Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ESTABLISHED 1895





United Nations Troops

Fall Back In 8S. Korea

Key Town
Abandoned

TOKYO, April 28.

CHINESE COMMUNISTS drove down Korea’s

western invasion route

today and occupied

Vijongbu, a main town about 20 miles north of the}:
South Korean capital Seoul.

Kapyong to the northeast had been abandoned

previously.

Earlier reports had indicated a slackening of Communist
activity along the western sector as the Chinese apparently

paused to allow supplies to c
ee |
aa

L INTIMATE
LOOK

OTTAWA—Staff.
Canada’s position in the
Insperial Preferemee trad-
ing system with, most like- |

bility of a continued and |
possibly enlarged trading |
gulf between the dollar and _
sterling areas will come
under over-all review in
important U.K.—Canada
trade discussions scheduled
for Ottawa in the week of |
May 21,

atch up with frontline forma-

The Chinese offensive, Which
jumped off on Sunday night, was
reported to have slowed down on
the central and eastern sectors of
the front.

Chinese losses continued to
mount as Allied troops fell back
towards Seoul. Communist cas—
ualties since the offensive began
were estimated at 35,000.

Red Losses

Up to last night Allied ground
and air forces claimed to have
killed or wounded at least 42,300
Communists since the Chinese
opened their massive drive last
Sunday night.

The Eighth Army thus claim over
30,500 of this total, Naval planes

claim to have inflicted 6,300 cas-

ualties and Far East Air Force

planes including land-based fight-
ers 5,500.

Air Force and Navy

Headquarters spokesmen _ said
ee eit eke woe they considered their estimates
ests in the British West extremely conservative. They did
Indies, not include casualties probably

inflicted during many strikes car

The meeting will be under ried out in poor visibility when

the auspices of the Canada—
U.K, Continuing Committee
on Trade and Economic Af-
fairs, Importance of the
meeting is that it will con-
vene shortly after results of
the Torquay tariff confer- |
ence are made known,
Specifically the Confer-
ence will be called on to
review the initial operations
of the B.W.1. trade liberaliz-
ation plan. I¢ will also have
before it Canada’s official
complaints to Whitehall re-
garding alleged U.K. trade

iscriminati ainst this
ntry’s g -

Events at Torquay have
undoubtedly sharpened a
growing demand in Canada
that there be a completely
new look at Canada-B.W.I.
trade and commercial rela- |
tionships.

The Canada-B.W.L. trade |
treaty of 1925 has long since |
ended so far as any binding |
obligations are concerned. |
Either side could terminate |
it on six months notice. But
Canada has been loath to do |
this in the present unsettled
state of world commerce.
Even though the price which
Canada pays by way of a
sugar preference, plus steam
| ship subsidies is high,—it is
| felt that to throw the whole
arrangement overboard now,
would be unwise. Moreover,
so long as present import
discriminations against Ca.
nadian goods are in effect,
there would be little use in
| working out new tariff
| schedules.

Thus the main business of
the May conference will
likely be a very intimate
and searching look at the
whole system of import
licenses and quotas as im-
posed by Britain and the
‘Sterling area against dollar |
goods.—Financial Post April | |

14.
|

_

ly, special reference to the
new and disturbing proba-
1
| we





Beef Shortage

Fantastic Prices Asked

This land of beaf steaks faces

in the

pendents
slim

Minister of Jamaica,
riving
May 6, to attend the opening of
the Caribbean Commission which

and explosives will be main-

*ticlan a rousing welcome.

results could not be observed.

—Reuter,



Coalition Govt. Of

Eire May Fall Soon

DUBLIN, April 28,

Eire’s three-year_old c0alition

Government may fall next week,
political observers said here to-
day.

Several right-wing Independents
Parliament have_ with-

drawn their support from Premier
John A. Costello’s Coalition.

The withdrawal of these Inde-
means that Costello's
parliamentary majority ig

wiped out,—Reuter,



Less Sulphur

LONDON, April 28.
Sulphur supplies for British

Industry will be limited to 100,000
tons per quarter,
announced to-day.

it was officially

The Government said that

searce sulphur would be rationed
from May 1.

Most users Will get

less than 90% of what they used
last year.

Key industries such as iron and

tained at full output. So will es-

sential Food and Health services,

—Reuter



BUSTA DUE HERE
NEXT SUNDAY

Hon, W. A. Bustamante, Prime
will be ar-
in Barbados on Sunday,

will be in session here.

Mr. W. A. Crawford and Mr.
Symmends are making
plans to give the Jamaican poli-

Ly ‘New York

NEW YORK, April 28.
a serious shortage of that com-

modity except at fantastic prices.
While 84,179,000 cattle roam ranches—according to the

latest count—people who can

_finding it hard to buy meat in New York.

RITA WANTS DIVORCE

NEW YORK, April 28.

Rita Hayworth announced to-
night through her lawyers that
she was taking necessary steps to
obtain legal and permanent
separation from Prince Ali Khan
She had reached the decision
“after long consideration and
without recrimination or external
influence,” she said.

“I have concluded that the
happy and contented home life
which I earnestly desire for my
children and myself, is otherwise
ungpatinable.

“Various factors including, my
husband’s extensive social obliga-
tions’ and far-flung interests un-
fortunately make it impossible to
establish or maintain the kind of
home I want, and my children
need. Their future welfare is my
only concern Reuter,

Senate President

ROME, April, 28.

Enrico De Nicola, the retired}



first President of the postwar
Italian Republic was today elect-|
ed President of the Senate in a}
secret ballot. De Nicola, at 73?
3 Ivanoe Bonomi the
Pre - and noted anti
wi April 20
—Reuter.

only pay moderate prices are

The New York City Council,
for instance, who want thousands
of pounds of fair priced meat for
hospitals, welfare homes and cor.
rectional institutions, are going
short.

Last week they were offered
only about a seventh of their
requirement and that at a record
price.

Cattle prices and uncertainty
over meat price control are
blamed for the difficulties,

Cattlemen are being accused of
laying off in the markets to keep
prices high.

It was expected that a new
order would soon be issued, set-
ting up a new set of meat prices
But this would touch off a funda-
mental political issue with the






















i acini baie

Australians
Go To Polls,

MELBOURNE, Agetl 28.

Five million Australians weat to
the polls today to decide whether
to give the Liberal Country Party
(Conservative) Government a
“fair go”, or bring the Labour
Party back to power.

On the tick of 8 p,.m., loeal time
ravers Were slammed on thousands
of polling pooths in the Eastern
States.

Vote-counting began and ; re.
turns were flashed to tally rooms
in each State capital,

But in Western Australia with 2
two-hour time lag, peopie were
Still voting and results were de
layed. There were 292 candidate:
for 121 seats in the House of Rep-
resentatives, (three of them have
already been returneq unopposed)
and 112 for the 60 Senate seats

The House is completed with
one Member each for the Northern
Territory and the Australian
Capital Territory (Canberra) but
neither has a vote, except on a
matter affecting his territory.

.Percentages of the Senate votes
in the Australian General Electior
at the end of the e¢ unt for the
night were:

Libera) and Country Parties:
New South Wales 47.4; Victorio
41.4; Queensland 54; South
Australia 49.3; Western Australia
53.42: Tasmania\51.14, Labour
43.3; 56.6; 42.47; 50; 44.66; 47.3;
Other parties 9.3; 2. 86: 0.7; 1.92
0.46.

To win six of the ten seats in
any State Party needs 54.5 per
cent. of the valid votes cast in the
State .—Reute’ .



Will Discuss Persia
Over Week-end

LONDON, April 28,

Senior British Foreign Office
officials met Foreign Secretary
Herbert Morrison at London
Airport this morning on his re-
turn from Paris to inform him of
the latest developments in the
Persian crisis.

licy meetings on handling:
the fast moving sgjtuation in
Teheran from the British side
are likely to occupy the entire
weekend,

Kenneth Younger, Minister of
State who was to have left Lon.
don on a speaking engagement,
cancelled his arrangements to be
available in London for discus-
sions with the Foreign Secretary

No immediate British action is
likely until more is known of the
attitude of the new Persian Gov.
ernment, —Reuter,

c *

No Conflict
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 25.

Sir Miles Thomas, Chairman of
the B.O.A.C., airways has said}
in Trinidad, that his company
has No intention of curtailing the
individuality ot British West
Indian Airways as aq self-contain-;
ed air erating company. Sir
Miles said th hat the purpose of
this trip is principally to intensify
and —_ consolidate inprovements
made during the past 12 months
During that period he said their
position financially improved by
$14,400.00 B.W.I. He said that
B.O.A.C, was in fact feeding
the B.W.I.A. with a consider-
able volume of business. Success
of their New York-Nassau service
encouraged expansion of north-
south feeder traffic to the Carib-
bean and West Indian areas, he
said,

Gairy Denied Entrance
To ‘som W.I. Islands

(From Our Own Correspondent}
GRENADA, April 28.
Colonel E. M. V. James, Police
Superintendent, in a letter to
Gairy of xomcay's date, in-
forms the M.M.W.U. President~
Genera] that the “Government of
Trinidad and Tobago and the
Government of St, Vincent have
notified me in my. capacity as
Chief Immigration Officer that
you will not be permitted to
enter either of those colonies.
Some days agO Gairy spoke of
plans to visit St. Vincent ' and
earlier of a Caribbean tour
énding in Jamaica to see Hon
Bustamante -



LONDON, April 27.
The British National Council
of Labour representing the La-
bour Party's



(deleted from
{mate, t

;he did not

| have
Shas gone up: —Reater.

8,000,000 ~ strongjed the
Trades Union Congress and the] movement originally stood, By
Co-operative Union, today issued] rejecting

|

BARBADOS, APiIL 29, 1951
SPRING DAY

IN BRIDGETOWN

ee




Between Cane, Beet





PRICE : SEX CENTS «,

eicome Of MacArthur
Controversy Doubtiul

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE
WASHINGTON, April 28.
HERE is no indication from General Douglas
MacAzthur as to what he intends to do after
he has testified to the Congressional Committees
on the Far Eastern situation next week.
It is now nearly three weeks since the General’s
dismissal from the United States and United

Nations Supreme Command in the Far East. But .

no one appears to know what political or other

course he will follow.
At times.there appear to bo overtones in the General's
statements suggesting that he might welcome becoming a
candidate for the Presidency in 1952. He was the unsuecess-
ful candidate for Republican nomination in 1948. Mac-
Arthur has said however, that he aspires to no political
office, and that he intends to “fade away”. His friends insist
that he means what he says. }
date RS RE Asa vesult of this situation, the
highly emotional. MacArthur con-
troversy here seems likely to
j peter out in a Vacuum even sooner
'than some of the sagest political
observers in the White House
predicted at the beginning of the

Fair Competition”

LONDON, April 28. controversy.
Suggestions for establishing Nothing conerete has so far

WITH the fountain ‘playing od the “Gannon Ball” tree in bloom, Bridgetown yesterday resembled a ‘fair and above board competi-|ejerged from MacArthur, which

late spring day. 101" between the beet and sugat |] is likely to be adopted as a prac.

i cit om Saale ne thee es alae gamete os cane industries are made in | tical policy either by the Execu-

memorandum — by the British | tive or Legislature of the

B. G; Legislature _ Defendin Britain Sugar Refiners’ Association sent] United States

tday to all members of Parlia Seme of MaeArthur’s proposals

ment for intensifying the war against

Had Stormy Debate! The memorandum say The jthe Chinese Communists in Korea

(From Our Owr. Corresponden ‘Oo oO sresent Government has recently |have all along been a part of the

GEORGETOWN, BG., I innounced its intention both of! developing policy of the Govern-
‘April 8, nationalising the beet sugar’ in-| ment.

In a stormy debate in the GLASGOW, April 28. justry and placing relevant legi The Truman Administration
presence of a large crowd, the], ritain's Chance oO ‘ation on a permanent basis |therefore, is going ahead with
Legislature on Friday | evening Bt ied that Brit llor Perce meet he Hugh sir mm neat “Some decision would have to|them as it would presumably
requested Government to employ «t ain’s ree-year Defence Fro- The taken whether the apportior: |haye done even if MacArthur

immediately as part-time
specialist, Dr. Heung Ho, at pre-
sent part.time ear, nose,
throat specialist.

The motion by Hon'ble John
Carter seconded by Hon'ble John
Fernandes nearly precipitated a}
constitutional crisis when Hon'ble
D. P. Debidin objected to Acting
Colonial Secretary D, J, Parkin-
son who said it was quite un-
acceptable to Government, and
suggested it be withdrawn.

Debidin said the Secretary’s
statement suggested Government
intended to flout majority opin-
ion, amd if so, he would move

~

a motion demanding the resigna- \)

tion of Dr. L. J. Eddy, ne
Services Director, failing which
he would move his salary be
next year’s esti-

Parkinson, however, explained
mean Government
would not accept the motion, but
that. offiial members would vote
against it, Put to the vote, 14
voted for, six against,

Gas Tank Explodes:
30 Girls Injured

MARYVILLE, Missouri, |
|



Aptil 28
A natural gas tank blew up]
today near a college dormitory,
crumbled one wall, and sent 180
girls fleeing in

1 nightgowns and
pyjamas, No one was killed but
30 girls were injured or burned,

and 17 were detained in hospital
The blast pitched one sheet of
steel four blocks, and shot flame
hundreds of feet into the sky.
The explosion broke plate glass
windows in the business distric‘ |



10 blocks away, severed thy
water main, and _= silenced tele-
phones in parts of the city.

—Reuter.



Builditig Asked For

W.L, Students Union

LONDON, April 28. 1
Officials of the West

drive to get more members and
more money.

They want a building of their
own. Mr. Rawle Farley, Presi-
dent, says: “We have been living

\ tor a long time on the good graces

of the Victoria League and the
British Council: now we must start
getting money together so that we
can have our own centre.

“West African, Indian anc
Malayan students all have their
dual centres. It is only the West
Indians who have not yet any
headquarters.”

There are 1,200 West ‘fndien
students in Britain with a big
and very activ’ nucleus in London,
Recently the Union’s commitments
increased and expenditure

‘apitalist Imperialism
Is Not Source Of Danger

—SAYS LABOUR

tional Communism.”

The manifesto said the leaders
cf world Communism had betray.
ideals for which their

democracy, they had

and]

Indian tof
Students Union have launched a*

(gramme was something the Government believed could be

Yeonomic life”.




4 ment of sales of sugar between ti
jarried out “without fatally damaging the fabric of our | Bri

ind the sugar cane refiners

{had not been dismissed.

Corpora “| WAR EXPANSION

To the extent that Mac Arthur's

itish Beet Sugar

was |

ot. Addressing the Scottish Re-— | be dealt with as at present by the}, als involve > expansi
oe mrs gional Conference of the British }"sreed quotas, or by leaving eacl ee west eta is Mesa
) Gaitskeil said they| side to compete freely with tho|area the even Administration
believed it could be done “with—| other.—Reuter. ei ae ‘

out our falling heavily into debt
again and losing our hardly won
economic independence, and with
out such a fall in our standard of
living as would be intolerable,”

Gaitskell said that there were
bound to be “great uncertainties
in Britain's future Defence Pro-
gramme, It had not been con-
cealed that the speed at which it | toc
could be carried out depended on
all sorts of conditions largely be-

$2,500 Penalty
For Harbour
Pollution

(From Trinidad Guardian) |
| The Legislature yesterday
i passed a Bill to outlaw the
} practice of some ships

; Labour Party,
It

emptying their bilge off the
island, This killed fish, it)

Gromyko Refuses
To Include Austria

Soviet Deputy Andrei Gromyko [sbotish

ing Eastern

shows no sign of abating its op-
| position to them, There appears
‘to be nothing which the support-
ers of MacArthur throughout the
country can do, or are likely to
do which would foree any change
upon the administration,

There have been proposals to
President Truman, to
bolish the State Department, to
found an entirely new De partment





PARIS, April 28

separat
western

lay “widened the gap

ana view. |

| mond ian esta vehicieade as points” at the Feur Power Depu | for Foreign Affairs. Others have
| Was said and spoiled bathing, | oth Britain “ direct control. : tics Conference here today, a|been made to revoke the Yalta
| Bey a specified a pen- plies py yee gt ge oc on Western spokesman said, follow.|and Potsdam Agreements, to re-
‘a yo or ., & 2 : s 8 ie Pe “hi vise the 2 ions C -

$: three months’ | adequate, the Defence job could| 17% the fortieth meeting which| vise the United Nations Charter,

imprisonment, but in com-
mittee this was increased to
| $2,500 fine or 12 months’ im.
prisonment on the suggestion
He the Hon, Sir Gerald

| Saeaibaed felt that ships’
| engineers would take a
chance to break the new law

as $500 was not too heavy a
fine, \
Sir Gerald pointed out |
that the Police were poorly
equipped to enforce the new
law, There was only one

not be completed in three years,
but it was too early to say that
the necessary tools would not be
forthcoming, we
Further Advances st
The Chancellor pointedly tre
jected the arguments that his bud-~|
get involved either departure Th
from Soeialist principles or | AU
frontal attack on Britain’s Health | fro
Services.
“When the present exceptional] Tr
diMeulty is over, further advances
will be possible. We shall then

have to make up our minds in
launch now able to keep up which direction They should be

with a ship at cruising speed, | | made,” he said.
The Trinidad penalty for A shortage of raw material
emptying oil in the territor- would mean that the Government





lasted two hours and ten minutes.
Gromyko
the new Western agenda put for

refused for the first time to agrec

ind to demand the dismissal of
dean Acheson from the Secretary—
ship of State.

Most of these proposals however
and (2)\are beyond the — constitutional
powers of the United States Con—
include Austria on the agenda. | ress, and it is doubtful whether
ree Western powers have had/ony of them could command a
stria on their proposed agenda] majority even within the opposi-

today (1) rejected

rd yesterday in another attemp:
meet Russian views,

m the beginning, and later|tion Republican Party itself.
agreed to add the question of —Reuter.
jieste —Reuter,



VOGELER FREED

VIENNA, April 28.
Robert Vogeler, a 38 year old
American business man, freed by
the Hungarian Government after

C.D.C. CAN START
AFRESH

LONDON, April 29.



ial waters is heavier than | had to deal with a worse situation The Sunday newspaper Obser.| Serving 14 months of ee 1° wine
| that in New York—$1,000. | | not a better one, Gaitskell argued] Ver finds evidence in the Colonial] Sentence for “eeplonege and oo
| But Sir Gerald emphasised | | {t would not be able to decrease | Development Corporation’s report} 2OMC sabotage”, ae '

that people did not bathe in | | taxation or increase Government | ‘4t at last expensive lessons of frontier into Austria to-day

New York harbour, while in expenditure.—Reuter. past failures in colonial develop —Reuter,

Trinidad half of the popula- | ment are being learned.

tion within ten miles of the | “It is important,” it said today, THE “ADVOCATE”

sea coast did not have proper

“th
| bathing facilities,

| |Freneh Assembly To





pose of the Colonial Development

at the moral and social pur-|!

pays for NEWS





| et Corporation has been stated so 2
Vote On New Bill boldly Lord Reith, the new DIAL 3113
Chairman, has already taken Day or Night
ay Day PARIS, Apri! 28. — to implement their princi-
The French National Assembly! bles ~—Reuter.
Si ec h votes in the early hours tomorrow | or SOL LAPP PAPEL A LALLA I
on Premier Henri Queuille’s new | st ts
ype Electoral Reform Bill which he % x
. wants approved as a preliminary’ & es
PARIS, April 28. step to holding a General Elec- * Ag
General De Gaulle, leader of} tion in June %s x
the French Peoples’ Rally will] ‘The Cabinet decided today to ” x
make a May Day Speech in view|jeave no stone unturned in its ¥ x
the forthcoming French] efforts to get the As sembly dis-| $ %
general elections, it was announc-! solved and a General Election | x 3
ed today. 5 held in June instead of October. | 3 $
The General will speak at) As a first step, the Government) *% *
open air meetings in the Bois De} leaders want to get rid of the ex.| % %
Boulogne, In the end of the city. isting voting system of propor-| ¥ *
at the same time, Communists] tional representation, which they| % x
will march along the traditional] fear would give the Gaullists. and| 3 ®
May Day route from the Placeynew parliament,—Reuter, x %
De La Nations to the Place De . x s
La Bastile. i ‘ g
—Reuter, ; »
Anglo-Iran Oil Co. | § %
siege cisnil ee oe $
m seine. » \ a .
PETAIN TAKING Protests To Pre mier % :
MORE NOURISHMENT LONDON, April 28. | \s %
The British controlled Anglo-| % x
PARIS, April 28. |Iranian Oil Company today} % x
Ex-Marshal Petain’s genera)|formally protested against the ¢ x
condition continues to improve] threateed nationalisation of its : s

and he is taking more nourish.|plant in . Persia,
ment daily, a bulletin issued here | announced here.
Said to-day. Reuter. In a note delivered to the
Persian Premier in Teheran, the
Company said that nationalisation
would be a breach of its agreement
with the Persian Government.
The Anglo-Iranian Company
reminded Persians, in its note,
that its oil concession ‘should be
based on principles of mutual
goodwill and good faith, and that

the Company






SSCS OS OIIS HI





S
it should not be annulled and that] %
its terms should not be altered by x
any legislative, administrative, or %
executive acts.’ %
; —Reuter.
tioha) Communism to lift the bur- Reuter g
den of fear from the world by *
joining in the constructive work M.C.A. WANT RELEASE o
of the United Nations, by permit-- OF TRADE UNIONISTS 8
ting the organisation of interna %

tional disarmament, by agreeing: ‘From Our Own Correspondent)









“farm bloc’ in violent Opposition,}an appeal for May Day asking|destroyed for the peoples underjon the control “and development! GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 28. 4
Meanwhile the meat industry|the leaders of international Com-|their domination the possibility of|of atomic energy under a world| ,The Manpower Citizens Asso- | %
have a bad case of jitters. It is]munism “to lift the burdens of|Socialism. authority.” ciation teday sent a@ resolution to %
reflected in the hesitancy to buy|fear from the world.” Instead, they had built for those} In Tokyo, the General Counci! the Venezu = Consul bere for x
cattle at current prices; in case| In its May Day manifesto, the|peoples a tyrannous form of State|of Japanese Labour Unions today transmission to the Pre: Caras %
the meat price is fixed at a level ]Council said that in the last half-jcapitalism, maintained in power {cancelled its projected May Day! the Junta Govern of ¢ rm %
uneconomic in relation to the un-|céntury, Labour had transformed|by police terror and aggressive in|rally in the face of a warning is eee ident athe Perez 1%
fixed cattle prices. the hopes of the early pioneers|its foreign policy. | sued by Supreme, Allied Head-1 ielan od ‘ oe " ae 3
—Reuter, |into reality. “The British Labour move ment | quarters : ids th er trade allen. le aders %
dow - “But when we turn to face the|rejects the pretensions of such a| The pare ade was to have taken es 1 alleunel Wits impris %
ONLY 33 PASSED future, the outlook is overcast.|system of dictatorship and is de-|place in the plaza front of the oned without judicial inquiry or |X
(From Our Ow», corresmondent) The gains which Labour has|termined to take every measure, | Imperial Palace Lieut-Genera]} without trial %
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 25. |“Tested from the past are threat-jincluding military rearmament,)/Matthew Ridgway’s headquarters} prey also want immediate| %
Out of 202 candidates who sat ened from a new quarter, {te ensure that this system is not | had said the Occupying Forces in! yeca}| from exile of Venezuelan %
the University of London Exam- “This time, the danger come3.imposed by force on free peo-|Japan would intervene if thel trade union leaders at present in| xy
ination held in Trinidad in|"0t from the policies of capitalist ples trades unionists paraded in the} Cuba and enforcement’ of the | 4
January 1951 only 33 were}imperialism, but from those who It appeals once again to those palace plaza Convention on Trade Union free—| %
successful, \ direct the movement of interna- who direct the policy of interna- —Reuter. dom, UP

¢ $4,54656664% .
LEED PASEO SOPHO TEE Ce “ *

K. W. V.
EAU DE CULUGNE §

THs EAU DE COLOGNE IS STEADILY gaining g

an increased demand Overseas. Made from the
purest and :nost fragrant Oils produced in Europe,
and with the addition of pure Grape Spirit, it has a
lasting fragrance unexcelled by any others. bn
Delightfully Refreshing it is indispensable for that
final touch to the toilette and for a really soothing
after-shave lotion.

It is comforting and refreshing, also, to your Sick
Friends and Relatives ! !

oe
K.W.Y, Eau De Cologne can be obtained from %
Messrs. Cave, Shepherd & Co. Ltd. %
Messrs. Bookers Drug Stores 3
Messrs. Bruce Weatherhead Lid. g
Messrs. Collins’ Ltd. %
Messrs. Knight's Ltd, x
Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd. x
Messrs. C. F. Harrison & Co. Ltd. x
Messrs. H. P. Harris & Co, s

.
“¢ “4 £,6,465056%
PSPS E ASAT ON



PAGE TWO SUNDAY





| JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs Over Newsam's





AQUATIC CLUH CINEMA

NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
RKO oresen





) Se oan

(Members Only)

BERT MITCHUM +o: JANET LEIGH :o: WENDELL COREY

in ‘*HOLIDAY AFFAIR”

Lower Broad Street

DRESSES of all Types

Ready-Made from London
Also Ma&de-to-Order

ONESDAY AT 5



p.m
and THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.20
ERON ROBERT RYAN :o: CHARLES KORVIN

‘BERLIN EXPRESS”

DAY
E





BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
COCKTAIL HANDBAGS

a

‘
|
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2

TODAY to TUEBSDAY—4.45 & 8.30 p.m. t

Not Manta

An Conerahd Production with
Solly FORREST, Keefe BRASSELLE, Leo PENN
——VaDNESDAY & THURSDAY :
2 New Features
BLUE GRASS OF KENTUCKY
Billi WOA4AMS, Jane HEIGH

A

10)






EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

ROYAL

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.15 pm

Columbia Big Double .

Robert YOUNG &
Marguerite CHAPMAN

in
+ RELENTLESS ”

*

3 p.m
Color by Cinecolor
DUBE GOES WrRsT

Darryl F. Zanuck presents LBERT

Irene DUNNE in —— SS
“THE MUDLARK” LAZ

AND OISTIN
with «LUST FOR GOLD” LAST * saewe TODAY
Alec GUINNESS Starring STORY OF SEA BISCUIT

Coler_by Techicoior
Barry FITZGERALD,
Shirley TEMPLE,
— and -—
Humphrey BOGART, in
CHAIN LIGHTNING

MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
DECISION of CHRISTOPHER BLAKE

Constance SMITH
Andrew RAY

& “LOST BOUNDARIES“

Beatrice PEARSON, Mel FERRER

Glenn FORD &
Sai eeisaaaine Ida LUPINO

‘l Tomorrow Only 5
8.50 p.m
Columbia Serial Ist Inst.
“SEA HOUND”
with Buster CRABBE

OLYMPIC

To-day

and MONDAY & TUBSDAY 8.90 ;

Warren WILLIAMS,
FEAR

m

To-day and To-mprrow, and

4.30 and 8.15 p.m.
M-G-M Smashing Double . .

Robert TAYLOR

&
Robert MITCHUM ae ne ear chow,

£2.Z

in 4 30 and 8.15 p.m. First Plotures ef the Story of the Hero
Universal All Action Double Bg. a
+ UNDER CURRENT” J WAYNE &
ot Randolph SCOTT (eneral DOUGLAS Mac ARTHUR
ee in This Timely Short Story will be shown
+ NIGHT MUST + THE SPOILERS ” a
FALL” AND BRIDGETOWN
Starring SEVEN SINNERS ” > a A 7 A
Rosalind RUSSELL & Starring :

John WAYNE &

Robert MONTGOMERY Brodrick CRAWFORD

from FRIDAY, MAY 4th together with
the featnre picture . . .

nanan Ss.

1S
re or









, With JANE ANDREWS
#ARLEY GRANGER and JOAN EVANS
REGULAR PRICES, k

ANNOUNCING

The Visit of ...

PPLE EPP PPPS P PPO

GLOBE THEATRE

TONITE 8.30; TOMORROW—TUESDAY, 5 & 8.15 P.M.
MISS ELAINE KINKEAD

Dorothy Gray

Beauty Consultant

BU Tt aT Lae

Copa Vat
Mig PUMA ae

Extras : “LET’S GO LATIN” and BRITISH MOVIE TONE
LOCAL TALENT AUDITION TO-DAY, 9.30 A.M.

aoe EE=—=E2 SS

STEPHEN McNALLY

SUE ENGLAND + BARBARA WHITING
‘end introducing “THE DUKES
Produced and Directed by MAXWELL SHANE
A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE



who will be available at COLLINS’ LTD., Cosmetic

. IMPORTANT
Department, from 30th April to 3rd May. OUR EVENING SHOWS will start promptly at 8.15 p.m.

+ as from TUESDAY, MAY 1ST, so as to enable our Patrons

a ¥ to obtain transportation. » 3
. 5
ry \SODCCEEEGS9S FEBS SOSSO9G 69569599 5695550556650508

MISS KINKEAD will gladly give her expert advics

en Make-Up, Skin Treatment and Personal Analysis

Chart to all who care to take advantage of this
opportunity.

STILL DEPENDS ON

BEATRICE
OLL STOVES

Tested and tried is the
Verdict of every Housewife

Trust...

Oblainable in Single and
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Diai 3306. LUMBER & HARDWARE

Dorothy Gray

LEPSESP SPP SP PSPSPS OE PPE POO OOF =
4

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AR a
OPEL SESE ESOP PEPE,

A COMBINATION
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OS ISFIELD EPPS L LLDPE LZPEZPLLLZLPLL-LLLELPLLLPDAALLD

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pak deinen s

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FOR THOSE WHO REMEMBER ITS GREATNESS—AND
THOSE WHO HAVE YET TO EXPERIENCE THE POWER
AND GLORY OF ITS EMMORTAL DRAMA—

THEATRE

"THE MIGHTIEST WAR DRAMA
EVER SCREENED ...1T RIPS THE
HEART. TO SHREDS AND TATTERS” °

! American

es Starring ‘ Z
a ie” ¥
ssa LOUIS WOLHEIM sex, {
ceeneallgin LICH MAHA UMARQUE'S novel - Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE As

STOP THAT LEAK
IN YOUR ROOF

We offer
EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
RED CEDAR SHINGLES

ROLL ROOFING —
ROLL ROOFING — Red
PITCH PINE

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY



ADVOCATE

i FF TO TORONTO yerterday

morning by T.C.A. went
Mr. and Mrs. E. Keith Waleott
jand their son Michael. Actom-

panying them was Mr. Walcott’s
; brother Dr, J. E. Walcott. Mr.
and Mrs. Walcott and their son
expect to be away for about two
months. Dr. Walcott however
will be returning in a few weeks
|'ime.
Departures By T.C.A.

| URING the eight months

Peggy Farmer plans to spend §
lin Canada she will be in Montreal
most of the time staying with
relatives. Tony Dormer
who was Barbados for
a week's returned to
Bermuda yesterday y ,.T.C.A.
â„¢ is with onl i ae
and is at present station in
Bermuda.

Back to Canada
Bs AND MRS. ARMAND
SMITH who had been here
since March 3r@,_left yesterday
TCA, for Tereato. Brig.
the son Gi the late
E. D. Smith of poet
passengers on .C.A,
northbound trip to Canada were,
Mr. Tounes” Mediand, Miss
Eleanor Wa Col, and Mrs.
Robert

in
holiday

Sal Mr. and Mrs.
Murray Wallace and Miss Evelyn
Macinnes, Mr. Wallace is a fe
iT.C.A, pilot and Miss Macinnes f
is a T.C.A, air stewardess.

T.C.A. Girls

ORETTA McDONELL, Mary
Fleming, Doris Tidy, Geral-
dine Hodgson and Lucie Grace
came in on the T.C.A. flight yes-

They all work Early Summer

enh TCA. in different parts of R. and Mrs, Cecil Goddard's
Canada. ‘Doris who is a reserva- son John, who is taking a

i erk in Toronto has been to | commerce course at Queen’s Uni-

Eorkeaes before. Mary, Geraldine | versity in Kingston, Ontario, is

and Lucie are from Montreal and f down’ for the summer holidays,

Loretta’s home is in Vancouver. which for him have begun some-
They are staying at the Ocean } what early. e

View Hotel. John has just completed the

second year of his couse. Other
KEEP THIS students expected down Saturday,
DATE OPEN

May 5th are Geoffrey Watson, his

sister Dorothy and Maureen John-
son. John says that Geoffrey
NOW SHOWING AT
EMPIRE

Skeete, Louglas Carter and Stan-
4.45 & 8.30 Daily

ley Carrington aze also coming
The Command

down fur the summer vacation,
Performance Picture

but he does not know when.

Not Since 1907

ROM Vancouver Island comes
Mrs. C. Boyd who has come to
spend about 6 months to one year
in Barbados. She is staying with
Miss Major at Bay Mansion, Miss
Boyd who went to school in Bar-
bados left here in 1907, this is
her first visit since then. She
came in by T.C.A. flight yester-

day.

Glad To Be Home

R, CLEMENT S, JARVIS, a

Barbadian who had been liv-
ing in Curacao for two and a half
years working with C.S.M., was
among the fourteen passengers
who came in on Friday from
Curacao. He tells me that during
his stay in Curacao he took a
course in real estate and auction-
eering and a post-graduate course
in real estate, law and accountancy
and has obtained diplomas in these
subjects. He is back home for
keeps, glad to be here and hopes
to go into business shortly.

Petroleum Engineer

R. BASIL HODGES who is

a petroleum engineer with the
United Oil Well Co., in Anaco,
Venezuela arrived from Vene-
zuela yesterday via Trinidad by
B.W.LA. accompanied by his
wife. Here for a short holiday,
they are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel...... arriving by the
same plane were Mr. and Mrs.
Charles B, White. Mr. White
us a sales representative of Coca
Cola. They plan to spend six
weeks with the Gidleys at a flat
on the St. Lawrence coast. Mr,
Gidley is also with Coca Cola.

Trinidad Arrivals

RS. E. DE LA BASTIDE ar-

rived from Trinidad yester-
day morning by B.W.I.A. A














Dorryl F. Zanuck presents RENE DUNNE
in “THE MUDLARK” with ALEC
GUINNESS» CONSTANCE SMITH
Andrew Ray - Beatrice Campbell

{
ee
SSS Dea



few minutes later her daughter
on Joan came in by T.C.A. from

Music of Manhattan; British] Trinidad.
|News—Showing 6th Mrs, de La Bastide is here for

Round F.A.
|\Cup—Birmingham’s early goal.

Boxing—Ronnie Clayton retains;
| His Titles,

two weeks. Joan plans to spend
one week in Barbados. They
are staying with Mr. ang Mrs.
Harold Kidney. Mrs. Kidney
is qa daughter of Mrs. de La
Bastide. Joam works in the
Public Relations Office of T.C.A.
in Montreal other arriva's
from Trinidad yesterday were Mr.
Fred Strasser and Mr. Edwin Da
Costa, Trinidad architect; as usual
Mr. Da Costa is staying at
Aquatic Gardens. “wire

TO PRESENT—

MAY 4th





LEW AYRES
LAST TWO

M
LEON ERROL in: “GALS
“WHE

an
A Double that has
DRA !
And LEON ERROL—You know

NOW

Plain

SPORT SHIRTS
MEN'S PLASTIC

LTD.

DIAL 4610



DIAL 4606

(

LT

anrib Calling

ADVENT



ASTOR THEATRE

“BUCCANEER'S GIR
Extra: LES BROWN &
IT’S A HOT PROGRAMME
onday and Tuesda
N TO-MORROW COMES
every thing—LOVE ! ACTION!
tN '

Make it your MUST SEE

SUNDAY, APRIL. 29,

Venezuelan Journalist:
OUR Venezuelan journalists
were intransit through Barba—
dos yesterday. They remained at
Seawell for about twenty minutes,
arriving from Grenads in time to
connect with B.W.I.A’s schedule
fligiit to Venezuela.

Twenty days ago, nine Vene-
zuelan journalists visited Trini-
dad on a goodwill tour orga-
nised by B.W.I.A. and the
Trinidad and Tobago Tourist
Bureau. They spent ten days in
Trinidad and five in Tobago,

after which, five of them return-
ed to Venezuela. These four how-
ever went on to spend four days

in Grenada. They were F.
Carmona who is on the staff of
El Impulso, Jose Machado of

Panorama, Oscar Lovera of E
Nacional and Carlos Lezenna c
El Heraldo. With them was ai
official interpreter, who accom—
panied them throughout their trip.
However one of them, Oscar
Lovera, spoke a little English. He
told Carib that he had been in
the newspaper business for fifteen
years, he was married and had
three children. They had thorough-
ly enjoyed their tour of the islands
and they had been treated with
‘every courtesy. Of the three
islands Trinidad, Tobago and
Grenada, he thought Grenada the
most beautiful.

Their interpreter Carlos Rod-
riguez, fomerly of B.W.1.A. bid

them adivs at Seawell. He re-
turned to Trinidad yesterday
afternoon.

Lady Director

ISS DORA DIBNEY, Direc-

tor of Women’s Programmes
over radio station CFCN in Cal-
gary, Alberta, is
in Barbados for
three weeks. She
flew in yesterday
from Canada by
TCA. and is
staying with Dr.
Norman and Dr.
M. . (Mrs.)
Wright at Aber-
geldie Flats.
Miss Dibney
spent thirty-five
yeas doing
newspaper work









in Canada and
was Telegraph
Editor for more DORA DIBNEY
than 25 years of various Cana

dian newspapers. After the
war she was a freelance journal-
ist before she began broadcasting.
Still Tops
AURICE JONES and his Fri-
day night talent shows con-
tinue to pack the Globe theatre.
Last Friday night's guest stars
were certainly most entertaining,
especially Joe Clemendore, versa-
tile song and dance man one min-
ute, clown the next. The crowd
loved him, :
They also encouraged the six
other performers with much ap-
plause. This shows that either the
talent is getting better or the
audience is encouraging them
Perhaps it’s both.



————

URES OF PIPA

1951





OFF TO CANADA yesterday by T.C.A. went Miss Peggy Farmer, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Wallace and
Miss Evelyn MacInnes. Mr. Wallace is a T.C.A. pilot and Miss MacInnes, a T.0.A. stewardess.

Shipwrecked?

AVE you ever been -ship-
wrecked? If not the Barbados
Polo Club will give you this “op-
portunity” on Saturday, July 21st,
the date of their annual ball at the
Paradise Beath Club, ‘

‘ * i
Children’s Paintings
His next exhibition at tne Bar-
bados Museum begins May
4th and will last for one month,
It will be an exhibition of chil-
dren's paintings from England.

Back To Caracas
Be TO CARACAS yesterday
after a holiday in Barbados
went Miss Grace Evans, Mrs.
Margot Betancourt, her datighter ~
-Carmen and Mr. and Mis. Frank
Wheeler and their daughter.
Comings and Goings
RS. H. H. HART returned

from her short visit to
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W TA... Mrs. A. _ Shields

was among the passengers bound
for Montreal yesterday by T.C.A,
Her final destination is Scotland.

Iss SHEIWLA IANTHE
* GROSVENOR of Lodge
Road, Secretary of the Christ

Church Old Girls Scholars’ Asso-
ciation has gone to the U.S. on a
visit Mr. Vernon T. East-
mond of the Sanitation Depart-
ment in St. Lueia is in Barbados
on holiday. He is on six months’
leave. A Barbadian, he is spend-
ing some of it with relatives at
George Ville, Bank Hall.

Trinidad Marriages

and Engagements
ISS PATSY SELLIER; who

captained t he Trinidad
Ladies water polo team to Bar-
bados last November was

* married in Trinidad yesterday to

Mr. Hugh Wight....Also mar-
ried yesterday in Trinidad was

Mr. Mark Conyers to Miss
Daphne Huggins. Mr. ‘nd Mrs.
Conyers are due to ariive. from
Trinidad today to spend their

honeymoon at the Hotel Royal
.... Recent engagements in Trini-
dad are Mr. Harry Bryden,.son
of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Bryden tc
Miss Valerie Knowles, tormer
B.W.1.A. hostess...... and Mr.
Ray Berard, son of Mr. and Mrs.
A. J. Bernard of San Fernando
to Miss Ruth (Binko) Millar,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Robert

Millar. Binko used ‘to go to
school at the Ursuline Convent
here.

Cats

‘I HOPE everybody realises that

no one owns a cat—your cat
probably owns you. If you are
not very careful you will firid that
you are not the possessor, but the
possessed. You can be your dog’s
master, but no one has ever yet
been the master of a cat. At the
best it is * equal partnership in
the art of living.” \
M. SODERBERG spéak-
ing in the B.B.C’s “The Na-
taralist” on “Cats and Cat-
Calls.”









SHOWS
L
ORCHESTRA
Dont Miss It

y
INCORPORATED"

MUSIC !
him; it’s laughs all the way.



$3.90 4.75

A5c,

BELTS Alc,

BOY'S PLASTIC BELTS

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

i. SSCS?
BEREEB BRR eeeee|e es 6
MEN'S WORSTED TROUSERS

BLUE, FAWN, BROWN

YOUTHS’ LONG GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS
BLUE PIN STRIPED SUITING



THE SALVATION
ANNUAL TAG DAY

; FRIDAY, MAY 4th

Please buy a Tag to
Help Others!

LAP SESFS

PPOSSSOSOS SSS S9SOD

$17.85

$6.18
$8.53
6.53
B5c.
38.

dc,

DIAL 4220





pee mR III NTN

‘ SUNDAY, APRIL 29,

1951



SUNDAY

Farm and Garden Gardening Hints

By AGRICQLA

PEAS AND BEANS

We offer no apology to-day for
reverting to this ali important
matter of proteins or fiesh-
fi since we in the West
Indies have never been able
it Supply our own needs in
this respect, although hardiy

ae of the more bulky

, Sweet potatoes, ed-

does, rice and so on. The produc-
tion of these is, generally speak-
ing, more: assured and, for-
tunately too, we need never per-
al actu go hungry where
are ai te supplies of

these commodities. It may be too
that our digestion has become ac-
customed, over long years of
habit, to take care of a ration
va ented by starch in its
various forms, and so the requis-
ite attention has not been paid to
those commodities equally if not
more important in the dietary
Cif good health is to be main-
tained) but ‘which, generally
speaking, are more hazardous to

( rough clima tie o

considerations. Let us ser
onee, however, that no reasonable
argument can be advanced against
the more extended production and
use of the Pigeon Pea as a farm
and garden crop since it is the
hardiest, the most adaptable and
the mest reliable yielder in this
group of plants and not likely to
Jet us déwn by reason of causes
d our control. Let us not
treat it casually, therefore, merely
rae se, in ered foods at any
we are inclined to ignore

the things we have and reach for
the imported article, This par-
ticular pea is concentrated good-
ness in food value, not forgetting
also its eral content, so es-
sential for bone growth. Thus, one
authority claims that one ounce
of pigeon peas contains as much
phosphoric acid and nearly twice
&$3 much potash as three and a
half ounces of rice. Hence, they
#tre 80 valuable when mixed with
rigee and so palatable that way
too, We hope that since last
Sunday many, especially new-
comers to the gardening fratern-
ity, have taken Johnnie's advice
to his father and started planting
pigeon peas as a border for the}
developing food garden. For this
purpose, put ina double row
closely spaced—say two to two
and a half feet away, three seeds
to a hole, After the first year’s
crop is over, the trees can be

ever

pruned back to produce a good
erop the second year.

A few additional facts about
the Pigeon Pea may be of interest.

Long cultivated in India—the
existence of a Sanskrit name
testifies to this—there is neverthe—
less a difference of opinion as to
whether its i
African. It came to the
West Indies from Africa and it
is sometimes known in the other
islands as Congo Pea. There is
a large number of types and strains
and there is considerable variation
in colour and shape of the pods
as well as in yields, maturity,
ete. There are ever-bearing strains
in the Wegt Indies and occasion-
al plants have been obseved here
but, so far, they have not gained
great Popularity, perhaps eg
the pods are smaller and more
tedious to shell. What a splendid
acquisition to the home garden is
an ever-bearing pea! The truth
is work on the Pigeon Pea has
been rather neglected in this part
of ee world. Not so in Hawaii,
Be EdD ad ESE eoeele epee
is regarded as one of the leading
food crops both for man and beast,
Its analysis shows qualities quite
equal to alfalfa, produces excel-
lent, nutritious forage in the
young pod stage and as pasturage
for beef cattle is capable of an
out-turn, under good average
eonditions, of as much as 1,000
lb. of prime beef per acre an-
num, Harvesting on a ijield scale,
is carried out by a_ specially
Seayiee mower with high cutter
ar.



S. H. asks;

Could Agricola tell me
why my squash is so vigor-
ous in the box but never,
never comes to anything in
the open bed? Does it need
special manure cr what?

——————— |

SALE

WELLINGTON.

Exactly 100 years ago Maoris
sold Queen Victoria 86,000 acres of
land at 1}d. an acre. To-day the
Maoris are asking for a review
of the sale and a lift in the price
to at least 2s. 6d, an acre. They
Say many of the Maoris who put
their names to the original sale
agreement were not genuine,



Cookery Corner

One of the many breads that are
very popular on the Continent is
the “Pain D’Epice.” It is also
known as “Honey Bread.” Here
is the recipe. ‘

PAIN D’EPICE
2 cups of flour

1 teaspoon bakin, wd
I teaspoon soda YS

te: salt
cup milk
teaspoon cinnamon

cup strained honey

eae slightly beaten

€aspoo nger

ix and sift dry in-
gredients. Add others.
Beat thoroughly for 15
minutes or more if.
conyenient. Bake in
loaf or bread-stick
pans in a moderate
oven. Add one table-
spoon of rum to mix-
ture, if liked. Cool and
cut in thin slices.

This week I am go-
ing to give you a basic
recipe to a Sponge
Cake or shall we call it a
Sponge Cake.”

TRUE SPONGE CAKE

5 egg whites

5 egg yolks

1 cup sugar

1 cup flour

1 tablespoon lemon juice or

vinegar

“True



—





Every

Grated rind of half lemon

4 teaspoon salt.

Measure all ingredients, Sep-
arate yolks from whites. Beat egg
whites until stiff, and beat in
gradually one tablespoon sugar
tor each egg white and set aside,

Add liquid to egg yolks and
beat until lemon-coloured and
thick, Add lemon rind. Beat in
remaining cuger.

Mix and sift remaining dry in-
gredients and cut and fold into
egg mixture. Do not
beat after adding flour,
to avoid breaking air
bubbles.

Pour into unbut-
tered pans. Cut
through mixture sev-
eral times to break
large air bubbles,
Bake one hour or mere
in moderately slow
oven, Bake 25 to 30
minutes in moderate
oven if in a layer-
cake pan or individual
tins. Invert on wire
cooler and let stand until cold,






AAAAAIAAAAAAAAALAGALS

Lovely Society women all over the

world follow this simple, inexpen-
sive beauty care;

one that is

within the reach of everyone of

"you.

This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond’s Cold
Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips.
and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then “rinse” with more
Cold Cream, for extra-cleansing, extra-softening. Very soon, your

skin will be clearer, smoother, lovelier.
FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION

By day, use a touch of Pond’s Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This
non-greasy cream will hold your powder matt for hours, and protect

your complexion from sun and wind.

=_—

POND’S

Vanishing Cream
Cold Cream

Start now to win the loveliness

that ean be yours
Pond’s Creams,

novmnal skin needs !
THESE 2 CREAMS
|

Fo THE BEA
VELIEST OMEN .
EVERYWHERE

SAAAADAAAALAAALAARATY }

Remove the cream,

You'll find the
distinctive opal-white jars at all

the best beauty counters.

For Amateurs

The Garden In April

Blue Plumbage—Border
Plants—The Sugar Apple



The Blue Flumbage, our
comparatively Rive, Sues
plants, is at its best during the
dry months of .

This a mole to be
tow e, a oor », OF a

den, It suited as an

Js cr pounders as it does
seldom reach-

ing # height ob more than three

Blue bago is a hardy plant,
id it will thrive in poor soil and
under very dry conditions. In

fact it prefers the dry ther
and during the dry months it flow-
ets continuously, being a mass
of lovely delicate pale Siue flow-
ers. During continuous rains it
stops flowering and the plants are
apt to turn a sickly yellowish
colour, but in any dry spell be
tween rains it will probably start
flowering again. Plumbago ean be
and although some people advise
an people adv
cutting it back to wi! six inch-
es of the ground at the beginning
of each rainy season this is not
really necessary if the hedge is in
good condition. Should the Plum-
ago get straggly, then it is ad-
visable to cut it back,

Blue Plumbago is propagated
by root division,

Border Plants For Our Beds

All garden beds have a neater
and more finished appearance
when planted with a border. For
abed of the herbaceous type, a
low growing edge is really neces-
sary but even the flat open type
of bed is far more attractive if
same border plant is put around
the edge.

One of the pettiest of the border
annuals is dwarf Ageratum
which grows only a few inches
high, and which wheu flowering is
a mass of fluffy bluey-mauye.
Ageratum grows very easily from
imported seed, and will bear con-
tinuously for many months. It
makes a splendid border to a
garden bed.

Another attractive border An.
nual is the Sweet Alyssum. This
snow-white, sweet smelling An-
nual is a useful edging to a bed
and will be covered in flowers for
many weeks, Seedlings.can often
be found under an old plant, but it
is best to plant fresh each year
from imported seeds, .

The dwarf Marigold also makes
ag border plant and is covered
in golden flowers when bearing.

Marigolds are one of the most
useful and hardy of our annuals,
and they have been a splendid
standby in our gardens in this
difficult year, They 4 only grow
easily from cutting, but seedlings
are aften to be found in a bed
where Marigolds have been for
some time.

Another thing to recommend
Marigolds is that as cut flowers
they last so well in the house.

Another border plant, but one
that may not appeal to everyone;
is Parsley, The curly parsley is
both decorative and useful, and
although it should by rights be
regulated to the Kitchen garden,
yet it is sometimes seen as a bord-
er in the flower garden. Used in
this way parsley serves the double
purpose of decoration and useful-
ness,

Fruit Trees—Continued

THE 8U' -APPLE

The Sugar.apple is a small to
medium tree growing and thriving
under almost any conditions, This
tree does not need special
depth of soil, and it can grown
from seed. {t is not recommended
as a garden tree however as dur-
ing March to May it drops its
leaves and so looks very unattra-
tive for a time, The fruit ripens
from September to January, and is
plentiful, sweet, and very popu-
lar with most people, The Sugar-
apple is hardy, needs no special

a

4
UTY

*
*
a
a
*
4a
*&

when you use





eare and will grow anywhere.

But it must not be thought from
this that even the hardy fruit-trees
should never have any attention.
Fruit trees peed re ular manuring
an uning if the
to $e obtateed. If after manuring
and pruning your fruit-trees are
leafy, but fruits poorly, you may be
sure that it needs something that
the manure has not supplied, and
expert advice should be sought.

Have you any Gardening ques-
tions you would like answered or
any garden information that would
be of interest to other Gardeners
to pass on?

Have you a surplus of seeds or
cuttings you would like to ex-
change?

Write to “GARDENING”,

C/o The Advocate
and watch this Column for a reply.

Questions
Mrs. King asks why her Big-
nonia Venusta drops its buds

before they open,

In spite of consultation with the
experts no reason can bg given
for this strange behaviour. It is
suggested however that a loosen-
ing of the mar] around the reots,
and a dressing of V.G.M. may have
good results and is worth trying.

To get a grafted Julie mango
tree the seed of a common mango
must be planted, and when the
tree is well grown the Agricultur-
al Department will send someone
to graft it. It is advisable to con-
sult with the Department as to
the correct time the graftins
should be done.

D. H. ROACH writes:—

I shall be much obliged if you
will recommend me a few flow-
ering vines or climbers, of a per.
manent nature, suitable for
arbour.. By permanent I mean
those that do not die off and have
te be replaced at intervals. If
possible | would like to get per-
petual bloomers or as nearly so as
possible.. 1 have five arbours in
my garden with bougainvillea on
all of them, but I am very dis-
appointed with them as my ex.
perience is that if bougainvillea
jis controlled, that is, trimmed fre-
quently to make a shapely arbour,
they will nat flower, 1 very much
admire what is known as thd
Trinidad vine as it is nearly al-
ways in flower and looks very
colourful, I have one arbour of it
and if it were left to me I would
have it on all the others, but my
femily are inclined towards the
current opinion that it is un
healthy. It has been said that it
gives off a pollen that causes cold
and hay fever. I also have the pink
coralita but that revels in climb-
ing trees or long fences and is not
at its best on a small arbour,

Thanking you in anticipation
for your kind assistance. ~
“Passage House,” i Fe
Passage Road,

St. Michael.

t results are <

ADVOCATE

SEWING

* How Much Material Should I Buy?”

n my experience one of the
most frequently asked questions
about dress making is, “how much
material should I buy?”

There are several different
methods of answering this ques-

. By far the most economi-
cal way to determine the quanti-
ty pf material needed for a given
pa is to make a cutting pattern
in paper for the bodice including
facing pieces and any collar or
culls ete, to be cut. A space
half the width of the material
should then be marked out on a
table or the floor and the pattern
laid in this space in the most
advantageous manner, care being
taken to place the grain lines
properly. When all the pieces
have been placed the length of
space they fill should be measured
and that will be the length need-
ed for the bodice. This method
is called planning a layout and
ence a layout has been decided
upon, it is helpful to make u
small sketch of it for use when
cutting.

Only the bodice was mentioned
in the layout method as most
skirts do not need a paper pattern
but ean be cut by the waistline

me ‘asurement directly in the
cloth. ralehe ris and
sk will require twice the

1 of skirt desired, measur-
ing from waist to hem, plus the
depth ef hem desired plus a seam
allawanee at the waist. Flares
take slightly more. A four gore
flare requires six extra inches to
cut and a cireular flare (semi-
cirele) requires approximately a
half yard extra Full cireular
skirts need four times the length
plus_about a half yard extra.
Or course, the above method,
requires a certain amount of time
and planning ahead. I find it
worth while because of the say-
ings in material. To purchase
the same quantity for every dress
is a waste in some cases and
results in skimping in others.
However when you are shopping
and see a piece of material you
just must have right away, you
want a guide method of deciding
how much to buy. If you have

a style in mind you can figure
doser but if even the style is
undecided you will have to fit
your style to your cloth when

you start to cut If the material
is thirty-six inches, as is usually

the case, you should figure on
twice the length of the bodice,
measuring from shoulder seam at
neck to waistline and adding
about three inches for seams
Add to this once the length of
sleeve, measuring from the
shoulder seam at armhole Ww
bottom of sleeve and addins
for seam and bottom hem. These

Quantities will usually do fo-
simple styles on average siz
individuals. Very large wome.
sometimes have to buy twice the
sleeve length.’ Of course larg>

collar or cuffs or reverses and
similar style details will requir»
additional amounts. The quan-
tity for the skirt is figured as

above.









ager

co



Bill and Algy get excited when
they see the marks on the snow-
covered ice. ** This is grand,” says

Bill. “Look, they lead straight to
the highest hill around here| Let's

follow them. Then we may see
the hare and get a real long sledge

ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened First Day



Don't let coughing, sneezing, chok-
ing thiack of Bronchitia or ‘Asthma
tuln your sl and en another

oo a ht. without ; in -

Ne medicine is not a

ok: ray, but works
rough thus resting the
tung an oo Hibes. ie a

01 starts t) -

gel ‘arti 1, 5, ai ee Tre-
ling mucus, 2. Thus

ea brea’ d sounder,

ps vi-

romans inp eis ag:
a eee ina

t



BLINDING

HEADACHES

MADE HER HELPLESS




KRUSCHEN
brought relief Suithr’ trom

severe head-
aches will be interested in

reading how this woman
ended her troubles :—

“I was subject to terrible
headaches. While they lasted, I
seemed to los my sight and all
power in my hands and was foreed
to lie down for hours at a time.
My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
Salts for years, suggested my
trying them. did 60, and I've
not had a return of those terrible
headaches for months. In fact,
I feel quite cured,’’"--M.W.

Headaches can nearly always
be traced to a disordered stomach
and to the unsuspected retention
in the system of stagnating
waste material, which poisons
the blood. Remove the poisonous

} accumulations — prevent them
} from forming again—and you
| won't have to worry any more.
And that is just how Kruschen
brings swift and lasting relief—
| by cleansing the system thor-
oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
« waste e &
| Ask your nearest Chemist or
| Stores for Kruschen

Rupert and the Ice-

Wh *2a
|




run as well.” “If we do see him
! hope he’s still carrying that ige-
flower. I'd no idea there were
such \hings,"’ says Rupert. Once
off the lake they find the trail leads
steeply upwards through pine trees.
*Tr'll be ronping to come back this

way," says Algy.

“10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
STACK-A-BYE CHAIRS

The All Steel Arm Chairs
$11.50 Each

at

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
! AND
HARDWARE












CIRCLE

It is important to keep in mind
that it is length you are buying
and in most styles t length will
hang length-wise on you so the
quantity is governed mostly by
your height and how long you
wear your skirts and how long
your sleeves are. For example,
long sleeves will usually require
half a yard more than short ones,
and short ones will usually
require a quarter of a yard more
than sleeves cut in the bodice

The following is an example of

the second or length method,
Bodice length 7
Seam allowances 3°
Skirt length ... . 80”
Skirt hem “aia « ea
Seam allowance

Flare allowance 6”
Multiplied by

Sleeve length

Sleeve hem “

Seam allowance ee

128°”

The amount to buy is 3 yds or
3% yds if a collar is to be cut.

Leave It To
Girls

LONDON

A group of shapely London
showgirls offered to-day to go to
the United States “to promote
closer Anglo-American relations,”
The girls made their offer after
reading reports of anti-British
feeling in the United States over
the dismissal of Gen. Douglas
MacArthur.
Leading members of the govern-
ment have been urged to visit the
United States in an effort to coun-
teract this anti-British feeling.
But Daphne Kiernander, ballet
mistress at the Casinc Theatre
said:
“We girls believe we can do a
far better job of winning over
Americans thpn any politicians,
We're trained to make people feel
good—politicians only make them
feel bad.”
Tall, red-haired “Rusty” Evans
said:
“T've known quite a few G.L.s,
and they all seem to go more for
beauty than brains.”
College educated Barbara Lewis
added:
“That doesn’t mean we haven't
any brains. We have definite
ideas on how to get next to
Americans,”
At the Windmill Theatre, blonde
Pat Hamilton elaborated on the
girls’ plans:
“We'd contact the thousands ¢'!
British G.I, brides in the states.
Through them, we'd tell millians
of Americans exactly how the



British feel. We all want the
same thing—a little peace and
happiness.” a

Rita Allan, a pert Scots girl,
chipped in:

“But not at any price. “We're
just as determined to resist the
Communists as the Americans
are. The Americans showed us
they could stand up for us, and
now we're not going to lie down
for the Russians.”

The Foreign Office declined to
comment on the girls’ offer,

—I.N.§

KLIM

ia soffe inv the
specially
packed tin!



















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for your romantic moment.
Get a few cakes of DREAM
TOILET SOAP, use _ it
faithfully in your bath,
shower and at the wash
basin for a_ soft-smooth-
clear skin, radjant with natural
loveliness.

DREAM is available at toilet goods
counters throughout the island.

°

—— ote
an meee
scoiatieineteeicatiam tocar
SL








with the faithful

*
g use of DREAM—The Soap

of the Beautiful.



PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR







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TO FIGHT DECAY



pana for gums

TO KEEP TEETH HEALTHY

HEALTHIER TEETH: Ipana’s unique formula reduces
acid-forming bacteria, thus fighting*tooth decay as well as
brushing teeth extra-white. *8 out of 10 U.S. dentists
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HEALTHIER GUMS : Massage with Ipana is the
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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951



W.1. TEAM BEST POSSIBLE Newcastle United Defeat THE JAMAICA PROBLEM

COMBINATION

Skipper Goddard Is Pleased
By 0. S. COPPIN

A LTHOUGH he could not diselose the personnel

\\ of the West Indies team to tour Australia,

< ; skipper John Goddard told me in Jamaica that he
was pleased with the selection and so are the

- majority of West Indies cricket fans ever since it

di 3 Was amnounced yesterday after a period of irritat-
Â¥ ing suspense. However, it is the consensus of
» opinion that the Selectors have done an excellent
7 job in’ their selection of the seventeen players to
represent the West Indies.

It is true that there has been the argument for choosing the odd

player instead of another but there is general agreement that the
sdlectors in the circumstances have chosen the best available talent
in the West Indies today.
_ For myself I have nominated
in previous articles sixteen of
the players chosen and I have not
selected Ferguson as the seven-
teenth since I considered that
Berkeley Gaslsn should have
been given preference.

However I approached the
question from the level that
“Boogles” Williams as a reserve
slow right arm spinner was not
| seeking selection and therefore
with the exception of Ferguson
there were no other slow spin
bowlers in the West Indies today
who could qualify by Interna~
tional standards for selection in
the team,

HAD RULED HIM OUT

ERGUSON TI had ruled out on

_. the strength that I was un-
willing to risk the possibility of
}a recurrence of his arm injury
that dogged him in India by
| sending him on a most important
and exacting Australian tour.

That was the only argument I
had against the inclusion of Fer-
guson. On the other hand he per-—
formed with remarkable success



: na JOHN GODDARD

in the recent Trinidad-Barbados Tests here and since these were
given the Official status of Trial Games in preparation for the Aus—
je oon visit, then it must be conceded at once that he has earned
selection.

I am of the opinion that he will prove a success as long as the

guarantee that each player must be pronounced medically fit is
observed. . .
_ There was no speculation at al. about the inclusion of

like John Goddard (captain), Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Alan ha walt
Valentine, Everton Weekes, Clyde Walcott, Frankie Worrell, Sonny
Ramadhin, Gerry Gomez, Roy Marshall and Robert Christiani.

Prior Jones who had already proven his worth shad only to
establish his bona fides and the West Indies Cricket Board of Control
would have to draw upon their dividends from the investment of hav-
ing already selected him to represent them in India and England.

SORRY FOR GASKIN
L AM particularly sorry for Berkley Gaskin and Andy Ganteaume.

Perhaps the chronicler of West Indies history of this period will
describe them as being among the most unfortunate of West Indies’
nearly-greats, ‘

The three players in the seventeen around whose selection the
most discussion has been céntred since the announcement of the
team are Denis Atkinson, Ken Rickards and Simpson Guillen.

I shall try to justify their selection since I claim the honour of
being the only sportswriter in the West Indies who has included all
three of them in his team forecasts. ?
| As a matter of fact I nearly suffered personal injury in Jamaica
when I published a forecast team during my recent visit there that
included Denis Atkinson. In the first place, 1 was fortunate enough to
have seen the Trial games that comprised the Intercolonial series
| between Barbados and Trinidad on the one hand, and Jamaica and
British Guiana on the other hand. :

In the first series I saw the pace bowling candidates Jones, King,
Muliins and Butler, It was at once apparent that Jones’ experience
and accuracy, though not fire would give him the edge over the other
three candidates,

JAMAICAN PACERS UNIMPRESSIVE
N JAMAICA I saw Hines Johnson, stan Goodridge, Miller, Trim
and Gaskin and here I had to pause to consider the situation, It
was not at all easy,
Fine batting by the British Guianese openers Leslie Wight and



Johnson and Stan Goodridge of any devil which they might have been
planning to develop.

| This theory of mine was only submitted for the sake of argument
in the first Test but by the second Test it had become an established
fact, It now devolved upon Trim and Gaskin to convince the selec-
tors as to their respective rights of inclusion in the team as pace bowl-
ers,

In the first Test Gaskin did everything right and got the maximum
result out of a new wicket that was responsive to turn and gave the
bowlers some advantage because of its uncomfortably high bounce.

This is no disparagement to Gaskin’s brilliant performance in
sending seven batsmen back to the pavilion and taking his 100th
| wicket in First class cricket on this tour as well.
| On the other hand, when conditions were more in line with what
;one would naturally expect to obtain in these games, Trim turned in
an excellent performance, maintaining both hostility, pace and direc-
| tion for long spells, I am not therefore surprised that he has gained

selection,
I SUPPORTED ATKINSON
ASSOCIATED myself with the few supporters of Denis Atkinson.
Few they were but, with the exception of myself perhaps, know-
ledgeable according to international cricket standards,
: I have always argued that the West Indies would be silly to have
invested in an experiment such as sending Denis Atkinson to India

from the experience of the tour and was willing to place this experi-
ence at the disposal of the West Indies Cricket authorities,

He was not eminently successful in the Trinidad—Barbados tour
here this year but he played a good innings in the second Test, he
bowled steadily and his fielding was up to a first class standard.

This, following immediately a successful seagon as an all-—
rounder in local Barbados Cricket Association games was sufficient,
in my opinion to have secured his selection.

UILLEN’S SELECTION

is Simpson Guillen of Trinidad. I agree with his inclusion.
In the first place it must be remembered that the place for a
stventeenth player was specifically created for the inclusion of a
wicket-keeper in his own right to relieve Clyde Walcott of this
responsibility in other than the more important games.

PHOSFERINE 7,

for youthful = -













Blackpool For F.A. Cup

By VERNON

|
i
|

MORGAN

WEMBLEY STADIUM, April 28.
Newcastle United won their fourth F.A. Cup Final here
today, when beating a fellow north country team Blackpool



by 2 goals to 0, after a goalless first half.
9 ent |

Everton Beat
Carlton 3-2

Everton defeated Carlton by
three goals to two in their First
Division football fixture at Ken-
sington yesterday evening.

For ‘®verton Blades,
centre forward, scored two of
the goals including a penalty
while the other was sent jn by
White. Greenidge and Reynold
Hutchinson scored for Carlton.

At half-time the score was one

all.
goal

their

Carlton defended the
from the screen end and were first
on the offensive. Their forward
line kept up a concentrated attack
on their opponents’ citadel but
the Everton defence coupled
with Reece between the uprights
nullified their efforts.

Everton also made a number of
attempts to open the scoring but
the Carlton full back Bright
always seemed to be in their way,
and sent the ball back in mid-field
with lusty kicks.

Carlton however drew first
blood when Reynold Hutchinson
headed in a free kick by Bright.

Everton launched an attack in
an endeavour to equalize and
their right-winger Haynes sent
in a good effort which goalkeeper
Warren turned around the corner,
Blades took the corner kick, but
nothing resulted.

It was not long after this that
Everton got the equalizer.
Haynes took a good kick from
away down the field and Blades
scored.

Carlton made some _ good for-
‘ward movements, trying to put
themselves in the lead, but when
they did get past the Everton
defence, their inside men kicked
wide. The interval was taken
with the score 1—1,

Shortly after the resumption,
Clairmonte handled in the pen-
alty area and centre forward
Blades who took the spot kick,
made no mistake to give Everton
their second goal.

_Everton again attacked the
Carlton goal and from a corner
kick by Blades, White headed
goalwards and the ball struck the
crossbar and rebounded into play.

Carlton now tried to draw level
and made a few attacks on their
opponents’ goal, but the defence

true.

Everton soon took over and
during one of their raids, centre
forward Blades was ordered off
the field by Referee Harris for
rough play. Shortly before this
incident the referee had called up
all the players and warned them.

The Carlton forwards moved
down the field in the Everton goal
area but “Brickie” Lucas who got
possession; kicked wide of the

Peter Bayley robbed the Jamaican shock bowling candidates Hines: goal.

The Carlton front line made
another raid and from a good
centre by Freddie Hutchinson on
the leftwing, goalkeeper Reece
saved, but did not gather and
Greenidge who was well up sent
in the second for Carltun.

It was not long after this that
White, the Everton inside right,
ran through and beat goalkeeper
Warren with a hard shot from in-
side the area to put Everton in
the lead.

In spite of one or two efforts
by Carlton to draw level, the
game ended with Everton winners
by_ three goals to two,

The referee was Mr. L. F.
Harris,

The teams were as follows:

Carlton: Warren, Bright, Ken-
nedy, F, Hutchinson, Clairmonte,
Cox, Marshall, R. Hutchinson,
Greenidge, Lucas, Mc .

Everton: Reece, Hall, Weekes,

in 1948.49 as-a comparatively untried youngster and fail to make use Fowler, Culpepper, Maynard, R. &
of this after he had satisfied his severest critics that he had benefited Haynes, White, Blades, Yearwood, wip, aun wise. inate i

Murray.

qualified.

them.

the other candidates.

The team is a formidable combination by International stand-
and the Selectors should be congratulated in selecting |
y _seventeen players in whom responsible cricket circles in the West
That being the case, Simpson Guillen of Trinidad and Alfie Indies repose complete confidence for placing West Indies cricket on
Binns of Jamaica were the only two candidates who in my opinion» the highest pinnacle in the International cricket arena.

TRAVEL |

ards,





2. It’s Cheaper too, than othe’

| vigour! a |!
Lack of vitality is a familiar symptom
today. Nothing really wrong, people
feel, but simply that they have lost their
normal happy tenor of life. Their
reserves are low. Their resilience has
vanished. They need
a tonic. If this is
our casc——start taking
PHOSFERINE for a day
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>

I wrote before the team was published that I would have
been satisfied, after witnessing the recent Tests in . Jamaica and
Barbados that I would have no objection to the selection of either
of these players as I did not think there was much to choose between
They have chosen Guillen and although some
must be extended to the also young and energetic Alfie Binns, I |
G must observe that whatever little leaning that might be
TT THIRD NEWCOMER, whose inclusion has excited comment argued in favour of Guillen’s selection must include the fact that he

has had the experience of ’keeping to Ramadhin more than any of



3. Take all the Excess Baggage

‘s international forward
handsome Jackie Milburn, playing
in the centre for Newcastle not
only scored both goals but was a
brilliant leader of his team.

He netted both goals within five
minutes — in the fifth and tenth
minutes of the second half,

The Blackpool defence was
partly to blame for the first, be-
cause, believing the Newcastle
forward who was lying upfield to
be offside, they stopped playing
and allowed him to dodge the
centre half and coolly place the
ball wide of the advancing goal-
keeper into the back of the net.

Second Goal :

The second goal was a beauty. ;
It was one of the finest ever seen ;
in the long history of the ee
Milburn, lying 30 yards outside the
goal mouth picked up a pass first |
time, and with a terrific left-foot |
drive nearly broke the back of
the net with his ananayle off .
Even Mortensen, Blackpool’s
centre-forward and England’s
pleasant leader shook hands with
his rival 6n this amazing goal.

No Excitement

The King and Queen, and
100,000 spectators paying £39,000
saw a game which was very
patchy.

It was never a real thriller and
there was little excitement or good
play by either team,

Milburn was always the best
man for the winners, and from the
opening whistle looked likely to
pierce the Blackpool defence with
his speedy dashing moves and
quick first-time shots.

The Newcastle defence was
extremely steady and undismayed
at the reputation of the strong

Blackpool attack which con-
tained the famous International
“Stanleys” — Matthews and|
Mortensen. |

In the 23rd minute Blackpool
had what proved to be their best
scoring opportunity of the match,
Off a corner, Mortensen putin |
perfect header which the New-|
castle right back Soll headed off |
the line with his goalkeeper |
beaten. Then minutes later the |
Blackpool goalkeeper Farm made’
a spectacular save.

A few minutes later Blackpool |
had a second chance of scoring,
but Slater hooked a knee high pass
from Matthews wide of the)
upright.

Blackpool attacked fiercely on
the resumption and harassed the
United men, but within 10 minutes
they found themselves two goals
down due to their not “playing
the whistle’ and to Milburn’s
brilliant shooting.

Thereafter, the heart seemed to
have been taken out of Blackpool,
and they never looked like
winning the game. Newcastle, and
Milburn in particular, kept up |
their pressure to finish, and won |
a deserved victory.

And so, Stanley Matthews is
still without his coveted Cup
medal, about the only honour in
the game which has eluded this
brilliant performer.



—Reuter.



Friendly Football

5 e .
Association
FOLLOWING are this weeks’

fixture: —
MONDAY, April 30th.
Maple vs. Penrode
Referee Mr. C, E. Reece.
TUESDAY, May ist.
Westerners “A” vs, Westerners “B".
Referee Mr. O. Graham.
WEDNESDAY, May 2nd.
Rangers vs. Maple
Referee Mr. J. Archer.
THURSDAY, May 3rd.
Harkliffe vs. Westerners “B” |
Referee Mr. C. Jemmott.
FRIDAY, May 4th.
Rangers vs. Penrode

above matches will be
played at St. Leonard's Grounds.

sympathy

logically

BWIA

1. Make Business Contacts
Faster in the Caribbean.

sea or air transportation.

you Need at New Reduced
Rates — 50% Saving. |



BWIAG

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS

B.T.C. Rules Need Immediate
Revision
By BOOKIE

4 HERE is a very real problem in racing in B.G.,

Trinidad and Barbados with regard to the classi-

fication of Jamaican bred horses and I wish that the

Barbados Turf Club, in particular, would wake up

and do something about it. It follows that such a

5 problem must be faced in a realistic manner, so let
€ us get down to the facts.

In British Guiana, no Jamaican creole can begin lower than C class
if he has not raced before, either in Jamaica or anywhere else. Should
he.begin his racing career in B.G. he is then promoted or demoted as
his form dictates. If he has raced before he goes to B.G. his form is
submitted to the classifiers and they place him where they think, fit.

In Trinidad the rule for Jamaicans is almost the same with. the.
difference that for “C class” one simply substitutes “class E2’’. Then
must be added that no Jamaican, half-bred or thoroughbred, can ever
go below class F2, no matter how badly ke runs.



In Barbados the rule is quite different. It simply_states that all
Jamaicans must be classified not lower than class C2. No matter how
badly he runs he can never go any lower, Furthermore the definition
of the word “creole” in the B.T.C. rule book reads that such a horse
is one sired and foaled in the W.I. and B.G. (Jamaica excepted).

Now as far as I can see the only rules which need changing are
those of Barbados. But the question is should we follow the B.G, or
the Trinidad style?

* * a
years ago this problem would have been « weighty one
aoe eee ee = toon wie of Droadmindedness on the part of
e 418fdad BWirt {ub which is entirely without precedent in the
annals of W.I. racing, and, I may say, to their everlasting credit, we
are now in a position to draw ample conclusions from the concrete

evidence of Jamaicans racing in Trinidad for the last five to six
years. What has this evidence proved?

To my mind it has proved beyond a shadow of doubt that Jamai-
can breeders, like their English counterparts, for that matter their
counterparts in any other country, do not wish to sell what iney con-
sider to be their best stock until they have seen them race in Jamaica.
Consequently the average Jamaican creole which has been coming to
Trinidad in the last five years is no better than the average Barbados
and Trinidad thoroughbred creole. Now this is a broad statement
with which many people will disagree and no doubt their first argu-
ment against it will be that since the Trinidadians first tried the
unraced Jamaicans in F2, why did they change the rule to place them
in E2 if they had not proved to be above the average Trinidad creole?
My answer to that brings to light what I had always maintained long
before the Jamaican irvasion. Trinidad breeders relied too much on
the half-breds. oh?

HE fact is that gradually the Jamaican creoles outnumbered the

thoroughbred Trinidad creocles and their standard was indeed
higher than the average of the Trinidadians. But coupled with their
Barbados. brothers, it cannot be denied that the average of the two
islands was well up to the Jamaican standard. Unfortunately only a
few Barbados creoles were ever seen racing against the Jamaicans in
the low classes. But even those who did were never disgraced. There-
fore to put it briefly we have found that taken sectionally the Jamai-
cans are better than we but together we could hold our own with them.

This sounds all very well on paper but once again we must re-
member that facts must be faced. Therefore since our actual racing
is done sectionally (i.e. only a few Barbados F class horses go to

‘Trinidad and fewer Trinidadians of the same calibre come here)
{to safeguard our breeders we should follow the Trinidad style and

begin all unraced Jamaicans in E2, There is no need to argue the
pros and cons of following the B.G. style since only in isolated cases
have creoles from that country been able to hold their own in Trini-
dad while quite a number of Trinidad breds from the low classes
have won in the former place in higher brackets.

The great thing now is to get the Barbados gentlemen in author.
ity to act upon this suggestion. That, I freely admit, is like trying
to move a mountain, They are ensconced in the view that it will be
detrimental to breeders in this island and since among those in author-
ity are some of the breeders themselves it goes without saying that

| the bill will have a sticky passage.

* * *

UT what must be called to the attention of these gentlemen is
the state of affairs which exists in the races framed for class

D and lower in Barbados. Here we are to-day with about 84 eligible
horses for one meeting on our classification list ang still not enough
between classes D and E to make a decent race. Yet if horses like

; Rosemary, Princess Rassiyya, or any other Jamaican now racing in

Trinidad in these divisions were allowed to come over here in the
same class, what excellent fields we would have for our D and E
class races. It is inconceivable with horses of the calibre of Bow
Bells, Watercress, Cross Roads and Mary Ann, one or all being fit,
that either Rosemary or Princess Rassiyya could come over here and
mop up. It is also inconceivable that we must have four races for
four horses over a period of four days.

Revise the rule now. If the thought of an unknown Jamaican
starting in E2 still frightens, in spite of all the evidence pointing to
the contrary, then meet the suggestion half-way and place them in
C2. But above all be realistic. Let those who have shown their
paces in Trinidad have the benefit of a classification on merit, not on
an obsolete rule made for past generations, the enforcement of which
reeks of insularity.

The above it must be remembered has nothing to do with the
entry of Jamaicans in the classics. That is another matter altogether.
But as Footmark won the Trinidad Derby with such ridiculous ease
last Christmas, I have no doubt that those who have always opposed
the idea will have gathered fodder for their cannons.

