Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895

—

Russia Can Launch





“Punishing Attack”

Upon

Japan

WASHINGTON, May 3.
ENERAL McARTHUR this morning began to
testify in private before a Joint Committee of
the Senate on his policy for the Far East.
The Press and general public were excluded.
A censored transcript of the proceedings was being

made available page by

page for publication.

The General walked through applauding
crowds to face his interrogators. Pickets evidently
protesting against the hearing being closed to the

public appeared outside
carrying placards “We
ged hearing.’’

the Senate Office building
don’t want a Truman rig-

“Don’t cover up blunders with

secrecy,” and “Russia knows our secrets, why can’t

we?”’

"Attlee Denies
Reds Used U.K

Materials

LONDON, May 3.

Prime Minister Attlee today
denied in the Commons _ that
strategic materials from Britain
had been used by Chinese Com
munists against British troops 1
Korea. ”

Opposition members who had
intended to demand debate on
this subject next week are now
partly calmed, But some ex-

pressed anxiety after Attlee had
said some rubber was being
sent to China.

But it was doubted if they

would be completely satisfied by
a detailed aceount of goods
supplied to China this year, whici
Attlee said,.Sir Hartley Shaw-
cross, President of the Board of
Trade would give next week.
Answering Winston Churchill
Attlee said the future policy on
the export of strategic materials
would be in full accord with
United States policy not only on
rubber, but on other materials.
—Reuter.

“Tke” Would
Oppose Mac

NEW YORK, May 3.

General Dwight D, Eisenhower
would accept Democratic nomina+
tion for the Presidency in 1952
if Republicans put up General
Douglas MacArthur or Senator
Robert A. Taft, a veteran Wash-
ington correspondent predicted

here.
—Reuter.





“Monty” Sees Pope |

VATICAN CITY, May 3.

Field-Marshal Lord Mont-
gomery, Deputy Supreme Com-
mander of the Atlantic Pact
foreés had a 25 minute private
audience with Pope Pius XII to-
day,

Montgomery arrived here on
Tuesday for military inspection
and talks with the Italian Govern-
ment and Service Chiefs. He is
expected to return to Paris to-
morrow.

—Reuter,

Electoral Reform

TEHERAN, May 3.
Persia’s new Prime Minister
Dr. Moshamed Mossadeq, told
the Majlis (Parliament) to-day
that he intended .to introduce
electoral and municipal reform
besides nationalising the Persian
oil industry.



—Reuter.

160 Hurt In Smash

BERLIN, May 3.
Over 160 people were injured,
néafly half of them seriously,
when two trains collided at full
speéd at Frauendorf on the East
German Borna-Le@ipzig line last
week-end, the West Berlin Tele-
graph said today. News of the
accident had only just become

known, the paper said.
—Reuter.

Ben Gurion In U.S.

WASHINGTON, May 3.
Istacl Prime Minister David
Ben Gurion arrived here from
Tel Aviv to-day for a three weeks’
visit to the United States: He
will discuss Israeli-Americau
relations with Presiden: Truman.

~—Reuter.

TIN DROPS
SINGAPORE, May 3.
Produciion of tin concentrates
in the Federation of Malaya for
the first quarter of this year
amounted to 18,393 tons and was
the lowest since the sécond
quatter of 1949.
The export figure fo
was 18,379 tons c
18,914 the corresponding
period ir 95 -~Reuter









rter



the qua





for





Corridors were roped off and
posted with police guards as the
General entered and stepped into
a lift to take him to the Commit-
tee room.

The first leak carhe from the

Committee room when Senator
Hugh Buti! @r (Republican
Nebraska) quoted General Mac

Arthur as telling the Commit-
tees he believed that Russian
Forces in Siberia were for
defence only.

MacArthur said he doubted ii
Russia could have occupied
Japan as a result of the removal
of United states garrison troops
to Korea, Japan could not be
taken except by amphibious
effort.

He said Russia had the capacity
to launch a “punishing attack”
upon Japan though he did not
believe she could overrun Japan
until she had command of the sea
and air.

“How long she would be able
to maintain the effort in all-out
war there is of course specula-
tive”, he said.

is that it
I believe

“My own opinion
would not be too long.

that their efforts would deteri-
orate from the beginning of
hostilities.

MacArthur quoted various esti-
mates of Soviet air strength in
the Far East but figures were
deleted from the transcript. Most
of these aircraft were fighters.
Of these most were jets and were
excellent, he said. Russia ptob-
ably suffered greatly from the
lack of maintenance facilities and
petroleum supplies.

MacArthur asserted that a few
additional ground troops could
finish the fighting in Korea if
backed up by “full capacity” ait
and naval effort

Hé said his connections with the
United Nations were largely nomi-
nal and his channel of communica-
tion was defined as United States
Army Chief of Staff. He alleged
that his reports to the United
Nations were censored by State
and Defence Departments.

Earlier he said that he believed

@ On Page 5.

fighting between Syrians and

lier to-day said that four Israeli
soldiers were killed yesterday and
that United Nations observers
were in the demilitarisead zone
checking casualties.

He said firing was going on in
the southern demilitarised zone
where Syrians fired on _ Israeli
workmen in the Arab village of
Nukeib.

The bodies of 20 Syrians were
found inside Israeli territory to-
day, on the scene of yesterday’s
battle west of the demilitarised
zone, the spokesman added,

An Israéli communique last
night claimed that Syftian forces
who crossed into Israel about half
mile west of the demilitarised zone
were engaged by Israeli forces and
driven back, —Reuter.

O’Dwyer Replies

MEXICO CITY, May 3.
William O’Dwyer, United States
Ambassador to Mexico since last
autumn, answering accusations
that he contributed to organised
crime while Meyor of New York
City, said here tosday that his



/ critics were trying to discredit him

|for “reasons unknown”,
—Reuter,

20 ARRESTED
TOKYO, May 3

batons broke up



! Police with

| attempts to interrupt a ceremony
here



cutside the Im
to-day i

There were

erial Palace
rrested 20 pe





Leaders.

Order Cease-fire
In Border Issue








SEAMEN
REFUSE
TO WORK

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,
May 3,

British merchant seamen to-day
refused to work.

They made their decision at a
meeting called to discuss the ten-
week-old dock strike for more
pay during which Government has
de-registered the waterside Work-
ers’ Union,

In Auckland the main trouble-
spot in the strike, bétween 200 and
300 members of new Unions went

to work to-day eseorted by the

biggest force of Police and service-
men ever seen there.—Reuter,



.

11,000 Join Up

WELLINGTON, May 3.
More than 11,000 people have
joined an emergency organisation
following the lead of an entire
Dutch Legation staff. The organi-
sation was formed after the
Prime Minister of Holland called
on Monday for a force to combat
“attempts to overthrow an

orderly Government by force’.

—Reuter.

LIE ON WAY TO U.S.
LONDON, May 3.
United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Trygve Lie flew off for New
York to-night after his tour of
European and Middle East eapi-
tals. In London he had met
Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor-
rison and other Government
—Reuter.

TEL AVIV, May 3.

United Nations Chief of Staff, Colonel Benned De Rid-
der of Belgium, has ordered an immediate cease fire in the

Israelis which broke out again

to-day along the border north of the Lake of Galilee.

The duel between heavy artillery and mortars was
going on to-day among ancient ruins in the Capernaum
area, it was officially reported.

An Israel army spokesman ear- ——-—~



Dr. HERBERT EVATT

Evatt Retains Seat

MELBOURNE, May 3.

Counting more votes has not
changed the expected final result
of the Australian etections held on
April 28—a slightly reduced Gov-
ernment majority in the House of
Representatives and a majority of
32 to 28 in the Senate

Final figures for all representa-
tive seats and for pagty represent-
ation in the Senate will not be
knoWn for several days

Deputy Leader of the Labour
Party and former United Nations’
Assembly President Dr H V
Evatt, will retain his seat at Bar-
ton, New South Wales.—Reuter



ne

MAC ARTHUR OQ



RECORDS FOR YV@NNE

“
FIFTEEN-YEAR-OLD Yvonne

ceives from Mr. Albert V, Nyrer
an album of Jo Stafford records,



Ameri¢ta”,

dian to win it. Yesterday

Miss Stafford,

2,000 Dockers
Still Out nU.K

LONDON, May 3

among British arms workers and

dockers. Over 2,000 Manchester
dockers voted to continue the

strike begun a week ago after two
men were suspended, In Glasgow,
3,000 dockers were asked by their
Union to ban overtime until em-
ployers granted recognition to a
branch comprising clerical grades
and cranemen.

About 2,000 armament workers
employed in the Royal Arsenal in
London continued their week-old
stoppage because one worker re.
fused to join the Union, Other
workmen there have been idle be-
cause the strike has held up pro-
duction, At seven other arms fac.

| tories men have been working

overtime because of disputes over
pay.

eines la alates ear geist amensiisasastiasaee pelea staat Hci tanta tetisaediaisyicnemenaaiane



—Reuter.



Greek Parliament

For Dissolution
ATHENS, May 3



we

Investigation took place behind closed doors

x Y

ZED BY SENATE

re of St. Patrick’s School, re-
Consul of the United States,

“Negroes In U.S.A.”
Win Prize For
15-Year Schoolgirl

YVONNE PADMORE, 15-year-old St. Patrick’s School
girl, won last week's competition “What aspect of life in
the United States interests me
sponsored by Miss Jo Staffeyd’s Show. over

t.” The competition is
“Voice of

It is a weekly feature, and Yvonne is the first Barba-

she received from the Vice

Consul of the United States of America, Mr. Albert VY.
Nyren, an album of Jo Stafiord’s records sent for her by

Yvonne’s form mistress told

the Advocate yesterday that
Yvonne sings very well.
said that she likes to

listen to the “Voice of America”,

| Yvonne
and to hear Miss Stafford’s songs,



and the winning letters for the
competition read. The _ records
js he received were “Alone

| together,” Sometimes Unhappy,”
“Yesterday”, “Walkin’ My Baby

Labour unrest continued to-day | Back Home” and four other pieces.

The aspect of life in the United
States which interests Yvonne most
is “The way in which negroes
are treated,” she told
Stafford,

Her letter shows that in Fair-
field Cross Road where she lives,
reads magazines and books on col-
our prejudice and listen to the
Voices of America, she has been

doing a lot of thinking on her
subject.
“IT am always grateful to the

“Voice of America’, for the chance
of hearing how negroes there live
and what is being done to help
promote their standards of life,”
she wrote

She finds it a pleasure to hear
and read about the way they are
allowed to display their natural
talents whether it is in the form
of boxing, acting or singing.

She thinks much of how emi-

grants from Barbados live in
America. She calls them “Our
boys.” She said that “Our boys

brought back reports of how well
they were treated and how every
|man, of every possible race is

The Greek Parliament, elected| given a chance to make his wav

in March 1950, is to be dissolved
New elections will be held on
September 15. This was agreed
to-night between Liberal Premier
Venizelos, Deputy Premier Papan-
dreou, (Democratic Socialist), and

General Plastiras, Leader of the

EPEK (Centre) Party who togeth-

er have a majority in the House
—Reuter.



Calypsoes At Fair

(From Our Own Correspondent:
LONDON, May 3.
Mr. Tom Cook, Under-Secretary
for the Colonies, who visited the
British Industries Fair to-day, said



he was pleased that the West
indies stalls had received many
erders from foreign buyers.

A group of West Indian girls
led by Louise Bennett of Jamaica
sang calypsoes at various stalls,

Business at the British In-

dustries Fair to-day was not brisk,
but this may be attributed to the
cpening of the Festival of Britain
to-day by their Majestic

Give Thanks

GIBRALTAR, May 3
Thousands joined in a thanks-

Biving service in Gibraltar’s
imain square to-night for the
town’s escape when the British
ammunition ship Bedenham blew
lup in the harbour last Friday
\The explosion killed 11 and
jare missing
—Reuter

in life.”

When Yvonne gets hold of one
lately from America, she likes to
be told of life out there and she
hopes that some day Barbadian
women will be able to emigrate to
the United States.

|King George Opens

Festival Of Britain

(By R. B. MACLURCI

--*

LONDON, May 3.

KING GEORGE VI and his Queen drove in state
through cheering crowds to-day to open the
Festival of Britain, nationwide celebration of the

centenary of the

eat exhibition of 1851.

Millions of their subjects, many of whom had
slept on the pavements all night, jammed the streets
of London to give a wild enthusiastic start to the
six months long festivities, planned to show that
the country can conquer its postwar perils and

hardships.

In an open carriage, escorted by
horsemen of the Household Cav
alry in shining breastplates and
helmets, the Royal Family drove
from Buekingham Palace to St
Paul's Cathedral in the city.

From the broad Cathedral steps,
the King made a speech which
started church bells throughout
the land ringing, and set off
carnival gaiety and festivity in
every towi: and hamlet.

King George wore the uniform
of an Admiral, Queen Elizabeth
was in powder blue and their
younger daughter Princess Mar-
garet, who drove with them, was
dressed in grey with a pink hat,

In the second carriage was Prin.

cess Elizabeth, heiress to the
Throne, and her husband the
Duke of Edinburgh

; Many Fainted

Military bands played along the
route.

All the pageantry and colour of
British tradition were on show at
St. Paul's Cathedral, yeomen in
scarlet and gold braid, pikemen in
silver armour, Foreign Secretary
Hetbert Morrison — nicknamed
“Lord Festival” by Britons for his
part in spohsoring the big show—
and other Cabinet Ministers, re-
veived the King and Queen on the
steps,

s they entered the Cathedral
the crowd surged into the roadway
cheering wildly, Police linked
arms to hold them back.

Many people along the Royal
route fainted in the crush,

King Makes Speech

Television viewers saw the cere-
mony at St, Paul's, cameras being
allowed inside the great Cathe-
dral for the first time

Tugs on the Thames sounded
their sirens as King George made
his speech declaring the Festival
open. The Royal Salute of 41
guns was fired and bells pealed.

The King described the Festival
as a symbol of Britain's abiding
courage and vitality. It had been
planned as a visible sign of nation-

Miss tl achievement and confidence,

“In this Festival we look back
with pride and forward with reso-
lution”, he said,

“Let us pray that by God's good
grace, the vast range of modérn
knowledge be turned from de-
structive to peaceful ends so that
all peoples as this century goes on
may be lifted.”—Retuter,



Woman Gradually

Becoming Man

KARACHI, May 3

A married woman with two
children is gradually turning into
a man in Azad Kashmir territory
etcording to a report received
here to-day from Pulanderi.

The report said the weman
“very distressed” was attending
regularly a hospital unit in the

wea, The report added that hair
war growing on her chin and
upper lip. Her voice was thick-

ening and other male character-
igtics were appearing.

Medical men in Karachi said
raodern hormone treatment could
in most cases retard sexual trans
formations of this type,—Reuter.



Mr. Nyren told her that she had PARLIAMENT DISSOL VED

done well to win the competition.
He hoped she would like the sou-

AMMAN, Jordan, May 38.
King Abudallah to.day, dis-

venir album Miss Stafford hadjsolved the Jordan Parliament.

sent her.

Cuba Wants

‘ -—Reuter

U.K. Owned

Railways Nationalised

HAVANA, Cuba, May 3.

President Prio announced to-day he would ask the
Cuban Congress for nationalisation of the British-owned

United Railways of Cuba.

The announcement was made at the Presidential Pal-
ace after the President had reached an agreement with
leaders of two big strikes, one itvolving the nationalisation

issue.



But the statement which said
the President would send an
“urgent message’ to Congress

gave no details and did net say
when # would be delivered.
Two strikés by maritime work-
ers and railwaymen—were called
off to-day after union leaders
conferred with the President.
Maritime workers, including
dockers, paralysed Havana and
other norts for 24 hours. They
stopped work for a 30 per cent.
wage increase and other benefits,

and for abolition of already sus-
wo|pended freight between Havana
and the United States
Reuter

Gromyko Asks

‘Instructions

PARIS, May 3.
Gromyko, Russian De-
puty at the Four Power talks here
to.day, was asking Moscow for
fresh ihstructions on the new
Westefh proposals, observers be~
lieved here

Andrei

Deptities
day because it
| lay —Reuter

were not meeting to-
was a French holi-

Indian Party
Plan Split

NEW DELHI, May 3.
Prime Minister
bers to-day to try
re-election split
powerful Indian
ress Party

to prevent a
all-
Con-

in the
National

Rebels are threatening to form
a new “Democratic Front’ Party
which would stand in opposition
elections next

o Congress at

November,

Members of the Congress Party
form the central Government at
New Delhi and in all states which
jas an elected legislature, Rebels
vad already formed a “democratic
ront” last year as a kind of back-
bench opposition wing within the

‘ongress party itself,—Reuter,



French Commuiitist
Party Splitting

By HAROLD KING
PARIS, May 3.

France's new breakaway Com.
munist group, the “Communist
Movement” now listed as one ot
the country’s political parties, was
believed to have received no
more than 3,000 or 4,000 Trade

Unionist adherents to date,
Leaders of the movement, form-
er Communist party members,
issued a manifesto yesterday as-
sailing the party “for its uncondi.
tional surrender to Moscow” and
calling for the defence of France

igainst all aggressors,

Leader of the breakaway is 43
year old Charles Lemoine,
“The French Communist Move-

ment” started in the coal mining

aréa of Northern Franes where
coal, textile and steel Workers
have always been revolutionary

and nationalist. This tevolt is
in part against the anti-nationalist!
policy of the official Communist
Party

~-Reute~

| cette dtd aaa

purest and most fragrant

Delightfully Refreshing it

after-shave lotion.

Friends and Relatives ! !

K.W.V. Eau De Cologne
Messrs. Cave, Sheph
Moasrs.

SSDS IFISSE SOS 99SEC GSSSSSSSSSSSS GSS

POSE SOOO SOOO SSOS

Communists to
north. ES
The Fifth Air Force pilots
claimed to have killed or wound-
Jawaharlal} gq pearly 500 Communist troops
Yehru met 46 rebel Congress mem-| yesterday, 200 of them by a single



EAU UE

THs EAU DE COLOGNE IS STEADILY gaining
an increased demand Overseas. Made from the

and with the addition of purée Grape Spirit. it has a
lasting fragrance unexcelled by any others.

final touch to the toilette and for a really soothing

It is comforting and reffeshing, also, to your Sitk

. Bookers Drug Stores





PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Reds Fire
On U.N.

Patrol
Near Seoul

TOKYO, May 3.

A United Nations armoured
patrol northeast of Seoul to-day,
met strong resistance for the firsi
time in four days.

Planes operating with the patrol,
spotted other large groups and
called for air strikes.

Allied pilots had earlier reported
heavy motor traffic on North
Korean roads during the night,
when they sighted 2,700 vehicles

Communist forces encountered
northeast of Seoul today poured
small arms fire into the patrol
Tanks and aircraft caused many
Chinese casualties, the Eighth
Army said.

Another
the road to

Task Force patrolling
Vijongbu met strong
Communist fire 2 miles south ot
the village, its objective, United
Nations patrols to the northwest
of Seoul, again engaged elements
of an estimated Comn.unist
regiment. This time they © forced
withdraw to the

strike north of Seoul by land-based
marine planes.—Reuter,



Sack Acheson
Move Now On

WASHINGTON, May 3.

A poWerful group of Repubti-
cans and Southern Democrats io
Congress are preparing a drive to
force the dismissal of Secretary of
State Acheson. Many supporters
of the administration are appre-
hensive of the attempt.

The group proposed to deny
funds to pay Acheson's salary after
June 30, They _gven contemplate
halting the State Department bud-
get for 1952 while Acheson
mains.—Reuter,

a

HONOUR UNKNOWN
SOLDIER

ROME, May 3.
Soil from 800 burial grounds
came to the tomb of the Unknowh
Soldier
ERinaudi held
“peace and
hood" service.
Mothets and widows of the
fallen soldiers had brought smal)
urns with
tary Cemetery, from
the country ond from
cemeteries abroad

re-

President
solemn
brother-

and
there a
universal

to-day

earth from the Mili-
throughout
Tralian

Reuter



THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night



PCCP

;

COLUGNE

Oils produced in Europe,

is indispensable for that

can be obtained from
ord & Co, Lid.

Messrs. Bruce Weatherhead Ltd.

Messrs. Collins’ Ltd.

Messrs. Knight's Ltd,

Messrs. Da Costa-& Co. Ltd. &

Messrs. C. F. Harrison & Co. Ltd. %
x Messrs. H. P. Harris & Co. &
SOOO DPOF TCS OO POS SO TST VIS TOT TSS INST 00sSooe

SPRCPIPVPGPOO POPS FV OOS EG FES DIVSSSSSSOSDS. OF SOOSOSS OG DOP POOP GEOEPO PLOPFGSPS POCO SS SSPE

we



PAGE TWO

—





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



MR. AND MRS. W. BRADSHAW were at Seawell yesterday tO meet Miss Carin Oldby and Mr. Erik

Ohlsson. Mr, Ohlsson is Inspector General in South America of A/B Atvidabergs Industrier.

rived by B.W.LA. yesterday from Trinidad.

R. AND MRS. K. KUCZYN-

SKI, (pronounced Koochin-
ski) were among the passengers
arriving by the Gasecogne from
England yesterday. Dr, Kuezynski
has come to take up an appoint-
nent as Medical Officer at the
Genera] Hospital. His last appoint-
ment was Resident Surgeon at the
Princess Margaret Rose Hospital
in Edinburgh.

RS, SUIRE DE KUTTEL
(Mrs. ‘Lioydstill’s daughter),
who arrived’ from Paris yesterday
by the Gascogne will be in the
West Indies until July. Her hus-
band who {S$ an art director with
Phillips radio in Paris is coming
to Barbado& in July for a_ short
holiday. In Paris Mrs. de Kuttel
is a representative of “Lancome”
French perfume manufacturers,
She has with her samples of their
latest perfume “Magie” which she
hopes to sell in the W.I. after her
holiday here,
Mrs. -de-Kuttel intends visiting
several G&the other W.I. istands
before regugning to France.

Winding Up Holiday
Iss NETTE LOWMAN,
Distriet. Nurse. of» British
Guiana whd spent the greater
part of six months’ leave in_Bar-
bados, is now on her way. to Gren-
ada on the S.S. Gascogne to wind



up her holiday before returning
home. ~-
While in, Barbados, she was

staying with Mrs. A. Phillips of
“Alma Cot", St. Lawrence.

Trinidad Businessmen
R. K. LINDSAY GRANT,
Managing Director of Messrs.

T. Geddes Grant Ltd., in Trinidad
and Mrs. Grant fiew in from
Trinidad yesterday by: B.W.LA.
accompanied by Mr. and Mrs,
Cecil Hope-Ross, Mr, Hope—Ross
is Manager of Messrs. D. Hope-
Ross in Trinidad. Here for a
short holiday they are all staying
at the Ocean View Hotel.

Pre-retirement Leave
FTER working in the Govern-
ment Service for the past 33

years, Miss ¥. E. Inniss, of “Car-
lisle View,” Bay Street, has now
gone on leave prior to retirement,

Her last, fost was in the Regis-

trar’s Office where she was in
charge of the Record branch.

New Exhibition

‘Tl: next exhibition at the

Museum begins “today for
four weeks. It is of Children’s Art
from Great Britain and is shown
by arrangement with the British
Council. In an adjoining room are
examples of Children’s Art from
various West Indian Colonies
which makes an interesting com-
parison, The exhibition of paint-
ings by Sybil Atteck, the Trinidad
artist which has attracted much
attention continues until 14th May



Mrs. DE KUTTEL.





HE Gavernment is said to be

seriously perturbed by the
case of the butcher who gave away
soup, without ane applied for
a catering-licence. It is believed
that there Are many people giving
away pennies at street-corners
who heve‘no licence or permit of
any sor.

Said . high. official yesterday.
“There is nothing much wrong, in
itself, with occasionally giving
things to the old and destitute,
but it should be done through the
proper channels, after registration,
and applicgtion for form 1871/364
‘T.1/92/S/788 cd. which, correctly
filled up, ahd witnessed by a civil
servant, entitles the registered
applicant to apply for an inter-
view, with a view to obtaining
the necessary forms for the grant
of a temporary licence.”

Behind closed doors

MAGINE, detestable reader,
this harassed Commission try-
ing to decide what the Dorset
Coast Erosion Committee can poss-
ibly know-about the ventilation
holes in @ brimless bowler hat,

while the Wwemen’s orchestra
scrapes away at the Chanson
Triste.. We, bestial reader, you

SEB REHBE BEEBE HRHREHREE BB
36 in. MARLANE CREPE in All Colours

36 in. FIGURED
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.

DIAL 4605

ADVENTURES

OF



WAY...

and I, are debarred from follow-
ing the inquiry, which is behind
closed doors; but let us crouch
behind this pile of old clothes in
the passage, and prick up our
furry ears. . There! Do you
hear that? Canon Sparklegrass
demands that the Commission be
given a model of Fumbling’s



The

cloud Rupert realises that he is on

moment he is out of the
the wron; side of the hill, but he
can do nothing to stop the sledge
and betore he can cry out he is shot
head first into a snow-drift. Gasp-
ing and breathiess, he struggles ou:
and sits up. To his astonishment

CREPE

em tS Na 5 Se het SS

_. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

PIPA



ee ee ae, A ee

STRIPED SILK Assorted Colours
FLOWERED CREPE
DYED SCROLL CLOQUE

They ar-

First Visit
R. ERIK A. OHLSSON, is at
present in Barbados. He is
Inspector General in South Amer-
ica of A/B Atvidabergs Industrie
Sweden, representatives of Facit,

Original Odhner and Halda, man-| 415-645 p.m. .

ufacturers of Adding and Calculat-
ing machines. Accompanying hin.
is Miss Carin Oldby who demon-
strates the working of the
machines, At Seawell to meet them
were Mr. and Mrs, W. Bradshaw.
Mr. Bradshaw is his agent in
Barbados. This is Mr, Ohlsson’s
first visit to Barbados, Since they
left Sweden, they have visitec
Paris, London, New York, Centra
America, @uba, Trinidad and now
Barbados. When they leave here
they will visit the F. W.I. Puertc
Rico and Jamaica in their circuit
north. Mr. Ohlsson’s headquar-
ters are in Rio de Janeiro.

With Cable and Wireless
FT’RANSFERRED to the engin-

eering staff of the Barbados
Branch of Cable and Wireless
after a spell in Nairobi is Mr.
Norman E. Walter who, accom-
panied by his wife and daughter.
arrived from England yesterday
by the Gascogne. .. . Mr. and Mrs
Wilfred Alston’s son Robin, who
goes to school in England came in
by the same ship.

Lighter Side
N ENGLAND, a conference on
the West Indies is being ar-

ranged, I understand, by the
Council for Education in World
Citizenship. The conference will

probably take place in London in
June. The serious topics will
cover general problems affecting
the West Indies. And for lighter
entertainment Boscoe Holder, the
famous West Indian dancer, will

perform.
W.I. Tour

Oâ„¢ to Grenada yesterday wen
Nurse F. Udell, Chief Nurse
at the Colorfial Office, who is o1
an official tour of this area. Befor
she returns to Barbados June 2
she will have visited Antigua
St. Kitts, Trinidad and Britist
Guiana. She will remain here foi
five or six days before leaving fo:
England via the Bahamas,

Coming in from B.G. on Wednes-
day, were Mr. C. H. Burton anc
Mr. Cecil Jordan.



Copyright « P. 26 + Vax Dias Int. Amsterdam

By BEACHCOMBER

brimless bowler to study. “It will
all take time and trouble,” he
says, “but I, for one, am not afraid
of a dreary task in the service of
——" His last words are drowned
by Sir Archer (“Zipp”) Fastner’s
mocking challenge: “Oh, go out-
side and wash a rhinoceros, if
you want a dreary task.”

—19

a cheerful face is beaming at him
within a couple of yards distance.
Ir is the running hare. ‘* Well,
well,"’ chuckles the creature, ** You

again ? Have you decided to took
for ice-flowers, too?" ‘* Please
what are you talking about?"

whispers Rupert.

$1.85
$2.95
$1.80
$3.13
$3.13





DIAL. 4220

Bridgetown Players Again
LHRILLER ine Shoup at
Sly Corner” is the title of the
Bridgetown Players’ next preduc-
tion. It opens at the. Empire
Theatre May 16

This play had a long and suc-
cessful run in the West End of
London. It was written by Edward
Percy, the author of “Ladies.in
Retirement”, and a number of
other successful plays. Mr. Perty’s
real name is Edward Percy Smith,
and he has served as a Member of
the House of Commons.

The play is one of thrills
Suspense with never a
moment, Gréta Bancroft
Frank Collymore play two of the

na
dull
and

leading parts, but besides these
popular actors are several new-
comers, Mrs. Blaydon, Mrs
Charles Howe and Dr . Oliver
James of the General

Be

mounting suspense and horrors.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

6.20 a.m.—12.15 p.m. 19.60 M
6.20 a.m. Festival of Britain, 6.40 a.m.
Tuterlude, 645 am. British Choices,

i a.m. The News, 7,10 a.m. News Analysis

' 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m

Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. Introduction
to Sorcery, 7.50 a.m. Interlude, & a.m,
Southern Serenade Orchestra, 8.15 a.m
Worcestershire vs. South Africans, 8.30
am. Semprinni at the Piano, 645 asm
How the Writer Does It, 9 a.m. “The
News, 9.10 a.m. Home News from Britain
9.15 aim. Close Down, 11.15 a.m. Pro*
gramme Parade, 11.25 a.m. Listeners’
Choice, 11.45 a.m. World Affairs, 12 noon
The News, 12,10 p.m,
12.15 p.m. Close Down,

News Analysis,

19.96

M.



4.15 p.m, Southern Serenade Orchestra,
445 p.m. Sporting Record, 5 p.m. Wor
cestershire vs. South Africans 5.05 p.m
One Thousand Guineas, 6.15 p.m. Jazz
Music, 5.45 p.m. Susheela Devi, 6 p.m
Merchant Navy Programme, 6.15 p.m
Introduction to Sorcery, 6.35 p.m. In-
terlude, 6.45 p.m, Programme Parade
6,.00-—11.00 25.58 M. 31.32

M



7 p.m. The News, 7.10 pm, News
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary,
7.45 p.m. Think on these Things, 8 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m,"English Maga-
zine, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 pan. From

|

.

Hospital

prepored for an evening
|

|

|

U.S.A. arrived by the Fort Am-—
herst yesterday morning on their
as Visit to the island and spent

e

and
sid3, Bay Street.

Both Surgeons of Harlem Hos-
pi tad,

and spent three weeks in St. Croix
where
They afterwards joined the Am-—

To-morrow’s Fair

U.S. Surgeon

' HE St. Matthias Assistant
KR LOUIS 1 WRIGHT and Curate Fund sheuld do well
Dr. James L. Wilson of the from the Fair at the Hastings

Rocks tomorrow, judging from the
many stalls and side shows: that
will be in operation. Needlework,
household, cakes, books, plants,
ices and drinks will be on sale as
well as other attractions—darts,
hocpla and lucky-dips.

Incidental Intelligence

A AKING life a of roses

usually entails years of pre-

liminary spadework.

ay ashore as guests of Dr.
ts. A. W. Scott of Wood-

they left New York on
h 28 on the Fort Townshend

Dr. Wilson has a home,









helpt to continue the cruise and —Saturday Evening Post.
a w om their way back home. —LES

i



*



JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street -t-

~—

DRESSES of all Types

Ready-Made from London
Also .Made-to-Order

BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
COCKTAIL HANDBAGS

Upstairs Over Newsam’s





ASTOR THEATRE

GRAND OPENING TO-NIGHT 8.30 and Continuing SUNDAY
20th CENTURY FOâ„¢ proudly presents
It's Tip Top Musical of the year
You'll Swing into High with ~- - -

“FLL GET BY”

DANCES by—June Haver — LOVE by William Lundigan — KISSES by
Gloria DeHaven SONGS by Dennis Day — Trumpet by Hary James
and over 10 Song Hits.

This is a MUSICAL you will want to see over and over again.
MOVIES are certainly getting better all the time.

Saturday Midnight— Whole Serial “TIGER WOMAN”








SAMUEL, GOLDWYN Presents TO-DAY AND CONTINUING

4.45 and 8.30 p.m
with
ANDREWS—Farley GRANGER
Joan EVANS—Paul STEWART

Plus—THE MAC ARTHUR STORY

Dana





TOMORROW (Sat.) 9.30 & 1.30 (2 New Monogram Features)

“SPY TRAIN” & “MOON OVER, MONTANA”

Starring: The Singing-Fightinz
JIMMY WAKELY



the Editorials, 9 p.m. World Affairs, 9.15 |
p.m. Festival of Britain, 9.45 p.m. Dance =
Music,
Interlude, 10.15 p.m
p.m. Rendezvous Players, 10.45 p.m, The
Debate Continues, 11 p.m, Ring up the
Curtain,

10 p.m,.—10.15 p.m
10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m. Canadian Chronicle, |
11.76 Mes 25.51 {

—_——











#0 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
Light Music, 10.30

| PLAZA DIAL
| OISTIN 8404

C.B.C. PROGRAMME

TODAY TO SUN. — 5 & 8.30 p.m.
MAY 4, 1951

(RKO"’s Big Double)
“Sfep Lively"
Fimpk Sinatra
Geofre Murphy
Gloria DeHaven
Denise Darcell & Chita





Lex Barker
M,





Midnite Sat.
Cisco Kid in
“Beauty &

The Bandit” &

Gilbert Roland James Dunn



——

EMPIRE

To-day at 2.30 only . .
DARRYL Z, ZENUCK
Presents ;
Irene Dunne in

« THE MUDLARK ”

To-night at 8.30 and
Continuing





a n CE?

Across 20th CENTURY FOX

2 Split lip tn a coat, (7) | Presents

7. Where they breed toys? (6,3) hi tu

ig: enougn to see Sucre oe) Te LD. CLIMB. THE

13: By * ar 4 bhai “were juvenile HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”
efforts. (4)

14. You may take one any time but}, Color by Technicolor.
an early morning one is sfimu- Starring Susan Hayward—
ating. (3) . Sie 5 e

18 §, funeral pile. (4) i William Lundigan and

+ Merited. (3) mer, Che

18. Broken lamps. (5) Rory Calhoun

20. To the imp it means harm. (3) | a fee ee

21. Used in catching fish. (5, 3)

22. Depressed, (3) 7 ROXY

23. Provides the rag end. (6)

Sown || To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15.
See his Pop ? Watering the garden
: erhape, M9) ’ 1 20th Century Fox Double

2 ne-eyed giant. (7) }

3 Some scrap. (4) ‘ a f

4. Post this, after dinner. (8> Dan DAILEY and

5 At this you will testify, (4) Ann BAXTER in

6. Supporter. (8) z
8. Hip as dry as a crulser’s birth- “cc YOURE MY
lace, (8)

v 3p class, (5) a 7 7 ri ”

10. Bring aid a different way (8) EVERYTHING

15. Change for ® rupee. (5) and '

19 Somebody's son, (3) %

Solution of yesterday's “SIDE STREET”

2. Whistle 8, V-sien

Meanest, 154. Irk — Starring —





Inn, 19, Ele



Farley GRANGER and
Cathy O’Donnell

\ CE eo ee

GLOBE

OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 and Continuing

“THE MIGHTIEST WAR DRAMA
EVER SCREENED...IT RIPS THE *
HEART TO SHREDS AND TATTERS”

N.Y, Journal American

act C QUIET 8 0

Attention: 9, Stranie:
Tier: 16. Nine; 18
Ran.














From ERICH MARIA REMARQUE'S novel - Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE

Plus: LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
Willie IML ........6- ses . STAR DUST.

Walter Burke ............ SO .IN LOVE.

Frances Hypolite .. . SONG OF SONGS.
Ken Buch .. : ils 44a

Phyllis Scott .... TENNESSEE WALTZ.

ore RaeieW . WILDEST GAL IN TOWN.

GUEST STARS:

Gerald Daisley & Phyllis Collymore
TICKETS on Sale TO.DAY & TONITE

Chester Holder



STOP THAT LEAK
IN YOUR ROOF NOW

We offer
EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
RED CEDAR SHINGLES
ROLL ROOFING — Plain !
ROLL ROOFING — Red :
PITCH PINE
DOUGLAS FIR

-

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LYFD.

DIAL 4610



LUMBER DEPARTMENT











- ——_——



“Tarzan & the
Slave Girl”

Vanessa Brown





5th (Monogram Double)

“The Living Ghost’







PSE SSS





GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James

t



MAT. SUN. 5 p.m.

Warner's Classic Technicolor
. Adventure !

THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT

with Shirley Temple, Barry Fitz-

gerald, Lon McAllister





Midnite Saturday 5th (Monogram)

“Call of the Jungle” & Tom Keene in

Ann Cirio “Driftin’ Kid”





——4

ROYAL

To-day to Sunday 4.30 and
8.30.

Republic Smashing Double,
Robert Rockwell and Bar-

bra Fuller in. .. .
* TRIAL WITHOUT
JURY ”

and

« HOMICIDE FOR
THREE ”

Starring

Long and Warren
Douglas.

OLYMPIC

To-day to Sunday, 4.30 and

Audry

8.15.
M.G.M. and Fox Action
Double
Dana Andrews and Gene
Tierney in

“ WHERE THE
SIDEWALK ENDS”
— and —

“ BATAAN ”

Robert Taylor and Lloyd
Nolan (Bataan) not suitable
for Children.

TODAY TO SUN. — 8,30 p.m.



FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

ee tS



ng

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
‘ MATINEES: TO-DAY & TC.MORERO Wat 5 pm
10-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30

JAMES STEWART
“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”





with RICHARD CONTE — LEE J. COBB — HELEN WALKER
A 20th Century-Fox Picture.



|

: |












out of the Blue Ridge
hills of Georgia
.-.and now bring
you this great,
authentic



SUSAN HAYWARD - WILLIAM LUNDIGAN 20: 4

Drvcted by Henry King Produced by Lamar !rotti

TO-DAY at 6.30

and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30





HERE WITHOUT SHAME .... IS THE NAKED
TRUTH ABOUT A BOY, A GIRL AND A







The Devil need only
whisper... to

those who would
Pee, listen!

Extra! Extra!




SAMUEL
GOLDWYN

who brought you America’s
most popular picture,



“TUE ve LOM: Ey ee
Mac ARTHUR | "BQGE oF.
STORY” 50™..



storing DANA ANDREWS

FARLEY GRANGER + JOAN EVANS
with ROBERT KEITH * PAUL STEWART
MALA POWERS * ADELE JETCENS
Disected by Mark Robson « Screen Play by Pillip Yerdsa
Based on the Novel by Leo Brady
Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.

First occupation Chief in
Japan’s 2,000 year history!

One of the timeliest Shorts
ever offered the public. ...





Playing TO-DAY “Friday” May 4th (3 Shows)
2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
And Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

BRIDGETOWRN





THE MOST

POPULAR PLAZA DIAL
CINEMA 2310
IN TOWN







COMING SHORTLY: (Warner Bros)

“YOUNG MAN WITH A HORN”



| EMPIRE THEATRE

SS
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)



SX

RR ORO DROID DEI

putt trbebetrtetstrtttrtt- Db bb Pitt ttt DP Pit P ILA ttt tr br brn trlrtotvlvt tn tvtvtrtntvtrlvtetmt tote ttrstrvtet~ttrdvtwtrtnttrtntnte

POIRIER

z
Oe

POD SSSS SSIS OO FOF TF OFE DDO OSE OPS S DSSS S PPPOE LPP APPEPPPEPE EPPA POOE
x 5
g
%,
% r °
: :
>
N x
x s
s x
‘, 7 . %,
‘ YOULL NEED!! <
/ A e %
Da
. Pa

x,

THE CORNER

664 44
POSSE COOP COS OOF OOOO

PHILIPS ELECTRIC
BULBS

5 — 200 WATTS

SCREW & BAYONET

AND

ELECTRIC LAMP
SHADES

BEAUTIFUL COLORS IN
BAKELITE FROM
27e. $1.29



STORE

SSBB O098 800000 56055566665°

PSS SSP SS SS GOCE S

s 4,454
PELPFLGGES SSF SEF LSP FLEE SS ESF

O44 654





a a

2 eC

FRIDAY, MAY 4,



“Looking At Pictures” |

1951

99 |

Mr. John Harrison, Art and Exhibitions Officer, British

LANDSCAPE PAINTING |
|

Council, gave the second of his lectures “Looking at Pic-
tures” at the Museum this week. The subject of the lec-

ture was Landscape im art.

scape like the portrait made its first ap)
the votive paintings of the Madonna an

background.

Landscape was not painted for
itself but was dragged in as part
of such pictures. To persons com-
missioning paintings at that time
a landscape atone would have
appeared as extraordinary as the
subject of a picture as abstract
paintings appeared to some to-day.
The landscape in early art was,
therefore, never the subject of a
painting, but it was tied in with
the type of subject fashionable
with purchasers. In many cases
the artist depicted in the back-
ground his home town, village or
countryside.

Haitian Background

Mr. Harrison compared a Euro-
pean painting of the flight of the
Holy Family into Egypt with a
painting of the same subject by
a Haitian painter in the Cathedral
at Port-au-Prince. The Haitian
painter had depicted what at firs:
seemed to him strange, following
the mule of the Holy Family was
a second mule on which were
strapped three brightly coloured
chairs. During his travels it
Haiti he met a family of peasants
moving house and there strapped
to the back of a mule were chairs
resembling those depicted in’ the
Cathedral. The artist had intro-
duced a Haitian background to
his painting as European artists
had done long ago.

Imaginary Landscape

Gradually artists began to feel
that there was no need to tie
landscape to the votive picture.
Breughel invented a number of
his forms in his landscapes. He
picked up pebbles and stones and
with tnese built up an imaginary
landscape on his studio table from
which he painted. Leonardo da
Vinci recommended the study of
the shapes of damp patches on
walls until mountains, rocks and
waterfalls could be imagined.





Leonardo's landscapes were
almost wholly imaginary; nowhere
in nature within reach of the

artist did such landscapes exist.
This school of imaginary land-
scape thought in terms of sym-
bols. Graham Sutherland, the
contemporary English painter, is
a direct descendant of this school
of thought. His boulders, moun-
tains and folded hills are highly
imaginary. He takes greater lib-
erties with nature than did the
early painters. His symbols are
real in nature, unlike the painters
of the studio table, but his
imagination plays upon them until
he creates from them an imagin-
ary landscape

Another type of imaginary
landseupe was that based on 4
romantic conception of the
ancient world which Was influ-
enced largely by Roman ruins.
Claude le Lorrain painted pic-
tures of imaginary ports and

towns based on such dreamy ideas.
Gradually this school of painting
applied the same notions to the
towns of its day. It depicted
beautiful and romantic cities
whose qualities as sueh were
exaggerated, It was a poetic ren.
dering: instead of the artist
imagining a landscape, he roman-
ticised the scene that lay before
him.

Revolution In Landscape

Not all landscape was treated
in this glittering fashion. In
England a love of flowers led to
a love of detail in landscape.
This appeared first in English
needlework, and reached its peak
in Carolean embroidery. The
English school of topographical]
artists was the natural outcome
of this influence: factual repre-
sentation and detail now became
of immense importance,

Early in the 19th century the
English painter Constable effected
a revolution in landscape painting,
which had recently come to be
recognised as a form of art. Con-
stable and Bonnington both
formed links between painting in

England and France, and they
influenced art on both sides of
Channel.

Pure Subject

The French Impressionists
effected a further revolution in
landscape painting. Claude Monet
painted scenes at various times of
the day—since light was con-
stantly changing in intensity and
colour. He registered a visual
impression of a scene at a certain
time in the same way that the
cemera registers a scene at 2
given moment. The impressionists,
however, painted only impressions
of scenes not photographic detail.

Landscape now became a pure
subject in art, for an_ ordinary
piece of land or a cornfield became
an interesting and _ individual

~~

W//

\\\

painting by suggested shapes and
Seca tg ae ee LEY

Mr. Harrison said that land-
arance in art in
the Saints in the

Children’s Art
From Great Britain

Dr. «Herbert Reed, the Art
critic, has written an interesting
introduction to the Exhibition of



Children’s Art from Britain
which opens at the Museum today
(Friday.)

“Though the art of children

may reflect the peculiarities of
their environment and mode of
life, it has nowhere any specifi-
cally national character, The
child expresses universal charac
teristics of human psyche, as yet!
unspoilt by social conventions and
academic prejudicés. It follows
that, to those visitors who are
familiar with the art of the
children of their own countries,
these drawings from Great
Britain will not strike any
startling note of originality. It
is not in the nature of the child to
be “original”, but only to express
directly its own individuality; the
individuality of a seeing and
feeling being, but not the origin-
ality of a thifking and inventing
being. It is an important distinc-
tion, and we know now that the
faults of the old methods of teach-
ing art were due to this false
bias. The child was called upon
to use faculties of observation
and analysis quite foreign to the
pre-adolescent stage of mentct
development,



Aim Is Enjoyment

The new methods which have
met with such success do not
necessarily exclude observation
and analysis—there are flower-
studies and )Jandscape sketches in
the present exhibition which
reveal quite extraordinary powers
of this kind. But the aim of the
new methods is to secure at all
costs the child’s enjoyment of
this plastic activity which is the
handling of a pencil or brush and
the exploitation of colours, This
can only be done by allowing the
activity to become an instinctive
one—which means, in_ effect,
allowing the child to discover its
own potentialities. The principa!
role of the teacher becomes sug-
gestive. What is before all
necessary is to create an atmos
phere which will induce the child
to exteriorize the rich and vivid
imagery in its mind, This
involves, in its positive aspect,
the creation of self-confidence in
the child; but there is a negative.
or rather a preventive aspeci,
which calls for ¢ven greater skill
and tact in the teacher. The
child is an imitative animal, and
picks up with incredible ease,
not only any idiosynerasies which
the teacher, as an artist, may pos-
sess, but also the more widely
distributed sophistications of
books, magazines and films. It is
impossible altogether to exclude
these infiuences, and perhaps not
desirable; but the good teacher
can lead the child to a recogni-
tion based on pereeption and
feeling, of what is genuine and
msophisticated in its own work.

Self Criticism

The necessary atmosphere for
happy creative activity is created
largely by the children them-
selves and, indeed the children
themselves may be their own
best critics. At some _ schools
represented in the exhibition a
highly successful system of group

criticism has been evolved by
the teachers, which, far from
inducing self-consciousness of

false pride, is responsible for
the complete absence of sophisti-
cation in the children’s work and
for a quality which might be
called social realism—the sub
jects chosen by the children tend
to be, not so much individual
phantasies, but dramatic inci-
dents with a group appeai,

All types of school have contri-

buted to the exhibition. But any
classification of the collection
would bear no relation to a

classification of the schools. The
only ‘possible classification is
according to psychological types,
and these types, when allowed
free expression, are found to be
quite evenly distributed,”





the omission of unnecessary detail.
Cezanne added to impressionist
painting a solid architecture. This
solidity of construction was offset
by the vibration and movement
of detail, so that his landscapes
did not become dull or heavy.
John Nash brought to English
painting the order of Cezanne.



The Only Pain Reliever
containing Vitamin B,

HEADACHES
NERVE PAINS
COLDS
CHILLS
RHEUMATIC
PAINS $

Rak: LLLLLLL ALS

PILL LILEL LLL DD LD
Ss

s

SLLLILDLLI ILL L ILS

When you take YEAST-VITE Tablets the
effect is wonderful!
Chill symptoms disappear, and you begin to.
well / There's nothing else like YEAST-VI

— it’s the ONLY pain reliever which ALSO
contains the tonic Vitamin B,. So make sure you
get YEAST-VITE to-day.

RELIEVES YOUR PAIN AND
MAKES YOU FEEL WELL

“YEAST-VITE” is o registered Trade Mark

Pain vanishes, Cold and

OS FA nos EO I IT

ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY AVAILABLE

BEDSTEADS

CALL AND SECURE YOURS QUICKLY
— ALSO —

BATHROOM TILES Coloured

SIMMONS
!



Established
1860

T. HERBERT Ltd.

10 & 11, Reebuck Street and Magazine Lane

Incorporated
1926

}









BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BANQUET FOR 2.000 OLD PEOPLE



THE COMMITTEE for the 2,000 years celebration of Paris offered at the Grand Hall of the Stock

Exchange a banquet for 2,000

old poor people.

the plates to the banquet.—Ewpress.



What Will

Become Of

The Coleridge Grounds

By H. O. HUSBANDS

A walk along Heywoods, then
a look to the east, and your at-
tention will surely be attracted
>y what seems to be a row of pink
cubicles upon a terrace

if you were to follow up your
curiosity, you will find out that
you were viewing, in the distance,
the new Coleridge School near
Douglas, St. Peter, which is well
on its way to completion

Soon the pupils of the present
Coleridge School will be aban-
doning their rather small and an-
tique looking edifice at the Rec-
tory Hill, St. Peter, to occupy
this new school, which has been
built on modern English plans.

They will be leaving behind
them a fine—though small—play-
ing field; a playing field that has
been trampled by generations of
school boys; one where many a
glorious struggle at cricket has
been witnessed.

Many of the parishioners of St.
Peter are anxiously looking for-
ward to the occupying of the new
school. But, they are at the same
time wondering what will become
of the grounds and the two school
rooms which are now in use,

Questions such as “will we see

more cricket, football, athletic
sports and énjoy more fairs at
these grounds, or will they be

allowed to run to ruin, or may be,
to a place just fit’: for the rearing
of sheep and goats.”

Perhaps the best answer to the
question lies in the practicability
of converting the grounds into a
public playing field—the first for
the parish—or, to exaggerate the
idéa a little, into a country park,
using the two school rooms as 8
pavilion and casino.

For instance, the purpose could
be similar to the intended purpose
of the Princess Alice Playing
rretad, One will still be able to
play his cricket, football and ten-
nis, for that matter and hold ath-
letie sports and fairs

As the grounds are at the mo-
ment, they, no doubt need a little
conditioning and perhaps one or
two facilities added to bring

up to the “should-be” standard of
a playing field.

No club has been occupying
thess grounds for quite a while,
leaving entirely to a porter and

the school boys, the responsibility

of keeping them trim and in a
condition suitable for games. If
steps are not taken in the near
future to make use of the grounds
when the school is transferred,
deterioration of the grounds will
of course be more rapid,

It may not be thought advisable

to convert the grounds into a
public playing field. Then an-
other worth while alternative

would be for sofne cricket club
to rent the grounds.

The Coleridge grounds are
glebe land, that is the property
of the church. Apart from the
school’s use of the grounds, clubs
have in the past rented grounds
from the Rector of the parish.

The Leeward Cricket club (Sec-
ond Division) were the first rent-
ers of the grounds and they had
the monopoly of them for quite u
number of years.

Leeward relinquished the
grounds about twice during their
regime, the last time being dur-
ing World War II when the short-
age of petrol forced the members
to decide to dissolve their club,

Up sprang a young team_ in
Speightstown shortly after Lee-
ward was dissolved, soon to get
second division cricket status, The
“Winton C.C.”, who rented the
grounds from the Rector of the
Parish until they faded out after
about three years of existence.

Since “Winton”, the grounds
were only regularly used by the
school and, once a year, for a fair
Just a few weeks ago they were
trodden by pupils of the eclemen-
tary schools of St. Peter.

Many are looking .forward tc
seeing the grounds being made
full use of when the school is
transferred, It will at least add
another to the few means of pub-
lic entertainment to be had in the

them parish.



Korea Pact

LEEDS, England. May 3.

When the Korean war broke out
last June, the Kinne family had
three sons in the army, The
brothers made a pact that each
would volunteer to take the place
of any one of them who might be
killed in action.

‘Last October Raymond, 21,
eldest and first sent overseas was
killed, His brother Derek 20,

volunteered for Korea. .
Yesterday their mother received

her second fateful telegram.
Derek too had been killed in
action.

That leaves the youngest

brother, Valentine 19.

“I am not going to let my third

son volunteer for Korea too”,
Mrs. Kinne told reporters. “The
pact has come to an end”. — (CP)

3
—








Fleschinann§
New Ory Yeasr

Bernhard Reports
On Argentine Visit

THE HAGUE, May 2.

The Dutch Cabinet to-day re-
ceived a personal report from
Prince Bernhard on his recent
visit to South America from which
he returned last Saturday.

At a Press Conference held
later Prince Bernhard said he be-
lieved the President and Madame
Peron were exceedingly popular.
There seemed every reason to
believe that in any free election
the President would receive at
least 70 per cent of the v~tes.

The Prince added in reply to
another question that he had seen
no evidence of a_ totalitarian
regime in Argentine and that
contrary to reports President
Peron drove about freely with-
out any armed guard.

—Reuter.





r Am fe j

~~
Rey

ee

Needs no refrigeration —
as easy to use as old-
fashioned perishable yecst

@ Imagine! Fleischmann’s Dry
Yeast stays fresh and active
for weeks after you buy it. So
convenient -- what deliciou
results. Ask your grocer f«
Fleischrnann’s Dry Yeast.

For Your Health's Sake—tr;
Ficischmann’s Fast Rising Prv
Yeast dissolved in fruit juice,
milk or water. Like old-tirne
foil yeast—it helps tone uj
your system

SO EASY TO USE
1, Sprinkle into lukewarm

2. Let stand 10 minutes
stir



ater
The

When dissolved, one pac}

age equals one compressed yeast
cake in any recipe.

D> keep a supply on hand- |
Sake af 2 moment$ norice



Picture shows the waiters and waitresses carrying

Pool Coupons
‘Would Baffle
This Woman
But German Documents—No

THE first woman ever faced
with the task of editing 400 ton
of captured German Foreign
Office documents said to me: “I
should be baffled if I had to fill
in a football pool coupon.”

She is the Hon, Margaret
Lambert, 45-year-olq scholarly
daughter of Viscount Lambert,

the veteran Liberal,

The British Foreign Office have
appcinted her as their editor-in
chief of the documents. The other
editors—in-chief—one French, on>®
American—are men,

Dr. Lambert (she is a doctor
of philosophy of London Univer
sity and a BA of Oxford) has
token the job without knowing
what the salary will be.

‘It hag not yet been decided,”
said the Foreign Office.

Her predecessor, General Sir
James Marshall—Cornwall, who
speaks nine languages, was paic
£1000 a year, for part—time work

Dr. Lambert is expected to have
a bigger salary, as hers will be
a full-time appointment.

Expert On Austria

She speaks and writes German
and French as éasily as she does
English. She is an authority on
Austria, and during the war
broadcast news to that country
from the BBC,

In London Dr, Lambert shares
a studio flat in St. John’s Wood
with a woman artist friend. Part
of the week she is at her father’s
farm at South Molton, Devon.

From there she drives the 18
miles to Exeter in a 1984 car,
to her job as lecturer in modern
history at University College.

‘Read Newspapers’

“T shall have to give up lec-
turing after September 1, when
I go to my new work,” she said

In her lectures she tells the
students to read the newspapers.
“Model your essays on the terse
style that journalists use,” she
advises,

In her new. job she will head
a staff of about 15 at Cornwall
House, near Waterloo Station,

She will take her Siamese ca:
Phra with her to the office.

Phra is the equivalent in
ee ef the English knight's
Sir.

—L.ES.



Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school—gir1s
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-
Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must reach the Short Story Editor,
City not later than Wednesday every week, The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

tition,

Send this coupon with your story.

Name
Age
School
Home Address ....

