Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




ESTABLISHED 189



Allies

harvbades

a
FOUR K@EEDOM AWARD



Win

Of Rivers:

U

TOKYO, May 2.

NITED NATIONS forces sent out aggressive patrois

deep into No Man’s Land today, the second day of the
lull along the Korean front. Communists believed to be
organising for the next phase of their “suicide” offensive
made small scale attacks on the eastern front. Elsewhere
they remained out of contact. But United Nations patrols
met Communist units ranging up to battalion size north-

west and north of Seoul.

Eighth Army estimated Com
munist casualties yesterday at
1,290. Officers said Communist
disengagement was similar to the
mysterious withdrawal in Chor
won-Kumhwa area about a week
ago just before their offensive.

United Nations planes attacked
North Korean traffic again today

claiming more than 150 trucks
foaded with supplies and twe
locomotives destroyed on mair

railways.

Jets blew up six trucks of an
ammunition train.

American aerial torpedoes won
a battle of the Rivers from Chi-
nese Communists to-day. Torrents
of water gushed through holes
ripped in the Hwachon dam by
United States skyraiders.

Communists had closed sluice
gates to lower the level of the
Pukham and Han Rivers and
make them easier to ford.

One of the dams was destroyed
A 10 foot hole was ripped in
another. Now the Reds will have
to build bridges to cross the
river. Their engineers will be
easy targets for United Nations
artillery and planes which blasted
the drive out of the nine day old
Communist offensive.

The front was quiet again on
Wednesday.

Probing Attempts
ommunists to-day mounted
light probing attempts below the
Hwachon dam in the centre of
the peninsula. These were block-
ed

Associated Press correspondent
Nate Polowetzky said Reds were
testing U.N. lines along the
Chunchon - Hongechon axis tradi-
tional invasion route down the
spiny centre of the peninsula.

Reds also tried to punch through
east of the Hw, ayn ear
Imje on the 38th paces
artillery planes and infantry
broke it up.

South Horeans still operating
about 29 miles north of the 38th
parallel on the east coast, broke
up a probing attack southwest of

nsong. .
weds ‘ore out of contact with
Allied Forces on the western
front north of Seoul. —(C.P.)

FOR CONFERENCE

r Own Correspondent)
(From ON GRENADA, May 2.

L. C. J. Thomas, newly elected
President of the Grenada Workers
Union has been chosen by his
Union to attend the International
World Free Trade Union Confer-
ence in Trinidad on May 11.

THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night



+ .
UN Plan Emhargo
F ‘ X
On Red China
LAKE SUCCESS, May 2.
United States will demand an
embargo on the shipment of
strategic material to Communis*
China when the United Nations
Sanctions Committee meets here

tomorrow, it was reliably learned
tonight.

“Strategic embargo” would
ban the shipment of atomic
materials, arms and ammunition

oil and certain materials
for arms manufacture. .
Twelve nations are represented
on the Committee, Australia,
Belgium, Brazil, Britain, Canada,
Egypt, France, Mexico, Philip-
pines, Turkey, United States and
Venezuela.—-Reuter,

used



Recognise Record

MELBOURNE, May 2.

The time of 11.96 seconds for
130 yards set by Panama sprinter
Lloyd La Beach in March has
been recognised by the Victorian
Athletic League as a wofld pro-
fessional record. ‘

La Beach starting from scratch

finished fourth in the Bendigc
£1,000 (AuStralian) professiona!
sprint on March 12. Three time

keepers clocked him at 12 seces..
11.96 secs, and 11.95 seconds
Affidavits testifying the accuracy
of the watches were submitted
to the Victorian League. Pre-
vious record of 12 seconds was
set by Jack Donaldson in 1911.
—Reuter.

one

New Persian Cabinet

TEHERAN, May 2.

Persian Premier Mossadeeq
formed and was expected to pre-
sent a new Cabinet to the Shah
later in the day.

A spokesman said. “This Cab-
inet does not claim to bring about
any speedy reforms. It assumed
power merely to settle the oil
question with the British. Later,
other national elements will get
control of affairs and implement
essential measures for the coun-
try’s welfare.” —U-P.

Cee,

50,000 Casualties

WASHINGTON, May 2
The Defence Department here
estimated to-day that Chinese and
North Korean casualties topped
50,000 in the first week of their
present offensive. These casual-
ties covered April 22 to 29.
—Reuter



1,000 Volunteer For
Anti-Strike Force

WELLINGTON, N.Z., May 2.

Men lined up at New Zealand
country’s new civilian law and order force.

orts to-day to join the
Their enrol-

ment for the emergency force came 24 hours after Prime
Minister Sidney Holland had called on every able-bodied
man to fight wreckers and trouble-makers trying to over-

throw orderly Government.



NO COMMENT

WASHINGTON, May 2.
Secretary of State Dean
Acheson, declined to comment on
Peron’s appeal to American states
to support Argentina’s claim to

pottions of the Antarctic. i»

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Darling, I have something
to tell you become a TV mother!”



Police in Wellington, enforcing
new get-tough orders, broke up a
march by 1,000 striking dock
workers yesterday. Holland's ap-
peal for civilian volunteers came
as the dock workers’ strike drags
ged through its 10th week.

To-day more than 1,000 men
had volunteered in Auckland. By
early afternoon about 100 police
used batons on Wellington strikers
when they tried to march through
police lines to Parliament build-
ings.

Marchers dispersed after being
told a deputation would meet the
Government. New Zealand’s in-
dustrial crisis stems from the dock
strike for higher wages—(CP)

Worcester Hit
135 For 6 Wkts

WORCESTER, May. 2.

Rain restricted play to three
hours and 20 minutes on the first
day of the South African touring
teams opening county cricket
match against Worcestershire here
to-day. In that time Worcester—
shire who won the tosg and batted
first, scored 135 for the loss of six
wickets.

The first four County batsmen
were out for 48, but Wyatt (25),
Outschoorn (23), Howorth (25)
and Bird (32 not out) prevented a
collapse.—Reuter.

REQUEST
LAKE SUCCESS, May 2.
Israel today asked the Security







Council to take prompt action to
force the retirement of Syrian
armed forces from the demilita—
rise the Huleh region
—Reuter,









MacArthur
Quiz To-day

(By PAUL SCOTT-RANKINF)
WASHINGTON May 2,

General Douglas MacArthur will
be cross-examined to-morrow by
a joint Senate Committee inch)d-
ing crities and supporters. Twen!y-
five Senators on Armed Services
and Foreign Relations Committees
have decided not to allow other
Congress members to attend the
secret hearing.

Their decision disclosed to-day
appeared certain to add to the
controversy in Cohgress.

House Republican Leader Joseph
Martin protested against closed
door interrogation,

The appearance of the former
war hero, the most controversial
figure in America to-day, will
climax the emotional controversy
that has raged for nearly a month
over the contradictory Korea war
strategies advocated by MacArthur
end President Truman.

When it was decided to invite
MacArthur before the Commit-
tees, attention was centred on the
reasons leading to his dismissal
by Truman,

Since then the debate has turned
upon the basic issue whether the
struggle between United Nations
snd Chinese Communist forces
could or should be limited to the
Korean area. :

—Reuter.

° e
Israeli Soldiers
Attack Arabs
TEL AVIV, May 2.

About 100 Israeli soldiers
attackea Arab inhabitants in the
demilitarised zone between Israel
and Syria today, a Syrian spokes-
man said tonight.

He said four Israeli soldiers
had been killed. Two Arabs were’
wounded.

The spokesman said Israelis
opened fire on inhabitants in an
attempt to steal cattle but Arabs
forced them to withdraw. The
exchange of fire lasted about an
hour.

The incident occurred northwest
of the mouth of the Jordan,

—Reuter.





.
Gairy On Charge
(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 2.
Two charges of the use of
threatening language during the
course of a speech in the Market
Square last Friday when address-
ing workers celebrating a wage
boost victory, have been preferred
by the Police against E, M. Gairy,
President of the M.M.W.U., who
is Summoned to appear before the
Magistrate next Monday. All
workers are understood to have
been instructed not to work on
Monday, but to converge at St.
George’s, because of the trial.
Though the stoppage is empha-
sised, it is not a strike.

Sentence Postponed

(From Our Own Correspondent)

: GRENADA, May 2.

Sentence was pending after
conviction on Monday by Acting
Magistrate W. L. McIntyre, on
two male members _ of the
M.M.W.U. who were found guilty
of charges of intimidating.

The Magistrate first decided t
rethand both in custody until the
devtision to-day ‘but ‘afterwards
accepted bail, releasing them,

Sentence is now further post
poned, Melntyre, a_ Trinidadiar
serving on the St. Lucia Bénch,
arrived last weekend to replace
Magistrate Bain who is on sick
leave.

EXCHANGE SHOTS

(Frem Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 2
Last night W. O’Brien Donovan,
retired Superintendent of Agricul-
ture discovered a strange man on
the prowl about his premises and
fired a shot in the dark. Another
shot rdng out in reply; then the
exchange ended.

Griffiths Asked

: LONDON, May 2.

Mr. Peter Smithers (Conserva-
tive) asked the Secretary of State
for the Colonies in the House of
Commons tonight what steps had
beén taken to improve facilities
for technical education in Barba~
dos in view of the recommenda-
tions of the Select Committee on
vocational and technical training
which started work in 1946.

Mr. James Griffiths replied:

“The report of the Select Com- |

mittee was received late in 1949
and as its principal recommenda-
},tion for the establishment of a

| training centre involved a capital

expenditure of $334,000 and a re-
current expenditure of $24,500 per

ject was deferred by the Barbados
Government pending completion
- f ¢

r al survey of the island









PRICE NOV& CENTS

Order Barbados
Rum At B.I. Fair

West Indians Get Free Beer

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 2,

At the British Industries Fair to-day, orders were
placed for Barbados rum and a table lamp made of Barbados
conch shell. Mr. John Dugdale, Minister for Colonial
Affairs, ate an ugli at the Jamaica stall when he visited the
British Industries Fair to-day. His two sons who accom
panied him ate a banana each. After eating the ugli Mr.
Dugdale remarked: “It’s delicious”. ‘

a eee At the Trinidad stall Mr. Dug-

dale said he understood Angos-
Bevan Votes

tura Bitters is bad for the siémach
With Attlee

bat Mr. P. fF iy
LONDON, May, 2.





Comptroller of Customs,
who was an attendant at
retorted: “Angostura Bitte
good for the stomach.” i

Commenting on — anthuriw

Britain’s squabbling Socialists} jilies on show at the Trinid
. closed their ranks solidly last stall, Mr. Dugdale said he theughit
wt 7 oe : 7 : ‘ight to beat down the divid' | they were made of wax, but dis
; and conquer manoeuvre, engin- d they were natural when
VICE-PRESIDENT Alben W. Barkley (2nd:from left) presents the Pour Freedom award to Dr, Ralph J. a ain} covered they ef
Bunche at the Starlight Roof of the Waldorf-Astoria. Bunche won the award by receiving an overwhelm- chieunane chuckling Winston he felt them. Afterwards he said:
ing majority of the 15,000 ballots cast by voters in all walks of life Rt from all parts of the Unitea rane Kies ° ie ae me ‘I am glad there are markets f¢
States, Emil K. Ellis (left), Judge Ferdinand Pecora (extreme right) look on.—Express, poking his cue from rebel} anthurium lilies,” __ im
Be i roe tech hd a ; Labour Members’ own protests Another distinguished visit

Meat Prices [King George Opens

Are Low

Commons Told

LONDON, May 2,

Federick Willey, Parliamentary
Secretary to the British Ministry
of Food, disclosed to-day how
meat prices under the new Argen-
tine Agreement compared with
prices for meat offered Britain by
private traders in other countries,

He was replying in the Com-|
mons to the question by Ivor sven |
Thomas, Labour member. Willey
said: ‘‘We have received in recent
months a number of offers from
European sources of frozen beef
mainly South American in origin,

“These have been at prices
varying from £130 per ton deliv-
ered from German frontiers to
£197.29 per ton from stores in
Hamburg.

“Prices we have now a
with Argentina for meat of similar

over rearmament, the Conserva-
live Leader came up with a motion
designed to draw the support of
dissident Socialists, but rebels re-

at the West Indies stalls to-day
was Sir Charles Woolley, Go
ernor of British Guiana. §S
Charles was favourably impress

e fused to be taken in. They kept ed with the general layout «
a solid party front that defeated the West Indies stalls and in

es wva O- a Churchill's motion by a 18-vote pressed the hope to visit the sta
margin of 305 to 292, and left later this week with aa

Woolley, ;

Business at West Indies —
to-day was brisk, A buyer fre
Rangoon placed an order for 2,800
bales of sea island cotton. A repre+
sentative of Needlers British Ime
ports Company ordered larg
quantities of Jamaican uglis for
the American market

Prime Minister Attlee still eling-
ing to control of the Government

Rebels Voted Labour

Churchill sent in his deputy
Anthony Eden, to offer a motion
expressing the anxiety of the
House that the rearmament pro-

Church Bells Will Ring

LONDON, May 3,
Britain goes on show to the world to-day in a gallant
bid to rise above war scars, international anxiety and eco-
nomic hardships.

:

gramme “was based on estimates :
The Voice of King George VI from the steps of Saint] of Defence production which were Free Drinks ;
Paul's Cathedral here, will open and dedicate the £1,500,000 ; not accepted by Ministers princi : '
Festival of Britain. Millions sitting at radio and television |?@!y concerned In the ‘Lrinidad stall buyerg
sets at home will hear him. From that moment all Britain. othe ratereeon eee Anmurin ae Serene in tinned fruits
Striving after gaiety, will be “at home” to visitors from | evan an arol¢ On, Whol Wes - ee
7 : resigned as Labour Minister atid st Indians and their friend

many parts of the earth for the next six months. woke af Semab Gretidest, - in

ToWhs and hamlets throughout
the nation, 10,000 of them, will
play a part in the celebrations.
There are two reasons for the; nN the spot.

Fair to-day were treated by th
British firm of Guinness, brewer:
to free drinks of Guinness. :

The idea behind the brewer?

protest over the budget, but both
Bevan and Wilson refused to be put

who visited the British Industries
;
Along with other

Sat On Snake:

Festival—¢ponsored by the Labour | Labour Party Left Wingers, they ;
- 1. rote. , . i generosity is that they plan to
Found A Deer Government Bete: 0 Wave of) Yored with ‘the Muterament. establish a brewery in Trinidad in

criticism, One ts that this Year is Both Bevan afid Wilson had as-

; the centenary of the Great Exhibi- | shiled the rearmament programme] the near future.
pr PORT OFS Aa tion of 1a e second is tolas incapable of fulfillment unless Halt Be es of iE In-
April 30 show that Britaih is still bold in|y.dre aid was forthcoming from] “ans Who drank samples of Guin-

enterprise and has faith in her
future.

Mr, Michael Niles, a pro- hess was, “It’s niece.”

the United States, but neither went
prietor of Penal, Trinidad,

so far as to refuse to accept pro-



quality are less than the lowest went out hunting and én. The ceritre-piece of the Festival

duttion estirmnates..—CP)

IREPUBL

of these offers, after taking into
account the ccst of bringing meat
to this country.”

H. L. F. Turner, Conservative,
asked whether the London Food
Ministry now purchased linseed
oil from other sources besides
Argentina and whether the new
Argentine Trade Agreement con-
tained any terms relating to the
purchase of linseed oil.

Willey in a written reply said:
“Yes. We buy linseed oil from
Uruguay ahd linseed from India
and British East Africa.”

The new Argentine Agreement
does not deal specifically with
purchases of linseed oil.—Reuter.

—_



is the exhibition of culture, art
‘and industry in Loiidon. Its vivid
modernistic, buildings. surrounding

countered a large macajuel * a
: which he took for a PANN Rim be
og. Mr. Niles sat down on

, the symbolic finger of metal "
the ropiile, After some time |[thf.g@iabolie Anger of | metal! Aid Suspended
the “log” kept moving. He the drab south bank of the

fired a shot from his gun and
killed the snake which mea-
sured 12 feet. He skinned it
and while doing so, found a
young deer in the intestines.

WASHINGTON, May 2
This Exhibition Suspension of Marshall Aid
row. grants and loans to Ireland was
As King George declares the |8 nounced here to-day, The an-
Festival open, church bells in |®ouncement said that the step was
rea and village will ring. | ‘aken in agreement with lari
~~ COLONIAL GUESTS e Royal Salute will be fired in; Government because of Ireland's
COLONIAL GUESTS the historic Tower of London, improved economic position,
LONDON. The limelight will fall brightly —Reuter
Fuller detéils are now available}/on to the Ghameshire village of
of the arrangements made for| Trowell with a population of 360,
Colonial representatives who will] Trowell, normally bypassed by
attend the Festival of Britain as) hurrying crowds, is chosen as a
guests of the U.K, Government | Festival village—a village which ,
from July 9th to 30th. best typifies British rural life. BERLIN, May 2.
Trowell’s railway station has East German Prime Minister
had a new coat of paint. The | Otto Grotewohl, left Berlin to-da

‘Thames River.

opens tomor-

GROTEWOHL ILL

Gromyko Does Not
Like New Proposals

PARIS, May 2.
Andrei Gromyko, Soviet De.
puty, gave a cool reception today
to the western powers’ “final
effort to reach an agreement on

the Foreign Ministers agenda
after more than eight “weeks!
meetings. ;
A Western spokesman com-
mented that Gromyko “did not
seem to like the latest. western
proposals,”

romyko complained that
western powers had _ still not

included the North Atlantic Pact
and the American bases overseas
in their agenda proposals,

NT railway station slaff has been|for medical treatment at a healt Western observers said thal
IC ANS W A increased by 900 per cent—-|resort, the East German News|today'’s proposals were to be
there are how ten men thee, | Agency said. His Deputy Walter|considered as the final bid to
There will be cricket and|Ulbright, will act for him, No de+|break the deadlock rather thas
O°vDW Y ER RE(¢ ‘ALI ED Shakespeare on the village green,|tails were disclosed. fee ae es 4: Tadd tel
s appeared at May Day celebrations oday’s meetin, §
" ap vies Mite tobe pabteraay .
Senator H. Alexander Smith, Republican, said Presi-
dent Truman should recall Ambassador William O’Dwyer
at once because of the Senate Crime Committee charge that
he helped the New York underworld. But the White House
said it knew of no plans for recalling the former New Yori

Mayor from Mexico City and

Towns, famous in history books,
will stage colourful pageants. Lady
Godiva will ride the streets of
Coventry again and William the
Conqueror will return to Hastings.
For the next six months Britain
will be the most musical country
in the world.

Boy Scouts will étart it off to-
Secretary Acheson said he saw | morrow night with campfire sing-

WASHINGTON, May 2,

no evidence that O’Dwyer had impaired relations between | S°ngs all over the nation.

the United States and Mexico,

Asked at his news conference
if he intends to consult the Am-
bassador about the charges against
him, Acheson said he had nothing
in mind along those lines.

The Crime Committee charged
that while O’Dwyer was King’s
County District Attorney and
later New York Mayor he con-
tributed to the grdwth of organ-
ised crime racketeering and
gangsterism in the metropolis.

Smith a member of the Senate
Foreign Affairs Committee said
‘it is perfectly obvious that the
former Mayor should be. recalled
from Mexico immediately. It is
contrary to every good principle
of democracy and diplomacy for
us to be represented in Mexico by
a man whose political activities in
this country are at the very least
open to s@rious question.”

“Never in 6ur history” he added
“has it been more important to be

represented by individuals who
are above suspicion.”
While there were Republican

demands for his recall, resignation
or dismissal, Democrats for the
most part were silent.—U.P.

whieh is not yet ready. In the
meantime, Government reports
that 100 apprentices are being

trained under the local Appren-

ticeshio Bursary Act. The men
are receiving part training in
motor €hgiheering, electficity,

| een

| building and architecture at Eve-

j ning Institutes; and 1,755 wofnen

| are receiving part-time instruction
in domestic subjects at house.

}eraft centres or in various rural
centres.”

; Mr. Parker

(Labour) asked,

annum, consideration of this pro- | what steps had been taken by the
|Government of British Guiana to
train doctors in tuberculosis care |

in view of the fact that the best

About Tech
In Barbados

| hospital.

Sir Adrian Boult will conduct
British music in the Festival
Concert Hall. The new building
which will stay a permanent fea-
ture of London’s musical life.

Music Festivals all over the
country—Edinburgh, Birmingham,
Liverpool, Manchester, and Aber-
deen are among some of the places
—~will provide a continuous series
of concerts from June to Septem-
ber. There will be special postage
stamps, There will be banners
and bunting. There will be foun-
tains and searchlights and gaily

ainted barges. On the eve of the
‘estival’s opening, critics, who
said this was no time for celebra-
tion, were silent

The Festival

receive them:

MOSES GITTENS,
Dayrells Road, Ch, Ch.

Mrs. U. L.. BRUCE,

Maxwell Road, Ch, Ch.
spirit had taken
hold. Crowds filled the streets to
ee myriad coloured lights that
ave changed the face of London
by night. Exhibition organisers
reported a great rush for tickets.

—Reuter,
FOR U.S. TOUR

WASHINGTON, May 2.

O. MecCONNEY,

Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch.

JOSEPH ALLEYNE,
Crane, St. Philip.



General Newton Estillac Leal,
WILLIAM 0D’ Brazilian War Minister, is
US. Am sd to Mexico \Scheduled to arrive late to-day to G. QUINTYNE,

begin his three-week tour of the

paied wh aids
arge t i
are Wi Seo ionine "ted Males. -chentee,

Church Village, St. Philip





nical Education

E. HINKSON,

Massiah Street, St. John.
tion of the tén-year development
ati owing to lack of local funds, H.. b. CAVE,
Ould he consider an increased St. John’s Dispensary,
allocation for the colony from
hospital had only one doctor with |'@,Colonial Development Fund

fo that social services which were
of assistance to plantation labour-
ers Would not be cut?

Mr. Griffiths in a written reply !
said “I am aware that the Gov

180 beds and no one to take over
when the doctor in charge went
on leave. e
| Mr. Griffiths in g written reply |
| nies Sie, Senet 2 j¢rhment of Grenada, like several
|ing in the treatment of tubercu | other colonial governments, has
|losis and he should be attached | reviewed its developments plan
shortly to the best .(tuberculosis) | largely owing to the burden of
Meanwhile the officer |e Gual recurrent expenditure

in charge of that hospital has vol- | “Mich the original plan entailed.
unteered to defer his leave until | he question of an increased allo-
early in 1952.” ation to any ferritory from the
a | limited Colonial Development and |
Mr. J. B. Hynd (Labour) asked | Welfare Funds available has to |

Items may be handed into



T. Gale.

if the Secretary of State was! te considered against the require
aware that the Government of | ments of the colonial territory
Grenada was considering reduc- —Reuter

The Advocate Co., Ltd.,
classified advertisements to be taken by various District
Agents and so far the following have been authorised to



CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

has made arrangements for

JOSEPH JEMMOTT,
St. Elizabeth Village,

St. Joseph.

S. A. DURANT,
Horse Hill, St. Joseph.

PHARMACY,
John.

EBENEZER
Four Roads, St.

Vv. HOLDER,

St.. Judes, St. George

8T. C. HUNTE,
Pine Gap, St. Michael.

Vv. RICE,
Bank Hall Road,
St. Michael
R. H. KING,

Near Sharon, St. Thomas.

the ahove for the following

Columns in the Classified Section :
BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, IN MEMORIAMS, ETC
FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

ADVOCATE Co. LTD.

Advertising Manager

‘ rsa eee RARE RO eNO RRL AN ROH RCRA DIOS A ee Ry



PAGE TWO

—~-—





Carib

| ace WOOD whose home is a
in England, has been in
Trinidad for several months on rs



holiday, Yesterday she flew over

by B.W.1A to spend a_ few

weeks in Barbados. She is a \
guest at the Hotel Royal, Lady ,

Wood ‘has visited Barbados ,.. .

before....Coming in _ by the > =

same plane were Mrs. Jessie |

Forster who had been in Tobago
for e short visit and Mr, Archie
McLean from Trinidad.

U.S. Schooi-teacher
RS. GLADYS DICKERSON
of Brooklyn, New York, is

touring the W.I. She arrived Pr gi

from Trinidad yesterday _ by, PENNY NOLAN
B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks in | : *
Barbados, What does Mrs, Sewing Circle

Dickerson do? She is a school-, J— OOK out for Penny Nolan’s
teacher in Brooklyn. What does Sewing Circle in the Sun-
she say of the W.1.? “I’m visit-yday Advocate. The first of this











‘ng your lovely little islands.” §series starts on May 6th. Mrs.
Nolan is well known in sewing
Colonial Attache circles here.
i today,
PROBABLE arrival ° Due From U.K. To-day

along with Mr. Jimmy Cozier
and Mr. Erskine Lindop is Mr. J
Kenneth Thomp-

son, Colonial]

UE in today from England by
the Gascogne ere Mr. and
Mrs. Derek Davies who have been





Attache at theffn the vi for the past few
British Embassy 7OMths. r. Davies is on the
in Washington@taff of the Royal Bank of

Mr. Thompson 1s Canada here.

also a member of
-he British sec. Husband Coming

ee 3 oe ] RS. HERBEK:' © ALLEYNE
i a . x and her three children
ae os why the Francis, Valerie and Catherine,
weitth meeting were among the arrivals from
t the Care Trinidad yesterday by B.W.LA.

Her husband is due
end of the month,

East Africa Bound

AJCR STANHOPE BILLY-
EALD, Police Superin-
t from British Guiana, i
in England, He is spending a quiet
holiday there and has made his
headquarters in London, Before
returning to British Guiana, he
and his wife will make a short
holiday visit to East Africa,

With U.B.O.T. =

AJ, AND MRS. ERROL L,
SEALY are in Barbados
with their three children for a

bean Commis- up at the

Thompson sion,

Mr

K,

Sisters

RS. CLAIRE HERRERA, her

son ken and her daughter
Roona atrived from Trinidad tendon:
yesterday Spy B.,W.1.A. to spend
a short hetiday staying with Mr,
and Mrs— Cecil Goddard at
Kenningtoi, George Street,
Mrs. Herrera. and Mrs, Goddard
are sisters.

Back From Martinique
R. J. BLONDIN, Manager of
Sam Lord's and Mrs. Blondin

are back from Martinique where

they spent-their honeymoon.
aad * noliday. They arrived from

Trinidad Col. Sec. Trinidad yesterday by B.W.LA.
coe BACK to the West In- and are staying with Maj. Sealy’s
' dies, shortly is Mr. P, M, parents, Dr. and Mrs. T. E. Sealy
Renison,, the Colonial Secretary at Welches, Christ Church,
of Trinidad. He has been on leave _ Maj. Sealy is | Supt. of
in England and expects to leave U,B.O.T’s Field Police Force in
for Trinidad in a few days. Point Fortin.

ADVENTURES OF PI

pa










BY THE WAY...

HE report about a mouse that
“really does sing” will merely

gesture, like laying a foundation
stone or cutting the tape across
a new road, Emotion does not
enter into these things, and I am
sure that if Mimsie Slopcorner had
been a veritable Cleopatra the
gas-container episode would have
passed off with an aloof dignity
far from the ‘emotional hysteria
suggested by Miss Slopcorner’s
statement to the Press.
Yrs, truly,
(Mrs.) Mabel Whackstraw.,

In passing
OMEONE asks if the Alphonse
Karr to whom I referred the
other day is the writer after whom
a street in Etretat was named. He
is, and well I used to know the
street, with a superb pastry-cook’s
shop where I guzzled as a boy.
It was Karr who said, when

prompt { music-lovers to ask,
“What does it sing?” If I squeaked
every time someone gave me a bit
of chees®obody would say I was
singing.

There was great excitement
some years ago about a mouse
which was alleged to sing a song,
words and all. Musicians went to
hear it, in a house near Uttoxeter,
They could hardly believe their
eyes or their ears when, from the
little mouth that just showed
through the wainscot, came a tiny,
crystal-clear voice singing: “’Twas
but a night in June,” The amaz-
ing occurrence was only explain-
ed when the ventriloquist was
discovered, crouching behind a
bag of fluff in an attic, with a
microphone in his hand,

Not much consolation i

There's not a pawn-shop in the
place,
Find one if you can,



You can walk back from Baldoyle
races,

But not from the Isle of Man.

The Irish song rang in my head
when I read of a man who walked
home 250 miles after losing all his
money at the races,
Koolukatfatti
#NHIEF KOOLUKATFATTI, the

plump ruler of 17,000,000

Mawsgis, arrived at London Air-
port yesterday. He was met by a
Foreign Office official who laugh-
ingly greeted him with Chester-
ton’s “Liquorice is not the least of
benefits we derive from the dark
heart of Africa.” The Chief, who
learned English from a film unit
in the Jambong hinterland, re-
plied: “On your way, sailor, it
sure is Tiitdy lousy havin’ yew-all
know nre-all deep Saouth deep
Saouth Rowdy folks bust da joint
wide open.” An interpreter was
sent for, but he failed to under-
stand what either of thern had
been talkjfg about. All this must
be hushed: up.

Thank you, Mrs.
Whackstraw






“THE MIGH

WALTER BURKE
WILLIE IFFIL
FRANCIS HYPOLITE
KEN BIRCH .
PHYLLIS SCOTT
CHESTER HOLDER

Guest

Ds Sir,

As one who saw Councillor
Tudmarsh kiss Mrs. Carga, : the
winner’ of the cake-weighing com-
petition-at our 1947 funfair, I can
vouch fdr the fact that there was
no levity either in approach or
execution. It was a mere official

PHYLLIS COLLYMORE

Prices: PIT 20—HOUSE
Buy your tickets

cere







EVER SCREENED... 4
HEART TO SHREDS AND TATTERS” |

N.Y. Journal American

ER

“ssa” LOUIS WOLHEIM

From ERICH MARIA RLAARQUE'S novel Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE
eee

GLOBE

GERALD PAISLEY ........-

Interior Decorator

M*

DONN BUNN
interior decorator.

is

home is in California and he has!
in Trinidad on and! M@@rer, we are seeing the resump-

been living

an
His

off for the past six years. .He was

from Trinidad yesterday

B.W.LA. Here for a week
ten days, Mr. Bunn is staying
the Ocean View Hotel... .Ot
arrivals from Trinidad are
and Mrs. Alfonso B. de Li

_ among the passengers coming iu!

by
or

her

Mr.

ma

and their daughter Sandra who

are spending a week at
Hotel Royal, Mr. Isabel
and her daughter Janet
the Camp, St. Lawrence,
Leah Gonzalez-Herrera
panied them over. They
here for one month,

are

Fattening

MERICA is

)

the
MeCail

at

Miss
accom -
are

making some
strange experiments in fat-

tening turkeys and cockerels for

the dinner table.

A synthetic female sex hormone

called Stilboestroi,

injected into

a young cockerel, transforms the
flesh to mouth-melting tender-
ness, Most cockerels aged from
six to eight weeks need one
tablet injected beneath the skin

by implantation,

The process means considerable
loss of dignity for the cockerel.

Its red comb is quickly lost;

are its Warlike instincts. Its early
morning crow sinks to a oe
aito-

squeak, then disappears

gether.
Square-Cut Putter

a Percy Gillespie, who
60, is winning matches

Hendon golf course with a two-

foot putter of his own design.

It is sha like the conven-
is ped Sos the

handle is square. “That keeps me
true on the pin,” says Gillespie.

tional sideways putter.

Maybe this is a hint for y
amateur golfers.

Air Voices

HAT’S new on «he radic—
Re-
diffusion Ltd., are out to get one

turn on that feminine

lady announcers !

charm.
Incidents! Intelligence

A

Gas Flame, Indianapolis,

PA

~~

By BEACHCOMBER

asked to sign a petition against
the death penalty: Je le veux bien.
Que messieurs les assassins coim-
Let the

mencent. “I'm all for it.
murderers give us a lead.”

Don't you know anything?
1. The number of cats rescued
from trees by firemen in October

this year was (a) 3,498,641. (
246,384, (c) 109,493.

2. Finsbury-pavement was built

in (a) 1794, (b) 1894, (c) 1876
3. Who was the first Mayor
Oakham?

4. In East Anglia there are (a)

46, (b) 9,371, (c) 12,632 bootsho
5. Gladstone was born in_(

Devizes, (b) Newcastle, (c) Bod-

min.
6. The smallest gasworks in
England is at (a) Stroud, (b)

Bromley, (c’ Bellingham,



OPENING TO-MORROW 5 & 8.15 P.M.







TIEST WAR DRAMA ©
IT RIPS THE

é

nw FROW

LEW AYRES »

Starring

plus
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

“So in Love”
“Stardust”

“Song of Songs”

“Tf”

“Tennessee Waltz”
“Wildest Gal in Town”

Stars

(B’dos No. 1 Vocalist)
WAP (“She’s « hot Baby”)

36—BAL, 48—BOXES 60.
to-day at the GLOBE

36 in.
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.

DYED SCROLL CLOQUE

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FIGURED CREPE... 82.95
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FLOWERED CREPE_. Wi. 2.0 osu a 88-18

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et at ak ek ett tt et

EVANS & WHITFIELUS

DIAL 4220

MAN’S body is remarkably
sensitive. Pat him on the
back and his head swells.—The

ES.



xe S|
ao

aan Compt 70 On Gtp Oe Aateiee

er



sO

is
on

ou

b)

of

ps.
a)




“'/ other stands Mr.












































BARBADOS AD

VOCATE





Pleats v. Frills

By Dorothy Barkley

; LONDON, April 27,
With the tennis season drawing

{tion of last year’s battle of the
conventional versus the reaction-
|ary in tennis wear. At ong ex-
treme stands Jantzen, proragting
the conventional style, % the
Teddy Tinling,
advocating the reactionary.

The Jantzen designs
ored and crisply cut, with no
frills or frivolous details. In con-
trast to this, are the Teddy Tin-
ling designs with their lace edges
and fancy stitching.

To illustrate just what is meant
by the “conventional” style we
show an example from the Jant-
zen range. Materials are chosen
for their crisp freshness, but also
for their washability. Thus we
find that cotton pique is the usual
choice, although of course ‘there
are spun rayons, sharkSkins and
—now this year—knitted shark-
skins. All of these are in white
—without a touch of colour,

are tail-

New Designs

Jantzen make suoris and dress-
es, and have introduced several
new designs. Shorts are varying
in styles, either pleated or plain,
There are the classic cuffed shorts,
simple and well tailored; afid a
new style, perfectly plain, with
jutting pockets on the hips which
accentuate the waist. Jantzen
have designed. also, an unusual
kilted skirt—pleated all round—
as short as a skating skirt, Other
shorts, perhaps more feminine,
have double sunray pleats that
flare in action. These are stitched
so that they lie flat for easy iron-
ing.

For wear with either shorts or
skirts, Jantzen have designed a
cap-sleeved shirt with a deep
back pleat for shoulder room
Those, like their neat briefs, are
made in matching materials.

Another * attractive style is
called the “romper tunic,” illus-
trated here. It consists of a one-
piece shirt-cum-bloomers with
“boxer” (elasticised) waist, and
a flared overskirt that fastens with

one button at the waist. This can
be removed and the one=piecr
bloomer-suit alone is just right

for the squash court.

Janizen design, too, dresses cut
on princess or button-through
lines; those are also perfectly
suitable for gold and sports wear
generally. ;

Mr. Teddy Tinling

Strikingly different from
that Jantzen have designed
the Teddy Tiniing styles.
vocates frills, lace edges, and
splashes of colour. He uses eve-
ning dress fabrics: washable bro-
cades, nylon, organdie in a variety
of styles and trimmed with a vari-

all
are
He ad-

CROSSWORD



Across
. Many who lend may do this for
their money. (7)

s

8. Sometimes used for five. (1-4)
11. Away from the west. (4)

12. Stingiest mat seen. (7)

13. lrritate. (3)

14. Can be erected tn sand, (3)

15, Farmer Giles’ dash, (4)

17, On. the way to victory in the

wing. (3)
.» Make your choice. (5)
. Refuse td take notice and then
nothing can upset the reign. (6)
. They make = short
honeycomb. (4)
. One way to rave. (4)
. "Near dry” sfter the

Down
. Would you shun such
(5) 3. Pronoun
. A handle from Athens, (6)
. A set line can be drawn out, (1)
German town of tireless energy.

work of a

hunt, (7)

a Spacey?
a mex



(5)

Were suldiers standing at it when
paying it? (Y)

What is more peculiar, |
know him. (8)

jon't

The geology of a district. (3)
. You may tire of such a row.
The tast of the teens, (4)

A word to jeer at,
Only a Kind of string
. Hastened. (3)

Solution ot vesterday's
1 Pirouette: 6
Ornate. 13. Cog
16. Nymph
25 Mania, 26 Co
1. Proclaim. 2
Tomb: 5. Tail
Tee; 12, Tan: 17
Weak: 21, Arch

(4)

OPS © 2 Soe =

note
Se








—o—

on display

=



WATCHES

have arrived” and are
{cd

Corner

ety of colours. An_ interesting
fabric was 96 per cent wool, four
per cent nylon, and was virtually
uncrushable.

Underwear for tennis, he main-
tains, is meant to show. So he
showed a dress in broderie an-
glaise, edged with cutton pique
complete with matching shorts.

The highlight of the collection
was an exquisite dress in nylon

lace: it had a round neck, short
cap-sleeves, and a_ very short
skirt with scalloped hem. To

complete the effect, there was a
lace hat and lace shoes to match.

Teenager

For the teenager he has de-
signed an outfit in jockey squares
of sharkskin and satin. Another
style had panels of guipuro lace
inset back and front on pique.

And he uses colour, as well as
l.ce frills which he introduces on
omplete outfits designed for wear



Ws.

| Rupert jerks the sledge aside to
| yet away from the steep slope and
finally stops on a flat space between

two banks of snow. He peers into
the gloom and feels anxious. “I’m
still in the wood," he mutters, “ but

riTCH PINE
DOUGLAS FIR



COTTON

| LUMBER DEPARTMENT

|









BELOW: Shorts with double sun-

ray pleating in rayon, pique ‘i
sharkskin, worn with cap-

sleevet

shirt, by JANTZEN.

oft the courts as well. These out-1
fits consist of dress and hip-
length jacket. One in white nylon
had a candy striped jacket tn:
match—orange, blue, green, red}
stripes on white: another, in
white pique had large saucer-size
red spots; a third was in white
organdie with a gold pattern—the
jacket here was in black with the |
same gold leaf design.

Bu. Mr. Tinling does not only
design tennis wear. He has made, !
too, clothes for sports wear gen-'
erally. Here particularly notice- |
able were cuffed shorts in yellow!
wool, worn with a yellow cash-;
mere sweater decorated with
rhinestones. Then, finally, the
outfit called “Prince Charming” in|
pink brocade with a gold pattern, |
which consisted of jeans, and
knee-length coat. But, all things, |
considered, we found it difficult to
fit these into our everyday life.





this and | can't find the tracks we
made when we came up. Still I
suppose if | keep on going downhill

I shall reach the lake.’’ He starts
again on a new slope wiiich sud-
denly becomes a precipice, and, bein;
unable to stop, he whizzes out o

1 don’t remember any place like the cloud into the daylight. @
site oie —





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IN YOUR ROOF

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RED CEDAR SHINGLES
ROLL ROOFING — Plain :
ROLL ROOFING — Red

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——— SS









at

The Jewel Box of Barbados

Brond & McGregor

of

ALFONSO B. DeLIMA © CO.. LID.

Streets

We are
proud to
announce







THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1551

B.B.C. Radio



Programme

















THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951 Scottish Mag 5.45 Wo
shire vs Afric 5.50
6.36 a.m,—12.15 p.m. . 1960 ™M Interlude, 6 p.m. Top Score, 64
nan Programme Parade
6.30 a.m. Festival of Britain Opening 6.00—11.00 p.m 25.53 M. 31 N
Ceremony by H.M, The King, 7.15 n
Listeners’ Choice, 7.30 am. The News 7 p.m 7.10 p N
7.40 a.m. News Analysis, 7.45 a.m. From Analysis, ‘ Britai
the Editorials, 7.55 a.m Programme p.m. The Great Ex! « 1
Parade, 8 a.m. The Great Exhibition of 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 815 5 i
1851, 8.15 a.m. Worcestershire vs. South Adventures of P.C. 49, £45 Int
Africans, 8.30 a.m Douglas Gamle lude, 8.55 p.m From the Edi i
845 a.m. Spare Parts for Human Bodies, 9 p.m. Special Dispatch, 9.15
Â¥ a.m. The News, 9.10 am. Home News Festival of Britain, 10 p.m. The
from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 10.10 p.m. Light Music, 10.45 p.t e
a.m Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m jn Britain, 11 p.m From to i
Listeners’ Choice, 1145 a.m. Special Programme
Dispatch, 12 inogn) The News, 12.10 C.B.C. PROGRAMME
p.m. News Anaiysis, 12.15 p.m. Close THURSDAY, MAY =
Down. —— se
4156.45 pom, ..... . 19.76 M. 10 p.m.—t0.15 p.m } v
— —____—_— 10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m, This week ir
4.15 p.m. Festival of Britain, 5 p.m. Canada. 11.76 Més 25.51 M












eon a” en kG ee ee

——

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA. (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 8.30
MERLE OBERON — ROBERT RYAN — CHARLES KORVIN

in ‘“*BERLIN EXPRESS”
An RKO Radio Picture



i ca ee I.



Commencing Friday 4th
* JAMES STEWART
“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”

in







——————

'

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY—4.45 and 6.30 p.m
MATINEE TO-DAY—1.30 p.m. (Monogram) Two Features
Golor by Cinecolor

“Blue Grass of Kentucky &. The Dude Goes West

Bill WILLIAMS, Jane NEIGH Eddie ALBERT Gale STORM

MATINEE :- THURSDAY — 1.30 p.m. (Mc
“JIGGS AND MAGGIE





mnosram) Two Features
CourRT”
with JOE YULE and RENNIE RIANO
“JOE PALOOKA CHAMP”
Plus those Headliners





and
LEON ERROL
Joe LOUIS (in action) Henry ARMSTRONG

OPENING FRIDAY 4TH - - - -
“EDGE OF DOOM” and MacARTHUR

STORY








PLAZA
OISTIN

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY
5 & 8.30 p.m. (Monogram)

“JIGGS and MAGGIE in COURT”
With JOE YULE & RENNIE RIANO

and
“MAN from HEADQUARTERS”
FRANK ALBERTSON

OOOO

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James

TO-DAY (Only) 8.30 p.m
Herbert WILCOX presents - - -
Anna Neagle & Michael Wilding in
“The COURTNEYS of CURZON

STREET”





DIAL
8404



to Sunda
Sunday

Friday 8.30 p.m.
Matinee 5 p.m.
THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT
Color by Technicolor
Shirley TEMPLE
Barry FITZGERALD
Lon McALLISTER



Friday, Sat. & Sun. 5 & 8.30 p.m. |
“STEP LIVELY” & “TARZAN & the
SLAVE GIRL"

Lex Barker |]





Frank Sinatra







|







GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWS
ABBOT & COSTELLO—PAT ROC & MAX REED
in in
“HIT THE ICE” “THE BROTHERS”
To-merrow “ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT”







ws



cont

HERE WITHOUT SHAME... IS THE NAKED }
TRUTH ABOUT A BOY, A GIRL AND A
SINFUL CRIME ...



CF



—_—.

The Devil need only
whisper... to







s

Extra! Extra!

those who would

listen!




SAMUEL
GOLDWYN



who brought you America’s
most popular picture,
“Our Very Own’
presents

“THE
Mac ARTHUR

STORY”

First occupation Chief in
Japan’s 2,000 year history!



"starring DANA ANDREWS

FARLEY GRANGER + JOAN EVANS
with ROBERT KEITH * PAUL STEWART
MALA POWERS © ADELE JERGENS
Directed by Mark Robson » Screen Play by Philip Yordan
Based on the Novel by Leo Brady
Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.

Pb bad ttle bdr tb trbvb- ted bbb ttt t ttl ttt bitte t bbb ttt ot” ttle ltt te tt d
DODO OIG PEPE EEE EEE

One of the timeliest Shorts
ever offered the public...

uta.’





Playing from FRIDAY, MAY 4TH (3 SHOWS)
2.30 — 4.45 & 830 P.M.

And Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.



Dubstvtvbvtetbebebtetvbvbvbubn
PIII DIES





THE MOST BRIDGETOWR
POPULAR PP i DIAL
CINEMA 2310
IN TOWN





COMING SHORTLY: (Warner Bros)

“YOUNG MAN WITH A HORN”





EMPIRE

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.30
20th Century Fox Double

Dan DAILEY and
Ann BAXTER in



ROYAL

Last Two Shows ‘To-day
4.30 & 8.30
Universal Big Double

John WAYNE &
Randolph SCOTT

«YOURE MY in
EVERYTHING ” “* THE SPOILERS”
and AND
“SIDE STREET” “ SEVEN SINNERS ”
with — Starring —

Farley GRANGER and
Cathy O'Donnell

ROXY

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M Big Double
George BRENT and

Joun WAYNE &
Broderick CRAWFORD

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
Universal Smashing Double

John HALL and
Maria MONTFZ in



Je /E i
ane POWELL in “< THE COBRA
“LUXURY LINER” WOMAN ”
and —
«THE OUTRIDERS ” * RIDERS OF
‘ SANTA FE”
Starring Starring
Joel McCREA and Rod CAMERON and
Arlene DHAL Fuzzy KNIGHT
SS="- a ew ee eee



THURSDAY,

eS

Another Butlerite
Resigns From Party

(Fron Our O Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.
Members of ihe Butler Party
in Port-of-Spain are dropping off

MAY 3,

like falling petals. Another
executive member and third
Vice-President Mr. MeVorrar

De Freitas and chief organiser of
the Party has.sesigned. Mr. De
Freitas in an exclusive interview
with me said that while at Point
Fortin, South Trinidad, a stormy
meeting took place. He said tha:
for some time there was great
dissatisfaction going on owing tu
the ridiculous statements made
by their “Chief” especially in
the Couneil or on , public plat
forms. Much controversy took
place and rather unsavoury
happenings ended in his immed.
iate resignation. While the
exchanges were going on, Mr
De Freitas said he told Butler:

“I joined this movement five
years, ago, and it is only today
you discover that I am a

Portuguese,”
Mrs. Butler in Tears

Butler replied: “Here is De
Freitas, trying to put me out of
the organisation I have built.”
At that time Mr. De Freitas said
he was supporting certain views
expressed by the Secretary of tne
Party. Announcement of his
resignation was met with di3-
favour. Even Mrs, Tubal Butler
one time Secretary of the “Chief”
held on to De Freitas. “Even
Mrs. Butler, bathed in_ tears,
asked me to reconsider what *
have done.” Hon, Mitra Sinanan
Legal Adviser and member of
the Butler Party, announced his
resignation two weeks ago, It is
reported that these “splits” will
tend to do the Party no good, and
it is feared that soon Butler will
find himself “the lonely one” in
the Legislative Council.

Last week’s suspension of Hon.
Tubal Butler from the Legisla-
tive Council will mean that he
will not receive salary amounting
to* $83.33, out of his $320. Fur-
ther, the Speaker said that Mr.
Butler would not be permitted
to attend or have anything to do
relating to the Council for
eight days. P

Egglesfield Calls
Air Services
Adequate

From Our Own Cotrespondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 30.

Wing Commander Egglesfield,
Director General of Civil Aviation
in the West Indies, arrived in
Trinidad last week to confer with
Sir Miles Thomas, visiting Chair-
man of the B.O,A.C. He com-
mented on the establishment of a
helicopter service for the Wind-
ward Islands, and said that at this
stage it would be too far ahead of
the times for journeys of the kind
over the sea for the most part in a
single-engined craft. \

He pointed out that while work
on a two-engined helicopter was
going on, this would take some
time to complete, as it had to be
flown anq tested. Mr. Egglesfield
said that he thought the existing
aiy services of the West Indies
were adequate, and he described
the recent B.W.1.A. cuts as not
serious enough to impair the
efficiency of the service.

——————

Trinidad Workers
Stage May Day
Parade

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.

Hundreds of workers repre-
senting every industry in the Col-
ony paraded the City on May Day,
whicn is recognised throughout
the world as Labour Day. It was
the biggest demonstration seen in
Trinidad on this occasion, The
cemonstration was organised by
the Trades’ Union Council, which
embraces the majority of Trade
Unions in the Colony. Placards
bearing “We want full employ-
ment,” “Long Live the Working
Ciass,” were held high as bearers
voiced their sentiments marching
triumphantly through the city.
Creating quite a stir among spec-
tators who viewed the procession
was a group of Chinese seamen,
representatives of the Chinese
National Seamen Union. Dressed
in their national costume and
proudly waving their standards,
they walked side by side with
their fellow workers, The
rhythmic beat of the steel band
who played “Onward Christian
Soldiers,” caused many onlookers
to join the parade. . Red-skirted,
and red-tied waterfront workers.
with blue-shirted oilfield workers
shouted their sidagan, “Give us
Work.” At the Savannah the cele-
brants, none the worse for wear,
heard Labour Day addresses by
their respective leaders.





Centeno Scheme Will Get
$33,000 From CDW Funds

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPALN, April 30.

Mr. Griffiths has agreed to pro-
vide $33,000 from Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare Funds to
eid Trinidad in its proposals for
advancing a section of the Cen-
teno scheme in Trinidad at a cost
of $87,000. This new scheme has
been worked out in view of the
establishment of the Central Ex-
periment Station for Agriculture
at Centeno and the possible erec-
tion of a Central Training Insti-
tute and Farm School, which
will make the need for a proper
water supply an ungent necessity.



How Aladdin’s Lamp

won the Princess

Once a poor young man named Aladdin
Whenever he
a genii would appear
h. Now Aladdin

» beautiful princess

found a magic lamp
rubbed the lan
and grant his e Wi

was im love wilt

1951





City Hoard To
Be Shown
At Guildhall

The “Cheapside Hoard,” a
collection of priceless Eliza.
bethan jewellery, found early
this century during excavations
in Cheapside, will be on exhibi-
tion at the Guildhall Museum
during the Festival of Britain.

Under the title “Nineteen
Centuries of City Life,” the

- exhibition will include London’s

personal adornments and house.
hold goods, dating from Romana
times to the present day.

The “Cheapside Hoard” is
believed to be the — stock-in-
trade of a City jeweller or
moneylender, who buried his
goods during some period of
disaster,

An oval watch

It includes a pendant in the
form of a grape cluster of
amethysts, a riehly jewelled

fan-holder, a garnet cross and aa

oval watch with an _ enamelled
face,
Some of the pendants and

chains are patterned with haw-
thorn flowers, daisies, and wild
roses, adorned with gems and
pearls.

The ems
from olombia,
Brazil, Indian rubies .and lapiz
lazuli from Persia, The collec
tion has not been on exhibition
in Lonéon since the first yeat
after the war.—L.E.§..

include emeralds
topaz from



T’DAD’S ADVISERS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 30.

When the Regional Economic
Committee sits in Barbados in
May, Hon. Harold Robinson, Mr.
Alan Storey, and Mr. A, T. Shill
Comptroller of Customs and Ex-
cise, will be Trinidad’s advisers.
This Conference will be under the
auspices of the Comptroller fov
Development and Wefare in the
British West Indies.



BITESOFF MAN’S EAR

From Qur Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.

Peter Rawlins, a Port-of-Spain
man was sentenced to prison in
the Third Police Court. for six
months because he bit off the ear
of another man and swallowed
it.

Sampson the victim, told the
Court that he went to a rum shop
to get a drink of water. Rawlins
-was standing at the counter, and
he asked him for a chance to get
the cu which contained the
water. Kawlins, he said, paid him
no mind, so he touched him on
the back, and Rawlins sprang on
him, bit off a piece of his left
ear and swallowed it.

SCOUTS JAMBOREE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, April 26.

Governor Sir Hugh Foot,
K.C.M.G.,, announced here Sun-
day that it was hoped in Margh,
next year, to have in Jamaica the
biggest Scouts Jamboree that the
West Indies has ever known, to
which will come scouts from all
parts of the West Indies.

The Jamboree is planned to
ecincide with the: seoveriet visit
ef the World Chief Scout, Lord
Rowallan, to Jamaica.

SETS NEW WALKING
RECORD

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 30.
James Jackson, Trinidad’s
champion walker, broke Colvin
Patrick's 20-year-old record in the
Port-of-Spain to Sangre Grande
race—28 miles and 1,000 yards on
Sunday. He won the event in
4 hours 47 minutes. Colvin Pat-
rick had walked and finished that
distance 20 years ago in six hours
2% minutes. Sinee then his record
remained unbeaten until Jackson
did the trick.











Oil Fights
Eelworm Pest

LONDON, April 27.

A_ petroleum-based chemical
product, known as Shell D-D, is
achieving remarkable results as a
soil fumigant and general anti-
pest “policeman”. From both
tropical and temperate countries
the success story is the same, It
has already proved effective in
such widely-different areas as
Hawaii, Uganda, Singapore. Here
is the story of this new ally in the
battle against crop disease,

Shell D-D is an abbreviation of
Dichloropropane-Dichloropropene,
and this liquid mixture of com-
pounds originally a mere waste
product of petroleum chemicals at
Shell chemical plants in the U.S.A,

In 1942-43 a crisis arose in the
hitherto thriving pineapple indus-
try of Hawaii. The root-knot eel-
worm, a microscopic threadlike
creature, was infesting the soil to
such disastrous effect that crop
yields were dropping to a fraction
of normal. Many chemical fumi-

ants were tried without result
hell D-D, by contrast, at once
achieved decisive defeat of the
eelworm and the crop was saved.

As a direct result, the United
States Department of Agriculture
instituted full-scale trials in con-
junction with SheNs research
organization and the fumigant
was quickly proved capable of
providing not only eelworm con-
trol but even, under favourable

conditions, of stimulating the
yield of ali kinds of crops most
spectacularly.

With the end of World War II,
the commercial possibilities of
Shell D-D soil fumigant were soon
demonstrated in many diverse
overseas countries, notably South
Africa, Australia, New Zealand,
Nigeria, Belgium, Holland and
the U.K., where extensive trials
began in 1945-46, —

Controls White Ant

Two other eelworms (or nema-
odes) have proved particularly
troublesome pests — the Potato
Root Eelworm and the Sugar Root
Eelworm, Although proving less
susceptible than tbe Root-knot
eelworm to D—D fumigation, these
two also may once day lose their
underground war. here have
been exhaustive tests on sugar
beet crops in Belgium and else-
where on the Continent and there
is some promise at last of real
relief to the farmer,

Nor is the effectiveness of D-D
confined to the eelworm pests.
Uganda, Singapore and the Phil-
ippines are but three of the areas
Where the termite, or white ant,
has been fought and controlled by
careful fumigation of its nest, One
Singapore report is interesting as
indicating an unusual anti-termite
battlegyound—the greens of a
local golf club.

White grubs attacking sugar
beet in Puerto Rico, eelworm in-
festing narcissus bulbs in Holland,
earthworms in Turkish tobacco
seed-beds, even wireworms,
crickets, ecockchafers and weed
growths—all these are other re-
cent enemies successfully attacked.

DEFT SKINNER
ESCOURT, South Africa,
George Burns, a Yorkshireman,
amazed experienced Natal ranch-
ers recently when he skinned and
eressed an ox of 684 pounds
dressed weight, in the record lime
ef nine minutes, 21 seeonds.(CP)

POWERFUL MOUSE
STAFFORD, England,
A mouse nibbling at an electric
Wite here caused a short circuit,
melting a gas pipe and leading to
an explosion that did heavy dam-
age.-(CP),
NO BOMB
EASTBOURNE, England,
Bomb-disposal experts were
called when workmen uncovered
a large hole im one of the main
streets. It turned out to be the







opening over an old-fashioned
drain,—(CP)
ROUSING REVIVAL
VANCOUVIR.

The clanging of a burglar alarm
interrupted a_ religious revival
meeting in the rear of a garment
store premises here. The pastor
called police, who found the
burglar had been scare ing his crowbar behind. —(CP)





Sy

One day Aladdin asked the genii how he
could get the Princess to marry him.
“Here, Master,” said thegenti,and hand-
ed him a package of Royal Pudding.

The Princess had refused many suitors
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Royal Puddifig, shecried, “It’s delicious!
1 will marry Aim if he promises to serye
me Royal Pudding every day.”



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

“Et tu, Harold?”

: Trish
Dispute

Insoluble
—Says Brooke

By CHARLES A. SMITH.
LONDON, April,

Prime Minister” of Northern
Ireland, Sir Basil Brooke, said in
London that the Irish partition
dispute is insoluble.

“There is absolutely no com-
mon meeting ground between
Northern Ireland and Eire on
which a basis of compromise could
be found or even discussed,” Sir
Basil told International ews
Service.

“And that applies to the long-
term view as well as to the pres-
ent time,” Sir Basil added.

The 64-year-old Premier said
he wanted to clear the air and put
before Americans a true picture
of Northern Ireland’s views.

“Northern Treland chose to re-
main affiliated to Britain by a free
and democratic vote,” Sir Basil
said. “Until the people of North-
ern Ireland say they want to leave
the British Empire and = them-
selves with the Republic of Eire,
Northern Ireland will
separate from Eire.

“Northern Ireland wasn’t dra-
gooned or bludgeoned or com-

lied to stay in the British orbit.

er people chose to remain Brit-
ish and will continue to remain

British,”
Open Ports

‘Sir Basil declared that because
Northern Ireland wanted to play
her full part in the defense of de-
mocracy, she would “readily throw
open her ports, airfields am mili-
tary establishments for the use of
Britain, America, and any other
co-operating powers in the event
of war, whether or not Eire re-
mained. neutral.”

And he said that should General
Eisenhower ask Northern Ireland
for bases, “they will readily be
given him, no matter how much
Eire may protest.”

The Premier described Northern
Ireland as one of thé bastions and
an essential factor in the British
een of defense and emphasized
that it would remain a_ bastion,
“in spite of Southern Irish neu-
trality or in spite of the refusal
of facilities for the use of South-
ern Irish ports.”

