Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text






__ ESTABLISHED 1895



U.N. SHOULD

THE ONLY HOPE TO ST OP.
AGGRESSION IN KOREA

WASHINGTON, May 4

GENERAL DOUGLAS

MACARTHUR said here
that the Congressional Record
carried an “absolutely incor-
reet” version of his statement
on the use of Nationalist
Chinese troops in his address
to Congress on April 19. The
Record quoted him as having
recommended removal of re-
straints on Nationalists to-
gether with United Nations
logistic support “to contribute
to their effective operation |_
against the Chinese main-
land.”

MacArthur disagreed
Senator McMahon that Russia
was America’s main enemy. Com-
munism was the main enemy he
said. He agreed that “higher
authorities than the Theatre
Commander” had to take into
account factors such as relative
strength and world political
atmosphere.

MacArthur
Kai Shek,

with

said that if Chiang
Chinese Nationalist
Leader decided to attack» the
Chinese mainland from Formosa,
he (MacArthur) would recom-
mend United States to give
Chiang “reasonable support” with
naval pretective units and sup-
plies. A Senator quoted Mac-
Arthur, as saying yesterday that
Washington would never let him
bomb one particular major Com-
munist supply point in Korea
near the Russian border

He said the censors deleted this
from the transcript.

A Great Symbol

MacArthur said that if one
country carried 90 per cent. of
the burden in Korea, it was
inappropriate that the other
countries should exercise “undue}








| Allies Make Smal)
Gains on the Front

TOKYO, May 4,
United Nations forces in Korea who last week drew
back before 300,000 Chinese Communists, have gone over
to a limited offensive and made small gains. After a three-
day lull and an all-day battle, Eighth Army tanks last night

scattered what was described as remnants of the Communist
_Regiment, north th of Si Seoul.

icnesgnceenon enaseesnigncancen hte

;fugene P.

| engine
geant

Plane Takes
Fire In Air
Lands Safely

BERMUDA, May. 3,
The huge C74 Globemaster of
the continental division of the
Military Air Training Service,
with 38 passengers and a crew of
11 aboard, caught fire on the way
from the Azores to New York, but
landed safely at .Kindley airforce

base, Bermuda, this afternoon,

| Number four engine suddenly
caught fire, enveloping the star—
board wing in flames, but quick
thinking by the crew averted pos-
sible disaster. The pilot, Major
Pitts, of Clarksvale,
Mississippi, was able to extinguish
the flames and cut off the failing
while radio master Ser-
James A. Bain, contacted
operations at Kindley

| In 12 minutes a B17 Flying
Dutchman of the Rescue Squad-
ron was airborne and the crippled
| Globemaster was intercepted



rescue

jabout 225 miles northeast of Ber-

authority” in any decisions made. | ie
MacArthur said he thought ; UGS. :
Chiang Kai Shek stood out to the The rescue plane escorted the

average Asiatic as a “great sym-
bol against Communism.” The
Government of Nationalists in
Formosa compared favourably
with many democracies,

General MacArthur was asked
if he had confidence in the
integrity of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff. He replied, he had complete
confidence in their professional
skill and integrity. General Mac-
Arthur said his plan to
Chinese intervention in
would be to disrupt the capacity
of the industrially weak Chinese

nation to supply their armies in
Korea.
He added, if you for instance

disturb in the slightest degree the

distributive systems of their food | General

you might well have 50,000,000
people starving.
He said that his plan to hit

China was the only hope to stop
“slaughter” in Korea, He believed
war with Russia was not in-

evitable. “The ordinary men of
the world are invincibly against
war” he added, “I believe, that

is so among the Russian masses.”

MacArthur said he would warn
the Chinese that if they refused
to consider a cease-fire in Korea
the United States should exercisa

military and economic sanctions
which would involve bombing
north of the Yalu. He thought

the United States Air Force large
enough to undemtake bombing
missions in the Far ast while
retaining sufficient power to act
as a deterrent to Russia.
MacArthur said Chinese nation-
alist landing on the mainland
could not be destroyed by Com-
munists if given proper support,
SnRewten,



NOEL COWARD
garden. enjoying a

delicious

pictured here





halt,
Korea | before the Senate Committee now

glass of coco

giant transport to Kindley, where
a safe landing was made,—<(CP)



Ike. May Testify

BUFFALO, NEW YORK, May 4
Senator Charles W. ‘Tobey,
(Republican, New Hampshire) said
General Dwight Fisenhower. may
be recalled from Europe to testify

| questioning General Douglas Mac-
Arthur.

who is a member
Relations

Senator Tobey,
of the Senate Foreign
Committee said the purpose of
Fisenhowet's testimony
would be “to fill in the kinks and
crevices showing in the structure
of our foreign policy.”—Reuter,



War Equipment

LIVERPOOL, May 4.
The 7,176 tons British Steamer
Eurymeden has docked here with
100 tons of captured war equip-
ment from Korea—-the first to
reach this country.
—Reuter.





EMBARGO TALKS

LAKE SUCCESS, May 4.

The United States resolution
that all members of the United
Nations cease sending arms, oil
or strategic materials to Com-
munist China, will be put to tha
United Nations Sanctions Com-
mittee on | Monday. —Reuter.



in Sir Edward Cunard's

which he says tasted

yesterday
onut water



They later drove back several
smaller groups and one patrol
entered Uijongbu 12 miles north
of the capital and shot up troops
there.

Exploiting their success, other
tanks moved up on the west bank
of the Pukhan River as far as
Chongjyongni 30 miles north-east
of Seoul.

They shot up Chinese outposts,
but sought in vain for the maia
force. In one brief engagement,
they killed 75 Communists,

The Infantry also went into
action, and in three engagements
drove back North Korean bat-
talions in the Inje sector on the
east central front.

Communists showed no inclina-
tion to fight, but there was no
indication that they were makin
a general withdrawal.

Reconnaissance last
showed they were still moving
large convoys southwards along
the roads to the battle fronts.

—Reuter.

night

Anti-Red Pressure
Increases In Yunan

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 4,

Organized Nationalist action
against Communists in southern
Yunan province is steadily in-
creasing, forcing Chinese Reds to
take drastic steps in an effort to
keep the Indo-China-Burma re-
gion of the province under contro),
according to official sources

General Li Mi one-time Gov-
ernor of Yunan under National-
ists, returned to the mainland
recently, and is now due to com-
mand a force of at least 20,006
men. Reports say that at least
10,000 of Li Mi’s men are regular
army men, well organized and well
equipped. They said several pitch-
ed battles in recent weeks extend-
ed through the area over which
Li Mi is in control.—U.P.



No Curtailment In
Oil To Free World

WASHINGTON, May 4.
The Persian Embassy here
stated today that nationalisation

of Persia’s oi] industry would
not involve confiscation of
Anglo-Lranian Oil Company

properties or the curtailment of
oil to the free world. Ambassador
Nasrollah Entezam called a
news conference on the instruc-
tions of Premier Moshadeq_ to
“clear up misunderstandings and
misrepresentations”. He said the
nationalisation law provided for
“fair and rightful compensation”
to be determined by the Majlis.
Nationalisation would be carried

out in accordance with the
established principles of inter-
national law,

—Reuter.

a en i eee ee

SATURDAY,








~. 5, 1951

|

|

This little known statue of PUCK in the Legislative Council
was presented to the Colony of Barbados by Lady Briggs in
memory of her husband Sir Thomas Graham = izes, Bart.

Fighting Breaks Out
On Syria-Israel Border

DAMASCUS, May 4,

A Syrian Government communique announced to-day
thatderaeli croops move vhay 200 strong launched two heavy
attacks yesterday in the demilitarised Syria-ssrael border

zone. One Arab’ was killed a
ment said. Israeli: casualties
_to be heavy.

Norwegian Givneie
Go On Strike

OSLO, May 4.

Nearly 74,000 Norwegian farmers
and small-holders went on strike
to-day refusing to deliver meat or
potatoes to market or to sow
spring wheat in fields. Striking
farmers cultivated an area of ap-
proxirnately 1,000,000 acres, two-
thirds of Norway's total cultivated
area, Farmers, demand _ higher
prices for agricultural products
as compensation for recent rises,
in labour costs and prices of in-
dustrial consumer goods, If the
strike becomes effective, Oslo will
be completely without meat in a
couple of days. Stocks of canned
meat and meat products are low,
Potato supplies are expected te
last about two weeks. Fish how
ever is in great supply.—(U.P.)



Tito Recovers
BELGRADE, May 4.

Marshal Tito has fully recoy-
ered from his operation fo:
gallstones,

—Reuter.

Noel Coward
Pays First Visit

Noel Coward, British actor,
dramatist, producer and composer
of light music is in Barbados stay -

ing with Sir Edward Cunard at
“Glitter Bay", St. James.
Mr. Coward told the Advocate

yesterday that this was his first
visit to Barbados. He arrived from
Jamaica on Thursday evening and
expects to be in Barbados for just
under a week.

Mr. Coward looked little diff-
erent yesterday from when cinema
fans here saw him in the film “In
Which We Serve” except, that in
place of a naval uniform he wore
4 pink sports shirt and brown
Shorts; and instead of balancing
on a rocking lifeboat, he was com-
fortably seated in a chair in Sir
Edward's garden sipping a Blass
of coconut water.

Mr. Coward who has a home in
Jamaica has known Sir Edward
for many years. He has been in
Jamfica since December, except
for a few days in Nassau, Miami
and Puerto Rico just before com-
ing here.

He has just finished writing a
play. He has not yet decided on
a name for it, and when asked
what it was about, replied: “Oh,”
he said rather slowly, “about
people " He is at present
working on a new book

Mr. Coward did not know if any
of his plays were at present run-
ning in py York or London, but
the film stonished Heart” which
he ee and in which he took
aiding role is now showing in
and is having a very good
after being an equal success

both Londor New York

a le
P.



|

Mr. Coward spends most win-
ters in Jamaica. Ne will be re-
turning there when he leaves Bar-
bados. He is then flying to
Wisconsin to visit Alfred Lunt and
Lyn Fontainne. His next stop
will be New York and he hopes
to be in England by June 5th just
in time for the Theatre Garden
Party, given every year for the
Actors Orphanage, of which he is
President. This is scheduled for
June 19th. Stars from the theatre
will be present as well as the
general public and he hopes that
they will make a lot of money

Noel Coward was born in Ted-
dington on December 16th, 1899.
He made his first appearance on
the stage between 1910 and 1911
at the Little Theatre, London, in





@ children’s fairy play “The
Goldfish”. He first achieved fame
in 1924 with his own play, “The
Vortex.” in which he and Lillian
Braithwaite played the principal
parts. Some of his best known
works are, “Hay Fever” (1924),
“This Year of Grace”
‘Bitter Sweet” (1929), Cav
cade” (1931), “Tonight at 8.30"
(1935), “Blithe Spirit” (1941),
“Present Laughter” and “This
Happy Breed” (1942)

He was responsible for and]

played the leading part in the fil m







{point

nd six injured, the announce

were not known but believed
Arabs were said to have re-

:pulsed both attacks despite heavy

artillery and mortar fire, The
communique Said that United
Nations observers witnessed thr
fecond Israeli attack as they were
touring the area in their white’
painted cars.

In the middle sector, Huel area
the communique aid, eight
Israeli tractors resumed drainage
work but Arabs opened fire.
Israeli’s stationed at Mazratt, El
Khoury and Ghandama, an Arab
village machine gunned them.
The communique said the firing
was still going on, —Reuter.

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

‘and in carrying out your
new duties, Filebrace, let it

always be your aim to

temper the jovial bonhomie

of the commission agent

with the quiet dignity of
the civil servant!”

ewe

Farouk Weds
Sunday

CAIRO, May 4,
Sunday’s Royal wedding pro-
cession of King Farouk, 3l-year-
old ruler of Egypt, and his 18-
year-old commoner bride Narri-
man Sadek will be televised to
fifteen different parts of i,





Gromyko May
pot Fag “e
Say “Yes
PARIS, May 4.
Soviet Deputy Andrei Gromyke
told the West today he would
agree on their draft agenda for the
Foreign Ministers meeting but
only on condition that they gave

in to Russia on one important
—U.P.



DANES CELEBRATE
COPENHAGEN, May 4.



Candles shone from windows
throughout Denmark tonight, the
Sixth Anniversary of Denmark's

liberation from Nazi occupation.

‘In Which We Serve” (1944),
penser gs the life of the Royal —Reuter.
Navy in war time a , " 1G

In 1937 he wrote his autobio- PIONEER AVIATOR DIES
graphy—‘Present Indicative”, and BUENOS AIRES, May 4.
he is the author of 2 volume of A pioneer in Aeronautics
short stories “To Step Aside | Eduardo Bradley died here to-day,
(1939) and “Middle East Diary” ' ceed 64 He crossed the Ande
(1945 t r 19 Reuter

| VISITORS ASK FOR RUM
FROM BARBADOS ATB.LF.

LONDON, May 4

| Cartan William Lambert

of the West Indies section
of the British Industries Fair
made a suggestion today that



| King Opens South

B k kk hi bi it West Indies ram produeers
an X 1 1 10n should get together and
launch a joint advertising

LONDON, May 4, ign.
King George VI threw open to his subjects here to-day ere is no reastn, he said,

why rum fron Barbados, Trinidad
and British Guiana should not
have a big sale in London,’

The rum is really good, he said.
“It is only a question of the pro-
ducers spending a little money on

the century’s greatest display of Britain’s achievements—
the Festival Exhibition. The Royal Family arrived in
typical grey London mists at shining nfbdern pavilions
gardens, fountains and towers on the south bank of the
River Thames.

The King and Queen drove by: — their selling campaign. They
car from Buckingham Palace to j ought to send a trial shipment
the Festival Exhibition Sal Go d oth

The Royal Party included Prin es Oo

cess Elizabeth, the Duke of Edin-
burgh, Queen Mary and Princes
Margaret

Crowds, including 12,000 special-
ly selected guests from all walks
of life, and thousands of the Ex
hibition staff cheered the King anc
Queen as they were received ai
the Royal Pavilion.

The Royal pair then walked to

the Dome of Discovery, the
‘Transport Pavilion and other
halls.

Among members of the Gov-

ernment at the top of the Dome
steps were Opposition Leader
Winston Churchill, and Herbert
Morrison, Foreign Minister, and

“Lord Festival.”

The Queen, wearing a powder
blue coat and hat to match, stood
to attention with the King in
drizzling rain, as the National
Anthem was played.—Reuter.



Want Back
Husbands

HONG KONG, May 4.

Women of Tungkoon. county
near Canton have threatened to
file mass divorce action on the
grounds of desertion unless their
husbands in Hong Kong and For-
mosa return by the end of June,
according to Chinese reports re
ceived here today.”

Reports said, women with the
assistance of Communist officials,
had formed a “get back our hus-
bands” movement at a meeting on
April 25,

Many husbands were said to be
serving with Nationalist armed
forces
—Reute,

“NAKED” MAN

LONDON, May 4.
A woman cleaner panicked
officials here by announcing she
had seen a naked man leaning
against a pillar in London’s Fes-
tival of Britain Exhibition site
this morning, just before the King
and Queen arrived.
All rushed out to investigate.
They found that a wax figure
of “The Fisherman”, an exhibit
in the fisheries section, had been
stripped of his blue sweater,
trousers and sou'wester and left
enly in rubber boots and gloves,
and his head had fallen off.
He was hastily removed to the
dressing room.
Officials came to the conelusion
that it was a practical joke.
—Reuter,

Progress Made

WASHINGTON, May 5
American and British official:
have made “Definite progress”
here toward settling differences
on a Japanese peace treaty, the
State Department announced to-
day. —Reuter.







Russian Tanks

BERLIN, May 5

The West German News Agency

D.P.A. reported today that Soviet

Army authorities are bringing

tanks into East Gemany at the
vale of one train load a night,
Reuter.

50.000 More Wanted

| LONDON, May 4.

Britain’s 21 Royal Ordnance
Factories need 50,000 more work~
ers to carry out the rearmament
programme, the Ministry of Sup-
ply announced today,



—Reuter.

; GOLD INTO MERCURY
|



WASHINGTON, May 4
Ancient alchemists who tric:
to turn base metals into gold
probably would not believe this,
The United States
hag succeeded where they fapee
but in reverse. Atomic energy
Oak Ridge, Tennessee is
being used to convert gold
mercury,—(U.P.)

Cae
inty



WHITE HOUSE GUEST

WASHINGTON,
Prime Minister
wus today a

May 4.
Israeli Davi
Ben Gurion,
of President
luncheon

—Reuter



WAR DEAD
THE HAGUE, May 4
Holland
her war dead
fience througheut the country
—Reuter

today

Government }

Guest}
Truman at al]

commemorated
with a two-minute

This was the result of enquiries
Fi visitors who wanted to Know
Aft WL Stall | why it is that only Jamaica rum
is on sale in London
. .
Of B.I. Fair

‘| (From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 4
Festival of Britain celebration:
and bad weather did not pre
vent the West Indies from trans
acting good business at the BIF
to-day, A representative of thc
China Trading Company placec

The rum and cigars displayed
on the West Indian stands, have
; attracted interested enquiries from
South African business men. They
say they would like ta import
direct from the Caribbean. They
have asked about prices and have
been put in touch with the West
India Committee,

West Indian embroidery which
appears on all the stands. bi



an order for large quantities O°! ¢en much admired. So has th
sea island cotton. Connell Lam straw and raffia work—the gay
bert in charge of the West In |S7#W and raiie eae
dies stands said: “Judging b hats, handbags and mats from
buyers’ inquiries, smaller Wes Temaica. British Guiana, Trinidad

and the Windward Islands, Queen
Clizabeth bought two highly deco-
rative straw bags from the Jamai-
ca stand end another two from the
Windward Islands stand,

Indian islands should concentrat
on minor industries, Thi,
would help West Indian economy
immensely.”

On show at the Jamaica stall) Some exquisite tortoiseshell work
today was a cricket bat autograph-| sent over from Barbados 4
ed by members of the England-| caused such a lot of “favourable
West Indies Test teams, 1950.| eomment that Captain aambert

Many English cricket enthusiasts
‘xamined the autographs

is going to suggest a bigger display
of it next year

“Objects made of tortoiseshell”
he said “are terribly expensive in
Britain, I am sure that Barbados
could produce them much cheaper
Very good trade could be worked
u

Ps sked if futher. specimens cculd
be flowne ever from Barbados,
Captain Lambert replied I don't
think there will be tine “Reuter,



Russian Shoots
U.S. Corporal

VIENNA, May 4,
United States authorities in
Vienna have asked Russians to
oin them in probing the shooting
ft a United States military police
‘orporal by a Russian soldier in
the city centre to-day

Warits Sovereignty

BERLIN, May 4,



American High Commissioner



Walter J. Donelly said he was Chancellor Konrad Adenauer’s
diving the matter immediate at- }) West German Government, reject-
ention and had asked Sovie'} ng all border claims of the past
tuthorities to take part in the 13 yeahs yrsonniigc ee ait
i "| eel sovereignty over é err 'Y ab if
jome tenipOne Dee - RAN TEE *xisted on December 31, 1937. In

effect he has renewed claimsto

East Prussia east of ae aaa

Neisse line now in the Poland-
Ban German Party Russian zone, and small border

districts absorbed by Belgium and
Holland.
—U.Y,

THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night

BONN, May 4

West German Government to-
day banned certain formations of
Neo-Nazi Socialist Reich's Party.
Dr. Robert Lehr, West German
Interior Minister, told a press
conference that the Government
would ask the Federal Constitu-
tional Court to declare the Party
unconstitutional as soon as the
Court was formed,



—Reuter,







“ omar ol <

|

Whenever you want a cigarette-
remember-

we odes

It’s the TOBACCO that counts

|
|

|
{





PAGE TWO



THE STAR BUDS of 1951 in their opening chorus “Orange-coloured Sky” at the Drill Hall last night.

R.,~ ERNEST W. BARLTROP,

Labour Adviser to the Se:-
retaryeof State for the Colonies
arrived from Dominica on Thurs-
day by B.G. Airways and ig ‘a
guest of Sir George and Lady
Seel. He is on a tour of this
area

On Ten-Day Visit

SINCE Mr. Harold Bishop, Gulf

Oil’s Speeial Representative
left Barbados, April 14th he has
visited Vénezuela, Texas, New
York and‘ Trinidad. He flew in
yesterday by B,W.1LA. from Trini-
dad and @xXpects to be here ten
days. He ds a guest at the Ocean
View Hotel,

Coming in by the same plane
were Miss Claudia Evelyn who is
on holiday, Mr, Ainsley Farfan
who is on a three-day visit and
Mr. V. A, Hospedales one of J._N.
Harriman’s-salesmerr in Trinidad.
They are Jl guests at the Hotel
Royal. ae

=-To-night

S Rapes No, 10 Club of the G.I_U.,

along with the other clubs,
are raising money for the G.I.U,
fete on Empire Day. Their con-
tribution is the dance at the
Y.M.P.C, tonight.

Off To Puerto Rico

R. AND MRS. JAMES TILL-

SON were among the _ pas-
sengers leaving by B,W.I1.A.
yesterday for Puerto Rico. Mr.

Tilson is an auditor of the Singer
Sewing Machine Co., stationed in

Puerto .-Rico, They were
married ,hére recently and had
been spending their honeymoon

at the Crane Hotel,...also on the
B.W.1.As: Puerto Rico flight was
Miss Grate Bryan, matron of the
Nightengale Home She is en
roule to»the U.S.A. on a_ four
months’ holiday. Miss V, Jones
of the St, Michael's» Almshouse
will be acting for her during her
absence.,

Get Together
ES'T INDIAN visitors for the
Fdstival of Britain may care

to be entertained by their fellow
countrymen. The organiser of one





scheme is Sam Morris, genial
Secretary of the League of Col-
oured Peoples. Sam says he is

making preparations for what he
described as au “big West Indian
get-together”,

“Star Buds of 1951”

HORTLY after 8.30 o'clock
last night, “The Star Buds of
1951” went into action at the

Drill Hall, Garrison. It was part
of Madame Ifill's second annual
benefit for the Christ Church Baby
Welfare League.

The show, which was under the
patronage of Hon. V. C. Gale,
M.L.C., and Mr, E. D. Mottley,
M.C.P., was followed by dancing,
after the hall had been cledred of
chairs,

The programme opened with an
overture by the Police Band. This
was followed by the Opening
Chorus, “Orange coloured sky”,
per formed by the entire cast. The
stage was perhaps a bit too small
for such a large number of people,
but the orange-coloured costumes
gave plenty of colour to the num-
ber. “A glimpse into the 20's”
came next. This was the Charles-
ton, complete with dresses worn in
those days.

The sketch, “The Mysterious
Suitcase” gave the show a touch
of local humour. Henry Ford
played ‘Joe’, Arnold Alleyne was
‘Harry’, the man with the valise
and ‘The Ghost’ was Austin Ward.
These three boys are Harrison
College students, and each of
them took part in “1066 and All
That" which was_ successfully
Staged at Harrison College sev-
eral weeks ago.

Betty Carrington’s number, a
ballet ‘By a Future Star’, was ‘the
next item on the programme. She
showed the audience that she has
a lot of talent.

This was followed by “The
High Steppers”, seven Star Buds,
Joan Farnum, Yvonne Gibbs,
Margaret Pilgrim, Daphne Smith,
Joyce Smith, Eudeen Layne, Mari-
lyn Gibbs led by Betty Carrington.

Seventh number on -the pro-
gramme was “The Masked Waltz
in Blue”, six couples; the girls in
blue evening dresses and the boys
wore blue dinner jackets, white
bow ties and grey flannels, Each
wore a mask.

The finale was the entire cast
singing “Goodnight Sweet
Dreams”. The costumes were de-
signed and made by Madame Ifill
assisted by Mrs. A. A, Herbert,
Mrs. C, Pinder and Miss I. Raw-
lins. Mrs. Margot Laffan taught
the girls thé Charleston »uraber.



ADVENTURES



OOD morning,

Averroists, If 12 parts. of
frozen egg-dust in a_ gelatine
sausage count as 15 parts of
vegetable matter, what percent.
age of fossilised penguin meat in
a processed pork pie will turn it
into utility fish patty?

Mimsie’s Slopcorner’s
protest

IMSIE SLOPCORNER his
issued this statement to the

“The reason why I refus
ed to be «kissed by Councillor
Tudmarsh at the christeninz of
the Shrewdleigh Gas-Container
was because he had previously
squeezed my arm while partak.
ing of a sandwich at the buffet
1 said ‘Keep yourself to yourse):
Councillor, if you please,” My
rebuke was overheard by
Colone] Telscombe, Mrs, Marsn,
and a Boy Scout named Huffle.
Thus I had reason to believe that
the ceremonial kiss would be an
expression of the Councillor's
personal . feelings, rather than
gratitude for the christening of
the gas-container.”

In @ Turkish jute-mill
aie now taking you over

W*.
a Turkish jute-mill,

where recordings — _have been

——

Ny

Press



TAN,
TAN
TAN

AU

& NAVY

DIAL 4606

Wnt

BY THE WAY...

little

made....Yes, well, here we are
in this—yes—in this—er—Turk.
ish jute-mill, Everybody's look.
ing pretty good....Now, could
you just tell us how this jute-mill
works?....Kaga rom kagik anal

..That was the Turkish Mana-
ger telling us about all this—er—
jute—masses of the stuff, First of
all it fs ee then jacketed,
then slivered,.,.Kaga rom _kagik

Shes plc inmceinicentient a







es °
Trinidad Civil Servant
RRIVING yesterday from
Trinidad by B.W.LA. were
Mr, and Mrs. Daniel Roach who
are staying with Mr. and Mrs.
L, L, Gittens at “Kenville” Colly-
more Rock. Mr. Roach is in Trini-
dad's Government Service. He is
Paymaster of the City Council.

Summer Courses
OME Bahamian and West In-
dian students in England will
surely avail themselves of the
special summer schools, with
scholarships, which are being ar-
ranged by the Labour Party in
England. The courses are eact
for one week and the scholarships
cover the full cost including board
and registration fee. One will be
held at the Labour Party’s “Coun-
try House’’—which Sydney anc
Beatrice Webb left to them—ir
Surrey and the other at Bangor
University in North Wales. Ti
subjects will be either Socialist
principles and policy, or Local
Government in England and
Wales, or oe Organisation. 1]
am told there will also be a special
course on Colonial affairs at Ban-
gor in August.

Battle of Britain
LEVEN years after the event
the Air Ministry are co-

operating in making a full-lengtr
feature film of the Battle o
Britain.

Here is a subject that offers
great opportunities. The Battle of
Britain was the turning point of
the war. The film is being writ-
ten, directed and produced by e
team of Battle of Britain airmen

Title will be: Hawks in the
Sun. Hawks was the R.A.F. code
word for enemy fighters. Some of
the shooting will take place a’
Kenley airfield where many of
The Few were stationed.

Who will fly the aircraft in the
film? Some of the pilots may be
survivors of The Few.

Incidental Intelligence
SOLICITOR who likes flut-
ters on the turf was asked by

a friend whether he preferred his
racing or legal income.

“In some ways, betting is more

attractive,” he said. “But the

courts are the better proposition

They even pay out on losers.”
—L.E.S.

OF PIPA



Copyright » P27. Vax Din: Int Amsterdam



By BEACHCOMBER

anal—yes, er—that was the
Manager again. How long hav
you worked here, Mustapha
Forty years? You mustaph;

very jolly time in the off season
I mean....No, well, actually-
Kaga rom kagik anal—yes, wei
I'm afraid that was the Manage
again. It’s certainly been

worth-while experience, here inp
“this — ev —— —er — Turkish SUIS. mill.

Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter fo

its Junior Short Story Competition.

The best story will be publishe:

ores eh Monday n The Evenifg Advocate, and the winner will receiv:
ze to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The storie
‘an be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30)
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocat

Co, Ltd.,

City not later than Wednesdow everv week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,

Send this coupon with your st

ory.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name ......+-..
Age

School
Form

seeee

Peete eee eee ee eee eee

Seen eee e eee eeee
sa eeeeee

Seen ete eee eee een teens

CMD ANGIONT way cis bases siies oot tues tassel ys tt

CASUALS

Oe a ee ee



EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

a ee
ee te ee ee

— ee ee

& WHITE CASUALS
sith Platform 5 joles and Wedge Heels

ADIES? SHOES

“WINDSOR BRAND”

WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS
NAVY & BLACK SANDALS

$9.44

$8.53
$9.37
$8.50

DIAL 4220





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THE “DRILL” FOR A

DATE WITH THE

WHOSE FACE IS HERE

AS the list of young men who
have escorted Princess Margaret
becomes longer, the pattern sets.
It goes as follows:—

First news is a telephone call
from Jennifer Bevan, her lady-in- jc
waiting, “Princess Margaret is
having a small party to go to the
theatre, and would very much like -

Waits,
the theatre manager.
ére ready and you slide off to the

— a

GIRL



officially “not expected,” and the
manager comes up bowing,
You sit through the interval—

no drinks, no changing places, no
ices,

And. afterwards your party
eaves first, while the audience
and the Princess thanks
The cars

Pee one natn cent to right club.

uckingham Palace at 7.30.” et
The young blood takes a taxi an. — i spemaget ue
or his car, drives straight in to + MOWSTS SES OR. Rae
the Privy Purse door (main en- ‘Served in a_ secluded place.

trance on the right). The police

apmpagne appears, but the bill

are warned and no one stops him. P@ver does (that is settled the
At the door there is an attendant N@xt day), and no one tips the
in the Royal Household uniform Waiters.

of dark blue, Next he goes up in

a lift to the Princess’s private
sitting-room,

There he gets a drink and
sandwiches—usually chicken and
ham, and “jolly good.”

Then they go down and get
into the royal car and drive to
the theatre. There are always a
few policemen round the door—
even when the Princess is



CROSSWORD

en Se ta me,





Across wt

1. Pune I'm out of piece with
the dance, (6)

4. With this in you may see a oull-
fight (3) 7. Contact. (0)
This montn ts the interval
between new mouns, (5)

. Rest this and make replacement
(3)

13.. Make up for a note, (5)







14, Reaps with a peculiar instru
ment. (5)
16. Through serving others | get in
the wet. (6)
12. The New Zeaiangd parrot. (3)
19. Bridge-like structure. (7)
21. Sort of thing vou may find tn a
shipyard, (4) 22. Colour. (3) 5
28 To do 24 Across a drill must (5)
24, See 23 Across (4)
> Down
1, Mow around the old measure, (6)
2. {t provides a tin dune. (8)
3 Who gave rope to Buan ? (8)
4. A white one ts cowardly. (6)
5 You will not get. much juice
unt this is off, (4) ;
6 Claim unduly. (8) 4
& Food trom the coai-hanger, (3)
9 Not even single. (4)
11 Probably an oyster. (6)
14. Made from broken tiles. (5)
15 Again happens to be a curer. (5)
18. Supplement (3)
20 Spot of sorts (3)
Solution of Saturday's puzzie,—Across:
%, Coalpit: 7 Ovster ved: ii ct
14. Sliminate: 13, Pope: 14, Dir
Pyre, 17. Due: 14 Psalm, 20. Air: 21
‘Trawl net, 22 Sad 24. Danger Down:
1 Hosepipes, 2. Cvelous. .5, Atum, 4.
Prandial’ 5. Test, 6 Adherent: 8, Ship
vard; % Elite: 10 Braiding: 15. Puree
ig. Lag
Literary News
nn row between Lady
Cabstanleigh, in her new
cole of literary hag, and_ the
Ineffable Matriarchy is _ boiling
upy Lady Cabstanleigh claims
that, in return for all the food
wind drink she gives to the
aovelists, she ought to have some
say in recommendations and
choices and diplomas, She com-

plains that though these matters
are often settled at her parties |
she’s not consulted. It is believed
that, rather than antagonise her,
he women will agree to let her
choose or recommend a_ novel
occasionally, providing that she
will confine herself to the names
yn the

‘oster. |

publishers’ monthly

Mixed Reading

LIBRARIAN tells me of an

aspect of mixed reading
which I had overlooked. Some
times a man and a woman share
he same book, which means thai
hey must sit too close together
or disinterested scholarship.
Ine day this librarian approached
me such couple, and _= said tact-
fully to the man, /Can’t I get you
1 book for yourself? Wouldn't
doth of you be happier with one
gach?” “Would you, if you were
sitting next to Ursula?” replied
he man,

Express Building
Disappears

HE Daily Express building in
Fleet-street was stolen last
right by a body of men believec
o be Canadians, An enormous
0-wheel lorry was seen on the
oad to Southampton at 11.15

.m., but people thought it was

( mew tank. Yard men are

xamining the empty space,
(Beachcomber News Agency).

One Thing and Another

HY not,” asks a_ food

adviser, “try disguising
Nain boiled rz abbit withe cream of
hicken soup? By all means,
wrovided that the tinned cream
f chicken soup.is disguised with
inned Madeira sauce, provided
hat the “Madeira sauce ig dis
uised with Mumpo paste, espe
‘ially if the whole dainty dish is
lisguised jugged hare tart
with porridge sauce.

CASUARINA CLUB

Members and friends are re-
minded that’ the CASUARINA
CLUB, is now situated at “ILFRA-
COMBE, Maxwell Ceast Road,
‘Telephone 8378

Whilst for tt
will continue 1
a day; membe
operate with th
making as litt|
when

ent the Club

» open 24 hours

» asked to ‘co-
Management by
noise. as possible
and leaving the
that no annoy-
sed to rieighbour

entering

Besicr we must be going,” and
i

It is the Princess who says:
unifer Bevan tips “for the
rincess in the powder room,
You say goodnight in the foyer
of the restaurant, and one 6f the
royal cars takes you home.
And, whatever happens,

néver tip the chauffeur,
—L.ES.

you



POLITICS AND ROBBERY

RANGOON: Communist-hued
bandits stopped a train in Upper
Burma and ordered the passen-
gers to descend, gave them politi-
eal lectures, then relieved them of
their cash and personal belongings,
Afterwards the train wag allowed
to a een

itupert oi: the



2(s up when he feels less
I'm not looking for any-
hir he says. “| missed my way
in ¢ oud and ail 1 want is to get
“Pooh, don’t worry about
**Much more
e-flowers. Won-

cries the hare.
‘ta And





oe PLE LLL ALLELE III OPPO TS



B.B.C. Radio |
Programme |

SATURDAY, MAY 5,
6.30 am.—12.15, pm

1951
19.60 M.,



Forces Favouritts, 7 a.m
The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analysis,
7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m. |
Programme Parade, 7.3 a.m. From the!
Third Programme, 7.50 a.m. Int riude,/
8 a.m. Montmartre Players, 6.15 a.m
Yorkshire vs. South Africans, 8.30 a.m.
Violet Carson, 6.45 &.m. Colonial Ques-j|
tions, 9 a.m, The News, 9.10 a.m. Home|
News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Cinse|
Down, 11.15 a.m. Rugby League Cup Final
11.30 a.m. Surrey vs. Lancashire, 11.45,
1.50 a.m. |

6.20 a.m

a.m. Programme Parade,
Iifterlude, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down
1.15-4.45 p.m. 19.76 M.
—
4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 5 p.m
Yorkshire vs. South Africans, 5.05 p.m.;
Interlude, 5.10 p.m. British Hard Court)
Championships, 5.15 p.m. Rugby League!
Cup Final, 5.30 p.m BBC Scottish |
Variety Orchestra, 6 p.m, Music for!
Dancing, 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade.’
6.45—11.00 p.m. . 26.53 M. 31 2 M



7 p.m. The News, 7,10 p.m. |
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Behind the News,
7.45 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at the
Theatré Organ, 8 p.m. Radio Newsre!,
8.15 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.30
p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m, Interlude, 10.15 p.m. Take
i: from Here, 10.45 p.m. Yours Faithful),
1; p.m. Southern Serenade Orchestra,

C.B.C. PROGRAMME
SATURDAY, MAY 5.

16 p.m.—10.15 p.m. ...... News
10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m Letter from
Canada. 11.76 Mes 25.31 M.





Died From Anti-Alcohol
Powders

PARIS: A 15-stone Frenchman
of Douvres drank a bottle of rum,
four bottles of wine and seven
bottles of cider a day. Recently
he died but not from alcoholic
poisoning. His fiancée had been
giving him overdoses of anti-
alcohol powder which had proved
fatal.

Hair After 35 Years

ROME; A 95-year-old farmer
from North Italy, who has been
completely bald for 35 years, has
now started growing a mane of
white hair. He did not follow any
cure, Doctors are examining the

! case.

Ice- flower —20

derful thing, ice-flowers. Just find
some and everything else will come
tight." ‘* That’s all very well,’

says Rupert, ** but what are they?"
**Come and see,"’ replies the other,
jumping away. Pulling his sledge
our of the snow Rupert hesitates.

Then he follows him.



GLOBE

TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 P.M.

and Continuing DATLY

Positively the greatest War Film ever

“All Quiet on the Western Front”

Lew Ayres — Louis Wolheim

“SPECIAL SHORTS”
; BIG CAT and LITTLE HOUSE
Pit 16 — House 30 — Balcony 40 — Box 54

AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TO-DAY — 5 p.m,
TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30

JAMES STEWART

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“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”

with RICHARD CONTE — LEE J, COBB — HELEN WALKER
A 20th Century-Fox Picture,

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To-night

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SATURDAY,



MAY 5, 1951





a LAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)



LR, ape ene Aes



GOLDWYN Presents

oF

SAMUEL

Dana

TO-DAY AND CONTINUING
445 nd 8.0 p.t
with
ANDREWS—Far GRANGER
Joan EVANS-—Paul STEWART

PlusTHE MAC ARTHUR STORY

MATINEE TODAY (Sat. ) 9.30 am, & 1.30 p.m

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TODAY TO SUN. — 5

Frank Sinatra
George Murphy
Gloria DeHaven

The Bandit” &
Gilbert Roland

LA Z A DIAL
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& 8.30 p.m.
RKO's Big Double)
“Step Lively” “Tarzan & the
Slave Girl”
Lex Barker
Vanessa Brown
Denise Darcell & Chita



Midnite Tonite (Monogram Double)

Cisco Kid in

“Beauty & “The Living Ghost’

James Dunn



Now

(2 New Monegcram Features)

Starring The Singing

Nee MY WAKELY





Warner's



Ann Cirio



GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James
TODAY TO SUN. — 8,30 p.m.
MAT. SUN. 5 p.m
Classic Technicolor

Adventure !

THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT

with Shirley Temple, Barry Fitz-
gerald, Lon McAtlister

Midnite Tonite (Monogram)

‘Call of the Junele”

“Driftin’ Kid”



EMPIRE THEATRE

MAS & 6.30 Daily.

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15...
& Continuing
20th CENTURY FOX

Presents .
“I'D CLIMB) THE

HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”
Color by Technicolor.

Starring Susan Hayward—
William Lundigan

with Rory Calhoun and
Barbara Bates

ROXY
TO-DAY to WEDNESDAY

4.30 and 8.15
Columbia Smashing

Gene AUTRY &
his Horse CHAMPION
in
* BEYOND THE
PURPLE HILLS”

and

“CONVICTED ”

— Starring —
Glen FORD &
Broderick CRAWFORD



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Directed by Henry King + Produced by Lamar Trotti





ROWVAL

TO-DAY and TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Smashing Double,
Robert Rockwell and Bar-
bra Fuller in... .

“ TRIAL WITHOUT
JURY”

and

« HOMICIDE. FOR
THREE ’

Starring
Audry, Long and Warren
Douglas.

OLYMPIC |

TO-DAY to SUNDAY
4.30 and 8.15

M.G.M., and Fox Double

Dana Andrews and Gene
Tierney in

* WHERE THE
SIDEWALK ENDS ”

— and —

« BATAAN ”
— Starring —
Robert Taylor and Lloyd
Nolan
“Bataan” not suitable for
Children.

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———











SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1951
The Duchess Eats Obituary :
Horsemeat Mr. W
Mr. W. D. Bayley
By NE A. :
y JOHN E Ce Tne death was announcea by
Traditional beef-eating Britons Cable from London on Thursday

today are filling out their meagre
meat rations with the flesh of an
estimated 180,000 horses a year.

Many are swallowing their
pride along with the horsemeat
because of the 9% cent weekly
fresh meat ration.

One dealer told International
News Service recently:

“Before the war, an English-
man would turn up his nose at
horseflesh. Now he’s glad to get
at.”

Another dealer—with a shop
near London’s swank Mayfair
district—said horsemeat is not
bought only by the “lower”
classes. He added:

“IT get customers in here in
mink coats and diamonds. I could

tell you of a Duchess who eats
horseflesh regularly.”

George Orban, largest horse-
meat wholesaler in the London
area, estimated that 2,000,000 of
Britain’s 50,000,000 population are
eating horsemeat at least once a
week.

“Many prefer it to other meat,”
he said. “Britain will soon be on
a par with France and Belgium in
the consumption of horseflesh.”

No exact records are kept of
horses slaughiered, but according
to figures supplied by the Hides
Control of the Board of Trade
about 220,000 were killed last
year. This compares with 130,000
killed in 1948.

Brigadier-Gereral Sir George
Cockerill. Director of the Inter-
national League for the Protection
of Horses, estimated that 80 per
cent of horses slaughtered in
Britain wind up on the nation’s
dinner plates. He added:

Extinct In 10 Years

“Horses will be practically ex-
tinet in Britain in 10 years at the
present rate of slaughter.”

Ministry of Agriculture figures
show there were 1,337,965 horses
on Britain’s farms 50 years ago.
Mechanization has dropped this
figure to fewer than 400,000.

A recent Government report on
the subject said:

“The idea of slaughtering
horses for food is distasteful to
many people in this country. We
respect this view, but must face
the facts as we find them, There
are enough horses for the present
needs of agriculture, and the only
other demand is for slaughter for
human consumption.”

A Ministry of Food spokesman
explained that the off-ration
horsemeat is “not controlled.”’ He
said dealers usually charge about
two shillings (28 cents) a pound
and added that local authorities
are responsible for any restrictions
or stipulations on the sale or con-
sumption.”

One local authority—in the
working class East End of London

said its only stipulation is that
“restaurants serving horseméat
should display a notice to this
effect.”

Notice Displaced

In six restaurants visited in this
district only one such notice was
found, and that was pasted to a
door facing the kitchen, not the
public part of the dining room.

A Ministry of Health spokes-
man said “no one in authority”
has ever given an opinion on
horsemeat in relation to the na-
tion’s diet.

Dr. Alfred Brown, a London
dietician, said he thought horse-
meat was “about the same as beef
in body-building qualities. Like
beef or any other meat, it has
bad effects when eaten to excess.”

He added:

“The main drawback to horse-
meat is psychological. To animal-
loving Britons it’s like eating one
of the family.”

A spokesman for the Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals said the society has ac-
cepted the slaughter of horses for
human consumption as “inevit-
able.”

“We are concentrating now on
seeing that slaughtering and
transport conditions are kept
humane,” he said.

—LN:S.













Help PREVENT room DECAY

=the pllupzt wos

Prevent tooth decay! Use refreshing LISTERINE Tooth Paste
which checks cavity formation these 3 important ways.

1, LISTERINE Tooth Paste helps remove destructive

of Mr. W. wD. Bayley, formerly
merchant of this City and Vestry-
man of the Parish.

Watter DeCourcy Bayley was a
member of a we.-known family
in this island. There were four
brothers, one of whom, Mr. Her-
mie Bayley, left this island and
two others became Opticians, Mr.
Wesley Bayley and the late Dr.
Hahnemann Bayley, Walter Bay-
ley, besides being an optician, dis-
tinguished himself as a musician
of the first class. It was his inter-
est in the art which brought him
into many of the controversies in
which he was en - In his
early years he learnt the Organ
with a distinguished musician
then Organist of St. Michael’s
Cathedral, Mr. Sibthorpe. As the
years rolled on his interest
increased and he took an. active
part in any organisation dedicated
to the improvement of music in
this island. He himself was a fine
exponent. It was due largely to
his perseverance that the new
——— Organ was bought in

25.

He was a Jeweller and Gold-
smith and proprietor of the Gem
Buildings at the head of Broad
Street. It was his interest in
modern trends which caused him
to advocate the removal of. the
“Cab Stand” from Trafalgar
Square and to advocate that the
Government give a grant to the
Civie Cirele for beautifying the
city .

in the Vestry he was the terror
against the old system of patron-
age by which the plums of office
were dispénsed to those who
served at election time blocking
the promotion of those who had
served in the humbler offices.
The old method of guessing at the
trade rate was publicly denounced
by him, and for some time as a
result of his agitation, the Vestry
became the butt of public criti-
cism. He strongly advocated the
establishment of a Mayor and
Corporation in order to correct
the abuses of parochial adminis-
tration.

With Mr. Bayley sponsoring a
cause there was little chance of
failure. He was enthusiastic and
had an ability to hold an audience
unrivalled by any publie speaker
in this island today. It was his
turbulence of spirit which brought
him public admiration but which
prevented his election. to the
House of Assembly. He did not
suffer fools gladly and men who
were not of high educational
standard and who indulged in pri-
vate favours at public expense
were his natural enémy.

But above all this Mr.
was a lovable character. Music
and the arts were his love. His
enthusiasm and his willingness to
do anything to help in a_ public
cause were second only to the
depth of friendship which he
gave. They were few who enjoyed
this; but to such as did he opened
not only his purse but his heart.

By his first marriage he had
two children, Dr. H. H. Bayley
and Mrs. Lawrence Goddard.

After his second marriage to a
distinguished musician the former
Miss Doreen Clark of the Royal
College of Organists he left for
England where he had been liv-
ing ever since, following a lengthy
illness.

The news of his death will be
the source of deep regret to many
friends and relatives in this
island.

—_——:

20,000 Await Orders

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 4,

Chinese Nationalist Intelligence
reports said an_ International
Communist force of 20,000 men in
Russian army uniforms is awaiting
orders from Moscow to cross from
Manchuria into Korea. Reports
said troops claim to be European,
Mongolian and Japanese contin-
gents of the “International Aid to
Korea Volunteers army.” In addi-
tion reports claimed at least one
division come from satellite coun-
tries —U.P.

Bayley



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HE WAS IN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



INDO-CHINA

ra
a a
=

;

~

, a

ig 5

THIS French-Vietnam soldier is receiving attention after being
wounded by a mine left behind at Baria by the fleeing rebels, engaged
ad

in the Indo-China war.—Express,

‘N.A.P. Treaty
Powers Annoutice
Council Merger

LONDON, May 3.

North Atlantic Treaty powers
announced today their decision to
merge the councils of their For-
eign Finance and Defence Minis-
ters to a streamline working or-
ganisation, The new structure
includes the formation of a Fin-
ancial and Economic Board which
will work in Paris, parallel with
the council for the deputies and
the Defence Production Board by
others who will continue to work
in London,





Antigua Crop
Slowed Up

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 3

After seven weeks of grinding
operations, the Antigua Sugar
Factory has manufactured 6,238
tons of sugar from 42,765 tons of

=

cane. Apart from four weeks’
idleness due to a cane cutters
strike the factory has lost
159.18 hours out of cane. The

factory has only worked 12 hours
so far this week ds there was a
stoppage on Monday. Workers
took a holiday on May Day and
had a march and pienic at Fort
James,

At since cutters

no time

The new. Board will take over returned to work has the factory

the function of permanent work-
ing of the staff of the Defence
Financial and Economic Commit-
tee Advisory group on raw mate-
rial problems and the economic
financial working group set u
some months ago in Paris. It will
work in close co-operation with
the organisation for European
Economic Co-operation,
—Reuter.

$250 For Wounding

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 2.

“You have found yoursélf in a
very unfortunate position, You
have probably allowed jealousy
to get the better of you. I would
advise that if the woman does not
want you, let her go”, said Mr.
Clement Phillips, Magistrate, to
Edward Roach, when he found
him guilty of maliciously wound
ing his rival Russell Bartholomew.
The Court heard, that the
defendant and one Virginin
Lewis had been very friendly at
one time. .She went to live with
Bartholomew some time after and
Roach became jealous. One
night he went to Lewis’ apart-
ment where he met Bartholomew
and during an altercation, took
up an ice-pick and stabbed him
in the chest. He had to pay
$250 compensation,














been kept supplied with enough
canes to keep it working to its
full capacity. It is already
known that even if from now on
the factory was supplied enough
to be operating in full capacity,
it is unlikely that the full crop
anticipated, 25,000 tons, will be
ground off. Last year 7,000 tons
of cane remained standing and
with Whit-Monday, Empire Day
and other holidays coming along
the situation this year is again
doubtful.

Senior Short Story Competition



Canada’s C.O.L.
Stull Climbing

OTTAWA, May 4.

Canada's cost of living is still
climbing. Trade Minister Howe,
told the Commons Thursday that
the official index reached a record
of 161.8 at April 2—an increase of
2.1 points from the _ previous
height of 179.7 one month earlier

His announcement was immedi-
ately used by Opposition parties to
bolster arguments that some of the
tax increases proposed in the
1951Â¥52 budget should be repealed.
They unsuccessfully moved to
repeal increases in sales and ex-
cise taxes ag substitute sources
of revenue. They proposed mgher
corporation taxes and tax on capi-
tal gains.—(CPp)

.
Rejected
LONDON,

Members of Parliament long
wondered whether the table
cloths in the House of Commons
dining room marked “Milwaukee
University Club’ were lost, stray-
ed or stolen

Finally Conservative Member
of Parliament C. J. Alport asked



the Chairman of the Kitchen
Committee, Labourite William
Coldrick

Coldrick said: “The tablecloths
referfed to are manufacturer's
rejects and have slight imperfec-
tions. They were purchased in
1947 when other tablecloths were
difficult to obtain.”—I.N.S,



Refugee Problem

STRASBOURG, May 3

After an impassioned appeal by
Chancellor Dr. Adenauer, a meim-
ber of the Committee of Ministers
of the Council of Europe in Stres-
bourg, today unanimously decided
to aid Western Germany to tackle
the problem of 11,000,000 refugees
from the other side of the “iron
curtain”. Three of the 15 repre-
sentatives of those in Britain, Bel-
gium and Denmark were persuad-
ed by Adenauer’s speech to with-
draw their objections to the pro-



+ posal, it was understood.

It was decided at this closed
meeting to call an immediate
conference of experts to uncover
all aspects of the refugee prob-
lem in pvope, estimated to con-
cern 11,850,000 people spread over
six countries.

—Reuter

MORE FOR 10UR

OF STATELY HOMES
LONDON,

The Earl of Pembroke is bring-
ing an inflationary trend to the
British peerage’s stately homes
business,

Lord Pembroke will open his
great Wiltshire House, Wilton.
the public on May 1 but will
charge sightseers admission,

Last year nearly a hundred
titled aristocrats allowed tourists
to tramp through their stately
homes for an admission fee of
60 cents.

Wilton, which was built in the
16th century, was headquarters
for the British Army’s Southern
Command during World yy i.

‘ —LN.S.





The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girts
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

tition.

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words

in length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd..
City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.

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confiscated TV sets and expen-
sive Persian lamb and silver fox
fur coats of many of the officers’
wives.

The raiders are from District
Attorney Miles McDonald's
office.

Racket-buster McDonald
showing the coats and TV sets to
a grand jury investigating police
graft,

Some high-ranking officers
have * submitted questionnaires
setting out their financial posi
tion to the grand jury.

And the jury is inspecting fur
coats and TV sets to determine
how truthfully the police answer-
ed their quiz,

It is believed the inquiry may
show that some did, in fact accept
large bribes from gamblers and
underworld chiefs.

The grand jury
crder arrests and
trial.

ADVERTISEMENTS in buses at

is

has power to
commit for

soaked
attract women's attention.

women are so attracted that they
tear them off for use as sachets.

EX-ACTRESS

in perfume attached

Hope Hampton
shed not a tear when £119,000 of
gems and cash were stolen from
her Park Avenue fiat.
police brought back her
cream-coloured safe, empty,
tumblers knocked off, she said: “|!

But whe:

sentimental value. I feel like ery
ing.”

GENEROUS acknowledgment by

the New York Times in a mes
sage from Cardiff; ‘“Britain’s
rearmament drive is beginning to
show results.”’ Correspondent Ben-
jamin Welles had just been seeing
20-pounders being produced
Centurion tanks.

£1,400,000 yacht
Grille (German for caprice) is
going to aid the rearmamen:
effort, She has been sold for over
£35,700, and will be broken up
for scrap. Since 1946, when the
Admiralty sold her, she has had
an English skipper, Captain
H. E, Byng.

THE ARMY has cut its call for
National Servicemen this month
from 60,000 to 40,000, Reason:
64,000 volunteers have come 1h
since January, 34,000 more than
expected. /

THE AIR FORCE asks the air-
eraft industry for a completely
automatic extra-high-altitude
fighter, It must travel at the speed
of sound to a ceiling of ten miles
and be armed with a guided mis-
sile, It must be made by 1954

A NEW atomic air-raid shelter
for President Truman will cost
£314,000. Says a White House
aide: “He could stay down there a
hundred years if he wanted to.”

A BATTLESHIP would be the
last place to look for
dope. But pharmacist’s mate
Francis Pastoria has been arrested

HITLER'S

on charges of smuggling £8,900

worth of morphine into America
in the battleship Missouri, just
back from a long tour of duty in
the Far Bast

THREE out of every
Yorkers would not in any
cumstances, according to a
change places with President Tru-
man. The job requires too much
wear and tear, The other two
would be willing to try “for the
honour and chance of service.”

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COURTESY

PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR







Printed by the Advccaic co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown

Saturday, May 5, 1951

An Unkind Cut

AN announcement has been made in a
Trinidad newspaper that the British Coun-
cil is about’ to abolish the posts of Music
Officer in the Eastern Caribbean and Art
and Exhibitions Officer in the West Indies.
The reason for such a decision is said to be
thé cut inflicted by the recent Budget on
the British Council. It is highly unfortun-
ate that the British Council should have
decided to remove these two officers from
their present fields of work at the moment
when progress is obvious.

The work of Miss Enid Richardson, the
Music Officer, and Mr. John Harrison, Art
and Exhibitions Officer is well known in
this Island, where, perhaps, Mr, Harrison
is better known. Miss Richardson’s head-
quarters are in Trinidad, but, she has vis-
ited Barbados on a number of occasions to
conduct courses, give recitals and broad-
casts, and to accompany visiting artists.
She has greatly widened musical apprecia-
tionin this island, and has given pleasure
to many. Hers has not altogether been an
easy furrow to plough, for British as this
Island is, it is proportionately unmusical.
Her success has been greater in colonies
where the inhabitants are of Latin descent,
and are therefore, more receptive. This,
however, in no way minimises the value of
her work in Barbados.



Mr. Harrison’s enthusiasm for his work
has been relentless. He has lectured, given
broadcasts, instructed schools and held
courses for teachers. He has organised
exhibitions and conducted parties of school
children around them. Museums, art soci-
eties and artists have all benefited from
his enthusiasm and guidance. Nor has his
been a straightforward task. He has en-
countered opposition from schools and in-
dividuals where the value of art teaching
to children was not formerly realised. By
courtesy and enormous drive, such opposi-
tion has largely vanished. The flourishing
art societies and frequent art exhibitions
from Nassau to British Guiana bear some
witness of his work during the past years.

Great regret and amazement are felt that
the British Council should have decided to
abolish the posts of Music Officer in the
Eastern Caribbean and Art & Exhibitions
Officer in the West Indies. The financial
saving to the-Council must be trifling when
its vast expenditure on seemingly unpro-
ductive work is considered.

It can scarcely cost the Council more
than £3,000 per annum, of which the
greater part consists of travelling expenses
for these officers. Now that the work of
these officers is beginning to show real
results, it is certainly not the moment to
terminate such valuable services, for it
will result in the unfortunate decline of
music and art. Teachers and others who
have benefited from the work of these
officers are not yet ready to stand alone.
lt is, in effect, the abandonment of this
area when more officers are required
rather than none at ail. There is nobody
or person capable of continuing such work.