* *

ELL there is something to be said on both sides. First of all

I would not allow the victory of Footmark to frighten us as
much as it undoubtedly has. We must remember that he is the first
Jamaican to win this classic in the four years since it was open to
them. In those four years our Derby winners have been Atomic II,
Ligan, and Ocean Pearl. With the exception of the last named it
is indeed very questionable whcther the Jamaican Derby winners
of the same years could have won the Trinidad Derby as well. There
may be arguments in favour of Blue Streak over Atomic II but that
Applemoney would have got nowhere with Ligan there is hardly any
doubt. Even on different underfoot conditions Ocean Pearl would
have had a good chance to sweep away all opposition. It cannot be
denied that on the second day she was a much better horse when
she defeated Blue Streak although only over six furlongs. At that
timé there was no horse in Jamaica as good as Blue Streak.

Therefore there is no certainty that the Jamaicans will always
hold sway in the Trinidad classics. It is also most unlikely that they
would ever win these races with the regularity that Barbados has
accomplished in the past. Therefore why bar the Jamaicans?

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SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE of









rd

PAGE FIVE



9.15 p.m., on Friday. 8 am. Hoiy “Communion. 9 a.m.

H.M. The Z
THE Festival of Britain begins Choral Eucharist & Address. 11

Hy T. GALE

Athleties oe, - o, © ( anc . APRIL 29 — NO. 169 |
LOCAL Boys PREPARE "he Festival Of Bretain Ma OHSS (“Fs Topic | 2
King Overseas Service of the BBC at ROGATION SUNDAY | }

of |



on May 3, and the BBC plans to, ae ——. ibe es, = Sn 8 oe. Sunday LEAVES 800
. broadcast a number of special comin : § 0. 7 p.m. Shortened Evensong e BODY FRESH,
THE announcement of the actual dates and rogramme Ol programmes describing the nation- BBC will broadcast a daily réport Yop Hymn Singing SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN .

the Intercolonial Sports has found the local athletes and
eycnsts hard at training. This is indeed a healthy sign for
the sport in Barbados as in the last few years the majority

wide celebrations to listeners in
Britain and overseas, Although
the opening ceremony will be at

of the first match of the touring
South African Cricket. Team—
against Worcestershire. These re-

9 saan.
rev! "K.'e.

Pilgrim ian. '



Last Week




© MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR

, i i : ’ a very early hour for us in the ports will be at 5.00 p.m. on , i:

< i are have waited until they knew a meeting was West ridies and nearby territories Wednesday and Friday and at y/o m. Me We S Aarthur; 7 pam.

efinitely on the cards before they made themselves ready. there will be a direct. broadcast 5-45 p.m., on Thursday, On Satur’ mr a. Oxiey. ; :
pent that they could be blamed, every reason to believe that the from London on special. wave. day at 5.00 p.m., there will be 2 yee ’ ee ee

ause it is only in recent years boys will be one hundred per cent lengths at that time. These will similar report on the first day of . 2 Fa oe. jioare (Holst $$...
that there was any hope of fit when the comes. I notice be on the air between 5.30 and their match against Yorkshire. pownes. eee 5 a an -
regular annual fixtures, Therefore too that most of them have been 7.15 a.m., on Thursday, 3rd May Other sporting broadcasts during a Yaa Sk
it is also a sign that we are concentrating on the route from to describe the opening ceremony the week We 4 Tetotiied ) ¢ Bite Me Re Penis. !
getting back to normal. Of course Bridgetown via Bay Street, Worfh- with the King and Queen driving description of the One Thousand 7 5,1, xg ee eee
We are nowhere there up to the ing ete to Oistin. This strikes me in pint atate “te St. Paul’s Cathe Guineas at Newmarket on Friday, ‘DUNSCOMBE :
present and perhaps we will not aS a good choice. There are little dral, the Service of Dedication in 4th. May, at 5.05 p.m., Tight after 11 am. Mr. O. Weekes. 1 p.m. Mr
be until the Athletic Association or ne inclines along this road and St, Paul’s Cathedral, and, on the the description of the day's play se
is placed on a sound financial if there is one thing to avoid in stroke of noon by British Summer against Worcestershire. Asp vo ine iat ates
footing. To do this it needs the training for the type of cycle Time, His Majesty’s declaring the heard on Saturday, Sth. May are 4; am. Rey, isbie, 4 p.m. they
support of the public at its meet- races we have, it is hill work. Festival open from the steps. of recorded descriptions of) the B. Crosby.
ings and this it should get at the Ken Farnum will naturally be the Cathedral, BBC commentators British Hard ‘Court Championships a
fortheoming one, which, to my Our number one man but will be stationed at various points at Bournemouth and_ the Sule i ee

mind, promises to_be the most in-

missed the meeting at which he

Stuart rode so well last time that

line up in A class. Also in this

to describe all these ceremonies.

and Queen will be the first visi-

League Cup Final. These follow

rituals in the Gilbert Islands of

WHITE BALL



930 am. Rev. B.

But it’s a poor boy flying


















teresting we have had in many he might almost be counted in The ‘al transmissions to this the report of the Yorkshire matci) | 9.90 am, Mr. G. Barker. 7 p.m. : : re
are the same bracket. What is very in- area aa be on 19.60 and 2492 on Saturday. The Two Thousand MY F. Moore, Jo, eee Till take trip él is dgprcial ingredinate of BUCKF AS m
I have not seen the local ath- triguing is the fact that neither of metres, 15.31 and 12.04 mega- Guineas will be reported at 5.05 4) an. Mr. G. Sinckler, 7 p.m. Boys! honey we will sip RS WANE quckiy festory to cmt
letes in training but one or two them have met any of the formi@- cycles. Later in the day on the p.m., on Wednesday, 2nd. May. Rev. M, Thomas. . ‘ . A glass or two a day of this fich, full.
with whom I have spoken have @ble Trinidad group which is com- normal wavelengths there will be land S 5. decal a Gee ; be Tyaseuy ert we heard bodied wine will fortify you against fever and
told me about their efforts, I also ing over and therefore it will lend a reconstruction _ of these cere— Island Sorcery ae pectic pm, Mr dee ha ee hee donth prevent the exhaustion of long-term fatigue
understand that many of them are to the a aness, which, monies and visits to Festival Sir Arthur Grimble, a former .. BANK HALL So sorry it aint more Take home Aa bottle today!
hard at work. as we saw last ae foes a long Centres in Britain. These latter Governor of the Windward _®% a.m, Rev. M, Thomas, 7 p.m. : . *

Perhaps our foremost local Way to drawing crowds. broadcasts will be at 4.15 and Islands, is well known as a most â„¢ rel MTSTOWN put OT a ences an |
conteénder will be A. Hunte, whose The persistent Leon Carmichael 9.15 p.m. interesting raconteur in BBC 8S Bryan, 7 p.m. Mr. Is go up to America “ ' a
nickname, I notice from the Sports Who rides with more guts than h k Exhibiti talks, On Friday next, 4th, May \. oe Pe ee Wwe ; sete
Programme published elsewhere, "erly anv other cyclist I have The South Bank Exhibition he begins a three-part series of _B. vy. 7 pm. Some call it indiscretion XN y
is Nugget. To be quite frank I ©Ver seen will once again be in the On Friday, 4th, May the King talks on witcheraft and magic BETHESDA And some a three months’ spree

j 2

broke the local 440 yards record
but I saw him run in a few heats
last year. Unfortunately he had

y . inti . f we can get a free trip
recently pulled a muscle, But Promoted from the Intermediates east descriptions of their arrival ; ’ ALKEITH I .
even then what I saw left me with t?.7ace with the top men. and tour of the twenty-seven acres troduction to Sorcery.’ The later 2 ee ee ee cei tuedanieeea vileeieiiia
a fayourable impression. Tali In_ the Intermediate there will of pavilions and gardens. An talks _ are Sorcerer s Revenge BELMONT Before we hardly settle Hibi AG FR MONIES OF SUCKPAST AD
Constable Wilfred Tull from Trini. P@ D. Yard, George Hill, Mike edited | version -vi this broadcast and ‘The Spell on the Oven. 11 am. Rev.(.R.; MoCallough. 1 p.tas |. Weill-plan our homeward trip . cS OF -BUCKFAST. ABBEY
aaa also expressed a liking for Fin a Agee Tw Foster xe Mr. G. Bascome eddane Bo, Gee gant Me Soperten.
unte’s style. ave all won a few races t ate, f t . 9 Rev. R. MeCull »*? . Ma z ir
my It has also been sugested that R ay Scouts Invested Mr xe st. Hu uheewe a You know whose coppers spending’
ite Fit erratic to PROVIDENCE It's the regular old milen cow
Quite Fi ; the erratic Sattaur of B.G. who is ° ® fe . . a.m. Mr. B. Browne. 7 p.m Take advantage everybody
I am told that Hunte is quite now living here should be brought = On St. George Ss Day Mr. R. Linton, — 2 Never mind who “build a row
fit now and so we are hoping he down from A into the Intermedi- Pro mime ¥ VAUXHALL ei é E .
stays until sports day. He will be ate division and I think _ this f ON Monday St. George’s Day, gee oy BS BP Fiaerte. © Bmp. Me tho enloy soctethung iree™

supported against the outsiders by
Denny and McClean of the local
Police and Oswin Hill of Holborn

clase is the pace setter Keizer who
never seems content to slacken
his speed while Skinner has been

would be a good move indeed. His
frequent flashes of speed -have
earned him a little in A, but I

tors to the South Bank Exhibition,
the centre-piece of the national
festival, and the BBC will broad-

SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951
6.360 a.m.—12.15 p.m. . 19.60 “.

the South Pacific. He will speak
on successive Fridays at 6.15 p.m.,
in the BBC’s General Overseas
Service. The first talk is ‘An In-

an Investiture and advancing
Ceremony took place at the Head-
quarters of tne 6lst Barbados

11 @.m, Rev, J. S. Boulton, 7 p.m.
Rev McCullough. 4.30 p.m. Annual
Saer Concert.

Crosby. 7 p.m,
»; |

To the land of Liberty.
. .

Why sometimes in Barbados
It's hatd to catch a bus

To-day this is the fashion
Even in the Assembly
. *

To those boys who are earnest

ree ; : : ecer th BAY STREET
or Pickwick, I am not sure which, Should think he will keep the | 6.80 a.m. _Week-end Sports Heport. (3rd Sea Scouts) Group: Sundyys 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Go up and work your best
‘All of these gentlemen are prom- Intermediates on their toes. 6.45 a.m, Sandy MacPhersor we aio . After the ceremony, the D. C., SUNDAY, April 29, 1951, Just mind your business only
ising and no doubt Denny’s visit _ The B class races will be crowd- {\0''News Analysis. une News. to LB. Waithe ana A. D. Cy G. EB. Subject of Lesson-Sermon: PROBA~ And forget all the rest.
to Trinidad will see him return €4 no doubt with more newcom- the Bditorials. 7.25 a.m. Programme Qorbin, addressed the Group on eo gee eect, bee Suk Wedhesday abou mid-ntent

i ers but among the regulars will 2stade. 7.30 a.m. English | Magazine oer : \ Golde’ : verbs : 16, a. i #
to Barbados in fit and hardened ba ten. Hsed ~ gulars will Perade. ting all Forees. 9’a.m. The the aims and benefits of Scouting. The man that wandereth out of the woes Joe was on his stroll
condition. Hill has a particularly Tackle Hosd gh ae Roett and ‘News. 910 a.m, Home News from Those invested were:— Pen a ee ee yor malar cave cells
good stride which is more suita- here ieratant s class, unlike A, Britain 9.15 a.m. Gee Down, 1.45 Juniors; 'T. S. Chandler, G. if that followeth. after rightéousnéss ; : °
ble. to middle distances than e giants are too prone to f#-m. Programme Parade. 11 2. Nicholls. R. Waterman and L. ayd merey findeth life, righteousness | Ob dear! don't be hard-hearted
sprints and as I am informed he Watch and wait on each “other, Yiichacl ahd St. George, 12,00 °Noon McLean, end health ‘ Help me! it's mid-night please:
is thinking of concentrating on the always produces all out races the News. 12.10 News Anabsi®. 12.18 — Seniors: f , SALVATION ARMY I'm soon going to Americn!

mi ‘ 8. 12. rs: L.. Worrell, O. Gilkes BRID N To help reap tomato and peas
latter, I suggest that he sticks more Which are the delight of the crowd. p.m. Close Down 926 mM. and O, Corbin. Pigg ed wae s p.m , :
to quarters and half miles, He We look forward to them repeat- E145 ..9.8. ae ou 10 96 atic into Senior Troop: Company Mesting. 7 ‘p.m. Salvation | The sirl friend said my dear boy
Advanced i S Pp

‘was not disgraced even in a mile
last year and his winning of the

va the Week. 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice Holiness Meetirg. 3 p.m |
880 yards last October, althougn | Oo Rendesvous Players, 645 p.m. To all those we say Good Luck Company Meeting. 7 pm, Salvation | Ang when you go to sign up reme?ini er
against yen en gave Tony Galento Will 22%.° [8 6% & Promamme ang wish them Great adventure Rng, Fae ee Next few days ih. the Park
ae ee es ee han ome. : E rai ae a . 553 m. in Scouting. a am ie Meeting. 3 pm rit go slong beloved sama chlnt Phensic 9
{ v 1 have o * * * fompany eeting. 7 pam. Sulvation ; ; mee | e
Archer and Blenman of Police and Fight Frazer 7 pm. The News. 7.10 pm. News Ag from Tuesday, ist May, Mees Preacher: a Gibbons. | uy will be true and honest | mes m4
FPeORTSN. OF Mer pbe Fa) BAL ny ‘ Analysis. 7.15 p.m, Caribbean Voices. aout Headquarters will open aS 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m It's only twelve weeks dear | The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner
against Bridgeman of the Trinidad i ne. eens, (161 Ibs.), | local kinwaita oi a Rich man and the follows:— Company Meeting, 7 p.m Salvation at | he tire a dua pe ‘. you'll feel better, for Phensic’s quick,
Police. Archer is another who fifhtiie Yay Be boxer ee 7.45—11.00 p.m. ...... 25.53 M, 31.32 M Monday to Friday—from 3.30 Meeting Pitcher. ee wees oe See ; safe action will bring relief, lift away
j ; ini ‘ 1 asy oy razer ah atest tdaae, ; “ 1° ine sed, i
will be running in Trinidad in the })° ) light-heavy weight maith @ pm. Radio Newsreel, @45 p.m. PM, to 9.30 p.m. 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Send me the Yankee dollar pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness

near future and perhaps his race
against Bridgeman over there will
give us pointers for our Sports. He

* . . "5 < Holiness Meeting as .
age sceueiyiceabr ovata egy" Toe, =". tdi Bi testiide, 10.18 in. British There will be ‘a meeting ef the Company Meeting. 7 p.m. | Salvation | Se darling — an _— Be prepared for pain keep a supply of
' Trotman has been away from razer came here about three (oi P"i9'30 p.m. London Forum. ive C ittee of the Coun- Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant Reld. AEDs, ey Oe es Hts Phensic handy.
the island in recent years but weeks ago hoping to fight Kid iY pan, Reettal, ixecutive Committee of the Coun- SPEIGHTSTOWN During the thres-months holtde
those of us who saw him win the Ralph. He is training at the * * * cil at Scout Headquarters on 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. | ve, Ons
first hundred yards which the Brighton's Sports Club. His Cee Anan Bs Monday, 7th May at 5.00 p.m. ee aoe: AF oe sponsored by
AA.A.B. in Sparring partners are Al Mauler |, 10 P-m.—20.36 p.m. ews ; D & « THE ST, JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
A held at their meeting in Inck at. Science. 10.15 p.m-—10.30 ‘There will be a meeting of the

Queen’s Park after the war, will
hardly forget his manner in doing
so,

Last but not least there will be
our Lady hope Grace Cumber-
batch who never fails to please the
crowd. To my mind Grace Cum-—

berbatch was as promising in her ee ne News 710 am. be held at Government House on (From Our Own Correspondent) and the blenders of NERVE PAINS, HESCALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS
sphere as a school girl as L. L. News Anabysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Sunday, 6th May. GEORGETOWN, April 26.
Crichlow of Lodge School was in LEGALL BEATS Editorials. 7.25 a.m. Programme Pa- Al] Scouts and Rovers are asked The Government has approved J&R RUM

his as a school boy. But the annoy-

ing the performance.



of St. Lucia. and Guadeloupe on
Monday next week, at the Brigh-

and Torpedo Brown.

Galento’s sparring partners are
Kenny Seaman and Sugar Ray.
Ben Jones, Kid Ralph’s former
Manager, is now training Galento.

Fighting on the same ticket are
Kenny Seaman and Al Mauler.



VICTOR BRUCE



4.15 pm. Music Magazine. 4.30 p.m.
Sunday Half Hour. 5 p.m. Composer of





Michael and St
Interlude, 8 55 p.m.

The Order of St
George. 8.45 p.m,
Frem the Editorials. 9 p.m. The Wonder-

p.m, Audience Mail Bag.

BOSTON
WRUL 15.29Mc, WRUW 11.75Mc,
* *
WRUX 17.75Mc.
MONDAY, APRIL 30, 1951
6.20 a.m.—12.15 p.m 19 60 M

Billy Cotton Band

rade. 7.30 a.m, The Mark of Greatness.
7 45 a.m, Souvenirs of Music. 8.30 a.m,

Elmer Scantlebury and Hainsley
Griffith,

Saturdays— from 1:00 p.m, to
9.30 p.m. :

Executive Committee of the South
Western Local Association at the
Y.M.C.A. on Friday, 4th May at
5.00 p.m.

tt * *

The Empire Youth Service will

ty meet at 3.30 p.m. outside the





Meeting. Preachér:; Major Smith,
WELLINGTON STREET
11 am.

Company Meeting, 7 am,

CHECKER HALL
il a.m.

7 p.m, Evensong and Sermon, Preach-

The Patt Fev. J, B. Grant L.Th,

B.G. Establishes
New Hospital

er



the establishment of a_ hospital

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIEN-
TIST, BRIDGETOWN, UPPER

Salvation ;
Mecting. Preacher; Lieutenant Etienne. |

3 pom |

No “feel-up" here to-night
Leave me first to draw the coppers
Then all things will work right
. . .

It goes a very long wa
It buys more slacks and dresses
To keep me fresh and gay

J & R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD








TONIC WINE



in a matter of minutes, Phensic neither
harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach,




for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBACO,

QPP LLLP LPL LLP PDL

ing part about such unusual ath- Practise Makes Perfcet. 8-45 gt The Western wall at Government a att — er “ SBEBOCORBOOOOO OO OOPOOO ME .
letes in Barbados is that after they (From Our Own. Correspondent) ebate Continues. 9 a.m. The News. Touse, rmy Air base, miles up the
} . ee ae 910 am. Home News from Britain. > i
leave school there are not enough PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 25, 9.15 a.m. Clone Down, 1118, athe, — sph Osthe he pital ill cater for 80
organised sports meetings to help Ralph Legall, Maple Club’s Sin- Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m, Listen- 7.45—-11,00 p.m, ....,. 25.58 M, 91 3? Mf fe: Hespigal Wit Cavey s0r
them make the natural progress ors, Chpiee, ae a.m. gg Fig hvala aa _ 7 ape 20 women.

i wealt! arvey. noon e News. 7.45 p.m. *rovision has been made i%
they should. Grace Cumberbateh sented Barbados in the recent 43.10 p.m. News Analysis: 12.15 pm 8 hah. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.my the proposed plan for the ues: >
will now have to take on Trini- Brandon Trophy tournament Close Down. Commonwealth. survey, 630. pn: ‘
dad’s Fileen King after neatly five scored a 6—0, 6—0 victory over *15—645 Bem... o.ssereeress 19.70 M Peactign “Siskes ‘Perfect. 845 Inter. diture of $25,000 on equipment, | ¥
months of inactivity in athletics ne i ten final |T2cR Zul Mee Aencc tenes, ORS Pin. Biein 8 Bator and $80,000 for recurrent expen-

3 2 . Victor Bruce in a quarter fina 4.15 p.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra, 9 p.m. British Concert Hall, 10 p.m, diture, such as staffing. When
Can she do it successfully? The fixture at the club’s court, Legall 5 p.m. Compos~r of the Week, 6.15 The News, 10.10 p.m, Interlude. eciablished, the hospital will cater
sports must answer the question. hag benefited greatly from the P.â„¢m-, The Story Teller, 5.35 p.m. In- 1.15 Tip Top Tunes. 10.45 p.m, Sci- 7 ode
The Cyclist at Ach. he ained in {tude 5.45 p.m. Semprini st the ence Review, 11 p.m. The Human for _ persons suffering from| %
je Sycusts experience which he gained in piano. 6 p.m. Nights at the Opera. 6.45 Body. chronic ailments and recuperation

The cyclists I have been seeing
regularly at work for almost the
whole period since our last meet.
ing in October. There is therefore



gles open Champion, who repre-

the Brandon series and virtually
swept Bruce off the court to win
in straight sets. The match lasted
35 minutes.

p.m, Programme Parade
6.00—F,15 Pom, .....5- sete) 25.58 M



7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Sorrell and Son



VSB & 5
The Mark of Greatness

* & *
C.B.C, PROGRAMME

10 p.m,—10,15 p.m. News and Com-
mentany 10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m. Ca-
nadian Chronicle,

after major operations,

Main reason for the Base Hos-
pital is to relieve congestion at
the Georgetown Hospital.





— WONDER WHEELS N° 4



i



Lack ff
ts r

8



BIG DRESS

LADIES

To know that we are busily engaged in opening
DRESS MATERIALS of cli descriptions for our
MATERIAL
scheduled to begin on

DISPLAY which is

LOPE LLL LALO CLE LPL

IT’S A

| _ SMITHS ENFIELD







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MONDAY 30th April

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PAGE SIX



Cole Porter:
Of Popular

From The Indianapol's Star

SONGS § started. flowing from
the brain and fingers of Cole
Porter when he was 10 years old,
and they have never ceased. The
songs of this American composer
are sung everywhere in the world
for there is love everywhere in
the world, and Cole Porter’s songs

are mostly of love. Moreover,
they have a beguiling, haunting
style of melody, a’ sophisticated

touch that remains in the mem
ory. One of Porter’s most popu-
lar songs, “Begin the Beguine,”
has an arresting title as well as
a haunting melody. Once heard,
the music is difficult to forget.

Cole Porter’s musical talents
were early apparent. His parents,
prosperous farmers in the mid-
western State of Indiana, encour-
aged this talent and gave the boy
piano and violin lessons before he
was big enough to reach the
plano pedals. At the age of 10
he wrote his first tune, “Song of
the Birds,” which he dedicated to
his mother.

His next composition was “The
3obolink Waltz,” which, though
not a work of genius nor super-
sophistication, alarmed his mater-
nal grandfather, who had no wish
to see his grandson become a
musician and insisted that the lad
turn his thoughts toward law and
away from artistic professions.

Young Cole was enrolled as a
student at Worcester Academy in
the east coast State of Massachu

setts and later matriculated at
Yale University. However, Cole’s
musical talents were much
stronger than his grandfather’s
wish that he become a lawyer.
Before he left Yale in 1913 he
had made an unforgettable im
pression by composing two of the
school’s _ still popular songs,
“Bingo” and “Bulldog.”

Cole Porter did defer to his
grandfather's ambitions sufficient-
ly to enroll at Howard Law
School, but after a year he

changed his course of studies to
music and by this time his grand-
father conceded defeat of his
hopes and agreed that he would
help his grandson round out his
musical education.

Cole Porter's first musical play,
“See America First,” was written
in collaboration with a friend and
was a miserable failure. Follow-
ing this disappointment Porter
sailed for France and joined the
French Foreign Legion, taking
with him a portable piano-zither-
harpsichord instrument. He car
ried the instrument on his back
and played for the entertainment
of the soldiers, Within the sound
af German guns, during World
War I, Porter wrote the song “An
Old-Fashioned Garden” and
played it for his comrades, When
the United States entered the war
in 1917, Porter transferred to a
French artillery school at Fon-
tainebleau near Paris. There he
met Linda Lee Thomas whom he
later married.

When the war ended, Porter
returned to the United States. On
the boat coming home he met the
late actor and theatrical producer,
Raymond Hitchcock, who _ heard
him play “An Old-Fashioned
Garden” and engaged him at once
to do the score for a new musical
play called “Hitchy—Koo of 1919,”
which was a tremendous success,
Financial security did not stop
Porter’s urge to write, but only
seemed to enhance it.

Today, Cole Porter is as anx-
ious for perfection in every lyric
and tune he composes as he ever
was, and he is as interested in the
reaction of the publie to his work
as any untried young composer
might be, Night after night he
can be seen at “Kiss Me Kate,”
the popular musical comedy play-
ing in New York for which he
wrote the lyrics. He likes to lis-
ten to the laughter and applause
of the audience, and to. take his
many friends to see and hear it

Through the years, Porter's
output has been prolific. In 1924
he composed the songs for “The
Greenwich Village Follies,” and,
although the play was not a great
success, “I’m In Love Again”
from the show became a most





Composer

Songs

COLE PORTER, American composer of popular songs for more than a
quarter-century, has heard his music sung from one end of the United
States to the other. A man with “music in his heart,” his most success-
ful songs have dealt with love, the universal and eternal verity.

popular song. Four years later,
Porter composed the songs for
“Paris,” and that score was such
a tremendous success that Cole
Porter was a permanent star in
the musical firmament thereafter.
Cole Porter has written the
lyrics for more than 20 musical
comedies which have been suc-
cessful on the American stage,
notable among them the musical
“Jubilee.” He also has written
innumerable love songs, including
“What Is This Thing Called
Love,” “Night and Day,” “In the
Still of the Night,” and, of course,
“Begin the Beguine.” He also
has written the lyrics for the
songs in such motion pictures as
“Born To Dance,” “Rosalie,” and
“Broadway Melody,” and’ the
motion picture “Night and Day,”
was based on Cole Porter’s life.
During the more than 30 years
he has spent in theatrical busi-
ness, Cole Porter has consistently
written songs that are adult and
sophisticated. He has never for--
gotten that love is the great emo-
tion which people like to sing
about. Thus, although most of
his lyrics about love are witty and
full of unexpected rhymes, he
usually has one entirely romantic
song in each play. In “Kiss Me
Kate,” that song is “So In Love.”
Stories about how Cole Porter
writes his songs are legion. At
present, he lives in an apartment
in a hotel when he is in New
York City, but he has a house in
the nearby east coast State of
Massachusetts where he often
goes for week ends. He enjoys
writing in crowded cafes and at
parties, and is not disturbed by
the din of people. Many of his
songs have been written in air—
planes, automobiles, and on ships.
Shortly before World War II, he
went on a round-the-world cruise,
taking a piano, an organ, 24
pencils, a quire of music paper, a
typewriter, and a metronome. He

returned from this trip with
words and music for the song
“Begin the Beguine” and the

score of “Jubilee.”

In his apartment in New York
City, Porter has a collection of
dictionaries that he uses for his
writings: a rhyming dictionary,
a foreign language dictionary,
medical dictionaries, and a thick
tome marked “Words — Ancient

and Modern.” Porter generally
chooses the title of a song first
and then writes the words and
music to fit it. He first composes
in his mind and then later at the
piano. Often he has fitted _ his
songs to the vocal runge of a
particular actor already sele:ted
for a role in one ef his musical
plays.

Odd incidents have inspired
some of Porter’s most popular
songs. “Miss Otis’ Regrets,” for
instance, was inspired by a west-
ern ballad he heard at a party
in a private home. For some in-
explicable reason, this song sold
100,000 copies in Scandinavia and
Hungary but, outside of New
York City, was not particularly
popular in the United States. The
song “You're The Top” originated
in Paris when Cole Porter was
having supper at a restaurant and
he and some of the guests began
making a list of all the superla-
tives they could think of which
rhymed. '

In person, Cole Porter is as
suave and polished as his own
lyrics. Even on opening nights,
when one of his musicals goes
before a critical audience for a
first time, he does not get nervous.
Although his talent has - been
long-recognized and applauded,
he works over each new song as
if it were his first. The haunting
strains of his magnificent melo-
dies prove a constant reminder of
this man with a heart fual of
music,

MUSIC HATH...!
ADELAIDE.

A gramophone with a dozen re-
cords ranging from Bach to
boogey—woogey are being used, by
a group of narthern terrttory
hunters to attract crocodiles, While
the hunters were fishing recently
and listening to the music, three
crocodiles cruised nearby, One was
shot. Now the hunters are. try-





ing to discover which kind of
music the crocs like best.
LONG-TERM
BARCELONA.

Seventy - two-year-old Luciano
Navarro is Spain’s oldest student.
He began studying to be a doctor
in 1896, when he was 17, He ob+
tained his medical degree recently,





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EVERY WHERE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

IF I HAVE
TO BUILD
AN ARK—

Taking the British weather as the theme this











eek tor

his PRIVATE FESTIVAL, BERNARD WICKSTEED *cworts’.. .

N view of the fact that it is
going to go on raining for

thinking of building an ark.
It seemed a jolly good idea at
first, but when we looked into it

There's the
vulgar cubit,

three kinds of cubit.
Olympic cubit, the

better stick to the legal one, don’t
you? We'll have enough vul-
garity . when the monkeys are

there were a number of difficulties aboard Without any more from

about ark building to-day
Noah didn’t encounter.

First of all, I suppose we shall
have to go to the Hampstead
Borough Council and get the
plans passed, and as they are sure
to regard. it as a dwelling within
the meaning of the Act, we shall
have to get a building licence,

Noah’s Cubits
HIS is going to be diffieult, be—
cause it is a private enterprise
ark and, as you know, they may
be built only in the proportion of
one to every council ark,

We have measured our garden
and it isn’t big enough for an
ark-yard, So we shall have to get
permission to work on Primrose
Hill or the top of Hampstead
Heath. In either case I imagine
there will be a lot of correspon—
dence before the matter is settled.

As we have never built an ark
before, we'll stick to Noah’s blue—
prints, According to these the
ark was 300 cubits long, 50 cubits
wide, and 30 cubits high. If we
only knew what a cubit was we
might get down to the costing,

You do know? It is the dis

that the cubits.

The legal cubit is a little under
22 ins., so the size of. Noah’s
ark was about 550 ft. by 90 ft. by
55 ft. That’s enormous, isn’t it?
It’s half the length of the Queen
Mary and twice the size of Nelson's
Victory.

Do you think, with a vessel of
these dimensions, we'll get an Al
certificate of flood—worthiness?

Noah’s Wood
OAH built his ark of gopher
wood. But where are we
going to go for that? And, any-
way, what is gopher wood ?

Some people think it was cedar
or pine. If so, we are in for more
trouble, because they are soft
woods and you have to have a
licence to import them,

There is a tree in Oregon that
the Americans call a gopher.
The wood is yellow and hard. 1
bought a brooch made of it once
for my wife. It costs dollars,
so the Treasury will be tiresome.

And what a time we are going
to have with the inspectors once

we start “getting the animals in.

Boy! Oh, boy! It will be an

tance from the elbow to the tip inspector’s dream come true.

of the fingers. Thats fine, but
whose elbow and whose fingers?

Yours, mine, or those of my son spectors,

Japhet John?

They will pour out to Hamp-
stead in bus-loads, sanitary in-
livestock inspectors,

If we don’t get it fishery inspectors, bird-sancturay

right we'll have the Inspector of inspectors, R.S.P.C.A. inspectors,

Weights and Measures after us. and inspectors looking for rabies, stopped ?

As a matter of fact, there are



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Scandal! She Fell

For A

THE AGE OF LONGING

By Arthur Koestler, Collins

12s, 6d. 448 pages,

The melodrama of love and
politics which is Arthur Koestler’s
important new novel—and the
Evening Standard Book of the
Month—is set in Paris during a
hot summer of international crisis.

It is a novel of the future,
tut a future which, Koestler seems
t» say is not far off. The date is
.95—. If it is not this summer, it
might be next The Western
world awaits the final blow from

the “Commonwealth of Freedom
poem | Peoples, a powerful East-
ern State with a ruthless Com-

munist ideology. As the weeks
pass into autumn, the crisis grows
more feverish. Rumours multiply.
Signs appear in the heavens. Mys-
terious epidemics break out.

The question: Is way coming?
becomes, before the novel closes
Has war already come? Is it true
that parachutists are dropping in
the Channel frea? Are those
truculent processions issuing with

banners from the working-class
suburbs of Paris, the advance
guards of a Communist Fifth
Column?

Questions that are never an-
swered. The crisis is not resolved.
It remains, as a_ background
steadily more alarming to the
love-story if it can be called that,
of Hydie and Fedya, Hydie an
American, the daughter of a diplo-
mat; Fedya Nikitin, an agent of
the “Commonwealth”.

Hydie would be recognised by
any student of Communist litera-
ture as a typical product of “de-
eadent capitalism.” She has lost

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her faith and divorced her hus-
band. She seeks an anchorage
for her life, without finding one.
Fedya’s appeal is immediate.
Where others question, he
knows the answers. “That was
the magic wand which dissolved
the frustrating guilt in her flesh
and made it surrender willingly
and with joy.” Koestler, who does
not pretend to be impartial, detesty
what Fedya stands for—yet gives

it a grudging admiration, There
is a streak of fatalism in this
author; too impressed by the

“Monolithic” quality of Commu-—
nism, he seems to predict its vie—
tory over a West that talks too
much and believes too little.
Certainly there would be small
hope for a civilisation made up of

the poseurs, frauds and café
piilosonipers whose portraits
oestler draws, often in a mood

of ferocious satire.

Dupremont, for instance, the
pornographic novelist who has
been reconciled with the Church
and now writes fiction more erotic
than ever describing luscious
temptations successfully resisted.

Or Julien, one of Hydie’s lovers,
who convenes a meeting to dis-
cuss whether ‘intellectual resist-
ance” could be maintained after
occupation by the “Common-
wealth.” The meeting decides,
no; several guests insist that their
names should not be associated
with the idea,

For, after all, not everybody is
so prosperous or so provident as
M. Touraine, who has an airplane
standing by to take him to North
Africa. “In all revolutions, there



Port of London Authority,
Ministry of Agriculture (food for

of
Commissicners, and the Brethren
of Trinity House



beetles, and dog licences.
Noah’s Creepies

*‘ ever, the Wicksteed family «are and the legal cubit. I think we'd -J HE mere collection of the ani-

mals is going to be a monu-
mental task, Tnere are about
80,000 insects and 20,000 worms
alone. My sons Ham Philip and
Japhet John have volunteered. for

this part of it.

They reckon they can sgon
capture “every creeping thing that
creepeth on the earth,” and they’ve
already started building up a sup=
ply of match—boxes with breath-
ing holes in the top.

We'll let the 15,000 different
fishes look after themselves, but

there are still 4,000 assorted
mammals, 4,000 reptiles, and
15,000 birds. ,
We'll have to get Mr. Morrison
to deal with the Belgian Congo
over the gorillas, because
are a prohibited export too, —
It’s the same with the tortoises
from the Seychelles (ting ‘™
Colonial Office, Whi, 2366, for =
permit) and the duck-billed platy—
pus (make an appointment to see
the High Commissioner for Aus-
tralia.
My Authorities
Y job is endless, There will
still be the Board of Trade
(safety regulations at sea), x
the

the animals), the Ministry of
Health (prohibition of the import
parrots), the Ecclesiastical

(lighting ar-
rangements on Mount Ararat).
What’s that ? The rain has
Well, thank goodness !
—L.ES.



are imbeciles who are sacrificed,
What matters is to avoid being
one of them.

If the men of the West have lost
the will to live, one of them as-
sures Hydie that the French, at
least, will die with a flourish,
“which will merely serve to cover
our bewilderment.” And that is
hardly enough.

On the other hand if the bar-
barian in Fedya appeals to his
American mistress his brutality
has a machine-like quality which
suddenly she finds unbearable.
When she discovers that her lov-
er’s task is to prepare “elimina-
tion lists in readiness for the in-
vaders, she slips a revolver into
her handbag.

Hydie should not have been so
surprised, After all her father is
busy making a list of “key”
Frenchmen who will be flown out
of the country when the war
comes. Nor should she have bun-
gled the business of killing her
lover. Typical of Western incom-
petence.

Fedya is recalled (to an Aretic
camp); Hydie’s father is recalled
(to Washington D.C.). There is
no police court case. If it can
do nothing else the West can still
hush up a scandal.

Koestler opens his book—satire
novel of ideas and cynical love-
story all in one—by gathering his
characters together in a _ party
given by a vivacious old hedonist
named M. Anatole. He closes it
by collecting them once more to
follow M. Anatole’s coffin to the
cemetery.

In the hired carriages, the bril-
liant talkers continue their dia-
lectics. M. Touraine listens anx-
iously to the air-raid sirens. Hy-—
die’s longing—the longing, Koest-
ler insists of a whole generation—
is not appeased.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.ES.



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wisqae



|

SUNDAY,

APRIE! $9, 1951



Clubwomen Operate A Children’s

Home

A businesswomen’s cab tn the jorh-
western State of Moptana has ®stah-
lished and is maiotaining a horre to
abandor ms! and neglected childre

its community,

By Mé ARGARET HICKRY

From LADIES HOMB JOURNAL

In the city of Butte, in the
north-western State ef Montana, a
group of businesswomen have
established & home for children
abandoned or neglected by their
parents. . While this home is in
Butte, it could be anywhere, There
are, unfortunately, sad.eyed. and
starving children ‘in any city in
the world. Welfare workers know
this; police know it, and civic-
minded people know it when they
thouble themselves to face facts.

In Butte, it was’ Mrs. Mary
Phillips, at the city’s Child Welfare
office, who first concerned herself
with fhe plight of the town’s neg
lected children. She herself was a
widow with three children to rear.
“What

we need is a home for
neglected children,” she kept re.
peating. But, while people sym-

pathised and agreed, nothing was
done, Then Mrs. Phillips became
one of the charter members af a
club composed of working-women
in executive jobs. The charter of
the club (one unit in avnational
organisation) made it obligatory
for members to maintain 4 servi¢e
programme for the ‘community.
The club was the. Soroptimist—
“sore for sister, optimo for the
highest:.good”’-—and it had a na.
tional reputation to uphold,

Mary Phillips proposed at the
club’s first meeting that the Butte
Soroptjinists. make the. creation of
a home for children their commu-
nity sérvice. Club members dis-
cussed; the proposal for some time;
and finally agreed that members
would: look for a suitable house,

and, if they found it, start a
campaign to buy it. wn
In May 1947 the club found a

house suitable for their project
it Was near schools and churches,
and in one of Butte’s best residen_
tal neighbourhoods. The hovse
was aj two-storey brick With’ 12
rooms) and two baths. It was in
fairly good condition, needing only.
fresh wallpaper and paint—and
the cost was reasonable. The club
decidegi that it would try to raise
enough money through voluntary
contributions to pay for the house
and ta furnish it,. By ahecend of
the firbt two weeks they made a
down payment on their house.

Ne eRe the remainder of
1947 the Butte Soroptimist Club
sponsdred numerous fund-taising
parties and projects. By the spring
of 1948, it had-ace umulated enough

money, to complete purchase of
the hdus se, and to buy ‘some fur.
niture, Also, there were sufficient

funds ‘to buy paint, and to start a
work project which “was. to: enlist
the co-operatoin of all the club
member $.

One member, a plumbing exec-

utive, | inspected and repaired the
plumjing. Another, who ran a
cleaning plant, cleaned the cur.
tains, t bedspreads, and clothing

whichfhad been given to the home.
Two jmembers teansforme old
feather mattresses into pillows:
Husbands of the club members
repaired toys, repaired and dec-
orate furniture, and. transported
donatéd crates of food. Work
patties assembled at the house in
the evenings to clean, scrub, and
paint, The Soroptimist Club mem-
bers put on the first coat of paint;
the Acttve Club a-man’s organisa.
tion, put on the second.

Before starting the work project;
however, the Soroptimist, «
went to union, meetings,
explained project, alfd got apt
proval f@gimembers to-do the ren-
ovation; (avork. They had-no diffi.
culty i a Securing this permission








since r townspeople were: as
enthusiastic over the proposed
childrerig home" ais wWeré the elub
memb sy “Large” and’ small
business ne gave generousty
of both gotisSemd' migney. Food

donated included some sweets. as



DARTWORDS.

OUND ands
I round the 50 TARTS j
words in the
\ circle you solvers must
go until. yous -have
arranged them’ so that

they lead from WHALE
to CHASTE. in such a
way that the relation-
ship between any one
word andthe next tb
it is goyerned hy one
of six rules. No tule/é
may he -irivoked more

than, twice consecu-

tively, <=

f ‘RULES.

1, The w
an A@nagsam
Ww Tita mie precedes

may be
the

it,

a

Ai ther ord.
that DreceRes. ;

3. Inmay be achieved
by adding ‘®ne letter to,
subtracting bie- letter
changing one letterin.
ceding word.

4. It may be associated with
the poe word in a saying,
a metaphor or association
of ‘- deas,

It may form with the pre-
coulis word a name of a wWell-
knoWn person or place tn fact or
a

It may

from. 0?
the pre-

be associated with
we preceding word in the title or
action of a book, play or other
composition,

A typical succession of waerds-
might © be: Spear = totes steal

spat









clinic

ub-



MACLEANS
PAROMMDIE TOOTH PASTE
keeps, WBE! W Es



IN



DISCUSSION |



MR. NAT CARMICHAFL. (fourth from left facing camera) who has

been appointed
“here leading a disctission
together at. the home of the

Mr. ©.
brother of

Y
+

well as ample supplies of staples.

Clothes were contributed in
abundance, Local doctors gave
free medical . examinations , and
treatment to ‘the children taken
into the home; the hospitals allow-
ed_hait, rates for -tonsiltectomies
and other ailments requiring hos-
pitalisation. The mental-health
promised free psychiatric

care should it be needéd,
By November 1948 the house
was ready for. occupaney, The

Child Welfare Department of. Butte
had helped the club find a matron
— an. experienced. child care
worker, with three children of her
own: There was new linoleum on
the floor of the play-room, and in
the kitchen the big electric refrig-
erator oe stove were in perfect
onder. Clothes were clean, pressed,
mehded, ‘and ‘in. elosets—waiting
for thé childrén te wear them

Before the frst children moved
in, the Soroptimist Club opened
the house to visitors’ on two occa.
sions. Members of the organisation
entertained the Soroptimist North-
west Conference in Butte. The
guésis brought gifts of clothing
and houge linens, and the regional
board of the organisation made a
cash gift. On the second occasion,
the club invited the townspeople
of Butte and Silver Bow County,
in. which the .city is located, to
visit the house.

The Soroptimist Receiving Home
for children of Silver Bow County,
Montana, opened on November 1,
1948. Eight children were the
charter residents; ‘Within two
weeks there wer@ 25. In the first
18 mionths the home sheltered
more: than 176 smial,.guests. ,

Complaints about neglected
£hijd@rermmay come from any inter-
ested person—neighbour, teacher,
police, minister, or even the child
himself, All complaints go first to
the Ghild Welfare office-in Butte.
It decides if the child Should be
rent to the home. ‘The home is
intended to be a receiving home
only—where the child “fiay sta
until a foster home is found for

“hint GF Until his own parents will

give him proper care. However,
until two years ago there was no
real Josie s-homeé care available in
Silver Béw Cotinty. Due, to the
efforts a the Welfare Department,
there are now 17 foster homes.
Mast.of the abandoned, deserted,
or negtected children come from
homés. where the problems are
psyehological as well as financial.
There fs relatively little unemploy-
ment * Butte aut the population

there is of mixed background $0

have vastly
that the, childre:
and and feligious in.

ferent ferent bfologival,

aha

Mow—Bow—Arrow,
.@ Solution.in Evening Advocate
Sipe aa tatlf incite penenysmenpneesinn i

REMANDED
TRIESTE.

A&A German resident of Trieste

enior Science Master at Harrison College is =

“Religion Society".

an of the University of Western Ontario.

ael, who is on the University Staff is a Barbadian, and a
. PSiac Carmichael of the Education Department.

He is expected in Barbados today.

heritance in their homes.

The Soroptimists have found
that the club’s job was far from
done when the home was opened.
They have added an infirmary and
a fire @s¢ape to comply with: state
requirements. In February 1950
the home received its state license.
Butte’s newly formed Community
Chest, an organisation for raising
funds for all charitable institutions
in} @ community, appropriated
funds to the home.

The children for whom the home
was éstablished thrive on the love
and good care given then. Part
of the’ homeé’s success has been
due to the mere fact that it exists.
But part also has been due to its
basically sound organisation. The
Soroptimist’s standards and goals
are those ‘of the professionally
trained: welfare departments of
the city, county, and State. Their
maintenance budget is based on a
four-way plan: part Community
Chest, part club, part Welfare De-
partment, and part city generosity.
Typical of its well-rounded basi
is its citizen board of directors
elected by the club. And typical
of its community contacts is the
list of other clubs and businesses
which work with the Soroptimist.

Not that the home has no prob-
lems. There undoubtedly always
will be staff problems in such an
institution, as well as maintenance
problems. Despite all the prob-
lems, however, the Soroptimists of
Butte Sem to have come comfor.
tably close to their dream of mak-
ing their home *‘a true children’s
home—and as close to perfect in
all ways as possible.”



ie) All About Eve,

B excellence

SUNDAY

At the Cinema

THE MUDLARK
iy 6.1.

THE more moving picturés } see, the more I am becom-
ing convinced that an all-star cast ae
contributing factor to the suceess o
a great advantage, as is a well-

ced
rson of whom the audience hears iy
lar ely responsible for suceets 2 fail

lya

tly, we have had several ch
opistanding examples of directio
at its fnest— ure and,
The Fallen Idol
and The Third Man, and this weelt
THE MUDLARK showing at the
Empire, is ano’ example of the
that results when
direction is in expert hands.

With an English cast—all but

Irene Dunné—Jean Negulescu,
an American director, has turned
out a film, (based on a legendary
episode in the reign of Queen
Victoria), which was chosen for a
Royal Command performance, and
his eminent success is no mean
feat of accomplishment. The choice
of Irene Dunne as Queen Victoria
may seem strange, but I can assure
you her portrayal of that great
lady is authoritative and convine-
ing, as is the role of. Disraeli,
played by Alec Guinness. Both
these performances are far be-
yond any expectation and will
undoubtedly rank with the best
that the cinema and stage have
offered.

The story is bused on Theodore
Bonnett’s book “The Mudlark” and
relates the tale of a small ten-
year-old derelict, who finds a
plaque of Queen Victoria in the
pocket of a dead searnan, lying in
the mud on the bank of the
Thames, and determines he is
going to see her. He eventually
arrives at Windsor where the old
lady has shut herself up for fifteen
years, since her husband’s death,
and makes an unceremonidus en-
try via the coal chute. His arrival
coineides with the more formal
entrance of the Rt. Hon. Mr, Dis-
raeli, whose efforts to persuade
the quéen to return to public life
have been unsuccessful. Seeing
the mudlark in the castle, the
Prime Minister realizes he can use
the child as a symbol of the
unwanted children of England,
who are denied the right to be-
come worthy citizens, and thus
push the passage of his reform
bill before Parliament. Furious at

. his inference that she is respon-

sible for the homeless mudlarks,
the queen hints at a successor to
Disraeli, but on the sudden reap-
pearance of the child, she is moved
by his obvious sincerity and in-
tense desire to see her, and con-
sents to make her long awaited
reappearance before her people.

Andrew Ray plays the Mudlark,
and a most appealing and en-
gaging little cockney tramp he is.
There is nothing sloppy or senti-
mental about the child’s portrayal,
ahd only a minimum of pathos has
been permitted, As Queen Vic-
toria, _Trene Dunne at last has a

ouR CHILDREN

Gross Road,
The ‘Sunday Afivocate” wants





























BABY BURKE, 7 months son of Mr. and Mrs. William Burke of Britton’s
ets a knock on his father’s Cuban

Druins.
to know what Your child is doing.

Send us your favourite photograph—print and negative—and write on

the back of the print: your name and address, the child’s name and age,
* and a short description of what he is doing.

For each picture published in the “Sunday Advocate” $2.50 will be
paid. Pictures should be addressed to the Art Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd.,

City, and should reach him not later than Wednesday every week.
pepe hbo OSS OSG OS OI GG

SNe

INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE

MOMBASA.
The battered skull . of a man,
killed with a hatchet, was passed

prefers’ Stalin. ‘to his mother-in- round the Court when an African

law. ‘Remanded’ for
her witha pisto!
he wanted to
East Prussia rather ti

threatening

n live with

his mother-in-law ormaghts side of the accused had committed the

the Iron Curtain.



he told the judge ne was
he. Tépatriated to crime.

so

was charged with murder. But
found not guilty of the
The court could not find

sufficient evidence to show tha

murder,

DEMAND....

ONE-0-ONE
CLEANING








ADVOCATE







ORR e en te |

| FREE YOURSELF
22, from the
BONDS OF
CONSTIPATION

. a





ot the most important
The film. It is certain-
lot, but the one
little, but who is
is the director.
nee {@)prove that she is ca
ble rious charactertantien.
Magi@ally transformed by make-
up, her face and tigure resemble
the queen as Closely as possible,
While her speech and manneér are
always in character. One of the
director’s difflculties was to bring
out the sympathy and warmth in

amen oe
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g tion. As Disraeli, Mr. Alec : Worms threaten ofd aod young alike. Be |
Cxtinness gives one of the most! Moule Warm dulcis, Made hy the |

ec ivincing performances I have
witnessed, Many fine actors have
portrayed this famous statesman
and I would say — that
Guinness is nearly on a par with
the late. George Arliss, whose
charactetization was probably tic
finest. The high point of the filn Tee
is the Prime Minister's speec! Ms
in. the House of Dowmaee, where
Mr. Guinness, is suaye and
biting, Sarcastic and pleading—
a polished, persuasive orator, who
fears neither the people nor his
queen,

The third grincipal role of Johr
Brown, the queen's ghillie i:
played by Finley Currie. A huge
brawny Scot, his performance i:
a delight from start to finish anc
his Scottish accent like a stream
rippling over bbles.

Filmed in England, the back.
ground is authentic where possi
ble, while portions of Windsoi
Castle have been faithfully re
produced to give realistic atmos
phere, A. neatly woven trifle of
English gistory, THE MUDLARK
has char and humour, excellent
acting .and expert direction, I
hope you like it.

HOLIDAY AFFAIR
HOLIDAY AFFAIR, showing
at the Aquatic Club, is a light
romance with humour and pathos, |

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HOW TO END
‘DOMESTIC
FRICTION

Of course she’s always
borrowing it for the house and
maybe she does forget to put

starring Robert Mitchum, Janet it back in the toolshed —
Leigh and Wendell Corey, witi ; but when one oil does so
aoe So as a captivating | \ many jobs so well
ve-year-old, t XX , Fj if,

With a background setting aI yawn nae ies
the excitement, bustle and tur ee, tne eS |
moil of Christmas time in New | re ae |
York department stores, it tells | cant of ESSO

the story of a young widow wita| # HANDY OIL,

small

a son, Who has to choose} : ‘
between het childhood sweet | Big 8oz. can with |
heart who is kindly and un-! curved spout
imagine tive, but secure finan. | E \

Clally, and.a young salesman, whe
offers romance, but not much |
else.

Janet Leigh is charming. as the | â„¢. AND PREVENTS RUST
young widow, while Wendell x
Corey and Robert Mitchum are
in good contrast to each other}
and the latter shows a nice flair}

{ lt pays fo say
for light comedy. Young Gordon .

Gebert carries off a demanding | (

role with a poise and assuranc,
o>

|

IT CLEANS AND LUBRICATES

which are in no way hampered

by two missing front teeth,
An unpretentious film

pleasant entertainment,

but,
* * ry

Both the Plaza and the Globe}
theatres are showing films de-
picting major social problems in|
the United States, NOT WANTED
at the Plaza is a semidocumentary,
and presents the problem of the
young unmarried mother, This
subject is treated with sincerity
and integrity and the film has
genuine emotional power. Sally
Forrest and Keefe Brasselle ail
exceptional performances in ta
leading roles, while Leo Penn as
a talented but frustrated musi
cian who deserts Miss Forrest |
is exceHent, The supporting cast |
is good, the settings realistic and }
the photography and _ musica'|
score deserving of special praise.’
Intelligent and thoughtful aduit
entertainment:

At the Globe, CITY ACROSS
THE RIVER presents the case of
juvenile delinquency. The story |

. M. JONES
co,, LTD |
Agents.



are ey es

‘ SACROOL ¢



aida

is laid in the tenement section |
of Brooklyn and = shows the}
home and _ neighbourhood — in- |

SECESOS SOOO SE SSS

fluences responsible for a decent |
boy’s degeneration,

The cast is composed of “un-
knowns,” with the exception of
Steve MeNally, and as is so often
the case, the result produces a
strong feeling of reality.. Though
no soltition to the problem ig at-
tempted, an honest ‘ort is made

SACROOL is
to point out some of the reason on sale at
for delinquency. The whole film | ¥%

is restrained and well done, and} % KNIGHT'S at



He Can Conquer

> gours also

SOS

shows Clearly the effect of en-
virohment on chdtaeter, especial- and all other Drug Stores
ly in youth.

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PAGE EIGHT





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
Sunday, April 29, 1951



Knowing The Law

Everyone is presumed in English law to
know the law and that applies to Barba-
dians as well. The Barbadian is, however,
at a special disadvantage in acquainting
himself with what the law is at any given
moment. This is due to the fact that the
annual volume of the laws is brought out
in insufficient numbers and appears never
to be reprinted.



At the present moment it is still possible
to. obtain the volumes of the laws which
were consolidated in 1942 but the annual
volumes which have come out since 1942
are for the most part unobtainable. Nor
does this unfortunate situation apply only
to Statutes. In recent years the spate of
Regulations which must be obeyed have
increased considerably and it is impossible
for persons to refrain from infringing the
law unless the Regulations are easily avail-
able. Traffic control and most traffic
offences are the result more of Regulations
than provision in the Motor Vehicles and
Road Traffic Act.

Those whose duty it is to advise persons
on the intricacies of the law are particu-
larly faced with great inconvenience. To
the scarcity of the volumes of the Laws
and Regulations must be added the non-
existence of the Rules of Court which are
so essential to a legal practitioner. The
rules for the Petty Debt Court. and
the Assistant Court of Appeal were printed
very many years ago and were apparently
néver reprinted. The few copies now in
existence show in a marked degree the
passage of the years and the pages are
liable to turn to dust in the reader’s hands.

The Rules of the Divorce Court are of
more recent date and the copies in exist-
ence can be read without risk of disintegra-
tion but copies are no longer available for
purchase, The Rules for the various
branches of the High Court are likewise
unobtainable.

Such a condition of affairs is as unsatis-
factory as it is unnecessary. The legal
department should be given a grant so that
these important books might be, available
to those who require access to them. When
this is done’ the opportunity should be
taken to revise, if need be, the Rules of
Court but no delay should be allowed be-
yond that which is absolutely necessary.

It is not only litigants and their advisers
who complain about these matters. Many
Laws and Regulations provide that certain
notices be exhibited in certain places and
cases have arisen whete persons have
broken the law because of their inability
to obtain the requisite notices. Govern-
ment should investigate the supply of all
government books’ and documents and
take steps to ensure that there is an ade-
quate supply.

mr ~



Nobedy’s Business?

BARBADOS has a name for beaches, in
fact they are our main tourist attraction.
But do we try to preserve them, beautify
them or even keep them clean? The
answer is no. Except for one’ memorable
oceasion when the Christ Church Vestry
cleaned up Rockley Beach, our beaches
have remained nobody’s business.

Tourists complain, travel agents com-
plain and local people voice their disgust,
but nothing is done. And how are the
scavengers helping? The beaches are
certainly not their business! If someone
with a house adjoining a beach cuts his
hedge what can he do with the clippings ?
The scavengers refuse to take them away,
since apparently “bush” and “refuse” are
quite different things. Their advice is:
“Put them on the beach and burn them.”

At one time people living in Bridgetown
had some:of the best bathing in the island
at thei? doorstep. The water in Carlisle
Bay was clear and sparkling, aid the bath-
ing. at Brown’s Beach and Gravesend was
excellent, But it is not so to-day, the
water in the Bay has gradually become
dirtier and dirtier. Fishermen, residents
on the seashore and ships discharging
refuse in the Bay.are to blame.

‘From Hamilton, Ontario, comes the
answer to our problems. The by-laws of
the Corporation of the Hamilton Harbour
Commissioners are strict, practical and
well worth quoting,

(1) No rubbish, refuse, ashes or other
material. shall be thrown into the Har-
bour .

(2) No person shall encumber navigable
water within the limits of the Harbour of
Hamilton or shall in any way
obstruct the navigation thereof with
stones, filth, rubbish, etc.

(3) No person, Company or Corporation
shall throw, drain or discharge into the
waters of the Harbour, or deposit on the
shores of the said harbour, or to discharge
or cause or permit any water or material
to flow into the Harbour of Hamilton or
into any stream or sewer running into the
Harbour of Hamilton, in which water or
material, there is gas, tar, oil, lees,

dregs

or solid matter, « an likely to

ythins
cause such ¢«
pediment or injury or to injuriously affect

vessels, property, water-fowls, fish life, o1

iction, im-

bathing, or to cause a nuisance of any
kind or to cause danger t: alt!
Well, that is a good lead to follow. Re-

member, there are plenty of other beauti-
ful islands in the Caribbean, and they are
going out of their way to aiiract tourists
while we complacently imagine that the
natural attractions of Barbados are enough.
In the meantime throug), sloth, neglect,
and lack of an appreciation of beauty we
are fast allowing our natural attractions
to be spoiled.

Indulgences

THE Report of the findings of the Royal
Commission on gambling issued last week
in London, will shock the Mrs. Grundys in
our midst and will revolutionise some of
the picturesque beliefs about the road to
ruin and perdition which have become
associated with gambling. The Report does
not praise or advocate gambling, neither
does it condemn gambling, it treats it in a
factual manner and stresses that the
danger is not in gambling but in immoder-
ate gambling,

“From our general observation and from
the evidence which we have heard we can
find no support for the belief that gam-
bling, provided that it is kept within
reasonable bounds, does serious harm
either to the character of those who take
part in it or to their family circle and the
community generally,” states the Report.

The Commission found that the average
expenditure on gambling was considerably
less than the average expenditure on other
indulgences, such as alcoholic liquor and
tobacco. Nor did they find that gambling
itself was the cause of crime. On the other
hand the Commissioners in no way sug-
gested that gambling should be encouraged
on a wholesale basis. They did not find
that National lotteries would be an econo-
mic proposition. Many persons put for-
ward Monte Carlo as a place where gam-
bling finances the state and where, because
of gambling the resident in Monte Carlo
lives tax free, but no doubt, the Commis-
sioners took the realistic view that Monte
Carlo is a special exception to the general
rule. Monte Carlo is known world-wide
as an international gambling haven and
the inveterate gambler as well as the pro-
saic businessman is attracted to risk a
flutter at the tables. It is the foreign ele-
ment which boosts the funds in the treas-
ury in Monte Carlo. Any place without
the world-wide reputation of Monte Carlo
would have to rely on gaining profits from
its own nationals which in effeet would be
taking “Peter’s money to pay for Paul,” The
Report recommends that it is time that the
gambling laws — outdated for centuries—
should be revised. Gambling should not
be forced underground, it should be legal-
ized and controlled. “In the first place we
consider that the State should not inter-
fere with the amusement of its citizens
except so far as it can be shown that these
amusements involve serious social conse-
quences. Secondly, if the State restricts a
form of amusement it has no assurance
that anything better will take its place.”
“The spread of gamblingis one of the
symptoms of an age in which people have
more leisure and cannot or do not know
how to make good use of it.”

The remedy lies not in restrictive legis-
lation but in education and the provision
of facilities for more healthy recreation.

The ‘Tenm

THE publication of the West Indies
cricket team to tour Australia comes as an
anti-climax. The public were keyed up
to fever pitch a month ago but as the
weeks passed without news of the per-
sonnel of the team interest gradually
waned,

{ There are no real surprises, and few
will disagree with the selectors’ choice.
As soon as it was learnt that a specialist
wicket-keeper was to be included certain
names automatically suggested themselves
and no doubt the selectors’ choice has
fallen on the best of not a very impressive
bunch of specialist keepers. In any event
it is unlikely that the specialist will be
seen in the test, for he would’ have’ to

‘ improve out of all recognition to depose

Walcott behind the stumps. Ferguson again
finds a place in the team and so do Trim,
Atkinson and Rickards, who toured India.

. All the wild and woolly rumours. have
at last been scotched. No fault can be found
with the selectors although it is a pity that
they never saw Mason and Crick in action
for undoubtedly the inclusion of one or
more youthful fast bowlers would have
strengthened t}e team immeasurably. The
seventeen players include all the outstand-
ing cricketers of these islands who were
called upon to show their paces before the
selectors, and with a seasoned and experi-
enced captain in John Goddard to lead
them, it should be possible to build up a
test combination that should not be easily
event should extend

defeated, and in any

to the utm ny team that the A



ians can put in the field.























SUNDAY

ADVOCATE

T° GLLLLLLLLLLLL LLL LLL LLL LLL CC CCC CT,



(



THE STAGE 47% WAKEFIELD HOUSE, showing the “curtain set”, The central figure is Mr. Risley
Tucker, British Council Representative in Barbados.

Barbados Has A Little

(From A Correspondent)

Barbados flow has a _ Little

Theatre, It is a very little theatre
indeed, for the duditorium seats
only ‘sixty; but it presents fea-
tures, none the less, that ought to
render it of high value in the
development of theatrical pro-
duction in the island.
- The birth of the theatre can be
dated to an evening in last
November when Mr. Charles
[Thomas of the British Drama
League, who was touring the
West Indies under the auspices
of the British Council, was giving
a lecture in a downstairs room—
which is divided by an archway
into two parts—at Wakefield
House, the Council’s Barbados
headquarters.

He had been speaking of the
disadvantages under which
amateur dramatic societies labour-
ed when they tried to put on
plays in halls and theatres — that
were quite unsuited for the pur-
pose. There was, of course, the
expense of hiring the hall in the
first place: the auditorium was
generally too large, and_ badly
designed: the acoustics were
often shocking; and, above alli,
the proportions of the stage were
almost always wrong. What one
got in a cinema theatre or village
hall was a wide front_to the
auditorium and only a few feet
of depth, measuring from the foot-
lights to the back of the stage
The players, in fact, were trying
to do their show on nothing but
a large shelf.

The lecturer paused and looked
around him.

“You know,” he = said reflec-
tively, ‘you could make some-
thing better than that out of this



room. Here, where I am stand-
ing, would be the stage, of
course, It’s small; but it’s just
in the right proportion-—plenty
of depth in relation to the pro-
secernium arch, You wouldn't.
need a raised stage: you could
\just use the floor, Naturally,

you'd have a simple curtain set
[The auditorium would be where
you are all sitting. It
have to be built up in a
but that shouldn’t be too diffi-
cult. There is room for a_ nice
little lighting equipment; and the
whole affair ought to be quite big
enough to give your local produc-
ers something to experiment with,
and a place in which they coulk?
put on really good plays without
having to bother whether they
would take in enough money at
the box-office to cover expenses.”

would
ramp;

In Gue course, Mr. Thomas
sailed for England; but he left

behind him the plans for a little
theatre to be constructed in that
room at Wakefield House, and
Mr,. Risely Tucker, the British
Council representative in Barba-
dos, helped by his assistant, Mr.
R. Le Fanu, has constructed it.
Mr. Tucker calls it a “pocket
theatre” and insists that it is not
intended to take the place of the
much larger and more elaborate
Little Theatre that he hopes
Barbados will have one day. But
it is at least a start; and there is
Mr. Thomas’ authority for be-
lieving that it will prove a yery
valuable one.

*TPOHE decline in the morale of
3ritish doggies was noted
here recently. Since then it has
been reported that an airedale
was found drunk and smelling
strongly of whisky after a wed-
ding reception at Southend,

It won't be long now before
the rot sets in, and dogs come
home late with staring eyes and
a silly smile on their faces,

Where have you been, Rover?

Pardon?
You heard the first time,

where?

Where ? Oo,
and lots of places.
With whom, Rover?

Um?

Whom did you meet?

Just a lot of dogs.
What kind of dogs?

Big dogs, little dogs, hairy
dogs, spotted dogs. But ‘all
jolly dogs, mind you. Jolly fine

lots and lots

1)

dogs
Friends of yours?

Oo, rather, All friends, All
pals. “Dear old pals, jolly old
pals.”

Don’t sing, Rover. The neigh-

bours will hear



Who cares about the neigh-
bours?
I do
Well, I don't
Your disrepute
not improved yC mar
Rover

SITTING ON

Did I?
Pull yourself together, Rover, ,
Where have you been?
Me? Out.
I know that, Rover, But




Theatre

The lecturer's
“curtain set’? was
by his audience,

reference to a
well understood
who had heard

him speak o1 the subject at
previous talks.
Why on ear.1, he asked, did

amateurs go to the expense and
pains of cons cucting elaborate
sets of painted canvas, which only
looked doubtfully realistic in any
case? It was perfectly possible to
give a play with the use of
curtains at the back of the stage
and in the wings which would
provide an acceptable setting for
almost any type of play. With
the right “props” and costumes
and other accessories, an audience
would forget in about two
minutes that they were not
actually looking at a drawing-
room or a library. The problem

was a little more difficult when
it came to outdoor scenes, but
even so—and ir. Thomas went

into technical cetails of how the
illusion of a wood or a _ wide
landscape cou'd be sustained
without a single square inch of
painted scenery.

The pocket theatre at Wake-
field House has therefore been
erected on the lines of these
recommendations; and all lovers
of the drama in the island will
be extremely interested to see
how they work out in practice.
The theatre owes its existence
entirely to the British Council:
and the relatively small sum of
money that has been expended on
it has come solely from British
Council funds. Before the work
had gone far, however, Mr.
Tucker invited two officials of the
Development and Welfare Or-
ganization to luncheon. Both of
them had had a good deal of ex-
perience of dramatic production;
and their host found that they
were as enthusiastic about the
possibilities of his “pocket
theatre” as he was. An informal
committee was formed on _ the
spot; and, before the meal was
over, discussion on a play which
might be put on by way of
launching the new venture, and

the players that could be invited

to take part
idvanced .

One of tnese omcials, Mr. C
A. Grossmith, the Administra-
tive Secretary at Hastings House,
is acting as producer of the play
that was eventually selected. It
is Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion”
~-a brilliant play in itself and one
that is of a particular topical
interest since it is concerned with
the subject of phonetics; for the
study of which the author left
most of his fortune in_ his will.
Incidentally, it has just been
revived in London with great
success,

The cast has been chosen
among enthusiasts for the drama
in Barbados who happened to be
available, and without reference
to their membership of any parti-
cular group. Some of the players,
including Mr. Grossmith, who is
playing the part of Doolittle, the
Cockney dustman, as well as
producing, have not been seen by

in it, was well



By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

You insulting my friends?
I shall

say what I like about

them.
Ooo, no you won't. Nobody's
gomg. to insult my friends.

Shall I tell you something?
Yes, Rover,

I don't like you.
That'll do, Rover,

I don't like you, never did
like you, never shall like you.
Pompous prig. That's you.
Come along, Rover. Time for

bed,

Gubbins’ Survey

F THE Government thinks it

can compete with Old Moore
Gubhins, the world-famous
astrologer, in predicting disaster
it will have to think again.

The Economic Survey for 1951
says that “in many, ways our
prospects are harsh and un-
pleasant.”

Old Moore Gubbins, who said
much the same thing in a New
Year message to his readers, now
says that our prespects will not
only be harsh and unpleasant,
but almost unendurable in every
possible way.

ae B >
3eginning on Tuesday (Budget
day), we shall enter a period of
national misery unparalleled in
our history.

As the wind was, blowing from

thé north-east on March 21 it will

rémain (according to O.M.G.’s
rvations over a_ number of
s) roughly in that direction



until June

mear bitte old

a Barbados audience before, Oth-
ers, including Miss Thelma Vallis,
Mrs. Golde White and Mr. Idris
Mills, have appeared in produc-
tions of the Bridgetoyn Players or
the Barbados Dramatic Club.

The problem of the audience is
in some ways a more difficult one
than that of the cast, With only
sixty seats available, it is obvious
that only a few of those whe
would like to see the Show will
be able to do so. I am asked te
say that if any of those who have
already shown their interest in
the theatre
tendance at one or more of Mr.
Thomas's lectures will send in
their names immediately to the
British Council at Wakefield
House, stating whether they
would like one seat or two, every
effort will be made to fit them in
at one or other of the four o
five performances that are likely
to be given. An announcemen*
regarding the public at large wil!)
be made in due course. The date
of the first performance has not
yet been fixed. It will not, in any
case, be before May 19th. It is
proposed to make a charge of ¢
dollar a seat—the proceeds to be
retained for eventual payment
into any fund that may be organ-
ized to assist in the establishmen
of a genuine Little Theatre,

It must be emphasized that,
whatever is decided in detail
about “Pygmalion”, the produc-
tion is simply intended to christen
the new theatre, and to give thosc
interested some idea of what can,
be done on a stage of this sizc
with the use of a curtain set,

The real idea behind the whole
project is that all drama group:
in Barbados, including those con-
nected with churches and schools
who would like to experiment
with the production of somethin:
better than the ordinary “com
mercial” light comedy or thrillér
(which doesn’t necessarily mea
something solemn or highbrow)
should have somewhere in which,
free of charge or on payment oi
only a very small sum to mee
actual expenses, they can try out
their ideas. If any group charges
admission for its performances
and makes a profit, it will be
asked to devote it to the Littic
Theatre fund, ;
oe Bettien Council
Gelighted if anyone wou
a shot at Shakespeare; a ass
delighted still if some work by <
local dramatist could be per
formed—even if, in one or tw
particulars, it fell slightly below
the Shakespeare standard. Mr
Tucker himself is going shortly o;
four months’ leave. Mr, Le Fanu.
during his absence, will be gla:
to receive any applications for use
of the theatre; and the informal
poerurs ae ae. remain in heine
Oo give any elp th
required, trial adit

—_ so, ladies
who care for the art of the
and the glories of the englien
language (not that the Alliance
Francaise would be turned down
if they felt inspired to give us
a glimpse of the French classica’
stage), you have your theatre—a
small thing, but your own.

The rest is up to you,

would be

and gentlemen

THE FENCE

spring and early summer with
fruit crops. ruined by frosts
bigger bills for fuel with less
money to pay them, and another

influenza epidemic,

It also means that the Festival
of Britain may open in a blizzard
which will drive Americar
visitors out of the country
quicker than boiled cod ano
parsley sauce, bruss
and English coffee, ae aes

Frozen to the marrow an
Weakened by flu, this unhapp,
breed will then search the shop
for warm underelothing, whic),

will be in short supply
§ supply becaus
rearmament, rt

Alarmed at the declining healt
of the population, and the in
creasing cost of free medicine, thy
Government will then switen
factories producing war material
back to making warm under
clothing, just in time to fill the
shops on the first day of summe1

Because of the heat, nobod
WUL buy the warm underclothing
It will be sold to the Eskimos it
exchange for whale blubber
which will be included jn the
meat ration,

. *

Summer will end in less than

a week Shivering citizens will
then demand the warm undev-
clothing, no longer available

About the end of July there will
be another flu epidemic
Heavy rain in August will ruin

the harvest. Nobody will have
any money 10 spend on holidays
Hotels and bars will be half emp
ty ving to higher taxation. Th

national revenue wi

in Barbados by at-'

SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951



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SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951



- Meat At 3d.
A Pound

EaT is so plentifui tuat it is

eaten for breakfast, lunch, tea
and dinner and costs only 3u. a
pound. Income tax is almost negli-
gible. Only about 250 of the popu-—
lation pay it at the rate of 1s, in
the £1. Families are paid children’s
allowances There is no housing
shortage. Sounds like Utopia but
it isn’t. Its an extract from
Donald McCormick’s “Islands for
sale” (Peter Garnett 10s, 6a.) a
written to “titillate your
palate” and send you running off
to buy the nearest island, which in





our case would be Pelican, The
world is full of islands, so full
that there ave more than 5,000

around the British Isles, I thought
that would shake you and _ they
are so deliciously individual with
no craze for centralization uni-
tcrmity or any of those twentieth
century signs of petulance against
the Creator’s handiwork, Islands
they were created and islards they
remain, distinet, different, delight-
ful--and depressing. Take Jersey
for instance. Income Tax in Jersey

is ofly 4s. in the £1. With a
large budget surplus, ‘ersey is
quite independent of the United

Kingdom, and _ trading profits on
vegetable crops last year amount-
ed to more than £4,000,000. And
in Jersey a married man with two
children can earn up to £10 a
week before he starts paying in-
come tax and then only at 2s. in
£1. And then there is Sark.
Two years ago there were 180 ap—
plicants from all over- the British
Isles for the post of assistant en-
gineer for Sark’s private enter—
prise electricity scheme. Yet the
salary offered was only £200 a
year. But some of the applicants
were willing to give up salaries of
£750 a year to take on the job and
to have a house
THERE jis no mention of Peli-
can but the Grenadines are given
a good name and Capri, Majorca
and the Aegean Islands get the
credit that is eternally theirs. The
merit of this book lies chiefly in
the great love that its writer feels
for islands, It is with reluctance
that he writes about the disadyan—
tages of certain islands, but he
never attempts to delude the read—
ers that there is anywhere an
island paradise. It is a book that
ought to be read by all those who
tend to dogmatise about islands.
There are really so many of them
and most of us are so ignorant of
their whereabouts. We may not
want to buy an island,—most of
us wonder whether we'll ever be
able to buy even a house—but
we ought to read “Islands for
sale” if only to break down that
huge chunk of ignorance which
we possess on the subject, island
livers though we be.
HETHER you travel to Eng-
land this year, or next you
take with you or buy
at the earliest opportun—
ity the Sunday Times Travel
and Holiday Guide of the Brit-
ish Isles and Ireland. If you
think you know these countries
already pay 10 shillings just for
the pleasant surprise of finding out
your mistake. The Guide is
illustrated and its information up-
to date (1951). There are modern
maps. Whether you go to Englang
or not, you can learn a lot from
this Guide. For those who are
fortunate enough to get to the
Continent the Sunday Times has
published at the same price a
Companior Travel and Holiday
Guide to the Continent of Europe
Maps about Cyprus, Malta and
East Africa are also included,
A NOTHER Sunday Times pub-
£\ lication to reach me is “Go”,
the Travel and Leisure magazine.
It will look well on the tables and
waiting rooms of those who travel

must

and of those who don’t. The
April—May number (price 3s.
6d.) contains a book in brief

scenes from the lives of the Marx
Bros,

Max in Rapallo tells the story of
Max Beerbohm. And for flower
lovers there is a special article on
an English Flower Festival.

GEORGE HUNTE.



Grenada Civil

Service Turn
Down COL Bonus

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, April 27,

The Civil Service Association
here has turned down an offer
from the Government on an

interim increase of 334 per cent
cost of living bonus as approved by
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies pending the receipt ox
the report of the commission in-
quiring into the cost of living of
the Windwards,

C.S.A seeks a 100 per cent
increase as a “very reasonble one,
that the interim offer would mean
nothing to them and therefore they
decided to await final settlement
of the matter’’,

The Association also passed a
resolution asking for assisted
passages of officers going abroad
on leave, as obtains in many other
colonies, or failing this, to revoke
regulation compelling them to go
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A



BY IAN GALE



ONE OF THE DELIVERY VANS.

—_—



THE COWS are milked twice



a day, at 4 a.m. and 12 noon.

Faiths Barbadians
Live By



10

The Christian Science Church

By JAMES F.

THE Christian Science Church
was organised in Barbados as a
Society in 1915. A few years
prior to that date a Barbadian
jady returned to the island from
the U.S.A. with the news that
through Christian Science treat—
ment she had been healed of a
nervous condition. The Misses
Law.and Carrington were in
England and Miss Carrington’s
brother, about this time too, in the
U.S.A., had just received a heal
ing through. Christiar Science
treatment, of tuberculosis in its
last stages.

On arrival in Barbados the two
ladies spoke of this healing and
they and a few friends began to
have Sunday Services at the Gar-
rison. After a short while these
Services were held in the home
of one of these individuals,

Soon after, a room was rented
in Broad Street, and besides other
meetings, a Wednesday evening
Testimony Meeting was held once
a month. A Reading Room was
started. A few years after, the
Services and Reading Rocm were
held in two large rooms on the
ground floor of the B.M.L.A.
Buildings in Lower Broad Street.

The membership grew and a
disused Garrison building was
bought and remodelled and is now
the present church building.

-The Church was dedicated in
1933 free of debt and became
First Church of Christ, Scientist
Bridgetown.

This, as every other Christian
Science Church, is a Branch of
the Mother Church, the First
Church of Christ, Scientist, in
Boston, Mass., which was organ—
ised they say: “to commemorate
the word and works of our Master,
which should reinstate» primitive
Christianity and its lost element of
healing.” (Page 17, Church
Manual, by Mary Baker Eddy).

In 1866 Christian Science was
discovered. In “Retrospection and
Introspection,” a work by M. B.
Eddy, the Discoverer and Founder
of Christian Science, we read,....
“In the latter part of 1866 I gained
the scientific certainty that all
@ausation was Mind, and every
effect a mental phenomenon. My
immediate recovery from the
effects of an injury caused by an
accident, an injury that neither
medicine nor surgery could reach,
was the falling apple that led me
to the discovery how to be well
myself, and how to fthake others

iv
SSSOSP A PPOVOOOF OSS,











BRATHWAITE

so......I then withdrew from
society about three years, — to
ponder my mission, to search the
Scriptures, to find the Science of
Mind that should take the things
of God and show them to the
creature, and reveal the great
curative Principle—Deity.

“The Bible was my textbook, It
answered my questions as to how
I was healed; but the Scriptures
had to me a new meaning, a new
tongue, their spiritual signification
uppeared; and I apprehended for
the first time their spiritual mean-
ing, Jesus’ teaching and demon-
stration, and the principle of
spiritual Science and metaphysical
healing,—in a word Christian
Science.” (Page 24—25.)