Sete wee een eeeee

eee eee ee eee ee
’



: “m REG, $336 — NOW $2.50
8 BEDSPREADS — since
33 REG, $514 — NOW $4.25

*

To Mothers
who cannot

feed their babies

Don’t worry ! Cow’s milk. can be prepared sothat the youngest baby

can digest ii without trouble, Th
Barley prevents the milk formii

making it easy for the delicate dig :stive organs to do their work
thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later
in life. That’s why wise nurses and mothers always use Robinson’s

‘Parent’ Barley.

r=




Pr Labatt

vad





ee

Teer reer rere eee)

¢ SA
=

aa

ROBINSON'S

‘PATENT’ BARLEY



PAGE THREE



Overseas League
Gives Cocktail |









Party

LONDON, May 3
Twenty-two countries were
represented ata cocktail parts
which the Overseas League gave
to members visiting Britain for
the Festival.

; Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder



«+» 80 velvety smooth
«++ delicately perfumed

«+» Clings softly for hours



From British Guiana came C. -—
P. Ashurst and the District and hours, giving you
Commissioner from Antigua, Miss that natural vivid look.
F. Nordon was there. Australia

was represented by
New Zealand by 30.

Earl Mountbatten of Burma
welcoming the guests to Britain
said it was imporiant to realise
exactly what the Festival stood}
for, Britain was at present
spending a large part of her
national income and effort on
rearmament, not to fight war
but to prevent it.

There was no better way than}
the Festival of showing the]
world Britain’s peaceful inten-}
tions. The Festival was in fact!
an outward and visible sign of
the goodwill of Britain extended:
to all who extended goodwill to
her,

Mountbattens Praised

Lady Mountbatten also au
the party renewing acquaintance
with people she has met all over:
the world. Air Chief Marshal ;
Sir Arthur Longmore with w hom |

103 people

FACE POWDER
FOR THAT NATURAL VIVID LOOK



was

was Field Marshai Sir William|
Slim, Chief of the Imperial
General Staff, said no two
Britishers. had done more as!
Ambassadors for their country)

than Lord and Lady Mountbatten

Ashurst is a daily visitor to
West Indian stands at the Britiou,
Industries Fair and Earls Court.|

He told Reuter that he and his
colleagues are very Satisflea
indeed with the attentioa|

Caribbean
from
day.

Particular interest is being}
taken in samples of West Indian
timber, Most visitors to the
stands seem to be surprised at
the variety of things produced
in the West Indies.

produce is

attractin;;
thousands of

people ever,

~—Reuter.

TRADE MARK

VASELINE is the registered trade mark
fy. Co., Conn'd

. . .
Financier Dies
KIRKLAND, Lake Ont

May 2,

Hyman Kaplan 69 who under-}
wrote the late Sir Harry Oakes’
first mining ventures ‘and re
jected his offer to become a share-
holder in Canada's richest mining
property died here last night. H¢
built a general store, the third
business establishment in this
ctcmmunity, and parlayed enter-
prise into. a fortune from the fur
trade, He later owned six theatres
and numerous properties in and
around Teck township. He loaned
money to Sir Harry to buy the
Lake Shore mine property and
shortly after gold was found he
turned down Six Harry's offer to
pay off the debt with stock in
the mining company, Mr, Kaplan
#aVe as his reason that he knew
nothing about the gold industry,

—(C.P.)

Vaseline Hak |

of the Chesebrough M













Net

BE SURE OF

OVER felt

uw

Stigmata Marks



~—with the faithful
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 2. Gg a hha a rhe San
Stigmata marks _ (marks of ie phot org The Som

resembling the wounds of Christ)

Play safe be prepared,

about one-eighth of an inch in for your romantic moment.
diameter, plainly visible on ab Get a few cakes of DREAM
infant here, attracted a number TOILET SOAP, use it
of visitors to the mother’s home, faithfully in your bath,

The mother Mrs, Berott of shower and at the wash
Degannes Street, Arima, think: basin for a soft-smooth-
her devotion during pregnancy is clear sicin, radiant with natural
responsible for the marks. loveliness.

She claims she constantly
knelt before a crucifix in prayct
and supplication to the infant
Jesus for safe delivery.—(CP)

DREAM is available at toilet goods —
counters throughout the island.

T REAL
DSc of

xcs

fe





Advocate Co,, Ltd.,

S°VEOCP SEE OPEE PEPE PEPE
THIS WEEK’S



PLASTIC MULTI-COLOURED BAGS




DOUBLE REG. $6.70 NOW $5.75
CREPES — prain. & coLoured

REG. $2.40 NOW 51.40





NIGHTIES PANTIES
BRASSIERES

e addition of Robinson’s ‘Patent’
ig large clots in baby stomachs,



S. ALTMAN, Proprietor

30, Swan Street

» 1m Onn?
aa n 1% PHONE 2702 ;
” ' ‘ NG
V QOUPOVCCCCC GOVT VC FOCSSSSOSS OOS SG GG OO 9 OSG OS OOS



PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Trt)
by the Advocate Co.,





Friday, May 4, 1951

paren

TWO FALLACIES

AT a public meeting held in Queen’s
Park on Tuesday night by the Barbados
Labour Party, Mr. F. L. Walcott, a mem-
ber of the Party and a member of the

: £ ,
Executive Committee, attempted to supply | top of Suringin eee in which was designed by a friend of ace aa ag been} .0tice in the er cae ai days
; ; iri Piccadilly. The famous Reading theirs. The Festival le are " often by historians. For in-| .jp j rench Liner Colombie. seemed

a cordial to the drooping spirits of the | Room in the London Library, assuring the public that it will Stance, 1851 wagethe year of the ig Wee POOPIE ITE

Party’s followers. He continued to blame

: iat leading literary gentlemen have But my neighbours, who have Wales and Treland. 1951 is also aj: ‘ we found ourselves jin that boat
the big merchants for the rising cost of been sleeping every afternoon for been experimenting on the model. census year and some of the 1th instant wea hate ws aaa
living and told his hearers that Barbados | the past fifty years, is dismantled are not so certain. results) are already bein; yound for Trinidad wher B " NS M
had no say in and was unable to do any- | and_ being replastered. A few The Well-Dressed Man published. ; : morning. ALA A
, years ago the City of London The London tailors try, in their Alarming Census

thing about world market prices. Both of
these statements are fallacies.

é ; reclame of a Dior, They stage a disaster. It revealed that in the], i but anchored about
The cost of living rose higher than it | i Fle¢t Street, « a Se - little show to indicate the trend previous ten years the surplus of excellent landing stage 7 . : e
St. Paul’s. Unfortunately it is of men’s fashions in the year. It women over men had increasec | 1alf a mile off. This was a disappointmen«

need have done because the Government
of Barbados refused to accept the advice
of the same “big” merchants before the
£ was devalued in September 1949, The
rejection of their advice cost the island a
sum estimated at approximately half a
million dollars. It was because they con-
tinually adopt the stupid attitude of blam-
ing somebody else and preferably the
merchants, that the Government Party
today suffers from a lack of knowledge of

, been enticing us with decorative ))j # . ‘
world market tendencies. Si eee. At y ae ———— waistcoats and sult jackets with ae ee ceramics Dotted about the mountain sides are small siseia didi aie
There are a number of local business- | Village in Nottinghamshire the Tartine’ Saville’ ow bie tne million today, ~ irab looking houses. One wonders how the

men capable of giving good advice to the

members of the Government but because | to employ workmen are them- ae a tha ceca trode years of.uneasy life. It was founa | ould see no roads or even paths.

of prejudice against the “big” merchants | selves getting to work with has four buttons, and the outside ©% to provide the minority with o *Phones : 4472 & 468
‘ be fre : , pockets, both large and small ,; 5 , ri a4

the advice is not taken and the island trees and put new turf on the favoured at the beginning of the vies. am is now being regarded as| jangerous on this coast; but a British Com-

suffers. village green. Some counties century. The tailors’ annual per- USeful even by people who do noi

The. story of the goose that laid the
golden eggs is one of those universal
stories that any voter of Barbados can
understand. It is quite simple, You have
been spending the gold as soon as the goose

STS foaee es)
Ltd., Broad St. :



a



News From Britain

LONDON, April 27. ‘ z

The great spring-cleaniig By DAVID T
seems to have been left to the Y ID TEMPLE ROBERTS
last possible moment before the gir”,
Festival. But this week

; i there that the little tower of
are men with paint pots

every- has now been taken away

seaffolding steam~-cleaning
stonework. I noticed one man booms,
scouring the dirt out of Plato’s areQ small circle of young archi
beard where he looks I .
company with Galen, Archi- just
medes, and Justinian from

the original model of the

where Poet Laureate and other all be safe even in a hi storm.

promised they would take away shy way, each year to capture the
a railway bridge and so give us, y ¥ Cay

still there, but the City has put has always seemed to me that
a coat of green paint on it, and there are two main sources of
added a coat of arms. men’s fashion ideas in the world,

Lord Mayor comes.up-river and that they fight a continuous

And we had our first taste of the battle. There is Harlem, and
charming river scene this week there is the clubland of London.
when the Lord Mayor came up riv- Bright ties, zoot suits, the draped
er in his barge, in full river pro- line, snap brim hats, and tapering
cession for the first time. in ‘Yousers showing bright socks, all

sriginated among the negro
nearly a hundred years, to open CT ;
the new water-bus service that Citizens of New York. On this

7 : ; side of the Atlantic the forces
= hag he They ro of British good taste are rallying
putting down new turf gutsiae SHaiNst he post-war, storm. Ror
the National Gallery and Trafal- ; , $ iad

parish councillors who falled to

‘, Reg ; t
Het the village to pay extra money its long jacket—but very differen

spade and fork to plant rows of

are behaving as if this Festiva) syasion is effective.
were their own private property j, England are
—Festival of Sussex” is proydly
proclaimed on the South Coast. jn England everything has com-
Last Minute Rush bined to remind us of the affairs

The strange fact is how late in of a hundred years ago when
the day all this hurry and Prince Albert’s ancestor of our

Men’s clothes
slowly changing,
and growing brighter. This week

The truth of the matter is
irders have revealeq some
d the Mendelssohn, of
where, and other men are Up Skylon is actually suspended in
the mid-air by wire ropes from three
In the flat above my own
= scme pleasant but forgotten things
down in tects who are proudly displaying Of the mid-Victorian age.
outside the front door the MWS
Skylon facts that come startingly to my

A TEN DAYS’
TRIP

By E. C. JACKMAN

troversies of 1851, even the news
of 1851 as it would have been
expounded by a modern radio
news-reader. The programmes
curiosities
course, was re-
gatded as the greatest musician
in the world. But otherwise the
music of the week has revealed

The

broadcasts included some

A friend of mine drew my attention to a

in nd, Scotland

census 1 pleasant way of passing ten days, so on the

But the 1951 Sad to say, we did not make use of the

census was a

rapidly and alarmingly. Politician:
put forward the now forgotten
proposal that women should be
recruited to emigrate to the
colonies where the vast surplus o:
men—in Canada, Australia and
New Zealand, was alarming! The
census also. showed that the
population of Ireland had fallen
by a fifth in the previous ten years} Venezuela.

1s we had heard otherwise.

I had to be satisfied, therefore, to view
(Trinidad from this distance, as I did not feel
nclined to use the tug.

Our next port of call was at La Guaira,

Here the mountains run almost
of famine. The -sons of Irelaud ip of flat land
took the cheapest passages.to the jown to the sea. Only a strip

New World, stepped off the ship| about 100 yards wide is left for the wharves
at Boston and y settled there ;
That populatiog Sich at” fous and, warehouses.

The B.B.C’s Third programme

m their homes, as I
has gained a place for itself in five dwellers get to and fro \

more or’ less highbrow radio ser] The anchorage here was one of the most

listen to it regularly, There is so] vany has built a concrete breakwater at a
much that can be done with] sost of a million sterling, inside of which
broadcasting if it is organisec| , .

without the thought of necessarily] *91PS are Now safe.
always entertaining the larges*
number, The Third Programmer
has been able to experiment with
music that otherwise would no!

La Guaira is a picturesque port because
f the mountains that encircle it. In the old



FRIDAY,

FOR SCHOOL

PHILIPS’

MAY 4,

1951

ATLAS

and
LAYNG’S ARITHMETIC
ROYAL READERS

Advocate Stationery

This handy and useful device provides the

housewife with a new and simple method of prepar-

ing recipes with utmost speed and accuracy. The
“Balansa” can be used for careful weighing and
measuring or as a guide for those who prefer to

guess.

WILKINSON



& HAYNES CO. LTD.



C.S. PITCHER & CO.

sas ; oft bustle has begun, Only a week Festival was about to open, And . ; i : ; e e : . é fs
laid it, but you are not satisfied that the a Sebponeinat ponctte came from Lord. Samuel, the best wit in get a public hearing. New lays it was sacked by the Pirates, and th with Pp le asure
goose is laying enough eggs for the whole ; the Festival Gardens that this English politics, has reminded us moderns” have been playec} *rench; and later destroyed by the great

community, so you kill the goose only to
find that there is no gold inside, and that
the: poor goose had, after all, been doing
her bést to keepoun the production of gold.

This is ‘what Mr. Walcott’s statements
suggest. ‘hab by taxing out of existence
the big merchants who are also the “big
employers” of labour, the merchants will
be forced out of business and there will not
even be the employment that there is un-
der the present regime under which Mr.
Walcott is able to enjoy his present status.

fun-fair and amusement park how dull nineteenth century
would open almost three wecks costume was then. The black
late, Since then there have been “hard hat" topped off a gloomy
a few days of sunshine and a ensemble. One business gentleman
tremendous burst of work. The could scarcely be distinguished
gardens will open five days late. from his solemn neighbour. What-
One curious point seems to have ever the solid merits of the
been missed by recent photo. Victorian Age in England, it had
graphs and reports from the Sout! a drab, gloomy appearance—and
Bank. Most of the world has seen its life, soon after this exhibition,
photographs of the Skylon which was to go through an even gloom-
will protrude 300 feet into the sky er phase when the Royal Court
But most of the photographs show virtually disappeared for twenty
the Skylon in course of construc- yeal's In mourning for the death
tion when the bottom tip of this of Prince Albert,
sharply pointed vertical cigar was Third Programme
supported on a 50ft. high tower The B.B.C. has been devoting

regularly and the musicians of] |
the past have been searched for earthquake of 1812.
interesting forgotten compositions | ond busy port.

At one time the Third Programme
seemed to be floundering in a sea
of dull antique music and second.
rate verse plays. But in the last
year it has become more selective
and its masters have a better idea
how to experiment successfully.

It is now a flourishing

Rich people who have interests in La
Guaira live at Caracas — a large and modern
city of skyscrapers beyond the mountains.

We could not make the trip to Caracas as a
We notice that some other broad. landslide has blocked the road, A new road,
aoe, ee ee eee fee! more convenient than the old one is now

the highbrows — notably — the] being built.
Italian Radio has a “Terza Pro-
gramma.” The B.B.C.’s_ scheme
costs a great deal. But the listener
to regular services may count the

From La Guaira we passed on to Curacao,
a Dutch Island. Nature has given Curacao a





Again !!

PETER DAWSON'S

SPECIAL

WHISKY
















4

7 ders. In explanation under its third transmission this week 1 ¢ ; 7
The members of the Government will | {he'photographs, It has generally entirely to a ‘fash back” of a conoey welt evens it it relieves his| solendid harbour, safe and commodious. One THE OLD FAVOURITE g
on € . Or 0-
not study trade movements and market ri Fag gs hea el the. pe Pratine Fea on ee era. the music and discussions on medieva'| P28ses through a narrow entrance, and enters ‘cspnaein eee
tendencies for themselves, nor will they mid- music of 1851, the talks and con- philosophy. the spacious harbour. A pontoon bridge,

seek advice from Jocal businessmen. They
rely instead on advice and orders from the
United Kingdom, which come from those
who consult first the interests of the Brit-
ish Treasury and the Board of Trade and

“appear to be suspended in
oe eeneenieneneeaeaieoteieainiaant



Puerto Rico Builds A Folk Sehool

This American island in the West
Indies, although handicapped by
limited resources, is working to pro-

Puerto Rico’s overpopulation
and dearth of natural resources



known as “Queen Emma” kindly opens up,
and lets us pass into Willemstad, the capital.

I thought that Barbados had a superfluity
subject area come together at

1 wi eeks for ae A et
eR TS re of them. Curacao is a long thin island a few

i iti ance to be imsur- vid re educational opportunities approximately three hours. These i v
then the interests of the British West peer a eer etd to the pro- fay its peanls through the Plan Moro- blocks of time are used to pro-| miles off the coast of Venezuela. It is 38
Indi ao i 1 island in the YS. Programme of guided home vide general orientation of units] ).; ‘
ndies. 4 gress of this small island in miles long and 2% at its narrowest.

Sir Stafford Cripps kept on saying that
the £ would not be devalued. The Gov-
ernment of Barbados wants to watch care-

West Indies. The Puerto Rican
people, however, insist upon
viewing themselves as a natural
resource of limitless potential.
Foremost in this concept is the

tudy.
“By LAWRENCE A. CREMIN
From NEA Journal

ered fully equivalent to the

standard secondary programme.

of work and to plan studies and
collateral activities. The office
further recommends that general)
group meetings be followed ne
an extended period during whic

Oil tanks are very conspicuous, as oil is
sent from Venezuela and refined in Curacao.

J
of motor cars, but in Curacao there are sl



THE C. 8. KINCH CO., LTD.=—Agents



JUST RECEIVED
LIGHTNING

fully statements that the £ will not be importance they attach to formal ss The poet of ale plan, and per students can soaplt wan se : rey = sae ~ shops ihe compara- ZIPP FAS I ENERS
tion. The Puerto Rican re- haps its most radical departure, teacher and receive i ividual| tively chea oods, but an attendant in one
revalued. A knowledge of world market pets “his public schools with a is the technique of guided inde- assistance. ¥ ps

tendencies is an essential to a healthy
economy. Barbados, if it thinks in terms
of world trade and utilises the best com-
mercial brains available locally, will find
means and methods of combating the cost
of living. Running down the big merchant
is as expensive a pastime as killing the
goose. Knowledge, not words is our great-
est.need.

The-voters of Barbados would be grate-
ful meanwhile to Mr. Walcott if he could
take some interest in fish, meat and
fruit which are being sold at prices
beyond the schedule, and thereby force up
the cost of living, without influence from
world markets.

pendent study. The major part
of the work is done by the stu-
dent himself—away from the
school, on his own time, and in
large measure at his own pace,
Inasmuch as the initiative re-
mains with the student, the
principal role of the teacher is as
guide and consultant. For this
purpose, the central office provides
each study group with two teachers
one specializing in language und
social studies, the other in mathe-
matics and natural sciences. The
first task of these teachers is to
organise and lead the work of
the student group. Their most
critical job, however, is to nurture
the attitudes and skills necessary
to successful prosecution of inde-
pendent study. Proponents of the
plan admit that it is on the ability
of these teachers effectively to

faith matched by few peoples in
history. Through them, he is de-
termined to find ways to a high-
er standard of living. i

Puerto Rico, an American ter-
ritory, maintains with the ex-
penditure of 30 per cent. of. its
budget a public-school organiza--
tion much like that in the United
States with six-year clementary
schools, three-year intermediate
or junior high schools, three-year
senior high (secondary) schools,
and a university. Gradual ex-
pansion toward the goal of uni-
versal elementary education is
under way. Paucity of funds has
presented to educators a major
challenge to devise new means to
care for out-of-school youth.

Many new proposals have been
tried. Few, however, seem to hold
the promise of Plan Morovis,

asked me $40 (American money) for a small
porcelain figure. It may be that other
articles are more reasonable.

Students meet in a simple room
requiring tables, chairs, a black-
board, a small library, and (in
the case of science classes) mini-
mum laboratory equipment. This
room functions also as an office
for teachers, as a guidance centre
for students, and, where practi-
cable, as a meeting place for
community clubs.

More than any other kind of
secondary education, Plan Moro-
vis requires a well-equipped and
functional library. Such a library
—containing basic texts, periodi-
cal material, supplementary refer-
ence books, and dudio-visual ma-
terials—is of servce not only to
students at all levels, but to the
whole community. In _ addition,
the flexible schedule opens up a
whole new range of valuable, in-
expensive resources such as guid-

Our next call was at Cartagena in Colom-
bia.
Northern coast of South America. After the
town had been captured three times, it was
thought advisable to fill up the Boca Grande
(large mouth) with stones, so that ships
could not use it.













The small mouth (Boca Chica) is now used
instead, as it is easier to defend. The old city
was enclosed by a very heavy wall but it
could not keep out the ubiquitous pirates of
Sir Francis Drake in 1585, or subsequently
the French.

This port has the best harbour on the)’

The original Zipp Fastener that

always’ works.

Lengths and Colours

For

In sizes - Type -

that are

“JUST RIGHT”

every

service

in Personal

apparel and equipment

meee my which had its origin in 1948 in teach these skills and attitudes ed field excursions. e
© the post war pressure for that much of the success of their Although the plan is still in F 4 ‘
WHY N oT? increased secondary education— rerane rests. ; Tr experimental stage, the re- 3 rom Cartagena we had the long run to For our i ti
especially in the smaller com-~ Ithough the broad over-all sults have been encouraging.! Jamaica where we tie i setectton see ..
THE Secretary-General of the Interna- munities on the island, curriculum is essentially the — Teacher interest has remainet} o-¢ When it eae = Be peeve ?

i ivi iati i j as that of the standard senior spirited, and students have not .
tional Civ Aviston, Organisation recently Two alternatives were then high (secondary) school, the ac- only met curriculum responsibili-| the Hope Gardens. The taxi driver said that DA COSTA «A co LTD
announced the signing of an agreement, ] available to the student seeking tual selection of courses to be of- ties, but also have organized! rain had fallen in th Ki reli a be
the fifth of its kind, giving technical assist- | secondary schooling (1) the regu- fered during a given school year many co-curriculum _ social and n had fallen in the Kingston district

ance to Thailand.

Under the terms of this agreement
1.C.A.0. will provide a Civil Aviation Ad-
viser to the Civil Aviation Board of that
eountry and fellowships which will en-
able two Thailand pilots to study commer-
cial flying abroad in order to become
regular pilots in their national airline in
the future,

No such assistance has been rendered to
Barbados because it is considered by
I.C’A.O. that we can get such assistance
from the United Kingdom. Few people in
Barbados realise the disadvantage of our
status with. regard to international assist-
ance of this kind. The United Kingdom,
and particularly its local representatives,
are at all times unwilling to ask for help
for its possessions. They regard this as an
admission of their failure to do everything
for their possessions. Yet flourishing com-

lar high (secondary) schools— will be conditioned by the needs
located principally in the large? and interests of the students and
towns+which could admit only a by the nature of local instruction-
limited number of students from al resources. The curriculum ts
their immediate or neighbouring developed around units of work
communities and (2) a plan of which, although prepared in basic
free examinations administered form at the central office, are
by the Puerto Rican Bureau ,of nevertheless subject to the criti-
, School Extension for work done cal analysis of the student groups.
independently. r Ordinarily, successful comple
Obviously, many of those de- tion of a work unit will involve
siring secondary education could jnitial orientation and assignments
not be adequately cared for under (undertaken by the group in co-
either arrangement. Seeking a operation with the teacher), indl-
way in which to meet this de- vidual consultation with teachers
mand without diverting funds from and other. local resources. A
the elementary school expansion student enrolls for as much work
programme, public educational as he feels he can successfully
authorities, largely under the negotiate, and evaluation is built
leadership of Agsistant Commis- on reports of the teacher and
sioner Francisco Collazo, estab- special tests constructed by the
lished a modest experimental central office. Academic credit is
plan at Morovis during 1948-49. also granted for appropriate oc-
Out of this experiment has come cupational experience under the
a pioneering programme. standard rules of the central of-
The central aim of the Morovis fice, and all credit ebtalned under
plan is to provide the fundamen- Plan Morovis is transferable
tal elements of a secondary edu- should the student later enroll in
cation—with special emphasis on a regular secondary school,

its application to Joecal commun- Class meetings are held accord-

civic activities. There is evidence] since a small shower in December.
that the plan is producing excel-
lent academic results throughout
the island,

Plan Morovis has opened a
whole new vista to educators on
the island. Already, a programme
is under way to extend its meth-
ods downward to the junior high
school and outward | to non-ma-
triculated adult groups. The
Puerto Rican Department of Edu-
cation is also studying means or
transferring some of its educa-
tional assets to the regular senior
high (secondary) school. An ex-
perimental project will be initia-
ted which will attempt to involve
the whole student body of a se-
nior secondary school in a simi-
lar programme incorporating self
study. Finally, a significant at-
tempt will be made in the autumr
of 1951 to bring vocational in-
struction into the scepe of the
plan.

Puerto Ricans have developed
in Plan Morovis a remarkable
educational innovation for their
island, one that might well be












This drought had turned the grass into
hay, and even the trees showed signs of being
parched. The dust, of course, was bad. In
the Hope Gardens the Bougainvillea and

colour, The orchid house is worth a visit.
These gardens can be beautiful but the
drough had spoiled their beauty.

This ten days’ trip has a curious zig-zag
itinerary. From Jamaica we returned to
Curacao and then passed on again to La
Guaira. On the way to Trinidad we hugged
the bleak looking Venezuela coast all the
morning. The sky was overcast until the
East Wind used its broom to brush the
clouds away. At once there was a trans-
formation. As far as the horizon the sea be-
came an expanse of molten silver. In contrast
the deep blue ocean to the west still slept.

Cannae had been watered and alone a



Dry Goods Dept.



HAMS
CHICKENS

CHEESE





Cold Storage Hams —
avge. 16 lbs.

Tin Hams — 3 Sizes

Salami

Frankfurter Sausages

Sausage Roll in Tins

Jellied Chicken in tins

ity life—to eer re adults bing Meg a ae schedule eoeer. a in other countries, and Jellied Turkey in Tins «
munities like Ceylon are helped with Point | wable to enroll in a regular se- y students in co-operation with have illustrated in no small} This time we nosed the wharf at Trini i

i , . ; ; idad Heinz Soups (Canadian)
Four Aid.. Why not help for Bathados ? nior high (secondary) school. teachers. The central office re- measure their determination to ‘ Campbell Soups (Canadian)

OUR





The education provided is consid- groups in each



commends that

so we landed and had a very pleasant drive
up Lady Chancellor’s mountain road, so
called after her because she had urged its

solve their problems.





=a



al

READERS SAY:





4
pation: KEEP COOL
Radio Inte.ference tc use afiy vehicle causing elec- rect type of resistor is used, in If no notice is taken of this a sum- From the top one has a wide expanse of with these!
trical interference with the law- fact manufacturers now fit sup- mons is likely to follow. ; view over valleys and shippin
To The Editor The Advocate ful and tormal operation of pressing devices before their cars A motor car owner can easily 8. Bass’ Ale
SIR,—In your edition of the licenced wireless apparatus or leave the works, ascertain if his car is causing in- cae

~ ith April “Optimist” wrote very

~ =tfeelingly and certainly not with-

out cause concerning interference

receiver.'

The ordinary private car only



The responsibility for seeing
that the Act is obeyed rests on the
Government Electrical Inspector

terference by driving it to a dis-
tance of about 50 feet from a radio
receiver and then with the engine



Back to the ship, and away for Barbados
and the end.

Ieing Sugar



Guinness Stout
Worthington Ale
‘Canada Dry Ginger Ale



to radio reception generated by requires a suppressor to be fitted who has two cars fitted with the running, the receiver should ‘be If you are n i Sul -_
radi ( y s s , ‘ 3 ot a good sail tanas Steer
passing vehicles, in the high tension cable con- requisite apparatus for detecting tuned to the 13, 19, 25, 31 and 48 of this tri ill di 8 ilor the pleasure Currants

For the benefit of our Members ected to the distributor. The this offence. The cars cruise about meter bands and the resulting ae: Pre we epend on the weather met. Prunes PHONE
and other car owners who may suppressor is a resistor usually the roads and should a vehicle be noise will let him know if it is We had a nasty night between Cartagena Mixed Peel :
not know that this is an offence made up in cartridge form, lt heard transmitting a noise suffici- sufficient to interfere with normal and Jamaica, a d e-left Ki . Peanuts cr even how to, overcome the costs about 60 cents and can be ent to make radio reception im- reception. ebatetihet os » and we left Kingston in a good Anchor Butter GODDARDS
eae, we would advise them as aon eS few seins. a of possible, its number is noted and Secretary, Barbados Auto- imitation of a gale; but having regard to the sym Memcnag Powder

o 1S: n ading garages have them in a white paper is sent to the owner mobile Association. i i , ‘corations

Section 14 of the Wireless Tele- stock. They do not interfere with advising him of the circumstances ~ 151 Roebuck St., entire trip the weather was on the whole Gold Braid Rum WE DELIVER
graph Act 1940 makes it illegal the running of the car if the cor- and requesting his co-operation. Briegetown good,

terete nteianeaeeet eens
as =,

—



=—





FRIDAY, MAY 4,

1951



Caribbean Commission
Opens Session Here

The first meeting of the Caribbean Commission ever
to be held in Barbados opens on Menday morning in the
Legislative Council Chamber.

His Excellency the Governor will deliver the opening
address, welcoming the delegates and declaring the meet-

ing open.

Subsequent sessions wil] be held in the new

Conference Room at Hastings House, under the Chairman-
ship of Sir George Seel, British Co-Chairman of the Com-

mission.

Millingtou Gives
Lecture Recital |

> UPILS and the staff of Com-

bermere School were treated

to a Musical Recital given yesier-

Gay morning in the School Hall,

by Mr. James A, Millington on tne

violin, accompanied by Mr, Geral.t
Hudson.

both Mr, Millington and Mr.
Hudson are members of the staff
Mr. Hudson teaches Music Appre-
ciaticn and Vocal Classes, while
Mr. Millington does Theory of
Music and teaches the violin.

Boys from nine years old to 19
listened enthusiastically to the re-
cital and appreciated it with the
warmth it deserved,

Some of the items included in
the informal but well arranged
pregramme were: Moto Perpetuo”,
by Bohn, “Czardus’” by Monti,
“Mazurka,” “Air and Variation”
by Danclu and “Concerto in G
Major” by De Beriot.

Before Mr. Millington played
each piece, he explained its struc-
ture and various technical points,
which were to be introduced, ana
the methods of producing these
effects on the violin. Mr. Milling-
ton’s masterly execution of the
pieces showed that he has lost
none of that gift of interpretation
of his earlier recital years,

The Recital, which lasted for
approximately one hour, was the
first ever to be held by the school.
Major Noott; Headmaster, told the
Advocate that he was extremely
pleased with the way in which the
boys appreciated the music.

ESIDENTS of Kensington New
Road had a_ great shock
yesterday merning, A large num-—
ber of labourers equipped with
pick axes, shovels and drills could
be seen along the road and many
people thought the road was going
to be pepaired.

They however found out later
that the Waterworks Department
was laying pipe lines.

A few residents, near the Fon-
tabelle end, already have water ia
their houses, The old pipe line did
not run along the full length of
the road. Other residents at ihe
other end of the road, near the
Baxters Road end, will now be
able to get taps in their homes

A man who was living in Ken -
sington New Road for the past 25
years, told the Advocate that he
was not extremely anxious to get
water. It was quite easy for him
to send to a public pipe for water
but “what he wanted was the
road repaired.”

One night he.wasygeing -home
and while walking along this road
he nearly broke his foot in a hole.
He said that when rain falls the
gutters are filled with water for
many weeks and it is very insani-
tary. He finds it impossible to
tolerate the number of mosquitoes.

Many residents of this road also
suffer great losses of stock during
the rainy season. When the fowls,
ducks and turkeys are not
drowned, they die of colds.

IXTY-TWO MEN were present

at the Central Police Stati
yesterday to apply for two vacan-
cies in the Fire Brigade.

The majority had an elementary
education to the Seventh Standard
while several were former pupils
of Secondary Schools and about
half a dozen held School Certifi-
cates,

They were examined by Fire
Officer Craggs and up to yesterday
evening the number was reduced
to three. These three are now
going through the final tests end
two will be chosen to fill the
vacancies,
7JOHE MONTHLY MEETING of

the Combermere Old Boys’
Association will take place at 8
o’clock tonight at Combermere.
There will be a film show given







by the British Council. After the
show the Secretary will like to
meet members interested in
football.



Govt. Must Erect
Bus Stand Latrire

Rus drivers and concuciors, as
weil as many passengers, are com-
plaining because there is no latrine
at the Probyn Street Bus Stand,
but they will not get one until
Government decides to erect it.

Mr, E. D, Mottley, M.C.P., told
the Advocate yesterday that the
Commissioners of Health are con-
reious of the fact of the necessity
of more sanitary accommodation
in the City and they are working
on the selection of sites.

“As far as the bus stand is con-
cerned, it is so obviously necessary.
that a Jatrine should have been
erected ever since, Of course
sanitary convenience in the bus



stand is a matter for central
Government”, he said.
Mr, Mottley said; “I am sure

that the Commissioners of Health
svould be willing to look after the
sanitary convemence im the bus
stand when it is erecte?.”

As regards the two new refuse
couectors, Mr. Mottley said that
they are giving exceptionally good
service and he is jooking forward
to the day when the Scavenging
Separtment is equipped with all
collectors of this type.

CA

What is epilepsy? We only know that
since time began it has attacked rich
and poor alike, great and humble. Julius
\Caesar, Napoleon and Byron were vic-
ims. Epilepsy has always interested
men of science and at last their efforts
have besn successful because a treat.



N EPILEPSY

This will be the twelfth meet-
ing of the Caribbean Commission
and the first to be held in Bar-
bsdos although the first session
of the. West Indian Conference
was held here in 1944.

The West Indian Conference is
an auxiliary body of the Carib-
bean Commission and _ its most
recent meeting was held in
Curacao last December when Mr.
F. L. Walcott and. Mr. E. L.
Ward. represented Barbados.

Addendum

The addendum for this neeting
will have to be finally accepted
by the Commissioners after the
meeting spens and it is expectec
that the main items for discussion
will inelude the recommendations
emanating from the West Indies
Conference, (Fourth Session) .

These recommendations for
the most part centre around the
agricultural problems of the
Caribbean and it now remains
for the Commission to take
action in line with the sugges-
tions made on the Conference
floor by the delegates from the
several territories,

Other matters which will be
discussed will be recommenda-
tions arising from technical
conferences sponsored by the
Caribbean Commission among
which are the technical meet-
ing of Rural Co-operatives,
held in Trinidad, the recom-
mendations of the Conference of
Statisticians and the meeting of
the Caribbean Research Coun-
cil’s Committee on Wild Life
and Forestry.

There are also the usual mat-
ters within the Commission’s
purview on which decision will
have to be taken, as well as the
normal review of the functions of
the Central Secretariat, which is,
as it were, the Commission's
executive arm,

An Experiment

The Caribbean Commission may
be described as an experiment
within the Caribbean on co-oper-
ation across national boundaries.
Its members are those- nations
which have responsibility for non-~
self‘ governing territories within
the .area—France, the Nether-
lands, the United Kingdom and
the U.S.A, ,

There are sixteen Commission-
ers, four from each national sec-
tion. The British Chairman, Sil
George Seel has. with him three
cther Commissioners, Mr. J. K.
Thompson, Colonial Attache to
the British Embassy, Mr, G. H.
Adams, Leader of the~ majority
Party in the House of Assembly
and .Hon, .W.. A. Bustamante,
Leadey of the majority Party in
the House of Representatives in
Jamaica,

_Mr. Thompson arrived yester-
day afternoon while Hon. W. A.
Bustamante. is expected to arrive
in Barbados on Sunday accom-
panied by his secretary.

The U.S. section is headed by
Mr. Ward Canaday, President of
the Willys Overland Corporation
of America. He is the man who
developed the “Jeep’’, (General
Purposes Vehicle) during the last
war.

Livestock Practices

Mr. Canaday, a multi-million-
aire, owns estates in St. Croix,
Virgin Islands, where he has con-
ducted. experiments in farm and
livestock _ practices suitable to
\hat area.

The other members of the U.S.
section are Mr, Jesus Pinero, the
first native Governor of Puerto
Rico. Mr. Pinero is very aetive
in Puerto Rican affairs and is a
close friend of the present Gov-
ernor. He is particularly inter-
ested in housing problems and is
a keen amateur photographer.

A new member of the U.S.
section is Dr. Alonzo Moron, a
native of the Virgin Islands who
is at present President of Hamp-
ton Institute, Virginia. The fourth
member of the U.S. section, Dr.
Rafael Pico, who was here for

the 1944 Conference and who
ergated a most favourable impres-
sion, will not be attending this

meeting but the section will have
the benefit of the advice of Mr.
Sol Luis Descartes, Treasurer of
Puerto Rico and Chairman of the
Caribbean Research Council.

French Section

The French section is led by
Baron Edmund Petit de Beauver-
ger, the French Ambassador to
Cuba and a man of considerable
experience in the French Over-
seas Service.

He. will be supported by Mr.
Gabriel Van Laethem, Secretary
to the French Embassy at Wash-
ington. Mr. Louis Feuillard,
engineer of the Guadeloupe Pub-
lic Works and Mr. Antoine
Wiliord, Head of the First Divi-
sion Of \the. Prefecture at Mar-
“tinique. ~

Dr. Hendrik Riemens, Minister
of the Netherlands in Venezuela,
is Netherland Co-Chairman, Dr.
Riemens was formerly Counsellor
to the Netherlands Embassy to
the United Nations at Lake Suc-
cess and presided at the recent
West Indian Conference when his
tact and ability were highly
acclaimed by the delegates.

The others in the Dutch section
are Dr. C. De la Try Ellie,
formerly President of the High
Court of Justice, Curacao; Jonk-
heer, Quarless Van Ufford, Sec-
retary to the Netherlands
Embassy in Washington and Mr.
C. H. H, Jongbow. of Surinam.

BE C

ment has been found tha’




relieves at-

tacks in most cases. This remarkable ’

medicine is described in an interesting
booklet entitled “Can Epilepsy be
Cured?” This booklet is given away free
to epileptics. Anyone suffering from
this disease should request a free copy

wie EDUCATION AL DIVISION Seabee ET OSL
-—

Sr ‘AL DIVISION, Dept jergen Ave., Jersey City, S.A.

HE EDUCATION - A

! Please send saa « copy of the free booklet entitled “Can Epilepsy be Cured? E. 107 '
i eae ee eae pee eed aee nsec ewe rete ree eseereereeseeereseees Seer tee

1 NAME steteneee nesses’ ~ (For clarity, please print) ; :
Ole os. A .asscoonee Spestenensncscncecessssssesasnensasanenastvesisbnesacersduanetatl '
8 city - COUNTRY ......---00s0-nsenceeresseresees

BARBADOS



HOSPITAL SURGEON



DR AND MBS. K. KUCZYNSKI who arrived by 5.5. Gascogne from

Bngland yesterday.
of the General Hospital,

The doctor is the\newly appointed medical officer

‘Ship Will Load Sugar
At Speightstown

A SUGAR SHIP is expected to call at ©peightstown

in another two weeks to load for the U.K.

It will be the

second to call at this port this crop,

A shipping clerk told the Advocate yesterday that a
ship, which was expected to call for sugar this week-end,
was no longer expected. The bonds in the City were be-
coming congested, he said, and the sugar ships calling at

Steel Band
To Play At
U.K. Festival

Inspector M. «.
master of the Volice Band, St
Iucia, will take » Trinidad Steel
Band to the Festival of Britain
He will conduct the band when

Grimth, Band-

it gives performances at the
Festival,
“This is the first time manv

Europeans will be hearing a Steel
Band and it should be a novelty
to them”, a member of the local
Police Band told the Advocate
yesterday.

‘Inspector Griffith arrived in the
island yesterday by B.W.1,A. from
St. Lucia intransit to Trinidad,



Inspector M. GRIFFITH
While here he called atthe local

Band Headquarters for a few
hours to look up his old friend
Sgt. Archer, who on many
eecasions has acted as conductor
of the local Band.

Sgt. Archer told the Advocate
that Inspector Griffith was once a
member of the Barbados Police
Band. He left the island and
joined the Trinidad Police Band
where he rose to the rank of
Sergeant. Following this he was
transferred to the St. Lucia Police
Band.

While in England Inspector
Griffith will take a six months
course at the Royal Schcol of
Music.

Sun ZESS neh eeeee
“PURINA”

PIGEON CHOW

see

all. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.

Barbados were first relieving these bonds.
—- —-f

The sugar bonds in Speights-
town are almost filled up. The
bonds of Messrs R. & G, Chal.
lenor are already filled and are
receiving no more sugar. Messrs
Plantations Ltd.'s bonds have
little recom left for further
storing.

As soon as Messrs’ Plantations
Ltd’s bonds are filled, all the
sugar produced by the sugar fac-
tories of the Leeward parishes will
have to be sent to Bridgetown.

The clerk said that the three
ships which took sugar at Bridge
town during this week, eased the
congestion of the bonds consid-
erably. This, he said, may hasten
the arrival of another ship at
Speightstown, 7

BREAKDOWN in the base-

ment of the first mill at
Fairfield Sugar Factory, has kept
the factory idle for the past two
days. Workmen were busy during
that period effecting the neces-
sary repairs, The factory is ex-
pected to start again to-morrow,

HE COMMISSIONERS of
Health of the parishes of St.
Lucy and St. Peter met yester
day to decide what they would do
with Farrows House, Farrows
House is built partly in St. Peter
and partly in St. Lucy and so ib
is the property of both parishes.
The Advocate learned that St.
Lucy was willing to sell her part
of the building. This fact was
discussed at the meeting,

OAD WORKERS were com-
pleting their laying of a pipe
line to the newly built Colefiuge
School at Douglas, St. Peter ‘yes-
terday. ose
They were breaking the sur
face of the top of the Station Hill
to finish laying the pipe line.
Vehicles moving along that road
had to be driven with great cau-
tion.

ere FINES were imposed

on offenders by _ Police
Magistrate Mr. S. H, Nurse at
District “E” Police Courts this
week. The highest fine was £2
and 2/— costs imposed on Ethel-
bert Ramsay of Ashton Tenan-
try, St. Peter, for overloading a
motor lorry with canes, This fine
was to be paid in seven days or

he wiil be imprisoned for a
month.
There was also a fine of 25

fcr indecent language, The _ of-

» fender was Oscar Worrell, alias

Freddie Fowls, of Rectory Hill,

St. Peter.

ne eatches of fish
were landed at the

Speightstown fish market during

the week. Mostly flying fish and
dolphin were caught. Boys made
peeket money by hooking small
jacks.

©

<\T. PETER has had a very dry
Ss week. The rainfall] returns at
District “E” Police Station re-
corded only three parts of rain
up to yesterday evening. The
three parts of rain fell on»Tues-
day night.

HE, HIGHWAY COMMIS.
SIONERS of St. Peter are
carrying out extensive repairs to
tenantry roads in Boseobelle. The
road workers are under the super

vision of Mr. Erie Challenor,
Road Inspector of the Parish, and
Mr. T. O. ‘Harris, Road En-
gineer,

ADVOCATE

New Books On
Show at Public
Library

The Public Library has just re
ceived 299 «new - books--185° fic
tion and 114 _ non-fiction—and
some of these which are now on
show will be released to the pub-
lic on Saturday.

Books on exhibition include
books on cricket and football
which will appeal to the school-
boy playing «these games. On
cricket there is “Book of Cricket”
by Sir Pelham. Warner dealing
extensively with bowling, fielding,
batting and a brief look-over of
some of thei world’s best batsmen
and bowlers. The most important
beok on football is Leonard
Gribble’s “They Kidnapped Stan
ley Matthews.’ In this book
Gribble tells of the experiences
ef this great English international
sceeer player.

On West Indian
are “Highways Across the West
Indies” by Herbert C. Lanks and
“The British West Indies” by W
L Burn, Professor of Modern
liistory at King’s College in the
University of Durham

Probation officers will be glad
to know that Sir Cyril Burt's “The
Backward Child” is ameng some
cf the books teuchine juvenile
problems. There is also “Chil-
dren of To-day” by Ethe! Dukes
wend Margaret Hoy.

history there



Should Taxis Be
Removed From
Bridgetown ?

A visitor to the island told the
Advocate yesterday that there
were still a few things in the local
parking regulations that could be
remedied.

He ‘suggested that the taxis be
removed from areas such as Tra-
falgar Square and Beckwith Place,

two of the busiest areas’ in
Bridgetown, He said that they
should be parked at a_ central

parking area outside the City and
a public phone placed at the dis-
posal of drivers, In this wey
people requiring a taxi could
easily phone for it,

He said that where the taxis are
at present parked, could be made
oarking areas for private cars.

otorists from the Windward
parishes could easily park their
vehicles in Trafalgar Square and
those from the Leeward parishes
at Beckwith Place,

“The noises at present made by
taxi engines and drivers chatting
near their vehicles would cease to

annoy clerks on the business
premises, especially a place like
the Public Buildings,” he said.

“There should be no taxis parked
in the vicinity of this building at
all. Private cars only move out of
their parking areas about three or
four: times a day while taxis are
constantly on the go.”

Work Elsewhere

Mr. E, D. Mottley, Senior Repre-
sentative in the House of Assembly
for the City, told the Advocate:
“Those people who are annoyed
by seeing taxis in the City ought
to find somewhere else to live and
work.”

He said that he did not think
the taxis should be removed from
the City. “Does it not appear to
some people that taxi drivers and
owners must also live?" he said.
“Surely these people have never
been to big countries. It is time
that people stop being so narrow-
minded and selfish and think of
the other fellow’s plight also,

“These taxi men also have wives
and children to support and why
should they be pushed out of the
City, when especially, there are
few public telephones, if any, to
contact them,” he said.

NO QUORUM
At St. Michael's Vestry

The meeiing of the St. Michael’s
Vestry which was scheduled to
take place at 2 p.m. yesterday was
not held because there was no
quorum.

Among the items which were
set down for discussion were the
Committee's Report on the method
to be adopted for the payment of
retrospective wages for Parochial
Employees; a motion by Mr. B. A.
Weatherhead that the Vestry con-
sider the advisability of having the
Vestries Act 1911 (1911—5) so
amended as to give the Vestry
power to make rules to be con.
firmed by the Governor-in-Execu.
tive Committee, for the proper
conduct of its meetings; and
another motion by Mr, F, McD.
Symmons suggesting the appoint.
ment of a committee to consider
and make recommendations on the
question of granting a_ cost-of-
living bonus to Vestry employees.

Present at the meeting were Mr, F
MeD Symmonds (Churehwarden!, Mr.
T. Bowring, Mr. C. C. Browne, Mr. A.
R.) Toppin, Mr. C. A. Braithwaite, Mr
D. G, Leacock, Mr. E, D. Mottley,
M.C.P. and M. J. W, Hewitt



REPEAT

NAIROBI: Eighteen months
ago a bull gored a farmer at Nai--
visha, 50 miles from Nairobi.
This week the same bull gored
tne farmer again and killed him,

e

.

Phoenix Soda Fountain



a

+,

FLEES SOSA SSS SSF





J
POLEELOVECL LOOP LOGCC POLLO PELLETED

ELEC 00000"

Mae Arthur Quizzed

@ from Page 1

Russia had so cften repeated tha
the United States was plann



attack her that Russia it had |
begun to believe MacArthur |
said the “position of the Joint

Chiefs of Staff and my own were |
so far as I know practically iden- |
tical.” On January 12 the Joint
Chiefs of Staff presented a study
to the Secretary of Defence em-
bodying these conditions

“That we were to continue and
intensify economic blockade trade |
with China. i

“That we were to prepare now |
to jimpose a naval blo¢kade of |
China.

“Remove now restrictions on air
reconnaissance of China coastal
areas and Manchuria.

“Remove now restrictions on
operations of Chinese Nationalist
forces.” |

He added: “As far as I know
the Joint Chiefs of Staff have
never changed those recommenda- |
tions.”

Asked if he thought the recom-
mendations had encountered veto
somewhere, either from the Secre-
tary of Defence or the President,
he replied: “I would assume so,
Sir.

“Recently Russia has probably
had a new vision opened” Mac
Arthur continued.” It is the pos
sibility of reaching the warm
waters of the Pacifie and Indian
Oceans.

“If by any combination she
could extend down to the Indian
Ocean she would not only out
flank the Mediterranean of cours
but it would place her fair and
flush upon the continent of Afr'ce |
which for the next hundred year:
with its enormous industrial poten
tial is something that attracts all
commerce and all industry what
ever its nationality might be.”

—Reuter





Appointed Sister
At General Hospital

NURSE Ena Walters who ha
just returned from England after
taking a course in nursing anc
midwifery, will take up a post as
Sister at the Barbados General
Hospital shortly.

She spent almost six years in
England, four of which were
devoted to the course, She told
ihe Advocate yesterday that she
had benefitted a great deal fron
her training at the various hos-
pitals and apart from the nursing

aspect, her stay in England hac
been most interesting and enjoy-
able.

Nurse Walters left Barbados i:
1945 and entered St. Mary’:
Hospital in North London where
she spent three years doing gen-
eral training work and part ol
her midwifery training. She ther
went on to Epsom Hospital where
she completed her midwifer)
training At this hospital she
worked as a staff nurse and. later



acted as Sister at St. Mary's
Hospital.

The next stage in Nurse
Waiters’ training was a_ six-

months’ course in Tropical Nurs

ing at University College Hos-
pital, a branch of the London
School of Tropical Medicine, At

this hospital, she got her Diploma
in Tropical Nursing,

For the past seven months she
has been working at Weir
Maternity Hospital London
doing midwifery,

Nurse Walters returned home
yesterday morning by the §.S
Coscogne» and plans to enjoy a
short holiday before assuming
her duties.

in

"QUAKE FELT

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May 3. 4

To-day an earth tremor was
felt lasting approximately 26
seconds. The shaking and rum-

bling was of an intensity to arouse
most people and the duration was

lengthy enough for them to
realize the ‘quake, This is the
second ‘quake within a week, a

previous slight sharp tremor hav-
ing occurred at 4.45 a.m, Thurs-
day April 26th,

ARTIFICIAL
SCARVES
In White with fringe.

SILK

Priced from .... $1.85—S82.3)

CONSULATE SPORT
SHIRTS

Short sleeves in sizes

142 to 17 Each............ $6.25

STRIPED UNDER PANTS
with Elastic inserts in waist
and fasteners. Sizes 28 to 3%
TEMAE Sin scsecisssvecesttictisisiaer WEOOe



TRY THE
Ricu
FLAVOUR

Or THE
CHERRIL.

IN OUR

At 6 tt

PECL SO

COS

ee

SRS,
‘e

900000. 0

PAGE FIVE





For that rich
savoury flavour? .,




Make that stew really tasty ©
with just a little Marmite !
Make it better for you too—
Marmite contains the B2 |
vitamins that build up
health and resistance to
illness. That’s why it’s so
good for everyone on bread
and butter or in tasty sand-
wiches. Yc can do so
much with Marmite in
soups, gravies, sauces and
savoury dishes—and Marmite
does so much for good cooking.

MARMITE

The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food

Made in England









HARRISON'S



DECORATED
OPAQUE GLASS

For WINDOWS, DOOR PANELS, Ete.

AVAILABLE IN FIVE ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS

tach in Two Sizes—48"x18" and 54” x16”

We are in a position to Quote

TS |ivery favourable Prices—Phone ee

2364





-SLINGSBY”
WAREHOUSE TRUCKS

(500 Ibs. Capacity)
WITH CENTRE METAL STRAP AND RUBBER
TYRED WHEELS ... .$57.26
WITH RUBBER TYRED WHEELS BUT WITHOUT
CENTRE METAL STRAP ... .$55.92
SIMILAR TRUCKS WITH SOLID IRON WHEELS

AT $40.32 and $38.80 Each

HARRISON’







LOCAL AGENTS
TEL. 2364



(OR GENTS & BOYS

© OLOURED ARTIFICIAL SILK

~CARVES—with fringe
Each from

~INEN HEMSTITCHED

_ HIEFS—%, inch hems.
BORON | iy.) scdsctssievncas

JENCOLA SYRIPED PYJAMAS (Size
US to 44 ins.)

$2,.28—$2.49
HANDKER-

Per Suit Tele tes $5.88
JOYS’ ALL WOOL BATHING
“RUNKS in Shades of Maroon and

‘ttoyal. Size 26 to 30,

Per Pair . $2.49

CAVE SHEPHERD & (0.. LTD.

10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET














Excellent for the Week-End Party.










GRANTS SCOTCH OATMEAL-—2-lbs, Tin . 64
FRERE PILGRIM SLING—All Sizes

BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE—per tin .24
CHEF TOMATO KETCHUP—ner bottle 40
EXETER PiCNIC HAMS—5 to 8 lbs.—per ib $1.25
SULTANA’S—per lb ; 45
DANISH CHEESE WAFERS-—ner pkt 30
SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF with CEREAL 57
VIENNA SAUSAGES—per tin 61
SEEDLESS GRAPES in Tins Large 48c. Small 29

COCKADE FINE RUM

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.







s





, PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

Gums Bleed!

s, Sore Mouth and Laose

PENTALUX

GLOSS FINISH PAINT

HENRY > BY CARL ANDERSON









‘eeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,

vreath Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
| chat will sooner or later cause your teeth

eart Trouble. Amosan stops fu

| Bceatng iH the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your
. mpty pack:

age. Get Amosan from your chemis

oday. e ir
antee protects

you.
s hb Mouth

| WITH AN
{

etn nalediphreeannsndisnpinigpiee sin




Exide



FOR SUPPLIED
mA BATTERY
YUH DON'T THINK A “
YOURE A
SCATACINSMS PICTURES’ COWBO Ware caeeorn $2) ; er
STAR... VOUNE GOT TO LOOK THE pA =e EXTERIOR

PARTICTHEY' RE =XPECTING YOU AT

WIDE





&

| you GET
STARTING ASSURANCE
AND LONG LIFE!

RANGE



ATTRACTIVE - Ss
OF

















oa THE MAN WHO »
BRI

NGS THEIR 0OG FOOD
IS A LITTLE LATE
TODAY






ME
TO COME HOME -- ) if
SUCH AFFECTION Hb



HARDWARE STORES

bt

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING





City Garage Trading Co., Ltd.—Asets,



DEAL HERE









SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only
aol ——_—_————_—_—_—_— _—S—S—_—_—_——











\ USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
B Mushrooms, Tins 55 48 Floral
; Icing Sugar, Pkgs. 33 29
© : ‘
Corned Beef with Cereal, Tins 31 25 Sriediey's Pécs, Tins 46 AA
All Bran, Pkgs. 29 25 Allsopp’s Beer, Bots. 26 20
j 7, Ul emo sapay, Bie PUT YOUR HANDS UP! WE
; LAWMEN COME! WANT YOU/

———_——_——____________ ~~~ ann

AGENTS IN ARMS

THE by MARY WINTER
| BEYOND THE EAGLE’S RAGE
ADVOCATE by HUGH POPHAM

HAS THE | TWO SCAMPS g

by GEORGE A. BIRMINGHAM s

BRINGING UP FATHER







SOPOT OS OSC OFPTSSS








—










YOU SAID YOU WANTED THE

AH! THERE'S My
SOFA -NOW PILLOWS TOO -WE COULDN'T
GIT THE PILLOWS FROM

—
WELL-HURRY fF
T UP== THIS
THING'S HEAVY!
fe UNDER HIM ==

| iz fir | |} BEST A WINDOW CLEANER’S ROMANCE







by NOEL GODBER %
BOOKS :

* %

IN TOWN
ADVOCATE STATIONERY {





NO, INDEED, YOUNG - i ie 1 e ‘
WOMAN! YOU'VE ALREADY ‘ ‘ + SEBSSSSSS9S6SS9569SSSS9995699 ¢ ‘ ¢ ‘

and Extra
Specials for















AND YOU'LL TAKE A SEAT
ON THE BOW WHERE T
CAN SEE YOu AT
ALL TIMES!




