewe Alexander 1.

Mansfield Town 2 Southport 2.

Rochdale 0 Darlington 0, Rotherham
United 3 Oldham Athletic 1,

Shrewsbury Town 4 New Brighton 2

Stockport County 2 Hartlepools United
0. Tranmere Rovers 1 Scunthorpe United
© York City 0 Halifax Town 0.



PROVISIONAL PLACES

FOR WORLD RACE

SILVERSTCNE, May 4.

Provisional starting grid posi-
tions for heats of the Internation-
al trophy race were worked out
on speeds achieved yesterday.
All practice laps to-day were
much slower. Fangio gained
number one position in the front
line for the first heat by virtue
of his 98.10 miles per hour trial
run yesterday. In number two
place is Robert Manzon, with
three British drivers making up
the front row.”—(C.P.)

Y.M.P.C. DEFEATS Y.M.C.A.

Y.M.P.C, defeated Y.M.C.A.
5° points to 5 when they played
Basket-Ball at Y.M.P.C. yester-
day evening. N. Thomas top
scored for Y.M.P.C. with 21
points, Other good scorers were
iu. Greenidge, 16, and D. Alkins,
mae V8





—!
mr

‘| offices?

~ Mobiloil

SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

| AT THE CROSS ROADS



| Racing Must Expand; Breeding

| Encouraged
BY BOOKIE

] ACKNOWLEDGE with thanks a copy of the
Provisional Programme for the B.T.C, race meet-
ing due to come off next August. The Turf Club is
to be commended for framing a programme so far
in advance of the dates ofthe meeting and also for
endeavouring to meet present day needs by drawing
up a four-day fixture.

duced a programme at such an early date and marked
n to suggestions for
changes, whether same are eventually discarded or adopted. In this
way they will not be in a position to tell owners and trainers that
their suggestions were not made in time. By the same method or
reasoning those owners and trainers with proposals would be well
advised to have same in some concrete form and not leave theni to
the atmosphere te be circulated.



Having pro !
it provisional, I take it that the Club will be ope:

an overall look at the programme it is one which immedi.
ately appears to have been framed along the most economical lines
possible to meet the present necessity for a four day fixture. On that
score the programme committee have done as well as they could,
Nevertheless the first point which might be queried is the fact that
on the third day there are only six races on the programme. Surely,
from an economical point of view, it would be beiter to have seven.
In the first place when the public learn that there will only be six
races they may not be so anxious to pay their entrance fee, whereas
they might consider it worthwhile if there were seven, It is a point

well worth further consideration.

OW one of the chief criticisms being bruited abroad is that there
N are only two races framed for class G. Therefore it would ap-
pear to be an opportune move if the third G class race agitated for
were placed on the programme on the third day, thus making 29
races in all instead of 28.

Such a move could not be regarded as uneconomical, first for the
reason stated above, and secondly because one G class race would
cost only $940.00. As the average profit of 5 extra races, (over and
above our usual total of 24) should, I imagine, be more than this
amount, it would seem that to bring in the extra G class races would
be feasible after all.

The main criticism against having three G class races is the fact
that there are only four horses in G and G2 who are likely runners.
Actually there are four who might be called certainties, but there are
also two more who might run. In addition there is a possibility that
some from Trinidad will come.

Taking

The next matter which engages the attention is that while the
programme has been framed in such a way that it eases the conges-
tion both in F class and among the two-year-olds, a similar claim
cannot be made with regard to the C class races, Yet, unless a special
handicap for C class Maidens is added, it looks as if this will be a
condition with which we will have to put up. As the cost of such a race
would be far more than the one for the Gs it cannot be advocated.
Consequently we must be like the Turf Club in hoping that all the
likely runners now in C and C2 will not start in one race if we wish
to see gafety for life and limb and a fair chance for each runner pre-
vailing in every race.

ONSIDERATION of the B.T.C. August programme cannot also

fail to bring to mind thoughts about the future of racing and
breeding in Barbados. Touching on the latter point first, it has been
said that one of the reasons for framing only three G class races is
simply that it is the first move towards the future policy of the B.T.C.
to exclude all half-bred races from our programmes. This means that
but for the purposes of producing horses to ride on the plantation and
polo ponies, breeders of local_half-breds will find no use for their
mares. Are these breeders to be discouraged? On the contrary, they
should be given every encouragement, But not to go on breeding
half-breds. They should be encouraged to breed thoroughbreds in-
stead.

Therefore before the B.T.C. sericusly consider discouraging local
| half-bred racing they should go out of their way to substitute some—
thing in its place lest those now interested drop out of the game for
good and all. Nothing could be more attractive to an owner of a half-
bred mare than the fact that he could replace her with a thoroughbred
one at the same price. Yet the initial price of those which are through
with racing out here seems to be inflated when compared with the
price they would fetch had they ended their racing days in England.
That many of them would do so in the iatter place with a maiden
certificate still intact is all too obvious. Consequently, it would not
be winning mares we would have to be after to get something equally
as good or better than our present importations.







ro obvious policy for the B.T.C. to follow then, if they do intend
to wipe out G class racing eventually, is to do something to help
local breeders get thoroughbred mares. They have already given
tore than enough help in the line of stallions. Therefore if it is too
much to ask for their financial aid, then what about using their good
I am sure it would not be asking too much.,

Touching on the racing part once again it is obvious that the
sport in Barbados is now at the cross roads. It has reached the stage
where we must decid¢ whether we are going to continue with it in
its limited proportions or make preparations which will aid its natural
and continuing expansion. It is not sufficient to say that 20 horses
have raced in one event at Arima therefore the same thing can be
undertaken here. Not long ago at the same Arima track which our
officials appear to be inclined to copy there was a spill in which four
horses went down. Two of them were killed, two more were injured
and all four jockeys were hospitalised, two of the latter being very
lucky to get away with their lives. This is the sort of thing which
is less likely to occur on a track with long wide stretches.

It is just such a track which is needed here if we continue to
see two dozen or more two-year-olds turn out to race each year, in
addition to the continued importation of English thoroughbreds. By
its own actions in support of breeding and racing the B.T.C, has
reached the stage where it compels itself to move to a new place of
abode. This is a tribute to its own farsightedness which the B,T.C
seems reluctant to accept. If only by such foresight the B.T.C.
could galvanise itself into action. Then I believe we would soon find
the answer to our problem,

E SWEEPSTAKE meanwhile continues to flourish. Series “T”

is on sale now and no doubt another will be coming up fairly
soon. This means that the first prize is well on the way to the figure
of $44,000 which it was in August last year, while if there is a last
minute rush, as is sometimes the case, we might well see the coveted
figure of $50,000 reached. Which reminds me of the number of
coveted figures which it has been hoped the first prize would reach
since it started somewhere back in thé 'twenties. First it was $5,000,
Then in August 1939 it hit $13,000. It then dropped back, but came
again and soon we were looking forward to a $15,000 prize. Aftce
that it continued to mount the scale and I can remember quoting
such figures as twenty thousand, then twenty-five thousand, followed
by thirty thousand. Yet when it reached forty-four thousand last



| year, I think we were as surprised as the time in 1939 when it
} reached thirteen thousand. A sign of the times no doubt. And a
sign to the B.T.C. that they have the confidence of the public, What
more could they wish for in search for a new track,
lft onesie rach Leech nnccinges age
|
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SUNDAY, MAY 6,





ONE DAY IT’S SHAW
—AND NEXT DAY
IT’S SHAKESPEARE...

1951





Right:

er hair hangs
the shoulder.

MANCHESTER, ae it has become the most

. cha''enging “ double first” of
UST before midnight .37-vear-old- wife's career. 7a
Vivien Leigh sat back Gennes ee oommainly ne
; ot at holed angers ure there,” said Miss
in her hotel suite tO Leigh tonight. “I have to face

consider the first of the tw
Cleopatras she will play i
a week

The

first, at

Manchester

tnem, No uve turning aside. But
how stimulating.”

She faces comparisons with
actresses who have tried one or
the other role before—but never

10
n

tonight, was the sly, squealing together .. . Edith Evans. Peggy
16-year-old coquette school- Ashcroft. even Mrs. Patrick
girl in Shaw's “Caesar and , Campbell.
Cleopatra.” Miss hopes the two Cleo-
In a week she tries the Patras will flow logically and
mature, patrician queen in Smoothly, ome from the other.
Shakespeare's “ Antony and Cleo- For Shakespeare, with its
patra.” greater Opportunities for chang-

And in London next month the
will follow each other

two plays
on successive nights.
formidable assignment
attempted before,

The suggestion was put to SI
Laurence Olivier

It is

never

half as a jest.

Woman Of The Week

ing emotions—and greater penal-
ties for failure—she will wear a
red wig, use a deeper voice.
Always Olivier will be there to
guide and advise her.
How does she see Cleopatra ?
She thought a minute, then she

a

it



FLAGSTAD Sails ©
Through The Storm

By EVELY

MAJESTIC as the Queen Mary,
blonde, Junoesque Kirsten Flags-
tad, reputedly the finest Wag-
nerian soprano of all time, sailed
through a 24-song recital at the
Albert Hall this week, welcomed
back to London by a wildly en-
thusiastie audience.

Next month at Covent Garden
she begins the last Wagner sea-
son of her career, Fifty-six next
July 12, Flagstad has decided to
take no_ chances with time’s
ravages. She means to relinquish
her mighty Wagnerian roles while
She is still at the apex of her fame
and form,

It was announced a few weeks
back that she was retiring from
opera altogether. But she changed
her mind, She will after all be
heard again at the New York

“Met.” next year — not in Isolde
and her other celebrated Wagner
parts, but in the less exacting

Alceste of Gluck, There will be
fewer operatic roles, and she will
become a mezzo-soprano giving
lieder concerts,



N IRONS

She met no antagonism in
London, where she made her first
come-back after the war with an
Albert Hall concert early in 1947.

But although she had a docu-
ment signed by the Norwegian
Chief Justice stating that she had
maintained a “steadfast patriotic
attitude” during ‘the occupation,
there was a terrific to-do when
she went on a nine-city tour of
the United States the same year,
Carnegie Hall bawled “Boycott
the Quisling!” while she sang
there. At Philad , fighting
broke out and stink-bombs flew
inside the concert hall. The
critics were sharply split into
Flagstad fors and againsts, The
againsts tore her to pieces.

Flagstad faced the sterm and
rode it out, returning to America
in successive years. In 1949 the
trustees of the San Francisco
Opera banned her because of
protests against her record by
the American Legion.

‘Provocative’



Lejt. MIND APPEAL.
wear for her Gimal scene in the Shake:
this fabulous ceremonial dress of gold
on the gorgeous plumage

w:g adds a contrast to Sh

wears fer her meeting with Caesar short trans-
i? grey muslin dress and barbaric jewellery.

Mer sandals are gold nei.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



VIVIEN LEIGH EMBARKS ON
A CLEOPATRA ‘DOUBLE’





Cleopatra at 37 will






1
im heavy black waves well below

said: “The genius of femininity
in_all tts guises.”

She should be able to present
that with ease.

But she also has to muke that
other tine come true. the line in
which Shakespeare says o! his
queen.

Age cannot wither her, nor
custom stale
Her mfinite variety

if Vivien Leigh can establish
that “infinite variety” she wil
have pulled off her “double
first” all right

Even in the middle of first

night nerves this evening she
had time for wa joke. The Shew
Play needs a revolving stage
electrically driven.

“That's the difficulty.” said
Vivien Leigh. “Whenever Larry
and I touch electricity it goes
wrong... .”

With the two tempting Cleo-
atras it will be quite a year. For
er film version of “Streetcar

Why Have

side



—It

consisted of champagne,
Pineapple juice, and oysters.
SITTERS GROTHER : Pe eee ent yy
THE West End is to 'yrone er, for he
become Broadway's has the longest “residential
Brother. Bette avis, Katharine Walification.
The Bogarts.

*
Hepburn,



Named Desire” is now ready to

the

ast @

sebtle
toings, Qnd au list of the right




speare qiay be shipped to Landon.
of the peacock. en] POSTSCRIPT : This was the Garland, Danny Kaye, this week
aw’s kittenish character. ‘SUPper Waiting im an ice-packed Beb Hope .. . the list grows.
MAN APPEAL, Cleopatra at iW Un resting im a fire bucket out What do they @o when they

in? Well, among other

cabs to dine after work.

é

curs.
fhe

the
the

judy



They Bannoli

Chevalier?
By SAM WHITE





time), and
hearty

for a joke at any
setting out to enjoy a
champagne supper.

She arrives at rehearsals punc-
tually to the minute, throws no
temperaments, turns on her
Niagara of a voice like a tap as
vequired.

Most singers spend many hours
dressing for a concert but not so
Flagstad. She gets ready as
quickly as a man and never
prinks in the mirror afterwards.
She could afford to dress lavishly.
But she is not much interested in
fashion although the diamonds





PARIS.
The refusal of: the United
States Government to grant a

visa to Maurice Chevalier has
caused little surprise in Paris.

Chevalier was said to have
signed the Communist-sponsored
Stockholm “Peace” Appeal, to
have sung at Communist fetes
and to have supported the Party
in other ways,

His case is not exceptional,
The singer Yves Montand was
refused a visa some time ago. A

score of French screen and stage
stars are known to figure; in the
American Embassy,’s “Black
Book” of “Cafe .Communists”
likely to apply for visas in the
future,

As for appearances on Commu.
nist’-platforms—purély ‘as -efiter-
tainers, of course—stars of such
stature as Edith Piaf and. a
hundred others readily and regu-
larly accept invitations to do so

Why? Most of them are
without any political convictions
and many could look forward to
profitable dollar contracts in the





1 ok
ur box-otlice
¢ ne

dressing-room
show. Not the first-night ‘swarm
(that’s easy), but the numbers in

word to apply
Holl



for antiques Discuss
figures and in-
tax... . Consider British
- And make the trek to
Aliens’ Office off Piccadilly

w register.

Marlene Dietrich prefers
00k ber own meals—and often
Wwitai
dinner
Oliviers
higher,
dack
certain Stand-up snack bar in the
Stra:

to

ises her cooking on Michael
ing. Everyone angles for a
invitation from The
(Notley Abbey rates
though. than Chelsea)
Bemy is attached to a

y ‘they count up their

Visitors after the

third week of the run.

For general adyice they go to

doyen

it seems an odd
t© him !—of the

London Express Service

and made cash donations to
Party funds.

A majority of those approach
ed inf this way yielded. Some did
not, ‘Among them was the ballet

star Serge Lifar.

What happened to Lifar? For
nearly four years after the
Liberation he remained. jobless
becatise any appearance of his

on a public stage threatened :
Communist riot.

Lifar has only recently been
able to resume his professiona)
career, but his appearances are
still interrupted by demonstra
tions and oceasional strikes of
Communist stage-hands,

Those not directly threatened
were suborned by more subile
means. The Communist Party
in France are a_ great national
force. They are the largest
single party in the French Par.
liament, and polled, 6,000,00(

votes at the last elections.

â„¢ *

They contrél a powerful Press;



MAY 6 NO. 170
The Topic
of
Last Week






ast Tuesday it was May Day
Joe, Robert, Louw; all three

| Went up the night to Queen's Park
To join the “talking spree”

The absence of the leader



On great things cried out; bait !
For some the brilliant speeches
Lacked, pepper, lime and salt

| They talk a lot of “moonshine”
| Poor things! thay missed the brain
| Of their most mighty leader
| ‘Twas all like

tainted cane”

| Joe looked up or the platform

| And Robert had his stare

| For there were missing comrades
And many an empty chair



What is the matter comrades
| Pray tell the people why
Saul's not among the prophets
| His voice was silent. why ¢
} ° . . .
| Well this is the position
It ever was like that

| Mongoose came to the
} Just to destroy the rat



island

Later the rat and mongoose

Ate chickens ‘til they glut

The dog too ate the fowl exes

| Then they ate the dog hut

| Lou said, Joe fits a parable

| Explain it all to me

But Joe said Loy beloved

| Are you too blind to see?

This mouth that I am wearing

Is big at any rate

It's made to close and open

I's not the Main-guard Gate
. *

A woman's mouth is different

fk vomits from the deep

The next door neighbour's business
Sometimes while fast asleep.

Well Thursday at the football
Joe, Robert and Lou too

Went down to see what Sparta:
With Notre Dame would do

When Spartan start the sparring
To kill poor Notre Dame dead
Joe said the famous Park team
Stop eating Enriched Bread

foor ‘Reece’ would miss the push bell
This followed by a fall
But Notre Dame was luckly

With just a few like “Paul”,

We tell you boys, we tell you
Start bucking up and play

Or the Jamaican youngsters
Will sureky win the day



So boys we'll meet at Seawell
This morning about eight
We'll all meet Bustamante
Of course Joe won't be late

. . * *
We'll welcome Bustarnante
That great West Indian Star
In our traditional manner
With a bottle of J. & R

sponsored by

J&R BAKERIES

Trust, It rups two big circulns |

tioht ing Sapers™in ‘Paris; «a> k f
popular Paris evening paper, a makers oO

dozen provincial dailies and

several big circulation weeklies | ENRICHED BREAD
and “monthlies, including stage |

and screen reviews. The power-| and the blenders of

ful Communist Press will flatter
only those who support the Party
and attack those who don’t. In
short, a popular French star who
with the





J&R RUM













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BUT a few weeks later they 4 - risk does not ‘play ball” E .
apes lifted the ban. Last year, wher, seeming) 2 7 MOREY isumdersianding about” thelr Party risks gelling bad notices 4/1! gpg YOU PREPARING ||| hel yc ybroerene,, most succesful, Correrponderes
YET the quality of that golden the British impresario. Rudolf Sms. references are political sympathies? a large section of the French individual training we equip you with the specialised knowledge
voice is still as fresh as’a sum- Bing, new general manager of eras Press, WE } ‘ou must have for a well-paid, key position
reer tnorning, | me the New York Metropolitan Opera, for good food, oatmeal, stout, » * * Finally, there are those stars— FOR THE BIG y Brat de he wane TRDLGe ton eceneinchshdltes
Golden voice it is Flagstad is Signed on Flagstad for the 1951 knitting and conversation. : : a small minority—who are con. i es eae
one of the world’s wealthiest Season that has just ended, his | Among her closest friends are The answer makes a curious yinced Communists, Among them ATHLETIC MEETING |
musicians, paid anything up to decision was called “provocative.” Bernard Miles, the actoy and story of blackmail, crude Press- js the singer Yves Montand, ALL TEXT BOOKS ARE
£1,200 for a single evening’s But there were no pickets, no producer, and his wife and three agentry and cupidity. It adds ay! YF We send you ws man
appearance in a strictly time- Stink bombs, this time. children. With them she has yp to an impressive tribute to He sets an exaraple by singing FRE @ volumes * the sinenk
tabled round of singing in New , Nevertheless, she has not sung entered into a gontract to give the power of the Communist songs with a strong propagandist Yetta oot i, W204
York, London, Paris, Barcelona, i" Norway since before the war, 20 performances next September party in France, favour, Montand’s most popular they become your personal nraparty.
Brussels Amsterdam Zurich 4nd it is unlikely that she ever will as Dido (in Purcell’s opera Dido In some cases the support song at the moment is a ballad ee
Milan Salzbure, , although she returns there for a and Aeneas), in the Mermaid given to the Party by French telling the sad story of a singer
Drama and controversy lay be- Short summer holiday at her Theatre which the Miles family stage and sereen stars is the who refuses to sing the kind of | 1S YOUR CAREER HERE?
hind her recent return to New house in sea-girt Kristian-sand. are installing in an old school yesylt of blackmail and nothing songs “that please the rich.” |
York’s Metropolitan Gpera. She “Noble” is the word the critics hall at the back of their house more, The ballad endg with Montand | iF NOT WRITE FOR FREE ADVICE
had to fight her way back there NOwadays use for her perform- in St. John’s Wood. Her only ‘ broken, unemployed, | A a bathe Draughtomanship, All Police, Special Course
against bitter opposition from ances, amd everything about fee—tfree lodging and two pints After the Liberation «many yontand is a long way from } Aviation (onciteering and Beate menene, Samia
Americans who alleged that she Flagstad is on the grand scale of stout daily. French stars found themselves tie preadline yet. He is among Wireless) Engincering, All Branches Quantity Surveying
collaborated with the Nazis in But there never was a_ prima ' in the embarrassing position of te three top paid music hall, and| Sere PE oe oe galegs Heres ganas Rodis (here wennre
Norway during the war. ; donna who behaved less like one The Throat being open to . collaboration (oporet stars im France. and Clerk of Works General Certificate of Secretarial Examinations
It started in 1942 when she left than this buxom rollicking Nordic, a , charges, At the time the Com- To avoid muscular pains Cambridge School Certifi- Education Examinations Shorthand (Pitman's)
the Metropolitan, where she had , A colleague ‘confessed that he ONE of the conditions is pat munists were the best organised Other popular themes with||} and to keep up your stride conteniy ona feltary Vea t Tancbere ot Handicrafts
been a member of the company had wept only twice in 10 years She will “let the management, or and most far-seeing of Resistance fellow:travelling singers _deal||} You should rub down with |]\ Shanty Mathematics Telacormuntentions
for six and a half years, to go to both times at Flagstad’s Isolde. any part thereof, look down her groups, Just as they went about with anti-American or anti-war| | Civil Enginaering Mining, Ail Subjects refity & Guilds)
her timber-merchant ‘husband, Then he met her. “She was very throat with a laryngoscope when~ seizing printing-presses and the themes, pot SACHOOL eer ee sets wikia ing Wiedlens Tolasrenhe ana
Henry Johansen, ill in German- jovial,” he reported, surprised and ewer they need encouragement.” pest office buildings, so they weit A Communist film magazine a Diesel Engines Plastics Telephony
occu yea Oslo. ” slightly disappointed. It is quite a throat. Sir Milsom jpout seizing names. recently published a_ list of thes i If your requirements are not listed above, write us for free advice
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PAGE SIX



May 6,

Sunday,

Coe

Caribbean Commission

THE Caribbean Gommission mets in
Barbados this week. The Commission was
created on March 9, 1942, and was known
as the Anglo Caribbean Commission. On
August 9, 1943 the United States State
Department issued a statement that the
British Government had generously offer-
ed to meet under reciprocal aid all claims
for compensation due to owners of private
property in the eight British territories
where bases had been leased to the United
States. “The generous offer of the British
Government” said the statement, “serves
to make these bases stand out not only as
effective weapons in time of war but also
as tangible reminders at all times of the
friendship and co-operation of the British
Government.”

This note of Anglo-American co-opera-
tion was sounded again in 1944 when the
first report of the Commission was publish-
ed. The affairs of the United States and
Britain in the Caribbean had become what
the report called “hopefully intermingled.”
Co-operation in solving common problems
was obviously needed, and the Commission
was formed to provide a mechanism for
the purpose. The Commission’s greatest
programme centred around the provision
of food supplies in face of an acute ship-
ping shortage, The West Indies Schooners’
Pool was organised and local Governments
were stimulated to produce more food.
Jamaica was able to cut rice imports en-
tirely. And Barbados increased the area
under food production to 35 per cent of the
land which has been under sugar cane
before the war. The Commission also gave
help in recruiting West Indian workers for
the United States.

Since the war the Commission has beei
feriding to concentrate on research through
the Research Council, and the name
was changed _ from ’ Anglo-Ameri-
can Caribbean Commission to
its shorter form when Holland and
France joined the organisation in 1946.
This was an event of outstanding import-
ance because France, Holland and the
United States all treated their West Indian
possessions in a way radically different
from that of the United Kingdom. The
United Kingdom has proclaimed its inten-
tion to give the British Caribbean territor-
ies either individually or collectively self-
government within the British Common-
wealth. Puerto Ricans have full protection
of the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of
the United States and elections are by uni-
versal suffrage. Citizens of the Virgin
Islands of the United States have had full
United States citizenship since 1932.

The first clause of the Dutch Constitution
defines the Kingdom of the Netherlands as
consisting of the territory in Europe and
the territories beyond the seas. These ter-
ritories overseas are “parts of the Kingdom,
inalienable parts, which cannot like mere
colonies (e.g. the British West Indian colo-
nies) be ceded or sold or put into any ex-
ceptional position outside the constitution-
al fabric without the Kingdom as a whole
being violated.”

Martinique and Guadeloupe are to-day
departments of Metropolitan France. The
development of French Caribbean territor-
ies is being integrated with the develop-
ment of France herself. To quote from a
correspondent in the Crown Colonist of
June 1946; “Carribean territories are faced
with the question: Can unity in diversity
be achieved without loyalty to a central
idea ? The Dutch have answered the ques-
tion by declaring equal partnership in the
Kingdom as the ultimate end of their pol-
icy. The French have answered the ques-
tion by an increase in the status of citizen-
ship, involving equality of treatment. How
far can the British answer the question by
holding out partnership in a Common-
wealth as the goal to be attained?” On
the answer to that question depends every-
thing, including the usefulness of the
Caribbean Commission in the area.

All the signs at present seem to indicate
that whereas the interests of French, Dutch
and American territories receive first-hand
attention in the parent metropolitan coun-
tries, the interests of the British Caribbean
territories are left to a Colonial Office
whose hands are already over-burdened
with the cares of Africa and other territor-
ies whose future development offers no
parallel to that of the West Indies. There
is no doubt that the Caribbean Commission
could become a regional organisation of
some importance to the area, and that its
usefulness would be strengthened by the
inclusion of the three independent repub-
lies of Cuba, Haiti and San-Domingo. But
it can do little until the United Kingdom
formulates a policy for the British Carib-
bean which is not so vacillating and un-
satisfactory as the present arrangement by
which the real interests of the Caribbean
are sacrificed to the gods of Quantity and
Fear in the Caribbean, while its economic
destinies are hammered out by the British
Board of Trade.

Bankruptcy of any effective policy in the
Caribbean makes the Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare organisation powerless
and the Caribbean Commission is unlikely
to produce anything as effective in time of
peace as it did in time of war, until the
other nations -participating know more



about British intentions, Meanwhile re-
search is a harmless method of spending
money provided by the metropolitan coun-
tries responsible for the area.



Strange

THE strange case of the British Union
Oil Company which gave the House of
Lords the opportunity for a most impres-
sive debate raises other questions for the
future. The British Union Oil Company
throughout its negotiations with the Gov-
ernment of Barbados stuck to the opinion
that more than one oil company operating
in an island the size of Bar-
bados would be undesirable,
The British Union Oil Company did
not win their point. But another British
Company not engaged in the uncertain
business of oil digging has been far more
fortunate than the British Union Oil Com-
pany. Under the Cables and Wireless
(West-Indies) Limited Act 1909 the Com-
pany, to quote Sir John Maude’s neglected
Report on Local Government in Barbados
is exempted from “all taxation parochial
or governmental.”

It does seem strange that the Govern-
ment of Barbados should have given the
British Union Oil Company such a hard
choice, when preferential treatment is
meted out to a company which has since
the Act under reference become the pro-
perty of the British Government. Sir John
Maude in his report was at pains to state
that “a special exemption of this kind is to
be deprecated.” Why should the Govern-
ment of Barbados show no concern about
the 41 year tax free holiday enjoyed by
Cable and Wireless Ltd., which also has a
monopoly in the area, and regard a British
Oil Company as a good sitting target for
the kind of negotiations which have not
resulted in their favour?

Nor is the preferential treatment en-
joyed by the nationalised British Company
of Cable & Wireless only remarkable when
compared to the non-preferential treat-
ment accorded the private British Com-
pany (the British Union Oil Company).

The Government of Barbados is continu-
ing the dangerous policy of refusing aid to
the hotel industry in the island at a time
when it subsidises unemployment by grant-
ing doles to temporary workers in the
United States. It can simultaneously
afford to squander $192,000 on 4,000 men,
and refuse to give investors in hotels the
opportunity to increase the island’s reve-
nue by expanding the tourist industry. But
it is quite content to let Cable and Wireless
go on enjoying an exemption which in the
words of Sir John Maude is “to be depre-
cated.”

If the sequel to the oil story turns out to
be similar to the nursery rhyme of old
Mother Hubbard and there is no-oil of
great quantity in Barbados, those respons-
ible or acquiescent in the Government’s
failure (unique in the Caribbean) to in-
crease employment in Barbados by encour-
aging more tourists who only require more
hotel accommodation to come here, cannot
hope to escape censure.



Mistimed Criticism

THE critical attack on the B.A.F.A. offi-
cials appears to be peculiarly mistimed.
For the first time since the Football Asso-
ciation came into existence in 1910, the
officials, within recent months, have been
making special efforts to develop the game
in the island. During the past two years

the games were so organised that the
Association, at the end of the season, could
show reasonable profits—a result that had
almost been unknown in the past, The
officials quite rightly are still not satisfied
with the financial position of the Associa-
tion, nor with the standard of play. They
realise that the standard of play and fin-
ance are interrelated and that the condi-
tions under which football is played in this
island must be changed if the standard is
to be improved. The Association must plan
for the future. The football season must
not be played in the dry season and the
game must be played on a full size ground.
The Association realises that changes such
as these can only materialise when it
possesses its own playing field.

These improvements cannot be made
overnight, nevertheless because a football
ground is not immediately forthcoming,
the public must not infer that the Associa-
tion is not interested in the matter. They
are preparing behind the scenes, They
have invited, ona reciprocal basis the foot-
ball team of the Kingston Cricket Club to
play a series of matches in Barbados later
this month, and in order that the public
can be assured of getting good value for
their money, and also that the Barbados
team will not be disgraced, the Association
has instituted an intensive training course.
They have been fortunate in getting the ser-
vices of a capable coach in the person of
Mr. G. Wilkes, of the Lodge School, a play-
er of considerable experience of football
in England. The course which extends over
a period of three weeks is planned to build
up physical fitness, improve technique, and
demonstrate the finer points of the game.

The officials of the B.A.F.A. and the
players are making strenuous efforts to
improve the standard of the game in Bar-
bados. The public, too, can help by flock-
ing in their thousands to watch the inter-
club and intercolonial matches and in this
way assist in building up the fuhds so
necessary, if the Football Association is
ever to acquire its own playing field.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

One Night With Bustamante

he
All 1 know about Mr, Busta
mante is that he ig a good

companion, I have never spent
a more pleasant social night in
the Caribbean than the night of
the British elections. There
were about six of us, sitting on
the American style upholstered
couches of the Santa Maria iu
Grenada, The wireless was kept
on until two and Busta and Miss
Longbridge (his secretary) ~pro-
vided the drinks, No one else
was allowed to pay. It is. im-
possible to recapture the atmo-
sphere of excitement and good
fun, of that distant night oi
February 1950. But no one
sould forget the charm, tne
gaiety of William Alexander
Bustamante. I first saw Mr.
Bustamante in the Chamber of
the House of Lords, which the
Commons were then using. David
Gammans went up to chat with
aim and Arthur Creech Jones,
hen His Majesty's Secretary of
State for the Colonies, was not
slow to pay his respects. Busta
never forgot Creech Jones and
when Mr. Creech Jones failed tv
get a seat in the elections of
1950, Busta was one of the first
to send him a_ cable regretting
the fact. Soon after Mr. Creech
Jones and Captain Gammans left
Busta’s box, I looked up to see
Bustamante, his white tie flapping
in excitement, waving with
enthusiasm across the House to
the other side of the gallery, He
was waving at Lord Milverton,
the man who jailed him for 1?
months, Lord Milverton also
tet him out of jail and Bustarmiant+
tells the tale that he “never
holds it against him.”

In Grenada, Busta was _ fas-
cinated by the magnificent prison
set 500 feet on a hill looking
down on the capital of St
George’s. “That ought to have
been a first class hotel,” he told
me. Busta seldom sheds his
white tie which matches his hair
In Grenada he wore a white tie
with his pepper brown tweeds
by day and wore it with his more
formal black at the Governor's
cocktail party for the sugar
delegates, Busta loves people
and he will walk out on anybody
just to please people. He was
talking to me one moment with
hands outstretched and his
elbows sticking out of his jacket
sleeves when carnival _ revellers
drove up to the hotel shouting
for Busta. The next I saw was



By George Hunte

Busta, six feet two of him, receiv-

ing the plaudits of the crowd
Busta himself tells the story of
how the people missed seeing

him in St. Kitts, when he passed
through on his way to Grenada
In a letter rece'ved in Grenade
he learnt that emplorers had

Mr. Rustamante



. good companion.

given employees the day off
come and welcoine him,
ployers and emp‘oyees
their thousands”,
in, Grenada: ‘They
bicycle, on foot, in
some walked all day

came

and

motor cars"
they he is a good companion.



It is impossible in a news
paper article to echo the voice
and intonation of Bustamante. J
enjoy listening to him in) much
the same way as I enjoy watcli-
ing a rollicking good actor like
George Robey on the stage. No
two men could be more unlike
but there is something of the
showman in both,
a mistake however to think of
Bustamante as a showman and
politician only. He speaks to
the gallery, but even
sandwiches in some good horse
sense. The night he walked out
on “Pop” Beasley’s dinner which
was attended by
of the Windwards and his wife
Busta told a public meeting in
the market square of St
George’s “you've got to work hard
if you want to make good.
What could be better advice?
But Bustamante is confusing
until you get to know him, if
you ever get to know him. “I
am pro American”, Busta _ told
me in the lounge of the Sante
Maria, “I love the British, but
what has the British Governmeni
done for the colonies? Nothing
but make them a dumping ground
for British manufactures.”

Publicly the same day he was|%

eooiing down some of the hot
heads who were
another Boston “tea party.”
“What,” he asked, “is the use of
throwing mud at
whom you are going to bargain?
We want to do _ business with
Britain. You don’t throw mud
at people with whom you de
business.” If I had to guess the
secret of Bustamante’s great
popularity (and he is the. only
politician in the area who has @
West Indian following) I wouila
put it down to his sense of good-
will, His gesture in distributing
thousands of bananas to poor
Londoners in the East End wa:
the action of a man witha big
heart. And only a man with ¢
big heart would describe his
secretary Miss Longbridge ~ a:
“the brains behind the line aac
wicked with the pen.” Those who

to know Bustamante best say thai
“Em- they don’t
came in stand with him nor how to tke
Busta told me what he says, but no one wiio has] ¢
on spent even a short time in hisj;$
admit that|@
“Things | §

know where they

presence can fail to

were so disappoiated to find me happen wherever Busta goes,” 1s

gone.”

no bad way to pay him tribute,



SITTING ON THE FENCE

“TI have instructed my _ staff
that if a woman comes through
the turnstiles with four children
and no money to spend she shall
be treated with the same consid-
eration as would be given a for-
eign ambBassador,”—Major Les-
lie Joseph, director of the Festi-
val Gardens,

AN I do anything for you,
' madam?
You can mind your own ben
ee ‘or a start. '

ought you might like to take

the children on the roundabouts
or the dodgem?

wo is a fine thing, ain’t

t?

Wherever you go in the gardens,
madam, you will be welcomed as
if you were a queen and your

charming children princes and
princesses.
Coo, ark at im, Willie, be-

have, Ow many times ave I
told you what your andker-
chief's for?

Perhaps the dear little fellow
would like some refreshment?

If you're talkin about Willie
he never stops eating from the
time he gils up till the time he
goes to bed with the iccups. But
we just don’t happen to ave the
dough-ray~me. See?

Pardon madam?

The old bees and oney, if you
understand plain English. The
stuff that goes chink-chink and
rustle-rustle, Got it?

I comprehend, madam. But if
you are troubled by a temporary
financial embarrassment, may I
assure you on behalf of the direc-
tors that no ambassador from a
foreign State, with unlimited ex-
penses, could be more certain of
a warm and sincere welcome at
the Festival gardens?

You swallowed a dictionary
for your dinner?

As proof of my earnest desire to
make your visit a memorable one,
may I offer to escort you, or your
delightful elder daughter, free of
charge, on a trip through the
magic cave?

Oh, so that’s the lark, is it?
After my Elsie, eh? I’ve read
about your type in the papers,
If you will trust me, madam,

I wouldn't trust you if you
was handcuffed at the bottom
of a coalmine. Come along,



BY NATHANIEL GUBBINS

Elsie. Pull down your skirt and
do up your coat. There’s wolves
about.

Englishman’s House

“My husband goes out three
evenings a week, plays golf on
Saturdays and Sundays. When
at home he sleeps in a chair.
What am I io do about it?—
Letter to a sogial problenv
column,

HERE are so many things you
can do about it that I don’t
know where to begin.

Pins are an obvious weapon. So
is a jug of water. I advise you
to be more subtle.

As men are supposed to like
wives who remain young and kit-
tenish, be young and kittenish. Be
as young as three years old.

As he snores in the chair oppo-
site, throw yourself back to child-
hood and play that lovely game of
opening the eyelids and saying,
“Oo’s got boo eyes.” Or brown
as the case may be.

If this fails, there is still the
enchanting pastime of “fingers up
your nose.” As any three-year—
old will tell you, the first and
second fingers of either hand must
be forced as far as possible up the
nostrils until the victim howls for
quarter. If you wear long nails
the results will be startling.

Should he drov off to sleep
again, get a pencil and a piece of
paper, stick the pencil down his
open mouth as far as the tonsils.
When he wakes half-choked, ask
him to draw a horse, a pig, or a
bunny rabbit on the piece of paper.

If sleep overcomes him once
more, play your last card. Climb
on his knees, as children do,
scraping the shins, treading on the
soft underbelly. This is painful
enough when a two stone three-
year-old is the climber.

Your 11 stone and sharp high
heels will put him off sleeping
anywhere, except in bed.

Political Sensation
7 Government circles
will be amazed at the confir-
mation of a plot to unseat them
which I have supported ever since

they were elected in 1945,

OUR READERS SAY:

Did Not Blame Big
Merchants

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—i am a very busy man,
and do not have enough time to
complete my routine duties in
twenty-four hours, but in the
interest of truth and justice, I
must challenge your leading arti-
cle in today’s paper which accused
me of blaming the bég merchants
for rising cost of living.

Your article is a complete dis-
tortion of my statement, which
cannot be supported by any of the
large number of hearers or any
reporter who listened to my
speech,

In dealing with the rising cost
of living, I pointed out that it
was not fair to blame the Govern-
ment for it; because the world
market conditions were beyond
the control of this Government,

Moreover, I went on and pointed
out that at present the Govern-
ment was subsidising Foodstuffs
te the extent of over one million
dollars and through the subsidy,
the prices of certain food items
were kept at their present prices.

I read the items listed below to
the meeting.

This was done to point out that

the Government was aware of the
rising cost and without this sub-
sidy the cost of living would have
been higher





Readers who write letters
to the Editor of tha
“Advocate” are asked to
note that this newspaper
does not normally publish
letters which are not exclu.
sive to this newspaper.

Contributors to OUR
READERS SAY who write
under a nom-de._plume are
reminded that their names
must be sent to the Editor
as a sign of good faith,
Names are never disclosed

but are treated as confiden-
tial by the Editor, except in
Signed letters.





I also stated that owing to the
complex world conditions and the
shortage of certain basic raw ma-
terials, items like Sulphyr, Zinc,
Rubber, Tin Plate, Cotton and
Woollens had risen by astronomi-
eal figures on the New York

markets, and, therefore, it fol-
Item Present Retail
Price
Fish Salted 22c. per 1b
Flour es os a ee
B.A.F. ‘% ws i re
Pork-salted (a) .. 17. ,,
|) Pee ea ce
(O}iiva:) BBG 5 ”
CG). ee
(e) «. 29.
(f)- .. 88e,

u »”

T am able to reveal that their
chief opponent is not Mr. Winston
Churchill, nor the Right-wing
Press, nor even Sir Waldron
Smithers.

It is Old Mother Nature her-
self.

When the wind-blown hag
visited the Sea Nest one bitter
April morning, she confessed that
she had fixed the weather for
seven years, with the avowed in-
ner of getting the Government
out, j

“T arranged droughts when the
crops needed rain,” she said, ‘and
rain when the crops needed sun-
shine.”

“Did you arrange last win-
ter’s rain and the spring floods?”
“Of course. I believe I have

drowned most of the early sown
wheat and hope to reduce the na-
tional milk yield so that the Food
Ministry’s promise of cream this
summer will not be fulfilled.”

“Were you responsible for the
hard winter which destroyed
thousands of sheep?”

“I regard that as one of my
greatest achievements. I think
nearly a million sheep and cattle
perished in the snow. This put
the meat ratiom in peril and
forced the Government into
a difficult position with’ foreign
meat importers.”

“What are your plans for the
future?”

“I shall certainly send a lot of
rain to ruin what’s left of the har-
vest.”

“May I ask you why you're
doing this?”

“Because, my dear man, I’m a
Conservative.”

“What will be your attitude
if the Government are defeated
at the next General Election?”
“Then I shall send rain in the

autumn, dry weather for the win-
ter plough, light showers and
warmth to nourish the spring
sowings and hot sunshine for the
ripening corn.”

“Do you think you will get
the Government out?”

_“T nearly did it last time. Next
time I shall succeed. They can
make their speeches, write their
articles, present their arguments.
But I, True Blue Mother Nature;
am the one to do it.”

London Express Service,



lows that an island importing
large quantities of goods must
face rising prices.

I never blamed any big, small
or medium merchants for the in-
crease in cost of living, and I must
point out that my status in life is
by my conviction, character and
sincerity in the cause of the work-
ing class movement that I have
chosen freely, without the help or
assistance of any big merchant.
Whenever I have cause to blame
the big merchants for anything, I
shall do so without fear,

T am indignant about your
article because it is untrue and
you claim that your paper is fair,
therefor give a true and accurate
report on people,

Finally, criticise me or my Party
at any time, but do not accuse us
of statements we have not made.

F. L, WALCOTT,
Barbados Progressive League,
Bridgetown,
May 4, 1951.
Subsidy Retail Price

without Subsidy
$12.90 pr. blk. 234c, per Ib

$ 2,36 lle.

94ce. per bag 8e. ar}
Increase

$1300 per Bri. Te. per

Amount voted $1,076,780,00.

It would bo] \
then hel%

the Governor] %

agitating for| $

people with] §

That’s




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SUNDAY,

OUTSTANDING

MAY 6,



Although the present owner cf
Drax Hall, the son of Admiral
Hon. Sir Reginald Aylmer
Ranfurly Pli tt »Erle












Drax, K.C.B., f

the foundation of

fortune was made in Barb:
Oldmixen, the historian

West Indian says that Colonel
Drax, from a tock of three
hundred pounds, ais 2d the
greatest estate of any planter of
his time except Mr. -Richard
Walter.

Col. James Drax, who was
created a Baronet by Charles [l,
pisyed an important part in the
history of this island, His estate,
Drax Hall, was one of the first

spots of ground to be cleared and
cultivated, and he was one of the



chief people responsible for
turning Barbados into a “sugar
island

In Barbados there was a pre-
suce of development con-
¢ g for generation. The
f crops planted were tobacco,



cottoa, indigo and ginger together
with food crops such as plantains,







ava, beans and corn. Culti-
vation at this time was dene by
smallholders, a condition which

the advent of cane altered, lead-
ing the appearance of the
capitalist planter and the dis-
placement of the smallholder,

It is recorded that for several
years the art of sugar boiling
remained a secret, known only to
Drax and a few other gentlemen;

to





who had employed a Duteh
planter from Brazil to superin-
tend their wor Major Scott,
writing in’ 1667 says “€ok.. Holdup
was the first that made sugar in
Barbados, but it came to little
till the great industry and more
thriving genius of Sir James
Drax engaged in that great
work.”

There is no record of when
Drax Hall was actually — built,
but tradition fixes it at about
1650 The architecture is
Jacobean, and although Schom-

burgk did not like it, saying that
“its appearance imparts a gloomy
character to the whole landscape





around,” I found it a charming
mansion.

The house is surrounded by
trees—evergreens, tamarinds and
mahoganies—and when the wind-
mill was working, Drax Hall
must h looked very pic-
turesque. The entrance to the
house is off centre to the West,

and at the East there is a square



drawing room. To the North
there is a range of three equal
rooms, the centre one containing
the magnificent stair. This is the
usual location of the stair in a
Jacobean house,

The stair hall opens into the

trance hall through a_ broad
elliptical arch in the style- of
ducobean codwork, The wood-
work, have been im-



which may









ported, shows E ish country Ja-
cobea lip at its best.
“The air” Waterman, “is



an excellent example of the best
design of the period The
English quality of the kouse is to
be seen in this stair. There Is. ng
other example on this side of the
Atlantic that displays com-

as

1951



HOMES=5



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

(aa eet a

DRAX HALL, ST. GEORGE

pletely the characteristics
Jacobean stvir building.”

of

Writing
Schomburg
“The - forest
property
formerly

ja tne last century,
said of Drax Hall
attached to the
seems to have bee:
of freat extent, and is

famed for traditional tales which
are still related by the working

class. This forest has now nearly
disappeared; a small portion only
clothes the’ ‘precipitous heights;
and the level ground near the
foot of the cliff, which was former-
ly covered with trees has proved
too valuable to be allowed to re.
main overgrown only by bri{ih-
weed with here and there the tim.
ber cf a fustic tree.”

It is said that the mastick tim-
ber frem the originel forest
fo:med the beams of Drax Hall
and was used to make the stair.
In thé loft I saw those old beams,
rough hewn with an adz. The date
on the lead water-heads of the
mansion is 1756, and one ‘of the
outbuildings bears the date 1774.
Like St. Nicholas Abbey, Drax
Hall has a fire-place, but it we>
built up many years ago. During
its existence, Drax Hall has
weathered several severe hurri-
canes, and it is said that either the
great hurricane of 1780 or that of
1831 swept away the upper part
of the south facade of the mansion.

Sir James Drax seems: ‘to have
lived like a prince. Occasionally
he used to kill an ox, an example
few of his fellow planters could
afford to follow since oxen were
used in cultivating the land. He
used..to.eat extremely well, For
instance this is the second course
at one of his banquets: A dish of
marrow bones, ‘potato pudding,
a leg of pork, fricasse of pork, ‘a

CYPR

Pictures

by



IAN. LaTOUCHE

THE SITTING ROOM with the dining room in the background. When
Sir James Drax held his banquets the table used to stretch the whole

length of the two rooms.

dish of bailed chickens, shoulder
of a young goat dressed with his
own blood and thyme, a kid with
a pudding in its belly, a sucking
pig with a sauce of the brains, a
shoulder of mutton, a pastry of
the side of a young goat, a loin of
veal, three young turkeys, two
capons, two hens with eggs in a
dish, four ducklings, eight turtl,
doves, three rabbits, and two Mus.
covy ducks larded and seasoned
well with pepper. and salt.

The means of recreation how

cver—apart from eating — were
but scant. There was neither hunt
ing nor hawking, to which the
Manters had been addicted in
“ng and. All that Drax seems _ to
have been able to do fer sport was
wo make some of his negroes play
it rapier and dagger, which they
lid very skilfully. He also got
some amusement by putting a
Muscovy duck into a pond, and
getting some of the best swimmers
among his negroes to try to catch
he duck in the water.



DRAX HALL boasts the finest Jacobean staircase this side of the Atlantic.

Met Death Through

Negligent

A NINE MAN JURY a

a labourer of Hall’s Road,

through the negligence of
of Hanson Hill,

Douglas to reverse the lorry

to death.

The inquest into Brewster's
death was held at District “B”
Court, St. George yesterday morn-
ing. The Coroner was Mr. C. W.
Rudder, Reynald Brewster a 19-
year-old labourer of Halls Road
was killed on the spot on April 27
when the motor lorry G.253 rolled
over him while he was working at

Francia Plantation, St. George
about 3.30 p.m. The driver of the
lorry was FitzHerbert Douglas

who is also owner.

A post mortem examination was
performed at the District “B”
Mortuary and this showed that
the deceased died from shock and
haemorrhage from injuries re-
ceived.

When the inquiry which lasted
for over three hours was started
yesterday, first witness called was
Jennie Wooding, a labourer of
Halls Road, St. Michael. She said
that on April 27 she was working
at Francia Plantation canefield
and was helping with the loading

of canes on the lorry G,253.
Sometime in the afternoon the
rain began to fall and she took

shelter under the platform of the
lorry.

Other workers
platform of the
Two men she_ recognised were
stooping next to her whom she
knows by the names of Harding
and Gooding. The deceased was

went under the
lorry with her.

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greed that Reynald Brewster,

St. Michael, met his death
Vernon. Gooding, a labourer
who directed FitzHerbert
G 253 which crushed Brewster

under the truck and the
was covered with trash,

aiso
ground

Sheitered Under Lorry

Douglas who was driving the
lorry told them to come from un-
der the truck and she did so.
After Douglas spoke to them he
reversed the truck and then she
heard Gooding said “Skipper,
look you mash this fellow.”

They usually call Douglas
“Skipper”. Douglas got out of
the truck and went to the spot
where Brewster was lying.
Brewster appeared unconscious
and was lying between the front
and rear wheels of the truck.
She could not remember hearing
anybody telling Douglas to re-
verse the truck. om

Edson Harding, a truck hand of
Kew Road, St. Michael said that
on April 27 he was loading cane

on the lorry G.253 in Francia
Plantation canefield, St. Geprge.
Other men were assisting, him

with this job and Brewster was
one of the men, About 3.30 p.m,
the same day a heavy fall of rain
came and he took shelter under
the platform of the lorry.

While under there he noticed
Gooding and Brewster. After
a time Douglas the driver and
owner of the truck told them to
come from under the lorry. He





BEFORE
THE PRICE





we








6c.

00
in

ADVANCES 4!

rushed from under the lorry and
shortly after Douglas reversed the
lorry. While the lorry was revers-
ing he noticed that one of the rear
wheels had rolled over Brewster's
body. There were about three
tons of cane on the platform of
the truck.

To the Coroner: Harding said
that the lorry had travelled about
six feet eight inches before it had
rolled over the body of the
deceased who was lying on the
ground.

FitzHerbert Eckley Douglas, the
owner of the motor lorry G—253,
and who lives at Dash Valley, St.
George said that on April 27 he
was hauling cane from a field at
Francia Plantation, St. George.
About 3 p.m. the same day there
was a heavy rainfall and the
labourers that were working in
the field ran under the platform
of the lorry to take shebter. This
is a habit of theirs when the rain
is falling.

“Come Back, Skipper”
After the rain had nearly fin-
ished he told them to get from
under the platform of the truck

as he was going to move it. He
started the engine and when a
voice told him “Come back
Skipper” he reversed the truck.
He had not reversed the truck
very far when he heard a man
said “Hold Skipper, a boy get

mash.” He stopped the truck and
on going to the side of the lorry
saw Brewster who had _ been
working with them for about
three days in the field, lying in an
unconscious state on the ground.*
There were about two tons of
cane on the platform of the lorry.

To the Jury: Douglas said that
the man who told him to reverse
was Vernon Gooding who usually
directs him when he is reversing
the truck in canefields. As far as
he knows Brewster was not on

i?

bad terms with anybody working
on the truck.

Douglas said that he-has been
driving lorries for about 19 years.

After this evidence was heard,
Capt. Grant then informed the
Coroner that he had no more eye-
witnesses to produce. The Coro-
ner then summed up and the Jury
after a 20-minute deliberation re
turned their verdict.



3 IN HOSPITAL AFTER
DANCE

(From Our Own Corresponden
ST, GEORGE'S, May 3. |
Three men were taken to hospi-

tal after a.dance held as part of
the M.M.W.U.’s wage victory
celebrations. The police are to

take action,

Mr. M A. G. Hanschell, new
Director of Agriculture, arrived
in the colony last Sunday eveni:
from St, Vincent where he was
formerly Superintendent of Agri-
culture, Mr. Hanschell, second son
of Mrs. Hanschell of ‘“Bosvigo’
Barbados has served in British
Guiana and Sierra Leone.





VISITING GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, May ¢
Mr. O. W. Roskill, an Indust:
Consultant from the United King
dom, is on a_ second visit to
Grenada after v ing St. Vin
cent, where he was accompanied
by Mr, Alistair _McLeod-Smith,
Financial and Economic Adyise#
to the Windward Islands. He is
holding further talks with th
Economic Development Commi
tee of the Legislative Council on
the possibility of establishing new
industries in the colony.







Sizes 20 to 24. Each





BY

FAN GALE



arch.



THE WOQDWORK of this arch, which may have been

imported,

shows Bnglish country Jacobean craftsmanship at its bost



DURING either the great hurricane of 1780 or that of 1831 the upper
part of the south facade was swept away.

American Column

A FRIEND SPEAKS
FOR BRITAIN

(From R. M. MacCOLL)

NEW YORK,
The shrewd voice of a staunca
friend of Britain was raised again
to-night—at a time when there is

much criticism of Britain in
America,
Lewis Douglas, ex-ambassador



to London, told 1,100 people gath-
ered in the Waldorf-Astoria'’s
Grand Ballroom:

“The attitude of caution which
3ritain has revealed towards cer-
tain proposals in the Far East has
caused a certain number of people
to raise their eyebrow

“There are various reasons for
what has appeared to be Britisn
caution, It partly reflects an atti-
tude common to several members
of the Commonwealth, including
Canada and Australia.”

And Douglas added: “Britain
and the United States need each

other far more to-day than at

iny time in their history

“Ln between the two maior seat
of power—the U.S.S.R. and the

United States in the West 3ritain
represents the last reliable bastion

of strength between the Iron
Curtain and oup.own shores.”
THE big-circulaticn New York

Daily News does not often compli-

ment Britain. But its main edi-
torial admires us for being “far
wiser and more realistic about



gambling” than the Americans

It gives Britain unstinted praise

for the way we do it, and ends
How long do you suppose it will
be before we get as smart as the
British on this?”

BUT the Hearst newspapers say
“Why are British propagandists
falling on us just now like a plague
of locusts? Wherever you go there
is an Englihman to make a speech
as though we needed instruction
The point is—do we have to lister

o”

to them?

IN MICHIGAN there is a com-
plete town up for sale. Its name
is Nahma and its population is 750
Neason; After 70 years’ operation
ihe town’s only industry, a Jumber
company, is closing. Price, includ-
ing an airport and golf course—a |



quarter of a million dollar
AMERICA is laughing
waggisn G.I. who, mindful of |
army anxiety about being sent |
home, stuck up the following dog- |
gerel on a Korean telegraph |
pole:
‘Disagree with Harry if you
wanna get back,
You don’t think it's true? Then |
ask Ole Mac!”
AFTER the Cambridge rowing
ying everybody is now hoping
that Oxford—with their stay
miler’, 22-year-old Roger Ban
nister—will do it again. Bannister

races against America’s best, Don
Gehrmann and Fred Wilt, in Phil-
adelphia on Saturday



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VMARVEN’S CANADIAN SODA WATERS—per tin 1.49
SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF WITH CEREAL—per tin 57
T'S CHEESE ner tin 57
VIENNA SAUSAGES-—ver tin j 61
KRAFT CHEESE & MACARONI—per tin 37
SAGO & TAPIOCA—ver lb. +22
HEINZ SPAGHETTI & CHEESE—lze. tin 40
HEINZ OVEN BAKED BEANS WITH PORK 50
IMPERIAL SLICED CLING PEACHES—per tin 64
SOUTH AFRICAN GUAVAS, Larce — per tin 53
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"thee ea. Aaa




PAGE EIGHT



The astonishing

LADY WILDE

By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

SPERANZA: a biography of Lady Wilde. By Horace Wynd-

ham. Boardman.
SCAR WILDE'S mother
pitying or

15s. 247 pages.

receives irom history a shrug,

amused. She deserves something better—

and a biography more polished than Mr. Wyndham’s, She

was a tragedy queen playing her part in a painful farce.
Her preposterous figure takes on a kind of grandeur

irom her deep sense of are: She believed in the innocence

of her husband and her son.

Sir William Wiide was Dublin's
leading oculist and gallant. By a
half suecessful operation, he
Bernard Shaw's father squint
outwards instead of inwards. As
the result of extra-professional
activities, he fathered a brood cf
illegitimate children.

As may happen to the most
careful (philanderer, Sir William
ence cayght a tartar, Mary Jose-
phine Travers. Lady Wilde wrote

letter to this young woman's
father, declaring that his daugh-
ter was employing low newspaper
boys to disseminate offensive
placards alleging an intrigue be-
tween Sir William and herself.
Miss Travers sued for libel.

Her evidence showed that, at
a critical moment during her at-
tendance as a patient in Sir

William's consulting room, she
had fainted, “Pray rouse yourself
or we shall both be ruined,” she
heard the oculist say as she came
to. Miss Travers alleged only one
of them was ruined

She was, in the end, awarded
a farthing damages. Sir William
was not permitted by his counsei
to give evidence. As Professor
Tyrell, the modernist theologian
said: “He ‘is a pithecoid*® person
of extraordinary sensuality and
eowardice, and funking the wit-
ness box left him without a de-
fender.”

In fact, Sir William lived ‘on
in Dublin, respected and affluent,
When he died, his widow fled to
London, where, in a gilded laurel
wreath, two crinolines and = an
eriental scarf she held a literary
salon

Curtains were drawn to ex-
clude the daylight; if the gas-bill
had not been paid, the room was
lighted by penny candles; it was
dreadfully furnished — and
crowded with celebrities.

As we passed, there was less
gas, fewer candles, and fewer
guests. Lady Wilde had to com-
plain of the “really extraordinary
attitude of the landlord.” He ex-
pected to be paid his rent,

She left in disdain for Chelsea.
‘I want to live on some high
piace, Primrese Hill or Highgate,
iecanse I was an eagle in my
youth.” But-Chelsea it had to be.

There was worse to come, far
werse Ospar, the adored, indulged
nod britiamt son, might develop
pecullaseamannerisms, might, for
cxamph{Sitrive for one of her
parties his hair one mass of
little rir curled tight “like a
negro paliifed white.” Her own
appearance “being so remarkable,
Lady Wilde would not notice a
trifle like that.

But in the end the disgrace was
too appalling to be ignored. The
old woman, deserted and bitterly
poor, could only hurl back at the
hostile werld her belief that her
son had not done, could not do,
cnything to be ashamed of. In a
few months she was dead.

The family provided a florid
inscription for the tombstone at
Kensal Green, but no funds for a
permanent sepulture. Seven years
jater she was reburied in a com-
mon grave.

A MIRROR’ FOR ‘
Translated from the Persian by
Reuben Levy. Oresset. 15s.
265 pages,

Sixteen years after the Battle
of Hastings, the worldly wise

Prince of Gurgan, on the southern
shores of the Caspian Sea, wrote
for his: son u book of advice for



both cases she was wrong.



LADY WILDE
+ « & salon in Cheleen,

one about to engage in polities,
business, war or love.

The Prince has few _ illusions
and a good deal of dry wit, “Re-
gard it as a great misfortune,” he
says, “to stand in need of kinsmen
humbler than oneself: it is better
to die in the water than to beg
help of a frog.”

His attitude to sport would find
little acceptance in Britain: “When
the ball. comes in your direction
return it; but take no part in the
scrimmage. You can achieve your

purpose merely by iooking on
That is how men of distinction
play polo.”

Men of distinction display a
more virile spirit in war: “You
must breakfast on your enemy

before he dines on you.”

On finance his opinions are
downright cynical, “You must
realise that the common run ot
men have an affection for the rich
without regard to their own per-
sonal concern, and that they dis-
like poor men even when their
own interests are not at stake.’
It follows that you should never
grant public office to the impecu-
nious,

A young man setting up in life
will wish to find suitable staff for
his harem. To be employed in .he
women’s apartments a_ slave
should have withered limbs, scanty
hair, a shrill voice, thick lips, a
flat nose, etc., etc.

To discourage his son from des-
pising an insignificant enemy, he
tells of the bold, witty and well-
regarded brigand Muhadhdhab,
who, slipping on a _ melon-rind,
drew his knife and stabbed it,
His servants, protesting at the
undignified . display, the brigand
retorted: “The melor-rind over-
threw me, it is my enemy. An
‘enemy must not be despised, even
thougk he is worthless."

It is sad to know that the recipi-
ent of all this wisdom managed
to hold his throne for only seven
years.

EARLY TO SEW. By Anne Piper.
Putnam. 8s. 6d, 194 pages

Awarded Evening Standard
prize for the most promising
opening sentence of the year,

Anne Piper wins with, “I married
most of them in the end” She
specialises in opening sentences,
e.g., from later episodes in this






tog S

THE
STONE...

ANCHORS ARE
‘OUT’ AT THE
FESTIVAL—

. « « and this is a long-focus view
of the figures—dwarfaa the
arrowed policeman — taken
across the river. The mural ts
called “ The Istanders.”” Axustrion-
born Si’gfried Charoux, now
British, worked on it for « year.

Last night he went to South
Bank to watch alterations to the
foodlighting.

from

ALAS.

Do you remember Iola, the
lioness who bit me on the behind?
She caught me bending in Darkest
Africa last year just as I was
getting into the bath.

Well, she is dead. She was shot
in mistake by a man who saw her
coming up his garden path and
didn’t know who she was.

Kenya may now be a safer
place for reporters to bathe in,
but the news has left me sad,
Every African traveller has a lion

story and Iola was the heroine of |

mine.

Most lion stories end with the
death of the lion, but up to now
mine didn’t. That's why it was
such a nice story. I lived to sit

down and Iola lived to become the |

most photographed lioness in
Kenya and appear in a film, yet
to be shown, called “No Vultures
Fly”.

Iola was brought up by a game
warden called “Tabs” at the
Tsavo National Park. He fed her
on the bottle and when she'd
finished he would put her over
his shoulder and pat her on the

sprightly account of one girl’s : :
serene “a Sehevad. very val back to bring her wind up.
for the rest of the summer.” “At 2 Abandoned
first I was glad to be alone.” She had been abandoned by her
*Ape-like, parents when only a day or two
World Copyright Reserved old. They didn’t put her on any-
ra one’s doorstep or leave a note with
her, but an African tracker heard

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SEA TURNS TO

A 40F1,.-SQUARE murat in
stone—just revealed by the
removal of scaflolding—brings the
sea to the South Bank Festival
exhibition it stands boldly in
front ot the Dome of Discovery.
But there are no waves, no
anchors, no nets, no boats,
Simply three rugged figures: a
fisherman and his wile, both wear-
ing the roll-neck jerseys in which
they toil, and their little son.
Steadtastly they gaze across the
flowing waters of the Thames. .

Said he: “1 decided not to use
ony Of those traditional things such
as onchors, but to introduce the
jeroet lo conmect {t with the sea.

“} usea vo models—the figures
are creations from my own head.

“1 estimates it would take at
least a tmtniyht to put up. And
1 was right.””

London Express Service





Wn a Harold Couway’s Show Talk

Sir Ralph Weighs The
Worth Of Making A Film

SIR RALPH RICHARDSON,
pack to the West End stage next
month, believes that no film sal-
ary is compensation for staying
out of the theatre too long. Not
even a five-figure salary—and he
can earn that in England or

Hollywood. =
Here is your true. legitimate
actor talking. The actor who

‘or E
emporarily left the cast of a Lon-
den play success, At Seven,
te film location scenes in Ceylon
—and who found the play off
when he returned.

So far as the public were con-

cerned, the.star was Home Too had

But Richardson’s doubts are
harf on the British studios where
outstanding actors are hard to
find. Hard, for instance, on Sidney
Gilliat—who puts his film about
Gilbert and Sullivan into produc-
tion this summer.