It may be that the abolition of the Music
Officer and the Art & Exhibitions Officer
is the thin end of the wedge, and that the
removal of the British Council from the
West Indies or from certain colonies is
contemplated. If such a step is planned,
could not the British Council retain both
these officers’ and place them under the
appropriate local Directors of Education
to continue their valuable work? By this
means such important work would con-
tinue and grow at a ‘trifling cost, for two
officers attached to Education Departments
would not require expensive headquarters
or large establishments.

If is to be hoped that the British Coun-
cil’s decision is not irrevocable. The work
of both its officers has greatly enriched
the lives of the peoples in the areas con-
cerned, where, formerly, .an, interest in
music and art was the prerogative of a
very few. Gratitude is due t» the British
Council for sending both officers to the
Caribbean and for sponsoring their work.
But, our gratitude is tinged with a certain
bitterness that the work of these officers
should be left “half finished’.
Richardson and Mr. Harrison the Council
has two fine British officers, devoid of pre-
judice, zealous and enthusiastic, and with
that rare gift of evoking enthusiasm in
others, It will be a long time before we
shall see their like again on these shores.

OUR READERS

In Miss {



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

British West Indies

Ever since the second half of the
last century, when the price of
sugar collapsed, to recover only
during the two World Wars and i
fall again in the interval between
them, there has been poverty in
tLe British West Indies. Professor
W. M. Macmillian says in his book
Warning from the West Indies:
“A social and economic study otf
the West Indies is necessarily a
study of poverty.”

Qne cause of poverty in the West
Indies has been the low price
paid for West Indian produce, Fo,
protracted periods during the past
seventy years the prices prevail-
ing for most tropical primary
products have been so low that
they have permitted payment only
of very low wages to the workers
in the industries producing them
and in no tropical region have
they been lower than in the
West Indies. Sugar is the prin-
cipal export crop of the West
Indies, and gives employment to
more people than any other crop.
For a great part of those seventy
years, the price of sugar exported

»was a halfpenny per pound and
wjseldom rose above a penny per

pound, until the outbreak of the
two World Wars and especially
since the exigencies of the Second
World War compelled resort by
the British Government to Bulk
Purchasing of sugar which was
established in 1939 and continues
to the present day.

One of the greatest needs of the
West Indies, and, in fact, of all
colonies, is stabilization of produce
prices at a remunerative level
Until that is done, wages cannot
be paid to support a reasonable
standard of living. Otherwise, as
one colonial administrator has
expressed it, “It is idle to talk of
colonial welfare, unless prices are
paid for colonial products to make
welfare possible.”

The other cause of poverty in
the West Indies is over-population,
The over-populated state of all of
the British West Indian islands
has long been the cause of much
concern. While the two continen-
tal colonies, British Guiana and
British Honduras, are very
sparsely populated, all of the
island colonies, except Dominica,
are over-populated and the pres-
sure of population has increased
in recent years.

In the past relief was found by
emigration to the United States of
America, Pahama, Cuba and other
Latin-American countries. But
immigration into the United States
of America is now extremely
restricted. During the war and
immediately afterwards, 15,000 Ja-
maicans were employed on farms
in the United States, but as un-
employment has increased in the
United States, more and more
Jamaicans have been repatriated,
and now the number there is
negligible,

Doors Closed To Emigrants

* Moreover, the Latin-American
countries have closed their doors
to coloured immigrants and Cuba
has gone to the length of com-
pelling West Indians» who have
.long resided there and have grown
old and destitute, to return home.
Added to the loss of avenues of
emigration, the death rate has
fallen and the birth rate has risen
in some of the colonies in which,
formerly, malaria increased the
one and reduced the other. Suc-
cessful control of the malaria-
carrying mosquito by D.D.T, and
treatment of the fever with re-
cently discovered medicines have
lowered the death rate and in-
creased the birth rate. It is now
estimated that the West Indian
population will double itself with-
in a generation.

The total West Indian popula-
tion is now increasing at the rate
of 2 per cent. per annum, which
is double the average rate for the
world, and there is an annual in-
crease of 56,000 people. In Jamaica
alone, where the birth rate is 32
per 1,000 and the death rate 12 per
1,000, the annual increase is 27,000
people. In Barbados, dependent
entirely on an agrarian economy
—the sugar industry—the density
of population is 1,300 to the square
wmile, which is nearly double the
density of the highly industrial-
ized countries of Western Europe.
Barbados is the most densely
populated country in the world,
except Malta.

In Jamaica, also dependent on
an agrarian economy, the density
is over 300 to the square mile, if
the total area is taken into reckon-



With acknowledgements to
The Anti-Slavery Reporter.

ing, but Jamaica is a very moun-
iainous island, ana toe most or Ns
area is too steep and rocky to be
used beneficially. The real den-
sity of population there is prob-
ably 600 to the square mile.

The Times correspondent in
Jamaica wrote, on the 1lith Sep-
tember 1950, that: “Unemployment
in Jamaica is causing a situation
which may become comparable
with the conditions of 1938, which
led to riots and eventually the
despatch of a Royal Commission
to the West Indies . . . According
to the 1947 employment census,
25 per cent. of Jamaica’s 600,000
workers were unemployed. . Con-
sequently, Kingston, the capital
and the centre of most political
controversy, is over-crowded and
shanty towns have sprung up
which are sources of unrest and
discontent.”

Seasonal Employment

To make matters worse, most of
the agricultural work is seasonal.
The sugar industry of Jamaica
employs about 50,000 workers in
the reaping season, between De-
cember and June, but later in the
year the number employed falls
off to about 25,000. Before the
war the banana industry used to
employ about 40,000 workers when
27 million bunches of bananas
were exported, Now only about
7 million are exported and the
number employed is correspond-
ingly less.

In Barbados the sugar estates
“stagger” the work. They employ
workers for only a few days a
week and replace them with
others for the other days, in order
to give as many as possible an
opportunity to earn something.
Commendable as this is to save
some from complete unemploy-
ment and starvation, it cannot but
result in under-nourishment.

We must not lose sight of the
fact that there is no unemploy-
ment relief or “dole” in any West
Indian colony. The destitute un-
employed have either to live on
the charity of people nearly as
poor as themselves, or resort to
crime to provide themselves with
sustenance, Theft of growing
food crops is consequently very
prevalent, and this often discour-
ages small-holders from growing
food crops, which are so often pil-
laged by hungry thieves during the
night. If the United Kingdom had
unemployed in the same propor-
tion to its population as Jamaica
has, there would be nearly five
million unemployed in the United
Kingdom. .

Peasant Small-holdings

A succession of Royal Commis-
sions from 1897 to 1938 have urged
the creation of small-holdings and
expansion of peasant agriculture
as a panacea for poverty and un-
employment in the West Indies.
That recommendation has been
acted upon to a greater extent
than is generally believed. In
Jamaica. one third of the cultiv-
able land is divided into holdings
of under 59 acres each, In British

Guiana, Trinidad, Grenada, St.
Vincent, St. Lucia, Dominica,
Antigua and Nevis a high pro-

portion of the cultivable land is
divided into small-holdings. In
Barbados one fifth is so divided.
In St. Kitts, on the other hand, no
land has been reserved for the
purpose,

The results obtained from peas-
ant cultivation have been disap-
pointing. Experience shows that
small-holders in the tropics, con-
fined as they are to the same small
area of land, over-crop it and do
not redress the balance with fer-
tilizers, The fertility of the land
steadily falls until it becomes bar-
ren and has to be thrown out of
cultivation for years to fallow until
it recovers fertility. So long as
there is enough land to permit of
shifting cultivation the results of
peasant cultivation are not dis-
astrous, but shifting cultivation is
impossible in over-crowded West
Indian islands.

In 1947 the Secretary of State
for the Colonies, Mr, A. Creech
Jones, sent a Commission, of
which Sir Geoffrey Evans was the
Chairman, to British Guiana and
to ‘British Honduras, to investigate
the possibility of developing in-
dustries in those sparsely popula-
ted colonies, so as to absorb sur-
plus population from the island
colonies,

The Evans Commission

The Commission wes intorme.
that it was necessary to transfe:
not less than 250,000 people i
aggregate from the West india:
islands in the near future to othe:
countries to relieve the pressure
on existing means of livelihood.
The physical possibility of settling
that number in the two conti-
nental colonies is clearly suggestea
by the great disparity between the
population of the continenta
and island colonies respectively
The total population of the islana
colonies is 2% million, while tha
of British Guiana and British Hon-
dufas together is under half-a mil-
lion. British Guiana is as large a:
the United Kingdom and Britis!
Honduras is as large as Wales, ye.
the area of all the islands togethe.
is less than that of British Hon-
duras.

The Evans Commission foun
thet large numbers of people coulc
be transferred to the two conti-
nentdl colonies, but that it woul
be possible only through vigorow
development of the latent re
sources of those colonies. Spac.
is not available here to set out i
detail the recbmmendations of th«
Commission, contained in a Report
which covers 350 pages of print
but briefly, the Commission re
commended the establishment ii
British Guiana and in Britis!
Honduras of certain industries
mainly agricultural, at a cost o.
about £25 million, which couk
employ 25,000 workers and main
tain 100,000 people, including th:
workers’ families.

This has been criticized as offer
ing an inadequate solution of th’
problem. Critics have lost sigh
of the fact that the 100,000 woul
be only the number employed an
supported directly by the indus:
tries recommended by the Com
mission and that a greater numbe
would be required to minister t:
the needs of the primary worker
and of each other. To illustrat
this the population of Barbado;
is 193,000 of whom only 26,000 are
employed in its sole industry, the
sugar industry. Yet 167,000 other
people there make a living in vari-
ous secondary ways, as teachers
artisans, shop-assistants and so on
On the analogy of Barbados, the
continent colonies should be able
to absorb three or four times the
number which the industries re-
commended by the Commission
could absorb. Moreover, if the
capital expenditure was multi-
plied, the absorptive capacity of
the continental colonies would be
proportionately increased. £250
per immigrant is a moderate sum
to pay for settling each of them.

Development Corporations

The Commission recommended
as the most suitable agency for
carrying out its recommendations
a development corporation in each
of the continental colonies. They
felt that the material standards of
the workers could best be raised
by increasing the yield of the soil
through expert © organization in
Jarge units of production, run on a
profit-sharing basis, rather than by
establishing small-holdings and
leaving the settlers to work out
their own salvation, and they were
strengthened in this belief by the
fact that they did not find among
prospective emigrants and their
political leaders any strong urge
towards the system of small-
holding.

The Report of the Evans Com-
mission was published in 1948 and
while some steps have been taken
to explore lines of enquiry sug-
gested by the Commission, too lit-
tle has been done to act upon its
concrete recommendations, Imple-
menting the recommendations of
the Commission has been entrusted
to the Colonia] Development Cor-
poration and that organization has
not shown much inclination to
co-operate with the people in the
colonies concerned and_ consult
them on their aspirations anc
wishes.

West Indians feel that little pro-
gress will be made towards solving
their unemployment and _ over-
population problems until a De-
velopment Corporation is estab-
lished in each of the continental
colonies, to the capital of which
every West Indian colonial govern-
ment which wishes may contribute
what it can and be represented on
the Board of Directors,




RIDGWAY=New U.N. Chief

IEUTENANT - GENERAL
MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY
commanded the Eighth Army in
Korea for 105 days. He went out
in December from being a Deputy
Chief of Staff in Washington’s
Pentagon, A lot of those who
know him expect him to go back
there one day as Chief of Staff.
Ridgway is 56, thrice married,
with a two-year-old son. He is
himself a Regular soldier’s son,

At 47, he turned the 82nd
Division into one of the United
States’ first two airborne
divisions, and led it in battle in
Sicily, Italy, an@ North-West
Europe.

When the war ended, the air-
borne genéral became United
States representative on the
United Nations military staff, a
married Penny, aged 30, he
present Mrs. Ridgway.
commanded in the

Then he
Caribbean

area.
For relaxation Ridgway chops

SAY: |

By ROBERT JESSEL

wood, ice skates, and reads the
works of Rudyard Kipling.

Hit, Hit, Hit ~-
ERKED from his Washington
desk job last Christmas into
‘the Korean fighting, he revitalised
the late General Walker’s slightly
jaded and bemused Eighth Army,
The Tenth Corps ceased to take
orders from General MacArthur
in Tokyo, and came forthwith
under command of General
Ridgway.

The Eighth Army found itself,
as another Eighth Army suddenly
found itself in the Western Des-
ert in 1942, when an almost un-
known general called Montgom-
ery flew out from England to
command it.

He let it be known that his
interests were homicidal, ‘not

feographical, and said: “Real
estate in Korea is incidental,”

His tactics were to work his
divisions forward by slow degrees,
hit the enemy hard and often
from the air, and then push his
armoured spearheads ahead to
keep contact with the Reds.

In defence, he accepted limited
enemy advances, then pinched
out the bulge with cool precision.

It worked. The general was up
daily at 5.30 and off by hover-
plane to visit the forward troops.
Patton’s emblem haq been his
pearl-handled revolvers. Ridg-
way’s became the two hand
grenades fastened to his webbing.

Wherever the hoverplane car-
ried the tireless, erect Command-
er among the soldiers, respect
was “demonstrated both ways.”'
(The men ceased to fight from
the valleys. He taught them to
dominate the heights.

Now he moves on and “i:

—LES.



Pay To Keep The Good Men

To The Fditor The Advocate
SIR,—1 had a very pleasant sur-

prise two nights ago when I

—attended a Film at The Empire

““goTheatre to find that I was not

pestered by an assortment’ of
hooligans insisting that I employ
one of them to watch my car
»* Previously I have always had to
hand out the half shilling for the
simple reason that if I did not,
parts of the car would be missing
wnd the body scratched when i
returned to it after the show. On
two occasions I have had perfectly
mew cars scratched because I had

not taken on the particular ruffian
who was accustomed to “bleed”
me. To find now that one can
drive his car to the Empire with-
out fear of its being damaged is
indeed a wonderful blessing, and
I understand that our present
Commissioner of Police is to be
thanked for that. This is only one
of the many good services that
ovr Commissioner has rendered the
public since he took up office, and
in the Force itself one can see a
vast improvement, but on looking
up to see what Barbados pays this
excellent Officer I am amazed to
find that we have such a good
man at such a low price, From

what I can gather he will be leav-
ing us this year for a similar job
with more pay, and he can’t be
blamed, as the many obligations
that the income of a Commissioner
of Poljce of Barbados has to
meet — leave him absolutely
nothing to buy a package of
Trumpeters with. All men in his
position are constantly spending
their own money entertaining on

behalf of the country Some
Police Official may arrive here
trom overseas — he has to be en-

tertained and the good name of
Barbados upheld out of the local
man's pocket. There are constantly
arriving military officials of im-

portance who have to be shown
the natural courtesy, and here
again the pocket of the Commis-
sioner is hit. How he can buy a
box of matches—God only knows.
It is quite time that Government
woke up to the fact that some of
the local Officials in key positiqns
are being very much underpaid,
ond that we should certainly pay
to keep good men. I hope that
the Commissioner will not be
annoyed at this letter, but I am
writing it for the good of Barbados
ond not for the object of praising
him,
Yours truly,
BARBADIAN.

ADVOGTE) @ver=Population In The) NOBODY'S DIARY

Monday — The workmen of Barbados have

fuesday — A fisherman near Paynes Bay

Wednesday — One of the most unusual

got such a bad name for absenteeism,
laziness and all the other characteristics
of fallen man, that it gives me great
pleasure to record a scene in Baxters|
Road. Thanks to the perpetual stream
of traffic jamminess which makes this
road unique in Barbados I was forced to
stop for the space of one minute or
more.

During the enforced halt I saw a great
swing of small picks. I wasn’t near
enough to hear any singing, but it looked
very much as if the lips of one of the
pick swingers were moving to the
rhythm of the other-six workers. I al-
most felt like causing a traffic jam my-
self, just to wait and see how long this
burst of energy would keep up, but what
I saw almost convinced me that there
were people in Barbados who liked to
work with their hands. I was particu-
larly glad to see them in Baxters Road,
because what that hideous neighbour-
hood needs and needs urgently is to be
completely destroyed and rebuilt.
With willing workers like the ones I saw
the matter could be arranged.

caught a shark the other day. It was
duly cut open as sharks are when fisher-
men catch them. Inside were found
(certainly not the copies of the neglected
Maude Report!) eleven other sharks.

objects in the Legislative Council Cham-
ber is Puck. The statue of Puck was
presented by Lady Briggs in memory of
Sir Thomas Graham Briggs Bart. A Mid-
summer Night’s Dream was my first intro+
duction to Shakespeare so Puck and I are
old friends, but on re-reading him I’ve
been asking myself why Puck in the
Legislative Council ?

Had it anything to do with that famous
crack of his in Act III, Scene II, when
he says:

‘‘And those things do best please

me
That befall preposterously.’’
And was it not Puck who said ?
“Up and down, wp and down
I will lead them up and down:
I am fear’d in field and town:
Goblin lead them wp and down.’’
Nor is it in keeping with the dignity of
the Upper House to speak like Puck
speaks when he says:

“Now when thou wakest with thine

own fool’s eyes peep.’
Them’s fighting words as my American
friends would say. But Puck says them
and Puck has. an honoured place in the
Upper House.

Thursday — The beauty that might be

Friday — Before

Saturday — Is this how you talk ?

Bridgetown’s. I saw it last week. It was
the day that Miss Nell Manning’s fountain
was playing in what ought to be the gar-
dens of Trafalgar Square. The rain was
coming down in buckets and was being
blown about the street in a thin white
spray. It was hitting the tar road and
bounding up again like millions of lizard
eggs.

There was no one about. The rain had
driven them away. The Cannon Ball
tree was in bloom and its leaves were
spring leaves,











In the Careenage a_ tall schooner
rocked its mast to the rhythm of the
pounding rain. There was water, water
everywhere. Bridgetown looked clean
and refreshed, a vision of beauty. Had
I the gift of the painter I would wait
until the Council window was free and
I would paint it and hang it in the
Museum, which is one of the only places
in Barbados where the things of beauty
can hope for much support. As for Miss
Nell Manning, may she get more foun-
tains to play and may barbarous hands
never be laid on her Cannon Ball Tree.

There is so little beauty left in Bridge-
town,

leaving the Legislative
Council can anyone tell me who was
Giacomo Ancono who painted Colonel
Henry Worsley, Governor of Barbados in
1722 ?

The painting was presented in 1921,
but when was it painted ?

lst woman:
waiting.

2nd woman: “Oh my !”

lst woman: We saw Betty at the Vie C.

2nd woman: How’s all the family ?

Ist woman: All pretty well.

2nd woman: June got her ring last
August. :

lst woman : Betty got her ring last fall.

2nd woman: Our two boys were two
years apart.

lst woman: We're back where we
started. Bill’s in Trinidad, Harold’s in
Montreal and Helen graduates in
Toronto this fall.

Ist man: Old Tom down in Ivanhoe

says he always likes to have a late one
coming on.
2nd woman:

Nothing so tiresome as

Guess we don’t think



SN a
"
a
————







SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1951





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Jellied Chicken in tins
Jellied Turkey in Tins
Heinz Soups (Canadian)
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with these!

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Guinness Stout
Worthington Ale
Canada Dry Ginger Ale

about growing old. We think they’re aiee tees PHONE

going to be with us all the time. Peanuts = ee Ty
Ist woman: Clarence didn’t like car — A GODDARDS

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carrots. Gold Braid Rum WE DELIVER



(Curtain)











3,

SATURDAY,

MAY



1951



Glendairy Helped

The Salvation Army -

— ELEVEN CORPS IN 1



LA ND

THE SALVATION ARMY in Barbados, held its Tag Day

yesterday.
Tag Day

is held for the Self Denial

Fund which

assists the Salvation Army in running Hostels, Night Shel-
ters and Family Relief. The Army also caters for the youth
of the island through the Probation system and many young
offenders, after completing their punishment at the Gov-
ernment Industrial School, have listened to the advice of

the Probation Officer “to lead

In the year 1865, the Army was
founded in the East of London
by Willlam and Catherine Boolh
During the two World Wars_ it
rlaved a great part. Red Shield
Clubs were provided for weary
servicemen and hot teas and cakes
were served to soldiers on trains,
on their way to the battle front.

; By the time its Founder died
in 1912 the organisation had
already spread to fifty-nine

countries. To-day the organisa~
tion spreads over 97 countries.

Preferred Glendairy

The women of the Salvation
Army have equal status with men.
The highest rank that can be
reached is that of General and
is open to women.

The Salvation Army came to

Barbados in 1898. On April 30,
1898, the pioneer officers, Staff
Captain and Mrs. Widgery

arrived in the island. '

The first indoor meeting to be
held in the island took place at
Wilhelmina Hall but soon after
the pioneers were brought before
the Police Courts on a charge of
holding an open air meeting, to
the annoyance of the public

In June, 1898, a special demon-
stration meeting was held in the
Wilhelmina Hall and Mrs. (Staff
Captain) Widgery gave a lecture
of her prison’ experiences in
British Guiana. The object of this
meeting was to raise funds to
defend the action then brought
against the Staff Captain for
holding an open air meeting.
When the case came up for heav-
ing, the Staff Captain. was found
guilty and the Magistrate gave
him the option of paying a fine
or going to Glendairy prison. He
preferred Glendairy.

11 Corps

On his discharge from Glen-
dairy the Army advanced rapidly.
Barbaaians flocked to meetings
and many men became soldiers.
They marched through the
streets of Bridgetown preaching
the word ef God. Soon after
corps were opened at Speights-
town and other parts of the
island.

That was 53 years ago, but
to-day the Salvation Army has
spread throughout the island.
There are eleven corps at Bridge-
town Headquarters, Wellington
Street, Speightstown, Oistin, Dia-
mond Corner, Four Roads,’ Long
Bay, Pie Corner, Checker Hall,
Carlton and Sea View. Three
Societies are, at Black Rock, Road
View 2x4 the Whim,

The Home League is a branch
of the Salvation Army work in
the interest of women, especially
mothers. This League is instituted
in every branch in the island and
mothers, apart from _— gaining
Christian knowledge, are instruc-

ted on how to care for their
children and run the home. The
membership of these Home

Leagues has doubled within the
last seven years and at some
Leagues women are taught needle-
work and handicrafts. ,

At various times special rallies
are held and talks are given on
Child Welfare, Home Manage-
ment and other useful subjects.
Members of the Home League
also make garments for distribu-
tion to the poor of the island.

At the age of thirteen, young
Army people may enter the Corps
Cadet Brigade and take up a

@ on page 7

an upright life.”

The Mongoose
And The Rat

The mongoose was, brought to
Barbados to kill the rat, but soon
after its arrival ii became rriendly
with the rat and now ‘there is a
mutuality between them. They
are inseparable friends, “actually
living in the same hole”,

Barbados has a rat control ser-
vice which is carried on by the
Agriculture Society. They prépare
baits and sell them cheaply. The
bait is put out in the dry season
when the rats tend to congregate
in water courses, near wells and in
plantation yards. This year’ there
was no dry season and this made
it difficult to control rats.

Mr. R. W. Tucker, Entomologist
of the Department of Science and
Agriculture, told the Advocate
yesterday that there was no means
of taking a census of mongooses
in the island. One planter had
told him that more mongooses
were seen in the country this year
but this did not definitely mean
that-there was an increase of mon-
gooses in the island.

He said that at one time people
used to be paid a bonus for either
the head or tail of a mongoose but
this was stopped. The rumour
had got around that the mongoose
was being raised “artificially” and
the bonus claimed by people who
made a hobby of it,

“At that time the greatest num-
ber of heads and tails were sent in
by people from the parish of St.
Michael but that did not prove
anything because there may be
more poultry kept in the pre-
cincts of St. Michael than in any
other part ofthe island,

Facts About Mongooses

Research has shown that the
mongoose has an amazing resist-
ance to the usual predator control
poisons; a large and active rut
population can,live side by side
with the mongoose, without being
molested; the average mongoose
shows very little fear of man or
dog; fish, especially salmon, seems
to be the preferred bait of the
mongoose. *

Besides being a menace to poul-
try the mongoose has been known
to gnaw cane, as rats do. “We
know that the rat and the mon-
goose live ‘amicably. There is a
sort of armed neutrality between
them,” Mr. Tucker said.

+

Seven a Day

Mr. Gordon Wilson of the firm
of Messrs C. S. Pitcher & Co., Ltd.,
told the Advocate that he had set
traps and caught as many as seven
mongooses per day in the woods
at the back of his home at Bishops
Court Hill.

He said that the mongooses
come down from the hills and
steal the chickens. In one day
they took as many as eight
chickens.

“The mongoose is so brazen that
it even steals chickens in the day,”
Mr. Wilson said.

Wounded

Eileen Clarke, a labourer of
Mahogany Lane, St. Michael, was
treated and discharged at the
General Hospital last night about
D o'clock for a wound on her
mouth.



Busta Will Get

Civic Welcome

Hon. W. A. Bustamante,

due to arrive in Barbados on Sunday mornin
via Trinidad at 8.20 to attend the Twelfth

Caribbean Commission.

He will be welcomed at Seawell
by a Reception Committee com—
prised of Mr. W, A.. Crawford,
M.C.P., Chairman, Mr. C. A.
Braithwaite, J.P., Mr. J. E, T.
Brancker, M.C.P., Mr.» D. D.
Garner, M.C.P., Mr. O. T. All-
der, M.C.P., Mr. F, MeD. Sym-
monds, Churehwarden of St. Mi-
chael, Mr. J. A. Martimeau, Dr.
J. LeV, Wilson, Mr. D. F. Black-
ett and Mr. L. B. Brathwaite.

From Seawell he will be con-
ducted to the Marine Hotel by a
procession of cars.

Mr. Crawford told the Advocate
yesterday that the Committee is
extending an invitation to the peo-
ple from all over the colony to be
present at Seawell to welcome the
militant Jamaican and B.W.I.
peoples’ leader. d

Within the past 15 years, he said
that Mr. Bustamante had estab-
lished a reputation as being one of
the outstanding champions in the
entire British Colonial Empire of
the cause of the hitherto inarticu-
late masses, “His position in the
history of Jamaica and, for that
matter, the British West Indies is
assured, and there is no living
Jamaican who could have accom.
plished for the people of Jamaica
at the time when he did, the social
and economic revolution which
has taken place in that colony.”

Appreciation

The Reception Committee is
convinced that both on his arrival
and throughout his stay in the is-
land, the people of Barbados will
demonstrate their appreciation of
his great services to the cause cf
West Indian progress.

A full programme of extra-con-
ference activities is being arranged
for him during his stay here. The

Churchwarden and members of
the St. Michael’s Vestry have
kindly agreed to tender him a

civic reception at Queen’s Park on
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock.

Prime Minister of Jamaica is
by BW.LA.
eeting of the

w



Hon, W. A. BUSTAMANTE

Various private functions are also
being arranged in his honour.

Mr.- Bustamante who will be
taken’ on “an ded tour of the
island, has consented to address a
public meeting to. be held under
the auspices of the Reception Com-
mittee at Queen’s Park during the

week. .

Mr. Crawford said that this was
an opportunity for the people of
Barbados to pay fitting tribute to
a distinguished son of the West
Indies. All over the world, people
‘paid due homage to merit and
Barbadians were by no means in-
appropriate. “Let us all be pre-
sent at Seawell to-morrow morn.
ing to give the Hon. W. A. Busta-
mante a right royal welcome to
our country”, he said.

Mr. Symmonds said that the re-
ception was being run strictly on
non-partisan lines.

ter eaten ocean ne





Regional Economic
Committee For W.I.

A Regional Economic Commit-
tee is to be set up for the British
West ‘Indies, British Guiana and
British Honduras. It, will consist
of the Economic Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare in the West Indies, who
will be Chairman, and a Member
appointed’ by each participating
Government. Eath Government
will, however, be free to send with
its members to meetings of the
Committee ate its own expense,
such advisers as it thinks fit.

The headquarters of the Com-
mittce will be the office cf the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare. Its functions will be as
follows:

(a) to act as an advisory and
consultative bedy to the
participating Governments
in economic matters of re-
gional significance; .
to provide for the exchange
of information on economic
matters between the par-
ticipating Governments;
to advise on all matters re-
lating to the British Carib-
bean Trade Commissioner
Service;
to prepare the annual es-
timates of the Committee’s
expenditure and _ submit
them to the Comptroller for
approval on behalf of the
participating Governments;
to report annually through
the Comptroller to the par-
ticipating Governments;

(f) to undertake such other
economic functions as may
be assigned to it.

The first meeting of the pro-
posed Committee is to be held in
Barbados beginning on the 16th of
May. Among the subjects set down
for discussion are the Trade Com-
missioner Service in Canada and
the proposed Trade Commissioner
Service in the United Kingdom,
the Customs Union Report, ex-
ternal trade matters and regional
economic matters,

His Excellency the Governor
has appointed Mr. Grantley Adams
Member of the proposed Regional
Economic Committee to represent
Barbados, The Honourable H. A.
Cuke, C.B.E., M.L.C., the Hon-
ourable K, R. Hunte, M.IL.C.,
Mr. D. G. Leacock, Jr., the Hon-
ourable Sir John Saint, Kt,
M.L.C. and Captain G. J. Brynn,
M.C., have been appointed ax
Advisers.

*

£3 For Speeding

A City Police Magistrate yes.
terday fined St. Clair Blenman
of Britton’s Hill, St. Michael £3
for speeding while driving the
motor van M-1617. The fine is
to be paid by monthly instal.
ments or in default two months’
imprisonment with hard. labour.

Police Constable Jones said
that on February 20 he was
checking the speeds of vehicles
on Bush Hall Road and made a
check on the motor van M-~1617
and found that it was driven at
over 41 miles per hour and the
speed limit on that road for that
type of vehicle is 20 miles per
hour.

Putting up a defence Blenman
said that his speedometer wag not
working properly and he could not
say at what speed the van was
travelling,

(b)

(c)

(e)





Asst. Labour Commissioner
Due Next Tuesday

Information has just been re-
ceived that Mr. R, N. Jack who
has been selected by the Secretary
of State for the Colonies fer ap-
pointment to the post of Assistant
Labour Commissioner, Barbados,
will be arriving in this Colony on
Tuesday, 8th May.

Robert Nicholas Jack. who was
born in 1905, was educated at the
St. Vincent Grammar _ Schoo).
After serving as a clerk in various
departments he was appointed
Labour Commissioner, St. Vincent
in 1941. Three years later he was
attached for a short period to the
Labour Department in Jamaica
and during the same year was sent
on a special. mission to Aruba and
Curacao, N.W.I, In 1945 he
served as Rehabilitation Officer by
demobilised war personnel and in
the following year acted as Census
Off cer,



Inquest Today
An inquest into the circum-

stances surrounding the death of
i9-year-old Reynald Brewster, a
lebourer of Halls Road, St.
Michael, will be held to-day at
District “B” Court, St. George.
The Coroner will be Mr. C. W.
Rudder,

Reynald Brewster was killed on
the spot on April 27, when the
lorry G-253 rolled over him while
he was working at Francia Plah-
tation, St. George about 3:30
o'clock in the afternoon.

The lorry is owned by Fitz
Douglas of Dash Valley who was
the driver at the time of the
occurrence,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



TRUMAN DEMONSTRATORS

York, in resentment against

| —Express.





Pah $5

MEMBERS of the American Trish Minute Men of 1949 when they
picketed the British Consulate in the BE

mpire State Building, New

alleged British influence in the dis-
missal of General MacArthur from his commands in Korea and Asia,

Hand-made Products

Hard To Sell In U.S.A.

Says Thompson

Mr. J. Kenneth Thor
British Embassy in Wa
Section of the Caribbe

tor hand-made vroducts.

100 Years Ago

“WEST INDIAN”
May ‘5th, 1851

A novel action was
tried in the Common
Pleas to-day, before Sir
Bowcher Clarke and a
special jury. It Was an
action for breach of
promise of marriage,
brought by Mr. Crispen
Field against Mr, E. P.
Newton, Thé_ simple
issue of promise of mar-
riage by the defendant
to Miss E. Field, eldest
daughter of the plaintiff,
and breach of that
promise, was clearly
proved, and the Jury

(a highly respectable
Jury), after a few mo-
ments’ deliberation

found for the plaintiff,
with damages of £500
sterling. The Court was
crowded with ladies and
gentlemen,



Case of Threats
eo ie meee
Dismissed

A case brought by’ Merton
‘Sealy in which he charged Mi-
chael Ramedin of White Park of
making threats to him wag dis-
missed without prejudice yester-
day by a District “A” Police Mag-
istrate.

Mr. W. W. Reece K.C. ap-
peared on behalf of Ramedin.
Sealy alleged that he went into
Ramedin’s place of business to
discuss a question about his wages
which were owed to hjm. While
there they got into an argument
and Ramedin said, “If you don’t
leave my place, I will blow your
brains out.”

Sealy called two witnesses to
corroborate his evidence, but, each
of them gave a different account
of what happened between
Ramedin and Sealy.

SOLD DOLPHIN
AT 30 CENTS A LB.

Justices G. L. “Taylor and
J. W. B, Chenery fined Edith
Millar a hawker of Dalkeith, St
Michael, £5 for selling dolphin at
30 cents per pound on March 21
in the Assistant Court of Appesi
yesterday. The fine is to be
paid by instalments or in default
two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour.

By doing this Their Honours
varied the decision of Mr. C, L
Walwyn, Police Magistrate of
District “A”, who had imposed a
fine of 30/- on Millar The
scheduled price of dolphin is 26
cents per pound retail

Eustace Gill, Price Contre!
Inspector told the court yeste:
day that on March 21 he saw the
defendant at the junciion of
Roebuck and Swan Streets wiih
a tray of dolphin. She was not
there very long when a man went

up to her and paid $1.05 for
three and a half pounds of
dolphin. He (Gill) went up to

her and asked her what a pound
she sold the fish at. She told
him 30 cents per pound



DIED SUDDENLY

Leroy Jones, five months’ old
son of Eudora Jones of Station
Hill, St, Michael died. suddenly at
the General Hospital yesterday
after he was admitted and de-
tained on April l: _ :

A post mortem examination was
performed at the General Hospital
Mortuary by Dr. E. L. Ward. An
inquiry has not been fixed

SSR ZEST UeREa eS
“PURINA” .

SCHICK STARTENA

see

tl JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pisteibutors
SERRE STT eee eees

mpson, Colonial Attache at the
shington and a member of the British
2an Commission,
yesterday that there is a big

told the Advocate
demand in the United States

Mr. Thompson arrived here on
Thursday by B.W.I.A from
Antigua to attend the Twelfth
Meeting of the Caribbean Com-
mission which opens in the Legis
lative Council on Monday morning.
He is staying with Sir George and
Lady Seel at Bemersyde, Christ
Church

He said that hand-made _pro-
ducts are difficult to market in the
U.S.A. and one has to be an
expert to understand the market
to be able to sell these goods

He had advised that Mr. and
Mrs, Fred Leighton be invited to
tour the West Indies to advise the
producers of handicrafts on the
type of goods to be produced,’
which will find a:sale in the U.S.A,

Mr. Leighton he said, is the best
expert in the U.S.A on the
marketing of handicrafts and his
wife is a well-known artist who
specialises in the design of handi-
crafts,

Caribbean Tour

Mr. and Mrs, Leighton’s Carib-

bean tour is being paid for by the

West Indian Governments with
assistance from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare, They have
already spent three weeks in
Jamaiea, four days in Trinidad
and are due to arrive here to-day
for about three or four days before
going. on to St, Vincent and
Dominica.

Mr. Thompson said that recruit
ing this year for contract agricul
tural labour in the U.S.A. has jusi
begun and the total number re-
quired is about 12,000 labourers
trom the British West Indies ‘and
the Bahamas,

“Employers of West Indian
labour in the U.S.A. speak very
highly indeed of the West Indians
and want to go on employing
them,” Mr. Thompson said, and
added that they are having a
Regional Labour Board in the
West Indies to allocate the
labourers to the various islands,



Big Sugar Export

THIRTY-FIGHT thousand,
seven hundred and twenty-three
tons of sugar have been shipped
from the island during January
to April this year. Of that amount
20,478 tons were shipped in April,

Two million, three hundred and
eighty-eight thousand, five hun-
dred and thirty-two and a half
gallons of molasses were shipped
over the same period. Last year
up to April, 1,940,395! gallons of
molasses were shippea.

Six hundred and twenty-eivht
thousand, five hundred and sixteen
gallons of fancy molasses and
19,145 gellons of choice molasses
went to Canada, Four hundred and
forty thousand, two hundred and
forty-eight gallons of vacuum pan
molasses were shipped to the Uni-
ted Kingdom.

Fifteen thousand, nine hundred
and seventy-five galions of fancy
molasses were exported to Ameri-
ca,

By the middle of last month
2,000,000 gallons of molasses were
produced.

LETTERS OF
ADMINISTRATION

His Honour the Chief Judge,
Sir Allan Collymore, yesterday
granted the petition of Etheline
Ernesta Cumberbatch for letters
of administration to the estate of
her husband Clifton A. Cumber-
batch, late of Carlton, St. James.

Mr. G. W. Farmer instructed
by Yearwood and Boyce, Solicitors

peared for Cumberbatch.

The following wills were

itted to probate:—

Henty © Bourne,

ad-
St

James,
G







th Crawford, St. Michael
George Nathaniel Williams, St
Michael, Agnes Nelson, St. Mi-
chrel, Joseph Douglin, St. James,
Agustus Watson,-St. Peter, Theres,

Jane Collymore, St. Joseph,
George Francis Cummins, St.
Thomas, Edward McLean, Christ

Church

iham, Loutse Best, St. Michael,|

ae |

Canada-Cuba |
Sugar Deal

LONDON, May 4

Despite the assurance of Com-
monwealth Relations Minister
Mi Patrick Gordon-Walker io
the Commons rday that n
agreement has been reached yer }
with Cuba, fears of Opposition |
members and others concerned in
Empire trade, have not by any
means been set at rest.

Conservative M.Ps who closely
questioned the Minister yesterday
in relation to the matter of prior
consultation with Commonwealth
producer countries, are likely to |
seize the earliest opportunity to
seek information on other aspects
of the Cuban “black deal’ as it
has been termed.

The main section of to-day's
issue cf the monthly bulletin of
‘he Empire Industries’ Association
lushes out at what it deseribes a
“the Spectacle of the British Gov-
ernment using Cuba es a pressure
point brought to bear upon Com-
monwealth producers.” It is not a
spectacle likely to commend itselt
te the British consumer, says the
euthor of the article

veste





NG

Both reported deals in Cuban
sugar and Cuban tebacco, the
writer continues, would injure

Jamaica particularly “and the end
of 1952 must present itself to the
West Indies as being the start of a
new cra when they are ts be forced
into direct competition with a
country which, has external ad-
vantage quite apart from those
presented by the proposed agree-
ment.”
Lever

Stressing that Cuba is
responsibility of Great
while the Commonwealth
writer continues:
to the conclusion that the U.K
Government’s purpose of retain-
ing this foreign element is that it
may be used as a lever in the mat-
ter of price bargaining, knowing
full’ well that when Cuba has
accomplished her annual deal with
the United States she is well in
the pocket and can afford to take
a lower price than she’ would
normally require

The U.K. Government is very
fond of referring to the ‘world
price’ which is in fact the price at
which Cuba can unload her sur-
plus supplies after having sold
the great proportion of her crop
at supported prices in the United
States”,

Cuba’s price it is argued, is ir
fact a depressed price in so far
as other countries are concerned

The proposal is mooted in thi:
bulletin’s article, that if as re-
ported, Canada is to take 67,00¢
tons of sugar annually from Cubs
a corresponding addition shoulc
“in all fairness’ be made to the
U.K., intake of Commonwealth
sugar.

Second Thoughts

Is the United Kingdom Govern:
ment having second thcughts about
Commonwealth sugar agreements?
Sugar industry representatives |
have been called to a meeting
with Food Ministry officials on
Tuesday. It is not a routine meet- |
ing, I learn,

An informed source suggests it
is a result of concern expressed
from all quarters of the Common-
Wealth since the leakage of news
cf the reported Cuba deal.

Whatever are the official inten-
tions at Tuesday’s meeting it is
certain that strong efforts will be
made to secure more definite in-
formation on Cuba business thar.
has yet been revealed in an answer
to Commons questions

“Nobody is satisfied with the |
Commonwealth Relations Minis-
ter’s statement yesterday that no
agreements have been reached,” a

@ on page 7 |
\
{

“Fort Amherst” Unloads

The SS. Fort Amherst finished

not the
Britain
the
“One is driven

1s,





unloading here yesterday, her
cargo from New York, New
foundland and Trinidad, It in

cluded 1,000 bags of wheat flour,
500 bags of cornmeal and 670 casks
of salted fish. The flour and corn
meal came to Messrs. Genera)
"raders Ltd, while the salted fish
‘as consigned to Messrs, Monroe!
& Co,, Ltd,

The “Amherst



elso brought a
small supply of oranges from
Trinidad, She left port yesterday ;
evening for St. Vincent, Her loca}
ogents are Messrs. Da Costa & Co.,,

High Blood Pressure |
Kil Men & Wome |
|

Twice as many women as men -
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
is a mysterious disease that starts
about the time of Change of Life and
's the real cause of much heart trouble
ind later on of paralytic strokes, Com-
mon symptoms of High Blood Pres.
jure are: Nervousness, headaches at
top and back of head and above eyes,
pressure in head, dizziness,
breath, paing in heart, pal itation,
vor sleep, loxs of memory an energy,
sasily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don't
Jelay treatment a single day, beca:
your life nay be in danger. Noxco
(formerly known as Hynox), a new
nedical discovery, reduces High Blood,
Vregsuroe with the first dose, takes a
eavy load off the heart, and makes
vou feel years younger in a few days,
jet Noxco from your chemist toda A
t Is guaranteed to make you feel fe
‘nd strong or money back,






ARTIFICIAL SILK

SCARVES

In White with fringe.
Priced from .... $1.85—$2.39

: CONSULATE SPORT
SHIRTS

Short sleeves in sizes

14% to 17 Each . $6.25

STRIPED UNDER PANTS
| with Elastic inserts in waist
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Pair $1.33







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—_--

BEFORE
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WE HAVE LARGE STOCKS OF

ARDATH cork-tipPep :

CIGARETTES

Packages of 10's & 20"

eve reducing.

Original price 10’s—19¢. now 16c.

20's—38e. 32c

Cartons of 200 for $3.00

Every cigarette guaranteed in
p. fect condition,

which we





695525.

HARRISON'S

BROAD STREET







DECORATED
OPAQUE GLASS

For WINDOWS, DOOR PANELS, Etc.

AVAILABLE IN FIVE ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS

Each in Two Sizes—48"x18" and 54” x16”

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very

2364

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(500 Ibs, Capacity)
WITH CENTRE METAL STRAP AND RUBBER

TYRED WHEELS .... .$57.26
WITH RUBBER TYRED WHEELS BUT WITHOUT

CENTRE METAL STRAP ... .$55.92
SIMILAR TRUCKS WITH SOLID IRON WHEELS
AT $40.32 and $38.80 Each

RIS ON'S toca AGENTS

TEL. 2364





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FOR GENTS & BOYS

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"4



















PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1951
neh enne aE TT iit a
HENRY







== rae

1 Dreadful, Choking, Spasms or _—«| Rheumatism
= | and Backache

| BRONCHIAL | Gonein1Week

Flush Kidneys With Cystex and You'll

| Feel Fine {
EASED IN Cystex—the prescription of a famous
oa oe = pees ae oe % faulty
} ney action in double quick time, so,
\ A FLASH if you suffer from Rheumatism, Selati-

ca, Neuritis, Lumbago, Backache, Ner-

vousness, Leg Pains, Dizziness, Circles

under Eyes, frequent Headaches and

WHY Colds, Poor Energy and Appetite, Puffy
F SLEEPLESS Ankles, Burning, Smarting Passages,

or have frequently to Get up Nights,

go to your chemist today for Cystex

NIGHTS When one dose of the amazing Mixture will and be fit and well next week.
Cystex Helps Nature 3 Ways
. s The Cystex treatment is highly scien-
ease that choking, smothering spasm in seconds! Buckley's tific, being specially compounded to
5 soothe, tone and clean raw, sore, sick
Mixt ag ae we and to remove
‘ : : acids an 80) ‘om yo system
ure is no ordinary medicine—its different from any | safely, quickly and intty, pot eoutaine
wt ve eee ee te oun
works in ese ways to en

Cough Remed — Tri | bag he ah

ug y you have ever tasted. Triple Strength—No | (1) Starts killing the germs which are
attacking your Kidneys, Bladder
and urinary system in two hours,
yet is absolutely harmless to human

tissue.

(2) Gets rid of health destroying,
deadly poisonous acids with which
your system hos heceme saturated.

(3) Strengthens and retnyigorates the
kidneys, protects you from the rav-
ages of disease-attack on the deli-
eate filter organism, and stimulates
entire systern.

9 Weeks in Hospital—
Now Welt






















LET ME SEE... A PEROX|DE RINSE...
CORRECTIVE MAKE-UP AROUND THE EVES)
»LIET THE HOCKS AND FETLOCKS...



NOW THAT t LOOK
SO ELEGANT ...

Syrup—All Medication.

One Dose Stops The Cough

When you feel a cough or choking bron-
chial spesm coming on, just take a dose of
Buckley’s Mixture and swallow slowly. |
You'll féel the powerful healing warmth
spread down through your throat and bron- |
chial tubes, soothing inflamed parts, easing
hard breathing and loosening tough phlegm, |
making it easy to expel. Buckley’s Mixture is |
made from rare Canadian Pine Balsam, and }
other proven ingredients. There’s not another |
cough medicine like it. Get a bottle TODAY,
and relief right away.

*BUCKLEY’S

MIXTURE

“I have suffered for five years with Kidney
and@ Bladder trouble, also Rheumatic pains
and Stiff’ Joints. I was not able to raise my
arms and spent nine weeks in a hospital.
They said I would not be able to work, but
after Cystex I feel years younger, well and
strong.” (Sgd.) J. A. FP. . |
Health Improved in 2 Days
“T had not felt really well for ages and suf-

|
|
| fered continually from backaches and head-

\ (THIS 1S THUH ONLY
WAY TO TRAVEL !

GAWRSH.-- AND 1 NEVER TRAVELED IN]
NOTHIN’ BETTER THAN AN UPPER BERTH!




















aches, I had tried almost everything but I
could not get lasting relief. Finally I decided
to give Cystex a trial, and wish I had tried
it long ago and saved myself much pain and

CAR, BOYS
e«. THE HEAD OF THE STUDIO HAS
RESERVEP HIS OWN PRIVATE CAR

FOR YOu! expense. It has improved my health more in

2 or 3 days than other things have done for
| months.” —Mrs. B

Guaranteed to Put You Right



or Money Back
Get Cystex from your chemist today.
Give it a thorough test. Cystex is
guaranteed to make
you feel younger,
stronger, better in
every way, in 24 hours
and to be completely
well in 1 week or your
money back if you re-
turn the empty pack-

A SINGLE SIP TELLS WHY WE SELL A MILLION BOT-
| BOTTLES A YEAR IN ICE-COLD CANADA ALONE.



age. Act now! for

A SINGLE SIP TELLS WHY WE SELL A MILLION



Cystexti2Xi:

The GUARANTEEL Remedy RHEUMATISM

—— —







scan Aiea aiid erento
Nn



IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE











SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only















USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Mushrooms, Tins 55 48 Floral
Icing Sugar, Pkgs. 33 29

THAT'S WHAT C )
>» FROM BEING me
TOO BIG A HURRY

Corned Beef with Cereal, Tins 31 25 Suiedinv'e Peas: Tin 46 AA

All Bran, Pkgs. 7 29 25 Allsopp’s Beer, Bots, 26 20






THEY KNOW SOMETHING ABOUT THE a
BANK ROBBERY ae oe WOULDN'T

THE BEST BOOKS

DROP IN AND SEE OUR SELECTION
— At The —

Advocate Stationery





LUXURY
TOILED SOAPS

. IMPERIAL LEATHER e@ LINDEN BLOSSOM e _ BLUE HYACINTH
————————


























OH! OH! THERE GOES
ONE OF MAGGIE'S
FAVORITE VASES //

. i
a 7 sks
me SSD o* 95

RIP. KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND

. WE'RE A FEW ve THEN WE JUéT STAY \ p ; aa i wow/ QT
YARDS OFF SHORE...WE Basle HERE AND 7 START CALLING ‘a fo LOOK AT HER GO!
H co Ss! ud , t\ %

WON'T GO IN TILL YOU FOR TI SHE’
HE'D OUT JUMP
rane ME THE ae { A JACK RABBIT!

a 7
x mm

YOU LUMMOX -=-

YOU'VE BROKEN

ONE OF THE TWO

eee VASES I
N

1h

f








WE'RE EVEN NOW-
MAGGIE -YOU DID

A GOOD JOB ON
TH! OTHER ONE .!





The car that
expresses you!

t

{

|
Tf it is true that a man expresses himself in
the clothes he wears, how much more
evident is the taste he exhibits in the car
he drives. The Wolseley ‘ Four-fifty”
is for the man who demands the highest

!

}











SS





C/V L)

i=
=

a








=
=——_






i



am 4
ee
hn, JB



mechanical achievements of the auto-
mobile age, expressed in coachwork of
superbcomfort, with the restrained exterior
styling that stamps his good judgment.



Luxuriousty Roomy Interior. Five sit comfortably
on genuine hide seats, cushioned in soft, resilient
foam rubber, Car heater and windscreen demister
fitted standard.

Oversize Luggage Accommodation. Over 10 cubic

7 a wt
= a

“Tt feels as if there's always some- ‘‘His sightis fine!” say t
thin Bi may Sree, \iee Fone. Mother frambts iadanimetion cued tr
: “Oh! Is his sight alright?’ glare and dust. I advise Optrex.

feet for suitcases, golf equipment, etc, Separate
compartment for spare wheel saves disturbing
luggage.

Adjustable Front Seats and Telescopic Steering
Column —because Wolseley designers recognise

worr

that all drivers are nor the same height. Tall or
@on, you drive in absolute fatigue-free comfort
with perfect control,

OKAY...
HERE'S YOUR
DARN KEy!



So, every day John bathes his eyes “Well!” says Mothey some days later,
with Optrex, washing away all dirt “I'm glad we learned about Optrex—

tAND GETTING BETWEEN and getms, soothing tiny eye veins. you're a real “bright-eyes’ now John!"

“4 | HER AND THE SPEEDBOAT,
CATCHES /T BROADS/DEL

PROTECT YOUR EYES wth

Optrex

EYE LOTION

N ON DIANA, THE
PHANTOM ROWS WITH

WOLSELEY

a4cae of CHARACTER







MAKE THIS TE
The rim of the eye and



FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 23285 Sole Distributors Phone 4504





acket a& ser
Gesigned eyebath





5,

SATURDAY, MAY

CLASSIFIED ADS.

1



(etiiainsmrsrnesitiiarsintaiiniiaeta

The charge for
Births, Marriages,

announcements of
Deaths, Acknow-

951



. FOR SALE

ledaments, and In Memoriam notices 1s

$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, end
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each

additional word
For Births,

Notices only after 4 p.m.

DIED







ALLEYNE—On the 4th May 1951, at her
Michael;
the}
Her
above residence at
Mary's

Folly, St.
(ate Janitor
Society).

residence Lakes
Naomi Sylvia
Cheapside Friendly
funeral leaves the
42 pm. to-day
Church

Ione Howell

Howell (sister).

of

for Saint

(daughter),

SREWSTER—On May
residence, ‘“‘Dunlow”
St. Michael,

4th. 1951,
Henity*s

J

at 4.320 p.m. to-day for
Ccmetery
Vi Spencer,

Foster,

Lela Foster, H. P





BELLAMY—In
dear mother Kathleen
died May 5th, 194)

Deep in our hearts lies a picture
More precious than silvcr or gold
It’s that «f our darling mother
Whose memories will never grow old.
Looking back with tenderness
Along the path we've trod

Bellamy who





We bless the years we had ber
And leave the rest with God.
Florence, Beryl, Annie, Herbert Pearl,
Deanie and Gwen (Children), eleven

grend and one great-grand.
5.5.51—In
GILKES—In loving memory of our be-
loved mother Delcina Gilkes, who
departed this life on May 5th, 1950.
“Absent but not forgotten.”
Lewis, Enid, Ina (Children), Gray,
Tony (grand children). 5.5.51—In

“GOVERNMENT NOTICES:

DEATH OF MR. EDWARD





JAMES
Information has been received
to the effect that Mr. Edward
James, a seaman and a native of
FParbados, died at the Sefton
General Hospital, Liverpool,
England, on the 26th = of

December, 1950.
§.5.51—1n



POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE

OPENING OF THE TWELFTH
MEETING OF THE CARIBBEAN
COMMISSION



made under Sec-

Regulaticns
of the Police Act,

tion 36 (2)
1968—2.

1. On the 7th May, 1951, no
vehicle shall be allowed to enter
the Public Buildings Yard be-
tween 10.06 a.m, and 11.30 a.m.
Drivers of vehicles con-
veying persons to the Ceremony
shall enter the Public Buildings
yard by the South Gate in single
line and after having set dowa
the occupants shall immediately
leeve by the North Gate and
park as directed by the Police.

3. Alftér the Ceremofiy’ drivers
of vehicles returning for their
occupants shall enter the Public
Buildings Yard, by the North
Gate and leave by the South
Gate.

4.
be
Public
the hours
a.m.



No vehicle shail park in or
allowed to remain on the
Buildings Yard between
of 9 am.. and 11.30

R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown,
2nd May, 1951.
5,.5.51—2n



Removal of the Labour Welfare
(Housing Loans) Organisation
and the Peasants’ Loan Bank

The offices of the Labour Wel-
fare (Housing Loans) Organisa-
tion and the Peasants’ Loan Bank
will be removed to Pinfold
House, Pinfold Street, City, as

from the 7th May, 1951.
: 5.5°51—2n



{pooospeqacannnrenre et
West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Hand blocked Beach-

Potiery,

wecr, Decoration House, S:

James. Tel. 91-74.

i 14,4.51—1m.
965969 SOS SOOOOUSSSSES SSO



ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANIS “tr







FOR LONGER SERVICE

T AR all posts before erecting,
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative



material still available
at your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price ...s-0sks 40c, per gallon,

Get Some To-day.



Furnish in May
The Money-Saving Way

STREAMLINED Vanities and
sinypler Dressing Tables with 1 to
7 drawers, in Pedestal, Bow front
and other shapes Bedsteads,
Beds, Cradles—Wardrobes, Chests-
of-Drawers,




DINING, Kitchen,. Fancy and
Sewing Tables, in some 50 sizes,
shapes and finishes, China, Kiteh-
en and Bedroom Cabinets, Bed-
side Tables, Sideboards.

DRAWING ROOM Furniture in
Morris, Bergere, Tub, Rush—
Berbice and Easy-chairs $3.50 to
$36.

DESKS with Flat and Sloping
tops, Bookeases, Bookracks, Office
duty Chairs.

L. §. WILSON

SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069





Marriage or Engagement
amnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
Scditional word. Terms cash. Fone 2508
between 8.30 anc 4 p.m., 3113 for Death

Hilda
5.5.51—I1n.

at her
Lane,
Olivia Theodora Brewster.
Her funeral leaves the above residence
the Westbury

5.5.51--In.



loving memory of our

Minimum charge week 17 cents and
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
junders







AUTOMOTIVE
CAR—Morris 8 — good second hand
buy. Apply T. G. McKinstry. Dial 3554
3.5.51—3n





CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-



CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer
refused. Apply to W. M. Watson C/o
R. & G. Challenor, Speightstown. Phone
91—01. 1.5.51—6n

CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
tyres, in good working condition, price
reasonable. Apply F, D. L. Gay, Staple
Grove, Christ Church. Dial 3207.

1.5.51—t.f.n.







CAR; One Standard 0 hp.
raechanical order. New Exide
Battery. Phone 2880—between
and 3 p.m.