Sir Basil charged that an “at-
tempt is being made today to ex-
ploit Western defense in the in-
terests of a campaign for the in-
clusion of Northern Ireland in an,
all-Ireland republic,” and that

remain

Southern Irish leaders have beenj!
attempting to enlist American aicphistoric

in the campaign. He said the basi
of the campaign apparently wa
that partition prevented Eire from
joining with the Atlantic Treaty
defense arrangements,

Ne Impediment

He drew attention however to
Eire’s history of neutrality and to
speeches by Irish leaders, the in-
ference from which was that “the
Irish republic will remain passive
as long as war does not touch its
own soil.”

“There can be no _ departure
from the existing position,” Sir
Basil said. “Whether Southern
Ireland retains or abandons neu-
trality, whether she joins the
Atlantic Pact or continues in iso-
lation, the decision of Northern
Ireland to remain part of the
United Kingdom is unalterable.
This is well known to the South-
ern Irish Government.”

“There is no sound reasgn why
Southern Ireland should not par-

ticipate without demanding the
fulfilment of any extraneous
condition,” the Premier insisted.

“The maintenance of Northern
Ireland's constitutional status can-
not legitimately be said to stand
in the way.”

—I.N.S.

pmnpeieneigpapaaneemmeeae
ESKIMO DELEGATES
ST. JOHN'S, N’fld.

Two Eskimo delegates from
Labrador spoke in their native
tongue at a recent fishermen’s
eonvention. Addresses by Martin
Martin and Jerry Sillett approv-
ing formation of a_fisherman’s
union were translated by another
delegate .—(CP)



Yes, everyone loves Royal Puddings.
They’re so rich and smooth. So nutritious,
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-
nila, and butterscoich. Try one today. |



i :
PREDICTED
WASHINGTON, May 1.
The long secret Wedemeyci
Report on Korea warned Preside:
Truman three years before wa
came that Russia “undoubtedly’
would seek control of that coun-

try, publication of the documen:
disclosed today.

“The report drafted in Septem-
ber 1947 by Lieutenant Genera)

Albert Wedemeyer urged the
United States to undertake a
vigorous programme of arms
assistance to the republic of
Korea.

Wedemeyer recommended to
Truman that American Occupation
treops remain in South
until Russian troops were with-

drawn from North Korea. This
was done. But Wedemeyer’s
recommendations for a

programme of United States

military aid was not implemented,

Wedemeyer predicted “undoubt-
edly” the Russian objective would
be to obtain control of South
Korea by using Communist Nortl
Korean military forces sponsorec
and trained by infiltration and by
other methods usually undertaken
by Reds.

Wedemeyer's report was made

three years before the North
Koreans struck at the South
Korean Republic in June 1950
with an invasion followed

up by the intervention of Chinese

Communists in force in November

1950. ar
Fact Finding

Truman on July 9, 1947 on the
recommendation of the then Sec-
retary of State General Marshall,
ordered Wedemeyer to China and
Korea on a fact-finding mission.
The General and the Mission
spent about one month in China
and then visited briefly Korea,

Wedemeyer said that after
Russian troops left North Korea,
“one of the Kremlin's major objec-
tives” will undoubtedly be to
control South Korea by utiliza-
tion of Communist Korean armed
forces as a means of pressure
after the withdrawal of United
States forces as done in the cases
of Poland, Outer Mongolia, Yugo-
slavia and Albania,”

He declared that “Soviet-dom-
inated Korea would constitute a
serious political and psychological
threat to Manchuria, North China
and Japan and hence to United
States interests in the Far East.

—Reuter



UNDER ESCORT

PORTSMOUTH, England.
Visitors to Horatio Nelson’s
flagship, the Victory, in
‘uture will be personally escorted
9 and from the vessel, to prevent
anyone gaining illegal entry to
he rest of the dockyard. —(CP)

i

Export Drive
In Wide Field

By JOHN E. CARLOVA

LONDON, April.
export drive to-day
from rubber

j
}
|

Britain's
covers everything
nakes and Gaelic dictionaries to
second-hand goose feathers.

These are a few of the items
covered in the 80 to 100 trade
inquiries reaching London each
week from all over the world

A Board of Trade officia) told
International News Service:

“We have a special department
to handle unusual requests. These
experts sort the inquiries out and
pass them along to manufacturers
who might be interested.”

He explained ine request for
rubber snakes—“King Cobras in
a striking attitude”--came from a
dealer in Arizona who thought
“they should have a great appeal
to_ kiddies.”

The Gaelic dictionaries were
wanted in Nova Scotia, and a St
Louis firm
feathers
mattress . {

Board of Trade files show the
requests come in all sizes. In a
single day inquiries were received
about “a few” tiny brass pins of

needed the old goose

for a special type ol!

a special make, three-and-a-half
million bricks and a two-masted
schooner

Puzzling

The Board of Trade experts are
often puzzled but seldom stumped
After investigation on two
requests, they discovered that “a
de-horner” is a deyice for remoy
ing cattle horns and “coffin
furniture” is the metal used in
decorating coffins

The experts admit
a lot in their job.
from Ceylon specifically asking}
about red and yellow umbrellas
led te the knowledge that yellow
umbrellas are used by Buddist
priests, while red ones are strictly
for royal occasions. Natinral
characteristics have to be under~
stood and catered to, For instance,
the experts discovered that
Americans take up more room
than the English when sitting |
down. This led to outsize export |
models in riding breeches and}
shooting sticks—that tricky little |
contraption that can be used as al
walking stick or a resting place |

they learn

An inguiry/



L i os
Korea 10” hikes,

Unkindest Cut
The Board of Trade men saia

strong} they are probably proudest of the }

way they handled a request trom |
he Lord Mayor of Bagdad. lic

wanted to tea service for 1,000]
people in a hurry. He got it, but

the Board of Trade experts are
till wondering .what the hurry

was about,

They said they usually keep
their noses out of the whys and
wherefores, but one from darkest
Africa for 20 Seotch bagpipes was
just too much for them. They
found out that the French coloniai
government wanted the bagpipes
to keep native troops happy.

Sometimes the experts are a
little hurt by the tone of requests

They said the unkindest cut of
all—in meat-rationed Britain—;
was from a dealer in Nebraska
for 1,000 steak knives "beets |
you probably haven't much tse
for them over there.”

—(I.N.S.)
|



Britain's Debt

LONDON, April.

Comptroller and Auditor Gen-
eral Sir Frank Tribe disclosed in
a White Paper that Britain's ex
ternal debt increased by $1,780,
865,603.20 as a direct result of the
devaluation of the pound sterling
in September, 1949,

Devaluation resulted in the cost
of a United States loan being in-
crpased $988,417,085,20, the
Economic Co-operation Agree
ment loan by /95,531,016, the Re-
construction Financg, Corporation
loan by $32,838,688.40, the Cana-
dian loan by $234,660,501, 60,
Canada’s interest free loan by
$83,643,114. 80; Newfoundland's
interest free loan by $2,537,928.40
get Belgium's loan by §$1,192,900..

Sir Frank’s report is on the Con
solidate Fund Abstract Account
for the year ended March 31,
1950,

by



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PAGE FOUR





Thursday, May 3, 1951

Festival Thursday

Today, on the sceps of St. Paul's, the
King will declare the Festival of Britain
open. This year is the fiftieth anniversary
of the Great Exhibition, a successful festi-
val sponsored by Prince Albert, husband
of Queen Victoria.

There is no deubt that the Festival will
be great fun, a fairyland has been created
at Battersea—one of the grimmest parts
of London—and arrangements have been
made for other sections of the show to be
staged in other centres, but is it worth it?
The Festival Gardens alone were estim-
ated at first to cost £770,000, but the cost
has now rocketed to £2,500,000 with an
estimated loss of £1,500,000. Out of all
this will come six months of pleasure for

‘Londoners.

Can the British afford to spend this
amount of money on a celebration when
they have so little to celebrate about? The
Festival, it was hoped, would succeed in
attracting dollar visitors to Britain, and by
putting Britain’s achievements in industry
on show help to boost the export trade.
But so far the Americans seem to be very
little interested in the Festival, and the-
tourists who are going to Britain this year
are heading for Stratford-on-Avon and the
Lake District, not for Battersea. It seems
as if the Socialists, not content with Gam-
bia and the Groundnuts Scheme, have
decided to go in for squandering money on
a large scale at home.

The core of the Festival will be in Lon-
don, where, besides Morrison’s fun fair,
there will be displays drawn from the
fields of science, technology and industrial
design. Also in London there will be ex-
hibitions of books, science and architec-
ture. In Glasgow British heavy industry
will be on show, and the exhibition in Bel-
fast will be mainly concerned with the
Trish linen industry.

There will also be two travelling exhi-
bitions which will visit the important
centres of the country, One of these will
be mounted on a ship and the other will
travel overland. The latter will need over
100 lorries to transport its collection of
5,000 exhibits from city to city.

“The chief and governing purpose of the
Festival”, says the Archbishop of Canter-
bury, “is to declare our belief and trust
in the British way of life, not with any
boastful self-confidence nor with any
aggressive self-advertisement, but with the
sober and humble trust that by holding
fast to that which is good and rejecting
from our midst that which is evil we may
continue to be a nation at unity in itself
and’ of service to the world. It is good at
a.time like the present so to strengthen,
and in part to recover, our hold on the
abiding principles of all that is best in our
national life.” But is this really so? will
the Festival do anything to maintain the
British way of life? It seems very un-
likely,

The only way for the British way of life
to be maintained is for Britain to prosper,
and with a Socialist Government in power
—a Government with so little economic
sense that they agreed that a bankrupt
country should stage an expensive Festival
—there is little hope of that.

But; if the Festival achieves nothing else,
it will at least have brought a little colour
and enjoyment to Britain. With “every-
thing going up” and a-shortage of food,
the British need a little diversion. In
fact, the Festival may act as a moral boo-
ster. But. no doubt it would have been
cheaper to equip every citizen with a
“morale raiser” like the one on show at
Battersea which murmurs comforting re-
marks stich as “Well done old chap; you’re
doing fine!” than stage a mammoth flop,

eee



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ta

“Handy time to tell us we’ve built it upside down.”



History

Ciudad Trujillo

You cannot escape history any-
where, but in this city it lives
with you vocally. For it has the
first cathedral to be established
in the New World; it was in this
island that the first Mass was
sung in the Americas it was here
that the first municipal govern-
ment of the New World was set
up and the first viceroyship of
the western world was that of
Santo Domingo.

It was from Santo Domingo
that Christopher Columbus car-
ried out his other voyages of dis-
covery; he landed on this island
on December 5, 1492—Jamaica
was discovered on May 3, 1494
nearly two years later. Here they
will show you homes’ where
members of Columbus’ family
lived; they reverently show you
too the remains of Christopher
Columbtis in an imposing marble
and vronze monument in the
cathedral.

So it is natural that los Domini-
canos regard themselves as hav-
ing a mission in the New World
—note their five million dollar
plan to erect a great international
monument to Columbus, a mono-
lithic cross one kilometre long
which will stand foursquare, ‘to
all the winds that blow, and will
send to the skies a great cross of
light as a beacon to lighten the
way for all the peoples of the
west.

This sense of mission and sense
of history are perhaps the same.
And it cannot fail to impress you,
even if you regard history as
dull and monuments past or pro-
jected as futile. Jamaicans seem
by contrast completely uncon-
cerned about the past; monu-
ments mean nothing to them;
their history perhaps has not
been sublimated into a national-
istic urge or consciousness.

Not se in Ciudad Trujillé, in
whose past I was perforce steeped
all day today when I had the
honour of a distinguished guide,
Senor Cesar Tolentino, brother of
Gustavo the Dominican Consul in
Kingston .

Cesar is one of the patriarchs
of the Government, the Trujill
Government. With unwrinkled
skin, bright eyes, only his uneven
steps suggest that he is nearing
0. He has served his country

in many capacities. It was dur-



? You Live It
San Domingo

By T. E. SEALY
Editor of The Daily Gleaner

ing his tenure of office as Min-
ister of Agriculture that the great
rice-growing programme was
started; it was his family who
sent to Jamaica seeds of the Buf-
falo strain of rice which have
shown such good results recently.

Cesar has been ambassador in
Spain, France, Rome and _ all
Central America. He knows Ja-
maica too for—like so many other
distinguished leaders of Latin
America in years past—he took
refuge there in 1913 during a
revolution.

Senor Tolentino showed me the
old section of the city with its
ancient walls and gates and forts,
explained the glories of the Do-
minican sense of mission, took
me over the site of the great
Columbus Beacon—el Faro Co-
lon—where men were’ working
at excavations for the central
erypt into which are to be re-
moved Columbus’s remains now
in the Cathedral, and other relics
of the family donated by the
government of Spain. The men
were hard at work although it
was a Holy Week holiday; the
Government wants rapid pro-
gress on the scheme.

>

The symbolism of the monu-
ment is, of course, based on the
cross, the Christian cross; look-
ing to the east from which re-
ligion and civilisation came to the
west; solid and massive in con-
struction to demonstrate the
hazards of wind and earthquake
to which the Caribbean is sub-
ject. Round about jt are to be
built a new town, an international
airport, a modern setting for the
memorial to the country’s found-
er.

Most countries of the New
World are subscribing to the cost,
and the inauguration—perhaps
two years’ time—will be a New
World festival.

After visiting the Senate, which
is housed in a massive building
erected as a Governor's palace
when the Haitians ruled the
whole island, we settled down to
converse. Mellowed by a Britisn
Honduras drink—Pitch a Clan—
or let’s get together—Senor To-
lentino talked of his country’s
past and its present problems,

“andon Exnress Service

In

The Dominican people, he tells | tally, too. Off his horse, many a gaucho is a
seventy-five per | fool,

me, still have
cent. indigenous Indian blood
mixed with Spanish, Negro and
other strains. In the interior you
may still see Dominican types
with the true Indian features.

That is one of the first contrasts
to note between Santo Domingc
and Haiti, the latter predominant-
ly negro, here Spanish mulattoes
on an Amerindian base, And Seno:
Tolentino told me of other con-
trasts—the high production oi
Santo Domingo, the more intense
producti the greater wealth
extracted from the soil. | For
while Haiti has to seek work fo

her people in Santo Domingo | them: a pound of steak and a pint of beer,

there is no unemployment here
and the Government is now de-
finitely to undertake limited im-
portation of Haitian workers
What Senor Tolentino has tolc
me is borne out by the figures
Santo Domingo exports about £14
per annum per head of its two
and a quarter million people:
while Haiti’s three and three-
quarter million people export only
£3 per head. The pressure on the
land in Haiti is great, more than
Jamaica's and almost
twice Santo Domingo’s 155 people
per square mile. The people of

Santo Domingo are able to fur-|moving in cavalcade from corral to corral as

nish taxation at the rate per head
of £14 per annum, more than
nine times the per capita taxes
of the Haitian people, and twice
the per capita taxation in Ja-
maica.

And so when you tie in the his-
tory of the emergence of Sante
Domingo from Haitian domin-
ance, when you realise that near-
ly half a million Haitians were
once living in this country and
had to be sent back home, note
the pressure on land room in
Haiti, the comparative prosperity
of this country, then you can
understand the border incidents
ef some years ago.

Perhaps that is one of the ex

planation’ for the masses
warplanes maintained by
Trujillo Government. Perhaps

too, it shows the significance of

the recent goodwill meetings be |by the yells and lashes of the gauchos to

tween the Presidents of the two
countries. It requires sound
diplomacy to balante the econo-
mic stresses. I begin to under.
stand,



| The tally on the wall outside the market

exactly|of the biggest meat merchants in the world

°
the] are back at the bar, and the heaving, steam-

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951








Frank Owen

In The Land Of Steaks

BUENOS AIRES.
DAWN streamed over the Rio de Plata,
the broad, rolling River of Silver, which is
the colour of mud, as I crossed the great
city and made my way to the West Side
| stock-yards of Mataderos. ;
i At the gateway is a striking bronze
statue of an old bearded gaucho, with bare
feet, long stirrup leathers, and a loose rein,
| riding across the pampas.
Prosperous citizens uptown, driving in
their shining American motor-cars along the
boulevards as beautiful as in Paris, should) %
brave the muck and bear the sour stench
of the stockyards to come and take a good |§
“ at him and his horse.

FOR SCHOOL

PHILIPS’ ATLAS
and.

LAYNG’S ARITHMETIC
ROYAL READERS

Advocate Stationery

sunss SCOOP












Together, they made one-third of this coun-
try’s prosperity and coming power.

The beasts inside the gate of Mataderos
made another third. Heaven, which gave the
sun, the soil, and the winds and rain. provid-
ed the rest.



This handy and useful device provides the
housewife with a new and simple method of prepar-
ing recipes with utmost speed and accuracy. The
“Balansa” can be used for careful weighing and
measuring or as a guide for those who prefer to
guess.

STEP LIVELY
While I was still a mile away I could hear
the moos of the second section of the part-
ners. Nearer, there blended with their bel-
lowing salute to the sun the snorts and
grunts and squeals of the pig public.








WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Successors to
C.S. PITCHER & CO.

"Phones : 4472 & 4687

SISOS

manager’s office announced the state of trade
at the turnstiles: cattle, 10,800; pigs, 777.
Time : 6.45 a.m.

In the stockyard, which was still not yet f
half-filled, it was like getting mixed up in] %â„¢
a Korean cavalry charge.

You need to step lively to miss the motor-
cars in the streets of Buenos Aires, where
there are no traffic lights and few traffic cops.
In Mataderos you jump for your life to avoid
the horsemen.

They came cantering down the tree-lined
lanes, lolling on the broad, barrel-like saddles
of wool and hide, cracking their whips like
pistol shots.

Their horses are as sturdy as bullocks,
sure-footed as goats. They turn when a rein
is laid on their neck, and they turn on a silver
dollar, 4

The gauchos themselves are as tough and| %
wiry as their steeds. Man and horse are|%
almost a single piece, physically and men-| %



SSIS

Enjoy it









with pleasure

PETER DAWSON’'S
SPECIAL

WHISKY

: ‘ji
Again !! :
%
1% THE OLD FAVOURITE
8am. STEAK 1X

Yes, madam, the gaucho wears a wide,

black sombrero, a_ bright-coloured cloak

(poncho), which is really a blanket with a
hole in the middle for the head to go through,
big plus-four trousers stuffed into high leath-
er boots, and a lasso is coiled on his saddle.
But they don’t look a bit like the American
film stars. These are Gurkhas on horseback.
At eight o’clock I am eating breakfast with

———_

JUST RECEIVED
LIGHTNING
ZIPP FASTENERS

. The original Zipp Fastener that










total price—ls. 3d. apiece.

The party then swallows a glass or two!
of local spirits, and fortunately is broken up
by the incessant clanging of the stockyard
jell. The market is about to begin.

Now the acres of Mataderos and the miles
of its lanes echo to the bell, the bellowing of
the beasts and the bawling of the buyers.

Messrs. Vestey, Swift, Armour and others



always works. In sizes - Type -

ie Rare. Lengths and Colours that are

“JUST RIGHT”

Their buyers, also mounted are

the stout 1,000lb. steers are sold, 20 to 40 at
a time, at a price. that ranges around £10
er head.

rc For

every service in Personal

ON THE WING

Bidding against merchants (lest the sever- ‘
al individual buyers should agree to carve apparel and equipment
up the market and cut the price) are the
agents of the Argentine Meat Prodycers’
Corporation.
This is a Government-controlled organisa-
tion to protect the poor Argentine rancher
against the rich foreign merchants,

In an hour or so it is all over, The buyers

For your selection see...

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.
Dry Goods Dept.

ing, slithering beasts are being herded off

their last round-up. Mataderos has done its
business for the day.

At noon other visitors arrive. Very im-
portant personages, these, at any rate in the

it's MAY DAY !!

TIME TO-*
SERVE WINE

steerage oi the Argentine.
They have come by special Pan-Air plane;







OUR READERS SAY:

flying some 10,000 miles from Toronto, in

\REMSSS RAOTAES TOES TAS 72 TET TERA SASS A AS US TES ETS
(HA FRO TR UE SN

=

BerMPOEO-Y

oe

MONE SRSA PIO SID

Serehodadicrare®

Row
Oe &<

2
a

Oil

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Cil is a known emollient
+a soothing agent. It was this
~ eas, that was in old Keir
- “Hardie’s mind when he said about
Churchill “well he doesn’t walk
about with an oil can.” But oil
as far as Barbados is concerned
, Stems to have lost this quality
_,since an important debate in the
House of Lords as published in
last Sunday's Advocate. “It has
‘, mow become an irritant, and aia’-
one who ventures to discuss ii
‘Ieaves himself open to criticism.
But if a subject is important it
should be discussed and talked
about in the honest endeaveur to
find the true facts‘and perspective,

In the Lo¥ds’ debate Lord Teviot
made. the following points— »

(I)* The B.U. (we'll,call them
so for brevity) had secured leases
over 78% of drillable land in
~Barbados. 2

(2) They drilled 52 wells of
about 4,015 feet deep. ;

(3) This was the position when
war started in, 1939.

(4) Arrangements had been
made with Leaseholds to drill
deep wells.

(5) In March 1946 the Col,
Secretary of Barbados intimated
to the Company that the Barba-

dos Government intended to take
over all underground oil rights,
and give the B.U. prospecting li-
cences over the whole Island.

(6) In July 1947, Sir H. Blood,
Governor of Barbados, read to
the Company’s agent a despatch
from the Colonial Office, London,
suggesting that Barbados give
a prospecting license to the Com-
pany over the whole » in
return for the surrender of the
Company's leases.

(7) Mr, Lepper’s report (Janu-
ary 1949) had recommended that
the B.U. be given the sole pros-
pecting licence over the ole
Island.

(8) In May 1949 the acting
Governor of Barbados confirmed
to B.U.’s Manager that his Gov-
ernment would abide by the
Lepper report.

(9) Trusting to these promises,
the B.U. surrendered their leases,
and did not oppose the Petroleum
measure,

(10). The aet gave no compen-
sation for the loss of rights io
explore for oil, which the B,U.
had secured by their leases,

These points make quite a for-
midable impression on the reader,
but you should note that they
consist of statements by a Col-
onial Secretary of Barbados—by

a Clerk in the Colonial Office,
London—by a Governor of Bar-
bados, and by Mr. Lepper. Now
none of these had any right or
authority to speak for the Legis-
lature of Barbados, or to bind
that Legislature in any way. [An
important Constitutional question
is involved, but this letter is too
long already to deal with that
here]; Nevertheless is it not a
fact that if you or I had received
such assurances we should have
relied on them, and been content
to do so.

Now about 1950 something
must have happened because
when the B.U. applied for a
prospecting licence it was refused.
Mr. Tanner had been asked for
advice. Who was the person who
first suggested the appointment
of a Canadian expert to advise
about Petroleum Regulations? We
shall probably never know. Up
to then the sky had been quite
clear and a_ gentle breeze had
been blowing favourable to the
B.U.;. but. storm clouds now
gathered, Someone had queered
the pitch for the B.U. Who was
it? Even Lord Teviot does not
suggest that persons here were
better off financially after the
above change of weather and I
should hate to think that a well
known American method of pro-
moting business had any place in
Barbados. In fact I do not believe
it.

Was it only that some bright
fellow suggested that it would be
advisable to have a competitor
in the field so that he and the
B.U. could spur each other on
to a speedy investigation of the
oil resources? Did some one think
that the B.U. did not show ade-
quate results for 32 years work
in the Island, and that they
should have sunk a deep well long
ago when the shallow wells prov-
ed inadequate? In this connection
it is fair to remember that the
war period should be written off,
as no materials could then be
obtained.

It is a pity that the B.U.
agents walked out of the meet-
ing so abruptly. Such conduct
achieves nothing, it only antag-
onises. If they had remained to
bargain they would probably have
secured r terms. Let us try
to forget all that and remember
that “in my opinion all that is
“known today about the Oil
“prospects of Barbados has been
“due .to the drilling opera-
“tions of the B.U. and the re-
“searches of its geologists”. [Lep-
per]. ;

If it be possible. at this late
hour to assist the B.U. and con-
cede better terms, let us be glad
to do it:

E. C. JACKMAN,
May 2, 1951.

Canada—16 splendid black-and-white Hol-
stein bulls.
All of these handsome gentlemen are

descended from famous fathers and are},

themselves each worth about £1,000.

It has cost at least 1,000 dollars apiece
(£340) to fly them here over America, the
Indies and the Andes,

Their flight took them close on three days,
due to fog over the Amazon jungle.

“What happens if they get restive at
12,000ft. ?” I asked the genial Canadian crew

| master.

“Oh, easy,” he said. “We just go up another
few thousand feet, and then the young fellers
sorta get short of breath and want to lie
down in the hay.”

MILLIONS ! OF

Every other week such another “bull flight”
lands on this giant airfield, probably the
largest in the world. The ranchers reckon

that it is no dearer and much safer than|

shipping the animals by a month-long sea!
voyage.

No doubt they know their own business
best. And cattle, with corn is the Argentine’s
own, and best, business.



{
|
—bES. |



“Sandeman’s Sherry
Sandeman’s Port
Dry Sack Sherry .
Bristol Cream Sherry
Prunier Brandy

’EM |

FRESH VEGETABLES

Carrots, Cabbage,
Beets, Tomatoes









WITH A
DELIGHTFUL
ROAST

Gold Braid Rum
Top Notch Rum
Vielle Curé
Curaco

Creme de Menthe,
Benedictine

THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS

Anchor Butter

Anchor Rich Milk Powder
Australian Cooking Butter
‘Van Houten’s Cocoa
Cadbury’s Cocoa Essence
Chocolate Nut Roll
Planter’s Nuts

Dutch Cheese

QUALITY MEATS

Beef, Lamb, Veal, Chickens
Frozen Salmon

Danish Cheese

Carr’s Crackers

Carr’s Tea Biscuits

Tea time Pastes in Jars—

15c. each.
Cook’s Paste—6c, each

Chocolate Cunch Biscuits—
10c. each

& POULTRY

Frozen Fillet Sole
Frozen Cod Fillets

Phone GODDARDS —

WE DELIVER

FFF
o



THURSDAY,

"
oy

MAY



Sketches

1951



Led To

Amateur Theatrieals

the
ing

cumstances,



MR. C. A. GROSSMITH

. -'t

Threatening
‘Letters Received

HE POLICE are investigating

a report from Marjorie Hard.

ing of Pool, St. John, who stated

that she received two letters from

an unknown person demanding
$20 by threats.

One letter was received on
April 21 and the other on April 27.
Ov WAY TRAFFIC system,

which has been in use in the
City for many months, is now ex-
tended to Fairchild Street. Hand
earts can go in any direction, but
motor and horse-drawn vehicles
and cyclists must obey the one way
traffic signs.

N TUESDAY evening table
tennis players from the
Y.M.C.A, visited the Y.W.C.A.

and gave the players there instruc.
tions in the game,

The men some of whom were
“A” Class players also gave many
exhibition games and the _ladies
were extremely interested.-Up to
late on Tuesday night, long after
the men had left, the ladies could
still be seen practising.
een broke and entered the

house of Jane Millington at
Rockley, Christ Church, and stole
a quantity of clothing and other
articles, total value $46.20. Tho
incident occurred between 6.00
p.m. and 9.00 p.m. on Monday.

PROGRAMME of varied

church musie will be ren-
dered at, the annual organ and
song recital at the St. John Bap-
tist Church, St. James, on Thurs-
day May 17 beginning at 7.45 p.m

The recital is being given in aid
of vicarage funds.

DEATH INQUIRY:
AGAIN ADJOURNED

Hearing in the inquest into the
death of Helena Mullins, a labour-
er of Sandy Hill, St. Philip, was
further adjourned until to-day by
Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Coroner of
District “A” yesterday.

Helena Mullins died suddenly on
the way to the General Hospital
on April 26 while she was being
transferred there from the
St. Philip Almshouse.

Only medical evidence was taken
vesterd»y and this was given by
Dr. A. S. Cato who performed the
pest mortem examination on the
body of Mullins at the General
Hospital on April 27.

He said that the apparent age of
the woman was about 41 years.
She was identified to him by Wil-
liam Linton and she was dead for
about 18 hours. There was a large
swelling under the scalp but there
were no signs of cerebral haemor-—
rhage. The skull was fractured. In
his opinion death was due to frac-
ture of the skull.

£3 for Faulty Brakes

A District “A” Police Magis-
trate yesterday ordered William
Gittens of Trent District. St.
George, to pay a fine of £3 by
monthly instalments or in default
two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour when he appeared on
a charge of driving a motor lorry
with faulty brakes.

The offence was committed on
March 14 while he was driving
the lorry along Arthur Hill Road.
Set Forde prosecuted for the
Police.

Inspector A. Farnum of High-
ways and Transport, said that he
examined the brakes of the truck
and found that the foot and hand
brakes were not working pros

perly. 2 he

Fined For Overloading

TWO bus conductors were fined
by a City Police Magistrate yes-
terday for overloading their buses.
They were Rupert Doyle of
Roebuck Street, St. Michael and
Darnley Yearwood of Branchbury,
St. Joseph.

Doyle was ordered to pay a
fine of 20/- in 14 days or one
month’s imprisonment and Year-
wood 10/- in seven days» or
seven days’ imprisonment, Doyle
was the conductor of the bus
M—1422 on Harmony Road, St.
Michael, at about 3.55 p.m. on
March 10 when the policeman on
duty stopped the bus and counted
44 passengers.

Yearwood’s bus was carrying 33
passengers when it was stopped.
The Magistrate told both conduc-
tors that the overloading of buses
was becoming very prevalent and
he hoped that it would stop.



COLLISION
Shortly after 10.10 a.m. yes-
terday, the motor lorry, O,145,

owned and driven by Joseph Kell-
man of Church Village, St. Jos-
eph, was involved in an accident
ey Coleridge Street near the Fire
Brigade Station with the bicycle
M.1040 owned and ridden by Syd-
ney Beckles of Bank Hall, St. Mi-
chael
The front wheel of the bicycle
extensively damaged.



MR. C. A. GROSSMITH, Administrative Secretary of
Development and Welfare Organisation who is produc -
Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion at the British Council’s
Little Theatre, Wakefield House, has had a great deal of
experience of dramatic work in an unusual variety of ¢ir-

In” an interview at Hastings
House yesterday, he told the
Advocate that though he was not
closely connected with the famous
theatrical family of the Grossmiths,
there was some slight relationship,
and perhaps, enough of their blood
flowed in his veins to account for
the interest in the theatre he had
felt all his life. ° os

He said that he developed a
taste for amateur acting when,
with a few of the officers of his
battalion ef the East Lancashire
Regiment in Mesopotamia at the
end of World War I, they tried to
ease the boredom of the troops
waiting for demobilization with
home made sketches. After that,
he was working in Germany for
some years and took the opportu—
nity to study German literature
and the drama in Berlin.

French, German Plays

On his return to England in 1934
he joined a small private circle of
friends for play readings in French
and German—which *;was great
fun. ' Ss

In the very early thirties, the
Colonial Office started an Amateur
Dramatic Society, and for about
ten years, they put on a series of
plays, gome of which he produced.
The Society produced Comedies of
Shakespeare, plays by Goldsmith
and Sheridan, modern drama and
Grand Guignol thrillers.

‘Phe plays" were performed in
hospitals and working men’s clubs,
winding up with three or four pub-—
lic performances,

Shakespeare played in curtain
sets was alWays well received,
but sometimes there were snaps,

One small club in North London
for instance, when they were
playing the “Taming of the
Shrew,” very kindly gave them
a painted back ‘sheet portraying
the local High Street complete
with an electric tramway system.
They held their breath for a
guffaw from the audience wher
their _small_page. announced: “A
street. scene in Padua.” But it was
allright. —- -

Public Readings

Mr. Grossmith was a founder
member of the Amateur Dramatic
Cirele at the Royal Empire
Society in London. He had been
too busy to do much during the
war, but he had kept his hand
in by taking parts in and helping
to run the public readings at the
Royal Empire Society of such
widely different plays as Shaw's
“Apple Cart”, “and Bridie’s
“Tobias and the Angel”.

When Mr. Tucker spoke to him
about helping with a performance
for the very little theatre at
Wakefield, he felt honoured and
readily accepted the invitation.
The choice ofa play was not
easy because for a_ variety of
reasons including Mr. Tucker's
early departure on leave to Eng-
land, there was so little time in
which to make a selection and get
underway with rehearsals.



To Speightstown
By Schooner

What about a sail to Speights-
town by schooner? This is the
atest craze of some Canadians
and Venezuelans holidaying here.

The Speightstown schooners are
in Bridgetown at least twice a
week. Around midday they sail
into the Careenage and just after
a few hours at the waterfront; they
are on the way to Speightstown
again. ?

No luxury cabins nor saloons,
just a small wooden deck on
which the pleasure seekers sit,
holding fast occasionally to the
riggings. They get lots of fun out
of the sail. .

They never lose sight of the
§and. The schooners just skirt
the coast and they make the trip
in about an hour and a half to two
hours.

What seems to attract them
most is the beautiful scenery of
the coast. Their eyes are hardly
ever off the coast. They hurl
questions at the sailors who are
always keen to tell them what
they are seeing.

When the weather is good, they
are always “so sorry” because
they have come to the end of the
trip too quickly. They land at
Speightstown pier and motor back
to Bridgetown.



WHEN THE WATER
IS TURNED OFF

THE Chief Engineer of the
Waterworks told the Advocate
esterday, that\the Department

not turned off water from any

seholder ..for. the current
quarter due to non-payment of
rates.

He said that. water rates should
be paid in advance during the
first tensdays of the quarter.
Reminder notices are put in the
newspapers about the end of the
second month and during the last
quarter, 2,000 personal reminder
notices were issued in the third
month.

It is only after this has been
done and the rates not paid that
the Department send out repre-
sentatives to shut off the water.
The Waterworks Department had
no wish to cause inconvenience
to people, but water rates must
be paid. :

If a new tenant fails to notify
the Waterworks of his tenancy,
naturally, the Department would
have no knowledge of his occupa-
tion of the building and water
would not. be available until
turned in by request.

Travelling Bank
Does Good Business

The Travelling Office of the
Government Savings Bank com-
pleted its tenth weekly visit to
the various sugar estates in the
island yesterday.

Business done for the week
showed that there were 78 depos-
its of which 13 were new accounts
and the amount of money collect-
€d was $2,701.12,



HOPES TO RREAK FASTING

i ‘

THE NAME of this man is

he started on his foodless marathon.
of fifty days without food. Twent;
by going without food for 46 days.



Board Of Health Want

Public Health



BARBADOS ADVOCATE






Mi given as Bobby, and he is se i
specially constructed glass cabin at Joachinisthaler Platz, Berlin, 2

He hopes to set up a new record
y five years ago he set up a record
—Evxpress

Act Amended

THE Board of Health will write a letter to the Colonial
Secretary asking him to go about getting the Public Health

Act amended so as to get proposed roads in the

mitted to the

plans sub-

Board, constructed to the satisfaction of the

Director of Highways and Transport. The Director would

have to forward a report to

100 Years
“The Liberal”, May 3, 1851
LEGISLATIVE PROCEEDINGS

MR. MAYCOCK introduced
a petition from the Council
of the General Agricultural
Society, which he moved
might be read. Mr. E. Packer
seconded the motion, and the
petition was read.

The petitioners allege that
the agricultural interests of
these colonies pre already
sufficiently depressed by the
unequal competition with the
Slave colonies to which they
are now exposed, and that
there is every likelihood of
further injury being done
them through the alleged
privileges if the patentees of
the princivle of applying
centrifugal force,to the curing
of sugar—which privileges
they claim to exercise only
in the free British Colonies.
Under these circumstances
and with a view to avert the
evils apprehended —, the
petitioners pray that the
House take steps for recurring
to this colony the privilege of
importing machines of foreign
invention and manufacture.

Australian Meat
Arrives ©

The steamship Tongariro was
still here yesterday ° discharging
the shipment of meat, cheese and
other foodstuffs she brought from
Australia. oh Tuesday.

Carts, lorries and vans were
being loaded with the bags and
boxes of the refrigerated cargo
which they took to their consig-
nees. Housewives will get thein
supplies of the meat to-day.

Oo







“Challenger”’
Takes Rum

The motor vessel Canadian
\Challenger left Barbados last
night for Canada after spending
four days here loading sugar,
molasses and rum for Canadian

ports.

She has loaded 600 tons of
sugar for Montreal, over 1,000
puncheons, barrels and half-

barrels of molasses for Charlotte-
town, Quebec, St. John and Hali-
fax and a quantity of rum.

The Challenger is sailing to
Canada via St. Lucia. Her agents
are Messrs, Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd.

YAMS SELL
SLOWLY,

Land owners who have planted
yams are finding difficulty in get-
iing them sold, the Director of
Agriculture, Mr. C. C. Skeete,
told the Advocate yesterday.

Housewives do not seem very
keen on ineluding much yam in
their food and so _ vegetable
dealers are not buying many.

The Director said that if the
yams remain in the ground too
long they will sprout again.

Latrine Wanted
In Bus Stand

It is now more than six months
that the bus stand has been re-
moved to Probyn Street. No lat-
rine has been erected at any place
near the bus stand. The bus con-
ductors and drivers complain be-
cause none is nearby and say that
one would be very convenient

Some told the Advocate yester-
day that a latrine would be es-
pecially useful to them as they
have to be about there regularly,
Besides, many people have to wait
about there to catch their buses





the Board.

The Board wants better
tenantry roads. They were cofi
sidering suggestions by the
Director of Highways & Tran
port for the type of road suitable
for construction in tenantries
under the Public Health Act,

The President of the» Board,
Dr. E, B, Carter, .said that at
present they could not demand
any definite type of road,

Mr. J. M, Kidney illustrated
an instance of a big area whici
had been divided, but which ha
no proper roads, He said tha‘
in many instances stones were
merely dropped upon the roads
and when the areas wére gold
out, Government weve put in an

embarrassing position and que
tioned about the roads,

Hon. V. C. Gale said that no:
mally the roads _ should I
inspected after they were finish
ed, but he believed that. the,
custom of inspection was not
followed up. aA

Mr. W. A. Abrahams, Chief
Government Inspector, told the
Board that inspectors used te
inspect the roads but the ques
tion was brought u as to
whether it was really their duty
Another thing was that some-
time permission was given to
divide land for agricultural pur-
poses and then a house would be
put up, the owner holding — that
he wanted to watch his iand

Decision Postponed

The Board postponed their

decision on the application for

permission for the division and
sale in lots of 78,000 square feet
of land at Westbury Road, St,
Michael, by Mr. S. A. Hawkins.

Dr. F. N. Grannum who visited
the spot said that when he saw
the land it was not flooded, bu-
it was very low lying land and
was apt to get flooded,

Four members of the . Board
will visit the site before they
decide whether they will approv«
the division,

The Board approved of the
division and sale in lots of
174,240 square feet of land al
Lodge Plantation, St. Michacl
by Mr. H, R. Farmer,

Permission was granted
Hutchinson & Banfield, Solici
tors, to amend the plan an!

statement in connection with the
proposals for the division = ani!
sale of land at Bush Hall and ip
the certificate of approval from
130,630 square feet to 135,120
square feet. Hutchinson & Ban.
field were acting for Ebeneze:
Alleyne.

YACHT ON DOCK

The pleasure yacht Maria
Catharina was on dry dock yes
terday. She is expected to spend
about four days on dock. When
she comes off, she will be making
ready to sail to Grenada.

Dock workers were removing
moss and seaweeds from her bot-
tom yesterday. She will be paint
ed and will undergo other minor
repairs.









FOUNTAIN PENS
Each 60c; $1.00; $1.08;

EXERCISE BOOKS
with single and double

PAINT BOXES—Each 42c;
PENCIL BOXES — Each

CRAYONS



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

moll

Supplies are in demand again

including Avithmetic

—

RECORD Larceny Case AMERICAN COLUMN:

Dismissed

A case brought by the Police
charging Eric Green of Thorn-
bury Hill, Christ Church, with the
larceny of clothing valued at
£1 19. 4 and the property of
Emmanuel Ishmael, was yesterday
dismissed without prejudice by a
District “A" Police Magistrate.

Sgt. C. Murrell prosecuted for
the Police while Green was not
represented by Counsel. Emmanuel
Ishmael told the court that he left
Green in his place on the morn-
ing of Avril 24 and when he re-
turned he found that a pair of
pants, and a shirt were nussing.

Sometime later he saw Green
wearing his shirt and he reported
the matter to the Police,

Another witness Drucilla
Mountain—said that she saw the
defendant with a parcel under his
arm on April 25. When she saw
him he was coming out of the
complainant's house. She could
not say What was in the parcel.

After reviewing all the evidence
the Magistrate said that there was
a doubt in his mind and as that
was the case, he would have to
give the defendant the benefit of
the doubt

Rosetta Sails The
World In 45ft. Boat

Ffom FRANK OWEN.
BUENOS AIRES, Friday.

: In a muddy, leafy creek of the
River Plate a’ 45-foot Australian
cutter, Waltzing Matilda, sailed by
three young men and a girl, made
ready to put to sea on the second
lap of the voyage round the world

The first stage

recently when
Matilda dipped her flag to the
Argentine capital and rolled up
the River Plate after a five-month
trip across the South Pacifie from
Sydney to Cape Horn,
_ “We sail now for Montevideo,
Rio de Janeiro, Pernambuco and
Bermuda—before the gales break,’
Said the skipper, Roy Davenport,
tall, tough, blue-eyed ex-R.A-F.
war pilot, as the cutter lay hauled
up for a refit.

“Then we head for New York,
and after that for Bonnie Secot-
land and Merrie England.”

“Don’t forget about France,
said dark-eyed, dark-haired (it is
a cute crew-cut) Rosetta Jean, his
young wife, in bell-bottom pants

All in R.A.F.

The other two of the
“the boys,” skipper Roy
them, are his younger
Keith and Donald Brown.

All three served in the R.A.F.
and since the war Roy and Don
have flown in civil airlines,

Mrs. Davenport was a hostess
in Qantas Airways, flying weekly
on the London-Sydney | route,
Keith has been a_ reporter in
Australia and Britain, and he is
keeping a lively log of his present
assignment.

Waltzing Matilda
trim craft.

She was built ostensibly for
ocean racing, “but I always had
that old schoolboy dream that I
would sgil and see the world in
her,” oa skipper Roy.



the | Waltzing

crew,
calls
brother

is a strong

He faced her for two years
between Sydney and Tasmania.
Ther’ the adventurers set forth

to see the world.

It was October
left Sydney for Auckland, New
Zealand. It took them 17 days,
and they spent a month or more
‘there,

29 when they

44 days

Then they headed for the South
Pacific, and for 44 days they
never saw another sail, hardly a
bird, and only a whale in all that
vast rolling waste of seas.

They made their landfall on
fthe rocky coast of Chile at Gulfo
de Penas.

Then they sailed south towards
Cape Horn, but heavy storms per-
suaded them to seek the route to
jthe South Atlantic by way of the
Magellan Straits,

“It was dirty enough in there,”
said Don Brown, “We would
anchor at nightfall, and all would
be peaceful and calm. Then sud-
denly the winds they calls
‘williwaws’ rose like a squall anc
blew at 50 miles an hour down
those steep funnel-like channels.”

The adventurers plan to sail up
Léndon River in September. I
hope we get the flags out.



ended safely |

SHOPS ARE

CUTTING
PRICES

NEW YORK.

For the umpteenth time the
economists and business trend
“predictors” have all been caughi
flat-footed—and this time it mean:
good news for “the consumer’
(meaning the man in the street)

In what the normally = staic
Wall-street Journal gleefully de
scribes as “a switcheroo.” the tun
has changed almost overnight it
Washington

Until the other day the talk wa
all gloom—shortages, disappearin,
#oods, higher prices

Now everyone is saying tha

prices are on the way down, Anc

all over this big country the

are proving it with cut—pric

sales.

Stocks ‘of goods on hand re
enormous. Estimated busines
inventories stood at a _ recor

65,100 million dollars at the en¢
of February—up 138,000 millioy
dollars over a year ago

MRS. JOSEPH TUTELA of Bos
ton, Massachusetts, complained t
Judge Jacob Lewiten that hei
husband was failing suppor
her.

Said Mr. Tutela
“Nonsense, once
dollar wreath
funeral,”

Said the judge: “No woman ca
buy groceries with a wreut!
however beautiful it is.”

SOMETHING odd is happenin,
to America’s night life. While the
expensive places and 50~doll arte
seat night clubs report a roaring
business, the cheap spots specialis:
ing in beer and juke boxes
languish.

Anthony Antravartolo, boss
the Chicago Tavern
Association succinctly
has done us dirt.”

to

indignantly
I gave her a ten
for her aunt



of
Owners
says “T'V

THE G.I's in Korea will soon be
getting their ham and eggs all ir
one tin, At Vineland. New Jersey
they are busy turning out the fips
shipments..What’s more, the egy
are not powdered but are seram
bled whole eggs. The ham i:
chopped.

THE AMERICAN _ farmer i
making more money than he ey>
did before—but there are far few |
men on the farms than there we
ten years ago.

The U.S, Censug Bureau reve |
that 1,300,000 men left the farm
for the big city since 1940.

eet en ae

| Junior Short Story Competition

PAGE FIVE



The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter f
ts Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be publish
very Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
» prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The stories
an be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 3@0
vords in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, the Advocate
Ce. Ltd., City not later than Wednescdoav every week.

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

.

Name ...... Oh erent revere ssecres ° tedeeeoreees
BOO Kwesi sees gris tas Seen sire oF eaacce te bowsewe
School .,.........+- chee... Sees eeee cenae tan ee
OTM occ icc cc ccceteccencseeececceecoessvesae vowe
Home Address . sed ee sees ede ne ceeerinesoesuwees










New Loveliness For You
witt PALMOLIVE SOAP

5 Follow this
Simple Beauty Plan

Awash your face with Palmolive Soap

Brthen, for 60 seconds, massage with
Palmolive’s soft, lovely lather. Rinse!

CPe this 3 times a day for 14 days.
This cleansing massage brings

heed skin Palmolive’s full

eautifying effect!

















THIS NEW FAMILY DRINK

~~

Maralyn Milk Plus is creamy milk . . . generously sugared
++. and specially enriched, It’s delicious! And it’s all
easily digested nourishment... acup of Maralyn sends you
to bed contented, You slip into sleep and sleep well, It
soothes away the restlessness you get from worry, overwork
or anxiety — you feel really fresh next day.

Maralyn




NO NEED TO ADD







wick eue MILK OR SUGAR |
A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT =~

RITA HAYWORTH, longing fo: a a a wa a Ba a w@ a a a wa ae a

a good old American frankfurter
(one of those light brown saus
ages inside’a roll) ordered one a.
her New York hotel.

A posse of “bell boys” was sent
to scour the neighbourhood, They
unearthed a frankfurter
modest drug store.



Canadians Unhappy
Over Trade Balarice |
With B.W.I. |

MONTREAL, May 2.
Canadian exporters are un-
happy about the unfavourable
trade balance between Canada
and the British West Indies, J. C
McDerby, Manager of the Cana-
dian Exporters’ Association told
the Montreal Service Club.

Restrictions by the United King-
dom were responsible for this un-
favourable picture, he said. Last
year’s imports from the West
Indies exceeded by $37,000,000
the value of goods sold in the
colonies by Canadian exporters,

He added: British West
Indies come under the United
Kingdom’s sphere of influence
and efforts to create a favourable
trade atmosphere with thé islands
— not been too well rewarded,”
—(CP),

“The



Trading Co. Has $193,000 Profit

The Board of Directors of tho

Barbados Shipping and Trading
Company, in their Annua!
Report, presented at yesterday’:
Annual Ordinary General Meet
ing of the Company, Prince
William Henry Street, showec
that the net profit for the yeai

was $193,851.60

The balance brought forwara
the report stated, amounted tk
$152,336.45 so that the total

amount available for distribution
was $346,188.05.

Mr, D. A. Lucie Smith ani
Mr. G. H. King, members of the
Board of Directors, who wer:
retiring under article 83 of tne
Articles of Association, wer:
re-elected yesterday,

The Board of Directors is a:
follows:— Mr. J, H. Wilkinson,
(Chairman); Mr. George S, Man

$1.32; and $2.96

lines--Each l0e.

60c; $1.20; $1.44
60c; and 84c.
18c; and 30c.



10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET











ning, (Vice Chairman), Mr. ¢
M. Manning, Mr. C, W. M
Sealy, Hon. Rn, Challenor
M.L.C., Hon. G. Douglas ~ Pli
M.L.C,, Mr. G. H. King, M
D. G, Leacock, Junior, Mr. G

D, Bynoe, Mr, D, A. Lucie-Smith

The Directors recommend th;
the amount of $346,188.05 bi
dealt with as follows

A dividend ot the; rate of
44c, per share per annum,

lews Income Tax at 4/6

in the £, be deciared,

absorbing NET $189,502 50
The sim of .,. 2,303



be placed to Reserve for
the Pepairs of Buildings

The sum of .. 2,000 0
be granted for charitable
donations at the = dis-
cretion of the Directors

The balance of 152,382 27

be left at the credit of
this Account. -
$7A6, 186 05





lots of other
Essential items



S9OCS SOO PS IO VSS OSS F FSO POSSI IODC PEE EE EE ATE)

|



git. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pistibutors.




a “PURINA”

LAYENA

see



USE A

“RIPPINGILLES ©

BLUE - FLAME
STOVE

5 ie el ih ini is el



_ FOR EASY & CLEAN |
| COOKING

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (B08) LTD.

AGENTS.



PLCLLLGLOPPLLALELLPLOLELLEVPFLPODVDA PPPS SORFSR





BEFORE
THE PRICE
ADVANCES







WE HAVE LARGE STOCKS OF

ARDATH cork tirrep .
CIGARETTES

Packages cf 10's & 20's which we
are reducing.

Original price 10’s—19¢. now léec.
20’s—-38e. ,, 32c.

Cartons of 200 for $3.00
Every cigarette guaranteed in
perfect condition.

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



* % aa tS aes (CO os (0S SDSS i 9S S

SOOSECS





PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951
ah a Td Ae ea ; —

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY

GuESS He MUST B= ONG |

\ OF THESE oy ae |



LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STAR

| Neediest Cases Fund

ANNOUNCEMENT

Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June at
Queen's Park, the undersigned will
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume

(bp) Steel Bands.

(ce) Advertising Bands.
(d) Histerical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carniyal, the Steering Committee
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being as original as ;

No entrance fee will be charged.

More jculars lates

A Carnival Band of thirty will
be visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade.

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk’s Office,
Bridgeto




MORNING, } |~

DRY GULCH’!
ANY NAME |S J. FLADDER WELKINRING !
1 REPRESENT “CATACLYSMIC PICTURES"!



SA.ESMEN YOu HEAR
SO WCH ABOUT!

,
\ / : . ' et
. \ ' a wi oY , \ —
\ i SS 3 ak — he 1 ak X T
vr ae ~ ee AN Yt _ ] a
A os - =a) = : — pa
h 7 a -
/ =1|¢ T\
y in / 7
u ws = :
be _4 ee 5 . x i
t y cj ¥ = ‘ , I>
< oI Q 5 < i
Re TK A , ial =~, Dy J es - 7 ¥ c
ie 2 > ; f - te ee = dl] “ eee ~—— a
ede ees > Z ‘ s = —= *
ef ¢. e ~ ain A \ \ \
« \ ] \ \ \ . fs /
Le ~ . %. m Copy fae, Wak E Pood \
: —<—— ae : se! S bid Bugis Pewee / . ed
: —-- - rie ; : sees - capes tines sting
See. aa
te “¥ \
| |
| j
i | | id y
* . 2 ‘ XN
7 se Sy 7 t 1] | sv
z 4's ~ =
C = } = age
fy pet, y, } i <5? ] ra
4 Ne 7 J '
¢ Oi aad Se a: A f =
gh = ; 1, LL “5 , es ih . Tare
BD a e A :





O nadabads You

PROMISED TO F dgetown.
DRAIN UNDER THE 5 For Booths, Stalls, and side-
. Shows, contact C. MORRIS,

Sobers Lane.

mw SINK FOR ME



~~







asim good looks tell you they’re just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price

tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
AS is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is
‘ ~ the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign

laa 9/ Gi wen which means ‘just right’! Look for it in
\ . leading stores in Barbados.

— JOHN WHITE

means made just.right






* ee ee
5 ee ht eae
a Selt
ih the first sign
sj; of muscular
to Ne | fatigue. The
i same safe an-
algesic, so effective
as a-headache rem-
edy, relieves discom-
fort quickiy, helps
you to relax. Keep
it handy - a/ways/







| 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH |

nh
then gave it up, An_ interesting
true beok by Monica Baldwin,



) Sring us your Feontain Pens for
modern tools for Pen Service.

'‘ JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
HARDWARE











Wes
K STRIKER

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HER

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only













[PACK ALL.OUR LOOT, Boys/) | [we wasTeD Time TRYING }/ LOOK! YJ
SADDLE! “VE GOT TO MOVE TOA CROOKS a THERE'S
LEAVEATRAILFOR THELAWTO IDE~OUT gamece= = c ONE
x. De.









USUALLY = NOW USUALLY NOW

Mushrooms, Tins 55 AB Floral
Icing Sugar, Pkgs. 33 29
Corned Beef with Cereal, Tins 31 25

Smedley’s Peas, Tins 48 44

All Bran, Pkgs. 29 25 Allsopp’s Beer, Bots. 26 20



D

‘WAGE YOu DON'T
XPBCT.ME TO WEAR
HeGtLY GETLP ————————————
AT THE BALL
may TONIGHT





EARLY FROM een

YOUR OFFICE!



THE AGENTS IN ARMS

by MARY WINTER

ADVOCATE BEYOND THE EAGLE’S RAGE

by HUGH POPHAM

HAS THE TWO SCAMPS

by GEORGE A. BIRMINGHAM

BEST A WINDOW CLEANER’S ROMANCE

by NOEL GODBER
BOOKS a

IN TOWN ADVOCATE STATIONERY

POROGISGS G9 SSOOSS9FD



rae

eta
-

SONNA GIT TH HERD
E2 THE BORDER



"LL TRY ONCE AGAIN -AN’
, SEE IF THOSE RUSTLERS

9999



Bus and

i '
TRUCK OWNERS |

Ni ° |
|

|










TLL GIVE YOu THE
KEY WHEN WE GET
ASHORE, IF yOu'LL

CAMBRIDGE
CYCLE TYRES



INSPECTION TIME NEED
NOT BE WORRYING TIME









|
\ °
S SEATS |
TIONIDE LEATHERETTE GREY PAINT. for Flooring | ’
CARPET MATERIAL SIGNAL RED for Body miles or
RUBBER MATS HEAT RESISTING BLACK
— NEVER? IT TAKES MORE THAN A P | T REAR VIEW MIRRORS WHITE LEAD & ZINC
7 OT FEW CHEAP GAMBLERG ANDTNT TO 2 , f Mieco 6 & 12 Volt BUZZERS MUFFLERS & PIPES
DIANA, WON'T YOU \" STOP US PALMERG. BESIDES, DEVILLL i evant / A ROOF LAMP BULBS & KING PIN SETS Our Mon
CHANGE YOUR MIND, Jap-yeagmempingmr TANE CARE OF ME++LETSGOF , AT? OS SOCKETS DECARBONIZING SETS | y : ey
a poy ee coer wate a . : 4 ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX BRAKE LINING SETS -
- -at - N —= . BATTERY CABLES FRONT SPRINGS for Ford
ACCESSORY SWITCHES & Chevrolet
Flat GALVANISED SHEETS FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT AND LOTS OF OTHER | ie
tor Interior t ESSENTIALS | Linas,
Mae oe
| * | & TRADING COMPANY
Se LIMITED.
ECKSTEIN BROTHERS (ECKSTEIN BROS.)
\§ Bay Street Dia} 4269
























































FOR LONGER SERVICE

















for Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consider-





































ACTUMUS — The Root Hormone Fer-






























tour England this summer arrived

at Southampton. The sun came































Evidence disclosed in to-day’s} Same, are reported by Cockshut
report strongly suggests that Setty Plow Company for the year ende











































ee
*Those vessels have limited passenger accommodation.












THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
ny ] * ’ * y 8569999088999 95950599
CLASSIFIED ADS. FOR SALE | PUHLIC SALES WANTED FOR RENT PERSONAL | eeeeseerermnttty..
Â¥
Minimum charge week 72 cents and| Ten cents per agate tine on week-aay,} Minimum charge week 72 cents and| Minimum charge week 72 cents and) —————— — 1% LVATI RMY
TELEPHONE 2508 | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — ever a} and 12 cent# per agate line on Sundera, 96 cents Sundays 24 asonde — over 24 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 4 : ie THE SA ON A
| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a/ rye cnarge $1.5C om week-days| wor’s 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a words 3 cents a word week—4 Crnte a The public are hereby warned against | @
word Sundee and $1.80 on Sundays word Sundays word Sundays. kiving credit to my wife GERTRUDE) ANNUAL TAG DAY
For eae, Serena a Sees. PUDBLI % N OTI CE s | BRATHWAITE (nee BARKER I s
announcemen ar ng e - — im | t hold rif onsible for ~
SSeues ts S000 ter way combos of bare] c AUTOMOTIVE Rai: EoAwe HELP pat. Sats, Meeaie smponcteie. Sw "Ser oe 1 :
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for exch) 4, li fe CARL A Tend eee neat —_—_—_—— HOUSES in my name unless by a written order | $ FRIDAY. ! (
sdditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 ‘sa cents per agate line on week-days ; Austin 12-6. No reasonabie ey Dae Due to the opening of a new branch, signed by me ss
between 8.20 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, refused. Apply to W. M. Watson o| SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: situated] we require the following staff on or | APARTM PRINCE BRATHWAITE | >
ly after 4 minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| R. & G. Challenor, Speightstown. Phone t Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 10,978! before June ist, 1951:— } ENT for rent to approved r Villag ie Ph b a Tag to
Retest: ory. see 4 Oe and $1.80 on Sundays. 91—01. . | 8a. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft, road. Dial! STENO-TYPIST—experienced com-| nant. Fully furnished apartinent in =e . % sense Duy 8
The charge for announcements of ? 2206 Day and 3465 Night 2.5,5)—t.f.n mencing salary $100.00 per month, | ete! area, Hastings, 3 bedrooms, garage acer 1S Help Others!
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- CAR-—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good | ——————_—__________ | TYPisT—also with clerical experience | ®"4 servants room. From ist June 3.5.51 4 7
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices 1: NOTICE tyres, in good earey condition, price | BUILDING SITE—With private Beach, - commencing salary $75.00 per} Write P.O. Box 297. 27.4.51—6n. Yeoses LLL ARETE
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays ; reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay, Staple | (Approximately! 1% acres, at Derricks. month. ———. * AEA
for any number of words up to 50, and THE LORD OLIVER FRIENDLY Grove, Christ Church, Dial 3207. Paynes Bay, St. James. For inspection INVOICING ASST.--accurate at fig- HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June
3 cents per word on week-days and SOCIETY 1.$5i—tin. |and further information, Dial 2991. ures — bly with previous P#nd July, Phone Mrs, A.D. Herbert 8385.
4 cents per word on Sundays for each| All members of the above Society who _ | (Offers received). 29.4.51—2n experience on invoicing — com- 3.5.51—4n >
additional word. have been in the Society up to the) CAR—Morris 8 — good second hand! ——————. aes mencing salary $90.00 per month, | -————————————_——
end of 1949, are hereby requested to! buy, Apply T. G. a@cKinstry. Dial 3564 That desirable two storied freehold Written application stating age and TO LET—In Marine Gardens for 6 A
~———— | leave the'r 1949 Contribution Cards at a; ssn dwellinghouse known as “Culloden! previous exp@rience to be sent to Sec- months, fully furnished. House-keeping
DIED ie, ee = yp Roaatrar OO PU ining eee View”, situate at the junction of Cul-| retary, Dowding Estates and Trading aero oS ee eee Write si puiesieiimelin,
s, Town Hall, CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-| toden And Dalkeith Roads, ith the} Company, Ltd., Bay Street x GM, . voca' 0. *
Foecorteg ae 7 ~ aus Eee = be accepted after the! dition. 23,000 miles, mew tyres. Can be| lend thereto containing 10'583° euuate 2,.5.51—6n, 3.5.51—3n | MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA. NEW | s
UCAS—On 2nd May, 1951, at her y. seen; at Fort Royal Garage Ph agu5.| fet. The hous aie | eerie einen ate LA LIM: . CACIQUE Del CARIBE
residence, Enterprise, Christ Churen, D. T. DANIEL, A. D. Herbert, = 3.5 51—4;,| dining rooms, library, Kitchen, bath ee SALES GIRL for our TOY ROOM. OFFICES above Lashlay's Ltd., Prince Saas — wit secepe carer and Passengers
Miss Emeline Lueas, age 72. Her Clerk, Registrar, Eee oer ee — -— | toilet downstairs and upstairs, four] Apply in person, JOHNSON’S STATION- | William Henry Street. Apply: J. E, 1 (MANS. LINE) for St. Vincent, St. Lactey-Gren-
funeral leaves the above residence at nner CARS—Do you want to buy a good] bedrooms ione with bath and toilet) | ERY. 3.5.51--3n | Marson. Phone 2471. 3,5.51--6n MS. “TONGARIRO" | sailed Brisbane | ada and Aruba. Sailing Saturday
4.30 p.m, to-day for the Christ Chureh secondhand car? If so we can offer you | Two servants rooms, garage for 1 car cre Sth, Arriving at ‘Barbados May | 28th inst
Cemetery. . . a 19849 Hillman, done 14,000 miles anc | ond tool room (all built h "i -
Marjorie Chase (niece), Bertie Chase Public Official Sale 199 Morris Oxford, done 19,000 miles.| yard ey ae MISCELLANEOUS cin Hobart, ith ‘May, Adelaide 20th |3§ _M.V. CARIBBEE will “secept
(nephe «'~in-law) Both cars in exeellent condition. Ring The date of sale will be published "WANTED TO BUY Scientists and Barristers re- — ph ata leans | Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
FP SOE SRO Ror Pa (The Provost Marshal's Act 4908, Brdos Agencies Ltd. later JOINERS' GOOD WORK — in Ma- st in private a famous 16th June, Sydney 23rd’ June, arriving |$§ ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
3.5.51—In. 1904 (1904-6) # 36). 29.4.51—6n | Inpeetion between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.|hogany, Cedar, Birch, Fir, Deal for oe at Trinidad during latter half of July, and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
On Friday the 18th day of May, 1951 +.) any day except Sundays on appoint-| Home and Office — L. S, WILSON, Spry murder—and disclose for and ‘preceeding thereafter to Barbados Atay
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon! CAR—Hillman Minx, 1950 model in| ment w.th the owner Mr. St. Clair Hunte., | Street. the first ti story of
THANKS will be sold at 1117 office to the highest| good order 9,600 miles. Apply E. D. | (Phone 3229). 3.5151—1n. : wget : — Beaten. 4h guid Cecivee «th :
bidder for any sum not under the| Davis, Small Ridge ne ae 7 GL. W. CLARKE & CO., a rn eight double | whiskies’ . . veasel et ample “abe a8 chilled ar mi B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
a patel ~~ appraised value, all that certain piece of ’ Solicitors. .
NESTFIZELD-—We beg through this ee hard frozen cargo. ERS ASSOC., INC.
wiedilinein.. to: Teteieiti. tiniest ik thee Tene Cone tere sere tans os TRAILER — One 4/5 ton Sugar Cane 26.4.51—6n. r nk Cargo accepted on terengh Bills ot | Ss , :
kind friends who sent wreaths, letters butting and bounding on lands of The Trailer with or without Tyres. Courtesy AUC’ 10N Lading for transhipment at ; Min ms aan Tele. 4047
ot Sone in any way €X-! Barbados Government Railway, on two! Garage, Dial 4616 1,5 .Siean - Islgnde. a cee eee : ;
ressed their syrt hy in our recent f —--- —__—_—__---- — — s - j
pots sides on lands of Welches Tenantry, and : FIAT VAN 19. furth ticulars apply
bereavement, the death of Venetia) on the Public Road at Fairfield together weg ar “ae Re PO etic arad 4 Bn instructed toveell this vehicie e 9 FURNESS WITHY & CO. Lid, TRIN: | %5
ATE TS He ad Sh :
Selwyn Nurse, Garfield Nurse I mp Bu haings, fig i ae “plicit ee er 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n. Sy Punt "Rutten eat he Snares Oo t ac e pes te ane co. ‘LTD, BRIDGE: MA lv rtise It Pa Ss
35.511" | “The whole property appraised to TWO Garage at 2 p.m. on Friday, 4th May TOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.I AVE one y
THOUSAND ee ss el ELECTRICAL 1951. : ry AN PINCHER ft
DOLLARS AND SEV: Y¥ ininieinerasctteatentibench- IN MEMORIAM (2,091.75). Attached from Sydney Roach DEEP FREEZER — Specially designed uubtione:. By CHAPM
£ and ie Burke for and towards sat-}| to serve Ice Creams, in good working 2.5.51—3n 0.
HOWARD_—In neve. isfaction, &c. : order $375.00 At. Ralph A. Boeard’s | qepmeeemctct
dur beloved agian McDonald Hewat, N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day| Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley By instructions received from the Sec- A STONISHLNG facts about the case of Stanley Setty, the ad
who was called to hie eternal rest on|Of purchase, | BREET | etary ee cin seneral sosnital wu murdered London car-dealer whose torso w waged in
ard » 1960, fe . Powe = se) vy ic competition at the arses’
‘A % in our thought wm pci i econ Marshal, p REFRIGERATOR ¢ gue. att Mareo Home on Thursday next, May at} the Essex marshes 18 months ago, are made pu for the -
. a4 a yovost Marshal's ce. ridge 10,06 erfect working order] 9 o'clock: ov Pis by Kohi 1 £ ao *
Ai ook 43 lite a Seay last 3.5.51—3n./ at Ralph A. Beard's Sh oy Rooms, Campbell. D'Arey aS Scott, Auctioneer | first time in a medico-legal report. NEW YORK SERVICE °
We shall remember thee. : Hardwood Alley 5.51—2n. 27.4.51—5n | At the trial of Brian Donald soon pn who was charged $8. TRYA” ailed 27th April Arrives Barbados sth May
June, Amelda and Ernesta (Children), . , i ed, medical experts ca teamer Sails 18th May . 29th
Christopher ‘Howard (Pather), Charlotte Dancing Classes LIVESTOCK | W ith the murder and acqui itt h y ld b y e————$_—_—_--—--—__- -——__--- pene ND
Howard « (Mbgien: Maatache, Sandee Sr Sout 3° the prosecution did not explain how Setty could have been NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Barton and Lawson (Brothers), Mrs, f COW—One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve t , a
Dorothy Greenidge and Mrs, Millicent | Pupils of The Barkades School ior [in three weeks. Gave 36 pints with third ou FICANS| stabbed tive times in the chest without struggling. — $$. ALCOA PATRIOT” Sailed 18th April Avrives Barbados 4th May
Codrington (Sisters), Milton Greenidge, ae eel ‘commence on Friday the} calf, C, Branch, near Paynes Road, An autopsy, carried out before] ~—— he 38. “ALCOA POLARIS” Sails and May os wth ,,
(Brother-in-law) 3.5.51—In | (or snd Saturday the Sth of May. Jackmans, St. Michael. ee J E la d the trial by Dr. Francis E. Camps, 38. “ALCOA. ROAMER” Sails, 16th May Ist June
‘3 ade ao inaiali : 51—3n. oes ‘ OF ae eee
' pia gone ee ona » 3.5.51—3n n ng n a Harley. street pemcleEats prov- Cockshutt Plow CANADIAN SERVICE
McKenzie who died on May 3rd 1950. a ed that the stab wounds were so : he
Not dead to us who love him LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE! MECHANICA By PETER DITTON clean-cut that Svtty could not Earns $4.75 SOUTHBOUND
Tot Poet hae Seve Vere » The application of Torrence Henry of] “TYPEWRITERS — Shipment of new have moved his body even a frac- Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B’dos.
e ves with us in memory | ad on : : :
Black Rock, St. Michael, for permission | model “Olympia” Portable Typewriters LONDON, April 25. tion of an inch while they were Sh Co ; eee
And will forevermore, 7 : * : : *$.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS April 27th April 30th lay oth
Joyce Straker and family. 3.5.81—1n | 10, fell, Spirits, Malt Tiquers. ail Gap,| just Fecelved—see thse superb machines! Skippered by 40-year-old] being delivered, Per Share MUIMNOM | 33. NCR PIONEER” May lth | May i4ath lay 24th
Baxters Road, City. St Hill, ‘Dial 3199" 39. 4.51—e.0.d, | Dudley Nourse, veteran of two] It also showed that Setty’s arms Consolidated net earnings o. | S8_"YOLKE BERNADOTTE’ May _25tn May 28th June 7th
————== | Dated this goth day of April, 1961, previous visits to this country,} had not been pinioned before he $2,032,786, equal to $4.70. pe. | NORTHBOUND ree
eb iter’ Signed A. HENRY, ; MISCELLANEOUS the South African cricketers tc} was killed, weer? oe : 3.8. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE" — due April 20th, Sails for St. John and Montreal.

Motion Picture Show to be
staged on Friday, 4th
May, 1951, at 6.15 p.m. by
Mr. Thornas B. Wainwright.
These films were taken dur-
ing his travels in Canada
and the West Indies.
By order of,
The Committee of Man-
‘agement,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretary.

{
}
| ed at a Licensing Court to be held at|tilizer, from H. Keith Archer's Drug] out to greet them and just a littl > he b in a drunken stu-| Vctover 31, 1950, compared-wit
T AR all posts before erecting. Police Court, District “A” on Thursday | Store. 3.5.51—5n. : just a e}may have deen in @. drunken stue| -. 7 "
‘A athhih Qiaueisy ce veitle the 10th day’ of May, 1951, at 11 o'clock more than 72 hours after putting| por when he was murdered. Saree. or $4.84 per share to] ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
oor am. ~ACTUMUS — The Key to Growing |foot on s ore, they had their first} Tests carried out by Dr. H. S. ‘ous ie year, r APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
R o t preventative H. A, TALMA, Power — from H. Keith Archers Drug ; . . L $ A own * ;
material still available Police Magistrate, Dist. “A''] Store. 3.5.51—5n, practice in the nets at Lord's. Holden, Scotland Yard's chief wares’ area net profit is sh ba
3.5.51.—In. | This was an entirely different] scientist, showed that Setty had] after transfer of $790,000 to reserve
at your GAS WORKS, Bay St. ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests —|reception from that awaiting|drunk eight double whiskies or| for doubtful accounts (against RGSS SRST SSIES
Brice ».,< >=2, ODES ERO LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE] *0™ #. Keith Archer's Drug Store. | John Goddard and his team from] their equivalent in alcohol shortly] $1,000,000 to inventory reserve in ;
Get Some To-day; The application of Peter Ross, holder 1 _ ee" the West Indies last summer.| before he died, the report states.) previous year) and after deducting
| Oy Pantie camera ree tee pote bi ae Ai tn Spe eoonomioal — 1 owt, They had their first game in this} But the prosecution’s medical] deferred income: on sales oi PASSAGES TO EUROPE oe me
a ase ae a se o 56 tons of ‘arty oe ‘ . ‘ a ikon i aa : ; » . me . “ 4
,\board and shingle shop with skedroof| Manure. From H. Keith Archer's Drug country in the middle of a minia-| experts did not reveal this evi-| $1,175,055 to dealers, This. latter Contact Antilles Products, I ted. Roses ini 35
attached, at Dayrell's Rd., Ch. Ch., with-| Store, 3.5.51--5n. | ture snowstorm, dence at the trial, The prosecu-| item represents unearned income PR abi mc fo ae mith othe ea eae re for wy
in Dist. “A”, for permission to use said Like the Australians when they] tion did not submit it. They may] on sales to dealer: id, as profits wing to Hurope fortnightly 1e usual ports of call are i“
Liquor License at a board and wall shop] ACTUMUS — The Fertil ea th : a etl ee . on sales [0 8. an Pp Dublin, London, o terdam, Sing 5 >70: ual - ~
Royal Barbados Yacht attached to residence at Deightons Road, | Future—increases fee: sant aera aa ye here in _ 1948, the South} have thought thet it would -not are not recorded until payment| reduction for chideen. er Single “fare £70; us
St, Michael. tion of soils. From H. Keith Areher's|4frieans are wife-less. In fact,| help their case. has been received, these deferred
Club monies siz jst day of May. 1981. , Drug Store, 3.5.51—Sn,|wives are banned not only from] The defence counsel’s argument} profits will be realized as goods
Signed: PETER, OSS, | AcrusiUs — Produced by Dr_S.(Busepeen eran eey hetghbouring| that more than one man must have| are delivered by the dealer 10 *1e) «nccescenenoseennenenssenasnennenrenineeneon—nenwnreneerenenreaegeens
: Applicant.| Marian. D.Se Englard, €liminates | European countries as well. The} been involved in the murder be- customer and settlement is. re |} — ,
NOTICE Be ere Frage Seah ec i ig disease at the roots of plants, From H,|one exception to the rule is Man- fore Setty’s body was deposited at ceived by the company. Sup a sa ake care of-your orders fot %
held at Police Court, District “A”. | Keith Archer's Drug Store" 9.5.51~9n. Jager Sid (Pegler, himself a former] Hume's flat was not seriously} 7)" 0) san implements exceedea beberle maint =
Members are invited to Gor, at Ti orClocky amr 7" For the treatment of disorders Of the | eee pau dant tie tee ene a consumer demand and, ye R GUN METAL FITTING
Ss are 951, o'e' Kidneys and Bladder try Rexall Kid arriving in a few days’ time. Th>| These facts were disclosed b rA ‘I ;
attend a Silent Coloured E. A. McLEOD, | | cna Bladder Pills. Price 1/6 bot, Obtain. Di ¥'| increased competition, We : ’ o
uae

kindly









































REAL ESTATE
JOHN
Na.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD



FOR SALE



COUNTRY HOUSE, St, Peter—
The most attractive property of
its type in the Island creating the
atmosphere of a small manor
house cleverly adapted for this

climate with wide verandahs fea-
turing natural stone archways and
some nicely designed wrought
iron grille work, The house con-
tains a sitting room, study, draw-
ing room, dining room, large
kitchen, laundry, 3 double bed-
rooms (1 with own bath and
toilet), tub bath with hot water,
large garage and 2_ servants’
rooms Ail mains services. Ap-
proximately 3 acres well laid out
in lawns, ornamental and kitchen
gardens, and. mahowany trees. A
property or unusual attraction
with sea bathing close at hand.

“WHITEHALL FLATS", Cod-
rington Hill, St. Michael—A weli
preserved country home recently
converted into a block of 4 spaci-
ous luxury flats, fitted with all
modern conveniences, The grounds
approx. 5 acres are laid out with
lawns, shrubbery and gardens and
there isa long carriageway ap-
proach flanked with mahogany”
trees. An investment property or”
suitable for conversion into Guest
House or Nursing Home, 3% miles
from town.

plied with fitted cupboards

rage,



There
2 servants’ rooms















—Attractive 3 bedroomed furnish-
ed seaside bungalow. Available
long lease if required.

ANDY LODGE
Furnished Chatel
beach

to of



, St. James—
with the best
and bathing the Island has

er



REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING
| Phone 4640



|
|
|
|

Loppositi

AND PATHS. 3
FOR RENT Tn.
. N. HARRIMAN
“ts. CHANCERY” on Coast at & CO. LID,
Silver Sands. Furnished. Seawell.
“WINDY WILLOWS"—Prospect, Phone 8444, Extension 8
St James, Unfurnished house on 26.4.51.—in
coast, with 3 bedrooms, lounge,
verandah, overlooking sea etc.
Immediate possession.
“WAVERLEY”, St. Lawrence—

Police Magistrate, Dist.
3.5.5





TAKE NOTICE

WUNTED



the fri

That HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland,
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distillers, has applied for the registra-
tion of @ trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3rd day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
a can be seen on application. at my
office.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
3.5,51—3n



taee HONCE





That HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland,
United States of America, whose trade
or business s#idress is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distillers, has applied for the . registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled
to register the same after one mopth
from the day of May, 1961, wiles:
some Person shali in the meantime give
notice in duplicite to me at my office of
ion of such registration, The
trade ae ca be seen on application
at _ my offi

Dated this, 30th day of April, 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,

—— or Sn





IDEAL FOR CONCRETE,
AND MAKING ROADS

|
Registrar of Trade Marks,
Modern Stone Bungalow, Graeme ae

Hall Terrace—-A modern bungalow we

of stone construction with parapet SOREN GR ALGO SIGS SIONS,
roof. This property has the ad- .
| vaniage of a corner site and a very

fine view seawards. There are 3 FOR SALE
oe woe with built-in

wardrobes rge lounge/livi

room with 2 verandahs leading CRUSHED

from it. The kitchen is well sup- STONE & FINES

N OTICE

BARBADOS 5.P.C.A,

The S.P.C.A. Phone No.
2624 is suspended until fur-

ther notice. Messages for
the Inspector will be taken

at 2673 between the hours %

of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and ¥%
at 08—Brittons Hill Police %
Station from & p.m. to 7]
a.m. ~
_C. WALCOTT, %

Hon. Secretary, May 2nd x |

».

POOP LSPS TOT?



5.51

able at KNIGHT'S LTD 3. Sry





LIFE SAVEPS—Fresh
ious Life Savers. Lime, Orange, Lemon,
Wild Cherny, Pep-o-Mint and Five
Flavours, Price 9 cents per Roll. BRUCE
VEATHERHEAD LTD. sc Sn
LIQUOR LICENSE One Liquor
License and stock. Apply Mrs, G. Stan-
ton Hall's Road, St. Michsel.
oer : rv? 3:5.512n





POWDERED MILK—One of the best;
that’s Holland’s “Frisian Girl Powdered





Milk Tops im butter fat content. Con-
tains vitamin D3 so essential for the
promotion of healthy life. Get it for
the family, the children will look alive
after a trial of this famous milk. Ask for
it by name. 3.5.51—3n
SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.
A. Tudor & Co., Roebucit Street, $12.00
per $8 lb, bag. Dial 2628
28 .4.51—Tn
Save your clothes from Moths by
hanging “Olev’” Moth Killer in your
Wardrobe. It is 560 times more effective

than Moth Balls. KNIGHT'S LTD.



3.5.51—3n.
We have in stock Rexall Cod Liver
Oil Emulsion, an ensily digested and

palatable preparation containing 50% by
volume of Vitamin Tested Cod Liver
Oil. KNIGHT'S LTD 3.5.51—3n

14,000 Tons Suger
Feared Lost In Fire

tecom Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 2.
A fire broke out in the main

sugar shed of Usine St. Madeleine
and fourteen thousand tons of
sugar are feared lost, The fire
which started at 2.30 this morn-
ing was uncontrolled at noon.

The entire building was blacked
out by columns of smoke. Units
from the Port-of-Spain Fire Bri-
gade were assisting.



Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sed Wonderful Coun-







Selior, Seh, M wis, Sch. Philip
H, Davidson, S e M, Smith, Sch,
United Pilgrim § h. Blue Nose Mac,
Sch, Marea Henrie ‘tta, Yacht Maria Cath-
arina, Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch

Leudalpha, Sch. Gardenia W.
DEPARTURES
Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt.
King, for St. Vincent.
Sehooner Mary E. Caroline, 54 tons net,
Capt, Joseph, for Dominica,
Sehooner W. L._ Eunicia,
Capt. Joseph, for Dominica
M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935
net, Capt. Clarke, for St. Lucia.

In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

CABLE AND WIRELESS (West Indies)
Ltd., advise that they can now com-
municate with the following chips
through their Barbados Coast Station:—

38 tons net

tons







s.s. Maria De Larrinaga, s.s. Brazil/
Wsbw, ss. Mormacréed, ss. Amerigo
Vespucci, s.s. Loide Argentine, s.s. Loide
Cuba, s.s. Santa Paula, s.s ta Clara,

s.s. Queen Mary/Gbtt, s.«, Alcoa Corsiar,





3.8 scognie, s.s. Solfa, s.s. Mormaciland
R, F. MeConneli, ss. British Earl, #4.
Nordidie, s,s, John Chandris, s.s. Hersilia

Perk, s.s. Louis Pasteur, Seminole

Gyst. ss. Athel Victor, ss. Sera/Peqy,
ss. British Character, 5 Fortbridger,
M.S. Macoris, s.s. Dolores, M.S. Willem-
stad/Pipi, ss, Redstone, ss. Gulfwing/
Wicp. 3.5. Fepublic, 5.8 tugard, Laniz,
r.8, Bonito, s.s. Hopecrést, s.s. Victoria/
Kesr



RATES OF EXCHANGE

















CANADA
MAY 2, 1951.
62 2/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 60 2/10% pr.
Demand
Drafts 60.05% pr.
Sight
Drafts 59 9/10% pr.
62 2/10% pr Cabie
607/10% pr Currency 10% pr
Coupons 58° or
Mails for St. Lucia by the Schooner
United Pilgrim § will be closed at the
{General Post Office as under
Parcel Mail. R tered Mail; Ordinary
Mail all at 10.15 a.m. on the Sth May,
195

reason for the ban by the South\
African cricket authorities has not
been explained to the team yet,
but Nourse, whose wife came with
him on the 1947 tour, says that it
had nothing to do with any hap-
penings that year.

Been Before

Other members who were here
with the 1947 team-are ‘Fullerton,
Mann and Athol Rowan. The only
other player to have toured Eng-
land in Athol’s elder brother, Eric,
who is vice-Captain of the team
and was a member of the 1935
South African touring party.

Fifteen. players have - been
brought here altogether and
Nourse’ has ventured to suggest
that with a fair share of luck the
side will acquit themselves well.
In the event of any members of
the team falling sick, arrange-
ments have already been made to
fly over one or two young players
from the Union,

The tourists commence their
official programme with the time-
honoured match with Worcester-
shire at Worcester on May 2nd.
They will be opposed to probably
the same team as that which drew
with the West Indies. It is to be
supposed that the selected South
African XI will be the strongest
ithey can put into the fleld and
the most likely to be picked for
the first Test.

Nourse himself is expected to
captain the side and both Rowans
and Mann and Fullerton are
expected to be included. Another
member of the team with personal
experience of this country, Clive
Van Rynveld, the former Oxford
cricket ‘blue’ and England rugby
international, will make a_ bold
challenge for selection, and _ his
leg-breaks, magnificent fielding
and forceful batting are .almost
certain to earn him a place.

Backbone

Nourse, Eric Rowan and Fuller-
ton will provide the backbone of
the batting which, weakened by
the absence this year of Bruce
Mitchell, appears on paper to be
the tourists’ weak point.

Athol Rowan and ‘Tufty’ Mann
will form the chief menace on a
turning wicket and~ the former
with his accurate off-spinners ane
the latter “with his immaculate
left-hand slows can, and do, keep
going all day if necessary,

These six are expected to select
themselves. This leaves five places
still to be filled. Requirements
are a couple of fast bowlers. 1
wicket-keeper and, presumably.
two more batsmen. Candidates
for these places aré McCarthy,
Chubb, Endean, McGlew, McLean,
Cheetham, Waite and Mansell.

The choice of wicket-keeper
lies between Endean and Waite
both of whom are opening bats-
men of some repute. Endean, by
virtue of his greater powers of
concentration, may just get the
vote. The opening attack will
come from McCarthy, said to be
the fastest bowler in the Union
for 30 years, Melle and Chubb
The former are both youngsters
but Chubb is 39 years of age and
ranks with Nourse and Eric
Rowan as a veteran of the side.
Even so, it is probable that his
great accuracy and ability to keep
going, very much in the manner
of an Alec Bédser, will earn him
a place with McCarthy at the

other end.
Not Easy

Filling the last two places is
not going to be easy. Jack Cheet-
ham, who was considered for the
captaincy before it became known
that Nourse would be available,
is likely to be one of the two, He
played against England in South
Africa two years ago and against
Australia twelve months later
He is a strong forcing batsman
and, in a most successful season
just completed, he headed the










Camps to a private meeting
of doctors, scientists, and barris-
ters, who reconstructed the Setty
case after the trial.

Dr, Keith Simpson, Home Office
pathologist, told the meeting that
he was perturbed that the prose+
cution did not produce the scien-
tifle evidence of Setty’s drunken

enough alcohol had
been discovered to give a perfect.
ly good and acceptable explana-
tion to the opinions of both sides,
it was difficult to understand why
such evidence was not produced,”
he said.

Hume admitted dropping
Setty’s torso into the sea from an
aeroplane, and pleaded guilty o
being an accessory after the fact.
He was sentenced to 12 years’
imprisonment,

“Who killed Setty and the cir-
cumstances in which it occurred
must remain a matter for specula-
tion.” Dr. Camps told the meet.
ing.

The additional evidence would
only have shown how those re-
sponsible for the murder were
able to do it without causing a

struggle,

* AN EMERGENCY system of
sending out B.B.C, broadcasts

through the telephone wires in-

stead of over the air is being

oo by the Defence Minis.

ry,

An enemy might be able to use
the signals from ordinary trans-
mitters as a means of guiding in
long-range rocket missiles,

Seven for Speed
* MOST seven-year-old _ girls
can run as fast as most
women, says Swedish scientist
Dr. P, oO. Astrand, who has timed
110 running females varying in
age from four to 30.—L.E.S.

deemed prudent to have acrattionet
stocks in the hands of the desler
organization, This has substan‘ ial-
ly inereased accounts receivable
and an additional amount of
$750,000 was provided as a reserve
against possible future losses.
Reserve of $2,250,000 against in-
ventories is considered sufficient at
the present time.

Working capital of $17,050,05'
at October 31 last compares wit!
; $14,267,648 a year ago. Accounts
receivable are up from $1,123,228
to $5,815,082. Earned surplus,’
after dividend payments ‘4
$662,222, totals $5,967,506.

C, Gordon Cockshutt, Baas
states that sales showed a reduc-
tior, This applies to Canada as
well as export countries and is
largely attributable to the fact that
sales connections established
during a buyer’s market had to
readjust their organizations to a
seller’s market. Prospects for 1951
from the viewpoint of demand, are
reasonably encouraging, The com
pany has budgeted for the same
volume in 1951 as in 1950 feeling
that any loss in civilian businese
might be made up in defense
work,

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LONDON.

The modern British miss—girls
born in 1951 — can expect to live
until 70 years of age or over,

But if they marry British boys
born this year, they are likely to
be widowed, for the life expecta-
tion of boys is only 66 years,

Authority for this forecast is
the British Registrar General's
report for 1950, which said thai
the exact age which the average
girl can expect to reach is 70.63
years, and for the average boy
66. or years.

The report estimated that the:
total population of England and |
Wales in 1950 was 44,137,000 and
added that this figure should in-
crease to 46,608,000 by 1990.

Let

>
%

s



i
| .
|

SOOO SOS

INS.
batting averages for Western
Province in the Currie Cup .
matches. x

It will then remain to be seen %
what is Nourse’s greatest require- | 3%
ment before making the eleventh %
choice. The need for an addi-| >
tional fast bowler would see the! 8
vote going to Melle, Another | =
batsman would pave the way for | ¥

a couple of youngsters, 21-year—
old Roy McLean, the only left- |
hand batsman in the side, or 22~|
year-old Derrick McGlew, an
opening batsman who believes in
hitting the ball hard and often.
Finally, not to be dismissed
lightly, are the chances of Frank
Mansell, who was born in England
and last season captained Rho-
desia. He is a fine all-rounder
and some consider him te he
South Africa’s best leg-spinner
There is room for speculation
but one thing is assured. Like}
other touring teams before them, ;
the South Africans will be assured |
of a good welcome wherever they }
go. '

SOOO GOSSOOSS

CHARLES

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PAGE EIGHT



West Africa Wants W.l. Athlete

Bailey Offered Coaching
Appointment In Nigeria

From Our Own

Corresponuent

The recent tour of West Africa undertaken by those
two great West Indian athletes, Arthur Wint and McDon-

ald Bailey was, I hear, a 100% success.

So much so that

invitations have been extended to McDonald Bailey to
undertake a full-time coaching appointment in Nigeria.
EE

SPORTS
WINDOW

FOOTBALL

Spartan meet Notre
Kensington this afternoon in a
return First. Divisior fixture
When Spartan met the newly
ptomoted Notre earlier this season
the Park team champions were
behirid for most of the game but
a last minute spurt earned them a
draw.

Notre Dame was given credit for
this 00d showing aainst the
Senior Division champions of two
seasons,

The return game this evening
should be a good one.

TABLE TENNIS—(Division I)

Barna vs. Everton at Y.M.C.A.

~—7.30

BASKET-BALL—(Division I)

M.H.S. vs. J.S.B.S. at (MH S.)

Pirates vs. L.S.S. at (H C_)
NETBALL

St. Michael's Girls’ vs. St. Mi
chael's Old, Girls at St. Michael's

11 Cricketers
Of 1950
4 W.L Iw

LONDON, April 27,

As a new cricket season dawns
£0 Our memories of what has
passéd are refreshed by the ap-
pearance of the several cricket
almanacks which are now on the
market. They recall for us such
incidents as the thrilling struggle
by England to avoid the follow-
on, and inevitable defeat, in the
final Test against the West Indies
at the Oval. They remind us that
the race for the County Champion-
ship finally ended in a tie be-
tween Lancashire and Surrey,
with Yorkshire, ever a power in
English- cricket, third, only 20
points behind. They review the
forthcéming season and invariably
Open wide the doorway for discus-
sion with their selection of the
best cricketers of the year.

Such a pattern has been follow-
ed by the Editor of the Playfair
Cricket Annual whose eleven
cricketers of 1950 include four
members of the victorious West
Indies touring team and two from
the Lancashire side which shared
the Clampionship. His selected
XI is Ramadhin, Valentine, Wor-

Dame. at











rell, Weekes, (West Indies),
Grieves and Tattersall (Lan-
eashire), Evans and § Wright

(Kent), Fishlock (Surrey), Park-
house (Glamorgan), and Sheppard
(Sussex and Cambridge).

It is a strong combination but,
surprisingly enough, contains not
ene bowler of pace. One cannot
help. wondering whether perhaps
this is not unfair to Alee Bedser,
who apart from his efforts in Aus-
tralia, which tour is not taken into
account in the selection of eleven
cricketers of 1950, was England’s
top wicket-taker against the West
Indies.

And I feel equally certain that
there are many West Indians who
feel that Alan Rae is worthy of a
place, possibly even at the expense
of one of his four chosen col-
leagues. But if Rae cannot claim
a place in the selected XI, at least
he is given his fair share of the
credit in the section devoted to
the review of the tour.

“No West Indies player made :
greater contribution to the win-
ning of the Rubber than Rae” says
the review. “His worth to the side
really cannot be over-emphasised.
With his most equable tempera-
ment and utterly unvelfish spirit,
he saw what his role should be
and played it to the hilt.”

The review concludes ‘“Rae’s
knowledge of the game and his
balanced judgement must mark
him out as a potential West Indies
eaptain,”

Playfair Books, Ltd.. 57 Haymar-
ket, London, S.W.1. Price 3/6d

Rugby Results

LONDON, May 1.

Results of Rugby games played
Monday in the United Kingdom
follow:

Rugby Union: Bridgewater and
Albion 6, Weston Super Mare
8. Cross Keys 3, Neath 0. Ponty-
pool 3, Newport 13. Redruth 18,
Falmouth 0. St. Ives 3, Pontypridd
6. Torquay Athletic Q, Swansea 11.
Rugby League: Oldham 36, Roch
dale Hornets 2. —(CP)



HEY! you'LL
HAVE TO TAKE
DOWN SOME OF
THE FENCE,SO'S
I CAN UNLOAD A

THIS HERE



* 2—0 in

Crowds flocked to see Wint ahd
Bailey running in Accra and
Lagos and there can be no doubt
that the newly awakened interest
in athletics in West Africa was
considerably stimulated by their
visit. Already there has been
iaik of entering Nigeria in the
1952 Helsinki Olympies and it is
possible that the visit of these two
notable athletes will result in
definite action along these lines
being taken.

Arthur Wint was only able to
remain in West Africa for one
week, because of his studies, but
McDonald Bailey remained for a
further seven days during which
he lectured to schools and youth
clubs.

A Question

One question which he repeat-
ediy had to answer was why
Arthur Wint had only” managed
to run the 440 yards in 50 seconds
during his second race in the
celony. The answer, which Mac
duly gave, was that Arthur felt
a slight muscular twinge and,
not wanting to aggravate a
former trouble, he decided not to
go flat out. Even so he was well
ahead of the rest of the field when
he broke the winning tape.

In both his 100 yards events
Bailey returned 9.9 seconds. This,
onsidering it was his first outing
of the season, was a particularly
good performance and augurs
well for his chances of retaining
his A.A.A. Championships later
this year,

Mac himself was very pleased
with his performance but con-
fesses he had a bad scare in his
second race when he failed to
make a good start and found him-
self three yards behind the local
fayourite with only forty yards to
eo. Only a sensational finishing
burst enabled him to break the
tape first.

“I just had to win that race
or what would the local crowd
have thought!” he added.



Empire Beat
Everton 2-1

Everton were beaten 2—1 by
Empire yesterday in a Second
Division football .mateh whica
‘was played at Bank Hall, This
is the first defeat for Everton
ond the first win for Empire who
were beaten 4—2 by College in
their last match,

Empire scored both goals i:
the first half. Their goal senrers
were S,. Harper and R. Norville
while S, Seale kicked in the
lone.goal for Everton from a
petty.

The game’ was slow throughoul
and there was very little wind
to worry the players, Both
teams had many opportunities tc
score more goals, About ter
minutes after play in the first
half had started, Norville on the
left wing for Empire toe-punched
the ball in the right corner of
the bars giving the Everton
custodian no chance to bring off
a save,

About three minutes after
first goal, Referee
awarded a penalty
Everton after a melee in their
area, This was taken by
Harper who made no mistake ia
kicking the ball out of the reach
of Nurse who hardly made 4a
move,

Half time

the
Graham
against

found the score at
Empire's favour, Aftei
half time Everton made stronger
efforts to score and these efforts
got them chances but their
kicking was far from eccurate.
About five minutes before the
blow off, Seale scored for Ever.
ton from a penalty as one of the

Empire backs handled the ball
in their area,

The teams were:—

Empire: Robinson, Jordan,
Bynoe, Clarke, Rudder, Wilson,
Morris, Haynes, Smith, Harper
and Norville.

Everton: Nurse, Culpepper.
Weekes, Seale, Archer, Fowler,
Holder, Sealy, Olton, Went and
Haynes,





WAVECREST HURT
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.
Wavecrest, 4-year old colt, has
sustained an injury during exer-
cises and is not expected to race
at the Arima Creole meeting. For
this meeting, horses are hard ut
preparation, My Babu, Leap On
and Diapotos turned out out-
standing gallops on Sunday
morning.

Registered U. 5. Patent Office

BARBADOS ADVOCATE ene







IN NIGERIA

THIS PICTURE taken during their recent visit to West Africa, shows McDonald Bailey and Arthur
Wint with Mr. J. R. Bunting (extreme right) who managed the 1948 Jamaican Olympic Games Team.

Mr. Bunting is now chairman of
Standing between Wint and

the Nigeria A.A.A.
Bailey is the May or of Lagos and on the left of Wint is the deputy

Mayor. The other person in the photograph (extre me left) is a master at King's College, Lagos.

Lancashire Beats
Oxford University

LONDON, May 2.

Tuesday’s first class cricket
results at Lords; MC.C. vs
Yorkshire. (non-county match)

hbandoned as draw. No play due
to rain. M.C.C. first innings 411
for seven declared, Yorkshire
first innings 218 all out; second
innings 38 for one. ;

At Oxford, Oxford University
vs. Lancashire (non-eounty
match), Lancashire won by an
innings and 158 runs, Lancashirc
first innings, 408 for three declar
ed, Oxford University first
innings all out 144, Seconc
innings all out 106,

At Nottingham, Nottingham
shire vs. Leicestershire, a two
day friendly match due to con
clude, was abandoned. No play
was possible on either day. :

Close of play score in the
Sussex vs. Hampshire two day
triendly match which began
today at Hove, Hampshire first
innings all out 263, Sussex os"

Friendly Football
TO-DAY’S FIXTURE
Westerners “B” vs, Harkliffe at

St. Leonards.
Referee: Mr. C. E, Jemmott.





What's On Today

Presentation to Miss Yvonne
Padmore at American
Consulate—10.00 a.m,

Police Courts—10,00 a.m.

Sale of Mrs. Theresa

HOOD TIPS TURPIN
TO BEAT ‘SUGAR’

_ CAN IT BE that Dave Sands—due in England on May 8
—is superstitious ? Sands, who is scheduled to defend his
Empire middle-weight title against Randolph Turpin at the

White City, London, on June 5, is going to train at N. -
on-Tyne for the fight, oe oe

Peter Wilson brings you a great ;
ex-champion’s opinion of a great °90sing Newcastle (Northum-
champion. berland) for a training spell—
Pi get ae aey ie udes me.

ocke, the Australian has accepi-
successful assault on the Empire ed another 144 moles match (for
list, 6lb, title which he won another £1,500) in his own coun-
some 18 months ago by knocking try in October
out Randolph’s brother Dick i
the first round, : *

_ But there’s an additional sen- Jobs we wouldn't like .
timental tie about Newcastle for refereeing the Rugger interna-
Sands. He has had over 50 per tional between Italy and Spain at
cent. of his fights in the town of Milan next month. +, edie
Newcastle, which is 100 miles Priest, the old Surrey player, has
north-east of Sydney, Australia, taken it on.
There must be some reason for

‘Unfair’

Notice in the programme of
the Turpin-Billy Brown “fight”
reads: —

“It was typical of the famous





This is where he trained for his

—LES.

Regatta On



London impresario” (Jack Solo- Sat rd

mons) “that, when approached Uu. ' ay
about switching the Randolph

Turpin-Billy Brown contest to The eighth regatta of the 195!
Birmingham he gave the matter season will be sailed in Carlisle
his urgent and sympathetic con~ Bay on Saturday under the
sideration.” : : auspices of the Royal Barbados
_ Having seen this “epic”, I think Yacht Club.

it’s thoroughly unfair to say that Starting times and handicaps:

it’s typical of Solomons to have are as follows:—
switched it as far away from

































































Wright's furniture at “The London as possible! Hasn't he = - ; we.
Bower”, Garrison (Messrs. any sympathy for Brum? Class No. Yacht Start at Flag
Branker, Trotman & Co.) a ih Wigerd ay hie
—11.30 a.m. , | Punching Power : .
— St Michael's Vestry Opinion of Jack Hood, one of D 4 Seabird 2.31 * Yellow
—2.00 p.m, the greatest welter—weight cham- ke
Meeting of Alliance Fran. pions ever produced by Great e wv Van ‘mnoendyk¢ eae
caise at British Council— | Britain: —
8.15 p.m. | “Two years ago I began to 8 33. Ranger 2.33 Yellow
CINEMAS think Turpin would lift a world’s “sj ~~ ws wae g@oua””” a4 -—
‘ * as bay 4 a 5 B 8 War Cloud 234 Red
Aguas Club—"Berlin Express title; now I’m certain, It would vi jou: jee
Empire — “You're My Everything” be unwise to hurry him in with B 6 Flirt 2.35 Yellow
& “Side Street" —145 & 8.80 ‘Sugar’ Ray Robinson, but Tur- 7
Py idgetown) “BI Gras : ¥ - - : . i 9 Okapi
Or Kentucky" & “The Dude pin would beat him—of that Imi B 481 ®intasy 2.36 Red
Goes West’ 4.45 & 8.40 certain. a hie
Be ake 180, & “Seven “Turpin punches hard, very B 8 Rageal 2.97 _ Yelipw
Galety (St. James—'The Court- | hard, His punching power should D 1 Buccaneer 2g8 Red
neys Of Curzon Street—#.30 beat Robinson’s speed and ener. -
gy. B 7 Moyra Blair 2.39 Yellow
Seber he - Joe is Unwise D 2 Imp ;
The sad saga of the man who’ PD 9 Olive Blossom 2.40 Red
vas once the world’s mightiest : SRA raed
; > 7 Sinbad 241 Yellov
The W eather heavyweight goes on. Yesterday eam ame
i" Joe Louis said he would give up “B 1 Gipsy
TO.DAY “big-time” boxing unless Ezzard @ 5 Mischief 248 Red i
Charles gives him another chance Yelle
: ©. mM, * - e ; bs Cc 6 Peggy Na 244 Yellow
ene = 3 <2 to win back the championship by Pe RA aes Soke EM er A Re ae a a
Moon (New) ‘May 6 ] this autumn, C 1 Miss Behave a
Lighting ; 7,00 p.m. But that doesn't mean he'll quit [ § Pauntess —“ “*
High Water: 1.58 a.m., 2.36 | the Ting. He can’t afford to. What peace
- " P it does mean is that the “sporting” I 2 Twader
. YESTERDAY world may see the old brown lion I 6 Eagle 246 Yellow
engaging in a series of bread and i
Rainfall (Codrington) .03 | butter” bouts against second- —C_') Maswin =
in, raters, K 35 Edril
Total for Month to Yester- Louis has been in hospital with | 1} Reen 249 Yellow
day: .04 in, a bad cold, but expects to be able i ew
Temperature (Max.) .85.5 °F to meet the Cuban Omelio Agra Cc 2 Scamp
‘empérature (Min,) 72.5 °F monte—whom he outpointed last K % Comet 2.50 Red
Direction (9 a.m.) February—in a fortnight’s time _' 7 Mohawk,
E.S.E. (3 p.m.) 8. by E. at Detroit. C 1 Gannet
Wind Velocity 7 miles per “Winning the title means every- I 1 Gnat 2.52 Yellow
hour thing to me,” said duouis, “put 1 18 Clstle
Ba ter (9 a.m.) 29.926 I'm not getting any younger.” Or “Ty cG tt 353 Red
(3 p.m.) 29.842. any wiser, alas. For at 37—his Bge erated.
next month—what chance car he cL Ree " ;
— " ave”? a yelone 2.5 Yellow
epee hope to have? ab’. Vatmnne
° | c iid alate
By Jimmy atlo } Ww To Meet Again N ms oe following date has beet
rs3 en hat_a glutton for punishment ‘ed for Regattas:—
) caetwem || golfer Norman von Nida must®be. ah tgs ola ars fe PR rt
F After losing 11 and 9 to Bobby Starter.

IT DOWN AND
THEN PUT IT UP
AGAIN“ BUT LIKE
AN EYE DOC’S

ALTERATIONS

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POLL DILL DDD Ot

GOLF IN
1951

By PETER DITTON

Britain’s Amateur Golf is again
to be put to the Test on May llth
and 12th, That is when the Am-
erican challenge for the third
post-war Walker Cup competition
will be made at Birkdale.

Since the war, with the excep-
tion of R. J. White, Britain has
not produced any golfers capable
of holding their own with the
Yong-hitting accurate-putting Am-
ericans, From Ireland the assist-
ance of Sam McCready, Jimmy
Bruen and Joe Carr has been re-
cruited. These players have cer-
tainly put a little extra “back-
bone” into the British team, But
generally speaking the Americans
have reigned supreme.

Many excusés have begn put
forward to account for e su-
periority of the Americans —
which dates back to pre-war
days. The most widely offered in
recent years has been that British
golfers have not had_ sufficient
practice. But while that might
have held good in 1947 and even
1949 it cannot be applied any
longer. It is perfectly true that
because of geographical conditions
the Americans didn’t lose as much
“golfingtime” as we did during
the war but we have had six years
since in Which to put matters to
right.

Explanation

I think probably the most sat-
isfactory explanation of Ameri-
ca’s- golfing superiority and cer-
tainly the most realistic is that
offered by former Walker Cup
player L, G, Crawley who is now
one of the Walker Cup Selectors.
Writing in the new Playfair Golf
Annual for 1951 (Playfair Books
Ltd., 57 Haymarket, London
S.W.1., price 5s) he deals at length
with this particular subject.

He points out that for one thing
there are far more golfers in
America than in this country, He
likens America to the young
brother which has grown up into
a Colossus from the small and
frail infant to whom the game
was taught. As one example he
quotes the entry figures for the
English Amateur Championship
which are normally between 200
and 250 and likens them to those
for the American amateur which
range from upwards of twelve
hundred.

Says Crawley: “I believe that
in years to come, as in the past,
we shall be compelled to bow to
the superiority of American golf-
ers and more often perhaps to
American teams than American
individuals. From time to time we

. shall win a Walker, a Ryder or a

Curtis Cup and occasionally we
shall be thrilled and proud of
another Cotten, another Tolley or
cnother Miss Wethered. But, over
the years, the weight of numbers
alone must ensure American su-

premacy.”
Wisdom

However unpalatable this may
be to Britain’s golf enthusiasts,
it has to be recognised as contain-
ing a wealth of wisdom,

And equally wisely does Craw-
Jey deal with the question of pro-
fessional golf in this country. He
says that the war began as one
generation of professionals began
to decline and that for six years
there were no new recruits. Since
the war times nave changed and
the ordinary professional golfer
cannot afford to pay his assistant
more than a bare living wage. And
apart from these few profession-
als who are among the big prize
money winners, life is not as at-
tractive as it was for those who
must earn their living trom the
game,

“Promoters of tournaments are
now putting up the enormous sum
of some £25,000 a year, the bulk
of which is going into the hands
of very few” says Crawley. “We
may well ask the question, How
much do professional tournaments
benefit the game? We may well
ask another: Is it a sign of the
times that one , well-established
tournament has been abandoned
for 1951, and will other promotets
follow suit?

Review

The Playfair Golf Annual with
its review of the major Golf
events of 1950 both in this coun-
try and America, together witN
records of previous years, is 4
book no real enthusiast can afford
to ignore. Apart from the review
by L. G. Crayley, it contains an
article by Henry Longhurst and
e contribution from Sir Guy
Campbell, for which alone it is
worth obtaining.

Sir Guy, one of the most famous
of all golf architects has “laid
out” the best ever course compil-
ed from famous holes in various
parts of the country. Each hole
is in its proper place in regard
to its home course and each is
arranged so that there is no more
than the normal amount of walk-
ing from green to tee box. He
has taken six holes from St. An-
drews (Old Course), three from
Heylake, three from Royal St.
George’s (Sandwich), and one
each from Portmarnock, Muirfield,
Deal, Prestwick, Westward Ho
and Carnoustie, A “walk” around
such a course is an entertainment
in itself.

BEST IN
FLAVOUR

°

_ BEST
IN
TEXTURE

Sd
BEST
IN ;
NUTRITION

LODO Do I~

— SO

OS





























THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951



Tennis Results

Highways and Transport Sports
Club began their series of Lawn
Tennis games against Police at the
Central Police Station yesterday
evening.

The results were as follows:—

Supt. E. B. Grant and Inspecton
B. King (Police) beat R. Garner
and Miss M, King 6—0.

‘Inspector King and Acting Supt
Simmons (Police) beat Harris and
Miss M. King 6—0.

Acting Supt, Simmons and Supt.
Grant (Police) lost to R. Garner
and Capt. C. Warner 6—0.

Acting Supt. Simmons and In-
Spector King (Police) lost to R.
Garner and Capt C. Warner 6—4.

Inspector King and Supt. Grant
(Police) lost to Harris and Capt.
C Wanner 6—4,

It is expected that other games
will be played at the Central
Police Station on Wednesday next,

We want you
people who are
next-door



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Past Beat Present

Harrison College Old Boys
defeated Harrison College by 31
goals to 27 in their Basketball
game at the Y.M.P.C, grounds
last night,



In the other game of the niglit
Fortress Club suffered their
second set back when they were
defeated 22—20 by Pickwick.





