Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
nan

Pav bados

DEFENCE : Service chiefs appointed to

look after protection of Britain







ESTABLISHED 1895













No major action on front line:

“Eden takes Attlee government
‘Reds hold back big offensive

OIL: COMMONS: to task on raw materials issue WAR:

THREE TO DIRECT DEFENCE OF U.K.

Committee Formed:| —_
Dempsey In Charge

LONDON, May 1.
RRITAIN has created a Commander in Chiefs
_ Committee for Home Defence in time of war
it was Officially announced to-day.

General Sir Miles Dempsey, Commander of
the British Second Army during the Normandy
Beachhead in 1944, will be the Chairman.

He will also be Commander-in-Chief of Bri-
tish land forces.

Persia wants rebate on
oil sold to British navy







ROYAL FAMILY TOUR THE RLF. 2

_ (Chinese Reds Delay
| Expected Attack
AU Quiet On Korean Kront

TOKY ’ =
ASSED CHINESE roRMATees WT i:

ing Seoul kept well out of artillery range to-day
and made no attempt to start any direct onslaught
on the battered city. Twice in the last three days
Communist columns venturing to within a few







THE SHAH of Persia is seen here

an autograph. He is due to
sign the Oi' Bill soon which will
legalise the nationalisation of the
oil industry.





meme



Admiral Power, present Com.
mander-in-Chief at Portsmouth,
will have charge of all
matters connected
defence of British home waters.

Air member will be Air Marshal
Sir Basil Embry, Commander-in-
Chief of Fighter Command.

Authoritative sources said today
the Committee had been estab-
lished to build up a command
organisation for the defence of
Britain in time of war,

One source said the move cer-
tainly did not mean Britain was
becoming insular minded, It was
a normal defence precaution.

e of General Bempsey’s first
tasks will be ‘to blish liaison
between his Committee and Min.
istries with which he would have
to co-operate in time of war such
as the Ministry of Food and Civil
Defence Services.

The Committee, which will have
full responsibility for defence of
Britain in the event of war will be
responsible to the Chiefs of Staff.

—Reuter,



; [
Petain.Gets Bouquet |

ILE DE YELI, May 1.
Madame Petain took a bouquet}
of carnations to-day to her 95-!
year-old husband in. his fortress |
cell to celebrate his name day,|
May 1 Festival, St, Phillipe.
Madame Petain said he eel
“wonderfully well” after his re-
cent attack of pneumonia. *
“T have high hopes that he will
not end his days here.” she said.
—Reuter.

at naval 1} S, Saved Life

Of Western
Europe— Eden

LONDON, May 1.

The United States has aq real
desire to see that scarce raw
materials are fully distributed
among North Atlantic countries,
Supply Minister George Strauss,
told Commons to-day.

He was meeting a Conservative
challenge aimed at embarrassing
the Government over the resig-
nation of three Minigters last
week,

A motion being pushed to fhe
vote later to-night expressed
anxiety that the Arms Programme
was based on the production es—
timates not accepted by the Minis-
ters principally concerned,

Before Strauss spoke, Anthony
Eden, chief Conservative speaker
in the debate, said Aneurin Bevan
and other resigning Ministers had
made grave charges which the

Sl

Uae -

THE KING AND QUEE

the Commonwealth section and bought many W.I, exhibits.



Appeal For
Men To End
Doek Strike

WELLINGTON, May 1,

The New Zealand Government
on Tuesday called on all able-
bodied men to join the Civil Force
to combat industrial strikers who
are trying to overthrow orderly
Government by force.

Prime Minister Sidney Holland

Government must either accept or} made his appeal as a dock work-

refute. |

Labour Protests

Eden deplored the “harsh werc's”
about the United States by some
resigning Ministers.

Amid protests from some Labour
members, he said “it was the
United States alone which saved
the life of Western Europe”’.

Strauss replieqd there was no
reason to be unduly pessimistic.

He said “it. is too early to say

whether we williget the raw ma-
terials we need for our Defence
Programme and our essential civil
production, but we are not justi-
fied here and now in saying that
we will not.

Aneurin psevan in a speech of
only two minutes accused Con-
‘servafives of the “old fashioned
| Party jousting” in framing their
| seers which expressed anxiety
that the Arms Programme was
based on production estimates not
accepted by the Ministers prin-
cipally concerned,

Bevan said that he hoped the
Government would be able to get
,raw materials from the United
| States more apecdily than at one
j time seemed likely: also that it
would not be “entirely scornful”
of any help his resignation might
have afforded.

Bevan said he and Wilson would
prefer to be proved wrong than
right—-Reuter.

GIVE UP A MEAL A WEEK
NEHRU TELLS INDIANS

NEW DELHI, May 1.
Indian Prime Minister Nehru, to-night called on all
Indians to give up one meal a week to help save the coun-
try from the “hovering spectre of famine”, '
Nehru proposed that food grains saved should be sent

as gifts to worst affected areas in Bihar and Madras.
=e — ~ The Prime Minister thanked

** Psst! Wanna buy some
sulphur?”





special Foreign
seid Marshal Stalin once admitted

unable to gain the loyalty of the
Russian people.

during a talk he had with Stalin

States Ambassador,

ers strike
10th week.

Beatings and dynamiting of a
coal district bridge have added to
the tensicn,

Holland said the country’s in-
dustrial crisis has taken a dram-
atic and grave turn. He urged
loyal citizens to register for an
emergency civil organization and
said a similar call might be issued
to women.—(CP)

Fear Rules
Russia

Says Harriman

LOS ANGELES, May 1
President Truman's personal
foreign policy spokesman said last
night that Russia was ruled by

dragged through its



fear —“The Kremlin fears tha
people and the people fear the
Kremlin.”

W. A. Harriman, Truman’s

Affairs assistant,

to him that the Kremlin had been

He said the admission came

while serving in Moscow as United

Harriman quoted the Russian
leader’ as saying during the last
war that people were “fighting for
their motherland, not for us.”

He addec: “By us’, he meant
the Kremlin. Unhappy people of}
satellite countries crave only to be|
free from its iron hand.” |

Harriman was speaking before
the American Association for the |
United Nations.—Reuter.

50 Hurt In May
Day Disorders

PARIS, May 1.

ne Oe






United Nations guns.

Today Allied patrois had to gc
out and find the Chinese, But
though they struck far out from
the threatened capital, they found
only a still and desolate No-Man’s-
Land and made only light and iso-
ated contact with the enemy.

The same tense quiet descended
on the entire length of the Korean
front. Even in the castern sector
where South Korean troops have
tenaciously hung on to the last
Allied grip of North Korean
ground, there was ne significant
activity.

From the early hours of the day
Allied troops in the defence are
around the South Korean capital
had waited on the alert for the
expected attack. Chinese tactics
of the last few days had given rise
to the theory that the Communists’
all-out attack on the city would
start in the first hours of May Day

No Mass Assault

But all through the night the
Allies listened in vain for the now
familiar sounds of a Chinese mass
assault—-bugle calls, high pitched
whistles and crashing gongs. All
they heard was the occasional
drone of Allied planes heading
north for night attacks on Com-
munist supply lines.

Today an Air Force spokesman
said Allied pilots had spotted at
least 4,300 lorries on North Korean
roads during yesterday and last
night. Phey had destroyed more
than 600, a new record for a single
day's operation,

- Planes were back in the alr to-
day again concentrating their
sweeps on the Communist trans-
port system. By the end of the
morning, they claimed to have
knocked out nearly 100 cars on



oe teeta es TA Ie ree app patency

Queen aa About
Barbadvs Rum

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 1,

The Queen to-day asked many questions about Barbados
rum. She also admired a conch shell table lamp, at the
Barbados.stand, when Their Majesties this morning’ visited.
the Commonwealth section of the British Industries Fair.
Buyers placed two large ordgis ior Barbados rum.

The King’s knowledge of the asphalt industry intrigued
officials at the Trinidad stand during Their Majesties’ tour.
Recalling that he had once

: | Walked in ‘Trinidad’s asphalt lake,
Y ou Du k His ty chatted eagerly about
Cc the halt industry with’ the

d L ‘Chai of Trinidad’s lake of

halt, ‘He commented favour.
Peonstit company
At The Movies




















\y de |





of

resulting in total British contro}
now,

Both the King and the Queen

showed keenest enthusiasm over

LONDON, May 1}.

The Festival of Britain’s stereo-
scopic cinema sets a new fashion
in movies,

Both sound and vision are three
dimensional hard formidable
ebjects such as cricket balls; and
lumps of rock seem to fly out of
the screen making the audience
duck involuntarily and then laugh.
Characters seem to walk right out
of the screen into stalls.

Sounds like sights have remark-
able depth. They come at the
audience from concealed loud
speakers completely encireling the
walls cf the theatre so that each
instrument in the orches‘re be-
comes separate and distinct.

Louis Applebaum from Sea
came to Britain specially to wrife
music for some stereoscopic films.
Production was by Jack Ralph,
also of Toronto,

The system gives the musician
rhanee to develop a new method
of composition,

—Reuter.



Controls On Japan
Will Be Relaxed

TOKYO, May 1

The United States Supreme
Commander in Japan Lieutenant
General Matthew B. Ridgway

told Japanese today he would
consider to relax occupation con-
trols so as to “smoothly bridge”
the transition to independence with}
the peace treaty.

the general attractiveness of the
West Indies stands.

Her Majesty made purchases at
different West Indies stands.
including two handbags by the
Grenada Manufacturing Company
at the Trinidad stand and two
handbags of sisal material at
Jamaica's stand. At the latter
stand, Her Majesty remarked
appreciatively on “all this lovely
work done in Jamaica.”

Never Saw Nutmeg Before

While at the Trinidad stand, Her
Majesty made inquiries about the
mutmeg plant from Grenada and
said she had never seen it before.
Sea island cotton took the eye of
the King, who wanted to know
from which particular part of the
West Indies it came. Connell
Dambert of the West Indies Com-
mittee gaid that the material His
Majesty was inspecting came from
St. Vineent,

A huge block of bauxite at the
British Guiana stand, brought
forth more questions from the
Royal visitors, Again it was Her
Majesty who was anxious to know
how thihgs were manufactured.

She stood for some minutes
while officials at the stand ex-
plained alumip!um processes

Queen Mary Buys

Queen Mary, who visited the
B.LF, today bought 12 handker
thiefs made of sea island cotton
at the | West Indies stall, Twe
uy ers from Germany and
Helgium placed large orders for
sea island cotton,

Mr. E. Piggott, industrial agen:







Afomic Energy Wilk | eat eesti ba et
Operate Electricity

BUENOS AIRES, May 1
Argentina’s entire electric net-

food grains, particularly America
and China. He also thanked Russia,
which he said he hoped would
soon be sending wheat to Ind:a.
“While we welcome all the help
that we can get from foreign coun-

Ag the Communist parade in The General's message for the of Dusseldorf, enquired about the
Paris was ending, fighting broke | fourth anniversary of Japan's possibilities of obtaining raw
out between North African de- P9Stwar constitution on May 3,)yarn of tea’ island cotton. Large
monstrators and the Police. said the Japanese Government otders wbre also placed by buyers

Fifty Police were reported hurt had been authorised to review °r=| for pwrpleheart wood at the Brit-
though none seriously. ders from occupation “for the, ich Guiaha stall

A group of about 1,000 North|Ppurpose of evolving through es- 1



tries”, he said, “we have made it
clear that such help must not have
any political strings attached to it
or any conditions which are unbe-
coming for a self-respecting na-
tion to accept, or any pressure to
change our domestic or interna-
tional policy.—Reutee’.

Guerilla Leader

Fleés To Formosa

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 1
Ylobay: Khan, guerilla leader
fiom Chinese Turkistan on the
borders of Central Russia, arrived
¢ Formosa ody and reported to
. eneralissimo Chiahg i-Shek.
May Day Strike Yilobars Khan, former Governor
t of Sinkiang province, fled over
C MADRID, May 1. (the Himalayas to Pakistan, to
Workers in some textile’ *-7-! escape fram Chinese Communists.
tories and home heav¥ industry] His wife died from exposure dur-
ylawts ae Beas went on| ing the journey,—Reuter.
strike ay. ut other workers ai b
in the city disregarded the re| Oil Well On Fire
ported call for a general May
TEHERAN, May 1.
An cil well at Naft Sufit fields,

Day strike. i

é There were str 1s|96 miles north of Abadan, acci-
against the cost of living in| dentally caught fire last night and
Barcelona last month, On Sun-| was to-day reported burning
men} fiercely.

day police arrested two

déscribed as agitators, after leaf-| Such fires often burn for a long

lets had _ been distributed in time because of the technical difi-

Malaga. Southern Spain calling| culties in extinguishing them,

for 4 geperal strike today Naft Sufit is one of a series of
have called} An oilfields stretching

on May 22

In Madrid leaflet:
for a general strike ‘ rth ithe huge Abadan refin-
-~Reuter ery.—Reuter

work may be operated by atomic
energy within two years, Peron
said to-day. He was delivering
an annual “state of the Nation”
message to the inaugural session
of Congress,

The President said: “If experi-
mental plans go as they have been
going until now, within two years
the whole network of electric
power in the Argentine will be
operated by controlled atomic
energy.” Then ihe syorld will
know,” he added, “how it has been
wasting its time preparing for a
war while Argentina has been
working for peace.”—Reuter.





demonstrations



iranian



from

tg —naD Snetinnaliaes

Africans mostly members of the|tablished procedures such moditi-| peyits abe handbags

“Movement for the Triumph of!¢ations as past experience, and

Democratic Liberties’ (a semi-
Communist organization) were
carrying hanned banners with

Nationalist slogans.

When the Police asked them to
hand over the banners, some
demonstrators hurled paving
stones and used clubs.

Others uprooted spiked railings
surrounding trees and threw them
like spears.

Arrests were made after about
800 extra Police arrived.

—Reuter,

SEARCH SPREADS
SAIGON, May 1.

The air and sea search for the
missing reconnaissance plane with
General Andre Hartemann French
Air Foree Commander in _ Indo-
China spread in the island to-day.
~—Reuter.



‘Britain Will Not Be F orced Into Settlement

LONDON, May 1,
Secretary Herbert
warned Persia to-day

Foreign
Morrison

that Britain would not negotiate |

settlement of the oil dispute un-
der duregs.

He told the House of Com-
mons that Britain could not ac-

cept the contentions of the
Persian Government that the
proposal to nationalise the gil-

eld atte le be-



the present situation render neces-
sary and desirable,”

Ridgway said the results of
four years application of the new
constitution “are reflected in the
internal situation of Japan today

which is one of purposeful and
peaceful reconstruction, with
much accomplished and oppor-

tunity for greater achievement in
the future.”

“As a result of this situation,
there has been a widening ac-
eceptance of the proposition that

Japan is ready for a formal peace
settlement, and positive steps
towards that end being taken by
the United States Government in

| rediecenans with other interested

Governments, offer a promise of

| Sonanaive results” General Ridg-

way said
—Reuter.

tween them and
Iranian oil company.
‘The British Goveroment had a
right to intervene, he said
Morrison added: “We have no |
wish that this question should |
become an issue between our-

the Anglo-



|

selves and our Persian friends
We are naturally anxious to si
down with them and work ovt
a solutior a reasonable at-

phere«

They were orders for Jamaican
made of
straw, ark sisal hemp. Jamaican
cigars alsp attracted buyers’ atten
tion,

One bpyer put forward the
ndvel suggestion that since pipe
smokers used Jamaican cigars.
manufacterers should manufacture
cigars, of quarter length for use
in pipes. | This, added the buyer,
woul save pipe-smokers whvu
enjoy Jamaican cigars from the
embarra: nt of cutting cigars
into small parts in public before
filling a pipe

Orders for grapefruit juice and
baskets on show at the Trinidad
Stall were placed by buyers. All
the West Indies stails were kept
busy to-day. Large crowds gath-
ered at the Jamaica stall when
Miss Tessd Prendergast, Jamaican
nodel, entered the stall clad in a
eolourful beach suit.

Morrison said it would be a
mattey of the greatest. difficulty
for Persians to operate installa-
tions They would also lose
world-wide marketing and dis-
tribution facilities.

These conditions might result
in unemployment and benefit
Communists.

Recent disturbances in the
Abadar he declared, wet

undoubtedly Commi

area,

Communist railways

The Chinese brought up heavy
anti-aircraft guns to try to pro-
tect their build-up.

Jet Battle

While Allied troops made the
best of the lull to improve de-
fence positions far to the north,
United Nations jet pilots fought
the first big air jet battle since
the start of the Communist spring
offensive eight days ago.

American Sabre jets damaged
four Communist jets and possibly
five, south of the Yalu River
border between Korea and Man-
churia.

All American pilots returned to
the base safely

Incomplete reports from Bighth
Army headquarters said that 2,976
casualties were inflicted on Com-
munists yesterday, many of them
by artillery.—Reuter.



French Kill 1,200
Rebel Troops

SAIGON, May 1

French forces have killed 1,206
cebels and taken 5,000 prisoners
in a 12-day combined land, ait
and river operation in the ‘Tong-
king delta ividgehead, it was
announced here today.

It was the biggest battle
against Vietminh Pro-Communis
guerillas to date, the communique
gaid. Forces had swept through
400 villages including 42 fortified
rebel strongholds,

The French also said they had
captured 2,800 weapons and
ammunition. —Reuter,



Marshall Aid Funids
Talks Successful

WASHINGTON, May 1}.
Economic Co-operation Admin-
istration (ECA) to-day announced
that its talks with the Belgium
mission on the freezing of Greel
Marshall Aid Funds in Belgium
had succeeded,

Marshall Aid to Belgium was
suspended on April 9 following a
Belgian court order last November
freezing over $7,000,000 worth of
Greek Marshall Aid Funds, Funds
were seized to recover for Belgian
creditors’ money owed by the
Gre Government since 1927.
E.C.A. contended that Marshall
funds could not be used to pay e@
private debt It set April 30 as
the deadline for the release of the
ftunds..—Reuter

ed.
“We do not dispute the right



of a Government to acquire
property in its ow! country
“But we cannot accept that the
company’s whole position in Per-
sia should be-radically altered
by unilateral action when agree-
ment the company freely
entered i by the Gov ment
itself provides é j

t Renter










miles of the city have been pounded to pieces by

Persia To Set
Up National
Oil Co. Board

LONDON, May |.

Persia is to set up a National
X11 Company with a Managin;
3oard and a Supervisory Board of
pecialists to take over the nation’s
vil resources, including the British
controlkd) Anglo-Tranian Oil Com.
rany

This was disclosed in an wnoffi-
cial text of a resolution approvec
hy the Parliamentary Oil Com
mittee on April 26, received in
London to-day

The Committee's resolution pro-
iding for the immediate taking
ver of the Persian oil industry
was approved by Majlis (the Low-
w House) last Saturday and un-
inimously ratified by the Senate

st night. Whether any amend-
ments were made to the original
resolution has not been made clear
in the reports on Parliament's
action.

Persia's new Premier Dr, Mo-
hammed Moshaqi, was Chairman
of the Oil Committee which pre-
sented the Resolution.

The Resolution said that buyers
ot Anglo-[ranian products on an
innual basis from the beginning
af 1948 to the last of March 20
‘ean continue to buy the same
amount annually”,

Whatever is left over, all condi-
tions being the same, they have
priority of purchase,” Article
seven of the Resolution added.

The Resolution said: “the Gov-
ernment is bound under the super-
vision of a Mixed Committee to ar-
range to send qualified students
abroad each year to acquire
“knowledge and experience” in
the oil industry. Their expenses
would be met out of the Persian
il revenue,—Reuter



RADIO FREE EUROPE

MUNICH, May |}.

A new powerful radio trans-
mitter “Radio Free Europe" to-day
joined other western radio stations
beaming ‘Western’’ news and
viey’s to peoples behind the “iron
urtain”. Radio Free Europe is
entirely financed by
American sources and
by Czech exiles, Germans
Americans. —Reuter.

private!
is staffed)
and |

Persia Awaits
Signature
Of The Shah
ON OIL BILL

HAIG NICHOLSON)
TEHERAN, May tl.

A few strokes of the Shah's pen
are all that are required to make
effective the nationalisation of
Persia’s British owned oil industry
in which about £500,000,000 capi-
tal are sunk,

The Shah's signature, expected
in the next few days will
formally legalise oil nationalisa~
tion

Dr Mohammed Mossadeq,
Persia's new Prime Minister, has
callee for the examination of the
Anglo-Lranian Oi Company's
accounts as part of nationalisation
of the country’s oil indusity now
approved by hoth Houses of
Parliament

Answering a question in. the
Senate last night, he alleged =that
the 19383 agreement with-Britain
was made under duress and was
therefore not legal and binding.

“Since 1933 the oil company
has acted without agreement and
it must now give us an accounting
of its income since then”, he
said.

“The Company had no right to
sell oil to the Royal Navy at a
price below world level.” “We
must examine the companys
bouks and have refunded to us
the rebate granted fo the “British
Navy”, Dr. Mossadeq added.
—Reuter

(By



18 Smallpox Cases

TILBURG, Hollaad, May |}

Eighteen adult cases of smatl-
pox have been diagnosed here, if
was learned today.

According ta Health Authorities
there is not much danger of the
disease spreading, because most
local citizens were recently
va¢cinated.

The infection. ig ‘believed to
have been carried from Indonesia
or Australia—Reuter.

THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
DIAL 3113
Day or Night



VN, VE only the bed will do












SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES

BENSON w/

OLD BOND STREET, LONDON



That indefinable gift,

which guides people of taste
and leads one instinctively
to select perfection, will
ensure the choice of

Benson & Hedges as the
cigarettes for all occasions

when only the best will do.






Ia j
‘tins of 50
$1.06 |

’

HEDGES,





PAGE TWO



—— Caruh Calling

IRST of the personnel of the

Caribbean Commission ‘whe
are coming io Barbados for the
twelfth Meeting of the Caribbean]
Conimission are due to arrive here
tomorrew. They are Mr. Jimmy
Cozier, Avting Information Officer
of the Caribbean Commission and
Mr. Lindop. Other staff member:
ef the Commission are expgeted in|
en Saturday, and the Seeretary
General..on Sunday. Delega
for the meeting are. also expectec
in around.this time.

The opening session will take
place in the Chamber of the Legis-
lative Council at 10 a.m. on Mon-
day, May-th, and His Excellency
the Governor will deliver an ad-
dress of welcome to the delegates
The remaining sessions will be
held at Hastings House.

Timely Talk

BD": IDA GREAVES’ timely talk

on*“Currency and Money in
the West Indies” at the Barbados
Museum: Gh Monday, May 7th at
5 p.m. shguld be especially inter-
esting, what with the forthcoming
changeovéf to a unified currency
in the West Indies.

Advocate at B.LF.
EOPLEtin England visiting the
British Industries Fair will be
able to read the Barbados Advo-
cate. Issues of this newspaper
from April 29th to May 8th are be-
ing flown to England by B/W.LA./
B.O.A.C. free of charge in three
batches. The first batch left Bar-
bados yesterday by B.W.I.A. for
Trinidad. Today they are being
tlown to Jamaica to connect with
B.O.A.C’s flight to London, B.LF.
visitors will probably be reading
thern sometime tomorrow . morn-
ing.
The second and third batches
will leave here May 5th and 8th,

Uniforms
EVERAL of the stores © in
Bridgetown as well as the

banks “have the ladies on their
staff wearing uniforms. The idea
is catehimfg on and almost every
week a new uniform can be seen

on Broad Street, Their design. is
simple ured skirt and blouse
to mat '

Leaving To-day

R. “SRAMJOHN G(KOOL,

Govfigs Director of the
Trinidad Trust ompany and
Director of Globe Theatres Ltd.,
who arrived from Trinidad on
Sunday is due to leave today for
B.G. where another Globe Theatre
is nearing completion. Carib has
been informed that Globe Theatres

Ltd. intends. building another
theatre -kere in the vicinity of
Eagle Hall.

Duringstis stay in Barbados he
was the est of Mr. Maurice
Jones, MA&nager of the Globe
Theatre ard China Doll.

Irish St. Joan
IR LAURENCE OLIVIER has
invited: Irish actress Siobhan
McKenna «to bring her {Irish-
language version of Shaw’s St.
Joan to London with the offer of
a_ theatre,

Miss McKenna is seriously con-
sidering the offer. But she would
prefer to take San Siobhan (as
it is called in Irish) to Belfast,
Limerick and Cork before accept-
ing Olivier's offer.









ADVENTURES.
~~

lil





POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER



“Before
idea of giving Scotland and
Wales their independence
out of hand, just pause and
think for a moment of some
of the people who could be
deported as undesirable

condemning the

aliens!""
21 Officers -
HE loss of the submarine

Affray means that. the Royal
Navy has lost all the young officers
at present trainiag for the sub-
marine service,

The Affray had on board all the
21 officers taking the submarine
course at H.M.S. Dolphin, the
submarine base at Gosport. Each
course lasts three months.

These young men, all volun-
teers, were half-way through
their course. Several of them “4
the submarine tradition deepl
rooted. One was Sub-Lieut. L
ton, son of one of our most fam-
ous wartime sub-—mariners, Com-
mander “Tubby” Linton, V.c.
who died in the service.

Festival Restaurants

HAT are the prices pro-

posed for the Festival of
Britain restaurants on the South
Bank. Luncheon at the Regatta
Restaurant and the Fairway Cafe
will be 6s., dinner up to 10s. Din-
her will also be served a la carte.

For drinks, the prices are like-
ly to be: Sherry, 2s. 6d., plain gin,
2s,; whisky, 2s, 6d.; martini, 3s.
to 3s. 6d. Champagne will cost
from £1 15s. to £2 5s. a bottle.

But one big mistake is being
made. Many North American
visitors will be deprived of a
favourite drink. No rye whisky
has been ordered,

Familiarisation Tour

R. and Mrs. Terry, O’Donnell

who arrived here April 24th,
left last night for Trinidad by
B.W.LA. Mr. O'Donnell is of the
O'Donnell Travel Service in Red
Bank, New Jersey. He is on a
familiarisation tour of this area.





?BY THE WAY...

O shos® who are not prepared

to take the New Economics

for granted it seems odd that a

controlled price for fish is “the

price we have to pay” for getting
no meat.

If a nationalised fishing indus-
try, working on the lines of the
nationalised coal mines, ever
succeeded in producing a serious
shortage of fish, I suppose a con-
trolled price for dried egg would
be the price we should have to
pay for no stale vegetables. By
the way, I notice, with a deep
feeling of humiliation, that
America has beaten us in the
race to find an easily-handled
substitute for milk. It is a tablet
of frozen milk paste, which melts
in hot -water. Our own food
scientists are still working on the
new canvas bread pills.

The. Palace of Progress

D* “STRABISMUS (Whom
God'Preserve) of Utrecht
was at the Festival Palace of
Progress yesterday to inspect
some of his exhibits. These
include a-rocking-horse with a
waterproof \snout, which has an
alarm clock inside its head; a

little glass distorting egg through
which everything appears fiat
and hairy; a lifesize model of the
engine-room of a Turkish sub-
marine in lard; a suction—pipe for
drawing pips through jelly; a
mechanical sneezer, with (zinc
eatches; an inverted bath for
tortoises; electric whiskers which
can be fitted to toy prawns; and
a boomerang-harpoon which
drops fly-papers on cows.

96 in.
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.

DIAL 4606

Finnish Refusal Drama

ET us suppose—a thing quite

- impossible—that I were to
write; “A Peruvian team of
athletes has declined an_ invita-
tion, to visit Luton during the
Festival.”. People would say I
was talking nonsense. Very well.
Read this, from an_ evening
paper: A Finnish team of ath-
letes has declined an invitation
to visit Ilford during the Festival,
No offence intended to Ilford, I
am sure. Possibly the members
of the team were told that one
of the conditions of the visit was
that they must not play Snakes
and Ladders on Sundays.



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for
its Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be publishe¢
Advocate, and tha peer % —

rize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery e stor!
an be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesdav every week.
NOTE: Stories must not be copied.
Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

every Monday n The Evening

Age
School

Sheen ee anes

Seba a eeeeeeee of

Home Address ......++..eeceeeessasssreereseeesee®

Ee BRP RBeeeeeeweweewee|) 8
MARLANE CREPE in All Colours
FIGURED CREPE
STRIPED SILK Assorted Colours
FLOWERED CREPE
DYED SCROLL CLOQUE

EVANS & WHITEIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

OF PIPA



ate Copyright P24. Var Orme ne Ae

Sateen mee eeeeees Sete e eee eeeenene

eS kt, A A a

ict ets at ean Sk tk

— ht ee tt tk

C.D.C. Home Expansion
L ORD REITH is Empire—build-
~ ing in London, As boss of the
Government's Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation he has settled
50 of his staff in 38. Park Street,:
Mayfair. His realm already con-
sisted of buildings in Dover Street,
Berkeley Street, and Curzon

Street.

This.extension of home tersibony
seems to have given Lord Reit

by ROBERT KINGSLEY

The old (Etonian) face has
changed very little over the past.
150-200. years; it would not need
the introduction of much mdre

transform any of the 52 Old Bran, &
jians whose Leaving Portraits ar’

on show in room four of the Tate
Gallery, into their modern equiv- ~

BARBADOS ADVOPATE

What makes the
ETON FACE?

than a barber and a bowler hat to ”














alents
the urge to inspect his overseas
possessions. After six months. as ‘4p ee ietures ape, oe. spate eal
Chairman, he is planning te tour an e B. rd,’
the Corporation's world-wide in- mester, Dr. Barna
terests barrassed by the custom of "poye*
Where is hé going? He will not Who were leaving tipping the He



decide for about three weeks. And «8S they said farewell, « a
it may be a month or two before
he sets out.

In the meantime, Lord Reith is
increasing his staff. He has ap-
pointed a Press Officer.

Star Prices

Here is a footnote on the price
of drinks in London now:

A friend who lives in the flats
at Grosvenor House ordered a
bottle of Martell brandy, Cordon
Bleu, The bill was £5 12s. 6d.

a cus! his predecessors had
warmly encouraged.

, promise or nobility
traits done and: pi
school, being painted» at ages
ranging from 17 to 22.

At the Tate you can see how the
school has stamped its impression _
upon them—and the same trade
mark is discernible on other Eton-



ie eS this brand in a shop is ‘ans today.
s. 6d.

Hauglity
— Meaning of Lehnte There is the short,

upper lip, curled as if its
EISURE is no medicament. at found non-Etonians tco eee
all unless you enjoy it. It teo nan erous, , same the

should abserb just enough of your haughty seven oe ‘ae: tem

attention to make you forget your Which
worries; but not so. much of yourâ„¢ight interpret as a look of arro-,
attention as to prevent your mind gance, but probably originated it,
from resting. That is what I con- tying to avoid too close contact
sider the important function of With hard collars at an early and
leisure; not doing nothing, as that impressionble age.
means that you brood; but doing In some the supercilious look is
something different tnat makes withering—the portrait of William
the blood flow from congested Wyndham Greville, painted in
cells of your brain into other 1781, it is the look of any old
‘empty cells. I find myself that
the best relief from work is to do
some different sort of work.”
Harold Nicolson, speaking in a.
B.B.C. programme.

Trinidad Artist

Qa people praised the
work of Trinidad artist Car-
Lisle Chang last week after an Art
exhibition staged by the British
Council, Chang, who is a student
at the Central School of Arts and
Crafts, submitted several paint-
ings in oil. Each received close
scrutiny from the experts attend.
ing the show and I am assured
that Chang’s work “shows all the
signs of a promising artist”.

MacArthur’s' Song

ENERAL MacARTHUR’'S
reference at close of his
Washington speech to “Old sol-
diers never die,” has started an
overnight rush among America’s (1813.39).seems to be giving his
top record makers, New songs mind to his studies and wears
based on the old ballad are al- spectacles to prove it, but he rose
ready being “composed” and re- to no greater height than a country
corded. parsonage.
Incidental Intelligence Richard Staunton Sitwell wil.
the mot ), on e other
ea. ee ane tae tana fale: ache te, ae
head of the house and the eared in the Nathaniel Dance
pedestrian has the right of way. portrait, wears the aspect of a
Both are fairly safe unless they young ian whose main reading
try to exercise their rights:—Grit. was ‘confined 'to the sporting
- ————-_ editions.

Rupert and the

a look that many waiters in night
clubs have encounte

One or two of the youths, on
the other hand, like Sir Arscott
Ourry Molesworth, Bart., (1789--
1823) are plainly hearties; then,
no doubt, they squeezed in sittings
for their portraits between meets
of hounds; today the fixture lists
of rugby or rowing clubs would
have to be consulted before ap-
pointments could be made.

The majority of the young men
whose portraits are shown look
towards the left, a trait not un-
known among old boys of the
present day, as the case histories
of Dr. Dalton, Mr. Strachey and
Lord Pethick-Lawrence demon-
trate.

A few—five, in fact—are por.
trayed reading books (but reading
them, it must be said, in a some.
what perfunctory, ashamed way).
True, William Charles Cotton




























For a wie Ru i and
in deligh: pao
views i here 1" he murtnuts,
“*Why have I never come this way

By BEACHCOMBER

a rere meses yen Nut-
i trying to pick out well-known
Is Passing euee . Tien, turning round,

a k, for clouds“have
OMEONE asks me what makes he gets 2 shoc

Cabinet Ministefs so_ vain.
One cause of their vanity is that
they become accustomed to see-
ing some such statement as “Our
aim is peace” greeted as though
it were a major contribution to,
political thought. Another cause
is the courteous applause which
greets them on the platform, and
which is always mistaken for a
demonstration of affection and a
proof of popularity.

(TOMORROW:
173lb. in five days:
the elephant,)



How I gained
by Moga,

receive

Entertain
throughout

PU e neem newer eee eneee eens

Deen eeeeeeneenee eeeee

Cotman newer eree

$1.85



the gift of a picture to the school —
might be more becoming than a~
£10 note slipped into his hand— ~

Etonian affronted by an inferior— ~

Dial 4000 for
s















ESE

“AE OLD ETGNIAN. 1951
Dr. Hugh Dalton,

Minister of © Govern-
ment and Planning.

Adbout’ all these young men
om Reynolds and Romney and
ppner and Gainsborough paint-
ed (for fees not much higher than
t old £10 head-master’s tip)
re ‘is in common something
eir heirs mostly lack, All—even
je yor sons—HKave a faint
air,of smugness that suggésts they
are not worried about: the future.

.Neither. call-up nor: death duties

ére large on their horizons,
Just One Tie

There was only one tie-proclaim-
ed Old Etonian: in the gallery
when I was there, and he moved
happily abcut as if among con-
temporaries, there were. one or
two who might have been mothers
and sisters of present boys, who
seemed to be practising disparage-
ment, for Lords or the Fourth of
June,

If there were any Harrovians in
the room, they wisely chose not
to display their schooling.

‘orld Copyright Reserved
‘ —LES.

Ice-flower —17



rolled up a valley behind him and
ave nearly reached the hill top.

my, I'd better follow ithe
others while | can see my way,’” he
gasps. He sets off, but within a
minute the cloud covers -him and

finds himself sliding through a
moist and gloomy feg.





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WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1951



B.B.C. Radio Programme

WEDNESDAY, MAY ® 1951
6.20 @.m.—12.15 p.m. 19.60 M

6.30 arm. Sports Diary, 645 a.m. Sport-
ing Record.-7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m.
News Angi-sis, 715 am, From the
Editorials, 7.25 a.m.
7.30 a.m.

AQUATIC. CLUE CINEMA (Members Only)
1O-NIGHT & TO:MORROW Shon at 8.30

MERLE OBSRON-— ROBERT RYAN — CHARLES KORVIN
“BERLIN EXPRESS”

An. RKO Radio Picture










845 a.m. You and the News, 9 am. The

News, 910 am. Home News from

» 915 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 am.

Parade, 11.25 a.m. Listeners’

ice, 11.45 a.m, ‘Statement of Account,

‘noon) The News, 12.10 = Newd
sa Fu pee P. Close Dow







4115—-6.45 0 bs tip e000 ap. MM, .

shee Tasers. t Tate ASTOR THEATRE
two usand Guineas, 5.15 p.m. Light a.
Yolee f evoun. 0s bum the ia, 4

oO! pom. .

te om rade Sa: ieee Columbia Smashing Double— .

eee te cha * RELENTLESS“

Ts REL

News, 7.10 p. ae News
7.15 p.m, Cailirig West
Indies, 71.45 p.m. Red

and
TAB—1L.00 pom. |e y:..... 2558, Da. ™M.
“8 p.m) Radio Revwee, 8.15 p.m. Books

LUST FOR GOLD”

to Read, 8.30 p.
Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Edi ' :

10:15 p.m.—10.30 Pp. ‘m, ’ Canadian ‘Chronicle.

11.76 Mes 25.51 M, “THE BROTHERS”

“HIT THE ICE"





9 p.m. nt of Account, 9.15 pan. ET
t, 10 Io im, "the, Neve, 10,0 Bron | oe
ot i GLOBE THEATRE
ie mine.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME ' TO.DAY 4.45 & 8.15 & TO-MORROW
ie pol -1h 18pm YY, MAY 2, 1981 Nioak ABBOT & err & ‘AT ROC & nm REED

cCROSsw ORD















: n (DIAL 2310)
Fa eek: hetahaek dale soi , TODAY AND ‘TOMORROW \Only)-4.45, and8.30 p:m.
; we Grass j
‘Ble Grass of Kentucky: & The Dade Goes West |
Bil WILLIAMS,’ Jane die ALBERT — Gale STORM
a MATINEE : THURSD. AY — 1,30 p.m. (Monogram) Two Features
JIGGS. AND MAGGIE COURT”
Y ‘ * aii NNIE RIANO and —
Plus those Headliners Joe LOUIS (in action) “Henry nie anes
OPENING FRIDAY. 47
4 a o GE oF DOOM” and MacARTHUR stoRY
Across. a PLAZA DIAL
* paneling meee nocsuse (6) || OASTIN (THE GARDEN) St. James
.Â¥. Food from the boat-house, (3) TODAY and TOMORROW TODAY Se 8.30 p.m.
11 Neat or decorativ: ; & 8.20 p.m. (Monogram) CIsco KID i
18. Wey ae ane, marble 9) “J1GGS8 ane Madam: td naan “SOUTH of “the RIO GRANDE”
\ R
18. ot the. fairies. ‘or nth ae eT ae ase Rolana WAYTERS ‘as Charlie CHAN
24. Silly’ way. to bes “ins new A | em ALBERTSON “THR GOLDEN EYE”
98. Aman, 1? How mad ! THURSDAY (Only) i" pm. |
6. Bird, (4) 27. Smash’ oo (5) OPENING FRIDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Herbert WILCOX apn
rae Anna Neagle wack a Witaing in
1. Announce “The COURTNEYS ef CU :
2 Anger in tna Kitonen ? (5) ; STREET:
‘3. rally your opponent. (5)
Grave when f in a yish
tricks. wen) 5, End piece, (4)
Greater ospreys conceal him, (4)
15; Gives “some people a \sborting ee eee ore eee ales <2
17. Hal BT ine orse. iy oy tae EMPIRE ROYAL
ig. sort of thoroughfare. (4)
20, Diluted. (4) 21, Sly. (4) Last Three Shows To-day To-day and To-morrow
a arowey refusal, (4) —4.45 ~~ 8. oe 4:30 & 8.30 p.m.
Friday, only.
en of yesterday’ : puzzle, —Across: ‘
baleat aoa ia: Mg de ii. Darryl F, Zanuck presents Universal All Action Double
Us. ti Mem 7 OY enti John WAYNE & z
FRc tosittuaes gal |] mete DUNNE Handlph Scorr
28, Run aS «© THE MUDLAR. in
GLOBE “THE SPOILERS ”
z Thursday Only 4.30 & 8.15
STARTING FRIDAY 20th Century Fox Double ann
THE MOST POWERFUL FILM |), “YOU'RE MY EVERYTHING” “ SEVEN SINNER.
EVER MADE.. ./t will _ eo ~
sear your memory “ SIDE eet Sonn WAYNE



s forever! Broderick CRAWFORD

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
Universal Big Double.

Mae Clarke and Boris

ROXY

Last ~e Shows To-day—
4.30 and 8.15.

20th Century Fox Double
Tom Conway and Noreen

Nash in Karloff in
“CHECKERED COAT” ** FRANKENSTEIN ”’
— and — and
«CAPTAIN FROM « DRACU.
CASTILE ” —~ with —
LEW AYRES — with —
LOUIS WOLHEIM , “etm \ eeiaais Power and Jean Bela Lugosi and Helen
om Aa. A BOMAMGUE'S navel: Ocacted by UUW MILESTONE Peters. . Chandler.



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WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,

Ouit Suez

Canal Zone
EGYPT TELLS BRITAIN

(By CHARLES A. SMITH
LONDON, April,

Egypt has joined the growing
list vi mations engaged in twisting
the tail of the British lion,

Egypt is demanding that the
British quit the strategically im-
portant;Suez Canal Zone, and that
the Anglo-Egyptian’ Sudan’ should
be united with Egypt under the
Egyptian crown.

To the accompaniment of opposi-
tion charges of “scuttling,” .the
British Government is playing for
time. It has indicated broadly
however that it would be prepar-
ed to withdraw its-ferces from
the Canal Zone, conditionally, and
let the- Sudanese. decide whether
or not they want to join their
more powerful norfherh néigh-
bour.

To-day—Not To-morrow

Using the forceful diplomatic
language -of- the Kremlin, thc
Egyptians have bluntly told the
British in reply that they refuse
to have their new demands
pigecn-holed. They say they want
their request fulfilled to-day rath-
er than~seme incalculable to-
morrow, and* not on conditions
such as the British have proposed.

Egyptian Foreign Minister
Salah el Din Bey said:

“Egypt is-eager to realize her
national aspirations. Egypt is
determined on evacuation, and can
aecept no other solution than unity
with the Sudan, with the Sudan

enjoying self-government. under
King Farouk.”
The next move is up to the

British Government, which realizes
it may have a_tough fight on_ its
hands should Parliament have to
ratify any agreement based wholly
on the Egyptian demands.

British troops are permitted to
occupy’ bases in the Suez Canal
Zone . under the terms of the
Anglo-Egyptian Treaty of 1939.
The Egyptiens have long clam-
oured ‘for revision of the Treaty.
Negotiations for such revision
were Started bit broke “down,
apparently irrevagably,, in . 194%.
The on then proved the chief
stumbling block,

'
Rely on Russians

To-day, however, with the hot
breath of Moscow reaching into
the Middle East, the British do
net like the idea of pulling their
forces, out of the vitally important
Suez Canal Zone, They have said
as much to the Egyptians, who
have replied that they would rely
on the Russians respecting Egyp-
tian neutrality.

The British do not subscribe to
that view. They say the most they
would do at this time wonld be
to agree to withdrawal of -their
forces’ in stages of upwards of
three |years, provided the Egyp-
tians jagreed to permit Britisn
working parties to maintain. the
evacuated bases in good order,
and agreed to permit the imme-
diate peaceful readmission of the
British} forces in the’ event’ of
imminent ‘or actual: war: =

And they offer in the meanwhile
to help train and equip the Egyp-
tian Army to prevent*‘a vacuum
from @ccurring if and when the
British’ do pull out.

Anything less would be “suicid-
al” at: this time, the British Gov-
ernment believés.

Gradual Withdrawal
British military experts, in ad-
vising the Government, say they
are not averse to a gradual with-
drawal. from the Suez Zone pro-
vided ‘the bases ate’ maintained
and the right of immediate peace-
ful readmission is guaranteed.
Tne¥ wonld use the period of
gradual withdrawal for, realigning
British. defenses in that part oi
the world at bases in Jordan to the
east, Cyprus to the north, and the
Tobruk area of, Libya tothe west.
The many opponents to thetidea
of any capitulation whatever to



~

Pee








1951"



YOU DESIR



“They'll

the Egyptians at this time, declare
it would virtually invite Russia to
put pressure on Egypt, and would
arouse alarm and even despair in
Greece, Turkey, and the Islamic
countries venerally.—LN.S.

Teaches Geience
With Tin Cas

PARIS, April.

A science teacher from. Missouri
has set out with a kit of tin cans,
strings, corks, burned-out electric
bulbs, razor blades and empty
food jars for Thailand—to teach
the Thailandese science.

He is Ellsworth Obourn, of the
John Burroughs School at Clay-
ton, Missouri... He is part of a
UNESCO team of teachers being
sent to Thailafd . te alleviate —a
shortage of teachers there.

‘Besides being ¢onsiderably less
expensive, Mr, Obourn claimed
that home-made’ devités’ may
help pupils grasp scientific prin-
ciples more easily than elaborate
laboratory equipment they do not
understand.

—I.N.S.



Bulgaria Protests
To United Nations

LONDON, April 28.
Bulgaria in a note to the United
Nations says that ‘the British and
United States Embassies in Ath-

ens are “endangering peace in
the Balkans”, according to’ Sofia
Radi. ~~ arg

It said they were actively sup.
porting groups ~ of Bulgarian
cmigres in Greece in. -their at-
tempts to “overthrow by violence
the lawful Government’ of Bul.
garia”.

The note referred to an organi-
sation which it said was prepar-
ing and organising an armed up~
rising against the Bulgarian Gov-
ernment -and. “criminal acts «of
sabotage and espionage of the
Bulgarian territory”.—Reuter,

LUXURY-LOVING. BIRDS,

KINGWILLIAMSTOWN,

ie ,, South Africa,
A housewife has ..solyed the
mystery of her missing laundry.
A’ pair “of hamorkops (a type of
crane) had taken vest, pants,
handkerchiefs and a bathing cos-
tume to-lipe the enermous nest

they were Muilding.— ..





V4

one



~7y

dh teh Sa

»
\

s tt oe

BEST TEA — SO US

RED ROSE TEA!

ae IT IS GOOD TEA.

ne

‘SMALL USER

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PI
— S _&

IIIA
ai

want to send Cambridge an American admiral

Their Majesties Will V isit
Colonial Art Exhibition

LONDON, April 25.
_The King and Queen are to
visit on May 24th (Empire Day)
the Exhibition of Traditivrial
Colonial Art at the Imperial
Ti:stitute, South Kenshigton,
London. ‘His Majesty has loaned
to this important Exhibition an
ivory leopard which was a pres-
ent to Queen Victoria following
the 1897 Expedition to Benin
(Nigeria), Rare examples of
Colonial Art, some never befqre
seen in England, will be shown.
Exhibits have been sent from all}

over . the. -world~-from Malaya,
Nigeria, Fiji, the Gold Coast,
Tanganyika, Uganda, Malta,

Cyprus; from the British Museum,
and from many private collec.
tions in England and abroad.

Not Comprehensive

Arranged by the
Office with the support and co-
operation of the Colonial Gov-
ernments concerned, and with
the advice and assistance of
many authorities in Great Britain
the Exhibition is planned not to
present a comprehensive display,
territory by territory, but rather
to demonstrate, with the finest
available examples, a number of
cultural traditions which are
entitled to rank among man’:
greater achievements.

The #éteetiarr-has “been influene:
ed by aesthetic. considerations.
The organisers emphasise that. it
is not planned as an ethnographi-
cal or -anthopological exhibition

It is divided into two sections:
the larger is devoted to sculpture,
and the smaller to such crafts
as pottery, basketwork, textiles
and other forms of cloth, metal
work, etc.

Colonial

This exhibition, the most out-
standing and comprehensive of
its kind yet held in, Englana, will
be open to the public from May
25 to September 30.

Among _ outstanding exhibits
will, be an unrivalled group . of
sculpiure from West Africa—
Wigeria, the Gold Coast, the
Britis: Cameroons, and Sierra
Leone,

From Nigeria, the Oni of- Ife,
spiritual head of the Yoruba peo-
ple, has lent eight of the famens
Ife bronzes, most of which were

a

‘
q






excavated within the grounds of
his palace during — rebuilding
operations in 1938—39. The

origin and exact date of these
priceless pieces is still undecided.
By virtue of their extreme
naturalism, reminiscent of the
sculpture of classical Greece
some have suggested ‘that they
were made under the = influence
of classical Greece, some have
Suggested that they were made
under the influence of Greek
Roman or Egyptian work, This
group includes two bronzes not
previously seen in England; they
were secured at the time of the
excavations by an American
collector who has recently return-
ed them to the possession of the
Oni.

Terra—Cottas

Of particular interest is a small
group of terra-cottas (heads of
men and animals) which are
among the first fruits of a pro-
gramme of excavation now being
carried out in the northern
provinces of Nigeria. On geolo-
gical evidence, these pieces have
been provisionally dated to the
latter half of the first millennium

B.c,, and thus represent the
earliest known period of Beniz
art.

A unique work is the. bronze
snask,
head, which
installation by the

is worn at his
Ata of Idah,

onthe east -bank of Niger. This}
mask has never before left j
Nigeria. P

The territories of East Africa,
while not . producing - as much

sculpture as. the est African
territories, have contributed a
number of. fine pieces, for
example, wooden masks of the

Makonde people of Tanganyika
and fine carved boxes, made in
wood by the Barotse of Northern
Rhodesia.

The frigate bird is one af the
dominant art motives of _ the
Pacific, and many of ‘the éxhibi-
tion pieces from the © Solomon
Islands embody this bird: in one


















Whenever you feel discomfort after
meals, just suck two Rennies, one
after the other.. As they dissolve,
their balanced blend of antaci
ingredients goes straight to where
the trouble lies, and corrects your
acidity. You can always’ settle
trouble from acid stomach im-
mediately, if you cerry a few Rennies
(they're Wrapped separately) in your
t or Landbag. If they don’t give
you relief, it's time you saw your
doctor, Get Rennies at any chemist.:

DIGESTIF | ES

NO SPOON, NO WATER...
; Sticke them like sweets

ARE YOU PREPARING
. FOR THE BIG
ATHLETIC MEETING



To avoid muscular pains
and to keep up your stride
You should rub down with

SACROOL

THE GREAT PAINKILLER
e

on sale at
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



: work is black

representing. .a-.humim4'



‘tt own Meetings Make
Laws For Many

U.S. Communities

MANCHESTER, New Hampshire.

In school auditoriums, commun-
ity centres, and towg halls of 223
communities in this State, hun-
dreds of men and women have re-
cently held their annual tow.
meetings to chart the course Gi
their lecal governments for the
coming year.

Like the residents of many
cther towns in the United States,
chiefly those in the northeastern
States, these persons practise a
simple, direct democracy. They
meet together to talk over local
issues and to act as their own
lawmakers. This is in contrast to
the more commonly used form of
American government—represen.
tative democracy — in which leg-
islators are elected by the voters
to do the lawmaking.

A moderator is chosen to con-
duct the town meeting and each
citizen has a chance to express
his views on any issue before a
vote is taken, Decisions are based
on the majority vote of those
present,

Whole Day
Among the items that frequent
ly appear on the agenda are tax
rates, authorization fer a new
school, maintenance of the town
library, provision of adequate fire
” and police protection, or improve-



no “. ment of the sewerage system or
i . ether public property. In addi-
I tee tion, the townspeople elect oifi-
cers to adminster the laws and

conduct public business until the

next meeting.

Usually a full day is set aside
once each year for the meeting, |
Sometimes the business is con-

time is required, an additional
meeting may be called at any
time during the year, Frequently
the women of the village pre
pare and serve a community din
ner for those attending the meet-

form or
the black
inlaid with

another, It appears i)
wooden food bow s
pearl shell, some
times alone and sometimes with |
a fish in its beak, One of the "8
finest exhibits from the Solomon This method of direct de-
Islands is a house-board, about mocracy has a 300-year history in
fifteen feet long, decorated with the United States, The tradition
seven frigate birds, carved in the cf the town meeting is inherited
round, and diving down on to « fyom the early days of Ameriean
sboal of carved fish applied t Jie when direct participation of
the pottom of the board. citizens in local government was
practised in nearly all communi-
ties of the new country,

Uganda Pottery



i

Fine examples of the repre
sentational sculpture of the Santa
Crug Isjands and New Hebrides
Fijiand Tonga are also on view

Among the outstanding craft
graphite pottery
trom Uganda, with its strong and

Medical Report
Approved

(From Our Own Correspondent)

graceful shapes; cloths, leathe: KINGSTON, April 26.
work and ceremonial shields, At a meeting of the Jamaic:
with bold geometrical patterns, Branch of the British Medica!

trom Tanganyika; gold, jewellery Association held in Kingston thi

and ornaments from the Gold week, approval was given to th
Coast; bowls, plates and boxes repori of the Caribbean Medical
of gold, silver and brass, and Conference held recently in

Trinidad.

The meeting also agreed on the
setting up of a Caribbean Council
of the British Medical Association

fine ‘sarong cloths from Malaya;
lace from Cyprus and Malta; anc
tapa; or bark cloth, from the
islatids of the West Pacific.



cana
ce
TEA

PLASTIC MULTI-COLOURED BAGS §
PREG. $3.36 NOW $2.50. 8

ae
BEDSPREADS — sincte §
pe REG, $5.14 NOW $4.25. 3
DOUBLE REG. $6.70 NOW $5.75
+ CREPES Ms PLAIN & COLOURED
7S" REG. $2140 ' NOW $1.40

POSS PIC CS SOCSSSS



NIGHTIES — PANTIES
__... BRASSIERES
AT



THE BARGAIN HOUSE

30, Swan Street S. ALTMAN, Proprietor

PHONE 2702
PVOPOCOO ISSO SIO SSO CC TS TOE GOV OI OOOO

ducted in less than a day. It 5
j

. ‘ 66,6693
SEES OO POE OSI

PAGE THREE

DAY OF REST

sore! Kidneys Must
Clean Qut Acids

four body cleans out excess Achis



ern that

make Su ivy a cdi t re






taki t
the
of rest in

eures
needs at
seven

|

|

j

|

way. be

anyway, becs and poisonous wastes in your bleed
thru 9 million tiny delicate Kidney
tubes or filters, 1f Poisons in the Kid»
neys or Bladder make your suffer from
Getting Up Nights, Nervousness, Leg

‘

least one

(CP)

ody







SCIENCE CENTURY
EDINBURGH,
More than 4,000 scientists,
dénts, laymen and emateurs are
expected to attend the 113th an-
nual meeting of the British Asso-

Pains, Circles Under Eyes, Backache,
Aching Joints, Acidity, or Burning
passages, don't rely on ordinary medi-
cines, Fight such Poisons and troubles
with the doctor's prescription Cyttex,
Cystex starts working in three 3
must prove entirely satisfactory and
be exactly the medicine you need or
money back is guaranteed. Ask your
chemist tor Cystex. (Sisstex) today.
The Guar-

stu-

ciation here in August The

" st anté@e
theme is “100 years cf British ee ex protects
science” and the Duke of Edin- For Kidneys, Rheumatiom, Bladder you,
burgh will attend.—‘€P)

White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use |
Propert’'s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No
surer way of making sure

that white shoes are white!