I don’t think he need hesitate.
This is ideal casting, and it is
high time we had a screen bio-
graphy about a British song-
writing team of genius, after all
those Hollywood memorials to
mediocrity. .

London theatre audiences won't
forget Richardson — or for that
matter, John ‘Mills, They would
probably > see them in the
picture, d films have never
cupngeren Stage stars’ reputa-
ions,

Bad ones, of course, are a dif-
ferent matter. ty our
best acters have become through
hard experience, shrewd critics of
sereen scripts, And with surtax
what it is, they are no longer
tempted to take a chance for the
sake of a nice fat cheque from
studios.

JOAN MILLER is an actress j

who could probably get all the
West End starring jobs she want-
ed, the impression she made in
Pick Up Girl just after the war
is not ea forgotten.

Instead, ss Miller prefers to
help her producer—husband Peter
Cotes, at the little Boltons Theatre
in Kensington—as actress, scene-
painter, anything which comes in
handy. Im good times, she @raws
£10 a week, the top salary; when
the box-office is slack, she leaves
her share in the kitty.



MY POOR LION!

Bernard Wicksteed “lourns

A Strang

her crying with hunger like a
baby.

She was so small you could hold
her in one hand, and if the

African hadn't found her she



Iola takes an interest in my work

A glass of sparkling ENO’S first thing in the morning is

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e Friend

one sniff and then
faces at her,

It was just like the girl in the
advertisements. Even her best
lion friends wouldn't tell her she
smelled of insecticide. So she just
sat there, and wistfully watched
them till they had gone.

When I went to stay with Tabs
at his camp in the bush Iola was
nine months old and weighed
170 lb, She loved people so much
that she used to jurmp up and put
her paws on their chests. You
had to say: “Down, Iola down,
there’s a good lion.”

She was shot on her way to
this country, where she was to

made nasty

make another film before going to

Dublin to marry a zoo lion there.
Tragic Escape

T had already planned a touch-

ing reunion of Androcles Wick-

steed

and the lioness. I was





Play safe! Brylcreem your hair. Dandruff on your collar,
loose hair on your comb-—these are danger signals that
point the need for Brylcreem’s double benefit:
{1) Day-long smartness. (2) Lasting hair health.
Massage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp,
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Brylcreem your hair — most

men do!
&

most ‘2 for Gloria Swanson. Instead, |
Bette Davis





On May 8 Joan Miller tackles
her biggest, and most provocative,
role since Pick Up Girl—the cen-
tral character in H. M. Harwood’s
and F. Tennyson Jesse’s play. A
Pin to See the Peep Show. Why

ative? Because the



— even more so, I gather, than |
the Vosper version we saw a few |
year’s back, le Like Us. }
If this new play could a a
West End transfer, Miss er’s
salary would jump 20-fold. But
the Lord Chamberlain who has
family protests on
the . Thompson subject, is
eum +, a
So Joan Miller, with faint hope,
is learning her long emotional
role for £10—and for love.

For ‘Gloria’ Read ‘Bette’

PRINCIPAL role in the film
Another Man's Poison was writ-

it. But what was good for

could be another star's, 7

poison—at least some of it.

From Settle, in
where the picture is on location, |
has come an S.OS. to script-|
writer Val Guest, who adapted |
the story from the play. |

He has had to drop all other
work—including a West End play
and a new Spanish-setting film
for Yolande Donlan—to hurry



North. oc, Oe

Official explanation, writing
some “local atmosphere” into the
script. My own guess: taking

some Swanson atmosphere out of
the star role.

Bette is faithfully eschewing
temperament for her English trip
But I would not blame her for
not picturing herself in a York-
shire Sunset Boulevard.

Queen Martita

End stage madness she will need
to make a violent mental switch.
Her film part is to be Queen
Eleanor of Aquitaine in the Dis-
nae poeta of Robin Hood.
ith Richard Todd as
Hood and the new
as Maid Marian, Walt Disney Is
virtuously proud that this English
picture => actually has an all-
cast.
WORLD COPYRIGHT eee

going to walk up to her backwards
und see if she recognised me,

defending his life, not his honour.

Tt isn’t the first African tragedy
of its kind. A few years ago a
lioness brought up in the same
way, was set free in the bush,
where she had a romance with a
reagnificent wild lion.

She was so proud of her litter
of cubs that she roamed round!
looking for some of her old
human friends to show them to.
One day she saw the camp of a
white hunter, and, full of happi-
ness, took her most handsome cub
in her mouth and went to pay a
call.

But the white hunter was a!
stranger to the district, and didn’t }
know her story. You can guess
the awful sequel.

Beachcomber the heartless fellow
says I should go into mourning
for Iola by sewing black crepe on
the seat of my pants.
















Yorkshire, ‘

SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

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SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

|LIBRARY OF
FILMS FOR
CHILDREN

The

SUNDAY







ADVOCATE PAGE NINE

en em





At The Cinema:
“?D CLIMB THE HIGHEST
MOUNTAIN”

LONGER
LASTING?

Definitely! Not even the most
expensive nail polish lasts longer

The Jittle girl with the angel’s smile,
£10,000—and a sad secret to learn

best motion pictures for
children prod 1ced in recent years ; rt
have been co ed by the National




Hy G. BB.

This week-end, drama both light and heavy seems to
be the keynote of the new films being shown. At the Empire
’'p CLIMB THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN is a simple and
often humourous drama of life in an American rural con-
gregation in the early days of this century, EDGE OF
DOOM, showing at the Plaza is heavy fare involving the
wurder of a Catholic Priest by a young boy, while ALL.
QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT which is being revived
at the Globe is an outstanding war film of the 1914—18
conflict,

Only Cutex contains the exclusive,
ingredient, Enamelon, The fine
lustre will remain on your nails
for days, No chipping, no peeling,
no fading. Choose from the
many exquisite fashion shades.

Children’s Film ibrary in New York
City for the delight of each new
generation of children

(By KARL G, PFEIFFER)

(From Parent's Magazine)

+ Every Saturday throughout the
Whuited States approximately 3,500
theatres show a special motion
F Picture for children. Every film
FP accepted tor these Saturday pro
grammes has passed several tests
before it is selected as especially
interesting to children, Committee
women have viewed it, discussed

desirable

Give vour lips that lovely, more

look with Cuter Lipstick, Comes
in the latest fashion shades that harmonize

it, and given their approval, and Unfortunately, I was unable te is told that the church cannot with your favorite nail polish,

100 New York school children, see this last film, but at the end of afford to give his mother an ex- C

age 8 to 12, have emphatically the column I will quote from the pensive funeral. ;

agreed that it is a film they New Yorker Magazine’s review. Filled with terror, hopelessness

like. Let's start with I'D CLIMB THE and despair, he turns against —_ <
A relatively recent feature of HIGHEST MOUNTAIN. It has a everyone in the struggle with his

community life, these programmes simplicity and genuine sincerity conscience and is ultimately led The World's Most P. lar N oli

are made peenaaay &-caw, aene that are most appealing. The to repentance through the sym- Wont oe Fopiter Neil Polish



profit, rapidly growing organiza— story is entertaining and the dra~ pathy and understanding of a

tion called the National Children’s matic situations ~ arise are young priest.

Film Library, sponsored by the natural and deeply human—just Filmed against the authentic ‘

Motion Picture Association of the type of crises that undoubt- background of Los Angeles slums GN: rr ES wie. bittev- weet

America. This library, caters to edly arose in the lives of the and “Skid Row” it is realistic, , 9 oe
people of a small rural settlement, stark drama — depressing — but ty

approximately 3,000,000 children and probably do to this day axpertly acted. Firley Granger, as

Gavdewia” by Goyw.:.a long-lasting
on the boy's guilt. VEw cof dence v oie e

" plowing onc EDGE OF DOOM fo, omantic meerings.
init aneawriur'sron’. tel GARDENIA

documentary covers all aspects of
the career of one of America’s

° ee ee oe pro- Based on the novel “Circuit jhe frenzied, bewildered boy gives
; amme, a c will ge e very Rider's Wife’ by Corra Harris, 4 fine performance in a demand-

best of pictures, selected with the
preatest care. However, that is not
he reason he will like it. He will
ike it because 100 youngsters of
»his own age and taste have liked it
before him,

herself a preacher's wife, it is the
story@of a young methodist min-
ister and his city-bred wife who
come to a small community in
the Blue Ridge Mountains of
north Georgia. How he wins the
devotion of his congregation and
helps his young wife to make the
necessary adjustments to her new
way of life makes delightful en-

ing role while Dana Andrews is
excellent as the young parish
priest, who accidentally stumbles

9

The Children’s Film Library was
the idea of Eric Johnston, former
resident of the Moticn Picture



ssociation. of America and at tertainment, His first sermon, most brilliant generals, from his

resent Administrator of the U.S. the crisis of an epidemic, the days as a cadet at West Point,
conomic Stabilization Agency. Sunday School picnic and his final through two World Wars, the
hile with the film industry Mr. farewell to his congregation are occypation. of Japan, his appoint

ohnston, a parent himself, felt all high spots in a sympathetic ment as the first Supreme United
at children, who make up a homespun story Nations Commander, the Korean

good share of the motion picture William Lundigan asthe earapaign and his final dismissat
pudience, were not getting the preacher is an excellent choice. py the President of the United
. Young, energetic, doing all the States, Under the circumstances,

onsideration due them from the

efilm industry. Children enjoy only things other men do as well as

displaying a personal interest in

this short is indeed “news.”

a few of each year’s film releases. ere ay SIGSTON is nearly eight. She has corn-gold curls and a smile like an angel’s.. She has his congregation as individuals ALL QUIET ON THE

7 Originally most films went into es meant 7 ~— ane fanaa . “

@eeerctirement as soon as they had That is the compensation decided upon by a Judge of the High Court whom she sat beside this week instead of simply a Geely of ae WESTERN FRONT

a een given initial distribution we eS Me! were in which she was terribly injured. me, Dr rites ~—_ mene Excerpt from the review in the

; : : r eae is the ensation for e fact— re i oa S characteristics are asiey " Foes ; Spl
Succeeding generations of children Palle es ike Saor ghite. She does not appreciate it yet—that she will never play and and naturally portrayed by Mr New | Yorker Magazine: All

Ouviet on the Western Front, a







had no opportunity to see the few Frances has already under, ‘ i Lundig: In a role that is a far
. : 5 : ; gone 12 operations in 18 months and faces another in two years’ time. aundigan, In-a role that is 8 har Alin rag fir released i
pictures which had a_ perennial The Judge refused to accept a settlement in Court for £8,000 but agreed to £10,000 which aevamies cry from her recent ones, Susan 7, that wl Sena Tar
pterest for them. Motion picture will bring Frances £12,850 when she is 21, Her father can obtain permission to draw on the money. Hayward plays the minister's too! Valop, and in battle scenes
roducers’ vaults contained dozens — for her education or a holiday overseas. In order to assist the little girl to keep up with her school Wif¢. Unsophisticated, though oie right oe "hace with the beat
classics such as “The Adven- work, hospital nurses have often stayed after duties to read to her, Tie GROG, SHO" DOREY See aver made. In all probability
oe * ~¢ Finn” ¢ ingly ¢ : 8 ¢ opes, 5 my :
es of Huckleberry Finn” and ingly all the doubts and hoy its pacifistic message will carry Gift Size and

TERice j syle ” , de ‘ " as well as the efforts to help het } .
Alice in Wonderland,” but only ation which threatens the practically everything, the Com- children’s reactions is the speed oe aetna expenances by a young as little weight now as it carried

Handbag Phial





/ theatres









S similar plan for a Children’s Film

Library had failed. In the autumn
ef that year 1,000 motion picture
in the United States
started showing films selected as
having special appeal for children,
but by the following June only two
theatres were continuing the plan.
The failure proved that adults
are not always good judges of what
children like. The films had been
selected without consulting the
oung customers themselves,
ndey the present plan children

“make the final decision, and if







they do not like a motion picture,
out it goes, no matter how whole-

» some, inspirational, or educational

their elders rate it. However,
adults determine what films will
be shown the children in the first
place. Before a picture is shown to
the junior critics, it is previewed

this pretended fear.

But it is neither the Children’s
Library Committee nor the ex-
pert advisers on child psychology
who deserve most credit for the
success of the Children’s Film
Library.. The “censors,” who best
know juvenile taste and unerring—
ly turn down what the customers
cwill not~like, are an unselected
group of New York City school
children who see the films and,
by their reactions, make it possible
for the committee to determine
their suitability.

Since, when questioned about
the films they see, children usually
speak up freely and say they like

invariably squirm and wiggle in
their seats. The children are no
longer asked what they like and
do not like. Instead, Committee
members sitting unobtrusively in
the audience watch the children’s
reactions to the film, and from
that determine the degree of ex-
citement or of boredom it arouses,

Uninhibited by the presence of
adults, children usually speak up
freely during the showing of a
picture. When “Annie Get Your
Gun” was “Wiggle-Tested” re-
cently, Annie’s unkempt appear-—
ance in the early sequences was
sharply reproved by the children,
The most surprising thing about

logists explain as rejection of an
experience for which they are not
ready.

The Committee also has some
aefinite conclusions regarding
what children like. Action and
movement are most important.
Children want a good story with
a clear plot and strong situations
causing suspense or _ laughter
broad comedy, “slapstick,” and
burlesque are porgalar.

There are now some 57 titles in
the Children’s Film Library. In
no two years is the repertoire of
the Library exactly the same, A
few current pictures have quali-
fied and will go in as soon as they
complete their commercial runs.
A few of the original list have
been discontinued. Among the

EDGE OF DOOM
3ased on the novel of the same
title: by Leo Brady, EDGE OF
DOOM playing at the Plaza is the
story of a poor boy, who mur-
ders his priest when he

parish





ever again to frame the figures

of marching men But in de-
seribing the horrors of actual
combat, Lewis Milestone, the

director, got down on celluloid a
great deal of impressive stuff.’

Ice-flower — 21

VAs we"





y | ie uaa eR osemmantaeiae ei ee See hid has conciaded that their with which one follows another. wife, The supporting cast are co Se Dies ite Srna, Der caves dae
ae hada cake 43 esha, s exp ce may n— actions are more e oquent than One minute they are wild with good and indeed,’ a number of ‘ s “pg he a atching Soap,
1 Gr duce real fear. On the other hand, their words. Consequently the excitement, the next they wiggle them are the residents of — the million people have had to look Perfumed Cologne
“= Pondering this situation, Mr, some psychologists say that pre- Committee developed the “Wiggle with boredom, Too much con- small town of Demorest, where at it, wars still seem to be very D eee
Johnston conceived the idea of the tended fear does not harm a child, Test” based on long observation versation in a motion picture in- the picture was made much with us . : usting Powder,

ildren’s Film Library, a plan but often allows him to work off of the uninhibited behaviour of cuces restlessness, as does subtle- Filmed in Technicolor, the There are, of course, flaws in and Bath Essence.

or keeping the films that chilaren aggression and frustration harm- children watching «a motion ty, but children object most beauty of the hills, and the bush (the silm) that have become

ke always available for them. lessly. Many of the situations to picture. When they are enjoying strenuously to sentimental love green foliage and red soil of more conspicuous with age. ihe
“Phe first problem to be solved was Which parents object, because they a film they may yell, jump up and scenes. Such scenes make them Georgia deserve special mention Sound track is uncertain, me . :
that of determining which films excite and apparently overstimu- down, or sit tense and silent; bul squirm, wiggle, and slouch in their as a picturesque setting for a editing . phy abrupt, Br 3 the MADE IN ENGLAND BY GOYA *. 161 NRW BOND STRERT + LONDON + WS
Fchildren would like. In 1925 a late the child, are only arousing when it begins to bore them, they seats, behaviour which psycho- warmly humen story ies b laoeaae i Sa gr gl Distributors: L.M.B, Meyers & Co. Ltd, P.O. Box 171, Bridgetown



DARTWORDS-

ERES this
Hees: teaser—
to arrange the 50

BE SURE OF

mr











most popular recent additions are
“The Wizard of Oz’, “Adventures
of Robin Hood,” and “Black









by the Children’s Film Library
Committee, a group made up of
representatives from 11 women’s











organizations. The film must meet ; Beauty.” The Arey omnes t ~” d b opcke corner Boer fo" mie pe wh sas Cena peers
%, ittee’c $ i th ircle so é reas est children’s sheet of ice where a little e put on our indow, £ ie
pi COMieattee s SOC Cee ty the Tead from a eeu . oe ane ite riall has been. Beside ‘t stands more about them.” But the hare
for suitability before it is shown to a y films available in the United i
: € d are ; BOTANY to CARESS States films which have been hare pointing at some delicace in another frisky mood, has bounded —with the faithful
an audience of children, Some 20 {n such a way that the ere. ee i re “hild flowers growing out of the solid ice, away. “Oh dear, that animal's use of DREAM—The Soap
films a year are selected as _ relationship between chosen with the elp of chilc “Oh, aren't they lovely!’ breathes quite dotty,”’ sighs Rupert. ‘* He of the Beautiful.
Library films. oak ty” ae Sere, audiences and | will continue © Rupert as he moves to pick one. still hasa’t tola me how to get Play safe .. . be prepared,
The fare offered on a children’s ag of PRP Ay No delight future generations © "Now | know where Jack home for your romantic moment. |
programme is usuallymadeupofa yle may be invoked children, AGL 14 RESERVED Get a few cakes of DREAM |
title from the Library plus a cur- more than twice con- TOILET SOAP, use it
rent motion picture rated suitable _ secutively. SE OSSOOO OCPD FPS POSPOPPOPPPI SSPE, faithfully in your bath, |
for children. The Library is not RULES shower and at the wash
big enough to supply continuously EDGE WATER basin for a soft-smooth+
the usual demand for two pictures x The word may Be ar skin, radiant with natura
for each showing, nor would it be hat precedes it HOTEL oabant t available at toilet goods
aie ny pier fice ' LAT 8 ailable a
desirable to do so even if it were 2.It may be a | BATHSHEBA counters throughout the island. {

Reduced Rates Ist May to

possible, for children like to see synonym of the word
the new motion pictures as well that prcceurs it.
t

as the bes ; 2 ; 3. It may be achieved
: idediripadead tee: .Suapr \by adding one aie to,
etter



Whenever the Children’s Film subtracting one c : oe
Library Committee is doubtful (!70™m, or changing one letter in, — RA 31st October for visits of

‘ ; 5 receding word.
about a film, it calls in a panel of ee .

experts from the field of child
guidance. Psychologists sometimes
take a different view from parents
on the question of what is good
for young people. They do not
believe that getting excited is
necessarily bad for children, and
they distinguish between two
kinds of fear—real fear and “‘pre-
tended fear.” Real fear, they point
out, is bad for the child, Any situ-

4. It may be associated with

jthe preceding word in a Saying, one week or over.
|
|

Perfume Always
Attract Women

NEW YORK: Bus advertise
jments in a Tennessee town have
blotters soaked in perfume at-
jtached to attract women’s atten-
{tion. Some women are so attract-
led that they tear off the blotter
| to use as sachets.

simile, metaphor, or association
of ideas.

5. It may form, with the pre
ceding word, the name of a well-
known person or place in fact ot
fiction.

6. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title
or action of a book, play, or other
composition.

A typical succession of words

Telephone 95276

666666666669 1966666650644

*
OSD CLEP LL POSS



OOEPEPOEOSPST CEPOL LLLP “y



990 FO OLEOLEES SOOOSSSSSGS GOOFS SOOO

CLEARS STUFFY NOSE!
SOOTHES SORE THROAT!
EASES ACHY CHEST!
CALMS RASPY COUGH!

O
7
>
f
G
Z





FACE POWDERS, CREAM,







OSES SOOOP EL PPPS SPOS SG SPOS














} aw --§----m
% L T g cr ovate gelief «oie in 20, many
y — $ 1 Your little patient Phun eee VapoRub is simply
s . aw Uy 8 ways. -*
x CHENILLE VELVET = White and other shades places eat bedtime — a
ccrehtieamsanpali SIDE
; MOSS. CREPE . Tsioe — ee ™
D to look d vivacious ? / i i WORKS With every breath: 4
© you want to look young and vivacious ? 4 2 k and % , ‘s medicina Be
eae MOIRE TAFFETA ‘ ‘: His chest, Pence {cel VapoRub'smediver, as
USE TOKALON = a eed and comly #» vapours peneot the troubled ' _
CREPE ROMAINE \ - VapoRub’s deep-reachiny Sir assages,clearingthe nen, “ape
x eases i : he throat, ©
‘ oultice action eh soothing t 5 ' .
Do you want to be captivating ? % EMBROIDERED DRESS NET .,, as : tightness a ae cod! ice bothersome cough. 1 %
%, jon r ‘
pea : . SIR . congestion. 4 inside and outside, hour
USE TOKALON 2) SILVER TINSEL BROCADE, WREATHS, SPRAYS, % This double action wo ee jorning, usually the iCK S
g VEILS ETC. after hout, throws. over, and Baby feels much
ors sg
= short, Ladies, do you want all men folk, and women folk too % “4 ; ’ : om” Pn VapoRusB
0 say of you: “There goes grace, charm and loveliness ?” Then: vie ‘ we
, . Toy $
bas tf LET DRESS YOU $ : =
% USE TOKALON % % % NOW EVERY FAMILY can afford to use
§ le Z R18 WITH LOVELY MATERIALS ; Vicks VapoRub! Get the large, oo
As use y the world’s most fascinating women !! > | % vormical bluc or ask. fur the new,
3 % i$ ALL THE YEAR ROUND % small tin at ra , ow prite! sip
LLCO SOOOCOOOL CL LLL LLL LEA LLL SOS GOO P9G9 99S OOOO OO OOOO OOOOH AOI oes


PAGE TEN v ;
DEMONSTRATORS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

Thieves Get Away
With $300

HIEVES MADE HAULS toial-
ling over three hundred dol-







Coughing, ‘Strangling Asthma,
Bronchitis Curbed in 3. Minutes

GAIRY

ITCHING
INFLAMED

Empire Youth
Service To-day

The Empire Youth Service will
take place at Government House



Asthma or Bron-

: you have at! ii ve
lars during last week Grounds to-day at 4.30 p.m. | cnit’so tad es Soe eee oe oan, ee kee, epee Oe ote.

At Fontabelle, St. Michael, the Rovers, Senior Scouts and Scouts ford t ike "you were being rup- | stor Asthma spasms Great night
a aoaiued Seer Ts om vi oF dates se 838 DY | Sees es i Seoreeeetss
°n and en! vrec elween 5 p.m : b _ t : rat dose
and 10.4¢ p.m. on Friday A pm “Re matter how jong you have eutteredor to work circulating through your
; ket b 0 : > t jaing $45. pen whai you bare on we eeoiinn salina teen. ne ing oes Gacm a ter may
poc oo . conta », a pen- . . i tions, | AS
knife ana: pair of "spectacles perce Se Deeewtve favsiomnner ‘All You do te take two vaste: | stgcr *R%, Wendace tinder en trot-cind
valued $3. were stolen. Lo less tablets at meals money back guarantee. You

Sipe ot Gunlea Oi seen s ee en de an tata aaa caste vou Maes as |Wopou Sant ea emt co ee Res
Searles at Garden, St. James, a 2xecutive Committee of the Island | nature to dissolve and remove strangling Mendaco just return the empty PE
thief stol: a quantity of articles Council at Scout H.Q. to-morrow, | promote free easy breathing and | o0G° the full purchase price will

g

nd sleep the first night so that from your
and cash, The store was broken Monday 7th, at 5 p.m. oe teat soem younger and stronger rea a see how well you sleep os
and entered between 8.00 p.m. on Members are earnestly asked to ene Asthma in 2.Years *| sight and how much-better you .

Tuesday and 5.45 a.m. on Wednes-
day.
Charles Small of Porey Spring,

rrow.
make every effort to attend. aa

Mendaco not only brings immedi-
Headquarters News comfort

almost
and free breathing but builds

off future attacks.
Hamilto:

uarantee
ate

stem to ward
Por instance. J. Bichards,

ea oo
Ends Asthma X Bronchitis * Hay Pasa











As from Tuesday 1st May, Scout a in, Ont.,
St. rn ‘ted that his house Q. ” . ‘ ‘ itching—caused }
Was’ lipoken and entered at about whe oben ss fllows— i perl een | ; Hoe
1.00 a.m. om Thursday and a Monday—Friday: 3.30 to 9,30 p.m. | checke
pearl pacilone, ores pone “ re a ies ; a = p.m, | en ee phos = aoa a BRUSH ose UP ean’ YOUR sas © eee
rings, a goid watch and @ Chain, onsequen ee is change, -
total value $85.80 were stolen. Scouters, Rovers, Senior Scouts | mac ree . ee se Game Y ’
While Robert Tubbs of Uppe and Scouts are asked to volunteer aie dames cone iestanmiion wosen ood
Collymore Rock was walking alon for assisting at H.Q. aes wee
the same road during the early The Honorary Secretary will! gkin trouble is giving you pain and distress
hours ae, rr he SCENE at a recent Gairy demonstration in St; Georges, Grenada. also be wlaa to meer oer joes on = Pees ie hy a
was attackec anc eaten Vy an genera impro nt, pro- . y
unkriown man who took $20.62 2 2 2 grammes, ete., any day between | MALARIA SORES or RINGWORM—
Sarees Rien. Gair Claims 1s Edueation 6 A Ss the hours of 4.30 and 6.30 p.m.| just a few applications of wonderful
The house cf Kenneth Waren t A at H.Q.

at Seventh Avenue, Belleville, was
entered between 9.00 pm. on
Tuesday and 7.00 a.m. on Wednes-
day and a gold watch valued $45
and $10 in cash were stolen.
Joseph St. Hill of Tweedside
Road reported that his shop was
broken and entered between 8,60
p.m. on Thursday and 5.30 a.m.
on Friday and rum and sardines,

Charges Were Planne

From Our Own Correspondent

GRENADA, May 5.

WEARING a red cape over his shoulders, his custom-
ary festive garb, Gairy last night told wildly cheering and
fanatieally loyal thousands gathered in the Market Square,
that the charges he is due to answer to at a Magistrate’s

Urgent As
Fire Alarm”

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, May 3
The rapid increase of popula-

Table Tennis Tournament

The second Inter-troop Table
Tennis Tournament among Groups
in the South Western istrict will
open on Friday next, llth May,
at 7.30 p.m. at Scout H.Q.

Fixtures for the week-end are
as follows:—

will be lasting! _D.D.D. Prescription is
obtainable from chemists and stores

everywhere.
Distributors : 4
F.B.Armstrong Ltd., Bridgetowr



total value $59.63, stolen court on Monday were plotted and planned by certain tion and the steep rise in the Friday — Ist Sea Scouts vs, Com PRESCRIPTION 4 Re ae
HE EMPIRE YOUTH SUNBAY members of the Legislative Council, but they “were only 44 school-age group have created Saturday — Gill’s Memorial vs. HERTFORD BST. I
SERVICE will be held at wasting their damned time. an acute situation which eflis for James Street. . Seer rE pn eter

Government House grounds at 4.30 action as urgently as a fire- nter-Troop Competition pas $9 SSS9S99SSSS9OSG9SS SPP PSOOGSS
o'clock this evening. It is expoctei and St, Vincent was also due to a e . alarm or as an S.O.S8., from a Bs Nien SW inter-troop RH EU M A I ie ap esoosrrorereeâ„¢
that over 2,000 youths from Si very great extent to the manufac- Work Begitis On ship in distress, ‘declared Mr. Competition will take place on : ’
Michael and Christ Church are tured gee a ce Rete in Gi J > Hi h Sch ! James L. Nicol, es Ad- :
expected to attend the service, Grenada. But the fact that Trini- irls 1 Oo viser to the Comptroller for De-

His Excellency the Governor Sa with its powerful Government, S uprated awn, Ue

iN) ; 3 cia can he and s g : S als ro ndent st , s
meee ae ee te a party to the ban showed that ee or GEORGE'S May 3 opening remarks to members of Queen *s College x
Cie Saribae’ Mess aii io poae oe they feared him. Work has begun on the founda- the Primary Education Commit- x
island will be Dea Maisie Greater Power tion ef the new Anglican Girls’ tee now sitting in British Gui- Guides’ Cam Here is REAL relief... s
Re , ‘ oe R oe D encey e, Claiming that he had done more High School, ana. 3 ip For real relief from rheumatic x FROM THE
i FB A ve Ste” Moore for Grenadians in a shorter time Last Thursday the first sods The Committee, with Mr, Ni- y as E Gabel to cancers $
= ‘The ‘Police Be, re vice py than any other in years, and pos- were formally turned by Arch- col as Chairman, has been ap- Camping hae ‘When they are due $

i sand, conducted bY sessed greater power than any in deacon H. G. Pigott and Miss pointed by the Governor to go — 1st Barbados Rangers, (Queen’s : age mulation of bodily $ LAND OF STARS
Capt. C. E. Raison will be in at- the island, he said who did not like Mab _ Bertrand, Headmistress of into the future policy of educu- College) with Miss E. Nurse as i ete aieaite ‘that &
tendance. The service will be Grenada his way, could get out. the School. tion in the Colony with reSpect Commandant, camped in the ; —which should $ é
broadcast over Rediffusion. If He said he understood that a 3 to the provision of schools and grounds of the Alexandra School these harmful impurities— AND STRIPES
rain falls, the service will be heid party of Auditors was coming out It was a quiet and simple pe- teachers. from 7th—13th April. This camp pei 5 cad phe d iadibing
at the Globe Theatre. from England to examine the caning. teen ‘a by mn eek was followed by another, of Ist oa. up. De Witt’s &
7 , 3 " ai . CoO e 8 z 2 . +1] = , ol. . 4
N TUESDAY the Police wid Hee a reeae t ee an eee; Lordship the Bishop of the Wind- . janes oti, Stine whee canaeie ae pe, yaa gol this pee ALS ERED FL ATTERY
Stage the Musical Ride by the and he understood they had a Ward Islands. “For the hordes of children who Commandant. The majority of they soothe and tone up FLOW

Mounted Police and the Beating plan. : With a brilliant morning sun seek and will continue in ever- these Guides were new campers cieordered idneys so effectively
of the Retreat, by members of the burning down on the site at Tan- increasing,numbers to seek acd- snd’ were thoroughly thrilled by i
Police Band, at District “A” Sta- understand that certain people teen, a small group stood with mission to already over-crowded their experience of camping under return to their normal function of
tion for members of the Caribbean will burn the Treasury so that the bared heads as the Archdeacon schools, adequate accommodation canvée oO" : Fi clearing the system of impurities,
Commission. Auditors cannot see the accounts, Tread a few short prayers of and staff are lacking, nor can “*)'™ De Witt’s Pills have been

Apart from these there will be
a Drill Display. The squad taking

art in this will drill for te in= at z time there's ¢ > lay } ancial resources in this or in any yu! ie i with great success. This fine
lites without a word seed the "dea a tis Suan Miss Bertrand followed. of the West Indian Colonies,”, de- pe q) oS RAINES. Sate ue re cine may be just what 1.60 d
There will also be a Fire Display there’s a fire in that Government clared Mr. Nicut, ticeth ae ae hee atts Boar. yan nests Ge fo he BP ih itertsininnsawigts ® Yy ,
; > . : ae ake : s ; sigr Ss § s » to St. emist and obtain
given by the Fire Brigade. ot ag it will not be care- “To ignore these facts,” he cent with her husband, Rev. J. supply of De Witt's
aSNOaR. , continued, is to run tl isk of B s, Who has nsferred Pills right
IRST PRIZE at the Local Talent Gairy called on workers to de- $450,000 Sugar Lost with-holding. Cea "sdueation ee atanchint check totina co = .

show at the Globe Theatre
On Friday night was awarded to
Willie Ifill who sang “Stardust,”

Walter Burke who sang “So in foregoing the first meal of theday. As a result of a fire of unknown Palliatives done good and very valuable work ) a full assortment of shades

Love”, was awarded the second He would seek & postponement in origin at Usine Ste. Madeleine |. i for Guiding during her 12 years’ i i i $2 29 yd

prize. order to await Mr. Sinangn, to Sugar Company South ‘trinidad, “Until economic conditions im- oe genni Ss pi ndos. There were including Helio . .
The Guest Stars were Phyllis defend him. $450,000 worth of sugur has been Prove we shall have accomplish- no Guides in St Philip when Mrs GUARANTEE

Collymore who played the guitar Teacher Turned Back lost. Mr, Eric Johnson, Géneral eee if We Can suggest DO ames went to liverat Hberese, | De Witte Pills are pea e

and sang and Gerald Daisley wno Reverting to the ban from St Manager of the Company in an Palliatives fur dealing with the manufactured under strictly hygienic

sang two pieces,

CANE FIRE at Waterford
Plantation on Friday burnt
five acres of

The ban on his visiting Trinidad

“Tf you get disturbances again, I

I'm not predicting that there will
be a fire in Grenada but I say if

sist from work on Monday because
their leader will be on trial and
asked them to fast on Sunday,

Vincent, he said that an ex-teacher,
Charles Bleasdill was ~ turned
back from St. Vincent on Wednes-
day on the ground that he was a



thanksgiving and dedication.
Afterwards, he took an agricul-
tural fork and turned a few sods,



(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SFAIN,

interview with the Gazette said
that the damage was considerablo
as the store-house had about
14,000 tons of suvar at that time
Hundreds of

Pats





these be provided on the scale

required from the available fin-

from large numbers of children

of school-age.

defects and educational needs now
confronting us. It may be that
the remedies suggested may not
be found readily acceptable to
those who are pressing Goyern-

Thursday 24th May (Empire Day).



Resignation

to the Methodist Church in*Kings-
town.
Mrs. Broomes will be greatly

missed in the Guides for sne has

and we now have 6 Guide Com-
panies in that Parish. At the last
Executive Committee meeting the
Island Commissioner presented
the Good Service Certificate to













conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.









D.D.D. Prescription will give instant
relief, Persevere, and the good results

that these vital organs 5)

SPUN.______-----$1.75 yd.
FLOWERED KUA-KUA

relieving rheumatic sufferers
in many parts of the world




now,

CREPE ROMAINE

SOSDSOPSOS GOO PPP SOPOT F



Is SEE THEM ON DISPLAY AT

Waiieeiss: LASHLEYS LTD.

PPP P PP PPE OSSS

second crop ripe Gairyite, but understood that the " whith 1. had ment to provide more and better her for the splendid work she had
ratoons, one acre of first crop ripe people there shouted ‘we want ee packed. Se "ode ae hid educational facilities. For the done for the Girl Guide Move- teat) Swan Street _ Prince Wm. Henry St.
ratoons and 740 holes of first crop Gairy,” as the plane took off with {2 ,2& Wickly “er.cved’ because present at least, however, we ment in this Island. OS A al aie ot
young ratoons. The damage is Z i fear that they tight have per- 460996 ;
covered by insurance. by warning officers of his execu- ;> ge Pee a largest the cloth available to us. Youth Service i
> Neighbours, assisted by the Pol- tive that he intended sparing no poe British West Indies. “I feel sure that our aims will Page Rachael
ice, put out the fire. The ratoons For more than six hours the

belong to R. E. Gill of “Comrie”,
St. Michael.

ee WAS plenty of meat in
the Public Market yesterday
morning. Housewives had no wor-
ry in getting some.

Many women who make pud-
ding and souse could be seen pur-
chasing the intestines of the
slaughtered animals.

Large quantities of vegetables
were also sold in the market yes-
terday,



'RODNEY’ DUE TUESDAY



The Lady Rodney will be arriv- former not having all in his favour. snatched her purse which on- of the Health Department, Trini- : : ; sin , uy “It dees seem so!” So say most of
ing here on Tuesday morning tained $50 elt when she raise 1 dad, has arrived in the colony to Wie bea ee ieee are is: es the ladies shopping at...
from British Guiana via Trinidad. an alarm a shot was fired into the take up new duties as Nutrition ossibl * Ree “7
Grenada and St. Vincent, She ONLY SON ground near her. Officer, Windward Islands, In P e. 5 9
will be taking passengers cnc In the Advocate Newspaper on May Police took particulars of the 1947 Miss Horne was awarded a © WANTED: More books and mag-
cargo for Canada, 5. a statement was made in comection incident but no arrest has yet C.D. & W. course in Nutrition azines. (Kindly phone Misg Nora
seen Men will leave on {hat ae nuded ior tune Get ae, been made. Capt. Kelly of the and ees at fe Edinburgh es whe =e yo an eh '
Wednedsay night for Bermuda, marn P. Bayley, optometrist and. an Redney has. also written a Royal Infirmary. She later spent them, rticles for the ips. i ‘ 5)
Boston, Halifax and Montreal via ot this island Was @ brother of the lite strong letter to the local agents six months with the Ministry of (These nay be left with Miss And to the ladies keen on knowing the origin of the material they buy,

the British Northern Islands. Her



agents are Messrs. Gardiner {ye only son of the late Reo Samal covering letter to the Adminis- Switzerland observing -nutritional Messrs. Cave Shepherd & Co. become the recipient of a
Austin & Co., Ltd. Bayley, Methodist Minister of this island. tration. practices in hospitals there. Ltd.).

$

SSOOOS

Â¥ POPPI SPOOFS OOO FFOOTD we & DRESS LENGTH OF Til EIR () WN CHOICE FREE
: Let Us Show You s Now, eee See. in large numbers and test your talent. :Tell us
~ KARDOMAH LUNA FAILLE. i 0 ie wide 16 gorgeous shades @ $2.18 per yd.
JEWEL PRINCESS ..... 36” .,, in White & popular shades with sequins
é 9 @ $3.25 per yd.
the 5 = S | AR car HALCREPON ....... ... 36” ,, in Floral & Pastel designs @ $2.00 pr yd

SOVEEESOIOO SSE SEED | GS OC DEES OS SO SOOO S OPO OFOP

. . PLEASE NOTE. JUST OPENED, A FINE ASSORTMENT OF
| THESE IN ALL SIZES AND COLOURS. HURRY WHILE
Lae |i THEY LAST.
Vike Best at Lowest Cost x | i
¢ | } Now, remember, when you cannot get it elsewhere you ean get it ar —
- % i |
‘ : | N. E. WILSON & CO
x, %
: CHARLES Me ENEARNEY & (0. LTD § } ee 7
% j uh ( EN J , JVe « x Fresh Shipcasetin Mabt woceived Xt HEADQUARTERS FOR LADIES’ SHOES AND DRESS MATERIALS
3 | oe 3 iB 31, Swan Street. _ DIAL 3676
SLPS SSG OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO SS OSFIOSOOOH IHS, Price : 39c. per 41b pkt. )

POG SG 9695555535505

him. Gairy wound up the meeting

one in the elimination, of any not
giving him a hundred per cent
loyalty, and mentioned his regret
at the absence from the platform of
comrades Blaize and Lowe.

The front rows crowd, however,
saw Blaize dramatically appear on
the scene with a Napoleonlile
fold on his muscular arms, listen-
Ing to the enslaught, and later gp-
proached Gairy with the apparent
request for an opportunity to use
the mike, but Gairy read a Psahn.
Another comrade led the Union
Song, “We'll never let the leadar
fall.” and the meeting ended,

It was reported in a recent story
of an executive meeting that Gairy
and Blaize had a verbal elash, the



Mr. W. D. Bayley. I beg to say that is

a mistake. Dr



blaze resisted all attempts b; the
Fire Brigade to bring it under
control,



Purse Snatched

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, May 3.
Mrs. B, Basham, a round-tripper
from Boston on the C.N.S. Lady
Rodney had an experience
ashore here last Sunday night
eausing her loss and quite a scare
as well as damaging the port’s
repute for tourists.

Along the wharf front a man

which has been sent on with a

must cut our coats according to

be unified if we keep in mind the
following words spoken in the
House of Commons also 80 years
ago:

“Upon the education of the
people of this country, the fate
of this country depends.”

and it is as true in British Gui-
ana to-day as it is in any other
countries that in the youth of the
nation lies its greatest asset.’



NUTRITION OFFICER

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 5

Miss Louise Horne, formerly

Food and toured Holland and

200 Rangers and Guides, under
District Commissioners Mrs. Skin-
ner and Mrs. Scott, will attend
the Youth Service to be held in
the grounds of Government House
to-day, Rangers and Guides who
are going to this Service will fall
in at Pax Hill at 3.15 p.m.

The Girl Guides Fair

Calling all Rangers, Guides and
Brownies:—Please remember that
there are only 4 weeks before the
2nd June—the day of our Fair,
Everyone is asked to go “all out”
to make this Fair a bigger success
than in previous years, because
although we have our own Head-
quarters there are certain very

Frank at the Guide Department,





‘Five-Star’ Motoring



P°LIEPPLPP PPPS SS

REL E SEL SESE SPOOL AAO SSS









i} TAFFETA PLAID ...... 36” ,,

% CREPE ROMAIN ...... 46” wide in several interesting shades.

g SATIN & TAFFETA of the best quality 36” wide in all shades from 76c.
x to $1.20 per yd.

g SEERSUCKER .........\ 36” wide @ $1.14 & $1.24 per yd.

‘ CHAMBRAY (good quality) 36” wide @ $1.46 & $1.56 per yd.

x PRINTED PERCALES .. 36” wide 88c. to $1.18 per yd.




































9 CDESC POOLE PLOLLLSS POPPE





~My! My?!

What a fine assortment of LADIES’
DRESS MATERIAL, and at such
reasonable prices too.

ARE WE AT
THE BRITISH
INDUSTRIAL

FAIR ??

after spending $20.00 and answering 4 out of 6 questions correctly, they

FLOWERED MEMOSA . 36” ,

FLOWERED LAMLEE , 46” ,,

FLOWERED TAFFETA . 36” ,, @ $2.00 per yd. i

GEORGIETTE in 18 shades 36” wide @ $1.27 per yd.

PLAIN MAROCAIN in 15 charming shades 36” wide @ $1.40 per yd.

JERSEY SILK ..... 54”, wide in Blue, Black, Lemon, Peach, Pink,
Gold, White, Torquoise @ $1.25 per yd.

CREPE de CHINE ...... 36” wide in 17 shades @ $1.32 per yd..

NANCY CREPE in 25 shades 36” wide @ $1.16 per yd.

SHOT SILK seeee 36” wide @ $L88 per yd.

from $1.20 to $1.68 per yd.

RAYON PLAID ....,,.. 36” ,, — ,, 84c. to $1.08 per yd.

SPUN in several shades 36” wide @ $1.00 per yd.

@ $2.39 & $2.70 per yd.
@ $1.68 per yd.

:

4

A fine assortment of Printed COTTONS 36” wide from 55c. per yd up.



AMERICAN SHOES




SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951







SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN











= —— SOOO enon

AN OLD FRIEND IN A NEW SPOT!
Among a few Recent Arrivals.
Planter’s Peanuts Noxzema Cream

Nelson's Chocolate Bars Evenflow Feeding Bottles
a Variety






YES, YOU CAN BUY IT AGAIN

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

———
—_—

Al
™ a s Small Ie Jars —
Marshmallows in pkgs. & cea _ GALV. OW. CANS —1, 2 & 5 Gin, Sizes
THE COSMOPOLITAN : _
PHONES: 4441 and 2041 1 ayes T. HERBERT Ltd Incorperated
Just a few yards from the original spot. 1860 . t j . 1926
Prince William Henry Street. | 10 & 11 ROEBUCK STREET,
t ea aa
1) cow a





4g










IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE







SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only








GEE.. THIS BUSINESS
OF YOUR BECOMING

USUALLY | NOW USUALLY NOW

S. L. Pineapple Juice, Tins 39 35 Dutch Pears, Tins 68 60 i
)}

Chivers i

Melo Tonic Food, Tins 107 96 T. Jellies, Pkgs 29, iw i
i

Jacobs Cream Crackers, Pkgs. 41 36 Raisins, Per |b. 46 ii









BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG
Se ADAH 10] [eT

DAGWOOD, THATS }



ATT TiAl

tt

Oger 68.
WHERE ) a’
ALL THOSE <—- “ert

TACKS COME J
7 FROM? x7




Re ae - |GIVE MEA
THE TENTH TIME “ ofa >) b RT
( YOU'VE TRIPPED ) ent COLA rac













| \_ OVER THaT _ 4 tee
sede 4
ANC CARPET 5

Ss

~ Si CS










By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to H.M. Kiang George VI

Quint;

Gordons —

Stands Supteme |

ELEVEN” CENTS
JUST THROWN




diate’

daha

OES

ie
oa

ONE OF THE ROBBERS HAD THANKS TO YOUR
9 OATS IN A LEAKING SADDLE- LEAKIN' SADDLE-] OF
BAG. WE'LL PICK UP THAT TRAIL BAG, LEE, WE'VE iyo chat oeee
LIKE THAT.



COOL















i
\
i
,
ih
\
\
.
\
i
H
v
»))
)))
RY
WHATS THE IDEA ve
NOW LETS SEE- OF SITTING ON WELL-T SEE YOU ({
WHEN SHE COMES MY NEW GOT OUT- DID v
IN-"LL DO ALL IN THE PARLOR ? ?













THE TALKIN’— E f GOOD D DION'T GIT
eS a

H FOR ALL |

aang OP oO ee SAS em ee * — PETROLEUM
= Tes : 4G Ga."

a CG

RIP KIRBY : BY ALEX RAYMOND
1
















Copr 1951, King Peatutes Syndicate, Ine; World rights reserved.




























-

* . , 64644444
BOLO LOS LLOLLLLPPPLARLPBIIS xt &

“Iv’s Just What The DOCTOR Ordered”
ae

THIS IS KIRBY...
NO,I'M NOT DEAD...
AND IF YOU'LL MOVE
FAST, WE MAY BE IN
TIME TO GET
{ CUTTLE, JOE CEVEN'S
GANG AND THE

CALLING CAR 48,,
, PICK UP JACK
=> _ . | MINCH, LOCKSMITH,
aN AT 2962 SEAWEED
: AVE...AND BRING
HIM IN TO
HEADQUARTERS
RIGHT AWAY !



for nervous disorders of all kinds. If
you are suffering from any form of nerve
trouble you will benefit rapidly from

a course of NUTROPHOS.

.
<
: : ' 2d " vor a

Those sleepless nig! end nerve- 7’ COMPOUND GLIXIR OF
(. THIAMINE CHLORIDE AND »,
PHOSPHOROUS r %,
,
‘

wracked days, when everything seems

to get you down and make you irritable

Ae ¢
POE

a Sean " y 7 sorte soe yeas at
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

WHATA CRAZY THING.A | XITS NOTA RUNAWAYS ITS
RUNAWAY SPEEDBOAT. OUR_ | RADIO-CONTROLLED?
ROWBOATS SUNK.WELLHAVE./ SOMEONES DIRECTING
TO SWIM IN~OH+IT (T FROM SHORE. ITS
TURNED AROUND:* couine BACK / 2
U , >





when you cannot concentrate and find

“4
ee

|
{
|
|
|

no enjoyment in your food—-all these

-

MISSED HER? THEYRE ALL IN THE
WATER NOW! TURNTHE BOAT
AROUND AND TRY

are the result of frayed nerve-ends.
NUTROPHOS is a combination of Thia-

mine Chloride and Phosphorous and is

-








A RUNAWAY SPEED-
BOAT+ WITHOUT A

OSAP ELL LLDPE LIAS
e

PSA FIPSS EO
LOSSES

well-known for its highly beneficial

44
SOY

results in all cases of nerve troubles.
If you want to regain youl natural
good humour and steady nerves, take

NUTROPHOS.

\$ YOU EAT WELL, SLEEP WELL N L] Ee R O P [4 Co Ne
| ¥ and FEEL WELL when you take \ | | oy, o

OOOO OOOO bot tytytytetytyt) a1 OK ES & BYNOE LTD.= AGENT S455:555656665656566 999 OOO9 POO VOTO



CL ALA AAMAS
SLGLSSLSPLES SS


TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1061

CLAS SIFIED ADS. |_2oMuc. sags jpomuic Norms | | waren | | FOH RENT (SHIPPING NOTICES










































po ed Minimum charge week 72 cents and

12 cents .per cpete fn uae o on yond Ten cents per agate line on week-days Minimum charge week 72 cents and Se a ae
nary! . week-days| and 12 cents agate line on Sundaya,! 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24| 96 cents Sundaj

and Gio on Shas = ™ r Canton charge $1.50 on wovk-days) words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

———| and $1,80 on Sundays. word Sundays, word Sundays.) $c ROYAL NETHERLANDS




































(he charge for announcements of REAL ESTATE “a! s HIP CO ae geen Te ne,
t r age 8 “ Deaths, aeaeae ts FOR SALE BUILDING SITE—With private Beach. NOTICE HOUSES TEAMS! ‘e Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and St.
he and In Memoriam notice’ Approximat es, at Derricks, SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM Kitts, iling iday \
$4.50 on Week-days and $1.80 on Sundays! Minimum charge week 2 cente ond Paynes Bay, St, James, For tnenection | Miss NICHOLLS of the Bantord Beauty HELP M.S; "“Oranjestad"10 “Mey 1981 FE
fc number of words a ae} 96 cents Sundays ot — over Miand further information, Dial—2091. toe ae hie eee her a= rs M.S. ““Bonaire’—1lth May 1061. M.V. Cacique Del Caribe will
ents per word on week-days and} words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a) (Omers ‘ .5.51—2p, | that her nw re-opening on] ” «. opening bh, ne M.S. “Hersilia”—24th May 1951. accept Cargo and Passengers for
4 cents per word on Sundays for each| word Sundaun, : eee Sanco Monday 7th May when appointments can! we require the tenlewiog: cae Pranch.| “53 Bedroom Cottage at Christ Church ersilia y sorts Getic and. Pesomseree te
al word. BUY NOW AND BE WISE be made. Dial 2205, before June ist, 1961:— Msin Road, shout 7 miles from City. | SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND and Aruba, Sailing on or about
: The Last and Only Two-Storey Stone- 6.5.51—In} " STENO-TYPIST—experienced — eom-| Modern Conveniences, Spacious mame an ee tea” 14th Dh 1981 18th instant.
For Births, Marriage or =e AUTOMOTIVE wall Business & Residence presently with| — mencing sajary $100.00 per month.| closed Yard. A Large Shop in yuncements in Carib Calling e










































































































x 7 ble Person or
® _ hop vT BDOS CIVIL SERVICE ASSOCIATION] yypisT—also with clerical experience| Street, to a Responsi SAXLING TO TRINIDAD,
ch $3.00 for any number of words CAR — Hillman Minx 1949 model hs ter Aree, Ssan te 22,390 ma, All members of the Subordinate Staffs — commencing salary $75.00 per} Merchant only. Dial—2111. ore ne PARAMARIBO AND GEORGETOWN
wt and 6 cents per word for eseh| Gog Condition. Ring 2674 ‘| A very Desirable 3-Bedroom Cottage at] of the H. & T. Dept. P. W. Dept., month, . M.S. “Hecuba"—6th May, 1951 BW. SCHOONER OWN-
edaditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 6,.5.51—in. | Ch, Ch, Main Rd. Not Far from Plaza,| Pumping Stations, W.W. Dept., Water INVOICING. ASST.—accurate at fig- sn AtEm Keeler: = James M.S. “Bonaire’—29th May, 1961. S ASSOC., INC
between 8.90 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Desth ———————— | Cistins, Modern Conveniences, Large Yard] Poats, Gov't Indust. Schools, Lightnouses, ures — preferably with preyious . t fab ais and baek porches., SAELING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA, ER tp .
Settces only after 4 p.m. CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-| enclosed with Stone, Going for £900 Neit, | Mental and Leper Hospitals, also Postmen, experience on invoicing — com-| New house av ch with» running} CURACAO AND JAMAICA
(Miscadaiicdseeabce. dition. 23,000 miles, new tyres. Can be] A Very Desirable 2-Bedroom Cot Messengers, Market | Sonssties. Public mencing salary $90.00 per month.| Three bedrooms, Sag Ps art | MLS. “Orantested”—-Béth Meee S081, Tele. 4047,
THANKS seen at Port Royal Garage Phone 8385.| Fontabelle, Modern Conetntenses, tole Library Attendants Deputy Marshalls} Written application stating age and) water. Dining room, nd’ modern conven-| § P, MUSSON. SON rp.
. j A. D. Herbert. 3.5.51—4r | for £1,050. An Attractive and Almost] are asked, to attend a special General] previous experience to be sent to Sec-! ope, Servant's room and mo a japan 2 § . MUSS . IN & CO. LTD.,
ae dance . . New Seaside Stonewall Bungalow at St,] Meeting Of Government's Subordinate retary, Dowding Estates and Trading} jences, Phone 2985. Mrs, C. urea Agents.
moa t as chev sige. beg through CAR—Hillman Minx, 1950 model im{ James, An Outlook, Nicely Set in off! Employees to be held in the intitle Company, Ltd., Bay Street. gl _ ¥ z ese to
i Sha’ uae us their sym-| 00d order 9,600 miles. Apply EB. D.| Main Rd, Going for £3100. A new 2-, Court Bridgetown on Tuesday next 8 ina, d 96 | ree emerinen t
we baa cone ieee f the death| Davis, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch.] Bedroom Concrete Bungalow by Lower| at 4.00 p.m, for the purpose of se s —_— | _FurEK rp oad; | Farnished
casion of th jeatt 1.5.51—8n | Fontabelle, Modern Conveniences, Going | a Committee of Management for Division] OVERSHER — An Under Overseer Bungalow. Telephone, gare ida ps
eloved Vivian Ifill 5 — | for £1,100. A %-Bedroom (possible 4)| TIT of the Association and to discuss} wanted at Hanson Plantation with] modern conveniences. Available a . hy a n a iona
Wilson (Mother) ¢ yide aes CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer Bungalow Type (Partly Stonewall), A-1| some very important matters. knowledge and experience of plantation] of May Apply Frederica ae ee
|, VGhildren’.. ‘The ‘Skeet: | refused. Apply to W, BM, Watson C/o} Condition, and a Small 2-Bedreom Stone-| Members and non members of the work. Apply to. Manager in person. | Telephone—3535. 5.5139. | gourEBOUND i
| ; Cr ee ae _| R. & G, Challenor, Speightstown, Phone] wall Residence (almost New) at Hastings | Association please attend. 95.1 | ‘iis
: a gia , 1.5.51—6n | Main Rd., Both Attractive and yield about A, E. LEWIS, — | HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June PR Barbador >
7 hrough Siig 9 erence oncenree ecemeeienteneni ranean $100.00 p.m., Going for Under £3,500, Secretary. KEDIFFUSION require an Announcer] and July. Phone Mrs, A. D. ery CAN. CONSTRUCTOR a April 1 May at 8 May Us Mey
| earn ee One nks tovall those] _CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good Two Attractive and Almost New Stone- 6.5.51—In| -Script Writer, male or {annie spot} | ofa Sh A Saadons ae. pb nal s * my = ey 29 May 30° May
ae a aap - ae aeeatn letters] tyres, in good working condition, price} wali Bungalows, One in and One Near diction and eee at _ oe PALIEACallpeeskc for Gis” vena San a Be 2 ay Pa ney roe a saae
cowwioles ce, or in any way express,| reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay, Staple] Nayy Gardens, One has a Large Flower guage essential. pply abate acta one ste eevee ember, | Cany as , coe ene it Far ja done os June
thelr sympathy in our recent death] Grove, Christ Church, Dial i tin, | Garden, Going for Under £3.00 seh. 1 soot & FOUND Trafalgar Street. S5,6-~-Ss Tat Mrs, 1. Weatherhead C/o J. N.| rapy iit “"30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July
; PEM ee eee ca | —ereepheinel erwin teers toe Gs rea Sa eee a MISCELLANEOUS iarriman, 5.5,51—4n. | LADY RODNEY *330 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug.
Paris MeCollin (Wite) ond ehil-]CAR; One Standard 10 h.p, Sound £3,000 Nett. About One Acre Seaside | -- Hh at Ce No. 6 Swan Street — Upstairs Premi- wus —
v 6.5.81.--In.| mechanical order, New Exide 12 V.] Land, Near City, Going for Under 34 cts - LOST nee pan | NO. 6 Swan Street, — Upstairs pre - ae
, Battery. Phone 2880- ween a.™.} ber sq. ft. C Me for Real Estate and Be ’ ses. 8 ss 5 ices a
and 3 p.m, 55.51—2n| Convinced. Dial 3111. D. F. de Abreu STAKE TICKETS — Serien| (In tins or tubs) 12 Fishtail Palms Ae Ta pS NORTHBOUND Arrives Bale or a ee fri,
RIAM ~~ _s=-—. | Call at Olive Bough, Hastings. SWEEPS. 0590 — 0599, 0610 — o6i9,| (Canvota) 12 Sago Palms, 12 Portlandia, | APP! , > 51i—In. | LADY RODNEY ON ey 9 May uae ‘es ms ou 26 May
IN MEMO CAR—Hillman Car M—1799~in good | ©*! | b620 0629" Finder please return same} Miss Nell Manning, Tel, 4062. , Plea ah Stig tae a PaBYy REM ie eet Bee a pid te sp sue
—| working ovder. Apply Frank Froverb:! LAND—Approximately 3,000 square feet | 9020, >- 208). Fave ere OFFICES above Lashlay's Ltd., Prince] LADY RODNEY 1.3 July 8 July 14 July se 16 July 19 July
C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd-, High) o¢ land at Stream Road, Christ Chureh ss —_— ——___—__—- Gua |william Henry Street. Apply: J. &. Y ON ll27Juky 29 July ¢ Aug. Aug. 12 Aug.
yee Maino ORR hy 5.5.51—5n} adjoining the Public Road. Appi’: One (1) Second Hand Chaff Cutter. Rat nig ie 3.5.51-_—6n. Peay eee “Gus iwack § sane 3 Sept. 21 Sept.
JONES—I ee: ee ae highet R C. Chapman C/o Messrs. Carrington J ‘ SALES Apply X c/o Advocate Co., Ltd. : Fee tne iekotne sable catia ate
Edgar Jones who was called to higher CAR—1937/38 1937/38 Vauxhall 14-6. Can be} @ Sealy. 27.4,51-—6n Pl BLIC 4.5.51—3n PARAISO—From June Ist, Barbarees| N.B,—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham=
on May 4th 1949. tiful garden) seen “ Courtesy Garage. PROM 461 eee aoa eeetesins xD — Experienced} Road, within one mile of the City. bers. Passenger Fares and freigat rates on a atian to:—
re ean tint x G. L, Challenor 4626, 5.5,51—3n | “LT AND—Only a few spots remaining at POSITION WANTED — Expe Dee. | eo ubaa “gellagten, Lanitanh pplic
. fror sorrow and pain ee roaming Worthing View so be sure to an female helper desires position in linen and: Diding m, three Bedrooms,
‘ . P . Room, enna
e day when life's journey 4 " CARS-—Wolseley 1948 14 HP. Mori: yours before all go. The gots 7 ran AUC'rION room of Hotel or Guest House & vise Kitchenette, Tiled Shower and Tub,
a ee you again 1946 10 HP.. Morris 1941 10 H.P.| from 6,000 to 12,000 sq. ft. ° STE TTT | ployment in, private Home. | Country }Po ty with’ hot water Upstairs, Large
oo" inital Bandon, | Morse oxtora, 10a ia Hg Maru] pices tance, trom. 0600 to, $20%. 00] By Tasructigna receved_T wil sell pretrrea. Wehe ‘MS.A. c'o ASvocue Juin ih, hot “water Upsalt. Langs GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents
Eve to be remem eree ontiaies) and | Minor 1950 8 H.P., Austin 1947 8 HP. per spot. For particulars see D'Arcy] by Public Auction on the spot at Bank — Basement. Gas and Electricity, Garage ha le %
TOTTENCe, GinNs Ford Van 10 H.P. ‘a real bargain. Ford] a. Scott, Magazine Lane, Dial 3743. Hatt Main Rosd 4th house fom AB











































































































































































































































































Ford V/8 1938 Coupe 2.5.51—3n. | souls Church, Thursday next the for two cates Apply Yearwood &
f 5.51—1n. | V/8 1935 Fo / . +90 , on ursday e) Boyce, James reet.
6.5 All these Gon on peed Fire in pe Pearce A ee 10th May et 2 o'clock, One, three- Kill those throbbing pains in oy! 6.5.51—T.F.N
5EOOSSOGISOSSS, respective classes and pi range. nr eres land table roof jouse WwW ut-offices,
§ VOCS PORAPSSS Fort Royal Garage Ltd., Thane 4508 for building, in lots of mot Jess than) 414 t the highest bidder. Must be your muscles at once! Apply J—.. ———————________-
% iti h — ‘ 4 oe Sustip + m ? ce 6:6 .61 , TO LET—In Marine Ds il ey 7
i : le ae ae | = = By mee, ag FFICE REQUISITES
$ West Indian & British MOTOR CYCLE — vee an S. aipasne eqvinennent. 9. Pine 5 minster’ y Sloan's Liniment lightly sarenent with epactna | verandahs, Write O
. Hand made Crafts, n . Apply W. roan Barber, ver . ve to Crane . GM. C/, Advoeate Co.
Fata. Hand ie ees S| crete brome oves,__8 Tea Ue Soe oa ee is e"aecn| UNDER "THE SILVER Be shits e
% weer, Decoration House, St aoeee One aa te Ford Station | Apply to W. I. Webster, Moncrieffe, St. HAMMER Siniagion’ Lo Wcawale Game” 4
+ ¥ James. Tel. 91-74, 14.4.51—1m. Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508] John. — ‘Phone 95-252. eh kttaste fea atk, sey ot Mid bedrooms, fully furnished, From 1st
3 oe Met Se Sceeggar 1 opensismeneesrinenarsentinunideprenii ve, Baynes we will sell her furniture inp to sist Lamia. Bent. Sees ae Roller Dampers, Glass Ink Stands, Glass Pen
VCO BEEOSECCCE SEO SSO SHOP AND LAND—No. 77 Roebuck] 4¢ “sopan’ St Lawrence Gap. which month, Dial 2259, 5.51—
SSS FURNITURE Street. Apply to N. Seahy, Fontabelle.} inciudes — Very nice Square Tip-Top ‘Trays, Paper Weights, Stamp Racks, Rubber
: een ae Dial 4007, 28.4.51—6n Dining Table hes 6), Vere Chaith, You don’t rub in “Sloan's” you dab it ds, Stapli Machin a
ITU ne e - . © , F n ‘ard ani s
MAPLE MANOR een seat 12, Price 40.00, Phone] SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: situntea) W780, Tea Trolley, Folding Card and! 1 affected part gently“ Sloan's” PERSONAL Stamps, Stamp Pads, Stapling Machines an
GUEST HOUSE 4117 811 a.m. 4—6 p.m, §.5.51—3n, at Ventnae Gardens. Ch. Ch. Ares, eon andah Chairs, Settee and Morris Chairs) dats the rest! Good for (=r Staples, Wire Trays and Wire Baskets, Letter
_———————————_$_$$—————— nl 1,962 sq: ft. with cushions in Cyp. ine Fla of ‘ SUNK
>POS STINGS ROCKS 2206 Day and 465 Night. 2,5.51—+.1.n. | Desk, Bookshelf, very nice China aches and pains and stiff
oe teins HAST re LIVESTOCK That deviable two woried rechold| Cabinet, Paintings, “Congoleum, Rugs. | joinus too! The public are hereby warned against Seales, Dating Machines and Pencil Sharpeners,
el. 3021, . " —e a lesirable two O1 Oval Mirror, Glass are, Luncheon f EDIT! p
agen ema. rallies mits ctrerbert. dwellinghouse known as “Culloden} Service for 8. Plated Ware, Norge Re- LOOK FOR THE ELRIDGE "GERTRUDE “BLACKMAN Metal Edge Rules,
i Tudor ‘Street, Gis.” “'5.581-an| View”, situate at the junction of Cul- frigerator in perfect working order.| pi¢rURE OF DR. SLOAN ( PILE) or any person. in my name
eee —eeeSaaaoaoaoeoeaoaoaouu r nial cocleindeet sure ane Psi Wrage ing 1oebe cecuieek Bigtee Lamp, Children's ements Bie ‘OM THE PACKET art do not hola myself responsible for
fn Jand ere containing f Cradle, Press, Dressing Table, Toy - 2 less
. = » MISCELLANEOUS feet. The house contains drawing and Shelves, all painted White, Larder, py wee earecres ae gece jess
dining rooms, library, kitchen, bath and] kitchen Cabinet, Breakfast Table and y a wri CECIL, W. BLACKMAN,
ANTIQUES — Of every description.) toilet downstairs and upstairs, four Chairs, 2-Burner Valor Oil Stove and “Walrondville”,
L E Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver| pedrooms (one with bath and _ toilet), Oven, Pressure Cooker, Scales, Kitchen } Bonnets, Clapham,
Water-colours. Early books, | Maps.| Two servants rooms, garage for 1 gar! tytensils, Electric Toaster, Iron and other LINIMENT St. Michael.
Autographs ete., wit ia ag a aor and tool room (all built of stone), in the} items, ‘Sale 11.30 o'clock. ae cae hotell! 6.5.51—3n
| Shop, adjoining ya ac ub, yard, és I chemists
j OH | 3.9.50—t.t.n.|""phe date of sale will be published en ae

| _—_—— “> ee feu
| ARSENOCRINE ampoules, for Anemia.| “ Ingpection between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. —2n S
| Overwork. Preunancy, Hemormhages andl anyday except Sundays on Appolit: de IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE WINDWARD ISLANDS
| 4 Siructions with every box. "(Laboratories| ment with the owner Mr. St. Clair Hunte, —_—— AND LEEWARD ISLANDS, ANTIGUA CIRCUIT

OBERLIN -~ FRANCE.) Obtainable , A.D. 1951
es G. L. W, CLARKE & CO.,, d 2 .D,

Legaing Drugeists: Se eaee soucitors, |Advertise... It Pays
| ‘ | ACTUMUS —- The Root Hormone Fer- ane In the Matter of .the Title by Registration Act Chapter 99
eee coe, et Arch eo vo and of Antigua Syndieate Estates Limited, Morteapets. ne

Store, eapane-O0, ‘ -bst d Registered Proprietor

INE RD H John Cecil ebster, Mortgagor an
| ACTUMUS — The Key to Growing PART O ORDERS under the said Act, is.
| A.F.S. 'V.A, aver ~ from H. Keith Re ae dela a Bs ;
| 2 Lue ‘ jeut.-Col, J. , O.B.E., E , 4 4 5
Ce : “ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests — Commanding, é : :

from H. Keith Archer's Drug Store. THE BARBADOS REGIMENT ss

| : ! ISSUE No, 18 4 MAY, 51. :

| GERALD WOOD ee 3.5,.51—5n.
wa a 1. PARADES—Training ~ zi

| in eel te nae ene weit All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1/700 hours on Thursday

| Manure, From H. Keith Archer's Drug i May 51. They Will Sapesnue sebeareing ae ae ping 8 Birthday marae ae
3 E ‘Oy arrangements, is the last opportunity to carry ou ‘0;

| FOR SALE ' ihn
| ACTUMUS — The Fertilizer of th te
COUNTRY HOUSE, St, Peter— Future—Inoreases. the Sarthwoem Donan 5 Band. practicos will be held on Monday 7 Wednesday 9 and Thursday 10 May 51.

es ost attractive property © ion of soils, From H, Keith Archer's B—Oficors S, b belts sie ‘
ioe Island creating the D: Sto: In future the normal dress for all parades for Officers will be berets, wel Fi :
| aye on oe Small manor rye ee, 3.5.51—6n, hosetops, boots ard short puttees, The Orderly Omcer will continue to wane .