Record Breakers

BUENOS AIRES: A _ 19-year-
old Argentinian and a 42-year-old
Spaniard recently worked non-
stop for 98 hours, with only a
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Full Text

PAGE 1

TIURSnu \1\V :l. IM1 RMCRADOS ADVOTATF PAC.F TlfRFF kitotfaer Boderite RerfgflB Vrom Party PORT-OF SPAIN. May I. Members of Lha Bugler Par:., in Port-of Spain arc dropping off %  executive member and thir > found earl; will not receive salary amounting this century during excavation to $83.33. OUl of his $320. Furi n Cheapside. will be on exhlhi tfatr, tho Speaker told that Mr. Uon at the Guildhall Museuii Btlller would nut be permitted during the Festival of Britain, to attend or have anything to do Under the title "Ninetec relating to 'he Cnuncfl for Centur.es of City Life." th:j eight days. "fit I". Harold." City Hoard To Ho Shown At Guildhall Cheapside The Hoard." EgglVsfW'Id Calls Air StervictM Ad<*quat/ going on. this would take some |%£M|| frorn p^ia. The colle.time to complete, as it had to no (j to not b€mn on exhibition down and tested. Mr Egglcsfleld said that he thought the cxlsttnr air services of the West Indie* were adequate, and he described %  .. p %  % %  i^nSl l ^S&irB T DA D-S ADVISERS emciencv of the service — irrotn Our Own rrr*>pondenlPOItT-OF SPAIN. April 30. When the Regional Economic Committee ritl in Barbados in May. Hon. Harold Robinson, Mr. Alan Storey, and Mr. A T. Shill Comptroller uf Customs and Ex clee, will be Trinidad's advisers. This Conference will be under the auspices of the Comptroller fog Development and Wefare in the I-on.! Utcr th slnco the : —L. t : Trinidad Workers Stage May Day Parade BITES OFF MAN'5 EAR From Our Own Corn POBT-OF-SPA1N. May 1 Hundreds of woikcra reproBritish West Indies renting every industry in the Colony paraded the City on May Day. wntcn ll recognised througliout the worla os Labour Day. It wa the biggest demonstration imin Fiom ^ Qwil Co ,„ %vo ^ rnX Trtrddad on this occasion %  !" PORT-QF SPAIN, May I. cemonstrat.on was o. ganlscdb> p^JTJJSft,, ;1 PoVt-oNSpain the Trades" l nlonCou.K.l v.h e.i sentenced to prison m tnskraces the majority "/Trade t|w Thir(i VoUct Cmm for Nix Unions in the Colony Plaraida momh|( ^.ause h bit off the ear beering "We Wtflt full empIo> f notn( r man anA swallowed %  nCtat." "Long Live the Working u Ckea." were held high as bearer* Sampson the victim, told the VOtaed lhall MUttssMntl marching court that he went to a rum sh^

-f thej Chinesa water. Kowlins. lie said, paid him National Seamen Union Dressed no mind, so he touched him on la their national costume and the back, and Rowlins sprang ofi pioudly waving their ti.ey walked side by their fellow workers, ihvthmic l>cat of the ^teel bond a>Ko pUtvi-d Onward Christian Soldiers," caused many onlooker4 to Join the parade. .Red-skirted .... %  ...> .ii t vain. !" !" ;', |-., standards, him. bit off a piece of his left side with ear and swallowed It Tt SCOUTS JAMBOREE Oil Fight* Eelworm Pest LONDON, April 27 A petrofeuni-baii'd clieinlcfll product, knou-n as .Shell D-D. i arfiiet'inp remnrlcable resuill a' a toil /tiniiyanf and yerieral anfipesl "policeiiian". Protn bofJi iropical and irmpereie counlrtrs (he luccetB sturn it the tame. Il has already pro red effective in ruch iridely-dif/creii! arras as Hawaii. l'aoda. i'inoapore. Here is the story of this >iru> ally In the bailie aaainst crop disease. Shell D-D is an abbreviation of Dlchloropropane-Dichloropropene, and thil liquid mixture of compounds originally a mere waste product of petroleum chemicals at Shell chomfcal plants in the U S.A. In 1942-43 a crisis arose In the hitherto thriving pineapple industry of Hawaii. The root-knot eelworm, a microscopic threadlike creature, was Infesting the soil to such disastrous effect that crop yields were dropping to a fraction of normal. Many chemical fumiI anls were tried without result hell D-D, by contrast, at once achieved decisive defeat of the eelworm and the crop was saved As a direct result, the United States Department of Agruulture instituted full-scale trials in conjunction with Shears research organisation and the fumigant was quickly proved capable of providing not only eelworm control but even, under favourable conditions, of stimulating the yield of all kinds of crops most spectacularly. With the end of World War II. the commercial possibilities of Shell D-D soil fumigant we soon demonstrated In many diverse overseas countries, notably South Africa, Australia. New Zealand. Nigeria. Belgium, Holland and the U.K.. where extensive 1rii*t began in 1945-40. Control*. White Ant Two other eelworms (or nemn•todes) have proved particularly troublesome pests — the Potato Root Eelworm and the Sugar Root Eelworm. Although proving less susceptible than UJC Root-knot eelworm to D D fumigation, these two also may one day lose their underground war There have been exhaustive tests on sugar beet crops In Belgium and elsewhere on the Continent and there Is some promise at la si of real relief to '.hr fanner. Nor is the effectiveness of D-D confined to the eelworm pestUganda. Singapore and the IlillIppines nre but three of the araag where the termite, or white ant. has been foughl and controlled by careful fumigation of ttfl Singapore report Is interesting as indicating an unusual anti-termite battleground—the greens of a local golf club. White grubs attacking sugar beet in Puerto Rico, eelworm Infesting narcissus bulbs in Holland. earthworms Ifl Turkish tobacco seed-beds, even wlrcworms. crickets, cockchafers and weed growths—all these are other recent enemies sucecssfulh attacked. irtm KINGSTON, April M. ,...d" led-ti'd waterfront workers Governor Sir Hugh Foot, with blue-shirted oilfield worker* K.C.M.C, amiouncod here Sunsnouted their slrtgan. "Ore* us day that it was hoped in Marvh, V.yik." At the Savannah IkW %  next yeai. to have in Jamaica in* biants. none the worse for wear biejfe* KcouU Jambore heard Labour Da that the addressee by West Indies ha* ever known, to Icthre leaderi Centeno Scheme Witt Get %33,000 From CDW Funds hich Will come scouts fro i arts f tlie West Indie* The Jamboree is planned x coincide with the projected visit of the World Chief Scout. Lord if. wallan, ta Jamaica. Own Cot i .| issjaH PORT-OF-SPAIei. Apnl 30 Mr. GrtSkths has agreed to pruvide 33.000 from Colonial Development and Welfare Funds to id 'Ir.iiidad m its proposal SETS NEW WALKING RECORD I %  'u Osr nwi '•m.t.n.riii lOKT-OF-SPAIN, April 30. James Jackson. Trinidad'' advancing a section'of"the Cenchampion walker, broke Calvin u lw sctMrme In Trinidad at a cost Patrick s 20-year.old record In the i f 187 1*10 This new scheme ha* Port-of-Spain to Sangre Grande bean worked out In view of lha race— 28 mile* and 1000 yards on establishment of the Central ESunday. He won the event in uerlment Station lor Agriculture 4 hours 47 minutes. CoWIn Pai gi Centeno and the possible erec rick had walked and finished that tion of a Central Training Instldistance 20 years ago in six hours tutf and Farm School, which H, minutes Since then his recoro v.'lll make the need for a prop*r remained unbeaten until Jackson water supply an uOgent necessity uid the tricky UKFT SKINNER F.SCOL'RT, South Africa. George Bums, a Yorkshlreman. amazed experienced Natal ranchers recently when he skinned and crcssed an ox of (UU pound* drensed weight, to the record Ugeej POWERFl'L MOI'SE STAFFORD. Fnglund. A inousi nilililuiK at an electric wiie hei-T caused a :.tiort circuit, melting a gas pipe and leading to an explosion that did heavy damage he would "readily throw open her ports, airfields and. military establishments for the use of Britain. America, and any other co-operating powers in the event of war. whether or not Eire remained neutral." And he said that should General Eisenhower nsk Northern Ireland for bases, "they wilt readily be given him, no matter how much Eire may protest." The I*remicr described Northern Ireland as one of the bastions and an essential factor tn the British system of defense and emphasized that it would remain a bastion, "In spite of Southern Irish neutrality or in spite of the refusal I r f.mh'ies for the u*e of Southern lush ports." Sir Basil charged that an "attempt is being made today to ex£.,.' W. ItCfB iiefei.se in the in•i-csts of ;i campaign for the Inclusion of Northern Ireland in an all-Ireland republic." and that. Southern Irish leuders have been] attempting to enlist American air in th< campaign. He said the basi of the campUfn apparently w that partition prevented Eire from joining with the Atlanti Treaty defense arrangements. Nn Impediment lie IrtW attention howovr Eire's history of neutrality and to rpeech e i by Irish lenders, the fereme Jrom which was that lush republic will remain passive as long us wai does not touch its "There cm be no departure from the existing position," Si Basil said. "Whether Souther Irejand ratalaa or abandonneutrality, whethei -he joins tut Atlantic Pnet oi continues in i.%oIdtion, the decision of Northerr IreUnd to remain part <>. ihc United Kingdom is inalterable. This i. well known to the Southern Iri-ii Qovecnnx nL" "Tlvere is no sound reason why Southern Ireland should not participate without demanding the lulhlment of any exlrnncou* cunditi'-n." the Premier Insisted "The maintenane-e of Northern Ireland's constitutional status cannet le-giinnately be said to stand in the WBJ —IN 8. PREDICTED KOREA WAR WASHINGTON. Mav 1 The long secret W< Report on Korc. w,m ,-,! I'MTruman three years before n came that Russia %  •undoubtedly" would seek control of thai eOUB try, pubUcatkM of the documaa disclosed today. "The lepoit ui.iiu.l u\ Se-plenibcr 1947 by Lieutennnt I Albert Wedemcycr urged the United St.ites to undertake a vigorous progruinme of arms assistance to the republic el KI.ICJ Wetlemeyer i-ecommended to Truman thut American Oceiipatiou tioope remain m South Korea until Etttgflian troops were withdrawn from North Korea This] was done But Wedemeyer"! recommend.it Ion s for a stronifl programme of United Kali mllltar) aid w not unplemented Wedemeyer predicted "und'iubtedty" the rtiwslen objective would' be to Obtain control of Soutl Korea by using Communist Nortl Korean military fbrci i I und trained by infiltration and b. other methods usually undertaken by Reds Weden-.'.er's repori was made three yeara before the North Koreans struck at the South Korean Republic in June igfiQ with an invasion followed up by the intervention of Chinese Communi-'" in force In Novemoe-i lflso. a I Kact Finding Truman on July 0. 1B47 on the recOuVneodatlon Of the then Secretary uf State General Marahall, oidcred Wedeuieyai to China and Korea on a fact-finding mission The General and the Hlaaton spent about one month in China and then visited briefly Korea Wedemever said th.it after Russian troops left North Korea, "one of the Kremlin's mujor objec•ivea" will undonbu-dly lie to control South Korea by utilization of Communist Korean armed fgfltaa as .. me-aiis of pressure after the withdrawal of United States forces as done in the rases of Poland, Outer Mongolia. Yugo%  Uvia ana Aibonln He declared that 'Soviet-don^ inated Korea would constitute ,. serious political and psychological threat to Manchuria. North China and Japan and hence to United States interests In the Far East —Renter Exporl Drive In Wide Field ,1* I.IIIN I < 4RI.OVA I OtfDQet April. •*| export dri\ %  \eiyining from rubt>er Miakea and Oaelic dictionaries lo hand goose feathers. These are a few of the item* ...veied m the ad to 100 trade inejUirfceJ reaching London c waak from all over Uie world A Board of Trade official told Intenialional News Sei. i "We have a special depaitnient io handle unusual leqtK'sts These n t tiir laiquu u i oui an I m along to ntanufaetun I ifcht be inlereded." lie .*|ii.umd |gi laqueai f" rubtaar snakev—' King Cobrag in %  striking attitude"—cunic hTOBB I daalgt In Arlcona who thought "they should have a great appeal to kiddles The Gaelic dictionartaa were wanted In Nova Seatta, and a St I.ouis nnn needetl the old |00 r. ; ., gpei lei !vp.< %  : n lto.il n quests come in %  ingle das uauiriaa srara received .. Kiot a few" tiny lii.i.-^. pins •>! make, three-ai I o iiioin hi irk', end 1'ufxling The Board of Trade expatti rc %  flei) oii/zletl bill seldi'in stuni]m' Alter investiiraiiun I-I IWi rnojuetta, Utaj alaoovared -.im ".i de-liiiiier' is a device fa illg cattle hoins and "VOfBg rurniiun-" li the n etal aaad o decorating coffins The expert* admit they awn a 1m in their tab An Inouli i from Ceylon tpectflceUj askii ^ almut rad *'"' yellow umbrvllar lcl to the knowledge thai yellow umbrellas are used bv lUi IdM pnesta, while i-ed ones are sim U) fo*royal occasions National < characteristics have to beunderHtood and catered ta F< the experts discovered thai Anterlciins take up im than the English win | down. This led to out-. models in riding breeches am; %  hooting sticks—that trleky UBUI i" ii I rapt ion that i walking stick in .i USSIUIH plii.-i •on hikes CX PI I I' I krtUQlj) unit sCiMiiohiM • an* HMCgHM t'nkinrlrat 4'ut The Board of Tiado they are probably proudest ol tin vay they h AhtMin avked the fo ho* hs ;ou!d gel the Pnaceot to mam him %  •.' .jut iM|nu.iieeaead eJ him J pjcLsgeoi kujjl fjJJ.ri -hen Al.ilJin ufliied her i tfiih of g<.>ir\JJrfia^ieioed "h'tMKtOMt* I r i mj->> lim if he ^'o""f* to icne %  ne Ho>al Kidtl'if I Vet, or...wr ta' Rn>al I'II44U< ltir'iiwik*iWi.-* Sonnniiowt. laa. -errfal flaw. : chncolalc. anitla. mnt tnu-rwi,li IriuewioSiy Britain s Di fc bl LONlK)N. April Comptroller and Audiloi Oon-1 eral Sir Frank Tube dj .. While I'aper that Britain', ,„ ternal debt increased by $1,700. Bflj,603 20 us a direct lesuit of thu devaluation of the pound sterling In September, 1940. Devaluation remltcii in the cost of a United 8taM loan living mer/ased by $SHH.4l7,U8n.2u. the Economic Co-operation Agree merit loan by /S,S3l|lltl, the KeHI finaiuftv Coi pi i inoi loan by $32.838,tUJH *u. the • %  •'>" %  dlan loan by K34.6tHl.5lil 00. ('.ituii.r ir ten %  Iiei l<37.hvjg 40 and Delgium's loan by >,I92.BOO. go Sir Frank'' repuii in on Ihe Con %  olidute Fund Al'.irarl An gmt for the yeai ended Munii 31, 1950 Senior Short Story Competition The F.Toning Advocate Invites all school-boys and xliool gini wtween the agea of 12—IB to enter for its Henler Hhort Story C'empe* %  tion. Stories can be on any subject, but should not eiceed 50Q wordn length and must reach the Hhert Htory F.ettor. Adveeate Co.. t.ld ity not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each v.-** %  dl be published In the Evening Advocate and the winner will re> elve a pnze of books or Stationery to the value of 12'8 Send this coupon with your atory. Naoae Ago School naoae Addreea y i >r \t ,s 11 RS, as well as erownups, muil make *uie of Inner CUanIwii, in of Jcr B tWff lit Playtime, jnd mOj Jctiund good hcalib, and tJu, young lady ha tound the way to H dli! Andrews i, in cxtitiog "'d//y" dring wl.i 'i hrings Innrr < i' ting ihc mouth, sailing ihc vtomscb, jnd toning up the liver Tinjllv, II gently clears (he bowelv As jrclrcshingdrmk al any lime of the dM, ukc one tcaspoouful of Andrews in a gi4ss ol water. More important Mill, don'i lorgci your Andrews when you mkg in the morning ANDREWS uvtRSAtT ^THfc IDEAL FORM*OF LAXATIVE' Tim AVAILABLE!! ADVERTISF. IN THE FVFMNIi ADVOCATE Cffu'ehon Monthh. Weci/r Ccntacl ... jsaVocafe Advtrtiung Depl BEDFORD mmm §2,135.00 Usual Fled Owners Discount riHIMISi I.MIM.I ROBERT THOM, LTD. — WhitPark Kd %  eaMMnMsosses



PAGE 1

I'M.I 101R BARBADOS ADVOCATE THfRsDAY. MVV J, 1K1 BARBADOS . 1— ADvo^rrE by lb* MTOMU CaLtd., Bo*4 BU Thursday. May 3. 1951 Today, on the sieps of St Paul's, the King will declare the Festival of Britain open. This year is the fiftieth anniversary of the Great Exhibition, a successful festival sponsored by Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria. There is no doubt that the Festival will be ureat fun. a fairyland has been created at Battersea—-me of the grimmest parts of London—and arrangements have been made for other sections of the show to be staged in other centres, but is it worth it? The Festival Gardens alone were estimated at first to cost £770.000, but the cost ha* now rocketed to £2.500.000 with an estimated loss of £1.500.000. Out of all this will come six months of pleasure for Londoners. Can the British afford to spend this amount of money on a celebration when they have so little to celebrate about? The Festival, it was hoped, would succeed in intruding dollar visitors to Britain, and by putting Britain's achievements in industry on show help to boost the export trade. But so far the Americans seem to be very little interested in the Festival, and thc* tourists who are going to Britain this year are heading for Stratford-on-Avon and the Lake District, not for Battersea. It seems as if the Socialists, not content with Gambia and the Groundnuts Scheme, have decided to go in for squandering money on a large scale at home. The core of the Festival will be in Lonlon. where, besides Morrison's fun fair, there will be displays drawn from the fields of .science, technology and industrial Also in London there will be exhibitions of books, science and architecture. In Glasgow British heavy industry will be on show, and the exhibition in Belfast will be mainly concerned with the Irish linen industry. There will also be two travelling exhibitions which will visit the important centres of the country. One of these will be mounted on o ship and the other will travel overland. The latter will need over 100 lorries to transport its collection of 5,000 exhibits from city to city. "The chief and governing purpose of the Festival", says the Archbishop of Canterbury, "is to declare our belief and trust in the British way of life, not with any boastful self-con lidence nor with any aggressive self-advertisement, but with the sober and humble trust that by holding fast to that which is goou and rejecting from our midst that which is evil we may continue to be a nation at unity in itself and of service to the world. It is good at a lime like the present so to strengthen, and in part to recover, our hold on the abiding principles of all that is best in our national life." But is this i tally so? will the Festival do anything to maintain the British way of life? It seems very unlikely. The only way for the British way of life to be maintained is for Britain to prosper, and with a Socialist Government in power —a Government with so little economic sense that they agreed that a bankrupt country should stage an expensive Festival —there is little hope of that. But. if the Festival achieves nothing else, it will at least have brought a little colour and enjoyment to Britain. With "everything going up" and a shortage of food. the British need a little diversion. In fact, the Festival may act as a moral booster. But no doubt it would have been cheaper to equip every citizen with a "morale raiser" like the one on show at Battersea which murmurs comforting remarks such as "Well done old chop; you're doim; line!" than stage a mammoth Hop. I <, "> '/Handy lime to tell us ui'iv huili it uptide do History? You Live It In San Domingo v Cl "?" d Truil 0 By T E REALY The Dominican people, he tellvnu cannot escape history anyEditor M rh oaii r oi'n me. gun have seventy-live pei where, but in this city it lives -. _ ... cent, indigenous Indian blood with you vocally For il has the ,n h tenure of office a* Mlnmlxod w|th Spanish, Negro and first cathedral to be established lsl<,r "' Apiculture that the great oUWT slra i ng | n the interior YOU in the New World; it was in this rice-growing programme was m((V gtiI [ ^ Dominican type* island that the (Wat Mass was started; il was his family who wjln the lrue Indian features sung In the Americas it was here sent to Jamaica seeds of the Bur Th „ 4 one of tne flrfl fonlrBat that the Finn munkipal governraio strain of rice which have lo |lule between Santo Doming! men! or the New World was set shown such good results recently. and Haltl hc allcr pred ominontup and the first viceroysnip of Cesar has been ambassador in (v „_-., .,._ c !" n ih mulatto** SSltrSSSn^ 1 1 WM P a ftfel fi R u !" d •i B ^er^. S „^ll h A !" 1 52S Santo Domingo. Central America He knows JoTo i cnl | no ln |d me of other con.anto Domingo maica too;_for—like so many other t^^u,,. high product „, .^Ht Santo Domingo, the more intenst soil Foi irk fo Tolenlino showed me the her people In Santo Domingo old section of the city with Its there is no unemployment here ancient walls and gates and forts, and the Government is now deexplained the glories of the Dofinitely to undertake 1 from that Christopher Columbus cardistinguished leaders rled out his other voyages of dlsAmerica In years past—he took Auction the sWater covery; he landed on this Island „ fugf there in 1913 during a ^ actc T>'m Re .oil on December ft, l2-Jamalc* revolution wh le Sitl hT to V"_" 0 """' "** l *. May rly two years later. Here they will show you homes where members of Columbus' lamkly lived; they reverently show too the remains of Christopher minlcan of mission, took poristlon of Haltia over the site of the great what Senor Tolentlno has to* ,olumbus Bencon—el Taro Como (, home oul by lhe figures Ion—where men were working gnnto Domingo exports about £14 ut excavations for the central per annum per head of its two crypt into which are to be reand n quarter million people; moved Columbus's remains now wn ii c Haiti's three and threcin the Cathedral, and other relics quarter million people export onb of the family donated by the £3 per head The u Tenure on the StocSS&STTSSS %  %  %  sS ? feFTiP" mc :: EAVsaiTsKrSwuK •nt to Columbus, ,i monowcro nard al W(lfk a i t hojah it Columb'ut in an imposing marble and wioim monument in th'. cathedral. So It is natural that los Dominiranos regard themselves as having a mission in the New World —note their live million dolli pi lutnent gress Holy nment in UH MB4 Jamaica's and almost exactly Week holiday; the iwi ce Santo Domingo's 135 pcopl< —pid proper square mile. The people o -Santo Domingo are able to furembolism of the mononiih ux.tion nt the rate per head ment is, of course, baaed on th* *',, pPr annum mo '* <" %  cross, the Christian cross; lookV* 7 ?, per capita taxe of the Haitian people, and twice apita taxation in Jilithic cross one kilometre long which will stand foursquare, lo ,all the winds that blow, and will send to the skies a great light aa a beacon to lighten the The way for all the peoples of the ment is, we-t This sense of mission and sense Ing to the eust from which re,^ of history are perhaps the same, llglon and civilisation came to the .TTi-Jr And It cannot fall to impress you, west; solid and massive in conmaiCfli even if you regard history as siructlon to demonstrate the And so when you tie in the hlsdull and monument* past or prohazards of wind imt earthquake lory of the emergence of Snnl< Jecled as futile. Jamaicans seem u> which the Caribbean Is subDomingo from Haitian domlnby contrast completely uncontcct. Hound about Jt are lo be ance, when you realise that near cerned about the past; monuBuilt a new town, antnternatlonal ly half a million Haitians wenments mean nothing to them; airport, a modern setting for the once living in this country and their history perhaps has not memorial lo the country'* foundhad to be sent back home, notr been sublimated into a nationalcr the pressure on land room to istic urge or consciousness. Most countries of the New Haiti, the comparative prosperity Not sc in Ciudad TruJillO. in World are subscribing to the cost, of this country, then you can whose past I was perforce steeped and the Inauguration-perhaps understand the border IncttMnll all clay today when I had the two years' time—will be a New cf some years ago. honour of a distinguished guide. World festival. Perhaps that is one of the ex Senor Cesar Tolentlno, brother of After visiting the Senate, which ptanations for the masses or Gustavo the Dominican Consul in is housed in a .missive building warplanes maintained by the Kingston erected as a Governors palace Trujilln Government. Pcrhap.* Qmm is one nf the patriarchs when the Haitians ruled the too. it shows the significance of of the Government, the Trujillwhole island, we settled down to the recent goodwill meetings be fJovanmnt With unwrinkled converse. Mellowed by a Britisn twecn the Presidents of the two skin, arighl eves, only his uneven Honduras drink—Pitch a Clan— countries. Il requires MUnd steps suggest that h.is Bearing or let's get together—Senor Todiplomacy to balance the cconomi He lias served his country lentino talked of his country's mic sttesse*. I begin lo under. in many rapacities. Il was durpast and in present problem*. stand I i nitk Oweu In The Land Of Steaks : BUENOS AIRES. I DAWN streamed over the Rio de Plata, the broad, rolling River of Silver, which is the colour of mud, as I crossed the great city and made my way to the West Side I stock-yards of Matadero*. At the gateway is a striking bronze statue of an old bearded gaucho, with bare I feet, long stirrup leather*, and a loose rein. riding across the pampas. Prosperous citizens uptown, driving in their shining American motor-cars along the boulevards as beautiful as in Paris, should brave the muck and bear ihe sour stench of the stockyards to come and take a good I look at him and his horse. Together, they made one-third of this counI try's prosperity and coming power. I The beasts inside the gate of Mataderos made another third. Heaven, which gave the • sun, the soil, and the winds and rain, provid, cd the rest. STEP LIVELY While I was still a mile away I could hear the moos of the second section of the partners. Nearer, there blended with their bellowing salute to the sun the snorts and grunts and squeals of the pig public. The tally on the wall outside the market manager's office announced the state of trade at the turnstiles; cattle, 10.800; pigs. 777. Time : 6.45 a.m. In the stockyard, which was still not yet half-tilled, it was like getting mixed up in a Korean cavalry charge. You need to step lively to miss the motorcars in the streets of Buenos Aires, where there are no traffic lights and few traffic cops. In Mataderos you jump for your life to avoid the horsemen. They came cantering down the tree-lined lanes, lolling on the broad, barrel-like saddles of wool and hide, cracking their whips like pistol shots. Their horses are as sturdy as bullocks, sure-footed as goats. They turn when a rein is laid on their neck, and thev turn on a silver dollar. f The gauchos themselves are as tough and wiry as their steeds. Man and horse are almost a single piece, physically and mentally, too. Off his horse, many a gaucho is a fool. 8 a.m. STEAK Yes, madam, the gaucho wears a wide. black sombrero, a bright-coloured cloak (poncho), which is really a blanket with a hole in the middle for the head to go through, big plus-four trousers stuffed into high leather boots, and a lasso is coiled on his saddle. [ But they don't look a bit like the American lilm stars. These are Gurkhas on horseback. At eight o'clock I am eating breakfast with them: a pound of steak and a pint of beer, total price—Is. 3d. apiece. The party then swallows a glass or two of local spirits, and fortunately is broken up by the incessant clanging of the stockyard jbell. The market is about to begin. Now the acres of Mataderos and the miles of its lanes£cho to the bell, the bellowing of the beasts and the bawling of the buyers. Messrs. Vestey. Swift. Armour and others of the biggest meat merchants in the world are here. Their buyers, also mounted are moving in cavalcade from corral to corral as the stout 1,0001b. steers are sold, 20 to 40 at a time, at a price that ranges around £10 per head. FOR SCHOOL PHILIPS' ATLA.i and I U M. -. ARITHMETIC ROVAI. READERS Advocate BALANSA SCOOP This handy and useful device provides the housewife with a new and simple method of preparing recipes with utmost speed and accuracy. The "Balansa" can be used for careful weighing and measuring or as a guide for those who prefer to guess. LTD. WILKINSON fc ll.WNKS Successors to C. S. PITCHER 'Phones : 4472 & 46S7 I Enjoy it \ with pleasure I Again!! I PETER DAWSONS f SPECIAL WHISKY THE OLD FAVOURITE rII HI AIM ItS SAY: Oil To thr Kdffor, DM AdMttU S|IR.—Oil is a known emollient TT soothing agent It mg tins J unlity that was in old Keir ardir'k mind when Insaid atxmt Churrlnll -well he doesn't walk cboul with an oil cn." But oil ut far a* Barbados If ooncerneri. seems to have lost this qualitv slnte an importanl debate in the House of Irds as published in last Bundsy'i AdvMttr. It hai mm baeoiM an irritant. oi\d a.*KM who vrntiire* to disruB* u leaves himself open to criticism Hut if | Mlblaci is important it Mould be discussed and talked about In the honest endeavour to lind the true facts and perspective. In the Lords' debate Lord Tavlot made Ihe following point*— le lit! (we'll.rail them FO for bfevit) i had secured leys*-. over 71% of drillabte land in Barlndos. dos Government intended to take over all underground oil rights. and live the n I prospertlng 11eeceea over the whole Island. <> In July !M7. Sir H. Blood. Governor of Barbados, read lo the Company's agent a despatch from the Colonial Office, London. MitWtmg that Barbados give i n prospecting license to the Company over thr whale IsJand. In mum for the surrender of the t'ampanp's laaaea. iTl Mr. Lepper's report way. |An important Constitutional question is involved, but this letter Is too lonf already to deal with that here). Nevertheless I* it not a fact that if you or I had received such assurances we should have relied mi them, and l>een content to do M>. Now about 1950 something must have happened because when the B.U. applied for a prospecting: licence it was refused. Mr. Tanner had been asked for advice. Who was the person who lirl suggested the appointment of ,i Canadian expert to advise about Petroleum Regulations? We shall probably never know. Up to then the sky had l>een qulto clear and a gentle breeze had been blowing favourable to the B.U ; but storm clouds now gathered. Someon? had queere.1 the pitch for the B.U Who was it fvtn l-ord Teviot does not suggest that persons ban mm better off financially after the above change of weather and I should hate to think that a well known American method of promoting business had any place In Barbados. In fsct I do not believe Was it only that some bright fellow suggested that it would be advisable to have a competitor in the field so that he and th* B.U. could spur eaefi other on to a speedy Investigation of the < II resources' D1<| some one think that the B U. did not show adequate result* for 32 years work in the Maud, and that thev should have sunk a deep well long ago when toe shallowwells proved inadequate"' In this connection It Is fair to remember that the war period should be written oft. as no materials could then be obtained. It Is a pity that the B U. agents walked out of the meeting; so abruptly. Such conduct achieves nothing It only antagonises If they had remained to bargain they would probably have secured better terms. Let us try to foruct all that and remember that "in my opinion all that is "known today about ihe Oil '•prospects of Barbados has been "due to the drilling operations of the B.U. and the re"searches of its geologists". {Lepper]. If II be possible at this lato hour to assist the B.U. and concede better terms, let us be glad to do it: E. May 2, 1951. C. JACK MANON THE WING Bidding against merchants (lest the several individual buyers should agree to carve up the market and cut the price) are the agents of the Argentine Meat Prodycers' Corporation. This is a Government-controlled organisation to protect the poor Argentine rancher against the rich foreign merchants. In an hour or so it is all over. The buyers are back at the bar. and the heaving, steaming, slithering beasts are being herded off by the yells and lashes of the gauchos to their lasl round-up. Mataderos has done its business for the day. At noon other visitors arrive. Very important personages, these, at any rate in the steerage Oi '.he Argentine. They have come by special Pan-Air plane, flying some 10,000 miles from Toronto, in Canada—16 splendid black-and-white Holstein bulls. All of these handsome gentlemen are descended from famous fathers and are themselves each worth about £1,000. It has cost at least 1,000 dollars apiece (£340) to fly them here over America, the Indies and the Andes. Their flight took them close on three days, due lo fog over the Amazon jungle. "What happens if ihey get restive at 12.000ft. ?" I asked the genial Canadian crewmaster. "Oh, easy," he said. "We just go up another few thousand feet, and then the young fellers sorta get short of breath and want to lie down in the hay." MILLIONS OF EM Every other week such another "bull flight' lands on this giant airfield, probably the largest in the world. The ranchers reckon that it It no dearer and much safer than I shipping the animals by a month-long sea 1 voyage. No doubt they know their own business! best. And cattle, with corn is the Argentine's own. and best, business. —L.E.S. I II T. II. kl\l II tO., II lAi> n(s JUST RECEIVED LIGHTNING ZIPP FASTENERS The original Zipp Fastener that always works. In sizes Type Lengths and Colours ihat are "JUST RIGHT" For every service in Personal apparel and equipment • For f/nur svlfrlinn MOV ... DA COSTA A COLTD. 111? I. Is ll.'j.l. If* MAY UAYH WINES I UQUEUXS Sandeman's Sherry Sandeman's I*on Dry Sack Sherry .. Bristol Cream Sb*rr Prunier Brandy WITH A DELIGHTFUL ROAST Cold Braid Rum Top Notch Rum V.elle Cur* Curaco Cremr de Month Benedictine THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS Anchor Butter Anchor Rich Milk Powder Australian C'ouking Butter Van Houten's Cocoa Ci.dbury's Cocoa Essence Choolatc Nut Roll Planter's Nuts Dutch Cheese Danish Cheese Carp's Crackers Carr*l Tea Biscuits Tea time Pastes in Jars— I* >acfa Cook's Past.'--c. each Chocolate Cunch Biscuits— Ilkeach QUALITY MEATS & POULTRY Beef. Lamb. Ve Frozen Salmon Froren Fillet Sole Frozen Cod Fillets fl!E$H VEGETABLES Carrots, Cabbage. Beets. Tomatoes Phone WE C.ODDARDS DELIVER



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 185 THURSDAY. MA" 3, 195! rnicE Allies Win Battle Of Rivers: Quiet Prevails On Front MM'II li.tl-EliOlH AW 'AMI TOKYO. Mav 2. JJNITEl) NATIONS forces sen! out aggressive patrols deep into No Mnn\ Lend today. __ second day of the lull along the Korean front. Communists believed to beorganising for the next phase of their "suicide" ofTenaive made small scale attacks on the eastern front. KUe where they remained out of contact. But I'nltcd Nations patrols m ct Communist units ranging up to battalion siie northwest and north of Seoul Eighth Army estimated Com munist casualties yesterday a' I .MO. Officers said Communist disengagement was similar to th< mystenous withdrawal in Chor won-Kumhwa area about a week %  • %  So Just before their offensive. United Nations piano attacked North Korean traffle again today claiming more than ISO truck.' loaded with supplies and lw locomotives destroyed on mail ntthms i Jets blew up six trucks of an ammunition train. American ae tal torpedoes won %  battle of thRiven, from Chinese Commun.sts to-day. Torrents of water gusited through holes % %  ipped in the Hwachon dam by t*nited States skyraidere. Communists had closed sluice itates to lower the level of the I'ukham and Han River 5 and make them easier to ford. One of the dams wa s destroyed A 10 foot hole was ripped in another. Now the Reds will have to build bridge?, to cross the river. Their engineers will be easy targets for United Nations artillery and planes which blasted the drive out of the nine day old Communist offensive. The front was quiet again on Wednesday Probing Attempts Communists to-day mounted light probing attempts below the Hwachon dam in the centre of the peninsula. These were blocked. Associated Press correspondent Nate Polowetzky said Reds were testing UN. lines along the Chunchon Hongchon axis traditional invasion route down the splnv centre of the peninsula. Reds also tried to punch through east f the Hwachon darn near Imie on the 38th parallel. Allied artillery planes and infantry broke it up South Koreans still operating about 2 miles north of the 38th parallel on tne east coast, broke up a probing attack southwest of Kansong. Red* were out of contact with Allied Forces on the wJtern front north of Seoul. — iCV ) FOR CONFERENCE tfroM 0r Ow Vtif*P">4fn\GRENADA. Mn> I L C J. Thomas, newly elected President of the Grenada Worker, Union has been chosen by Union to attend the Internal] World Free Trade Union Conference In Trinidad on May 1 THE -ADVOCATE" paya for NEWS DIAL 3113 Day or Night UN Plan Embargo On Red China I-AKE SUCCESS. May 2. Tinted States will demand an embargo on the shipment of strategic material to Communis* China when the United Nation. Sanctions Committee meets hentomorrow, it was reliably learned tonight. "Strategic embargo" would ban the shipment of atomic materials, rm B and ammunition 1 and certain materials used for arms manufacture. Twelve nations are representcc t Uie Committee. Australia Belgium. Brazil. Britain. Canada. Egypt, rranre, Mexico. Philip, pines, Turkey, United States and ViMWaUt Renter. Recognise Record MELBOURNE. Mav 2 The time of 11.96 seconds for 30 yards set by Panama sprinter Lloyd La Beach in March has been recngnised by the Victorian Athletic League as ;. world pro. fesslonul record. La Beach starting from scratch finished fourth in the Bendigt £1.000 (Australian) profession.i' sprint on March 12. Three Urn* keepers clocked him at 12 sees 11.06 sees, and 11.9a second; Affidavits testifying the accuracy of the watches were submltte I to the Victorian League, pre vious record of 12 seconds was tet by Jack Donaldson in I MacAfthur Quiz To-day )Br PAUL SCOTT RANKINF) WASHINGTON. May 2. General Douglas Mat-Arthur will be cross-examined to-morrow by a Joint Senate Committee inched inj critics and supporters. Twenty five Senators on Armed Service* and Foreign Relations Committees have decided not to allow other Congress members to attend tho secret hearing. Their decision disclosed to-day nppcared certain to add to the ontroversy in Congrci.-. Houoe Republican leader Joseph Martin protested against closed door interrogation. The appearance of the former war hero, the most controversial 'Igure in America to-day. will climax the emotional controversy that has raged for ntarly a month over the contradictorsKorea war strategic advocated bv Mac Arthur rnfl President Truman When It was decided to invite MacArthur before the Committees, attention was centred on the reasons leading to his dismissal by Truman. Since then the debate has turned upon th" basic Issue whether the struggle between United. Nations %  >nd Chinese Communist forces' Id or should be limited to t)wl Korean area. —Heater uter. Now Persian Cabinet TEHEI.AN, May 2. Pre.nlei Mosvanecq formed :ind was expected to pre— tent a new Cabinet to the Shall later In the day. A spokesman said. "This Cabinet does not claim to bring about an) •peed] rafoniu. It assumed power mini) to settle the oil question will, the British, later, other national elements will gel ( affairs and implement essentinl measures for the country'; welfare D P 50,000 Casualties WASHINGTON. May LThe Defence Department here estimated to-day th it Chinese and Notth Korean casualties topped 50.000 in the first #eeh of their present offensive. These casualties covered April 22 to 29 —Renter 1,000 Volunteer For Anti-Strike Force WELLINGTON. N.Z.. May 2. Men lined up at New Zealand ports to-dayto join the country's rww civilian law and order force. Their enrolment for the emergency force came 24 hours after Prime Minister Sidney Holland hod called on every able-bodleri man to fight wreckers and trouble-makers trying to overthrow orderly Government. „ -, „. _______ __, Pohee in Wellington, enforcing new get-tough orders, broke up a march by 1,000 striking duvV NO COMMENT WASHINGTON. May 2 Secretary of Stale Dean Acheson. declined tn comment or Peron's appeal to American state* to support Argentina's claim to portions of the Antarctic. i [• POCKET CARTOON by OSBLKf LANCASTER __{f ISP^ jp*|$4j yp "Darling I have something to tell you —I'm going to become u TV mother !" Order Barbados Rum At B.L Fair West Indiana Get Free Beer (From Our Owl Correspondent) LONDON. May 2. At the British Industries Fair In-day. ot-dplacexl for Bai bados mm and a table lamp made of Bu I conch shell. Mr. John Dugdale, Minisl.M foi Colonial Affairs, ate an ugli at the Jamaica stall when he visited in*' BrttWl Industries Fair to-day. His two sonwho pained him ate a banana each. After eat inn the u] Du^dalc ivmarked: "It's delicious" At the THnidad stall Mr. Dug] dale said He undii VICE PBE8IDEKT Alben W Bsrklay C-'nd from Isftl present* the Four Freedom **r* to Dr. Ralph J Buncos st the Starbiiht Roof of UM Waldorf Astoria. Buncho won —e award by receiving an overwhelm ing m)omy of the ir..ooo ballots csat b voters In all walk* of lift and from all aarls of th* United Stats*. EaUl K. Ellis (left), *a*ge Tsrdiosnd Pocora (nu.mr iightl look on Express. Israeli Soldiers Attack Arabs TEL AVIV. May 2. About 100 Israeli w>ldlers attackea Arab inhabitants In the demilitarised /.one between Israel and Syria today, a Syrian spokesan said tonight. He said four IraU soldier* had been killed. Two Arabs were minded. The spokesman said Israelis opened lire on inhabitants in an attempi to steal cattle but Arabs forced them to withdraw. The exchange of fire lasted about hour. The incident occurred northwest of the mouth of the Jordan —Beater workers yesterday. Holland's ap peal for civilian volunteers came as the dock workers' strike dragged through its I Oth week. To-day more than 1,000 men hud volunteered in Auckland. B; ly afternoon about 100 police u^ed batons on Wellington strikers when they tried to march through polire line* t„ Parliament buildings. Marchers dispersed after being told a deputation would meet the Government. Ne%.Zealand's inlustnal crisis stems from the dock strike for higher wares— (CPI Gairy On Charge (Fran OBr 0 ttriiMI GRENADA. Mny 2. Two charges of th? use of threnlcning language during thi i uui %  %  of a speech in the Market Square last Friday when addressing workeri celebrating a wage boost victory, havflj been preferred by the Police againM E. M. CJalry. President of the M.M.W U who is summoned to appear before the Magistrate next Monday. All workers are understood to have been instructed not to work on Monday, hut to converge at St. George's, because of the trial. Thnugh thstopnaffe Is emphasised, it is not a strike. Sentence Postponed "GRENAIMTMB" 2. Sentence was pending aftei conviction on Monday by Acting Magistrnte W. U Mclnlyre. 01 two male members of the M M.W t' who were found guilt of charges of intimidating. The Magistrate first derided t remand Itoth m custody unt(l th* •decision to-day but afterwarda accepted hail, releasing them. Sentence Is now further pnsl poned. Mclntyiw, a Tniud-diai serving on the St Lucia Bench, arrived ln*t weekend to replaec Magistrate Bain who is on sick leave. Meat Prices Are Low Commons Told LONDON. May 2, Kedenck Willey, Parliamentary Secretary to the British Ministry of Food, disclosed to-day how meat prices under the new Argentine Agreement tiompared with prices for meat offered Britain by private traders In other countries. He was replying in the Commons to the question by Ivor Owen Thomas, Labour member WUtay I "We have received In rcceiu months a number of offers from European sources of frozen beef mainly South American in oiigln. "These have been at price* varying from i* 130 per ton delivered from German frontiers io £ 19? 29 per ion from stores ir. Hamburg "Mm we have now agree., with Argentina for meal of similar quality are less thnn the lowest of these oifers. after taking into account the c *t of bringing meat to this country." H. L. F. Turner, Conservative, asked whether the London Food itinlstry now purchjsed linseed II from other sources besides Argentina and whether the new Argentine Trade Agreement contained any terms relnting Io the purchase or linseed oil. Wiley in a wrlttet; reply said "Yes. We buy linseed oil from Uruguay and linseed from India and British East Afrka." The new Argentine AjB does not deal specifically with purchnses of Unseed oil.— Beater. King George Opens Festival To-day Church Bells Will Ring I LONDON. May 3. Britain goes on shuw tn the world to-day in a r.;ill..i: bid to rise above war scars, international anxiety and economic hardships. Tho Voice or King George VI from the steps of Saint Paul's Cathedral here, will open and dedicate thv f 1,500,000 Festival of Britain. Millions sitting at radio and Ulevisloi M U it home will hear him. From that moment all Britain striving after gaiety, will lw "at home" to viiiton from many parts of the earth for the next six months Towns and hamlet* throughout me nation. 10.000 of Sat On Snake: Found A Deer II.M O-r O-a CamaaMJ'M PORT-OF-SPAIN. April 30 Mr. Michael Nile*, a pr-> pt nor of Venal. Trinidad, waM out hunting and en. wunterni a larg> macajuel __ke which he rook for a 101 Mr Niie* sat down on the rqplUa, Aftei some time the "log" kept moving He (lred a shot from his gun and killed the snake which maa-urnl || feet. He skinned It and while doing so, found a young deer In the Intestines. COLONIAL GUESTS LONDON Fuller details are now available of the arrangements made for Colonial representative* who will attend the Festival of Britain a-^ guests of the V K. Government from July 9th to 30th Vt oreester Hit 135 For 6 Wkts WORCESTER. May 2 Rain restricted play to three hours and 20 minutes on the first day of the South African touring l-enlng county cricket match against Worcestershire here to-day In that time Worcestershire who won the tosi and batted first, scored 135 for the los* of six art i The first four Countv batsmen were out for 48. but Wyatt <2S). Outschoorn (21), Howorth (25) and Bird f32 not out) prevented ; i t. :i.-i;> .> —Keuter. REQUEST LAKF SUCCESS M _J .sked the Security Council to take prompt action to j force *he retirement of Syrian armed force* from the flamlWa r*ed /one In the Huleh region — Healer. EXCHANGE SHOTS GRENADA*May 2 Last night W. O'Brien Donova retired Superintendent of Agriculture discovered a strange man the prowl about his premises and fired a shot in the dark. Another %  hot rang out in reply; then the exchange ended. REPUBLICANS WANT O'DWYER RECALLED WASHINGTON, May 2. Senator H. Alexander Smith, Republici.n, said HUM clcnl Truman should reciill Ambassador William 0*DwVwi at once because of thi> Senate Crime Committee c Inn yy that he helped the New York underworld. But the While House said it knew of no plans lor recalling the former New York Mayor from Mexico City and Secretary Acheson taid he law no evidence that O'Owyer had impaired relation* between the United States and Mexico. Asked at his new* conference — — if he intend* to consult the Ambassador about the chcrges againi: him. Acheson said he had nolhmu in mind .iloi^g those lines. The Crime Committee charged that while O'Dwyer wa King'.: County District Allorney and inter New York Mayor he contributed to the growth of organised crime racketeering mm Ci.iigsterisi!i in the metropolis Smith a member of the Senate Foreign Affair* Con mittee salo "It is perfectly obviouthat the former Mayor should be recalled from Mexico immediate!. N i< contrary to every givi principle of democracy and diplomacy Id us to be represented in llc-xtd bj a man whose political KftvlU— this country are at tie vtd Igggl open to serious iiuestton "Never m our his* ry" he added "has It been more impcrtant to be represented by Indhrkluall who are above luspiclon." While there wet.Republican demands for his recall, resignation or dismissal. Dt.nocrats for the most part were silent.-—U p. WIf.l.IAM ODWTER U.S. Ambcaaodor to Me.rtc charged with aiding crime the nation, 10,000 of them. %  day a part in the celebration' There are two reaaona for the Feitival -gpniisorad hy the Lalxtur (lovernmeril against t wave of criticism Dhe Is that thm fmmi i the centenarj of the Oreat Kvhti>ilion of lISl '*'' second li to (bow that Britain Is mil bold In enterprise nrtd his faith in her future The centre.piece of the Ftallvnl U the aahibitlon u( cultuie. art and tnduatiy l Umdon. lu vivid modernistic i>ulldlng* turroundlng the aymbolic linger of metal called "SkylnH" hav brightencl the drub south hank of the Td. 00 per cent-there are new trn mrn tin %  There will IKcricket and Sliakcspeaie on the village green. History Repeats Towns, famous in history liooki. win stage colourful aagaanta, I—dy fiodlvn will ride ihp greets of Coventry again and William the /on |u. roi will return in Hasting* For the ncI six months Britain will be the most musical country i the world II > IcouU Mill sUrt it off tomorrow night with rninpflre singings all over the nation Sir Adrian Boult will conduct British music in the Festival Concert Hall The new buUdtaj hh'h will stay n pertnanent feature of London* musical life Music Festivals all over the ountry—Edinburgh. Birmingham. jverpool, Manchettar, ami Abereen are among some of the phices -will provide a continuous series if cotwerti from .I>ine tu Suptemlnr There will i>c special postage (lamps. There will be baj_ri arid bunting There will INfour: laink and icarchllgbts and gaily t ainted barges On the eve ,,l trie t-suval'ft opening, critics, who said this was no time for celebration, W.T. client The Feitival spirit had taken Mid Crowd* tilled the streeti to myriad coloured lights that e rhanged the face of London by night Exhibition organiser* reported a great rush for ticket* Beater FOR U.S. TOUR WASHINGTON, Muv I 0—li r al Newton Estilla\.v,\. Braiilian War Minister, U •theduled to arrive late to-day la begin his three-week lour of the United Rtales Aeuu-r. Bevun Votes With Attlee LONDON, May, Brltnn's M]UBbb1lng Socialist! iieir ranks solidly last %  Ight to beat down the dividt and conquer manoeuvre, engm i.i-ed b> chuckling Winston ChurchPJ Taking hll eu* from rebel L.ibour Members' own piotests over rearmament, the Conserve uve leader eiune up with a motion designed in draw the support of dlatWonl Sotiallsts. but rebel fused to be taken in They kept ii solid party front that defeated Churchill's motion l>v | IS vote margin of SOS to 292. and left Prime Minister AltIe P ..nil cling ng Io control ,,f the OW | I Rebels VOICMI Labour ChurcKIU sent in hi-dtimtv Anthony Eden, to offer a motion • xpre-,*lnH. the anxiety of the House th the rearmament programme "was baaed on estimate' i i Dofahea pttatueMoo which were hot accepted by Minister, princ pally concerned N The reference was to Aneurin i>van and Harold Wil icslgned as Libour Minister and Hoard of Trade President. prote-l nver th* Igjat. bul both Bevun and Wilson refused to be pu . they vond with the Government Boui Bevar afld Wiir*<, n had as aOed thf reanranteni programme is incapible of fulfillment unless H ore aid was forthcoming from ihe United Stales, But neither went .> far as to refute to accept duCIt %  -tn ate* iCWi Aid Suspended WASII1N<;T0N, May 2 Suspension of Marshall Aid granta and loans to Ireland was announced here to-day The an nounrement said lhat the slcp wa* nken m agreement with Ihe Irish Joverntnent because of Ireland* Improved economic position — Beuter GROTEWOHL ILL BFRLIN. May I East German Prime Minister Otto Orotewohl. left nerlln to-day for medical treatment at a health resort, the East German News Agency said His Deputy Walter tMuright, will act for him No de tails were disclosed. Orotewohl appeared nt May Day cplchration* v.-terdav -Beuter \iMd| o-da> "st re-4 iut rl ei Laid} tura Bitters is bad i hut Mr P I Blan.. Depu.v Comptroller of CUBtCBbs. who was an attendant at Ihe M.-III. retorted. "Angostura Bitten kgood for the stomach Commenting on anthuriu^i lilies on show at the Trinidad stall. Mr Dugdale said he thcuglfl they were made of wax, but riisV covered they were natural whop he fell than Afterwards he said' "I am glad there are markets anthurnim liltes Another distinguished at the West Indies stalls io-dg> was Sir Charles Woollej OQ* ernnr of British (lulanu Si Charles was favourably impre i ed with the general layout the West Indies stalls and pressed the hope to visit the s later this week with Wool ley Business at West Indies -mill to-day wa* brisk. A buvei fti.it' Rangoon placed an order for S.flUt bales of sea Island colton A repref tentative ..f NeedierBritish Imf ports Company ordered largr quantities of Jamaican ugh* foi the Aminnn market Free Irrinks In th* rrinidad stall buyerf showed interr t in tinned fruit! and wixidwork. West Indians and their fncndt who visited the British Industries Fair to-day wer P treated by the British linn of Guinness, brewer* to free drinks of Cm linear The Idea bah—d the hrew^rs* generosity la that they plan lt establleh a brewery In Trinidad in th* near future General comment of West Indians who drank samples of Guinness was, 'It's nice Gromyko Does Not Like New Proposals PARIS, May 2 Andrei Clromyko. Soviet l>eputy, gave a cool reception today tn Ihe western powers' "flnaj, effort to reach an ngreement on the Foreign Ministers agendd after more than eight weeks' meetings. A Western spokesman com-; merited that Gromyko "did not seem t.i like the l.iN' >.. %  u i,, pro|>osHls." Gromyko romplained thn* western powers hud still iiol included the North Atlantic Pad and the American bases overseain their agenda proposals. Western observers said that today's proposals were to \ ~ considered as the final bid ta break the deadlock rather thai as an ultimatum Today's meeting lasted for over four hour-. Reuter. Griffiths Asked About Technical Education LONDON. May 2 Mr Peter Smlthers (Conservative) asked the Secretary of Stata for the Colonies in the House of Commons tonight what steps had been taken to improve facilities for technical education in Barbados in view of the recommendations of the Select Committee on vocational and technical trainir.g which darted work in 1946 Mr James Griffiths repliedI "The report of the Select ComI mittee was received late in 1049 I and as its principal reeornrr.er.d.i lion for the establishment of a I training centre involved a capital expenditure of $334,000 and a recurrent expenditure of $24,500 per annum, consideration of this project was deferred by the Barbados Government pending completion of a fiscal survey of the island In Barbados which is not yet ready. In the meantime. Government reports that 100 apprentices are being trained under the local Apprenticeship Bursary Act The men ir receiving part training in motor engineering, electricity. building and architecture at Evenmg Institutes; and 1,755 women are receiving part-!ime in domestic subiects at house. eraft centres or in various rural centres Mr Parker (Labour) asked, what steps had been takGovcrnrr.ent of British Guiana to train doctors in tuberculosis care ] m view of the fact th.v hospital had only one e cut'' Mr Cutllths in a written rrpl> | laid "I am aware that the Gov IrmRrint '.t Grenada, like sen-era! MM %  looial g' eeri n mi | reviewed itn develcpn.i largely owing to the burder of residual recurrent expenditure duch the original plan entailed, lion of an increased allocation to any Urritorj from the limited Colonial Development and Welfare Funds available has to i he considered against the requirements of the colonial ten %  %  ! CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS The Advocate Ce. Ltd., has made arrangements for i .-Mini advertisements to be taken bj various District Agenta and ae far Ihe following have been authorised to receive them I MOSKrt GrriTNft, DavrelU Road. Ch. Ch Mrs V i. WOOl Maxwell Road. Ch Ch f> MeCONNET. Pilgrim Road. Ch Ch "i.ii'ii AI.LCTNi:. Crane. M, Philip fl QIINTYNE. Charrh Vlllaie Hi Philip t: HINRRON, Ma\Hlah street. St John H I. CAVE. Si Jnhnk nispenaarr, rOffl III JFMMOTT St Flliabelh Vlllaie, Rl Joseph S A Dl'RANT. __gf_ Hill It Jeseph imsi/li: PHARMACY Four Road*. %  John \ HOI.DKK. St Jadea. SI George ST C HI'NTE. Plae Gap. SI Michael V RICE. Raak Hail Read St Michael R H MO, Near aharon. ii Theaias Items may be handed Into the above for ihe followlm Columns In Ihe Classified Seellon : BIRTHS. MARRIAGES, DEATH*. IN Ml MuKI \ M ETC FOR SALE. FOR RENT. WANTED, LOST or FOVND ADVOCATE CO.. LTD. T Gale Advertising Manager



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PA(.I ~l\ liARBAOOS ADVOCATE TIKRSDAV. MAY i, IM1 MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY ^ JCfAT.' %  o TVWtl : -":ss- JOHN WHITE means madejustright J 'T'rTEIR good looka trll you they're jutt right. You know, too. when you look at the price tag, that you can't get finer valne. llluBtrated .. a Fall Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair U the John White Guarantee Shield—the tign which means juit right'! Look for it in leading ktorei in Barbadoi. LOYAL BROTHERS OF THE STAR Neediest Cuea Fuad ANNOUNCEMENT Relative to Carnival and Fair lo l iirlrt on ralac the atandard af Carnival, the Bleertnj Committee mould appreciate the co-operation of Firm Cluba and Individual* i.tiit, • oriiinal aa paaalblc No entrance fee will be charted More particular* latei A Carnival Band of thirty will be vLalUni Barbado* lo take part in the parade Cloning date. 19th Mar BEYMOI K BECKLES e/o Vratry CWrh a Oince. Bridie town. For Booths. Stall*, and snicShow* contort C. MORHIS. SVUTI Lane. MUSCULAR iATIOUC? : Gr bock in atp wiMi ALKA-SSLTZIIH m> •ic, tO ftUftlVO t a l.rj.1 .thr f.m•4t, fIiev*i (tinant-lu.cL.v h.lp. 10-DAVS NEWS FLASH In* U-. by MINI %  >rai and i> Inlorvulml i Baldwin II Fountain Prill fur HACK rrelac*n-int*. .. %  %  Sl..lr lillr.l %  .llll Ml: _atadeai l JOHNSON'S -1 \TIO\IKY AND ii \v.\iw \I:I YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEQAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY 55 31 29 NOW 18 M 2.1 USUALLY NOW Floral Icing Sugar. Pkgs. Smedley's Peas. Tins AHsopp's Beer, Bois. 33 48 26 2 44 _o D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street AGENTS IN ARMS by MARY WINTER BEYOND THE EAGLE'S RAGE by HUGH POPHAM TWO SCAMPS by GEORGE A. BIRMINGHAM A WINDOW CLEANER'S ROMANCE by NOEL GODBER • ADVOCATE STATIONERY TRUCK OWNERS I • INSPECTION TIME JVEED XOT BE H'OJtltlXVG TIME DUNLOP CAMBRIDGE CYCLE TYRES more DUNLOPILI O BUS SEATS LIONIDE LEATHERETTE CARPET MATRRIAL RUBBER MATS REAR VIEW MIRRORS 6 a 12 Volt BUEEERS ROOF LAMP BULBS t SOCKETS ELECTRIC WIRE I rLIX BATTERY CABLES ACCESSORY SWITCHES Fin! GALVANISED SHEFTS Hud