If you find yourself lying awake
; are constantly “tired”;
easily upset and too often depressed,

it is a sure sign that your strength is

at nights

flagging and you're suffering from over:
taxed nerves, The special ingredients of
BUCKFAST TONIC WINE will
quickly restore lost energy y fortifyyou.
and the exhaustion 6f

against lever

long-term fatigne.

Take home
a bottle today!

muceeasr

BUCKFAST,
TONIC WINE

MADE BY
THE MONKS OF
BUCKFAST
ABBEY





OUR baby’s happiness and well-being in the years to come

depend on the care yougive him now. The fiest important duty...
is to take every means to ensure that your baby is fed fromethe-~
breast. Remember that Breast-fed is Best-fed.

The food which Nature supplies is the perfect food for baby.
Mother's milk is'naturally constituted to suit his delicate digestion
and to provide the nutritive elements for sturdy growth and
healthy development.

Wide experience has proved the remarkable value of ‘Ovaltine’
to expectant and nursing mothers. Doctors and nurses strongly
recommend that ic be taken regularly before and after baby
comes, to stimulate a rich and ample supply of breastmilk, mt
| In addition, ‘Ovaltine’ helps to maintain the strength and vitality of
the mother during the nursing periods =

@
Ovaltine
Helps Mothers to Breast-Feed their Babies.

and Stoves.
~

P.C.295













a
POLS?

Me Ram,

AA

tan Anne ae

PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS Sa A

Gees = saa


Wednesday, May 2,

Ce

Housing Authority

EN April 1942 the then Governor appoint-
ed a Committee under the Chairmanship
of the Colonial Secretary, Mr. R. C. Stan-
ley, to enquife into the condition of hous-
ing in this island and to make recommenda-
That Committee penned a most
valuable report which was well received
in this island and which was reputed to
have had the backing of the Colonial Office

tions.

at the time.

During the nine
the

is still

terms of Report
Barbados
ing Programme

one.

agent of the Government

neGessary powers to carry out a programme
consistent with the needs of the island.

There are conditions existing in some
districts which make them unsuitable for
tenantry purposes; there are houses in cer-
tain districts which in the general interest
of public health and safety*should be de-

. : ‘ ; themselves happily under the
molished and in certain areas, especially Giet cas. Ina beowiy soem
business sections, there are buildings | taller, sturdier and happier.

which should be set back or re-sited in

order-that-the public might

advantage from the use of the space,

None of these things can be done by the
Housing Board with its limited authority.

The attitude of the Government towards
the present department for administering
Loans under the Welfare
Fund seems to indicate an indifference
which is harmful. That department was set
up with an initial fund of $400,000 and is
now operating capital in the vicinity of
$750,000, It was first housed in the science
room of Harrison College at the entrance |
of Queen’s Park. Within the last. two weeks |
tenders called for office space for that
It will now be housed in a
The people from the
country districts who will make use of that
fund will now find it in Waldron Street,

the Housing

Department.
less known district.

near Magazine Lane.

This Department has during its short
period of existence, financed the repair or
reconstruction of about 1,200 houses over
the island which in effect means that about
six. thousand people have benefited from
But the im-
portance of this department eannot be
gauged merely from the numbers served

the work of this department.

by the loans.

The lack of a proper Housing Authority
such as was recommended in the Report of
the Stanley Committee can no longer be
overlooked. It was recently admitted in the
House of Assembly that the present Hous-
ing Board can only act as an agent of the
Government and could not carry out those
functions which~ would fall within the
scope of the Housing Authority,

Housing in Barbados is an essential and
everything in connection with it should
be the first concern of the Government. It
is not in the interest of the Housing Depart-
ment that itsshould be moved at irregular
intervals from place to place. A permanent

“place for this department and the creation
‘of a Housing Authority should be among

the first steps in a proper
gramme.

Meat

A Paragraph appearing in this news-
paper yesterday stated that the price of
beef which is scheduled at 36 cents was
now 42 cents in the public market and that
the butchers had adopted a take it or leave

it attitude.

This question of the price and supply of
fresh meat has been the causé of some
public concern during the last two weeks.
Negotiations between the butchers and the
Controller of Supplies failed because of the
obstinacy of the butchers who refused to

attend the meeting to settle

Now the public must be content with
the price fixed arbitrarily by the butchers
and pay or do without fresh meat.

This is not good for law and order and
the Government ought to intervene and
enforce the schedule or amend it.

» ADVOGATE
SSS Foca

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown





Christophe’s Citadel {Munir

The pilgrimage to the Citadel.
built by King Christophe in the
turbulent early 1800's is required
of all who visit Haiti and wish
not to be thought disrespectful of
the nation’s chief monument, The
tourist may set out light-heartedly
but the experience of the visit is
rearly always dramatic. Certainly
ic was so in my case.

I chose to make the journey to
Cap Haitien, chief town near the
Citadel, by road fromm Port-au-
Prince, a 6-hour journey. It was
interesting to see how the popu-
lation atmosphere changed with
the agricultural features of the
land. From Port-au-Prince to St,
Mare, the road passes through arid
end semi-arid country with sisal
the prominent culture, and cactus
and prickly bushes laden with dust
as the endless wild feature. In
this area the people reflect the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By T. E. SEALY
Editor of The Daily Gleaner

per cent. of the population, but
were Baptists,

After the farmer’s son had cut
down for us some water coconuts,
the climb was resumed towards
this mysterious Citadel of which
so far we had not even caught a
glimpse.

The muletrack now being
widened into a jeep road, winds
endlessly upwards and as we
climbed gangs of workers passed
or overtook us on their way to or
from the Citadel upon which
restoration work is now being
done for the first time in over 100
years, I was interested to see a
cooking going on for road work-
ers, and herrings put to boil for
the soup into which later on would
be added yams and plantains for

years which have
elapsed nothing was done to implement the

without a Hous-
satisfactory to any-
No Housing Authority has been
appointed and as a result a Board selected
by the Governor continues to act as an

hardship of their existence. a real one-pot meal.

But after the Artibonite plain _ Meanwhile, the view widened
has been passed where rice fields #5 the altitude increased, and the
begin to show a change in the 5¢ene became truly grand and im-
countryside, beautiful mountain Pressive with the Atlantic Ocean
country opens up with the Puil- endless to the north and the great
boreau climb into country very Plain in which nestled these
much like the hills of Jamaica or ee seeming to get vaster
Grenada where the disappearance 274 vaster.
of coffee has left naked erosion The sound of weird singing in-
ae where vegetable crops form creased as we climbed and then
the main cultivation. we burst upon them, a y of

On the other side, as the road S0me 2) men 30 women doing
winds down to the north coast of ee ae This was no mystic
Haiti and the Atlantic Ocean, jose ut a Be , down.to-earth
pleasant ribbons of village run formers a _Which in Ja-
alongside the road which paral- aea We Cay 8 digging, It was
Jels for many miles delightful â„¢ore than a digging, however, for
streams which give verdure to the 4), ve Oe oh were preparing
scene and glimpses of Haitian © Sroun or planting peas, the

washer-women busy at their tasks Sanat aera devices 3
on the river stones or washing members, ramming them into the

and _ today

without the

ARTIE’S HEADLINE
OD ee

As the car speeds seaward along
the north coast, the great north
plain—one of Haiti’s wealthiest
assets—reveals itself. Thus ,is
reached Cap Haitien, the great
seat of the north over which once
ruled that great ex-slave Henri
Christophe who, born in the Brit-
ish island of St, Christopher, rose
tc be one of the great liberating
soldiers of his people and king of
north Haiti,

From the Cape, the Citadel is
reached by a short motor journey
to Milot, from whose police de-
tachment, riding and pack animals
were outfitted for the 5-mile moun-
tain climb to the Citadel.

get the best

As my 210-lbs. were strenuously
hoisted along the winding track
by a small and wiry mule, there
was little to show that I was not



in Jamaica ‘in our own mountains
clothed with mixed forest growth
—with mango, breadfruit and the
like, with yam fields here and
there, sweet potato plots, the litle
peasants’ houses stuck perilously
on the edges of the mountain-side,

There too, were wild garden
cgg—the leaves of which I am
told, are used as a tobacco sub-
stitute — soursop trees, bananas
and plantains, everything as it
would have been in Jamaica, Gren-
ada, or Barbados, so far as nature
was concerned,

The sun beat mercilessly down
upon us and we were forced to
call a half-way halt for the animals
—mine lathered with sweat by
now. We rested under a (great
mahogany tree below which nes-
tled a better-off peasant’s cottage
and outbuildings.

Here in a simple but clean cot-
tage of two bedrooms lived a
family, a farmer, his wife and four
children. The sitting room was
rustic but obviously they enter-
tained somewhat because_ there
were 14 small chairs in the sitting
room, many of them covered with
brightly coloured home - made
cushions, a refinement in contrast
to the rough-sawn lumber stored
on the cross beams overhead,

On a tree outside twelve feet
above the ground were, great
bundles of corn hung up for dry..
ing. The ubiquitous peasant’s pig
grunted around the yard with
numerous chickens, It was appar-
ently a progressive family and
they proudly told me that they

ground and building the frame-
work around which the owner
with his family would eventually
put mud and wattle walls.

The coumbite is a common fea-
ture in Haitian rural life, because
the small farmer’s economy can-
not afford cash wages. Food in
great quantity and clarin or tafia
—two local grades of white rum
made in small peasant’s rum stills
all over the Republic—were the
wages and the enjoyment of these
men and women as_ they toiled
together .

The sound of their singing
cheered us on and then grew
fainter and fainter as we left

them behind and below, When
we had journeyed on the trail
for about another hour and the
climb was beginning to take its
toll in weariness we _ suddenly
burst dramatically round a corner
which revealed frowning mas-
sively upon us on a higher hill
beyond a gap the Citadel itself.

Its great frontal mass seemed
like some great petrified ship left
high on the mountain peak and
its battlements. bulged behind
menacingly on cither side, That
first sight is as impressive an
experience ag one could wish and
as the end of the trail grew near-
er and neerer, the massiveness
of the stone ciiadel took on sin-
ister detail,

The aura cf -aystcry and omen
which the. history of those days
has left alike upon the structure
and upon all these who have
read about the horrible stresses
in Haiti at

were not Roman Catholics like 99 of revolutionary life





housing pro-



Murderous

_ VIENNA

Feel like murder? Blame it on
the weather.

In parts of Austria, Germany
and Italy the “fohn” season is
coming, and from past experience
the homicide rate will rise with
the temperature.

The “fohn” is a gentle sduth-
ern wind that blows in from Italy,
climbs the Alps and ranges the
valleys. It brings springlike
warmth and wreaks havoc on the
nervous system.

Austria usually is hardest hit.
When the weatherman ye the
“fohn” is coming it sets of a five-
bell alarm,

When a forerunner of the wind
struck Vienna in March five per-
sons attempted to commit suicide

By ERIC WAHA

A teenage girl drank poison
because of a love affair anda
second girl took an overdose of
sleeping pills for the same rea-
son. Both were considered the
“cool” type. Both died.

Fifth victim was a 35-year-old
locksmith who started to explain
in a letter why he opened the
gus jets, Apparently fumbling
for the reasons he took too much
time and the letter never was

finished .
Dr. Herbert Reisner, chief
doctor of the ‘“Rosenhuegel”

asylum in Vienna said the “fohn”
attacks the vascular system which
in turn affects the nervous sys-

the start of the 19th century,
gathers about us like a shroud.

There are citadelz in Europe
greater than” Christophe’s. The
architecture follows the engineer-
ing experience of medieval war-
lords who had to. build against
fierce enemies, But»the Citadel is
a unique experience because the
man who built it was born a
slave and was one of the men
who led an insurrection of his
pecple—slavesfrom all parts of
Africa—in successful rebellion
against the power of Napoleon’s
troops. ps

Yellow fever, no doubt, was
their greatest aid, but nothing
can take away the glory and thc
spirit of those revolutionary year
which made Christophe the firs’
Negro king of the Americas anc
led him in symbolism to buile
this mammoth Citadel as a land-
mark for his people even thoug!
as an instrument of war it neve:
served its purpose.

On top of»the Citadel as you
stand on the walls seven anc
eight feet thick at the top, onl)
those of the strongest nerve can
risk to look boldly outwards at
the scene. I for my part prefer
red to lie flat on my stomach anc
peer gingerly over the brink t
the great vast plain below, a dro)
of certainly well over 1,000 feet

As TI lay ‘ite still 1 drank i
the scene, the sounds of Haiti
the voodoo drums practising ir
the remote distance for the cere
monies of the Saturday night an
the singing of the coumbite stil’
wafted up, a choir and its aceom-
paniment. ea many miles apar
and both them miles awa;
from me. The sounds came to me
eerily on this monstrous for:
symbolising the whole yesterda)
of Haiti, its terrors and its tri-
umphg, its passions and the warn:
humanity of fts toiling and neg-
lected masses.

And then my reverie was bro-
ken as the guide told the story
of the prisonet who, weary of hi:
dungeon, had begged Christophe
that he be allowed to jump from
the parapet to the valley below
and thus end his own sorrows.
And jump he did byvChristophe’:
decree. =

Soldiers found him below not
dead, but alive. His fall had
been miraculously broken by ¢
clump of treég, his life spared in
a manner so Yhiraculous that ever
hardened Chifstophe relented anc
gave the man his freedom.

And then they told the other
story of Christophe drilling some
of his garrison on one of the
higher parapets as a display for
a British Admiral. The men
marched along in fours absolutely
obedient to Chri-tophe’s com-
mands, And then as they marched
along the parapet Christophe’s at-
tention was momentarily distracted
in conversation with the Admiral,
and the men found themselves
marching to the end of the para-
pet.

So ruthlessly disciplined were
they that on they went and the
foremost ranks marched to death
over the edgé.” ‘Until Christophe’s
attention regained, the order was
given to halt, none would cease
the onward march.

The chief pride of the Haitian,
in the Citadel is the genius by,
which hundreds of massive can-|
non were taken up to this moun- |
tain top fortress, It is said that
oftentimes gangs of prisoners and
workers would find it difficult to
get a gun over a_ particularly
steep bit of mountain, Christophe
would order some of them shot
and then the rest would finish
the job.

A tale is told against the Am-
ericans—whom the Haitians de-
light to ridicWle—that during the}
ovcuipation they wished to take
away some of the cannon from
the fortress as souvenirs, but
could not get. them down the
mountain, Truly there are one
or two left abandoned on the
mountain roa@, a sly jest against
the Americans, whose: engineering
_skiil, they say, could not bring
down what Christophe had taken
up.



Weather

People already suffering from
diseases of the nerves show a
pronounced deterioration .

“In my hospital, for instance,
I do not have to know _ the
weather forecast to know there)
is a “fohn.” I see it from the con-
dition of my patients.”

In some cases, the effect is so
strong that capital crimes are
committed and suicides are at-
tempted.

Dr, Reisner said there is nc
drug or “sure remedy” for the
“fohn”. Only ‘self-control and, ir.
hospitals, of careful watching oi
patients, can be of help.

Austrian Justice Ministry offi-
cials said that while there is no
general ordinance to provide for
milder sentences for a crime com.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,

AUTOGRA

SCRAPS & SNAP

ALBUMS

at
Advocate Stationery

paansa SCOGP

1951







Heat Experiment j
Successful |

DARRELL GARWOOD) ,

WASHINGTON.

A secret U.S. experiment successfully con-
taining multi-million degree temperatures in
a vacuum chamber was reported to confirm
Argentina’s announcement that sun-like heat
can be created on earth.

One government scientist said the tem-
perature was achieved in an extremely small
quantity of material, and that whether the
energy process of the stars can be started
is still a big question mark.

The scientist said that the principle of the
experiment was a “small sun” suspended by
magnetic attraction in the midst of a vacuum
while atomic-speeding machines fired large
numbers of high speed particles into it to
raise its temperature.

He pointed out that all metals melt under
a few thousand degrees and that millions of
degrees would have been impossible except
that a vacuum does not conduct heat.

In another interview Dr. Hans A. Bethe,
Cornell University’s widely known atomic
authority, said that there is a secret way to
get multi-million degree temperatures that
conceivably could start a sun-like reaction.

An example of a process that may be em-
ployed is provided by the stars called Red
Giants; which operate it at temperatures of
2,000,000 degrees Fahrenheit compared to
38,000,000 degrees for the sun, and which
get their energy from lithium and hydrogen.

When lithium and hydrogen atoms can be
made to combine, the combination divides
into two helium atoms with a release cf
energy that is greater by weight than that
obtained by splitting, uranium,

The lithium-hydrogen reaction has been
obtained many times through the use of
“atom smashers.” These, however, use mag-
netic attraction to speed up particles and
offer-no hope of a chain reaction.

In the stars, the atoms get the necessary
speed from heat only. Since more heat is
produced when the reaction occurs, the pos-
sibility of a continuing chain reaction exists.

Asked whether a continuing reaction might
be established, Dr. Bethe expressed doubt,
but said :

“That is the $64 question. Until we have
made more experiments, we can’t know.”

Dr. Bethe could not elaborate on the secret)
method for getting multi-million degree tem-
peratures, so the question is unanswered as x
to the volume of material in which these
might be obtained.

In one sense, a cosmic ray or a cyclotron-
speeded particle can already be said to have
a temperature in millions of degrees, but it
is certain that a chain reaction would not
occur unless the heat was in a “critical mass
of material.”

If the temperature were obtained in any
quantity of material, it would probably have
to be contained in a vacuum chamber that
would not conduct the heat, since all metals
melt at a few thousand degrees.

Dr, Urner Liddell, chief of the Navy’s
Nuclear Physics Branch, strongly doubts
whether the heat-mass conditions of the stars
can be duplicated on a controlled basis.
Speaking of the possibility of getting the
high temperatures by firing quantities of
cyclotron-speeded particles into a vacuum
chamber, he said :

“It would be like trying to move a freight
train with a BB gun. The BB might veer

sufficient velocity, but it wouldn’t have the
weignt.” |
Dr. Bethe believes, however, that by sup-









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plying extra high temperatures—for in-
stance, a temperature of 10,000,000 degrees |
for a reaction that in the stars requires only ,
2,000,000 degrees—the lack of volume might)
be offset to a large extent.

If the chain reaction can be obtained, the,
energy can be used even though the heat is;
not being conducted in the usual way. |

High-speed particles or rays emerging
from a vacuum chamber and encountering
dense material presumably would cause
great heat in water or any other medium,





American scientists are almost unanimous in
believing that it. will be many years before
such an application could be developed.

In particular, although a Rube Goldberg
sort of heat-vacuum chamber bomb might be
imagined, they cannot foresee any military

TIME TQ *
SERVE WINE









WITH A

the first day.

tem.

mitted under the influence of the| use for

the prices A 46-year old taxi driver, left

“fohn”, judges in the areas where

the process except where a hydrogen

a note saying: “I’m tired of liv-
ing”. He strung himself up on a
tree in front of his “home. Pas-
sersby cut him down before he
succeeded.

A railroad worker, after 4
quarrel with his wife, was next
He slashed his wrists. Doctors

The 38-year-old nerve special-
ist said while the “fohn” does
not itself cause nervous disorders
it does deteriorate those diseases
that already exist, although they
need not be “advanced” cases.

Dr. Reisner said the effect is
,»oth psychic and physical. Its

the effect of the wind is felt most|€XPlosion is triggered by the heat of an
seus consider it an “extenu- | ordinary A-bomb.
ating circumstance.” , ;
In Innsbruck, in the heart of Even if Heeb Sp the thermonuclear pro-
‘the Tyrolean Alps, the wind|¢cess may lack the corapac i
brings one’ blessing. uranium of fissi r oe , een, ee
Professors at the University of n. of ssion reaction, and thus have
Innsbruck immediately call off all] reat significance only in areas where coal.



The Riviera is basking at the
moment in the watery rays of
Britain’s increased tourist allow.
ance, This increase has restored
to the South of France for the first
time’ since the war its cherished
winter season.

True, it isan austerity version
of the pre-war winter season. It
does not make much difference to
the casinos, but has made all the
difference to the languishing hotel
trade of the coast.

For the dominant economic fact
about the Riviera is that it cannot
live without the -British middle
classes. It was the British middle-
class visitor escaping regularly for
two or three months from ‘the
rigours of a British winter—the
retired Army officer or civil serv-

The Champagne Crowd Pep Up The Riviera

ant or elderly widow of independ-
ent means—who was the basis of
the Riviera’s prosperity.

For tive post-war years the
Riviera has been trying to get
along without the British middle

class. The winter season virtual-
ly disappeared, !t was replaced
by a summer invasion of French
shopkeepers and their families.

Hollywood film stars. Belgians and
Swiss intent on profiting from the
favourable exchange rate. This
enabled the large hotels to survive
—but it brought ruin to the hun-
dreds of smailer notels and pen-
sions.

Now at last the siege has been
lifted and the Riviera’s garish Ed-
wardian hotels, whose very names
recell their. English associations,

who saved him quoted the work-
er as saying: “my wife and tha
‘fohn’ are too much,”

ymptoms are
1ess,
general

insomnia,
fatigue.

increased touchi-
headaches



| @ French hotel-keep-
| ers are happy again as
t the English—with more
| frances to spend — help

them back to prosperity. |
by SAM WHITE



echo again to English voices
speaking the language which pro-
prietors, porters and waiters had
almost forgotten.

The English are back. Nowhere
in the world could their presence
be more welcome. By way of
contrast to the frugalities of tour-
ist life, there is always the bar of

the luxury hotel. Here you get
fascinating glimpses of life as ‘it
is lived by that hardy breed of
nomads, the International Set..

It is a life geographically bound
by an Empire of far-flung but
strictly limited resorts, and popu-
lated almost entirely by princes,
dukes, maharajahs and million-
aires. In this world nohody goes
to ved béfore four, or lunches
before three; bodily energy is
maintained on a staple diet of
steaks, souffles and champagne.

Gossip provides everyone with
a eGnstant occupation; hangovers
with a constant illness, boredom
with an ever present worry—the
possibility of not being recognised.
The favourite subject of conversa-

—LNS.

examinations the first sign of | oj ; pars
aaa! ive soulbily Pika oii and uranium are not available,

—LN.S.



tion is money, A typical luxury
hotel bar dialogue will deal ex-
haustively with the intricacies of
currency exchange rates and re-
marks such as, “You should try
my man, he will get you eight
to one for your Swiss frances in-
stead’ of the seven to one at the
American Express,”

Over at the casinos the faint
eathedral hush still hangs over
gaming tables, but the betting is
modest. The casinos have been
losing money steadily ever since
the war, and are only now begin-
ning to break even.

The decline in heavy-scale gam
bling is partly explained by the
post-war decline of the casinos as
an exclusive resort. It is hard to

gamble for large sums in an at-
mosphere quite as public as the
present-day Riviera casino.
Familiar faces from newspaper
front pages who wear their win-
ter sun-tan like’ a film star’s
make-up abound everywhere.

There is a mild boom in yacht
buying. Cannes harbour is crowd-
ed with yachts flying a dozen dif-
ferent flags. Cynics explain the
boom by the eagerness of some
wealthy Europeans
get-away to Tangier in the event
of a war
of a liner-like size and luxury and

fly the flags of South American |
republics i
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED rR
—LES. |)

to ensure a;

Many of the yachts are |

me in this way could create steam and elec-| : 7 o ss
ricity.
Despite the Argentine | At *s MA VY DA Y fl

|

DELIGHTFUL
ROAST

Gold Braid Rum
Top Notch Rum
Vielle Curé

Curaco

Creme de Menthe,’
Benedictine



WINES €& iiQUEURS
Sandeman’s Sherry
Sandeman’s Port
Dry Sack Sherry . ..
Bristol Cream Sherry
Prunier Brandy

THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS

Anchor Butter Dani.

u sh Chee: r
Anchor Rich Milk Powder Carr’s Freshers
Sustralion Cooking Butter Carr’s Tea Biscuits
eae Houten’s Cocoa Tea time Pastes in Jars—
Petr ne Cocoa Essenée | ; 15c. each.
Scams tence Roll | Cook’s Paste—6c, each

nter’s Nuts | Chocolate Cunch Biscuits—

Dutch Cheese 10c, each

QUALITY MEATS

Beef, Lamb, Veal, Chi ; ro? ;
Tveie Aebhes hickens Frozen Fillet Sole

Frozen Cod Fillets

FRESH VEGETABLES

Carrots, Cabbage,
Beets, Tomatoes

Phone GODDARDS

WE DELIVER

& POULTRY |



WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,

To Tour

1951



C.J. Approves W.I. Team

Australia

S'’R ALLAN COLLYMORE, President of the Barba-
dos Cricket Association, told the Advocate yesterday that
he thought the West Indies team to tour Australia later

in the year was a very good one.

He thought that the

Selectors had done as good a job as anyone co(!ld have

hoped for.

A number of other cricketers interviewed yesterday

also expressed sat ‘sfaction

Policemen
Open Shops

Al Central Station

HE POLICEMEN at the Central

Police Station now have

tneir own barber shop. This was

opened this week and an experi-

enced barber is doing the hair
cutting,

A restaurant which will serve
hot méals, will be opened at the
Central Police Station, shortly.
Cocnstabies who come in when on
duty will be able to purchase hot
meals.

During the&yeek a shoemaker’s
shop and tailors department were
also opened.

EN BOYS from each of the

Boys’ Clubs in the island. will

be attending the Empire Youth

Sanday service at Government
House on Sunday at 4.30 p.m.

They’ will carry banners bear-
ing the names of their various
clubs,

N MAY 8 the Mounted Police
will give the Mouisical Ride
and members of the Police Band
will beat the Retreat at District
“A” Police Station for members of
the Caribbean Commission who
will be in the island.
dig BRITISH COUNCIL Friday
evening film shows for the
public will be discontinued for
some weeks.
HE QUARTERLY Service of
Song of the Salvation Army
will be held in the Reed Street
Hall on Thursday at 8.00 p.m.

The Songster Brigades, Young
People’s Singing Companies and
Youth Groups of the two City
Corps will ‘take part.

On Friday, May 4, the Salyation
Army will be holding its Annual
Tag Day and it is expected that
the public will give generously
to the taggers. i

S A RESULT of motorists co-
“ operating with the Police by
rot parking their vehicles along
Bay Street during the rush hours
—3.30 to 4.30 p.m.—traffic is able
to flow more freely and congestion
reduced,

Col. R. T. Michelin told the
Advocate that one car parked in
this narrow street during the peak
period can cause a great deal of
dislocation in the flow of traffic.

LARGE CROWD turned out

at the York Barbell Club,
Black Rock, on Sunday when a
series of “try-outs” on the Olym-
pic lifts by the weightlifting mem-—
bers of the Club, took place.

This was in preparation for the
forthcoming Inter-—Club Cham-
pionships which will be held by
the Amateur Weightlifting Asso-
ciation at Queen’s Park, next
month,

The results were as follows:—

S. Rudder: Press 157, Snatch
172, Clean and Jerk 217, Total 546,

H. Stoddard: Press 172. Snatch
1594, Clean and jerk 204%. Total
536 Ibs.

U. Bartlett: Press 162, Snatch
159}, Clean and jerk 192. Total
513% lbs.

Officials: Referee J. Bullen.
Judges A. Walcott and C. Welch.



Waterfront Crane

Removed

ANOTHER ‘crane is going up on
the waterfront of the inner basin
of the Careenage. It is Messrs,
Piantations Ltd.'s crane which
tthhey removed from the berth of
the Careenage opposite the Spirit
Bond,

The crane’s new berth is just a
few yards to the east of the
vacuum pan molassés berth, The
erane will be used chiefly for
loading lighters with puncheons of
molasses. The trunk is already in
place.

While this new crane is being
erected, an. old crane opposite
Messrs. S. P. Musson is _ being
removed. The crane owned by
Messrs H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.,
was out of commission for years.
Its 2-foot platform was being dug
down yesterday and in a few days,
the spot will be level again,

The old crane is being removed
because its owners agreed with
the Port Enquiry Committee that
it was just a hindrance on the
waterfront. With the crane re-
moved, more space will be avail-
able for schooners and motor ves-
sels to discharge their cargoes.

Music Exam Results

Other results of the Practical
Examination of the Royal Schools
of Music, taken by Mr. H. Wilson
are:—

Pupil of Miss L. Taylor

M. Bayley, Grade V. P.
P. M. Bayley, Grade IV. M.
A. P. Bancroft, Grade I. P.
F. M. Best, Grade IV. M.
C. P. Spencer, Grade II. M.
P. C. Goddard, Grade I. P.
M. D. Gibbs, Grade V. P.
B. L. Goddard, Grade III. P.
G. I. Gibbs, Grade V. M.
Mrs. M. P. Cobham, A.T.C.S.
J. A. Skinner, Grade I. P.

Pupils of Miss M. Griffith.
B. W. Chandler. Grade IV. P.
Cc. J. Smith, Grade IV. M.
(Violin) .
J. Greaves, Grade V. P.
R. E. C. Moe, Grade V. P.

89° IN THE SHADE

Bridgetown had a hot day yes-



terday. The barometer read 89°
in the shade. When the heat was
getting very oppressive near 1
rm.m. a sudden downpour of rain
fell for about five minutes. The
city workers were glad for thi
eooling rain especially after that
the heat started to grow less.



with the. selection of the team.
-! Sir Allan said

that he was
pleased to see the number of all-
rounders in’the team, since the
inclusion of all-rounders was an
important factor,

He hoped that the team would
pull together with good team
spirit on and off the fleld-and fel
that it should give a good account
of itself as did the last West
Indies’ team in England,

Mr. G. H. Adams, ex-Inter-
colonial player and a _ former
Captain of the Spartan Cricket
Club, said that the team on the

whole was good enough to’ beat
Australia, given a fair share of
the luck,

He was not prepared to criti-

cise the selection and did not sec
any possible alternative to
Guillen, the only choice about
Which there seemed to be public
controversy.

Guillen’s Selection

He said that he had _ sufficient
faith in the _ selectors, more
especially in John Goddard, to
say that if Guillen’s selection

was the result of their considered
opinion and not of a compromise,
then he thought it was a good
one. s

Sir ALLAN COLLYMORE

Mr. E. A. V. Williams said
that the team was a strong one
and should bring back the ashes.

He however felt that either
Legall or Binns. should have
been chosen in preference’ to
Guillen.

He thought that Atkinson was
very fortunate to have gained

selection, but added that he was
a good cricketer and he wished
him well.

Mr, A. M. Taylor said that the
team was a good one, and the
best ‘that the Selectors could
haye. possibly picked. There
were no surprise selections and
with good conditions, the team
should do well in Australia,

Mr. C. G. Alleyne said that the
team was a well balanced one.
It was popular opinion that fast
bowlers were very successful in
Australia and one might have
thought that one of the young-
sters like Goodridge of Jamaica
or Frank King of Trinidad might
have been tried.

No doubt he said, that the
Selectors had included Atkinson
instead to assist the fast men as
they felt that from the experience
gained by him on the India tour,
he. could be more beneficial to
the West Indies than any of the
untried or inexperienced fast
bowlers.

Stronger Batting

He was looking forward to the
West Indies putting up a good
showing in Australia as they had
a powerful batting side whigh he

felt was even. stronger than
Australia’s. \ ;

Mr. A. O’N. Skinner said that
he thought the Selectors , had

first class job as he was
{0% ta agreement with their
selection. He did not see how
any possible change could have
been made in_ the personnel of
the _ team. He said that it
appeared to him as_ if the Seg c-
tors had chosen Guillen as the
seventeenth man in the team.

Mr. W. F. Hoyos said that the

team was a good selection. The
only su: prise was Guillen whom
he considered very lucky. He
regretted that places could not be
found for Legafl nor Ganteaume,
although he. could not say at
whose expense as the team was °
fairly well balanced one.

———

Frozen Meat Comes

MEAT was. plentiful in Bridge-
town yesterday. Beef, mutton,
veal, poultry—in all sorts of cuts
—were throWn, ashore on the
wharf by. lighter after lighter.

The supply of refrigerated meat
had ‘jast arrived from Australia
by the steamship Toagarire.

Housewives, who are now get-
ting over the recent butchers’
strike in the City market while
they are being asked to pay, more
per pound for beef, welconjed the
arrival of the Montreal-Australia-
New Zealand Liner.

The refrigefated cargo was
loaded at Brisbane and Melbourne.
It included ox crop beef, tongues,
loins, rumps and livers, boneless
beef, frozen chickens, briskets and
fillets, sundries, rashers. There was
also canned and potted meat,
sausages, soups, sweet corn,
orange juice, ‘canned pears and
peaches, bacon, liquid egg and
milk products,

The Tongariro also landed here
1,092 packages of tinned and 200
cises of cooking butter along with
66 begs of Pat butter, 96 packages
of hams, 1,746 cases and cartons
of cheese.

From Melbourne, she brought
1,268 jute bags and from Adelaide,
50 cartons cf merchandise. She
arrived here via Port-of-Spain,
from” which port she brought 38

tierces of oranges for local fruit
sellers

The Tongariro’s agents are
Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd





Stalin Takes
Salute
At May Day Parade

LONDON, May 1,

Marshal “Stalin headed a
ph@lanx-cf Soviet Government
leaders on the saluting base
of Moscow’s Red Square to-
day for the traditional Soviet
May Day parade past Lenin’s
tomb.

While massed bands played,
Marshal Alexander Vassilev-
sky, Army Minister, inspected
troops lined up in the square
adjoining the Red Square, ac-
cording to Moscow Radio.

Then he returned to the Red
Square and mounted the rostrum
of the tomb for his address

The Square was splashed with
flags, emblems, giant pcrtraits of
Lenin and Stalin and political
slogans,

Government buildings, factories
streets and houses were decorated
with bright coloured slogans,
banners and’ parlands of green,

Vassilevsky accused “¢ apitalist
countries” of making pteparations
for a new war.

_ “For American monopolists war
is necessary for the enslavement
of other countries”, he declared,

“It is for this reason that they

have rejected Soviet proposals tor
the reduction of armaments.
_ “American monopolists are wag-
ing an expansionist war against
the Korean people. This unjust
war will bring the American
people nothing good. They will
not be held by clumsy manoeuvres
by which they try to disguise
Ineir setbacks in Korea,”

_ Peace Wanted

Vassilevsky said: “The people
do not want war. In all countries
the ranks of fighters for peace
against forces of aggression are
growing daily,

“The Soviet . Union’s policy is
clear, Our Government has always
pursued and will continue to
pursue a policy of preventing war
und safeguarding peace.”

He began his speech by claim.
ing that the Russian people had
successfully fulfilled their post-war
Five Year Plan. Most important
tasks had been “considerably over-
fulfilled,

“The economy of our country is
at a new high level”, he deciared.
“All branches of our industry are
developing rapidly.”

“Invited guests” from several
foreign countries were on the
reviewing stand, including France,
Italy, Germany, Holland, Sweden,
Finland, Denmark, Austria,
Canada, Iceland, Britain, America,
China and Korea,

They were described as “repre-
sentatives of the working people,”
i Members of the Diplomatic
Corps and Military Attaches were
also present,

A small girl climbed on to the
rostrum and handed Stalin a big
bouquet of flowers. He lifted her
up in his arms and waved to the
crowd,

Reute’ reports from other
centres describing May Day cele-
brations said; 3

Reds Arrested

Damascus: Police arrested ten
Communists in Damascus after a
clash on the eve of May Day in
which three people were injuredt

Authorities took —

u Special pre-
cautions for today, Three were
injured when police broke u p

group Communists who were dis-
tributing maps outside last night.
Rome: Millions of Italian work-
ers today marched through cities
and villages to celebrate May
Day bringing the country’s
normal life to a virtual standstill,

Factories, offices, shops and
schools were closed. Cities were
without public transport.

ong processions of work-
ers carrying red flags ¢on-
veged on the 1,900-year—old
‘Colosseum, the world’s largest
amphitheatre for a mass meeting
onganised by the Communist-led
General Confederation of Labour,

Followers of the rival Christian
Democrat Labour Organisation
marched to a big theatre for
a separate rally. Later they dis-
tributed free meals to unemploy-
ed workers and pensioners,

Walter Reuther, European
representative of the United
States Congress of Industrial
Organizations, told a May Day
parade union rally here that
Berlin workers had shown the
world that the answer to the
Cominform was not sterile anti-
Commiinism, but determination to
make democracy work.

Aggression

In a fighting speech
the most effective
“Stalinist aggression” lay in the
determination of free men
everywhere to make democracy
work by translating democratic
idealism into a practical and
positive programme of _ social
and economic action.”

“Millions of free Trade Union-
ists in America stand by your
side. They will never forget
your devotion to freedom and
will never abandon interest in
your fight.

If necessary, we are determined
to give added weight to this
pledge by common trade union
action together with you against
threats from extreme right and

he said
counter to

phoney left who would seek to
deny us social and economic
justice and our’ personal free-
dom.”

Prague; President Klement Gott-
wald told a May Day meeting
here today that “exposure and
liquidation” of former Foreign

Minister Vladimir Clementis had
frustrated western hopes _ that
“subversion” would succeed in
Czechoslovakia, a Czech news
agency reported.

President Gottwald coupled
the former Foreign Minister with
Marie Overmova and Otto Sling,
two former highly placed Com-
munists who have been denounc
ed as “traitors and plotters” with
Clementis.

The Czechoslovak President-de-
sciibed the elimination of “this
gang” as a “great contribution

to the consolidation and strength-
ening of our state and the cause
of
Londor:
rhillion
Mao

world peace
Three

Chinese

Tse Tung

- quarters of a

marched past
in Peking’s

ever May Day parade,
to Peking radio.

of te people

t



BARBADOS

S.A.

CRICKETERS



ADVOCATE

IN EN



AND

80 cricket team arrived

present tour. They were greeted by well known English players.
Cuan Neil McCarthy is here seen holding the Masco’







t of the team.



ALOES WAS THRIVING
BARBADOS INDUSTRY

ALOES was once a thriving industry in Barbados,
From 1843 to 1902 the island exported £63,164 worth of
aloes. Planters do not cultivate it now as they claim they

cannot grow it profitably.
apnea ates niesPoer

Virtuoso At 8

“Father” Lashley walked
around beaming yesterday
at the musical instruments
and fittings department up-
stairs Harrison’s when his 8.
year-old son Egbert Lashley
played by air quite a few
popular piano pieces and
attracted a large number of
onlookers.

Little Egbert’s talent was
discovered some weeks ago
by Mr. Maurice Jones of the
Globe Theatre and he was
made to play some pieces
before an audience at that
theatre.

Yesterday he was just
doing as his smiling father
told him, now saying “Play
them a jazz,” and then, “A
faster piece”. The boy was
not troubled by the onlpok-,,
ers, but just played in a
naive way.

It happened that violinist
William Clairmonte was
around at the same time and
he gave him a present of a
book from the book ‘store
above. The young pianist
picked, “Adventure story for
boys.”



Larceny Case
Adjourned

Further hearing in the case in
which Elsie Hutson, a maid of
Goodland, St. Michael, is charged
by the Police with the larteny
from the Governor-in-—Execttive
Committee of articles valued at
5/9 on April 20 was further ad-
journed by a Police Magistrate of
District “A”, until May 10.

The Police are also bringing
cases of larceny from the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
against Millicent Belgrave of
Hindsbury Road, Emily Sealy of

Greaves End, Black Rock, Ernesta
Gittens of Browne’s Land, St
Michael, Florence Ward of

Alleyne’s Land, St. Michael, and
Bessy Nicholls of Belfield Land,
St. Michael. :

Mr. E. W. Barrow is appearing
on behalf of Hutson, while Mr.
W. W. Reece, K.C., is prosecuting
for the Police. On the first day of
hearing, Cpl. Watson gave evi-
dence of how he searched Hutson’s
basket while she was leaving the
Mental Hospital going home on
April 20 about 5.55 p.m, He told
the court that he found many
goods in the basket which were
wrapped in brown paper. These
goods the defendant said she had
got from the place where she
worked in the Mental, Hospital.

Richard Rock, as neat wate
eeper, gave evidence for re
Seatociiiad and said that he saw
when the defendant was called
into his office by Cpl. Watson and
her baskets searched.

. /
Fined 60’-
Charles Bruce Farley of Orange
Hill, St. James, was ordered. tc
pay a fine of 20/— by a Distrie
“A” Police Magistrate for failing
to produce his driving licence
when asked to do so, 4
In another case brought by the
Police Charging him with not pay-
ing attention to road signs he war
fined 40/_ to be paid in 28 days
or in default two months’ im-
prisonment. Both offences were
committed on March 7.

DID NOT STOP: FINED 10’-

A District “A” Police Magis-
trate yesterday fined Clayton
Willoughby, a tanourer of Baynes
Gap, Spooner'’s Hill, 10/— for not
stopping at a major road while he
was riding the bicycle M-3864 on
March 6.

abreast was six mi'es long.

The city was ablaze with colour
and crowds danced in the streets.
Formosa; Generalissimo Chiang
Kai-shek urged a May Day mass
meeting of workers here to help









liberate Chinese mainland work
ers from “Communist | slavery.”
Twenty thousand people greet-

ed him with shouts of “long live}
|

the Ptesident.”

A procession over a mile

iong |

I ied past his home —Reuter, .

Writing in the West Indian
Bulletin of 1902, Mr, William G,
Freeman, Scientific Assistant, Im-
perial Department of Agriculture
for the West Indies, said that one
of the reasons for the decline in
the industry was the crude pro.
cess of manufacture, At that time
the Dutch West Indies used to
supply sufficient to flood the mar-
ket. This too helped to prevent
the industry from being revived
here,

The Director of Agriculture Mr,
©. C. Skeete, told the Advocate
yesterday that the aloes industry
is not as big im the Dutch Wes:
Indies now either. That may be
due to a lesser demand for the
juice.

Aloes juice is used in medicine
as a purgative and in small doses
as a tonic. It is used for fever,
spleen, liver troubles and for eye
diseases.

Aloes used to be grown chiefly

on an extensive tract of waste,| place.

rocky land on the Windward
coast of St. John and St. Philip
in particular. They are specially
adapted for growth in poor soils

Hardy Plant

It is so hardy that no great
amount of protection needs to be
taken except that it begins to

grow best in dry weather as there

is the possibility of its rotting
when it is young and gets tov
much water,

Mr, Freeman quoted Ligon to
describe the plant when he said,
“The leaves are four inches
broad, three quarter inch thick

and one and a half feet long with
prickles on either side, and the
last sprout which rises up in the
middle bears yellow flowers one
above another.”

“The Barbadian aloes is said to
have been first known in London
warehouses in 1693,

“Their fleshy leaves contain
large sources of water in reserve
for periods of prolonged drought.

“If kept in good order and
weeded, the first crop can be
gathered in a year’s time. They
are cut about six inches above
the base The cut leaves are
placed with leaves to one side
The juice rapidly exudes and
running down the trough is caught

in collecting vessels.”

The matter is then boiled. I!
used to be shipped away in tins
In those days, he wrote, the
cost of the cultivation of the

manufacture after it was planted
was $25 per acre.



£3 For Wounding

A City Police Magistrate yester-
day found 23-year-old Dorothy
Stanton, a domestic servant o!
Hall’s Road, guilty of wounding
Samuel Rayside, a labourer otf
School Gap, Hall's Road, with a
knife on April 1.

Stanton was fined £5 to be
paid by monthly instalments or
in default two months’ imprison-
ment with hard labour. Dr. O
James who treated Rayside for
the wound at the General Hospi-
tal said that the injury was no
permanent and could not be con-
sidered to be serious.



Price Inspector
Penies Rumours
Of Meat Prices

FORTY-TWO

are paying for beet but those
who are in a better financial
position purchase the same
pound of beef for two sbillings
or two shillings and sixpence
without even making a com-
plaint.

_ Captain Evans Chief Price!
Control Inspector, told the]
Advocate yesterday that the
mujovity of butchers are selling
beef at thirty-six cents :

per
pound, but this pound is made up
of skin, bones

fat and a small bit

ot lean The butchers now

refuse to sell the best cuts at 36
cents per pound

Housewives purchasing mea

may see a man drive up in hi

car and go to a butcher. Thi

man is given a choice cut of be

while the housewives look o:
with an envious eye Very fe
of them ever realise that thi
man is paying perhaps $1.20 fo:
the two pounds of beef



As far = as Captain Evan
knows, the butchers are. stil
Sticking to schedule prices He

had two Price Control Inspectors
in the Public Market on Saturday
and they did not return to bin
with one complaint of * butcher
selling beef at more than 36 cear
per pound

No Profiteering

|



SCENTS a
pound is what the poor people |

}
i
|
|
|
|



He said that mutton and vea
were always sold at the schedulec
40 cents per pound and he ha
never heard of any butche:
trying to profiteer on these The
butchers, a few weeks ago, were
selling pork below the scheduler
42 cents per pound, Only
recently a few began sellin

pork at the scheduled price
Captain Evans said that he saw
an article in yesterday's Advocate

which stated that the butcher:
slogan. was “Pay 42 cents pei
peund for it or leave it.” This

referred to beef

“It is no-use people
to the newspaper with a yarn like
this, They must go to the righi
source,” Captain Evans said

He said that at present the

butchers have a grievance, but

they have never represented i\

to the Controller of Prices, Thes

all want a better price, but they

should put up a conerete case

which can be justitied if thy

ciréumstances warrant it

He added that at present the
supply of cattle falls short of th
demand for fresh beef

Fish Prices

As regards fish, Captain Evin
said that it is impossible to track
the prices of fish under th
existing system The Govern
ment must centralise the mark«
if the fishermen are to be stop
ped from selling at black mark:
prices,

“When boats go to their variou

moorings and the fishermen tak,
the fish to the various beaches, ;
is then that they have a chance,
to sell at black market prices
Under the present conditions

lot of black marketing is takin

It would take an army «
Price Control Inspectors to trac<
these fishermen”, he said

The natural Way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

Jf you want to be attractively
slim, with bright eyes, radiant
complexion, and real fitness,
Nature demands that you keep
your system cleansed of
impurities, Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Beans
do this, gently and effectively
Bile Beans are keeping millions
healthy and youthful in looks
and figure. Start taking them
tonight.

Nature's Gentle Aid

BILE BEANS

Just a couple at Bedtime

FOUNTAIN PENS

Each 60c; $1.00; $1.08: $1.32: and $2.96

EXERCISE BOOKS

PAINT BOXES—Each 42¢:
PENCIL BOXES — Each
| CRAYONS



Cave Shepherd &

10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET





FRZEBRAwEBeReaae a

a
HEN

“PURINA”

CHOW

(Seratch Grain)
see

SH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD Distributor.

SB
SRSSEEE EPUB Beets
ee

ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY AVAILABLE

SIMMONS

CALL AND SECURE

B



(DSTEADS
YOURS QUICKLY

ALSO —

BATHROOM

Established
1860

10 & 11, Reebuck St

T. HPRBERT Lid.

TILES Coloured



Incorperated
1926

rect and Magazine Lane

ER A A

; .
running | %

Supplies are in demand again

including
with single and deuble [ino



PAGE FIVE

See





TIME-TESTED IN THE TROPICS—

O.

—

Women know it ®.
ensures a lovely skin
Ye

ro
—T
é



we ‘HAZELINE SNOW"

Stn

protects the skin from dust
and dirt ... guards against sun

cools the skin immediately
it is applied . . . so refreshing

softens and perfumes the
skin, prevents that shiny look

v

cleanses thoroughly, gently
- gives a perfect ‘matt’
| foundation for powder

The very feel of * Hazeline Snow’
upon your skin is so ice-cool, so
| refreshing! Womeneverywheretrast
\ its gentle action for preserving a
| silky skin, treating little blemishes
and avoiding that shiny look on the
hottest day, At night, too, nourish
the skin with * Hazeline* Cream,

HAZELINE SNOW’



|
/*
i
]

wo
ee A BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. PRODUCT
Sele Agente for Barbados ; Collins’ Litd., 28 Broad Street

>



WAR
AGAINS

GERMS

WITH



JEYPINE:

THE PROTECTIVE PLUS

GERMICIDE & DISINFECTANT
50% MGRE EFFECTIVE
x Deadly to Germs, Harmless to Tissue.



VSP TO

.

It’s fragrant and Hygienic

% 40c. a Bottle

y
* KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

+
R sceusbehedanbegehenthiiinneatncabeinuiensandll












SPECIFY

“EVERITE’

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

~ TURNALL’”

ASBESTOS
WOOD.






Arithmetic

Fach 10¢.

Se; $1.20; S144
60c; and 84e,
i8e; and 200



Co, Ltd.

lots of other ~
Essential items





COLPCOLPLLE TET E EEOC TEEPE OEE

ATTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining yous requirements
IN

+
-

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from %4” upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes
FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill



PPL LLL PLL LLLP LLL

$ At PRICES that cannot be repeated.

$ i

R miki ;

8 The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

$ White Park Road, St. Michael

% DIAL 4528

Tkiteeeeset GOOC0S005006608 OBO SO88 909969990 *



PAGE SIX : BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1951
esstiiasndanciti seminaries seenneaannendeneatenaeneeaaiaianiaesaitiltanite Sin a a ia telarleinseONaaanis

BY CARL ANDERSON





POND’S COLD CREADNM4 to cleanse and soften
your skin.
POND’S VANISHING CREAM |

to protect your skin by day. and to hold your |
powder matt.






POND

offer these Beaty Woducts



Ohhh that nice feeling of
pec eiazes
on chest when y'
rub on ‘casa VapoRub. It
works outside like a poultice,
“drawing out’ achy tight
ness. At the same time...

Anh} those soothing medi-
cinal vapours released by
VapoRub! They work inside
the irritated air- passages,
and clear stuffy nose, eas@
sore throat, calm coughing.
This “‘inside-outside” action
continues for hours during

sleep. Usually, by me .
the worst of the cold is over.

G:VISKS

SE TT

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

——————eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeoeoeEeoeEeoeoeo=S=SeeeeeoeooaoEoOoONoNoNEoNESEEE=-=Po—=SeOm—=—E—=2EDDE=ELELE=E=E=EEEE
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only



























\ THEY, MICKEY..COME HERE!
S iT MUSTA SNOWED OR

OW SUMP'N LAST NIGHT !
a
8 @B--
rd || \S 5

SNOW, MY FOOT! THIS 1S ’
eee: POND’S FACE POWDER: clinging,
perfumed, sceintifically blended, for
a glamorously matt complexion. POND’S LIPSTICK smooths

so easily onto your lips; the
rich vibrant colour. stays on
and on and on.

IWAS A BIG HIT N
TELEVISION YESTERDAY!
BUT T“BET EVERYONE'S
FERGOT BY , TODAY !






| Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely society women every-
\ where. Simple and inexpensive, they are all you need to keep you looking
| flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best at all times. You will find them
at all the best beauty counters.














BLONDIE
|

TATRA T \

ans
THE BOSS TOLD ME
+ TODAY THE COST OF






SOME SAY IT'S
uP AS HIGH AS











GEER PR ||NSERtae ee
; aio) 2 || ae oe Lamb Tongues, Tins 70 62 Fry's Cocoa lb. Tins 47 A2

i i 2j
Le ladies, Phos. 24 91 Condensed Milk, Tins 27 5



Heinz
ig Table Butter, Tins 92 86 Baked Beans Tins 28 24
raeecaincoamy || (OLE Ame SS ON MRR Se Bae cB Broad Street

W TRAIL!



sineeeetees iar tanec aii merrier ane Pe TE
— —— ———————







FO FOO SOOOF OE SPOPOPOSSS SOOT P OPTS SOFESOSOSPSSPSESSPPOGOOY



by MARY WINTER

ADVOCATE BEYOND THE EAGLE’S RAGE

by HUGH POPHAM

HAS THE TWO SCAMPS

by NOEL GODBER

BEST A WINDOW CLEANER’S ROMANCE

| THE AGENTS IN ARMS

oes






BRINGING UP FAT

eo 4
5 »
T HOPE M

SSS SS9S F9 SOSS GSS BOSS SSE FSS SOON,

<
POPES EOLSAPFS PS OPAPP APSA FOSS

" 2 BOOKS by GEORCE A. BIRMINGHAM
*
IN TOWN ApVOCATE STATIONERY
te: | :

“94

PSOCPSSSSO OSL POSSESS 6666665066556 005599S5440659GSS 599 G5FFIOSSOSSSTSSSIO TOG FFOT
GOCCP O POP OOL LOD OPV IS LODVOD POPP OAD PPP POP,
o

. FOR BETTER
COOKING
FLORENCE
spe OIL



Oe









RIP

Ne ; + BUTT
. whi |,
IS iD T =>
TWE COT ‘g
I Cree os

MAINLAND...
HES GOT ME
Sty weo!




BY ALEX RAYMOND
GANWHILE: THERES A DESERTED
7 DOCK AHEAD,

SOLES PEFE OSTEO





\THINR WE CAN

1M NOT AFRAID UNCLE
Ff SCARE HERS GET

WE CANT PROVE THEY PUT THAT
DAVE. DON'T WORRY: TNT IN THE CAR. COME ON, IM
LATE FOR MY TRAINING TODAY+



(VE GOT 10 SWIM THAT :
CHANNEL,NOW, agg | W)L9ON,
or BUST? A 4-9



RWI Fr CITY GARAGE TRADING CO.