1 tmosphere - ae Sree catetatia t i or lectures, , . g $ H
| house cleverly ads ane ae ACTUMUS — Produced by Dr. S. whem thoy are ash Lareiiege Gant ae mee ee aT ed Here’s our cheque from John M. Bladon paid within

climate with wide eee aa Sak eee England, eliminates All Ranks
} turing natural stone areh sease at the roots of plants. From H. Thi t , 7
| 0 nicely ae RO Ne Gane Selth Archer's Drug Store 3,5.51—Bn. Be a double fold at the 195. "Phe fold must be the length of a cigarette packet. 48 hours of the auction and only charging 10%, I

grille wor ne LO P
} tains g-aitting room, study, draw. EN FRE STOCK-IN-TRADE Furniture]: ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING : would certainly recommend anyone to have John
| Siegen aun ea, Soubie Bed Hl) Swan Street wock yaied aoe sisaes | Gedy OMeer ....,aYLeut. A. at. Clarke ience i
| eae he “own bath and Store could’ be leased. for 2, years, Orderly Serjeant .. =... a4 Sit Williams, Bs 2, | ee Bladon auction their furniture if our experience is
} toilet), tub bath with, Apt ae inper interested write T. C/o “Shee Next at Po tint “TA: Git | Bias % ‘“

arge atage and 5.51— rderly icer P i eut. ens eee ¢ y apitent
| yooms, Pa ‘mains aerell laid et re eh as ne, a ae Orderly Serjeant . ¢ 278 Sjt Williams, §. D Bias Tae any criterion.
| proximately 3 acres we' GALVANIS s
it eeu fs obhamental hd tee new sheets, ay ctr lehas The iand’! M. L, Be a na Masor, AU

d and mahogany trees 6 8.0 utant, CT NWN
ra re a oea Yee ton o ft 08; 7 ft A tt $6. "elven oe The Barbados Regiment. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to =e panes Of We
with sea bathing close at hand. A. BARNES & CO., LTD r PART II ORDERS Supreme Court of the Windward Islands and Leewa s be high-
" FLATS", Cod. E4150) ee AD EROS. REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 16 | the 8ist day of March, 1951, I will sell at public auction to the hig ;
“WHITEHALL x oye Ma 56 —_—_—_——— 3RD MAY 51 SHEET NO. 1. Thursda the 7th day of June, 1951, at 2 o’clock in
utton Hill, St. Michael ah oe HAMAMELIODE drops, cure for Vart~ | errr eee | CSt bidder, on 4 a, rt House, St. John’s, Antjgua, ALL THAT
reset Utar a block of & apacie cose Veins — Hemorrhoids, Menopause STRENGTH DECREASE Dismissals the afternoon at the Cou J Villa” but formerly
converted intg a block 0} = n ~ Congestions and circulatory troubles. 233 L/S Blackman, A oO piece or parcel of land now known as Barant illa u
ez entencen The wounds (Laboratories OBERLIN-FRANCE) Ob- 402 Pte King, L 8, part of Tomlinsons Estate, one of the Gunthorpes Estates, sue oe
nox. § acres are iaid out with tainable at leading Druggists. oop uti, Ss he the Parish of Saint John in the Island of Antigua, comprising = a AB.S., F.V.A.
“a jie sacway = SE eee: 260 Gibson, P! A! acres, of which said land JOHN CECIL WEBSTER is Ma reer
: lage n —— . 4 hy ‘
| Srach” fant with mahogany INVESTMENT SHARES in Barbados “il eel A re: proprietor under Certificate of Title Register Book R Folio 7 0 : Plantations Building
| trees. An investment property or Seen caoclety and.” Bubscription 340". Ingram, "A. L Register of Titleg of the Antigua Circuit.
\ table for conversion into Guest Shares at one dollar per month, Phone 477 Hinds, "Ht ; Na : St. Jonn’
| House or Nursing Home, 3% miles Secretary 4476 Barnes Ruiaios, diccae 346 * Miller, J. Articles of sale may be seen at the Registrar's Ome | t. John’s, ,
| from. Town, ee $ 443 .~«, «Griffith, E. o. Dismissed from the Regiment by the ; j workin ours of said office, -——_—

| smicmecreu, ith Avenue, |] “CARDERSOne “Large Pine Larder, | $27‘ Brout.’st. ¢ C2 ing iy naeetondanne, 4} paredhe | ABH ENS! On! any ey “during ihe ,
| peilevilie-Well maintained bunga: In Good Condition, Phone—2169. 451, Mayers, W. wef 14 May 51, Dated the 4th day of April, 1951.
| low. constructed of te with 6,5.51—in, LEAVE—Privilese N. A, eee.
| lab hingled roo’ e ace ~ , B. Gr 3 ths’ P/Leave wef 1 May $1 e rar.
| commmnodation consists of an en- PRAM — (one) Convertible Pram $16 Cpl Williams, B Tented D. SKEWES.COX. Major, zu bi IST EEs IF ED
; closed vallery, living room, dining in good condition Ring—3195, $O.L.F. & Adjutant, See Some teneaeeclnn ~

roor our bedrooms, kitchen, ser- 6.5.51.~—In. The Barbados Regiment.

x room and aouble garage.

Erde." ‘matt orchard and |W] « tor a Go. Moebeek Senet. fh | SPRING ROUND-UP ADVERTISEMENTS

we side, a small orchard and A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00 | memes snpereseenseueemeeneeeee E

is falls _ enclosed anes a oer 98 Ib, bag. Dial 2628, i
| Sects sree eat town tol beni oiom!| ORIENTAL w

anted For Cash
r Ss smemrensepremnnininpeanenenenpennsaemcunieaenenssinitie
ba ‘) met saa Pa ce proper- SAILING DINGHY, half decked 12 &, SOUVENIRS, CURIOS, Veed and Unused POSTAGE " ieee didi £8. eee dad aeeasibiabinde ‘ber
| de standing ap speros. 1% Saene 50 due ant end Me fe Mette: tier Oe eee STAMPS of the British West (WESTERN DRESS) e Advocate Co., Ltd.,
| the “buy” ef the year at £5,500, fitted out and 10 ft. Rowing Dinghy to- New Shipment opened " he ri District
house lends itself to easy gethcr $200 also International Torpadg Indies. Good Prices Paid at the bee ate classified advertisements to be taken by various
| conversion into attractive flats and Kit $300. Telephone 91-61. 6.5.51—~ THANI’S DIAL CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY RAL

2 % acre of land at the side could 3466 No. 10, Swan Street, on Agents and so far the following have been authorised to

bi wold ‘oft readily as a building ae SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1951
E Frenetee acuurat’ prmnucins as" ,,, MAIL NOTICE 2090559000000 TO OOOH, In aid of the St, Winifred’s receive them :
| from the main prop- eorett ares TH pomeines, Mont: 7 Building Fund
| on w.atane, wall, Bosioii, Halifax,’ Montreal by the RMS. FA IR The St. David's Chureh eo Music . + bh Poli MOSES G NS JOSEPH JEMMOTT
| , “INCH MARLOW — On arovox {il Uetleegt Beet Omen sends = In Aid of — A alls iy le ages
| 2. acres _coastle na _near_, Silver Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered Mail St, WINIFR®D'S BUILDING FUND Annual Basaar - ‘he eee rideeioner of © @\Dayrells Road, Ch, Ch. St. Elizabeth Village,

Ronee, with selaien ay ous ina the 6th May, ibe mere» ener Se sngae = will be held in the } Police. St. Joseph.

ft ing, 4 reception yedrooms, ’ 8 ‘i ey 5

verandah, as throoms and ee ST. WINIFRED Ss on SATURDAY ah MANO DANCING 9.00 p.m, | Mrs. U. L.. BRUCE,

2 kitchens, 2 servants’? rooms, 3 pm ) 00 sale now

: a artments but PINE HILL Be i Tickets $1.00 on Ma: Road, Ch. Ch. 8. A.. DURANT
| easy 40. eeseun ee on — aris, TOde opened by )) Sharkskin, Jersey, Plain & Refreshments will be on sale well f Bint” " disssaie

FLORENCE GODDARD } ‘ ' Horse . Joseph.

y 1 ore SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1951 By the kind permission of riped Support this worthy cause! . 3 ’

% ee ee rel ac fone Ne store from 3—6 p.m. ne pee ioe i Stri ) Silver & Gold Tinsel | Dress Optional OQ. McCONNEY,

Cor h with approx. § : kind mission of Colonel ie ce and will be in . ! YY.
| sy Baws ABR Fe michelin ue petieg Baad will we apmreranatenannee Crepe & Georgette, Plain & {{{ 1) xen Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch.. EBENEZER PHARMACY,
| There are 5 bedrooms, in attendance. $ % '

& # Ginn eam, ‘ritehen, cenclllent ang Sian KEEP THE DATE OPEN Cntdren 6d, eA eee eee A COUNTRY FAIR | JOSEPH ALLEYNE, ere
\ . servants’ rooms, 2 garage properties hich keep his 7 . Satins, Tafetas, Spuns, Etc. {{}\ :

i “various outside” busidings, | \tender skin healthy and Q) X= AY | Sosooooossooossooesosss will be held under the Crane, St, Philip. Vv. HOLDER,

a: property is well elevated and ‘ Hats, Shoes, Nylons, t e of

| commends exeellent views of the A G F t 5 ar. és ues 3 Wilki a St., Judes, St. George.
| anaes erate, nd Modern High School St. James’ Combi na

i \ Ropkiy ; ne d of ae , ern Ig C at St. James’ Combined G. Q E,

B ding . Land Rock ley yew j y
ma | (All Souls Church Funds) 3 MONDAY, May 14th
4 in this WHIT y ’

mere than 4a 4 ee ns ‘at : y Education) e | 3—10 p.m Pine Gap, St, Michael.
| popular new developit are , a mM. x
| near Golf Club } EMPIRE CLUB GROUNDS LONDOw CHAMBER OF |]] Refreshments, Sweets, Snack E, HINKSON,

2 OF : $ COMMERCE CERTIFICATE John White Shoes, Shirts, {||| Bar, Pudding and Souse, V. RICE
| % WHIT MONDAY, May 14th STAGE RESULT ‘“ , : , Ice Cream, Ete. Massiah Street, St. John. ‘ >
| FOR RENT 1: en ae , Two candidates, Euraline iocks, Ties, H'k & Hats. Dancing from 6— -.e 4 ‘ Bank Hall Road,
i ADVERTISE ‘ pPm.—6 p.m. — S Bentham and Alvin. May- The Police Band conducte H., L. CAVE, Mi 1
| (as CHANCERY” on. Coast at % Variety Stalls — Dancing nard, were entered for {i\{{ LET US SERVE YOU. by Capt. Raison, A.R.C.M. Pi Mia a St.. Michael.
| Silver Sands. Furnished i % Merry Go-Round — Pony ¢ book-keeping at the Autumn will: be. in attendance, by St. John’s Dispensary, - say ee Rie
| .qwInDY WILLOWS"—Prospect, me the Rides Etc. Examination, 1950; both } “kind permission of Colonel + = wee E, LORDE

st James, Unfurnished house on nm ADMISSION — — I/- Michelin. Peneoede in ae of . iH. A Bank Hall X Road,

r with & bedrooms, lounge, the Baptist car—

erandah, overlooking sea ete. ADVOCATE 29.4.5)—3n. % * aOR P Near Sharon, St, Thomas. St, Michael,
s Immediate possession. 5 q ° Admission : 4
| VAVERLEY”, St. Lawrence— om Adults 1/- :o: Children 6d. . ‘

j 3 bedroomed furnieh- : > 99.4.51—3n. Items may be handed into the above for the following
€ bungalow. Available 1 , x { “

lease if required, 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH NOTICE | ANNUAL DANCE f Columns in the Classified Section : :

DY LODGE”, St. James Mr. John Hammond begs %, ETC.
| Furtiched Chalet with the ‘best (3 p beach and bathing the tilend has an ne ee ee eee for his White Elephant Stall EMPIRE CLUB ; Ifyou wish a good FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

aa is causing a sensation at the Festi- at the Country Fair in aid ef 1 r
ST ra kilns (ETE vit ct susiio, Se the St. John the Baptist asra MAY" 1951 HAND SPRAYER
pointed furnished apartments. — | aS ve Pee aed Vicarage, on May 14, O at the ; ia '
_JOHNSON'S STATIONERY clothes, books, magazines, CLUB’S PAVILION Try our special 1 qt. size just receives. ADVOCATE CO. LTD.
REAL ESTATE AGENT | a crea china, glass, in fact, re Bank Hall ’
AUCTIONEER ENAMEL-IT PAINTS for your including money wi e Subscription 3/- Sa an hy , :
Dee am gratefully accepted. ; Music: Mr. Percy Green’s CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. T. Gale. Advertising Manager
PLANTATIONS BU ILDING | jg Pet Furniture is at - - - Telephone 2292 for things Orchestra : :
’Phone 4640 ' JOHNSO HARDWARE to be collectd. Admission by Invitation Pier Head.
‘al
” 4 SST NON ae . aS aa POSEN SDE tt a RATAN LTTE SITLL,




SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

Faiths Barbadians Live B.B.C. RADIO NOTES :
By—11

The New Testament Church of God
By James F. Brathwaite

The New Testament Church

of God is the name of the local R

church which has been received
by and comprises a part of the
General Assembly of the Church
of God, whose International
Headquartérs are at 2502 Mont-
gomery Avenue, Cleveland Ten-

nesse, U.S.A. e@ church was
incorporated by ial Statue of
the Megiatature this Island on

December 30, 1940.

It n its work here in 1936
when . J. H, Ingrim made
his first visit to Bar! during
his Missionary tour of the West
Indies.

Rev. Ingrim who said that he
had been “led of the spirit” to
call here, met the late Rev. J. H.
Marshall, and Rev. C. N. Ford.
These had for some years beén
carrying on Pentecostal Meetings
at Eckstein Village, and at River
Road. They welcomed. the visit
of Rev. Ingrim and decided to
link up their two Churches, with
the American Movement at
Cleveland, Tennessee which Rev
Ingrim represented.

From this time the work began
to spread rapidly throughout the
whole Island. To-day it is being
carried on in the eleven parishes,
with 33 organised assemblies, and
a communicant membership. of
just over 2,000 persons.

2 The Parent Body at Cleveland,
Tennessee, ‘had, its beginning as
far back as_1886. when the..Rev
Richard G. ing was thoved
upon by the Spirit, and began to
search the Bible, and Church
History, for God’s plan concern-
ing His Church, In the Year 1886
he organiséd 4 Chufch with éight
members in the Barney Creek
Meeting-house in east Tennessee.
It was from this small group that
the denomination started.

This little organisation strug-
gled along until January 1906
when they assembled in a General
Meeting at the home of Rev.
J.C. Murphy, in the same com-
munity, to discuss plans for better
Government. and methods o
expansion. This meeting became
known as the first General Assem-
bly. Co-incidentally, this was
the year that Los Angeles, Cali-
fornia, was visited by a great
outpouring of the Holy Ghost.

The second General Assembly
fook place at the Union Church
House about fourteen miles from
Cleveland, Tennessee, in a rurat
section of Bradley County. At
this General Assembly the organ-
ization was named the Church of
God. In this same year 1907, the
first evangelistic efforts were
made in the City of Cleveland,
Tennessee. The Third General
Assembly was held there.

Up to this time, the Chaniecat
Overseer who had been moderator
at two General Assemblies and
was Pastor of the local Church in
Cleveland. had not yet received
the Baptism of the Holy Ghost.

To the Third General Assembly
ev. T. G. Cashwell, of North
Carolina was invited. Rev. Cash-
well had been to Los Angeles,
California, and had received the
Baptism of the Holy Ghost in the
great. Pentecostal yn ere |
there. This Evangelist preaché
on the Saturday night after a
Assembly had closed, and on the
Sunday morning during the Ser-
vice the General Overseer was
baptized with the Holy Ghost.

From this time the Church at
Cleveland began a great Revival.
work grew as never before.

In fact, during the whole year. of
1908 there was a revival in the
new Church at Cleveland. It was
a great time of soul saving, sanc-
tification of believers, and Holy
Ghost baptisms. e sick were
healed, and pédple laid prostrate
under the Power of God for hours.
Many of the older members still
look back on those days with joy.

One of the intérésting things in
the history of this Church of God
movement is the way it started.
Many of the Church organizations
of today were started by factions
splitting off from other churches,
usually a group of ministers who
sought leadership. Other organi-
zations have been born hy the
uniting of smaller grqups into one
body. This movement did not
have its beginning in either way.
God used a small group isolatéd
in the hills of .Eastern Tennessee
and Western Carolina and led
them step by step to build the
Movement which has become
world-wide within the last 50
years. There are now 2a
churches in the U.S.A., 1,080
churches in foreign lands, 3,202
ministers preaching a full Bible
Gospel, and just over 200,000 com-
municant members.

The Church has not forgotten
the educational side of its work.
The Lee College located in Cleve-
land, Tennessee, owned and oper-
ated by the Church with an en-
rolment of between six and seven
hundred students, has the High-
School division, Junior college
division, and also the religious-
education division. This Institu-
tion provides a four-year fully
accredited college, and a fully ac-
credited Bible College course.

There are a number of other
schools that are training ministers
and christian workers.

he work in Barbados has
grown steadily and has even ex-
tended to some other colonies.
There are now Assemblies here in
one parish of the island, four
in St. Vincent, one in St. Luica,
two in Dominica, five in St. Kitts,
and one each in the islands of
Nevis and St, Martin.

The fécént visit of Rev. J. B.
Reesor with his ministry of Faith
Healing, has hel the public in
general to régard the New Testa-
ment Church of , with more
respect, and with greater confi-
dence than ever before.

~ CHURCH SERVICES

COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH

Gilkes. -—t
ETHEL
EMPIRE YOUTH SUNDAY
Uo a.m. and 7 p.m, v..B, Crosby
Holy Se a aft th Service.
9 a.m, Rev, B. Crosby Holy Communion
7 p.tn, P. Deane.
BELMONT
11 a.m. Rev. M. A. EB Thomas. Holy
Communion; 7 p.m. Mr, Bi arper,
SOUTH aie

UT T
9 am, Rev. M. A, nora, Holy

Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. A, L. Mayers,
PROVIDENCE
11 a.m. Mr, C. Best; 7 p.m. Mr. J.
Clarke
VAUXHALL

11_a.m, Mr, C, Jones; 7 p.m. Rev. M.
A. E. Thomas.

JAMES §' ET

Tl a.m. Rev. J. S. Boulton

Holy Communton, 7 p.m, Rev.
ton, Holy Communion.

PAYNES BAY
9,30 a.m. Mrs. Phillips; 7 p.m. Mr. PF.

Moore
WHITE HALL
9.30 a. ay R, a ge Holy
Communion, p.m junt.
GILL huMontac
1l_ a.m, Rev, R. M., eC gnough, Holy
Communion; 7 p.m . St. HM,

LETO
8,30 a.m. Mr. G, Matville; 7 p.m, Mr.

cott.
BANK HALL
--9.30 am. Mr. J T Oxley; 7 p.m, Mr
G. Me Allister
SPEIGHTSTOWN
11 a.m, Mr. Mc Clean; 7 p.m. Rev. R
McCullough. Holy Communion.

11 a.m, Mr. E L_ Bannister;
BETHESDA

11 a.m, Mr, Greaves; 7 p.m, _,

ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

7 p.m, Evensong and Sermon, Even-

(Broadeast)
J. 8. 1-

7pm








song led by Rev. L. B. Clarke, Preacher
Rev, J. B. Grant \.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

A. First Church of Christ, Scientist, Bridge-
Bay. Street

§ 1
Subject of Lesson—Sermon: Everlasting

punishment.

Golden Text: Ezekiel 18:30, Repent, and
turn yourselves from all your trans-
gressions; so iniduity shall not be your

ruin,
ST. PAUL'S
7.30 an, Holy Communion; 9.30 a m
Solemn Mass a ion; 3 p.m. Sun-
day School and Procéssion to Youth Ser-
vice; 3.15 p.m, Solemn Baptism; 7 p m.
Solemn Evensong, Sermon and Proces-
sion, Preacher; The Rev. G. W. Silk M.D.
Priest from the Diocese of Derby, Eng-
land,
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.n. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Major eet.
WELLINGTON STREET
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting,
Preacher : Sr.,Major. Gibbs.
, PIE CORNER
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher: Sr. Major Hollingsworth,
DIAMOND. CORNER
11 a.m, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Com
pany Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Captain e.
CARLTON
11 a.m, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Preacher : Captain Bourne.
FOUR ROADS
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Lieutenant Gunthorpe.

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Lieutenant Gibbons.

8ST. LEONARD'S
8 a.m. Holy Communion; 9 a.m. Choral

Eucharist & Address; 10.30 a.m. Holy






JUST RECEIVED!



West Indians
At Festival

In “West Indian Diary”

ON Friday next, llth. May,
there will be a change in the char-
acter of the B.B.C. programm:
‘West Indian Diary.’ In place o/
the previous form of interviews
of the West Indians in Britain—
incidentally did you heat _ the
West_ Indian students at Oxford
on Friday 4th May?—the pro-

gramme will consist of a News- *!—*

letter, Postscript, Interview and
Round-up with emphasis on
Britain in Festival time and Wes
Indians now on holiday in Britain
for it. Broadcast continues at the
regular time of 7.15 p.m. on the
25 and 31 metre band beams.
Festival Sidelights

Two B.B.C. talks in the com-
ing week will give listeners to
the B.B.C’s General Overseas
Service first-hand impressions 6!
‘the lesser-known attractions o/
the Festival of Britain now in it;
second week which offers endles:
treasure-trove to interested
observers. On Tuesday, 8th inst.
John Betjeman will talk. abou:
‘Festival Oddities’ describing some
of the more or less orthodox
architectural wonders of the south
Bank with spécial reference to
‘Eceentrics’ Corner.’: John Bet-
jeman.is well known as a writer
and broadcaster with a gift of
fantasy and a flair for whimsical
architecture. On Thursday, 10th
inst. Hugh.Casson, an- architect
who has been responsible for the
architectural side of the 1951
Exhibition from its beginnings,
will ‘talk, ‘not about his’ Brain-
child, but on the Fun Fair in the
Festival Gardens at Battersea
Park, covering twenty-seven acres
“e aoe ae er these
alks wi Ven at.7.45 p.m.
right after the West Indies pro-
grammes. Remember the dates,
Tuesday and Thursday, 8th and
10th inst.

AH Serial

Taking the place of “Sorréll
and Son” on Mondays will be
Thomas Hardy's great novel, “The
Mayor of Casterbridge.” The
story has been dramatised for
broadcasting by Desmond Haw-
kins, a feature. writer and pro-

ducer in the B.B.C’s West of
England Region, who is an
authority on Hardy and_ his

beloved Wessex. The music is by
Vaughan Williams, another Wes-
sex man whose passion for folk-
jore is as great as Hardy’s own
and whose music is infused with
Hardy’s sense of the forces which
struggle for mastery within a
human being. ®roadcast will be
at the regular time of B.B.C.

serials, namely 7.15 p.m. on
Mondays, beginning on the 7th
inst. ;

J. B. Priestley

J. B. Priestley is much in news
of B.B.C. programmes in the
coming week. On Sunday, 6th
inst. hé gives the first of his new
series of talks called “The Spur
of the Moment” reflecting his
impromptu thoughts and salty,
candid, human, homely observa-
tions on life and letters. These
talks will be given at 5.05 p.m.
on Sundays. In addition, Priest-
ley’s play, ‘The Linden Tree’ will
be broadcast in “Radio Theatre”
beginning at 8.30 p.m. on Satur-
day, 12th inst, Gladys Young and
Edward Chapman také the lead-
ing parts.

“After the war I was describing
how I had returned to one of my
favourite lochs and hew I strug-
gled with one of the b st trout
of my life, playing him to a stand-
still. My talk was translated into
Spanish and reached South Amer-
ica. Months afterwards I got an
indignant letter from an afficion..
ado of the bull ring tebuking mu
for my cruelty! “Our bulls,” he
said, “die in proud fighting, your
trout in cold terror,” It was a
strange experience for a rather
mild Scotsman to be chided for
cruelty by a fan of the bull ring
But you know, I think I saw what
he meant.”

MORAY McLAREN,
(in a BBC Programme).



Baptism; 11 a.m. Matins & sermon; 3
p.m, Sunday School; 7 p.m, Evensong
end Sermon,
ROEBUCK sT.
11 a.m, Rev, D. C. Moore, (Holy Com-
munion); 7 p.m. Rev. A. C. Pilgrim.

GRACE HILL ea ae
rai a.m, Mr. w Wivde 7 ~.th, Mr. U
s . FU
11 am. Mr. T. aS p.m. Mr. oO
Lewis.

7 om. a
7 p.m. Mr 8 sin

eekes,
DUNSCOMBE
11_a.m, Mr. G. C. Lewis; 7 p.m. Mr
C. Green.



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St. Michael
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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



. e.
B.B.C. Radio
Programme
SONDAY, MAY 6, 1951
0.20 au tae S een one
ae sin
6.30 a.m. Week-end Sports Report,
£45 a.m. Sandy MacPherson at the
Theatre Organ, 7 a.m. The News, 7.10
a.â„¢. News Analysis, 7.15 a.m, From the
Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme Parade,
7.30 a.m. English Magazine, 8
Calling all Forces, 9 a.m. The News,

9.10 a.m. Home News from Britain,
9.15 a.m., Close Down, 11,15 a.m. Pro~



gra le, 11.20 a.m. Interlude,
uu &.m. Festival Service, 12 (noon)
The News, is,

12.10 p.m. News
72.15 p.m. Close Down.
: p.m.

4.15 p.m. Music Magazine, 4.30 Pp.





acm. |

19.76 M. |i

——_



MR. CARPE

You've been
Waiting for
13" and 2"

THESE HAVE

Sunday Half Hour, 5 P.m. Interi .
5.0 pm. The r of the Moment,
5.20 p.m. * Choice, 6 p.m. |
Rendezvous Players, 6.15 p.m. Ray’s a}
Gu 11.00 p.m. ...... 25.53 M. 31.22 M.
6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m.

The News, 7.1 -m. News Analysis,
7.13 p.m. ¢ in. Voices, 7.45 p.m,
Christianity and the Parliamentary Tradi-
tion, 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
Festival of Britain, 8.45 p.m. Interlude
8.55 p.m m the Editorials, 9 p.m
Submarine Jubilee, 10 p.m, The News,
10.10 p.m. Interlude, 10.15 P.m. Council
of Burope, 10.30 p.m. London Forum
11 p.m. Louis Kentner

C.B.C, PROGRAMME

SUNDAY, MAY 6.

10 p.m,.—10.15 p.m aa News
a
10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m. Audience Mail Bag
1L.76 Mes 25.51 M
BOSTON

WRUL 15.29 Mc, WRUW 11.75 Me,
WRUX 17.75 Me.

MONDAY, MAY 7, 1951

630 am—!5-pom. cocee, 19 60M.





6.30 a.m, The Billy Cotton Band Show,
7 a.m, The N@wWs, 7.10 a.m. New:
Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editoridls,
7.25 a.m, Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m
At the Bottom of the Deep Blue Sea
7.45 a.m. Composer of the Week, 8 am.
Council of *

7 * ‘ Debate
Continues, 9 a.m. The News, 9.10 a.m
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m.
Close Down, 11.15 a.m, Programme
Patade, 11.25 a.m. Listeners’ Choice,
11.45 a.m. Commonwealth Survey, | 12

(noon) The News, 12.10 p,m, Neéws
Anal 12.15 p.m. Close Down.
11646 Pom. 22. 19.76 M

4.15 p.m. Australia's Jubilee Year,
5 p.m. Yorkshire ys. South Africans,
5.05 p.m, Interlude, 5.15 p.m. The
Storyteller, 5.35 p.m. Gramophone Re-
cords, 6 p.m. Nights at the Opera, 6.45





7 p.m. The News, News
Anajysis, 7.15

pm. The May o
Casterbridge, 7.46 p.m. At the Wont

7.10 p.m

of the Deep Blue Sea, 8 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.15 p.m, | Commonwealth
Survey, 8.30 p.m tice . makes

Perfect, 8.45 p.m, Interlude, 8.55./p.m,
From the Editorials, 9 p.m, Britis:
Concert Hall, 10 p.m, The News, 10,1

p.m. Interlude, 10.15 p.m. Tip Top
Tunes, 10.45 p.m. Seience§ Review,
ll p.m. Thi ve
c. . 1G! ME
Â¥, MAY 7. .
10 p.m.—10,15 p.m. .........0-.. News.
a — —
10.15 p.m. —> 10.30 p.m. Canadian
Chronicle, 11.76 Mcs 25,51 M
ee ee

Barbados Mutual
Bonus Rate
Increased from
12% to 2%

The Directors of the Barbados
Mutual» Life Assurance -Seeiety
have recently received the very
welcome news from the Society's

Actuary in Erigland that on ac- |’

count of the splendid results
achieved by the Society during
the past five years he is in a posi-
tion 16 recommend the declaration
of a Compound Reversionary
Benus of 2% per annum for the
Quinquennium ended 31st Decem-
ber, 1950, The rate for the pre
vious 10 years has been 1!2%.

The fact that this Bonus is cal-
culated on the Sum Assured plus
all previous Bonuses that have
already been added, and therefore
involves a very considerable sum,
is evidence of the very sound
position of the Society.

From the following example
(actual figures of a policy in
force) it will be seen that where-
as the Sum Assured is $2,000 it
will require $573 to add a Bonus
of 2% per annum for the 5 years
just ended.



Sum Assured. . $2,000

Previous Bonuses 3,730

$5,730

Bonus to be added.. 573
(2%.x 5 = 10%) -

Total Value $6,203

_ There will of course be many
Policies taken out during the
Quinauénnium. which will not
fave been in force for five years.
These policies will get a 2%
Bonus for each year they have
been in force.















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PAGE THIRTEEN





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__ PAGE FOURTEEN | Se ile SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. MAY 6, 1951
|
Tornadoes Favoured By - Weather [== invesinent 9 << may
THE “Bighth Regatta "ot ‘the A WINNER se en a } ‘
:

R.B.Y.C. was sailed inc arlisle Bay A. M. WEBB

yesterday eitarnoon in weather Stockbroker
33, Broad St. (Over Phoenix
Pharmacy)

FOR LONGER SERVICE | and
|
|













i







MED. cob as
TOILET SOAPS!

IMPERIAL LEATHER @ LINDEN BLOSSOM @ BLUE HYACINTH

this season. In nearly all the
R.B.Â¥.C. Regattas the conditions
were suitable for them The race
was south about

Denis Atkinson brought in Cy.
clone first in the “C", Centreboard
and Tornado Class yesterday. He
steered Cyclone very well and al-
though at the start Vamoose got
the jump, Cyelone was able to
overtake ‘her going around the bea
gle, Cyclone defeated Vamoose by
a minute and 11 seconds

Flirt, skippered by her owner
Eyre Kinch, scored her first vic-
tory ir the “B” Class this season. {
In the Intermediate Class Bertie
Clarke sailed in Mohawk with
David Payne and Bob Cumber-
batch.




for the Tornadoes
TAR all posts before erecting.

The wind was light and the sea
A small quantity of this
17 Jewel and 15 Jewel

calm, Tornado skippers can count
Ro t preventative
Watches with a 3-year guarantee

themselves extremely lucky so far
material still available

at your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price 40c. per gallon.
Get Some To-day,











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at your Jewellers
UILR -DZQOWSS

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Corrected Cryptoque Owing
to the Printer’s Devil this had
to be repeated

Last Crypt Whatsoever thy
hand findeth to do,-do it with
thy might,



hurrah!

BLAZERS

at last

Ten

Ten boats started in the “B”
Class, Wizard did not race. First to
complete the first lap was Ranger,
85 seconds ahead of War Cloud
which gave her a minute. Flirt,
which gave a minute to War
Cloud, finished this round 20 sec-
onds behind her. Fantasy was
fourth, about a minute and a half
behind Flirt with Rascal, which
liad given Okapi a minute and
cvertook her, a few seconds be
hind. Mischief and Gipsy each
gave four minutes to Moyra Blair
and by the end of thi round
Moyra Blair still had the lead on

them Mischief completed the RAR
round ten seconds ahead of Gipsy oa eee skippered by Denis Atkinson, carried off honours in the ADMISSION Gents 2/- Ladies 1/6

“1 ; f , Contreboard and Tornado Class when the Eighth Regatta of the
In the second lap Flirt overtook
both Ranger and War Cloud. She RB: Y.C. was sailed in Carlisle Bay yesterday.

—Ecclesiast@s.





Mk. VERNON BOWS 'S

extends a cordial invitation to his
DANCE
which will be held at
WELCHMAN HALL CASINO
St. Thomas
Music by the Orchestra that is
again back into popular favoilr,

Phone 4267 for
Ferrocrete rapid-hardening Cement |
in 375 lb. Drums

Snowcrete White Cement
in 375 lb. Drums

Colorcrete Cement

was first to complete the lap, about aS a Ste i te aN bel Ske | YELLOW in 375 lb. Drums
37 seconds ahead of War Cloud | YACHTSMAN DIES Amateur Night 4 id: te n eee

For the first time since the War we can offer
Readymade Blue Blazers for Girls and Boys.
Sizes for children from 10 to 16 years of age.

Mr. Coa Alleyne and his
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at

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC Everite Asbestos-Cement Corrugated Sheets

(Local & va Members 6 ft., 7 ft. 8 ft., 9 ft. 10 ft. Lengths

- Everite Trafford Tiles

SATURDAY, MAY 12th,
9 p.m. 6 ft. and 8 ft. Lengths.

Can you Play an Instrument?

Whistle? Sing? Imitate? WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Impersonate?
Or are you in any way

which also overtook Ranger
IN GRENADA

Ranger was now nearly one a .
ute behind War Cloud while Fan-
(From Our Cwn Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 5

tasy came around fourth, about 20
seconds after Ranger, The others
ie order vite Se es ‘ -. 3,4 Mr. D. G. Lusan, senior pilot
seconds ahead o schief, anc 3 ash 2 St. Georges and
Moyrs Blair. : = of the port of St, Georges
Flirt kept the lead and won
easily, a minute and 55 seconds
ahead of War Cloud, She com.
pleted the three laps in one hour,
57 minutes and 20 seconds, three
minutes and 55 seconds better than
War Cloud.

stevedoring foreman for years
died yesterday, aged 70. He was|
highly respected by shippers and
officers of all lines calling here
and was prominent in organising
regattas and aquatic sports. He
was himself a keen yachtsman.



















































oe, was George Stoute’s Ras- . Talented?
eal, twenty-five seconds ahead of This is your opportunity to BOSSSSSOOFSP SOO SPOOGIOS LPLLEV PVE AL TAPAS,
Pore sie defeated Fantasy only FOOTBALL display it! S ere e me % | PFIVIOSSG PPPS DIS ISIS FIO OOO AFIT,
five seconds * - x
; ‘ Don’t be Shy! You can be |R e > $
7 ‘ . ‘ 31 Ys ‘ %
Eleven FIXTURES vereen etoauet ts tS ALU EFICaNes : 8
_in the “c', Centreboard and DIVISION 1 applause of the Audience 1% urr % ,
Tornado Class eleven boats, which Monday, May 4. Please send your entries to 1% z a
includes four Tornadoes, started, : Notre Dame vs, Everton. the Club’s Office $ x ;
Mi Behave and Foll vere a] 5 Reteree ; O. S. Coppin. § \e ~ o . ¥
oa - oe a oe ears the e Linesmen ; ©, Robinson and L, DANCING x x x
c vats to start. ey were a Parris, ns ¥
given three minutes by Magwin. | eee ete : Tuesday, May over % a sits x 8
Edril was given three minutes by minerener. wre rhe eR kL ie ed after the Entertainment. 1% % : 24
Gannet, Rogue, Cyclone and ‘he results were as follow: — Linesmen: D, Sayers and J Admission to Ballroom 2/- | x x
Vamoose started scratch, giving 1 Class __ Start Elapsed Place puucdane = iy 6 KEEP THIS DATE OPEN 1% ' % ;
two minutes to Gannet. 9. Dauntless (p.m) DNS Notre Dame vs. Carlton 6.5.51—In 1% g
First to complete the first lap - “7 S, Gittens. : % 00 $ s
was Miss Behave, about eight sec. & ate. prs ares g : O, Graham and A. 1R a % %
onds tee on epee Peggy Nan | a Reen 2.49 1.33.38 7 sisvaae May 12 — GOOOOSe LALO SPL SSS SOOO, | & %
was third, followed by Edril, 12. Dawn 2 49 1.29.12 3 Spartan vs, Everton ? 21%
Scamp with Cyclone only a few 7% Mohawk 2.50 13051 6 Fotaren: WN paver x ATTENTION PLEASE 1 3is But When ! Nobody Knows! %
seconds behind, Cyclone had given 18. Civtie 2 52 1aes2 EE eaapattecenies ee x "3 % % '
Seamp four minutes, Gannet came _ + _ Coronetta 2.53 1.25.24 2 DIVISION II 3 = s MEN
ar 3 aowler i . D Cla 3 ‘ T EX
i. Sees next nearly two minutes 4° "Seapira 231 151.12 § tummy mae ere % DON T FORGET TH % | ® q
re ents vee in = 19, Van Spartan va, Empire at Bank Hall xv DATE % | ¥
{ vere se, Rogue anc Thorndyke 1.50.18 6 Ref : BH 5 7 ’ i
Ber hick eee eu. meee Asois wipletee: B: Hoyos 3 : Coe You can’t afford to allow the violence of ¥
In the second round Denis At. }, Buccaneer 1.40.05 4 Lodge vs: Everton at Bank Hall Y19th MAY, 1951 § % BUY
‘ ; ", i 2. 1.35.24 2 eferee ; mory. a
kinson carried Cyclone into the 9° Olive Carlton vs, College at College & x HURRICANES, EARTHQUAKES, FIRE, <
ead and won by a wide margin Blossom 1.43.38 7 Referee: L. F. Harris % x Xs AND
Second was Vamoose, skippered , 7. Snb*4 ee Fiimpire ve. Lodge ot Bank Hell $ AN UAL * , 3
: Ss 5. odge a an
by Tony Hoad, a minute and eight Sq Med DNS Referee: ©. Graham . % ¥ SEA-WAVE, RIOT and CIVIL COMMOTION x -
sconds ahead of Magwin, Cyclone 13. Ranger 2.05.47 8 Referee: W. Howorth. % ( N XY 1 $
completed the two laps in one 3. War Cloud 2.00.15 2 a eet | ; i > >
hour, 17 minutes and 13 seconds, . Beast eas 4 Wea Panay S S S Ce : 5 ‘
Dauntless did not startin the asi) Fanta i ; Oe ev dee ¥ ane y
Intermediate Class, Eight boats 8 Pascal $3 1 3 Rabies pot choice ee x peers x 1% A y — ‘ >
raced, Honours went to Clytie 7. Mivra Blair 3 as oa 2 Sea Scouts ys. Foundation at JAMES STREET METHOD- 4 | § if % OTHER STRIPED & :
which defeated Coronetta by 27 5, Mischiet 2.43 1 7 Het Mee IST CHURCH S| S % ’ adavatey é
seconds, Third was Dawn, 11 sec. © Class Regiment vs, C.O, Boys at Com- | % $1 8 SHIR rs °
onds behind Coronetta, 8. Peggy Nan 2.44 1.33.27 9 ppermete % to be held at s | % ‘ % .
At the end of the first round 1. Miss Behave 2.45 1.29.50 6 eforee H. D_ Wilson. 1 1G 1 ma 1% oe ¢ °
hi * oie 9, Folly 2.45 1.35.45 il Poli s. Empire > | >» |» P T T
Dawn, which started with Reen fe Sagwin 2 48 aes 3 Referes R. Parris, Pare | x HASTINGS ROCKS % | st A ainst These 3 S OR t SHIR Ss ree A NEW 8
and gave three minutes to Invader 2. Scamp 2.50 1.23.53 4 Carlton ys, Notre Dame at Black 2 7 eM x %
and Eagle, was leading, a few gec- 0. Gannet 5.03 a Wehr, Rens | pit oye A es of ene x oe x %
onds ahead of Mohawk. Coronetta ‘35 F4"! 2.49 1.25.35 > Thureaes, doy aR itor x oor and Needy) x oS x ¥,
was third, followed by Invader. a ee te 1 an2 % Empire vs, "Eve erton at Bank Hall ¥ Lady Seel has_ kindl % x eri s % RANGE OF DESIGNS 3
Gnat and Reen, Gnat eventually Ks. Cyclone 2.54 1,17.13 i Referee : C, Smith Q ae oF ancy | x x
finished fourth and Eagle fifth, © *40. Vamoose 2.54 1.18.24 2 MEEAY: Tent a Poli x een mted'to wee the Fair % | . %
; peeiman ‘a giotice at, Garris son . 2 m., which will con- s . % 9c) \ "
aloe eS com, || tinue to 6'p-m, Sy 38 MEN’S HALF HOSE
Rainbow won in the “D” Class. ILLUSTRIOUS nermere J. Axohe? ® COME EARLY ASD ENJOY * | Se LESLIE’S offer you a LLOYD'S COMBINED x $
It defeated Imp by only three sec- Wanderers vs" Conibermere at || % THE 'TIME-HONOURED % x
onds. This was one of the closest SCHOOL SPORTS eae $ BENEFITS OF THIS %/% COMPREHENSIVE POLICY PAIRS FOR UP
finishes in the “D” Class this seas- Turn mopman Beck! % GRAND FAIR s r
on and another interesting battle ‘The Mlustrious School, Chelston Road, ieee ee eee 4 x r ;
for fifth position was witnessed Gap, successfully staged art Refereé: A. Parris % Attractions inciude: A va- § |X Affording full Protection for your Home “44
between Seabird and Van Thorn- athletic meet at the Bay Grounds x riety of Utility Stalls, Re- 3 \ ES I & TOWEL SHIR I S
Gatie pe ae a by six yesterday. Mr. C. R. W. Suttle % apis oo and a & and its Contents %
seconds. Third in this Class was is the principal of the school. gy zancy Dress - Competition % X
Sinbad and Fourth Buccaneer. The prizes eta distributed by * X for Children, x | ‘ x AT LOW PRICES
ee started with Van Mr. D. Alleyne . The Weather sy kind permissi f th * % x
Thorndyke but soon after pulled ‘The events were as follows - , ay Kind) permission of the @ 1% e INSURANCE § 2
away and went into the lead. She 109 yards 110 Pays tata: TUR aap TODAY x foe ee of Police, the rad ee & Co. LTD. x $
was first to complete the first lap, 2%. Hall, 3. ©, Clarke. : 3 ss ae jand conducted by x > COLLINS BUILDING BRIDGETOWN x To 4 %
Seabird was given a minute by of s si GS 4 O, Weekes, 2. R Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m } $ Supt . c E. Raison will & g - Pree a ev $
Van Thorndyke but came around — 100 yords (14-16): 1, EB, King, 2 R Moon (New) May 6 ix render popular items. 21 ¢ DIAL 3006 BARBADOS % : :
second two minutes and 30 seconds Hardins, 3. F. Niles Lighting: 7.00 p.m. | $ ADMISSION: “ADULTS Is.» x ¢ 30, Swan Street i S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
ahead of the same boat, Imp fin- _ 1 Yards (Girls): 1. M, Waithe, 2. E High Water: 2.33 a.m, 3.29 || % Mladen £ hive aa. oe ¥ PHONE 2702
ished this round fourth, about 44 Simmons, 3. G. Pichards pm. | Beane Se REPOS Ses 5S x
r 7 , 1 ae 220 yards (Visitors): 1, M. Linton, , > 946566665666 64366 « | %
seconds behind Van Thorndyke, » p. Cave, 3 8. Clarke YESTERDAY POPPE POPPE AEE | CESSES D 60:66666006 APOCEOSSSOSSSO e iutaite
Buccaneer gave Rainbow six min. _ 220 yards 110-14): 1. N, Fields, 2. Rainfall (Codrington) nil , ee Boe e tee nee aoe eeobeeoneneeeeeee one;
utes but Rainbow only defeated it eee 3 Fr eat oa catia Total for Month to yester | M ‘
by two minutes and 47 seconds iD eines ee are day: .05 in, |
The Ninth Regatta of the Sack Race: 1, A. Garnes, 2. T, Sim. Temperature: 75.0°F, INTERCOLONIAL
R.B.Y.C. will be sailed at 2.30 mons, 3. D. Marshall Wind Direction (9 a.m.) | ee
p.m. on Saturday, April 12 and , “Qgerdes Rots 21. Os, Gresnidae, E.S.E, (11 am.) E.S.E. eee
" - t 2. K. Boxill, 3% H. Brathwaite 1 7
is Tenth on Thursday, May 24 “200 yards (Girls: 1, M. Waithe, "en Pe ee :
(Empire Day) at 1.00 p.m 2 ¥§E, Simmons, 3. G. Richards our
The Fourth Tornado Regatta , 0 yards: 1. E, King, 2. R, Harding, Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,978, It’:
will be sailed at 10.30 a.m. to- Wheel Barrow Race; A. Blackma | (AY am.) 29.060 : $2 ay

day. and E, Belgrave.





—



IN

HIGH CLASS

to see those



JAMAICA vs
BARBADOS

extra fine













| Tr hey'll Do It Every Time silhiaie 0. hie ots By penny Hatlo



VERY GOOD, THEN»
HEH-HEH! you WiLL
START ON MONDAY,

points in a
well tailor-

Bigoove

HAS AN EYE JAMAICA TEAM ARRIVES

:
|
May 18 for tour until May 30

May 29 vs. COLONY

ke ADMISSION: Kensington and

MISS PATOOTIE:+: 7 FOR BEAUTY
meee A GAL HAS TO May 21 vs. COLTS XI ed suit that
BE A KNOCK- May 23 vs. CARLTON you should 7 ’
OUT - GET May 24 vs. COLONY ; "AIL ORING
aaa Ee May 26 vs. COLONY always
CLERK «= May 28 vs. SPARTAN ‘contact the

ieee |

Top Scorers

ia OF ALL KINDS
in Tailoring -

George Challenor Stands 2/- e

Bur THE GUYS | UNCOVERED STANDS 1/- ne
HE HIRES »+s GROUNDS 6d. per match. SMART r
(pur-eceze- — C.B. RICE & C
ide.
IM EATING! ) Season tickets for admission - = “4 O.
to Kensington and George
Challenor Stands $2.00 each. o

OF
BOLTON LANE

THANX TO
“6.0.” (ONE OF THE
GLAMOROUS 7)
NEW YORK, NY.

O. S. COPPIN
Hony. Secty
B.A.F.A

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd

Prince Wm. Henry Street

Se
SF!
?



|
|
|
|

RES
IOP RSS LOIS

OANARAAAA







VISE SS

é






PAGE 1

PACK KKiHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY . IMI •The astonishing LADY WILDE o s By QBOBOI MALCOLM THOMSON "Llt\\/..V a biography i La4y Wilde. By Horace Wyndham. Board man 15*. 247 paces. fcSC \K WILDER mother receteee imm history a shniR. pitvinff 01 amused. She deserves aomethinp. betterg h.ngraphY more polished than Mr. Wymlham's She i irauedv queen play inn her P"*t in a painful farce Hei preposterous figure takes on a kind of grandeur 11 u m In i deep sense of loyaltv. She believed in the innocence of her husband and her son In both cases she was wrongI v. n WfUt araa Duhll i leading oculist and gallant. By a hair successful operation, he sued* Bernard ShaW* faiher ssrnhv outward* instead of mvnsrda. A of ftra-prol f *"* J n 1 • •• (..thered s brood • t i.-. chlaavea rr-.iImppen u< the IW1 %  ri i Sir William one) %  .ii.[Li .1 lunar. Mars Jo*-phi r, ...Laab Wilde wrote to Ihil young wosrsan'r fathar, deelariiif, that his daughi mployttl 1* iiewepape.dis*e*nmatc oceer-uve placards alleging an Intrigue bein William and herself : i avari sued for libel. Her evidence showed thai, .it ... moment during her aitemlance ui it patient m Sir William'consul tin* room, she bad fainted "Piay notf yourself 1 an hoth b* niined." she hfttid Ihe oeullsl sa. Il.iiolll (lIHHJIf's SIlOW I .ilk Sir Ralph Weighs The Worth Of Making A Film THE SEA TURNS TO STONE ANCHORS ARE OUT' AT THE FESTIVAL— A 40fi siji tkt win m /#. ifoae-.u.i .„ral,a ay is* THHMI vl tad4<>Uin-aiiMf< '*> sea fa Ifie Sour* ftjx* Fnilrml taMMtoa /i >iod* hoMiy m /ronf <>f ?fi* /inrnt o/ Ihteiurttt ft—I tktri m> nn *iM*. no %  nc Aw it* MA %  > M/I timpl* lh-n >rwJ **•'> I • itsae/assa and fin uile. holfi fi' mo Ihe rotl-neth '•e m irfttffi ffWv 'of. and fftrfr MHe MM VlMoVudla fAea 0 arroil iht timing Kji'n nf l*i# Theme* one about to engage in politic*, busbies*, war or love TinPrince h:is few illusion, 1 Itlll: I ruined. R farthing damages Sir William permitted by hi* roun'ri • v idenre APrufew-i :t,elogiar %  pithecoid* person ,,„ g| extraordinary sensuality and 5rJ5S"!5 i runking the \\i!PBU box left him without a defender. humbler than oneself: it is better help of a frof Hn latitude bo saon ivould find e in Britain "When the boll come* in JPI in return it; but tak* DO piT l In Ika .crimmnge. Tou ran achle\'e your t Sir W,U,.m Jived on ££*SSVJVS& pla reapaeted nnd ufnurnt. %  hen he died, his widow lied lo i < m a milled laurel Breath, |wn crinoline? and polo." Men of ddatsBCttt ate virile spun li u*i breakfast •rr c-.-ol'oa. /nit m# orro aa4. I ,.•(./•:.(.. if U nuM lake af .' % %  ••* a O'/n./i/ lo |.nf up. A* I aat rlflfd 1<.:HIP.-. Eiorea* Servtca SIR RALPH RICHARDSON, oack to the West End stage neat montn. believea ttuM no aim aalarj ii compensation for staying out of the theatre too long. Not even a nve-flgure salary—and he can earn that in England oi Hollywood. Hera is your true legitimate .-wtor talking The artor who ." %  npcimrily ten the rat of a Lon'on play occeu, Home At Seven, to Btrq location scene* In Ceylon —and who found the play off when he i-etumed. So far as the public were concerned, the itar was Home Too Late But Rlchardson'a doubts are har* on the British 'tudtos where outstanding actors are hard to find Hard, for instance. t End starring Jobs she warn < bar producer huvbmid Peter Cotes, at the little Bollonc Theatre In Kensington—as actress, scenepamssr, anything which comes ra hand] In good times, i^iie draws £ 10 a week, the top salary ^ when the box-'iffice is stuck, she her share in the kitty On May Joan MilUr tacklal liei btgge&t, and most provocative, role since Pick Up Girl -the central character in H M. Hsrwood's and P Tennyson Jesse's play A Pin to Sec the Peep Show Why provocative" Because Use story is easily identiaable with the ( Thompson-By waters murder case even more so. I gather, than the Vosper version we saw a few years back. People Like Us. If this new play could get a West End transfer. Miss Miller'* salary would jump 20-fold. the Lord Chamberlain who has had previous family protests on the Mrs Thompson subject, is still hesitating about a public performance aeence. So Joan Miner, with faint hop*. is learning her long emotional role for C 10—and for lore For 'Gloria' Read Belle PRINCIPAL role In the film Another Man's Poison was wrilieo for Gloria Stranson Instead. Berte Datta came over here lo play it But what was good tor Swanstii could be another star's poison -at least some nf It From Settle, in Yorkshire, where Die picture is on location. has come an SOS to scriptwriter Val Guest, who adapted the story from the play. He has had to drop all other work—including a West End play nnd a new Spanish-setting film for Yolande Donlan—to hurr> North. Official explanatioi •nine "local atniospher script. My own gue-a: lome Swanson atniospher the star role Belliis faithfully %  temperament for her Etiglish trip But I would not blame her for not picturing herself in a Yorkshire Sunsel Boulevard. Queen Marlita MARTTTA HUNT. ex-Mad, woman of Challlot. gets that nmi )ob—and stays in England*. After a year of Broadway and West End stage madness she will need tn make a violent mental switch Her film part is to be Qf Eleanor of Aquitalne in the Dis ni v production of Robin Hood. With Richard Todd as Robin Hood and the as Maid Marian. virtuously proud thai this English picture of his actually has an all nrrtiah cast. K L Joan Kirr it Disney 1> —L.E.S Ma*< "I tea landlcrd." He ex%  eeted to ipaid his rent. She Uli m di'dain for Chelsea to Uvg on some high sjiao prnai • Hill or Blghgate, ,. %  I was an eagle hi rn> joutu." But Chelsea 11 had to bt Bag worse *r> come, far I rj--. the adored, Indulged A voung man settinK up in hie will wish lo nnd %  UlUbse slafT lor his harem. To be employed in .he Sroman*! apartmenta slave should have withered limbs, scanty hair, a shrill voice, oalck lips, a flat none, etc.. etc. To discourage hr* son from deapisine an insignificant enemy, he l>li\"!3rri\ .as." JJJ^JIjJJ; !" r regarded brigand Muhadhdh;ib. who. slipping on a melon-riiid. drew his knlfr and stabbed it. His servants, protesting at the undi tan tiled display, the brigand 'The mHor—rind overthrew me, it is my enemy. An enemy must not be despised, even though he is worthless It i sad to know Ihot the recipient of all this wisdom managed to hold histhrone for only seven year* ALAS, MY POOR LION! Bernard Wicksteed Mourns A Strange Friend one of her i hair one mass of riiss*> curled tight "like > regro p.Tftfixi while" Her own appearance being so lamarkable. J^^e'i Lav> t'resart la* sprightly account of one gLrl*| !1"> pages, l"v.-hl> "I behaved very w -11 Sixtaan years after the Battle for the rest of the summer" M of Hnsiings, the worldly whw itrst I was glad to be alone." Prince of Gurgan, on ihe southern 'Ape-like. I ihe Caspian Sea. wrote World CopyrigM Resrrted for his son a book ot advice lor L.E.S. Do you remember lola. the lioness who bit me on ihe behind" She caught me bending in Dsrkest Africa lat year just as I wagettiug into Ihe Iwitli Well, she idead. She was in mistake by a man who en coming up his garden path (.idn't know who she was. Kenya may now be a safer place for reporters to bathe In bui the news has left me sao Every Africnn traveller has a lion story and (ola was ihe heroine of nine. Moat lion itoma end a• %  1 > HM death of Ihe lion, but up mine didn't. That's why it sygg t.uch a nice story 1 lived |.> fj| down and lola lived to become the most photographed lioness in Kenya and appear in a tilm. yet to be shown, called -No Vulture, Fly". loli was brought up by .1 |gmg waulen called "Tabs" at the Tsavo National I'ark He led her OB the bottle and when she'd f.nished he would put her over his shoulder and pat her on Ih* back to bring her wind up. Abandoned She had been abandoned by her parents when only a day or two old They didn't put her On HO one's dcorstep or lean .1 note with her, but nil Afrlcun trucker hcuru lola takes an interest i going 10 walk up to her backward and see if she recognised me Now I'll never see her. She escaped from her cage B Kiamuu. Kenya, while waiting fw would probably have been eaten .. ip l0 Kngland and went for by J leopard. t ^u,. to see if there was anyone T.iba tent trained her with an about th W ^e knew. in^ectaride gua. Wherever she The man who kilted her is as was naughty he gave her a squirt „,„, M mmL He hag no Idas .uirl aae stunk away guiltily that she was only a beautiful film ime day some wild Dona came ,f?res* m search of love anfl past the camp and lola rushed out fBmcUcm He thought he was joyfully to meet trrem. They gave defending his life, not hihonour on<* sniff und then made nasty ft isn't the itrst African tragedy natal at her of its kind. A few years ago 0 "<• lioness brought up In the same writing into the taking out of advertisements. Even her best way, set free the bush. ion mends wouldn't tell her she umerp .he had a romance with g .•mened of insecticide. So she >ust lta n incent wild Lion. y.t there, and wistfully watched gh, waB *, proud 0 f her Ullcr Uiem till they had gone. P / cubs that she roamed round' When I went to slay with Tabs looking for some of her old at bis camp in the bush lola was human friends lo show them to nine months old and weighed one day she saw the camp of a 170 1b. She loved people so much wn ite hunter, and, full of happi that she used to jump up and put nes]l> look her ino>t handsome cub her paws on their chests You ln h rr mouth and went to pay a had lo say: "Down, lola down, 0iiu there's a good lion p/iit. the white hunter was a She was shot on her way lo lu -anger lo the district, and didn't this country, where she was lo know her slory. You can guess make anoUior film before going to ne aw f u i sequel Dublin 10 marry a zoo lion there. Beachcomber the heartless fellow Tragic Escape say* 1 should go into mourning T had already planned a touchfor lola by sewing black crepe on nig reunion of Androcles Wickthe seal of my pants. sleed and the lioness. I was — LM.S The Internationally Famout ELITE SHIRT WITH THE WORLD FAMOUS -Till Ifl'MM %  :" roil MIS THE SHIRT THAT FITS TO A aT" 1 for battar listening Designed and built for service under ihe most exacting conditions. ihc splendidly styled Ekco receivers arc noteworthy fixseniitivhy, clarity, power and complete reliability. They give you better listening because they are constructed by Briuin't finest radio techrrkians after careful study ut BBRf local reception conditions; and because ihcy are quality •engineered throughout. For really wordiwhile, trouble-free radio, rtlv on Fkcol MOOtt 1.1H roa s.vou aoaassuiai |.|./i,l,.....li(„ ( .u,,.(rtuflim.r*^,!/.!! flMni*M*" •*•<**•. S">,... i„•• hMaafeM .^-*EK^ssi... MO* wW /..( Ik •>! plum, fmlly l—ip-allirtl. .*>*• T *—p.HaiiTydrmlni.— It's good for the liver' ***. IWMW asssse -e*" Write to us for further details A. BARNES & Co. LTD. P.O. Box 92, Bridge St., Bridgetown, Barbados, B.W.I. Official Distributors A glass of sparkling 1 NO'S flrM tiling tn the mstrning is good for lite lever. Ii ,k.i it..bead In .1" linn The wonderful ajfcrsa a taac %  cleansing and retrejjttng la a Uak nasty mouth. The mm luhn tbrming aaasaaW actfao keeps the system nsglilar I N'O's h i>l 1111 \ 1111 mm 1\nri) I.I 1 g a nil a 1 uiios MI K ni MIS< HI. 1 ininaWaBH HI taist as, m BsM at f...o/r. f..r li-tltrng |rrili"iii Play safe! Brylcreem your hair. Dandruff on your collar, loose hair on your comb—these are danger signals that point (be need for BrvlcrccnY. double benefit: |1| Day-lanf tmartnaii. (X) Lading hair heahh. Mkssage with Brylcreem stroiuuttes the scalp, cocourages natural hair growth, wards off Dandruff. Its pure emulsified oils put life into Dry Hair god impart a splendid i gloss. Don't take any chances, Brylcreem your hair — most 7fcr aa %  ' aari "rasri i*n 1 ^ idol leaded DIESEL ENGINES ALL STATIONARY 6 MARINS DUTIES llnguiea hearing tliese laterpatiooally famous names ara doing -|.In.ill.I service throughout the world on land and sea. There ta a ajaaj and t)-pe for every duty. They are snpplied in a convenient range of powers from Ij u 1,440 U.II.P. CENTRAL mm LTD. DISTRIBUTORS