I'LL TAKE THE WHEEL...
the Cocktail



SWEET ASST: For COCKTAILS
SWEET BIS\/LITS in
Tins, Special Design ALLEYNE ARTHUR'S




















Macfarlane ’s After-] SPECIAL RUM
z noon Tea in 1b, tins
THE RADIO-CONTROLLED SPEED-| | NWHERES THAT B ; Macfarlane Lang's IS DELICIOUS
BMT RACES OUT INTOTHE WATER~| |(G 2 geen o t cu Chocolate Vienna for mixing Cocktails or a
Â¥ r} meen). ak oii 7 HRISCUITS Macfarlane Lang's Straight Drink or with
i ey eT MACFARLANE LANGS Biscuits im ith Carbonated Beverages
- 4 s scults tins.
in %41lb pkgs. Macfarlane Lang's SEAGER'S COCKTAIL
A ready mixed Martini
Marie Saas Whatt hed A.A, SPECIAL LIQUEUR
Petit Beurre
Custard Cream COCKTAIL

Fruit Short Cake miscuits|} ALLEYNE ARTHUR

G
ateats Macfarlane Lang's . 1
eee Cocktail Savoury & Co. Ltd.
JACOBS Peak Frean’s Cheeslets

Cocktail Water Peak Frean’s, Crackers “YOUR GROCERS”

i Cream Crackers Crawford’s Ufillit

Familf Assorted ont ee
FALERNUM 8ic, pet bot. ;
|
| |
(








———:
Tras SSS ST a





FRIDAY, MAY 4,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

Seicshapeceningainace
The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deeths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is

$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and



4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional wend
DIED
RAYLEY—On May 3rd 1951, in London
Walter De Courcy Bayley, father of
Dr. H. Bayley.
Mrs. Dorian Bayley (wife, England),
Dr. H. Baylar ‘son). Mrs. Doris
Goddard (daughter), Miss Elizabeth
Bayley (daughter, England), Mr. lan
Bayley ‘san, England),



TAKE NOTICE




<5

That
co., INC.,
the laws
United States of America,
er business address is 405
Avenue, New York,
Distillers,

of the State of

tion of a trade mark in Part

Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
unless some

the 3rd day of May, 1951,

person shall in the meantime give«notice | °F
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
The trade

sition of such registration,

mark can be seen on application at my

office.
Dated this 30th day of Avril. 1951,

That
co., INC
the laws



of the State of

United States of America, whose trade
405 Lexington
New York, New York, U.S.A.,
has applied for the registra-
in Part “A” of

or business address is

Avenue,
Distillers,
tion of a

trade mark

Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
and will be entitled
the same after one month
unless

especially
to register
from the

whisky,

3rd day of May,
some person

1961,

opposition of such registration.
at my office.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.

3,5.51—3n

HUNTER-WILSON — DISTILLIN'
» @ corporation organized under
Maryland,

HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
a corporation organized under!
Maryland,
whose trade
Lexington
New York, U.S.A.,
has applied for the ‘registra-

“ay of| Mr



shall in the meantime give
notice in duplivite *o me at my office of
The
trade mark cai) be seen on application

PRESS OSO VOSS OG SOTTO”

POE

&
‘ West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,

Hand
Decoration
Tel, 91-74.

blocked Beach-
House, St

Potrery,
weer,
James.
$ 14.4,51—1m.
POPPERS



a 6660600

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS

DIAL
3466



1- DAV N NEWS FLASH



LEAP OVER THE GARDEN
a story ot a Nun who was
Convent for 28 years and

» it up. An_ interesting

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
AND
| HARDWARE

fares

FOR LONGER SERVICE

TAR all posts before erecting,
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative

material still available
WORKS, Bay St.
40c, per gallon.
Some To-day.

your GAS
Price

at

Get

FOR SALE

Crane re House

| This well known coastal
with approx.

including a
of beach
to

property
12} acres

stretch

long
frontage
offers.

is open

| John M. Biadon

A.F.S., F.V.A.

‘Phone 4640
PLANTATIONS BUILDING

Roval Barbados Yacht

.

Club
NOTICE

Members are invited to
attend a Silent Coloured
Motion Picture Show to be
kindly staged on Friday, 4th
May, 1951, at 6.15 p.m. by
Mr. Thomas B. Wainwright.
These films were taken dur-
travels in Canada
West Indies.

By order of,
of Man-

ing his
and the

The Committee
agement,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretary.

SSS
i



3

I

WALI

mia

then gave

true book by Monica Baldwin,
| bring us your Fountain Pens for
NIB and SACK replacements.
Ours is the only Store fitted with
; } modern tools for Pen Service.
$

Â¥





|







FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
% cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a!

word Sundewe
AUTOMroTIvVE

.
CAR—Morris 8 — good second hand
buy, Apply T. G. McKinstry. Dial 3554.
3.5.51—tn

eS

CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-
dition. 23,000 miles, new tyres. Can be
seen at Fort saved Garage Phone 83485.
A. D. Herbe: 3.5.51—4n

CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer
refused. Apply to W. M. Watson C/o

R. & G. Challenor, §;
2—01. peightstown. Phone

CAR—Vauxhall
tyres, in good working condition, price
reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay,
Grove, Christ Chureh. Dial 3207.

1.5.51—t.f.n



Staple









1,.5.51—6n| Dancing are notified that

| PUBLIC NOTICES

cpats per agute line on week-days



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-cuy:

ona't 12 pened per agate line on Sundays,| and 12 cente per agate line on Sundays,

minimum cherge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.





NOTICE

THE LORD OLIVER
SOCIETY

FRIENDLY

All members of the above Sdciety who | «

have been
end of 1949,
deave their

in the Society up

are hereby

to the
requested to
1949 Contribution Cards at

the Office of the Registrar of Friendly
Societies, Town Hall.

No cards will be accepted after the
7th of May, 1951.

D. T. DANIEL,
Clerk, Registrar, mma eet,
5. 51—3n.

.
Dancing Classes
Pupils of The Barbados School of
classes for
next term will commence on Friday the

2 3.5.51—Sh

14 six with 4 good} 4th and Saturday the 5th of May.



(Pennant

CARS—Do you want to buy a gooa+LZIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 'y

secondhand car? If so we can offer you
a 1949 Hillman, done 14,000 miles and
1949 Morris Oxford, done 19,000 miles.
Both cars in excellent condition. Ring
4808, B'dos Agencies Ltd.

29.4.51—6n.

CARS—Wolseley 1948 14 HP, Morris!
1946 10 H.P., Morris 1947 10 H.P
Morris Oxford 1949 14 H.P Morris
Minor 1950 8 H.P., Austin 1947 8 HP
Ford Van 10 H.P. a real bargain Ford
V/8 1935 Ford V/8 1938 Coupe.

All these Cars are good buys in their
respective classes and price range. For
Fort Royal Garage Ltd., Telephone 4504

4.5.51—3n

TRUCK—One 1938 Bedford Truck in
Good Working Order. Apply to Mr
Newton Brereton, Courtesy Garage, or
Larrell Brathwaite, Cherry Grove,
John. 4.5.51—In.





St.

SL
WAGGON; One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508



$20.00. May be seen
Lower Broad St
McBeth Beaumont,

Table
Table
Mahogany Wardrobe $50.00 Phone 4117
8—11 a.m.:

in three weeks,
calf,
| Jackmans, St. Michael.

3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

"

ELECTRICAL
MULLARD l1-TUBE RADIO tilting
dial, 1 Electric phonograph with ampli-
fier all in working order, Cc. Lewis,
, St. Thomas. 2.5.51—3n





(1) Dining Table
at Newsam ‘& Co.,
Ironing Board $5,00
Hastings. Dial 5001,

4.5.51—2n

FURNITURE—One



Mahogany Dining
$60.00, 1 Extension
12) $40.00,

FURNITURE —
{to seat 6)
(Pine) (to seat

1

4—6 p.m
4.5.51—4n

LIVESTOCK

COW—One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve
Gave 36 pints with third
near Paynes Road,

3.5.51—3n.





Cc, Branch,



MISCELLANEOUS

For the treatment of disorders of the



Kidneys and Bladder try Rexall Kidney

end Bladder Pills.
able at KNIGHT'S LTD.

Price 1/6 bot. Obtain-
3.5,51—3ni

———————
IPON DOUBLE BED & MATTRESS as

=

|The average yield on the assur-
jance fund for the year
out at 4.88% as against

McBeth, Beau-
4.5.51—20

new $40.00, Dial 5001

mont, Hastings.





The application of Sciivan Bros. per
Kenneth A. Sullivan holders of Liquor
License No 1063 of 1951, granted to
Kenneth Sullivan in respect of a 2-storey
wall building at corner Nelson and King
Wm. Streets, St. Michael, for permission



mimmum 1.
ad te cet a es

REAL ESTATE

SUITABLE BUILDING SITE:
t Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch.
sq. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft. road. Dial
2206 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5.51

situated

—t. tom,



be AUC’r10N

FIAT VAN 1947 MODEL
| We are instructed to sell this vehicle
| which has been damagea in an accident,



by Public Auction at the Courtesy
Garage at 2 p.m. on Friday, 4th May
1951.
JOHN M. BLADON,
Auctioneer,
2.5.51—3n





|

Area 10,978!

UNDER THE SILVER

: HAMMER

| On Tuesday 8th by order of Mrs

. Baynes we will sell her furniture
- “Oban” St. Lawrence Gap, which
} in wludes —- Very rice Square Tip-Top
} Dining Table isect 6), Upright Chairs,
Ww . Tea Trolla;’, Folding Card and
‘es, all in Mahogany, Ver
Settee ard Morris Chairs
Cyp. Pine Fiat Top





, wit in

to use said Liquor License .&c., 2t a | Desk Bookshelf, ver’ 2 Shir

~ , . y nice China
board and shingle shop known as Bee | Cubinet, Paintings, Congoleum, Rugs
Hive" Lower Dayrell’s Rd. Ch. Ch.)/Gval Mirror, Glass Ware, Luncheon

»within District “A”
Dated this 3rd day of My, 1951.
—E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,

Police’ Magistrate,

District “A”.
AGUSTA BRATHWAITE
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A" on Tuesday
the 15th day of May, 1951, at 11 o'clock,
a.m.

To:

E. A. McLEQD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
4.5.51—In



FOR SALE



GALVANISED SHEETS—Best qu tity
new ae Cheapest in the Islar
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7
10 ft $8 40. Nett cash Better hurry i
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.





LIFE SAVERS—Fresh stock of delic-

ious Life Savers. Lime, Orange, Lemon,
Wild Cherny Pep-o-Mint and Five |
Flavours.

Price 9 cents per rep ees £

VEATHERHEAD LTD. 3n





POWDERED MILK--One of the best; {
that’s Holland's “Frisian Girl” Powdered | @
Milk. Tops in butter fat content. Con-
tains vitamin D3 so ential for the
promotion of healthy e. Get it for
the family, the children will look alive

after a trial of this famous milk, Ask for
it by name. 3.6.54 —3n

SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.







Service for 8 Plated Ware, Norge Ri
fcigerator in perfect working order,
Electric Lamp, Children’s Bedsteads and
beds, Cradle, Press, Dressing Tabie, Toy
Shelves, all painted White, Larder
Kitehen Cabinet, Breakfast Table ani
Chairs, 2-Burner Valor Oil Stove and
Oven, Pressure Cooker, Scales, Kitchen
Utensils, Electric Toaster, lron and ot!

items. Sale 11,30 o'clock, Terms CA

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
4.5 Mi—2n

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, MLRIAN
ALEXANDRIA ROUSE inee PHILLIPS;
as I do not hold mystlf responsible for
her or anyone else covtracting any debt
or debts in my name unless by a. written
order signed by me,

CLARENCE ROUSE,
Paynes Bay,
St. James,
4.5.51—2n

LOOOP ETD OO TIOF OF

* NOTICE 3

x

§ BARBADOS S.P.C.A.

s The S.P.C.A. Phone No
2624 is suspended until fur
ther notice. Messages” for
the Inspector will be taken
at 2673 between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m, and
at 08—Brittons Hill Police
Station from 5 p.m. to 8

a.m.
C. WALCOTT,
Hon. Secretary, May 2nd



>

PPP PSPSPS OOS

OOOO





A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00
per 98 lb, bag. Dial 2628,
28.4.51-—7n
Save your clothes from Moths by
hanging “Olev” Moth Killer in your
Wardrobe. It is 500 times more effectiv*
than Moth Balls. KNIGHT'S LTD.
3.5.51—3n.
We have in stock Rexall Cod Liver
Oil Emulsion, an easily digested ang
palatable preparation containing 50% by
volume of Vitamin Tested Cod Liver
Oil, KNIGHT'S LTD.

3.5.51—3n |

Demerara Lille to. Award. Medical
Scholarship to Deserving Student



Moral Duty of Beneficiary to Return

and Serve

Community



Mr. Perey (. Wight Makes Announcement at

Society's

Annual

Meeting



Mr. Percy C. Wight, O.B.

E., Be eat of the Demerara

Mutual Life Assurance Society, announced at the 59th

annual general meeting of members yesterday, that the
Society will award a medical scholarship, of £300 per
annum for six years, to a qualified candidate who lacks the
means to enter the University College of the West Indies.

The Chairman pointed out that there will be no con-
ditions to the scholarship which will be tenable at the W.1.
University College, other than those normally attached
to open scholarships awarded by the University, but stress-
ed that the Society will expect that the beneficiary will
look upon it as a moral duty to return and serve the com-

munity after qualifying.

Mr. Wight was moving the
adcption of the report of the So-
ciety—a report which disclosed
another year of progress.

Others present at the meeting
were: Directors—the Hons. E, F.
McDavid, C.M.G., C.B.E., and
Capt. G. H. Smellie, Messrs A.
Groves, C. L. de Freitas, F. A
Seaford, R. K. Steele and P. W.
King, O.B.E., with E. C. Inniss,
secretary and H. Cannon, assist-
ant secretary.

Members—Messrs J. J. Hutt,
Ramlall, A. S. Outridge, S. N.

McAllister, J. Joseph, R.N.,
Callender, A. Dickie, R. M.
Wight, C. P. Wight, J. A
Campbell, G. I. Edmonds and

H. J. Bunyan.

Moving the adoption of the re-
port the chairman said:

“Gentlemen, Once again I have
much pleasure to present to you
the report of the directors on the
transactions of the Society for
the year 1950. The report has
been reproduced in the Press and
no doubt everyone must have
observed the steady ‘progress be-
ing made by the Society.

“The new issue for the year
again exceeded the million and a
half dollar mark, being 1,039
policies assuring $1,618,990 with
an annual premium income of
$92,341.90, as compared with the
previous year when the Society
issued 1,016 policies assuring
$1,544,530 with an annual premi-
um income of $89,305.70.

“Claims during the year totalled
73 policies assuring $142,058 in-
cluding bonus additions. This is
slightly higher than the previous
year and must be considered nor-
mal, The maturing of 213 policies
resulted in the sum of $332,252
being paid out. These bring the

total claims paid out by the So-

ciety since its
485,821.

Substantial Sum Added To
Assurance Fund

inception to $8,-

The ratio of expenses of man-

agement (including commission
account) to premium receipts is
17% as against 16.9% in 1949.

worked |
4.83% |

in 1949. I might mention that
the average yield for the four
years of the present quinquen-
nium is 4.838% which is ver)
satisfactory indeed. As a -resuli
of the transactions for the yeal
the substantial sum of $392,534
has been added to the assurance
fund which now stands at $6,110,-
067—-another satisfactory feature

“At the last general meeting of
the Society on April 25, 1950, Mr
Arthur Davis moved a_ motior
which was fully supported by the
members present, inviting the
Board to consider the grant of
some form of scholarship as a
public benefaction from the funds
of the Society; and the Board then
gave an assurance that this sug-
gestion would be considered.

The Board have giv carefu’
consideration tc this mi . and
while what Mr. Davishad_ ir
mind was a-scholarship to provid«
training for a non-professiona
career, the directors feel that the
best interests of the public anc
of this Society would be servec
at the present time by the award
of a scholarship tenable et thr
University College of the Wes
Indies. The Board have been im-
pressed by the announcement
made by the Vice-Prinicpal and
Professors of the University dur-
ing their recent visit to British
Guiana to hold entrance exam-
inations, that there are a number
of qualified candidates here whe
are without the means to enter
the University.

“The Board have accordingly
decided in keeping with their un-
dertaking at the last general
meeting to award a_ scholarship
to be styled the “Demreara Mu-
tual Life Medical Scholarship” to
a eandidate to be selected by the
University authorities from among
those qualified fer entrance to the
University. The value of ‘the
scholarship will be such sum not
exceeding £300 per annum for six
years, as may be fixed by the
University .authorities



Good-will Gesture To
Community
“There will be no conditions
to the sch p other than
these normally attaching to oper



Advertise. eons It Pays

scholarships awarded, by the Uni-
versity; but ‘this \ Society wy
expect that the beneficiary wil
accept it to be a moral duty to
return to British Guiana and
serve the community in his pro-
fession after he qualifies. I trust
that the members -will welcome
and endorse this decision which
the Board have made, as a ges-
ture of goodwill and service to
the community as a whole.

“Before I close my address, |
would like to place on record my
Lthanks to the directors for their
co-operation and the staff for
their loyal service

“With these remarks gentlemen,
I formally move the adoption of
the report and after it has been
seconded, I shall be pleased to
answer any questions peor
may care to ask.”

The adoption of the report was
seconded by Mr. Hutt who said
it was gratifying to note that the
directors had decided to award
the scholarship. It was very good

that it should come from the
Society. and it would go abroad
he said, that the Society was not

only looking after the life of its
members, but was looking after
the moulding their offspring to
serve the community.

Several Resolutions Adopted

resolutions were
adopted during the afternoon’s
business. One, moved by Mr
Hutt and seconded by Mr. Cal-
lender, provided for the re-elec-
tion of three retiring directors,
Messrs. Percy Wight, Steele and
McDavid.

A resolution moved by Mr.
Hutt and seconded by Mr. R. M.
Wight, fixed the directors’
remuneration at $4,000 for the
ensuing year; $1,000 for the chair-
man» and $3,000 to be divided
among the other directors.

Several

Messrs. Fitzpatrick Graham
and Co., were re-elected: auditors
on the motion by Mr, R, M
Wight seconded by Mr. Ramlall

and their remuneration was
passed at $1,440 on a motion by
Mr. Callender and seconded by
Mr. C. P. Wight.

Mr. C. P. Wight moved; that
the meeting approves of appropri-
ation for donations to charity, to
the extent of $2,535 for last year,
and of a sum not exceeding that
amount for the current year.
This was seconded by Mr. Hutt
and adopted.

The Chairman, before closing
the meeting thanked members for
receiving the report so satisfac-
terily and endorsing the recom-
mendation made to grant the
scholarship. He suid it had cer-
tainly afforded the directors very
much pleasure that the members
had done so, and he assured them

that the Colony. would benefit)

materially by that step.

Mr. Wight added that he was|
grateful to Mr. MeDavid. for
interviewing the Professors and

the amount of trouble he had}

taken over the matter, and he felt
the Directors would wish him to

express their thanks to Mr,
McDavid.

Mr. Percy Wight Re-elected

Chairman

At a meeting of the directors
held afterwards, Mr. Percy
Wight was unanimously _ re-
elected chairman -for the ensuing
year.



”
|



lee

fe awarded to plaintiffs Beres-



'
|

'

i



WANTE#

Minimum charge week 172 cents and}
96 cents Sundays 24 words —. over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word Sundays.
ns



HELP

————
“Due to the opening of a new branch,

we require the following staff on or

before June Ist, 1951:—
STENO-TYPIST—experienced



— com-

meneing salary $100.00 per month.
TYPIST—also with clerical experience
-—- commencing salary $75.00 per
month, -

INVOICING ASST.—accurate at fig-{
ures — preferably with Lehi a July.

experience on invoicing — com-
meneing salary $90.00 per month.
Written application stating age and
previous experience to be sent to Sec-
retary, Dowding Estates and Trading

Company, Ltd., Bay Street
2.5. 51—6n.

SALES GIRL for our TOY ROOM.
Apply in person. JOHNSON’S STATION-
ERY. 3.5.51—3n



MISCELLANEOUS

MINT—Olive Blossom Stamps of Bar-











bados, Will pay 48c. each for pertect
copies. ‘Phone Herbert Bayley 3703

29.4.51--3n.

—

One (1) Second Hand Chaff Cutter.,
Apply X c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.

4.5,51—3n.

ROOM & BOARD for Gentlemen.

On Sea. Reasonable terms for perma-

nents Apply Casuarina Residential
Club, Maxwell Coast, Tel. 8378

4.5. 51--2n



PAGE SEVEN









ome eee
FOR RENT OFFICIAL NOTICE in
Minimum charge week 72 cents kee IN THE cot RT OF CHANCERY
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over IN PURSUANCE 906, I dk ereby give notice to all .
3 cents a word week—4 Cents a/ persons having or clai mterest suny Hien or incumbrance ‘

words
word



HOUSES





eee ae
CLIFF COT—Blue Waters Terrace.
Purnished 3 bedrooms, from May to end

July. Ring C. C. Worme 8160,
4.5.51—tn
HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June
Phone Mrs, A, D. Herbert 8385.
3.5.51—4n

TO LET—In Marine Gardens for 6
months, fully furnished, House-keeping
apartment with spacious verandahs, Write
Box G.M. C/. Advocate Co,

3. 5: 51—an

OFFICES above Lashlay's Lta., “Prince
William Henry Street. Apply: J. E,
Marson. Phone 2471. 3.5.51—8n

LOST & FOUND















LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS — Series L.
3330 to 3; Q. 1997. M. 0470—0471; L
9000-9001; P. 0480, 0483; K_. 8033, 7303;
M. 5470; O. 5099, 5903, 5909; N. 1330,
1331, 6133, 7718 to 7719. O, 0055. Finder
please return same to Advocate Co,
Reward offiered 4.5.51—2n





Labour Talks
In Jamaica

\From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, May 3.
The first meeting of the
Regional Labour Board of the
West Indies which is being
established to co-ordinate the
United States farm labour pro-
gramme will be held in Jamaica
this month. It will be attended
by representatives of variou
participating colonies and by Mr.
J, Thompson, Colonial Attache of
the British Embassy, Washington,
who made an overnight stop at
Jamaica last night on the way to
Barbados to attend the meeting
of the Caribbean Commission of



which he is a member.

The establishment of the
Board was recommended at a
conference of the British West
Indies Labour Officers held in
Jamaica in December,

~

.-. CHARGED WITH
MANSLAUGHTER

Gordon Brathwaite, a labourer
of St. Philip, is charged by the
Police with manslaughter in con-
nection with Helenna Mullins’
death, This was disclosed by Capt.
E. B. Grant at the inquest into
the circumstances of Mullins’
death which was adjourned sine
die yesterday by Coroner C. L.
Walwyn,

Mullins died while on her way
to the General Hospital from the
St. Philip's Almshouse on April
26. A post mortem examination
was performed the next day
by Dr. A. S. Cato at the Hospital
Mortuary and death was attribut-
ed to a fractured skull.



DAMAGES AWARDED

Judgement to the amount of £6

ford Bennett and Eldica Bennett
of Bank Hall, St. Michael by Judge
J, W. B. Chenery in the Court
of Original Jurisdiction yester-





Plan Welcome
For Bustamante

Hon. William Bustamante, Prime
Minister of Jamaica, is expected
to arrive here on Sunday at 8.20
am. He will take part in the
meeting of the Caribbean Commis-
sion which starts on Monday.

A reception Committee has been
set up and arrangements have
been made for a programme of
activities for him during his
visit here. A public welcome is
planned for him on his arrival at
Seawell Airport.

During next week he will be
taken on a tour of the island,
and several receptions are being
arranged for him, He is also
scheduled to address a_ public
meeting at Queen’s Park Curing | _ gosscososacsosuscggounssecsecseseuboaceocooseenecsaneoeneneeeeeeeeeeeeh
the week.

Canadian Govt.
Will Not Interfere

OTTAWA, May 3.

The Canadian Government does
not plan to interfere with the
award made by its arbitrator in
settling the wage-hour dispute
that led to a nine-day general
railway strike last year, Rrime
Minister St. Laurent told the
Cemmons yesterday. He would
not ask Parliament to aa

MILK POWDER
LONDON.

Food Minister Maurice Webb
told the House of Commons that
milk powder is one of the main
ingredients of Britain’s present-
day beef sausage.
“How much milk powder can be
put in before a sausage becomes

: eream bun?”

Webb refused to answer a
Conservative member's question:
—I.N.5.



In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

CABLE AND WIRELE&SS (W.1) Ltd.
advise that they can now communicate

day. with the following ships through their
Beresford Bennett and Eldica Barbados Coasteatation: sl) a
Bennett brough case ins as, Fort Amherst, 8.8, Gascogne, %.
Ebenezer anes ad ? Agamemnon, 8.8. Tindra, 8.8. Capa
ttiekehn’ eae an Rodney, 8.8. Hecuba, 8.8. Raban, 4.8.
Hall claiming damages to the Berlin,’ s.s. Attila, #.8. Papendrecht,
amount of £50. They said in| s.s. Ramona, s.#. Esso Highmond, '#,2
evidence that Alleyne on March | Cenadian eee eh Ganuhny
29, damaged 806 holes of sugar! ,. Gervais, 5.8, Redstone, #\s. Fort
cane and 18 holes of banana trees. | Bridger, 8.8. Mormacland, 8.8, Morning
Light, 8.8. S. Cecilia, 6.58. Loide Aren-
tina, s.8. Francesco Morosini, 8.5, Reangt-
tuta, s.8. 2. and T, Forester, 5.8, Loide
RATES OF EXCHANGE Cuba, #6, Ecuador, s.8. Alcoa Corsair,
ss, City of Swansea, 5.5, Raban, §.8
CANADA Defender, 8.5. Helena, 5.8 S. Paula,
MAY 3, 1951 3.8, Matina, s.s. Tacito, s.8. Helicon
65 5/10% pr. Cheques on M/T Vestfold
Bankers 61 5/10% pr.
Demand , MAIL NOTICE ‘
Drafts 61.36% pr Mails for ST, LUCIA by the M/V La ¥
Sight Drafts 61 2/10% pr. | Joy will be closed at the General Pos
62 5/10% pr. Cable Office as under;~
62% pr. Curreney 60% pr Parcel Mail, “Registered = Mail ; md
Coupons 59 3/10% pr. | Ordinary Mail at 10 a.m. on the h
Silver May 1951.

sesioi’

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

The Advocate Co,, Ltd., has made arrangements for
classified advertisements to be taken by ‘various District
Agents and so far the following have been authorised to



receive them : uv SUC
MOSES GITTENS, JOSEPH JEMMOTT,
Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch. St. Elizabeth Village,
St. Joseph.

Mis. U. L.. BRUCE,
Maxwell Road, Ch. Ch. S. A.. DURANT,

Horse Hill, St. Joseph.
©. McCONNEY,

Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch.. EBENEZER PHAKMACY,

Four Roads, St. John.

,

Vv. HOLDER,
St.. Judes, St. George.

JOSEPH ALLEYNE,
Crane, St, Philip.

G, QUINTYNE,
Church Village, St. Philip ST. C. HUNTE,

Pine Gap, St. Michael.
E. HINKSON,

Massiah Street, St. John. Vv. RICE,
Bank Hall Road,
H.. L. CAVE,
St.. Michael.
St. John’s Dispensary,
R, H. KING, E, LORDE

Bank Hall X Road

Near Sharon, St. Thomas. St, Michael.

Items may be handed into the above for the following

Columns in the Classified Section :

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, IN MEMORIAMS, ETC.
FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

ADVOCATE CoO., LTD.

T. Gale. Advertising Manager



a.





»perty of the defendants)
witnesses, documents and

in or affecting the. pro tioned (the pre
to brine before me an accor f r clai with the
vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of
12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Re tration Office, Public Butidings,
Bridgetown before the 7th day of July, 10 n order that such claims may be re-
ported on and ranked according to and priority thereof respectively,
otherwise such persons will be preclu ,s of any decree and be
| deprived of all claims om or against





nid pr

operty





Plaintiff ; HERBERT HUTCHI BAYLEY, trustee of the will of George
Byron Warren, ¢
Defendants: LAVINIA LEWI FANNY LEWIS GLADYS LEWIS, MAR-
GARET CADOGAN: BEATRICE Lewis and CLARA LEWIS,
PROPENTY ALL THAT certain parce! ef land (formerly part of Goodland plant-

ation) situate in the
containing: by
perches or th
the Westbury Ceme

parish of Saint Michael and Island abovesaid
ent Two ae res three roods ten and one-half

of Alexander Gibson on
piace called Frolic and on a






private rondway or » is abutting.
Bill Sled 2th February, 1951
Dated 2nd May, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.

4.5. 51—4n



OT ~
ROYAL NETHERLANDS | sae
BARING reol AMSTERDAM .
S. “Oranjestad"—10 May 1951 p
M.S. “Bonaire’—1ith May 1961 Cie Gle Transatlantique nt
M.S. “Hersilia"—24th "May 195},
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND ae
STERDAM
M.S. “Willemstad” 17th May 1961. SAILING TO .
SAKLING TO TRINIDAD, EN FR. x .
PARAMARIBO AND GEORGETOWN NGLAND & ANOS
5. “Hecuba'’—6th May, 1951 : *
MS. “Bonaire”—29th May, 1951 GASCOGNE, May 12, 1951.
SAELING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA via St. Lucia, Martinique, r
CURACAO AND JAMAICA Guadeloupe and Antigua, dated
M.S, “Oranjestad’—24th May, 1951 +
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD. 333 as
ieee a es _
ll CARIBBEAN CRUISE. .
ESS OSSIISGS GIGS O ISSO ‘
s M.V _Sypresgpronmes com apne Del CARIBE COLOMBIE, May 30th, 1951. ~
will accept Cargo & Passengers Trinidad, La Guaira, Cu- tear |
for St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba racao, Cartagena and
Sailing on Or About 18th May,
an Jamaica, ie a
tt
M.V. Caribbee will accept Cargo i
and Passengers for Antigua, St Accepting Passengers, ,
Kitts, Montseratt and Nevis only Car do Mail. .
Passengers for Dominica Sailing argo ‘an ba
on the 4th May, 1951



B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN.-
ERS ASSOC., INC.

Tele, 4047,

R. M. JONIS& Co, Ltd.
renebiniat
Phone 3814

=



Do Sigmaner ng tinge’ cad TO EUROPE oo 2

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for ee hee
sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual rts of call are amas!
Dublin, London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual piece |
reduction for chi.dren. ae



ORIGIN DGD NEG GEE EEL EEG

We are now in a position to take care of your orders for

GUN METAL FITTINGS.



THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry Ltd.,—Proprietors)
Cnr. of Broad & Tudor Streets,



POCONO DOM 6 D100 PEED MLD VOVEDOION,
ATTENTION !!

FACTORY MANAGERS}

Take this opportunity of obtaining youx requirements
IN




}
4

ee

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

ea



Ranging from %” upwards vom as

MILD STEEL < ai

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes 4
BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes a
FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill 4
At PRICES that cannot be repeated. 4

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lek

White Park Road, St, Michael
DIAL 4528

Lovely
Carpets

of \
ordered care that gives a
HOME — its Charm a =

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED —

add to that little touch



B. M. K. WOVAX RUGS —various sizes
VELVET FINISHED SOFA RUGS—various sizes
VALI RUGS — various sizes

vilOader RUGS & CARPETS—various sizes
DRUGGET STAIR CARPETING—various sizes

224 and 27 inches wide. \

WILLIAM FOGARTY LID.

oo

*









ONE

;





eg

=".

es



PAGE EIGHT





He’s Off Again...

>

a
Ww € ANAOA

‘The Car Should Do The Trip

In 30 Days,’

ON FRIDAY, June 1, I am set-
ting out to report the most fas-
cinating news story of a motor-
‘ear that has come my way this
year. I expect to be away a
menth, and to travel nearly 30,-
600 miles.

It will be a bid by four o!
Britain’s toughest road drivers to
motor round the world in 30 days
in the new A40 sports car.

They will take the easterm
route to America by way of the
Middle East. India and Honolulu.

Over .the oceans the team and
the car will travel by plane.

If things go to plan they will
arrive in Montreal, fly back te
Scotland, and motor down t
their starting point at London
Airport,

Austins are not only supplyin
vhe small sports car and the fou:
drivers, They are chartering from
K.L.M. Airlines a_ specially
adapted, four-engined Skymaster
to act as flying tender.

Non-Stop Race

This round-the-world effort is
aimed to prove to the world what
an expertly driven British car can
do when raced non-stop round
that world.

I shall fly above the car to fe-
cord its desert, jungle, and sea
crossing adventures,

The audacious plan sprang from
a half-crown wager made by Mr.
Leonard Lord, Chairman of Aus-
tins, with bald but tough Alen
Hess, his 51-year-old public re-
lations officer.

It was shortly after Hess—who
holds 165 motoring records—-more
than anyone else in the world—
had driven 10,000 miles in 10,000
minutes in an Austin car, and the
two were in Mr. Lord’s Long-
bridge, Birmingham, office,

Half-crown Bet

Lord said he had been struck
‘with an idea while driving to his
office that morning—the round-
the world bid. “I'll bet you there
is something you can’t do,” he
said,

“What is that?” asked Hess.

Lord replied: “I'll bet you half
a dollar you can’t drive round the
world in 30 days.”

Hess accepted. The car he chose
is the first open-bodied model on
the famous A40 chassis. It sells
abroad for under £600,

As his team he chose:—

Ex - Squadron - Leader Ralph
Sleigh, 39, who in an Austin made
the fastest-ever run from Britain
to the Cape. Sleigh is a paint
man, is married, has a child lives
near Ipswich.

Tester - mechanic Ronald
Jeavons, 32, who shared with

ooo

(TAX CLAIMS MA

i
\S

Says Cardew

Hess and two other the feat of
cramming 10,000 miles into 10,000
minutes in a saloon A40, Jeavons
is a bachelor, served seven years
in the R.A.E., lives in Birming-
ham;

Car“tester George Caates, 48,
who, with Alan at Indianapolis
averaged 70.54 miles an hour for
seven days and nights in an Ago.
Cggtes prepared vehicles for D-
Day under the Americans. He is
a family man (three children),
lives at Rubery, near Birmingham.
So not one of them on age is a
chicken.

The team will work in. pairs
two in the car driving and navi-
gating, and two resting in the
plane above.

The team captain chose from
the 20,000 factory staff two of
their best racing mechanics. These
Spanner-nurses, experienced in
France and America, will be wiry
Releigh Appleby and agile Joseph
Galvin,

They will fiy along with me in
the plane piloted by K.L.M.’'s
top pilot — Captain J. J. Bak,

Hess decided that the car and
the mother plane should be able
io talk together. Arranging this
was perhaps his hardest task, A
special short-wave set had to be

fitted in the car.
June Heat
Then he had to get radio
operating permits from each of

the 16 territories the car will pass
through England, France,
Switzerland, Italy, Lebanon, Syria,
Jérdan, Iraq, India, Siam, Guam,

Wake Island, Hawaii, U.S.A.,
Canada (including Newfound-
land).

The total route involves travell-
ing a daily average of 1,000
miles, of which one-third will be
overland and two-thirds by ocean
crossing.

Across the Syrian and Arizona
deserts the car will travel in the
full blast of June heat, so it will
be fitted with a white hood to
throw off the sun's rays. In
India the drivers expect to meet
the monsoons.

The start : 11 a.m. from Lon-
don Airport on Friday, June 1,
‘The car will nose its way through
Kingston down to Manston, Kent
(where special R.A.F. permission
had to be granted) for flight te
Paris, yy

And if all goes well, within a
month it will be on the road
trom Prestwick in Ayrshire speed-
ing through the night to London
Airport, Staines. A complete
globe circle.—L.E.S.



Y MAKE TURPIN

SHY OF ROBINSON

(By GEORGE WHITING)

_. At last there has arrived an
opponent of whom Randolph Tur-
pin, the highest explosive in Brit-
ish boxing, is mortally afraid,

-It.is not Billy Brown, of the
US.A., whom he fights at Bir-
mingham next Monday. It is not
Dutehman Jan de Brum, his oppo
nent at Coventry on May 7, Nor
is it Australia’s Dave Sands, from
whom he will attempt to take the
Empire middle-weight title at the
White City on June 5. Nor even
the mighty Ray Robir.son, cham-
pion of the world,

None of these could make
Rahdo!sk Turpin fight-shy, but
the inceme-tax man could —and
does,

If Turpin wins the Empire
championsnip trom Sands (“Let
me hit him just once; that is all
I ask,” says Randolph), then the
promotional machinery of Jacy
Soloifions will immediately be
geared for a world title fight
against Robinson, But there are
breakers ahead.

Title Fight in Late Summer

Solomon’s idea is for the world
championship fight to be held in
London ini the late summer, but
any compliance with this plan on
the part of Turpin would imme-
diately set the super-tax sleuths on
Randolph's trail.

Turpin, already a comparatively Wales this summer.

They'll

LL


















AND I WILL BE
OVER AT THE WARE-
HOUSE IF ANYONE
CALLS, KITTY:
HAR-RUMPH!

rich young man, will be way up
in the super-tax brackets after his
meetings with Brown, de Bruin
and Sands. Any further activities
in the current financial year would
put him in the same predicament
that used to worry Bruce Wood-
ecek and Freddy Mills—the sense-
less problem of taking punches for
almost the sole benefit of the In-
land Revenue.

Mills and Woodcock, aided by
smart acceuntants, solved their
aifficulties legitimately after con-
sultation with the tax-gathers,
The same kind of compromise is
needed for Randolph Turpin if
we are to see him fighting for a
world title in London in 1951.
The physical risks of arguing the

point with riotous Robinson are
not including the slightest loss of
sleep in the Turpin household,

Randolph’s quietly expresed
view is that the mighty Ray has
never yet been hit by qa muiddle-
weight with a real bang in his
fists. His own hands, he thinks,
might be able to make things
remarkably interesting for the
world champicn, I think so, too—
provided those hands are really
sound.

Turpin, by the way, fancies the Sy

idee of turning himself into » holi-
day attraction for visitors to North
—LES.









HE JUST INHERITS
HIS OLD SUITS AN’
CARNATIONS ==

BARBA’

DOS ADVOCATE



-- - Around the World



SPARTAN and Notre D

ame played to a goalless draw

in their First Division return football match at Kensington

yesterday evening.

The game was one of the best seen at Kensington for

the season and one of the b
beginning to end.
The full backs for both

iggest gates. It was fast from

teams played excellently and

there were very little to choose between Gibbons (Spartan)

and Browne (Notre Dame).

very rarely conceded a thro

“Per” Cadogan at centre-hal
proved once more that he 15 one
of the best players at tis posi-
tion in the island. Ee was
constantly in position to ward off
Notre Dame attacks. Lloyd Gili
played very well at centre for-
ward for the Dames.

For Notre Dame, Paul Mande-
ville also gave a good perform-
ance. He took a_ few tries at
the Spartan goal but unfortun-
ately they went wide.

Fred Cozier in goal for
tan was in his old form,
from all angles. The Notre
Dame goabie, Wilkinson, alsu
brought off a few good saves,

The Game

The game started with Notre
Dame defending the southern
goal. Spartan took the touci
off. Soon after a corner kick
was awarded to Notre Dame.
Darey McCollin, _ their right
winger, took the kick but Cozier
brought off a good save before
Lloyd Gill, the Notre Dame
centre forward, could get his
head to the ball,

Keith Walcott then received
the ball from Cadogan and toox
a beautiful shot but Wilkinson
was fin position and saved.

The Notre Dame forwards
went into the attack and Mande.
ville received a long pass. He
took a hard shot along the
ground but the ball was diverted
by one of the Spartan backs,

Notre Dame again attacked
the Spartan goal. Archer, their
right half, centred beautifully
but Freddie Daniel, their left
winger who ran into the centre
forward position, failed to time
the ball and miskicked.

Missed Opportunity

Cadogan later got hold’ of the
ball and beat through the Notre
Dame halves. He took a_ shot
from outside the area but again
Wilkinson was in position and
saved. The next person to try
out Wilkinson was Tom Reece
at right wing for Spartan, He
sent in a lovely grounder from
the wing but once more Wilkin-
son saved,

Shortly before half time
Mandeville received a short pass
while he was unmarked, He
took a hard one-time shot bui
did not get over the ball properly
or it went high over the cross

Spar-
saving

ar,

When the second half was only
a few minutes old Walcott ran
through and centred from the
right wing. There were, however,
no Spartan forwards in position
to score and Wilkinson saved
easily,

In this half Spartan did: most
of the attacking for the first
fifteen minutes. Their forwards
were constantly going down bu*
Browne and Straughn warded
off these attacks,

Notre Dame tried hard in the
last few minutes to score the
winning goal but when Referee
Sayets blew off, the game was
still goalless,

The teams were as follows:—-

Notre Dame: Wilkinson,
Browhe, Straughn, L, Daniei,
Capt., Archer, Mandeville, McCol-

lin, Gill, Parris, F. Daniel and
Robefts.
Spartan: Cozier, Gibbons,

Bowen, Medford, Capt., Cadoga
Gittens, Reece, Johnson, Walcott,
Griffith, Boyce.

Modern High School Wins

Yesterday “afternoon at the

Modern High Schoo! grounds, the #

Modern High School team won
their fifth suecessive game and
maintained their unbeaten record
by defeating James Street Scout
roop to the tune of 74 points to 5.

Vernon Skeete, the captain of the

Modern High School team, scored
26,

Jimmy Hatlo

VK

ZATHEY'RE AS ALIKE e)|
AS TWO “P'S...
“P" FOR PINHEAD,
THAT 1S +55


















WHAT I'D LIKE TO
KNOW IS WHO THATAT6HII

BIGOOME PATTERNED
HIMSELF AFTER!




rs

| Rerlectep aiory—
WATCHING THE. BOSS’S

ASSISTANT TRYING

TO MAKE LikE THE e

BIG BOY HIMSELF ««-< |





Both ¢leared accurately and
w-in.
f





Atkinson’s
Selection
Criticised

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca. May 3.

The Gleaner’s cricket critic
Longfield, to-day criticised the
selection of Denis Atkinson on the
West Indian team saying that
West Indians had come to the con-
clusion, following the history-
making performances of Test
Cricket from 1948 to 1950, that
our cricket teams are being select-
ed not on a basis of mediocrity
and sentiment.

Says Longfield, “but the selec-
tion of Denis Atkinson has prc-
vided rude awakening. It reminds
us that the customs of the South
still persist in the midst of our
world of acclaim. What explana-
tion can the Selectors give for the
inclusion of this undoubtedly
mediocre player? It is not fair to
Atkinson, to be persistently
pitchforked into company which
he does not belong. The inclusion
of Guillen for Binns might have
shocked many, and to a lesser
degree that of Prior Jones, but
while there is a ready explanation
for the selections of both, there is
certainly none for the Atkinson
blunder.

“This is undoubtedly a deliberate
insult to the intelligence of the
West Indian cricket public, and the
ability of our Australian op-
ponents,”’

Both Longfield and Lawrence
Roberts, Gleaner’s Sports Editor,
find it impossible to understand
the selection of Guillen over Binns,
Trim over Goodridge, and Jones
over Johnsqn,

Longfield, more outspoken, says
of Jones and Johnson, “T still be-
lieve in the hostility of a genuine
fast bowler, and on the record of
Jones and Johnson in England, if
the former (no longer a_ fast
bowler) is selected, Johnson should
also have been included.”



; 4 ‘
Ladies at Water
Polo
There will be a ladies’ water
polo practice match this afternoon

at the Barbados Aquatic Club.
The teams are as follows:—

Team “A”, June Croney, Sheila
Pitcher, Marie T. Lopez, Joan
Ghent, Rosamund Clarke, Jeanna
-Lewis, Ann Hutchinson.

Team “B", Nancy Jones, Janet
Ingram, Consuela Knight, Mar-
garet Ramsey, Peggy Johnson,

Anne Hoad, Brenda Roett.
Reserves, Ann Raison and Rose
mary Lewis,

After this game there will be
enother practice match between
the other ladies turning up for
practice,

Play begins at 5 p.m.



PLOLPDADD Pe PDP

OPTI Oe BONO

-
7

a
DORSET AIS FO OOS

eR



ro Dooly i

ow



‘Soccer Results

LONDON, May, 3.

Results of soccer matches play-
ed Wednesday in the United King-
dom follow: Division 1. Blackpool
0, Arsenal 1. Fulham 1, Portsmouth
4. Wolverhampton Wanderers 0,
Né@weastle 1.

Division II: South Aldershot 8,
Crystal Palace 0. Gillingham 2,
Swindon Town 1. Notts Forest 2,
Newport County 1. Reading 1,
Millwall 1, (tie) Accrington Stan-
ley 0, Tranmere Rovers 2, New
Brighton 1, Chester 0. Wrexham 3,
Rochdale 1.

Scottish League Division A;
Motherwell 3, .Raith Rovers <.
Glasgow Charity Cup: First
Round. Rangers 2, Celtic 1,

Other matches: Dundee 4, St.
Johnstone 0. Manchester United 3,
Aberdeen 1, —(C.P.)

Coalition Cabinet

MELBOURNE, May 3. :
The Australian new Coalition
Cabinet will meet on May 11.
Liberal Prime Minister Menzies
and his Deputy, Country Party
Leader Fadden are discussing its



composition. In their last Cabinet
the Country Party had five posts.
—Reuter.



What’s On Today

Court of Ordinary, Court of
.. Appeal and Lower Courts
—10 a.m.
Football Div, 2 —
Harrison College vs, Lodge

5 p.m. |

Football Div, 3 —
Combermere v. Sea Scouts

at Garrison—5 p.m.
Harrison College vs. Foun-
dation—5 p.m,

Basket-ball —

Carlton vs. Harrison Col-
lege—7.45 p.m.

Fortress vs. Pirates—8.45
p.m,

Meeting Combermere Old
Boys’ Association at Com.
bermere—8 p.m,

Mental Hospital
Club Dance

Police Band, Christ Church
Baby Clinic Annual Show
and Dance at Drill Hall

Cricket

Plaza (Bridgetown) “The Mac
Arthur Story’

y"".
Aquatic “Call Northside 777" 5 and
8.30

.30 p.m.
Empire “U'd Climb the Highest
Mountain” 8.30 p.m,
Royal “Trial Without Jury” oe

“Homicide For Three 4.80

8.30 D.m.

Roxy “You're My ype
15

and “Side Street” 4.30 &

p.m,
Olympic “Where the Side Walks
End” & “Bataan” 4.30 & 8.15

p.m, ws tal *



TO-DAY.

Sun Rises: 5.44 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m.

Moon (New) May 6.

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Water: 2.17 a.
3.05 p.m.

YESTERDAY .

Rainfall (Co@rington)

m.,

01

in,.
Total for Month to Yester-
day: .05 i

Temperature (Max.) 85.5°F.

Temperature (Min.) 75.0°F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.,
(3 p.m.) E_S.E.

Wind Velocity: 6 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.934
(3 p.m.) 29.856.

ns.

|
The Weather
|

eS

FES STI,
See...
It’s so easy
< extra fine

to see those

points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the
Top Scorers

| P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co.,Ltd

; Prince Wm.

we al TORN

nee



Henry Street

in Tailoring
to be on the
SMART
side.
©
|

4
poner |
eee ITS ew WN









Spartan, Dames pl ay to Goalless Draw



Surrey Lead M.C.C.
On Ist Innings

LONDON, May 3.

Clese of play scores in Wednes-
day’s first class cricket matches.
M.C.C. first innings all out 62.
second innings 32 for four. Sur-
rey first innings all out 140,
(non-county match) Cambridge
University first innings 124 for six,
Lancashire to bat. Rain restricted

play, (non-county match). Ox-
ford University vs. Yorkshire,
(non-county match) no play

possible owing to rain.

Hampshire first innings all out
263, second innings 61 for seven
declared, Sussex first innings 104
for nine declared. Second innings
160 for three. —(CP).



Tommy Lawton Turns
Down US. Offer

! LONDON, May 3.

Tommy Lawton, famous England
and Notts county centre-forward
turned down a New York offer to
coach American soccer teams this
summer,

Lawton had a tempting cable
offer from the Manager of the
German-Hungarian team of Brook-
lyn who said that his acceptance
would give a big boost to soccer in
the States.—(CP)

YOUR SILVER
NEEDS THE GENTLE






With‘each 8-ounce
ECL

ce ie








Magnificent Photo Cards
of Modern British Cars!
Ty s |

FLAKES ” m

Every 8-ounce packet contains 2
cards,

ANNUAL TAG DAY
FRIDAY, MAY 4th

Please buy a Tag to
Help Others!




MAKE YOUR PARTY
A SUCCESS

with
Bots Cocktail Cherries
” ” Onions
“ ” Peanuts
Tins Vienna Sausages
Bots Olives
Tins Tomatoes
” Carrots
” Tomatoe Juice
Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple
+ Peaches
Pkgs Jellos, l4c., 12c, & 22e.
Tins Custard Powder
be Coffee
‘ Nescofe
Nesta,

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

HEADQUARTERS FOR BEST
RUM

ed

2

4

Worcester Faces
Defeat To-day

WORCESTER, May 3.

South African cricketers com-
pletely turned the tables on
Worcestershire in their opening
county match of the tour when
at one time they seemed to be
facing defeat.

After Worcestershire had carried
their overnight score of 135 for
four to 192 allout this morning,
the South Africans lost their first
five wickets for 25 runs, But the
middle batsmen Van Ryneveld
(29), A. Rowan (44) and Mann (49
not out) prevented a complete col-
lapse and the tourists’ total reached
157.

When Worcestershire batted
again they did no better than the
early South Africans and by the
elose had lost six wickets for 50,
and were thus 85 runs ahead.

cae: —Reuter.
B'dos Friendly Football

ssociution
TO-DAY'S FIXTURE.

Pangers v Penrode at St.
Leonard’s.
Referee: Mr. Robert Parris.




FLORAL
SPUNS

An extra special ,
_valueindn |
assortment of px
pretty patterns” +

and colourings

36" wide. Per
yard.

$1.20

CAVE
SHEPHERD
& Co, Ltd.

10-13 Broad St.











|
!
:

RED








HIGH

Or







Phone 4267 for

Ferrocrete rapid-hardeniné Cement
in 375 Ib. Drums

Snowcrete White Cement
in 375 lb. Drums

Colorcrete Cement
YELLOW in 375 Ib. Drums

|} Everite Ashestos-Cement Corrugated Sheets

6 ft., 7 ft., 8 ft., 9 ft. 10 ft. Lengths

Everite Trafford Tiles
6 ft. and 8 ft. Lengths,

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.

IN

TAILORING

ALL KINDS

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF
BOLTON LANE

FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

Gardner Will Fight

Brion June 5
LONDON, May 3.

Jack Gardner, British, Europeaa
und British Empire heavyweight
champion will have his postponed
contest with Argentina’s Cesar
Brion at the White City Stadium,
London, on June 5.