BRITISH; WEST/iNDIAN FAIRWAYS, LTD. §
B.W.LA., BRIDGETOWN li vebeinsiniiiiannaaecinainn

SSO OG FFF

LOPE PPP ELLPELEE REE EL PPELPL PPP LPPBD LLLP

SLL SPOS







WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



or Engagement
arib Calling the

announcements of

between
Notices
The
Cu Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
oe and In Memoriam notices 1s
on



LOST & FOUND

—_—_ _—— —

LOST

_
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET--Series O. 1918.





ERTIFICATES KNIGHT'S LTD.
is hereby given that applica-
tion has been made to the Board of

Cameron Hawkins deteased for the issue
of a Share Certificate for two hundred
{200) Shares Nos. 18654 to 18853 inclusive,
dated 3rd May, 1921, and onc hundred
(100) Shares Nos. 27437 to 27536 inchusiye,
dated 26th February 1943, in place of the
original Ce?tificates which have been lost,
lestroyed and not deposited with any
one as security or otherwise, and notice
is hereby given that within 30 days from
the date hereof if no claim or represen-
tation in t of such original Certi-
ficates is made to the Directors they will
then proceed to deal with such applica-
tion for a Duplicate.
By order of the Board of, Directors.
: C. N. TAYLOR,
Secretary.
18.4.51—3n,

—_——_——
EDUCATIONAL

BARRISON COLLEGE ENTRY 1951

There will be a limited number of
vaeanciés in September, 1951, in the
Preparatory Department and in the Main
School. Applications for Entry must be
made on the official form available from
the Headmaster's Secretary, and must be
returned to the Headmaster, accompanied
by a Birth/Baptismal Certificate and a
Certificate of Good Conduct from the
boys’ previous school. These forms
must be returned completed before 31st
May, 1951.

If unsuccessful application was made
in a previous year a new form for 1951
must be returned, ,

The minimum age for entry is 8 years
6 months in September, 1951. Parents/
Guardians will be notified later of the
date and times of the examination, which
will be during July. 8.4.51—3n





ee
Minimum charge week 72 cents and
98 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HELP







‘Due to the opening of a new branch,
we require the following staff on or
before June Ist, 1951:—

STENO-TYPIST—experienced — com-
mencing salary $100.00 per month.

TYPIST—also with clerical experience
— commencing salary $75.00 per
month,

INVOICING. ASST.—accurate at fig-
ures — preferably with previous
experience on invoicing com-
mencing salary $90.00 per month.

Written application stating age and
previous experience to be sent to Sec-

and Trading



retary, Dowding cig oe
Company, Ltd., Bay Stree deaaiseaes
MISCELLANEOUS





WANTED TO BUY
(In tins or tubs) 12 Fishtail Palms
(Canyota) 12 Sago ray 12 Portlandia.
. Tel. 4062,
Miss Nell Manning. Geiei-as

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANT’S = "ser



-_





YOUR INSURANCE
ReeDs CONSULT

ANDREW D. SHEPPARD
Representing
Confederation Life Association
ARMSTRO!

Go ¥. B. ARM! ING LTD.,

eee Tel. 2840
_——————
= : = ——





FOR LONGER SERVICE |

T AR all posts before erecting.
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative
material still available
at your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price 40c, per gallon.
Some To-day.

Get





Just Received

FRESH STOCK
OF .

DOBIE'S
FOUR SQUARE
YELLOW & PURPLE
TOBACCO
202 & 402 ‘Kins

‘C. CARLTON BROWNE

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
Wholesale & Retail Druggist

FOR SALE

« MEDMENHAM “

PINE HILL

This highly recommended
property standing on approx.
134 acres is the “buy” of the
year at £5,500. The house
fends itself to easy conver-
sion into attractive flats and
a % acre of land at the side
could be sold off readily as
a building plot with no ap-
parent detraction from the
general amenities as it is
separated from the main
property by a stone wall.

John *4. Braden
A.F.S,, F.V.A.
Phone 4640
Plantations Building







| PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea_cents per tine on week-days

and $1.80 on Sundays.



IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES /|
IN THE MATTER OF WEST INDIAN
MILLS
NOTICE GIVEN that the
Creditors of the \ ee tess
which is being edie ti wo! up,

ere on. or amd day
July i951, being the day for that barbobd
fixed by the undersigned, tq send their

names and ages, and the eulars
St theae does bee woh Ves nantes

‘ware of

Lucas Street, Bridgetown, Ba the
Liqui of the said Com; + and,
if s® required by notice in writing

from the’ said Liquidator, are to come
in and preve their debts or claims

at such time and as shall be
woe in aon eeere or in default

they, will “be texeluded from -the
pened of wha nm made before

such debts are proved, 9 ~ i
Dated this Ist day of May 1951.
. , Hy LISLE THOMAS,
Liquidator
2.5.57—7n.



NOTICE
Re ¢
JOHN RICHARD MAHON
Deceased)

' D

NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that all}

persons having any debt 2 claim’ i
John ard

the Estate of




( ‘of, Christ
of August 1948, are hi 7
requiréd ‘to se Particulats of . their
claims duly attested to the uhdersigned
Richard. Gladstone Smith of .Dayrelis
Road, ‘Christ Ohurch, the qualified
Executor of the. Will of the Deceased
in care of Messrs. Carrington & Sealy
of Lucas Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors,
on or before the 15th day of June 1951,
after which I shall proceed to distribute
the assets of the Deceased among the
parties entitled. thereto having regird
only to such claims of which I shall
then have had notice, and that I will
not be liable for the ‘assets or any pavt
thereof $0 distributed, to any person of
whose debt or claim I shall not then
have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
Ectate are requested to settle their
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 2nd day of April, 1951.
RICHARD GLADSTONE SMITH
Qualified Executor of the Will of
John Richard Mahon, deceased. |

3.4,51—4n.

Public Official Sale

On Tuesday the 8th day of May 1951
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after-
oon .will be. sold. at my office to the
highest bidder for any sura not under
the appraised value. All that certain
piece of Land containing by estimation
2 roods situate in the Parish of St.
Michael butting and bounding on lands
of S, Thompson, on lands of C. Quin-
tyne, on lands of Friendship Plantation
and on lands of Florence W, Prescod,
near St. Matthew's Church appraised as
follows: The whole area of land apprais-
ed to Five Hundred and Sixty-eight
dollars ($568.00). Attached from said
Florence W. Prescod for and towards
Satisfaction, &c.

N.B.--25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase,
W. R. DOUGLAS,
Provost Marshal (Aicting).
Provost Marshal’s Office.
19th day of April 1951.





20.4.51—3n

Public Official Unreserved
Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904

: (1904-6) § 50)
On Tuesday ‘the 15th day of May 1951,
at the hour of 2 o’clock in the afternoon.
will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder all that certain piece of Land con-
taining by admeasurement 5,907 square
feet situcte in Parish or City of Saint
Michael butting and bounding on two
sides on lands of Barbados Co-operative
Bank Limited, on lands of Clement
Warner %ver @ road fourteen feet wide;
and on the said road calied Villa Road
at Britton Hill, together with the Chattel
dwelling-house thereon and all appur-
tenances. Attached from Walter Evans
Phillips for and towards satisfaction, &c.,
and if not sold on such da’, said sale
will be kept open and a subsequent day
will be fixed for said sale.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase,
T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal,
Provost Marshal's Office.
28.4.51—3n.

NOTICE

THE LORD OLIVER FRIENDLY
SOCIETY

All members of the above Society who
have been in the Society up to the
end of 1949, are hereby requested to
leave their 1949 Contribution Cards at
the Office of the Sentasen of Friendly

ieties, Town Hall.
eae cards will be accepted after the

a
RS ot AY TE D. T. DAVID,

« , endly Societies.
Clerk, Registrar, Fri Ai bic









West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach~-

weer, Decoration House, St
James. Tel, 91-74.
14.4.51—1m.
POOOOSSS

EPCS

Wanted For Cash

Used and Unused POSTAGE
STAMPS of the British West
Indies. Good Prices Paid at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY

No, 16, Swan Street.



|





CLES



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over
words 3 cents @ word week—4 Cents a
word Sundews



‘AUTOMOTIVE

_—_———
ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van
Guarantee if required. Extra Masonite
Flooring. Licensed and Insured Upset
Price $1,850. New one Costs $2,125 pre-
sently. Apply Courtesy Garage
2.5.51—1n
_ on
CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer
refused. Apply to W. M. Watson C/o
R. & G. Challenor, Speightstown. Phone
v1—01. 15 ott

CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
tyres, in good working condition. price
reasonable. Apply F. D. L y, Staple



1.5.51—t.f.n

erage
CAR—1938 Buick 8 cyls, in sound
mechanical condition tyres
Dial 4616.
26.4.51—6n





CARS—Do you want to buy a good
secondhand chr? If so we can offer you
a 194% Hillman, done 14,000 miles and
199 Morris Oxford, done 19,000 miles
Both cars in excellent condition. Ring
4908, B’dos Agencies Ltd.

29.4.51—6n

_—_—_ ees "
WAGGON; One 1942 V-8 Ford Station

Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3506

or 3743. ; 22.4.51—t. fir

ELECTRICAL



_—_—
DEEP FREEZER — Specially designed
to serve Ice Creams, in good working

order $375.00 At Ralph A. Beard's
Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley
2.5.5.—8n.





MULLARD 11-TUBE RADIO tilt
dial, Y tiecttic Phonograph with apie
s3 all. in working order. G Lewts,

rihur Seat, St. Thomas. 2.5.51—3n

REFRIGERATOR—6 cub. ft. Marco
Fridge $200.00. Perfect working order
at alph A. Beard's Show Rooms,
Hardwood Alley 2.5.51—2n

MECHANICAL



TYPEWRITERS — Shipment of new
model “Olympia” Portable Typewriters
just received—see these superb machines
before committing yourself. A, G.
St. Hill. Dial 3199. 29.4.51—e.0.d



MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES — Of

every
Glass, China,

description,
old Jewels, fine Silver
Water-colours. Early books, Maps,
Autographs etc., at Gorringes Antique
Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht Club.

3.9.50—t.f.n.

eae
AFTER DINNER MINTS—Fresh stock
of delicious after Dinner Mints. Price
1/- per cello bag. Bruce Weatherhead

29.4.51—3n.





BRICKS—For building or garden walks



$3.00 per 100, also Fire Bricks. Apply
The Old Ice Co., Prince Wm. Henry St
1.5.51—2n





SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.
A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00
per 98 lb, bag. Dial 2628. .

. 28.4.51—Tn







STOVES—Valor single, 2, 3 and +
kerosene oil burner. Secure your. be-
fore advance in price. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4391. 26.4 51—6n

TANK—One (1) Steel Tank, capacity
400 gallons in perfect condition, Apply
Manager. Dukes, St. Thomas, Phone
4130. 28.4.51—4n.



TYRES—5 second hand 19” x 450 Tyres
and tubes in good condition $18.00 each,



Apply to H, A. Field, “Ashley”. Ith
Avenue, Belleville. 1,5.51—2n
_

TRAILER — One 4/5 ton Sugar Cane

Trailer with or without Tyres. Courtesy
Garage, Dial 4616. 1.5.51—3n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER AND REMOVAL
The application of Cecil Small, shop-
keeper of Vauxhall, Christ Church,
purchaser holder of liquor license No.
premises viz—a board and shingle shop
923 of 1951, granted to him in respect of



with shedroof attached near Wildey,
Clapham, St. Michael, for permission to
rémove the said license to a board and
shingle shop with shed attached at
Vauxhall, Christ Church, within District
“B” and to use the said license at such
lest described premises.
Dated this Ist day of May, 1951.

To: C. W. RUDDER, Esq,

Police Magistrate,

District “B"
Cc, SMALL,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at the Licensing Court to be held
on llth day of May, 1951, at 11 o'clock
a.m. at Police Courts Dist. “‘B".

Cc. W. RUDDER,
Magistrate, Dist. “B”.

police
es 2.5.51—I1n



Loo
SOTTO SOOOCOOOOOOOOOE,

DANCE
NOTICE

Invitees are reminded of
ithe Dance to be held at the
Mental Hospital on FRIDAY
NIGHT 4th May, 1945, in
aid of the Mental Hospital
Cricket Club.





/
‘

CLE CSSLESLOSSECOOOLL LLL {

MANNING & CO., LTD.

AGENTS

fll

666 OOOO OLE

POPP PSDI OLE





Trustee Investment to yield

414%
Industrial Shares to yield
614%
A. M. WEBB
Stockbroker
} 33, Broad St. (Over Phoenix
| Pharmacy)

aa eeprceseneeeeemipeere ne enee,





jena atinn estlag seneetcinatinateneneeensegrienpeseeunemmainenmemmnntis oo?



and 12 cent per agate tine oleae

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on





FOR RENT

Mintmum charge week 72 cents and





Eczemalich

minrmum crarge $1.0 week-days weer s an g-B. 4 %
c é on #2 cente.a week--4 Cente a
and $1.80 om Sundays word Sundays. Kill i i 7 Mi
REAL ESTATE HOUSES Your okin has near 50 million way
LAND — 10,60) sq. ft, situated at} APARTMENT — Cool and spacious | S®#8 and pores where germs hide
Ventror near Golf Club. Phone 8@43./ apartment at Sew View, Upper Bay St Se Boing eS oe tae
G. A, Atwell 28.4.51—3n. j On the sea, opposite Bay Mansion. Apply Ringworm Psoriasis, Blackheads,
on premises. 2.5.51—2n/ Pimples, Foot Itch and other. blem-

«t

te
Ww,
of
ni

| drive to Crane Coast.

to

Telephone,
Apply to W.
John

Ww
ye

tr

prices range from $1,000.00 to $2,090.00
per

A



wv

—_—
SUITABLE BUILDING SITE; situated
sq. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft. road. Dial

2205 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5.51—t.f.n
LAND. 8-10 acres of land guitable








Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 10,978

r building, in lots of net less than
000 sq. ft. Overiooking a large area
St. Philip and Christ Church. Mag-
ficent environment,, 15 to 20 minutes’
Walking distances
Lodge and High School. Govt. Water,
a ee

. Webster, Moncr t.
- "Phone 95-252. f :
29.4519.

LAND Only a few spots remaining at
orthing View so be sure to select
all go The spots range
12,000 sa. ft. and the

on





“rs before
om 6,000 to

spot For particulars see D'Arcy
Scott, Magazine Lane, Dial 3743.
2.5.51—3n



AUC?ION

, FIAT VAN 1947 MODEL
We are instrueted to sell this vehicie
hich has been damaged in an accident





APARTMENT for rent to approved
tenant.
hotel area, Hastings, 3 bedrooms, garage

Write P.O. Box 257.

FLATS—Two (2) Furnished Flats at
Dundee, St. Lawrence Gap, suitable for
2 only, From May Ist onward. Apply

29.4.51—2n
—

Pully furnished apartinent

27.4.51—6



Premises or Phone &240.

Apply:
st

ist June.

ishes, Ordinary treatments give only
temporary relief because they do not
kill the germ cause. The new discov-
ery, Nixoderm, kills the germs in 7
minutes and is guaranteed to give you
a soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin
“ one ween, omnes tee on are
of empty pac e. guarantee:

Nixoderm from your chemigt todayand

Nixoderm t:'%:::°

real cause
For Skin Troubles trouble.

in

in.

of akin

MILDENE-—Upper Collymore Keck. Cool
pnd airy. 3 bedrooms, Drawing and Dining
Rooms, Verandah etc.
Jemmotts Lane and Bay



Corner

2.5.81-—2n Advertise wie Pays





:
:
|

SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian Nat

ional Steamships



by Public Ayction at the Courtesy
mo at 2 p.m, on Friday, 4th May
7, JO! , Sails Arrives
a Montreal Walifax Boston -—«- Barbados Rarhados
2.5,51—3n LADY RODNEY - 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 28 Apr 24 Apr.
~er LADY RODNEY Dour etune «it Sune | soJune st June
* une 6 June 1 June une
able Et the anette | LAE NELSOK «30 June 3 July S3uly 14 July. 43 lly
sell by Public competition at the Nurses’ | LADY RO! a «+30 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 18 Aug, 4 Avg.
jome on Thursday next. ni May at! NQREmBOUND ‘Arrives Arrives Artives Arrives
Campbell. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer. Senacee Sa Boston St. John | Halifax poe
Staaten NEY ...10.May 12May 21 May = — 22 May
di ial Sa Bae ae A ee ee +» June 6June 14 June = 16 dine 19 June
By instriictions ‘1° will, ell “by | Public R i Whe 0 July 2 AN - ° Ase: p hus.
Auction t é ee y R. Ug. .
the ‘and of May at 3 octock at Bank | EADY RODNEY (126 Aug. 28 Aug — 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11 Sept.
uo Mai ‘ Ses
ay Cait Gb Tee tao Kaci N.B,—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham-

w
w

It
In-

ith out-offices. To be removed.
ill be sold to the highest bidder.

spection on application to

D

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane.

ial 3743. 27.4,$1—4n,



UNDER THE SILVER !

On Thursday 3rd, by order of Mrs,
Theresa Wright,

tu

Dining Table, Rush Arm-Chairs, Coffee oe
Table, Morris Arm-Chairs with cushions,
2 ee eae ent PB mee
; ae Vessel From Leaves Barbados
Flat Top Desk » Jamai “
Verandah Chairs, Pine Cabinet, Foi S-S. “HERDSMAN - London 12th April. 2nd May
Card Table, Glass Ware, Dinner and. T .5. “DEFENDER” +» Lond 22nd April 7th May
Services, Double and Single Iron Bed-7S.S. “PLANTER” a e {i
steads with Springs, Dunlopillo and Hair S.S. “LINGUIST” » London 3rd May 16th May -
Mattresses; Cedar Linen Press, Celatex re 4 - London 10th May 28th May
Bréseeh, Bureau, Dressing qatie and|S.S. “DALESMAN” Glasgow &
Goolerator, Larder, Ware. Press, ddBurnes Liverpool 25th April 8th May
Gas Stove (with Oven) in good order, | ~~ cneticey Fitohen Utensils, Garden Tools and other HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash, Vessel For Closes in Barbados
BRANKER, TROTMAN & O00. /\'s.s_ “STATESMAN” London 30th April
Auctioneers S.S. “SPECIALIST” Liverpool ith May ,
29,4.51-2n. | S.S. “STUDENT” London 4th May ,
7 oe ash ae Na See S : .



M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Wonderful Coun-

bers. Passenger Fares and freig

ut = =rates on applicatian to: —

—_—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.



HAMMER



















we will sell her Furni-
re at “The Bower,” Garrison,

Which includes :



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay



HARRISON LINE



STEAMSHIP CO,

sellor, Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch, Phill

H. Davidson, Sch, Lueille M, Smith, SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM

Sch. United Pilgrim S., h Wo lk M.S. “Oranjestad'’'—-10 May .1951
Bunicia, Seb. Blue Nose “Mac, Seh.{ M.S. “Bonaire’—11th May 1951.
Belqueen, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Yacht} ™.S, ‘‘Hersilia’—24th May 1951.
Maria Catharina, Sch. Mariom Belle] gait ¥ J

Wolfe, Sch, Laudalpha, Sch. Gardenia W. AMSTERDAM tee ae

M.V. Canadian Challenger, M.S. “Willemstad’’ 17th May 1951.

Robinson,

61

61
5Y

MAY 1, 1951
CANADA
4/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 59 6/10% pr.
Demand
Drafts 59.35°> pr. 5
Sight Drafts 59 2/10% pr. -
4/10% pr. Cable
9/10% pr. Currency 58% pr.
Coupons 57 3/10% pr.
> pr. Silver 20% pr

50

Antigua, St. Kitts, St. Thomas, V.I. and
New York by the S.S. Fort Amherst will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under: —

M.

2.0 p.m,







Mrs. NORMAN HOWELL,
(Registered Spencer *
Fitter 1931).
Strathclyde, St. M. 9. ¢
Tel. No, 3954. g
29.4,51—2n, %
OPO OSSOOCOSSS >
SSSSSSSOSOFSOS TO FIOTITO”

ARRIVALS
S.S. Tongariro, 5,504 tons net,
from Australia via Trinidad,



Capt. SAILING TO TRINIDAD,
" Saal Toa AND GEORGETOWN
MS.

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA,

“Hecuba"—4th May
““Monaire’—29th May

1951.
1951,

CURACAO AND JAMAICA

MAIL NOTICE

Martinique,



Mails for St, Vincent,

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
ail at 1.90 pom. and Ordinary Mail at
on the 2nd May 1961,

NOTICE |
Mr. John Hammond begs
his friends to send him gifts

for his White Elephant Stall
at the Country Fair in aid of











the St. John the Baptist
Vicarage, on May 14. Old
clothes, books, magazines,

china glass, in fact anything
including money will be
gratefully accepted.

Telephone 2292 for things
to be collectd.



NOTICE

I wish to notify my
patients and any interested
~ persons, that I still carry on
‘my work as Spencer Cor-
setiere and have at no time
ceased to do so.

MAY GAY

FURNITURE

a
Money - Saving Prices

CHARM in China and Bedroom
Cabinets, Sideboards $15 to $90;
Dining, Luneh, Sewing and Kitch-
en Tables, Waggons, Larders,
Kitchen Cabinets.

SMART Mahogany, Birch and
other Bedsteads, Full panelled and
Railed and Panelled,, Cradles,
Beds, Vanities, Dressing Tables,
Washstands, Wardrobes, Chests-of-
Drawers.

MORRIS, Tub, Bergere and Rush
% Furniture — Morris Cushions,
, Spring and Springlike $4.50 up.
DESKS with flat or sloping tops,
Book cases, Book racks, Office
duty chairs

L.S. WILSON
SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069
‘
COLL LLCO



M.S.








“Bonaire’—20th May 1951.

8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO, LTD.,,
Agent










M.V. CACIQUE Del CARIBE
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Gren-
ada and Aruba. Sailing Saturday
28th inst.

M.V. CARIBBEE will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-

jea, An , Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
May.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOC., INC.

Tele, 4047,











OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

For further information apply te - -
DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.—

ROYAL NETHERLANDS

Agents

FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatlantique

th
ue

SAILING TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

“GASCOGNE” May 12th,
1951

via St. Lueia, Martinique,
Guadeloupe and Antigua,





SOUTHBOUND

“GASCOGNE” May 3rd,
1951
Grenada, Trinidad, Demer—
ara and Fr, Guiana.
$33
Accepting Deck passengers
to Grenada, Trinidad, St.
Lucia and Martinique also
Cargo and Mail to all Ports
of Call,

R. M, JONES & Co., Ld.

AGENTS
Phone 3814

8

.

nt







—














COSCON

PASSAGES

Contact Antilles Products,

sailing to Europe fortnightly.

Dublin, London, or Rotter
reduction for children.





TO EUROPE

Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
The usual ports of call are
dam, Single fare £70; usual



—_—__—.
I LEAP OVER THE GARDEN
WALL—a story of a Nun who was
in a Convent for 28 years and
then gave it up, An_ interesting
true book by Monica Baldwin

Bring us your Fountain Pens for
NIB and SACK replacements.

Ours is the only Store fitted with
modern toots for Pen Service.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND
HARDWARE



















BEAUTY ?

You'll’ find it
in our NEW

COSMETIC
DEPT.

Pay us a visit today

No. 16, Swan Street -:

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH:

SEARCHING FOR

FOR SALE

CRUSHED
STONE & FINES
IDEAL FOR CONCRETE,
AND MAKING. ROADS
AND PATHS,
Apply...
J. N. HARRIMAN
& CO., LTD.,
Seawell,
Phone 8444, Extension 8
26.4.51.—7n












SOAPS PERFUMES
POWDERS CREAMS
LIPSTICKS SHAMPOOS
POMADES BRILLIANTINES
— ALSO —
HAIR BRUSHES COMBS,
TOOTH BRUSHES | TOOTH PASTE
MANICURE SETS RAZOR SETS

And many more items of Interest

, and make your Selections

Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd.
(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
- ’Phone : 2109, 4406 or 3534






























\a

PAGE SEVEN

Youthful Vigor Restored

In 24 Hours

Glands Fortified
by New Discovery

Do you feel old before your time? Are you tired,
Tun-down, worn out, and uneble to ee with the
speed and pleasures of modern life? suffer
from loss of memory, nervy » Weak body, im~

ute blood? Are you worrie@? Do you suffer from

ear or have an inferiority complex? Do you enjoy
the Cree. of women or 40 beaut itul women pass
you by without a second glance? If you suffer from
these conditions, then you are the victim of we
glands, and unless your og are fortified and
stimulated, you can not hope to regain youthful
vigour and animation.

Vitalize Your Glands

Fortunately for those who suffer from run-down
gens action, @ physician with 30 years’ experience
as perfected a stp. be and positive prescrip-

tion to stimulate gland activity and thus b a
feeling of increased energy, rene and health.
nis prescription, called Vi-Tabs, in pleasant,

tasteless, tablet form, All you need to do |
is to take two little tablets three times
each day. This prescription starts work |
Tey Ue eee ene in-

and enlivening your
whole body. As our glands rapidly become
stronger, you will feel and see yourself be-



rectl in the gland system, the nerves,
and to thata new blood aud vil s

ur, there is
come youn Praptaes Wl wake rants pes no long waiting for results. Most users re-
realizing the joys and pleasures of life rt an astonishing improvement within

4 hours and that they feel ten years
pocness within one week. These results

ve been accomplished time after time
in thousands of cases, some of which had
almost given up hope of ever being strong,
well, and vigorous again,

Results Guaranteed.

more frequently than ever before. ,

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs
Dr, J. Rastelli Nae tet European
hysiclan, recently stated: “Many scien-
ists are of the opinion that the true secret
~of youthful vigour and vitality lies in the
ands. If we could keep our Bipndes Suns.



ioning properly, we would feel an ‘
Years younger and live years longer, Based | yce questanding ha bean, te Be of
cases throughout the world the it is now

ars of rience in stu:
rasticer ft is thy opinion that the medi=
ula known as



it is my aa en. offered under a itive rantee t
— nothing unless dutitely Sa factory, Une
Vi-T. represents the / der this guarantee get Vi-Tebs from
most Cat chemist foday. Put Ke on st and seo
tifle internal m of | for yourself how new blood tinglos t! h
duratlae Mf Manta | Botte sehen 20% Nie sae
thus tends SS restore | ¢ riget F.. hy can ener lite at tritici

ly can enjoy life as f ently
and as_vigo ously i you ‘did your
prime, Then if for any reason at all you
are not completely satisfied, merely return

yeahs vigour and vi-+
ality to the body.”

24-Hour Results

the empty pack nd the ful
Because Vi-Tobs are price wil ve Tetunded, Get Virravs trom
scientifically designed | your chemist today. The gua “pro-
————————~" and prepared to act di-/| fects you.
To Restore
Vi-Tabs « Guaranteed ; wantoos. Vielity
ea — a

INORG
For best Results Fit

Cooper Split Roller Bearings

“Split” Feature enables dismantling and
re-assembling to be effected with ease,
speed and economy.

CENTHKAL FOUNDRY LTD.
Pier pm ene

CSO OOOO

oo



eae

PPPS RO



= nn nn ae

WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD.

LOVELY CARPETS

add to that little touch of
ordered care that gives a

re
.



HOME — its Charm
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED —

B. M. K. WOVAX RUGS —various sizes Big ioe : =
VELVET FINISHED SOFA RUGS—various sizes 2
VALI RUGS — various sizes : R ri
DRUGGET RUGS & CARPETS—various sizes 9 y
DRUGGET STAIR CARPETING—various sizes ‘

224 and 27 inches wide. y



CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

The Advocate Co., Ltd., has made arrangements for
classified advertisements to be taken by various District
Agents and so far the following have been authorised to

receive them :

JOSEPH JEMMOTT,
St. Elizabeth Village,
St.

MOSES GITTENS,

Dayrells Road, Ch, Ch
Joseph.
Mrs. U. L.. BRUCE,

Maxwell Road, Ch. Ch.

8. A.. DURANT,
Horse Hill, St. Joseph.

0. McCONNEY, EBENEZER PHARMACY,
Pilgrim Road, Ch. Ch. Four Roads, St. John,
V. HOLDER,
JOSEPH ALLEYNE, St.. Judes, St. George.

Crane, St, Philip.
ST. C. HUNTE,

G. QUINTYNE, Pine Gap, St, Michael.

Church Village, St. Philip

Vv. RICE,
E. HINKSON, Bank Hall Road,
Massiah Street, St. John. St. Michael.
H.. L. CAVE, R. H. KING,
St. John’s Dispensary, Near Sharon, St. Thomas.

Items may be handed into the above for the following

Columns in the Classified Section :

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, IN MEMORIAMS, ETC.
FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

ADVOCATE CoO., LTD.

T. Gale. Advertising Manager





| PAGE EIGH'



Carlton Team Defeat Everton 2

Carlton defeated Everton two goals to nil when they
played their:return first division football fixture at Ken-

sington yesterday evening.
When these two teams
defeated Carlton 3—2.,

first met this season, Everton

Skipper “Brickié” Lucas scored both goals for Carlton.
Playing at inside left, he was outstanding in all the Carlton

forward movements.







Labour Party
Hold May Day
Meeting

Joining with the thousands of
labourites all over the world, the
Barbados Labour Party observed
May Day with a political meeting
held in the Stee| Shed at Queen's
Park last night.

Top members of the Party unde:

the chairmanship of Dr. H. G
Cummins, M.C.P. addressed the
large crowd who attended the
meeting. Dr. Cummins in refer-

ring to the manner in which May
Day is celebrated in Burope and
even in some parts of the West

Indies, said he hoped Barbados
would soon reach the stage of
having precessions and demon

strations on that day.

Mr. G. H. Adams, General Presi-
cent of the Labour Party did not
attend the meeting because of
jilness. His doctor has advised
him to take a rest.

Dr. Cummins introduced Mr,
Torrie Pilgrim and Mr. Hugh
Cumberbatch whom he deseribed
as two of the latest comrades
Vie cause of Labour. Mr, Pilgrim
nad Mr. Cumberbatch will, at the
next General Elections, face the
electorate in St. John and St
(yeorge respectively .

Dr. Cummins said he was sure
they were ali glad to see Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis back with them
after a long illness,

The crowd which was mostly
composed of working class men
and women filled the steel shed in
spite of the showers which fell
uround the time the meeting was
scheduled to start Those who
could not find seats stood around
in the shed itself and even out-
side. :

First speaker was Mr. F,L Wal-
cott who told the audience that
the Party pledged itself to regain
the seat at the General Elections
which they had lost in St. Andrew
and advised them that it was they
(the electors) who had to work
hard to keep the Labour Party in
power at the General Elections.

Mr, Walcott denied that Gov-
ernment had, while increasing
wages, allowed the cost of living
to goup. On the contrary he said,
the Government spent a_ mil-
lion dollars a year on subsidiza-
tion so as to keep the cost of liv-
ing from rising to abnormal
heights. The prices that obtained
to-day were based on world
market prices over which the Gov-
ernment had no control.

He reminded the people of the
work that the Labour Party had
done in improving conditions of
work and increasing wages. He
next spoke of emigration.

After referring to the visit tc
Washington which he had made
last year, Mr. Walcott talked about
present emigration opportunities
to the U.S.A. He said it was an
opportunity for.4,000 men to work
for 12 weeks for $1,728,000

Some people were suggesting
that Government should take the
money they were going to spend
on that scheme and create local
employment by, say, opening the
East Coast Road. But that road
could not be opened in June and
could not employ 4,000 people

Moreover, if they refused the
Americans now, they, the Ameri-
cans would think that they were
high hatted and haughty, and
when there was another oppor-
tunity with perhaps more favour
able conditions, the Americans
would seek elsewhere for
workers. They should remem-
ber that 50% of the workers in
the island were only casually
employed, and it was therefore
necessary to grasp every employ-
ment opportunity, even when it
was only temporary.

Mr. Walcott in conclusion urged
his listeners not to be despondent

because they had lost the bye-
election in St. Andrew, He re
minded them that on a _ former
oceasion they had lost a_ bye
election in St. George, but had
returned iv, the General Efee-
tions and put in a man _ with
enough force to put in three

men.

Mr. M. FE. Cox, the next speaker,
also referred to the high cost of
living, and like Mr. Walcott, he
denied that it was something
which Government could control.

He said that Government was
in. sympathy with small

The first goal he
from a

up.
Both goals were scored during
the first half of play. Through-

out the game, Carlton played as
the better team. Their forward;
combined well and they got good
support from the backs.

King, their goalie, kept goa!
exceptionally well. His counte:
part Reece also kept goal well.
The two goals that were shot on
him were weil placed.

Little rain had fallen before
lay began and the grass was a
it slippery

The Game
Just after Carlton had ‘taken
the touch off, Everton were
pressing down on them. Carlton's
goalie, King, had to do a bit of
saving early.

The next minute, “Brickie”
Lucas, at inside left took a
powerful, low shot, but the ball

went straight to Reece in goal.

After about 12 minutes’ play,
Carlton opened the scoring.
Maynard, playing in the Ever-
ton’s half back line, fouled a
Cariton player in the ‘penalty
area. Lucas took the penalty
kick and made no mistake.

Carlton were soon two goals up
with Lucas coming again into the
picture, From a melee in Ever-
too’s goal area, Lucas who was
standing back, but yet within
the goal area, nicely received a
pass. He took a lovely low shot
which passed to Reece’s . right
hand and lodged itself into the
nets. The score was 2—0.

The game quickened, Everton
tried hard to score and would
have, had not for King’s safe
goal keeping. On the other hand,
Carlton kept Reece busy. But,
Carlton still seemed to have the
best of the game. The score was
still 2—0 in favour of Carlton at
half time.

On resumption, Everton were
the aggressors. For fully four
minutes they kept the ball con-
centrated at the north goal. King
was again forced to do a good bit
cf goal-keeping.

Carlton made an attack on the
Everton goal, but they could not
“et past the backs, Another at-
tack, but Reece was there to save.

What seemed a sure goal for
Everton was nullified by King
who half-stopped the ball and fell
cn it before throwing it over the
heads of the pressing Everton for-
wards. King was in good position
and that was all, It was a power-
ful shot from White, then playing
at centre forward, who was only
a few yards away.

During the last stages of the
game, Carlton’s goalie was almost
idle. Carlton kept the drive. They
were only prevented from further
scoring through the good defence
put up by Everton's backs and the
fine performance of Reece in goal.

The game ended 2—0.

The teams were:

Everton: Reece, Hall, Weekes,
Harewood, Yearwood, Maynard,
White, Blades, R. Haynes, Sealy,
Murray

Cariton: King, Bright, Kennedy,
Marshall, Clairmonte, oo xX,
Hutchinson, Hutchinson, Green-
idge, Lucas, McLeod.

Referee: Mr. S. Gittens.

Jack Milburn
Pulls Muscle

LONDON, May 1,

Jack Milburn chosen as centra
forward for England against
Argentina in the internationat
soccer match at Wembley Stadium
on May 9, may be unfit to play.
He pulled a muscle in his right
leg on Saturday afternoon in the
Neweastle—Blackpool match. A
detinite decision is however being
awaited.

Ted Ditchburg | (Tottenham)
has been chosen as an internation-
al for England’s team.

lt has already been recommend-
ed that subject to both teams

agreeing, players be allowed as
substitutes up to the forty-fourth
minute in case of injury —Reute.,

B'dos Friendly Football
Association
TO-DAY'S FIXTURE.

,Rangers vs. Maple at St. Leon-
ard’s. Referee: Mr. J. Archer.







controls which as the experience
sof the 1914-18 war had shown,

shop-;}would result in a drastic increase

keepers and was working on agiin the price of commodities.

scheme to make their lot easier.
But the Government had
sympathy whatsoever with the
big merchants’ request for in-
creased profits and cessation of



| They'll Do It Every Time

ON WEEKDAYS FARVER
FRAU DOES
“ THE PLOW +s

THEN You'D BETTER
WEED THE EAST 40:



EVERYTHING BUT PULL



Mr. Cox told those present that

no®jhe had always fought their battles

from the time of his entry into
volitics and he would continue to
jo so.

Registered U.S. Patent OMe

JONES’S

| THANX TO

scored wes
penalty while the second
was a well timed shot from close

| MRS.E.H WOLTER,
| 1609 238° ST, N.W.,
CANTON 9, OHIO

{ { a

Victin.— Express.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE a

HORSE



THE OLYMPIC HORSE TRIALS were held recent ly at Badminton, England and were spread over
three days, including Dressage, Endurance and Jum ping. Photo shows Captain Hans Swarzenbach who
won the Individual Cup as he competes in the Jum ping Tests.



Germany Admitted
To Boxing Union

LONDON, April 28,
Germany was admitted to
membership of the European Box-
ing Union at the first session of
the Union’s Annual Conference
here today.
The Saar and Turkey were also
admitted to membership «

In a statement, following the
first session which was private,
Mr. J. Onslow Fane, Pissident,
announced that the Union was
now satisfied that boxing in
Germany was controlled by one
governing body, and by non-
financially interested people.

“We are happy” he eqntinued, |

“to welcome these three affiliated
bodies and T am certain they will
strengthen the union.”

—Reuter.



SPORTS
WINDOW

FOOTBALL
The players chosen to be coach-

ed by Mr. Wilkes in preparation
for the forthcoming Jamaica—
Barbados tournament. will turn

out at Combermere School at 5
p.m. to-day to continue training
and on Sunday at Kensington at

8 am,
DIVISION 2
May 2—Everton vs
Bank Hall,
DIVISION &%

Empire at

May 2—Sea Scouts vs. College at
Garrison.
Combermere vs. Y.M.P.C. at

Combermere,
Wanderers vs,
Bay.

Police vs. Eyerton at Park.
TABLE TENNIS—Division 1
Pelican vs. Y.M.P.C. at Y.M,C.A.
BASKET-BALL—Division 2%
Y.M.P.C, vs. Police at Y.M.P.C
Pirates vs. Sea Scouts at College

Foundation at





—--

7h. . mh
What's On Today
Police Courts 10.00 a.m,
Court of Appeal—10,00 a.m.
Annual Ordinary General
Meeting of the Sharehold-
ers of the Barbados Ship-
ping and Trading Com-
pany Ltd.—12 noon.
Meeting of the General
Board of Viealth — 2,30

p.m,

Mr, John Farrison gives lec.
ture at the Barbados Mus-
eum on “Looking at Pic-
tures”—5.00 p.m.

CINEMAS

Globe—"Hit The Ice" &
Brothers’ 4.45 & 8.15 p.m,

Plaze (Bridgetown)—''Blue Grass
of Kentucky” & “The Dud Goes
West" —4.45 & 8.30 p.m,

Empire—"The Mudlark"”—4.45 and

“The





8.30 p.m.
Roxy — “Checkered Coat" and
“Captain From Castille’—445 &
8.40 pom. .
—





The Weather

TO.DAY
Sun Rises: 5.44 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (New) May 6.
Lighting :
High Water: 1.33 a.m.,
p.m

2.00

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) .01 in,

Temperature (Max), 86.5 °F

Temperature (Min,) 74.5 °F

Wind Direction (8, a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E.S.E.

Wind Velocity 7 miles per
hour .

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.953
(3 p.m.) 29.885









By Jimmy Hatlo

But So CONSIDERATE 1S JONESY *
SUNDAY**s HE MUST BE RESTING
HER UP FOR MONDAY s+ss

men ( CAREFUL,DEARs*

————

THESE STEPS
ARE ITE /-
TAXING **s






MODERN HIGH WINS
AGAIN

OWING to a heavy rainfall last
night only the first quarter in the

Pickwick—Y.M.P.C, first Divi-
sion basketball match was com-
pleted at the Y.M.P.C. grounds,

Beckles Road. The end of the first
quarter found the Y.M.P.C.
team leadihg with ten goals to
four. Before the rainfall, the pitch
was soft and slippery. This was
the only game started.

On Monday afterngon the Mod-
ern High School got their fourth
successive win when they de-
feated ateam of the Barbados
Regiment by 17 goais to 14 in a
Second Division basketball match
which was played at the Modern
High School, Roebuck Street

3
s

s
x

“T don’t need to be show
protection in general, L’ve
which lack of it brought

-
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“To-day, though, a represe
showed me a Commercial

stand-out. He showed ‘me how a Lloyd's *H.P.’ Policy
ean be written to my individual needs, giving — me
complete indemnity against claims, damage, five and

theft all in one low-cost police
“Lin getting it, You shoul

«

J.B. LESLIE & Co.

COLLIN EUR Teli ke

DIAL 3006

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QPCSSSSSS SESS OSSF SHI FOSSOS
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P.C.S. MAFF

Prince Wm. H

He comes from Zurich and is on Vae

SDDSSSSSSS SDSS SPSS PO SPSS OOS EEOLPESSSSPOSSPFOPS



PERHAPS
Have SOMETHING THERE!

Motor Vehiele plan that’s a



BLOC LCL LEPC CLL PESTS

POORER EAR





JUMPING



33 Invited To
Practice

The Selection Committee of the
Barbados Cricket Association
held a meeting yesterday morning
and decided to circularige 33
players in preparation for the
eficket tours to Trinidad and
British Guiana during July and
September respectively.

Invitees have been asked to re-
port by May 16 as to whether
they are available for either one
or both of these tours if selected

Present at the meeting were
Mr. J. M. Kidney, Mr. J. D.
Goddard, Mr. T. N. Peirce, Mr
$.'O’C. Gittens and Mr. W. F.
Hoyos.



LESLIE'S

n the wisdom of insurance
seen too many instances in
about serious financial loss.

tative of J. B. Leslie & Co.,

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BRIDGETOWN

BARBADOS, B.W.1!

*

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~.



See ece

it’s so easy
to see those
extra fine
points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the
Top Scorers
in Tailoring

to be on the
SMART
side.

oa natigtnmennapimemnmanictnetcantie che

EI & Co., Ltd

enry Street

LLL OLE LIAN OA EO
PRIA SSSR EAS

M.C.C.
Declared
LONDON, May 1,



No Fit Challengers

LONDON, May 1.

The Administrative Control and
Appeals Board of the European
Boxing Union in London has
decided that there are no suitable
challengers for three British box-
ers who hold European titles,
Randolph Turpin, middleweight;
Don Cockell, lightheavyweight;
and Jack Gardner, heavyweight.

Two Italian claims for matches
with Turpin and Cockell have
been turned down.

The Committee decided that
Gino Campagne, Italian middle-
weight is not at the moment good
enough to be considered, and the
issue is further involved by the
fact that Turpin is due to fight
Dave Sands of Australia, for the
Empire Title, and possibly Ray
Robinson for the World Cham-
pionship.

The Committee also agreed not
4to proceed at the moment with
the claims of the Italian champion
Totini, for a European title fight
with Coekell.

—Reuter



411—7

Close of play scores in Mon-
day’s first class cricket matches
at Lord’s: M.C.C. first innings
411 for seven declared, Yorkshire
first innings all out 218. Second
innings 32 for one (non-county
match). At Oxford Lancashire
first innings 408 for three declared
Oxford University first innings al!
out for 144, Second innings 62
for five (non-county match)—(CP)

—





INTERCOLONIAL
FOOTBALL

JAMAICA vs
BARBADOS

JAMAICA TEAM ARRIVES
May 18 for tour until May 30

May 21 vs. COLTS XI
May 23 vs. CARLTON
May 24 vs. COLONY
May 26 vs. COLONY
May 28 vs. SPARTAN
May 29 vs. COLONY



ADMISSION: Kensington and
George Challenor Stands 2/-
per match.

UNCOVERED STANDS 1/-
per match.

GROUNDS 6d. per match.



Season tickets for admission
to Kensington and George
Challenor Stands $2.00 each.



O. S. COPPIN,
Hony. Secty.
B.A.F.A.

a a
. Se



The
AMATEUR ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION

OF BARBADOS

presents its

BIG THREE-DAY
CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

KENSINGTON OVAL

Whit-Monday . May 14th
‘Thursday . May 17th
& Saturday . May 19th

beginning at 1 p.m, each day

; e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
an coo aed zeae

reher, ugge' junte,
Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin
Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists

and A as well as
Miss _— Cumberbatch
oh Miss Eileen King in
at the Historic Oval

Gates Open at 12 noon daily

e
PRICES OF ADMISSION :
SEASON TICKETS

Kensington Stand . . $2.16
George Challenor . . $1.68
a

DAILY TICKETS

Kensington Stand + $1.00
Gecerge Challenor . . 2e.
Uncovered Seats . 48e,
Grounds . 1... . %#€

Season Tickets on Sale daily
at the Civic, Swan & High
Street.

Tenders are invited for
Sale of Bar and Refresh-
ment Rights to Saturday,

May Sth at 4.00 p.m \%

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1951













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in White, Grey, Beige and Eggshell
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SCHOOL WEAR

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BROADWAY DRESS SHOP

Where Satisfied Customers Gather

—= Se















Phone 41267 for
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in 375 lb. Drums

Snowerete White Cement
in 375 lb. Drums

Colorcrete Cement
YELLOW in 375 Ib. Drums
RED in 375 lb. Drums

Everite Asbestos-Cement Corrugated Sheets
6 ft., 7 ft., 8 ft, 9 ft. 10 ft. Lengths