PAGE 1

i wi.i.vi: SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY , 1W1 CLASSIFIED ADS, TCI El" I GIB 1B0I re 17-eatria. Ac k no*-I a. aftd _. -i-i-a-eas* and >1 on l u—i n >moer of •re: da up in SO. aa*< per wwd co week-dare and I per word on Sunday* tar %  • il word. Foe BlTtr*. Marriage or aVigag w aant i ilm| tn charge U WO* tor anv number of word* ill* In Sal and certta par weed for each Mtniuonal word. Term* cash Fkooo SMI Prta-ven I W and 4 pm.. Ills lor %  .MM |m FOK SALE X"" 1 "" ekoroo irnt Tl eeni I ces.it funddfet M word* — a "* a > emu • word Id Mil I o-d Susdes,-. AI TO.VrOTIVF. THANKS lag u.iuuaii %  %  %  .,lr Wilaml and Earnest. i i-i The Hhvrt• %  H—In %  • heg through tanka. lend* win) Mill wrealrib letter. I Mm ire or I* an .n %  prr— >nii rerenl daolh %  ,w.r. ...d rail. -.i IN MEMOUAM %  r <1 Biio ... !..-. %  u>> ih loao i ,ir;.lr> K-mMPborod by Rondo r. Coland 'Children > an „ .-,---,'. '.'-V ;J W5l Indian & British MAPLE MANOR (.IE** IIOLSg OPPOSITE HASTINGS BOCKS TH Bitl. I BOIIBKB. REAL ESTATE JOHN M. I.I WON A r.a, 1 V A. "i'i'" : GERAI.II WOOD FOH SALE d wrouahl .,„ TIM li..vi.r ...n„iv. draw KtMB, laitndi). ie*>, inii wain Baraae a.... i larae 3 d.."Wc bedmn balh and „ih hoi water, L-I ittoaj .ail-ins tiow al hand V MITtBAI.I. HAT" Codloci li.ii. Si Mnharl A wait ,,r.i caawMO raoano recently r I %  flat.. Hit id '. %  .id OUl WlHt mahogany .• An lnve*lmen< piopertv or Ian into Omit ni U p—a. 3', mile* BM-HKLIBH". nth Avenue, lit Wrll maintained bunaa .i-ii-mi ni Hona with ad ratal The ar%  %  mm roMlita of an enUWiig r.-,in dinina ... tanbtl area nrat to. Mr IIMIMItH I\I II mmow On a tla.il near snivel i.%  tenl i r. 1 i-edr. .,.,d lOllell It' L-.lll.. 1 %  In 1 .iparlnirnl* bul lH mod* • 11—Ii ih—Mocria Oaford in rscellei.i ii U miles, new ijret tan Be at Port Boval Oslo** lh.ue M A D Haft* ] %  B Hill....,, Mini. IIC-. modal order O.aBB anllaa. Apply K D Hail. Small ludgr Plantation. CV Cl CAR A.-iiii 114 No raaonab.r ofl rofuatd. Apply to W, H. Wataon C R O. Challanoa. k|#l->IMown Pt>oi •1—M. I 1 SI -n >B-VaabaU U aU with 4 i i in good working rondmon, prKa .r.abla Apply T, D. L Gay, SMph %  Chnu Chutch. Dial IBrt. litl 4.I.F. CAB Oitr Wandard 10 I. p fexifW %  hai.n-ai ordar Naw r.mdiII V llallrrv. Pttorta M* *wl*cn 10 am : < ', mi s. n % i. \ 111 .i i ,, i.. .„;,.... i ad'IXIo rhan pom I dial' ,. ... -,iiifc kite .. autoMB b.uid perl] -all .*avW"l ..i-llr"! nr. i.f I .itlnia. lUH-kla. \'.yi,ia A iboiaa i %  FOR RENT %  W91 fflUfl' Proapacl, lkl.11 l-rrnc*I i—I mad i, tnHk taatlda bumialuu aaajtraaJ, RBAI l BTATI AOBfT M c IHINKKK I'l. \NTATID\S Rl'll.niNO Fhoii* 4640 CAI'. ll.llwiai. Car M ITM In |OO0 .irkniaj % %  dar. Applv Frank Plovi kl Prmarb* a Co, IM. I Stirrl SS SI PI'BILIi: SAJLKS Taw aaoia par aeala aw wn taaak-oa*. ad 11 canaa par aoa4a baa o Ba4aj|M, y aum Mara* |l H N**Hi r i %  dURw Boadapa BEAI, KSTATB BUILDING StTB—WIU private Beach Approlr.aiel) i I 1 acrea, ai Uarrlcka Payne* Bay. J-m aa For Inapoclloii ar.0 furtber n.lormalior.. Dial—BUI OBara racatvad • I Si Ip %  VINOW A.M. BS WIBk Ttaa LMI and ualy Tayo-Mwiey Btoaa'.II DUIIHIH A Uruotixr praaaoll/ wild i Lane Gatair ur Worbahofi In Tudor Il Buey Area. Qoiiif lot B1J0O Nail t ay Daairable S-Bedrouin Col Ufa el :h. Ch. Mam Rd Nol Paa fio... ."laaa. ittrtlna. Modern Conventanawa, Lauga Ya-d n.rluwo wllh Stone. Uolna l.r *Paa Nell A Very Ua.irabJI Baal room Coiiaar by Jan—. A Sa-e In o* Mem Hal. Oolnf lor *;.! %  A naw %  Bedioom Cnnrrvtr Bnnajakiw by lower Fc.nuibrllr Modem CanVenlencOB, Going lo. C 1.100 A l-Brdroom ipoaaaMa 4. Bungalow Type 1J-111II' Slonowalli. A-i C
dlllin '" ""^ "" Near Naw Garden.. Orhaa a L-rge riower OaidH.. Going lor Under £ l.Ot* e*.h A Deauabb) 1-Bodrwm MaaMaiK* al Rrkle> M.i 1. Bd.. Nrai Blue Waters. Gu.ua IM £3.000 Neai About One Acre Sea tide Land. Near City. Oolng lor Under M IU per aq II C Me for Real Batata and Bi Convinced Dial IIII D T de Abre,, Call at Olive Bough. Ila.llnaje. < W H.r a VouXball 14-0 Can b. *e.i at Cuitaay Ueraae I1*na 4f.ll >. G. 1, Ovallanor * I I II I' •,VRB—Wviaalay IPU 14 H.P Mom I eta iu HP. Morrla IMt 10 H.P Uorrli Onford Itdt It HP, Morrii Minor IPM %  II P AuWin 1041 I H P rord Van 10 H P a real bargain Ford V %  IMS Ford V 0 IBM Coupe All ineaa Cara are goad buyi In theli reaperllve rlaaaea and price range FaFort Royal Oarage Ltd Tetaeanaaw BM 4 1 11—JO MOTOR CVCLB Valaoatta M0 C.C Applv W Rogarn Barber. Over J H Ooddard, Broad Btreet. S ._ "WAGGONOne 1*41 V-0 Ford SUtlor Waggon "1 perfect condition. Apply 30H or 11*3. n 4 tl-t.t. FURMTl'RF. Pinj|NTnnUB—Onaf Gi enlenalon T PTKe e*0.B0 phori>.m I SI LIVESTOCK MISCELLANEOUS ANTiqUEB Ol every dearrlpll OlBM, Cbltva. old Jewel*. Bne Bllver WBlrr-roloUrsRarly book*. Map* Autogruph* etc., at Gorringe* Antlqui Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht Club IIB-Iln AIISKNIK'HINF. ampoule*. I'.rivmik. Piegnancy, Hemurrhaa, Mganic Derlrlency Caa be taken la AlTUMUS The Root Hormone Fei llliar. Iron. H Keith Archer-i Drua llore. lUl-in ACTUMl'8 The Key le Orowlnn ',.w.r from H Keith Archer. Drua Itore. T. Sl-Sn M Tl'Mi's Control* Inwcl Pt>*t* t.1.11 II Keiin Archer* Drug Store 10.91 Jn. AITUMI'S .. Ii economical 1 rwt ii equal lo Ml Ion. of Farm Yard Manure. From H. Keith Archei'i Drug '•ore. ] l_n Uriia Itore The Ferlllliar of Uw 4 trie eerlhwi.rm populg rrom H. Keith ArrherL l.S.|l-ta. ACTITMUS — Producwd by D flanan. D Be Bngland, -1ii„m,|*. [run Archer*. Drug Atnre 1.5 S| hi KNTlllFSTIKKIV TRADr penUbn ml Fliiinac ol a Dry Good* Store In .wan Street. Hock valued abo.il 111. oao JWre could be lea,* for | H JMr rhe Inlereeted write T. C/o Ad vocal. S JI In GAI.VAN1BBJD SHBBTBBeat quMlbv iw aheela Cheapen In Ihe liland n B104. 7 11 is a a it M.i] a it r> st: 10 fi M 4o Neil caah Better n.irry UAHM-S A CO.. LTD. 4 > I-t.f Tl. JlAMAMrtUOllr; u ,.m., .u e for Vnrl mar Velru — 11 em on hold., Congeal ona and ClrcuUbu l-borator .-. OHERl.IN-FHANC-Ei Ob alnable a( leading Druggiali S SI In INVrMTMKNT 8IIARBS In Harbadoi Jullding S..lel> and Bubarrkpllur thare* ai one dollar per month Phone xoilt.ii 4414 ll.,i... Building B> 4 ll--4n l.AHJJEH One Large Pine Larder 1 Oood Condition Phono HOP %  t 91—In ei Convrartlble Pram Rlng-3IM 99. SI —! %  nllJT PEAB—Can be bought al Jaa '. Tudor A Co.. Roebuck Sir eel. •ll r .M >er M lb baj Dial MM. Ktl -In SAILING DINGHY, half decked II ft In Dagger centre plate completely filled out and 10 fl Rowing Dingle to felh't SBM aUo International Tornado' •MO Telephone *I-ai 4 SSI A MAIL NOTICE Mail, for si Lucia. Dominica. Monl rr-t Antigua, St Kllta, Berniudi Boiion Halirax. Monlr*>l by the RMi i-*I Redaey will be cloeed al Ihe Pout Office ai under Ii. m.:. 1 'I Mall reOraBi Mall HEASHY Haby incBtotJaa ,^-T likclatbacca* * p A deughtful Cuucura Soap II combines emollient and ntdklBal propcnLci whiih keep ha (color tkin healih-f ami free from TtlimlilbTO. %  Ojnaue) f toft aod eclrar*. ,61 (uticura V^ SOAP VMIMIISI: lm the ADVOCATE IANT>Appro*InuivHy 3.000 square feel al land al Stream Road, Owlet Church ad.oming Ihe JMbllc Road. ApPl': R C. Chapman C,o Meaara Carrington A Seal*. B --# Pimil Ml I III S Taa araU par epofe Mae on v aoak da ond II eenia per uoete Una on Sttsdoaai. •Mlanani rhm>*m II M on \W* % %  #> and |1.M on Tnndav* NOTICE MiSICHOI 1A of the Banford Bea lUlon Bollon Lane inform, her •-lent* Ihat bar Baton will M Monday Tlh May when • be made Dud SH %  M—Il Biioa tivn invii 1 %--oi IIIIOS nrdinate Staff* of t-e II x T Dept P W Dtp* Coals. Oov*l Induil Brhf MaWalMid l-*~. ll,.-.il.. .:-, BBBBBBB. n.ployrea lo be nets] la Ine Pell' Debt ..url Br.UaWli, —1. on Tii'>da> neil %  inM. I 400 pin foe Ihe purpose ol vlirilnaj Commlllee of Managenwnl lor fhviwon II of ihe AaaoelaUon and to diaruaa r vrry Impactanl matter. Member* and non rnambeia ol isnieulion please attend A r. ixwis W.VIII <• Mini aiaai rhn-s* ei .iikui.i 1a laaawa r-"i I cent, a word ueek -rj Ibadun. Tl renla and HEX.P ST ENO-TYPI BT-eapariant ed < a aalary lUO 00 per a TYPIST alao wilh ckarical e.penen.c — commencing aalary $71 00 pe. monUa ISVOtrlSCI ASST accurate at flgurei prefrrahly with pravioui rapeneiico oi\ Invoicing — commencing aalary MO DO per month Written appbcallon rtal %  ...,,. !LOST A I Ol Ml LOST vWEFi-STAKE TICKETB Berae* I as** 0000. au — OSM, MM — 4~ nasn OOM Pindar pleata return a I.AND Only a lew *pot* remaining al your* before all go The spoil range from 0.000 la IL0M aq ft and the price* range from 01 000 00 10 II 'U *u par apot For panlrulara aae D'Arcy A Bcott. Magallne Lane, Dial FI4J. II 91—on .liable gVtjjB gjL & i^ereaoBing a liia area (I at phihp and Chmt Church MagiiAcenl environment. IS lo M minute*' 1ru*r to Crane Coaat Walking dli'ancei 0 lodge and High School. Govt Water, Telephone. Electric Light pan Ihe area. Apply to W I Webster. Monrnrffe. St fohn Phone M191. B*491-fm. RUITABUB RUl.-DIMO BITE Utualed *t Ventno* Oaidena. Ch. Ch. Area 10V7I vi ft Land, and 1JS1 aq: ft road. Dial BB Day and MS9 NIgtil. IJ 1—I f n Thai dwelllngl View, aliuale at Ihe junction of Culloden and Dalkellh Roada, with Ihe land thereto containing I0.MB aquare leel The houie contain* drawing and dining room*, library, kitchen, both and li'llet downnatn and upalalr*. four bedrooms tone with bath and loileii Two aervant* rooma, garage lor I car and tool room lall built of %  lonei. in the yard. The date of -to will bo published Inapectlon between 9 pm. and B p.m any day eirept Sunday* on a p point menl wllh Ihe owner Mr. Rl Clalr Hunle. 1 Phone ami G. L. W. CIJUUTJE CO.. Halle 1 tors VI HIM SAI IS AUC*I0N By Innruetran* received I will .ell w Public Auction an Ihe apot al Bank %  all Main Bead 4th house rrom Soul. Church, on Thursdneat loth May at 1 e-clork, One threeroofed house with out-office* Will be void lo the higheil bidder Must be rwnovea* t • %  —do UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Twos %  *> Mil lurniluro at %  in,.i, St l^wrence Gap w Includes — Very nice Square Tip-Top Dining Table 'et Ot Upright Cl Waggon Tea Trolkv. Folding Card and Ornament Table*, all In Mahogany. Verandah Chair*. Settee ard Mori it Chall wllh cuahlona m (vp Pine Flat Tofj r-rak. Bookaholf. vy nice Chin Cabinet. Painting*. Congoleum. Kuga. Oval Mirror. Glan Ware. Louchee Service for B Pleiad Ware. Norge ReIrlgeralor in perfect wording order %  ler-trK lamp. Children** Bedatrad. bed,. Oraille. Prrw. Dt-taing Table. Toy She I..-, all palmed White. Larder. Kllehen Cabinet. Bre-kfait Table an Chair-. 1-Burner Valor OH Stove ant Oven. Presaure Cooker. Bcale. Kllchei Uten.IL. Electric Toailer. Iron and othe llema Bale II o'clock Term* CASH HKANKI It TBOTMAN A CO. Audlonecn An Und'r Overeeet HansHi PlanUIKMl wllh n.owledgr and eipenenee of plants I lu. .orb ApptV la Manager In per "on 5 9 91—ir Mill III VI fdlai-aam c here a week Tl ceala and I cewla iuodoa* Id wards — eeer M worn* 1 cents a aaord u-eek 4 cenia a HOUSES A 3 Bedroom Collage at Chnal Churrtn Main Road, about T miles from City Modern Conveniences, hascMus *> %  M Yard A Large Shop In Tudor Sllrel. IO a Baapona l Me Perion or Merehanl only Dial--1111. -,.,_. BI-AIP ATMOI^ Applrby SI llraM New houea with (root and beck porctie* Three* bedrooma, each *R| n Dlrung ream. Bllltng roen t.-iServanl room and mode, gd, Phone MBS Mr*. C C Clerk* B> 4 91 to I'lTHEKA fc.,lerpi.-e Kosd Furntshed Surtgaluw Tetephone. Betrigaralo* -nd aindem .•onvenleiv.es Available Mldd*' of May Apply Frederics Fit a pa trick MBBIFFI BION ...jure an Announcer Script Wrller, nuile . Klnare. BooJ ctlon and command 0( F.ngll'h Isi. iggkr eeaenllal Appiv letier onli*. Trafalgai Slreel 9B8I— In MISCELLANEOUS WAKTEIl Til 111 n lm. oi iu*., u Fi.nL.il Pain rvolai II Sagn Palma. I] Porlli.udl. i Nell Maiming. Tel 4083. 1 9 91 1 Second 4 9 n POSITION WANTED Experlei I.-rsle help** dealre* puullon in I room of Hotel or Oueat House or plovmnit In private Home Country prelened. Wrile M A r „ A-tv... n-.c I 9.91-ln Rill UroM throbbing palnc In your ffliiHlec at one* Apply SrBtni Linlfnent llfhtly-^ foI your Yon don! tub at "Sloan'i" you dab il on (ho aflcdrxJ pan tc il >—" Sloan'i" doa the reM I Good for |"_^ achca and pami arid iiitf jj-^,,—-., jnn!i loo ^S^^ L00B MB THi SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. IAM.IMU FROM AMBTBBBAM MS. %  oraniesiad'—10 May lf*l MS Bon.lre--lllh May ifal M B Henuis'-Mth May 1*81 Mil IM. TO PL1MOITH AMP -"•TFRDAM SAUIM. TO TRINIIkAB P\M|v|\HHtil AMI I.IOlOtTimV MS. Ilecuba'-ath Mav. IM1 MS. -Bonaire'-Mih May, 1MI. SABLINt. TO TRINIUAB 1 \ <. i 11K \ tl'RAIAO AND JAM .11 A MS -Oranlestad "—S4lh May. 1M1. S P SIIISSON. SON A CO. LTD. Agenti Canadian National Steamships IIRATHt-RElJeThe Crane, foe Jurw and July. Phone Mr. A. D Herbert I :i i SI 4n MALTA Clllewa*h. for the monUi il June. Jwlv. November. Deceraber. -.ppit Mr* I. Wewlhrrhead C.oJ N > fl Swan SI reel Upstair* PremlKceeonable Bent Suitable fur Offices Aii.l Thanl Bros DlsJ~MM B 9 91-In OITK'EH ahere l.-hla. %  ltd. Prime WBBoM Henry Street. Applv: J E. asMTMBi Ph.-ne MIL 19 SI do PARAISO—Fran. June let Bel ..oad, within one mile of Ihe City rron< and two aide gallene*. LOultfo and Oinlng Room, three BedroomKiu-h.neile. Tiled Shower and Tub B-lh wllh hot water Upeleir*. Large Kitchen. Game* and other rooms Ii Baeement Oa* and Electricity Oaragi for two rare Apply Yearwood I Box. J ..r~.. f f s| T r s TO LET—In Marine Oarden fo month*, fullv lurniahed llouw keeping apartment with ipaclou* verandsh* Write Box O.M C Advocate Co. l-3i TMFII.sJSDON — M.nwells Coa edrnom*. full' furnlohed. From let unc to Hit Auguit. Ben flMOO per iMtnth Dial SB. 91.11—In IM'IISO.Vtl. credit m my wile FJ>rni I GBRTHirilE DIACKBAK £1 or any person In my n not hold my** II reapomlbla iilni order ilgned by ma. CW'll. W Hi-ACKMAN. %  Walrondvllle". Bonneli. Clapharn. Advertise.... It Pays PART ONE ORDERS I i.m -i ,,l J. CONNBLL. O.B.E.. F Commanding, THI BABBADOS RBOIMFS'T PARA urn— Train la All lank, will parade 10 May SI They wlU the Battalion rehearsal i Hefimeiiial nilnue reheat I 1* Ihe la-i %  kei place. t Monday Wrdiu-ida' when the> ... All K.„I. All rank* are remln be a double fold at i OBDFBI.Y OFFICBB II MAY N Orderly Officer Orderly Serjeant ed of Ihe correct way ol foldir w lop The fold mud be the le AND ORDFBI.V SBBJFANT Fl 1/00 hour* nn Thursday '. Birthday Parade under irry oul Coy drill before ) and Thursday IB May 91. %  will be beret., neb belt*. ind -linelor lecture*, etc nglh of a rigareltr packet IR "UK [MUM. H Clarke w. B. D _ PART II ""in;-. THE HARRADOS FIBGIMCNT 3RD MAY 91 T A Gltleni 0 SKEWES-COX. Mai • I r A Adjutant. Harbadoi Regiment HTRFNI1TH DBCBIABB DliBBI* Ul L S Blackman. A I. O 401 Pte Kl.... f. 8. 'G* .. Auilln. V I. HI ., Harewoud. B. C SB0 .. Gibson. P. A 144 .. Bovell, A DaC. 410 .. Hi n.r.1-. P P 340 .. Ingram. A U 4TT .. Hindi. H 140 .. Miller. J 441 .. l.r.iMi. %  O HT ,. I'I... i Rl C 4SI .. Mayers. W. Illnu i I C O lor wef 14 Mav Granted 1 months' P. Leave wef 1 Mav SI M. L. D RKBWRR-COX. Major. lOLf A AdJuioni. The Barhado. II IN THE HITBEME COURT OF THE WINIeWAltD ISLANDS AND LEEWARD ISLANDS, ANTIGUA CIB0OR A.D. 1951 In the Maltcr ol tho Title uy Registration Act Chapter 99 arul of Aulitun Syndicate Estates limited. Mortgagees, and John Cecil Webfter, Mortgagor and Registered Proprietor under the said Act. BOITBBOD9TB rONfTTRCCTOB I-ADY NELSON CAN. CRUISER CAN ) .. 9 Jin** ,.M Jane .. 10 July .' Ma> B -' %  3 July g Aug. 11 May II Juno S July 4 Aug. .. May %  M-v 39 May M Miy M M*> T J.,i %  I June M) June II June U July 19 July %  1 Aug. 14 Aug NU-BTBBOtRB LADY RODNTY IA1>V KELSON ,. 3 June LADY RODNEY .. 3 July I-ADY NELSON ..FT July LADY RODNEY ..M Aug. M Arrive. I John UaUfoa Montr**! II May M May M June I* J""" — IB July IB July 0 Aug. IB Aug. g Sept II Bept. GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. Agent.. •^V/,'WV//,V,V/,V/AV-V/.V-V.V.',V/AV/, |" ORIENTAL SOI V|;Nmn. Cl-RIOS. inn is NW Hhipraml upD.d THANIS •>!£ %  FA IK hi Aid of — M WINIjr-RtiOS BUI1J>ING FUND ST. WINIFRED'S KEEP THE DATE OFBN A .raiis ; : on i WHIT MONDAY, May 14tn (Baak Hall) I p.m.—8 pjn. Variety Stall* — Dancing Merry Go-Round — Pony Rides Etc. ADMISSION — — 1/29.4.51—911. Modern High School lAppraved by the Dept or [\\ Education ) LONDON CHAMBER OF (OMMKR()| C'ERTTpH-aiTE STAGE HI si i i Two candidates, Euruliu.' Benthum and Alvin. Maynard, were entered for book-keeping at the Autumn EXH inin at Ion, 1950; both passed 8.5 51.—In. NOTICE Mr. John Hammond begs his frlendi to semi htm gift" for his White Elephant Stall at the Country Fair In aid at the St. John the Baptist Vicarage, on May 14. Old clothes, book*, muBnzines, china, glass, in fact, any'hlng including money will be gratefully accepted. Telephone 2292 for thing* lo be collecld. ANNUAL DANCE of the EMPIRE CLUB on the 29r*l MAV 1951 at the CLUB'S PAVILION Bank Hall subs,, run Ion 9/. MUBIC : Mr. Percy Green'* Orchestra Admission by Invittition Dntert the 4th day of April. 19S1 SHOP HERE! LADIES! DRESS GOODS Sharkskin, Jersey, Plain & Striped. Silver Gold Tinsel Crepe A Georgette, Plain & P r i nt e d Crepe-de-Chine, Sunns. Tafetas. Spur.-. Etc. Hats, Shoes, Nylong. GENTS! John While Shoes. Shirt*. $ Socks, Tie-, Hk 4 Hats. LET IAS SERVE YOV. THANIs Pr. Wm Henry & Swan St* A BBRIUDCE. Reglrtrnr. SPRING ROUND-IP DANCE (WESTERN DRESS) to be held at the CHANB HOTEL SATURDAY, MAV 19, 1901 In aid of the St. Winifred's building Fund Music supplied by the Police i Band by kind permisait of the Cominhtsioner i Police. DANCING 9.00 p m. in-kri'. 91 00 on s.i11' HOW Refreshments will be on sale i A COUNTRY FAIR will be held under the patronage of Mr. & Mrs. J. II. Wilkinson at St. James' Combined School, Hole town, on WHIT MONDAY. May 14th. 3—10 p.m. Refreshments. Sweets. Snack Bar, Pijciding and Souse. Ice Cream. Etc. 1 .i in HK from €—8 V Bl. The Police Band conducted by G'lpt. Ruison. A.R.C.M. will bo In attendance, by •1 Proceeds in aid of St. John the Baptist Vicarage fund. Admission Vilulls 1 :o: (hlldren 6d. 29.4.51 3n khid peTiiiisoaoii of Michel ii If you wiih a good IIAMI SIMIWI II Try our special 1 ql. nit;ust received. OFFICE REQUISITES Knllrr Dampers, Glass Ink Stands, ftlaas Pen Trays. Piper Weight*. Stamp Racks, Rubber SUmps, sLinip psds. Stapling Maehlnes and Staples. Wire Trays and Wire Baskets. Letter Srales. Dating Machines and Pencil Sh*rpeners, Metal Edge R.lee • ROBERTS & CO. Dial 3301 I g I NOTICE IS IlEHEHY GIVEN that pursuant to the Order of the Supreme Court of the Windward Islands and I .mnfementa for I.t-il.rd J .l\.iil.,mr.„lo br uken l.y v.rtoa. I.Kl'l. 1 A.rnU and M. for Ih. follouln. have been aulhorUrd to R*M|T1 Ih.m : MORES OHTSNB. r-Dajrvll. Road. Ch. Ch Mr.. IT. L. BRVCE. M.xwtll Road. Ch Ch. 0. McCONNKY. l'llirin. load. Ch Ch. JOSEPH ALLEVNE, Crmnr. 91. Philip. G QCINTTNE, Church Vlllacc. SI. Philip r H1NKION, Mudlh Street. HI John B.. L. CAVR, St. John. Dlapciuarr. R. H. KING, Near Sharon, St. Jh........ JOSEPH JEMMOTT. St. Elltabeth Vlllacv, SI Joweh. S. A DURANT. Horae Hill, St. Joseph. I IMM/IH PHARMACY, Four Roads, St Ji.hr V HOLDER. SI. Jiulrs. 81 Ooorn. rr. c. HCNTE, Pine Gap, SI. Mir bad V RICE, Bank Hall Road, SI Michael E. I.ORDF Bank Hall X Road. si Michael

Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
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ESTABLISHED 1895





Reds Not Contacted 7

Uijongbu Left Deserted) U.S., Britain

TOKYO, May 5.

Deadlocked

UNITED NATIONS tank and infantry patrols
roved far ahead of the Allied defence line north| Cver Mediterranean Chief

of Seoul to-day. But they made little contact with |
Communists, and found no evidence of prepara-
tions for a renewed Chinese offensive.

In an area where United Nations patrols had cut three|for the Mediterranean area, con-|

LONDON, May 5.
The Americans and British are
completely deadlocked on _ the
choice of a Supreme Commander

Communist companies to pieces yesterday, they found only { t"ary to recent reports that a Brit-

a squad to-day.

Allied tank patrols again en-!
tered Uijongbu, 11 miles north of}
Seoul, and found the town empty.
But an estimated two Communist
regiments skirmished with A\l-
lied patrols northwest of the
South Korean capital.

Nine Communists, some of them
in new summer unifoims, we
captured during the day.

in the same area, United Na-
tions engineers abandoned an at-
tempt to lift a Chinese minefield
when Communist mortar bombs
began to fall among them. '

A large mechanised Task Force
probed several miles north of the
United Nations line on the cen-
tral front meeting only sporadic
fire from small Communist bands
in nearby hills.

On the east Central front Allied
patrols reached almost to the 38th
parallel. Everywhere Commun-
ists seemed to have pulled their
main forces back leaving behind
only screen troops.

Large South Korean forces at-
tacked about 500 Communists
near Inje on the Eastern front but
withdrew after a hard fight.

790 Red Casualties

As the weather cleared after
yesterday’s rain, United States
planes stepped up their support
and reconnaissance operations.

They attacked a big Communist
supply dump north of the parallel
starting two fires.

The air force claimed 60 Com-



e






munists killed or wounded and 24
vehicles, 35 railway wagons, and
230 buildings destroyed or dam-
aged during the day.

Eighth Army Headquarters
estimated yesterday’s Communist

casualties for ground action § at
790.
Military observers here be-

lieved the Chinese might be pre-
paring to renew peir spring offen-
We wihh. TRO ext two weeks
before the start of the rains.

But they did not think there
would be as much power behind
the Communists’ punch as there
was in the first six days of their
offensive.

The Allied Commanders expect
Chinese to try to seize Seoul again
for its propaganda value.

The big question among military
observers was whether the United
Nations would continue to hold a
firm defence line or go over to a
limited offensive. —Reuter.



Nine Point Plan

STRASBOURG, May 5.

A nine point plan for keeping
Europe financially stable | and
hard at work was presented to
the Council of Europe’s Con-
sultative Assembly when it opened
a ten-day session in Strasbourg
to-day. ;

It proposed among other things
the creation of a European In-
vestment Bank to aid under-de-
veloped countries in the Council.

—Reuter.

Vital Airfield

TRIPOLI, Libya, May 5

The U.S. Air Force is walking
a diplomatic tight rope here, as
the United . States prepares to
negotiate for continued use of this
vital airfield. U.S. bombers could
in time of war deliver atom
bombs to any target in European
Russia from this base.

Right now, the field, operated by
Military Air Service, is one of
Uncle Sam’s biggest international
bargains. He pays less than
$5,000 rent per year to upwards ol
1,000 individual Arab farmers for
this 1,335 acre toe-hold in the
Middle East.—U.P.





GIRL GUIDES,
at the London Girl Guides Headquarters in Buckingham Palace Road, Second from left is Miss Marjorie

(Joey) Pemberton of Barbados.

THE W.1. GIRL GUIDES

‘ish Admiral
according to
nations,

The argument has been going
on for months and it has held up
the formal naming of the Ameri-
can Admiral William M. Fetch.
teler as Supreme Commander for
the Atlantic. The British argue
that if there is any spot outside
their coastal waters where they
shovld command, it is the Mediter
ranean, They paint to their life-
line—the Suez—and in the Middle
East, the fortress of Gibraltar,
and the key bastion of Malta.

The Americans reply that the
strength they are now pouring
into the Mediterranean area, the
much larger U.S, Sixth Fleet and
their contributions to Greece,
Turkey and Italy entitle them to
command.

A report emanated recently
from London saying flatly that a
calls. the visit’ to London last] British Admiral would get the
November - December of Premier |POSt. It was not correct, and
Hanlon when the trade talks with | C2Used considerable consternation
Cuba had started. “He was over|i" Washington where Government
here to talk about sugar”, the level discussions on the command

would get the post,
officials’ of both

UK.—Cuba’
Pact Attacked

By DAILY EXPRESS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 5.
editorial attack
‘the impending U.K.-Cuba pact, ap-
pears in this morning’s Daily
Express under the heading
“Secret and Shameful”.
The paper accuses the



A further on



British
Government of a “shocking lack
of candour in its relations with the
rest of the Commonwealth”. }

Dealing first with the position
of Queensland, the editorial re-

ae

U.N. FORCES CR

Sunday Advocat

BARBADOS, MAY 6, .1°51

eee

.

DRAX HALL, St. George, one ‘o:
mil,



Express says, “yet not a word of |@d been and are still underway.!

Britain's negotiations with Cuba}
was mentioned. Was this the way French, British and United
to treat a Dominion? | States service representatives in

The editorial continues “Empire} Washington are discussing the
preference is to be thrown over-| United States’ plan to give the
board to the extent of 500,000 tons|Supreme Command to a Briton
of sugar a year. j with an American deputy, usually

The Cuba pact is shameful, and| well informed circles said here
should never be signed. today.

The circumstances in which it The proposal would make the
has been negotiated, are even | United States’ Admiral, William
riore shameful. Neither the West | R. Carney, subordinate to a British
indies nor Mauritius nor Queens- |Commander, and would divide the
land have been consulted about | whole Mediteranean area into four
it. They have merely been noti-| commands, one of which would be
fied — when the document was|in the French sphere.
almost ready for signing.” If the three representatives
approve of the plan, it will then
have to come before the Military
Committee of the North Atlantic
Treaty and Defence Ministers of
the countries concerned,

ascceg — (Reuter & U.P.)
Workers
Cease Work

U.S. Deputy



B’dos Rum Attracts
Attention. At.B.LF.

(from Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 5.
Barbados Rum attracted the at-
tention of visitors to the British



Industries Fair to-day, Attend-}
ance, to-day was its highest} It has come to the notice
since the opening cay. of the Bureau of Employment
There was much activity at and Emigration that a few
West Indies stalls. A representa- workers have ceased working
tive of a Swecish firm placed with the object of registering
large orders fcr Jamaica vinned at the Bureau as unemployed.
fruits; rice on show at the Critish They have stated that this
Guiana stall attracted buyers’ has been doue so that they
attention. may get the opportunity of

going to work in the United
States of America. Only men
who are genuinely unable to
find work need register.

There will be no new regis-
trations of unemployed men
during the coming week.

Mr, J. A. Back, Director of the
Bank of Australasia Sydney, Aus-
tralia who is representing Austra-
lia’s interests a the British
Industries Fair, met West Indian
Test cricketer Alnn Rae and
Arthur Wint at the Jamaica stall.

They took a group photograph
with cther West Indians. Refer-
ring to the forthcoming Test
matches between the West Indies
and Australia, Mr, Back said: “I
think you West Indians are good
to beat us.” West Indians in the
stall smiled aprovingly; Alan “4









“Britain Forced To
Rearm”—Attlee

: LONDON, May 5.

Prime Minister Clement Attlee
told a May Day rally here to-day
that Britain had been forced to
rearm against her will.

“But we have to show that we
can defend ourselves and that we
have a better system.”

What Britain had
could be destroyed

smiled non-committally and
replied: “I have no comments to
make.”

FRENCH STRIKE AT
REBEL HIDEQUT

SAIGON, May 5.
French troops to-day struck at



achieved
by action

another pro-Communist rebel} ?' ¢ & SOK n
hideout in the Tongking delta! Communism was “tolerance”. _
bridgehead in a sweep through These totalitarian Communist

countries of to-day are really a

; nf cavern)! Pitiful result to come from a
They aimed to wipe out several) vnovement that started with such

thousand rebels who were yester-{}. :
day reported to have attacked high ideals.
French partisan troop positions
end villages in the Kesat regign, ;
about 25 miles southeast o!
Hanoi,

A post in Daloc village fell to
the rebels after bitter fighting.

—Reuter.

the jungle and ricefield.

“Our Socialist movement is not
a movement merely out to change
things. It is out to change peo-
ple. We have in this country
democratic Socialism that did not
ring itself
formula.”



to an economic

—Reuter.

from tne West Indies, now on a Visit to London are seen with two English Guides

—Express



relief in one way or another,
On the Advisory Committee are
‘

|

from outside or from inside ; z j
: ae mission and detailed scope of its
Attlee said that the difference erie ;
between democratic Socialism and General William C. Chase, chief

W.L. Cotton.
Industry Needs
Special Help |

SAYS TEMPANY
LONDON, May 5.
The West Indian Sea Island
Cotton Association is trying its
hardest over here to get the gov-
ernment to lower the high pur-
chese tax on manufactured goods
sold in this country. ;
Sir Harold Tempany, Chairman
of the Association’s Advisory Com-
mittee in England gaid to-day
that he was confident that in the
long run the industry would ge.

represented growers, spinners, the
West Indian Committee of Plant-
ers and. .Mercharts,,and... cata
other official organisations,

This week Sir Harold took the
delegation to the Board of Trade
the difficulties the
tradesmen are experiencing in sel-
ling sea island cotton in Britain
chiefly beccuse of the cost of cot-
ton and high purchase tax,

He emphasised that a strony
export trade required the “cush
ioning” of a sound home trade.

“We explained to the Board o!

told Reuter to-day,
outlook for the cotton
islands is getting

”

to explain



Trade”, he
“that the
industry in the
rather worrying.

He pointed out that if the in-
dustry disappeared, or had to re-
dgee its output,
serious effects on
the islands
grant aided.

this would have

the inecme of

are already
Reuter.

which



U.S. Mission To
China Works Out

Programme

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 5.
Staff officers of the United
States military mission to Nation-
alist China, plunged ahead at top
speed in working out the pro
gram of the organisation whic
will determine the final size of the

of the mission, and U.S. Minister
Karl L. Rankine, directly under
whom the mission will operate,
have been holding a series of con-
ferences with Chinese miilitary
leaders and U.S. Naval and Mili-
tary and Air attaches to prepare
working orders which will be fol-
lowed in gradually extending the
mission's work.—U.P,



EIGHT KILLED
IN JOHORE

SINGAPORE, May 5.

Six Ghurka soldiers
Malay policemen were
killed and four other
wounded
with
hore.

and two
reported
Ghurkas
Wednesday in a clash
Communist guerillas in Jo-
—(U.P.)

EXPELLED
PARIS, May 5.
of



The French Ministry the
Interior to-day expelled Iradj
Eskandary, former Persian Minis-
ter of Industry and Commerce.



—Reuter. /i5 sitting.

Fire Guts Kingston Business Houses

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica, May 5,
The Jar a Sugar Manufac-
turers Association and the Feder-
ation of Primary Producers of the
Caribbean, lost their Headquar-
ters, valuable office equipment
and documents, as a fire destroyed
the second and third floors of a
new, massive building in the heart
of Kingston to-day, leaving the
damage estimated at half a million







| dollar

jfloor w

|
j

The fire began on the third

air-conditioning







i being
st



enveloped the



i SSE?

a



—-* ~~

DRAX HALL



f the oldest h § in the Island, taken from the top of the old wind-

(Story on page 7).

‘Ike Asks Britain To
increase Military Aid
BRITAIN SAYS “NO”

. LONDON, May 5
sINFORMED SOURCES said that General Bisenhower
esked Britain for a bigger military contribution to the
Novth Atlantic Treaty Organisation, but Biitain has de
ciined to increase the five Divisions promised to thi
Supreme Commander

_ Gifts Pour
‘ Into Cairo

ye FOR FARQUK

CAIRO, May 5

A festive air, rivalling “Arabian
Nights” setting, pervaded Cairo as
fabulous gifts poured into the
Royal Palace on the eve of King
Farouk’s wedding to his 17-year
old commoner fiancee,’ The King
and dark-haired Narriman Sadek
will be married at 11 a.m. on Sun-
day in a Moslem ceremony which
the bride does not attend,

The mafriage coincides with the

_— it was said that Bisenhower
made “several appeals’ for «a
| rreater British effort to encourage
;a bigger effert by the other Euro
pean members of the North Atlan
tic Treaty Organisation,
Eisenhower’s requests are. saic
to have been made through Pac
machinery, and the British reply
was said to have been a “categor-
ical rejection,”

had promised. to contribute five
Divisions to Eisenhower, the Su
preme Commander, on the Con
tinent,

Informed sources said that wher
Eiscuhower completed his Euro.
pean tour in January, he esti-
mated that all he could rely on at
that moment was seattered forces
totalling about thirteen Divisions
Al the same time, dissatisfactior










14th anniversary of Farouk’s! ig said to have been expressed ir
official aec n to the throne.} Washington about what were
The marriage is ‘arouk's second,| described as the “inadequate con
and will be performed by Sheik! tributions” of 3elgium, Holland
Mohamed Ibrahim Salem, Presi-| ana Denmark,
dent of the Sharia High Court,| Belgium is said to have beer
Egypt's highest Islamic Judiciary! criticised for allowing strategic
body, Special delegations bearing’ materials to reach Russia, Holland
presents from. chiefs of Arab|is said to have been asked by
States have been converging on} Fisenhower to increase her rou-
Cairo for the past three days.| tine military call-up,

Jordan's King Abdullah sent: He is said to have made “gev-
Farouk the Hussen Ibn Ali Kyar-jferal appeals” to all Buropear
don, his country’s highest decora- members of the North Atlantic

tion. He sent the; bride a cosmetic Treaty for greater contributions
set of pure gold studded with|to enable him to build a force of
sparkling precious stones,—U,P. }a strength sufficient to art

a to aggression.—U.P,
|

Protest Parade

JOHANNESBURG, May 5
Thousands of ex-serviceme:
made a torchlight parade through
the strects of Johannesburg las
night in protest against the South |
African Government's coloured
voling policy. The protest meet
ing was held at Port Elizabeth, |
The Johannesburg demonstrator;

as f





PRESIDENT PLEADS
FOR ITALY’S RIGHTS

ROME, May 5,

Former Italian President, Hnrico
De Nicola, to-day took over the
Presidency of the Senate with an
impassioned plea that Italy be
restored to her “rightful place ui
honour among the nations.”

De’ Nicola, succeeding late Pre-





] ; marched to the City Hall wher
mier Bonomi, told sénators that} they passed a resolution “pro.!
Italy should be freed from the testing in the strongest possible|
“humiliating and unjust con-|/terms against the action of the}
ditions” of the peace treaty. present Government in proposing}

Italy’s contribution to the final|to violate the spirit of the consti |

Allied victory over Germany and
her long tradition of culture and
glory far outweighed her tempor-
ary misadventures he said.
Reuter.
———

Alert For Demonstration

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 5.
A St. Lucia police detachment
of 20 arrived to-day as a precau
tionary measure with a view to
iudications of Monday’s likely
flocking of the capital, There will
be no surprise, however, if other
tightening up developments ara
consequent upon the meeting at
Government House this morning.
Superintendent of Police James

—Reuter.

IMPRISONED

BERLIN, May 5
A West Berlin court to-day sen. |
tenced 45-year-old industrial |
salesman Erich Kaeding to 18)
months imprisonment for illegal-~'
ly forwarding West German steel

products into the Soviet Zone.
—Reuter.

1,000,000 TON

SULPHUR SHORTAGE
WASHINGTON, May 5.

The International Sulphur Com
mittee reported to-day that the
free world’s supply of sulphur ir
1951 was expected to fall short
of its requirements by “at least
1,000,000 tons."”"—Reuter,

tution



















. : =
e Estimated At $500,000 |
second floor ag firemen made én as the new third political party. |
early morning stand shortly afte M.A’s Manager, D. J. Verity
3 a.m, to prevent it taking the firs! said: “everything ig destroyed; it
floor is quite a blow.” Verity is also
secretary of the rr
Offices which were totally de ag ae - : " rae “g {
Sa ale Wiis valuable paper nial The damage estimated does no
ol Joe eae : fnclude the damage caused by
equipment, were the ‘S.M.A the y to valuable tyre stocks of |
P.P.B.C, United Estates Ltd ate ; g aA nipment |
7 - merchandise and office equipment]
the Central Committee of Primaty py the first floor offices of th
Producers of Anhydrous Alcohol 4. j;qjn, owned by Hon. ¢ AG
Ltd., the Jamaica Imperial Asso- ¢, rphey, M.C., M.L.C., ar ¢
ciation, the Jamaica Cigar Manu- y.),\ch ‘offices now destroyed be}
facturers Association, the Jamaica ved in on Avril} |
Carbolies Ltd., as well ae re
offices proposed for the Farn Fire Chief Reid, and one firema

Federation, which is billed locally were injured

It was understood that Britain! ernment, and our capacity, &nd



-





DEFENCE LINE

MacArthur Wants
Abolition Of War

WASHINGTON, :
GENERAL MacARTHUR today pleaded for
world wide abolition of war and said “Time is
running out.’’ “I said a} the end of World War IT

that we have had our last chance and I believe it

firmly,’’ he added.

‘L believe that 99 percent of the people of the world
believe that.”

The General is making his third aprearance before
the joint Senate Committee investigating United States
policy in the Far East.

He said it was quite possible his plan would call for
additions to air and naval strength in the Far East, and he
believed these additions would be readily available with-
out prejudice to any other area or operation contemplated.

- - While the General was giving his
evidence to-day, Democrat Senator
| Pat MacCarran quoted him as hav-
jing flatly refused to discuss the
| “Troops to Europe” dispute on the
| grounds that it involved political
| controversy
| MacArthur said his policy to hit
--SHINWELL |Communist-China and win the
war in Korea could be carried out
WASHINGTON, England, May 5.,; Without prejudice to any other
Defence Minister Emanue!| operations or demands that might

U.S. Criticism
Unjustified

Shinwell in a speech said that} be made on the United States

Britain was not being dragged «!| armed forces.

the U.S, tail, and called for a He said it would take only “a

end to criticism of America,| relatively small fraction” of the

policy, United States overall strength to
Addressing a mass meeting o | mind on the campaign he had in

miners at this coalmining cent: : ;

in the county of Corie. Shin The increase in Far East

well said “the sooner we stoy trength would not be as. great

disparaging the U.S, the better.’| "5 far as ground troops were con-

cerned, said the General.
“IT wish people who indulge t:
criticism of the U.S. would show

Evacuation

more commonsense. We are not
being dragged at the tail of th The General to-day told the
U.S. There is no evidence of that }Committee that plans had been
whatsoever.” drawn up for the evacuation of
Korea and the withdrawal of
Shinweill also attacked the} United Nations troops .to Japan
Conservative Leader, Winston jin an emergency.
Churchill, charging him with He said all details were never
spreading the notion that Britain! werked out but withdrawal was
was weak, anc’ describing him a? | eontemplated, What might have
the “rudest man” in the Hou fiappened later would have de-
of Commons, pended on the action itself, or the
“There he sits on the front o!| directives he might have re-
the Opposition bench, muttering} ceived
sometimes to himself, and some He said there was no method
dimes audibly indulging in the) of avoiding surprise attack of an

rudest possible ejaculations. cnemy.
| “If you are not ready at the tima
you might well be overwhelmed
before many factors gave you a
‘certain period of time in which

|

The reason why some — peopl
and some countries regard us e4
weak is not because we are weal

but because Churchill, and com} yo.) coukd bulld up to meet attack.
pany have disparaged the gov MacArthur was asked what

course he would recommend tf
as a result people overseas be | after his policy was adopted,

lieve it.”

| Chinese Communists were thrown
back into Manchuria but refused
sign the Peace Treaty.

tie replied that Chinese would
then be unable to launch more
cffensives and he believed they
|} would agree to a rational treaty.
| MacArthur told the Committee
that if the United States failed to
top Communist aggr n in the



15 Pledged to Work
For Common Good
By PATRICK CROSSE









STRASBOURG, May 5 | far Bast, it would be “an invita.
Fifteen Governments, forming! tion’ to Russia to attack in
the Council of Europe, solemnly! gycther area of the world.
pledged themselves today “to —Reuter.
work close together for the com
mon good” in the face of East
West tension. THE “ADVOCATE”
The declaration was contained

pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night

in a mesage delivered to the Euro. |
pean Parliament at Strasbourg by,
the Committee of Ministers form.’
ing an “Upper House” of thé
Council of Europe.”’-—Reuter,



THE. en icvets

A stock of models always on display

and ready for you to take away.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

10, 11, 12 &°13 BROAD STREET.



PAGE TWO









DRED ASS

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TONITE 8.15 pm. MOND. and TUESDAY
ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT

oF

HE US. Sectiog: of
bean Commissigh including Mr
Wurd M. Candday, Hon.

Puerto Rico, Mr
Jefferson Jones,

AT

oSee













Lew AYRES Louis WOLHEIM ;
—_—— — tertcaepdeacnianittiieitaiiaimivaiet. a Miss Elizabeth
“Talent Au edition TODAY 9.30 a.m. } Armstrong, Mr
* x Sol Luis. Des-
cartes and Mrs
Virgina Lewis,

are.Gue in from
Puerto Rico at 6
o'clock this eve-
ning. Mr. De la
Try Ellis, former
Chief Justice of
Curacao and Mr.
uarles van
fford, Secretary

the Mether-



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Dana



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M.
Mrs.








iss Lee-Sack-Sioe, Miss M
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Mr. L. W. Cramer.
























are due in this mornin
Arriving by the samme ie
be Hon. W. A. Bustaman











secretary.









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Robert Taylor and Lloyd
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“Bataan” not suitable for
Children.

9 Sil acct ana oan A
MONDAY and TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M and Fox Double...
Alice FAYE in
“FALLEN ANGEL”

AND
“ HIDDEN EYE”
with
Edmund ARNOLD &
France RAFFERTY





















have arrived. and ®

are on display o% ;

fevrie
ra

AL



ALFONSO B. DeLINA & CO..

The Jewel Box of Barbados
Corner of Broad & McGregor










Streets





the Carib-

Jesus ‘TT,
Pinero, , first native Governor of



embers of the Commission's
oe ¢ Boe yes-

F, Beauregard,
Durier,

B.
pene, Miss J. Landreth- tsa




Wiss T. Carrington, Mrs. B.

Secretary
General and Mrs. M. Traboulay

ht will
and his

anada after a two weeks’ visit.
Yearwood is with the Fort

= ee ene

lands Embassy in Mr. De in Try Ellis
Washington of the Duteh Section
Hendrik

etit de Beauverger of
the French Section arrived yes-
afternoon and Mr. Blanche,

Laéthem are due this evening at










“Step Livel on,
grick ae ees ia THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT Back Fre Catiad
ate ae rnge Berkar with Shirley Temple; Barry Mitz- ac rom hada
2 r
i: Denise Darcell & Chita. at RE WR R, fe, MRS. JACK YEAR-
00 are back from



ASTOR THEATRE

LAST SHOW TONIGHT 8.30

Tip Top Musical ot - year
You'll Swing into High with -

“PLL GET BY”
ANCES by—J Haver — LOVE by William Lundigan — KISSES by
Gloria Dettaven meso NGS by Dennis Day — Trumpet by Harry James

and over 10 Son# Hits.
This is i MUSICAL you will want to se
OVIES are certainly getting be

MON ¥ ar and. TUESDAY | _ This colossal double ‘from Fox & M.GM
“CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE” & “LUXURY LINER”

TWO Weekend Pictures given you for your midweek pleasure. Can you

afford a trip on the Luxury finer? Well come over to the ASTOR and

sit in on all the Fun asd Grandeur of M.G.M.'
It's Yours jor 18, 24, #0, or 48 cents







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Carb Calling

Engineering and

Agriculture
TANLEY CARRINGTON, son
of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Car-
rington of “Windsor"’, St. George,

Has just finished the third year
of his course in engineering at
McGill Univérsity. Yesterday he
flew in by T.C.A. to spend the
summer holidays with his parents.
He is due back in Canada in Sep-
tember. . Another Barbadian
student coming in by the same
plane was Don Layne, better
known to his close friends as
“Joe”.

“Joe” (I am his close friend) is
the ‘son of Mr. atid Mrs. J. G.
Layne of the W.1l. Rum Refinéry,
Brighton. He is doing agriculture
and has just completed his second
year at Macdonald College. He
too is returning in September.

Sisters
ISS JOAN DE LA BASTIDE
who is with T.C.A’s Public
Relations Office in Montreal left
yesterday by T.C.A. after spend-

- ihe a Week's holiday with her

brother-in-law and sister, Mr, and
Mrs. Harold Kidney. Her mother
if also in Barbados. Prior to her
week's stay here, Miss de La Bas-
tide spent a couple of weeks in
Trinidad.

Station Manager, Ireland

R.HAROLD BAXTER is
T.C.A.’s_ Station Manager
in Shannon Field, Ireland, He

arrived by T.C.A. yesterday to
spend five days’ holiday in Bar-
bados. He is a guest at the
Ocean View Hotel.












> over and over again.
er all the time.









s Luxury Liner.

—_—_—_—_

ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15
Republic Smashing Double,
Robert Rockwell and Bar-
bra Fuller in... .

“TRIAL WITHOUT
JURY”

and
« HOMICIDE

THREE ”
Starring
Audry Long and Warren
Douglas.

FOR

MONDAY and | TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Whole Serial—
«TIGER WOMAN
with Allan LANE
and Linda STERLING

ROXY
TO-DAY to WEDNESDAY
4.50 and 8.15
Columbia Smashing Double

Gene AUTRY &
his Horse CHAMPION
in
“BEYOND THE
PURPLE HILLS”
and
“ CONVICTE!

— Starring —

Glen FORD &
Broderick CRAWFORD

-
.







COMBINATION
YOULL

NEED !!




PHILIPS -ELECTRIC

BULBS
5 = 200 WATTS
SCREW & BAYONET

SS

+
%

2



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MATINEE:





AND

ELECTRIC LAMP
_ SHADES
BEAUTIFUL COLORS IN



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7c. — $1.29






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Telephone No. 2039



oO








BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS

PRESENT

THE SHOP AT SLY CORNER

A PLAY IN THREE ACTS BY EDWARD PERCY

under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
The Governor and Lady Savage

AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE

—on —
17th, & FRI. 18th MAY
FRIDAY 18th

ORCHESTRA & BOXES $1.50, CIRCLE $1.20, HOUSE $0.72

Beoking Office Opens Tomorrow at 8.30 a.m.




to 3” Mesh

LTD.
DEPARTMENT

aaa eE=R==_lemlel@@mele_eEEE










Since 1944

R, PATRICK GREAVES left

Barbados in 1944 to study
medicine at London Hospital.
He qualified last April and spent
nine months interning in England.
Dr. Greaves is hére until mid-
June staying with felatives. He
is a former student of Lodge
School.

In June hé goes to Canada to
do mere interning at the Toronto
Genera] Hospital. His mother
Mrs. Rachel Greaves now lives
in Ottawa and he spent a month
with her in Canada, before com-
ing dowh to Barbados.

On Six Months’ Leave
EAVING yesterday by
B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico
en route to the U.S.A. for a
holiday was Mr. G. B. Brahdford
of Navy Gardens, Christ Church.
Mr. Brandford is Clerk of the
Police Magistrate’s Court, Dis-
trict “B” and is on six months’

vacation leave.

Northbound

R. AND MRS. JOSEPH A.
a KITCHEN of Hamilton end-
ed their holiday in Barbados
yesterday when they left Seawell
by T.C.A. for Canada, Their
daughter Sally Ann accompanied
them, Mr, Kitchen is a manu-
facturer of ladies nosiery in
Hamilton. They had been here
since February 28th..... leaving
by the same plane for Canada
were Mr, and Mrs. George Som-
mers, their son Guy, Mrs, M. Lee,
Mrs. H. Mahon and Mrs, M.
Alexander, Radiographer at the
General Hospital. She has gone
to Toronto.

| Handicraft Expert
R, and MRS. FRED LEIGH-
TON flew in from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.1.A., on a five
day visit which has been ar.
ranged by C.D.
various W.I. governments, Mr.
and Mrs. Leighton have already
visited Jamaica and Trinidad and
from here they will visit some of
the other W.I.
Mr. Leighton is President of
Fred Leighton Inc., importers of
hand merchandise and Vice Presi-
dent of the National Counci of
ae Importers of the
He is also a member of
line” Advisory Committee on Im-
ports to the U.S. Department of

and W. and

islands,



Commerce in Washington, Mr
Leighton is the best experts in
the U.S.A. on the marketing of

handicrafts. His wife is a designer
and stylist in handicraft work
Mr, and Mrs, Leighton live in
New York City. ey left the
U.S. April 10th,

Nurse Returns
ETURNING shortly to Gren-
ada, after six years in Britain,
is Miss Monica Manuel. She is a
fully qualified State Nurse and has
pursued studies in midwifery and
public health.





| Across

1. The very man tor the cavern. (4)
4. Lessen what the sailor consumed.

(5). 8. Amphibious rodent. (6)

9. Cheats out of a perfume bag. (6)

2. An abbot’s vestment. (6)

3. Each go to him to charge with

a crime. (3)

4. The common holly. (4)

7. If L entered this youd have a
choice, (5)

19. Lt's am real tapioca pudding. (3)

21. Row without noise.

22. More or less than a unit? (4)
24. Product of a fine can. (7)
25. Such a box holds money. (3)
26. Condition subject to dreams. (5)
Down
1. Vehicle to make rice curi, (8)
2. Loose ott gre t becomes antl-
quated.
3. Provides (4)
5. This rt is di tent youl find.
(6) 6. Change the meat. ane. (4)
7 nen away me Fsto heen aS om
) 10, Turn aaa 2}
11. Always. (7) Hiant, 4)
16. Ball maybe. )
18. He should succeed. (4)
20. J

. Just a quick glance ? (4)
23. United. (3)

1. Mit Ave:

unar: 12 Ore
Waiter: WJ Kea. 29, Vinge
22. Hi Enter. 24.

ue: 23,
Mellow: 2. an undal
Streak: 5.

6.
None: 11. spahauive: 14, Stile:
18, Eke Dab.





JULY 21st.
A MUST DATE

FOR YOU



a

TAN & NAVY

DIAL 4606



TAN & WHITE CASUALS
All erith Platform Soles and Wedge Heels



Mr.

After Eight Years
R. NAT CARMICHAEL who
was on the T.C.A. plane yes-
terday comes to take up an ap-
pointment at Harrison College as
Senior Chemistry lecturer.

Nat has been away from Bar-
bados for eight years during
which time he was ih Jamaica
whéte he was Chemistry and
Gymnastic Instructor at Kingston
College, Jamaica, and Visiting
Science Master at Jamaica Col-
lege, Jamaica. He then went to
McGill University where he ob-
tained his B.Sc. and on to “West-
ern” in London, Ontario for his
M.Sc. There, he did research
in activators in synthetic rubber
and was also demonstrator and
assistant lecturer while there.
He was also awarded a_scholar-
ship of the National Research
Counci) of Ottawa.

NAT CARMICHAEL.

Home Economics
ISS MAUREEN JOHNSON
Â¥ daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
arold Johnson of “Ellangowan”,
St. Joseph, was among the pas-
sengers coming in yesterday by
T.C.A. Accompanying her was
her friend Miss Dorothy Watson,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Her-
bert A, Watson of Welches, St.
Michael. They are both at
MacDonald College doing home
economics. They have just got
through their second year. Now,
they are on holiday unti} about
September.

T.C.A. Engineer

R. FRED MOORE, T.C.A.

aero-engineer accofnpanied
by his wife have come down to
spend a few days in Barbados
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.
He was Flight Engineer in one of
the flights which came here a year
ago last February. Yesterday,
however, he was a passenger and
this time he is on holiday.

ie DOG which had been taught
. to give up its seat in trains
to ladies, jumped from a first class
corner-seat in a crowded train
last night,

“T’m not as old as all that,” said
the lady. “They didn’t say any-
thing about age,” replied the dog.
“They just said give up the seat
to a lady. “Oh well,” said the
lady, “I’m old myself,” went
on the dog. “You don’t suppose [
like standing. But it’s manners.
That’s what it is.’ “You needn’t
say it so grudgingly,” said the
lady. “Oh, go on, take the seat,”
growled the dog. “Thank you, ho!”
said the lady. “I’d rathér stand.”
“More fool you,” said the dog.
settling himself comfortably in
the seat. “I wish you two wouldn’t
talk so much,” snapped a passen-
ger over his newspaper.

A Bowler’s Eye View
T is believed that the Cockle-
carrot. Commission, ‘after
hearing enough expert evidencé
to deafen a camel, is inclined to
accept the theory that it would
be just as easy to sleep in a brim-
less bowler without ventilation
holes as in one with them. In other
and equally fatuous words, thesé
little vents, for nightwear, are
purely decorative, whatever their
cooling properties during the day.
And it must always be remember-
ed (I forget why) that even in
the daytime, if the wearer of a
brimless bowler stands in the
sunshine, the heat of the sun will
penetrate through the vents. Soe
| will rain, hail, or snow. That is
| why the vents are made so laugh~
jably small. “They are but tiny
‘ casements opening on to another
world,” as the man said when he
looked at Saturn through the
crown of his hat.

a CS ee a

ADIES” SHOES

WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS
TAN, NAVY & BLACK SANDALS

CASUALS _



EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

>. BY THE WAY

BRAN

es ee es
—_— a

SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

Studying Journalism

RS. M. wu. HARRISON ac-

companied by her daughter
Joan arrived from Canada _ by
T.C.A. yesierday. Mr. Harrison
was at Seawell to meet them,
Joan has just finished her first
year at Carleton College in Ot-
tawa, She ts stuelying journalism.
She left Barbados in August 1950,
and expects to return to Canada

in September.
Holiday Over .
R. AND MRS. EDWARD
WILKINSON who had been
holidaying in Barbados_ since
Apfil 7th with their baby son
Charles, left yesterday for Cana-
da by A os en route to
England, While in. dh Mrs
they were staying wil Mrs
Wilkinson’s parents, Dr. and
Mrs. Gerald Manning of
“Flodden,” Culloden Road.

Six Weeks
FF to Toronto yesterday to
spend six weeks holiday was
Mrs. Rita Teetzel . . . also Tofon-
to bound yesterday Was Miss
Yvonne Wells. Yvonne is to be
married in two weeks to Mr. Chris
Morely. Mr. Morely was formerly
stationed with B.G. Timbers in
British Guiana, but after their
marriage they will be leaving Can-
ada for East Africa. . . . Col, and
Mrs. Keith Stewart have gone to
Bermuda.
Flying Visit
W JHO should pop in from Ber-
muda yesterday by T.C A
but Terry Ryan. Terry has been
living in Bermuda for three years,
and is Assistant Manager of the
Castle Harbour Hotel in Tuckers
Town. Terry is on his way to St.
Thomas, and may be here until
Friday.
At present staying at the Castle
Harbour, he told Carib, .was Mr.
Thomas E. Dewey of New York.