CAR—Hillman Car M—1799 in good
working order. Apply Frank Proverbs
C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd., High

Sound
12 ~«V«~
10) sim.
5.5.51—2n







Street. 5.5.51—Sn

CAR—1937/38 Vauxhall 14-6. Can be
seen at Courtesy Garage. Phone 4616
or G. L, Challenor 4626, §,5.51—3n





{ WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
) Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

"



ELECTRICAL

MULLARD 11-TUBE RADIO tilting
dial, 1 Electric phonograph with ampli-
fier all in working order. G. C. Lewis,
Arthur Seat, St. Thomas. 2.5.51—3n

REFRIGERATORS
Retrigerators, Coolerators, Ice Boxes,
Owen T. Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial
3299. §.5.51—1n





Westinghouse



FURNITURE

~FURNITURE- One (1) extension Table
(Pine) to seat 12. Price $40.00. Phone
4117 8—11 a.m. 4—6 p.m. §.5.51—3n

FURNITURE—One (1) Dining Table
$30.00. May be seen at Newsam & Co.,
Lower Broad St. Ironing Board $5.00.
McBeth Beaumont, Hastings. Dial 5001.

4.5.51—2n





























LIVESTOCK

COW—One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve
in three weeks. Gave 36 pints with third
ealf. C. Branch, near Paynes Road,
Jackmans, St. Michael.













3.5.51—3n.

GOAT—1 Alpine Goat (for sale)

Fresh in milk, Apply to C. Herbert,

55 Tudor Street, City. 55.512
MECHANIC!







BICYCLE—One (1) Green Silver King
Hercules, complete with light. Tyres
good. Phone 2582. 54.51—2n,

SEWING MACHINES—Hand, treadle
and Electrically driven. Owen T.Allder,
Roebuck Street, Dial 3299. 5.5.51—In

TYPEWRITERS -— Shipment of new
model “Olympia" Portable Typewriters
just received—see these superb machines













before committing yourself. A. G.
St. Hill. Dial 3199. 29.4.51—e.0.d.
MISCELLANEOUS



ACTUMUS — The Root Hormone Fer-

tilizer, from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store. 3.5.51—5n,

ACTUMUS — The Key to Growing
Power — from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store. 3.5.51—5n.

ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests —
from H, Keith Archer's Drug Store.

ACTUMUS — is economical — 1 ewt.
is equal to 56 tons of Farm Yard
Manure. From H, Keith Archer's Drug
Store. 3.5.51—5n.

ACTUMUS The Fertilizer of the
Future—increases the earthworm popula-



tion of soils. From H. Keith Archer's
Drug Store. 3.5.51—5n.

ACTUMUS - Produced by Dr. S,
Marian, D.Se.. Englard, eliminates
disease at the roots of plants. From H.
Keith Archer's Drug Store 3.5.51—5n,

LIQUOR LICENSE — One Liquor

License and stock, Apply Mrs, G, Stan-
ton Hall's Road, St. Michael.
3.5.51—2n



For the treatment of disordes of the
Kidneys and Bladder try Rexall Kidney
and Bladder Pills. Price 1/6 bot. Obtain-
able at KNIGHT'S LTD. 3.5.51—in

—

GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality
new sheets. Cheapest in the Island !
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;





10 ft $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry!
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. i

4.5.51—t.f.n.

es,

IRON DOUBLE BED & MATTRESS as

new $40.00. Dial 5001 McBeth, Beau-

mont, Hastings. §.51—2n



LIFE SAVERS—Fresh stock of delic-
ious Life Savers. Lime, Orange, Lemon,
Wild Cherny, Pep-6-Mint and. Five
Flavours. Price 9 cents per Roll, BRUCE
VEATHERHEAD LTD. 8.2 “3n

POWDERED MILK-—One of the best;
that's Holland's “Frisian Girl” Powdered
Milk. Tops in butter fat content. Con-
‘ains vitamin D3 so essential, for the
promotion of healthy life. Get it for
the family, the children. will look alive
fter a trial of this famous milk. Ask for
it by name. 3.5.51—3n

——$—$——$—$—$—$—S

SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.
A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00
oer 98 lb, bag. Dial 2628;







Save your clothes from Moths by
hanging “Olev’ Moth Killer in your
Wardrobe. It is 500 times more effective
than Moth Balls. KNIGHT'S LTD.

3.5.51—3n.



We have in stock Rexall Cod Liver
Oil Emulsion. an easily digested angi
palatable preparation containing 50% by
e of Vitamin Tested Cod Liver
KNIGHT'S LTD, 3,5.51—3n

volum
Oil.

TAKE NOTICE
ee ner 08 ts oes











That HUNTFER-WIL’-9N DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland.
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distiliers, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entith
to register the same after one mon!



96 centc Sundays 24 words — over 24;



the same, NOTICE is hereby



PUBLIC NOTICES

minimum charge $1.50 on week
and $1.89 on Sundays.



Dancing Classes

Pupils of The Barbados School
Dancing are notified that classes
next term will commence on Friday the
4th and Saturday the 5th of May.

+ 3.5.5!—3n

Public Official Unreserved
Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
(1904-0) § Say

On Tuesday the 15th day of May 1951,
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon
will be sold at my office to the highest



bidder all that certain piece of Land con-
5,907 square

taining by admtasurement
feet situate in Parish or City of Saint
Michael butting and bounding on two
sides on lands of Barbados Co-operative
Bank Limited, on lands of Clement
Warner over a road fourteen feet wide
and on the said road ealied Villa Road
at Britton Hill, together with the Chattei
dwelling-house thereon and all appur-
tenances. Attached from Walter Evans
Phillips for and towards satisfaction, &c.,
and if not sold on such day, said sale
will be kept open and a subsequent day
will be fixed for said sale.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase.

T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.
Frovost Marshal's Office.
28.4.51—3n.

PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

On Tuesday the 8th day of May 1951
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after-
moon will be sold at my office to the
highest bidder for any sura not under
the appraised value, AU that certain
piece of Land containing by estimation
2 roods situate in the Parish of St
Michael butting and bounding on lands
of S. Thompson, on lands of C. Quin-
tyne, on lands of Friendship Plantation
and on lands of Florenc@,W. Prescod,

c
near St. Matthew's Chur praised as
follows: The whole area of land/apprais-



ed to Five Hundred and Sixty-eight
dollars 4$568.00). Attached from said
Florence W. Prescod for and towards

satisfaction, &c
N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase.
W. R. DOUGLAS,
Provost Marshal (Acting),
Provost Marshal's Office
19th day of April 1951.
20.4,51—3n-



NOTICE
THE BARBADOS
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY
LOST POLICY
EUSTACE BEN ANTHONY FARMER
having made sworn deposition that
Policy No, 21,237 on his life has been
Jost, and having made application to
the Directors to grant a duplicate of
given that
unless any objection is raised within one
month of the date hereof the- duplicate
Policy asked for will be issued.
By Order,
c. K

MUTUAL

BROWNE,
Secretary

21.4,.51—4n



PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, MLRIAN
ALEXANDRIA ROUSE (nee PHILLIPS:
as I do not hold mystlf responsible for
her or anyone else cortracting.any debt





or debts in my name unless by a writtea

order signed by me.
CLARENCE ROUSE,
Paynes Bay,
St. James.

4.5.51—2n

The public are hereby warned against

giving credit to my wife EDITI{

DGE GERTRUDE BLACKMAN

any debt contracted in my name unless

by a written order signed by me,

CECIL W. BLACKMAN,
“Walrondville’,

Bonnets, Clapham,
St, Michael.
§.5.51-—3n



TAKE NOTICE



That HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland,
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distillers, has applied for the régistra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of

Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3rd day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.
Dated this 30th day of April,_1951.

H, -
Registrar of irks.





LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STAR

Neediest Cases Fund

ANNOUNCEMENT

Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June at
Queen’s Park, the undersigned will
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume Bands
(b) Steel Bands.

(ce) Advertising Bands.
(ad) Historical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival, the Steering Committee
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being as original as possible.

No entrance fee will be charged

More particulars late)

A Carnival Band of thirty will
be visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade.

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk's Office,

Bridgetown,
For Booths, Stalls, and side-
Shows. contact C. . MORRIS,

from the 3rd day of May, 1951, unless | Sobers Lane.

wome person shall in the meantime give

notice in duplicite to me at my office of

opposition of such registration. The

trade mark cai) be seen on application

at_my office,
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
3,5,51—3n





SY,
Wanted For Cash

Used and Unused POSTAGE
STAMPS of the British West
Indies. Good Prices Paid at the

CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
No. 10, Swan Street.



t



{



COPS OOOE OOPS OPPO S

NOTICE

This serves to inform the
general public that my wife
Leotta Waithe (nee Reid)
formerly of Paynes Bay, St.
James, has deserted re since
1941 and I have not heard of





her whereabouts It is my ¥)
intention to re-marry in the $
near future %
% BERESFORD WAITHE, x
o Paynes Bay, x
x St. James. %
x °
POCO OFF OOO OCOOOOOOOOO>



Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,

|
=
|
|

ef
for;

BARBADOS
PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-cay:
end 12 tents per a me on Sundays
minimum cnarge i on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays

REAL ESTATE
LAND—Approximat ly 3,000 square fect

of land at Strgem Road, Christ Churct
adjoining the Public Road, Ap)

R .C, Chapman C/o Messrs. Carrington
& Sealy. 27.4.51-—5n
——_—

LAND--Only a few spots remaining at
Worthing View so be sure to select
Yours before all go The spots range
from 6,000 to 12,000 sq. ft. and the

prices range from $1,000.00 to $2,000.00

per spet. For particulars see D'Arcy

A. Seott, Magazine Lane, Dial 3743.
2.5.51—3n

“SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: situated

et Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 10,978
eq. {t land, and 1,982 sq; ft. road. Dial
2206 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5.51—t.£.n
—————_—

That desirable two storied freehold
dwellinghouse known as “Culloden
View”, situate at the junction of Cul-
loden and Dalkeith Roads, with the
lend thereto containing 10,585 square
fcet. The house contains drawing and
dining rooms, library, kitchen, bath and

{tuilet downstairs and upstairs, four
| bedrooms (tone with bath and toilet)
}| Two servants rooms, garage for 1 gar

end tool room (all built of stone), in the
yard
The date
later,
Inspection between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m
any day except Sundays on appoift-
ment with the owner Mr, St, Clair Hunte.



of sale will be published

(Phone 3229).
G. L. W. CLARKE & CO.,
Solicitors.
26.4.51—6n

—_—. dia tees toeeminniniitenntacitie ete taaeie
PREMISES—No. 6 Swan Street, Up-
stairs premises, very spacious and cool





ADVOCATE
WANTES®?

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
% cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word Sundays.





HELP

“Due to the opening of a new branch,
we require the following staff on or
befure June Ist, 1951:—

STENO-TY PIST—experienced com-

mencing salary $100.00 per month.

TYPIST—also with eclcrical experience

—+ commencing salary $75.00 per

month.

INVOICING ASST.-aceurate at fig-
ures preferably with previous
experience on invoicing com-
mencing salary $9.00 per month

Written application stating age and

previous experience to be sent to Sec-
retary, Dowding Estates and Trading
Company, Ltd., Bay Street.

2.5,51—6n.

———

Man with general all round experi-
ence needs position with well
established firm, Will interest you to
comr#»;uinicate Write H Ww Clo
Advocate Advertising Dept.





5.5.51—1ia
OVERSEER, An Under Overseer
wanted Hanson Plantation with
knowledge and experience of plantation
work. Apphy to Manager in person
5.5.51—2n
———









REDIFFUSION require an Announcer
Script. Writer, male or female, good
diction and command of English lan-
guage essential Apply letter onl



Trafalgar Street, 5.5.5)

SALES GIRL for our TOY ROOM.
Apply in person, JOHNSON’S STATION~-







ERY. 3.5.51—3n
TES AOA
MISCELLANEOUS







suitable =~ Factory, Agents po
Dentists; Aplictioss,. or Society, Dery: MINT—Olive Blossom Stamps of Bar-
Thani Bros, or Dtal 3466. 6.5.51—2n. | 240s, Will pay 48c. each for ber bet
i .
opies, ‘Phone Herbert Bayley 3703,
AUC'’r10ON ; 29.4.51--3n.
eigeta —_—_—
By instructions received I witl sell One (1) Second Hand Chaff Cutter.
by Public Auction on the spot at Bank| Apply X c/o Advocate Co., Ltd,
Hall Maint Road 4th house from All 4.5.51-—-3n.
Souls Courch, on, Thursday next th’ — —— omen
10th May at 2. o'clock, One three- WANTED TO PURCHASE, Household
roofed house ‘with out-offices, Will be] equipment of all description, Owen *
sold to the highest bidder Must be! Alider, Roebuck Street, Dial 3299.
removed, 5.5 Si—4n | §.5,51-—1In
Canada-Cuba South Bank
Sugag. Deal Exhibition
UX
we @ .From.pese 5 LONDON, May 4.
West Indies-producer said to-day. ‘The last workman with a
‘We waft to know what is really of the

going on,” he added,

Australia will be represented at
Tuesday’s talks along with rep
sentatives of the Colonial .s
industry. oY

Routine Suggestion

A Ministry of Food official to-
night anxiously denies that any
suggestion of Tuesday’s meeting is
cther than routine. He explains
that following the signing of Com-
monwealth sugar agreements,
— meetings are held periodic-
ally. ‘

Collective action now in the
West Indies might well lead the
British Government to facilitate
greater reciprocal trede between
the West Indies and Canada. Mr.
Allan Walker, Managing Director
of West Indies sugar, thinks so. He
tells me to-night he has been dis+
cusying these matters at the Coloe
nial Office and with Members
Parliament and finds “sympathe

|

tic’ reaction on the prablem Ob

the West Indies-Canada Trade, —
Now is the time, Walker feels

ALN. Sosa so ee:

Canada to limit the a
dollars the British Treas e
from the’sale of West Indies sugar
to Canada.

“I know” Walker says, “Cana-"

dians are pretty sick at the idea
that they are taking Empire sugar
and by reason of the operation of
the dollar pool, they are unable in
turn to export to normal B.W.1.
markets,”

Immediate Action

There is need for immediate
action, Walker thinks, to avoid a
situation which will “seriously
interfere with Canada’s whole
outlook regarding West Indian
Trade”.

Referring to the reported Cana-
dian Agreement on the purchase of
Cuban sugar, he said it was im-
portant that moves in that direc-
tion should not be extended, The
only way to prevent it was for tha
West Indies to be in a position to
use the dollars they were creating
for purchases in Canada. They
should be enabled to buy food-
stuffs—salt fish, flour et cetera—
and certain manufactured goods
necessary ‘from Canada,

Concluding the interview, Walk-
er reiterated that the need in the
West Indies at this time was for
collective action through their
Governments.



GLENDAIRY HELPED
THE ARMY

@ From page 5
course of study and_ practical
work which prepares them for
future service in the Army.

Captain Olive White sees after
this type of wock in Barbados.
Probation Officers
The local Army also has. a
League of Mercy, which was
formed by the late Mrs. (Major)
A. E. Moffett in May 1944, a few
weeks after she arrived in the
island. The objects of this League
are to visit sick patients in the
Hospitals, inmates of the Alms-
houses and offenders at prisons

Army deal with Juvenile Delin-

uency in_the island. There is
also a Missing Persons Bureau
which affords» men and women
who have become separated from
relatives antl friends, to unite
Many relatives in far off coun-
tries have been joined together.
Within the last few years ~this
department has sent and dealt
with enquiries in the United
Kingdom, Canada, United States,
Jamaica, Trinidad, British Guiana,
French Guiana, St. Kitts,
Antigua, Bermuda, St. Vincent,
British Honduras, Panama Canil
Zone and Cuba.

In cnarge of the Barbados
branch of the Salvation Army is
Major A. E. Moffett, Divisional
Commander.

ORO GOTO LLL INTE

Walton m
Indies ean purchase goods’ from and members of

it of.

The Probation Officers of the:

hammer, retreated ahead
King and Queen as they advanc-
ed through cheering crowds to
open the Festival of» Britain
“Exhibition here today. Two
thousand carpenters, electricians
and cleaners, West Indians
among them, had worked all
night to have» the show beside
the Thames ready in every
detail in time,

Pageantry amid futuristic
structures on the South Bank
opened in rainy weather with
grey and chilly mist seeping up the
river, Low-lying clouds seemed
to mute even the trumpeters’
fanfare as the Royal Party
arrived, But the year’s careful
preliminary organisation, months
of difficulties and criticism and
finally weeks of delays and dis-

appointments owing to the
abnormally wet winter, were
crowned with success that defied
everything.

Many top hats and frock coats
were worn today but the majority
came with good sound raincoats

assadors Ministers
any countries with ladies
their staffs
stood on chairs to see the King
and ‘Queen. arrive. Diplomats
present included representatives
of Haiti and Spanish American
Republics.

The South Bank Exhibition,
crowded with scientifie experi-
ments and industrial exhibits, is

i certain, for pressure to be put on and strong shoes.

ee PIL or any person in my -namet
I do not hold myself responsible for]

and

for prestige purposes and not
to sell goods. It is full of sur-
prises, Seeking some scientific

wonders, one suddenly glimpses
through huge plate-glass-win—
dows, a number of duncoloured
cows placidly chewing their cud.
“Modern Bloodstock”, says the
notice, “Two Thousand Years
Have Gone Into Breeding Them.
Best Of Their Blood Has Helped
To Stock The World.” There
are prize-winning strains of
sheep and pigs. Eggs are being
laid every hour by prime poultry
exhibited’ living on an_ intensive
system in small wire cages.
Chickens are being hatched in a
nearby incubator, In another
corner is the bronze “Reclining
Figure” by Henry Moore, whose
ultra-modern sculpture is a
surprise in almost any surround.
ings.

Ten million
expected to pass through the
turnstiles before it closes in
September. Seven _ hundred
thousand people from overseas—
150,000 from the Commonwealth

visitors are



000 while they are here.
There will be unofficial repre-
sentatives of the West Indies at

‘today’s pageant, but official
representatives are not expected
as guests of the Government
until July.

Jamaica will be represented by
Sir. Harold Allan, Minister of
Finance in, the Executive Coun-
ceil, and Lady Allan; L. L. Sim-
monds, House of Representatives
and D, J. Judah, nominated
member of the Legislative
Council, and Mrs, Judah.

—Reuter.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for the United Kingdom,
Amsterdam and Antwerp by the 8.8.
Willemstad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 12 noon and Ordinary Mai} at
1 p.m. on the 16th May 1951

TODAY'S NEWS. FLASH

I LEAP OVER THE GARDEN
WALL—a story of a Nun who was
in a Convent for 28 years and
An_ interesting
true book by Monica Baldwin,

Sring us your Fountain Pens for
NIB and SACK replacements.
Ours is the only Store fitted with
modern tools for Pen Service,



then gave it up,

ge

|

'§) JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND
HARDWARE

|

If you wish a good

HAND

Pier





be
APRIL



CENTRAL FOU

SPRAYER

Try our special 1 qt. size just received.





DRY LTP.

Head.































































PAGE SEVEN 49
mu hON RENT | SHIPPING NOTICES
Minimum 12 and ; a
S86 cents Sundays 24 words — over #4 af ie te ee a ee ae snncoiutdlnclinalts-Sthpentcltiecitia= tai
| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents @ cae
| MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW | 330
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED = Vv Co ~~ aa
will accept “argo a! ny s
HOUSES MAN. LINE for St. Lucia, Grenada and. Aruba.
a PR. a oARIRO" sailed Brisbane Sailing of Or About 18th May,
BUNGALOW — Newly built Bungalow | Ist. » Arriving at Barbados May 1951.
it Worthing from 15th May. 3 bedrooms ss. * ” . Ps
with ruaning water in each roeom.| from Haber tan “iy mean. Bel soa Dupeaanat oe mitehs, at.
Dining, Drawing rooms, Servants’ room | May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane Kitts, Montseratt and Nevis only
= ama Dial ST and ey + 16th June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving Passengers for Dominica Sailing
ht, oe ee oe Inijet half of July, on the 4th May, 1951
pliner 3 .
“FONTAMARA'—Fully furnished, in-] and Liverpool "°° Barbados
cluding Fridge and telephone. For June,
October, November and December. Phone | ,, In 1 aaa. to general cargo this B.W.1I, SCHOONER OwWN-
ive, Browne. 207. 5.5.51—29 | hard foael treet ear ERS ASSOC. INC.
. argo. ip a
Cargo accepted on through Bills of ‘
HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June pb us o}
and July, Phone Mrs. A.D. Herbert 838s, | E2ging for transhipment at Trinidad: to Tele. 4047,
3.5.51—4n sande ulana, Leeward amd Windware
” hea ruatlowead i cealate For further particulars apply —
MALTA-—Cattlewash, for the manth pply sonal
of June, July, November, December, ic aw on & CO. Lid. TRINI
Apply Mrs. I. Weatherhead C/o J. N DA COSTA & CO. LTD., BR .
c . * IDGE * ro
tie rc = 5.5.51-4n. | TOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.I. Advertise.... It Pays iv
IU ican RCE a Sn ceereniinibansibaneie ated NE
William Henry Street. Apply: J. E, rs "
Marson. Phone 2471. 3.5.51—6n0 e e e on
ROOM & BOARD for Gentlemen. Canadia N t l Stea oe
On Sea, Reasonable terms for perma- n a iona ms s cy
nents Apply Casuarina Residential] g90UTHBOUND chy
Club, Maxwell Coast, Tel. 8378. Sails Satle Sails Arrives Salle 3%
4,.5.51--2n Montreal = Hu lifax Boston Barbados Barbados
— . CAN, CONSTRUCTOR 28 April 1 May - 10 May 11 May —->
SEA-GAZE-—On-the'sea Maxwell's fully | LADY NELSON + 12 May = 15 May 25 May 25 May -
furnished including telephone and 7e-| CAN. CRUISER 1? May 20 May — 29 May 30 May aa
frigerator for the month of June, For |.CAN. CHALLENGER 26 Miy 29 May 12 May 7 June 8 June %
further particulars dial 2250, 5,5.51-—-1n | LADY RODNEY « 5 June 6 June lt June 20 June 21 June %
— RADY NELSON ..30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July ‘
THERSISDON -- Maxwell's Coast, 4) LADY RODNEY +30 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. . 14 Aug.
bedrooms, fully’ furnished, From ist} ———__.._.. _.__.___ aoe avacniomapoeelibreomsinenin wanna _~
June to Bist August. Rent $190.00 per | NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives ves. ©
month, Dial 2259, 5.5.51—2n Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax itreal sf
LADY RODNEY 8 May 9 Mar 17M > 22 May 26°May ~ o
LADY NELSON .. 3 June 5 June 14 June _ 16 June 19 June
LOST & FOUND LADY RODNEY .. 3 July 6 July 14 July - we July 19 duly
i LADY NELSON ..27 Juhy 29 July 7 Aug 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
LADY RODNEY ..26 Aug. 28 Aux 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 1) Sept. :



LOST

KETS - Series L.
0470-0471; L,



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9000-9001; PP. 0480, 0483; K. 8033, 7303;
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1331, 6133, 7718 to 7719. O. 0055, Finder

please return same to Advocate Co.
Reward offiered 4.5. 51—2n

Berths Vacant
In Careenage

YESTERDAY

Quite a few berths in the
Careenage and inner basin were
vacant yesterday. Towards the
end of the wharf and the Pie:
Head, only one schooner was made
fast. There was also one schooner
in the inner basin.

Yet, the Careenage was busy.
Lighters attending on the twe
steamships in port kept the lower
wharf active. They were landing
flour from the S.S. Fort Am-
herst.

Higher up the wharf, the
motor vessels Caribbee and Lady
Jcy were loading cargo, making
ready to sail the same evening.
Then, there were schooners dis-
charging cargoes of firewood and
charcoal,

A launch was hauled up op
the wharf by the Government
crane for repairs, Shipwrights
were working on it, Some yards
below the launch,,engineers were
gtill digging up a crane.

Flour was being landed in the

inner basin,

DECREE ABSOLUTE

In the suit of S, St. A. Sands
versus E. G. Sands in the Court
ef Divorce and Matrimonial
Causes yesterday, His Honour the
Chief Judge pronounced decree
absolute. Decree nisi had been
“pronounced on February 9 for the
dissolution of the marriage.

J. Harewood was co-respondent,

Decree nisi was pronounced in
the suit of E. W. Gibbons versus
'T. N. Gibbons,

Mr, D. H. L. Ward, who is
holding papers for Mr, G. H.
Adams, instructed by Hutchinson
and Banfield, appeared for E. W.
Gibbons. There was no order as
to costs.





Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch, Wonderful Coun-
sellor, Sch, Philip H, Davidson, Sch
Lucille M. Smith, Sch, United Pilgrim S.,
Sch. Blue Nose Mac, Sch, Marea Heén-
rietta, Yacht Maria Catharina, Sch
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch, Laudalpha,
Sch. Gardenia W.

ARRIVALS

Schooner Zenith, 70 tons net,
Tannis, from British Guiana,

DEPARTURES
MV. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt.

Capt

Gumbs, for Dominica.

Schooner Mary M. Lewis, 69 tons net,
Capt. Marshall, for British Guiana

M.V. Lady Jay, 46 tons net, Capt.
Persons, for St. Laicia.

S.S. Fort Amherst, 1,946 tons net,
Capt, Kean, for St, Vincent,

RATES OF EXCHANGE

CANADA
MAY 4, 1951
Cheques an

Bankers
Demand

Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currenay
Coupons
Silver

63 5/10% pr.

61 6/10% pr
61.45% pr
61 3/10% pr
60 1/10% pr.
59 4/10%% pr.



3 510%
626% pr.

pr.

oak am an a

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Passenger Fares and freight rates on applicatian to:—~

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SS. “TRYA" sailed %%th Apyil
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5.8. “ALCOA POLARIS” Sails 2nd May n ” 1a ”
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sabicchiomnshdiniaienaigaaamamntas [
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8.8. "FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 28th June “7th ~ p
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Pine Gap, St, Michael.
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Ba ‘ ia
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Bek



PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



JAMAICA FOOTBALLERS COMING

Who’s Who of Team

(By O. S. COPPIN)

FOOTBALL fans who are eagerly awaiting the arrival
} of the first Jamaica football team ever to taur Barbado












‘ given to-day a brief Who’s W
FOOTBALL—Division I
CARLTON and Pickwick-Rover
meet at Kensington this afternoor
ima return First Division fixture
When Ulete teams met earlier
this season Cariton won b mar |
gin of four oal » iw
DIVISION It
In order to conclude the B.A.F_A
Second and Third Divi xture
by Friday, May 18, the wing
3 changes in the fixtures have been
made :
Wednesday 9
Carlton v Colles at Colle
Lodge y Evertor t Bank Hall
\ Friday it —
Spartan vs. Colle at Collate ‘
Empire v Lodge at Bank Hall. !
Tuesday 15 —
Everton vs. Cariton at Rank Hall
Lodge vs. Spartan at Park
Friday 16 —
College vs. Evert at College
Carlton vs. Ew at Bank Hall,
Divis ii
“4 Tuesday 15 —
: Empire y C.0, Bo. at Comber-
| mere
’ Wednesday 6 —
Empire v Regiment at Bank
Hall
Sea Scout College at Collede
Friday in —
Police C.O. Bo at Park
Tuesday 22 -
ayers. Div aA ¥ Winner
BASKET-PALL
Y.M C.A vs YMPC and
HC. vy Fortress both at Y.M.P.C
oly E NETBALL
ympia vs. Erdisto Z
College at Erdiston. T*aining
TABLE TENNIS

Pelican vs. Abby Marines,



H.C. Beat Lodge
School 1—0

HARRISON COLLEGE defeat-
ed Lodge School 1—0 at Bank
Hall in their Second Division foot-
ball match yesterday evening, The
goal was scored by C. T. Tudor
the’centre forward.

it was a slow, dull game from
beginning to end with but few
spurts of liveliness, The College
team, however, showed themselves
the better players and play was
concentrated in the Lodge goal
area most of the time.

Both teams threw
ehances of scoring. Camie Smith
playing in the College forward
line was given the ball when he
was unmarked soon after the first
goal was scored. He was well with
in the goal area but kicked the
ball wide of the bars.

College keeper E. L, Roach was
called upon to save a good try
when the Lodge forward line ran
down near the end of the game
and their centre forward sent the
ball at the nets.

Brookes, Streetly and Cramon,
three of Lodge’s usual second di-
vision players were absent. Mr.
Wilkes played in the back line,

The teams were:

College: E. L. ‘
Morrison, J. D. Forde, H. M

Simmonds, Mr. A. G. Williams,
‘ R. C, Dash, J. Williams, C. W.
Smith, C. T. Tudor, K. Griffith
and F. Tudor,

Lodge: C. M. Redman, F, W.
Cheeseman, R. C, Goddard, J. St.
C. Hutchinson E. A. L. King,
C. O. Williams, Welch E. L.
Glasgow, R. L. King, Mr. Wilkes
and G, Gill.

WILL REFEREE
WORLD SOCCER

LONDON, May 4,
Mr. B. M. Griitiths of New-
port has been appointed referee
uf the international soccer mateh
at Wembley Stadium, between
England and Argentina on
Wednesday .

away many

Roach, J. C

Griffiths cfficiated in the world

cup series at Rio last summer.
There will be two English lines-
men for this match, They are
R. Bond of London, and EB. P. L.
Greig, of Middlesex.

Mr. R. J. Leafe of Nottingham,
another World Cup referee, will
referee Argentina's game against
Eire at Dublin on May 16,

The Argentine football team o
their way here by air to play have
been held up en route,

The delay occurred between
Rio and Montevideo. Their plane
which was due at London about
4 p.m. G.M.T. is not expected
untit 8 p.m. G.M.T. to-day

—Reuter

RIFLE SHOOT THIS
; AFTERNOON

The final of the Frontenac
trophy will take place at the Gov-
ernment rifle range at 1 o'clock
this afternoon. The sixteen who
have qualified for the finals will
shoot 15 rounds at 500 and 600
yards.





KEITH “JIM” HERON:—Kingston

HARRY PRENDERGAST:—

They'll Deo It Every

are
ho of the players,

I have seen most of these play
during my recent visit to Jamaica
and some of the inforination I have
got from authentic sources.
RONNIE COOPER:— Kingston

and All Jamaica goalkeeper since

1948. A daring spectacular cus-

todian who will be hard to beat

ind a real crowd pleaser. Age 20

Hag toured Haiti for the colony

ARNOLD FOOTE
College and All Schools goal-
keeper. A very promising young-~

with a safe pair of hands.
The “baby” of the side age 16,
will be making his first tour.

DICKIE BAYLISS:— Melbourne
and All Jamaica full back. A
fast and persistent tackler, a
quick recoverer with a strong
kick in both feet Also plays
right half. Age 28. He has toured
Haiti and Trinidad.

HUNTLEY DA COSTA:—Kingston
and All Jamaica full back, A
very steady and sound back who
in his younger days was known

“The Artist”. Age 35. He
represented the R.A.F. during
the war. He can also play at left
wing and will probably be the
manager of the side.

TREVOR PARCHMENT:
ston and All Jamaica, plays in
any position on the half line
Very good tackler who passes
the ball well. Age 19. He has
toured Haiti

DUDLEY SMITH:— Melbourne
and All Jamaica also plays in
any position on the half line,
A wonderful positional player
who feeds his forwards well and
will most probably fill an in-
side position in the forward line
at times. Age 25, He has toured
Haiti and Trinidad

Jnr.:—Jamaic

ster

DUDLEY SMITH



as



King-



ROBERT BERRY

and All Jamaica, A sticker a
half backs gv, a marvellous as-
set from the throw ins which
are like corner kicks and are
very dangerous. Age 28, his first
tour,

Ja-
maica College and All Schools.
A promising half back who
should gain valuable experience
from this tour. Age 19.

ALTY SASSO:—Kingston and All
Jamaica. The other veteran of
the side, Age 39 he is the oldest
member but is still quite a force
to be reckoned with. The “Stan-
ley Matthews” of Jamaica he
has an uncanny way of dribbling
down the touchline with the ball
on his head which leaves the
defence nonplussed, Has toured
Cuba and Haiti.

HENRY MILLER:—Kingston and
All Jamaica inside forward, Cap-
tain of the Club, a strong and
energetic player with a good shot
in either foot. Age 21, he has
toured Haiti.

ROBERTO MIRET:— Kingston
centre forward. Scored 25 goals
last season. Very quick and not
afraid to shoot from any angle
and very accurate with his
head. His height is no hindrance
and is somewhat like “Roddy
Littlepage”. who toured with
Casuals team of Trinidad some
years aback. Age 20, his first
tour.

ROBERT BERRY:—Kingston in
side forward, A cool player who
makes good openings for his
forwards and has a good shot in |

both legs. Age 22, his first tour.

ALVIN MCLEAN:— Melbourne
and All Jamaica—outside or in-
side right. A very clever player
who is not afraid to cut in and
shoot. His Joping stride does not
make him look fast, but he will




HARRY PRENDERGAST

be hard to hold, Age 24. Has -———————
re iti relati f " F
mote No relation of Officers vs. Serjeants
KEATS HALL:—Melbourne | left Football Match

Wing, Very fact and accurate.
This boy has improved consider-
ubly during the last season,
Centres well and is not afraid
to shoot when he cuts in, Age
21, his first tour,

EARRY NARCISSE:— Kingston
reserve centre forward a very
energetic player who always
follows the ball and shoots from
all angles, Age 19, Hig first tour,

MALCOLM MCLEAN:—Kingston,
and All Jamaica, Trinidad, Plays
in any position in the half line

On Sunday May 6th at 9 o’cleci
sharp the Officers of the Barbao:
match against the Serjeants at tho
Regiment will play a footbail
Garrison,

This is the first game of its kind
to be played since the formation
of the Regiment and a very exci
ing game is expected.



Match Abandoned

Well known to Barbados fans WORCESTER, May 4

having played here during the Rain prevented play on the
Trinidad tour in 1944, Is not a8 Jast day of the cricket mate!
fast as he used to be, but has between Worcestershire and the

gained in experience and posi- South African touring team her»

tional plays. Age 27. Has played today, ana the match was
football in Barbados, Trinidad, abandoned “as a draw.
Jamaica and Curacao. —Reuter.





‘Time i Registered US Potent OMe y

y Jimmy Hatlo |







DOES THE ELEVATOR STOP?





"Try TO PUSH A LOAD ON, AND Wi/JERE
FOOT ABOVE FILOOR LEVEL“:

—— EEE SESE

Burt ONCE ABOARD, WHERE DOES THE |
|




ABOUT A WALL TROLLEY STOP WHE! YOU WANT
OFF 2A FOOT BELOW NORMAL,OF Course!

a

'
|
}
{
|
|

|




—_






SWE







THANK TO
CLEO HINDMAN
60 N.OAKLEY,

COLUMBUS OHIO j



TREVOR PARCHMENT

KEITH

Ist Class Cricket

Close of play scores in Thurs

day's

Oxford University first innings:;—
All out for 115; Yorkshire first in-

nings,







ARNOLD FOOTE Jnr.

MALCOLM MC LEAN

ROBERTO MIRET.

RONNIE COOPER

a

DICKIE BAYLISS

“JIM” HERON.

ALTY SASSO

LONDON, May 4

first class cricket matches: out 157.—(CP)

210 for five.

CRYPTOQUOTE No. 16

Cambridge University, first in- ei ee
nings, all out for 174; Lancashire NORYPTOMUETE ie
first innings, all out for ‘8 No RIVACJGZSWLY YLS SDC
play was possible after tea owing UILR -DZQOWSS
to rain. Last _ Crypt Whatsoever thy
M.C.C. first innings, all out Bape SES te user de
for 62; second innings, ail out ~——"y A. CORBIN &2 50RD
for 70





q

‘>

" Beh ¥ iy
ve Original Late’ Foam Cushioning

;
é

HOUSE OF COMMONS



_The Speaker’s chair,
all seating throughout the Chamber,
galleries and lobbies and every other
article of upholstered furniture
throughout the new building

LILO
















j Acknow
o-operatic

Sir Giles Githert Sot, O.M1., RA,
edgments:

ors responsible fi i i
lily acknowledged by Dunlap Rubber Ge Ledeen). Cate
; dy itd. Lenden; Mapie & Ge. Ltd., London; H. H. Martyn
i & Led., Cheiternham F. Sage & Co. Ltd., London; Waring &
| Gillow Led., London.

n of the Contra





LLO. DIVISION
Â¥ BOND STREE

WALTON, L
T, Wa

LATEX FOAM

VERPOOL

OF THE INDUSTRY

50D, DS9

ECKSTEIN BROS. Bay St.—Distributors.















presents its
hn Da \ BIG THREE-DAY
Surrey first innings, all out 140.
Worcestershire first innings, all} CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

{

April 28
Although weather conditions
were not favourable on Saturday.
the wickets had dried out during
the week and good scores were
returnec from mosi of the Clubs









League,
against

Lancashire
the toss

the
won

In
Bacup
Accrington and sent them -to bat

first on a wicket which was
expected to play easier as the day
went on. They were all out for
147 runs after having 9 wickets

down for 100 runs. Everton
Weekes captured 2 wickets for
47 runs in 12 overs. Bacup lost
8 wickets for 100 runs when
stumps were drawn. Everton
Weekes was bowled for 3 by
Raymer the Australian left-hand
slow bowler.

laslingden also won the toss
against Enfield and sent them in
to bat. Enfield’s batsmen were
in top form, scoring 204 for the
loss of 5 wickets in 150 minutes
Clyde Walcott led the way with
125 in equal minutes and was
highly applauded on his return
to the pavilion. Haslingden were
left with 150 minutes to score 204
and at the end of the day’s play
were 114 for the loss of 7 wickets.
J. K. Holt scored 32 and was
wicket by a
Walcott












the

caught behind
Clyde

brilliant catch.

———





*
> 4? .

What's On Today

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m,

Inquest concerning death of
Reynald Brewster of Halls
Road at Dist. “B” Court, |
St, George—10.00 a.m.

Illustrious School Sports at
Bay Grounds, Beckles
Road—2.00 p.m.

Rev. F. E, Pestaina who was
vicar of All Saints Church
to be installed Rector of
St. Lucy’s Church—4 p.m.

Police Band to play at St.
Matthias Annual Fair
which will be held at
Hastings Rocks, Christ
Chureh—4.00 p.m.

CINEMAS

Globe—"All Quiet on the Western

Front’—5.00 & 8.15 p.
Aquatic “Call Northside 777" 5 and
8.50 p.m,

Empire “Id Climb the
Mountain” 8.30 p.m.
Royal “Trial Without Jury” and
“Homicide For Three” 4.30 &

$15 Dom
Roxy “You're My
and “Side Street”

Highest

Everything”
430 & 8.15

p.m,
Olympic ‘Where the Side Walk
Ends” & “Bataan” 4.30 & 8 30

p.m,
Plaza (Bridgetown) — “Edge of
Doom"—4.45 & 8.30 p.m,

Sun Rises: 5.43 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m,
Moon (New) May 6
Lighting ; 7.00 p.m.
High Water: 2.33 a.m., 3.29
p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for month to yester-
day: .05 in.

Temperature (Max.) 86.5 °F
Temperature (Min.) 75.5 °F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.S8.E.

Wind Velocity 8 m.p.h.
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.958
(3 p.m.) 29.883.

The Weather
, TO-DAY







CLYDE WALCOTT'S

| Report On Lancashire

|
|
|
|
|

League Cricketers

captured 2

SATURDAY,

MAY 5, 1951









Eve of King’s Birthday

GRAND DANCE

‘Or Masked Ball;
t the AQUATIC CLUB on
JUNE 6Gih at 9 P.M
(Eve of H.M
Birthday Celebration!

Tickets 2/6 each. Obtainabie

wickets for 45 runs in a the Anustic Sm

Tickets and masks available at
15 overs. . ‘SJolingon's Stationery,
Rain held up play at Rawten- Broad Street
stall in their match against Low- C. BR. BROWNE'S ORCHESTRA
erhouse. Rawtenstall batted first y
and scored 158 for 3 wickets ~—)

declared. Rawtenstall gave Low-
erhouse a sporting chance to get
168
stopped play when they were 58
runs for ? wickets.

Bruce Pairaudeau







mivtntvtntntntctrtrttnintnt ttvtnine, 8 boot
SRNR RR ROR ARE

Annual Dance

to be held by



in 90 minutes, but rain

scored 100



not out against East Lancashire

and in the same game Cecil TE ere oF
Pepper captured 7 wickets for 82 : UAE,
runs. at the

In the Ribblesdale League, Ken
Rickards scored I
against St. Annes, but his team
scored 157 for
and won easily.





DRILL HALL
TO-NIGHT

SUBSCRIPTION — 3/6
Admission by Invitation

26 for Darwen

7 wickets declared

R





>
3

In the opening games of the Cen- Only se ioe ts z

tral Lancashire League, Cromp-

ton met Walsden where two; grey?

West Indians were playing against)

each other, both being from

Trinidad. Crompton batted first

and were all
Ellis Achong captured 8 wickets
for
deliveries. Walsden
score for the loss of 9 wickets.
Ramadhin captured 5 wickets for!
18 runs and all 5 wickets were
taken with leg spinners.

out for 70 runs.

will be given by
MRS. ETHELINE BRYAN

SATURDAY NIGHT,
MAY, 1951

At the FOX CLUB, GARDEN, St.
JAMES.

his left arm
passed the;

36 runs with

On Sth

Frank Worrell scored a brilliant ee ae
century for Radcliffe in their invite your friends
match against Rochdale. Rad- Music by Mr. C.” ALLEYNE’S
cliffe scored 178 for 6 wickets Y Viereteatee

declared, but Rochdale went for!
the runs
loss of 4 wickets.

SPT BAGSTER



The
AMATEUR ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
OF BARBADOS

out for 192; second innings 50 for
six, South Africa first inings all!

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

KENSINGTON OVAL
in

Thursday .
& Saturday .

. May 14th
. May 17th

. May 19th
beginning at 1 p.m. each day

e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold
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PAGE 1

PAGE PHO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. MAY S, I'l.M CcUiU) Callinq Tlir. STAR BUBS of MI in their opming choiui "Oraii** coloured Sky" >t Uie Drill Hall laat night. M I WEST W HAKLTROP. I % %  ,! %  Adviser to the Se.. far il CokMW • 1 %  % % %  .-. mi Thui> I v und U ..iid I^d, t lout of thi, area O.1 Tew-Day Visit S INCF Mr. Harold Hishop. Gulf MLC i flBgalal Representative MPP M April llth he hi .ti.rrueU, Texas, New York and TriiMii.m. Hi' llvw In %  • % %  i W i A rrocn Trlni. f-Xi^-lsi to be here ten u... Hi '. "Star Buds of 1951" S HORTLY .ifter 8 30 o'rlock last nicht. "The Star Buds of 1SSI" went into action at the nnii Hull. Garrison n *u part of Madame mil's second annual benefit f"i Hi. -fhii-t Church Rabv Welfare UagUS The show, which was under the patronage of lion V (' Qgjt, Mi B. D. Mottley. followed by dancing. lc;lTi.l Dl Trinidad Civil Servant A RRIVING yesterday from Trinidad by It WI.A. were Mr. and Mrs Daniel Roach who are ilayina with Mr. anil Mo 1 L OltMni ..t K.-mdle" Collymore Rock. Mr. Roach is In Trinu dad Qovarnmmi Service nt li Paymaster or Ihe City Council Summer Courses S OME Bahamian and West Indian student!! in England will surelv aval) themselves of tin special summer schools. with Ipa, %  hi' !i .iic lieinjt ar anged by the Labour Cut. The courses are earl hip* after the hall hail I chairs. The progranmn opened with an overture by the Police Baml Tin wan followed by the Opening Chorus, "OranM oolound sky". Cnjln, m l,v U name plan. Eg%2gl iLTbTt 'too' -Jill lor one week am. .he M. Claudia Evelyn who .s Vnr >,.ch Urc Surnbe? ofoSe • *• '" •* "Kludinil bo. cmholiday, Mr. Aln.ley Farlar, K SgoSSrM eoSTrnM and registration foe. One will b. -To-nifhl subjeets will be either Soelojis' T HE No m ClUb .if lrn G.I U l^" 1 "ketch. "The Mysterious Drlnriples and policy, or Local •long with ll„. Qthn clubs Suitcase' 1 gave the show a touch Government in England and i i.iK money I... the O 1 1.'' "' Emplrt Day Their eonR, S r 1 J Arnold Alleyne • t the "'"Is ,h 1 "V:" *'"," "" ,\:'''' V MIT. tonbjM. i"< 1 T, l'-f-hosf wa, Austin Ward. Off To Puerto Rico local humour. Henry Fnrd Wales, or Party Organ Nation. and •The Ghost" : These three boy: College • Indents, .mil ich of IJeltv L'arruigton'a number. ballet By a Future Star', was th M R. AND MRS JAMES TILL ihem took part in "1M0 and All SON were MMMlf HM pa • Thai" which wan successfully tengera leaving by n.wi A fttafad at Harrison College sevI> lor Puerto Rico. Mr. .HI auditor of the Singe: Sewing Machine Co.. stationed it Puerto Rico. They were and h...) %  %  ; boa liii<"i ,. %  II. •' %  ...-,. on ttn B w i A. Puerto Rloo BJgtM wa Mtts <.rgtc Bryan, mat • %  : '• Hi nv She a Mio ISA on | foui HI : .i.,„,. Bj Mid ad Aim-In.uSeventh n-imber on the prowill ba ucilng fur her during her gramme was "The Masked Walt/ in Blue", sit couplen. the girls in Get Together blue eyening dresaw and the boys told there will also be a special course on Colonial a(T;iirs ;tt Han %  or In August. Battle of Britain E LEVEN years after the event the Air Ministry are conking a full-lengtt of the Battla o Ail operating In feature liln Britain Here I a subject lhat offer' next item on the programjM She gJS WMttUgWag, The Battle o" showed the audience that she has I ,,ain w th J turning point o) i lot of talent. This was followed by "The High Steppers", seven Star Buds. Joan Farnuin, Yvonni QlbbS, Margaret Pilgrim. Daphne Smith, Joyot Siniib. Eudi-cn Laynt, llarllyii Gibbs led by Betty Cnrrington the war. The film Is being ten. directed and produced bv r team of Bottle of Britain airmen Title will be: Hawks in th< Sun H.twks was the R A F. codi word for enemy lighters. Some < %  Ihe shooting AIM take placa I Kenlcv airfield whnt manv of The ri W were stationed. Who will fly the aircraft In th film' Some of the pilots may b survivors of The Few. wore bin ickets. white W l INDIAN vlaiiura for the bViw ties and gray Hannela. Ewh %  Uv.il of Hiilain n.a> canwore .1 mk lertainpd hy their fellow The Mnale was the entire cast CLuntryonn The "iiwni.fr of one singing %  C,.->dni ( ;ht Bwagf %  friend sforfl Rttrital Dreams*' The cottumes were deiguc : Colsigned and made ba Madam* (All Peoples San layi be Is assisted by Mi. A A Herbart, Mrs. C. Pin.li 1 and Ml I Rawlins. Mrs. Mai got LatTan taught the t :nK the Cli..il.-.to., %  : pt,. 'in KICHI I Intelligence A SOLICITOR who likes flutters on the turf was asked bj ' what be big Wosl Indian 1 belhir he pieferrcd hi"? iadng or legal income. 'In .mil. w;.\s, Itetting ia more he said "Bui the baltar proposition %  an p.-i",ii on lot si 1. f-. s \M\IMIHIS OF ViV\ BY THJE WAY • By BEACHCOMBER G OOD morning. little made Yes. well, here we aie anal—ves. ei-that waj I Ma, If 12 parts ol In this—yes—In tWs—cr—Turk. Manager again How |on| haw egg-dust in 0 gelutii'.e lah Jute mill. Everybody's lookyou worked here MuaUpha count as 15 parts of ing pretty good Now. cou'.d Fwlv vaarat You mustnph. a matter, what percent you Just tell us how this jute-mill very jolly time in tin..K mini loasfflsed penguin (beat in works?.. Kaga rom ka.ik ami I mean.. No. well, actuallv ed park pie will turn ,t That was the TurkUh MnnaKaga rom kaglk anal—yes. wei into utility tlsh patty? |t., u-llmg us about all this—er— I'm afraid thai was the Manage ,-. .", „, jute—masses of the stun*. First of again. It's certainly been I//ms/.-.Woproraw all It i,. wholvad. then lacketed, worth-wnJia experience, here ir fiioh-nl U>*P lllvarad. Kngi k.ui. thiser Turkish (iite-mill S£" Junior Short Story Competition ed to be • kissed by Councillor 1 Tudnurafa at lh cbustenin ..f The Evrnlnr Advacale Invites all children under 12 to enter fo Uia Shi. uoh Q CODtalnn lu Junior Short Storv Competition. The best atory will be publishc eauH bo had pr louil) every Monday n The Evealgg Advocate, and the winner will recelv. arm while partak priie to the value of7/ in either books or stationery. The storle in* of a urtidwlch al the buffecan be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30 Isold Keen youretU lu >oui-..: words In length, and must reach The Chiliren'a Editor. The Ad vocal %  ; To Ltd.. Clly not later than Wednesdnv everv week. v h,J 1 NOTE: Stories must not be copied. i. tnibe. Mrs Mora-.. Send this coupon with your story, and u Hoy Booul oamad Hume Thus I had reason to beluve thai JUNIOR siloit I STORY COMrnTTION the ceremonial KIS* wmild lie an 1 in of the Councillor s Name 1 feelings, rathar than the ilinsuming of Age In m Turkish juUmiU ch ^ 1 W E anoli taking ro Foras ........... ......... 10 ., rurkUh |uta nOl, ^,-here rfeordJAgi I iva bau Home Addraaa Edwards THE "DRILL" FOB \ DATE WITH THE ftQKL WHOSE FACE IS HERE B.B.C. Radio Programme UV I IMI LADIES' SHOES -ii rx it so it MI 1 \n 1 WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS $ 9.44 I TAN, NAVY & BLACK SANDALS $ 8.53 TAN & NAVY CASUALS $ 957 I TAN 81 WHITE CASUALS $ 8.50 Afi the list of youna men who -.ffiuaHy 'not expected." and the have escorted Princess Margaret manager come* up bowing.. Tou sit through the Intervalbecomes longer, the pattern sets. It goes aa follows:— First news is a telephone call om Jennifer Brvai*. her lady-inwaitmg. "Princess Margaret is liaviiii* a small party t c go to the theatre, and would very much like you to come. Please come to '. 11J, _7."Ti. Buckingham Palace at 730" rwf The young blood take* a Uxi "J"*-„'*-"' or his cai. drives atraight in to lh f*' "'"" •he PHvy Purse door imaln en ' nka. no changing places, i.*ej And afterwanbi your party %  •avoa first, while the audience •van*, and the Princes* thanki the thentrf manager. The can ready and you slide off u> the I club. Once ..gam the manager i tab!. secluded pi; lyin uwi i"i" '-it... ; %  trance on the right) The police CHampagne appear*, but the i.d re warned and no one J t.,!:., hnii. fjyw does (that la settled the At the door there is an .itlendaiit p '*' Bay), and no one tips th la the Ruyal Household uniform waiters. if dark blue. Next he goes up in 1 lift to the Princes^ p-'"Sm . lv Ina rnnmi who says ilti'ik room. %  think aaa must IHnuing." and he gets a drink and Jlh'iifer Bevan tipi for iht -andwichott—-'usually chicken and Princess in the powder room ham. and "Jolly good." Vou sav goodnight in the foyc Then they go down and gel if -h,1 <-siaurant. and one of Ihe into the royl car and drive tioyal carj takes vou home the theatre There are always n An ,| whatever happena. ^n D l iK' C ^ h r",' ."aulT,,:, vru. < UOSSWOIIO r I c i p %  %  9 a J F j p i p? in. ilaor*. iSi With Ulla in W m. ngln Ui 1. 1 rnw m bflwrro n*w m JUI 1 ; itfwt tnv nd maar 13, 13. Miikr up Ii 1. Reap* wjtn %  pei-Mii PR :t .'Jirougn wivmi uuivr* t el in tnr wet .Hi rut f-ew '.riuiiu pi rv% 1 -i• Brldae-iiKp mructurp lit Sort ul mint, tat mv nnd in %  ,Mprd i4i r 1 %  24 ACroa* dull mul iS SP 'i3 M. Dawa i* Around tin pmvuii1 1111 .I |M ~ ropiT 'u Kuan fM imirli lilcp Ullll: (III* 1oil. (41 Ctmrn iimlvily IBI Pood iroin the io; nans'-'. <3i N..i t-Ti-n .mmm in oi.ici mi M %  % %  ISI < A41111 nappvo' iuM> ruin i) poll men* 1S1 I fpol r.t %  %  i' • %  ia. % %  1 %  1 INN I.ilvrarv Vic* T HE row b c t <• I n Lad Cabstonletgh. In her nuv. role of lileriu b.ig. Ineffable Matriarchy jp. bad) Cabal that, in return for all the 1 m titlin.. A LIBRARIAN tells me of an ^ .ispitt of iniKid a-hlcli 1 (no ovt > times a man and %  arosnan share l book, Which means thn. hay must alt too cloaa ar dJUnti %  aosarthtp Ina daj tbla librarian aj.proaehe. ng %  1.''h 1'iupie. and i %  i %  t.i. t (ully to Ihe man. Cant I net you 1 book fbr yourself" Wouldn't >oth of vou IKhappier Witk Mch Would fOU, II %  •itting next to Unwlar' replied he man. Kv/tri'MM llll 11 ill a:: Oisii/i/irnis T HE Darts fcipraai building i Fleet street was stolen lasl itght by a body of man o be Ciina.il.on An aDorntoui 0-wheet lorry was seen on th. Dad t> Southampton at |l | >.m.. but paopla thought it wa new lank Yard man II %  %  %  [Bra 1 1.. OM Thiiif: uiul \imthrr W HY not.asks f. I soup?" Hy all me thai the tiniK 1 chicken %  oup HI diagutaed \ Inned M hat the Ith Mumpo pa %  ill] 11 tt,iwhole dalnrj .! %  %  M tlf nit It i p ltitfn'itt V/*v mitt II •#/#/' ##'#'/s EV/IKS ri WHITFIELDS DiAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 POLITICS AND ROBBERY RANGOON: Communlst-hued I and its stopped a train in Uppe Burma and ordered the paasen j;ers to descend, gave them political lectures, then relieve I tin %  c; Mi and personal belongings. train waa lloi proceed. I a m rorM FavourHn. T %  1 i* Ne'i. til iin N. I 1 IS a r., rrom ih. Editorial*. 1. • Proatamm* Paraa>. 7 IS .1 1 TTitrd Pvagnmm*. ia >MID V. I -.i**ni: II • XroBiutw PLIWM. II at a 1 12 iiWDio TTl* Nm 111* u v .lylv 11 11 p "i Ct a J i s w a PLAZA TheaU*— Bridgetown (DIAL 23ICJ IL OUIDSVN PraaaMa WJ-D\ IMI*' %  %  mm"*"*" ^ M,,, -THE MAC ARTHUR STORY %  riMi ifii SPY TRAIN" & "MOON OVER,MONTANA" III pui UManan' CTwM* 8 n. VirkOtliF > %  SouII Afrlvam. J.0I p m Irlrrtudc. i 10 p.m Brmah llatd Co.ll Cnampiu^nhlpa. lllpm H >f b. !*. % %  — Cup Plnal. J Ml |> in IIUI S.^.lli-1. VatWtr OfThartnt. • %  > Danrln* a 45 |i IT. Prog*' % %  1 V II .• J p m Tba Na-a-a, 110 p .< Hawi van. T IS p m Bvhn.d o* Nri. p m aaaMy MacPharaon at th* Ii* Organ, B p m Radio Nawara 1. p m Contpdan of in* *< %  I JO Radio Thcalia. 10 p m Th. NI I p nt Inlarluda, II II p m Taka tn. Merr. 10*4 pin. Youri F.itnfuh'. 1 m BouUMTn hci.nail. 01 c M rinomssi SATURDAY. MAY S m 10 IS p m Naa It '. 1.1 Irixn (rom %  ) %  II IS Mr* 31 M PLAZA DIAL OISII\ TODAY TO Sl-N 5 Si l pm "ISO. Bit ll-akl'l •• II.tip n Tarn* a u> rraii" Sm.irj If *la*a Ulrl" Qaort. Hurpn> Of Lev Baikal (ilna Drllavm V.I--. Dartiaa Dar.aH J> Chita Mldalit Taallr I 'i'c. "Mjrh morr tfl, Wondrrlul thina. ili. iht oihft. hMBpsni ;ay. Pulf.nit hn ilcdft oui ol ihr t-w Rupvn liui.. Then he (ollowp him. G I. O it I TO.UAY 5 A 8 15 P.M. and C'onllnulna n Ml v I'oslllvely Hi,, crrateat War Film ever "All Quiet on the Western front" In Am — Umis Wolheim 'SPFX-IAL SHORTS" Bir. CAT and LITTI.K HOUSE I'll Hi — II 10 — Bal-ony 40 — Box 54 tOI Y I l< < I I II ( I MM A IM.mb.ri Only) MATINF.F.: TO-DAY — p.m. lO-MCillT TO MONDAY Ml.III al 8.30 JAMES STKWAHT in "CALL NORTHSIDE 777" wllll RICHARD CONTE — LEE J. COBB — HELEN WALKER A 20lh ganM Plolur. To-nif/hl risit n.l II MORGAX The most Beautiful Mplif CIuo /rom Afiaml fo Rio ii'if'i a irorlil-u-Mjr repuiarion /or good food Music, Dancing En tertainmen i throughout the night Dial 4000 for te$ervationt TODAY 4 IS and R 15 . A < outliiaing 20th CENTURY FOX Present.s . %  I'D CUMIt THV. HIGHEST \HH\T.U\" Color by Technicolor Starring Busaa Hay ward— William Lundlgan with Itory Calhoun nnd \ i lt:iti HO.W TODAY to WBDNBSDAf 4 no and 8 If Columbia flnmtllng Di Rockwrll and Bar bra Faller In •• TRIAL WITHOUT JIM and •• IIO.WCWK FOM TUtES Slarr.nu Audry Lone and Warrrn iI. HI l.iOLYAIPIC T<* HAY .1 4 30 and 8 U M.r; v ible Dana Ar.Jreu*.-. and Gene Tlerney In •• WBBtE TIH: stm:n u.k /:\ns" — and — •IIM ii\ — Starring — Robert Taylor and Lloyd Nolan "Halaan" nol -uiUlile lor Children iV*y/#v/,y/,y//,v/,v*v/,y//,v////,*.v,*///.*/.v.*/.'.' GASUAMNA (UB rin ami IMVII..' pramlar* in oid -t ilui no inr STOP THAT LEAK IN YOUR ROOF NOW We offer, KVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS RED CEDAR SHINGLES ROLL ROOFING — Plain ROLL ROOFING —Red PITCH PINE DOUGLAS FIR THE ii Aim \iios iiioi'iir.iui mi io\ i AI ion LTD. I I Ml'.u; DF.PARTMENT DIAL 401* W0 BUY A'OII AND SAVE ELITE SHIRTS $373 f OTHER STRIPEI) tl nC .5^7 SHIRTS JJ-UJ J.JI SPORT SHIRTS -A NEW RANGE OF DESIGNS MEN'S HALF HOSE— J PAIRS FOR \j QO UP VEST & TO)X EL SHIRTS AT LOW PRICES | THE BARGAIN HOUSE ; J 30. Swan Slrccl — S. AI.T.MAN. Proprietor J PHONE 270.' I