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Full Text

PAGE 1

IIAIili WMJN ADVOCATE WFDVE-SDAY. MAY 2. 15( Qahib CaUinq F IRST t>l t*iii>*rwirir-l of tl "'ion -wt.ntt of the Caribbeai • Hue to arrive hcrcl tnmi.iTpw Thry m Mr. Jinimv Id iii.ii OflWci of the Cart! bc*n Conn Ml Uiv.i and the i&fa et Sunday. Di-lesjai (or \r\f pwttng are also i -i-I In around-this time. Thp opemK saasion will Uk plaec In the Chamber of the Legls< Lirvrfl H! 10 ii m on Mon. Tin. and His Ecfl!tiicy ID deliver an ad• welcome to the delegates ruining sessions n ill bf !u'd „t I *.. --(UKHousv Timely T.Ik D H IOA GREAVES timely 1-lk on-"Currenc> and Monev in :> % %  WaatOadlw" -l the llarbadut Museum Monday, May 7th al .' p rr bhgpld be especially Inier• tiMj:. what with the forthcoming VBT to a unlAed in trie Wcj*t In Advocate fit B.I.F. P EOPLBlin England vtaUlOf the l.ntlsb Industries Fan will * dlle to raa the IUrbadi Mn este. Issues of thtr newspape from April 29th to Mai 8th are be. IIIR flown to England by B.W.I.A./ free of charge in three Iwitchq* The first batch left Barbados yesterday by B.W.I A. for i) they are being flown to Jamaica to connect with night to London. BIT. "ill probably be reading them some time tomorrow morning. The second and third batches will leave here May 5th and Bin Uniforms S F.VERAi. of the stores in Bridgetown as well as the hank*, -have the ladies on their staff wearuig uniforms. The idea is catering on and almost every week a new uniform can be seen on Droad Street. Their design is M in pie -eafiurccl skirt and blouse to matcTT Leaving To-day M ~3*AMJOH\' Ot. KOOI-. (I t. .IJup.. DIM clxir of the Trinidad Trust Comnanv and actor Of Glolw Theatres Ud.. who arrived from Trinidad on Sunday Is due to leave today for BO where another Globe Theatre h Marina, cdnplaaon Carlb has been infotiawl that Globe Theatres Ltd. intend* building another theatre here In the vlrlnitv of HaU Itur.nrtns stay in, Barbados he was Ihe-Jucst of Mr. Maurice Jonrs Manager of the Globe The..!rc and China Doll. Irish St. Joan S IR LAURENCE OUWER has invited; Irish actress Siobhan McKennn -to bring her Irlshlanguagc version of Show'* St. Joan to IxHidon with the offer of ., thaatra Miss McKenna is seriously considering the offer. But she would prefer to take San Siobhan (as It is called In Irish) to Belfast, Limerick and Cork before accepting Olivier ', offer. "Before condemning the Idea of giving ScofJunii and Wain (heir indepenJinee out of ruiruf juu haute and ih,..l fo, a moment of tome of the peofdr who could he drponrd at undeurable 21 Officers T HE loss of the submarine Affray means that the Royal Navy has lost all the young officers at present traini.ig for the submarine service The Affray had on board all the 21 officers tcklng the submarine course at II.M.S. Dolphin, the submarine base al Gosport. Each course lasts three months. These young men. all volunteers, were half way through their course Several of them had the submarine tradition deeply rooted One was Sub-Lieut Union, son of one of our most famous wartime sub-mariners. Commander "Tubby" Union, V.C. Who died in the service Festival Restaurants W HAT are the prices proposed for the Festival of Britain restaurants on the South Bank. Luncheon at the Regatta Restaurant and the Fairway Cafe will be fl*.. dinner up to 10s. Dlnher will also be served a la carle. For drinks, the prices are likely to be: Sherry, 2s. 6d.. plain gin. 2s.; whisky. 2s. 6d ; martini. Ss to Ss. 6d. Champagne will cost from £1 15s. to £2 5s. a bottle. But one big mistake Is being made. Many North American visitors will be deprived of a favourite drink. No rye whisky has been ordered. Familiarisation Tour M B. and Mrs. Terry. O'Donnell who arrived here April 24th. left last night for Trinidad by PW.l.A. Mr. O'Donnell Is of the O'Donnell Travel Service in Red Bank. New Jersey. He is on a familiarisation tour of this area. C.D.C. Home Exr>an*i*n I OPD RKTTH Is Emplre-build' >r.g in London. As boss of the Government's Colonial Development Corporation he has settled SO of his staff In 38 Park Street. May fair. His realm already con•titcd of buildings In Dover Street. Berkeley Street, and Curaon Street. Thls-extenslon ot home territory •eems to have glvn Lord Refth the urge to Inspect his overseas poss es sions After six months M Chairman, he Is planning to tour the Cotporattan' wand v/lde interest.* Where . h* going? He will hot dtelda for aboul three weeks. And it may be a month or two before he sets out. In the meantime. Lord Relth is increasing his staff. He has appointed a Press Offtcei. Star Prices Here u a footnote on the price of drinks in London now: A friend who lives in the flat* at Grosvenor House ordered :i bottle of Martell brandy. Cordon Hleti The bill was L 5 12s. 8.1 Price of this brand In a shop is £2 17s 6d The Meaning of Leisure I Kist'RK i no medicament at *-' all unless you enjoy it. It should absorb iust enough of your attention to make you forget your worries; but not so much of youi attention as to prevent your mind from resting. That it what 1 consider the important function of leisure; not doing nothing, as that means that you brood; but doing something different tnat makes the blood flow from congested cells of your brain into other empty cells. I rind myself that the best relief from work is to do .some different sort of work." Harold Nicolson, speaking in n BBC programme. Trinidad Artist S EVERAL people praised the work of Trinidad artist Carlisle Chang last week after an Art exhibition staged by the British Council. Chang, who u a student at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, submitted several paintings in oil. Each received close scrutiny from the experts attend, ing the show and 1 am assured met Chrutg's work "shows all the signs of a promising artist". Mar Arthur's Song G ENERAL M*cARTHUR'S reference at close of his Washington speech to "Old soldiers never die." has started an overnight rush among America's top record makers. New songs based on the old ballad arc already being "composed," and re corded. Incidental Intelligence I EG ALLY the husband is the head of the house and the pedestrian has the right of way. Both are fairly safe unless they try to exercise their rights— -Grit. What makes the ETON FACE? B.B.I. Radio Pr^rasiBf wada*** hy ROBERT K.KG8LEY The old (Etonian; face has changed very little over uie past 150-200 years, it would not needi the introduction of much more than a barber and a bowler hat to %  transform any of the 52 Old Etonians whose Leaving Portrait* air on show in room four of the Tate t Gallery, into their modern equivalents These pictures owe their to an eighteenth century hei muter. Dr Barnard,' who, emberiatsed by the custom of boys who were leaving tipping the Heed as lhe> *ald farewell, sugjtesned the gift of a picture to the school ml^ht be more becoming than a 1 in note slipped into his hand-i custom his predecessors had warmly encouraged. So boys of promise or nobility had their .per., traits done and presented to the school, being painted at ages ranging from 17 to 13. At the Tate you can see how the school has stamped Its Impression upon them—and the same trade mark Is discernible on other Eton tans today. *>•-•SS %  m SpoiU D.r 144 „, % tnt Heeot* lam. Tha Hem. T 10 &•*•• A". %  i it %  . rrom th %  Miion*!7 * n m n|rami Fuxk I M %  i lha Ni and War Tt,*. Wor4.1S |.m CyrU SUpMon. t c*4*Wlllr v Smith Afiicr.. Two Thounrict U. 1' •!"< I ?.*UN Tl..%  %  %  m Heara P-m. ^ i.-.i : i" p m '.C^llrie the W Ifllrl D*> ssji. sue M THE OU) ETONIAN, US* Richard HUunl* n Sltwall WUmat aainiad ay Vsihsniel Dsim S pm Radio N*wa-aa). Illpm Boohla ttaaa. BM p.n rilm rt*vi*w. • BJ lnl.lu. :•. i> in F-roni me RdilarlaU. I p.m. Slalcmanl of A<- .might interpret as a loos; of arroganro, but probably originated in trying to avoid ton close contact with herd collars at an early and impressionble age. In iome the supercilious look if. withering—the portrait of William IVyndham Greville. painted In 1781. it Is the look of any old Etonian affronted by an inferior— a look that many waiters in night clubs have encountered. One or two of the youths, on the other hand, like Sir ArscotI Ourry Moleaworth. Bart., (17891833) are plainly hearties; then, no doubt, they squeezed In sittings for their portraits between meet, of hounds; today the fixture lists of rugby or rowing clubs would .— !" — % %  --= jv* mm have to be consulted before ap worn Reynolds and Romney and pointments could be made. rroppner and Gainsborough paintThe majority of the young men e< ( (or '*** nut much higher than whose portraits are shown look '.£ ** £ "* head-master's tip) towards Ihe left, a trail not unJf* 1 %  " common something known among old boys of the # e r heirs mostly lack. All—even present day, as the case histories •'" younfest sons—have a faint of Dr. Dalton, Mr. Strachey and %  "" ot smugness that suggeais they Lord Pet hick-La wren ce demonflr not worried about the future, irate. .Neither call-up nor death duties sre large on their horizons. A few—five, in fact—are portrayed rending books (but reading Just One Tie them, it must be said, In a some„ what perfunctory, ashamed wayj. There wai only one tie-proclaim True. William Charles Cotton € '\ ol ? Eloni n 'n the gallery (1813-39) aeems to be giving his hm w ,her *. an d n moved mind to his studies and wear* figJW f^ut^M among conspectacles to prove It. but he rose t"P'"*"es. there were one or lo no greater height than a country iwo who ml nl have been mothers parsonage. *" ld s'*ters of present boys, who Richard Staunlon Sitwell Wllemcl to be practising disparagemot (1734-1811). on the other m,,nl for Ll rda r the Fourth of hand, though his book is dogJ n .*; l eared in the Nathaniel Dance there were any Harrovians in portrait, wears the aspect of a lhc Ioom ,ne y wisely chose not young man whoae main reading ***?}*% !" ir schooling. was confined to the sporting Tlerld Cepyrlght ffc-jerved "dlllon?. —UE.fi. Rupert and the Ice-flower — 17 i nos>uoni (I AV* a ATn:.CLrHCINEliA (rlWrraWflOraV) MATINEt: TO-DAY at 5 an. H) NIGHT A TOMOBKOVa NIGHT at S. MERLE OBSRON — ROBERT RVAN — CHARLES KORVIN in -BERLIN EXPRESS" An ItKo tadU Pislmre ASTOm THEATRE Wedaetaar Thursday Columbia Smashing Double— ~ mBUZVTLKSH"%  • and "LVST Font voi.if GLOBE THEATRE TO-DAY 4U1I.IS1 TO-MORROW A11DOT i COSTELLO it PAT ROC & MAX REED •HIT Tilt irr"THE BROTHERS" PLAZA Thaa Bridgetown (OIAL 2310) Blae (iris's iil kntwkv & Tkr D4r Cots West ^i HH itiuR f a#hr^->* ail & %  ^ *-— K—A_* Bill WI1.LUMH. Ji rdd.At.nrrtT OalORM Bi TllUKSDAV iaO pm iMunoffanv Tl "JIOOH AMO MAOOIS IM COI'BT" nlh JUE Vl'L and IUV.1II RIANO — I arUam Heiirr UUN EBIIOI H CRHQ1ABM!rrfio>*a . rood frosn ilia bost-iioiia*. %  11 Neat or decorative, if) IS. Britfli to tkU ')rva usa an aitsa. (Si 14. Mads -! marbit ? (i is. Ooea to tea to Dt tasea. ill is. One ot trie tslrtss. %  5 %  IS DUco'Jiii fur riamolt. (Si 34. SUlj war lo bcflo ID i trl bOUH. (5) a*. A man. I | Kow nsd I ||| 3*. aim. |4| S7. Snaah up. (Si DONS I. Announce IBI 1. Ajiar m tha kltchtn T (I) s. Maturanr your uypouant. (I) 4. Orf WJIMI iiiund in TomboyUn trlcSi. 141 8. Bud plict. (4i v. OsMasr oapieyi conwal him, <4| a. I upaet the Dona car. (Si 10. Olv some peopla a %  porting Hart. I!J TtvSUIa: IS, Ivor?; BY THE WAY... s y BEACHCOMBER T O those who aie not prepared lo lake the New Economic* •.ted ll seems odd lhat a %  d price for fish is "the %  have to pay" far getting no meat. If a nationalised fishing Industry working on the lines of the nationalised coal mines, evei MI creed cd in producing a serious hhoringe of ilsh. I suppose) a controlled price lor dried egg would be the price we should have lo 1 .iy for no stale vegetables By the way. I notice, wllh a deep laaUni of humiliation. that America has beaten us in the race to O' 1 an easiiy-hamllei) ,'<: for milk It is a tablet ' frozen milk paste, which melt'; in hot .'water. Our own fonri M-icnlisls are still working on lhtnew canvas bread pills. Thf Palace of ProgrvnH D R. .-STRABISMUS (Whom Cod Erekcrve) of Utrecht was at the Festival palace of Progress yesterday to inspect his exhibits. These Include rock inghorse with a "iii'ipn-if snout, which has an alarm clock inside its head; a asl distorting egg through which everything appears fla: and hairy; a hfeslie model of the engine-room of u Turkish subm a rl oa la lard; n suction-pipe for drawing pips through jelly. %  mevhaiiieal with /inc CS J c ha s ; an Inverted bath for tortoises: electric whiskers which can be titled to u>) prawns; ami a boomerang-harpoon which droplly-papei. on cows. I'inni-li l.'< fu-ul Drama I ET us suppose—a thing quite • impossible—that I were to write: "A Peruvian team of athletes has declined an invltutloa to visit Luton during the Festival." People would say I was talking nonsense. Very well. Read this, from an evening B per A Finnish tram of nines has declined an im-irafioii fo nisi! fl/ord during Ihe Fce*lral. No offence intended to Ilford. r am sure. I*o**il>ly the members of the team were told lhat one of the conditions of the visit was lhat they must not play Snakes and ladders on Sundays. In Panting S OMEONE asks n ~ what makes Cabinet Ministers so vain. One cause of their vanity is that I hey become accustomed to see ing some such statement as "Our aim Is peace" greeted as though It were a major contribution to political thought. Another cause is the courteous applause whieh greets them on the platform, and which is always mistaken for a demonstration of affection and a proof of popularity. (TOMORROW. How 1 uained 1731b. in /indaps: bp Mooa. Ihe elephant.) foe s while Ruptrt ioski round in delight. "What wonderful vicwa from hart !" h munwAiri. Why hive I n*r corns ihi. wiy bfforc?" Ha guti lowitd. Nutwood trying to pirk out wfll-known Landmark). Than, turning round. he get! shock, lor cktodt~hav rolled ip %  valk-y behind him and b'A So.tt. K Saul: m.nV t>**m. 1 *jiiH.ti: li. Inl.r..n. kWl I". Id*.: 14. Omm: 15. RADt; GLOBE STARTING FRIDAY THE MOST POWERFUL FILM EVE* MA0E...llwi//^ i star your memory rfdR rO'.v*-rf $881 j& liW *YWS LOUIS WOWflM, PLUS LOCAL TALENT Tickets on sale Daily-Globe PLAZA DIAL OISTIK 8404 TODAY and TOMORIIOW i A 1.30 p.m. Mo-SISln in.i.aaS MAOOtl %  I'OI RT' Wllh Jot VUI* at RENNtE IANO and "HAH <••" %  HiM'l|t "' ntANK A13MIT90N -IABZAN S 'Hi SLAVS 'IM I > llirl.i CAIETV (THE GARDttS] ft, iames TODAY lOnlyi SSO pm CISCO KID In 'SOITK at th* RIO r.MSDt' and Roland WBtrrBM a. Chullr CHAN %  TO* UOLDt-N ITS HUltSDAY lOnlvi I.M p.m. %  rr: WILfOX prWMTIIS • • i N...I/ A BUtfcaal WlUl... I I OIK1M .al I I K/U> EMPIRE LM Thf* Hhows To-day —4.U >nd i.M. Friday. !H •nly Darryl F. Zanuck presents Irene DUNNE in •• THE MVDLAKK Thuraday Only 4.M (.IS Zflth Centvry Fex Double "Y0U*M MY tVCtYTHINC And ••s/of $rfrBOXY Last Two Shaw. TiwUv — 4 3t and t.lB. 2*th Cenlary Fox Double Tone Ceaway and Noreeb Nosh In ... "CHECKERED COAT' — and — CAPTAIN FKOV CASTILE — wllh — Tyrone Power and Jean MM. ROYAL To-day and To-morrow 430 eAeommmmmm)eowmmmimmmmoMm H mmo emmoM w mmm>mm 1 COMBMNATMON YOU'LL? JVEEBIJ STOP THAT LEAK IN YOUR ROOF NOW We offer EVF.MTE CORBUGATED SHEETS RED CEDAS SHINGLES ROLL. ROOFING — Plain I ROLL ROOFING —Red PITCH PINE DOUGLAS FIR PHILIPS ELECTRIC BULBS 5-200 WATTS SCREW & BAYONET AND ELECTRIC LAMP SHADES BEAUTIFUL COLOR'S IN BAKELITE FROM 27c. — $1.29 THE tfARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. LUMBER DEPARTMENT DIAL 41> THE CORNER STORE 1 •&&W^\'&0*feWSeV* l '**'e***''*'S**-''********>



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PAGE HCH1 IIARHADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. MAY 2. IMI Carlton Team Defeat Everton 2 — 0 Carlton defeated Everton iwo goals to nil when ihey played then return a football fixture at Ken%  % %  %  When these Iwo teams first met this season. Everton defeated Carlton I Skipper "Br'f-kie" Lucas scored both SI sis foi (.' a H Playm: ^t UUKI Iwi. ha was outttwUajg En all the Carlton forward movements. N goal he scored we* from a (tensity while the second was a well limed shot from i lose %  ions*: .11 >i %  > %  ><. Labour Parlv Hold May Day Meeting Joining with Wie thouxaii'ls of labourites all over th world, the Both goals were scored during the tlr.et hnlf of play. Thnuihnl the tiinr. Cerltun played ,K iha belter usini. Their sorward tombtnaa' wtu ->n<* ihey cot gooi %  uapart from the backs. King, their goalie. Kept goal i ;v well till i-ountei IMit Reecr also kept foal well Barbados Labour Panv observe! The two goals that were shot on • Day with :i political meeting htm wata well plced. beforr was .i taken wart held in the Steel Shed a: Quaan's Park last night Top member | I vie cnatrn ...i%  ..;. Dr II C i waning, M.C large crowd nu attended tin meeting. Dr CunWIUH In ref i t %  mg to the manner in which M.i Day i* celebrated In Kuiopv anil Molie."Kiiit had to do even n yoir.r parts Ol the Waai Js vlng early. (CHUM, gald he honed llarb-u. r(H Iltx i minute, "Brickie" would soon rc.-irh the stngc o. Lucas, at inside leH took ;i l-.aving pracaaaions -nd demon powerful, low shot, but the b-il strationson thai wtm s t rJ .ight SO Recce in goal SB Q B A Qaoaral PrasiAlltr u hout \2 minutas' play. Hem nf the Labour Part] did no Oariton opened the attend the natttuX bacauao flaying in the Everbaa .Kinscc Little rain h.l fallen I Hat ajraa The Game Just after Carlton had i %  lunch off, Y. m nres-tmc down on them. Carlti bit No Fit Challengers LONDON*. May 1. The Administrative Control and Appeals Board of the European Boxing Union In London has decided thst there are no suitable hallrngcrc for three British boxers who hold European titles. Randolph Turpin. middleweight. Don CockeR. I Igtilliaar j a eight. .IT.LI Jack Gardnei, heavyweight. I aro Italian claims for matches with Turpm and Oockc.i have been turned down. The Committee decided thai Glint Cimuagrie, Italian middleweight is oot at >he moment good enough to be considered, and the issue is further involved by the fact that Turpin Is due to fight lands of Australia, for the Phnpiia Title, .ind possibly Bay Robinson for the World Championship The Committee also agreed not i to proceed at the moment with I the claims of the Italian cha.npion. 'Totmi. for a European title OgM' with Cockell. —Inner THE WHOLE FAMILY TUT OLYMPIC HORSE TRIALS wra held recent Iv at Badminton. England and wue spread over three day*, Including Drosage. Endurance and Jum plug. Photo show* Casitaiii Hans •warseiibach who won la* Individual Cup as ha compete* In the Jum ping TesU. Ho coiacs from Eurlck an* 1* on Tae VletsB.— Express. %  ilnea. Mi him ta tato a real Dr. cummins Introdi Torrta Pilgrim and Hi Hmi' Cumherbotch whom he iii-*rnlieci as two of the late-: comrades %  le cause of Labour. Mr. Pilgrim tSrrmiinv ulinill. *aed tu Recce < r hand and lodged Itaelf into " ***" nd. The .core was 2-0. The came quickened. Everton ...| to score and wuld bay* haid apt for K gog] keeping On the OSW I arllon kepi Re. Bui Carlton still aecmed_ to have th;' J H LONDON. April 28, admitted to u-opaan Box, Ing Union at the llrM H Union's Annual Conference here today. i kM .idimtteil ,,'l^r .nd Turkey Ke .U. J^' ;, If twick line. MllM (arllon pUycr In the onaIty ..rca. Lucas took the penalty tick >ni( 1 sni p of nr E >tur From a melee in Ever %  i ii goal area. Lucas who jrai .LiiHliiig back, but yet within the goal urea, nicely received ,,;. He t.-k .i lovely low sh. '• hleh IKUNHKI lo Recce's .right a statement, following the session which wns private, Fane, l*i 'sideni, iced that the Union was now satisfied thnt boxing In Germany was controlled by one mine body, and by non_ icially Interested pcoP 1 *I jar.alf ume. P5t speaker wa s Mr. F L Wal. <> rcsumplio.u Lvcrton catt whS told the aud.encc that h JMreasora. '"> „ |U the Party pMgajj itaatf tor^rt. ^^^'"JZ'JS* SS, MODERN HIGH WINS AGAIN OWING Infall ISM nmht imiv the Brst i,n,m.i HI im Tick wickV M P I first Dl*1 i. tnall matBti was com%  H V .i 1' ground*, llCckUs Road The end of Uie nMt found thi \ l.f.C ilh tun goals to the rainfall, the pitch was soft and slippery. This was 33 Invited To Practice The Selection Committee of the BarbadoB Cricket Association held a meeting yesterday morning and decided to clrcui.n 11 H D prriMiration for the irsciaet tour.-, to Trinidad and British Guiana during July and September respectively. .st,. four bodies and I am certain they strength —Rcuter Invitees have been asked to report by May 16 as to whether On Monday afternoi n the Modthe> are available for eitner one em High Schi->l got their fourth n both of these tours if selected successive win when the> defeated a team of the BarbadoPresent at the meeting were Regiment by 17 goals to I* in a Mi J H Kr-.i-v. Mr J. D Second Division basketball match Goddard. Mr. T. N. Peiree, Mr. whtah was played at the Mortem S O'c CHtteni and Mr. W F. High School. Poehuck Street H' the Party pledged itself to regain ; •j h Kim th, at at the General %  lections irc goal (or eminent had. while Increasing gjvertqn was nuUifted by King wages, allowed the coat ol living vllll h.ilf-slopped the ball and fell to go up On the contrary he snirt. n ,. bafor throwing it over the the Govern men I spent a milheads ol the piasitng stearton to?llon dollars a year on subsidiza. wards. King waj in good position tlon so as to keep the coat of livun d that was all. It was a powering from rising to abnormal ful shot from White, then playing heigMs The pi ico thai obtained ii centre forward, who was only to-day were baaed on world a few yards away. market puceover which the G ernment had no control. He reminded the people of the work th;d tin I %  • hart v done in improving conditions of work and increasing wages. B next spoke of emigration After referring to :!>' Washington which he hnd During the last stages of the .Urn's goalie was ah low Carlton kept the drive They rnad from further scoring through the good defence put up by Evcrton's backs and the Fne |erfonnance of Recce in goal. The game ended 2—0. The tenms were: _. Reece, Hall, Weekes. SPORTS WINDOW N I" Ml for the lorthi aartaaani 4> ui al Cotni last year, Mr Walcott Ulked aboui i.a";iw(.d. Yearwii-Kl. Maynard, present emigration opportunities \u n n,. f afadas* R Haynas, s> ly. to the us A n< an Mums Opportunity foi 1.000 mei lo work Carlton King, Bright. Kennedy. for Li weeks for S1.72R.OOQ Marshall. Uairmontc. Cox, Some people were MiggeaUng Huwhlnson. HuWhlnson, Greenthat Government ghould M"ka Of >"'BcLiu-a*. McLeinl money they were goin u t t > spr'nd on that aaaccM employment by. say. owning the East Coast Road. Bui that road could not be o|>ened n J could not employ 4.000 people MHI over, if they refua AmeiuMii' now, they, the Amerlcans woulil think (hat they wet/ high hatted and hau.ir. ai when there w.>> another illy witn perta Renfi '• %  Mi s Olttan s Jack Milburn Pulls MIIM-IILONDON, alas I, jaak Miltsurn chaaap gs "iiu.' fniAard for England ggaUUl Argentina in the inlernaih nf.ee 4ii—7 Declared LONDON. May 1. Cloee of play scores in Monday a first class cricket matches at Lord's: M.CC flrit innings 411 for seven declared. Ycrkahlre first innings all cut 218 Second innings 3X for one (non-eoun'.y match) At Oxford Lancashire first inning* 4UB for three dechred Oxford University first innings al out for 144. Second innings 62 for five vton-counly match)— fCPi INTERCOLONIAL FOOTBALL JAMAICA vs BARBADOS JAMAICA TEAM ARRIVES May 18 for tour until May 30 inteh at Wembley Stadium la> !'. IK' unlit to play Ha pn ila d a Dnnwki m his rlsjhi leg on Saturday afteinqpri in th* •Blackpool matcli, A deflnlta da ever ceing swaltad. Ted Uiiehburg (Tottenham) has been chosen as an internationawa oonditlona, the Ame would tak awhere foi workers They should remembat thai JO*; of the the Island were onlj casuallj empiovMi. and il wi Utarafora noressaiy fo grasp every employrtunity, oven wbieo H was onl-. temporary, Mr. Walcott in conclusion urged -d ("' hngland s team. his listeners not to Indesp-mdenl >"" .'tlnady been n'commeudlicaue thev had lost the bye '-l 1 >.'' 'ub)eet to both t**m elertluu In St Andrew. He reagreeing, players be allowed as mind.-d then th • eg ubstltutaa up to the forty-rourth had lost a tbsetion in Bi George, hut had returned u the Otneral Baeetlons and put in a with enough force %  • put in three men. Mr M F to*, the next speaker. also referred to the high cost of living, and hk. Mi W denied thai It was lameuuhg which Goveinmrnt could control. 1!< BSid thai Government W sympathy with small \\ liafsOirroduy I'ulice Courts "i Court or Appeal—10.00 am. Annual Ordinary t.rnrral Meeting of the Shareholders of the Barbados Shipping and 'fading Company Ltd—ll mtun Meeting of 'he (ieneral Hoard ol health — Z :h> P m Mr. John Harrison given lee. lure al the Barbados Mu*rum on Looklua at Pletures"—5 OS p.m IINEM4* uUh— iin Th, i., a -ta* Hf-Ur>'~t.4t a B41 r %  I'Uia iHtiaitl*>~ Hlu. OlM -f H,i 'l.rfl.il, I i: .nil keepers'and was wortdng scheme to make IheJr lol ea But the Govarnmanl had sympathy whatsoever with the, big merchants' request for creased proAti and cei atlo nute In case of injury — Rfali,*. B'dos Friendly Football Association TO-lAV S FIXTl'RE. Itaruters vs Maple al St l..-.,n;.tn K.f.iei. Mr J. Archer. controls which as the experience mf the 1B14-1S war had shown. shop-.-Jwould result in a draitic increase oHi H I In the price of commodities. Mr <"ox told those present that he had always fought their battles from the time of his entry into i d he would continue to The Weather TO. DAY Sun Hhve ; 5.44 a.m. Sun seU : b IS p.m Moon : \, u i May 6 Llihtlug | High Water: I H am %  "' p m VE8TKRDAV K.mi.ll (c odrlngton) 01 In. Temperature (Max). Hfi.S *K Temperature iMIn.) : l .. *F Wind Hiir.i (3 p m > E E. Wind Veloc1t> 7 miles per huur Barometer tS a.m ) 29S53 asm) 19MS The/ll Do It Every Time ON WEEKDAYS FARVZR JDMES'S FRAU DOES EVERyiHlNG BJT PULL TWE PLOrV — Z^TUEN VtXj'O BETTER i WEED 7WE EAST 40-> V DID YOU CLEAM 'H>\>L ^—^.TWE MILK C*W5^ -— By Jimmy Hado BUT SO CONSIDERATE IS JONCSX SUNI2AY-"ME MUST BE RESTING HER UP FOR M0HMY •• PERHAPS LESLIE'S Hare SOMETHING THERE! i "i %  ,l la IK prolwl which In. k 'To il. . llniiiiili. n r nhnvvcil 'I"' ii i'lilnnii ~linll itli' vvUil.iin Df iii-iliillli'i' I %  ..II ISQ tuny iiHrtuwra in I 1.1. MrwIH liii.uii i.il lOBi •mum.. „f .1 II Lndir Co., i .1 %  : %  V -lii.i.' plan thai .., : .I,I -timil nut I?.ithownl Iui a I.Uiy.lV 11 T PdUf ;iM INMiilf.-n 10 Hiy iniliviiili.l IMWfb, ^Hi.ia n i..in|ili I.. inili'tiiinii Bgaiml ilniius. .liniiiiir •. fln an ll" -II nil i W l<. .•"-' l>i'l'. %  "I'm L'.-lliim n You iholllil • • %  .IIH.III il. IIN." J. B. LESLIE & Co. LTD. • INSURANCE COLLINS BUILOING HR .ii'.H O WN DIAL H'Oi. BAfrSADOS, D W 1. 1 '/.','//MW//.'//A'//' ( / Can See . TMAIX TD I MRS.E.M.WOLTER, ; l&C9Z3*ST y N.w'. CA Myw f, OHO If* MI easy lo see those extra fine points in %  well tailored suit that yon should alwaya contact the Top Scorers in Tailoring to be on the SMART side. P. C. S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd Prince Wm. Henry Street May 21 May 23 M. v 24 May 26 May 28 May 20 VS, COLTS XI %  a, CARLTON vs. COLONY vi. COLONY vi SPARTAN va. COLONY ADMISSION: Kanainftan and Qaorga Cballaoor Stand* ?/par match. UNCOVERED STANDS !/ %  par match GROUNDS nil. per match. Saaiun ticket* for adDiiaiion to Kenalngtou and Oeorga Chnllenor Stand12 00 each. O S COPPIN. Hony. Secty. II A F A (aatMfasMasflBi KSK^KKBK^KI^K^IT? Th 8 AMATEUR ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF BARBADOS BIO 1 111:11 II \\ rvri.E AND \ mi 1 1 K SPORTS MEETING (under the distinguished patronage of HI Excellrncy the ttovornnf fill Al/rr Lady Savage) al klNSINGTON OVAI. Hhit-Monda> Thursday . A Saturday beginning at I May 14th May 17th May IMh p.m. each day 4* 1){]; 11.11 ><. EVENTS See Ken Parnam. Lusauay M.shi Gardon. Cecil I'halpa. Harry Sluart. Mike Tucker, The Head brelh%  r.. George Hill, Harold Archer. (Nugget) Hunle, (hmln Hill, Brldgaaaan Company. The Lewie Twin Brolheitt, and a string of other male WJ. Cydisto aad Alkletea aa well aa Miaa Grace Curaberbatck aad MUw Eileen Klag la acuea at the Hlatorlc Oval Gaits Open al 12 noon dally • TRICES OF ADMISSION: SEASON TICKETS K>nlngtan Stand . It 16 George Challenar . ILH • DAILY TICKETS KM .in*tin stand . 11.00 Gecrge Challenar . 12c I'ncovered Seat*. m,. Grounds 3 4c. Season Tickcti. on Sale Ja.iy nt the Civic Swan A Migli Stl.-.T an Iniilad for Sale of Bar ami Refresh i.icnt Rights to Saturday May 5lh at 4.4 iki. n>u*uuitur>i oi' uovd~Te. ttrti4We havr them In all t.lie* far Ladles. GenU aud LilUe Children. The Ideal ahoe tot wear In any kind of MI.JI t. or (or ordinar> wear when you are rrlaxlug. Worn by Champions iit every same CAVE SHEPHERD &. Co, Ltd. 10-53 Broad St. $1.91 $2.13 $2.40 $6.22 in White, Grey, Beige and Eggshell 42 inches wide at $4.13 per yard SCHOOL WEAR Ulrls %  ;11.1111. 1 HaU dV Shoes Hoys Cap* and Shoes into inn A v muss SHOP Where Sallslied Cutlomer. Galhot PSMBM r_Mi7 1..1 PeTroerefe rapid-bardeHiiK> Ci-nn-ni in :175 Ih. Drums Snowrri-UWhile Cement in :175 lb. I ii mm Colorerete Cement YELLOW in .175 lb. Drums BSD in' 375 lb. Drum* Everite AsbttlHS-Oarill I orni]*alrd Sheets Ii fl.. 7 fl„ 8 II.. 9 ll. 10 f|. l.i-naih, y verite Trafford Tiles 6 ll. and S (I. Lengths. ON & HAYNES CO, LTD. SPECIALISTS MX HIGH CLASS TAILORING OF ALL Ki.Xit.S C. B. RICE & Co. OF It 101. T00X LAJVE



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r M.I i in II BARBADOS ADVOC'.ATl: WEDNESDAY. MAY t. 1951 B\RR\00S AmtMTE r. 1 *•----—*1 rMavted b Hi* AdocM Co.. Ltd.. Bros* ••_ Bna**u> WwbMtiay, May 2. 19.% Christophers Citatlel By T E SCALY TH* WIIIT UUa-.r ihe start of the 19th century. fathers about us like a shroud. Housing Anlliorily id April 1942 Ihe then Governor appointed a Committee under the Chairmanship of the Colonial Secretary Mr. R. C Stanley, to enquire into the condition of housing i" this island and to make recommendations. Thai O >' '"' I'limeil I most valuable report wln.li WM well received in this ialand and which was reputed to have had the backing ol the Colonial Office at the nme Dunne, the nine years which have elapsed nothing wai done to Implement the terms of the Report and today Bar had.is ia Itill without %  Housing Programme sausf.icloi v to any, Houaing Authority has been appointed and as a result a Board selected by the Governor continues to act as an agenl of the Government without the necessary powers lo carry out a programme :ii with the needa of the island. There are conditions existing in some districts which make them unsuitable for tenantry purposes; there are houses in certain districts which in the general interest of public health and piety should be demolished and In certain areas, especially business sections, there are buildings which should he set back or rc-ited in order thai the public might get the best advantage from the use of the space. None of these things can be done by the Housing Board with its limited authority. The attitude of the Government towards the present department for administering the Housing Loans under the Welfare fund eeema to indicate an indifference which is harmful. That department was set up with an initial fund of MOO.000 and is now operating capital in the vicinity of $750,000. It was lirst housed in the science room of Harrison College at the entrance of Queen's Park. Within the last two weeks lenders called for office space for that Department. It will now be housed in a less known district. The people from the country districts who will make use of that fund will now lind it in Waldron Street, near Magazine Lane. This Department has during its short period of existence, linanced the repair or reconstruct ion ol about 1,200 houses over the Ialand which in effect means that about six thousand people have benefited from the work of this department. But the importance of this department cannot be gauged merely from the numbers served by the loans. The lack of a proper HOUSHIK Authority such as was recommended in the Report of the Stanley Committee can no longer be overlooked. It was recently admitted in the House of Assembly that the present Housing Board can only act as an agent of the Government and could not carry out those functions which would fall within the scope of the Housing Authority. Housing in Barbados is an essential and everything in connection with it should be the Bret concern of the Government. It is not in the interest of the Housing Deparln.eiil that it should be moved at irregular intervals from place to place A permanent place for this department and the creation of a Homing Authority should be among the first steps in a proper housing pro gramme. Meal A Paragraph appearing in this newspaper yesterday stated that the price of beel which is scheduled at 36 cents was now 42 cents in the public market and that the butchers had adopted a take il or leave it attitude. This question of the price and supply of fresh meat has been the cause of some public concern during the last two weeks. Negotiations between the butchers and the Controller of Supplies failed because of the obstinacy of the butchers who refused to attend the meeting lo settle the prices. Now the public must be content with the price fixed arbitrarily by the butchers and pav or do without fresh meat. This is not good for law and order and the Government ought to intervene and enforce the schedule or amend it. The piluirmag.. lo the Cluck'. Luili by Kin* Chn t..piie In the turbulent early minis if laqu .( ill who vi.lt Halll and %  "' ,n Population, but There ,.• rttotW .,. Euros* r.ot to be thouaht .i.-M-pectful o' *''"' ""P"* 1 !_. reter than ChrlslopKr-s The .,„! ..umeiit. The A"" the farmer son had cut .irhiteclure folio*. Hie erujtneerIflurltf mav et cmi liuht-heartedh l wn or u< ""he water cocoo'its, mg experience of medieval wwI the TXDCT*SCC • % %  ,l,mb WM %  """"I toward, lord, .-ho -l lo kutld aaalnst .ivXTcwinUlc Cer, ''" * lrt "' 'nemi. But U,e C.Udel 11 i WM m in mv cue so far we had not even caught • a unique experience Ic.us* tht glimpse. man who built it wits born • 1 chose to make the journey lo %  . slave an.! wa. one of the men Cap Haitleo. chief towi ,"' ,'.'1'"** """, *2! •* M : * "j Cadel. by road from Port.an '%""} "" * *— "** %  """* paeeU S U > !rom .11 part, of Prince, a *hour >ou,.,e, II a< ?**?>> _iE*gL.g %  *. .* Afr.c..-,,, aumtsful rebellion ting to how the popu. 'J^i^TZ £ ZSS'ZJZrl ?"" " •" • %  Napo.e Jut ion .ilmo'phirc changed wit the agricultural feature* of Atomic Heal Experiment j Successful Bl The n.utetrack idened in'-O endlessly upwards and cltsnbed Ranis or work*. i i vet look u on their way to or irmua finm the Citadel upon which """•"' icstoration work U now being Yellow fever, n doubt. H !" ?^1^.^L.,,"' i %  "" %  *• ""< t.me m over 100 their treated aid. but nnthmt Marc, the road paste. through „r.d ^ mt( r „ Ie< to w „ ca „ a|(C aw v ,„,. Klor> lind ,„, "n ,?' JS HJ<£M tkin|i going on for road workspirit c those revolution... M.ment culture. nd ".i,,* erv and hernngs put to boil for which made Christopho the fir, and prickly bushes laden^ 1th dust h iMo wh|ch |a|er on wou|d Nefro Un|[ rf th( Amcr c „ n *tdded yams and plantain, for M him ,n svmbolum to butl. the endle& n •fieri the hardship of Iheir exirtence. Hut after the Aitib< Dill plain haj bttn p—rd where rice Heidi Lcrf.n to ihow a chanite in Iht ccuntrysiric bMllUful mountain ceuntry SfMM up with the Pudboreau climb into country very n.ucn ilk.UM tniis f Junalea or Grenada where the disappearance S•. endless to the north and the great stand on the walls sever, am plain la w.hlch nestled these eight feet thick at the top. onlj mountains seeming to get vaster those of the strong nerve and vaster risk to look boldly outwards a' the scene. 1 for my part preler The sound of weird singing inred to lie flat on mj *to.nach an end where vegetable crops form creased as we climbed and'then peer ehiierly over inbrink the main cultivation. c [„irt upon them, a party of the great vast plain below. %  droi r*... %  -— ,,J_ _. ,u_ .,-. some 20 men and 30 women doing of certainly well over 1,000 feet alongside the rood which paral. morp |n-n a d £ !" ZL^ tor • remote streams which give verdure to tho lhf oum for p | an in „ p^ th<> the singing oMhe coumb.te sttl scene .Mifi glimpses of Haltlnn nwn building a house at *fted up. a choir ami n washer women busy at *VU least, putting up the wooden panimeiit eat* many miles apar !H member*, ramming them into the nd ****£ ,hem mi,w i,wa inc from me. The sounds came to m ily on thr monstrous for s-nbolislng the whole yesterda the (By DAMUELL elves ARTIES HEADLINE of Haiti, its terrors and Its triumphf. its passions and the warn. lunianity of fts toiling and neg lected masses. And then my reverie was broken as the guide told the stor\ of the prisoner 1 who. weary of hidungeon, had begged Chrlstopht that he be allowt-l to hunp frn:r the parapet to the valley balo* and thus end his own sorrows And Jump he djd^by-Chrlslophc' decree. Soldiers fountl him dead, but alive. His laten miraculously broken by clump of tr*#, his life spared In I inaimer aVO miraculous that tvw hardened C'hrfctophe relente V^Talo^pfo'tsX.".^ "'" "* """ -* ~ "^'^I^^TmarXl pcant.' house, .tuck perllouiily T he coumbile I. a ,ommo„ fenXVlhc oaSpet Chrlrtoph, % %  on the dge, of the mountain..lde. urc ln „,„„„ rurn li(Ci ,,„„ KHo",.^ rfSnentarily distract.-,! T.|,M lu m^m ..-ild ..-.r.UM, the small farmer's economy canThere loo, were wild garden R Food h> " • % %  '' %  '" %  ; "" %  '" ,;,,-.,,,uanut| and cCiii at lake told, are used as J tobacco sub_ tw „Val grade, of white run .lilute — our.op Uee>. bananas made ,„ s|n>1| pca „ n ,., „„ ,, U |. and plantaiiis. everything a. 11 „ n nvl r lho Republic-were th.s „ ruthlexslv duclpllned were would have been in Jamaica, (.ranw and lh( cn) „, m enl o( the Ui,. v that on Ihey went and in. %  "' %  %  "' la"'''** on .. re „,.„ .„„, „„ .,. ,,,., ,„„,,! „„,„„,. a „ k .. „„ ir ,,..,,, ,., ,i c .,.|, wa concerned together. „„,., |he edge Orit,l (-hristnphi's The sun beat mercilessly down T^.ound of their singing attention regnmed. the onter WM upon us and we were forced to rhe ? r % ^"''on andthen gtw fiven to .Jill; none would cease rail a half way halt for the animals fninlPr ,,,„, Winter as we left ,hp onwa.d march, —mine lathered with sweat by ln ,, m behind and below. When %  onversatiou with Ihe Admiral, and the men found themselves marching lo the end of the pat.ipel. The ehiof pride of the Haitll GARWOOIX WASHINGTON. A secret U.S. experiment successfully containing muili-million degree temperatures in a vacuum chamber was reported to confirm Argentina's announcement that sun-like heat can be created on earth. One government scientist said the temperature was achieved in an extremely small quantity of material, and that whether the energy process of the stars can be started 1 is still a big question mark. The scientist said that the principle of the, experiment was a "small sun" suspended by magnetic attraction in the midst of a vacuum .vhile atomic-speeding machines fired large numbers of high speed particles into it to raise its temperature. He pointed out that all metals melt under a few thousand degrees and that millions of degrees would have been impossible except that a vacuum does not conduct heat. In another interview Dr. Hans A. Bethe. Cornell University's widely known atomic authority, said that there is a secret way to get multi-million degree temperatures that conceivably could start a sun-like reaction. An example of a process that may be employed is provided by the stars called Red Giants, which operate it at temperatures of 2.000,000 degrees Fahrenheit compared to :i8,000,000 degnees for the sun. and which get their energy from lithium and hydrogen. When lithium and hydrogen atoms can be made to combine, the combination divides into two helium atoms with a release cf energy that is greater by weight than that obtained by splitting uranium. The lithium-hydrogen reaction has been obtained many times through the use of "?.tom smashers." These, however, use magnetic attraction to speed up particles and offer 00 hope of a chain reaction. In the stars, the alom get the necessary hali | speed from heat only. Since more heat is produced when the reaction occurs, the possibility of a continuing chain reaction exists. Asked whether a continuing reaction might be established. Dr. Bethe expressed doubt, but said "That is the $64 question. Until we have made more experiments, we can't know." Dr. Bethe could not elaborate on the secret method for getting multi-million degree tem-[ peraturcs, so the question is unanswered asf to the volume of material in which these might be obtained. In one sense, a cosmic ray or a cyclotronspeeded particle can already be said to have a temperature in millions of degrees, but it is certain that a chain reaction would not occur unless the lieu' was in a "critical mass of material." If the temperature were obtained in any quantity of material, it would probably have AUTOGRAPH SCRAPS & SNAP ALBUMS at Advocate Stationery BALANSA SCOOP This handy and useful device provides the housewife with a new and simple method of preparing recipes with utmost speed and accuracy. The "Balansa" can be used for careful weighing and measuring or as a guide for those who prefer to guess. WILKINSON & UAYNF.S CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phones : 4472 & 4687 Enjoy it with pleasure Again ! PETER DAWSON'S SPECIAL WHISKY THE OLD FAVOURITE had journeyed on ihe trail in lno tlIil(U .| „ the genius by \ to be contained in a vacuum chamber that We rested under a jrreal and outbuildings. toll In weariness we suddenly (alll fortress U Is said that melt at a few thousand degrees. ^J-^^^BU^^^^^T^^^S Dr Urner Lidde "' %  he Navy,i family, a toTner, his wife and four ^ ni| he c.tadel itself. If" V o mount ^ !" culor .'> children. The sitting room war steep W. <>i moui. ruatk hut obviously they enter]t s great frontal moss seemed would order som. Limed somewhat because^ there like some (treat petrified ship left nd then the ies, were It small chairs in the sitting high on the mountain peak and 'he Job room, many of them covered with lu battUmwU J' 1 '^'^ U $?* A tale Is told .against the Amiln. Christoptv .f them shot A HI Id finish limhily coloured home made menacingly in. UM -whom the Haitians de,, ( stiiom. ;. rrtliiMiiet.1 In •OOwMl BlU %  %  •< I %  < %  Impj JW 10 tha rOUfhm lumber stored ?£*"£ i^tH^rJJt-SSiupitloV. they wished lo'takc uii the (MO l'."ns .rverhead. the erd ol It ni t-n %  • ut.n , ,., HI i tie .nasstvone* On a tree outside twelve feet ()f „„, >Uil Bj ; lltllk ,„, nliove the around wi:re gre.il , Hctnil bundle. ..f coin hung up far dry '" light trridicule-that d ig th* my koine ol the OUUkOO from c forlress %  %  souvenirs, but could not get them down the I'udy there The ubiquitous peasant's pig The am %  id o.nen or two lefl abandoned on the grunted around the yard with which th.in r> .f iho -la^ inoun'..ii: ...:..n t numerous chickens. Il was apparhas lefl alike upon Uw itniCtUM the Americans wh, engmeerinn cntlv %  progressive family and and upon all thOM who have, skid, Ihey say. could noi bring thev proudly told me thai they read about the horribta stresses down what Christophe had laken were not Roman Catholics like W of rcvoluliu%  .; Uf lo BaltJ at up. l>lurilc k i*iiK Weather* girl drank love affair VIENNA People already ftiffcring from Blame It on By ERIC WAHA diseases of the nerves show .. pronounced deterioration. "In my hospital, for instance. I do not have to know the wcntriT forecast to know than is a "fohn." 1 see it from the con Both were considered the dition of my patients.' 1 "cool" type. Both died. In uiniv ease*, the effect is so strong that capit.il LlllUSM tn Fifth victim was u 35-ycar-oH committed and suicides are at... locksmith who started to explain tsanpstd. U„. in .i letter wh> he OpStsld the g&> jets. Apparently fumbling Feel like murder the weather. In parts of Austria, Germany A teenage and Italy the "fohn" season is 1-ecuuse of coming, am 1 tram past •XpOISSOH NCOtld girl took an overdose of the homicide rate will rise with sleeping pills for lithe temperature The "fohn" is a gentle southern wind that blows in from Italy, climbs the Alps and ranges the valleys. It brings springlike warmth and wreaks hav sysl Dr, Reisner said there .s n d.K-lor nt UN Itosenhueger Austrian JusUce Ministry oiTtWhen a foremnner of the wind uaylum in Vienna said the "fohn" clsila said that while there is i struck Vienna in March rive perattacks ihe vascular system which leneral ordinance to provide fi sort! attempted to commit lufcld* m i urn arlect* the nervous sysmilder sentences for a crime com. the first day. (em. nutted under the influence of th A 46-year old taxi driver lefl "fohn". judges in the areas where a note saying: "I'm tired of livThe 38-year old nerve special ihe effect of the wind Is felt most mg". He strung himself up on %  1st said while ihe "fohn" does usually consider it an "extenutrsw m front of his home. Pasnot itself cause nervous disorders attfll cinum-:sncc." sersby cut him down before h

nan

Pav bados

DEFENCE : Service chiefs appointed to

look after protection of Britain







ESTABLISHED 1895













No major action on front line:

“Eden takes Attlee government
‘Reds hold back big offensive

OIL: COMMONS: to task on raw materials issue WAR:

THREE TO DIRECT DEFENCE OF U.K.

Committee Formed:| —_
Dempsey In Charge

LONDON, May 1.
RRITAIN has created a Commander in Chiefs
_ Committee for Home Defence in time of war
it was Officially announced to-day.

General Sir Miles Dempsey, Commander of
the British Second Army during the Normandy
Beachhead in 1944, will be the Chairman.

He will also be Commander-in-Chief of Bri-
tish land forces.

Persia wants rebate on
oil sold to British navy







ROYAL FAMILY TOUR THE RLF. 2

_ (Chinese Reds Delay
| Expected Attack
AU Quiet On Korean Kront

TOKY ’ =
ASSED CHINESE roRMATees WT i:

ing Seoul kept well out of artillery range to-day
and made no attempt to start any direct onslaught
on the battered city. Twice in the last three days
Communist columns venturing to within a few







THE SHAH of Persia is seen here

an autograph. He is due to
sign the Oi' Bill soon which will
legalise the nationalisation of the
oil industry.





meme



Admiral Power, present Com.
mander-in-Chief at Portsmouth,
will have charge of all
matters connected
defence of British home waters.

Air member will be Air Marshal
Sir Basil Embry, Commander-in-
Chief of Fighter Command.

Authoritative sources said today
the Committee had been estab-
lished to build up a command
organisation for the defence of
Britain in time of war,

One source said the move cer-
tainly did not mean Britain was
becoming insular minded, It was
a normal defence precaution.

e of General Bempsey’s first
tasks will be ‘to blish liaison
between his Committee and Min.
istries with which he would have
to co-operate in time of war such
as the Ministry of Food and Civil
Defence Services.

The Committee, which will have
full responsibility for defence of
Britain in the event of war will be
responsible to the Chiefs of Staff.

—Reuter,



; [
Petain.Gets Bouquet |

ILE DE YELI, May 1.
Madame Petain took a bouquet}
of carnations to-day to her 95-!
year-old husband in. his fortress |
cell to celebrate his name day,|
May 1 Festival, St, Phillipe.
Madame Petain said he eel
“wonderfully well” after his re-
cent attack of pneumonia. *
“T have high hopes that he will
not end his days here.” she said.
—Reuter.

at naval 1} S, Saved Life

Of Western
Europe— Eden

LONDON, May 1.

The United States has aq real
desire to see that scarce raw
materials are fully distributed
among North Atlantic countries,
Supply Minister George Strauss,
told Commons to-day.

He was meeting a Conservative
challenge aimed at embarrassing
the Government over the resig-
nation of three Minigters last
week,

A motion being pushed to fhe
vote later to-night expressed
anxiety that the Arms Programme
was based on the production es—
timates not accepted by the Minis-
ters principally concerned,

Before Strauss spoke, Anthony
Eden, chief Conservative speaker
in the debate, said Aneurin Bevan
and other resigning Ministers had
made grave charges which the

Sl

Uae -

THE KING AND QUEE

the Commonwealth section and bought many W.I, exhibits.



Appeal For
Men To End
Doek Strike

WELLINGTON, May 1,

The New Zealand Government
on Tuesday called on all able-
bodied men to join the Civil Force
to combat industrial strikers who
are trying to overthrow orderly
Government by force.

Prime Minister Sidney Holland

Government must either accept or} made his appeal as a dock work-

refute. |

Labour Protests

Eden deplored the “harsh werc's”
about the United States by some
resigning Ministers.

Amid protests from some Labour
members, he said “it was the
United States alone which saved
the life of Western Europe”’.

Strauss replieqd there was no
reason to be unduly pessimistic.

He said “it. is too early to say

whether we williget the raw ma-
terials we need for our Defence
Programme and our essential civil
production, but we are not justi-
fied here and now in saying that
we will not.

Aneurin psevan in a speech of
only two minutes accused Con-
‘servafives of the “old fashioned
| Party jousting” in framing their
| seers which expressed anxiety
that the Arms Programme was
based on production estimates not
accepted by the Ministers prin-
cipally concerned,

Bevan said that he hoped the
Government would be able to get
,raw materials from the United
| States more apecdily than at one
j time seemed likely: also that it
would not be “entirely scornful”
of any help his resignation might
have afforded.

Bevan said he and Wilson would
prefer to be proved wrong than
right—-Reuter.

GIVE UP A MEAL A WEEK
NEHRU TELLS INDIANS

NEW DELHI, May 1.
Indian Prime Minister Nehru, to-night called on all
Indians to give up one meal a week to help save the coun-
try from the “hovering spectre of famine”, '
Nehru proposed that food grains saved should be sent

as gifts to worst affected areas in Bihar and Madras.
=e — ~ The Prime Minister thanked

** Psst! Wanna buy some
sulphur?”





special Foreign
seid Marshal Stalin once admitted

unable to gain the loyalty of the
Russian people.

during a talk he had with Stalin

States Ambassador,

ers strike
10th week.

Beatings and dynamiting of a
coal district bridge have added to
the tensicn,

Holland said the country’s in-
dustrial crisis has taken a dram-
atic and grave turn. He urged
loyal citizens to register for an
emergency civil organization and
said a similar call might be issued
to women.—(CP)

Fear Rules
Russia

Says Harriman

LOS ANGELES, May 1
President Truman's personal
foreign policy spokesman said last
night that Russia was ruled by

dragged through its



fear —“The Kremlin fears tha
people and the people fear the
Kremlin.”

W. A. Harriman, Truman’s

Affairs assistant,

to him that the Kremlin had been

He said the admission came

while serving in Moscow as United

Harriman quoted the Russian
leader’ as saying during the last
war that people were “fighting for
their motherland, not for us.”

He addec: “By us’, he meant
the Kremlin. Unhappy people of}
satellite countries crave only to be|
free from its iron hand.” |

Harriman was speaking before
the American Association for the |
United Nations.—Reuter.

50 Hurt In May
Day Disorders

PARIS, May 1.

ne Oe






United Nations guns.

Today Allied patrois had to gc
out and find the Chinese, But
though they struck far out from
the threatened capital, they found
only a still and desolate No-Man’s-
Land and made only light and iso-
ated contact with the enemy.

The same tense quiet descended
on the entire length of the Korean
front. Even in the castern sector
where South Korean troops have
tenaciously hung on to the last
Allied grip of North Korean
ground, there was ne significant
activity.

From the early hours of the day
Allied troops in the defence are
around the South Korean capital
had waited on the alert for the
expected attack. Chinese tactics
of the last few days had given rise
to the theory that the Communists’
all-out attack on the city would
start in the first hours of May Day

No Mass Assault

But all through the night the
Allies listened in vain for the now
familiar sounds of a Chinese mass
assault—-bugle calls, high pitched
whistles and crashing gongs. All
they heard was the occasional
drone of Allied planes heading
north for night attacks on Com-
munist supply lines.

Today an Air Force spokesman
said Allied pilots had spotted at
least 4,300 lorries on North Korean
roads during yesterday and last
night. Phey had destroyed more
than 600, a new record for a single
day's operation,

- Planes were back in the alr to-
day again concentrating their
sweeps on the Communist trans-
port system. By the end of the
morning, they claimed to have
knocked out nearly 100 cars on



oe teeta es TA Ie ree app patency

Queen aa About
Barbadvs Rum

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 1,

The Queen to-day asked many questions about Barbados
rum. She also admired a conch shell table lamp, at the
Barbados.stand, when Their Majesties this morning’ visited.
the Commonwealth section of the British Industries Fair.
Buyers placed two large ordgis ior Barbados rum.

The King’s knowledge of the asphalt industry intrigued
officials at the Trinidad stand during Their Majesties’ tour.
Recalling that he had once

: | Walked in ‘Trinidad’s asphalt lake,
Y ou Du k His ty chatted eagerly about
Cc the halt industry with’ the

d L ‘Chai of Trinidad’s lake of

halt, ‘He commented favour.
Peonstit company
At The Movies




















\y de |





of

resulting in total British contro}
now,

Both the King and the Queen

showed keenest enthusiasm over

LONDON, May 1}.

The Festival of Britain’s stereo-
scopic cinema sets a new fashion
in movies,

Both sound and vision are three
dimensional hard formidable
ebjects such as cricket balls; and
lumps of rock seem to fly out of
the screen making the audience
duck involuntarily and then laugh.
Characters seem to walk right out
of the screen into stalls.

Sounds like sights have remark-
able depth. They come at the
audience from concealed loud
speakers completely encireling the
walls cf the theatre so that each
instrument in the orches‘re be-
comes separate and distinct.

Louis Applebaum from Sea
came to Britain specially to wrife
music for some stereoscopic films.
Production was by Jack Ralph,
also of Toronto,

The system gives the musician
rhanee to develop a new method
of composition,

—Reuter.



Controls On Japan
Will Be Relaxed

TOKYO, May 1

The United States Supreme
Commander in Japan Lieutenant
General Matthew B. Ridgway

told Japanese today he would
consider to relax occupation con-
trols so as to “smoothly bridge”
the transition to independence with}
the peace treaty.

the general attractiveness of the
West Indies stands.

Her Majesty made purchases at
different West Indies stands.
including two handbags by the
Grenada Manufacturing Company
at the Trinidad stand and two
handbags of sisal material at
Jamaica's stand. At the latter
stand, Her Majesty remarked
appreciatively on “all this lovely
work done in Jamaica.”

Never Saw Nutmeg Before

While at the Trinidad stand, Her
Majesty made inquiries about the
mutmeg plant from Grenada and
said she had never seen it before.
Sea island cotton took the eye of
the King, who wanted to know
from which particular part of the
West Indies it came. Connell
Dambert of the West Indies Com-
mittee gaid that the material His
Majesty was inspecting came from
St. Vineent,

A huge block of bauxite at the
British Guiana stand, brought
forth more questions from the
Royal visitors, Again it was Her
Majesty who was anxious to know
how thihgs were manufactured.

She stood for some minutes
while officials at the stand ex-
plained alumip!um processes

Queen Mary Buys

Queen Mary, who visited the
B.LF, today bought 12 handker
thiefs made of sea island cotton
at the | West Indies stall, Twe
uy ers from Germany and
Helgium placed large orders for
sea island cotton,

Mr. E. Piggott, industrial agen:







Afomic Energy Wilk | eat eesti ba et
Operate Electricity

BUENOS AIRES, May 1
Argentina’s entire electric net-

food grains, particularly America
and China. He also thanked Russia,
which he said he hoped would
soon be sending wheat to Ind:a.
“While we welcome all the help
that we can get from foreign coun-

Ag the Communist parade in The General's message for the of Dusseldorf, enquired about the
Paris was ending, fighting broke | fourth anniversary of Japan's possibilities of obtaining raw
out between North African de- P9Stwar constitution on May 3,)yarn of tea’ island cotton. Large
monstrators and the Police. said the Japanese Government otders wbre also placed by buyers

Fifty Police were reported hurt had been authorised to review °r=| for pwrpleheart wood at the Brit-
though none seriously. ders from occupation “for the, ich Guiaha stall

A group of about 1,000 North|Ppurpose of evolving through es- 1



tries”, he said, “we have made it
clear that such help must not have
any political strings attached to it
or any conditions which are unbe-
coming for a self-respecting na-
tion to accept, or any pressure to
change our domestic or interna-
tional policy.—Reutee’.

Guerilla Leader

Fleés To Formosa

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 1
Ylobay: Khan, guerilla leader
fiom Chinese Turkistan on the
borders of Central Russia, arrived
¢ Formosa ody and reported to
. eneralissimo Chiahg i-Shek.
May Day Strike Yilobars Khan, former Governor
t of Sinkiang province, fled over
C MADRID, May 1. (the Himalayas to Pakistan, to
Workers in some textile’ *-7-! escape fram Chinese Communists.
tories and home heav¥ industry] His wife died from exposure dur-
ylawts ae Beas went on| ing the journey,—Reuter.
strike ay. ut other workers ai b
in the city disregarded the re| Oil Well On Fire
ported call for a general May
TEHERAN, May 1.
An cil well at Naft Sufit fields,

Day strike. i

é There were str 1s|96 miles north of Abadan, acci-
against the cost of living in| dentally caught fire last night and
Barcelona last month, On Sun-| was to-day reported burning
men} fiercely.

day police arrested two

déscribed as agitators, after leaf-| Such fires often burn for a long

lets had _ been distributed in time because of the technical difi-

Malaga. Southern Spain calling| culties in extinguishing them,

for 4 geperal strike today Naft Sufit is one of a series of
have called} An oilfields stretching

on May 22

In Madrid leaflet:
for a general strike ‘ rth ithe huge Abadan refin-
-~Reuter ery.—Reuter

work may be operated by atomic
energy within two years, Peron
said to-day. He was delivering
an annual “state of the Nation”
message to the inaugural session
of Congress,

The President said: “If experi-
mental plans go as they have been
going until now, within two years
the whole network of electric
power in the Argentine will be
operated by controlled atomic
energy.” Then ihe syorld will
know,” he added, “how it has been
wasting its time preparing for a
war while Argentina has been
working for peace.”—Reuter.





demonstrations



iranian



from

tg —naD Snetinnaliaes

Africans mostly members of the|tablished procedures such moditi-| peyits abe handbags

“Movement for the Triumph of!¢ations as past experience, and

Democratic Liberties’ (a semi-
Communist organization) were
carrying hanned banners with

Nationalist slogans.