Air Tour
ING COMMANDER L. A.
EGGLESFIELD, Director
General of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean, leaves to-day for San
Juan to visit the U.S. Navy Com-
mand at San Juan.

To-morrow accompanied by
U.S. Naval Officers he is due to
visit Guantanamo, Cuba and Ja-
maica returning to San Juan on
Tuesday. After final talks on
Wednesday he expects to return

to Barbados on Thursday.

First Visit

R, AND MRS. EUGENE H.
ZAKALA of Winnipeg are

in Barbados until May 18th, Mr.
Zakala is with T.C.A.’s_ Traffic
Department in Winnipeg. This
is their first visit here, and they
are staying at the Ocean View

Hotel Arriving Py. the
same plane was Mrs. Elsie Dayis
of Toronto. Mrs, Davis will

spend two weeks. staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

At Bathsheba
R. HAROLD “PER” CADO-
GAN, Spartan and intercolo-
nial footballer was married re-
cently and they are spending their
honeymoon at Bathsheba.





ADVENTURES OF PIPA



Copyright . P28 . Vax Dias int. Arnsterdam

BY BEACHCOMBER

Councillor Tudmarsh
Replies
OUNCILLOR TUDMARSH
said yesterday: “The sug-
gestion that I would be capable
of bestowing an ardent kiss on
Miss Slopeorner at the christening
of a gas-container is little short
of outrageous. If I pressed her
arm at the buffet it was merely
to guide her away from a rather
used pile of sandwiches, and to-
wards the sliced cake. My kiss
would have been entirely academ-
ic, and no more significant than
the annual kiss I am called upon
in the course of duty, to bestow
on the horse which wins our local
steeplechase.”

Board Condemns
Foreign Seesaw

IR ERNEST FULLPOWDER,
Chairman of the Seesaw
Board, was rather more pompous.
He said: “The essence of see-
saw is its gregariousness, and
that is why it attracts the club.
able man. Light-hearted spon-
taneity and friendly rivalry are
the keynotes. A friendship made
on the seasaw does not end with
the game. Moreover, seesaw
builds character, by developing
the team-spirit and encouraging
give-and-take, There is no room
for the selfish or the quarrel.
some at either end of the plank,
and may I take this opportunity
of saying that my Board has no
intention of recognising the
foreign version of this typically
English game, in which, I under-
stand, the plank is balanced on
the belly of a third player. Such
innovations detract from the
dignity of a game which is a
symbol of life’s ups and downs.”

$9.44
$8.53
$9.37
$8.50

DIAL 4220









SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951



GARDENING HINTS FOR AMATEURS FARM AND

The

Weed on Lawns. Carnations.

The Guava Tree

May is rather an in-between
month in the garden. All annuals
should by now have been planted
out, and most of them will be in
bloom, soi there jis little to be
dene in the way of planting.
There will therefore be a bit of
a lull in the garden until the rainy
weather descends on us a few
weeks from now.

Yet there is always work to be
done in a garden, and now that
the annuals are blooming, cutting
off the dead flower-heads alone is
quite a job in a garden of any
size.

During this slack time, it’s quite
a good idea to tackle the weed on
the lawn. With the grass so short
and with most of the weed with-
ered it will be found comparative-
ly easy to get it out, and the bare
patches left, will quickly get cov-
ered in grass when the rains come.
In taking up the weed, it is un-
avoidable not to take up a certain
amount of mould as well. This
should be replaced by sprinkling
some sifted mould over the bare
patches. Although our Barbados
turf can never hope to reach the
perfection of English turf yet
with proper care we need not be
ashamed of our lawns. But a
lawn should have as much atten-
tion as a flower—bed. Weeds must
he eradicated as soon as they ap-
pear, bare patches and uneven-
ness levelled off with sifted mould,
and mowing, rolling. and water-
ing, done regularly, not just now
and then. As has already been
written in these articles the best
way of controlling the spread of
weed—on a lawn is to keep the

rass properly mowed. If this is
fg the grass never gets long
enough to seed. When coupled
with this, every little bit of weed

Garde

; that appears is dug out, it is poss-

ible in time, to get rid of the
weed altogether.

A nice green lawn, well kept, is
a thing of beauty, and it is poss-
ible to have a green lawn even
during the dry weather if some
trouble over it is taken.

Do it in this way. Sprinkle the
grass evenly with V.G.M. (Vege-
table garden manure), having
done this give the lawn a thor-
ough soaking with the hose, If
the weather continues dry, keep

--the sprinkler on the lawn for

. some time each day.

The result
will be sure to please you.

One of the loveliest of all flow-
ers is the Carnation, not only be-
eause.of its beauty, but because of
its lovely scent, Yet in this

, island, for some strange reason,

Carnation regarded
somewhat in the light of a deli-
cate problem child difficult to
handle, and to be dealt with only

plants are

Cookery

The recipe that I am going to
give you this week comes from a
Soho Chef. This chicken dish only
serves two.

POUSSIN CORONET

1 spring chicken. |

1 medium-sized onion.

2 az. butter.

1-tin mushrooms.

2 slices lean ham or bacon.

4 cup strong stock. ‘

1 sherry glass white wine.

14 teaspoon parsley.

1 tablespoon of grat-

ed cheese.

Salt. Pepper.

Divide the poussin

must be just cooked,
‘still the merest frac-
tion pink around the
leg joints. Lift from
the fat on to a lightly
buttered, fireproof dish and keep
warm without drying.
Fry the onion, diced small,

the fat until tender but not eae
Add the mushrooms and the ham



MM



m in May

by experts. This is a most mis-
taken idea, for if treated correct-
ly, the Carnation is a hardy,
sturdy little plant, that will suc-
ceed as well in the open garden
as in pots. These plants do par-
ticularly well when planted as a
border to @ raised bed, as, in this
positdn they are more likely to
get the good drainage which they
like. Give the plants a well man—
ured but light soil, and a sunny
position. Water lightly, but regu—
larly. When fully grown in an
open bed the plants may need the
support of a short farked stick to
keep them out of the mud of the
hed. Some people advise a
Westerly position. When the
Carnation plant buds, (as a rule
in a cluster )it is best to pick off
some of the buds. leaving only
one or two out of. the cluster.
This will ensure more space for
developing finer blooms.

The Australian seeds give the
best results.
_ Carnations can be grown from
imported seeds, by layering, or by
cutting or slip.

FRUIT TREES (continued)

The Guava Tree

The Guava tree is one of the
small fruit-trees which can easily
be grown in a garden. It is a
low spreading tree, from which
the fruit can, as a rule be easily
picked without climbing, or the
aid of a step-ladder. The Guava
tree bears fruit during the rainy
months (July-Octobaz) but, given
sufficient moisture, it will bear at
other, or almost any time of the
year.

Guavas are among the most
useful and valuable of our Barba-—
dian fruits. They can be made
into delicious Jelly, Stewed and
eaten with milk, custard or cream,
and made into Jam or Guava
Cheese,

For a Garden tree, it is best to
grow the ‘Psidium Pyriferum,
commonly known as the French
Guava, as the fruit of this species
is larger and sweeter than that of
the common Guava, and can be
eaten raw. Give your Guava tree
plenty of manure (fifteen or
twenty pounds of V.G.M. a year)
and plenty of water, and in return
it will give generously of fruit.

The Guava is propagated by
seed, i

Questions

In reply to D. H. Roaeh, I
would say that the Trinidad vine
is certainly one of the pretties:
and most suitable of Arbour
vines. I have never heard of the
idea that it causes Hay-fever and
colds, and would be inclined to
ignore it. Among other suitable
vines for arbours are Black-eye
Susan, Honeysuckle, Stepanotis,
and Onion-vine,

Corner

or bacon, and -cook lightly, Re-

move from pan.

Place ham or bacon under the
poussin halves. Lay a _ whole
mushroom on each breast.
the 4 cup of stock to the pan
and stir thoroughly. Stir in the
wine, add parsley and season,

Coat the poussin with the sauce.
Sprinkle the surface with the fine.
ly grated cheese. Place in a slow
oven for 10 minutes so that the
surface becomes glazed.

With this dish you
ean serve Potatoe
Chipps or Sherried
Sweet Potatoes.

2 medium-sized

sweet potatoes.

1 tablespoon of butter.
Cream to moisten.
Salt. Sherry.

Bake potatoes, scoop
out inside, add_ salt,
butter, and cream.
Flavour with sherry to
taste, Retill ukins and
bake 5 minutes in hot
over,

fuerte

Add these?
fat of spinach plants, e.g. the common

GARDEN

Hy Agricola

(TIMELY HINTS)

Many gardeners with small
gardens may be puzzled as to what
types of crops they should co
centrate on. Obvieusly, owing
limitations of space they cannc
plant everything listed in a seed
catalogue; in any case, to try to
do so may result in little of most
end not
kind to provide an aderuate sup-
ply when required to form part
of a meal,

n
to





We may note that foods can be
classified into three main groups
according to the purpose they
serve in the body: (1) body!
warmers (2) body builders (3){
body protectors. In the first group
the starchy crops (yams, eddoes
sweet potatoes, etc.) are best suited
io large gardens and farms and,
moreover, are not usually in short
supply. We have stressed the im
portance of the second group in
previous notes when we discussed
the proteins or flesh-formers; these
supply material for renewals and
repair to the body. The peas and
beans are in this group and, in
this connection, we strongly re-
commended greater use of the
pigeon pea, utilising it as an
attractive border and also to give

protection from wind. We also
Suggest including the ordinary,
climbing, white lima bean, a

prolific bearer and at the same
time useful for covering up an
old fence or hiding an ugly corner
in the garden. It is advisable to
secure a good strain of these; some
contain a fairly high proportion of
beans with red or reddish seed
coats and should be rejected as
they are liable to prove bitterish.
There is a small, bush lima
suitable for a garden bed and, if
there is room, include this, but it
is not so prolific as the climbing
sort. The climbing bonavist may
also be used for purposes similar
to the climbing lima bean; the
pods should be picked when the
seeds are still quite green and not
too full. Other peas and beans
such as black-eyes, rounceval and
increase peas should not be over-
looked; they come into bearing
quickly and can be used in the
green, snap stage when they make
en excellent addition to the
dietary. Section and cook them as
cone would the stringless beans
from imported seed. Many of the
pods should be left to develop
further for shelling and use as
green peas or in the dry state and
come in very handy when pigeon
peas are not in season,

Now the third group, the body
protectors, are most important
and, as a group, is generally the
one most often lacking in the
average meal, These protective
foods of the plant world are an
absolute must in the small home
garden; if no room for anything
else, concentrate on the so-called
green, leafy vegetables first and
foremost, What are some of
Lettuce, the various kinds



French spinach with thick, shiny

leaves; the species of pigweed
(Amaranth) with large, smocth
Jeaves; Swiss chard, mustard,

Chinese Cabbage and so on. If
beets and carrots are grown, be
careful not to discard the tops:
those of the beet make deliciqus
spinach and carrot tops car
the younger ones at any rate—be
finely cut up and put into sauces
or gravies. And of course, the
hardy okra might find a place in
some odd corner; it is supposed by
some to have properties which
counteract any tendency to peptic
ulcer and, in that sense, is a body
protector. Indeed, it is surprising
what a wide range of plany
material there is available in this
group if we are alert and make
good use of it. The term “wayside
greens” is not an infrequent head-
ing in home magazines these days.
It should be noted that local
types figure largely in the above
list and there is no need to wait
for imported seed to get started





Zz

Every normal skin needs
THESE 2 CREAMS

AAAARAAAALAAAAAAAARA

enough of a particular |



into two equal halves
down the breast. Place
in the hot melted fat
in a frying pan and
cook gently for 12 to
15 minutes. The pieces
’

Lovely Society women all over the
world follow this simple, inexpen-
sive beauty care; one that is
within the reach of everyone of

you.

FOLLOW THE BEAUTY

LOVELIEST WOMEN
EVERYWHERE

SOCIETY’S

PEPPER SE

PAAAAAAAAALIAALAAAARY

This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond’s Cold

Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips.

Remove the cream,

and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then “rinse” with more

Cold Cream, for extra-cleansing, extra-softening.
skin will be clearer, smoother, lovelier,
FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION

Very soon, your

By day, use a touch of Pond’s Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This
non-greasy cream will hold your powder matt for hours, and protect

your complexion from sun and wind.

9

POND’S

Vanishing Cream
Cold Cream



Pond’s

Start now to win the loveliness

that can be yours when you use

You'll find the

distinetive opal-white jars at all

the best beauty counters.



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

Sewing Circle

Grain Of Material



PENNY NOLAN

In order to sew really well you
must have a great deal of respect
for your cloth and in order to re-
spect cloth you. must understand

If you have ever fought a
piece of cloth that was cut off
grain trying to make it hang pro-
perly you will realize that rmate-
rial often seems to have a wili of
its own. In fighting its tendency
to wrinkle or pull where it
shouldn't you may lose your iem-
per but if the fault was bad cut-
ting to begin with, you probably
won't be able to correct it short
of recutting that particular sec-
tion. However, if you understand
grain and its importance
you cul you will avoid these fitting
difficulties.

Material is woven on looms. The!
big power looms of today work}
on the same basic principles that

were employed in the home hand
There are,:

loom of pioneer days.

a series of lengthwise threads,
strung on the loom. These are
called warp threads and _ the
crosswise or woof threads are,
woven over and under these
threads. â„¢ pT

In cutting clothes it will be
found that the lengthwise threads
hang better when they are placed
lengthwise on the body. They also
wear better. The crosswise threads
which run at right angles to them
should then be on the horizontal
lines of the body.

The method of achieving this
when cutting fs as follows. In
most styles the centre front and
centre back of the bodice should
be on a lengthwise thread. The
selvage edge, if it is straight, can
'be taken to represent the true
lengthwise grain. If the selvaga
is not straight it can often be
straightened by proper pressing
though some very cheap cloth is
so badly woven that finding the
proper grain is almost impossible.
Fortunately this is the rare ex-
ception rather than the rule,

Placing the centre front and the
centre back of the pattern paral-
lel to the selvage edges will result
in the bodice being cut on the
proper grain. The sleeve pattern
should have a grain or straight
of goods line on it, running from
the notch in the cap to be placed
at the shoulder seam straigh‘
down to the hem. Folding the
sleeve pattern in half from this
notch down will give you this line
which should also be placed paral-
lel to the selvage edge. Sleeves
are ogeasionally cut with this line
on the crosswise grain but gen-
erally they do not hang so well
or wear well.

The bias is not a grain as it is
not a thread. It is the centre of
the right angle formed by the
crossing of the warps and woof
threads, Hence the bias stretches.
This characteristic of the bias



with groups (2) and (3) during
this showery weather

ANSWER TO QUESTION
For the information of cor.
respondent S.H., it should be
stated that transplanted cucurbits,
squash, cucumber, pumpkin
seldom do well, The seeds, prefer.

ably, should be sown direct in
properly tiled and manured
(rotted compost or dung) beds,

the plants require liberal water-
ing and occasional spraying with
Bordeaux mixture against mildew,

ty
SASS

HERE’S
MORE

|
| MR. PLANTER!!

YIELD For

YOU WITH

at a on the bias place this fold

makes it very useful in dressmak -
img and designing. Cowl neck
bocdices for example, are cut with
the centre front on the bias so
that the draped neck will hang
gracefully. Bias cuts are
used for stripes to make them
@ome together in attractive Vs.

WN strips cut from the true
blag ge used for finishing neck-
Tin sleeves and for trim-

ming purposes.
The true bias of material is |
found by folding the width to the |
length, or otherwise the cut edge
of the material te the selvage
edge, forming an angle. The re-
sulting fold is the true bias. Bias
strips may be cut from, this fold
A gauge which attaches to your
scissors points may be purchased
that enables you to cut bias the
same width all along its length
without measuring and marking.

To lay a pattern on the bias it is
more practical to determine a line
that can be placed on the straight
of goods, making the centre front
fall on the bias. This is done by
drawing a line at right angles to
the centre front line on the pat-
tern to represent the crosswise
grain then fqlding thie centre front
line to this line. The resulting
fold in the pattern represents the
bias when the centre front is cut
on the length. To cut the centre

parallel to the selvages. When
cutting on the bias it is advisable
to make a full pattern rather than
a half. opening the material out
to a single thickness.

-_

Miss KEVELOS
Throws a Challenge
To the Mem

By ROBERT WALLING

SOFT. VOICED Olga Kevelos
aged 26, manages a cafe with
a staff of nine. Her father, a
Greek, now naturalised, gave her
the business, She finds her buss
indgor life demands an outdooi
hobby as corrective,

So the customers will miss hey
in Birmingham on Saturdays,

She is a promising car race.
driver. Cyril Kieft, who makes
fleet half-litre and one-litre rae
ing cars, has engaged her for
1951 (“I pay her expenses: she
takes the prize money,’’)

She will drive against men on
the Continent and at home, And
note that these cars are no longe:
in the “baby” elass, One Coope:
1100 ce car lapped the Susse>
circuit in one race at Easter a!
85.89 m.p.h.—two miles an hou
slower than the average speed o!
winner Bira with a 4%-litn
Osear in another event that da:

Miss Kevelos fs one of the fey
women racing this year, “Wha
is the matter with young wome
to-day?” she asks, “If the:
can’t make money, at least it i
a great thrill.”

She sends out this challenge t

men; ‘You always seem t
settle in a procession after thx
first lap in a race, Why no
‘mix it’ a bit?” She is used t

“mixing it’—-overtaking when-
ever possible—in motoreyek
events.

Her first and only car race s
far was last year. She led, Then
—‘‘some man flagged me to ge
slower.” She was beaten.

When she races her new £606
car she will prepare her make-up
carefully before starting—part of
her pre-race drill to get “every
thing right.” She always wear:
a crash helmet, carries no mascot
(“silly things’). Smoking anc
cocktails are not’ dropped be
cause of racing.

Kieft says of her: “She is a
good driver. She changes gear
expertly, makes best use of her
engine, holds her car _ firmly.

She can be aggressive, too.”
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED,
—L.E.S.





ACTUMUS

© The KEY to GROWING POWER

© The KEY to

It is said that extensive
fertility of such land. This is
System.
tility,

SOIL FERTILITY

cropping of land reduces the
only the case with the artificial

in this system developing mineral acids destroy fer-
In the Actumus it is entirely contrary. The more roots

plants throw out, the better will the soil be transversed and
loosened, and consequently there will be left organic residues

from such extended root systems

fertility of the soil.

Actumus also acts as a kind of soil police

which will build up the

More harm is

done to plants by the entry into the plant system of elements

which are not required, than
required
the entry of such elements by
its electronic crystals

The Actumus gardener requir

tools are a teaspoon and
jug or similar

3 preparatory operations:
3
5
5
5
5

(1) Making a standard solution of Actumus
ounces of Actumus, or one ounce of Aectumus “

of water

(2) Keep this standard
every time you use it.

COLERIDGE STREET

OOO OSDeeeeeeoeteeneee “
' 4? SOROS

Se

a watering can.
reeeptacle holding two pints

by lack of elements which are

Unwanted hydrogen, calcium and iron in their ionic
forms cause many dangerous v

irus diseases. Actumus controls
the special features, features of

very little equipment. His
He also requires a
These are the

Dissolve two
L”, in two pints

Let stand for twelve hours,

solution covered, and stir it up

For further information and supplies apply to

H. KEITH ARCHER

DIAL 2999
EOD COS

them



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BRIDGETOWN,



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COW: GAT

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J. B. LESLIE & CO, LTD.

MILK
FOOD




AND YOU CANT
60 WRONG!

The regular use of
Lanalol Hair Food
will, by its action on
the roots agd scalp,
nourish every hair
gland and encourage
richer growth, It
provides nourishment
to the sealp and hair
roots and corrects
such troubles as

DANDRUFF

THIN. & FALLING HAIR
The datly application of this Hair
Food it unfailingly in a really
beautiful glossy head of hair.
LANALOL No.1! With ol! (Yellow
Label) for setlp.
LANALOL No. 2 Without olf (Green
Label) for hair that is naturally oily —~
astringent and cooling.

(Blue Label). A

LAN wae CREA
joss ir dressing.

aNaLow SOLIDIFIED (Bakelite
box). An ideal fixative,

LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Red

Label), A liquid soap de luxe,

ee)

goes 10 THE Roor OF typ inoent





Wise is the sufferer from headache or nerve pain
who keeps a supply of Phensic! In a matter of
minutes the worst of pains give way to Phensic—
and as the pain lessens, you feel fit and cheerful,
ready again for work or play. It is good to know
that you can always have the certain relief of

Phensic. Be prepared for headaches—keep a suppl:
of Phensic handy. w













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ed

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——" ae ee

PAGE FOUR





ANEMIA

er ces
Tie ia

Headache, sour stomach, that sick-
ish “morning-after” feeling — the
price we often pay for enjoying
too much good food and drink!
Try this and see how much better
you will feel! Take Alka-Seltzer
before retiring, again—if needed
— in the morning.



ro

Alka-Seltzer contains an analgesic
for soothing headaches, plus alka-
lige ingredients to neutralize ex-
cess gastric acidity... two-way
action that brings quick relief,
Not a laxative — you can take
Aika-Seltzer any time.

‘Drop one or two tablets of Alka-
Seltzer into a glass of water, Watch
it fizz into a refreshing solution —
then drink ‘t. Pleasant-tasting
Alka Seltzer will help “set you
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hand — always!

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millions daily

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AMATEUR ATHLETIC
~ ASSOCIATION
OF BARBADOS

presents its
BIG THREE-DAY
CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

~» (under the distinguished
‘ patronage of

His Excellency the Governon
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

at
KENSINGTON OVAL

on

Whit-Monday . . May 14th
Thursday . . May 17th
& Saturday . . May 19th

beginning at 1 p.m. each day

e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold
Archer, (Nugget) Hunte,
Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin
Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists
and Athletes as well as
Miss Grace Cumberbatch
and Miss Eileen King in
action at the Historic Oval

“ Gates Open at 12 noon daily
)
PRICES OF ADMISSION :

SEASON TICKETS
Kensington Stand . . $2.16
George Challenor . . $1,68

®
DAILY ‘LICKETS

Kensington Stand . . $1.00
George Challenor . . . 72c.
Uncovered Seats . . . 48c.
Grounds ...... 24e.

e
Season Tickets on Sale daily
sat the Civic, Swan & High
Street.



acinar eens











HERE
AT LAST!!

deny that never in the two Tests aid

ee

PUERILE ATTACK ON
W.1. TEAM
B'dos Preparing For J’ca Footballers
| BY ©.S. COPPIN

Cem vAtion: on the team selected to repre-

sent the West Indies at cricket against Australia
this year have now come to hand from Jamaica.
There is a sort of freemasonry among news-
7 papermen in the Caribbean, and .for the most part,
Â¥ the world over, that prevents us from attempting to
’ hold one another up to ridicule or to make such ob-
se servations as would tend to undermine any profitable
reputation they might have established in their particular phase of
journalistic activity.
I find myself, however, compelled to challenge most strongly the
writings of C. A. “Longfield” Jack Anderson, cricket critic of the
Jamaica Daily Gleaner




PAINFUL

JT IS painful to me and although this is not intended to be any
apologia, I regret to have to take such strong objectjon since I have
just spent a most enjoyable three weeks in Jamaica.

Anderson in criticising the selection of the West Indies team has
referred to Denis Atkinson’s selection in these words: “It is not fair
to Atkinson to be persistently pitch-forked into company which he
does not belong.” i

He does not, however, suggest whom should be played in place of
Atkinson; Guillen of Trinidad he would have substituted with Binns
of Jamaica; Trim he would not have selected before Johnson also of
Jamaica and Goodridge, also of Jamaica he would have selected before
Jones.

If perhaps Nunes of Jamaica could be persuaded to go as Man-
ager and High Priest, then “Longfield” would most certainly have
selected him before Cyril Merry of Trinidad

STENCH

This awful stench of insularity is not compatible with the enor-
mous suriaes wien Wa. amaes cricket has made during tne past
decade and whicn achievement has now qualified tnem to compete in
lhe coming. seriés with Australia tor word cricket supremacy.

Anower comforting fact is that tne opinions o1 “Longheld” are
not regarded in Jamaica and in Me teaaing West Indian cricket com-
muniues as necessarily responsible, and so the minimum amount of
narm snouid be aone.

{ was privilegea to see the Barbados—Trinidad Tests here and
the Jamaica—briuish Guiana ‘lesis in Jamaica (“Longneid’ did not
see botn series) and there is no question of a doubt, vonn Trim de-
served his selection.

He maintainea a good pace und direction and always seemed to
be doing something with the bail wnether it was old or new. 1 was
among those who thought that he nad earned selection on the ly5v
West indies team: to Mngland bu: tne Selectors thougnt duterent.

GOODRIDGE NOT GOOD ENOUGH

OQODRIDGE I was hoping would make the grade. He was so
steady and young but absolutely guileless. Can “Longfield”
ne manage to take the eage of
either of the British GUianése openers Peter Bayley and Lesue Wight?
Surely on the strength of his performance ne was not better than
either King or Mullins and the electors should have no qualms of
conscience in leaving him out. ;

Johnson I tnink is better and perhaps fitter than Jones is to-day
and there is some justification for suggesting that Jonnson might have
peen selected in piace of Jones, 7

For my part I think that Johnson is the best pace bowler in the
West Indies to-day but who does not know that he gives up far too
quickly if conditions are not in has favour. Any fool can win but
1et “Longfleld” observe how some jose.

here is not much to choose between Guillen and Binns and as
I have already written, I would not have questioned the selection
of either of these when once it had been established that a seventeenth
place had been created specificaily for the inclusion of a specialist
wicket-keeper .

I find little difference in their respective batting ability since
neither can be regarded as a star but I tnink that Guinen Migut Lave
gained the edge and so selection for the place on the strengtn that he
nas already had experience of Keeping wicket to the wily stamadhin,

‘the most disgusting part of tne observations is the reierence lv
the fact that Atkimson gained selection because he is related to yohn
Godaard and will soon be related through marriage.

No greater insult could have been omered a man who has led the
West Inaies to victory in ‘British Guiana, Jamaica, india and 1
England. ‘1he sooner unis 1s torgotten, the more time one has to think
about the cemenung of imtercusonia: friendships, the most truitful
medium for the establishment of which is the cricket field.

GODDARD’S WELCOME

I WAS at Sabina Park when John Goddard arrived there for the
first British Guiana—Jiamaica Test and I prefer to remember

the spontaneous welcome the Jamaican crowd afforded him rather
than this despicable attempt to drag the grand game of ericket down
to gutter levels. ; 5

If ‘“Longtield” is thinking of West Indies players being pitch-
forked into West Inaes’ teams when they had no right to be there, I
might remind him that public memory is notoriously short but not
short enough to forget that Jamaican players have had more oppor-
tunity to show that they had no right being selected in West Indies
tearus than any other isiand,

Few will forget the burlesque performances of R. K. Nunes and
BE. A. Rae of the 1928 West Indies team to England, Ivan Barrow
in the 1939 West Indies team to England, and J. Cameron of the
1948—49 West Indies team to India.

“te

- oaeen
a

‘Yam sure that Atkinson gave a better all-round performance in
India and will wager “Longfield” any amount within reason that he
performs satisfactorily by literate standards on the Australian tour,

BARBADOS—JAMAICA FOOTBALL

j ITH the Jamaica—Barbados Intercolonial football tour just
around the corner, the Barbados players are hard at practice
in preparation.
ir. Wilkes in the three weeks at his disposal has already put
the invitees through their paces in, ball control, tackling, heading,
correct kicking of the ball, charging and the various phases of trap-
ping the ball. So far there have been two practices at Kensington
and one at Combermere School «nd to-morrow morning they meet
again at Kensington for another | wactice. ‘ ‘

In addition to this Mr. Willes has also circulated an instruc+
tional pamphlet aimed at instruc ing players to carry out necessary
weet Nha Winding up practices the players will indulge in team
tactics. Whatever is the outcome of the tournament it is true to say
that never before has there been any attempt at teaining a Barbados
team as such to take part in any one tournament.



A Cane Trailer



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Carlton Wins Easy Victory

SCORES FIVE GOALS TO Argentine F.
BEAT PICKWICK-ROVERS Team Practise

_ CARLTON se
in their first divi
i terday evening.

<



‘



SILVERSTONE,
Northamptonshire, May 5,

Reg Parnell of Britain was
awarded the International Trophy
Motor Race after the event had
been stopped owing to torrentia!
rain here to-day,

The stewards decided to award
the Trophy on positions gained
when the race was abandoned

Parnell drove an Italian Ferrari,

Duncan Hamilton of Biitsia oa
a French Talbot was second, and
Juan Manuel Fangio on an Argen-
tine Alfa Romeo was third.

The race started in bad condi-
tions, and pools of water made
miniature lakes on the . track,
while cars left a wake similar to
that turned up by speedboats, as
they careered round the course.

Drivers were soon soaked to the
skin, and cars not in the lead could
not see a thing owing to the spray
and rain. Eventually, all the cars
got away, if somewhat slowly and
it was soon apparent that new re-
cords could not be expected.

After most of the cars had com-
pleted five laps, it was realised
that conditions were impossible
and the race was called off.

Fangio who had earlier broken
the lap record in a heat had just
passed Graham Whitehead of
Britain to enter the sixth
lap when the race was stopped.
Whitehead was placed fourth,
having not quite completed five
laps,

Guiseppe Farina, the Italian and
World champion in an Alfa Romeo
‘was ninth, and the two other Alfa
Romeos driven by Noneti and
Sanesi finished tenth and sixteenth
respectively. The Swiss champion,
Baron Emanuel, was placed twen-
ty-first.

The leading French driver,
Louis Rosier in a Talbot was fifth,
while Johnny Claes of Belgium
also in a Talbot finished eighth.

Parnell received the Silver Tro-
phy and £500, Hamilton £250,
Fangio £100, Whitehead £75 and
Rosier £350.

The Italian champ was sad. The
Alfa Romeo team had been con-
fident of securing the premier
award.

“The weather robbed us. It was
bad luck”, one of their drivers
said.—Reuter.

Connell Wins
Frontenac Trophy

Lt.-Col. J. Connell won the
Frontenac Trophy for the second
time yesterday at the Government
Rifle Range. It was the fourth
occasion the trophy was shot for
and the previous winners were
Capt. C. R. E. Warner, Lt.-Col. J.
Connell and Mr, T, A, L. Roberts.

The trophy was given by R. M.
Jones & Co., agents for Frontenac
beer. Major A. De V. Chase pre.
sented it to Lt.-Col, Connell,

Conditions yesterday were gen-
erally good with a steady breeze
from the left, Lt.-Col, Connell at
first tied with Mr. G. F. Pilgrim,
each scoring 140 points out of 150,

Mr. Pilgrim and Lt.-Col. Connell
each had to take an extra shot to
decide the winner,

The eight best scorers were:





Capt, C. R. BE. Warner .

GIFT OF CRICKET
GEAR ARRIVES

The crate of cricket gear sent
to Barbados by players of Surrey
County has arrived in the island
for distribution to poor clubs of
Barbados. The crate was con-
signed to the Social Welfare
Department and arrangements
are being made to distribute the
gear in accordance with the
wishes of the donors,



BWIA = i:

1. Moke Business Contacts

da 5—0 victory over Pickwick-Rovers
football fixture at Kensington yes-

The Carlton front men played
all over their opponents goal and
registered four of their goals du-
ring the first half hour. Pickwick-
Rovers gave a better display du-
ring the second half of the game
but failed to penetrate the Carl-

"ee.
Carlton, “Brickie” Lucas
registered two of the goals while

Greenidge, Kenny Hutchinson
and Freddie Hutchinson each
sent in one.

Play

Carlton defended the goal from
the screen end and within five
minutes of play Greenidge their
centre forward, scored to put his
team one up.

The Pickwick-Rovers front line
now tried to get past the Carl-
ton defence in an endeavour to
ecualize but failed to do so
as Kennedy and Bright, Carlton
full backs proved too good and
sent the ball back midfield.

The Carlton forwards took over
from this point and Kenny
Hutchinson registered the second
when the goalkeeper Maurice
Foster failed to gather,

Carlton were now playing all

‘over their opponents’ goal and

“Brickie” Lucas after beating the
right full back, sent in a hard
one from just inside the area to
give Carlton their thitd goal.

It was not long after this that
the Carlton forwards got posses-
sion and Lucas notched the fourth
for Carlton,

Pickwick-Rovers had their first
good shot at the Carlton goal when
Jones their outside right sent in
a good effort which Warren
saved.

Pickwick-Rovers made one or
two efforts to decrease this lead
but without result and the interval
was taken with the score at 4—0
in favour of Carlton.

Second Half

On resumption Carlton were
first on the offensive and from a
through pass by Clairmonte,
Freddie Hutchinson on the left
wing centred accurately but
centre forward Greenidge headed
straight to goalkeeper Foster who
had no difficulty in saving.

Pickwick-Rovers now took over
and began to press for sometime.
Jones their outside right tested
out Warren with a good shot
which the latter saved and later
Taylor missed the upright by
inches.

Pickwick-Rovers launched an-
other attack and Taylor sent in a
grounder which Warren saved.
Carlton now took over and carried
the ball well down the. field, but
centre forward Greenidge, with
only the goalkeeper to overcome,
kicked wide.

From another raid by Carlton,
Reynold Hutchinson centred from
the right wing and his brother
Freddie converted from close
range to give Carlton their fifth

‘oal.
Pickwick-Rovers tried to de-
crease this lead but their efforts
were all in vain. The Carlton
front men again got possession and
were still on the hunt for goals,
but their forwards did everything
else except to score. The final
blast of the whistle found them
winners by five goals to love.
The Referee was Mr. Ben Hoyos.
The teams were as follow: —
Carlton: Warren, Bright, Ken-
nedy: Marshall, Clairmonte, Cox;
K. Hutchinson, R. Hutchinson,
Greenidge, Lucas, F. Hutchinson.
Pickwick-Rovers: M. Foster;
Hunte, Lewis; Kelly, Robinson,
Cuke; Jones, Hoad, Wells, Taylor,
Foster.

. ,
B'dos Friendiy Football
Association
Following are this week's fix-
tures:—
Mon,, May %th—Westerners “A”
vs, Penrode,
Referee: Mr, O. Graham
Tues., May 8th—Maple vs. Har-
kliffe.
Referee; Mr. R. O. Culpepper.
Wed., May 9%th—Westerners “B”
vs. Pe irode,
Rereree: Mr. J. Archer,
Thurs. May 10th—Maple vs. Har-
kliffe.
Referee; Mr. C. Reece.
Fri., May 11th—Pangers vs. West-
erners “A"’,



Referee: Mr. Robert Parris.
N.B.—All above matches will be
played at St. Leonard’s
Grounds, Richmond,

\
S

as



wait a}

At Highbury

LONDON, May 5.

Argentina’s “Mister Rugilo” as
the British Press calls him, stole
the limelight in al] three London
Saturday evening papers with a
flying save that made a most
astonishing photograph.

Miguel Rugilo, practising with
his team mates at Arsenal's ground
at Highbury this morning, was
caught by cameramen in an almost
horizontal position, feet out, arms
raised in a butterfly breast stroke
attitude, ball clenched ip his left
hand,

Driving rain showers, fleeting
sunshine and “heavy going” greet-
ed the Argentine players who had
their first practice match of 45
minutes this morning at the
famous Arsenal Stadium.

Tom Whittaker, the Manager of
Arsenal, who followed every move
of the game, summed up British
opinion when he said. “they all
look pretty fit and “they certainly
seem to be enjoying their workout.

“The weather does not seem to
have upset them and it looks as
if their fast positional play and
dribbling are as good as one was
led to expect. Their goalkeeping
too is of a very high standard.
Their defence, of course, is a
different system from our English
style, but they work it very well
If Boya always shoots -like he did
when he got that goal, the English
goalkeeper is going to have a hard
time.”

Conditions

The Argentine Captain com-
mented: “the conditions to-day as
you can imagine were a little
difficult for our boys.” “But may-
be we will get longer studs for
their boots if it is really heavy
going on Wednesday.”

“If the conditions are no worse
than to-day, they will not affect
us at all. The ball is no heavier
than we are accustomed to, but
these conditions do make it a little
harder to keep control of the ball
Still it can be done, and IT
have complete faith in the boys.”

—Reuter.

———————_——

Football Results

LONDON, May 5.
Doncaster Rovers 1 Sheffield United 1.
Hull City 5 Luton Town 3.
Leeds United 2 Swansea Town 0.
Manchester City 2 Grimstyy Town 2.
Notis County 2 Leicester City 3.
West Ham United 0 Cardiff City 0.
First Division: Aston Villa 6 Stoke
City 2.
Blackpool 1 Manchester United 1.
Charlton Athletic 1 Derby County 0.
Chelsea 4 Bolton Wanderers 0.
Newcastle United 1 Middlesbrough 1.
Portsmouth 2 Burnley 1.
Sheffield Wednesday 6 Everton 0,
Sunderland 0 Wolverhampton Wan-
derers 0.
Third Division Southern:
Torquzjy United 0,
Bournemouth 1 Reading 0.
Bristol Rovers 1 Northampton Town 1.
Colchester United 1 Port Vale 1,
Ipswich Town 2 Bristol City 0.
Newport County 3 Brighton and Hove

Aldershot 1

Norwich City 3 Crystal Palace |.
Southend United 5 Exeter City 1.
Swindon Town 2 Nottingham Forest 3.

Watford 1 Walsall 3.

Third Division Northern: Chester 0
Bradford City 2.

Lincoln City 4 Crewe Alexander 1.

Mansfield Town 2 Southport 2.

Rochdale 0 Darlington 0, Rotherham
United 3 Oldham Athletic 1,

Shrewsbury Town 4 New Brighton 2

Stockport County 2 Hartlepools United
0. Tranmere Rovers 1 Scunthorpe United
© York City 0 Halifax Town 0.



PROVISIONAL PLACES

FOR WORLD RACE

SILVERSTCNE, May 4.

Provisional starting grid posi-
tions for heats of the Internation-
al trophy race were worked out
on speeds achieved yesterday.
All practice laps to-day were
much slower. Fangio gained
number one position in the front
line for the first heat by virtue
of his 98.10 miles per hour trial
run yesterday. In number two
place is Robert Manzon, with
three British drivers making up
the front row.”—(C.P.)

Y.M.P.C. DEFEATS Y.M.C.A.

Y.M.P.C, defeated Y.M.C.A.
5° points to 5 when they played
Basket-Ball at Y.M.P.C. yester-
day evening. N. Thomas top
scored for Y.M.P.C. with 21
points, Other good scorers were
iu. Greenidge, 16, and D. Alkins,
mae V8





—!
mr

‘| offices?

~ Mobiloil

SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

| AT THE CROSS ROADS



| Racing Must Expand; Breeding

| Encouraged
BY BOOKIE

] ACKNOWLEDGE with thanks a copy of the
Provisional Programme for the B.T.C, race meet-
ing due to come off next August. The Turf Club is
to be commended for framing a programme so far
in advance of the dates ofthe meeting and also for
endeavouring to meet present day needs by drawing
up a four-day fixture.

duced a programme at such an early date and marked
n to suggestions for
changes, whether same are eventually discarded or adopted. In this
way they will not be in a position to tell owners and trainers that
their suggestions were not made in time. By the same method or
reasoning those owners and trainers with proposals would be well
advised to have same in some concrete form and not leave theni to
the atmosphere te be circulated.



Having pro !
it provisional, I take it that the Club will be ope:

an overall look at the programme it is one which immedi.
ately appears to have been framed along the most economical lines
possible to meet the present necessity for a four day fixture. On that
score the programme committee have done as well as they could,
Nevertheless the first point which might be queried is the fact that
on the third day there are only six races on the programme. Surely,
from an economical point of view, it would be beiter to have seven.
In the first place when the public learn that there will only be six
races they may not be so anxious to pay their entrance fee, whereas
they might consider it worthwhile if there were seven, It is a point

well worth further consideration.

OW one of the chief criticisms being bruited abroad is that there
N are only two races framed for class G. Therefore it would ap-
pear to be an opportune move if the third G class race agitated for
were placed on the programme on the third day, thus making 29
races in all instead of 28.

Such a move could not be regarded as uneconomical, first for the
reason stated above, and secondly because one G class race would
cost only $940.00. As the average profit of 5 extra races, (over and
above our usual total of 24) should, I imagine, be more than this
amount, it would seem that to bring in the extra G class races would
be feasible after all.

The main criticism against having three G class races is the fact
that there are only four horses in G and G2 who are likely runners.
Actually there are four who might be called certainties, but there are
also two more who might run. In addition there is a possibility that
some from Trinidad will come.

Taking

The next matter which engages the attention is that while the
programme has been framed in such a way that it eases the conges-
tion both in F class and among the two-year-olds, a similar claim
cannot be made with regard to the C class races, Yet, unless a special
handicap for C class Maidens is added, it looks as if this will be a
condition with which we will have to put up. As the cost of such a race
would be far more than the one for the Gs it cannot be advocated.
Consequently we must be like the Turf Club in hoping that all the
likely runners now in C and C2 will not start in one race if we wish
to see gafety for life and limb and a fair chance for each runner pre-
vailing in every race.

ONSIDERATION of the B.T.C. August programme cannot also

fail to bring to mind thoughts about the future of racing and
breeding in Barbados. Touching on the latter point first, it has been
said that one of the reasons for framing only three G class races is
simply that it is the first move towards the future policy of the B.T.C.
to exclude all half-bred races from our programmes. This means that
but for the purposes of producing horses to ride on the plantation and
polo ponies, breeders of local_half-breds will find no use for their
mares. Are these breeders to be discouraged? On the contrary, they
should be given every encouragement, But not to go on breeding
half-breds. They should be encouraged to breed thoroughbreds in-
stead.

Therefore before the B.T.C. sericusly consider discouraging local
| half-bred racing they should go out of their way to substitute some—
thing in its place lest those now interested drop out of the game for
good and all. Nothing could be more attractive to an owner of a half-
bred mare than the fact that he could replace her with a thoroughbred
one at the same price. Yet the initial price of those which are through
with racing out here seems to be inflated when compared with the
price they would fetch had they ended their racing days in England.
That many of them would do so in the iatter place with a maiden
certificate still intact is all too obvious. Consequently, it would not
be winning mares we would have to be after to get something equally
as good or better than our present importations.







ro obvious policy for the B.T.C. to follow then, if they do intend
to wipe out G class racing eventually, is to do something to help
local breeders get thoroughbred mares. They have already given
tore than enough help in the line of stallions. Therefore if it is too
much to ask for their financial aid, then what about using their good
I am sure it would not be asking too much.,

Touching on the racing part once again it is obvious that the
sport in Barbados is now at the cross roads. It has reached the stage
where we must decid¢ whether we are going to continue with it in
its limited proportions or make preparations which will aid its natural
and continuing expansion. It is not sufficient to say that 20 horses
have raced in one event at Arima therefore the same thing can be
undertaken here. Not long ago at the same Arima track which our
officials appear to be inclined to copy there was a spill in which four
horses went down. Two of them were killed, two more were injured
and all four jockeys were hospitalised, two of the latter being very
lucky to get away with their lives. This is the sort of thing which
is less likely to occur on a track with long wide stretches.

It is just such a track which is needed here if we continue to
see two dozen or more two-year-olds turn out to race each year, in
addition to the continued importation of English thoroughbreds. By
its own actions in support of breeding and racing the B.T.C, has
reached the stage where it compels itself to move to a new place of
abode. This is a tribute to its own farsightedness which the B,T.C
seems reluctant to accept. If only by such foresight the B.T.C.
could galvanise itself into action. Then I believe we would soon find
the answer to our problem,

E SWEEPSTAKE meanwhile continues to flourish. Series “T”

is on sale now and no doubt another will be coming up fairly
soon. This means that the first prize is well on the way to the figure
of $44,000 which it was in August last year, while if there is a last
minute rush, as is sometimes the case, we might well see the coveted
figure of $50,000 reached. Which reminds me of the number of
coveted figures which it has been hoped the first prize would reach
since it started somewhere back in thé 'twenties. First it was $5,000,
Then in August 1939 it hit $13,000. It then dropped back, but came
again and soon we were looking forward to a $15,000 prize. Aftce
that it continued to mount the scale and I can remember quoting
such figures as twenty thousand, then twenty-five thousand, followed
by thirty thousand. Yet when it reached forty-four thousand last



| year, I think we were as surprised as the time in 1939 when it
} reached thirteen thousand. A sign of the times no doubt. And a
sign to the B.T.C. that they have the confidence of the public, What
more could they wish for in search for a new track,
lft onesie rach Leech nnccinges age
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ONE DAY IT’S SHAW
—AND NEXT DAY
IT’S SHAKESPEARE...

1951





Right:

er hair hangs
the shoulder.

MANCHESTER, ae it has become the most

. cha''enging “ double first” of
UST before midnight .37-vear-old- wife's career. 7a
Vivien Leigh sat back Gennes ee oommainly ne
; ot at holed angers ure there,” said Miss
in her hotel suite tO Leigh tonight. “I have to face

consider the first of the tw
Cleopatras she will play i
a week

The

first, at

Manchester

tnem, No uve turning aside. But
how stimulating.”

She faces comparisons with
actresses who have tried one or
the other role before—but never

10
n

tonight, was the sly, squealing together .. . Edith Evans. Peggy
16-year-old coquette school- Ashcroft. even Mrs. Patrick
girl in Shaw's “Caesar and , Campbell.
Cleopatra.” Miss hopes the two Cleo-
In a week she tries the Patras will flow logically and
mature, patrician queen in Smoothly, ome from the other.
Shakespeare's “ Antony and Cleo- For Shakespeare, with its
patra.” greater Opportunities for chang-

And in London next month the
will follow each other

two plays
on successive nights.
formidable assignment
attempted before,

The suggestion was put to SI
Laurence Olivier

It is

never

half as a jest.

Woman Of The Week

ing emotions—and greater penal-
ties for failure—she will wear a
red wig, use a deeper voice.
Always Olivier will be there to
guide and advise her.
How does she see Cleopatra ?
She thought a minute, then she

a

it



FLAGSTAD Sails ©
Through The Storm

By EVELY

MAJESTIC as the Queen Mary,
blonde, Junoesque Kirsten Flags-
tad, reputedly the finest Wag-
nerian soprano of all time, sailed
through a 24-song recital at the
Albert Hall this week, welcomed
back to London by a wildly en-
thusiastie audience.

Next month at Covent Garden
she begins the last Wagner sea-
son of her career, Fifty-six next
July 12, Flagstad has decided to
take no_ chances with time’s
ravages. She means to relinquish
her mighty Wagnerian roles while
She is still at the apex of her fame
and form,

It was announced a few weeks
back that she was retiring from
opera altogether. But she changed
her mind, She will after all be
heard again at the New York

“Met.” next year — not in Isolde
and her other celebrated Wagner
parts, but in the less exacting

Alceste of Gluck, There will be
fewer operatic roles, and she will
become a mezzo-soprano giving
lieder concerts,



N IRONS

She met no antagonism in
London, where she made her first
come-back after the war with an
Albert Hall concert early in 1947.

But although she had a docu-
ment signed by the Norwegian
Chief Justice stating that she had
maintained a “steadfast patriotic
attitude” during ‘the occupation,
there was a terrific to-do when
she went on a nine-city tour of
the United States the same year,
Carnegie Hall bawled “Boycott
the Quisling!” while she sang
there. At Philad , fighting
broke out and stink-bombs flew
inside the concert hall. The
critics were sharply split into
Flagstad fors and againsts, The
againsts tore her to pieces.

Flagstad faced the sterm and
rode it out, returning to America
in successive years. In 1949 the
trustees of the San Francisco
Opera banned her because of
protests against her record by
the American Legion.

‘Provocative’



Lejt. MIND APPEAL.
wear for her Gimal scene in the Shake:
this fabulous ceremonial dress of gold
on the gorgeous plumage

w:g adds a contrast to Sh

wears fer her meeting with Caesar short trans-
i? grey muslin dress and barbaric jewellery.

Mer sandals are gold nei.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



VIVIEN LEIGH EMBARKS ON
A CLEOPATRA ‘DOUBLE’





Cleopatra at 37 will






1
im heavy black waves well below

said: “The genius of femininity
in_all tts guises.”

She should be able to present
that with ease.

But she also has to muke that
other tine come true. the line in
which Shakespeare says o! his
queen.

Age cannot wither her, nor
custom stale
Her mfinite variety

if Vivien Leigh can establish
that “infinite variety” she wil
have pulled off her “double
first” all right

Even in the middle of first

night nerves this evening she
had time for wa joke. The Shew
Play needs a revolving stage
electrically driven.

“That's the difficulty.” said
Vivien Leigh. “Whenever Larry
and I touch electricity it goes
wrong... .”

With the two tempting Cleo-
atras it will be quite a year. For
er film version of “Streetcar

Why Have

side



—It

consisted of champagne,
Pineapple juice, and oysters.
SITTERS GROTHER : Pe eee ent yy
THE West End is to 'yrone er, for he
become Broadway's has the longest “residential
Brother. Bette avis, Katharine Walification.
The Bogarts.

*
Hepburn,



Named Desire” is now ready to

the

ast @

sebtle
toings, Qnd au list of the right




speare qiay be shipped to Landon.
of the peacock. en] POSTSCRIPT : This was the Garland, Danny Kaye, this week
aw’s kittenish character. ‘SUPper Waiting im an ice-packed Beb Hope .. . the list grows.
MAN APPEAL, Cleopatra at iW Un resting im a fire bucket out What do they @o when they

in? Well, among other

cabs to dine after work.

é

curs.
fhe

the
the

judy



They Bannoli

Chevalier?
By SAM WHITE





time), and
hearty

for a joke at any
setting out to enjoy a
champagne supper.

She arrives at rehearsals punc-
tually to the minute, throws no
temperaments, turns on her
Niagara of a voice like a tap as
vequired.

Most singers spend many hours
dressing for a concert but not so
Flagstad. She gets ready as
quickly as a man and never
prinks in the mirror afterwards.
She could afford to dress lavishly.
But she is not much interested in
fashion although the diamonds





PARIS.
The refusal of: the United
States Government to grant a

visa to Maurice Chevalier has
caused little surprise in Paris.

Chevalier was said to have
signed the Communist-sponsored
Stockholm “Peace” Appeal, to
have sung at Communist fetes
and to have supported the Party
in other ways,

His case is not exceptional,
The singer Yves Montand was
refused a visa some time ago. A

score of French screen and stage
stars are known to figure; in the
American Embassy,’s “Black
Book” of “Cafe .Communists”
likely to apply for visas in the
future,

As for appearances on Commu.
nist’-platforms—purély ‘as -efiter-
tainers, of course—stars of such
stature as Edith Piaf and. a
hundred others readily and regu-
larly accept invitations to do so

Why? Most of them are
without any political convictions
and many could look forward to
profitable dollar contracts in the





1 ok
ur box-otlice
¢ ne

dressing-room
show. Not the first-night ‘swarm
(that’s easy), but the numbers in

word to apply
Holl



for antiques Discuss
figures and in-
tax... . Consider British
- And make the trek to
Aliens’ Office off Piccadilly

w register.

Marlene Dietrich prefers
00k ber own meals—and often
Wwitai
dinner
Oliviers
higher,
dack
certain Stand-up snack bar in the
Stra:

to

ises her cooking on Michael
ing. Everyone angles for a
invitation from The
(Notley Abbey rates
though. than Chelsea)
Bemy is attached to a

y ‘they count up their

Visitors after the

third week of the run.

For general adyice they go to

doyen

it seems an odd
t© him !—of the

London Express Service

and made cash donations to
Party funds.

A majority of those approach
ed inf this way yielded. Some did
not, ‘Among them was the ballet

star Serge Lifar.

What happened to Lifar? For
nearly four years after the
Liberation he remained. jobless
becatise any appearance of his

on a public stage threatened :
Communist riot.

Lifar has only recently been
able to resume his professiona)
career, but his appearances are
still interrupted by demonstra
tions and oceasional strikes of
Communist stage-hands,

Those not directly threatened
were suborned by more subile
means. The Communist Party
in France are a_ great national
force. They are the largest
single party in the French Par.
liament, and polled, 6,000,00(

votes at the last elections.

â„¢ *

They contrél a powerful Press;



MAY 6 NO. 170
The Topic
of
Last Week






ast Tuesday it was May Day
Joe, Robert, Louw; all three

| Went up the night to Queen's Park
To join the “talking spree”

The absence of the leader



On great things cried out; bait !
For some the brilliant speeches
Lacked, pepper, lime and salt

| They talk a lot of “moonshine”
| Poor things! thay missed the brain
| Of their most mighty leader
| ‘Twas all like

tainted cane”

| Joe looked up or the platform

| And Robert had his stare

| For there were missing comrades
And many an empty chair



What is the matter comrades
| Pray tell the people why
Saul's not among the prophets
| His voice was silent. why ¢
} ° . . .
| Well this is the position
It ever was like that

| Mongoose came to the
} Just to destroy the rat



island

Later the rat and mongoose

Ate chickens ‘til they glut

The dog too ate the fowl exes

| Then they ate the dog hut

| Lou said, Joe fits a parable

| Explain it all to me

But Joe said Loy beloved

| Are you too blind to see?

This mouth that I am wearing

Is big at any rate

It's made to close and open

I's not the Main-guard Gate
. *

A woman's mouth is different

fk vomits from the deep

The next door neighbour's business
Sometimes while fast asleep.

Well Thursday at the football
Joe, Robert and Lou too

Went down to see what Sparta:
With Notre Dame would do

When Spartan start the sparring
To kill poor Notre Dame dead
Joe said the famous Park team
Stop eating Enriched Bread

foor ‘Reece’ would miss the push bell
This followed by a fall
But Notre Dame was luckly

With just a few like “Paul”,

We tell you boys, we tell you
Start bucking up and play

Or the Jamaican youngsters
Will sureky win the day



So boys we'll meet at Seawell
This morning about eight
We'll all meet Bustamante
Of course Joe won't be late

. . * *
We'll welcome Bustarnante
That great West Indian Star
In our traditional manner
With a bottle of J. & R

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BUT a few weeks later they 4 - risk does not ‘play ball” E .
apes lifted the ban. Last year, wher, seeming) 2 7 MOREY isumdersianding about” thelr Party risks gelling bad notices 4/1! gpg YOU PREPARING ||| hel yc ybroerene,, most succesful, Correrponderes
YET the quality of that golden the British impresario. Rudolf Sms. references are political sympathies? a large section of the French individual training we equip you with the specialised knowledge
voice is still as fresh as’a sum- Bing, new general manager of eras Press, WE } ‘ou must have for a well-paid, key position
reer tnorning, | me the New York Metropolitan Opera, for good food, oatmeal, stout, » * * Finally, there are those stars— FOR THE BIG y Brat de he wane TRDLGe ton eceneinchshdltes
Golden voice it is Flagstad is Signed on Flagstad for the 1951 knitting and conversation. : : a small minority—who are con. i es eae
one of the world’s wealthiest Season that has just ended, his | Among her closest friends are The answer makes a curious yinced Communists, Among them ATHLETIC MEETING |
musicians, paid anything up to decision was called “provocative.” Bernard Miles, the actoy and story of blackmail, crude Press- js the singer Yves Montand, ALL TEXT BOOKS ARE
£1,200 for a single evening’s But there were no pickets, no producer, and his wife and three agentry and cupidity. It adds ay! YF We send you ws man
appearance in a strictly time- Stink bombs, this time. children. With them she has yp to an impressive tribute to He sets an exaraple by singing FRE @ volumes * the sinenk
tabled round of singing in New , Nevertheless, she has not sung entered into a gontract to give the power of the Communist songs with a strong propagandist Yetta oot i, W204
York, London, Paris, Barcelona, i" Norway since before the war, 20 performances next September party in France, favour, Montand’s most popular they become your personal nraparty.
Brussels Amsterdam Zurich 4nd it is unlikely that she ever will as Dido (in Purcell’s opera Dido In some cases the support song at the moment is a ballad ee
Milan Salzbure, , although she returns there for a and Aeneas), in the Mermaid given to the Party by French telling the sad story of a singer
Drama and controversy lay be- Short summer holiday at her Theatre which the Miles family stage and sereen stars is the who refuses to sing the kind of | 1S YOUR CAREER HERE?
hind her recent return to New house in sea-girt Kristian-sand. are installing in an old school yesylt of blackmail and nothing songs “that please the rich.” |
York’s Metropolitan Gpera. She “Noble” is the word the critics hall at the back of their house more, The ballad endg with Montand | iF NOT WRITE FOR FREE ADVICE
had to fight her way back there NOwadays use for her perform- in St. John’s Wood. Her only ‘ broken, unemployed, | A a bathe Draughtomanship, All Police, Special Course
against bitter opposition from ances, amd everything about fee—tfree lodging and two pints After the Liberation «many yontand is a long way from } Aviation (onciteering and Beate menene, Samia
Americans who alleged that she Flagstad is on the grand scale of stout daily. French stars found themselves tie preadline yet. He is among Wireless) Engincering, All Branches Quantity Surveying
collaborated with the Nazis in But there never was a_ prima ' in the embarrassing position of te three top paid music hall, and| Sere PE oe oe galegs Heres ganas Rodis (here wennre
Norway during the war. ; donna who behaved less like one The Throat being open to . collaboration (oporet stars im France. and Clerk of Works General Certificate of Secretarial Examinations
It started in 1942 when she left than this buxom rollicking Nordic, a , charges, At the time the Com- To avoid muscular pains Cambridge School Certifi- Education Examinations Shorthand (Pitman's)
the Metropolitan, where she had , A colleague ‘confessed that he ONE of the conditions is pat munists were the best organised Other popular themes with||} and to keep up your stride conteniy ona feltary Vea t Tancbere ot Handicrafts
been a member of the company had wept only twice in 10 years She will “let the management, or and most far-seeing of Resistance fellow:travelling singers _deal||} You should rub down with |]\ Shanty Mathematics Telacormuntentions
for six and a half years, to go to both times at Flagstad’s Isolde. any part thereof, look down her groups, Just as they went about with anti-American or anti-war| | Civil Enginaering Mining, Ail Subjects refity & Guilds)
her timber-merchant ‘husband, Then he met her. “She was very throat with a laryngoscope when~ seizing printing-presses and the themes, pot SACHOOL eer ee sets wikia ing Wiedlens Tolasrenhe ana
Henry Johansen, ill in German- jovial,” he reported, surprised and ewer they need encouragement.” pest office buildings, so they weit A Communist film magazine a Diesel Engines Plastics Telephony
occu yea Oslo. ” slightly disappointed. It is quite a throat. Sir Milsom jpout seizing names. recently published a_ list of thes i If your requirements are not listed above, write us for free advice
Bhe stayed with him through Champagne Too Rees the veteran Covent Garden ‘ Freneh stars who have signed the ||} THE GREAT PAINKILLER '
the rest of the war. In 1945 he I HAVE seen her, after going se nginge. ie nae — Gains, Dae nee teniee Stockholm appeal, They — ae a 2. a A ——————-Direct Mail to DEPT. 188-—
was arrested on a charge of through Brunnhilde’s last har- OP‘) > at. Ome DRE 20. er oa Te re bered 64, w!, @tls! : “ane ee
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PAGE SIX



May 6,

Sunday,

Coe

Caribbean Commission

THE Caribbean Gommission mets in
Barbados this week. The Commission was
created on March 9, 1942, and was known
as the Anglo Caribbean Commission. On
August 9, 1943 the United States State
Department issued a statement that the
British Government had generously offer-
ed to meet under reciprocal aid all claims
for compensation due to owners of private
property in the eight British territories
where bases had been leased to the United
States. “The generous offer of the British
Government” said the statement, “serves
to make these bases stand out not only as
effective weapons in time of war but also
as tangible reminders at all times of the
friendship and co-operation of the British
Government.”

This note of Anglo-American co-opera-
tion was sounded again in 1944 when the
first report of the Commission was publish-
ed. The affairs of the United States and
Britain in the Caribbean had become what
the report called “hopefully intermingled.”
Co-operation in solving common problems
was obviously needed, and the Commission
was formed to provide a mechanism for
the purpose. The Commission’s greatest
programme centred around the provision
of food supplies in face of an acute ship-
ping shortage, The West Indies Schooners’
Pool was organised and local Governments
were stimulated to produce more food.
Jamaica was able to cut rice imports en-
tirely. And Barbados increased the area
under food production to 35 per cent of the
land which has been under sugar cane
before the war. The Commission also gave
help in recruiting West Indian workers for
the United States.

Since the war the Commission has beei
feriding to concentrate on research through
the Research Council, and the name
was changed _ from ’ Anglo-Ameri-
can Caribbean Commission to
its shorter form when Holland and
France joined the organisation in 1946.
This was an event of outstanding import-
ance because France, Holland and the
United States all treated their West Indian
possessions in a way radically different
from that of the United Kingdom. The
United Kingdom has proclaimed its inten-
tion to give the British Caribbean territor-
ies either individually or collectively self-
government within the British Common-
wealth. Puerto Ricans have full protection
of the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of
the United States and elections are by uni-
versal suffrage. Citizens of the Virgin
Islands of the United States have had full
United States citizenship since 1932.

The first clause of the Dutch Constitution
defines the Kingdom of the Netherlands as
consisting of the territory in Europe and
the territories beyond the seas. These ter-
ritories overseas are “parts of the Kingdom,
inalienable parts, which cannot like mere
colonies (e.g. the British West Indian colo-
nies) be ceded or sold or put into any ex-
ceptional position outside the constitution-
al fabric without the Kingdom as a whole
being violated.”

Martinique and Guadeloupe are to-day
departments of Metropolitan France. The
development of French Caribbean territor-
ies is being integrated with the develop-
ment of France herself. To quote from a
correspondent in the Crown Colonist of
June 1946; “Carribean territories are faced
with the question: Can unity in diversity
be achieved without loyalty to a central
idea ? The Dutch have answered the ques-
tion by declaring equal partnership in the
Kingdom as the ultimate end of their pol-
icy. The French have answered the ques-
tion by an increase in the status of citizen-
ship, involving equality of treatment. How
far can the British answer the question by
holding out partnership in a Common-
wealth as the goal to be attained?” On
the answer to that question depends every-
thing, including the usefulness of the
Caribbean Commission in the area.

All the signs at present seem to indicate
that whereas the interests of French, Dutch
and American territories receive first-hand
attention in the parent metropolitan coun-
tries, the interests of the British Caribbean
territories are left to a Colonial Office
whose hands are already over-burdened
with the cares of Africa and other territor-
ies whose future development offers no
parallel to that of the West Indies. There
is no doubt that the Caribbean Commission
could become a regional organisation of
some importance to the area, and that its
usefulness would be strengthened by the
inclusion of the three independent repub-
lies of Cuba, Haiti and San-Domingo. But
it can do little until the United Kingdom
formulates a policy for the British Carib-
bean which is not so vacillating and un-
satisfactory as the present arrangement by
which the real interests of the Caribbean
are sacrificed to the gods of Quantity and
Fear in the Caribbean, while its economic
destinies are hammered out by the British
Board of Trade.