Christian Science has now
spread all over the globe and its
only preachers are the “Bible”
and “Science and Health”, with
Key to the Scriptures by Mary
Baker Eddy, which are read by
two Readers at the Sunday
Services. There is a Service on
Wednesday evenings when these
books are read and testimonies of
Christian Science healing are
given,

The aim of Christian Scientists
is to know the Scriptures from
the basis that God's creation is
good only, as is spoken of in
Genesis I, The Master said>‘‘Ye
do err not knowing the Scrip-—
tures.” Tenet I reads: “As ad
herents of truth, we take the in—
spired Word of the Bible as our
sufficient guide to eternal Life.
(Page 497. S. and H.)

There are many in Barbados
who find solace and healing from
the study of Christian Science.

Some one once said: “The
noblest charity is to teach a man
how to do without charity”, and
although Christian Scientists do
not turn away from the immediate
need, they decidedly know what
is meant by “The Lord is my
Shepherd, I shall not want”, and
“Son, thou are ever with me, and
all that I have is thine.”

Every Church of this denomina-
tion is guided by the rules of the
Chureh Manual, which is the work
of the Discoverer and Founder.

The literature is freely dis-
tributed by the Distribution Com
mittee and includes the weekly
Sentinel, the monthly Journal,
(the official organ of the Mother
Church, a publication which in~
cludes the list of the Churches





- Ph





POLIS STITT O OOOO



St

MODEL

This week I met Maggie, Syi-.
via,. Rese and Matilda, among
others, at Bulkeley Dairy. At this
dairy, which only started in 1942
and now has 75 cows, 2 bulls ana
15 calves, each animal has a
name, One of the bulls, incidental.
ly, is a ferocious characteg, called
Sam, +

No better situation for a,
than Brighton could hav@sbeen
found, It is cool, breezy, afi iso-
‘ated, and although The cows ma?
not appreciate it, there is a good
view, s

The cows are milked twwice®a
day, at 4 am, and) 12 and
after the early milking they are
turned out into a large meadow
for a few hours. There are four

iry

different breeds of cows at the
dairy — Holsteins, Ayrshires,

Guernsies and Zebus. It has been
found that while the first three
breeds’ give a large quantity of
milk, the Zebus though they give
less, have a higher percentage of
butter fat in their milk.

The cows are milked by hand
and by machine. At the moment,
since the dairy is not, quite fin-

ished yet, there is omly one
mechanical milker, whidh cau
milk two cows. at a time. Mr,

Cuke, the manhger, is very .en-
thusiastic about it.
A large dairy stall is the ome

of the cows, and it is “kept
remarkably clean. Every day,
when the cows are let out into

the meadow, the stall is’ Washed
out with E.C., which ts made ‘at
Bulkeley Factory, and before the
men milk, they wash their
with the same disinfectant
the crop is over Mr. Carrington,
the manager of Bulkeley, plans
to re-design the stall so that it
can ko'd twice as many cows.



arms
After

Durittg the crop season the
cows are fed on cane tops, and

out of crop they get sour grass,
Besides that, throughout the year,
they are given a special concen
trated cow feed. In front af each
cow in the stall hangs a black
beard which gives such informa-
tion as ti name of the cow, tim
fed, amount fed and the name of

the milker.
Although Mr. Cuke starts work
at 3 a.m. and consequently ha

Civil Service Asso.
Elects Officers

At the Annual General Meet-
ing of the Civil Service Associa-
tion yesterday, Mr. L. A. Hall
was elected General Secretary.
Mr, Hall got 131 votes to win
from Mr. R. P. Parris who was
also nominated.

Five members were elected to
the Council of the Association,
They are: Messrs. A. E. Lewis,
A. G. Jordan, F. H. Barker, L.
T. Gay and L. EB. Smith, A. E.
Lewis won 63 votes and A, G.
Jordan 61 to be elected on thd
Council. The other three’ with
another member got 57 each
Those three were decided on by
the casting vote of the President,
Mr, C. A. Coppin,

Mr. C. A. Coppin was elected
President before this meeting
Judge H. A. Vaughn is the Vice
Presiaent, C. D. Gittens, Treas-
urer and C,. W. Cumberbatch,
Assistant Secretary.

The returning officers were
Messrs. D. A. Haynes and C, B.
Long, of the Peasants’ Loan Bank

C. C. Barrow, St. Judes, G. C.
Bishop, Government Industrial
School, and Miss Yearwood of

the Mental Hospital,



13 Get Through

Sixty-eight candidates — forty-
eight girls and twenty boys—took

the Junior School Certificate
examination in December last
year.

The following 13 were success-
ful:

INDUSTRY SCHOOL
K. C. Agard, L. E. Best

PRIVATE CANDIDATES

K. A, Carew

INDUSTRY SCHOOL

D. A. Brathwaite, A. E. Burke, 0. C
Callender, M. D. Nicholls, ©. A. Sealey,
J. B. Smith

ROYAL ACADEMY

A.C. Griffith
PRIVATE CANDIDATES

E. Clarke, M. FE. Roach, E Weekes,

ee

Pp

and practitioners of the move-
iment). There is also the Christian
Science Monitgr, an international
daily newspaper, The Herald is
published in several languages.

Tiere is a Board of Lectureship
in Boston and every Christian
Science Church gives at least one
free lecture a. year. r

The Reading Room
island is now located
Broad Street (over
Sons) The Bible and Mr:
Eddy’s works and all authorigs
literature on Christian
may be read, borrowed
chased.

A cordial invitation is always
extended to all to attend the
Services, and the lectures and to
visit the Reading Room,

this
«J

in
at No
Bowen _ and

d
Science
or pur









CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

aaa PARRA PPRAPAAAAOOOOOOE,
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INDAY “ADVOCATE

DAI





AFTER the early milking the cows are turned out into a meadow
tor a few hours,



THE COW STALL is large and airy—and clean,

to go to bed at the time that
most people are having dinner
he likes his job, and he told ine
proudly that when he started

City Building
Dug Down

THE two buildings on Prince
William Henry Street which used
to comprise the Manhattan Club,
W. A. Medford & Co., groceries,
and Evelyn Roach & Co., Ltd's
Ice Depot are being pulled down
The 10,000 square teet of land cn
which the buildings were standing

and which belong to Mr, Evelyn
Roach, will be sold. Soon some
new structure will be set up
there.

The old building was built most-
ly of brick, rubble and_ block
stones. There used to be livery
stables in the buildings some years
ago.

The man who has bought the

building is selling the stones and
wood,

Less Aloes Wantec
From D. West Indies

In a bulletin from the Carib-
bean Commission, Mr. E. Nord-
fohne, economist to the Imforma-
tion Institute of the Economic
Planning Bureau of the Nether-
lands West Indies in Amsterdam
said that during the last few
years, the demand for aloes from
the Netherlands had decreased.

Mr. Nordlohne who is working
for a Doctor’s degree at the
University College of Economics
at Rotterdam, Holland, had
visited the territory to familiar-
ise himself with the social and
economic problems of the area.

Among other things, he studied

the commercial aspects of the
cultivation of aloes which ar¢
grown on the islands of Aruba

and Bonaire and attributed t.>»
decrease in the demand. for that
crop to various causes,

He said that in the first place
there was considerably les
demand for the crop in the
United States; secondly, the cost
of the material was generally too
high in the Netherlands West
Indies because of high labou:
costs and thirdly, there was strong
competition from South Africa

Yesterday, the Advocate inter-
viewed the Director of Agricul-
ture as to the possibility of
growing aloes in Barbados on a
commercial basis He said that
at the beginning of the present
century, the crop was grown on
a small commercial seale, but it
did not pay and kad to be dis-
continued,

The crop, he said, is one of
those which thrive on relatively
poor moisture conditions.

At present negligible quantities
of aloes are however found in
peasants backyards among fruit
trees,

OC,
SSF



This is the real stuff

GOOSE FEATHER PILLOWS
27” x 18” Each ..

FIGURED DOWN FEATHER PILLOWS
27” x 18” Each ....





‘SIMMONS STAR PILLOWS
2

-"

>” x 17” Each









work at Bulkeley Dairy last Ju
they were producing 450 pints
milk a day but now the

at
figure

Meat Could Be Had
Yesterday

There was of

the Public

plenty
Market

meat i
yesierua

morning. Some housewives weie
making sure by purchasing mewt
for the next day (to-day) so wist
even if the butchers did decias
on a. “meatless Sunday” tuey
would have olready had theu
supplies.

A merchant told the Advocat»
yesterday that approximately i4)
tons of frozen meat are due to
arrive here on Tuesday by th»
S.S. Tongariro from Australie,
via Trinidad, The ship is alsu
bringing large quantities of but

ter and cheese,

Mr. William Patterson of the
firm of Messrs, J. N. Goddard &
Sons said that his firm hag no
meat at all and is depending on
this shipment. For many week

now they have had to turn away

housewives who wanted to pur
chase meat

The firm, however, has lar:
quantities of deep sea fish an‘!
during the butchers’ strike mu

of this was sold

Fined 10/- For
Stealing Cane

A City Police Magistrate ye:
terday told 68-year-old Ernes
Thorpe of Baynes Gap, Spooner
Hill, “I find you guilty of larcen)
but I am taking into consideratioi
your age,” when he appeared be

ore him chanted by the Polic
with the larceny of sugar cam
valued at 2/-

Thorpe was fined 10/- for thr

larceny. Failing to pay the fin
he will have to undergo 14 day:
imprisonment The cane is th
property of Warren’s Plantation
The watchman of the plantatior
said that on April 27 about 4.3
p.m. he was told something }
the Manager and going into th
cane field saw the defendant wit!
a bag. Pieces of canes were in thi
bag.
Putting

up a defence, Thorp:

told the court that on April 2
he was walking near Warren
canefield and saw a piece of can

in the road, He took up the pie
and put it into a bag and th
Manager passed the same _ tim
and saw him, Later the watch
may came to him and took hur
to «he office.

“RODNEY” ARRIVES

Over 400 tons of general cr



from Canada and a quantity of
fruit. from the British Northerr
Islands were landed here yester

cay by the R.M.S. Lady Rodney
She also landed %3 passenger:
The Rodney left port last night
for British Guiana via St, Vincent
Grenada and Trinidad, She
consigned to Messrs,
Austin & Co,, Ltd.

wa

Gardiner





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PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE



ee AT

Failing Hair?

SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951

IL IN THE. LORDS CAUSES



Paling hair is a definite sign that your hair roots are starved of vital

organic sulystances normally supplied by the body. That’s why you








1
need SilVikiTh, urgently. For Silvikrin contains, in concentrated form,
the fourteen essential hair-forming substances, Massaged into the | HOUSE OF LORDS, April 17 id ‘ ti A
cates Zilvik ‘ohn, Stik. she ake rabekee : | , April 17 wou receive a prospecting arra ents. s._I have said, American company, ’so eager to in the domestic affairs of Barbados. the economic rivalries of t he
Dysitvikrin one Sourishes the hair rar and — hair ows licence over the whole island, the Myr, ‘Tanber was called in and the get into the island that apparently May I glance, for a moment, at the Metropolitan Powers, and they
AZARGANUN healthy, handsome vigour. Pure Silvikrin will get your hair | Lord Teviot rose to call atten- company entered into negotiations matter was going to be dealt with they were ed to gake any Constitution of Barbados? As your dread what may be happening be-
priiehgeRaba trivilig again and keep it healthy. tion to the ry position of the with ac Leaseholds Limit- on the Alberta system. In our terms, did ecept, but the Lordships may know, it consists of hind the closed doors of the Cuban
to British Union Oi Lim- ed, who are the principal oil view, for a small island like Bar- §B.Y.0,C.’s attitude was fully jus- a Legislature, which is the Gov- negotiations. I gather that, as in
UsSee Trin in severe cases of dandruff ited in Barbados, arising from the operators in Trinidad and own bddos, that was ridiculous. tified, as the originally put ernor, the Legislative Council of photography, a darkened room is
ankQGUMFIair. As a daily dressing use Bee ee om. by oon be — —e in the ‘ Since _ the terms to ee Gulf forward by the Government prov- fiiteen members, and a House of pecessary for development and the
Silvtke Tonic Lotion or, for dry heads, e os vern é mpire. s company Company have been greatly modi- orka they 4 semb fi members. j i i
the newsbiw ein Lotion with Oil. ask His have vast experience of deep fied, as will be seen from. the 04: ae a nee oe Fe ae pacer See dhag Rea a yg Poses



since had to be greatly relaxed "Phe Governor has a negative voice

Barba
foreign company, and Pp ; d
Majesty's Crane for . drilling, and they undertook to do copy of which I have the picture, so they wait, dread-
ti A ee ¢ ee “aul idence of




; m ; The Barbados Petroleum Act, in the making and passing of laws jng lest they are to be sacrificed,
ot ond ea em on arringesnent with a oie iaveur displayed to- 1950, provided for payments by and, in the : phraseology, jutchered to make a Cuban holi-
oe to mens tor Papers The U fin Company. They had wards sag can ra n, Way of royalty to land owners in laws are passed with the advice gay Let us leave the West Indies
‘noble Lord said | My Lords, 1 Waiting all the uipment requir- And it.ghould be emphasised that £Teas where oil may be found, and consent of the Legislath® and go to East Africa, where the

“apologise for brini this Bd. tb DERE. Work Bt | OnGe. the G poration had e no- 2nd also for compensation to land Council and General DIY settlers of our own race await with
important matter you at October, 1948, the Colonial Office thi ‘ island: they had Cwners for the taking over of of the island, who may make all Geepest apprehension the dogmatic
this fate hour, but 1 found on jn- *Ppolnted the late Mr. C. M. made fo 3, and had bought ‘ncillery rights, such as the right such laws as may from time to 1 -onouncements of Whitehall doc-
quiry that there was no other date Lepper, 2 highly qualified mining no ipment’ whereas the ‘to enter on land to search for and time be required for the pegc® tinsires. They, too, fear lest all
aoa Op eg ree | oad Ss te Me Pee UO Sec, My eme, id Pein, oe and Pe fags vee OF NS che ean tar nay be oh fr
ing- 3 y i in cu an ‘or e on of island, a “ ”
ves ae eu, loration developments. to His the island, have done a great deal buildings, tanks ond "the like. Se inuch fot legislation, But een iy Quantity, not quality” —
beat with me thls Ph ‘Ag is ‘ajesty’s Mint of Fuél of valuable work and, as I have Feople receiving royalties from an you may ask, who has executive the miscarriage of democracy.

HOME- eTHE custiconey a J has WG wer from 1936 1946. What a stated, have incurred “ating well, or the lessee of an power in the island? The answer And so on. One could go round
e interest at all if iy matter on I am going to tell your Lordships heavy expenditure. Put simply, ¢ i well are entitled to com- is, the Governor, his Executive the Empire, but there is no time
« a tran on€ now is of great importance. Mr. the Government of Barbados went pensation, bu sati t i ide ephére, a showi A is art
raises in thiS Hous must say Le ’s te of tef wei Pp , t no compensation Council and, in a wide sp , 4 showing the inconsistencies which
will set you on the right that 5 have & ea Be th: the pper’s terms ce were bark Rags. 2 mis jeg e she whatsoever is pyricee for the body called the Executive Com~- arise from lack of consistent pur-
J £2 course for success British Union Oil Company. This ‘to advise the Governor of Barbados on pecti i" Be over the Shoe Joss of the right to drill for oil, mittee. The Executive Council pose and lack of consistent princi-

You make sure of planned progress in the career of your choice when is a somewhat unusual matter to the subject of oll mining legislation and ng such as was possessed by the the

consists of the Governor,
Colonial Secretary and the Attor-
ney-General, ex officio, and suc?
others as His Majesty may ap-
peint — at the present moment,
tnree others. The Executive Com-
mittee was created by local Statute
and consists of all mem of
the Executive Council ex officio,
plus one member of the Legisla-
tive Council, plus four members of
the House of Assembly are

island, which, be it noted, under
the usual Colonial legislation,
calls for a_ selection of the
aH and therefore ba 4 by place
stitute a monopoly. In its ce
tay offered the Bue. a licence
a auaster of the island, on terms
one qui is! on

which were so unworkable that
they were consequen ed in
the case of the Gulf Co ation
after the B.U.O.C. had withdrawn.

ples. We seem to be getting the
worst of both worlds. We dis-
courage the British investor, on the
one hand, and we undermine the
confidence of nascent Dominions,
on the other. I repeat that the
case before us is not creditable to
the Barbados Government and
merits the intervention of His
Majesty’s Government. I claim
that that is so because it is their

4 . on the subsequent issue of licences, and
bring before your Lordships and, {to furnish a te a

port.”’

before doing so, I took steps to That report, which is dated Jan-
find gut Whether it was a proper uary, 1949, definitely recommend-
matter to raise, With your Lord. ed, In Paragraph 122, that the
ship’s leave I will read this short British Union company, which
letter from the Colonial Office. It had secured a fi ass opera
says} artni in Trinidad €
mited, should be given the sole
pisenretse licence over the whole

land. Mr. Lepper —T am

you let the most progressive, most successful Correspondence
College in the world coach you through the post. By friendly,
individual training we equip with the specialised Knowledge
you must have for a well-paid, Key position.

Make the first move TO-DAY— pest the coupon below

B.U.0.C. before the passing of
this Act, In other words, so far as
the B.U.0.C. are concerned, the
measure has resulted in complete
confiscation of their rights. with,
out compensation, and this as
your ips must be aware,
is completely contrary to all prac-
tice in areas under British influ-
ence, That these mining rights
are extremely Valuable is clearly




there is no rear why a Suestion

, the ect of Bi
Crete ie erbados should not we asked

n
“Barbados Figs a Legislative
of its own it is still adi

reading his words from his
report— ;





























; ly : proved b @ willingness of Tri- e Hov vic duty to try and preserve tradition- %
nr rte, lon See te In. gdaltion, to oll, research ‘dad LansenGlae LIIEG 1 An ee ne a saa a ner cdionies atl under ‘eel

Parilamen work, of the company’s r eseiOn | Oo! ss
iS YOUR CAREER HERE? ithe saqae why send ot ae” been MAR © of geologists Sy ery in Ime] pro- esata bt the | i PLP the Lega Teele ieee esos and ae ; In nee

M Z the’ British i Company and the V. n.of a -plass water su ation to get into the i: id at is, et, the prit ‘ - sion, I say that I am loth to loo!
IF NOT, WRITE FOR FREE ADVICE There tae ee ja. pi BP ologists.”” ; Ely, ai the teport on the atol i peroe ay price ena 0 ina the test of kovernment, i’ ae. oe and aia 5 os, eo aah
comuptancy Exgme. Draughtsmanship, All Police, I Course ; i » ¢ tigatio! ~ great expense of déep ing. ces a e es, _ prepa’ overnm n the role of Gallio.
eet ee er impor, Tabeid he rar On Mae 2g MR the Acting eau ner esotee Jn aris, te BUDE, bo efor i ue Danas ana te AUG 1 not hin hat ale stl
ers Subjects and cxamina- Radio Service Engineering ing this matter in your Lordships’ to the British Unioa Oil Com- bated ei. We br NesAh is te tice and a fair deal, fo g ernie te ine tor the ae ee en . a ear i a
oor a ‘Short W: é ’ : " ernment w ernment, ni nd
Cambridge School Corti» Education Examinations secretarial rama Meters. moving the, Motion, Government did not intehd %6 de: SRE have aso AE RN Me Bie: al management of Government pro- ciples of publi honesty, and T hope
cate Beomiantion Institute of Municipal . | should like to give a short history viate fram the Lepper take Lars Saye Bee Bre iehami. Ditraty Sapenode Be sae Barbados perty. The four members who that they will yet relent from the
Chemisty res schemata 7 of Hand| | of the British Union Oil. Company® late..as Beeicey 80, 3949, this ve oP BArEaGoR et by, import- ore ale 1 ee a on come to the Bxecutive Committee attitude which they have taken up.
Ai'commerealkinets Retottninetag To and its operations. in Barbados. ee ae eed cabled ko the iE, {RE DECESSREY SPD orks rasttaken Ofer under the Pe. om, the, House of Miuct of pub. , The Parliamentary Under-Secre-
Diesel nginas ” Pane Wireless Telegraphy and’! hear PO ated tse tea Colonia ce.in London. an as- og Sabled Be te eats the troleum Act, but compensation ji pisiméss in that House, But in ‘ary of State for Commonwealth
<2" “iByour requirements are nat listed above, Sri - 1914 with capital of £6,000,000, surance that the Barbados Gov- qj YEE a te oot eee nas Will be payable and a claim has spite of their acceptance af collec- [eiations (Lord = Ogmore): My
wanes inted anapneney t+ 8 107 free didiies 1914 with a capital of £6,000,000, Cr ent would not depart in any {urel gay has BAD been filed. However, although ; : the Lords, I must first express my
; ~ its main object, being to acquire Way froth the Lepper Y tural has also proved @ Ese , tive responsibility for policy, the

——s=r—Direct Mail to DEPT. 188
¢ THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD. -

SHEFFIELD, E ND.

f eport, Re-,
lying upon the assurance given,
the company gave up theit leases
to the Government and did not
oppose the Petroleum Bill intro-

the gas was taken over, the pipe-
line and accessories necessary to
operate the gas were not taken
by the Act. The company, in the
course of business, naturally de-



appreciation to the noble Lord,
Lord Teviot, for consenting to ad-
journ this debate from its original
date to to-day, in order to meet my

,}oil and petroleum-bearing lands
‘Land to explore, work, exercise,

~“jand develop them. In the year
‘| 1919 the company obtain

boom to-all in the ;
ever, so far as we can see,

ne unde ft nothing hte

Executive Committee would not
resign if defeated in the House, in
that they ‘are responsible to the
yovernor and not to the House.








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are registered Trade Marks,

ses
over 78 per cent. of the available
drillable area of Barbados. I would
mention, in pes , that no one
else had explored this area for oil;
it was an entirely new venture.
These leases were granted by the
“owners of over 340 estates and a
number of peasant proprietors
holding ten ‘acres or. less, Between
the years 1919 and 1940, the com-
pany drilled no fewer than fifty-





two wells, the greates: depth
reached belhg 4,015 feet. The
sroduction amounted to only

137,000 barrels, which, while not
a commercial gu tity, néverthe-
less confirmed the opinion of
eminent geologists that the island
had | gréat potentialities ‘a5 a
source of commercial oil ‘once
deep drilling had beén carried out,
In addition, nineteen exploratory

_| boreholes were drilled and ‘a vast

amount of geological survéy work
carriert out.

The total. expenditure by the
British Union, Oil. Company was
coughly £1,000,000, and the evi-
dence obtained for the expenditure
of this sum and the great amount
of work it entailed proved that oil
“an commercial quantities was not
available at shallow depths, and
it would be necessary to drill deep
down to 10,000 or 19,000 feet. The
company had this .» mind when
war broke out in 193% - and the
outbreak of war, of course, seri-
wusly interrupted its plang. I
vi sy nor poe - et | eee
ial equipment. In fact, permis.
sion to acquire it was refused.
‘ull report by the company’s
jeologist, the late Dr, Sehn, dated
January, 1941, Was given by the
sompany to: Sir Frank Stockdale,
Controller of the ‘West Indian
Development and Welfare Com-
mission, and forwarded by him to
he Colonial Office. here with a
ttpong "plea! for action, ~
: In June’ and July, 1941," the
jompany ‘made My Seen to
dis pubis s Government for
Jnited States dollars exchange
‘or the purpose of carrying out a

ophysical* survey in Barbados,

t this ee sed, and the
company, refore, had to break
off its negotiations with the United
States Reoph teal survey ¢on-
tractors. In 1945, the company
called for estimates from 4rilling
contractors in the United States
of America, and also approached
a contractor operating In Haiti. It
was evident that deep drilling was
qoing to be a costly business,
amounting, roughly speaking, to
somewhere between £250,000 and
£300,000 for each. well, and a
minimum of. three deep wells was
aecessary. The company felt that
it was not justified in incurring
such ex ess it could
certain t it would -be protect
against pirate competitors who
would not have borne: any. share
of the expense of the discovery.

in March, 1946, Colonial Sec-
retary in Barbados told the British
Union Oil Company’s manager
there that the Government pro-
posed to take over all underground
rights and that they would give
the company a prospecting licence
oyer the whole island. On July
28, 1947, the company’s manager
in Barbados interviewed the Gov-
eer. Sir Hilary Blood, who read
extracts from a dispatch to him
from the Colonial Office in Lon-
don, which document ‘suggested
at the Barbados Government
ight give the British Uniory Oil
pany a prospecting licence
the whole island in return for
fees they held. The Governor
utther stated that the Exécutive
Cothmittee had agreed to this pro-
posal, On December 21, 1950, the
oni Secretary
tegarding the ve, and on
January 19, 195}, I requested that
@ ¢opy of the document quoted by
Sir Hilary Bleod might be cited
‘me. On January 29, the Colo-
tial Secretary, thé right honour-
able Mr. Griffiths, refused,my -re=.
‘quest on the. grounds that ‘the
fdécument in question was.a dis-
atch, but he confirmed that ‘his
@decessor (Mr...Creech Jones)
hud suggested 10 Sir Hilaty Blood
that the British Union OH Com-
pahy might bé given’ an oi) pros
pécting licenée over ‘the: whole
island

Avery firm understanding
eXistéd and, relying on the,prom
lisés Innde .to.the effect that the
‘British Union Git Company

~






LB
——$ $<

was advised.

duced into the Legislature of
Barbados. This bécanie law orn
January 5, 1950. The Bill pro-
vides compensation for land own-
ers for loss of rights, but contains
no. provision for compensation for
less of rights to explore for oil,
et cetera, This means that the
company’s leases, Which gaye
them the right to explore for oil,
et cetera, were rendered valueléss
without cémpensation for the loss
of their rights. Such a provision
is quite unknown under British
ewe anywhere in the
world.

the youle ee seus area rs je
é méasures gover the nat
tionaélisation df Parioud*thaustries
in this Country, all of which have
rovided for compensation, how-
ver, inadequate, for the owners
of rights taken ovér by the Gov-
ernment. I would also refer your
Lordships to the case of the Irra-
waddy Fiotilia Company Limited;
whieh was
‘Government of Burma, when
compensation was paid, I would
also refer to the nationalisation
measures in Jugoslavia and
Czechoslovakia which took place
after the war, and to the strong
diplomatic action ta by 1
British Government whith résul
ed in. seturing | compensation
amounting te many millions of
pounds—! believe in the case of
Czechoslovakia the figure was
£8.000,000—for British interests
which were affected by the na-

tionalisation measures. Therefore,:
A jt seems that British interests be-

hifd the Iron Curtain can obtain
some measuré of support and pro-
tection from the British Govern-
ment for their properties, we a
company operating in a British
Colony can get nothing.

Tintnediately the Petroleum Act
was passed i

any applied for a ng
ficence, and also requested that a
provisional licence be. granted as
a drilling rig was reany at Trini-
dad to proceed to. Barbados to
commence deep drilling. To the
company’s astonishment, this was
refused, although the Governor,
then Mr. (now Sir) Arthur Sav-
age, stated, among other com>
ments, that he fully appreciated
that the company had a strong
moral claim for first consideration
for. an island-wide c on.
However, the Barbados Govern-
ment invited. Mr. Tanner, the
Minister of Mines in Alberta, to
come to Barbados to advise them
on. the preparation of petroleum
regulations under the Petroleum
Act, Apparently the Government
had already decided to grant a

taken..over by. the bY.8

taken ‘by the ‘

Barbados the com- ~

fiseated, .

“On Tune’, 1950, the company’s
representative saw the Permanent
Under-Secretary of State for the
Colonies: in London, but he could
make no practical svagesti 1s, be-
yond saying that if the company
would prepare a claim against the
Barbados Government, the Colo-
pial. Office would forward it to
Barbados, with comments on ques-
tions of fact only. At the samé
time, the Minister. must have
known Of the altered instruct
Which were sent to Barbados, an
were fost cértainly not in the
interests of this country. I have
ex ed a humber of, letters
with Colonial Secretary, but
have unable to ascertain ex-
actly what is meant by the offer
in q ion. It seems. to, me--and
Tam sure your Lordships will
agree—a wien ee time to put for-
ward any claim to We eco

mment unless it is backed

ive from thé Colorial
Secretary. Ih this connection,
may. say that I have made the
fullest inguiries, and have been
informed that, While Barbados has
a Legislative Assembly of its.own,
it is still administered throu
the Colonial Office
quently, is not ind dent of
Parliament, Inridentally, in one
letter Preceived from the Colonial
Secretary he réferred to Barbados
as Vitually a self-governing Col-
eny, which entirely substantiates
ihe Sette ra: pie tar re
Lordships, at the inning of my
speech. itt ebrrectly interpret this
reference, it means that a directive
from the Secretary of State would
have to be obeyed by the Legis-
jation in Barbados, but to put
ferward a Claim as suggested
would su e's be a waste of time.

The fast: letter.1, received from
the . Golonial, Secretary, capes
March: 2, 1951; in, effect ad c
that. the B.U.O.C. were promis-
ed the sole praspecti licence
when the Government decided to
nationalise the underground
rights . in . Barbados... It. was
further stated by the Secretary of
State that the Colonial Sécrétary
ih Barbados went so far as to in-
form oné of the local representa-
tives of the B.U.O.C. that the
Petroleum Bill then before the
Legislature was based on the
Lepper Ri , and that he would
consider himself bound by it un-
less and until he received con-
trary instructions from the Sec-
rotary - of ‘State., As the Lepper
Report , was’. departed. fro I
have asked the Secretary of State

ef

and, conse-





rospecting licence to more than Whether. instructions were given
es ee » A Mr. Bishop, who [0 this effect. from. tendon as
had been in the island some time reply, howeyer, is ve, on
and ‘was in close touch with the does: net) state ly what
Government, filed an application was dane, I now i for a reply
on behalf of the Gulf Oil pora- to that ion. that the
tion, an Amprican concern, The noble .wh@ is. to an-
Government decided. .to ads Bi. ay half Hit ajesty’s
Tanner's suggestions for wor’ overn: will be able to give
to plan, which meant applying the me some information to what
same conditions to the small was said. It was, I ink, the
island of Barbados as applied to Coloni 4 in Barbados,
the vast territories of Alberta, a -Mr,, Perowne, Who made that
deciston which, in all the circum-. statement. -~

stances, was manifestly absurd. As
a result of this decision the com-
pany were offered what amounted
finally to only 22 per vent. of t

drillable area of the island. Of

course, this was declined, . Prior ,

to this offer to the B.U.O.C., the
Gulf Corporation were made an

offer oho much the same terms and.

accepted, over, laid already ex-
plored by the B.U.0.C. and on the
very spots whéne they would hive
comimenced deep drilling had
they been protected.

1 know that it has been said-that
the B.U.O.C, started with 78 per

cent. of the drillable area, and I
also know that they had an offer
of 55 per cent. Let us just,study
that offer for a moment and See
whether that does not boil Aggie
dewn to 22 per cent, The offer
was for 55 per cent..of the, .w!

island, less strips of one mile wide,
dividing the island into four quar-
ters, these strips including drilly
able land. The offer was only for
licence. If exploratory work had
heen successful, lease would have
Heen groanted.of half. the avea
lieensed—-that is to say, 274 per
cent. of that aref, Which eduals
92 per cent. of the Whole islatid,
The offer was présénted as a last
word, atid in the shape of an ulti-
matum. In fact, the Gulf Cor:
poration subsequently - succeeded
in s€curing several important al+
terations in the conditions of their

Summarising thé position, the
B.U.0.C.’'s ¢ Md a Pe
‘or many years they he eases
ving full riiin rights over
the greater part of the drillable
. During a









it ‘hot beén Tor» dou!
work and’ exploration edrried 6

by the B.U.O.C. The Government
broke the promise given to thr
B.U.0.C. that the Lepper Report
would be, put ig operation and
that the B.UL0,C, wollld be. give’

fittiihg rignfs Ovér thé whole is-
land. Instead, they put ferward
ednditions for the granting of 8
licence to explofe. which were so
impossible that the company tad
no option but to rejett them. An

clined to part with their property,
the pipeline and so on, until the
compensation claim was settled.
The Barbados Government's. an-
swer to this was to pass the Nat-
ural Gas Corporation Act, 1950
Under Section 18 of this Act,
natural gas plant is transferred
to the corporation sét up by the
Government. This, I am sure your
Lordship will agree igs more
worthy of action in a totalitarian
State than in a democracy. In con-
¢lusion, I would call your Lord-
ships’ atention to the nt hai
penings in Persia, and to the staté-
ment made in this House and in
ee placé. This is the state-
ment: i

‘ ‘Tt, i4 uot the bis apa ihe Bate of
ne Government to take pos:
sible measures fo provect the legitimate
ritish commercial under-
taking overseas.”

This is, of Caen 8 fundamental
fact, ard it will be aj

that if a member of the Colonial
Empire, such as Barbados, is al-
lowed to confiscate without com-
pensation, rights acquired by a
British company, such as the

gh B.U.O-C., then, to say the léast,

it will be extremely difficult for
the British Government to object

similar action being. taken
against a British company by a
foreign Government. I feel confi-
dent that the position held by this
country over centuries for honest
and fair dealing will be upheld
by the members of the present
Government, and that they will
see that the necessary steps are
taken to ensure that full and ade-
quate compensation is paid to the
B.UO.C. for the compulsory tak-
ing away of their drilling rights
by the Government in Barbados.
My Lords, I beg to move for Pa-
pers,

Lord Milverton: My Lords, I
wish to offer a few brief remarks
on this Motion, latgely because F
view it from a slightly different
angle from that of the noble Lord
who has moyed it. I havé no per-
sonal interest in the British Union
Dil Company, but I have a con-
sidérable personal interest in Col-
onial policy and in the Tepe
of the British Government. I may
also, perhaps, say that I have had
personal experience in two or
three colonies of the introduction
of this model oil ordnance. As your
Lordships are no doubt aware, it
is, and has for long been, the pol-
icy of the British Government to
yest oil rights in various Colonies
in. the Crown, That is largely to
ensure efficient commercial ex-
ploitation of oil, And may I say
that I have never seen any pro-
ceedings in a Colony with which
I have been associa which
would compare With the way in
which this matter has been dealt
with in Barbados.

I do not wish te go again into
the facts of the ¢>3e, which, I un-
derstand, ar2 10: in dispute and
which have been stated by the no-
ple Lord, Lord Tevist, but I should
like to und@é@rline the absurdity of
going to the Mines Department of
Alberta for advice on how te deal
with oil concessions in Barbados.
As your Lordships possibly know,
the Alberta Goverment works on
what is known &s the “chequer-
board systém.” Under that sys-

, When oi) is found in com-
cial Quantities the area is di-
ded up intd sections. The pros-
tor gets alternate sections and
Government other alternate
fections, Which are sold by auc-
uioh. However well that kind of
ot may work in Alberta
ich is, I Understand, about
255,000 square miles in area—it
Obviously does not make any kind
ef sense in the is}and of Barbados,
Which has an atea of 166 square

les, .or, in other words, is 21

les in Jength by 14 miles at the

dest t. It is clear, I should

| Rave thought, that in that particu-

r island oil can be worked effi-

‘iehtly and commercially only by

oné consessionaive,

Having said that, on the facts,
the action of the Barbados Govern-
meént. reflects no credit on them or
oh their reputation for fair dealing.
Tshould like, if your Lordships will
beat with me, to say a few words
on the contention that jt was not
opén to the British Government to
intervene in this matter, on the
ground that they canhet intervene

There are other details I could
give to make the point clear, but
I do not think it is necessary. The
last Colonial Office List says ot
Barbados:

“This Colony possesses representative
institutions but not responsible Govern-
ment.”

The Crown possesses a veto over
legislation and the Secretary of
State retains power of appoint-
ment and eontrol of public officers,
except strangely @nough, of the
Treasurer, who is nominated by

P- the House of Assembly.

I suggest that one word of ad-

vice m His Majesty’s Govern-
ment to thé’ Governor, through
the Séerétary of State, would

have thé desired effect. Indeed,
why not? It may be, and T do not
doubt that it is, the policy of His
Majésty’s Government not to in-
terferé in the doméstic affairs of
such Colonies, as Barbados, but
surely, there is équally no doubt
that they can interfere, if oniy by
authoritative advice to the Gover-
nor, when a scandal, such as this
scems to be, occurs. As I see it,
this transaction transcends the
domestic scene, affects the reputa-
tion of His Majesty’s Government
and makes a mockery of the prin-
ciples of British justice, Wih ‘t
not be suggested perhaps that Jus-
tice has lost her blindness, once
the symbol of her impartiality, and
is now able to see, thaugh perhaps
only through her left eye?

Let me take one or two in-
stances. Suppose an _ injustice,
such as I conceive this to be, had
been done in Barbados to a group
of smallholders, is it conceivable
that His Majesty’s Government
would have said that it was power-
less to intervene? Suppose, if you
like, it was a more authoritative
body, something like the Co-opera-
tive Wholesale Society, a capitalist
organisation which has seen the
light, if only the req light; would
they not have the means of making
their views heard? Or let me
turn to the other side, and suppose
the position had been reversed;
that it was the American Company
which had been in the position of
the British.Union Oil Company
over those;twenty years, and they
had been treated in this manner;
and suppose, as undoubtedly would
have happened, that the American
Government had made representa-
tions about such treatment: is it
conceivable that His Majesty’s
would have said that they were
not able to do anything in the mat-
ter? I suggest that the answer is
plain.

So we come to this: a delicate
squéamishness against interference
at all with Colonies whose Govern-
ments havé wide powers of man-
aging their own affairs. That is
to me an altogether strange de-
tachment. Are the principles of
British justice and tair dealing be-
ing disregarded by the Barbados
Government? “Well,” say His
Majeésty’s Government, “they have
the right to do so, if they wish.”
And what is the melancholy moral
of all this? Surely it is that if Brit-
ish investors, want the protection
of His Majesty's Government they

ust go outside the British Bm

ire. It is 9 curious contradietion,
based pernaps. on populaf appeal
that the protection given in i
foreign country is denied in a
small Eritish Colony — patriotism
in the first place, and in the second,
more of the incense which has been
offered to the great idol of self-
overnment.- My Lords, the Brit-
ish Government are not really im-
potent. In these matters, “where
there’s a will, there’s away.” They
must accept responsibility for
their wards, and surely they must
curb such unhealthy manifesta-
tion of self-expréssion, There is a
grave side to the

of
of any real
policy: that

words and deeds to

ot her

the reignin

have to
that on one occasion there was a
pitched battle between the sup-

characters have
with this island, There was Sir
Henry M¢rgan who started, as
we know,
who ended u
sanctity as
island, as
noble
whose career sterted in somewhat
different
were Admiral Benbow, Admiral
Nelson, ‘and George Washington,
and ag it is the custom to-day to
take note of the views of U.S.
. citizéns I should like to say that

Si

the

country
House, one can well imagine that
the dominant
were people o
a ae ee ae of mind:
MK in fact, they raised the issue of
1 > ‘te case we are con- “no taxation without tenroaseii
Sidering. It is only one symptom tion” over a hundred years before
iany, a symptom of our lack the Boston Tea Party. The con-
and positive colonial stitution, as the noble Lord, Lord
divorce between Milverton, indicated, is an ancient
which the one.

I think your Lord-
ships will agree with me when I
say that the speeches of the two
noble Lords who have so far taken
part in the debate show that be-
hind this case is a constitutional
issue of some importance. The
case, so far as the company is con-
cerned, is q matter of deep con-
cern, but it is also a matter of con-
cern to us in this House, and to
many outside. There is a consti-
tutional issue here. Therefore, be-
fore coming to the actual events
as given by the noble Lord, with
many of which I agree, I would
prefer to.say something of the
background, because in this case
the background js of great impor-
tance. In the first place, as the
Noble Lord, Lord Milverton, has
told us, Barbados is a small island.
I can never picture what “so many
miles by so many miles” means,
and perhaps it is easier if we bear
jp mind that. the island,is a little
arger than the Isle of Wight. It
has a long association with this
country, and particulary with your
Lordship’s House, as I will show in
a moment.

The Island was first discovered
by the Portuguese in the sixteenth
century, and it was called Los
Barbados after the bearded fig
tree. That is 4 curious specimen
which I admit 1 have never dis-
covered myself, but apparently
there are bearded fig trees on the
island, and from those the name
derives. It was first discovered
for this country by Captain Cata-
line, of the good ship Olive Blos-

som, in 1625, and it was claimed

by him for “James, King of Exg-
land and of this island.” aA One
sion of adventurers went to the
Caribbean. The thirst for gold,
enmity towards Spain, jealousy
rich conquests, love of
acventure, the desire for freedom
of religion and hostility towards
powers in England
all played their part in actuating
the péople who went to Barba-
dos, and to other of our posses-
sions in the Caribbean. But, in
fact, this small island, which had
been bypassed by thé Spaniards
in their search for gold, was first
developed by a London merchant,
Sir William Courteen, who was a
protege of the Earl of Marlbor-
ough. Since that day many mem-
bers of your Lordships’ House
have been connected with this
island—the Earls of Marlborough,
Carlisle, Pembroke, Harewood
and Lord Willoughby. I regret to
inform your Lordshipa

porters of two members of your
Lordships’ House for possession

of the island, or of part of it,

Many famous and _ colourful

been associated

as.a buccaneer, and
p in an aura of
Governor~ of the
a predecessor of the
Lord, Lord Milverton,

circumstances, There

ashington ¢njoyed him-
: the a He Wis: made

a_me - of Beéfsteak. and
Tripe Club, which I understand
was a ocratic of; tion,

and moted in his diary:

“Hospitality and genteel behayiour is
hown to every Gentl y
Seaanehene’ mileman stranger by

With its connettion with this
and your Lordships’

arty in the island
some character

The House of Assembly was

noble Marquess who leads the Op- constituted in 1839, and it is the
position in this House has drawn Second oldest colonial legislative

attention before

body

in the whole Colonial Em-

Let me turn from Barbados and pire, being second only to Bermu-

this question of principle to the da.

West Indies-in general. There

is institutions,

It possesses répresentative

but mot completély

a growing feeling there that they responsible Government, bécause
g g

stand friendless

and impotént amid as the noble Lord, I

ra Milver







SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951



ton, said, the Crown ha av
9n_ legislation. ‘oes

Viscount Swinton: Has
power of certification? .. ..

Lord Ogmore: I am not certain
on that point, but I will find out.
This Executive Committee, which
a - smuaratively recent date,

whose constitution has been
described by Lord Milverton, is
the controlling organism in Bar-
bados. So we find that this
Colony is virtually self-governing
in domestic matters, aiihough on
matters of foreign policy and the
like, and ‘on any .- lations which
are not purely domestic, His
-Majesty’s Government are tho
controlling authority. 1 entirely
agree with the nobie Lord, Lord
Teviot, that ultimately, throug!
the Secretary of State, Parliament
has a responsibility for Barbados.
I do not for a moment attempt
to waive any responsibility, nor
do I want it to be thought that
we do not believe we should
answer for events in Barbados,
although, as I say, Parliament and
the Secretary cf State nowadays
have certain limitations to ‘he
Power which they had originally.
T'will deal with’ that point in a
moment.

‘The issue which is presented by
this case is one of the most im-
portant in the modern Colonia}
Empire. For years past, successive
Governments in Barbados of
whatever ‘Party colour they have
been, have supported the move-
ment for self-government, That
has not been sought by one Party
alone, but by all Parties, It may

* that one Party may think the
movement is going a little faster
than it would desire, but that isa
question of degree. The principle
has been agreed upon by all Par.
ties, This necessarily entails a re-
linquishment of power on the part

the Government of this coun.
try. It means that the Barbados
Government may do things which
we do not like. It also means that
we cannot intervene except in
cases of great constitutional im-
portance, In other words, we
cannot give a very great degree
of self-government and, at the
same time, interfere in what the
other Government do. It is an
extraordinary thing, but during
the time I ,was at the Colonial
Office I noticed one curious fact.
The very same people who en-
deavoured to persuade the Gov-
ernment to give more and more
power to colonial peoples, at a
pace which the Government did
not always think was advisable,
were those who, when anything
Nappened, wanted the Govern.
ment to make the maximum in-
terference, This sort of case came
up On more than one occasion
during that period. We had to
decide whether we thought it wise
to interfere in a case where the
Government had made a decision
with which we did not agree. In
other wards, could we risk a
constitutional. crisis over what
might be a comparatively small
matter, although a very import-
ant matter to those directly con-
cerned?

On the history of this particu-
lar dispute there is not very much
difference between us. I agree
very largely with what the noble
Lord, Lord Teviot, has _ said,
although there are one or two
differences which perhaps hi
should mention. The company
first applied for an allocation of
steel and dollars’ in 1941—as the
noble Lord has said—and that was
refused. In 1946 they applied for
protection. They took the view that
they were unable to incur heavy
expenditure on deep drilling,
without protection against com-
petitive drilling in areas over
which they had not a licence. I
expect the noble Lord would
agree with that. This request
necessarily implied, from the
company’s point of view, nation-
alisations of the mineral rights.
One point which the noble Lord
did not bring out, but which I
now want to bring out, was that
the whole of this affair develop-
ed from this application by the
company to be protected against
heavy expenditure on drilling in
areas over. which they had no
control.

Lord Teviot: The whole matter
arose for a very simple reason,
which I am sure every noble
Lord in this House who has any
knowledge of business will _ap-
preciate, It was that a company
proposing to spend about a mil-
lion pounds in preliminary pros -
pecting, want to be quite certain
that it has protection against
other people tapping its sources.

Lord Ogmore: I am not object-
ing,. and I am not saying that
the company were unreasonable
at all in ‘that viéw. I am saying
merely that this was not, as one
might have thought from the
speech of the noble Lord, a sud-
den desire on the part of the
Government for mationalisation.
It was an attempt, in the begin-
ning at all events—although we
shail see that there was a slight
slide away towards the end—to

it a





“T find Hornblower’ admirable”,
read the message from Winston
Churchill to Oliver Lyttelton,
Minisfer of State in Cairo, The
Prime Minister was aboard the
Prince of Wales on his way to
draft the Atlantic Charter with
President Roosevelt.

At Middle East headquariers
anxious officers searched their
files for some new operation with

meet the legitimate requirements
of the company to be protected
when they desired to do this extra
deep drilling. I think the noble
Lord will agree with me there
This request implied nationalisa-
tion of the mineral rights, be-
cause there was no other way in

which the ernment could
protect the “company against
competition. The company felt

that, unless they could get thi«
monopoly, when they got down
to very .great depths they would
be at the mercy of land owners
over whose land they had not
been granted leases. The noble
Lord may shake his head, but I
do not understand otherwise why
they appliet for protection in
this way. I thought it was com-
mon ground between us that they
did want protection. I do not
blame them, and I should feel
the: same way myself; but that
was’ the origin of this attempt bv
the Government to meet the com-
pany’s wishes.

Lord Teviot: I do not want to
interrupt the noble Lord unreces-
sarily, but let me just make this
matter clear, We had 78 pe. cent
of the drillable area. Outside that
78 per cent., there was 10 «vail--
able drillable area—it was moun-
tains, or land upon which ‘here
could be no oil. Therefore over
the island we had a cumplete
licence to prospect, and the noble
Lord will -see’ what Mr. Lepper
said,

Lord Ogmore: I really do not
understand why the company
applied to the Government in
respect of these other leases if
they were satisfied with what
they had. I do not understand
why they should go to the Gov-
ernment and say: “We want pro-
tection.” I do not agree with the
noble Lord on this oe I
should have thought that the
company, from their own limited
point of view, were entitled to
make a request at a time when
they were expending large sums
of money. I am not blaming the
company; I am only trying to
explain how this thing arose. |
hope the noble Lord will find that
I am fair to him when I try to
explain what happened,

In 1946, the acting Governor in-
formed the Secretary of State for
the Colonies of the situation, and
after some talk between them, in
April, 1947, the Secretary of State
for the Colonies replied to the
Governor suggesting that the
company might be given an oil-
prospecting licence over the whole
of Barbados. So far as His Ma-
jesty’s Government here were
concerned, they thought that the
company should have this pros-
pecting licence over the whole of
the island—that is common ground
between us. The Barbados Goy-
ernment reconsidered the question
of the vesting of the mineral oil
in the Crown, which had been in
abeyance since 1938, and the Sec-
retary of State suggested that they
should follow the example of the
United Kingdom Act, 1934, which
vests in the Crown_ property in
mineral oil in the United King-
dom, and provides for no com.
pensation to land-owners. The
Government published the Bill on
the lines of the United Kingdom
Act, offering no compensation,
and this, quite naturally, droused
some hostile criticism from land
owners. The Government invited
an oil expert from the United
Kingdom to advise. When Mr.
Lepper went there, he was not
merely advising on the question
of the B.U.O.C.’s leases and their
managerial operations, but also, I
understand, on the question of the
rights or otherwise of land owners
under the Act,

Lord Teviot:
to it. ‘

Lord Ogmore: I am coming to
that. In the meantime, the Gov-
ernor informed Mr, MacIntyre, of
the company, that they had de-
cided to introduce legislation. On
May 5, 1948, the Governor in-
formed Mr. Fitzgerald and Mr.
MacIntyre that no formal decision
with regard to the prospective
licence had been reached, and
that it was impossible for him to
say how the Committee would re-
act. Mr. Lepper went to Barba-
dos towards the end of 1948, hav-
ing been appointed by the Barba-
dos Government but on the re-
commendation of the Colonial
Office. After full examination of
the position, he recommended the
vesting of mineral oil in the
Crown and the grant of a pros-
pecting licence over the whole
island to the company in recogni-
tion of the amount of money that
had been spent. In January, 1948,
a representative of the Gulf Cor-
poration appeared in the picture,
and he also applied for a pros-
pecting licence. He said thai the
Corporation would be satisfied
with a licence over half the island.
The Gulf Corporation, as your
Lordships know, is a big Ameri-
can corporation. There is another
issue involved here, other than
that exposed by the noble Lord.
Before deciding, the Executive
Committee asked Mr. Tanner, the
Minister of Mines of Alberta, to

But he did refer



C. S. Forester —Talk

of English mythology. For through
his adventures, recorded in six
novels with a seventh to follow.
he has grown to almost life-like
stature in the . consciousness. 9f
millions of readers. +
It is almost distressing to re.
port, then, that his creator Cecii
Scott Forester, has no salt wa‘er
in his blood, comes from a family
of conscientious land-lubbers--
—doctors and. civil servants—is

codeword “Hornblower.” They awkward with engines and has

were. relieved to find that 1S never been in a sailing ship in his
cryptic signal was merely Mr. life.

Churchill’s way of thanking Lyt-
“I first concéived of the char-

telton.for a copy of C. S, Fores-
ter’s trilogy Captain Hornblower, acter when I became interested
RN. in the psychological problem of
It 1a haeed.:h Heep independent command”, Mr. > Fe.
would not inde en a * ester told me, addipg “I hope that
wnuual had the , WON CHG" Gogen’taotnd 100 Righbrow”
0" . ms ince seamanship in the days
cree adie tikes & fou 4 bg of sailing ships mats saiatively
iralty : Pr t . Forester de-
gard for the introspective, taciturn. 'S4eq it would be easier if his
courageous Captain Horatio Horn- hero was an insecure, self-critica’
blower and the tees Re and tligittiy con¥c character. “We
in whicl. he swept ‘ — a could then go through our doubts
foreigners during the Napoleonic together,’ he said.

Wars.
The Land-Lubber Although Hornblower has ‘sail-
There is a good chance, too, ed frigates and ships of the line
that Hornblower may some day through raging seas and fougnt
join Sherlock Holmes, Jeeves and the best that Spain and France
the Scarlet Pimperne! in the ranks could pit against him, Mr. Fores.



advise, and he formed the opinion
that it was in the best interests of
the. island that two companies
should have prospecting licences.
He felt, however, that the Gov-
ernment should first take the de-
cision on the claim of B.U.O.C> to
be granted an island-wide licence
on account of past operations. In
other words, Mr. Tanner decided,
on oil grounds, so to speak, that it
would be better to have the two
companies operating, but he said
that as there was a political mat-
ter involved—namely, the existing
leases of B.U.O.C.—it would be
better for me Government to de-
cide rather than that he should
advise. °
The Petroleum Act of 1950 was
passed, whereby the property in
petroleum in its natural condi-
tion in strata was vested in the
Governor in the Executive Com-
mittee. As a result, no person
may now search for or get petro-
Jeum except in pursuance of a
licence. This Act also made pro-
vision for the grant of compensa-
tion to the company for their two
producing wells previously men-
tioned—the only two vvells pro-
ducing in Barbados—or, alterna-
tively, for the grant to the com-
pany of a lease of the wells. The
B.U.O.C., of course, took some ex-
ception to this proposal, and they
presented their case before the
Executive Committee. After
hearing them, the . Bxecu-
tive Committee decided to
divide the island for oil prospect-
ing purposes into two parts—55
per cent. to B.U.O.C.—and_ they
proposed to give rights to prospect
to both BU.O.C. and the Gulf
Corporation. So they definitely
departed there from the recom-
mendation of Mr. Lepper. The
Government also resolved that, in
recognition of the part played by
B.U.O.C., they would give them a
licence over 55 per cent. of the
island, with a right to lease half
this area for twenty-one years,
if the lessees desired. They were
allowed to select this area: they
were given the ¢hoice of four
sub-divisions of the island for oil
prospecting purposes. The Gov-
ernment also offered B.U.O,.C. 50
per cent. of certain territorial
waters’ surrounding the island,
with similar rights as regards the
licensing. The Gulf Corporation
were offered a licence over the
remainder of the island and the
remainder of the territorial waters,
They were not offered this licence
prior to the offer to B.U.O.C.: it
occurred simultaneously,

The working conditions to
which the noble Lord, Lord
Teviot, referred were rather on-
erous. But there is no doubt that
these would have been relaxed if
B.U.O.C, had proceeded with their
lease. The reception of this offer
by the Government fell on stony
ground, so far as B.U.O.C. were
concerned. They stated in their
interview with the.. Attorney-
General that the offer was un-
acceptable, and after a number of
somewhat hostile references to
their competitors they rose
abruptly and left the room, This
broke up the discussions. The
Government decided to continue
the discussions. with the Gulf Cor.
poration, on the basis of a pros-

eting licence for half the island,
eaving the remaining half as a
Crown reserve. Eventually, the
Gulf Corporation were granted an
oil prospecting licence over half
the island and certain of the ter-
ritorial waters, the Corporation
paying a royalty on crude oil pro-
duced and a rental for land held
under lease—the normal basis for
Colonial leases, In an interview
at the Colonial Office in June last,
B.U.O.C. urged a claim for com-
pensation against the Barbados
Government on moral grounds.
They were informed that this was
a matter for decision by the Bar-~
bados Government, but that the
Secretary of State would forward
written representations. The com-
pany have not taken advantage of
this offer—in fact, as the corres-
pondence, a copy of which Lord
Teviot has kindly sent me, shows,
six months went by before the
next approach to the Colonial
Office. was made, by the noble
Lord. Until then, e Company
had not accepted the offer of the
Secretary of State or his repre-
sentative to send written repre-
sentations through the Colonial
Office to the Barbados Govern-
ment,

There is one other item that I
must mention here, because the
noble Lord made reference to it,
and it would be confusing if I
did not touch on it. In addition
to the Petroleum Act of 1950, an-
other Act was passed—namely,
the Barbados Natural Gas Cor-
poration Act of 1950. The Barba-
dos Government opened negotia-
tions with B.U.O.C. in April, 1950,
for the grant to them, in lieu of
cash compensation, of a lease of
two wells producing natural gas.
The company made certain stipu-
lations. They wanted certain
qualifications to the offer: first,
that during the term of the lease
no other, person should be allowed
to get or supply natural gas and,
secondly, that they should have
the right to open new wells in

___

CONSTITUTIONA

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



:

substitution for ext wells, if
these ceased ‘to acs
Government. could aceede to

this suggestion, which m
been in contradiction of"
Corporation’s licence and
The Gulf's pros)
specifically’ exeludes
gas wells. B.U.O.Cé dig
that this was sufficient
and they wanted,
tion. The "
able to _ th
was no. ate 4
wells ‘could have been ., tapped
from Gulf land, As regards the
natural gas, in this cage agai. $
OV-
to



Rave




in the case of petroleum, the
ernment were not pre

give B.U.0.C. a monopoly of na-
tural gas; and as a result they
passed the Gas Act which Ihave
méntioned, and have eularog sto
negotiations to purchase the -
pany's pipelines and ee n.
The company created di ties
about the basis of compensation,
but they have not submitted a
elaim under this Act, as they are
entitled to do.

The noble Lord, and also the
noble Lord, Lord Milverton, com-
mented on the fact that the Gulf
Corporation is an American
cern. In fact, since 1986, “it
been the policy of His M
Government to grant
rights to foreign sybj
to say, where their. Go
give certain rights to.our
and in 19. this. ey ek
tended to Colonial territories. We,
therefore, have no ground for dis-
crimination—even if we wished to
vexercise any—against the G
Corporation. I am so that the
noble Lord made a ererice to
Persia, which is a very delicate
subject at the moment>-~Apart
from the passing of the Natural
Gas Corporation Act, which es
them the right to take over the
two gas wells, all that the Barba-
dos. Government have done is to
nationalise mineral oil rights, and
it was done on more handsome
and favourable terms to the land
owners than_in this country under
a Conservative Government. So
I do not think one can that
there has been any question. of
bringing in a totalitarian State, I
am sure noble Lords opposti
would reject such an allegation.
Harsher measures Were passed
1934 than those passed by
Barbados Government.

Viscount Swinton: Iam not here
to argue about that. The analogy
does not seem to me to be exact,
because, so far as I understand
the noble Lord, Lord Teviot, he is
not complaining about the terms
on which mineral was nationalised
What he says is that, since the
company had rights granted by a








ie

_leasehold, when the State nation-

alised the mineral which was un-
der lease or under prospecting
licence, the State ought to take
them over stibject to those rights.
I should have thought that that was
a tenable proposition, and was not
at all inconsistent with the Act*we
passed on nationalising British oil.
I think I am right in saying that,
in our dealing with oil here, the
State took over subject. to any
rights which had been granted, IS
that not so? :

Lord Ogmore; That is not at
all, of course, what the B.U.O.C.
wanted. They did not want the
State to take over the rights of the
oil, subject to existing rights, be-
cause they were not satisfied with
the rights they already possessed.
They wanted more rights than
they had.

Viscount Swinton: And ended
by getting less.

Lord Ogmore: And ended by
getting less. I am sorry for them,
but that is what happened. In Per-
sia, as we know, the mineral oil
rights have been owned by the
Persian Government for some con-
siderable time—but I do not want
to go into that, because it is &
delicate subject. Then there was

a reference to the Irrawadi Flotilla:

Company; they were paid com>
pensation under nationalisation by”
the Burma Government, but not
by His Majesty’s Government.

Lord Teviot: No, I did not say
that.
Lord Ogmore; I do not want to

weary the House, I will come now
to my series of conclusions, and
try to sum up the position as fairly
as I can, As I see it, in the first
place, the company have no legal
right to compensation under the
Petroleum Act, 1950, for their ex-
propriated leases, It is unfortun-
ate, but I think it is agreed that
that is so, Im the second place,
the company have a legal right to
compensation under the Petroleum
Act, 1950, in respect of two wells,
and under the Natural Gas Cor-
poration Act, 1950, in réspect of
their pipeline. Thirdly, the com-
pany have broken off negotiations
with the Government, If I may
say so, I think they have beep
hasty in doing so. Also, they have
been dilatory in presenting their
request for compensation under



By MILTON

ter receives no complaints about
the tactics and techniques he em-
ploys.

All in the Book

He owes much of his informa-
tion to an old Admiralty manual
he picked up Portsmouth. “It is
a 1798 edition of a handbook for
he explained
“and not only tells you how to gét
a ship out of trouble but what
trouble it is likely to get into.”

master mariners,”’

Mr. Forester seems slightly sur-
prised that anyone should expect
him to know any more. “Acquir-
ing the appearance of knowledge
is rot a difficult thing,” he said
“It's mereiy a confidence trick,”

Such candour comes naturally
from a man whose ready laughter
and easy informality betray his
inability to take himself too seri-
ously. If it were not for the im-
pressive height of the almost

Gothic forehead you might guess youngest of five children in Cairo

that the tight face with its gold-
rimmed spectacles belonged to a
bank manager; a Solicitor ora
minor civil servant.

Fast Reader

C. SS. Forester was born

SCHULMAN



C. S. FORESTER

in 1899. His father was a Govern.
ment official and the boy did not
come to England yntil he was six,

From an unimpressive career a‘
the Dulwich College, Forester went on authorship and a series of succes:

napa Renter

s About “My Confidence Trick”



STORM

the Petroleum Act, and under the
Natural Gas Corporation Act, They
started this whole manoeuvre with
the intention of obtaining a mono-
poly, because they were not satis-
fied. I do not know why they
started it at all, unless they were
not satisfied with their existing
rights. The Colonial Secretary
made representations to the Barba-
dos Government to grant a pros-
peeting licence for the whole island

, to the Company, but the Barba-

40s Government did not agree, and
decided to grant them only 55 per
cent, of the area under prospecting
licence,

There has been no preferential
treatment of a foreign company.
Under the constitution and by
practice, the Government and the
Legislature have wide powers in
internal affairs. For the Colonial
Secretary to have enforced his
wishes, overriding the Executive
Committee, would have been in-
compatible with modern trends in
Colonial administration. I was
rather surprised to hear from the
noble Lord, Lord Milverton, a view
which from ‘my experience of him
(I was not in office when he was
a Governor, so-I can say this; I

| Was a private Member of Parlia-

ment) is quite incompatible with
what he would have thought of
this matter if he were the Gover-
ner of Batbados. -It would: be a
bold Secretary of State who would
have overridden the noble Lord.
Lord Milverton, and his Executive
Committee during his period as a
Governor. I think his change of
scene from the West Indies here
has also changed his views greatly
ina matter of this kind.

It is true that on occasion, in
matters of great constitutional im-
portance, @ course such as has been
Suggested to us by two noble Lords
would have to be taken, but I do
not think one can be expected to
take such a course on matters ot
other than great constitutional] im-
portance, In my view the com-
pany would be well advised to ac-
cept the suggestions that I am
about to make. I suggest, first o1
all, that the company should re-
open negotiations with the Barba-
dos Government for the grant of
a prospecting licence over the re-
mainder of the island. I suggest,
secondly, that they put -in their
claim for compensation under the
Petroleum Act and the Natural
Gas Corporation Act, because it
seems to me that to charge the
Government of Bartbados with
harsh treatment, and to describe
them in the way in which they
have been described by the two
noble Lords who have spoken, is
somewhat extreme when one re-
members that it is the company
who have broken off negotiations,
I would suggest that they re-enter
negotiations on both the matters
to which I have referred, and I
am sure that the Colonial Office
will assist them so far as possible.
I realise the disappointment that
the company must necessarily have
felt over this matter, but I think
that in their own interests, and in
the interests of good relationships
between the business world of
this country and of the West
Indies, they should reopen negoti-
ations on these matters, in order to
see what decision the Barbados
Government will in fact come to.
It may be that in the course of
negotiations the company will be
able to obtain a more liberal .wffer
than has so far been the case, As
we who have had any dealings
with business all know, once you
break off negotiations, the other
party does nothing at all about
reopening them, Whilst negotia-
tions are on, there is always a: pos-
sibility of good treatment from the
other side.

Lord Teviot; My Lords, I must
thank the noble Lord for his
answer to my Motion, but I fear I
am not at all satisfied with it, For
a few moments I should like to
refer to some of the things that the
noble Lord has said. To begin
with, I cannot believe that it was
wrong for a British Company to
go into a British Colony like Bar-
bados and prospect for oil. In
order to do so, we had definite
property, in that, as I have already
told your Lordships, we obtained
from land owners leases over 300-
odd properties, We have given up
that property. We were induced to
give it up by the assurances which,
as the noble Lord will admit, we
received through the Lepper Re-
port. If we had anticipated that
this sort of thing was going t»
happen, we would not have give.
up those leases and we would have
objected to the Petroleum Bill, but
we did not do so because we had
every confidence in the assurance
of the Governor and his Executive
Committee at that time. We gave
up our preperty in view of the
assurances which were given here

to spend three years studyin”
medicine at Guy’s Hospital. His
inability to identify bones and his
desire to write combined to pre-
vent his entering the medical pro.
fession.,

Searching for an explanation for
his interest i: writing. Mr. For-
Tester attibutes it largely to the
fact that his home was close to a
‘public library. I think I read
everything in that library except
the books on philosophy and mu-
sic,’ he said. “Gibbon impressed
me most,

He is still an omnivorous and
amazingly fast reader. He can
go through an average novel in
an hour arid a half, He still avoids
philosophy and music,

Odd bits of verse, articles for
trade magazines and. two bad his-
torical novels of the Napoleonic

mened earned him a precarious
ivelihood until 1926 when _his

neat and exciting murder story.
Payment Deferred, was published

It was converted into. a play star-
ring Charles Laughton, filmed in

Hollywood and still sells more
than 2,000 copies a year.

That turned him

to full-time

and over there. The. Colonial
Secretary has said he was bouno
by the. Lepper Report, and we
thought that we were quite safe
in giving up those leases. The
noble Lord may say that we broke
off negotiations: but what is the
good of talking to people who do
not stand by their bargains! You

cannot on doing it.
I would like to correct the noble
Lord on his remarks regarding

gas. The gas question is still the
subject of negotiation, Nothing has
been broken off there. I will tell
the noble Lord the reason why we
wished to be careful about gas, As
I understand it, the gas comes
through a fault, and we wanted to
be quite certain that a certain area
round the fault could not be tapped
by somebody else. If it were tap-
ped, they would get the gas which
otherwise would come through to
us, That was quite a reasonable
view, and one which any business
man would have taken. It was
quite a reasonable thing to ask, It
is all very well to say that we may
have been a little tiresome about
this matter, but we never-had the
offer that the Gulf Corporation
have now obtained, We received
an offer. which, ..from a business
point of view, was perfectly hope-
less. The Gulf , Corporation ac
cepted the offer. and ‘subsequently
obtained a very much better cne

Lord’ Ogmore: My point was that
in the first place the British Union
Oil Compgny had a slightly better
offer than the Guif Corporation
were given — 55 per cent. as
against 45 per cent. In the second
place, through negotiation the Gul:
Corporation managed to get much
better terms, and it’ was rather
foolish of:the British Union Oi)
Company not to have entered inte
further negotiations instead 0;
breaking them off in order to ob-
tain the same result,

Lord Teviot: The noble Lore
will remember that we held leases
over 78 per cent. of the area anc
we were cut down to 22 per cent
I thought I explained very clearly
that the 55 per éent. merely mean:
22 per cent, The noble Lord will
see that that is so.

Lord Ogmore: I know,

Lord Teviot: That is a fact, an@
this is something you cannot pass
over as being a fair deal, f am not
throwing any stones at the Gulf
Corporation, They were perfectly
right. They went in and hr
Bishop negotiated for tiem. We
know all about that, "hey man.
aged to complete a deal whieh
has proved very much to their
advantage, I think tnat Lord
Milverton made = an_ exccilent
point. I wonder what the Govern.
ment would have done if the
Barbados Government had treat.
ed the Gulf Corporation as thev
have treated us.. It would have
been a very different matter, J
can see the United States repre.
sentative here making a great
song and dance about it, if they
had received the treatment we
have,

The noble Lord concentrated on
the question of protection. In the
early part of my life I was a miner
in Canada, America and South
Africa, and I know all about
“pegging out” and getting «
preliminary licence to prospect
But immediately you get on tc
anything that is of value, thér
you want to get protection, You
want to see that you get what you
have found and that somebody
else is not going to tap what you
have discovered. Sir Hilary Blooc
with his Executive Committe:
endorsed the Lepper report; Mr
Perowne said he was bound by it.
We have reached a most unfor-
tunate. state, if a British under-
taking in any part of the Empire
is not going to be protected bs
the home Government where it
is possible under the Constitution
for it to be protected, I am afrain
that, as the noble Lord has told
us, we can entertain no hope oi
receiving any assistance from the
Colonial Office here in regard tc
what I consider to be our out
standing claim for compensation
That is all I have to say, It appears
that we shall receive no help, «5
we must reconsider our position
I thank the noble Lord for the
suggestion at the end of his
speech. We will seriously con-
sider it; but it does meaa that

whatever happens, unless the
Gulf Corporation are out of ovr
way, we shall get o very riv

deal after the expenditure of a
large amount of money, I am no*
going to ask the House to divide
but I am not going to withdraw
the Motion,

MADRAS.

A Rajkot shopkeeper recently
fired all his assistants on the spo,
Reason? They refused to shav«
their heads clean.’ The shopkeep
er had a clean shaven head an
insisted on his servants shavin
theirs also,



ful novels that switched from
mystery to history for their plots
—Brown on Resolution, Plain Mur-
der, The Gun, The African Quee
Queen, .

In 1932 he accepted a 13-weel
contract at $500 a week to write
film seripts in Hollywood, It was
a job he did annually after that
until tie war came, “They would
give me a star, a locale and a few
other factors and I would provide
a plot,” he said. “Every week in
Hollywood gave me a month of
freedom elsewhere.”

Ifttdentally the original treat-
ment of the Hornblower film now
to seen in the West End was
wrt by Forester in 1939 for
Leslie Howard. Hig comment on
the film’? “I think they got too
maity battles in it, but it could
have been lots worse.”

£15,000 A Year

Forester’s reputation as a story-
teller and the popularity of his!
novels—he earns between £15,000
and £20,000 a year—has tended to
obscure his more solid achieve-)
ments as a perceptive and imag-}

.

inative writer. |

World Copyright Reserved

—LES. j





PAGE

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PAGE TWELVE

Prize List Of
Horticultural Show

E PRIZE LIST of the Orchid

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951





a REE





: VENEZUELAN JOURNALISTS

EOL ESLEE LSE LOSS



SOVHOSS”

sl Fon BETTER
| COOKING

‘FLORENCE
OIL

STOVES

AND



Sections at the Barbados
Horticultural Society Show at
Queefi’s bark on Saturday, April

21, is as follows:
FLOWERS IN POTS
Cattleya Laelia—ist, Mr. D, BE. W. Git

tens.
Cattleya Hybrid—Iist, Mr. FA
2nd, Mrs. LK. Nicholls.

Cattleya © Skinneri—ist, Miss ©. Da
Rocha; 2nd. Miss B. Chenery

Cattleya Species—ist. Mr. V. Marson;
Qnd, Mr. F A _ Hunte

Dendrobium Phajoenopsis—ist, Mr. R
F. Parkinson Jnr

Dendrobium Species—ist, Mr. F. A
Hunte; 2nd, Mrs L. H Nicholls
Dendrobium Superbiens—2nd, Miss B.
Chenery.

Dendivbiur Supérbum—2nd, Mr. H. N
Leacock

Oncidfum Species—ist fr. E. « Wily
kie.

Oncidium Papilio—tst M A Ww
Hutchinson; 2nd, Mr H. B. Bannister
Phalaenopsis Hybrid—ist, Mr. H N
Leacoek; 2nd, Miss B Chenery
Phalaenopsis Species—ist, Miss O. Da
Rocha; 2nd, Mr. H. B. Bannister
Schombruekia—2nd, Mr. H. N. Leacock.
Spathoglottis—ist, Virs. P. B, O'Neal;
{nd, Mr. H B_ Bannister

Vandas—ist, Mrs. P. B. O'Neal

3 different Species—ist, Mr. R. F. Par-
kinson.



WE PRESENT
For the First Time in Barbados
BAVARIAN SILVER

PORCELAIN

— ALSO—
New and Large Shipments of :









a









CUT FLOWERS 5 Royal Crown Derby
ae Skinnerii—ist, Mr WwW H Bone China
Cattleya he s—Mrs. W, HW. Grar — AND —
num; 2nd, HN Leacock , ; \ [
penarobium Hybrid—ist, Mr. R. F Crown Staffordshire O E N S
- Parkinson. pnalenopsis—tst, Mrs. 1 THESE four Venezuelan journalists and an interpreter Mr. Carlos Rodriguez (extreme right) were { Bone Shine
L. ee. " RPS Se instransit through Barbados yesterday by B.W.1A. enroute to Venezuela. ' e
| aor ot, - V"Marson ye a : They are Mr. F. Carmona, Mr, Jose Machado, Mr. Carlos Lézenna and Mr. Oscar Lovera. see Carib. ! Beautiful China
sieanarshium Sunerbjens Y at its very best oe
si << OUR READERS SAY: ; = A
gawock: 2nd. Mr HN, Lescol Og ) ‘ Labour <. 1
Barrow! 2nd, Mr ef Parkinson ' O IS BAY EY ( (i GE TRADING (‘0
Oncidium Species-Ist, Mis ". Sher + ‘ e e , .
herd: 2nd, Miss E. Shepherd Thanks spent, say in helping to_ check C e L U Li L
“Gchombrugkia—ist, Mrs.I. W. Chand- the alarming expansion of Russian ommissioner Jewellers
Nee ee ott 2 pene oeas: dhe; 10, FRC Editor, The Advocate-- Communism, which constitutes a Ld r OF ;
Mrs P O'Neal, | Neal; 2nd, " SIR,—Permit me space in your positive threat to our freedom? S, and do LID
Vandas—ist, Mr. H. N. Leacock; Mr. journal to express my sincere The thought terrifies me. ays eee e Bolton Lane and Barbados Aquatic Club ie .

RR... Parkinson.
A OV —i1st, Mr. R. F. Parkinson;
2nd, Mr, H. N. Leecock

3 different Species—ist, Mr. R. F. Par
kinson; 2nd, Mr, R. F. Parkinson
Collection—1st, Miss E. Shepherd; 2nd,

Mrs. Hutchinson.
Button Hole—ist, Mrs. I, W. Chandler;
2nd, Mrs. P. O'Neal





Corsage—ist, Mrs. L.. A. Worme; 2nd,
Mrs. P. O'Neal

Cup presented by the Barbados Orchid
Circle to members was won Migs "0
Da Rocha for Phalaenopsis Stewartiena

MUSIC EXAM RESULTS
The results of the Practical Ex-
amination of the Royal Schools of
Musié, taken by Mr. H. Wilson,

are as follows :—

Pupils of Mr, Gerald Hudson Hon
A.R.C.M—J. A. F. Cole. Grade 11bM;
G. M E. Yard, Grade VP, N. F Cum-
berbatch, Grade VM; E_ Williams,
Grade VM; G C. Moe, Grade VII M;
A. Goddard. Grade VII P; J, O. P.
Vaughan, Grade VIII P; R. A. Hudson,
Grade Vill M; J. Reed, Grade Vv M; F.
M. Best, Grade 1V M; C. P_ Spencer,
Grade II M; P_ Cc Goddard, Grade T P;
M. D. Gibbs, Grade V_P; B. S. Goddard,
Grade lll P: G S Gibbs, Grade V M

Pupils of Miss Deane—C Gill, Grade 1

Pupil of the Ursuline Convent -B. Fer-
raira, Grade TI P.

Pupils of Miss E, Maxwell D. E. Fos-
ter, Grade III M; W. M. Thomas, Grade
IIL P.

Pupils of Miss £, Parkinson—E. Dottin,
Grade Ill P: B. Konigsburs, Grade I! P;
J. Dottin, 0.P.

Codrington High School—S. Rodriguez,
Grade Ill P.

Pupils of Mr. Millingten--P. Bayley.
Grade II M, Violin; D Byer, ‘Grade Tt
M, V'olin; G. Moe, Grade IV D, Violin;
W D Harris. Grade V D, Violin

Puplis of Mrs, M. Benfield—F. A,
Smith, Grade 11 P; P. N. Worrell, Grade
I P; BE, Armstrong. Grade IV P; S. H.
Grimith, Grade V P; R. EB. C. Moe Grade
v

Pupils of Mr. § Corbin, L.R.S.Mp-A
Mellowes, Grade VII P; J. Layne, Grade

Iv_M.

Pupils of Mrs, Sidney Payne- FP E
Clarke, Grade Il P; J. P Holder, Grade
Til P; N. D. Moore, Grade Ill M; M E
Clarke, Grade IV P; J. I. Clarke, Grade
VP.

REMANDED WITH BAIL

ERIC GREEN of Thornbury
Hill, St. Michael was remanded
with bail until May ‘1, by a City
Police Magistrate after he was



i4anks to all those who have
issisted in teaching me in the
craft of printing, and to Mr,
( Parris in particular who took
a keen interest in teaching me the
linctype operation and mechanism.

During my term in the priating
craft, I have made many friends
to whom much gratitude is owed
for their inspirations in making
my five-year training a success.

I must say, I selected printing
cut of the six trades then offered,
without having any idea what it
was all about. Now I have finished
my coutse I have ho regrets,

As for the Bursaries Board, my
thanks is due for their appreciable
help in awarding twenty-four
bursaries yearly to boys, in this
island, I hope that in the near
future the number of bursaries
granted will be increased to ot
least thirty, owing to the large
number of applicants yearly. And
I look forward in the not too dis-
tant future to see at least two
beys granted a further term to
take an advanced course in fhe
U.K. or some other country. This
apples chiefly to those boys who
have gained certificates in printing,
engineering and electricity. I also
hope that the Board will see to it
that these journeymen are always
provided with work.

Thanks is also due to Mr.
Theobalds, Acting Director of
Education for so kindly presenting
us with certificates, and Mr.
Payne for his kind and advising
words in his address to the boys;
also to Mr. Weekes our Secretary
for his great interest in the wel-
fare of the boys.

KEITH W, DEANE.
Upper Collymore Rock,
St. Michael, 16.
April 27th, 1951,

Misspent
To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—1I read with interest the
article under the caption “English

“DISGUSTED”

April 27, 1951.

“B.A. F. A. Bungling ”
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The BA.F.A._ accepted
an offer from Mr, Wilkes of the
Lodge School to coach and train
24 local footballers at Kensington
in preparation for the forthcom-
ing Jamaica tournament, Mr.
Wilkes’ requirements were sim-
ple, i.e., eight footballs, two or
three dozen wicket-sticks, a
blackboard and a piece of chalk.