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PAGE 1

S\TIRD\Y. MAY 5. !Mt IIAKBADOS ADVOCATE P \OF I HKKF. III. DlUllCSS Eals Obituary Hors*iii'at By JOHN i: CARLOVA. LONDON. Trad11ir.naI beef-eating Britons today are tilling out their mcacre meat rations with the ftesh ol an esUmaUd 180.000 horses a year Many are swallowirg their pride along with the horsemcat because of the 9S cent weekly Irish meat ration. One dialer (old International "Before the war. an Englishman would turn up his noae at horseflesh. Now he's glad to get it." Another dealer—with a shop near London's swank Mayfalr district—said horaemeat is not bought only by the 'lower" .lasses. Me added: "I get customers In here in mink coals and diamonds I could tell you cf a Duchess who eats l.oreefiesh regularly George Oman, largest horsemeat wholesaler in the London irca. estimated that 2,000.000 of Britain's 50.000.000 population are eating horsemcat at least once a week "Mfiny prefer it to other meat." he said "Britain will soon be on a ptr with France and Belgium in the consumption of horserWh No exact records are kept of horse* slaughtered, but according to figures supplied by the HMM Control of the Board of Trade about 220.000 were killed last .(..i This i mparea with iso.ooo killed In 1948. Brigadu'r-G*r.cT:il Sir George Cock*rill. Director of the International League for the Protection of Horses, estimated that 80 per ent of horses slaughtered In Britain wind up on t*ie nation's dinner plates. He added: Extinct In 10 Years will be practically extinct In Britain in 10 years at the present rate of slaughter." Ministry of Agriculture figures show there were l ,.137.965 horses on Britain*! farms 50 years ago. Mechanization has dropped this ligure to fewer than 400,000. A recent Government report on the subject said: The Idea of slaughtering horses for food Is distasteful to many people In this country. We respect this view, but must face the,facts as we lliul them. There are enough horses for the present needs of agriculture, and the only other demand is for slaughter for human consumption A Ministry of Food spokesman explained that the ofT-ration horsemcat Is "not controlled." He said dealers usually charge about two shillings <28 cents) a pound and added that local authorities are responsible for onv restrictions or stipulations on the sale or consumption." One local authorityfn the working class Fast End of I-ondon said its only stipulation Is that "restaurants serving horscmeat should dlaplaj I "otiee to this effect Notice Displaced In six restaurants visited in this district only one such notice was founo, and that was pasted to a door facing the kitchen, not the public part of the dining room. A Ministry of Health spokesman said "no one in authority" hat ever given an opinion on horscmeat in relation to the nation's diet. Dr Alfred Brown, a London dietician, said he thought horsemeat was "about the same as beef In body-building qualities. Like beef or any QUWr mc.it. it has bad effects when eaten to excess." He added"The main drawback to horsemoat is psychological. To animalloving Britons it s like eating one of the family." A spokesman for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said the society has accepted the slaughter of horses for human consumption as "inevitable." "We are concentrating now on seeing that slaughtering and transport conditions are kept humane," he said. —IN H. Mr. W. D. Bayley -ui was annouiicea by %  A Lonaon on I u Mr. u. ttajley. tormcriy merchant of ihis City and VestryI the Parish. Waataf Uecourcy Bayley was a Member of a weu-known family in this island. There were four biotMts, one of whom. Mr. Her .< M.ivl.y, left this island and two otherbecame opticians. Mr. -vlcy and Ine late Dr HahnMUann Bayley Walter Bayley, beside* being an optician, distinguished himself as a musician Of the first class. It was his Interest In thean which brought him into many uf the controversies in which he was engaged. In his early years he learnt the Organ with a distinguished musician then Organist of St Michael's Cathedral. Mr Sibthorpe. As the years rolled on his Interest increased and be took an active part in any organisation dedicated to the improvement of music In this island. He himself was a fine exponent. It was due largely to hi* perseverance that the new Cathedral Organ was bought in 1929. He wns a Jeweller and Goldrmith and proprietor of the Gem Buildings at the head of Broad Street. It was his Interest in modern trends wluch caused him to advocate the removal of the "Cab Stand" from Trafalgar Square and to advocate that the Government give a grant to the Civic Circle for l-autifying the city. In the Vestry he was the terroi against the old system of patronage by which the plums of uftice were dispensed to those who ... i %  t-d ,.i ele. lion mmblocking the promotion of those who had asrved in the humbler offices. The old method of guessing at the M was publicly denounced by him. and for some time as a result of his aglUUon. the Vestry became the butt of public criticism. He strongly advocated the establishment of a Mayor and C r >iporation In order to t-orrect Uie abuses of parochial administration With Mr Bayley sponsoring a cause there was little chance of failure Ho was enthusiastic and had an ability to hold an audience v mi vailed by any public speaker in this island today. It was hie turbulence of spirit which brought him public admiration but which prevented his election to the House of Assembly-. He did not suffer fools gladly and men who Mtsj not of high educational standard and who Indulged In private favours at public expense were his natural enemy. But above all this Mr. Bayley was a lovable character. Music and the arts were his love. His and his willingness to do anything to help In a publiccause were second only to the deptli of friendship which he gave. They were few who enjoyed this; but to such as did he opened not onlv his purse but his heart. By his first marriage he had two children. Dr. H 11 Bayley nnd Mis Lawrence Ooddard. After his second marriage to a distinguished musician the former Miss Doreen Clark of the Royal College of Organists he left for England where he had been living ever since, following a lengthy illness. The news <>r hit death will b. the source of deep regret to many friends and relatives in this island. Ill WAS IX IMIIMIIIW $F v Canada '* C. O.L. J %  %  *'' '""* N # sail climbing Police Raid Homes Of Policemen OTTAWA. M.. v 4. Canada's cost ol liwng .< still .•limbing Trade Minister How", told the Commons Thursday that the official Index reached a record of tei 8 at April 2—an increase ol 21 points from the pievious height ol lTt.1 one month earlici His announcement was immediately used by Opposition pBff*Jl bolster arguments that some of the t.tx li i teases proposed In the !95t '52 budget should be repealed Tbc\ unsuccessfully moved to tvpt 1 Increases In sales and txclssj taxes a* substitute sources of revenue they proposed mgner n taxes and tax on capit,l fi.in._tC* Rejected LONDON. Mrmbers of Parliament long wondered whether the table cloth-. In the House of Commons dinuig room marked "Milwaukee University Club*" were lost, strayed n rtoUn. Finally Conservative MMtbef of Parliament C J Alport asked the Chairman of the Kitchen Ceshmlttae, Labourite Willlum Cold i irk k said "The tablecloths tefeitV.l to are manufactur M*" rejects and hive slight itnperlYc tions Thev were purchased in 1947 when other tablecloths we-o difficu!'. to obtain "—I.N.S. I THIS French-Vutnam soldier Is receiving attention after being wounded by a mine left behind at Bails by the fleeing rebels, engaged In Uie Indo Cluiia war -f.rprr.-. N.A.P. Treaty Powers Annouiiee Council Merger Antigua Crop Siouvd Up LONDON. Ma After ptjfatl It 0i> c ..,,., p.i-.J. I.I %  ANTIGUA. May 3 'On weeks of grinding the Antigua Sugai niinufactured &.23B from 42.765 tons of front four weeks' factory has lost it of cane. The v worked 12 hours as thers was .' North Atlantic Treaty powers Factory has i announced today their decision to tons of sugar merge the councils of their Forcone. Apart eign Finance and Defence Mini*idleness due tars to a streamline working orstrike the ganlsation. The new structure 158.18 hours u Includes the formation of a Finfactory has on aneial and Economic Board which „„ tar this we will work in Pans, parallel with stoppage on Monday. Workers Jfc r£ uLl h ", d *P u ,, "£* took a holiday on May Day and ^^JXZ^iti £%  -* — WJ fi Fort In London. James. At no tune since cutters The new Board will lake over returned to work has the factor./ the function of permanent workbeen kept supplied with enough Ing of the staff of the Defence canes to keep it working to its Financial and Economic Commitfull capacity. It Is already tee Advisory group on raw mate known that even If from now on rial problems and the economic the factory was supplied enough financial working group set up t„ be operating in full capacity, some months ago in Paris. It will lt j, unlikely that the full crop lose .o-opeutlon with anticipated. 25.000 tons, will In ........isaiion for %  %  %  %  Economic Co-operntlon -fieuter RVfugec Problem STRASBOURG. May 3 After an impassioned appeal I V Dr. Adenauer, a member uf ihc Committee of Mlnlste-s ol thi Council ol Europe In Sti ^. bourg, today unanimously decided to aid Western Germany to tackle the problem of 11.000.000 refuge**. from the other side of the "umi curtain". Three of the 15 remcsentatives of those in Britain. Bclgium MHI Denmark were persuaded by Atlen.ucT's speech to wfindraw their objections to the pea poaal. It wes understood It was decided at this rinsed meeting to call an tmmedi.it c conference of experts to uncover all dspects of the refugee problem in Europe, estimated to concern 11.850.000 people spread over six countries. —Heater work I canelemained Mantling 20,000 Await Orders TA1PEH, Formosa. May 4. Chinese Nationalist Intelligence reports said an International Communist force of 20,000 men in Russian army uniforms is awaiting orders from Moscow to cross from Manchuria Into Korea. Report* said troops claim to be European. Mongolian and Japanese contingents of the "International Aid to Korea Volunteers army" In addition reports claimed at least one division come from satellite countries—UP. $230 For Wounding ffMa or own OssssasssssssMl PORT OF-SPAIN. May 2 "You have found yourself in .i very unfortunate position. Vi have probably allowed jealousy to get the better of you. I would advise that if the woman does not want you, let her go", said Mi. Clement Phillips. Magistrate, ta Edward Roach, when he found him guilty of maliciously wound Inf his rival Russell Bartholomew The Court heard, that thu defendant and one Virgin ith Whit-Monday. Empire Day and other holidays coming along the situation this year is again doubtful. MORE FOR 10UR OF STATELY HOMES LONDON. The Earl of Pembroke is bring inf an inflationary trend to the British peerage's stately ImiiHbustnei Lord Pembroke will open Ml %  real Wiltshire House. Wilton t, the public on May I but will chargu sightseers udmlsslon. Last year nearly a hundred tilled aristocrats allowed tourists lo tramp through their stalely homes for an admission fee of 8U cents Wilton, which was built in the lflth century, was headquartot s for the British Army's Southern Command duiuig World War II. —IN S. Lewis had been one time. .She t Bartholomew son Roach lietame night he went rery friendU g| [•nt to live with i time after and jealous. One Lsrwu' %  part. mant where he met Bartholomew and during an altercation, took up an icepick and stabbed Mm in the chest He hnd to pay $250 compensation. Senior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-giril between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior short Story Competition. Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed aoo words in length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co. Ltd City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week srtU be published In the Evening Advocate and the winner will re reive a prlio of books or Stationery to tie value of 12'fl. Send this coupon with your story. Hasae School Home Address Frosn NEWF.LL ROOKfts NKW YORK The police recently i homes of New York policemei contscated TV sets and expen si\e Persian lamb and silver r>\ lur coats of many of the ofttce |SftffJ The raiders are from District Attorney Miles McDonald' office Racket-buster McDonald I showing the coats and TV task t. u grand jury investigating peitin graft. Some high-ranking officers have • submitted questionnaire-! yetting cut their financial |Hi lion to the grand >ury. And the jurv is inspecting fui coats and TV seta to determine how truthfully the police aruwei < %  i their saatg, It is believed the) inquiry mav show that some did. m fact sMOlCn large bribes fre>m ganil underworld e-hiefs. The grand Jury has power t" irder arrests an ing." (iKNKROI N ,,i knowleeigment bv the Now York TIHU-* in a tnos -as*. Mom Cnrdtfl "Bi Itali rearmameiu drive Is b0flnnlll| b show results." Corn-spondent Ben jamin Welles had just been seeine. 20-pounders being producetl !o r centinioii tanks. urn .us r 1.400,000 yacht CJrille (German for caprice) is going to aid the rearmamen. t ffort She has been sold for ove £S!V.700, and will be brofcajn up for scrap. Since 11*46. wbon the Admiralty sld her. she has hail an English skipper. Captain II E. Byng THE ARM! has GUI II MOl fOl National Se-rvtcen en II •com OO.IKW to 40.000. Reason64.0U0 volunteers have COJM 111 since January 34,000 RMgfJ QlsW expected lilt AIR lt'i:< I craft industry %  Utomatlc extra-hn i lighter. It must travel at the speed f lOUnd to It ceiling o' ten mileand be armed with %  |Uksl litsile It must lie made by 19.14 A NEW atomic kid iholtet for President Truman will BQtl £814.000 Says a White House •Ida He could st dOWl hundred rSsfeTI it he wanted to" A BATTLEHHir WOUld KIV lost place to look fnr wniiggle.! dope Hut pharmaii Francis Pastor la has leen arresiteu on charges or smuggle worth oj %  uoiphiTie bto Amertea in the bsitUgenlp Ml i "" I. n "' back fiinn a IORSJ ion: %  'i'ii\ "' the rv Mm THRU Ml -' tftt) %  W Ne>. •rould not m any %  breuntHues, gceordlni I change jdaces with President Truman The job requlrei tin. much and tear. The Other M 1 Urlllln| to '" ( "' ,h W. H. Fox Talbot k mh-tnjt, b !" Mtti h*r bra IV/ %  *> o/^,ni Ishr ike firtt phob^rtfk, kf imrwW rif CaL'ljrpr fKtro, u-fii.li *>*J, ii paaikkjir my nmitr tf fvinnti el mtmt fkmttfrmi.mttlt mpmr. IlitmilkiieiafrntlulJtmi&m /*• %  <*)• l him*Ul. I d VI INI fim NTIWI ilklay>. HI Weekends without Fecr or Winy shout Sunburn. Remember SO "NOX7FMA" The MtdtiairJ Crr>im m the -Little Blue iat" in fhrcc St/cs I'. .'/V. ..nd V% per Isr Obtainable at BOOKER'S (Barbados; DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. HfltSSfJ See Our Up-to-the-lHinule STYLMIVGS for Spring 1951 ^ %.-...', i Mm BBn AND c Mi.Ditr.v sons ALSO CLEANIIS. nin.lll. AND ll!:l -11' %  • sr,.Difri TU**fk pnmiiiy i "Midrtu Jtinm. 4 tdjttt U %  MMntf itii. kitmJni oVm.il/. iVrilir mi 4 fiOtk\i. Ik ^.vkrjfcrM Flm'i, mi nmli mi (Wrmrn, Ikkirut, Cm%t, Ml*, MUi. W—M* (m eMmrr SUivmu ImfimrJ miHimrn ll'iik Sn UnrfKmrHmm.liiwm pimtei nmsUl. fi "JTl •<•'-'( , KM, -J !" %  irpn-r-fi l\-i O^mtmm Dina. ,/ Wiukirt M ikt fAilnmnrl tk*t ftiwi tk.KfrV'M Hill pj 18U. m I3 go. )u rracl, inM your potkci or hodh lor your link Vkki fiindar. IT'S TINY-Wit kwoV.1 lull ol v.il.iiik. iu-r WrMm mrdl.Btlan. Now. uiiMirwtlw..i|>. nnJ|Hit 11Ktip ol V H k, luluki ilflktoiw rathttullv IHIMIII nt Mm liiti iW'd.*|il. Klrilit a*a> — tfok* 0\ hrttHil— youtnoiciiiidlicuJI.tlclr.ii.iv.ilit'l ieMolt.tttittt*0.\l. *r*'VICKS INHALIR NOW! Dental Science Reveal* MOOF THAI MUSHINO TiEIH R10HT AFTIR EATIrM IS THE JAM, EFFECTIVE WAY TO HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY with Colgate Dental Cream BEDFORD PELIVEHY !" s $2,135.00 Usual Fleet Owners Disicdunt not** COIRTE^Y ,.\U\4.I ROBERT THOM, LTD. — While Park Rd. — Dial 4391








__ ESTABLISHED 1895



U.N. SHOULD

THE ONLY HOPE TO ST OP.
AGGRESSION IN KOREA

WASHINGTON, May 4

GENERAL DOUGLAS

MACARTHUR said here
that the Congressional Record
carried an “absolutely incor-
reet” version of his statement
on the use of Nationalist
Chinese troops in his address
to Congress on April 19. The
Record quoted him as having
recommended removal of re-
straints on Nationalists to-
gether with United Nations
logistic support “to contribute
to their effective operation |_
against the Chinese main-
land.”

MacArthur disagreed
Senator McMahon that Russia
was America’s main enemy. Com-
munism was the main enemy he
said. He agreed that “higher
authorities than the Theatre
Commander” had to take into
account factors such as relative
strength and world political
atmosphere.

MacArthur
Kai Shek,

with

said that if Chiang
Chinese Nationalist
Leader decided to attack» the
Chinese mainland from Formosa,
he (MacArthur) would recom-
mend United States to give
Chiang “reasonable support” with
naval pretective units and sup-
plies. A Senator quoted Mac-
Arthur, as saying yesterday that
Washington would never let him
bomb one particular major Com-
munist supply point in Korea
near the Russian border

He said the censors deleted this
from the transcript.

A Great Symbol

MacArthur said that if one
country carried 90 per cent. of
the burden in Korea, it was
inappropriate that the other
countries should exercise “undue}








| Allies Make Smal)
Gains on the Front

TOKYO, May 4,
United Nations forces in Korea who last week drew
back before 300,000 Chinese Communists, have gone over
to a limited offensive and made small gains. After a three-
day lull and an all-day battle, Eighth Army tanks last night

scattered what was described as remnants of the Communist
_Regiment, north th of Si Seoul.

icnesgnceenon enaseesnigncancen hte

;fugene P.

| engine
geant

Plane Takes
Fire In Air
Lands Safely

BERMUDA, May. 3,
The huge C74 Globemaster of
the continental division of the
Military Air Training Service,
with 38 passengers and a crew of
11 aboard, caught fire on the way
from the Azores to New York, but
landed safely at .Kindley airforce

base, Bermuda, this afternoon,

| Number four engine suddenly
caught fire, enveloping the star—
board wing in flames, but quick
thinking by the crew averted pos-
sible disaster. The pilot, Major
Pitts, of Clarksvale,
Mississippi, was able to extinguish
the flames and cut off the failing
while radio master Ser-
James A. Bain, contacted
operations at Kindley

| In 12 minutes a B17 Flying
Dutchman of the Rescue Squad-
ron was airborne and the crippled
| Globemaster was intercepted



rescue

jabout 225 miles northeast of Ber-

authority” in any decisions made. | ie
MacArthur said he thought ; UGS. :
Chiang Kai Shek stood out to the The rescue plane escorted the

average Asiatic as a “great sym-
bol against Communism.” The
Government of Nationalists in
Formosa compared favourably
with many democracies,

General MacArthur was asked
if he had confidence in the
integrity of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff. He replied, he had complete
confidence in their professional
skill and integrity. General Mac-
Arthur said his plan to
Chinese intervention in
would be to disrupt the capacity
of the industrially weak Chinese

nation to supply their armies in
Korea.
He added, if you for instance

disturb in the slightest degree the

distributive systems of their food | General

you might well have 50,000,000
people starving.
He said that his plan to hit

China was the only hope to stop
“slaughter” in Korea, He believed
war with Russia was not in-

evitable. “The ordinary men of
the world are invincibly against
war” he added, “I believe, that

is so among the Russian masses.”

MacArthur said he would warn
the Chinese that if they refused
to consider a cease-fire in Korea
the United States should exercisa

military and economic sanctions
which would involve bombing
north of the Yalu. He thought

the United States Air Force large
enough to undemtake bombing
missions in the Far ast while
retaining sufficient power to act
as a deterrent to Russia.
MacArthur said Chinese nation-
alist landing on the mainland
could not be destroyed by Com-
munists if given proper support,
SnRewten,



NOEL COWARD
garden. enjoying a

delicious

pictured here





halt,
Korea | before the Senate Committee now

glass of coco

giant transport to Kindley, where
a safe landing was made,—<(CP)



Ike. May Testify

BUFFALO, NEW YORK, May 4
Senator Charles W. ‘Tobey,
(Republican, New Hampshire) said
General Dwight Fisenhower. may
be recalled from Europe to testify

| questioning General Douglas Mac-
Arthur.

who is a member
Relations

Senator Tobey,
of the Senate Foreign
Committee said the purpose of
Fisenhowet's testimony
would be “to fill in the kinks and
crevices showing in the structure
of our foreign policy.”—Reuter,



War Equipment

LIVERPOOL, May 4.
The 7,176 tons British Steamer
Eurymeden has docked here with
100 tons of captured war equip-
ment from Korea—-the first to
reach this country.
—Reuter.





EMBARGO TALKS

LAKE SUCCESS, May 4.

The United States resolution
that all members of the United
Nations cease sending arms, oil
or strategic materials to Com-
munist China, will be put to tha
United Nations Sanctions Com-
mittee on | Monday. —Reuter.



in Sir Edward Cunard's

which he says tasted

yesterday
onut water



They later drove back several
smaller groups and one patrol
entered Uijongbu 12 miles north
of the capital and shot up troops
there.

Exploiting their success, other
tanks moved up on the west bank
of the Pukhan River as far as
Chongjyongni 30 miles north-east
of Seoul.

They shot up Chinese outposts,
but sought in vain for the maia
force. In one brief engagement,
they killed 75 Communists,

The Infantry also went into
action, and in three engagements
drove back North Korean bat-
talions in the Inje sector on the
east central front.

Communists showed no inclina-
tion to fight, but there was no
indication that they were makin
a general withdrawal.

Reconnaissance last
showed they were still moving
large convoys southwards along
the roads to the battle fronts.

—Reuter.

night

Anti-Red Pressure
Increases In Yunan

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 4,

Organized Nationalist action
against Communists in southern
Yunan province is steadily in-
creasing, forcing Chinese Reds to
take drastic steps in an effort to
keep the Indo-China-Burma re-
gion of the province under contro),
according to official sources

General Li Mi one-time Gov-
ernor of Yunan under National-
ists, returned to the mainland
recently, and is now due to com-
mand a force of at least 20,006
men. Reports say that at least
10,000 of Li Mi’s men are regular
army men, well organized and well
equipped. They said several pitch-
ed battles in recent weeks extend-
ed through the area over which
Li Mi is in control.—U.P.



No Curtailment In
Oil To Free World

WASHINGTON, May 4.
The Persian Embassy here
stated today that nationalisation

of Persia’s oi] industry would
not involve confiscation of
Anglo-Lranian Oil Company

properties or the curtailment of
oil to the free world. Ambassador
Nasrollah Entezam called a
news conference on the instruc-
tions of Premier Moshadeq_ to
“clear up misunderstandings and
misrepresentations”. He said the
nationalisation law provided for
“fair and rightful compensation”
to be determined by the Majlis.
Nationalisation would be carried

out in accordance with the
established principles of inter-
national law,

—Reuter.

a en i eee ee

SATURDAY,








~. 5, 1951

|

|

This little known statue of PUCK in the Legislative Council
was presented to the Colony of Barbados by Lady Briggs in
memory of her husband Sir Thomas Graham = izes, Bart.

Fighting Breaks Out
On Syria-Israel Border

DAMASCUS, May 4,

A Syrian Government communique announced to-day
thatderaeli croops move vhay 200 strong launched two heavy
attacks yesterday in the demilitarised Syria-ssrael border

zone. One Arab’ was killed a
ment said. Israeli: casualties
_to be heavy.

Norwegian Givneie
Go On Strike

OSLO, May 4.

Nearly 74,000 Norwegian farmers
and small-holders went on strike
to-day refusing to deliver meat or
potatoes to market or to sow
spring wheat in fields. Striking
farmers cultivated an area of ap-
proxirnately 1,000,000 acres, two-
thirds of Norway's total cultivated
area, Farmers, demand _ higher
prices for agricultural products
as compensation for recent rises,
in labour costs and prices of in-
dustrial consumer goods, If the
strike becomes effective, Oslo will
be completely without meat in a
couple of days. Stocks of canned
meat and meat products are low,
Potato supplies are expected te
last about two weeks. Fish how
ever is in great supply.—(U.P.)



Tito Recovers
BELGRADE, May 4.

Marshal Tito has fully recoy-
ered from his operation fo:
gallstones,

—Reuter.

Noel Coward
Pays First Visit

Noel Coward, British actor,
dramatist, producer and composer
of light music is in Barbados stay -

ing with Sir Edward Cunard at
“Glitter Bay", St. James.
Mr. Coward told the Advocate

yesterday that this was his first
visit to Barbados. He arrived from
Jamaica on Thursday evening and
expects to be in Barbados for just
under a week.

Mr. Coward looked little diff-
erent yesterday from when cinema
fans here saw him in the film “In
Which We Serve” except, that in
place of a naval uniform he wore
4 pink sports shirt and brown
Shorts; and instead of balancing
on a rocking lifeboat, he was com-
fortably seated in a chair in Sir
Edward's garden sipping a Blass
of coconut water.

Mr. Coward who has a home in
Jamaica has known Sir Edward
for many years. He has been in
Jamfica since December, except
for a few days in Nassau, Miami
and Puerto Rico just before com-
ing here.

He has just finished writing a
play. He has not yet decided on
a name for it, and when asked
what it was about, replied: “Oh,”
he said rather slowly, “about
people " He is at present
working on a new book

Mr. Coward did not know if any
of his plays were at present run-
ning in py York or London, but
the film stonished Heart” which
he ee and in which he took
aiding role is now showing in
and is having a very good
after being an equal success

both Londor New York

a le
P.



|

Mr. Coward spends most win-
ters in Jamaica. Ne will be re-
turning there when he leaves Bar-
bados. He is then flying to
Wisconsin to visit Alfred Lunt and
Lyn Fontainne. His next stop
will be New York and he hopes
to be in England by June 5th just
in time for the Theatre Garden
Party, given every year for the
Actors Orphanage, of which he is
President. This is scheduled for
June 19th. Stars from the theatre
will be present as well as the
general public and he hopes that
they will make a lot of money

Noel Coward was born in Ted-
dington on December 16th, 1899.
He made his first appearance on
the stage between 1910 and 1911
at the Little Theatre, London, in





@ children’s fairy play “The
Goldfish”. He first achieved fame
in 1924 with his own play, “The
Vortex.” in which he and Lillian
Braithwaite played the principal
parts. Some of his best known
works are, “Hay Fever” (1924),
“This Year of Grace”
‘Bitter Sweet” (1929), Cav
cade” (1931), “Tonight at 8.30"
(1935), “Blithe Spirit” (1941),
“Present Laughter” and “This
Happy Breed” (1942)

He was responsible for and]

played the leading part in the fil m







{point

nd six injured, the announce

were not known but believed
Arabs were said to have re-

:pulsed both attacks despite heavy

artillery and mortar fire, The
communique Said that United
Nations observers witnessed thr
fecond Israeli attack as they were
touring the area in their white’
painted cars.

In the middle sector, Huel area
the communique aid, eight
Israeli tractors resumed drainage
work but Arabs opened fire.
Israeli’s stationed at Mazratt, El
Khoury and Ghandama, an Arab
village machine gunned them.
The communique said the firing
was still going on, —Reuter.

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

‘and in carrying out your
new duties, Filebrace, let it

always be your aim to

temper the jovial bonhomie

of the commission agent

with the quiet dignity of
the civil servant!”

ewe

Farouk Weds
Sunday

CAIRO, May 4,
Sunday’s Royal wedding pro-
cession of King Farouk, 3l-year-
old ruler of Egypt, and his 18-
year-old commoner bride Narri-
man Sadek will be televised to
fifteen different parts of i,





Gromyko May
pot Fag “e
Say “Yes
PARIS, May 4.
Soviet Deputy Andrei Gromyke
told the West today he would
agree on their draft agenda for the
Foreign Ministers meeting but
only on condition that they gave

in to Russia on one important
—U.P.



DANES CELEBRATE
COPENHAGEN, May 4.



Candles shone from windows
throughout Denmark tonight, the
Sixth Anniversary of Denmark's

liberation from Nazi occupation.

‘In Which We Serve” (1944),
penser gs the life of the Royal —Reuter.
Navy in war time a , " 1G

In 1937 he wrote his autobio- PIONEER AVIATOR DIES
graphy—‘Present Indicative”, and BUENOS AIRES, May 4.
he is the author of 2 volume of A pioneer in Aeronautics
short stories “To Step Aside | Eduardo Bradley died here to-day,
(1939) and “Middle East Diary” ' ceed 64 He crossed the Ande
(1945 t r 19 Reuter

| VISITORS ASK FOR RUM
FROM BARBADOS ATB.LF.

LONDON, May 4

| Cartan William Lambert

of the West Indies section
of the British Industries Fair
made a suggestion today that



| King Opens South

B k kk hi bi it West Indies ram produeers
an X 1 1 10n should get together and
launch a joint advertising

LONDON, May 4, ign.
King George VI threw open to his subjects here to-day ere is no reastn, he said,

why rum fron Barbados, Trinidad
and British Guiana should not
have a big sale in London,’

The rum is really good, he said.
“It is only a question of the pro-
ducers spending a little money on

the century’s greatest display of Britain’s achievements—
the Festival Exhibition. The Royal Family arrived in
typical grey London mists at shining nfbdern pavilions
gardens, fountains and towers on the south bank of the
River Thames.

The King and Queen drove by: — their selling campaign. They
car from Buckingham Palace to j ought to send a trial shipment
the Festival Exhibition Sal Go d oth

The Royal Party included Prin es Oo

cess Elizabeth, the Duke of Edin-
burgh, Queen Mary and Princes
Margaret

Crowds, including 12,000 special-
ly selected guests from all walks
of life, and thousands of the Ex
hibition staff cheered the King anc
Queen as they were received ai
the Royal Pavilion.

The Royal pair then walked to

the Dome of Discovery, the
‘Transport Pavilion and other
halls.

Among members of the Gov-

ernment at the top of the Dome
steps were Opposition Leader
Winston Churchill, and Herbert
Morrison, Foreign Minister, and

“Lord Festival.”

The Queen, wearing a powder
blue coat and hat to match, stood
to attention with the King in
drizzling rain, as the National
Anthem was played.—Reuter.



Want Back
Husbands

HONG KONG, May 4.

Women of Tungkoon. county
near Canton have threatened to
file mass divorce action on the
grounds of desertion unless their
husbands in Hong Kong and For-
mosa return by the end of June,
according to Chinese reports re
ceived here today.”

Reports said, women with the
assistance of Communist officials,
had formed a “get back our hus-
bands” movement at a meeting on
April 25,

Many husbands were said to be
serving with Nationalist armed
forces
—Reute,

“NAKED” MAN

LONDON, May 4.
A woman cleaner panicked
officials here by announcing she
had seen a naked man leaning
against a pillar in London’s Fes-
tival of Britain Exhibition site
this morning, just before the King
and Queen arrived.
All rushed out to investigate.
They found that a wax figure
of “The Fisherman”, an exhibit
in the fisheries section, had been
stripped of his blue sweater,
trousers and sou'wester and left
enly in rubber boots and gloves,
and his head had fallen off.
He was hastily removed to the
dressing room.
Officials came to the conelusion
that it was a practical joke.
—Reuter,

Progress Made

WASHINGTON, May 5
American and British official:
have made “Definite progress”
here toward settling differences
on a Japanese peace treaty, the
State Department announced to-
day. —Reuter.







Russian Tanks

BERLIN, May 5

The West German News Agency

D.P.A. reported today that Soviet

Army authorities are bringing

tanks into East Gemany at the
vale of one train load a night,
Reuter.

50.000 More Wanted

| LONDON, May 4.

Britain’s 21 Royal Ordnance
Factories need 50,000 more work~
ers to carry out the rearmament
programme, the Ministry of Sup-
ply announced today,



—Reuter.

; GOLD INTO MERCURY
|



WASHINGTON, May 4
Ancient alchemists who tric:
to turn base metals into gold
probably would not believe this,
The United States
hag succeeded where they fapee
but in reverse. Atomic energy
Oak Ridge, Tennessee is
being used to convert gold
mercury,—(U.P.)

Cae
inty



WHITE HOUSE GUEST

WASHINGTON,
Prime Minister
wus today a

May 4.
Israeli Davi
Ben Gurion,
of President
luncheon

—Reuter



WAR DEAD
THE HAGUE, May 4
Holland
her war dead
fience througheut the country
—Reuter

today

Government }

Guest}
Truman at al]

commemorated
with a two-minute

This was the result of enquiries
Fi visitors who wanted to Know
Aft WL Stall | why it is that only Jamaica rum
is on sale in London
. .
Of B.I. Fair

‘| (From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 4
Festival of Britain celebration:
and bad weather did not pre
vent the West Indies from trans
acting good business at the BIF
to-day, A representative of thc
China Trading Company placec

The rum and cigars displayed
on the West Indian stands, have
; attracted interested enquiries from
South African business men. They
say they would like ta import
direct from the Caribbean. They
have asked about prices and have
been put in touch with the West
India Committee,

West Indian embroidery which
appears on all the stands. bi



an order for large quantities O°! ¢en much admired. So has th
sea island cotton. Connell Lam straw and raffia work—the gay
bert in charge of the West In |S7#W and raiie eae
dies stands said: “Judging b hats, handbags and mats from
buyers’ inquiries, smaller Wes Temaica. British Guiana, Trinidad

and the Windward Islands, Queen
Clizabeth bought two highly deco-
rative straw bags from the Jamai-
ca stand end another two from the
Windward Islands stand,

Indian islands should concentrat
on minor industries, Thi,
would help West Indian economy
immensely.”

On show at the Jamaica stall) Some exquisite tortoiseshell work
today was a cricket bat autograph-| sent over from Barbados 4
ed by members of the England-| caused such a lot of “favourable
West Indies Test teams, 1950.| eomment that Captain aambert

Many English cricket enthusiasts
‘xamined the autographs

is going to suggest a bigger display
of it next year

“Objects made of tortoiseshell”
he said “are terribly expensive in
Britain, I am sure that Barbados
could produce them much cheaper
Very good trade could be worked
u

Ps sked if futher. specimens cculd
be flowne ever from Barbados,
Captain Lambert replied I don't
think there will be tine “Reuter,



Russian Shoots
U.S. Corporal

VIENNA, May 4,
United States authorities in
Vienna have asked Russians to
oin them in probing the shooting
ft a United States military police
‘orporal by a Russian soldier in
the city centre to-day

Warits Sovereignty

BERLIN, May 4,



American High Commissioner



Walter J. Donelly said he was Chancellor Konrad Adenauer’s
diving the matter immediate at- }) West German Government, reject-
ention and had asked Sovie'} ng all border claims of the past
tuthorities to take part in the 13 yeahs yrsonniigc ee ait
i "| eel sovereignty over é err 'Y ab if
jome tenipOne Dee - RAN TEE *xisted on December 31, 1937. In

effect he has renewed claimsto

East Prussia east of ae aaa

Neisse line now in the Poland-
Ban German Party Russian zone, and small border

districts absorbed by Belgium and
Holland.
—U.Y,

THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night

BONN, May 4

West German Government to-
day banned certain formations of
Neo-Nazi Socialist Reich's Party.
Dr. Robert Lehr, West German
Interior Minister, told a press
conference that the Government
would ask the Federal Constitu-
tional Court to declare the Party
unconstitutional as soon as the
Court was formed,



—Reuter,







“ omar ol <

|

Whenever you want a cigarette-
remember-

we odes

It’s the TOBACCO that counts

|
|

|
{


PAGE TWO



THE STAR BUDS of 1951 in their opening chorus “Orange-coloured Sky” at the Drill Hall last night.

R.,~ ERNEST W. BARLTROP,

Labour Adviser to the Se:-
retaryeof State for the Colonies
arrived from Dominica on Thurs-
day by B.G. Airways and ig ‘a
guest of Sir George and Lady
Seel. He is on a tour of this
area

On Ten-Day Visit

SINCE Mr. Harold Bishop, Gulf

Oil’s Speeial Representative
left Barbados, April 14th he has
visited Vénezuela, Texas, New
York and‘ Trinidad. He flew in
yesterday by B,W.1LA. from Trini-
dad and @xXpects to be here ten
days. He ds a guest at the Ocean
View Hotel,

Coming in by the same plane
were Miss Claudia Evelyn who is
on holiday, Mr, Ainsley Farfan
who is on a three-day visit and
Mr. V. A, Hospedales one of J._N.
Harriman’s-salesmerr in Trinidad.
They are Jl guests at the Hotel
Royal. ae

=-To-night

S Rapes No, 10 Club of the G.I_U.,

along with the other clubs,
are raising money for the G.I.U,
fete on Empire Day. Their con-
tribution is the dance at the
Y.M.P.C, tonight.

Off To Puerto Rico

R. AND MRS. JAMES TILL-

SON were among the _ pas-
sengers leaving by B,W.I1.A.
yesterday for Puerto Rico. Mr.

Tilson is an auditor of the Singer
Sewing Machine Co., stationed in

Puerto .-Rico, They were
married ,hére recently and had
been spending their honeymoon

at the Crane Hotel,...also on the
B.W.1.As: Puerto Rico flight was
Miss Grate Bryan, matron of the
Nightengale Home She is en
roule to»the U.S.A. on a_ four
months’ holiday. Miss V, Jones
of the St, Michael's» Almshouse
will be acting for her during her
absence.,

Get Together
ES'T INDIAN visitors for the
Fdstival of Britain may care

to be entertained by their fellow
countrymen. The organiser of one





scheme is Sam Morris, genial
Secretary of the League of Col-
oured Peoples. Sam says he is

making preparations for what he
described as au “big West Indian
get-together”,

“Star Buds of 1951”

HORTLY after 8.30 o'clock
last night, “The Star Buds of
1951” went into action at the

Drill Hall, Garrison. It was part
of Madame Ifill's second annual
benefit for the Christ Church Baby
Welfare League.

The show, which was under the
patronage of Hon. V. C. Gale,
M.L.C., and Mr, E. D. Mottley,
M.C.P., was followed by dancing,
after the hall had been cledred of
chairs,

The programme opened with an
overture by the Police Band. This
was followed by the Opening
Chorus, “Orange coloured sky”,
per formed by the entire cast. The
stage was perhaps a bit too small
for such a large number of people,
but the orange-coloured costumes
gave plenty of colour to the num-
ber. “A glimpse into the 20's”
came next. This was the Charles-
ton, complete with dresses worn in
those days.

The sketch, “The Mysterious
Suitcase” gave the show a touch
of local humour. Henry Ford
played ‘Joe’, Arnold Alleyne was
‘Harry’, the man with the valise
and ‘The Ghost’ was Austin Ward.
These three boys are Harrison
College students, and each of
them took part in “1066 and All
That" which was_ successfully
Staged at Harrison College sev-
eral weeks ago.

Betty Carrington’s number, a
ballet ‘By a Future Star’, was ‘the
next item on the programme. She
showed the audience that she has
a lot of talent.

This was followed by “The
High Steppers”, seven Star Buds,
Joan Farnum, Yvonne Gibbs,
Margaret Pilgrim, Daphne Smith,
Joyce Smith, Eudeen Layne, Mari-
lyn Gibbs led by Betty Carrington.

Seventh number on -the pro-
gramme was “The Masked Waltz
in Blue”, six couples; the girls in
blue evening dresses and the boys
wore blue dinner jackets, white
bow ties and grey flannels, Each
wore a mask.

The finale was the entire cast
singing “Goodnight Sweet
Dreams”. The costumes were de-
signed and made by Madame Ifill
assisted by Mrs. A. A, Herbert,
Mrs. C, Pinder and Miss I. Raw-
lins. Mrs. Margot Laffan taught
the girls thé Charleston »uraber.



ADVENTURES



OOD morning,

Averroists, If 12 parts. of
frozen egg-dust in a_ gelatine
sausage count as 15 parts of
vegetable matter, what percent.
age of fossilised penguin meat in
a processed pork pie will turn it
into utility fish patty?

Mimsie’s Slopcorner’s
protest

IMSIE SLOPCORNER his
issued this statement to the

“The reason why I refus
ed to be «kissed by Councillor
Tudmarsh at the christeninz of
the Shrewdleigh Gas-Container
was because he had previously
squeezed my arm while partak.
ing of a sandwich at the buffet
1 said ‘Keep yourself to yourse):
Councillor, if you please,” My
rebuke was overheard by
Colone] Telscombe, Mrs, Marsn,
and a Boy Scout named Huffle.
Thus I had reason to believe that
the ceremonial kiss would be an
expression of the Councillor's
personal . feelings, rather than
gratitude for the christening of
the gas-container.”

In @ Turkish jute-mill
aie now taking you over

W*.
a Turkish jute-mill,

where recordings — _have been

——

Ny

Press



TAN,
TAN
TAN

AU

& NAVY

DIAL 4606

Wnt

BY THE WAY...

little

made....Yes, well, here we are
in this—yes—in this—er—Turk.
ish jute-mill, Everybody's look.
ing pretty good....Now, could
you just tell us how this jute-mill
works?....Kaga rom kagik anal

..That was the Turkish Mana-
ger telling us about all this—er—
jute—masses of the stuff, First of
all it fs ee then jacketed,
then slivered,.,.Kaga rom _kagik

Shes plc inmceinicentient a







es °
Trinidad Civil Servant
RRIVING yesterday from
Trinidad by B.W.LA. were
Mr, and Mrs. Daniel Roach who
are staying with Mr. and Mrs.
L, L, Gittens at “Kenville” Colly-
more Rock. Mr. Roach is in Trini-
dad's Government Service. He is
Paymaster of the City Council.

Summer Courses
OME Bahamian and West In-
dian students in England will
surely avail themselves of the
special summer schools, with
scholarships, which are being ar-
ranged by the Labour Party in
England. The courses are eact
for one week and the scholarships
cover the full cost including board
and registration fee. One will be
held at the Labour Party’s “Coun-
try House’’—which Sydney anc
Beatrice Webb left to them—ir
Surrey and the other at Bangor
University in North Wales. Ti
subjects will be either Socialist
principles and policy, or Local
Government in England and
Wales, or oe Organisation. 1]
am told there will also be a special
course on Colonial affairs at Ban-
gor in August.

Battle of Britain
LEVEN years after the event
the Air Ministry are co-

operating in making a full-lengtr
feature film of the Battle o
Britain.

Here is a subject that offers
great opportunities. The Battle of
Britain was the turning point of
the war. The film is being writ-
ten, directed and produced by e
team of Battle of Britain airmen

Title will be: Hawks in the
Sun. Hawks was the R.A.F. code
word for enemy fighters. Some of
the shooting will take place a’
Kenley airfield where many of
The Few were stationed.

Who will fly the aircraft in the
film? Some of the pilots may be
survivors of The Few.

Incidental Intelligence
SOLICITOR who likes flut-
ters on the turf was asked by

a friend whether he preferred his
racing or legal income.

“In some ways, betting is more

attractive,” he said. “But the

courts are the better proposition

They even pay out on losers.”
—L.E.S.

OF PIPA



Copyright » P27. Vax Din: Int Amsterdam



By BEACHCOMBER

anal—yes, er—that was the
Manager again. How long hav
you worked here, Mustapha
Forty years? You mustaph;

very jolly time in the off season
I mean....No, well, actually-
Kaga rom kagik anal—yes, wei
I'm afraid that was the Manage
again. It’s certainly been

worth-while experience, here inp
“this — ev —— —er — Turkish SUIS. mill.

Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter fo

its Junior Short Story Competition.

The best story will be publishe:

ores eh Monday n The Evenifg Advocate, and the winner will receiv:
ze to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The storie
‘an be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30)
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocat

Co, Ltd.,

City not later than Wednesdow everv week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,

Send this coupon with your st

ory.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name ......+-..
Age

School
Form

seeee

Peete eee eee ee eee eee

Seen eee e eee eeee
sa eeeeee

Seen ete eee eee een teens

CMD ANGIONT way cis bases siies oot tues tassel ys tt

CASUALS

Oe a ee ee



EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

a ee
ee te ee ee

— ee ee

& WHITE CASUALS
sith Platform 5 joles and Wedge Heels

ADIES? SHOES

“WINDSOR BRAND”

WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS
NAVY & BLACK SANDALS

$9.44

$8.53
$9.37
$8.50

DIAL 4220





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THE “DRILL” FOR A

DATE WITH THE

WHOSE FACE IS HERE

AS the list of young men who
have escorted Princess Margaret
becomes longer, the pattern sets.
It goes as follows:—

First news is a telephone call
from Jennifer Bevan, her lady-in- jc
waiting, “Princess Margaret is
having a small party to go to the
theatre, and would very much like -

Waits,
the theatre manager.
ére ready and you slide off to the

— a

GIRL



officially “not expected,” and the
manager comes up bowing,
You sit through the interval—

no drinks, no changing places, no
ices,

And. afterwards your party
eaves first, while the audience
and the Princess thanks
The cars

Pee one natn cent to right club.

uckingham Palace at 7.30.” et
The young blood takes a taxi an. — i spemaget ue
or his car, drives straight in to + MOWSTS SES OR. Rae
the Privy Purse door (main en- ‘Served in a_ secluded place.

trance on the right). The police

apmpagne appears, but the bill

are warned and no one stops him. P@ver does (that is settled the
At the door there is an attendant N@xt day), and no one tips the
in the Royal Household uniform Waiters.

of dark blue, Next he goes up in

a lift to the Princess’s private
sitting-room,

There he gets a drink and
sandwiches—usually chicken and
ham, and “jolly good.”

Then they go down and get
into the royal car and drive to
the theatre. There are always a
few policemen round the door—
even when the Princess is



CROSSWORD

en Se ta me,





Across wt

1. Pune I'm out of piece with
the dance, (6)

4. With this in you may see a oull-
fight (3) 7. Contact. (0)
This montn ts the interval
between new mouns, (5)

. Rest this and make replacement
(3)

13.. Make up for a note, (5)







14, Reaps with a peculiar instru
ment. (5)
16. Through serving others | get in
the wet. (6)
12. The New Zeaiangd parrot. (3)
19. Bridge-like structure. (7)
21. Sort of thing vou may find tn a
shipyard, (4) 22. Colour. (3) 5
28 To do 24 Across a drill must (5)
24, See 23 Across (4)
> Down
1, Mow around the old measure, (6)
2. {t provides a tin dune. (8)
3 Who gave rope to Buan ? (8)
4. A white one ts cowardly. (6)
5 You will not get. much juice
unt this is off, (4) ;
6 Claim unduly. (8) 4
& Food trom the coai-hanger, (3)
9 Not even single. (4)
11 Probably an oyster. (6)
14. Made from broken tiles. (5)
15 Again happens to be a curer. (5)
18. Supplement (3)
20 Spot of sorts (3)
Solution of Saturday's puzzie,—Across:
%, Coalpit: 7 Ovster ved: ii ct
14. Sliminate: 13, Pope: 14, Dir
Pyre, 17. Due: 14 Psalm, 20. Air: 21
‘Trawl net, 22 Sad 24. Danger Down:
1 Hosepipes, 2. Cvelous. .5, Atum, 4.
Prandial’ 5. Test, 6 Adherent: 8, Ship
vard; % Elite: 10 Braiding: 15. Puree
ig. Lag
Literary News
nn row between Lady
Cabstanleigh, in her new
cole of literary hag, and_ the
Ineffable Matriarchy is _ boiling
upy Lady Cabstanleigh claims
that, in return for all the food
wind drink she gives to the
aovelists, she ought to have some
say in recommendations and
choices and diplomas, She com-

plains that though these matters
are often settled at her parties |
she’s not consulted. It is believed
that, rather than antagonise her,
he women will agree to let her
choose or recommend a_ novel
occasionally, providing that she
will confine herself to the names
yn the

‘oster. |

publishers’ monthly

Mixed Reading

LIBRARIAN tells me of an

aspect of mixed reading
which I had overlooked. Some
times a man and a woman share
he same book, which means thai
hey must sit too close together
or disinterested scholarship.
Ine day this librarian approached
me such couple, and _= said tact-
fully to the man, /Can’t I get you
1 book for yourself? Wouldn't
doth of you be happier with one
gach?” “Would you, if you were
sitting next to Ursula?” replied
he man,

Express Building
Disappears

HE Daily Express building in
Fleet-street was stolen last
right by a body of men believec
o be Canadians, An enormous
0-wheel lorry was seen on the
oad to Southampton at 11.15

.m., but people thought it was

( mew tank. Yard men are

xamining the empty space,
(Beachcomber News Agency).

One Thing and Another

HY not,” asks a_ food

adviser, “try disguising
Nain boiled rz abbit withe cream of
hicken soup? By all means,
wrovided that the tinned cream
f chicken soup.is disguised with
inned Madeira sauce, provided
hat the “Madeira sauce ig dis
uised with Mumpo paste, espe
‘ially if the whole dainty dish is
lisguised jugged hare tart
with porridge sauce.

CASUARINA CLUB

Members and friends are re-
minded that’ the CASUARINA
CLUB, is now situated at “ILFRA-
COMBE, Maxwell Ceast Road,
‘Telephone 8378

Whilst for tt
will continue 1
a day; membe
operate with th
making as litt|
when

ent the Club

» open 24 hours

» asked to ‘co-
Management by
noise. as possible
and leaving the
that no annoy-
sed to rieighbour

entering

Besicr we must be going,” and
i

It is the Princess who says:
unifer Bevan tips “for the
rincess in the powder room,
You say goodnight in the foyer
of the restaurant, and one 6f the
royal cars takes you home.
And, whatever happens,

néver tip the chauffeur,
—L.ES.

you



POLITICS AND ROBBERY

RANGOON: Communist-hued
bandits stopped a train in Upper
Burma and ordered the passen-
gers to descend, gave them politi-
eal lectures, then relieved them of
their cash and personal belongings,
Afterwards the train wag allowed
to a een

itupert oi: the



2(s up when he feels less
I'm not looking for any-
hir he says. “| missed my way
in ¢ oud and ail 1 want is to get
“Pooh, don’t worry about
**Much more
e-flowers. Won-

cries the hare.
‘ta And





oe PLE LLL ALLELE III OPPO TS



B.B.C. Radio |
Programme |

SATURDAY, MAY 5,
6.30 am.—12.15, pm

1951
19.60 M.,



Forces Favouritts, 7 a.m
The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analysis,
7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m. |
Programme Parade, 7.3 a.m. From the!
Third Programme, 7.50 a.m. Int riude,/
8 a.m. Montmartre Players, 6.15 a.m
Yorkshire vs. South Africans, 8.30 a.m.
Violet Carson, 6.45 &.m. Colonial Ques-j|
tions, 9 a.m, The News, 9.10 a.m. Home|
News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Cinse|
Down, 11.15 a.m. Rugby League Cup Final
11.30 a.m. Surrey vs. Lancashire, 11.45,
1.50 a.m. |

6.20 a.m

a.m. Programme Parade,
Iifterlude, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down
1.15-4.45 p.m. 19.76 M.
—
4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 5 p.m
Yorkshire vs. South Africans, 5.05 p.m.;
Interlude, 5.10 p.m. British Hard Court)
Championships, 5.15 p.m. Rugby League!
Cup Final, 5.30 p.m BBC Scottish |
Variety Orchestra, 6 p.m, Music for!
Dancing, 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade.’
6.45—11.00 p.m. . 26.53 M. 31 2 M



7 p.m. The News, 7,10 p.m. |
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Behind the News,
7.45 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at the
Theatré Organ, 8 p.m. Radio Newsre!,
8.15 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.30
p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m, Interlude, 10.15 p.m. Take
i: from Here, 10.45 p.m. Yours Faithful),
1; p.m. Southern Serenade Orchestra,

C.B.C. PROGRAMME
SATURDAY, MAY 5.

16 p.m.—10.15 p.m. ...... News
10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m Letter from
Canada. 11.76 Mes 25.31 M.





Died From Anti-Alcohol
Powders

PARIS: A 15-stone Frenchman
of Douvres drank a bottle of rum,
four bottles of wine and seven
bottles of cider a day. Recently
he died but not from alcoholic
poisoning. His fiancée had been
giving him overdoses of anti-
alcohol powder which had proved
fatal.

Hair After 35 Years

ROME; A 95-year-old farmer
from North Italy, who has been
completely bald for 35 years, has
now started growing a mane of
white hair. He did not follow any
cure, Doctors are examining the

! case.