When the Police asked them to
hand over the banners, some
demonstrators hurled paving
stones and used clubs.

Others uprooted spiked railings
surrounding trees and threw them
like spears.

Arrests were made after about
800 extra Police arrived.

—Reuter,

SEARCH SPREADS
SAIGON, May 1.

The air and sea search for the
missing reconnaissance plane with
General Andre Hartemann French
Air Foree Commander in _ Indo-
China spread in the island to-day.
~—Reuter.



‘Britain Will Not Be F orced Into Settlement

LONDON, May 1,
Secretary Herbert
warned Persia to-day

Foreign
Morrison

that Britain would not negotiate |

settlement of the oil dispute un-
der duregs.

He told the House of Com-
mons that Britain could not ac-

cept the contentions of the
Persian Government that the
proposal to nationalise the gil-

eld atte le be-



the present situation render neces-
sary and desirable,”

Ridgway said the results of
four years application of the new
constitution “are reflected in the
internal situation of Japan today

which is one of purposeful and
peaceful reconstruction, with
much accomplished and oppor-

tunity for greater achievement in
the future.”

“As a result of this situation,
there has been a widening ac-
eceptance of the proposition that

Japan is ready for a formal peace
settlement, and positive steps
towards that end being taken by
the United States Government in

| rediecenans with other interested

Governments, offer a promise of

| Sonanaive results” General Ridg-

way said
—Reuter.

tween them and
Iranian oil company.
‘The British Goveroment had a
right to intervene, he said
Morrison added: “We have no |
wish that this question should |
become an issue between our-

the Anglo-



|

selves and our Persian friends
We are naturally anxious to si
down with them and work ovt
a solutior a reasonable at-

phere«

They were orders for Jamaican
made of
straw, ark sisal hemp. Jamaican
cigars alsp attracted buyers’ atten
tion,

One bpyer put forward the
ndvel suggestion that since pipe
smokers used Jamaican cigars.
manufacterers should manufacture
cigars, of quarter length for use
in pipes. | This, added the buyer,
woul save pipe-smokers whvu
enjoy Jamaican cigars from the
embarra: nt of cutting cigars
into small parts in public before
filling a pipe

Orders for grapefruit juice and
baskets on show at the Trinidad
Stall were placed by buyers. All
the West Indies stails were kept
busy to-day. Large crowds gath-
ered at the Jamaica stall when
Miss Tessd Prendergast, Jamaican
nodel, entered the stall clad in a
eolourful beach suit.

Morrison said it would be a
mattey of the greatest. difficulty
for Persians to operate installa-
tions They would also lose
world-wide marketing and dis-
tribution facilities.

These conditions might result
in unemployment and benefit
Communists.

Recent disturbances in the
Abadar he declared, wet

undoubtedly Commi

area,

Communist railways

The Chinese brought up heavy
anti-aircraft guns to try to pro-
tect their build-up.

Jet Battle

While Allied troops made the
best of the lull to improve de-
fence positions far to the north,
United Nations jet pilots fought
the first big air jet battle since
the start of the Communist spring
offensive eight days ago.

American Sabre jets damaged
four Communist jets and possibly
five, south of the Yalu River
border between Korea and Man-
churia.

All American pilots returned to
the base safely

Incomplete reports from Bighth
Army headquarters said that 2,976
casualties were inflicted on Com-
munists yesterday, many of them
by artillery.—Reuter.



French Kill 1,200
Rebel Troops

SAIGON, May 1

French forces have killed 1,206
cebels and taken 5,000 prisoners
in a 12-day combined land, ait
and river operation in the ‘Tong-
king delta ividgehead, it was
announced here today.

It was the biggest battle
against Vietminh Pro-Communis
guerillas to date, the communique
gaid. Forces had swept through
400 villages including 42 fortified
rebel strongholds,

The French also said they had
captured 2,800 weapons and
ammunition. —Reuter,



Marshall Aid Funids
Talks Successful

WASHINGTON, May 1}.
Economic Co-operation Admin-
istration (ECA) to-day announced
that its talks with the Belgium
mission on the freezing of Greel
Marshall Aid Funds in Belgium
had succeeded,

Marshall Aid to Belgium was
suspended on April 9 following a
Belgian court order last November
freezing over $7,000,000 worth of
Greek Marshall Aid Funds, Funds
were seized to recover for Belgian
creditors’ money owed by the
Gre Government since 1927.
E.C.A. contended that Marshall
funds could not be used to pay e@
private debt It set April 30 as
the deadline for the release of the
ftunds..—Reuter

ed.
“We do not dispute the right



of a Government to acquire
property in its ow! country
“But we cannot accept that the
company’s whole position in Per-
sia should be-radically altered
by unilateral action when agree-
ment the company freely
entered i by the Gov ment
itself provides é j

t Renter










miles of the city have been pounded to pieces by

Persia To Set
Up National
Oil Co. Board

LONDON, May |.

Persia is to set up a National
X11 Company with a Managin;
3oard and a Supervisory Board of
pecialists to take over the nation’s
vil resources, including the British
controlkd) Anglo-Tranian Oil Com.
rany

This was disclosed in an wnoffi-
cial text of a resolution approvec
hy the Parliamentary Oil Com
mittee on April 26, received in
London to-day

The Committee's resolution pro-
iding for the immediate taking
ver of the Persian oil industry
was approved by Majlis (the Low-
w House) last Saturday and un-
inimously ratified by the Senate

st night. Whether any amend-
ments were made to the original
resolution has not been made clear
in the reports on Parliament's
action.

Persia's new Premier Dr, Mo-
hammed Moshaqi, was Chairman
of the Oil Committee which pre-
sented the Resolution.

The Resolution said that buyers
ot Anglo-[ranian products on an
innual basis from the beginning
af 1948 to the last of March 20
‘ean continue to buy the same
amount annually”,

Whatever is left over, all condi-
tions being the same, they have
priority of purchase,” Article
seven of the Resolution added.

The Resolution said: “the Gov-
ernment is bound under the super-
vision of a Mixed Committee to ar-
range to send qualified students
abroad each year to acquire
“knowledge and experience” in
the oil industry. Their expenses
would be met out of the Persian
il revenue,—Reuter



RADIO FREE EUROPE

MUNICH, May |}.

A new powerful radio trans-
mitter “Radio Free Europe" to-day
joined other western radio stations
beaming ‘Western’’ news and
viey’s to peoples behind the “iron
urtain”. Radio Free Europe is
entirely financed by
American sources and
by Czech exiles, Germans
Americans. —Reuter.

private!
is staffed)
and |

Persia Awaits
Signature
Of The Shah
ON OIL BILL

HAIG NICHOLSON)
TEHERAN, May tl.

A few strokes of the Shah's pen
are all that are required to make
effective the nationalisation of
Persia’s British owned oil industry
in which about £500,000,000 capi-
tal are sunk,

The Shah's signature, expected
in the next few days will
formally legalise oil nationalisa~
tion

Dr Mohammed Mossadeq,
Persia's new Prime Minister, has
callee for the examination of the
Anglo-Lranian Oi Company's
accounts as part of nationalisation
of the country’s oil indusity now
approved by hoth Houses of
Parliament

Answering a question in. the
Senate last night, he alleged =that
the 19383 agreement with-Britain
was made under duress and was
therefore not legal and binding.

“Since 1933 the oil company
has acted without agreement and
it must now give us an accounting
of its income since then”, he
said.

“The Company had no right to
sell oil to the Royal Navy at a
price below world level.” “We
must examine the companys
bouks and have refunded to us
the rebate granted fo the “British
Navy”, Dr. Mossadeq added.
—Reuter

(By



18 Smallpox Cases

TILBURG, Hollaad, May |}

Eighteen adult cases of smatl-
pox have been diagnosed here, if
was learned today.

According ta Health Authorities
there is not much danger of the
disease spreading, because most
local citizens were recently
va¢cinated.

The infection. ig ‘believed to
have been carried from Indonesia
or Australia—Reuter.

THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
DIAL 3113
Day or Night



VN, VE only the bed will do












SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES

BENSON w/

OLD BOND STREET, LONDON



That indefinable gift,

which guides people of taste
and leads one instinctively
to select perfection, will
ensure the choice of

Benson & Hedges as the
cigarettes for all occasions

when only the best will do.






Ia j
‘tins of 50
$1.06 |

’

HEDGES,


PAGE TWO



—— Caruh Calling

IRST of the personnel of the

Caribbean Commission ‘whe
are coming io Barbados for the
twelfth Meeting of the Caribbean]
Conimission are due to arrive here
tomorrew. They are Mr. Jimmy
Cozier, Avting Information Officer
of the Caribbean Commission and
Mr. Lindop. Other staff member:
ef the Commission are expgeted in|
en Saturday, and the Seeretary
General..on Sunday. Delega
for the meeting are. also expectec
in around.this time.

The opening session will take
place in the Chamber of the Legis-
lative Council at 10 a.m. on Mon-
day, May-th, and His Excellency
the Governor will deliver an ad-
dress of welcome to the delegates
The remaining sessions will be
held at Hastings House.

Timely Talk

BD": IDA GREAVES’ timely talk

on*“Currency and Money in
the West Indies” at the Barbados
Museum: Gh Monday, May 7th at
5 p.m. shguld be especially inter-
esting, what with the forthcoming
changeovéf to a unified currency
in the West Indies.

Advocate at B.LF.
EOPLEtin England visiting the
British Industries Fair will be
able to read the Barbados Advo-
cate. Issues of this newspaper
from April 29th to May 8th are be-
ing flown to England by B/W.LA./
B.O.A.C. free of charge in three
batches. The first batch left Bar-
bados yesterday by B.W.I.A. for
Trinidad. Today they are being
tlown to Jamaica to connect with
B.O.A.C’s flight to London, B.LF.
visitors will probably be reading
thern sometime tomorrow . morn-
ing.
The second and third batches
will leave here May 5th and 8th,

Uniforms
EVERAL of the stores © in
Bridgetown as well as the

banks “have the ladies on their
staff wearing uniforms. The idea
is catehimfg on and almost every
week a new uniform can be seen

on Broad Street, Their design. is
simple ured skirt and blouse
to mat '

Leaving To-day

R. “SRAMJOHN G(KOOL,

Govfigs Director of the
Trinidad Trust ompany and
Director of Globe Theatres Ltd.,
who arrived from Trinidad on
Sunday is due to leave today for
B.G. where another Globe Theatre
is nearing completion. Carib has
been informed that Globe Theatres

Ltd. intends. building another
theatre -kere in the vicinity of
Eagle Hall.

Duringstis stay in Barbados he
was the est of Mr. Maurice
Jones, MA&nager of the Globe
Theatre ard China Doll.

Irish St. Joan
IR LAURENCE OLIVIER has
invited: Irish actress Siobhan
McKenna «to bring her {Irish-
language version of Shaw’s St.
Joan to London with the offer of
a_ theatre,

Miss McKenna is seriously con-
sidering the offer. But she would
prefer to take San Siobhan (as
it is called in Irish) to Belfast,
Limerick and Cork before accept-
ing Olivier's offer.









ADVENTURES.
~~

lil





POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER



“Before
idea of giving Scotland and
Wales their independence
out of hand, just pause and
think for a moment of some
of the people who could be
deported as undesirable

condemning the

aliens!""
21 Officers -
HE loss of the submarine

Affray means that. the Royal
Navy has lost all the young officers
at present trainiag for the sub-
marine service,

The Affray had on board all the
21 officers taking the submarine
course at H.M.S. Dolphin, the
submarine base at Gosport. Each
course lasts three months.

These young men, all volun-
teers, were half-way through
their course. Several of them “4
the submarine tradition deepl
rooted. One was Sub-Lieut. L
ton, son of one of our most fam-
ous wartime sub-—mariners, Com-
mander “Tubby” Linton, V.c.
who died in the service.

Festival Restaurants

HAT are the prices pro-

posed for the Festival of
Britain restaurants on the South
Bank. Luncheon at the Regatta
Restaurant and the Fairway Cafe
will be 6s., dinner up to 10s. Din-
her will also be served a la carte.

For drinks, the prices are like-
ly to be: Sherry, 2s. 6d., plain gin,
2s,; whisky, 2s, 6d.; martini, 3s.
to 3s. 6d. Champagne will cost
from £1 15s. to £2 5s. a bottle.

But one big mistake is being
made. Many North American
visitors will be deprived of a
favourite drink. No rye whisky
has been ordered,

Familiarisation Tour

R. and Mrs. Terry, O’Donnell

who arrived here April 24th,
left last night for Trinidad by
B.W.LA. Mr. O'Donnell is of the
O'Donnell Travel Service in Red
Bank, New Jersey. He is on a
familiarisation tour of this area.





?BY THE WAY...

O shos® who are not prepared

to take the New Economics

for granted it seems odd that a

controlled price for fish is “the

price we have to pay” for getting
no meat.

If a nationalised fishing indus-
try, working on the lines of the
nationalised coal mines, ever
succeeded in producing a serious
shortage of fish, I suppose a con-
trolled price for dried egg would
be the price we should have to
pay for no stale vegetables. By
the way, I notice, with a deep
feeling of humiliation, that
America has beaten us in the
race to find an easily-handled
substitute for milk. It is a tablet
of frozen milk paste, which melts
in hot -water. Our own food
scientists are still working on the
new canvas bread pills.

The. Palace of Progress

D* “STRABISMUS (Whom
God'Preserve) of Utrecht
was at the Festival Palace of
Progress yesterday to inspect
some of his exhibits. These
include a-rocking-horse with a
waterproof \snout, which has an
alarm clock inside its head; a

little glass distorting egg through
which everything appears fiat
and hairy; a lifesize model of the
engine-room of a Turkish sub-
marine in lard; a suction—pipe for
drawing pips through jelly; a
mechanical sneezer, with (zinc
eatches; an inverted bath for
tortoises; electric whiskers which
can be fitted to toy prawns; and
a boomerang-harpoon which
drops fly-papers on cows.

96 in.
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.
36 in.

DIAL 4606

Finnish Refusal Drama

ET us suppose—a thing quite

- impossible—that I were to
write; “A Peruvian team of
athletes has declined an_ invita-
tion, to visit Luton during the
Festival.”. People would say I
was talking nonsense. Very well.
Read this, from an_ evening
paper: A Finnish team of ath-
letes has declined an invitation
to visit Ilford during the Festival,
No offence intended to Ilford, I
am sure. Possibly the members
of the team were told that one
of the conditions of the visit was
that they must not play Snakes
and Ladders on Sundays.



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for
its Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be publishe¢
Advocate, and tha peer % —

rize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery e stor!
an be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesdav every week.
NOTE: Stories must not be copied.
Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

every Monday n The Evening

Age
School

Sheen ee anes

Seba a eeeeeeee of

Home Address ......++..eeceeeessasssreereseeesee®

Ee BRP RBeeeeeeweweewee|) 8
MARLANE CREPE in All Colours
FIGURED CREPE
STRIPED SILK Assorted Colours
FLOWERED CREPE
DYED SCROLL CLOQUE

EVANS & WHITEIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

OF PIPA



ate Copyright P24. Var Orme ne Ae

Sateen mee eeeeees Sete e eee eeeenene

eS kt, A A a

ict ets at ean Sk tk

— ht ee tt tk

C.D.C. Home Expansion
L ORD REITH is Empire—build-
~ ing in London, As boss of the
Government's Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation he has settled
50 of his staff in 38. Park Street,:
Mayfair. His realm already con-
sisted of buildings in Dover Street,
Berkeley Street, and Curzon

Street.

This.extension of home tersibony
seems to have given Lord Reit

by ROBERT KINGSLEY

The old (Etonian) face has
changed very little over the past.
150-200. years; it would not need
the introduction of much mdre

transform any of the 52 Old Bran, &
jians whose Leaving Portraits ar’

on show in room four of the Tate
Gallery, into their modern equiv- ~

BARBADOS ADVOPATE

What makes the
ETON FACE?

than a barber and a bowler hat to ”














alents
the urge to inspect his overseas
possessions. After six months. as ‘4p ee ietures ape, oe. spate eal
Chairman, he is planning te tour an e B. rd,’
the Corporation's world-wide in- mester, Dr. Barna
terests barrassed by the custom of "poye*
Where is hé going? He will not Who were leaving tipping the He



decide for about three weeks. And «8S they said farewell, « a
it may be a month or two before
he sets out.

In the meantime, Lord Reith is
increasing his staff. He has ap-
pointed a Press Officer.

Star Prices

Here is a footnote on the price
of drinks in London now:

A friend who lives in the flats
at Grosvenor House ordered a
bottle of Martell brandy, Cordon
Bleu, The bill was £5 12s. 6d.

a cus! his predecessors had
warmly encouraged.

, promise or nobility
traits done and: pi
school, being painted» at ages
ranging from 17 to 22.

At the Tate you can see how the
school has stamped its impression _
upon them—and the same trade
mark is discernible on other Eton-



ie eS this brand in a shop is ‘ans today.
s. 6d.

Hauglity
— Meaning of Lehnte There is the short,

upper lip, curled as if its
EISURE is no medicament. at found non-Etonians tco eee
all unless you enjoy it. It teo nan erous, , same the

should abserb just enough of your haughty seven oe ‘ae: tem

attention to make you forget your Which
worries; but not so. much of yourâ„¢ight interpret as a look of arro-,
attention as to prevent your mind gance, but probably originated it,
from resting. That is what I con- tying to avoid too close contact
sider the important function of With hard collars at an early and
leisure; not doing nothing, as that impressionble age.
means that you brood; but doing In some the supercilious look is
something different tnat makes withering—the portrait of William
the blood flow from congested Wyndham Greville, painted in
cells of your brain into other 1781, it is the look of any old
‘empty cells. I find myself that
the best relief from work is to do
some different sort of work.”
Harold Nicolson, speaking in a.
B.B.C. programme.

Trinidad Artist

Qa people praised the
work of Trinidad artist Car-
Lisle Chang last week after an Art
exhibition staged by the British
Council, Chang, who is a student
at the Central School of Arts and
Crafts, submitted several paint-
ings in oil. Each received close
scrutiny from the experts attend.
ing the show and I am assured
that Chang’s work “shows all the
signs of a promising artist”.

MacArthur’s' Song

ENERAL MacARTHUR’'S
reference at close of his
Washington speech to “Old sol-
diers never die,” has started an
overnight rush among America’s (1813.39).seems to be giving his
top record makers, New songs mind to his studies and wears
based on the old ballad are al- spectacles to prove it, but he rose
ready being “composed” and re- to no greater height than a country
corded. parsonage.
Incidental Intelligence Richard Staunton Sitwell wil.
the mot ), on e other
ea. ee ane tae tana fale: ache te, ae
head of the house and the eared in the Nathaniel Dance
pedestrian has the right of way. portrait, wears the aspect of a
Both are fairly safe unless they young ian whose main reading
try to exercise their rights:—Grit. was ‘confined 'to the sporting
- ————-_ editions.

Rupert and the

a look that many waiters in night
clubs have encounte

One or two of the youths, on
the other hand, like Sir Arscott
Ourry Molesworth, Bart., (1789--
1823) are plainly hearties; then,
no doubt, they squeezed in sittings
for their portraits between meets
of hounds; today the fixture lists
of rugby or rowing clubs would
have to be consulted before ap-
pointments could be made.

The majority of the young men
whose portraits are shown look
towards the left, a trait not un-
known among old boys of the
present day, as the case histories
of Dr. Dalton, Mr. Strachey and
Lord Pethick-Lawrence demon-
trate.

A few—five, in fact—are por.
trayed reading books (but reading
them, it must be said, in a some.
what perfunctory, ashamed way).
True, William Charles Cotton




























For a wie Ru i and
in deligh: pao
views i here 1" he murtnuts,
“*Why have I never come this way

By BEACHCOMBER

a rere meses yen Nut-
i trying to pick out well-known
Is Passing euee . Tien, turning round,

a k, for clouds“have
OMEONE asks me what makes he gets 2 shoc

Cabinet Ministefs so_ vain.
One cause of their vanity is that
they become accustomed to see-
ing some such statement as “Our
aim is peace” greeted as though
it were a major contribution to,
political thought. Another cause
is the courteous applause which
greets them on the platform, and
which is always mistaken for a
demonstration of affection and a
proof of popularity.

(TOMORROW:
173lb. in five days:
the elephant,)



How I gained
by Moga,

receive

Entertain
throughout

PU e neem newer eee eneee eens

Deen eeeeeeneenee eeeee

Cotman newer eree

$1.85



the gift of a picture to the school —
might be more becoming than a~
£10 note slipped into his hand— ~

Etonian affronted by an inferior— ~

Dial 4000 for
s















ESE

“AE OLD ETGNIAN. 1951
Dr. Hugh Dalton,

Minister of © Govern-
ment and Planning.

Adbout’ all these young men
om Reynolds and Romney and
ppner and Gainsborough paint-
ed (for fees not much higher than
t old £10 head-master’s tip)
re ‘is in common something
eir heirs mostly lack, All—even
je yor sons—HKave a faint
air,of smugness that suggésts they
are not worried about: the future.

.Neither. call-up nor: death duties

ére large on their horizons,
Just One Tie

There was only one tie-proclaim-
ed Old Etonian: in the gallery
when I was there, and he moved
happily abcut as if among con-
temporaries, there were. one or
two who might have been mothers
and sisters of present boys, who
seemed to be practising disparage-
ment, for Lords or the Fourth of
June,

If there were any Harrovians in
the room, they wisely chose not
to display their schooling.

‘orld Copyright Reserved
‘ —LES.

Ice-flower —17



rolled up a valley behind him and
ave nearly reached the hill top.

my, I'd better follow ithe
others while | can see my way,’” he
gasps. He sets off, but within a
minute the cloud covers -him and

finds himself sliding through a
moist and gloomy feg.





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WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1951



B.B.C. Radio Programme

WEDNESDAY, MAY ® 1951
6.20 @.m.—12.15 p.m. 19.60 M

6.30 arm. Sports Diary, 645 a.m. Sport-
ing Record.-7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m.
News Angi-sis, 715 am, From the
Editorials, 7.25 a.m.
7.30 a.m.

AQUATIC. CLUE CINEMA (Members Only)
1O-NIGHT & TO:MORROW Shon at 8.30

MERLE OBSRON-— ROBERT RYAN — CHARLES KORVIN
“BERLIN EXPRESS”

An. RKO Radio Picture










845 a.m. You and the News, 9 am. The

News, 910 am. Home News from

» 915 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 am.

Parade, 11.25 a.m. Listeners’

ice, 11.45 a.m, ‘Statement of Account,

‘noon) The News, 12.10 = Newd
sa Fu pee P. Close Dow







4115—-6.45 0 bs tip e000 ap. MM, .

shee Tasers. t Tate ASTOR THEATRE
two usand Guineas, 5.15 p.m. Light a.
Yolee f evoun. 0s bum the ia, 4

oO! pom. .

te om rade Sa: ieee Columbia Smashing Double— .

eee te cha * RELENTLESS“

Ts REL

News, 7.10 p. ae News
7.15 p.m, Cailirig West
Indies, 71.45 p.m. Red

and
TAB—1L.00 pom. |e y:..... 2558, Da. ™M.
“8 p.m) Radio Revwee, 8.15 p.m. Books

LUST FOR GOLD”

to Read, 8.30 p.
Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Edi ' :

10:15 p.m.—10.30 Pp. ‘m, ’ Canadian ‘Chronicle.

11.76 Mes 25.51 M, “THE BROTHERS”

“HIT THE ICE"





9 p.m. nt of Account, 9.15 pan. ET
t, 10 Io im, "the, Neve, 10,0 Bron | oe
ot i GLOBE THEATRE
ie mine.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME ' TO.DAY 4.45 & 8.15 & TO-MORROW
ie pol -1h 18pm YY, MAY 2, 1981 Nioak ABBOT & err & ‘AT ROC & nm REED

cCROSsw ORD















: n (DIAL 2310)
Fa eek: hetahaek dale soi , TODAY AND ‘TOMORROW \Only)-4.45, and8.30 p:m.
; we Grass j
‘Ble Grass of Kentucky: & The Dade Goes West |
Bil WILLIAMS,’ Jane die ALBERT — Gale STORM
a MATINEE : THURSD. AY — 1,30 p.m. (Monogram) Two Features
JIGGS. AND MAGGIE COURT”
Y ‘ * aii NNIE RIANO and —
Plus those Headliners Joe LOUIS (in action) “Henry nie anes
OPENING FRIDAY. 47
4 a o GE oF DOOM” and MacARTHUR stoRY
Across. a PLAZA DIAL
* paneling meee nocsuse (6) || OASTIN (THE GARDEN) St. James
.Â¥. Food from the boat-house, (3) TODAY and TOMORROW TODAY Se 8.30 p.m.
11 Neat or decorativ: ; & 8.20 p.m. (Monogram) CIsco KID i
18. Wey ae ane, marble 9) “J1GGS8 ane Madam: td naan “SOUTH of “the RIO GRANDE”
\ R
18. ot the. fairies. ‘or nth ae eT ae ase Rolana WAYTERS ‘as Charlie CHAN
24. Silly’ way. to bes “ins new A | em ALBERTSON “THR GOLDEN EYE”
98. Aman, 1? How mad ! THURSDAY (Only) i" pm. |
6. Bird, (4) 27. Smash’ oo (5) OPENING FRIDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Herbert WILCOX apn
rae Anna Neagle wack a Witaing in
1. Announce “The COURTNEYS ef CU :
2 Anger in tna Kitonen ? (5) ; STREET:
‘3. rally your opponent. (5)
Grave when f in a yish
tricks. wen) 5, End piece, (4)
Greater ospreys conceal him, (4)
15; Gives “some people a \sborting ee eee ore eee ales <2
17. Hal BT ine orse. iy oy tae EMPIRE ROYAL
ig. sort of thoroughfare. (4)
20, Diluted. (4) 21, Sly. (4) Last Three Shows To-day To-day and To-morrow
a arowey refusal, (4) —4.45 ~~ 8. oe 4:30 & 8.30 p.m.
Friday, only.
en of yesterday’ : puzzle, —Across: ‘
baleat aoa ia: Mg de ii. Darryl F, Zanuck presents Universal All Action Double
Us. ti Mem 7 OY enti John WAYNE & z
FRc tosittuaes gal |] mete DUNNE Handlph Scorr
28, Run aS «© THE MUDLAR. in
GLOBE “THE SPOILERS ”
z Thursday Only 4.30 & 8.15
STARTING FRIDAY 20th Century Fox Double ann
THE MOST POWERFUL FILM |), “YOU'RE MY EVERYTHING” “ SEVEN SINNER.
EVER MADE.. ./t will _ eo ~
sear your memory “ SIDE eet Sonn WAYNE



s forever! Broderick CRAWFORD

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
Universal Big Double.

Mae Clarke and Boris

ROXY

Last ~e Shows To-day—
4.30 and 8.15.

20th Century Fox Double
Tom Conway and Noreen

Nash in Karloff in
“CHECKERED COAT” ** FRANKENSTEIN ”’
— and — and
«CAPTAIN FROM « DRACU.
CASTILE ” —~ with —
LEW AYRES — with —
LOUIS WOLHEIM , “etm \ eeiaais Power and Jean Bela Lugosi and Helen
om Aa. A BOMAMGUE'S navel: Ocacted by UUW MILESTONE Peters. . Chandler.



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YOULL’

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SADR EOE SEH OS Ot OPER Hemi 2M


WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,

Ouit Suez

Canal Zone
EGYPT TELLS BRITAIN

(By CHARLES A. SMITH
LONDON, April,

Egypt has joined the growing
list vi mations engaged in twisting
the tail of the British lion,

Egypt is demanding that the
British quit the strategically im-
portant;Suez Canal Zone, and that
the Anglo-Egyptian’ Sudan’ should
be united with Egypt under the
Egyptian crown.

To the accompaniment of opposi-
tion charges of “scuttling,” .the
British Government is playing for
time. It has indicated broadly
however that it would be prepar-
ed to withdraw its-ferces from
the Canal Zone, conditionally, and
let the- Sudanese. decide whether
or not they want to join their
more powerful norfherh néigh-
bour.

To-day—Not To-morrow

Using the forceful diplomatic
language -of- the Kremlin, thc
Egyptians have bluntly told the
British in reply that they refuse
to have their new demands
pigecn-holed. They say they want
their request fulfilled to-day rath-
er than~seme incalculable to-
morrow, and* not on conditions
such as the British have proposed.

Egyptian Foreign Minister
Salah el Din Bey said:

“Egypt is-eager to realize her
national aspirations. Egypt is
determined on evacuation, and can
aecept no other solution than unity
with the Sudan, with the Sudan

enjoying self-government. under
King Farouk.”
The next move is up to the

British Government, which realizes
it may have a_tough fight on_ its
hands should Parliament have to
ratify any agreement based wholly
on the Egyptian demands.

British troops are permitted to
occupy’ bases in the Suez Canal
Zone . under the terms of the
Anglo-Egyptian Treaty of 1939.
The Egyptiens have long clam-
oured ‘for revision of the Treaty.
Negotiations for such revision
were Started bit broke “down,
apparently irrevagably,, in . 194%.
The on then proved the chief
stumbling block,

'
Rely on Russians

To-day, however, with the hot
breath of Moscow reaching into
the Middle East, the British do
net like the idea of pulling their
forces, out of the vitally important
Suez Canal Zone, They have said
as much to the Egyptians, who
have replied that they would rely
on the Russians respecting Egyp-
tian neutrality.

The British do not subscribe to
that view. They say the most they
would do at this time wonld be
to agree to withdrawal of -their
forces’ in stages of upwards of
three |years, provided the Egyp-
tians jagreed to permit Britisn
working parties to maintain. the
evacuated bases in good order,
and agreed to permit the imme-
diate peaceful readmission of the
British} forces in the’ event’ of
imminent ‘or actual: war: =

And they offer in the meanwhile
to help train and equip the Egyp-
tian Army to prevent*‘a vacuum
from @ccurring if and when the
British’ do pull out.

Anything less would be “suicid-
al” at: this time, the British Gov-
ernment believés.

Gradual Withdrawal
British military experts, in ad-
vising the Government, say they
are not averse to a gradual with-
drawal. from the Suez Zone pro-
vided ‘the bases ate’ maintained
and the right of immediate peace-
ful readmission is guaranteed.
Tne¥ wonld use the period of
gradual withdrawal for, realigning
British. defenses in that part oi
the world at bases in Jordan to the
east, Cyprus to the north, and the
Tobruk area of, Libya tothe west.
The many opponents to thetidea
of any capitulation whatever to



~

Pee








1951"



YOU DESIR



“They'll

the Egyptians at this time, declare
it would virtually invite Russia to
put pressure on Egypt, and would
arouse alarm and even despair in
Greece, Turkey, and the Islamic
countries venerally.—LN.S.

Teaches Geience
With Tin Cas

PARIS, April.

A science teacher from. Missouri
has set out with a kit of tin cans,
strings, corks, burned-out electric
bulbs, razor blades and empty
food jars for Thailand—to teach
the Thailandese science.

He is Ellsworth Obourn, of the
John Burroughs School at Clay-
ton, Missouri... He is part of a
UNESCO team of teachers being
sent to Thailafd . te alleviate —a
shortage of teachers there.

‘Besides being ¢onsiderably less
expensive, Mr, Obourn claimed
that home-made’ devités’ may
help pupils grasp scientific prin-
ciples more easily than elaborate
laboratory equipment they do not
understand.

—I.N.S.



Bulgaria Protests
To United Nations

LONDON, April 28.
Bulgaria in a note to the United
Nations says that ‘the British and
United States Embassies in Ath-

ens are “endangering peace in
the Balkans”, according to’ Sofia
Radi. ~~ arg

It said they were actively sup.
porting groups ~ of Bulgarian
cmigres in Greece in. -their at-
tempts to “overthrow by violence
the lawful Government’ of Bul.
garia”.

The note referred to an organi-
sation which it said was prepar-
ing and organising an armed up~
rising against the Bulgarian Gov-
ernment -and. “criminal acts «of
sabotage and espionage of the
Bulgarian territory”.—Reuter,

LUXURY-LOVING. BIRDS,

KINGWILLIAMSTOWN,

ie ,, South Africa,
A housewife has ..solyed the
mystery of her missing laundry.
A’ pair “of hamorkops (a type of
crane) had taken vest, pants,
handkerchiefs and a bathing cos-
tume to-lipe the enermous nest

they were Muilding.— ..





V4

one



~7y

dh teh Sa

»
\

s tt oe

BEST TEA — SO US

RED ROSE TEA!

ae IT IS GOOD TEA.

ne

‘SMALL USER

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PI
— S _&

IIIA
ai

want to send Cambridge an American admiral

Their Majesties Will V isit
Colonial Art Exhibition

LONDON, April 25.
_The King and Queen are to
visit on May 24th (Empire Day)
the Exhibition of Traditivrial
Colonial Art at the Imperial
Ti:stitute, South Kenshigton,
London. ‘His Majesty has loaned
to this important Exhibition an
ivory leopard which was a pres-
ent to Queen Victoria following
the 1897 Expedition to Benin
(Nigeria), Rare examples of
Colonial Art, some never befqre
seen in England, will be shown.
Exhibits have been sent from all}

over . the. -world~-from Malaya,
Nigeria, Fiji, the Gold Coast,
Tanganyika, Uganda, Malta,

Cyprus; from the British Museum,
and from many private collec.
tions in England and abroad.

Not Comprehensive

Arranged by the
Office with the support and co-
operation of the Colonial Gov-
ernments concerned, and with
the advice and assistance of
many authorities in Great Britain
the Exhibition is planned not to
present a comprehensive display,
territory by territory, but rather
to demonstrate, with the finest
available examples, a number of
cultural traditions which are
entitled to rank among man’:
greater achievements.

The #éteetiarr-has “been influene:
ed by aesthetic. considerations.
The organisers emphasise that. it
is not planned as an ethnographi-
cal or -anthopological exhibition

It is divided into two sections:
the larger is devoted to sculpture,
and the smaller to such crafts
as pottery, basketwork, textiles
and other forms of cloth, metal
work, etc.

Colonial

This exhibition, the most out-
standing and comprehensive of
its kind yet held in, Englana, will
be open to the public from May
25 to September 30.

Among _ outstanding exhibits
will, be an unrivalled group . of
sculpiure from West Africa—
Wigeria, the Gold Coast, the
Britis: Cameroons, and Sierra
Leone,

From Nigeria, the Oni of- Ife,
spiritual head of the Yoruba peo-
ple, has lent eight of the famens
Ife bronzes, most of which were

a

‘
q






excavated within the grounds of
his palace during — rebuilding
operations in 1938—39. The

origin and exact date of these
priceless pieces is still undecided.
By virtue of their extreme
naturalism, reminiscent of the
sculpture of classical Greece
some have suggested ‘that they
were made under the = influence
of classical Greece, some have
Suggested that they were made
under the influence of Greek
Roman or Egyptian work, This
group includes two bronzes not
previously seen in England; they
were secured at the time of the
excavations by an American
collector who has recently return-
ed them to the possession of the
Oni.

Terra—Cottas

Of particular interest is a small
group of terra-cottas (heads of
men and animals) which are
among the first fruits of a pro-
gramme of excavation now being
carried out in the northern
provinces of Nigeria. On geolo-
gical evidence, these pieces have
been provisionally dated to the
latter half of the first millennium

B.c,, and thus represent the
earliest known period of Beniz
art.

A unique work is the. bronze
snask,
head, which
installation by the

is worn at his
Ata of Idah,

onthe east -bank of Niger. This}
mask has never before left j
Nigeria. P

The territories of East Africa,
while not . producing - as much

sculpture as. the est African
territories, have contributed a
number of. fine pieces, for
example, wooden masks of the

Makonde people of Tanganyika
and fine carved boxes, made in
wood by the Barotse of Northern
Rhodesia.

The frigate bird is one af the
dominant art motives of _ the
Pacific, and many of ‘the éxhibi-
tion pieces from the © Solomon
Islands embody this bird: in one


















Whenever you feel discomfort after
meals, just suck two Rennies, one
after the other.. As they dissolve,
their balanced blend of antaci
ingredients goes straight to where
the trouble lies, and corrects your
acidity. You can always’ settle
trouble from acid stomach im-
mediately, if you cerry a few Rennies
(they're Wrapped separately) in your
t or Landbag. If they don’t give
you relief, it's time you saw your
doctor, Get Rennies at any chemist.:

DIGESTIF | ES

NO SPOON, NO WATER...
; Sticke them like sweets

ARE YOU PREPARING
. FOR THE BIG
ATHLETIC MEETING



To avoid muscular pains
and to keep up your stride
You should rub down with

SACROOL

THE GREAT PAINKILLER
e

on sale at
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



: work is black

representing. .a-.humim4'



‘tt own Meetings Make
Laws For Many

U.S. Communities

MANCHESTER, New Hampshire.

In school auditoriums, commun-
ity centres, and towg halls of 223
communities in this State, hun-
dreds of men and women have re-
cently held their annual tow.
meetings to chart the course Gi
their lecal governments for the
coming year.

Like the residents of many
cther towns in the United States,
chiefly those in the northeastern
States, these persons practise a
simple, direct democracy. They
meet together to talk over local
issues and to act as their own
lawmakers. This is in contrast to
the more commonly used form of
American government—represen.
tative democracy — in which leg-
islators are elected by the voters
to do the lawmaking.

A moderator is chosen to con-
duct the town meeting and each
citizen has a chance to express
his views on any issue before a
vote is taken, Decisions are based
on the majority vote of those
present,

Whole Day
Among the items that frequent
ly appear on the agenda are tax
rates, authorization fer a new
school, maintenance of the town
library, provision of adequate fire
” and police protection, or improve-



no “. ment of the sewerage system or
i . ether public property. In addi-
I tee tion, the townspeople elect oifi-
cers to adminster the laws and

conduct public business until the

next meeting.

Usually a full day is set aside
once each year for the meeting, |
Sometimes the business is con-

time is required, an additional
meeting may be called at any
time during the year, Frequently
the women of the village pre
pare and serve a community din
ner for those attending the meet-

form or
the black
inlaid with

another, It appears i)
wooden food bow s
pearl shell, some
times alone and sometimes with |
a fish in its beak, One of the "8
finest exhibits from the Solomon This method of direct de-
Islands is a house-board, about mocracy has a 300-year history in
fifteen feet long, decorated with the United States, The tradition
seven frigate birds, carved in the cf the town meeting is inherited
round, and diving down on to « fyom the early days of Ameriean
sboal of carved fish applied t Jie when direct participation of
the pottom of the board. citizens in local government was
practised in nearly all communi-
ties of the new country,

Uganda Pottery



i

Fine examples of the repre
sentational sculpture of the Santa
Crug Isjands and New Hebrides
Fijiand Tonga are also on view

Among the outstanding craft
graphite pottery
trom Uganda, with its strong and

Medical Report
Approved

(From Our Own Correspondent)

graceful shapes; cloths, leathe: KINGSTON, April 26.
work and ceremonial shields, At a meeting of the Jamaic:
with bold geometrical patterns, Branch of the British Medica!

trom Tanganyika; gold, jewellery Association held in Kingston thi

and ornaments from the Gold week, approval was given to th
Coast; bowls, plates and boxes repori of the Caribbean Medical
of gold, silver and brass, and Conference held recently in

Trinidad.

The meeting also agreed on the
setting up of a Caribbean Council
of the British Medical Association

fine ‘sarong cloths from Malaya;
lace from Cyprus and Malta; anc
tapa; or bark cloth, from the
islatids of the West Pacific.



cana
ce
TEA

PLASTIC MULTI-COLOURED BAGS §
PREG. $3.36 NOW $2.50. 8

ae
BEDSPREADS — sincte §
pe REG, $5.14 NOW $4.25. 3
DOUBLE REG. $6.70 NOW $5.75
+ CREPES Ms PLAIN & COLOURED
7S" REG. $2140 ' NOW $1.40

POSS PIC CS SOCSSSS



NIGHTIES — PANTIES
__... BRASSIERES
AT



THE BARGAIN HOUSE

30, Swan Street S. ALTMAN, Proprietor

PHONE 2702
PVOPOCOO ISSO SIO SSO CC TS TOE GOV OI OOOO

ducted in less than a day. It 5
j

. ‘ 66,6693
SEES OO POE OSI

PAGE THREE

DAY OF REST

sore! Kidneys Must
Clean Qut Acids

four body cleans out excess Achis



ern that

make Su ivy a cdi t re






taki t
the
of rest in

eures
needs at
seven

|

|

j

|

way. be

anyway, becs and poisonous wastes in your bleed
thru 9 million tiny delicate Kidney
tubes or filters, 1f Poisons in the Kid»
neys or Bladder make your suffer from
Getting Up Nights, Nervousness, Leg

‘

least one

(CP)

ody







SCIENCE CENTURY
EDINBURGH,
More than 4,000 scientists,
dénts, laymen and emateurs are
expected to attend the 113th an-
nual meeting of the British Asso-

Pains, Circles Under Eyes, Backache,
Aching Joints, Acidity, or Burning
passages, don't rely on ordinary medi-
cines, Fight such Poisons and troubles
with the doctor's prescription Cyttex,
Cystex starts working in three 3
must prove entirely satisfactory and
be exactly the medicine you need or
money back is guaranteed. Ask your
chemist tor Cystex. (Sisstex) today.
The Guar-

stu-

ciation here in August The

" st anté@e
theme is “100 years cf British ee ex protects
science” and the Duke of Edin- For Kidneys, Rheumatiom, Bladder you,
burgh will attend.—‘€P)

White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use |
Propert’'s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No
surer way of making sure

that white shoes are white!



If you find yourself lying awake
; are constantly “tired”;
easily upset and too often depressed,

it is a sure sign that your strength is

at nights

flagging and you're suffering from over:
taxed nerves, The special ingredients of
BUCKFAST TONIC WINE will
quickly restore lost energy y fortifyyou.
and the exhaustion 6f

against lever

long-term fatigne.

Take home
a bottle today!

muceeasr

BUCKFAST,
TONIC WINE

MADE BY
THE MONKS OF
BUCKFAST
ABBEY





OUR baby’s happiness and well-being in the years to come

depend on the care yougive him now. The fiest important duty...
is to take every means to ensure that your baby is fed fromethe-~
breast. Remember that Breast-fed is Best-fed.

The food which Nature supplies is the perfect food for baby.
Mother's milk is'naturally constituted to suit his delicate digestion
and to provide the nutritive elements for sturdy growth and
healthy development.

Wide experience has proved the remarkable value of ‘Ovaltine’
to expectant and nursing mothers. Doctors and nurses strongly
recommend that ic be taken regularly before and after baby
comes, to stimulate a rich and ample supply of breastmilk, mt
| In addition, ‘Ovaltine’ helps to maintain the strength and vitality of
the mother during the nursing periods =

@
Ovaltine
Helps Mothers to Breast-Feed their Babies.

and Stoves.
~

P.C.295










a
POLS?

Me Ram,

AA

tan Anne ae

PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS Sa A

Gees = saa


Wednesday, May 2,

Ce

Housing Authority

EN April 1942 the then Governor appoint-
ed a Committee under the Chairmanship
of the Colonial Secretary, Mr. R. C. Stan-
ley, to enquife into the condition of hous-
ing in this island and to make recommenda-
That Committee penned a most
valuable report which was well received
in this island and which was reputed to
have had the backing of the Colonial Office

tions.

at the time.

During the nine
the

is still

terms of Report
Barbados
ing Programme

one.

agent of the Government

neGessary powers to carry out a programme
consistent with the needs of the island.

There are conditions existing in some
districts which make them unsuitable for
tenantry purposes; there are houses in cer-
tain districts which in the general interest
of public health and safety*should be de-

. : ‘ ; themselves happily under the
molished and in certain areas, especially Giet cas. Ina beowiy soem
business sections, there are buildings | taller, sturdier and happier.

which should be set back or re-sited in

order-that-the public might

advantage from the use of the space,

None of these things can be done by the
Housing Board with its limited authority.

The attitude of the Government towards
the present department for administering
Loans under the Welfare
Fund seems to indicate an indifference
which is harmful. That department was set
up with an initial fund of $400,000 and is
now operating capital in the vicinity of
$750,000, It was first housed in the science
room of Harrison College at the entrance |
of Queen’s Park. Within the last. two weeks |
tenders called for office space for that
It will now be housed in a
The people from the
country districts who will make use of that
fund will now find it in Waldron Street,

the Housing

Department.
less known district.

near Magazine Lane.

This Department has during its short
period of existence, financed the repair or
reconstruction of about 1,200 houses over
the island which in effect means that about
six. thousand people have benefited from
But the im-
portance of this department eannot be
gauged merely from the numbers served

the work of this department.

by the loans.

The lack of a proper Housing Authority
such as was recommended in the Report of
the Stanley Committee can no longer be
overlooked. It was recently admitted in the
House of Assembly that the present Hous-
ing Board can only act as an agent of the
Government and could not carry out those
functions which~ would fall within the
scope of the Housing Authority,

Housing in Barbados is an essential and
everything in connection with it should
be the first concern of the Government. It
is not in the interest of the Housing Depart-
ment that itsshould be moved at irregular
intervals from place to place. A permanent

“place for this department and the creation
‘of a Housing Authority should be among

the first steps in a proper
gramme.

Meat

A Paragraph appearing in this news-
paper yesterday stated that the price of
beef which is scheduled at 36 cents was
now 42 cents in the public market and that
the butchers had adopted a take it or leave

it attitude.

This question of the price and supply of
fresh meat has been the causé of some
public concern during the last two weeks.
Negotiations between the butchers and the
Controller of Supplies failed because of the
obstinacy of the butchers who refused to

attend the meeting to settle

Now the public must be content with
the price fixed arbitrarily by the butchers
and pay or do without fresh meat.

This is not good for law and order and
the Government ought to intervene and
enforce the schedule or amend it.

» ADVOGATE
SSS Foca

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown





Christophe’s Citadel {Munir

The pilgrimage to the Citadel.
built by King Christophe in the
turbulent early 1800's is required
of all who visit Haiti and wish
not to be thought disrespectful of
the nation’s chief monument, The
tourist may set out light-heartedly
but the experience of the visit is
rearly always dramatic. Certainly
ic was so in my case.

I chose to make the journey to
Cap Haitien, chief town near the
Citadel, by road fromm Port-au-
Prince, a 6-hour journey. It was
interesting to see how the popu-
lation atmosphere changed with
the agricultural features of the
land. From Port-au-Prince to St,
Mare, the road passes through arid
end semi-arid country with sisal
the prominent culture, and cactus
and prickly bushes laden with dust
as the endless wild feature. In
this area the people reflect the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By T. E. SEALY
Editor of The Daily Gleaner

per cent. of the population, but
were Baptists,

After the farmer’s son had cut
down for us some water coconuts,
the climb was resumed towards
this mysterious Citadel of which
so far we had not even caught a
glimpse.

The muletrack now being
widened into a jeep road, winds
endlessly upwards and as we
climbed gangs of workers passed
or overtook us on their way to or
from the Citadel upon which
restoration work is now being
done for the first time in over 100
years, I was interested to see a
cooking going on for road work-
ers, and herrings put to boil for
the soup into which later on would
be added yams and plantains for

years which have
elapsed nothing was done to implement the

without a Hous-
satisfactory to any-
No Housing Authority has been
appointed and as a result a Board selected
by the Governor continues to act as an

hardship of their existence. a real one-pot meal.

But after the Artibonite plain _ Meanwhile, the view widened
has been passed where rice fields #5 the altitude increased, and the
begin to show a change in the 5¢ene became truly grand and im-
countryside, beautiful mountain Pressive with the Atlantic Ocean
country opens up with the Puil- endless to the north and the great
boreau climb into country very Plain in which nestled these
much like the hills of Jamaica or ee seeming to get vaster
Grenada where the disappearance 274 vaster.
of coffee has left naked erosion The sound of weird singing in-
ae where vegetable crops form creased as we climbed and then
the main cultivation. we burst upon them, a y of

On the other side, as the road S0me 2) men 30 women doing
winds down to the north coast of ee ae This was no mystic
Haiti and the Atlantic Ocean, jose ut a Be , down.to-earth
pleasant ribbons of village run formers a _Which in Ja-
alongside the road which paral- aea We Cay 8 digging, It was
Jels for many miles delightful â„¢ore than a digging, however, for
streams which give verdure to the 4), ve Oe oh were preparing
scene and glimpses of Haitian © Sroun or planting peas, the

washer-women busy at their tasks Sanat aera devices 3
on the river stones or washing members, ramming them into the

and _ today

without the

ARTIE’S HEADLINE
OD ee

As the car speeds seaward along
the north coast, the great north
plain—one of Haiti’s wealthiest
assets—reveals itself. Thus ,is
reached Cap Haitien, the great
seat of the north over which once
ruled that great ex-slave Henri
Christophe who, born in the Brit-
ish island of St, Christopher, rose
tc be one of the great liberating
soldiers of his people and king of
north Haiti,

From the Cape, the Citadel is
reached by a short motor journey
to Milot, from whose police de-
tachment, riding and pack animals
were outfitted for the 5-mile moun-
tain climb to the Citadel.

get the best

As my 210-lbs. were strenuously
hoisted along the winding track
by a small and wiry mule, there
was little to show that I was not



in Jamaica ‘in our own mountains
clothed with mixed forest growth
—with mango, breadfruit and the
like, with yam fields here and
there, sweet potato plots, the litle
peasants’ houses stuck perilously
on the edges of the mountain-side,

There too, were wild garden
cgg—the leaves of which I am
told, are used as a tobacco sub-
stitute — soursop trees, bananas
and plantains, everything as it
would have been in Jamaica, Gren-
ada, or Barbados, so far as nature
was concerned,

The sun beat mercilessly down
upon us and we were forced to
call a half-way halt for the animals
—mine lathered with sweat by
now. We rested under a (great
mahogany tree below which nes-
tled a better-off peasant’s cottage
and outbuildings.

Here in a simple but clean cot-
tage of two bedrooms lived a
family, a farmer, his wife and four
children. The sitting room was
rustic but obviously they enter-
tained somewhat because_ there
were 14 small chairs in the sitting
room, many of them covered with
brightly coloured home - made
cushions, a refinement in contrast
to the rough-sawn lumber stored
on the cross beams overhead,

On a tree outside twelve feet
above the ground were, great
bundles of corn hung up for dry..
ing. The ubiquitous peasant’s pig
grunted around the yard with
numerous chickens, It was appar-
ently a progressive family and
they proudly told me that they

ground and building the frame-
work around which the owner
with his family would eventually
put mud and wattle walls.

The coumbite is a common fea-
ture in Haitian rural life, because
the small farmer’s economy can-
not afford cash wages. Food in
great quantity and clarin or tafia
—two local grades of white rum
made in small peasant’s rum stills
all over the Republic—were the
wages and the enjoyment of these
men and women as_ they toiled
together .

The sound of their singing
cheered us on and then grew
fainter and fainter as we left

them behind and below, When
we had journeyed on the trail
for about another hour and the
climb was beginning to take its
toll in weariness we _ suddenly
burst dramatically round a corner
which revealed frowning mas-
sively upon us on a higher hill
beyond a gap the Citadel itself.

Its great frontal mass seemed
like some great petrified ship left
high on the mountain peak and
its battlements. bulged behind
menacingly on cither side, That
first sight is as impressive an
experience ag one could wish and
as the end of the trail grew near-
er and neerer, the massiveness
of the stone ciiadel took on sin-
ister detail,

The aura cf -aystcry and omen
which the. history of those days
has left alike upon the structure
and upon all these who have
read about the horrible stresses
in Haiti at

were not Roman Catholics like 99 of revolutionary life





housing pro-



Murderous

_ VIENNA

Feel like murder? Blame it on
the weather.

In parts of Austria, Germany
and Italy the “fohn” season is
coming, and from past experience
the homicide rate will rise with
the temperature.

The “fohn” is a gentle sduth-
ern wind that blows in from Italy,
climbs the Alps and ranges the
valleys. It brings springlike
warmth and wreaks havoc on the
nervous system.

Austria usually is hardest hit.
When the weatherman ye the
“fohn” is coming it sets of a five-
bell alarm,

When a forerunner of the wind
struck Vienna in March five per-
sons attempted to commit suicide

By ERIC WAHA

A teenage girl drank poison
because of a love affair anda
second girl took an overdose of
sleeping pills for the same rea-
son. Both were considered the
“cool” type. Both died.

Fifth victim was a 35-year-old
locksmith who started to explain
in a letter why he opened the
gus jets, Apparently fumbling
for the reasons he took too much
time and the letter never was

finished .
Dr. Herbert Reisner, chief
doctor of the ‘“Rosenhuegel”

asylum in Vienna said the “fohn”
attacks the vascular system which
in turn affects the nervous sys-

the start of the 19th century,
gathers about us like a shroud.

There are citadelz in Europe
greater than” Christophe’s. The
architecture follows the engineer-
ing experience of medieval war-
lords who had to. build against
fierce enemies, But»the Citadel is
a unique experience because the
man who built it was born a
slave and was one of the men
who led an insurrection of his
pecple—slavesfrom all parts of
Africa—in successful rebellion
against the power of Napoleon’s
troops. ps

Yellow fever, no doubt, was
their greatest aid, but nothing
can take away the glory and thc
spirit of those revolutionary year
which made Christophe the firs’
Negro king of the Americas anc
led him in symbolism to buile
this mammoth Citadel as a land-
mark for his people even thoug!
as an instrument of war it neve:
served its purpose.