The first afternoon for practice,
Wednesday 25th in&t., found Mr.
Wilkes at Kensington and the
selected’ players eagerly waiting
to go out for their coaching at-





Readers who write letters
to the Editor of tha
“Advocate’”’ are asked to
note that this newspaper
does not normatly publish
letters which are not exclu.
sive to this newspaper.

Contributors to OUR
READERS SAY who write
under a nom-de.plume are
reminded that their names
must be sent to the Editor
as a sign of good faith.
Names are never disclosed
but are treated as confiden-
tial by the Editor, except in
Signed letters,





tended by Messrs, Kelly Foster,
O, S. Coppin and Christie Smith
from the B.A.F.A. But Mr.
Wilkes did not require Messrs.
Foster, Coppin or Smith. What he
wanted were the eight footballs,
the two or three dozen wicket-
sticks, the blackboard and the
piece of chalk and not one single
of these articles was produced by
the B.A.F.A. You will agree,
Sir, that it is beyond the realms
of possibility to use Mr. Foster
ag a blackboard, or to substitute
Mr. Coppin for eight footballs or
even to use Mr, Smith in place

Mr. E. S. S. Burrowes, Labour
Commissioner told the Advocate
yesterday that air transport com-
panies have been asked to tender
for the transportation of workers
from the various colonies to the
U.S.A. during 1951.

He said that the reaping of the
sugar crop is progressing satis-
factorily and the workers both in
the fields and factories are work-
ing well.

The water front workers have
also been busy during the week
loading sugar.

He said that most unemploy-
ment figures are subject to some
error, but this does not say that
such figures cannot indicate
trends, As stated in his interview
with the Advocate on Wednesday,
thefe are over 6,000 men on the
live register and he is satisfied
that there is considerable unem.
ployment in the island.

DEATH INQUIRY
ADJOURNED

Further hearing in the inquiry
into the circumstances surround.
ing the death of 43-year-old
Berkeley Hoyte of Haggatt Hall
will be resumed at District “B”
Court tomorrow morning at 10.00
o'clock,

Hoyte's body Was_discovered on
Bulkeley Road shortly after 12,15
am. on April 22. His motor
eycle was lying a little distance
from him, Post em evidence
will be given by Dr. E. L. Ward.





small bit of ground behind the
goal posts, as no arrangements
seemed to have been made by the
B.A.F.A. to obtain the use of
the football field for the evening.

Boiling it all down, the B.A.F.A.
have obviously made no effort to
help Mr. Wilkes in his kind and
generous offer mor have they

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN





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FPP EEE EEE EEE EEE PE EEE Ee POA APOLLO OOO | 7 FORD a a





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“1 1|% FRENCH LINE OFFERS
oe la s BARBADOS|JAMAICA CRUISE .
eng ©) 1% ON EVERY SOUTHBOUND SAILING %
pth Ser a OF THE LUXURY LINER








A WHOEVER THOSE CROOKS ARE, THEY'VE CLEANED OUT THE
GET GU 2

ME. TELL LONE RANGER ABOUT
ROBBERY. MAYBE THIS SAME
GANG HIM TRAIL FOR,
LONG TIME!



S.S. COLOMBIE S

-

TEN DAYS OF UNFORGETTABLE ENJOYMEN 3

POSSE OUT % WELL EXAMINE THE REAR OF





CLUES THE LAWMEN @
; AS _OVERLOOK: 2





“\

Minimum Rates



Sailing Dates

SOOO GOPPOOGOSS

FIRST CLASS ei fey 2 ee.
$218.00 fed AON nae ane July 1th x

a

2ESDSSSSCSSSSSS GSS SOG SS SOOO

CABIN CLASS
$164.00





August 22nd ‘

























: October 3rd &

‘ %

a ae : .)

| e 3 TOURIST CLASS x

pal ie a November 13th &

i or NED > .

YOU HEARD ME--I 1 Wekaer I ST NES % $ 5
WANT TOUTS GIVE || BUT-MAGGIE-My HAPPENED- a we ee ¥ 104.00 x
MY COUSIN EVAN BUSINESS OUTLOOK ; aR de ir Me %s %
STEVEN A JOBIN || IS BAD ENOUGH ; ‘ Oar IN, eo % ; 6 " %
Your OFFICE- -_/| WITHOUT HAVIN) TO { x Te Eve! (a, 7. |. x Shore Excursions arranged in advance for Trinidad La Guaira, Curacao, a
Lae j 4

f x Cartagena and Kingston, Jamaica. { %

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% For Further Particulars, Apply to: R. M. JONES & Co., Lid %

x $ ‘ »

% Agents: Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, Tel. 3814 >

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y Osbb 9696666 60> *
LE CS9C9 OD POOP OPPOSE EEO PEPE EPPS OSD LLP LOLA LLLLL ILLIA AAI EP



























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{N ‘TEN MINUTES/ E aT 3 7 BZ
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_BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS
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sy Cope 1951, King Features Syndicate % $

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RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND $s g
* °
= ee " ‘ ss ; , iti iii pbtbci tines becomming > >
; ee §=6YOU FOOL! 1T WON'T IT WILL...WITH THIS DISTRIBUTOR J yy Fa D YOU RE A PRETTY SMART COOKIE, % $
= ies START! 3 CAP! I TOOK THE fy “Nita AREN'T YOU, MR. KIRBY ? I HAVE @ % %
ToL TELL ER : SOMETHING,TOO! THE KEY To CUTTLES & %
YOU WHY I LET HIDEOUT WHERE HE STASHED Mla ‘ x
JOE SEVEN GET AWAY te THE STOLEN MONEY! _ j el iy 3
WITH CUTTLE... BECAUSE % 3
WE CAN BEAT THEM .% g
ASHORE IN YOUR % %
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° at THERE GOES THE BET“AND WHY,| NEVER HEARD DAVE ~ WHAT'S TNT \VE BEEN A te 8
h ants a1 Ra EVERYTHING | OWN*BUT UNCLE DAVE TALK MORE THAN (IN THE CAR HAVE STUPID OLD x >
BUTUNCLE DAVE, YOU YY FORGET THOSE GAMBLERS ARE SET LIKE THAT , HES TELLING. | 1000 WITH DIANAS {i AN* sTUP 1D ‘Q x
WERE SO ANXIOUS ABOUT IT, ON STOPPING HER+ | - BEFORE +~ B ILLTALK TO HIM. | {CHANNEL SWIM if ve STUPID! & xs
FOR ME TO SWIM DIANA. | FOR- WON'T RISK HER m r yi Vee yo % x
THE CHANNEL+~ BID YOU TO Beet oan" 1 1S 3
por! A 2 v i% 3
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a hs 1 ts easy with A. K. POMADE. Even without any experience you can make your hair xe
Hi | smart and attractive in the styles you have always longed ,to copy, because A. K é
7 1 POMADE is simple to apply and use, and makes your hair soft, lustrous and easy t x»
1% manage. Why not try A. K—you'll be glad you did %
| Pd ?
; A.K. POMADE
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§ | PSOE STOKES & BYNOF LTD Agents 0 66666 656566 OOOO OL PES0



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PAGE FOURTEEN



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508





For Births, Marriage or Engagement
@mnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for amy number of words
up te 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.80 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Netices obly after 4 p.m.

The charge fer announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and in Memor. notices 1s
$1.50 on week-days and $1 on Sundays
for any number ef words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
sdditional word.

DIED

April 26th 1951, at his
“Bacheior Hall”, St. James,
Mr, Clarence Ver Valen House, His
funeral took place at the Holetown
Cemetery, St. James Parish, Barbados.
Dudiey Phelps. 29.4. 51—In

ie

THANKS

HOYTE — We the undersigned beg to
thank all of those kind friends who
sympathised with us in the loss of
Berkiey Hoyte of Haggatt Hall.

Iris (wife), Agnes Hoyte (mother), Lynch

Hoyte \father), George, Morene, Elene,

Pegsie, Keith and George (children).

29.4.51—1n.







HOUSE—On
residence







PHILLIPS—The Phillips’ family beg
through this medium to return thanks
to all those kind friends who sent
wreaths, letters of condolence, or in
any other way expressed their sym-
pathy in our recent bereavement,
caused by the death of Wesiey Van
Oppenheim Phillips. 29.4.51—1n.



IN ' MEMORIAM
S_
“DEANE — In loving memory of our dear
sister Justine Eudora Deane who
denarted this life on April 28, 1950
“Some think you are forgotten
We see your face no more
But in memory you are with us
As you were ever before.”
Miriam Griffith, Alicia Deane (Sister),
and relatives. 29.4.51—1n

LOWE — In ever loving memory of my
datling Collis Lowe, 11 months, who
was called to higher service on April
23rd, 1948.

You are in a sweeter, dearer home
in yonder happy Land.
Ever to be remembered by Enid Sobers







(Mother), Annie Sobers (Grandmother),
Shirley and Irmin (Sisters), Lance and
Alva (Brothers) Bannisters Ld,, St.
Michael. 29.4.51—1n.



GOVERNMENT. NOTICES



FIRE BRIGADE
Recruiting to fill two (2) vacan-
cies in the Fire Brigade will take
place on the Parade Square, Cen-
tral Police Station, at 10 a.m. on
Thursday 3rd May, 1951.
Applicants must.be 5 ft. 8 ins.
in height and of an educational
we of not less than standard
Il.
Salary $52.00 to $80.00 per
month plus free uniform.
Applicants are requested to
bring their educational certificates
and testimomals with them.
R. T. MICHELIN,
Superintendent of Fire
Brigade.
Bridgetown Fire Brigade.
2ith April, 1951.



THE MAYOR AND TOWN
COUNCIL OF NEW
AMSTERDAM, BERBICE,

BRITISH GUIANA

Invite applications from Mechani-
cal and Electrical Engineers for
the post of

CHIEF ENGINEER TO THE
COUNCIL

Applicants, who should be
quaiined Mechanical or Electrical
Engineers and have had good ex.
perience of internal combustion
engines, will be required to ad-
minister and supervise the Coun-
cil’s engineering services com.
prising a suction producer gas

- engine and Diese) driven electric
power station with an installed
capacity of 596 K.W’s, the 2,300
votts primary, 110—220 volts sec
ondary, 60 cycles alternating cur-
rent overhead electricity distribu.
tion system, the ‘Water Works
pumping plant (250 h.p.) and the
water mains system; and exercise
general supervision over the work
of the Couneil’s. Town Superin-
tendent.

Previous experience in an
executive capacity is necessary
and preference will be given to
applicants who are, or are eligible
for, corporate membership of the
Institutions of Mechanical or Elec.
trical Engineers. Experience of
Suction Producer Gas and. Diesel
engines would also be an advan.
tage.

Applicants must not be more
than 45 years of age and must
state age and nationality in their

‘ applications. The person selected
for appointment to the post will
be required to submit himself to
a medical examination as to his
fitness.

The salary of the post is £1,000
per annum, and free current for
domestic purposes is provided.

The appointment which will be
on the basis of a three-year con-
iract inthe first instance, is sub.
iect to the previous approval of
the Governor in Council of the
Coleny of British Guiana, and
carries leave privileges at the
rate of one month for each year
of service. Passages for the
Engineer, his wife and up to two
children will be paid in the case
of a successful applicgnt resident
outside of British Guiana.

Applications which should be
addressed to the wndersigned
must be received in New Amster-
dam before the 26th May, 1951.

D. DOW,
Town Clerk,
New Amsterdam, Berbice,
British Guiana
27.4,.51.—3n,

“1 BOR LONGER SERVICE

TAR all posts before erecting.
A small quantity of this
Bo t preventative

material still available
Price 40c, per gallon.
Some To-day.

Get

OORT INTIS

FOR SALE

CRUSHED
_ STONE & FINES
IDEAL FOR CONCRETE,



AND MAKING ROADS
3 AND PATHS,
Apply ...
J. N. HARRIMAN
& CO., LTD.,
Seawell.
Phone 8444, Extension 8
$ 26.4.51.—7n i

Acting Secretary, Governing Body,
Harrison College.

at your GAS WORKS, Bay St. |

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundoys 24 words — over
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundews

AUTOMOTIVE
CAR—“One (1) 6 Cylinder two seater
De Soto. Suitable for making pick-up.
Tyres very good. Engine in good work-
ing order. Phone 3430." 27.4.51—3n.









CAR—1938 Buick 8 cyls, in
mechanical condition and good tyres.
Suitable especially for hire. Dial 4616.
26.4.51—6n.

CARS—-Do you want to buy a good
secondhand car? If so we ean offer jou
a 1949 Hillman, done 14,000 miles and
189 Morris Oxford, done 19,000 miles,
Both cars in excellent condition. Ring
4908, B’'dos Agencies Ltd.

29.4. 51—6n

WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 9743. 22,4.51—t..n,

FURNITURE

At Ralph Beard’s Furnishing Show-
rooms, Hardwood Alley, Morris type
Cane and Rush Easy Chairs in Pine and
Birch $36.00 per pair. Also Rush Bottom
Upright Chairs $3.75 with Arms $41.50 and
Rockers $5.00 each not forgetting a
numerous variety of new and second
hand furniture, Open daily, 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. including Breakfast, closed mid-
day Saturday. 25.4.51—5n.

LIVESTOCK
Cow_One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve

in three weeks, Gave 36 pints with

third calf. C, Branch, near Paynes

Road, Jackmans, St. Michael. ,
27.4.51—3n

MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITERS — Shipment of new
model “Olympia” Portable Typewriters
just received—see these superb machines
before committing yourself. A. G
St. Hill. Dial 3199, 29.4.51—e.0.d

MISCELLANEOUS

AFTER DINNER MINTS—Fresh stock
of delicious after Dinner Mints. Price
1/- per cello bag. Bruce Weatherhead

sound

























Ltd 29.4.51—3n

ANTIQUES — Of every description.
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver
Waier-colours, Early books, Maps,

Autographs etc.,

at Gorringes Antique
Shop,

ajdoining Royal Yacht Club.
3.9.50—t.f.n
ANALGENINE TABLETS, prescribed}
for Arthralgia, Rheumatismal Pains,
Scictica, Neuralgia and INFLUENZA:
Contains Vitamins B-1 and C. (Labora-
tories OBERLIN-FRANCE) Obtainable at
leading DRUGGISTS. 29,.4,51—1n
———
BRICKS—For building or garden walks
$3.00 r 100, also Fire "Bricks. Apply
The Old Ice Co., Prince Wm, Henry St.
25.4.51-—-5n.



CONNECTIONS (Pump), eycle, short
and long 30 doz, to clear 13¢., 15c. each.
Whitflelds’ Hardware Dept.

28.4.51—2n

CABIN-TRUNK — One Cabin-Trunk





filled with wardrobe and drawers. Prac-
tically new. Phone 4059, Major Noot,
Combermere School, 29.4,51-—-In.



—--—

ENTIRE STOCK-IN-TRADE Furniture
and Fittings of a Duy Goods Store in
Swan Street, stock valued about $15,000.
Store could be leased for 2\) years,
Tnose interested write T. C/o Advocate
td 28.4.51—2n

INVESTMENT SHARES in Barbados

Building Society and Subscription
Shares at one dollar per month, Phone
Secretary 4476 Barnes Building.

29.4, 51—4n

REPAIR OUTFITS ba staf Tonnes
24 doz. to clear id4c., 22c, each, .
felds Hardware Dept. 28.4, 51—2n,







oe eerie neeenananen|

STOVES—Valor single, 2, 3 and +
kerosene oil burner. Secure yours be:
fore advance in price, Courtesy Garage
Dial 4391. ANB

SOAP: Genuine Australian Tablet
a Delightfully Scented. Can b
used for all purposes. 6 large tablets,
for only 36c. Buy ee Stanway Store,

Street, Dial 4910
Lueas $h.4. ted

ht J

PLIT PEAS—Can be bought at Jas

aPmidor & Co., Rogkuete Street, $120
Ib, bag. Ha’ 5

per 98 ag 2628. 98.4.81—4n

ee
Tite one U) Steel Tank, capacity

400 gallons in perfect condition, Apply
, St. Thomas, Phone
ia ee 28.4.51—4n

——
PIANO—One upright iron frame Piano
in teen condition. For further particu-
ars, apply to Mrs. EB. Foster, Paynes Bay,
opposite Clarke's Drug Store. Gah: 40,

= So
WATCH: Gold centre—second pocket
watch at ager wes D. Rich-
ards & Son, 6.4.51—20

EDUCATIONAL

ACME UNITY HIGH SCHOO

L
Corner of King St., White Park Rd.
This School re-opens on Tuesday, Ist



May, at 9.30 am. New p will be
fitirvipwed on Monday, 30th April, at
— J. N. SHEPHERD,
Headmaster.
29.4.51—I1n.
MALVERN ACADEMY
EDENVILLE, CHEAPSIDE

This school will re-open on Tuesdays
lst May at 9.30 a.m. New pupils will be
interviewed on Monday 30th April at

10 a.m,
MORRIS,
Headmaster,
22.4.51—3n

QUEN'S COLLEGE
The next term at Queen's College will
begin on Tuesday the Ist of May, 1951,
and the School will be in session for the

F. L.



entire day. S. C, CORBIN,
Acting Secretary, Goyerhing Body,
os colieae
Department o: Ox,
26th April, 18 49.4,51—11,
‘Leneddianecenanieeretla causenuabeee

HARRISON. COLLEGE
The next term at Harrison College will
begin on Tuesday, the Ist May, 1951, and
the School will be im session from 9.15
a.m, to 3.30 p.m,
S. C, CORBIN,

Department of Bdueation,

27th April, 195}, 29.4.51—1n



LOST & FO
LOST

blue rims in or near Broad Street
Reward offered. Johngon's Stationery
28.4.51—2n,

FOUND





=

MAPLE MANOR

GUEST HOUSB

OPPOSITE HASTINGS ROCKS
Tel. 3021, 1. BOURNE,
Manageress.

WANTED

$50,000 LOAN at 5%

Secured by





on Valuable Freehold

Advocate

|
Property in Barbados |
“Opportunity”, |

PFS \











































|

First Mortgage {}|





PUBLIC NOTICES

Ter cents per agate line on week-daye
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays,



NOTICE
1S HEREBY GIVEN that it the In-
tention of the Vestry of the Parish of

Saint Andrew to be
introduced into the House of
of this Island a Bill to authorise the
Vestry to borrow a sum not exceeding
00 for the purpose of building
ble quarters for the Nurses at the
Almshouse at Belleplane, the loan to

Assembly



| corry interest at the rate of not exceed-

ing, 4% per annum and to be repaid
by 15 equal annual! instalments out of
the rates of the said parish
c. A. SKINNER,
Vestry Clerk, St. Andrew.
27 .4.51—3n



NOTICE

Is ork. GIVEN that it is the inten-
tion of the Westbury Cemetery Board to
be caused to be introduced into the
House of Assembly of this Island a Bill
to amend the Westbuny Cemetery Act
1908 so as to increase the penalties for

breaches of the regulations for the
conduct of the Cemetery and to reduce
the amaunt of e required to be

given by the Chaplain on resigning his
appointment.



E. D. MOTTLEY,
Chairman of the Board.
28.4 51—3n
NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JAMES

As from the Ist May to the 3ist May
the Office of the Parochial Treasurer will
be opened only on t following days:

Saturday Sth from 1

Saturday 19th from 10 a.



22.4.51—





NOTICE

THE COTTAGE GIFT SHOP _ will be
open on Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays
from 10.00 a.m, to 12,00 noon, and from
4.00 p.m. to 6 30 p.m, every afternoon
as usual. 29.4.51—In.





NOTICE

YÂ¥.M.P.C,

The Annual Athletic Sports Meeting
will be held on Thursday, May 24th at
Beckles Road from 12.30 p.m.

Entries close on May 15th and may be
forwarded to Mr. O, Hill C/o R. Thom

Ltd or to the en
POTTER,
Hony. Secty.

29.4.51-—-In

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.











—
HELP
————
EXPERIENCED COOK — Apply to
Berwyn Guest House or Dial le
29.4.51—1n.
MISCELLANEOUS

—
MINT—Olive Blossom Stamps of Bar-
bados. Will pay 48. each for perfect

copies, ‘Phone Herbert Bayley 3703
29.4.51--3n

YOUNG MAN — By versatile intel-
ligent young man, any kind of job
with reasonable conditions and wages.
Secondary education, EN eee of
Spanish. Few vegrets guayvanteed. Phone
3693. Ai 29.4,51-—In



PUHRLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-day:
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays
mimmun cnarge §1. on week-day:
and $1.80 on Sundays

~~ REAL ESTATE



Bungalow in
Bed:
Verandah ete.
No.

Goodland

12 James St. 23,4.51—In

——
BUILDING SITE—With priva

Beach.
(Approximately! 1)4 acres, at Derricks,
Paynes Bay, St. James. For i ppection
and Further information, 2991.
(Offers received), 4.S1--an.





Beat It if U Can! Almost New Seaside
Bungalow at St. James, Good Location
and Bathing, Wide Sandy Beach, An
Outlook, Well Set in off Main Rd., Re-
duced from £3, to £3,100. A Cottage
by Fontabelle, Good Condition and Loea-
tion, Reduced from £1,200 to £1,050. A
3 Bedroom Cottage at Ch. Ch. Main Rd.
about 7 miles from Tawn, Good Condition
and Location, Modern Convenences, Spac-
ious Yard enclosed with Stone, Vacant,
Reduced from £1,000 to £850. A Two
Storey Stonewall Business and Residence
with a Large Garage [Ts Ww
Walon At. Busy Area, Vacant,

ro} 500 to £2,

A Bungalow

2. Almost New Small Stonewall}
idence at Hastings Main
Location. Reduced from £1,400
A Residence at Rockley Main Road Nea:
Blue Waters. Good Condition and Loca-
tion, Reduced from £3,200 to £3,000 Nett
C Me for (Nearly Anything in Real Estate
and fiimoat in any District at Bargain
Prices with Sale Values. Mortgages
Arranged, If I Can't—Who Will? Dial 3111.
D. FP. de Abreu. Call at Olive Bough
Hastings.

LAND — 10,600 sq. ft. situated at
Ventror near Golf Club. Phone 8243
G. A. Atwell 29.4.51—3n

LAND—Approximately 3,000 square feet
of land at Stréam Road, Christ Chure!

29.4.51—1n,



adjoining the Public Road. Appiy: Mr.
R. ©, Chapman C/o Messrs. Carringtor
& ¥, 27.4.51—5n

LAND—10,000 sq. ft. of Land on th
seaside at Derricks Bay, St. James, gooo

sea bething. Apply to L. M, Clarke
Jeweller, No. 12 Jamts Street. Phons
3757. 29.4.51—2n

AND—3 spots at Fairfield Land, Gooa
soll, Connecting three ‘bus sto near
as “th (from abit al

29.4.51-——1n
LAND

TR ie ee ar ear Far eS
in Mt ntl el Mian



for building,
10,000 5 Over & a large area
of St. Philip and Ohrist Church. Mag
nificent environment. 15 to 20 minutes’
drive to Crane \y
to Lodge and Ht
Telephone, Eh
Apply to W. 1.
John, ‘Phone







Hair Dressing Notice

Madame Valaire has ask-
ed to notify all her clients
that the “Modern Beauty
Salon” will be open daily
from 1 P.M. except on
Wednesdays; and on Satur-
days from 8 A.M. “Rein-
earnate Your Beauty” by
dialling 2790 and make your
appointments.

29.4.51—In.

o

PPPOE POO

PRED PPLE SSS SSISES

NOTICE

, I wish to notify my
patients and any interested
persons, that I still carry on
my work as Spencer Cor-
setiere and have at no time
ceased to do so

Mrs. NORMAN HOWELL,
(Registered Spencer
Fitter 1931).
% Strathclyde, St. M. 9.
R Tel. No. 3954
; 29.4.51—2n. $
%
POO SSSI SO SPO PI OFF F >

tenant
hotel area, Hastings, 3 bedrooms, Garage

and

caused to be;

conveniences, Phone
Clarke

2 toilets and bath, modern kitchen
Available, unfurnished on 6 rentaces

Rockley,
all stone construction.

menth to

a.m. to 12 noon,
Saturday 12th from 10 a.m. to 12 noon.
. ta 12 noon.
Saturday 26th from 10 a.m. to 12 noon.

nished.
reoms, running water, Kitchen with gas,

usual conveniences. No pets or children
Dial—2636.

Drawing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms,
Electricity, Toilet and Bath
Belgrave,

—_
HOME, On St. James Coast from Au-
gust

Hunte, C/o. Advocate Co.

opposite Rendezvous Gap. Drawing and
dining
Light
conveniences.
further particulars Dial—2974 or 3426.

spacious and airy.

Lodge,
square feet.

dwellinghouse

BUNGALOW-—One newly built Wall

containing +
ms,, Drawing and Dining roams,
L. M. Clarke, Jeweller,

at tings Main Rd., Good Condition
ang Location. eaneed from £2,500 t

\, Good
£1,200,

| SHOES!

Walking Jistances
1. Govt, Water,



Pr. Wm Henry &
I

FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
u6 son's Sundays M warts â„¢ over
eres 3 cents @ wor ec
era 4 week—4 Cents





HOUSES

APARTMENT for

rent
Fully

to approved
furnished :

apertinent in

servants room,

n From
Write P.O. Box 257.

lst June
27.4. 0—in

Sep
BLAIR ATHOL—Anppleby, St
New house with front and back
ae x ‘ooms, each witn
water ining room, Sittin, ream
Gorage, Servant’s room and moder:
2985. Mrs. ©. €
Berke. 29.4 51—8n

SS
BUNGALOW—Very modern 3
Bungalow, situated at Top Rock. Hitinn





es.

Frunnans

12 months lease. Ring #569 or 4683,
28.4. 51—3n

Blue Waters,
completed bungalow
Furnished or
For a period, or
month. 3 Bed Rooms with
weter in each room, Built-in
in 2 Rooms, Dressing Room,

and Baths, Miod
Kitchen with built-in Gupsenesâ„¢ 2
Garage and Wash

Servants’ Rooms,
Room adjoining House. Phone 2342
28.4.51—t.f.n.

between 8 and 11 o'clock.

CHANDOS, 2nd Ave. Belleville. Fully
furnished, Available May 15th. Inspec-
tion by «wpointment, Phone 3450 or
3926. 20.4.51—t.f.n.

CLIFPCOT Blue Waters Terrace
Furnished, 3 bedrooms with running

BUNGALOW—No. 10
newly
unfurnished.

running
Presses





} water and frigidaire, from Ist May to

the Zist July, Dial 8160.
29.4,51—I1n



FLATS—Two (2) Furnished Flats at
Dundee, St. Lawrence Gap, suitable for
2 only, From May ist onward, Apply
on premises or Phone 8240.

29.4.51—2n
FLAT—Beaumont, Hastings unfur-
ining and Sitting room 2 bed-

24.4.51.—3n.

LAKE VIEW

Constitution Road.

Apply_ G.
Constitution Rd.
29.4.51—1n.

“Madeville,”

to October 1951. Write

Ltd.
8.4.51—gn.

George



“SEAFORTH" Worthing, on the sea,
rooms, 3

bedrooms, Electric
and gas

installed. All modern
From May Ist. For

24.4.51.—4n.
Swan Street, very

Reasonable rent for
Phone 3466.

UPSTAIRS, No. 6

right person.
28.4.51—2n

PUHLIC SALES

,

REAL ESTATE
HOUSE SPOTS OF LAND at Stanmore
Black Rock.
Good roads
—15,000 sq. ft
Dial 2947, R.
Street.









— Electric Linht

at Belmont, St.
Archer McKenzie,
29.4.51—I1n,

————
SHOP AND LAND—No, 77 Roebuck

Strevt. Apply to
Dial 4007

Sealy, Fontabelle

28.4.51—n



That desirable two storied freehold
known as = “Culloden
View", situate at the junction of Cul-
loden and Dalkeith Roads, with
land thereto containk
feet. e house contains drawin
dining rooms, library, kitchen, bath and
tuilet downstairs and upstairs,
bedrooms (one with bath and _ toilet)
Two servants rooms,
and tool room (all built of stone), in the
yard.

The date of sale will
later.

Inspection between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m
any day except Sundays on appoint-
ment with the owner Mr, St. Clair Hunte.
(Phone 3229).

Gq. L. W. CLARKE & CO.,
Solicitors.
26,.4.51—6n

PROPERTIES FOR SALE—Properts
called Ft re at Maxell ree Ub can
sists of %4 of an any m-
sorsate house witen is built aR

e anc
wi and has open verandah on twe
sides,
and dining rooms, 4

closed gallery to front, drawins

bedrooms, break

fast raom, modern kitehen, garage, yare

enclosed with wall. Price £2,600, an¢é
the purchaser will pay stamp duty.

One property which consists ef 60 add
aeres of land and a house, I will leave
in two-thirds of the purchase pricé
which is yery reasonable at 5%. Apply
to D'trey A. Scott, Magazine Lane.

28.4.51—3n.









AUC%1ION
FIAT VAN 17 MODEL

We are instructed to sell this vehicle
whieh has been damaged in an accident,







by Public Auction at the Courtesy
Garage at 2 p.m, on Friday, 4th May
1951.
JOHN M. BLADON,

Auctioneer,

29.4.51—1n
By instructions recei from the Sec-
pital I will

sell by Public competition at the Nupses
Home on Thursday next, 3rd May at
2 o'clock. one Piano by Kohler and
Campbell. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer

27.4. 51—in

retary of ite General



By instructions I will sell by Public
Auction on the spot on Wednesday next
‘the 2nd of May at 2 o'clock at Bank
Halli Main Road, 3 houses from All
Souls Church, One three roofed house
with out-offices, To be removed. It
will be sold to the highest bidder. In-
spection on application to

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane.

Dial 3743. 27.4,.51—4n.

(eae







SHOES!
SHOES!

io see our grand variety
of Shoes
Prices !

Two Tone in Black &
White

at real Low

Two Tone in Brown &

White
Plain Black & Brown

Suede Shoes, Mocasin,
Loafers etc.
Also a big Variety in
BOYS sHoes:
Shop Today at

THAN bros.

Swan Sts.



‘

34 | 2n May at 12.30 o'clock, one spot of
a

dJames.,










2,400 and 8,000

Miciiael.
Victoria

the
10,585 square
and
four

garage for 1 gar

be published

GENTS! We irvite you
{

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PUBLIC SALES=AUCTION

By Public competition at my office at
a zine Lane on Wednesday next the



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

SALES IN MAY
TUESDAY &th—Mrs. V. P. Baynes Sale.

land situate at Deacon's Road, by ad-
measurement 14,340 sq. ft. with a front-
age of 55 ft, ALSO One business
premises at Tweedside Road. Shop. house
and usual eut-offiees together with 1,997

sq. ft. of land. Inspection on application] ‘Oban. St. Lawrence Gap

to Miss Elaine Robinson who is doing THURSDAY 1?th—Mrs. E. A. Craw-
business there. D'Arcy A. Scott, Auc-| ford’s Sale. The Farm, St. Philip:
tioneer. Dial 3743. 28.4.51—3n.

THURSDAY 3ist—Mr. J. H. Peacock's
Sele Maxwell o

UNDER THE SILVER | BRANKER, “‘TROTMAN & CO.



HAMMER Auctioneers
29.4. 51—1n,
ON TUESDAY Ist May by order ot
Miss M veo ae wi sell age ean as
a> o louse”, “
Te iain whee Shelndee : UNDER THE SILVER
Round Tip!) & Table, Upright and

HAMMER

On Thursday 3rd, by order of _ Mrs.

Berbice Chairs, tee, Sideboard, Wag-
gon, Liquer Case, Leather Uphols. Arm
hairs. Ornament Table, Ploor Lamps;

(very nice), all in Mahogany: Glass} Theresa Wright, we will sou ic. Furni-
Ware, Dinner and Tea Services, Pitd.|ture at “The Bower,” Garrison.

Ware in Tea Servite, Waiters &e Which includes :

Cutlery and Brass; Good Linen, Con-| Dining Table, Rush Arm-Chairs, Coffee

oleum and Carpet, Single Iron Bedsteads

ings and Hair Beds, Simmons Bed-
stead very good, Linen Press, Dressing
Tabie. and Chest of Drawers; Child's
Press, Flat Top Desk all in Mahogany:
Rush Chairs and Rockers; Treadle
Machine, Norge Refrigerator, (working

Table, Morris Arm-Chairs with cushions,
all in Bireh, Rockers, Settee, Arm-Chairs,
Coffee Table, all in Mahogany: Pine
Fiat Top Desk and Stool, Jamaican Rugs,
Verandah Chairs, Pine Cabinet, Fold
Card Table, Glass Ware, Dinner and Tea
Services, Double ag a nee. ar
order), Carpet, 2 Burner Hot Pilate, 2 steads with Springs, Dunlopillo an air
Burner Florence Of1 Stove and Oven, ne Cedar Linen Press, Celatex
c S, h, Lady’ ‘wanes, jureau,
Raleigh ‘Siloeed es, gr iy Press combined, Electric Table
new), Ferns and Palms, Tennis Net and
Poles and other items
Sale 11,30 o'clock. Terms ch,

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers



Lamps,



Gas Stove (with Oven)

tale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
27.4,51—2n.



PART ONE ORDERS

By
Lieut.-Col, J, GONNELL, O.B.E., ED,
‘omnmanding,
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT



Issue No. (7

27 Apr. SL

1, PARADES — Training

ryeene wily ulate at Reg!mental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday,
3 May Sl, They will drill on the Savannah under Coy arrangements with
a View to training for the King’s Birthday Parade.
Ban
Band practices will be held on Monday 30 Apr., Wednesday 2 and Thursday
3 May 51,
AUDIT BOARD )
The Commanding Officer has appointed the following Officers as Audit Boards
to audit the erpunis for the financial year ending 31 Mar. 51.
Officers’ Mess Account :

Major C, E, P. Weatherhead — President



a



Capt. S. E. L. Johnson —- Member

Lieut, P. L. C. Peterkin — Member
Regimental Punds’ Account ¢

Malar L. A. Chase President

Lieut . T._A, Gittens — Member

2/Lt. A. H. Clarke — Member

3. tare OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJBANT FOR WEEK ENDING
Â¥ Ol.

derly Officer — 2/Lieut. C. G. Peterkin
Orderly Serjeant — 215 Sit. Husbands, H. A.
Next for dut;
Orderly r — 2/Lieut. A. H. Clarke
Orderly Serjeant — 234 Sjt. Williams, E. D.










M, L. D. SKEWES-COX, Maior,
8$.0.L.P. & Adjutant;
The Barbados Regiment.
PART If ORDERS
= RBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 15
27TH APRIL, 1951 SHEET 0. 1.
1. STRENGTH INCREASE
357 Pte. Brooks, B.C, “A” Retaken on strength of Regiment w.e.f.
3 May
Commission i:
Mr. J. S. Derrick Appointment to Second Lieutenant
approved by H.E. the Governor w.e.f,
5 Feb. 51 The marginally named is
taken on strength of B’dos Regt. and
eoonsee for duty to No. 1 Coy B'dos
“adet C S.
2. STRENGTH DECREASE oe
514 Pte. Bowman, O, “B" Coy. Permitted to resign from the Regt, w.e.f,
1 May 51,
3. LEAVE SICK
493 Pte. Reid, C. ” Granted 2 weeks’ S/Leave w.e.f. 4 April
4. PROMOTIONS ae
311 L/€ Cedrie, W HQ Coy. Promoted to Corporal w.e.f. | May 51
278 L/S Williams, S.D, ” Promoted to Serjeant w.e.f. i May 61,
M, L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
S.O.L.F. & Adjutant;
The Barbados Regiment.
NOTICE

The Annual General Meetin f the Os s ';
May & May at & oO W.Os & Serjeants will be held on Satur

OFFICIAL NOTICE





BARBADOS.

noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Publi ”
inte Briduetown before the eleventh day of May, 1951 me ble Sud
such claims may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and
thereof respectively otherwise such persons will be precluded from the
of any decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property.
PLAINTIFF : JAMES ARTHUR TUDOR
DEFENDANT : MERTON CLEMENT HURDLE

PROPERTY. ALL THAT certain Piece or parcel of land situate at Welchman Hall
in the parish of Saint Thomas and Island aforesaid containing by ad-
measurement 3 roods 17 perches or thereabouts 1
perches are in the public road hereinafter mentioned) abutting and

bounding on lands formerly of McD. Chandler but no

on lands of the Estate of William Small, Se. on Manda See
late of one Mayers on lands of Highland
lic Road or however else the same
with the messua:

buildings and erections thereon,

may abut and bound TOGETHER

H. WILLIAMS,
Bin Aled 10th January, 1951. ee
lated 6th March, 1951,







For particulars Apply

CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY Club, Tel.—8496.

No. 10,

’ . 5 %
§ Wanted For Cash 3 NTED
ly Used & Unused PposTaGE } Room and Board for Gentle-
1% STAMPS of the British Wast we ||} neh On. Bea. HARRSAANIS \ terms
4 Indies. Good Prices Paid at the % for Permanents.

Swan Street Casuarina

SOSD

5,

CESSSESSSCSSSSOGOOEESES
PPSSSISSO9SS 95959 >

co

63999393



MULTI-COLOURED BAGS

REG. $3.36

BEDSPREADS — sinate

REG. $5.14
DOUBLE REG. $6.70

NOW $2.50

NOW $4.25
NOW $5.75

CREPES — tain a cotourep
REG. $2.40 NOW $1.40





NIGHTIES PANTIES
BRASSIERES
AT



8

h , Savings §

% - 2

Â¥
THE BARGAIN HOUSE

% 30, Swan Street _ S. ALTMAN, Proprietor

x 2702

:

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,
SAILING

MS. “HECUBA”—I7th April 1951.
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND

M.S. “ORANJESTAD"—19th April 1951,
SAILING 10 TRINIDAD, P.

M.S. “HERSILLIA"—1ith April 1951.
SS, “COTTICA"—23rd April 1951.

SALLING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA

“GANYMEDES"—13th April 1951.
S. P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Ltd.
Agents,



Canadian National Steamships

Dressing Table and

Coolerator, Larder, Ware Press, 3-Burner
in good order,
Kitehen Utensils, Garden Tools and other



OSRSSISIS

eum on LIAL OS POTATO We

ee



: IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY.
mm pursuance of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persons
having or claiming any estate, richt or interest or any lien or incumbrance in or
canes the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the Defendant) to
ving before me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and
veg ers to be examined by me, on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours

JOHN D. TAYLOR &

that
prow
nefits

(of which area 4
deceased on lands now or
Plantation and on the Pub-
we or dwellinghouse and all and singular other the

Roberts & Ca. = Dial 3301







SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1961

NOTICES

M.V. CACIQUE Del CARIBE
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for St. Vincent, St. Lucia, as
ada and Aruba. Sailing Sat
28th inst.







FROM AMSTERDAM

M.V. CARIBBEE will accept

AMSTERDAM Cargo and Passengers for

ica, Ps Mon. serrat, ‘Nevis
= St. ts. _
ay.

Sailing Fridgy 4th
B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN.
ERS ASSOC., INC.
Tele. 4047.

AND GEORGETO

CURACAO &c,













Satis Arrives Sails

Pha ead Montreal = Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
ie NEY oo 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 28 Apr. 23 Apr.
pee Leow +. 7 May 10 May 12 May 21 May 22 May
ee DNEY +» 5 June 6 June 11 June 20 June 21 June
ae ania 30 June 3 Iwy 5 July 14 July 15 July
DNEY +30 July 2 Aur. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug.

NORTHBOUND Arrives Satis Arrives = Arri Art:

ives ves Arrives

hee Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
Â¥ RODNEY ..10 May 12 May 21 May _ 22 May 26 May
ex NELSON +» 3June 5 June 14 June - 16 June 19 June
DNEY .. 3July 5 July 14 July ~ 16 July 19 July
Lape NELSON ..27 Juky 29 July 7 Aug. mp 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
RODNEY ..26 Aug. 28 Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept, 11 Sept.

Nabe to change without notice. All vi
rs.

essels fitted witn cold storage cnam-
Passenger Fares and freight rates on application o e

____

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.

GG ~ ? rover - "
S559 SOOO Neeaeagent pote.

For best Results Fit

Cooper Split Roller Bearings

“Split” Feature enables dismantling and
re-assembling to be effected with ease, te
speed and economy. ne

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Pier Head Lane,
Agents.



ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY AVAILABLE
SIMMONS BEDSTEADS

CALL AND SECURE YOURS QUICKLY
— ALSO —
BATHROOM TILES Coloured

T. HERBERD Ltd. "Spee"

10 & 11, Reebuck Street and Magazine Lane

Established
1860

et eee



WHITSUNTIDE IS APPROACHING.

We advise that YOU make a special note of this Holiday
and Order your Supplies BARLY.
e

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM
(With the Distinetive Playour)
AND

TAYLOR'S FALERNUM LIQUEUR
will be in demand,
°

SONS LTR.

: or







ELUE PRINT READING AND }
MODERN OIL ENGINE PRACTICE
DIESEL ENGINE MANUAL
STEAM ENGINES AND
ELECTRIC WIRING

Y
THE WELDING ENGINEER'S POCKET BOOK
And

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON LATHEWORK







POLICE NOTICE



WANTED

For escaping from custody at Central Police Station



on the night of 19th instant.

DUDLEY BUTCHER ‘
Alias: “Francis”

Address: Nurse Land, Tweedside
Michael.

Age: 40 years,

Colour: Black.

Height: 5 ft. 4 ins.

Build: Medium. Da

Face: Long features, rough and frowning.

Jaws: Sunken

Cheek bones: High—small scar on left.

Mouth: Corners white.

Teeth: Some of upper front missing.

Hair: Reverting from front of head leaving a bald
patch,

Anyone giving any information leading to this

Road, St,

man’s arrest will be suitably rewarded.

ac o-

R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Pslice,

ee A ae Mm.

Police Headquarters,

Bridgetown,

25th April, 1951. 27.4.51—-3n,

sa staat eae

SSS

IRIS



SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN














































































































We Se “SSS RISIORI ENG SONGS ISIS IS Peveereeyeyereenreereter oor)
attenta VERN MENT NOTICE Th l}
ion is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- é Tex “a , Al 8
ment) Order, 1951, No. 11 which will be published in the Official BE us ISE ar He ONOMISE ¢
Gazette of Monday, 30th April, 1981. AMATEUR ATHLETIC é
2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling USE cE
price of “Herrings~——-Canned” are as follows: — ASSOCIATION } $
—_— — 1 S
ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE RETAIL PRICE OF BARBADOS I ! ANOTHER 3
(not more than) (not more than) presents 4 e L %
: ee
Herrings—Canned $15.04 per case of 48x154 $2 . Biggest Cycle and Athletic | i ; REMINDER
oz. tins ers ois Ee ©. per tin } 7 = » INT 2
$15.04 per case of 48x15} B4c SPORTS MEETING { BLADOGN , | ANTI CORROSIVE i A . 2
oz. tins i $ : ” sn ; %
$14.72 per case of 48 1-Ib. } under the distinguished A.F.S, F.V.A, THE PROVED PROTECTOR OF IRON AND CTESt. 3 fa =
, talls or p. case of 48 14- 83c. _ Patronage of ennieniheiibes’s \}) GOES FARTHEST 3 LASTS LONGEST ff The “FRAY BENTOS” Soup Free Competition
oz, ovals or $3.72 per His Excellency the Governor P ; i One Gallon will cover 800—1000 sq. ft. i staried on 2nd April and closes on 29th June, 1951. li
St tins .. ‘ea Sir Se K.CMG GERALD WooD you have not joined in the competition DO SO NOW.
-75 per case of 14- y Savage. in Supplied in - - i Just collect your “FRAY BENTOS” Soup labels and
wee GS y } : P
te ‘is Or $3.72 per . d FeO OVAL FOR SALE | Se ae nO te a |X send them to T. Sydney Kinch Ltd., any time up to 29th
; be ; a ay, May 14th , . !, Graeme Hal | A » Dis ai June, Fourteen (14) lovely prizes to be given away.
49.00 per cose of 48 7308. | seemay =. . May 2th Sree eee, aaa © | SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting) — e = ¥
tins or $2.04 per doz. fe. y .. . . May 19th ‘ construction with parapet | ;
tins , Fe Sere oS Set Gite Sip OR scot, Tae ween be Oe In Tins of Imperial Measure.
$5.92 per case of 36 7-02. } Fourteen (14) Cyclists from Ene vied saeweres att San:
tins or $2.04 per doz, } 8c. | Teimidad and Brith Guiana [30 S°°."iSyehogetns “cf | WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD
| tins i $e et will invade Barbados in an idahs leading from it. ” ‘
effort to defeat th 1 is well supplied with ;
i cf Barbados led can ae | | fitted cupmoares. There is a ee ’Phone 4456 33 Agents
¥FSSSSOSSSSSSSSSOSSOSGGOO, | FFF 9ST SSSSSS9SSGGF OOS GSS X garage, 2 servants’ rooms
Indies most outstanding Tee sas
e a) | ? ‘yelist 1 laundr
West Indian & British A Grand Fete eines og “PINE ', We are instruct- ;
Hand made Crafts, Antiques, is aid of Ken — | a ta otter a inodern 3 bearoamed
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach- bungalow in this residential area
weet; . Dedoraticn . Hause, . 8 (All Rate. Suen Funds) Eileen King | for the rensotable um, of O68
James. Tel. 91-74, = att | cormthanded. end» dull aetele.
eae 14451—1m. $| % EMPIRE CLUB GROUND®S Trinidad White City Hope gore ot eee |
pu | (Bank Hall) will match strides with our . }
9SOSOSSE SSS SS SSS FSGS" ton: Lady Sprinter .. . pias ged Ee eae a
ORIENTAL sien et ee apy 6e Grace Cumberbatch arity situated on approx. 1% acres
. v Hs. oe oS. : e ne government House auae
arietly a _— ancing r is spacious and well proportion
soeveEWELS Merry “Go-Round — Pony #1 footed Police ‘will meet Bar. |p| 2ccin Sahel met tect
F coms, yedrooms, | h large
New nrg opened ADMISSION — oars bados seaceo9 Athletes . . rooms. 4 bedror ma, 8 willy
THANT DIAL 29.4.51—3n kitchen, servants’ rooms, garage
war $466 sy ; Hunte (Nugget), Archer, fernettemererd houres OC oer 7 - ;
pesacac aes esansaseaeee Denny ieee raee ie | ee ere | .
: Get ready, Folks, For The Sport. PROGRAMME OF EVENTS gerdontin. The vOe eas, (a
V i ae nae of the older csiamioned || The law requires that all workmen, as defined by the
r ) i of some ¢ he oldes cstablished | fH | P ! 1,
fariety Entertainment A Grand Dance FIRST DAY Reuven Ant tht exclasive area. i | Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943, shall be insured.
ai tertainny / fle Cy, Wed A very sound buy at’ £5,50 | , sstecte ania eae ts
he held oh the CHILDREN'S ALPRED PRESCOD a : uae to Novices ; 2a a mow at | Allow us to issue you with
TOON was. LEAGUE by members Trumpeter in C, B. Browne's Ork 3. 1 Mile a Mr pees a | “LOCKERBIE HOt SR". | Brit;
o e Harrow Club Monday > ee 3. lle Cycle Class tons Cross Road—A distinctive anc | y , ONS i i y
Cae a. nls oh seems ite Hora Boe Li 4. 1 Mile Cycle Class B well-built two, storey sean aamee : A WORKMEN'S C€ OMPENSATION INSURANCE
Ams, See andra orem 1A ty Sat ah oto Fae TBs [fl eae ae saa ep! ~Y. De Lima & Co, Lid Anvil
udor y iy nagement 6. 100 Yds. Plat (Boys gardens are well matured and x ”» .
on a. r | j : x
Monday Night, oth. April. 198) ? tee Ye TeesWay tok gapeaeE iam | | that will give you full cover and protection.
m ssion 3 ‘ . (Elemen, Boys) There is a covered entrance porch | . “Your Jewelers”
Music by os” Bcwnee bee. 8. 100 Yds. Flat (Ladies) en tou Sata a Y stair, iB | For inf i and r S !
im arke ol ava ie . Ss ass dining room, four good bedrooms, |
anes ee 12, Sqfiles (Cycle Inter. 1B Focmsand ‘uruat_oftces”" Owais (| DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—acents
e | there is a large garage, servant's | :
INTE) ers, 1 r- | SS
MR. EARL B. BAIRD 13. 220 Yds. Fist eve over | po if mr damien Se AUR Sen Se SESE seen eranpenialrenatnen ite =U lies
d : 6 re | “RICHELIEU”, th Avenue; | Rena enae nn 7" ean
requests the a of 14. 110 Yds. Hurdles } Belleville—Well imaintaived bangee |
your company ‘oO 15. 880 Yds. Flat - ( or ‘ eG oe stone va |
A PICNIC at cammodation ¢onsists "et "an en- |
ST, ALBAN’S BOYS’ fou, four bedfooms, kitshen, bare
will be held SCHOOL, ST. JAMES vant’s room and double warage |
9 ° - The property has a wide lawn |
ie On SECOND DAY at one side and smail orchard and |
; si , is fully enelosec ~entr si- (|
. babogiel rc ies la 1. 1 Mile Cycle Roadster | dental aree neat town and schonis, |i |
The Hastings Rocks on MAY, 1951 OE RS so Ba page ‘ own and schools. | fm |
Mr. Hoppie Jordan’s 3 ria Mile eats ctae 2 “SWEET FIELD" St Peter |
On Saturday May 5th ‘ahi Gevtigatan a ¢. ‘4, Mile Cycle Class A Seri he ne ee eee | We proudly present |
: oa “it B.°f ile Ladies’ 5 . leaving th Solony The house a j a
Commencing at 3.00 p.m. Dancing 12 noon — 6 p.m. 6. 220 Yds, Flat oan, is of the. Estate. Type with The SILVER KING “Floating Ride” Cycle
’ Refreshments on Sale, 7. 440 Yds. Fla t (School store me nee be of stone with | Complete re design of frame angles has in White Grey Bei e and E shell
Boeck ot oe ae tind Be Boys) Pont iaege fourm witn elt ||| resulted in the FIRST MAJOR IMPROVEMENT oe gg
Sweets, Household, Books Cakes, é. yupwing a Discus aadaky Nome Wink kee ie in bicycle design since the War, with }
Siemadi wici yey . ile Cycle Class B bat Pine

EASIER STEERING 42 inches wide at $4.13 per yard

EASIER PEDALLING
and the FLOATING RIDE performance.
|

} unobstructed view of the sea a {
short distance away. The 3 bed-

A COUNTRY FAIR

will be held under the

10. 2 Mile Cycle Inter.

F
‘or the children, there will be 11. 2 Mile Cycle Class A



a Fancy Dress’ Competition, rooms are large and airy, one has










Lucky Dips and a Punch and 12. 220 Yas, Flat (Ladies) its own bathroom with tub bath
patronage of tand hot ter. Th i le : .
inode Spetee, Reames ase Mr, & Mrs. J. H. Wilkinson 13 us OF Wee ta ts) scope for " inexpensive improve: Great Beauty has been combined with SCHOOL WEAR
loop a t. ’ ; 4 ar eats ments and modernizati to be j i .
By Kind permission of Rood Meee 14. 440 Yds, Relay (Open) Serxied, ‘out witha ‘the properts inne PSRNITH et Gt Tie te pean
whe oe Hake eens hee ||\||-wHir MONDAY. Moy’ vach, |]] 18. Long sump Siena eerie: penis (irls’ Panama Hats & Shoes
abn ae Serhan ‘ 3—10 p.m, 7 16, 3 Miles Flat in extent well planted. ith ‘eke TOUGHER FORK TIPS ‘
PETRA NE Fefreshments, Sweets, Snack 17. Devil Takes the Hind. zee flowering shrub of ail varie- , STREAMLINE FORK SWEEP Boys’ Caps and Shoes
ss : : x ies. ere are two carriageways
Adults. 1/- eae a SP — and there is a right of way over POLISHED CHROMIUM THIMBLES eee
Children 6d. Dancing from 6—8 p.m. THIRD DAY Buy the new Silver King FLOATING RIDE NOW, ‘oa «6
or. The Police Band conducted }. ne hk Pie Vetaribs alee eee, 5 Why “make-out” with any other? BROADWAY DRESS SHOP
ach hte aha y Capt. Raison, A.R.C.M. ger i ahs \ home situated right on the becch | \
wit be in atmadance, ee Hg. as vial’ thom fl eee ee ee A BARNES & CO... LTD, | Where Satisfied Customers Gathor

construction is of timber raised
on stone pillars with shingle
ing and is of sound con

kind permission of Colonel
Michelin, Proceeds in aid of
St. John the Baptist Vicar-

PASSES POOOSOD

THE

Men)
4. 100 Yds, Flat (Boys over
16



ER RRR

| LODODSSSS99OSEVFSB SSS FO POOP POSSE PIO IVOD POP IVIOO

NY nena Sas niinsidaaihiamidiaeiaieam
SSS SSS: =
SS









throughout. There are 3 be



~ §t, Matthias Church
Open Air Bazaar |||}
|



f ‘ , wisins), lounge, wide roo ed { av) % |

Sr lilies: 5. 100 Yds. Flat (Girls [Ml] jaites’overiooinn” the oc \ ATTENTION !! :

GIRL GUIDES Adults 1/- :0: Children 6d. 6. 100 Yds, Flat (Girls over bathing eubieles and garage space, 5 in " ;
stati 0 | ieecetgew caer ree * FACTORY MANAGERS

%
7. 440 Yds. Flat (Open) “SILVERTON”—Cheapside, Com- X |
modious 2-storey atone house

8. 5 Mile Cycle Class B

| standing in *pprox 1% acres



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FAIR

€ 5 lle *vcla wr
9. 5 Mile Cycle Inter, | planted with fruit trees. 2 large

IN



QRS EOOSOSSF &

Amateur Night

10. 5 Mile Cycle Class A



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the beach with excellent bathing. |
'
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| 16. Girls’ Schools’ Relay |
Race
17. 9 Mile Cycle Open
|





























AUCTIONEER
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
"Phone 4640

Contact the Hon, Secretary,
C/o Civie Society, Swan
and High Streets.

KEEP THIS DATE OPEN

4
g Fair. %
x 29.4. 51—1u.

99.4.51—In. $






Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements
x reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 |
& will ba held at . 4 ll. ae oan (Finals) } ee Bitotien,, 2 bathe aae 4
a AL e me . en ral y located an su sy >
8 ‘ iw baBsanos Aquatic 12. 440 Yas. Relay (Shoot [ff ac at ne ee eae oo a ig
¢ 7
3s The Drill Hall ¥ CLUB 13. 1 Mile Flat iekOR SALE OR LEASE P
. ¢ (Local & Visiting Members é oes STRATHMORE”, Culloden Ra
$
Seturd end 3 x Only) 14. 15 Miles Cycle (Open) Handsome 2-storey stene property MILD STEEL
on Saturday, 2n une, on : a oe sige abl ee ; : ‘ | SELECT THESE NOW
% SATURDAY, MAY 12th, TRATES ae SDeaaION: Piaceoma f bathe ane tetione Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes Bear te i ee on
Entensively emodelle recently, , om e tbe * ‘ S eevee °
1951, from 3 to 10 pm. } 9 p.m. Kensington Stand . . $1.00 || Wated grounds of abou 15,000 BOLTS & NUTS—AIl Si BACON (Sliced) tb CORN FLAKES Pkes
% i % | {{ Can you Play an Instrument? Geo. Challenor Stand . 72c, | ff) square feet. Pleasant town resi- || i as see |) SODA BISCUITS |... ‘Tins. COCKTAIL BISCUITS, Tins
There will be the usual ¥ Whistle? Sing? Imitate? Tinsovered feats 48c dence suitable as Doctor's resi- || |\{ SODA BISCUITS .... Tins. s 8, Tin
% : : STALLS % 8 . 2 deere ee b dynse’or Guedidtoles | % , \{ CHICKEN i!ADDIES — Tins UFILLIT BISCUITS .. Tins
} interesting - =—% a ah aed ra FILTER CLGTH—White Cotton Twill HAMS (Cooked) ..,.., Ib MUTTON AND PEAS. Tins
TIE SH SUPREME .... T 4 JES ....
$ ca, ose - ee % Sar, ae mae ce StesonMCKETS FOR RENT % At PRICES that cannot be repeated. ¥ | PEARS... Tims VEG. JUICE | Tins
y . , § 8 is your opportu’ ensington Stend . . $2. pg ie , |) PEACHES ... Tins GOOSEBERRIES .... Tins
% SNACK & MILK BARS, $ a a is Gea, =e - + + $168 [BR iver Sands. Furnishea' “* ) JAMS "gins OAT MEAL ......... Tins
“ A ! can os
% LUCKY DIPS, etc., efc. % pee eS ae A and 83! Season Tickets on sale from | “WINDY WILLOWS"—Prospect, The BA , + wy , |} CREAM OF aetk te mes
> o , ts St James. Unfurnished house on e Z RBADOS FOL NDRY Ltd. \) 2AM OF W e he Bs
x Two RALEIGH BICY e | Prizes will be awarded by the Tuesday, May ist. coast vith 3 bedrooms, lo: |
$ v ”~ % | applause of the Audience e | WeranaaHtnoperiqniing “die sete. White Park R i ;
¥% CLES will be raffled — x dees send your entries to Entries close 4 p.m. | Samecide Gossmien. inn DIAL 4528 oad, St. Michael | PERKINS & co., LTD.
2 m the Club’s Office. Saturday, May 5th. — ive o oan ; DIA 502 k St.
% Tickets at2/- each § e Aitactive t bedroomed furnish | | ¥%C0%0S09%60454905459659900999006000090000505008 | ho Se ek ps yl \
% On ‘Saleat Cave ‘Shep- % DANCING Tenders are invited for Sale | ed seaside bungalow., Available \fm| =a oe cmos aes La
> . P : after the Entertainment. Sahat, oak tee tae REAL ERATE AGENT Foe IOP OOH OOOO ON OOOO II OOOO PPO III | 7 =
% herd & Co. and at the Admission to Ballroom 2/- 2

g lease if required,
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LIPSTICKS SHAMPOOS is
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APPOINTMENTS AS FROM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH



POF

Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) i
No. 16, Swan Street -:- ‘Phone : 2109, 4406 or 3534 i

Buy Now! PLANTATIONS
Bay Now! LIMITED

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an ON OOOO

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LLLP LPL PLL PEA PPL LLELSLEE LSS AS PSPSPS OSS
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' ; on ue A







PAGE SIXTEEN



‘By Our Yachting Correspondent)

Mischief scored her first vic
‘ory for the season when she
defeated the other “B” Class

boats in the Seventh Regatta of
the R.B.Y.C, which was sailed in
Carlisle Bay yesterday afternoon.

Fantasy looked a certain winner
mip to the end of the second lap
but on the last leg of the nal
Yap she was overtaken by Mis-
chief whose helmsman must be
given credit for good judgement.

The wind was very light and
the sea smooth. These condi
{ions were ideal for the Tornadoes
and they outsailed the other
boats in the “C” and Centreboard
Class. The boats sailed north
ebout.
‘ J] think it is necessary to hay>
two tables of handicaps now
jhat the Tornadoes are sailing.
Yn the handicaps yesterday Edn
was given ten minutes by Rogue
und nine by Gannet., These
boats found it impossible to get
within shouting distance of Edril.
This clearly shows that the handi-
caps were fixed to suit a medi
um to strong or strong wind but
on the other hand the wind was
light. If there were alternative
handicaps the Regatta would
}:ave been much more interesting.

Seven Boats

In the “B” Class seven boats
started. Both Okapi and Moyra
Blair sre on dry dock. Mischief
defested Fantasy by 46 second:
after giving her seven minutes
Third was George Stoute’s Rascal
ihree minutes and three secone:
behind Fantasy.

Fantasy was first to comple.c
the first lap after overtaking
Range. She came around a min-

ute and ten sceonds ahead of
Ranger. The others in order were
Flirt, Rascal, War Cloud while
Mischief and Gipsy were minutes
behind.

Ai the end of the second lap
Fantasy was still leading but Mis-
chief, who had now overtake
Rascal, Ranger, War Cloud and
Flirt, was second, a minute and
23 seconds behind. Rascal was now
third and Flirt fourth, It was in
the last stages of the last lap that
Mischief snatched honours from
Fantasy.

Eleven boats started in the “C”,
Centreboard and Tornado Class.
Honours went to Edril with Ivan
Perkins at the helm. Eevril. was
first to start in this Class and in-
creased her lead. She went ahead
leaving all the other boats far
behind. She finished nine minutes
and 21 seconds ahead of Vamoose
which gave her eight minutes.
Third in this Class was another
Tornado, Cyclone, skippered by
Denis Atkinson who other vachts-
































I’M RE



Qa gnn€_.






Onvy your Most
IMPORTANT DATE OF
THE YEAR*AND BYE-
BYE UPPER PLATE.*

THANX To N.RANDALL THOMAS,
SOUTH ROAD, CHESTER N.S.



HENRY! WE CAN'T





MOHAWE scored her second victory for the season when she defeat-

ed the Intermediate boats in the

Seventh Regatta of the R.B.Y.C.

sailed in Carlisle Bay yesterday evening.

men said *‘was a bit nervous over
his selection on the West Inaie
team and his engagement”.

The Start

Cyclone and Vamoose starte:
scratch along with Clytie and Cor-
onetta. Cyclone got the jump but
was soon afterwards overtaken by
Vamoose. First to complete the
lap was Edril, followed by Vam-
oose, Scamp and Cyclone, Misbe-
thave was disqualified for crossing
Magwin and dropped out of the
race with one side damaged. Fin-
ishing fourth was yet another
‘Tornado, Comet.

Mohawk = skippered by Bob
Cumberbatch, carried off Inter-
mediate Class honours. This boat
always sails very well in a light
wind. It started scratch with
Invader and gave two minutes to
Eagle. Dauntless and Dawn did
did not start.

| They'll Do It Every Time —® emnse sr ona y Jimmy Hatlo
— / “ALL SET, KIDDO + ie
JUST GOTH To PUTH
MY SHIRTH ON «++
I’M WASHING

MY Teeny ) Wy

Ooops !! MS

ee y Koes ¥
=_mde

ADY,

The Directors are pleased to Announce that the Society’s Actuary has recommended the
Declaration of a 2% per annum Compound Reversionary Bonus for the Quinquennium

ended 31st December, 1950.

At the end of the first lap
Mohawk was 30 seconds ahead of
Eagle while Reen was third. It
finished once minute and 43 seconds
ahead of Gnat which came second
Coronetta finished third,

Buccaneer claimed “D” Class
honours ,beating Olive Blossom by
five minutes, 12 seconds. Olive
Blossom however gave Buccaneer
three minutes. Sinbad finished
third, four minutes and 23 seconds
after Olive Blossom.

I understand that the Tornado
Association is thinking of having
a series of single-handed sailing

When this happens we will
definitely see who is the best
helmsman in Barbados. One
helmsman was practising alone

yesterday.

The Tornado Association will
sai] their Third Regatta in Carlisle
Bay at 10.30 «.m. this morning.

If the weather conditions are ideal ;









Lalo







Renee







SSS

% Annual Dance

SUNDAY

Mischief Scores First Victory For Season ¢

SECOND VICTORY

the results should be interesting.









The Eighth Regatta of the
BR:B:Y-C will ke sailed in
Carlisle Bay on Saturday, May 12

Start Time }

I CLASS
(p.m. Klapsed Place |
him s |

9 Dauntless D.NS. |

6 Eagle 2 45 75 |

2 Invader 247 10 7

7 Mohawk 2 47 5 12 vs

12 Dawn DNS. | ¢

il Reen 1 50 39 ,

1 Gnat 143 57 3 |

4 Coronetta 7 43 09° 3

18 Clytie 14 i 5 |
B CLASS

10 Wizard D.N.S. | s

12 Ranger 2°93 0, 39,12

War Cloud 215 44 6) | &

6 Flirt 214 #38 5 %
481 Fantasy 5-0 ak mt

9 Okapi DNS | ‘

8 Raseal 2 208 18 3 .

7 Moyra Blair D.N.S DNS! ¥

5 Mischief 242 1 59 29 1 |

1 Gipsy 4 20 10 4@ 7]

D CLASS - ‘

8 Peter Pan D.N.S D.N.S

4 Sea Bird 235 2 06 39 6

10 Van

Thorndyke 233 2 06 21) 6

12 Rainbow 234. 3,0) S48. 7

1 Buccaneer 2 35 1 48 02 1

9 Olive ‘

_ Blossom 2 38 1 59 19 ° 2

2 Imp 240 1/52 87 4

7 Sinbad 241 + $188" s
Cc CLASS

1 Miss Behave 2 45 DNF.

8 Peasy Nan 245 2 02 21 10

9 Folly 246 1°46 15 °° 8

11 Magwin 2 46 143 49 6 |

2 Scamp 2 47 140.28 § |
K35 Edril 2 44 Let te. La
K34 Comet 2 47 ee ee ea!
K29 Cyclone X.S8) 3 3s 23 3
R49 Vamoose 262 1% 80 2
C10 Gannet 253 #1 39 48 «9

7 Rogue 254 136 29 7 |§



—_ 1

MAIL NOTICES - | @



Mails for St-Lucia, Martinique, Guade-
loupe, Antigua, United Kingdom and | yo

France by » S'S? Gascogne will “be |
closed at the General Post Office as
under:

Parcel Mail at 10 am, Registered

Mail at 1 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at |
2 p.m. on May 11, 1951, |

| The Weather ||

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 5.45 a.m,

Sun Sets: 6.30 p.m. ’
Moon (New) May 6 |
Lighting : 6.30 p.m, '





High Water : 10.55 a.m. | , = :
YESTERDAY COLLINS BUILDING BRIDGETOWN
a ig een .07 ins DIAL 3006 BARBADOS, B. W. 1.
‘0 or Month to Yester. |
day : 5.30 ins, |
‘Suemperature (Min) 73.0 °F x
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) S.
wee sen 4. ales. per GBS 8 OBE SG99 S999 99S FPO SOOO SD OESSO POSS SSSE
hou :
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.950
(11 a.m.) 29.939 ; SIDER GO GOONIES ETON FFG

CRYPTOQUOTE, No. 14
FDWOW/HX/BRFDHBM/HB/
FDW/SROAJ/XR/BRQAW/G X/
G/LGB/RY/WBFHLWBF.

-— XDWOHJGB

Last Crypt: If the present criti-
cises the past, there is not
much hope for the future,

— Churchil.

~—s. A. CORBIN @ SONS.