Ice- flower —20

derful thing, ice-flowers. Just find
some and everything else will come
tight." ‘* That’s all very well,’

says Rupert, ** but what are they?"
**Come and see,"’ replies the other,
jumping away. Pulling his sledge
our of the snow Rupert hesitates.

Then he follows him.



GLOBE

TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 P.M.

and Continuing DATLY

Positively the greatest War Film ever

“All Quiet on the Western Front”

Lew Ayres — Louis Wolheim

“SPECIAL SHORTS”
; BIG CAT and LITTLE HOUSE
Pit 16 — House 30 — Balcony 40 — Box 54

AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TO-DAY — 5 p.m,
TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30

JAMES STEWART

in

“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”

with RICHARD CONTE — LEE J, COBB — HELEN WALKER
A 20th Century-Fox Picture,

nf

——~

CLUB

To-night

visit

MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations

STOP THAT LEAK ;
IN YOUR ROOF NOW

We offer.
EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS

RED CEDAR SHINGLES
‘ ROLL ROOFING —
ROLL ROOFING —

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DOUGLAS FIR

THE KARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY L&D.

LUMBER DEPARTMENT







Plain
Red

ase DIAL 4610







SATURDAY,



MAY 5, 1951





a LAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)



LR, ape ene Aes



GOLDWYN Presents

oF

SAMUEL

Dana

TO-DAY AND CONTINUING
445 nd 8.0 p.t
with
ANDREWS—Far GRANGER
Joan EVANS-—Paul STEWART

PlusTHE MAC ARTHUR STORY

MATINEE TODAY (Sat. ) 9.30 am, & 1.30 p.m

“SPY TRAIN” & “MOON OVER ~MONTANA”™

SSS SSS










iz

ne

OO

TODAY TO SUN. — 5

Frank Sinatra
George Murphy
Gloria DeHaven

The Bandit” &
Gilbert Roland

LA Z A DIAL
ne 8404

& 8.30 p.m.
RKO's Big Double)
“Step Lively” “Tarzan & the
Slave Girl”
Lex Barker
Vanessa Brown
Denise Darcell & Chita



Midnite Tonite (Monogram Double)

Cisco Kid in

“Beauty & “The Living Ghost’

James Dunn



Now

(2 New Monegcram Features)

Starring The Singing

Nee MY WAKELY





Warner's



Ann Cirio



GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James
TODAY TO SUN. — 8,30 p.m.
MAT. SUN. 5 p.m
Classic Technicolor

Adventure !

THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT

with Shirley Temple, Barry Fitz-
gerald, Lon McAtlister

Midnite Tonite (Monogram)

‘Call of the Junele”

“Driftin’ Kid”



EMPIRE THEATRE

MAS & 6.30 Daily.

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15...
& Continuing
20th CENTURY FOX

Presents .
“I'D CLIMB) THE

HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”
Color by Technicolor.

Starring Susan Hayward—
William Lundigan

with Rory Calhoun and
Barbara Bates

ROXY
TO-DAY to WEDNESDAY

4.30 and 8.15
Columbia Smashing

Gene AUTRY &
his Horse CHAMPION
in
* BEYOND THE
PURPLE HILLS”

and

“CONVICTED ”

— Starring —
Glen FORD &
Broderick CRAWFORD



Double

BUY
AND SAVE

ELITE SHIRTS $38

SOMEONE YOU LOVE

SHOW IN G

Sez THIS
PICTURE WITH

VERY, VERY MUCH...

cxoR ey

TECHNICOLOR

20.

CENTURY-FOX

SUSAN HAYWARD - WILLIAM LUNDIGAN

Directed by Henry King + Produced by Lamar Trotti





ROWVAL

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M.G.M., and Fox Double

Dana Andrews and Gene
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* WHERE THE
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— and —

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Robert Taylor and Lloyd
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“Bataan” not suitable for
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SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1951
The Duchess Eats Obituary :
Horsemeat Mr. W
Mr. W. D. Bayley
By NE A. :
y JOHN E Ce Tne death was announcea by
Traditional beef-eating Britons Cable from London on Thursday

today are filling out their meagre
meat rations with the flesh of an
estimated 180,000 horses a year.

Many are swallowing their
pride along with the horsemeat
because of the 9% cent weekly
fresh meat ration.

One dealer told International
News Service recently:

“Before the war, an English-
man would turn up his nose at
horseflesh. Now he’s glad to get
at.”

Another dealer—with a shop
near London’s swank Mayfair
district—said horsemeat is not
bought only by the “lower”
classes. He added:

“IT get customers in here in
mink coats and diamonds. I could

tell you of a Duchess who eats
horseflesh regularly.”

George Orban, largest horse-
meat wholesaler in the London
area, estimated that 2,000,000 of
Britain’s 50,000,000 population are
eating horsemeat at least once a
week.

“Many prefer it to other meat,”
he said. “Britain will soon be on
a par with France and Belgium in
the consumption of horseflesh.”

No exact records are kept of
horses slaughiered, but according
to figures supplied by the Hides
Control of the Board of Trade
about 220,000 were killed last
year. This compares with 130,000
killed in 1948.

Brigadier-Gereral Sir George
Cockerill. Director of the Inter-
national League for the Protection
of Horses, estimated that 80 per
cent of horses slaughtered in
Britain wind up on the nation’s
dinner plates. He added:

Extinct In 10 Years

“Horses will be practically ex-
tinet in Britain in 10 years at the
present rate of slaughter.”

Ministry of Agriculture figures
show there were 1,337,965 horses
on Britain’s farms 50 years ago.
Mechanization has dropped this
figure to fewer than 400,000.

A recent Government report on
the subject said:

“The idea of slaughtering
horses for food is distasteful to
many people in this country. We
respect this view, but must face
the facts as we find them, There
are enough horses for the present
needs of agriculture, and the only
other demand is for slaughter for
human consumption.”

A Ministry of Food spokesman
explained that the off-ration
horsemeat is “not controlled.”’ He
said dealers usually charge about
two shillings (28 cents) a pound
and added that local authorities
are responsible for any restrictions
or stipulations on the sale or con-
sumption.”

One local authority—in the
working class East End of London

said its only stipulation is that
“restaurants serving horseméat
should display a notice to this
effect.”

Notice Displaced

In six restaurants visited in this
district only one such notice was
found, and that was pasted to a
door facing the kitchen, not the
public part of the dining room.

A Ministry of Health spokes-
man said “no one in authority”
has ever given an opinion on
horsemeat in relation to the na-
tion’s diet.

Dr. Alfred Brown, a London
dietician, said he thought horse-
meat was “about the same as beef
in body-building qualities. Like
beef or any other meat, it has
bad effects when eaten to excess.”

He added:

“The main drawback to horse-
meat is psychological. To animal-
loving Britons it’s like eating one
of the family.”

A spokesman for the Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals said the society has ac-
cepted the slaughter of horses for
human consumption as “inevit-
able.”

“We are concentrating now on
seeing that slaughtering and
transport conditions are kept
humane,” he said.

—LN:S.













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of Mr. W. wD. Bayley, formerly
merchant of this City and Vestry-
man of the Parish.

Watter DeCourcy Bayley was a
member of a we.-known family
in this island. There were four
brothers, one of whom, Mr. Her-
mie Bayley, left this island and
two others became Opticians, Mr.
Wesley Bayley and the late Dr.
Hahnemann Bayley, Walter Bay-
ley, besides being an optician, dis-
tinguished himself as a musician
of the first class. It was his inter-
est in the art which brought him
into many of the controversies in
which he was en - In his
early years he learnt the Organ
with a distinguished musician
then Organist of St. Michael’s
Cathedral, Mr. Sibthorpe. As the
years rolled on his interest
increased and he took an. active
part in any organisation dedicated
to the improvement of music in
this island. He himself was a fine
exponent. It was due largely to
his perseverance that the new
——— Organ was bought in

25.

He was a Jeweller and Gold-
smith and proprietor of the Gem
Buildings at the head of Broad
Street. It was his interest in
modern trends which caused him
to advocate the removal of. the
“Cab Stand” from Trafalgar
Square and to advocate that the
Government give a grant to the
Civie Cirele for beautifying the
city .

in the Vestry he was the terror
against the old system of patron-
age by which the plums of office
were dispénsed to those who
served at election time blocking
the promotion of those who had
served in the humbler offices.
The old method of guessing at the
trade rate was publicly denounced
by him, and for some time as a
result of his agitation, the Vestry
became the butt of public criti-
cism. He strongly advocated the
establishment of a Mayor and
Corporation in order to correct
the abuses of parochial adminis-
tration.

With Mr. Bayley sponsoring a
cause there was little chance of
failure. He was enthusiastic and
had an ability to hold an audience
unrivalled by any publie speaker
in this island today. It was his
turbulence of spirit which brought
him public admiration but which
prevented his election. to the
House of Assembly. He did not
suffer fools gladly and men who
were not of high educational
standard and who indulged in pri-
vate favours at public expense
were his natural enémy.

But above all this Mr.
was a lovable character. Music
and the arts were his love. His
enthusiasm and his willingness to
do anything to help in a_ public
cause were second only to the
depth of friendship which he
gave. They were few who enjoyed
this; but to such as did he opened
not only his purse but his heart.

By his first marriage he had
two children, Dr. H. H. Bayley
and Mrs. Lawrence Goddard.

After his second marriage to a
distinguished musician the former
Miss Doreen Clark of the Royal
College of Organists he left for
England where he had been liv-
ing ever since, following a lengthy
illness.

The news of his death will be
the source of deep regret to many
friends and relatives in this
island.

—_——:

20,000 Await Orders

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 4,

Chinese Nationalist Intelligence
reports said an_ International
Communist force of 20,000 men in
Russian army uniforms is awaiting
orders from Moscow to cross from
Manchuria into Korea. Reports
said troops claim to be European,
Mongolian and Japanese contin-
gents of the “International Aid to
Korea Volunteers army.” In addi-
tion reports claimed at least one
division come from satellite coun-
tries —U.P.

Bayley



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HE WAS IN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



INDO-CHINA

ra
a a
=

;

~

, a

ig 5

THIS French-Vietnam soldier is receiving attention after being
wounded by a mine left behind at Baria by the fleeing rebels, engaged
ad

in the Indo-China war.—Express,

‘N.A.P. Treaty
Powers Annoutice
Council Merger

LONDON, May 3.

North Atlantic Treaty powers
announced today their decision to
merge the councils of their For-
eign Finance and Defence Minis-
ters to a streamline working or-
ganisation, The new structure
includes the formation of a Fin-
ancial and Economic Board which
will work in Paris, parallel with
the council for the deputies and
the Defence Production Board by
others who will continue to work
in London,





Antigua Crop
Slowed Up

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 3

After seven weeks of grinding
operations, the Antigua Sugar
Factory has manufactured 6,238
tons of sugar from 42,765 tons of

=

cane. Apart from four weeks’
idleness due to a cane cutters
strike the factory has lost
159.18 hours out of cane. The

factory has only worked 12 hours
so far this week ds there was a
stoppage on Monday. Workers
took a holiday on May Day and
had a march and pienic at Fort
James,

At since cutters

no time

The new. Board will take over returned to work has the factory

the function of permanent work-
ing of the staff of the Defence
Financial and Economic Commit-
tee Advisory group on raw mate-
rial problems and the economic
financial working group set u
some months ago in Paris. It will
work in close co-operation with
the organisation for European
Economic Co-operation,
—Reuter.

$250 For Wounding

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 2.

“You have found yoursélf in a
very unfortunate position, You
have probably allowed jealousy
to get the better of you. I would
advise that if the woman does not
want you, let her go”, said Mr.
Clement Phillips, Magistrate, to
Edward Roach, when he found
him guilty of maliciously wound
ing his rival Russell Bartholomew.
The Court heard, that the
defendant and one Virginin
Lewis had been very friendly at
one time. .She went to live with
Bartholomew some time after and
Roach became jealous. One
night he went to Lewis’ apart-
ment where he met Bartholomew
and during an altercation, took
up an ice-pick and stabbed him
in the chest. He had to pay
$250 compensation,














been kept supplied with enough
canes to keep it working to its
full capacity. It is already
known that even if from now on
the factory was supplied enough
to be operating in full capacity,
it is unlikely that the full crop
anticipated, 25,000 tons, will be
ground off. Last year 7,000 tons
of cane remained standing and
with Whit-Monday, Empire Day
and other holidays coming along
the situation this year is again
doubtful.

Senior Short Story Competition



Canada’s C.O.L.
Stull Climbing

OTTAWA, May 4.

Canada's cost of living is still
climbing. Trade Minister Howe,
told the Commons Thursday that
the official index reached a record
of 161.8 at April 2—an increase of
2.1 points from the _ previous
height of 179.7 one month earlier

His announcement was immedi-
ately used by Opposition parties to
bolster arguments that some of the
tax increases proposed in the
1951Â¥52 budget should be repealed.
They unsuccessfully moved to
repeal increases in sales and ex-
cise taxes ag substitute sources
of revenue. They proposed mgher
corporation taxes and tax on capi-
tal gains.—(CPp)

.
Rejected
LONDON,

Members of Parliament long
wondered whether the table
cloths in the House of Commons
dining room marked “Milwaukee
University Club’ were lost, stray-
ed or stolen

Finally Conservative Member
of Parliament C. J. Alport asked



the Chairman of the Kitchen
Committee, Labourite William
Coldrick

Coldrick said: “The tablecloths
referfed to are manufacturer's
rejects and have slight imperfec-
tions. They were purchased in
1947 when other tablecloths were
difficult to obtain.”—I.N.S,



Refugee Problem

STRASBOURG, May 3

After an impassioned appeal by
Chancellor Dr. Adenauer, a meim-
ber of the Committee of Ministers
of the Council of Europe in Stres-
bourg, today unanimously decided
to aid Western Germany to tackle
the problem of 11,000,000 refugees
from the other side of the “iron
curtain”. Three of the 15 repre-
sentatives of those in Britain, Bel-
gium and Denmark were persuad-
ed by Adenauer’s speech to with-
draw their objections to the pro-



+ posal, it was understood.

It was decided at this closed
meeting to call an immediate
conference of experts to uncover
all aspects of the refugee prob-
lem in pvope, estimated to con-
cern 11,850,000 people spread over
six countries.

—Reuter

MORE FOR 10UR

OF STATELY HOMES
LONDON,

The Earl of Pembroke is bring-
ing an inflationary trend to the
British peerage’s stately homes
business,

Lord Pembroke will open his
great Wiltshire House, Wilton.
the public on May 1 but will
charge sightseers admission,

Last year nearly a hundred
titled aristocrats allowed tourists
to tramp through their stately
homes for an admission fee of
60 cents.

Wilton, which was built in the
16th century, was headquarters
for the British Army’s Southern
Command during World yy i.

‘ —LN.S.





The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girts
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

tition.

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words

in length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd..
City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.

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{MERICAN COLUMN:

Police Raid
Homes Of
Policemen

From NEWELL ROGERS

NEW YORK

confiscated TV sets and expen-
sive Persian lamb and silver fox
fur coats of many of the officers’
wives.

The raiders are from District
Attorney Miles McDonald's
office.

Racket-buster McDonald
showing the coats and TV sets to
a grand jury investigating police
graft,

Some high-ranking officers
have * submitted questionnaires
setting out their financial posi
tion to the grand jury.

And the jury is inspecting fur
coats and TV sets to determine
how truthfully the police answer-
ed their quiz,

It is believed the inquiry may
show that some did, in fact accept
large bribes from gamblers and
underworld chiefs.

The grand jury
crder arrests and
trial.

ADVERTISEMENTS in buses at

is

has power to
commit for

soaked
attract women's attention.

women are so attracted that they
tear them off for use as sachets.

EX-ACTRESS

in perfume attached

Hope Hampton
shed not a tear when £119,000 of
gems and cash were stolen from
her Park Avenue fiat.
police brought back her
cream-coloured safe, empty,
tumblers knocked off, she said: “|!

But whe:

sentimental value. I feel like ery
ing.”

GENEROUS acknowledgment by

the New York Times in a mes
sage from Cardiff; ‘“Britain’s
rearmament drive is beginning to
show results.”’ Correspondent Ben-
jamin Welles had just been seeing
20-pounders being produced
Centurion tanks.

£1,400,000 yacht
Grille (German for caprice) is
going to aid the rearmamen:
effort, She has been sold for over
£35,700, and will be broken up
for scrap. Since 1946, when the
Admiralty sold her, she has had
an English skipper, Captain
H. E, Byng.

THE ARMY has cut its call for
National Servicemen this month
from 60,000 to 40,000, Reason:
64,000 volunteers have come 1h
since January, 34,000 more than
expected. /

THE AIR FORCE asks the air-
eraft industry for a completely
automatic extra-high-altitude
fighter, It must travel at the speed
of sound to a ceiling of ten miles
and be armed with a guided mis-
sile, It must be made by 1954

A NEW atomic air-raid shelter
for President Truman will cost
£314,000. Says a White House
aide: “He could stay down there a
hundred years if he wanted to.”

A BATTLESHIP would be the
last place to look for
dope. But pharmacist’s mate
Francis Pastoria has been arrested

HITLER'S

on charges of smuggling £8,900

worth of morphine into America
in the battleship Missouri, just
back from a long tour of duty in
the Far Bast

THREE out of every
Yorkers would not in any
cumstances, according to a
change places with President Tru-
man. The job requires too much
wear and tear, The other two
would be willing to try “for the
honour and chance of service.”

New
cir-

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COURTESY

PAGE THREE



=

W.H. Fox
Talbot

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Ttison this process that all modem
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Born at Melbury in Dorset in 1800, Fox Talbot was a man with remarkably wide ihterests,
Though primarily amathematician, a subject in which he took an honours degree at Cambridge
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French, and could read German, Hebrew, Gaelic, Welsh, Polish, Wendish (an obsgure

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Wiltshire in the Parliament that passed the Reform Bill of 1832
In 1854 he threw open his patents on the Calotype process, taken

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PAGE FOUR







Printed by the Advccaic co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown

Saturday, May 5, 1951

An Unkind Cut

AN announcement has been made in a
Trinidad newspaper that the British Coun-
cil is about’ to abolish the posts of Music
Officer in the Eastern Caribbean and Art
and Exhibitions Officer in the West Indies.
The reason for such a decision is said to be
thé cut inflicted by the recent Budget on
the British Council. It is highly unfortun-
ate that the British Council should have
decided to remove these two officers from
their present fields of work at the moment
when progress is obvious.

The work of Miss Enid Richardson, the
Music Officer, and Mr. John Harrison, Art
and Exhibitions Officer is well known in
this Island, where, perhaps, Mr, Harrison
is better known. Miss Richardson’s head-
quarters are in Trinidad, but, she has vis-
ited Barbados on a number of occasions to
conduct courses, give recitals and broad-
casts, and to accompany visiting artists.
She has greatly widened musical apprecia-
tionin this island, and has given pleasure
to many. Hers has not altogether been an
easy furrow to plough, for British as this
Island is, it is proportionately unmusical.
Her success has been greater in colonies
where the inhabitants are of Latin descent,
and are therefore, more receptive. This,
however, in no way minimises the value of
her work in Barbados.



Mr. Harrison’s enthusiasm for his work
has been relentless. He has lectured, given
broadcasts, instructed schools and held
courses for teachers. He has organised
exhibitions and conducted parties of school
children around them. Museums, art soci-
eties and artists have all benefited from
his enthusiasm and guidance. Nor has his
been a straightforward task. He has en-
countered opposition from schools and in-
dividuals where the value of art teaching
to children was not formerly realised. By
courtesy and enormous drive, such opposi-
tion has largely vanished. The flourishing
art societies and frequent art exhibitions
from Nassau to British Guiana bear some
witness of his work during the past years.

Great regret and amazement are felt that
the British Council should have decided to
abolish the posts of Music Officer in the
Eastern Caribbean and Art & Exhibitions
Officer in the West Indies. The financial
saving to the-Council must be trifling when
its vast expenditure on seemingly unpro-
ductive work is considered.

It can scarcely cost the Council more
than £3,000 per annum, of which the
greater part consists of travelling expenses
for these officers. Now that the work of
these officers is beginning to show real
results, it is certainly not the moment to
terminate such valuable services, for it
will result in the unfortunate decline of
music and art. Teachers and others who
have benefited from the work of these
officers are not yet ready to stand alone.
lt is, in effect, the abandonment of this
area when more officers are required
rather than none at ail. There is nobody
or person capable of continuing such work.

It may be that the abolition of the Music
Officer and the Art & Exhibitions Officer
is the thin end of the wedge, and that the
removal of the British Council from the
West Indies or from certain colonies is
contemplated. If such a step is planned,
could not the British Council retain both
these officers’ and place them under the
appropriate local Directors of Education
to continue their valuable work? By this
means such important work would con-
tinue and grow at a ‘trifling cost, for two
officers attached to Education Departments
would not require expensive headquarters
or large establishments.

If is to be hoped that the British Coun-
cil’s decision is not irrevocable. The work
of both its officers has greatly enriched
the lives of the peoples in the areas con-
cerned, where, formerly, .an, interest in
music and art was the prerogative of a
very few. Gratitude is due t» the British
Council for sending both officers to the
Caribbean and for sponsoring their work.
But, our gratitude is tinged with a certain
bitterness that the work of these officers
should be left “half finished’.
Richardson and Mr. Harrison the Council
has two fine British officers, devoid of pre-
judice, zealous and enthusiastic, and with
that rare gift of evoking enthusiasm in
others, It will be a long time before we
shall see their like again on these shores.

OUR READERS

In Miss {



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

British West Indies

Ever since the second half of the
last century, when the price of
sugar collapsed, to recover only
during the two World Wars and i
fall again in the interval between
them, there has been poverty in
tLe British West Indies. Professor
W. M. Macmillian says in his book
Warning from the West Indies:
“A social and economic study otf
the West Indies is necessarily a
study of poverty.”

Qne cause of poverty in the West
Indies has been the low price
paid for West Indian produce, Fo,
protracted periods during the past
seventy years the prices prevail-
ing for most tropical primary
products have been so low that
they have permitted payment only
of very low wages to the workers
in the industries producing them
and in no tropical region have
they been lower than in the
West Indies. Sugar is the prin-
cipal export crop of the West
Indies, and gives employment to
more people than any other crop.
For a great part of those seventy
years, the price of sugar exported

»was a halfpenny per pound and
wjseldom rose above a penny per

pound, until the outbreak of the
two World Wars and especially
since the exigencies of the Second
World War compelled resort by
the British Government to Bulk
Purchasing of sugar which was
established in 1939 and continues
to the present day.

One of the greatest needs of the
West Indies, and, in fact, of all
colonies, is stabilization of produce
prices at a remunerative level
Until that is done, wages cannot
be paid to support a reasonable
standard of living. Otherwise, as
one colonial administrator has
expressed it, “It is idle to talk of
colonial welfare, unless prices are
paid for colonial products to make
welfare possible.”

The other cause of poverty in
the West Indies is over-population,
The over-populated state of all of
the British West Indian islands
has long been the cause of much
concern. While the two continen-
tal colonies, British Guiana and
British Honduras, are very
sparsely populated, all of the
island colonies, except Dominica,
are over-populated and the pres-
sure of population has increased
in recent years.

In the past relief was found by
emigration to the United States of
America, Pahama, Cuba and other
Latin-American countries. But
immigration into the United States
of America is now extremely
restricted. During the war and
immediately afterwards, 15,000 Ja-
maicans were employed on farms
in the United States, but as un-
employment has increased in the
United States, more and more
Jamaicans have been repatriated,
and now the number there is
negligible,

Doors Closed To Emigrants

* Moreover, the Latin-American
countries have closed their doors
to coloured immigrants and Cuba
has gone to the length of com-
pelling West Indians» who have
.long resided there and have grown
old and destitute, to return home.
Added to the loss of avenues of
emigration, the death rate has
fallen and the birth rate has risen
in some of the colonies in which,
formerly, malaria increased the
one and reduced the other. Suc-
cessful control of the malaria-
carrying mosquito by D.D.T, and
treatment of the fever with re-
cently discovered medicines have
lowered the death rate and in-
creased the birth rate. It is now
estimated that the West Indian
population will double itself with-
in a generation.

The total West Indian popula-
tion is now increasing at the rate
of 2 per cent. per annum, which
is double the average rate for the
world, and there is an annual in-
crease of 56,000 people. In Jamaica
alone, where the birth rate is 32
per 1,000 and the death rate 12 per
1,000, the annual increase is 27,000
people. In Barbados, dependent
entirely on an agrarian economy
—the sugar industry—the density
of population is 1,300 to the square
wmile, which is nearly double the
density of the highly industrial-
ized countries of Western Europe.
Barbados is the most densely
populated country in the world,
except Malta.

In Jamaica, also dependent on
an agrarian economy, the density
is over 300 to the square mile, if
the total area is taken into reckon-



With acknowledgements to
The Anti-Slavery Reporter.

ing, but Jamaica is a very moun-
iainous island, ana toe most or Ns
area is too steep and rocky to be
used beneficially. The real den-
sity of population there is prob-
ably 600 to the square mile.

The Times correspondent in
Jamaica wrote, on the 1lith Sep-
tember 1950, that: “Unemployment
in Jamaica is causing a situation
which may become comparable
with the conditions of 1938, which
led to riots and eventually the
despatch of a Royal Commission
to the West Indies . . . According
to the 1947 employment census,
25 per cent. of Jamaica’s 600,000
workers were unemployed. . Con-
sequently, Kingston, the capital
and the centre of most political
controversy, is over-crowded and
shanty towns have sprung up
which are sources of unrest and
discontent.”

Seasonal Employment

To make matters worse, most of
the agricultural work is seasonal.
The sugar industry of Jamaica
employs about 50,000 workers in
the reaping season, between De-
cember and June, but later in the
year the number employed falls
off to about 25,000. Before the
war the banana industry used to
employ about 40,000 workers when
27 million bunches of bananas
were exported, Now only about
7 million are exported and the
number employed is correspond-
ingly less.

In Barbados the sugar estates
“stagger” the work. They employ
workers for only a few days a
week and replace them with
others for the other days, in order
to give as many as possible an
opportunity to earn something.
Commendable as this is to save
some from complete unemploy-
ment and starvation, it cannot but
result in under-nourishment.

We must not lose sight of the
fact that there is no unemploy-
ment relief or “dole” in any West
Indian colony. The destitute un-
employed have either to live on
the charity of people nearly as
poor as themselves, or resort to
crime to provide themselves with
sustenance, Theft of growing
food crops is consequently very
prevalent, and this often discour-
ages small-holders from growing
food crops, which are so often pil-
laged by hungry thieves during the
night. If the United Kingdom had
unemployed in the same propor-
tion to its population as Jamaica
has, there would be nearly five
million unemployed in the United
Kingdom. .

Peasant Small-holdings

A succession of Royal Commis-
sions from 1897 to 1938 have urged
the creation of small-holdings and
expansion of peasant agriculture
as a panacea for poverty and un-
employment in the West Indies.
That recommendation has been
acted upon to a greater extent
than is generally believed. In
Jamaica. one third of the cultiv-
able land is divided into holdings
of under 59 acres each, In British

Guiana, Trinidad, Grenada, St.
Vincent, St. Lucia, Dominica,
Antigua and Nevis a high pro-

portion of the cultivable land is
divided into small-holdings. In
Barbados one fifth is so divided.
In St. Kitts, on the other hand, no
land has been reserved for the
purpose,

The results obtained from peas-
ant cultivation have been disap-
pointing. Experience shows that
small-holders in the tropics, con-
fined as they are to the same small
area of land, over-crop it and do
not redress the balance with fer-
tilizers, The fertility of the land
steadily falls until it becomes bar-
ren and has to be thrown out of
cultivation for years to fallow until
it recovers fertility. So long as
there is enough land to permit of
shifting cultivation the results of
peasant cultivation are not dis-
astrous, but shifting cultivation is
impossible in over-crowded West
Indian islands.

In 1947 the Secretary of State
for the Colonies, Mr, A. Creech
Jones, sent a Commission, of
which Sir Geoffrey Evans was the
Chairman, to British Guiana and
to ‘British Honduras, to investigate
the possibility of developing in-
dustries in those sparsely popula-
ted colonies, so as to absorb sur-
plus population from the island
colonies,

The Evans Commission

The Commission wes intorme.
that it was necessary to transfe:
not less than 250,000 people i
aggregate from the West india:
islands in the near future to othe:
countries to relieve the pressure
on existing means of livelihood.
The physical possibility of settling
that number in the two conti-
nental colonies is clearly suggestea
by the great disparity between the
population of the continenta
and island colonies respectively
The total population of the islana
colonies is 2% million, while tha
of British Guiana and British Hon-
dufas together is under half-a mil-
lion. British Guiana is as large a:
the United Kingdom and Britis!
Honduras is as large as Wales, ye.
the area of all the islands togethe.
is less than that of British Hon-
duras.

The Evans Commission foun
thet large numbers of people coulc
be transferred to the two conti-
nentdl colonies, but that it woul
be possible only through vigorow
development of the latent re
sources of those colonies. Spac.
is not available here to set out i
detail the recbmmendations of th«
Commission, contained in a Report
which covers 350 pages of print
but briefly, the Commission re
commended the establishment ii
British Guiana and in Britis!
Honduras of certain industries
mainly agricultural, at a cost o.
about £25 million, which couk
employ 25,000 workers and main
tain 100,000 people, including th:
workers’ families.

This has been criticized as offer
ing an inadequate solution of th’
problem. Critics have lost sigh
of the fact that the 100,000 woul
be only the number employed an
supported directly by the indus:
tries recommended by the Com
mission and that a greater numbe
would be required to minister t:
the needs of the primary worker
and of each other. To illustrat
this the population of Barbado;
is 193,000 of whom only 26,000 are
employed in its sole industry, the
sugar industry. Yet 167,000 other
people there make a living in vari-
ous secondary ways, as teachers
artisans, shop-assistants and so on
On the analogy of Barbados, the
continent colonies should be able
to absorb three or four times the
number which the industries re-
commended by the Commission
could absorb. Moreover, if the
capital expenditure was multi-
plied, the absorptive capacity of
the continental colonies would be
proportionately increased. £250
per immigrant is a moderate sum
to pay for settling each of them.

Development Corporations

The Commission recommended
as the most suitable agency for
carrying out its recommendations
a development corporation in each
of the continental colonies. They
felt that the material standards of
the workers could best be raised
by increasing the yield of the soil
through expert © organization in
Jarge units of production, run on a
profit-sharing basis, rather than by
establishing small-holdings and
leaving the settlers to work out
their own salvation, and they were
strengthened in this belief by the
fact that they did not find among
prospective emigrants and their
political leaders any strong urge
towards the system of small-
holding.

The Report of the Evans Com-
mission was published in 1948 and
while some steps have been taken
to explore lines of enquiry sug-
gested by the Commission, too lit-
tle has been done to act upon its
concrete recommendations, Imple-
menting the recommendations of
the Commission has been entrusted
to the Colonia] Development Cor-
poration and that organization has
not shown much inclination to
co-operate with the people in the
colonies concerned and_ consult
them on their aspirations anc
wishes.

West Indians feel that little pro-
gress will be made towards solving
their unemployment and _ over-
population problems until a De-
velopment Corporation is estab-
lished in each of the continental
colonies, to the capital of which
every West Indian colonial govern-
ment which wishes may contribute
what it can and be represented on
the Board of Directors,




RIDGWAY=New U.N. Chief

IEUTENANT - GENERAL
MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY
commanded the Eighth Army in
Korea for 105 days. He went out
in December from being a Deputy
Chief of Staff in Washington’s
Pentagon, A lot of those who
know him expect him to go back
there one day as Chief of Staff.
Ridgway is 56, thrice married,
with a two-year-old son. He is
himself a Regular soldier’s son,

At 47, he turned the 82nd
Division into one of the United
States’ first two airborne
divisions, and led it in battle in
Sicily, Italy, an@ North-West
Europe.

When the war ended, the air-
borne genéral became United
States representative on the
United Nations military staff, a
married Penny, aged 30, he
present Mrs. Ridgway.
commanded in the

Then he
Caribbean

area.
For relaxation Ridgway chops

SAY: |

By ROBERT JESSEL

wood, ice skates, and reads the
works of Rudyard Kipling.

Hit, Hit, Hit ~-
ERKED from his Washington
desk job last Christmas into
‘the Korean fighting, he revitalised
the late General Walker’s slightly
jaded and bemused Eighth Army,
The Tenth Corps ceased to take
orders from General MacArthur
in Tokyo, and came forthwith
under command of General
Ridgway.

The Eighth Army found itself,
as another Eighth Army suddenly
found itself in the Western Des-
ert in 1942, when an almost un-
known general called Montgom-
ery flew out from England to
command it.

He let it be known that his
interests were homicidal, ‘not

feographical, and said: “Real
estate in Korea is incidental,”

His tactics were to work his
divisions forward by slow degrees,
hit the enemy hard and often
from the air, and then push his
armoured spearheads ahead to
keep contact with the Reds.

In defence, he accepted limited
enemy advances, then pinched
out the bulge with cool precision.

It worked. The general was up
daily at 5.30 and off by hover-
plane to visit the forward troops.
Patton’s emblem haq been his
pearl-handled revolvers. Ridg-
way’s became the two hand
grenades fastened to his webbing.

Wherever the hoverplane car-
ried the tireless, erect Command-
er among the soldiers, respect
was “demonstrated both ways.”'
(The men ceased to fight from
the valleys. He taught them to
dominate the heights.

Now he moves on and “i:

—LES.



Pay To Keep The Good Men

To The Fditor The Advocate
SIR,—1 had a very pleasant sur-

prise two nights ago when I

—attended a Film at The Empire

““goTheatre to find that I was not

pestered by an assortment’ of
hooligans insisting that I employ
one of them to watch my car
»* Previously I have always had to
hand out the half shilling for the
simple reason that if I did not,
parts of the car would be missing
wnd the body scratched when i
returned to it after the show. On
two occasions I have had perfectly
mew cars scratched because I had

not taken on the particular ruffian
who was accustomed to “bleed”
me. To find now that one can
drive his car to the Empire with-
out fear of its being damaged is
indeed a wonderful blessing, and
I understand that our present
Commissioner of Police is to be
thanked for that. This is only one
of the many good services that
ovr Commissioner has rendered the
public since he took up office, and
in the Force itself one can see a
vast improvement, but on looking
up to see what Barbados pays this
excellent Officer I am amazed to
find that we have such a good
man at such a low price, From

what I can gather he will be leav-
ing us this year for a similar job
with more pay, and he can’t be
blamed, as the many obligations
that the income of a Commissioner
of Poljce of Barbados has to
meet — leave him absolutely
nothing to buy a package of
Trumpeters with. All men in his
position are constantly spending
their own money entertaining on

behalf of the country Some
Police Official may arrive here
trom overseas — he has to be en-

tertained and the good name of
Barbados upheld out of the local
man's pocket. There are constantly
arriving military officials of im-

portance who have to be shown
the natural courtesy, and here
again the pocket of the Commis-
sioner is hit. How he can buy a
box of matches—God only knows.
It is quite time that Government
woke up to the fact that some of
the local Officials in key positiqns
are being very much underpaid,
ond that we should certainly pay
to keep good men. I hope that
the Commissioner will not be
annoyed at this letter, but I am
writing it for the good of Barbados
ond not for the object of praising
him,
Yours truly,
BARBADIAN.

ADVOGTE) @ver=Population In The) NOBODY'S DIARY

Monday — The workmen of Barbados have

fuesday — A fisherman near Paynes Bay

Wednesday — One of the most unusual

got such a bad name for absenteeism,
laziness and all the other characteristics
of fallen man, that it gives me great
pleasure to record a scene in Baxters|
Road. Thanks to the perpetual stream
of traffic jamminess which makes this
road unique in Barbados I was forced to
stop for the space of one minute or
more.

During the enforced halt I saw a great
swing of small picks. I wasn’t near
enough to hear any singing, but it looked
very much as if the lips of one of the
pick swingers were moving to the
rhythm of the other-six workers. I al-
most felt like causing a traffic jam my-
self, just to wait and see how long this
burst of energy would keep up, but what
I saw almost convinced me that there
were people in Barbados who liked to
work with their hands. I was particu-
larly glad to see them in Baxters Road,
because what that hideous neighbour-
hood needs and needs urgently is to be
completely destroyed and rebuilt.
With willing workers like the ones I saw
the matter could be arranged.

caught a shark the other day. It was
duly cut open as sharks are when fisher-
men catch them. Inside were found
(certainly not the copies of the neglected
Maude Report!) eleven other sharks.

objects in the Legislative Council Cham-
ber is Puck. The statue of Puck was
presented by Lady Briggs in memory of
Sir Thomas Graham Briggs Bart. A Mid-
summer Night’s Dream was my first intro+
duction to Shakespeare so Puck and I are
old friends, but on re-reading him I’ve
been asking myself why Puck in the
Legislative Council ?

Had it anything to do with that famous
crack of his in Act III, Scene II, when
he says:

‘‘And those things do best please

me
That befall preposterously.’’
And was it not Puck who said ?
“Up and down, wp and down
I will lead them up and down:
I am fear’d in field and town:
Goblin lead them wp and down.’’
Nor is it in keeping with the dignity of
the Upper House to speak like Puck
speaks when he says:

“Now when thou wakest with thine

own fool’s eyes peep.’
Them’s fighting words as my American
friends would say. But Puck says them
and Puck has. an honoured place in the
Upper House.

Thursday — The beauty that might be

Friday — Before

Saturday — Is this how you talk ?

Bridgetown’s. I saw it last week. It was
the day that Miss Nell Manning’s fountain
was playing in what ought to be the gar-
dens of Trafalgar Square. The rain was
coming down in buckets and was being
blown about the street in a thin white
spray. It was hitting the tar road and
bounding up again like millions of lizard
eggs.

There was no one about. The rain had
driven them away. The Cannon Ball
tree was in bloom and its leaves were
spring leaves,











In the Careenage a_ tall schooner
rocked its mast to the rhythm of the
pounding rain. There was water, water
everywhere. Bridgetown looked clean
and refreshed, a vision of beauty. Had
I the gift of the painter I would wait
until the Council window was free and
I would paint it and hang it in the
Museum, which is one of the only places
in Barbados where the things of beauty
can hope for much support. As for Miss
Nell Manning, may she get more foun-
tains to play and may barbarous hands
never be laid on her Cannon Ball Tree.

There is so little beauty left in Bridge-
town,

leaving the Legislative
Council can anyone tell me who was
Giacomo Ancono who painted Colonel
Henry Worsley, Governor of Barbados in
1722 ?

The painting was presented in 1921,
but when was it painted ?

lst woman:
waiting.

2nd woman: “Oh my !”

lst woman: We saw Betty at the Vie C.

2nd woman: How’s all the family ?

Ist woman: All pretty well.

2nd woman: June got her ring last
August. :

lst woman : Betty got her ring last fall.

2nd woman: Our two boys were two
years apart.

lst woman: We're back where we
started. Bill’s in Trinidad, Harold’s in
Montreal and Helen graduates in
Toronto this fall.

Ist man: Old Tom down in Ivanhoe

says he always likes to have a late one
coming on.
2nd woman:

Nothing so tiresome as

Guess we don’t think



SN a
"
a
————







SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1951





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with these!

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Guinness Stout
Worthington Ale
Canada Dry Ginger Ale

about growing old. We think they’re aiee tees PHONE

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Ist woman: Clarence didn’t like car — A GODDARDS

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(Curtain)








3,

SATURDAY,

MAY



1951



Glendairy Helped

The Salvation Army -

— ELEVEN CORPS IN 1



LA ND

THE SALVATION ARMY in Barbados, held its Tag Day

yesterday.
Tag Day

is held for the Self Denial

Fund which

assists the Salvation Army in running Hostels, Night Shel-
ters and Family Relief. The Army also caters for the youth
of the island through the Probation system and many young
offenders, after completing their punishment at the Gov-
ernment Industrial School, have listened to the advice of

the Probation Officer “to lead

In the year 1865, the Army was
founded in the East of London
by Willlam and Catherine Boolh
During the two World Wars_ it
rlaved a great part. Red Shield
Clubs were provided for weary
servicemen and hot teas and cakes
were served to soldiers on trains,
on their way to the battle front.

; By the time its Founder died
in 1912 the organisation had
already spread to fifty-nine

countries. To-day the organisa~
tion spreads over 97 countries.

Preferred Glendairy

The women of the Salvation
Army have equal status with men.
The highest rank that can be
reached is that of General and
is open to women.

The Salvation Army came to

Barbados in 1898. On April 30,
1898, the pioneer officers, Staff
Captain and Mrs. Widgery

arrived in the island. '

The first indoor meeting to be
held in the island took place at
Wilhelmina Hall but soon after
the pioneers were brought before
the Police Courts on a charge of
holding an open air meeting, to
the annoyance of the public

In June, 1898, a special demon-
stration meeting was held in the
Wilhelmina Hall and Mrs. (Staff
Captain) Widgery gave a lecture
of her prison’ experiences in
British Guiana. The object of this
meeting was to raise funds to
defend the action then brought
against the Staff Captain for
holding an open air meeting.
When the case came up for heav-
ing, the Staff Captain. was found
guilty and the Magistrate gave
him the option of paying a fine
or going to Glendairy prison. He
preferred Glendairy.

11 Corps

On his discharge from Glen-
dairy the Army advanced rapidly.
Barbaaians flocked to meetings
and many men became soldiers.
They marched through the
streets of Bridgetown preaching
the word ef God. Soon after
corps were opened at Speights-
town and other parts of the
island.

That was 53 years ago, but
to-day the Salvation Army has
spread throughout the island.
There are eleven corps at Bridge-
town Headquarters, Wellington
Street, Speightstown, Oistin, Dia-
mond Corner, Four Roads,’ Long
Bay, Pie Corner, Checker Hall,
Carlton and Sea View. Three
Societies are, at Black Rock, Road
View 2x4 the Whim,

The Home League is a branch
of the Salvation Army work in
the interest of women, especially
mothers. This League is instituted
in every branch in the island and
mothers, apart from _— gaining
Christian knowledge, are instruc-

ted on how to care for their
children and run the home. The
membership of these Home

Leagues has doubled within the
last seven years and at some
Leagues women are taught needle-
work and handicrafts. ,

At various times special rallies
are held and talks are given on
Child Welfare, Home Manage-
ment and other useful subjects.
Members of the Home League
also make garments for distribu-
tion to the poor of the island.

At the age of thirteen, young
Army people may enter the Corps
Cadet Brigade and take up a

@ on page 7

an upright life.”

The Mongoose
And The Rat

The mongoose was, brought to
Barbados to kill the rat, but soon
after its arrival ii became rriendly
with the rat and now ‘there is a
mutuality between them. They
are inseparable friends, “actually
living in the same hole”,

Barbados has a rat control ser-
vice which is carried on by the
Agriculture Society. They prépare
baits and sell them cheaply. The
bait is put out in the dry season
when the rats tend to congregate
in water courses, near wells and in
plantation yards. This year’ there
was no dry season and this made
it difficult to control rats.

Mr. R. W. Tucker, Entomologist
of the Department of Science and
Agriculture, told the Advocate
yesterday that there was no means
of taking a census of mongooses
in the island. One planter had
told him that more mongooses
were seen in the country this year
but this did not definitely mean
that-there was an increase of mon-
gooses in the island.

He said that at one time people
used to be paid a bonus for either
the head or tail of a mongoose but
this was stopped. The rumour
had got around that the mongoose
was being raised “artificially” and
the bonus claimed by people who
made a hobby of it,

“At that time the greatest num-
ber of heads and tails were sent in
by people from the parish of St.
Michael but that did not prove
anything because there may be
more poultry kept in the pre-
cincts of St. Michael than in any
other part ofthe island,

Facts About Mongooses

Research has shown that the
mongoose has an amazing resist-
ance to the usual predator control
poisons; a large and active rut
population can,live side by side
with the mongoose, without being
molested; the average mongoose
shows very little fear of man or
dog; fish, especially salmon, seems
to be the preferred bait of the
mongoose. *

Besides being a menace to poul-
try the mongoose has been known
to gnaw cane, as rats do. “We
know that the rat and the mon-
goose live ‘amicably. There is a
sort of armed neutrality between
them,” Mr. Tucker said.

+

Seven a Day

Mr. Gordon Wilson of the firm
of Messrs C. S. Pitcher & Co., Ltd.,
told the Advocate that he had set
traps and caught as many as seven
mongooses per day in the woods
at the back of his home at Bishops
Court Hill.

He said that the mongooses
come down from the hills and
steal the chickens. In one day
they took as many as eight
chickens.

“The mongoose is so brazen that
it even steals chickens in the day,”
Mr. Wilson said.

Wounded

Eileen Clarke, a labourer of
Mahogany Lane, St. Michael, was
treated and discharged at the
General Hospital last night about
D o'clock for a wound on her
mouth.



Busta Will Get

Civic Welcome

Hon. W. A. Bustamante,

due to arrive in Barbados on Sunday mornin
via Trinidad at 8.20 to attend the Twelfth

Caribbean Commission.

He will be welcomed at Seawell
by a Reception Committee com—
prised of Mr. W, A.. Crawford,
M.C.P., Chairman, Mr. C. A.
Braithwaite, J.P., Mr. J. E, T.
Brancker, M.C.P., Mr.» D. D.
Garner, M.C.P., Mr. O. T. All-
der, M.C.P., Mr. F, MeD. Sym-
monds, Churehwarden of St. Mi-
chael, Mr. J. A. Martimeau, Dr.
J. LeV, Wilson, Mr. D. F. Black-
ett and Mr. L. B. Brathwaite.

From Seawell he will be con-
ducted to the Marine Hotel by a
procession of cars.

Mr. Crawford told the Advocate
yesterday that the Committee is
extending an invitation to the peo-
ple from all over the colony to be
present at Seawell to welcome the
militant Jamaican and B.W.I.
peoples’ leader. d

Within the past 15 years, he said
that Mr. Bustamante had estab-
lished a reputation as being one of
the outstanding champions in the
entire British Colonial Empire of
the cause of the hitherto inarticu-
late masses, “His position in the
history of Jamaica and, for that
matter, the British West Indies is
assured, and there is no living
Jamaican who could have accom.
plished for the people of Jamaica
at the time when he did, the social
and economic revolution which
has taken place in that colony.”

Appreciation

The Reception Committee is
convinced that both on his arrival
and throughout his stay in the is-
land, the people of Barbados will
demonstrate their appreciation of
his great services to the cause cf
West Indian progress.

A full programme of extra-con-
ference activities is being arranged
for him during his stay here. The

Churchwarden and members of
the St. Michael’s Vestry have
kindly agreed to tender him a

civic reception at Queen’s Park on
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock.

Prime Minister of Jamaica is
by BW.LA.
eeting of the

w



Hon, W. A. BUSTAMANTE

Various private functions are also
being arranged in his honour.

Mr.- Bustamante who will be
taken’ on “an ded tour of the
island, has consented to address a
public meeting to. be held under
the auspices of the Reception Com-
mittee at Queen’s Park during the

week. .

Mr. Crawford said that this was
an opportunity for the people of
Barbados to pay fitting tribute to
a distinguished son of the West
Indies. All over the world, people
‘paid due homage to merit and
Barbadians were by no means in-
appropriate. “Let us all be pre-
sent at Seawell to-morrow morn.
ing to give the Hon. W. A. Busta-
mante a right royal welcome to
our country”, he said.

Mr. Symmonds said that the re-
ception was being run strictly on
non-partisan lines.

ter eaten ocean ne





Regional Economic
Committee For W.I.

A Regional Economic Commit-
tee is to be set up for the British
West ‘Indies, British Guiana and
British Honduras. It, will consist
of the Economic Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare in the West Indies, who
will be Chairman, and a Member
appointed’ by each participating
Government. Eath Government
will, however, be free to send with
its members to meetings of the
Committee ate its own expense,
such advisers as it thinks fit.

The headquarters of the Com-
mittce will be the office cf the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare. Its functions will be as
follows:

(a) to act as an advisory and
consultative bedy to the
participating Governments
in economic matters of re-
gional significance; .
to provide for the exchange
of information on economic
matters between the par-
ticipating Governments;
to advise on all matters re-
lating to the British Carib-
bean Trade Commissioner
Service;
to prepare the annual es-
timates of the Committee’s
expenditure and _ submit
them to the Comptroller for
approval on behalf of the
participating Governments;
to report annually through
the Comptroller to the par-
ticipating Governments;

(f) to undertake such other
economic functions as may
be assigned to it.

The first meeting of the pro-
posed Committee is to be held in
Barbados beginning on the 16th of
May. Among the subjects set down
for discussion are the Trade Com-
missioner Service in Canada and
the proposed Trade Commissioner
Service in the United Kingdom,
the Customs Union Report, ex-
ternal trade matters and regional
economic matters,

His Excellency the Governor
has appointed Mr. Grantley Adams
Member of the proposed Regional
Economic Committee to represent
Barbados, The Honourable H. A.
Cuke, C.B.E., M.L.C., the Hon-
ourable K, R. Hunte, M.IL.C.,
Mr. D. G. Leacock, Jr., the Hon-
ourable Sir John Saint, Kt,
M.L.C. and Captain G. J. Brynn,
M.C., have been appointed ax
Advisers.

*

£3 For Speeding

A City Police Magistrate yes.
terday fined St. Clair Blenman
of Britton’s Hill, St. Michael £3
for speeding while driving the
motor van M-1617. The fine is
to be paid by monthly instal.
ments or in default two months’
imprisonment with hard. labour.

Police Constable Jones said
that on February 20 he was
checking the speeds of vehicles
on Bush Hall Road and made a
check on the motor van M-~1617
and found that it was driven at
over 41 miles per hour and the
speed limit on that road for that
type of vehicle is 20 miles per
hour.

Putting up a defence Blenman
said that his speedometer wag not
working properly and he could not
say at what speed the van was
travelling,

(b)

(c)

(e)





Asst. Labour Commissioner
Due Next Tuesday

Information has just been re-
ceived that Mr. R, N. Jack who
has been selected by the Secretary
of State for the Colonies fer ap-
pointment to the post of Assistant
Labour Commissioner, Barbados,
will be arriving in this Colony on
Tuesday, 8th May.

Robert Nicholas Jack. who was
born in 1905, was educated at the
St. Vincent Grammar _ Schoo).
After serving as a clerk in various
departments he was appointed
Labour Commissioner, St. Vincent
in 1941. Three years later he was
attached for a short period to the
Labour Department in Jamaica
and during the same year was sent
on a special. mission to Aruba and
Curacao, N.W.I, In 1945 he
served as Rehabilitation Officer by
demobilised war personnel and in
the following year acted as Census
Off cer,



Inquest Today
An inquest into the circum-

stances surrounding the death of
i9-year-old Reynald Brewster, a
lebourer of Halls Road, St.
Michael, will be held to-day at
District “B” Court, St. George.
The Coroner will be Mr. C. W.
Rudder,

Reynald Brewster was killed on
the spot on April 27, when the
lorry G-253 rolled over him while
he was working at Francia Plah-
tation, St. George about 3:30
o'clock in the afternoon.

The lorry is owned by Fitz
Douglas of Dash Valley who was
the driver at the time of the
occurrence,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



TRUMAN DEMONSTRATORS

York, in resentment against

| —Express.





Pah $5

MEMBERS of the American Trish Minute Men of 1949 when they
picketed the British Consulate in the BE

mpire State Building, New

alleged British influence in the dis-
missal of General MacArthur from his commands in Korea and Asia,

Hand-made Products

Hard To Sell In U.S.A.

Says Thompson

Mr. J. Kenneth Thor
British Embassy in Wa
Section of the Caribbe

tor hand-made vroducts.

100 Years Ago

“WEST INDIAN”
May ‘5th, 1851

A novel action was
tried in the Common
Pleas to-day, before Sir
Bowcher Clarke and a
special jury. It Was an
action for breach of
promise of marriage,
brought by Mr. Crispen
Field against Mr, E. P.
Newton, Thé_ simple
issue of promise of mar-
riage by the defendant
to Miss E. Field, eldest
daughter of the plaintiff,
and breach of that
promise, was clearly
proved, and the Jury

(a highly respectable
Jury), after a few mo-
ments’ deliberation

found for the plaintiff,
with damages of £500
sterling. The Court was
crowded with ladies and
gentlemen,



Case of Threats
eo ie meee
Dismissed

A case brought by’ Merton
‘Sealy in which he charged Mi-
chael Ramedin of White Park of
making threats to him wag dis-
missed without prejudice yester-
day by a District “A” Police Mag-
istrate.

Mr. W. W. Reece K.C. ap-
peared on behalf of Ramedin.
Sealy alleged that he went into
Ramedin’s place of business to
discuss a question about his wages
which were owed to hjm. While
there they got into an argument
and Ramedin said, “If you don’t
leave my place, I will blow your
brains out.”

Sealy called two witnesses to
corroborate his evidence, but, each
of them gave a different account
of what happened between
Ramedin and Sealy.

SOLD DOLPHIN
AT 30 CENTS A LB.

Justices G. L. “Taylor and
J. W. B, Chenery fined Edith
Millar a hawker of Dalkeith, St
Michael, £5 for selling dolphin at
30 cents per pound on March 21
in the Assistant Court of Appesi
yesterday. The fine is to be
paid by instalments or in default
two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour.

By doing this Their Honours
varied the decision of Mr. C, L
Walwyn, Police Magistrate of
District “A”, who had imposed a
fine of 30/- on Millar The
scheduled price of dolphin is 26
cents per pound retail

Eustace Gill, Price Contre!
Inspector told the court yeste:
day that on March 21 he saw the
defendant at the junciion of
Roebuck and Swan Streets wiih
a tray of dolphin. She was not
there very long when a man went

up to her and paid $1.05 for
three and a half pounds of
dolphin. He (Gill) went up to

her and asked her what a pound
she sold the fish at. She told
him 30 cents per pound



DIED SUDDENLY

Leroy Jones, five months’ old
son of Eudora Jones of Station
Hill, St, Michael died. suddenly at
the General Hospital yesterday
after he was admitted and de-
tained on April l: _ :

A post mortem examination was
performed at the General Hospital
Mortuary by Dr. E. L. Ward. An
inquiry has not been fixed

SSR ZEST UeREa eS
“PURINA” .

SCHICK STARTENA

see

tl JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pisteibutors
SERRE STT eee eees

mpson, Colonial Attache at the
shington and a member of the British
2an Commission,
yesterday that there is a big

told the Advocate
demand in the United States

Mr. Thompson arrived here on
Thursday by B.W.I.A from
Antigua to attend the Twelfth
Meeting of the Caribbean Com-
mission which opens in the Legis
lative Council on Monday morning.
He is staying with Sir George and
Lady Seel at Bemersyde, Christ
Church

He said that hand-made _pro-
ducts are difficult to market in the
U.S.A. and one has to be an
expert to understand the market
to be able to sell these goods

He had advised that Mr. and
Mrs, Fred Leighton be invited to
tour the West Indies to advise the
producers of handicrafts on the
type of goods to be produced,’
which will find a:sale in the U.S.A,

Mr. Leighton he said, is the best
expert in the U.S.A on the
marketing of handicrafts and his
wife is a well-known artist who
specialises in the design of handi-
crafts,

Caribbean Tour

Mr. and Mrs, Leighton’s Carib-

bean tour is being paid for by the

West Indian Governments with
assistance from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare, They have
already spent three weeks in
Jamaiea, four days in Trinidad
and are due to arrive here to-day
for about three or four days before
going. on to St, Vincent and
Dominica.

Mr. Thompson said that recruit
ing this year for contract agricul
tural labour in the U.S.A. has jusi
begun and the total number re-
quired is about 12,000 labourers
trom the British West Indies ‘and
the Bahamas,

“Employers of West Indian
labour in the U.S.A. speak very
highly indeed of the West Indians
and want to go on employing
them,” Mr. Thompson said, and
added that they are having a
Regional Labour Board in the
West Indies to allocate the
labourers to the various islands,



Big Sugar Export

THIRTY-FIGHT thousand,
seven hundred and twenty-three
tons of sugar have been shipped
from the island during January
to April this year. Of that amount
20,478 tons were shipped in April,

Two million, three hundred and
eighty-eight thousand, five hun-
dred and thirty-two and a half
gallons of molasses were shipped
over the same period. Last year
up to April, 1,940,395! gallons of
molasses were shippea.