On top of»the Citadel as you
stand on the walls seven anc
eight feet thick at the top, onl)
those of the strongest nerve can
risk to look boldly outwards at
the scene. I for my part prefer
red to lie flat on my stomach anc
peer gingerly over the brink t
the great vast plain below, a dro)
of certainly well over 1,000 feet

As TI lay ‘ite still 1 drank i
the scene, the sounds of Haiti
the voodoo drums practising ir
the remote distance for the cere
monies of the Saturday night an
the singing of the coumbite stil’
wafted up, a choir and its aceom-
paniment. ea many miles apar
and both them miles awa;
from me. The sounds came to me
eerily on this monstrous for:
symbolising the whole yesterda)
of Haiti, its terrors and its tri-
umphg, its passions and the warn:
humanity of fts toiling and neg-
lected masses.

And then my reverie was bro-
ken as the guide told the story
of the prisonet who, weary of hi:
dungeon, had begged Christophe
that he be allowed to jump from
the parapet to the valley below
and thus end his own sorrows.
And jump he did byvChristophe’:
decree. =

Soldiers found him below not
dead, but alive. His fall had
been miraculously broken by ¢
clump of treég, his life spared in
a manner so Yhiraculous that ever
hardened Chifstophe relented anc
gave the man his freedom.

And then they told the other
story of Christophe drilling some
of his garrison on one of the
higher parapets as a display for
a British Admiral. The men
marched along in fours absolutely
obedient to Chri-tophe’s com-
mands, And then as they marched
along the parapet Christophe’s at-
tention was momentarily distracted
in conversation with the Admiral,
and the men found themselves
marching to the end of the para-
pet.

So ruthlessly disciplined were
they that on they went and the
foremost ranks marched to death
over the edgé.” ‘Until Christophe’s
attention regained, the order was
given to halt, none would cease
the onward march.

The chief pride of the Haitian,
in the Citadel is the genius by,
which hundreds of massive can-|
non were taken up to this moun- |
tain top fortress, It is said that
oftentimes gangs of prisoners and
workers would find it difficult to
get a gun over a_ particularly
steep bit of mountain, Christophe
would order some of them shot
and then the rest would finish
the job.

A tale is told against the Am-
ericans—whom the Haitians de-
light to ridicWle—that during the}
ovcuipation they wished to take
away some of the cannon from
the fortress as souvenirs, but
could not get. them down the
mountain, Truly there are one
or two left abandoned on the
mountain roa@, a sly jest against
the Americans, whose: engineering
_skiil, they say, could not bring
down what Christophe had taken
up.



Weather

People already suffering from
diseases of the nerves show a
pronounced deterioration .

“In my hospital, for instance,
I do not have to know _ the
weather forecast to know there)
is a “fohn.” I see it from the con-
dition of my patients.”

In some cases, the effect is so
strong that capital crimes are
committed and suicides are at-
tempted.

Dr, Reisner said there is nc
drug or “sure remedy” for the
“fohn”. Only ‘self-control and, ir.
hospitals, of careful watching oi
patients, can be of help.

Austrian Justice Ministry offi-
cials said that while there is no
general ordinance to provide for
milder sentences for a crime com.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,

AUTOGRA

SCRAPS & SNAP

ALBUMS

at
Advocate Stationery

paansa SCOGP

1951







Heat Experiment j
Successful |

DARRELL GARWOOD) ,

WASHINGTON.

A secret U.S. experiment successfully con-
taining multi-million degree temperatures in
a vacuum chamber was reported to confirm
Argentina’s announcement that sun-like heat
can be created on earth.

One government scientist said the tem-
perature was achieved in an extremely small
quantity of material, and that whether the
energy process of the stars can be started
is still a big question mark.

The scientist said that the principle of the
experiment was a “small sun” suspended by
magnetic attraction in the midst of a vacuum
while atomic-speeding machines fired large
numbers of high speed particles into it to
raise its temperature.

He pointed out that all metals melt under
a few thousand degrees and that millions of
degrees would have been impossible except
that a vacuum does not conduct heat.

In another interview Dr. Hans A. Bethe,
Cornell University’s widely known atomic
authority, said that there is a secret way to
get multi-million degree temperatures that
conceivably could start a sun-like reaction.

An example of a process that may be em-
ployed is provided by the stars called Red
Giants; which operate it at temperatures of
2,000,000 degrees Fahrenheit compared to
38,000,000 degrees for the sun, and which
get their energy from lithium and hydrogen.

When lithium and hydrogen atoms can be
made to combine, the combination divides
into two helium atoms with a release cf
energy that is greater by weight than that
obtained by splitting, uranium,

The lithium-hydrogen reaction has been
obtained many times through the use of
“atom smashers.” These, however, use mag-
netic attraction to speed up particles and
offer-no hope of a chain reaction.

In the stars, the atoms get the necessary
speed from heat only. Since more heat is
produced when the reaction occurs, the pos-
sibility of a continuing chain reaction exists.

Asked whether a continuing reaction might
be established, Dr. Bethe expressed doubt,
but said :

“That is the $64 question. Until we have
made more experiments, we can’t know.”

Dr. Bethe could not elaborate on the secret)
method for getting multi-million degree tem-
peratures, so the question is unanswered as x
to the volume of material in which these
might be obtained.

In one sense, a cosmic ray or a cyclotron-
speeded particle can already be said to have
a temperature in millions of degrees, but it
is certain that a chain reaction would not
occur unless the heat was in a “critical mass
of material.”

If the temperature were obtained in any
quantity of material, it would probably have
to be contained in a vacuum chamber that
would not conduct the heat, since all metals
melt at a few thousand degrees.

Dr, Urner Liddell, chief of the Navy’s
Nuclear Physics Branch, strongly doubts
whether the heat-mass conditions of the stars
can be duplicated on a controlled basis.
Speaking of the possibility of getting the
high temperatures by firing quantities of
cyclotron-speeded particles into a vacuum
chamber, he said :

“It would be like trying to move a freight
train with a BB gun. The BB might veer

sufficient velocity, but it wouldn’t have the
weignt.” |
Dr. Bethe believes, however, that by sup-









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plying extra high temperatures—for in-
stance, a temperature of 10,000,000 degrees |
for a reaction that in the stars requires only ,
2,000,000 degrees—the lack of volume might)
be offset to a large extent.

If the chain reaction can be obtained, the,
energy can be used even though the heat is;
not being conducted in the usual way. |

High-speed particles or rays emerging
from a vacuum chamber and encountering
dense material presumably would cause
great heat in water or any other medium,





American scientists are almost unanimous in
believing that it. will be many years before
such an application could be developed.

In particular, although a Rube Goldberg
sort of heat-vacuum chamber bomb might be
imagined, they cannot foresee any military

TIME TQ *
SERVE WINE









WITH A

the first day.

tem.

mitted under the influence of the| use for

the prices A 46-year old taxi driver, left

“fohn”, judges in the areas where

the process except where a hydrogen

a note saying: “I’m tired of liv-
ing”. He strung himself up on a
tree in front of his “home. Pas-
sersby cut him down before he
succeeded.

A railroad worker, after 4
quarrel with his wife, was next
He slashed his wrists. Doctors

The 38-year-old nerve special-
ist said while the “fohn” does
not itself cause nervous disorders
it does deteriorate those diseases
that already exist, although they
need not be “advanced” cases.

Dr. Reisner said the effect is
,»oth psychic and physical. Its

the effect of the wind is felt most|€XPlosion is triggered by the heat of an
seus consider it an “extenu- | ordinary A-bomb.
ating circumstance.” , ;
In Innsbruck, in the heart of Even if Heeb Sp the thermonuclear pro-
‘the Tyrolean Alps, the wind|¢cess may lack the corapac i
brings one’ blessing. uranium of fissi r oe , een, ee
Professors at the University of n. of ssion reaction, and thus have
Innsbruck immediately call off all] reat significance only in areas where coal.



The Riviera is basking at the
moment in the watery rays of
Britain’s increased tourist allow.
ance, This increase has restored
to the South of France for the first
time’ since the war its cherished
winter season.

True, it isan austerity version
of the pre-war winter season. It
does not make much difference to
the casinos, but has made all the
difference to the languishing hotel
trade of the coast.

For the dominant economic fact
about the Riviera is that it cannot
live without the -British middle
classes. It was the British middle-
class visitor escaping regularly for
two or three months from ‘the
rigours of a British winter—the
retired Army officer or civil serv-

The Champagne Crowd Pep Up The Riviera

ant or elderly widow of independ-
ent means—who was the basis of
the Riviera’s prosperity.

For tive post-war years the
Riviera has been trying to get
along without the British middle

class. The winter season virtual-
ly disappeared, !t was replaced
by a summer invasion of French
shopkeepers and their families.

Hollywood film stars. Belgians and
Swiss intent on profiting from the
favourable exchange rate. This
enabled the large hotels to survive
—but it brought ruin to the hun-
dreds of smailer notels and pen-
sions.

Now at last the siege has been
lifted and the Riviera’s garish Ed-
wardian hotels, whose very names
recell their. English associations,

who saved him quoted the work-
er as saying: “my wife and tha
‘fohn’ are too much,”

ymptoms are
1ess,
general

insomnia,
fatigue.

increased touchi-
headaches



| @ French hotel-keep-
| ers are happy again as
t the English—with more
| frances to spend — help

them back to prosperity. |
by SAM WHITE



echo again to English voices
speaking the language which pro-
prietors, porters and waiters had
almost forgotten.

The English are back. Nowhere
in the world could their presence
be more welcome. By way of
contrast to the frugalities of tour-
ist life, there is always the bar of

the luxury hotel. Here you get
fascinating glimpses of life as ‘it
is lived by that hardy breed of
nomads, the International Set..

It is a life geographically bound
by an Empire of far-flung but
strictly limited resorts, and popu-
lated almost entirely by princes,
dukes, maharajahs and million-
aires. In this world nohody goes
to ved béfore four, or lunches
before three; bodily energy is
maintained on a staple diet of
steaks, souffles and champagne.

Gossip provides everyone with
a eGnstant occupation; hangovers
with a constant illness, boredom
with an ever present worry—the
possibility of not being recognised.
The favourite subject of conversa-

—LNS.

examinations the first sign of | oj ; pars
aaa! ive soulbily Pika oii and uranium are not available,

—LN.S.



tion is money, A typical luxury
hotel bar dialogue will deal ex-
haustively with the intricacies of
currency exchange rates and re-
marks such as, “You should try
my man, he will get you eight
to one for your Swiss frances in-
stead’ of the seven to one at the
American Express,”

Over at the casinos the faint
eathedral hush still hangs over
gaming tables, but the betting is
modest. The casinos have been
losing money steadily ever since
the war, and are only now begin-
ning to break even.

The decline in heavy-scale gam
bling is partly explained by the
post-war decline of the casinos as
an exclusive resort. It is hard to

gamble for large sums in an at-
mosphere quite as public as the
present-day Riviera casino.
Familiar faces from newspaper
front pages who wear their win-
ter sun-tan like’ a film star’s
make-up abound everywhere.

There is a mild boom in yacht
buying. Cannes harbour is crowd-
ed with yachts flying a dozen dif-
ferent flags. Cynics explain the
boom by the eagerness of some
wealthy Europeans
get-away to Tangier in the event
of a war
of a liner-like size and luxury and

fly the flags of South American |
republics i
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED rR
—LES. |)

to ensure a;

Many of the yachts are |

me in this way could create steam and elec-| : 7 o ss
ricity.
Despite the Argentine | At *s MA VY DA Y fl

|

DELIGHTFUL
ROAST

Gold Braid Rum
Top Notch Rum
Vielle Curé

Curaco

Creme de Menthe,’
Benedictine



WINES €& iiQUEURS
Sandeman’s Sherry
Sandeman’s Port
Dry Sack Sherry . ..
Bristol Cream Sherry
Prunier Brandy

THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS

Anchor Butter Dani.

u sh Chee: r
Anchor Rich Milk Powder Carr’s Freshers
Sustralion Cooking Butter Carr’s Tea Biscuits
eae Houten’s Cocoa Tea time Pastes in Jars—
Petr ne Cocoa Essenée | ; 15c. each.
Scams tence Roll | Cook’s Paste—6c, each

nter’s Nuts | Chocolate Cunch Biscuits—

Dutch Cheese 10c, each

QUALITY MEATS

Beef, Lamb, Veal, Chi ; ro? ;
Tveie Aebhes hickens Frozen Fillet Sole

Frozen Cod Fillets

FRESH VEGETABLES

Carrots, Cabbage,
Beets, Tomatoes

Phone GODDARDS

WE DELIVER

& POULTRY |
WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,

To Tour

1951



C.J. Approves W.I. Team

Australia

S'’R ALLAN COLLYMORE, President of the Barba-
dos Cricket Association, told the Advocate yesterday that
he thought the West Indies team to tour Australia later

in the year was a very good one.

He thought that the

Selectors had done as good a job as anyone co(!ld have

hoped for.

A number of other cricketers interviewed yesterday

also expressed sat ‘sfaction

Policemen
Open Shops

Al Central Station

HE POLICEMEN at the Central

Police Station now have

tneir own barber shop. This was

opened this week and an experi-

enced barber is doing the hair
cutting,

A restaurant which will serve
hot méals, will be opened at the
Central Police Station, shortly.
Cocnstabies who come in when on
duty will be able to purchase hot
meals.

During the&yeek a shoemaker’s
shop and tailors department were
also opened.

EN BOYS from each of the

Boys’ Clubs in the island. will

be attending the Empire Youth

Sanday service at Government
House on Sunday at 4.30 p.m.

They’ will carry banners bear-
ing the names of their various
clubs,

N MAY 8 the Mounted Police
will give the Mouisical Ride
and members of the Police Band
will beat the Retreat at District
“A” Police Station for members of
the Caribbean Commission who
will be in the island.
dig BRITISH COUNCIL Friday
evening film shows for the
public will be discontinued for
some weeks.
HE QUARTERLY Service of
Song of the Salvation Army
will be held in the Reed Street
Hall on Thursday at 8.00 p.m.

The Songster Brigades, Young
People’s Singing Companies and
Youth Groups of the two City
Corps will ‘take part.

On Friday, May 4, the Salyation
Army will be holding its Annual
Tag Day and it is expected that
the public will give generously
to the taggers. i

S A RESULT of motorists co-
“ operating with the Police by
rot parking their vehicles along
Bay Street during the rush hours
—3.30 to 4.30 p.m.—traffic is able
to flow more freely and congestion
reduced,

Col. R. T. Michelin told the
Advocate that one car parked in
this narrow street during the peak
period can cause a great deal of
dislocation in the flow of traffic.

LARGE CROWD turned out

at the York Barbell Club,
Black Rock, on Sunday when a
series of “try-outs” on the Olym-
pic lifts by the weightlifting mem-—
bers of the Club, took place.

This was in preparation for the
forthcoming Inter-—Club Cham-
pionships which will be held by
the Amateur Weightlifting Asso-
ciation at Queen’s Park, next
month,

The results were as follows:—

S. Rudder: Press 157, Snatch
172, Clean and Jerk 217, Total 546,

H. Stoddard: Press 172. Snatch
1594, Clean and jerk 204%. Total
536 Ibs.

U. Bartlett: Press 162, Snatch
159}, Clean and jerk 192. Total
513% lbs.

Officials: Referee J. Bullen.
Judges A. Walcott and C. Welch.



Waterfront Crane

Removed

ANOTHER ‘crane is going up on
the waterfront of the inner basin
of the Careenage. It is Messrs,
Piantations Ltd.'s crane which
tthhey removed from the berth of
the Careenage opposite the Spirit
Bond,

The crane’s new berth is just a
few yards to the east of the
vacuum pan molassés berth, The
erane will be used chiefly for
loading lighters with puncheons of
molasses. The trunk is already in
place.

While this new crane is being
erected, an. old crane opposite
Messrs. S. P. Musson is _ being
removed. The crane owned by
Messrs H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.,
was out of commission for years.
Its 2-foot platform was being dug
down yesterday and in a few days,
the spot will be level again,

The old crane is being removed
because its owners agreed with
the Port Enquiry Committee that
it was just a hindrance on the
waterfront. With the crane re-
moved, more space will be avail-
able for schooners and motor ves-
sels to discharge their cargoes.

Music Exam Results

Other results of the Practical
Examination of the Royal Schools
of Music, taken by Mr. H. Wilson
are:—

Pupil of Miss L. Taylor

M. Bayley, Grade V. P.
P. M. Bayley, Grade IV. M.
A. P. Bancroft, Grade I. P.
F. M. Best, Grade IV. M.
C. P. Spencer, Grade II. M.
P. C. Goddard, Grade I. P.
M. D. Gibbs, Grade V. P.
B. L. Goddard, Grade III. P.
G. I. Gibbs, Grade V. M.
Mrs. M. P. Cobham, A.T.C.S.
J. A. Skinner, Grade I. P.

Pupils of Miss M. Griffith.
B. W. Chandler. Grade IV. P.
Cc. J. Smith, Grade IV. M.
(Violin) .
J. Greaves, Grade V. P.
R. E. C. Moe, Grade V. P.

89° IN THE SHADE

Bridgetown had a hot day yes-



terday. The barometer read 89°
in the shade. When the heat was
getting very oppressive near 1
rm.m. a sudden downpour of rain
fell for about five minutes. The
city workers were glad for thi
eooling rain especially after that
the heat started to grow less.



with the. selection of the team.
-! Sir Allan said

that he was
pleased to see the number of all-
rounders in’the team, since the
inclusion of all-rounders was an
important factor,

He hoped that the team would
pull together with good team
spirit on and off the fleld-and fel
that it should give a good account
of itself as did the last West
Indies’ team in England,

Mr. G. H. Adams, ex-Inter-
colonial player and a _ former
Captain of the Spartan Cricket
Club, said that the team on the

whole was good enough to’ beat
Australia, given a fair share of
the luck,

He was not prepared to criti-

cise the selection and did not sec
any possible alternative to
Guillen, the only choice about
Which there seemed to be public
controversy.

Guillen’s Selection

He said that he had _ sufficient
faith in the _ selectors, more
especially in John Goddard, to
say that if Guillen’s selection

was the result of their considered
opinion and not of a compromise,
then he thought it was a good
one. s

Sir ALLAN COLLYMORE

Mr. E. A. V. Williams said
that the team was a strong one
and should bring back the ashes.

He however felt that either
Legall or Binns. should have
been chosen in preference’ to
Guillen.

He thought that Atkinson was
very fortunate to have gained

selection, but added that he was
a good cricketer and he wished
him well.

Mr, A. M. Taylor said that the
team was a good one, and the
best ‘that the Selectors could
haye. possibly picked. There
were no surprise selections and
with good conditions, the team
should do well in Australia,

Mr. C. G. Alleyne said that the
team was a well balanced one.
It was popular opinion that fast
bowlers were very successful in
Australia and one might have
thought that one of the young-
sters like Goodridge of Jamaica
or Frank King of Trinidad might
have been tried.

No doubt he said, that the
Selectors had included Atkinson
instead to assist the fast men as
they felt that from the experience
gained by him on the India tour,
he. could be more beneficial to
the West Indies than any of the
untried or inexperienced fast
bowlers.

Stronger Batting

He was looking forward to the
West Indies putting up a good
showing in Australia as they had
a powerful batting side whigh he

felt was even. stronger than
Australia’s. \ ;

Mr. A. O’N. Skinner said that
he thought the Selectors , had

first class job as he was
{0% ta agreement with their
selection. He did not see how
any possible change could have
been made in_ the personnel of
the _ team. He said that it
appeared to him as_ if the Seg c-
tors had chosen Guillen as the
seventeenth man in the team.

Mr. W. F. Hoyos said that the

team was a good selection. The
only su: prise was Guillen whom
he considered very lucky. He
regretted that places could not be
found for Legafl nor Ganteaume,
although he. could not say at
whose expense as the team was °
fairly well balanced one.

———

Frozen Meat Comes

MEAT was. plentiful in Bridge-
town yesterday. Beef, mutton,
veal, poultry—in all sorts of cuts
—were throWn, ashore on the
wharf by. lighter after lighter.

The supply of refrigerated meat
had ‘jast arrived from Australia
by the steamship Toagarire.

Housewives, who are now get-
ting over the recent butchers’
strike in the City market while
they are being asked to pay, more
per pound for beef, welconjed the
arrival of the Montreal-Australia-
New Zealand Liner.

The refrigefated cargo was
loaded at Brisbane and Melbourne.
It included ox crop beef, tongues,
loins, rumps and livers, boneless
beef, frozen chickens, briskets and
fillets, sundries, rashers. There was
also canned and potted meat,
sausages, soups, sweet corn,
orange juice, ‘canned pears and
peaches, bacon, liquid egg and
milk products,

The Tongariro also landed here
1,092 packages of tinned and 200
cises of cooking butter along with
66 begs of Pat butter, 96 packages
of hams, 1,746 cases and cartons
of cheese.

From Melbourne, she brought
1,268 jute bags and from Adelaide,
50 cartons cf merchandise. She
arrived here via Port-of-Spain,
from” which port she brought 38

tierces of oranges for local fruit
sellers

The Tongariro’s agents are
Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd





Stalin Takes
Salute
At May Day Parade

LONDON, May 1,

Marshal “Stalin headed a
ph@lanx-cf Soviet Government
leaders on the saluting base
of Moscow’s Red Square to-
day for the traditional Soviet
May Day parade past Lenin’s
tomb.

While massed bands played,
Marshal Alexander Vassilev-
sky, Army Minister, inspected
troops lined up in the square
adjoining the Red Square, ac-
cording to Moscow Radio.

Then he returned to the Red
Square and mounted the rostrum
of the tomb for his address

The Square was splashed with
flags, emblems, giant pcrtraits of
Lenin and Stalin and political
slogans,

Government buildings, factories
streets and houses were decorated
with bright coloured slogans,
banners and’ parlands of green,

Vassilevsky accused “¢ apitalist
countries” of making pteparations
for a new war.

_ “For American monopolists war
is necessary for the enslavement
of other countries”, he declared,

“It is for this reason that they

have rejected Soviet proposals tor
the reduction of armaments.
_ “American monopolists are wag-
ing an expansionist war against
the Korean people. This unjust
war will bring the American
people nothing good. They will
not be held by clumsy manoeuvres
by which they try to disguise
Ineir setbacks in Korea,”

_ Peace Wanted

Vassilevsky said: “The people
do not want war. In all countries
the ranks of fighters for peace
against forces of aggression are
growing daily,

“The Soviet . Union’s policy is
clear, Our Government has always
pursued and will continue to
pursue a policy of preventing war
und safeguarding peace.”

He began his speech by claim.
ing that the Russian people had
successfully fulfilled their post-war
Five Year Plan. Most important
tasks had been “considerably over-
fulfilled,

“The economy of our country is
at a new high level”, he deciared.
“All branches of our industry are
developing rapidly.”

“Invited guests” from several
foreign countries were on the
reviewing stand, including France,
Italy, Germany, Holland, Sweden,
Finland, Denmark, Austria,
Canada, Iceland, Britain, America,
China and Korea,

They were described as “repre-
sentatives of the working people,”
i Members of the Diplomatic
Corps and Military Attaches were
also present,

A small girl climbed on to the
rostrum and handed Stalin a big
bouquet of flowers. He lifted her
up in his arms and waved to the
crowd,

Reute’ reports from other
centres describing May Day cele-
brations said; 3

Reds Arrested

Damascus: Police arrested ten
Communists in Damascus after a
clash on the eve of May Day in
which three people were injuredt

Authorities took —

u Special pre-
cautions for today, Three were
injured when police broke u p

group Communists who were dis-
tributing maps outside last night.
Rome: Millions of Italian work-
ers today marched through cities
and villages to celebrate May
Day bringing the country’s
normal life to a virtual standstill,

Factories, offices, shops and
schools were closed. Cities were
without public transport.

ong processions of work-
ers carrying red flags ¢on-
veged on the 1,900-year—old
‘Colosseum, the world’s largest
amphitheatre for a mass meeting
onganised by the Communist-led
General Confederation of Labour,

Followers of the rival Christian
Democrat Labour Organisation
marched to a big theatre for
a separate rally. Later they dis-
tributed free meals to unemploy-
ed workers and pensioners,

Walter Reuther, European
representative of the United
States Congress of Industrial
Organizations, told a May Day
parade union rally here that
Berlin workers had shown the
world that the answer to the
Cominform was not sterile anti-
Commiinism, but determination to
make democracy work.

Aggression

In a fighting speech
the most effective
“Stalinist aggression” lay in the
determination of free men
everywhere to make democracy
work by translating democratic
idealism into a practical and
positive programme of _ social
and economic action.”

“Millions of free Trade Union-
ists in America stand by your
side. They will never forget
your devotion to freedom and
will never abandon interest in
your fight.

If necessary, we are determined
to give added weight to this
pledge by common trade union
action together with you against
threats from extreme right and

he said
counter to

phoney left who would seek to
deny us social and economic
justice and our’ personal free-
dom.”

Prague; President Klement Gott-
wald told a May Day meeting
here today that “exposure and
liquidation” of former Foreign

Minister Vladimir Clementis had
frustrated western hopes _ that
“subversion” would succeed in
Czechoslovakia, a Czech news
agency reported.

President Gottwald coupled
the former Foreign Minister with
Marie Overmova and Otto Sling,
two former highly placed Com-
munists who have been denounc
ed as “traitors and plotters” with
Clementis.

The Czechoslovak President-de-
sciibed the elimination of “this
gang” as a “great contribution

to the consolidation and strength-
ening of our state and the cause
of
Londor:
rhillion
Mao

world peace
Three

Chinese

Tse Tung

- quarters of a

marched past
in Peking’s

ever May Day parade,
to Peking radio.

of te people

t



BARBADOS

S.A.

CRICKETERS



ADVOCATE

IN EN



AND

80 cricket team arrived

present tour. They were greeted by well known English players.
Cuan Neil McCarthy is here seen holding the Masco’







t of the team.



ALOES WAS THRIVING
BARBADOS INDUSTRY

ALOES was once a thriving industry in Barbados,
From 1843 to 1902 the island exported £63,164 worth of
aloes. Planters do not cultivate it now as they claim they

cannot grow it profitably.
apnea ates niesPoer

Virtuoso At 8

“Father” Lashley walked
around beaming yesterday
at the musical instruments
and fittings department up-
stairs Harrison’s when his 8.
year-old son Egbert Lashley
played by air quite a few
popular piano pieces and
attracted a large number of
onlookers.

Little Egbert’s talent was
discovered some weeks ago
by Mr. Maurice Jones of the
Globe Theatre and he was
made to play some pieces
before an audience at that
theatre.

Yesterday he was just
doing as his smiling father
told him, now saying “Play
them a jazz,” and then, “A
faster piece”. The boy was
not troubled by the onlpok-,,
ers, but just played in a
naive way.

It happened that violinist
William Clairmonte was
around at the same time and
he gave him a present of a
book from the book ‘store
above. The young pianist
picked, “Adventure story for
boys.”



Larceny Case
Adjourned

Further hearing in the case in
which Elsie Hutson, a maid of
Goodland, St. Michael, is charged
by the Police with the larteny
from the Governor-in-—Execttive
Committee of articles valued at
5/9 on April 20 was further ad-
journed by a Police Magistrate of
District “A”, until May 10.

The Police are also bringing
cases of larceny from the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
against Millicent Belgrave of
Hindsbury Road, Emily Sealy of

Greaves End, Black Rock, Ernesta
Gittens of Browne’s Land, St
Michael, Florence Ward of

Alleyne’s Land, St. Michael, and
Bessy Nicholls of Belfield Land,
St. Michael. :

Mr. E. W. Barrow is appearing
on behalf of Hutson, while Mr.
W. W. Reece, K.C., is prosecuting
for the Police. On the first day of
hearing, Cpl. Watson gave evi-
dence of how he searched Hutson’s
basket while she was leaving the
Mental Hospital going home on
April 20 about 5.55 p.m, He told
the court that he found many
goods in the basket which were
wrapped in brown paper. These
goods the defendant said she had
got from the place where she
worked in the Mental, Hospital.

Richard Rock, as neat wate
eeper, gave evidence for re
Seatociiiad and said that he saw
when the defendant was called
into his office by Cpl. Watson and
her baskets searched.

. /
Fined 60’-
Charles Bruce Farley of Orange
Hill, St. James, was ordered. tc
pay a fine of 20/— by a Distrie
“A” Police Magistrate for failing
to produce his driving licence
when asked to do so, 4
In another case brought by the
Police Charging him with not pay-
ing attention to road signs he war
fined 40/_ to be paid in 28 days
or in default two months’ im-
prisonment. Both offences were
committed on March 7.

DID NOT STOP: FINED 10’-

A District “A” Police Magis-
trate yesterday fined Clayton
Willoughby, a tanourer of Baynes
Gap, Spooner'’s Hill, 10/— for not
stopping at a major road while he
was riding the bicycle M-3864 on
March 6.

abreast was six mi'es long.

The city was ablaze with colour
and crowds danced in the streets.
Formosa; Generalissimo Chiang
Kai-shek urged a May Day mass
meeting of workers here to help









liberate Chinese mainland work
ers from “Communist | slavery.”
Twenty thousand people greet-

ed him with shouts of “long live}
|

the Ptesident.”

A procession over a mile

iong |

I ied past his home —Reuter, .

Writing in the West Indian
Bulletin of 1902, Mr, William G,
Freeman, Scientific Assistant, Im-
perial Department of Agriculture
for the West Indies, said that one
of the reasons for the decline in
the industry was the crude pro.
cess of manufacture, At that time
the Dutch West Indies used to
supply sufficient to flood the mar-
ket. This too helped to prevent
the industry from being revived
here,

The Director of Agriculture Mr,
©. C. Skeete, told the Advocate
yesterday that the aloes industry
is not as big im the Dutch Wes:
Indies now either. That may be
due to a lesser demand for the
juice.

Aloes juice is used in medicine
as a purgative and in small doses
as a tonic. It is used for fever,
spleen, liver troubles and for eye
diseases.

Aloes used to be grown chiefly

on an extensive tract of waste,| place.

rocky land on the Windward
coast of St. John and St. Philip
in particular. They are specially
adapted for growth in poor soils

Hardy Plant

It is so hardy that no great
amount of protection needs to be
taken except that it begins to

grow best in dry weather as there

is the possibility of its rotting
when it is young and gets tov
much water,

Mr, Freeman quoted Ligon to
describe the plant when he said,
“The leaves are four inches
broad, three quarter inch thick

and one and a half feet long with
prickles on either side, and the
last sprout which rises up in the
middle bears yellow flowers one
above another.”

“The Barbadian aloes is said to
have been first known in London
warehouses in 1693,

“Their fleshy leaves contain
large sources of water in reserve
for periods of prolonged drought.

“If kept in good order and
weeded, the first crop can be
gathered in a year’s time. They
are cut about six inches above
the base The cut leaves are
placed with leaves to one side
The juice rapidly exudes and
running down the trough is caught

in collecting vessels.”

The matter is then boiled. I!
used to be shipped away in tins
In those days, he wrote, the
cost of the cultivation of the

manufacture after it was planted
was $25 per acre.



£3 For Wounding

A City Police Magistrate yester-
day found 23-year-old Dorothy
Stanton, a domestic servant o!
Hall’s Road, guilty of wounding
Samuel Rayside, a labourer otf
School Gap, Hall's Road, with a
knife on April 1.

Stanton was fined £5 to be
paid by monthly instalments or
in default two months’ imprison-
ment with hard labour. Dr. O
James who treated Rayside for
the wound at the General Hospi-
tal said that the injury was no
permanent and could not be con-
sidered to be serious.



Price Inspector
Penies Rumours
Of Meat Prices

FORTY-TWO

are paying for beet but those
who are in a better financial
position purchase the same
pound of beef for two sbillings
or two shillings and sixpence
without even making a com-
plaint.

_ Captain Evans Chief Price!
Control Inspector, told the]
Advocate yesterday that the
mujovity of butchers are selling
beef at thirty-six cents :

per
pound, but this pound is made up
of skin, bones

fat and a small bit

ot lean The butchers now

refuse to sell the best cuts at 36
cents per pound

Housewives purchasing mea

may see a man drive up in hi

car and go to a butcher. Thi

man is given a choice cut of be

while the housewives look o:
with an envious eye Very fe
of them ever realise that thi
man is paying perhaps $1.20 fo:
the two pounds of beef



As far = as Captain Evan
knows, the butchers are. stil
Sticking to schedule prices He

had two Price Control Inspectors
in the Public Market on Saturday
and they did not return to bin
with one complaint of * butcher
selling beef at more than 36 cear
per pound

No Profiteering

|



SCENTS a
pound is what the poor people |

}
i
|
|
|
|



He said that mutton and vea
were always sold at the schedulec
40 cents per pound and he ha
never heard of any butche:
trying to profiteer on these The
butchers, a few weeks ago, were
selling pork below the scheduler
42 cents per pound, Only
recently a few began sellin

pork at the scheduled price
Captain Evans said that he saw
an article in yesterday's Advocate

which stated that the butcher:
slogan. was “Pay 42 cents pei
peund for it or leave it.” This

referred to beef

“It is no-use people
to the newspaper with a yarn like
this, They must go to the righi
source,” Captain Evans said

He said that at present the

butchers have a grievance, but

they have never represented i\

to the Controller of Prices, Thes

all want a better price, but they

should put up a conerete case

which can be justitied if thy

ciréumstances warrant it

He added that at present the
supply of cattle falls short of th
demand for fresh beef

Fish Prices

As regards fish, Captain Evin
said that it is impossible to track
the prices of fish under th
existing system The Govern
ment must centralise the mark«
if the fishermen are to be stop
ped from selling at black mark:
prices,

“When boats go to their variou

moorings and the fishermen tak,
the fish to the various beaches, ;
is then that they have a chance,
to sell at black market prices
Under the present conditions

lot of black marketing is takin

It would take an army «
Price Control Inspectors to trac<
these fishermen”, he said

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PAGE SIX : BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1951
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BRITISH; WEST/iNDIAN FAIRWAYS, LTD. §
B.W.LA., BRIDGETOWN li vebeinsiniiiiannaaecinainn

SSO OG FFF

LOPE PPP ELLPELEE REE EL PPELPL PPP LPPBD LLLP

SLL SPOS




WEDNESDAY, MAY 2,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



or Engagement
arib Calling the

announcements of

between
Notices
The
Cu Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
oe and In Memoriam notices 1s
on



LOST & FOUND

—_—_ _—— —

LOST

_
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET--Series O. 1918.





ERTIFICATES KNIGHT'S LTD.
is hereby given that applica-
tion has been made to the Board of

Cameron Hawkins deteased for the issue
of a Share Certificate for two hundred
{200) Shares Nos. 18654 to 18853 inclusive,
dated 3rd May, 1921, and onc hundred
(100) Shares Nos. 27437 to 27536 inchusiye,
dated 26th February 1943, in place of the
original Ce?tificates which have been lost,
lestroyed and not deposited with any
one as security or otherwise, and notice
is hereby given that within 30 days from
the date hereof if no claim or represen-
tation in t of such original Certi-
ficates is made to the Directors they will
then proceed to deal with such applica-
tion for a Duplicate.
By order of the Board of, Directors.
: C. N. TAYLOR,
Secretary.
18.4.51—3n,

—_——_——
EDUCATIONAL

BARRISON COLLEGE ENTRY 1951

There will be a limited number of
vaeanciés in September, 1951, in the
Preparatory Department and in the Main
School. Applications for Entry must be
made on the official form available from
the Headmaster's Secretary, and must be
returned to the Headmaster, accompanied
by a Birth/Baptismal Certificate and a
Certificate of Good Conduct from the
boys’ previous school. These forms
must be returned completed before 31st
May, 1951.

If unsuccessful application was made
in a previous year a new form for 1951
must be returned, ,

The minimum age for entry is 8 years
6 months in September, 1951. Parents/
Guardians will be notified later of the
date and times of the examination, which
will be during July. 8.4.51—3n





ee
Minimum charge week 72 cents and
98 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HELP







‘Due to the opening of a new branch,
we require the following staff on or
before June Ist, 1951:—

STENO-TYPIST—experienced — com-
mencing salary $100.00 per month.

TYPIST—also with clerical experience
— commencing salary $75.00 per
month,

INVOICING. ASST.—accurate at fig-
ures — preferably with previous
experience on invoicing com-
mencing salary $90.00 per month.

Written application stating age and
previous experience to be sent to Sec-

and Trading



retary, Dowding cig oe
Company, Ltd., Bay Stree deaaiseaes
MISCELLANEOUS





WANTED TO BUY
(In tins or tubs) 12 Fishtail Palms
(Canyota) 12 Sago ray 12 Portlandia.
. Tel. 4062,
Miss Nell Manning. Geiei-as

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANT’S = "ser



-_





YOUR INSURANCE
ReeDs CONSULT

ANDREW D. SHEPPARD
Representing
Confederation Life Association
ARMSTRO!

Go ¥. B. ARM! ING LTD.,

eee Tel. 2840
_——————
= : = ——





FOR LONGER SERVICE |

T AR all posts before erecting.
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative
material still available
at your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price 40c, per gallon.
Some To-day.

Get





Just Received

FRESH STOCK
OF .

DOBIE'S
FOUR SQUARE
YELLOW & PURPLE
TOBACCO
202 & 402 ‘Kins

‘C. CARLTON BROWNE

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
Wholesale & Retail Druggist

FOR SALE

« MEDMENHAM “

PINE HILL

This highly recommended
property standing on approx.
134 acres is the “buy” of the
year at £5,500. The house
fends itself to easy conver-
sion into attractive flats and
a % acre of land at the side
could be sold off readily as
a building plot with no ap-
parent detraction from the
general amenities as it is
separated from the main
property by a stone wall.

John *4. Braden
A.F.S,, F.V.A.
Phone 4640
Plantations Building







| PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea_cents per tine on week-days

and $1.80 on Sundays.



IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES /|
IN THE MATTER OF WEST INDIAN
MILLS
NOTICE GIVEN that the
Creditors of the \ ee tess
which is being edie ti wo! up,

ere on. or amd day
July i951, being the day for that barbobd
fixed by the undersigned, tq send their

names and ages, and the eulars
St theae does bee woh Ves nantes

‘ware of

Lucas Street, Bridgetown, Ba the
Liqui of the said Com; + and,
if s® required by notice in writing

from the’ said Liquidator, are to come
in and preve their debts or claims

at such time and as shall be
woe in aon eeere or in default

they, will “be texeluded from -the
pened of wha nm made before

such debts are proved, 9 ~ i
Dated this Ist day of May 1951.
. , Hy LISLE THOMAS,
Liquidator
2.5.57—7n.



NOTICE
Re ¢
JOHN RICHARD MAHON
Deceased)

' D

NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that all}

persons having any debt 2 claim’ i
John ard

the Estate of




( ‘of, Christ
of August 1948, are hi 7
requiréd ‘to se Particulats of . their
claims duly attested to the uhdersigned
Richard. Gladstone Smith of .Dayrelis
Road, ‘Christ Ohurch, the qualified
Executor of the. Will of the Deceased
in care of Messrs. Carrington & Sealy
of Lucas Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors,
on or before the 15th day of June 1951,
after which I shall proceed to distribute
the assets of the Deceased among the
parties entitled. thereto having regird
only to such claims of which I shall
then have had notice, and that I will
not be liable for the ‘assets or any pavt
thereof $0 distributed, to any person of
whose debt or claim I shall not then
have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
Ectate are requested to settle their
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 2nd day of April, 1951.
RICHARD GLADSTONE SMITH
Qualified Executor of the Will of
John Richard Mahon, deceased. |

3.4,51—4n.

Public Official Sale

On Tuesday the 8th day of May 1951
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after-
oon .will be. sold. at my office to the
highest bidder for any sura not under
the appraised value. All that certain
piece of Land containing by estimation
2 roods situate in the Parish of St.
Michael butting and bounding on lands
of S, Thompson, on lands of C. Quin-
tyne, on lands of Friendship Plantation
and on lands of Florence W, Prescod,
near St. Matthew's Church appraised as
follows: The whole area of land apprais-
ed to Five Hundred and Sixty-eight
dollars ($568.00). Attached from said
Florence W. Prescod for and towards
Satisfaction, &c.

N.B.--25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase,
W. R. DOUGLAS,
Provost Marshal (Aicting).
Provost Marshal’s Office.
19th day of April 1951.





20.4.51—3n

Public Official Unreserved
Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904

: (1904-6) § 50)
On Tuesday ‘the 15th day of May 1951,
at the hour of 2 o’clock in the afternoon.
will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder all that certain piece of Land con-
taining by admeasurement 5,907 square
feet situcte in Parish or City of Saint
Michael butting and bounding on two
sides on lands of Barbados Co-operative
Bank Limited, on lands of Clement
Warner %ver @ road fourteen feet wide;
and on the said road calied Villa Road
at Britton Hill, together with the Chattel
dwelling-house thereon and all appur-
tenances. Attached from Walter Evans
Phillips for and towards satisfaction, &c.,
and if not sold on such da’, said sale
will be kept open and a subsequent day
will be fixed for said sale.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase,
T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal,
Provost Marshal's Office.
28.4.51—3n.

NOTICE

THE LORD OLIVER FRIENDLY
SOCIETY

All members of the above Society who
have been in the Society up to the
end of 1949, are hereby requested to
leave their 1949 Contribution Cards at
the Office of the Sentasen of Friendly

ieties, Town Hall.
eae cards will be accepted after the

a
RS ot AY TE D. T. DAVID,

« , endly Societies.
Clerk, Registrar, Fri Ai bic









West Indian & British

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach~-

weer, Decoration House, St
James. Tel, 91-74.
14.4.51—1m.
POOOOSSS

EPCS

Wanted For Cash

Used and Unused POSTAGE
STAMPS of the British West
Indies. Good Prices Paid at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY

No, 16, Swan Street.



|





CLES



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over
words 3 cents @ word week—4 Cents a
word Sundews



‘AUTOMOTIVE

_—_———
ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van
Guarantee if required. Extra Masonite
Flooring. Licensed and Insured Upset
Price $1,850. New one Costs $2,125 pre-
sently. Apply Courtesy Garage
2.5.51—1n
_ on
CAR: Austin 12-6. No reasonabie offer
refused. Apply to W. M. Watson C/o
R. & G. Challenor, Speightstown. Phone
v1—01. 15 ott

CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
tyres, in good working condition. price
reasonable. Apply F. D. L y, Staple



1.5.51—t.f.n

erage
CAR—1938 Buick 8 cyls, in sound
mechanical condition tyres
Dial 4616.
26.4.51—6n





CARS—Do you want to buy a good
secondhand chr? If so we can offer you
a 194% Hillman, done 14,000 miles and
199 Morris Oxford, done 19,000 miles
Both cars in excellent condition. Ring
4908, B’dos Agencies Ltd.

29.4.51—6n

_—_—_ ees "
WAGGON; One 1942 V-8 Ford Station

Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3506

or 3743. ; 22.4.51—t. fir

ELECTRICAL



_—_—
DEEP FREEZER — Specially designed
to serve Ice Creams, in good working

order $375.00 At Ralph A. Beard's
Show Rooms, Hardwood Alley
2.5.5.—8n.





MULLARD 11-TUBE RADIO tilt
dial, Y tiecttic Phonograph with apie
s3 all. in working order. G Lewts,

rihur Seat, St. Thomas. 2.5.51—3n

REFRIGERATOR—6 cub. ft. Marco
Fridge $200.00. Perfect working order
at alph A. Beard's Show Rooms,
Hardwood Alley 2.5.51—2n

MECHANICAL



TYPEWRITERS — Shipment of new
model “Olympia” Portable Typewriters
just received—see these superb machines
before committing yourself. A, G.
St. Hill. Dial 3199. 29.4.51—e.0.d



MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES — Of

every
Glass, China,

description,
old Jewels, fine Silver
Water-colours. Early books, Maps,
Autographs etc., at Gorringes Antique
Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht Club.

3.9.50—t.f.n.

eae
AFTER DINNER MINTS—Fresh stock
of delicious after Dinner Mints. Price
1/- per cello bag. Bruce Weatherhead

29.4.51—3n.





BRICKS—For building or garden walks



$3.00 per 100, also Fire Bricks. Apply
The Old Ice Co., Prince Wm. Henry St
1.5.51—2n





SPLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas.
A. Tudor & Co., Roebuck Street, $12.00
per 98 lb, bag. Dial 2628. .

. 28.4.51—Tn







STOVES—Valor single, 2, 3 and +
kerosene oil burner. Secure your. be-
fore advance in price. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4391. 26.4 51—6n

TANK—One (1) Steel Tank, capacity
400 gallons in perfect condition, Apply
Manager. Dukes, St. Thomas, Phone
4130. 28.4.51—4n.



TYRES—5 second hand 19” x 450 Tyres
and tubes in good condition $18.00 each,



Apply to H, A. Field, “Ashley”. Ith
Avenue, Belleville. 1,5.51—2n
_

TRAILER — One 4/5 ton Sugar Cane

Trailer with or without Tyres. Courtesy
Garage, Dial 4616. 1.5.51—3n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER AND REMOVAL
The application of Cecil Small, shop-
keeper of Vauxhall, Christ Church,
purchaser holder of liquor license No.
premises viz—a board and shingle shop
923 of 1951, granted to him in respect of



with shedroof attached near Wildey,
Clapham, St. Michael, for permission to
rémove the said license to a board and
shingle shop with shed attached at
Vauxhall, Christ Church, within District
“B” and to use the said license at such
lest described premises.
Dated this Ist day of May, 1951.

To: C. W. RUDDER, Esq,

Police Magistrate,

District “B"
Cc, SMALL,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at the Licensing Court to be held
on llth day of May, 1951, at 11 o'clock
a.m. at Police Courts Dist. “‘B".

Cc. W. RUDDER,
Magistrate, Dist. “B”.

police
es 2.5.51—I1n



Loo
SOTTO SOOOCOOOOOOOOOE,

DANCE
NOTICE

Invitees are reminded of
ithe Dance to be held at the
Mental Hospital on FRIDAY
NIGHT 4th May, 1945, in
aid of the Mental Hospital
Cricket Club.





/
‘

CLE CSSLESLOSSECOOOLL LLL {

MANNING & CO., LTD.

AGENTS

fll

666 OOOO OLE

POPP PSDI OLE





Trustee Investment to yield

414%
Industrial Shares to yield
614%
A. M. WEBB
Stockbroker
} 33, Broad St. (Over Phoenix
| Pharmacy)

aa eeprceseneeeeemipeere ne enee,





jena atinn estlag seneetcinatinateneneeensegrienpeseeunemmainenmemmnntis oo?



and 12 cent per agate tine oleae

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on





FOR RENT

Mintmum charge week 72 cents and





Eczemalich

minrmum crarge $1.0 week-days weer s an g-B. 4 %
c é on #2 cente.a week--4 Cente a
and $1.80 om Sundays word Sundays. Kill i i 7 Mi
REAL ESTATE HOUSES Your okin has near 50 million way
LAND — 10,60) sq. ft, situated at} APARTMENT — Cool and spacious | S®#8 and pores where germs hide
Ventror near Golf Club. Phone 8@43./ apartment at Sew View, Upper Bay St Se Boing eS oe tae
G. A, Atwell 28.4.51—3n. j On the sea, opposite Bay Mansion. Apply Ringworm Psoriasis, Blackheads,
on premises. 2.5.51—2n/ Pimples, Foot Itch and other. blem-

«t

te
Ww,
of
ni

| drive to Crane Coast.

to

Telephone,
Apply to W.
John

Ww
ye

tr

prices range from $1,000.00 to $2,090.00
per

A



wv

—_—
SUITABLE BUILDING SITE; situated
sq. ft land, and 1,982 sq: ft. road. Dial

2205 Day and 3465 Night. 2.5.51—t.f.n
LAND. 8-10 acres of land guitable








Ventnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 10,978

r building, in lots of net less than
000 sq. ft. Overiooking a large area
St. Philip and Christ Church. Mag-
ficent environment,, 15 to 20 minutes’
Walking distances
Lodge and High School. Govt. Water,
a ee

. Webster, Moncr t.
- "Phone 95-252. f :
29.4519.

LAND Only a few spots remaining at
orthing View so be sure to select
all go The spots range
12,000 sa. ft. and the

on





“rs before
om 6,000 to

spot For particulars see D'Arcy
Scott, Magazine Lane, Dial 3743.
2.5.51—3n



AUC?ION

, FIAT VAN 1947 MODEL
We are instrueted to sell this vehicie
hich has been damaged in an accident





APARTMENT for rent to approved
tenant.
hotel area, Hastings, 3 bedrooms, garage

Write P.O. Box 257.

FLATS—Two (2) Furnished Flats at
Dundee, St. Lawrence Gap, suitable for
2 only, From May Ist onward. Apply

29.4.51—2n
—

Pully furnished apartinent

27.4.51—6



Premises or Phone &240.

Apply:
st

ist June.

ishes, Ordinary treatments give only
temporary relief because they do not
kill the germ cause. The new discov-
ery, Nixoderm, kills the germs in 7
minutes and is guaranteed to give you
a soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin
“ one ween, omnes tee on are
of empty pac e. guarantee:

Nixoderm from your chemigt todayand

Nixoderm t:'%:::°

real cause
For Skin Troubles trouble.

in

in.

of akin

MILDENE-—Upper Collymore Keck. Cool
pnd airy. 3 bedrooms, Drawing and Dining
Rooms, Verandah etc.
Jemmotts Lane and Bay



Corner

2.5.81-—2n Advertise wie Pays





:
:
|

SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian Nat

ional Steamships



by Public Ayction at the Courtesy
mo at 2 p.m, on Friday, 4th May
7, JO! , Sails Arrives
a Montreal Walifax Boston -—«- Barbados Rarhados
2.5,51—3n LADY RODNEY - 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 28 Apr 24 Apr.
~er LADY RODNEY Dour etune «it Sune | soJune st June
* une 6 June 1 June une
able Et the anette | LAE NELSOK «30 June 3 July S3uly 14 July. 43 lly
sell by Public competition at the Nurses’ | LADY RO! a «+30 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 18 Aug, 4 Avg.
jome on Thursday next. ni May at! NQREmBOUND ‘Arrives Arrives Artives Arrives
Campbell. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer. Senacee Sa Boston St. John | Halifax poe
Staaten NEY ...10.May 12May 21 May = — 22 May
di ial Sa Bae ae A ee ee +» June 6June 14 June = 16 dine 19 June
By instriictions ‘1° will, ell “by | Public R i Whe 0 July 2 AN - ° Ase: p hus.
Auction t é ee y R. Ug. .
the ‘and of May at 3 octock at Bank | EADY RODNEY (126 Aug. 28 Aug — 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11 Sept.
uo Mai ‘ Ses
ay Cait Gb Tee tao Kaci N.B,—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham-

w
w

It
In-

ith out-offices. To be removed.
ill be sold to the highest bidder.

spection on application to

D

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane.

ial 3743. 27.4,$1—4n,



UNDER THE SILVER !

On Thursday 3rd, by order of Mrs,
Theresa Wright,

tu

Dining Table, Rush Arm-Chairs, Coffee oe
Table, Morris Arm-Chairs with cushions,
2 ee eae ent PB mee
; ae Vessel From Leaves Barbados
Flat Top Desk » Jamai “
Verandah Chairs, Pine Cabinet, Foi S-S. “HERDSMAN - London 12th April. 2nd May
Card Table, Glass Ware, Dinner and. T .5. “DEFENDER” +» Lond 22nd April 7th May
Services, Double and Single Iron Bed-7S.S. “PLANTER” a e {i
steads with Springs, Dunlopillo and Hair S.S. “LINGUIST” » London 3rd May 16th May -
Mattresses; Cedar Linen Press, Celatex re 4 - London 10th May 28th May
Bréseeh, Bureau, Dressing qatie and|S.S. “DALESMAN” Glasgow &
Goolerator, Larder, Ware. Press, ddBurnes Liverpool 25th April 8th May
Gas Stove (with Oven) in good order, | ~~ cneticey Fitohen Utensils, Garden Tools and other HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash, Vessel For Closes in Barbados
BRANKER, TROTMAN & O00. /\'s.s_ “STATESMAN” London 30th April
Auctioneers S.S. “SPECIALIST” Liverpool ith May ,
29,4.51-2n. | S.S. “STUDENT” London 4th May ,
7 oe ash ae Na See S : .



M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Wonderful Coun-

bers. Passenger Fares and freig

ut = =rates on applicatian to: —

—_—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.



HAMMER



















we will sell her Furni-
re at “The Bower,” Garrison,

Which includes :



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay



HARRISON LINE



STEAMSHIP CO,

sellor, Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch, Phill

H. Davidson, Sch, Lueille M, Smith, SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM

Sch. United Pilgrim S., h Wo lk M.S. “Oranjestad'’'—-10 May .1951
Bunicia, Seb. Blue Nose “Mac, Seh.{ M.S. “Bonaire’—11th May 1951.
Belqueen, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Yacht} ™.S, ‘‘Hersilia’—24th May 1951.
Maria Catharina, Sch. Mariom Belle] gait ¥ J

Wolfe, Sch, Laudalpha, Sch. Gardenia W. AMSTERDAM tee ae

M.V. Canadian Challenger, M.S. “Willemstad’’ 17th May 1951.

Robinson,

61

61
5Y

MAY 1, 1951
CANADA
4/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 59 6/10% pr.
Demand
Drafts 59.35°> pr. 5
Sight Drafts 59 2/10% pr. -
4/10% pr. Cable
9/10% pr. Currency 58% pr.
Coupons 57 3/10% pr.
> pr. Silver 20% pr

50

Antigua, St. Kitts, St. Thomas, V.I. and
New York by the S.S. Fort Amherst will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under: —

M.

2.0 p.m,







Mrs. NORMAN HOWELL,
(Registered Spencer *
Fitter 1931).
Strathclyde, St. M. 9. ¢
Tel. No, 3954. g
29.4,51—2n, %
OPO OSSOOCOSSS >
SSSSSSSOSOFSOS TO FIOTITO”

ARRIVALS
S.S. Tongariro, 5,504 tons net,
from Australia via Trinidad,



Capt. SAILING TO TRINIDAD,
" Saal Toa AND GEORGETOWN
MS.