& *
DIG OGI IIE SII TIO OS



oS



at the
DRILL HALL
on
SATURDAY, 5th MAY, 1951

SUBSCRIPTION — 3/6

Admission by Invitation
Onl

CLUB PREMIERE

y
‘4
o
to be held by
THE MEMBERS OF
y
22,.4.57—3n |



ROEBUCK 8ST.
MORAVIAN CHURCH

ANNUAL FAIR

ae HE tan
THE MORAVIAN MANSE
Country Road
(Proceeds in. aid of Church
Funds)
on THURSDAY, May 3rd,
3-6 p.m,
Stalls Refreshments Games
Pony Rides
Children (under 14's)
Fancy Costume Competition
By Kind perrvission of the
Commissione: »: Police
the Police Baia under
Captain Raison will be in
attendance
Admission
Children 12 cents
Adults 24 cents

1951





and











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—
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PAGE 1

PACI HJIRTKEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 21 l5l CLASSIFIED ADS. TIUVMONl iSOB M.rrua* W Bri H Bpaan i In Cartb CalTina; Ma ro Btnru. i. %  %  • %  f. i %  i. cHM it U lot any numbti o( worn. I • Hindi eanta par word lor a--ch FOII SALE ittai-.l .aid Tom UO'd S.d• .-J — poa* M Wl—U. and I" Mama,** no |i M Hi MN-M)! ..-1 SISS o> I lor Buy numbor of words up w 4 (UU par word on Suadaya Si •'<*nl oed AR-'Ont Hi t ciindrr two arater Da tola SUiUblo lor makins puk-up T,i~ vary aood Knalna M ,oo-l *a*kDIED NMtfrarr maahpnlr*4 ronSilt,.* and apod SullaBJe -P—aallF 1-* Iwo Dial II... tPB ii rasafeai Until W| thank all i'( %  *.' mill -ia la lire lata al '!,,.It Hall \IW HoMa nr" i l("-W 'fain, l.tanr. I>r* .Mid rant iiiiiJr> T Fh.ihp. %  %  to aU Uioaa kind frlanda wht wraathi. inter, of rondo I WAUUOM: Una IfU V- Fold %  UUi'l Wuw |n pailavl kondilion. Ai>pi> *Kd pp at ii -ii cauaed Opponhrlrn (toll IN MEMOUAM %  inomoiv of Eudora Daane aro .inart-d thl. l.fe on April M. )• •air* think >ou are fnrBOttrn ir faro no more .mi are with UI . >r liefnre Mmaaa Griffith. Alicia Dcane .si-ten and aflameNMI Ii LOWS datfins Colin I...W*. II monlli'. whi %  n* called lo hHWt .ervice on April 3 i M You are In a •woolor. dearer Imim In yonder happy Land. Evaf lo trrmr'niwr-d fc Fnid Sober. Mofhar. *n.rlaj %  AU. iptioihrixi Bannl*<*r* Id. fl Mlthart BMS1-1 GOVERNMENT NOTIfES mi BRIGADE Recruiting lo till two (2) vacancies In the Kite Brigade will lake place on Ihc Parade Square. Central Police Station, at 10 am. on Thursday 3rd May. 1951 Applicants '"ust be 5 ft 8 Ins. In helirht and of an educational standard of not less than standard VII Salary $92 00 to $60.00 pe month plus freeuniform. Applicants are requeued I I Ting their educational err t incite i mi testimonial* with them. It. T. MICHELIN, sin%  iinii'iuiint (if nra I'.i n ;.ili Bridajtown Tin Mm... i..'.tii April, i5i. AUTO>rOTlVE IB III..* %  %  4(1 lo guy a ilood .....i itMlaa MM -H. H n. done HO lalord. dun* It.WB %  %  %  1 I ruRNinrai Al Ralph Board*. Furni.Mrn -"in Hardwood A Ituah Eay Chalra Rock*ra hand lurnllura. Opan 4 pm. includlnc Biraklaat day Sami day. ri i.n nrnnca T* Oaola pat pal* MM on u>#*li-ilJH IMJ I) cania pat aaatla "• on yUvt a>Ntm*.-i ikotw |1 H ow hiMk-aap* aaal i aO o* Jwdaaia. NOTICE IM mtOEBV OFVW* lhat i i•niton ol Bha Vaatry at i S*lnl Andr- lo b ,. i"ttndui IM• %  > bo inhl> %  •oalnt lldmi a *t It> I. an i" .oawlNMM lalmo-i(* i ...I.I p*rt>r> B A. KIXMEM. NOTICE la the inianAbury Con.tory Bi^rd lo L T-l r.1 ol in. laUnd a hill l aioand IM Waaibon ia*a '' ISO* an ai lo mciomar l"* panallMa lo. ( %  itdact oi ihr CaajSan -nd In iad-.< II. anKiunl nf ntk< |uiiri U. o. (..an Uy UM Chaplalo OP roa:m>iii hl< ..opoliilmanl r. n MDTTIJV. %  OR m-:.vr Imimon rhfo* araafc Tl raoll and a pad Sumiiiiyi M woda — •>• %  *.• M a>rOi 1 iia a 100*4 wpa* -4 'awia a -o-d lipdapaHOUSKS % %  %  VliTMI.\T a-" %  n M dhi Bl M r .. ( %  _.%  ,(,. fkrvani Ill SAI.KS-AltTIOX ,-'.' Maai < %  <• Uiw >' Jaalr at ll B> WadaMada} %  apot 01 %  •• Road, i" ad %  It M0 aq ft with a frontprajai J *l TWrel'itw H. 1 -a *>nop. home ..lit .daa H.aiallirt .IU I SttI ctMn ..|i appliralhNi y.. Hanlli.hinaon who it dtoa bwaj %  \1 UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER !' %  i ItrNCAI/tW -v„. iunp..-1-w. aiiualrd lolh-la and ball,. <•; Ti T r*>AV HIB] M Hot-on ruimiiii < i* l ). nludra ... UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER •IUI IN HAV Ira. V T B->iiaalo. %  •*"". ; TMUHBDAV fM Old* Salt Tho P-r... -t "hiltp M 3i*i Mr J H Pr-eorh^ lalo Maxwoii ^.oa.at. BKANKER. TPOTMAS A CO. AvrllaaieerSHIPPING NOTICES katlnd Tin 1 Tan Table. IV aM .n-1 %  •on. mg uu Data, l-.tii— Vi,t,..., An. I"*I urnatiwi.l Tal.lo. I'toor ... OUUatr and T UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER la*-. IU-, and ,., tan. as 4 ii—fa tm an PS it' MaALOW—No ID Bluo Water. Inrklay. nrwiy com pitted bunnatow UI a'onr cowatrurUon P.nmhisd ... ,..f. M,,.r„ 0 ror period, ... fn.ix. aaowtk, j fed (loam, wllo un.nos w.tar In aactt room. || U ||t-i„ Mooirva. Ll.aa.l14 Boon., aUMarn Typ. Il.lh#. i'i Or* %  >()„ ii -iM.,,. r.,* to oalva ii tl.rop waafet. Ci-f M pint* with %  hint >air C. Branrh. noar Pavnaa Road. JacMieaaa Bt Mirhaal Tl 4 M—In ndt Quad %  s,. %  1 %  m. C.u l 11.i, %  :. rry IimJ. I.i and Choat o u, %  not Top Dnak atl in Maho*ar.,: thalia and Rotr.. Ttawdaa i. Nori* Itofriforatnr. 'WOM„.| Carp-i i I noroetr OH to*a ard Oven Utsnii>>. Oardcn Bench. Lodr 1 a-Soead Bleytl. .piactl.aH •n. and Pailina. Tenm. Hrt STMI nd oilier llamt i RMS" Dinina Tablr. H Tab* HnrrM An Hirrh, Rocker-. SotlO*. Am (o.lra Table, all in Mahosan; Fjl Top De-k and Slool. Jamal.t Verandah Chair.. Pino Cabinet. .. !" Card Tablo, GU Waie. Dir.not id Too Se.vna.. Double and Himla lion Uad'.ed. with Sprlna.. Dunloplllo and Hair %  Pro-ao*. Buraou. Dreaalns Table and I'rria rambtned. ITktrlMc Tablo 1-trnp.. ( % %  ...lerator. Laidei. "are Pro". 1-Onrner -• larltti Ovant In sood o Ki'ehon Utan'ili. Garden Tool* and < ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. mi. SAILING TO nlMOIH AMB VMM I Hl> AM I • ''OBASUnVTAD-'-lPUi April IBM. •All IM. lo TBINlbAD. PABAMABIBO ASP i.liiti.iiiiMs MS IIIHSIIJJA llih April • %  •'COTTaCA-' Old April 1 • .II IM. TO TBIM1DAO. UA <.l MIA Ct'BACAO Ac. IS 'QANYMBDEi -jjih April 1MI a. r. MirssoM. BOH Co. Ltd. M V CAC1QUK Pal CAB1BK will accopl Caipo aatd Paaaottaara lor Vlneonl. Bl U-cu Gfattada and Aruna Sailu.a Biivrdar Jtth II. i M V CAR1BBCE ail) -Y NELBOi; LADY ROUNBY .. 1 Map .. B J„.r ..30 Juno .. July BIKaa; 1* Apr. IB 140 IS Apr II Juna :. July 4 A „ %  Arnvaa Balis Barhnaaa Borbadoa IB Apr M Apr 31 May O May BO Juno 11 Juna 14 July IS July 15 A us 14 Allf. NUBTBBMirND Barbados Barbadof IB May 11 May rl Ma; Arrwaa BL John Halifax hVantmsl — H May M May — IB Juna IS Juna — 14 July It July B Aug. 11 AuB. S S-i-l. 11 Bapt. mi MAYOR ANU TOWN COUNCIL or NKM AMSTERI1AM. HI It UK I BRITISH 01 IANA Invite upphcalluiis from Mn ca| und EleclncDl Enctneers the pot! ot . t'HIKF I •( .IM I K TO THE COt'MII. Applicants, who should Mechanic*] or Kkxtr) Eniineers and have had sood ex. petiBce of internal combustion •'t.Kiuet, will be required to admmiilcr and supervi'e the c'uun cil's engineering services com. {.risiiuj a suctiun producer gas trgine and Diesel driven .-lecim. power slation with an installed .apacity of 596 K.VVs. ihc 2.S00 voila primary. 1 Hi—220 volts sc ondary. 60 cycles alternating i tint overhead electricity disiribu. lion !ytem. the Walev Works pumping plant (2.10 h.p.) and ijie wglgf mains syitem; end exercise fceneral supervision over the work of the CoUBcli's Town Superintendent. Previous experience in an executive capacity is necessary and preference will be given lo applicants who are. or are eligible for. corporate membership of thi Institutions of Mechanical or Elec. trlea] Engineers Experience of Suction Producer Gas and Diesel efbglBdjg would also be an advan. Applicants must not be moro • • than 45 years of age and must) state age and nationality in thci applications. The person sclecte. for appointment to the post will be required to submit himself a medical examination as to his htneu. The salary of the post is £1.000 per annum, and free current for domestic purposes Is provided The appointment which will be on the basis of J Lbree-year con met, in the nrsi Instance, is sub %  .•.t tn me previous approval ol the Governor in Council of LhC Ccsvay of DriUtta Guiana, and i. in i ive privlleces al the rate of one month for each mt of aerviee Passages for Ibe Ens^ficer. bin wife and up to two children will be paid In f of a successful applicant resident utnfPI Of British Guiftn Applications which should be rridrcssed to the underslaniHl map i %  %  received In New Amster. ilam before the 26th May. 1951 D. DOW. Town Cl.rk. New An, -'.. i.i,im llerblre. in i'.^h Gun 27 4 si _nn. FOR lONIiER SERVICE



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PACE EIGHT M M>\. ADVOCATE si SIPW U'KII. 29. 1951 BARBADOS! Am DMT E PntuJ by UM AdvtoM C*^ Lid.. Sunday. April 29, 1951 Knowing The Law Everyone is presumed in English law to know the law and that applies to Barbadians as well. The Barbadian is, however, at a special disadvantage in acquainting himself with what the law is at any given moment. This is due to the fact that the annual volume of the laws is brought out in insufficient numbers and appears never lo be reprinted. At the present moment it is still possible to obtain the volumes of the laws which were consolidated in 1942 but the annual volumes which have come out since 1942 are for the most part unobtainable. Nor does this unfortunate situation apply only to Statutes. In recent years the spate of Regulations which must be obeyed have increased considerably and it is impossible for persons to refrain from infringing the law unless the Regulations are easily available. Traffic control and most traffic offences are the result more of Regulations than provision in the Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act Those whose duty it is lo advise persons on the intricacies of the law are particularly faced with great inconvenience. To the scarcity of the volumes of the Laws and Regulations must be added the nonexistence of the Rules of Court which are so essential to a legal practitioner. The rules for the Petty Debt Court and the Assistant Court of Appeal were printed very many years ago and were apparently never reprinted. The few copies now in Wstence show in a marked degree the passage of the years and the pages are liable to turn to dust in the reader's hands. The Rules of the Divorce Court are of more recent date and the copies in existence can be read without risk of disintegration but copies are no longer available for purchase. The Rules for the various branches of the High Court are likewise unobtainable. Such a condition of affairs is as unsatisfactory as it is unnecessary. The legal department should be given a grant so that these important books might be, available to those who require access to them. When this is done the opportunity should be taken to revise, if need be, the Rules of Court but no delay should be allowed beyond that which is absolutely necessary. It is not only litigants and their advisers who complain about these, matters. Many Laws and Regulations provide that certain notices be exhibited in certain places and cases have arisen where persons have broken the law because of their inability to obtain the requisite notices. Government should investigate the supply of all government books and documents and take steps to ensure that there is an adequate supply. \o limit's II it si II 4 ss? BARBADOS has a name for beaches, in fact they are our main tourist attraction. But do we try to preserve them, beautify them or even keep them clean ? The answer is no. Except for one memorable occasion when the Christ Church Vestry cleaned up Rockley Beach, our beaches have remained noboiy's business. Tourists complain, travel agents complain and locnl people voice their disgust, but nothing is done. And how are the scavengers helping ? The beaches are certainly not their business '. If someone with a house adjoining a beach cuts his hedge what can he do with the clippings ? The scavengers refuse to take them away, since apparently "bush'' and "refuse" are quite different things. Their advice is: "Put them on the beach and burn them.'' At on,> time people living in Bridgetown had *>me of the best bathing in the island at their doorstep. The water in Carlisle Bay was clear and sparkling, and the bathing at Brown's Beach and (Iravoscnd was excellent. But it is not so to-day, Uie water in the Bay has gradually become dirtier and dirtier. Fishermen, residents on the seashore and ships discharging refuse m the Bay are to blame. From Hamilton. Ontario, comes the answer to our problems. The by-laws of the Corporation of the Hamilton Harbour Commissionuis are strict, practical and well worth quoting. (1) No rubbish, refuse, ashes or other material shall be thrown into the Harbour .... (2) No person shall encumber navigable water within the limits of the Harbour of Hamilton .... or shall in any way obstruct the navigation thereof with stones, filth, rubbish, etc. (3) No person. Company or Corporation shall throw, drain or discharge into the waters of the Harbour, or deposit on the shores of the said harbour, or to discharge or cause or permit any water or material to flow into the Harbour of Hamilton or into any stream or sewer running into the Harbour of Hamilton, in which water or material, there is gas, tar, oil, lees, dregs or solid mattal pediment or injury oi to Injuriously affect vessels, propci Ij bathing, or lo cause a nuisance of any kind or to cause dan;; Well, that is a good lea.. %  f" 1 member, I %  ful islands in the C U fob* going out of their w*j tourists while we com placer tly n.i.r iSje that the natural attractions of Barbados are enough. In the meantime through slow, I and lack of an appreciati .n of beauty we are fast allowing our natural attractions to be spoiled. Indulgi'iares THE Report of the Iii. 1 form of amusement it has no assurance that anything better will take its plan.'' "The spread of one of the symptoms of an age in which people have more leisure and cannot or do not know how to make good use of it." The remedy lies not in restriclivi lation but in education and the provision of facilities for more healthy recreation. The Team THE publication of the West Indies ineket team to tour Australia comes as an anti-climax. The public were keyed up to fever pitch a month ago hut as the weeks panted Without news of the personnel of the team interest gradually waned. There are no real surprises, and fewwill tUiagian with baa aalectars' choice. As soon as it was lenrnt thai a specialist wicket-keeper was to be inrluded certain names automatically suggested themselvis and no doubt the selectors* choice has fallen on the best of nut .1 very Unntnasivi bunch of specialist kMpera, In any event ft is unlikely that the %  pectausl will be seen in the test, for he would have it improve out of all recognition to depose Walcolt behind the tumps. ftrguson again finds a place in the team and BO do Trihi Atkinson and Rickards. who toured India. All the wild and w, oily rumours have at lasi been scotched No I mlt can be found with the selectors although it 1 a piiy thai they never saw Mason and Crick In for undoubtedly the Inclusion of one of more youthful fast bowlers would have strengthened % * team w meow rventeen pl.iyers inchi'i nil themr ing cricket, r of these inlands win. were railed upon to show then paces before the selectors, and with %  see red ami expertence.l captain in John Goddl them, it should, I to build up a b • combination thai should not be easily kted* ai event to the utmost limit any team thai t ; tralians can put in the field. THE STAtF. *V WAKEFIBLD HOUSE, shown*.; the "curtain Btf, The cmmi Bgure la Mr. KI-I Tn. ker. Brttl-h Council B'pre*nUtlTt In Brb*d< ItarbutloK lias A Little* (From A Correspondent* Barbados now nas a Little It is a very little theatre indeed, for thu auditorium seats only *ixt>: but it presents lea-. 1 at the let*, that ought to render It of high value In the nenl of theatrical production In the Wand The birth oi *he theatre can in* Bated l" an evening In las? November when Mr. Charles fhOSMS of the l.ritiah Drama ftlfllt who was 1 ->uring the WC-HI India under tha auspice* ,.( the British Council, w.(Wins 1 lactun In a downstairs room— Which is divided by an arvl-vay Ua two parts—at WakcOetd flouae, the Council's Biirbadoe hc."W|ii..r..i He had been speaking of the dsSadvantasaa under wi ieh aoMttaur dramatic societies lat> 'irsd when they tried to put on %  1..II and theatres mat wen' quite unsuiled for the purPOBU There wa*, of course, 'hi expense of hiring the hall in the Ant plans the auditorium v generally too large, and ha.'l.. the acoustics were jftan shocking; and, above all. the proportions of the St I almost always wrong. What o c got in a cinema theatre or village hall was a wide front_ to the auditorium and only u few !• %  • %  Of depth, measuring from the footUahta to the track of ths rta %  The players. In fact, winu %  to do 1heir show on nothing i ul a large shelf. The lecturer paused andlool..-:! around him. "You know," ho said rSflee* Uvi I %  you could make sornsthing better than thai 0 room. Here, when' 1 ,im standing, would be the course. It's small; >ut i'\ just in the ritint propoitum plenty of depth in relation '< %  tha proBiah v. u wouldn't need a raised stage j lid the Boa Naturally, 'd have a simple curtain set The auditorium would be where ill inn It would have to be built up In a .imp; but llial shouldn't !>e t.-> difHThere is room for "ice little lighting equipment; | OM whole affair ought to bo quite big enough t<> I a ) %  : local producers something lo CKperii u rth> :t a place In which thfj COtUtl nit on really good ploys without %  bothar whether they •' ul.l Like in enough n miev at the box-ofRee to cover In UM course, Mr. Thorns. ailed (<>r England; hut he left m IhO plan-* f..i ;i lillle thealra i. be constructed in that i !" i. ..I Wakelivld lln e I 1 Mi Bistly Tucker, the British Council rcpresentatu.' HI I.IIMdoe, helped by his aisartani Mi it I*Kanu. has construrted It Mr Tucker calls It B |-kel ind IgeSjeli iii.it it is not ntanded u take the place of the IlUCh larger and more el.iborato I.niie Theatre il ha h i>-. will h.ive lie dav. Cut laan %  atarti an Mr. Thomas' authority lor be 'loving that It will prove a very i' "IIC. Tin atre The lecturer' "curUdn sol" v by his audlenc him sjM-ak O ] pp' ii>us talks. Why on ci.i anurteun go 11 a Barbados audience before. Others, including Miss Thelma Vallu. Mrs Golue White and Mr Idrls Mills, have appeared In p reference to a Hons of the Bridgetovn Plfg I well understood the Barbados Dramatic Club, who had heard The problem of the audience n the subject at in some ways a more diftlruH one than '.iat of Ihe cast. With only he nsked, did sixty seats available, it is obvious the cxpfiiso and that only a few of those whe pains or con. .meting elaborate would like lo see the Show wltj sets of painted anvas. which only be able to do so. 1 am asked U looked doubtfu ly realisuc In any say that If any of those who have !• %  % %  Il w.is p-rfectly possible tu already shown their interest give a play with the use of the theatre in Barbados by atrurtains at the back of the stage tendance at one or more of Mr and in the wings which would YtMsnea's lectures will send Ir. provide an acceptable setting for their names Immediately to the almost any type of play. With BriUsh Council at Wakefteld the right "props" and costumes House, stating whether the> and other ncce*-ories, an audience would like one seat or two, every would forget in obout two effort will be made to tit them ir minutes that thev were nol "t one or other of the four oi actually looking at a drawing"ve performances that are likely room or A library. The problem to bo given An announcernen' was a little more difficult ul, the publli al la it came lo outdoor scenes, but ho made In duo course, The date even so —and l',c. Thomas went "' 'he Brat parfo Into technical netaUi of hnw the ><'' l, een lixi-d. It will not. HI any illusion of a v.ood or a wide rns '. '*' before M..v 10th It i' landscaiMcou'd be sustained P"l without a single s<|tiare inch of <'ollar a seat—the proceeds to b* paint.-i scenfty a t a f aod tor eventual payment Into any fund that may be organThe pocket theatre at Wakeized lo assist in the estnhliNhmen held House has therefore been of a genuine Little Theatre erected on the lines of these recommendation*; and all lovers It must be emphasized that, of the drama in the island will whatever u decided in detail be extremely interested to see about "Pygmalion", the produ.huw they work out in practice t>on is simply Intended to christen The theatre owes Us existence the new theatre, -nd lo give thos* entirely to the Hnlish Council, interested some idea of what can and UM relaUTal] rntall sum of he done on a stage of this si/ money that has been i-xpended on with the use of a curtain se* It has come solely fn,,,, British The real idea behind Ihe whole Council funds. Before the work project .s that all drama group had gone far, however, Mr. in Barbados, Includlnv those mn Tucker inv.ted two officials of the iieetwi with ehiirrhl .Ir!L Development and Welfare OrwhTSuri IISTS ^JLS^ ganlzation i„ luncheon. Both of w f lu x l^L %,*J**? !" : nX than had had a good deal of exSaMsW ttan*?^!*! "omcthin, pe.ieneo of dramatic production; J^rrTa| io h 0 2' nnry com and >he,r boat found that they "•;' "Bhf eomody or thriller enthusiastic obout the 1*,''?. ''"S! "" %  meai i ihties of his "pocket _t! n !V? ln|t olmn ,,r highbrow) theatre" as he was. An informal "Miid ,a vp ^'mewhe'e in which, committee was formed on the '"*' of charge or on payment u. spot; and, before the meal was """y a vef y small sum to mee over, discussion on a play which ual expenses, they can try ou' might IKput on by way of "T cir ideas. If any group rl.argelaunching the new venture, and admission for its performances Ihe players that could be invited and makes a profit, it wili )-, to take part in it. was well i !" 0 '" . no pou u-ow'l. Nobody's 10 il(lt nip friend*. ShaU I t.-ll pou lomefhino? Yes. Hover. J if.Mi'i like pou. That'll do. Rover I don't Nice you. n.vrr did lilcr you, never shall lUce you Pompous prig. That's pou. tg, Rover, Time for bed. Culthins' Suivey I r THF Governnant thinks it can compete with Old Moor-* c, u b i* i n .*. the t/orU-faramu as'.iologer. in preditting disaster it will have to Ihink again. The Economic Survey for 1951 taya that "In many ways our prospects are harsh and unleaearr!' Old Moore Gubblns. who said much the same thinn in a New Year message to his readers, now says that our prospects will not only be hanh and unpleasant. but almost unendurable in eve. %  possible way. Beginning on Tuesday {Budget day), we shall enter i period of national illeled in our history. As the wind was.Mowing from the •north-east on March 21 it will ig :,i O.MQ. 1 observations over a # number of years) roughly in that direction until Jar* This means a bitterly cold THKC II. KI \I II i O.. LTD.—AtfeiMK g j EVERY WELL DRESSED GENTLEMAN MAY NOW HAVE HIS WISH BY WEARING A PAIR OF "D A K S" TROUSERS TAILORED BY SIMPSONS in GABARDINES, WORSTEDS and TROPICALS DROP IN AT YOUR CONVENIENCE and make YOUR SELECTION From DA COSTA & Co., Ltd DRY GOODS DEPT. '.;'.::','.'sz,:'.' r 's;~ prjof and early rammer with M. v?P" ruln d bv •*' % %  liijceer bills for fuel wllh les< money lo oav Ihem, nnd another I nfl lW BM epidemie. II also means lhal the Festival of Britain may open In a blizzau' which will drive America. vlnton out of the counlr quicker than boiled cod an,, E? J y JHf** 1 bru l aprout. and English coffee Froren to the marrow an % %  ; t;y nu. thi. uhhapp. il then search the shop "V; 81 1 underclothing, wnic: will !%  in short supply because ol rearmament. Alarmed al il„. d..lming healt of the population, and the In creasmg cosl of fr. medi, me. th Government p then nwlten no.iurmg ., material makiaa warm under [ft to nu th. %  lie l!tt day of summei of the heat, imbed will buy th.warm underrMhini; it ,,.i be %  „!., %  %  ex. hangc for Whale blubbci whu-h will IKInch) i % %  Ir, ;} %  meftt ralion. • • • i will end In less than a i. Shivering citizens will md the wann under doUUne. no longer available About the end of July i r mi i Hi nrj rain in August will niin the banes' Nobody will have any money o spend on : Hoteln and bars will be h.df mp. • to higher taxi I national revenue will drop. BE SURE THE RUM IS "GODDARPS GOLD BRAID" BE SURE THE SODA OR GINGER IS "CANADA DRY"



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Rt'KDAV. APRIL 2. 151 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGI ill vis CONSTITUTIONAL STORM 'uU !\! h CroWn hM a "to on legislation. Viscount Swinton: Hs_; it %  power of certificaiion* l*rd Ogmore: I am nut certain S, P 010 *bul wi And out. ThU Executive Committee, which Hd fOmj-r-Hvei, recent date. described by Lord Milverton, is Ue controlling organism in Bafeadc* so we And that this Colon* | virtually self-governing m domaslumallei-, .u.fimigh m mailers or foreign poJ^ und ln „ like, -rid r;itlvelv small mailer, although a very Important matter to those directly concerned? On the history of this particular dispute there is not very much difference between us. 1 agree very largely with what the noble Lord, Lord Teviot. has said although there are one or two differences which perhaps • should mention. The company tlrst applied for on allocation of steel and dollars In 1941—as the noble liord has said—and that was refused. In 1940 they applied for protection. They took the view that they were unable to Incur lu y expenditure on deep drilling, without protection against competitive drilling In areas over which thi'y had not a licence. I expect the noble Lord would agree with that. This request necessarily implied, from the company's point of view, nationalisations of the mineral rights. One point which the noble Lord did not bring out, but which 1 now want to bring out, was lh.it the whole of this affair developed from this application by the company to be protected against heavy expenditure on drilling in areas over which they had no control. Lord Teviot: The whole matter arose for a very simple reason, which 1 am sure every noble Lord in this House who has any knowledge of business will up preci.ite. It was that a company proposing to spend about a mil lion pounds In preliminary pros pectins, want to be quite certain that it has protection against other people tapping its sources. Lord Ogmore: I am not objecting, and I am not saying that the company were unreasonable at aU in that view. I am saying merely that this was not, as one might have thought from the speech of the noble Lord, a sudden desire on the part of th_Government for nationalisation. It was an attempt, in the begin nlng at all evenU—although we shall see riat there was a slight slide away towards the end—to meet the legitimate requirements of the company to be protected when they desired to do this extra deep drilling. I think the noble I-ord will agree with me there This request implied nationalisalion of the mineral rights, because there was no other way in which the Government cou.d protect the 'company against competition. The company felt ihut ..riles* they could get thl monopoly, when they got down to very great depths they would be at the mercy of land owners over whose l;in,l they had not been granted lease*. The noble Lord may shake his head, but I do not understand otherwise why lhey applied for protection in this way. I thought it was common ground between Us that they did want protection. I do not blame them, and I should feel the same way myself; but that was the origin of this attempt bv the Government to meet the company's wishes. Lord Teviot: I do not want to Interrupt the noble I*o. d unrec'ssarlly. but let me jusl make this mutter clear. We had 78 pt. t Yd of the drillable area. Outside that 78 per cent., there was no available drillable area—II was mountains, or land upon which Asm could be no oil. Therefon over me island we had a rumplsrti licence to prospect, and :he noble I.ord will see what Mr. Lepper said. Lord Ogmore: I really do not understand why the company applied to the Government ir. respect of these other leases if they were satisfied with what thevhad. I do not understand why they should go to the Government and say: "We want protection." I do not agree with the noble Lord on this point. I should have thought that the company. fr.om their own limited point of view, were entitled to make a request at a time when they were expending large sums of money. I am not blaming the company; I am only trying to explain how this thing arose. hope the noble Lord will find that I am fair to him when I try to explain what happened. In 1946. the acting Governor informed the Secretary of State for the Colonies of the situation, and after some talk between them, in April, 1947. the Secretary of State fog UN Colonies replied to the Governor suggesting that the company might be given an oilprospecting licence over the whole of Barbados. So far as His Majesty's Government here were concerned, they thought that the company should have this prospecting licence over the whole of the island—that is common ground between us. The Barbados Government reconsidered the question of the vesting of the mineral oil in the Crown, which had been in abeyance since 1938, and the Secretary of State suggested that they should follow the example of the. United Kingdom Act, 1934. which vests In the Crown property In mineral oil in the United Kingdom, and provides for no com. pensation to land-owners. T e Government published the Bill on the lines of the United Kingdom Act. offering no compensation, and this, quite naturally, aroused some hostile criticism from land uWu ar s, The Government invited an oil expert from llie United Kingdom l> advise When Mr. Leppcr went there, he was not mrielv advising on the question of the B.U.O.C.*s leases and their managerial operations, hut also, I understand, on the question of the rights or otherwise of land owners iindu the Avt. Lord Teviot: But he did refer to it. Lord Ogmore: I am coming to that. In the meantime, the Governor informed Mr. Maclntyre. of the company, that they had decided to introduce legislation. On May 5, 1948. the Governor in formed Mr. Fitzgerald and Mr Marlntyrc that no formal decision with regard to the prospective licence had been reached, and that It was impossible tor him to say how the Committee would react. Mr. Lepper went to Barbados towards the end of 1948, having been appointed by the Barbados Government but on the recommendation of the Colonial Office. After full examination ot the position, he recommended the vesting of mineral oil In the Crown and the grant of a prospecting licence over the whole island to the company in recognition of the amount of money that had been spent. In January. 1948, %  representative of the Gulf Corporation appeared in the picture, and he also applied for a prospecting licence. He said that the Corporation would be satisfied with a licence over half the island. The Gulf Corporation, as your Lordships know, is a big American corporation. There is another issue involved here, other than that exposed by the noble Lord. Before deciding, the Executive Committee asked Mr. Tanner, the Minister of Mines of Alberta, to advise, and he formed the opinion that it was in the best interests of the latand that two companies should have prospecting lltagjrjai He felt, however, thai the Government should first lake the decision on the claim of B.U.O.C: to be granted an island-wide licence oo account of past operations. In other words. Mr. Tanner decided, on oil grounds, so to speak, thai n would be better to have the two companies operating, but he said that as there was a political mailer Involved—nametv. Ihe existimi leases of B.U.O.C --it would !*• better for the Government to decide rather than that he should advise. The Petroleum Act of 1950 wgl passed, whereby the propertv in petroleum in its natural condition in strata was vested in the in the Executive Committee. As a result, no person may now search for or get petroleum except In pursuance of %  licence. This Act also made provision for the grant of compensation to the company for their two producing wells previously mentioned—the only two -.-ells producing In Barbados—or, alternatively, for the grant to the company of a lease of the wells. The B.U.O.C., of course, took some exception to this proposal, and thev presented their case before ihe Executive Committee. After hearing ihem. the Executive Committee decided to divide the Island for oil prospecting purposes into two parts— 55 per cent to B.U.O.C-and they proposed to give rights to prospect to both BU.O.C and the Gulf Corporation. So they definitely departed there from the recommendation of Mr. Lepper. The Government also resolved that, in recognition of the part played by B.U.O.C.. they would give them a licence over 55 per cent, of the island, with a right to lease half this area for twenty-one years. If the lessees desired. They were allowed to select this area: they were given the choice of four sub-divisions of the Island for oil prospecting purposes. The Government also offered BU.O.C. 50 per cent, of certain territorial waters surrounding the island, with similar rights as regards the licensing. The Gulf Corporation were offered a licence over the remainder of the inland and the remainder of thr territorial waters They were not offered this licence prior to the offer to BU.O.C: it occurred simultaneously. The working conditions to which the noble Lord, Lord Teviot, referred were rather onerous. But there IK no doubt that these would have been relaxed if B.U.O.C. had proceeded with their lease. The reception of this offer by the Government fell on stony ground, so far as B.U.O.C were concerned. They slated in their interview with the AttorneyGeneral that the offer was unacceptable, and after a number of somewhat hostile referenda to their competitors they rose abruptly and left the room. This broke up the discussions. The Government decided to continue the discussions with the Gulf Corporation, on the basis of a prospecting licence for half Ihe island. leaving the remaining half as a Crown reserve. Eventually, the Gulf Corporation were granted an oil prospecting licence over half the island and certain of the territorial waters, Ihe Corporation paying a royalty on crude nil produced and a rental for land held under lease the normal basis for Colonial leases In an interview at the Colonial Office in June last, B.U.O.C. urged a claim for romE msation against the Barbados Dvernmrnt on moral grounds. They were informed that this was a matter for decision by the Barbados Government, hut that the Secretary of State would forward written representations. The company have not taken advantage of this offer—in fact, as the corrcsf indence, a copy of which Lord eviot has kindly sent me, shows, six months went by before the next approach to the Colonial Office was made by the noble Lord. Until then, the Company had not accepted the offer of the Secretary of State or his representative to send written representations through the Colonial Office to the Barbados Government. There is one other item that I must mention here, because the noble Lord made reference to it. and It would be confusing if I did not touch on it. In addition to the Petroleum Act of 1950. another Act was passed—namely, the Barbados Natural Gas Corporation Act of 1950. The Barbados Government opened negotiations with B.U.O.C. In April. 1950. for the grant to them, in lieu of cash compensation, of a lease of two wells producing natural gas. The company made certain stipulations. They wanted certain qualifications to the offer: first, that during the term of the lease no other person should be allowed to get or supply natural gas and, secondly, that they should have the right to open new wells in substitution for existing well* it L-ed lo produce 'I fie Government could not sceeiJ* to this suggestion, which might nave (veil m >onti .idiction of live C.ulf l^vporatlon's licence ind le. e The Gulfs prospecting lie* ice excludes B.U Ofc.'s gas welts B U.O.C* did not agree that this was sufficient protection, and lhey wanted further protection. The Government were unable to gram thetr request, as It was net upktkMv that the *o wells eoulo have been tapped from Gull land As regards the natural gas. in this case ngjin.-os in the case of petroleum, the C.>\rrnrhent ware not prepared \n give 111* Ot* 'i monopoly of natural gas: and as a result th<> G.is A.t which I ha->e ivrn'ionen', and have entered Into -. in purchase the'eon-f an> s pipelines and equip then, he company created difficult!' about the basis of compensatlc bul ttie> have not submitted %  claim under this Act, as they are entitled to do. The nobW Lord, and also the noble Lord. Lord Milvrrton. conmenled on the fact that the Gi if Corporation is an American coi corn. In fact, since 19M, it his been the policy of His Majesty's Government to grant reciprocal rights to foreign MIOJCCH %  Miat'ts to say, where their Gnvernmcats givcertain rig!ts to our subjects; and in IMa, this policy was extended iu Colonial territories. We. therefore, have nn ground for discrimination-—even if we wished to 'exercise any—against the Gulf Corporation. I am sorry that the noble Lord made a reference to Persia, which is a very delicate subject at the moment Apart from the passing of the Natural Gas Corporation Act, which gives them the right to lake over the two gas wells, all that the Barbados Government have done is to nationalise mineral oil lights, and It was done on more handsome and favourable terms to the land owners than in this country under a Conservative Government. So I do not think one can soy that there has been any question of bringing In a totalitarian State. I am sure noble Lords oppodle would reject such an allegation. Harsher measures were passed In 1934 than those passed by tie Barbados Government. Viscount Swinton: I am not here to argue about Ihat. The analogy does nol seem to me to be exact. because, so far as I understand ihe noble Lord, Lord Teviot, he Is not complaining alout the terniN on which mineral was nationalise" What he says is that, since the company had rights granted by %  leasehold, when the State nationalised the mineral which was onder lease or under prospecting licence, the State ought to take them over subject to those rights I should have thought that that was : tenable proposition, and was hoi al all inconsistent with the Act we passed ,.n nationalising British oil I think I am right ln saying that. in our dealing with oil here, the State took over subject to any rights which had been grantid. is that not so? Lord Ogmore: That is not at all. of course, what the B.U.O.C. wanted. They did nol want the State to take over the rights of the oil. subject to existing rights, because they were not satisfied with the rights they already possessed. They wanted more rights than they had. Viscount Swinton: And ended by getting less. Lord Ogmore: And ended by getting less. 1 am sorry for them, but that is what happened. In lersia, as we know, the mineral oil rights have been owned by the Persian Government for some considerable time—but I do not want to go into that, because it Is delicate subject. Then there was a reference to the Irrawadi Fluulas Company: they were paid compensation under nationalisation by Ihe Burma Government, but not by His Majesty's Government Lord Teviot: No, I did not Mfr that. Lord Ogmore: I do not want to weary the House. I will come now to my series of conclusions, and try to sum up the position as fairly as I can. As I see it, in the first place, the company have no legal right to compensation under the Petroleum Act. 1950. for their expropriated leases. It is unfortunate, but 1 think It is agreed that that Is so. In the second place, the company have a legal right to compensation under the Petroleum Act, 1950. in respect of two wells, and under the Natural Gaa Corporation Act. 1980. in respect of their pipeline. Thirdly, the company have broken ofT negotiations with the Government. If I may say so, 1 think they have beeo hasty in doing so. Also, they have been dilatory in presenting their request for compensation under the Petroleum Act, and under the Natural Gas Corporation Act ft**] started this whole manoeuvre with the intention of obtaining a monopoly, because they were not satisnad I do not know why they started It at all, unless they were not satisfied with their existing rights. The Colonial Secretary made representations to the Barbados Government to grant a prospecting licence for Ihe whole island to the Company, but the Barbados Government did not agree, and decided to grant them only 55 per cent, of the area under prospecting There has been no preferential treatment of a foreign company. Under the constitution and by practice, the Government and the legislature have wide powers m internal affairs. For the Colonial Secretary to have enforced his T'ishes. overriding the Executive Committee, would have been incompatible with modern trends in Colonial administration l was rather surprised to hear from the noble Lord, Lord Mllverton. a view which from my experience of him (I was not in office when he wus a Qnvemor. so I can say this. 1 was a private Member of Parliament) is quite incompatible with what he would have thought of this matter If he were the Governor or Barbjdc*, It would be a bold Secretary of State who would have overridden the noble Lord. Lord Milverton. and his Executive Committee during his period as a Governor I think Ms change of scene from the West Indie* here has also changed his views greatly in a matter of this kind. It is true that on occasion, in matters of great constitutional importance, a course such as has been suggested to us by two noble Lord.; would have to be taken, but I do nol think one can be expected t take such a course 0 n matters oi other than great constitutional lmpwUmce. In my view the company would be well advised to ac cept the suggestions that I am about to make. I suggest, first oi all, that the company should reopen negotiations with the Barbados Government for the grant of a prospecting licence over the remainder of the island. I suggost secondly, that lhey put in their claim for compensation under the Petroleum A,-. jn d the Natural Gas Corporation Act. because it seems to me that to charge the Government of Barbados with harsh treatment, and to describe them In the way in which the> have been described by the two noble Lords who have spoken, is Mimewhat extreme when 0 ne remembers that It is the company who have broken off ne|otiations. I would suggest that fhe v r*7H %  ntcr negotialions mi both the matters to which I have referred, and I aaii sure that the Colonial Office will assist them so far as possible. I realise the disappointment that the company must necessarily have felt over this matter, but I think that in their own interests, and in the Interests of good relationships between the business world of this country and of Ihe West Indies, they should reopen negotiations on these matters, in order to see whal decision the Barbados Government will in fact come to It may be that in the course of negotiations the company will be able to obtain a more liberal .offer than has so far been the ease. As we who have had any dealings with business all know, once you break off negotiations, the other party does nothing a t all about reopening them. Whilst negotiations are on, there is always a possibility of good treatment from the other side. Lord Teviot. My i,.i>. I must thank the noble Lord lor his answer to my Motion, but 1 fear I am not at all satisfied wilh it. For a few moments I should like to refer to some of the things that Ounoble l-ini has said. To begin with, 1 cannot believe that it was wrung for a British Company lu go into a British Colony like Barbados and prospect for oil. In order to do so, we had definite property, m that, as I have already told your lrdships, we obtained from land owners leases over 30"odd properties. We hove given up that property. We were induced to give it up by the assurances which, as the noble Lord will admit, we received through the Lepper Heport. If we had anticipated that this sort of thing was going ; %  happen, we would not have give i up those leases and we would have objected to the petroleum Bin. but we did not do so because we had every confidence in the assurance of the Governor and his Executive Committee at that time. We gave up our property in view of the assurances which were given here and over there The Colonial Secretary has said he was bouno by the Lepper Report, and we thought that we were quite safe in giving up those leases. Tlu noble Lord ma* say that we broke off negotiationv but what is the good of talking to people who do not stand by their bargains! You cannot go on doing it. I would Mas to correct the noble Ixml on bis remarks regarding gas. The gas nuestion is still the subject of negotiation Nothing has been broken off there. I will tell the noble I*>rd the reason whv we wished to be careful about gas \s I underhand it the gas cornea through a fault, and we wanted to be quite certain that a certain area round ihe fault could not be tapi>ea by somebody else If it were tapped, they would gel the gas which otherwise would come through tc us. That was quite a reasonable view, and one which any buslnesi man would have taken it was quite a reasonable thinto ask It is All very well to say that we may have been a little tiresome about thl mutter, but we never had th* offer that the Gulf Corporaiion hmt Btow obtained. We received an offer which, from a business point of view, was perfectly hopeless. The Gulf Corporation accepted the offer and siibaequentlv obtained a very much beiler dra) !^>M Ogmore: My poini was that in ihe first place the British Union oil Company had a slightly bcitei offer than ih e Gulf Corporation were given — 35 per cent a> against 45 per cent In ihe sec-one, place, through negotiation the Ch Corporation managed to get much better terms, and it was rathei foolish of the British Union oi* Company not to hav c entered intt further negotiation, instead *> breaking them off i„ order to obtain the same result. Lord Teviot: The noble Lon will remember that we held lensc over 78 per cent, of the area anc we were cut down to 32 per cent I thought 1 explained very eleailv that the 53 per tent, merely mean, U per cent The noble Lord will see that that Is so. Lord Ogmore I knuw Lord Teviot: That Is a fact in ihis is something you cannot paover as being a fair denl. I am Itui throwing ;my stones at the C ill 2P-*2S B Tney werp PTrfcrtly Srt %  They WOnl '" •* MJ Bishop negotiated for U.ern W know all about Ihat. "hoy „iar aged to complete a deal wnlei. has proved very much to (heir advantage. I ihmk „,„, I(0r Milverton made an exccllem point. I wonder wnat the Govern ment would have done if ihe %  WMQQgj Government nad] tr ed the Gulf Corporation us thev nave treated us. It would hav.> been u very different matter. I can see the United States representative here makaig a great song and dance about it, if the> had received the treatment w have. The noble Lord concentrated on the question of protection. In thi early part of my life I was a minci in Canuda. America and South Africa, and I know all about "IH-gging out" and getting i preliminary licence to prospect But immediately you gel on t anything that is of value, thei you want to get protection. Y.u want to see that you get what yet huve found und that somebod.\ else is not going to tap what ym have discovered. Sir Hilary Bloui with his Executive Commltt-'i endorsed the lepper report; Mr IVrowne said Inv...-. Umnd hs it We have reached a moat unfor turuito state, if a British under tuking in any part of the Empue Is not going to be protected bj the home Government where Ii is possible under the Constluitnn for it to be protected, I am afn i way. we iraall get v.-iy r deal after the expenditure of a large amount of money. I am nogoing to ask the House to divide but I am not going to withdraw the Motion. FIRED MADRAS A Kajkol shopkeeper recent I \ fired all his assistants on the spo. Reason ? They refused to shav. their heads clean. The *hopkeei> er had n clean shaven head ain insisted on his servants shavin theirs also. C. S. Forester —Talks About "My Confidence Trick" "I And Hornblower admirable'. read the message from Winston Churchill to Oliver Lyttelton, Minister of State in Cairo. The Prime Minister was aboard the Prince of Wales on his way tc draft the Atlantic Charter with President Roosevelt. Ai Middle &ast headquar.eri anxious officers searched their flies for some new operation with codeword "Hornblower." The/ were relieved to find that this cryptic signal was merely Mr. Churchill's way of thanking Lyttelton for a copy of C. S. Forester's trilogy Captain Hornblower, RJi\ It would not Indeed, have beet unusual had the word "Hornblower" been used to conceal a prospective naval operation. For Admiralty circle* have a fond regard for the introspective, taciturn, courageous Captain Horatio Hornblower and the efficient manner in write!. he swept the seas of foreigners during the Napoleonic Wars. The I-and-Lubber There Is a good chance, too. that Hornblower may ^omr da 1 ,otn Sherlock Holmes. ihe Scarlet pimpernel in Ihe ranks of English mythology. For through his adventures, recorded In six novels with a seventh to follow he has grown to almost life-like stature In the consciousness •>! millions of readers. It is almost distressing to re. port, then, that hi< creator Cecn Scott Forester, has no salt wuvr in hi* blood, comes from a family of conscientious land-lubbers-—doctors and civil servants—is awkward with engines and has never been ln a sailing ship in hit life. '•I first conceived of the character when I became interested in the psychological problem nl independent command". Mr. Fc ester told me. addipg "I hope th t doesn't sound too highbrow." Since seamanship in the dayj of sailing ships was a relative!. remote subject. Mr. Forester dc cided it would be easier if hi* hero was an insecure, aalf artUn' and *llgi'tiy conic character "W* could then go through our doubts together." he said. Although Hornblower has sai'ed frigates and ships of the lintthrough raging seas and fought the best that Spain and France could pit against him. Mr. Fores By MILTON SCHULMAN ter receives no' complaints about the tactics and technique* he employs. All in the Book He owes much of his information to an old Admiralty manunl he picked up Portsmouth "It is u 1798 edition of a handbook for master mariners." he explained '•nd not only tells you how to *** a ship out of trouble but whi:* trouble it Is likely to get into." Mr. Forester seems slightly sur prised that anyone should expect him to know any more. "Acquiring the appeaianee of knowledge la "ot a difficult thing.'" he said "1: s meiei.a confidence trick." Such candour comes naturally from a man whose ready laughlei and easy informality betray his inability to take himself too seriously, if it were not for the impressive height of the almost Gothic forehead you might guess that Hie Ughl face with its goldrlmmed spectacles belonged to a bank manager, a solicitor or a minor civil >ervant. Fast Reader C. S. Forester was born the to spend three years atudyln • medicine at Guy's Hospital It.s Inability to identify bones and tm deslre to write combined to prevent his entering the medical pro fesslon Searching for an explanation for his interest 1,-. writing. Mr. For tester attibutes it largely to the fact that hi* home was close to a public library. 1 think I read everything in thai library except the books on philosophy and music," he said. "Gibbon impressed me most. He Is still on omnivorous and amazingly fast reader. He can go through an average novel ln an hour arid a half. He still tfol ll philosophy and music Odd bits of verse, articles for trade magazines and, two bad his lorleal novels of the Napoleonic period earned him a precarious livelihood unUI 1926 when his neat and exciting murder story ZWA nveenndren in Cairo ^S^JSSSS^Si JtrK. ment official and the boy did nol Hollywood and still sells more come to England until he was six. Uia n 2.00O copies a year. From on unimpressive career at That turned him to full-time Dulwich College, Forester went on authorship and a series of successful novels that switched frorr mystery to history for their plot* -Brown on Resolution, Plain Mm der, The Oun. The African QueQueen. In 1932 ha accepted a 13 wee, contract at $500 a week to writ film scripts in Hollywood. It wa* a )ob he di<> annually after thai until t/le war came. "Theywould gi%-e me a liar, a locale and a fewother factor* and I would provide a plot." he *aid. "Every week In Hollywood gave me %  month oi freedom elsewhere." S rOMSTII IrffMentally the original treat1 ment oT the Hornblower film now to be seen In the West End aw writQm by Forester In 1939 fo LagUe Howard. His continent "n the flli "I think they gut loo many b.ittles In It, but it cou'd have been lofS worse." UiiHKiA Year Forester 1 reputation as a stor^ teUer and the popularity of his novels—he earns between f.lMJ'H) and 120,000 a year—has tended to obscure his more solid achieve. ments as a perceptive and iroawInative wnter. World Cupyriohf nVservad tit NEW sty It—ADDED comfort 1 i--r*rKc ihe >fca*urc of *c.mog ihe* cslra vnan --PIM .host. Made In lofl^h omfta n from me ftarst *.-kv(cd k>alhci%. SPIRL thoct arc Oarraa hmh in tit and w*k See 'he full tjngev newly armed from I ngLiHl. si yiHti kading Agrnt> for Air\j,M General Agency Co, lBarbados) Ltd. tPO Box 2*1. 14 High Street. Bridgetown fitting for men %  \ Kardomah Whatever kind of teapot you may use, you can be sure of a delicious cup of lea if you put in Kardomah Tips. Fragrant, refreshing and a little goes a long way I Frh ShipmrnU just received Price : 3Se. per >ilb pkt. from all Grocer, and Chemkai. ^WWUUlilil,/////^ / \x t t\9WNQ'sf"A YEASWTE The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B, .fa _. HEADACHES NERVE PAINS COLDS, CHILLS and '. RHEUMATIC PAINS If ymi JIV iulT>ring from %  Cold, ( lull. llaadadM of Nerve i'ain *tsn i4king VliAM \ I II. TablenAI ONCE Ymiwilthe ovoiioyed ai tiniliMcrena11 SI V.-iii i'jin. t „M. or U11II .ympicm. Mill iHjlvfcly disappear, md you'll feel ever •o mu.h belief MUIVES TOUR rWN and MAgf'. YOU till W£U i ha t. '1 nothing ibe Liu"ll AM VI II fi\ (£ ONI V pain reliever wtlCi AISO ...mains 'he %  oatC Vitamin B ( < %  -DAYI Thai*, the besi way in eel kjuick rclicl and feel belter, teo* YEAST-VITE



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SUNDAY. APRIL 29, 1931 SUNDAY ADVOCATE FACE FIVE HUUtttm LOCAL BOYS PREPARE By T. .AI i The Festival Of Britain f huTfh Services APRIL 2 Opening Carwuonv by MM The Kin! THE Festival of Britaai logins May 3. and the BBC plai \NC.U<-N 'I LfoVARBI ROCATlO-N Sl'*DAV • it! Hoi. CoASS uBlci C*rsl EuchiiM A AdHr... %  p.*. V"5'.r.. ,n R XK a Wol Indies ana nearby m lories Wednesday and HP> M %J Jl'iJ %  • *" Is ready. ,„,.„ will bo a d.recl broadcast %  P, m " !" U "j^ %*f '*" „Tj„r thai IK, „ om London „ ^.i wave, day at io.. tncre "'" f -. „ „,. „," n r* n I par com ^nph, .t that time. The.. wlU sUnllar iWtl ea> the tlrstday of rorim ,.„„,. „ m M MovrnoMiar a m tii A. PTiiiua* sanr an I a m a* r o snaih M s nil.. P, Mr fl l.h< t p m will bo en tho air in tho Genera! Overseas Service of tho BBC at 9.15 p.m >n Friday. Short* Broadcasts THE announcement of the .dual dates and programme of ^ra^ne? dStJIbuTg tension! BBC "fl brdadca a"datl7report V^n^wSTtltt the Intercolonial Sports has found the local athletes and wide celebrations to listener* In of ""• %  *. >na'ch of the toucans, MOBAVIAN cyclists hard at training. This is indeed a healthy sign for Britain and mmru. Altbouah ?""• w!i C rSt.,,h !" TiuSTro" """•'' the sport in Barbados as In the last few years th.'majority '."'"'" 'VS^.^S FtS £" of our bos-s have waited until they knew a mealing was Wr J indS..'„" „„„ r i,v lon'iorJ. We.lnc.0 definitely on the cards before they made themselve: Not that they could bo blamed, every reason to bol because II la only in roconl years boy, will bo one hundred per corn length, ai ,. v ~i„ that there was any hope ..f nt when tho day comer. I notice bo on I ho air between .'iJQ and ibtlr match afainsl Yorkauiire. or.no, regular annual fixtures Therefore i-w> that most of •*em have been 7 15am on Thursday 3rd May Other sporting broadens, rturin It also a sign that wo are neentratlni on the route from i„ describe the openinj ceremony 1"' •* will be a JjeWaw aettlnj back to normal. Of course Brldietown via Bay Street. Worth with the Kin, and Queen drivirg description of the One ThouaonJ w# are nowhere there up t.. thIn* etc to Oistin Thij strikes mo in seml-slate to St Paul's CauveGuineas .it rlewmarfcet rei r-raisi present and perhaps we will not as a good choice There are hilldral. the Service or Dedication In h May at 5 05 pm. rlsr.1 .nor be until the Athlete A>sooatlon or no inclines along this load and St. Paul's Cathedral, and. on the the description of Ihe aaya paw ta placed on o sound financial if Ihere is one thing to avoid in stroke of noon by Brill* Summer against Worcestershire^ !" io^ footing. To do thai il needs tho training for the tvpo of cycle Time. His Malesty • ileelanng the heard on saturaj support of the public at its meetraces we have. It is hill work. Festival open from the steps of recorded mga and this It should get at lbs Ken Famum will naturally be the Cathedral BBC commentat. i British "-— -~" TTr-.. Jr an forthcoming one. which .to .... aa> number one man but will be sUUoned at various pants at ^'""T"^ ,;"%£. MSS 0 *— mind, promises to be .he most in.Smart rode so well last time thai to describe all these ceremonlo, !" ,ne Yo.k.hfre mitcVi • % %  n, 5? ^i at?, terestlnc we have had in many he might almost be counted In The apecial tr.nsraM.km I, .this U>e report of '"' Y '„*; hl !" ^„ „! \ 'SJ? %  years. Ihe same bracket What is very in-area will be on MM and 24.M on Saturday. !" T * T B !" 'JS I have not seen the local athtrlguing la the fact that neither of metres. 13.31 and 1204 mega, fiui" !" g %  "^ a £ M „ letea In training but one or lw< them have met any of the formlScycles. Later In the day on the pm. on eeanosao, with whom I have spoken have able Trinidad group which la comnormal wavelengths there win ue uland Sureen told me about their efforts I al.o mg over and therefore it will lend a reconslnieOon of mec_core..,..,_ % %  ,„._,. understand that rranv of them an'" "~ Una^Aajlyseis, which. Itionlea and vialtt loj rests -1 h,r Arthur l.r.mble a f.rn. JSSS^L SS. w-nSe W T^SS3 £Sca had ESVm. &J, ^.contour in Bjc; clasr Is the pare setter Keirer who tors to the South Bank Eshlbltlnn. Ihe South Pacific He il speaa Hems content to slacken Uie centre-piece of the national on successive Fridays at ej 3 p The Topic of Last Week o9 *x o s o A0 THE WHOLE FAMILY M.i rtfr. Ion* missa-d the rne-etinn at which broke the* local 440 ynTr.!. rwrorrt bul I lut ">^7. 'un'rortunatpiy' hr"hnd hls £5^ V hil .^ ,n n ^ iSiJ*" lMl,v t'SfiiS! B fS^' ^i fitrrd ... proinotwl from \he Intr-rmnlintrs t descriptions of Iheir arnv. OU ta, -.a.^ ..alaaV .W^ __J .... the BBC's Osjwwral Ovirsis %  hmtf as am Ragraaim. to Barbados In nt and hardened •" but amoi.g ihe regulars will ; %  ^"S-.'aii rSS: condition. Hill has a pnrlirularly c Len Head. O. hllis. Hoett anal „„. ,a n. Hao.. ^~ !" ~ good stride which Is more suitaJackie Hoad This class, unlike A. ontaie. s.il aaa ca> Do. "IS where the giants are too prone to ". Piasr.-im. P.riMSr 11 "amYJ ch %  n el* wai "„" ch -"•" %  -sS'.aiVooS: ;r. '! %  .:.'. aiwavs produces all out race> tit* N*i u.ia • %  • Anibt> n which are the delight of the crowd, p m ct Onwn We look forward to them repe.il* %  ** *•** %  %  "* ON Monday St. Q — fg i l !>*>'. an Investiture and advanclmc ceremony ua*_pl.ee .1 the Head• %  ""' T ,S!fXS X !£^!%I^S' quarters ol lite Blst Uarba.lo ptt y sTrunrr (3rd Sea Scout** Group. Soitsii* u %  "> •> P After the i-eremony, the i). C. siwnvaT. Apr.) hie to middle distances than sprlnta and as I am informed he it thinking of concentrating on the latter, I suggest that he sticks moro to quarters and half miles He was not dikgracvd •VffO in I mile last year and his winning of the 840 yards last October, ulthougn against inferior opposition, gave promise ot better things to come. In the sprints we shall have Archer and Blcnman of Police ami Trotman of Enterprise to pit against Bridgeman of the Trinidad Police. Archer is another wh will be running in Trinidad in the near future and perhaps n race The 1* M M 1 nerforrr f win rtnidnvinia PUli" SIS Tony Galento Will K;i Fight Frazer Tony Galento 1161 lbs.), local £ light heavyweight boxer, will be fighting Easy Boy Frazer (182 lbs.) light-heavyweight champion Radio K.i.oei t IS an. against Hndgoman over .here win "' %  %  Lu ". ""P"" d '^"St K" cZ^iu ^m'".-."m5t" 1 SSm. give us pointers for our Sports He Monday nest week, at Ihe llrigh„„ m ,,. ajona,.,. %"SST S a sprfnter of .uame potent,., tonj Spjir t,i Chib % %  ;. InIJjr a !" fJX Trotman haa beet) away from '.2 "T^.V ..!.. i-Y. c-r, i so am •he island ,n recent year, but *• *k>TJJlJ. S "."*, CM noOSAMMI C'orbin, addressed the Group on S-aian %  the aims and beneflts of Scoutln Tt* mt "-"^^ Those invested wan "„. n m| Mma ".. Juniors: T. S. Chandlai. t< id <• ,\ taiiawaih Nicholls. B Waterman and U McLean. ,,,,,._ SALVATION ARMY SenlonL. Worrell, U Gllkes suunosTowi CNTR-II andO. Corbin. H Holm... M>Muis a Advanced into Senior Troop: Co.-** • %  > "'•"" %  '" %  ; % %  Elmer Scantlebury and Hamsley ,,,'r.tinTc.ioN" M.II I To all thos. we say Good IAIC* gjn*-^ ^^ MJ> -' .„i,l wish them Great adventure '*'" p '" ch 0 1(lT 7 N M """ In SLOUtlng. II "> llnllnfM MrelliiB 3pm • • Con.nsnv MerUltg 1 p.m. S.lv.u-xi A. from Tut^day. 1st May. "' "**& [^'^ ""*• %  Scout Headquarters will open as n m it..iiM,-„ wreur: .% MM T IS pm CThe Hii' m aiut *m .. m IB ( ..,(.: %  SB M n. N-w. Voicca •nd the %  MM laOladl" those of us who saw him win the •'* "%, ''"""'"* '" '", flrat hundred vards which the „.;","' ?P5" ,S .,J'.'.' ,, „V„ i, m '~,i i"imVisow, ami i.i AA.A.B. held at their meeting In spaning panners are At Mauler J{ %  %  %  .„„„• ,„ „ „ m ._aa ntiaan'a Park after the war will "' %  1( >n>erto Brown. m Aadleor, Mail Baa SSt^tSZS^S^SS ..Galcnto's sparring partners am KorMi. There will be a meetinj: el the Executive Committee of the Council at Scout Headquarters on Monday. 7th May at 5.00 p.m. Last but not least there will bf our Lady hope Grace Cumber battch who never fails to please the crowd. To my mind Grace Cum-berbatch was ns promising in her sphere as a school girl ai> L. L. CTkhlow of I-odge School was in his as a school bov. But the annoying part about such unusual athlet.-s in Barbados Is that after they leave school there are not OKltlgh organised sports meetings to help them make the natural progress B l Kenny Seaman and Sugar Ray lien Jones. Kid Ralph's former Manager, is now training Galento. Fighting on the same ticket :.ro Kenny Seaman and Al Mauler WRt'l. WRl'W : i: TJM. LEGALL BEATS VICTOR BRUCE There will be a meeting of the Executive Committee of the South n TSMe. Western Local Aasociatinn at the Y MCA on Friday. 4th May at WftVX IT MMr laApn MONDAY. \ran. M, IMI 50 %  n ; I" M • • The Empire Youth Service will • m ^^J T? ,, ^ 0 ia *?m bP lH ld al Government House on NT. Air*. 7is -m rVn ihSunday. 6th May. Mii.sfi.1. 1B_ nv Prosrirnrm. P-All Scouts and Rovers are asked nanl Hi t 111 I Ml It M I HoU-ets Mw—iu$ 3 p lit Mrrtinf 1 PH> S.L..U..'. rarMt. UcxiWnani Hem I-. l-.ll is KlW "s 11 a ni llailiiir.. V.i-anti- 3 (.I 111'*.") Ms-etnia 1 p it. Sb.lv.Uon tfia-liraB I'rs-s-rti SjC'pl %  talvip — ST. JAMS* NATION*!. MAPTIftl : I! evm I Sormati. Pre*Otoi I.Tt. ASS SaMe-MaU I H.G. Establish?* New Hospital That Mirk ol Onatnaaa ? to .m SiHivenlr* ol fratlK* M>H Prrtrrt IVlMlr Colithine. 9 n t 10 am. Ilnme Net. • II m Clot* Do IV,vs-r.,ni"H> ParaHlr II tnr CTto.ee. l to am eommnii liitv*v II noon Tne Nt--. PORT 0F-S1' \IN Api %  -'" %  Ralph Legal 1. MapV Club's Slnti open Champion, who reprethey should. Grace Cumberbatch sen ted Barbados in the retent iV.ia'p m' New. Ansivu will now have to take on TrinlBrandon Trophy tournament CHa*_Dam. dad's Eileen Kinij after nearly five scored (1—0, B—-0 victory over months of Inactivity In athletics. Victor Bruce in a Quarter Hnal Can she do It successfully? The fixture at the club's court. Legal! sports must answer the question, has benefited graatly from tho Th* Cyclists experience which he gained in The ryeum I have been seeing tho Brandon scries J.nd virtually regularly at work for almost the swopBniea off the court to will whole period since our last meet In straight sets. The match lasted In* in October. There is therefor.35 minutes. 'Ftotii OMT !••?> riiit<>*pondr>iii> CEORtiBTOWN. April 2 The Government has ajiproved "**• tsi meet at 3 30 p.m. outside the lh establishment of a hospital .„ Th'; Western wall at Government %  Atkinson Field, former U-S. Ifasm House A tiny-Air base. 20 miles up the Uriuin *. Demerara River. ..... -----T"* hospital will roter for BO %  % % %  | itients — 60 men and 20 women. ....:.-.. Prm'lslon has been made h is p.mi ihg pLroposed plan for tlie expeniponiorrd by JAR BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of JAR RUM Phensie fur quick, safe relief FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC P'.INS, LUMBAGO, | NERVE PAIRS, W! -TJlVaiA, INP UCNIM CntBS BWIU ,v-^^^',^^^*#v',^^vv* ( .'*^'*o^^.v,*,o'-v-v^^^^^^*-'----,• La*t*i>T 4.1 <.11 p r. l) P diture of 125,000 oil equipment. 1-thtd-S.M i.... %  %  i% % %  p Pi .uiisr .M-i.il p.m ThM..-I nl It. 1ft pm a pm. Had.* Nawwi-vl CMnn>onwalUi "fciryvy. % %  p rn '"" "-""."*" FwT'ii*S,.aMS.i -'I W0.00O tor racurnnl rspen snr.phany On-h.tnr. pm Britinh Omfifi Hail is p "t ditare, such as staffing. When Can.po.-r_o!' iKr__weh, III Th Haw*. 10 IB P." 1 l"i"->^" rt' iblu.he'l, Ihe hospital will cater Th/* TWUMI 'p* ^persons sufferln* o... -' II -J %  %  ' pRonaaMMi: IS p m 10 13 pm News and CammartUS' 10.11 pm-IDM p.m Ca> %  .iidutii Chronkrlp chronic ailments and recupeiiitioii .dter maior operatlona. Miiin reason for the Base Hospital is to relievo congestion ut the Georgetown Hospital. LADIES WANTED — WONDER WHEELS N Why Hercules CYCLES arrive in Barbados in perfect condition The npecitl Hercules packing roeihods the result of 30 years study of packing for countries overseas—ensure this. Theweliwrapped parts are placed carefully in strong cases so that they can be simply, safely and correctly assembled nn arrival at destination. SMITHS FJVFIELD irs A ******* To know Ihal m are busily assgagtnl In OfMllBI DUISS MATKKIAI.N nl Ii descriptions) for Ollf RIO DRESS MATKRIAI. DISPLAY which is srheuuled In beiiln on MONDAY 30th April This show lias been arraiimil with llii10 nu.railon of our numerous Ovaraoaa Mannuclurari who have sen! us runsiuiiiiiriils of the lineal oualilv anil iisMirlnn-nl ..I I'l.AIN. I'ASTKI. KLORAI.. and PRINTK1I I %  WIII'll S In SII.K. KAVON. TAH-KTA. SATIN, LINKS. CAMBBIC, POPLIN. PLKCALE SHARKSKIN *le. tit.. Millable fur any and every occasion. In short, you will have the same opportunity of seeinic a rruresentative range of DRESS MATF.RIALS at N. E. WILSON 4 It), as Ihe folks who will nltend the BRITISH INDUS1WAL I \lit IN I M.I.AND and buy the pick of the variety nt lowest possible prices. Wi llri'M I S for I III' Uriilr SMITHS Il.tHKS ARK 100'. BRITISH MADE vitw o Hiacuid ,ACaiN3 AND OflSATCH Dl"S.riSiN' Hercules 7HI hiacuLis CfCH 4 Moron cOMaair smiths I iilnl.1 8-day •inkinir and lomiti:i-loi'kand 10-hour thawpiMM ir-a dflight t" all vho iMfc for r ..,..| taste anil prrfert rrliul.ilitv. withprieea that Mr. TWv tf availahlc in allrar[Vl t.tiO.1, niniil.fr.I nd HI--ISI 1 ttm\ aod ,. Itnti.hmadr tiii g fcl SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS %  VaaBsWIMMsl GRANT LTD.. BRIDGETOWN And here is talent:— ill op|i %  rliliiilv t" make m.H To every $20.00 you t|>rnd ymi will LWMtM entitled to he asked the nrlifin of s\\ difTerpnt Materials. Upon torrerlly anawerinK four nut M thr six, you will he Ihe recipient of m DRESS LENGTH of your own choice FREE Here we give you an iden of the origin of Ihe inuteriaU on display :— ClawboaloVakla, HoBaJkonKJapan. Ireland. The I.K.. Amcnia. Franrr. ItaU (lermany. Holland etc. etc. And now, Ladies, don'i mil offered hv this nppnrlu N. E. WILSON & Co., The I'llra Modern Storr carriiiiK the inosi moilerii Dn'ss Materials for disrriminatinu Ladies s111 i,r paon rot a 1 in ,1 >ltin r 1 m . sTnr.Mi, Dial .1S7B ril. Swan St. 1st E\enin)j Heir Fur Me anil Itonifvlir Wear ,','.',-,'.'.'--*'a-.'.'.'.'^A'.->'.'a'.'*--'-*''.*'''*.*>'.*.



PAGE 1

M S*QAY, \PRIf. , 1SJ1 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAOF SEVEN Clubwomen Operate A Children** Home I IHM I SSI\ B>MAK(iAKi:TIII(Kl \ I In the i .t> el hunt, in the IM of Montana, Croup of business*, omen haw established a home lor children abandoned or neUected I" ttai paren:While ml* hum* i* ,n Butte. || could be anywhere Tnere uie, unfortunately, tad Starving children in any city in U.is; police know It, II Inded people Know it whan they tioubk' themselves to face facts. Jn Unite, it was Mr*. Mary I 'II ; . 'ul Welfaie office, who fir.-t concerned herself Wit* I i, 'he more 1 am l>ccomnfl convinced that an all-star cast is ru>t the most Important contributing factor to the success oLfJ-e film. It i* certainly a great advantage, as is a oreU-hsnoxed plot, hut the one person of whom the audience hears_/ftry Hulc. but who is laroely responsible for success or failure 1 is the director Recently, we have had several ohnneie ut prove thai she is caps i that she I We of /ericus characte Mag.cnB..' transformed by makeup, her face and figure iesemb|c the queii at closely oi possflilt. while) hrr speach and manner are always In character One of the that results when director's (iifTcultle* was to bring In expert hands. ""'_ tha sympathy and warmth In Handing examples of dlrecU' at its finest —Treasure Wand, All About Eve The Fallen tdo\ and The Third Man, and thi wee* THE MrnLARK showing at the Empire, is another example of it" excel! diiectlnn MR NAT CARMICHAPI. (fourth from left facing camaia) who has oa>. *H-I-M Senior Sclance Muter at HirrlMii College la s*tn hero lea ling a dlscgsfloa o Rousts*. 4 a*oii'. • %  1I*M^ a" together U the borne of tba Dean of the University of Western Ontario hual. who Is on the University Staff is a Barbadian, and a lirotrier of Mt I*aae CarmrchHcl of the Education Department expected In Barbados today. well ; ample i ttonal reputation to upholdWith an EnjgJish raatr—all bu a character notad for Us coldnea*, Irene Dunne,—Jean Neulu. and to portray the hetplcsMie-... an American director, has turned -""id grief suffered by the queen out a Mm. (based on a legendary on the lo.-s of her husband. M; I m the reign of Queen Neguleacu has succeeded In this Victoria), which was chosen for a 'ask wit! oul ihe slightest dl Roval Command perfcrmance, and mlnution it Her Majesty's dignity nant success is no mean or royal 'caring and Miss Dunne feat of accomplishment. The.holcu portray* he subtle human real of Irene, Dunne as Queen Victoria in t* ep< 'ienced by the queen. may seem strange, but I can assure a = a worr "< ;| f ai thi I you her portrayal of that grew. "' •"**' *"d apparently cold lady Is authoritative and convine!*. erv 5 ,f ,hc sovereign It U in-, as is the role of Disraeli, ""* memorable chnroctcrl played by Alec Guinnees Both J: n * Dlaraeli. Mr Alec ( these performances are far be( '*nnea> gives one of the most >ond any expectation and will £25* liSr^lS^Sri S. !" ndouhtedly rank w.th the beat --££ R^ST !" *"*'* n,ve and I MU1<1 sa> thai Mr GiunnaM W nearly an %  par with .... Ttiwdore ">' %  '•, Crr Art,,., wtum LuK' lob !" "fr"trom Bonnm's book 'Thr Mudlark' and ck^acUlliaUon • %  prolvbljr In. Jono when the horn. Twi/SSS. "*•" "'•'' "' he.h,.h_po,m ot uS ippllcs of staples, heritance in their homes. The Soroptlralsts have I iviti d found The story i* bused I Itiv .n.edirul examtnat.ons and Th,, „ aV e added ,,n intlrinaiv and >ear-old dereUet. who linds • 'he Prime Minister s speeel Mnrv PhUUps proposed at the treatment In the rhlMrrn taken a lire escape to o.mph with ?ute l'l"i'"' %  < *Wf VktorU in Ihe 1 '' l ,n ,,','',f,' eiub's first meenna mat the Butts <" 'he horn,, the liu>pitals allow, c ,iiinen..nt. I„ February KM pocket of a dead srai.wn. Irin in H„„ U SH2!S A SoroplffOsu make the creavtiui of td hM' rales for tnn^lleetomles the home received Its sbjte license. Ihe mud on the bonk of the bl ;"" ( .^ "• •<<* " dp '""""i*a home for children their conimu. and other ailmenls reflulrlnK hon. Bwr > s ncw i v f orm ed Community Thames, and determines He is .^'""" !" P* r ,*,""*'"V "!""" %  *J nity service. Club i.i.-mbeis dis rl">llation The mcntal.heaim Co e, u a „ or|anlsation for ralilnii ein to see her lie eventually ',"*""' '" l* 0 !"" "or nil cussed.the proposal for seme lime, clinic promised free psychiatric fund, for all charitable institutions ; rrlves at Windsor where the old l^f"*.. „,„„.,, ,. „, .„.. and Anally agreed that niembon eaxe hould It be needed. „, a community, appropriated lady has shut herself up for fifteen !" lhlr .d oruaclpal ,le of Johl would look for a sultabl'bdtur. found it. %  > buv i: in *ny 1947 th •he queen'.. Ehillie TtpJaTl to I n l|ay !' Child Welfare Department of Butte •,„ thell 'omiletlu "' h '^ ""' cl ub *4 m ' r rl and |ood" eare' green %  ..IKST a evper.enced child caie o! the home's sure. .'. ?ta ,':',;'.', riu,"' 1 ;'I'i.'r,"''.'^' Or*f. with three cluldren of he, due ,0 the mere fact that ,t exists ttil etubcurhsnris' The lloni "*'• Tl """" **• V H"" 1 """ "" But part also has been clu.. la it was S^ r !" i,Hek with 1^ "" noor "' "" P>>"~">. • !" >,l basically sound odnanisation Th, ,i?^ i,..V. I, ,,.. i„ 'he kitchen the bi| electric refrlr, SoroptimistV roomi .1*1 two baths. It was n tiiIni ^ -|nm J iir w .. fairly Rood cnnditlon. necilinjt only .hould it l.e needed. n a community, appropriaien "•*>' "<>n.'"i lacieeii us>v. mi.n> p_ WI ,.. November m the hou* "*" ' " "ome. KK^^^ift V?*' b i 1 l '"> """ %  -<•" a, ,eadi for ...cupaney. The Th. children for whom the home ?„ v 71 ,£ !" l 7tatT II i arriv'tl braunr Sl "' m %  '""""c a ,. established thrive on me love .,„ c d( ; w ,„; ,„,. mo „ rorma a delight fro,,, .rt to Hit i. I'ait ...,„..-. ^r ,t,„ o, ii..,, M. rii^h,> Seollish a, cent like a slrean,ee „.,. been ', \?&t J!,"," persuade "f^T Echlnd U,e iurek !?" ^" un u -^E ,rtul ., Soo "P e hie. while porttoni "f Windso. uschvnl. >n* gonto pS^fut^J^mt.'!!"^ efc c " "* v "" '""'""" "' crator nd stove were hi perfect are those of the proCewinnallv E^lu t 1 i' ', .„ I'"" 1 """' give realistic aim,.. i.ider. Clothes were elesui, oressed, trained welfare department. p r ,nr c "'" ?,i„ -., phew. ntutly woven IrttV. of ,t?l',' a ,.^^.. !" .M. l 'T I ', nSndd. nd in closet, '.Iting uj city, county, and State. Their r" ^"^^K M ,* sl' *">'"" I 1 """!" Mt:i,I.AIIK tcecoit was reasonable. The club ,. _.[,,,__ to „ >r jjem mairtenanee buditet is based on a no an danlcd tile light to behas chirfc ami humour, cxcellrnl decldejl thai it would Hj I > ran. me cmiorcn vo wc maintenance bna-et !" „„„ „.„ rtnv c |,|„„ s and thus acting and open d,.e.t,„n I enouglf money through voluntary n.foie th. tlrsi children moved [?'",, f '_%,„. *^„ WclfanI ' tush ""' P""' 0 ' h l> rr,orm hope you like It enntrib..' the house in, the Soroptlmist Club opened ", '• %  ",, „,V ,,, r i ,'ilv oi-iiern. •, m b '"' l "c Parliament. Furious at and l.( furnish ". n> ah,' %  Ml of (he house to visitor, on two occa. Tv' r'l of t' well rounded h., • %  '"' Inferenca that die Is responHOLIDAY AFF.4IR i. it. crtfan hoard of d,rect !" > "**' <"' *• homeless mudlarks, IIOLIUAV AFFAIK. shuwuu. lectcd by the club And typical h c u """ '""" S '"cce""' '" '>•' A'iu;li. Club, la a llgh' „f itCOmrnunrtJ contael I OH "' % %  • %  ''' on Ihr•sudden reapimnnne.. v.ith liumnur and ,. .;h., •Ut of other riuBa and budnngM peanince of the child, she Is moved ;'rring Rotart Miti-hum, Janet by hi obvloua sincerity and 111l*ih and Wendell Corey, trim leu., desire tn gaa her, and eontlordon lichen as a caplivalinc Not Uiat the home has no probm. nl s to make her long awaited Ave year-old. ,, kins. There undoubtedly alwav-. renppcawaneg befora her people. With a haikgruund setting al buatnt and tur is tune ill N. %  probh'lus. Despite all the probanil a ntoal appealing and enYork ili-|.., Inicnt stores, It tell EDGE WATER ay HOTEL RAIIIHltFBA Kedurest Rale. IM May In list Ortahrr for vislu of one week ut oier. Trleplui '.". I;I; A new perfume for YOU... Q • % %  Mi rntavrs of the urgnnlsatioi down payment on their house entertained the SoroptirruM NorthTliifuiihiiin %  in Butte. The 1947 0.. Iiutfc si nu4kti browhl nitts of clothing' cponadVed numcroui (undVi.-hiK rod houm lin.n and the regional 3!,^ "'''V wWrTthc Soiontu partieJandpi llf n„or K an.satioi made n ** of 14141. ii hud Bceumulati h in Ti On tlve second occasion, monev to < 3mplete i i. invited the t.iwnspeoplithe lufusf. anil to buy %  ioHn' fin „' Hmtr nn.l Silver Bow County, will be ta(I problems U. such an the excitement, .,:,,. i, nu ; i. i located, t.. ir.-titution. as well as maintenance Andrew Ra> plays Ihe Mudl.irk. m ,, ( i ,,( i i thr hjuie. probk'ms. Despite all the probana a most appealing and enYoi k d< ; rlnumi fUBdi ti buy paint. :tnd to Art n wark bro|acl paratotn of an tba ctab Ona| n.ciitL. ,. .1 plumbii %  %  %  %  i.tlvf. in-peettil and i'i pluinbit-!. Another, who ran .i cleanibx plant, cleaned the CUT. t lothlni: wMchbiad been given to the home. nus.-.ioi.tin.iM KeceivitigHoimiemi. however, the SoraMlnilita of -.'King little coekhey tramp he is. the alor f.i ttiiidun i.f BilVCI ho,v Count\. Bultf Hem '" haY come eomfor. There it nothing sloppy or aentli BOaau Montana, opened on November l. tably do-.to their drtam i inaV: mental about the child'* portrayal, between IBM, Eight child.en were thr in*, ihelr home 'a true eMldretr'g and only o minimum of pthos has heart v charter i.-sldenu. wltbin two home--and at close to parfed In been permit led. Aft yueen VhiBUigJnrl weeNg th" re w*fe> ?r>. In tb'' flrat all wpys as possible." torla, Irene Dunne at last has is mouth' tiw borne ibWlered mure* than JM aauuA *uc-ts, iplauits about neg.ected oi II HlllllllV o bneniluT't-ranrfo:an*ii old xhiid'eimay come from any interfeather matt maa aa int.) pliraan led parson—neighbour, teacher, HusbiJuU of the club memlwrs police minister, or even the child n |.... i toy*, repaired and dec himself. All complaints go llrst to oratcJ furniiurc. and trantporU the Ui.ln Welfare ofnee m Butte. dotiatid crataj of rood, Work i t decides if the child should be parin'* .i -embli'd at the houe In r en| to the home. The home lit the earnings lo .lean, scrub, and intended > %  • In n receiving home paint Th? Soroptlmbtt Crmi mew e m> *nt the child n r oi paint; until a toatei home ifound fur ihe Aetter CluT!.-a-iTian*i organ.-m. hini or Tin til h tn parents win tion. put on the i gjva him proper care. However. Before starting (he work project, until two years jgo there was no lb* Soropiin.iJit Club real l.-:• r.hoiie cafe available in went to Lattiar union -nfotlniw. Silver Btfw County. Dhe to the t.Ml* project, utftl got ap' cfTnrl; of the Welfare De par tine ni. proval fiKtiember-; to do the renIhaw annow 17 foster home*. orttioiiSrork They hadno dirt.. Mustof the^ abandoned, deserted. cully nnce ntluisi. chlldre Rtecunng this permission oi i.i*(4hxtrd children come from i/ngpeople were as homes where the problems are r i;v*r the proposed b^ehdlogical as well as financial. il. \-re th" elu" Theiv fc relatively little unemployr*J I-argc' rule" : smilH menl M Butehut the population (.'• %  n %  -v urnrrousty there Is nt mixed background to WuSind inucssy Food th.1t tincr\*lcti i |i have vastly •'•fated included tvoril circle vou solvers HHIM go uaO). vou iiav. anragiM tham so tin. r it iedl:om WHAI V to CH\STE in such n *ay that Cie relationship betweeu anv one uurd ant) the nexr to :t is governed by onr of sla* rule*. No rule may be-invoked mortthan, (vice consecutively. RULES I. Tlio *fd mat • an ar.iiRt.ia. of IITL '..nrtj.tlia, preoedM it. -.. It "maj b>vnornaa> at Hi* 1 i haprecedes.It, S. IiaisJbc nch'.eted DJ adding ape letter to. uu-racting Me letter from o. i-Tianging one tener tn The preceding word 4. It may be associated with %  he preceding word in a savma. *imlle, metaphor or association ol dam a. It may torm with the preceding word a name ol a wellimoai. person or place m lact oi net ion. fi it mar oe asaocla'.cn n-.-n the precedmg word in the ntJe oi action oi a book plav or other compoflltlon. A tvplcal succtnaajn uf ward* Oilght w: -TJefcrfh — Tnre:rrl%  young widow wlt.i who has u> i IIIXIS' ini.ih.-i.t ureei %  kindly .in,! (in but %  aoufa noaii (ally. an.I .. young lalwiraui) wh< ofTers romance, but not much 6ue. J-mct Ucigh ia channing us the young widow, while Wendell Corey ami Robert Mitchum are in good conirust to each other and the latter shows a nice flan for light coined>'. Younu QordM Get>ert rarrles oft a demandin:. it | flli a poise ami ..h -h are In no sraj hampered t,\ two missini! front totth. An unpietenliiiiis 1.1m but. pleasant entertainment. HOW TO END DOMESTIC FRICTION Of matt she's alwsrs bornming It for the home and maybe ihe doit lorgei 10 put it back m the lool-hcJ — but when ••"/ oil %  %  * w> \^k. many |obs * *>cll you'U find life IT (;! %  *.'.; II AND l-i .ifil j frp aysfo say HANDY OIL Th rOat-^Treat— 1 -sr uMow-Bo* Arrow. SaJutlon In Kvening Advocate Both the Pla/a and the t.lobc are snowuig films de picting major social problems in the United States. NOT WANTFD at the llaga U a seir.idocumcntai!... and presents the problem of th. young unmarried mother This subject Is .tented with sincerity and integrity and the film ha.-! j&e,, genulnc emotional power. Sallv ff i gnd Kccfe Hrasaclle give •xeaptiuoaj pi'iformances In the le.iditin ioles rtliilc Lao Pcnn U a Ulenlad but frustratad mail rinn who des-t Miss Fomst li i-.-iumt Th*supporaliifl eaat la god. the settings realistic ana the photography and mii'icn ..core deserving of BABY BOUKE, 7 BWnths on of Mr. and Mrs William Burke of Brltton* J 'J a lll SjJ. 1I | 0 ^^jtaMem V^Hdross Boad. geta a knock on hU faUuWs Cuban DrnHW. ti-mutcd an hoflaal etTort is mod" Tbs "8riB !" „ !" nv an.l 1 and slicrt deacnatlon of what lie is doing rntr.. ned and well con, arm 4 Tor each picture pubU^ed in the "Banday AdvocaU" 2 M will bs %  >"W-clearly the !" £ or „ _, l"dd. fficuuea -honld bo addresiod to the Art Editor. AdvocaU Co.. Ltd, vin.nmem on t Barley— Clty ^ o, flu id reach him net later than Wednr day evary wk. ly in jouth M. JONKS CO H LTD AgenlH I h. DM fl I Wtlll ill.' BOURJOI8 i iu*u LAI Dl UUi Mggvaw INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE MOMBASA The battered skull of a mar,, with a hatchet, was passed REMANDED TRIESTE. A German resident oi Tricstu killed -,-bn lo h"*mother-inround th e Court when an African law Remanded for i charged with n.urd''. But her with a pistoT he told the judge ae was loynd not guilty ol the he wanted to be repatriated tocrime. The cou,rt could not find East Prussia rafter tfian hve with sufflclenl evidence to ho w tha hw mother-in-law os-^hlX vide of the accused had committed tho the Iron l%urtain murder. MACLEANS I?JJh^(Sd^)IS TOOTH PASTE and healthy in:\i.\xn.... OM-O-OM: €LEASL\G PIWIMH It Can 1 OHI;IIIT fftmrs ills,, SHIHHH in an nail at K\ II. II IS I I II. and all other Drug Stores \ ii 50 beautifully easy... so easily beautiful beCtlUSC Hrylfoun'* rich lather cleanses thoroughly and effortlessly, infu4.nit vitality low every type A hair, l-ook In your mirror and ace hw a Hnli-in •,hampo redly docs brinf new lovelinc'.s to your hair; Ic.l lam pliable and manageable it is, too. So eay-to-uic. str.iis.il from the rube, Brylfoam needs no preparation or special runes. In tubes, the Auwdy scd the forge *"• "* %  there's wore foam in BRYLFOAM IHE OB-OINAL SHAMPOO IN A TUIE --,*---,',-,',%. TOKALON FACE POWDERS The only K. %  I rfd blended wit double Mouaac of Craar to protesrl <-ur skin an> ONK-O-ONI CUtANauU, the Claanwr in ihe large nine Druni .... i-a-i you get vi. am „1 the world Cleanser for <i(-,gcciuL.t,ci.r ^itii*ag< r v,*,*,r *, •,',•,-,•.*,*,*,*,*.-,*,*,*,', '-'.wv^awt ,-,*.*,',*^-v**a>