Don Cockell, British, European
end British Empire light heavy-
weight champion and Randolpn
Turpin, holder of the British and
European middleweight titles, wilt
cppose American fighters on thé
same bill,

Jack Solomons, the promoter,
will call this pfogtfamme his
“carnival of champions for the
Festival of Britain” and it will
take the place of the Turpin versus
Dave Sands (Australia) British
Empire middleweight title fight,
which he now hopes gr on in
the same Stadium in September

Solomons has the names of the
opponents for Cockell and Turpin
but is waiting for confirmation

before he discloses them.—Reuter.

in 375 lb. Drums

SSS

CLASS

vie arr

SO ss



f



Full Text

PAGE 1

i Rimv. \i vv i II:,I 11 Mill MIOS lliMu VII PICE si VEN CLASSIFIED ADS. mm,,XOTirES ^pe%  >— •*> -WeSad* dh a*. d*—S da-P* A aW •# • T , (p-r ^^ bM ^ M — 'HCrHONl 2MI %  on... leVBrr.er.tt.. and In I li 5* .1. •Mb)i and UN on two lor any number of -oca* up to M. 1 coal* per •Old on wM-ai cant* par word on Sunday %  for i DIED i MI." >,, Mas are mi. m LoAdoi Day** lainei < l>. II n-yley Mm Ikmn Ba>:.. igffSt, England : T > %  I Elllabelh .! %  Mr TAKE NOTICE **So &BS. *?***&* DISTILLING M ill %  in.Ml I ihe Siale ol Maryland. 'inrrw. WBOM trad* ur buiiniM a-< A^pl |o CMJBMM M MM Mag '•' i ilii w u Wat *(*-.i(hlitown Pho..e %  CAR -V„.„h*j| u u wiu. 4 food Ifr**. in good working eundll..., MiMJ reaaonaM* Appl. F D I. Oa>. Simple Orov*. Christ Church Dial 3301. I S 11-1 1 B CARS Do you want to buy a good • %  %  """nd carII -, a* ran offar you %  ISO Hllfcajaai. done It.uOo mile* and UHB Mom* Oaford. dona 11.000 rrile. Both can in eacellem condition Ring •MS. Boo. Asencloi Ltd. IP t SI On IMS 10 II p Uorrli Oxford M nor IPM %  HP Ford Van 10 H P V %  IMS Ford V I All ihe** Can a .>,. and |i 00 „ sandap. NOTICE THE LORD 0UVI %  OCBTI All W Pa tn of UW .bov a SOcMly -h. have bean in Iha Society up to the and of 1MB. arc here*.; requoatsd to •leave iho r IW0 Contribution Canla ai Uie OfrV* of ihe Rocialrar ol Friewdl) Bocietle*. Town Hall No card, will be accaptad after Ihe II r Clerk. Refinrar. t'rlrndlv Societies I i W %  -*< V'I'HLir SAI.IS *wi. KSrATK Sl'TTABlr C* CH Area 10*71 a li land .r^ i.paM, (I IOd_ Dial HI Day and MM Nmht IS St If.WA.-VII.I I OH HIM It i'm:i JCanddpa I* n.' **! %  , i rnla a ioo^ v. ard *'hdobi ir-eofc Tl HMI rd w..k 4 COM tUktoT Dancing Classes PuMli of The Barbados Dancliid are nMlflad thai '*! mm will tun w n oiw o> h and Salurday Iho 5th tlai-e. for ruin UP I Ua> AtC'ilON MAT VAN IPI1 MOBIL re matrorlod to ml im> .tkh-M been dimafm in a>i acrMe-.L Auction ..i MM • Krida 4lh Ma JOHN M Mafljf) ISH—* LIQL'OR I l( I \sl NOTICE K-nneih A. Sullivan hoklr Ucomo No KM of IPM. uranted • all buikHitfj at mwi N-lv" and Klruj Wm. SUeei i>rrmiaa>on u aaid IJqm I UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Oi TPaMffdP lih k} iniir of Ui< i we will aall PM „_,•' "**6* %  LdPrapnoo Ofap I.I. Pre Nouare Trp-Tpii Lyr'ff'P*^"T.bk *.t •> Don %  on. Tea Tn Foldnv i a *• all i" Mahoauti Vl H %  %  Morrli %  •an <( H P 'in mi il barsal Coupe %  PM huv II I' Mom a I II P Ford M • thr 1M %  %  -nation. The trade mark ran be apm on application at my %  Daleri thi* 30th d.iv o4 Aaril IP5I II WILLIAMS. l(c*i>lr„r of Tf-IMaik. One IBJB llrdford Truck Good Woikina Order Apply lo M Rrereion. Covinro Carape. WAGGON One 147 V-l Ford Sution WSdJBN m perfect condillon Appl) JXd or S143 XI 51-1 f.n ELECTKICAIMl 1 I.Alii) I Tllll KADI O C I^wl* TAKE NOTICE 1 Hz'. UH 1 of the Slai I %  a.liKr-I Maw York, rt, %  %  : •">•< Oi a trade mark Hcairtir in rmprl of al wnlihr. the i '••' DISTILLING i iff an lied u nder fti M„nli..,l. m I^.inaloi. m Part "A" of %  holic bevcradc. be entitled %  M ii-. r-.ri ahall tl i .1. ph. ne • M'n %  ML unli :.,",.ir.tion. 7 tra.ir mark ca.i bo **en on appllrati lte.l thlawih day of Arml. IP1I II WILI.IAMK. n*fl>lrar of Trudr Mark" 1151 V*-> '•*•-. '*'•'*•.'.'•;'.'.;'.'.'*'.'*'.', West Indian & British llmd made Crafl-. Ai>|iquei. Hand li locked Beachworr, Decootlon llouae. Si .-.,!.Tel ll-H. ', ',V/rV/////rV/rM V&% {.HII.VTAI. SOl'lAIRS. < JEWEL! Nfw Shipment THANI'S SOl'lMHS. ( I Kills. JEWELS Nfw Shipmrnt oprnrd TODAYS NEWS FLASH Dim* ui your Fountain Pen* for NUI and RACK replacementa. Quo li the only Store filled with modern tool. Ml Pen tdnlM lOBNWm STATIONERV AMI ii.xitim'Aiti: H.:: Iii'i.l I! SERVICE TAB all poata before eiectln. A i-ii.U quantity of thla irrl.l .1:11 available OAI nOEKi. Bay St. IBC. per gallon. let Some To-day. Mill SALE Crane House Thl A(ii known eoMtaJ property with approx. U| MM including a Itch of beach is open to .Coin. >l. lll-kU.. A F S F V A %  I'hone 4640 PLASTATION-i BIILmNO Fl'RNITl'RK llilTUHC One V Di .II l5l intie ahop knuwi ILI\P lower Davrella Bd wlthta in--Data* thl* 3rd day of PBB; To:—B. A. HcLCOD. Kaq Poll.. Mapdrate. HMTMI A AGUSTA BRATIIWAm: fnr A, N B -Thi %  ouiii. %  cred at a Ucanaina Court in Or held al P..li.e CDUrl Dl-lri.l A the IMh day ..I Umj, IfMl. a *M*. t A MtU Police Map.ir b DM v %  M i Suit* %  STTNO-T*Pl*T-eperlenced commanctnd aalary |I00 00 per i-ionth rVPIST IMP .ih atlMMl e.penen.e rommoncing aalary Hi 00 par '> %  A*T -accuiaie al fuiUfM ineferably with previoiia eupprten.-e on lnvokrlna COrnii encliin uUi) PM M per month Writirn application Hatlnp ale anl NUM. HOUSES i nrr COTs Walei. Tf-.rI bedrnoma. front May to i Rina Q C WoenM IIM s.\iJ}s Gnu. lor our TOY BOOM Anpl% M peiwHi JOHNSON'S STATION. MY 3 5 51-311 MISCELLANEOUS MINT—Olive Bloaaom Stamp, of Bar bid... Will pay Mr each Mr perieci ...pie* 'Phon. Herbert Bay ley 17* lir.ATHrntl.!> The Crane, for J ind July Phone MrA. D Herbert 1 11 M-4n TO IXT-ln Marina Garden, tar I norilha. fully furnlahod. H.Ikeepi"; apaitmei i wllh .pa c Mui verandah*. Wnie BOB a M C Advocate Ca 3 1 M .' %  i.ovr A i oi \ LOST ( .-I.i .,1 C.n %  .-I Mirror. %  OrVMO f". I PUIed Wat,. %,,„,H :/lperalor u. perfect working BhTtrir Lamp. Children Bedate bed. Cradle Plea*. PrrWi,, Bhalvo*. nil painted While. Lard-i Kitchen Cabinet. Braaklait Table anl Chair. I-Bunier Valor OH Stove and IKati. Preaaurr Cooker. Vale-. Kllche-i ItenalU HoctrK Toaater. Iron and otba~ llama Bale II .. BRANKKR. TROTMAN CO. Aurllonecri roil SALE Mi He 11; lleiurr UllMTl'RE I Mahooanv DIMM able Ho ml •> M0 00 I Calanalik able iPlnei .to neat !>• M0 00. Mahogany Wardrouo |50 00 Phone ail LIVESTOCK COW One Zebu Hulaleln Cow lo ealve t three week. Gave M pmu wllh third %  If C. Branch, near Payne. B.iad. M-kmain, St. Michael MJH—in. M1SCM,I.ANEOUS the treatment of dtaorder. ol ihe n MM m..d Rr-.all Kidney ldder Pilli Pike I I Dot. OblaliI KNIGHT'S LTD M 51 Jiv IIM IN r-iiiiit I.I n A MA-rntt-s cw PM0O Dial 5001 Mclleth. Beauout. KMOMJI 4 1B1-J. GAL\A.M -1 I.i IIIhe liland I. fl MO* 7 fi |5M. I fl M.TI 10 (I M *0 I A IIAHM %  .v CO., LTD. 4 1 11I f ii. LITE SAVERS Frrah pha loui Ufe SaverLfe Wild Cherr-. Pero-Mint and Pit* flavour*, ."rice term* per II..n BRUCE VKATHttUIKAl) LTD, POWDERED MILK that. Holland"PIMM Milk Top* In boiler cf the boat: Hi" Powdered y .. i p.. Gel il (or rill look alivo milk AaK for MM— Jn I'lllSflMI The public j %  heraby %  ad .-,, %  By *a. I -iT.. MUUAS I 'IIILIIPS. i. I do not hold my Mil reaponaiblo for •M eUe eo. irartlna *Jt| iOM %  %  CI.ABFNCV HOUSE. ". %  I SI1.IT \ Tudor M 'IAS A Co i...: K... .. In 1 .!'. MM nl .' .Stree'. Ill 00 M 4 SI 7 %  %  lungir.-Olev" Moth Kin. Wardrobe li I* MO time, more ptTortPi ban Moth Hall. KNIGHTS LTD 3 5 51In III palalalilr preparalWrn containing W. by volume of Vitamin Te.led Cod Uv" Oil. KNIGHTS 1TI1 IJJH 1> NOTICE RAKHADOK S.P ( A. Ttw SI'CA. Phone N usp'-nded until fn.ihcr nolicr. Messages for the Inspeclor will be taken ;il 2fi73 l-'twreii the hours ui 0 a.m. und & p.m. unit ,it 08—Britlons Hill Police ffoni 5 p m. lo 8 C. WA1X.OTT. Hun. Secretary. May 2ml WAV/VAVrWWAV//> Advertise... It Pays Demerara Life lo Award Medical Scholarship to Deserving Student Moral Duly of Beneficiary lo Return and Serve (omniunity Mr. Perry C Society's Makes Animuiimmnl Annual Meeting ,u Mr. Percy C. Wight, O.B.E.. Chairman of Iho Dcmorara Mutual Life' Assurance Society, announced at the 59th annual general meeting of members yesterday, that the Society will award a medical scholarship, of 11300 per annum for six years, to a qualified candidate who lacks the means to enter the University Colltg. of the West Indies. The Chairman pointed out that there will be no conditions to the scholarship which will be tennblt ..' lit WX University College, other than those normally attached to open scholarships awarded by the Univrr.ied that the Society will expect that tl., beneficiary will look upon it as a moral duty to return and serve the community after qualifying. (iov.il Barbados Yarht Club NOTICE .-ire invited to Silent Coloured •me Show lo be kindly itafed on Friday. 4th May. 1931. at 6.15 p.m. by Mr Thomas B. Walnwright. M -riken durtraveli la Canada h.diei. By order of. The Committee of Man' T. BRICK : Manager 4 Secretary. Mr. Wight was moving the adcption of the upon if thl Bf> clety—a report which disclosed lAothai year of progress Other, present Ml Ihe mceUiiK ware Dm-ctor*—the HonK K UcDavld, C M 0., C.B E.. and Capt. G. H. Smellic, Messrs A. >ves, C. I.. €le Freltas, F. A Seaford. It. K. Sleele und P W King. O I! K with E. C. lnnlss. rotary and II. Cannon, asslst_nt secretarv Menil*nu-Mcssri J. J. Hutt. Mamlull. A. S. Oulndge. S N McAllister, J. Joseph, R N Ciilleii'ler. A. Dickie. R. M Wight. C P. Wight. J A CuMiiUll. V, I. Edmonds und II J. Runyan. Moving the adoption of the report the chairman said: "Gentlemen. Once again I have much plea*ure to present to you the report of the directors i>n (hi transitions of the Bockfty '"' the year 1950. The report has been reproduced in the Press and no doubt everyone must have '.bserved the steady progress being made by the Society. "The new issue for thr yaai again exceeded the million and half dollar mark, being 1.039 pcliciev assuring $1,618,990 an annual premium income of S92.341.90. as compared with the prartoui year when the isMied 1.016 policies assuring SI.544.530 with an annual premium income of $89.305 70 "Claim* duiing the yr.ir totalled 73 policies assuring 1142,058 including bonus additions This is slightly higher than the DTCVifMal yenr and must be considered n mal. The maturing of 213 polii resulted in the sum of S332.252 being paid out. Those bring the total claims paid out by the So%  ea its inceptinn to $8.485.821. Kiih-Miiti.il Sum Added To Assurance Fund The ratio of expenses of management (including commission account) to premium receipts i* IT', as against 16.0% In 1949 Thd> average yield on the assur MNI fund for the vear worked out at 4.88'". ai against 4 83 in 1949. I might mention that %  .ige yield for the foui years of ihe P T EM HT I qul nq ip fll mum is 4 88% which WM satisfactory Indeed. As a resul of thitransactions for the yen the substantial sum of $392.53' has been added to the uMuranci fund which now stands at $6,110,'— arrpth' faariin •Al the lasl iMparal m the Society on April 2f>, IW'iO, Mi Arthur Davis moved a mot lor which '.SMS fully lupportfid by UB members present. Inviting thl Board to cOMtdCT the grant of some four, ol sihi 1 iship as a public benefaction from the fund; of trie Rocloty; and the Board ther giivo an assurance that this fUgsjMtlon would iconstdtred ml have givau .,) %  • -fn" msideraUon to this mgrW and hlla what mind was a schoUirship to provid* training for a non-p career, the directors fei I that tin bail interests of thip of this Society would be sorvct at the present time by ihe award n.-larchip ten.i'.:. ; Collcgi -•/ %  I } fifj btCtl uiipreiecd by the anna made by the Vtifj Fl I ilk pal ,.i!-' %  i %  %  Guian.i to hold entrance exam. %  %  % %  hare are without the means to enter the Umvi "The Board have accordingly decided in keeping Waft their undertaking At the last general meeting to award a m to be styled the "Den:. tual Life i candidate to 1. selected bv th l/nivemily nuthr i |) those qualified for ftntrai The vulur* of thr ip will be such sun not cEcceding £300 per annum f->r six may be fixed by t)u • authorities. Ciood-uill Geslure To Community "There will be no i-hotarship other than finally attaching to open/ •I crane whli b gesBOOM BOARD lor Gentlemen 0 OP* Seasonable term, tor pennaI.'. Apply Caauaiina tte*idrniial I MM, T*l Mil I S SI—Jn AKX TPTKETS Se.W. L 3U0 lo M t> IM1 M IXIO Mil I. ftaa> M1. P OUR. Ml K 131. 71 M MTP. O MS*. JMU. m S IMilaU, IISJ nil M HI! O WU IUvde. plrase return Hii.r b> Ad. -ir CS I — ,r,l .-llered 4 S II—tn iiI. II -: inawarded by the Unii iMtv. but thia Soci.-tv win expect that the beneflciary svilt accept it to be a moral mity to return to British Guiana and serve the community In his profession after he qualifies. I trust that the members will .nut eadorei tins dsclflo the Board have mode, a lure of goodwill and service t Ihe community as a whole Before I CaOaa my uddress. I would like to ploce on record rr.v thanks to the director Im then optrattan and the staff for their loyal service "With these remarks gontlcm. : I formally move the adoption ol ii..' report ind altar it has been 1 phall l"' pleased to answer any questions membeu may cure to ask." The adoption of the report was .econded by Mr. Hutt who said It was gratifying to note thai pna hud decided to award the scholarship It wai very good that il should come from the Society, and it would go abroa'i he said, that Iho Societ %  only looking after the life of its meml>prs. Imt was looking after the moulding their offspring to %  em ihe community Several Reuilutions Adopted Several resolutions were adopted during the afternoon's business. One. moved Hutt and seconded by Mr. CslIcndor. proviiled for the i %  -ele. tion of three retiring director*. U,-. : tv IVMV Wiu4. Steel,ami McDavid itition moved by Mr HUM and MfMOded by Mr. n. M.I Wight, flxeii the dlrecton remuneration at $4,000 for the, ensuing year; $1,000 for the chair-: naa and IM00 u. ba dlvWaW Mie other titreeti Messrs Fltrpatrick Orahan and Co ware n'-electod auditoion the motion by Mr. R. M Wight seconded by Mr RamlaU their remuneration wai pas*ed at $1,440 on a n Mr. Callendor and teeonded by Mr C IV Wight Mi. C. PWight moved, that 'he meeting approves of appropriation for donations to cliarlty. to •h<> extent of $2,535 foi 1 .iid of a %  .urn not excee-iing that amount for the curu'rit year This was seconded by Mr. Hult and adopted. The Chairman, bofoi. ag thanked members for receiving the report so satisfactorily and endorsing the rccom mendation made to grant U* •chnlarship. He r.iid it had certainly afforded the dirntoi tren Btuch pleasure that the members had done so. and he assurer! the that the Colony would benefiti materlallv by that step. Mr Wight added that he wasj sratcful to Mr. McDnvid for) rhig the Professors and. the amount of trouble ho h."S' 'nken over Ihe matter, and he fell! tori would wish him lo nxpress their thanks to Mr ( McDavid Mr. Percy Wight He-elected Chairman At a meeting of the held "flei-wards, Mr. Percy Wight was unai elected chairrran for the cnnuiig yeir. / u finni Talks In Jamaica ...... %  .. KINGSTON M 3 The mat aiaatlB| of Iho l-ibour lU*nr\t of lluWeal Indies which Is bcin. established to r,..ordin.it,Iha Untied States farm lubour pio iranuna win be held in Jaaalcd thll month It will IM.ittende 1 by ropraaasatatieaa of vanoupartiCipotatUJ OOIOBAM and by Mr I Thompson. otonlal Attache of the British Embassy, Washington "> made an ovt-nnghl stop at i.n: alea Laal niahl on the way lo Bat lo %  Hand Iho naaaUng C rlbbean CommlMion of aiuch hi is .i oMmbor. The ostablbhinent of the Board am recommeockad at a KM of the Briti h Wi t in.ius Lobour OrBeora held in J.iin.iK.i in DefMBnbeT. CHARGED WITH MANSLAUGHTER Hi.ithw.iite, a labourer I St. Philip, to charged by the *olice with manslaughter m run ncction with Helenna Muliins* liath. Tin .1 by Capt. I B tii.mi ..! ii inest into circumstances of Mulllns' deaih which WM adjourned sine die yesterday bv Coroner C. L. Walwyn. Mulllns died while on her way tinGeneral Hospital from thu St Philip's AlmshoiLsion April 26 A past marirm exummation rbl rncil the DOXt day by Dr. A s Cat" m tinHoapllaJ Mortuary and death was allribul ed lo a frui tiirrd skull £6 DAMAGES AWARDED pwJudgement lo the amount ol IB was awarded l<> plaintiffs ((ere*ford Bennett and Eldica Benneil el Bank Hall. St Mi< h ie| by .ludu J W It Chenery in the Court Of Original Juiistlli I M:!.T day I.IMI'1.1 Bannatt and Eldici Bennttl broughl %  COM agilnst Kbene/er Alleyne plio of It ink Hall claiming duniugrs to the amount of [50. They said In evidence thai Alleyiie on Mann 29. damaged 80ti holes of lugu..ane and IB holes i.| banana trees. RATES OF EXCHANGE Plan Welcome lor Itutttamanie Hon. William bustamante. Prime Minister of Jamaica, is expected n %  <• here on Sunday at 8.20 a m. He will take part in ihe tnoitlM ,.f Ihe Caribbean Commission which starts on Monday. A reception Committee hag been set up and arrangements have In-en made for a programme of activities tor him during his visit here. A public welco m e U planned for him on his urriva) ut Senwell Airport Durhaf next week he will he taken on a tour of the b and several receplionpi are being stringed for him. He is BJM •chedulad bo addn %  %  public meeting at Queen's Park during thl week Cunudiuii Govl. >\ill No! Interfere OTTAWA. May 3 The Canadian Government doe* u il plan to interfere with the award nsada by tt< grtaitrMoi b settling the wage-hour dispute thai ktd to u nlne-ilus BOMTa! ru>lwa> stiike lias t year. I'linii Minister St. I-nirent told tl" C< mmons yesterday. He wouli ii. ask Parliament In intervene OFFICIAL NOTICE MM *: • IN mi oi %  oi i ii wi i i' v.' 'W* I do ni i %  ui or atlaiUnT the e I %  ported on and ia>>< i mwl prim n.iaiis iiritnr.ST H %  %  U.r.-a..., i ,vf on r\ THAT reby alve noii.e la all .fobraae* ' of Iho aefendanlai "*eii* and between Hie hour* of .. .1..L.,.. i.n lre %  'I any darree and ba .( the -ill "I *T)YS LBWI>< MAP -and plan'Ihe S'e.'fc-i %  I Bill 'led MM rtaled *il May 1*JI i Aleian.lrr (libaon I iHad r. ..i* and — i rba fame i SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. -AIMM. rmN AHirSBDAM M.S. Otarne.la.l-10 Mas Hr-', MS Ronalra III, Ma. Iff I M S Bonaire n< Mils,. ,, % TBIMIIAII I i I k \< \o \M. nvi vi, MS lliai.le.ta.1 Mil. Ma.. a p MuaBun, SON I CQ B.W I. SCHOONER OWN ERR A8SOC., INC. Tele. 4047. FRENCH LINE t lc Gle Trans*tUntlque MI mo TO ENGLAND FRANCE i. UKXrOMB, Mav 12. 1951. .'-I I.n. i*. Martinique, Go ulrl.iiipc ind Antigua < iCIMMlW GRITSE f OLOMBII Mm 31th. IMI. I •undid I .i Giulrs, CM%  arao. Cirlagena and \ . litnr. I'.iss. inters Oatgo ind M*H R.M.JONF,S&('o..Ud. AGENTS Phone ::: 3814 PASSAGES TO EUROPE MILK POWDER LONDON Fond Minister Maurice WOhb told the House of Commons thai milk pOWOOr hi one of the mall' iinjrclicnlN "f Hutain's pre.ent il.. l-el s.iuv.ifce "How much milk powdei con lput In bofbre %  sausage IteciMne a raara bun?" Wahb refused to answer Conservative member's question —I.N.8. In Touch With Barbadoi Coast Station CAIU IANI) WUUUSMS iW I < I.I.I t.Uvl** Ih.l rhoy tan ooo eainmunp-ali svllh Ibe following >hlpi througn (bell P.rbad— Cnaat dHatlor. .< K...I A.nher.t. %  (laatogi--. Ag-n.e.,M->". • %  Tlndra. a Cap" Hndnr. U HeeiitM. *Bab-n % %  lloli.. • Ailll... %  • I'apr.idreibl . Bamoiia. £ C*a Klehi MAY J IMI . %  Mfesn ii ^ il. ei DMMM) Ihafi. II 11% pr Slghl Orafl, |l 1 CSl I 1.1 Bare^u*. a %  %  • Oervaia. %  ReOatona. %  • l.iHll" %  Motmerland .a Mor.ilni l.lgtil • S Cecil... I LoMs An*M Una a • llai-e-i" Monxlnl %  Knur) L.I-" il "and T. r.it**Wr. %  • l*W< Cuba if rauador. • > AJM M . s*.. The usual uorti of call are Dublin, London, or Rotterdam Single fare £70; usual rcducUot) for cht.drcn. We lire now in a position to Hike .are of your orders foi GUN METAL FITTINGS. TUB: CEJVTMAL t Mi'oitit i# (Central roundly Ltd..—IVoprlrlun.* Cnr of Broad ATudor Btratti -EMSMWiaiWMSiSeiWSfK^iKWWI'.ilt^I'SV-tlWSWKWSSSlJSsWS-I Arroiiv MANAGBBS J. Take iln. opportunity of olitniniiiK v|U '. 'I.... .MM-HI-. IN GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE lianf.irH* (rum U" upwards ^* MILD STEEL Flath", Rounds. Squares In nil Sires BOLTS & NUTS All Sin. FILTER CLOTH White Cotton Twill At PRICES lhal cunnot be repeated. : Tho n\mt urns i tn Mm i it*. White Turk Road. SI. Michael 28 y WILLIAM FOtiARTV LTD. a cfjDjV&Jjy QahpztA add lit lluil Huh' touch of ordvri'd canlhal gives a HOME — its Charm WF. HAVE JUST RECEIVED — B. M. K. M'OVAX RIGS'—various si/rs VELVET I IMSIIHI Slll'A III'llS—various siies VA1.I RL'C.S — various sites I Hit (.1,1 l BOGS & t'ARI'KTS—various siies nnjOOR STAIR CAKI'KTINd—various siies 221 and 27 in. lies ide. WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD.



PAGE 1

PACK KtlR DARB.XnOS ADVOCATE FRIDAV. MAY 4. US I BARBADOS # ADVDeSTE t. 1 1—-i Print**! > U AdvocdU CO, Lid-. I TWO FALLACIES AT a public meeting held in Queen's Park on Tuesday night by the Barbados Labour Parly. Mr t, L. Walcott, a member of the Party and a member of the Executive Committee, attempted to supply a cordial to the drooping spirits of the Partv's followers. He continued to blame the big merchants for the rising cost of living and told his hearers that Barbados had no sa> in and was unable to do anything about world market prices. Both of these statements are fallacies. The cost of living rose higher than it need have done because the Government of Barbados refused to accept the advice of the same "big" merchants before the £ was devalued in September 1949. The rejection of their advice cost the island a sum estimated at approximately half a million dollars. It was because they continually adopt the stupid attitude of blaming somebody else and preferably the merchants, that the Government Party today suffers from %  lack of knowledge of world market tendencies. Then' are a number of local businessmen capable of giving good advice to the members of the Government but because of prejudice againsi tin"bin" merchants the advice is r.ot taken and the island suffers The story of the goose that laid the golden eggs is one of those universal stones that any voter of Barbados can understand. It is quite simple. You have been spending the gold as soon as the goose laid it, but you are not satisfied that the goose is laying enough eggs for the whole community, so you kill the goose only to find that there is no gold inside, and that the poor goose hod, after nil. been doing her best to ktep no the production of gold. This is -what Mr. Walcolt's statements suggest. 'iluV by taxing out of existence the big merchants who are also the "big employers" of labour, the merchants will be forced out of business and there will not even be the employment that there is under the present regime under which Mr. Walcott is able to enjoy his present status. The members of the Government will not study trade movements and market tendencies for themselves, nor will they seek advice from local businessmen. They rely instead on advice and orders from the United Kingdom, whxh come from those who consult first the interests of the British Treasury and the Board of Trade and then the interests of the British West Indies. Sir Stafford Cripps kept on saying that the £ would not be devalued. The Government of Barbados wants to watch carefully statements that the £ will not be revalued. A knowledge of world market tendencies is an essential to a healthy economy. Barbados, if it thinks In terms of world trade and utilises the best commercial brains available locally, will find means and methods of combating the cost of living. Running down the big merchant is as expensive a pastime as killing the goose. Knowledge, not words is our greatest need. The voters of Barbados would be grateful meanwhile to Mr. Walcott if he could take some interest in tish. meat and fruit which are being sold at prices beyond the schedule, and thereby force up the cost of living, without influence from world markets. WHY NOT? THE Sec rotary-General of ihe International Civil Aviation Organisation recently announced the signing of an agreement, the fifth of its kind, giving technical assistonce to Thailand. Under the terms of this agreement I.C.A.O. will provide a Civil Aviation Adviser to the Civil Aviation Board of that country and fellowships which will enable two Thailand pilots to study commercial flying abroad in order to become regular pilots in their national airline in the future. No such assistance has been rendered to Barbados beOftUM it is considered by I.C.AO. that we can get such assistance from the United Kingdom. Few people in Barbados realise the disadvantage of our status with regard to international assistance of this kind. The United Kingdom, and particularly its local representatives, are at all times unwilling to ask for help for its possessions. They regard this as an admission of their failure to do everything for their possessions. Yd flourishing communities like Ceylon are helped with Point Four Aid. Why not help for Barbados ? News 1 I-OIIQ Britain I.ONDON. April 27. trover*.es of 1851 ev the nffi The frnt *pring.clean..u By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS of 1851 as il would havo been seems to have been left tu IDS expounded by a modern rad Uisl passible moment before the nlr Tnr lrulh & thf matter i news-reader. The programme! Festival. But this week then thai the lillle lower of girder-. h * v revealed lomc curiosities are men with patnt pots every. n „ now b^ taken awav ^nd the Mewtelaaohn. op course, was rewhere. and other men are uj. Skylon is actually suspended in Carded a* the greatest musician scaffolding steam cleaning the mid-air by wire ropes from three In the world. But otherwise the stonework I iir.ti.-ed one man boom.'. In the flat above my own music of the week has revealed scouring the dirt out of Plato's are a small circle of young urchi%  *" pleasant but forgotten thing.' beard where he looks down to lccts who arc proudly displaying of the mld-Vlctorian age. company with Galen. Arch! JllM outside the front door the "* %  broadcasts included medes. and Justinian from the original model of the Skylon * cl !" t coma startingly to my top of Burlington House in which *i designed by a friend of ears—though they must nave bear Ptecadllly. The famous Readm,' theirs. The Festival people are no"* <>"n by historians For in Room in the London IJbrary assuring the public that tt will tance. ,851 waj-the yaar r>f th where Poet Laureate and other all be safe even in a high storm. fS n f u ,n ?*!* col 1 1 n 5n y way. each veai to captuie the But the IBM census was a railway bridge and so give u*. reclame of a Dior. They stage ;< disaster. It revealed trial in the in Fleet Street, n good view of |, m <. Bnow |o indicate the trend previous ten vear* the surplus o! St. Paul's. Unfortunately it i* to meiVl fashions in the year. It women over men had merman still there, but the City has put has always seemed to me that rapidly imd alarmingly lMitician ; a coat of green paint on It, and lhrrp fcr e two main source); of pu t forward the now forg-.ttcr added a coat of arms men's fashion Ideas In the world, proposal that women should b*. Lord Mayor comes up-river and that they tight a continuous recruited to emigrate to :h< And we had our first taste of lbs %  "* A herp ,',* Harlem, and colonies where the vast surplus o charming river scene th,, week there is the clubland o' Umdon m ,._ in Canada, Australia and when the Lord Mayor came up nvnht I.e. zoot suits, the draped New Zealand, was alarming' Th. cr m hi* barge, in full river pro. une P >>"tn hat*, ami tapenng census also showed that lh< ccaSoni for the first Hmf in trouwr f how,n *>"**" wk *" J %  population of Ireland had fallen nearly a hundred years, to open ^g^^L v-TVk On lE b ? •"""• ft Pvlous ten > %  ... the new water-bus service that STS ftAHairtSthr• fnreS f J".? ,n *L The ,ons ' ,rClu,,t .ill take visitors from one Festi* *.*.* *. *~* g? took the cheapeat passage, to thi ,1 rttS to another They arc ,** J^S-SL*, a JEJ? ,> iX N !" Wor,d **H* ? the,ah.,. SitingfdSa-rT"ew lurtouteK —'* "* >£"•', •?"" V" aV Boon and'nj^ ^.UedVere ineTa.ionTGa'nery and Tr.fa.. E?J&£?lJfi2olEl W^"^sT^ < !" gar Square has playing again. At the Festival fountain. b t n "<-' us *'' decorative mill i 0 n, alarm* th, m waistcoats and suit jacket* with Q -51 has sunk VDfaft in No..ing h m .hirc tt. ^.' %  ..-..'^.J^'SZ."'^. K !" million iU,, l>nrlsh councillor.H who fulled 1 eel the village to pay extra mono, |rom (| ^ ht unr*"'. -rt,,.. -no 1 JUrltt3EE&Si nalgaln^fplaceXr It'se^T? themI' !" .'I!' .."""'f SX^; years ofuneasyllfo. It was founo IL/ fy'.tr^iS d ,n P^ide the minority with a more or less highbrow radio s*-r vice. It Is now being regarded ,1UuBe given. Some countle£Z££T T\*'ialU>£-'"n !" ,*\\wUM>ful tvcn by people who do no areTh/ving a, if this Feativ.; ££Z is eMTM^!""inffes £2 %""&£ %  2 tsS wan their own private property Jn Eni( i ann ai( ,, owlv .hanging. n ^ h n c n .^ do "* w (l -Festival of Sussex" ,. progdld KIoWlnK brighter. Th,s week ^^f l n f „ l J 22SS? piorlaimed on the South Coast. n RnK ,, llld everything has com*" h n m thp t lh u h r n ^'^ri> v Last Minute Rush hined to remind us of the affair* J !" Er "KT"^ 9* n JHy ;,, ., .. %  1..., i.,!e 1 %  ( a hundred vears ,... • when n umh ^ '/ !" ir '' • %  "" "' ,)„ d S this hurry and Prince Albert/ancestor of our ^^ZZX^TIT** !" !" U.stlc has begun. Only a WCCK Festival was almit to open. And %  * that otherwi ago depressing reports came from Lord Samuel, the best wit the Festival Gardens that this English politics, hareminded [un-fail and amusement pan; how dull nineteenth century would open almost three wet!., costume was then. The get a public hearing. New "moderns" have been playe* regularly and the musicians of black ltlc l* 81 h ve be,n ^"rned for there have bWQ "hard hat" topped off a gloomy interesting rorntter, -;'"^'' l the Third Prograi be floundering In a %  A TliM DAYS' TRIP By E. C JACKMAN w day, of s..i..huic and a i-mcmhlc Onr'liuflnrw g lTl ji r ilJ *> funinrtniM liunl "I work. Th" fould warrrly Inh. i '"• I % %  ,""" w"ll Vn nvc day. laic frnn, hi5 .olnnn nc.jhlm.ir. Whatof dull antique mui.c and %  ,-. o u i-^iuui w.inl ocm, 10 have .-vet lh.ohd mrrit. ot the rale verar ulay.. But in the bain" rniid ^, TOM photo Victorian Ae In England. II had year It ha, b* E£S l .T€c"sE^'tSc'h tXffUSi an'-en^oT: K" JtWKf I un.'Sc 300 lecl UMa the nky ier phaw when Ihc Hoyal Court cajt.nl sy.lem. haw cople.1 lh. &.V*a.je -r "% l $?^ m g£?VuM Tha B.B.C. ha, been dcvollne costs a Kreal deal. But Ihc listener ider its mini transniuion Urn week to regular services may count the cnUrcly lo a "Hash back" ot a money well spent tt II relieves h,s Skylon hundred years. On the Third Profavourite wavelength of chaml. a a al u.a^ltv ai^4 .liei-lll'Lltlhv gramme we have music of 1851, tii,. talks r d the music and discussions on IMdieVii d conphilosophy. Puert€ Rieo Builds A Folk School Am.rit.1. i-Ui.il in lh* t %  iwousri handicapped rt-toturr*. I* worklns lo I the latural potentiiil FOR SCHOOL PHILIPS' ATLAS and LAYNG'S ARITHMETIC ROYAL READERS Advocate r v VM' v -V £2. BALAASA SCOOP This handy and useful deviee provides the housewife with a new and simple method of preparing recipes with utmost speed and accuracy. The "Balansa" can be used for careful weighing and measuring or as a guide for those who prefer to guess. WILKINSON & I1AYNF.S Successors to C. S. PITCHER 'Phones : 4472 & 46X7 CO. LTD. & CO. n < PETER Enjoy it with pleasure Again ! DAWSON'S SPECIAL WHISKY THE OLD FAVOURITE .Khl.il subject area come together nt least once every two weeks for approximately three hours. These blocks of lime are used to provide general orientation of units of work and to plan studies and collateral activities. The ottic*: further recommends that general 'red fully equivalent to the group meeting* be followed by Foremost in this concept is the standard secondary programme, an extended period during which importance they attach to formal The heart of the plan, and perstudents can consult wit cdutulion The Puerto Hican rehaps It* moat radical departure, teacher and receive ind cards his public schools with a Is the technique of guided Indeassistance faith matched by few peoples in pendent study The major part Students meet In a simple room history Through them, he is deof the work Is done by the sturequiring tables, chairs, a blacktcrmined to find ways to a highdent himself—away from the board, a small library, and (In cr standard of living. school, on his own time, and in the case of science classes) miniPuerto Rico, an American tcrlarge measure at his own pace. mum laboratory equipment. Thi* rilory, maintains with the exInasmuch us. the initiative reroom functions also at an office penditure of 30 per cent, of 1U mains with the student, th'. for teachers, as a guidance centre bia. budget a puh'ir-school organiiaprincipal role of the teacher Is as for students, and. where practltion much like that in ihc United guide and consultant For this cable, as a meeting pl.ee for States with six-year elementary purpose, the central offlce provide* community clubs. schools, three-year intei mediate each study group with two teachers More t^-in any other kind of Of junior high schools, three-year one specializing in language and secondary education, Plan Morosenior high (secondary) schools, social studies, the other in mathevis requires a well-equipped and and a university. Gradual exmatlcs and natural sciences. The functional library. Such a library pansion toward the goal of unlllrst task of thc*c teacher* Is to —containing basic texts, period.versal elementary education is organise and lead the work of cal material, supplementary referunder way. Paucity of funds has the student group. Their most ence books, und audio-visual mapresented to educators a major critical job, however. l lo nurturt teiials—is of sarvoi nol only to challenge to devise new means to the attitudes and skills necessary students at all levels, but to the care for o\it-of-*chool youth to successful prosecution of indewhole community. In addition, •Many new proposals have been pendent study. Proponents of the the flexible schedule opens up a tried Few. however, seem to hold plan admit that it is on the ability whole new range Of valuable, inthe promise of Plan Morovls. of these teachers effectively t-> expensive resources such as guidwhlch had ita origin In 1948 in teach these skill* and attitudes ed Held excursion*, the post war pressure for that much of the lueeess of their Although the plan U sUII In increased secondary education programme rest*. the experimental stage, the recspccially In the smaller comAlthough the broad over-nil mils have been encouraging. munitie* on the Island. curriculum Is essentially the same Teacher interent has remained as that of the standard senior spirited, and students have not Two alternative* were then high (secondary) school, the aconly met curriculum rcspomibiliavailable to the student seeking tual selection of courses to be ofties, but also have organized secondary schooling (11 the rcgufered during a given school year many co-curriculum social and lar high (secondary) schools— will be conditioned by the need.civic activities There Is evideno located principally In the larger and interests of the students and that the plan is producing excel town*-which could admit only a by the nature of Ix-al instructionlent ucademic icsulls throughout limited number of students horn al lesnurco*. The curriculum Is the island. their Immediate or neighl*>urtng developed around uiuu of work Plan Morovls has opened communities and (2> a plan of which, although prepared In basic whole new vista to educators on free examinations ailministi'ie-l fnrm at the central office, are Ihe island. Already, a programme hv the Puerto Ri.an Bureau of nevertheless sublcvt to ihe critlis under way to extend IU methSchool Extension for work done cal analysis of the student groups, ods downward to the junior high independently. Ordinarily, successful compleschool and outward to non-ma Obviously, many of those detion of a work inn; will involve trlctuated adult group*. Th> siring secondary education could Initial orientation and assignments Puerto Kir an Department or Edunot be adequately cared for under (undertaken by the group In cucation 1* also studying means oi either arrangement. Seeking a operation with th* teacher), tndltransferring some of its ediu way in which to meet this devldual consultation with teru-h.T* tional assets to the regular ten. mand without divertinc fund* from and other local resource*. A high (secondary) school. An exilic elementary school extension student enrolls for as much work perimental project will )>c Initiaprogramme, public educational a* he feels ht can successfully ted which will attempt lo Involve authorities, largely under the negotiate, and evaluation is built the whole student body of a se ]i ..<(. i hip of Aasiatant Commison reports of the teacher and nior secondary school In a slmiMuni'i Francisco Collaro. estubspecial tests constructed by the lar programme Incorporating self Hulled a modest ex|>erimental central office. Academic credit is study. Finally, a significant atplan at Morovis during 1848-49. also granted for appropriate 0Ctempt will be made in the outu.ni Out of tbii experiment has come eunational experience under the of 1951 to bring vocational ina pioneering programme standard rule* of the central ofstruclion irlo the scop*; of the The central aim or the Morovls Ree. and all credit obtained under plan, plan Is to provide the fundamenPlan Morovis is transferable Puerto Rican* have developed tal clement* of a secondary cdushould the student later enroll In hi Pten MOUHH a remarkable cation—witli special emphasis on a regular secondnry school educational Innovation for their its application to local ru nmunClass meeting* an* bald accordIsland, one that might well be itv life —to adolescent* and adults lug to a flexible schedule arrangadopted m other countries, and unable to enroll in a regular seed by students in co-operation with have illustrated In no small nior high ( %  ecomUry) school, teachers. The central office remeasure their determination The education provided Is con*idcommends that groups In etch *olve their problems Oil tanks are very conspicuous, as oil is sent from Venezuela and refined in Curacao. Il was said that the shops have comparatively cheap goods, but an attendant in one asked me $40 (American money) for a small pircelain figure. It may be that other articles are more reasonable. Our nexl call was at Cartagena in ColomThis port has the b-est harbour on the Northern coast of South America. After the lown had been captured three times, it was thought advisable to till up the Boca Grande (large mouth) with stones, so that ships could not use it. The small mouth (Boca Chica) is now used instead, as it is easier to defend. The old city was enclosed by a very heavy wall but it could not keep out the ubiquitous pirates of Sir Francis Drake in 1585, or subsequently the French. From Cartagena we bad *-!.e long run to Jamaica where we tied up alongside the wharf. When it got cooler we took a drive to the Hope Gardens. The taxi driver said that no rain had fallen in the Kingston district since a small shower in December. This drought had turned the grass into hay, and even the trees showed signs of being parched. The dust, of course, was bad. In the Hope Gardens the Bougainvillea and Cannae had been watered and alone flauntjrd ?olour. The orchid house is worth a visit These gardens can be beautiful but the d rough had spoiled (heir beauty. I III; C. II. KIMII III.. I I II A ... is ;: .Ml'ST MATl* lit LIGHTNING ZIPP FASTENERS The original Zipp Fastener that always works. In sizes Type Lengths and Colours ihat are "JUST RIGHT" For every service in Personal apparel and equipment • for i/iiur sflfrlitm . . HA MIST A A CO., I III. >• I..Mills lt|-|,l. OIK READERS SAY: Rtiiliu Inli'.frri'iuv T'i Tag Editor The atdopaf S1K.—In your edition i>T tin* Kill April "O.itimi't'* unite very •l.ilmgly and certainly mil with* %  i BUM i: 11. mini .rit.-itVii'iin" to radio reception generated by i ling vehieler.. For the benefit of our Membert ear owners who may not know that this 1* an or even hfiW to. overcome the trouble, wi would advise them as follows: %  graph Act 1940 makes it illegal Id use any vehicle causing electriCal inteifii.il..' wiili the lawful and normal operation of litenced wireless apparatus or •1,,-iv.r The ordinary private car only raqutrei a suppressor to be fltted in the high tension cable con%  Ihe distributor The suppressor is a resistor usually made up in cartridge form. It coat* about 60 cent* and can be fitted in a few minutes. Moat of the leading garages have them in sink They do not intuf.T.wlUl the running of the car If the correct type of resisior il used. In feet manuf.irlurcrs now \\\ suppressing devices WCn,iheii urs leave the works. The respon-ilbilily for seeing that the Act is obeyed rests on the Government Electrical Inspector who has two cars tltted trill, the apparatus for ttoMCtsBg .h(| oflattM, The ears cruise about the roads and should a rtbajli ba nGlinting a noise sufllci %  n*. to make radio reception impossible, us number is noted and I white paper II sent to the owner ; (olloa A motor car owner can easily f IHN car U causing intarfanne* by driving II to a dist.-ince of about 50 feet from a radio leceivcr and then with the engine running, the receiver ihould betuned to the 13. 19. 25 I meter Muds and the resulting i.oise will Ul him know if it II sufficient tu interfere with normal irveption. Secretary. Barbados Automobile Association. 151 Roebuck Si wn This ten days' trip has a curious zig-zag itinerary. From Jamaica we returned to Curacao and then passed on again to La Juaira. On the way to Trinidad we hugged he bleak looking Venezuela coast all the morning. The sky was overcast uniil the East Wind used its broom to brush the clouds away. At once there was a transformation. As far as the horizon the sea became an expanse of molten silver. In contrast the deep blue ocean to the west still slept. This time we nosed the wharf at Trinidad. so we landed and had a very pleasant drive up Lady Chancellor's roountain road, so called after her because she had urged its building. From the top ofte has a wide expanse of view over valleys and shipping. Back to the ship, and away for Barbgdo*.. and the end. If you are not a good sailor the pleasure nf this trip will depend on Ihe weather met We had a nasty night between Cartagena and Jamaica, and we left Kingston in a good imitation of a gale; but having regard to th entire trip ihe weather was on the whole good. rou voi it asm Anchor Butler Anehar Milk Powder Decoration* Gold Braid Rum HAMS CHICKENS CHEESE < .-l,i Storaie Hams — avge 16 I's. Tin Ham* — 3 Sites Salami Frankfurter Sau-avei Sausare Roll In Tin* Jellied Chtekrn In tins Jellied Turke\ In Tins • Helm Soups (Canadian) Campbell Soup* (Canadian) Kl I I4 no I with llii-sr! Bass Ale • .mi i '... Stout Wort hint: ton Ale Canada Iir> (linger Ale PHONE GODDARDS WE DELIVER



PAGE 1

PAOI -i\ BARBADOS ADVOCATE IRIDAY. MAY 4. 1WI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON f ^^ttLW ^^U MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY ^ N0VS ~-\NOOB •CATACL>ST\C f :"uS' co*-ta\ STAB ...\O W VB JOT —o :_00 B VSBCT%3 VOU AT •7/ 1 ~^ TMf 0 M^TA -0 BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG HOW CUTE --THE J LITTLE CURLINGS MB WAIT NG R ME ./ TQ) COME HOWE-J CUCH AFFFCT,C*4 /S J _ A I • L WE'D *8ETTEP PONE T-E N g W I lBOg l 1 CAN'T. MAMA' M R*P'-?iT -.„ ,7 FQ *<$< Mjffl i re* nprv CESTS |^-T AN HOUR hffi THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS AH THESC'5 ICCA-NOW LST MB BSE Wi-I=?g ,: AtANT vou I TO PUT iT13 F^ **J **" % " LJ *> % **> TWB I > PltuW' Tr>>-we COULDN'T c* I Sf TUB PILLOWS MOM ^ > rr PENTALUX GLOSS FOR EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR USE 'ENTALU* <*LSS FINISH <:**&,. .-. .€T.*19M ....... #**: % % % % % %  %  < % %  %  Wr' Gums Bleed! Tf*m maan lit •> •••" %  f+IuZlZm Araonn ;r%  ••*•" WITH AN £xifce BATTERY ' o"H.CL .MDU COLOURS YOU GIT STARTING ASSURANCE AND LONG LIFE! THE VERY BEST IN PAINT OBTAINABLE AT ALL l.i:.\ll.\. HAHDWARK STORKS DEPENDABLE BATTERIES FOR 61 YEARS! IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE ;SPEGAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only w USUALLY Mushrooms, Tins 55 Corned Reef with Cereal, Tins 31 All Bran, Pkgs. 29 NOW USUALLY NOW • Floral Icing Sugar. Pkgs. 33 at %  2.1 Smedley's Peas, Tins 48 Allsopp's Beer, Bois. 26 29 44 •JO D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street < .**'r,-s'*-ttr>v*' 'm+srs'*'* : s,',%' r '*'S,',%'^ THE ADVOCATE HAS THE BEST BOOKS IN TOWN BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM SC""." AGENTS IN ARMS by MARY WINTER BEYOND THE EAGLE'S RAGE by HUGH POPHAM TWO SCAMPS by CEORGE A. BIRMINGHAM A WINDOW CLEANER'S ROMANCE by NOEL GODBER ADVOCATE STATIONERY ;-rlj =fflt BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES r W EEDlS mill Extra Spi'iiuls for tinCocktail Hour . HIM UTS %  iviniiinl i iM. In '.ft kf FamMV AMorWd Mltlr Pelll H.un,CBUrd I rum Frull Shaft fk> Cilnitr Nut Short Ck* IMDH < . kUII Water rrrm ITlfkrr, SHEET ANT. SWEET BIS, I TTS |n !" Tina Special l*Hlin M.n I nUnr I.JI '-. Attrrnuon Tea. In lib 11M M Ai-r.nl. II if Lang's ( h.n.iUlr Virniu M..l.ill.nr 1 in*'-, I tin -1 t\iI hlrRivfUlu In lib Iliw. MMfarUn* I-an' KvinJrrr rrawfotd' >u .,,1,1 Drink or with < 'arboPi.tr| BevtratM SFAOFR in K l Mi A ready mixed Martini \ \ -,.•( %  i w I l,i I i: FALERS'l'M 4P pef bo*. ALLEYJ\E A Co. ARTHUR Ltd. "YOIII t.HIMIIIS


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ENQ8MM618_0A4MXP INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:06:44Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02573
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES





PAGE 1

EMMY MVV I Mil n \llllAIM.IS AI)VU \TE r \r.r. FIVE N Caribbean Commission Opens Session Here Tinlirst meeliriK of Ihe taribbran Commission rvrr to be held in Barbados opens on Monday morning in the l.ei;i*liilivr Council Chamber. His Kxcellency the Governor will deliver Ihe opening address, welcoming the delegates and declaring the meeting open. Subsequent sessions wj]| be held in the new ranc* Room at Hastings House, under the Chairmanship of Sir George Seel. British Co-Chairman of the Commission. Tlus will Or the twelfth meeting of the Caribbean Commits! on and the first to he held m Hmbcilos although the UK session i f the West Indian I'cmrVrrncc ;.s held hot. in IH4 The West Indian Conf.ivmr is an auxiliary body of Ihe Cartb9 %  :ool wr treated •* Commission and its mo." >eteiit meeting was held in Curacao last December when Mr F. L. Walrott and Mr E I. Ward represented Barbados IIOSI-II \l SI IM.IOV Vlillmgtoi. Gives L^flure Keeital i ii -. id the start of Co to a tMUMtvl Hecilal giv 'iing in the Schoui Hall. by Mr. James A. Mnlingion on MM violin, accompanied by Mr. Geruli Hudson. Hr. MtUmgton and Mr. mbars of tne stan* OH U.uhcs Music Appiiciat* n -"d Vocal Clajaaaa, w iui. Mi Millington does Theory Musii* ..nd teaches Ihc violin Addendum The addendum for this •neriiiv: will have to be finally accepted by the Commissioners after the uf matttng '-pens .nd it is expevtcr. thai the main items for discussion bom nine yfaUl old to IB *"' ,n ^ lua 'be recommendations listened enthusiastic llj to the otal and appreciated it with the warmth it aeserved. Some of the items included In lb* inform 11 but well arrang* i prifcrammc were: Moto Perpetuo". t.v Boho, "Czardas" by Monti. 'Air and Variation 01 and "Concert., in C, Major" by De Bvn.it. Baton Mr MlUbigton played each piece, he explained its structure and various technical points. which were to be introduced, anu the methods of producing these effects on the violin. Mr. Milling. ton's masterly execution of th pieces showed that he has lust nono of that gift of interpretation %  artier recital years. The Recital, which approximately one hour, was the first tVCT to lie held by the school Major No.,n. Headmaster. \,,\,\ tne Advocate tli .1 DC Sri i'xui-it;ii> %  aad arUh the way In wbldi the boys appreciated the m I R l HDDm of Kensington New itoad h . be taken, as well as the normal review of the function* of Ihc Central Secretariat, which i .is it were, the Commission';; exacutive arm. An Experiment The Caribbean Commission mav be described as an experiment within the Caribbean on co-oper. ation across national boundaries Its members are thosenation* which have responsibility for non.stlf governing territories within the area—France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom an l New Books On Ma totharQ Show al Public Librar\ fram Page I The !' books—its m lion and 114 BOO Bi I thea* whicii ..!<• now on -l i u ,i ill be released to the public on Saturday. Books on exhibition i n clude books iji cricket and football which "ill appeal :. %  the sent %  boy playing these games On tn ampr*e~ n'naval esoCBMdi there U "Book Of Cm ket" China by Sir FYlham. Warner dr.lmg h with IwUflJL Heidin*. letting and %  buef look-over of baaj batsmen and boa %  :mportant Cribble's "They Kidnapped Stan %  the United Slates was planning to : that !to of reaching the warm waters of the Paeifte and Indian bg Heihert C Link: i Inriii %  t> W Burn. Pi raran of Medarn it King's College in the U of Durham FeebaUon offlcers will be clad Mi.it Sir Cyril Hurt's "The Itickttard Child" is amcug tome Oceans. i f ihe bc-Ws tcuchinn luvnllf There 1* nlio "Chilen of To tay" hy Kthe! DukM Dl AND MSB K KUCZYNSKI who arrived by SB Osscofne from Bmland yentenUy. The doctor is the newly appointed mediral offlc^i of the Qntrsl HosplUl Shouiri Taixis Hv. Ramoved Vrom Itritlgetown ? by any CCN could extend down to the Incoar () (it. i but it would pi* %  I'ndi uiKin the continent of AircWhlCh f"I 'he in %  %  lial is something that 11 and nil Induatn whal aver its nationahlv might —Realrr Make th.it >rcw realty tasty with hjai i little Marmnc Make it hrffrr lor you too — Marmitc conuins the Bi viurnins that build up health and resistance to illness. That's why i\\ so good tor everyone on bread and btmcr or in tasty sandwiches. SOU .'i'do SO much with Marmitc in •mips, gravies, sauces and savouiy dishes and Marmitc does so much tor good cooking. Ship Will Load Sugar At Speightstown latown It will no the A Sl'CIAR SHIP is expected to CJ.11 i in another two weeks to load for the U.K. second to call at this port this crop. A shipping clerk told the Advocate vesterdt) thai a ship, which WU expected to call for suKaY this week-end. was no longer expected The bonds in the Cit\ were becominj' conMestod. he said, and the sugar ships ciillmc Bl Barbados were first relieving these bonds. \ liattor to the island told the Adverale >i>tcul.o that there were still a few things in the local jarMB^rtul.Uon. B..I could M fa (;,.,|,.rul llos|>illll ,'; %  HUBBI bl w. ;... 1h,-L"'iSr..... |s T"" two ..1 itMi in ,,,k u-iibB ] &£S V7:il u iSLSSi'JS: %  imuld l>c parked at a centr;il \||ioiiili'il Sislcr Stater ..t the Barbadd MAR MITE The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food Mid" In England ; KV&ttV.: ? m ttt tt S&a.w.;' r v should ic parked at a centr.t % %  %  /*"., ( arklng area outside the City anil '<"H>it.il sl.nrtly ;i public (1 |i t .oe placed al the dJ. %  *• "I**"" J,mi Steel Band To Play At (f.K. Festival but "what he wanted was road repaired." One night hi and while walking along thli he nearly broke his foot in hole. He said that when rain falls the ponied hv hja secretary. %  utteri ara filled with water fur The U.S. section Is headed by many weeks, and it is very llsaaniMr Ward Canaday. President of lary. Ha Bndi it impossible t-> the Willys Overland Corporation •nlerate the numlicr of mosquitoes, of America. Me is the man who Hafts, residents of this road also developed the "Jeep", (General suffer great losses of stock during Purposes Vehicle) during the last When the fowl;;, war. ducks and turkevs are not .... ,, dr owned they dig of colds. Livestock Practices S IXTY-TWO MEN were present Mr C anaday. a mulli-milhnnat the Central Police SttU i aire. owns estates In St. CroU. yesterday to apply for tw„ vaemivirgin Islands, where he has concles In the Fire Brigade. ducted experiments in farm and The majority had an elementary livestock practices suitable to education to the Seventh Standard that area. while sever J1 were former pupils The other members nf the U.S. of Secondary Schools and about section arc Mr. Jesus Pinero. the half a doxeti held School Cerliilfirst native Governor of Puerto Inspector M. • Unmth. Handmaster of the "nlice Band. St I ucia. will take %  Trinidad Steel Band to the Fr.t.val of Britain Hv will comlu the band when it gives performances at the Festival "This is the (irst time man-' Europeans will be hearing Steel Band and it should be a novelty to them", a member of the local Police Band told the Advocate yaatarday, Inspector Griffith arrived In the island yesterday by B W.I.A. from St. Lucia intransit to Trinld id I -i> ., ,i in ,...ii oTdriver in this w %  "kl-"ii. foui of wMeh awn .-quiring: ;, taxi < oulcl "•**• %  '" ""' '*""'' s ' '"''' ,.,ii, phone ta it lht Adraeaai ,< terdai thai rv He said that where the taxi ire li '-' banafitted %  ireat deal %  1 preeent ps^riud, eould ba made ,l *' iralnlnj ai lha varl %  • to S irking arasu (or private cars pttala and apart fronti tru totoriata from Ihe Windward aapn-l. her lUj In Engl partshi could cull) park their bean moat iritereaunj vehiclev in Trafalgar Squiire and kt* those from the 1-eeward parishes Niuve Walters, left ll.nliados li at Bckwltta Place. Itil5 and entere.1 St Kai | %  •The nolaea al present made by HoaptteJ m North London when taxi engineand drivari chatting ha ipant tbreo rea iwai then vetuew woul %  ral iralnlng work and par) of nnnoy clerks on the business i„., midwifery training She ihei little room left for further „„, „ ., pl .„ ( llM .,,,.,...,,, h ,,..,„.,, the Public Huildlngv. he BBM ihe COmplatad her The,., should be no taxiviMikol honing Al II.is ho.p.tal sh. ked ai i t.iii nurse and tatet The sugar bonds in Speightstown ore almost filled <"p. Thw*ne and plftftl lO enjov ., short hohd... i her duties. Contact them." he said. R OAD WOBUM nleiing their laying of a pd built foleriu NO QUORUM At St. Michael's Vestry p|le Oft School terday. ;it Dougl.e St I'.r. i v. They were breaking the sur face u f the top of th. BUI H to linish laying the plpt Vehicles moving along that road had to be driven with great can%  ehedutad t< i yeslerday wai there was m %  Vetry whic. tang ptisja at 2 p. %  n in si/rs 141 lo IT Emh KM STKII'EII UNDER PANTS wilh I I.ISIM insrrls in w;ii.l and I MI M IM I Bfawi 2K lo :ih Pair *I.3J (OK (JEMS & BOYS ^jj^ "I III 111 li MM II II I .1 SILK ( \RVES_,ii(h irin B iInk from Wit IT It IMS III MSI ll( HI l> HINIIKKB HIKES—', inch hrni.. Erh ttc. IKNCOU STRIPED PYJAMAS (81M HI lo II ins.) Ptff Suit .', s-: IOYS' ALL WOOL BATHING .'XI NKS in Slniilr. of Maroon mill : >;.i Slu 2ii lo :III. IVr I'uir sj m CAN EPILEPSY BE CURED? WK*I n (Diieoii' *e o"ir kn " ,fljl m Bt ""^ "**" ,ovna !" feiiti at> .^. ..!... A hit iirhfked ntti lKi in "it)*! cam Ihn remjrkiftlp %  no.1 CIWS Inn rtm*'Uble rwfliciofl is (kicrittetl i" V interti: "• ~"t ~,. -,sr.ce lim* b|s it Has Jtlackrd ifisil|old 'Westj WecoM_^ I "*** ( ''ife-'d—sBssn'issin I Aaoaisi -v. "PITRIIVA* PIC;EOI\ CHOW wee a H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Di.mwo,. M %  % % %  aj % %  ajfj %  %  %  %  %  aj REPEAT NAIROBI: Kxhuen monlhi ago a bull liorcd n lurmrr al Niilill. .'I null., from Nairobi 'I his work Ihc same bull gored ' again and Klllr.t hiu mr run HUH 11. II Ol H HIIlll IHiHHIl s in it CHERRY CREAMS TO-DAY KNIGHTS I Plidt-nix Swla Fnuiilain I AVI SIIH'limil & III.. Illl. 10. II. 12 & 13. BRCAD STREET KSsP* ice//enf DRAHT8 SCOTCH W DANISH CHEESE WAFERS nei pkt -30 i UNCHEON Ml I i EAL .fH • '. \ SAl'SAi.K.S iici tin . IS GRAPES PI In:% %  tM, Small ... .29 i IM KUM ran RIM STAMWVL*. sroi'l A 0 00. LTmX






ESTABLISHED 1895

—

Russia Can Launch





“Punishing Attack”

Upon

Japan

WASHINGTON, May 3.
ENERAL McARTHUR this morning began to
testify in private before a Joint Committee of
the Senate on his policy for the Far East.
The Press and general public were excluded.
A censored transcript of the proceedings was being

made available page by

page for publication.