Bankruptcy of any effective policy in the
Caribbean makes the Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare organisation powerless
and the Caribbean Commission is unlikely
to produce anything as effective in time of
peace as it did in time of war, until the
other nations -participating know more



about British intentions, Meanwhile re-
search is a harmless method of spending
money provided by the metropolitan coun-
tries responsible for the area.



Strange

THE strange case of the British Union
Oil Company which gave the House of
Lords the opportunity for a most impres-
sive debate raises other questions for the
future. The British Union Oil Company
throughout its negotiations with the Gov-
ernment of Barbados stuck to the opinion
that more than one oil company operating
in an island the size of Bar-
bados would be undesirable,
The British Union Oil Company did
not win their point. But another British
Company not engaged in the uncertain
business of oil digging has been far more
fortunate than the British Union Oil Com-
pany. Under the Cables and Wireless
(West-Indies) Limited Act 1909 the Com-
pany, to quote Sir John Maude’s neglected
Report on Local Government in Barbados
is exempted from “all taxation parochial
or governmental.”

It does seem strange that the Govern-
ment of Barbados should have given the
British Union Oil Company such a hard
choice, when preferential treatment is
meted out to a company which has since
the Act under reference become the pro-
perty of the British Government. Sir John
Maude in his report was at pains to state
that “a special exemption of this kind is to
be deprecated.” Why should the Govern-
ment of Barbados show no concern about
the 41 year tax free holiday enjoyed by
Cable and Wireless Ltd., which also has a
monopoly in the area, and regard a British
Oil Company as a good sitting target for
the kind of negotiations which have not
resulted in their favour?

Nor is the preferential treatment en-
joyed by the nationalised British Company
of Cable & Wireless only remarkable when
compared to the non-preferential treat-
ment accorded the private British Com-
pany (the British Union Oil Company).

The Government of Barbados is continu-
ing the dangerous policy of refusing aid to
the hotel industry in the island at a time
when it subsidises unemployment by grant-
ing doles to temporary workers in the
United States. It can simultaneously
afford to squander $192,000 on 4,000 men,
and refuse to give investors in hotels the
opportunity to increase the island’s reve-
nue by expanding the tourist industry. But
it is quite content to let Cable and Wireless
go on enjoying an exemption which in the
words of Sir John Maude is “to be depre-
cated.”

If the sequel to the oil story turns out to
be similar to the nursery rhyme of old
Mother Hubbard and there is no-oil of
great quantity in Barbados, those respons-
ible or acquiescent in the Government’s
failure (unique in the Caribbean) to in-
crease employment in Barbados by encour-
aging more tourists who only require more
hotel accommodation to come here, cannot
hope to escape censure.



Mistimed Criticism

THE critical attack on the B.A.F.A. offi-
cials appears to be peculiarly mistimed.
For the first time since the Football Asso-
ciation came into existence in 1910, the
officials, within recent months, have been
making special efforts to develop the game
in the island. During the past two years

the games were so organised that the
Association, at the end of the season, could
show reasonable profits—a result that had
almost been unknown in the past, The
officials quite rightly are still not satisfied
with the financial position of the Associa-
tion, nor with the standard of play. They
realise that the standard of play and fin-
ance are interrelated and that the condi-
tions under which football is played in this
island must be changed if the standard is
to be improved. The Association must plan
for the future. The football season must
not be played in the dry season and the
game must be played on a full size ground.
The Association realises that changes such
as these can only materialise when it
possesses its own playing field.

These improvements cannot be made
overnight, nevertheless because a football
ground is not immediately forthcoming,
the public must not infer that the Associa-
tion is not interested in the matter. They
are preparing behind the scenes, They
have invited, ona reciprocal basis the foot-
ball team of the Kingston Cricket Club to
play a series of matches in Barbados later
this month, and in order that the public
can be assured of getting good value for
their money, and also that the Barbados
team will not be disgraced, the Association
has instituted an intensive training course.
They have been fortunate in getting the ser-
vices of a capable coach in the person of
Mr. G. Wilkes, of the Lodge School, a play-
er of considerable experience of football
in England. The course which extends over
a period of three weeks is planned to build
up physical fitness, improve technique, and
demonstrate the finer points of the game.

The officials of the B.A.F.A. and the
players are making strenuous efforts to
improve the standard of the game in Bar-
bados. The public, too, can help by flock-
ing in their thousands to watch the inter-
club and intercolonial matches and in this
way assist in building up the fuhds so
necessary, if the Football Association is
ever to acquire its own playing field.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

One Night With Bustamante

he
All 1 know about Mr, Busta
mante is that he ig a good

companion, I have never spent
a more pleasant social night in
the Caribbean than the night of
the British elections. There
were about six of us, sitting on
the American style upholstered
couches of the Santa Maria iu
Grenada, The wireless was kept
on until two and Busta and Miss
Longbridge (his secretary) ~pro-
vided the drinks, No one else
was allowed to pay. It is. im-
possible to recapture the atmo-
sphere of excitement and good
fun, of that distant night oi
February 1950. But no one
sould forget the charm, tne
gaiety of William Alexander
Bustamante. I first saw Mr.
Bustamante in the Chamber of
the House of Lords, which the
Commons were then using. David
Gammans went up to chat with
aim and Arthur Creech Jones,
hen His Majesty's Secretary of
State for the Colonies, was not
slow to pay his respects. Busta
never forgot Creech Jones and
when Mr. Creech Jones failed tv
get a seat in the elections of
1950, Busta was one of the first
to send him a_ cable regretting
the fact. Soon after Mr. Creech
Jones and Captain Gammans left
Busta’s box, I looked up to see
Bustamante, his white tie flapping
in excitement, waving with
enthusiasm across the House to
the other side of the gallery, He
was waving at Lord Milverton,
the man who jailed him for 1?
months, Lord Milverton also
tet him out of jail and Bustarmiant+
tells the tale that he “never
holds it against him.”

In Grenada, Busta was _ fas-
cinated by the magnificent prison
set 500 feet on a hill looking
down on the capital of St
George’s. “That ought to have
been a first class hotel,” he told
me. Busta seldom sheds his
white tie which matches his hair
In Grenada he wore a white tie
with his pepper brown tweeds
by day and wore it with his more
formal black at the Governor's
cocktail party for the sugar
delegates, Busta loves people
and he will walk out on anybody
just to please people. He was
talking to me one moment with
hands outstretched and his
elbows sticking out of his jacket
sleeves when carnival _ revellers
drove up to the hotel shouting
for Busta. The next I saw was



By George Hunte

Busta, six feet two of him, receiv-

ing the plaudits of the crowd
Busta himself tells the story of
how the people missed seeing

him in St. Kitts, when he passed
through on his way to Grenada
In a letter rece'ved in Grenade
he learnt that emplorers had

Mr. Rustamante



. good companion.

given employees the day off
come and welcoine him,
ployers and emp‘oyees
their thousands”,
in, Grenada: ‘They
bicycle, on foot, in
some walked all day

came

and

motor cars"
they he is a good companion.



It is impossible in a news
paper article to echo the voice
and intonation of Bustamante. J
enjoy listening to him in) much
the same way as I enjoy watcli-
ing a rollicking good actor like
George Robey on the stage. No
two men could be more unlike
but there is something of the
showman in both,
a mistake however to think of
Bustamante as a showman and
politician only. He speaks to
the gallery, but even
sandwiches in some good horse
sense. The night he walked out
on “Pop” Beasley’s dinner which
was attended by
of the Windwards and his wife
Busta told a public meeting in
the market square of St
George’s “you've got to work hard
if you want to make good.
What could be better advice?
But Bustamante is confusing
until you get to know him, if
you ever get to know him. “I
am pro American”, Busta _ told
me in the lounge of the Sante
Maria, “I love the British, but
what has the British Governmeni
done for the colonies? Nothing
but make them a dumping ground
for British manufactures.”

Publicly the same day he was|%

eooiing down some of the hot
heads who were
another Boston “tea party.”
“What,” he asked, “is the use of
throwing mud at
whom you are going to bargain?
We want to do _ business with
Britain. You don’t throw mud
at people with whom you de
business.” If I had to guess the
secret of Bustamante’s great
popularity (and he is the. only
politician in the area who has @
West Indian following) I wouila
put it down to his sense of good-
will, His gesture in distributing
thousands of bananas to poor
Londoners in the East End wa:
the action of a man witha big
heart. And only a man with ¢
big heart would describe his
secretary Miss Longbridge ~ a:
“the brains behind the line aac
wicked with the pen.” Those who

to know Bustamante best say thai
“Em- they don’t
came in stand with him nor how to tke
Busta told me what he says, but no one wiio has] ¢
on spent even a short time in hisj;$
admit that|@
“Things | §

know where they

presence can fail to

were so disappoiated to find me happen wherever Busta goes,” 1s

gone.”

no bad way to pay him tribute,



SITTING ON THE FENCE

“TI have instructed my _ staff
that if a woman comes through
the turnstiles with four children
and no money to spend she shall
be treated with the same consid-
eration as would be given a for-
eign ambBassador,”—Major Les-
lie Joseph, director of the Festi-
val Gardens,

AN I do anything for you,
' madam?
You can mind your own ben
ee ‘or a start. '

ought you might like to take

the children on the roundabouts
or the dodgem?

wo is a fine thing, ain’t

t?

Wherever you go in the gardens,
madam, you will be welcomed as
if you were a queen and your

charming children princes and
princesses.
Coo, ark at im, Willie, be-

have, Ow many times ave I
told you what your andker-
chief's for?

Perhaps the dear little fellow
would like some refreshment?

If you're talkin about Willie
he never stops eating from the
time he gils up till the time he
goes to bed with the iccups. But
we just don’t happen to ave the
dough-ray~me. See?

Pardon madam?

The old bees and oney, if you
understand plain English. The
stuff that goes chink-chink and
rustle-rustle, Got it?

I comprehend, madam. But if
you are troubled by a temporary
financial embarrassment, may I
assure you on behalf of the direc-
tors that no ambassador from a
foreign State, with unlimited ex-
penses, could be more certain of
a warm and sincere welcome at
the Festival gardens?

You swallowed a dictionary
for your dinner?

As proof of my earnest desire to
make your visit a memorable one,
may I offer to escort you, or your
delightful elder daughter, free of
charge, on a trip through the
magic cave?

Oh, so that’s the lark, is it?
After my Elsie, eh? I’ve read
about your type in the papers,
If you will trust me, madam,

I wouldn't trust you if you
was handcuffed at the bottom
of a coalmine. Come along,



BY NATHANIEL GUBBINS

Elsie. Pull down your skirt and
do up your coat. There’s wolves
about.

Englishman’s House

“My husband goes out three
evenings a week, plays golf on
Saturdays and Sundays. When
at home he sleeps in a chair.
What am I io do about it?—
Letter to a sogial problenv
column,

HERE are so many things you
can do about it that I don’t
know where to begin.

Pins are an obvious weapon. So
is a jug of water. I advise you
to be more subtle.

As men are supposed to like
wives who remain young and kit-
tenish, be young and kittenish. Be
as young as three years old.

As he snores in the chair oppo-
site, throw yourself back to child-
hood and play that lovely game of
opening the eyelids and saying,
“Oo’s got boo eyes.” Or brown
as the case may be.

If this fails, there is still the
enchanting pastime of “fingers up
your nose.” As any three-year—
old will tell you, the first and
second fingers of either hand must
be forced as far as possible up the
nostrils until the victim howls for
quarter. If you wear long nails
the results will be startling.

Should he drov off to sleep
again, get a pencil and a piece of
paper, stick the pencil down his
open mouth as far as the tonsils.
When he wakes half-choked, ask
him to draw a horse, a pig, or a
bunny rabbit on the piece of paper.

If sleep overcomes him once
more, play your last card. Climb
on his knees, as children do,
scraping the shins, treading on the
soft underbelly. This is painful
enough when a two stone three-
year-old is the climber.

Your 11 stone and sharp high
heels will put him off sleeping
anywhere, except in bed.

Political Sensation
7 Government circles
will be amazed at the confir-
mation of a plot to unseat them
which I have supported ever since

they were elected in 1945,

OUR READERS SAY:

Did Not Blame Big
Merchants

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—i am a very busy man,
and do not have enough time to
complete my routine duties in
twenty-four hours, but in the
interest of truth and justice, I
must challenge your leading arti-
cle in today’s paper which accused
me of blaming the bég merchants
for rising cost of living.

Your article is a complete dis-
tortion of my statement, which
cannot be supported by any of the
large number of hearers or any
reporter who listened to my
speech,

In dealing with the rising cost
of living, I pointed out that it
was not fair to blame the Govern-
ment for it; because the world
market conditions were beyond
the control of this Government,

Moreover, I went on and pointed
out that at present the Govern-
ment was subsidising Foodstuffs
te the extent of over one million
dollars and through the subsidy,
the prices of certain food items
were kept at their present prices.

I read the items listed below to
the meeting.

This was done to point out that

the Government was aware of the
rising cost and without this sub-
sidy the cost of living would have
been higher





Readers who write letters
to the Editor of tha
“Advocate” are asked to
note that this newspaper
does not normally publish
letters which are not exclu.
sive to this newspaper.

Contributors to OUR
READERS SAY who write
under a nom-de._plume are
reminded that their names
must be sent to the Editor
as a sign of good faith,
Names are never disclosed

but are treated as confiden-
tial by the Editor, except in
Signed letters.





I also stated that owing to the
complex world conditions and the
shortage of certain basic raw ma-
terials, items like Sulphyr, Zinc,
Rubber, Tin Plate, Cotton and
Woollens had risen by astronomi-
eal figures on the New York

markets, and, therefore, it fol-
Item Present Retail
Price
Fish Salted 22c. per 1b
Flour es os a ee
B.A.F. ‘% ws i re
Pork-salted (a) .. 17. ,,
|) Pee ea ce
(O}iiva:) BBG 5 ”
CG). ee
(e) «. 29.
(f)- .. 88e,

u »”

T am able to reveal that their
chief opponent is not Mr. Winston
Churchill, nor the Right-wing
Press, nor even Sir Waldron
Smithers.

It is Old Mother Nature her-
self.

When the wind-blown hag
visited the Sea Nest one bitter
April morning, she confessed that
she had fixed the weather for
seven years, with the avowed in-
ner of getting the Government
out, j

“T arranged droughts when the
crops needed rain,” she said, ‘and
rain when the crops needed sun-
shine.”

“Did you arrange last win-
ter’s rain and the spring floods?”
“Of course. I believe I have

drowned most of the early sown
wheat and hope to reduce the na-
tional milk yield so that the Food
Ministry’s promise of cream this
summer will not be fulfilled.”

“Were you responsible for the
hard winter which destroyed
thousands of sheep?”

“I regard that as one of my
greatest achievements. I think
nearly a million sheep and cattle
perished in the snow. This put
the meat ratiom in peril and
forced the Government into
a difficult position with’ foreign
meat importers.”

“What are your plans for the
future?”

“I shall certainly send a lot of
rain to ruin what’s left of the har-
vest.”

“May I ask you why you're
doing this?”

“Because, my dear man, I’m a
Conservative.”

“What will be your attitude
if the Government are defeated
at the next General Election?”
“Then I shall send rain in the

autumn, dry weather for the win-
ter plough, light showers and
warmth to nourish the spring
sowings and hot sunshine for the
ripening corn.”

“Do you think you will get
the Government out?”

_“T nearly did it last time. Next
time I shall succeed. They can
make their speeches, write their
articles, present their arguments.
But I, True Blue Mother Nature;
am the one to do it.”

London Express Service,



lows that an island importing
large quantities of goods must
face rising prices.

I never blamed any big, small
or medium merchants for the in-
crease in cost of living, and I must
point out that my status in life is
by my conviction, character and
sincerity in the cause of the work-
ing class movement that I have
chosen freely, without the help or
assistance of any big merchant.
Whenever I have cause to blame
the big merchants for anything, I
shall do so without fear,

T am indignant about your
article because it is untrue and
you claim that your paper is fair,
therefor give a true and accurate
report on people,

Finally, criticise me or my Party
at any time, but do not accuse us
of statements we have not made.

F. L, WALCOTT,
Barbados Progressive League,
Bridgetown,
May 4, 1951.
Subsidy Retail Price

without Subsidy
$12.90 pr. blk. 234c, per Ib

$ 2,36 lle.

94ce. per bag 8e. ar}
Increase

$1300 per Bri. Te. per

Amount voted $1,076,780,00.

It would bo] \
then hel%

the Governor] %

agitating for| $

people with] §

That’s




3 ft.









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SUNDAY,

OUTSTANDING

MAY 6,



Although the present owner cf
Drax Hall, the son of Admiral
Hon. Sir Reginald Aylmer
Ranfurly Pli tt »Erle












Drax, K.C.B., f

the foundation of

fortune was made in Barb:
Oldmixen, the historian

West Indian says that Colonel
Drax, from a tock of three
hundred pounds, ais 2d the
greatest estate of any planter of
his time except Mr. -Richard
Walter.

Col. James Drax, who was
created a Baronet by Charles [l,
pisyed an important part in the
history of this island, His estate,
Drax Hall, was one of the first

spots of ground to be cleared and
cultivated, and he was one of the



chief people responsible for
turning Barbados into a “sugar
island

In Barbados there was a pre-
suce of development con-
¢ g for generation. The
f crops planted were tobacco,



cottoa, indigo and ginger together
with food crops such as plantains,







ava, beans and corn. Culti-
vation at this time was dene by
smallholders, a condition which

the advent of cane altered, lead-
ing the appearance of the
capitalist planter and the dis-
placement of the smallholder,

It is recorded that for several
years the art of sugar boiling
remained a secret, known only to
Drax and a few other gentlemen;

to





who had employed a Duteh
planter from Brazil to superin-
tend their wor Major Scott,
writing in’ 1667 says “€ok.. Holdup
was the first that made sugar in
Barbados, but it came to little
till the great industry and more
thriving genius of Sir James
Drax engaged in that great
work.”

There is no record of when
Drax Hall was actually — built,
but tradition fixes it at about
1650 The architecture is
Jacobean, and although Schom-

burgk did not like it, saying that
“its appearance imparts a gloomy
character to the whole landscape





around,” I found it a charming
mansion.

The house is surrounded by
trees—evergreens, tamarinds and
mahoganies—and when the wind-
mill was working, Drax Hall
must h looked very pic-
turesque. The entrance to the
house is off centre to the West,

and at the East there is a square



drawing room. To the North
there is a range of three equal
rooms, the centre one containing
the magnificent stair. This is the
usual location of the stair in a
Jacobean house,

The stair hall opens into the

trance hall through a_ broad
elliptical arch in the style- of
ducobean codwork, The wood-
work, have been im-



which may









ported, shows E ish country Ja-
cobea lip at its best.
“The air” Waterman, “is



an excellent example of the best
design of the period The
English quality of the kouse is to
be seen in this stair. There Is. ng
other example on this side of the
Atlantic that displays com-

as

1951



HOMES=5



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

(aa eet a

DRAX HALL, ST. GEORGE

pletely the characteristics
Jacobean stvir building.”

of

Writing
Schomburg
“The - forest
property
formerly

ja tne last century,
said of Drax Hall
attached to the
seems to have bee:
of freat extent, and is

famed for traditional tales which
are still related by the working

class. This forest has now nearly
disappeared; a small portion only
clothes the’ ‘precipitous heights;
and the level ground near the
foot of the cliff, which was former-
ly covered with trees has proved
too valuable to be allowed to re.
main overgrown only by bri{ih-
weed with here and there the tim.
ber cf a fustic tree.”

It is said that the mastick tim-
ber frem the originel forest
fo:med the beams of Drax Hall
and was used to make the stair.
In thé loft I saw those old beams,
rough hewn with an adz. The date
on the lead water-heads of the
mansion is 1756, and one ‘of the
outbuildings bears the date 1774.
Like St. Nicholas Abbey, Drax
Hall has a fire-place, but it we>
built up many years ago. During
its existence, Drax Hall has
weathered several severe hurri-
canes, and it is said that either the
great hurricane of 1780 or that of
1831 swept away the upper part
of the south facade of the mansion.

Sir James Drax seems: ‘to have
lived like a prince. Occasionally
he used to kill an ox, an example
few of his fellow planters could
afford to follow since oxen were
used in cultivating the land. He
used..to.eat extremely well, For
instance this is the second course
at one of his banquets: A dish of
marrow bones, ‘potato pudding,
a leg of pork, fricasse of pork, ‘a

CYPR

Pictures

by



IAN. LaTOUCHE

THE SITTING ROOM with the dining room in the background. When
Sir James Drax held his banquets the table used to stretch the whole

length of the two rooms.

dish of bailed chickens, shoulder
of a young goat dressed with his
own blood and thyme, a kid with
a pudding in its belly, a sucking
pig with a sauce of the brains, a
shoulder of mutton, a pastry of
the side of a young goat, a loin of
veal, three young turkeys, two
capons, two hens with eggs in a
dish, four ducklings, eight turtl,
doves, three rabbits, and two Mus.
covy ducks larded and seasoned
well with pepper. and salt.

The means of recreation how

cver—apart from eating — were
but scant. There was neither hunt
ing nor hawking, to which the
Manters had been addicted in
“ng and. All that Drax seems _ to
have been able to do fer sport was
wo make some of his negroes play
it rapier and dagger, which they
lid very skilfully. He also got
some amusement by putting a
Muscovy duck into a pond, and
getting some of the best swimmers
among his negroes to try to catch
he duck in the water.



DRAX HALL boasts the finest Jacobean staircase this side of the Atlantic.

Met Death Through

Negligent

A NINE MAN JURY a

a labourer of Hall’s Road,

through the negligence of
of Hanson Hill,

Douglas to reverse the lorry

to death.

The inquest into Brewster's
death was held at District “B”
Court, St. George yesterday morn-
ing. The Coroner was Mr. C. W.
Rudder, Reynald Brewster a 19-
year-old labourer of Halls Road
was killed on the spot on April 27
when the motor lorry G.253 rolled
over him while he was working at

Francia Plantation, St. George
about 3.30 p.m. The driver of the
lorry was FitzHerbert Douglas

who is also owner.

A post mortem examination was
performed at the District “B”
Mortuary and this showed that
the deceased died from shock and
haemorrhage from injuries re-
ceived.

When the inquiry which lasted
for over three hours was started
yesterday, first witness called was
Jennie Wooding, a labourer of
Halls Road, St. Michael. She said
that on April 27 she was working
at Francia Plantation canefield
and was helping with the loading

of canes on the lorry G,253.
Sometime in the afternoon the
rain began to fall and she took

shelter under the platform of the
lorry.

Other workers
platform of the
Two men she_ recognised were
stooping next to her whom she
knows by the names of Harding
and Gooding. The deceased was

went under the
lorry with her.

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St. George,



WE HAVE LARGE STOCKS OF

ARDATH cork.tTierep
CIGARETTES

32¢

Cartons of 200 for $3

Directions

greed that Reynald Brewster,

St. Michael, met his death
Vernon. Gooding, a labourer
who directed FitzHerbert
G 253 which crushed Brewster

under the truck and the
was covered with trash,

aiso
ground

Sheitered Under Lorry

Douglas who was driving the
lorry told them to come from un-
der the truck and she did so.
After Douglas spoke to them he
reversed the truck and then she
heard Gooding said “Skipper,
look you mash this fellow.”

They usually call Douglas
“Skipper”. Douglas got out of
the truck and went to the spot
where Brewster was lying.
Brewster appeared unconscious
and was lying between the front
and rear wheels of the truck.
She could not remember hearing
anybody telling Douglas to re-
verse the truck. om

Edson Harding, a truck hand of
Kew Road, St. Michael said that
on April 27 he was loading cane

on the lorry G.253 in Francia
Plantation canefield, St. Geprge.
Other men were assisting, him

with this job and Brewster was
one of the men, About 3.30 p.m,
the same day a heavy fall of rain
came and he took shelter under
the platform of the lorry.

While under there he noticed
Gooding and Brewster. After
a time Douglas the driver and
owner of the truck told them to
come from under the lorry. He





BEFORE
THE PRICE





we








6c.

00
in

ADVANCES 4!

rushed from under the lorry and
shortly after Douglas reversed the
lorry. While the lorry was revers-
ing he noticed that one of the rear
wheels had rolled over Brewster's
body. There were about three
tons of cane on the platform of
the truck.

To the Coroner: Harding said
that the lorry had travelled about
six feet eight inches before it had
rolled over the body of the
deceased who was lying on the
ground.

FitzHerbert Eckley Douglas, the
owner of the motor lorry G—253,
and who lives at Dash Valley, St.
George said that on April 27 he
was hauling cane from a field at
Francia Plantation, St. George.
About 3 p.m. the same day there
was a heavy rainfall and the
labourers that were working in
the field ran under the platform
of the lorry to take shebter. This
is a habit of theirs when the rain
is falling.

“Come Back, Skipper”
After the rain had nearly fin-
ished he told them to get from
under the platform of the truck

as he was going to move it. He
started the engine and when a
voice told him “Come back
Skipper” he reversed the truck.
He had not reversed the truck
very far when he heard a man
said “Hold Skipper, a boy get

mash.” He stopped the truck and
on going to the side of the lorry
saw Brewster who had _ been
working with them for about
three days in the field, lying in an
unconscious state on the ground.*
There were about two tons of
cane on the platform of the lorry.

To the Jury: Douglas said that
the man who told him to reverse
was Vernon Gooding who usually
directs him when he is reversing
the truck in canefields. As far as
he knows Brewster was not on

i?

bad terms with anybody working
on the truck.

Douglas said that he-has been
driving lorries for about 19 years.

After this evidence was heard,
Capt. Grant then informed the
Coroner that he had no more eye-
witnesses to produce. The Coro-
ner then summed up and the Jury
after a 20-minute deliberation re
turned their verdict.



3 IN HOSPITAL AFTER
DANCE

(From Our Own Corresponden
ST, GEORGE'S, May 3. |
Three men were taken to hospi-

tal after a.dance held as part of
the M.M.W.U.’s wage victory
celebrations. The police are to

take action,

Mr. M A. G. Hanschell, new
Director of Agriculture, arrived
in the colony last Sunday eveni:
from St, Vincent where he was
formerly Superintendent of Agri-
culture, Mr. Hanschell, second son
of Mrs. Hanschell of ‘“Bosvigo’
Barbados has served in British
Guiana and Sierra Leone.





VISITING GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, May ¢
Mr. O. W. Roskill, an Indust:
Consultant from the United King
dom, is on a_ second visit to
Grenada after v ing St. Vin
cent, where he was accompanied
by Mr, Alistair _McLeod-Smith,
Financial and Economic Adyise#
to the Windward Islands. He is
holding further talks with th
Economic Development Commi
tee of the Legislative Council on
the possibility of establishing new
industries in the colony.







Sizes 20 to 24. Each





BY

FAN GALE



arch.



THE WOQDWORK of this arch, which may have been

imported,

shows Bnglish country Jacobean craftsmanship at its bost



DURING either the great hurricane of 1780 or that of 1831 the upper
part of the south facade was swept away.

American Column

A FRIEND SPEAKS
FOR BRITAIN

(From R. M. MacCOLL)

NEW YORK,
The shrewd voice of a staunca
friend of Britain was raised again
to-night—at a time when there is

much criticism of Britain in
America,
Lewis Douglas, ex-ambassador



to London, told 1,100 people gath-
ered in the Waldorf-Astoria'’s
Grand Ballroom:

“The attitude of caution which
3ritain has revealed towards cer-
tain proposals in the Far East has
caused a certain number of people
to raise their eyebrow

“There are various reasons for
what has appeared to be Britisn
caution, It partly reflects an atti-
tude common to several members
of the Commonwealth, including
Canada and Australia.”

And Douglas added: “Britain
and the United States need each

other far more to-day than at

iny time in their history

“Ln between the two maior seat
of power—the U.S.S.R. and the

United States in the West 3ritain
represents the last reliable bastion

of strength between the Iron
Curtain and oup.own shores.”
THE big-circulaticn New York

Daily News does not often compli-

ment Britain. But its main edi-
torial admires us for being “far
wiser and more realistic about



gambling” than the Americans

It gives Britain unstinted praise

for the way we do it, and ends
How long do you suppose it will
be before we get as smart as the
British on this?”

BUT the Hearst newspapers say
“Why are British propagandists
falling on us just now like a plague
of locusts? Wherever you go there
is an Englihman to make a speech
as though we needed instruction
The point is—do we have to lister

o”

to them?

IN MICHIGAN there is a com-
plete town up for sale. Its name
is Nahma and its population is 750
Neason; After 70 years’ operation
ihe town’s only industry, a Jumber
company, is closing. Price, includ-
ing an airport and golf course—a |



quarter of a million dollar
AMERICA is laughing
waggisn G.I. who, mindful of |
army anxiety about being sent |
home, stuck up the following dog- |
gerel on a Korean telegraph |
pole:
‘Disagree with Harry if you
wanna get back,
You don’t think it's true? Then |
ask Ole Mac!”
AFTER the Cambridge rowing
ying everybody is now hoping
that Oxford—with their stay
miler’, 22-year-old Roger Ban
nister—will do it again. Bannister

races against America’s best, Don
Gehrmann and Fred Wilt, in Phil-
adelphia on Saturday



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ts $1.47
Each $2.80

CAVE

SHEPHERD
S& Co., Ltd.

10—13, Broad St.



i
|





PAGE SEVEN



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T'S CHEESE ner tin 57
VIENNA SAUSAGES-—ver tin j 61
KRAFT CHEESE & MACARONI—per tin 37
SAGO & TAPIOCA—ver lb. +22
HEINZ SPAGHETTI & CHEESE—lze. tin 40
HEINZ OVEN BAKED BEANS WITH PORK 50
IMPERIAL SLICED CLING PEACHES—per tin 64
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@



"thee ea. Aaa







PAGE EIGHT



The astonishing

LADY WILDE

By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

SPERANZA: a biography of Lady Wilde. By Horace Wynd-

ham. Boardman.
SCAR WILDE'S mother
pitying or

15s. 247 pages.

receives irom history a shrug,

amused. She deserves something better—

and a biography more polished than Mr. Wyndham’s, She

was a tragedy queen playing her part in a painful farce.
Her preposterous figure takes on a kind of grandeur

irom her deep sense of are: She believed in the innocence

of her husband and her son.

Sir William Wiide was Dublin's
leading oculist and gallant. By a
half suecessful operation, he
Bernard Shaw's father squint
outwards instead of inwards. As
the result of extra-professional
activities, he fathered a brood cf
illegitimate children.

As may happen to the most
careful (philanderer, Sir William
ence cayght a tartar, Mary Jose-
phine Travers. Lady Wilde wrote

letter to this young woman's
father, declaring that his daugh-
ter was employing low newspaper
boys to disseminate offensive
placards alleging an intrigue be-
tween Sir William and herself.
Miss Travers sued for libel.

Her evidence showed that, at
a critical moment during her at-
tendance as a patient in Sir

William's consulting room, she
had fainted, “Pray rouse yourself
or we shall both be ruined,” she
heard the oculist say as she came
to. Miss Travers alleged only one
of them was ruined

She was, in the end, awarded
a farthing damages. Sir William
was not permitted by his counsei
to give evidence. As Professor
Tyrell, the modernist theologian
said: “He ‘is a pithecoid*® person
of extraordinary sensuality and
eowardice, and funking the wit-
ness box left him without a de-
fender.”

In fact, Sir William lived ‘on
in Dublin, respected and affluent,
When he died, his widow fled to
London, where, in a gilded laurel
wreath, two crinolines and = an
eriental scarf she held a literary
salon

Curtains were drawn to ex-
clude the daylight; if the gas-bill
had not been paid, the room was
lighted by penny candles; it was
dreadfully furnished — and
crowded with celebrities.

As we passed, there was less
gas, fewer candles, and fewer
guests. Lady Wilde had to com-
plain of the “really extraordinary
attitude of the landlord.” He ex-
pected to be paid his rent,

She left in disdain for Chelsea.
‘I want to live on some high
piace, Primrese Hill or Highgate,
iecanse I was an eagle in my
youth.” But-Chelsea it had to be.

There was worse to come, far
werse Ospar, the adored, indulged
nod britiamt son, might develop
pecullaseamannerisms, might, for
cxamph{Sitrive for one of her
parties his hair one mass of
little rir curled tight “like a
negro paliifed white.” Her own
appearance “being so remarkable,
Lady Wilde would not notice a
trifle like that.

But in the end the disgrace was
too appalling to be ignored. The
old woman, deserted and bitterly
poor, could only hurl back at the
hostile werld her belief that her
son had not done, could not do,
cnything to be ashamed of. In a
few months she was dead.

The family provided a florid
inscription for the tombstone at
Kensal Green, but no funds for a
permanent sepulture. Seven years
jater she was reburied in a com-
mon grave.

A MIRROR’ FOR ‘
Translated from the Persian by
Reuben Levy. Oresset. 15s.
265 pages,

Sixteen years after the Battle
of Hastings, the worldly wise

Prince of Gurgan, on the southern
shores of the Caspian Sea, wrote
for his: son u book of advice for



both cases she was wrong.



LADY WILDE
+ « & salon in Cheleen,

one about to engage in polities,
business, war or love.

The Prince has few _ illusions
and a good deal of dry wit, “Re-
gard it as a great misfortune,” he
says, “to stand in need of kinsmen
humbler than oneself: it is better
to die in the water than to beg
help of a frog.”

His attitude to sport would find
little acceptance in Britain: “When
the ball. comes in your direction
return it; but take no part in the
scrimmage. You can achieve your

purpose merely by iooking on
That is how men of distinction
play polo.”

Men of distinction display a
more virile spirit in war: “You
must breakfast on your enemy

before he dines on you.”

On finance his opinions are
downright cynical, “You must
realise that the common run ot
men have an affection for the rich
without regard to their own per-
sonal concern, and that they dis-
like poor men even when their
own interests are not at stake.’
It follows that you should never
grant public office to the impecu-
nious,

A young man setting up in life
will wish to find suitable staff for
his harem. To be employed in .he
women’s apartments a_ slave
should have withered limbs, scanty
hair, a shrill voice, thick lips, a
flat nose, etc., etc.

To discourage his son from des-
pising an insignificant enemy, he
tells of the bold, witty and well-
regarded brigand Muhadhdhab,
who, slipping on a _ melon-rind,
drew his knife and stabbed it,
His servants, protesting at the
undignified . display, the brigand
retorted: “The melor-rind over-
threw me, it is my enemy. An
‘enemy must not be despised, even
thougk he is worthless."

It is sad to know that the recipi-
ent of all this wisdom managed
to hold his throne for only seven
years.

EARLY TO SEW. By Anne Piper.
Putnam. 8s. 6d, 194 pages

Awarded Evening Standard
prize for the most promising
opening sentence of the year,

Anne Piper wins with, “I married
most of them in the end” She
specialises in opening sentences,
e.g., from later episodes in this






tog S

THE
STONE...

ANCHORS ARE
‘OUT’ AT THE
FESTIVAL—

. « « and this is a long-focus view
of the figures—dwarfaa the
arrowed policeman — taken
across the river. The mural ts
called “ The Istanders.”” Axustrion-
born Si’gfried Charoux, now
British, worked on it for « year.

Last night he went to South
Bank to watch alterations to the
foodlighting.

from

ALAS.

Do you remember Iola, the
lioness who bit me on the behind?
She caught me bending in Darkest
Africa last year just as I was
getting into the bath.

Well, she is dead. She was shot
in mistake by a man who saw her
coming up his garden path and
didn’t know who she was.

Kenya may now be a safer
place for reporters to bathe in,
but the news has left me sad,
Every African traveller has a lion

story and Iola was the heroine of |

mine.

Most lion stories end with the
death of the lion, but up to now
mine didn’t. That's why it was
such a nice story. I lived to sit

down and Iola lived to become the |

most photographed lioness in
Kenya and appear in a film, yet
to be shown, called “No Vultures
Fly”.

Iola was brought up by a game
warden called “Tabs” at the
Tsavo National Park. He fed her
on the bottle and when she'd
finished he would put her over
his shoulder and pat her on the

sprightly account of one girl’s : :
serene “a Sehevad. very val back to bring her wind up.
for the rest of the summer.” “At 2 Abandoned
first I was glad to be alone.” She had been abandoned by her
*Ape-like, parents when only a day or two
World Copyright Reserved old. They didn’t put her on any-
ra one’s doorstep or leave a note with
her, but an African tracker heard

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SEA TURNS TO

A 40F1,.-SQUARE murat in
stone—just revealed by the
removal of scaflolding—brings the
sea to the South Bank Festival
exhibition it stands boldly in
front ot the Dome of Discovery.
But there are no waves, no
anchors, no nets, no boats,
Simply three rugged figures: a
fisherman and his wile, both wear-
ing the roll-neck jerseys in which
they toil, and their little son.
Steadtastly they gaze across the
flowing waters of the Thames. .

Said he: “1 decided not to use
ony Of those traditional things such
as onchors, but to introduce the
jeroet lo conmect {t with the sea.

“} usea vo models—the figures
are creations from my own head.

“1 estimates it would take at
least a tmtniyht to put up. And
1 was right.””

London Express Service





Wn a Harold Couway’s Show Talk

Sir Ralph Weighs The
Worth Of Making A Film

SIR RALPH RICHARDSON,
pack to the West End stage next
month, believes that no film sal-
ary is compensation for staying
out of the theatre too long. Not
even a five-figure salary—and he
can earn that in England or

Hollywood. =
Here is your true. legitimate
actor talking. The actor who

‘or E
emporarily left the cast of a Lon-
den play success, At Seven,
te film location scenes in Ceylon
—and who found the play off
when he returned.

So far as the public were con-

cerned, the.star was Home Too had

But Richardson’s doubts are
harf on the British studios where
outstanding actors are hard to
find. Hard, for instance, on Sidney
Gilliat—who puts his film about
Gilbert and Sullivan into produc-
tion this summer.

I don’t think he need hesitate.
This is ideal casting, and it is
high time we had a screen bio-
graphy about a British song-
writing team of genius, after all
those Hollywood memorials to
mediocrity. .

London theatre audiences won't
forget Richardson — or for that
matter, John ‘Mills, They would
probably > see them in the
picture, d films have never
cupngeren Stage stars’ reputa-
ions,

Bad ones, of course, are a dif-
ferent matter. ty our
best acters have become through
hard experience, shrewd critics of
sereen scripts, And with surtax
what it is, they are no longer
tempted to take a chance for the
sake of a nice fat cheque from
studios.

JOAN MILLER is an actress j

who could probably get all the
West End starring jobs she want-
ed, the impression she made in
Pick Up Girl just after the war
is not ea forgotten.

Instead, ss Miller prefers to
help her producer—husband Peter
Cotes, at the little Boltons Theatre
in Kensington—as actress, scene-
painter, anything which comes in
handy. Im good times, she @raws
£10 a week, the top salary; when
the box-office is slack, she leaves
her share in the kitty.



MY POOR LION!

Bernard Wicksteed “lourns

A Strang

her crying with hunger like a
baby.

She was so small you could hold
her in one hand, and if the

African hadn't found her she



Iola takes an interest in my work

A glass of sparkling ENO’S first thing in the morning is

good for the liver. It clears

the head in

no time. ‘The

wonderful effervescence is cleansing and refreshing to a stale

nasty mouth. The non hubit-forming /axative action keeps the
ENO’S is pleasant to take.
Glauber’s Salt, no Epsom Salts and in its action it is gentle
A real family remedy.

system regular.

yet quickly effective.
© Fruit Salt’ handy !

Eno’s
“Fruit Salt’









It contains no

Keep your

SPPCIALLY RECOMMENDED
for IRREGULAR ACTION,
SICK HEADACHE, LIVERISHNESS,

BILIOUSNESS, HEARTBURN, ete.

Sold in bottles for
lasting freshness,

$1/a3

e Friend

one sniff and then
faces at her,

It was just like the girl in the
advertisements. Even her best
lion friends wouldn't tell her she
smelled of insecticide. So she just
sat there, and wistfully watched
them till they had gone.

When I went to stay with Tabs
at his camp in the bush Iola was
nine months old and weighed
170 lb, She loved people so much
that she used to jurmp up and put
her paws on their chests. You
had to say: “Down, Iola down,
there’s a good lion.”

She was shot on her way to
this country, where she was to

made nasty

make another film before going to

Dublin to marry a zoo lion there.
Tragic Escape

T had already planned a touch-

ing reunion of Androcles Wick-

steed

and the lioness. I was





Play safe! Brylcreem your hair. Dandruff on your collar,
loose hair on your comb-—these are danger signals that
point the need for Brylcreem’s double benefit:
{1) Day-long smartness. (2) Lasting hair health.
Massage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp,
encourages natural hair growth,
wards off Dandruff. Its pure
emulsified oils put life into Dry
Hair and impart a splendid
gloss. Don’t take any chances,
Brylcreem your hair — most

men do!
&

most ‘2 for Gloria Swanson. Instead, |
Bette Davis





On May 8 Joan Miller tackles
her biggest, and most provocative,
role since Pick Up Girl—the cen-
tral character in H. M. Harwood’s
and F. Tennyson Jesse’s play. A
Pin to See the Peep Show. Why

ative? Because the



— even more so, I gather, than |
the Vosper version we saw a few |
year’s back, le Like Us. }
If this new play could a a
West End transfer, Miss er’s
salary would jump 20-fold. But
the Lord Chamberlain who has
family protests on
the . Thompson subject, is
eum +, a
So Joan Miller, with faint hope,
is learning her long emotional
role for £10—and for love.

For ‘Gloria’ Read ‘Bette’

PRINCIPAL role in the film
Another Man's Poison was writ-

it. But what was good for

could be another star's, 7

poison—at least some of it.

From Settle, in
where the picture is on location, |
has come an S.OS. to script-|
writer Val Guest, who adapted |
the story from the play. |

He has had to drop all other
work—including a West End play
and a new Spanish-setting film
for Yolande Donlan—to hurry



North. oc, Oe

Official explanation, writing
some “local atmosphere” into the
script. My own guess: taking

some Swanson atmosphere out of
the star role.

Bette is faithfully eschewing
temperament for her English trip
But I would not blame her for
not picturing herself in a York-
shire Sunset Boulevard.

Queen Martita

End stage madness she will need
to make a violent mental switch.
Her film part is to be Queen
Eleanor of Aquitaine in the Dis-
nae poeta of Robin Hood.
ith Richard Todd as
Hood and the new
as Maid Marian, Walt Disney Is
virtuously proud that this English
picture => actually has an all-
cast.
WORLD COPYRIGHT eee

going to walk up to her backwards
und see if she recognised me,

defending his life, not his honour.

Tt isn’t the first African tragedy
of its kind. A few years ago a
lioness brought up in the same
way, was set free in the bush,
where she had a romance with a
reagnificent wild lion.

She was so proud of her litter
of cubs that she roamed round!
looking for some of her old
human friends to show them to.
One day she saw the camp of a
white hunter, and, full of happi-
ness, took her most handsome cub
in her mouth and went to pay a
call.

But the white hunter was a!
stranger to the district, and didn’t }
know her story. You can guess
the awful sequel.

Beachcomber the heartless fellow
says I should go into mourning
for Iola by sewing black crepe on
the seat of my pants.
















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SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

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SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

|LIBRARY OF
FILMS FOR
CHILDREN

The

SUNDAY







ADVOCATE PAGE NINE

en em





At The Cinema:
“?D CLIMB THE HIGHEST
MOUNTAIN”

LONGER
LASTING?

Definitely! Not even the most
expensive nail polish lasts longer

The Jittle girl with the angel’s smile,
£10,000—and a sad secret to learn

best motion pictures for
children prod 1ced in recent years ; rt
have been co ed by the National




Hy G. BB.

This week-end, drama both light and heavy seems to
be the keynote of the new films being shown. At the Empire
’'p CLIMB THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN is a simple and
often humourous drama of life in an American rural con-
gregation in the early days of this century, EDGE OF
DOOM, showing at the Plaza is heavy fare involving the
wurder of a Catholic Priest by a young boy, while ALL.
QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT which is being revived
at the Globe is an outstanding war film of the 1914—18
conflict,

Only Cutex contains the exclusive,
ingredient, Enamelon, The fine
lustre will remain on your nails
for days, No chipping, no peeling,
no fading. Choose from the
many exquisite fashion shades.

Children’s Film ibrary in New York
City for the delight of each new
generation of children

(By KARL G, PFEIFFER)

(From Parent's Magazine)

+ Every Saturday throughout the
Whuited States approximately 3,500
theatres show a special motion
F Picture for children. Every film
FP accepted tor these Saturday pro
grammes has passed several tests
before it is selected as especially
interesting to children, Committee
women have viewed it, discussed

desirable

Give vour lips that lovely, more

look with Cuter Lipstick, Comes
in the latest fashion shades that harmonize

it, and given their approval, and Unfortunately, I was unable te is told that the church cannot with your favorite nail polish,

100 New York school children, see this last film, but at the end of afford to give his mother an ex- C

age 8 to 12, have emphatically the column I will quote from the pensive funeral. ;

agreed that it is a film they New Yorker Magazine’s review. Filled with terror, hopelessness

like. Let's start with I'D CLIMB THE and despair, he turns against —_ <
A relatively recent feature of HIGHEST MOUNTAIN. It has a everyone in the struggle with his

community life, these programmes simplicity and genuine sincerity conscience and is ultimately led The World's Most P. lar N oli

are made peenaaay &-caw, aene that are most appealing. The to repentance through the sym- Wont oe Fopiter Neil Polish



profit, rapidly growing organiza— story is entertaining and the dra~ pathy and understanding of a

tion called the National Children’s matic situations ~ arise are young priest.

Film Library, sponsored by the natural and deeply human—just Filmed against the authentic ‘

Motion Picture Association of the type of crises that undoubt- background of Los Angeles slums GN: rr ES wie. bittev- weet

America. This library, caters to edly arose in the lives of the and “Skid Row” it is realistic, , 9 oe
people of a small rural settlement, stark drama — depressing — but ty

approximately 3,000,000 children and probably do to this day axpertly acted. Firley Granger, as

Gavdewia” by Goyw.:.a long-lasting
on the boy's guilt. VEw cof dence v oie e

" plowing onc EDGE OF DOOM fo, omantic meerings.
init aneawriur'sron’. tel GARDENIA

documentary covers all aspects of
the career of one of America’s

° ee ee oe pro- Based on the novel “Circuit jhe frenzied, bewildered boy gives
; amme, a c will ge e very Rider's Wife’ by Corra Harris, 4 fine performance in a demand-

best of pictures, selected with the
preatest care. However, that is not
he reason he will like it. He will
ike it because 100 youngsters of
»his own age and taste have liked it
before him,

herself a preacher's wife, it is the
story@of a young methodist min-
ister and his city-bred wife who
come to a small community in
the Blue Ridge Mountains of
north Georgia. How he wins the
devotion of his congregation and
helps his young wife to make the
necessary adjustments to her new
way of life makes delightful en-

ing role while Dana Andrews is
excellent as the young parish
priest, who accidentally stumbles

9

The Children’s Film Library was
the idea of Eric Johnston, former
resident of the Moticn Picture



ssociation. of America and at tertainment, His first sermon, most brilliant generals, from his

resent Administrator of the U.S. the crisis of an epidemic, the days as a cadet at West Point,
conomic Stabilization Agency. Sunday School picnic and his final through two World Wars, the
hile with the film industry Mr. farewell to his congregation are occypation. of Japan, his appoint

ohnston, a parent himself, felt all high spots in a sympathetic ment as the first Supreme United
at children, who make up a homespun story Nations Commander, the Korean

good share of the motion picture William Lundigan asthe earapaign and his final dismissat
pudience, were not getting the preacher is an excellent choice. py the President of the United
. Young, energetic, doing all the States, Under the circumstances,

onsideration due them from the

efilm industry. Children enjoy only things other men do as well as

displaying a personal interest in

this short is indeed “news.”

a few of each year’s film releases. ere ay SIGSTON is nearly eight. She has corn-gold curls and a smile like an angel’s.. She has his congregation as individuals ALL QUIET ON THE

7 Originally most films went into es meant 7 ~— ane fanaa . “

@eeerctirement as soon as they had That is the compensation decided upon by a Judge of the High Court whom she sat beside this week instead of simply a Geely of ae WESTERN FRONT

a een given initial distribution we eS Me! were in which she was terribly injured. me, Dr rites ~—_ mene Excerpt from the review in the

; : : r eae is the ensation for e fact— re i oa S characteristics are asiey " Foes ; Spl
Succeeding generations of children Palle es ike Saor ghite. She does not appreciate it yet—that she will never play and and naturally portrayed by Mr New | Yorker Magazine: All

Ouviet on the Western Front, a







had no opportunity to see the few Frances has already under, ‘ i Lundig: In a role that is a far
. : 5 : ; gone 12 operations in 18 months and faces another in two years’ time. aundigan, In-a role that is 8 har Alin rag fir released i
pictures which had a_ perennial The Judge refused to accept a settlement in Court for £8,000 but agreed to £10,000 which aevamies cry from her recent ones, Susan 7, that wl Sena Tar
pterest for them. Motion picture will bring Frances £12,850 when she is 21, Her father can obtain permission to draw on the money. Hayward plays the minister's too! Valop, and in battle scenes
roducers’ vaults contained dozens — for her education or a holiday overseas. In order to assist the little girl to keep up with her school Wif¢. Unsophisticated, though oie right oe "hace with the beat
classics such as “The Adven- work, hospital nurses have often stayed after duties to read to her, Tie GROG, SHO" DOREY See aver made. In all probability
oe * ~¢ Finn” ¢ ingly ¢ : 8 ¢ opes, 5 my :
es of Huckleberry Finn” and ingly all the doubts and hoy its pacifistic message will carry Gift Size and

TERice j syle ” , de ‘ " as well as the efforts to help het } .
Alice in Wonderland,” but only ation which threatens the practically everything, the Com- children’s reactions is the speed oe aetna expenances by a young as little weight now as it carried

Handbag Phial





/ theatres









S similar plan for a Children’s Film

Library had failed. In the autumn
ef that year 1,000 motion picture
in the United States
started showing films selected as
having special appeal for children,
but by the following June only two
theatres were continuing the plan.
The failure proved that adults
are not always good judges of what
children like. The films had been
selected without consulting the
oung customers themselves,
ndey the present plan children

“make the final decision, and if







they do not like a motion picture,
out it goes, no matter how whole-

» some, inspirational, or educational

their elders rate it. However,
adults determine what films will
be shown the children in the first
place. Before a picture is shown to
the junior critics, it is previewed

this pretended fear.

But it is neither the Children’s
Library Committee nor the ex-
pert advisers on child psychology
who deserve most credit for the
success of the Children’s Film
Library.. The “censors,” who best
know juvenile taste and unerring—
ly turn down what the customers
cwill not~like, are an unselected
group of New York City school
children who see the films and,
by their reactions, make it possible
for the committee to determine
their suitability.

Since, when questioned about
the films they see, children usually
speak up freely and say they like

invariably squirm and wiggle in
their seats. The children are no
longer asked what they like and
do not like. Instead, Committee
members sitting unobtrusively in
the audience watch the children’s
reactions to the film, and from
that determine the degree of ex-
citement or of boredom it arouses,

Uninhibited by the presence of
adults, children usually speak up
freely during the showing of a
picture. When “Annie Get Your
Gun” was “Wiggle-Tested” re-
cently, Annie’s unkempt appear-—
ance in the early sequences was
sharply reproved by the children,
The most surprising thing about

logists explain as rejection of an
experience for which they are not
ready.

The Committee also has some
aefinite conclusions regarding
what children like. Action and
movement are most important.
Children want a good story with
a clear plot and strong situations
causing suspense or _ laughter
broad comedy, “slapstick,” and
burlesque are porgalar.

There are now some 57 titles in
the Children’s Film Library. In
no two years is the repertoire of
the Library exactly the same, A
few current pictures have quali-
fied and will go in as soon as they
complete their commercial runs.
A few of the original list have
been discontinued. Among the

EDGE OF DOOM
3ased on the novel of the same
title: by Leo Brady, EDGE OF
DOOM playing at the Plaza is the
story of a poor boy, who mur-
ders his priest when he

parish





ever again to frame the figures

of marching men But in de-
seribing the horrors of actual
combat, Lewis Milestone, the

director, got down on celluloid a
great deal of impressive stuff.’

Ice-flower — 21

VAs we"





y | ie uaa eR osemmantaeiae ei ee See hid has conciaded that their with which one follows another. wife, The supporting cast are co Se Dies ite Srna, Der caves dae
ae hada cake 43 esha, s exp ce may n— actions are more e oquent than One minute they are wild with good and indeed,’ a number of ‘ s “pg he a atching Soap,
1 Gr duce real fear. On the other hand, their words. Consequently the excitement, the next they wiggle them are the residents of — the million people have had to look Perfumed Cologne
“= Pondering this situation, Mr, some psychologists say that pre- Committee developed the “Wiggle with boredom, Too much con- small town of Demorest, where at it, wars still seem to be very D eee
Johnston conceived the idea of the tended fear does not harm a child, Test” based on long observation versation in a motion picture in- the picture was made much with us . : usting Powder,

ildren’s Film Library, a plan but often allows him to work off of the uninhibited behaviour of cuces restlessness, as does subtle- Filmed in Technicolor, the There are, of course, flaws in and Bath Essence.

or keeping the films that chilaren aggression and frustration harm- children watching «a motion ty, but children object most beauty of the hills, and the bush (the silm) that have become

ke always available for them. lessly. Many of the situations to picture. When they are enjoying strenuously to sentimental love green foliage and red soil of more conspicuous with age. ihe
“Phe first problem to be solved was Which parents object, because they a film they may yell, jump up and scenes. Such scenes make them Georgia deserve special mention Sound track is uncertain, me . :
that of determining which films excite and apparently overstimu- down, or sit tense and silent; bul squirm, wiggle, and slouch in their as a picturesque setting for a editing . phy abrupt, Br 3 the MADE IN ENGLAND BY GOYA *. 161 NRW BOND STRERT + LONDON + WS
Fchildren would like. In 1925 a late the child, are only arousing when it begins to bore them, they seats, behaviour which psycho- warmly humen story ies b laoeaae i Sa gr gl Distributors: L.M.B, Meyers & Co. Ltd, P.O. Box 171, Bridgetown



DARTWORDS-

ERES this
Hees: teaser—
to arrange the 50

BE SURE OF

mr











most popular recent additions are
“The Wizard of Oz’, “Adventures
of Robin Hood,” and “Black









by the Children’s Film Library
Committee, a group made up of
representatives from 11 women’s











organizations. The film must meet ; Beauty.” The Arey omnes t ~” d b opcke corner Boer fo" mie pe wh sas Cena peers
%, ittee’c $ i th ircle so é reas est children’s sheet of ice where a little e put on our indow, £ ie
pi COMieattee s SOC Cee ty the Tead from a eeu . oe ane ite riall has been. Beside ‘t stands more about them.” But the hare
for suitability before it is shown to a y films available in the United i
: € d are ; BOTANY to CARESS States films which have been hare pointing at some delicace in another frisky mood, has bounded —with the faithful
an audience of children, Some 20 {n such a way that the ere. ee i re “hild flowers growing out of the solid ice, away. “Oh dear, that animal's use of DREAM—The Soap
films a year are selected as _ relationship between chosen with the elp of chilc “Oh, aren't they lovely!’ breathes quite dotty,”’ sighs Rupert. ‘* He of the Beautiful.
Library films. oak ty” ae Sere, audiences and | will continue © Rupert as he moves to pick one. still hasa’t tola me how to get Play safe .. . be prepared,
The fare offered on a children’s ag of PRP Ay No delight future generations © "Now | know where Jack home for your romantic moment. |
programme is usuallymadeupofa yle may be invoked children, AGL 14 RESERVED Get a few cakes of DREAM |
title from the Library plus a cur- more than twice con- TOILET SOAP, use it
rent motion picture rated suitable _ secutively. SE OSSOOO OCPD FPS POSPOPPOPPPI SSPE, faithfully in your bath, |
for children. The Library is not RULES shower and at the wash
big enough to supply continuously EDGE WATER basin for a soft-smooth+
the usual demand for two pictures x The word may Be ar skin, radiant with natura
for each showing, nor would it be hat precedes it HOTEL oabant t available at toilet goods
aie ny pier fice ' LAT 8 ailable a
desirable to do so even if it were 2.It may be a | BATHSHEBA counters throughout the island. {

Reduced Rates Ist May to

possible, for children like to see synonym of the word
the new motion pictures as well that prcceurs it.
t

as the bes ; 2 ; 3. It may be achieved
: idediripadead tee: .Suapr \by adding one aie to,
etter



Whenever the Children’s Film subtracting one c : oe
Library Committee is doubtful (!70™m, or changing one letter in, — RA 31st October for visits of

‘ ; 5 receding word.
about a film, it calls in a panel of ee .

experts from the field of child
guidance. Psychologists sometimes
take a different view from parents
on the question of what is good
for young people. They do not
believe that getting excited is
necessarily bad for children, and
they distinguish between two
kinds of fear—real fear and “‘pre-
tended fear.” Real fear, they point
out, is bad for the child, Any situ-

4. It may be associated with

jthe preceding word in a Saying, one week or over.
|
|

Perfume Always
Attract Women

NEW YORK: Bus advertise
jments in a Tennessee town have
blotters soaked in perfume at-
jtached to attract women’s atten-
{tion. Some women are so attract-
led that they tear off the blotter
| to use as sachets.

simile, metaphor, or association
of ideas.

5. It may form, with the pre
ceding word, the name of a well-
known person or place in fact ot
fiction.

6. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title
or action of a book, play, or other
composition.

A typical succession of words

Telephone 95276

666666666669 1966666650644

*
OSD CLEP LL POSS



OOEPEPOEOSPST CEPOL LLLP “y



990 FO OLEOLEES SOOOSSSSSGS GOOFS SOOO

CLEARS STUFFY NOSE!
SOOTHES SORE THROAT!
EASES ACHY CHEST!
CALMS RASPY COUGH!

O
7
>
f
G
Z





FACE POWDERS, CREAM,







OSES SOOOP EL PPPS SPOS SG SPOS














} aw --§----m
% L T g cr ovate gelief «oie in 20, many
y — $ 1 Your little patient Phun eee VapoRub is simply
s . aw Uy 8 ways. -*
x CHENILLE VELVET = White and other shades places eat bedtime — a
ccrehtieamsanpali SIDE
; MOSS. CREPE . Tsioe — ee ™
D to look d vivacious ? / i i WORKS With every breath: 4
© you want to look young and vivacious ? 4 2 k and % , ‘s medicina Be
eae MOIRE TAFFETA ‘ ‘: His chest, Pence {cel VapoRub'smediver, as
USE TOKALON = a eed and comly #» vapours peneot the troubled ' _
CREPE ROMAINE \ - VapoRub’s deep-reachiny Sir assages,clearingthe nen, “ape
x eases i : he throat, ©
‘ oultice action eh soothing t 5 ' .
Do you want to be captivating ? % EMBROIDERED DRESS NET .,, as : tightness a ae cod! ice bothersome cough. 1 %
%, jon r ‘
pea : . SIR . congestion. 4 inside and outside, hour
USE TOKALON 2) SILVER TINSEL BROCADE, WREATHS, SPRAYS, % This double action wo ee jorning, usually the iCK S
g VEILS ETC. after hout, throws. over, and Baby feels much
ors sg
= short, Ladies, do you want all men folk, and women folk too % “4 ; ’ : om” Pn VapoRusB
0 say of you: “There goes grace, charm and loveliness ?” Then: vie ‘ we
, . Toy $
bas tf LET DRESS YOU $ : =
% USE TOKALON % % % NOW EVERY FAMILY can afford to use
§ le Z R18 WITH LOVELY MATERIALS ; Vicks VapoRub! Get the large, oo
As use y the world’s most fascinating women !! > | % vormical bluc or ask. fur the new,
3 % i$ ALL THE YEAR ROUND % small tin at ra , ow prite! sip
LLCO SOOOCOOOL CL LLL LLL LEA LLL SOS GOO P9G9 99S OOOO OO OOOO OOOOH AOI oes





PAGE TEN v ;
DEMONSTRATORS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

Thieves Get Away
With $300

HIEVES MADE HAULS toial-
ling over three hundred dol-







Coughing, ‘Strangling Asthma,
Bronchitis Curbed in 3. Minutes

GAIRY

ITCHING
INFLAMED

Empire Youth
Service To-day

The Empire Youth Service will
take place at Government House



Asthma or Bron-

: you have at! ii ve
lars during last week Grounds to-day at 4.30 p.m. | cnit’so tad es Soe eee oe oan, ee kee, epee Oe ote.

At Fontabelle, St. Michael, the Rovers, Senior Scouts and Scouts ford t ike "you were being rup- | stor Asthma spasms Great night
a aoaiued Seer Ts om vi oF dates se 838 DY | Sees es i Seoreeeetss
°n and en! vrec elween 5 p.m : b _ t : rat dose
and 10.4¢ p.m. on Friday A pm “Re matter how jong you have eutteredor to work circulating through your
; ket b 0 : > t jaing $45. pen whai you bare on we eeoiinn salina teen. ne ing oes Gacm a ter may
poc oo . conta », a pen- . . i tions, | AS
knife ana: pair of "spectacles perce Se Deeewtve favsiomnner ‘All You do te take two vaste: | stgcr *R%, Wendace tinder en trot-cind
valued $3. were stolen. Lo less tablets at meals money back guarantee. You

Sipe ot Gunlea Oi seen s ee en de an tata aaa caste vou Maes as |Wopou Sant ea emt co ee Res
Searles at Garden, St. James, a 2xecutive Committee of the Island | nature to dissolve and remove strangling Mendaco just return the empty PE
thief stol: a quantity of articles Council at Scout H.Q. to-morrow, | promote free easy breathing and | o0G° the full purchase price will

g

nd sleep the first night so that from your
and cash, The store was broken Monday 7th, at 5 p.m. oe teat soem younger and stronger rea a see how well you sleep os
and entered between 8.00 p.m. on Members are earnestly asked to ene Asthma in 2.Years *| sight and how much-better you .