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA,

“Hecuba"—4th May
““Monaire’—29th May

1951.
1951,

CURACAO AND JAMAICA

MAIL NOTICE

Martinique,



Mails for St, Vincent,

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
ail at 1.90 pom. and Ordinary Mail at
on the 2nd May 1961,

NOTICE |
Mr. John Hammond begs
his friends to send him gifts

for his White Elephant Stall
at the Country Fair in aid of











the St. John the Baptist
Vicarage, on May 14. Old
clothes, books, magazines,

china glass, in fact anything
including money will be
gratefully accepted.

Telephone 2292 for things
to be collectd.



NOTICE

I wish to notify my
patients and any interested
~ persons, that I still carry on
‘my work as Spencer Cor-
setiere and have at no time
ceased to do so.

MAY GAY

FURNITURE

a
Money - Saving Prices

CHARM in China and Bedroom
Cabinets, Sideboards $15 to $90;
Dining, Luneh, Sewing and Kitch-
en Tables, Waggons, Larders,
Kitchen Cabinets.

SMART Mahogany, Birch and
other Bedsteads, Full panelled and
Railed and Panelled,, Cradles,
Beds, Vanities, Dressing Tables,
Washstands, Wardrobes, Chests-of-
Drawers.

MORRIS, Tub, Bergere and Rush
% Furniture — Morris Cushions,
, Spring and Springlike $4.50 up.
DESKS with flat or sloping tops,
Book cases, Book racks, Office
duty chairs

L.S. WILSON
SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069
‘
COLL LLCO



M.S.








“Bonaire’—20th May 1951.

8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO, LTD.,,
Agent










M.V. CACIQUE Del CARIBE
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Gren-
ada and Aruba. Sailing Saturday
28th inst.

M.V. CARIBBEE will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-

jea, An , Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
May.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOC., INC.

Tele, 4047,











OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

For further information apply te - -
DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.—

ROYAL NETHERLANDS

Agents

FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatlantique

th
ue

SAILING TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

“GASCOGNE” May 12th,
1951

via St. Lueia, Martinique,
Guadeloupe and Antigua,





SOUTHBOUND

“GASCOGNE” May 3rd,
1951
Grenada, Trinidad, Demer—
ara and Fr, Guiana.
$33
Accepting Deck passengers
to Grenada, Trinidad, St.
Lucia and Martinique also
Cargo and Mail to all Ports
of Call,

R. M, JONES & Co., Ld.

AGENTS
Phone 3814

8

.

nt







—














COSCON

PASSAGES

Contact Antilles Products,

sailing to Europe fortnightly.

Dublin, London, or Rotter
reduction for children.





TO EUROPE

Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
The usual ports of call are
dam, Single fare £70; usual



—_—__—.
I LEAP OVER THE GARDEN
WALL—a story of a Nun who was
in a Convent for 28 years and
then gave it up, An_ interesting
true book by Monica Baldwin

Bring us your Fountain Pens for
NIB and SACK replacements.

Ours is the only Store fitted with
modern toots for Pen Service.

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AND
HARDWARE



















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And many more items of Interest

, and make your Selections

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(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
- ’Phone : 2109, 4406 or 3534






























\a

PAGE SEVEN

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ear or have an inferiority complex? Do you enjoy
the Cree. of women or 40 beaut itul women pass
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glands, and unless your og are fortified and
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vigour and animation.

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Fortunately for those who suffer from run-down
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CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

The Advocate Co., Ltd., has made arrangements for
classified advertisements to be taken by various District
Agents and so far the following have been authorised to

receive them :

JOSEPH JEMMOTT,
St. Elizabeth Village,
St.

MOSES GITTENS,

Dayrells Road, Ch, Ch
Joseph.
Mrs. U. L.. BRUCE,

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8. A.. DURANT,
Horse Hill, St. Joseph.

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ST. C. HUNTE,

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Church Village, St. Philip

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Items may be handed into the above for the following

Columns in the Classified Section :

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, IN MEMORIAMS, ETC.
FOR SALE, FOR RENT, WANTED, LOST or FOUND.

ADVOCATE CoO., LTD.

T. Gale. Advertising Manager


| PAGE EIGH'



Carlton Team Defeat Everton 2

Carlton defeated Everton two goals to nil when they
played their:return first division football fixture at Ken-

sington yesterday evening.
When these two teams
defeated Carlton 3—2.,

first met this season, Everton

Skipper “Brickié” Lucas scored both goals for Carlton.
Playing at inside left, he was outstanding in all the Carlton

forward movements.







Labour Party
Hold May Day
Meeting

Joining with the thousands of
labourites all over the world, the
Barbados Labour Party observed
May Day with a political meeting
held in the Stee| Shed at Queen's
Park last night.

Top members of the Party unde:

the chairmanship of Dr. H. G
Cummins, M.C.P. addressed the
large crowd who attended the
meeting. Dr. Cummins in refer-

ring to the manner in which May
Day is celebrated in Burope and
even in some parts of the West

Indies, said he hoped Barbados
would soon reach the stage of
having precessions and demon

strations on that day.

Mr. G. H. Adams, General Presi-
cent of the Labour Party did not
attend the meeting because of
jilness. His doctor has advised
him to take a rest.

Dr. Cummins introduced Mr,
Torrie Pilgrim and Mr. Hugh
Cumberbatch whom he deseribed
as two of the latest comrades
Vie cause of Labour. Mr, Pilgrim
nad Mr. Cumberbatch will, at the
next General Elections, face the
electorate in St. John and St
(yeorge respectively .

Dr. Cummins said he was sure
they were ali glad to see Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis back with them
after a long illness,

The crowd which was mostly
composed of working class men
and women filled the steel shed in
spite of the showers which fell
uround the time the meeting was
scheduled to start Those who
could not find seats stood around
in the shed itself and even out-
side. :

First speaker was Mr. F,L Wal-
cott who told the audience that
the Party pledged itself to regain
the seat at the General Elections
which they had lost in St. Andrew
and advised them that it was they
(the electors) who had to work
hard to keep the Labour Party in
power at the General Elections.

Mr, Walcott denied that Gov-
ernment had, while increasing
wages, allowed the cost of living
to goup. On the contrary he said,
the Government spent a_ mil-
lion dollars a year on subsidiza-
tion so as to keep the cost of liv-
ing from rising to abnormal
heights. The prices that obtained
to-day were based on world
market prices over which the Gov-
ernment had no control.

He reminded the people of the
work that the Labour Party had
done in improving conditions of
work and increasing wages. He
next spoke of emigration.

After referring to the visit tc
Washington which he had made
last year, Mr. Walcott talked about
present emigration opportunities
to the U.S.A. He said it was an
opportunity for.4,000 men to work
for 12 weeks for $1,728,000

Some people were suggesting
that Government should take the
money they were going to spend
on that scheme and create local
employment by, say, opening the
East Coast Road. But that road
could not be opened in June and
could not employ 4,000 people

Moreover, if they refused the
Americans now, they, the Ameri-
cans would think that they were
high hatted and haughty, and
when there was another oppor-
tunity with perhaps more favour
able conditions, the Americans
would seek elsewhere for
workers. They should remem-
ber that 50% of the workers in
the island were only casually
employed, and it was therefore
necessary to grasp every employ-
ment opportunity, even when it
was only temporary.

Mr. Walcott in conclusion urged
his listeners not to be despondent

because they had lost the bye-
election in St. Andrew, He re
minded them that on a _ former
oceasion they had lost a_ bye
election in St. George, but had
returned iv, the General Efee-
tions and put in a man _ with
enough force to put in three

men.

Mr. M. FE. Cox, the next speaker,
also referred to the high cost of
living, and like Mr. Walcott, he
denied that it was something
which Government could control.

He said that Government was
in. sympathy with small

The first goal he
from a

up.
Both goals were scored during
the first half of play. Through-

out the game, Carlton played as
the better team. Their forward;
combined well and they got good
support from the backs.

King, their goalie, kept goa!
exceptionally well. His counte:
part Reece also kept goal well.
The two goals that were shot on
him were weil placed.

Little rain had fallen before
lay began and the grass was a
it slippery

The Game
Just after Carlton had ‘taken
the touch off, Everton were
pressing down on them. Carlton's
goalie, King, had to do a bit of
saving early.

The next minute, “Brickie”
Lucas, at inside left took a
powerful, low shot, but the ball

went straight to Reece in goal.

After about 12 minutes’ play,
Carlton opened the scoring.
Maynard, playing in the Ever-
ton’s half back line, fouled a
Cariton player in the ‘penalty
area. Lucas took the penalty
kick and made no mistake.

Carlton were soon two goals up
with Lucas coming again into the
picture, From a melee in Ever-
too’s goal area, Lucas who was
standing back, but yet within
the goal area, nicely received a
pass. He took a lovely low shot
which passed to Reece’s . right
hand and lodged itself into the
nets. The score was 2—0.

The game quickened, Everton
tried hard to score and would
have, had not for King’s safe
goal keeping. On the other hand,
Carlton kept Reece busy. But,
Carlton still seemed to have the
best of the game. The score was
still 2—0 in favour of Carlton at
half time.

On resumption, Everton were
the aggressors. For fully four
minutes they kept the ball con-
centrated at the north goal. King
was again forced to do a good bit
cf goal-keeping.

Carlton made an attack on the
Everton goal, but they could not
“et past the backs, Another at-
tack, but Reece was there to save.

What seemed a sure goal for
Everton was nullified by King
who half-stopped the ball and fell
cn it before throwing it over the
heads of the pressing Everton for-
wards. King was in good position
and that was all, It was a power-
ful shot from White, then playing
at centre forward, who was only
a few yards away.

During the last stages of the
game, Carlton’s goalie was almost
idle. Carlton kept the drive. They
were only prevented from further
scoring through the good defence
put up by Everton's backs and the
fine performance of Reece in goal.

The game ended 2—0.

The teams were:

Everton: Reece, Hall, Weekes,
Harewood, Yearwood, Maynard,
White, Blades, R. Haynes, Sealy,
Murray

Cariton: King, Bright, Kennedy,
Marshall, Clairmonte, oo xX,
Hutchinson, Hutchinson, Green-
idge, Lucas, McLeod.

Referee: Mr. S. Gittens.

Jack Milburn
Pulls Muscle

LONDON, May 1,

Jack Milburn chosen as centra
forward for England against
Argentina in the internationat
soccer match at Wembley Stadium
on May 9, may be unfit to play.
He pulled a muscle in his right
leg on Saturday afternoon in the
Neweastle—Blackpool match. A
detinite decision is however being
awaited.

Ted Ditchburg | (Tottenham)
has been chosen as an internation-
al for England’s team.

lt has already been recommend-
ed that subject to both teams

agreeing, players be allowed as
substitutes up to the forty-fourth
minute in case of injury —Reute.,

B'dos Friendly Football
Association
TO-DAY'S FIXTURE.

,Rangers vs. Maple at St. Leon-
ard’s. Referee: Mr. J. Archer.







controls which as the experience
sof the 1914-18 war had shown,

shop-;}would result in a drastic increase

keepers and was working on agiin the price of commodities.

scheme to make their lot easier.
But the Government had
sympathy whatsoever with the
big merchants’ request for in-
creased profits and cessation of



| They'll Do It Every Time

ON WEEKDAYS FARVER
FRAU DOES
“ THE PLOW +s

THEN You'D BETTER
WEED THE EAST 40:



EVERYTHING BUT PULL



Mr. Cox told those present that

no®jhe had always fought their battles

from the time of his entry into
volitics and he would continue to
jo so.

Registered U.S. Patent OMe

JONES’S

| THANX TO

scored wes
penalty while the second
was a well timed shot from close

| MRS.E.H WOLTER,
| 1609 238° ST, N.W.,
CANTON 9, OHIO

{ { a

Victin.— Express.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE a

HORSE



THE OLYMPIC HORSE TRIALS were held recent ly at Badminton, England and were spread over
three days, including Dressage, Endurance and Jum ping. Photo shows Captain Hans Swarzenbach who
won the Individual Cup as he competes in the Jum ping Tests.



Germany Admitted
To Boxing Union

LONDON, April 28,
Germany was admitted to
membership of the European Box-
ing Union at the first session of
the Union’s Annual Conference
here today.
The Saar and Turkey were also
admitted to membership «

In a statement, following the
first session which was private,
Mr. J. Onslow Fane, Pissident,
announced that the Union was
now satisfied that boxing in
Germany was controlled by one
governing body, and by non-
financially interested people.

“We are happy” he eqntinued, |

“to welcome these three affiliated
bodies and T am certain they will
strengthen the union.”

—Reuter.



SPORTS
WINDOW

FOOTBALL
The players chosen to be coach-

ed by Mr. Wilkes in preparation
for the forthcoming Jamaica—
Barbados tournament. will turn

out at Combermere School at 5
p.m. to-day to continue training
and on Sunday at Kensington at

8 am,
DIVISION 2
May 2—Everton vs
Bank Hall,
DIVISION &%

Empire at

May 2—Sea Scouts vs. College at
Garrison.
Combermere vs. Y.M.P.C. at

Combermere,
Wanderers vs,
Bay.

Police vs. Eyerton at Park.
TABLE TENNIS—Division 1
Pelican vs. Y.M.P.C. at Y.M,C.A.
BASKET-BALL—Division 2%
Y.M.P.C, vs. Police at Y.M.P.C
Pirates vs. Sea Scouts at College

Foundation at





—--

7h. . mh
What's On Today
Police Courts 10.00 a.m,
Court of Appeal—10,00 a.m.
Annual Ordinary General
Meeting of the Sharehold-
ers of the Barbados Ship-
ping and Trading Com-
pany Ltd.—12 noon.
Meeting of the General
Board of Viealth — 2,30

p.m,

Mr, John Farrison gives lec.
ture at the Barbados Mus-
eum on “Looking at Pic-
tures”—5.00 p.m.

CINEMAS

Globe—"Hit The Ice" &
Brothers’ 4.45 & 8.15 p.m,

Plaze (Bridgetown)—''Blue Grass
of Kentucky” & “The Dud Goes
West" —4.45 & 8.30 p.m,

Empire—"The Mudlark"”—4.45 and

“The





8.30 p.m.
Roxy — “Checkered Coat" and
“Captain From Castille’—445 &
8.40 pom. .
—





The Weather

TO.DAY
Sun Rises: 5.44 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (New) May 6.
Lighting :
High Water: 1.33 a.m.,
p.m

2.00

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) .01 in,

Temperature (Max), 86.5 °F

Temperature (Min,) 74.5 °F

Wind Direction (8, a.m.) E.
(3 p.m.) E.S.E.

Wind Velocity 7 miles per
hour .

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.953
(3 p.m.) 29.885









By Jimmy Hatlo

But So CONSIDERATE 1S JONESY *
SUNDAY**s HE MUST BE RESTING
HER UP FOR MONDAY s+ss

men ( CAREFUL,DEARs*

————

THESE STEPS
ARE ITE /-
TAXING **s






MODERN HIGH WINS
AGAIN

OWING to a heavy rainfall last
night only the first quarter in the

Pickwick—Y.M.P.C, first Divi-
sion basketball match was com-
pleted at the Y.M.P.C. grounds,

Beckles Road. The end of the first
quarter found the Y.M.P.C.
team leadihg with ten goals to
four. Before the rainfall, the pitch
was soft and slippery. This was
the only game started.

On Monday afterngon the Mod-
ern High School got their fourth
successive win when they de-
feated ateam of the Barbados
Regiment by 17 goais to 14 in a
Second Division basketball match
which was played at the Modern
High School, Roebuck Street

3
s

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x

“T don’t need to be show
protection in general, L’ve
which lack of it brought

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“Lin getting it, You shoul

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BLOC LCL LEPC CLL PESTS

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JUMPING



33 Invited To
Practice

The Selection Committee of the
Barbados Cricket Association
held a meeting yesterday morning
and decided to circularige 33
players in preparation for the
eficket tours to Trinidad and
British Guiana during July and
September respectively.

Invitees have been asked to re-
port by May 16 as to whether
they are available for either one
or both of these tours if selected

Present at the meeting were
Mr. J. M. Kidney, Mr. J. D.
Goddard, Mr. T. N. Peirce, Mr
$.'O’C. Gittens and Mr. W. F.
Hoyos.



LESLIE'S

n the wisdom of insurance
seen too many instances in
about serious financial loss.

tative of J. B. Leslie & Co.,

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SOEESVESSOCOFESSO SOS

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BRIDGETOWN

BARBADOS, B.W.1!

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~.



See ece

it’s so easy
to see those
extra fine
points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the
Top Scorers
in Tailoring

to be on the
SMART
side.

oa natigtnmennapimemnmanictnetcantie che

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enry Street

LLL OLE LIAN OA EO
PRIA SSSR EAS

M.C.C.
Declared
LONDON, May 1,



No Fit Challengers

LONDON, May 1.

The Administrative Control and
Appeals Board of the European
Boxing Union in London has
decided that there are no suitable
challengers for three British box-
ers who hold European titles,
Randolph Turpin, middleweight;
Don Cockell, lightheavyweight;
and Jack Gardner, heavyweight.

Two Italian claims for matches
with Turpin and Cockell have
been turned down.

The Committee decided that
Gino Campagne, Italian middle-
weight is not at the moment good
enough to be considered, and the
issue is further involved by the
fact that Turpin is due to fight
Dave Sands of Australia, for the
Empire Title, and possibly Ray
Robinson for the World Cham-
pionship.

The Committee also agreed not
4to proceed at the moment with
the claims of the Italian champion
Totini, for a European title fight
with Coekell.

—Reuter



411—7

Close of play scores in Mon-
day’s first class cricket matches
at Lord’s: M.C.C. first innings
411 for seven declared, Yorkshire
first innings all out 218. Second
innings 32 for one (non-county
match). At Oxford Lancashire
first innings 408 for three declared
Oxford University first innings al!
out for 144, Second innings 62
for five (non-county match)—(CP)

—





INTERCOLONIAL
FOOTBALL

JAMAICA vs
BARBADOS

JAMAICA TEAM ARRIVES
May 18 for tour until May 30

May 21 vs. COLTS XI
May 23 vs. CARLTON
May 24 vs. COLONY
May 26 vs. COLONY
May 28 vs. SPARTAN
May 29 vs. COLONY



ADMISSION: Kensington and
George Challenor Stands 2/-
per match.

UNCOVERED STANDS 1/-
per match.

GROUNDS 6d. per match.



Season tickets for admission
to Kensington and George
Challenor Stands $2.00 each.



O. S. COPPIN,
Hony. Secty.
B.A.F.A.

a a
. Se



The
AMATEUR ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION

OF BARBADOS

presents its

BIG THREE-DAY
CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

KENSINGTON OVAL

Whit-Monday . May 14th
‘Thursday . May 17th
& Saturday . May 19th

beginning at 1 p.m, each day

; e
48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad broth-
an coo aed zeae

reher, ugge' junte,
Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin
Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists

and A as well as
Miss _— Cumberbatch
oh Miss Eileen King in
at the Historic Oval

Gates Open at 12 noon daily

e
PRICES OF ADMISSION :
SEASON TICKETS

Kensington Stand . . $2.16
George Challenor . . $1.68
a

DAILY TICKETS

Kensington Stand + $1.00
Gecerge Challenor . . 2e.
Uncovered Seats . 48e,
Grounds . 1... . %#€

Season Tickets on Sale daily
at the Civic, Swan & High
Street.

Tenders are invited for
Sale of Bar and Refresh-
ment Rights to Saturday,

May Sth at 4.00 p.m \%

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1951













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FILES



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WEDNESDAY. MAY 2. I HI BARBADOS ADVOt VTE PACE FIVE C.J. Approves W.I. Team Stalin' Takes Salute At Mav Day ParaH. V A. 1 Mil Hi IIIIS l.\.l \\l To Tour Australia SR ALI.AN COLLYMORE. President ol th,Baitadoc Cricket Association, told the Advocate yesterday that he ti.ouyht the West Indies turn to tour Australia later in the year was a very good one. He thought thit the P h *ianx-ci Sovi.-t lluvernmen". i-electors had done as good a job as anvone t^lld have 'eadcrs on the sa'utinp. base hoped for > Moacow*! K. I • ,,uare toA number of other mckaters interviewed yesterday ''?>' '" r ln traditional Soviet also expressed sat sfaction with the selection of the team Mj,> "'> parade past I.inin's Sn Allan Mid that he pleased to see the number ol allin inr team, !nce iBJHuelOn ... .. %  rnp .it.,1,' %  ISC hoped thai thiloam woni.l pull inselhei ,ib anoj learn ,T?',"">."'"'!."" "'' SS* '"' rord '" <" Mow-on liadio.' thai .l.shouM.,,ve %  food acttua. TO !" he munag ,„ ?„' „ cd Square and mounted tl„ tomb tor his address Policemen Open Shops At Central Station LONDON. Mav 1. Marshal Stalin headed I'imli. While massed bands played, Marshal Alexander Vseauev sky. Arm', iflnistei inspected lied up in die squire adjoining the Red Square, acef the Ineir opened thli coed barber euttSBf. restaurant which doing Ihe hair Kill f itself as did 11Klast ndies leam in England T ..E POLICEMEN a, .hettntr.l ^L^aVt^ former flo^ete, ~-J?*£SJ Police station now hav. Captain of the Spartan Crick SiaHn,\£ :rlra IK! barber shop, This M Sab, ntd Hut thi tana on U. %  !., Swl,n nd %  *> hl "' l k una an fxocnwho],wn nod Bnougl 35 factories apjar* %  ; i % % %  ^dsa hot meals, will IH> opened „t the '•' > hl tW-ectlon and did not nee \ : s ,' J !" J?J: Central .Police Station, shortly. %  i-.s-K.HnltarMrtltw to countries'" or makh Lmi,i>iM who come in wnen on C.uilln. (he pal) .none about f or j, n>| wai F duty will be able to purchise hot Which there scemc.t to be pyblu y cr American monopolist* war <""• OgtttnrWI necessary for the enslavement Dunn* thcwcek a shoemaker. nai1ia' — ' other countries" he dcvl ircd shop and tailors department MX ... 'a" "!,"," t*, 1 ?",, ,,. • '"' *U reason that the. T IT-V. J? ... ?^!W*cltlto In John ooddmn. U K 1 ^ Ih* island will av thM lf Guillens Mk-Ctlon be attending the Empire Youth Was he re8U |, 0 llW | r considered Sunday service jt Government opinion and not of a Bompromi tMf) he thought it was one House 0 n Sunday at 4.30 p They will carry banners bearing the names of their vaiiou* clubs. O N MAV I the Mounted Police will give the M'.sical Ride and members of the Police Band will beat the Retreit at District "A" Police Station fur memberi of the Caribbean Commission who will be in the Island. T Ht BJtrrift!! COUNCIL Friday evening film shows for thepublic will be discontinued for some weeks. *T*HE OIAITEIII.V Service of %  Song of the Salvation Army will be held in the Reed Street Hall on Thursday a t 8 00 p.m The Songster Brigades. Young People's Singing Companies d&d Youth Qroups of the two City Corps will 'take part. On Friday, May 4. the Salvation Army will be holding its Annual Tag Day and it is expected that the public will give generously to the taggers. A S A RESULT of motorists cooperating with the Police by pot parking their vehicles along Bay Slrecl during the rush hours ,haI ,h e team was a —3.30 to 4.30 p.m.—traffic is able "<' should brim, back the to How more freely and congestion J'** tlM reduction of arm amenta. nopoltaij are wg%  %  't ii agaiiiM the Konstfl people. Jhi~ upJUM war will bring the Amer.ca.i people nothing good. They will not I ,• held by clumsy manoeuvre* by which they try to dirguls*' inin Mtbgki ni ROTM %  Peace Uanlrd lid: -The people do not want war. 1„ all OOUtttriM the rank* o| lit-hiei* for peao against forces of aggression ore growing dailv. "I~le Soviet Union's polfc v || dear. Our Govcrunient has alwiy. i nrfil cooUnuo to pursue a polk* of provooUng war •iiid safeginirdlng peace He began his speech by cltiming that the Russian people hod •ucccssfully fulfilled their post-war Five Year Plan. Most important tarks had been ".. i fulfilled. "The economy of our country is i new high level", he declared. prf*nt tour Tney were iireud by well knjwn En.i*4lh playti.... CHSII Nnl McCarthy H here seen holding the Mascot of the feam Sir ALLAN COLLYMORE E. A. V VlitlaWI howeve felt reduceil. Col R. T. Michelin told th> Advocate that one cr parked In this narrow street during the peak Rum: until been civ Guillen. He thought that Atkinion he. that cithe should huvi pit feronea u "All branches of our industry i rievelupmg rapidly." lOVRM gUMU" from MVtlpI foreign countries were on the "' % %  Ntwlni "liuid. including France. lub Oormany, Holland. Swadtn, I kland. Denmark, Austni. Canada. Iceland. Britain. Amenci i %  I Koroa They were described as "repre' nUI %  • % %  i the m rkliu people" Memljers 0 f tb.Diplomatic i : t ltd Military AttaotM M %  ilso present. h ill girl climbed on to the lection, but added that ! %  v..ii<>-trum and handed Stalin a big A .... ,.,„,. good cricketer and be wished bouquet of flowers Ha lifted her LTl2r vTuirnK nlm we UP ln hut armj and wavetl <> the ., u o t , ^r 1 *" t c u Mr A M r *y ior Mtd ,hDl lne crowd Black Rock, on Sunday when a eam Wfl5 a good onr and | hl Real* reports from other aeries of "try-outs on the Olym,„,„ tnal lhe Selectors could centres describing Mov Dav Beatpic lifts by the welghtlrting memnavo possibly picked. There brations said: bers of the Club, took place. werf no surprise selections and This was in preparation for the w j ( h good conditions, the team Rduio Jenos/of/ forthcoming Inter-Club Ch.mshould do well in Austrah.. MCWO ^***'*ai? pionships which will be held by Mr. C. G. Alleyne said that the Damascus Pnllee -,.r^i,.,i t,.„ the Amateur Weightlifting Assoteam was a well balanced one Communists in oTmaJcu^ after a Queen's Purk. next It was popular opinion that fast clarh on th(f w %  M g^jj ** hniS Wh iCn ,hrcc I^P1P were iniuiedl Authorities look ^special pre-' period can c.us* a great' d'eafof JSSLSPVfJS^^SS &*?£ tlisliK-atioii in the flow of traffic. LARGE CROWD turned out the York Barbell Club. might the youn; 536 lbs, U. Bartlett : Pn 1591 Clean and jerk 192 Total r.l3>lbs. Officials: Referee J. Bullen •Iiidges A Walcott and C. Welch Waterfront Crane Removed clution month. bowlers were very The results were as follows:— Australia and one S Rudder: Press 151. Snatch thought that one ol tne >oun, lilutlon ror ^dav three were 172. Clean and Jerk 217 Total 546 stera like t.oodridgcot J..m:ilc.i i, ljurrd whm |k| II. Stoddard: Press 172 Snatch or Frank King of Tnmdad might „ roUD Communists who were dis I5*|. Clean and jerk 204', Total have been tried lribut.ng map. outside last nlghl ,.2. sn.,ch i&g&2&!hrz ""=-"s tho West Indies llu.il swot Mr lchaol> ^ c | untried or Ine.penenred fast wilnoul i>u||Ui lp „„ sporl bowlers. I-ong processions of work m niMsa Ratline cr carrying red Rags conStroneer Ballmit VCIOd nn h( .joo.ye.r-old lir was looking forward to the <*olosscum. the world's largest West Indies putting up a good amphitheatre for a mass meeting ANOTHER crjne Is going up „n showing In Austiallo as they had %  •nganlted by the Communist led the waterfront of the inner ba.iin , K ,wcrful batting side whlfh he tj, 2?*T a l Confederalion of Labour, of Ihc Careenage. It U Messrs. Mi was even stronger than Followers of the rival Christian Plantations Ltd.'s crane which Australia's. "CIS' L,bo r Organisation they removed from the berth of Mr. A. ON. Skinner said that mulched to a big theatre for the Careenage oupa-ite Ihc Spirit he thouht ihe Selectors had a separj.le rally Later they dis. Bond. done a lirsl rl.ss Job as he was tributed free meal, to unemploy The crane's new berth Is jusl a 1001 In agreement with their ed work. !" nd pensionerj. %  linn He did not see how Waiter Heulher. Eurnj)can possible change could have representati%'e ( f the United neei. mude In 'he personnel of States Congress of Industrial learn He said that it Organizations, told a May Dav jred to him as if the S 1902 the island exported £63.IW worth of aloes. Planters do not cultlva'e n now as thev ciaiRI lh cannot ni'ow it ptulUa bly. Writing in the We s i ln.1.,, BulletUl of 1902. Mr William •'. Freetnan, Seientlfh Atautant, Imperial Depaiimani ol Agriculture lor the West Indies, said that one ol the reasons for the decline in the industry was the crude pio teas of manufacture. At that time Bte DUtCh West Indies ti-e.l t,. supply sufficient to Hood the market This too helped to prevent tie Industry from bei revived I 'rive fnt*/H>etor Den iet* Ru mini rs tif Mvut Price* pound is what thep* are paying [or bci I %  position purehan the aan>e shillings: or two ihininfi and (Ixpence without even mnkir. plaint ceneral toeaai * % %  %  "awdaj thai ihe %  ' ,: thnt> ,i\ eenta |H*r il thli pi und ii . i' lean. The but ra icfuse to *etl u,,. (io.l eutl P KIM.I %  %  car and go to ., butchet man is idven a choice eul of be look with .in anvtoui eye that ( a nan K paytni pcrha %  iln v\ knowa. |faa butcttari i Price Contri i in ihe Public Ma did no) return to bin wtni at e Mnpl % %  of teliiiK bivf at m I II N I'rnfilrci iim I md VCOl en re always sold it the • novei heard < %  .,-,. u i i trying n proAtaei on theae Tra mitcnora. i raa ennki %  %  van %  ik below II,. <2 ceiitg pei paund. >ml\ racenuj %  ion began %  ellin pork „t the s.heduled price Evan lid that be s.,., AllH>4l arfucb stated that ihe bulcrten stofan was %  I'm 4L cents nrtxii T. MI/I iv i II n mop/cj— Womon knon il rnsun^ a lovHv skin at i< 111!'.I I • /iroleela ihe•kin fro* irisMkkta %  oflena awl perfuai*. IW I ...... ..„,„,<. ih.i ddaa i-.i. <>lrmm*ri ihof,.,,,!,!,. sjtvlly . gi\t> |.e.ir,t 'aan' (outwlitiua fa* i tun Jet Th* wr 1"1 of • |f.elii) So.' >>p..n four win i* w it'-rtsi M frfirtainsj' a>scnrarrrMik'r*ITUit a. etui' niiua far preamiac a uUy .l<". frreuiai I.11U Men look •* iha hollr.i ail \l nisTtil. MOj oouriao I be .In. .ilh H.i tm' jeaa_ IIAZELINE SNOW n Virtuoso At 8 "Father" i.-hi., walked around beamlni yealerday at the musical InatrumraU and iiiimf. departanent up Ulrs Harrtson's when hU I. .r ..id M.I, fcfbcrl Laahley played by air quite a revpopular piano pieces and attracted a lane number ot onloafcer* Mttlr Kiberl'H lalrnt idbravered same weeks •>: %  by Mr. Maurlre Jones of thr (ilohe Thralrr and he was made to play nome pieces before an audience at that theatre Yesterday he waa Just dolnf aa himmlllni father told him. now saylnf "Play them a Jail." and then. "A faater piece". The boy wa* not troubled by the onlaakera, but Just played ia naive way It happened that vlellnUl William Clalrmonle was around al the same iim r and he lava him a preaenl of a book from the book store above. The young pianist picked. "Adventure sitory far boys" The Director of Agriculture Mr. (' < Skeete. told the Advocate >< tentay that the aloes Industry is not as big In tha Dulch Wesi Indies now either. That may be due to a le-.-i demand 1W the Aid IMtintl Tor it or I. ... Bd tO lieef. "It is DO uM pObplO i .nrut. to Ihe newapoper wltri .1 rani 1 >K tin. The) iiiiiti io to the rifh v.. iren," Captalji BVBBO said. Me said that ,it pie en bulcheri have .1 it lei 1 :ii< \ havi 1 -i \.i renreaenled 1 i.. ihe Control r ol Prt< • I ail want a bottei priei. but ti.< put u|. %  Col which can be |u. load il th1 ireumstances warrant it. Me addi <1 that ..' ( % %  %  %  uppl) of .attie f.u. gnori ol ih dornand fot rreati beeg Fi-h IMcggt As regai.i. il-l i iptall & .11-t thai it Ii Inypoaalble to troi th> 11" M % %  ( Rgn under un exi-tmg vv-tem Tin<. .\c rj mem mutl centraUag the martti if ihe iiMiruniM era to b> IHI! from ooltln %  When boati go to thai iiiitKoii.ii> lELuovt a in. pnnnrci • • I|.M. %  It/Me.. CaOBM' 114. Jl i J J - from the Oovernor-in-l.ecflUvi Committee ol articles valued at 5/9 on April 20 was further atiJourned bv a 1'ohce Magistrate of District %  A", until May 10. The Police arc also bringing cases of larceny from the (Jovernor in-Executive Committee against Millicent Delgr;u llindsbury Bond, Emily 5r tonic It is used for fev-i, spleen, hver tioublea and for eye .ii ..,-. Aloes used to be grown rhieily on an extensive tract of waste. rocky land on the Wiridwaid roast of St John and St I'd] r in particular They me speeiall.i adapted for growth in IKHH soilHardy PI .m It Is so hardy that no great amount ol protection needs to be taken except that It bi grow best in dry weather as there is the possibility ol %  %  rotting when il Is young and gets h*much water. Mr. Freeman quoted LagOO tfl da Bib) the plant when he laid, "The leaves are four inchebioad. three quarter inch thick and one and a half feet long with on either side, and the last sprout which rises up In lb* middle bears yellow flowers one above another." The Marbudiun aloes is said to have been first known in London warehouses in 1093. "Their fleshy leavej rHntll| large sources of water In raaarve for periods of prolonged drought. "If kept in good order and weeded, the first crop can W gathered in a year's time. The> of ore cut about six inches obov of the have The rut leaves on %  mooring* lull doses the fish In il the llftherin.il |al th. vartot %  crone's new berth is jusl a few yards to the ewt of the sel vacuum pan molasses berth. The inj crane will be used chiefly loading lighters with puncheons of 'hi mObnen The trunk is already in eppeo P "^,„, ,1,1. *. crane I. beln. %  SpW^ '" erected. %  •*• — %  — !" it Messrs. removed. Ctvuvi-fend Hlr.k P i-k Kmestptacad with leav? s t 0 one side OUteni uf Browne's Land. St The mice rapidly exudes am Michael, Florence Ward of running down the trough is caught Alleyne's Land, St. Michael, and njollettinn ft i new crane Is being old crane opposite ( S P. Musson is beir The crane owned Mo>os said that the Coininform was not sterile antiim was a" good selection. Tne Communism, but determination to 1 only su I'lse was Guttattt whom maki> democracy work. .^ y he'considered very lucky. He Ai'Brrvsion Messrs H. Jasorr Jones AV Co., Ltd, K „ tl „| x \\:\\ places could not be i„ a fighting sj>eech he said was out of commission for year, '; ,,„. Le^n nor Ganteaume. he mos eiTeclive counter to Its 2-foot platform was being dug aUhoU| ,i, he couhl not y %  '• stalinut aggression" lay in the down yesterday and in a few days. whpV expense as the team woi determination of free men the spot will be level ag mi. j a r|v wc u balanced one everywhere to make democracy The old crane is being removed work by translating democratic because Its owners agreed with ,. .r, _„ _„ idealism into a practical and Ihe Port F-nquiry Committe,. Thai / fOJgen ifteU( IsOntes positive programme of social It was Just a hindrance on the and economic action." waterfront. With the crane reMEAT was plentiful in Bridge"Millions of free Trade Unionmoved, more space will be avjHtown yesterday. Beef, mutton. 1st* In America stand by your able for schooners and motor ves vca) poultry—in all sorts of cuts side. They will never forget 5els to discharge their cargoes. —were thrown ashore on the your devotion to freedom and wharf by lighter after lighter. will never abandon interest In a • l? TV -a, The supply of refrigerated meat your fight. MO&lC tiXUin KCSU.IS had just arrived from Aifttnlia If necessary, we arc determined by the steamship Ta-warlro. i<> give added weight to thi Other results of the Practical Housewives, who are nn* ge: pledge by common trade union FjtaminaJion of the Royal Schools ting over the recent butchers' act lor together with you against of Music, taken by Mr. II Wilson ltr tkc in the City market Itewi'v NicholU of llelfleld Land. St. Michi.el Mr. E. W. Barrow is appearing on liehalf of Hulson. while Mr w w Raaca, K c, is raroeecuung for the Polne On Iha llrst day of hearing, Cpl Watson g.ive evidence of bow he searched Hut son's basket while she was leaving the Mental Hospital going home on April 20 about S.H p.m. He told the court that he found many goods in the basket which were wrapped in brown paper These goods the defendant sain got from the place where sbi pTortrad In the Ment..l I 1 Richard It-K-k. assistant gatekeeper gave evidence for the prosecution ond said Ibal '" •' when the defendant Th r matter is then boiled used to br shipped awav in tl In those days, he wrote, t cost of the cultivation of t manufacture %  ftei il .iptantsd %  %  V*> |>ei .HI*' JBJ for Wounding A City Police Magistrate yesteri ." %  roar old Doroth] St Miton. ; don u ll.ilis Road, gmity .f wourMUni Samuel Rayride, %  labourei "i S. hool 'i;i| ( II. .11'. Road, with %  knife on April I Stanton was Oned rs u> bt paid by monthly instalments oi In default two months' Imprison .nto his office l-> cpl. Watson and ment with hard IJIXHII I>I o her baskets searched. died / .vhiie threats from extreme right gfld ore:— PHB4I of Mis. M. B P. A. r. c. p. Taylor M Grade V. P Bayley. Grade IV P Bancroft. Grade 1 P. M. Best. Orade IV M. P. Spencer. Grade II. If. C Coddard. Grade I. P D Glbbs. Grade V P. they ore being asked to pay, more per pound for beef, waa %  rrlval of the Montreil-AustraliJ New Zealand Liner. The refrigerated cargo wa* loaded at Brisbane and Melbourne It Included ox crop beef, tongues. Icins, rumps and livers, boneless beef, frozen chickens, briskets and who would seek l< ncfal and economic our personal free. Mrs J phoney loft den uj justice and dom." Prague: President Klement Gott wald told n May Day meet in.; here today that "exposure and liquidation" of former Foreign Minister Vladimir Clementis had 1 Goddard Grade III P b **'' frozei ? cnlcken1 w i!" !" a " frustrated western hope* that I G^ Grade V M fllleU. sundries, rashers^There was .., u Wr nton would BUC ^ ed il( also canned and potted meat, csechoslovakia. %  Czech news sau-"age3. soups, sweet corn M „ncy reported orange juice, -canned pejr* and i. rp .,dcnt Gottwald coupled peaches, bacon, liquid egg a.io th# tormtr Foreign Minister with milk products. Marie Overmova and Otto Sling. The Teawartro also landed here wo f (irmer highly placed Com1,092 packages of tinned and 200 mi in.sts who have been denounc ciaes of cooking butter along with rd as "traitors and plotters" with t>o b?;* of Pat butter. &fl package* clementis. if hams. 1.746 cases and cartons The Czechoslovak ft'esident-deof cheese. K.ibi itlon of "tins From Melbourne she brought gang" aa a "great contribution 1.268 jute bags and from Adelaide, to the consolidation and strength50 r.rtons Cf nicrchandise She enii-g of our state and the cause arrived ben Spain, ol world peace, getting very oppressive near i from which port she brought 38 ndoi : Three ouarters of a r m a sudden downpour of rain tierces of oranges for local fruit million Chinese marched past fell for about five minutes. The sellers. Mao Tse Tung In Peking's city workers were glad for thiThe Toncarlra's agents a r e biggest ever May Day parade. 'oollng rain especially -ifter that. Mcssr?. Da Costa & Co. Ltd. according to Peking radio, ihe beat started to grow less. The column of lei. people Finotl WChailes Bruce F.u lev of Oi. ng< Mill. St .lames, was ordrre.i t. pay a fine of 20/by a Ihstrlc "A" Police Magistrate for faillnf to produce his driving licence when asked to do so. In another case brotlg] Police charging him with not paying attention to road signs he war lined 40'. to (%  paid in 21 days or In default two months' Imprisonment. Both offences were committed on March 7 M P C'obham. A T.C 8. A Skinner. Grade I. P PapilB of *.nM '.ninth B W Chandler Grade IV P C. J Smith, Grade IV. M. (Violin J. Greaves. Grade V P, R. E C. Mug. Grade V P. 89 IN THE SHADE Bridgetown had a hot day yes terdav The iKirometei in the .shade When the heat wa* DID NOT STOP:FMe0 10'A District "A" Police Magistrate yesterday fined Clayton Willoughby. a laoourer of BaneGap, Spooner's Mill, 10/for not stopping at a major rood while he was riding the bicycle M-3664 on March 6. James who treated Rayslde fo. the wound at in. f.rr.rial il % %  pi "ild that the injury was no ment and could not be *nin, with bright eyes, nduni >omplc*ion, sad ical ftincn, Njture dcirutult duf 00 seep your system cleansed 3 impurities. i IIUKJI I, i doctors conhim Out Mile BcaAl do BUS, icntlv and erlsctiverr Hik Ik-im antucplng roiialoni hcalihy and youthful in li.ik. and ligurc Man taVing Ihv.n lonWat. Nsiure'i Gem/e Aid BlLt BEANS SPECIFY EVERITE" ASBESTOS-CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND "TURMIX" ASBESTOS WOOD. Supplies are in demand again MUM \IS l'| V. i4ih •<-. i mi si XIS i „h t-, ri N< ii. BOXEfl i ,i, lit ITONI M.I > illimetk Baah lac si : vi ii ie: and HI-. HY. and 30. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, II, 12, & Kl. !; %  :< \|i STRKKT lots of other I '-s-i-ii I items %  %  %  % % % % % %  WWW % %  at 1 "PUIIIIVA" I HEX CHOW I (S.ri.lili 1.1. %  MI) I wee !H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Di.wbuto,.. k v,ww, w/VWAV .,. Mw ATTKNTMVti FACTORY V///.V/,V//^//'a4*VV-V.\v MANAGERS Take tin* opportunity l obtaining yovx rcquiremcnl-* IN GALVANISED & Ranging from abreast was six mi'es long, The c iv was ..bl.i/and cr




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PAGE sre BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. MAY 2. 1SI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON to miaMi, you, \ovi\ljjr Jfor &t&t1&*M*&L 1£aj* c-"bf TaV-'-'r <• raao* UML MM* T niu^va Ibu *uit iMhaa *•* %  %  * •** '* COLD CREAM to cleanse and soften your :;km. POND'S VANISHINC cm AW to protect your skin by day and to hold your powder matt. Arsons why *aw* Ofc-h-U thai nice fcdinj of wanrth and comlort you get on chrst and byck when you rub on pkasarTi VapoRub. U worki ouliirfr like a pouluoe. "drawing out* achy :iMnf At :hr wrw ume ... ohlV" t lM>v woihnif medicinal vapour* released) by VapoRub! They *ork uui* the ltiilate*l air-pasag. and clear iiully note. ca>€ lore throat, cilm coughing -rhn"imtde-ouuvide" action continue* (or hour!during %  Wep dually, by morning, the *or*t 0< Iht cold is mm '^W VAPORUI IT PAY S YO U TO DEAL HERE SPEQAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW 70 •9 Fry's Cocoa 1 lb. Tins 47 12 24 21 Condensed Milk, Tins 27 Heinz 2.p 92 8 Baked Beans Tins 28 24 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street "/ %  W.VWiv-SWVWWX^I'WVrt^^^ AGENTS IN ARMS by MARY WINTER BEYOND THE EAGLE'S RAGE by HUGH POPHAM TWO SCAMPS by NOEL GODBER A WINDOW CLEANER'S ROMANCE by GEORGE A. BIRMINGHAM ADVOCATE STATIONERY B*j I I Oil BETTER VOOKMXG FLORENCE 1 %  OIL "STOVES AND OVENS BRITISH i mSTUHOIMHlBWm. B.W.I.A.. BRIDGETOWN || CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. I s I < > i Mw wtawwvwwww i II mm I—******