The General walked through applauding
crowds to face his interrogators. Pickets evidently
protesting against the hearing being closed to the

public appeared outside
carrying placards “We
ged hearing.’’

the Senate Office building
don’t want a Truman rig-

“Don’t cover up blunders with

secrecy,” and “Russia knows our secrets, why can’t

we?”’

"Attlee Denies
Reds Used U.K

Materials

LONDON, May 3.

Prime Minister Attlee today
denied in the Commons _ that
strategic materials from Britain
had been used by Chinese Com
munists against British troops 1
Korea. ”

Opposition members who had
intended to demand debate on
this subject next week are now
partly calmed, But some ex-

pressed anxiety after Attlee had
said some rubber was being
sent to China.

But it was doubted if they

would be completely satisfied by
a detailed aceount of goods
supplied to China this year, whici
Attlee said,.Sir Hartley Shaw-
cross, President of the Board of
Trade would give next week.
Answering Winston Churchill
Attlee said the future policy on
the export of strategic materials
would be in full accord with
United States policy not only on
rubber, but on other materials.
—Reuter.

“Tke” Would
Oppose Mac

NEW YORK, May 3.

General Dwight D, Eisenhower
would accept Democratic nomina+
tion for the Presidency in 1952
if Republicans put up General
Douglas MacArthur or Senator
Robert A. Taft, a veteran Wash-
ington correspondent predicted

here.
—Reuter.





“Monty” Sees Pope |

VATICAN CITY, May 3.

Field-Marshal Lord Mont-
gomery, Deputy Supreme Com-
mander of the Atlantic Pact
foreés had a 25 minute private
audience with Pope Pius XII to-
day,

Montgomery arrived here on
Tuesday for military inspection
and talks with the Italian Govern-
ment and Service Chiefs. He is
expected to return to Paris to-
morrow.

—Reuter,

Electoral Reform

TEHERAN, May 3.
Persia’s new Prime Minister
Dr. Moshamed Mossadeq, told
the Majlis (Parliament) to-day
that he intended .to introduce
electoral and municipal reform
besides nationalising the Persian
oil industry.



—Reuter.

160 Hurt In Smash

BERLIN, May 3.
Over 160 people were injured,
néafly half of them seriously,
when two trains collided at full
speéd at Frauendorf on the East
German Borna-Le@ipzig line last
week-end, the West Berlin Tele-
graph said today. News of the
accident had only just become

known, the paper said.
—Reuter.

Ben Gurion In U.S.

WASHINGTON, May 3.
Istacl Prime Minister David
Ben Gurion arrived here from
Tel Aviv to-day for a three weeks’
visit to the United States: He
will discuss Israeli-Americau
relations with Presiden: Truman.

~—Reuter.

TIN DROPS
SINGAPORE, May 3.
Produciion of tin concentrates
in the Federation of Malaya for
the first quarter of this year
amounted to 18,393 tons and was
the lowest since the sécond
quatter of 1949.
The export figure fo
was 18,379 tons c
18,914 the corresponding
period ir 95 -~Reuter









rter



the qua





for





Corridors were roped off and
posted with police guards as the
General entered and stepped into
a lift to take him to the Commit-
tee room.

The first leak carhe from the

Committee room when Senator
Hugh Buti! @r (Republican
Nebraska) quoted General Mac

Arthur as telling the Commit-
tees he believed that Russian
Forces in Siberia were for
defence only.

MacArthur said he doubted ii
Russia could have occupied
Japan as a result of the removal
of United states garrison troops
to Korea, Japan could not be
taken except by amphibious
effort.

He said Russia had the capacity
to launch a “punishing attack”
upon Japan though he did not
believe she could overrun Japan
until she had command of the sea
and air.

“How long she would be able
to maintain the effort in all-out
war there is of course specula-
tive”, he said.

is that it
I believe

“My own opinion
would not be too long.

that their efforts would deteri-
orate from the beginning of
hostilities.

MacArthur quoted various esti-
mates of Soviet air strength in
the Far East but figures were
deleted from the transcript. Most
of these aircraft were fighters.
Of these most were jets and were
excellent, he said. Russia ptob-
ably suffered greatly from the
lack of maintenance facilities and
petroleum supplies.

MacArthur asserted that a few
additional ground troops could
finish the fighting in Korea if
backed up by “full capacity” ait
and naval effort

Hé said his connections with the
United Nations were largely nomi-
nal and his channel of communica-
tion was defined as United States
Army Chief of Staff. He alleged
that his reports to the United
Nations were censored by State
and Defence Departments.

Earlier he said that he believed

@ On Page 5.

fighting between Syrians and

lier to-day said that four Israeli
soldiers were killed yesterday and
that United Nations observers
were in the demilitarisead zone
checking casualties.

He said firing was going on in
the southern demilitarised zone
where Syrians fired on _ Israeli
workmen in the Arab village of
Nukeib.

The bodies of 20 Syrians were
found inside Israeli territory to-
day, on the scene of yesterday’s
battle west of the demilitarised
zone, the spokesman added,

An Israéli communique last
night claimed that Syftian forces
who crossed into Israel about half
mile west of the demilitarised zone
were engaged by Israeli forces and
driven back, —Reuter.

O’Dwyer Replies

MEXICO CITY, May 3.
William O’Dwyer, United States
Ambassador to Mexico since last
autumn, answering accusations
that he contributed to organised
crime while Meyor of New York
City, said here tosday that his



/ critics were trying to discredit him

|for “reasons unknown”,
—Reuter,

20 ARRESTED
TOKYO, May 3

batons broke up



! Police with

| attempts to interrupt a ceremony
here



cutside the Im
to-day i

There were

erial Palace
rrested 20 pe





Leaders.

Order Cease-fire
In Border Issue








SEAMEN
REFUSE
TO WORK

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,
May 3,

British merchant seamen to-day
refused to work.

They made their decision at a
meeting called to discuss the ten-
week-old dock strike for more
pay during which Government has
de-registered the waterside Work-
ers’ Union,

In Auckland the main trouble-
spot in the strike, bétween 200 and
300 members of new Unions went

to work to-day eseorted by the

biggest force of Police and service-
men ever seen there.—Reuter,



.

11,000 Join Up

WELLINGTON, May 3.
More than 11,000 people have
joined an emergency organisation
following the lead of an entire
Dutch Legation staff. The organi-
sation was formed after the
Prime Minister of Holland called
on Monday for a force to combat
“attempts to overthrow an

orderly Government by force’.

—Reuter.

LIE ON WAY TO U.S.
LONDON, May 3.
United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Trygve Lie flew off for New
York to-night after his tour of
European and Middle East eapi-
tals. In London he had met
Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor-
rison and other Government
—Reuter.

TEL AVIV, May 3.

United Nations Chief of Staff, Colonel Benned De Rid-
der of Belgium, has ordered an immediate cease fire in the

Israelis which broke out again

to-day along the border north of the Lake of Galilee.

The duel between heavy artillery and mortars was
going on to-day among ancient ruins in the Capernaum
area, it was officially reported.

An Israel army spokesman ear- ——-—~



Dr. HERBERT EVATT

Evatt Retains Seat

MELBOURNE, May 3.

Counting more votes has not
changed the expected final result
of the Australian etections held on
April 28—a slightly reduced Gov-
ernment majority in the House of
Representatives and a majority of
32 to 28 in the Senate

Final figures for all representa-
tive seats and for pagty represent-
ation in the Senate will not be
knoWn for several days

Deputy Leader of the Labour
Party and former United Nations’
Assembly President Dr H V
Evatt, will retain his seat at Bar-
ton, New South Wales.—Reuter



ne

MAC ARTHUR OQ



RECORDS FOR YV@NNE

“
FIFTEEN-YEAR-OLD Yvonne

ceives from Mr. Albert V, Nyrer
an album of Jo Stafford records,



Ameri¢ta”,

dian to win it. Yesterday

Miss Stafford,

2,000 Dockers
Still Out nU.K

LONDON, May 3

among British arms workers and

dockers. Over 2,000 Manchester
dockers voted to continue the

strike begun a week ago after two
men were suspended, In Glasgow,
3,000 dockers were asked by their
Union to ban overtime until em-
ployers granted recognition to a
branch comprising clerical grades
and cranemen.

About 2,000 armament workers
employed in the Royal Arsenal in
London continued their week-old
stoppage because one worker re.
fused to join the Union, Other
workmen there have been idle be-
cause the strike has held up pro-
duction, At seven other arms fac.

| tories men have been working

overtime because of disputes over
pay.

eines la alates ear geist amensiisasastiasaee pelea staat Hci tanta tetisaediaisyicnemenaaiane



—Reuter.



Greek Parliament

For Dissolution
ATHENS, May 3



we

Investigation took place behind closed doors

x Y

ZED BY SENATE

re of St. Patrick’s School, re-
Consul of the United States,

“Negroes In U.S.A.”
Win Prize For
15-Year Schoolgirl

YVONNE PADMORE, 15-year-old St. Patrick’s School
girl, won last week's competition “What aspect of life in
the United States interests me
sponsored by Miss Jo Staffeyd’s Show. over

t.” The competition is
“Voice of

It is a weekly feature, and Yvonne is the first Barba-

she received from the Vice

Consul of the United States of America, Mr. Albert VY.
Nyren, an album of Jo Stafiord’s records sent for her by

Yvonne’s form mistress told

the Advocate yesterday that
Yvonne sings very well.
said that she likes to

listen to the “Voice of America”,

| Yvonne
and to hear Miss Stafford’s songs,



and the winning letters for the
competition read. The _ records
js he received were “Alone

| together,” Sometimes Unhappy,”
“Yesterday”, “Walkin’ My Baby

Labour unrest continued to-day | Back Home” and four other pieces.

The aspect of life in the United
States which interests Yvonne most
is “The way in which negroes
are treated,” she told
Stafford,

Her letter shows that in Fair-
field Cross Road where she lives,
reads magazines and books on col-
our prejudice and listen to the
Voices of America, she has been

doing a lot of thinking on her
subject.
“IT am always grateful to the

“Voice of America’, for the chance
of hearing how negroes there live
and what is being done to help
promote their standards of life,”
she wrote

She finds it a pleasure to hear
and read about the way they are
allowed to display their natural
talents whether it is in the form
of boxing, acting or singing.

She thinks much of how emi-

grants from Barbados live in
America. She calls them “Our
boys.” She said that “Our boys

brought back reports of how well
they were treated and how every
|man, of every possible race is

The Greek Parliament, elected| given a chance to make his wav

in March 1950, is to be dissolved
New elections will be held on
September 15. This was agreed
to-night between Liberal Premier
Venizelos, Deputy Premier Papan-
dreou, (Democratic Socialist), and

General Plastiras, Leader of the

EPEK (Centre) Party who togeth-

er have a majority in the House
—Reuter.



Calypsoes At Fair

(From Our Own Correspondent:
LONDON, May 3.
Mr. Tom Cook, Under-Secretary
for the Colonies, who visited the
British Industries Fair to-day, said



he was pleased that the West
indies stalls had received many
erders from foreign buyers.

A group of West Indian girls
led by Louise Bennett of Jamaica
sang calypsoes at various stalls,

Business at the British In-

dustries Fair to-day was not brisk,
but this may be attributed to the
cpening of the Festival of Britain
to-day by their Majestic

Give Thanks

GIBRALTAR, May 3
Thousands joined in a thanks-

Biving service in Gibraltar’s
imain square to-night for the
town’s escape when the British
ammunition ship Bedenham blew
lup in the harbour last Friday
\The explosion killed 11 and
jare missing
—Reuter

in life.”

When Yvonne gets hold of one
lately from America, she likes to
be told of life out there and she
hopes that some day Barbadian
women will be able to emigrate to
the United States.

|King George Opens

Festival Of Britain

(By R. B. MACLURCI

--*

LONDON, May 3.

KING GEORGE VI and his Queen drove in state
through cheering crowds to-day to open the
Festival of Britain, nationwide celebration of the

centenary of the

eat exhibition of 1851.

Millions of their subjects, many of whom had
slept on the pavements all night, jammed the streets
of London to give a wild enthusiastic start to the
six months long festivities, planned to show that
the country can conquer its postwar perils and

hardships.

In an open carriage, escorted by
horsemen of the Household Cav
alry in shining breastplates and
helmets, the Royal Family drove
from Buekingham Palace to St
Paul's Cathedral in the city.

From the broad Cathedral steps,
the King made a speech which
started church bells throughout
the land ringing, and set off
carnival gaiety and festivity in
every towi: and hamlet.

King George wore the uniform
of an Admiral, Queen Elizabeth
was in powder blue and their
younger daughter Princess Mar-
garet, who drove with them, was
dressed in grey with a pink hat,

In the second carriage was Prin.

cess Elizabeth, heiress to the
Throne, and her husband the
Duke of Edinburgh

; Many Fainted

Military bands played along the
route.

All the pageantry and colour of
British tradition were on show at
St. Paul's Cathedral, yeomen in
scarlet and gold braid, pikemen in
silver armour, Foreign Secretary
Hetbert Morrison — nicknamed
“Lord Festival” by Britons for his
part in spohsoring the big show—
and other Cabinet Ministers, re-
veived the King and Queen on the
steps,

s they entered the Cathedral
the crowd surged into the roadway
cheering wildly, Police linked
arms to hold them back.

Many people along the Royal
route fainted in the crush,

King Makes Speech

Television viewers saw the cere-
mony at St, Paul's, cameras being
allowed inside the great Cathe-
dral for the first time

Tugs on the Thames sounded
their sirens as King George made
his speech declaring the Festival
open. The Royal Salute of 41
guns was fired and bells pealed.

The King described the Festival
as a symbol of Britain's abiding
courage and vitality. It had been
planned as a visible sign of nation-

Miss tl achievement and confidence,

“In this Festival we look back
with pride and forward with reso-
lution”, he said,

“Let us pray that by God's good
grace, the vast range of modérn
knowledge be turned from de-
structive to peaceful ends so that
all peoples as this century goes on
may be lifted.”—Retuter,



Woman Gradually

Becoming Man

KARACHI, May 3

A married woman with two
children is gradually turning into
a man in Azad Kashmir territory
etcording to a report received
here to-day from Pulanderi.

The report said the weman
“very distressed” was attending
regularly a hospital unit in the

wea, The report added that hair
war growing on her chin and
upper lip. Her voice was thick-

ening and other male character-
igtics were appearing.

Medical men in Karachi said
raodern hormone treatment could
in most cases retard sexual trans
formations of this type,—Reuter.



Mr. Nyren told her that she had PARLIAMENT DISSOL VED

done well to win the competition.
He hoped she would like the sou-

AMMAN, Jordan, May 38.
King Abudallah to.day, dis-

venir album Miss Stafford hadjsolved the Jordan Parliament.

sent her.

Cuba Wants

‘ -—Reuter

U.K. Owned

Railways Nationalised

HAVANA, Cuba, May 3.

President Prio announced to-day he would ask the
Cuban Congress for nationalisation of the British-owned

United Railways of Cuba.

The announcement was made at the Presidential Pal-
ace after the President had reached an agreement with
leaders of two big strikes, one itvolving the nationalisation

issue.



But the statement which said
the President would send an
“urgent message’ to Congress

gave no details and did net say
when # would be delivered.
Two strikés by maritime work-
ers and railwaymen—were called
off to-day after union leaders
conferred with the President.
Maritime workers, including
dockers, paralysed Havana and
other norts for 24 hours. They
stopped work for a 30 per cent.
wage increase and other benefits,

and for abolition of already sus-
wo|pended freight between Havana
and the United States
Reuter

Gromyko Asks

‘Instructions

PARIS, May 3.
Gromyko, Russian De-
puty at the Four Power talks here
to.day, was asking Moscow for
fresh ihstructions on the new
Westefh proposals, observers be~
lieved here

Andrei

Deptities
day because it
| lay —Reuter

were not meeting to-
was a French holi-

Indian Party
Plan Split

NEW DELHI, May 3.
Prime Minister
bers to-day to try
re-election split
powerful Indian
ress Party

to prevent a
all-
Con-

in the
National

Rebels are threatening to form
a new “Democratic Front’ Party
which would stand in opposition
elections next

o Congress at

November,

Members of the Congress Party
form the central Government at
New Delhi and in all states which
jas an elected legislature, Rebels
vad already formed a “democratic
ront” last year as a kind of back-
bench opposition wing within the

‘ongress party itself,—Reuter,



French Commuiitist
Party Splitting

By HAROLD KING
PARIS, May 3.

France's new breakaway Com.
munist group, the “Communist
Movement” now listed as one ot
the country’s political parties, was
believed to have received no
more than 3,000 or 4,000 Trade

Unionist adherents to date,
Leaders of the movement, form-
er Communist party members,
issued a manifesto yesterday as-
sailing the party “for its uncondi.
tional surrender to Moscow” and
calling for the defence of France

igainst all aggressors,

Leader of the breakaway is 43
year old Charles Lemoine,
“The French Communist Move-

ment” started in the coal mining

aréa of Northern Franes where
coal, textile and steel Workers
have always been revolutionary

and nationalist. This tevolt is
in part against the anti-nationalist!
policy of the official Communist
Party

~-Reute~

| cette dtd aaa

purest and most fragrant

Delightfully Refreshing it

after-shave lotion.

Friends and Relatives ! !

K.W.V. Eau De Cologne
Messrs. Cave, Sheph
Moasrs.

SSDS IFISSE SOS 99SEC GSSSSSSSSSSSS GSS

POSE SOOO SOOO SSOS

Communists to
north. ES
The Fifth Air Force pilots
claimed to have killed or wound-
Jawaharlal} gq pearly 500 Communist troops
Yehru met 46 rebel Congress mem-| yesterday, 200 of them by a single



EAU UE

THs EAU DE COLOGNE IS STEADILY gaining
an increased demand Overseas. Made from the

and with the addition of purée Grape Spirit. it has a
lasting fragrance unexcelled by any others.

final touch to the toilette and for a really soothing

It is comforting and reffeshing, also, to your Sitk

. Bookers Drug Stores





PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Reds Fire
On U.N.

Patrol
Near Seoul

TOKYO, May 3.

A United Nations armoured
patrol northeast of Seoul to-day,
met strong resistance for the firsi
time in four days.

Planes operating with the patrol,
spotted other large groups and
called for air strikes.

Allied pilots had earlier reported
heavy motor traffic on North
Korean roads during the night,
when they sighted 2,700 vehicles

Communist forces encountered
northeast of Seoul today poured
small arms fire into the patrol
Tanks and aircraft caused many
Chinese casualties, the Eighth
Army said.

Another
the road to

Task Force patrolling
Vijongbu met strong
Communist fire 2 miles south ot
the village, its objective, United
Nations patrols to the northwest
of Seoul, again engaged elements
of an estimated Comn.unist
regiment. This time they © forced
withdraw to the

strike north of Seoul by land-based
marine planes.—Reuter,



Sack Acheson
Move Now On

WASHINGTON, May 3.

A poWerful group of Repubti-
cans and Southern Democrats io
Congress are preparing a drive to
force the dismissal of Secretary of
State Acheson. Many supporters
of the administration are appre-
hensive of the attempt.

The group proposed to deny
funds to pay Acheson's salary after
June 30, They _gven contemplate
halting the State Department bud-
get for 1952 while Acheson
mains.—Reuter,

a

HONOUR UNKNOWN
SOLDIER

ROME, May 3.
Soil from 800 burial grounds
came to the tomb of the Unknowh
Soldier
ERinaudi held
“peace and
hood" service.
Mothets and widows of the
fallen soldiers had brought smal)
urns with
tary Cemetery, from
the country ond from
cemeteries abroad

re-

President
solemn
brother-

and
there a
universal

to-day

earth from the Mili-
throughout
Tralian

Reuter



THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night



PCCP

;

COLUGNE

Oils produced in Europe,

is indispensable for that

can be obtained from
ord & Co, Lid.

Messrs. Bruce Weatherhead Ltd.

Messrs. Collins’ Ltd.

Messrs. Knight's Ltd,

Messrs. Da Costa-& Co. Ltd. &

Messrs. C. F. Harrison & Co. Ltd. %
x Messrs. H. P. Harris & Co. &
SOOO DPOF TCS OO POS SO TST VIS TOT TSS INST 00sSooe

SPRCPIPVPGPOO POPS FV OOS EG FES DIVSSSSSSOSDS. OF SOOSOSS OG DOP POOP GEOEPO PLOPFGSPS POCO SS SSPE

we
PAGE TWO

—





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



MR. AND MRS. W. BRADSHAW were at Seawell yesterday tO meet Miss Carin Oldby and Mr. Erik

Ohlsson. Mr, Ohlsson is Inspector General in South America of A/B Atvidabergs Industrier.

rived by B.W.LA. yesterday from Trinidad.

R. AND MRS. K. KUCZYN-

SKI, (pronounced Koochin-
ski) were among the passengers
arriving by the Gasecogne from
England yesterday. Dr, Kuezynski
has come to take up an appoint-
nent as Medical Officer at the
Genera] Hospital. His last appoint-
ment was Resident Surgeon at the
Princess Margaret Rose Hospital
in Edinburgh.

RS, SUIRE DE KUTTEL
(Mrs. ‘Lioydstill’s daughter),
who arrived’ from Paris yesterday
by the Gascogne will be in the
West Indies until July. Her hus-
band who {S$ an art director with
Phillips radio in Paris is coming
to Barbado& in July for a_ short
holiday. In Paris Mrs. de Kuttel
is a representative of “Lancome”
French perfume manufacturers,
She has with her samples of their
latest perfume “Magie” which she
hopes to sell in the W.I. after her
holiday here,
Mrs. -de-Kuttel intends visiting
several G&the other W.I. istands
before regugning to France.

Winding Up Holiday
Iss NETTE LOWMAN,
Distriet. Nurse. of» British
Guiana whd spent the greater
part of six months’ leave in_Bar-
bados, is now on her way. to Gren-
ada on the S.S. Gascogne to wind



up her holiday before returning
home. ~-
While in, Barbados, she was

staying with Mrs. A. Phillips of
“Alma Cot", St. Lawrence.

Trinidad Businessmen
R. K. LINDSAY GRANT,
Managing Director of Messrs.

T. Geddes Grant Ltd., in Trinidad
and Mrs. Grant fiew in from
Trinidad yesterday by: B.W.LA.
accompanied by Mr. and Mrs,
Cecil Hope-Ross, Mr, Hope—Ross
is Manager of Messrs. D. Hope-
Ross in Trinidad. Here for a
short holiday they are all staying
at the Ocean View Hotel.

Pre-retirement Leave
FTER working in the Govern-
ment Service for the past 33

years, Miss ¥. E. Inniss, of “Car-
lisle View,” Bay Street, has now
gone on leave prior to retirement,

Her last, fost was in the Regis-

trar’s Office where she was in
charge of the Record branch.

New Exhibition

‘Tl: next exhibition at the

Museum begins “today for
four weeks. It is of Children’s Art
from Great Britain and is shown
by arrangement with the British
Council. In an adjoining room are
examples of Children’s Art from
various West Indian Colonies
which makes an interesting com-
parison, The exhibition of paint-
ings by Sybil Atteck, the Trinidad
artist which has attracted much
attention continues until 14th May



Mrs. DE KUTTEL.





HE Gavernment is said to be

seriously perturbed by the
case of the butcher who gave away
soup, without ane applied for
a catering-licence. It is believed
that there Are many people giving
away pennies at street-corners
who heve‘no licence or permit of
any sor.

Said . high. official yesterday.
“There is nothing much wrong, in
itself, with occasionally giving
things to the old and destitute,
but it should be done through the
proper channels, after registration,
and applicgtion for form 1871/364
‘T.1/92/S/788 cd. which, correctly
filled up, ahd witnessed by a civil
servant, entitles the registered
applicant to apply for an inter-
view, with a view to obtaining
the necessary forms for the grant
of a temporary licence.”

Behind closed doors

MAGINE, detestable reader,
this harassed Commission try-
ing to decide what the Dorset
Coast Erosion Committee can poss-
ibly know-about the ventilation
holes in @ brimless bowler hat,

while the Wwemen’s orchestra
scrapes away at the Chanson
Triste.. We, bestial reader, you

SEB REHBE BEEBE HRHREHREE BB
36 in. MARLANE CREPE in All Colours

36 in. FIGURED
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.

DIAL 4605

ADVENTURES

OF



WAY...

and I, are debarred from follow-
ing the inquiry, which is behind
closed doors; but let us crouch
behind this pile of old clothes in
the passage, and prick up our
furry ears. . There! Do you
hear that? Canon Sparklegrass
demands that the Commission be
given a model of Fumbling’s



The

cloud Rupert realises that he is on

moment he is out of the
the wron; side of the hill, but he
can do nothing to stop the sledge
and betore he can cry out he is shot
head first into a snow-drift. Gasp-
ing and breathiess, he struggles ou:
and sits up. To his astonishment

CREPE

em tS Na 5 Se het SS

_. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

PIPA



ee ee ae, A ee

STRIPED SILK Assorted Colours
FLOWERED CREPE
DYED SCROLL CLOQUE

They ar-

First Visit
R. ERIK A. OHLSSON, is at
present in Barbados. He is
Inspector General in South Amer-
ica of A/B Atvidabergs Industrie
Sweden, representatives of Facit,

Original Odhner and Halda, man-| 415-645 p.m. .

ufacturers of Adding and Calculat-
ing machines. Accompanying hin.
is Miss Carin Oldby who demon-
strates the working of the
machines, At Seawell to meet them
were Mr. and Mrs, W. Bradshaw.
Mr. Bradshaw is his agent in
Barbados. This is Mr, Ohlsson’s
first visit to Barbados, Since they
left Sweden, they have visitec
Paris, London, New York, Centra
America, @uba, Trinidad and now
Barbados. When they leave here
they will visit the F. W.I. Puertc
Rico and Jamaica in their circuit
north. Mr. Ohlsson’s headquar-
ters are in Rio de Janeiro.

With Cable and Wireless
FT’RANSFERRED to the engin-

eering staff of the Barbados
Branch of Cable and Wireless
after a spell in Nairobi is Mr.
Norman E. Walter who, accom-
panied by his wife and daughter.
arrived from England yesterday
by the Gascogne. .. . Mr. and Mrs
Wilfred Alston’s son Robin, who
goes to school in England came in
by the same ship.

Lighter Side
N ENGLAND, a conference on
the West Indies is being ar-

ranged, I understand, by the
Council for Education in World
Citizenship. The conference will

probably take place in London in
June. The serious topics will
cover general problems affecting
the West Indies. And for lighter
entertainment Boscoe Holder, the
famous West Indian dancer, will

perform.
W.I. Tour

Oâ„¢ to Grenada yesterday wen
Nurse F. Udell, Chief Nurse
at the Colorfial Office, who is o1
an official tour of this area. Befor
she returns to Barbados June 2
she will have visited Antigua
St. Kitts, Trinidad and Britist
Guiana. She will remain here foi
five or six days before leaving fo:
England via the Bahamas,

Coming in from B.G. on Wednes-
day, were Mr. C. H. Burton anc
Mr. Cecil Jordan.



Copyright « P. 26 + Vax Dias Int. Amsterdam

By BEACHCOMBER

brimless bowler to study. “It will
all take time and trouble,” he
says, “but I, for one, am not afraid
of a dreary task in the service of
——" His last words are drowned
by Sir Archer (“Zipp”) Fastner’s
mocking challenge: “Oh, go out-
side and wash a rhinoceros, if
you want a dreary task.”

—19

a cheerful face is beaming at him
within a couple of yards distance.
Ir is the running hare. ‘* Well,
well,"’ chuckles the creature, ** You

again ? Have you decided to took
for ice-flowers, too?" ‘* Please
what are you talking about?"

whispers Rupert.

$1.85
$2.95
$1.80
$3.13
$3.13





DIAL. 4220

Bridgetown Players Again
LHRILLER ine Shoup at
Sly Corner” is the title of the
Bridgetown Players’ next preduc-
tion. It opens at the. Empire
Theatre May 16

This play had a long and suc-
cessful run in the West End of
London. It was written by Edward
Percy, the author of “Ladies.in
Retirement”, and a number of
other successful plays. Mr. Perty’s
real name is Edward Percy Smith,
and he has served as a Member of
the House of Commons.

The play is one of thrills
Suspense with never a
moment, Gréta Bancroft
Frank Collymore play two of the

na
dull
and

leading parts, but besides these
popular actors are several new-
comers, Mrs. Blaydon, Mrs
Charles Howe and Dr . Oliver
James of the General

Be

mounting suspense and horrors.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

6.20 a.m.—12.15 p.m. 19.60 M
6.20 a.m. Festival of Britain, 6.40 a.m.
Tuterlude, 645 am. British Choices,

i a.m. The News, 7,10 a.m. News Analysis

' 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m

Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. Introduction
to Sorcery, 7.50 a.m. Interlude, & a.m,
Southern Serenade Orchestra, 8.15 a.m
Worcestershire vs. South Africans, 8.30
am. Semprinni at the Piano, 645 asm
How the Writer Does It, 9 a.m. “The
News, 9.10 a.m. Home News from Britain
9.15 aim. Close Down, 11.15 a.m. Pro*
gramme Parade, 11.25 a.m. Listeners’
Choice, 11.45 a.m. World Affairs, 12 noon
The News, 12,10 p.m,
12.15 p.m. Close Down,

News Analysis,

19.96

M.



4.15 p.m, Southern Serenade Orchestra,
445 p.m. Sporting Record, 5 p.m. Wor
cestershire vs. South Africans 5.05 p.m
One Thousand Guineas, 6.15 p.m. Jazz
Music, 5.45 p.m. Susheela Devi, 6 p.m
Merchant Navy Programme, 6.15 p.m
Introduction to Sorcery, 6.35 p.m. In-
terlude, 6.45 p.m, Programme Parade
6,.00-—11.00 25.58 M. 31.32

M



7 p.m. The News, 7.10 pm, News
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary,
7.45 p.m. Think on these Things, 8 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m,"English Maga-
zine, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 pan. From

|

.

Hospital

prepored for an evening
|

|

|

U.S.A. arrived by the Fort Am-—
herst yesterday morning on their
as Visit to the island and spent

e

and
sid3, Bay Street.

Both Surgeons of Harlem Hos-
pi tad,

and spent three weeks in St. Croix
where
They afterwards joined the Am-—

To-morrow’s Fair

U.S. Surgeon

' HE St. Matthias Assistant
KR LOUIS 1 WRIGHT and Curate Fund sheuld do well
Dr. James L. Wilson of the from the Fair at the Hastings

Rocks tomorrow, judging from the
many stalls and side shows: that
will be in operation. Needlework,
household, cakes, books, plants,
ices and drinks will be on sale as
well as other attractions—darts,
hocpla and lucky-dips.

Incidental Intelligence

A AKING life a of roses

usually entails years of pre-

liminary spadework.

ay ashore as guests of Dr.
ts. A. W. Scott of Wood-

they left New York on
h 28 on the Fort Townshend

Dr. Wilson has a home,









helpt to continue the cruise and —Saturday Evening Post.
a w om their way back home. —LES

i



*



JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street -t-

~—

DRESSES of all Types

Ready-Made from London
Also .Made-to-Order

BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
COCKTAIL HANDBAGS

Upstairs Over Newsam’s





ASTOR THEATRE

GRAND OPENING TO-NIGHT 8.30 and Continuing SUNDAY
20th CENTURY FOâ„¢ proudly presents
It's Tip Top Musical of the year
You'll Swing into High with ~- - -

“FLL GET BY”

DANCES by—June Haver — LOVE by William Lundigan — KISSES by
Gloria DeHaven SONGS by Dennis Day — Trumpet by Hary James
and over 10 Song Hits.

This is a MUSICAL you will want to see over and over again.
MOVIES are certainly getting better all the time.

Saturday Midnight— Whole Serial “TIGER WOMAN”








SAMUEL, GOLDWYN Presents TO-DAY AND CONTINUING

4.45 and 8.30 p.m
with
ANDREWS—Farley GRANGER
Joan EVANS—Paul STEWART

Plus—THE MAC ARTHUR STORY

Dana





TOMORROW (Sat.) 9.30 & 1.30 (2 New Monogram Features)

“SPY TRAIN” & “MOON OVER, MONTANA”

Starring: The Singing-Fightinz
JIMMY WAKELY



the Editorials, 9 p.m. World Affairs, 9.15 |
p.m. Festival of Britain, 9.45 p.m. Dance =
Music,
Interlude, 10.15 p.m
p.m. Rendezvous Players, 10.45 p.m, The
Debate Continues, 11 p.m, Ring up the
Curtain,

10 p.m,.—10.15 p.m
10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m. Canadian Chronicle, |
11.76 Mes 25.51 {

—_——











#0 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
Light Music, 10.30

| PLAZA DIAL
| OISTIN 8404

C.B.C. PROGRAMME

TODAY TO SUN. — 5 & 8.30 p.m.
MAY 4, 1951

(RKO"’s Big Double)
“Sfep Lively"
Fimpk Sinatra
Geofre Murphy
Gloria DeHaven
Denise Darcell & Chita





Lex Barker
M,





Midnite Sat.
Cisco Kid in
“Beauty &

The Bandit” &

Gilbert Roland James Dunn



——

EMPIRE

To-day at 2.30 only . .
DARRYL Z, ZENUCK
Presents ;
Irene Dunne in

« THE MUDLARK ”

To-night at 8.30 and
Continuing





a n CE?

Across 20th CENTURY FOX

2 Split lip tn a coat, (7) | Presents

7. Where they breed toys? (6,3) hi tu

ig: enougn to see Sucre oe) Te LD. CLIMB. THE

13: By * ar 4 bhai “were juvenile HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”
efforts. (4)

14. You may take one any time but}, Color by Technicolor.
an early morning one is sfimu- Starring Susan Hayward—
ating. (3) . Sie 5 e

18 §, funeral pile. (4) i William Lundigan and

+ Merited. (3) mer, Che

18. Broken lamps. (5) Rory Calhoun

20. To the imp it means harm. (3) | a fee ee

21. Used in catching fish. (5, 3)

22. Depressed, (3) 7 ROXY

23. Provides the rag end. (6)

Sown || To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15.
See his Pop ? Watering the garden
: erhape, M9) ’ 1 20th Century Fox Double

2 ne-eyed giant. (7) }

3 Some scrap. (4) ‘ a f

4. Post this, after dinner. (8> Dan DAILEY and

5 At this you will testify, (4) Ann BAXTER in

6. Supporter. (8) z
8. Hip as dry as a crulser’s birth- “cc YOURE MY
lace, (8)

v 3p class, (5) a 7 7 ri ”

10. Bring aid a different way (8) EVERYTHING

15. Change for ® rupee. (5) and '

19 Somebody's son, (3) %

Solution of yesterday's “SIDE STREET”

2. Whistle 8, V-sien

Meanest, 154. Irk — Starring —





Inn, 19, Ele



Farley GRANGER and
Cathy O’Donnell

\ CE eo ee

GLOBE

OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 and Continuing

“THE MIGHTIEST WAR DRAMA
EVER SCREENED...IT RIPS THE *
HEART TO SHREDS AND TATTERS”

N.Y, Journal American

act C QUIET 8 0

Attention: 9, Stranie:
Tier: 16. Nine; 18
Ran.














From ERICH MARIA REMARQUE'S novel - Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE

Plus: LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
Willie IML ........6- ses . STAR DUST.

Walter Burke ............ SO .IN LOVE.

Frances Hypolite .. . SONG OF SONGS.
Ken Buch .. : ils 44a

Phyllis Scott .... TENNESSEE WALTZ.

ore RaeieW . WILDEST GAL IN TOWN.

GUEST STARS:

Gerald Daisley & Phyllis Collymore
TICKETS on Sale TO.DAY & TONITE

Chester Holder



STOP THAT LEAK
IN YOUR ROOF NOW

We offer
EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
RED CEDAR SHINGLES
ROLL ROOFING — Plain !
ROLL ROOFING — Red :
PITCH PINE
DOUGLAS FIR

-

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LYFD.

DIAL 4610



LUMBER DEPARTMENT











- ——_——



“Tarzan & the
Slave Girl”

Vanessa Brown





5th (Monogram Double)

“The Living Ghost’







PSE SSS





GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James

t



MAT. SUN. 5 p.m.

Warner's Classic Technicolor
. Adventure !

THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT

with Shirley Temple, Barry Fitz-

gerald, Lon McAllister





Midnite Saturday 5th (Monogram)

“Call of the Jungle” & Tom Keene in

Ann Cirio “Driftin’ Kid”





——4

ROYAL

To-day to Sunday 4.30 and
8.30.

Republic Smashing Double,
Robert Rockwell and Bar-

bra Fuller in. .. .
* TRIAL WITHOUT
JURY ”

and

« HOMICIDE FOR
THREE ”

Starring

Long and Warren
Douglas.

OLYMPIC

To-day to Sunday, 4.30 and

Audry

8.15.
M.G.M. and Fox Action
Double
Dana Andrews and Gene
Tierney in

“ WHERE THE
SIDEWALK ENDS”
— and —

“ BATAAN ”

Robert Taylor and Lloyd
Nolan (Bataan) not suitable
for Children.

TODAY TO SUN. — 8,30 p.m.



FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

ee tS



ng

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
‘ MATINEES: TO-DAY & TC.MORERO Wat 5 pm
10-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30

JAMES STEWART
“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”





with RICHARD CONTE — LEE J. COBB — HELEN WALKER
A 20th Century-Fox Picture.



|

: |












out of the Blue Ridge
hills of Georgia
.-.and now bring
you this great,
authentic



SUSAN HAYWARD - WILLIAM LUNDIGAN 20: 4

Drvcted by Henry King Produced by Lamar !rotti

TO-DAY at 6.30

and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30





HERE WITHOUT SHAME .... IS THE NAKED
TRUTH ABOUT A BOY, A GIRL AND A







The Devil need only
whisper... to

those who would
Pee, listen!

Extra! Extra!




SAMUEL
GOLDWYN

who brought you America’s
most popular picture,



“TUE ve LOM: Ey ee
Mac ARTHUR | "BQGE oF.
STORY” 50™..



storing DANA ANDREWS

FARLEY GRANGER + JOAN EVANS
with ROBERT KEITH * PAUL STEWART
MALA POWERS * ADELE JETCENS
Disected by Mark Robson « Screen Play by Pillip Yerdsa
Based on the Novel by Leo Brady
Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.

First occupation Chief in
Japan’s 2,000 year history!

One of the timeliest Shorts
ever offered the public. ...





Playing TO-DAY “Friday” May 4th (3 Shows)
2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
And Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

BRIDGETOWRN





THE MOST

POPULAR PLAZA DIAL
CINEMA 2310
IN TOWN







COMING SHORTLY: (Warner Bros)

“YOUNG MAN WITH A HORN”



| EMPIRE THEATRE

SS
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)



SX

RR ORO DROID DEI

putt trbebetrtetstrtttrtt- Db bb Pitt ttt DP Pit P ILA ttt tr br brn trlrtotvlvt tn tvtvtrtntvtrlvtetmt tote ttrstrvtet~ttrdvtwtrtnttrtntnte

POIRIER

z
Oe

POD SSSS SSIS OO FOF TF OFE DDO OSE OPS S DSSS S PPPOE LPP APPEPPPEPE EPPA POOE
x 5
g
%,
% r °
: :
>
N x
x s
s x
‘, 7 . %,
‘ YOULL NEED!! <
/ A e %
Da
. Pa

x,

THE CORNER

664 44
POSSE COOP COS OOF OOOO

PHILIPS ELECTRIC
BULBS

5 — 200 WATTS

SCREW & BAYONET

AND

ELECTRIC LAMP
SHADES

BEAUTIFUL COLORS IN
BAKELITE FROM
27e. $1.29



STORE

SSBB O098 800000 56055566665°

PSS SSP SS SS GOCE S

s 4,454
PELPFLGGES SSF SEF LSP FLEE SS ESF

O44 654


a a

2 eC

FRIDAY, MAY 4,



“Looking At Pictures” |

1951

99 |

Mr. John Harrison, Art and Exhibitions Officer, British

LANDSCAPE PAINTING |
|

Council, gave the second of his lectures “Looking at Pic-
tures” at the Museum this week. The subject of the lec-

ture was Landscape im art.

scape like the portrait made its first ap)
the votive paintings of the Madonna an

background.

Landscape was not painted for
itself but was dragged in as part
of such pictures. To persons com-
missioning paintings at that time
a landscape atone would have
appeared as extraordinary as the
subject of a picture as abstract
paintings appeared to some to-day.
The landscape in early art was,
therefore, never the subject of a
painting, but it was tied in with
the type of subject fashionable
with purchasers. In many cases
the artist depicted in the back-
ground his home town, village or
countryside.

Haitian Background

Mr. Harrison compared a Euro-
pean painting of the flight of the
Holy Family into Egypt with a
painting of the same subject by
a Haitian painter in the Cathedral
at Port-au-Prince. The Haitian
painter had depicted what at firs:
seemed to him strange, following
the mule of the Holy Family was
a second mule on which were
strapped three brightly coloured
chairs. During his travels it
Haiti he met a family of peasants
moving house and there strapped
to the back of a mule were chairs
resembling those depicted in’ the
Cathedral. The artist had intro-
duced a Haitian background to
his painting as European artists
had done long ago.

Imaginary Landscape

Gradually artists began to feel
that there was no need to tie
landscape to the votive picture.
Breughel invented a number of
his forms in his landscapes. He
picked up pebbles and stones and
with tnese built up an imaginary
landscape on his studio table from
which he painted. Leonardo da
Vinci recommended the study of
the shapes of damp patches on
walls until mountains, rocks and
waterfalls could be imagined.





Leonardo's landscapes were
almost wholly imaginary; nowhere
in nature within reach of the

artist did such landscapes exist.
This school of imaginary land-
scape thought in terms of sym-
bols. Graham Sutherland, the
contemporary English painter, is
a direct descendant of this school
of thought. His boulders, moun-
tains and folded hills are highly
imaginary. He takes greater lib-
erties with nature than did the
early painters. His symbols are
real in nature, unlike the painters
of the studio table, but his
imagination plays upon them until
he creates from them an imagin-
ary landscape

Another type of imaginary
landseupe was that based on 4
romantic conception of the
ancient world which Was influ-
enced largely by Roman ruins.
Claude le Lorrain painted pic-
tures of imaginary ports and

towns based on such dreamy ideas.
Gradually this school of painting
applied the same notions to the
towns of its day. It depicted
beautiful and romantic cities
whose qualities as sueh were
exaggerated, It was a poetic ren.
dering: instead of the artist
imagining a landscape, he roman-
ticised the scene that lay before
him.

Revolution In Landscape

Not all landscape was treated
in this glittering fashion. In
England a love of flowers led to
a love of detail in landscape.
This appeared first in English
needlework, and reached its peak
in Carolean embroidery. The
English school of topographical]
artists was the natural outcome
of this influence: factual repre-
sentation and detail now became
of immense importance,

Early in the 19th century the
English painter Constable effected
a revolution in landscape painting,
which had recently come to be
recognised as a form of art. Con-
stable and Bonnington both
formed links between painting in

England and France, and they
influenced art on both sides of
Channel.

Pure Subject

The French Impressionists
effected a further revolution in
landscape painting. Claude Monet
painted scenes at various times of
the day—since light was con-
stantly changing in intensity and
colour. He registered a visual
impression of a scene at a certain
time in the same way that the
cemera registers a scene at 2
given moment. The impressionists,
however, painted only impressions
of scenes not photographic detail.

Landscape now became a pure
subject in art, for an_ ordinary
piece of land or a cornfield became
an interesting and _ individual

~~

W//

\\\

painting by suggested shapes and
Seca tg ae ee LEY

Mr. Harrison said that land-
arance in art in
the Saints in the

Children’s Art
From Great Britain

Dr. «Herbert Reed, the Art
critic, has written an interesting
introduction to the Exhibition of



Children’s Art from Britain
which opens at the Museum today
(Friday.)

“Though the art of children

may reflect the peculiarities of
their environment and mode of
life, it has nowhere any specifi-
cally national character, The
child expresses universal charac
teristics of human psyche, as yet!
unspoilt by social conventions and
academic prejudicés. It follows
that, to those visitors who are
familiar with the art of the
children of their own countries,
these drawings from Great
Britain will not strike any
startling note of originality. It
is not in the nature of the child to
be “original”, but only to express
directly its own individuality; the
individuality of a seeing and
feeling being, but not the origin-
ality of a thifking and inventing
being. It is an important distinc-
tion, and we know now that the
faults of the old methods of teach-
ing art were due to this false
bias. The child was called upon
to use faculties of observation
and analysis quite foreign to the
pre-adolescent stage of mentct
development,



Aim Is Enjoyment

The new methods which have
met with such success do not
necessarily exclude observation
and analysis—there are flower-
studies and )Jandscape sketches in
the present exhibition which
reveal quite extraordinary powers
of this kind. But the aim of the
new methods is to secure at all
costs the child’s enjoyment of
this plastic activity which is the
handling of a pencil or brush and
the exploitation of colours, This
can only be done by allowing the
activity to become an instinctive
one—which means, in_ effect,
allowing the child to discover its
own potentialities. The principa!
role of the teacher becomes sug-
gestive. What is before all
necessary is to create an atmos
phere which will induce the child
to exteriorize the rich and vivid
imagery in its mind, This
involves, in its positive aspect,
the creation of self-confidence in
the child; but there is a negative.
or rather a preventive aspeci,
which calls for ¢ven greater skill
and tact in the teacher. The
child is an imitative animal, and
picks up with incredible ease,
not only any idiosynerasies which
the teacher, as an artist, may pos-
sess, but also the more widely
distributed sophistications of
books, magazines and films. It is
impossible altogether to exclude
these infiuences, and perhaps not
desirable; but the good teacher
can lead the child to a recogni-
tion based on pereeption and
feeling, of what is genuine and
msophisticated in its own work.

Self Criticism

The necessary atmosphere for
happy creative activity is created
largely by the children them-
selves and, indeed the children
themselves may be their own
best critics. At some _ schools
represented in the exhibition a
highly successful system of group

criticism has been evolved by
the teachers, which, far from
inducing self-consciousness of

false pride, is responsible for
the complete absence of sophisti-
cation in the children’s work and
for a quality which might be
called social realism—the sub
jects chosen by the children tend
to be, not so much individual
phantasies, but dramatic inci-
dents with a group appeai,

All types of school have contri-

buted to the exhibition. But any
classification of the collection
would bear no relation to a

classification of the schools. The
only ‘possible classification is
according to psychological types,
and these types, when allowed
free expression, are found to be
quite evenly distributed,”





the omission of unnecessary detail.
Cezanne added to impressionist
painting a solid architecture. This
solidity of construction was offset
by the vibration and movement
of detail, so that his landscapes
did not become dull or heavy.
John Nash brought to English
painting the order of Cezanne.



The Only Pain Reliever
containing Vitamin B,

HEADACHES
NERVE PAINS
COLDS
CHILLS
RHEUMATIC
PAINS $

Rak: LLLLLLL ALS

PILL LILEL LLL DD LD
Ss

s

SLLLILDLLI ILL L ILS

When you take YEAST-VITE Tablets the
effect is wonderful!
Chill symptoms disappear, and you begin to.
well / There's nothing else like YEAST-VI

— it’s the ONLY pain reliever which ALSO
contains the tonic Vitamin B,. So make sure you
get YEAST-VITE to-day.

RELIEVES YOUR PAIN AND
MAKES YOU FEEL WELL

“YEAST-VITE” is o registered Trade Mark

Pain vanishes, Cold and

OS FA nos EO I IT

ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY AVAILABLE

BEDSTEADS

CALL AND SECURE YOURS QUICKLY
— ALSO —

BATHROOM TILES Coloured

SIMMONS
!



Established
1860

T. HERBERT Ltd.

10 & 11, Reebuck Street and Magazine Lane

Incorporated
1926

}









BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BANQUET FOR 2.000 OLD PEOPLE



THE COMMITTEE for the 2,000 years celebration of Paris offered at the Grand Hall of the Stock

Exchange a banquet for 2,000

old poor people.

the plates to the banquet.—Ewpress.



What Will

Become Of

The Coleridge Grounds

By H. O. HUSBANDS

A walk along Heywoods, then
a look to the east, and your at-
tention will surely be attracted
>y what seems to be a row of pink
cubicles upon a terrace

if you were to follow up your
curiosity, you will find out that
you were viewing, in the distance,
the new Coleridge School near
Douglas, St. Peter, which is well
on its way to completion

Soon the pupils of the present
Coleridge School will be aban-
doning their rather small and an-
tique looking edifice at the Rec-
tory Hill, St. Peter, to occupy
this new school, which has been
built on modern English plans.

They will be leaving behind
them a fine—though small—play-
ing field; a playing field that has
been trampled by generations of
school boys; one where many a
glorious struggle at cricket has
been witnessed.

Many of the parishioners of St.
Peter are anxiously looking for-
ward to the occupying of the new
school. But, they are at the same
time wondering what will become
of the grounds and the two school
rooms which are now in use,

Questions such as “will we see

more cricket, football, athletic
sports and énjoy more fairs at
these grounds, or will they be

allowed to run to ruin, or may be,
to a place just fit’: for the rearing
of sheep and goats.”

Perhaps the best answer to the
question lies in the practicability
of converting the grounds into a
public playing field—the first for
the parish—or, to exaggerate the
idéa a little, into a country park,
using the two school rooms as 8
pavilion and casino.

For instance, the purpose could
be similar to the intended purpose
of the Princess Alice Playing
rretad, One will still be able to
play his cricket, football and ten-
nis, for that matter and hold ath-
letie sports and fairs

As the grounds are at the mo-
ment, they, no doubt need a little
conditioning and perhaps one or
two facilities added to bring

up to the “should-be” standard of
a playing field.

No club has been occupying
thess grounds for quite a while,
leaving entirely to a porter and

the school boys, the responsibility

of keeping them trim and in a
condition suitable for games. If
steps are not taken in the near
future to make use of the grounds
when the school is transferred,
deterioration of the grounds will
of course be more rapid,

It may not be thought advisable

to convert the grounds into a
public playing field. Then an-
other worth while alternative

would be for sofne cricket club
to rent the grounds.

The Coleridge grounds are
glebe land, that is the property
of the church. Apart from the
school’s use of the grounds, clubs
have in the past rented grounds
from the Rector of the parish.

The Leeward Cricket club (Sec-
ond Division) were the first rent-
ers of the grounds and they had
the monopoly of them for quite u
number of years.

Leeward relinquished the
grounds about twice during their
regime, the last time being dur-
ing World War II when the short-
age of petrol forced the members
to decide to dissolve their club,

Up sprang a young team_ in
Speightstown shortly after Lee-
ward was dissolved, soon to get
second division cricket status, The
“Winton C.C.”, who rented the
grounds from the Rector of the
Parish until they faded out after
about three years of existence.

Since “Winton”, the grounds
were only regularly used by the
school and, once a year, for a fair
Just a few weeks ago they were
trodden by pupils of the eclemen-
tary schools of St. Peter.

Many are looking .forward tc
seeing the grounds being made
full use of when the school is
transferred, It will at least add
another to the few means of pub-
lic entertainment to be had in the

them parish.



Korea Pact

LEEDS, England. May 3.

When the Korean war broke out
last June, the Kinne family had
three sons in the army, The
brothers made a pact that each
would volunteer to take the place
of any one of them who might be
killed in action.

‘Last October Raymond, 21,
eldest and first sent overseas was
killed, His brother Derek 20,

volunteered for Korea. .
Yesterday their mother received

her second fateful telegram.
Derek too had been killed in
action.

That leaves the youngest

brother, Valentine 19.

“I am not going to let my third

son volunteer for Korea too”,
Mrs. Kinne told reporters. “The
pact has come to an end”. — (CP)

3
—








Fleschinann§
New Ory Yeasr

Bernhard Reports
On Argentine Visit

THE HAGUE, May 2.

The Dutch Cabinet to-day re-
ceived a personal report from
Prince Bernhard on his recent
visit to South America from which
he returned last Saturday.

At a Press Conference held
later Prince Bernhard said he be-
lieved the President and Madame
Peron were exceedingly popular.
There seemed every reason to
believe that in any free election
the President would receive at
least 70 per cent of the v~tes.

The Prince added in reply to
another question that he had seen
no evidence of a_ totalitarian
regime in Argentine and that
contrary to reports President
Peron drove about freely with-
out any armed guard.