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rillllsDW M\Y X IM II\Klt\IMIS \IH1X VII M.I SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS.! ""!?"; ?T?L??2 TILCPHONI ISO! ChMg* H SIS* Mr My nomboi tip M M *ntf • conn par wont for ret. •tfajiiltx.al word Tfi. ca.h fr-oia HI Mwrtn 450 •] 4 em. 3113 fur Dta4 NIUMI on** afior 4 pm TV rBtfd Mr IUfi:DNiMDll cf %  uilu, ktairlaftra, DWln, Acknowtrdgmmla, and In Moanorliro notirra it %  IM xi IM>>I and ll.SO M |un40' %  Mf at ward* up to M. anO 3 rl par word on warO-daii i Ml wold on &Unda)i (or oSfUIIOIlfal WMd. IT 1*1 H \OTH'Enmr. Chi Miftnrlli* U-r. tajr Tl Hrr tunrral Iravra Ih* abuva rrWOonrr %  Uarforto Chaw . Brtt* ("hoar M THANKS M "II 11 I II I !" M -in thank* to all II .... ornt wreath.. Icl f Bat UW or In any way brtravrtmrnl. IM daaU. ..I Vimiu NMfM i <; %  .. IN.,-. S.. ,-. 3 .1 St I' IN MEMORIAM IHIMMMI In ranar t-dinj niemor* a l -.1 Obit. MrDonaUl llwar,\ lid l*tU I IBM hlni I I..I cntu* brforr llr livr* i'h II* in memoir And win lorovi i tMM la KIR LONGER SERVICE T A .t all pollbcloro orrcUiig. A %  "•.nil quantity of thli %  O 1 |>rViiUtlio %  natrrlal nil II available at your GAS Hui.l. Bay SI. Pilro c. par gallon. Oat Some To-d.r. NOTICE THE LORD OLIVER PRIENDI.V %  OC1ETY All nirmbrt. l thr attovr Surtrl> who havr been in Ih* Society up to Ula md of 1MJ. arr hrrrby n attain to lea.r mar 1MB Contilbntion Coroo al lha Office of lha Kegi'iiar of FrleMI> Smirtie.. Town Mall No card* will bo arrepted aftrr lha 1th of May. |MI D T. DANDTI Clerk. rWiatrar Ftla. 1' I II fcl Piklir (Hlirial Sak Marabala Art lM l*M-a %  Ml. On Friday lha lath dav of May. IM1 at thr ho-r o( 9. of lock in lha afternoon v-ill or aold at n orTlee to Ihhiahnt blddrr for any mm not undn the nppro#d value, all that certain piece nl Lend containing aboi.l 1.114 Squire r>* m.i.ilr In Pariah of Sal..' butllnaT and bounding on landa of Thaterbadoa Government Ritlwav. on tw.> tide* on landa of Welch.a Tenantry, and ,-., the IMbi-r Road >t Fairneld toerthn with Ibe Dwelling Mouae. and Shop Building-. Jrc, appialaed tg IDBI M:— Thr whola property appraurd to TWO THOUSAND AND ItlMaVn 0M1 DOU-AHS AND SBX'tNTV I'lV I. I Qfl ?0l TAtta.hrd from Bydnrv fV,arr> %  nd lo-|.lul HTM re. pa:.I on day Dancing Classes Puplla o| Thr Sarbadoi Scb i %  i I'M i ik I.ICENSF NOTICE The application of Torren.. li, .. it... ^. si Mi 'hML M iM. i. to -ell Spirit-. Malt Uqiritr*. fbc. at a wall building at Cornar Mar-hall Cap. Ka.trrRoad. City. Uaird thi. 3*th day ..f April. 1M1. Tu Ihr Pollca Magutiatr. Dial "A". Staned A HENRY. for Applicant. N B -Till* application will ba cu.-. cli < %  nl it • Lirriviliig Court to be held at Polio Court. Dittr.rt A i-n Thurnday ihr 10th day of May. 1*31. at II o'clock H. A. TALMA. Iliival Barbados Yacht (lib NOTICE invited to Silrnl Coloured tur Show to be i n Friday, 4th May, 19.11, nt e 15 p.m. by Mi Tnotnu n Wulnwright ..... bl ii:ivilhi Canada and thr West li By order of. < of Man-*. T BRUCE LEWIS, Manager & Secretary. REAL ESTATE JOHN hi. i.l 1DON A F 8., IT A. I:. in. ..nl u i' r : I.IKAI li WOOD FOR SALE COUNTRY HOUSE. St. Pater-Tlir nn>t alt"iflie property of n. type in Ihr Inland afM lMl d thr n i-..-l>nre of a amall manor i i. adapted for thi* climate wiili v.-.'"' lelandahi teatuittag i—tmal lonr archwaye and i iloiaurd wiotialil Iron iriU .>rk The hnuer con.tudy. drawOtaiM loom, large kill hen. laundry. 3 double bedm bain and % %  %  torn gar**" ""' 3 %  TraPlr iim. All inain> wivkw. Ap| Mm well laid out in lawn*. ..mam-Mal and kilehen I ina>.oganv HHI A 1 . %  .ial with ira ba''urii cloaa at hand PI. ATS". CodMichael -A well homa recrnUy lUol block of 4 .pacl>i. > luiury flaia. nt ted with all i.i. l.-.n (sinvrnlenrri The greundg ipprnx B Bert I ,ir.lain n with iWBl •tuiiburiv ana %  nrnXu and here II a long rairiaarway ap""*>* 1 fljnkrrf with mahogapr rcr^ An in> raiment property nr %  .,l,.l.lr f-r om>irr.lon l-in Gueel louw nr Nur.ru ll.>mr 3', mile. ; %  -.' m ';-. M :..-i A nvrfrr i prnprMy hi a corner aite and a vrty •eawardi There arc 3 Iroom* with built-in I-arg l i. in lradma J*C "Hohin li wrll aupr.nre' t .pi-...rt. Thar* FOR RENT %  rUNT WIIIOW. Project, St .'amen. Unlumlahed houee on rojM. with 3 bodraowi, loung*. verandah, ovrrlooklng ara etc ( ODQI r hale I w i h>iaini ii REAL ESTATE AGENT AITTIONEER PI \STATIONS in ll DIM. Phone 4640 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Tie application of Peter Baaa. hotder of i iquoi Lira taw No. loie of IM1. ai-nte-l to Eleanor flibbi in rnprct o( a board and ihlnale appll-d mi lM linn nl Irnde mark tn Part A" of Iteanter m -eepri-i ol alcoholic beverage., especially *hlV. and -ill br entitled to ragladr Ihr -amr after one D DOtt froti gJH %  Hi ItM. MtMD vhall In the meantime give noil In duplk'atr to me al my odlcr of nop •IIHIII of -uch re gut ration. The ir* mark ran br teen on application al n %  Vatnl tblt Wth day of April. 1091 II WILLIAMS. Rrglatrar of Trade Man,. TAKE NOTICE That HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING -O INC a corporation organlied under be law* of ihe SUIr of Marylan.l. 'n.ied Mat., ot America, who— iradr D I.Mi la. lion of H. Hi.tr. New York. vl.A .. lod for thr recHtratrad* mark in I'art "A" rr.uerl of aknhnlic brvn i. *k Tl OrWle %  tnhlu,! 14 uo'dg *re *. lenu O Ivo-d ^.reV. ~4 t aw |l m o4Sawdg agate ttaa a (paaA-oat,. pa II -^ oa % %  > dmt AUTOMOTIVE RtAI. ESTATE LITABIJ' BUIIJ'INO SITE •i-ni .hall it .., wit* 4 goo t;i-n in good work' ,i nrJitian, pric n un n bli Appi F D i 'ml Church UiCAK MarrU tg. Apgd) r -. a-.k r..d •rrorvd ft*-Ml tan t>n .-'. \ j • n Area 10*71 ft road Dial lil'll HING SITE Wi h private Be %  Approximate!. %  I', MM. .I Drmck. t Jam.-. ror mapect...,. .n-i lurthe. information. Dial M %  .ivew> m 4 11 j. —MotTU OxfOMl I.L r.irllr-M .,. SS.4U mllra. -.. I 3 S VI I CARS-Do you .ml |o buv a Hoiidh.r, car? If ao wt can off* J 1*4* liuiman. aonr ll.HM mile. IR4t Mom. O.lurd. done l*,M0 %  raooUenl condiUan CArl H v IM -.,. good MM MUM tsa*j I D Oa... S..L-H M 1 : >l — One 4 I \t<" Sugar Can. Tr.llrr with or Without Tyre* Coaartaa. . in good VVnUM Ralph A Heard*. ood Alkty II itilw.ii.l A %  LIVESTOCK row One Zrbu-H.il.teln Cow to calve r. iKrre week-. Gave M pint, u nil Ihlrd %  1' C. Branch, near Payne. Road. %  dDMi sHMMMI MECHANIC AL Tvpf:wrnciis a*aJMknH ..I an %  %  del Ol.vmpla" JMrloble Tvpmnkr itl rrceivrd ace It. .Mparb nuilii..l-.f.iT.' |-<.irillill1l'p ,..uiwlf A O Hill Dl.il 31SB 4 -SI rod MIS* I I.l.AM (US VCTt'MU!* ACTUMUS i. ., ....... | lanuii Prom H Ki I %  %  < %  „| thr ACTUMUS Marian. D S. Celth Archer. Pradiirrd 1 W nProm 1 I '. 1) | -ble twt daraUinghouH known aa -Culloden tal the lunctlon of Cul I**" h "' Dalk, tn Hood.. With lha (•%  Ml Ihrreto containing 10 MS oquarr I.l Thhc.jcontain* drawing and . bath aim t-4lrt dot. II.I.I,, and uoatali. ga_ bMioaario oak II reaU M M real. fkOfawa M vorda — aaaor 1 woeOa raj. • ^ ord f ob 4 crate Mf.I.r* •DM 1 opening of a new branch, ihr followtrui Mai I Ml — i-TYPlST—Mpanoncod com. %  waBjaAagl .alary 1100 DO per month Til 1ST alao with rkrncal rxpe.ncr commencing oaUry |T5 On pax HOUSES s:i\n .'JHISG *V r.prrtrnco on invoicing — OOen%  g ubii |M oo par month Wnitrn applKaUon Hating ago and prertoua oaplvtonca to M oent lo Srerrtory. Dowding Satalr* and Trading Comoonv Ltd Bo> Stirrt i 9 ai-*i SALDI niRJ. for our TOY ROOM App:* in pe-raon JOHNSON'S STATIONAPARTMENT for rent to appeo.rd leriant Pully furnHhod op>rtiarnl H hotol area. Haotuag*. 1 bodrooeno. garage 0"d arltanU roam. Prom lat J.i^r WrttO P O B... Ml I' 111 h, ^r TO LET n Marine Gardoria f n..xithe. fully lurnlahrd Hoaat -kerpinj aparl.ne.it wllh apoanma veraiaSaha V Boa O M C Advoralr Co. .i .1. m A*) I Id.hhi a Lid Prln. Street Applv J 1 HT1 J 1 31 n MISCELLANEOUS WANTED TO Bl JOINERS' OOtiD WORK In Mahoga>iv. Cedar. Blirb. Ttr. Deal for lionand Office L S W1IJOH. Spry Sireri Srif-nUtfa and it.in i.i.r. rt*. *afpr In privafa* a famoua MiunliT—and dtarloaw. for the first time a atory ol 'eight double whr-ihteiT JOILV M BLADON Auctioneer 13.11 a roeatvoa from the Sr> rotary nt (he General Hoapatal 1 will nell liv Plihlir roniftlllon jl thr Nm .,. it %  on Thu. .).rwxt, Jrd May ft I b. K.hlrr nd Campbell D'ArCl A Scott. Anclioneri 17 4 tl *r. h i. li. I i LTD Lll'lBAVM | I... Wild ChotM Pi Flavour %  VEATHflUIKAI. LTD KfuH-li of dell. BJH i • l.liVl < II.WlHltr.D MUK Oixol Ihr heal: Ihat*. Holland'. Til I'..,. Milk Tope 1" butler fat p %  I n DJ ao raaenllal for th* promotion of heallbv lllr Get It ror Ihr cl A.k for 3SSIi Moth BaliKNIOH r Oil Emulo>. an ea.lly dig. *tr.t and paUUblr prrparotlon .. %  .t K DM h, volume Of Vitamin Tr.lrd C.Ml laTrSff Oil KNIGHTS LTD MJM ID 14,(MM) Tons Sugur Ffurcd L 2 A tire brokfl out in the main .sugar shfNJ cif UdlM St M;uli U dM i ttiotisnnii tons of ft'iircd Insl The lire whit-li itartad at 2 30 this morninR was uncontrolled at noon. The tnlire building; wag blacked Otil li' %  ulumns of smoke. Units from the Port-of-Spain Fire Brigade were a->i%!ini; Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay M.V. Srdgelii-k'. V %  |.i, Mai Unllr-I Pilgru., S Si Srb. Mareo llrnrletta. Vac hi Mam VtM s.i M,„i.,11,11Wolfr. Srh Ludiilplx. Sch G.i' iiirvxii ii | Sthoonrr Rrlniren. 44 l.mi not, Cap* KhM, r, i Carolina, ^ t..m net eph. for Dominica W. U Xunh-la. 3g ton. ne" i\.pl .1 "pli for D.irTilnlr. M V<-...adlon Challenger. 3.*-l Inn. Clarke, for Si I .. In Touch With Barbados [ Coast Station FOR SALE PM Mil II STONE A FINES IDEAL TOR CONCRETE. AND MAKINO ROADS AND PA His Apply J. N. HARRIMAN & CO.. LTD., Sea well. Phcnc 8444, Extension 8 26.4.51 —1 Id with the fi;oi Mp. through their Barbadoa Coaet Ilia i Dr Larrinaaa. ii Bran I WfafW, • MnrnurrirfJ. i. Amerigo Veipucrl. il. I^dda Argentine. *. Lolda -.iota PaHUa, a. Sanl* Clara, . vf.ir.ri Mary tiblt. . Ak-oe Coi.ur, %  C^wognlr, %  s. It F McC'.>irli. I N'ordidir. %  i John Clisiai-1i I Pork, ii I.\tnel Victor. %  %  PM brldnn. .. | Dow \: | %  NOTICE RATES OF EXCHANGE BARBADOS 8.PCA. The S.P.C.A. Phone P 2624 ig suspended until fur ther notice. Messages for the Inspector will be taken ] at 2673 between the hours | of 8 a.m. and 5pm and • at 08—Bri'tons Hill Police ; Station frun 'p.m. to 3 a.m. C. WALCOTT. Hon. Secretary. May 2nd VrV/rVeV////////r*,'/V','/i Hank— D -iI Lr.C. MAIL NOTICE bv the Schooner L'n.lrd I South Africans In England B> PETER mill.-. I.ONDON. April 25 Skippered by 40-year old Dudley Nourse, veteran of lw< vUlta to this country the South African cricketers U lorn Kiitrl.iri.l this summer amveU nt Soulhampton. The sun came Out lo greet them and just a little more than 72 hours afu-i p ittaBJ ft on shore, they had Hun litsl practice in the nets at Lord's This was an entirely .lnteimt reception from that awalllnc John ('.odri.ird and his i< the Weal indies last Minimvr Thoy had Iheir first game in this country in tlie middle of -j minlatura no %  like the Austnili;ins when Ihey tound htra lo i48. tho South rV M aa n j ira wife-less in fail. r.IinI-.II %  -i.i TIMI onij fron FjiRland but from neighlHiurinii Bunpaan eouiiMai u wall rin ma vxicptlun to the rule is Man Mr Sid IVKler. himself a formei l*i i playar All wife will be llTMlig HI :i raw days* time. Th I % %  I ii [CM tha boo D) the South \h ii ..ii II. hi i %  uthoiiUi %  IH-CII cxplfiim'd to thi' l.-.iin • %  !. "i Wi %  '. %  rlim.1uii,. %  .,,„. ,,'iM. biro OB the IM1 lour, soys that it hod nothing to do with anv hapili.it year. Bern Before Other members who war with live IM7 iifini ore Fullerton Mann and Athol Rowan, The only other player lo have totlTBd Eon land in Auwl'i elder brother, Eru who is vice -Captain of the team mid was a member of Ihe IMS South African touring part Fift.'.-N playon have 1 brought here altogether am) Noursp hai vrntiiied \„ |1lffJM tli.it with tl fi.it share 'if lurk Hi" side will ncqult themselves well In UM i VOtei I .Hi. rn.\nl-'i | ..' the team fulling sick, arrangements hove already been made to fly over one or two young player* from the Union. The tourists commence their ilin.il programme with the limehonoured match with Woreestrrshlre at Wortesler on May 2n They will be opposed to probably the mme team as that which drew with the West Indies. It IN to .%  supposed that the selected South African XI will be the strongest they can put into the field and the ni'fst likely lo be picked f"i the first Test. Nourse himself is expected to captain the side and both Rowans mid Mann and Fullerton art expected to be included Another member of the learn with personal experience 'if this country, Cllve Van Rynveld, the former Oxford cricket 'blue' and England rugby International, will make a bold hull, HHI' for isIoetaOn, and his leg-breaks, itiiignilkfiit fielding M f.infui battlntj sra almost ci-i.ilii lo earn him | plaoa, Backbf.ne • Brie Rowan and ViiUorton will pi thi the twitting which, weakened by DfSfj Ihi-t veiir of BrtlCO '.:.i.., . ,..-i %  I weak point. Ath.il Rowan and -Tufty' Uafli will form (hiilnef menace on a turning wicket and tho forrnor with his accurate off-spinncrs nnr" the ratttr wtth Nfli .mmaculato irc-i.arni ilowi can, and do, keep lining all ri.iy if neeesgary. Tin %  %  • six an' expert it I to .<;..* thems.-lves. This leaves live plans still 10 ! %  hlleil. Refjuiremrii' are a couple of fast bowki%  wicket-keeper and. presumably two more batsmen. Candidates I places are McCarthy, Chllbb, Hndean. Mcdlew. Mil-ean Chectham. Waite and Mansell. The choice of wicket-keeper lies between Endean and W.iite both of whom are opening batsmen of some repute Endean, by virtue of hi* greater |n>wers Of concentialion. may jwt get the vote. The o|iening attnek Will OOOM froa ru Mild '" bo %  hr nat i .wler in the L'ni n for 30 roars, Melle and Chulili The former aie both youngsters but Chubb is 39 years of age and ranks with Nourse and EricRowan aa a veteian of the side Even so, it is piobable lhat his great accuracy and ability to keep going, vary much In the mannei of an Alec Hedser. will earn hir. a place with McCarthy at Ihe other end. Not Easy Filling the last two places l DOt going to be easy. Jack Cheetham. who was considered for the captaincy before it became known lhat Noun*, would be available, is likely to be one of the tv..> If. played against England In South Africa two years ago and against Australia twelve months later He is a strong forcing batsman and, in a most successful season Just completed, he headed the Was Setty Too Drunk To Fight Back? By CHAPMAN PINCHER A STONISHING facts about the case of Stanley Setly. the murdered London car-dealer whose torso was found in un BBWX marshes 18 months ago. are made public* for the Hrst time in a medico-lefial report. At the trial of Brian Donald Hume, who was charged with the murder and acquitted, medical experts called hr the prosecution did not explain how Sully could have been rjUbbejd live limes in the chest without fltruggling. An autopsy, carried out _before Cockahutt Plow Earns s /. 75 Per Share Common the trial by IH Francis E Casri|M. .1 H.ii li"--stii'ii pathologist, proved that tho rtab wounds were so elna-cut that Butt? could not have moved his body even a fraction of .in inch while Micy were bcinic dauvoxad, It also showed ihal Sclty's arms had not been pinioned before he wi's killed. .' ..nee disclosed in to-day's report strongly suggests that Setty rn.iv have been in a drunken stupor when he was murdered. 1Y. : %  allied il b.v Hr II S rt-lgrii Scotland Yard's chief I. showed thai Setty had drunk eight dtxablr whtaklea 01 Iheir equivalent in alcohol shortly DOfON no died, Ihe report states. tin' ine pro.eculion's medical i Xpert* did no) ivves) ibis evidence at the iiiiil. The prnseeuiii 'i ii a no! in nut it. They may have ihotight thai ii would not help ther case. The defonce counsel's argument that more than one man must have been involved in Ihe murder befo a Sctty's body was deposited al Hume's flat was not seriously challenged. These facts wore disclosed by I) Camps to a private rnfMttni of doctors, scientists, and barristers, who reconstructed ibe Setly t %  • aftei Ihe trial. Dr Kellh simMSfi. Home On.ce S uthologist, told the mot-ling that i was perturbed that the prosecution did not produce the scient i* ivulence of Sclty's drunken rjute at th<. trial. "When enough alcohol had ben i in n.vri .-.I to .... ,i pei ftt ly good an<| acceptable explanalion lo the opinions of both sides, It was difficult to understand why .uch evidence was not produced." h* said Hume admitted dropping Solly's torso into Ihe sea from an .' ropiaiie. .md pleaded guilty 0 being an accessory after the fact He was sentenced to 12 years' imprisonment. 'Who killed Setty and the circumstances in which H occurred must remain a matter for speculalion." Dr. Camps told the meet, ml The additional evidence would only have shown how those responsible fin the murder were able to do it without causing a atiuggle. Precaution -d> ANKlWtROENCY system of send if if out Il.B.C, broadcasts ugh Ihe telephone wires instead of over the air Is being •nsidered by the Defence Mm-. try. my might be able to use; signalfrom ordinary transit means of guiding in long-range rocket missiles. Seven for Speed ^ MONT stvi'ii.year-old girls can run as fast as most women, soys Swedish scientist Dr. P. O Astrand. who has timed 110 i tinning females varying in age from four to 30.—L.K.8. Hrilish Ming 70 lX>NDON. The modern British mis*—girls born in IBM — can expect to liv. until 70 Mars of age or over. Hut If they marry British hoys born this year, they are likely to rictowed, for the life cxpeclaU of i.,ys is only 6fl years. Airthonty for this forecast Iins Ilnlish Registrar Of port for 19M which said thai Ihe exact age which the average girl can expect to reach Is "063 years, and for the averag.. bov J 66 01 years. The report estimated that the total population of England and Walo in 1&50 wa* 44.137.000 and' added that this figure should increase to 46.608.000 by IW0. —INS batting average* for Wogtwrn m the Currtij CUp n will the**) retnaln to be seen -.ourse's greatest requiremen! before making the gtoventti ••hoice The need for an additional fast bowler would sec the vote going to Melle Another Hatsman would pave the way fOf i couple of youngsters, 21-yearthe only lefthand batsman in the side, or 22 Ml Clew, an opening batsman who bel hittmg the ball hard and often Fin.illy, not to be dismissed lightly, are th.chances of Frank Mansell. who was bOTD in England and last season captained Rhone ig a line all-rounder and some consider him to %  *. South Africa's best leg-splnner room for Mbut one thing is assured lake %  mg teams before U*em, Africans will IHassured of a good welcome whe ri nso\ \J # p..blir rr hrra) B"ATH*ITT iv i *>l hokl .... i|ii. 's,^', '&v x$vz Mai SS -AHAr.l \ . '-.I.ilrd to 111. May. AOrlaKlo Mat. Mrlbotirnr Stn Ma*. HtiUv.i-. IOUI Junr. Sygary Sard Ju" al Trinidad during laitor hail sf and priwrnllna tin i aitd branp lo addilion to grnrial rgo ihl. vraarl hai an.plr -,..r lur I hard frootn cargo Cargo o.-pml un llumi* lulling for lrairll| BH Brltlah Uulan.. IilO U V CACIQUE III areapf Cargn %  %  Or) CAKnM inb mm 1 iir-aa.-4*rooi,: >.v,r.l.> U V i .no a. Ai and SI CARt Kill. .. u s. •Hi oreopt i. i Dot** %  arrrat. NovH og Friday 4th J aj Lward and Wnvdoaid fgr further pailirulara aj.p'i ruamaa WITHY a co Lid iff i-oarA a CO i TII. nnincr-1 A gl\a>rtist TOWN HARMAn-lS. OW1 "!>' llr B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNI Its ASSOC. INC. Tele. 4047. ll Pays V-ewA AicOCV ^amAhip Co. NEW YORK %  i:\lie NEW OUofaANl SERVICE SoiWd IBiii A i %  l*Ttv .. %  .1... m Hu llh 1.1 Junr in inn. II *-u CANADIAN SIKVICC Sail. M. ..I...I Consolidated net earnings I t^.nJ^.i'lii. equal to Bfi.lO P< II-II. m reported by CocKshu now Company for the n.u Mai .11, IK >!' I %  ll.l'.ll f,l Wll >.'iii'u.ui3 or Jl H4 per share I. ihe previous fiscal year. Tn latest year's net profit is show afler transfer of 7aU.IHHI to rescrv :or doubtful accounts (again* si.000,000 to inventory raservi n... year) and after deduct tn deferred income on sales (h SI, 175.0S5 lo dealers. Tils Ulttol item represents unearned income %  n sales to dealers and, as profits .it not recorded until payim-m iiaa been received, these defeinu profits will be realized as goodi are delivered by the dealer to T> customer and settlement M re colved by the company Sup ply of farm Implements exceeded un.tuner demand and. In view ol increased competition, it m I deemed prudent to have addition.d •UK'k. in ihe hands of ih t deti.'i II ii ihis has Btibotairt.il i, i. i.i ,n emmrn en and an additional amount nl S7D0.OOO was provided as a leseivt against possible future losses 0l S2.2M..000 against inventories is eoimldcred sulllcient at thf pre SffJt time Working capital of SI7,nMl.0.S i i.t. HIT 31 last compare* wit' 14.267,648 a year ago Account! i.. eiv.ii.lt> are up front $I.123.?2H in S.V8I5.082. Earned M'tpho. afler dividend payments ol $862,222. totals $3,067,506 i OefalOII Cockshutt. Presiilent states thai sales showed a reduction. This applies to Canada as well as export countries and If largely attributable to the fact that mincetions established miring a buyer's market had 10 Mielr organizations t., %  ellcr', miukel ITospecta lor 1S5I from the viewpoint of demand, are reasonably encouraging. Thi pany has budgeted for the same volume In 1051 as In 1050 frcltn that anv loss In civilian husinemight be made up In defem work %  SS "ALCOA 1" %  %  a AIX'ilA I'lONCEH" .S 'I.HKI III l<\ MiillTI. April rrui May lltu May Wi A; nl %  i, ES May Slh May Mlh turn :tn .OltlhniMi (a "FULKE IlKRMAIHlTll it„r Ai.nl Kit' %  ., S, J .hn and Monti Ml. ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND C.CI.F SERVICE. ArPLV;—DA COSTA •% CO.. LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE '.llilStJSWS^WMi', West Indian & British .v////y////y,-*;cv/^v>yx,'. ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS, i nuns. II Ul I S New Shipmrni opened THANI'S "at Al l'i I.. thai riinn.il itc nin.il.il OALVAMEtS SIIKKTS— t;li.. Hi., Hit. lit. 10 it. ALUMINUM SHEETS — tilt., 711.. Mi Ml., 10(1., 11(1.. 12(1. KVKRITK KIIIXTS— Ml., 7(1.. Ml., 9(1., 1011. ALUMINUM GITTTEBING RH) C'KIIAK SIIINCI.KS KUIIKIIOID MINKKAL SUKFAC'KII KOOFING 3f. Wide II" U \a$r! 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PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIII'KSDAV. MAY 3. 1*51 West Africa Wants W.I. Athlete Baile) Offered Coaching Appoinlmenl In Nigeria I 'rum Our Own Correspondent The receni tour of West Africa undertaken by those two great Waal Indian athletes, Arthur Wint and McDonald Bade, WM 100% success. So much so that invitation's have been extended to McDonald Bailey to underlakia full-time coaching appointment in Nigeria. tlcoked to see Wint afid Balkj ntnmiiK in Accra and Lagos and there can br no doubt thai the ncuiv awakened intetiii In athletics in Wen AMei was cumi denihly stimulated by their LnMNto there has beer. alk of enterini Nigeria in the lOM Helsinki Olympic, nnd it is U .it thr rWt of the** two IHrleMt athletes will mult In definite action along these lints ifcefj Arthur Wiit was only able to remain In West Africa f"r one weak, because of his iu McDonald Bailey remained 101 ; %  further seven days during which lie lectured to schools and youth dubs. A Quettbm One question which he repeataaUf hud to answer wa why mm Wint hud only managed to run the 440 yards in SO second.-I second nice in the n'lony. The answer, which Mac ... was that Arthur felt a -Unlit muscular twinge and, not wanting to aggravate a former trouble, he decided not to i\f / Qj?#] '''l OttJ Ev.-n so he was well iJrf M *7lMlr ahead oi the rest of the field when %  ^ lie broke the winning tape. In both his 100 yards even1 i'ley returned 9.9 seconds Thi*. uuj it wag his first outing f ihe season, was a particularly i'.ood perfoiTnancc and augurs wH for his chances of retaining big A.A A. Championships later nan Mac himself was very pleased results but l\ VH.IIII A GOLF IN 1951 Tennis Results I'usl Heal Present SPORTS WINDOW rooiKM I Si.ru. %  •*< KanMiwluii Ihla rvtwm Hut niviuon WIN Spartan mat it" i. S w tha Hm tram P ll Ihr %  .!"> %  UI m,i. M -: aarnaa 1ID ant*, Ni.trr P. • Ihn iiovd ihowlnj inamu a sy j oi nvm m ,t...pK>i of Tha rrhaa awnt BUI •hnuMj l*> %  eniHl MM SM>IMMil. TJS RV-I.I1 It M 1in.I.I,... I MILS vJSRS al \l I 11 Cricketers 1950 4 W.I. In Hiihways and Transport Sports Harrison College Old Boys Club began iheir series of Lawn defeated Harrison College by 31 Tnni% games against police at the goals to 17 In their Basketball Central Police Station yeaterdav game at the Y.M.PC. grounds .„„aa „., evening. last night. Bg i i i i l: mill.Th. rMU u m „ fo |iow Britain s Amateur Coir is aaain Suot. E B Cant and lnspecto,In tne ,ner *ame of the night to the Tesfon May lllh B Kmg M points behind They rei forthcoming season and open wide the dm Slon with their selection of the best erlCftMara -if the year. Such a pattern has lieen fallawed by the Editor of Ihe Plarfaii Cricket Annual whoae elevei cricketers of 1950 include fou' gtaaabert nf the vteta lo i Wi Indies touring team and hvo brorn the Lana^hirc the Cl.ampionship. His selected XI U Ramadluu, Valentine Worrell, Weekes. (Wesi Indiesl. Grieves and Tattersall (Lancashire). Evans nui Wrlfh) (Kent), Fishlock (Surrey). Parkhouse (Glamorgan), mil (Sussex and Cambridge). I.ONDON. May 2 first class cricket Lords: MC( v Yorkshire (non-county match, feaw he had a bad scare in his abandoned as draw. No play dm hen he failed lo to rain. M.C.C. first innings 4i: ike a vood start anj) found himfor seven declared. Yi .If three yards behind the local fits! innings 218 all out favouriui with onl) tony yards to innings 38 for one o, Only n sensational finishing At Oxford. Oxford University i urat enabled him to break tin vs. Lancashire (non-county tape Aral, match), Lancashire won by an "I Just had to win that race innings and 158 runs. 1-ancashi^ what would the local crowd firat innings. 408 for Ibree ami THIS PICTURE taken during their recent vl-it to West Africa, shows McDonald Bailey and Arthur Wint with Mr. J. R. Bunting (extreme ri(bt) who managed the 1918 Jamaican Olympic Games Team. Mr. Bunting >* now chairman of the Nigeria A A A Standing between Wint and Bailey It the May or of Lagos and on the loft of Wint 1* the deputy Mayor. The other person in the photograph (extre Die left) is a maatar at King's College. Lagos. UncashiH Beats HOOD TIPS TURPIN Oxford University TO BEAT 'SUGAR' CAN IT BE that Dave Sands—due in England on May B —is superstitious ? Sands, who is scheduled to defend his -snrd f *r n P ,r mWd ^-weiht title aRjiinst Randolph Turpin at the .Vhitc City. Ixmdon, on Juno 6, is Roing to train at Newcastleon-Tyne for Ihe fight. generally speaking the Americans Dave i.mned supreme. Many excuses have bceyi put forward to account for the superiority of the Americans — which dates back to pre-war days. The mo^t widely offered in recent years has been that British golfers hnve not had sufficient practice But while that might have bald good in 1947 gnd awn 1949 it cannot be applied any linger It is perfectly true that because of geographical conditions the Americans dldn'i lose as much "gollinif-time" as we did during the war but we have had six years since in which to put matters to right. Explanation I think probably ihe mosi satisfactory explanation of America'sgolfing superiority and certainly the most realistic Is that offered by former Walker Cup player L. G. Crawley who Is now one of the Walker Cup Selectors. Writing in the new Playfair Golf Annual for 1951 (Playfair Books Ltd., 57 Haymarket. London S W.I., price 5s) he deals at length with this particular subject. He points out that for one thing there are far more golfers in America than in this country. He liken.' America to the young brother which has grown uo into u Colossus from the small and frail infant to whom the game was taught. As one example he quotes the entry figures for the Kngllsh Amateur Championship which are normally between 200 ..iid 250 and likens them to those /or the American amateur which range from upward* of twelve Bt'ENOS AIMS: A 19-yearold Argentinian and j 42-year-old Spaniard recently worked nonstop for 98 hours, with only -i 15-mlnute pause in every four hours They wanted to set up I vor't and production record at Central ihe lOOhour mark, but collapsed before reaching it. ollce Station on Wednesday next. I FEU ENDS* liverstty firs' Second Peter Wilson brln B you a great ex champion's opinion of a great rn-MMlnjr Newcastle (Norlhu... champion ber:and) for a training spell— hundred -^! . . although I must say it eludes me ">'* where he trained for his Locke, the Australian ha 8 accept buccessnil assault on the Empire cd another 144 moles match (tonal, mo. title which he won another {1,5001 in his own eounome ll months ago by knockinp fry i„ October. out Randolph's brother Dick l.i the ilrsl round. • • Bui there's an additional senJobs we wouldn't like iimental tic about Newcastle for referceing the Rugger interim Curtis Cup and occasionally we Sands He has had over 50 per Uonal between Italy and Spain at .hall be thrilled and proud of .. beaten 2-1 b> SuiWX vs Hampshire tw "; ; cent, of his rights In the town of Milan next month. . T.E. mother Cotten, another Tolley or *„..!,? I A • s 7 ,n<1 ineiuily match uhlch wun ficwemnit, which Is 100 mile? Priest, the old Surrey player, ha. ;n other Miss Wethered. But, over '"'• today %  t.W "JSJftff north-east of Sydney. Australia, taken It on. he years, the weight of numbers %  thought"' ha addad Empire Beat Everlon 2-1 cd, Oxford L'n innings all out innings all out 106 At Nottingham. Nottil thire vs. Leicestershire, a IWI dav friendly match due to con elude, was abandoned. No play was possible on either day. Close of |.langhart Says Crawley: "1 believe that in years to come, as In the past, we shall be compelled to bow to the superiority of American goliand more often perhaps to American teams than American individuals. From time lo time we shall win a Walker, a Ryder or Innings all out 283. Sussex to Uni Everton -. Harkliffe a "" S Karpar u nd H. Norvilie St. Leonards. %  lulr S Senle kicked in the Referee: Mr. C. E. Jemmott. line,, go;il fms had many opportunities u w)u< apart from his effortB In Aua: ri inor '' "nals. About tee tralia. which tour is not t,.ke'i int^. miltutai nfter play in the 11 iM account in ihe selection Of .(even llu,f h <"* %  birted. Nnrville on the Ien wing for Empire toe-punched the ball In the right comer if the barn giving the Fveitnn (ustodian no chance lo brinu nil There must be tome reason for What's On Today cricketers of 195it, wai tcp wlrket-takcr against the West lndiei. And 1 feel tQUally certain thai there are many Watt bad feel Ibat Alan KM ll \<.uthy ol .i plaoe, peaaibty e'a al in Of one of his four c!| %  | | leagues. But if i,.ie cannot cli a pi; h> tat grvefl his fair share of Ctedlt in the section devoted lo the review of the tow Abotlt three iiuiiute< gftar tiic drat goal. Bafaraa Graham nwarded n |>enuliy against natea In their .,, JnttnJS'iD i5£ka? Licking the ball ..ut of UV of Nurse who hardly nuMUs I %  %  Half time found the MDn l1 2— 6 in Empire's favour. Aftti hall ttnie Bvarton made Mlronger to KOra and these gflorU %  M ihem chances but their kicking was fnr from rccuratc About live nunutev bafora UM bun* off) Baala scored foi fcwci 1 I '" %  ton from I panalty ai one of Uiv Empire backs handled the hall in their area The learns were: — (mplre: Robinson. Jnrd.m, %  iLirke. Rudder. Wilson. Mcrris. Haynes. Smith. HariK-r and Norvilie. I'.vrrton: Nurse. Culpeppor waaki scde. Archar, Fowler. HBtdai Sealy, Olton. Went anil rtaynai "No Wait greater conlnbutL ii to the winnlngof the RubbM than ihe rOVll .v "Hll worth to the -id,really cannot be over-en With his moat equable temperament and uUerll un eliish spirit. he MW what his ro;.n* and played il to Ihe hilt The review concludi knowledge of the gar.-.balanced judgement must mark him oui |g a potantlal West Indies clptam." Playfair Books. Ltd.. 17 llaimai ket London SHI Price 3 fid Rugby Results LONDON. May 1 Results of Rugby names playcii Monday in the United K-ngdom follow: Rugby Union: Briiigewater and Alb. MM i; Wi 8. Cross Keys 3. Neath 0. Polityat the A WAVECREST HURT irtom Our Own Corr—oendenli PORT OF SPAIN. MM 1 Wavecrcat, 4-year old colt, has .oi Injury durlni exer iot expected to race Creole meeting. F I>ool 3. Newport IS Hedruth IS. Ilui meeting, horses are hard :•! Kalmouth ii St. Ivcj :?. Pontypi i ; T, My Babu, I>-p On 6. Torquay Athletic C. Swanaaa 11. nod Dtapotoa turned out outRugby League: Oldnam 3fi. Roch .vtanding gallops on 5un rroming PresenUtlon to Mi— Yvonne Padmore at \merlean ton-ulale—10.00 am Police Courts—10.08 a m Sale of Mr* Theresa u i I. in furniture at "The Bower". Harrison I Messrs. riranker. Trtitman & Co.) —11.30 am Meetim St Michael's Vestry —1.M pm Meetim of Alllanee Kran. raise at British Council— K IS p.m Dfl M Aaae eje laratrev.. gasMM 1 I Mr rllilni in.. Oraei The Weather TO. IIA V Sun Rises : 8.44 am Sun Seta: 6.10 %  m Monn (New) May I Lighting : 7 08 p.m High Water: LSI a.m.. 2.3 p.m YESTERDAY Rainfall (Codrlnglon) .03 in. Total t i = r Month to Yesterday: 04 Ui Temperature (Max ) M & "F Temperature b (3 pm ) 28 841 ^ HE/f you'tL Y HA/E TO T/K£ DOM S0f/E CF TWE FENCE SO'S I CAH UULOAO THIS MERE They'll I)o li livery Time •• %  By Jimmy Hatlo 'Unfair Notice in the programme of the Turpln-Billy Brown light" reads: — "It was typical of the QUNMSg I^ridon Impresario" (Jack Solo mons) "that, when approached about switching the Randolph Turpin-Billy Brown contest to Birmingham he gave the matter iiis urgent and i>ympathetii sidcrntion." Having Man thli "epic'. I think It's thoroughly unfair to say that it's typical of Solomons to have switched n as far 8W8) IMW Ixindon as possible! Hain't ho any sympathy 'or Brum' Ptmchinu Power Opinion of Jack Hood, one %  ,' Ihe greatest welter weight chainpion* ever produced. In Draal Britain: — "Two years ago I ber.ui d. think Turpin would lift I wortO? I Title; now I'm certain it would j IKunwise to hurry him in with 'Sugar' Ray Robinson, hut Tini pin would beat him—of that Viu i certain. Tuiiiin punches hard, very I hard. His punchlnji power should beat Rooliuton**! speed and BIUH I gy. Joe is Unwise The sad an go of thman who t as 0008 "'•' world's mightiest heavy-weight goo* on. Yestcrda;. Joe Louis said he would give ui bigtlnw" boxing unless JCrj-.m: Charles gives him aimlhei ih:,n. to win back the championship by thli autumn. But that doesn't mean he'll quit the ring. He can't afford to. What it does mean ll that Uie M spertll v 1 world may see the old tM engaging i n a scries of bread and imtter" Iwiuts against secoiulraters. Louis has been in hospital with a bad cold, but expects to be able to meet the Cuban Omell i Agra monte—whom he outpointed lit >* Kebrunrv—m a fortnight* time at Detroit "Winning the title means even. thing to me." Mid Louis, "bn*. I'm not getting any younger" Or any wiser, alas. For at 87—Ins Ke next month—what chance carr he %  >L'i i hnvV To Meet Aenln What a glutton for punishmen' golfer Nonnan von Ntda nmit iK-. After losing II and V to bottb; ..._ yea 1 alone must ensure American supremacy." However unpalatable this may be to Britain's golf enthusiasts, it has to be recognised as conta' mg a wealth of wisdom. And equally wisely does Crawley deal with the question of professional golf in this country. He The eighth regatta of the 1051 says that the war began as one cacon will be sailed in Larlislti generation of professionals began onBay on Saturday under the to decline and that for six years auspices of the Royal Barbados there were no new recruiti. Since Regatta On Saturday w e v.-ant you people who are just tike your next-door neighbours. Fri. 8.30 to Tues. live Every Warm, Wonderful Seep of the way Id climb the Highest Mour SUSAM IMmtD %  UUIIMMM "rt^ %  ""coT, -.AlcUNOER KNOt 2ft \'.-.','.'.'.: -,*, V////*V/AV//VMV//////^/T>WV///WV Yacht Club. Starting times are as follow-: — ft — N Yacht Slarl ut rial a ,.. IS 8*8 ii Sr.ilillil 311 VsMse b D II S.B He.l ': %  BJHOH 1.34 Tettae II 3 Rwl B S Flirt %  -i Vflto %  1 411 IU i I ianun2.311 ncd Ii iai *"t~ li Buwanesr ii..i ll %  Ma; | ias Vllo* I) 1 Ohv* Blow. ,.. ui %  eg Ii T Buaaa Ml VeHes Ii n I H&rhW ?.1 Real D !.,. %  \ 944 • 1 1 1 S HtM V-<-*\ %  34S M 1 ,; l TeUesi '* II Mfcgwki % %  Bwl 1 I ii ii %  gru Dawn I* reUi ^ K t %  CoiTlVt % %  aw Red 1 IS I III 1.. in Trlto* C ntUa IS) I...,i 0 K K 11 R nB i. r 1 3S4 rM .I p.+%\ GRUNK&SKAFTER £L$L. SKUNK&GRAFTER* WwUm REEK-4.FELIZWWI, MAHA3ER. 5' contribution from Sir Guy Campbell, for which alone it b worth obtaining. Sir Guy, one Of the most famoui of all golf architects has "laic out" ihe best ever course compiled from famous holes in various parts of the country. Each hoi Is in Its proper place In regard to its home course and each I' arranged so that there is no more \. '! % %  lhan the normal amount of walk lug from green to tee box. Hi has taken six holes from Si An rirewi (Old Course), three from licylnke. three from Royal St George's (Sandwich), and one each from Portmarnock. Muirtleld, bes* Deal. Prestwick. Westward Ho and Carnoustie. A "walk"" around such a course is an entertainment in itself. J&R ENRICHED BREAD Till: FOOTBALLER** mOICK Thi Medicated Skin Cream Soothes and Heslt EVERY SLICE IS A SLICE OF STRENGTH BEST IN FLAVOUR &f BEST IN TEXTURE BEST IN NUTRITION o.xci: ir.i/v AVAMLAmLm... "NOXZBMA" Your Favourite Stan Cream prevents SUNBURN Skin Irnlations "NOXZFMA" allow* >.HI to enjoy your Holidays, or Weekends without Fear or Worry ahooi Sunburn. Remember it. NOXZFMATht Medimtfa ( rt m >n thr -little Blue ImT in Three 5i< I , 7/9. and 5/6 per far Ohtalnable at BOOKERS (Barbados^ DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. Haatinaa 7we pnouu*£uni We hire thei in all sizes f.ir Ladies. c.enU and Little Children. The ideil shoe foe wear In any kind of sport, or for ordinary wear when you are relaxlnc Worn bi rhamploim in every fame. CAVE SHEPHERD &. Co, Ltd. 10-13 Broad Si. $1.91 $2.13 $2.40 $6.22 I'IK.II. 1207 for Ferrocrete ravid-hardeain? Cement in 375 lb. Drums Snowcrete White Cement in 373 lb. Drums Colorerete Cement IBWW in 375 lb. Drums l!l Ii in 375 lb. Drums Everite Asktslos-Onrnl (orraflilfd Sheets 6 ll.. 7 ft. 8 It.. 9 It. Ill ll. Unglhs Everite Trafford Tiles fi It. and K ll. lengths. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.



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Till KSDAV. MAV 1, 1UI IIAKKUMIS AIIMM Ml Sketches Led To Amateur Theatricals MR C. A. GROSSMITH, Administrative Secretary of the Development and Welfare Organisation who is produt mtt Bernard Mr.w's Pygmalion it ihe British Council's Thettrc, Wakefield House, has had a great deal of dramatic work in an unusual variety of cir%  i In an Interview at Hastings Mtarday, he told tne W\wik thai though he was not closely connected with the fimous theatrical family ot the Uroaarnith*, there u.i some alight relationship. and perhtps, enough of their blood (lowed m his veins to account for the interest in the theatre he had felt all his tin • He >al th it ho developed a taste lor amateur acting when, with a few of the officer* of his battalion of the East Lancashire Hcjtlnient in Mesopotimia at til* end of World War I. they tried to CUM the boredom of the troops waiting for demobilization with home made sketches. After that, he was working in Germany for some years and took the ppaortu nity to study German literature and the drama in Berlin French, German Plays On hi 9 return to England In ISM he joined a small private circle of friends for play readings in French and German—which ''.was. great fun. In the very early thirties, the Colonial Office started an Amateur Dramatic Society, and for about ten years. Ihey put on %  series of plays, some of which lie produced The Socictv produced Comedies Of ..!*" .'"* Shakespoare. pfcyi by Goldsmith and Sheridan, modern drama and PACE I IM: SIOI'I S TO Kill \K KASI IM. Ill I OKI! UROSSMITH Threatening IA'IUTH Receivetl T in: POI.UK %  iviiorl Iron. M"Jrie Hard, me ol Pool. St John who >ltud 0rlr d au |, no | ihrillor. mat >h received two letter! lira.. Tnc Uv5 „„, —rformed 'unknown person demanding nosp i la j. Larceny Case Dismissed %  hur> Hill. Christ Church with KM BC clothing £' 19. 4. and the prowrt] ol Emmanuel Ishmael, wai %  without |>rr,udice I>\ %  Murrell prosecuted for Ihe Police while Greet %  i-nmael told thi court that he left Green in mi (,!.,,,. ,.„ hp morn ing of Acnl 24 and when tir returned he found that a pair of i>ant, and a shirt were missing f later he saw Green Mi shlrl and he reported witness nnmii, thai she saw the defendant with .. parcel under tnv arm on April M Whei him he was coming out of tn .compiamanfs house. She could what was tn the parcel Aflat rtrrtewini nil the ealdanta Use MuutraU said that then was n his mind and as that I the benefit of llu ubt $20 by threat One letter was received on April 21 and the other on April 27. O NE WAV TRAFFIC system, which bat bain in use in the City for many months, is now extended to Fairchild Street. Hand carts enn go In any direction, but id working men's clubs, winding up with three ur lour pub lie performances. Shakespeare played in curtain %  tli an aldrayi well received. but sometimes there were snaps. One small club in North London instance, when they THE NAME of Uus man Is given as Bobby, and he Is two In hi. %  peclally oonatmcUd gi cabin at JoachtnUUialer Plan Berlin he started An hi* foodies-, marathon He hopes to set up %  new record of fifty days without food Twenty avc years ago he -vel up a record Uy going without food for 46 days —Ea-pre !" nd horse-drawn vehicles play*n the Taming motor and cyclists must obey the one way trafltc Bhffl Shrew," very a painted ck Of the ndly gave I hem sheet portraying Board Of Health Want Public Health Act Amend.ioItv brakeg The offence wag committed on Mi*r-h 14 while he was driving %  long Arthur Hi> 1 It I Mi t ic prosecuted for Ihe P. .lice. lor A Farnum of Highways and Transport, said thnt he examined Ihe brakes of the true!:o>r for the current quarter due *o non-payment of rates. Me said that water rates should advance during the first ten days of the quarter. Thev were Ruccrt Doyle of Reminder notices are put In the Roebuck Street. St Michael and newspapers about the end of the Yegrwond of Branchbury. second month and during the last Si Joseph quarter. 2.000 personal remindei Doyle was ordered to pav a notices were issued tn the thirci fine of 20/In 14 days or one month. month's imprisonment and YearIt is only after this has bce> wood 10'in seven davs or done and the rates not paid that seven tUY*' imprisonment. Doyle the Department send out rcprewafc the conductor of the bus sentaUves to shut off the water. M—1433 on Harmony Road. St The Waterworks Department hM Michael, at about 3.55 p.m. oi. no wish to couse inconvenience IB when the policeman on to people, but water rates must duty stopped the bus and counted be paid d4 passenger. If a new tenant falls to notify Yearwood's bus was carrving 33 the Waterworks of his tenancy passengers when It was stopped, naturally, the Department would The Magistrate told both conduchave no knowledge of his occup*tors thai the overloading of buses tlon of the building and water %  randaaj aary prevalent and would no; be available he hoped that it would stop. turned in by request. division and sole in lot • %  174.240 square feet of land al LodffC Plantation. 81 by Mr. H. R. Farmer Permission was granted Mutchlnson 4 Bandeld. Sola. tors, to amend the plan an' stdement in connection with thThe motor vessel Canadian 1-rop.^ls for the jttvttoa, and molasses and rum for huXXm ^j^^^tcSStlS^AS^' She has loaded 600 tons of Al |r y nt fugar for Montreal, over 1,000 puncheons, barrels and halfYACHT ON DOCK barrels of molasses for Charlottetown. Quebec. St. John and HahThe pleasure jachi Maria fax and a quantity of rum Catkartna was on dry ck The Challenger is sailing lo terday She lo *M Canada via St Lucia. Her agents about four days on dock Waet are Messis. Gardiner Austin & she comes off. she will I %  Co., Ltd. ready to sail to Grenada. Dock vraritOTa were removing moss and seaweeds from baa ' torn yesterday. She will be paint ed and will undergo other minor lepalrs. Rosetta Sails The W orld In ir,f|. Bout FTom FRANK OWEN BUENOS AIRES. Fndnv ITa muddy, leafy creek of Uu, Rlier Plate a 45-foot Australia., Wgjtilng Matilda, sailed bv IBJ men and a girl. mad. ready to put to sea on tho second i' of ihe Voyage round Ihe world Ihe lu-sl stage en den s.ifel. ;• %  i.tK when the Waltziilg Miililda dipped her flag to the e capital and rolled up the River Plate after a llve-inoiuh trip across the South Pacific from Sydney to Cape Horn. I now for Montevideo Rio de Janeiro, Pcrnambuco and before the gales break.' said the skipper, Roy Davenport tall, tough, blue-eyed ex-R A F >ir pilot, as the cutter lay hauled up for a refit. Than we head for New York, and after lhal for Bonnie BCOC< land and Metric England" Don*) tergal anjOUt France." nid dark-eyed, dark*halred 11| li %  %  i n ^^ %  cut Roaetta Jean hit yeung wife, in bU*botUam pants All in K.\ h Tie other two of th c crew, 'the boys," skipper Roy calls (hem. anhis younger brother Keith and Omald Brown. All thre,. %  arvad m the R A F al d nnCi lluwai (toy and Hoti have flown In civil airlines. Mrs. Davenport was a hostess li Qantas Airways, flying weekly in Ihe I-ondonSydney route Keith has been a reporter in Australia and Britain, and he is keeping a lively log of his present assignment. Walt/ing Matilda is a strong trim craft. She was built ostensibly for < < cm racing hut I always had th.it old schoolboy dream that 1 ->''.! i ^.1 ..nil see the world In her." s"Td skipper Roy. He fared her for two years between Sydney ana Tasmania Then ih,. advanturera set forth i %  %  Hie trot Id It was October 29 when thev left Sydney for Amkland. New Zealand It took them 17 day-;. and they spent a month or more there. 44 days Then they headed for the South Pacific, and for 44 days they W another sail, hardly • %  oil I, and only n whale in all that %  Ulnf waste ol -1 i ag nude lhaii landfall on the rocky coast of Chile at Gulfo dc Panaa, Then they iail<-d socth towards ( p> Horn, but heavy storms per%  uaded tbam t<> seek the route li the South Atlantic by way of the Magellan Strait*. It was dlrtv enough In there." %  aid Don Brown. "We would anchor at nightfall, and all would b peaceful and calm. Then suddenly the winds they calls 'williwaws' rose llko a squall atu' blew at 50 miles an hour down aep funnel-hke channels' The adventurers plan lo sail up Ldndon River In September. I hope aa get the flags out \WttHw tn/t V\. SHOPS ARE CUTTING PRICES NEW YORK For the umpteenth time th* II and business trend predictors' have at! been caught flat-footed-and this time it mean good news for "the consumer' (meaning Ihe min in the street I In what the normally sfik Wall street Journal gleeful!v da scribes as "a swltcheroo the tun, h.iv changed almost overnight n Washington Until the atfaar ,i l] Hal t.lk iDgtooni --h,.it.i,:,dtanpaesu nj goods, higher prices Now everyone '* aaylnaj ; a re im the u.i\ ,i %  ill over this l>ig counUrj U are proving It with cut prtt sales. Storks of goods on hand .t enormous. Estimated busme> Inventories >tood at a recur05.100 million dollars | the en< of February -up 13.000 n.illio. dollars over a year ago MBS josr.ni Tiru \ ten. Massachusetts. complaUWd I Judge Jaeota Le\. itn i:.,: :, husband was hilling | | Said Mi Tutali indicnantij "Nonsense. onc ( | gave t dollar wreith (of her aunl funeral Said the )udge N, W ouy groceries with n.iw.^ei baautlrui li SOMFTHIM; odd > %  tUsppdatfhj to America's night lif. Whil.. u < expensi\ places and ill doll .r a. aeat night rJuna eport ;( roarim bui ln oai. the che i| ... Ing In beer and Inkg M lasifulafa Anthony Antravariolo, bos* ol the Chicago Tavern Owner* Association aucetnetie has done us dirt THE G Is in Korea M ill aoOB U< latttng then hnn and agaa all li DM tO Al \ Iw %  %  Ne Ihey are busy turniiig oul the fa >lupniem 'A ..: %  ,, aie not powdcrc v.ll. I.rl bltlM. Km..* f llo Ihli t i,„„. %  .1,, (,., || J,., c Thi. .l*ii..o.in*an' l o*crwork %  %  tiiiciy — you ft really f>M ni diy. Maralyn NO NEED TO ADD MILK OR SUG.'.R A lOVniL QUALITY PRODUCT Canadians l|>) Over Tirade BUIUIH'C With ll.W.I. MONTItKAl. M I %  %  in exporlcrM rue in happy about the unfa trade balance uctwri n Canada aiMl Ihe British We-,t Indies, .1 C M' I > %  %  %  lunajjai of tht ( anadlan i:i->rters' Assoclati ><, tol the Montreal Servirr Club BOM iv the United Km: (linn were reeportalble for this unfavourable picture, be sale Laai year's imports from the WK! Indies exceeded bv S3~.0• ate %  favourabli trade ulino.plnio unh the Island!) have not been too well rewarded L A Y E 1\ A we ,H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.-Dutributor.. Trading Co. lias sim.ono Profit YAMS SELL SLOWLY Land owners who have planted yams are finding difficulty in gelling them old. the Director of Agriculture. Mr C. C. Skeete. told the Advocate yesterday. Housewives do not seem very keen on including much yam in their food and so vegetable dealers are not buying many The Director said that if th? yams remain m the ground too long they will sprout again. until COLLISION Shortly after 10 10 a.m. yfterday. Ihe motor lorry. 0.145. owned and driven by Joseph Koilnian of Church Village. St Joai ph. was involved In an accident Kraal near the Fire Hrigade Station artta the bicvclc M.1040 < ,ev Beckle. of Bank Hall. St MlThe frm; wheel of the bicycle wa< extensively damaged. Travelling Bank Doe* Good Business The Travelling Office of tho Tit Savings Bank com* tenth weekly visit to the various sugar estates In thc island yesterday. Business done for the week showed that there were 7t depositof which 13 were new accounts and the amount of money collected was $2,701.12. Latrine Wanted In Bus Stand II Is now more than six months that the bus stand has been re. moved to Probyn Street. No 1st rine has been erected al any place i.ear the bus stand The bus con. ductor* and drivers complain be c."use none is nearby and say that one would be very convenient Some told the Advocate yestcr day that a lalrine would be especially useful to them as they hrve to be about there regularly. Besides, many people have to wait atout there to catch thetr buses The Board of Dtrectori of thBarbados Shipping and Trndinv Company, in their Annn.i' ssefMrL presented ;it yesterday' Annual Ordln.n'. Cem-ral MVi hoi of tho Companj Prince: William Henry Street, shower thai the not profit for thp ye.,. WIIH S1B38MG0. The belanee brougni torwaro Ihe report sUHad. an i |lDaJaa.4S so that the total available tut dMrlbutkir Wat $346.18805 Mr. I) A. U la s. .'h Mi (i II King, members of ihe Board of Director-., who wei retiring unrirr article 83 ot tn%  Articles of Association, wer re-elected yesterday. The Board of Directors Is a followsMr. J. H. Wilklnw. • Chairman); Mr fieorge S Mai: ning. fVice Chnirman), Mr M. Manning, Mr c. w. %  l. Hon it. Challen MLC. Hun C. DOUII I MI.C. Mi C. II Ki i> tl l/'.n.Hh. Junior. Mr It Bynoe. Mr D, A Lueie-Smitl ThtUireetors recornri %  n ounl .f 1148 I il.nlt with B foil IM BMMM T... DM • fej .,I~.I.I,LJ( Mrr i*i.n'? a The mm t I.att a be plared I* Br-ir,. loi lh rir. l M ..idiine The %  m ol .. S.0l Or. be Kruitr'l lut < donations M Inv dH tt.tt.iti ot Ih.' i 7ne balance of I13.MO /i be irll al the i tlili Account. -.. Mas Supplies are in demand again FOtNTAIN PENS Karh 8V: $1 00: $l.eft: SI.32: and $2 SG atsaasMBH B(M>KS Inrladiac fl.lthmetle with inf|e and dnublr Ihtal Each IBe. PAINT BOXKH— Each *ie. hOr: $I: SHI PENCIL BOXES — Each ex: and Mr. (RAYONS W a: and Me Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd ia, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD nun lots of other I M< nil .1 items USE A KIPPINGILLES BLUE-FLAME STOVE FOR EASY & CLEAN COOKING a A.S.BRYDEN& SONS (BDOS) LTD. AGENTS. i ARDATH CORK TIPPED CIGARETTES O Parkaiea tf Il'i A Ms which ^• are reducing * Oriiinal price la's lc now Ue. o's— $ae .. 32c. ;> Cartom of ''-<"' 'ur i <' O Every elatrrlle luaranlerd In %  aetfeal i ondiiion ; kMi.ins iiRiii sroRis '* s r .*.' r W,*.W r r r *.*.'*'.'S*'*'t'& '.'***'.'*','.*,'.