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%  II I I Vi m; Service chicft appointed to rnwm.m *.. %  + % % %  .. loo|) ifUr p otw ., ion of Briuin OIL: Persia want* reb.iton oil sold to British navy C'OMMOX*: Fden take* Attire government to task on raw materials issue W II N major action on front line: * %  : Reds hold bock big offensive THREE TO DIRECT DEFENCE OF U.K. I Chinese Reds Delay Expected Attack Committee Formed: Dempsey In Charge LONDON, Hay 1. URITAIN has created a Commander in Chiefs Committee for Home Defence in time of war it was officially announced to-day. General Sir Miles Dempsey, Commander of the British Second Army during the Normandy Beachhead in 1944, will be the Chairman. He will also be Commander in-Chief of Bri tish land forces. HOV.%1. FAMILY TUMI I Hi W.I.I. Admiral Power, present Com. inanUer-in-Chief al Portsmouth. Mill have charge of all naval matters connected with the defence of British home waters. Air member will be Air Marshal Sir Basil Embry. Commander-inChief of Fighter Command Authoritative sources asid today the Committee hud been cstabljhed t bmld up a command organisation for the defence of Britain in time of war. One source said the move certainly did not mean Britain was becoming insular minded. It was a normal defence precaution. One of Ceaeral Dempsey's first tasks will be to establish liaison l>etween his Committee and Ministries with which he would have to co-operate in lime of war such as the Ministry of Food and Civil He fence Services. The Committee, which will have full responsibility for defence of Britain in the event of war will be responsibly to the Chiefs of Staff —-Heuter. Petain Gets Bouquet ILE DE YEL1. May 1. Madame Petain took of carnations to-day i year-old husband in hit forlref* cell to celebrate his name dav. May 1 Festival. St. Phillips. Madame Petain said he was "wondfj fully well" after his re— edit attack of pneumonia. "I have high hopes that he will not end his days here" she said. —R ruler U.S. Saved Life Of Western EuropeEden LONDON. May 1. The United Slates has a real desire lo see that scarce raw material., are fully distributed among North Atlantic countries. Supply Minister George Strauss, tld Commons to-day. He was meeting a Conservative challenge aimed ot embarrassing the Government over the resignation of three Ministers test A motion being pushed to (He vote later to-night expressed anxiety that the Arms Programme wta based on the production es tlma'es not accepted by the Minis Inelpalty concerned, before Strauss spoke. Anthony Eden, chief Conservative speaker in the debate, said Aneurin Bevan ,itid uther resigning Ministers had bouquet' made grave charges which the her 85(Government must cither accept or refute. €•>'I* "P*#t' Wanna buy IOHM nulphurf Labour Protests Eden deplored the "harsh wet c's" about the United States by SOflM lesiidiing Ministers. Amid protests from some labour members, he said "it was the United States alone which saved the life ol Western Europe". Strauss replied there v. no reason to he unduly pessimistic He said "it is too early to say nether tve wiiliget the raw materials we need for our Defence, Programme and our essential civil production, but we arc nut Justified here .ind now in saying that we will not. Aneurin r>cvan in a speech of only two minutes accused Conservatives of the "old fashioned [Party JOUStiM' ID fr-imug then motion which expressed anxiety [that the Arms Programme was j based on production setlmates nol accepted by the Ministers principally concerned. Bevan said that he hoped | Government would beable to get raw materials from the Urn i State rporc speedily Uun .: ope time seemed likely: also that It {would not be "entirely scornful" if any help his resignation might I 'iave afforded Dtvaa said he and Wilson would (prefer to be proved wrong thar ri|f ht —K ruler. GIVE UP A MEAL A WEEK NEHRU TELLS INDIANS NEW DELHI. May 1. Indian Prime Minister Nehru, to-night called on all Indians to Rive up one meal a week to help save the country from the "hovering spectre of famine". Nehru proposed that food grains saved should be sent as gifts to worst affected areas in Bihar and Mi-dras. The Prime Minister thanked ,,. those countries which had sent Aft Ml lie hlH'rgV vVlIli r TUB KINO AND QUEEN, and Queen Mary y.surdsy tonree \ ths Connaoiiwealut lecurn and bought many W I minimAppeal For Men To End Dock Strike WELLINGTON. May I. The New Zealand Government on Tuesday called on all ablebcKiied men to join the Civil Force to combat industrial strikers Who are trying to overthrow orderly Government by lorce. Prime Minister Sidney Hollind maoc his appeal as a dock workers strike dragged through it* 10th week. Hastings and dynamiting of p coal district bridge have added to the ;ensli-n. Holland snld th ( country's Industrial crisis has taken a dramatic and grave turn. He urged loyal uti/ens to register; lot an emergency civil organization and ild a similar call mlghi be issued women.— Kft Fe/ar Rules Russia Says Harriman I .OS ANGK.-r. .. May I Piesidenl Truman's personal foreign policy spokesman said la*Q night that Russia was ruled by fesr —'The Kremlin fears th. people and the people fear uh< Kremlin W A. Harriman, Truman* special Fcreign Affairs ntsistunt, sbid Marshal Stalin once admitted ti him thai the Kremlin had been unable to gain the loyalty of the Russian people. Id -ind the admission .luring | talk he had with Stalin while serving in Moscow ns United States Ambassador. Harriman quoted the Ruatll leader ag saying during the last war that people were "nghtfgg fj their motherland, not fui uv" He nddei' "By us", he meant the Kn'inim (Jnlupp) peopls ofl satellite countries gvs only to be free from its iron I I llarnmun waft speaking befOM tr.t Amen:-1) Association for thf L'u.ted N itil A fleuter Queen Ablks About Barbados Rum (Krnm Our Own Correspondent 1 LONDON. May I, Tlie Queen to-day asked msny questions about Baibadi %  ., rum. She also admired a conch shell table lamp, at the Barbados stand, when Their ftf..jesties this reornliU visited the Commonwealth section of ho Hrilish Industries Kan Buyers placed two lar^c orde] lui" Barbados rum Th.Kind's knowledge of trxasphalt industry intrigued officials at the Trinidad stand during Their Majesties' tour. It' calling that he had once w I'od m Trinidad's asphalt lake. Hi.*4J-vsty chatted cagciky abmil MM asphalt industry with the O' rSMft of Trinidad's lake of {asphalt. He coinmenusd favour LL. rraaag, at .4// Quiet On Korean Fronl TOKYO, May 1 MASSED CHINESE F0RMATI0WS threaten ing Seoul kept well out of artillery range to day and made no attempt to start any direct onslaught on the battered city Twice in the last three days Communist columns venturing to within a few milea of the city have been pounded to pieces by United Nations guns Persia To Set Up National Oil Co. Board LONDON, May I i .. to set up a National i i nip.iny with a Maimgm .1 VIM. i. Hoard ol You Duck And Laugh At The. Mm'ifs i-ONDON. MHV I. The Festival of Britain's .tereontopic clnamu sets a new fashion in movie*. Both sound and vision are three dimensional hard formidable objects such as cricket balls, and lump-, of rock seem to fly nut of the KcrSSSI making the audience •luck involuntarily and then laugh I'hatacters seem to walk right out n( the screen Into ftsUj Sounds like *ighi* have remark %  bit depth. They COOS BSJ .'.udience Icom concealed loud speakers completely encircling th** walls cf the theatre so that eaih iDatrutasni bn the urchss'xs bcIUIIICS separate and distinct. I-.illApplebaum from Toronto ramo lo Britain ipa ct a U y to write musir for some sUreoscoplc ppru Production was by Jack lU'ph also of Toraoto, The lyslem gives the mustcian hance to deveton a new meUtsxt ol comp'ttitlon %  —sir. 50 Hurt In May Day Disorders Operate Eloetrieity BURNOS AIRES. May I Argentina'! entire electric network may be operated by atomic energy within two yeari. Peron said to-day He was delivering an annual "state of the Nation" message to the inaugural session of Congiesv The President said: "If experimental "l.ini go as they have been going until now. within t"u years the whole network of electric power in the Argentine will be operated by controlled atomic energy." Then the v.*trld will know." he added, "Low It has been wasting iti time preparing for a war while Argentina ha.s been working for peace "—Stealr.-. May Day Strikf MADRID. May 1. Worker* in some textile 'tories and home heav.s indurtiy plants |n Barce*ona went on -tr.ke today. But other Worker* in the city disregarded the reported call for %  general slay Day strike Tbere were demon st ration* : Utf PARIS. May 1. Ag Hi' Communist parade Paris was eliding, fighting bi >ut_" monstrators and the Pol Fifty Police were reported hurt though none seriously. group of about 1,000 North •nostly members of the nt for the Triumph of Deigjocrattc Liberties" (a semiCommunist organisation) were eying banned banners with Nationalist slogans. When the Police asked them to hand over the banners, some demonstrators hurled paving i -id used clubs. Others uprooted spiked railings nrroundlng trees and threw them like rpears. Arrests were made after about 900 extra Police arrived —Reuter. (sontrvls On Japan Will Bv Relaxed TOKYO. Mn\ I Th United States Supreme Commander in Japan Lieutenant Jon era I Matthew 1) Hidgway u Ui Japangve today he Mould eofuwtsfr to relax occupotloa cuotiols go as to 'smoothly bridga" the transit ion to |ndependn< iwith thf pence treaty. Th* General's message for the t-UCD >utniH*n tntal BH chaag-u m. the romp ntml Today Allied patroia had t.ut and find the Cbiness Btfl though the> Itruck far out from the threatened capital, the) f< Prom the early hours of the day Allied troops In the defence are around the South Korean capital had wailed on Ihe alert for the expected attack Chii" a of thelal lew days had Sjvtr rtSS to the thsorv that the Coaunuoials all-out attutk on Ihs cRl would start in the BrM horns of Mv Pa> No Hasa Assault lint all through the night th. AlssM listened in Vain PM UM BOO familial sounds of a Chinese ma* 1 assault bugle calls, high pitched i and i.i lung gongs All they i ;i ..id Ads the occasional ilrone ol Alliei north lor mghl att.uk on Conj. nunlst supply lines Todsy an Air Force spokesman said Allied pilots had spotted at least 4.300 lorrtes on Nortn Korean roads during vestcrdav and last night Thc\ had dsSWnyi than S00. a new record lot a Mi.gle da\ s operation Planes w*r back in tho air today again eoneentrnflng their fourth anniversar: of n-.th the King and the Queen ihewfd keenest enthusiasm ovci the general attractiventii of th* We Indies stands. Hi i* Majesty made purchases at difloient West Indies stands lOtluding two handbags by the Grenada Manufacturing Company at Uie Trinidad stand and two hand'-ags of sisal material a'. JamuicVs stand. At the latter .tan.' Her Majesty remarked appreciatively on "all thi lovely Wprl dune in Jamaica %  Never Saw KuttSfeSfl Belorc While at the Tjinidad stand. Her Majesty made inquiries aboul the i.mt lrom Grenada and .win -he had never seen it before. S. island cotton look the eye of the King, who wanted to know fiom whuh partuulai part of the %  SM Indies it rauie Connell Lambed of the West Indies Cumnvtlee said that the BUtarial HU M.. i t) was Inspecting came ftOH It Vknoanl A hufe block of bauxite at th* Bntiih Qulana Mend, brought forth isore questions from Ihe t.i Again il was llci Vtajei. who was anxious to know ItSv. thitgs were manufactured : d loi some minutes *hile otficisll at the stand explained alumir um psVOSSsi (iiiecn Mary Buys Queen Mary, who visited thi HIE to-day l.ught 12 handker hiefs mftde of sea island CottOfl •l tbe West Indies stall. Twi tuyirs from Germany anc lelgium placed large orders foi ,ea island cotton. Mr E Piggott. industrial agen %  f Diissetdorf. enquired aboul th< Japan's |KI ibilitjes 0 r obtaining ra^ the SEARCH SPKEADS SAIGON. May I The air and sen search for the missing reconnaissance plane with consultation Clone ral Andre Hartemann French Governments, (iir force Commander in Indoconclusive rei China spread in the island to-day. I way said —Reuter id th had been pVv from occupati puii.ose of evolving through established i>rtr,'<-ei I'lice. and 1 nt situation rend* %  desirable R ldkavay said tbe ri four yaata application of the new ('institution "are reflected In the Internal situation of Japan tod: which Is one of purposeful ai peaceful reconstruction. with ich accomplished and opportunity for greater achievement the future." "As a remit of this situation. there has been a widening acceptance of the propa n Japan is ready for a formal peace and positive slops towards that end being takes I the United States Government i I i"'--i<"'"e. 3,i#.,rn of H I %  'lithe lo nlai port system ly the rnd of the morning, they claimed to have knocked out nearlv 100 cars on C munti • rail* I) The Chin-' %  'i 'i urcraft guns to try to pro. teet their liuiidup |tccialisls lo take >d tcteuices, mi-Indi .ililiollJl Anglo-Ira the nalion'i n t th,. Hi dish nan Oil Cm. Jet Battle tn* While Allied troops best of the lull to Improve uefeme |isitinis far to the north, United Nations jet pilots fought the llrst big air (el battle wiwe the start of the CoVOrnunks! pring ulTeiisive eight days ago American Sabre lU 8 four Communist jets and possibly fWe. south ol the Valu River border between Koiea and Manchuria. All American pilots relurnei to the base BSh 1) Imoindeie i.|-rt> from Bighlh Army headquarteis said that ?.S7f casualties were iiitluted — Sealer. ... lea island cotton. Large Japanese Guvenimi-ni ( Wrr „ wfcr( „ lw p| actK i by buyers honsed to revie^ or-* for pa,, (1 fcn Cf C wood at the Brilsh Sulata stall. Thev ttere order* for Jamaican fruits, alu handbag mad" of it raw, iiigi sisal hemp. Jamaican o attracted buyers' alter: .ion One buyer put forward the •lovel suggestion that since pipe smokers used Jamaican cigar*. -nanufacttrirn. should manufacture cigars, of quarter length for use n pipes Thii, added the buyer, would save pipe-smokers whn enjoy Jamaican cigars from the •imbarrassnwnt of cutting cigaiinto small parts In public l>efori filling a ;*|KOrder* lor grapefruit juice an I Mufcct* OR show at the Trirddad j werv stall were placed by r. the West indies stalls wen French Kill 1.200 Kebel Troop* SAIGON. Hay 1 French forces havtkilled IJOC • lie Is .ir..! takei > UIKI pi I %  nn I Ui a Uday i aid.ined land, all and river opciatiofl 10 the Tongkmg delta liidgehcad. it WU announced hem today. It was the uigge-t battle against Vletminh Prof guerillas to date, tht coiiununi'tuv said forces had swept througi too villages including IS tori rebel strongholds. the French also aid they had capMrcd 2 800 wea|totis %  nuimnition-dteuter. .VlarHhull Aid Fuiids Talks SmTt-safuI ::i in an um.mei .1 itst ol .* reeolutlt i %  hy Ihe Paiiiamcntaiy Oil Com intttee on Apni M, received In Loodi n I The i i ounlttte %  solution proid ing foi die iinmediata taking vei oi the Persuui all industry Mali tUie U>W ii i last Satunluv and unnnnoosU ratlAotl % %  DM Senate st night Whelhei gnj 'nrnU weiv made t>> ll gmal -isolulinn has not bSsM %  %  '"' I '' %  • in the reporti on Parliament' n lion %  , DWVI 1'ienoei Dl M'i i..iinn.ie. M. ha %  Chain i .. I.I Commutes whicb pre. nted th ReaoluUori Thv Itcsolution said that buyej •1 Ai.gln-hanian products oh at nrmal basis ti'iin the bemiiliing ,1 IHW to the lusi of Mai'-h 20 -an o i.timn to bU) '"•" •""W 1 unounl iiniivi.dl | Wl.,,1. ., IS left 0\yr, all roll tions being the name, thev have prlerlti of puieaase.*" AiticL -even of the Mesolntion added The RtSOlUtlOn said "Ihe OoVarnmsnl is bound under thesnp'rvtsioo of a Mixed Committee to arii.nge to send qua aluoad each vear to aojjuj 'knowledge and experience" the oil indusii. 'I hen expanses s.ould lie met out of the Pcsliin tl revenue —Reuter fSSSNSNSi TUX SHAH of Pr-4a Is seen bars signing sn sutagrapli. Ha Is due U sign taa or BUI %  oon which will lagallsa the nationalisation of the I industry. Persia A waits Signature Of The Shah ON OIL BILL (By IIMti NICIIOLAON) TEHERAN Mav 1 A few strokes of the SI are all that are required to make •tractive the nationalisation of Persia's llntish owned oil tndustr> in which alH.ut £5WM'fl0.0oO capital are sunk ["ho Sh.th-. signati expects in the next lew d.i>t will foniialK legalise oil naiion-h-'tllllL in Mohammed Mossadwi. Perata'a nesi Prime Muitner. bai I. : i In* %  v.uinnalioii of the AnasO-Iranlaa Oil O occounts as part of natlo sMis s atton i -ii unn oil .i i.e EQ so I approved hi la.tli Houses of I'm liaiurnl An s wering a question lo the Senate la-t uiaht. he alleged th-r ihe 1BSS agrceinetri with BriUii i undei durosa SfU wo ihercfprt not legal ind innding Since IIJSJ the oil has ailed without agreement am' ion give us an uecninUni 1 of iis irtcnme afnee then* id The Company had no right to .ell oil lo the Hoyal Nav* It nine IM-IUW world level" "Wtmust axamlsgl ,h * -ompnn>'s books and have refunded to us ifte i-ebate granted fo tlie ssTttSsn Navv", l'i .elded —Reuter RADIO FRt-E EUROPE MUNICH. May 1 A new powerful radio trunsmfttej "Radio Free Europe" today loined othei wcaMrn ilium statiojiH oeaining 'Western new* and i ,.-. T .. peoples Mhind the ii.ni urtaln". Kadio Free Kurope ii I entirely nnanceU by prrvala American I la atalfed by Czech exiles. Oarmw Americans —Reuter lit Smallpox Gss0*l rn.rd'Hi; HoWaocl Mai Eighteen s4ull casea <.f suiaii poi bova beep dla|noeed here, ii was learned today. A" ofdlns io Heah i A ilhotitle-. not much dangi i t 11 %  dlseaag spreading. DSCbJ < BM local citl/eus SStre recent l> varcinatfd The infection t belMved | from Indoj %  u u i Australia —Reuter. THE -ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS DIAL 3113 Day or Night rVv/ o/'/// 4&6 && t0§$4fa Eco itlriiti that Alts hi WASIIINCTON. May 1 linn c o.opeiutiun Ad n [BCAJ to-day : %  talks with Ihe the freezing Marshall Aid Funds had succeeded Marshall Aid lo Belgi suspended on April 0 following i Belgian court order last Novcmbe freezing over JV.OnO.000 worm ol Oreek Maislr.il Aid Funds. Funds lized to recover for Belgiaji .cis All [credi to r*' money owed bj In* rr. kept |Grelk (Jovernment 'her Inter.-steO husv to-dtv. I^rgc crowds ^ath-'B.C.A. contended that Marshall ,f cred at the Jamaica stall *rn.*i funds could not be used to pay a tSias Tesrj Prendergast, Jamaican private debt It set April 30 as nodel, entered the stall clad In the daadUao for the sSMasg of the colourful beach suit funas— Reulrr Britain Will Not Be F orced Into Settlement LONDON. May I. Foreign Secretary Hcrber Morrison warned Persia to-day that Britain would not negotiate ?ettlement of the oil dispute un-' ucr duress. if Commons that Britain could not ac-. rept the contentions of the Persian Government that the proposal to nationalise the oil-' lely beiween them and the Anglo, i Iranian oil company. The British Corernment had a light to Interreoe, he said Morrison added 'We have n: wlth that this quettloi become an issue between our%  We are naturally anxious to sit th them and work out • solution" In a reasonable atincsphere." Morrison taid it would be a matter of tingreatest difficult* penile installations fney would also lo*-* world-wide marketing and distributlor focllll %  These condition'; might result In taMmploymenl and benefit j Communist*. disturbances in Iht Abadan area, he declared. wer.>! %  •*We do nut of g Gonrnirant I < |Utre proper!-m ds owi "But v... cannot accep' that the whole BOSHS Id be radicallv altered by unilateral action when afMb ment with the compi %  roWaas agali —n enter #^R fSjsTsJIaalli *ifl* huh gUlrf.n pro/*/' o/l.i. il Ugadl ""•• innliiuli'.ly In %  aloof /H-rfi-rlion, it ill tnaurr UM gsssSBBst "/ Ih IOMII Ik ffedgea ns IrSe rigarrllrn for all ovra'ioHM uhrn o'l/v Ihe hml ulll tin. SI;PER VIRGINIA .IGARETTES BY MEXSO\ / HEDGES ^. %  i^ HUM iinn r ;ni d(" %  VLO HU\t> sllllll. LO.M>0\ ^ *^'^ *f^*J r*^ a >^% i. ~*7



PAGE 1

wr.nsF.snAY. MAY 2. IMI n\Riunh Plan* SaSS n IM and pa*. Sill (or D'M i anl* after 4 p m Tha ch.t. ot MJMunmMnb of BUlba, UamifH Death*. A.-a now. ardgmant.. and la MernorUat na ils H >* UN an wee*.-day. and II at on Sunday' tar any number of word! up to M, and 1 a**** par word en >M4.)i and i canla pat word on Sund*>. lor eerh aiaBBaaa ) ward. LOST aft FOUND LOST Pindar plr-ni 1 -.> r.r Secret* offered AK1 TICKET Kane O 1*11 LMT CBBTIFrTATT.*KNIOBT'S I.TP HOTaC* U hetab. given thai application haa baan made to tha Board gf Daractor. of the above Company by tha %  Maruior of th* Estate of Dud<> Csoaeron Hit*, kin* detaaard for lb* l**t>" of a Shirr Certificate for two hundred 'HOi Sh.tf. Nm 1M ta ISBU Inclti.t" datad Ird Ma*. IMI. and tin hundred nwi Hh.trN... nan is STUB m dated Mm February 1H3. m plan original Crrtir^-ir. which ha.a baan toai or de.l-o.rd and not drpn.tted wl Mf aa security or othrrwla*. and li hereby given that within da* tha data hrrrut If no claim or raf.. talton %  reepeet of >uch original O Aral** li made to th* Director* tha* will than proceed to deal viiih .ucti appl id iton for Dupi,*-t* By MdM of, tlto Board of Director. C N TATIOK. bHllfl) I'l'tH.H' \OIHIS r. Mdi paaaal* Ma* aa a M at Sagi >*d II cr.li par aorta Une pa Hwl^l, •" %  r***aa U M M waw k aaaa %  *J II a of tha abovnamad Ooanpaiiy IfhO' ot %  ally •' %  renuirrd on or before the Jut* Ifrtl being the day for U flattl by me unde*algti*d. to -and then i„.irw. and nddri aw a. .1..1 We parthrular of tt.eir debt. OI cl***... and Ihe riarnr and *ddr***e* of Weir Solietb**. U ana lo the indo-UKrd H 14-lr Thou—* H .-•r. of Mfr.. Canlnlori flwaly o I.m.u Straat. Bridaaioan. Baibad**. in I iquklalar of ihr aafd Company, •ml. it to taqmrad b iwMWw to wriurto from thaaald Liquidator, an u> nd grava UwU uid dabta rclilad aoch ivoUca. dJabll wlatUI l tli. EDUCATIONAL %  ARIU40N COI.I^UB ENtKT IMI Tbara *IU w < Umllad numbr-r of vaaancin in Srptatnbrr. It* I In lh Praparalorr Uapartroml and In lha aUm School Appllcatloni lor rnlty ""l la mada on lha official form available Itom th* Ha-admaaler'* S*crrUrT. and muat bo rallarnad to th* H-admait*r. a-cmip-iKd by a Birth Bapflunal Cm!(! %  ta and a CtTtlAcatr of Good Conducl fioni tht bora' ptrviou. achool Thaa* form* tnuat l> taiucnad romplrtad brforr> SIM May. IMI II unouci-aiaful appliaallon WM mada In a prrvlwiia yaar J -raw foim fur IJftl muat ba rrtutrvad Thr minimum ui* for antry la S ytoira •• month* in "japlambar. IMI Patr-nlt' Guardian* will b* notlftod Ulaa of trio data and lltnai of tha aiamination, which will br duiHka July. • Bl—Jn WAVII.i* Mlalmum cho'Ur it* TI ei M canta MtaCaa/p 14 taarda — iporda a cant* a word u-ark -* %  cord .fuaddjya. Ufci>P banafll bf an* 'mltallMton mada hf..r . i dbbla ara prwvad. D-trd Ihi. Id day of Mav IMI M lAU TIIOMAA. MM! S.I I %  fiaiTiirai rbarpa Mrk TJ W fali laadaya t* ato V wa aaoxia 1 raali a wvd iaaakwtord aniad~> AUTOMtXTIVt ALMOST VFVV 12 M P Bedford V.n Cuaranta. H ra*|.,ri r.ira Maaonitc rioonn, Ucanaad and lnaura Up#n CAR Auaun II* K, IMM tab^ offar rafuard Appl to W M W>uo n Co %  O Cnallanor. ftoaifhtitown Pnonv CA—Vauihall H Ma nh a ood tvraa. in pood workinR ...ndition nnrr raaaonablr AppJ T D I. Oay. Sl.pl.Srowa. Cnrin Church Dial 3J0T •— la*J BukTk %  cyla. in aouno ..irrhamcal rondlllon --id (.^-1 i 1It SuiUbto ..prciall, for hire Dial Ml* M • 11 *i' CARS Do jog wanl to buy a good •toondhand tirli u> can offer .-ou %  '**• HiUrnan. dona It.aoo milaa and IBM Mom* Oalord. dona It.oao miWi Both cart in a^coUant c.-mlitiun Um> •MA U doa Atanciclid. I SI •• %  I'Mll.ll SALES KkAI. fcSTATE ST-IT.VRIJ: m'li.niM; sm *m>atr4 .1 Vantnor Oardana. Ch Ch Anaa LOMI **| ft land and S.M3 *q ft road BUM Day and MS NuM tsti i •rroa of Mind aulUbW P% I trtra a Caaal Walftiraj daajincoa - .!(- and Hiah Bchoot Oovl Water fr rphona. CkMUk I^tThl at" lha ma Appl, to W I Wabatar. ijWt,*fe75^ lohn '•hnate M MUl-dto WAUGON One IMt V^ Ford SLilioWaa-goii „, M riact condition Appl) Mft bi JTai B *, TYPIST il>o uue to ine opaaUu| of a new blanch, wo require lha following ataff on or before June Itt. IMli — •rrTMJ-TVPIST—-.prrlenced — *o—vlary I10U 00 per month _lary HI 00 per fNVOICINt: ABBT—accurate at flfuraa — preferably with provioua apetier.te on Invotcln.* — comihtixini talan |M 00 per inontn Wl HUB application >utin a*e ani prcvloiia eiperlence to be tent lo Becfat^ry. Dowdl.-a Mate, and Tradfn Company. Ud Ba> fkreat ^ ( ^_^ MSCELLANEOl'S WANTED TO Bl V (In IBM or tub*' IS Flahtall Palmt iCafota. II *.> P.ima. IS Portlandu MUa Nail M B nn.n Tel MM. ORIENTAL BOUVENIRS. CURIOS. JEWELS New Shipment •peacd THANI'S %  aaFOB TOUB IN1CBANCB NIBD1 COHWW ANDB1W 1> 8HEFPAKD RepreMnUDd Caaftdtratlaa Ufa AaaaalaUaa Cor.B AMM3IRONQ LTD. BHlDOBTOWr3ARBADOB. T.I. MM FOR LONGER SERVICE TAB all poata befora rrecUnf. A .mall qtu.ntl.jr of thla E o t prevonutiva material mil avalinblo al your GAB WORKS, Bay I Prlea M r. par talton. Get Some To-day. Just Received FRESH STOCK or ... DOBIE'S IIIIK SQUARE YELLOW it PURPLE TOBACCO C CAiUTON BROWNE 136 Ro+hurk St. Dtsl ZS13 Wholrsale RrUlI n-ujr 1st FOR SALE "MEDMENHAM" PINE HILL This highly rwommended property utandiiig on approx. l*j acres is the "buy" of the year at £ 5.500. The house lends itself to easy converFion into attractive flats and a 't acre of land at the'aide could be sold off readily as & bulletins plot with no apparent detraction from the. general amenities as It la Mparated from the main property by a stone wall. JdbkB. M. BlahaJ.BB A F S, F V A PhoRf 4<4 PlanUllooji BuUdiiift ELEf'IlilCAI, NOTICE NOTU 1*. MCBXBY atVEN IBM sll ortNina MMrf any debt or CUMD >Baimi • •* R-iaio of John aUchard Manon late nf Da-i*ll< Rortd In tha pAilah of Chu" %  : %  r.ii who dHl ,r IhU Itlafkd on thlath day of AafuM IBM. w hajqhj rrquirrd to taiul nuirUculat* of their rla'mt duly alte-ted to lha underalmed P.n.rU aiadtlona Seniin of Dayraiu Ri.id CbrHl COMirch, the qualified Eeculpr of the Will of the Decoaaad In cate of Meawi CarriniUn A Battiy of l.ucaa Alntet. Brldflown. Solicitor*, on or before the lllh day of June IMI after which I anall proceed lo dlitrlbutr tba aaaata of the Dareaard among tha partial antitlad thereto havn.a raclrd only to aucti cUima of which I ahall then have lad notice, and that 1 -ill be liable for tha iwu or any part thereof ho ttutributr-d, to any prraon of whoar debt or claim 1 ahall not then | DUP • %  Hirj.EH BpactoD) de.l.d [ aarve Ira Lrttmi. in .i worainf I order W1S a) At Ralph A Beard Show Boom*. Hardwood Atley III'-* "UllABIi ll-TVBl RADIO unina Lai. i fliMnr phonos r.iph itn amplljee all in workina order Q C 1 t^. tnnpr Heal. Si Thomai a i 91—f BAM And all peroor.t indebted to th* a EVtalr are requaatad to oallle Ih iiidrbtedne*. witbout dehVy Dated int. 2nd day of April. 1SS1. KIOIARD Qa-ADSTONK SMITH Uiialined BKaculor of the Will o John Kit hud Mahon. drtaaaed Public Official sakOn Tueaday the Mh day of May IMI i the hour of 1 o'clock In the afler%  > % % %  • will be —Id at my ofnr* to th* hianert bidder for any SUM not under appralaad va'ue All (hat certain r of lAnd conlalninf by la tttn a h M n aoda situate in the Panih of st Mwhaal outline, and boundlnl on land, of S. Thompaun. on land, of C Qulntyne, on land, of mend ah I p Plantation and on land* of Florence W Preocod. near Bt Matthew-. Church appraiaed a. follow.: The whole area of land appraiaed to Five Hundred and Sit>-eifht dollars iMMi Attached from aald Florence W Preacod for and toward* tattifactton, Ac N B '. Deposit to be paM on day of piirrhaae. W R DOUOI-AS. I1.1V..H Marshal iArtln>. Provoti Marshr. CaMce llth day of April IMI M 4 ll-Sn Public Ollkial Unnsfrvr. Rah l ^%\^\ •MMINIU m n n r vo West Indian & British Hand mad* Crafts. Antique., faitery. Hand blocked Beachwerr. DecoraUon HOUM. Bt J.n.rTel. IMt. titr -f RrrnicrftATOR n PrldSe UDUO0 Perle. t at Ralph A Heard H-r>liK>d Allev MECHANICAL TVPCWRITBRS Shipment of ne model Oltmpia Por'-able IMwotitn juat received —aee these .uperb machliw before rornrnlttlni ymiraelf A t Bt Kill Dial 3IM. M I SI -eo d MISCELLANEOUS ANTIQUES of every deacrlnl Olaaa. China, old Jewel'., fine Bl Walei-colours Early books Map*. Autoarsph. etc at Ooirliuies Antlqui Shop, adloming Ro>al Yacht Club a .M— t f n AfTtOl DLNNm MINTS >esh .lock of deliclcut .ft,. Dinner Mints, price !•• per cello ba Bruce Weatheihrad %  AI. a SI Jn BRICK.* Pot building or garden walke 9 M per 10* also Tire Brlc*. Apply Phe Old Irr Co Prince Wm Henry St I 3 SI -Si> SfPtJT PEAS—< an be bought al Jaa A. Tudor A Co. RoebucN Slree' |l*"0C per M lb. bag. Dial SWO M 4 SI Tn STOVES-Valor 'Ingle. I. ) and • keroaene oil burner Secure yo 1 "before advance in price Courtr.y Oarage Dial MI M 4 SI gn TANK One III Steel Tank, capacity WD gallons in perfeel condition. Apply Manager. Duke*. Si Thomai, "hone 4130. M. 51—4n. TY1UER-1 aKond hand If 410 T>r and lube, in good cor-lnmn 111" 1 r>cii Apply to It A Field. "A-hley" llth Avenue. B.-llevihiLaJl-fll I ^-,n o..i, | tow spma reeaalasna at woiihiag Vtew at be sure In aetoet your* before all go The apot. rang. fio.1, t*to la II.0M an ft and ihr pre** range from II **> ** to |l.oa< av per -pot For particular* are D'Arv A Scoct. Magailne Lane. Dial JTlS i s ai—an AtC/lON MM V *N !• %  ; MIlBrt w.-e in-iLieied to eell Ihi. vahHi t.ht.h haa been darr-sged In an tSUBllU by PublnAuclton at |he C*AITMffl Oarage at I pre on Ft Ida *Ui Ma% 1 i JOHN M BLADON. ^ %  i | IS SI -* FOH ll!>T MkM-taat eftarae areeh ti eaato • naala .* %  -*.„. s* wo-da ** aao'd week -4 '* %  : MOUSES M'AKTMrcr Cool and .pae-.,i. •arttneni at S*s Vtew t*pp— *• •! n the MB. npp n aite Bay Mae-uan Apply n prenuae* I SSI an AFARTMtNT for rial to approved tenant Bully fumiehod apartment In hotel area Ifaellivgv 1 brdrr-mu. garage and aervanu room From 1st Jun* Writ* PO BO* Bl 17 4 SI n PLATA Two UP Furnlabad Plato al htndee. •>! Lawrence Gap. rullable lot only Fro-n Mav III onward Api.lt n pramiaae or Phone UH >M Br VHI in v, i ., Eczema llth Youthful Vigor Restored Killed in 7 Minutes %  1. W ralltton til %  enrtia ana poraa whrraeraia hu and '-ana* t-rnhle Hchlna, Prachlnr. Fcirmfc, Peeling. nutrilBR. Acne. Kingwurm, Paoriaal*. Hlaxkhr. I-. Foot lt>h and I'thar blan.ishea ordinary irratmen'.a 1v i.nly l-riir-'raif relief became they do not kill the germ < auae Th* new dlarov%  rv Nlaedarm. hllla the pimi In I iinnute* ami I. guaranteed to give yon a Mifc rfaar. attractive, amooth akin In one week, or money back on return of emplr pa. %  *#* (tot saaranteed N.aodarm from our ch*ral*l todayan.l Nixoderm r.r it/. r r ..ti.i r %  .: <• Atlvcrlisc.... It Pays SHIPPING NOTICES Canadian National Steamships By tnatruclIon* received (Tom the $ec retac* of Uu Oaneral HeaplUl 1 will aell by Public comarllllMi al the Nui*ea Home on Thursday next, am May at • aViort on* Piano b* Kohler and Camoheli D'Arey A *a-oll. Audionaer n Jl-*n LADY HODNBY UADY NELSON 1-VDY ROI1NEY : AIIV NEIAI;: IADV BUDBXY MonlreaJ n if.. — 10 Arr .. T May |0 Mapsac i* \... % %  '• rlto/w I -ill Mil br PUblW Auction on rn*> *pol on Wesmeaday ne*t the Snd of May at ) o'clock at Bank Hall htaln Road. 3 housea fiom All Soula Church. One three roofed house with otH-ofBces. Tn be removd It will be aold lo the hlghett biddrt. In%  peclton on application to D'ARCY A. SCOTT, Magaaine Lane Dial MM 17 4 51 *r '" %  I* ot;r IADY RUDNSV LACY NELSON IAiV Roosr.v 1ADY NTajtON :-PV RODNIY %  araad** u-b.da* 10 May II Mai .. a June 5 June I Juit s July .*? J,i. H July .. M Aug. M Aug ml not I. a Arrrva* Amv Bt John HalUaH 10 Jin-. T Aua 6 Sept IS June UJoTr and freiarnt tales i GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. A t er.t. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On Thursday Ird. by order of Mrs. Tiieieu iight we will sell her Furn at "The Bower." Oarrlson Which include_ n.na Table. Huah Arm Chair.. Cofli Table Morn. Ann-Chain with ruahtona. all in Birch. Hmtrrt. Settee. Arm Chai Cofte* Table, all In Man.-.-. > Flat Top De.k and Sioo., Jan _. Verandah Cnalr*. Pin* Catwaat. Fc Card Table. Glaaa Ware. Dinner and T Service.. Double and Single Iran Bed-leed. with Spring. Dunloplllo and Hair M-u nu. Cedar luien l'i.-Celatev Freeze. Bureau, Dre.ting Table and Pre-a ronAlned. Eleclnc Table Lamps. Coolerator. ..order. War* Pre*. aJJurner Oai Stove .with Ov*n> In flood order. Kitchen Utensil.. Garden Tools and olher Bale IIM o'clock Terms Caah. ill! \tKi it TItOTMAN % CO. Aurtloneera 4ll-to a i I.IQUOK LICENSE NOTICE TBANSrEB AMI B1MOVAI. The appHcntion of Cecil Small, .hopkeeper of Vauahall. Chi Irt Church. purchaser holder of liquor Ikenar No premier* vlla hoard and -hlngle .hop TO of IMI. granled to Mm in respect of with .hedroof ailarhrd near Wildey. Clapham. SI Michael, fat permission M remove the old llrcnae lo %  board and •hlngle >hop with died nttached at Vauahall. Christ Church, ttithm Di.trl "B" and lo ua* th* said IbMCaM leal deM-ribed premlaea Dated Ihi. 1*1 d-y od Mav, IMI TO; C. W RITDDER. Baq Polic M.igi-lr.ilr Didrlct B C SMAIJ... Applicant N.n-Thh application will be con.lderrd al the Ltcen.mg f".n 10 Bfl hrlrt on llth day of Mav. IBM. at II -) clock a.m. at Police Courts Dial "B" C W BtlDDEIL police Mngldiatr. Dirt "B' Harbour Log In Carli.le Bay MV Srdjri.1.1 S,h Wonderful CO %  ellor. Hrh talari M lafWl*. Bth Philip II [anvlda.ii. Brh l.trllltM Smith, Brh. United I'llgrlm S. M W La r %  s. in.. N,,-. w„Srh. I'rlquee.i Srh Mare* Henrietta. Yar-hl Maria Catharlna. Sch M.rlo. Bell* Wolfe Sch Idiidalpha, Sh Uard>nl W. M V Canadian Ch.ller.arr ARB1VALS BS. Tongariro. IJM tona not. CB|P: Roblnaon. Iron. Ai.Hf.ll. via Ttlnldad. HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM TMMI HERDSMAN %  nEFENDKI! PLANTER' 1 LINGUIST 1 DALESMAN %  %  Ml. Ixindon 12lh April 2n I-.IKI.'M 22nd April 7th May London 3rd May loth Mny London 10th May 28th May nittaniiii a Llvprpool 25th April flth May HOMEWARD FOB THE UNITED KINGDOM Vnul For Cl~~ la STATESMAN" London 301h Alirll "SPECIALIST Ltvcriiool 7th M.y %  STUDENT" London .th May DAISCE NOTICE Invitees arc rcmindfd the Dunce to be held at the Mental Hospital on FRIDAY NIGHT 4th May, 1945. in aid of Ihe Mental HtKpltal Ickel Club. WW.WAW, RATES OF EXCHANGE CANADA Chnqu*. on Banker* M J I* %  .1 Diafta M 1 Sighl Drafts M 1 Cable Currenr y M' I CouponSI 3 Stiver BV-. MAIL NOTICE MaUa for 8c. Vlncrnl. Al.ttinm Antigu,!. Bl Kitla. St Tliomaa. V1 an New York by me SS Fort Arnher.l wl be rloetd ol Itbr General Port Office NOTICE Mr. John Hammond 1>CK> his friends to send him gifts for his White Elephant Stall at the Country F.itr In aid of th.st John the Baptist Vicarage, on May 14. Old clothes, books. magaUncs, china glass, In fact anything including money will be gratefully accepted. Telephone 2292 for things to be collectd. -SS*Sf*S'*'S'*'''**'i''*S'**''''*''****'ft SS*SSSS.*S, 4 -'.* Ml \y. Ma] • AJI.1NI. TO TRIN MMMI-IIIII AND MB. "Hecuba 4th HI "Mo'taiie" a • Ml is.. TO i 'IMI rtRAt AO AND MS -Bonaire' a*th May IMI 8 P MUSBON. SON A CO. LTD. Agent* I MIv M V CACK.UT Del C-AIUMP will arrepl Carpi and Paiorngei. for Ht Vincent. St l^icia. lire. ada and A rube Balling Saturday mh ln*t. M V CARIBBEC will accepl Cargo and Pasarngert for Domlnara. Antigua. Mtmtwrrat. Nevl* end SI. Kltti Sailing niday *tn Ma B.W.I. HCHOONF.R OWNEftB A8SOC, INC. For further information apply tc • • DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.-A4tw.tj ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. -MIIM. PBOM AMHTBBDAM M S Oianjeatad — %  • May 1*51 MS. "Bonaire"-lltli Ma IHI MS "Iterauta" Mth M.,, IMI. BAIIJNU TO ri VMOITU AND AM-TINDAM FRENCH LINE CtC OlB I f-iiw.illaiiti.iiie HAI1JNO TO I M.I \M> A MIAMI "OASCOONE" May lMh. 1051 vi.i St l.ticiu. Martinique. GuffttMoupa and Alillgua. 'Ill I Mill H Mi C.ASCOONE" May 3rd. 1951 Orenada, Tnnldad. Demorfir.i and Er. Gulanu. Irenada. Tnnldad. St. Luda and Martinique also Caigo and Mall ti all Purls of Call. It.M, JO NTS MIL, I til. AGENTS rton* ::: UU AJRRAVS 1 MILK 'I STOUT MilH I I wish lo notify my e patients and any interests! 9 parsons, thai I still carry on & my work as Spencer CorV %  etierc and have at no time X ce&*ed to do ao. o Mn NORMrtN HOWELI.. J (Registered Spencer l* Fitter 1931). X Strathclyde. St M *> Tel. No 3954. 29 4 51—2n S EDINBURGH SCOTLAND MANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS Wanted For Ch Uaed and Unused POelTAUE I STAMPS of the Bnluh Weal '-haa Good Prlnrs Paid al the j < ABJBMAN STAMP B0CHTT No. It. Swan Street Truatee Inveatment to ield lndu.lrUl Shares to leVd A. M. WEBB Slockbroker 33. Broad St. (Over Phoenix Phanauc> i *W//////V////r'////iV//l | MAY GAY I FURNITURE Money Saving Prices CHARM in China and Bedroom Cabinet-. Sideboard* 111 to an Dining. Lunch. Sewing and Km' en Table*. Waggon'. Larde-.. Kibhen Cabinet. I SMART aahogan*. B.rch and other Bedateadi. lull panalled and Raiwd and Panelled.. Cradl**. II—t. Vaniiie*. Drea.ing Table* Wathatand.. Wardrobe*. Chcsle-ofDraarara. MORRIS Tub. Bergere ahd Ru.h Purnilore M o f r I %  Cuahaon.. Spring arul aprlatllha NK up DKSKS with Sat or aloplng top* L.S. WILSON SPRY ST. DIAL 4M. PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products. Limited, Roseau. Domlnien, for sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual ports of rail are Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual %  fuctniii for children. I0-DAVS NEWS FIASH • l AP "VBR THr nARDRN WAIJ, a atory of %  Nun -h,. gnja then gave It up An llju'lluM true book by Monica Baldwin Kf* •. %  •' PounUIn Pen, to, NIB and .1A.K replacement Ot^r. M the (abfet Store filled ,tr, JOHNSON'H STATIONERY AND HARDWARE FOH SAI.I: li I -.III II HTOM a FINE. IDRA1, FOH CONCHETE. AND MAKING ROAUS AND PATHS. Apply . J. N. IIAIIIUMAN & CO.. LTD Sea well. Phono B4I4. Extension 1 2S...51—Tn SEARCHINQ FOR BEAUTY ? You'll find In our NEW COSMETIC DEPT. SOAPS POWDERS LIPSTICKS POMADES HAIR RRI SUES TOOTH BRt sill •> MANICL'RE SETS i mi i Mrs CREAMS SHAMPOOS BRH UAVTIVEH COMBS Ml' I II I %  \ I I RA/XIR SETS And many more iiems ol lRler*u4 Pay us a visit today, and make your Selections Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. (THE IIOUSF. FOR BARGAINS) No. Hi. Swan Street 'Phone : 2109. 440C or 3534 In 24 Hours *\ Glands Fortified \?*\ by New Discovery | Do TOO. feel old before vosr nate* Ara reu tired. %  '*•". w*rn*at. and tiaau* to *• %  > up wiin it.* speed and pleeaar** al meeavn Ufa* Do you saRar 1 leu of Biaaiori. narreaaaaaa, waaS bod*. iasalood* Air rou werrMT Do jou .uff.r from bar* an inferiority temp***' Da **M *n*jf K?: ST."-". :h2,V BCS J. H caaspara* Do 70a •n)o*' 329*36*8 MI ar* lb* t Icllrn of •*• %  1 'condlllans. than 10a ar* lb* •vrllan of < (tend., and uidaaa faalV ttaBas ar* fortified illimilaled. ye* can not hop* to regaut TUJI 111 la I'd. -.iii Vitalii. Your Glands G rortunatrlr for thoee oh* infer from nin-doan it.4 a. lion, phy.lelan ailh M Till' %  i*rlted s umple. aala. and posture piaacrlp' tton lo atimulile gland artltrtr and Ihu. bring a leeliiig of inrnaaed rnlilj. msllly. and neslth. This praacripiian. called VlTaa*. la la pleasant, ta.tel.aa. lablrt form All *M Bead te do 1. lo take ten mile laMeta three tiataa earli Oar Thla praacrlptwa alalta oui aland, rapidly beceaaa _,,. llM „ ... _., al.onger. you ill leal and aaa faaiaelf •*1VJ f. aS&^Sf-ffi Doctor PrtlladsB Vi-Tobs Df J Raaletll, widely-Inoen Turope i.hy.l'ian. i.t.cUy • tat id Many acw ti.l* ar* of tba opinion ir.at tha true eac of louthful ijjour and vitality )• In I %  lands If -a cotild Vaep our (land* r>n tiontng piopail). a* aould Irel and U year* teui*ai aiad llva yrait long.r th.. Irel tan rear* TOuiif'r within one *m TI-%  ir.ult. hat* bean accomtluhed time 1 on at* i**r* of rit-ii'iK. In .i.iJy and l -aatuc. 11 u UIJ opiiuan that tha ntedi^^__^_ cai f.iiinu!* hnawa ai Vi-Tea. repreernia the neat an*item and aeirnlAo inlrmal m ft bed of i.iiiy to lb* body. 24-Hour Rosults Beca^te Vl-Tabl ale and pupsiid to or ahtih had alatoat glaaa up hope of tear being Minus. aril, and vu>uivie egaiaRoawlta Ouorontodsfi vftrv.r^^d.T.rd'S-aXr.s Q laaa. Ihroagnout the aorld that 11 J new oRrird undri a pontKr (uaianle* Is coal nomine mil**, anur.ly taliafacloif. UaC IMa ,.ia. :, r gal Vi-Taa* < rhemiai u.,U) Put li lo lb.' far rabraalf boa itea Wood H four if.nt. haa TOUT aw lajlr* .. aparaie. .our it.p a flimrr .oriiig. aod lhal foai really ran enjm 111. af(ii*nU, and a. vtguiiiously aa vou did In year piiai* Than If for any iraaon it al) lou in ..i ..i.i-"i. ..i..n..i satM latatB in* rmpty patlage and in* f he handed Into Ihe above for ihr follow In*. I'olumna In the CUaalHed Seetton : BIRTHS MARRIAGES. DFATHS. IN MEMORIAMS. ETC. FOR SALE. FOR RENT. WANTED LOST or FOl'ND. ADVOCATE CO., LTD. T Gal. Advertising Manager



PAGE 1

\\H>NKM>\Y M\Y 2. 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATF PAGE THREE Quit Suez Canal Zone FGVPT TELLS BRITAIN I(.'HARM %  \ IMIIPI LONDON. April. EK:-VI has joined tin t IWfM engt-geo m tWHtlnfl the tail ol the British lion Egypt is demanding that the Bnli'h quit the stratagwoUv important.Suet Canal Zone, and th-i T^r At.glr-rirv^tia.i urtat> should be ur>ijr>d with Egypt under ihc to have their new demand" pigeon-holed li.v Ray they won' their request full) I led tOHlu uil. IT than •om* tncJilculabUtomorrow, and n>i on oooaUfcUtt cueh H Lh* Brtttah haw prop oat* in Foreign Minister Salah el Din Bey said: "Egypt is eager to realize her national aspiration* Egypt If iielei mined on i*v.u.illon and can the Egyptian* at this tin*, declare .nipt go Other golutlonthan onlty II would virtually invite Bus-sin to with *r Sudan, with the Sudan put pg— wi w on Egypt, and would enjoying self-government under arouse alarm and even despa. 1 own MrrthipMakr [diwfl For Mam U.K C0111m111.it.rs Ml Hi i %  i ne day %  st II M I t I Vil'RY KDIHBUItOH, %  i %  U p P i tilt i UWi an%  nation nan In Ajftfju %  i on yaai i ,riu ta Dak* UANClirIn school aiHtrtoriuma and iou ha'.l* i,f 123 rommunitie-. in this Matt, hundreds of men and women have re(fiit'.y held their annual tow.' n.eetinga to chart the course u their local governments for the ooatUng year Like the resident;, of man> .liter towns In the United Slate-. t hiefly those m the northeastei n Itaattj Itaata person 1 practise > jnplc. direct democracv. The. meet together to talk over local i**h v/Hl attend—1 issues and to act a* their o n lawmakers. This is in contrast M |h$j mon commonly used nSflM Ol Ameruan fOVei taUvn ilemocracy — In which leeislators are elected by the •otan i' law-making. A moderator is choen to ODE duct the town niccting and each cttlron has a ihanee Xo express on any issue before a ikon, Dtelatonf an bato I an the in, iiy vote ,;( ttaata present. Kidnevs Must Clean Out Acids n -i ,..-> %  M*I tluu t %  I %  I ,. NlaMa. N.., !" .n" Lac • A i.lii i. %  >* M u r—at fa— %  >•, a .ii rait wi • idinary aaaoll %  Ha • .. Cfwxm*. C r iit .larla -malua I" \tir— BOUTS. %  natuKaasenp and b a.Uv tn RHII< mo >ou iirad or k I* i]rnt-l Aife jnw C/ttf*. (Staatrii loda^. -— Th* Uwr.. Cystex;,;,'.;,: FKIMKIWUIK IIMH >„u. I 'Thay'll want King Rarouk." The n British Onwrnmer.t. which reahzes it may hnve a tougfa fiv.li*. on |U nanth inould Pnrhament have lo i.itii, nnj aaTMwwnl i>a-.ed wholly on tho Egyptian demtind*. British troops m permitted to occupy' baMs iu ihe Sue? Canal Zone under the terms of Uie Ahglu-Rgvptian Treaty of HttO. The IgratttH haVt long .lainourcd for revision of the Trenty Orcaea, Turkey, and the Islamic Ctt UB trial uenerall..*.—JN.S. T( > iu i, hoA SckMMe With Tin Cans Their Majesties Will Visit Colonial Art Exhibition Fr nil ivhiiv nhovn — The visit i the r.KlS. April %  teacher from Missouri set out with a kit of tit I form or another. the black wooden inlaid with peal I %  lnncv oh lie LONDON, April 25 excavated within the grounds t King and Queen are to his palace during rcbuildin tin May 24th (Empire Day t cperations In m38—39. Th Exhibition of Tradition;.! ongin and -xact date of the. Colonial Art at the tmaerud priceless pstCwJ || still nndended a ft-n in itbeak One of t Ii stituU', South KensMfton By virtue of their extreme finest exhibit* from the Soluir. London. Bis Majesty ha* loane l naturalism, reminiscent of Uic island 1 ; If %  hoosib...nd. tBOfi Itrlnga, eorfea, burneU-oul electric to this Important Exhibition an sculptme of elasslcnl Ilreece nfteen feet long, decoi.ited w bulbs, razor blades ami empty Ivory leopard which was a prt some have 'Uggested that thry seven frigate birds, carvtd In Negotiations for tttCh pai '' l '" ^ '"' Thailand—to teach ent to Wueeu Victoria following were made under the influence round, and diving down on to were started, but broke down, th* Thuilaitdeta scienoe. QM 18T Expedition to Benin of classical Greece, some have .boa 1 of carved Ann applied apparentlv irrevui-abl>. in 19V.. \} e '*, EHsworth^Obourn, of the I i N l ' pr, f > A i n re ""xamples ^ t>f sufflnMted that^they were ^made ihtt^iottom of the board Tun-fiiM^'hlMk PrOV lh " lon Miaaourt. He is part of a acn In England, will be showu. Roman or Egyptian work. This Laanda INHey stumbling block. nair-n *...,„ ^f ..„,:.. h>.. r^hlhitv h:.ee i* P n *..m r.nm <.n a ,.,. -,<,*U,A^ ..,> hr^nM .-..• t-g;ini i 1 appears i • % % %  .I ben hell. %  I rtnn.i lie i Ellsworth Obourn. of the (Nijeria). Rare chief ''"hn Burroughs School al ClayColonial Art, some never befqre under the influence of Crock Ion. Missouri. He Is part of a seen in England, will be shown. Roman or Egypt'"" work. Tim I NKM'O team of teachers being Exhibits have been sent from all group includes two bronze* not Kelv oil Russian* *" nl l Thailand to allavlate a over the world—from Malaya, previously seen in England; thry with tta. hoi s hiUgc of teachers there. Nigeria. Fiji, the Gold Conat, were secured at the time of lh-' TV dir however. breath of Moscow leaching into UM Middle Baat, the British do not like the idaa of pulling their feron out "' tho vltnuy nnpotlanl %  al Zone Thev ntWO MM as much 10 ihe Egyptians, who hjRVe irplied that they would ntljl on tho i itrallty. n> British do not subscribe to that vicv. They ig) tne most ihey would do at thb. tune would be to agree to withdrawal of their forces in stages of upwards of three years, provided the Egyptians greet to permit Britisn working parties to maintain the evacuated bases tn cood order. and agreed to permit the immelaeeful readmlssion of th Ttesides nen.g considerably less Tanganyika. Uganda. Malta, excavations by •KpM up. Mr. Obourn claimed Cyprus; from the British Museum, collector who has that home-made devices may and from many private collee ed them to the possess help pupils grasp -cientiikpiinlions in England and abroad. Onl. elaiea man easily than elaborate Nol Compreheustive Ferrn—CMlM Hne examples ol ihe repre nttl sculpture of the San. laboratory equipment iindertand. —I V I Bulgaria Protosls To United Nations i Amcrlcnil Cnu islands and New llebrid cently returny iti Mnd Tonga are ,dso on vie "' p Among the outstanding ci work is black rtraphite potM Irani t'ganda, with il Mrong graceful shapes; cloths. Ienth< work and ceremonial shield with iiold geometrical patle Irom Tanganyika; oid and '-rnaments from •ft nii Whole Day Among the dents that frequent ;, ppMI u" the ugenda mo l-> rates, authorization fer a new sthool. mainteuan-e ol the town library, provision ol ndequini nro t protection, in It.ent Of the sewerage i ther public property. In a-ldtUOQ, the lawnanaopni earl i.. idmlnati i the t .* M ei nduct publli husinesK until the next mcaHIni Usually I full d • rear for ttw mcoUni ducted In %  ihn I oaj H mot e tune is laqulrtd, u additional meeting maj Incallcsl at ..: v nine during ih,. year. rnqufnU] He woman ol ina wli para and MTVO a community din nr> f.r those attending the meet inf. This method of dtKNl da 1 %  i.K-iai \ b„ a .Hi 1 the United States. The tradrtlon it UM town meeting Is inherited | from IM early day* of Ameriem. Ufa when d'rect |articipatlon ol %  i local government ww> nractlsed In nenrlv all eonununi| ties of Ihe new cOUntiy. Medical Report Approved Coast, bowls, plates j(. i. silver and line Irani Oa> O* n I -f t. .|>„I.J. i i KINOSTON, \iui .'.' %  At a meeting of the Branch M Ihe BrlUsn Medka'| lewelleiy Asso-mtion held in Kingston tin I praval was glvan i H' Arranged by the Colonial Of particular interest is n small OfTice with the support and c*group of terracottas (heads i.( operation of the Colonial Qovmen and animals) which are ernments concerned, and with ;:mong the (Irsi fruits of a prothe advice and assistance of iromme of excavation now Iteing many aolhorities In Great Britain earned out in the northern Ihe Exhibition is planned not to provinces of Nigeria. On t>,eolo ; present a comprehensive display, gieal evidence, these pieces have tilC £X ,i ,J, fr. territory by territory, but rathe, been provisionally dated to tho "P""' """ K *' %  n !" to demonstrate, with the fineslatter half of the first millennium *hmds " the West PH.HK number of B.C.. and thus represent tht — i-hich arc mrliest known period of Ben id boxe.i repon oi the Cartbbcan Uadlca | brass, ,UIM Conlersiiee held t.^eiith nii cloths from Malavu: Irin'dad. atf'i The meeting also agreco H %  !' %  itting up of a Coribbi n i oun BritisS forces JII the'event .*+ ^.H*" 1 Immitianl or actual war. And they offer in the meanwhile to help train arid equip the Egyptian Arm to prevent a vacuum from occurring if and when th< i. ,i.. ,.,.u i Britisftldb pull obt. Anvtliing less wouli*. be "sulci' al" at this time, the British Go ernmenl believes. LONDON. April 28. Bulgaria in a note to the United available examples. Nations says that -the British and cultural traditions United States Embassies in Athentitled to rank among ens are "endangering peace m greater achievements. ins", according to Sofia Raditf. The *Wn*tttofT his "been Inftuefic It said they were actively sup. ed by aesthetic consider.itirms porting groups of Bulgarian The organisers emphasise that it emigre* In Greece tn their atis not planned as an ethnographi tempts to "overthrow by violence cal or anthopaJogtcal exhibition Government" cf Bui. It is divided into two section*. art. 'I""" The note referred to an organi%  anon which u said was proper* ing and organising an armed up. ruing agaiust the Bulgarian Government and "criminal acts of si-bolasie and espionage of the Bulgarian territory''.—Reuter Gradual Withdrawal British military experts, in advising the Government. -. % %  Use) are no) averse to n gradual withiu A.II from the Sue? Zone pro% %  — %  %  'he bases ate Mafcitalnad H'Xt'RY-LOVlNG BIRDS and the right of immediate peaceful readmlssion is guaranteed. Tncy 1 would use the period ( of gradual withdrawal l<* reolignin^ British defenses m lhat part oi the world at bases in Jordan to the A' pair of namnrkops ( east. Cyprus to the north, and the crane) had taken Tcbruk niva of labys. to UM west handkerchief: The mafiy opponents to the 1 idea uuiic to II of any capitulation whatever to they were the larger is devoted to sculpture and the smaller to such crafts as pottery, bnsketwork. textile! and other forms of cloth, metal work, etc. A unique work is the bronze mask. representing ,* hunum head, which is worn at his installation by the Ata of Idah on the east .bank of Niger Th. mask has never before left MM I The territories.of East Africa, while not producing as mucn sculpture as the West African territories, have contributed a number of fine pieces, foi -xainplf. wooden masks of the Makonde people of Tanganyik. and fine carved boxes, made n II wood by the Barotse of Northen Rhodesia KINGWILLJAMSTOWN. Soulh Africa. A housewife has solved th ystery of her missing laund'j This exhibition, the most out standing and comprehensive Its kind yet held in Englano, w be open to the public from M. Nigeria. Ih.G..I.I l ...,!. Ilio !" l I""". ,r m H-ili'l. Camoroons. and Sicn.i (. r, %  of .* %  %  :..(jint:. l-'r^rn Nigctia. Ih. 0"i "I I'-' _od balhing cos.Pinlu.il hold al Ihr Varubg pen. line lh.. enormous nesl pie. "• %  •" !•" "' ' Ife bron7e*. mosl ol which weiw WHETHER YOU ARE A LARGE USER OR A REDROSE S1VIALL USER YOU DESIRE ira BEST TEA SO USE RED ROSE TEA! IT IS GOOD TEA the Solon Islands embody this bird In c limiGtra tttgM you down ? ( ,lv,v/,v,v/ivv^^,v,v.v.'.v/.-.v.v/,v.w.V', : I THIS WEEK'S Thencver vm feel discomfort after incali. >UM -i; k two Reoniei. ooe alter the other. As they dissolve, their balanced blend of antacid ingredients g>* straight to where the trouble lies, and corrects your addity. You can slwayi KHIC trodbk from arid stomach nomed,jiclv, il yoa c-rry a few Rennics (thaVn swirled icMnaaM in your pocket of l.anJh.g. II ir-cy Jon I girC TOU relief, it's nmc you ssw year doctor %  *! Ifcr.m. at any .heram. ^ DICESTIf '. mmm KENNIES Ml %  PLASTIC MULTI-COLOURED BAGS REG. $336 NOW S2.M AKF HOB PRKPARIW FOR TIIK BIO ATHI.FTIC. MSST/VC To avald muscular palm and tn keep up your striae You should rub down with SACH0I1I. THE OREAT PAINKILLER • on tale at KNIGHTS DKIC 8TOBE.< REG. SINGLE $5.14 DOUBLE REG. $670 NOW NOW $4.25 S5.75 — PLAIN & REG. $2.40 COLOURED NOW $1.40 NIGHTIES PANTIES BRASSIERES AT nCWfa, \\ lirle Jioes. io pass muster in company, must be spotless, immaculate. Use Propcrt's White Renovato or Propcrt's Shuwliile. No surer way of nuking sure tlul while shoes aic ".hiitl IMIOPEHTS SIILKHITF d> WBITM RENOVATOR V^Dl'lt ll.v huppio*.* and Mdl-blng In the vsars to COtM %  CBWa M>II gisr him now. Tht ln.i imporiani duty and io pr.ivld hr.llh> Jcwloi \l il. ^|M'fl(^<^ Il tta ana**) i*m %  -! gff iL.i i •unmldif ssbvl thai It*-, .if. A ii K. -i %  !.:! paUaa it ihe prrfect fi nuMd In luil hi* del • lurdy id for babrhi* drlnafc Ji^i-tlkOD iwth aad depead I* to lak* an braax. Krrtwi Tht food wMch Naiur. M.nli.r". milk % %  naiutai Ida tha nu provsd Ihe rrmarkabla value of 'OvaltuM* afcai motlirr*. OOCIOM and sunn •ironaJv bv iakraa