Six hundred and twenty-eivht
thousand, five hundred and sixteen
gallons of fancy molasses and
19,145 gellons of choice molasses
went to Canada, Four hundred and
forty thousand, two hundred and
forty-eight gallons of vacuum pan
molasses were shipped to the Uni-
ted Kingdom.

Fifteen thousand, nine hundred
and seventy-five galions of fancy
molasses were exported to Ameri-
ca,

By the middle of last month
2,000,000 gallons of molasses were
produced.

LETTERS OF
ADMINISTRATION

His Honour the Chief Judge,
Sir Allan Collymore, yesterday
granted the petition of Etheline
Ernesta Cumberbatch for letters
of administration to the estate of
her husband Clifton A. Cumber-
batch, late of Carlton, St. James.

Mr. G. W. Farmer instructed
by Yearwood and Boyce, Solicitors

peared for Cumberbatch.

The following wills were

itted to probate:—

Henty © Bourne,

ad-
St

James,
G







th Crawford, St. Michael
George Nathaniel Williams, St
Michael, Agnes Nelson, St. Mi-
chrel, Joseph Douglin, St. James,
Agustus Watson,-St. Peter, Theres,

Jane Collymore, St. Joseph,
George Francis Cummins, St.
Thomas, Edward McLean, Christ

Church

iham, Loutse Best, St. Michael,|

ae |

Canada-Cuba |
Sugar Deal

LONDON, May 4

Despite the assurance of Com-
monwealth Relations Minister
Mi Patrick Gordon-Walker io
the Commons rday that n
agreement has been reached yer }
with Cuba, fears of Opposition |
members and others concerned in
Empire trade, have not by any
means been set at rest.

Conservative M.Ps who closely
questioned the Minister yesterday
in relation to the matter of prior
consultation with Commonwealth
producer countries, are likely to |
seize the earliest opportunity to
seek information on other aspects
of the Cuban “black deal’ as it
has been termed.

The main section of to-day's
issue cf the monthly bulletin of
‘he Empire Industries’ Association
lushes out at what it deseribes a
“the Spectacle of the British Gov-
ernment using Cuba es a pressure
point brought to bear upon Com-
monwealth producers.” It is not a
spectacle likely to commend itselt
te the British consumer, says the
euthor of the article

veste





NG

Both reported deals in Cuban
sugar and Cuban tebacco, the
writer continues, would injure

Jamaica particularly “and the end
of 1952 must present itself to the
West Indies as being the start of a
new cra when they are ts be forced
into direct competition with a
country which, has external ad-
vantage quite apart from those
presented by the proposed agree-
ment.”
Lever

Stressing that Cuba is
responsibility of Great
while the Commonwealth
writer continues:
to the conclusion that the U.K
Government’s purpose of retain-
ing this foreign element is that it
may be used as a lever in the mat-
ter of price bargaining, knowing
full’ well that when Cuba has
accomplished her annual deal with
the United States she is well in
the pocket and can afford to take
a lower price than she’ would
normally require

The U.K. Government is very
fond of referring to the ‘world
price’ which is in fact the price at
which Cuba can unload her sur-
plus supplies after having sold
the great proportion of her crop
at supported prices in the United
States”,

Cuba’s price it is argued, is ir
fact a depressed price in so far
as other countries are concerned

The proposal is mooted in thi:
bulletin’s article, that if as re-
ported, Canada is to take 67,00¢
tons of sugar annually from Cubs
a corresponding addition shoulc
“in all fairness’ be made to the
U.K., intake of Commonwealth
sugar.

Second Thoughts

Is the United Kingdom Govern:
ment having second thcughts about
Commonwealth sugar agreements?
Sugar industry representatives |
have been called to a meeting
with Food Ministry officials on
Tuesday. It is not a routine meet- |
ing, I learn,

An informed source suggests it
is a result of concern expressed
from all quarters of the Common-
Wealth since the leakage of news
cf the reported Cuba deal.

Whatever are the official inten-
tions at Tuesday’s meeting it is
certain that strong efforts will be
made to secure more definite in-
formation on Cuba business thar.
has yet been revealed in an answer
to Commons questions

“Nobody is satisfied with the |
Commonwealth Relations Minis-
ter’s statement yesterday that no
agreements have been reached,” a

@ on page 7 |
\
{

“Fort Amherst” Unloads

The SS. Fort Amherst finished

not the
Britain
the
“One is driven

1s,





unloading here yesterday, her
cargo from New York, New
foundland and Trinidad, It in

cluded 1,000 bags of wheat flour,
500 bags of cornmeal and 670 casks
of salted fish. The flour and corn
meal came to Messrs. Genera)
"raders Ltd, while the salted fish
‘as consigned to Messrs, Monroe!
& Co,, Ltd,

The “Amherst



elso brought a
small supply of oranges from
Trinidad, She left port yesterday ;
evening for St. Vincent, Her loca}
ogents are Messrs. Da Costa & Co.,,

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pressure in head, dizziness,
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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1951
neh enne aE TT iit a
HENRY







== rae

1 Dreadful, Choking, Spasms or _—«| Rheumatism
= | and Backache

| BRONCHIAL | Gonein1Week

Flush Kidneys With Cystex and You'll

| Feel Fine {
EASED IN Cystex—the prescription of a famous
oa oe = pees ae oe % faulty
} ney action in double quick time, so,
\ A FLASH if you suffer from Rheumatism, Selati-

ca, Neuritis, Lumbago, Backache, Ner-

vousness, Leg Pains, Dizziness, Circles

under Eyes, frequent Headaches and

WHY Colds, Poor Energy and Appetite, Puffy
F SLEEPLESS Ankles, Burning, Smarting Passages,

or have frequently to Get up Nights,

go to your chemist today for Cystex

NIGHTS When one dose of the amazing Mixture will and be fit and well next week.
Cystex Helps Nature 3 Ways
. s The Cystex treatment is highly scien-
ease that choking, smothering spasm in seconds! Buckley's tific, being specially compounded to
5 soothe, tone and clean raw, sore, sick
Mixt ag ae we and to remove
‘ : : acids an 80) ‘om yo system
ure is no ordinary medicine—its different from any | safely, quickly and intty, pot eoutaine
wt ve eee ee te oun
works in ese ways to en

Cough Remed — Tri | bag he ah

ug y you have ever tasted. Triple Strength—No | (1) Starts killing the germs which are
attacking your Kidneys, Bladder
and urinary system in two hours,
yet is absolutely harmless to human

tissue.

(2) Gets rid of health destroying,
deadly poisonous acids with which
your system hos heceme saturated.

(3) Strengthens and retnyigorates the
kidneys, protects you from the rav-
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eate filter organism, and stimulates
entire systern.

9 Weeks in Hospital—
Now Welt






















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»LIET THE HOCKS AND FETLOCKS...



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made from rare Canadian Pine Balsam, and }
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and relief right away.

*BUCKLEY’S

MIXTURE

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arms and spent nine weeks in a hospital.
They said I would not be able to work, but
after Cystex I feel years younger, well and
strong.” (Sgd.) J. A. FP. . |
Health Improved in 2 Days
“T had not felt really well for ages and suf-

|
|
| fered continually from backaches and head-

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GAWRSH.-- AND 1 NEVER TRAVELED IN]
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aches, I had tried almost everything but I
could not get lasting relief. Finally I decided
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it long ago and saved myself much pain and

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OH! OH! THERE GOES
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FAVORITE VASES //

. i
a 7 sks
me SSD o* 95

RIP. KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND

. WE'RE A FEW ve THEN WE JUéT STAY \ p ; aa i wow/ QT
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H co Ss! ud , t\ %

WON'T GO IN TILL YOU FOR TI SHE’
HE'D OUT JUMP
rane ME THE ae { A JACK RABBIT!

a 7
x mm

YOU LUMMOX -=-

YOU'VE BROKEN

ONE OF THE TWO

eee VASES I
N

1h

f








WE'RE EVEN NOW-
MAGGIE -YOU DID

A GOOD JOB ON
TH! OTHER ONE .!





The car that
expresses you!

t

{

|
Tf it is true that a man expresses himself in
the clothes he wears, how much more
evident is the taste he exhibits in the car
he drives. The Wolseley ‘ Four-fifty”
is for the man who demands the highest

!

}











SS





C/V L)

i=
=

a








=
=——_






i



am 4
ee
hn, JB



mechanical achievements of the auto-
mobile age, expressed in coachwork of
superbcomfort, with the restrained exterior
styling that stamps his good judgment.



Luxuriousty Roomy Interior. Five sit comfortably
on genuine hide seats, cushioned in soft, resilient
foam rubber, Car heater and windscreen demister
fitted standard.

Oversize Luggage Accommodation. Over 10 cubic

7 a wt
= a

“Tt feels as if there's always some- ‘‘His sightis fine!” say t
thin Bi may Sree, \iee Fone. Mother frambts iadanimetion cued tr
: “Oh! Is his sight alright?’ glare and dust. I advise Optrex.

feet for suitcases, golf equipment, etc, Separate
compartment for spare wheel saves disturbing
luggage.

Adjustable Front Seats and Telescopic Steering
Column —because Wolseley designers recognise

worr

that all drivers are nor the same height. Tall or
@on, you drive in absolute fatigue-free comfort
with perfect control,

OKAY...
HERE'S YOUR
DARN KEy!



So, every day John bathes his eyes “Well!” says Mothey some days later,
with Optrex, washing away all dirt “I'm glad we learned about Optrex—

tAND GETTING BETWEEN and getms, soothing tiny eye veins. you're a real “bright-eyes’ now John!"

“4 | HER AND THE SPEEDBOAT,
CATCHES /T BROADS/DEL

PROTECT YOUR EYES wth

Optrex

EYE LOTION

N ON DIANA, THE
PHANTOM ROWS WITH

WOLSELEY

a4cae of CHARACTER







MAKE THIS TE
The rim of the eye and



FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 23285 Sole Distributors Phone 4504





acket a& ser
Gesigned eyebath


5,

SATURDAY, MAY

CLASSIFIED ADS.

1



(etiiainsmrsrnesitiiarsintaiiniiaeta

The charge for
Births, Marriages,

announcements of
Deaths, Acknow-

951



. FOR SALE

ledaments, and In Memoriam notices 1s

$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, end
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each

additional word
For Births,

Notices only after 4 p.m.

DIED







ALLEYNE—On the 4th May 1951, at her
Michael;
the}
Her
above residence at
Mary's

Folly, St.
(ate Janitor
Society).

residence Lakes
Naomi Sylvia
Cheapside Friendly
funeral leaves the
42 pm. to-day
Church

Ione Howell

Howell (sister).

of

for Saint

(daughter),

SREWSTER—On May
residence, ‘“‘Dunlow”
St. Michael,

4th. 1951,
Henity*s

J

at 4.320 p.m. to-day for
Ccmetery
Vi Spencer,

Foster,

Lela Foster, H. P





BELLAMY—In
dear mother Kathleen
died May 5th, 194)

Deep in our hearts lies a picture
More precious than silvcr or gold
It’s that «f our darling mother
Whose memories will never grow old.
Looking back with tenderness
Along the path we've trod

Bellamy who





We bless the years we had ber
And leave the rest with God.
Florence, Beryl, Annie, Herbert Pearl,
Deanie and Gwen (Children), eleven

grend and one great-grand.
5.5.51—In
GILKES—In loving memory of our be-
loved mother Delcina Gilkes, who
departed this life on May 5th, 1950.
“Absent but not forgotten.”
Lewis, Enid, Ina (Children), Gray,
Tony (grand children). 5.5.51—In

“GOVERNMENT NOTICES:

DEATH OF MR. EDWARD





JAMES
Information has been received
to the effect that Mr. Edward
James, a seaman and a native of
FParbados, died at the Sefton
General Hospital, Liverpool,
England, on the 26th = of

December, 1950.
§.5.51—1n



POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE

OPENING OF THE TWELFTH
MEETING OF THE CARIBBEAN
COMMISSION



made under Sec-

Regulaticns
of the Police Act,

tion 36 (2)
1968—2.

1. On the 7th May, 1951, no
vehicle shall be allowed to enter
the Public Buildings Yard be-
tween 10.06 a.m, and 11.30 a.m.
Drivers of vehicles con-
veying persons to the Ceremony
shall enter the Public Buildings
yard by the South Gate in single
line and after having set dowa
the occupants shall immediately
leeve by the North Gate and
park as directed by the Police.

3. Alftér the Ceremofiy’ drivers
of vehicles returning for their
occupants shall enter the Public
Buildings Yard, by the North
Gate and leave by the South
Gate.

4.
be
Public
the hours
a.m.



No vehicle shail park in or
allowed to remain on the
Buildings Yard between
of 9 am.. and 11.30

R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown,
2nd May, 1951.
5,.5.51—2n



Removal of the Labour Welfare
(Housing Loans) Organisation
and the Peasants’ Loan Bank

The offices of the Labour Wel-
fare (Housing Loans) Organisa-
tion and the Peasants’ Loan Bank
will be removed to Pinfold
House, Pinfold Street, City, as

from the 7th May, 1951.
: 5.5°51—2n



{pooospeqacannnrenre et
West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Hand blocked Beach-

Potiery,

wecr, Decoration House, S:

James. Tel. 91-74.

i 14,4.51—1m.
965969 SOS SOOOOUSSSSES SSO



ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANIS “tr







FOR LONGER SERVICE

T AR all posts before erecting,
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative



material still available
at your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price ...s-0sks 40c, per gallon,

Get Some To-day.



Furnish in May
The Money-Saving Way

STREAMLINED Vanities and
sinypler Dressing Tables with 1 to
7 drawers, in Pedestal, Bow front
and other shapes Bedsteads,
Beds, Cradles—Wardrobes, Chests-
of-Drawers,




DINING, Kitchen,. Fancy and
Sewing Tables, in some 50 sizes,
shapes and finishes, China, Kiteh-
en and Bedroom Cabinets, Bed-
side Tables, Sideboards.

DRAWING ROOM Furniture in
Morris, Bergere, Tub, Rush—
Berbice and Easy-chairs $3.50 to
$36.

DESKS with Flat and Sloping
tops, Bookeases, Bookracks, Office
duty Chairs.

L. §. WILSON

SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069





Marriage or Engagement
amnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
Scditional word. Terms cash. Fone 2508
between 8.30 anc 4 p.m., 3113 for Death

Hilda
5.5.51—I1n.

at her
Lane,
Olivia Theodora Brewster.
Her funeral leaves the above residence
the Westbury

5.5.51--In.



loving memory of our

Minimum charge week 17 cents and
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
junders







AUTOMOTIVE
CAR—Morris 8 — good second hand
buy. Apply T. G. McKinstry. Dial 3554
3.5.51—3n





CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-



CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer
refused. Apply to W. M. Watson C/o
R. & G. Challenor, Speightstown. Phone
91—01. 1.5.51—6n

CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
tyres, in good working condition, price
reasonable. Apply F, D. L. Gay, Staple
Grove, Christ Church. Dial 3207.

1.5.51—t.f.n.







CAR; One Standard 0 hp.
raechanical order. New Exide
Battery. Phone 2880—between
and 3 p.m.

CAR—Hillman Car M—1799 in good
working order. Apply Frank Proverbs
C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd., High

Sound
12 ~«V«~
10) sim.
5.5.51—2n







Street. 5.5.51—Sn

CAR—1937/38 Vauxhall 14-6. Can be
seen at Courtesy Garage. Phone 4616
or G. L, Challenor 4626, §,5.51—3n





{ WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
) Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

"



ELECTRICAL

MULLARD 11-TUBE RADIO tilting
dial, 1 Electric phonograph with ampli-
fier all in working order. G. C. Lewis,
Arthur Seat, St. Thomas. 2.5.51—3n

REFRIGERATORS
Retrigerators, Coolerators, Ice Boxes,
Owen T. Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial
3299. §.5.51—1n





Westinghouse



FURNITURE

~FURNITURE- One (1) extension Table
(Pine) to seat 12. Price $40.00. Phone
4117 8—11 a.m. 4—6 p.m. §.5.51—3n

FURNITURE—One (1) Dining Table
$30.00. May be seen at Newsam & Co.,
Lower Broad St. Ironing Board $5.00.
McBeth Beaumont, Hastings. Dial 5001.

4.5.51—2n





























LIVESTOCK

COW—One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve
in three weeks. Gave 36 pints with third
ealf. C. Branch, near Paynes Road,
Jackmans, St. Michael.













3.5.51—3n.

GOAT—1 Alpine Goat (for sale)

Fresh in milk, Apply to C. Herbert,

55 Tudor Street, City. 55.512
MECHANIC!







BICYCLE—One (1) Green Silver King
Hercules, complete with light. Tyres
good. Phone 2582. 54.51—2n,

SEWING MACHINES—Hand, treadle
and Electrically driven. Owen T.Allder,
Roebuck Street, Dial 3299. 5.5.51—In

TYPEWRITERS -— Shipment of new
model “Olympia" Portable Typewriters
just received—see these superb machines













before committing yourself. A. G.
St. Hill. Dial 3199. 29.4.51—e.0.d.
MISCELLANEOUS



ACTUMUS — The Root Hormone Fer-

tilizer, from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store. 3.5.51—5n,

ACTUMUS — The Key to Growing
Power — from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store. 3.5.51—5n.

ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests —
from H, Keith Archer's Drug Store.

ACTUMUS — is economical — 1 ewt.
is equal to 56 tons of Farm Yard
Manure. From H, Keith Archer's Drug
Store. 3.5.51—5n.

ACTUMUS The Fertilizer of the
Future—increases the earthworm popula-



tion of soils. From H. Keith Archer's
Drug Store. 3.5.51—5n.

ACTUMUS - Produced by Dr. S,
Marian, D.Se.. Englard, eliminates
disease at the roots of plants. From H.
Keith Archer's Drug Store 3.5.51—5n,

LIQUOR LICENSE — One Liquor

License and stock, Apply Mrs, G, Stan-
ton Hall's Road, St. Michael.
3.5.51—2n



For the treatment of disordes of the
Kidneys and Bladder try Rexall Kidney
and Bladder Pills. Price 1/6 bot. Obtain-
able at KNIGHT'S LTD. 3.5.51—in

—

GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality
new sheets. Cheapest in the Island !
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;





10 ft $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry!
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. i

4.5.51—t.f.n.

es,

IRON DOUBLE BED & MATTRESS as

new $40.00. Dial 5001 McBeth, Beau-

mont, Hastings. §.51—2n



LIFE SAVERS—Fresh stock of delic-
ious Life Savers. Lime, Orange, Lemon,
Wild Cherny, Pep-6-Mint and. Five
Flavours. Price 9 cents per Roll, BRUCE
VEATHERHEAD LTD. 8.2 “3n

POWDERED MILK-—One of the best;
that's Holland's “Frisian Girl” Powdered
Milk. Tops in butter fat content. Con-
‘ains vitamin D3 so essential, for the
promotion of healthy life. Get it for
the family, the children. will look alive
fter a trial of this famous milk. Ask for
it by name. 3.5.51—3n

——$—$——$—$—$—$—S

SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.
A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00
oer 98 lb, bag. Dial 2628;







Save your clothes from Moths by
hanging “Olev’ Moth Killer in your
Wardrobe. It is 500 times more effective
than Moth Balls. KNIGHT'S LTD.

3.5.51—3n.



We have in stock Rexall Cod Liver
Oil Emulsion. an easily digested angi
palatable preparation containing 50% by
e of Vitamin Tested Cod Liver
KNIGHT'S LTD, 3,5.51—3n

volum
Oil.

TAKE NOTICE
ee ner 08 ts oes











That HUNTFER-WIL’-9N DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland.
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distiliers, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entith
to register the same after one mon!



96 centc Sundays 24 words — over 24;



the same, NOTICE is hereby



PUBLIC NOTICES

minimum charge $1.50 on week
and $1.89 on Sundays.



Dancing Classes

Pupils of The Barbados School
Dancing are notified that classes
next term will commence on Friday the
4th and Saturday the 5th of May.

+ 3.5.5!—3n

Public Official Unreserved
Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
(1904-0) § Say

On Tuesday the 15th day of May 1951,
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon
will be sold at my office to the highest



bidder all that certain piece of Land con-
5,907 square

taining by admtasurement
feet situate in Parish or City of Saint
Michael butting and bounding on two
sides on lands of Barbados Co-operative
Bank Limited, on lands of Clement
Warner over a road fourteen feet wide
and on the said road ealied Villa Road
at Britton Hill, together with the Chattei
dwelling-house thereon and all appur-
tenances. Attached from Walter Evans
Phillips for and towards satisfaction, &c.,
and if not sold on such day, said sale
will be kept open and a subsequent day
will be fixed for said sale.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase.

T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.
Frovost Marshal's Office.
28.4.51—3n.

PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

On Tuesday the 8th day of May 1951
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after-
moon will be sold at my office to the
highest bidder for any sura not under
the appraised value, AU that certain
piece of Land containing by estimation
2 roods situate in the Parish of St
Michael butting and bounding on lands
of S. Thompson, on lands of C. Quin-
tyne, on lands of Friendship Plantation
and on lands of Florenc@,W. Prescod,

c
near St. Matthew's Chur praised as
follows: The whole area of land/apprais-



ed to Five Hundred and Sixty-eight
dollars 4$568.00). Attached from said
Florence W. Prescod for and towards

satisfaction, &c
N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase.
W. R. DOUGLAS,
Provost Marshal (Acting),
Provost Marshal's Office
19th day of April 1951.
20.4,51—3n-



NOTICE
THE BARBADOS
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY
LOST POLICY
EUSTACE BEN ANTHONY FARMER
having made sworn deposition that
Policy No, 21,237 on his life has been
Jost, and having made application to
the Directors to grant a duplicate of
given that
unless any objection is raised within one
month of the date hereof the- duplicate
Policy asked for will be issued.
By Order,
c. K

MUTUAL

BROWNE,
Secretary

21.4,.51—4n



PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, MLRIAN
ALEXANDRIA ROUSE (nee PHILLIPS:
as I do not hold mystlf responsible for
her or anyone else cortracting.any debt





or debts in my name unless by a writtea

order signed by me.
CLARENCE ROUSE,
Paynes Bay,
St. James.

4.5.51—2n

The public are hereby warned against

giving credit to my wife EDITI{

DGE GERTRUDE BLACKMAN

any debt contracted in my name unless

by a written order signed by me,

CECIL W. BLACKMAN,
“Walrondville’,

Bonnets, Clapham,
St, Michael.
§.5.51-—3n



TAKE NOTICE



That HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland,
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distillers, has applied for the régistra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of

Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3rd day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.
Dated this 30th day of April,_1951.

H, -
Registrar of irks.





LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STAR

Neediest Cases Fund

ANNOUNCEMENT

Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June at
Queen’s Park, the undersigned will
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume Bands
(b) Steel Bands.

(ce) Advertising Bands.
(ad) Historical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival, the Steering Committee
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being as original as possible.

No entrance fee will be charged

More particulars late)

A Carnival Band of thirty will
be visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade.

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk's Office,

Bridgetown,
For Booths, Stalls, and side-
Shows. contact C. . MORRIS,

from the 3rd day of May, 1951, unless | Sobers Lane.

wome person shall in the meantime give

notice in duplicite to me at my office of

opposition of such registration. The

trade mark cai) be seen on application

at_my office,
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
3,5,51—3n





SY,
Wanted For Cash

Used and Unused POSTAGE
STAMPS of the British West
Indies. Good Prices Paid at the

CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
No. 10, Swan Street.



t



{



COPS OOOE OOPS OPPO S

NOTICE

This serves to inform the
general public that my wife
Leotta Waithe (nee Reid)
formerly of Paynes Bay, St.
James, has deserted re since
1941 and I have not heard of





her whereabouts It is my ¥)
intention to re-marry in the $
near future %
% BERESFORD WAITHE, x
o Paynes Bay, x
x St. James. %
x °
POCO OFF OOO OCOOOOOOOOO>



Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,

|
=
|
|

ef
for;

BARBADOS
PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-cay:
end 12 tents per a me on Sundays
minimum cnarge i on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays

REAL ESTATE
LAND—Approximat ly 3,000 square fect

of land at Strgem Road, Christ Churct
adjoining the Public Road, Ap)

R .C, Chapman C/o Messrs. Carrington
& Sealy. 27.4.51-—5n
——_—

LAND--Only a few spots remaining at
Worthing View so be sure to select
Yours before all go The spots range
from 6,000 to 12,000 sq. ft. and the

prices range from $1,000.00 to $2,000.00

per spet. For particulars see D'Arcy

A. Seott, Magazine Lane, Dial 3743.
2.5.51—3n

“SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: situated

et Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 10,978
eq. {t land, and 1,982 sq; ft. road. Dial
2206 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5.51—t.£.n
—————_—

That desirable two storied freehold
dwellinghouse known as “Culloden
View”, situate at the junction of Cul-
loden and Dalkeith Roads, with the
lend thereto containing 10,585 square
fcet. The house contains drawing and
dining rooms, library, kitchen, bath and

{tuilet downstairs and upstairs, four
| bedrooms (tone with bath and toilet)
}| Two servants rooms, garage for 1 gar

end tool room (all built of stone), in the
yard
The date
later,
Inspection between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m
any day except Sundays on appoift-
ment with the owner Mr, St, Clair Hunte.



of sale will be published

(Phone 3229).
G. L. W. CLARKE & CO.,
Solicitors.
26.4.51—6n

—_—. dia tees toeeminniniitenntacitie ete taaeie
PREMISES—No. 6 Swan Street, Up-
stairs premises, very spacious and cool





ADVOCATE
WANTES®?

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
% cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word Sundays.





HELP

“Due to the opening of a new branch,
we require the following staff on or
befure June Ist, 1951:—

STENO-TY PIST—experienced com-

mencing salary $100.00 per month.

TYPIST—also with eclcrical experience

—+ commencing salary $75.00 per

month.

INVOICING ASST.-aceurate at fig-
ures preferably with previous
experience on invoicing com-
mencing salary $9.00 per month

Written application stating age and

previous experience to be sent to Sec-
retary, Dowding Estates and Trading
Company, Ltd., Bay Street.

2.5,51—6n.

———

Man with general all round experi-
ence needs position with well
established firm, Will interest you to
comr#»;uinicate Write H Ww Clo
Advocate Advertising Dept.





5.5.51—1ia
OVERSEER, An Under Overseer
wanted Hanson Plantation with
knowledge and experience of plantation
work. Apphy to Manager in person
5.5.51—2n
———









REDIFFUSION require an Announcer
Script. Writer, male or female, good
diction and command of English lan-
guage essential Apply letter onl



Trafalgar Street, 5.5.5)

SALES GIRL for our TOY ROOM.
Apply in person, JOHNSON’S STATION~-







ERY. 3.5.51—3n
TES AOA
MISCELLANEOUS







suitable =~ Factory, Agents po
Dentists; Aplictioss,. or Society, Dery: MINT—Olive Blossom Stamps of Bar-
Thani Bros, or Dtal 3466. 6.5.51—2n. | 240s, Will pay 48c. each for ber bet
i .
opies, ‘Phone Herbert Bayley 3703,
AUC'’r10ON ; 29.4.51--3n.
eigeta —_—_—
By instructions received I witl sell One (1) Second Hand Chaff Cutter.
by Public Auction on the spot at Bank| Apply X c/o Advocate Co., Ltd,
Hall Maint Road 4th house from All 4.5.51-—-3n.
Souls Courch, on, Thursday next th’ — —— omen
10th May at 2. o'clock, One three- WANTED TO PURCHASE, Household
roofed house ‘with out-offices, Will be] equipment of all description, Owen *
sold to the highest bidder Must be! Alider, Roebuck Street, Dial 3299.
removed, 5.5 Si—4n | §.5,51-—1In
Canada-Cuba South Bank
Sugag. Deal Exhibition
UX
we @ .From.pese 5 LONDON, May 4.
West Indies-producer said to-day. ‘The last workman with a
‘We waft to know what is really of the

going on,” he added,

Australia will be represented at
Tuesday’s talks along with rep
sentatives of the Colonial .s
industry. oY

Routine Suggestion

A Ministry of Food official to-
night anxiously denies that any
suggestion of Tuesday’s meeting is
cther than routine. He explains
that following the signing of Com-
monwealth sugar agreements,
— meetings are held periodic-
ally. ‘

Collective action now in the
West Indies might well lead the
British Government to facilitate
greater reciprocal trede between
the West Indies and Canada. Mr.
Allan Walker, Managing Director
of West Indies sugar, thinks so. He
tells me to-night he has been dis+
cusying these matters at the Coloe
nial Office and with Members
Parliament and finds “sympathe

|

tic’ reaction on the prablem Ob

the West Indies-Canada Trade, —
Now is the time, Walker feels

ALN. Sosa so ee:

Canada to limit the a
dollars the British Treas e
from the’sale of West Indies sugar
to Canada.

“I know” Walker says, “Cana-"

dians are pretty sick at the idea
that they are taking Empire sugar
and by reason of the operation of
the dollar pool, they are unable in
turn to export to normal B.W.1.
markets,”

Immediate Action

There is need for immediate
action, Walker thinks, to avoid a
situation which will “seriously
interfere with Canada’s whole
outlook regarding West Indian
Trade”.

Referring to the reported Cana-
dian Agreement on the purchase of
Cuban sugar, he said it was im-
portant that moves in that direc-
tion should not be extended, The
only way to prevent it was for tha
West Indies to be in a position to
use the dollars they were creating
for purchases in Canada. They
should be enabled to buy food-
stuffs—salt fish, flour et cetera—
and certain manufactured goods
necessary ‘from Canada,

Concluding the interview, Walk-
er reiterated that the need in the
West Indies at this time was for
collective action through their
Governments.



GLENDAIRY HELPED
THE ARMY

@ From page 5
course of study and_ practical
work which prepares them for
future service in the Army.

Captain Olive White sees after
this type of wock in Barbados.
Probation Officers
The local Army also has. a
League of Mercy, which was
formed by the late Mrs. (Major)
A. E. Moffett in May 1944, a few
weeks after she arrived in the
island. The objects of this League
are to visit sick patients in the
Hospitals, inmates of the Alms-
houses and offenders at prisons

Army deal with Juvenile Delin-

uency in_the island. There is
also a Missing Persons Bureau
which affords» men and women
who have become separated from
relatives antl friends, to unite
Many relatives in far off coun-
tries have been joined together.
Within the last few years ~this
department has sent and dealt
with enquiries in the United
Kingdom, Canada, United States,
Jamaica, Trinidad, British Guiana,
French Guiana, St. Kitts,
Antigua, Bermuda, St. Vincent,
British Honduras, Panama Canil
Zone and Cuba.

In cnarge of the Barbados
branch of the Salvation Army is
Major A. E. Moffett, Divisional
Commander.

ORO GOTO LLL INTE

Walton m
Indies ean purchase goods’ from and members of

it of.

The Probation Officers of the:

hammer, retreated ahead
King and Queen as they advanc-
ed through cheering crowds to
open the Festival of» Britain
“Exhibition here today. Two
thousand carpenters, electricians
and cleaners, West Indians
among them, had worked all
night to have» the show beside
the Thames ready in every
detail in time,

Pageantry amid futuristic
structures on the South Bank
opened in rainy weather with
grey and chilly mist seeping up the
river, Low-lying clouds seemed
to mute even the trumpeters’
fanfare as the Royal Party
arrived, But the year’s careful
preliminary organisation, months
of difficulties and criticism and
finally weeks of delays and dis-

appointments owing to the
abnormally wet winter, were
crowned with success that defied
everything.

Many top hats and frock coats
were worn today but the majority
came with good sound raincoats

assadors Ministers
any countries with ladies
their staffs
stood on chairs to see the King
and ‘Queen. arrive. Diplomats
present included representatives
of Haiti and Spanish American
Republics.

The South Bank Exhibition,
crowded with scientifie experi-
ments and industrial exhibits, is

i certain, for pressure to be put on and strong shoes.

ee PIL or any person in my -namet
I do not hold myself responsible for]

and

for prestige purposes and not
to sell goods. It is full of sur-
prises, Seeking some scientific

wonders, one suddenly glimpses
through huge plate-glass-win—
dows, a number of duncoloured
cows placidly chewing their cud.
“Modern Bloodstock”, says the
notice, “Two Thousand Years
Have Gone Into Breeding Them.
Best Of Their Blood Has Helped
To Stock The World.” There
are prize-winning strains of
sheep and pigs. Eggs are being
laid every hour by prime poultry
exhibited’ living on an_ intensive
system in small wire cages.
Chickens are being hatched in a
nearby incubator, In another
corner is the bronze “Reclining
Figure” by Henry Moore, whose
ultra-modern sculpture is a
surprise in almost any surround.
ings.

Ten million
expected to pass through the
turnstiles before it closes in
September. Seven _ hundred
thousand people from overseas—
150,000 from the Commonwealth

visitors are



000 while they are here.
There will be unofficial repre-
sentatives of the West Indies at

‘today’s pageant, but official
representatives are not expected
as guests of the Government
until July.

Jamaica will be represented by
Sir. Harold Allan, Minister of
Finance in, the Executive Coun-
ceil, and Lady Allan; L. L. Sim-
monds, House of Representatives
and D, J. Judah, nominated
member of the Legislative
Council, and Mrs, Judah.

—Reuter.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for the United Kingdom,
Amsterdam and Antwerp by the 8.8.
Willemstad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 12 noon and Ordinary Mai} at
1 p.m. on the 16th May 1951

TODAY'S NEWS. FLASH

I LEAP OVER THE GARDEN
WALL—a story of a Nun who was
in a Convent for 28 years and
An_ interesting
true book by Monica Baldwin,

Sring us your Fountain Pens for
NIB and SACK replacements.
Ours is the only Store fitted with
modern tools for Pen Service,



then gave it up,

ge

|

'§) JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND
HARDWARE

|

If you wish a good

HAND

Pier





be
APRIL



CENTRAL FOU

SPRAYER

Try our special 1 qt. size just received.





DRY LTP.

Head.































































PAGE SEVEN 49
mu hON RENT | SHIPPING NOTICES
Minimum 12 and ; a
S86 cents Sundays 24 words — over #4 af ie te ee a ee ae snncoiutdlnclinalts-Sthpentcltiecitia= tai
| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents @ cae
| MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW | 330
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED = Vv Co ~~ aa
will accept “argo a! ny s
HOUSES MAN. LINE for St. Lucia, Grenada and. Aruba.
a PR. a oARIRO" sailed Brisbane Sailing of Or About 18th May,
BUNGALOW — Newly built Bungalow | Ist. » Arriving at Barbados May 1951.
it Worthing from 15th May. 3 bedrooms ss. * ” . Ps
with ruaning water in each roeom.| from Haber tan “iy mean. Bel soa Dupeaanat oe mitehs, at.
Dining, Drawing rooms, Servants’ room | May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane Kitts, Montseratt and Nevis only
= ama Dial ST and ey + 16th June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving Passengers for Dominica Sailing
ht, oe ee oe Inijet half of July, on the 4th May, 1951
pliner 3 .
“FONTAMARA'—Fully furnished, in-] and Liverpool "°° Barbados
cluding Fridge and telephone. For June,
October, November and December. Phone | ,, In 1 aaa. to general cargo this B.W.1I, SCHOONER OwWN-
ive, Browne. 207. 5.5.51—29 | hard foael treet ear ERS ASSOC. INC.
. argo. ip a
Cargo accepted on through Bills of ‘
HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June pb us o}
and July, Phone Mrs. A.D. Herbert 838s, | E2ging for transhipment at Trinidad: to Tele. 4047,
3.5.51—4n sande ulana, Leeward amd Windware
” hea ruatlowead i cealate For further particulars apply —
MALTA-—Cattlewash, for the manth pply sonal
of June, July, November, December, ic aw on & CO. Lid. TRINI
Apply Mrs. I. Weatherhead C/o J. N DA COSTA & CO. LTD., BR .
c . * IDGE * ro
tie rc = 5.5.51-4n. | TOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.I. Advertise.... It Pays iv
IU ican RCE a Sn ceereniinibansibaneie ated NE
William Henry Street. Apply: J. E, rs "
Marson. Phone 2471. 3.5.51—6n0 e e e on
ROOM & BOARD for Gentlemen. Canadia N t l Stea oe
On Sea, Reasonable terms for perma- n a iona ms s cy
nents Apply Casuarina Residential] g90UTHBOUND chy
Club, Maxwell Coast, Tel. 8378. Sails Satle Sails Arrives Salle 3%
4,.5.51--2n Montreal = Hu lifax Boston Barbados Barbados
— . CAN, CONSTRUCTOR 28 April 1 May - 10 May 11 May —->
SEA-GAZE-—On-the'sea Maxwell's fully | LADY NELSON + 12 May = 15 May 25 May 25 May -
furnished including telephone and 7e-| CAN. CRUISER 1? May 20 May — 29 May 30 May aa
frigerator for the month of June, For |.CAN. CHALLENGER 26 Miy 29 May 12 May 7 June 8 June %
further particulars dial 2250, 5,5.51-—-1n | LADY RODNEY « 5 June 6 June lt June 20 June 21 June %
— RADY NELSON ..30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July ‘
THERSISDON -- Maxwell's Coast, 4) LADY RODNEY +30 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. . 14 Aug.
bedrooms, fully’ furnished, From ist} ———__.._.. _.__.___ aoe avacniomapoeelibreomsinenin wanna _~
June to Bist August. Rent $190.00 per | NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives ves. ©
month, Dial 2259, 5.5.51—2n Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax itreal sf
LADY RODNEY 8 May 9 Mar 17M > 22 May 26°May ~ o
LADY NELSON .. 3 June 5 June 14 June _ 16 June 19 June
LOST & FOUND LADY RODNEY .. 3 July 6 July 14 July - we July 19 duly
i LADY NELSON ..27 Juhy 29 July 7 Aug 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
LADY RODNEY ..26 Aug. 28 Aux 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 1) Sept. :



LOST

KETS - Series L.
0470-0471; L,



SWEEPSTAKE TIC
3330 to 39; Q, 1997, M.

9000-9001; PP. 0480, 0483; K. 8033, 7303;
M. 5470; ©. 5099, 5903, 5909; N. 1330,
1331, 6133, 7718 to 7719. O. 0055, Finder

please return same to Advocate Co.
Reward offiered 4.5. 51—2n

Berths Vacant
In Careenage

YESTERDAY

Quite a few berths in the
Careenage and inner basin were
vacant yesterday. Towards the
end of the wharf and the Pie:
Head, only one schooner was made
fast. There was also one schooner
in the inner basin.

Yet, the Careenage was busy.
Lighters attending on the twe
steamships in port kept the lower
wharf active. They were landing
flour from the S.S. Fort Am-
herst.

Higher up the wharf, the
motor vessels Caribbee and Lady
Jcy were loading cargo, making
ready to sail the same evening.
Then, there were schooners dis-
charging cargoes of firewood and
charcoal,

A launch was hauled up op
the wharf by the Government
crane for repairs, Shipwrights
were working on it, Some yards
below the launch,,engineers were
gtill digging up a crane.

Flour was being landed in the

inner basin,

DECREE ABSOLUTE

In the suit of S, St. A. Sands
versus E. G. Sands in the Court
ef Divorce and Matrimonial
Causes yesterday, His Honour the
Chief Judge pronounced decree
absolute. Decree nisi had been
“pronounced on February 9 for the
dissolution of the marriage.

J. Harewood was co-respondent,

Decree nisi was pronounced in
the suit of E. W. Gibbons versus
'T. N. Gibbons,

Mr, D. H. L. Ward, who is
holding papers for Mr, G. H.
Adams, instructed by Hutchinson
and Banfield, appeared for E. W.
Gibbons. There was no order as
to costs.





Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch, Wonderful Coun-
sellor, Sch, Philip H, Davidson, Sch
Lucille M. Smith, Sch, United Pilgrim S.,
Sch. Blue Nose Mac, Sch, Marea Heén-
rietta, Yacht Maria Catharina, Sch
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch, Laudalpha,
Sch. Gardenia W.

ARRIVALS

Schooner Zenith, 70 tons net,
Tannis, from British Guiana,

DEPARTURES
MV. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt.

Capt

Gumbs, for Dominica.

Schooner Mary M. Lewis, 69 tons net,
Capt. Marshall, for British Guiana

M.V. Lady Jay, 46 tons net, Capt.
Persons, for St. Laicia.

S.S. Fort Amherst, 1,946 tons net,
Capt, Kean, for St, Vincent,

RATES OF EXCHANGE

CANADA
MAY 4, 1951
Cheques an

Bankers
Demand

Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currenay
Coupons
Silver

63 5/10% pr.

61 6/10% pr
61.45% pr
61 3/10% pr
60 1/10% pr.
59 4/10%% pr.



3 510%
626% pr.

pr.

oak am an a

{ Christian Science
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S.s HERD MA _
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er “DEFENDER” » London 22nd April | 7th May
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SS. “TRYA" sailed %%th Apyil
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5.8. “ALCOA POLARIS” Sails 2nd May n ” 1a ”
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8.8. "FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 28th June “7th ~ p
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| St. Joseph.
Mrs. U. L.. BRUCE,
Maxwell Road, Ch. Ch, §. A.. DURANT,
Horse Hill, St. Joseph.
©. McCONNEY, ote, BO
Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch. EBENEZER PHARMACY,
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Pine Gap, St, Michael.
E. HINKSON, i z , commie,
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PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



JAMAICA FOOTBALLERS COMING

Who’s Who of Team

(By O. S. COPPIN)

FOOTBALL fans who are eagerly awaiting the arrival
} of the first Jamaica football team ever to taur Barbado












‘ given to-day a brief Who’s W
FOOTBALL—Division I
CARLTON and Pickwick-Rover
meet at Kensington this afternoor
ima return First Division fixture
When Ulete teams met earlier
this season Cariton won b mar |
gin of four oal » iw
DIVISION It
In order to conclude the B.A.F_A
Second and Third Divi xture
by Friday, May 18, the wing
3 changes in the fixtures have been
made :
Wednesday 9
Carlton v Colles at Colle
Lodge y Evertor t Bank Hall
\ Friday it —
Spartan vs. Colle at Collate ‘
Empire v Lodge at Bank Hall. !
Tuesday 15 —
Everton vs. Cariton at Rank Hall
Lodge vs. Spartan at Park
Friday 16 —
College vs. Evert at College
Carlton vs. Ew at Bank Hall,
Divis ii
“4 Tuesday 15 —
: Empire y C.0, Bo. at Comber-
| mere
’ Wednesday 6 —
Empire v Regiment at Bank
Hall
Sea Scout College at Collede
Friday in —
Police C.O. Bo at Park
Tuesday 22 -
ayers. Div aA ¥ Winner
BASKET-PALL
Y.M C.A vs YMPC and
HC. vy Fortress both at Y.M.P.C
oly E NETBALL
ympia vs. Erdisto Z
College at Erdiston. T*aining
TABLE TENNIS

Pelican vs. Abby Marines,



H.C. Beat Lodge
School 1—0

HARRISON COLLEGE defeat-
ed Lodge School 1—0 at Bank
Hall in their Second Division foot-
ball match yesterday evening, The
goal was scored by C. T. Tudor
the’centre forward.

it was a slow, dull game from
beginning to end with but few
spurts of liveliness, The College
team, however, showed themselves
the better players and play was
concentrated in the Lodge goal
area most of the time.

Both teams threw
ehances of scoring. Camie Smith
playing in the College forward
line was given the ball when he
was unmarked soon after the first
goal was scored. He was well with
in the goal area but kicked the
ball wide of the bars.

College keeper E. L, Roach was
called upon to save a good try
when the Lodge forward line ran
down near the end of the game
and their centre forward sent the
ball at the nets.

Brookes, Streetly and Cramon,
three of Lodge’s usual second di-
vision players were absent. Mr.
Wilkes played in the back line,

The teams were:

College: E. L. ‘
Morrison, J. D. Forde, H. M

Simmonds, Mr. A. G. Williams,
‘ R. C, Dash, J. Williams, C. W.
Smith, C. T. Tudor, K. Griffith
and F. Tudor,

Lodge: C. M. Redman, F, W.
Cheeseman, R. C, Goddard, J. St.
C. Hutchinson E. A. L. King,
C. O. Williams, Welch E. L.
Glasgow, R. L. King, Mr. Wilkes
and G, Gill.

WILL REFEREE
WORLD SOCCER

LONDON, May 4,
Mr. B. M. Griitiths of New-
port has been appointed referee
uf the international soccer mateh
at Wembley Stadium, between
England and Argentina on
Wednesday .

away many

Roach, J. C

Griffiths cfficiated in the world

cup series at Rio last summer.
There will be two English lines-
men for this match, They are
R. Bond of London, and EB. P. L.
Greig, of Middlesex.

Mr. R. J. Leafe of Nottingham,
another World Cup referee, will
referee Argentina's game against
Eire at Dublin on May 16,

The Argentine football team o
their way here by air to play have
been held up en route,

The delay occurred between
Rio and Montevideo. Their plane
which was due at London about
4 p.m. G.M.T. is not expected
untit 8 p.m. G.M.T. to-day

—Reuter

RIFLE SHOOT THIS
; AFTERNOON

The final of the Frontenac
trophy will take place at the Gov-
ernment rifle range at 1 o'clock
this afternoon. The sixteen who
have qualified for the finals will
shoot 15 rounds at 500 and 600
yards.





KEITH “JIM” HERON:—Kingston

HARRY PRENDERGAST:—

They'll Deo It Every

are
ho of the players,

I have seen most of these play
during my recent visit to Jamaica
and some of the inforination I have
got from authentic sources.
RONNIE COOPER:— Kingston

and All Jamaica goalkeeper since

1948. A daring spectacular cus-

todian who will be hard to beat

ind a real crowd pleaser. Age 20

Hag toured Haiti for the colony

ARNOLD FOOTE
College and All Schools goal-
keeper. A very promising young-~

with a safe pair of hands.
The “baby” of the side age 16,
will be making his first tour.

DICKIE BAYLISS:— Melbourne
and All Jamaica full back. A
fast and persistent tackler, a
quick recoverer with a strong
kick in both feet Also plays
right half. Age 28. He has toured
Haiti and Trinidad.

HUNTLEY DA COSTA:—Kingston
and All Jamaica full back, A
very steady and sound back who
in his younger days was known

“The Artist”. Age 35. He
represented the R.A.F. during
the war. He can also play at left
wing and will probably be the
manager of the side.

TREVOR PARCHMENT:
ston and All Jamaica, plays in
any position on the half line
Very good tackler who passes
the ball well. Age 19. He has
toured Haiti

DUDLEY SMITH:— Melbourne
and All Jamaica also plays in
any position on the half line,
A wonderful positional player
who feeds his forwards well and
will most probably fill an in-
side position in the forward line
at times. Age 25, He has toured
Haiti and Trinidad

Jnr.:—Jamaic

ster

DUDLEY SMITH



as



King-



ROBERT BERRY

and All Jamaica, A sticker a
half backs gv, a marvellous as-
set from the throw ins which
are like corner kicks and are
very dangerous. Age 28, his first
tour,

Ja-
maica College and All Schools.
A promising half back who
should gain valuable experience
from this tour. Age 19.

ALTY SASSO:—Kingston and All
Jamaica. The other veteran of
the side, Age 39 he is the oldest
member but is still quite a force
to be reckoned with. The “Stan-
ley Matthews” of Jamaica he
has an uncanny way of dribbling
down the touchline with the ball
on his head which leaves the
defence nonplussed, Has toured
Cuba and Haiti.

HENRY MILLER:—Kingston and
All Jamaica inside forward, Cap-
tain of the Club, a strong and
energetic player with a good shot
in either foot. Age 21, he has
toured Haiti.

ROBERTO MIRET:— Kingston
centre forward. Scored 25 goals
last season. Very quick and not
afraid to shoot from any angle
and very accurate with his
head. His height is no hindrance
and is somewhat like “Roddy
Littlepage”. who toured with
Casuals team of Trinidad some
years aback. Age 20, his first
tour.

ROBERT BERRY:—Kingston in
side forward, A cool player who
makes good openings for his
forwards and has a good shot in |

both legs. Age 22, his first tour.

ALVIN MCLEAN:— Melbourne
and All Jamaica—outside or in-
side right. A very clever player
who is not afraid to cut in and
shoot. His Joping stride does not
make him look fast, but he will




HARRY PRENDERGAST

be hard to hold, Age 24. Has -———————
re iti relati f " F
mote No relation of Officers vs. Serjeants
KEATS HALL:—Melbourne | left Football Match

Wing, Very fact and accurate.
This boy has improved consider-
ubly during the last season,
Centres well and is not afraid
to shoot when he cuts in, Age
21, his first tour,

EARRY NARCISSE:— Kingston
reserve centre forward a very
energetic player who always
follows the ball and shoots from
all angles, Age 19, Hig first tour,

MALCOLM MCLEAN:—Kingston,
and All Jamaica, Trinidad, Plays
in any position in the half line

On Sunday May 6th at 9 o’cleci
sharp the Officers of the Barbao:
match against the Serjeants at tho
Regiment will play a footbail
Garrison,

This is the first game of its kind
to be played since the formation
of the Regiment and a very exci
ing game is expected.



Match Abandoned

Well known to Barbados fans WORCESTER, May 4

having played here during the Rain prevented play on the
Trinidad tour in 1944, Is not a8 Jast day of the cricket mate!
fast as he used to be, but has between Worcestershire and the

gained in experience and posi- South African touring team her»

tional plays. Age 27. Has played today, ana the match was
football in Barbados, Trinidad, abandoned “as a draw.
Jamaica and Curacao. —Reuter.





‘Time i Registered US Potent OMe y

y Jimmy Hatlo |







DOES THE ELEVATOR STOP?





"Try TO PUSH A LOAD ON, AND Wi/JERE
FOOT ABOVE FILOOR LEVEL“:

—— EEE SESE

Burt ONCE ABOARD, WHERE DOES THE |
|




ABOUT A WALL TROLLEY STOP WHE! YOU WANT
OFF 2A FOOT BELOW NORMAL,OF Course!

a

'
|
}
{
|
|

|




—_






SWE







THANK TO
CLEO HINDMAN
60 N.OAKLEY,

COLUMBUS OHIO j



TREVOR PARCHMENT

KEITH

Ist Class Cricket

Close of play scores in Thurs

day's

Oxford University first innings:;—
All out for 115; Yorkshire first in-

nings,







ARNOLD FOOTE Jnr.

MALCOLM MC LEAN

ROBERTO MIRET.

RONNIE COOPER

a

DICKIE BAYLISS

“JIM” HERON.

ALTY SASSO

LONDON, May 4

first class cricket matches: out 157.—(CP)

210 for five.

CRYPTOQUOTE No. 16

Cambridge University, first in- ei ee
nings, all out for 174; Lancashire NORYPTOMUETE ie
first innings, all out for ‘8 No RIVACJGZSWLY YLS SDC
play was possible after tea owing UILR -DZQOWSS
to rain. Last _ Crypt Whatsoever thy
M.C.C. first innings, all out Bape SES te user de
for 62; second innings, ail out ~——"y A. CORBIN &2 50RD
for 70





q

‘>

" Beh ¥ iy
ve Original Late’ Foam Cushioning

;
é

HOUSE OF COMMONS



_The Speaker’s chair,
all seating throughout the Chamber,
galleries and lobbies and every other
article of upholstered furniture
throughout the new building

LILO
















j Acknow
o-operatic

Sir Giles Githert Sot, O.M1., RA,
edgments:

ors responsible fi i i
lily acknowledged by Dunlap Rubber Ge Ledeen). Cate
; dy itd. Lenden; Mapie & Ge. Ltd., London; H. H. Martyn
i & Led., Cheiternham F. Sage & Co. Ltd., London; Waring &
| Gillow Led., London.

n of the Contra





LLO. DIVISION
Â¥ BOND STREE

WALTON, L
T, Wa

LATEX FOAM

VERPOOL

OF THE INDUSTRY

50D, DS9

ECKSTEIN BROS. Bay St.—Distributors.















presents its
hn Da \ BIG THREE-DAY
Surrey first innings, all out 140.
Worcestershire first innings, all} CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

{

April 28
Although weather conditions
were not favourable on Saturday.
the wickets had dried out during
the week and good scores were
returnec from mosi of the Clubs









League,
against

Lancashire
the toss

the
won

In
Bacup
Accrington and sent them -to bat

first on a wicket which was
expected to play easier as the day
went on. They were all out for
147 runs after having 9 wickets

down for 100 runs. Everton
Weekes captured 2 wickets for
47 runs in 12 overs. Bacup lost
8 wickets for 100 runs when
stumps were drawn. Everton
Weekes was bowled for 3 by
Raymer the Australian left-hand
slow bowler.

laslingden also won the toss
against Enfield and sent them in
to bat. Enfield’s batsmen were
in top form, scoring 204 for the
loss of 5 wickets in 150 minutes
Clyde Walcott led the way with
125 in equal minutes and was
highly applauded on his return
to the pavilion. Haslingden were
left with 150 minutes to score 204
and at the end of the day’s play
were 114 for the loss of 7 wickets.
J. K. Holt scored 32 and was
wicket by a
Walcott












the

caught behind
Clyde

brilliant catch.

———





*
> 4? .

What's On Today

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m,

Inquest concerning death of
Reynald Brewster of Halls
Road at Dist. “B” Court, |
St, George—10.00 a.m.

Illustrious School Sports at
Bay Grounds, Beckles
Road—2.00 p.m.

Rev. F. E, Pestaina who was
vicar of All Saints Church
to be installed Rector of
St. Lucy’s Church—4 p.m.

Police Band to play at St.
Matthias Annual Fair
which will be held at
Hastings Rocks, Christ
Chureh—4.00 p.m.

CINEMAS

Globe—"All Quiet on the Western

Front’—5.00 & 8.15 p.
Aquatic “Call Northside 777" 5 and
8.50 p.m,

Empire “Id Climb the
Mountain” 8.30 p.m.
Royal “Trial Without Jury” and
“Homicide For Three” 4.30 &

$15 Dom
Roxy “You're My
and “Side Street”

Highest

Everything”
430 & 8.15

p.m,
Olympic ‘Where the Side Walk
Ends” & “Bataan” 4.30 & 8 30

p.m,
Plaza (Bridgetown) — “Edge of
Doom"—4.45 & 8.30 p.m,

Sun Rises: 5.43 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m,
Moon (New) May 6
Lighting ; 7.00 p.m.
High Water: 2.33 a.m., 3.29
p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for month to yester-
day: .05 in.

Temperature (Max.) 86.5 °F
Temperature (Min.) 75.5 °F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.S8.E.

Wind Velocity 8 m.p.h.
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.958
(3 p.m.) 29.883.

The Weather
, TO-DAY







CLYDE WALCOTT'S

| Report On Lancashire

|
|
|
|
|

League Cricketers

captured 2

SATURDAY,

MAY 5, 1951









Eve of King’s Birthday

GRAND DANCE

‘Or Masked Ball;
t the AQUATIC CLUB on
JUNE 6Gih at 9 P.M
(Eve of H.M
Birthday Celebration!

Tickets 2/6 each. Obtainabie

wickets for 45 runs in a the Anustic Sm

Tickets and masks available at
15 overs. . ‘SJolingon's Stationery,
Rain held up play at Rawten- Broad Street
stall in their match against Low- C. BR. BROWNE'S ORCHESTRA
erhouse. Rawtenstall batted first y
and scored 158 for 3 wickets ~—)

declared. Rawtenstall gave Low-
erhouse a sporting chance to get
168
stopped play when they were 58
runs for ? wickets.