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i'\i.i inn II Altll \uin \I)M>( V11 Illl'RSnAV, M\\ Qahih QaULnq L ADY WOOD whose home Kngland. hag been In • \ oral months o.i %  • ly -he Hew over bs I'.WIA to spend a few Bha i* a tha Hotel Royal* Lady DM visited Darbudus K in by the .me were Mrs. Jessie I ho lurf been In Tobago Mrt VIMI and Mi. Archie Mcl-ean from Trinidad. U.S. Schooi-teacher M RS GLADYS DICKEHSON Ne York, i* Muring UM W I She arrived baited yr-sierday by B.WJ \ Ui spend two weeks In Barbados. What does Mr*, n do! She is a school OOK out teacher in Brooklyn. What does %  *_ *he say of tha W 1 Tm visit .nn your lovely little Islands" Colonial Attache IjiaiMAiu.K arrival tod a; along with Mr. Jimmy Cozlei and Mr Erskine Lindop is Mr. J Kenneth Thomp. ton, Co Ionia Utache at thi arlttah Embassy! m Washington Mr Thompson is .1 %  • a member of he HnUsh sec. .ion or the Caribj • .. n Commls comV. TEHUY NOLAN Sfwina; Circle IVnny Nolan's Sewing Circle in the Sunday Advocate The first of this aeries starts on May 6lh Mr> Nolan is well known In sewing ircles here Due From U.K. To-day n today from England by he Oaaeagne .-re Mr. and i. Derek navies who have be on the U.K. for the past few nonths. Mr. Davkes is on the naff of the Royal Bank of Canada here. Husband Coming Vfl'S HERBEK. ALXCYNE Interior Decorator M R. DONN BUNN Is interior decorator, hnsne is In California and he h;..>>ccn living in Trinidad on and off for the past six yearn BM law among the passengers coming I i fiom Trinidad yesterday by It W I A Here for a week or ten days. Mr. Bunn is staying ui the Ocean View Hotel. Othi arrival* from Trinidad are M mid Mrs. Alfontn B de I.iir tod their daughter Sandra who .ire spending a week at the Hotel Royal. Mr Isabel MeCn.i and her daughter Janet are at the Camp. St. Lawrence. M. Leah Oonialei-Herrera aerom K aiied them over. They anPre for one month. if* II I.I i.iii> %  {. %  •-kii> ,'£ Fatteninf D UE th I g for elfth t h e Carlbb c a n CommlsSigters -l"a. and her three children Francis. Valerie and CMheruw. ,„ were among the arrivals from ririh? Tr'nidad yesterday by B.W.I.A Her husband is due up at the end of the month East Africa Bound M AJOK STANHOPE BILLYEALD. Police Superintendent from British Guiana, in England. He is spending a quiet holiday there and has made his headquarters in London. Before M RS. CLAIKE HERRERA. her son Mn and her daughter Hoona afirtved from Trinidad vesterday 3>y B.W.I.A. to spend a short holiday staying with Mr. and Mrs~ Cecil Goddard at — ,—.j i> iiu'Jtiiuiv ix ill irt'iuiuii iniuik KraningMB. G.orge Street. „., ur H „, ng „, „,,„,„ G UIMI. he Mr. lierrer. .nri Mt.. GoddgtJ „,,, hll \. lf< wU mak( „ g,,,., holiday vnll to Ens! Africa. Bock From Martinique M R J. BLONDIN. Manager Sam Lord With U.B.O.T. spent The Trinidad Col. Sec. Mrs Blondin Vf AJ. AND MRS ERROI. L. rlartiniquc wtfeBN IvI SEALY are in Barbados honeymoon with their three children for a nollday. They arrived from Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I A. C OMING BACK to the West Innd are staying with Maj. Scaly"* dies shortlv Is Mr P. M, parents. Dr and Mrs. T. E. Sealy ReniaorZ the Colonial Secretary at Welches. Christ Church. of Tnnidad. He has been on leave Mai. Scaly is Supl. of in England and expects to leave U.B.O.Ts field Police Force In for Trinidad in a few days. Point Portln. A MERICA Is making some strange experiments in fattening turkeys and cockerels for the dinner table. A synthetic female sex hormone called Stilboestrol. injected into a voting cockerel, transforms the flesh to mouth-melting tenderness. Mott cockerels aged from six to eight weeks need one tablet injected beneath the skin by implantation. The process meang considerable loss of dignity for the cockerel. It* red comb is quickly lost; so are Its warlike instincts Its early morning crow sinks to a merc squeak. then disappears altogether. Square-Cut Putter B URLY Percy Gillcspie. who is •0. is winning matches on Hendon golf course with a twofoot putter of his own design. It i s shaped like the conventional sideways putter. But the handle is square. That keeps me true on the pin." says Gillespie Maybe this is a hint for you amateur golfers. Air Voiceg W HAT'S new 0.1 tfie radiolady announcers Rcdiffuslon Ltd.. are out to get one . turn on that feminine charm. Incidental Intelligence A MAN'S body is remarkably sensitive. Pat him on tne back and his head swells.—The Gas fia-iii', In die no poll* —L.E.S. \n\ 1 vi i m s 01 PIPA BY THE WAY • • • By BEACHCOMBER T HE report nhout a mouse that grnlurv, tike laving a foundation asked to sign a petition .i,:.iin^t In does sing" will merely alone or oiiffiny the fai*acrou the death penalty: Jf Ic rrux Men prompi j music-lovers lo ask. a nru Toad EmoHosi do.'i not Quo nieisienrs [ assassins roin,in. H •in**" If I miionbrri enter iitlo ehne rhinos, and I a m tnencent. "I in nil for It. 1-et tne :r>'!m,ne S^SS^St. f*" tH " ""iT W^T "," !" < !" ** a ,Md p^lioiwdy wouldsay I was ***" a rr-rtlable Clrupaira u singing. been oas-confairnr pisode liquid hav There ..i. whirh was alleged to sing a song, words and all. Musicians went to bear It, In a house near Uttoxctcr. They could hardly believe their eyes or their ears when, from the little mouth that Just showed through the wainscot, came o_liny. %  .it voice slngtn; night in June." Until .you know anything? The number of rats rescued was great excitement %'* J* "** W *J*gJ*2 from trees by ilrenien In rs ago about a mouse ^'J'""' "'' -W 01 ?, .J'" !" ? this year was (a) 3.498. suoccsled op Miss Slopeorner's .•facment fo the Prttn. Yr$. truly. (Mr$.) Mabel Wharfcstn hi fHwnin/e OOMEONE asks if "he Alphonse Oi lolK-r 641. (b> 1 only rxpli vi when the ventriloquist Has 1. crouching behind a bag of Hurt in an attic, with | niicrophone In his hand. .>/ murh vunnnlation There's no, a pau-n-snop in the Man-. Find one 1/ poll rnn. You can walk baa Jroin Baldoylr races. Bui nor /roni Hie Isle of Man. The Irish song rang In my head whin I read of n man who walked home 230 miles after losing all his money at the races. hoolukatfalli /-'HIEF' KOOLUKATFATTI, the plump niter <>r 17,000,000 Mawgis. arrived at London Airport yesterday. He was met by a Foreign Office official who laughingly greeted him with ChcstcrrmorfeM is not Ihe least of benefits we derive from the dark henrt of Africa The Chief, who learned English from a film unit in Ihc Jambong hinterland, repjted "On your way. ture 1* TQJdy lousy havin' yew-:ill know me-all deep Saouth deep Aaouth Rowdy folks bust da joint wide open" An inlei,*ft.T was %  eM lor. but he failed lo understand wtoal either of Ihetn had been laQfibf about. All this n.ust lie hushed up. Thank you. .Wm. H tiarkxlriiu' B y.\H Mr As on< u-hn sate Councillor ll kt%M Mrs. Cargo, the ie|ntfa-r Ol tha vake uHphlno coni01 our 1947 funfair. I can rouch fir fhc fart rliaf there u as no lerlf,!* either in approach or It was a mere official this 240.38*. (c) 10B.493. 2. Finsburv-pavement was built in 1... 1794, tbl 1894. (c) 1876 3. Who was the lirst Mayor of Oakham? 4. In East Angha there are (a) ..rerred the 16. thl 9.371. tc 12.632 booUhopa. ng: 'Twas other dav is the writer nfter whom 5 Gladstone was horn n ui The amain „ lrePl m F .tretat was named. He Devizes, (bj Newcastle, (c) BodKan whom I 1 .-. uid well I us.d to know the mln. street, with a superb pastry-cook's 6 The smalle-t nMrOflU III shop where 1 guzzled as a boy. England is at u| Slroud. (b) It was Karr who said, when Bromley. U" Bellmgham. GLOBE ()PENIS %  >! .he <.nmt ... Can oe erecieu in * Ij. F-unvr dues' e.asii. ui 11 On HIP way to victory in in* vina;. Oi 18. Hake your rimicp. 01 t\. KNux t0 Uise notier ana ".ITI notiuns can npet thP r.-ian. (• 'O. nicy nialr *liort "'K -t a 2b. %  Nenr'arv" 'ti-'i tha nuni iTI lln n 1 would vim si' i ii> .4 ln.Jl.l I Ift A me: I I i tnwn ol tirr.i1 WCTP u idu*isundina %  • imsniK it i i. H What is more ueeuii.it I | IV nir KeoiuK* "t .i ill-' 14. You may nr> ul -noli i in*. HI l. Trie la OI th Krrn: Hi IB A wua lo test It, i JO Onu .. I I id %  : .1 .ILL; 141 H Hi.-teiirl ill i. pique or I n. worn with cap' akevet shirt, by JANTZEN. LONDON April t With the tennis season %  .,i i I atUa ol ifacli ary In tennis wear. A* treme stands Jantzen. proiaattuii: the conventional style V other stands Mr. Ted. Thus wri find that OOtton piifue is the Usual "took*, although ,-t c< • are spun rayons, sharkskins and now thi ttd sharliakliu AH of these are In i,. % %  —without a. touch of col New I>r<.it>ns Jantzen mane anerta and oBaaaj es, and have introduced %  avaaai new desinnii Sborta an in styles, either pirated There are the classic cuffed shorts, simple and well tailored; and a new style, perfectlv pi jutting pockets on the hips which accentuatr the waist Jantz.>n have designed also, an ui.usi.al kilted skirt—pleated all round as short as a skating skirt. Otlv r shorts, perhaps more f< n iru. %  have double sunray pleats that flare in acti.t. so that they lie flat for eaav ironing. Pat asstj; with either shorts or skirts. Jantzen have designed a rap-peeved shirt with .1 chH back pleat for ? houliiThose, like their neat 1 made in matching materials. Another attractive stvle Is .alk.l tha "romper turn, tratcd here. It consists of a onepiece shirt CUR! !>h.HUTS arlUi "boxer" icla-iticised) waist, and a flared averaadli thai la U one button at the waist. This can UN onr-p'e,, bloomer-suil alone i.s ,u.i n B ht for the squash cotlrt. Janiz.cn design. t<... .'i on princess or b'lllori-thrrni*;. lines; those are fclfi suitable for (Old generally. Mr. Teddy Tinlinu Strikingly different from all that Jantzen hi %  the Teddy Timing styles lie advocates frills, lace edges, and splashes of colour. He ning dress fabrics: washable brocades, nylon, organdie In of stym and trimmed ll B.B.C. Radio Programme %  a> • %  \r. MAT s. mi 1 -1. IS • iim r*Miv>i or nnuin opsai m Carnnoey b. II M 1 I Uitaiirra' Cttomrm. TJS • m. TtMS- T 40 a m NII Anilvua. 1 43 am. frnm Ihr Edtlonala. T SS a m ParaS*. ll B 11 a > %  South nlricana, I Jo a m !>..•i %  4S ani Spar* Part* dr Unman Bodle*. • am Tha Na*aS.la a.m. HOMM Kaw* from BriUln. IH.n Cto-c Dow.. II IS am Proawnni ."aiaS*. II SB %  m UtfatiM. ft.. !" ll 4* a-m. Sprcul Dup-tch 1Z mow Ttir New*. II n> pm New. AMkm U IS P." Ooa. i-. ass !''*•• at. %  > Britain, T p m. Tlw Its**. Anaim*. T.I5 p "i %  p m The Great EMmonion m S pro Radio Nowareel. I rea ol PC . %  lude, S 58 p m ) S pm apoclaJ DUpaU-n. S 11 I-aallval ol Bni.. 10 10 pm. U(hl Mum. 11 Brnaa I PT..T MM rm IHIM.I, USJSI TMUBSJlAV AQUATIC CUn (l.\EMA (MambanOnlyj To-\tciir 41 8.3* MERLE OBF.KON — ROBERT RYAN — CHAIII.ES KOBVIN in "BERLIN EXPRESS" ( .Inlnr-.u 11 I ml 1. I Ul JAMES STEWART CALL NORTHSIDE 777" PLAZA THrmiro— Bridgetown (DIM 2310) 1.AST TWO HIIOWS TO-HAV 4 ti ..i.l 11 ID p m NAT1.NW. T.I-HAV I>iv..: lllonBSnHBU T-.. I. Bint' (irass ol krnlurky cV il' Hud'' (MI Weil NriGii -j i.i n MATINff THt'HHOAV 130 pm 1M01 1 .. I "JlOOa AND M\i.<.li i\ 1 111 n with JOE YOtJE and HCKMIC RlAJiO and "JOB I'M mil, IIIXMI 11. >N I Plua UVKM lleadlimia Jo* LOUIS Hit arlloiu 1 M< tut III K KIIIRV ety of colours. An fabric was 96 per cent SPOOL lOUl per cent nylon, and was virtually habla. I "ritd-rueii for ti'iinis. he maintains, la meant to show. So ha showed a dress In broderle anglaise, edged with chiton pique .Mih rnatchlnj Tha lughiighi of ihe etwaeuon was an exquisite dress in nylon bM i' round neck, short .is, and a very short • ilh scalloped hem. Tn compltta th.effect there was n lace V;.' and laca snoM to match. TerusKcr tm the teetiaser he has designed ar. out lit In jockey squares km and 5iitin Another stysa ban panels of guipum laca S k and front on plQjUa, %  uses colour, as well as which ho introduces on omplete outfits designed for wear Marts as ili. These out,st ol dress and hiplength jacket One in white nylon n„(i .. %  ."MI. nii'-i lacka ''• match -iiiii,;*Mia*, ureen. red Stripes on white-, another, in .•hi'i i-mue hud large saucer-sire red spots; a Ihird was in white organdie with a gold pattern—the laeJcH here was in black with the snmc gold leaf design. I" .. Ml PIl ta| "ol only design tennis wear. He hns made.i too. clothe. r.r sports wear gen%  orally Here particularly notice: i.' CUflfd shorts in yellow' wool, worn with u yellow cashj %  aatai de. orated with rhlnattoMa. Then. Bnalbr, the outfit called "Prince Charniing 1 in pink bnwade with a liold pattern, which cooaisted of jeans, and kmc-U MBth coal. But, all thinns. (onsulcrcd. W found it difficult 1u fit these into our everyday life. %  •LAX A OIM'I* DIAL 8404 "JIUGS a-4 MAGUIK la I'OI NT" WIUi JOE VUIS: Si REN N IE RIANO rrid-v. Sat. Sim t S, * p m sTre iivr.ii a t\xx\s a ih. KIAVR e.tst|. Irank Mi..I.. |, Rarktr l-AIIIV (IHE GARDEN) St. Jamei TO-DAY 1O11I1 ^Mpprl wnx-ox arssSBls kaaa H ss st s *. Mick> r i >,ui,,, it Tfc (OIKIMV•( Ol BSOM S1KIII %  i... %  .f XI'IX ntd RAI :Kupirt and the lce-llower—18 r~ /. V \ ^ #h A p U p:t tsn to net jwiy from *he siccp .i-pc and finally P* o" "*' P* bctwwn t*o funk, ol mow. Hf p STOP THAT LEAK IN YOUR ROOF NOW We offer EVKRITK CORRUGATKD SHEETS RED CEDAR SHINGLES BOLL ROOFING — Plain ROLL ROOFING — Bed : %  ; i ( 11 PINE DOUGLAS FIR THE 1IAIIH..IION KI-OI'lH.ilVi; COTTON FAtTORY LTD. GLOBE THEATRE TO-DAY 4.45 H.I5 I'.M LIST SHOWS ABBOT ll COSTIXLO—PAT HOC & MAX UEEI) -HIT im ICE" 'THK HKOIIIFhl.i mim.u "Al.l. ni:l ON Till. \VI sll (is I RONI HERE WITHOUT SHAME.... IS THE NAKED TRUTH ABOUT A BOY, A GIRL AND A SINFUL CRIME l.vtiti Extra I 36 in. MARLANE CREPE in All Colours. ILH 36 in. FIGURED CREPE_ f2.S 36 in. STRIPED SILK Assorted Colours ai.SO 36 in. FLOWERED CREPE taUt 36 in. DYED SCROLL CLOQUE JNJI EVA1VS rS. WHITFIELII.S DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 *m? We are proud to announce SWISS WATCHES ta and are have anvi on display at 111ONSO B. D^l IMA 4V CO.. LTD. The Jewel Box of Barbados Corner of Broad & McG'Sflor St rest. THE MAiAIITHlR STORY" First occupation Chief In Japan's 2.000 year history? One of the timeliest Shorts ever offered the public . The Devil need only whisper ... to those who would listen! 1*,;^ DANA ANDREWS FARLEY GRANGER • JOAN EVANS aoaiti KIIIH • PAW niWAir MAI* POWI11 • AHll JISGIhS MNM h sen mm • ! %  Um U ewt ana %  aaleaMBMltilMkBli asrasM h) H Ma raam at Plsylns from FKIDAV, MAY 4TII (3 SHOWS) 2 30— 4.45 Si 8 30 P.M. And ( mil In uin.ii.nh at 4 45 & 8 3D p m THE MOST POPULAR CINEMA IN TOWN BRIDI.I I O > S PLAZA DIAL 2310 i i nil \(, SHORTLY : (Warnrr Bros) %  uirxi. >I\A WITH A IIOII.Y" df i I YIRMIII To-day Onl> 4.30 and : %  ^Oth Century Fox Double Dan DAILEY und Ann BAXITR in YOVRE Mi EvanraBK % %  and •SIDE STREET" wab Farley GRANGER and Cathy O'Donnell BOXY" To-dar Only 4.36 and 8 15 M-G-M Big Double Geomv IthEXT I Jane POWELL In "it-A* AM l.l\ER" %  THE nmtlDERS" Starring Joel MeCREA and Arlene DUAL HOYAI. i -i-i Two Bamai To-day 4.30 & 8 30 Universal liig Druble John WAYNE & Hanclolph SCOTT in •• Tin: spoil ins •• AND %  SF.\F\ SI\M:RS — SUrrlnc — John WAYNE A Brodcrick CRAWFORI> OLYMPIC To-day Only 4.M and 8 15 Unlvoiaal Smasliine I John HAM. and Maru MOR -IHE CORR.X WOMAA % %  RIDERS Ol SANTA ll ring Rod CAMERON and FU7EV KMGHT




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ESTABLISHED 189



Allies

harvbades

a
FOUR K@EEDOM AWARD



Win

Of Rivers:

U

TOKYO, May 2.

NITED NATIONS forces sent out aggressive patrois

deep into No Man’s Land today, the second day of the
lull along the Korean front. Communists believed to be
organising for the next phase of their “suicide” offensive
made small scale attacks on the eastern front. Elsewhere
they remained out of contact. But United Nations patrols
met Communist units ranging up to battalion size north-

west and north of Seoul.

Eighth Army estimated Com
munist casualties yesterday at
1,290. Officers said Communist
disengagement was similar to the
mysterious withdrawal in Chor
won-Kumhwa area about a week
ago just before their offensive.

United Nations planes attacked
North Korean traffic again today

claiming more than 150 trucks
foaded with supplies and twe
locomotives destroyed on mair

railways.

Jets blew up six trucks of an
ammunition train.

American aerial torpedoes won
a battle of the Rivers from Chi-
nese Communists to-day. Torrents
of water gushed through holes
ripped in the Hwachon dam by
United States skyraiders.

Communists had closed sluice
gates to lower the level of the
Pukham and Han Rivers and
make them easier to ford.

One of the dams was destroyed
A 10 foot hole was ripped in
another. Now the Reds will have
to build bridges to cross the
river. Their engineers will be
easy targets for United Nations
artillery and planes which blasted
the drive out of the nine day old
Communist offensive.

The front was quiet again on
Wednesday.

Probing Attempts
ommunists to-day mounted
light probing attempts below the
Hwachon dam in the centre of
the peninsula. These were block-
ed

Associated Press correspondent
Nate Polowetzky said Reds were
testing U.N. lines along the
Chunchon - Hongechon axis tradi-
tional invasion route down the
spiny centre of the peninsula.

Reds also tried to punch through
east of the Hw, ayn ear
Imje on the 38th paces
artillery planes and infantry
broke it up.

South Horeans still operating
about 29 miles north of the 38th
parallel on the east coast, broke
up a probing attack southwest of

nsong. .
weds ‘ore out of contact with
Allied Forces on the western
front north of Seoul. —(C.P.)

FOR CONFERENCE

r Own Correspondent)
(From ON GRENADA, May 2.

L. C. J. Thomas, newly elected
President of the Grenada Workers
Union has been chosen by his
Union to attend the International
World Free Trade Union Confer-
ence in Trinidad on May 11.

THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night



+ .
UN Plan Emhargo
F ‘ X
On Red China
LAKE SUCCESS, May 2.
United States will demand an
embargo on the shipment of
strategic material to Communis*
China when the United Nations
Sanctions Committee meets here

tomorrow, it was reliably learned
tonight.

“Strategic embargo” would
ban the shipment of atomic
materials, arms and ammunition

oil and certain materials
for arms manufacture. .
Twelve nations are represented
on the Committee, Australia,
Belgium, Brazil, Britain, Canada,
Egypt, France, Mexico, Philip-
pines, Turkey, United States and
Venezuela.—-Reuter,

used



Recognise Record

MELBOURNE, May 2.

The time of 11.96 seconds for
130 yards set by Panama sprinter
Lloyd La Beach in March has
been recognised by the Victorian
Athletic League as a wofld pro-
fessional record. ‘

La Beach starting from scratch

finished fourth in the Bendigc
£1,000 (AuStralian) professiona!
sprint on March 12. Three time

keepers clocked him at 12 seces..
11.96 secs, and 11.95 seconds
Affidavits testifying the accuracy
of the watches were submitted
to the Victorian League. Pre-
vious record of 12 seconds was
set by Jack Donaldson in 1911.
—Reuter.

one

New Persian Cabinet

TEHERAN, May 2.

Persian Premier Mossadeeq
formed and was expected to pre-
sent a new Cabinet to the Shah
later in the day.

A spokesman said. “This Cab-
inet does not claim to bring about
any speedy reforms. It assumed
power merely to settle the oil
question with the British. Later,
other national elements will get
control of affairs and implement
essential measures for the coun-
try’s welfare.” —U-P.

Cee,

50,000 Casualties

WASHINGTON, May 2
The Defence Department here
estimated to-day that Chinese and
North Korean casualties topped
50,000 in the first week of their
present offensive. These casual-
ties covered April 22 to 29.
—Reuter



1,000 Volunteer For
Anti-Strike Force

WELLINGTON, N.Z., May 2.

Men lined up at New Zealand
country’s new civilian law and order force.

orts to-day to join the
Their enrol-

ment for the emergency force came 24 hours after Prime
Minister Sidney Holland had called on every able-bodied
man to fight wreckers and trouble-makers trying to over-

throw orderly Government.



NO COMMENT

WASHINGTON, May 2.
Secretary of State Dean
Acheson, declined to comment on
Peron’s appeal to American states
to support Argentina’s claim to

pottions of the Antarctic. i»

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Darling, I have something
to tell you become a TV mother!”



Police in Wellington, enforcing
new get-tough orders, broke up a
march by 1,000 striking dock
workers yesterday. Holland's ap-
peal for civilian volunteers came
as the dock workers’ strike drags
ged through its 10th week.

To-day more than 1,000 men
had volunteered in Auckland. By
early afternoon about 100 police
used batons on Wellington strikers
when they tried to march through
police lines to Parliament build-
ings.

Marchers dispersed after being
told a deputation would meet the
Government. New Zealand’s in-
dustrial crisis stems from the dock
strike for higher wages—(CP)

Worcester Hit
135 For 6 Wkts

WORCESTER, May. 2.

Rain restricted play to three
hours and 20 minutes on the first
day of the South African touring
teams opening county cricket
match against Worcestershire here
to-day. In that time Worcester—
shire who won the tosg and batted
first, scored 135 for the loss of six
wickets.

The first four County batsmen
were out for 48, but Wyatt (25),
Outschoorn (23), Howorth (25)
and Bird (32 not out) prevented a
collapse.—Reuter.

REQUEST
LAKE SUCCESS, May 2.
Israel today asked the Security







Council to take prompt action to
force the retirement of Syrian
armed forces from the demilita—
rise the Huleh region
—Reuter,









MacArthur
Quiz To-day

(By PAUL SCOTT-RANKINF)
WASHINGTON May 2,

General Douglas MacArthur will
be cross-examined to-morrow by
a joint Senate Committee inch)d-
ing crities and supporters. Twen!y-
five Senators on Armed Services
and Foreign Relations Committees
have decided not to allow other
Congress members to attend the
secret hearing.

Their decision disclosed to-day
appeared certain to add to the
controversy in Cohgress.

House Republican Leader Joseph
Martin protested against closed
door interrogation,

The appearance of the former
war hero, the most controversial
figure in America to-day, will
climax the emotional controversy
that has raged for nearly a month
over the contradictory Korea war
strategies advocated by MacArthur
end President Truman.

When it was decided to invite
MacArthur before the Commit-
tees, attention was centred on the
reasons leading to his dismissal
by Truman,

Since then the debate has turned
upon the basic issue whether the
struggle between United Nations
snd Chinese Communist forces
could or should be limited to the
Korean area. :

—Reuter.

° e
Israeli Soldiers
Attack Arabs
TEL AVIV, May 2.

About 100 Israeli soldiers
attackea Arab inhabitants in the
demilitarised zone between Israel
and Syria today, a Syrian spokes-
man said tonight.

He said four Israeli soldiers
had been killed. Two Arabs were’
wounded.

The spokesman said Israelis
opened fire on inhabitants in an
attempt to steal cattle but Arabs
forced them to withdraw. The
exchange of fire lasted about an
hour.

The incident occurred northwest
of the mouth of the Jordan,

—Reuter.





.
Gairy On Charge
(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 2.
Two charges of the use of
threatening language during the
course of a speech in the Market
Square last Friday when address-
ing workers celebrating a wage
boost victory, have been preferred
by the Police against E, M. Gairy,
President of the M.M.W.U., who
is Summoned to appear before the
Magistrate next Monday. All
workers are understood to have
been instructed not to work on
Monday, but to converge at St.
George’s, because of the trial.
Though the stoppage is empha-
sised, it is not a strike.

Sentence Postponed

(From Our Own Correspondent)

: GRENADA, May 2.

Sentence was pending after
conviction on Monday by Acting
Magistrate W. L. McIntyre, on
two male members _ of the
M.M.W.U. who were found guilty
of charges of intimidating.

The Magistrate first decided t
rethand both in custody until the
devtision to-day ‘but ‘afterwards
accepted bail, releasing them,

Sentence is now further post
poned, Melntyre, a_ Trinidadiar
serving on the St. Lucia Bénch,
arrived last weekend to replace
Magistrate Bain who is on sick
leave.

EXCHANGE SHOTS

(Frem Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 2
Last night W. O’Brien Donovan,
retired Superintendent of Agricul-
ture discovered a strange man on
the prowl about his premises and
fired a shot in the dark. Another
shot rdng out in reply; then the
exchange ended.

Griffiths Asked

: LONDON, May 2.

Mr. Peter Smithers (Conserva-
tive) asked the Secretary of State
for the Colonies in the House of
Commons tonight what steps had
beén taken to improve facilities
for technical education in Barba~
dos in view of the recommenda-
tions of the Select Committee on
vocational and technical training
which started work in 1946.

Mr. James Griffiths replied:

“The report of the Select Com- |

mittee was received late in 1949
and as its principal recommenda-
},tion for the establishment of a

| training centre involved a capital

expenditure of $334,000 and a re-
current expenditure of $24,500 per

ject was deferred by the Barbados
Government pending completion
- f ¢

r al survey of the island









PRICE NOV& CENTS

Order Barbados
Rum At B.I. Fair

West Indians Get Free Beer

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 2,

At the British Industries Fair to-day, orders were
placed for Barbados rum and a table lamp made of Barbados
conch shell. Mr. John Dugdale, Minister for Colonial
Affairs, ate an ugli at the Jamaica stall when he visited the
British Industries Fair to-day. His two sons who accom
panied him ate a banana each. After eating the ugli Mr.
Dugdale remarked: “It’s delicious”. ‘

a eee At the Trinidad stall Mr. Dug-

dale said he understood Angos-
Bevan Votes

tura Bitters is bad for the siémach
With Attlee

bat Mr. P. fF iy
LONDON, May, 2.





Comptroller of Customs,
who was an attendant at
retorted: “Angostura Bitte
good for the stomach.” i

Commenting on — anthuriw

Britain’s squabbling Socialists} jilies on show at the Trinid
. closed their ranks solidly last stall, Mr. Dugdale said he theughit
wt 7 oe : 7 : ‘ight to beat down the divid' | they were made of wax, but dis
; and conquer manoeuvre, engin- d they were natural when
VICE-PRESIDENT Alben W. Barkley (2nd:from left) presents the Pour Freedom award to Dr, Ralph J. a ain} covered they ef
Bunche at the Starlight Roof of the Waldorf-Astoria. Bunche won the award by receiving an overwhelm- chieunane chuckling Winston he felt them. Afterwards he said:
ing majority of the 15,000 ballots cast by voters in all walks of life Rt from all parts of the Unitea rane Kies ° ie ae me ‘I am glad there are markets f¢
States, Emil K. Ellis (left), Judge Ferdinand Pecora (extreme right) look on.—Express, poking his cue from rebel} anthurium lilies,” __ im
Be i roe tech hd a ; Labour Members’ own protests Another distinguished visit

Meat Prices [King George Opens

Are Low

Commons Told

LONDON, May 2,

Federick Willey, Parliamentary
Secretary to the British Ministry
of Food, disclosed to-day how
meat prices under the new Argen-
tine Agreement compared with
prices for meat offered Britain by
private traders in other countries,

He was replying in the Com-|
mons to the question by Ivor sven |
Thomas, Labour member. Willey
said: ‘‘We have received in recent
months a number of offers from
European sources of frozen beef
mainly South American in origin,

“These have been at prices
varying from £130 per ton deliv-
ered from German frontiers to
£197.29 per ton from stores in
Hamburg.

“Prices we have now a
with Argentina for meat of similar

over rearmament, the Conserva-
live Leader came up with a motion
designed to draw the support of
dissident Socialists, but rebels re-

at the West Indies stalls to-day
was Sir Charles Woolley, Go
ernor of British Guiana. §S
Charles was favourably impress

e fused to be taken in. They kept ed with the general layout «
a solid party front that defeated the West Indies stalls and in

es wva O- a Churchill's motion by a 18-vote pressed the hope to visit the sta
margin of 305 to 292, and left later this week with aa

Woolley, ;

Business at West Indies —
to-day was brisk, A buyer fre
Rangoon placed an order for 2,800
bales of sea island cotton. A repre+
sentative of Needlers British Ime
ports Company ordered larg
quantities of Jamaican uglis for
the American market

Prime Minister Attlee still eling-
ing to control of the Government

Rebels Voted Labour

Churchill sent in his deputy
Anthony Eden, to offer a motion
expressing the anxiety of the
House that the rearmament pro-

Church Bells Will Ring

LONDON, May 3,
Britain goes on show to the world to-day in a gallant
bid to rise above war scars, international anxiety and eco-
nomic hardships.

:

gramme “was based on estimates :
The Voice of King George VI from the steps of Saint] of Defence production which were Free Drinks ;
Paul's Cathedral here, will open and dedicate the £1,500,000 ; not accepted by Ministers princi : '
Festival of Britain. Millions sitting at radio and television |?@!y concerned In the ‘Lrinidad stall buyerg
sets at home will hear him. From that moment all Britain. othe ratereeon eee Anmurin ae Serene in tinned fruits
Striving after gaiety, will be “at home” to visitors from | evan an arol¢ On, Whol Wes - ee
7 : resigned as Labour Minister atid st Indians and their friend

many parts of the earth for the next six months. woke af Semab Gretidest, - in

ToWhs and hamlets throughout
the nation, 10,000 of them, will
play a part in the celebrations.
There are two reasons for the; nN the spot.

Fair to-day were treated by th
British firm of Guinness, brewer:
to free drinks of Guinness. :

The idea behind the brewer?

protest over the budget, but both
Bevan and Wilson refused to be put

who visited the British Industries
;
Along with other

Sat On Snake:

Festival—¢ponsored by the Labour | Labour Party Left Wingers, they ;
- 1. rote. , . i generosity is that they plan to
Found A Deer Government Bete: 0 Wave of) Yored with ‘the Muterament. establish a brewery in Trinidad in

criticism, One ts that this Year is Both Bevan afid Wilson had as-

; the centenary of the Great Exhibi- | shiled the rearmament programme] the near future.
pr PORT OFS Aa tion of 1a e second is tolas incapable of fulfillment unless Halt Be es of iE In-
April 30 show that Britaih is still bold in|y.dre aid was forthcoming from] “ans Who drank samples of Guin-

enterprise and has faith in her
future.

Mr, Michael Niles, a pro- hess was, “It’s niece.”

the United States, but neither went
prietor of Penal, Trinidad,

so far as to refuse to accept pro-



quality are less than the lowest went out hunting and én. The ceritre-piece of the Festival

duttion estirmnates..—CP)

IREPUBL

of these offers, after taking into
account the ccst of bringing meat
to this country.”

H. L. F. Turner, Conservative,
asked whether the London Food
Ministry now purchased linseed
oil from other sources besides
Argentina and whether the new
Argentine Trade Agreement con-
tained any terms relating to the
purchase of linseed oil.

Willey in a written reply said:
“Yes. We buy linseed oil from
Uruguay ahd linseed from India
and British East Africa.”

The new Argentine Agreement
does not deal specifically with
purchases of linseed oil.—Reuter.

—_



is the exhibition of culture, art
‘and industry in Loiidon. Its vivid
modernistic, buildings. surrounding

countered a large macajuel * a
: which he took for a PANN Rim be
og. Mr. Niles sat down on

, the symbolic finger of metal "
the ropiile, After some time |[thf.g@iabolie Anger of | metal! Aid Suspended
the “log” kept moving. He the drab south bank of the

fired a shot from his gun and
killed the snake which mea-
sured 12 feet. He skinned it
and while doing so, found a
young deer in the intestines.

WASHINGTON, May 2
This Exhibition Suspension of Marshall Aid
row. grants and loans to Ireland was
As King George declares the |8 nounced here to-day, The an-
Festival open, church bells in |®ouncement said that the step was
rea and village will ring. | ‘aken in agreement with lari
~~ COLONIAL GUESTS e Royal Salute will be fired in; Government because of Ireland's
COLONIAL GUESTS the historic Tower of London, improved economic position,
LONDON. The limelight will fall brightly —Reuter
Fuller detéils are now available}/on to the Ghameshire village of
of the arrangements made for| Trowell with a population of 360,
Colonial representatives who will] Trowell, normally bypassed by
attend the Festival of Britain as) hurrying crowds, is chosen as a
guests of the U.K, Government | Festival village—a village which ,
from July 9th to 30th. best typifies British rural life. BERLIN, May 2.
Trowell’s railway station has East German Prime Minister
had a new coat of paint. The | Otto Grotewohl, left Berlin to-da

‘Thames River.

opens tomor-

GROTEWOHL ILL

Gromyko Does Not
Like New Proposals

PARIS, May 2.
Andrei Gromyko, Soviet De.
puty, gave a cool reception today
to the western powers’ “final
effort to reach an agreement on

the Foreign Ministers agenda
after more than eight “weeks!
meetings. ;
A Western spokesman com-
mented that Gromyko “did not
seem to like the latest. western
proposals,”

romyko complained that
western powers had _ still not

included the North Atlantic Pact
and the American bases overseas
in their agenda proposals,

NT railway station slaff has been|for medical treatment at a healt Western observers said thal
IC ANS W A increased by 900 per cent—-|resort, the East German News|today'’s proposals were to be
there are how ten men thee, | Agency said. His Deputy Walter|considered as the final bid to
There will be cricket and|Ulbright, will act for him, No de+|break the deadlock rather thas
O°vDW Y ER RE(¢ ‘ALI ED Shakespeare on the village green,|tails were disclosed. fee ae es 4: Tadd tel
s appeared at May Day celebrations oday’s meetin, §
" ap vies Mite tobe pabteraay .
Senator H. Alexander Smith, Republican, said Presi-
dent Truman should recall Ambassador William O’Dwyer
at once because of the Senate Crime Committee charge that
he helped the New York underworld. But the White House
said it knew of no plans for recalling the former New Yori

Mayor from Mexico City and

Towns, famous in history books,
will stage colourful pageants. Lady
Godiva will ride the streets of
Coventry again and William the
Conqueror will return to Hastings.
For the next six months Britain
will be the most musical country
in the world.

Boy Scouts will étart it off to-
Secretary Acheson said he saw | morrow night with campfire sing-

WASHINGTON, May 2,

no evidence that O’Dwyer had impaired relations between | S°ngs all over the nation.

the United States and Mexico,

Asked at his news conference
if he intends to consult the Am-
bassador about the charges against
him, Acheson said he had nothing
in mind along those lines.

The Crime Committee charged
that while O’Dwyer was King’s
County District Attorney and
later New York Mayor he con-
tributed to the grdwth of organ-
ised crime racketeering and
gangsterism in the metropolis.

Smith a member of the Senate
Foreign Affairs Committee said
‘it is perfectly obvious that the
former Mayor should be. recalled
from Mexico immediately. It is
contrary to every good principle
of democracy and diplomacy for
us to be represented in Mexico by
a man whose political activities in
this country are at the very least
open to s@rious question.”

“Never in 6ur history” he added
“has it been more important to be

represented by individuals who
are above suspicion.”
While there were Republican

demands for his recall, resignation
or dismissal, Democrats for the
most part were silent.—U.P.

whieh is not yet ready. In the
meantime, Government reports
that 100 apprentices are being

trained under the local Appren-

ticeshio Bursary Act. The men
are receiving part training in
motor €hgiheering, electficity,

| een

| building and architecture at Eve-

j ning Institutes; and 1,755 wofnen

| are receiving part-time instruction
in domestic subjects at house.

}eraft centres or in various rural
centres.”

; Mr. Parker

(Labour) asked,

annum, consideration of this pro- | what steps had been taken by the
|Government of British Guiana to
train doctors in tuberculosis care |

in view of the fact that the best

About Tech
In Barbados

| hospital.

Sir Adrian Boult will conduct
British music in the Festival
Concert Hall. The new building
which will stay a permanent fea-
ture of London’s musical life.

Music Festivals all over the
country—Edinburgh, Birmingham,
Liverpool, Manchester, and Aber-
deen are among some of the places
—~will provide a continuous series
of concerts from June to Septem-
ber. There will be special postage
stamps, There will be banners
and bunting. There will be foun-
tains and searchlights and gaily

ainted barges. On the eve of the
‘estival’s opening, critics, who
said this was no time for celebra-
tion, were silent

The Festival

receive them:

MOSES GITTENS,
Dayrells Road, Ch, Ch.

Mrs. U. L.. BRUCE,

Maxwell Road, Ch, Ch.
spirit had taken
hold. Crowds filled the streets to
ee myriad coloured lights that
ave changed the face of London
by night. Exhibition organisers
reported a great rush for tickets.

—Reuter,
FOR U.S. TOUR

WASHINGTON, May 2.

O. MecCONNEY,

Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch.

JOSEPH ALLEYNE,
Crane, St. Philip.



General Newton Estillac Leal,
WILLIAM 0D’ Brazilian War Minister, is
US. Am sd to Mexico \Scheduled to arrive late to-day to G. QUINTYNE,

begin his three-week tour of the

paied wh aids
arge t i
are Wi Seo ionine "ted Males. -chentee,

Church Village, St. Philip





nical Education

E. HINKSON,

Massiah Street, St. John.
tion of the tén-year development
ati owing to lack of local funds, H.. b. CAVE,
Ould he consider an increased St. John’s Dispensary,
allocation for the colony from
hospital had only one doctor with |'@,Colonial Development Fund

fo that social services which were
of assistance to plantation labour-
ers Would not be cut?

Mr. Griffiths in a written reply !
said “I am aware that the Gov

180 beds and no one to take over
when the doctor in charge went
on leave. e
| Mr. Griffiths in g written reply |
| nies Sie, Senet 2 j¢rhment of Grenada, like several
|ing in the treatment of tubercu | other colonial governments, has
|losis and he should be attached | reviewed its developments plan
shortly to the best .(tuberculosis) | largely owing to the burden of
Meanwhile the officer |e Gual recurrent expenditure

in charge of that hospital has vol- | “Mich the original plan entailed.
unteered to defer his leave until | he question of an increased allo-
early in 1952.” ation to any ferritory from the
a | limited Colonial Development and |
Mr. J. B. Hynd (Labour) asked | Welfare Funds available has to |

Items may be handed into



T. Gale.

if the Secretary of State was! te considered against the require
aware that the Government of | ments of the colonial territory
Grenada was considering reduc- —Reuter

The Advocate Co., Ltd.,
classified advertisements to be taken by various District
Agents and so far the following have been authorised to



CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

has made arrangements for

JOSEPH JEMMOTT,
St. Elizabeth Village,

St. Joseph.

S. A. DURANT,
Horse Hill, St. Joseph.

PHARMACY,
John.

EBENEZER
Four Roads, St.

Vv. HOLDER,

St.. Judes, St. George

8T. C. HUNTE,
Pine Gap, St. Michael.

Vv. RICE,
Bank Hall Road,
St. Michael
R. H. KING,

Near Sharon, St. Thomas.

the ahove for the following

Columns in the Classified Section :
BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, IN MEMORIAMS, ETC
FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

ADVOCATE Co. LTD.

Advertising Manager

‘ rsa eee RARE RO eNO RRL AN ROH RCRA DIOS A ee Ry
PAGE TWO

—~-—





Carib

| ace WOOD whose home is a
in England, has been in
Trinidad for several months on rs



holiday, Yesterday she flew over

by B.W.1A to spend a_ few

weeks in Barbados. She is a \
guest at the Hotel Royal, Lady ,

Wood ‘has visited Barbados ,.. .

before....Coming in _ by the > =

same plane were Mrs. Jessie |

Forster who had been in Tobago
for e short visit and Mr, Archie
McLean from Trinidad.

U.S. Schooi-teacher
RS. GLADYS DICKERSON
of Brooklyn, New York, is

touring the W.I. She arrived Pr gi

from Trinidad yesterday _ by, PENNY NOLAN
B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks in | : *
Barbados, What does Mrs, Sewing Circle

Dickerson do? She is a school-, J— OOK out for Penny Nolan’s
teacher in Brooklyn. What does Sewing Circle in the Sun-
she say of the W.1.? “I’m visit-yday Advocate. The first of this











‘ng your lovely little islands.” §series starts on May 6th. Mrs.
Nolan is well known in sewing
Colonial Attache circles here.
i today,
PROBABLE arrival ° Due From U.K. To-day

along with Mr. Jimmy Cozier
and Mr. Erskine Lindop is Mr. J
Kenneth Thomp-

son, Colonial]

UE in today from England by
the Gascogne ere Mr. and
Mrs. Derek Davies who have been





Attache at theffn the vi for the past few
British Embassy 7OMths. r. Davies is on the
in Washington@taff of the Royal Bank of

Mr. Thompson 1s Canada here.

also a member of
-he British sec. Husband Coming

ee 3 oe ] RS. HERBEK:' © ALLEYNE
i a . x and her three children
ae os why the Francis, Valerie and Catherine,
weitth meeting were among the arrivals from
t the Care Trinidad yesterday by B.W.LA.

Her husband is due
end of the month,

East Africa Bound

AJCR STANHOPE BILLY-
EALD, Police Superin-
t from British Guiana, i
in England, He is spending a quiet
holiday there and has made his
headquarters in London, Before
returning to British Guiana, he
and his wife will make a short
holiday visit to East Africa,

With U.B.O.T. =

AJ, AND MRS. ERROL L,
SEALY are in Barbados
with their three children for a

bean Commis- up at the

Thompson sion,

Mr

K,

Sisters

RS. CLAIRE HERRERA, her

son ken and her daughter
Roona atrived from Trinidad tendon:
yesterday Spy B.,W.1.A. to spend
a short hetiday staying with Mr,
and Mrs— Cecil Goddard at
Kenningtoi, George Street,
Mrs. Herrera. and Mrs, Goddard
are sisters.

Back From Martinique
R. J. BLONDIN, Manager of
Sam Lord's and Mrs. Blondin

are back from Martinique where

they spent-their honeymoon.
aad * noliday. They arrived from

Trinidad Col. Sec. Trinidad yesterday by B.W.LA.
coe BACK to the West In- and are staying with Maj. Sealy’s
' dies, shortly is Mr. P, M, parents, Dr. and Mrs. T. E. Sealy
Renison,, the Colonial Secretary at Welches, Christ Church,
of Trinidad. He has been on leave _ Maj. Sealy is | Supt. of
in England and expects to leave U,B.O.T’s Field Police Force in
for Trinidad in a few days. Point Fortin.

ADVENTURES OF PI

pa










BY THE WAY...

HE report about a mouse that
“really does sing” will merely

gesture, like laying a foundation
stone or cutting the tape across
a new road, Emotion does not
enter into these things, and I am
sure that if Mimsie Slopcorner had
been a veritable Cleopatra the
gas-container episode would have
passed off with an aloof dignity
far from the ‘emotional hysteria
suggested by Miss Slopcorner’s
statement to the Press.
Yrs, truly,
(Mrs.) Mabel Whackstraw.,

In passing
OMEONE asks if the Alphonse
Karr to whom I referred the
other day is the writer after whom
a street in Etretat was named. He
is, and well I used to know the
street, with a superb pastry-cook’s
shop where I guzzled as a boy.
It was Karr who said, when

prompt { music-lovers to ask,
“What does it sing?” If I squeaked
every time someone gave me a bit
of chees®obody would say I was
singing.

There was great excitement
some years ago about a mouse
which was alleged to sing a song,
words and all. Musicians went to
hear it, in a house near Uttoxeter,
They could hardly believe their
eyes or their ears when, from the
little mouth that just showed
through the wainscot, came a tiny,
crystal-clear voice singing: “’Twas
but a night in June,” The amaz-
ing occurrence was only explain-
ed when the ventriloquist was
discovered, crouching behind a
bag of fluff in an attic, with a
microphone in his hand,

Not much consolation i

There's not a pawn-shop in the
place,
Find one if you can,



You can walk back from Baldoyle
races,

But not from the Isle of Man.

The Irish song rang in my head
when I read of a man who walked
home 250 miles after losing all his
money at the races,
Koolukatfatti
#NHIEF KOOLUKATFATTI, the

plump ruler of 17,000,000

Mawsgis, arrived at London Air-
port yesterday. He was met by a
Foreign Office official who laugh-
ingly greeted him with Chester-
ton’s “Liquorice is not the least of
benefits we derive from the dark
heart of Africa.” The Chief, who
learned English from a film unit
in the Jambong hinterland, re-
plied: “On your way, sailor, it
sure is Tiitdy lousy havin’ yew-all
know nre-all deep Saouth deep
Saouth Rowdy folks bust da joint
wide open.” An interpreter was
sent for, but he failed to under-
stand what either of thern had
been talkjfg about. All this must
be hushed: up.

Thank you, Mrs.
Whackstraw






“THE MIGH

WALTER BURKE
WILLIE IFFIL
FRANCIS HYPOLITE
KEN BIRCH .
PHYLLIS SCOTT
CHESTER HOLDER

Guest

Ds Sir,

As one who saw Councillor
Tudmarsh kiss Mrs. Carga, : the
winner’ of the cake-weighing com-
petition-at our 1947 funfair, I can
vouch fdr the fact that there was
no levity either in approach or
execution. It was a mere official

PHYLLIS COLLYMORE

Prices: PIT 20—HOUSE
Buy your tickets

cere







EVER SCREENED... 4
HEART TO SHREDS AND TATTERS” |

N.Y. Journal American

ER

“ssa” LOUIS WOLHEIM

From ERICH MARIA RLAARQUE'S novel Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE
eee

GLOBE

GERALD PAISLEY ........-

Interior Decorator

M*

DONN BUNN
interior decorator.

is

home is in California and he has!
in Trinidad on and! M@@rer, we are seeing the resump-

been living

an
His

off for the past six years. .He was

from Trinidad yesterday

B.W.LA. Here for a week
ten days, Mr. Bunn is staying
the Ocean View Hotel... .Ot
arrivals from Trinidad are
and Mrs. Alfonso B. de Li

_ among the passengers coming iu!

by
or

her

Mr.

ma

and their daughter Sandra who

are spending a week at
Hotel Royal, Mr. Isabel
and her daughter Janet
the Camp, St. Lawrence,
Leah Gonzalez-Herrera
panied them over. They
here for one month,

are

Fattening

MERICA is

)

the
MeCail

at

Miss
accom -
are

making some
strange experiments in fat-

tening turkeys and cockerels for

the dinner table.

A synthetic female sex hormone

called Stilboestroi,

injected into

a young cockerel, transforms the
flesh to mouth-melting tender-
ness, Most cockerels aged from
six to eight weeks need one
tablet injected beneath the skin

by implantation,

The process means considerable
loss of dignity for the cockerel.

Its red comb is quickly lost;

are its Warlike instincts. Its early
morning crow sinks to a oe
aito-

squeak, then disappears

gether.
Square-Cut Putter

a Percy Gillespie, who
60, is winning matches

Hendon golf course with a two-

foot putter of his own design.

It is sha like the conven-
is ped Sos the

handle is square. “That keeps me
true on the pin,” says Gillespie.

tional sideways putter.

Maybe this is a hint for y
amateur golfers.

Air Voices

HAT’S new on «he radic—
Re-
diffusion Ltd., are out to get one

turn on that feminine

lady announcers !

charm.
Incidents! Intelligence

A

Gas Flame, Indianapolis,

PA

~~

By BEACHCOMBER

asked to sign a petition against
the death penalty: Je le veux bien.
Que messieurs les assassins coim-
Let the

mencent. “I'm all for it.
murderers give us a lead.”

Don't you know anything?
1. The number of cats rescued
from trees by firemen in October

this year was (a) 3,498,641. (
246,384, (c) 109,493.

2. Finsbury-pavement was built

in (a) 1794, (b) 1894, (c) 1876
3. Who was the first Mayor
Oakham?

4. In East Anglia there are (a)

46, (b) 9,371, (c) 12,632 bootsho
5. Gladstone was born in_(

Devizes, (b) Newcastle, (c) Bod-

min.
6. The smallest gasworks in
England is at (a) Stroud, (b)

Bromley, (c’ Bellingham,



OPENING TO-MORROW 5 & 8.15 P.M.







TIEST WAR DRAMA ©
IT RIPS THE

é

nw FROW

LEW AYRES »

Starring

plus
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

“So in Love”
“Stardust”

“Song of Songs”

“Tf”

“Tennessee Waltz”
“Wildest Gal in Town”

Stars

(B’dos No. 1 Vocalist)
WAP (“She’s « hot Baby”)

36—BAL, 48—BOXES 60.
to-day at the GLOBE

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DYED SCROLL CLOQUE

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et at ak ek ett tt et

EVANS & WHITFIELUS

DIAL 4220

MAN’S body is remarkably
sensitive. Pat him on the
back and his head swells.—The

ES.



xe S|
ao

aan Compt 70 On Gtp Oe Aateiee

er



sO

is
on

ou

b)

of

ps.
a)




“'/ other stands Mr.












































BARBADOS AD

VOCATE





Pleats v. Frills

By Dorothy Barkley

; LONDON, April 27,
With the tennis season drawing

{tion of last year’s battle of the
conventional versus the reaction-
|ary in tennis wear. At ong ex-
treme stands Jantzen, proragting
the conventional style, % the
Teddy Tinling,
advocating the reactionary.

The Jantzen designs
ored and crisply cut, with no
frills or frivolous details. In con-
trast to this, are the Teddy Tin-
ling designs with their lace edges
and fancy stitching.

To illustrate just what is meant
by the “conventional” style we
show an example from the Jant-
zen range. Materials are chosen
for their crisp freshness, but also
for their washability. Thus we
find that cotton pique is the usual
choice, although of course ‘there
are spun rayons, sharkSkins and
—now this year—knitted shark-
skins. All of these are in white
—without a touch of colour,

are tail-

New Designs

Jantzen make suoris and dress-
es, and have introduced several
new designs. Shorts are varying
in styles, either pleated or plain,
There are the classic cuffed shorts,
simple and well tailored; afid a
new style, perfectly plain, with
jutting pockets on the hips which
accentuate the waist. Jantzen
have designed. also, an unusual
kilted skirt—pleated all round—
as short as a skating skirt, Other
shorts, perhaps more feminine,
have double sunray pleats that
flare in action. These are stitched
so that they lie flat for easy iron-
ing.

For wear with either shorts or
skirts, Jantzen have designed a
cap-sleeved shirt with a deep
back pleat for shoulder room
Those, like their neat briefs, are
made in matching materials.

Another * attractive style is
called the “romper tunic,” illus-
trated here. It consists of a one-
piece shirt-cum-bloomers with
“boxer” (elasticised) waist, and
a flared overskirt that fastens with

one button at the waist. This can
be removed and the one=piecr
bloomer-suit alone is just right

for the squash court.

Janizen design, too, dresses cut
on princess or button-through
lines; those are also perfectly
suitable for gold and sports wear
generally. ;

Mr. Teddy Tinling

Strikingly different from
that Jantzen have designed
the Teddy Tiniing styles.
vocates frills, lace edges, and
splashes of colour. He uses eve-
ning dress fabrics: washable bro-
cades, nylon, organdie in a variety
of styles and trimmed with a vari-

all
are
He ad-

CROSSWORD



Across
. Many who lend may do this for
their money. (7)

s

8. Sometimes used for five. (1-4)
11. Away from the west. (4)

12. Stingiest mat seen. (7)

13. lrritate. (3)

14. Can be erected tn sand, (3)

15, Farmer Giles’ dash, (4)

17, On. the way to victory in the

wing. (3)
.» Make your choice. (5)
. Refuse td take notice and then
nothing can upset the reign. (6)
. They make = short
honeycomb. (4)
. One way to rave. (4)
. "Near dry” sfter the

Down
. Would you shun such
(5) 3. Pronoun
. A handle from Athens, (6)
. A set line can be drawn out, (1)
German town of tireless energy.

work of a

hunt, (7)

a Spacey?
a mex



(5)

Were suldiers standing at it when
paying it? (Y)

What is more peculiar, |
know him. (8)

jon't

The geology of a district. (3)
. You may tire of such a row.
The tast of the teens, (4)

A word to jeer at,
Only a Kind of string
. Hastened. (3)

Solution ot vesterday's
1 Pirouette: 6
Ornate. 13. Cog
16. Nymph
25 Mania, 26 Co
1. Proclaim. 2
Tomb: 5. Tail
Tee; 12, Tan: 17
Weak: 21, Arch

(4)

OPS © 2 Soe =

note
Se








—o—

on display

=



WATCHES

have arrived” and are
{cd

Corner

ety of colours. An_ interesting
fabric was 96 per cent wool, four
per cent nylon, and was virtually
uncrushable.

Underwear for tennis, he main-
tains, is meant to show. So he
showed a dress in broderie an-
glaise, edged with cutton pique
complete with matching shorts.

The highlight of the collection
was an exquisite dress in nylon

lace: it had a round neck, short
cap-sleeves, and a_ very short
skirt with scalloped hem. To

complete the effect, there was a
lace hat and lace shoes to match.

Teenager

For the teenager he has de-
signed an outfit in jockey squares
of sharkskin and satin. Another
style had panels of guipuro lace
inset back and front on pique.

And he uses colour, as well as
l.ce frills which he introduces on
omplete outfits designed for wear



Ws.

| Rupert jerks the sledge aside to
| yet away from the steep slope and
finally stops on a flat space between

two banks of snow. He peers into
the gloom and feels anxious. “I’m
still in the wood," he mutters, “ but

riTCH PINE
DOUGLAS FIR



COTTON

| LUMBER DEPARTMENT

|









BELOW: Shorts with double sun-

ray pleating in rayon, pique ‘i
sharkskin, worn with cap-

sleevet

shirt, by JANTZEN.

oft the courts as well. These out-1
fits consist of dress and hip-
length jacket. One in white nylon
had a candy striped jacket tn:
match—orange, blue, green, red}
stripes on white: another, in
white pique had large saucer-size
red spots; a third was in white
organdie with a gold pattern—the
jacket here was in black with the |
same gold leaf design.

Bu. Mr. Tinling does not only
design tennis wear. He has made, !
too, clothes for sports wear gen-'
erally. Here particularly notice- |
able were cuffed shorts in yellow!
wool, worn with a yellow cash-;
mere sweater decorated with
rhinestones. Then, finally, the
outfit called “Prince Charming” in|
pink brocade with a gold pattern, |
which consisted of jeans, and
knee-length coat. But, all things, |
considered, we found it difficult to
fit these into our everyday life.





this and | can't find the tracks we
made when we came up. Still I
suppose if | keep on going downhill

I shall reach the lake.’’ He starts
again on a new slope wiiich sud-
denly becomes a precipice, and, bein;
unable to stop, he whizzes out o

1 don’t remember any place like the cloud into the daylight. @
site oie —





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ALFONSO B. DeLIMA © CO.. LID.

Streets

We are
proud to
announce







THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1551

B.B.C. Radio



Programme

















THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951 Scottish Mag 5.45 Wo
shire vs Afric 5.50
6.36 a.m,—12.15 p.m. . 1960 ™M Interlude, 6 p.m. Top Score, 64
nan Programme Parade
6.30 a.m. Festival of Britain Opening 6.00—11.00 p.m 25.53 M. 31 N
Ceremony by H.M, The King, 7.15 n
Listeners’ Choice, 7.30 am. The News 7 p.m 7.10 p N
7.40 a.m. News Analysis, 7.45 a.m. From Analysis, ‘ Britai
the Editorials, 7.55 a.m Programme p.m. The Great Ex! « 1
Parade, 8 a.m. The Great Exhibition of 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 815 5 i
1851, 8.15 a.m. Worcestershire vs. South Adventures of P.C. 49, £45 Int
Africans, 8.30 a.m Douglas Gamle lude, 8.55 p.m From the Edi i
845 a.m. Spare Parts for Human Bodies, 9 p.m. Special Dispatch, 9.15
Â¥ a.m. The News, 9.10 am. Home News Festival of Britain, 10 p.m. The
from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 10.10 p.m. Light Music, 10.45 p.t e
a.m Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m jn Britain, 11 p.m From to i
Listeners’ Choice, 1145 a.m. Special Programme
Dispatch, 12 inogn) The News, 12.10 C.B.C. PROGRAMME
p.m. News Anaiysis, 12.15 p.m. Close THURSDAY, MAY =
Down. —— se
4156.45 pom, ..... . 19.76 M. 10 p.m.—t0.15 p.m } v
— —____—_— 10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m, This week ir
4.15 p.m. Festival of Britain, 5 p.m. Canada. 11.76 Més 25.51 M












eon a” en kG ee ee

——

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA. (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 8.30
MERLE OBERON — ROBERT RYAN — CHARLES KORVIN

in ‘“*BERLIN EXPRESS”
An RKO Radio Picture



i ca ee I.



Commencing Friday 4th
* JAMES STEWART
“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”

in







——————

'

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY—4.45 and 6.30 p.m
MATINEE TO-DAY—1.30 p.m. (Monogram) Two Features
Golor by Cinecolor

“Blue Grass of Kentucky &. The Dude Goes West

Bill WILLIAMS, Jane NEIGH Eddie ALBERT Gale STORM

MATINEE :- THURSDAY — 1.30 p.m. (Mc
“JIGGS AND MAGGIE





mnosram) Two Features
CourRT”
with JOE YULE and RENNIE RIANO
“JOE PALOOKA CHAMP”
Plus those Headliners





and
LEON ERROL
Joe LOUIS (in action) Henry ARMSTRONG

OPENING FRIDAY 4TH - - - -
“EDGE OF DOOM” and MacARTHUR

STORY








PLAZA
OISTIN

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY
5 & 8.30 p.m. (Monogram)

“JIGGS and MAGGIE in COURT”
With JOE YULE & RENNIE RIANO

and
“MAN from HEADQUARTERS”
FRANK ALBERTSON

OOOO

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James

TO-DAY (Only) 8.30 p.m
Herbert WILCOX presents - - -
Anna Neagle & Michael Wilding in
“The COURTNEYS of CURZON

STREET”





DIAL
8404



to Sunda
Sunday

Friday 8.30 p.m.
Matinee 5 p.m.
THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT
Color by Technicolor
Shirley TEMPLE
Barry FITZGERALD
Lon McALLISTER



Friday, Sat. & Sun. 5 & 8.30 p.m. |
“STEP LIVELY” & “TARZAN & the
SLAVE GIRL"

Lex Barker |]





Frank Sinatra







|







GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWS
ABBOT & COSTELLO—PAT ROC & MAX REED
in in
“HIT THE ICE” “THE BROTHERS”
To-merrow “ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT”







ws



cont

HERE WITHOUT SHAME... IS THE NAKED }
TRUTH ABOUT A BOY, A GIRL AND A
SINFUL CRIME ...



CF



—_—.

The Devil need only
whisper... to







s

Extra! Extra!

those who would

listen!




SAMUEL
GOLDWYN



who brought you America’s
most popular picture,
“Our Very Own’
presents

“THE
Mac ARTHUR

STORY”

First occupation Chief in
Japan’s 2,000 year history!



"starring DANA ANDREWS

FARLEY GRANGER + JOAN EVANS
with ROBERT KEITH * PAUL STEWART
MALA POWERS © ADELE JERGENS
Directed by Mark Robson » Screen Play by Philip Yordan
Based on the Novel by Leo Brady
Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.

Pb bad ttle bdr tb trbvb- ted bbb ttt t ttl ttt bitte t bbb ttt ot” ttle ltt te tt d
DODO OIG PEPE EEE EEE

One of the timeliest Shorts
ever offered the public...

uta.’





Playing from FRIDAY, MAY 4TH (3 SHOWS)
2.30 — 4.45 & 830 P.M.

And Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.



Dubstvtvbvtetbebebtetvbvbvbubn
PIII DIES





THE MOST BRIDGETOWR
POPULAR PP i DIAL
CINEMA 2310
IN TOWN





COMING SHORTLY: (Warner Bros)

“YOUNG MAN WITH A HORN”





EMPIRE

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.30
20th Century Fox Double

Dan DAILEY and
Ann BAXTER in



ROYAL

Last Two Shows ‘To-day
4.30 & 8.30
Universal Big Double

John WAYNE &
Randolph SCOTT

«YOURE MY in
EVERYTHING ” “* THE SPOILERS”
and AND
“SIDE STREET” “ SEVEN SINNERS ”
with — Starring —

Farley GRANGER and
Cathy O'Donnell

ROXY

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M Big Double
George BRENT and

Joun WAYNE &
Broderick CRAWFORD

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
Universal Smashing Double

John HALL and
Maria MONTFZ in



Je /E i
ane POWELL in “< THE COBRA
“LUXURY LINER” WOMAN ”
and —
«THE OUTRIDERS ” * RIDERS OF
‘ SANTA FE”
Starring Starring
Joel McCREA and Rod CAMERON and
Arlene DHAL Fuzzy KNIGHT
SS="- a ew ee eee
THURSDAY,

eS

Another Butlerite
Resigns From Party

(Fron Our O Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.
Members of ihe Butler Party
in Port-of-Spain are dropping off

MAY 3,

like falling petals. Another
executive member and third
Vice-President Mr. MeVorrar

De Freitas and chief organiser of
the Party has.sesigned. Mr. De
Freitas in an exclusive interview
with me said that while at Point
Fortin, South Trinidad, a stormy
meeting took place. He said tha:
for some time there was great
dissatisfaction going on owing tu
the ridiculous statements made
by their “Chief” especially in
the Couneil or on , public plat
forms. Much controversy took
place and rather unsavoury
happenings ended in his immed.
iate resignation. While the
exchanges were going on, Mr
De Freitas said he told Butler:

“I joined this movement five
years, ago, and it is only today
you discover that I am a

Portuguese,”
Mrs. Butler in Tears

Butler replied: “Here is De
Freitas, trying to put me out of
the organisation I have built.”
At that time Mr. De Freitas said
he was supporting certain views
expressed by the Secretary of tne
Party. Announcement of his
resignation was met with di3-
favour. Even Mrs, Tubal Butler
one time Secretary of the “Chief”
held on to De Freitas. “Even
Mrs. Butler, bathed in_ tears,
asked me to reconsider what *
have done.” Hon, Mitra Sinanan
Legal Adviser and member of
the Butler Party, announced his
resignation two weeks ago, It is
reported that these “splits” will
tend to do the Party no good, and
it is feared that soon Butler will
find himself “the lonely one” in
the Legislative Council.

Last week’s suspension of Hon.
Tubal Butler from the Legisla-
tive Council will mean that he
will not receive salary amounting
to* $83.33, out of his $320. Fur-
ther, the Speaker said that Mr.
Butler would not be permitted
to attend or have anything to do
relating to the Council for
eight days. P

Egglesfield Calls
Air Services
Adequate

From Our Own Cotrespondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 30.