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SUNDAY, APRIL 211. INI M VI.AY Al.Vot \| I PAGS IHKKI: Farm and Garden Gardening Hints SEWING CIRCLE By AGRICQLA PEAS AND BEANS We offer no apologyto-day for reverting to this gii important matter of proteins or neshfomwr*, since we in the West Indies have never Men .bit to supply our own needs in %  '• 0>eet. although hardly ever short of the more bulky feede—yama. sweet poutoes, ed•fr '" %  .. %  "** * on Th produc lion of these la. generally speaking, more assured end. for tunately too, we need never per• %  actually go hungry where inere are adequate supplies of Iheae commodities It may be tou that our digestion has become ac fu*wmed, over long years of habit. 10 take rare of ration over-weighted by starch m iu various forms, and so the requisite attention ha* not been paid to "hose commodities equally if not more important HI the dietary f good health is to be main tained) but which, generally speaking, are more hazardous to JlSi !" ""'^^.cUm-Uc or other tonside rat ions. Let u ma..,,, *i onoe. however, that no reasonable argument can be advanced against the more extended production and use of the Pigeon Pen as a farm and garden crop since it is the hardiest, the most adaptable snd the moat reliable ylelder In this group of plains and not likely to let us down by reason of causes beyond our control l*t us not treat It casually, therefore, merely oecauM>. in some foods at any raw, we are Inclined to ignore tne things we have and reach for the imported article This particular pea is concentrated good"•* %  in food value, not forgetting also its mineral content, so essential for bone growth. Thus, one authority claims that one ounce of pigeon peas contains as much phosphoric acid and nearly twice LI much potash as three and a ralf ounces of rice. Hence, they •re so valuable when mixed with r.ce and so palatable that way too. We hope that since last Sunday many, especially newcomers to the gardening fraternity, have taken Johnnie's advice to his father and started planting pigeon peas as a border for the) developing food garden. Tor this purpose, put in a double row closely spaced—say two to two r.nd a half feet away, three seeds to a hole. After the first year's crop Is over, the trees can be pruned back to produce a good crop the second year. A few additional facts abou. the Pigeon Pe may be of interest. Long ntitivated in India—the existence of a Sanskrit name) testifies to this—there Is nevertheless a difference of opinion as to whether iu origin is Asiatic or African. It pobahty cam* to the West Indies from Africa and it ii sometimes known In the other islands as Congo Pea There hi a large number of types and strains and there Is considerable variation in colour and shape of the pods M weu as in yields, maturity, etc There are ever bearing strains in the WogJ Indies and occasional plant* hive been obscved here but, so far, they have not gained great popularity, perhaps because the pods arc smaller and more tedious to shell. What a splendid acquisition to the home garden i* n n ever-bearing pea • The truth is work on the Pigeon Pea has been rather neglected in this part of the world. Not so in Hawaii, wllfRL tbe Pigeon Pea is treated For Amateurs April •Ho* Murli Material Should I Buy?" The 4...rdrii %  Blue Plumbago—Border Plants— The Sugar Apple The Bluu Plumbago, one of our lue flowes during In my experience one of US DBI .jueations that it fa making %  how much and In n liould 1 buy?" hang lei There are several dlfferenl quantaii..rtant to lensflh gth-srtsgovei: ep in iniivi i uyUig I K> the %  tang r .. id how long For example. usually lequne than SBMHI uill usually This plant* is suitable to be and pruning your frult-Uee* fcre (., Trig pieces and any collar or require a quarter >1 I yard B*or* grown as a small shrub, or as a leafy, but fruits poorly you may bo ( fa > ie. to be cut. A space than sieve* o : i ihe low hedge or boundary wtUkMl u,v thai It needsomething that j 11 the width of the material The following >* "" example lha garden.' It i* not suited at an the manure has nnt supplied. ar.\ hen he marked out on a the second or lengi re and will grow anywhere. But It must not be thought freen n eshods >f answering this quesyour hnghi and t .s that even the hardy fruit-trees y sl> tar the most econnrmweai youi sk>" ...ould never have any attention. til way to determine the quanti your sloes comparatively rare blue flowering Fruit trees need legul-i manuring iv of material needed for a given long sleeves uill plants, |a st Its boat duruig ihu and pruning if the best result* arc style Is to make a cutting pattern half a i %  %  moqflu of the year >o be obtained. If after manuring r popci U.\ the bodice including and anorl CfaM th. So span lha ptttat! crop or 'useoiL i'e la regarded as one of the leading food crops both for man and beast. Its analysis shows qualities quite eqii.il to alfalfa, produces excellent, nutritious forage m the young pod stage and as pasturage for beef cattle Is capable of an out-turn, under good average conditions, of as much as 1.000 lb of prime beef per acre nor jniium. Harvesting on a ucH scab), is carried out by a spetlnrly adapted mower with high cutter bar cuter boundary hedge, as It does expert advice should be sought not grow very tall, seldom reachHave vou any Gardening quesla Ing a height of more than three, lions you would like answered or a antageous manner, care feet. any garden Information fnat would laxen to place the grain lineBlue Plumbago Is a hardy plant be of interest to ttner Gardeners inperly. Whan all the pieces and it will thrive in poor soil and efore they open U or consultation with tho %  ^rp&ssnaSvz uggested however that a loo*ing of the marl around the touU, and a dressing of V'i; il ni-y have good nsUKl and i worth trying. To get ii grafted Julie mango trn the seed must be pi crs continuously, being i_ of lovely delicate pale blue flowers. During continuous rains il %  stops flowering and the plants mu ; lt to turn a sickly yellowish colour, but in any dry BfMl be tween rains It will probably state flowering again. Plur-.bago enn be ,B aaaeib* wa w aaawd m a hedir-. although some people advise cutting it back to within six inches of the ground at the beginning of each rainy season this Is not leally necessary If the hedge is In pood condition Should the Plum bago get straggly, then it is advisable lo cut It back. Blue Plumbago n pn by root division. MUgth lUowaikftea Skin length ... Ski it hi.i I Flare al Multiplied bar II3' JO" ax SI.-.V Slee.. geswi Ian (it h hem •llowanci Isf ie amount to l|gg yds if a collar is to be rut Leave It To Girls s H. asks: Could Agrlcola tell mo why my squash Is so vigorous in the box but never, never comes to anything m the open bed? Does It need special manure or what? SALE WELLINGTON Exactly 100 years ago Maoris sold Queen Victoria 86,000 acres of land at l|d. an acre. To—day the Maoris are asking for a review of the sale and a lift In the price to at least 2s. Od. an acre. They say many of the Maoris who pt:t their names to the original sale ugreement were not genuine Cookery Corner One of the many breads that are very popular on the Continent is the "Pnln DEpice." It Is also known as 'Honey Bread." Here is the recipe. rAiN bn'iu t cups of flour 1 teaspoon baking powder l teaspoon soda l teaspoon salt 1 cup milk 1 teaspoon cinnamon | cup strained honey I egg slightly beaten 1 teaspoon ginger Mix and sift dry inK fdienls. Add others. it thoroughly for 15 •ninutcs or more if convenient. Bake in loaf or bread-stick pans in a moderate oven. Add one tablespoon of rum to mixture. If liked. Cool and cut in thin slices This week I jm B oIng to give you a basic recipe to a Sponge Grated rind of half lemon 1 teaspoon salt Measure all ingredients. Separate yolks from whites. Beat egg whites until stiff, and beat in grsdually one tablespoon sugar for each egg white and set aside. Add limnd to egg yolks and beat until lemon-coloured and thick. Add lemon rind. Beat In rero.3i:iing sugar. Mix and sift remaining dry In%  Iled planning a layout ami Once a layout has been decided UpoaL It Is helpful to make small sketch of 11 for use when only Ihe bodice was mentuaie.1 I' the layout method as most s'r tts do not need a paper pattern l> .1 can be cut by me waistline n aaurernent directly In the i-l'itk. ntraiihi •kirta and gutwti -kigfes will require twice Ihs I, rsflh of skirt desired, measuifruj from walat to hem. plus tho depth of lie in desned plus a seam .i Iowa.tee at tho waist Flares 'fr" %  >* sllghll' more A fair gore 1 btMWBt wUl send !" ,„.„c J ; cl J •?£,££. "Ti,,,, !" !" .^ Bordrr Pl.nU For Our Bed. ^.f !" '.1' th 1 'l^S?''," '"?„ S fr75. KuM ,„ !" l„ %  SUJt with tbe llepaitiiieiil an to ..„>, ni^nt iimr nm,ti.n li-rmth All garden bed. have a n-ater ute correct time the graltin,: S "fi !"S \ X l 'T^eltrV snd more finished appesTanco should be done. .^about a half yoni igtra when planted with a border. For '" "Hiree. the ab-)ve method. a bed of the herbaceous type, a %  H. ROACH srri | requnea ;. ee.taui ..mount of tin %  ff*| law growing edge Is really neces' sha be much obliged if you and planning ahead. 1 find it lary but even the flat open type 1! ntommend me a lew flowwoith while because of the savof "bed Is fsr more attractive it erirsR vines or climber*, of a per. bigs in material. To purchase some border plant is put around maneni nature, suitable i u > U'< %  '"' the edge. ai boui. By permanent I mean as a waste; in some cases and One of the pettiest of the border Ihogej that do not djt off and "* skimping %  annuals Is the dwarf Ageratum It be re|ih>ced at intervals If """ which grows only a few Inches possible I would like in gel peahigh, and which when flowering is ptual bloomers or ;*rwstrl] so > a masa of fluffy uluey mauve, possible i have I Aaeratum grows very easily from my gardes, with bi iniported seed, and will boar conall of them, but 1 am vet) ii? tii-uously for many months. It appointed with them ;v my on make, a splendid border to a perigftM U lhal I bou ("" V'U ?..' •! bad." garden bed. ,.:,..-.. '\' '" >""' ,,,,h "Jfj T-H. r.d-h; Another attractive boi.-.ar An. l|Urn il> lo make a snapilj arb. H . ="*: J f ^ !" *%3?} "M; nual is the Sweet ADSSUJThis ,,„ w ,i ; nol lU)V ,., „,, rnuon f ^^'^''''^^'t'Z'^ v *" k 'T' n qu,l e u '"* G '' Miow.whito. *weot smell, ng An : flrt rnire what 4 kxowri as the "'.* .'. ., ,, -md they all seem to go more for Trinidad vine Q < .,.„| v .1 lu lh U'nillll of the bodice. | Huty than brains vavs ", i we' aid halts vetv "" Curtega .ducaled Barbara Ixwis ways in nower and looks viy |1Mk U) waistline and adding added: I have one arbour of it „ . „,,.,. )lutl) ,..,„ Th.d tha-Mit mean wo haven't and If It ware left to me I would Al m this onro tbe length of m brglfti We have dsflnit. have>it on all the other-, but my ,|,,,,-. measuring from tinIdeas ,, n how to get next to fasnll) ara inclined ttwards the ,, ,..,,„ „, a ,. m hnl. %  Ameucans." (urrent opinion thai It Is irn. l„. .„., of ||eev and addln • At the Windmill Theatre, blond" healthy •'"beet that it (,, earn and Imttom hem Thes Pal Hamilton elahoraled on the gives off ,i pollen lhal eausei old gun ititles will usually do fo girls' plans: and hay fever 1 also have the pu'-k %  • %  rtyh mi average M* "We'd c^uUict the thousands << iraliu but that revels in climbIndividuals. Very large wnme i British r. l hrld. s In the states %  trees or long fences and is not sot:., times h;ive to huy twice th small arbour. lleeva length.' Of course larg i in anticipation gollai or ruff* or reverses an* are often to be found In a bed for your kind assistance. where Mangolds have been for %  Tussagc House. .\ tome time." rnssaae Road. tin Another thing to recommend St. Michael. obo Mangolds u that as cut floweis _^^_^^^— they last so well In the house. .Hid ft .nt LONDON A group of shaprl> umtfori tlu.wglrla effoead to-day to go \p the uiuied States "to p r ea r aa C g tnghVAmerican relations The girls made their oiler after idtng leports of iint.-ili IIIMI the foiled States over the dismissal of Osn Dougl... MarArlhui Leadlnu member* of the govern ment have i*'en urged to vtstt the United St.iti effort to eout. L-i.i.i this .inli-Briluh feeling But Daphne Kternander, ballel .i; !" *.?," "r le 'SiTyoS m j i "^ ihp c "* Thcairi Ta**J£!! w "' believe we can du a ..„. "-.!!: rar bgglgi i U wlnnlag over Ameiu-.oi* ttisiii any politicians. u*ainad M nw %  people feel poll 11 elans only make thorn I ieee of ava right ,• ,i,le n.ell. -1 how much hi buy If you ha astylt in mind you can llgur** wJ,*., %  it ev*n ""' l >e is K(MJ dIluvt, Kvai^ nual Is a useful edging to a bod and will be covered In flower, for many weeks. Seedlings can often he found under an old plant, but il is best to plant fresh each yeai from imported seeds The dwarf Marigold also makr %  good border plant and is covered m golden flowers wgen bearing Marigolds are one of the most useful and hardy of our annuals, and they have boon a splendid standby in our gardens in this difficult year. They not only grow aI 'J* b ** t easily from cutting, but seedlings atyls rial i r Ihe dotgjli lounts km is .ill requli The quaii figured a Through them, we'd tell millic of Americans exactly how the We all want the i little peace and Irtish led. tama thin*;i happine-s. Rita Allan, hipp.it in "But not at i pert Scots girl. edient; d cut and fold Into pgg mixture Do not beat after adding flour, to avoid breaking air bubbles. Pour into unbutt e r e d pans. Cut through mixture several times to break large air bubbles. Bake one hour or more in moderately slow oven. Bake 25 lo 30 minutes in moderate nven If in a layertake pan or individual tins. Invert on wire !" r "• n o|/*iige ups Invert on v Spongecake" *' " '"^"^ r ICr and !" %  U ld unlil C0,U TlltK SPONGE CAKE 5 egg whites Another border plant, but one thai may not appeal lo everyone. ii Parsley, Tho curly parsley II both decorative and useful, and although il should by rights be regulated to the Kitchen garden. yet It is sometimes seen us a bord. er in the flower garden. Used in this way parsley serves the doubl.,„ LIU* or tiihiu ruls your alep an4 %  rtargy %  nnihar .•r an ..:-• lolaollpn sr sprav. bul worka thiy.ush tia bteod. lhir.aihli.. thUir.fi ami ti-oaahla.1 lubaa. Th* firm I A* iinrii h>lp]*v aalura liomadl; !• 1 fan; 1 Hlpa looitn iJtitnv ( ihlrh atranslinf mum*. I Th u j aremoi-a rrac Waal hln. and anundar. aura f-fraailns alaap 1. 11.1;. alla.i a t* %  JtiAnw. whaasinf. sstasfaa. ul.- aattafacllnn ur moeav b*ck %  aaranlaaS. Ost UENDACO rrora HUM specially packed tin! 10-DA VS gjPB FLASH i S[Aboa isrribla h<>it hea for months in fact. 1 feel quite cured Mtt H-sdaches can nearly always b. traoM to a UP rdaeMStornaw n and to tbe unsui>p*cted retention in tbe system of stagnating waste material. which poisons the blood. Remove the poisonous .Utlon* — previ-nt them from forming again--and you won't have to worry any more. And that is Just how Kruacheo bring, swirl and lasting relief— bv "Itaiinlng the nyatm i horouihlv of all harmful, pain-giving waste # , Ask your nearest O'bemlat or Stores for Knucbeo ALL-OVBlfooJP* len lovellfw mi VM Is counters throur> -with the faithful ,( DMA** TheSo^p Ucjutlful. Play safe ... be prepared, for your romantic momem (let a few cakes of IlglvAM T'lllKT hOAP. use It fsithfully i.i your bath, shower and al ihe wash I,;L.. for o sofl-smoothskin radiant nh natural lable at loilet goods the island. Bourn-vita G More Lustrous? Uin|iMiaa*ar Linie ya-f Mlla ihea CUTflX. i . %  .'. ssea eeaaswse UM -^ Waml'ilul nr— Infrrillrnt -i_ *>, %  j M .l. lueir hunt I I hi(.|OII| I.i. l-rllii.. ui. fsdlns. fir Htw-,atm UmkU P.I*~. i a] 11 /\ /.•n.rfUUllt,. Il '.H*J,r ro/ k sag grUJl^avMS \fcftA %  %  / It *ts •-^p jf I dreamed I want strolling in my maiden form dm looting along rind loving it! VVtij', I never draameej be'ore I could look so lovely I And all because ot my Maidenioim'b'a. No wonder people More. There never wo'< a bra ,k, at fitted quite like •has to comtof table. :-o ;uto. so completely secure* Td neve' be without a Ma-donform bra, nof •yen in my wildest dreams." Show" MoMalorn<-| ,m Q-''mi', o *w o. u brs m 'i. a l.l>. thalook yo-ia'-OVai %  •• A..B. Cc-p. OSBSSH M a>lBS liMMSnwg/W**. laata a fltOmOi JXMtH *c -.., i,p I



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BARBADOS /*DVOC/lTE 1951 %  JAN i



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ttntoi jMtiweat ESTABLISHED 1B05 BARBADOS, AP II, 2, 1K1 United Nations Troops Fall Back In S. Korea Key Town Abandoned -_ TOKYO, April 28. CHINESE COMMUNISTS drove down Korea's western invasion route today and occupied uijongbu, a main town About ao m ,i* north f th South Korean cipital Seoul. Kapyong to the northeast had been abandoned previously. Earlier reports had Indicated a BlMkenlna . — l** -. I M'lrl.lluto UlMW .,, %  .! disturbing proba I'll ii or a i u in i mi I'd and potolbly rnliiird trading calf between the dollar and -.iciiiri, iniwill romr under over-all review in Important U.K.—Canada trade discussions scheduled hi Ottawa In the week ot May 21. ih.ii on the agenda will h,. < 4iudj special trade Inter eaU In the ItrlUah West Indies. The meeting will be under the auspice* of th r Canada— 1' K. ontln ; Commlltrr on Trade and Economic Alislr* Importanee or the meetlm lm that It will ronvene shortly after resultol the Torquay tariff conferfin-,, are madr known. Specifically the Confer' enee will be railed on to review the Initial operations of the B.W.I trade llbcralis.'. %  Hi plan. It will also have before It Canada'* official romplalnlx to Whitehall regarding, alleged I' K trade .li-.rintiiv.tion against UlU country's umil. Events at Torquay have undoubtedly iharpened a growing demand In Canada that there be a completely new look at Canada-B.W.I trade and commercial relaI in ii-'ni The Canada-BWM. trade treaty of 1925 haa long slnre ended ao far aa any binding obligations are roneemed Either aide rould trrminate It on six months notice. Bui Canada ha* been loath to do thin In the present unsettled %  i ii' ol uorld commerce. Even Hum :h Uie price which Canada pays by way of a sugar preference, plua steam ship subsidies la high.—It is fell that to throu the whole arrangement overboard now. would ii r unwise Moreover, so inn.: as present import dlserlm I nation* against Ca. nadlan i K are In effect there would be little use In working out new tariff schedules. Thus the main business of the May conference will likely be a very Intimate and searching look at the Mhole ayatem of Import licenses and quoU* as Impoaed by Britain and Hie Sterling area against dollar good*.—Flnanclsl Poat April 14. The Chinese offensive, which jumped off iwi Sunday nigbt. a) reported to have slowed down i ihc renlral and eastern sectors of the front. C Mn —a losses continued to mount ns Allied troop* fell hack towards Seoul. Communist casualties sinee the offensive began ID ..ted at 35 000 Red I.oun Up to last night Allied ground and air forces claimed to have killed or wounded at least 42.300 Communist* since the Chinese lned their massive d"ve last Sunday night Tlif Eighth Army thus cla'm over 30.500 of this total. Naval Plane* claim to have indicted 6300 raualtie* :md Far East Air Force planes unhiding land-based lighters 5,500. Air Force and Navy Headquarter* pokesmen sa id hey considered their estimates xtremcly conservative. They did not include casualties probably ntlicted during many strikes car %  led out in poor visibility when %  e*ult* could not he observed. —H-uter. Coalition Govt. Of Eire May Fall Soon DUBLIN. April 28 Eire's three-year, old coalition Government may full next week, political observers said here todag Several right.whig independent* in the Parliament have withdrawn their support from Premier John A. Co*tello's Coalition. The withdrawal of these Indc pendents means that Coslello's slim parliamentary majority ig wiped out.—Reuter. Australians Go To Polls MELBOURNE. April M Five million Australia!^ tha polls today to decuh ••' to give the Liberal 0ou**0 r (Conservative) I kn I %  "fair go' or bring the es*ion here. Mr. W. A. Crawford and Mr. McD. Symmcmls are making plans to give the Jamaican polittdan a rousing welcorn*Beef Shortage bi New York Fantastic Prices Asked NEW YORK. April 28. This land nf beaf steaks faces A serious shortage of that commodity except at fantastic prices. While 84,179.000 cattle roam ranches— according to the ) itcst count—people who can only pay moderate prices are finding it hard to buy meat in New York. The New Yo.k City Council, for inMonce. who want thousands RITA WANTS DIVORCE NEW YORK, April 2B Rita Hay worth announced tonight through her lawyer.* trwit she was taking necessary steps to Obtain legal and permanent : I'li.n .i'.;ini from Prince All Khan She had reached the decision *\ifur long consideration and without recrimination or external influence," she said. "I have concluded that the happy and contented home life which 1 earnestly desire for my children and myself, is otherwise iin>itinable. "Various: factors including, my husbinds extensive social obllga bom Ihd '.11 flunk interest-, un fortunately make it impossible to or "wmtain the kind of home I want, and my children need. Their future welfare Imy cnly concern "—Renter. Senate Presided! ROME. April. 28. Kruno Da Nicola, the retired first President of tha rlapubUc wag I ed President of the Senate secret ballot. De Nie Ivanoe Bonoml, form*-: d noted • who died on April 20 ot pounds of fair priced meat for "osoltals, welfare homes and cor. national 'n-'.ituttons, ar going short Ui>t week they were offered only about a seventh of their %  it and thai at a record once. Cattle prices and uricertaint over meal price control r %  darned f"r the difficulties Cattlemen an living accused of aying off in the markets to keep prices high. It was expected that a new order would soon be issued, setling up a new act ot meat prices But this would touth "" a fundamental political issue with the "farm I>1H la violent oppositlo Meanwhile the meat industrv have a had case of litters it is reflected in the hesitancy ha |, uv cattle .it 1 urraM the meat price is fixed at u level uneconomic in relation to the unBttla urices. —Reuter Wiil Discuss Persia Over Week-end IXJNDON, April 2rt. Senior British Foreign Office officials met Foreign Secretary Herbert Morrison at J-ondoi. Airport this morning on his re. turn from Paris U, inform him ol the latest developments l>ersin n crisis Policy meetings on handling the fast moving situation Li Teheran from the British side are likely to occupy the entire weekend." K'-imeih Younger. Minister of State who was to have left Un< :lon on a speaking engagement, rancolied his arrangements to be .ivailable in Ixmdon for discus. sions with the Foreign Secretary No immediate British action 1 ikely until more i s known of the attitude of the new Persian Gov mment. — Reuter. No Conflict itiatn Our 0i CorfMpondfMi PORT-OF SPAIN. April 25. Sir Miles Thomas. Chairman of ttie B.o.A C airways hBs said iti Trinidad, that his company %  1.1s n 0 intention of curtailing the individuality requested Government to employ immediately as part-time eye specialist. Di Hump Ho. at present part.tinie ear. nose, and throat specialist. The Button h Hi.n'ble John Carter seconded by Hon'ble John 'Vrnandes nearly precipitated a o.isUkillonal crisis when Hon'ble ) P. DeUdin objected to Acting Colonial Secretary D. J. Parkinn who said it was c withdrawn. Dabldln fftH tinsecretary.^ statement j.ugJtesti*d QOVOI Dmenl n tended to flmit majority opinion, and if so. he would move motion deniandluj the raatna*] 1 tion of Dr. L J Eddy. Medical 1 Services Director, fulling which' •uld move his salary be the'deleted from next year*! I mate. Parkinson, however, explained did not mean Qovernsna al would not accept the nattoa but that official member* srauld eeie igaioet it. Put to the rote, 14 oted fur, six aaaj Defending Britain Will Not Prove Fatal Gat* Tank Explodes: 80 Girls Injured MARYVILLE, Missouri, April 2R I A natural gas tank blew uj today oaar a college drmJtorj crumbled one wall, and sent IK girls fleeing 111 nighUowns am pyjamas. No ono was killed bu 30 girls were injured <>r burned and 1; ansre detained in I The blast pitched one sheet of steel four blocks, and shot Maine undreds of feet into U The explosion broke jilide y\ tl s, windows in the business dislric' 10 blocks away, seve-i.i t, water main, and ulcmed laie/ phones in parts of the etty, — Kriiti r GLASGOW. Apul 2H. lit it.in.1 Chancellor of the Exchequer. HUHII Gaiiskell. said j.nuay that Britain's £4.700.000,oon three-jMr Deft nc Programme was somethini; the Gnvemment helievi .1 cmiid tn 1 'nit "without fatally (Inma^in^ th.fabric nf 00a -fcoriomlc life". %  Addiesiing the Scottish Renioniil Conference of xitr British l.il-nir Party. Galtskell said they believed it could le dune with OUT falling heavily ll again and losing our hanlU wot economii inde|)endanea, and with out such a fall In our standard of living as would lie 111I0I4 i.,( le rjall 1 ill said that ll.. Dund in be "srv future Defence Proiimme ll had not been c. %  aled Dial the speed at which it HUd he 1 nrricd out depended I sorts of conditions lanab be >nd Britain's direct control. The Chancellor said thai if supplies of machine tools were not idequatc. the Defence Job couh •mpleted in three years, nil it was too early to say that tho necessary tools would not he rorthcomlng, Further Advances Th,. Chancellor pointedly re raetSd the arguments that his bud get involved either dejierture from Socialist principles 01 frontal itl -I'S llealtl Services. "When the p" %  llllleiilt) 1ovi 1 I 11 ii< 1 ncKann' 'Mil u pngillial We tbaU then nave to BaBM up our minds In which direction They should In na.le. • he said. A shortage of raw material A-ould mem tii.it tha Ooverncaanl had tn deal emh a worse situation better "in. C.. it.~kt'i| nijnieii It wo.dd in it be ,iMr to deciiMM axatiou or increase Qovernrnanl gpendlture lieuier 4 $2,500 Penalty for Harbour Pollution 11..... 1H1.U..1 niiieasal %  he 1 1.1-1 .un, yeaterdat .-t-,1 a Bill in outlaw the practice of some ship* %  %  in. no; ihu blUe off the "il I'.ikilled lisli. it u aald and spoiled bathing. The Mil operlhed a penaltv of uo or three months* hiiprlsonmrnt, but In mm adltee ilns waa Increased ta !.5a0 One or It months ins. prlsoament on the sutsestton 1 •* he Hon, Sir (ierald IViglu. Members felt thai ships' enilneers would take a 1 chanre to break the new l.iu B' 5e0 was not too heavy a fine Mir Oerald pointed oul that the I'ollre were poorly equipped la enforce the new law There was only one 1.mm Ii naw able to keep up with a ship at crulsim speed. The Trinidad prnalty for emptyim oil in the territorial waters l* lieaUer than that In Raw York—$100(1 Rut Sir (.. %  iiii einphaaised that people did not bathe In 1 Mew Verb harbour, while In 1 Trinidad half of thr population within ten miles ef the sea coast did not have pmprr 1 (rathlns facilities Building \-kril l.r V-M. f like dtj at the same tune. COtDfllunlSll will march along the traditions Mar Day route from Ihe I'l.m IX' La Nations to the Place I). I ll.1 • Ii' —Reuter. Income Of MacArthur Controversy Doubtful By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE WASHINGTON, April SJ. 'PHEEE is no indication from Oeneral Douglas MacArthur as to wl'.it he intends to do atttr he has testified to the Congressional Committees on the Far Eastern situation noxt week. It is now nearly three week3 since the General's dismissal from the United States and United Nations Supreme Command in the Far East. But no one appears to know what political or other course he will follow. At times then appear i" ba overtonei in the General'! itatementi niggestinR thai ' %  might welcome becoming :i : ilr for .Ii*' I 'I <*M
  • litioir" Between Cane, !<'*'! LONlX)N. Apnl M Suggestion'. in. '"-Mbltshink 'mi and above board 1 t'n isMiraan "' ; '' baai and nigat •*""" insluatrlai are made In 1 %  ncm.n.niduiii b) tha Ii .n ^iigin Heflnei'" Assoeliitmu today unt all PI 1 Unmemorandum say 1 Oovernniani hi mnoun % %  iialionallsing the heet su^nr 1 lustry and pliieiiiK relevn-u hM 'jtiun nti 11 |-ei nianent l>asih I %  ii-.iMim vrould have 'f taken vrhethei the iieni ui ealea of uanr bet BrtOafa ii' %  8u| I mil tii ( augjar oane reonei be deit with aa ut praaaal by I agreed Quniaa. or by '• Midtu compete Iraalj Other Retiter. Fronoh AatirmM}' To Vote On New Bill I "Alt IS. April JK The french Natienal Assembly oh %  In ii % %  earl) hours lomorrov. 11 Premlor Henri Queulile'a oan Qeetoral Reform Bill which hi •'unts aporoVed us .1 pretlrnlnar) hyp tn hniititit Gonei >i Els* Ion ui Jin.. Ilir c.il.iiiM d.-.i'1-.l trlay to leave no stone unturntit in |H efforts to #vt Ihe Asaaoibb die%  olved and •> Oeneral F.lc a U held in June Instead Of OctobCI A* %  tirst step, the Oovenunani ml In ptt 1 id rs^eeted Hie ni*w Western agenda put (Ot ward yesterday In anotln-i 1 nee* Uusstun view., and C£ rasueed tor the lint time to agre* to Include AUHIILI on (hi Three Western |H>wert have h.n Austria on their ptapoiad (rum the i*ginning. and late* iigreed to add the qm j Tm-sli' —Reuler. C.D.C. CAN START AFRESH I.ONDON. April 29 The Sunday newspapn Olnx-r vi r Bndi evldt oca in the 1 ulonia Developmeni Corporation*i 1 > pori iii^t .it taat a x pa na ivB lessons of past faiiun In i<'ii'in.ii develop an nt are bt bu lai %  '! %  It I-, %  •nporlant." It said today, %  that tho moral and soclol pur ; %  "< ul the Colon in I Developmeni < poi itlon haa been stnted so lol.lly Ixird Itiith. lit.new Chairman. ha<. %  toeady taken %  1 1 Implament then pi incl Men. ReMter. vacuur than some of the sagest peUtstal observers In the Whit.rlouae predicted at the beginning of the Nothing 1 so far 4 teAr thur, which %  I Kxeeu live at Legti latura of th* %  b B> "i MaoAithur's propossls lor mteitstfymg the war against In Ran %  it the GovernThe Truman Administration Is going ahead with them *t ll would preon the ailmimstialion. I' %  ; jraan, to lepei %  Arf.ui> Others have to revoki. the Yalta %  IL Agreemante. to re1 Dlted Nations Charter. mi t 1 dgenand tin* '.i-nussai of 1 A ft in the Secretary%  bis al : these proposals however ire IK-VOTM ttie constituUonal nnweni of tho United '• ll is dOUbiful whether any if them coutd con 111 and a majority even within the oppnsl lion IN-iHililKan Parly it*elf. Reuler. VOGRLER FREED VIKNNA. April '2H Reberi Voaytlar, %  3H veer eld I ualneaa man, freeii hy ihe Hum 1 "t after %  arvini it inontl Hntence for '*eeplcnasyj and eoa .1 it Qie ntiei v. 1.. 1 1 da Reater. THE "ADVOCATE" r ay for NEWS DIAL 3113 Duy or N1 I'.I.: PBTAVS TAKING wHtr: wbvMaaiam PARIS. Apnl 2H Ex-Marslial Petain's general ecudltlon continues to improve and he Is taking more nourish ment daily, a bulletin issued her* *:.id to-day.— Renter Capitalist Imperialism Is Not Source Of Danger —SAYS LABOUR ONLY 33 PASSED ff SPAIN, April Jfl Out of 202 candidates who sat l/indon Examination held in Trinidad in 'January 1951 0 nly 33 were LONDON, April 27. The British National Council of labour representing the La hour party* 8.000.000 ^Irons' Trade* Union Congress and th'C'J operative Union. loXli an uppesl for Mav Day %  aHn] the leaders of international Communism "to lift the burdens of r**r from the world" In its May Dj\ manifesto, the Council 'aid that tn Ihe last halfcetilurv. Labour had transformed the hopes of th,. early psenggfi into reality "It'it when we turn to face the future, the outlook is trraicaat. The gains which Labour has wrested from the past are thre.it ened from a new quarter This time, the danger come.. —Renter. >uccessful. tiona! Communism." The manifesto said the leaders Of world Communism had betray-. ed the Ideals for which (heir movement originally stood By rejecting democracy, titty hml destroyed for the peoples under their domination the possibility of Socialism. Instead, they had built for those peoples a tyrannous form of State capitalism, maintained oid aggressive in its foreign policy. "The llntish Labour movement rejects the pretensions 1 I system of dictatorship and is determined to take every measure. including military rearmament. to ensure that this system Is not posed by force on free [ ot from the policies of capital imperialism, hut from those who "it appeals once aga Anglo-Iran Oil Co. Protests To Pninier LONDON. April 28 The British controlled Anglo Iranian OH Company today formally protested against thi Uineteed o;,i.on.i!.-. t i,..i, ..f .• plant In Persia, the Comimiiy announced here. Ii %  note leUvared to tha Persian Premier in Teheran, UuCompany said that natlonallsatioi would be a breach of Its agrccmen: with |ha Persian Government The Anglo-Iranian Compun> reminded Persians, In Its note. Oil concession 'should be listed on principles of mutual goodwill and good faith, and that ft should not be annulled and Hulls terms should not be altered by .any legislative, administrative 01 executive act —Reuter M.C.A. WANT RELEASE J OF TRADE UNIONISTS Udhel Communism to lift the %  den of fear from the world tofnirig In the constructive work of the United Net ring the orrjgoalaattoe "' m'ernn lional disormament. by agreeing: m *'"•"• "*! r .'S n ^"J l aa the control and developmt : |5t_"S 4 %  % %  -.erjtargjy andai wai Id %  Mhorirj In Tokyo, the General Council of Japanese labour Unions today Is projected May Day rally In tinface of a warning ued by ~ April 28 The M.< 1 elation t. -i.1 senl %  H solution to Consul here for transmissio' '" In Pn the Junta < %  'mment pi %  .pre,neAllied Head ^^.^ ,. direct the movement of Internowho direct the policy of internsquarter J The parade was to have taken place in the plaza front of the l Gener. I Mattii. .. Rldgway' h.-adquarters :he (x-cupying Foreen in Japan would trades unionists paraded in ba those palace plaza. —Reuter trade unloi who. it Is illcgad were Imprli oned without judicial Inquiry or %  %  % %  1 0 wanl immediate Ol from exile of Venezuelan tnl trade union leaders at present in tool Cuba ami enforcement of ihe r ventlon on Ti %  %  '' %  %  frsji dom. <• " %  .. K. W. V. EAU 1JE COLOGNE T^HIS EAU DE COLOGNE IS STEADILY qalnlnq an increased demand Overseas. Made from the purosl and .nosl iragrant Oils produced in Europe, and with the addition ol pure Grape Spirit, it has a lasting fragrance unexcelled by any others. Delightfully Ralreehinq ll i indispensable lor that final touch to the tollelte and lor a really soothing attar shave lotion. It Is comforting and refreshinq. also, lo your Sick Friends and HelatWee I K.VV.V. Eau Do Cologne can be obtained trom Messrs. Cave, Shepherd 4 Co. Ltd. Messrs. Bookers Drug Stores Messrs. Bruce Weatherhead Ltd. Messrs. Collins' Ltd. Messrs. Knight's Lid. Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd. Messrs. C. F. Harrison 4 Co. Ltd. Meesrs. H. P. Harris & Co. s,::',',;;;'.'*





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    SUNDAY, APRIL 2), 19SI SUNDAY xl.VOCATE Meat At 3d. A round -no diiiiii '*l*n for breakfast, lundi, tea Jtid u onij Id I \ MODEL DAIRY PACE MS* pound. Income tax u alnum negligible. Only about 2Mi of the rxn-a laiion pay It at in* nu tnUUfla an paid Tnere is i... Sounds llln Uiopu but ft i>n i. it* mi attract Etna Donald MCCIJIIICK'.S "Islands for MuV (Prttr Qwiwn lus. tki.> a titillate your tnd acnd you running off U bUJ the neareit island, whicn in %  '..ulU I* Pelican. The Kill ul i-lund*. ao full that there .-* more than d.tWO around the Drlttiih Isles. I thought uld lhaJta you and tnry %  UdOUaly individual witJi no erase for central nation uni %  it-nnity or any „f those twentieth century signs of petulance against the Creator a handiwork. Islands I and lslaids they distinct, tttffaraut, dtUfjfati depressing. Take Jc*ey -' %  • %  r.i\ 11 I.'t•, i in tru| I Will Urge budget sui|.Ui quite independent of U rod trading proflti on U crops last year amounted to more than £4.000.000. And In Jersey a married man with two children can earn up to £ 10 a week before h starts paying ,n %  and 'hen only at 2i In II. And then there is Sark Two yearr ag<> there were 180 uu plicanU from u'l over the British ll.-v i..i tin|x>st „f .issUtant enInee* tor Batrtfl private enter%  %  ilcity scheme Ye! |fcf Mlary nffered was only £200 a >ear. But some of :he applicants were willing to give U p salaries of £750 a year to take on the job an i to have a house THERE s no mention of Pelican but the Grenadines are given a good name and Capri, Majorcn and the Aegean Islands get the credit that Is eternally theirs The merit of thi* book lies chieflv in the great love that its miter fatal for bland*, n i, W uh reluctiDci that he writes ubout the disadvantages of certain blinds, but he never attempts to delude the readers thai there b anywhere art island paradise. It is a book that ought to be read by all those who "•mi to dogmatise about islands i am in r-r.iiK io ,.,. in> of Own and most of us are so ignorant of their whereabouts. We may not warn to buy an island.—most of us wonder whether we'll ever be able (o buy even a house—but we ought to read "Islands for sale" if only to break down that huge chunk of Ignorance which we possess on the subject, bland livers though wc be. 1 BY IAN GALE This week I m t Magg.-. S.". via. Rose and Ma At thi, nay, wBIck onlj rtartati -I 1*43 and now B Jlu. Wu 1 hoi .. %  %  I No better situation foe .i.aNa.ry '•.on could havNBCen found. It i ..mi .s aled, and although fiie DO) appreciate M Ifcere is > awxt nlked and 13 rto<% i ONE OF THE DELIVERY VANS. THE COWS arc milked twice day. at a m and 12 day. at 4 ; after the early milking ITIfv aie turned out into .. large m %  alow for n few bouri There are f.nr different bratdl d a I r %  --Hotiti A Gucrnsic-s ard 7. found that while the first three •< large quantity of Zebui though they givibutter fnt Io thenmilk Thd eon are IT:1 !.*-,) b9 -\t the n. iince the mi. OtU* I.IIC i. mnker, whk* can nulk two cowa at a linnMr, Cuke, the rnaffsger, u vty.. vtilic about it A laige rtinrj tne home of the cows, and u hj kepi b .-lean r'vcr. day, when th i t m the stall u vfxmt i ul with K.C which bt m: w Ilulkeley F;ntoi>. arid men milk, taws wash their arm. with the same dismfvt;nit Aftet the crop !• -..i Mi <'arrlnKt nn Uw Duaaier of Bulk.-! IO re-design the stall so tli.it || con r.o'cl '. DurTTtl the crop season the cows are ^•d On cane tops, and out of crop they gel %  ouj Besides thut. throughout the ycai lhy sro given .i tpaelal ncen tiatod cow feed. In fi ont Of each oow In ihe stall hanav %  blaeh % %  ch Infornu turn as t* ruuna of the cow. tim. rod, ..n.omit f ( ',i pad the Range %  .' '< |o to tod si tto lion Ui. milker moM people are having rim Although Mi Cuke slarn wor he lik.^ his ml. and he told % %  ;( I in -'i"i ConseqiMnt1| i proudb lh.it when he sla in tli treitmcnt of tarcoptic mjnje in tmall animili Teimoo1' b Invariably effective. At the moit, two or %  hree application), are required and mortovcr during treatment no special liolition it necessary. Tctmojoi' it non-greasy, non-ualnlng and hat no obnoxiout imell. 'TETMOSOL' Tetraethylthiuram Monosulphida Solution IS IMPERIAL CHEMiaL(PHARMACEUTiaU) LIMITED ,. fuBt7 eonypa*i of (mbeffo* Cf**n %  • ' '' HIP butcbll Old i> %  ISO nominated The 10.000 sqiuntet ol Luni i. OB a "meutliss Sunday" L.e> Five members were < le. v t.. wnlcn the buHdlnj* wero standing ^ ,1U 'J have elraadj had n.-i | AsaociatiiMi. ail(| whlcn belong io Mi Evelvi 'i >'' Roach, will be sold. Soon some merchant told the tdvoc .t • A s^isas^r^s^fi'st^^ ^,-5rE %  %  %  a !" wm "• N "' • ss^ssL'srs "..! J f,!"V"'" *-"Plr. U> llnd Iho Sdcnn or \'Z'~ w ." 63 J?*2 !"? ASi The „l,l l,uil,Un w built mot -","'""' '" Tu.-l, h>' III isund ban Mmd lh.t sho„l d i ak „ ,h e UUnp *". ' T '" b ^,! U '*:'?."" \" lv 01 tart, n.bl.K.,. d block %  8. TMl.rlr. ham AutnU., of God aod show Ihcm to the -; %  ""'"' J !" f. ' h hr S ''i' on. There u .| to be liver, %  Trn.ldad The ,h.|. i CTMUir., „ d reveal the reat KS? r _2^** JSLS .." MM m th. bu.l.lm. '" %  " '"" ' %  <* Pr.-sloent. C. l> Oltl forbmau e.mugl, u. get |j ft. ^tmaJT^ u.bVrcTuogi.taS "SS^^JtoEMSftlJZ S"i '""' %  ' Canmeiu Ihe Sunday Times has last stages meanAgaJatanl Sacratary, published ot the same price a On .,?riv,l i., %  %  -he u.,, In8, Je "" ,pach 'ng and demon ihe returning r >re „ .. ,, a. • %  PT,vv ,„ 'i,,,d.„ ,.2 !" ,' m' ,i -"^;"" 1 %  %  ST i, A II i. I roni I). West Indus I lul le : %  Ihe C. i III oil al Curepo tn"y" iT* f w f,le..H'-"*... '" •:' "." u e f n •""' nietaphy.ie.1 Lonf, -f Ihe Pnuanu' Uoon Bank Less Vlot's Wiiiii.'-.i Maps about Cyprus. Malta and ha F-ist Africa nre also included. friends began to ,,,,;,„,, ,„ „,„;, ,.,,,-.,, K v. t*. Barrow, St. Judes, <• C In %  hullcUn fru Sunday Service, at the (,ars 1 ence.,Page 24 I $ J >, A NOTHER Snnd."y Times nub ^*"" %  A cr J*," W ,;" '' ^J* 1 S ''' : "' c to now School, and Miss Yearwood of lobj> economist to the If. fur. Alkation to reach ma is "Sos f tu, s ,* erc *'** '" n VJ e n m P^< •'" ?tg Ihe K Iobe and Its (be Mental Hospital. Uoo Inatitute r the B. the Tr.ivel and Leisur? magarme' '">'"> "'vWu>U. only preachers are the %  ll,!,le" P taanlnj hureau of the N. It will look well on the tVble"aml S<*n after, a room was rented nd -Science and Health-, with —, lands \W i ..,. %  rVmaumUm !" um^ Ki Gl*t Throiijrh -Id ,hn, during the las. f, rind of those whn don't The mcptll, B !i a Wednesday evening Baker Eddy, which arc icad by P t . ,,„ ,,,„ ,,.„ Anrll—Mnv numher fnric 3s T '" slllT,on y Meetim. was he-d once two Headers at the Sunday Slxty.elght candidates forty th.Netherlands t-id o> fld.) contains a book In brief a month. A Reading Room was Services. There is a Service on *-''Kht girls and twenty bo> -took *cene< from the live* of the Marx larlea: A '*'* v*"* !" after, the \fednesday evenings when these ""••' Junior School CertlfSOaM *' Nordh-hne who is working Bros. Services and heading Kocm were books are read and testimonies of examination Io Doembti last ; r l*oetor s degree at the Max in Ranallo tells the storvof hcW 'n two large rooms on the Christian Science heating are >* %  %  I'luvcrstty College of Economics Max Bcerbohm. And for flower ground floor of the B.M.L.A. given. „ The following 13 mm% maotsM il1 Rotterdam. Holland, HI md Mr William PutUrson of Ih %  firm (if Mafafl .f N (I %  i thai hli inn kg %  i ind ddpaSBdini ., inj .-get tun.had to I flOUB '.'i' %  i In DUI . %  Tha Brm, h... %  i %  %  duiing id. Of tina. 4*al\ a % % %  / 4 Ins and 2 Ins MESH Obtain our tluntatlons tvrfore boring elaewherr. lovers there i an English Flower FVsih OEOROF. HUNTE special article on Buildings in Lower Broad Street. The aim of Christian Scientists ul; Grenada Civil Service Turn Down COL Bonus The membership grew and a |, t 0 h now the Scriptures from disused Ciarrison buildm., was t he basis that God's creation is bought and remodelled and is now goon on |y i nB ls pt kcn of in Genesis I. The Master said "Y the present church building. The Church was dedicated in PllTVATE CANntDATUr* do not knowing the BcflpMDUfTlll w-iiooi. I> A RriHItttultr. A t. B CaUwttfer, M D \ %  • \ 3 t Smlin ROVAI. ACADCSIV • 0 i.nfflir g l'AMm>ATBS IW, M I' RlUKh. g visited the territory to famlli Ise himself with the i <>niimnproblems of the area. Among other things, he ttatUi I the Kminnrriid ,--iei-tv of lli< cultivation of aloes whi grown ir the ctup in the United Stales; second 1>. the 1S3S free of debt and became t urcs. M Tenet I reads: 'As ad First Church of Christ, Scientist herents of truth, we take the InUrlrlgctown. spired Word of the Bible as our This, as every other Christian sufficient guide to eten : If Science Church, is a Branch of (Page 4B7 S and H 1 the Mother Church, the First TherP „, I11iinv „, Batu;1) | M Church of Christ. Scientist. In who flnd so i acc and hoB | mg from The Civil Service Assoeiulloi Boston. Mass.. which was organInP study of Christian Siience bate nag turned down an offer ised they say: "to commemorate from the Oovernment on an the word and works of our Master. BOOM ON once said: "The and practitioners u f lh c move"' lhe material was g<-'nei alu t interim uicrense of 331 per cent which should reinstate primitive noblest charity is to teach a man inent) Tticre is alwi the I'hriattan n '* h m ""' Nftherlands Wc" cost of living bonus as approved by Christianity and its lost element of how to do without chanty", an.i Science MonlUr an International %  l 1 ""* ijecause of high labouthe S<-crelary of State for UK) healing.'' (Page 17. Church although Christian Scientists do daily newspaper The Herald i ""'" "nd thhdlv. theie was stron-i Colonies pcmilng the receipt o. Manual, by Mary Baker Eddy). not turn away from the immediate published in several languages competition from South Africa the reimrt of the commission m^ 8M Chr|sliail Sciffn ce was need, they decidedly know what T.iere is a Board of UcturCsnlD Vesdordoj the Advocate Intel quiring >to the cost of hung of dlwoverpd In ..Retrospection and is meant by "The Lord is m IP Lsottoo and ewerv Chriailaii **•"* th r,ir ^""' of Agri.nl the Windwards. introspection.-' a work by M. U. Shepherd, I shall not w an: | Choroh gives at leafnqr *£*, ,'" ,h tSSS^ 9 '' C.SA seeks a 100 per cent a^dv. the Discoverer and Founder -Son. thou are ever with me. and tr( v lecture i increase as a -very reasonble one. f ; llnn Science, we read all that 1 have Is thmr"' The Heading Room i„ '! '" ',' '. M that the interim offer would mean ?.,„„,„ u,,.,. ,^ r1 n i ,RB 6 I pined Everv Church of this deSOmlng btUnd ,„, V, ZT..'%* .. lf n,, '^'"""H "' the present Fined 10 7 For Stealing CUM . PI i terday told 68 raal oU I Bayt p, Spooner HUL "I Hud you guilty of Larcan but I am taking Ml your age." when he g| ore him chaiuad by the Polk with the larceny of. sugar ooa ..! 2 %  Thorpe wtt lined )u In ) Failing to pay the fin \ he will have | () undergo 14 day. property f Warren'i Plantation The watclniun of lh d, mol a '" %  •" l 1 I 1 1 !" '' Sfer of lhc Dbcovorer on,| FOUIICI.T. Edd, <* ,|| .,...,,,,.. ..,,,,.,.,1 i ill I,. i ... Brll Jdalim a .W X ."IS '" %  "" %  t-XSo I *a T1,C lilcalU..IM-ral „ ,l„i..l,a„ S I^.~ of omSJi. anirui "broad cfTcrt. of on Inlur, caused by a" ulbulcd by lhc l>,si.,l.,... %  . Da read, aarrov.-.i ,., u,„ '-, %  ,'''. '•'' "'""' 1 TfS n. £1!mmvolhi" aoeMtat, an in]urIh.l ncllhrr ,„,,„,. .„ „ :( ,, >' % % % %  > • %  Uhd. ; ,. ,,., j,_._; -..V !" .. !" „.l.l . a ..h u. M ...< ....u... .A % %  %  1—..-..— poor iimisluri.ti(llllon. The Hcdnrv Icfl i".i at praaacrt HCKIIBIIIII' % %  '"* ""< %  "" "'"' Jjj~j Oardl. I lhl. In ravak* medicine nor surucry could roach. Sentinel, ihe monthly Journal. A cordial Invitation >lva rauu.lion •araBaUlBa the... 10 "" 'he falling apple lht led me (Uw 0 m c iai organ of lh. dad l„ all i„ >I| , hr inrnal %  ( manted more than Uucj Cburette cuiranta^d In perfect rondltion. KMItllTS MIT. STORES • .::•.: %  .::::: %  .::::•.:•.:•. : % % %  .: •.iv.v.w//y.v.'.'//* CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET Helm ;.,',. II, lh (];,% %  and Tomato %  i % %  %  . 9 .SO linn/ li.'.,,i ii.,r. uith Pork (Lartv) H llrl.i/ (hitkrii N..-.M, Soup i ..ruii-ii%  .' .ib * %  i thicken Noodle Soup .undented ,3t* i .Ml|.l.f II II,-.SOUJt < ondeitfrd . .?.'> .1 -Ch,-II ( |, M k, ,, H ||h I!.. %  ('i.de.i'ed 31 < jinphclli <-.anoomme ('uiideiwed 49 ( unipheir, lloulllun f'mideived .39 ( .i.ipiII -. (ream of M,.-h room (ondrnaed Vt CsskiplMli'i i'.|.|M. Pot ( IIIMlfl.s.ll 3 Marvrn • .. ,.i..,. -.,..1, Wafer, per Tin I.4B c ... kt ul I I., il,, I ,i. l.^i (Mrdiunu .12 sm*ll> .51 liatni-li linnrd IUm< 4',lb. 4.IS f'.Tbt Ml NeiKn', I'atudUn < hoeo Ul*** — per Box per Bar .Vi Sliced lUni Silted Baeoii. %  atlll M^rU.i.llSTA.XSFKLB StOTM i oit THIS • Order these Favourites • VI III Ml IN HBP 18c. a hot. $4.00 a Carton • I IM KI M A #.. lit



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    SUNDAY, Ai'RII. . ItSI M \II\Y MiWH \TI I'U.I 1 IIIII N umii>i\i Mlllll Attention i*. drawn t*> the Cggtftrol of McM Punch and Judy Show Olhar Inalud* Darts. Hoa*la. I. By Ktad aenal.alon t>l CaJ. Uu'rfUn. ikta a-aUra Band .ma** Cnpt Ralaon. will be in aiienAdulU l/ ChiLdrao H. Nmft' 2 "1 -Id J THE GIRL GUIDES FAIR \ will be held at | The Drill Hall >; on Saturday, 2nd June. 5 1951, from 3 to 10 p.m. There will tw the usual S interesting STALLS — J; GIFTS & NOVELTIES. ^ SWEETS. CAKES. ICES s> SNACK & MILK BARS. ? LUCKY DIPS, etc., etc. 5 Two RALEIGH BICYJt CLES will be raffled — ^ Tickets at 2/each $ On Sale at Cave ShepMr. Mr. J. H WUkinaon at St. Jamea' Combined School. Holctown. yn WHIT MONDAY. May 14th, 3—10 p.m. Fo/reshmenU, Sweets. Snack Bar. Pudding and Souse, lie Cream. Etc. Dancing /ram 6—K p m. The Police Band conducted by Cnpt. Raison. A.RC.M. will be in attendance, by kind permission o! Colonel Michelin. Proceeds In aid of St. John the lt;iplist Vicarage fund. Admia-ion : \.lulls I :•: ( |, MI I„I L9 4 r. > —:in. $ herd & Co. and at the ^ Fair 29.4.51—In. V>V#VVV*,'aVV'. Amateur Night at THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CtTJB (Local VislUng Member* Only) SATURDAY. MAY 12th. 9 p.m. Can you Play an Inurnment? WhlatiaT ling? Imitate? Imaeraanata? Or are fan. to ny T Talented" 1 Thia is your opportunity to display It I Don't ba sfiy' Ton can b* between tbo agaa of 3 and 831 PrUea will be awarded by the applanse of the Audience Please sand your entries to the Club's OBlce. DANCING after the Entertainment Admission to Ballroom 2 KEEP THIS DATE OPEN M 4.0a—la /"•/W Rfrfrf /^J3 u-t> oiler EYEHYVMXU FOB YOVH BOOF At I'm.that cannot Inrepeated GALVAV7F SHEETS—Sit., 7ft.. 8ft. 9lt. 10 ft. AI.VMO I M SHEETS — 6ft„ 7ft.. 8ft.. Sit.. 10ft.. lift.. 12ft. BVEBITE SHEETS—6ft.. 7ft.. 8ft.. 9ft.. 10ft. ALl'MINX'M GUTTERING RED CEDAR SHINGLES Rl'BEROlD MIVr.RAI. SURFACED ROOFING 3ft. Wide Buy Xoirl Hun Xou-S I PLANTATIONS LIMITED The, AMATEUR ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF BARBADOS precenu Wisest Crete Mkl Alklelir SPORTS MEETING under Iht distinguished patronage ul Hit Ckeellencv ihe G. %  Sir AUred Scvaa*, KCMO and Lady Savage at KENSINGTON OVAL • %  Wait Mano,, May 144k TUBradla, May l.ih SatunU. MB> l90i beginning at 1 pm each dav laitrteen 414) CrHiata from Trtaldad and Bnl.-.i, Guiana "ill Inrad* Barbadoa la an effort to defeat the CvclHts ol Barbadoa led by the Uesi Indie*, most oulatandlm Cyclist Ken Farntim • i ileen Km. I'm. :!..,! While Oat* Mm.. will match strides with our Lady Sprinter Grace 1/iiinberbatch • While Hi.Trinidad fleetfooted Police will meet Barbados' Improved Athletes • Hum.' i\uui'ii Archer. Denny PROGRAMME Of HI.NTS FIRST DAY 1 Mile Cycle Novices I Mile Cycle mtai i Mile Cycle Class A '. Mile Cycle Claa* B 100 Ydh. Flat (Oven, 100 Yds. Flat (Boys under IS) 100 Yds. (demon Boysl 100 Yds Flat (Ladles) S Miles Cycle Clg \ 3 Miles Cj • (". 3 Miles Cjl • %  IT •. %  High Jump INTERVAL 220 Yds I %  r -, iet 110 Yds. I 8B0 Yds P %  Girls' Schftol*' Hrlnv Race 9 M le Cycle Open REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BL4DtJ>N A F S. r V A Repreaentatlve : GERALD WOOD FOR 5ALE i^ • t.K %  %  %  •Kf ^awai^a TT M*T.I %  %  >"i Iwatu in *r>t. Large h ngi l': verandah* lead'. kitchen I* •>*.; mill. I cvipbnartU Tlwre i" a 1 dar 1IM Nil 1 1 Ihi. t. t de..lial arii ajtbw mi" oi atMai %  and lull dautU ma> %  uMainanl iv. ai'i>lkatMt IIIIVII.MIAN %  Hill A c line a al.TO praftart* pl*inltY illtiLilvd P" approa P. aere %  ..„, Oorrn.me.il Houae TBeN I and mil pcuporlio""**! I „,,..,„ntorti' i n i < intEtt.M aarvjnt-' i>gala* %  %  Ther • i-ll .i .: |ta| „ t.... a ptraaam %  %  i aai \ %  iv*n i o KI anil no -i Hi <: *i well bar* in •ai .r* .Til malurrd ami Ui*r H mm*'f firlva*^ ''•* 'hr xiMwn and ad>oinlna araear^ That* it a eavarad aartratva perch SKCOXD DAY 1 Mile Cycle Roaaster •a Mile Cycle Class B %  Cycle Inter 'i Mile Cycle Class A 1 Mile Ladies' Roadster 220 Yds. Flat (Open) 440 Yds. Flat (School Boyi i Throwing the Di 2 Mile Cycle Class B 2 Mile Cycle Inter. 2 Mile Cycle Class A 220 Yds. Flat (Ladiea, INTERVAL Tug Of War (Htftl 440 Yds. Relay en, Long Jump 3 Miles Flat Devil Ti.k. %  ). ||, %  THIRD DAY Putting TheShot 100 Yds. Flnt 11 Olrl i \w Yds Flat Mem 1011 Yds. Flal (!' %  16) 100 Yds. Flnt (Girlt under 16) lOOYde, Pltl (Oil 16) 4II Y,IPUt (Open) S Mile Cycle la i; B MillCycle Inter, .'. Mile Cycle Cluaa A Tug Of War (Finulsi INTERVAL 440 Ydt. Relay (School Bovs) 1 Mile Flat 1' Miles Cycle (OJM'II) ..-<,' aai r DHHI fcadrooma. k tchm. btillar'* IHair U a lamr aataar. uuin ataWtam fir An filramrlv lrUnot Than rmwti Ijfi* laanea *nh fra '" envatad vataiidiihi from huh Ihara It unabatructad -ww oi IM II rtiitaiicr av Tha 1 badtoom* ara larfa and airy, ana h. 11own bathroom with tuti bal-i land hnl a/alar Tharo it •"*: %  arop* lor inaapanalva Haprovamamand modem nation 'a ba ran lad mil without tha pranarli loalna Hi "Old WorldntmaapiianTha armind. aia appro* ga* rra> %  n a-trnt wall plantad with (raa. iind Anwar I na ahiuba .if all vartellai Thara ara two captagaw >* %  and Uaara i naht nl an avar lha baarh with aaaatti inaai K Oaettri SEASON TICRFTH Kenalngton SL-nd $2 lit Ge*. Challenar fl.fig Season Tickets on aalo from Tuesday. M.iv : | Entries dor4pm Saturday. May 3tft Tender* are Invited for Sale of Bar ar.d Refreahment righta u# to >af. May Mn. Contact the Hun Beet Co Civic Society. Sw nnd Hich Street' hnma allualod MgM % %  ; U al II" i>.. on none plllaia wuh ahlm • rag ...--• Id ol aau.nl ,.-< 0 %  Bga>, wifl. %  nlli-\ ovarliHHi I 1 OJan invitad %  aHHHIH | pintail witi, full iraca 3 la>M recaption nmnu 4 ldroom> aallaiiaa. hlt.lia-v 2 ballnuom H. Cantrall> lorntarl and >ailt .t, rtar cnr.r.*a. .i into flat* nr ba.ir,i I tin -in in: I I .-I iitwHMortf c-niimiat, n.i idtunia %  • %  tarry Muipxop-rt %  Wal ad in,,,, | %  FOR RENT trnroi MM I <>\. %  i-,.. ,..-, <. HI Jamea tin I urn I-had aouna nn %  earl. WIUI 1 beoTonmt. lotinva. larandah uvrrlcioMInc aaa etc iFT'm'diate poaaaaaWn -aivriUl' SI Lawranaa Altractiva 1 hadi".." r-l aeaiade txniialnw Avallahla aa U loqulrad REAL EfTTATK AGENT AITTIOM I It n \M\IHI\S Bt'lLDING l'lione 4640 BK niSF FtOXOillSF. USE BOWRANITE ANTI-CORROSIVE lAINT Tll£ PROVED PROTECTOR OK IRON AND STEEL GOES FARTHEST LASTS LONGEST line Gallon will Carat MM—ISM ipplled la PERMANENT GREENRED. GREY, BLACK and SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting) In fill of Impe/ia/ Meaiu'r WILKINSON & HAYNES COLTD. '.:;:;',','.'.','^'A.\Him\m9$*KHrt JUST ANOTHER REMINDER Thonr MM Agents The FKAY BKNTOS' S*mp Free Oimpeliliuii utarlerl on 2nd April and cU*c<. on 29tli June. 1951. If MB have not joined in the competition DO SO NOW. Juat colleet yuur "FRAY BFVTOS" Soup label, and send them to T. S> dney Kinrh Ltd any time up to 2tth June. Fourteen (14) lovely priies to be given away. L r? ^?c;i:*^'-*,;;M-cii^iSS^c'-i;'~C".-.'^K''.',-,:-','.\"^.'V^%'."'-.'.:. u^. ^M&Slgg• • • new daP*" V\ i ttsliiiif .ft'irt'lrif non al Y. De Lima & Co.. Ltd. "Your Jtwttwn" 20 BROAD STREET The law requirm that .ill workman, a.-, dtfintd by the Worknwn'i OonMeuMtton Act. 194a. shall be insured. All'AvW'/V.'.'.V.'.V,V.V.V.VAVA'.V.'.V/V' | .tTTEXTIO.XH I U I 'OKI' II.IV.(.MIS Tuke this uppiirlunily ol oblsiiiini; ynur requiremrnls IN GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranging Irom 14" upwards MILD STEEL Flat*. Rounds, Squares In all Sires BOLTS & NUTS-All Sizes FILTER CLOTH-Whit* Cotton Twill At PRICES that cannol be repented. in White. Grey. Beige and Eggshell 42 inches wide at $4.13 per yard SCHOOL WEAR l.irls r .".mi. Huts ik Shoes I toys Caps und Mine* KIIOAIIH AY l.lll SS SIMM" FOODS HAMH (Smukrdi II.A( ON (Sllaedi |b. -MI. \ BISCVBTH Tim. UK KIN MANMBH Tlni H %Ms i ...,i.,,i lb FISH si rrttMl Ttlta, rilABm Tina PBACHRS Tina JAMS I,ii SHECT THfSt NOW Iho It AMI \I0OS iOt XIIIIY Ltd. White Park Road, St. Michael DIAL 1528 V&^+VSSSSSSMS&'&SSif&SSS&SArt'r'fs'j'sV^ HOVAL JFLLV CORN II \M. ( OCKTAII. BIX I I l> I I II I i i BISCI'ITH MI'TTON AND PKAH IAMB TONGI'ES VKi Jilt I. (< n \^i IM.M r I



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    "\r.r six 81 SOW ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL M. 1851 Co/e Porter: Composer Of Popular Songs From ,.-U-: % %  I'. SUr SONGS startednowlng from the brain and fingers of Coir Portei Alien he was 10 years old. and they have never ceased. The wmx of this American composer • \CT.wheic in th. world : where In (he world, and Cole Porter's song* are mostly "f love. Moreover. ihc> have a beguiling, haunting raatodj. a sophisticated touch IhM remains in the mem ory. One i.f Porter"* moat poptilar songs. "Begin the Heguinv.' has an arresting title at well a* a haunting melody. Onco heard, themusic is difficult to lorc-t. P ilei'v musical talents were early apparent. His parents, prosperous farmer* in the mid siatr of Indiana, cm our aged this talent and gave the boy piano and violin lessons before he enough to reach the Liano podals At the age of 10 %  hi his flrat tune. "Song of which he dedicated to I.is mother. Xt composition was "The Bobolink Walt?." which, though no! a work of genius nor superrtton, alarmed hit mater nal grandfather, who had no wish ttis grandson become a musician and insisted that the lad 'urn his thoughts toward law jrw m artistic profession* Vui:ii Cole ;. enroll, i ., %  Woicestcr A< ai i the east coast State of M isw hu %  ; %  .(!i.| I'tcr matriculated at HOWOW, Cole's musical talents were much Mronger than his grandfather's wish that he become a lawyer I Wore he left Vale in 1913 h. had made an unforgettable im by composing two of the school's still popular songs. >nd "Bulldog." Cole Porter did defer to his grandfather's ambitions sufficiently to enroll at Howard Law School, hut after a year he changed his course of studies to music and by this time his grandfather conceded defeat of his hopes and agreed that he would help his grandson round out his musical education. Cob Porter *! tlrst musical play. "So* America First." was written in collabora'.-"!! wild a friend and wai n miserable failure. Follow ing this disappointment Porter willed for France and joined the French Foreign Legion, taking with him a portable piano-zitherord InjtrunWnt He ear n'.i IM laatnimtMlt on his back and played for the entertainment of the soldiers. Within the sound rV German guns, during World War I, Porter wrote the song "An lionad Garden" and Played >' for his comrades. When ,1 Stales; entered the war in 1917. Porter transferred to a French artillery school at Fon UUMblMU near Paris. There he met Linda Lee Thomas whom he %  r .irrled. When the war ended. Porter returned to the United States. On the boat coming home he met the Into actor mid theatrical producer, Raymond Hitchcock, who heard him play "An Old-Fashioned Garden" and engaged him at once to do the score for a new musical play called "Hltchy-Koo of 1919," which was %  Iromondaua success. Financial security did not atop Porter's urge lo write, but onlv seemed to enhance it Today, Coic Porter is as anx[oul for perfection In every lyric gnd tune he compose* as he ever .. Interested in the reaction of the public to hia work as any untried young composer %  night bo Night after night he can be seen at "Kiss Me Kate, the popular musical comedy play inn In New York for which he %  < lyric*. He likes to listen to the laughter and applause of the audience, and to take his many friends to see and hear it Through the year*. Porter'* output h;is \x-m prolific. In 1924 he composed the song* for "The Greenwich Village Follies," and. although the piny wa* not n great Bucceas, "I'm In Love Again" from the show became a most IF I HAVE TO BUILD AN ARK— Taking the British weather at the thtmt thh *—k tar hit PRIVATE FESTIVAL. BERNARD WICKSTEED iowrti . COLE PORTER. American componnr of popular song* for more than a quarter-century. has heard his music sung from one and of tha United States to the other. A man with "mimic in hiheart." his most %  fill songs have dealt with IOTB, the universal and eternal verity popular song. Four years later, Porter composed the songs for "Paris." and that wore was such a tremendous success that Colo Porter was n permanent star in the musical firmament thereafter. Cole Porter has written the lyrics for more than 20 musical comedies which have been successful on the American stage. notable among them the musical "Jubilee." He also has written Innumerable love songs, including "What Is This Thing Called I-ovt." "Night and Day." "In the Still ..I ihe Night.' ami, of course. "Begin the BcgullM" He also has written the lyrics for the songs in such motion pictures as "Born To Dance." "Hosalle," and "Broadway Melody." and the motion picture "Night and Day." was based on Cole Porter's life During the more than 30 year* ',i h.e spent in theatrical bus! noss. Cole Porter has consistently written songs that are adult and sophisticated. He has BtVtl for S rtlen thnt love is the great emo on which people like to sing about. Thus, although most of hi* lyrics about love are witty and full of unexpected rhymes, ho usually has one entirely romantic song in each play. In "Kiss Me Kate." that song is "So In love." Stories about how Cole Porter writes his song* are legion. At present, he lives In an apartment in a hotel when he Is in New York City, but he has a house in the nearby east coast Slate uf Massachusetts where he often goes for week ends He enjoys writing In crowded cafes and at parties, and Is not disturbed by the din of people Many of his songs have been written In airplanes, automobiles, and on ships. Shortly before World War 11. he went on a round thc-world cruise, taking %  piano, an organ, 24 pencils, a quire of music paper, a typewriter, and a metronome, lie returned from this trip with words and music for the song "Begin the Beguine" and Ihe score of 'Jubilee." In hi* apartment in New York City. Porter ha* a collection Ol dictionaries thai he USM for Ml writings: a rhyming dictionary. a foreign language dictionary, medical dictionaries, and a thick tome marked "Words Ancient and Modern." Porter generally chooses the title of a song first and then writes the words and music to fit it. Ha first composes in his mind and then later at the piano. Often he has fitted his songs to the vocal range of a particular actor already sele;ted for a role in one of his musical play*. Odd incidents have Inspired some of Porter's most popular songs. "Miss Otis Regrets," for instance, was inspired by a west ern ballad he heard at a party in a private home. For some in explicable reason, this song sold 100,000 copies In Scandinavia and Hungary but, outside of New York City, was not particularly popular In the United States. The song "You're The Top" originated in Paris when Cole Porter was having supper at a restaurant and he and some of the guests began making a li*l of all the superla tives they could think of which rhymed. In person, Cole Porter is as suave and polished as his own lyrics. Even on opening nights, when one of his musicals goes before a critical audience for a first time, he does not get nervous. Although his talent has been long-recognized and applauded, he works over each new song as if it were his first. The haunting strains of hi* magnificent melodies prove a constant reminder of this man with a heart full of music. MUSIC HATH . ADELAIDE. A gramophone with a dozen records ranging from Bach to boogey-woogey are being used by a group of northern territory hunter* to attract crocodiles While Ihe hunters were fishing recently and listening to the music, three crocodiles cruised nearby. One was tnOt, Now the huntc;s are trying to discover which kind of mimic the crocs like best. J N view of the fact that it is *> going to go on raining for ever, the Wicksteed family are thinking of building an ark. It seemed a jolly ^ood Idea at first, but when we looked into II there w ere a number of difncul: iea about ark building to-day that Noah didn't encounter. First of all. 1 suppose wc shall have to go to the Hampttc-.nl Borough Council and get the plans passed, and as they are sure to regard It as a dwelling with.*the meaning of Ihe Act. we anal) have to get a building licence. %  will • Cubit* T HIS is going to be difficult. t>< cause it is a private enterpri i* ark and. as you know, they may be built only in the proper.on of one to every council ark. We have measured our garden and it isn't big enough re an %  ik yard, so we shall have to tet %  •crtnlssion lo work on Pi P Oast Hill or the top of Hamp-ad Heath. In either case I imagine there will be a lot of corrcsyon dence before the matter is settled As we have never built an ark boJUW, we'll stick to Noah's blue prints. According to these the ark was 300 cubits long, SO cubit* wide, and 30 cubits high, if we only knew what a cubit wa* we mijiht get down to the coating. You do know' It is the ili* tance from th elbow to the tip of the fingers. Thai's fine, but whose elbow and whose flngeis? Yours, mine, or those of my :on Japhet John? If we don't get It right we'll have the Inspector of Weights and Measures after u*. Aa matter of fact, there are three kinds of cubit. There's the Olympic cubit, in,, vulgar cubit. and the legal cubit. I think we'd better stick to the legal one, don't mC We'll have enough vulgarity W |,en the monkeys are aboard without any more from the cubits. The legal cubit i. a little under 23 ins., so the size oi Noah's ark was about 550 It. by 90 ft. Ky 55 ft. That's enormous, isn't It? It's half the length of the queen Mary and twice the size of Notion's Victory. EkD you think, with a vessel of 'Jiese dimensions, we'll get an Ai %  •• of flood-worth I nes % %  Noah'N Wood N OAH built hi), ark or gopher wood. But where are we going to go tor that.' And. anyway, what is gopher wood ? Some people think it was cedar or pine. If so. we are in for more trouble, because they are -oft woods and you have lo have a licence to import them. There is a tree in Oregon that Ihe Americans call a gopher The wood is yellow and hard. 1 bought a brooch made of it once for my wife. It costs dollars. so the Treasury will be tiresome. And what a time we are going to have with the inspectors once we start getting the animals in. Eoy! Oh. boy I It will be an inspector's dream come true. They will pour out t Hampstead in bus-loads, sanitary inspectors, livestock inspectors, nsherv inspectors, blrd-sancturay inspectors, H.S.P.C.A. inspector*, and inspectors looking for rabies, anthrax, fowl pest, Colorado bee'les, and Jot" licences. Noah's Creepier* fMIR mere collection of the animals is going to be a monumental task. Tnere are about 80.000 Insects and 20,000 worms alone. My sons Ham Philip and Japhet John have volunteered for this part of it. They reckon they can soon capture "every creeping thing that creepelh on the earth," and they've already started building up a supply of match-boxes with breaming holes In the top. Well let the 15,000 different flshe* look after themselves, but there are still 4.000 assorted mammals. 4.000 reptiles, and 15.000 bird*. We'll have to get Mr. Morrison to deal with the Belgian Congo over Ihe gorillas, because ihey are a prohibited export too. it's the same with the tortoises from the Seychelles (ring h Colonial Offlre. Whi 2M8. for ; %  permit) and the duck-billed platypus (make on appointment to see the High Commissioner for Australia. My Authorities M Y job 1* endless. There will still be the Board of Trade (safety regulations at sea), the Port of London Authority, the Ministry of Agriculture (food for the animals), the Ministry of Health (prohibition of the Import of parrots), the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and the Brethren o( Trinity House (lighting arrangements on Mount Ararat) What's that ? The rain hat stopped? Well, thank goodness! —L.E.8Neuralgia, Neuritis, Sciatica, Toothache A fencrous app.i tlon of comfort: i loothlnj 1HtPMOG'.-> It does you g oo d In tm Mtdic-,.-, .-I i EKCO Iw/j Write to us for further details A. BARNES & Co. LTD. P.O. Box 92, Bridge St., Bridgetown, Barbados, B.W.I Official Distributors CDESN and. THE PAIN HASCONE! %  ASPHO' scis swiftly to stop psin—and when i"' pain goes .ofeel At and vigorous i|sln. %  ASPRO' leivti vou with no tired, deprened. r.tii'r-ricidrd iftermsth. The inalgesK (painra'icvmg) action of 'ASPRO' helps tha body to Ire* Itself from hesdachas, (roes rheumatic or neuralgic psin without producing harmful ild s afftts. Ai toon it vou like 'ASPRO' you begin to Icel its nerve Safety' WMM o5!^%ajJS!L HEADACHES ;*i. HtURVnS [ ^ SSSffsSSS!ir 3 Tablet. 3d. 30 Tablets 2'6 OITAIMAaU aVIRYWHiHl AN Tn4t £!r