Bruce Pairaudeau







mivtntvtntntntctrtrttnintnt ttvtnine, 8 boot
SRNR RR ROR ARE

Annual Dance

to be held by



in 90 minutes, but rain

scored 100



not out against East Lancashire

and in the same game Cecil TE ere oF
Pepper captured 7 wickets for 82 : UAE,
runs. at the

In the Ribblesdale League, Ken
Rickards scored I
against St. Annes, but his team
scored 157 for
and won easily.





DRILL HALL
TO-NIGHT

SUBSCRIPTION — 3/6
Admission by Invitation

26 for Darwen

7 wickets declared

R





>
3

In the opening games of the Cen- Only se ioe ts z

tral Lancashire League, Cromp-

ton met Walsden where two; grey?

West Indians were playing against)

each other, both being from

Trinidad. Crompton batted first

and were all
Ellis Achong captured 8 wickets
for
deliveries. Walsden
score for the loss of 9 wickets.
Ramadhin captured 5 wickets for!
18 runs and all 5 wickets were
taken with leg spinners.

out for 70 runs.

will be given by
MRS. ETHELINE BRYAN

SATURDAY NIGHT,
MAY, 1951

At the FOX CLUB, GARDEN, St.
JAMES.

his left arm
passed the;

36 runs with

On Sth

Frank Worrell scored a brilliant ee ae
century for Radcliffe in their invite your friends
match against Rochdale. Rad- Music by Mr. C.” ALLEYNE’S
cliffe scored 178 for 6 wickets Y Viereteatee

declared, but Rochdale went for!
the runs
loss of 4 wickets.

SPT BAGSTER



The
AMATEUR ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
OF BARBADOS

out for 192; second innings 50 for
six, South Africa first inings all!

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

KENSINGTON OVAL
in

Thursday .
& Saturday .

. May 14th
. May 17th

. May 19th
beginning at 1 p.m. each day

e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold
Archer, (Nugget) Hunte,
Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin
Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists
and Athletes as well as
Miss Grace Cumberbatch
and Miss Eileen King in
action at the Historie Oval

Gates Open at 12 noon daily
@
PRICES OF ADMISSION :
SEASON TICKETS



Kensington Stand . . $2.16
George Challenor . $1.68
| e

| DAILY TICKETS

|| Kensington Stand . . $1.00
George Challenor . . . 72¢
Uncovered Seats 48e.
Grounds 24c.

Season Tickets on Sale daily
at the Civic, Swan & High
Street.





ADMISSION: Gents 2/- Ladies 1/6

and scored 180 for the















aaron A
TEA

Tender

yf
~ TENDER LEAF TEA
alunys



FLORAL
SPUNS

An extra special
value in an
assortment of K
pretty patternsâ„¢ > ne
and colourings

36" wide. Per
yard.

$1.20

CAVE
SHEPHERD
& Co, Ltd.

10-13 Broad St.



Phone 4267 for

Ferrocrete rapid-hardenini Cement
in 375 Ib. Drums

Snowcrete White Cement
in 375 Ib, Drums

Colorcrete Cement
YELLOW in 375 lb. Drums

RED ib. Drums

Everite Asbesios-Cement Corrugated Sheets
6 ft., 7 ft., 8 ft., 9 ft. 10 ft. Lengths

Everite Trafford Tiles

6 ft. and 8 ft. Lengths.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.

in 375







cent








PAGE 1

PACE six nAKIMnOB ADVOCATE SATURDAY. MAY 5, ltSl HENRY Dreadful, Choking, Spasms Of BRONCHIAL ASIHMA I IASIII l.-V I I AMI WHY SUFFER TORTURES OF SLEEPLESS NIGHTS When one dose of the amazing Mixture will ease that choking, smothering spasm in seconds! Buckley's Mixture is no ordinary medicine—Its different from any Coufh Remedy you have ever taited—Triple Strength—No Syrup—All Medication. One Dose Stops The Cough When you (eel a cough or choking bronchial spasm coming on. just take a dose of Buckley's Mixture and swallow slowly. You'll (eel Ih* powerful healing warmth spread down through your throat and bronchial lubes, soothing inflamed pcrts, eaainit hard breathing and loosening tough phlegm, making it easy to expel Buckley's Mixture i* made from rare Canadian Pine Balsam, ami other proven ingredwnts. There'* not another cough medicine like It. Get a bottle TODAY. and relief right away. BUCKLEY'S MIXTURE A SINGLE SIP TELLS WHY WE SELL A MILLION BOTBOTTLES A YEAR IN ICE-COLD CANADA AI.ONK A SINGLE SIP TELLS WHY WE SELL A MILLION Rheumatism and Backache GoneinlWeek i .%  h Kidneys w.ih Cyst** end Yoy'll Natfkjp Cyetaa—the prearrlrmott of a famnaa ;• all ir"uPtea du> to fault/ kidi.e-y arih.it In dul>L quirk time, ao. If YOU .HIT... from HHaumatiani. Sciatica. Natirltle. Lumbaaa. %  •tkuh.. Narvouanaaa L*fl Pjmi Diiimeea. Ciixlaa under %  >•>. frequent Heaaachaa and) Celda. Poor Inarav and Apiditi. Putty Anklee. Burning, s-irting Paaaaaaa, or have fraquaMIv In Oat up Nia*i. to to yotir fhnntit t day for CMi and ba fit and wall r.m waak. Cyste. Helps Noture 3 Woyi Tlia Cyeta. traatmani la hifhlf •rt-nlltV. being; spax-UUy compound'* H a<".lh*, tona and .laan raw. sore, sick hklnrva and bladda-r and tn rmr. iirlda and polaona from your ayat"i • ifelr. <|Ulrlly and aur.ly. ret r-.nuWna no harah, harmful or Jinffmui driuia CyHea worka In those 1 waya (o and \mir t rouble*-— m Starta hlltlnir the im thkh at* attarklm your Kldnavn. Bladder and urlnarr nitem In two hnura. yet Iabaolut'ly harmlaaa lo human OOatirldofhaalth dti troy Inf. d'ftdlv p"l'>n-.u %  "ld with whl-h yor avataro M• %  or-me a* turned. (II Stren|theoa ai.u e1nn-ialir eaim . % %  • 't la a Hcipita: Tka aauf I uoald not k* M In ->-*. oaf aft" Cyate f f—t ?• aaor. e<*fl aad atraahf.' (Bad i J A. I* %  Health Improved in 2 Days %  7 had -of /ell raoMr wall tor Of*' aid fa/("fit roi nit ally (foi ba Cvilt' a (Mai. aad >ak kad tried • t tona or aad lartd *H*'t "ark aaia aad • ii"ift kai laiaroiad %  "? kolfk aiorr (• 7 '* 1 daai fAaa olkr tkiafi kara da# /or .aoark* kin B Oaa*>twa. M Hi Ya lf*.t MMMt|lMk n, Cyalaa from your chamlat today. Utva> It a thorututh leal. Cysttx I* guirinlrnl to i-ik.y.. .1 faal youni-r. • lron|ii. I..I(IT III e*ci* w>r. In II houra %  ad to ba mmplatPly wall In 1 waak or yvur %  none}bath If you rlurt. Iha amply park*' Ael nowf 0 r-a>ad.a4..KIDNIYS tyiteXilADDlR • u ,m.str*i R.-.d, RMIUMATISM IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEQAL offers lo all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY Mushrooms, Tim 55 Corned Beef with Cereal, Tins 31 All Bran, Megs. 29 N0W USUALLY NOW '" Floral Icing Sugar, Pkgs 33 23 Smedley's Peas, Tins 48 M Allsopps Beer, Bots. 26 44 20 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE ADVOCATE HAS THE BEST BOOKS IN TOWN DROP IN AND SEE OUR SELECTION — At The — Advocate Stationery The car that expresses VOllI lr it it true that a msn expresw* hlrmell" In ihe cloihe* he fjrs. ho* much evklenl K the taste he ethibtla in the car he drive*. The Woltelev "Four-fUty" ii tor ihe man *ho demand* ihe highe n-achanieil awhicvements of the auio* mobile age. exnrrAied In coachmotk of iuefcomfon.*iihthererairiede*ierio •tyllng thai stamnt his good judgmeni. I .iati.lt RaaaaT latarta'. Fa alt co-rfonabr. oa .air* ham rvMatr. < athaani >M *>adacT*a atMSSM hnaj aasndaid. (k.t.a 1—raai Atfaaaaii4al.ua. Otr' 10 aaWc t*UIH tin 05OLSELEY a aat H lllllllll FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Pkona 2J8S Sol? Diilributor. Phone 4504 PROTECT YOUR EYES wifA Opt I E Y E EYE LOTION A4 A I fHM TIS } Tht rim of dw rf? and inn b'niag ihouU be Ivilih. rkcolour II they arr ted or r A aaaMOfwal arbMtl vow ajra n*d nc-i,i IRKIn



PAGE 1

Mil I:K\V. M\v -,. ifi RAHHAOOS AIIWH \ II PACE FIVE Glendairy Helped The Salvation Army — ELEVEN CORPS AY ISLAND Til.-: SALVATION ARMY in Barbados, held its Tap. Dav yesterday. Tag Day is held for the Self Dental Fund which assists the Salvation Army in running Hostels. Night Shol1 Family Relief. The Army also caters for the youth olthe island through the Probation system and many young ofTe.-ioVT s. after completing their punishment at the Government Industrial School, have listened to the advice of lha Probation Officer "to lead an upright lift." In the year 1865. the Atnv was %  led In ihc Ew of Londo-i n and Catharine Bo Dm,:: lha two World Wan .ill K-d Shu... %  ft) provided for weary l l % %  %  and lii>i tea* and cakes wen .served to soldiers on trains. -< ihur any lo the battle frontThe mongoose was brought la By the time its Founder died Barbados to kill the rat. bui soon In IBI2 the organisation had after its arrival it became irtendly (O tifiy-nir.e iMth the ral and now there Is a To-day the organisammuainy between Iheni. They "is M\pr 97 countric Preferred Glcndairy The women of the Salvi Army have equal status with men. The highest rank that can be reached bj that of Genera) and is open to women. Toa Salvation Army came to Parbado* in 1898 On April 30, IBM, i Inpioneer officers. Staff Captain and Mrs. Widger> arrived In the island IIUMW IM MOWI It \ I tlt ndoi -—_ _ ffiji The Mongoose And The Ral Canada-Cuba Sugar Deal l.ON 'he nsj-urann MUUetei Mr. H-' Ml. I I that >ia6le friends, "actual! living In the same hole" Barbados has a rat control service which Is carried or, ay the Agriculture Society They prepare baits and sell them cheapl> The bait is put out m the dry season when the rats tend to congregate in water course*, near wells and in plantation yards. This year there was no dry season and this made it difficult to control rats. Mr H. W. Tucker. Entomologist of the Depaitrmnt of Science and : i Indoor meet ins to be Agriculture, told the Advocate neld m Ihc island took place al yeslerda.* that there was no means II hut soon after of taking a census of mongooses the pioneerswere brought before i n the island One planter had the Police Courts on a charge of told Inni thai more mongooses holding an open air meeting, to were seen in the country this vear the annoyance Of the public but this did not definitely mean In June. 1898, a special demonthat there was an Increase of mon*t rat ion meeting was held in the gooses in the island. Wilhclmino Hall and Mrs (Staff He said thnt at one time people %  Wirigery gave a lecture used to l>e paid a bonus for either < f hci prison experiences in the head or tail of a mongoose but British Guiana The object of thin this was stopped The rumour meeting was to raise funds lo had got around that the mongoo*.i after with tht mongoose, without bemy. Were opened at Speightsmolested; the average mongoose town and other parts of Ihc shows very little fear of man or Island dog; fish, especially salmon, seems That was 33 vears ago, but to be the preferred bait of the i..-.iv the Salvation Army ha* mongoose. spread throughout the island. Item den being a menace to poul%  Q corps at Bridgetry the mongoose has been known t. i Headquarter*, Wellington to gnaw cane, as rats do. "We Street Speight I< en, (Matin, DinI"'"* Iha the fat and the monmonrt Corner, Four Roads, Lon* goose live amicably. There is a Bay, Pie Corner. Checker Hall, sort of armed neutrality between Cailton BJ d Ba View. Three them." Mr. Tucker said. S -i. tie. mo a,t Black Hock. Road View *%  • the Whim. Seven a Day Thr Home I-caguc is a branch of the Salvation Army work In the U)terett of women, especially mothers. This League is institute,! in ever) I ranch in the island and mothers, apart from gaining Christian knowledge, are instructad im how to care for their children und run the home The membership of these Home league* has doubled within the last seven years and at S'wno I. ., ,.•,M>: p., r are taught needletvorfc and handicrafts. A; vinous limes spcciul rallies •re luld and talks are given on Child Welfare. Home Management and other useful subjects. Members of the Home League also make garments for distribution to the poor of the island At the age of thirteen, young ople may enter the Corp* Cadet Brigade and take up a p on page %  Mr. Gordon Wilson of the firm of Messrs C. S Pitcher Co, Ltd.. told the Advoeit* that he had set traps and caught as many as seven mongooses per day in the woods at the back of his home at Bishops Court Hill. He said that the mongi>oses cone down from the hills and steal the chickens. In one day they took as many as eight rhickens. "The mongoose Is so brazen that it even steals chickens in the day," Mr Wilson said. Regional Et-oi.omir Gomimttei' For W.I. A Regional Economic Committee ito be set up for the British VfeM lurtirs Hrih'h Guiana and iiritifh Honduras It will consist of the Economic Adviser to the Comptroller for Development and Welfare in the West Indies who will be Chairman, and a Member appointed by each participating Government. Each Government will, however, be free to send with Its members to meetings of the Comrnittce at it> own expense, such advisers as it thinks fit The headquarters of the Commute < %  win !*• the office Of the Comptroller for Development and Welfare. Its function* will be a* follows; (a) to act ns an advisory and consultative bedy to the participating Governments in economic matters of regional significance; (b) to provide for the exchange of Information on economic matters between the participating Governments; (ci to advise on all matters relating to the British Caribbean Trade Commissioner Service; to prepare the annual estimates of the Committee's expenditure .tnd submit them to the Comptr. Her for approval on behalf of the participating Oovarrnnanta; (a) to report annually through the Comptrollei to the pal ticipating Governments; (fl to undertake such other economic functions as may be assigned to it The Ant meeting of the proposed Committc-e is to be held in Barbados beginning on the 16th of May. Among the subjects set down for discussion are the Trade Commissioner Service in Canada and the proposed Trade Commissioner Service in the United Kingdom, the Customs Union Report, external trade matters and regional economic matters. His Excellency the Covemor has appointed Mr. Grantlev Adams Member of the proposed Regional Economic Committee to represent Barbados The Honourable H A. Cuke. C BE.. M.L.C., the Honourable K R. Hunte, M I.C., Mr. D G. Leocock, Jr.. the Honourable -Sir John Saint. Kl M.L.C. and Captain G. J Bryn.i, M C have been appointed ..* Acv i-ei v (d> .. i) cat.. ft %  members and Qtl I Empire trade, have not by an> •M set at rest. rvatrre M PS who closely "I the Minister yesterday in relation to the matter of pn-.r .instillation with Commonwealth producer countries, are hkelv to I opportunity to I M aapai; %  pi the Cuban l.l.uk deal" as It has i ten termed Tne mam %  tftton Of to-da'laaua i r the moothlj buUatai of %  '-•Emptn laduttj k %  \ lushes nut at what it describes a i i-i tettu l of the Britata Ooi uninent using Cuba is a pressure point brought to bear upon Com mot*wealth producers.* It is not %  I ikelv i,. commend its.-i to th,British eonaurnei Utht i of the .nti.le Both rapoc to d deal in Cohan sugar and Cuban tobacco, the i itei continual! wuid U|urv 1 particularly and UM en t of IBM imi-i praaanl Itaetl *.1 OH West Indies as being thnea i r when UV %  into dirrel I-I ntpetitlon wtttl I country whJch ( hai avaarnal advantage lint' 1 apart ftetn IhOOO pi-esentej b> the pioposed .ureeminl Lever Strewing thai Cuba • %  IKM HI %  reaponHbUM ol Oreai Britain BrtiW,V h K nne '&. T t'" m l' su "f-" 1 ""'" AUKhe a. th, S&'S Z S,^ "rilhsh LmhassvinUashinKtananri a member of ihc British to the t h i thai n. | i. rvetion nt the Caribbean Commission, told tile Advocate QonnmmkVt puipOM of reuiuyesterdny that there is :i U| demand In the United Slate* "" "'" %  """ %  !' %  '"'" Mr Th, ,„p„„ „„,„.,! „,.,,. ,„ "'" v "—< '.' l "" "• the ilThuntday by B.W.I A. Cror. ARDATH CORKTIPPED CIGARETTES r-rkascN .-i ir* • hkh %  e rrdurlnf fhHtlnal nriai !•'.—ic now idW-Mf .. Jte Cariean of '*• 'or ga.na Kvery rlsarftte laataailaai in v ini aoa*a1haaa KNKillTS DKili mUg /^y//^///AVAV//*V^V.%V>W/Aor MEMBERS of the Amsrkan Iri.h MimiU M picketed th Bntinh Oaamlata nt thr rtnplia Tork. in reieutment afauurl ..Ikufd Bttti-ih nuUal or Oenrrsl Mai Artliir from I —EJ press. v: 1'iM wh m ti' y 8tat BlUldULC. New .. lie ili in Kr>* knd A.la Hand-made Products Hard To Sell [n U.S.A. Says Thompson for hand-made orochicr 100 Years Ago "WEST INDIAN" !*iay Sth. 1B51 A novel action Hafl irted In the (omiMii Fiona to-dai, before *lr Boweher Clarke and a special Jury. It waa an aellea for breach of prernla e of mairlue. (Touaht by Mr Crlspen Field ncalnst Mr. B. P. Newton, Th* simple Uiioe of nromise af marrlace by thr tlefendani lo Mian l Field eldest dauchter of the plaintiff and breach of that promtae. Ma rlearly proved, and the Jurt (a hlchly respectable Jury), after a few momenta' deliberation found for the plaintiff with damage* of £500 ilertlnc The < ...in w u crowded with ladle* and senllemen. ina\ !-• lived as tti of puce luiKumintt. kimuini full ll ihnt whei Antigua (a Ute.ul il.e Twelfth . Ihnl whr tubi l,JT M-etlng of the CorihheanoSS! STuS^w^ !" ^.* muuinn which open li the Lean ;; '' zSS (Tnid |o take *h. Case of Threats Dismissed opens in the l.e*i,, U i rve council on Monday mot Mnj ,hp *"**** He fa slaying with SlrOeeta* wS Sff 1>^ ' %  Udy Seel nt ftemersyde. ChrlM '"V!^. £ Church Tn -J-**Oovorrunarri i^ rerj He nld that handmade pro'*""' ' "''•' l ""K '"'he %  world re dlfflcull to market in the '"''' •** i> w fact the price nt U S A und one has to be an ***" Cuba can tUlload her surcxport to understand the marinrt l lu "'W h ni afUi having sold lo i" ablo to mil these goodi ""' n a ptnoortkai of her crop He had advised that Mr. and nt "Upporte.1 price-; In the United Mtv t'uI I. %  ,! %  .,, Ul Mate." tour the Waal Indus ti adVUW thfl Cuba'price II li. urgtieo. is ir producen oi aandicrafti on the '•d depresM-d prtca in so fi type of Ku*"k to be produced.' as Iher cnunlrle* are ON Which will find a sale in the USA. The propoanl i* m.ded In thi. Ml l.i-iKhion he shid. is the best bulletin'* article, thai if as recvpeit in the V S A on the ported. Canada i> lo take HT.fMK marketing of handlcraftl and lit* ton.* of Migar iinnualb from Cub. i well-known a Mist who a corresponding addition t.huult specialise-: in the deign of hand! "in all fairms: be made to the rr n '^ ,. n. U %  ,,Bk '' ,,f t'^nnuHiwealth Caribbean Tour najai Mr and Mrs I^ighlcns C'arib Second Thou<;hls bean toui U l>elng paid for by Ihe I, th* i n.ted Kingdom GovernWeat Indian (.overnment* with nienl having .second thi.tight* about %  from CotonW Develop conn veaiUi ogan avnenonts? mant and Welfare. They have Sugar industry representative. ijlready upent three weeks in hove l-een enlle.1 I., a meeting T ^'". r VK *V Trtnidad „,,,, rood M.m.trv offlclala on "' ' • J* 2*52 Tuea.m> it -s ,a,t .'roSne^neatfor about three or four days iM-foie „,,, | itdIn Oan^nkS '" ''"" %  ""' *<" An lfr r '" %  ,, ""^ !" '* ,: Ml Thomson -id, h1,. fc_ ".?"""' !" nee.n express A case brought by Merton Sealy i n w hieh he charged MiehLi.-l Idimedin i.f Wh;'.. \'.k %  p*on said Hint recruit Ing this year for contract ngrieul luial labour in the USA. hia jusi begun and th* total number re making threats to h.n, "wa," "n^ ^^1* BriSS Waa^lgSlS^ ^ ^ '*'"-"^-,,u.g ,, mi,*ed without prejudice rerter. ,-j.;' ,'' ' "" day by Dtatrlct -APolice Maga^g". of West lml(-I1 i ,„ ... „ .. „ hihoui -n the U.S.A. sue-ik very Mr. W. W Recce K.C. aphighly ...deed of the West btdlnru peared on behalf of Ramedln and want to go on einploylnu o Commons., Scaly alleged that he wen: Ulto them,'' Mr Thompson said, and "Nolxidy is ntUAed with Ituniedm's place of business lo added that thev are having ,i Commonwealth ReUti Mlnii from all ouarten nf Iho i WoaHIl vane the leakage nf MWI if the re|nrted Cuba dewl. Whatevei are Ihc ofrlMal inttnlertain thai strong effort* will be made to secure more definite Infurination on Cuba business thai yet been revealed in an answer * l/Uka^ diatA occasion '""" • on Acute at the hading AloA&A %  aagaaagaiwad II AKI.ISOX S HKOAI) STKIKT Wounded £3 lor Speeding Eileen Clarke, a labourer of Mahogany Lane. St. Michael, was treated and discharged at the General Hopltal laic* night about D o'clock for a wound on her mouth Busta Will Get Civic Welcome Hon. W. A. Bustamanu?. Prime Minister of Jamaica is dlM to arrive in Barbados on Sunday morning by B.W.I.A. \m Trinidad al 8.20 to attend the fSvelfth Meeting of the Caribbean Commission. Ho W01 be welcomed at Seawcll • bv a Reception Committee comprised of Mr. W A. Crawford, M ( P Chairman, Mr. C. A. Hr.utln.aite, J.P., Mr. J. E. T. Brnnckcr. M.C P.. Mr. D. D. Oarner, M.C.P., Mr. O. T. Aline.. M C P Mr. F. McD. Symmonds, Churchwarden of St. Mi. Cha**, Mr .1. A. Mai t mean. Or. J. I.eV. Wilson. Mi I) F Blacketl nnd Mr III Itrathwaite From Seawell he will be condUCted to the Marine Hotel by a procesnon of cars Mr Crawford told the Advocate yesterday that the Committee is extending an invitation to the peo. pie from all over the colony to be present at Seawell to welcome the militant Jamaican and B.W.I, ( %  copies' leader. Within the past 16 yean, he sale) v Biistamante had established a reputation as being one of the outstanding champions in the entire British Colonial Empire of the came of the hitherto inarticulate masses "His position m thi history of Jamaici and. for tha. matter the British West Indies t* .^S* a 'n,1"V !" A City PoHce Magistrate terday fined St. Clair Blenman of Britton's Hill, St. Michael £3 for speeding while driving the motor van M-1617. The fine Is to be paid by monthly instalments or In default two months* imprisonment with hard laboui Police Constable Jones said that on February 20 he wgl checking the speeds of vehicle?! on Bush Hall Road and made a chock on the motor van M-1817 and found that it was driven at over 41 miles per hour and Ihc speed limit on thai road for that type of vehicle Is 20 ntfjnl par hour. Puttinji up a defence Blenman said that hi* speedometer wa, not working properly and he could not say at what speed the van wa* travelling discuss a question about his W.K I Hbo which were owed t„ bjm While Weal India*. t there they not into in argument I.-l.ourers to the and Ramedin nld, "If you don't —^^^ leave niy place. I will blow your brains out." Scaly rnlled two wilne-s.es tt. corroborate his evidence, but each of (hem ggJVO I difTen-i t account of what happened between Ramedln and Sealy. having Board In the ; % %  tlk %  %  ter'. IJ'IV* stattment yesterday Hut 1 •a pace 7 SOLD DOLPHIN AT 30 CENTS A LB. Justices G. I. 'Taylor um J. W. B. Chenery fined BditJ Millar | hawker of Dalkoilh, St llig Sugar Export THiitTY-i.ir.H i haoasend %  even hundred onu twonty-thrt* tons of sugar have boon ihlppad fnm the Island during January to Apni tins year, of ihat nrnouni 20.478 tons were %  hinpod in April Two million, lluee hundred and eighty-eight thousand, five hundred and thirty-two and a half gallon* nf molasaes were fhln*eH over the aame period. I Up to Apul. l.inn.:i!i 1 %  gullon* oi %  IH.IIKM-S win *.lii(i|"'i Siv hundred and Iwenty-elghl Han. W. BI'STVMANTi: V IOUS private functions are al*o honour ,d there ij no l.vmg "j ^tSS^^jH tne Jamaican who could have accom. ^ H ft conwrite< to add es> p h*d for the people of Jamaica b 1( ^ to ^ hcM untler at the tune when he did. the social n crr nf ^ Reception Comand economic revolution which baa taken place in that colony." Ass/. Labour Commissioner Due Next Tuesday Information ha* juit been received that Mr. H. N. Jack who ha* been selected by the Secretary nf state far the Colonies fr appointment lo the post of Assistant Labour Commissioner, Barbados, will be arriving In this Colony on Tuesday. Bth May Robert Nicholas Jack who was born in 1905. was educated at the St. Vincent Grammar School After serving as a clerk in varlou., department* he was appointed Labour Commissioner. St. Vincent in 1941. Three year* later he was attached for a short period to the Labour Department m Jamaica and during the same year was sent on n special missimi lo Aruba and Curacao. N W I In 194.1 he %  •crved as Rehabilitation Officer by demobilised war personnel and In ih<* following year tcted as Censu* OfTcer. Michael. £5 fur se hng > %  > -•"' %  •"" forty thou.an.l. two bundled and two monthh nnpi.sonment w.tli foiiy-e.uhl gaJlOfUJ of vacuum pan 3f* n* DiBtrict '"A", who had Impoaod line of 30 on Mill.i' r scheduled price of dolphin i cents per pound retail Eustace Oil "Fort Amherst" Unload* Tlic SS Fort Amhri.t inloadlng hero yesterday, her cargo from New York, New Icundland and Trinidad It in eluded 1.000 big. of when' Horn SQ0 bags of cornmeal nnd clTj cask* i f %  altod Hsh The Hour and corn meal rante t Meurs. Genera: Trader* Ltd. while the salted fluh <"as consigned to Mei< Mnrc '. Co Ltd The Amber, t ., | roajahj ., nail supply of ormaei Iron, Trinidad She left oort yeMeida. v. ning for St. Vino nl Mr, local > %  M t Ha Co-la tt I'u Ltd | BECORATEaal For WINDOWS. IMUIK PANKI.S, Klc. AVAILAHI.K IN FIVE ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS Each in Two Mm ITlIC and W *1" :. %  We are in a poshiun lo Quote very favourable Price*— I'hoiie 2Mii ">t > >flve gahui ii ..I t-ses >• ,-ii' • if fane ti i %  cuddle of Ural month prodigal, LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION •vi i 11 Honour QW finer Judge. not Sir Allan Collymore, yesterday Inspector told the aosnri du thai on Marefa 21 he si defendant at the |uno*h Roebuck nnd Bwan BtteoU a tray of dolphin She wi there very long when n man went panted ihe peti...., up to her and paid SI o. f,„ Firnita Cumberbatch for letters "*£•,. and •,„ l ? a,f '"' %  ' "-nn.tr.,tmr lothl %  dolphin He fC.ill) went up to her Luaband Clifton A Cumberher and asked her what a Mind i.,,,,1,. late of Carlton. St jarnal old the fish 30 cents per pound DIED SUDDENLY High Blood Pressure Kills Men & Women r-f iron. i"ih u",.„i f^saaeaTaaaaa l".,^.'?^: l ^,"" ", 4 !?'• %  • h 1 •'-"* %  V V -i %  '' %  •"' U'na .%  I lal-innof,,.,,,,,,, .(rofc.. c on, mi •ymi.n.m, „( llifh blood Pr M "* ",', "*'*'•" %  >•••. 'i>a(u|iaril)| WITH CBNTBB METAI. STRAP AND III Hill I! TYRED WHEELS S.-.7.20 %  l> '• Ilr.l ..... irt worry. L >.ipm.r... In, N.... WITH III I'.lll l: TVKKII WHEELS BI'T WITHOL'T CBOTU METAI. STRAP S.V. 112 SIMILAR TRICKS WITH SOLID IRON WHEELS AT M0.32 ;iml S:IH.H1I Each uland. has contented ti addrew a % %  _. 'it f public iiu-vtlni lo b held under IlKIUt'Sl I OOU> (•an iniinli-N nf lha Dad-nut inn Cur-. • I.ITI.V J'.IH'S. aon of Cudora Jones Hill. St. Michael d.ed ml tinOengral 11 ana) ii veaterda) after he was admitted talned on April 1-. A post anortem examination w performed at the General H< Mortuary by Dr R U Wai inquiry has not been fixed She told Mr C. W. Tarme, lntnirte, %  Yearwood and Boyce. Solicitois %  d f"i t'umberbatch. were adi probate;— He fit i Bourne. St Jame*. • BOH Bt Michael.I 111 Crawford. S: Michael hn iriUlaim, Bi %  %  N I, Joseph Douglin. St. James. Aitustus Watson. St Peter, Therea i Jane Collymore. si Jiweph. pita] '. %  me Francli Cummin*, St An Th<. ...i. ..„ !" ,.,„ %  / %  .„„-,3"; ^artUW"BV*" %  •" '* HARRISON'S LOCAL AGfNTS TEL 23*4 McLean. Christ mittee at Queen's Park during the week .•Appreciation The Reception Committee Is Mr Crawford said that this was i \\\„\ both on I is arrival an opportunity for the people of and throughout his stay in the IsBarbados to pay fitting tribute In land, the people of Barbados will a distinguished son of the West demonstrate their appreciation of Indies All over the world, people his great services to the cause cf paid due homage to merit and Went Indian progress Barbadians were by no means in. A full programme of extra-con. appropriate. "Let us all be preUaa is beins arranged sent at Seawell to-morrow mom. for him during his stay here. The ing to give the lion W. A. BustBChurcawardon and members of manle a right royal welcome to Mict.acl's Vestry have our country", he said. agreed lo tender him a Mr Symmonds said that the r*. • i-Mion at Queen's Park on caption was being run strictly on Afonday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock, non-partisan lines. An inquest into the circumrtance* surrounding the death of ; 9-year-old Reynald Brew*ter. a Irbourer of Halls Rood, St Michael, will be held to-day at District -Ii* Courl, St. George. The Coroner will be Mr. C. W. Rudder. Reynald Brcwster was killed on the spot on April 21. when tag lcrry G-253 rolled over him while he was working at Franria Plantatkra. St George about 3 30 o'clock in the afternoon. The lorry Is owned by Flu rouglas of Dash Valley who was the driver at the time of 'he occurrence. %  % %  ^ %  %  % % % %  %  %  %  %  %  JB %  •-|-|'III.\A" %  f HICK STARTEXA %  %  nee %  B H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.-Di.tributor.. FOR (JEMS & BOYS i HI in id II ARTIFICIAL sil.K SCARVES—wllh irinii.BMh Irnin <2.2K— SZ.I9 LINEN HEMSTITl IIEI) IIWllKKK I HIKES— T, inch hnti.. Each JOc. ARTIFICIAL SILK SCARVES In While with Irinitc. Priced from S1.8S—t2.:i'J BOYS' AL TRUNKS RKNCOLA STKII'EII PYJAMAS (Si„. M It, 44 intt.) I't r Suit $SJJ8 CONSULATE SPORT SHIRTS Short nlccvci in si/,^ 14'j lo 17 Each Sli J STRIPED INKER PANTS with Elastic interts in waist 1.111I /.ist.-tiers. Si/.-s 28 lo 3h Pair I1.3J WOOL BATHTNO 1 Shinies nf MariHin and HIIMII. Size 20 lo 311. Per Pair S2.49 IAVE SHEPHF.RII & CO.. LTD. 10, II, 12, & 13, IRCAD STREET



PAGE 1

1 ?.\TI'RI'\V MAI .".. 13I lIAItUUHK MIVOCATK PAGE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. TiLtPHOhl 2301 TM c Barge tot 0, .•'.. .triil In Mentor lam ck-dxyi ir4 111 o a.ia..-n 130 rt 4 IA, 1111 lor I IIMM On IM 41li May 1HI. M hei *< Mx-heel Naomi Svtvta >lili Janitor ol UM cheep-ide rri*iHiiv DMMJ *• i n -A dm e-d U rrnti P— eomliar aa SaaeVaM, a.,,.-—, cfcarp* || N M ar--*-," •* II %  •• fwd-rt Dancing Classes AUTO.XrOTIVt Apply T G Mel CAR— Morn. Oxford In eacellrnt e. diinn U mile*, now lyrea. Can aeen al Foil Ro>al Garage Phone gl A D Herbert. ) 1 M — CAR Aurtui IM refuaed Apt.: to It Q Chalirnor. a-onaUe orlei Wttmm C L. %  town Phone CAR Vn u *hall 14 all with 4 Mod tyraa. in good working condition, purr reaeonable. Appi. T. D. L_ Oa>. Staple CA* One Standard 10 h.p Bound t .ccr.anK.il order. New E-ndf 11 V Baiter. 1-r.i.ne IW brl.m, !• LIT and 3 pm Jl| l„ I'AR Hiaman Car M-lfM M good working order Apply Flank Proverb* Co Harold Provcrbc | Co lad Hi1. Sireel. 41 II—n CAB— HOT 30 VauihalL rrn al Couile-y Garag r G L Chalirnor ** (.11 Ki—1 1 memory ol our belovrd mother Drklna C.ilkr.. whi %  i. Ml IBM Alxi-nl bul ii' iMBOtWfl tan ii '. Chiidf lean IMp (JOVERNMENT NOTKES in ATI! OF MR BFWABB IAMBI i .l>oen received • o tha cife.-t Uul Mi I rd :: ami a nslive of (larbadus. died at the Seflon i ;. :; Liverpool, on the 26th Of r, 1950. 5.5.51in POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE Ol I MM. Ol' TIIK TWELFTH Ml I UM. Ol IIU ( XKIBBEAN COMMISSION p. ide under Section 36 (Si el the Police Ac*., I I. On the 7th May. 1951, no vi hall b* allowed to enter in'Public liuildmRs Yard bei00 a.m. ind 11.30 a m. DrivOTCI i ( vi'hirles 11111la UM cuciiuiuy Mr the Public Buildings yard by the Souih Oat* In single i (tar ha\ Ina wi dowu tin occupanta hall immediately lerve by ttM Korth G directed by the Police. Alt Kf drivers %  I trablelai returning tor their 00 upanU shall enter the r-ublic Bu.lrtinRK Yard by the North. Gale and leave by the South I 4. No vehicle nail park in or bi* .tllowr.1 to remain on the Public Buil.lini'-. Yard between I am. and 11.30 ii. in i: T MICHF.I.IN, Commissioner of Polne. Poliea HaadOiuarMri, Bridselown. 2nd May. 1951. naiMIll of thr l.jb.iur Wellire (Housing 1-oanti OrgmniiialiMi ai.d the I*ra.jnls' I.IMII B-.nk : .en of the Labour Welfare (Housing Loans) QtiJattalMj lion and ihe PeasunU' Loan Bank will be removed to Pinfold Pinfold Street. City, as n tfwj TQ| May, 1951. 5.5'S l—2n 1 ,',',->',*,0*^-***W**V^'r->*>^'*§ West Indian & British i..! Hal Cralta. %  .Vi U U*corllon llouw, Taitl-M. 14.491—11 OH I IMA I 80f v ENm8. C'I'RIOS. JEWELS New Shipmrni opfned THANI'S -a. 1 FOR LONGER SERVICE TAR all po.li brlora rrrellng. A amiill qiur.lily ol Ihli M .i I iirrvnlallva m.itrfial atill i.valiabla M t.A I HOBKS. BMr St. Piltr 4 0c. ptr gallon. Got Some To-day. WAGGON: On* 1041 V-a Ford Button Waggon In prr(rt:t condition Apply JoU* or 3143. XI 4 II I iho Stn Bcno>l .( rUaaaa lor i bar a 1'ublir ufiii j,it I nn M rv-il Salr „TK 'lb* 1-t.i.il ^lal.lLal. A.l |WM I -t < %  On Tuaaday ihr Dih div ol Miv |M| al Ihr haul ol 1 oYlork In Iho a^iajo,! will bo .old al nit .rftrr to thr hlghoat (ir taming bv adni'sauirmrn loot atiiw i n Parian o> MMharl bulling .rid bou n.'^k i in Ni %  M.I.-I BVdfl a road font NTH fral w to* and on Ihr aald ro-d ral.rd Villa Ho.i al Brllton Hill. M.T:II. *itn tnr CnaUrl %  tm*rrr. Attachad rn.ni Walirr K\n< Pl.lllip* for -id lowaldi aatnlacllon. *r and II no* aold on >.-h da aald oaW • %  ill br krpt open and a ..ibaoquntl da, will be llkrd lot MM Drpoall k> or paid on day T T KF.ADLJEY. Praa -i Mi iwaal i i. raat Ma (ad %  0*** PI in.MSALES Tn atwrt yar oaatM %  • %  tr*rh-oa aid II —m— 9— dBdlr lla ok Soadoa* •' %  'F !" rno-or II If a woa k l ia i awd |I M o^ndagai KfLAI. r.STATB AnprOJilmal. ly 3 01 of land al St-fWKi Bnad C %  %  11 C Chaiin.ii 4k Baal. ran Cfakw App.i: i ii pa i >' Oaly a !• %  pon rrmaining al IT .urr U. oiUc< IWn bSOura ah go Thr apola rang* %  Irom 11.WO 00 to M raM hold n.> "W .a^->nablr ir | my drht ranlrartrd In my n-mr unlraa ly a wrlllr^ order aiinutd I I ,. II. N MIA.'KM AN" %  •Walninilvlll'. Uonnclr.. Ciapham. .i m ilara-r al Ihr root Crllh Ar. | 1 : ,.,. g Slot* Ill" 3. M 11 LIQUOR IJCCNSR Urrnnr and %  lock Apply on Hall* Road. SI. M.cli Mr. 3 1 M For Ihr lrratm-r Kldnrv. ahd ni.id. nnd PUdder Pill. able at KNIGHT'S I or d PriM i LTD. ...l, n !" .ii • boi nl Ihr Kidney Dblam5 51 Jr. GALVANISED SltFETS lint i nl, raw aheeta Cheape.l in Ihe Uland II M 04. 1 II MM: • 11 M tl; t f. n 50. D II M 40 NrU caa'. Beltrr hunv I IIAIINFS a CO. LTD. 4 t SII 1 n IRON DOUB1X IIF-D , MATTTiy" new l*ooo Dul S001 MoMMfc M mont. Haillngi. 4 1 51 1 TUT SAITP.S Pmh %  tock ol dell' VEATII LTD POWOFHFD Mil* On* ol Ihr bra: lh.it %  Holland'-. "PrUlan Olrl*' Powdrrad VtUK Topa In buu-T 1st conWnt. Con alt.. vlUmln m w r.aenllal lor Ihi uromotlon ol healthy lllo. Orl II lo' he lamlf. the chlldrgn will took ativi %  fltr .i Irial ol ihl lamoua milk A.k loi SP1.1T PEA"!—Can bo boughl at Jaa. t Tudor A Co. Rorbuck Stree'.. lldOO r N lb Mi. Dial MM. M 4 Sl-Tn Save your cloth-, from Uolh> langlng "Olev" Moth Killer In your Vardrobe II t 500 time, more rrlrctlvMa H th H..I1KMC;MT s i in 1151 In .1.1 %  : %  ; ...I %  KNIGHTS LTD aaallv dlgralad anil i conUlnlr^ RXi Terted Cod L TAKE NOTICE Furnish in May Thr Miinry-Saii^ Way ..li.isirn VaaCfi I i T.blri Wllh 1 lo I 1 ..I. IV %  Irinl Ih-M aha jr. H> ..He. Wardrobe*. ChrMI' MR, Fancy ant Seiaing T-blea. In om' diapr* and (Inlahf*. China. KH4tlen and Bedroom Cabirwta. B*d.ide Table.. Bideboaid. DHA'VING ROOM Purnitnre in Morrl. rg-ra Tub, RuaB Plerbare and Eav-chair. 13 SO I %  DESKS wllh Flat ar %  %  !,:.>-. MM Thai HUNTrR-WlL-IN niSTII.I TNG CO INC a rorporaimn u runited under 'he Uti of Ihr Stale of Maryland United Slate, nl Anwrico. who.e trade or BMlUlf aldreta la 485 Lexington I New York New Yotk. UJIA. DHtJirr*. haa applied for in. mti-iraUM al a trade mark In Part "A" ol Regitter In rr.perl ol alcoholic brvcrage. a.peclaUy •thiakj. and will be o rrgi^er Ihe *am alter from tho 3rd day ol Ma.. me pereon .h.11 In Iho m, nonce in duplnile \a m* al my aMSce ol opposition of awrh raai.lratkm The trade mark ra. be aeon on application .r %  I ..rri-D..U-1 Ihn lli day of Ar.nl IMI H WILLIAMS Regwiiar of Trade Mark. Uai-3n %  M ""I W.nt.d For Ch Uaad and Unuaed POSTAGE 8TAMPS ol Ihe Brltlah W Indie. Good PriCM Paid al Ihe CABIBBKAM STAMP artTIBTT I PI'BLir OFFICIAL SALE i room*. laniif..r I < %  %  ...ii bin;: ..i u of aale will be pubtUdfeM InaptTtlon between ) p m and 0 pi-, .n\ dak eKcept ftunda/i on appon i merit with Ihe owner Ml. SI i -Phone nai>. O. LW. CVLARKX A CO.. %  am tr>. MIM *: ba %  Ihe hlghe-1 biddr, Ihe appraiard vu'ue AU I i> rattmaUon 'i looda ailiiale in Ihe Pan.n of Ml Michael bulling and haiBllllBI %  L . I 1, lyne. on land' of h'r.. ..Ivliap Ptorilallon and on landa of lion %  \1 rPr.-c near Si M..uh.-ClMarrl | lollowi: The whole ar.. if: i and W i B 1 I M llou-od lor kc IV. MH Ml %  -W II ILA I %  Provod Mardi.iia Office April IMI. 31 4 II—In NOTIO. EUSTACK BEN Polk nan i Ui life %  Ma Dim tor* to grant a dir.nc.il.' i e. NOTIcK u henHi> i i nv oliinli.Mi I r...-e.l wllhlu on. %  I Hi. policy a.krd for will be tuned. i K %  BPWW1 31 4 51 -An PMaMOMI Ma | Baaajj nraai i uiUble for Pactoty. AgrnU OflVrr Dwnliaia. Bollcltora. or Bociety Apply Th-nl B-o. or Ptal 34M i AUCi ION -ui. old to Ihe htgheat I II ..i.-i WASirtil Mimwan rha'g* w.rk T3 ceali i M rand* *--da M ;i mm k-orda 1 cvarr a leo-d w->" I (nnd Jaatdagt. I Oil HIM -.am charga pn. n mil aad I to Ihe .< I gjh ihe following, atari before June laL IMI. %  M*rlervc*d Coin t aalaiv IM M per rwaaith TYl'ltT-! %  • with afc-rical etprrlewce "i"i> Hl.M pe: ma.nl. INVOKING ABST accurati urr. prelrrat... with riprrirnee tui invokring -aaimanclng aalary IP) au per month Wnllen apolnaliwn rtaltng agr ani i>retioua expelienca' lo be ami lo Be. %  rotary, Dowdmg r.taiea ana Traulna 1 id Bai Street UOUSES UMOAIaOa Nawtl bum Buncalow wiih f.mnlrul w.i n, Drawtni and garaar li.-i atl5 and I WVtgM IONTAMARA' ... ding Iridge aid teleph.Hir Foi .ember and December SHIPPING NOTICES i. general all IO.IIHI raperi.1. poaltwo vtilh cll r.l^bllahrd lUm Will InHrnl ywu Wrllr H W Mvrrlldng Drpl III HIM I -It .. i tommand of Bi kiaaw eenllal Appi. leller out tlalalgar Street 1S11—> 7AU GDU. far our TOY ROOM L|-l>l> Irv pvraon. JOHSSHN'S 5TATUINMISCll.l \MHS Ml.NT OHva Bloaaom St -do.. Will pay 4ar each Ml perl ii %  iiaibarl Baplaa JTiu prrlei-l Second Hand Ch*rr Cutler ro pinuutAat" Owen T -ii.fk Street. Dial aW MALTAc-attlewaah. lor Ihe month ol June. Julv. November. December. 1 Wr.lhrrhrad Co J N OmCBl above Ualila • Ltd William Henry Street Appi. J E Mar-on Phmw 3411 > 5 51 4n B..OM at BOARD Inr Genilemen On See Hrawanable trim, lor perma i.tnl. Applv Cauarlna Heaidrntla Club. Maxwell Coarl. Tel UTa 4 i Bi~m stAc.Arr baM Ma. well'. Iclephoiw an. lor the month nl JWM tk-ui-r. dui naa 111 THritSJSJ<>N .ilI.l ,i.i Auaurt twnti. DUI 7SM i.ovr A II n MI LOST MONTRF.AI., AISTrtAl.lA, NEW ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED iM A N | Ms %  n.MiAhlrto ...ilad Mtiaban* k^'.h 14th. Arriving .1 Barbadoa May ,"' ARABIAI. ..hnluM u. aafl fiam HotoaH. im. May. Adelaide Mih Ma.. Mella .„.,, aili Jui '•*'' "". Sidney abd J.. i at Trmi.li.,1 .| . I.Mrr half ol J„i%. and pr.Hr.il., i>, r ..i.. r (Q BarbaaVia and l-.rrpaol l" addition to general cargo Uira veaaal haample epaor lor chiliad and hard frozen cargo Cargo accepted on through BUIn %  filing (or iranahlpment at Trinldatd lo ana, Leeward .• %  .. %  Iwgn I aland. For further par I n-RNrs-i WITHY DAD, B W 1 and DA 04BTA A CO LTD., TOWN. BAR0ADOS. B.W.I. I .he* ..ill ,i i %  Paew-ruier. for Daeaiaara Sailing IMI B.WI. .S(|IONER OWN l H A-SOC, INC. Tele. 4047. \d\irlis*'.... It Pays Canadian National Steamships %  C w i ..N-Ttu't-ri" l^DY Nrj-.iN t"A*V (-HL'LSEK CAN CIIA I.ADY HOI.MV BADY NH.Sli:: l_M>Y KODNEY I Jura • Jura M J • %  ..• 13 Aug. 11 Juna It July 14 • -U1TIBOIJIIB IADV IIOIINEY 1>HV NVI.ADN t-ADY NEXBON IADY RODN'KY Baia A-ii.r. B JufM 1 Italy It July M Aug 14 July SWBaafWTAKi: TWKtTS Srile. L 3310 lo : (| Itn M 04TH 1*4:1. I. MM %  ": I' IHOft. O-AXI. Kami, T3M, IUI. oiu. ma t J MM Findei Advocale Ci. I t 11 -m Canada-Cu l>a Sugar Deal South Bank Kxhihition Frani pace 5 Waal Indie* pi-oducer said to-da; r ,; int ,„ know what in reall; tfolTrjJ on." be ;uldi-d. will ! %  represented a Iks along with iilhe Colon ll ri uso\ \i %  AUXA-NDKIA BOI -1 i net ba anyone rlae cm it a dchl* %  il. MUtlAN .. PH1I I IPSl apt Ma i .t .^ ... dgM %  Ml %  1 4 11 1X)NIX>N, Ma> 4 The MM wWa a aan with .i n.'iiniiM'E ivlreated ahead of the KniR and Queen as Utey advance.| tlmrtn:ii .hiviing crowds to eprtM oprn uie Festival of Britain •U4UA Kshib:!...(-. here ttklity. Two thoiis.ti.ri tarpaiTtarB. elcetrlciana lion und rleanera. Wort Indians had worked all UM tiow beside Auatral Tuewlaj's MtiUUVM itnlil'!i> Kotiline Sucife ,\ .1 ii.ii. of Pood oaaClal b>amonf UM ninht MlXtoUBb dfinc. th;.T an] ni.:ht to hnvi sumteition of Tuesdays meeting u the Thamaa ith'r than routine. He explnin* dftell in InnIfaai rolhrariiig the Mgnlntj ol comp inonwaalth Miitar agreementa, structures n Ihese moetiiiKS are held periodicBU) %  d, cvery >n UM Sonlt, ILmk .pened in rain., wcitber with is \ ind chUh in,il %  • piiiKuptho TAKE NOTICE vAVNr^ ^2~*iA,&* DISTILLING gani'rd under %  H ... ll.^lr 1... I.-.ill •i York. US Ui.it"! lue. New Yi. 1 ol a trade trunk in Pint A" a Heantrr in re.prcl nl alcoholic bevrragei dally whi-kv and will be entitled ti ter live -an.e alter one month frori mark can t otBcr Date.1 thi. al my office ol uppoi-I rat Ion Tlir tiadc on application at mi II Ragutrar ol LOYAL BROTHERS OF THE STAR Neediest Caic. Fund ANNOIMLMENT Relative lo Carnival and r'alr to be hold on 7th and 91li June al Queen's PUR. the undrralgnrd Mill receive entriea rr Ihe following: 4B) C'otumo Band* i> Sterl Itaiul* (o) AalrerUsini Bands Id) lliototlcal Band*. In order la rai-r ilio sUndard ol Carnival, the Sleirlng < ommitlcr weuld %  i %  i>r i i a. Ihr ro-operatior, of Firms. < lul's and Irdivkdual being A* original a* possible No entrante fpe will be rhargrd More jui'. II III.IIlain A I ..rn:\ %  Band of thirty will be vKiting Barbados lo take part In the parade < I.I-III date. 191h May. s| V Mill It BUCKLES cVo Voilrv Clerk* Oflief, Bridgetown .'•). %  Shows. eontarl C. MOKKlS. Sobers I^inc. "illoclive IUIIOII now in th* river. Low*>lylna: rlouda seemed •' %  Ii..' i mignt W1I lead tlib to mute even the IrumpMaVB 1 British OovenuiMnt lo faciUtala fanfare as ihe IL.v.ii i'.iri> ra M ptfOfall tr;-da tunweiM arrived. Hut tl*' %  Wi 1 Indies and Canada. Mr. preliminary organisation, month* Allan Walker. ManaginK Director of difficulties and crltlciam and of We*l Indies sugar, think* so. Ha finally wrwkg of delays and di*. tellroc u-nigh I he hits l-een disap| nintmenta owing to the (wjaMng ihese mattani at the Colo* api-uimallv wri winter, wer < und with Member*! of crowned with success that deiii-J Parliament and finds "sympathatverything in" reaction on the problern oi, Many tu|i hats and frock coals the Wr-l Indias-Canada Truck*, wenworn today bul ihe majority Now in the lime, Walker (eels ramc with good sound raincoats certain, foe pnMUH I,, be put tin ami strotiK shoes. %  % %  viriuiacnt .ly :''!,,*%. aVniJiiaaiidors and Ministeroontrel -o that the WtMnT^rorri mnny countries wilh ladies HI imrchiisc goi'-i, trum and members of their staffs Canada to limit the amount of stood on chairs to sec the Kin.: dollar* the British Treasury earn* ami Queen arrive plpl BU from Ihe sale of West Indies %  ujjar present Included rep r eaatitaUvag in Canada. uf Haiti and Span-th Amcricnn "1 know" Walker ays. "CanaRepubKrs dlans are pretty sitk at the idea The South Hank aSasMMtlon, that they are taking Emplri' sugai riowded wilh fcMntlflc tiqMri. and Iry reason <' %  i al rrtantj and UMlUitrMl c-xbllni-.. is the dollar p.iol, Uiej are un.ilile in (or prrstn?e purposes and not Hun t. export to normal U.W I i„ sell aoorVs It is full of surma\rinM. M prises SeekuiK Mane sdentitlc Ilium rli.il.' \ i i wonders, one suddenly |i Th-re is need for immediate through huge plate-nl.. '.Valker I hi nk. to avoi i a dows, a number of luw.il..ui' I situition which will "senouslv cows placidly chewing thei. eud with Canada's whole "Modern Bloodstock". says the outlook regarding Waal Indian notice. "Two Thousand YaaTI Ii Have (I(erring to the reperted CanaBest Of Their Blood Hus llclpe.1 dian Agreement on the purchase of To Stock The World." There Cuban sugar, he said it was imare prize-winning sn til portanl that moves In that dire. sheep ind pig". Eggs are being tion should not be extended. Th lnld e\*ery hour by prune poultry ly way to prevent it was for tfri Exhibited living on an mlenilve We t Indies to be in a position lo lystem in -mall wite MhaMI MM ttM dollars they were crcatlnc Chickens are being hatched in u for ptirchases in Canada The. nearby incubator. In another should be enabled to hu-v food* corner is the bronze "Rerllning stuffs—salt llsh. flour et cetera— Figure' by Henry Moore, whore BlM ii-tlain manufactured goodultriimodern sculpture is a neeeirary from Canana. surprise in almost any surnnind Concluding ihe interview. Walkings, Berths Vacant In Caf eenago YCSTMDAY Wuite a few berths in lh< Careenage and inner bus in were vacant yesterday. Tow..' end of the whirf and the Piei Head, only one schooner wa mad. ta-d There was also one schoonci in the Inner baaln. Yel. the Careenage wag busy Lighter* attending on the tw< Heamships in port kept the lowei wharf active, raay ueii ].nuliti t (lour from the S.S. Fort Amherst Higher up the wharf, the motor raMMll Cartbbee and lady Jiy were loading cargo, making i e.idy i., Mill tha same evening Then, there were schooners dlscharging cargoes of firewood and i...Ii.nl A launch was hauled up on Ihe wharf by the Government iratie lor repairs. Shipwright' were working on it. Some yardi below Ihe launch, engineers were Hill digging up a crane Flour was being landed in the InnM i>-sifi. DECREE ABSOLUT-E In the suit of S. St. A. Sand. \etMi-, K Ci Sands in the Court of Divorce and Matrimonial Causes yesterday. His Honour the (hlaf Judge pronounced decree absolute Decree nisi had been pronounced on February 9 for the c issuiniion of tho marriage. .1 Han-wood A as en lespolidcnt pi .an unfed iii the tuil of K. W. Gibbons versus T N. Glbl>ons. Mr. D. H. L. Ward, who is holding papers for Mr. O. H. Attains, instructed by Hutchinson and Main:eld. appeared for F. W Gibbons There was DO order a* lo costs. iireltaratad ihat iiie ttcajd in u. West Indies at this lime waf„ eoUaeUve •ctlon n%otiata tb..,r GLENDA1RY HELPED THE ARMY • From i>.ice 5 4 study and work which prepares '' %  >' %  en ii i in the Captain Olive White sees BfUl Si Ten millinn visitors are axpasetad to pass through the lurnsliles before it closes in September. Seven hundrerl people from overseas— 150.000 from Ihe Commonwealth r-setad lo Bpand L'M.OOO.. 000 while ihev are here. Than win ba unomeiai rapre* of |ha Waal Indies at bul ofllciiil iMpiN latatlvw Bra not • %  J u guests of tha (ii.vernmenl hem for until July. Arms .[ .i ili ., %  .. HI ba Harold Allan Mb of wc k m Bnrbadi i j ince %  UM Executive Coun Tmhiilion Ofllrerv nl. and Udy Allan, I.. L SimThe local Army also bus a rnonds, House of Ucprewntatlves league of Mercy, which WBi and D. J Judah. nonni,,.t..1 rmed b) irn late Mrs. (Majon member of the !-. gislative A E. Mofletl in May 1944. n few Cnnnnl t Mi Judal Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay M V Sedgellrld. Hrh Woi.dn I..1 <'..ui. u-llor Srh Philip 11 Davldwe. tk h 1.,. air M Skrulh Srh Unllrd IMgrlrn S Marion lielle Wolfe, Hch lamlalph. *., (iard-rila W ABBlVAIJt Bchoorier rarnlth. Ml armnel. Capl T fram linn.ii Oulana III 1 M 1 l III M V Carlbbee. 140 lona net, Capl 1 -khenrr Mary M Lrwia. M lona net Capl Merahall. lor Hriu.h Guiana M V Lady •/. 46 tonnet. Capl Paraoni. for Ml lajrla • %  Fbrt AanhMVi. IJM1 lona nrl C-pt Kran. lor BJ \ RATES OF EXCHANGE CANADA MAY 4. IMI ar Cheque* an lU'iWr. BI i | Dtsaand Dr.lt, ii! a •agin rir.it. n .1 Mid', pr Cable %  „,,! %  1 1' |. %  Dm V///.W.W.'.V.'.V.Wr*/> with n.t|uirie# in Ihr I int. Kingdom, Canada, United State Jamatca, Trinidad. British Guiana, French Guiana. St Kill-. Antigua, Bermuda, Si Vincent C:.l Zone and Cuba. in marge of the Barbadfe 4 the Salvation Armv i; Major A T. Moffelt. Dh Ipi nder. Rruter MAIL NOTICh %  %  Unlled H rdana laid Anlnrrp b. i ailad v.ii< be clovd at thr ...del it Mall at la a m Ri 10-llAVS NEWS HASH OVF.II TIIK flAKtlEN nms-iisrATicM.v AND n.iiim Mil {Christian Science ^ j Reading Room \ 5 1ST l-LOOR. ROWEN a SONS 1 I Ulroad !ttr..|i f I HourII a m 1 p ra. a, Z Tueadaya, Wtdneadavn. rrM.yi. | 1 10 am II o clock S-tniday. V *1 Al Ihla II...n. Ihe Bible and k ihe Chrl.tlan Belence leil-bonH I %  Maaee and Hrallh with k. lha Brnpn.re* by MARY DAKRR | < BOI mar •*• *• %  '*. borrowed. I or pure ha -rd vi-.iif.n-* ARE WELCOMI | At riteArriveArrlvea Ml John It. ila. Maalt^al MM.. M*U — la Juna l* J"H* — IS July It Jul* • Aug. 11 Aug. • Sept. II Bept. I mint kiln mid itoragr rhaaaGARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agenu. HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM \n*rl s s HKIIIISMAN 1 s "IIEFENOF.K" (.8 PLANTER' s s. I.IM1UIST" s s 11 U ISMAN From lamdon Iamdt>n lailldoll lailldeM (!la*l'w A Liverpool Leavea 12th April S3nd April ii i Maj I >-ii May Due Rarbadoa 2nd May 7th May I8tb Mg] 2flth May 25lh April 8th May HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KXHOD0M Veaael For Closra In Itarhados • %  KTATKSMAN" London 30th Apr.l SPICIAI 1ST I ..n-x.1 7th May '•STUDENT" I-.ndon 4th May s B s s s s Tor foxthar Information apply le • DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.—AfonU 9 ^Mcoa, Si*a*utipe* NEW VOKK -l.:\l. i NEW ORLEANS SERVICE Al in. PATRIOT" Hailed Ai. *>A I" .IMI AIA-OA HilAMBIC tail. Ilili M.. ••Ol TIIIIOIMI CANADIAN FIERVICK "Ala-OA PEOASUS" r. rAll n I'hlMI.II SS "rOLKK nEHNAUOTTK Apt II ITlh May I tin May Mill due Aim! 10th. Sai •rhrie W...I. I 'J -wtr'-ai. I ROBERT TIIOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE. APPLV-DA l OSTA CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE PASSAGES TO EUROPE Conlnet Antillci Produrts, Uinlled, Itoseau. Dominica, for sailing to Buropa (ortnlfthUy, The usual ports of call are Dui.Im. London, or il-u.-id.im. Single fare £70; usual n im tinn r.a i i.i.di. ii CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS Thr Advocale Co., Ltd.. haa made arranirmrnU far rla-klllrd adverlisemrnts to IMUkrn by various District Agriil* and so far llir follow Inc have been aulhorlsrd to recrlvr them : 1^V///////////-V/////.W///////.^'.J HAND sruxti It < i:\TII.\l. FOI XIIIIY PIT H-ad I.TI1. Just Received FRESH STOCK OF ... DOBIES FOl'R Sqi'ARE YELLOW A l l i: l l i TOBACCO 202 4*2 ltna C CARLTON BROWNE 1SS Roebuck HI. Dial 2S13 Wholesale < Retail Dmialst MOS1S f.lTTIVDayrell. It aad Ch. VU Mr* D I. BRI'CE. Maaell Road, th Ch. O MrfONM.V. I'll.run Road. Ch Ch MI-I i II ALLI.YNE, Crane, Ml. Philip. G QI'INTYSK. Charrh VHUie, M. Philip E HINKAON, Manlah Street. St John II L CAVE, St. John's Dispensary, R It KING. Near Sharon, St Thomav HI-.I I'll Jl MMOTT. SI Elifahelh Vlllafe, KI Joseph 9 A DIRANT. liaise Hill. St. Joseph. I III \l/.IK PHARMACY, Four Roadi. St JabJL V HOLDER, St Judes, St l.mrie If C Ill'NTE, Pine Gap. SI Mkkaal. V Rirr. Hank Hall Road. SI Michael K I.ORIIK Hank Hall X Read. Nl. Michael Items ma* be handed inl ihe above for Ihe followlns Columns In the Claullied Seellon : RIKIIIS MAKRIAGCS. 1)1 \ Ills. IN MFMORIAMS. ETC. FOR SALE. FOR RENT. WANTED. LOST or FOl'ND. ADVOCATE CO., LTD. T Gala. Advertmng Manager