Wing Commander Egglesfield,
Director General of Civil Aviation
in the West Indies, arrived in
Trinidad last week to confer with
Sir Miles Thomas, visiting Chair-
man of the B.O,A.C. He com-
mented on the establishment of a
helicopter service for the Wind-
ward Islands, and said that at this
stage it would be too far ahead of
the times for journeys of the kind
over the sea for the most part in a
single-engined craft. \

He pointed out that while work
on a two-engined helicopter was
going on, this would take some
time to complete, as it had to be
flown anq tested. Mr. Egglesfield
said that he thought the existing
aiy services of the West Indies
were adequate, and he described
the recent B.W.1.A. cuts as not
serious enough to impair the
efficiency of the service.

——————

Trinidad Workers
Stage May Day
Parade

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.

Hundreds of workers repre-
senting every industry in the Col-
ony paraded the City on May Day,
whicn is recognised throughout
the world as Labour Day. It was
the biggest demonstration seen in
Trinidad on this occasion, The
cemonstration was organised by
the Trades’ Union Council, which
embraces the majority of Trade
Unions in the Colony. Placards
bearing “We want full employ-
ment,” “Long Live the Working
Ciass,” were held high as bearers
voiced their sentiments marching
triumphantly through the city.
Creating quite a stir among spec-
tators who viewed the procession
was a group of Chinese seamen,
representatives of the Chinese
National Seamen Union. Dressed
in their national costume and
proudly waving their standards,
they walked side by side with
their fellow workers, The
rhythmic beat of the steel band
who played “Onward Christian
Soldiers,” caused many onlookers
to join the parade. . Red-skirted,
and red-tied waterfront workers.
with blue-shirted oilfield workers
shouted their sidagan, “Give us
Work.” At the Savannah the cele-
brants, none the worse for wear,
heard Labour Day addresses by
their respective leaders.





Centeno Scheme Will Get
$33,000 From CDW Funds

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPALN, April 30.

Mr. Griffiths has agreed to pro-
vide $33,000 from Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare Funds to
eid Trinidad in its proposals for
advancing a section of the Cen-
teno scheme in Trinidad at a cost
of $87,000. This new scheme has
been worked out in view of the
establishment of the Central Ex-
periment Station for Agriculture
at Centeno and the possible erec-
tion of a Central Training Insti-
tute and Farm School, which
will make the need for a proper
water supply an ungent necessity.



How Aladdin’s Lamp

won the Princess

Once a poor young man named Aladdin
Whenever he
a genii would appear
h. Now Aladdin

» beautiful princess

found a magic lamp
rubbed the lan
and grant his e Wi

was im love wilt

1951





City Hoard To
Be Shown
At Guildhall

The “Cheapside Hoard,” a
collection of priceless Eliza.
bethan jewellery, found early
this century during excavations
in Cheapside, will be on exhibi-
tion at the Guildhall Museum
during the Festival of Britain.

Under the title “Nineteen
Centuries of City Life,” the

- exhibition will include London’s

personal adornments and house.
hold goods, dating from Romana
times to the present day.

The “Cheapside Hoard” is
believed to be the — stock-in-
trade of a City jeweller or
moneylender, who buried his
goods during some period of
disaster,

An oval watch

It includes a pendant in the
form of a grape cluster of
amethysts, a riehly jewelled

fan-holder, a garnet cross and aa

oval watch with an _ enamelled
face,
Some of the pendants and

chains are patterned with haw-
thorn flowers, daisies, and wild
roses, adorned with gems and
pearls.

The ems
from olombia,
Brazil, Indian rubies .and lapiz
lazuli from Persia, The collec
tion has not been on exhibition
in Lonéon since the first yeat
after the war.—L.E.§..

include emeralds
topaz from



T’DAD’S ADVISERS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 30.

When the Regional Economic
Committee sits in Barbados in
May, Hon. Harold Robinson, Mr.
Alan Storey, and Mr. A, T. Shill
Comptroller of Customs and Ex-
cise, will be Trinidad’s advisers.
This Conference will be under the
auspices of the Comptroller fov
Development and Wefare in the
British West Indies.



BITESOFF MAN’S EAR

From Qur Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.

Peter Rawlins, a Port-of-Spain
man was sentenced to prison in
the Third Police Court. for six
months because he bit off the ear
of another man and swallowed
it.

Sampson the victim, told the
Court that he went to a rum shop
to get a drink of water. Rawlins
-was standing at the counter, and
he asked him for a chance to get
the cu which contained the
water. Kawlins, he said, paid him
no mind, so he touched him on
the back, and Rawlins sprang on
him, bit off a piece of his left
ear and swallowed it.

SCOUTS JAMBOREE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, April 26.

Governor Sir Hugh Foot,
K.C.M.G.,, announced here Sun-
day that it was hoped in Margh,
next year, to have in Jamaica the
biggest Scouts Jamboree that the
West Indies has ever known, to
which will come scouts from all
parts of the West Indies.

The Jamboree is planned to
ecincide with the: seoveriet visit
ef the World Chief Scout, Lord
Rowallan, to Jamaica.

SETS NEW WALKING
RECORD

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 30.
James Jackson, Trinidad’s
champion walker, broke Colvin
Patrick's 20-year-old record in the
Port-of-Spain to Sangre Grande
race—28 miles and 1,000 yards on
Sunday. He won the event in
4 hours 47 minutes. Colvin Pat-
rick had walked and finished that
distance 20 years ago in six hours
2% minutes. Sinee then his record
remained unbeaten until Jackson
did the trick.











Oil Fights
Eelworm Pest

LONDON, April 27.

A_ petroleum-based chemical
product, known as Shell D-D, is
achieving remarkable results as a
soil fumigant and general anti-
pest “policeman”. From both
tropical and temperate countries
the success story is the same, It
has already proved effective in
such widely-different areas as
Hawaii, Uganda, Singapore. Here
is the story of this new ally in the
battle against crop disease,

Shell D-D is an abbreviation of
Dichloropropane-Dichloropropene,
and this liquid mixture of com-
pounds originally a mere waste
product of petroleum chemicals at
Shell chemical plants in the U.S.A,

In 1942-43 a crisis arose in the
hitherto thriving pineapple indus-
try of Hawaii. The root-knot eel-
worm, a microscopic threadlike
creature, was infesting the soil to
such disastrous effect that crop
yields were dropping to a fraction
of normal. Many chemical fumi-

ants were tried without result
hell D-D, by contrast, at once
achieved decisive defeat of the
eelworm and the crop was saved.

As a direct result, the United
States Department of Agriculture
instituted full-scale trials in con-
junction with SheNs research
organization and the fumigant
was quickly proved capable of
providing not only eelworm con-
trol but even, under favourable

conditions, of stimulating the
yield of ali kinds of crops most
spectacularly.

With the end of World War II,
the commercial possibilities of
Shell D-D soil fumigant were soon
demonstrated in many diverse
overseas countries, notably South
Africa, Australia, New Zealand,
Nigeria, Belgium, Holland and
the U.K., where extensive trials
began in 1945-46, —

Controls White Ant

Two other eelworms (or nema-
odes) have proved particularly
troublesome pests — the Potato
Root Eelworm and the Sugar Root
Eelworm, Although proving less
susceptible than tbe Root-knot
eelworm to D—D fumigation, these
two also may once day lose their
underground war. here have
been exhaustive tests on sugar
beet crops in Belgium and else-
where on the Continent and there
is some promise at last of real
relief to the farmer,

Nor is the effectiveness of D-D
confined to the eelworm pests.
Uganda, Singapore and the Phil-
ippines are but three of the areas
Where the termite, or white ant,
has been fought and controlled by
careful fumigation of its nest, One
Singapore report is interesting as
indicating an unusual anti-termite
battlegyound—the greens of a
local golf club.

White grubs attacking sugar
beet in Puerto Rico, eelworm in-
festing narcissus bulbs in Holland,
earthworms in Turkish tobacco
seed-beds, even wireworms,
crickets, ecockchafers and weed
growths—all these are other re-
cent enemies successfully attacked.

DEFT SKINNER
ESCOURT, South Africa,
George Burns, a Yorkshireman,
amazed experienced Natal ranch-
ers recently when he skinned and
eressed an ox of 684 pounds
dressed weight, in the record lime
ef nine minutes, 21 seeonds.(CP)

POWERFUL MOUSE
STAFFORD, England,
A mouse nibbling at an electric
Wite here caused a short circuit,
melting a gas pipe and leading to
an explosion that did heavy dam-
age.-(CP),
NO BOMB
EASTBOURNE, England,
Bomb-disposal experts were
called when workmen uncovered
a large hole im one of the main
streets. It turned out to be the







opening over an old-fashioned
drain,—(CP)
ROUSING REVIVAL
VANCOUVIR.

The clanging of a burglar alarm
interrupted a_ religious revival
meeting in the rear of a garment
store premises here. The pastor
called police, who found the
burglar had been scare ing his crowbar behind. —(CP)





Sy

One day Aladdin asked the genii how he
could get the Princess to marry him.
“Here, Master,” said thegenti,and hand-
ed him a package of Royal Pudding.

The Princess had refused many suitors
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Royal Puddifig, shecried, “It’s delicious!
1 will marry Aim if he promises to serye
me Royal Pudding every day.”



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

“Et tu, Harold?”

: Trish
Dispute

Insoluble
—Says Brooke

By CHARLES A. SMITH.
LONDON, April,

Prime Minister” of Northern
Ireland, Sir Basil Brooke, said in
London that the Irish partition
dispute is insoluble.

“There is absolutely no com-
mon meeting ground between
Northern Ireland and Eire on
which a basis of compromise could
be found or even discussed,” Sir
Basil told International ews
Service.

“And that applies to the long-
term view as well as to the pres-
ent time,” Sir Basil added.

The 64-year-old Premier said
he wanted to clear the air and put
before Americans a true picture
of Northern Ireland’s views.

“Northern Treland chose to re-
main affiliated to Britain by a free
and democratic vote,” Sir Basil
said. “Until the people of North-
ern Ireland say they want to leave
the British Empire and = them-
selves with the Republic of Eire,
Northern Ireland will
separate from Eire.

“Northern Ireland wasn’t dra-
gooned or bludgeoned or com-

lied to stay in the British orbit.

er people chose to remain Brit-
ish and will continue to remain

British,”
Open Ports

‘Sir Basil declared that because
Northern Ireland wanted to play
her full part in the defense of de-
mocracy, she would “readily throw
open her ports, airfields am mili-
tary establishments for the use of
Britain, America, and any other
co-operating powers in the event
of war, whether or not Eire re-
mained. neutral.”

And he said that should General
Eisenhower ask Northern Ireland
for bases, “they will readily be
given him, no matter how much
Eire may protest.”

The Premier described Northern
Ireland as one of thé bastions and
an essential factor in the British
een of defense and emphasized
that it would remain a_ bastion,
“in spite of Southern Irish neu-
trality or in spite of the refusal
of facilities for the use of South-
ern Irish ports.”

Sir Basil charged that an “at-
tempt is being made today to ex-
ploit Western defense in the in-
terests of a campaign for the in-
clusion of Northern Ireland in an,
all-Ireland republic,” and that

remain

Southern Irish leaders have beenj!
attempting to enlist American aicphistoric

in the campaign. He said the basi
of the campaign apparently wa
that partition prevented Eire from
joining with the Atlantic Treaty
defense arrangements,

Ne Impediment

He drew attention however to
Eire’s history of neutrality and to
speeches by Irish leaders, the in-
ference from which was that “the
Irish republic will remain passive
as long as war does not touch its
own soil.”

“There can be no _ departure
from the existing position,” Sir
Basil said. “Whether Southern
Ireland retains or abandons neu-
trality, whether she joins the
Atlantic Pact or continues in iso-
lation, the decision of Northern
Ireland to remain part of the
United Kingdom is unalterable.
This is well known to the South-
ern Irish Government.”

“There is no sound reasgn why
Southern Ireland should not par-

ticipate without demanding the
fulfilment of any extraneous
condition,” the Premier insisted.

“The maintenance of Northern
Ireland's constitutional status can-
not legitimately be said to stand
in the way.”

—I.N.S.

pmnpeieneigpapaaneemmeeae
ESKIMO DELEGATES
ST. JOHN'S, N’fld.

Two Eskimo delegates from
Labrador spoke in their native
tongue at a recent fishermen’s
eonvention. Addresses by Martin
Martin and Jerry Sillett approv-
ing formation of a_fisherman’s
union were translated by another
delegate .—(CP)



Yes, everyone loves Royal Puddings.
They’re so rich and smooth. So nutritious,
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-
nila, and butterscoich. Try one today. |



i :
PREDICTED
WASHINGTON, May 1.
The long secret Wedemeyci
Report on Korea warned Preside:
Truman three years before wa
came that Russia “undoubtedly’
would seek control of that coun-

try, publication of the documen:
disclosed today.

“The report drafted in Septem-
ber 1947 by Lieutenant Genera)

Albert Wedemeyer urged the
United States to undertake a
vigorous programme of arms
assistance to the republic of
Korea.

Wedemeyer recommended to
Truman that American Occupation
treops remain in South
until Russian troops were with-

drawn from North Korea. This
was done. But Wedemeyer’s
recommendations for a

programme of United States

military aid was not implemented,

Wedemeyer predicted “undoubt-
edly” the Russian objective would
be to obtain control of South
Korea by using Communist Nortl
Korean military forces sponsorec
and trained by infiltration and by
other methods usually undertaken
by Reds.

Wedemeyer's report was made

three years before the North
Koreans struck at the South
Korean Republic in June 1950
with an invasion followed

up by the intervention of Chinese

Communists in force in November

1950. ar
Fact Finding

Truman on July 9, 1947 on the
recommendation of the then Sec-
retary of State General Marshall,
ordered Wedemeyer to China and
Korea on a fact-finding mission.
The General and the Mission
spent about one month in China
and then visited briefly Korea,

Wedemeyer said that after
Russian troops left North Korea,
“one of the Kremlin's major objec-
tives” will undoubtedly be to
control South Korea by utiliza-
tion of Communist Korean armed
forces as a means of pressure
after the withdrawal of United
States forces as done in the cases
of Poland, Outer Mongolia, Yugo-
slavia and Albania,”

He declared that “Soviet-dom-
inated Korea would constitute a
serious political and psychological
threat to Manchuria, North China
and Japan and hence to United
States interests in the Far East.

—Reuter



UNDER ESCORT

PORTSMOUTH, England.
Visitors to Horatio Nelson’s
flagship, the Victory, in
‘uture will be personally escorted
9 and from the vessel, to prevent
anyone gaining illegal entry to
he rest of the dockyard. —(CP)

i

Export Drive
In Wide Field

By JOHN E. CARLOVA

LONDON, April.
export drive to-day
from rubber

j
}
|

Britain's
covers everything
nakes and Gaelic dictionaries to
second-hand goose feathers.

These are a few of the items
covered in the 80 to 100 trade
inquiries reaching London each
week from all over the world

A Board of Trade officia) told
International News Service:

“We have a special department
to handle unusual requests. These
experts sort the inquiries out and
pass them along to manufacturers
who might be interested.”

He explained ine request for
rubber snakes—“King Cobras in
a striking attitude”--came from a
dealer in Arizona who thought
“they should have a great appeal
to_ kiddies.”

The Gaelic dictionaries were
wanted in Nova Scotia, and a St
Louis firm
feathers
mattress . {

Board of Trade files show the
requests come in all sizes. In a
single day inquiries were received
about “a few” tiny brass pins of

needed the old goose

for a special type ol!

a special make, three-and-a-half
million bricks and a two-masted
schooner

Puzzling

The Board of Trade experts are
often puzzled but seldom stumped
After investigation on two
requests, they discovered that “a
de-horner” is a deyice for remoy
ing cattle horns and “coffin
furniture” is the metal used in
decorating coffins

The experts admit
a lot in their job.
from Ceylon specifically asking}
about red and yellow umbrellas
led te the knowledge that yellow
umbrellas are used by Buddist
priests, while red ones are strictly
for royal occasions. Natinral
characteristics have to be under~
stood and catered to, For instance,
the experts discovered that
Americans take up more room
than the English when sitting |
down. This led to outsize export |
models in riding breeches and}
shooting sticks—that tricky little |
contraption that can be used as al
walking stick or a resting place |

they learn

An inguiry/



L i os
Korea 10” hikes,

Unkindest Cut
The Board of Trade men saia

strong} they are probably proudest of the }

way they handled a request trom |
he Lord Mayor of Bagdad. lic

wanted to tea service for 1,000]
people in a hurry. He got it, but

the Board of Trade experts are
till wondering .what the hurry

was about,

They said they usually keep
their noses out of the whys and
wherefores, but one from darkest
Africa for 20 Seotch bagpipes was
just too much for them. They
found out that the French coloniai
government wanted the bagpipes
to keep native troops happy.

Sometimes the experts are a
little hurt by the tone of requests

They said the unkindest cut of
all—in meat-rationed Britain—;
was from a dealer in Nebraska
for 1,000 steak knives "beets |
you probably haven't much tse
for them over there.”

—(I.N.S.)
|



Britain's Debt

LONDON, April.

Comptroller and Auditor Gen-
eral Sir Frank Tribe disclosed in
a White Paper that Britain's ex
ternal debt increased by $1,780,
865,603.20 as a direct result of the
devaluation of the pound sterling
in September, 1949,

Devaluation resulted in the cost
of a United States loan being in-
crpased $988,417,085,20, the
Economic Co-operation Agree
ment loan by /95,531,016, the Re-
construction Financg, Corporation
loan by $32,838,688.40, the Cana-
dian loan by $234,660,501, 60,
Canada’s interest free loan by
$83,643,114. 80; Newfoundland's
interest free loan by $2,537,928.40
get Belgium's loan by §$1,192,900..

Sir Frank’s report is on the Con
solidate Fund Abstract Account
for the year ended March 31,
1950,

by



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PAGE FOUR





Thursday, May 3, 1951

Festival Thursday

Today, on the sceps of St. Paul's, the
King will declare the Festival of Britain
open. This year is the fiftieth anniversary
of the Great Exhibition, a successful festi-
val sponsored by Prince Albert, husband
of Queen Victoria.

There is no deubt that the Festival will
be great fun, a fairyland has been created
at Battersea—one of the grimmest parts
of London—and arrangements have been
made for other sections of the show to be
staged in other centres, but is it worth it?
The Festival Gardens alone were estim-
ated at first to cost £770,000, but the cost
has now rocketed to £2,500,000 with an
estimated loss of £1,500,000. Out of all
this will come six months of pleasure for

‘Londoners.

Can the British afford to spend this
amount of money on a celebration when
they have so little to celebrate about? The
Festival, it was hoped, would succeed in
attracting dollar visitors to Britain, and by
putting Britain’s achievements in industry
on show help to boost the export trade.
But so far the Americans seem to be very
little interested in the Festival, and the-
tourists who are going to Britain this year
are heading for Stratford-on-Avon and the
Lake District, not for Battersea. It seems
as if the Socialists, not content with Gam-
bia and the Groundnuts Scheme, have
decided to go in for squandering money on
a large scale at home.

The core of the Festival will be in Lon-
don, where, besides Morrison’s fun fair,
there will be displays drawn from the
fields of science, technology and industrial
design. Also in London there will be ex-
hibitions of books, science and architec-
ture. In Glasgow British heavy industry
will be on show, and the exhibition in Bel-
fast will be mainly concerned with the
Trish linen industry.

There will also be two travelling exhi-
bitions which will visit the important
centres of the country, One of these will
be mounted on a ship and the other will
travel overland. The latter will need over
100 lorries to transport its collection of
5,000 exhibits from city to city.

“The chief and governing purpose of the
Festival”, says the Archbishop of Canter-
bury, “is to declare our belief and trust
in the British way of life, not with any
boastful self-confidence nor with any
aggressive self-advertisement, but with the
sober and humble trust that by holding
fast to that which is good and rejecting
from our midst that which is evil we may
continue to be a nation at unity in itself
and’ of service to the world. It is good at
a.time like the present so to strengthen,
and in part to recover, our hold on the
abiding principles of all that is best in our
national life.” But is this really so? will
the Festival do anything to maintain the
British way of life? It seems very un-
likely,

The only way for the British way of life
to be maintained is for Britain to prosper,
and with a Socialist Government in power
—a Government with so little economic
sense that they agreed that a bankrupt
country should stage an expensive Festival
—there is little hope of that.

But; if the Festival achieves nothing else,
it will at least have brought a little colour
and enjoyment to Britain. With “every-
thing going up” and a-shortage of food,
the British need a little diversion. In
fact, the Festival may act as a moral boo-
ster. But. no doubt it would have been
cheaper to equip every citizen with a
“morale raiser” like the one on show at
Battersea which murmurs comforting re-
marks stich as “Well done old chap; you’re
doing fine!” than stage a mammoth flop,

eee



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ta

“Handy time to tell us we’ve built it upside down.”



History

Ciudad Trujillo

You cannot escape history any-
where, but in this city it lives
with you vocally. For it has the
first cathedral to be established
in the New World; it was in this
island that the first Mass was
sung in the Americas it was here
that the first municipal govern-
ment of the New World was set
up and the first viceroyship of
the western world was that of
Santo Domingo.

It was from Santo Domingo
that Christopher Columbus car-
ried out his other voyages of dis-
covery; he landed on this island
on December 5, 1492—Jamaica
was discovered on May 3, 1494
nearly two years later. Here they
will show you homes’ where
members of Columbus’ family
lived; they reverently show you
too the remains of Christopher
Columbtis in an imposing marble
and vronze monument in the
cathedral.

So it is natural that los Domini-
canos regard themselves as hav-
ing a mission in the New World
—note their five million dollar
plan to erect a great international
monument to Columbus, a mono-
lithic cross one kilometre long
which will stand foursquare, ‘to
all the winds that blow, and will
send to the skies a great cross of
light as a beacon to lighten the
way for all the peoples of the
west.

This sense of mission and sense
of history are perhaps the same.
And it cannot fail to impress you,
even if you regard history as
dull and monuments past or pro-
jected as futile. Jamaicans seem
by contrast completely uncon-
cerned about the past; monu-
ments mean nothing to them;
their history perhaps has not
been sublimated into a national-
istic urge or consciousness.

Not se in Ciudad Trujillé, in
whose past I was perforce steeped
all day today when I had the
honour of a distinguished guide,
Senor Cesar Tolentino, brother of
Gustavo the Dominican Consul in
Kingston .

Cesar is one of the patriarchs
of the Government, the Trujill
Government. With unwrinkled
skin, bright eyes, only his uneven
steps suggest that he is nearing
0. He has served his country

in many capacities. It was dur-



? You Live It
San Domingo

By T. E. SEALY
Editor of The Daily Gleaner

ing his tenure of office as Min-
ister of Agriculture that the great
rice-growing programme was
started; it was his family who
sent to Jamaica seeds of the Buf-
falo strain of rice which have
shown such good results recently.

Cesar has been ambassador in
Spain, France, Rome and _ all
Central America. He knows Ja-
maica too for—like so many other
distinguished leaders of Latin
America in years past—he took
refuge there in 1913 during a
revolution.

Senor Tolentino showed me the
old section of the city with its
ancient walls and gates and forts,
explained the glories of the Do-
minican sense of mission, took
me over the site of the great
Columbus Beacon—el Faro Co-
lon—where men were’ working
at excavations for the central
erypt into which are to be re-
moved Columbus’s remains now
in the Cathedral, and other relics
of the family donated by the
government of Spain. The men
were hard at work although it
was a Holy Week holiday; the
Government wants rapid pro-
gress on the scheme.

>

The symbolism of the monu-
ment is, of course, based on the
cross, the Christian cross; look-
ing to the east from which re-
ligion and civilisation came to the
west; solid and massive in con-
struction to demonstrate the
hazards of wind and earthquake
to which the Caribbean is sub-
ject. Round about jt are to be
built a new town, an international
airport, a modern setting for the
memorial to the country’s found-
er.

Most countries of the New
World are subscribing to the cost,
and the inauguration—perhaps
two years’ time—will be a New
World festival.

After visiting the Senate, which
is housed in a massive building
erected as a Governor's palace
when the Haitians ruled the
whole island, we settled down to
converse. Mellowed by a Britisn
Honduras drink—Pitch a Clan—
or let’s get together—Senor To-
lentino talked of his country’s
past and its present problems,

“andon Exnress Service

In

The Dominican people, he tells | tally, too. Off his horse, many a gaucho is a
seventy-five per | fool,

me, still have
cent. indigenous Indian blood
mixed with Spanish, Negro and
other strains. In the interior you
may still see Dominican types
with the true Indian features.

That is one of the first contrasts
to note between Santo Domingc
and Haiti, the latter predominant-
ly negro, here Spanish mulattoes
on an Amerindian base, And Seno:
Tolentino told me of other con-
trasts—the high production oi
Santo Domingo, the more intense
producti the greater wealth
extracted from the soil. | For
while Haiti has to seek work fo

her people in Santo Domingo | them: a pound of steak and a pint of beer,

there is no unemployment here
and the Government is now de-
finitely to undertake limited im-
portation of Haitian workers
What Senor Tolentino has tolc
me is borne out by the figures
Santo Domingo exports about £14
per annum per head of its two
and a quarter million people:
while Haiti’s three and three-
quarter million people export only
£3 per head. The pressure on the
land in Haiti is great, more than
Jamaica's and almost
twice Santo Domingo’s 155 people
per square mile. The people of

Santo Domingo are able to fur-|moving in cavalcade from corral to corral as

nish taxation at the rate per head
of £14 per annum, more than
nine times the per capita taxes
of the Haitian people, and twice
the per capita taxation in Ja-
maica.

And so when you tie in the his-
tory of the emergence of Sante
Domingo from Haitian domin-
ance, when you realise that near-
ly half a million Haitians were
once living in this country and
had to be sent back home, note
the pressure on land room in
Haiti, the comparative prosperity
of this country, then you can
understand the border incidents
ef some years ago.

Perhaps that is one of the ex

planation’ for the masses
warplanes maintained by
Trujillo Government. Perhaps

too, it shows the significance of

the recent goodwill meetings be |by the yells and lashes of the gauchos to

tween the Presidents of the two
countries. It requires sound
diplomacy to balante the econo-
mic stresses. I begin to under.
stand,



| The tally on the wall outside the market

exactly|of the biggest meat merchants in the world

°
the] are back at the bar, and the heaving, steam-

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951








Frank Owen

In The Land Of Steaks

BUENOS AIRES.
DAWN streamed over the Rio de Plata,
the broad, rolling River of Silver, which is
the colour of mud, as I crossed the great
city and made my way to the West Side
| stock-yards of Mataderos. ;
i At the gateway is a striking bronze
statue of an old bearded gaucho, with bare
feet, long stirrup leathers, and a loose rein,
| riding across the pampas.
Prosperous citizens uptown, driving in
their shining American motor-cars along the
boulevards as beautiful as in Paris, should) %
brave the muck and bear the sour stench
of the stockyards to come and take a good |§
“ at him and his horse.

FOR SCHOOL

PHILIPS’ ATLAS
and.

LAYNG’S ARITHMETIC
ROYAL READERS

Advocate Stationery

sunss SCOOP












Together, they made one-third of this coun-
try’s prosperity and coming power.

The beasts inside the gate of Mataderos
made another third. Heaven, which gave the
sun, the soil, and the winds and rain. provid-
ed the rest.



This handy and useful device provides the
housewife with a new and simple method of prepar-
ing recipes with utmost speed and accuracy. The
“Balansa” can be used for careful weighing and
measuring or as a guide for those who prefer to
guess.

STEP LIVELY
While I was still a mile away I could hear
the moos of the second section of the part-
ners. Nearer, there blended with their bel-
lowing salute to the sun the snorts and
grunts and squeals of the pig public.








WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Successors to
C.S. PITCHER & CO.

"Phones : 4472 & 4687

SISOS

manager’s office announced the state of trade
at the turnstiles: cattle, 10,800; pigs, 777.
Time : 6.45 a.m.

In the stockyard, which was still not yet f
half-filled, it was like getting mixed up in] %â„¢
a Korean cavalry charge.

You need to step lively to miss the motor-
cars in the streets of Buenos Aires, where
there are no traffic lights and few traffic cops.
In Mataderos you jump for your life to avoid
the horsemen.

They came cantering down the tree-lined
lanes, lolling on the broad, barrel-like saddles
of wool and hide, cracking their whips like
pistol shots.

Their horses are as sturdy as bullocks,
sure-footed as goats. They turn when a rein
is laid on their neck, and they turn on a silver
dollar, 4

The gauchos themselves are as tough and| %
wiry as their steeds. Man and horse are|%
almost a single piece, physically and men-| %



SSIS

Enjoy it









with pleasure

PETER DAWSON’'S
SPECIAL

WHISKY

: ‘ji
Again !! :
%
1% THE OLD FAVOURITE
8am. STEAK 1X

Yes, madam, the gaucho wears a wide,

black sombrero, a_ bright-coloured cloak

(poncho), which is really a blanket with a
hole in the middle for the head to go through,
big plus-four trousers stuffed into high leath-
er boots, and a lasso is coiled on his saddle.
But they don’t look a bit like the American
film stars. These are Gurkhas on horseback.
At eight o’clock I am eating breakfast with

———_

JUST RECEIVED
LIGHTNING
ZIPP FASTENERS

. The original Zipp Fastener that










total price—ls. 3d. apiece.

The party then swallows a glass or two!
of local spirits, and fortunately is broken up
by the incessant clanging of the stockyard
jell. The market is about to begin.

Now the acres of Mataderos and the miles
of its lanes echo to the bell, the bellowing of
the beasts and the bawling of the buyers.

Messrs. Vestey, Swift, Armour and others



always works. In sizes - Type -

ie Rare. Lengths and Colours that are

“JUST RIGHT”

Their buyers, also mounted are

the stout 1,000lb. steers are sold, 20 to 40 at
a time, at a price. that ranges around £10
er head.

rc For

every service in Personal

ON THE WING

Bidding against merchants (lest the sever- ‘
al individual buyers should agree to carve apparel and equipment
up the market and cut the price) are the
agents of the Argentine Meat Prodycers’
Corporation.
This is a Government-controlled organisa-
tion to protect the poor Argentine rancher
against the rich foreign merchants,

In an hour or so it is all over, The buyers

For your selection see...

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.
Dry Goods Dept.

ing, slithering beasts are being herded off

their last round-up. Mataderos has done its
business for the day.

At noon other visitors arrive. Very im-
portant personages, these, at any rate in the

it's MAY DAY !!

TIME TO-*
SERVE WINE

steerage oi the Argentine.
They have come by special Pan-Air plane;







OUR READERS SAY:

flying some 10,000 miles from Toronto, in

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Row
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2
a

Oil

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Cil is a known emollient
+a soothing agent. It was this
~ eas, that was in old Keir
- “Hardie’s mind when he said about
Churchill “well he doesn’t walk
about with an oil can.” But oil
as far as Barbados is concerned
, Stems to have lost this quality
_,since an important debate in the
House of Lords as published in
last Sunday's Advocate. “It has
‘, mow become an irritant, and aia’-
one who ventures to discuss ii
‘Ieaves himself open to criticism.
But if a subject is important it
should be discussed and talked
about in the honest endeaveur to
find the true facts‘and perspective,

In the Lo¥ds’ debate Lord Teviot
made. the following points— »

(I)* The B.U. (we'll,call them
so for brevity) had secured leases
over 78% of drillable land in
~Barbados. 2

(2) They drilled 52 wells of
about 4,015 feet deep. ;

(3) This was the position when
war started in, 1939.

(4) Arrangements had been
made with Leaseholds to drill
deep wells.

(5) In March 1946 the Col,
Secretary of Barbados intimated
to the Company that the Barba-

dos Government intended to take
over all underground oil rights,
and give the B.U. prospecting li-
cences over the whole Island.

(6) In July 1947, Sir H. Blood,
Governor of Barbados, read to
the Company’s agent a despatch
from the Colonial Office, London,
suggesting that Barbados give
a prospecting license to the Com-
pany over the whole » in
return for the surrender of the
Company's leases.

(7) Mr, Lepper’s report (Janu-
ary 1949) had recommended that
the B.U. be given the sole pros-
pecting licence over the ole
Island.

(8) In May 1949 the acting
Governor of Barbados confirmed
to B.U.’s Manager that his Gov-
ernment would abide by the
Lepper report.

(9) Trusting to these promises,
the B.U. surrendered their leases,
and did not oppose the Petroleum
measure,

(10). The aet gave no compen-
sation for the loss of rights io
explore for oil, which the B,U.
had secured by their leases,

These points make quite a for-
midable impression on the reader,
but you should note that they
consist of statements by a Col-
onial Secretary of Barbados—by

a Clerk in the Colonial Office,
London—by a Governor of Bar-
bados, and by Mr. Lepper. Now
none of these had any right or
authority to speak for the Legis-
lature of Barbados, or to bind
that Legislature in any way. [An
important Constitutional question
is involved, but this letter is too
long already to deal with that
here]; Nevertheless is it not a
fact that if you or I had received
such assurances we should have
relied on them, and been content
to do so.

Now about 1950 something
must have happened because
when the B.U. applied for a
prospecting licence it was refused.
Mr. Tanner had been asked for
advice. Who was the person who
first suggested the appointment
of a Canadian expert to advise
about Petroleum Regulations? We
shall probably never know. Up
to then the sky had been quite
clear and a_ gentle breeze had
been blowing favourable to the
B.U.;. but. storm clouds now
gathered, Someone had queered
the pitch for the B.U. Who was
it? Even Lord Teviot does not
suggest that persons here were
better off financially after the
above change of weather and I
should hate to think that a well
known American method of pro-
moting business had any place in
Barbados. In fact I do not believe
it.

Was it only that some bright
fellow suggested that it would be
advisable to have a competitor
in the field so that he and the
B.U. could spur each other on
to a speedy investigation of the
oil resources? Did some one think
that the B.U. did not show ade-
quate results for 32 years work
in the Island, and that they
should have sunk a deep well long
ago when the shallow wells prov-
ed inadequate? In this connection
it is fair to remember that the
war period should be written off,
as no materials could then be
obtained.

It is a pity that the B.U.
agents walked out of the meet-
ing so abruptly. Such conduct
achieves nothing, it only antag-
onises. If they had remained to
bargain they would probably have
secured r terms. Let us try
to forget all that and remember
that “in my opinion all that is
“known today about the Oil
“prospects of Barbados has been
“due .to the drilling opera-
“tions of the B.U. and the re-
“searches of its geologists”. [Lep-
per]. ;

If it be possible. at this late
hour to assist the B.U. and con-
cede better terms, let us be glad
to do it:

E. C. JACKMAN,
May 2, 1951.

Canada—16 splendid black-and-white Hol-
stein bulls.
All of these handsome gentlemen are

descended from famous fathers and are},

themselves each worth about £1,000.

It has cost at least 1,000 dollars apiece
(£340) to fly them here over America, the
Indies and the Andes,

Their flight took them close on three days,
due to fog over the Amazon jungle.

“What happens if they get restive at
12,000ft. ?” I asked the genial Canadian crew

| master.

“Oh, easy,” he said. “We just go up another
few thousand feet, and then the young fellers
sorta get short of breath and want to lie
down in the hay.”

MILLIONS ! OF

Every other week such another “bull flight”
lands on this giant airfield, probably the
largest in the world. The ranchers reckon

that it is no dearer and much safer than|

shipping the animals by a month-long sea!
voyage.

No doubt they know their own business
best. And cattle, with corn is the Argentine’s
own, and best, business.



{
|
—bES. |



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FRESH VEGETABLES

Carrots, Cabbage,
Beets, Tomatoes









WITH A
DELIGHTFUL
ROAST

Gold Braid Rum
Top Notch Rum
Vielle Curé
Curaco

Creme de Menthe,
Benedictine

THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS

Anchor Butter

Anchor Rich Milk Powder
Australian Cooking Butter
‘Van Houten’s Cocoa
Cadbury’s Cocoa Essence
Chocolate Nut Roll
Planter’s Nuts

Dutch Cheese

QUALITY MEATS

Beef, Lamb, Veal, Chickens
Frozen Salmon

Danish Cheese

Carr’s Crackers

Carr’s Tea Biscuits

Tea time Pastes in Jars—

15c. each.
Cook’s Paste—6c, each

Chocolate Cunch Biscuits—
10c. each

& POULTRY

Frozen Fillet Sole
Frozen Cod Fillets

Phone GODDARDS —

WE DELIVER

FFF
o
THURSDAY,

"
oy

MAY



Sketches

1951



Led To

Amateur Theatrieals

the
ing

cumstances,



MR. C. A. GROSSMITH

. -'t

Threatening
‘Letters Received

HE POLICE are investigating

a report from Marjorie Hard.

ing of Pool, St. John, who stated

that she received two letters from

an unknown person demanding
$20 by threats.

One letter was received on
April 21 and the other on April 27.
Ov WAY TRAFFIC system,

which has been in use in the
City for many months, is now ex-
tended to Fairchild Street. Hand
earts can go in any direction, but
motor and horse-drawn vehicles
and cyclists must obey the one way
traffic signs.

N TUESDAY evening table
tennis players from the
Y.M.C.A, visited the Y.W.C.A.

and gave the players there instruc.
tions in the game,

The men some of whom were
“A” Class players also gave many
exhibition games and the _ladies
were extremely interested.-Up to
late on Tuesday night, long after
the men had left, the ladies could
still be seen practising.
een broke and entered the

house of Jane Millington at
Rockley, Christ Church, and stole
a quantity of clothing and other
articles, total value $46.20. Tho
incident occurred between 6.00
p.m. and 9.00 p.m. on Monday.

PROGRAMME of varied

church musie will be ren-
dered at, the annual organ and
song recital at the St. John Bap-
tist Church, St. James, on Thurs-
day May 17 beginning at 7.45 p.m

The recital is being given in aid
of vicarage funds.

DEATH INQUIRY:
AGAIN ADJOURNED

Hearing in the inquest into the
death of Helena Mullins, a labour-
er of Sandy Hill, St. Philip, was
further adjourned until to-day by
Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Coroner of
District “A” yesterday.

Helena Mullins died suddenly on
the way to the General Hospital
on April 26 while she was being
transferred there from the
St. Philip Almshouse.

Only medical evidence was taken
vesterd»y and this was given by
Dr. A. S. Cato who performed the
pest mortem examination on the
body of Mullins at the General
Hospital on April 27.

He said that the apparent age of
the woman was about 41 years.
She was identified to him by Wil-
liam Linton and she was dead for
about 18 hours. There was a large
swelling under the scalp but there
were no signs of cerebral haemor-—
rhage. The skull was fractured. In
his opinion death was due to frac-
ture of the skull.

£3 for Faulty Brakes

A District “A” Police Magis-
trate yesterday ordered William
Gittens of Trent District. St.
George, to pay a fine of £3 by
monthly instalments or in default
two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour when he appeared on
a charge of driving a motor lorry
with faulty brakes.

The offence was committed on
March 14 while he was driving
the lorry along Arthur Hill Road.
Set Forde prosecuted for the
Police.

Inspector A. Farnum of High-
ways and Transport, said that he
examined the brakes of the truck
and found that the foot and hand
brakes were not working pros

perly. 2 he

Fined For Overloading

TWO bus conductors were fined
by a City Police Magistrate yes-
terday for overloading their buses.
They were Rupert Doyle of
Roebuck Street, St. Michael and
Darnley Yearwood of Branchbury,
St. Joseph.

Doyle was ordered to pay a
fine of 20/- in 14 days or one
month’s imprisonment and Year-
wood 10/- in seven days» or
seven days’ imprisonment, Doyle
was the conductor of the bus
M—1422 on Harmony Road, St.
Michael, at about 3.55 p.m. on
March 10 when the policeman on
duty stopped the bus and counted
44 passengers.

Yearwood’s bus was carrying 33
passengers when it was stopped.
The Magistrate told both conduc-
tors that the overloading of buses
was becoming very prevalent and
he hoped that it would stop.



COLLISION
Shortly after 10.10 a.m. yes-
terday, the motor lorry, O,145,

owned and driven by Joseph Kell-
man of Church Village, St. Jos-
eph, was involved in an accident
ey Coleridge Street near the Fire
Brigade Station with the bicycle
M.1040 owned and ridden by Syd-
ney Beckles of Bank Hall, St. Mi-
chael
The front wheel of the bicycle
extensively damaged.



MR. C. A. GROSSMITH, Administrative Secretary of
Development and Welfare Organisation who is produc -
Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion at the British Council’s
Little Theatre, Wakefield House, has had a great deal of
experience of dramatic work in an unusual variety of ¢ir-

In” an interview at Hastings
House yesterday, he told the
Advocate that though he was not
closely connected with the famous
theatrical family of the Grossmiths,
there was some slight relationship,
and perhaps, enough of their blood
flowed in his veins to account for
the interest in the theatre he had
felt all his life. ° os

He said that he developed a
taste for amateur acting when,
with a few of the officers of his
battalion ef the East Lancashire
Regiment in Mesopotamia at the
end of World War I, they tried to
ease the boredom of the troops
waiting for demobilization with
home made sketches. After that,
he was working in Germany for
some years and took the opportu—
nity to study German literature
and the drama in Berlin.

French, German Plays

On his return to England in 1934
he joined a small private circle of
friends for play readings in French
and German—which *;was great
fun. ' Ss

In the very early thirties, the
Colonial Office started an Amateur
Dramatic Society, and for about
ten years, they put on a series of
plays, gome of which he produced.
The Society produced Comedies of
Shakespeare, plays by Goldsmith
and Sheridan, modern drama and
Grand Guignol thrillers.

‘Phe plays" were performed in
hospitals and working men’s clubs,
winding up with three or four pub-—
lic performances,

Shakespeare played in curtain
sets was alWays well received,
but sometimes there were snaps,

One small club in North London
for instance, when they were
playing the “Taming of the
Shrew,” very kindly gave them
a painted back ‘sheet portraying
the local High Street complete
with an electric tramway system.
They held their breath for a
guffaw from the audience wher
their _small_page. announced: “A
street. scene in Padua.” But it was
allright. —- -

Public Readings

Mr. Grossmith was a founder
member of the Amateur Dramatic
Cirele at the Royal Empire
Society in London. He had been
too busy to do much during the
war, but he had kept his hand
in by taking parts in and helping
to run the public readings at the
Royal Empire Society of such
widely different plays as Shaw's
“Apple Cart”, “and Bridie’s
“Tobias and the Angel”.

When Mr. Tucker spoke to him
about helping with a performance
for the very little theatre at
Wakefield, he felt honoured and
readily accepted the invitation.
The choice ofa play was not
easy because for a_ variety of
reasons including Mr. Tucker's
early departure on leave to Eng-
land, there was so little time in
which to make a selection and get
underway with rehearsals.



To Speightstown
By Schooner

What about a sail to Speights-
town by schooner? This is the
atest craze of some Canadians
and Venezuelans holidaying here.

The Speightstown schooners are
in Bridgetown at least twice a
week. Around midday they sail
into the Careenage and just after
a few hours at the waterfront; they
are on the way to Speightstown
again. ?

No luxury cabins nor saloons,
just a small wooden deck on
which the pleasure seekers sit,
holding fast occasionally to the
riggings. They get lots of fun out
of the sail. .

They never lose sight of the
§and. The schooners just skirt
the coast and they make the trip
in about an hour and a half to two
hours.

What seems to attract them
most is the beautiful scenery of
the coast. Their eyes are hardly
ever off the coast. They hurl
questions at the sailors who are
always keen to tell them what
they are seeing.

When the weather is good, they
are always “so sorry” because
they have come to the end of the
trip too quickly. They land at
Speightstown pier and motor back
to Bridgetown.



WHEN THE WATER
IS TURNED OFF

THE Chief Engineer of the
Waterworks told the Advocate
esterday, that\the Department

not turned off water from any

seholder ..for. the current
quarter due to non-payment of
rates.

He said that. water rates should
be paid in advance during the
first tensdays of the quarter.
Reminder notices are put in the
newspapers about the end of the
second month and during the last
quarter, 2,000 personal reminder
notices were issued in the third
month.

It is only after this has been
done and the rates not paid that
the Department send out repre-
sentatives to shut off the water.
The Waterworks Department had
no wish to cause inconvenience
to people, but water rates must
be paid. :

If a new tenant fails to notify
the Waterworks of his tenancy,
naturally, the Department would
have no knowledge of his occupa-
tion of the building and water
would not. be available until
turned in by request.

Travelling Bank
Does Good Business

The Travelling Office of the
Government Savings Bank com-
pleted its tenth weekly visit to
the various sugar estates in the
island yesterday.

Business done for the week
showed that there were 78 depos-
its of which 13 were new accounts
and the amount of money collect-
€d was $2,701.12,



HOPES TO RREAK FASTING

i ‘

THE NAME of this man is

he started on his foodless marathon.
of fifty days without food. Twent;
by going without food for 46 days.



Board Of Health Want

Public Health



BARBADOS ADVOCATE






Mi given as Bobby, and he is se i
specially constructed glass cabin at Joachinisthaler Platz, Berlin, 2

He hopes to set up a new record
y five years ago he set up a record
—Evxpress

Act Amended

THE Board of Health will write a letter to the Colonial
Secretary asking him to go about getting the Public Health

Act amended so as to get proposed roads in the

mitted to the

plans sub-

Board, constructed to the satisfaction of the

Director of Highways and Transport. The Director would

have to forward a report to

100 Years
“The Liberal”, May 3, 1851
LEGISLATIVE PROCEEDINGS

MR. MAYCOCK introduced
a petition from the Council
of the General Agricultural
Society, which he moved
might be read. Mr. E. Packer
seconded the motion, and the
petition was read.

The petitioners allege that
the agricultural interests of
these colonies pre already
sufficiently depressed by the
unequal competition with the
Slave colonies to which they
are now exposed, and that
there is every likelihood of
further injury being done
them through the alleged
privileges if the patentees of
the princivle of applying
centrifugal force,to the curing
of sugar—which privileges
they claim to exercise only
in the free British Colonies.
Under these circumstances
and with a view to avert the
evils apprehended —, the
petitioners pray that the
House take steps for recurring
to this colony the privilege of
importing machines of foreign
invention and manufacture.

Australian Meat
Arrives ©

The steamship Tongariro was
still here yesterday ° discharging
the shipment of meat, cheese and
other foodstuffs she brought from
Australia. oh Tuesday.

Carts, lorries and vans were
being loaded with the bags and
boxes of the refrigerated cargo
which they took to their consig-
nees. Housewives will get thein
supplies of the meat to-day.

Oo







“Challenger”’
Takes Rum

The motor vessel Canadian
\Challenger left Barbados last
night for Canada after spending
four days here loading sugar,
molasses and rum for Canadian

ports.

She has loaded 600 tons of
sugar for Montreal, over 1,000
puncheons, barrels and half-

barrels of molasses for Charlotte-
town, Quebec, St. John and Hali-
fax and a quantity of rum.

The Challenger is sailing to
Canada via St. Lucia. Her agents
are Messrs, Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd.

YAMS SELL
SLOWLY,

Land owners who have planted
yams are finding difficulty in get-
iing them sold, the Director of
Agriculture, Mr. C. C. Skeete,
told the Advocate yesterday.

Housewives do not seem very
keen on ineluding much yam in
their food and so _ vegetable
dealers are not buying many.

The Director said that if the
yams remain in the ground too
long they will sprout again.

Latrine Wanted
In Bus Stand

It is now more than six months
that the bus stand has been re-
moved to Probyn Street. No lat-
rine has been erected at any place
near the bus stand. The bus con-
ductors and drivers complain be-
cause none is nearby and say that
one would be very convenient

Some told the Advocate yester-
day that a latrine would be es-
pecially useful to them as they
have to be about there regularly,
Besides, many people have to wait
about there to catch their buses





the Board.

The Board wants better
tenantry roads. They were cofi
sidering suggestions by the
Director of Highways & Tran
port for the type of road suitable
for construction in tenantries
under the Public Health Act,

The President of the» Board,
Dr. E, B, Carter, .said that at
present they could not demand
any definite type of road,

Mr. J. M, Kidney illustrated
an instance of a big area whici
had been divided, but which ha
no proper roads, He said tha‘
in many instances stones were
merely dropped upon the roads
and when the areas wére gold
out, Government weve put in an

embarrassing position and que
tioned about the roads,

Hon. V. C. Gale said that no:
mally the roads _ should I
inspected after they were finish
ed, but he believed that. the,
custom of inspection was not
followed up. aA

Mr. W. A. Abrahams, Chief
Government Inspector, told the
Board that inspectors used te
inspect the roads but the ques
tion was brought u as to
whether it was really their duty
Another thing was that some-
time permission was given to
divide land for agricultural pur-
poses and then a house would be
put up, the owner holding — that
he wanted to watch his iand

Decision Postponed

The Board postponed their

decision on the application for

permission for the division and
sale in lots of 78,000 square feet
of land at Westbury Road, St,
Michael, by Mr. S. A. Hawkins.

Dr. F. N. Grannum who visited
the spot said that when he saw
the land it was not flooded, bu-
it was very low lying land and
was apt to get flooded,

Four members of the . Board
will visit the site before they
decide whether they will approv«
the division,

The Board approved of the
division and sale in lots of
174,240 square feet of land al
Lodge Plantation, St. Michacl
by Mr. H, R. Farmer,

Permission was granted
Hutchinson & Banfield, Solici
tors, to amend the plan an!

statement in connection with the
proposals for the division = ani!
sale of land at Bush Hall and ip
the certificate of approval from
130,630 square feet to 135,120
square feet. Hutchinson & Ban.
field were acting for Ebeneze:
Alleyne.

YACHT ON DOCK

The pleasure yacht Maria
Catharina was on dry dock yes
terday. She is expected to spend
about four days on dock. When
she comes off, she will be making
ready to sail to Grenada.

Dock workers were removing
moss and seaweeds from her bot-
tom yesterday. She will be paint
ed and will undergo other minor
repairs.









FOUNTAIN PENS
Each 60c; $1.00; $1.08;

EXERCISE BOOKS
with single and double

PAINT BOXES—Each 42c;
PENCIL BOXES — Each

CRAYONS



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

moll

Supplies are in demand again

including Avithmetic

—

RECORD Larceny Case AMERICAN COLUMN:

Dismissed

A case brought by the Police
charging Eric Green of Thorn-
bury Hill, Christ Church, with the
larceny of clothing valued at
£1 19. 4 and the property of
Emmanuel Ishmael, was yesterday
dismissed without prejudice by a
District “A" Police Magistrate.

Sgt. C. Murrell prosecuted for
the Police while Green was not
represented by Counsel. Emmanuel
Ishmael told the court that he left
Green in his place on the morn-
ing of Avril 24 and when he re-
turned he found that a pair of
pants, and a shirt were nussing.

Sometime later he saw Green
wearing his shirt and he reported
the matter to the Police,

Another witness Drucilla
Mountain—said that she saw the
defendant with a parcel under his
arm on April 25. When she saw
him he was coming out of the
complainant's house. She could
not say What was in the parcel.

After reviewing all the evidence
the Magistrate said that there was
a doubt in his mind and as that
was the case, he would have to
give the defendant the benefit of
the doubt

Rosetta Sails The
World In 45ft. Boat

Ffom FRANK OWEN.
BUENOS AIRES, Friday.

: In a muddy, leafy creek of the
River Plate a’ 45-foot Australian
cutter, Waltzing Matilda, sailed by
three young men and a girl, made
ready to put to sea on the second
lap of the voyage round the world

The first stage

recently when
Matilda dipped her flag to the
Argentine capital and rolled up
the River Plate after a five-month
trip across the South Pacifie from
Sydney to Cape Horn,
_ “We sail now for Montevideo,
Rio de Janeiro, Pernambuco and
Bermuda—before the gales break,’
Said the skipper, Roy Davenport,
tall, tough, blue-eyed ex-R.A-F.
war pilot, as the cutter lay hauled
up for a refit.

“Then we head for New York,
and after that for Bonnie Secot-
land and Merrie England.”

“Don’t forget about France,
said dark-eyed, dark-haired (it is
a cute crew-cut) Rosetta Jean, his
young wife, in bell-bottom pants

All in R.A.F.

The other two of the
“the boys,” skipper Roy
them, are his younger
Keith and Donald Brown.

All three served in the R.A.F.
and since the war Roy and Don
have flown in civil airlines,

Mrs. Davenport was a hostess
in Qantas Airways, flying weekly
on the London-Sydney | route,
Keith has been a_ reporter in
Australia and Britain, and he is
keeping a lively log of his present
assignment.

Waltzing Matilda
trim craft.

She was built ostensibly for
ocean racing, “but I always had
that old schoolboy dream that I
would sgil and see the world in
her,” oa skipper Roy.



the | Waltzing

crew,
calls
brother

is a strong

He faced her for two years
between Sydney and Tasmania.
Ther’ the adventurers set forth

to see the world.

It was October
left Sydney for Auckland, New
Zealand. It took them 17 days,
and they spent a month or more
‘there,

29 when they

44 days

Then they headed for the South
Pacific, and for 44 days they
never saw another sail, hardly a
bird, and only a whale in all that
vast rolling waste of seas.

They made their landfall on
fthe rocky coast of Chile at Gulfo
de Penas.

Then they sailed south towards
Cape Horn, but heavy storms per-
suaded them to seek the route to
jthe South Atlantic by way of the
Magellan Straits,

“It was dirty enough in there,”
said Don Brown, “We would
anchor at nightfall, and all would
be peaceful and calm. Then sud-
denly the winds they calls
‘williwaws’ rose like a squall anc
blew at 50 miles an hour down
those steep funnel-like channels.”

The adventurers plan to sail up
Léndon River in September. I
hope we get the flags out.



ended safely |

SHOPS ARE

CUTTING
PRICES

NEW YORK.

For the umpteenth time the
economists and business trend
“predictors” have all been caughi
flat-footed—and this time it mean:
good news for “the consumer’
(meaning the man in the street)

In what the normally = staic
Wall-street Journal gleefully de
scribes as “a switcheroo.” the tun
has changed almost overnight it
Washington

Until the other day the talk wa
all gloom—shortages, disappearin,
#oods, higher prices

Now everyone is saying tha

prices are on the way down, Anc

all over this big country the

are proving it with cut—pric

sales.

Stocks ‘of goods on hand re
enormous. Estimated busines
inventories stood at a _ recor

65,100 million dollars at the en¢
of February—up 138,000 millioy
dollars over a year ago

MRS. JOSEPH TUTELA of Bos
ton, Massachusetts, complained t
Judge Jacob Lewiten that hei
husband was failing suppor
her.

Said Mr. Tutela
“Nonsense, once
dollar wreath
funeral,”

Said the judge: “No woman ca
buy groceries with a wreut!
however beautiful it is.”

SOMETHING odd is happenin,
to America’s night life. While the
expensive places and 50~doll arte
seat night clubs report a roaring
business, the cheap spots specialis:
ing in beer and juke boxes
languish.

Anthony Antravartolo, boss
the Chicago Tavern
Association succinctly
has done us dirt.”

to

indignantly
I gave her a ten
for her aunt



of
Owners
says “T'V

THE G.I's in Korea will soon be
getting their ham and eggs all ir
one tin, At Vineland. New Jersey
they are busy turning out the fips
shipments..What’s more, the egy
are not powdered but are seram
bled whole eggs. The ham i:
chopped.

THE AMERICAN _ farmer i
making more money than he ey>
did before—but there are far few |
men on the farms than there we
ten years ago.

The U.S, Censug Bureau reve |
that 1,300,000 men left the farm
for the big city since 1940.

eet en ae

| Junior Short Story Competition

PAGE FIVE



The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter f
ts Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be publish
very Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
» prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The stories
an be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 3@0
vords in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, the Advocate
Ce. Ltd., City not later than Wednescdoav every week.

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

.

Name ...... Oh erent revere ssecres ° tedeeeoreees
BOO Kwesi sees gris tas Seen sire oF eaacce te bowsewe
School .,.........+- chee... Sees eeee cenae tan ee
OTM occ icc cc ccceteccencseeececceecoessvesae vowe
Home Address . sed ee sees ede ne ceeerinesoesuwees










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NO NEED TO ADD







wick eue MILK OR SUGAR |
A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT =~

RITA HAYWORTH, longing fo: a a a wa a Ba a w@ a a a wa ae a

a good old American frankfurter
(one of those light brown saus
ages inside’a roll) ordered one a.
her New York hotel.

A posse of “bell boys” was sent
to scour the neighbourhood, They
unearthed a frankfurter
modest drug store.



Canadians Unhappy
Over Trade Balarice |
With B.W.I. |

MONTREAL, May 2.
Canadian exporters are un-
happy about the unfavourable
trade balance between Canada
and the British West Indies, J. C
McDerby, Manager of the Cana-
dian Exporters’ Association told
the Montreal Service Club.

Restrictions by the United King-
dom were responsible for this un-
favourable picture, he said. Last
year’s imports from the West
Indies exceeded by $37,000,000
the value of goods sold in the
colonies by Canadian exporters,

He added: British West
Indies come under the United
Kingdom’s sphere of influence
and efforts to create a favourable
trade atmosphere with thé islands
— not been too well rewarded,”
—(CP),

“The



Trading Co. Has $193,000 Profit

The Board of Directors of tho

Barbados Shipping and Trading
Company, in their Annua!
Report, presented at yesterday’:
Annual Ordinary General Meet
ing of the Company, Prince
William Henry Street, showec
that the net profit for the yeai

was $193,851.60

The balance brought forwara
the report stated, amounted tk
$152,336.45 so that the total

amount available for distribution
was $346,188.05.

Mr, D. A. Lucie Smith ani
Mr. G. H. King, members of the
Board of Directors, who wer:
retiring under article 83 of tne
Articles of Association, wer:
re-elected yesterday,

The Board of Directors is a:
follows:— Mr. J, H. Wilkinson,
(Chairman); Mr. George S, Man

$1.32; and $2.96

lines--Each l0e.

60c; $1.20; $1.44
60c; and 84c.
18c; and 30c.