—Reuter.





r Am fe j

~~
Rey

ee

Needs no refrigeration —
as easy to use as old-
fashioned perishable yecst

@ Imagine! Fleischmann’s Dry
Yeast stays fresh and active
for weeks after you buy it. So
convenient -- what deliciou
results. Ask your grocer f«
Fleischrnann’s Dry Yeast.

For Your Health's Sake—tr;
Ficischmann’s Fast Rising Prv
Yeast dissolved in fruit juice,
milk or water. Like old-tirne
foil yeast—it helps tone uj
your system

SO EASY TO USE
1, Sprinkle into lukewarm

2. Let stand 10 minutes
stir



ater
The

When dissolved, one pac}

age equals one compressed yeast
cake in any recipe.

D> keep a supply on hand- |
Sake af 2 moment$ norice



Picture shows the waiters and waitresses carrying

Pool Coupons
‘Would Baffle
This Woman
But German Documents—No

THE first woman ever faced
with the task of editing 400 ton
of captured German Foreign
Office documents said to me: “I
should be baffled if I had to fill
in a football pool coupon.”

She is the Hon, Margaret
Lambert, 45-year-olq scholarly
daughter of Viscount Lambert,

the veteran Liberal,

The British Foreign Office have
appcinted her as their editor-in
chief of the documents. The other
editors—in-chief—one French, on>®
American—are men,

Dr. Lambert (she is a doctor
of philosophy of London Univer
sity and a BA of Oxford) has
token the job without knowing
what the salary will be.

‘It hag not yet been decided,”
said the Foreign Office.

Her predecessor, General Sir
James Marshall—Cornwall, who
speaks nine languages, was paic
£1000 a year, for part—time work

Dr. Lambert is expected to have
a bigger salary, as hers will be
a full-time appointment.

Expert On Austria

She speaks and writes German
and French as éasily as she does
English. She is an authority on
Austria, and during the war
broadcast news to that country
from the BBC,

In London Dr, Lambert shares
a studio flat in St. John’s Wood
with a woman artist friend. Part
of the week she is at her father’s
farm at South Molton, Devon.

From there she drives the 18
miles to Exeter in a 1984 car,
to her job as lecturer in modern
history at University College.

‘Read Newspapers’

“T shall have to give up lec-
turing after September 1, when
I go to my new work,” she said

In her lectures she tells the
students to read the newspapers.
“Model your essays on the terse
style that journalists use,” she
advises,

In her new. job she will head
a staff of about 15 at Cornwall
House, near Waterloo Station,

She will take her Siamese ca:
Phra with her to the office.

Phra is the equivalent in
ee ef the English knight's
Sir.

—L.ES.



Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school—gir1s
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-
Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must reach the Short Story Editor,
City not later than Wednesday every week, The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

tition,

Send this coupon with your story.

Name
Age
School
Home Address ....

Sete wee een eeeee

eee eee ee eee ee
’



: “m REG, $336 — NOW $2.50
8 BEDSPREADS — since
33 REG, $514 — NOW $4.25

*

To Mothers
who cannot

feed their babies

Don’t worry ! Cow’s milk. can be prepared sothat the youngest baby

can digest ii without trouble, Th
Barley prevents the milk formii

making it easy for the delicate dig :stive organs to do their work
thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later
in life. That’s why wise nurses and mothers always use Robinson’s

‘Parent’ Barley.

r=




Pr Labatt

vad





ee

Teer reer rere eee)

¢ SA
=

aa

ROBINSON'S

‘PATENT’ BARLEY



PAGE THREE



Overseas League
Gives Cocktail |









Party

LONDON, May 3
Twenty-two countries were
represented ata cocktail parts
which the Overseas League gave
to members visiting Britain for
the Festival.

; Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder



«+» 80 velvety smooth
«++ delicately perfumed

«+» Clings softly for hours



From British Guiana came C. -—
P. Ashurst and the District and hours, giving you
Commissioner from Antigua, Miss that natural vivid look.
F. Nordon was there. Australia

was represented by
New Zealand by 30.

Earl Mountbatten of Burma
welcoming the guests to Britain
said it was imporiant to realise
exactly what the Festival stood}
for, Britain was at present
spending a large part of her
national income and effort on
rearmament, not to fight war
but to prevent it.

There was no better way than}
the Festival of showing the]
world Britain’s peaceful inten-}
tions. The Festival was in fact!
an outward and visible sign of
the goodwill of Britain extended:
to all who extended goodwill to
her,

Mountbattens Praised

Lady Mountbatten also au
the party renewing acquaintance
with people she has met all over:
the world. Air Chief Marshal ;
Sir Arthur Longmore with w hom |

103 people

FACE POWDER
FOR THAT NATURAL VIVID LOOK



was

was Field Marshai Sir William|
Slim, Chief of the Imperial
General Staff, said no two
Britishers. had done more as!
Ambassadors for their country)

than Lord and Lady Mountbatten

Ashurst is a daily visitor to
West Indian stands at the Britiou,
Industries Fair and Earls Court.|

He told Reuter that he and his
colleagues are very Satisflea
indeed with the attentioa|

Caribbean
from
day.

Particular interest is being}
taken in samples of West Indian
timber, Most visitors to the
stands seem to be surprised at
the variety of things produced
in the West Indies.

produce is

attractin;;
thousands of

people ever,

~—Reuter.

TRADE MARK

VASELINE is the registered trade mark
fy. Co., Conn'd

. . .
Financier Dies
KIRKLAND, Lake Ont

May 2,

Hyman Kaplan 69 who under-}
wrote the late Sir Harry Oakes’
first mining ventures ‘and re
jected his offer to become a share-
holder in Canada's richest mining
property died here last night. H¢
built a general store, the third
business establishment in this
ctcmmunity, and parlayed enter-
prise into. a fortune from the fur
trade, He later owned six theatres
and numerous properties in and
around Teck township. He loaned
money to Sir Harry to buy the
Lake Shore mine property and
shortly after gold was found he
turned down Six Harry's offer to
pay off the debt with stock in
the mining company, Mr, Kaplan
#aVe as his reason that he knew
nothing about the gold industry,

—(C.P.)

Vaseline Hak |

of the Chesebrough M













Net

BE SURE OF

OVER felt

uw

Stigmata Marks



~—with the faithful
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 2. Gg a hha a rhe San
Stigmata marks _ (marks of ie phot org The Som

resembling the wounds of Christ)

Play safe be prepared,

about one-eighth of an inch in for your romantic moment.
diameter, plainly visible on ab Get a few cakes of DREAM
infant here, attracted a number TOILET SOAP, use it
of visitors to the mother’s home, faithfully in your bath,

The mother Mrs, Berott of shower and at the wash
Degannes Street, Arima, think: basin for a soft-smooth-
her devotion during pregnancy is clear sicin, radiant with natural
responsible for the marks. loveliness.

She claims she constantly
knelt before a crucifix in prayct
and supplication to the infant
Jesus for safe delivery.—(CP)

DREAM is available at toilet goods —
counters throughout the island.

T REAL
DSc of

xcs

fe





Advocate Co,, Ltd.,

S°VEOCP SEE OPEE PEPE PEPE
THIS WEEK’S



PLASTIC MULTI-COLOURED BAGS




DOUBLE REG. $6.70 NOW $5.75
CREPES — prain. & coLoured

REG. $2.40 NOW 51.40





NIGHTIES PANTIES
BRASSIERES

e addition of Robinson’s ‘Patent’
ig large clots in baby stomachs,



S. ALTMAN, Proprietor

30, Swan Street

» 1m Onn?
aa n 1% PHONE 2702 ;
” ' ‘ NG
V QOUPOVCCCCC GOVT VC FOCSSSSOSS OOS SG GG OO 9 OSG OS OOS
PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Trt)
by the Advocate Co.,





Friday, May 4, 1951

paren

TWO FALLACIES

AT a public meeting held in Queen’s
Park on Tuesday night by the Barbados
Labour Party, Mr. F. L. Walcott, a mem-
ber of the Party and a member of the

: £ ,
Executive Committee, attempted to supply | top of Suringin eee in which was designed by a friend of ace aa ag been} .0tice in the er cae ai days
; ; iri Piccadilly. The famous Reading theirs. The Festival le are " often by historians. For in-| .jp j rench Liner Colombie. seemed

a cordial to the drooping spirits of the | Room in the London Library, assuring the public that it will Stance, 1851 wagethe year of the ig Wee POOPIE ITE

Party’s followers. He continued to blame

: iat leading literary gentlemen have But my neighbours, who have Wales and Treland. 1951 is also aj: ‘ we found ourselves jin that boat
the big merchants for the rising cost of been sleeping every afternoon for been experimenting on the model. census year and some of the 1th instant wea hate ws aaa
living and told his hearers that Barbados | the past fifty years, is dismantled are not so certain. results) are already bein; yound for Trinidad wher B " NS M
had no say in and was unable to do any- | and_ being replastered. A few The Well-Dressed Man published. ; : morning. ALA A
, years ago the City of London The London tailors try, in their Alarming Census

thing about world market prices. Both of
these statements are fallacies.

é ; reclame of a Dior, They stage a disaster. It revealed that in the], i but anchored about
The cost of living rose higher than it | i Fle¢t Street, « a Se - little show to indicate the trend previous ten years the surplus of excellent landing stage 7 . : e
St. Paul’s. Unfortunately it is of men’s fashions in the year. It women over men had increasec | 1alf a mile off. This was a disappointmen«

need have done because the Government
of Barbados refused to accept the advice
of the same “big” merchants before the
£ was devalued in September 1949, The
rejection of their advice cost the island a
sum estimated at approximately half a
million dollars. It was because they con-
tinually adopt the stupid attitude of blam-
ing somebody else and preferably the
merchants, that the Government Party
today suffers from a lack of knowledge of

, been enticing us with decorative ))j # . ‘
world market tendencies. Si eee. At y ae ———— waistcoats and sult jackets with ae ee ceramics Dotted about the mountain sides are small siseia didi aie
There are a number of local business- | Village in Nottinghamshire the Tartine’ Saville’ ow bie tne million today, ~ irab looking houses. One wonders how the

men capable of giving good advice to the

members of the Government but because | to employ workmen are them- ae a tha ceca trode years of.uneasy life. It was founa | ould see no roads or even paths.

of prejudice against the “big” merchants | selves getting to work with has four buttons, and the outside ©% to provide the minority with o *Phones : 4472 & 468
‘ be fre : , pockets, both large and small ,; 5 , ri a4

the advice is not taken and the island trees and put new turf on the favoured at the beginning of the vies. am is now being regarded as| jangerous on this coast; but a British Com-

suffers. village green. Some counties century. The tailors’ annual per- USeful even by people who do noi

The. story of the goose that laid the
golden eggs is one of those universal
stories that any voter of Barbados can
understand. It is quite simple, You have
been spending the gold as soon as the goose

STS foaee es)
Ltd., Broad St. :



a



News From Britain

LONDON, April 27. ‘ z

The great spring-cleaniig By DAVID T
seems to have been left to the Y ID TEMPLE ROBERTS
last possible moment before the gir”,
Festival. But this week

; i there that the little tower of
are men with paint pots

every- has now been taken away

seaffolding steam~-cleaning
stonework. I noticed one man booms,
scouring the dirt out of Plato’s areQ small circle of young archi
beard where he looks I .
company with Galen, Archi- just
medes, and Justinian from

the original model of the

where Poet Laureate and other all be safe even in a hi storm.

promised they would take away shy way, each year to capture the
a railway bridge and so give us, y ¥ Cay

still there, but the City has put has always seemed to me that
a coat of green paint on it, and there are two main sources of
added a coat of arms. men’s fashion ideas in the world,

Lord Mayor comes.up-river and that they fight a continuous

And we had our first taste of the battle. There is Harlem, and
charming river scene this week there is the clubland of London.
when the Lord Mayor came up riv- Bright ties, zoot suits, the draped
er in his barge, in full river pro- line, snap brim hats, and tapering
cession for the first time. in ‘Yousers showing bright socks, all

sriginated among the negro
nearly a hundred years, to open CT ;
the new water-bus service that Citizens of New York. On this

7 : ; side of the Atlantic the forces
= hag he They ro of British good taste are rallying
putting down new turf gutsiae SHaiNst he post-war, storm. Ror
the National Gallery and Trafal- ; , $ iad

parish councillors who falled to

‘, Reg ; t
Het the village to pay extra money its long jacket—but very differen

spade and fork to plant rows of

are behaving as if this Festiva) syasion is effective.
were their own private property j, England are
—Festival of Sussex” is proydly
proclaimed on the South Coast. jn England everything has com-
Last Minute Rush bined to remind us of the affairs

The strange fact is how late in of a hundred years ago when
the day all this hurry and Prince Albert’s ancestor of our

Men’s clothes
slowly changing,
and growing brighter. This week

The truth of the matter is
irders have revealeq some
d the Mendelssohn, of
where, and other men are Up Skylon is actually suspended in
the mid-air by wire ropes from three
In the flat above my own
= scme pleasant but forgotten things
down in tects who are proudly displaying Of the mid-Victorian age.
outside the front door the MWS
Skylon facts that come startingly to my

A TEN DAYS’
TRIP

By E. C. JACKMAN

troversies of 1851, even the news
of 1851 as it would have been
expounded by a modern radio
news-reader. The programmes
curiosities
course, was re-
gatded as the greatest musician
in the world. But otherwise the
music of the week has revealed

The

broadcasts included some

A friend of mine drew my attention to a

in nd, Scotland

census 1 pleasant way of passing ten days, so on the

But the 1951 Sad to say, we did not make use of the

census was a

rapidly and alarmingly. Politician:
put forward the now forgotten
proposal that women should be
recruited to emigrate to the
colonies where the vast surplus o:
men—in Canada, Australia and
New Zealand, was alarming! The
census also. showed that the
population of Ireland had fallen
by a fifth in the previous ten years} Venezuela.

1s we had heard otherwise.

I had to be satisfied, therefore, to view
(Trinidad from this distance, as I did not feel
nclined to use the tug.

Our next port of call was at La Guaira,

Here the mountains run almost
of famine. The -sons of Irelaud ip of flat land
took the cheapest passages.to the jown to the sea. Only a strip

New World, stepped off the ship| about 100 yards wide is left for the wharves
at Boston and y settled there ;
That populatiog Sich at” fous and, warehouses.

The B.B.C’s Third programme

m their homes, as I
has gained a place for itself in five dwellers get to and fro \

more or’ less highbrow radio ser] The anchorage here was one of the most

listen to it regularly, There is so] vany has built a concrete breakwater at a
much that can be done with] sost of a million sterling, inside of which
broadcasting if it is organisec| , .

without the thought of necessarily] *91PS are Now safe.
always entertaining the larges*
number, The Third Programmer
has been able to experiment with
music that otherwise would no!

La Guaira is a picturesque port because
f the mountains that encircle it. In the old



FRIDAY,

FOR SCHOOL

PHILIPS’

MAY 4,

1951

ATLAS

and
LAYNG’S ARITHMETIC
ROYAL READERS

Advocate Stationery

This handy and useful device provides the

housewife with a new and simple method of prepar-

ing recipes with utmost speed and accuracy. The
“Balansa” can be used for careful weighing and
measuring or as a guide for those who prefer to

guess.

WILKINSON



& HAYNES CO. LTD.



C.S. PITCHER & CO.

sas ; oft bustle has begun, Only a week Festival was about to open, And . ; i : ; e e : . é fs
laid it, but you are not satisfied that the a Sebponeinat ponctte came from Lord. Samuel, the best wit in get a public hearing. New lays it was sacked by the Pirates, and th with Pp le asure
goose is laying enough eggs for the whole ; the Festival Gardens that this English politics, has reminded us moderns” have been playec} *rench; and later destroyed by the great

community, so you kill the goose only to
find that there is no gold inside, and that
the: poor goose had, after all, been doing
her bést to keepoun the production of gold.

This is ‘what Mr. Walcott’s statements
suggest. ‘hab by taxing out of existence
the big merchants who are also the “big
employers” of labour, the merchants will
be forced out of business and there will not
even be the employment that there is un-
der the present regime under which Mr.
Walcott is able to enjoy his present status.

fun-fair and amusement park how dull nineteenth century
would open almost three wecks costume was then. The black
late, Since then there have been “hard hat" topped off a gloomy
a few days of sunshine and a ensemble. One business gentleman
tremendous burst of work. The could scarcely be distinguished
gardens will open five days late. from his solemn neighbour. What-
One curious point seems to have ever the solid merits of the
been missed by recent photo. Victorian Age in England, it had
graphs and reports from the Sout! a drab, gloomy appearance—and
Bank. Most of the world has seen its life, soon after this exhibition,
photographs of the Skylon which was to go through an even gloom-
will protrude 300 feet into the sky er phase when the Royal Court
But most of the photographs show virtually disappeared for twenty
the Skylon in course of construc- yeal's In mourning for the death
tion when the bottom tip of this of Prince Albert,
sharply pointed vertical cigar was Third Programme
supported on a 50ft. high tower The B.B.C. has been devoting

regularly and the musicians of] |
the past have been searched for earthquake of 1812.
interesting forgotten compositions | ond busy port.

At one time the Third Programme
seemed to be floundering in a sea
of dull antique music and second.
rate verse plays. But in the last
year it has become more selective
and its masters have a better idea
how to experiment successfully.

It is now a flourishing

Rich people who have interests in La
Guaira live at Caracas — a large and modern
city of skyscrapers beyond the mountains.

We could not make the trip to Caracas as a
We notice that some other broad. landslide has blocked the road, A new road,
aoe, ee ee eee fee! more convenient than the old one is now

the highbrows — notably — the] being built.
Italian Radio has a “Terza Pro-
gramma.” The B.B.C.’s_ scheme
costs a great deal. But the listener
to regular services may count the

From La Guaira we passed on to Curacao,
a Dutch Island. Nature has given Curacao a





Again !!

PETER DAWSON'S

SPECIAL

WHISKY
















4

7 ders. In explanation under its third transmission this week 1 ¢ ; 7
The members of the Government will | {he'photographs, It has generally entirely to a ‘fash back” of a conoey welt evens it it relieves his| solendid harbour, safe and commodious. One THE OLD FAVOURITE g
on € . Or 0-
not study trade movements and market ri Fag gs hea el the. pe Pratine Fea on ee era. the music and discussions on medieva'| P28ses through a narrow entrance, and enters ‘cspnaein eee
tendencies for themselves, nor will they mid- music of 1851, the talks and con- philosophy. the spacious harbour. A pontoon bridge,

seek advice from Jocal businessmen. They
rely instead on advice and orders from the
United Kingdom, which come from those
who consult first the interests of the Brit-
ish Treasury and the Board of Trade and

“appear to be suspended in
oe eeneenieneneeaeaieoteieainiaant



Puerto Rico Builds A Folk Sehool

This American island in the West
Indies, although handicapped by
limited resources, is working to pro-

Puerto Rico’s overpopulation
and dearth of natural resources



known as “Queen Emma” kindly opens up,
and lets us pass into Willemstad, the capital.

I thought that Barbados had a superfluity
subject area come together at

1 wi eeks for ae A et
eR TS re of them. Curacao is a long thin island a few

i iti ance to be imsur- vid re educational opportunities approximately three hours. These i v
then the interests of the British West peer a eer etd to the pro- fay its peanls through the Plan Moro- blocks of time are used to pro-| miles off the coast of Venezuela. It is 38
Indi ao i 1 island in the YS. Programme of guided home vide general orientation of units] ).; ‘
ndies. 4 gress of this small island in miles long and 2% at its narrowest.

Sir Stafford Cripps kept on saying that
the £ would not be devalued. The Gov-
ernment of Barbados wants to watch care-

West Indies. The Puerto Rican
people, however, insist upon
viewing themselves as a natural
resource of limitless potential.
Foremost in this concept is the

tudy.
“By LAWRENCE A. CREMIN
From NEA Journal

ered fully equivalent to the

standard secondary programme.

of work and to plan studies and
collateral activities. The office
further recommends that general)
group meetings be followed ne
an extended period during whic

Oil tanks are very conspicuous, as oil is
sent from Venezuela and refined in Curacao.

J
of motor cars, but in Curacao there are sl



THE C. 8. KINCH CO., LTD.=—Agents



JUST RECEIVED
LIGHTNING

fully statements that the £ will not be importance they attach to formal ss The poet of ale plan, and per students can soaplt wan se : rey = sae ~ shops ihe compara- ZIPP FAS I ENERS
tion. The Puerto Rican re- haps its most radical departure, teacher and receive i ividual| tively chea oods, but an attendant in one
revalued. A knowledge of world market pets “his public schools with a is the technique of guided inde- assistance. ¥ ps

tendencies is an essential to a healthy
economy. Barbados, if it thinks in terms
of world trade and utilises the best com-
mercial brains available locally, will find
means and methods of combating the cost
of living. Running down the big merchant
is as expensive a pastime as killing the
goose. Knowledge, not words is our great-
est.need.

The-voters of Barbados would be grate-
ful meanwhile to Mr. Walcott if he could
take some interest in fish, meat and
fruit which are being sold at prices
beyond the schedule, and thereby force up
the cost of living, without influence from
world markets.

pendent study. The major part
of the work is done by the stu-
dent himself—away from the
school, on his own time, and in
large measure at his own pace,
Inasmuch as the initiative re-
mains with the student, the
principal role of the teacher is as
guide and consultant. For this
purpose, the central office provides
each study group with two teachers
one specializing in language und
social studies, the other in mathe-
matics and natural sciences. The
first task of these teachers is to
organise and lead the work of
the student group. Their most
critical job, however, is to nurture
the attitudes and skills necessary
to successful prosecution of inde-
pendent study. Proponents of the
plan admit that it is on the ability
of these teachers effectively to

faith matched by few peoples in
history. Through them, he is de-
termined to find ways to a high-
er standard of living. i

Puerto Rico, an American ter-
ritory, maintains with the ex-
penditure of 30 per cent. of. its
budget a public-school organiza--
tion much like that in the United
States with six-year clementary
schools, three-year intermediate
or junior high schools, three-year
senior high (secondary) schools,
and a university. Gradual ex-
pansion toward the goal of uni-
versal elementary education is
under way. Paucity of funds has
presented to educators a major
challenge to devise new means to
care for out-of-school youth.

Many new proposals have been
tried. Few, however, seem to hold
the promise of Plan Morovis,

asked me $40 (American money) for a small
porcelain figure. It may be that other
articles are more reasonable.

Students meet in a simple room
requiring tables, chairs, a black-
board, a small library, and (in
the case of science classes) mini-
mum laboratory equipment. This
room functions also as an office
for teachers, as a guidance centre
for students, and, where practi-
cable, as a meeting place for
community clubs.

More than any other kind of
secondary education, Plan Moro-
vis requires a well-equipped and
functional library. Such a library
—containing basic texts, periodi-
cal material, supplementary refer-
ence books, and dudio-visual ma-
terials—is of servce not only to
students at all levels, but to the
whole community. In _ addition,
the flexible schedule opens up a
whole new range of valuable, in-
expensive resources such as guid-

Our next call was at Cartagena in Colom-
bia.
Northern coast of South America. After the
town had been captured three times, it was
thought advisable to fill up the Boca Grande
(large mouth) with stones, so that ships
could not use it.













The small mouth (Boca Chica) is now used
instead, as it is easier to defend. The old city
was enclosed by a very heavy wall but it
could not keep out the ubiquitous pirates of
Sir Francis Drake in 1585, or subsequently
the French.

This port has the best harbour on the)’

The original Zipp Fastener that

always’ works.

Lengths and Colours

For

In sizes - Type -

that are

“JUST RIGHT”

every

service

in Personal

apparel and equipment

meee my which had its origin in 1948 in teach these skills and attitudes ed field excursions. e
© the post war pressure for that much of the success of their Although the plan is still in F 4 ‘
WHY N oT? increased secondary education— rerane rests. ; Tr experimental stage, the re- 3 rom Cartagena we had the long run to For our i ti
especially in the smaller com-~ Ithough the broad over-all sults have been encouraging.! Jamaica where we tie i setectton see ..
THE Secretary-General of the Interna- munities on the island, curriculum is essentially the — Teacher interest has remainet} o-¢ When it eae = Be peeve ?

i ivi iati i j as that of the standard senior spirited, and students have not .
tional Civ Aviston, Organisation recently Two alternatives were then high (secondary) school, the ac- only met curriculum responsibili-| the Hope Gardens. The taxi driver said that DA COSTA «A co LTD
announced the signing of an agreement, ] available to the student seeking tual selection of courses to be of- ties, but also have organized! rain had fallen in th Ki reli a be
the fifth of its kind, giving technical assist- | secondary schooling (1) the regu- fered during a given school year many co-curriculum _ social and n had fallen in the Kingston district

ance to Thailand.

Under the terms of this agreement
1.C.A.0. will provide a Civil Aviation Ad-
viser to the Civil Aviation Board of that
eountry and fellowships which will en-
able two Thailand pilots to study commer-
cial flying abroad in order to become
regular pilots in their national airline in
the future,

No such assistance has been rendered to
Barbados because it is considered by
I.C’A.O. that we can get such assistance
from the United Kingdom. Few people in
Barbados realise the disadvantage of our
status with. regard to international assist-
ance of this kind. The United Kingdom,
and particularly its local representatives,
are at all times unwilling to ask for help
for its possessions. They regard this as an
admission of their failure to do everything
for their possessions. Yet flourishing com-

lar high (secondary) schools— will be conditioned by the needs
located principally in the large? and interests of the students and
towns+which could admit only a by the nature of local instruction-
limited number of students from al resources. The curriculum ts
their immediate or neighbouring developed around units of work
communities and (2) a plan of which, although prepared in basic
free examinations administered form at the central office, are
by the Puerto Rican Bureau ,of nevertheless subject to the criti-
, School Extension for work done cal analysis of the student groups.
independently. r Ordinarily, successful comple
Obviously, many of those de- tion of a work unit will involve
siring secondary education could jnitial orientation and assignments
not be adequately cared for under (undertaken by the group in co-
either arrangement. Seeking a operation with the teacher), indl-
way in which to meet this de- vidual consultation with teachers
mand without diverting funds from and other. local resources. A
the elementary school expansion student enrolls for as much work
programme, public educational as he feels he can successfully
authorities, largely under the negotiate, and evaluation is built
leadership of Agsistant Commis- on reports of the teacher and
sioner Francisco Collazo, estab- special tests constructed by the
lished a modest experimental central office. Academic credit is
plan at Morovis during 1948-49. also granted for appropriate oc-
Out of this experiment has come cupational experience under the
a pioneering programme. standard rules of the central of-
The central aim of the Morovis fice, and all credit ebtalned under
plan is to provide the fundamen- Plan Morovis is transferable
tal elements of a secondary edu- should the student later enroll in
cation—with special emphasis on a regular secondary school,

its application to Joecal commun- Class meetings are held accord-

civic activities. There is evidence] since a small shower in December.
that the plan is producing excel-
lent academic results throughout
the island,

Plan Morovis has opened a
whole new vista to educators on
the island. Already, a programme
is under way to extend its meth-
ods downward to the junior high
school and outward | to non-ma-
triculated adult groups. The
Puerto Rican Department of Edu-
cation is also studying means or
transferring some of its educa-
tional assets to the regular senior
high (secondary) school. An ex-
perimental project will be initia-
ted which will attempt to involve
the whole student body of a se-
nior secondary school in a simi-
lar programme incorporating self
study. Finally, a significant at-
tempt will be made in the autumr
of 1951 to bring vocational in-
struction into the scepe of the
plan.

Puerto Ricans have developed
in Plan Morovis a remarkable
educational innovation for their
island, one that might well be












This drought had turned the grass into
hay, and even the trees showed signs of being
parched. The dust, of course, was bad. In
the Hope Gardens the Bougainvillea and

colour, The orchid house is worth a visit.
These gardens can be beautiful but the
drough had spoiled their beauty.

This ten days’ trip has a curious zig-zag
itinerary. From Jamaica we returned to
Curacao and then passed on again to La
Guaira. On the way to Trinidad we hugged
the bleak looking Venezuela coast all the
morning. The sky was overcast until the
East Wind used its broom to brush the
clouds away. At once there was a trans-
formation. As far as the horizon the sea be-
came an expanse of molten silver. In contrast
the deep blue ocean to the west still slept.

Cannae had been watered and alone a



Dry Goods Dept.



HAMS
CHICKENS

CHEESE





Cold Storage Hams —
avge. 16 lbs.

Tin Hams — 3 Sizes

Salami

Frankfurter Sausages

Sausage Roll in Tins

Jellied Chicken in tins

ity life—to eer re adults bing Meg a ae schedule eoeer. a in other countries, and Jellied Turkey in Tins «
munities like Ceylon are helped with Point | wable to enroll in a regular se- y students in co-operation with have illustrated in no small} This time we nosed the wharf at Trini i

i , . ; ; idad Heinz Soups (Canadian)
Four Aid.. Why not help for Bathados ? nior high (secondary) school. teachers. The central office re- measure their determination to ‘ Campbell Soups (Canadian)

OUR





The education provided is consid- groups in each



commends that

so we landed and had a very pleasant drive
up Lady Chancellor’s mountain road, so
called after her because she had urged its

solve their problems.





=a



al

READERS SAY:





4
pation: KEEP COOL
Radio Inte.ference tc use afiy vehicle causing elec- rect type of resistor is used, in If no notice is taken of this a sum- From the top one has a wide expanse of with these!
trical interference with the law- fact manufacturers now fit sup- mons is likely to follow. ; view over valleys and shippin
To The Editor The Advocate ful and tormal operation of pressing devices before their cars A motor car owner can easily 8. Bass’ Ale
SIR,—In your edition of the licenced wireless apparatus or leave the works, ascertain if his car is causing in- cae

~ ith April “Optimist” wrote very

~ =tfeelingly and certainly not with-

out cause concerning interference

receiver.'

The ordinary private car only



The responsibility for seeing
that the Act is obeyed rests on the
Government Electrical Inspector

terference by driving it to a dis-
tance of about 50 feet from a radio
receiver and then with the engine



Back to the ship, and away for Barbados
and the end.

Ieing Sugar



Guinness Stout
Worthington Ale
‘Canada Dry Ginger Ale



to radio reception generated by requires a suppressor to be fitted who has two cars fitted with the running, the receiver should ‘be If you are n i Sul -_
radi ( y s s , ‘ 3 ot a good sail tanas Steer
passing vehicles, in the high tension cable con- requisite apparatus for detecting tuned to the 13, 19, 25, 31 and 48 of this tri ill di 8 ilor the pleasure Currants

For the benefit of our Members ected to the distributor. The this offence. The cars cruise about meter bands and the resulting ae: Pre we epend on the weather met. Prunes PHONE
and other car owners who may suppressor is a resistor usually the roads and should a vehicle be noise will let him know if it is We had a nasty night between Cartagena Mixed Peel :
not know that this is an offence made up in cartridge form, lt heard transmitting a noise suffici- sufficient to interfere with normal and Jamaica, a d e-left Ki . Peanuts cr even how to, overcome the costs about 60 cents and can be ent to make radio reception im- reception. ebatetihet os » and we left Kingston in a good Anchor Butter GODDARDS
eae, we would advise them as aon eS few seins. a of possible, its number is noted and Secretary, Barbados Auto- imitation of a gale; but having regard to the sym Memcnag Powder

o 1S: n ading garages have them in a white paper is sent to the owner mobile Association. i i , ‘corations

Section 14 of the Wireless Tele- stock. They do not interfere with advising him of the circumstances ~ 151 Roebuck St., entire trip the weather was on the whole Gold Braid Rum WE DELIVER
graph Act 1940 makes it illegal the running of the car if the cor- and requesting his co-operation. Briegetown good,

terete nteianeaeeet eens
as =,

—



=—


FRIDAY, MAY 4,

1951



Caribbean Commission
Opens Session Here

The first meeting of the Caribbean Commission ever
to be held in Barbados opens on Menday morning in the
Legislative Council Chamber.

His Excellency the Governor will deliver the opening
address, welcoming the delegates and declaring the meet-

ing open.

Subsequent sessions wil] be held in the new

Conference Room at Hastings House, under the Chairman-
ship of Sir George Seel, British Co-Chairman of the Com-

mission.

Millingtou Gives
Lecture Recital |

> UPILS and the staff of Com-

bermere School were treated

to a Musical Recital given yesier-

Gay morning in the School Hall,

by Mr. James A, Millington on tne

violin, accompanied by Mr, Geral.t
Hudson.

both Mr, Millington and Mr.
Hudson are members of the staff
Mr. Hudson teaches Music Appre-
ciaticn and Vocal Classes, while
Mr. Millington does Theory of
Music and teaches the violin.

Boys from nine years old to 19
listened enthusiastically to the re-
cital and appreciated it with the
warmth it deserved,

Some of the items included in
the informal but well arranged
pregramme were: Moto Perpetuo”,
by Bohn, “Czardus’” by Monti,
“Mazurka,” “Air and Variation”
by Danclu and “Concerto in G
Major” by De Beriot.

Before Mr. Millington played
each piece, he explained its struc-
ture and various technical points,
which were to be introduced, ana
the methods of producing these
effects on the violin. Mr. Milling-
ton’s masterly execution of the
pieces showed that he has lost
none of that gift of interpretation
of his earlier recital years,

The Recital, which lasted for
approximately one hour, was the
first ever to be held by the school.
Major Noott; Headmaster, told the
Advocate that he was extremely
pleased with the way in which the
boys appreciated the music.

ESIDENTS of Kensington New
Road had a_ great shock
yesterday merning, A large num-—
ber of labourers equipped with
pick axes, shovels and drills could
be seen along the road and many
people thought the road was going
to be pepaired.

They however found out later
that the Waterworks Department
was laying pipe lines.

A few residents, near the Fon-
tabelle end, already have water ia
their houses, The old pipe line did
not run along the full length of
the road. Other residents at ihe
other end of the road, near the
Baxters Road end, will now be
able to get taps in their homes

A man who was living in Ken -
sington New Road for the past 25
years, told the Advocate that he
was not extremely anxious to get
water. It was quite easy for him
to send to a public pipe for water
but “what he wanted was the
road repaired.”

One night he.wasygeing -home
and while walking along this road
he nearly broke his foot in a hole.
He said that when rain falls the
gutters are filled with water for
many weeks and it is very insani-
tary. He finds it impossible to
tolerate the number of mosquitoes.

Many residents of this road also
suffer great losses of stock during
the rainy season. When the fowls,
ducks and turkeys are not
drowned, they die of colds.

IXTY-TWO MEN were present

at the Central Police Stati
yesterday to apply for two vacan-
cies in the Fire Brigade.

The majority had an elementary
education to the Seventh Standard
while several were former pupils
of Secondary Schools and about
half a dozen held School Certifi-
cates,

They were examined by Fire
Officer Craggs and up to yesterday
evening the number was reduced
to three. These three are now
going through the final tests end
two will be chosen to fill the
vacancies,
7JOHE MONTHLY MEETING of

the Combermere Old Boys’
Association will take place at 8
o’clock tonight at Combermere.
There will be a film show given







by the British Council. After the
show the Secretary will like to
meet members interested in
football.



Govt. Must Erect
Bus Stand Latrire

Rus drivers and concuciors, as
weil as many passengers, are com-
plaining because there is no latrine
at the Probyn Street Bus Stand,
but they will not get one until
Government decides to erect it.

Mr, E. D, Mottley, M.C.P., told
the Advocate yesterday that the
Commissioners of Health are con-
reious of the fact of the necessity
of more sanitary accommodation
in the City and they are working
on the selection of sites.

“As far as the bus stand is con-
cerned, it is so obviously necessary.
that a Jatrine should have been
erected ever since, Of course
sanitary convenience in the bus



stand is a matter for central
Government”, he said.
Mr, Mottley said; “I am sure

that the Commissioners of Health
svould be willing to look after the
sanitary convemence im the bus
stand when it is erecte?.”

As regards the two new refuse
couectors, Mr. Mottley said that
they are giving exceptionally good
service and he is jooking forward
to the day when the Scavenging
Separtment is equipped with all
collectors of this type.

CA

What is epilepsy? We only know that
since time began it has attacked rich
and poor alike, great and humble. Julius
\Caesar, Napoleon and Byron were vic-
ims. Epilepsy has always interested
men of science and at last their efforts
have besn successful because a treat.



N EPILEPSY

This will be the twelfth meet-
ing of the Caribbean Commission
and the first to be held in Bar-
bsdos although the first session
of the. West Indian Conference
was held here in 1944.

The West Indian Conference is
an auxiliary body of the Carib-
bean Commission and _ its most
recent meeting was held in
Curacao last December when Mr.
F. L. Walcott and. Mr. E. L.
Ward. represented Barbados.

Addendum

The addendum for this neeting
will have to be finally accepted
by the Commissioners after the
meeting spens and it is expectec
that the main items for discussion
will inelude the recommendations
emanating from the West Indies
Conference, (Fourth Session) .

These recommendations for
the most part centre around the
agricultural problems of the
Caribbean and it now remains
for the Commission to take
action in line with the sugges-
tions made on the Conference
floor by the delegates from the
several territories,

Other matters which will be
discussed will be recommenda-
tions arising from technical
conferences sponsored by the
Caribbean Commission among
which are the technical meet-
ing of Rural Co-operatives,
held in Trinidad, the recom-
mendations of the Conference of
Statisticians and the meeting of
the Caribbean Research Coun-
cil’s Committee on Wild Life
and Forestry.

There are also the usual mat-
ters within the Commission’s
purview on which decision will
have to be taken, as well as the
normal review of the functions of
the Central Secretariat, which is,
as it were, the Commission's
executive arm,

An Experiment

The Caribbean Commission may
be described as an experiment
within the Caribbean on co-oper-
ation across national boundaries.
Its members are those- nations
which have responsibility for non-~
self‘ governing territories within
the .area—France, the Nether-
lands, the United Kingdom and
the U.S.A, ,

There are sixteen Commission-
ers, four from each national sec-
tion. The British Chairman, Sil
George Seel has. with him three
cther Commissioners, Mr. J. K.
Thompson, Colonial Attache to
the British Embassy, Mr, G. H.
Adams, Leader of the~ majority
Party in the House of Assembly
and .Hon, .W.. A. Bustamante,
Leadey of the majority Party in
the House of Representatives in
Jamaica,

_Mr. Thompson arrived yester-
day afternoon while Hon. W. A.
Bustamante. is expected to arrive
in Barbados on Sunday accom-
panied by his secretary.

The U.S. section is headed by
Mr. Ward Canaday, President of
the Willys Overland Corporation
of America. He is the man who
developed the “Jeep’’, (General
Purposes Vehicle) during the last
war.

Livestock Practices

Mr. Canaday, a multi-million-
aire, owns estates in St. Croix,
Virgin Islands, where he has con-
ducted. experiments in farm and
livestock _ practices suitable to
\hat area.

The other members of the U.S.
section are Mr, Jesus Pinero, the
first native Governor of Puerto
Rico. Mr. Pinero is very aetive
in Puerto Rican affairs and is a
close friend of the present Gov-
ernor. He is particularly inter-
ested in housing problems and is
a keen amateur photographer.

A new member of the U.S.
section is Dr. Alonzo Moron, a
native of the Virgin Islands who
is at present President of Hamp-
ton Institute, Virginia. The fourth
member of the U.S. section, Dr.
Rafael Pico, who was here for

the 1944 Conference and who
ergated a most favourable impres-
sion, will not be attending this

meeting but the section will have
the benefit of the advice of Mr.
Sol Luis Descartes, Treasurer of
Puerto Rico and Chairman of the
Caribbean Research Council.

French Section

The French section is led by
Baron Edmund Petit de Beauver-
ger, the French Ambassador to
Cuba and a man of considerable
experience in the French Over-
seas Service.

He. will be supported by Mr.
Gabriel Van Laethem, Secretary
to the French Embassy at Wash-
ington. Mr. Louis Feuillard,
engineer of the Guadeloupe Pub-
lic Works and Mr. Antoine
Wiliord, Head of the First Divi-
sion Of \the. Prefecture at Mar-
“tinique. ~

Dr. Hendrik Riemens, Minister
of the Netherlands in Venezuela,
is Netherland Co-Chairman, Dr.
Riemens was formerly Counsellor
to the Netherlands Embassy to
the United Nations at Lake Suc-
cess and presided at the recent
West Indian Conference when his
tact and ability were highly
acclaimed by the delegates.

The others in the Dutch section
are Dr. C. De la Try Ellie,
formerly President of the High
Court of Justice, Curacao; Jonk-
heer, Quarless Van Ufford, Sec-
retary to the Netherlands
Embassy in Washington and Mr.
C. H. H, Jongbow. of Surinam.

BE C

ment has been found tha’




relieves at-

tacks in most cases. This remarkable ’

medicine is described in an interesting
booklet entitled “Can Epilepsy be
Cured?” This booklet is given away free
to epileptics. Anyone suffering from
this disease should request a free copy

wie EDUCATION AL DIVISION Seabee ET OSL
-—

Sr ‘AL DIVISION, Dept jergen Ave., Jersey City, S.A.

HE EDUCATION - A

! Please send saa « copy of the free booklet entitled “Can Epilepsy be Cured? E. 107 '
i eae ee eae pee eed aee nsec ewe rete ree eseereereeseeereseees Seer tee

1 NAME steteneee nesses’ ~ (For clarity, please print) ; :
Ole os. A .asscoonee Spestenensncscncecessssssesasnensasanenastvesisbnesacersduanetatl '
8 city - COUNTRY ......---00s0-nsenceeresseresees

BARBADOS



HOSPITAL SURGEON



DR AND MBS. K. KUCZYNSKI who arrived by 5.5. Gascogne from

Bngland yesterday.
of the General Hospital,

The doctor is the\newly appointed medical officer

‘Ship Will Load Sugar
At Speightstown

A SUGAR SHIP is expected to call at ©peightstown

in another two weeks to load for the U.K.

It will be the

second to call at this port this crop,

A shipping clerk told the Advocate yesterday that a
ship, which was expected to call for sugar this week-end,
was no longer expected. The bonds in the City were be-
coming congested, he said, and the sugar ships calling at

Steel Band
To Play At
U.K. Festival

Inspector M. «.
master of the Volice Band, St
Iucia, will take » Trinidad Steel
Band to the Festival of Britain
He will conduct the band when

Grimth, Band-

it gives performances at the
Festival,
“This is the first time manv

Europeans will be hearing a Steel
Band and it should be a novelty
to them”, a member of the local
Police Band told the Advocate
yesterday.

‘Inspector Griffith arrived in the
island yesterday by B.W.1,A. from
St. Lucia intransit to Trinidad,



Inspector M. GRIFFITH
While here he called atthe local

Band Headquarters for a few
hours to look up his old friend
Sgt. Archer, who on many
eecasions has acted as conductor
of the local Band.

Sgt. Archer told the Advocate
that Inspector Griffith was once a
member of the Barbados Police
Band. He left the island and
joined the Trinidad Police Band
where he rose to the rank of
Sergeant. Following this he was
transferred to the St. Lucia Police
Band.

While in England Inspector
Griffith will take a six months
course at the Royal Schcol of
Music.

Sun ZESS neh eeeee
“PURINA”

PIGEON CHOW

see

all. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.

Barbados were first relieving these bonds.
—- —-f

The sugar bonds in Speights-
town are almost filled up. The
bonds of Messrs R. & G, Chal.
lenor are already filled and are
receiving no more sugar. Messrs
Plantations Ltd.'s bonds have
little recom left for further
storing.

As soon as Messrs’ Plantations
Ltd’s bonds are filled, all the
sugar produced by the sugar fac-
tories of the Leeward parishes will
have to be sent to Bridgetown.

The clerk said that the three
ships which took sugar at Bridge
town during this week, eased the
congestion of the bonds consid-
erably. This, he said, may hasten
the arrival of another ship at
Speightstown, 7

BREAKDOWN in the base-

ment of the first mill at
Fairfield Sugar Factory, has kept
the factory idle for the past two
days. Workmen were busy during
that period effecting the neces-
sary repairs, The factory is ex-
pected to start again to-morrow,

HE COMMISSIONERS of
Health of the parishes of St.
Lucy and St. Peter met yester
day to decide what they would do
with Farrows House, Farrows
House is built partly in St. Peter
and partly in St. Lucy and so ib
is the property of both parishes.
The Advocate learned that St.
Lucy was willing to sell her part
of the building. This fact was
discussed at the meeting,

OAD WORKERS were com-
pleting their laying of a pipe
line to the newly built Colefiuge
School at Douglas, St. Peter ‘yes-
terday. ose
They were breaking the sur
face of the top of the Station Hill
to finish laying the pipe line.
Vehicles moving along that road
had to be driven with great cau-
tion.

ere FINES were imposed

on offenders by _ Police
Magistrate Mr. S. H, Nurse at
District “E” Police Courts this
week. The highest fine was £2
and 2/— costs imposed on Ethel-
bert Ramsay of Ashton Tenan-
try, St. Peter, for overloading a
motor lorry with canes, This fine
was to be paid in seven days or

he wiil be imprisoned for a
month.
There was also a fine of 25

fcr indecent language, The _ of-

» fender was Oscar Worrell, alias

Freddie Fowls, of Rectory Hill,

St. Peter.

ne eatches of fish
were landed at the

Speightstown fish market during

the week. Mostly flying fish and
dolphin were caught. Boys made
peeket money by hooking small
jacks.

©

<\T. PETER has had a very dry
Ss week. The rainfall] returns at
District “E” Police Station re-
corded only three parts of rain
up to yesterday evening. The
three parts of rain fell on»Tues-
day night.

HE, HIGHWAY COMMIS.
SIONERS of St. Peter are
carrying out extensive repairs to
tenantry roads in Boseobelle. The
road workers are under the super

vision of Mr. Erie Challenor,
Road Inspector of the Parish, and
Mr. T. O. ‘Harris, Road En-
gineer,

ADVOCATE

New Books On
Show at Public
Library

The Public Library has just re
ceived 299 «new - books--185° fic
tion and 114 _ non-fiction—and
some of these which are now on
show will be released to the pub-
lic on Saturday.

Books on exhibition include
books on cricket and football
which will appeal to the school-
boy playing «these games. On
cricket there is “Book of Cricket”
by Sir Pelham. Warner dealing
extensively with bowling, fielding,
batting and a brief look-over of
some of thei world’s best batsmen
and bowlers. The most important
beok on football is Leonard
Gribble’s “They Kidnapped Stan
ley Matthews.’ In this book
Gribble tells of the experiences
ef this great English international
sceeer player.

On West Indian
are “Highways Across the West
Indies” by Herbert C. Lanks and
“The British West Indies” by W
L Burn, Professor of Modern
liistory at King’s College in the
University of Durham

Probation officers will be glad
to know that Sir Cyril Burt's “The
Backward Child” is ameng some
cf the books teuchine juvenile
problems. There is also “Chil-
dren of To-day” by Ethe! Dukes
wend Margaret Hoy.

history there



Should Taxis Be
Removed From
Bridgetown ?

A visitor to the island told the
Advocate yesterday that there
were still a few things in the local
parking regulations that could be
remedied.

He ‘suggested that the taxis be
removed from areas such as Tra-
falgar Square and Beckwith Place,

two of the busiest areas’ in
Bridgetown, He said that they
should be parked at a_ central

parking area outside the City and
a public phone placed at the dis-
posal of drivers, In this wey
people requiring a taxi could
easily phone for it,

He said that where the taxis are
at present parked, could be made
oarking areas for private cars.

otorists from the Windward
parishes could easily park their
vehicles in Trafalgar Square and
those from the Leeward parishes
at Beckwith Place,

“The noises at present made by
taxi engines and drivers chatting
near their vehicles would cease to

annoy clerks on the business
premises, especially a place like
the Public Buildings,” he said.

“There should be no taxis parked
in the vicinity of this building at
all. Private cars only move out of
their parking areas about three or
four: times a day while taxis are
constantly on the go.”

Work Elsewhere

Mr. E, D. Mottley, Senior Repre-
sentative in the House of Assembly
for the City, told the Advocate:
“Those people who are annoyed
by seeing taxis in the City ought
to find somewhere else to live and
work.”

He said that he did not think
the taxis should be removed from
the City. “Does it not appear to
some people that taxi drivers and
owners must also live?" he said.
“Surely these people have never
been to big countries. It is time
that people stop being so narrow-
minded and selfish and think of
the other fellow’s plight also,

“These taxi men also have wives
and children to support and why
should they be pushed out of the
City, when especially, there are
few public telephones, if any, to
contact them,” he said.

NO QUORUM
At St. Michael's Vestry

The meeiing of the St. Michael’s
Vestry which was scheduled to
take place at 2 p.m. yesterday was
not held because there was no
quorum.

Among the items which were
set down for discussion were the
Committee's Report on the method
to be adopted for the payment of
retrospective wages for Parochial
Employees; a motion by Mr. B. A.
Weatherhead that the Vestry con-
sider the advisability of having the
Vestries Act 1911 (1911—5) so
amended as to give the Vestry
power to make rules to be con.
firmed by the Governor-in-Execu.
tive Committee, for the proper
conduct of its meetings; and
another motion by Mr, F, McD.
Symmons suggesting the appoint.
ment of a committee to consider
and make recommendations on the
question of granting a_ cost-of-
living bonus to Vestry employees.

Present at the meeting were Mr, F
MeD Symmonds (Churehwarden!, Mr.
T. Bowring, Mr. C. C. Browne, Mr. A.
R.) Toppin, Mr. C. A. Braithwaite, Mr
D. G, Leacock, Mr. E, D. Mottley,
M.C.P. and M. J. W, Hewitt



REPEAT

NAIROBI: Eighteen months
ago a bull gored a farmer at Nai--
visha, 50 miles from Nairobi.
This week the same bull gored
tne farmer again and killed him,

e

.

Phoenix Soda Fountain



a

+,

FLEES SOSA SSS SSF





J
POLEELOVECL LOOP LOGCC POLLO PELLETED

ELEC 00000"

Mae Arthur Quizzed

@ from Page 1

Russia had so cften repeated tha
the United States was plann



attack her that Russia it had |
begun to believe MacArthur |
said the “position of the Joint

Chiefs of Staff and my own were |
so far as I know practically iden- |
tical.” On January 12 the Joint
Chiefs of Staff presented a study
to the Secretary of Defence em-
bodying these conditions

“That we were to continue and
intensify economic blockade trade |
with China. i

“That we were to prepare now |
to jimpose a naval blo¢kade of |
China.

“Remove now restrictions on air
reconnaissance of China coastal
areas and Manchuria.

“Remove now restrictions on
operations of Chinese Nationalist
forces.” |

He added: “As far as I know
the Joint Chiefs of Staff have
never changed those recommenda- |
tions.”

Asked if he thought the recom-
mendations had encountered veto
somewhere, either from the Secre-
tary of Defence or the President,
he replied: “I would assume so,
Sir.

“Recently Russia has probably
had a new vision opened” Mac
Arthur continued.” It is the pos
sibility of reaching the warm
waters of the Pacifie and Indian
Oceans.

“If by any combination she
could extend down to the Indian
Ocean she would not only out
flank the Mediterranean of cours
but it would place her fair and
flush upon the continent of Afr'ce |
which for the next hundred year:
with its enormous industrial poten
tial is something that attracts all
commerce and all industry what
ever its nationality might be.”

—Reuter





Appointed Sister
At General Hospital

NURSE Ena Walters who ha
just returned from England after
taking a course in nursing anc
midwifery, will take up a post as
Sister at the Barbados General
Hospital shortly.

She spent almost six years in
England, four of which were
devoted to the course, She told
ihe Advocate yesterday that she
had benefitted a great deal fron
her training at the various hos-
pitals and apart from the nursing

aspect, her stay in England hac
been most interesting and enjoy-
able.

Nurse Walters left Barbados i:
1945 and entered St. Mary’:
Hospital in North London where
she spent three years doing gen-
eral training work and part ol
her midwifery training. She ther
went on to Epsom Hospital where
she completed her midwifer)
training At this hospital she
worked as a staff nurse and. later



acted as Sister at St. Mary's
Hospital.

The next stage in Nurse
Waiters’ training was a_ six-

months’ course in Tropical Nurs

ing at University College Hos-
pital, a branch of the London
School of Tropical Medicine, At

this hospital, she got her Diploma
in Tropical Nursing,

For the past seven months she
has been working at Weir
Maternity Hospital London
doing midwifery,

Nurse Walters returned home
yesterday morning by the §.S
Coscogne» and plans to enjoy a
short holiday before assuming
her duties.

in

"QUAKE FELT

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May 3. 4

To-day an earth tremor was
felt lasting approximately 26
seconds. The shaking and rum-

bling was of an intensity to arouse
most people and the duration was

lengthy enough for them to
realize the ‘quake, This is the
second ‘quake within a week, a

previous slight sharp tremor hav-
ing occurred at 4.45 a.m, Thurs-
day April 26th,

ARTIFICIAL
SCARVES
In White with fringe.

SILK

Priced from .... $1.85—S82.3)

CONSULATE SPORT
SHIRTS

Short sleeves in sizes

142 to 17 Each............ $6.25

STRIPED UNDER PANTS
with Elastic inserts in waist
and fasteners. Sizes 28 to 3%
TEMAE Sin scsecisssvecesttictisisiaer WEOOe



TRY THE
Ricu
FLAVOUR

Or THE
CHERRIL.

IN OUR

At 6 tt

PECL SO

COS

ee

SRS,
‘e

900000. 0

PAGE FIVE





For that rich
savoury flavour? .,




Make that stew really tasty ©
with just a little Marmite !
Make it better for you too—
Marmite contains the B2 |
vitamins that build up
health and resistance to
illness. That’s why it’s so
good for everyone on bread
and butter or in tasty sand-
wiches. Yc can do so
much with Marmite in
soups, gravies, sauces and
savoury dishes—and Marmite
does so much for good cooking.

MARMITE

The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food

Made in England









HARRISON'S



DECORATED
OPAQUE GLASS

For WINDOWS, DOOR PANELS, Ete.

AVAILABLE IN FIVE ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS

tach in Two Sizes—48"x18" and 54” x16”

We are in a position to Quote

TS |ivery favourable Prices—Phone ee

2364





-SLINGSBY”
WAREHOUSE TRUCKS

(500 Ibs. Capacity)
WITH CENTRE METAL STRAP AND RUBBER
TYRED WHEELS ... .$57.26
WITH RUBBER TYRED WHEELS BUT WITHOUT
CENTRE METAL STRAP ... .$55.92
SIMILAR TRUCKS WITH SOLID IRON WHEELS

AT $40.32 and $38.80 Each

HARRISON’







LOCAL AGENTS
TEL. 2364



(OR GENTS & BOYS

© OLOURED ARTIFICIAL SILK

~CARVES—with fringe
Each from

~INEN HEMSTITCHED

_ HIEFS—%, inch hems.
BORON | iy.) scdsctssievncas

JENCOLA SYRIPED PYJAMAS (Size
US to 44 ins.)

$2,.28—$2.49
HANDKER-

Per Suit Tele tes $5.88
JOYS’ ALL WOOL BATHING
“RUNKS in Shades of Maroon and

‘ttoyal. Size 26 to 30,

Per Pair . $2.49

CAVE SHEPHERD & (0.. LTD.

10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET














Excellent for the Week-End Party.