Tuesday and 5.45 a.m. on Wednes-
day.
Charles Small of Porey Spring,

rrow.
make every effort to attend. aa

Mendaco not only brings immedi-
Headquarters News comfort

almost
and free breathing but builds

off future attacks.
Hamilto:

uarantee
ate

stem to ward
Por instance. J. Bichards,

ea oo
Ends Asthma X Bronchitis * Hay Pasa











As from Tuesday 1st May, Scout a in, Ont.,
St. rn ‘ted that his house Q. ” . ‘ ‘ itching—caused }
Was’ lipoken and entered at about whe oben ss fllows— i perl een | ; Hoe
1.00 a.m. om Thursday and a Monday—Friday: 3.30 to 9,30 p.m. | checke
pearl pacilone, ores pone “ re a ies ; a = p.m, | en ee phos = aoa a BRUSH ose UP ean’ YOUR sas © eee
rings, a goid watch and @ Chain, onsequen ee is change, -
total value $85.80 were stolen. Scouters, Rovers, Senior Scouts | mac ree . ee se Game Y ’
While Robert Tubbs of Uppe and Scouts are asked to volunteer aie dames cone iestanmiion wosen ood
Collymore Rock was walking alon for assisting at H.Q. aes wee
the same road during the early The Honorary Secretary will! gkin trouble is giving you pain and distress
hours ae, rr he SCENE at a recent Gairy demonstration in St; Georges, Grenada. also be wlaa to meer oer joes on = Pees ie hy a
was attackec anc eaten Vy an genera impro nt, pro- . y
unkriown man who took $20.62 2 2 2 grammes, ete., any day between | MALARIA SORES or RINGWORM—
Sarees Rien. Gair Claims 1s Edueation 6 A Ss the hours of 4.30 and 6.30 p.m.| just a few applications of wonderful
The house cf Kenneth Waren t A at H.Q.

at Seventh Avenue, Belleville, was
entered between 9.00 pm. on
Tuesday and 7.00 a.m. on Wednes-
day and a gold watch valued $45
and $10 in cash were stolen.
Joseph St. Hill of Tweedside
Road reported that his shop was
broken and entered between 8,60
p.m. on Thursday and 5.30 a.m.
on Friday and rum and sardines,

Charges Were Planne

From Our Own Correspondent

GRENADA, May 5.

WEARING a red cape over his shoulders, his custom-
ary festive garb, Gairy last night told wildly cheering and
fanatieally loyal thousands gathered in the Market Square,
that the charges he is due to answer to at a Magistrate’s

Urgent As
Fire Alarm”

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, May 3
The rapid increase of popula-

Table Tennis Tournament

The second Inter-troop Table
Tennis Tournament among Groups
in the South Western istrict will
open on Friday next, llth May,
at 7.30 p.m. at Scout H.Q.

Fixtures for the week-end are
as follows:—

will be lasting! _D.D.D. Prescription is
obtainable from chemists and stores

everywhere.
Distributors : 4
F.B.Armstrong Ltd., Bridgetowr



total value $59.63, stolen court on Monday were plotted and planned by certain tion and the steep rise in the Friday — Ist Sea Scouts vs, Com PRESCRIPTION 4 Re ae
HE EMPIRE YOUTH SUNBAY members of the Legislative Council, but they “were only 44 school-age group have created Saturday — Gill’s Memorial vs. HERTFORD BST. I
SERVICE will be held at wasting their damned time. an acute situation which eflis for James Street. . Seer rE pn eter

Government House grounds at 4.30 action as urgently as a fire- nter-Troop Competition pas $9 SSS9S99SSSS9OSG9SS SPP PSOOGSS
o'clock this evening. It is expoctei and St, Vincent was also due to a e . alarm or as an S.O.S8., from a Bs Nien SW inter-troop RH EU M A I ie ap esoosrrorereeâ„¢
that over 2,000 youths from Si very great extent to the manufac- Work Begitis On ship in distress, ‘declared Mr. Competition will take place on : ’
Michael and Christ Church are tured gee a ce Rete in Gi J > Hi h Sch ! James L. Nicol, es Ad- :
expected to attend the service, Grenada. But the fact that Trini- irls 1 Oo viser to the Comptroller for De-

His Excellency the Governor Sa with its powerful Government, S uprated awn, Ue

iN) ; 3 cia can he and s g : S als ro ndent st , s
meee ae ee te a party to the ban showed that ee or GEORGE'S May 3 opening remarks to members of Queen *s College x
Cie Saribae’ Mess aii io poae oe they feared him. Work has begun on the founda- the Primary Education Commit- x
island will be Dea Maisie Greater Power tion ef the new Anglican Girls’ tee now sitting in British Gui- Guides’ Cam Here is REAL relief... s
Re , ‘ oe R oe D encey e, Claiming that he had done more High School, ana. 3 ip For real relief from rheumatic x FROM THE
i FB A ve Ste” Moore for Grenadians in a shorter time Last Thursday the first sods The Committee, with Mr, Ni- y as E Gabel to cancers $
= ‘The ‘Police Be, re vice py than any other in years, and pos- were formally turned by Arch- col as Chairman, has been ap- Camping hae ‘When they are due $

i sand, conducted bY sessed greater power than any in deacon H. G. Pigott and Miss pointed by the Governor to go — 1st Barbados Rangers, (Queen’s : age mulation of bodily $ LAND OF STARS
Capt. C. E. Raison will be in at- the island, he said who did not like Mab _ Bertrand, Headmistress of into the future policy of educu- College) with Miss E. Nurse as i ete aieaite ‘that &
tendance. The service will be Grenada his way, could get out. the School. tion in the Colony with reSpect Commandant, camped in the ; —which should $ é
broadcast over Rediffusion. If He said he understood that a 3 to the provision of schools and grounds of the Alexandra School these harmful impurities— AND STRIPES
rain falls, the service will be heid party of Auditors was coming out It was a quiet and simple pe- teachers. from 7th—13th April. This camp pei 5 cad phe d iadibing
at the Globe Theatre. from England to examine the caning. teen ‘a by mn eek was followed by another, of Ist oa. up. De Witt’s &
7 , 3 " ai . CoO e 8 z 2 . +1] = , ol. . 4
N TUESDAY the Police wid Hee a reeae t ee an eee; Lordship the Bishop of the Wind- . janes oti, Stine whee canaeie ae pe, yaa gol this pee ALS ERED FL ATTERY
Stage the Musical Ride by the and he understood they had a Ward Islands. “For the hordes of children who Commandant. The majority of they soothe and tone up FLOW

Mounted Police and the Beating plan. : With a brilliant morning sun seek and will continue in ever- these Guides were new campers cieordered idneys so effectively
of the Retreat, by members of the burning down on the site at Tan- increasing,numbers to seek acd- snd’ were thoroughly thrilled by i
Police Band, at District “A” Sta- understand that certain people teen, a small group stood with mission to already over-crowded their experience of camping under return to their normal function of
tion for members of the Caribbean will burn the Treasury so that the bared heads as the Archdeacon schools, adequate accommodation canvée oO" : Fi clearing the system of impurities,
Commission. Auditors cannot see the accounts, Tread a few short prayers of and staff are lacking, nor can “*)'™ De Witt’s Pills have been

Apart from these there will be
a Drill Display. The squad taking

art in this will drill for te in= at z time there's ¢ > lay } ancial resources in this or in any yu! ie i with great success. This fine
lites without a word seed the "dea a tis Suan Miss Bertrand followed. of the West Indian Colonies,”, de- pe q) oS RAINES. Sate ue re cine may be just what 1.60 d
There will also be a Fire Display there’s a fire in that Government clared Mr. Nicut, ticeth ae ae hee atts Boar. yan nests Ge fo he BP ih itertsininnsawigts ® Yy ,
; > . : ae ake : s ; sigr Ss § s » to St. emist and obtain
given by the Fire Brigade. ot ag it will not be care- “To ignore these facts,” he cent with her husband, Rev. J. supply of De Witt's
aSNOaR. , continued, is to run tl isk of B s, Who has nsferred Pills right
IRST PRIZE at the Local Talent Gairy called on workers to de- $450,000 Sugar Lost with-holding. Cea "sdueation ee atanchint check totina co = .

show at the Globe Theatre
On Friday night was awarded to
Willie Ifill who sang “Stardust,”

Walter Burke who sang “So in foregoing the first meal of theday. As a result of a fire of unknown Palliatives done good and very valuable work ) a full assortment of shades

Love”, was awarded the second He would seek & postponement in origin at Usine Ste. Madeleine |. i for Guiding during her 12 years’ i i i $2 29 yd

prize. order to await Mr. Sinangn, to Sugar Company South ‘trinidad, “Until economic conditions im- oe genni Ss pi ndos. There were including Helio . .
The Guest Stars were Phyllis defend him. $450,000 worth of sugur has been Prove we shall have accomplish- no Guides in St Philip when Mrs GUARANTEE

Collymore who played the guitar Teacher Turned Back lost. Mr, Eric Johnson, Géneral eee if We Can suggest DO ames went to liverat Hberese, | De Witte Pills are pea e

and sang and Gerald Daisley wno Reverting to the ban from St Manager of the Company in an Palliatives fur dealing with the manufactured under strictly hygienic

sang two pieces,

CANE FIRE at Waterford
Plantation on Friday burnt
five acres of

The ban on his visiting Trinidad

“Tf you get disturbances again, I

I'm not predicting that there will
be a fire in Grenada but I say if

sist from work on Monday because
their leader will be on trial and
asked them to fast on Sunday,

Vincent, he said that an ex-teacher,
Charles Bleasdill was ~ turned
back from St. Vincent on Wednes-
day on the ground that he was a



thanksgiving and dedication.
Afterwards, he took an agricul-
tural fork and turned a few sods,



(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SFAIN,

interview with the Gazette said
that the damage was considerablo
as the store-house had about
14,000 tons of suvar at that time
Hundreds of

Pats





these be provided on the scale

required from the available fin-

from large numbers of children

of school-age.

defects and educational needs now
confronting us. It may be that
the remedies suggested may not
be found readily acceptable to
those who are pressing Goyern-

Thursday 24th May (Empire Day).



Resignation

to the Methodist Church in*Kings-
town.
Mrs. Broomes will be greatly

missed in the Guides for sne has

and we now have 6 Guide Com-
panies in that Parish. At the last
Executive Committee meeting the
Island Commissioner presented
the Good Service Certificate to













conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.









D.D.D. Prescription will give instant
relief, Persevere, and the good results

that these vital organs 5)

SPUN.______-----$1.75 yd.
FLOWERED KUA-KUA

relieving rheumatic sufferers
in many parts of the world




now,

CREPE ROMAINE

SOSDSOPSOS GOO PPP SOPOT F



Is SEE THEM ON DISPLAY AT

Waiieeiss: LASHLEYS LTD.

PPP P PP PPE OSSS

second crop ripe Gairyite, but understood that the " whith 1. had ment to provide more and better her for the splendid work she had
ratoons, one acre of first crop ripe people there shouted ‘we want ee packed. Se "ode ae hid educational facilities. For the done for the Girl Guide Move- teat) Swan Street _ Prince Wm. Henry St.
ratoons and 740 holes of first crop Gairy,” as the plane took off with {2 ,2& Wickly “er.cved’ because present at least, however, we ment in this Island. OS A al aie ot
young ratoons. The damage is Z i fear that they tight have per- 460996 ;
covered by insurance. by warning officers of his execu- ;> ge Pee a largest the cloth available to us. Youth Service i
> Neighbours, assisted by the Pol- tive that he intended sparing no poe British West Indies. “I feel sure that our aims will Page Rachael
ice, put out the fire. The ratoons For more than six hours the

belong to R. E. Gill of “Comrie”,
St. Michael.

ee WAS plenty of meat in
the Public Market yesterday
morning. Housewives had no wor-
ry in getting some.

Many women who make pud-
ding and souse could be seen pur-
chasing the intestines of the
slaughtered animals.

Large quantities of vegetables
were also sold in the market yes-
terday,



'RODNEY’ DUE TUESDAY



The Lady Rodney will be arriv- former not having all in his favour. snatched her purse which on- of the Health Department, Trini- : : ; sin , uy “It dees seem so!” So say most of
ing here on Tuesday morning tained $50 elt when she raise 1 dad, has arrived in the colony to Wie bea ee ieee are is: es the ladies shopping at...
from British Guiana via Trinidad. an alarm a shot was fired into the take up new duties as Nutrition ossibl * Ree “7
Grenada and St. Vincent, She ONLY SON ground near her. Officer, Windward Islands, In P e. 5 9
will be taking passengers cnc In the Advocate Newspaper on May Police took particulars of the 1947 Miss Horne was awarded a © WANTED: More books and mag-
cargo for Canada, 5. a statement was made in comection incident but no arrest has yet C.D. & W. course in Nutrition azines. (Kindly phone Misg Nora
seen Men will leave on {hat ae nuded ior tune Get ae, been made. Capt. Kelly of the and ees at fe Edinburgh es whe =e yo an eh '
Wednedsay night for Bermuda, marn P. Bayley, optometrist and. an Redney has. also written a Royal Infirmary. She later spent them, rticles for the ips. i ‘ 5)
Boston, Halifax and Montreal via ot this island Was @ brother of the lite strong letter to the local agents six months with the Ministry of (These nay be left with Miss And to the ladies keen on knowing the origin of the material they buy,

the British Northern Islands. Her



agents are Messrs. Gardiner {ye only son of the late Reo Samal covering letter to the Adminis- Switzerland observing -nutritional Messrs. Cave Shepherd & Co. become the recipient of a
Austin & Co., Ltd. Bayley, Methodist Minister of this island. tration. practices in hospitals there. Ltd.).

$

SSOOOS

Â¥ POPPI SPOOFS OOO FFOOTD we & DRESS LENGTH OF Til EIR () WN CHOICE FREE
: Let Us Show You s Now, eee See. in large numbers and test your talent. :Tell us
~ KARDOMAH LUNA FAILLE. i 0 ie wide 16 gorgeous shades @ $2.18 per yd.
JEWEL PRINCESS ..... 36” .,, in White & popular shades with sequins
é 9 @ $3.25 per yd.
the 5 = S | AR car HALCREPON ....... ... 36” ,, in Floral & Pastel designs @ $2.00 pr yd

SOVEEESOIOO SSE SEED | GS OC DEES OS SO SOOO S OPO OFOP

. . PLEASE NOTE. JUST OPENED, A FINE ASSORTMENT OF
| THESE IN ALL SIZES AND COLOURS. HURRY WHILE
Lae |i THEY LAST.
Vike Best at Lowest Cost x | i
¢ | } Now, remember, when you cannot get it elsewhere you ean get it ar —
- % i |
‘ : | N. E. WILSON & CO
x, %
: CHARLES Me ENEARNEY & (0. LTD § } ee 7
% j uh ( EN J , JVe « x Fresh Shipcasetin Mabt woceived Xt HEADQUARTERS FOR LADIES’ SHOES AND DRESS MATERIALS
3 | oe 3 iB 31, Swan Street. _ DIAL 3676
SLPS SSG OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO SS OSFIOSOOOH IHS, Price : 39c. per 41b pkt. )

POG SG 9695555535505

him. Gairy wound up the meeting

one in the elimination, of any not
giving him a hundred per cent
loyalty, and mentioned his regret
at the absence from the platform of
comrades Blaize and Lowe.

The front rows crowd, however,
saw Blaize dramatically appear on
the scene with a Napoleonlile
fold on his muscular arms, listen-
Ing to the enslaught, and later gp-
proached Gairy with the apparent
request for an opportunity to use
the mike, but Gairy read a Psahn.
Another comrade led the Union
Song, “We'll never let the leadar
fall.” and the meeting ended,

It was reported in a recent story
of an executive meeting that Gairy
and Blaize had a verbal elash, the



Mr. W. D. Bayley. I beg to say that is

a mistake. Dr



blaze resisted all attempts b; the
Fire Brigade to bring it under
control,



Purse Snatched

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, May 3.
Mrs. B, Basham, a round-tripper
from Boston on the C.N.S. Lady
Rodney had an experience
ashore here last Sunday night
eausing her loss and quite a scare
as well as damaging the port’s
repute for tourists.

Along the wharf front a man

which has been sent on with a

must cut our coats according to

be unified if we keep in mind the
following words spoken in the
House of Commons also 80 years
ago:

“Upon the education of the
people of this country, the fate
of this country depends.”

and it is as true in British Gui-
ana to-day as it is in any other
countries that in the youth of the
nation lies its greatest asset.’



NUTRITION OFFICER

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 5

Miss Louise Horne, formerly

Food and toured Holland and

200 Rangers and Guides, under
District Commissioners Mrs. Skin-
ner and Mrs. Scott, will attend
the Youth Service to be held in
the grounds of Government House
to-day, Rangers and Guides who
are going to this Service will fall
in at Pax Hill at 3.15 p.m.

The Girl Guides Fair

Calling all Rangers, Guides and
Brownies:—Please remember that
there are only 4 weeks before the
2nd June—the day of our Fair,
Everyone is asked to go “all out”
to make this Fair a bigger success
than in previous years, because
although we have our own Head-
quarters there are certain very

Frank at the Guide Department,





‘Five-Star’ Motoring



P°LIEPPLPP PPPS SS

REL E SEL SESE SPOOL AAO SSS









i} TAFFETA PLAID ...... 36” ,,

% CREPE ROMAIN ...... 46” wide in several interesting shades.

g SATIN & TAFFETA of the best quality 36” wide in all shades from 76c.
x to $1.20 per yd.

g SEERSUCKER .........\ 36” wide @ $1.14 & $1.24 per yd.

‘ CHAMBRAY (good quality) 36” wide @ $1.46 & $1.56 per yd.

x PRINTED PERCALES .. 36” wide 88c. to $1.18 per yd.




































9 CDESC POOLE PLOLLLSS POPPE





~My! My?!

What a fine assortment of LADIES’
DRESS MATERIAL, and at such
reasonable prices too.

ARE WE AT
THE BRITISH
INDUSTRIAL

FAIR ??

after spending $20.00 and answering 4 out of 6 questions correctly, they

FLOWERED MEMOSA . 36” ,

FLOWERED LAMLEE , 46” ,,

FLOWERED TAFFETA . 36” ,, @ $2.00 per yd. i

GEORGIETTE in 18 shades 36” wide @ $1.27 per yd.

PLAIN MAROCAIN in 15 charming shades 36” wide @ $1.40 per yd.

JERSEY SILK ..... 54”, wide in Blue, Black, Lemon, Peach, Pink,
Gold, White, Torquoise @ $1.25 per yd.

CREPE de CHINE ...... 36” wide in 17 shades @ $1.32 per yd..

NANCY CREPE in 25 shades 36” wide @ $1.16 per yd.

SHOT SILK seeee 36” wide @ $L88 per yd.

from $1.20 to $1.68 per yd.

RAYON PLAID ....,,.. 36” ,, — ,, 84c. to $1.08 per yd.

SPUN in several shades 36” wide @ $1.00 per yd.

@ $2.39 & $2.70 per yd.
@ $1.68 per yd.

:

4

A fine assortment of Printed COTTONS 36” wide from 55c. per yd up.



AMERICAN SHOES







SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951







SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN











= —— SOOO enon

AN OLD FRIEND IN A NEW SPOT!
Among a few Recent Arrivals.
Planter’s Peanuts Noxzema Cream

Nelson's Chocolate Bars Evenflow Feeding Bottles
a Variety






YES, YOU CAN BUY IT AGAIN

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

———
—_—

Al
™ a s Small Ie Jars —
Marshmallows in pkgs. & cea _ GALV. OW. CANS —1, 2 & 5 Gin, Sizes
THE COSMOPOLITAN : _
PHONES: 4441 and 2041 1 ayes T. HERBERT Ltd Incorperated
Just a few yards from the original spot. 1860 . t j . 1926
Prince William Henry Street. | 10 & 11 ROEBUCK STREET,
t ea aa
1) cow a





4g










IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE







SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only








GEE.. THIS BUSINESS
OF YOUR BECOMING

USUALLY | NOW USUALLY NOW

S. L. Pineapple Juice, Tins 39 35 Dutch Pears, Tins 68 60 i
)}

Chivers i

Melo Tonic Food, Tins 107 96 T. Jellies, Pkgs 29, iw i
i

Jacobs Cream Crackers, Pkgs. 41 36 Raisins, Per |b. 46 ii









BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG
Se ADAH 10] [eT

DAGWOOD, THATS }



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WHERE ) a’
ALL THOSE <—- “ert

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By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to H.M. Kiang George VI

Quint;

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Stands Supteme |

ELEVEN” CENTS
JUST THROWN




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ONE OF THE ROBBERS HAD THANKS TO YOUR
9 OATS IN A LEAKING SADDLE- LEAKIN' SADDLE-] OF
BAG. WE'LL PICK UP THAT TRAIL BAG, LEE, WE'VE iyo chat oeee
LIKE THAT.



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THE TALKIN’— E f GOOD D DION'T GIT
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aang OP oO ee SAS em ee * — PETROLEUM
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RIP KIRBY : BY ALEX RAYMOND
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Copr 1951, King Peatutes Syndicate, Ine; World rights reserved.




























-

* . , 64644444
BOLO LOS LLOLLLLPPPLARLPBIIS xt &

“Iv’s Just What The DOCTOR Ordered”
ae

THIS IS KIRBY...
NO,I'M NOT DEAD...
AND IF YOU'LL MOVE
FAST, WE MAY BE IN
TIME TO GET
{ CUTTLE, JOE CEVEN'S
GANG AND THE

CALLING CAR 48,,
, PICK UP JACK
=> _ . | MINCH, LOCKSMITH,
aN AT 2962 SEAWEED
: AVE...AND BRING
HIM IN TO
HEADQUARTERS
RIGHT AWAY !



for nervous disorders of all kinds. If
you are suffering from any form of nerve
trouble you will benefit rapidly from

a course of NUTROPHOS.

.
<
: : ' 2d " vor a

Those sleepless nig! end nerve- 7’ COMPOUND GLIXIR OF
(. THIAMINE CHLORIDE AND »,
PHOSPHOROUS r %,
,
‘

wracked days, when everything seems

to get you down and make you irritable

Ae ¢
POE

a Sean " y 7 sorte soe yeas at
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

WHATA CRAZY THING.A | XITS NOTA RUNAWAYS ITS
RUNAWAY SPEEDBOAT. OUR_ | RADIO-CONTROLLED?
ROWBOATS SUNK.WELLHAVE./ SOMEONES DIRECTING
TO SWIM IN~OH+IT (T FROM SHORE. ITS
TURNED AROUND:* couine BACK / 2
U , >





when you cannot concentrate and find

“4
ee

|
{
|
|
|

no enjoyment in your food—-all these

-

MISSED HER? THEYRE ALL IN THE
WATER NOW! TURNTHE BOAT
AROUND AND TRY

are the result of frayed nerve-ends.
NUTROPHOS is a combination of Thia-

mine Chloride and Phosphorous and is

-








A RUNAWAY SPEED-
BOAT+ WITHOUT A

OSAP ELL LLDPE LIAS
e

PSA FIPSS EO
LOSSES

well-known for its highly beneficial

44
SOY

results in all cases of nerve troubles.
If you want to regain youl natural
good humour and steady nerves, take

NUTROPHOS.

\$ YOU EAT WELL, SLEEP WELL N L] Ee R O P [4 Co Ne
| ¥ and FEEL WELL when you take \ | | oy, o

OOOO OOOO bot tytytytetytyt) a1 OK ES & BYNOE LTD.= AGENT S455:555656665656566 999 OOO9 POO VOTO



CL ALA AAMAS
SLGLSSLSPLES SS





TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1061

CLAS SIFIED ADS. |_2oMuc. sags jpomuic Norms | | waren | | FOH RENT (SHIPPING NOTICES










































po ed Minimum charge week 72 cents and

12 cents .per cpete fn uae o on yond Ten cents per agate line on week-days Minimum charge week 72 cents and Se a ae
nary! . week-days| and 12 cents agate line on Sundaya,! 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24| 96 cents Sundaj

and Gio on Shas = ™ r Canton charge $1.50 on wovk-days) words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

———| and $1,80 on Sundays. word Sundays, word Sundays.) $c ROYAL NETHERLANDS




































(he charge for announcements of REAL ESTATE “a! s HIP CO ae geen Te ne,
t r age 8 “ Deaths, aeaeae ts FOR SALE BUILDING SITE—With private Beach. NOTICE HOUSES TEAMS! ‘e Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and St.
he and In Memoriam notice’ Approximat es, at Derricks, SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM Kitts, iling iday \
$4.50 on Week-days and $1.80 on Sundays! Minimum charge week 2 cente ond Paynes Bay, St, James, For tnenection | Miss NICHOLLS of the Bantord Beauty HELP M.S; "“Oranjestad"10 “Mey 1981 FE
fc number of words a ae} 96 cents Sundays ot — over Miand further information, Dial—2091. toe ae hie eee her a= rs M.S. ““Bonaire’—1lth May 1061. M.V. Cacique Del Caribe will
ents per word on week-days and} words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a) (Omers ‘ .5.51—2p, | that her nw re-opening on] ” «. opening bh, ne M.S. “Hersilia”—24th May 1951. accept Cargo and Passengers for
4 cents per word on Sundays for each| word Sundaun, : eee Sanco Monday 7th May when appointments can! we require the tenlewiog: cae Pranch.| “53 Bedroom Cottage at Christ Church ersilia y sorts Getic and. Pesomseree te
al word. BUY NOW AND BE WISE be made. Dial 2205, before June ist, 1961:— Msin Road, shout 7 miles from City. | SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND and Aruba, Sailing on or about
: The Last and Only Two-Storey Stone- 6.5.51—In} " STENO-TYPIST—experienced — eom-| Modern Conveniences, Spacious mame an ee tea” 14th Dh 1981 18th instant.
For Births, Marriage or =e AUTOMOTIVE wall Business & Residence presently with| — mencing sajary $100.00 per month.| closed Yard. A Large Shop in yuncements in Carib Calling e










































































































x 7 ble Person or
® _ hop vT BDOS CIVIL SERVICE ASSOCIATION] yypisT—also with clerical experience| Street, to a Responsi SAXLING TO TRINIDAD,
ch $3.00 for any number of words CAR — Hillman Minx 1949 model hs ter Aree, Ssan te 22,390 ma, All members of the Subordinate Staffs — commencing salary $75.00 per} Merchant only. Dial—2111. ore ne PARAMARIBO AND GEORGETOWN
wt and 6 cents per word for eseh| Gog Condition. Ring 2674 ‘| A very Desirable 3-Bedroom Cottage at] of the H. & T. Dept. P. W. Dept., month, . M.S. “Hecuba"—6th May, 1951 BW. SCHOONER OWN-
edaditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 6,.5.51—in. | Ch, Ch, Main Rd. Not Far from Plaza,| Pumping Stations, W.W. Dept., Water INVOICING. ASST.—accurate at fig- sn AtEm Keeler: = James M.S. “Bonaire’—29th May, 1961. S ASSOC., INC
between 8.90 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Desth ———————— | Cistins, Modern Conveniences, Large Yard] Poats, Gov't Indust. Schools, Lightnouses, ures — preferably with preyious . t fab ais and baek porches., SAELING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA, ER tp .
Settces only after 4 p.m. CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-| enclosed with Stone, Going for £900 Neit, | Mental and Leper Hospitals, also Postmen, experience on invoicing — com-| New house av ch with» running} CURACAO AND JAMAICA
(Miscadaiicdseeabce. dition. 23,000 miles, new tyres. Can be] A Very Desirable 2-Bedroom Cot Messengers, Market | Sonssties. Public mencing salary $90.00 per month.| Three bedrooms, Sag Ps art | MLS. “Orantested”—-Béth Meee S081, Tele. 4047,
THANKS seen at Port Royal Garage Phone 8385.| Fontabelle, Modern Conetntenses, tole Library Attendants Deputy Marshalls} Written application stating age and) water. Dining room, nd’ modern conven-| § P, MUSSON. SON rp.
. j A. D. Herbert. 3.5.51—4r | for £1,050. An Attractive and Almost] are asked, to attend a special General] previous experience to be sent to Sec-! ope, Servant's room and mo a japan 2 § . MUSS . IN & CO. LTD.,
ae dance . . New Seaside Stonewall Bungalow at St,] Meeting Of Government's Subordinate retary, Dowding Estates and Trading} jences, Phone 2985. Mrs, C. urea Agents.
moa t as chev sige. beg through CAR—Hillman Minx, 1950 model im{ James, An Outlook, Nicely Set in off! Employees to be held in the intitle Company, Ltd., Bay Street. gl _ ¥ z ese to
i Sha’ uae us their sym-| 00d order 9,600 miles. Apply EB. D.| Main Rd, Going for £3100. A new 2-, Court Bridgetown on Tuesday next 8 ina, d 96 | ree emerinen t
we baa cone ieee f the death| Davis, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch.] Bedroom Concrete Bungalow by Lower| at 4.00 p.m, for the purpose of se s —_— | _FurEK rp oad; | Farnished
casion of th jeatt 1.5.51—8n | Fontabelle, Modern Conveniences, Going | a Committee of Management for Division] OVERSHER — An Under Overseer Bungalow. Telephone, gare ida ps
eloved Vivian Ifill 5 — | for £1,100. A %-Bedroom (possible 4)| TIT of the Association and to discuss} wanted at Hanson Plantation with] modern conveniences. Available a . hy a n a iona
Wilson (Mother) ¢ yide aes CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer Bungalow Type (Partly Stonewall), A-1| some very important matters. knowledge and experience of plantation] of May Apply Frederica ae ee
|, VGhildren’.. ‘The ‘Skeet: | refused. Apply to W, BM, Watson C/o} Condition, and a Small 2-Bedreom Stone-| Members and non members of the work. Apply to. Manager in person. | Telephone—3535. 5.5139. | gourEBOUND i
| ; Cr ee ae _| R. & G, Challenor, Speightstown, Phone] wall Residence (almost New) at Hastings | Association please attend. 95.1 | ‘iis
: a gia , 1.5.51—6n | Main Rd., Both Attractive and yield about A, E. LEWIS, — | HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June PR Barbador >
7 hrough Siig 9 erence oncenree ecemeeienteneni ranean $100.00 p.m., Going for Under £3,500, Secretary. KEDIFFUSION require an Announcer] and July. Phone Mrs, A. D. ery CAN. CONSTRUCTOR a April 1 May at 8 May Us Mey
| earn ee One nks tovall those] _CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good Two Attractive and Almost New Stone- 6.5.51—In| -Script Writer, male or {annie spot} | ofa Sh A Saadons ae. pb nal s * my = ey 29 May 30° May
ae a aap - ae aeeatn letters] tyres, in good working condition, price} wali Bungalows, One in and One Near diction and eee at _ oe PALIEACallpeeskc for Gis” vena San a Be 2 ay Pa ney roe a saae
cowwioles ce, or in any way express,| reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay, Staple] Nayy Gardens, One has a Large Flower guage essential. pply abate acta one ste eevee ember, | Cany as , coe ene it Far ja done os June
thelr sympathy in our recent death] Grove, Christ Church, Dial i tin, | Garden, Going for Under £3.00 seh. 1 soot & FOUND Trafalgar Street. S5,6-~-Ss Tat Mrs, 1. Weatherhead C/o J. N.| rapy iit “"30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July
; PEM ee eee ca | —ereepheinel erwin teers toe Gs rea Sa eee a MISCELLANEOUS iarriman, 5.5,51—4n. | LADY RODNEY *330 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug.
Paris MeCollin (Wite) ond ehil-]CAR; One Standard 10 h.p, Sound £3,000 Nett. About One Acre Seaside | -- Hh at Ce No. 6 Swan Street — Upstairs Premi- wus —
v 6.5.81.--In.| mechanical order, New Exide 12 V.] Land, Near City, Going for Under 34 cts - LOST nee pan | NO. 6 Swan Street, — Upstairs pre - ae
, Battery. Phone 2880- ween a.™.} ber sq. ft. C Me for Real Estate and Be ’ ses. 8 ss 5 ices a
and 3 p.m, 55.51—2n| Convinced. Dial 3111. D. F. de Abreu STAKE TICKETS — Serien| (In tins or tubs) 12 Fishtail Palms Ae Ta pS NORTHBOUND Arrives Bale or a ee fri,
RIAM ~~ _s=-—. | Call at Olive Bough, Hastings. SWEEPS. 0590 — 0599, 0610 — o6i9,| (Canvota) 12 Sago Palms, 12 Portlandia, | APP! , > 51i—In. | LADY RODNEY ON ey 9 May uae ‘es ms ou 26 May
IN MEMO CAR—Hillman Car M—1799~in good | ©*! | b620 0629" Finder please return same} Miss Nell Manning, Tel, 4062. , Plea ah Stig tae a PaBYy REM ie eet Bee a pid te sp sue
—| working ovder. Apply Frank Froverb:! LAND—Approximately 3,000 square feet | 9020, >- 208). Fave ere OFFICES above Lashlay's Ltd., Prince] LADY RODNEY 1.3 July 8 July 14 July se 16 July 19 July
C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd-, High) o¢ land at Stream Road, Christ Chureh ss —_— ——___—__—- Gua |william Henry Street. Apply: J. &. Y ON ll27Juky 29 July ¢ Aug. Aug. 12 Aug.
yee Maino ORR hy 5.5.51—5n} adjoining the Public Road. Appi’: One (1) Second Hand Chaff Cutter. Rat nig ie 3.5.51-_—6n. Peay eee “Gus iwack § sane 3 Sept. 21 Sept.
JONES—I ee: ee ae highet R C. Chapman C/o Messrs. Carrington J ‘ SALES Apply X c/o Advocate Co., Ltd. : Fee tne iekotne sable catia ate
Edgar Jones who was called to higher CAR—1937/38 1937/38 Vauxhall 14-6. Can be} @ Sealy. 27.4,51-—6n Pl BLIC 4.5.51—3n PARAISO—From June Ist, Barbarees| N.B,—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham=
on May 4th 1949. tiful garden) seen “ Courtesy Garage. PROM 461 eee aoa eeetesins xD — Experienced} Road, within one mile of the City. bers. Passenger Fares and freigat rates on a atian to:—
re ean tint x G. L, Challenor 4626, 5.5,51—3n | “LT AND—Only a few spots remaining at POSITION WANTED — Expe Dee. | eo ubaa “gellagten, Lanitanh pplic
. fror sorrow and pain ee roaming Worthing View so be sure to an female helper desires position in linen and: Diding m, three Bedrooms,
‘ . P . Room, enna
e day when life's journey 4 " CARS-—Wolseley 1948 14 HP. Mori: yours before all go. The gots 7 ran AUC'rION room of Hotel or Guest House & vise Kitchenette, Tiled Shower and Tub,
a ee you again 1946 10 HP.. Morris 1941 10 H.P.| from 6,000 to 12,000 sq. ft. ° STE TTT | ployment in, private Home. | Country }Po ty with’ hot water Upstairs, Large
oo" inital Bandon, | Morse oxtora, 10a ia Hg Maru] pices tance, trom. 0600 to, $20%. 00] By Tasructigna receved_T wil sell pretrrea. Wehe ‘MS.A. c'o ASvocue Juin ih, hot “water Upsalt. Langs GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents
Eve to be remem eree ontiaies) and | Minor 1950 8 H.P., Austin 1947 8 HP. per spot. For particulars see D'Arcy] by Public Auction on the spot at Bank — Basement. Gas and Electricity, Garage ha le %
TOTTENCe, GinNs Ford Van 10 H.P. ‘a real bargain. Ford] a. Scott, Magazine Lane, Dial 3743. Hatt Main Rosd 4th house fom AB











































































































































































































































































Ford V/8 1938 Coupe 2.5.51—3n. | souls Church, Thursday next the for two cates Apply Yearwood &
f 5.51—1n. | V/8 1935 Fo / . +90 , on ursday e) Boyce, James reet.
6.5 All these Gon on peed Fire in pe Pearce A ee 10th May et 2 o'clock, One, three- Kill those throbbing pains in oy! 6.5.51—T.F.N
5EOOSSOGISOSSS, respective classes and pi range. nr eres land table roof jouse WwW ut-offices,
§ VOCS PORAPSSS Fort Royal Garage Ltd., Thane 4508 for building, in lots of mot Jess than) 414 t the highest bidder. Must be your muscles at once! Apply J—.. ———————________-
% iti h — ‘ 4 oe Sustip + m ? ce 6:6 .61 , TO LET—In Marine Ds il ey 7
i : le ae ae | = = By mee, ag FFICE REQUISITES
$ West Indian & British MOTOR CYCLE — vee an S. aipasne eqvinennent. 9. Pine 5 minster’ y Sloan's Liniment lightly sarenent with epactna | verandahs, Write O
. Hand made Crafts, n . Apply W. roan Barber, ver . ve to Crane . GM. C/, Advoeate Co.
Fata. Hand ie ees S| crete brome oves,__8 Tea Ue Soe oa ee is e"aecn| UNDER "THE SILVER Be shits e
% weer, Decoration House, St aoeee One aa te Ford Station | Apply to W. I. Webster, Moncrieffe, St. HAMMER Siniagion’ Lo Wcawale Game” 4
+ ¥ James. Tel. 91-74, 14.4.51—1m. Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508] John. — ‘Phone 95-252. eh kttaste fea atk, sey ot Mid bedrooms, fully furnished, From 1st
3 oe Met Se Sceeggar 1 opensismeneesrinenarsentinunideprenii ve, Baynes we will sell her furniture inp to sist Lamia. Bent. Sees ae Roller Dampers, Glass Ink Stands, Glass Pen
VCO BEEOSECCCE SEO SSO SHOP AND LAND—No. 77 Roebuck] 4¢ “sopan’ St Lawrence Gap. which month, Dial 2259, 5.51—
SSS FURNITURE Street. Apply to N. Seahy, Fontabelle.} inciudes — Very nice Square Tip-Top ‘Trays, Paper Weights, Stamp Racks, Rubber
: een ae Dial 4007, 28.4.51—6n Dining Table hes 6), Vere Chaith, You don’t rub in “Sloan's” you dab it ds, Stapli Machin a
ITU ne e - . © , F n ‘ard ani s
MAPLE MANOR een seat 12, Price 40.00, Phone] SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: situntea) W780, Tea Trolley, Folding Card and! 1 affected part gently“ Sloan's” PERSONAL Stamps, Stamp Pads, Stapling Machines an
GUEST HOUSE 4117 811 a.m. 4—6 p.m, §.5.51—3n, at Ventnae Gardens. Ch. Ch. Ares, eon andah Chairs, Settee and Morris Chairs) dats the rest! Good for (=r Staples, Wire Trays and Wire Baskets, Letter
_———————————_$_$$—————— nl 1,962 sq: ft. with cushions in Cyp. ine Fla of ‘ SUNK
>POS STINGS ROCKS 2206 Day and 465 Night. 2,5.51—+.1.n. | Desk, Bookshelf, very nice China aches and pains and stiff
oe teins HAST re LIVESTOCK That deviable two woried rechold| Cabinet, Paintings, “Congoleum, Rugs. | joinus too! The public are hereby warned against Seales, Dating Machines and Pencil Sharpeners,
el. 3021, . " —e a lesirable two O1 Oval Mirror, Glass are, Luncheon f EDIT! p
agen ema. rallies mits ctrerbert. dwellinghouse known as “Culloden} Service for 8. Plated Ware, Norge Re- LOOK FOR THE ELRIDGE "GERTRUDE “BLACKMAN Metal Edge Rules,
i Tudor ‘Street, Gis.” “'5.581-an| View”, situate at the junction of Cul- frigerator in perfect working order.| pi¢rURE OF DR. SLOAN ( PILE) or any person. in my name
eee —eeeSaaaoaoaoeoeaoaoaouu r nial cocleindeet sure ane Psi Wrage ing 1oebe cecuieek Bigtee Lamp, Children's ements Bie ‘OM THE PACKET art do not hola myself responsible for
fn Jand ere containing f Cradle, Press, Dressing Table, Toy - 2 less
. = » MISCELLANEOUS feet. The house contains drawing and Shelves, all painted White, Larder, py wee earecres ae gece jess
dining rooms, library, kitchen, bath and] kitchen Cabinet, Breakfast Table and y a wri CECIL, W. BLACKMAN,
ANTIQUES — Of every description.) toilet downstairs and upstairs, four Chairs, 2-Burner Valor Oil Stove and “Walrondville”,
L E Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver| pedrooms (one with bath and _ toilet), Oven, Pressure Cooker, Scales, Kitchen } Bonnets, Clapham,
Water-colours. Early books, | Maps.| Two servants rooms, garage for 1 gar! tytensils, Electric Toaster, Iron and other LINIMENT St. Michael.
Autographs ete., wit ia ag a aor and tool room (all built of stone), in the} items, ‘Sale 11.30 o'clock. ae cae hotell! 6.5.51—3n
| Shop, adjoining ya ac ub, yard, és I chemists
j OH | 3.9.50—t.t.n.|""phe date of sale will be published en ae

| _—_—— “> ee feu
| ARSENOCRINE ampoules, for Anemia.| “ Ingpection between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. —2n S
| Overwork. Preunancy, Hemormhages andl anyday except Sundays on Appolit: de IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE WINDWARD ISLANDS
| 4 Siructions with every box. "(Laboratories| ment with the owner Mr. St. Clair Hunte, —_—— AND LEEWARD ISLANDS, ANTIGUA CIRCUIT

OBERLIN -~ FRANCE.) Obtainable , A.D. 1951
es G. L. W, CLARKE & CO.,, d 2 .D,

Legaing Drugeists: Se eaee soucitors, |Advertise... It Pays
| ‘ | ACTUMUS —- The Root Hormone Fer- ane In the Matter of .the Title by Registration Act Chapter 99
eee coe, et Arch eo vo and of Antigua Syndieate Estates Limited, Morteapets. ne

Store, eapane-O0, ‘ -bst d Registered Proprietor

INE RD H John Cecil ebster, Mortgagor an
| ACTUMUS — The Key to Growing PART O ORDERS under the said Act, is.
| A.F.S. 'V.A, aver ~ from H. Keith Re ae dela a Bs ;
| 2 Lue ‘ jeut.-Col, J. , O.B.E., E , 4 4 5
Ce : “ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests — Commanding, é : :

from H. Keith Archer's Drug Store. THE BARBADOS REGIMENT ss

| : ! ISSUE No, 18 4 MAY, 51. :

| GERALD WOOD ee 3.5,.51—5n.
wa a 1. PARADES—Training ~ zi

| in eel te nae ene weit All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1/700 hours on Thursday

| Manure, From H. Keith Archer's Drug i May 51. They Will Sapesnue sebeareing ae ae ping 8 Birthday marae ae
3 E ‘Oy arrangements, is the last opportunity to carry ou ‘0;

| FOR SALE ' ihn
| ACTUMUS — The Fertilizer of th te
COUNTRY HOUSE, St, Peter— Future—Inoreases. the Sarthwoem Donan 5 Band. practicos will be held on Monday 7 Wednesday 9 and Thursday 10 May 51.

es ost attractive property © ion of soils, From H, Keith Archer's B—Oficors S, b belts sie ‘
ioe Island creating the D: Sto: In future the normal dress for all parades for Officers will be berets, wel Fi :
| aye on oe Small manor rye ee, 3.5.51—6n, hosetops, boots ard short puttees, The Orderly Omcer will continue to wane .

1 tmosphere - ae Sree catetatia t i or lectures, , . g $ H
| house cleverly ads ane ae ACTUMUS — Produced by Dr. S. whem thoy are ash Lareiiege Gant ae mee ee aT ed Here’s our cheque from John M. Bladon paid within

climate with wide eee aa Sak eee England, eliminates All Ranks
} turing natural stone areh sease at the roots of plants. From H. Thi t , 7
| 0 nicely ae RO Ne Gane Selth Archer's Drug Store 3,5.51—Bn. Be a double fold at the 195. "Phe fold must be the length of a cigarette packet. 48 hours of the auction and only charging 10%, I

grille wor ne LO P
} tains g-aitting room, study, draw. EN FRE STOCK-IN-TRADE Furniture]: ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING : would certainly recommend anyone to have John
| Siegen aun ea, Soubie Bed Hl) Swan Street wock yaied aoe sisaes | Gedy OMeer ....,aYLeut. A. at. Clarke ience i
| eae he “own bath and Store could’ be leased. for 2, years, Orderly Serjeant .. =... a4 Sit Williams, Bs 2, | ee Bladon auction their furniture if our experience is
} toilet), tub bath with, Apt ae inper interested write T. C/o “Shee Next at Po tint “TA: Git | Bias % ‘“

arge atage and 5.51— rderly icer P i eut. ens eee ¢ y apitent
| yooms, Pa ‘mains aerell laid et re eh as ne, a ae Orderly Serjeant . ¢ 278 Sjt Williams, §. D Bias Tae any criterion.
| proximately 3 acres we' GALVANIS s
it eeu fs obhamental hd tee new sheets, ay ctr lehas The iand’! M. L, Be a na Masor, AU

d and mahogany trees 6 8.0 utant, CT NWN
ra re a oea Yee ton o ft 08; 7 ft A tt $6. "elven oe The Barbados Regiment. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to =e panes Of We
with sea bathing close at hand. A. BARNES & CO., LTD r PART II ORDERS Supreme Court of the Windward Islands and Leewa s be high-
" FLATS", Cod. E4150) ee AD EROS. REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 16 | the 8ist day of March, 1951, I will sell at public auction to the hig ;
“WHITEHALL x oye Ma 56 —_—_—_——— 3RD MAY 51 SHEET NO. 1. Thursda the 7th day of June, 1951, at 2 o’clock in
utton Hill, St. Michael ah oe HAMAMELIODE drops, cure for Vart~ | errr eee | CSt bidder, on 4 a, rt House, St. John’s, Antjgua, ALL THAT
reset Utar a block of & apacie cose Veins — Hemorrhoids, Menopause STRENGTH DECREASE Dismissals the afternoon at the Cou J Villa” but formerly
converted intg a block 0} = n ~ Congestions and circulatory troubles. 233 L/S Blackman, A oO piece or parcel of land now known as Barant illa u
ez entencen The wounds (Laboratories OBERLIN-FRANCE) Ob- 402 Pte King, L 8, part of Tomlinsons Estate, one of the Gunthorpes Estates, sue oe
nox. § acres are iaid out with tainable at leading Druggists. oop uti, Ss he the Parish of Saint John in the Island of Antigua, comprising = a AB.S., F.V.A.
“a jie sacway = SE eee: 260 Gibson, P! A! acres, of which said land JOHN CECIL WEBSTER is Ma reer
: lage n —— . 4 hy ‘
| Srach” fant with mahogany INVESTMENT SHARES in Barbados “il eel A re: proprietor under Certificate of Title Register Book R Folio 7 0 : Plantations Building
| trees. An investment property or Seen caoclety and.” Bubscription 340". Ingram, "A. L Register of Titleg of the Antigua Circuit.
\ table for conversion into Guest Shares at one dollar per month, Phone 477 Hinds, "Ht ; Na : St. Jonn’
| House or Nursing Home, 3% miles Secretary 4476 Barnes Ruiaios, diccae 346 * Miller, J. Articles of sale may be seen at the Registrar's Ome | t. John’s, ,
| from. Town, ee $ 443 .~«, «Griffith, E. o. Dismissed from the Regiment by the ; j workin ours of said office, -——_—

| smicmecreu, ith Avenue, |] “CARDERSOne “Large Pine Larder, | $27‘ Brout.’st. ¢ C2 ing iy naeetondanne, 4} paredhe | ABH ENS! On! any ey “during ihe ,
| peilevilie-Well maintained bunga: In Good Condition, Phone—2169. 451, Mayers, W. wef 14 May 51, Dated the 4th day of April, 1951.
| low. constructed of te with 6,5.51—in, LEAVE—Privilese N. A, eee.
| lab hingled roo’ e ace ~ , B. Gr 3 ths’ P/Leave wef 1 May $1 e rar.
| commmnodation consists of an en- PRAM — (one) Convertible Pram $16 Cpl Williams, B Tented D. SKEWES.COX. Major, zu bi IST EEs IF ED
; closed vallery, living room, dining in good condition Ring—3195, $O.L.F. & Adjutant, See Some teneaeeclnn ~

roor our bedrooms, kitchen, ser- 6.5.51.~—In. The Barbados Regiment.

x room and aouble garage.

Erde." ‘matt orchard and |W] « tor a Go. Moebeek Senet. fh | SPRING ROUND-UP ADVERTISEMENTS

we side, a small orchard and A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00 | memes snpereseenseueemeeneeeee E

is falls _ enclosed anes a oer 98 Ib, bag. Dial 2628, i
| Sects sree eat town tol beni oiom!| ORIENTAL w

anted For Cash
r Ss smemrensepremnnininpeanenenenpennsaemcunieaenenssinitie
ba ‘) met saa Pa ce proper- SAILING DINGHY, half decked 12 &, SOUVENIRS, CURIOS, Veed and Unused POSTAGE " ieee didi £8. eee dad aeeasibiabinde ‘ber
| de standing ap speros. 1% Saene 50 due ant end Me fe Mette: tier Oe eee STAMPS of the British West (WESTERN DRESS) e Advocate Co., Ltd.,
| the “buy” ef the year at £5,500, fitted out and 10 ft. Rowing Dinghy to- New Shipment opened " he ri District
house lends itself to easy gethcr $200 also International Torpadg Indies. Good Prices Paid at the bee ate classified advertisements to be taken by various
| conversion into attractive flats and Kit $300. Telephone 91-61. 6.5.51—~ THANI’S DIAL CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY RAL

2 % acre of land at the side could 3466 No. 10, Swan Street, on Agents and so far the following have been authorised to

bi wold ‘oft readily as a building ae SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1951
E Frenetee acuurat’ prmnucins as" ,,, MAIL NOTICE 2090559000000 TO OOOH, In aid of the St, Winifred’s receive them :
| from the main prop- eorett ares TH pomeines, Mont: 7 Building Fund
| on w.atane, wall, Bosioii, Halifax,’ Montreal by the RMS. FA IR The St. David's Chureh eo Music . + bh Poli MOSES G NS JOSEPH JEMMOTT
| , “INCH MARLOW — On arovox {il Uetleegt Beet Omen sends = In Aid of — A alls iy le ages
| 2. acres _coastle na _near_, Silver Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered Mail St, WINIFR®D'S BUILDING FUND Annual Basaar - ‘he eee rideeioner of © @\Dayrells Road, Ch, Ch. St. Elizabeth Village,

Ronee, with selaien ay ous ina the 6th May, ibe mere» ener Se sngae = will be held in the } Police. St. Joseph.

ft ing, 4 reception yedrooms, ’ 8 ‘i ey 5

verandah, as throoms and ee ST. WINIFRED Ss on SATURDAY ah MANO DANCING 9.00 p.m, | Mrs. U. L.. BRUCE,

2 kitchens, 2 servants’? rooms, 3 pm ) 00 sale now

: a artments but PINE HILL Be i Tickets $1.00 on Ma: Road, Ch. Ch. 8. A.. DURANT
| easy 40. eeseun ee on — aris, TOde opened by )) Sharkskin, Jersey, Plain & Refreshments will be on sale well f Bint” " disssaie

FLORENCE GODDARD } ‘ ' Horse . Joseph.

y 1 ore SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1951 By the kind permission of riped Support this worthy cause! . 3 ’

% ee ee rel ac fone Ne store from 3—6 p.m. ne pee ioe i Stri ) Silver & Gold Tinsel | Dress Optional OQ. McCONNEY,

Cor h with approx. § : kind mission of Colonel ie ce and will be in . ! YY.
| sy Baws ABR Fe michelin ue petieg Baad will we apmreranatenannee Crepe & Georgette, Plain & {{{ 1) xen Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch.. EBENEZER PHARMACY,
| There are 5 bedrooms, in attendance. $ % '

& # Ginn eam, ‘ritehen, cenclllent ang Sian KEEP THE DATE OPEN Cntdren 6d, eA eee eee A COUNTRY FAIR | JOSEPH ALLEYNE, ere
\ . servants’ rooms, 2 garage properties hich keep his 7 . Satins, Tafetas, Spuns, Etc. {{}\ :

i “various outside” busidings, | \tender skin healthy and Q) X= AY | Sosooooossooossooesosss will be held under the Crane, St, Philip. Vv. HOLDER,

a: property is well elevated and ‘ Hats, Shoes, Nylons, t e of

| commends exeellent views of the A G F t 5 ar. és ues 3 Wilki a St., Judes, St. George.
| anaes erate, nd Modern High School St. James’ Combi na

i \ Ropkiy ; ne d of ae , ern Ig C at St. James’ Combined G. Q E,

B ding . Land Rock ley yew j y
ma | (All Souls Church Funds) 3 MONDAY, May 14th
4 in this WHIT y ’

mere than 4a 4 ee ns ‘at : y Education) e | 3—10 p.m Pine Gap, St, Michael.
| popular new developit are , a mM. x
| near Golf Club } EMPIRE CLUB GROUNDS LONDOw CHAMBER OF |]] Refreshments, Sweets, Snack E, HINKSON,

2 OF : $ COMMERCE CERTIFICATE John White Shoes, Shirts, {||| Bar, Pudding and Souse, V. RICE
| % WHIT MONDAY, May 14th STAGE RESULT ‘“ , : , Ice Cream, Ete. Massiah Street, St. John. ‘ >
| FOR RENT 1: en ae , Two candidates, Euraline iocks, Ties, H'k & Hats. Dancing from 6— -.e 4 ‘ Bank Hall Road,
i ADVERTISE ‘ pPm.—6 p.m. — S Bentham and Alvin. May- The Police Band conducte H., L. CAVE, Mi 1
| (as CHANCERY” on. Coast at % Variety Stalls — Dancing nard, were entered for {i\{{ LET US SERVE YOU. by Capt. Raison, A.R.C.M. Pi Mia a St.. Michael.
| Silver Sands. Furnished i % Merry Go-Round — Pony ¢ book-keeping at the Autumn will: be. in attendance, by St. John’s Dispensary, - say ee Rie
| .qwInDY WILLOWS"—Prospect, me the Rides Etc. Examination, 1950; both } “kind permission of Colonel + = wee E, LORDE

st James, Unfurnished house on nm ADMISSION — — I/- Michelin. Peneoede in ae of . iH. A Bank Hall X Road,

r with & bedrooms, lounge, the Baptist car—

erandah, overlooking sea ete. ADVOCATE 29.4.5)—3n. % * aOR P Near Sharon, St, Thomas. St, Michael,
s Immediate possession. 5 q ° Admission : 4
| VAVERLEY”, St. Lawrence— om Adults 1/- :o: Children 6d. . ‘

j 3 bedroomed furnieh- : > 99.4.51—3n. Items may be handed into the above for the following
€ bungalow. Available 1 , x { “

lease if required, 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH NOTICE | ANNUAL DANCE f Columns in the Classified Section : :

DY LODGE”, St. James Mr. John Hammond begs %, ETC.
| Furtiched Chalet with the ‘best (3 p beach and bathing the tilend has an ne ee ee eee for his White Elephant Stall EMPIRE CLUB ; Ifyou wish a good FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

aa is causing a sensation at the Festi- at the Country Fair in aid ef 1 r
ST ra kilns (ETE vit ct susiio, Se the St. John the Baptist asra MAY" 1951 HAND SPRAYER
pointed furnished apartments. — | aS ve Pee aed Vicarage, on May 14, O at the ; ia '
_JOHNSON'S STATIONERY clothes, books, magazines, CLUB’S PAVILION Try our special 1 qt. size just receives. ADVOCATE CO. LTD.
REAL ESTATE AGENT | a crea china, glass, in fact, re Bank Hall ’
AUCTIONEER ENAMEL-IT PAINTS for your including money wi e Subscription 3/- Sa an hy , :
Dee am gratefully accepted. ; Music: Mr. Percy Green’s CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. T. Gale. Advertising Manager
PLANTATIONS BU ILDING | jg Pet Furniture is at - - - Telephone 2292 for things Orchestra : :
’Phone 4640 ' JOHNSO HARDWARE to be collectd. Admission by Invitation Pier Head.
‘al
” 4 SST NON ae . aS aa POSEN SDE tt a RATAN LTTE SITLL,







SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1951

Faiths Barbadians Live B.B.C. RADIO NOTES :
By—11

The New Testament Church of God
By James F. Brathwaite

The New Testament Church

of God is the name of the local R

church which has been received
by and comprises a part of the
General Assembly of the Church
of God, whose International
Headquartérs are at 2502 Mont-
gomery Avenue, Cleveland Ten-

nesse, U.S.A. e@ church was
incorporated by ial Statue of
the Megiatature this Island on

December 30, 1940.

It n its work here in 1936
when . J. H, Ingrim made
his first visit to Bar! during
his Missionary tour of the West
Indies.

Rev. Ingrim who said that he
had been “led of the spirit” to
call here, met the late Rev. J. H.
Marshall, and Rev. C. N. Ford.
These had for some years beén
carrying on Pentecostal Meetings
at Eckstein Village, and at River
Road. They welcomed. the visit
of Rev. Ingrim and decided to
link up their two Churches, with
the American Movement at
Cleveland, Tennessee which Rev
Ingrim represented.

From this time the work began
to spread rapidly throughout the
whole Island. To-day it is being
carried on in the eleven parishes,
with 33 organised assemblies, and
a communicant membership. of
just over 2,000 persons.

2 The Parent Body at Cleveland,
Tennessee, ‘had, its beginning as
far back as_1886. when the..Rev
Richard G. ing was thoved
upon by the Spirit, and began to
search the Bible, and Church
History, for God’s plan concern-
ing His Church, In the Year 1886
he organiséd 4 Chufch with éight
members in the Barney Creek
Meeting-house in east Tennessee.
It was from this small group that
the denomination started.

This little organisation strug-
gled along until January 1906
when they assembled in a General
Meeting at the home of Rev.
J.C. Murphy, in the same com-
munity, to discuss plans for better
Government. and methods o
expansion. This meeting became
known as the first General Assem-
bly. Co-incidentally, this was
the year that Los Angeles, Cali-
fornia, was visited by a great
outpouring of the Holy Ghost.

The second General Assembly
fook place at the Union Church
House about fourteen miles from
Cleveland, Tennessee, in a rurat
section of Bradley County. At
this General Assembly the organ-
ization was named the Church of
God. In this same year 1907, the
first evangelistic efforts were
made in the City of Cleveland,
Tennessee. The Third General
Assembly was held there.

Up to this time, the Chaniecat
Overseer who had been moderator
at two General Assemblies and
was Pastor of the local Church in
Cleveland. had not yet received
the Baptism of the Holy Ghost.

To the Third General Assembly
ev. T. G. Cashwell, of North
Carolina was invited. Rev. Cash-
well had been to Los Angeles,
California, and had received the
Baptism of the Holy Ghost in the
great. Pentecostal yn ere |
there. This Evangelist preaché
on the Saturday night after a
Assembly had closed, and on the
Sunday morning during the Ser-
vice the General Overseer was
baptized with the Holy Ghost.

From this time the Church at
Cleveland began a great Revival.
work grew as never before.

In fact, during the whole year. of
1908 there was a revival in the
new Church at Cleveland. It was
a great time of soul saving, sanc-
tification of believers, and Holy
Ghost baptisms. e sick were
healed, and pédple laid prostrate
under the Power of God for hours.
Many of the older members still
look back on those days with joy.

One of the intérésting things in
the history of this Church of God
movement is the way it started.
Many of the Church organizations
of today were started by factions
splitting off from other churches,
usually a group of ministers who
sought leadership. Other organi-
zations have been born hy the
uniting of smaller grqups into one
body. This movement did not
have its beginning in either way.
God used a small group isolatéd
in the hills of .Eastern Tennessee
and Western Carolina and led
them step by step to build the
Movement which has become
world-wide within the last 50
years. There are now 2a
churches in the U.S.A., 1,080
churches in foreign lands, 3,202
ministers preaching a full Bible
Gospel, and just over 200,000 com-
municant members.

The Church has not forgotten
the educational side of its work.
The Lee College located in Cleve-
land, Tennessee, owned and oper-
ated by the Church with an en-
rolment of between six and seven
hundred students, has the High-
School division, Junior college
division, and also the religious-
education division. This Institu-
tion provides a four-year fully
accredited college, and a fully ac-
credited Bible College course.

There are a number of other
schools that are training ministers
and christian workers.

he work in Barbados has
grown steadily and has even ex-
tended to some other colonies.
There are now Assemblies here in
one parish of the island, four
in St. Vincent, one in St. Luica,
two in Dominica, five in St. Kitts,
and one each in the islands of
Nevis and St, Martin.

The fécént visit of Rev. J. B.
Reesor with his ministry of Faith
Healing, has hel the public in
general to régard the New Testa-
ment Church of , with more
respect, and with greater confi-
dence than ever before.

~ CHURCH SERVICES

COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH

Gilkes. -—t
ETHEL
EMPIRE YOUTH SUNDAY
Uo a.m. and 7 p.m, v..B, Crosby
Holy Se a aft th Service.
9 a.m, Rev, B. Crosby Holy Communion
7 p.tn, P. Deane.
BELMONT
11 a.m. Rev. M. A. EB Thomas. Holy
Communion; 7 p.m. Mr, Bi arper,
SOUTH aie

UT T
9 am, Rev. M. A, nora, Holy

Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. A, L. Mayers,
PROVIDENCE
11 a.m. Mr, C. Best; 7 p.m. Mr. J.
Clarke
VAUXHALL

11_a.m, Mr, C, Jones; 7 p.m. Rev. M.
A. E. Thomas.

JAMES §' ET

Tl a.m. Rev. J. S. Boulton

Holy Communton, 7 p.m, Rev.
ton, Holy Communion.

PAYNES BAY
9,30 a.m. Mrs. Phillips; 7 p.m. Mr. PF.

Moore
WHITE HALL
9.30 a. ay R, a ge Holy
Communion, p.m junt.
GILL huMontac
1l_ a.m, Rev, R. M., eC gnough, Holy
Communion; 7 p.m . St. HM,

LETO
8,30 a.m. Mr. G, Matville; 7 p.m, Mr.

cott.
BANK HALL
--9.30 am. Mr. J T Oxley; 7 p.m, Mr
G. Me Allister
SPEIGHTSTOWN
11 a.m, Mr. Mc Clean; 7 p.m. Rev. R
McCullough. Holy Communion.

11 a.m, Mr. E L_ Bannister;
BETHESDA

11 a.m, Mr, Greaves; 7 p.m, _,

ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

7 p.m, Evensong and Sermon, Even-

(Broadeast)
J. 8. 1-

7pm








song led by Rev. L. B. Clarke, Preacher
Rev, J. B. Grant \.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

A. First Church of Christ, Scientist, Bridge-
Bay. Street

§ 1
Subject of Lesson—Sermon: Everlasting

punishment.

Golden Text: Ezekiel 18:30, Repent, and
turn yourselves from all your trans-
gressions; so iniduity shall not be your

ruin,
ST. PAUL'S
7.30 an, Holy Communion; 9.30 a m
Solemn Mass a ion; 3 p.m. Sun-
day School and Procéssion to Youth Ser-
vice; 3.15 p.m, Solemn Baptism; 7 p m.
Solemn Evensong, Sermon and Proces-
sion, Preacher; The Rev. G. W. Silk M.D.
Priest from the Diocese of Derby, Eng-
land,
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.n. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Major eet.
WELLINGTON STREET
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting,
Preacher : Sr.,Major. Gibbs.
, PIE CORNER
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher: Sr. Major Hollingsworth,
DIAMOND. CORNER
11 a.m, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Com
pany Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Captain e.
CARLTON
11 a.m, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Preacher : Captain Bourne.
FOUR ROADS
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Lieutenant Gunthorpe.

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Preacher: Lieutenant Gibbons.

8ST. LEONARD'S
8 a.m. Holy Communion; 9 a.m. Choral

Eucharist & Address; 10.30 a.m. Holy






JUST RECEIVED!