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    PACK 'i no M NOW MIMM \ I I M M.W AI'KII. 2, 1*51 JAM II \ IMIISS .MUM' l.rr RIK-UI Mrcel l'llair (>M Nc DRESSES of all Types AVI 'ATM < II II IKEMA ;M.n*.r.Onl r am T %  -.., mom ,T ..,., IMmui -n mmu i .BET i* 'HOLIDAY AFFAIR" I NIQH r AT *M .AMl.Ff KORVIM /Yo€-/tt**Xe& r i.., pr.s\ *• %  Ml %  • no WBST ^•"AlBf OMB W) |, V GAIETY HW SAtOtN] S. JM IA*IT I Ww TODAY 1 ft | LOST BOUNDARIES //#. i ##/./. / Aim .v / / / of Ik* Sto> of Ifcp It.-,. -r rui..„ irnrral DOUGLAS Mar AKTHUt TliK Tlmel* Short Mory will h, shvu n •1 the nitiiM.i wmwH PLAZA from FRIDAY, MAY 4th tarelher with X O H TO TOKONTO yer'.crday big by TO A. went M and] Mn E. Keith Watoatt %  an MkhaM. AceamLbe* was Mr W.iJeWts .brother Dr. J. E. Walrott Mr. and Mrs. Walcott and their son i bo away for abjut two months. Dr. Walcott however will b* returning tn a few week* Umr, Departure* By T.C.A. D URING the "Kill m<#itha Pegfv Fnimer plans in Canada she will be in Montreal most of list time staying with ralaUvn. Tony Dormer who was m Barbados for • week's holiday returned to Bermuda >eaterday by T.C.A He it with Cable and Win-Land in at present stationed in Bermuda. Back to Canada B RIO. AND MRS. ARMAND SVtTM who had been here since March Sni. |#ft yesterday by T.C A. for TOs..,to. Hng Smith is the son Off h late Senator E. D Smith of Ontario Other paaasrigsni on T.C A. !" northbound trip to Canada were Mr. Thomas MedUnd, Miss Eleanor Ward, Col. and Mis Robert Saunders, Mr. and Mrs Murray Wallace and Miss Evelyn Maclnnes Ur Wallace is a T.C A. pilot and Mlea aracinm* is a TCA. air sttwardasss. T.C.A. ClrU L OHrTTA McDONELL. Ma Fleming, I>oris Tidy. c,raldtnc Hodeson and J*Jrac tame in on the TCA flight £8terday morning They all work with TCA. in different parts o* Canada Doris who Hi r va ; Uon clerk in Toronto has been to tofore Mary. Oernldin< and I-utii ara from Monlrc.il and horn* is in Vancouver ,e slaying at the Ocean Vk Hotel QaJxib Calling ANNOUNCING To V\iii ol . MISS ELAINE KINKEAD Dorothy Gray B.auly Consultant who wUl be availabl. at COUJNS' LTD.. Couiwnc D*partmont. bom 30th April to 3rd May. MISS KINKEAD will gladly gtfl her ..pen cdvlcs en MalntUp Skin Treatment and P.nonal AnalyU Churl to all who car. to tost, advantage, ot this opportunity. Trail . Dorothy Gray the featnre picture EDGF or DOOYi With JANE ANDHP.WS I tRU V GRANGER and JOAN EVAN;; KCULXAK PRICES hi If THIS IH II. OPEIS' JULY 21st GLOBE THEATRE TONITF *50. TOMORROW—TTFSDAY, 5 ft 141 r\M InarusM-rw im m • in NIMH UN CITY ACROSS THI RIVER NOW SHOWING AT EMPIRE 4.45 & 8.30 Daily lht Command Performance Picture of the Year K*ln> : "Ll-rS OO LATIV ana KKITISH MOVIC TONE LOCAL TALENT At DITION TO-DAV. .SII AM OIL STOVES Tested and tried is the Verdict of every Houtewifc I Hihiimihl. in Silttflf mill IhmIIIiItmrnrr* \. II. HOW I I I Diul MOO. I.U.MIIKK & IMPORTANT OIR EVENING SHOWS ulll -Ufl promptly at HIS p.m. t~m TUESDAY. MAY 1ST. e also coming iown for the summer vacation. but he does not know when. Not Since 1907 F ROM Vancouver Island comes Mrs. C. Boyd who has come to pend about 6 months to one yr-i, in Barbados She is staying with Miss Major at Bay Mansion. Miss Bovd who went to school In Barbados left here in 190?, this is hrr lint visit since then. She came in bv T.C.A. flight vesterday. Glad To Be Home M R. CLEMENT S. JARVIS. I Barbadian who had been living in Curacao for two and a half years working with C.S.M was imonj, the fourteen passengers who came in on Friday from "uracao. He tells me that durimhis stay in Curacao he took a course in real estate and auctioneering nnd a post-graduate course n real estate, law ami accountancy and has obtained diplomas In these subjects. He Is back home for keeps, glad to be here and hope* to go into business shortly. Petroleum Engineer M R. BASIL HOIX.ES who la a petroleum engineer with the United Oil Well Co.. in Anaco. 'eneiucla arrived from Veiu-uela yesterday via Trinidad hy B.W.I.A. accompanied by his Here for a short holiday, Lhey artstaying al the Ocean v>w Hotel arriving by the plane were Mr. and Mn. Ch..rlcs B. White. Mr. Whit" sales representative of Coca Cola. They plan to spend s,x eeks with the Old leys nt a flat i the St. tawrence coast. Mr. Gidley is also with Coca Cola. Trinidad Arrivals M RS E. DE LA BASTIDE arrived irom TrlnidOti ... t> I day morning by B.W I.A. A few minutes later her daughter Joan came in by T.C.A. from Trinidad. Mrs. de La Bavtido is here for two weeks. Joan plans lo spend one week in Barbados. They are staying with Mr and Mr> Harold Kidney. Mrs. Kidney daughter of Mrs. de La Battlde. Joan works in the Public Relations Office of T.C.A In Montreal other arrira' from Trinidad yesterday wer Ml Fred Strasser and Mr. Bdtf.n Da Costa, Trinidad architect; u usual Mr. Da Costa Is staying at Aquatic Gardens. Venezuelan Journali;*.pouR Venatualan journalist Shipwrecked ? EfAVE you aver been ihlp* intransit througn llai'biiX a wrevkT If not the Barbad" dos yesterday. They remained at Polo Club will give you this "opSeawell for about twenty minutes, portunity" on Saturday. July list, arriving irom Grenadin time to Jh*> date of their annual ball at the connect with B.W I.A's schedule PlWstusl Beath Club. ''t'^T^*, „ V-. Childr.n'. Ptintin,. 7iielan Journalists visited Triml T*' n*t exnlbsuon at tne Bardad on a goodwill tour orgu. %  hados Museum begins May nlsed by B W I A and the ,n n d *"1 last for one month. Trinidad and Tobago Tourist ll wUl he an exhibition of chilBureau They spent te n day Trinidad and live in Tobago. after which, five of them returned to Venezuela These four how. ever went on to spend four days in Grenada fist* were F Carmona who is on the staff .if El fmpulso. Jose Machado Panorama. Oscar Lovai 1 Nar.oiul and Carlos Lezenns El Herald* With them was at %  ,l/|RS H.'H. HART resumed official Interpreter, who accomlvl. tram her short visit to panied them throughout tlieir trip. Trtnidad yesterday morning bv However one of them. Osc-r I1W.I A... Mrs. A Shields Loverii. spoke little Fiikhsh. Hi njs .miong the passengers bound told Carlo that he had been m for Montreal yesterday by T.CA, the newspaper bvslnes* for flftwn Her flnsl desttnaUon is Scotland. years, he was married and him \M ISS SHEILA 1ANTHK three children. They had thorough lvl. GROSVE\OR of Lodgo ly enjoyed their tour of the islands Road. Secretary of the Christ and they had been treated with Church Old Girls Scholars' Assoevery courtesy. Ot the three elation has gone to the US on A islands Trinidad. Tobago and vislt Mr. Vernon T. EastGrenada, he thought Grenada the m n" <* 'he Sanitation Departmost beautiful meat in St. Lucia is in Barbados Their interpreter Carlos Rodg jP M 'fr fc_ jg* J . %  %  months Cren's paintings from England. Back To Caracas B ACK TO CARACAS yesterday after a holiday m Barbados went Mis.-Grace Evans, Mrs. Mai got Bvianoourt, her daughter CiiriTicn and Mr. and Mrs. franu t A'hevlei and their daughter CoT.ing-s and Goings lvl fro rtguez. fomerly of B.W.I A bid J eaT ** Barbadian, he is spendthem ssttaa ! Smw.-ii Hn n-ln sorne <* ,l With, relatives at yrVterdTy JPO K' Ville. Bank HaU. Trinidad Marriage? turned to Trinidad afternoon M.SS^A^IISEY Dire" d Eng.fe-I. Mtor of Women's Program !" -. M^ P*TSV BILUEB, who over radio station CTCN in CalXTX t'"P^"ed t h e Trinidad Lndtrs water polo team to Barbados last November was married In Trinidad yesterday to Mr Hugh Wight Also married yesterday in Trinidad was Mr Mark Conyers to Miss Daphne Muggins. Mr r\r\ Mis. Conyora are due to arrive from Trinidad today to spend (Mir honeymoon at the Hotel Royal Heeent engagements In Tfinidnd are Mr. Hurry Bryden, son of Mr. nnd Mrs. W. F. Bryden te theatre. •* %  no one owns a cat—your cat f : lai niKhl'v guest -tars probably owns you. If you Bra were certainly most entertaining, not very careful you will nnd Un' oix-ciallv Joe Clemendore. versayou are not the possessor, but the tile song and dance man one mmpossessed. You can be your dog s nte atown the next. The crowd master, but no one lias ever y> loved lum heen the master of a cat. At the Thev also encouraged the six best it is an equal partnership in other iiertormers with much apthe ai gary. Alberta, is In Barbados for three weeks. She flaw In ri from Canada by T.C A. and 1 a staying with Or Norman and Dr. M. A. (Mrs.) Wright at AU-rgeldie Flats. Miss Dlbney spent Usni yeafS d o i n g i 'i \vorK| in Canad.i was Telegraph Editor far more mm* HI*M* than 25 years of various Cana dial) newspapers. After UW war aha rM I I'u'l'ii'"' journalist before she began broaaossstlng. Still Tops AURICE JONES and his Friday night talent showi M I plause." This shows that either the talent Is BetUnl better or the audience is encournging them Perhaps it's both. —P. M SOhERBFRG speaking in the BBC's "The Naturalist" on "Cnts and CatCalU." ASTOK TMBA THE I \-) TWO -I"'"%  irt-ANRta-* oiai t-tra: U BROWS S. OBfHESfTBA rr-a A HOT PHOOHAMME n-m MM n M.'le %  I-.-4.1 UOH 1RFJQL |p "OAI.S INCOBPOaATFI' Jnd SHIN so-MOaaow MHIA Douhtr lr.t %* %  %  ••*>• IhinalOXT %  ACTION DKAMA Ml'SIC AM LF'>N rimO**-Vu "i" him: M'l ta;.h. all il.r i M.. f ii reat **< n aBl $ THE SALVATION ASM! | ANNUAL TAG DAY J | HilHW. MAY 4th I ^ Plenit buy a Tf to ^ 5 Help Other.! !j MEN'S WORSTED TROUSERS SI-.H.-i /.(.£'. FAWN, ni;nv. \ YOUTHS' LONG GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS S.l BLUE PIN STRIPED SUITING S8..t3 SPORT SHIRTS S3.JMI 1.75 6.53 MEN'S PLASTIC BELTS lie, -1.1c, .Me, 85c. BOYS PLASTIC BELTS 38c EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 (



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    PAI'.I. IT. I SUNDAY ADVOCATK SUNDAY, APRII 2. 1851 Prize List Of Hortieulliiral Show Tr rm/.i i II i 1 s*. VKXIV.I'EI.AX MM ll\ \l ISIS >f ihe Orchid %  1 the Barbuda Sections Horticului.i.l yu*eri. i 21. It u IIOMIHK IS. ri~ CatUa>. L-Wii .-< Ml toM < atttori II : % %  %  MI u € %  !•>• Mimwri pocha; tnd Mi u CalUat* .p4-dc-l.l. Mr V M.r.or-. Irw l,Mr r A Hunta Suprrbl, DiiiJ-^ui'i *"P LsM Onctdfum Span* Onc.il. >m Far. %  1 lluu-t-.uwoft. 2nd. Mi K t... it ii*' a**UanoaaU Spactai IM|M. Mr II. II IpMkMlouu fed. Mr H 11 1 dilTeirnl Spam %  riT rio"r C-UleT> •*".•.hi c cii'ir"'.. % %  (... < %  lim; 1...1 Mi II \ I • IWndWb.um Hybrid i t Mr Fl V nSSKhliim PbaltltopaW -Ul. Mr.. II L natelM. IMMWiim fltir--I W. CMWr; Snd W.I Hhn>tir* SputkovloMiUt. Mi* r oUrai. lr,-l. Mm P ONral %  Vanda. LI. Ml H '• A* O v"""l !" !" air. R r PilMllll Ind. Mr H T* l>ark. 3 diaarr.ii R R F ParkmwHi: >nd. M. B i'...vinmn < \.)W I Mra. Hutrhlriaon p • Mr* I W. lhandlar. In*, Mm. r ON-il CotM*.—1-t, Mr. I \ Mil. P O-Nfil t Clip praaante-1 bv i. r I "• CHrla lo mambar. IU Rocha for Ptial .fed. Mi BM THESE lout Venezuelan Journalists And an Interpret*! Mi CaiJoBodrignd lnntianslt tfarouith Barbados yesterday by B.W.I.A. enroute to Vcoomala. They |r Mi. F. Carmona. Hi. JOM Uacbado. Mr. Carlo" L+se-nns and Mi. Oicar Lovers OUR READERS SAY: K-air— I h<:ut • spent, suv In helping to the the farming expansion of RussL Communism, wnnh COnfUtUtCf threat to our freedom icore The thought terrifies me. Have flHOL'STKU" the April 27. 1951. Mr. •• %  /. A. /'. A. Bungling look To The Edifor, The AdDOfOIr— SIR. The BA.F.A. accepted •""' nt the >' ,r Tht Atl>< :' flve-year tialning fucci the six trade* then offered. x^ nf dozen wjckel-ittlcka. a ing well. wi'hoilt hnving Mlj idea what it blackboard and a piece of chalk. The water front workers have all about. Now I have iinWn-n,,. n, h ] aftirnoon for practice, also been h>u*.v during the weeR Wednesday 25th inlt.. found Mr. loading *ugat „ at Kensington and the He M)(l th t moal un emplov. %  laeUMl playeri eagtnly waiting n^t ngures are *ubje.t to some to go t..i their coaching alr HI I' raall. .1 Mi, Oibtoi ,-n n r* my course 1 have no regrrt*. i the Itiirnarles Board, my M.. thankL due lxi then appreciable |p In awarding twfntv-f.nn ,££.'. bUl~.il lei yearly to boys in thl.s m Ut iau.nd I hope that in tlic near (uturo the number Of bursaries i i; Tied "ill be increased to at 1, : | thirty, owing to the large .: u .t.>: ,,t apphV "ii~ yearly And I i DM rorwartl in the not too dislai,' future to sexat least IWO boti aranifd a fariawr Una u> .(Ivanccd course in fiw U.K. or aome other country. This MM lie? chiefly to those boys who DoMht, li.i\ e gained certificate, in prinUng. KArTii.hura Orada M Pi rnnineerlug and electricity. I also hO| %  11,1 ,nc B**'"d wil *"* to '* these Journcymi-n are alwaya provided with work. Thnnks is also due to Mr TtMrOtNlds, Acting pueetor of i :i for so kindly preerrUng —us with certificates, and Mr. tended by Messrs. Kelly Foster. Payne for his kind and udviMiu; O B Coppln anrt Christie Smith D his address to the DOY; fmm the B A.P A. But Mr. Mr Wet^ea our Secretary* Wilkt-a did not require Measn for the First Tim* in Barbados BAVARIAN SILVER PORCELAIN — ALSO — Nrw and Largp Shipme-ala ef : Royal Crown Derbv Bone China ANI> Crown SlalTordihire Bone China • Beautiful China at its very best LOUIS L. BAYLEY Jewellers -OF — Holton Lane -nd Ba/badoa Aquatic Club it %  %  •• Oraiii i-upil al U Cnallna (I raira. Ora-la II P PaalU f Mi I M.. •ar. Oradi raalto al MIM %  Parkl"n-l C.rada 111 P B J Dlln. 1 P Cadrtarlan lllfh Srhaal—S KudnaM Uladc III P raall. -I Mr. I M M M l f iaa Orada II H. VaBlU 1> V. V ullr. C V— .;.-..!, W D Harrii. Oruda raiu ryradi D, •> %  n-iirid-r A n>llh. Oradr II P; I' N W or rail. Oradi III P: t Armtlrorm. Orada IV P s n or-mih. C.adr V Pi n %  I V P. raall* -1 M raaM al Mr. Hi.lm P.iP fn-rka. prada n P: .' P III P; N D Moor*. Orada III M Hfstrn who write letters to the i diu.. ..I lii.i "Advoejte' are asked la note tliat this newopaper din--, not normalls publish letters which are not excln. live to thin newspaper Contributor* to O I' R i:l \nn:SAY who write I'lob i a 'i.nii lie plume axe rrmindrd that their names must be sent lo the Editor >• a aagn ol good faith. Names are never disclosed but are treated as confidential hy the Editor, rtrrat In Signed letters. rror. but this does not say that •.uch figures cannot indicate trends. \* "'atcd in his interview •.will the Advocate on Wednesday, there are over 6.000 men on the live reginter and he is satisfied that there is considerable unem. pa in the island v P I. Cradr IV j i n. REMANDED WITH BAIL ERIC GREEN of Thornhuiy Hill, St. Michnei was lemmded with ball until May l try i Clt %  •e^es our for his great Interest In In* (arc of the boys. KEITH W. DEANE. Up:>or Collymore Rock, Michael. 16. Kp il ITth, IBM. Wl .[. Foster, Coppln or Smith. What he wanted were the eight footballs, the two or three dozen wicketsticks, the blackboard and the piece of chalk and not one singl of these articles was produced b; DEATH INQUIRY ADJOURNID Further heating in the inquiry Intn tin circumstances surrounding the death of 43-yeor-old Beikeley Hoyte of Haggatt Hall vill be resumed at District "B" Court tomorrow morning at 10.00 o'clock. lloyte's body was discovered on Bulkeley Road shortly after 12.13 a.m. on April 22. His motor cycle wa< lying a little distance from him. Pert nMtrtern evidence will be given by Dr. E. I-. Waul small bit of ground behind the goal posts, as no arrangement? acemed lo have been made by the I liror. The Adtwatc— SIR, 1 lend with Interest tho the B.A.F.A. You will agree. B.A.F.A to obtain the use of Sir. that It is beyond the realms the football held for the evening, of possibility to use Mr. Poster Boiling It all down, the B.A.F.A. as a blackboard, or to substitute have obviously made no effort to Mr. Coppln for eight footballs or help Mi Wilke* in his kind find Police Mngi"i ite al ri cki under the caption "SnElLsh aetn to use Mr. Smith In place generous offer nor have they charged by the Police yesterday Doors" In today's Issue of your of t-ro dozen wicket-sticks, and so shown any consideration for the With the laxcenv of clothlne. costnewspaper. ->n %  • can hardly consider thi* the players concerned. One can only ing £1 ifl'l beiotiRtng lo Email. n amazes me that, with the original intention add thai such inaction on the part uel Ishmnel on Apul J<' world situation as it Is today. Eventually Pickwick Club kind0 f the B.A.F.A. Sgt O. Munell Bttsched to the Britain can 3nd it poasibl. Csvtral PH %  '"" "' l ing on behalf of the Polic recks lo high upplied Iwo or throe foothills heaven and should l>e seriously ... J mere door. and a dozen wicket-sUcks. and criticised, uld not that money be better the footballers were coached on a CRITIC. Iv Pimples and Bad Skin AN OLD FRIEND IN Among plalrter'i i'eanuts Neuaoo'j Chocolate Bars— a Variety MarsnmaJlaws in pkgs. & tins NEW Recent Arrivals. Noxiema Cream Evenflow Fi^eding Botllei Small lee Jars Ncrvono THE rOSMORIBMTiXX liiiiM s 4441 and 2041 Just a few >ards fram the c.-lglnal spot. Prince WUIkun Henry nlreel A New Discovery Nliadarm U aa olntmni. but stknM irlt" j" 1! ia 0 a' "' %  "' *a5 "r psraa It U>pa iiclira. Burntiis and imarUBaj Jr. 1 w 10 inionu.. aiid e %  ,B cltai. aoli and vchoty amootb. Works Fost LWWdm-i %  un on til* afftpd fla?. All '"' '" %  d'.aku'iaa Mo>' Ut. unoulh and > ~ .-in"" 6'*a Ni.oa.— IM wwreaMT f |iifSl"'*llT M* i ti Kind %  akin Unit. iu bay, aaja_Ui o-jy-^ tjry^ w „_,,dl In -^ '—mt font CIniM -in It >•. EiSSI) SERVES AGRICILTURE with Petroleum Products for every Farm Machine and Vehicle IT rAYI TO IAT It.M. JONES & CO. LTD. Agents. i4S S a J M4iaaa*saaaaaBBaMaataaaaakiMSSaaaaS>aa' FOH BETTER COOKiXG FLORENCE OIL STOVES AND OVENS lead*** father DIESEL ENGINES ALL STATIONARY 6 HARINi DUTIES Kngines liearing these Internalionally famous names are doing ]ilendid service throughout the world on land and sea. There is a niie and type for every duty. They are supplied in a convenient range of powers from It te 1,440 Hill 1 CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. DISTRIBUTORS CITY GARAGE LTD. WM. FOGARTY LTD. HER EVER-SMART APPEARANCE LED TO HER DAY OF DAYS HERE WE MENTION SOME NEW ARRIVALS THAT SHOULD KEEP YOU IN THE BETTER-DRESSED BRACKET DRESS NET with Gold Metal Impressions In Pink. Blue and W lute (n $2.28 per yard CREPE ROMAINE Several Exquisite Shades W *2.:16 and (2.40 per yard CREPE ROMAINE Brown and Black 0 $1.2 $1.55 per vard SHARKSKIN White and Beige I?) $3.00 and $1.85 per yard respectively. WM. FOGARTY LTD. WHEN MORE LIGHT inside YOUR HOUSE NEEDS MORE REAUTY Outside SIMPLY APPLY §NOWCGM Decora I i ve Wale rproof Coating SNOWCEM protect! the outHide of your building from rain and moisture and improves its appotirance. Its clean flriih on inside walls and ceilings increases linhtrcflection value by at least 20 per cent SNOWCEM is hyRienic since its vaiuable surface promotes maximum cleanliness and prevents the harbouring of fifing, SNOWCEM DECORATIVE WATERPROOF COATING Obtainable in : While. Cream, Pink. Sllver-mey. Green, Blue, Yellow & Terra-col ta. T. GEDDES GRANT LTD.—Agents Of* Sale at all Hardware & Lumber Stores



    PAGE 1

    i' v..r TF\ SINDAV ADVOCATE SUNDAY. APRIL i*. I5! filing Hair! oat hair root* ire starved of v kal .•rime BMHM norrnatl> uipplied 9J the iod\ Thai's why you s .%  nin. inconc— u mdiwn. .-** (Mental hair-forming SaeaUnOa*. Massaged into the ,hry nirtshcMhch.iti toots--and soon han inws h keafchj. handsomeigoui. Pure SihU'li will gel /oar ban %  ihriMiif again and keep it healthy I Pi tlVil r < wr m r-jf. <•/ dbad-nf •t-firyfjr-T.im* I,/** or. for important matter before you at i ihis late hour, but 1 found on Inquiry that there was no other date } for a long time on which 1 could bring ihis matter before you. and I hope, therefore, that you Will .._ jnd thev undertook deep drilling in Barbados by arrangement with ihf British Union Oil Company. They had uniiino all the equipment requir.... In the Gulf Ci been greatly modi till be seen from the icencc, a copy of which I have here We have other evidence of favouritism being displayed towards the American Corporation, nndji.ahoidd be emphasised that rporation had done noof Barbados the economic rivalries t ( t t he iment. at the Metropolitan Power*, and they Jos? Aa your dread what may be happening beleans, did" accept 6ut ** lordships may know, it conatsta of hind the closed doors of the Cuban B.U.OC 's attitude was fullv jusa Legislature, which is the Govnegotiations I gather tha:. .. titled, as the tehns originally put crnor. the LegisUtlve Council of yhotcgraphy, a darkened room i* forward by the Government j>rOVfilleen members, and a House or necessary for development and the ed so unworkable that they have Am-mbly of twenty four members, intrusion of a little light may rum >mce had to be greatly relaxed The Governor has a negative voice ln „ picture, so they wait, dreadThe Barbados Petroleum Act. in the making and passing of laws lllg \ enX t h cy are to be sacrificed. 19M. provided fc>r payments by and. in the normal phraseology, butchered to make a Cuban holiwav of royalty to land owners in laws are passed with the advice dajr j^ M teave the ^est Indies creas where oil may be found and consent of the L^t" 1 """ and go to East Africa, where the id also for compensation to land Council and General Assembly j^,,^ of „„,. own rac0 awa n with ed to begin wont at once. m me UUK Corporation had done no"i !" iw wn !" vi. >v % % % %  < %  ,..... — ~C"~i^' "-w* n >•"•'*"•'""'"^ •"%  • % %  October, 1948. the Colonial OT.ce thing ik ujisland; tffyhad cvnm ior thc takin ovw of M i h lsland ho "^L "I? !" t„ deepest apprehension the dogmat appointed the late Mr G. M. made no surveys and had bought rncillery rights, such as the right such laws aj may %  """ !" 2L2£ pronouncements of Whitehall doc. I^-pper, a highly qunlifled mining no aouipment. whereas the to enter on land to search for and time be required ior " W" tnnaire-*. They. too. fear lest all engineer and petroleum geologist B U.OjJ., during the. thirty-two take petroleum, or to use and oc; nd good government oi and technical adviser on oil exyears they had been wav^mg In cupy land for thc erection ol i-land. ploraUon developments_ to His the islano, have done a great deal buildings, tanks and the like Sn much Mole Ministry of Fuel and tm mi.* sure al pi iffd Q rogrSM the carat rofyosi cholcs when M lr< Ih* proif PM Corrpondtnr. Coil| .i ih */D d ntity. nevtithelegs cmllrmed thi nent geologists Limited, should be given the sole pntpecfini U island. Mi reading %  report— alua already heavy expenditure. Put simply the Government of Barbados went back on their promise to the B.U.O.C. to grant them a proapecting licence over the whole island, which, be it noted, under the usual Colonial legislation calls for a select!. .Tea. and therefore does not con stitute a monopoly. Itt place ihey offered the B.U.OC. a licence giving them first choice on only one quarter of the island, on terms which were so unworkable that ihev stand for may be sold fcr a slogan—"Quantity, not quality"-the miscarriage of democracy. ich as was possessed by the Consists of the Governor, the B.U.O.C. before the passing of colonial Secretary and lh c Attoi £ of MM the xh,i Act ,n othCT worrts M ,tr as ney-General, ex -fUcle. and suci 1C the B.U.OC. are concerned, the ^^ as Hls Majesty may at> measure has resulted in complete „ mt fll [he pr ewnt m-^" connvauon of their nstbiwi.t. (n,^ „iner.. Th e Executive Com | And so on. One could go round the Empire, but there Is no time. %  showing the inconsistencies whicn arise from lack of consistent pur1 pose and lack of consistent pnn %  lii ence over the whole they were consequently relaxed "th* cvt of the Gulf Corporation rf'cr t'.a B.U.O.C. had withdrawn. u iht i. kw*n U€li> HI ope''ni In UdiUon to oil tMM the BrXish UnMn Oil i"rche "I )U %  '>loiid ~ On May II, 1949. the Acting Governor of Barbadi to the British Unio pany's Manager there tht his Government dkl not Intend to dcviatr from the Lepper Repot' As Late us September 80. 1949. this gentleman advised the companj s manager that he had cabled to thi Colonial Office In London an assurance that the Barbados Government would not depart in any way from the Lepper Report. Relying upon the assurance given, the company gave up their leases to the Government and did not oppose the Petroleum Bill intro ork, the work of the company's geologists has resulted in thc pro.iwon of a first-class water suo1 ly, and the report on the gtologii .il investigations of the underground water resources in Barbaconflrmed hados drawn up by the Company's Oil Comgeologist, the late Dr. Senn. Is regarded as a model work. The n.U.O.C. have also provided employment for many of the inhabitants of Barbados and. by importing the necessary supplies or oil, ipletery contrary to all prar tire In areas under British influence. That these mining rights nre extremely valuable Is clearly proved by the willingness or Trlres*arch nldad Leaseholds, Limited to pies. We seem to be gelling the worst of both worlds. We discourage the British investor, on the one hand, and we undermine Ilka confidence of naacent Dominions. on the other. I repeat that thc case before us U not creditable to the Barbados Clovemmem and merits the intervention of His Majesty's Government. 1 claim .ted by local SUlut. our Lordships must be aware, and po,,,^ 0 r a u members ol the Executive Council ex •Acts, plus one member of the Legislative Council, plus four members of that that is so because it is thei the House of Assembly who are duty to try and preserve tradilionnppolnted by the Government at al morality in Government busting beginning of each session of ness in Colonies still under their the Legislature. This Committee control and influence. In eoncluIs. m fact, the principal Lnstruslon. I say that I am loth to look cur \M mem of government, and introon and see. as It seems, the British reiTexpeVs K e" of deep drilling All duce, all money votes, prepares Government in the role, of Gallic the BU OC rowAsk for if hisEstimates and initiates all Govern. H o not think that Gallio was realment measures, it is responsible ly a prototype 0 r a Socialist Govfor Government works a nd for the ornment, asked to defend the prlnmanagemortt of Government prociples of public honesty, and I hope perry. The four members who come to the Executive Committee from the House of Assembly artconduct of pubdertake deep drilling, ai eagerness of the Gun* poration to get into the almost any price and ti id by th !>tt Corsland i lice and a fair deal As further evidence of the ar bitrary methods of the BarbaduGovernment, I would mention thnt the gas well operated by B.U.O.C. las taken over under the PeE inc necry !" jwu . WM ltktn ovn under the Tercsp0n ,ible for the cO' ri"L b !if,SrS •• Act. but compensation ,,,. Ksrncss in that House. B ; nd waterworks to operate. Th< i i eovgry and harnessing of nalurn! gas has also proved a great boom to all In the island. However, so 'ar as wp can see, all this haa eoui.lpd for nothingand tho company's rlghut have oeen conflated. will be payable and a claim has been filed. However, although the gas was taken over, the that they will yet relent from the attitude which they have taken up The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations (Lord Ogmore): My Lords, 1 must first express my ulte of their acceptance of collec B5S iasfisS g&H£g b P *S!* : S ""--" %  *— """they are r,-sponsible to the fift*LB?S2S22?-SfH On /une 1, 1990. the company's i epreseritative taw the permanent Act. The company, in tt ourse of business, naturally declined to part with their property the pipeline and so on. until th impensation claim WM bellied 'i h ey are respons ivernor and not to the House re other details I coula make the point clear, but Under-Secretary of S:ate for the ^p Barbados Government's an lolonles in London, bul he could lake no practical suggestions, brond saying lhat If the nmpany uld prepare a ist th ovemment, the Colo would forward It t ,vlth comments oh quesonly. At tl the same .. this was to pass the Ni ural Gas Corporation Act, 1930 Under Section 18 of this Art. natural gas plant is transferred |o the corporation set up by the Government. This, I am sure j Ixudship will agree lg n .irthy of action in a tolallta arbados: Th.. Oekni ent of the avaiUhle dueed lnto lhfl |^gi fl | a t. Barbados. This became law on January A, 19&0 The Bill provides compensation for land owners for loss of rights, but contains no provision for compensation for loss of rights to explore for oil. ef cetera. Thll means that the company' lenaes, which gave i,..rbanos them the tight t> nplore fr nil t.ial Ofii.' et crrcro. wtrv remit-ted valueless Barbados without tornpens.ith* fur the loss Uofu] of f of Ihelr right* Surh Is quite unknown under British Known m nw %  •"%  !" ,,....—.... 'n^'."d W^he'tat*| ^ ugg9st tha| Qtti WOIJ uf uv \ice from Hi Majesty'c.nwu ile to to-day, in order to meet my onvenience. 1 think your Lordhips will agree with me when 1 l.-ul Coloniul ontcc Ul iUiys Ol noblr Lord * h '-' • I" l """ %  .rMrt.ffm VIM !h. M.nUIiT mull have w-rlliy wl acilDIi m a u.iauw'i.n IM.-I.I -lid conllol or publi. > i.. IK. 2fCuh ...^,_ .cnt t,> BarhadAS. and elusion. I would call your l*oru> 'r rea surer. who i.^ uomli The down possesses a veto over "." [figUUtlon and the Secretary of :tatrk it entailed proved that oil .n.ii.cn ml quantllies was not ivsilabJe at shallow depths, and it would be necessary lo drill deep „,,,,, h n, sown to 10,000 or iroOO feet The company had this %  mind when var broke out In 19JW and the aulbreak of war. of course, seri..1 ]. interruptsd it* plans. It was not possible to obtain essenial equipment. In fact, permission to acquire it was refused. A .. eport by the company's hind the Iron C ist, tho late Dr. Senn. dated some measu 1941. was given by the tectl rr-ent to the Governor the Secretary of Slat. have the desired etT>> t ^ ^* Msa.^1 tj&ttABGLznae? A^SWrftV'S? .gre*—a -aste of time to put ioiURIn< ov ma Majesty's Government not to u i J1 _i h i 11 , n ihp paia of the rrrttw,rf *** claim to the Baroados „„„„ „ T ,JT B -I.I t'rfere in the domestic affairs of and perhaps it wps^riom^corSany umiud. rrsstiv?*$ Ve'coffi t^&i ns%; "SSSSA *• < iova^i ^Su^. b3 wa K-cretary. Ih this %  tjnmj-i T that mwbjr^r ,, co.on.al lliat iH ey can Interfere; If only by ESi&a ^jlt^JS&J. S^^Slr. x^sSr&zx ir ^TtglraWS 8/ Co o'niaf SlSr^^eoraS IM e^em^y^dln^ul 'for d,mes„c scene, affect, the reputa %  eTn^nt'ShrWltgently. U not Independent ^^'^— tj 1 ,„,pens.ition Pitllament ImidenUlly. hi oneto similar action being, millions of i.iter I receleed from the Colonial against a British company b; ; equally m> doubt larger than the Isle of Wight. It long association with thi* country, and porticulary with your I-oroship's House,. a moment. I will sho ponndt -I believe In the case Czechoslovakia the figure was 1:8000.000for British interests which wenaffecled by thenationalisation measures. Therefore. It seems lhat British Interests bcrtain can obtain lupport and proBritish GovernSecretary b ;ually ^bj-ct lion of His Majesty's Government taken 8'>d makes a mockery of Ihf. pilnof British justice. Will iggested perhaps thut Ju: while i British ompany to Sir Frank Stockdale. menl for their propertl* roller of the West Indian compnny operating in •lopment and Welfare ComColony can get nothing nlssion, and forwarded by him to ] mmcd for a prospecUng In June and July, 1941, the licence, and also requested that a xvnpany made an application to provisional licence be granted as Its Majesty's Government for ., drilling rig was ready at Trini icil SUte doHar, nctniK dad lo procped lo BarbidoK lo hc-n live Govwmmfm drcldcd t. ,. (crence, it means that a direct: irom the Secretary of State would have to be obeyed by the l*gts. Son m Barbados, but to put B.U.O.C for the compulsory •.,. •lalm as suggested ing away of their drilling right be a waste of lim*. by the Government in Barbrtor My Lords. I beg tThe last letter 1 received from per,, the Colonial Secretary, dated March I 19*1, in effect admitted uord (ha; the B U.O.C. werepromissole prospecting licer ic ranuM a I o ild *U c ._. the purpose of carrying out a commence deep drilling. To the geophvsical survey in Barbados, company's astonishment, this WM but this was refused, and the icfused. although the Governoi. company, therefore, had to break then Mr (now Sir) Arthur So off its negotiation* with the United age, stated, among othe States cer.physical survey con"i that the moral i" comfulTy appreciated panv had n stmng n for first consideration .. .sland-wlde concession However, the Barbados Government invited Minister of Mines in Alb come to Barbados to advise them !" on the preparauon of petroleum !" 2. i'i .lion iiise the underground angle from lhat of the noble Lord i ibis' in Barbados. It was who has moved IV I have no per o.ther stated by the Secretary of sonal interest in the British Union iff! lhat the Colon.al Secretary Oil Company, but I ha-e a conL„ iiorhndos went CO far as to Insiderable peraoiial interest in ColThe Island was first discovered %  the Portuguese In the sixteenth %  nttiry. and It was called L" Barbados after the beard!-,! li. ire*. That b a rurious specimei. which I admit 1 have never ddovered myself, but apparently here are bearded fig trees on the Island, and from those the name derives. It wan first discovereo Let me take one or tw 0 infor this country by Captain Catasunces. Suppose an injustice, line, of thc good ship Olive Blssuch as I conceive this to be, had usn, in 1825, and it was claimed teen done in Barbados to a group by him for "James, King of Eogof smallholders, Is it conceivable l.ind and of this island." A succesthat His Majesty's Government gfon of adventurers went to the would have said that it was powerCaribbean. The thirst for gold. less to intervene? Suppose, if you enmity towards Spain, jealousy like, it was a more authoritative ot her rich conquests, love of Milverton' My Lords, 1 body, something like the Co-opera&c*venture, thc desire for freedom wish to offer a few brief remarks t, ve wholesale Society, a capitalist of religion and hostility towards on this Motion, largely because I organisation which has seen the J % ""Ciginng powers in England il from a slightly different hghl > f ^j^ lhe ^ n g ht. would a played their oart in actuatiiiK referred to Barbados foreign Government. 1 fetl confln i self-governing Coldent lhat the position held by this 1 t en entirely substantiate* country over centuries for honest t ; 'letter Uiat I read out to your and fair dealing will be upheld ti i-dships at the beginning of my by the members of the present only through her left eye If I correctly interpret thi. Government, and that they will see that the necessary steps are taken to ensure that full and atlequate compensation Is paid to th. has lost her blindness. symbol of her impartiality, and lOW able to see. though perhaps move for i In 1945, the company called for estimates from drilling contractors in the United States H£Si|s2 SS5S WMM^> £300,000 for each well, and minimum of three deep wHls was iccessar> The company felt that 0| <1 was not justified in incurring n such expense unless it could be ni ^rtain that if would be protected ( ; against pirate eompetltors who oi would not have borne any share tl af the expense of the discovery Barbados w-ent so far as to Insiderable personal (oi n one of the local represent*onial policy and In thc reputation lives of the B.U.OC that the ^' ^e British Government I may .^Britum !" ^ Pi troleum Bill then before the also, perhaps, say that I have had QVCJ |hw tweBl legislature was based on thc personal experfemc in two or treated dos Oovern[JJ !" r Report, and that he would three colonies of the introduction %  T ". nncT -.. lhc ei.nslder himaelf bound by It unof this model oil oidnanee. As you: Lordships are r.o doubt aware. It is. and has for long been, the polity of the British Government to VMI oil rights In various Colonies the Crown. That is largely to ven ensure efficient commercial exthis effect from Loodon. flu ploiutlon of oil And may I say reply, however, is evasive, and that 1 have never seen any prod<>es net done people who went lo Barba aos. and to other of our possessions In the Caribbean. But, in fact, this small island, which lytd been bypassed by the Spaniards ii. their search for gold, was first developed by a London merrhani. Sir William Courteen, who was a protege of thc Earl of Marlborough. Since that day many meal. uppose. as undoubtedly would ^^ of ytur Loj-jgjup,. n ous e have been connected with tinisland—the Earls of Marl borough they not have the means of their views heard Or let me turn to the other side, a nd suppose the position had been reversed; lhat it was the American Company which had been in the position "t OH Company rears, and they Ihis manne nd v* happened,-that the American Government had* made representa one company. A Mr. Bishop, who had been in the island me time %  nd was in dost touch with the iH.vernmenl, filed an application — behalf of the Gulf OU Corporan, an American concern. The vernment decided U> adopt Mi f State what ii' thi Be It COJ i ivi .tui uhwi el;, oi I,M A( n, take a Jash ofENO'S '• 1-ruii Sk.i Thi* will ..;i \t>ut liigcsuvjuices flowing, help i l>dfjc,i, fcmmv thefcclingof discomlori -iJ congcMion And th;ink Ac mouth ENO'S contains no HfiUU Salts Vet, by a gentle Iixaiivc .•(perfci't regularity. Alosi ol* us need firsl 'hiftg in Uu nurninK, Tanner s suggestions for working Government will be ln March. 1949. the Colonial Sec{o ,. in wmcn mcn nt applying thc retary in Barbados told the BritUh nrnr condlllons to the small Union Oil Company's manager \ t \ an d of Barbados as applied to there that the Government pro(he vast territories of Alberta, a posed to take over all underground decision which, in all the circumrights and that they would give stances, was manifestly absurd. As the company a prospecting licence a result „f this decision the company were offered what amounted flnallc to only 2? per rent, ot the drillable area of the Island. Ot course, this WM declined. Puot to this offer to the B.U.O.C Die Qulf (Yipoiaib-n were made an rf< i bh much the same term< and rl slreaHv exceeding* in a Colony'with which I have been associated which BqM would compare with the way In t ., t i which Ihis matter has i>cen dealt men| with in Barbados tno's Fruit Salt' Bfgi ; tl.! t Kiu>>t\it\hi D l-f l..|..IU.l IIUV. MCk Hi [>At HI U.fBlSHMss HI IKT seas .i. gyJri ... i>i.iiUt/hr o.er the whole island. On July 1 21, 1947, the company's menagei In Barbados interviewed the Governor, Sir Hilary Blood, who lead extracts from a dispatch to him from the Colonial Office in Loii| don. which document mggcste.i t/iat the Barbados Government ffctht give the Britir.il Union Oil (Company a prospecting licence [ over the whole blond m letum lot rented. Dlpredbf ver> ipot i-onti". over II %  It.'i I* OC. :mtl on tlie i whtnt ihei wcapd have ,1 deep .ml'ii.. had i piihtnli-i statr -leflnllely I now ask for a lhat question. I hope that the ble Lngd whe_ Is going lo anbehalf of His Majesty's ble to give ,e Information as to what I do not wish f" go again into was said, ft was, I think, the the tacts of the t e, which.. I unColor.ul Secretary in Barbados, demand, ar? no in dispute and Mr perown*. who made that which liave been stated by the now ,,. r ,. n t ble Lord. Lord Tevlot, but I should Summarising the position, the S.kc to underline the absurdity of B U O.C-'s els* Is quite simple going to the Mines Department S ot many years the> held leases Alberta for advice on how to d Ivlng full mining rights over with oil concessions In Barbed the greater part of the drillable AS your Lordships pos.s:i.i>know Pta of Barbados. During this the Alberta Goverment works oi M-ttod thaw Iteril lavishly, and what is known te the 'chequer urrh 1 oil Mplotaton work bQaid system." Under that sys whirl ifl the Voids wf the expert tern, when cil is found in com iippoii.tel W-tlie Colonial Office, mercial quantities the area is di Mie lateJirV U-pper. baa resulted vided up into sections. The pros<•the urspoVfr;, of Mi that Is ptctor gets alternate sections ;.;. %  the oil prospect* of the f;ovemmont other altem luch treatment: Is Carlisle. Pembroke. Harewood that His Majehiys and I^rd Willoughby. I regret to have to inform your l-onishipi that on one occasion there was n pitched battle between the supporters of two members of your House for possession known a*MUt the oil prospect* of the Government leases thev held The Governor Hi" been pioUclct HaJtwdug* Just bafbre the f-ections, which are sold by Bui further stated that thc Executive I knnw tnnt it haa been *nld that B.U O G. had completed arUcn However well that kind < Cothrnitlee had agreed to this pro( ne BUOC. started with 78 per langemc-nfa wlth.Xrinidad Leasesystem may work m Albert poaBl On December 21. 19.W. the rent, of the drillable area, and I h.-kls. IJwsted. tq carry out deep whkh is, I understand, al Colonial Seci regaiding th. Jen i Copy Sir Mil. by me nbi S.sbUMi !.: p.;, nud 'H. thai th> pan> II pegtini Mai.il advised .iK> know that they had an offi above, and oh of 55 per cent. Let us just.study li. 1951. I reqiieste.1 that that offer for a moment and *c* if the document quoted by whether that does not boil itarn bout : conceivable would have said that they not able to do anything in the matter? I suggest lhat the answer is rlain. re come to this: iishnes* against Interference ,ith Colonies whose Governments have wide powers of managing their own affairs. Thi to me an altogether strange tachmeni. Are the principles • Lntish justice and fair dealing bein disregarded by the Barbados | Govcnunent? "Well," say Hi* Mfrjesty'j Government, "they have the right to do so. If they wish' .leal And what is the melancholy morai were Admiral Benbow, Admiral of all this? Surely it is that if Brit Nelson, and George Washington. Hi investors, want the protection and as It is the custom to-day to of His Majesty's Government the-, t^ke note of the views of U.S. must go outside the Britisn En. 'izens 1 should like to say that plre. It is f curious eonthWleilon. George Washington enjoyed hima. iu pemaps on popuUr appeal : "vlf In the Island. He was made that the protection given in : a member of the Beefsteak and foreign country is denied in a Tripe Club, which I understand small British Colony — patriotism wa a datnocratic organltetlon In the first place, and in the second. more of thc incense which has beer offered to the great idol of selfgovernment My Lords, the Brit-ernment are not really "~ j u—i> Lordships' >J£S!X "f the island, or of part of Mnny famous and colourful haraeters have been associate.! vith this island. There was Sir 1 is Henry M. rgan who started, as '<*we know, as a buccaneer, and who ended up In an aura of i;mctity as Governor of the id. as a predecessor of lh nuble Lord. Lord Milverton. whose careerstarted In somewhat different circumstances. The ..nd noted in his diary: Orntlri igtit be, given I.t-ene,. over lo 22 per cent. The oner propeft was for 55 per cent, of lhc whole ; M nati less strip* of one mUe wide, dividing the tsiand Into tour quarter.these strips including drillable land. The offer was unit for licence If exploratory work had )*en successful, lease would have Hilarv Blood been an-uled o.* haU* Hie in OH Comliceiiseil 'hal Blood mlgh' be cited n January 29 the Colptary, the rtgh' iriftlths, refu.M-.i.mc rethe groundthai "the ,n quesUon as a dla: he cOrturnied that hi,, (Mi Cratch Junes) ._sted 10 Si Tho ;r. : Aliich cQUal. ..!. %  ,.l.,ii,i :m a la's, h t c>r an UlMil wty r.im niali-i'lr.ndln %  •'. %  ...:: I...1 thiOil lit. Kiao> U> JitHtoct that th. In itunn, ,r.r.l importrnl lBrtltth Union Oi! Compani UtttloM In Ha condlUon, of th,li illinlSh."doitonMt.Qt SorIH.0M sou.rr mlioijB B* It JJ, *„, haditt *lti Pctrloum Aft. obvloudsraoM not m.k. any kind gJ^J,^ ihcr.s a way The i5 coSon 1 wnrT^e Sft ^JiS^l^Si a, tnlSaST iS ^iC £gZ : :i r.. WiTBdl would never bn> ;i d rt t point I, is clear. I should turn *£*WgZ^J*£; I vc * Ihopght of at all had have thought, ih.it in that pattic It ho; been for the tremendous lar island oil can uworked work and exploration carried odt eiently and eotanterclaUy onl; !>v the B.U.OC. The Government one eouseasion.m*-. brofcthe promise given U> the Having said that, on the fact U.U.OC. thai the Upper Report the action of Ihe Barbados (lover., would be I^t '"to op-rata>ii and mem reflects no credit on diem oi that t^fB^.O.C would be give* o..1h l ..epuiat 1 .,,f.., -fa.rdeal.nc .Kiit^ ovfi Ihe whole III >liould like, .1 voui lordships w.i land InBtod. they nut forward bear with me, lo an* a few wmu%  bs grave side to the case we are con ider;ng. It is only one sympton of iany. a s>Tnptom of our lad of B ny real and positive colonia :iiat divorce betweend deeds to which ih noble Mftrquess who leads the Op position in this House has drawi attention before Let mi With its conneatlon with thj-ountry and your Lordship* House, one can well imagine that the dominant party In the Island were people of some charactei and some independence Of mind: in fact, they raised the Issue of "no taxation without rcpresenta ti n" over a hundred year* betoi. the Boston Tea Party. The con" M the noble Lord. Lord Milverton, Indicated. '* an aneitnt i ne Thc House of Assembly Wai constituted in 1619, ;i..i Meatd olo Ml colonial legislative body In Ine whole Colonial Em .m Barbados and pire. being second only to Bermu.-.tnti ; oiw for the"granting of a on the contention that |l was not this question of prlnclpse to the da. It possesser. iepresentati\e licence to explore which were so open to the British Government to West Indies In general. Them Is institutions, but not complete!-, impe'-slbtr ltutt the edmpany hafl intervene in thii matter, on the 3 growing feeling there lhat they responsible Government, because, no option bul to reject them An ground that they cannot intervene Hand friendless and Impotent amid ss the noble Lord. L-rd Miivi i



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    SUNDAY, APRIL M, 1951 SJ'NDAV ADVOi ATL I'M.I. THIRD I \ HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW 70 02 Fry's Cocoa | lb Tim 47 12 Condensed Milk. Tins 27 25 Lamb Tongues. Tins Lux Flakes, Pkgs. Table Butter. Tins 24 21 Heinz 92 M Baked Beans Tins D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street OS* Vt** .* A|*|>-.. > %  „.'•• :m N •. II M I,... S I...... Gordons Stands Supt&Hvz 28 21 FRENCH LINE OFFERS BARBADOS/JAMAICA CRUISE < ON EVERY SOUTHBOUND SAILING OF THE LUXURY LINER SLSL COL03iBBE TEN DAYS OF UNFORGETTABLE ENJOYMENT ~n Sailing Date Jj July lltli August 22nd October 3rd November 13th : ,'.:•.•.:•,•.'.:',•.''' %  ••'•••' %  '''' MAKE YOUR HAIR THE CENTRE OF ATTRACTION ,.-. wild A K POMADE I HlWttiWUt tntliMMI I U I llU "MK A K you'll be |l*d you did A.K. POMADE %  .•.v.::::w.:-s.::w.::::::::::w.:STOKES BVNOr LTD *••>*'%  ..ws.-'.::::::-:::::::::::::WSM'.



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    PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 151 Mischief Scores First Victory For Season laffiuna Coirwpondem < Mbrhirl M >i<"U 0* the seaton when fbt the other I :h,. Seventh ReKatla of h wu nOad tn I afternoon Faat*a> looted .. certain winner %  up to tht end c i the Mcond tap but on the lasl leg of the .:ni lap she was overtaken by Mtorhlef whMf helmsman must b liven credit I I ludfenwnt. The winri • %  the tea smooth. Tin tions werr Ideal f'>i the Tonwdoca and they oul tailed the other hoat* in the C" and Centreboanl Clan. The boats sailed nortn 1 think it is MCOM ITJ '•" I" 1 let of handicap! n i Tornadoes arc ...nn:. In the hanin;ips yeeterda} Kdni %  !i ten mlnutea by RIU~ nd ("tie t Ciannet These tola to ev iilnn shouting distance ol Edrll ,r!v shmvs that ttu hand. aajpi irora luted to suit • medl i in lo strniit or strong wind bu* baad the wind wai liKht. If there wer alternative the Henatta would i ve i en much mow l. Seven Boats In tb B" 1 % %  ***** boatMatteii Iloih OkaiM and Mj. J Mtair rLII dr\ clt-ek Mi-ehlel tantay by 40 aecond %  fHr ftvlni her seven niinute. Third wai Oeorae Stnrtrt Been l end three kippcrcd by Denis Atkinson who other yachtsSIOM VII TOIIV the results should rbe KiKhth Re R.B Y.C will %  REE FROM l 8 5 : u M ) ai*. D N S •cal : 37 ... Ml F D : %  %  riHei i *i %  1 ONI I m .'i I M i a or MOHAWK kcored her eond victory for the. nuon od the lntenaediato boat* in the Seventh Regatta mailed in Carlisle Bay yesterday evening. when she defeat Of the R.B.Y.C. KM < %  „„. KM CyttoM P*n V.mr— M" MAIL NOTICES HI Lucia. MarttnKjur. Gua*t' lOUp*, AnllM, U. llrO KiiitfdOllt .ir.d I Franc* b>v i_ *i Oicofnr wilt be '...Ki ^i ihr flrtmiil Purt OiVf l •>r*l Mall al 10 a.ai I Mail l I i m .ntH (liillii.ir Mail at ( I p m on May II. IMI men said "was a bit nervous over hla KlecUon on the WeM Indie team and his engagement". The Start < >clone and \-.in... %  %  i.-i.-ii along with Clylle and CmonrtU Cyrlnne %  .\ ;c -.in t. ,,1H'| \v .u >i< \ i i t '•.< tl i %  Vamooae. First lo complete the lap was Edril, followed by Vameow, Scamp and Cyclone. MUbetiave was disqualified fur crosslim Macwin and dropped out of ih-rac*. with one side damagefl. Finishing fourth was yet another Torn.nlo. Camel. Mohawk skippered by Bob Cumberbatrh. carried off Intermediate Class honours. This boat always sails very well in a light wind. It ttaxted urn ten with Invader and K.IVC two minutes to I..!( %  l)Aiuith-<. and Dawn did did not start. At the end of the first lap Mahawk w.is 30 seconds ahead ol Eagle while Keen was third. It finished one minute and 43 seconds %  head ol Gnat which cam i i Co rone l U llni-hed third. Bueraneer clahTWd "D" &M i %  tln| Olive Rliiwum bg live minutes. 12 seconds Olive Bloaaam however gave Buiraneei three minutes. Slnbad finished third, four inuiute. and -it seeondi after OUve Bioaaom. I understand that the Tornado m is thinking of navinj a aeries of single-handed sailing When this hapjiens we will definitely see who is the be*' helnriiian ill Barbados. Onr was practising alone yesterday The Tornado Association will sail their Third Regatta in Carlisle Bay at 10.30 a.m. this morning. If the weather condition! are Ideal The Weather TO-DAY Sun Rise* : 5 15 a.m. Sun Sets 8.30 p.m. Moon (New) May t> I i, lii IN .. : 6 30 |. IN High Water: 10.S5 am YESTERDAY Rainfall (Codrlngton) 07 ins Total for Month to Yeater. day : 5.30 Ins. -min-ratiin(Mini 73.0 "I Wind Direction <9 m. H Wind Velocity 7 miles per hour Barometer (9 a.m %  29 95* til am ) 29 939 WORRY AND WOE Shirts, Vests, Pyjamas. It's always a comfortable and re-assui in business thought to know your etimmercial motor vthlcln haw complete insurance protection — that you'n oownd ,on practically cveiy contingency that may arise. A complete, all-inclusive motor insurance policy, bind on an analysis of your personal needs, is now offered At Lloyd's. Get particulars at once. Write or Phono. J. B. LESLIE & CO. LTD. • INSURANCE COLLINb UUILOINO* BRIDGETOWN OIAL 300S BARBADOS. O. W, 1. RENOWN SMp.d Pylama Suit.. Six*. 36 lo 44 S(.. i:i RENOWN Sell Colour Spoil Shin.. Short SIMTM in thades oi While. Blue ami Cream. Made ol Broad cloth. Sties: Small, Medium and Lara*. bcii .t4.ee ELITE While Broadcloth Shirts. Trubenised Collar attached. Siiei 14 to 17. lech 95.4X IAEGEB Pure Wool INDIA Cotton Gaure Veen. Short Sleeve.. SUe. 36. 3. 40, and 46 ins. • OTIS Sleevelee. Veels. Sires 36 lo 46. Each SI.2H A $1.32 Vests. Button Front, Short Sleeves. Sire. : 36 to 46. rLANNELETTE SWped P Y | A M A S. Radlac Brand. Sixes : 38 to 44 inchi-a. Suit SB.87 SEE OUR HOSIER} DEPARTMENT Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II, 12 a. 13 Broad Street. Do It Every Time 1 itlfTomoit. Ma II 1'IIWOW IIX. IIUPUIIHU Mil VUVI SROAJ XH IIHUAW OX/ o ix.it HV WBTOI.WHT — XDWOHJOll ,"*^-!5i55*K;i^K5i;i ,;^;;;;m;^ii5K:*-;K5?; aajea>e)a)eooo / Can See... SPECIALISTS THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY ACTUARY RECOMMENDS 2% BONUS The Directors are pleased to Announce that the Society's Actuary has recommended the Declaration of a 2% per annum Compound Reversionary Bonus for the Quinquennium ended ilst December, 1950. C. K. BROWNE, Secretary. \ I



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    PACK Till I SUNDW ADVOCATi: -.1 NDAY, U'KII. 2*. 151 I P ana for teeth TO /GHT DECAr Ipana, for gums TO KEEP TEETH HEAITHY HEALTHIER TEETH: Ipana* unique formula reduce* acid-forming hacicrui, thu* fihurs tomb decay as well as brushing iicih mra-whitc. out of 10 I'.S. demists advocate the Ipana way of denial tare. HEALTHIER GUMS MaVaaaa with Ipana is ihc •..implement ol thorough brushing. Ipat'a factually MimuIJICS the gums, promoting thai he-1 thy firmness which demists like to sec. And remember, over }0"„ of (f Irrtial Ing suspense. However. It is the consensus of opinion that the Selectors have done an excellent |b In' I heir selection af the seventeen plajers to %  ••present the West Indie* Jt is true that there has been the argument for choosMng the odd player instead o( another but there is general agreement thai the have chosen the best the West lndi< toda 4 YfrrBy VKRNON MOIU.AN WEMBLEY STADIUM. April 28. Newcastle United won their fourth r.A Cup Final here today, when beating a fellow north country team Blackpool by 2 goals to 0. after a goalies f,rs t half. England's international forward )..uidsome Jackie Mllburn. plajhSj j'i the centre for Newcastle not only scored both goals but was a brilliant leader of his team. He netted both goals within five minutes — In the fifth and tenth minutes of the second half. The Blackpool defence was Everton Beat Carlton 3-2 i IIOSI APT* AXC.I.KThe Internationally Famous ELITE SHIRT WITH THE WORLD FAMOUS -nuiN<.Mf the players chos.it and I have not 'elected Ferguson as the seven'renth since I <een given preference. However I approached the question from the leva! thai Boogies" Williams as a reserve •low right arm spinner was not seeking selection and therefore with the exception of Ferguson there were no other slow spin bOWlMI IB the West Indies today who could qualify by International standards for selection in the team. HAD RULED HIM OUT F ERGUSON I had ruled out on the strength that I was unwilling to risk the possibility of a recurrence of his arm Injury lhat clanged him In India by sending him on a most important nnd exaiting Australian tour. That was the only argument I had against the inclusion of Ferguson On the other hand he per formad with remarkable in the recent Trinidad Huritido* T, lOven the official status of Trial Games trallan visit, then it must b conceded selection. I am of the opinion that he will prove a nueee guarantee that each player must be pronounced Thcrc wa no "Peculation at al. about the inclusion ot kev men Oka John Ooddard (captain). Jeffrey Slollmcyer, Alan P, Alf Ramadh Prior J %  tUbttsh i. Everton defeated Carlton by liable talent tiiree goals to two in their First l>'v,s.on football t;xture al KenP" !" to hlame for the first, be s;ngt^ yesterday evening. tor -v riI(>n Blades. the centre forward, scored two o the goals includin. u penalty ,nd ,low 1 while the other was BMU in by cenlre na a White. Grecnldge and fwi, u id Hutchinson scored for Carlton. At half-time the score was ono JOHN GODDARD here and since these were i preparation for the Ausonce that he has earned as as long as the medically fit Is •, mrtoa Waaina, Clyde W..'lciilt, Fiankic Worrell", Sonny in, Gerry Comer. Hoy Marshall and Rolxrl Chrlstlani. cause, believing the NewcasU forward who was lying uptirUI t be offside, they stopped playing him to dodge the and coolly place the ball wide of the advancing goal keeper Into the back of the net Second Goal %  "' The second goal was a beauty., Carlton defenned the goal It was one of the finest ever seen \ frum the screen end and were first In the long history of the Cup. i on the offensive Their forward Mllburn, lying 0 yards outside the I l kept up a concentrated attack goal mouth picked up . pass first their opponent*' citadel but time, and with a terrific left-fool I Everton defence coupled drive nearly broke the back of Mi Bevee between the upi-igiiia th* n iu. >••• ...,..K affnrt Diluted t>ieir effort*. Even Mortensen. Blackpool's Everton also made a number of centre-forward and England'! attempt* to open the scoring but pleasant leader shook hands with thterce the Dlaiignr.nl defanca wftfc nothing reaulled. £(„ sp eedy dashing moves and 1 It was not lung after this tha". quick first-time shots Everton got the equalizer. The Newcastle defence was ilaynes took a good kick from extremely steady and undismayed %  way down the Held and Blades ,,t the reputation of the strong scored. [tlackpool attack which conCarlton made some good formined the famous Internalional movements, ..„..,...v.., trying to pul "Stanleys" — Matthews u H u who had already proven his Worth .had only to themselves in the lead, but when Mortensen i fldraimd the Heat Iiulies Cricket Board of Control they did get past the Everton m the 23rd minute Blackpool would have lo draw upon Iheir dividends from the Investment of h a v'lefence. their Insldi wide. The Interval with, the score 1—I. FQ kicked | liH i W hat proved to be their best lak ring opportunity of the match. Off a corner, Mortensen pulyln perfect header which the Newcastle right back Soil headed off the line with his gnalkeeuci IIK ulroady selected him lo reprem-nt them in India and England. SOKKV FOR GASK1N 1 AM particularly sorry for Berkley Gaskin and Andy Ganteaume. Shortly a fter the resumph v „ Perhaps the chronicler of West Indies history of this period will Clairmonte handled in the pen-' describe them as being among Ihe most unfortunate of West Indies* ally area and centre forward nearly-greata. Blades who took the spot kick, beaten. Then minutes later the The three players in the reventecn around whose selection the 'iade no mistake to give Everton Blackpool goalkeeper Farm made most discussion has been centred since the announcement of the "'fir second goal. a spectacular save. team are Denis Atkinson, Ken Rickurds and Simpson Guillen Everton again attacked the A ,PW minutes later Blackpool I shall try to Justify their selection since I claim the honour of ( -Tlton icoal and from a corner had a second chance of scoring, being the only sportswriter in the West Indies who has included all ' y Blades. White headed but Slater hooked a knee High pass i three of them in bis team forecasts goalwards and the ball struck the from Matthews wide of the As a matter of fact I nearly suffered personal injury in Jamaica l, "** ba r nd rebounded into play, upright. when I published a forecast team during my recent visit there that „ *ariton now tried to draw level Blackpool attacked fiercely on Included Denis Atkinson. In Ihe first place, I was fortunate enough to a,ld mad ''. fw attacks on their the resumption and harassed the have seen the Trial games that comprised the Intercolonial series gH l 5f !" oa1 l,ul ,h defence United men. but within 10 minutes between Barbados and Trinidad on the one hand, and Jamaica and W K^5JS; . %  .„,_ they found themselves two goalr British Guiana on the other hand. In the first series I saw the pace bowling candidates Jones. King, Mulling and Butler. It was at once apparent lhat Jones' experience and accuracy, though nol lire would giv e him the edge over the other three candidates. JAMAICAN PACKRS UNIMPRESSIVE N JAMAICA I saw Hines Johnson, atan Goodndge. Miller, Trim Everton soon took over and down due to Iheir not "pLiyuia during one of their raids, centre the whistle" and to Mllburn", rward Blades was ordered of? brl m ant shooting. laa field by Referee Harris for Thereafter, the heart seemed to rough play. Shortly before this h-( !^en taken out of Blackpool. dent the referee had called up ^ lhey MVtT iookcd like inning the game. Newcastle, a.""d THE JAMAICA PROBLEM B.T.C. Rules Need Immediate Revision By BOttKIl T HERE is a very real problem in racing In B.O. Trinidad and Barbados with regarl to the claari•lcation of Jamaican bred horses and I wish that the Barbados Turf Club, m particular, would wake up and do something about it. It follows that such a problem must be faced in a realistic manner, so let us get down to the facts. In British Guiana, no Jamaican creole can begin lower than C class If he has not raced before, either in Jamaica or anywhere else. Should he begin his racing career in B.G. he is then promoted or demoted as his form dictates. If he has raced before he goes to B.G. his form la submitted to the classiiicrr. and they place him where thay think fit. In Trinidad the jiile for Jamaicans is almost the same with Ihe dUfenncs) thai for *C Claaa" one simply substitutes •class E2". Then mut be added that no Jamaican, nail-farad Or thoroughbred, con ever go below class F2, no matter how basil) *: %  rma, In Barbados the rule is quite different It simply states that all Jamaicans must be classified not lower than class C2. No matter how badly he runs he can never go any lower. Furthermore ihe definition of the word ••creole %  • in the BTC. rule book reads thai such a horse is one sired and foaled in the W I. and B.C. (Jamaica excepted). Now as far as I can see the only rules which need changing are those of Barbados. But the question Is should we follow the B.G. or the Trinidad style? A FEW nan ago this problem would have b*-— weighty one /Viiuitfd' Bin that*'''*•'* "' '" "i"""dedness on the part of mernnidad Turf Club which is entirely without precedent in the annals of W.I. racing, and, I may say, to their everlasting credit, we are now in a position to draw ample conclusions from tl' concrete evidente of Jamaicans raring In Trinidad for the last five to six years. What has this evidence proved? To my mind it has proved beyond a shadow of doubt that Jamaican breeders, like their English counterparts, for that matter their counterparts in any other country, do not wish to sell wh*. Ihe consider lo be their best slock until they have seen them race In Jamaica. Consequently the average Jamaican rreole which has been coming to Trinidad in the last five years Is no better than the average Barbados and Trinidad thoroughbred creole. Now this Is a broad statement with which many people will disagree and no doubt iheir first argument against it will bo that since the Triiudadlans first Irieil the unraced Jamaicans in F2. why did they change the rule to place them In E2 if they had not proved to t>e above the average Trinidad creole? My answer to that brings to liKht what I had always malntaitsad long before the Jamaican IrVBBlon Trinidad bnadOl mil I too mu.h on the baU-fartdi T HE fact is that gradually the Jamaican Creoles outnumbered the thoroughbred Trinidad creolcs and their standard was indeed higher than the average of the Trinidadians. But coupled with their Barbados brothers, it cannot be denied that the average of the two islands was will up to th.1 %  tuaieiin standard. Unfortunately only a few Barbados creoles were ever seen racing against the Jamaicans In the low classes. But even thOBO %  DO did WON never disgraced. Therefore to put it briefly we have found that taken scctionally the Jamaicans are better than we but together we could hold our own with them. This sounds all very well on paper !>ut once again we must remember that facts must be faced. Therefore since our actual racing is done sectionally (i.e. only a few Barbados F class horses go to Trinidad and fewer Trinidadians of the same calibre come here) to safeguard our breeders we should follow the Trinidad style and begin all unraced Jamaicans in E2. There is no need to argue the pros and cons of foUOwini tha B.C. style since only in isolated cases have creoles from that country been able to hold their own in Trinidad while quile a number of Trinidad breds from th c low classes have won in the former place in higher brackets. The great thing now is to get the Barbados gentlemen In authority to act upon this suggestion. That. I freely admit, is like trying to move a moi-ntain Thev an s M OO nc ad In the view lhat it will be detrimental to breeders in this island and since among those in authority are some of the breeders themselves it goes without saying lhat the bill will have a sticky passage. %  11 the players and warned "them and the The Carlton forwards moved nnd Gaskin anil here I had lo pause to consider the situation. It d^wnthe field In Ihe Everton goal Hi!u U !!L^r^il' C iwdsii. S won not al all easy. -rea but "Brickie" Lucas who Fine baiting by thc British Guianesu openers Leslie Wight and wssessloni kicked wide of the IVW-i Hayley robbed the Jamaican shock bowling candidates Hines *">'• Johnson and Stan Goodndge of any devil which they might have been The Carlton fronl line made %  !" '. flielr pressure to finish, a deserved victory. And so. Stanley Malthcw* I still without his coveted Cu aX> planning to develop. another raid and Iron, a good "ned"'. ,bou, fc ^ I, y l!SS th Th ls theory of mine w. only submitted for the sake of argument ""<";_£>' .Teddie Hutchinson on the game £'•*"" aM ln,s ,n tha tilt Test hul by the second Test it had become an established '"' l 1 ^ w ," 1 * oalk,, 'W """^ brilliant perrormer. fact. II now devolved upon Trim and r.askin to convince * "lee? vcd . bul •*' d " h "nd —Renter. tori as to Iheir reswtive rights of Inclusion in thc team as pace bowl,V,,he second for" CaXIi UP *"" ing right and got the maximum „ h t ,."'',' h ""I'?"„ 0 er i" 1 gff In Ihc first Tcsl Gaskin did cverythu result out of a new wicket lhat i ivith a hard shot from into put Everton In disparagement to Gaskin's brilliant performance sending seven batsmen back io thc pavilion and taking his 100th wicket in First class cricket on this tour as well. On the other hand, when conditions were more in line with what ona would oaturallj expoci lo obtain Id ihciaa garnca, Trim turned m an excellent peifoiiiiaiic.', maintaining i oih hoMilH>. pate and diiection for long spells. I am not therefore surprised lhat he has gained selection. I SUPPORTKD ATKINSON I ASSOCIATED myself with the few supporters of Denis Atkinson. Few they wer 0 but. with thc exception of myself perhaps, knowncdy, F. Hutchinson. Clairmonte, ledgeable according to intcrnationcl cricket standards. Cox Marshall. B. Hutchinson. ] km always argued that Die Wesl Indies would be silly to have Grecnidgc, Lucas. McLcod. invested in an experiment such as sending Denis Atkinson to India Kverion: Recce. Hall, Weekes, : In lfl48_ as a compaiulively untried youngster and fail to make use *' owlcr h" 1 '*!***; 1 >, Maynard, R. i f this after be had satisfied Ins seveicsl critics lhat he had benefited ->nes. While, Blades, Yearwood.C side thi the lead In spile of one or two efforts by Carltor. to draw level, thc game ended with Everton winners by three goals lo two. The referee was Mr, L, F. Harris. The teams were as follows. CarlUn: Warren. Bright, KenFriendly Football Association FOLLOWING are this weeks' fixture:— MONDAY. April swh. % % %  %  I,.. %  !. II.-tri.-v Mr C E Hi' Tl'CSDAY, May lit. Wntrmrra 'A" v Wnlrnm "B". Rcfn** Mr O Graham. Wr.DNr.SDAY, May Ind. RaiMteis va Maple IN • %  J. Archer. "P%  •"" "" %  Tm-RIAY. M| M.iklnl,vi Westerners "B~ fU-iete* Mr C JerarrvoM KHlOAV. K*y 411. Ranfera vs. Pen rode Referee Mr. >< Parrli N B. AU atxise mulches will played al SI. Leonard's Ground*. from tlie expciienn<>[ ihc tour .mil wi.s willing to place this anca at the disposal of the West Indies Cricket authorities. He was not eminently successful in thc Tnnidnd-Barbados lour qualified. I wrote before the team waa published lhat I would have lieic tins year bui ho played a good innings in the second Test, he been, satisfied, after wiuieaaing the recent Tests in Jamaica and bowad steadily and his lulding was uii to a first class standard. Barbados that I would have no objection to the selection of either immediately a successful season as an all of these players as I did not think there was much to chooae between They have chosen Guillen and although some sympathy This, following rounder in local Barbados Cricket Association games wag suffkicnt. Sam. in my opuuon to have secured his selection. (.1 II I I N s SELECTION T IE THIltD NEWCOMER, whose inclur.ion has excited Is Simpson (;ulllen of Trinidad. I agree with his inclusion. In the first place it must be remembered that the place for a %  tvantoanUl player was specifically created for the inclusion of a wicket-keeper in his own right to relieve Clyde Waliott uf this u-sponsibility in other than the more important gi must be extended to tha also young and energetic AUle Binns, must observe that whatever little leaning that might be logically argued in favour of Guillen's selection must Include the fact that he has had ihc experience of 'keeping to Hamadhin more than any of Uie other candidates. The team is a formidable combination by IrUornatlonal standards, and the Selectors should be congratulated In selecting players In whom responsible cricket circles in tlie West P.II That being thc case. Simpson Guillen of Trinidad and Alfie Indies repose complete confidence for placing West Indies cricket i ns of Jamaica were the only twu candidates who in my opinion | the highest pinnacle in thc International cricket arena. B UT what must be called to Ihe attention of these gentlemen Ls the slate of affairs which exists in thc races framed for class D and lower in Barbados. Here we arc to-day with about 84 eligible hortas for one meeting on our olaasiflcatlon list uug slill not enough between classes D and F. to make a decani race. Yet if horses like Rosemary Princess Rassiyya. or any other Jamaican now raring in Trinidad in these divisions were allowed to come over here In the same class. WDM excellent fields we would have for our 13 and E class races. It is inconceivable with horses of the calibre of Bow Bells, Watercress, Cross Roads and Mary Ann, one or all being fit, that either Rosemary or Princess Rassiyya could come over here and mop up. It is also inconceivable that wc must have four races for four horses over a period of four days. Revise the rule now If the thought of an unknown Jamaican starting in E2 still frlghtaai, In tplU Of all the evidence pointing to the eontrnry, then meet the suggestion half-way and place them in C2. But above all be realistic Let those who have shown their paces in Trinidad have the benefit of a classification on merit, not on an obsolete rule made for past generations, Ihc enforcement of which reeks of insularity. The above it must be remembered has nothing to do with the entry of Jama^ans in th t olaask*. That is another matter altogether. But as Footmark won the Trinidad Derby with such ridiculous ease last Christmas. I have no doubt that those who have alwnys opposed the Idea will have gathered fodder for their cannons. W ELL titan is something to be said on both lides. First of all I would not allow the victory of Footmark to frighten us as much as it undoubtedly has. We must ..member that he is the first Jamaican to win this classic in Ihe four years since it was open to them. In those four years our Derby winners have been Atomic II. Ligan. and Ocean Pearl. With the exception of the last named It is indeed very questionable whether the Jamaican Derby winner* ..! tht BBOM jPOOn l Had haw won tl I TTtntdad Diil.y ,.% \.>ll Thenmay be arguments in favour of Blue S'.rcjk over Atomic II but that Applemoney would have gol nowhere with Ligan there is hardly any doubt. Even on different underfoot conditions Ocean Pearl would have had a good chance to sweep away all opposition. It cannot be denied that on the second day she was a much better horse when she defeated Blue Streak although only over six furlongs. At lhat time there was no horse in Jamaica ns good as Blue Streak. Therefore there is no certainty that Ihc Jamaicans Will always hold sway in the Ti.nidad classics. It is also most unlikely that they would ever win these races with thc regularity that Barbados has accomplished in the past. Therefore why bar th e Jamaicans? til S nd I 111 1 h OHV1HS i\si'iriio\ TIME mum \OT ass? WOHHYl.XU TIME SEE MS FORDUNLOPILLO BUS SEATS LIONIDE LEATHERETTE CARPET MATERIAL RUBBER MATS REAR VIEW MIRRORS 6 & 12 Volt BUZZERS ROOF LAMP BULBS & SOCKETS ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX BATTERY CABLES ACCESSORY SWITCHES flu GALVANISED SHEETS Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT for Interior PitOSFERINE for youthful vigour! GREY PAINT for Flooring SIGNAL FED 'or Body HEAT RESISTING BLACK WHITE LEAD ft ZINC MUFFLERS ft PIPES KING PIN SETS DECARBONIZING SETS BRAKE LINING SETS FRONT SPRINGS -for Ford ft Chevrolet FIRE EXTINGUISHERS AND IXJTS OF OTHER ESSENTIALS Lack of vitality h a familiir lympiom today. Nothing reslly wrong, people feel, hut Mmply tlut iru-y have lost iheif nocnul t.ippv iwor Of life llt.ir reserves arc low. Their rcsflkaOS has varaShfd. 'i ivy need a took It till* in your tj-v—*i-n taking PHOSI'IiKINI 1 for a Jay T>-^ 'li — BWIA PitOSFERINE begins its good work by reviving thc appetite. This, in turn, starts a whole sequence of benefits. A good digestion waits on appetite. Good digestion enriches thc bloodstream feeds tha nerves, builds up strength and energy. Try PIIOSFERINE today— for buoyancy, resussnea. confidence, to drops of PIIOSFERINE equal a Tablets. 1 Mokt Butinett Contacts Faifer in •ht Caribbean. 2 It's Cheaper toe, then otheio or air transportation. 3 Take all rhc Eictss Baggage you Need at New RcJuced Rote* — 50o Sovmg Mobiloil hacked by 85 year's; e xperience ( • Why be satisfKd^ikitb leu llian ihe beM performance from your or* U MOBILOIL and keep your engine In peak eon dilion—runninj smoodSly, pow erfully. economically, mile alter MOBILOIL costs a l* more—but it assures full lection with peak economy—Uw result of lower engine mam tcnancr costs—fewer repairs.*' LARGEST SELLER Besi known brand ol nxKorj oil around the clot*, f THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS fW Dstnototi. 0Hr. Mil" afto Inflow SIpl>n*U. W BWIA BKITISH WIST MIAN AIRWAYS gk Ask for and demand Mobiloil Agent.:-GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.


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    ESTABLISHED 1895





    United Nations Troops

    Fall Back In 8S. Korea

    Key Town
    Abandoned

    TOKYO, April 28.

    CHINESE COMMUNISTS drove down Korea’s

    western invasion route

    today and occupied

    Vijongbu, a main town about 20 miles north of the}:
    South Korean capital Seoul.

    Kapyong to the northeast had been abandoned

    previously.

    Earlier reports had indicated a slackening of Communist
    activity along the western sector as the Chinese apparently

    paused to allow supplies to c
    ee |
    aa

    L INTIMATE
    LOOK

    OTTAWA—Staff.
    Canada’s position in the
    Insperial Preferemee trad-
    ing system with, most like- |

    bility of a continued and |
    possibly enlarged trading |
    gulf between the dollar and _
    sterling areas will come
    under over-all review in
    important U.K.—Canada
    trade discussions scheduled
    for Ottawa in the week of |
    May 21,

    atch up with frontline forma-

    The Chinese offensive, Which
    jumped off on Sunday night, was
    reported to have slowed down on
    the central and eastern sectors of
    the front.

    Chinese losses continued to
    mount as Allied troops fell back
    towards Seoul. Communist cas—
    ualties since the offensive began
    were estimated at 35,000.

    Red Losses

    Up to last night Allied ground
    and air forces claimed to have
    killed or wounded at least 42,300
    Communists since the Chinese
    opened their massive drive last
    Sunday night.

    The Eighth Army thus claim over
    30,500 of this total, Naval planes

    claim to have inflicted 6,300 cas-

    ualties and Far East Air Force

    planes including land-based fight-
    ers 5,500.

    Air Force and Navy

    Headquarters spokesmen _ said
    ee eit eke woe they considered their estimates
    ests in the British West extremely conservative. They did
    Indies, not include casualties probably

    inflicted during many strikes car

    The meeting will be under ried out in poor visibility when

    the auspices of the Canada—
    U.K, Continuing Committee
    on Trade and Economic Af-
    fairs, Importance of the
    meeting is that it will con-
    vene shortly after results of
    the Torquay tariff confer- |
    ence are made known,
    Specifically the Confer-
    ence will be called on to
    review the initial operations
    of the B.W.1. trade liberaliz-
    ation plan. I¢ will also have
    before it Canada’s official
    complaints to Whitehall re-
    garding alleged U.K. trade

    iscriminati ainst this
    ntry’s g -

    Events at Torquay have
    undoubtedly sharpened a
    growing demand in Canada
    that there be a completely
    new look at Canada-B.W.I.
    trade and commercial rela- |
    tionships.

    The Canada-B.W.L. trade |
    treaty of 1925 has long since |
    ended so far as any binding |
    obligations are concerned. |
    Either side could terminate |
    it on six months notice. But
    Canada has been loath to do |
    this in the present unsettled
    state of world commerce.
    Even though the price which
    Canada pays by way of a
    sugar preference, plus steam
    | ship subsidies is high,—it is
    | felt that to throw the whole
    arrangement overboard now,
    would be unwise. Moreover,
    so long as present import
    discriminations against Ca.
    nadian goods are in effect,
    there would be little use in
    | working out new tariff
    | schedules.

    Thus the main business of
    the May conference will
    likely be a very intimate
    and searching look at the
    whole system of import
    licenses and quotas as im-
    posed by Britain and the
    ‘Sterling area against dollar |
    goods.—Financial Post April | |

    14.
    |

    _

    ly, special reference to the
    new and disturbing proba-
    1
    | we





    Beef Shortage

    Fantastic Prices Asked

    This land of beaf steaks faces

    in the

    pendents
    slim

    Minister of Jamaica,
    riving
    May 6, to attend the opening of
    the Caribbean Commission which

    and explosives will be main-

    *ticlan a rousing welcome.

    results could not be observed.

    —Reuter,



    Coalition Govt. Of

    Eire May Fall Soon

    DUBLIN, April 28,

    Eire’s three-year_old c0alition

    Government may fall next week,
    political observers said here to-
    day.

    Several right-wing Independents
    Parliament have_ with-

    drawn their support from Premier
    John A. Costello’s Coalition.

    The withdrawal of these Inde-
    means that Costello's
    parliamentary majority ig

    wiped out,—Reuter,



    Less Sulphur

    LONDON, April 28.
    Sulphur supplies for British

    Industry will be limited to 100,000
    tons per quarter,
    announced to-day.

    it was officially

    The Government said that

    searce sulphur would be rationed
    from May 1.

    Most users Will get

    less than 90% of what they used
    last year.

    Key industries such as iron and

    tained at full output. So will es-

    sential Food and Health services,

    —Reuter



    BUSTA DUE HERE
    NEXT SUNDAY

    Hon, W. A. Bustamante, Prime
    will be ar-
    in Barbados on Sunday,

    will be in session here.

    Mr. W. A. Crawford and Mr.
    Symmends are making
    plans to give the Jamaican poli-

    Ly ‘New York

    NEW YORK, April 28.
    a serious shortage of that com-

    modity except at fantastic prices.
    While 84,179,000 cattle roam ranches—according to the

    latest count—people who can

    _finding it hard to buy meat in New York.