GRANTS SCOTCH OATMEAL-—2-lbs, Tin . 64
FRERE PILGRIM SLING—All Sizes

BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE—per tin .24
CHEF TOMATO KETCHUP—ner bottle 40
EXETER PiCNIC HAMS—5 to 8 lbs.—per ib $1.25
SULTANA’S—per lb ; 45
DANISH CHEESE WAFERS-—ner pkt 30
SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF with CEREAL 57
VIENNA SAUSAGES—per tin 61
SEEDLESS GRAPES in Tins Large 48c. Small 29

COCKADE FINE RUM

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.







s


, PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

Gums Bleed!

s, Sore Mouth and Laose

PENTALUX

GLOSS FINISH PAINT

HENRY > BY CARL ANDERSON









‘eeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,

vreath Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
| chat will sooner or later cause your teeth

eart Trouble. Amosan stops fu

| Bceatng iH the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your
. mpty pack:

age. Get Amosan from your chemis

oday. e ir
antee protects

you.
s hb Mouth

| WITH AN
{

etn nalediphreeannsndisnpinigpiee sin




Exide



FOR SUPPLIED
mA BATTERY
YUH DON'T THINK A “
YOURE A
SCATACINSMS PICTURES’ COWBO Ware caeeorn $2) ; er
STAR... VOUNE GOT TO LOOK THE pA =e EXTERIOR

PARTICTHEY' RE =XPECTING YOU AT

WIDE





&

| you GET
STARTING ASSURANCE
AND LONG LIFE!

RANGE



ATTRACTIVE - Ss
OF

















oa THE MAN WHO »
BRI

NGS THEIR 0OG FOOD
IS A LITTLE LATE
TODAY






ME
TO COME HOME -- ) if
SUCH AFFECTION Hb



HARDWARE STORES

bt

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING





City Garage Trading Co., Ltd.—Asets,



DEAL HERE









SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only
aol ——_—_————_—_—_—_— _—S—S—_—_—_——











\ USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
B Mushrooms, Tins 55 48 Floral
; Icing Sugar, Pkgs. 33 29
© : ‘
Corned Beef with Cereal, Tins 31 25 Sriediey's Pécs, Tins 46 AA
All Bran, Pkgs. 29 25 Allsopp’s Beer, Bots. 26 20
j 7, Ul emo sapay, Bie PUT YOUR HANDS UP! WE
; LAWMEN COME! WANT YOU/

———_——_——____________ ~~~ ann

AGENTS IN ARMS

THE by MARY WINTER
| BEYOND THE EAGLE’S RAGE
ADVOCATE by HUGH POPHAM

HAS THE | TWO SCAMPS g

by GEORGE A. BIRMINGHAM s

BRINGING UP FATHER







SOPOT OS OSC OFPTSSS








—










YOU SAID YOU WANTED THE

AH! THERE'S My
SOFA -NOW PILLOWS TOO -WE COULDN'T
GIT THE PILLOWS FROM

—
WELL-HURRY fF
T UP== THIS
THING'S HEAVY!
fe UNDER HIM ==

| iz fir | |} BEST A WINDOW CLEANER’S ROMANCE







by NOEL GODBER %
BOOKS :

* %

IN TOWN
ADVOCATE STATIONERY {





NO, INDEED, YOUNG - i ie 1 e ‘
WOMAN! YOU'VE ALREADY ‘ ‘ + SEBSSSSSS9S6SS9569SSSS9995699 ¢ ‘ ¢ ‘

and Extra
Specials for















AND YOU'LL TAKE A SEAT
ON THE BOW WHERE T
CAN SEE YOu AT
ALL TIMES!




I'LL TAKE THE WHEEL...
the Cocktail



SWEET ASST: For COCKTAILS
SWEET BIS\/LITS in
Tins, Special Design ALLEYNE ARTHUR'S




















Macfarlane ’s After-] SPECIAL RUM
z noon Tea in 1b, tins
THE RADIO-CONTROLLED SPEED-| | NWHERES THAT B ; Macfarlane Lang's IS DELICIOUS
BMT RACES OUT INTOTHE WATER~| |(G 2 geen o t cu Chocolate Vienna for mixing Cocktails or a
Â¥ r} meen). ak oii 7 HRISCUITS Macfarlane Lang's Straight Drink or with
i ey eT MACFARLANE LANGS Biscuits im ith Carbonated Beverages
- 4 s scults tins.
in %41lb pkgs. Macfarlane Lang's SEAGER'S COCKTAIL
A ready mixed Martini
Marie Saas Whatt hed A.A, SPECIAL LIQUEUR
Petit Beurre
Custard Cream COCKTAIL

Fruit Short Cake miscuits|} ALLEYNE ARTHUR

G
ateats Macfarlane Lang's . 1
eee Cocktail Savoury & Co. Ltd.
JACOBS Peak Frean’s Cheeslets

Cocktail Water Peak Frean’s, Crackers “YOUR GROCERS”

i Cream Crackers Crawford’s Ufillit

Familf Assorted ont ee
FALERNUM 8ic, pet bot. ;
|
| |
(








———:
Tras SSS ST a


FRIDAY, MAY 4,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

Seicshapeceningainace
The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deeths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is

$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and



4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional wend
DIED
RAYLEY—On May 3rd 1951, in London
Walter De Courcy Bayley, father of
Dr. H. Bayley.
Mrs. Dorian Bayley (wife, England),
Dr. H. Baylar ‘son). Mrs. Doris
Goddard (daughter), Miss Elizabeth
Bayley (daughter, England), Mr. lan
Bayley ‘san, England),



TAKE NOTICE




<5

That
co., INC.,
the laws
United States of America,
er business address is 405
Avenue, New York,
Distillers,

of the State of

tion of a trade mark in Part

Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
unless some

the 3rd day of May, 1951,

person shall in the meantime give«notice | °F
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
The trade

sition of such registration,

mark can be seen on application at my

office.
Dated this 30th day of Avril. 1951,

That
co., INC
the laws



of the State of

United States of America, whose trade
405 Lexington
New York, New York, U.S.A.,
has applied for the registra-
in Part “A” of

or business address is

Avenue,
Distillers,
tion of a

trade mark

Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
and will be entitled
the same after one month
unless

especially
to register
from the

whisky,

3rd day of May,
some person

1961,

opposition of such registration.
at my office.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.

3,5.51—3n

HUNTER-WILSON — DISTILLIN'
» @ corporation organized under
Maryland,

HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
a corporation organized under!
Maryland,
whose trade
Lexington
New York, U.S.A.,
has applied for the ‘registra-

“ay of| Mr



shall in the meantime give
notice in duplivite *o me at my office of
The
trade mark cai) be seen on application

PRESS OSO VOSS OG SOTTO”

POE

&
‘ West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,

Hand
Decoration
Tel, 91-74.

blocked Beach-
House, St

Potrery,
weer,
James.
$ 14.4,51—1m.
POPPERS



a 6660600

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS

DIAL
3466



1- DAV N NEWS FLASH



LEAP OVER THE GARDEN
a story ot a Nun who was
Convent for 28 years and

» it up. An_ interesting

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
AND
| HARDWARE

fares

FOR LONGER SERVICE

TAR all posts before erecting,
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative

material still available
WORKS, Bay St.
40c, per gallon.
Some To-day.

your GAS
Price

at

Get

FOR SALE

Crane re House

| This well known coastal
with approx.

including a
of beach
to

property
12} acres

stretch

long
frontage
offers.

is open

| John M. Biadon

A.F.S., F.V.A.

‘Phone 4640
PLANTATIONS BUILDING

Roval Barbados Yacht

.

Club
NOTICE

Members are invited to
attend a Silent Coloured
Motion Picture Show to be
kindly staged on Friday, 4th
May, 1951, at 6.15 p.m. by
Mr. Thomas B. Wainwright.
These films were taken dur-
travels in Canada
West Indies.

By order of,
of Man-

ing his
and the

The Committee
agement,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretary.

SSS
i



3

I

WALI

mia

then gave

true book by Monica Baldwin,
| bring us your Fountain Pens for
NIB and SACK replacements.
Ours is the only Store fitted with
; } modern tools for Pen Service.
$

Â¥





|







FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
% cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a!

word Sundewe
AUTOMroTIvVE

.
CAR—Morris 8 — good second hand
buy, Apply T. G. McKinstry. Dial 3554.
3.5.51—tn

eS

CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-
dition. 23,000 miles, new tyres. Can be
seen at Fort saved Garage Phone 83485.
A. D. Herbe: 3.5.51—4n

CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer
refused. Apply to W. M. Watson C/o

R. & G. Challenor, §;
2—01. peightstown. Phone

CAR—Vauxhall
tyres, in good working condition, price
reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay,
Grove, Christ Chureh. Dial 3207.

1.5.51—t.f.n



Staple









1,.5.51—6n| Dancing are notified that

| PUBLIC NOTICES

cpats per agute line on week-days



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-cuy:

ona't 12 pened per agate line on Sundays,| and 12 cente per agate line on Sundays,

minimum cherge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.





NOTICE

THE LORD OLIVER
SOCIETY

FRIENDLY

All members of the above Sdciety who | «

have been
end of 1949,
deave their

in the Society up

are hereby

to the
requested to
1949 Contribution Cards at

the Office of the Registrar of Friendly
Societies, Town Hall.

No cards will be accepted after the
7th of May, 1951.

D. T. DANIEL,
Clerk, Registrar, mma eet,
5. 51—3n.

.
Dancing Classes
Pupils of The Barbados School of
classes for
next term will commence on Friday the

2 3.5.51—Sh

14 six with 4 good} 4th and Saturday the 5th of May.



(Pennant

CARS—Do you want to buy a gooa+LZIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 'y

secondhand car? If so we can offer you
a 1949 Hillman, done 14,000 miles and
1949 Morris Oxford, done 19,000 miles.
Both cars in excellent condition. Ring
4808, B'dos Agencies Ltd.

29.4.51—6n.

CARS—Wolseley 1948 14 HP, Morris!
1946 10 H.P., Morris 1947 10 H.P
Morris Oxford 1949 14 H.P Morris
Minor 1950 8 H.P., Austin 1947 8 HP
Ford Van 10 H.P. a real bargain Ford
V/8 1935 Ford V/8 1938 Coupe.

All these Cars are good buys in their
respective classes and price range. For
Fort Royal Garage Ltd., Telephone 4504

4.5.51—3n

TRUCK—One 1938 Bedford Truck in
Good Working Order. Apply to Mr
Newton Brereton, Courtesy Garage, or
Larrell Brathwaite, Cherry Grove,
John. 4.5.51—In.





St.

SL
WAGGON; One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508



$20.00. May be seen
Lower Broad St
McBeth Beaumont,

Table
Table
Mahogany Wardrobe $50.00 Phone 4117
8—11 a.m.:

in three weeks,
calf,
| Jackmans, St. Michael.

3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

"

ELECTRICAL
MULLARD l1-TUBE RADIO tilting
dial, 1 Electric phonograph with ampli-
fier all in working order, Cc. Lewis,
, St. Thomas. 2.5.51—3n





(1) Dining Table
at Newsam ‘& Co.,
Ironing Board $5,00
Hastings. Dial 5001,

4.5.51—2n

FURNITURE—One



Mahogany Dining
$60.00, 1 Extension
12) $40.00,

FURNITURE —
{to seat 6)
(Pine) (to seat

1

4—6 p.m
4.5.51—4n

LIVESTOCK

COW—One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve
Gave 36 pints with third
near Paynes Road,

3.5.51—3n.





Cc, Branch,



MISCELLANEOUS

For the treatment of disorders of the



Kidneys and Bladder try Rexall Kidney

end Bladder Pills.
able at KNIGHT'S LTD.

Price 1/6 bot. Obtain-
3.5,51—3ni

———————
IPON DOUBLE BED & MATTRESS as

=

|The average yield on the assur-
jance fund for the year
out at 4.88% as against

McBeth, Beau-
4.5.51—20

new $40.00, Dial 5001

mont, Hastings.





The application of Sciivan Bros. per
Kenneth A. Sullivan holders of Liquor
License No 1063 of 1951, granted to
Kenneth Sullivan in respect of a 2-storey
wall building at corner Nelson and King
Wm. Streets, St. Michael, for permission



mimmum 1.
ad te cet a es

REAL ESTATE

SUITABLE BUILDING SITE:
t Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch.
sq. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft. road. Dial
2206 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5.51

situated

—t. tom,



be AUC’r10N

FIAT VAN 1947 MODEL
| We are instructed to sell this vehicle
| which has been damagea in an accident,



by Public Auction at the Courtesy
Garage at 2 p.m. on Friday, 4th May
1951.
JOHN M. BLADON,
Auctioneer,
2.5.51—3n





|

Area 10,978!

UNDER THE SILVER

: HAMMER

| On Tuesday 8th by order of Mrs

. Baynes we will sell her furniture
- “Oban” St. Lawrence Gap, which
} in wludes —- Very rice Square Tip-Top
} Dining Table isect 6), Upright Chairs,
Ww . Tea Trolla;’, Folding Card and
‘es, all in Mahogany, Ver
Settee ard Morris Chairs
Cyp. Pine Fiat Top





, wit in

to use said Liquor License .&c., 2t a | Desk Bookshelf, ver’ 2 Shir

~ , . y nice China
board and shingle shop known as Bee | Cubinet, Paintings, Congoleum, Rugs
Hive" Lower Dayrell’s Rd. Ch. Ch.)/Gval Mirror, Glass Ware, Luncheon

»within District “A”
Dated this 3rd day of My, 1951.
—E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,

Police’ Magistrate,

District “A”.
AGUSTA BRATHWAITE
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A" on Tuesday
the 15th day of May, 1951, at 11 o'clock,
a.m.

To:

E. A. McLEQD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
4.5.51—In



FOR SALE



GALVANISED SHEETS—Best qu tity
new ae Cheapest in the Islar
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7
10 ft $8 40. Nett cash Better hurry i
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.





LIFE SAVERS—Fresh stock of delic-

ious Life Savers. Lime, Orange, Lemon,
Wild Cherny Pep-o-Mint and Five |
Flavours.

Price 9 cents per rep ees £

VEATHERHEAD LTD. 3n





POWDERED MILK--One of the best; {
that’s Holland's “Frisian Girl” Powdered | @
Milk. Tops in butter fat content. Con-
tains vitamin D3 so ential for the
promotion of healthy e. Get it for
the family, the children will look alive

after a trial of this famous milk, Ask for
it by name. 3.6.54 —3n

SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.







Service for 8 Plated Ware, Norge Ri
fcigerator in perfect working order,
Electric Lamp, Children’s Bedsteads and
beds, Cradle, Press, Dressing Tabie, Toy
Shelves, all painted White, Larder
Kitehen Cabinet, Breakfast Table ani
Chairs, 2-Burner Valor Oil Stove and
Oven, Pressure Cooker, Scales, Kitchen
Utensils, Electric Toaster, lron and ot!

items. Sale 11,30 o'clock, Terms CA

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
4.5 Mi—2n

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, MLRIAN
ALEXANDRIA ROUSE inee PHILLIPS;
as I do not hold mystlf responsible for
her or anyone else covtracting any debt
or debts in my name unless by a. written
order signed by me,

CLARENCE ROUSE,
Paynes Bay,
St. James,
4.5.51—2n

LOOOP ETD OO TIOF OF

* NOTICE 3

x

§ BARBADOS S.P.C.A.

s The S.P.C.A. Phone No
2624 is suspended until fur
ther notice. Messages” for
the Inspector will be taken
at 2673 between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m, and
at 08—Brittons Hill Police
Station from 5 p.m. to 8

a.m.
C. WALCOTT,
Hon. Secretary, May 2nd



>

PPP PSPSPS OOS

OOOO





A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00
per 98 lb, bag. Dial 2628,
28.4.51-—7n
Save your clothes from Moths by
hanging “Olev” Moth Killer in your
Wardrobe. It is 500 times more effectiv*
than Moth Balls. KNIGHT'S LTD.
3.5.51—3n.
We have in stock Rexall Cod Liver
Oil Emulsion, an easily digested ang
palatable preparation containing 50% by
volume of Vitamin Tested Cod Liver
Oil, KNIGHT'S LTD.

3.5.51—3n |

Demerara Lille to. Award. Medical
Scholarship to Deserving Student



Moral Duty of Beneficiary to Return

and Serve

Community



Mr. Perey (. Wight Makes Announcement at

Society's

Annual

Meeting



Mr. Percy C. Wight, O.B.

E., Be eat of the Demerara

Mutual Life Assurance Society, announced at the 59th

annual general meeting of members yesterday, that the
Society will award a medical scholarship, of £300 per
annum for six years, to a qualified candidate who lacks the
means to enter the University College of the West Indies.

The Chairman pointed out that there will be no con-
ditions to the scholarship which will be tenable at the W.1.
University College, other than those normally attached
to open scholarships awarded by the University, but stress-
ed that the Society will expect that the beneficiary will
look upon it as a moral duty to return and serve the com-

munity after qualifying.

Mr. Wight was moving the
adcption of the report of the So-
ciety—a report which disclosed
another year of progress.

Others present at the meeting
were: Directors—the Hons. E, F.
McDavid, C.M.G., C.B.E., and
Capt. G. H. Smellie, Messrs A.
Groves, C. L. de Freitas, F. A
Seaford, R. K. Steele and P. W.
King, O.B.E., with E. C. Inniss,
secretary and H. Cannon, assist-
ant secretary.

Members—Messrs J. J. Hutt,
Ramlall, A. S. Outridge, S. N.

McAllister, J. Joseph, R.N.,
Callender, A. Dickie, R. M.
Wight, C. P. Wight, J. A
Campbell, G. I. Edmonds and

H. J. Bunyan.

Moving the adoption of the re-
port the chairman said:

“Gentlemen, Once again I have
much pleasure to present to you
the report of the directors on the
transactions of the Society for
the year 1950. The report has
been reproduced in the Press and
no doubt everyone must have
observed the steady ‘progress be-
ing made by the Society.

“The new issue for the year
again exceeded the million and a
half dollar mark, being 1,039
policies assuring $1,618,990 with
an annual premium income of
$92,341.90, as compared with the
previous year when the Society
issued 1,016 policies assuring
$1,544,530 with an annual premi-
um income of $89,305.70.

“Claims during the year totalled
73 policies assuring $142,058 in-
cluding bonus additions. This is
slightly higher than the previous
year and must be considered nor-
mal, The maturing of 213 policies
resulted in the sum of $332,252
being paid out. These bring the

total claims paid out by the So-

ciety since its
485,821.

Substantial Sum Added To
Assurance Fund

inception to $8,-

The ratio of expenses of man-

agement (including commission
account) to premium receipts is
17% as against 16.9% in 1949.

worked |
4.83% |

in 1949. I might mention that
the average yield for the four
years of the present quinquen-
nium is 4.838% which is ver)
satisfactory indeed. As a -resuli
of the transactions for the yeal
the substantial sum of $392,534
has been added to the assurance
fund which now stands at $6,110,-
067—-another satisfactory feature

“At the last general meeting of
the Society on April 25, 1950, Mr
Arthur Davis moved a_ motior
which was fully supported by the
members present, inviting the
Board to consider the grant of
some form of scholarship as a
public benefaction from the funds
of the Society; and the Board then
gave an assurance that this sug-
gestion would be considered.

The Board have giv carefu’
consideration tc this mi . and
while what Mr. Davishad_ ir
mind was a-scholarship to provid«
training for a non-professiona
career, the directors feel that the
best interests of the public anc
of this Society would be servec
at the present time by the award
of a scholarship tenable et thr
University College of the Wes
Indies. The Board have been im-
pressed by the announcement
made by the Vice-Prinicpal and
Professors of the University dur-
ing their recent visit to British
Guiana to hold entrance exam-
inations, that there are a number
of qualified candidates here whe
are without the means to enter
the University.

“The Board have accordingly
decided in keeping with their un-
dertaking at the last general
meeting to award a_ scholarship
to be styled the “Demreara Mu-
tual Life Medical Scholarship” to
a eandidate to be selected by the
University authorities from among
those qualified fer entrance to the
University. The value of ‘the
scholarship will be such sum not
exceeding £300 per annum for six
years, as may be fixed by the
University .authorities



Good-will Gesture To
Community
“There will be no conditions
to the sch p other than
these normally attaching to oper



Advertise. eons It Pays

scholarships awarded, by the Uni-
versity; but ‘this \ Society wy
expect that the beneficiary wil
accept it to be a moral duty to
return to British Guiana and
serve the community in his pro-
fession after he qualifies. I trust
that the members -will welcome
and endorse this decision which
the Board have made, as a ges-
ture of goodwill and service to
the community as a whole.

“Before I close my address, |
would like to place on record my
Lthanks to the directors for their
co-operation and the staff for
their loyal service

“With these remarks gentlemen,
I formally move the adoption of
the report and after it has been
seconded, I shall be pleased to
answer any questions peor
may care to ask.”

The adoption of the report was
seconded by Mr. Hutt who said
it was gratifying to note that the
directors had decided to award
the scholarship. It was very good

that it should come from the
Society. and it would go abroad
he said, that the Society was not

only looking after the life of its
members, but was looking after
the moulding their offspring to
serve the community.

Several Resolutions Adopted

resolutions were
adopted during the afternoon’s
business. One, moved by Mr
Hutt and seconded by Mr. Cal-
lender, provided for the re-elec-
tion of three retiring directors,
Messrs. Percy Wight, Steele and
McDavid.

A resolution moved by Mr.
Hutt and seconded by Mr. R. M.
Wight, fixed the directors’
remuneration at $4,000 for the
ensuing year; $1,000 for the chair-
man» and $3,000 to be divided
among the other directors.

Several

Messrs. Fitzpatrick Graham
and Co., were re-elected: auditors
on the motion by Mr, R, M
Wight seconded by Mr. Ramlall

and their remuneration was
passed at $1,440 on a motion by
Mr. Callender and seconded by
Mr. C. P. Wight.

Mr. C. P. Wight moved; that
the meeting approves of appropri-
ation for donations to charity, to
the extent of $2,535 for last year,
and of a sum not exceeding that
amount for the current year.
This was seconded by Mr. Hutt
and adopted.

The Chairman, before closing
the meeting thanked members for
receiving the report so satisfac-
terily and endorsing the recom-
mendation made to grant the
scholarship. He suid it had cer-
tainly afforded the directors very
much pleasure that the members
had done so, and he assured them

that the Colony. would benefit)

materially by that step.

Mr. Wight added that he was|
grateful to Mr. MeDavid. for
interviewing the Professors and

the amount of trouble he had}

taken over the matter, and he felt
the Directors would wish him to

express their thanks to Mr,
McDavid.

Mr. Percy Wight Re-elected

Chairman

At a meeting of the directors
held afterwards, Mr. Percy
Wight was unanimously _ re-
elected chairman -for the ensuing
year.



”
|



lee

fe awarded to plaintiffs Beres-



'
|

'

i



WANTE#

Minimum charge week 172 cents and}
96 cents Sundays 24 words —. over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word Sundays.
ns



HELP

————
“Due to the opening of a new branch,

we require the following staff on or

before June Ist, 1951:—
STENO-TYPIST—experienced



— com-

meneing salary $100.00 per month.
TYPIST—also with clerical experience
-—- commencing salary $75.00 per
month, -

INVOICING ASST.—accurate at fig-{
ures — preferably with Lehi a July.

experience on invoicing — com-
meneing salary $90.00 per month.
Written application stating age and
previous experience to be sent to Sec-
retary, Dowding Estates and Trading

Company, Ltd., Bay Street
2.5. 51—6n.

SALES GIRL for our TOY ROOM.
Apply in person. JOHNSON’S STATION-
ERY. 3.5.51—3n



MISCELLANEOUS

MINT—Olive Blossom Stamps of Bar-











bados, Will pay 48c. each for pertect
copies. ‘Phone Herbert Bayley 3703

29.4.51--3n.

—

One (1) Second Hand Chaff Cutter.,
Apply X c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.

4.5,51—3n.

ROOM & BOARD for Gentlemen.

On Sea. Reasonable terms for perma-

nents Apply Casuarina Residential
Club, Maxwell Coast, Tel. 8378

4.5. 51--2n



PAGE SEVEN









ome eee
FOR RENT OFFICIAL NOTICE in
Minimum charge week 72 cents kee IN THE cot RT OF CHANCERY
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over IN PURSUANCE 906, I dk ereby give notice to all .
3 cents a word week—4 Cents a/ persons having or clai mterest suny Hien or incumbrance ‘

words
word



HOUSES





eee ae
CLIFF COT—Blue Waters Terrace.
Purnished 3 bedrooms, from May to end

July. Ring C. C. Worme 8160,
4.5.51—tn
HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June
Phone Mrs, A, D. Herbert 8385.
3.5.51—4n

TO LET—In Marine Gardens for 6
months, fully furnished, House-keeping
apartment with spacious verandahs, Write
Box G.M. C/. Advocate Co,

3. 5: 51—an

OFFICES above Lashlay's Lta., “Prince
William Henry Street. Apply: J. E,
Marson. Phone 2471. 3.5.51—8n

LOST & FOUND















LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS — Series L.
3330 to 3; Q. 1997. M. 0470—0471; L
9000-9001; P. 0480, 0483; K_. 8033, 7303;
M. 5470; O. 5099, 5903, 5909; N. 1330,
1331, 6133, 7718 to 7719. O, 0055. Finder
please return same to Advocate Co,
Reward offiered 4.5.51—2n





Labour Talks
In Jamaica

\From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, May 3.
The first meeting of the
Regional Labour Board of the
West Indies which is being
established to co-ordinate the
United States farm labour pro-
gramme will be held in Jamaica
this month. It will be attended
by representatives of variou
participating colonies and by Mr.
J, Thompson, Colonial Attache of
the British Embassy, Washington,
who made an overnight stop at
Jamaica last night on the way to
Barbados to attend the meeting
of the Caribbean Commission of



which he is a member.

The establishment of the
Board was recommended at a
conference of the British West
Indies Labour Officers held in
Jamaica in December,

~

.-. CHARGED WITH
MANSLAUGHTER

Gordon Brathwaite, a labourer
of St. Philip, is charged by the
Police with manslaughter in con-
nection with Helenna Mullins’
death, This was disclosed by Capt.
E. B. Grant at the inquest into
the circumstances of Mullins’
death which was adjourned sine
die yesterday by Coroner C. L.
Walwyn,

Mullins died while on her way
to the General Hospital from the
St. Philip's Almshouse on April
26. A post mortem examination
was performed the next day
by Dr. A. S. Cato at the Hospital
Mortuary and death was attribut-
ed to a fractured skull.



DAMAGES AWARDED

Judgement to the amount of £6

ford Bennett and Eldica Bennett
of Bank Hall, St. Michael by Judge
J, W. B. Chenery in the Court
of Original Jurisdiction yester-





Plan Welcome
For Bustamante

Hon. William Bustamante, Prime
Minister of Jamaica, is expected
to arrive here on Sunday at 8.20
am. He will take part in the
meeting of the Caribbean Commis-
sion which starts on Monday.

A reception Committee has been
set up and arrangements have
been made for a programme of
activities for him during his
visit here. A public welcome is
planned for him on his arrival at
Seawell Airport.

During next week he will be
taken on a tour of the island,
and several receptions are being
arranged for him, He is also
scheduled to address a_ public
meeting at Queen’s Park Curing | _ gosscososacsosuscggounssecsecseseuboaceocooseenecsaneoeneneeeeeeeeeeeeh
the week.

Canadian Govt.
Will Not Interfere

OTTAWA, May 3.

The Canadian Government does
not plan to interfere with the
award made by its arbitrator in
settling the wage-hour dispute
that led to a nine-day general
railway strike last year, Rrime
Minister St. Laurent told the
Cemmons yesterday. He would
not ask Parliament to aa

MILK POWDER
LONDON.

Food Minister Maurice Webb
told the House of Commons that
milk powder is one of the main
ingredients of Britain’s present-
day beef sausage.
“How much milk powder can be
put in before a sausage becomes

: eream bun?”

Webb refused to answer a
Conservative member's question:
—I.N.5.



In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

CABLE AND WIRELE&SS (W.1) Ltd.
advise that they can now communicate

day. with the following ships through their
Beresford Bennett and Eldica Barbados Coasteatation: sl) a
Bennett brough case ins as, Fort Amherst, 8.8, Gascogne, %.
Ebenezer anes ad ? Agamemnon, 8.8. Tindra, 8.8. Capa
ttiekehn’ eae an Rodney, 8.8. Hecuba, 8.8. Raban, 4.8.
Hall claiming damages to the Berlin,’ s.s. Attila, #.8. Papendrecht,
amount of £50. They said in| s.s. Ramona, s.#. Esso Highmond, '#,2
evidence that Alleyne on March | Cenadian eee eh Ganuhny
29, damaged 806 holes of sugar! ,. Gervais, 5.8, Redstone, #\s. Fort
cane and 18 holes of banana trees. | Bridger, 8.8. Mormacland, 8.8, Morning
Light, 8.8. S. Cecilia, 6.58. Loide Aren-
tina, s.8. Francesco Morosini, 8.5, Reangt-
tuta, s.8. 2. and T, Forester, 5.8, Loide
RATES OF EXCHANGE Cuba, #6, Ecuador, s.8. Alcoa Corsair,
ss, City of Swansea, 5.5, Raban, §.8
CANADA Defender, 8.5. Helena, 5.8 S. Paula,
MAY 3, 1951 3.8, Matina, s.s. Tacito, s.8. Helicon
65 5/10% pr. Cheques on M/T Vestfold
Bankers 61 5/10% pr.
Demand , MAIL NOTICE ‘
Drafts 61.36% pr Mails for ST, LUCIA by the M/V La ¥
Sight Drafts 61 2/10% pr. | Joy will be closed at the General Pos
62 5/10% pr. Cable Office as under;~
62% pr. Curreney 60% pr Parcel Mail, “Registered = Mail ; md
Coupons 59 3/10% pr. | Ordinary Mail at 10 a.m. on the h
Silver May 1951.

sesioi’

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

The Advocate Co,, Ltd., has made arrangements for
classified advertisements to be taken by ‘various District
Agents and so far the following have been authorised to



receive them : uv SUC
MOSES GITTENS, JOSEPH JEMMOTT,
Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch. St. Elizabeth Village,
St. Joseph.

Mis. U. L.. BRUCE,
Maxwell Road, Ch. Ch. S. A.. DURANT,

Horse Hill, St. Joseph.
©. McCONNEY,

Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch.. EBENEZER PHAKMACY,

Four Roads, St. John.

,

Vv. HOLDER,
St.. Judes, St. George.

JOSEPH ALLEYNE,
Crane, St, Philip.

G, QUINTYNE,
Church Village, St. Philip ST. C. HUNTE,

Pine Gap, St. Michael.
E. HINKSON,

Massiah Street, St. John. Vv. RICE,
Bank Hall Road,
H.. L. CAVE,
St.. Michael.
St. John’s Dispensary,
R, H. KING, E, LORDE

Bank Hall X Road

Near Sharon, St. Thomas. St, Michael.

Items may be handed into the above for the following

Columns in the Classified Section :

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, IN MEMORIAMS, ETC.
FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

ADVOCATE CoO., LTD.

T. Gale. Advertising Manager



a.





»perty of the defendants)
witnesses, documents and

in or affecting the. pro tioned (the pre
to brine before me an accor f r clai with the
vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of
12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Re tration Office, Public Butidings,
Bridgetown before the 7th day of July, 10 n order that such claims may be re-
ported on and ranked according to and priority thereof respectively,
otherwise such persons will be preclu ,s of any decree and be
| deprived of all claims om or against





nid pr

operty





Plaintiff ; HERBERT HUTCHI BAYLEY, trustee of the will of George
Byron Warren, ¢
Defendants: LAVINIA LEWI FANNY LEWIS GLADYS LEWIS, MAR-
GARET CADOGAN: BEATRICE Lewis and CLARA LEWIS,
PROPENTY ALL THAT certain parce! ef land (formerly part of Goodland plant-

ation) situate in the
containing: by
perches or th
the Westbury Ceme

parish of Saint Michael and Island abovesaid
ent Two ae res three roods ten and one-half

of Alexander Gibson on
piace called Frolic and on a






private rondway or » is abutting.
Bill Sled 2th February, 1951
Dated 2nd May, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.

4.5. 51—4n



OT ~
ROYAL NETHERLANDS | sae
BARING reol AMSTERDAM .
S. “Oranjestad"—10 May 1951 p
M.S. “Bonaire’—1ith May 1961 Cie Gle Transatlantique nt
M.S. “Hersilia"—24th "May 195},
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND ae
STERDAM
M.S. “Willemstad” 17th May 1961. SAILING TO .
SAKLING TO TRINIDAD, EN FR. x .
PARAMARIBO AND GEORGETOWN NGLAND & ANOS
5. “Hecuba'’—6th May, 1951 : *
MS. “Bonaire”—29th May, 1951 GASCOGNE, May 12, 1951.
SAELING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA via St. Lucia, Martinique, r
CURACAO AND JAMAICA Guadeloupe and Antigua, dated
M.S, “Oranjestad’—24th May, 1951 +
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD. 333 as
ieee a es _
ll CARIBBEAN CRUISE. .
ESS OSSIISGS GIGS O ISSO ‘
s M.V _Sypresgpronmes com apne Del CARIBE COLOMBIE, May 30th, 1951. ~
will accept Cargo & Passengers Trinidad, La Guaira, Cu- tear |
for St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba racao, Cartagena and
Sailing on Or About 18th May,
an Jamaica, ie a
tt
M.V. Caribbee will accept Cargo i
and Passengers for Antigua, St Accepting Passengers, ,
Kitts, Montseratt and Nevis only Car do Mail. .
Passengers for Dominica Sailing argo ‘an ba
on the 4th May, 1951



B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN.-
ERS ASSOC., INC.

Tele, 4047,

R. M. JONIS& Co, Ltd.
renebiniat
Phone 3814

=



Do Sigmaner ng tinge’ cad TO EUROPE oo 2

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for ee hee
sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual rts of call are amas!
Dublin, London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual piece |
reduction for chi.dren. ae



ORIGIN DGD NEG GEE EEL EEG

We are now in a position to take care of your orders for

GUN METAL FITTINGS.



THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry Ltd.,—Proprietors)
Cnr. of Broad & Tudor Streets,



POCONO DOM 6 D100 PEED MLD VOVEDOION,
ATTENTION !!

FACTORY MANAGERS}

Take this opportunity of obtaining youx requirements
IN




}
4

ee

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

ea



Ranging from %” upwards vom as

MILD STEEL < ai

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes 4
BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes a
FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill 4
At PRICES that cannot be repeated. 4

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lek

White Park Road, St, Michael
DIAL 4528

Lovely
Carpets

of \
ordered care that gives a
HOME — its Charm a =

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED —

add to that little touch



B. M. K. WOVAX RUGS —various sizes
VELVET FINISHED SOFA RUGS—various sizes
VALI RUGS — various sizes

vilOader RUGS & CARPETS—various sizes
DRUGGET STAIR CARPETING—various sizes

224 and 27 inches wide. \

WILLIAM FOGARTY LID.

oo

*






ONE

;





eg

=".

es



PAGE EIGHT





He’s Off Again...

>

a
Ww € ANAOA

‘The Car Should Do The Trip

In 30 Days,’

ON FRIDAY, June 1, I am set-
ting out to report the most fas-
cinating news story of a motor-
‘ear that has come my way this
year. I expect to be away a
menth, and to travel nearly 30,-
600 miles.

It will be a bid by four o!
Britain’s toughest road drivers to
motor round the world in 30 days
in the new A40 sports car.

They will take the easterm
route to America by way of the
Middle East. India and Honolulu.

Over .the oceans the team and
the car will travel by plane.

If things go to plan they will
arrive in Montreal, fly back te
Scotland, and motor down t
their starting point at London
Airport,

Austins are not only supplyin
vhe small sports car and the fou:
drivers, They are chartering from
K.L.M. Airlines a_ specially
adapted, four-engined Skymaster
to act as flying tender.

Non-Stop Race

This round-the-world effort is
aimed to prove to the world what
an expertly driven British car can
do when raced non-stop round
that world.

I shall fly above the car to fe-
cord its desert, jungle, and sea
crossing adventures,

The audacious plan sprang from
a half-crown wager made by Mr.
Leonard Lord, Chairman of Aus-
tins, with bald but tough Alen
Hess, his 51-year-old public re-
lations officer.

It was shortly after Hess—who
holds 165 motoring records—-more
than anyone else in the world—
had driven 10,000 miles in 10,000
minutes in an Austin car, and the
two were in Mr. Lord’s Long-
bridge, Birmingham, office,

Half-crown Bet

Lord said he had been struck
‘with an idea while driving to his
office that morning—the round-
the world bid. “I'll bet you there
is something you can’t do,” he
said,

“What is that?” asked Hess.

Lord replied: “I'll bet you half
a dollar you can’t drive round the
world in 30 days.”

Hess accepted. The car he chose
is the first open-bodied model on
the famous A40 chassis. It sells
abroad for under £600,

As his team he chose:—

Ex - Squadron - Leader Ralph
Sleigh, 39, who in an Austin made
the fastest-ever run from Britain
to the Cape. Sleigh is a paint
man, is married, has a child lives
near Ipswich.

Tester - mechanic Ronald
Jeavons, 32, who shared with

ooo

(TAX CLAIMS MA

i
\S

Says Cardew

Hess and two other the feat of
cramming 10,000 miles into 10,000
minutes in a saloon A40, Jeavons
is a bachelor, served seven years
in the R.A.E., lives in Birming-
ham;

Car“tester George Caates, 48,
who, with Alan at Indianapolis
averaged 70.54 miles an hour for
seven days and nights in an Ago.
Cggtes prepared vehicles for D-
Day under the Americans. He is
a family man (three children),
lives at Rubery, near Birmingham.
So not one of them on age is a
chicken.

The team will work in. pairs
two in the car driving and navi-
gating, and two resting in the
plane above.

The team captain chose from
the 20,000 factory staff two of
their best racing mechanics. These
Spanner-nurses, experienced in
France and America, will be wiry
Releigh Appleby and agile Joseph
Galvin,

They will fiy along with me in
the plane piloted by K.L.M.’'s
top pilot — Captain J. J. Bak,

Hess decided that the car and
the mother plane should be able
io talk together. Arranging this
was perhaps his hardest task, A
special short-wave set had to be

fitted in the car.
June Heat
Then he had to get radio
operating permits from each of

the 16 territories the car will pass
through England, France,
Switzerland, Italy, Lebanon, Syria,
Jérdan, Iraq, India, Siam, Guam,

Wake Island, Hawaii, U.S.A.,
Canada (including Newfound-
land).

The total route involves travell-
ing a daily average of 1,000
miles, of which one-third will be
overland and two-thirds by ocean
crossing.

Across the Syrian and Arizona
deserts the car will travel in the
full blast of June heat, so it will
be fitted with a white hood to
throw off the sun's rays. In
India the drivers expect to meet
the monsoons.

The start : 11 a.m. from Lon-
don Airport on Friday, June 1,
‘The car will nose its way through
Kingston down to Manston, Kent
(where special R.A.F. permission
had to be granted) for flight te
Paris, yy

And if all goes well, within a
month it will be on the road
trom Prestwick in Ayrshire speed-
ing through the night to London
Airport, Staines. A complete
globe circle.—L.E.S.



Y MAKE TURPIN

SHY OF ROBINSON

(By GEORGE WHITING)

_. At last there has arrived an
opponent of whom Randolph Tur-
pin, the highest explosive in Brit-
ish boxing, is mortally afraid,

-It.is not Billy Brown, of the
US.A., whom he fights at Bir-
mingham next Monday. It is not
Dutehman Jan de Brum, his oppo
nent at Coventry on May 7, Nor
is it Australia’s Dave Sands, from
whom he will attempt to take the
Empire middle-weight title at the
White City on June 5. Nor even
the mighty Ray Robir.son, cham-
pion of the world,

None of these could make
Rahdo!sk Turpin fight-shy, but
the inceme-tax man could —and
does,

If Turpin wins the Empire
championsnip trom Sands (“Let
me hit him just once; that is all
I ask,” says Randolph), then the
promotional machinery of Jacy
Soloifions will immediately be
geared for a world title fight
against Robinson, But there are
breakers ahead.

Title Fight in Late Summer

Solomon’s idea is for the world
championship fight to be held in
London ini the late summer, but
any compliance with this plan on
the part of Turpin would imme-
diately set the super-tax sleuths on
Randolph's trail.

Turpin, already a comparatively Wales this summer.

They'll

LL


















AND I WILL BE
OVER AT THE WARE-
HOUSE IF ANYONE
CALLS, KITTY:
HAR-RUMPH!

rich young man, will be way up
in the super-tax brackets after his
meetings with Brown, de Bruin
and Sands. Any further activities
in the current financial year would
put him in the same predicament
that used to worry Bruce Wood-
ecek and Freddy Mills—the sense-
less problem of taking punches for
almost the sole benefit of the In-
land Revenue.

Mills and Woodcock, aided by
smart acceuntants, solved their
aifficulties legitimately after con-
sultation with the tax-gathers,
The same kind of compromise is
needed for Randolph Turpin if
we are to see him fighting for a
world title in London in 1951.
The physical risks of arguing the

point with riotous Robinson are
not including the slightest loss of
sleep in the Turpin household,

Randolph’s quietly expresed
view is that the mighty Ray has
never yet been hit by qa muiddle-
weight with a real bang in his
fists. His own hands, he thinks,
might be able to make things
remarkably interesting for the
world champicn, I think so, too—
provided those hands are really
sound.

Turpin, by the way, fancies the Sy

idee of turning himself into » holi-
day attraction for visitors to North
—LES.









HE JUST INHERITS
HIS OLD SUITS AN’
CARNATIONS ==

BARBA’

DOS ADVOCATE



-- - Around the World



SPARTAN and Notre D

ame played to a goalless draw

in their First Division return football match at Kensington

yesterday evening.

The game was one of the best seen at Kensington for

the season and one of the b
beginning to end.
The full backs for both

iggest gates. It was fast from

teams played excellently and

there were very little to choose between Gibbons (Spartan)

and Browne (Notre Dame).

very rarely conceded a thro

“Per” Cadogan at centre-hal
proved once more that he 15 one
of the best players at tis posi-
tion in the island. Ee was
constantly in position to ward off
Notre Dame attacks. Lloyd Gili
played very well at centre for-
ward for the Dames.

For Notre Dame, Paul Mande-
ville also gave a good perform-
ance. He took a_ few tries at
the Spartan goal but unfortun-
ately they went wide.

Fred Cozier in goal for
tan was in his old form,
from all angles. The Notre
Dame goabie, Wilkinson, alsu
brought off a few good saves,

The Game

The game started with Notre
Dame defending the southern
goal. Spartan took the touci
off. Soon after a corner kick
was awarded to Notre Dame.
Darey McCollin, _ their right
winger, took the kick but Cozier
brought off a good save before
Lloyd Gill, the Notre Dame
centre forward, could get his
head to the ball,

Keith Walcott then received
the ball from Cadogan and toox
a beautiful shot but Wilkinson
was fin position and saved.

The Notre Dame forwards
went into the attack and Mande.
ville received a long pass. He
took a hard shot along the
ground but the ball was diverted
by one of the Spartan backs,

Notre Dame again attacked
the Spartan goal. Archer, their
right half, centred beautifully
but Freddie Daniel, their left
winger who ran into the centre
forward position, failed to time
the ball and miskicked.

Missed Opportunity

Cadogan later got hold’ of the
ball and beat through the Notre
Dame halves. He took a_ shot
from outside the area but again
Wilkinson was in position and
saved. The next person to try
out Wilkinson was Tom Reece
at right wing for Spartan, He
sent in a lovely grounder from
the wing but once more Wilkin-
son saved,

Shortly before half time
Mandeville received a short pass
while he was unmarked, He
took a hard one-time shot bui
did not get over the ball properly
or it went high over the cross

Spar-
saving

ar,

When the second half was only
a few minutes old Walcott ran
through and centred from the
right wing. There were, however,
no Spartan forwards in position
to score and Wilkinson saved
easily,

In this half Spartan did: most
of the attacking for the first
fifteen minutes. Their forwards
were constantly going down bu*
Browne and Straughn warded
off these attacks,

Notre Dame tried hard in the
last few minutes to score the
winning goal but when Referee
Sayets blew off, the game was
still goalless,

The teams were as follows:—-

Notre Dame: Wilkinson,
Browhe, Straughn, L, Daniei,
Capt., Archer, Mandeville, McCol-

lin, Gill, Parris, F. Daniel and
Robefts.
Spartan: Cozier, Gibbons,

Bowen, Medford, Capt., Cadoga
Gittens, Reece, Johnson, Walcott,
Griffith, Boyce.

Modern High School Wins

Yesterday “afternoon at the

Modern High Schoo! grounds, the #

Modern High School team won
their fifth suecessive game and
maintained their unbeaten record
by defeating James Street Scout
roop to the tune of 74 points to 5.

Vernon Skeete, the captain of the

Modern High School team, scored
26,

Jimmy Hatlo

VK

ZATHEY'RE AS ALIKE e)|
AS TWO “P'S...
“P" FOR PINHEAD,
THAT 1S +55


















WHAT I'D LIKE TO
KNOW IS WHO THATAT6HII

BIGOOME PATTERNED
HIMSELF AFTER!




rs

| Rerlectep aiory—
WATCHING THE. BOSS’S

ASSISTANT TRYING

TO MAKE LikE THE e

BIG BOY HIMSELF ««-< |





Both ¢leared accurately and
w-in.
f





Atkinson’s
Selection
Criticised

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca. May 3.

The Gleaner’s cricket critic
Longfield, to-day criticised the
selection of Denis Atkinson on the
West Indian team saying that
West Indians had come to the con-
clusion, following the history-
making performances of Test
Cricket from 1948 to 1950, that
our cricket teams are being select-
ed not on a basis of mediocrity
and sentiment.

Says Longfield, “but the selec-
tion of Denis Atkinson has prc-
vided rude awakening. It reminds
us that the customs of the South
still persist in the midst of our
world of acclaim. What explana-
tion can the Selectors give for the
inclusion of this undoubtedly
mediocre player? It is not fair to
Atkinson, to be persistently
pitchforked into company which
he does not belong. The inclusion
of Guillen for Binns might have
shocked many, and to a lesser
degree that of Prior Jones, but
while there is a ready explanation
for the selections of both, there is
certainly none for the Atkinson
blunder.

“This is undoubtedly a deliberate
insult to the intelligence of the
West Indian cricket public, and the
ability of our Australian op-
ponents,”’

Both Longfield and Lawrence
Roberts, Gleaner’s Sports Editor,
find it impossible to understand
the selection of Guillen over Binns,
Trim over Goodridge, and Jones
over Johnsqn,

Longfield, more outspoken, says
of Jones and Johnson, “T still be-
lieve in the hostility of a genuine
fast bowler, and on the record of
Jones and Johnson in England, if
the former (no longer a_ fast
bowler) is selected, Johnson should
also have been included.”



; 4 ‘
Ladies at Water
Polo
There will be a ladies’ water
polo practice match this afternoon

at the Barbados Aquatic Club.
The teams are as follows:—

Team “A”, June Croney, Sheila
Pitcher, Marie T. Lopez, Joan
Ghent, Rosamund Clarke, Jeanna
-Lewis, Ann Hutchinson.

Team “B", Nancy Jones, Janet
Ingram, Consuela Knight, Mar-
garet Ramsey, Peggy Johnson,

Anne Hoad, Brenda Roett.
Reserves, Ann Raison and Rose
mary Lewis,

After this game there will be
enother practice match between
the other ladies turning up for
practice,

Play begins at 5 p.m.



PLOLPDADD Pe PDP

OPTI Oe BONO

-
7

a
DORSET AIS FO OOS

eR



ro Dooly i

ow



‘Soccer Results

LONDON, May, 3.

Results of soccer matches play-
ed Wednesday in the United King-
dom follow: Division 1. Blackpool
0, Arsenal 1. Fulham 1, Portsmouth
4. Wolverhampton Wanderers 0,
Né@weastle 1.

Division II: South Aldershot 8,
Crystal Palace 0. Gillingham 2,
Swindon Town 1. Notts Forest 2,
Newport County 1. Reading 1,
Millwall 1, (tie) Accrington Stan-
ley 0, Tranmere Rovers 2, New
Brighton 1, Chester 0. Wrexham 3,
Rochdale 1.

Scottish League Division A;
Motherwell 3, .Raith Rovers <.
Glasgow Charity Cup: First
Round. Rangers 2, Celtic 1,

Other matches: Dundee 4, St.
Johnstone 0. Manchester United 3,
Aberdeen 1, —(C.P.)

Coalition Cabinet

MELBOURNE, May 3. :
The Australian new Coalition
Cabinet will meet on May 11.
Liberal Prime Minister Menzies
and his Deputy, Country Party
Leader Fadden are discussing its



composition. In their last Cabinet
the Country Party had five posts.
—Reuter.



What’s On Today

Court of Ordinary, Court of
.. Appeal and Lower Courts
—10 a.m.
Football Div, 2 —
Harrison College vs, Lodge

5 p.m. |

Football Div, 3 —
Combermere v. Sea Scouts

at Garrison—5 p.m.
Harrison College vs. Foun-
dation—5 p.m,

Basket-ball —

Carlton vs. Harrison Col-
lege—7.45 p.m.

Fortress vs. Pirates—8.45
p.m,

Meeting Combermere Old
Boys’ Association at Com.
bermere—8 p.m,

Mental Hospital
Club Dance

Police Band, Christ Church
Baby Clinic Annual Show
and Dance at Drill Hall

Cricket

Plaza (Bridgetown) “The Mac
Arthur Story’

y"".
Aquatic “Call Northside 777" 5 and
8.30

.30 p.m.
Empire “U'd Climb the Highest
Mountain” 8.30 p.m,
Royal “Trial Without Jury” oe

“Homicide For Three 4.80

8.30 D.m.

Roxy “You're My ype
15

and “Side Street” 4.30 &

p.m,
Olympic “Where the Side Walks
End” & “Bataan” 4.30 & 8.15

p.m, ws tal *



TO-DAY.

Sun Rises: 5.44 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m.

Moon (New) May 6.

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Water: 2.17 a.
3.05 p.m.

YESTERDAY .

Rainfall (Co@rington)

m.,

01

in,.
Total for Month to Yester-
day: .05 i

Temperature (Max.) 85.5°F.

Temperature (Min.) 75.0°F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.,
(3 p.m.) E_S.E.

Wind Velocity: 6 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.934
(3 p.m.) 29.856.

ns.

|
The Weather
|

eS

FES STI,
See...
It’s so easy
< extra fine

to see those

points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the
Top Scorers

| P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co.,Ltd

; Prince Wm.

we al TORN

nee



Henry Street

in Tailoring
to be on the
SMART
side.
©
|

4
poner |
eee ITS ew WN









Spartan, Dames pl ay to Goalless Draw



Surrey Lead M.C.C.
On Ist Innings

LONDON, May 3.

Clese of play scores in Wednes-
day’s first class cricket matches.
M.C.C. first innings all out 62.
second innings 32 for four. Sur-
rey first innings all out 140,
(non-county match) Cambridge
University first innings 124 for six,
Lancashire to bat. Rain restricted

play, (non-county match). Ox-
ford University vs. Yorkshire,
(non-county match) no play

possible owing to rain.

Hampshire first innings all out
263, second innings 61 for seven
declared, Sussex first innings 104
for nine declared. Second innings
160 for three. —(CP).



Tommy Lawton Turns
Down US. Offer

! LONDON, May 3.

Tommy Lawton, famous England
and Notts county centre-forward
turned down a New York offer to
coach American soccer teams this
summer,

Lawton had a tempting cable
offer from the Manager of the
German-Hungarian team of Brook-
lyn who said that his acceptance
would give a big boost to soccer in
the States.—(CP)

YOUR SILVER
NEEDS THE GENTLE






With‘each 8-ounce
ECL

ce ie








Magnificent Photo Cards
of Modern British Cars!
Ty s |

FLAKES ” m

Every 8-ounce packet contains 2
cards,

ANNUAL TAG DAY
FRIDAY, MAY 4th

Please buy a Tag to
Help Others!




MAKE YOUR PARTY
A SUCCESS

with
Bots Cocktail Cherries
” ” Onions
“ ” Peanuts
Tins Vienna Sausages
Bots Olives
Tins Tomatoes
” Carrots
” Tomatoe Juice
Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple
+ Peaches
Pkgs Jellos, l4c., 12c, & 22e.
Tins Custard Powder
be Coffee
‘ Nescofe
Nesta,

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

HEADQUARTERS FOR BEST
RUM

ed

2

4

Worcester Faces
Defeat To-day

WORCESTER, May 3.

South African cricketers com-
pletely turned the tables on
Worcestershire in their opening
county match of the tour when
at one time they seemed to be
facing defeat.

After Worcestershire had carried
their overnight score of 135 for
four to 192 allout this morning,
the South Africans lost their first
five wickets for 25 runs, But the
middle batsmen Van Ryneveld
(29), A. Rowan (44) and Mann (49
not out) prevented a complete col-
lapse and the tourists’ total reached
157.

When Worcestershire batted
again they did no better than the
early South Africans and by the
elose had lost six wickets for 50,
and were thus 85 runs ahead.

cae: —Reuter.
B'dos Friendly Football

ssociution
TO-DAY'S FIXTURE.

Pangers v Penrode at St.
Leonard’s.
Referee: Mr. Robert Parris.




FLORAL
SPUNS

An extra special ,
_valueindn |
assortment of px
pretty patterns” +

and colourings

36" wide. Per
yard.

$1.20

CAVE
SHEPHERD
& Co, Ltd.

10-13 Broad St.











|
!
:

RED








HIGH

Or







Phone 4267 for

Ferrocrete rapid-hardeniné Cement
in 375 Ib. Drums

Snowcrete White Cement
in 375 lb. Drums

Colorcrete Cement
YELLOW in 375 Ib. Drums

|} Everite Ashestos-Cement Corrugated Sheets

6 ft., 7 ft., 8 ft., 9 ft. 10 ft. Lengths

Everite Trafford Tiles
6 ft. and 8 ft. Lengths,

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.

IN

TAILORING

ALL KINDS

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF
BOLTON LANE

FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1951

Gardner Will Fight

Brion June 5
LONDON, May 3.

Jack Gardner, British, Europeaa
und British Empire heavyweight
champion will have his postponed
contest with Argentina’s Cesar
Brion at the White City Stadium,
London, on June 5.