West Indians
At Festival

In “West Indian Diary”

ON Friday next, llth. May,
there will be a change in the char-
acter of the B.B.C. programm:
‘West Indian Diary.’ In place o/
the previous form of interviews
of the West Indians in Britain—
incidentally did you heat _ the
West_ Indian students at Oxford
on Friday 4th May?—the pro-

gramme will consist of a News- *!—*

letter, Postscript, Interview and
Round-up with emphasis on
Britain in Festival time and Wes
Indians now on holiday in Britain
for it. Broadcast continues at the
regular time of 7.15 p.m. on the
25 and 31 metre band beams.
Festival Sidelights

Two B.B.C. talks in the com-
ing week will give listeners to
the B.B.C’s General Overseas
Service first-hand impressions 6!
‘the lesser-known attractions o/
the Festival of Britain now in it;
second week which offers endles:
treasure-trove to interested
observers. On Tuesday, 8th inst.
John Betjeman will talk. abou:
‘Festival Oddities’ describing some
of the more or less orthodox
architectural wonders of the south
Bank with spécial reference to
‘Eceentrics’ Corner.’: John Bet-
jeman.is well known as a writer
and broadcaster with a gift of
fantasy and a flair for whimsical
architecture. On Thursday, 10th
inst. Hugh.Casson, an- architect
who has been responsible for the
architectural side of the 1951
Exhibition from its beginnings,
will ‘talk, ‘not about his’ Brain-
child, but on the Fun Fair in the
Festival Gardens at Battersea
Park, covering twenty-seven acres
“e aoe ae er these
alks wi Ven at.7.45 p.m.
right after the West Indies pro-
grammes. Remember the dates,
Tuesday and Thursday, 8th and
10th inst.

AH Serial

Taking the place of “Sorréll
and Son” on Mondays will be
Thomas Hardy's great novel, “The
Mayor of Casterbridge.” The
story has been dramatised for
broadcasting by Desmond Haw-
kins, a feature. writer and pro-

ducer in the B.B.C’s West of
England Region, who is an
authority on Hardy and_ his

beloved Wessex. The music is by
Vaughan Williams, another Wes-
sex man whose passion for folk-
jore is as great as Hardy’s own
and whose music is infused with
Hardy’s sense of the forces which
struggle for mastery within a
human being. ®roadcast will be
at the regular time of B.B.C.

serials, namely 7.15 p.m. on
Mondays, beginning on the 7th
inst. ;

J. B. Priestley

J. B. Priestley is much in news
of B.B.C. programmes in the
coming week. On Sunday, 6th
inst. hé gives the first of his new
series of talks called “The Spur
of the Moment” reflecting his
impromptu thoughts and salty,
candid, human, homely observa-
tions on life and letters. These
talks will be given at 5.05 p.m.
on Sundays. In addition, Priest-
ley’s play, ‘The Linden Tree’ will
be broadcast in “Radio Theatre”
beginning at 8.30 p.m. on Satur-
day, 12th inst, Gladys Young and
Edward Chapman také the lead-
ing parts.

“After the war I was describing
how I had returned to one of my
favourite lochs and hew I strug-
gled with one of the b st trout
of my life, playing him to a stand-
still. My talk was translated into
Spanish and reached South Amer-
ica. Months afterwards I got an
indignant letter from an afficion..
ado of the bull ring tebuking mu
for my cruelty! “Our bulls,” he
said, “die in proud fighting, your
trout in cold terror,” It was a
strange experience for a rather
mild Scotsman to be chided for
cruelty by a fan of the bull ring
But you know, I think I saw what
he meant.”

MORAY McLAREN,
(in a BBC Programme).



Baptism; 11 a.m. Matins & sermon; 3
p.m, Sunday School; 7 p.m, Evensong
end Sermon,
ROEBUCK sT.
11 a.m, Rev, D. C. Moore, (Holy Com-
munion); 7 p.m. Rev. A. C. Pilgrim.

GRACE HILL ea ae
rai a.m, Mr. w Wivde 7 ~.th, Mr. U
s . FU
11 am. Mr. T. aS p.m. Mr. oO
Lewis.

7 om. a
7 p.m. Mr 8 sin

eekes,
DUNSCOMBE
11_a.m, Mr. G. C. Lewis; 7 p.m. Mr
C. Green.



“PREMIER” ELECTRIC KETTLES WITH
| AUTOMATIC THERMAL
CUT-OUT AND
ELECTRIC TOASTERS

A NEW SHIPMENT OF CERAMIC TABLE LAMPS

COLOURS:—

Tweedside Road
Phone 4629

ee

RESIDA GREEN, PIGEON BLUE, LIGHT BLUE,
TURQUOISE, MOTHER-OF-PEARL AND MAHOGANY

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED

St. Michael
& 437

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



. e.
B.B.C. Radio
Programme
SONDAY, MAY 6, 1951
0.20 au tae S een one
ae sin
6.30 a.m. Week-end Sports Report,
£45 a.m. Sandy MacPherson at the
Theatre Organ, 7 a.m. The News, 7.10
a.â„¢. News Analysis, 7.15 a.m, From the
Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme Parade,
7.30 a.m. English Magazine, 8
Calling all Forces, 9 a.m. The News,

9.10 a.m. Home News from Britain,
9.15 a.m., Close Down, 11,15 a.m. Pro~



gra le, 11.20 a.m. Interlude,
uu &.m. Festival Service, 12 (noon)
The News, is,

12.10 p.m. News
72.15 p.m. Close Down.
: p.m.

4.15 p.m. Music Magazine, 4.30 Pp.





acm. |

19.76 M. |i

——_



MR. CARPE

You've been
Waiting for
13" and 2"

THESE HAVE

Sunday Half Hour, 5 P.m. Interi .
5.0 pm. The r of the Moment,
5.20 p.m. * Choice, 6 p.m. |
Rendezvous Players, 6.15 p.m. Ray’s a}
Gu 11.00 p.m. ...... 25.53 M. 31.22 M.
6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m.

The News, 7.1 -m. News Analysis,
7.13 p.m. ¢ in. Voices, 7.45 p.m,
Christianity and the Parliamentary Tradi-
tion, 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
Festival of Britain, 8.45 p.m. Interlude
8.55 p.m m the Editorials, 9 p.m
Submarine Jubilee, 10 p.m, The News,
10.10 p.m. Interlude, 10.15 P.m. Council
of Burope, 10.30 p.m. London Forum
11 p.m. Louis Kentner

C.B.C, PROGRAMME

SUNDAY, MAY 6.

10 p.m,.—10.15 p.m aa News
a
10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m. Audience Mail Bag
1L.76 Mes 25.51 M
BOSTON

WRUL 15.29 Mc, WRUW 11.75 Me,
WRUX 17.75 Me.

MONDAY, MAY 7, 1951

630 am—!5-pom. cocee, 19 60M.





6.30 a.m, The Billy Cotton Band Show,
7 a.m, The N@wWs, 7.10 a.m. New:
Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editoridls,
7.25 a.m, Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m
At the Bottom of the Deep Blue Sea
7.45 a.m. Composer of the Week, 8 am.
Council of *

7 * ‘ Debate
Continues, 9 a.m. The News, 9.10 a.m
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m.
Close Down, 11.15 a.m, Programme
Patade, 11.25 a.m. Listeners’ Choice,
11.45 a.m. Commonwealth Survey, | 12

(noon) The News, 12.10 p,m, Neéws
Anal 12.15 p.m. Close Down.
11646 Pom. 22. 19.76 M

4.15 p.m. Australia's Jubilee Year,
5 p.m. Yorkshire ys. South Africans,
5.05 p.m, Interlude, 5.15 p.m. The
Storyteller, 5.35 p.m. Gramophone Re-
cords, 6 p.m. Nights at the Opera, 6.45





7 p.m. The News, News
Anajysis, 7.15

pm. The May o
Casterbridge, 7.46 p.m. At the Wont

7.10 p.m

of the Deep Blue Sea, 8 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.15 p.m, | Commonwealth
Survey, 8.30 p.m tice . makes

Perfect, 8.45 p.m, Interlude, 8.55./p.m,
From the Editorials, 9 p.m, Britis:
Concert Hall, 10 p.m, The News, 10,1

p.m. Interlude, 10.15 p.m. Tip Top
Tunes, 10.45 p.m. Seience§ Review,
ll p.m. Thi ve
c. . 1G! ME
Â¥, MAY 7. .
10 p.m.—10,15 p.m. .........0-.. News.
a — —
10.15 p.m. —> 10.30 p.m. Canadian
Chronicle, 11.76 Mcs 25,51 M
ee ee

Barbados Mutual
Bonus Rate
Increased from
12% to 2%

The Directors of the Barbados
Mutual» Life Assurance -Seeiety
have recently received the very
welcome news from the Society's

Actuary in Erigland that on ac- |’

count of the splendid results
achieved by the Society during
the past five years he is in a posi-
tion 16 recommend the declaration
of a Compound Reversionary
Benus of 2% per annum for the
Quinquennium ended 31st Decem-
ber, 1950, The rate for the pre
vious 10 years has been 1!2%.

The fact that this Bonus is cal-
culated on the Sum Assured plus
all previous Bonuses that have
already been added, and therefore
involves a very considerable sum,
is evidence of the very sound
position of the Society.

From the following example
(actual figures of a policy in
force) it will be seen that where-
as the Sum Assured is $2,000 it
will require $573 to add a Bonus
of 2% per annum for the 5 years
just ended.



Sum Assured. . $2,000

Previous Bonuses 3,730

$5,730

Bonus to be added.. 573
(2%.x 5 = 10%) -

Total Value $6,203

_ There will of course be many
Policies taken out during the
Quinauénnium. which will not
fave been in force for five years.
These policies will get a 2%
Bonus for each year they have
been in force.















| for DRY SKINS





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—— a
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e
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NTER!!

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@ A. BARNES & CO.,



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CHEESE, *,-lb ’
LUNCH. BEEF
PATE DE FOI
OX TONGUE
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MANGOES .
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‘ eee
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DIAL 2072 & 4502



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BROAD STREET or ALPHA PHARMACY




PAGE THIRTEEN





SSS |





SOS IGS SRI S IS:

perere, IN Ott DA IAA DPA PAA ttt ttt ttt
PELLETS T OTT

Z.
NT

NOW !!

~~ ”
PEELE OSES TS +



Det totem te FRE
(DOR OOD OOOO FOS FETT SN?



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PEPE OI POT OTIS SE EGP FSS

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JEWELLERS OF

Bolton Lane and Aquatic Club





|






4
POE IOS

—

OS

EOS

“+

9466S

DEES ED

erate





in White, Grey, Beige and Eggshell



SCHOOL WEAR

Girls Panama Hats & Shoes

42 inches wide at $4.13 per yard

Boys’ Caps and Shoes




BROADWAY DRESS SHOP

Where Satisfied Customers Gather







ATTENTION !!
FACTORY

MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining youx requirements

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from %” upwards

MILD STEEL ‘

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS~—All Sizes ‘

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill }
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

» White Park Road, St. Michael
DIAL 4528

——








SSE

SEARCHING FOR
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You'll find it
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DEPT.







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PONETPSTICKS ONYSHAMPOOS
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And many more items of Interest



Pay us a visit today, and make your Selections

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(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

No. 16, Swan Street -:- ‘Phone : 2109, 4406 or 3534

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Ask your Grocer for ‘SELECT’ Powdered Milk
THAT

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--















__ PAGE FOURTEEN | Se ile SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. MAY 6, 1951
|
Tornadoes Favoured By - Weather [== invesinent 9 << may
THE “Bighth Regatta "ot ‘the A WINNER se en a } ‘
:

R.B.Y.C. was sailed inc arlisle Bay A. M. WEBB

yesterday eitarnoon in weather Stockbroker
33, Broad St. (Over Phoenix
Pharmacy)

FOR LONGER SERVICE | and
|
|













i







MED. cob as
TOILET SOAPS!

IMPERIAL LEATHER @ LINDEN BLOSSOM @ BLUE HYACINTH

this season. In nearly all the
R.B.Â¥.C. Regattas the conditions
were suitable for them The race
was south about

Denis Atkinson brought in Cy.
clone first in the “C", Centreboard
and Tornado Class yesterday. He
steered Cyclone very well and al-
though at the start Vamoose got
the jump, Cyelone was able to
overtake ‘her going around the bea
gle, Cyclone defeated Vamoose by
a minute and 11 seconds

Flirt, skippered by her owner
Eyre Kinch, scored her first vic-
tory ir the “B” Class this season. {
In the Intermediate Class Bertie
Clarke sailed in Mohawk with
David Payne and Bob Cumber-
batch.




for the Tornadoes
TAR all posts before erecting.

The wind was light and the sea
A small quantity of this
17 Jewel and 15 Jewel

calm, Tornado skippers can count
Ro t preventative
Watches with a 3-year guarantee

themselves extremely lucky so far
material still available

at your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price 40c. per gallon.
Get Some To-day,











CKRYPTOQLOTER Nao. te
NVS WG SDC GZOS LU
FLYACJGZSWLY YLS SDC

at your Jewellers
UILR -DZQOWSS

Y. De LIMA & CO, LTD.

20, Broad Street






















Corrected Cryptoque Owing
to the Printer’s Devil this had
to be repeated

Last Crypt Whatsoever thy
hand findeth to do,-do it with
thy might,



hurrah!

BLAZERS

at last

Ten

Ten boats started in the “B”
Class, Wizard did not race. First to
complete the first lap was Ranger,
85 seconds ahead of War Cloud
which gave her a minute. Flirt,
which gave a minute to War
Cloud, finished this round 20 sec-
onds behind her. Fantasy was
fourth, about a minute and a half
behind Flirt with Rascal, which
liad given Okapi a minute and
cvertook her, a few seconds be
hind. Mischief and Gipsy each
gave four minutes to Moyra Blair
and by the end of thi round
Moyra Blair still had the lead on

them Mischief completed the RAR
round ten seconds ahead of Gipsy oa eee skippered by Denis Atkinson, carried off honours in the ADMISSION Gents 2/- Ladies 1/6

“1 ; f , Contreboard and Tornado Class when the Eighth Regatta of the
In the second lap Flirt overtook
both Ranger and War Cloud. She RB: Y.C. was sailed in Carlisle Bay yesterday.

—Ecclesiast@s.





Mk. VERNON BOWS 'S

extends a cordial invitation to his
DANCE
which will be held at
WELCHMAN HALL CASINO
St. Thomas
Music by the Orchestra that is
again back into popular favoilr,

Phone 4267 for
Ferrocrete rapid-hardening Cement |
in 375 lb. Drums

Snowcrete White Cement
in 375 lb. Drums

Colorcrete Cement

was first to complete the lap, about aS a Ste i te aN bel Ske | YELLOW in 375 lb. Drums
37 seconds ahead of War Cloud | YACHTSMAN DIES Amateur Night 4 id: te n eee

For the first time since the War we can offer
Readymade Blue Blazers for Girls and Boys.
Sizes for children from 10 to 16 years of age.

Mr. Coa Alleyne and his
Rhythm Cardinals







Prices according to sizes;

$5.42, $5.91, $6.36, $6.82 and $7.41

Isn’t that excellent value ?

cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

















at

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC Everite Asbestos-Cement Corrugated Sheets

(Local & va Members 6 ft., 7 ft. 8 ft., 9 ft. 10 ft. Lengths

- Everite Trafford Tiles

SATURDAY, MAY 12th,
9 p.m. 6 ft. and 8 ft. Lengths.

Can you Play an Instrument?

Whistle? Sing? Imitate? WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Impersonate?
Or are you in any way

which also overtook Ranger
IN GRENADA

Ranger was now nearly one a .
ute behind War Cloud while Fan-
(From Our Cwn Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 5

tasy came around fourth, about 20
seconds after Ranger, The others
ie order vite Se es ‘ -. 3,4 Mr. D. G. Lusan, senior pilot
seconds ahead o schief, anc 3 ash 2 St. Georges and
Moyrs Blair. : = of the port of St, Georges
Flirt kept the lead and won
easily, a minute and 55 seconds
ahead of War Cloud, She com.
pleted the three laps in one hour,
57 minutes and 20 seconds, three
minutes and 55 seconds better than
War Cloud.

stevedoring foreman for years
died yesterday, aged 70. He was|
highly respected by shippers and
officers of all lines calling here
and was prominent in organising
regattas and aquatic sports. He
was himself a keen yachtsman.



















































oe, was George Stoute’s Ras- . Talented?
eal, twenty-five seconds ahead of This is your opportunity to BOSSSSSOOFSP SOO SPOOGIOS LPLLEV PVE AL TAPAS,
Pore sie defeated Fantasy only FOOTBALL display it! S ere e me % | PFIVIOSSG PPPS DIS ISIS FIO OOO AFIT,
five seconds * - x
; ‘ Don’t be Shy! You can be |R e > $
7 ‘ . ‘ 31 Ys ‘ %
Eleven FIXTURES vereen etoauet ts tS ALU EFICaNes : 8
_in the “c', Centreboard and DIVISION 1 applause of the Audience 1% urr % ,
Tornado Class eleven boats, which Monday, May 4. Please send your entries to 1% z a
includes four Tornadoes, started, : Notre Dame vs, Everton. the Club’s Office $ x ;
Mi Behave and Foll vere a] 5 Reteree ; O. S. Coppin. § \e ~ o . ¥
oa - oe a oe ears the e Linesmen ; ©, Robinson and L, DANCING x x x
c vats to start. ey were a Parris, ns ¥
given three minutes by Magwin. | eee ete : Tuesday, May over % a sits x 8
Edril was given three minutes by minerener. wre rhe eR kL ie ed after the Entertainment. 1% % : 24
Gannet, Rogue, Cyclone and ‘he results were as follow: — Linesmen: D, Sayers and J Admission to Ballroom 2/- | x x
Vamoose started scratch, giving 1 Class __ Start Elapsed Place puucdane = iy 6 KEEP THIS DATE OPEN 1% ' % ;
two minutes to Gannet. 9. Dauntless (p.m) DNS Notre Dame vs. Carlton 6.5.51—In 1% g
First to complete the first lap - “7 S, Gittens. : % 00 $ s
was Miss Behave, about eight sec. & ate. prs ares g : O, Graham and A. 1R a % %
onds tee on epee Peggy Nan | a Reen 2.49 1.33.38 7 sisvaae May 12 — GOOOOSe LALO SPL SSS SOOO, | & %
was third, followed by Edril, 12. Dawn 2 49 1.29.12 3 Spartan vs, Everton ? 21%
Scamp with Cyclone only a few 7% Mohawk 2.50 13051 6 Fotaren: WN paver x ATTENTION PLEASE 1 3is But When ! Nobody Knows! %
seconds behind, Cyclone had given 18. Civtie 2 52 1aes2 EE eaapattecenies ee x "3 % % '
Seamp four minutes, Gannet came _ + _ Coronetta 2.53 1.25.24 2 DIVISION II 3 = s MEN
ar 3 aowler i . D Cla 3 ‘ T EX
i. Sees next nearly two minutes 4° "Seapira 231 151.12 § tummy mae ere % DON T FORGET TH % | ® q
re ents vee in = 19, Van Spartan va, Empire at Bank Hall xv DATE % | ¥
{ vere se, Rogue anc Thorndyke 1.50.18 6 Ref : BH 5 7 ’ i
Ber hick eee eu. meee Asois wipletee: B: Hoyos 3 : Coe You can’t afford to allow the violence of ¥
In the second round Denis At. }, Buccaneer 1.40.05 4 Lodge vs: Everton at Bank Hall Y19th MAY, 1951 § % BUY
‘ ; ", i 2. 1.35.24 2 eferee ; mory. a
kinson carried Cyclone into the 9° Olive Carlton vs, College at College & x HURRICANES, EARTHQUAKES, FIRE, <
ead and won by a wide margin Blossom 1.43.38 7 Referee: L. F. Harris % x Xs AND
Second was Vamoose, skippered , 7. Snb*4 ee Fiimpire ve. Lodge ot Bank Hell $ AN UAL * , 3
: Ss 5. odge a an
by Tony Hoad, a minute and eight Sq Med DNS Referee: ©. Graham . % ¥ SEA-WAVE, RIOT and CIVIL COMMOTION x -
sconds ahead of Magwin, Cyclone 13. Ranger 2.05.47 8 Referee: W. Howorth. % ( N XY 1 $
completed the two laps in one 3. War Cloud 2.00.15 2 a eet | ; i > >
hour, 17 minutes and 13 seconds, . Beast eas 4 Wea Panay S S S Ce : 5 ‘
Dauntless did not startin the asi) Fanta i ; Oe ev dee ¥ ane y
Intermediate Class, Eight boats 8 Pascal $3 1 3 Rabies pot choice ee x peers x 1% A y — ‘ >
raced, Honours went to Clytie 7. Mivra Blair 3 as oa 2 Sea Scouts ys. Foundation at JAMES STREET METHOD- 4 | § if % OTHER STRIPED & :
which defeated Coronetta by 27 5, Mischiet 2.43 1 7 Het Mee IST CHURCH S| S % ’ adavatey é
seconds, Third was Dawn, 11 sec. © Class Regiment vs, C.O, Boys at Com- | % $1 8 SHIR rs °
onds behind Coronetta, 8. Peggy Nan 2.44 1.33.27 9 ppermete % to be held at s | % ‘ % .
At the end of the first round 1. Miss Behave 2.45 1.29.50 6 eforee H. D_ Wilson. 1 1G 1 ma 1% oe ¢ °
hi * oie 9, Folly 2.45 1.35.45 il Poli s. Empire > | >» |» P T T
Dawn, which started with Reen fe Sagwin 2 48 aes 3 Referes R. Parris, Pare | x HASTINGS ROCKS % | st A ainst These 3 S OR t SHIR Ss ree A NEW 8
and gave three minutes to Invader 2. Scamp 2.50 1.23.53 4 Carlton ys, Notre Dame at Black 2 7 eM x %
and Eagle, was leading, a few gec- 0. Gannet 5.03 a Wehr, Rens | pit oye A es of ene x oe x %
onds ahead of Mohawk. Coronetta ‘35 F4"! 2.49 1.25.35 > Thureaes, doy aR itor x oor and Needy) x oS x ¥,
was third, followed by Invader. a ee te 1 an2 % Empire vs, "Eve erton at Bank Hall ¥ Lady Seel has_ kindl % x eri s % RANGE OF DESIGNS 3
Gnat and Reen, Gnat eventually Ks. Cyclone 2.54 1,17.13 i Referee : C, Smith Q ae oF ancy | x x
finished fourth and Eagle fifth, © *40. Vamoose 2.54 1.18.24 2 MEEAY: Tent a Poli x een mted'to wee the Fair % | . %
; peeiman ‘a giotice at, Garris son . 2 m., which will con- s . % 9c) \ "
aloe eS com, || tinue to 6'p-m, Sy 38 MEN’S HALF HOSE
Rainbow won in the “D” Class. ILLUSTRIOUS nermere J. Axohe? ® COME EARLY ASD ENJOY * | Se LESLIE’S offer you a LLOYD'S COMBINED x $
It defeated Imp by only three sec- Wanderers vs" Conibermere at || % THE 'TIME-HONOURED % x
onds. This was one of the closest SCHOOL SPORTS eae $ BENEFITS OF THIS %/% COMPREHENSIVE POLICY PAIRS FOR UP
finishes in the “D” Class this seas- Turn mopman Beck! % GRAND FAIR s r
on and another interesting battle ‘The Mlustrious School, Chelston Road, ieee ee eee 4 x r ;
for fifth position was witnessed Gap, successfully staged art Refereé: A. Parris % Attractions inciude: A va- § |X Affording full Protection for your Home “44
between Seabird and Van Thorn- athletic meet at the Bay Grounds x riety of Utility Stalls, Re- 3 \ ES I & TOWEL SHIR I S
Gatie pe ae a by six yesterday. Mr. C. R. W. Suttle % apis oo and a & and its Contents %
seconds. Third in this Class was is the principal of the school. gy zancy Dress - Competition % X
Sinbad and Fourth Buccaneer. The prizes eta distributed by * X for Children, x | ‘ x AT LOW PRICES
ee started with Van Mr. D. Alleyne . The Weather sy kind permissi f th * % x
Thorndyke but soon after pulled ‘The events were as follows - , ay Kind) permission of the @ 1% e INSURANCE § 2
away and went into the lead. She 109 yards 110 Pays tata: TUR aap TODAY x foe ee of Police, the rad ee & Co. LTD. x $
was first to complete the first lap, 2%. Hall, 3. ©, Clarke. : 3 ss ae jand conducted by x > COLLINS BUILDING BRIDGETOWN x To 4 %
Seabird was given a minute by of s si GS 4 O, Weekes, 2. R Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m } $ Supt . c E. Raison will & g - Pree a ev $
Van Thorndyke but came around — 100 yords (14-16): 1, EB, King, 2 R Moon (New) May 6 ix render popular items. 21 ¢ DIAL 3006 BARBADOS % : :
second two minutes and 30 seconds Hardins, 3. F. Niles Lighting: 7.00 p.m. | $ ADMISSION: “ADULTS Is.» x ¢ 30, Swan Street i S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
ahead of the same boat, Imp fin- _ 1 Yards (Girls): 1. M, Waithe, 2. E High Water: 2.33 a.m, 3.29 || % Mladen £ hive aa. oe ¥ PHONE 2702
ished this round fourth, about 44 Simmons, 3. G. Pichards pm. | Beane Se REPOS Ses 5S x
r 7 , 1 ae 220 yards (Visitors): 1, M. Linton, , > 946566665666 64366 « | %
seconds behind Van Thorndyke, » p. Cave, 3 8. Clarke YESTERDAY POPPE POPPE AEE | CESSES D 60:66666006 APOCEOSSSOSSSO e iutaite
Buccaneer gave Rainbow six min. _ 220 yards 110-14): 1. N, Fields, 2. Rainfall (Codrington) nil , ee Boe e tee nee aoe eeobeeoneneeeeeee one;
utes but Rainbow only defeated it eee 3 Fr eat oa catia Total for Month to yester | M ‘
by two minutes and 47 seconds iD eines ee are day: .05 in, |
The Ninth Regatta of the Sack Race: 1, A. Garnes, 2. T, Sim. Temperature: 75.0°F, INTERCOLONIAL
R.B.Y.C. will be sailed at 2.30 mons, 3. D. Marshall Wind Direction (9 a.m.) | ee
p.m. on Saturday, April 12 and , “Qgerdes Rots 21. Os, Gresnidae, E.S.E, (11 am.) E.S.E. eee
" - t 2. K. Boxill, 3% H. Brathwaite 1 7
is Tenth on Thursday, May 24 “200 yards (Girls: 1, M. Waithe, "en Pe ee :
(Empire Day) at 1.00 p.m 2 ¥§E, Simmons, 3. G. Richards our
The Fourth Tornado Regatta , 0 yards: 1. E, King, 2. R, Harding, Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,978, It’:
will be sailed at 10.30 a.m. to- Wheel Barrow Race; A. Blackma | (AY am.) 29.060 : $2 ay

day. and E, Belgrave.





—



IN

HIGH CLASS

to see those



JAMAICA vs
BARBADOS

extra fine













| Tr hey'll Do It Every Time silhiaie 0. hie ots By penny Hatlo



VERY GOOD, THEN»
HEH-HEH! you WiLL
START ON MONDAY,

points in a
well tailor-

Bigoove

HAS AN EYE JAMAICA TEAM ARRIVES

:
|
May 18 for tour until May 30

May 29 vs. COLONY

ke ADMISSION: Kensington and

MISS PATOOTIE:+: 7 FOR BEAUTY
meee A GAL HAS TO May 21 vs. COLTS XI ed suit that
BE A KNOCK- May 23 vs. CARLTON you should 7 ’
OUT - GET May 24 vs. COLONY ; "AIL ORING
aaa Ee May 26 vs. COLONY always
CLERK «= May 28 vs. SPARTAN ‘contact the

ieee |

Top Scorers

ia OF ALL KINDS
in Tailoring -

George Challenor Stands 2/- e

Bur THE GUYS | UNCOVERED STANDS 1/- ne
HE HIRES »+s GROUNDS 6d. per match. SMART r
(pur-eceze- — C.B. RICE & C
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IM EATING! ) Season tickets for admission - = “4 O.
to Kensington and George
Challenor Stands $2.00 each. o

OF
BOLTON LANE

THANX TO
“6.0.” (ONE OF THE
GLAMOROUS 7)
NEW YORK, NY.

O. S. COPPIN
Hony. Secty
B.A.F.A

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd

Prince Wm. Henry Street

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SUNDAY. MAY 8. 1K1 SUNDAY ADVOCATE I'UI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON C3CZ) DO VOUB BIT "TO HELP BEAUTIFY YOUR COMMUNITY A*i OLD RIEND IN A NEW SPOI! Among a t— *K\t Ai'ivali Planters Peanuta Noxzcma Cream Chocolate Bantvmlinv Fmiina Bottle. iSSS, m pk> a • %  '- J,r .,„, Nervane IB %  S*iOIHMJT. 1 .V PHOMv I'll uid '"I! Iv.i a %  • %  >*rd from tiir .. i-m.l pol. Prince WUI'am llmry MI.M YES. YOU CAN BUY IT AGAIN LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH SUPREME IN QUALITY AND I — A: T.A1.V Oil. CANS — I %  ••'" i rtaUkkai ISM) I.HHilUKlUii. 10 S. II KOKBr<'K sTRI-ET. In mil.. '.. .1 I't.'i; IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY | SPEQAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only SKE.. T3 BwN6S5 ^ .;. = "W=F2<5 RZCXE... I ONL.V TO B*T! 1K=A": LOOK AT -{NEAH! AND JUS MOl_t> IT I A COWBOV STAB t <% S£ 8L0NDIE BY CHIC YOUNG ,il U /' ALL THOSE -V;-. ( TACKS COME T Si FROM %  t' C 4 THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER ONE OP TOE ROSeCRS HAD 1 OATS IN A LEAKING SAHXE-I BAG WEIL RCK UP THAT TRAIL %  BEHIND THE BANK[ AMD HXlOW IT' TUANKS TO YOURT0NLY A NEW MEMBER LEAKIN' SADDLE-1 OF THE GANG ttCULD BAG, LEE. UrEVE i MAKE A MISTAKE UK*; THAT. SORRY pOflfiW YOU WAIT HERE. HFTY AND SEE IF ANYONE FQU0W5 THE TRAIL OF OATS FROM TOWN. JOIN US LATER J AT CX HIDEOUT RIGHT] BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS %  -.' guT OP T .-" > -l TCv WELi_T *EE YOU ;y..r CT.JTCD "OU OiVE rte* -_b AOOUMBNTp RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND . %  %  ... TAMPSP CALLING CAH 40 P\C< L- JAC< ^ fi THE PHANTOM USUALLY S. L Pineapple Juice. Tins 39 Melo Tonic Food, Tins 107 Jacobs Cieam Crackers, Pkgs. 41 NOW USUALLY NOW %  I Dutch Pears. Tins 68 • Chivers !Ml T. Jellies, Pkgs :i<> Raisins, Per lb IH D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd, Broad Street 9^ VG* %  T [-f>.it.iirmM i.iu DMtM C MM kin* GMffl Goid Stands Supte^fte. ,$io&y \ FOR ALL PETROLEUM PRODUCTS It's Just What The DOCTOR Ordered' ,


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PAGE SIX M MAI A1>V #iro uli-il the ilrtnkm. No on* else i tn ney. %  ( it (m irc.iptiirr the atmo sphere of excitement und too* tun, of that distant night <>. February 1950 But no one ri forget the charm, tsjt gaiety of William Alexander Bustamantc. I first saw Mi. Buitamante in the Chamber of the House of Lord*, which the Commons were then using David Gammana went up to chat with jlm and Arthur Creech Jones, hen His Majesty's Secretary of Sm'e for the Colonies, was not slow to pay his respects. Husta nevtr forgot Creech Jones tine h*-n Mr Creech Jones foiled t< get it seat in the election* <>l infill. Busta w.is one of the Brat end him a cable regretting the fact. Soon after Mr. Creech Jones and Captain Gammniu left Buata's box, I looked up to sev Bustamantc. his white tie flapping' excitement. waving; wftrt enthusiasm across the House \j the other side of the gallery. Ik waving at Lord Mllvtrton, the man who jailed him for 1' months. Lord Milverton nlso let him out of jail and Bustamanttells the tale that he • nevr. holds It against him." In Granada, Busta was facinuted by the magnificent prlsn.t H't 500 feet on a hill looking town OB the capital of S' George's. 'That ought to have been a first class hotel," he told me. Busta seldom sheds hi< white tie which matches his hnir In Grenada he wore a white tic with Ins pepper brown tweoooy day and wore it with his more mal block at the Governor's Mail party for tba ugnr delegates Busta loves people and he will walk out on anybody Just to please people. Ms was talking to me one moment witS hands outstretched and his elbows sticking out of hi. jacket sleeves when carnival reveller* drove up to the hotel shouting for Busto. The next I saw was Mr. Kiislttniaiiflr FOR SCHOOL PHILIPS' ATLAS Misiiiiitil ft-iiiciftiu THE criticul attack on the B.A.F.A. officials appears to be peculiarly mistimed. For the tirst time since the Football Association came into existence in 1910, the officials, within recent months, have been making special efforts to develop the game in the island. During the past two years the games were so organised that the Association, at the end of the season, could show reasonable profits—a result that had almost been unknown in the past. The officials quite rightly are still not satisfied with the financial position of the Association, nor with the standard of play. They realise that the standard of play and finance are interrelated and that the conditions under which football is played in this island must be changed if the standard is to be improved. The Association must plan lor the future. The football season must not be played in the dry season and the game must be played on a full size ground. The Association realises that changes such as these can only materialise when it possesses its own playing Ikld. These improvements cannot be made overnight, nevertheless because a football ground is not immediately forthcoming, the public must not infer that the Association is not interested in the matter. They arc preparing behind the scenes. They have invited, on a reciprocal basis the football team of the Kingston Cricket Club to play a series of matches in Barbados later this month, and in order that the public can be assured of getting good value for their money, and also that the Barbados team will not be disgraced, the Association has instituted an intensive training course. They have been fortunate in getting the services of a capable coach in the person of Mr. G. WiIkes, of the Lodge School, a player of considerable experience of football in England. The course which extends over a period of three weeks is planned to build up physical iitness, improve technique, and demonstrate the liner points of the game. The officials nf the B.A.F.A. and the players are making strenuous efforts to improve the standard of the game in Barbados. The public, too, can help by flocking in their thousands to watch the interclub and intercolonial matches and in this way assist in building up the funds so iiv. if the Football Association is ever to acquire its own playing field. Busts, six feet two of t mpossihle in a new ing the plaudits Of thCfOVrd paper article to echo the vol. Bust a himself tell* tin intonation of Busumante. J how the PDPaa mused seeing enjoy hsUaUnl to him in m him in S" M th-> same way as I em. % %  through on hi. %  a Omuda 1B| a rollicking good acta* B in a letter rac*vd In Orenaoj Oaoraja Robey on the %  • %  could !• more unime but there is something of the ... JII.III in both. It would Of I mistake however to think nl llustamante as a showman an-i poUgelan only He speaks t> the gallery, but even then he sandwiches in some good horao sense. The night he • on "Pop"" Beasley's dinner which was attended by the Governor of the Windwards and his wit* Busta told a public meeting in %  kot square of S' George's "you've got to work hard if you want to make good.' HI ..: MUM IKbettci .nK iceBut Bustamante is confusing until you get to know him, U you ever get to know him. am pro American". Busta tolt ilounge of the Santv I love ihe British, but what has the British Governmen (Ml | fix the colonies? Nothing hut make them a dumping ground for British manufactures." Publicly the same day he woi coo'.ng down some of the hot heads who were agitating for another Boston "tea party.' "What." he asked, "is the use of throwing mud at people with whom you are going to bargaii.? Wi u.mt to do business wltii .in You don't throw mud at people with whom you d< I l l l If I had to guess tin secret of Busta mantes great popularity (and he is the onl> politician In the area who bag ; %  West Indian following) I would put it down to his sense of good will. His gesture in distrliutini thousands of bananas to pool Londoners in the East End wa; the action of a man with o ii heart. And only a man with big heart would describe hii secretary Miss Ixtngbridge .... good companion. "">e brains behind the line n.n wicked with the pen Those given employees the day oft lo know Buslainaule best say tha come and well" la him. "Emthey don't know where the> ployeis nnd rmp <>>ees came in stand with him nor how to t.ike their thousands". Busta told me what he says, but no one WHO ben In Grenada: Yliey came on spent even a short time In hi.< bie'vde. on foot, In motor carspresence can fall lo admit th.it some walked all day and th*-y he is a-good companion. "Things were so disappoi lied to find imhappen wherever Busta goes," E „ne." o bad way to pay him tribute. SITTING OX THE FENCE "I have Instructed my stall that if a woman comes through tin turnstiles with four children and no money to spend she shall I* treated with the same COBl iteration as would be given a foreign ambassador."— Major Left* lie Joseph, director of the Frsifrnl Gardens. C AN I do anything for yon. madam? You can, mind |/our men busfHs> for m ttarU I thought you might like to l k the children on the rou n dab o ut! or the dodgem? Chance I* a fine thing, ain't if? Wherever you go in the gardens. madam, you will be welcomed as if you were n queen and your charming children princes and princesses. Coo. ark at Ins, Willie, behave. Ow many fi-nes are I fold yoM what uottr amifcerchiefs /or:" Perli;ijis the dtlf Hi tie fellow would like some refreshment? 7/ you're talkin about Willie inuii'.-r sfups ratine fnwi MM lime he oils up fill the MOM '' bed low* "if i-cups. Bui iiv jnsl doa'l hOgeMH t0 nrc Ihe don oh-r in/ KM" Sec? Pardon madam? The old bees and oney. if you nndersiand plain Enplijh. The stuff that ones rhin!e-rht"' and raiffe-rufttlf Got it" comprehend, madam. But if i are troubled by a temporary metal embarrassment, may I ure you on behalf of the director* that no ambassador from a foreign Slate, with unlimited expenses, rould be more certain of warm and sincere welcome at Ihe Festival gardens'' You sti'dllou'crt n dictionary for your dinner? As proof of my earnest desire to make your visit a memorable one. may I offer to escort you, or your iellghtful elder daughter, free of charge, on a trip through the magic cave? Oh, to that's Ihe larlc, is ir" After 'y Elsie, eh? I've read about your type in the papers. H you will trust me, madam. / icoaldu't trust yon 1/ you leas handcuffed af fhc bottom of a coalmine. Come along. BY NATHANIEL GURBINS Eltie. Pull dou'i HMftT skirt and do up your cunt. There's tcolres about. KiiKlishnmn's House "My husband goes out three evenings a week, plays golf on Hiturdays and Sundays. When at home he sleeps in a chair. What am I 10 do about it?— Latter lo a *orial problem eefmst, T HERE are so many things you can do about It that I don't know where" to begin. Pins are an obvious weapon. 00 la a ]ug of water. I advise you to be more subtle. As men ore supposed to like wives who remain young and kittenish, be young nnd kittenish. Be as young as three years old. As he snores In the chair opposite, throw yourself back tochildbeod and play that lovely game of opening the eyelids and saying. "Oo's got boo eyes." Or brown ,i (III MO may be. If this fails, there is still the enchanting pasUme of "fingers up vour nose." As any three-year(Id will tell you, the first and second fingers of either hand must be forced as far as possible up the nostrils until the vicUm howls for quarter. If you wear long nails the results will be startling. Hhould he drop oft to sleep attain, get a pencil and a piece of paper. sUck the pencil down his open mouth as far as the tonsils. When he wakes half-choked, ask him to draw a horse, a pi*, or a bunny rabbit on the piece of paper. If sleep overcomes him once ir. >re. play your last card. Climb on his knees, as children do. scraping the shins, treading on the soft underbelly. This is painful trough when %  two stone tnrcevear-old is tht clirnbOr. Your It stone and sharp high heels will put him off sleeping anywhere, except m bed. Political Sensation '-X)-DAY. Government circles X will be amazed at the confirmation of a plot to unseat them which I have supported ever since they were elected In 1945. ffi i.ble to reveal that their f op|iiiient is not Mr. Winstoi Churchill, nor the Right-wing Pre, nor even Sir Wnldron Smithcrs. It li Old Mother Nature heri If When the wind-blown hag visited the Sa Nest one bitter April morning, she confessed thai she had IWed Uie weather for seven years, with the avowed ... tention of getUng the Government nut i arranged droughts when the crops needed rain." she said, "and rain when the crops needed sunshine." "DM you arrange last urinter'i rain and the spring floods? "Of course. I believe I have drowned most of the early sown wheat and hope to reduce the national milk yield so that the Food Ministry's promise of cream tliis summer will not be fulfilled." "Werp you responsible for hard u'lnter u-hlrh destroyed thousands o/ sheep"" "I record that as one of my grcasjnt achii'vt'tru'nts. I think nearly %  million sheep and cattle Mriabod in the snow. This put the meal ration in peril forced the Government a difficult position with foreign meat importers." "What arc your plans for future''" "I shall certainly send a lot of rain to ruin what's left of ihe harvest." "Mai, f ait you ichy youY doing this?" "Because, my dear man, I'm ; Conservative." tt'liof irlfl be your aflifudi if the Government are defeated at Ihe next General Elecfio "Then I shall send rain In the nutumn..dry weather for the w tcr plough, light showers and warmth to nourish the sprine sowings and hot sunshine for the ripening corn "Do you l in nl; you u'ill oe| the Government out?" "I nearly did It last time. Next time 1 shall succeed. They can mnke their speeches, write theii articles, present their arguments. But I, True Blue Mother Nature, am the one to do it." London Erpress Service. OCR READERS SAY: liitl \t,t MMM Big More bants To ihe Editor, The Advocate— SIR.—I am o very busy man. and do not hove enough time lo eomptOtO my routine duties In twenty-four hours, but In the interest of truth and justice. I must challenge your leading article in today's paper which accused me of blaming the l:i* merchants for rising cost of living. Your article is n complete distortion of my statement, which -annot be supported by on) of the large number of hearers or any reporter who listened to my speech. In dealing with the rising cost of living. I pointed out that It was not fair to blame the Govern. merit tor it, lvause the world maiket conditions were beyond the control of this Government. Moreover. I went on nnd pointed out that at present the Qovwm ment was subsidising V U tfao OKlont of over one million dollars anil through the subsidy, the price's of certain ( Wn k.-i.t at their present prices. I read the items luted below to the meeting. This was done to poin' out that the Government rising cost and without this sublld] tha cost Of living would have been higher. I Readers whe write Mlere to the Editor of Urn "Advocate" are asked la note thai tin-, newspaper does not normally publish letters which are Bet esrlaslve to tiiinewsseper. Contributors to Ot'R HEADERS SAY who write ender a nem-de ptame are reminded that Ihelr names must be sent to lae Editor as a sign of good faith. Names are never disclosed but are treated as confidential by the Editor, except In tlined letters. I also slated that owing to the complex world conditions and the shortage of certain basic raw materials. Items like Sulphur, /inc. Rubber. Tin Plate, CotJ Wooik-ns had risen by astronomical figures on the New York alasTfOft, and, therefore, it follows that an island Importing large quantities of goods mu-i face rising prices, I never blamed any big, smalt oi medium merchants for the crease in cost of living, and I must point out thai my status In life by my conviction, character and sincerity in the cause of the work ing class movement that I have chosen freely, without the help or assistance of any big merchant Whenovei I have cause to blame the big merchants for anything, I vli ill do so without fear, I am indignant about > article because It | 9 untrue you claim that your paper is fair, then fQra give a true and accurate report on people. Finally, criticise me or my Parly at any time, but do not accuse u* Of rtateaMotl we have not made F L WAU-OTT. Barbados Progressive League, Bridgetown. Ma> 4. 1951. Item I i lied Hour l'\K Pork salted fa) (b) (') esenl Retail Price S2e. per Ih 8ic „ „ ITc. '.' ". 18c 23c 2"*o. „ ,. 29c Subsid> $12.90 pr blk • •: If. "Ii\ per bag J1S0O per Brt. Retail Trice withaul sul..til bu ret i 7c. per lh Amount voted $1,078,780.00. LAYNG'S ARITHMETIC ROYAL READERS Advocate Stationery No. 505 I K.Hi ORLWITE CURTAIN RAILS (Aluminum Alloy) AND STEEL PLATED CADMCM HOOKS for bcBvy or liuht curtains ALSO EXTENSION RODS Plastic in various colours nnd Steel WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. 'I'h.mcs : 4472 & 46*7 A SYMBOL OF QUALITY ;iaM FOR K.\Tt:RT.U.\l\t; HJUSUKE Thai'* vhy—YOV SIIOI'I.D SfiUCT H. M. V. RADIOS and RADIOGRAMS er v DA COSTA & CO., LTD. —Electrical Depl. | F1Ut BUST III IS VISIT DA COSTAS • NOW IN STOCK FOR > OUR SELECTION SIMMONS BEDSTEADS IN THL FOLLOWING SIZES :i (I. 3fl .tin. mid III li ins. ALSO ALUMINUM SAUCEPANS in 7, 8. und 10 |.is. • DA COSTA A GO„ I .Til. Dry 1.1,oils Depl. It EST IN F I WOI If Blended and Exported by J. N. GODDARD and SONS LTD. Bridgetown. Barbados. Biiti'.h West Indies GODDARD S GOLD BRAID RUM



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SIMIAV. MAY a. ltjl SUNDAY ADVOCATE TM.f. THREE GARDENING HINTS FOR AMATEVRS FARM AND GARDKIS Weed on I.HUIIS. Carnations. Tb* Guava Tre* May is rather an in-between month in the farden. All annuMe should by now have been planted out. and moat of them will be In bloom, sa there. 15 little u, be 'lone in the way of plantiii|f. There will therefor* be a bit of a lull in the garden until thf rainy weather detcends on us a few weeki from now. Yet there Is always work to be dona In a garden, and now that the annual* are blooming, cutting off the dead flower-heads alone i* quite a )ot in a garden uf anv site. During this flack time, it's quite a good idea to tackle the weed on the lawn. With the grass so short and with most of the weed withered it will be found comparatively easy lo get U out. and the bare patches left, will quickly get covered In grass when the rains come. In taking up the weed, it it unavoidable not to take up a certain amount 01 mould a* well. This should be replaced by sprinkling some sifted mould ova patches Although our Barbados turf Can nrvcr hope to reach the perfection of Engli*h turf yet with proper care wc need not be ashamed of our lawns Hut %  lawn should have as much attention as a flower-bed. Weeds must *d drainage which they '"Hons of space %  'ike (live the plants a well man l'"" 11 <-vcr> thin*: I ured but light soil, and a sunny catalogue, in any cast Water llghtlv. but regudo so may result in little of most larly. When fully grown in an *d nut enough of a pn open bed the plants may need the "'"d ' provide m Mipport of a short forked stick to P* when required to f keep them out of the mud of the of a meal, li. m I^OPI* advise a Westerly position. When the We may note that foods ran bci Carnation plant buds, (as a rule 'btssitled into three mam grouus in a cluster lit is best to pick off according to the purpose Eft* some of the buds leaving only serve in the body: <|> body one or two out of the cluster warmers <2> body builders (3.1 This will ensure more space for body protectors. In the ilm gnul developing finer bloom, the starchy crops (yam' eddoT give the rveet potatoes, c, 1 %  baa) rge gardc.is and f;.' Sewing Circle drain Of Material a* .is, 0*1 Cowl neck PENNY NOLAN i raallj well y< .. mut haw a great deal of re*i<*t %  ft v Mai id dcMgi.iuk roi example, ;re cut w the utie fn nt 011 '1 1 tha' the draped neck will hat gra. rfull> Bta>. ruts are oftc Used for Stripes to make thai xn.e together in attractive Vi ffarrtr* strips cut from the Irue bias tf used lor finishing ntckl.nassWaal sleeve and for arin m.pg purposes. TI true bias of material i > 'oldinp the width to the leng1. or otherwise the cut ed*?of 1 te mateiial lu the selvage edge forming an angle. The resulting told is the true faaaa its. ^ strips may be cut from this fold A g.uge which attaches tu youi sciss>rs points may be purchase,! that enables you to cut bias the TIT: v.idth all along its length will nit measuring nnd markinr. The Australian seed: lest results. Carnationcan Ingrown from coreover'an'-'iV.': uau ,'lv "M ~V!'!l l> ' '" : "" '" Und€TSUnc| imported seeds, by layering, or by kUppry W e have \ tressed he m rooghl a T > lay a pattern o. the bias It .s cutting or slip. 1-1 t.mv of the Jj^t !" L I off '"<>" P**WI 0 ***** _u, .--..<. previous StmTmJZ^. < P *' ***** '" *"-** h -"< P"ln * can ^ *-•> on lhe nl ht Mil IT TREKS (continued) STSSitoJ Zformi !" te'' rt%  JrH tt 1. f^ m s Rrou > ; ,d : ( ! %  VOW Mm<•"> "' repreaent the crosswise -ee fromIh./h !" W n ^" n "'' :auh was bad culTlm then fqlding tfic centre fr.ml wh>eh commended greater uof the ting to begin with you urnbah v *"• l lh ,,nf Th reeulUng pigeon pea. utiltaang it M WI wont be able to nsrractll short fo,d n lh P attrrn "presents the attractive border and particular secW| W •*• %  ,hc *^ n,,e tr 9 ni W cu protection from wind We iuadraftsjs1 '" "" ''"C" 1 To cut thr centre suggest including the ordinary, grain mt..,! will ..void th.se filtlmll 0 *"*'"* 1 lo lnp Ml,a B Wne prolific hearer and ..1 the I %  • %  eutlmg On the hins it is advisable lime useiul tor covering up %  1 tooms The 6 ?' 0 L k " '"" P*"*'" lather than old fence or hiding an uglv come,bl| H Of todav worku? openniM the material out in the garden. It is advisable to on 11 1 principles that[l to • %  "' %  "• >" Hne H good strain of tfMaa; MM 'vre employed in the home hand"? be grown low spreading tree, from which the fruit can. as a rule be easily picked without climbing, or the aid of a stepladder. The Guava tree bears fruit during the rainy months (July-Oetobag) but. given sufficient moisture, it will bear at other, or almost any time of the Guavas are among the most useful and valuable of our Barbadian fruits. They can be made nto delicious Jelly. Slewed and roll,a "i a faiirly high proportion of l" ni * pioneer days There beans with red l breads. u\cr and under utting clothes r\ :ii eaten with milk, custard or cream, De nt w n red or reddish seed and made into Jam or Guava 0al and "'""Id be n %  Cheese. ,nev are liable to prove bitterish. For a Garden tree. It Is best to Tl ,rp '- a small, bush lima grow the 'Psldium Pyriferum. suitable for a garden bed and. if commonlv known as the French there is room, include this, but it Guara. as the fruit of this species ' not so prolific as the climbing „. is larger and sweeter than that of sort. The climbing bonavlst may !2S?l2H ll "f'hwise threads the common Guava. and can be also be used for purpos. • ',,. ?h V -rW^t 6 eaten raw. Give your Guava tree to the climbing lima bean, the Zuf. ~ plenty of manure (fifteen or pods should be picked when tho ^Kirh rm twenty pounds of V.G.M a year) seeds are still quite green and nol .. ,M n! loo full. Other peas and bean* black-exes, rounceval and The me tfiss KEVELOS HriW" ,.( lengthwise threadsJI strung on the loom. These are j caUe %  I ho N. ihiavi and plenty of water, and In it will give generously of fruit The Guava is propagated ln ( lloll |,, green, snap stage when they make be VIM thread. The I en excellent addition to tfm 1 [ li i straight, dietary. Section and cook them as u taktj) lo n B> lion 1; 1 WALUNG SOFT-VOICED Olga K. w I, magot, a cafe with MM Her father, g naturalited. gave hei t this 'T l>,, inew She finds her uu*\ s In 1 n *f' "fa defiiandi an ouldoni. it gad ho V l> v u •onroeiivg .So thv customers will miss hei %  u liiiiuugham ,MI Saturday!, stl i' %  i>ioniising car race driver. Cyril Kieft. who makai colds, and would bo inclined to further for shelling and Ignore it. Among other suitable green peas or in the dry state vines for arbours are Black-eye come fa veiv handy when pigi Sutan. Honeysuckle. Stepanntls, peas are not In season, and Onion-vine. though some ver> cheap "cloth is woven that finding the 1 sin li almo-t impossible. "*' Continent and al home. akae the prlgo money.") She wilt drive against men I ilv this is the fare excepUon laihei than the rule. tn Muni and the centre back of the pattern paralA:, Cookery Corner Now lhe third group, tho body protectors, are most b and, as a group, Is generally the one most often lack ins; in the lel l ,ho %  •Wage edges wilt result average meal. These protective '" th " bodice Mnj eu l foods of the plant world are an pmi**r grain. The sleev. patten j.bsoiute meat iii the small homo should have a grain 01 straight The recipe that I am going lo S ve you this week comes from a iho Chef. This chicken dish only serves two. FOtSSIN CORONET 1 spring chicken. 1 medium-si^ed onion. 2 07, butter. I tin mushrooms. 3 slices lean bam or bacon. 1 cup strong stock. T sherry glass while wine i; teaspoon parsley. 1 tablespoon of grated cheese Salt. Pepper. Divide lhe poussin into two equal halves down the breast. Place In the hot melted rai In a frying pan and cook gently for 12 to 15 minutes. The pieces must be just cooked, still the merest fraction pink around lhe leg joints. Lift from the fal on to a lighth buttered, fireproof dish and keen worm without drying. .* F £. "" %  nnlon mrcd "mm In h f,"L unUl lendcr b,tl '" hrown, lshrooms and the ham i r bacon, and 1 move from pan. Place ham or poussin halves. Lay lightly, nc garden: if no room for anyth else, concentrate on the %  1 bacon under the gree.^ leafy vegetables lb whole lorem.i.sl. What ire HI goods tine on it. running from the notch m the cap to be placed al the louldi -naigtr down fa the hem Folding the T35 thaeai' Ij.t!,.•. ih „.!.,. h,n,i* sleeve pattern in hglf (10111 this nushroom on each breut. Add "J** l 1 ,ll ,u *j; '"* * l > *'"-' ,,.,1.1,.),^,, ikl. 11— the i cup of stock to the pan fat of spin.ich plants, a g the common and sUr thoroughly. Stir in the fr.eh spinach with tin. 1 wttie, add parsley and season. leaves; the IMCletj of Coal th poussin with the sauce. jAniai-ainih. with large, %  tnoolh leav iven for 10 minutes so that lhe beets and carrots aie grown, be urface becomes glazed. careful not to discard ih< 1 With this dish you those of the beet make deUcirjjs .spinach and carrot tops cmthe younger ones at nny rate finely cut ui> and put into Huces This chai or gravies. And of course, the hardy okm might And a place in ——————— some odd corner: it is Mippused l.v some to have properties which counteract any tendency to paptlO leer and. 111 th.it CUM', is a body !or. Indeed, it is .vu 1 hat a wide range of plant; in it. rial ihere .evaQable n th group if we are alert and mako jquagb, cucumber, hat these curs aie no lungs In thi "baby" class. One Coope [inn pc ear lapped tho Susae: one race at Caster %  R.VHH m.p.h.—two miles un hou UOwei than the gvergge >peed u varan Bira with a 4 > 4 -]itr. Oacar in another e\ent that da; Un Kavftog ione or tinfe. racing this year. "Wha ithrr with young womc • 1 Ihg asks. -If the can't make money, at loat it : KM d thrill ends out this challenge v arn: 'Von always seem t. p ro cea i lori aftei lh* a race. Whv no She 1used I hit'.. Po I a I oe Chipps or Mherrtrd Sweet Potatoes. 2 medium-s I x e d sweet potatoes 1 tablespoon of butter. Cream to moisten. Salt. Sherry Bake potatoea, scoop out Inside, add suit, hutter. and c r e n m. Flavour with sherry to taste Refill -kins and bake 5 minutes in hot not, h down will give you this line which should also l>r placed parallel to toe SkMvej .oe occasion al l ) ^-ut with iiu t line ~ the croaswlse grain but genseftie in %  not hung so well first lop veil 'mi Th. bios is not nol .. thread, it 1 the tight angle rormed by the eveide. crashing of the warps and woof Her first and only ear race m Heine the bins stretches, fur was last year. She led. Thei the bias —"some man flagged me to gr _____ ____________________ ei She was beaten. When he races her new £601 with groups f_> and (g> during ,i,r •—' -* 11 prepare her make-uj CU-fUU) ("'for.' .tailing —part her pre race drill to get "every ANHVfn TO til K.HTION thing right" She alwaya wean Fur in*' iiiloriii.iiion oi coo> •• cmh lie I met. canies no musco respondent S II it should be ("silly tbings"). Smoking am planted cucurbit*, ..xklails are not dropped be S ain as It U "miking if overtaking when Centre of ever iKi-tsible—In motorcyrh Add the (pjert* Koodu-oo. Th.-urn, '.;. %  „'„ ,„ W ,,,' T ^ ,„!.,,. .,.,. 'JS_J_3~S I.-: "Shu 1. .< !" .'I. no. in Inlmjuonl I %  .,.,.„„,, Sh. rhin— fu, ln ( m home m.fuln.. thm-,!,.. ,.,,.,,. ,,„,., „,,.,.,,„ .,,,„,, ,„, 5_~_ V, (rotted roinpoM or duns) bed*, .-ngnvf. twldl her OV tlrmly 'rsqulra litx'ral vvjter she ejn be affKreulve, loo." :nK and ixvxsiori.il ,pi:.vlnu with wnm i> ropvFIHHT m-swvili -US should be tiutect thai local 15IH-S il.ure larnely in tho .bovo „„. planl ,,„,,,. liat and there .. no need to wait ,„ K ,„,, ,.,.„, „„,, ,„„„„, wllh for imported *d to *M %  :-^ ,,. ...S .ifdjew Every normal skin needs THESE 2 CREAMS FOLLOW THE BEAUTY CARE OF SOCIETY'S LOVELIEST WOMEN EVERYWHERE ? Lovely Society women all over the world follow this simple. Inexpensive beauty care; one that Is within the reach of everyone of you. %  ##'*######"#.'#e ###*#;This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond's Cold Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips. Remove the cream, and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then "rinse'' with more Cold Cream, for cxlra-cleanslng. extra-softening. Very soon, your skin will be clearer, smoother, lovelier. FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION By day, use a touch of Pond's Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This non-greasy cream will hold your powder matt for hours, and protect your complexion from sun and wind. PONDS Vanishing Cream Cold Cream Start now tn win the loveliness that can be yours when you use eUa-M. You'll find the distinctive opal-white jars at all the best beauty counters. i;!iii//,i,v////^ttv///////,ttmK.*/.s'/.ft: MR. PLANTER!! HERE'S MORE YIELD FOR YOU WITH ACTUMUS • The KEY to GROWING POWER The KEY to SOIL FERTILITY It is said that extern, fertJUtj of net) land. This ._ %  yetenv in UM a urgtem developing 'dity. In the Actumui It is en'irel. throw out. the better will i jfwmtb there will be left organic"residues from such extended root systems which will build up the opping of land reduce* the the case with tht artificial mineral acids destroy fercontrury The more roots the soil be transveraed and It) of the oil Actumut also acts i kind of soil polli done to plant. t ,v ,h, en.r> T,;;o l^'^ST^ui* eta£tf. ^i h rJl ' k r "enwnt. which arc mr** !" an "-"" '" '^" """rue diseases Actumus co.itroK ires, features of The Actumus garden. i,,tl.equipment. His to" 1 " can. In also nqudrea ., 'Je holdiog t^o pints. These are the preparatory operntlons: 11 Making a standard solid.on of Actumus. Dissolve two r Arfuirus, or onoun i D Ariumu"!,", in two pints Let st_nd for twelve hour*. %  '' K "'i' ttna "tandard i. and stir It up %  %  "4li lor further inform-turn mil sup#lir% appll la H. KEITH ARCHER is nan DIAL MM i i ni i-i ii ii rrir; iiiii un miu, < CatY ONI JOAf (HVU YOUH Wlh TWS U07WO ntAMANa Yar aUn wHI ba caatar. iwaatar... da.ir.Wy dalMy Iran la< la Hi oCiiv/i 1 ami oLecnaai on COW & GATE! m How hippy Baby Is and how healthy —It li a pleasure to look at him. Buy your Baby, too, a tin of Health and Happiness—TO-DAY 1 COW&6ATEK Oka. FOOD o/ ROYAL BABIES J. %  LISLIL • CO. LTD —AirnU AMD YOU CUNT BO WHOM! The iritulv use of i aui*i .i Hair leod will, r" Its aL'Uoa oil the loots -yJ —alp, nournh stefy h-ir glaad and couuisgc n.hci grofeth. ti provalei iHiuiwhrnsni to tht M-U 1 and li- iii and iorrv isuch irouNes s> MUIUFF PAnTIAt MLONEft THIM A FALLING HAIR lh* dally appllCMloa of this Hair food results unfamugi}' i. really be-utifut glossy head of t—ir LANALOL fa. I With oil (TeHew i jbti) 'or 4rj tcaip LANALOL Na. X Without oil i&ntn Label) tor hue that M nueraHy aily — Mi'inttM and ceolint LANALOL CHI AH (Hue LskeA. A I 1 'ii, drssun* LANALOL otlOlFIIO (gsfceJite i r... An tdMl flsMive LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Rtd Label). A liquid soap da lu. Lore. tHUrttMon Thr (itntiul Aftm • 1 tlarhtidi" i I. hi, P.O. Bos 27 imiiM.i lows Lanaloi .III l'l 0t aT._" Nam "'•'aKSS itS-s.: > — -= a When strike rememb$n t Phensic! Wise k the snflarer from *"*4tfb* or nerve pain who keeps a supply of Phensic I In s matter of minutes die worst of pains give way to Phensic— and as the pain lessens, you feel fit and cheerful, ready again for work or play. It is good to know ihat you can always have the certain relief of Phensic. Re prepared for headaches —keen a bupDlv of Phensic handy. ^ — %  Phensic for quick, safe relief FROM HEADACHES,RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO," NERVE PAINS, NEURALSIA, FLU, C0L03 & CHILLS


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SUNDAY MAY e. ur,i SUNDAY ADVOCATE S VIVIEN LEIGH EMBARKS ON The Topic A CLEOPATRA 'DOUBLE'^ <* Last Week PACE FIVE MAY 6 — NO. 170 Falling Hair! %  dof vital organs Mil h If inn. ihc Ton' ng vtlxuncei. Massaged into the kvikrW in.nl. fcssh ] %  % — inJ soon hair grow* agginwiih healths, handvimcv.roar furr Sfhii ri„ *illyd veii-hair giowing and during again *ml keep it healthy. ~ran IMkffca MHU ikmmiitt •>-< %  v.. Ik, me i :t *.*// %  / Silvikrin ffj I NATURAL .. V** O.W D/l y /T'S SHA W —AND NEXT DA Y IT'S SHAKESPEARE. .. Le)i MIsTi* *KP*I. ( lrpaira at •'•' '' •"' •"•I wi' t ihe -ink. -i..-. Hi.r j|.ii|..u. rrrnaHimaJ grt — ..I (.tig la the gorget** plumage of th 1 T—-uv u * btja n. a up l