10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET











ning, (Vice Chairman), Mr. ¢
M. Manning, Mr. C, W. M
Sealy, Hon. Rn, Challenor
M.L.C., Hon. G. Douglas ~ Pli
M.L.C,, Mr. G. H. King, M
D. G, Leacock, Junior, Mr. G

D, Bynoe, Mr, D, A. Lucie-Smith

The Directors recommend th;
the amount of $346,188.05 bi
dealt with as follows

A dividend ot the; rate of
44c, per share per annum,

lews Income Tax at 4/6

in the £, be deciared,

absorbing NET $189,502 50
The sim of .,. 2,303



be placed to Reserve for
the Pepairs of Buildings

The sum of .. 2,000 0
be granted for charitable
donations at the = dis-
cretion of the Directors

The balance of 152,382 27

be left at the credit of
this Account. -
$7A6, 186 05





lots of other
Essential items



S9OCS SOO PS IO VSS OSS F FSO POSSI IODC PEE EE EE ATE)

|



git. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pistibutors.




a “PURINA”

LAYENA

see



USE A

“RIPPINGILLES ©

BLUE - FLAME
STOVE

5 ie el ih ini is el



_ FOR EASY & CLEAN |
| COOKING

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (B08) LTD.

AGENTS.



PLCLLLGLOPPLLALELLPLOLELLEVPFLPODVDA PPPS SORFSR





BEFORE
THE PRICE
ADVANCES







WE HAVE LARGE STOCKS OF

ARDATH cork tirrep .
CIGARETTES

Packages cf 10's & 20's which we
are reducing.

Original price 10’s—19¢. now léec.
20’s—-38e. ,, 32c.

Cartons of 200 for $3.00
Every cigarette guaranteed in
perfect condition.

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



* % aa tS aes (CO os (0S SDSS i 9S S

SOOSECS


PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951
ah a Td Ae ea ; —

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY

GuESS He MUST B= ONG |

\ OF THESE oy ae |



LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STAR

| Neediest Cases Fund

ANNOUNCEMENT

Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June at
Queen's Park, the undersigned will
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume

(bp) Steel Bands.

(ce) Advertising Bands.
(d) Histerical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carniyal, the Steering Committee
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being as original as ;

No entrance fee will be charged.

More jculars lates

A Carnival Band of thirty will
be visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade.

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk’s Office,
Bridgeto




MORNING, } |~

DRY GULCH’!
ANY NAME |S J. FLADDER WELKINRING !
1 REPRESENT “CATACLYSMIC PICTURES"!



SA.ESMEN YOu HEAR
SO WCH ABOUT!

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BD a e A :





O nadabads You

PROMISED TO F dgetown.
DRAIN UNDER THE 5 For Booths, Stalls, and side-
. Shows, contact C. MORRIS,

Sobers Lane.

mw SINK FOR ME



~~







asim good looks tell you they’re just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price

tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
AS is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is
‘ ~ the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign

laa 9/ Gi wen which means ‘just right’! Look for it in
\ . leading stores in Barbados.

— JOHN WHITE

means made just.right






* ee ee
5 ee ht eae
a Selt
ih the first sign
sj; of muscular
to Ne | fatigue. The
i same safe an-
algesic, so effective
as a-headache rem-
edy, relieves discom-
fort quickiy, helps
you to relax. Keep
it handy - a/ways/







| 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH |

nh
then gave it up, An_ interesting
true beok by Monica Baldwin,



) Sring us your Feontain Pens for
modern tools for Pen Service.

'‘ JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
HARDWARE











Wes
K STRIKER

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HER

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only













[PACK ALL.OUR LOOT, Boys/) | [we wasTeD Time TRYING }/ LOOK! YJ
SADDLE! “VE GOT TO MOVE TOA CROOKS a THERE'S
LEAVEATRAILFOR THELAWTO IDE~OUT gamece= = c ONE
x. De.









USUALLY = NOW USUALLY NOW

Mushrooms, Tins 55 AB Floral
Icing Sugar, Pkgs. 33 29
Corned Beef with Cereal, Tins 31 25

Smedley’s Peas, Tins 48 44

All Bran, Pkgs. 29 25 Allsopp’s Beer, Bots. 26 20



D

‘WAGE YOu DON'T
XPBCT.ME TO WEAR
HeGtLY GETLP ————————————
AT THE BALL
may TONIGHT





EARLY FROM een

YOUR OFFICE!



THE AGENTS IN ARMS

by MARY WINTER

ADVOCATE BEYOND THE EAGLE’S RAGE

by HUGH POPHAM

HAS THE TWO SCAMPS

by GEORGE A. BIRMINGHAM

BEST A WINDOW CLEANER’S ROMANCE

by NOEL GODBER
BOOKS a

IN TOWN ADVOCATE STATIONERY

POROGISGS G9 SSOOSS9FD



rae

eta
-

SONNA GIT TH HERD
E2 THE BORDER



"LL TRY ONCE AGAIN -AN’
, SEE IF THOSE RUSTLERS

9999



Bus and

i '
TRUCK OWNERS |

Ni ° |
|

|










TLL GIVE YOu THE
KEY WHEN WE GET
ASHORE, IF yOu'LL

CAMBRIDGE
CYCLE TYRES



INSPECTION TIME NEED
NOT BE WORRYING TIME









|
\ °
S SEATS |
TIONIDE LEATHERETTE GREY PAINT. for Flooring | ’
CARPET MATERIAL SIGNAL RED for Body miles or
RUBBER MATS HEAT RESISTING BLACK
— NEVER? IT TAKES MORE THAN A P | T REAR VIEW MIRRORS WHITE LEAD & ZINC
7 OT FEW CHEAP GAMBLERG ANDTNT TO 2 , f Mieco 6 & 12 Volt BUZZERS MUFFLERS & PIPES
DIANA, WON'T YOU \" STOP US PALMERG. BESIDES, DEVILLL i evant / A ROOF LAMP BULBS & KING PIN SETS Our Mon
CHANGE YOUR MIND, Jap-yeagmempingmr TANE CARE OF ME++LETSGOF , AT? OS SOCKETS DECARBONIZING SETS | y : ey
a poy ee coer wate a . : 4 ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX BRAKE LINING SETS -
- -at - N —= . BATTERY CABLES FRONT SPRINGS for Ford
ACCESSORY SWITCHES & Chevrolet
Flat GALVANISED SHEETS FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT AND LOTS OF OTHER | ie
tor Interior t ESSENTIALS | Linas,
Mae oe
| * | & TRADING COMPANY
Se LIMITED.
ECKSTEIN BROTHERS (ECKSTEIN BROS.)
\§ Bay Street Dia} 4269





















































FOR LONGER SERVICE

















for Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consider-





































ACTUMUS — The Root Hormone Fer-






























tour England this summer arrived

at Southampton. The sun came































Evidence disclosed in to-day’s} Same, are reported by Cockshut
report strongly suggests that Setty Plow Company for the year ende











































ee
*Those vessels have limited passenger accommodation.












THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
ny ] * ’ * y 8569999088999 95950599
CLASSIFIED ADS. FOR SALE | PUHLIC SALES WANTED FOR RENT PERSONAL | eeeeseerermnttty..
Â¥
Minimum charge week 72 cents and| Ten cents per agate tine on week-aay,} Minimum charge week 72 cents and| Minimum charge week 72 cents and) —————— — 1% LVATI RMY
TELEPHONE 2508 | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — ever a} and 12 cent# per agate line on Sundera, 96 cents Sundays 24 asonde — over 24 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 4 : ie THE SA ON A
| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a/ rye cnarge $1.5C om week-days| wor’s 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a words 3 cents a word week—4 Crnte a The public are hereby warned against | @
word Sundee and $1.80 on Sundays word Sundays word Sundays. kiving credit to my wife GERTRUDE) ANNUAL TAG DAY
For eae, Serena a Sees. PUDBLI % N OTI CE s | BRATHWAITE (nee BARKER I s
announcemen ar ng e - — im | t hold rif onsible for ~
SSeues ts S000 ter way combos of bare] c AUTOMOTIVE Rai: EoAwe HELP pat. Sats, Meeaie smponcteie. Sw "Ser oe 1 :
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for exch) 4, li fe CARL A Tend eee neat —_—_—_—— HOUSES in my name unless by a written order | $ FRIDAY. ! (
sdditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 ‘sa cents per agate line on week-days ; Austin 12-6. No reasonabie ey Dae Due to the opening of a new branch, signed by me ss
between 8.20 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, refused. Apply to W. M. Watson o| SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: situated] we require the following staff on or | APARTM PRINCE BRATHWAITE | >
ly after 4 minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| R. & G. Challenor, Speightstown. Phone t Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 10,978! before June ist, 1951:— } ENT for rent to approved r Villag ie Ph b a Tag to
Retest: ory. see 4 Oe and $1.80 on Sundays. 91—01. . | 8a. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft, road. Dial! STENO-TYPIST—experienced com-| nant. Fully furnished apartinent in =e . % sense Duy 8
The charge for announcements of ? 2206 Day and 3465 Night 2.5,5)—t.f.n mencing salary $100.00 per month, | ete! area, Hastings, 3 bedrooms, garage acer 1S Help Others!
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- CAR-—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good | ——————_—__________ | TYPisT—also with clerical experience | ®"4 servants room. From ist June 3.5.51 4 7
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices 1: NOTICE tyres, in good earey condition, price | BUILDING SITE—With private Beach, - commencing salary $75.00 per} Write P.O. Box 297. 27.4.51—6n. Yeoses LLL ARETE
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays ; reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay, Staple | (Approximately! 1% acres, at Derricks. month. ———. * AEA
for any number of words up to 50, and THE LORD OLIVER FRIENDLY Grove, Christ Church, Dial 3207. Paynes Bay, St. James. For inspection INVOICING ASST.--accurate at fig- HEATHFIELD—The Crane, for June
3 cents per word on week-days and SOCIETY 1.$5i—tin. |and further information, Dial 2991. ures — bly with previous P#nd July, Phone Mrs, A.D. Herbert 8385.
4 cents per word on Sundays for each| All members of the above Society who _ | (Offers received). 29.4.51—2n experience on invoicing — com- 3.5.51—4n >
additional word. have been in the Society up to the) CAR—Morris 8 — good second hand! ——————. aes mencing salary $90.00 per month, | -————————————_——
end of 1949, are hereby requested to! buy, Apply T. G. a@cKinstry. Dial 3564 That desirable two storied freehold Written application stating age and TO LET—In Marine Gardens for 6 A
~———— | leave the'r 1949 Contribution Cards at a; ssn dwellinghouse known as “Culloden! previous exp@rience to be sent to Sec- months, fully furnished. House-keeping
DIED ie, ee = yp Roaatrar OO PU ining eee View”, situate at the junction of Cul-| retary, Dowding Estates and Trading aero oS ee eee Write si puiesieiimelin,
s, Town Hall, CAR—Morris Oxford in excellent con-| toden And Dalkeith Roads, ith the} Company, Ltd., Bay Street x GM, . voca' 0. *
Foecorteg ae 7 ~ aus Eee = be accepted after the! dition. 23,000 miles, mew tyres. Can be| lend thereto containing 10'583° euuate 2,.5.51—6n, 3.5.51—3n | MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA. NEW | s
UCAS—On 2nd May, 1951, at her y. seen; at Fort Royal Garage Ph agu5.| fet. The hous aie | eerie einen ate LA LIM: . CACIQUE Del CARIBE
residence, Enterprise, Christ Churen, D. T. DANIEL, A. D. Herbert, = 3.5 51—4;,| dining rooms, library, Kitchen, bath ee SALES GIRL for our TOY ROOM. OFFICES above Lashlay's Ltd., Prince Saas — wit secepe carer and Passengers
Miss Emeline Lueas, age 72. Her Clerk, Registrar, Eee oer ee — -— | toilet downstairs and upstairs, four] Apply in person, JOHNSON’S STATION- | William Henry Street. Apply: J. E, 1 (MANS. LINE) for St. Vincent, St. Lactey-Gren-
funeral leaves the above residence at nner CARS—Do you want to buy a good] bedrooms ione with bath and toilet) | ERY. 3.5.51--3n | Marson. Phone 2471. 3,5.51--6n MS. “TONGARIRO" | sailed Brisbane | ada and Aruba. Sailing Saturday
4.30 p.m, to-day for the Christ Chureh secondhand car? If so we can offer you | Two servants rooms, garage for 1 car cre Sth, Arriving at ‘Barbados May | 28th inst
Cemetery. . . a 19849 Hillman, done 14,000 miles anc | ond tool room (all built h "i -
Marjorie Chase (niece), Bertie Chase Public Official Sale 199 Morris Oxford, done 19,000 miles.| yard ey ae MISCELLANEOUS cin Hobart, ith ‘May, Adelaide 20th |3§ _M.V. CARIBBEE will “secept
(nephe «'~in-law) Both cars in exeellent condition. Ring The date of sale will be published "WANTED TO BUY Scientists and Barristers re- — ph ata leans | Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
FP SOE SRO Ror Pa (The Provost Marshal's Act 4908, Brdos Agencies Ltd. later JOINERS' GOOD WORK — in Ma- st in private a famous 16th June, Sydney 23rd’ June, arriving |$§ ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
3.5.51—In. 1904 (1904-6) # 36). 29.4.51—6n | Inpeetion between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.|hogany, Cedar, Birch, Fir, Deal for oe at Trinidad during latter half of July, and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
On Friday the 18th day of May, 1951 +.) any day except Sundays on appoint-| Home and Office — L. S, WILSON, Spry murder—and disclose for and ‘preceeding thereafter to Barbados Atay
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon! CAR—Hillman Minx, 1950 model in| ment w.th the owner Mr. St. Clair Hunte., | Street. the first ti story of
THANKS will be sold at 1117 office to the highest| good order 9,600 miles. Apply E. D. | (Phone 3229). 3.5151—1n. : wget : — Beaten. 4h guid Cecivee «th :
bidder for any sum not under the| Davis, Small Ridge ne ae 7 GL. W. CLARKE & CO., a rn eight double | whiskies’ . . veasel et ample “abe a8 chilled ar mi B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
a patel ~~ appraised value, all that certain piece of ’ Solicitors. .
NESTFIZELD-—We beg through this ee hard frozen cargo. ERS ASSOC., INC.
wiedilinein.. to: Teteieiti. tiniest ik thee Tene Cone tere sere tans os TRAILER — One 4/5 ton Sugar Cane 26.4.51—6n. r nk Cargo accepted on terengh Bills ot | Ss , :
kind friends who sent wreaths, letters butting and bounding on lands of The Trailer with or without Tyres. Courtesy AUC’ 10N Lading for transhipment at ; Min ms aan Tele. 4047
ot Sone in any way €X-! Barbados Government Railway, on two! Garage, Dial 4616 1,5 .Siean - Islgnde. a cee eee : ;
ressed their syrt hy in our recent f —--- —__—_—__---- — — s - j
pots sides on lands of Welches Tenantry, and : FIAT VAN 19. furth ticulars apply
bereavement, the death of Venetia) on the Public Road at Fairfield together weg ar “ae Re PO etic arad 4 Bn instructed toveell this vehicie e 9 FURNESS WITHY & CO. Lid, TRIN: | %5
ATE TS He ad Sh :
Selwyn Nurse, Garfield Nurse I mp Bu haings, fig i ae “plicit ee er 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n. Sy Punt "Rutten eat he Snares Oo t ac e pes te ane co. ‘LTD, BRIDGE: MA lv rtise It Pa Ss
35.511" | “The whole property appraised to TWO Garage at 2 p.m. on Friday, 4th May TOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.I AVE one y
THOUSAND ee ss el ELECTRICAL 1951. : ry AN PINCHER ft
DOLLARS AND SEV: Y¥ ininieinerasctteatentibench- IN MEMORIAM (2,091.75). Attached from Sydney Roach DEEP FREEZER — Specially designed uubtione:. By CHAPM
£ and ie Burke for and towards sat-}| to serve Ice Creams, in good working 2.5.51—3n 0.
HOWARD_—In neve. isfaction, &c. : order $375.00 At. Ralph A. Boeard’s | qepmeeemctct
dur beloved agian McDonald Hewat, N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day| Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley By instructions received from the Sec- A STONISHLNG facts about the case of Stanley Setty, the ad
who was called to hie eternal rest on|Of purchase, | BREET | etary ee cin seneral sosnital wu murdered London car-dealer whose torso w waged in
ard » 1960, fe . Powe = se) vy ic competition at the arses’
‘A % in our thought wm pci i econ Marshal, p REFRIGERATOR ¢ gue. att Mareo Home on Thursday next, May at} the Essex marshes 18 months ago, are made pu for the -
. a4 a yovost Marshal's ce. ridge 10,06 erfect working order] 9 o'clock: ov Pis by Kohi 1 £ ao *
Ai ook 43 lite a Seay last 3.5.51—3n./ at Ralph A. Beard's Sh oy Rooms, Campbell. D'Arey aS Scott, Auctioneer | first time in a medico-legal report. NEW YORK SERVICE °
We shall remember thee. : Hardwood Alley 5.51—2n. 27.4.51—5n | At the trial of Brian Donald soon pn who was charged $8. TRYA” ailed 27th April Arrives Barbados sth May
June, Amelda and Ernesta (Children), . , i ed, medical experts ca teamer Sails 18th May . 29th
Christopher ‘Howard (Pather), Charlotte Dancing Classes LIVESTOCK | W ith the murder and acqui itt h y ld b y e————$_—_—_--—--—__- -——__--- pene ND
Howard « (Mbgien: Maatache, Sandee Sr Sout 3° the prosecution did not explain how Setty could have been NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Barton and Lawson (Brothers), Mrs, f COW—One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve t , a
Dorothy Greenidge and Mrs, Millicent | Pupils of The Barkades School ior [in three weeks. Gave 36 pints with third ou FICANS| stabbed tive times in the chest without struggling. — $$. ALCOA PATRIOT” Sailed 18th April Avrives Barbados 4th May
Codrington (Sisters), Milton Greenidge, ae eel ‘commence on Friday the} calf, C, Branch, near Paynes Road, An autopsy, carried out before] ~—— he 38. “ALCOA POLARIS” Sails and May os wth ,,
(Brother-in-law) 3.5.51—In | (or snd Saturday the Sth of May. Jackmans, St. Michael. ee J E la d the trial by Dr. Francis E. Camps, 38. “ALCOA. ROAMER” Sails, 16th May Ist June
‘3 ade ao inaiali : 51—3n. oes ‘ OF ae eee
' pia gone ee ona » 3.5.51—3n n ng n a Harley. street pemcleEats prov- Cockshutt Plow CANADIAN SERVICE
McKenzie who died on May 3rd 1950. a ed that the stab wounds were so : he
Not dead to us who love him LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE! MECHANICA By PETER DITTON clean-cut that Svtty could not Earns $4.75 SOUTHBOUND
Tot Poet hae Seve Vere » The application of Torrence Henry of] “TYPEWRITERS — Shipment of new have moved his body even a frac- Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B’dos.
e ves with us in memory | ad on : : :
Black Rock, St. Michael, for permission | model “Olympia” Portable Typewriters LONDON, April 25. tion of an inch while they were Sh Co ; eee
And will forevermore, 7 : * : : *$.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS April 27th April 30th lay oth
Joyce Straker and family. 3.5.81—1n | 10, fell, Spirits, Malt Tiquers. ail Gap,| just Fecelved—see thse superb machines! Skippered by 40-year-old] being delivered, Per Share MUIMNOM | 33. NCR PIONEER” May lth | May i4ath lay 24th
Baxters Road, City. St Hill, ‘Dial 3199" 39. 4.51—e.0.d, | Dudley Nourse, veteran of two] It also showed that Setty’s arms Consolidated net earnings o. | S8_"YOLKE BERNADOTTE’ May _25tn May 28th June 7th
————== | Dated this goth day of April, 1961, previous visits to this country,} had not been pinioned before he $2,032,786, equal to $4.70. pe. | NORTHBOUND ree
eb iter’ Signed A. HENRY, ; MISCELLANEOUS the South African cricketers tc} was killed, weer? oe : 3.8. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE" — due April 20th, Sails for St. John and Montreal.

Motion Picture Show to be
staged on Friday, 4th
May, 1951, at 6.15 p.m. by
Mr. Thornas B. Wainwright.
These films were taken dur-
ing his travels in Canada
and the West Indies.
By order of,
The Committee of Man-
‘agement,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretary.

{
}
| ed at a Licensing Court to be held at|tilizer, from H. Keith Archer's Drug] out to greet them and just a littl > he b in a drunken stu-| Vctover 31, 1950, compared-wit
T AR all posts before erecting. Police Court, District “A” on Thursday | Store. 3.5.51—5n. : just a e}may have deen in @. drunken stue| -. 7 "
‘A athhih Qiaueisy ce veitle the 10th day’ of May, 1951, at 11 o'clock more than 72 hours after putting| por when he was murdered. Saree. or $4.84 per share to] ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
oor am. ~ACTUMUS — The Key to Growing |foot on s ore, they had their first} Tests carried out by Dr. H. S. ‘ous ie year, r APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
R o t preventative H. A, TALMA, Power — from H. Keith Archers Drug ; . . L $ A own * ;
material still available Police Magistrate, Dist. “A''] Store. 3.5.51—5n, practice in the nets at Lord's. Holden, Scotland Yard's chief wares’ area net profit is sh ba
3.5.51.—In. | This was an entirely different] scientist, showed that Setty had] after transfer of $790,000 to reserve
at your GAS WORKS, Bay St. ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests —|reception from that awaiting|drunk eight double whiskies or| for doubtful accounts (against RGSS SRST SSIES
Brice ».,< >=2, ODES ERO LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE] *0™ #. Keith Archer's Drug Store. | John Goddard and his team from] their equivalent in alcohol shortly] $1,000,000 to inventory reserve in ;
Get Some To-day; The application of Peter Ross, holder 1 _ ee" the West Indies last summer.| before he died, the report states.) previous year) and after deducting
| Oy Pantie camera ree tee pote bi ae Ai tn Spe eoonomioal — 1 owt, They had their first game in this} But the prosecution’s medical] deferred income: on sales oi PASSAGES TO EUROPE oe me
a ase ae a se o 56 tons of ‘arty oe ‘ . ‘ a ikon i aa : ; » . me . “ 4
,\board and shingle shop with skedroof| Manure. From H. Keith Archer's Drug country in the middle of a minia-| experts did not reveal this evi-| $1,175,055 to dealers, This. latter Contact Antilles Products, I ted. Roses ini 35
attached, at Dayrell's Rd., Ch. Ch., with-| Store, 3.5.51--5n. | ture snowstorm, dence at the trial, The prosecu-| item represents unearned income PR abi mc fo ae mith othe ea eae re for wy
in Dist. “A”, for permission to use said Like the Australians when they] tion did not submit it. They may] on sales to dealer: id, as profits wing to Hurope fortnightly 1e usual ports of call are i“
Liquor License at a board and wall shop] ACTUMUS — The Fertil ea th : a etl ee . on sales [0 8. an Pp Dublin, London, o terdam, Sing 5 >70: ual - ~
Royal Barbados Yacht attached to residence at Deightons Road, | Future—increases fee: sant aera aa ye here in _ 1948, the South} have thought thet it would -not are not recorded until payment| reduction for chideen. er Single “fare £70; us
St, Michael. tion of soils. From H. Keith Areher's|4frieans are wife-less. In fact,| help their case. has been received, these deferred
Club monies siz jst day of May. 1981. , Drug Store, 3.5.51—Sn,|wives are banned not only from] The defence counsel’s argument} profits will be realized as goods
Signed: PETER, OSS, | AcrusiUs — Produced by Dr_S.(Busepeen eran eey hetghbouring| that more than one man must have| are delivered by the dealer 10 *1e) «nccescenenoseennenenssenasnennenrenineeneon—nenwnreneerenenreaegeens
: Applicant.| Marian. D.Se Englard, €liminates | European countries as well. The} been involved in the murder be- customer and settlement is. re |} — ,
NOTICE Be ere Frage Seah ec i ig disease at the roots of plants, From H,|one exception to the rule is Man- fore Setty’s body was deposited at ceived by the company. Sup a sa ake care of-your orders fot %
held at Police Court, District “A”. | Keith Archer's Drug Store" 9.5.51~9n. Jager Sid (Pegler, himself a former] Hume's flat was not seriously} 7)" 0) san implements exceedea beberle maint =
Members are invited to Gor, at Ti orClocky amr 7" For the treatment of disorders Of the | eee pau dant tie tee ene a consumer demand and, ye R GUN METAL FITTING
Ss are 951, o'e' Kidneys and Bladder try Rexall Kid arriving in a few days’ time. Th>| These facts were disclosed b rA ‘I ;
attend a Silent Coloured E. A. McLEOD, | | cna Bladder Pills. Price 1/6 bot, Obtain. Di ¥'| increased competition, We : ’ o
uae

kindly









































REAL ESTATE
JOHN
Na.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD



FOR SALE



COUNTRY HOUSE, St, Peter—
The most attractive property of
its type in the Island creating the
atmosphere of a small manor
house cleverly adapted for this

climate with wide verandahs fea-
turing natural stone archways and
some nicely designed wrought
iron grille work, The house con-
tains a sitting room, study, draw-
ing room, dining room, large
kitchen, laundry, 3 double bed-
rooms (1 with own bath and
toilet), tub bath with hot water,
large garage and 2_ servants’
rooms Ail mains services. Ap-
proximately 3 acres well laid out
in lawns, ornamental and kitchen
gardens, and. mahowany trees. A
property or unusual attraction
with sea bathing close at hand.

“WHITEHALL FLATS", Cod-
rington Hill, St. Michael—A weli
preserved country home recently
converted into a block of 4 spaci-
ous luxury flats, fitted with all
modern conveniences, The grounds
approx. 5 acres are laid out with
lawns, shrubbery and gardens and
there isa long carriageway ap-
proach flanked with mahogany”
trees. An investment property or”
suitable for conversion into Guest
House or Nursing Home, 3% miles
from town.

plied with fitted cupboards

rage,



There
2 servants’ rooms















—Attractive 3 bedroomed furnish-
ed seaside bungalow. Available
long lease if required.

ANDY LODGE
Furnished Chatel
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to of



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with the best
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REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING
| Phone 4640



|
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|
|

Loppositi

AND PATHS. 3
FOR RENT Tn.
. N. HARRIMAN
“ts. CHANCERY” on Coast at & CO. LID,
Silver Sands. Furnished. Seawell.
“WINDY WILLOWS"—Prospect, Phone 8444, Extension 8
St James, Unfurnished house on 26.4.51.—in
coast, with 3 bedrooms, lounge,
verandah, overlooking sea etc.
Immediate possession.
“WAVERLEY”, St. Lawrence—

Police Magistrate, Dist.
3.5.5





TAKE NOTICE

WUNTED



the fri

That HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland,
United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distillers, has applied for the registra-
tion of @ trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3rd day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
a can be seen on application. at my
office.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
3.5,51—3n



taee HONCE





That HUNTER-WILSON DISTILLING
CO., INC., a corporation organized under
the laws of the State of Maryland,
United States of America, whose trade
or business s#idress is 405 Lexington
Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A.,
Distillers, has applied for the . registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages,
especially whisky, and will be entitled
to register the same after one mopth
from the day of May, 1961, wiles:
some Person shali in the meantime give
notice in duplicite to me at my office of
ion of such registration, The
trade ae ca be seen on application
at _ my offi

Dated this, 30th day of April, 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,

—— or Sn





IDEAL FOR CONCRETE,
AND MAKING ROADS

|
Registrar of Trade Marks,
Modern Stone Bungalow, Graeme ae

Hall Terrace—-A modern bungalow we

of stone construction with parapet SOREN GR ALGO SIGS SIONS,
roof. This property has the ad- .
| vaniage of a corner site and a very

fine view seawards. There are 3 FOR SALE
oe woe with built-in

wardrobes rge lounge/livi

room with 2 verandahs leading CRUSHED

from it. The kitchen is well sup- STONE & FINES

N OTICE

BARBADOS 5.P.C.A,

The S.P.C.A. Phone No.
2624 is suspended until fur-

ther notice. Messages for
the Inspector will be taken

at 2673 between the hours %

of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and ¥%
at 08—Brittons Hill Police %
Station from & p.m. to 7]
a.m. ~
_C. WALCOTT, %

Hon. Secretary, May 2nd x |

».

POOP LSPS TOT?



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License and stock. Apply Mrs, G. Stan-
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that’s Holland’s “Frisian Girl Powdered





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tains vitamin D3 so essential for the
promotion of healthy life. Get it for
the family, the children will look alive
after a trial of this famous milk. Ask for
it by name. 3.5.51—3n
SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.
A. Tudor & Co., Roebucit Street, $12.00
per $8 lb, bag. Dial 2628
28 .4.51—Tn
Save your clothes from Moths by
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than Moth Balls. KNIGHT'S LTD.



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palatable preparation containing 50% by
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14,000 Tons Suger
Feared Lost In Fire

tecom Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 2.
A fire broke out in the main

sugar shed of Usine St. Madeleine
and fourteen thousand tons of
sugar are feared lost, The fire
which started at 2.30 this morn-
ing was uncontrolled at noon.

The entire building was blacked
out by columns of smoke. Units
from the Port-of-Spain Fire Bri-
gade were assisting.



Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sed Wonderful Coun-







Selior, Seh, M wis, Sch. Philip
H, Davidson, S e M, Smith, Sch,
United Pilgrim § h. Blue Nose Mac,
Sch, Marea Henrie ‘tta, Yacht Maria Cath-
arina, Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch

Leudalpha, Sch. Gardenia W.
DEPARTURES
Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt.
King, for St. Vincent.
Sehooner Mary E. Caroline, 54 tons net,
Capt, Joseph, for Dominica,
Sehooner W. L._ Eunicia,
Capt. Joseph, for Dominica
M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935
net, Capt. Clarke, for St. Lucia.

In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

CABLE AND WIRELESS (West Indies)
Ltd., advise that they can now com-
municate with the following chips
through their Barbados Coast Station:—

38 tons net

tons







s.s. Maria De Larrinaga, s.s. Brazil/
Wsbw, ss. Mormacréed, ss. Amerigo
Vespucci, s.s. Loide Argentine, s.s. Loide
Cuba, s.s. Santa Paula, s.s ta Clara,

s.s. Queen Mary/Gbtt, s.«, Alcoa Corsiar,





3.8 scognie, s.s. Solfa, s.s. Mormaciland
R, F. MeConneli, ss. British Earl, #4.
Nordidie, s,s, John Chandris, s.s. Hersilia

Perk, s.s. Louis Pasteur, Seminole

Gyst. ss. Athel Victor, ss. Sera/Peqy,
ss. British Character, 5 Fortbridger,
M.S. Macoris, s.s. Dolores, M.S. Willem-
stad/Pipi, ss, Redstone, ss. Gulfwing/
Wicp. 3.5. Fepublic, 5.8 tugard, Laniz,
r.8, Bonito, s.s. Hopecrést, s.s. Victoria/
Kesr



RATES OF EXCHANGE

















CANADA
MAY 2, 1951.
62 2/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 60 2/10% pr.
Demand
Drafts 60.05% pr.
Sight
Drafts 59 9/10% pr.
62 2/10% pr Cabie
607/10% pr Currency 10% pr
Coupons 58° or
Mails for St. Lucia by the Schooner
United Pilgrim § will be closed at the
{General Post Office as under
Parcel Mail. R tered Mail; Ordinary
Mail all at 10.15 a.m. on the Sth May,
195

reason for the ban by the South\
African cricket authorities has not
been explained to the team yet,
but Nourse, whose wife came with
him on the 1947 tour, says that it
had nothing to do with any hap-
penings that year.

Been Before

Other members who were here
with the 1947 team-are ‘Fullerton,
Mann and Athol Rowan. The only
other player to have toured Eng-
land in Athol’s elder brother, Eric,
who is vice-Captain of the team
and was a member of the 1935
South African touring party.

Fifteen. players have - been
brought here altogether and
Nourse’ has ventured to suggest
that with a fair share of luck the
side will acquit themselves well.
In the event of any members of
the team falling sick, arrange-
ments have already been made to
fly over one or two young players
from the Union,

The tourists commence their
official programme with the time-
honoured match with Worcester-
shire at Worcester on May 2nd.
They will be opposed to probably
the same team as that which drew
with the West Indies. It is to be
supposed that the selected South
African XI will be the strongest
ithey can put into the fleld and
the most likely to be picked for
the first Test.

Nourse himself is expected to
captain the side and both Rowans
and Mann and Fullerton are
expected to be included. Another
member of the team with personal
experience of this country, Clive
Van Rynveld, the former Oxford
cricket ‘blue’ and England rugby
international, will make a_ bold
challenge for selection, and _ his
leg-breaks, magnificent fielding
and forceful batting are .almost
certain to earn him a place.

Backbone

Nourse, Eric Rowan and Fuller-
ton will provide the backbone of
the batting which, weakened by
the absence this year of Bruce
Mitchell, appears on paper to be
the tourists’ weak point.

Athol Rowan and ‘Tufty’ Mann
will form the chief menace on a
turning wicket and~ the former
with his accurate off-spinners ane
the latter “with his immaculate
left-hand slows can, and do, keep
going all day if necessary,

These six are expected to select
themselves. This leaves five places
still to be filled. Requirements
are a couple of fast bowlers. 1
wicket-keeper and, presumably.
two more batsmen. Candidates
for these places aré McCarthy,
Chubb, Endean, McGlew, McLean,
Cheetham, Waite and Mansell.

The choice of wicket-keeper
lies between Endean and Waite
both of whom are opening bats-
men of some repute. Endean, by
virtue of his greater powers of
concentration, may just get the
vote. The opening attack will
come from McCarthy, said to be
the fastest bowler in the Union
for 30 years, Melle and Chubb
The former are both youngsters
but Chubb is 39 years of age and
ranks with Nourse and Eric
Rowan as a veteran of the side.
Even so, it is probable that his
great accuracy and ability to keep
going, very much in the manner
of an Alec Bédser, will earn him
a place with McCarthy at the

other end.
Not Easy

Filling the last two places is
not going to be easy. Jack Cheet-
ham, who was considered for the
captaincy before it became known
that Nourse would be available,
is likely to be one of the two, He
played against England in South
Africa two years ago and against
Australia twelve months later
He is a strong forcing batsman
and, in a most successful season
just completed, he headed the










Camps to a private meeting
of doctors, scientists, and barris-
ters, who reconstructed the Setty
case after the trial.

Dr, Keith Simpson, Home Office
pathologist, told the meeting that
he was perturbed that the prose+
cution did not produce the scien-
tifle evidence of Setty’s drunken

enough alcohol had
been discovered to give a perfect.
ly good and acceptable explana-
tion to the opinions of both sides,
it was difficult to understand why
such evidence was not produced,”
he said.

Hume admitted dropping
Setty’s torso into the sea from an
aeroplane, and pleaded guilty o
being an accessory after the fact.
He was sentenced to 12 years’
imprisonment,

“Who killed Setty and the cir-
cumstances in which it occurred
must remain a matter for specula-
tion.” Dr. Camps told the meet.
ing.

The additional evidence would
only have shown how those re-
sponsible for the murder were
able to do it without causing a

struggle,

* AN EMERGENCY system of
sending out B.B.C, broadcasts

through the telephone wires in-

stead of over the air is being

oo by the Defence Minis.

ry,

An enemy might be able to use
the signals from ordinary trans-
mitters as a means of guiding in
long-range rocket missiles,

Seven for Speed
* MOST seven-year-old _ girls
can run as fast as most
women, says Swedish scientist
Dr. P, oO. Astrand, who has timed
110 running females varying in
age from four to 30.—L.E.S.

deemed prudent to have acrattionet
stocks in the hands of the desler
organization, This has substan‘ ial-
ly inereased accounts receivable
and an additional amount of
$750,000 was provided as a reserve
against possible future losses.
Reserve of $2,250,000 against in-
ventories is considered sufficient at
the present time.

Working capital of $17,050,05'
at October 31 last compares wit!
; $14,267,648 a year ago. Accounts
receivable are up from $1,123,228
to $5,815,082. Earned surplus,’
after dividend payments ‘4
$662,222, totals $5,967,506.

C, Gordon Cockshutt, Baas
states that sales showed a reduc-
tior, This applies to Canada as
well as export countries and is
largely attributable to the fact that
sales connections established
during a buyer’s market had to
readjust their organizations to a
seller’s market. Prospects for 1951
from the viewpoint of demand, are
reasonably encouraging, The com
pany has budgeted for the same
volume in 1951 as in 1950 feeling
that any loss in civilian businese
might be made up in defense
work,

°\9555940650S0500900000,,
West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiqués,
Potvery, Hand blocked Beach-
weer, Decoration House, 8»
James. Tel, 91-74,



Precaution

ORIENTAL |

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANDS "ar





British Miss 70 >| 3

LONDON.

The modern British miss—girls
born in 1951 — can expect to live
until 70 years of age or over,

But if they marry British boys
born this year, they are likely to
be widowed, for the life expecta-
tion of boys is only 66 years,

Authority for this forecast is
the British Registrar General's
report for 1950, which said thai
the exact age which the average
girl can expect to reach is 70.63
years, and for the average boy
66. or years.

The report estimated that the:
total population of England and |
Wales in 1950 was 44,137,000 and
added that this figure should in-
crease to 46,608,000 by 1990.

Let

>
%

s



i
| .
|

SOOO SOS

INS.
batting averages for Western
Province in the Currie Cup .
matches. x

It will then remain to be seen %
what is Nourse’s greatest require- | 3%
ment before making the eleventh %
choice. The need for an addi-| >
tional fast bowler would see the! 8
vote going to Melle, Another | =
batsman would pave the way for | ¥

a couple of youngsters, 21-year—
old Roy McLean, the only left- |
hand batsman in the side, or 22~|
year-old Derrick McGlew, an
opening batsman who believes in
hitting the ball hard and often.
Finally, not to be dismissed
lightly, are the chances of Frank
Mansell, who was born in England
and last season captained Rho-
desia. He is a fine all-rounder
and some consider him te he
South Africa’s best leg-spinner
There is room for speculation
but one thing is assured. Like}
other touring teams before them, ;
the South Africans will be assured |
of a good welcome wherever they }
go. '

SOOO GOSSOOSS

CHARLES

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PAGE EIGHT



West Africa Wants W.l. Athlete

Bailey Offered Coaching
Appointment In Nigeria

From Our Own

Corresponuent

The recent tour of West Africa undertaken by those
two great West Indian athletes, Arthur Wint and McDon-

ald Bailey was, I hear, a 100% success.

So much so that

invitations have been extended to McDonald Bailey to
undertake a full-time coaching appointment in Nigeria.
EE

SPORTS
WINDOW

FOOTBALL

Spartan meet Notre
Kensington this afternoon in a
return First. Divisior fixture
When Spartan met the newly
ptomoted Notre earlier this season
the Park team champions were
behirid for most of the game but
a last minute spurt earned them a
draw.

Notre Dame was given credit for
this 00d showing aainst the
Senior Division champions of two
seasons,

The return game this evening
should be a good one.

TABLE TENNIS—(Division I)

Barna vs. Everton at Y.M.C.A.

~—7.30

BASKET-BALL—(Division I)

M.H.S. vs. J.S.B.S. at (MH S.)

Pirates vs. L.S.S. at (H C_)
NETBALL

St. Michael's Girls’ vs. St. Mi
chael's Old, Girls at St. Michael's

11 Cricketers
Of 1950
4 W.L Iw

LONDON, April 27,

As a new cricket season dawns
£0 Our memories of what has
passéd are refreshed by the ap-
pearance of the several cricket
almanacks which are now on the
market. They recall for us such
incidents as the thrilling struggle
by England to avoid the follow-
on, and inevitable defeat, in the
final Test against the West Indies
at the Oval. They remind us that
the race for the County Champion-
ship finally ended in a tie be-
tween Lancashire and Surrey,
with Yorkshire, ever a power in
English- cricket, third, only 20
points behind. They review the
forthcéming season and invariably
Open wide the doorway for discus-
sion with their selection of the
best cricketers of the year.

Such a pattern has been follow-
ed by the Editor of the Playfair
Cricket Annual whose eleven
cricketers of 1950 include four
members of the victorious West
Indies touring team and two from
the Lancashire side which shared
the Clampionship. His selected
XI is Ramadhin, Valentine, Wor-

Dame. at











rell, Weekes, (West Indies),
Grieves and Tattersall (Lan-
eashire), Evans and § Wright

(Kent), Fishlock (Surrey), Park-
house (Glamorgan), and Sheppard
(Sussex and Cambridge).

It is a strong combination but,
surprisingly enough, contains not
ene bowler of pace. One cannot
help. wondering whether perhaps
this is not unfair to Alee Bedser,
who apart from his efforts in Aus-
tralia, which tour is not taken into
account in the selection of eleven
cricketers of 1950, was England’s
top wicket-taker against the West
Indies.

And I feel equally certain that
there are many West Indians who
feel that Alan Rae is worthy of a
place, possibly even at the expense
of one of his four chosen col-
leagues. But if Rae cannot claim
a place in the selected XI, at least
he is given his fair share of the
credit in the section devoted to
the review of the tour.

“No West Indies player made :
greater contribution to the win-
ning of the Rubber than Rae” says
the review. “His worth to the side
really cannot be over-emphasised.
With his most equable tempera-
ment and utterly unvelfish spirit,
he saw what his role should be
and played it to the hilt.”

The review concludes ‘“Rae’s
knowledge of the game and his
balanced judgement must mark
him out as a potential West Indies
eaptain,”

Playfair Books, Ltd.. 57 Haymar-
ket, London, S.W.1. Price 3/6d

Rugby Results

LONDON, May 1.

Results of Rugby games played
Monday in the United Kingdom
follow:

Rugby Union: Bridgewater and
Albion 6, Weston Super Mare
8. Cross Keys 3, Neath 0. Ponty-
pool 3, Newport 13. Redruth 18,
Falmouth 0. St. Ives 3, Pontypridd
6. Torquay Athletic Q, Swansea 11.
Rugby League: Oldham 36, Roch
dale Hornets 2. —(CP)



HEY! you'LL
HAVE TO TAKE
DOWN SOME OF
THE FENCE,SO'S
I CAN UNLOAD A

THIS HERE



* 2—0 in

Crowds flocked to see Wint ahd
Bailey running in Accra and
Lagos and there can be no doubt
that the newly awakened interest
in athletics in West Africa was
considerably stimulated by their
visit. Already there has been
iaik of entering Nigeria in the
1952 Helsinki Olympies and it is
possible that the visit of these two
notable athletes will result in
definite action along these lines
being taken.

Arthur Wint was only able to
remain in West Africa for one
week, because of his studies, but
McDonald Bailey remained for a
further seven days during which
he lectured to schools and youth
clubs.

A Question

One question which he repeat-
ediy had to answer was why
Arthur Wint had only” managed
to run the 440 yards in 50 seconds
during his second race in the
celony. The answer, which Mac
duly gave, was that Arthur felt
a slight muscular twinge and,
not wanting to aggravate a
former trouble, he decided not to
go flat out. Even so he was well
ahead of the rest of the field when
he broke the winning tape.

In both his 100 yards events
Bailey returned 9.9 seconds. This,
onsidering it was his first outing
of the season, was a particularly
good performance and augurs
well for his chances of retaining
his A.A.A. Championships later
this year,

Mac himself was very pleased
with his performance but con-
fesses he had a bad scare in his
second race when he failed to
make a good start and found him-
self three yards behind the local
fayourite with only forty yards to
eo. Only a sensational finishing
burst enabled him to break the
tape first.

“I just had to win that race
or what would the local crowd
have thought!” he added.



Empire Beat
Everton 2-1

Everton were beaten 2—1 by
Empire yesterday in a Second
Division football .mateh whica
‘was played at Bank Hall, This
is the first defeat for Everton
ond the first win for Empire who
were beaten 4—2 by College in
their last match,

Empire scored both goals i:
the first half. Their goal senrers
were S,. Harper and R. Norville
while S, Seale kicked in the
lone.goal for Everton from a
petty.

The game’ was slow throughoul
and there was very little wind
to worry the players, Both
teams had many opportunities tc
score more goals, About ter
minutes after play in the first
half had started, Norville on the
left wing for Empire toe-punched
the ball in the right corner of
the bars giving the Everton
custodian no chance to bring off
a save,

About three minutes after
first goal, Referee
awarded a penalty
Everton after a melee in their
area, This was taken by
Harper who made no mistake ia
kicking the ball out of the reach
of Nurse who hardly made 4a
move,

Half time

the
Graham
against

found the score at
Empire's favour, Aftei
half time Everton made stronger
efforts to score and these efforts
got them chances but their
kicking was far from eccurate.
About five minutes before the
blow off, Seale scored for Ever.
ton from a penalty as one of the

Empire backs handled the ball
in their area,

The teams were:—

Empire: Robinson, Jordan,
Bynoe, Clarke, Rudder, Wilson,
Morris, Haynes, Smith, Harper
and Norville.

Everton: Nurse, Culpepper.
Weekes, Seale, Archer, Fowler,
Holder, Sealy, Olton, Went and
Haynes,





WAVECREST HURT
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 1.
Wavecrest, 4-year old colt, has
sustained an injury during exer-
cises and is not expected to race
at the Arima Creole meeting. For
this meeting, horses are hard ut
preparation, My Babu, Leap On
and Diapotos turned out out-
standing gallops on Sunday
morning.

Registered U. 5. Patent Office

BARBADOS ADVOCATE ene







IN NIGERIA

THIS PICTURE taken during their recent visit to West Africa, shows McDonald Bailey and Arthur
Wint with Mr. J. R. Bunting (extreme right) who managed the 1948 Jamaican Olympic Games Team.

Mr. Bunting is now chairman of
Standing between Wint and

the Nigeria A.A.A.
Bailey is the May or of Lagos and on the left of Wint is the deputy

Mayor. The other person in the photograph (extre me left) is a master at King's College, Lagos.

Lancashire Beats
Oxford University

LONDON, May 2.

Tuesday’s first class cricket
results at Lords; MC.C. vs
Yorkshire. (non-county match)

hbandoned as draw. No play due
to rain. M.C.C. first innings 411
for seven declared, Yorkshire
first innings 218 all out; second
innings 38 for one. ;

At Oxford, Oxford University
vs. Lancashire (non-eounty
match), Lancashire won by an
innings and 158 runs, Lancashirc
first innings, 408 for three declar
ed, Oxford University first
innings all out 144, Seconc
innings all out 106,

At Nottingham, Nottingham
shire vs. Leicestershire, a two
day friendly match due to con
clude, was abandoned. No play
was possible on either day. :

Close of play score in the
Sussex vs. Hampshire two day
triendly match which began
today at Hove, Hampshire first
innings all out 263, Sussex os"

Friendly Football
TO-DAY’S FIXTURE
Westerners “B” vs, Harkliffe at

St. Leonards.
Referee: Mr. C. E, Jemmott.





What's On Today

Presentation to Miss Yvonne
Padmore at American
Consulate—10.00 a.m,

Police Courts—10,00 a.m.

Sale of Mrs. Theresa

HOOD TIPS TURPIN
TO BEAT ‘SUGAR’

_ CAN IT BE that Dave Sands—due in England on May 8
—is superstitious ? Sands, who is scheduled to defend his
Empire middle-weight title against Randolph Turpin at the

White City, London, on June 5, is going to train at N. -
on-Tyne for the fight, oe oe

Peter Wilson brings you a great ;
ex-champion’s opinion of a great °90sing Newcastle (Northum-
champion. berland) for a training spell—
Pi get ae aey ie udes me.

ocke, the Australian has accepi-
successful assault on the Empire ed another 144 moles match (for
list, 6lb, title which he won another £1,500) in his own coun-
some 18 months ago by knocking try in October
out Randolph’s brother Dick i
the first round, : *

_ But there’s an additional sen- Jobs we wouldn't like .
timental tie about Newcastle for refereeing the Rugger interna-
Sands. He has had over 50 per tional between Italy and Spain at
cent. of his fights in the town of Milan next month. +, edie
Newcastle, which is 100 miles Priest, the old Surrey player, has
north-east of Sydney, Australia, taken it on.
There must be some reason for

‘Unfair’

Notice in the programme of
the Turpin-Billy Brown “fight”
reads: —

“It was typical of the famous





This is where he trained for his

—LES.

Regatta On



London impresario” (Jack Solo- Sat rd

mons) “that, when approached Uu. ' ay
about switching the Randolph

Turpin-Billy Brown contest to The eighth regatta of the 195!
Birmingham he gave the matter season will be sailed in Carlisle
his urgent and sympathetic con~ Bay on Saturday under the
sideration.” : : auspices of the Royal Barbados
_ Having seen this “epic”, I think Yacht Club.

it’s thoroughly unfair to say that Starting times and handicaps:

it’s typical of Solomons to have are as follows:—
switched it as far away from

































































Wright's furniture at “The London as possible! Hasn't he = - ; we.
Bower”, Garrison (Messrs. any sympathy for Brum? Class No. Yacht Start at Flag
Branker, Trotman & Co.) a ih Wigerd ay hie
—11.30 a.m. , | Punching Power : .
— St Michael's Vestry Opinion of Jack Hood, one of D 4 Seabird 2.31 * Yellow
—2.00 p.m, the greatest welter—weight cham- ke
Meeting of Alliance Fran. pions ever produced by Great e wv Van ‘mnoendyk¢ eae
caise at British Council— | Britain: —
8.15 p.m. | “Two years ago I began to 8 33. Ranger 2.33 Yellow
CINEMAS think Turpin would lift a world’s “sj ~~ ws wae g@oua””” a4 -—
‘ * as bay 4 a 5 B 8 War Cloud 234 Red
Aguas Club—"Berlin Express title; now I’m certain, It would vi jou: jee
Empire — “You're My Everything” be unwise to hurry him in with B 6 Flirt 2.35 Yellow
& “Side Street" —145 & 8.80 ‘Sugar’ Ray Robinson, but Tur- 7
Py idgetown) “BI Gras : ¥ - - : . i 9 Okapi
Or Kentucky" & “The Dude pin would beat him—of that Imi B 481 ®intasy 2.36 Red
Goes West’ 4.45 & 8.40 certain. a hie
Be ake 180, & “Seven “Turpin punches hard, very B 8 Rageal 2.97 _ Yelipw
Galety (St. James—'The Court- | hard, His punching power should D 1 Buccaneer 2g8 Red
neys Of Curzon Street—#.30 beat Robinson’s speed and ener. -
gy. B 7 Moyra Blair 2.39 Yellow
Seber he - Joe is Unwise D 2 Imp ;
The sad saga of the man who’ PD 9 Olive Blossom 2.40 Red
vas once the world’s mightiest : SRA raed
; > 7 Sinbad 241 Yellov
The W eather heavyweight goes on. Yesterday eam ame
i" Joe Louis said he would give up “B 1 Gipsy
TO.DAY “big-time” boxing unless Ezzard @ 5 Mischief 248 Red i
Charles gives him another chance Yelle
: ©. mM, * - e ; bs Cc 6 Peggy Na 244 Yellow
ene = 3 <2 to win back the championship by Pe RA aes Soke EM er A Re ae a a
Moon (New) ‘May 6 ] this autumn, C 1 Miss Behave a
Lighting ; 7,00 p.m. But that doesn't mean he'll quit [ § Pauntess —“ “*
High Water: 1.58 a.m., 2.36 | the Ting. He can’t afford to. What peace
- " P it does mean is that the “sporting” I 2 Twader
. YESTERDAY world may see the old brown lion I 6 Eagle 246 Yellow
engaging in a series of bread and i
Rainfall (Codrington) .03 | butter” bouts against second- —C_') Maswin =
in, raters, K 35 Edril
Total for Month to Yester- Louis has been in hospital with | 1} Reen 249 Yellow
day: .04 in, a bad cold, but expects to be able i ew
Temperature (Max.) .85.5 °F to meet the Cuban Omelio Agra Cc 2 Scamp
‘empérature (Min,) 72.5 °F monte—whom he outpointed last K % Comet 2.50 Red
Direction (9 a.m.) February—in a fortnight’s time _' 7 Mohawk,
E.S.E. (3 p.m.) 8. by E. at Detroit. C 1 Gannet
Wind Velocity 7 miles per “Winning the title means every- I 1 Gnat 2.52 Yellow
hour thing to me,” said duouis, “put 1 18 Clstle
Ba ter (9 a.m.) 29.926 I'm not getting any younger.” Or “Ty cG tt 353 Red
(3 p.m.) 29.842. any wiser, alas. For at 37—his Bge erated.
next month—what chance car he cL Ree " ;
— " ave”? a yelone 2.5 Yellow
epee hope to have? ab’. Vatmnne
° | c iid alate
By Jimmy atlo } Ww To Meet Again N ms oe following date has beet
rs3 en hat_a glutton for punishment ‘ed for Regattas:—
) caetwem || golfer Norman von Nida must®be. ah tgs ola ars fe PR rt
F After losing 11 and 9 to Bobby Starter.

IT DOWN AND
THEN PUT IT UP
AGAIN“ BUT LIKE
AN EYE DOC’S

ALTERATIONS

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POLL DILL DDD Ot

GOLF IN
1951

By PETER DITTON

Britain’s Amateur Golf is again
to be put to the Test on May llth
and 12th, That is when the Am-
erican challenge for the third
post-war Walker Cup competition
will be made at Birkdale.

Since the war, with the excep-
tion of R. J. White, Britain has
not produced any golfers capable
of holding their own with the
Yong-hitting accurate-putting Am-
ericans, From Ireland the assist-
ance of Sam McCready, Jimmy
Bruen and Joe Carr has been re-
cruited. These players have cer-
tainly put a little extra “back-
bone” into the British team, But
generally speaking the Americans
have reigned supreme.

Many excusés have begn put
forward to account for e su-
periority of the Americans —
which dates back to pre-war
days. The most widely offered in
recent years has been that British
golfers have not had_ sufficient
practice. But while that might
have held good in 1947 and even
1949 it cannot be applied any
longer. It is perfectly true that
because of geographical conditions
the Americans didn’t lose as much
“golfingtime” as we did during
the war but we have had six years
since in Which to put matters to
right.

Explanation

I think probably the most sat-
isfactory explanation of Ameri-
ca’s- golfing superiority and cer-
tainly the most realistic is that
offered by former Walker Cup
player L, G, Crawley who is now
one of the Walker Cup Selectors.
Writing in the new Playfair Golf
Annual for 1951 (Playfair Books
Ltd., 57 Haymarket, London
S.W.1., price 5s) he deals at length
with this particular subject.

He points out that for one thing
there are far more golfers in
America than in this country, He
likens America to the young
brother which has grown up into
a Colossus from the small and
frail infant to whom the game
was taught. As one example he
quotes the entry figures for the
English Amateur Championship
which are normally between 200
and 250 and likens them to those
for the American amateur which
range from upwards of twelve
hundred.

Says Crawley: “I believe that
in years to come, as in the past,
we shall be compelled to bow to
the superiority of American golf-
ers and more often perhaps to
American teams than American
individuals. From time to time we

. shall win a Walker, a Ryder or a

Curtis Cup and occasionally we
shall be thrilled and proud of
another Cotten, another Tolley or
cnother Miss Wethered. But, over
the years, the weight of numbers
alone must ensure American su-

premacy.”
Wisdom

However unpalatable this may
be to Britain’s golf enthusiasts,
it has to be recognised as contain-
ing a wealth of wisdom,

And equally wisely does Craw-
Jey deal with the question of pro-
fessional golf in this country. He
says that the war began as one
generation of professionals began
to decline and that for six years
there were no new recruits. Since
the war times nave changed and
the ordinary professional golfer
cannot afford to pay his assistant
more than a bare living wage. And
apart from these few profession-
als who are among the big prize
money winners, life is not as at-
tractive as it was for those who
must earn their living trom the
game,

“Promoters of tournaments are
now putting up the enormous sum
of some £25,000 a year, the bulk
of which is going into the hands
of very few” says Crawley. “We
may well ask the question, How
much do professional tournaments
benefit the game? We may well
ask another: Is it a sign of the
times that one , well-established
tournament has been abandoned
for 1951, and will other promotets
follow suit?

Review

The Playfair Golf Annual with
its review of the major Golf
events of 1950 both in this coun-
try and America, together witN
records of previous years, is 4
book no real enthusiast can afford
to ignore. Apart from the review
by L. G. Crayley, it contains an
article by Henry Longhurst and
e contribution from Sir Guy
Campbell, for which alone it is
worth obtaining.

Sir Guy, one of the most famous
of all golf architects has “laid
out” the best ever course compil-
ed from famous holes in various
parts of the country. Each hole
is in its proper place in regard
to its home course and each is
arranged so that there is no more
than the normal amount of walk-
ing from green to tee box. He
has taken six holes from St. An-
drews (Old Course), three from
Heylake, three from Royal St.
George’s (Sandwich), and one
each from Portmarnock, Muirfield,
Deal, Prestwick, Westward Ho
and Carnoustie, A “walk” around
such a course is an entertainment
in itself.

BEST IN
FLAVOUR

°

_ BEST
IN
TEXTURE

Sd
BEST
IN ;
NUTRITION

LODO Do I~

— SO

OS





























THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1951



Tennis Results

Highways and Transport Sports
Club began their series of Lawn
Tennis games against Police at the
Central Police Station yesterday
evening.

The results were as follows:—

Supt. E. B. Grant and Inspecton
B. King (Police) beat R. Garner
and Miss M, King 6—0.

‘Inspector King and Acting Supt
Simmons (Police) beat Harris and
Miss M. King 6—0.

Acting Supt, Simmons and Supt.
Grant (Police) lost to R. Garner
and Capt. C. Warner 6—0.

Acting Supt. Simmons and In-
Spector King (Police) lost to R.
Garner and Capt C. Warner 6—4.

Inspector King and Supt. Grant
(Police) lost to Harris and Capt.
C Wanner 6—4,

It is expected that other games
will be played at the Central
Police Station on Wednesday next,

We want you
people who are
next-door



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Past Beat Present

Harrison College Old Boys
defeated Harrison College by 31
goals to 27 in their Basketball
game at the Y.M.P.C, grounds
last night,



In the other game of the niglit
Fortress Club suffered their
second set back when they were
defeated 22—20 by Pickwick.





Record Breakers

BUENOS AIRES: A _ 19-year-
old Argentinian and a 42-year-old
Spaniard recently worked non-
stop for 98 hours, with only a
15-minute pause in every four
hours. They wanted to set up
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