Don Cockell, British, European
end British Empire light heavy-
weight champion and Randolpn
Turpin, holder of the British and
European middleweight titles, wilt
cppose American fighters on thé
same bill,

Jack Solomons, the promoter,
will call this pfogtfamme his
“carnival of champions for the
Festival of Britain” and it will
take the place of the Turpin versus
Dave Sands (Australia) British
Empire middleweight title fight,
which he now hopes gr on in
the same Stadium in September

Solomons has the names of the
opponents for Cockell and Turpin
but is waiting for confirmation

before he discloses them.—Reuter.

in 375 lb. Drums

SSS

CLASS

vie arr

SO ss



f




PAGE 1

FRIDAY, MAY 4. 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAf.F THREE ••Looking At Pictures" / 1 XOSCAPE PAINTING Ail and Exhibitions Officer. British Cow %  neend of hir lectures "Looking at Pictures" at the Museum this week. The subject of the lecture was Landscape m art. Mr. Harrison said that landscape like the portrait made its tirst appearance in art in the votive paintings of the Madonna and the Saints in the background — ———' Landscape was not painted fot r-U'U*.- A _• ItaaU but was dra*aed in as part l.llllumi & ATI n paVMM com""': From Great Britain %  AXfl'RT %  J.OIMI ou norii landscape alone would have ..cpear.,! as extraordinary as Ihe j^. „„.„„, >n d. uuAll l^ii.'STT? —rtTirt i.' ""reduction u IM Ixhibilion or ,ijr„J !" „-..,.hTjuh,^! ,Y CMkUW. Art from Brilai.i the type ol 1 subject fashionable **iSSi with purchasers. In many caw the artist depicted jn the barkKround his home town, vtllatcc or countryside II HI i.iii Barkground Mr. Harrison compered a EuroMr. Harrison compared a turn,._,„,„ ' *,.*••..•. .,„... .. Though the art of child* may reflect the peculiarities o(| their environment and mode of life, il has nowhere any ipecifirally national character The •nlld expresses universal charac Tel Holy "F.imlly into Egypt painting of the same subject .-i Huitian painter in the Cathadnl at Port-au-Prince The Haitian pajntar had drpictci what at flr* *eemed to him lranffc. following the mule of the Holy Famil; .mi academic prejudices. It folio that to those visitors who arc familiar with the art of the i-mliluMi nf their own countries. thete drawings from Great Britain will not strike any THE COMMITTEE for the 2.000 year* celebration of Pans offered Exchange a banquet for 2.000 old poor people Picture -how. \ltbe pistes to the banqa#t.--Erpri'*<. il tbe Otand Hall of tbe Stork •falters and waitresses carrylni i What Will Become Of nd i^The Coleridge Grounds By H. O. HUSBANDS second mule m which were """riling note of originally It strapped three brightly coloured %  not in the nature of the child chairs. During hts travel* II >* original but only to express Haiti he met n family of peasants directly its own individuality; th moving house and there strapped Indreidtnrilty of u lastna an. tu the back of u mule were chairs feeling being, but not the originresembling those depicted in the nlity of a thinking and InvttlUni Cathedral The aftlat had Introbeing. Il is an ia.porl.iiil distuic duced a Haitian background tolion, nnd we know now that th< his painting as European nrtists faults of the old methods of teachhad done long ago Ing art were due to this false Imaghiarv landscape htaa. The child w.is cniled upon aS^Js^si ';:.'"• ^ u ?n^r^ .i CT ^rris % ,. 0 „ s m^**, * .. P ,„ ,„. -*** %  .*.. * „ landscape to the votive platan pre-adoleecent rag* of men..-l • lk •,*• *•. %  "<• > ">%  <£ %  >*"* "••£ Breughel taveated a numb.-, ..( .l.-volopment. tension will surely uattracted No club has been occupyini !. 11 , ,..-.....J-inc. H, ->y what seems lo be a row of pinl lhes~ (rounds (or quite a while. Kk2TSp^bJS.WdSS. Aim is Enjoyment cubB ivin entirei, to a pen* ami with those built up an imaginary The new methods which have landscape en Ins studio table from met with *uch success do not whuh ru painted. Laooanlo da LMcaaaarUy exclude observation .-..nimended the :.ludy %  and analysts—there are floweri poa <-f damp patches r studies and landscape sketches walls until mountalni.. rocks and the present exhibition inglned. reveal quite exlraordinar>' powers %  torfalta could ba Leonardo's landscapes almost wholly imaelnai-y: nowhere new methods is to secure at all In nature within reach of the coiw the child's enjoyment of ? ortist did such land-capes exist, .hi., uinntie activity which is the This school of linaginurv landhandling of .. pencil or brush and sca(;e thoughl in term' of sy nlh( oxilo,!alion of colours. Thi; boh. fiiaham_ Sutherland, the ^ ly ^ do ^ pJl^apiM the the school boys, Hie rehponsibility .r you were u follow up your 0 f keeping them turn nnd In a curiosity, you will llivd ..ut that ton dition suit.ible for games. If you were viewing, in th.dUMnct. >teps ore not taken in the near the new Coleridge School new f„| Urf lo make use of the ground* which Doufos, st IVter. which is well whon the school Js transferred. on Its way to completem deterioration of the grounds will contemn, rj BnflU h paJnaar. i ^.vity t.. becorat aa Instm'tivc !" > a SZJLJS^LaSS :i duct defendant f thN -hool i „ t ^.f,t, il t _-.„; „ ,* P „ them a fine—though smal—pay Coleridge Schbd will be rather small ntui anII may not be thought advisable tique looking editice at the Reeto convert the grounds into a lory HHl. St Peter. tt< OCeupy pulilic playing tle'd. Then antnis new school, which has lieen other wcrth while alternative built on modern English plans. tould be for sofre cricket club They will be leaving behind to rent the ground uiv landscape Another 1> landscape %  -,h "*•" potential!!,.-., n. prlndpal T3LFSS!**' SSSS?^?. !" S iluchurch. A|.:,.t from the Si "„;,'" ,„;,,! £• "' '"-''-her t mmm su8SSm^SnSi m. !" ;' fhooi;. U. ol Ih.round., club, itii natura uwn ana '" native. Wha! is before all fAJi; %  ,„„.,*, have in Ihe past rented K'ound* ear y pamu-r. wmbTta ." %  necesK,,., I, lo ccMla an almo, b ~ n •"""—" ,„,„ „„. „,.,,',„ „, „,e par!*. "r ii.. 1 il,, V-5Tle Lul hii pnr "' whi wi '"*"" ""• chlld M n >' "' ,h paridiioner, ol SI. The Leeward Cricket club (Sec...,...V,..,i, ,..!.,. 'XihZ !" ;,! to exteriortie Ihe rich and vivid peter arc anxiously looklnj lorund DivuHoii) were the flrM rent:' % %  ,e '1u? InS. Ihem ari maim"">'rv In IU mind. Thl, ward lo the occupying ol the new en of the ground, and they had involve*, in il; positive aspect, school. But, they are at the same the monopoly of them for quite j „. ,,, ,,, ,.| "" %  "cation of .elf-.-onll.le.He in |i, IIP wondering what will become numlier of yeara. ih.i based on I the.hl!.l ; i.ui itie.e Ig a nefaUve. of the ground* and the m I conception ..I Ilu '", %  '"1 ,, •', preventive aapec; r..„m, which ara now in uaa. ,„ -.,,,1.1 uln. I%  .-... InBu. whjrti call, for even greale, skill Queallon. lueh as "will we ae. .-,... i i„.i. Roman ruin '"t In " teacher. The ,„o,icricket, foolb-ill. athletl, Claude le l/irrain Minted picehlld i. nn Imitative animal, anil s porl-, .ind oniny lures nf Imaginary aorta and Ple* up with Incredible ease. t nc e grounds, o lawns I ,.-..,,. Ideaa. ,lv ;, ny uliosyncra.ies which allowed to run to Gradual!, IhU Kboal at panning the li a gta r M an ani.t. may post„ place just fit ror me rearing „-,'.--:%  •" 3—SCT*ji^r"t — applied the same notions lo the 'ess. but also the more widely „f .heap and goats "tj „ .ujjio^d Jlv i. .., towns of Its day It deplete! distributed sophistications of Perhap. the best answer lo th. ^ w " '^'J.unVSbJf The beautilul and romantic eilirs books, magasme, and film. It Is quM tlon He. in the practicability .econd division cricket status. The whose .,,,,1,1,.as such w.ra impossible allogelher le exclude of converting the grounds, Into,. ""don t_l_ .v. ho rented too sxaggereled. II was a poetic ren. Ihese Influences, and perhaps nol public playing deld-lhe first far rou ds ,'"f^,.,^ ..,,,". „,,.,..* deling Instead ,.r Ilia anisl desirable; hut Ihe good teacher the p.tish-^r. lo exaggerule .lie l-in.*unUI lliey faded oulntlci imagining a landscape, lie romancan Had the child to a recogr.iIdea a little. Into a country park, about three year, or existence li.i-.-d the s.cnc ttaat lay baton lion based on perception and ugtDJ the two school rooms as J sinco Winton". the ground? lUm. feeling, of what is genuine and pavilion und casino. were Dll j y regularly used bl II. %  Revi.lulion III Landscape insophisllcated in Its own work. „.___ ads school and. once a yeai, f... .1 M Not .,11 land-cap, 1,,-al.M Self Crillci.m JSjSS^h^&JSSrtSSi Jus. a few Week, ago they wc I .reward iTlmquiahed Ihe i.iuuiid-; about twice during their '. regime, Ihe lust timo beim; dur. more fairs at ing World War II whet. Uhorl r will thev be "S*' u P l 't | "ol lorceu the meirtiier'. ruln. or may be. to decide to diuolve their tlub. atmosphere for childV : ereoied of %  hem[ ,"" Jn this gUttartnd fashion. In The necessary Knsland I love of dowers led to happy creative a a love of delail in landscape, largely ba Ilia This appeared first In English .dees and. needlework, and ..ached its peal, themselves nv in Carolean embroidery. The besl critics. At some school English school of topographical represented in the exhibition ,. artists wa< the natural KIIIO.II. nlgh | y successful svslem of grouo """," '"' %  %  of this influence: factual reprecriticism has been evolved by ~ senl.tlon and detail now betas,lhe eacr er>i wh lch. far fro,', ol immense importance. Inducing ")lf*onclousnass of Early In Ihe 19th cenlurv th" ,„| se prid „ responsible for English pa-n cr Constable effected ,„ c cc mp | ct abMn „ „f aophlatl. a rcvolulion ,n lanriaeape painting. „,,„„ ,„ ne cm dren -, wotk „„ d which had recently come lab. ,„ „, h h ,„ reeognised as a form of art. Constable and Boniungton both formed links between painting In ;"""C_~""r England and France, anil Ihe-. S,. !" :."? niiuen.ed aron bolh sid ,. be similar to the Intended purpose %  the Princes. Alice Playing ,"J*" >„P" r "''l "p,"^ "''"""" One will still be able to tary schools of bl Peter. Many are looking torwaid '• ll.e childre,, idem','T M ",„ vrt fnottiall and lenMany are looking rt'^'r ^'^rarEF^" 1 "'"Ju.f-use'of baffled if I hud to ft l m a (oiilball pool coupon" Sin M the Hon. Margin. Lambert, 45 -year nl ( | tcholnl daughter of Viscount Lamben. the vi teran Liberal. Tlie British foreign Office hav.anpai %  k' 1000 n year. Cor pail time work Dr. Isfimberl iw exiieded in haw a bigger salary, as hem will be a lull-lime appointment Expert On Austria She speaks and write-. Geini.n ami Fteiirh as easily us she do*-* English She is an authority oh Austria, and during Hie wai bnuJcj-! new*, in that countiv Ironi th,. BBC'. In Idondon Dr. Lambert fllares u studio Hat in St. John's W<> . as leeturei in nn ilcr-i history at University College. 'Read Vewspapers' "I shall hav u to give up lecturing after September I, when I go to my new work." she said In her lectures sh t tells the lludonts to read the newspapers "Model your essays on Ihe terse Stylaj that Journalists use." she ocivises. In her new )ob she will head a staff of about IS at Cornwall House, near Waterloo Station She will lake her Siamese ca Plira with her to the office. Phra is the eaulvalcnt in se tf lhe English knight's Overseas League Gives Coektail Partv LONDON. Hag I I"wentv two couniriea were i.'preaenii.i ai a cooMall part] which the Ove.-seas League gave 'n member* visiting Britain foi lhe Festival. From British Guiana came C V A-.hurst and lhe Distri.i Commissioner from Antigua. Mia. v Harden w% Ofetra A I was represented by 10S pcopu ...iland by SO. Earl Mountbatten of Bunn.. uelnming the guests lo Britain said it was important to real exactly what the Feativa) stood lor, Britain was at present spending a large part of her ii.itioiial income and effort at) rearmament. riot to fight WJ. but to prevent U There was no better wav thaUM nollval of showing ind w.nld Bntain'k peaceful mtci. 1 UOM The Paatttral w m taicq an outwanl and visible sign ol t"ie goodwill of Britain exlende %  to all who extended fo Mounihatlens l'i... : ,1 Lady Mou'iib-i:. ;. "" 9 uncling acquaintance with people she h.s uu-t ..II „v.-i the world Air Chief Marsh;.! Sir Arthur Longroors with whoai W M.n^h..l Sir Wild..,, USB, chief of tlie ImjierialJ General Staff. said no twol B rWafc asi haid done more aal Amhassadi>rs for their eouattyl than l^rrl .nut Lauh MosaMbattotl I Ashursl iv .. d.nh > l.itoi i West Indian itandi .it the Biittsui Industrie* F.ur and Eai He laid Krater that h,. ;,,„! hj il coltaafuaa ar varj %  attiileol i n 1 I -' tt with the .iltent.o. i Caribbean pnxtuce is atuacun from thottaands of people evei das Particular Intwaat taken in aMiplM ai W. | ., timber. M.^t VMIton lo the I" be surprised m UM N.uiety of thing-. prOdSKM in Hie W.-sl Iiuliea. -Realer ^\auUw^oveuiteJjf. V^O^// ^Caifesati* B"uu.ua( lac* f*o*rdr . so %  •)< lanoolh ... dillcartly petise Into .i fortune ftmn the flir irada Hg later owrwd six theatres ml r.iinii i i i .i around Teek township He loaned money t.. So rlarry to buy too Laka Shore mine prapart) and thortly after gold was found h< turned down Six llarry'i Offfl lo pay off the debt with stork in thi 1 iiuniiig company Mr. Kaplan gave as hi* Pta O Ott that he knew nothing about lhe gold industry —ICP I Stigmata *Vfarks POMTOF SPAIN. May 2. Stigmata marks inunk* resembling ihe wound, "f I'lui LJ nbout one-eiKbtli of an inch In* diameter, plainly visible on BO infant here, nitraitetl i. nuiiilie' of viitnrtn the mother' horn The mother Mrs. Herott o' r>efannes Street. Anrn.i. Inlng her devotion during Drognanc3 u responsible for the marks. Bha i Linn-, iha i onatantlj knelt before a crucilix in |uay nnd supplication to the Iruwll Jesus for s,ife delivery —

cs. when allowed colour. He registered a visual free expression, are found to be impression of a scene at a certain quite evenly distributed." time In the same way that th.* cpmera registers a scene at 0 Ihe omission of unnecessary delail. personal report from "iiird on his recent America from whlrii Saturday, %  lion At a Press Conference held October Raymond. 21, later Prince Hernhard said be bend first sent oveiseas war Moved the President and Madame brother Derek 20, peron were exceedingly popular. volunteered for Korea. There seemed every reason Yesterday their mother received believe that in any free election given moment. The impressionists. Cezanne added to impressionist however, painted onlv impressions palming a solid architecture. This ol scone* not photographic detail, solidity of eonnruction was offset Lanascapc now became a pure by the vibration and movement subject in art. for an ordinary of detail, so that his landscapes 50n ticce of land or a cornfield became did not become dull ot heavy, on interesting and individual John Nash brought to English painting by suggested shapes and painting the order of Cezanne. telegram, the President would recel' killed III (east 71) per cent of lhe vMes. The Prince added in reply to youngest another question that he had seen n 0 evidence of a totallluru" regime in Argentine and that y third ^ntmry lo reports President volunteer for Korea loo p PTOn drove about freely wilhMrs. Kmne told reporters. "The u mny armed guard. pact has come to an end". — —Hauler. her second fateful Derek too had been action Thai leaves the brother. Valentine 19 I am not going to lei i Senior Short Story Competition The Eeaodng Advocate Invites all school-boys ami m lMl|. gll I* between the ages of 12—19 lo enter for IU Sealer Short Slors CODIIMllllon. Stories can bo on any subject, but should not exceed 500 word' In length and must reach the Shert story Editor, Adveeate <:•, i.t.t. Citv not later than Wednesday every week. The best slry each week will be published In the Evening Adveeate and the winner will reiclve a prize of hooka or Stationery to the value of 12/8. Send this coupon with your story. Naase Aa Sahool Heaae Addreae r t5E SURE OF ALUOVBROJJP^ CMM*^ < the faithful Cr i. %  %  i iui > ^ ut Hie Heauteiul. I'ljvsaN be preparea for your romanuc moment liet a !• take. ..[ UMKAM Tlill.rr SOAP. use It ralthfulry in your bath, shower and at the wash basin fur a sofl-smoothskin, radiant with natural PRFAM la available at toilet gooda rountcra throughout the island. S* v CS VWVING'c "'SJ YEAST-VITE The Only Pain Raliavar containing Vitamin B f For I HEADACHES j NERVE PUNS I COLDS | j CHILLS I ] RHEUMATIC PUNS ; 1 1i YourHc-lihiSask'tr Yra-i diw.lv.d la n milk . mm I fud yca~tt help* tune ui your syttrm so lasr to i;. i Sffinkir intoiakanwii ••': I lOmtnun PIH Whn. di.wlvi.i. PlASTIl' MULTI-C REG. $336 NOW 82.50 To Mothers who cannot ** &ep a supp/y on Aand8*6s at a moments nottce feed their babies non'tvrorr!rhy can digest .. ,;houl trouble. The aJdili.vn .if R.ibmson'. -Patenl' Berley prevents the milk formi.ig large clot-, in baby sl.tmachs, making it easy for Ihe delicate fU| -stive organs lo do Iheir a-ork raorouglily whilst getting Ihem ready lo digest hesvier fisods Ister in life Thai's why wise nurses feejd m.ehers always use Robinson's -I'atent'Barli ROBINSON'S • ATENT BARLEY SPREADS SINGLE REG. $514 NOW S4.25 DOUBLE REG $670 NOW S5.75 CREPES PLAIN & COLOURED REG $240 NOW Sl.40 MGHTIFS PANTIES BRASSIERES AT I THE BAKGAIN HOUSE | • 30, Swan Street — S. AI TMAN Proprietor l'llONK 2702 •''.-.•.-.-.•.•.----..• %  ---.--.-.-.----'.•%  .V.'.HUttMv % 



PAGE 1

PACI ni" BARB MMis \nv<>< \n liiinw M\V I IKI Qwrib fiaUinq Bridgetown Players Again Bridget own Ptojn lion It Theatre May 16 This play hau a long and cessful run in in* West End U.S. Surgeon rjR LOCIS T wHioiir I,onHon It %  Retirement ', and a i other successful piny* Mr. Perev'i •1 name u Edv and he has served as i v i use .4 Con. The play is one of I auepenso *ith never a dull I,,.' I %  o ol thtf leading pill i Mi Btaydon Mi Charles Howe and I> the Gencnii Be prepared li i MISpi'li | To-morrow'* Fair Matthias Assistant Curate Fund she-ild do well '. *55 pf the rram • :Fan at the Hastings hZS ££ d ty "* F#rt A "<** tcmotww. judgmg from the aZrJSPffSL m ? rn n ,m ih *" man> %  tall and side shows that 'o the island and spent *ill be in operation Needlework. as guesU of Dr. household, rakes, books, plants, Seoit of Woodices and drinks will be on sale in. ind l *rftt#tl by Edw< Street. i WothSurReom of Harlem HnsI ml B.B.C. Radio Programme MB AND MRS W BRADSHAW were at Seawall yesterday to mMt Miss Csrin Oldby and Mr Erik Ohlison. Mr. Oblason Is Inspector Oanaral in South America of A/B Alvldaberg*. Industrial They ar rived by K.WLA. y*Wrday from Trlnldsd D R AND MBS. K KUCZYN Ne* Exhibition (pronounced Kooehin<-j-HR next exhibition u nong the passengers M" First Vi.ii ERIK A OHLSSON. sj at %  ing Ihe passengers 1 Museum begin* "today for 1 W I present tit Barbados. He M Q iscagne from (l(ur WPOkl n „ of Children's An Inspector General In South Amcr%  rday. Dr. Kuczynski trom Greal Britain and bj shown ica of A B Alvldaberg* Industrie' has come to take up in appointby arran gement with lh BrttHh Sweden, representatives of F.n:. pflMtr %  Hi" Council In an adjoining room are Original Odhncr and Halri I His last appointsni im phi ol Children's Art from ufactUrers of Adding and Calcula'.Ba Resident Surgeon at the various West Indian Colonies ing michines Accompanying hin Princess Margaret Rose Hospital which makes an interesting comIs Miss Carln Oldby wit, In Edinburgh. parison. The exhtbilion of paintstrates ihe working of the OF. KUTTEL '"f 9 bv Sybil Atteck. the Trinid id m;ichmes. At Seawell to meet them irtlst which has attracted much were Mr and Mrs. W Bradshaw. st'IRr iVl (Mrs liaydstM'l daughter). who arrived' from Paris yesterday attention contii Qstassjas) will ba In the West Indies until July. Her husband who rx an art director with Phillips radio in Paris is coming to Barbados, In July for a short holiday. In Paris Mrs. de Kultel is a representotive of "I^ncome" French perfume manufacturers. Sho has with her samples of their % %  test perfume "Magic" which she .. U Ufc N I after her holiday hilt Mi-de Kultel uttndl visiting t \ bQ> HWIA accompanied by Mr and Mrs. Cecil Hope-Ross. Mr Hope-Ross 1* Manager of Meswii D Hopcttoss in Trinidad. Here for a i.hort holiday they arc all staying at the Ocean View Hotel Pre-retirement Leave A FTER working in the Guv.inment Service for Ihe past 33 V i; Innlss, of "CarH.iv Street, has now gone on leave prior to retirement. Her ;asf post was in the Registrar's Office where she was In < the Record branch. ntil 14th May Of KlTTKI Mr Bradshaw is his agent ir Barbados This is Mr. Ohlsson'first visit to Barbados. Slttc< the;. loft Sweden, the> haw vi.iuPris, London, New York, Ce.ilni U'uba, Trinidad and now. Barbados. When they leave here they will visit the F W.I. Puert< Rico and Jamaica in their circuit north. Mr. Ohlsson's headquarters are In Rio de Janeiro. With Cable and Wireless TMIANSFERRED to the engineering staff of the Hnrhados Branch of Cable and Wireless after a snell in Nairobi Is Mr Normaa E Walter who. accompanied hv his wife nnd daughter arrived from England yesterday bv the Ga*eogtr. . Mr. and Mrs Wilfred Alston's son Robin, who goes to school in England came in by the same r-hlD. Lighter bide I N ENGLAND, a conference 00 the West Indies is being arranged. I understand, l>v ihe Council for Education In World Citizenship. The conferenev will probably take place In London In June. The serious topics will cover general problems allecting the West Indies. And for lightei cnloitainment Boscoe Holder, the famous West Indian dancer, will perform. W.I. Tour O FF to Grvn I.M %  i. Nurse F Udell. Chief Nursf ul the Coloifial Office, who Is oi an official tour of this area, uefor she returns to Barbados June 2 she will have visited AntlfUS It Kilts. Trinidad and Britisl (;.ii.im. She will remain here foi live or six diy before leaving foi England via the l.ahomas. Coming In fit m oG on Wednes%  Mi C H Burton an( Mr Cecil Jordan \l\ IM I III S OF I'lIM BY THE WAY T HE Government pciUirbed Rupert and the Ice-flower — 19 lid to be and I, are debarred from followby the ing ibe inquiry, which Is behind case Of tho butcher who gave away rlosed doors; but let us crouch soup, without having applied for behind this pile of old clothes In -i catering licence. It Is bvllcv, A Ihe passage, and prick up our that there are many people giving furry ears. There! Do you nSSdeJ at street-corners hear that'.' Canon Sparklegrass i> once or permit of demands that the Commission be given a model of Fumbling's Saia M high official yesterday nothing much wrong. In itself, with occasionally giving I hi nr.s to the old and destitute. I ,.; .1 should Ix.done through the h innels. after registration. -atlon for form 1871/364 T I 92 S-738 cd. which, correctly llllcd up, and witnessed by %  civil servant, entitles the B lo spply fni an interview, with a view to obtaining I iirv forms foi the gran", of a temporary licence." fi'lun,I cloKott dnon I MAGINE, detestable reader. this harassed Commission trying to decide what the Dorset i: i CommlttM can poss.' the ventilation a brtmlem twmipr hat. •nen's orchestr.i %  way at llic Chanson TriJle. We, bestial reader, you By BEACHCOMBER bilmless bowler lo study. "It wil all take time and trouble," h says, "but I. for one. am not afraii of a dreary task in the service of His last words are dnWDtsI by Sir Archer C'Zlpp") FastnerV mocking challenge; "Oh. go outside and wash a rhlr you want a dreary task r. ,%  %  ^' "> '^fe>,] %  >ioi.J Ruprn rcalitf ilu *roni nd ol ihe hill, bui he fin do nodnni id nop ihe lrd* Off b* tin (iy oui h 11 vhoi inn J w.o-driii. Guping sad btvaih'tfit, he urugglf ou: J'td wli up. To hit (iromihmrnt i (herilijl tic ii bc-iming JI him within %  touplr Ot yardi diiiane*. Ii i( |h riinnin* h.ire. Well, well." chatWI*. ihe trtaiUfl. Yea ..inn ? Hiv >un drcdr.l io look : u .rrlowsri. too ? " Plan* .. Hal lit yoj ulk.r-i ibaur ?" h;iprr* Rjpf well as other attractions—dart hoopla and lucky-dips Incidental lntel!i(ence hnse waste In sVcn4si \I AKING f a **** ' "*** IVIlson has a borne ^" A usually entails year leisraiea joined the Asaliminary spadawork '0"'lmie the eruis.. —Matarday Evening Past hack home — L.E.I* PA.XKTTA I^wer Braad Street IIIIISS AOI ATK til II II.MMI M.mb.r,C MATINEES; TO-DAY A TO.MORRO Wsl 5 pm I O Ml.II I III MOMIV1 Ml.HI il S in JAMES STEWART DRESSES of all Types N. y Jour nil A II \ .-..^-*Jlfl* LEWAYRES If*. tfiiMj > %  xi a^ -' IOUIS WOIHEIM : c j Plu. : LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE Willie lihl STAR DUST Walter Burkr SO IN MVE 1 i.mi-. ll>P-'lile ... SONG OF SONGS Ken Much II Ihtll. SroU IFNNKSSEE WALTZ Chester Holder WILDEST GAL IN TOWN. t.l BS1 STARS : raid !tal*lr A I'hyllb. Collymore Tl< Kl I* M Salr TO.HAY A TOMTI'. 36 in. MARLANE CREPE in All Colours S 1.8.1 36 in. FIGURED CREPE S2.S.1 36 in. STRIPED SILK Assorted Colours SI.80 36 in. FLOWERED CREPE gS.lS 36 in. DYED SCROLL CLOQUE _.S.i: EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 460O YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 STOP THAT LEAK IN YOUR ROOF JVOW We offer EVER1TK CORRIT.ATED SHEETS RED CEDAR SHINCLES ROLL ROOFING — Plain ROLL ROOFING — Sd PITCH PINE DOUGLAS FIR THE II Mill UION O-OPEKATIVE t"OTTO.\' FAITOnV I.TB. I.I MBIK DEPARTMI N 1 PHILIPS ELECTRIC BULBS 3 200 WATTS SCREW & BAYONET AND ELECTRIC LAMP SHADES BEAUTIFUL COLORS IN BAKELITE FROM 27c. — $1.29 THE CORNER STORE \



PAGE 1

^ MAC ARTHUR QUIZZED BY SENATE Investigation took place behind closed doors . Russia Can Launch Punishing Attack" Upon Jupan WASHINGTON, May 3 GENERAL McARTHUR this morning began to testify in private before a Joint Committee of the Senate on his policy for the Far East. The Press and general public were excluded A censored transcript of the proceedings was being made available page by page for publication The Oeneral walked through applauding crowds to face his interrogators. Pickets evidently protesting against the hearing being closed to the public appeared outside the Senate Office building carrying placards "We don't want a Truman rig ged hearing "Don't cover up blunders with secrecy," and "Russia knows our secrets, why can't we?" Corridors were roped of? and Ktcd with police guards as the nrr.ii entered and stepped Into lift to take htm to the CommitAttlee Denies RedslJsedU.K Materials LONDON, May 3, Prime Minister Attlee toda> denied in the Commons that strategic materials from Britaii had been used by Chinese Com munisli againt British troops u Korea. Opposition members who had intended to demand debate this subject next week are now partly calmed. But some am. pressed, anxiety after Attlee hud said some rubber was being sent to China. But It was doubted if the: would be completely satisfied by a detailed account of goods supplied to China this year, whlcn Attlee said Sir Hurtle-. Bh cross. President of the Board of Trade would give next week. Answering Winston Churchill Attlee laid the future policy on the export of strategic materials would be in full accord with United States policy not only on rubber, but on other materials. heutrt tfc Ike" Would Oppose MAC NEW YORK. May J. General Dwight D. Eisenhower would accept Democrotic nomination for the Presidency in 1M2 if Republicans put up General Douglas MacArthur or Senator Robert A. Tafl. a veteran Washington correspondent predicted here. —Reuter I'M Orel leak came from the Committee room when Sent Hugh Bullir < Republican Nebraska) quoted General Mac Arthur as telling the Committees he believed that Russian Forces in Siberia were fi defence only. MacArthur said he doubted Russia could have occupied Japan as a result of the removal of United fltntes garrison troop* to Korea. Japan could not tx taken except by amphil>iou>. effort. He said Russia had Ihe capacity to launch ii "punishing attack* upon Japan though he did not believe the could overrun Japan until she had command of the sea and air. "How long she would be able to maintain the effort in all-out war there is of course speculative", he said "My own opinion Is that li u-ould rnt be too long 1 believe that their efforts would deteriorate from the beginning of hostilities. MacArthur quoted various estimates of So\iet air strength In the Far East hut figures e"ete deleted from the transcript. Most uf UaCS aircraft were lighters. Of these moM were ids aji I aftlT excellent, he said. Hussia probably sulTertHl greatly from the lack of maintenance facilities and petroleum supplies. MacArthur asserted that l few additional ground troop*. could finish the fighting in Korea ked up by "full capacity" a ked up by naval effot "Monty" Sees Pope VATICAN CITY, May 3. Field-Marshal Lord Montgomery, Deputy Supreme Commander of the Atlantic Pact forces had a 25 minute privaf audience with Pope Pius XII today. Montgomery arrived here on Tuesday for military inspection and talks with the Italian Government and Service Chiefs. He is expected to return to Paris tomorrow. —Heater. Eleetoral Reform TEHERAN Ma\ 3 Persia's new Prime Mm isM Dr M Kthamcd Mossadeq. told the Majlis t Parliament) to-day that he intended to Introduce electoral and municipal reform besides nationalising the Persian oil industry. — Reuter He said his connections with tht I Uong were largely nominal and his channel of tommunlcn tlnn was defined as United States Army Chief of Staff He allege! lhat his reports to the Untied Nations were censored by State and Defence Departments. Earlier he said thai he believed 0) On Page I. SEAMEN REFUSE TO WORK WELLINGTON. New Zealand. Maj .t British merchant seamen to-day refused to work. They made their decision at .t meeting called to discuss the tenweek-old dock strike for more pay during which Government hns de-registered the waterside Workera' Union In Auckland the main troublcspot In the strike, between 200 and 300 members of new Unions wenl to work to-dav escorted by the biggest force of Police and service i^ien ever seen there.-Reuter. 11,000 Join Up WKLLINC.TON. May a More than 11,000 people hav joined an emergency m lulluv. log the lead of an entnr Dutch Legation staff. The organisation was formed after the Prime Minister of Holland called on Monday lor a force to combat •attempts to overthrow art Ofdtfl) Government by lout-' —Reuter LIE ON WAY TO U.S. LONDON. Mav 3. eral Trygve Lie New * P** week-end. the West Berlin Tele graph said today News of the arcident had only |u*t become known, the paper said. —Reuter Ben Gui-ion In U.S. WASHINGTON Mav S. Israel Piime Mmister David Ben Gurion arrived henfrom Tel Aviv to-day fo, a three weeks' visit to the United S ate*. H will discuss Israell-Amcricai relations with Presiden Truman —Reuter TIN DROPS SINGAPORF. Produc.ion of tin concentrate* in the Federation of Malaya for the first quarter of this year amounted to 10.393 tor the lowest since tha quarter of 1949. The t-vport figure for the quarte: was 18.379 tons compared will 18.914 for the Her today said that four Israeli soldM'i* were killed yesterday and that United Nations observers were m the demilitariseo zone checking casualties. He said firing was going on in the southern demilitarised none where Syrians fired on Israeli workmen in th e Arab village ol Nukeib. The bodies of 20 Syi.. found Inside Israeli territory today, on the scene of vesterday'fl battle west of the demilitarised rone, the spokesman added. An Israeli ommunique last night claimed that Syrian fore who crossed into Israel about half mile west of the demilitarised zone were engaged by Israeli forces and driven back —Reuler O'Duyer Replies MEXICO CITY. May | William O'Dwyer. United Stale* Ambassador to Mexico .'ince autumn, answering accusali that he contributed to organised crime while Mayor of New York City, said here to-day that his critics were trying to discredit hir for "reasons unknown". —Reatei 20 ARRESTED : lS0— Hester TOKYO. avitti rntons attempts to ii.'errupt a cutside to-day. and a corresponding There were a few small it oka up %  cremony are here riPTEEN YEAR OLD Yvouns Msaort of St Patnafcl Be ha. I receives from Mr. Albert V. Merer* vice Consul of the Unite* State*, an album of Jo Stafford record*. "Negroes In U.S.A." Win Prize For 15-Year Schoolgirl YVONNE PADMORE, 15-year-old St. Patrick's School Kir), won last week's competition "Whut aspen of life in the United Stales interest-, me moat The competition is sponsoud by Miss Jo Staff r?ti s show over the "VMrw of America", It IB a weekly feature, and Yvonne is the first Barbadian to win it. Yesterday sho received from the Vice Consul of the United Stales of America, Mr Albert V. Nyren, an album of Jo Stafford's records sent for her by Miss Stafford. King George Opens Festival Of Britain I By R B MAOLURCIM). LONDON, Hay 3 I^INO OEOROE VI and his Queen drove in state through cheering crowds to-day to open the Festival of Britain, nationwide celebration of the centenary of the great exhibition of 1861 Millions of their subjects, many of whom had slept on the pavements all night, jammed the street* of London to give a wild enthusiastic start to the six months long festivities, planned to show that the country can conquer its postwar perils and hardships 2,000 Dockers Still Out In L.K LONDON. Mav 3 Labour unrest eaattnuad lo-day rnoiig British arms worker* and ncker* Ovei 2,000 Manchester uocket-. voted tO continue the >trlke bCRiin a week ago after two men were suspended In QlaMOS) 3,000 dockers were asked by their Union to ban overtime until employers grunted recoinition lo a branch comprising clerical grades and rrnnemen. About 1,000 %  nnameM workers employed m the Royal Arsenal In London continued theu week-oiii %  tonian lcause one worker re. fused to Join the Union. Other (vukiiiea men have ••ecu Idle be>uler Greek Parliument For Dissolution ATHENS. May 3. The C.teek P-iliamcnt. elected In March IBM, IK to be dissolved New elections will be belt) W pWiii t ie i 15 This wi. agree-1 to-night I i Deputy Premier Popardreou. (DemoeraUe Socialist), and Ciencral PlaMlras. I^ttd.KPKK cCentn Part] arho tooei ej ttgvs. rnajorftf in the Houi —healer %  I in the sqna -K.iil Dr. m rr.i r i KVATT E^all Ht-lainS k al MELBOURNE. Mav 3. Oountin* more vote* has not changed the expeeled final reaul'. nf the Australian eV^-tions held on April 28—a slightly reduced Government majority In Ihe House of Representative! and a mi 32 to 2A in the Senate. Pmjil figures for .til representative seats and (or pafty represent, alion in the Senate will not be known for seven.. Deputy Leader of the Laboui Party and former United Nation*' Assembly President Dr H V Fvatt. will retain hi* seat at Barton, New South Wales— fteattr Culv|>so0niM sings very well. Yvonne said that she likes to listen t<> the Voice of America", and to hear Mu.. StafToid's songs, the winning letters fur the competition read The records received were "Alone together." Sometimes Unhappy," Ye*terduy", Walkin' My Biby Hack Home" and four olhei pMCH Tlie aspect of life in the United St.ite* which Interest* Yvonne mo.t The way In which negroc aj treated. she 'old Ml* Stafford. Ilei letter shows tho" in PairHeld Cross Road where she lives, ids ma guv I lies and books on colour prejudice ami listen pa Ihe Voleei of America, she has been dning a lot of thinking on her subject "I am always grateful to the Voice of America", for the chance of hearing how negroes there live hat in being donv in help promote their stand.irris of life," he wrote She finds it a pleasure to hear nd read about the way they are illowed to display their natural talent, whether it is in the form if taxing, acting or singing She thinks much of how tmlgranl* from Barbados live in America She calls them "Our boys." She said that "Our boys bt'Highl back reports of how they were Irealed and how evtry man, ol every possible race il % %  van a chance !<• mske his w* HI Mfe When Yvonne gnu hold of one lately from America, she like* tc be told of life out there and she hopes that some day Barbadian ram will be able to emigrate to the United Stales Mr. Nyren told her that xhe had done well to win the competition He IWped, stte would like the souvenir J"" •ent hei .pen carriage. •SCOHed b) hoi semen of the Household Cnv airy in shining breB-ipiat ueu.King tieoigc madi hi* speech declaring Ihe Festival pan The Royal Salute or 41 mi', was fired und bells pealed The King described the Festival s a symbol of Britain's abiding courage and vitality II nad been planned as a visible sign of nalionI ii achievement and eonAdencf • lh this Festival we look baik witli pride and forward With r* hlttOQ* he said l.c us pray that hy God's good grace, the vast range of modern knowledge be turned from de%  tru.tive to peaceful ends so that all people*! as this century goes on ma> lie lifted"—RsHter Woman Gradually Becoming Man Indian Party Plan Split" NFW DELHI, May 3. Prime Minister Jawsharlal fchru met 4fl rebel CongreeB mem hers to-day to nv te vMvenl a ie-eleclion spill In the allpowerful Indian National C0B< tteafl Pert) Hebels are threatening lo (nrin a new "Democratic Front" Parly which would stand in opposition -> Congi ess at elections n .* vornbei Men.bets ol the Congress Psity form the central Government a< w Delhi and In all slate* which IHS an elected leglslatuie tletiela tad already for.ned a "demucrnlie null" last year as a kind of back> bench opposition wing within th" ongress par! .• itself -heater Reds Fire On U.N. Patrol Near Seoul sal TOKYO. May United Nations unvoureu id north.-.! %  : S. 'o-da>. let strong reslstame loi ;h' fir %  ne in row dffyi Planes operating with the patrol, spotted other Urge groups and called for air strikes Allied pilot, had earlier reporter heavy motor truffle on N'oill Korean made during the night hen they sighted 2.700 rehtctei Communist forces encounterc %  orthesst of Seoul today poured mall arm* fire into the petrol Tanks and aircraft eu*ed many Chinese casual ties, the Eighth Army said. Another Task Force patrolling e road to Uilngbu met alro&l CoraenuaM toe 2 DsUta uth 0' the village, its obie.Uve Un|te:l Nations patrols to the northwesi Of Seoul, again engagcl eU-m-nt of an estimated Conin.uui*' regiment This time they fereed Communists to withdraw to the north TM F'Tth Air Foree pilots clalriUHl to have killtit or wound ed nearly SOW Communist troons yesterday. ^00 of them by n single drike north of Seoul hy land-t>B*ed BlgrlM plane—Reuter. Sack Acheson Move Now On WASHINGTON. May %. A powerful group of Hepuhh cans and Southern Democrats in Congress are preparing a drive to forte the dismissal nf Secretary of State Acheaou. Many supporters of the administration are apprehensive of the attempt The group proposed to den; funds lo pay Acheson'a salary after June 30 They aven contemplate halting the State Department budget for 1052 while Arhrson remain*.— h*Uter French Comitiuiiirtt Party Splitting B* IIABOLD KIM. PAItIS, Mat 3 France* new breakaway Communist group. Ihe "Communist Movement" now listed as one the country's political parties was believed lo have received m more Ihsn 3,000 or 4.000 Tradi 'Jnionlst sdhorenls to dale. leaders of the movement, form er Communist parly meniben issued a manifesto yesterday 111 tailing the parly "foi it* uncondU tional surrender lo Moscow" and railing for the defence of France igalnst all aggressor* Lea.lei of the breakaway >-. 4.t year old Charles Lstmolne "The French Communist M 1 merit" itarted In the coal mining area oV Northern Pranc where eoul. tv-Klile and steel VQrfcei iiave always iieen revolutlona<>' Dnd nationalist This revolt U In pait against the antl-nstinnalist pOlKB ol the c^Tlclul C'nmniunl-t Party i*^*Vvv,' rf V',A',VV' 1 AV>V>' l ^V/s>*sV>*A HOXOIH t YA V>W\ SOLDIER ROME, May 3. Soil from 800 burial ground* rnme to the tomb of the Unknowh Soldier to-d iy and President Einaudl held there j solcm' "peace and universal brother hood" service Mothers and widows of the fallen soldiers had brought grngll uins with earth trom Hie Military Cemetery, from throughout the country ind from Italian roineteriev abroAil —ReuUr THE ADVOCATE"' pay. fer NF.WS DIAL 3113 Day or Night KAItACIII. May 3 hil „ r led Mil tw .;iv n Aj.id Kashmir terrltni> ccording lo a report received MM to-day Irom Pulanderi Tinreport said the weman %  vry distressed" was attending tegular Iy a hospital unit In the rea The reiiori added that hair was growing on her CtssB and upper lip. Her voice was thickinlng and other male character111ie% were appeal .tig. Medical men in Kirarhi said modern hormone treatinci.t could in most cases retard sexual trsn. formations of this type Keuter PARUAMEW DISSOI.\ f/> AMMAN. Jordan. May S. King Abudallah to-day. disIhum Miss Stafford had solved the Jordan 1 Cuba Wants U.K. Owned Railways Nationalised HAVANA, Cuba. May I Prenident Piio announced to-day he would ask the Cuban Congress for nationalisation of the British-owned Uniled Railways of Cubn. The announce.nent was made at the Presidential Palace after the President had reached an agreement with leaders of two big strikes, one involving the nationalisation Issue But the statement which said — — • %  ihe President would send an "urgent meaaege' lo OongTeaa, gave no details and *>*t*)e>*ge*}fls*)t4)*9^



PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE I HII.VS MAY I. 151 He's Off Again . . . Around the World in 30 Days,' Say? QffdS/ Spartan, Dames pi ay to Goalless Draw Worcester Faces Defeat To-day WORCESTER, May 3 South African cricketers completely turned the tablet cm Worcestershire in their opening county match of the tour when at one time they seemed :o be lacing defeat. After Worcestershire had corned their overnight score of 135 for lour to 182 allout this morning. the South Africans lost their first five wickets for 25 runs. But the middle batsmen Van Ryneveld (29). A. Rowan (44) and Mann (49 not out I prevented a complete collapse and the tourists* total reached 117. When Worcestershire batted again they did no better than the early South A fin .ms and by the %  lose had lost six wickets fnr *0. ind were thu* 85 runs ahead —Reuter ON FRIDAY. June I, I am soiling out to report the most falternating r i %  > ,i motoriar thai has COm my way this year. 1 expect to M menth, and te n bid t>v four o' Britain's toughest road drivers !•. motor round the world In so day:, in the new A40 sport* car. They will taka tht route to America bv tvav of the MIddl,. EaM. India and Honolulu, over tin 1 oceana the UHun and the car will travel bj i If things Kto plan thay will BiTlva In Montreal, iiv back t<. Scotland, and niuior down I their itartlng i>olnt nt Londo'i Airport. AuMms arc not only supplyin .ha small sports car and the foui drivers. They are chBrterinf from KX.lt. Airlines adapted. four-enemed Sltj 10 act as flying tender. Non-Slnp Race This round-tho war Id eflori is iiimcd tn prova to tin world wharf %  S expertly driven llntish cur can do when raced non-stop round that world. I shall fly above the Cftf tp ra ooM Ita daaart, |ungM, and seo CfOJllng adventures The audacious plan sprang from a half-crown wager made by Mr. Leonard Lord. Chairman of Austins, with bald but tough Abu Hess, his 51-year-old public r> 1 a lions officer It was shortly after Hess— Hess and tWO Mher the teat of ennuning 10.000 miles into IO.OOO • i saloon A40 JeavOns is u bachelor, served seven year* in the R A.E., lives in Birmingham; ( .ricU-r r.erge CosUes. 48. who. with Alan at Indiana poll* .iveragcd 70.54 miles an hour (or i veil days and nights in an A0 i M '(Mired vehicle* fur DH r the AfisarleaM He is 0 family man (thre r children), proved once more th;i| he ig one lives at Rubery. near llirmingham. of the beat players at tU Bo not one el them on atfe is a Uon In the Island. Ra -as chicken. constantly in position to ward off .tn will work in pan Noire Dame attacks. Lloyd Gill two in the. ear driving and navlplayed very well at centre foi anting, and two resting in the ward for the Dames liana ubove. y^. Nolre Dame, Paul Munde20.000 factory sUff two of ncp „ 0 look „ f ,. w f r ie* best racing mechanics Theso Ihl s rtan n() unfurluL Soccer Results The Spa l-'mdTnier.ca^w^b^wlr; il !& hp >' wenl "**• (ia,| V |n n H m n,B oM orm rhev aril] By along ifftth ma In t !" 1 %  nn|(,0 ?„„ 1 T hc tha plane ,..loted v K 'l. M 1 **>* ****. W.lk.n,..r top pilot Captain J. J. Bak. brought off a few good si Mess decided thai the car and The Game the mother plane should be aM" Tn '* *amc started lo talk together. Arrnnging this Dame defending th haps lua hardest task. A dual. Spartan look thc touch special short-wave set had to be off. Soon after a coiner kick lltted tn the car. was awarded to Notre Dame June Heal Darcy McCotlin. their right Then he had lo get radio winger, took the kick but Coxle,nperaltng permits from each of brought off a good save before thc 16 territories the car will pass Moyd GUI. the Notre Dome through — England. Prance, centre forward, could get his land. Italy, Lebanon, Syria, head to the ball. holds 165 motor hi K records more Jordan, Iraq, Italia. Slain. Guam. Keith Walcott then than anyone clue in the world-Wake Island, Hawaii. USA., the ball from Cadogan had driven 10,000 miles in 10,000 ''anBda (including Newfounda beautiful shot bill Wllkl SPARTAN and Notre Dame played lo a goalless draw in their First Division return football match at Kensington yesterday evening. Th,name was one of the best seen at Kensington for „„„,,, 0| JfJ!?2£h2''i£. il, iron and one of the nicest gales. It was fast from d VJn^U* 1h c Um.Td K,niueginning lo end. a „ m taUotr; Division I. BIBCKDOOI The full backs for both teams played excellently and 0, Artf-nitl I. Fulham I. Portsmouth there were very little to choose between Gibbons (Spartan) I w..iv<-rhampton wandi-r o. and Browne (Notre Dame). Both cleared accurately and N *5 M *"'',•„ „ K .umh.j i -ery rarely conceded a throw-in. "T^'IV ,'" T' „, ?„.?, \ Swindon Town I. Nolls Fore*t £, Newport County 1. Head it v. I. Millwall I. (tie) Accrington Stanley 0, Trattinore Rover. 2. New Brighton 1, Chester 0 Wrexham I, Ilochdale 1. Scottish League DiVLsion A; Motherwell ?, Rolth Rovers 1. Glasgow Charily Cup: First Round. Ringers 2. Celtic I. Other matches: Dundee 4. St Johnstone 0. Manchester United 3. Aberdeen I. (C P.) Coalition Cabinet Atkinson's Selection Criticised Surrey Lead M.C.C. On 1st Innings LONDON. May 3. Close of play scores In Wednesday's llrit class cricket matches. M C C Urst innings all out 62. second Innings S2 for four. Surrey first innings all out 140. (non-county match) Cambridge University first Innings 124 for six. i nin |o bat. Run play, (non-county match). Ox ford University vs. Yorkshiie. (non-county match! no piny possible owing to ntta Hampshire first inninK.11 ou< 203, second innings fll for seven declared. Sussex llrst innings 101 for nine declared. Second Innings 160 for three —iCP) B'dos Friendly Football Association TODAYS IIMII:, Rangers I Penrode at SI Leonard\. Referee: Mr Roben Pun.. Gardner WMHghi Hrion June 5 LONDON, May 3. Jack Gardner. British. European lab Empire heavyweight champion will have his postponed contest with Argentina 1 Cesar Brion at the White City Stadium. London, on June 5. Don Cockell. British, European rnd British Empire light heavyweight champion and Randolpii Turpln, holder of the British and European middleweight lilies, will i ppose American fighters on the same bill. Jack Solomons, the promoter, will cill this programme his "carnival of champions for tha Festival of Britain'' and It will 'akc the place of the Turpin versus LiVC Sands (Australia) British Empire middleweight title fight, which he now hopes to put on m the same Stadium in September Solomons has the names of Ihf •.pponents for Cockell and Turpm but a waiting Tor confirmation before he discloses them— Reulrr. KINGSTON. Jca. May 3 Thc Gleaner's cricket crilic saving Longrield, to-day criticised the Kotra selection of Denis Atkinson on ttai also Wost Indian team savin* th ll wes. Wcsl Indians had come to the conclusion, following the with Notre making performances of Teat ithern Cricket from 1948 to 1DS0, that our cricket teams are being selected not on and sentiment Tommy Down Lawton Turns U.S. Offer MELBOURNE, May 3. The Australian new Coalition Cabinet will meet on May 11 Liberal Prime Minister Menzies and his Deputy. Country Party oasis or mediocrity 1^^,,. Faddcn arc discussing its ornpoaition In tUeir Iwt Cabinet Says Longfteld. "but the selecl'te Country Party ha f Denis Atkinson tus —Reuter. minutes in an AuMin two were in Mr Louis l-int bridge. Birmingham, office. Half-crown Bot Lord said he bud been struck wilh an idea whil,. driving to his office that inornmK—the rOUnd1he world bid. 'Til bei you there land). The total route i was in position and The Notre Dame rorwarc .olves trayellwent Into the attack and Mandi ig a dally average of l noo V illo received a long LS ich one-thlrd Will be Iook nard 5not K fl *;, ni m uround but the ball was divertei by one of the Spartan Uack: Notre Da overland and two-thirds bv %  roartng Across thc Syrian and Ari/on'i vided rude awakening. H remind* us thil the customs of the South still persist in the midst of our received world of acclaim. What explariand too.* ll n can the Selectors give for the hclusion 0 f this undoubtedly nediocre player? It is not (air to Atkinson. t 0 be persistently pitchforked into company which lb is something you can't do/' he deserta the car will travel In the th * ., „ a said. 'ill blast of June heat, so it will '? P h( '^iV said. "What is that?" asked Ram Lord replied: "I'll bet you half a dollar you can't drive round the world In 30 day Hess accepted The car ru> chose is the first open-bodied model on the famous A40 chassis. It sells abroad for under £600. As his team he chose:— he docs not belong. The inclusioi of Guillen for Binns might have shocked many, and to a lesser degree that of Prior Jones, but ne again attacked while ihere Is a ready explanation goal. Archer, their for the selections of both, there is be ntted with a while hood to f 1 *^ 1 J" ,\ cenlrPd beautifully certainly none for the Atkinson throw oR the sun's ravs In Jg Freddie Daniel, thetr left blunder. India the drivers expect to meet *mer who ran into the centre t .1nviisooni. forward poaition, railed to time "This ^ undoubtedly a deliberate The start : 11 a.m. from I/mlne r,a nm mlskicked. insult to the intelligence of the don Airport on Friday. June I. Miwd Opportunity Wesl Indian cricket public, and the The car will nose its way through Cadogan later got hold of the utility of our Australian opKingston down to Mansion. Kent unll and beat through the Notre P"" ""' twhere special RAT permission Dame halves. He took n shoT Bit Ssjaadron Leader Ralph 'ind to be granted) for flight t? from outside the area but ag-in Sleigh. 3y. who in an Austin made Paris. >ag Wilkinson was in position and the fastest-ever run from Britain And If nil goes well, within i saved. The next person to li\ to the Cape. Sleiah is a paint month it will be on the road out Wilkinson w s Tom Hcccc man, is married, has n child live-, nom Prestwtck in Ayrshire speed, u right wing for Sinrtan It, near Ipswich. Ing through the rught to London aent f n \ *£ Iv '"founder frTeller me.-hir.le It ,, n Id A ,JK iid not get over the ball properly tfhd It went high over the cross Both lnglleld and Lawrence Roberts, Gleaner'* Sporti Editor. find it impossible to understand the selection of Guillen over Blnns Trim over Goodndge, and Jones f Johns>uv lar. When the second half was only few minutes old Walcott ran TAX CLAIMS MAY MAlKE TURPIN SHY OF ROBINSON (By GKORGF. WI1IT1M,) tllh y0ung m n| Wlll b,. „.., ,.„ At last there hai arnv.i|>er-tax brackets oner his opponent ol whom Randolph Turmeetings with Brown, de Bruin through and centred from tr S ri. the highest explosive m Brit;,,,,( Sands Any further activities right wing There were, however. boxing, is mortally afraid, ,, the current financial year would no Spartan forwards in position It is not Hilly Brown, Of UM pul blm in the same predicament 10 score and Wilkinson saved USA Vbom be ngftta at Bto> that used to worry Bruce Woodea.lly. mlngham nexl Monday, It is not cock and Kredriv Mill' Ihe senseI" this half Spartan did most Dutchman Jan de llrum. his oppo \ tnt problem of taking pi.nrhes for f ,he attacking for the first ii.ri'. ..: Coventry QII May n, sole benefit of Ihe Inn 'I*en minutes. Thei Is it Australia's Dave Sat.i: i i |. IP ( ( itevenue. >'ere constantly going d rt-hom he will attempt to take the — Rrovrne and Straugnri Mills and Woodcock, aided by ,r „il w p atlack rmurt acccunUmts, solvod then Miflicullifs legitimatelj after ,,nisultatlon with the lax-gathers I kind of compromise is (Or Randolph Turpin if U) see him lighting lor a world title in London iii ini. I deal risks of arguing the < LONDON. May 3. Tommy lAwton, famous England and Notts ccunty centre-forward turne" i "' a mei •••• Empire mi< ""••:• •" %  "•" 3Ur£?£%X£&£££r "' -"i.. Notre Dame tried hard in the List few minutes to score ihr winning KOOI but when RoftPH Snyers blew off. the cam.%  # %  till gOJlllCSS. The teams were as follows: Notre Dame WtlWnson Browne. Stiaughn. L. Daniel. Capt., Arrher. Mandevllle. McCol Un, Gill. Pan-is. r. Daniel utn) I ask," says Randolph), Ihen the promotional machinery of Jacu Solomnm will unmedl geared for a world title figh: jK-ms: Roblnaoti BUI breakcr% uhead. Title Fight in Lie Summer Solomon's idea is EOT UM world Spartan: Cozier. Gibbons. leep in the Turpin household. Randolphs quhrtl] expresed J5?**^! d j !" d ''"" ( '-' l, "k-" that the mighty Ray has * M U-en hit by n middleith a real hung in his His own hands, he thinks, might be able to make things u*S !" SL f •*