PAGE 1

PU.I FOIR BARBADOS ADVOtATF. s VII Kl>\\ 11 \\ BARBADOS i — f—_.i rrlnM by U Advc;— M, Lva RTOMI SL. IchUvlowa Saturday. May 5. 1951 O ver-Popu la I ion In The British West Indies An I iikiml Cut AN announcement has been made in a Trinidad newspaper that the British Council is about" to abolish the posts of Music Officer in the Eastern Caribbean and Art and Exhibitions Officer in the West Indies. The reason for such decision is said to be the cut inflicted by the recent Budget on the British Council. It is highly unfortunate that the British Council should have decided to remove these two officers from their present lields of work at the moment when progress is obvious. The work of Miss Enid Richardson, the Music Officer, and Mr. John Harrison. Art and Exhibitions Officer is well known in this Island, where, perhaps, Mr, Harrison is better known. Miss Richardson's headquarters are in Trinidad, but, she has visited Barbados on a number of occasions to conduct courses, give recitals and broadcasts, and to accompany visiting artists. She has greatly widened musical appreciation*^! this island, and has given pleasure to many. Hers has not altogether been an easy furrow to plough, for British as this Island is, it is proportionately unmusical. Her success has been greater in colonies where the inhabitants are of Latin descent, and are therefore, more receptive. This, however, in no way minimises the value of her work in Barbados. Mr. Harrison's enthusiasm for his work has been relentless. He has lectured, given broadcasts, instructed schools and held courses for teachers. He has organised exhibitions and conducted parties of school children around them. Museums, art societies and artists have all benefited from his enthusiasm and guidance. Nor has his been a straightforward task. He has encountered opposition from schools and individuals where the value of art teaching %  to children was not formerly realised. By courtesy and enormous drive, such opposition has largely vanished. The flourishing art societies and frequent art exhibitions from Nassau to British Guiana bear some witness of his work during the past years. Great regret and amazement are felt that U British Council should have decided to abolish the posts of Music Officer in the Eastern Caribbean and Art & Exhibitions Officer in tinWest Indies. The financial saving to the Council must be trifling when its vast expenditure on seemingly unproductive work is considered. It can scarcely cost the Council more than £3,000 per annum, of which the great.-r part consists of travelling expenses for these officers. Now that the work of these officers is beginning to show real results, it is certainly not the moment to terminate such valuable services, for it will result in the unfortunate decline of music and art. Teachers and others who have benefited from the work of these officers arc not yet ready to stand alone. II is. in effect, the abandonment of this area when more officers are required rather than none at all. There is nobody or person capable of continuing such work. It may be that the abolition of the Music Officer and the Art & Exhibitions Ofltcer is the thin end of the wedge, and that the removal of the British Council from the West Indies or from certain colonies is contemplated., it such a step is planned, could not the British Council retain both these ottcefii ;ind place them under the appropriate local Directors of Education to continue their valuable work ? By this means such important work would continue and grow at a trifling cost, for two officers attached to Education Departments would not require expensive headquarters or large establishment. It is to be hoped that the British Council's decision is not irrevocable. The work of both its officers has greatly enriched the lives of the peoples in the areas concerned, where, formerly, an interest in music and art was the prerogative of a very lew, Gratitude is due 1 the British Council for sending both officers to the Caribbean and for sponsoring their work. But, our gratitude is tinged with a certain bitterness that the work of these officers should be left "half finisher!". In Miss Richardson end Mr. Harrison the Council has Iwo fine British officers, devoid of prejudice, zealous and enthusiastic, and with that rare gift of evoking enthusiasm in others. It will be a long time before we shall see then like again on these shores. Evt i mtmet the second half of the li.it century, when ihe price ui suiiar collapsed, to recover only during UM %  :..n and U l)i 11 again kfl tbl b in. m. ihflN has been poverty With acknowledge!" -is to The Anti Slavery Reporter The Evans Commission The CommisaU-u w.s lO I P t— ., thai it hS lunile. nol lea* than 2.W.UO0 people u ugreKate fro n ihe West indm. countric. to seHtvc th* prsui% on existing means of livelihood. The physic.. I possibility of settling Jamaica wToX. M'tftVuTlTscp" lhal number ta "" two conU between tht huh may become comparablo population of the continent" m: but Jamaica Is % %  land .in .. British We>t Indie*.' Professor used beneficially. The real den W M. Mi.cmilin.ii ay in his book Uy or population there is probU-imlni from Ihe Wet Ia4*e.. ably ot>u to the square mile "A social and economic study M Ihe rttnew correspondent the Weal Indies is necessarily a study of poverty MSt of poverty in the West Indies ha* been the low pru paid for West Indian produce. K.>: With the conditions of 1938. which and island colon lev. respectively protracted periods during the past led to riots and eventually the The total population of the isla.io seventy years the trice* prevaildespatch of a Royal Commission colonies Is 2V million, while thu II.,: fOT SWat tropical primary to the West Indie* . According of British Guiana ond British MonI'lodui-t* have been so low that to the 194" employment census, duraa together is under half a mllihey have permitted payment only 25 per cent, of Jamaica'* ttOO.OOO Hon. British Guiana is as IftrgOat Of rOT) low wages to the works 'ere unemployed. Conthe United sPngriom and liritinl in the industries producing them sequently, Kingston, the capital Honduras Is as large as Wales, ye %  no tropical region hive and the centre of most political the area of all the Islands togethe they been lower than in the controversy. Is over-crowded and is leg* than that of British HonWest Indies. Sugar Is the pnnshanty towns have sprung up duraa. clpal export crop of the West which are sources of unrest and The Ev-ms Commission fount Indies, and gives employment to discontent." th; t large numbers of people couh nore people than any other crop. Seasonal Kmployment be tiansferred to the two tonti For a grest part of those seventy To make matters worse, most of ncntrft colonies but that it wouh years, the price of sugar exported the agricultural work Is seasonal, be possible only through vigorous ,was a halfpenny per pound and The sugar Industry of Jamaica development -seldom rose above a penny per employs about 50,000 workers in source* of those colonies. Spac pound, until the outbreak of tho u, t reaping season, between Do. ,, not available here to set out li two Woild Wars and especially C ember and June, but later in the detail the recommendations of th the exigencies of the Second VCiir ll0 number employed falls commission, contained in a Repon World War compelled resort_ by o(l ,„ ahou i 25.000. Before the wh(rh cmTri 35g ^ of piln war the banana %  ndustry used to bu brlt nv> ne Cnmmission re !; mp,oy ll ? boU, J 0 '!S. W0 ? e ^ h n commended th e SSt .bhshment U 27 million bunches of bananas u.,.,_h r. I.-.. „ n> t i.. ur.ti.1 b*r employed i, eorr*,po„d. SH* ^ %  ' !" .', .^ • J2 the iiniisd OovonuMat to Bulk i u of sugar which was established in 1939 and continues to the present day. One of the greatest needs of the West Indies, and. in fact, of all ... colonies, is stabilization of produce ji, R iy less, prices St remunerative level Until that is done, wage* cannot tx paid to support a reasonable standard of living Otherwise, as colonial administrator cost about £25 million, which couli In Barbados the sugar estates c,n P >' n 2 *£ worker* and main "-tagger" the work. They employ *'n lOO.OOO people, including th. workers for onlv a few days a workers families. week and replace them with Thia )m been criticized us offer others for the other days, in order ln n inadequate solution of thpressed It. "It is idle to talk of to give as many as possible an problem. Critics have lost sigh Initial welfare, unless prices are opportunity to earn something, of the fact that the lOO.OOO wouh lid for colonial products to make Commendable as this Is to save be only the number employed an If.ii. possible." some from complete unemploysupported directly by the inrtus **. .._ -* .( „ ment and starvation, it cannot but tries recommended by the Corn !ttjttS^?!T_S EZSSJ? rr.u in undrr-nour^hmen, „„s,ion and IhM ,rrn, r nun.be Wr muM not lose sight of the would be required lo minuter t fact that there is no unemploy. the needs of the primary worker in. ni i.-lief or -dole" in any West Bnd 0 f Mcn other. To llluntint Indian colony. The destitute unlnis lno population of Barbadu lbs W.'-t Indies is ovcr-population. The over-populated state of all of un Iuili>h West Indian islands has long been the cause of much While the two contlnen %  I eolo Cm,..,. nd employed have either lo live on ,, |g3.00 „f whom only 26.000 ... nd the charity of people nearly as orn p, oye d ,„ ,„ „l. industry, lb „iS!"e?cep,"Do m ini'c.. zsZSf !" ^*! !" *^:* K^'"T "'""""""', 5S* '% n ^p^,ie,was^,ndhy ^ c^th^reToSen^ ^— .estneted Durrn, the war and ". there would be natty. ve immediately afterwards. 15.000 Jamillion unemployed in the United ^ ^^^^j onlinent colOftlea should be abl to absorb three nr four times the number which the industries recommended by the Commission could absorb. Moreover, if th' capital cxpendltu.c was multiplied, ihe absorptive capacity of aicans were employed on farms Kingdom. old i would be ... the United States, but as employment has increased in tho United States, more and moreJamaicans have been repatriated. nnd now the number tune is negligible proportionately Increased. £250 per immigrant is :< moderate sum Peasant Small-holdings A succession of Royal Commisto pay for settling each of then tt^ !" 2££*XKU?2Z Uevelopmen, tepMta. expansion of peasant agriculture The Commission recommended as .1 panacea for poverty and unas the most suitable agency tor Doors Closed To Kmiifranls employment in the West Indies, carrying out Its recommend..!ions That recommendation has been a development corporation in" each Mi i. .ver. the 1 ^ tin A | nw c £" ac,c < "P< ^ 8Tr extent of hc continental colonies They countnes have closed theii doors lh>n y generally believed. In ( cU Uiat the matcrul standards ol L C !" U ".^ ^i* t !" Jamaica one third of the cullivlh e workers could best be raised ^.n.JTttW uJZf who (Sve •* Uni1 * di,r,aod '^holdings bv increasing the yield of the soil Ip\^Sj^aS^l^t^l o lun ^^' K ^,** t ii In British t h ro Ugh „pe rl organiz-tion In ?• %  .y % %  %  ? |??P Ouiana Trinidad. Grenada. St. large units of production, run on „ S^lfffliToTlSIiirS VC3, *. Lucia. Dominies. proilt-sh.nn K basis, ralhr than by J nl ,1 n^h Antl u and NevU hi ** P ro wUblislilng small-holdings and nSandthe^ ' r,, n uf ,he cultivable ltnd Is i cav | ng the settlers to work out inS^et^mSiSiS^tSS dlvtdcd into nall-holdlngs. In Ihe | r own salvation, and the, were fOTTTrWly, mularia IncnUOd the Barbados one itfth is so divided, strengthened in this belief by the DOS Md reduced the other Sue ' St. Kitts. on the other hand, no f ac t that they did not And among fill eontrol of the malarialand has been reserved for the prospective emigrants and then ...living mosquito by DDT. and purpose. political leaders any strong urge ire..! ment of the fever with reThe results obtained from peastowards the system of smallunilv discovered medicines have ant cultivation have been disaphold.i.*. Sd the death rate and inpointing. Experience shows that The Report of the Evans Comcreased the birth rale. It is now small-holders in the tropics, conmission was published in 1948 and BsUmatSd that the West Indian fined as they .ire to the same small while some steps have been taken population will double itself witharea of land, over-crop it and do to explore lines of enquiry sugIn u generation. nol MdrSM 'inbalance Witt fergested bv the Commission, too lltThc total WcM Indian populatillzrrs The fertility of the land t | C h b been done to act upon its tlon Is now increasing at the rate steadily I ills until it becomes barconcrete recommendations. Impleof 2 per cent, per annum, which ren and has to be thrown out of menting the recommend itlons of Is double the average rate for the cultivation for years to fillow until ihe Commission has bee n entrusted world, and there it, an annual ml( recovers fertility So long as t„ the Colonial Development Corrreuse of 50.otm people In Jamaica lhere lg cnoUK h land to permit ot pontion u nl that urgnnlMlIon hai alone, where the t.irm nttsn shiftinn cultivation the results of not shown much inclination to per 1.000 and the death rate 12 per „,„,„( cuU lvatlon are not dlsco-operate with the people in the 1,000, ttwaanus* toaajas s f* gt a.trous. but shifting eull.vatlon is colonies concerned and consul', people. In ^^ „ dc i^ n v t Impossible in over-crowded West ,hem o n lhe, r aspiration^ a n < Indljn islands wishes. In 1947 ihe Soeretiry of State West Indians feel that little profor the Colonies. Mr. A. Creech grPM w m be made towards solving Jones, sent a Commission, ol their unemployment and over_ which Sir f.eufTiev EVUK WHS the population problems until a DeIt densely Chairman, to British Guiana and vclopmen! Corporation is estabin the world, 'o "British Honduras, to investigate llshed in each of the continental the possibility of developing Incolonies. t y the capital of which a also dependent on dustries In those sparsely populaevery West Indian colonial govern• HRiirian economv. the density ted colonies, so as to absorb sui ment which wishes may contubuli „vvr 100 to the square mile. If plus population from the ilnnd what it can and be lepresented OP the total area is taken into reckoncolonies. the Board of Directors. entirety M n agrarian economy —the sugar industry—the density of population is 1.300 to the square ,, ,ir rWch Is nearly double the density of the highly Industrialist countries of Western Europe Durbados is the populated country except Malta. KIDGWAY—New UJf. Chief L ) K.I TENANT GENERAL MATTHEW B. RIDGWAV commanded the Eighth Army in Korea for 105 days*. He went out in December from being a Depulv Thief of Staff in Washington's Pcntaiton. A lot of those who know him expect him to so back there one day as Chief of SUIT. Rldgway is 58. thrice married. with a two-year-old son. He Is himself a Regular soldier's son. At 47, he turned thy 82nd Division Into one of the United S t a t e s' first two airborne .md led It in battle in Sicily, Italy, and Northwest Europe. Wlten tho war ended, the airborne genera! became United Btafai representative co the United Nations military >tafl\ and married Penny, aged 30, the prasssni Mrs. Ridgway. Then he commanded m the Caribbean area For relaxation Ridgway chops By ROBERT JfSSEL wood, ice Skataa, and reads the works of Rudyard Kipling. Hit. Hit. Hit J ERKED from his Washington desk Job last Christmas into the Korean fighting, he reVltallsad the late General Walker's slightly jaded and bemused Eighth Armv. The Tenth Corps ceased to take orders from General MacArthur in Tokyo, and came forthwith under command of Gencr:.! Ridgway. The Eighth Army found ItSStt, as another Eighth Army suddenly found itself in the Western Derert in 1942. when an slmosl unknown general called Montgomery Mew out from England to command It. He let It bo known that hi* Interests were homicidal, not ceographical. and said: "Real cMata in Korea is incidental," His tactics were to work his divisions forward by slow dcgrci hit the enemy hard and often from the air, and then push his armoured spearheads ahead la keep contact with the Reds. In defenco, he accepted limited enemy advances, then pinched out the bulge with cool precision. It worked The general was up daily at 530 and off by hoverS lane to visit the forward troops at ton's emblem had been hi-, pearl-handled revolvers Ridgway's became the two ham; Krenudc fastened to his webbinit a/hswav*c ihe hoverplane car ncd thi tireless, erect Command er among th* soldiers, respect was %  demonstrate.! both The men reused to tight from the valleys. He taught them t> dominate the height*. Now he moves on and up. —L.K8 NOBODY'S DIARY Monday — The workmen of Barbados have' got such a bad name for absenteeism. 1 laziness and all the other ulMllilanltHWi of fallen man. that it gives me tfraat pleasure to record a scene in BuHnTl Road. Thanks to the perpetual stream, of traffic jamimness which makt-x ibis, road unique in Barbados 1 was forced toj stop fur the space of one minute ur, more. During the enforced halt I saw a great ; swing of small picks. I wasn't near j enough to hear any singing, but it looked i very much as if the lips of one of the pick swingers were moving to the, rhythm of the other six workers. I almost felt like causing a traffic jam myself, just to wait and see how long this burst of energy would keep up. but what I saw almost convinced me that therewere people in Barbados who liked to work with their hands. I was particularly glad to see them in Baxters Road, because what that hideous neighbourhood needs and needs urgently is to be completely destroyed and rebuilt. With willing workers like the ones I saw the matter could be arranged. Tuesday — A iishi-rm.ni near Paynes Bay caught a shark the other day. It was duly cut open as sharks are vhen fishermen catch them. Inside were found (certainly not the copies of the neglected Maude Report!) eleven other sharks. iVednenday —: One of the most unusua objects in the Legislative Council Chamber is Puck. The statue of Puck was presented by Lady Briggs in memory of Sir Thomas Graham Briggs Bart. A .ViW HHNSSsr Sight 'M /tnam was my lirst introduction to Shakespeare so Puck and I are old friends, but on re-reading him I've been asking myself why Puck in the Legislative Council ? Had it anything to do with that famous crack of his in Act III. Scene II, when he says: "And thou th-it'i' <7>hi si /,/<." Them's fighting words as my American friends would say. But Puck says them and Puck has an honoured place, in the Upper House. Thursday — The beauty that might be Bridgetown's. I saw it last week. It was the day that Miss Nell Manning's fountain was playing in what ought to be the gardens of Trafalgar Square. The rain was coming down in buckets and was being blown about the street in a thin white spray. It was hitting the tar road and bounding up again like millions of lizard eggs. There was no one about. The rain had driven them away. The Cannon Ball tree was in bloom and its leaves were sprir.g leaves. In the Careenage a tall schooner rocked its mast to the rhythm of the pounding rain. There was water, water everywhere. Bridgetown looked clean and refreshed, a vision of beauty. Had I the gift of the painter I would wait until the Council window was free and I would paint it and hang it in the Museum, which is one of the only places in Barbados where the things of beauty can hope for much support. As for Miss Nell Manning, may she get more fountains to playajt^ may barbarous hands never be laid on her Cannon Ball Tree. There is so little beauty left in Bridgetown. FOR SCHOOL I'HII.IPS' ATLAS •nd I.AYNf.'S AKITIIMKTK' ROVAI. I;I MH I -• Advocate Stationery FACTORY OWNERS AND FREIGTERS WE CAN SUPPLY 72' BIRKMYRE CANVAS FOR T\KI\U I.INS OR TARPAULINS MADE TO YOUR ORDER WILKINSON aV IIAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472 & li.s; A SYMBOL OF QUALITY Ol'II READERS SAY: Aii Tit Ari'/i Thr (itmil Mm To The Editor The Advocate SIR. 1 had a very pleasant surprise two niiihts afo when t *tt*nde Hood <>f B : nd not for the object of praising Yours tu.lv. HAKBADJAN. Friday — Before leaving the Legislative Council can anyone tell me who was Giacomo Ancono who painted Colonel Henry Worslev, Governor of Barbados in 1722? The painting was presented in 1921 but when was it painted ? Saturday Is this how you talk ? 1st woman: Nothing so tiresome ai waiting. 2nd woman : "Oh my !" 1st woman : We saw Betty al the Vic C. 2nd woman : How's all the family ? 1st woman : All pretty well. 2nd woman : June got her riiv; List August. 1st woman: Betty got her ring lust fall. 2nd woman : Our two boys were two years apart. 1st woman: Were back where we started. Bill's in Trinidad. Harold's in Montreal and Helen graduates in Toronto this fall. 1st man : Old Tom down in Ivanhoe says he always likes to have a late one coming on. 2nd woman: Guess we don't think about growing old. We think they're going to be with us all the time. 1st woman : Clarence didn't like carrots. Now he is in the RAF, he likes carrots. (Curtain) HIS MASTER'S VOICE FOR BtntTAJNBUe Pl.t:{SINK That's why—YOV SHOULD SKLtXT H.M.V. RADIOS and RADIOGRAMS | DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Eleilrieal lift. | JVST iii.ri.it in LIGHTNING ZIPP FASTENERS The original Zipp Fastener that always works. In sizes Type Lengths and Colours ihat are "JUST RIGHT" For every service in Personal apparel and equipment • for your •.i-lfrliim .*•• ... DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. IH7 4.IMMIS II, 1.1.



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ESTABLISHED 1896 SATI'RO.*^ MAY h. 11*01 U.N. SHOULD GIVE CHINA ULTIMAT THE ONL Y HOPE TO STOP AGGRESSION IN KOREA Ol It I'll K WASHINGTON. May 4. f^ENKKAI. O O T (i I, A S VJ MACAKTIIl'K -.Hid here thai (InCiuiurt'sMoniil Itccnrd carried an "absolutely incorrect" version nf his statement on the use of Nationalist Chinese troop* in his address to Congress on April 19. The Record qui.tcd him as havinu rccoiium-tided removal of restraints on Nationalist-, t,, gather with United Nations Mftatfc support "to contribute to their effective operation against the Chinese mainland." MncAHhor disagreed with Senator McMahon that Russia was America's main enemy Oni.munism was the main enai %  aid. Me airrei-l that "higher authorPses than the Commandoi" had to taka into account factoid iuch .. rataii' strength and world political at mo* plu 11 %  MacArthur said that if Chiang Kol Shek. Chinese Nationalist Leader decided to Chinese mainland from Formosa he (MacArthur) would recommend United States to givChiang "reas'mable support" with naval ^elective units gad MB-1 Number four engine .uddenly a£iV ^"^^ t<" % %  • rstoplng the gtar W&SfJS '"' '"'• ,; "" *' %  '" names, but quick nunust supply i Bint m Korea near the Russian border He said the <> from the transcript. A Great Symbol Allies Make Small Gains on the Front TOKYO. Mav 4. United Nations forces in Korea who list week .u. % %  „ %  back before 3110.000 Chinese Communists, have yone over to a limited tfftnaiva and made small Bains. After a lirreeday lull and an all-day battle. Eighth Aimv tanks last nipht scattered what was described as remnants of the Curnmunist Regiment, noith of S-oul. They later drove back tavara] smaller groups and en* patrol entered Lijongbu 12 MHl of the capit.il gnd ggWI up troops there. K\pl.,Uing their success, othc; tanks moved up on U e west b-tna o( ihe Pukhan River as far BJ Chongjyougni 30 miles north-east of Seoul. They shut up Chinese outposts, but sought m vain for the mai.i force In one brief engagement. they killed 75 Communists. The Infantry also went into action, and in three engagement'drove back North Korein battallojw in the Inje sector on the east gantraj front Communists showed no inclination to light, but thenWSJ B indication that they were makln, a general withdrawal Reconnaissance last night ghowad they were .till moving! large convoys southwards along, the road-, t,> the battle fronts. —Neuter Plane Takes Fire In Air Lund's Safel) BERMUDA. May. 3 The huge C74 Globemastcr of tha contlnantal division of the Military Air Training Service. With 38 passengers and a new ol %  caught fire on the way from the Ar.ores to New York, bill landed safely ji Klndley alrforce base. Ilenmld i. this afternoon. IMi disaster The pilot Eugena p puts, of Clarksvale. PI i, wan able to extinguish Iha BSSBSS and cut off the fiilinK engine while radio master Seraaant .lames A. pain, pontactsd it Kinsley In 12 minutes a BIT Flying Dutchman of the Rescue Squadron was airborne and the crippled intercepted about 225 miles northeast of BerMite hndlng made MacArthur said that if one country carried 90 per cent, o' the burden in Korea. It was inappropriate that the other countries should exercise "unduo authority" in any decisions made MacArthur said lie thought Chiang Kat Shek stood out lo the average Asiatic as a "grc.it sjrmbol against Communism." The Government of Nationalists in Formosa compared favourably With many damoexacigS. General MacArthur was a>ked If he had confidence in the integrity of Ihe Joint CtuSH Ol i:'"FFALO. NEW YORK. M. Staff He replied, he had complete Senat confidence in their professional (Jtcpubl skill and Integrity Genera] Max Auhur said his plan to halt Chinese Intervention in Korea would be to disrupt the capacity Of the industrially weak Chinese nation to supply then He ndded. if you f"i instanc* disturb in the slightest degree the distributive gystanv ol their food you might well have 50.000.000 people starving He sold that hit plan *.o hit China was the only hop? to stop "flanghter'* in Korea He believed war with Russia was not Inevitable. "The ordinal*, ihe world are Invlndbn war" he added. 'I belttve, that is so among the Russian masses." Anti-Red Pressure ] Increases In Yunan. TAIPEII. Formera. May 4. Organized Nationalist action I Tha rescue plane escorted the against Communists in southern J gjanl transnorl to Kindley. where Yunan province is steadily en MacArthur said he would worn the Chinese that if they refused to crnsidcr a cease-fire In Korea Ihe United States should ntCrCUM military and economic sanctions which would involve bombing north of the Yalu. He thought the Unit, enough to undertake bembing ni the Par ' j eta in ing sufficient power to .iei rat a deterrent to Russia. MacArthur said Chinese nationalist landing on the mainland could not be destroyed by Communists if given proper support. —Keuter Um May Testify aev. n. New Hampshire) said Genenl Dwight Eisenhower may l>e recallbefore ihe Senate Committee now diiestionins General Dougla MaeArthur who %  :| member of ihe Sonata Foreign Relations Commlttae said the purpose ol General Euanhowart lartimonj would l>e to 111) in the icii.k anj crevices showing in the rtructi i ? of our foreign policy.**—Heater War Equipment ng. forcing Chinese Heds to take drastic steps in an effort to keep the Indo-China-Burma region of in* province under control, according to official sources here General LI Mi one-lime Govrtnr of Yunan under Nationalists, returned to the mainland ntly. and is now due to command a force of at least 20.00C Reports say that at lean 10,000 or LI Mi's niv.i arc rejtula, army men. well organized and well equipped. They said several pitched battles in recent weeks extended through the area over which Li Mi is In control—IT. LIVERPOOL. May 4. The T,17fl long British Steamer Eurymedua has docked here with 100 tons of captured war equipment iiom Korea—the first to reach this country. —Renter. EMBARGO TALKS LAKE SUCCESS. May 4 The United stales r ai o l utl that all members of the United ntaUon cease sending arms, oil or strategic materials to Communist China, will be put to tha United Nations Sanctions Com n.ittee on Monday.—Renter No Curtailment In Oil To Free World WASHINGTON, May 4. The Persian Embassy here stated today that nationalisation of Persia's oil industry would not involve conflscotion of Anglo-Lranian Oil Company properties or the curtailment ol oil to the free world. Ainbassadoi Nasrollah Enteram called news conference on the instructions ol Premier Moshadeq "clear up misunderstandings and misrepresentations" He said the ttlon law provided fur •fair and rightful compensatloi to be determined by the Majt Nationalisation would be enrrn out in accordance with Ihe established principles of intc national law. This HHIe known ststoe at P1TK In the Legislative rounril was presented to the folony of Barhado* bj Lad u -• in mrmon of her husband Sir Thorn** Graham gVlggS, Bart. Fighting Breaks Out On Syria-Israel Border DAMASCUS. May 4, A Syrian Government, communique announced to-dnv 0s were said to have rei ii. M..ii — — .pulsed >>olh attacks despite heavy artillery and mortar tire. The commumvir saui that United Nations observers witnessed M rerond ISIHIII attack as they were touring the area in then wi.lt? !Sorwrgian Farmerfl Go On Strike OSLO. May 4 Nearly "4.000 Norwegian farmers Mid small-holders went on strike To-day retuing to deliver meat Of potatoes tu market or to eoig spring wheat in Balds, Striking tarmcrs cultivated an area of approximately 1.000,000 acre-, two. thirds of Nui w..y\ total cultivated areo. Farmers dem ind higher prices for ngruullural product* i,s compensation for recent rlsssg in labour costs and prices of oustrial consumer good.-II trie %  true be...tiK-s tflectlve, Oslo will be completely without meat in u couple of days Stocks of canne i meat and meat products aie low Potato supplies are exiM-cted to last about two weeks. Fish how ever Is in grcit supply — (I* P t Tito Recovers BEM3RADE. May i Marshal Tito has fully rec ercd from ts operation gallstones. Reutei Noel Coward Pays First Visit XOEL COWARD, pictuitd here yesterday in Sir Edward Cunard's tsrden eri)OTing a glass of coconut water—which h ssri tasted IflflMfRB Noel Coward. British actor, dramnllst. producer ond compostr of light mnsir is in Barbados slajing with Sir Edward Cunard at "Glitter Bav". St. James Mr Coward told the Adnocarc yesterday that this was his Urst, visit to Barbados. He arrived from Jamaica on Thursday evening and expects lo be in iWhado* for just under i ws< s Mr Coward looked little diffc i nil .. sterday from when cinema fans here saw him in the film "In Which We Serve" except, that in place of a naval uniform he wore 0 p:nk sports shirt and brown 1 shorts: and instead of balancing on a rocking lifeboat, he was comeated in %  chair in Sir Edward's garden sipping a glass of coconut water Mr Coward who has a home In Jamaica has known Sir Edward for many years He has been in Jamaica siriro Dccembct. aStCwM for a few days in Nassau. Miami and Puerto Rico lust before pomIni" henHe has lust linishid writing a play. He has not yet decided <>n a name for it. and when asked what it was about, replied: "Oh.' ha said ratl.er slowly, "about l* working on a new book Mr. Coward did not know if any of his plavs were at present running in New York; n 1. the nlm "Astonished He Jr t w hi. n he produced and in which he took .. I Khng role is now showing in Paris and is having a very good run after being an equal success in both London and New York. Ml Coward spends most winters in Jamaica He will be res turning there when he lent B bados He is then luring 'o '.VIM I m to visli Alfred Luni inj Lyn Fontalnne Ills next stop will be New York and he ho|tes to be in England by Jun. 5th p-sl in time for the Theatre Garden Party, given ever) -car tor the Actors Oi Inch h President This is scheduled f'r June 18th Stars frrm the theatn will be present awell as the gsnera] imblic and he hopes thaj the> will make a lot of money Noej Coward wa bora in Tcidington on Deeemtier 16th. 181*0. He made his first appearance on the stage between 1910 and Hl| at the Ijltle Theatre. Umdon. .n )• children'!* (airy play. "Tug Goldfish" He first achieved fa in 192* with his own play "Thf, Vortex it. wall I Brotthwalte played t) parts Some of his l>est kii"n works an Fever" I l#s*|, Thh v. Bitter Sueef 'IMfii. "Cat cade" M83IJ. TunighV at B l|35i 'blithe Spirit" (1941). "Present LaiiKi:'> %  Happy Breed" '1942) He was responsiblr I otayed the loading part i In Wim (1911). illustrating the life n! the Ro gj Navv in war time In 1937 he wrote his autobto%  i 1 %  fl039> and Middle East Diaiv" (1945). painted cars. In the middle sector. Hue-I arei. the eornsauiikjue lav. *igh: Israeli tiactors lesumed drainage work but Arabs opened tire Israeli's stationed at Mazratt. El Khour> and Ohandama. an Arab village machine gunned them The communique said the firing was still going on. — Reuter POCKET CARTOON by OSBKRT LANCASTFR olv lemp, of I ull'l ill. intuit benhomie t din (ii.i agent ihe owirl il.L.-.iii. itf VISITORS ASK FOR RUM FROM BARBADOS ATB.I.F. King Opens South Bank Exhibition LONDON, huu 1 Kim; George VI threw open to his subjects here bxtfcj the century's greatest display of Britain's achievementsthe Festival Exhibition. The Royal Family arrived in ivpical grey London mists at shinutg rrfbelern pavilions Ifsfsstsg, fountains snd towers e>n the south bank of the River Thames LONDON, M-v 1 ("'APTAIN Uillia ^^ of the Weal In King and Queen drove bj i i from Uuckingliain I the Pasilval BxhlblUon The Koyal Party included Pi in cegg Kh/ibeth. the Ihike of Edinburgh. Queen Mary and Princes. Margaret. Crowds, including 12.000 specially selected guel* trout all walk: %  ( Ufa, *nd thousands o( the Exhibition staff cheered the King am' tjueen as they were received a" the Royal Pavilion. The Royal pair then walked 10 the Dome ,f Db.coveiy. the Transport Pavilion and other halls. Among members <>f the GovaniRMglt at the top of the Donv.step* were OupoaitieHi l^adee Winston Churchill, ond Herbevi Morrison. Foreign Minister, and "Ixird Fostival The Queen, wearing a powder blue coat and hat to match, stooe la attention with Ihe King in drilling ram. BJ tinNation, I Anthem was played Reuter Sales Good At W.I. Stall Of B.I. Fair I ... !" OBI o> Want Baek Husbands HONG KONG, May 4 Women of Tungkoon OOtUltj near Canton have threatened t. file maw divorce action on the grounds of dentition unless then huihands in Hong Kong and Formosa return by the end of June according to Chinese reports re reived here today.— Reports said, w-eunen with the assistance of Communist officials' had formed a "get back mil hUSbands" movement at a meeting on April 25 Many husband*, were said to be %  erving with Nationalist ;uineil forces —Reut LONDON. Mav 4 Festival of Britain oielu.itiun and bad weather did not pre vent the West Indloi fnan iraw .H I.III gowl busines.* at the BIP UMlay A representative of Ihe ChtlM TiadiHn Company place: an order for large quautitic*. sea island cotton Council l*in berl in ctiame of the West In tiles stands said 'Judging V buyara* Irsgui ri ea. imauer W Indian islands should concent rat on minor indutirlas, Thi. would help West Indian economy irnmanss l ) On show at the Jamaica stall today was a cricket bat autograph gg by member* of the England Weal Indies Tci taaens, i50. Mam English nickel enthusiasts -hammed the autographs "NAKED" MAIS LONDON May 4 A woman cleaner panschM onVials here by announcing she had seen a naked man leaning agamst a pillar in L/Mtdon*i Pag* -ivsl of Brit..in Exhibition stU hii moaning, just before the King and Queen arrived. All rushed out to investigate Tltc.v found that a wax figure Of The Fisherman", an t xhitut m the fisheries section, had been snipped of his blue sweater trousers and sou'wester and left emly In rubber boots and gloves. %  id his head had fallen off He was hastily removed te. the %  ening loom Official, came to the conclusion '. %  It was a practical |oke —Reuter Russian Shoots U,S. Corpora I VIENNA. May I United Btatea %  uOtortttei if. /ienna have ashed Russian* to orn them In probing the 'booting f a t'mtecJ State* militai poilee 'orporal by u Russian loldlei W lie i n.i cantM tti-day Amencan High Commissionei tValter J Donclly said h was living the mattet immetlialr atention and had asked Sovie' luthorlties to take part in ihe %  mill investigation -Renter. Ilium L.unlert Indies of it next veer %  i ii.in %  made • I tortolaashetr he said -are terrlbbj genenslve I i Britain. I am sure that Barlmde: could produce thara mud Verv good trade could IH> worked Han 4*eri-ian Parly IIONN. M... 4 Wed by Belgium and Holland. fHE "ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS DIAL 3113 Da> or Nifht Progress Maule WASHINGTON, May S Ameiican and Brihsli OrsWIall ive made iie'lnit' progress" ire toward settling dinTcrencc i a Japanese peace treaty, the State Oepartment announced ti>dj. —Renter. III! I iinni k Wfldfl Sunday C'AIHO May 4. Sunday's Royal w-dding prolaaglan of King rarouk, ll-yaar, i i ruk i of ssgrpt, and his IByear-old commoner bride N.un man Sadek will be televised to fifteen different parts of Cairo Russian TankBEHL1N. May 5 The Wei German New. Agenc> UFA reportted today that Bovtai Army authorities are bringing Uinks tnu, East Gemany at the <>f one train load a night. Reuter Gromyko May Say "Yes" PARIS. May Soviet Deputy Andrei Gromyk.-. told the Weal today he. woe.:d agree on their draft agenda lor the Foreign Ministers meeting uut only on condition that thev gave. in to Russia on one U poir.t. t r DANE8 CELEB&ATE COPENHAGEN, May 4. Candleshoo,f r .-window throughout Denmark tonight, the Sixth Anniversary ' Denmark'^ liberation from N-d occupation —Reuter. rV0.VCa 1 MAIOR DiES BCENOS AIUKS May i A ploneei In Aeronautic Eduardo Bradley died hereto-day. : Had S4 He crosw^l the An*;*in 3 balloon In 191' — Reuter r>(MMM)Mon>rVaill.d LONDON. May 4 Britain's 21 Royal Ordnance Factories need 50.tH)0 more work ers to carry out the i.armauien' r.rogromme. the Mini-tr> of Supply announced today —Reuter GOLD INTO MERCURY WASHINGTON. M*y 4 AncksW alchemistsVtW t'> In turn base metalinto gohl probably would not believe the Tbt United States Government ha, MI ileaded where they fotlri but in reverse Atomic energv al Oak Hidge. Tenneasee ia now being used to convert gold inte mercury -tt'P) WHITE HOUSE GUEST WASHINGTON h Israeli Prime Minister Ben Gurion, was lf President Truman at luncheon Reutei %  want a cigarettes the TOBACCO that counts Whenever you reraemberIt I..,'-1 I Gue'l WAR DEAD THF HAGUE. May 4 Holland today commemorated hjr war dead with a two-minute %  -r>*M"ht>ut the country —Renter



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PACK EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATI'KIIAY. MAY .1, 1951 JAMAICA FOOTBALLERS COMING ; iQ^ l o ^l ancashir e Who's Who of Team iiu f a. oonu) Mgei ly awaii of n,( in • Jamah a tootbaJ] lasun avas to laaji Mrbad i KIWI; lo-da /al V* h >i Ihc pis -if;. lm*I of during nr recent fMt to J imalca ind lomr of the Information I have not from tuthentlc source* KONN'IF COOrT.lt:— Kingston Jamaica goalkeeper since %  cular iuarhe will be hard to M i! i ml Ajfi SPORTS VVJ.NDOW M* %  r.-i.... i %  I. ;h. i ION II i. r \t A I madr %  W ril— -.l>r • — .-! %  %  I ... Ta..a.i I — > %  ip-il-n X I'D. trUa. I— Cr,IIa. I .Ikar Carton i i DIVISION III T II I Wt/hmUi *iir i. Mall I,.,I,, ,. %  M IbnK n CnJk-av M \ vi. V-KI I B M I \ %  < < %  % %  „ Nrr.i i '.i"i. i MI IIW School 1 — O HARRISON COLULOj ed Lodge School 1 0 HafJ In l/ienrjgfoml D;\ l-II match yMUrdv evening, tha goal wan scored by C. T. Tudor tne centre forward. It wan a slow, dull itume from beginning to end with but few spurts of liveliness. The College team, however, showed themselves the belter plmti ami i i conccntmcd in the Lodge gorii area most of the Both teams throw VI chance* of scoring CM playing in the CoUogo lorward A|,TV KARKO:—Kingston and Al tg\IH I) IOOTK Jar :_l.,ii i;i ., ad AH let* . ..I.y" of the side age IK. will t>e miking his first l'>ur. i ii kii nwi.iss— M mil Ail Jamaica full back A ladder, ;. quick rtcoven r wHh both [oel right h>n AM HI lh.ni u lll'NTl.l.Y DACOsTA -K.r -..., %  ad AH Jamaica fttU i :..„ H irhe III his younger days was known bo AitiM" Ak>M. H< %  '.tul ihc H A F during Hcan also pLaj al hatl iblj I"Ihc fnaitui > TRIIVOR r.WtCHMENT: Kingston and AH Ji any position on the ball tint Very goad tackier the ball well Aue 19 Ha l>.> %  %  II lltl hi III I V SMITH:— Ml %  Ml All Jamaica also plays % %  • ally posit im ott UM b df line A wonderful poafttonaj | who feeds hi* forwards well and will must probably 1)11 an Inside position in the forward line \ M II.' bas tourad Main and TrloJdad KEITH JIM" HERON:—Ku I and All Jamaica A iHckol half backs go. a marvellous asrt from the throw ins which an Ilka cornai kkkj und arc Bigarcatf. Age 28. hi first tour. IIARKY l'KFNI>F.R.AHT:— Jamaica College jnd All Schools marine half bark who gain valuable experience from this lour. Age in line was given the ball whan iHwas unmarked soon after ;be Hi VL goal was scored. He was well within the goal area but kicked the ball wide of the bars College keeper E. 1. Roach was called upon to save %  good try when the Lodge forward Una ran down near the end of the game and their centre forward MM the ball at the nets. Brooke*. Shcetly and Cramun. three of Lodge's usual atcond division players were Jibient. Mr. Wllkes played in the back line The teams were.— College: E L. Roach. J C. Mormon. J. D. Forde. II. M. Mi A <; Williams, i: C Dean J •• I I W Smith. C T Tudor. K. Griffith and F Tudor. Lsdir: C. M Redman. F W Chceseman. R. C. Goddard. J. St. C Milhlnaon E A L. King. C. O. WilliamWl ktfa I i. Glasgow. R 1. Km,;. Mr. Wilkc* and Q, Gill. WILL REFEREE WORLD SOCCER IAINIX)N. MJV I Mr Ii M. Orifflthi i f Mewpoit M.I bai n %  ppoJiM i rab raa of thi Intel natkmal toi %  ai Wamble) Stadium, between Bnthmu and Argentina on Wednesday. Gnrlltha i ITIclated In the world cup aoiee al Rio last summer. There will he two aallUatl Unaamen for tins m.lcli. This ate R. Bond of Limilnn. and | I' I. Mr R. J I %  t. 4 \oitinghnm. another World Cup rtferec. will feniee Aix, n:.n.i gaaae aaaaawl Eire at Dublin on May IB. The Argentine football team < %  tiuir was bore b) ah toplaj have born held up en %  "•utr. The datag i DUIT Rio and Uonunrldeo Their plane which wa< ue at I I 4 p m f; M T IS not xpected Until a |i in G M T. today —Reater Jamaica. The other vetera the side Age 3H he is the oldest member but is still quite a fore to be reckoned with The "StanIcy Matthaa w fanwrtn l %  has an uncanny way of drlbhlln. down the touehllne with the ball on hl head which love* the defence nonplussed Mas loured Cuba und Haiti. HEKBV MII.I.KR:—Kingston and All Jamaica inside forw.rd. Cai> UUn ol the Club, a strong am en erg etic player with a good ahoi in aithar foot Age 21. be hat toured Hn'i ROBERTO MUtET:— Kingstoi, otntro rorward, Scored n goabi \ eaaotl Vary quick and no afraid to shoot Irom any angle and very accurate with hi lie id His height i s no hindrance and Is somewhat like "Roddy Llttlepage". who tourad wHn Casuals team of Trinidad some back. Age :•<>. hi" r.s' tour ROBERT B:RRV:Kindlon In alaa forward, A cool Duuai adw nuod openinK" 4 '"* bl> ronvanki ami bai a go g| Age 22. hit % %  %  \I.\IN MCLEAN:— all bOUTD* and An 3 '' DD %  %  MM rlgbl A \--iy etevar pi><-i who i i %  • %  %  %  fraid to cut m and shoot. His loping stride does not make him look fast, but lie will be hard to hold. Age 2t lias tourad n till No ral il on i Malcolm. League Cricketers Am Al-nl 1?R table on Saturday bad irrad out durln. the week and good scores were returnee" from moa. of the Cluus .;., In Bacuj Acrnngl Lancashire League. >>n the toss against end sent them to bai wiekat which 47 inns 9 wick [jected to play easier as the day oi on. They were all out for gfUM having wkkcls An for 100 nuts, ranart %  ptarad 2 wickets for n 12 overs Bat up lost for 100 runs when snare drawn. Everton Weekc* was bowled for 3 by Raymer the Australian left-hand slow bowler. HaMingden also won the ti*s 'against Bnfleld und sent tbem in IU. bat. i '"" "'" m lap form. Bearing 2tH for th loss of a wickets in IftU minutes Clyde Walcott led the WBj With 129 In equal minutes and was highl) ipplaudcd on hia return to the pavtllon. Haslmgrien wcr< left with 150 minutes to score 2tH and al the end <-f the day's pinv *re lit for the loss of 1 arlckata. j K Haiti %  eared 32 and was caught behind UM fcfca* to %  Cl.de Walcotl W liars On Today i-.hi II %  Courts — lo.ao a.m. Inquest eearernlng death of r.. MI. Id Rrrwster of Halls KM., i al Dlst "B" Court. gt. (ieorge—10 09 a.m lllu-lriou. Srhool Sports at Bay Grounds. Beekles Knacl—'! 00 p m Rev. F E. PesUlna who was Vtear of All SalnU Church to <>. Installed Rector of SI Lucy's Church—4 p.m. l-.-in %  Band U plar at St. Matthias Annual Fair which will be held al Hastings Rocks. Christ Church—4 00 p m rtMIMAS (.).•*—-*ll tfalal an Iht Ha.ia.n rt.al—va* • ill pm AqaalK "(all NailkiWa *•!'' S " %  l II .in Mai II. m wuia V4 UM Officers v>. Serjeants 1st Cla88 Cricket Football Match On StlSdU May Ufa II I I I match ngaiii-t the Scr|eanii at th > Regiment will clay %  football < ..n i rot pros of it* bind to be played sun'c the fomiatio.i of the Regiment ind a van %  • ; %  RIFLE SHOOT THIS AFTERNOON The final of the Frontenic tiophv will Unas place ll the Government rihv range at i o'clock % %  in who have Qualified f"i the Urals will ehoot 15 rounds at 500 and IWW1 yards. KEATS HALL:—Mehiom lie Raf| Wing. Very fait and aCCUrBU This boy has Impiuvcd corutlder* ably during the bar) sag OR < UM v.eii and • ii"afrakj '.., %  hod when he CUtS HI. AtfC U ins in si law, HARRY NARCISSI I, reaerve centre forward a very rnengatlC player who always follows the ball and shot I nil anglos Age i His '" % %  ; tl1 MAI.I'OLM MCLEANK and All Jamaica. Tumi .d I'l..v, in any position in the half line Weil known to Barb-ad having played here during the Trinidad tour In l44 Is not B| bug dav of 'he cricket r.-t .ihe used to In', but has between Won estershire a gsntod in SRpsrloocs and s^utii African tourin b Age SI I' 1 playeg today, anrt the match i football In Barbados. Trinidad, abandoned *ns B draw. Jamaica and Curacao. — Realer LONDON. May 4 in Thuis :.>>' int class cricket matches: Oxford Uulversil Ail out for U5: Yorloshlrc flrsl Ibnlngs. 210 for five. i in • ruruv, ail i ui For 114: Lai Hist innings, all out tor '.R jfo 1 %  i Surrey Bret innings, all out L0 %  i .lure first nan out for 192; second Innings 50 for I Afiua Brsl Inlngg all out 157 — ICP) t„ |. t-KVIl'tMcUOTC No IS . i .in .unjowsa ~T a i OSTIUN T"-' woncnm MU prrvcnlei) plBy mjl' hci HOUSE OF COMMONS They'll Do It Every Time %  B Ty lO PUSH A LOAD ON. AND v/ JERE DOCS TOE ELEVATOR STOP? ABOUT A FOOT /3C3VE FLCX3R LEVEL" y )< imiiii' Hatlo BUT ONCE ABOARD WERE DOES THE WALL TROLLEY STOP WHE" VOU WASIT OfF?A FOOT BELOW U0RVAL.CF COURSE.'. v-, t The Speaker's chair, all seating throughout tha Chamber. galleries and lobbies and every other article of upholstered furniture throughout the new building are equipped with : :Oi!iiO I I : >ihtd L.7/..V Foam Cushioning SnaajnaVi %  :.-vi< r0 a* -. '•I.MHltl. ... ,K. „,,... ,, ..Vi.j-.aa.ej b, o,.,, gauar C* U~J i 0*4.. i •* %  •" %  .U.MII H.H K^, r „ I "* % %  **•• % %  **: Mi:U C. U L.nW... r a. C.U.. Ug_ La.*, !" I .... w. ns OF THI IATIX FOAM INDUSTRY MOOS* ECKSTFI\ mm a** m. aanaasm. The Weather TO-DAY -.in Rimes: 5.43 am Saa Me: 11 p.m Moon (New) May 0 Minting i 7.00 p m llisli Hater : % 33 -m 3.Z9 IUTUDA1 Rainfall i nil ToUl lor month to yesterday I 05 in. Temperature (Max.) S6.5 "i I'rmperature iMIn > 15.5 "I Wind Direction (9 a.m.) t. i :i p m.) K $ E vtlnd v.i • m p k Haramclrr ( .mi %  •.<.< •<;>* (3pm) 30.013. Tha AMATEUR ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF BARBADOS prenonls Its BIO THREE-DAY 0TCU AND ATHLETir SPORTS MEETING (under the disiinguished patronage of His Exeellcney the Governor Sir Alfred & Lady Savofc) at KENSINGTON OVAL W'hll-Monday Thursday . a Saturday May 14th May ITth May 19th l. Graunda S *c. fieason Ticketon Sal.at the Cnse. Swan A High captured 2 wickets for 45 ru 15 ower It.un In IJ Up I .•tall in tht crnciuse. Kauteiisiull butted first and scorva 158 for 3 wicketdeclared. Rawtenstall gave LOW. erhouse a -porting chance to get 158 in n minutes, but rein Stopped play when tiicy were 55 lun. far '< %  Bruce Pairatidcau scored M not out against Fast Lancashire and in the same gM I'epi-r captured 7 wl< ket.s for 8In USB •:iH', K. Riekards scored 28 RR against Si Anncs. but his team scored 157 for 7 wieketi and won easily. In the opening aames of the O tral Lancashire I-eneue. croqiptr,n met Wals-ien when' IWO w.-i Indsaa ivesra | I vtng sgasnet] each other, both belna from Trinidad. Crornpcon batted Bral and were all out for 7Q runs Ellis Achone captured 8 wicket* for S6 runs with his left arm deliveries Waladen passed the score for the loss of 0 wickets. ILimaTHE MEMBERS OF CLUB I'TtFMIFRF at the DRILL HAM. TO-NIGHT SUBSCRIPTION — 3/6 Admission b|i Inrtlalioii Only /£mp~fafaG