    RITA WANTS DIVORCE

    NEW YORK, April 28.

    Rita Hayworth announced to-
    night through her lawyers that
    she was taking necessary steps to
    obtain legal and permanent
    separation from Prince Ali Khan
    She had reached the decision
    “after long consideration and
    without recrimination or external
    influence,” she said.

    “I have concluded that the
    happy and contented home life
    which I earnestly desire for my
    children and myself, is otherwise
    ungpatinable.

    “Various factors including, my
    husband’s extensive social obliga-
    tions’ and far-flung interests un-
    fortunately make it impossible to
    establish or maintain the kind of
    home I want, and my children
    need. Their future welfare is my
    only concern Reuter,

    Senate President

    ROME, April, 28.

    Enrico De Nicola, the retired}



    first President of the postwar
    Italian Republic was today elect-|
    ed President of the Senate in a}
    secret ballot. De Nicola, at 73?
    3 Ivanoe Bonomi the
    Pre - and noted anti
    wi April 20
    —Reuter.

    only pay moderate prices are

    The New York City Council,
    for instance, who want thousands
    of pounds of fair priced meat for
    hospitals, welfare homes and cor.
    rectional institutions, are going
    short.

    Last week they were offered
    only about a seventh of their
    requirement and that at a record
    price.

    Cattle prices and uncertainty
    over meat price control are
    blamed for the difficulties,

    Cattlemen are being accused of
    laying off in the markets to keep
    prices high.

    It was expected that a new
    order would soon be issued, set-
    ting up a new set of meat prices
    But this would touch off a funda-
    mental political issue with the






















    i acini baie

    Australians
    Go To Polls,

    MELBOURNE, Agetl 28.

    Five million Australians weat to
    the polls today to decide whether
    to give the Liberal Country Party
    (Conservative) Government a
    “fair go”, or bring the Labour
    Party back to power.

    On the tick of 8 p,.m., loeal time
    ravers Were slammed on thousands
    of polling pooths in the Eastern
    States.

    Vote-counting began and ; re.
    turns were flashed to tally rooms
    in each State capital,

    But in Western Australia with 2
    two-hour time lag, peopie were
    Still voting and results were de
    layed. There were 292 candidate:
    for 121 seats in the House of Rep-
    resentatives, (three of them have
    already been returneq unopposed)
    and 112 for the 60 Senate seats

    The House is completed with
    one Member each for the Northern
    Territory and the Australian
    Capital Territory (Canberra) but
    neither has a vote, except on a
    matter affecting his territory.

    .Percentages of the Senate votes
    in the Australian General Electior
    at the end of the e¢ unt for the
    night were:

    Libera) and Country Parties:
    New South Wales 47.4; Victorio
    41.4; Queensland 54; South
    Australia 49.3; Western Australia
    53.42: Tasmania\51.14, Labour
    43.3; 56.6; 42.47; 50; 44.66; 47.3;
    Other parties 9.3; 2. 86: 0.7; 1.92
    0.46.

    To win six of the ten seats in
    any State Party needs 54.5 per
    cent. of the valid votes cast in the
    State .—Reute’ .



    Will Discuss Persia
    Over Week-end

    LONDON, April 28,

    Senior British Foreign Office
    officials met Foreign Secretary
    Herbert Morrison at London
    Airport this morning on his re-
    turn from Paris to inform him of
    the latest developments in the
    Persian crisis.

    licy meetings on handling:
    the fast moving sgjtuation in
    Teheran from the British side
    are likely to occupy the entire
    weekend,

    Kenneth Younger, Minister of
    State who was to have left Lon.
    don on a speaking engagement,
    cancelled his arrangements to be
    available in London for discus-
    sions with the Foreign Secretary

    No immediate British action is
    likely until more is known of the
    attitude of the new Persian Gov.
    ernment, —Reuter,

    c *

    No Conflict
    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 25.

    Sir Miles Thomas, Chairman of
    the B.O.A.C., airways has said}
    in Trinidad, that his company
    has No intention of curtailing the
    individuality ot British West
    Indian Airways as aq self-contain-;
    ed air erating company. Sir
    Miles said th hat the purpose of
    this trip is principally to intensify
    and —_ consolidate inprovements
    made during the past 12 months
    During that period he said their
    position financially improved by
    $14,400.00 B.W.I. He said that
    B.O.A.C, was in fact feeding
    the B.W.I.A. with a consider-
    able volume of business. Success
    of their New York-Nassau service
    encouraged expansion of north-
    south feeder traffic to the Carib-
    bean and West Indian areas, he
    said,

    Gairy Denied Entrance
    To ‘som W.I. Islands

    (From Our Own Correspondent}
    GRENADA, April 28.
    Colonel E. M. V. James, Police
    Superintendent, in a letter to
    Gairy of xomcay's date, in-
    forms the M.M.W.U. President~
    Genera] that the “Government of
    Trinidad and Tobago and the
    Government of St, Vincent have
    notified me in my. capacity as
    Chief Immigration Officer that
    you will not be permitted to
    enter either of those colonies.
    Some days agO Gairy spoke of
    plans to visit St. Vincent ' and
    earlier of a Caribbean tour
    énding in Jamaica to see Hon
    Bustamante -



    LONDON, April 27.
    The British National Council
    of Labour representing the La-
    bour Party's



    (deleted from
    {mate, t

    ;he did not

    | have
    Shas gone up: —Reater.

    8,000,000 ~ strongjed the
    Trades Union Congress and the] movement originally stood, By
    Co-operative Union, today issued] rejecting

    |

    BARBADOS, APiIL 29, 1951
    SPRING DAY

    IN BRIDGETOWN

    ee




    Between Cane, Beet





    PRICE : SEX CENTS «,

    eicome Of MacArthur
    Controversy Doubtiul

    By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE
    WASHINGTON, April 28.
    HERE is no indication from General Douglas
    MacAzthur as to what he intends to do after
    he has testified to the Congressional Committees
    on the Far Eastern situation next week.
    It is now nearly three weeks since the General’s
    dismissal from the United States and United

    Nations Supreme Command in the Far East. But .

    no one appears to know what political or other

    course he will follow.
    At times.there appear to bo overtones in the General's
    statements suggesting that he might welcome becoming a
    candidate for the Presidency in 1952. He was the unsuecess-
    ful candidate for Republican nomination in 1948. Mac-
    Arthur has said however, that he aspires to no political
    office, and that he intends to “fade away”. His friends insist
    that he means what he says. }
    date RS RE Asa vesult of this situation, the
    highly emotional. MacArthur con-
    troversy here seems likely to
    j peter out in a Vacuum even sooner
    'than some of the sagest political
    observers in the White House
    predicted at the beginning of the

    Fair Competition”

    LONDON, April 28. controversy.
    Suggestions for establishing Nothing conerete has so far

    WITH the fountain ‘playing od the “Gannon Ball” tree in bloom, Bridgetown yesterday resembled a ‘fair and above board competi-|ejerged from MacArthur, which

    late spring day. 101" between the beet and sugat |] is likely to be adopted as a prac.

    i cit om Saale ne thee es alae gamete os cane industries are made in | tical policy either by the Execu-

    memorandum — by the British | tive or Legislature of the

    B. G; Legislature _ Defendin Britain Sugar Refiners’ Association sent] United States

    tday to all members of Parlia Seme of MaeArthur’s proposals

    ment for intensifying the war against

    Had Stormy Debate! The memorandum say The jthe Chinese Communists in Korea

    (From Our Owr. Corresponden ‘Oo oO sresent Government has recently |have all along been a part of the

    GEORGETOWN, BG., I innounced its intention both of! developing policy of the Govern-
    ‘April 8, nationalising the beet sugar’ in-| ment.

    In a stormy debate in the GLASGOW, April 28. justry and placing relevant legi The Truman Administration
    presence of a large crowd, the], ritain's Chance oO ‘ation on a permanent basis |therefore, is going ahead with
    Legislature on Friday | evening Bt ied that Brit llor Perce meet he Hugh sir mm neat “Some decision would have to|them as it would presumably
    requested Government to employ «t ain’s ree-year Defence Fro- The taken whether the apportior: |haye done even if MacArthur

    immediately as part-time
    specialist, Dr. Heung Ho, at pre-
    sent part.time ear, nose,
    throat specialist.

    The motion by Hon'ble John
    Carter seconded by Hon'ble John
    Fernandes nearly precipitated a}
    constitutional crisis when Hon'ble
    D. P. Debidin objected to Acting
    Colonial Secretary D, J, Parkin-
    son who said it was quite un-
    acceptable to Government, and
    suggested it be withdrawn.

    Debidin said the Secretary’s
    statement suggested Government
    intended to flout majority opin-
    ion, amd if so, he would move

    ~

    a motion demanding the resigna- \)

    tion of Dr. L. J. Eddy, ne
    Services Director, failing which
    he would move his salary be
    next year’s esti-

    Parkinson, however, explained
    mean Government
    would not accept the motion, but
    that. offiial members would vote
    against it, Put to the vote, 14
    voted for, six against,

    Gas Tank Explodes:
    30 Girls Injured

    MARYVILLE, Missouri, |
    |



    Aptil 28
    A natural gas tank blew up]
    today near a college dormitory,
    crumbled one wall, and sent 180
    girls fleeing in

    1 nightgowns and
    pyjamas, No one was killed but
    30 girls were injured or burned,

    and 17 were detained in hospital
    The blast pitched one sheet of
    steel four blocks, and shot flame
    hundreds of feet into the sky.
    The explosion broke plate glass
    windows in the business distric‘ |



    10 blocks away, severed thy
    water main, and _= silenced tele-
    phones in parts of the city.

    —Reuter.



    Builditig Asked For

    W.L, Students Union

    LONDON, April 28. 1
    Officials of the West

    drive to get more members and
    more money.

    They want a building of their
    own. Mr. Rawle Farley, Presi-
    dent, says: “We have been living

    \ tor a long time on the good graces

    of the Victoria League and the
    British Council: now we must start
    getting money together so that we
    can have our own centre.

    “West African, Indian anc
    Malayan students all have their
    dual centres. It is only the West
    Indians who have not yet any
    headquarters.”

    There are 1,200 West ‘fndien
    students in Britain with a big
    and very activ’ nucleus in London,
    Recently the Union’s commitments
    increased and expenditure

    ‘apitalist Imperialism
    Is Not Source Of Danger

    —SAYS LABOUR

    tional Communism.”

    The manifesto said the leaders
    cf world Communism had betray.
    ideals for which their

    democracy, they had

    and]

    Indian tof
    Students Union have launched a*

    (gramme was something the Government believed could be

    Yeonomic life”.




    4 ment of sales of sugar between ti
    jarried out “without fatally damaging the fabric of our | Bri

    ind the sugar cane refiners

    {had not been dismissed.

    Corpora “| WAR EXPANSION

    To the extent that Mac Arthur's

    itish Beet Sugar

    was |

    ot. Addressing the Scottish Re-— | be dealt with as at present by the}, als involve > expansi
    oe mrs gional Conference of the British }"sreed quotas, or by leaving eacl ee west eta is Mesa
    ) Gaitskeil said they| side to compete freely with tho|area the even Administration
    believed it could be done “with—| other.—Reuter. ei ae ‘

    out our falling heavily into debt
    again and losing our hardly won
    economic independence, and with
    out such a fall in our standard of
    living as would be intolerable,”

    Gaitskell said that there were
    bound to be “great uncertainties
    in Britain's future Defence Pro-
    gramme, It had not been con-
    cealed that the speed at which it | toc
    could be carried out depended on
    all sorts of conditions largely be-

    $2,500 Penalty
    For Harbour
    Pollution

    (From Trinidad Guardian) |
    | The Legislature yesterday
    i passed a Bill to outlaw the
    } practice of some ships

    ; Labour Party,
    It

    emptying their bilge off the
    island, This killed fish, it)

    Gromyko Refuses
    To Include Austria

    Soviet Deputy Andrei Gromyko [sbotish

    ing Eastern

    shows no sign of abating its op-
    | position to them, There appears
    ‘to be nothing which the support-
    ers of MacArthur throughout the
    country can do, or are likely to
    do which would foree any change
    upon the administration,

    There have been proposals to
    President Truman, to
    bolish the State Department, to
    found an entirely new De partment





    PARIS, April 28

    separat
    western

    lay “widened the gap

    ana view. |

    | mond ian esta vehicieade as points” at the Feur Power Depu | for Foreign Affairs. Others have
    | Was said and spoiled bathing, | oth Britain “ direct control. : tics Conference here today, a|been made to revoke the Yalta
    | Bey a specified a pen- plies py yee gt ge oc on Western spokesman said, follow.|and Potsdam Agreements, to re-
    ‘a yo or ., & 2 : s 8 ie Pe “hi vise the 2 ions C -

    $: three months’ | adequate, the Defence job could| 17% the fortieth meeting which| vise the United Nations Charter,

    imprisonment, but in com-
    mittee this was increased to
    | $2,500 fine or 12 months’ im.
    prisonment on the suggestion
    He the Hon, Sir Gerald

    | Saeaibaed felt that ships’
    | engineers would take a
    chance to break the new law

    as $500 was not too heavy a
    fine, \
    Sir Gerald pointed out |
    that the Police were poorly
    equipped to enforce the new
    law, There was only one

    not be completed in three years,
    but it was too early to say that
    the necessary tools would not be
    forthcoming, we
    Further Advances st
    The Chancellor pointedly tre
    jected the arguments that his bud-~|
    get involved either departure Th
    from Soeialist principles or | AU
    frontal attack on Britain’s Health | fro
    Services.
    “When the present exceptional] Tr
    diMeulty is over, further advances
    will be possible. We shall then

    have to make up our minds in
    launch now able to keep up which direction They should be

    with a ship at cruising speed, | | made,” he said.
    The Trinidad penalty for A shortage of raw material
    emptying oil in the territor- would mean that the Government





    lasted two hours and ten minutes.
    Gromyko
    the new Western agenda put for

    refused for the first time to agrec

    ind to demand the dismissal of
    dean Acheson from the Secretary—
    ship of State.

    Most of these proposals however
    and (2)\are beyond the — constitutional
    powers of the United States Con—
    include Austria on the agenda. | ress, and it is doubtful whether
    ree Western powers have had/ony of them could command a
    stria on their proposed agenda] majority even within the opposi-

    today (1) rejected

    rd yesterday in another attemp:
    meet Russian views,

    m the beginning, and later|tion Republican Party itself.
    agreed to add the question of —Reuter.
    jieste —Reuter,



    VOGELER FREED

    VIENNA, April 28.
    Robert Vogeler, a 38 year old
    American business man, freed by
    the Hungarian Government after

    C.D.C. CAN START
    AFRESH

    LONDON, April 29.



    ial waters is heavier than | had to deal with a worse situation The Sunday newspaper Obser.| Serving 14 months of ee 1° wine
    | that in New York—$1,000. | | not a better one, Gaitskell argued] Ver finds evidence in the Colonial] Sentence for “eeplonege and oo
    | But Sir Gerald emphasised | | {t would not be able to decrease | Development Corporation’s report} 2OMC sabotage”, ae '

    that people did not bathe in | | taxation or increase Government | ‘4t at last expensive lessons of frontier into Austria to-day

    New York harbour, while in expenditure.—Reuter. past failures in colonial develop —Reuter,

    Trinidad half of the popula- | ment are being learned.

    tion within ten miles of the | “It is important,” it said today, THE “ADVOCATE”

    sea coast did not have proper

    “th
    | bathing facilities,

    | |Freneh Assembly To





    pose of the Colonial Development

    at the moral and social pur-|!

    pays for NEWS





    | et Corporation has been stated so 2
    Vote On New Bill boldly Lord Reith, the new DIAL 3113
    Chairman, has already taken Day or Night
    ay Day PARIS, Apri! 28. — to implement their princi-
    The French National Assembly! bles ~—Reuter.
    Si ec h votes in the early hours tomorrow | or SOL LAPP PAPEL A LALLA I
    on Premier Henri Queuille’s new | st ts
    ype Electoral Reform Bill which he % x
    . wants approved as a preliminary’ & es
    PARIS, April 28. step to holding a General Elec- * Ag
    General De Gaulle, leader of} tion in June %s x
    the French Peoples’ Rally will] ‘The Cabinet decided today to ” x
    make a May Day Speech in view|jeave no stone unturned in its ¥ x
    the forthcoming French] efforts to get the As sembly dis-| $ %
    general elections, it was announc-! solved and a General Election | x 3
    ed today. 5 held in June instead of October. | 3 $
    The General will speak at) As a first step, the Government) *% *
    open air meetings in the Bois De} leaders want to get rid of the ex.| % %
    Boulogne, In the end of the city. isting voting system of propor-| ¥ *
    at the same time, Communists] tional representation, which they| % x
    will march along the traditional] fear would give the Gaullists. and| 3 ®
    May Day route from the Placeynew parliament,—Reuter, x %
    De La Nations to the Place De . x s
    La Bastile. i ‘ g
    —Reuter, ; »
    Anglo-Iran Oil Co. | § %
    siege cisnil ee oe $
    m seine. » \ a .
    PETAIN TAKING Protests To Pre mier % :
    MORE NOURISHMENT LONDON, April 28. | \s %
    The British controlled Anglo-| % x
    PARIS, April 28. |Iranian Oil Company today} % x
    Ex-Marshal Petain’s genera)|formally protested against the ¢ x
    condition continues to improve] threateed nationalisation of its : s

    and he is taking more nourish.|plant in . Persia,
    ment daily, a bulletin issued here | announced here.
    Said to-day. Reuter. In a note delivered to the
    Persian Premier in Teheran, the
    Company said that nationalisation
    would be a breach of its agreement
    with the Persian Government.
    The Anglo-Iranian Company
    reminded Persians, in its note,
    that its oil concession ‘should be
    based on principles of mutual
    goodwill and good faith, and that

    the Company






    SSCS OS OIIS HI





    S
    it should not be annulled and that] %
    its terms should not be altered by x
    any legislative, administrative, or %
    executive acts.’ %
    ; —Reuter.
    tioha) Communism to lift the bur- Reuter g
    den of fear from the world by *
    joining in the constructive work M.C.A. WANT RELEASE o
    of the United Nations, by permit-- OF TRADE UNIONISTS 8
    ting the organisation of interna %

    tional disarmament, by agreeing: ‘From Our Own Correspondent)









    “farm bloc’ in violent Opposition,}an appeal for May Day asking|destroyed for the peoples underjon the control “and development! GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 28. 4
    Meanwhile the meat industry|the leaders of international Com-|their domination the possibility of|of atomic energy under a world| ,The Manpower Citizens Asso- | %
    have a bad case of jitters. It is]munism “to lift the burdens of|Socialism. authority.” ciation teday sent a@ resolution to %
    reflected in the hesitancy to buy|fear from the world.” Instead, they had built for those} In Tokyo, the General Counci! the Venezu = Consul bere for x
    cattle at current prices; in case| In its May Day manifesto, the|peoples a tyrannous form of State|of Japanese Labour Unions today transmission to the Pre: Caras %
    the meat price is fixed at a level ]Council said that in the last half-jcapitalism, maintained in power {cancelled its projected May Day! the Junta Govern of ¢ rm %
    uneconomic in relation to the un-|céntury, Labour had transformed|by police terror and aggressive in|rally in the face of a warning is eee ident athe Perez 1%
    fixed cattle prices. the hopes of the early pioneers|its foreign policy. | sued by Supreme, Allied Head-1 ielan od ‘ oe " ae 3
    —Reuter, |into reality. “The British Labour move ment | quarters : ids th er trade allen. le aders %
    dow - “But when we turn to face the|rejects the pretensions of such a| The pare ade was to have taken es 1 alleunel Wits impris %
    ONLY 33 PASSED future, the outlook is overcast.|system of dictatorship and is de-|place in the plaza front of the oned without judicial inquiry or |X
    (From Our Ow», corresmondent) The gains which Labour has|termined to take every measure, | Imperial Palace Lieut-Genera]} without trial %
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 25. |“Tested from the past are threat-jincluding military rearmament,)/Matthew Ridgway’s headquarters} prey also want immediate| %
    Out of 202 candidates who sat ened from a new quarter, {te ensure that this system is not | had said the Occupying Forces in! yeca}| from exile of Venezuelan %
    the University of London Exam- “This time, the danger come3.imposed by force on free peo-|Japan would intervene if thel trade union leaders at present in| xy
    ination held in Trinidad in|"0t from the policies of capitalist ples trades unionists paraded in the} Cuba and enforcement’ of the | 4
    January 1951 only 33 were}imperialism, but from those who It appeals once again to those palace plaza Convention on Trade Union free—| %
    successful, \ direct the movement of interna- who direct the policy of interna- —Reuter. dom, UP

    ¢ $4,54656664% .
    LEED PASEO SOPHO TEE Ce “ *

    K. W. V.
    EAU DE CULUGNE §

    THs EAU DE COLOGNE IS STEADILY gaining g

    an increased demand Overseas. Made from the
    purest and :nost fragrant Oils produced in Europe,
    and with the addition of pure Grape Spirit, it has a
    lasting fragrance unexcelled by any others. bn
    Delightfully Refreshing it is indispensable for that
    final touch to the toilette and for a really soothing
    after-shave lotion.

    It is comforting and refreshing, also, to your Sick
    Friends and Relatives ! !

    oe
    K.W.Y, Eau De Cologne can be obtained from %
    Messrs. Cave, Shepherd & Co. Ltd. %
    Messrs. Bookers Drug Stores 3
    Messrs. Bruce Weatherhead Lid. g
    Messrs. Collins’ Ltd. %
    Messrs. Knight's Ltd, x
    Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd. x
    Messrs. C. F. Harrison & Co. Ltd. x
    Messrs. H. P. Harris & Co, s

    .
    “¢ “4 £,6,465056%
    PSPS E ASAT ON
    PAGE TWO SUNDAY





    | JANETTA DRESS SHOP

    Upstairs Over Newsam's





    AQUATIC CLUH CINEMA

    NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
    RKO oresen





    ) Se oan

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    in ‘*HOLIDAY AFFAIR”

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    DRESSES of all Types

    Ready-Made from London
    Also Ma&de-to-Order

    ONESDAY AT 5



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    and THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.20
    ERON ROBERT RYAN :o: CHARLES KORVIN

    ‘BERLIN EXPRESS”

    DAY
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    BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
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    a

    ‘
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    PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2

    TODAY to TUEBSDAY—4.45 & 8.30 p.m. t

    Not Manta

    An Conerahd Production with
    Solly FORREST, Keefe BRASSELLE, Leo PENN
    ——VaDNESDAY & THURSDAY :
    2 New Features
    BLUE GRASS OF KENTUCKY
    Billi WOA4AMS, Jane HEIGH

    A

    10)






    EMPIRE

    To-day 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
    and Continuing

    ROYAL

    Last Two Shows To-day
    4.30 and 8.15 pm

    Columbia Big Double .

    Robert YOUNG &
    Marguerite CHAPMAN

    in
    + RELENTLESS ”

    *

    3 p.m
    Color by Cinecolor
    DUBE GOES WrRsT

    Darryl F. Zanuck presents LBERT

    Irene DUNNE in —— SS
    “THE MUDLARK” LAZ

    AND OISTIN
    with «LUST FOR GOLD” LAST * saewe TODAY
    Alec GUINNESS Starring STORY OF SEA BISCUIT

    Coler_by Techicoior
    Barry FITZGERALD,
    Shirley TEMPLE,
    — and -—
    Humphrey BOGART, in
    CHAIN LIGHTNING

    MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
    DECISION of CHRISTOPHER BLAKE

    Constance SMITH
    Andrew RAY

    & “LOST BOUNDARIES“

    Beatrice PEARSON, Mel FERRER

    Glenn FORD &
    Sai eeisaaaine Ida LUPINO

    ‘l Tomorrow Only 5
    8.50 p.m
    Columbia Serial Ist Inst.
    “SEA HOUND”
    with Buster CRABBE

    OLYMPIC

    To-day

    and MONDAY & TUBSDAY 8.90 ;

    Warren WILLIAMS,
    FEAR

    m

    To-day and To-mprrow, and

    4.30 and 8.15 p.m.
    M-G-M Smashing Double . .

    Robert TAYLOR

    &
    Robert MITCHUM ae ne ear chow,

    £2.Z

    in 4 30 and 8.15 p.m. First Plotures ef the Story of the Hero
    Universal All Action Double Bg. a
    + UNDER CURRENT” J WAYNE &
    ot Randolph SCOTT (eneral DOUGLAS Mac ARTHUR
    ee in This Timely Short Story will be shown
    + NIGHT MUST + THE SPOILERS ” a
    FALL” AND BRIDGETOWN
    Starring SEVEN SINNERS ” > a A 7 A
    Rosalind RUSSELL & Starring :

    John WAYNE &

    Robert MONTGOMERY Brodrick CRAWFORD

    from FRIDAY, MAY 4th together with
    the featnre picture . . .

    nanan Ss.

    1S
    re or









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    Extras : “LET’S GO LATIN” and BRITISH MOVIE TONE
    LOCAL TALENT AUDITION TO-DAY, 9.30 A.M.

    aoe EE=—=E2 SS

    STEPHEN McNALLY

    SUE ENGLAND + BARBARA WHITING
    ‘end introducing “THE DUKES
    Produced and Directed by MAXWELL SHANE
    A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE



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    FOR THOSE WHO REMEMBER ITS GREATNESS—AND
    THOSE WHO HAVE YET TO EXPERIENCE THE POWER
    AND GLORY OF ITS EMMORTAL DRAMA—

    THEATRE

    "THE MIGHTIEST WAR DRAMA
    EVER SCREENED ...1T RIPS THE
    HEART. TO SHREDS AND TATTERS” °

    ! American

    es Starring ‘ Z
    a ie” ¥
    ssa LOUIS WOLHEIM sex, {
    ceeneallgin LICH MAHA UMARQUE'S novel - Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE As

    STOP THAT LEAK
    IN YOUR ROOF

    We offer
    EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
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    THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
    FACTORY



    ADVOCATE

    i FF TO TORONTO yerterday

    morning by T.C.A. went
    Mr. and Mrs. E. Keith Waleott
    jand their son Michael. Actom-

    panying them was Mr. Walcott’s
    ; brother Dr, J. E. Walcott. Mr.
    and Mrs. Walcott and their son
    expect to be away for about two
    months. Dr. Walcott however
    will be returning in a few weeks
    |'ime.
    Departures By T.C.A.

    | URING the eight months

    Peggy Farmer plans to spend §
    lin Canada she will be in Montreal
    most of the time staying with
    relatives. Tony Dormer
    who was Barbados for
    a week's returned to
    Bermuda yesterday y ,.T.C.A.
    â„¢ is with onl i ae
    and is at present station in
    Bermuda.

    Back to Canada
    Bs AND MRS. ARMAND
    SMITH who had been here
    since March 3r@,_left yesterday
    TCA, for Tereato. Brig.
    the son Gi the late
    E. D. Smith of poet
    passengers on .C.A,
    northbound trip to Canada were,
    Mr. Tounes” Mediand, Miss
    Eleanor Wa Col, and Mrs.
    Robert

    in
    holiday

    Sal Mr. and Mrs.
    Murray Wallace and Miss Evelyn
    Macinnes, Mr. Wallace is a fe
    iT.C.A, pilot and Miss Macinnes f
    is a T.C.A, air stewardess.

    T.C.A. Girls

    ORETTA McDONELL, Mary
    Fleming, Doris Tidy, Geral-
    dine Hodgson and Lucie Grace
    came in on the T.C.A. flight yes-

    They all work Early Summer

    enh TCA. in different parts of R. and Mrs, Cecil Goddard's
    Canada. ‘Doris who is a reserva- son John, who is taking a

    i erk in Toronto has been to | commerce course at Queen’s Uni-

    Eorkeaes before. Mary, Geraldine | versity in Kingston, Ontario, is

    and Lucie are from Montreal and f down’ for the summer holidays,

    Loretta’s home is in Vancouver. which for him have begun some-
    They are staying at the Ocean } what early. e

    View Hotel. John has just completed the

    second year of his couse. Other
    KEEP THIS students expected down Saturday,
    DATE OPEN

    May 5th are Geoffrey Watson, his

    sister Dorothy and Maureen John-
    son. John says that Geoffrey
    NOW SHOWING AT
    EMPIRE

    Skeete, Louglas Carter and Stan-
    4.45 & 8.30 Daily

    ley Carrington aze also coming
    The Command

    down fur the summer vacation,
    Performance Picture

    but he does not know when.

    Not Since 1907

    ROM Vancouver Island comes
    Mrs. C. Boyd who has come to
    spend about 6 months to one year
    in Barbados. She is staying with
    Miss Major at Bay Mansion, Miss
    Boyd who went to school in Bar-
    bados left here in 1907, this is
    her first visit since then. She
    came in by T.C.A. flight yester-

    day.

    Glad To Be Home

    R, CLEMENT S, JARVIS, a

    Barbadian who had been liv-
    ing in Curacao for two and a half
    years working with C.S.M., was
    among the fourteen passengers
    who came in on Friday from
    Curacao. He tells me that during
    his stay in Curacao he took a
    course in real estate and auction-
    eering and a post-graduate course
    in real estate, law and accountancy
    and has obtained diplomas in these
    subjects. He is back home for
    keeps, glad to be here and hopes
    to go into business shortly.

    Petroleum Engineer

    R. BASIL HODGES who is

    a petroleum engineer with the
    United Oil Well Co., in Anaco,
    Venezuela arrived from Vene-
    zuela yesterday via Trinidad by
    B.W.LA. accompanied by his
    wife. Here for a short holiday,
    they are staying at the Ocean
    View Hotel...... arriving by the
    same plane were Mr. and Mrs.
    Charles B, White. Mr. White
    us a sales representative of Coca
    Cola. They plan to spend six
    weeks with the Gidleys at a flat
    on the St. Lawrence coast. Mr,
    Gidley is also with Coca Cola.

    Trinidad Arrivals

    RS. E. DE LA BASTIDE ar-

    rived from Trinidad yester-
    day morning by B.W.I.A. A














    Dorryl F. Zanuck presents RENE DUNNE
    in “THE MUDLARK” with ALEC
    GUINNESS» CONSTANCE SMITH
    Andrew Ray - Beatrice Campbell

    {
    ee
    SSS Dea



    few minutes later her daughter
    on Joan came in by T.C.A. from

    Music of Manhattan; British] Trinidad.
    |News—Showing 6th Mrs, de La Bastide is here for

    Round F.A.
    |\Cup—Birmingham’s early goal.

    Boxing—Ronnie Clayton retains;
    | His Titles,

    two weeks. Joan plans to spend
    one week in Barbados. They
    are staying with Mr. ang Mrs.
    Harold Kidney. Mrs. Kidney
    is qa daughter of Mrs. de La
    Bastide. Joam works in the
    Public Relations Office of T.C.A.
    in Montreal other arriva's
    from Trinidad yesterday were Mr.
    Fred Strasser and Mr. Edwin Da
    Costa, Trinidad architect; as usual
    Mr. Da Costa is staying at
    Aquatic Gardens. “wire

    TO PRESENT—

    MAY 4th





    LEW AYRES
    LAST TWO

    M
    LEON ERROL in: “GALS
    “WHE

    an
    A Double that has
    DRA !
    And LEON ERROL—You know

    NOW

    Plain

    SPORT SHIRTS
    MEN'S PLASTIC

    LTD.

    DIAL 4610



    DIAL 4606

    (

    LT

    anrib Calling

    ADVENT



    ASTOR THEATRE

    “BUCCANEER'S GIR
    Extra: LES BROWN &
    IT’S A HOT PROGRAMME
    onday and Tuesda
    N TO-MORROW COMES
    every thing—LOVE ! ACTION!
    tN '

    Make it your MUST SEE

    SUNDAY, APRIL. 29,

    Venezuelan Journalist:
    OUR Venezuelan journalists
    were intransit through Barba—
    dos yesterday. They remained at
    Seawell for about twenty minutes,
    arriving from Grenads in time to
    connect with B.W.I.A’s schedule
    fligiit to Venezuela.

    Twenty days ago, nine Vene-
    zuelan journalists visited Trini-
    dad on a goodwill tour orga-
    nised by B.W.I.A. and the
    Trinidad and Tobago Tourist
    Bureau. They spent ten days in
    Trinidad and five in Tobago,

    after which, five of them return-
    ed to Venezuela. These four how-
    ever went on to spend four days

    in Grenada. They were F.
    Carmona who is on the staff of
    El Impulso, Jose Machado of

    Panorama, Oscar Lovera of E
    Nacional and Carlos Lezenna c
    El Heraldo. With them was ai
    official interpreter, who accom—
    panied them throughout their trip.
    However one of them, Oscar
    Lovera, spoke a little English. He
    told Carib that he had been in
    the newspaper business for fifteen
    years, he was married and had
    three children. They had thorough-
    ly enjoyed their tour of the islands
    and they had been treated with
    ‘every courtesy. Of the three
    islands Trinidad, Tobago and
    Grenada, he thought Grenada the
    most beautiful.

    Their interpreter Carlos Rod-
    riguez, fomerly of B.W.1.A. bid

    them adivs at Seawell. He re-
    turned to Trinidad yesterday
    afternoon.

    Lady Director

    ISS DORA DIBNEY, Direc-

    tor of Women’s Programmes
    over radio station CFCN in Cal-
    gary, Alberta, is
    in Barbados for
    three weeks. She
    flew in yesterday
    from Canada by
    TCA. and is
    staying with Dr.
    Norman and Dr.
    M. . (Mrs.)
    Wright at Aber-
    geldie Flats.
    Miss Dibney
    spent thirty-five
    yeas doing
    newspaper work









    in Canada and
    was Telegraph
    Editor for more DORA DIBNEY
    than 25 years of various Cana

    dian newspapers. After the
    war she was a freelance journal-
    ist before she began broadcasting.
    Still Tops
    AURICE JONES and his Fri-
    day night talent shows con-
    tinue to pack the Globe theatre.
    Last Friday night's guest stars
    were certainly most entertaining,
    especially Joe Clemendore, versa-
    tile song and dance man one min-
    ute, clown the next. The crowd
    loved him, :
    They also encouraged the six
    other performers with much ap-
    plause. This shows that either the
    talent is getting better or the
    audience is encouraging them
    Perhaps it’s both.



    ————

    URES OF PIPA

    1951





    OFF TO CANADA yesterday by T.C.A. went Miss Peggy Farmer, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Wallace and
    Miss Evelyn MacInnes. Mr. Wallace is a T.C.A. pilot and Miss MacInnes, a T.0.A. stewardess.

    Shipwrecked?

    AVE you ever been -ship-
    wrecked? If not the Barbados
    Polo Club will give you this “op-
    portunity” on Saturday, July 21st,
    the date of their annual ball at the
    Paradise Beath Club, ‘

    ‘ * i
    Children’s Paintings
    His next exhibition at tne Bar-
    bados Museum begins May
    4th and will last for one month,
    It will be an exhibition of chil-
    dren's paintings from England.

    Back To Caracas
    Be TO CARACAS yesterday
    after a holiday in Barbados
    went Miss Grace Evans, Mrs.
    Margot Betancourt, her datighter ~
    -Carmen and Mr. and Mis. Frank
    Wheeler and their daughter.
    Comings and Goings
    RS. H. H. HART returned

    from her short visit to
    Trinidad yesterday morning by
    B.W TA... Mrs. A. _ Shields

    was among the passengers bound
    for Montreal yesterday by T.C.A,
    Her final destination is Scotland.

    Iss SHEIWLA IANTHE
    * GROSVENOR of Lodge
    Road, Secretary of the Christ

    Church Old Girls Scholars’ Asso-
    ciation has gone to the U.S. on a
    visit Mr. Vernon T. East-
    mond of the Sanitation Depart-
    ment in St. Lueia is in Barbados
    on holiday. He is on six months’
    leave. A Barbadian, he is spend-
    ing some of it with relatives at
    George Ville, Bank Hall.

    Trinidad Marriages

    and Engagements
    ISS PATSY SELLIER; who

    captained t he Trinidad
    Ladies water polo team to Bar-
    bados last November was

    * married in Trinidad yesterday to

    Mr. Hugh Wight....Also mar-
    ried yesterday in Trinidad was

    Mr. Mark Conyers to Miss
    Daphne Huggins. Mr. ‘nd Mrs.
    Conyers are due to ariive. from
    Trinidad today to spend their

    honeymoon at the Hotel Royal
    .... Recent engagements in Trini-
    dad are Mr. Harry Bryden,.son
    of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Bryden tc
    Miss Valerie Knowles, tormer
    B.W.1.A. hostess...... and Mr.
    Ray Berard, son of Mr. and Mrs.
    A. J. Bernard of San Fernando
    to Miss Ruth (Binko) Millar,
    daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Robert

    Millar. Binko used ‘to go to
    school at the Ursuline Convent
    here.

    Cats

    ‘I HOPE everybody realises that

    no one owns a cat—your cat
    probably owns you. If you are
    not very careful you will firid that
    you are not the possessor, but the
    possessed. You can be your dog’s
    master, but no one has ever yet
    been the master of a cat. At the
    best it is * equal partnership in
    the art of living.” \
    M. SODERBERG spéak-
    ing in the B.B.C’s “The Na-
    taralist” on “Cats and Cat-
    Calls.”









    SHOWS
    L
    ORCHESTRA
    Dont Miss It

    y
    INCORPORATED"

    MUSIC !
    him; it’s laughs all the way.



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    ‘ SUNDAY, APRIL 29,

    1951



    SUNDAY

    Farm and Garden Gardening Hints

    By AGRICQLA

    PEAS AND BEANS

    We offer no apology to-day for
    reverting to this ali important
    matter of proteins or fiesh-
    fi since we in the West
    Indies have never been able
    it Supply our own needs in
    this respect, although hardiy

    ae of the more bulky

    , Sweet potatoes, ed-

    does, rice and so on. The produc-
    tion of these is, generally speak-
    ing, more: assured and, for-
    tunately too, we need never per-
    al actu go hungry where
    are ai te supplies of

    these commodities. It may be too
    that our digestion has become ac-
    customed, over long years of
    habit, to take care of a ration
    va ented by starch in its
    various forms, and so the requis-
    ite attention has not been paid to
    those commodities equally if not
    more important in the dietary
    Cif good health is to be main-
    tained) but ‘which, generally
    speaking, are more hazardous to

    ( rough clima tie o

    considerations. Let us ser
    onee, however, that no reasonable
    argument can be advanced against
    the more extended production and
    use of the Pigeon Pea as a farm
    and garden crop since it is the
    hardiest, the most adaptable and
    the mest reliable yielder in this
    group of plants and not likely to
    Jet us déwn by reason of causes
    d our control. Let us not
    treat it casually, therefore, merely
    rae se, in ered foods at any
    we are inclined to ignore

    the things we have and reach for
    the imported article, This par-
    ticular pea is concentrated good-
    ness in food value, not forgetting
    also its eral content, so es-
    sential for bone growth. Thus, one
    authority claims that one ounce
    of pigeon peas contains as much
    phosphoric acid and nearly twice
    &$3 much potash as three and a
    half ounces of rice. Hence, they
    #tre 80 valuable when mixed with
    rigee and so palatable that way
    too, We hope that since last
    Sunday many, especially new-
    comers to the gardening fratern-
    ity, have taken Johnnie's advice
    to his father and started planting
    pigeon peas as a border for the}
    developing food garden. For this
    purpose, put ina double row
    closely spaced—say two to two
    and a half feet away, three seeds
    to a hole, After the first year’s
    crop is over, the trees can be

    ever

    pruned back to produce a good
    erop the second year.

    A few additional facts about
    the Pigeon Pea may be of interest.

    Long cultivated in India—the
    existence of a Sanskrit name
    testifies to this—there is neverthe—
    less a difference of opinion as to
    whether its i
    African. It came to the
    West Indies from Africa and it
    is sometimes known in the other
    islands as Congo Pea. There is
    a large number of types and strains
    and there is considerable variation
    in colour and shape of the pods
    as well as in yields, maturity,
    ete. There are ever-bearing strains
    in the Wegt Indies and occasion-
    al plants have been obseved here
    but, so far, they have not gained
    great Popularity, perhaps eg
    the pods are smaller and more
    tedious to shell. What a splendid
    acquisition to the home garden is
    an ever-bearing pea! The truth
    is work on the Pigeon Pea has
    been rather neglected in this part
    of ee world. Not so in Hawaii,
    Be EdD ad ESE eoeele epee
    is regarded as one of the leading
    food crops both for man and beast,
    Its analysis shows qualities quite
    equal to alfalfa, produces excel-
    lent, nutritious forage in the
    young pod stage and as pasturage
    for beef cattle is capable of an
    out-turn, under good average
    eonditions, of as much as 1,000
    lb. of prime beef per acre an-
    num, Harvesting on a ijield scale,
    is carried out by a_ specially
    Seayiee mower with high cutter
    ar.



    S. H. asks;

    Could Agricola tell me
    why my squash is so vigor-
    ous in the box but never,
    never comes to anything in
    the open bed? Does it need
    special manure cr what?

    ——————— |

    SALE

    WELLINGTON.

    Exactly 100 years ago Maoris
    sold Queen Victoria 86,000 acres of
    land at 1}d. an acre. To-day the
    Maoris are asking for a review
    of the sale and a lift in the price
    to at least 2s. 6d, an acre. They
    Say many of the Maoris who put
    their names to the original sale
    agreement were not genuine,



    Cookery Corner

    One of the many breads that are
    very popular on the Continent is
    the “Pain D’Epice.” It is also
    known as “Honey Bread.” Here
    is the recipe. ‘

    PAIN D’EPICE
    2 cups of flour

    1 teaspoon bakin, wd
    I teaspoon soda YS

    te: salt
    cup milk
    teaspoon cinnamon

    cup strained honey

    eae slightly beaten

    €aspoo nger

    ix and sift dry in-
    gredients. Add others.
    Beat thoroughly for 15
    minutes or more if.
    conyenient. Bake in
    loaf or bread-stick
    pans in a moderate
    oven. Add one table-
    spoon of rum to mix-
    ture, if liked. Cool and
    cut in thin slices.

    This week I am go-
    ing to give you a basic
    recipe to a Sponge
    Cake or shall we call it a
    Sponge Cake.”

    TRUE SPONGE CAKE

    5 egg whites

    5 egg yolks

    1 cup sugar

    1 cup flour

    1 tablespoon lemon juice or

    vinegar

    “True



    —





    Every

    Grated rind of half lemon

    4 teaspoon salt.

    Measure all ingredients, Sep-
    arate yolks from whites. Beat egg
    whites until stiff, and beat in
    gradually one tablespoon sugar
    tor each egg white and set aside,

    Add liquid to egg yolks and
    beat until lemon-coloured and
    thick, Add lemon rind. Beat in
    remaining cuger.

    Mix and sift remaining dry in-
    gredients and cut and fold into
    egg mixture. Do not
    beat after adding flour,
    to avoid breaking air
    bubbles.

    Pour into unbut-
    tered pans. Cut
    through mixture sev-
    eral times to break
    large air bubbles,
    Bake one hour or mere
    in moderately slow
    oven, Bake 25 to 30
    minutes in moderate
    oven if in a layer-
    cake pan or individual
    tins. Invert on wire
    cooler and let stand until cold,






    AAAAAIAAAAAAAAALAGALS

    Lovely Society women all over the

    world follow this simple, inexpen-
    sive beauty care;

    one that is

    within the reach of everyone of

    "you.

    This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond’s Cold
    Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips.
    and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then “rinse” with more
    Cold Cream, for extra-cleansing, extra-softening. Very soon, your

    skin will be clearer, smoother, lovelier.
    FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION

    By day, use a touch of Pond’s Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This
    non-greasy cream will hold your powder matt for hours, and protect

    your complexion from sun and wind.

    =_—

    POND’S

    Vanishing Cream
    Cold Cream

    Start now to win the loveliness

    that ean be yours
    Pond’s Creams,

    novmnal skin needs !
    THESE 2 CREAMS
    |

    Fo THE BEA
    VELIEST OMEN .
    EVERYWHERE

    SAAAADAAAALAAALAARATY }

    Remove the cream,

    You'll find the
    distinctive opal-white jars at all

    the best beauty counters.

    For Amateurs

    The Garden In April

    Blue Plumbage—Border
    Plants—The Sugar Apple



    The Blue Flumbage, our
    comparatively Rive, Sues
    plants, is at its best during the
    dry months of .

    This a mole to be
    tow e, a oor », OF a

    den, It suited as an

    Js cr pounders as it does
    seldom reach-

    ing # height ob more than three

    Blue bago is a hardy plant,
    id it will thrive in poor soil and
    under very dry conditions. In

    fact it prefers the dry ther
    and during the dry months it flow-
    ets continuously, being a mass
    of lovely delicate pale Siue flow-
    ers. During continuous rains it
    stops flowering and the plants are
    apt to turn a sickly yellowish
    colour, but in any dry spell be
    tween rains it will probably start
    flowering again. Plumbago ean be
    and although some people advise
    an people adv
    cutting it back to wi! six inch-
    es of the ground at the beginning
    of each rainy season this is not
    really necessary if the hedge is in
    good condition. Should the Plum-
    ago get straggly, then it is ad-
    visable to cut it back,

    Blue Plumbago is propagated
    by root division,

    Border Plants For Our Beds

    All garden beds have a neater
    and more finished appearance
    when planted with a border. For
    abed of the herbaceous type, a
    low growing edge is really neces-
    sary but even the flat open type
    of bed is far more attractive if
    same border plant is put around
    the edge.

    One of the pettiest of the border
    annuals is dwarf Ageratum
    which grows only a few inches
    high, and which wheu flowering is
    a mass of fluffy bluey-mauye.
    Ageratum grows very easily from
    imported seed, and will bear con-
    tinuously for many months. It
    makes a splendid border to a
    garden bed.

    Another attractive border An.
    nual is the Sweet Alyssum. This
    snow-white, sweet smelling An-
    nual is a useful edging to a bed
    and will be covered in flowers for
    many weeks, Seedlings.can often
    be found under an old plant, but it
    is best to plant fresh each year
    from imported seeds, .

    The dwarf Marigold also makes
    ag border plant and is covered
    in golden flowers when bearing.

    Marigolds are one of the most
    useful and hardy of our annuals,
    and they have been a splendid
    standby in our gardens in this
    difficult year, They 4 only grow
    easily from cutting, but seedlings
    are aften to be found in a bed
    where Marigolds have been for
    some time.

    Another thing to recommend
    Marigolds is that as cut flowers
    they last so well in the house.

    Another border plant, but one
    that may not appeal to everyone;
    is Parsley, The curly parsley is
    both decorative and useful, and
    although it should by rights be
    regulated to the Kitchen garden,
    yet it is sometimes seen as a bord-
    er in the flower garden. Used in
    this way parsley serves the double
    purpose of decoration and useful-
    ness,

    Fruit Trees—Continued

    THE 8U' -APPLE

    The Sugar.apple is a small to
    medium tree growing and thriving
    under almost any conditions, This
    tree does not need special
    depth of soil, and it can grown
    from seed. {t is not recommended
    as a garden tree however as dur-
    ing March to May it drops its
    leaves and so looks very unattra-
    tive for a time, The fruit ripens
    from September to January, and is
    plentiful, sweet, and very popu-
    lar with most people, The Sugar-
    apple is hardy, needs no special

    a

    4
    UTY

    *
    *
    a
    a
    *
    4a
    *&

    when you use





    eare and will grow anywhere.

    But it must not be thought from
    this that even the hardy fruit-trees
    should never have any attention.
    Fruit trees peed re ular manuring
    an uning if the
    to $e obtateed. If after manuring
    and pruning your fruit-trees are
    leafy, but fruits poorly, you may be
    sure that it needs something that
    the manure has not supplied, and
    expert advice should be sought.

    Have you any Gardening ques-
    tions you would like answered or
    any garden information that would
    be of interest to other Gardeners
    to pass on?

    Have you a surplus of seeds or
    cuttings you would like to ex-
    change?

    Write to “GARDENING”,

    C/o The Advocate
    and watch this Column for a reply.

    Questions
    Mrs. King asks why her Big-
    nonia Venusta drops its buds

    before they open,

    In spite of consultation with the
    experts no reason can bg given
    for this strange behaviour. It is
    suggested however that a loosen-
    ing of the mar] around the reots,
    and a dressing of V.G.M. may have
    good results and is worth trying.

    To get a grafted Julie mango
    tree the seed of a common mango
    must be planted, and when the
    tree is well grown the Agricultur-
    al Department will send someone
    to graft it. It is advisable to con-
    sult with the Department as to
    the correct time the graftins
    should be done.

    D. H. ROACH writes:—

    I shall be much obliged if you
    will recommend me a few flow-
    ering vines or climbers, of a per.
    manent nature, suitable for
    arbour.. By permanent I mean
    those that do not die off and have
    te be replaced at intervals. If
    possible | would like to get per-
    petual bloomers or as nearly so as
    possible.. 1 have five arbours in
    my garden with bougainvillea on
    all of them, but I am very dis-
    appointed with them as my ex.
    perience is that if bougainvillea
    jis controlled, that is, trimmed fre-
    quently to make a shapely arbour,
    they will nat flower, 1 very much
    admire what is known as thd
    Trinidad vine as it is nearly al-
    ways in flower and looks very
    colourful, I have one arbour of it
    and if it were left to me I would
    have it on all the others, but my
    femily are inclined towards the
    current opinion that it is un
    healthy. It has been said that it
    gives off a pollen that causes cold
    and hay fever. I also have the pink
    coralita but that revels in climb-
    ing trees or long fences and is not
    at its best on a small arbour,

    Thanking you in anticipation
    for your kind assistance. ~
    “Passage House,” i Fe
    Passage Road,

    St. Michael.

    t results are <

    ADVOCATE

    SEWING

    * How Much Material Should I Buy?”

    n my experience one of the
    most frequently asked questions
    about dress making is, “how much
    material should I buy?”

    There are several different
    methods of answering this ques-

    . By far the most economi-
    cal way to determine the quanti-
    ty pf material needed for a given
    pa is to make a cutting pattern
    in paper for the bodice including
    facing pieces and any collar or
    culls ete, to be cut. A space
    half the width of the material
    should then be marked out on a
    table or the floor and the pattern
    laid in this space in the most
    advantageous manner, care being
    taken to place the grain lines
    properly. When all the pieces
    have been placed the length of
    space they fill should be measured
    and that will be the length need-
    ed for the bodice. This method
    is called planning a layout and
    ence a layout has been decided
    upon, it is helpful to make u
    small sketch of it for use when
    cutting.

    Only the bodice was mentioned
    in the layout method as most
    skirts do not need a paper pattern
    but ean be cut by the waistline

    me ‘asurement directly in the
    cloth. ralehe ris and
    sk will require twice the

    1 of skirt desired, measur-
    ing from waist to hem, plus the
    depth ef hem desired plus a seam
    allawanee at the waist. Flares
    take slightly more. A four gore
    flare requires six extra inches to
    cut and a cireular flare (semi-
    cirele) requires approximately a
    half yard extra Full cireular
    skirts need four times the length
    plus_about a half yard extra.
    Or course, the above method,
    requires a certain amount of time
    and planning ahead. I find it
    worth while because of the say-
    ings in material. To purchase
    the same quantity for every dress
    is a waste in some cases and
    results in skimping in others.
    However when you are shopping
    and see a piece of material you
    just must have right away, you
    want a guide method of deciding
    how much to buy. If you have

    a style in mind you can figure
    doser but if even the style is
    undecided you will have to fit
    your style to your cloth when

    you start to cut If the material
    is thirty-six inches, as is usually

    the case, you should figure on
    twice the length of the bodice,
    measuring from shoulder seam at
    neck to waistline and adding
    about three inches for seams
    Add to this once the length of
    sleeve, measuring from the
    shoulder seam at armhole Ww
    bottom of sleeve and addins
    for seam and bottom hem. These

    Quantities will usually do fo-
    simple styles on average siz
    individuals. Very large wome.
    sometimes have to buy twice the
    sleeve length.’ Of course larg>

    collar or cuffs or reverses and
    similar style details will requir»
    additional amounts. The quan-
    tity for the skirt is figured as

    above.









    ager

    co



    Bill and Algy get excited when
    they see the marks on the snow-
    covered ice. ** This is grand,” says

    Bill. “Look, they lead straight to
    the highest hill around here| Let's

    follow them. Then we may see
    the hare and get a real long sledge

    ASTHMA MUCUS

    Loosened First Day



    Don't let coughing, sneezing, chok-
    ing thiack of Bronchitia or ‘Asthma
    tuln your sl and en another

    oo a ht. without ; in -

    Ne medicine is not a

    ok: ray, but works
    rough thus resting the
    tung an oo Hibes. ie a

    01 starts t) -

    gel ‘arti 1, 5, ai ee Tre-
    ling mucus, 2. Thus

    ea brea’ d sounder,

    ps vi-

    romans inp eis ag:
    a eee ina

    t



    BLINDING

    HEADACHES

    MADE HER HELPLESS




    KRUSCHEN
    brought relief Suithr’ trom

    severe head-
    aches will be interested in

    reading how this woman
    ended her troubles :—

    “I was subject to terrible
    headaches. While they lasted, I
    seemed to los my sight and all
    power in my hands and was foreed
    to lie down for hours at a time.
    My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
    Salts for years, suggested my
    trying them. did 60, and I've
    not had a return of those terrible
    headaches for months. In fact,
    I feel quite cured,’’"--M.W.

    Headaches can nearly always
    be traced to a disordered stomach
    and to the unsuspected retention
    in the system of stagnating
    waste material, which poisons
    the blood. Remove the poisonous

    } accumulations — prevent them
    } from forming again—and you
    | won't have to worry any more.
    And that is just how Kruschen
    brings swift and lasting relief—
    | by cleansing the system thor-
    oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
    « waste e &
    | Ask your nearest Chemist or
    | Stores for Kruschen

    Rupert and the Ice-

    Wh *2a
    |




    run as well.” “If we do see him
    ! hope he’s still carrying that ige-
    flower. I'd no idea there were
    such \hings,"’ says Rupert. Once
    off the lake they find the trail leads
    steeply upwards through pine trees.
    *Tr'll be ronping to come back this

    way," says Algy.

    “10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
    STACK-A-BYE CHAIRS

    The All Steel Arm Chairs
    $11.50 Each

    at

    JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
    ! AND
    HARDWARE












    CIRCLE

    It is important to keep in mind
    that it is length you are buying
    and in most styles t length will
    hang length-wise on you so the
    quantity is governed mostly by
    your height and how long you
    wear your skirts and how long
    your sleeves are. For example,
    long sleeves will usually require
    half a yard more than short ones,
    and short ones will usually
    require a quarter of a yard more
    than sleeves cut in the bodice

    The following is an example of

    the second or length method,
    Bodice length 7
    Seam allowances 3°
    Skirt length ... . 80”
    Skirt hem “aia « ea
    Seam allowance

    Flare allowance 6”
    Multiplied by

    Sleeve length

    Sleeve hem “

    Seam allowance ee

    128°”

    The amount to buy is 3 yds or
    3% yds if a collar is to be cut.

    Leave It To
    Girls

    LONDON

    A group of shapely London
    showgirls offered to-day to go to
    the United States “to promote
    closer Anglo-American relations,”
    The girls made their offer after
    reading reports of anti-British
    feeling in the United States over
    the dismissal of Gen. Douglas
    MacArthur.
    Leading members of the govern-
    ment have been urged to visit the
    United States in an effort to coun-
    teract this anti-British feeling.
    But Daphne Kiernander, ballet
    mistress at the Casinc Theatre
    said:
    “We girls believe we can do a
    far better job of winning over
    Americans thpn any politicians,
    We're trained to make people feel
    good—politicians only make them
    feel bad.”
    Tall, red-haired “Rusty” Evans
    said:
    “T've known quite a few G.L.s,
    and they all seem to go more for
    beauty than brains.”
    College educated Barbara Lewis
    added:
    “That doesn’t mean we haven't
    any brains. We have definite
    ideas on how to get next to
    Americans,”
    At the Windmill Theatre, blonde
    Pat Hamilton elaborated on the
    girls’ plans:
    “We'd contact the thousands ¢'!
    British G.I, brides in the states.
    Through them, we'd tell millians
    of Americans exactly how the



    British feel. We all want the
    same thing—a little peace and
    happiness.” a

    Rita Allan, a pert Scots girl,
    chipped in:

    “But not at any price. “We're
    just as determined to resist the
    Communists as the Americans
    are. The Americans showed us
    they could stand up for us, and
    now we're not going to lie down
    for the Russians.”

    The Foreign Office declined to
    comment on the girls’ offer,

    —I.N.§

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    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951



    W.1. TEAM BEST POSSIBLE Newcastle United Defeat THE JAMAICA PROBLEM

    COMBINATION

    Skipper Goddard Is Pleased
    By 0. S. COPPIN

    A LTHOUGH he could not diselose the personnel

    \\ of the West Indies team to tour Australia,

    < ; skipper John Goddard told me in Jamaica that he
    was pleased with the selection and so are the

    - majority of West Indies cricket fans ever since it

    di 3 Was amnounced yesterday after a period of irritat-
    ¥ ing suspense. However, it is the consensus of
    » opinion that the Selectors have done an excellent
    7 job in’ their selection of the seventeen players to
    represent the West Indies.

    It is true that there has been the argument for choosing the odd

    player instead of another but there is general agreement that the
    sdlectors in the circumstances have chosen the best available talent
    in the West Indies today.
    _ For myself I have nominated
    in previous articles sixteen of
    the players chosen and I have not
    selected Ferguson as the seven-
    teenth since I considered that
    Berkeley Gaslsn should have
    been given preference.

    However I approached the
    question from the level that
    “Boogles” Williams as a reserve
    slow right arm spinner was not
    | seeking selection and therefore
    with the exception of Ferguson
    there were no other slow spin
    bowlers in the West Indies today
    who could qualify by Interna~
    tional standards for selection in
    the team,

    HAD RULED HIM OUT

    ERGUSON TI had ruled out on

    _. the strength that I was un-
    willing to risk the possibility of
    }a recurrence of his arm injury
    that dogged him in India by
    | sending him on a most important
    and exacting Australian tour.

    That was the only argument I
    had against the inclusion of Fer-
    guson. On the other hand he per-—
    formed with remarkable success



    : na JOHN GODDARD

    in the recent Trinidad-Barbados Tests here and since these were
    given the Official status of Trial Games in preparation for the Aus—
    je oon visit, then it must be conceded at once that he has earned
    selection.

    I am of the opinion that he will prove a success as long as the

    guarantee that each player must be pronounced medically fit is
    observed. . .
    _ There was no speculation at al. about the inclusion of

    like John Goddard (captain), Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Alan ha walt
    Valentine, Everton Weekes, Clyde Walcott, Frankie Worrell, Sonny
    Ramadhin, Gerry Gomez, Roy Marshall and Robert Christiani.

    Prior Jones who had already proven his worth shad only to
    establish his bona fides and the West Indies Cricket Board of Control
    would have to draw upon their dividends from the investment of hav-
    ing already selected him to represent them in India and England.

    SORRY FOR GASKIN
    L AM particularly sorry for Berkley Gaskin and Andy Ganteaume.

    Perhaps the chronicler of West Indies history of this period will
    describe them as being among the most unfortunate of West Indies’
    nearly-greats, ‘

    The three players in the seventeen around whose selection the
    most discussion has been céntred since the announcement of the
    team are Denis Atkinson, Ken Rickards and Simpson Guillen.

    I shall try to justify their selection since I claim the honour of
    being the only sportswriter in the West Indies who has included all
    three of them in his team forecasts. ?
    | As a matter of fact I nearly suffered personal injury in Jamaica
    when I published a forecast team during my recent visit there that
    included Denis Atkinson. In the first place, 1 was fortunate enough to
    have seen the Trial games that comprised the Intercolonial series
    | between Barbados and Trinidad on the one hand, and Jamaica and
    British Guiana on the other hand. :

    In the first series I saw the pace bowling candidates Jones, King,
    Muliins and Butler, It was at once apparent that Jones’ experience
    and accuracy, though not fire would give him the edge over the other
    three candidates,

    JAMAICAN PACERS UNIMPRESSIVE
    N JAMAICA I saw Hines Johnson, stan Goodridge, Miller, Trim
    and Gaskin and here I had to pause to consider the situation, It
    was not at all easy,
    Fine batting by the British Guianese openers Leslie Wight and



    Johnson and Stan Goodridge of any devil which they might have been
    planning to develop.

    | This theory of mine was only submitted for the sake of argument
    in the first Test but by the second Test it had become an established
    fact, It now devolved upon Trim and Gaskin to convince the selec-
    tors as to their respective rights of inclusion in the team as pace bowl-
    ers,

    In the first Test Gaskin did everything right and got the maximum
    result out of a new wicket that was responsive to turn and gave the
    bowlers some advantage because of its uncomfortably high bounce.

    This is no disparagement to Gaskin’s brilliant performance in
    sending seven batsmen back to the pavilion and taking his 100th
    | wicket in First class cricket on this tour as well.
    | On the other hand, when conditions were more in line with what
    ;one would naturally expect to obtain in these games, Trim turned in
    an excellent performance, maintaining both hostility, pace and direc-
    | tion for long spells, I am not therefore surprised that he has gained

    selection,
    I SUPPORTED ATKINSON
    ASSOCIATED myself with the few supporters of Denis Atkinson.
    Few they were but, with the exception of myself perhaps, know-
    ledgeable according to international cricket standards,
    : I have always argued that the West Indies would be silly to have
    invested in an experiment such as sending Denis Atkinson to India

    from the experience of the tour and was willing to place this experi-
    ence at the disposal of the West Indies Cricket authorities,

    He was not eminently successful in the Trinidad—Barbados tour
    here this year but he played a good innings in the second Test, he
    bowled steadily and his fielding was up to a first class standard.

    This, following immediately a successful seagon as an all-—
    rounder in local Barbados Cricket Association games was sufficient,
    in my opinion to have secured his selection.

    UILLEN’S SELECTION

    is Simpson Guillen of Trinidad. I agree with his inclusion.
    In the first place it must be remembered that the place for a
    stventeenth player was specifically created for the inclusion of a
    wicket-keeper in his own right to relieve Clyde Walcott of this
    responsibility in other than the more important games.

    PHOSFERINE 7,

    for youthful = -













    Blackpool For F.A. Cup

    By VERNON

    |
    i
    |

    MORGAN

    WEMBLEY STADIUM, April 28.
    Newcastle United won their fourth F.A. Cup Final here
    today, when beating a fellow north country team Blackpool



    by 2 goals to 0, after a goalless first half.
    9 ent |

    Everton Beat
    Carlton 3-2

    Everton defeated Carlton by
    three goals to two in their First
    Division football fixture at Ken-
    sington yesterday evening.

    For ‘®verton Blades,
    centre forward, scored two of
    the goals including a penalty
    while the other was sent jn by
    White. Greenidge and Reynold
    Hutchinson scored for Carlton.

    At half-time the score was one

    all.
    goal

    their

    Carlton defended the
    from the screen end and were first
    on the offensive. Their forward
    line kept up a concentrated attack
    on their opponents’ citadel but
    the Everton defence coupled
    with Reece between the uprights
    nullified their efforts.

    Everton also made a number of
    attempts to open the scoring but
    the Carlton full back Bright
    always seemed to be in their way,
    and sent the ball back in mid-field
    with lusty kicks.

    Carlton however drew first
    blood when Reynold Hutchinson
    headed in a free kick by Bright.

    Everton launched an attack in
    an endeavour to equalize and
    their right-winger Haynes sent
    in a good effort which goalkeeper
    Warren turned around the corner,
    Blades took the corner kick, but
    nothing resulted.

    It was not long after this that
    Everton got the equalizer.
    Haynes took a good kick from
    away down the field and Blades
    scored.

    Carlton made some _ good for-
    ‘ward movements, trying to put
    themselves in the lead, but when
    they did get past the Everton
    defence, their inside men kicked
    wide. The interval was taken
    with the score 1—1,

    Shortly after the resumption,
    Clairmonte handled in the pen-
    alty area and centre forward
    Blades who took the spot kick,
    made no mistake to give Everton
    their second goal.

    _Everton again attacked the
    Carlton goal and from a corner
    kick by Blades, White headed
    goalwards and the ball struck the
    crossbar and rebounded into play.

    Carlton now tried to draw level
    and made a few attacks on their
    opponents’ goal, but the defence

    true.

    Everton soon took over and
    during one of their raids, centre
    forward Blades was ordered off
    the field by Referee Harris for
    rough play. Shortly before this
    incident the referee had called up
    all the players and warned them.

    The Carlton forwards moved
    down the field in the Everton goal
    area but “Brickie” Lucas who got
    possession; kicked wide of the

    Peter Bayley robbed the Jamaican shock bowling candidates Hines: goal.

    The Carlton front line made
    another raid and from a good
    centre by Freddie Hutchinson on
    the leftwing, goalkeeper Reece
    saved, but did not gather and
    Greenidge who was well up sent
    in the second for Carltun.

    It was not long after this that
    White, the Everton inside right,
    ran through and beat goalkeeper
    Warren with a hard shot from in-
    side the area to put Everton in
    the lead.

    In spite of one or two efforts
    by Carlton to draw level, the
    game ended with Everton winners
    by_ three goals to two,

    The referee was Mr. L. F.
    Harris,

    The teams were as follows:

    Carlton: Warren, Bright, Ken-
    nedy, F, Hutchinson, Clairmonte,
    Cox, Marshall, R. Hutchinson,
    Greenidge, Lucas, Mc .

    Everton: Reece, Hall, Weekes,

    in 1948.49 as-a comparatively untried youngster and fail to make use Fowler, Culpepper, Maynard, R. &
    of this after he had satisfied his severest critics that he had benefited Haynes, White, Blades, Yearwood, wip, aun wise. inate i

    Murray.

    qualified.

    them.

    the other candidates.

    The team is a formidable combination by International stand-
    and the Selectors should be congratulated in selecting |
    y _seventeen players in whom responsible cricket circles in the West
    That being the case, Simpson Guillen of Trinidad and Alfie Indies repose complete confidence for placing West Indies cricket on
    Binns of Jamaica were the only two candidates who in my opinion» the highest pinnacle in the International cricket arena.

    TRAVEL |

    ards,





    2. It’s Cheaper too, than othe’

    | vigour! a |!
    Lack of vitality is a familiar symptom
    today. Nothing really wrong, people
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    ‘
    >

    I wrote before the team was published that I would have
    been satisfied, after witnessing the recent Tests in . Jamaica and
    Barbados that I would have no objection to the selection of either
    of these players as I did not think there was much to choose between
    They have chosen Guillen and although some
    must be extended to the also young and energetic Alfie Binns, I |
    G must observe that whatever little leaning that might be
    TT THIRD NEWCOMER, whose inclusion has excited comment argued in favour of Guillen’s selection must include the fact that he

    has had the experience of ’keeping to Ramadhin more than any of



    3. Take all the Excess Baggage

    ‘s international forward
    handsome Jackie Milburn, playing
    in the centre for Newcastle not
    only scored both goals but was a
    brilliant leader of his team.

    He netted both goals within five
    minutes — in the fifth and tenth
    minutes of the second half,

    The Blackpool defence was
    partly to blame for the first, be-
    cause, believing the Newcastle
    forward who was lying upfield to
    be offside, they stopped playing
    and allowed him to dodge the
    centre half and coolly place the
    ball wide of the advancing goal-
    keeper into the back of the net.

    Second Goal :

    The second goal was a beauty. ;
    It was one of the finest ever seen ;
    in the long history of the ee
    Milburn, lying 30 yards outside the
    goal mouth picked up a pass first |
    time, and with a terrific left-foot |
    drive nearly broke the back of
    the net with his ananayle off .
    Even Mortensen, Blackpool’s
    centre-forward and England’s
    pleasant leader shook hands with
    his rival 6n this amazing goal.

    No Excitement

    The King and Queen, and
    100,000 spectators paying £39,000
    saw a game which was very
    patchy.

    It was never a real thriller and
    there was little excitement or good
    play by either team,

    Milburn was always the best
    man for the winners, and from the
    opening whistle looked likely to
    pierce the Blackpool defence with
    his speedy dashing moves and
    quick first-time shots.

    The Newcastle defence was
    extremely steady and undismayed
    at the reputation of the strong

    Blackpool attack which con-
    tained the famous International
    “Stanleys” — Matthews and|
    Mortensen. |

    In the 23rd minute Blackpool
    had what proved to be their best
    scoring opportunity of the match,
    Off a corner, Mortensen putin |
    perfect header which the New-|
    castle right back Soll headed off |
    the line with his goalkeeper |
    beaten. Then minutes later the |
    Blackpool goalkeeper Farm made’
    a spectacular save.

    A few minutes later Blackpool |
    had a second chance of scoring,
    but Slater hooked a knee high pass
    from Matthews wide of the)
    upright.

    Blackpool attacked fiercely on
    the resumption and harassed the
    United men, but within 10 minutes
    they found themselves two goals
    down due to their not “playing
    the whistle’ and to Milburn’s
    brilliant shooting.

    Thereafter, the heart seemed to
    have been taken out of Blackpool,
    and they never looked like
    winning the game. Newcastle, and
    Milburn in particular, kept up |
    their pressure to finish, and won |
    a deserved victory.

    And so, Stanley Matthews is
    still without his coveted Cup
    medal, about the only honour in
    the game which has eluded this
    brilliant performer.



    —Reuter.



    Friendly Football

    5 e .
    Association
    FOLLOWING are this weeks’

    fixture: —
    MONDAY, April 30th.
    Maple vs. Penrode
    Referee Mr. C, E. Reece.
    TUESDAY, May ist.
    Westerners “A” vs, Westerners “B".
    Referee Mr. O. Graham.
    WEDNESDAY, May 2nd.
    Rangers vs. Maple
    Referee Mr. J. Archer.
    THURSDAY, May 3rd.
    Harkliffe vs. Westerners “B” |
    Referee Mr. C. Jemmott.
    FRIDAY, May 4th.
    Rangers vs. Penrode

    above matches will be
    played at St. Leonard's Grounds.

    sympathy

    logically

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    B.T.C. Rules Need Immediate
    Revision
    By BOOKIE

    4 HERE is a very real problem in racing in B.G.,

    Trinidad and Barbados with regard to the classi-

    fication of Jamaican bred horses and I wish that the

    Barbados Turf Club, in particular, would wake up

    and do something about it. It follows that such a

    5 problem must be faced in a realistic manner, so let
    € us get down to the facts.

    In British Guiana, no Jamaican creole can begin lower than C class
    if he has not raced before, either in Jamaica or anywhere else. Should
    he.begin his racing career in B.G. he is then promoted or demoted as
    his form dictates. If he has raced before he goes to B.G. his form is
    submitted to the classifiers and they place him where they think, fit.

    In Trinidad the rule for Jamaicans is almost the same with. the.
    difference that for “C class” one simply substitutes “class E2’’. Then
    must be added that no Jamaican, half-bred or thoroughbred, can ever
    go below class F2, no matter how badly ke runs.



    In Barbados the rule is quite different. It simply_states that all
    Jamaicans must be classified not lower than class C2. No matter how
    badly he runs he can never go any lower, Furthermore the definition
    of the word “creole” in the B.T.C. rule book reads that such a horse
    is one sired and foaled in the W.I. and B.G. (Jamaica excepted).

    Now as far as I can see the only rules which need changing are
    those of Barbados. But the question is should we follow the B.G, or
    the Trinidad style?

    * * a
    years ago this problem would have been « weighty one
    aoe eee ee = toon wie of Droadmindedness on the part of
    e 418fdad BWirt {ub which is entirely without precedent in the
    annals of W.I. racing, and, I may say, to their everlasting credit, we
    are now in a position to draw ample conclusions from the concrete

    evidence of Jamaicans racing in Trinidad for the last five to six
    years. What has this evidence proved?

    To my mind it has proved beyond a shadow of doubt that Jamai-
    can breeders, like their English counterparts, for that matter their
    counterparts in any other country, do not wish to sell what iney con-
    sider to be their best stock until they have seen them race in Jamaica.
    Consequently the average Jamaican creole which has been coming to
    Trinidad in the last five years is no better than the average Barbados
    and Trinidad thoroughbred creole. Now this is a broad statement
    with which many people will disagree and no doubt their first argu-
    ment against it will be that since the Trinidadians first tried the
    unraced Jamaicans in F2, why did they change the rule to place them
    in E2 if they had not proved to be above the average Trinidad creole?
    My answer to that brings to light what I had always maintained long
    before the Jamaican irvasion. Trinidad breeders relied too much on
    the half-breds. oh?

    HE fact is that gradually the Jamaican creoles outnumbered the

    thoroughbred Trinidad creocles and their standard was indeed
    higher than the average of the Trinidadians. But coupled with their
    Barbados. brothers, it cannot be denied that the average of the two
    islands was well up to the Jamaican standard. Unfortunately only a
    few Barbados creoles were ever seen racing against the Jamaicans in
    the low classes. But even those who did were never disgraced. There-
    fore to put it briefly we have found that taken sectionally the Jamai-
    cans are better than we but together we could hold our own with them.

    This sounds all very well on paper but once again we must re-
    member that facts must be faced. Therefore since our actual racing
    is done sectionally (i.e. only a few Barbados F class horses go to

    ‘Trinidad and fewer Trinidadians of the same calibre come here)
    {to safeguard our breeders we should follow the Trinidad style and

    begin all unraced Jamaicans in E2, There is no need to argue the
    pros and cons of following the B.G. style since only in isolated cases
    have creoles from that country been able to hold their own in Trini-
    dad while quite a number of Trinidad breds from the low classes
    have won in the former place in higher brackets.

    The great thing now is to get the Barbados gentlemen in author.
    ity to act upon this suggestion. That, I freely admit, is like trying
    to move a mountain, They are ensconced in the view that it will be
    detrimental to breeders in this island and since among those in author-
    ity are some of the breeders themselves it goes without saying that

    | the bill will have a sticky passage.

    * * *

    UT what must be called to the attention of these gentlemen is
    the state of affairs which exists in the races framed for class

    D and lower in Barbados. Here we are to-day with about 84 eligible
    horses for one meeting on our classification list ang still not enough
    between classes D and E to make a decent race. Yet if horses like

    ; Rosemary, Princess Rassiyya, or any other Jamaican now racing in

    Trinidad in these divisions were allowed to come over here in the
    same class, what excellent fields we would have for our D and E
    class races. It is inconceivable with horses of the calibre of Bow
    Bells, Watercress, Cross Roads and Mary Ann, one or all being fit,
    that either Rosemary or Princess Rassiyya could come over here and
    mop up. It is also inconceivable that we must have four races for
    four horses over a period of four days.

    Revise the rule now. If the thought of an unknown Jamaican
    starting in E2 still frightens, in spite of all the evidence pointing to
    the contrary, then meet the suggestion half-way and place them in
    C2. But above all be realistic. Let those who have shown their
    paces in Trinidad have the benefit of a classification on merit, not on
    an obsolete rule made for past generations, the enforcement of which
    reeks of insularity.

    The above it must be remembered has nothing to do with the
    entry of Jamaicans in the classics. That is another matter altogether.
    But as Footmark won the Trinidad Derby with such ridiculous ease
    last Christmas, I have no doubt that those who have always opposed
    the idea will have gathered fodder for their cannons.

    * *

    ELL there is something to be said on both sides. First of all

    I would not allow the victory of Footmark to frighten us as
    much as it undoubtedly has. We must remember that he is the first
    Jamaican to win this classic in the four years since it was open to
    them. In those four years our Derby winners have been Atomic II,
    Ligan, and Ocean Pearl. With the exception of the last named it
    is indeed very questionable whcther the Jamaican Derby winners
    of the same years could have won the Trinidad Derby as well. There
    may be arguments in favour of Blue Streak over Atomic II but that
    Applemoney would have got nowhere with Ligan there is hardly any
    doubt. Even on different underfoot conditions Ocean Pearl would
    have had a good chance to sweep away all opposition. It cannot be
    denied that on the second day she was a much better horse when
    she defeated Blue Streak although only over six furlongs. At that
    timé there was no horse in Jamaica as good as Blue Streak.

    Therefore there is no certainty that the Jamaicans will always
    hold sway in the Trinidad classics. It is also most unlikely that they
    would ever win these races with the regularity that Barbados has
    accomplished in the past. Therefore why bar the Jamaicans?

    BB ef ef .
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    rd

    PAGE FIVE



    9.15 p.m., on Friday. 8 am. Hoiy “Communion. 9 a.m.

    H.M. The Z
    THE Festival of Britain begins Choral Eucharist & Address. 11

    Hy T. GALE

    Athleties oe, - o, © ( anc . APRIL 29 — NO. 169 |
    LOCAL Boys PREPARE "he Festival Of Bretain Ma OHSS (“Fs Topic | 2
    King Overseas Service of the BBC at ROGATION SUNDAY | }

    of |



    on May 3, and the BBC plans to, ae ——. ibe es, = Sn 8 oe. Sunday LEAVES 800
    . broadcast a number of special comin : § 0. 7 p.m. Shortened Evensong e BODY FRESH,
    THE announcement of the actual dates and rogramme Ol programmes describing the nation- BBC will broadcast a daily réport Yop Hymn Singing SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN .

    the Intercolonial Sports has found the local athletes and
    eycnsts hard at training. This is indeed a healthy sign for
    the sport in Barbados as in the last few years the majority

    wide celebrations to listeners in
    Britain and overseas, Although
    the opening ceremony will be at

    of the first match of the touring
    South African Cricket. Team—
    against Worcestershire. These re-

    9 saan.
    rev! "K.'e.

    Pilgrim ian. '



    Last Week




    © MORE LASTING PROTECTION
    @ NO TELL-TALE ODOR

    , i i : ’ a very early hour for us in the ports will be at 5.00 p.m. on , i:

    < i are have waited until they knew a meeting was West ridies and nearby territories Wednesday and Friday and at y/o m. Me We S Aarthur; 7 pam.

    efinitely on the cards before they made themselves ready. there will be a direct. broadcast 5-45 p.m., on Thursday, On Satur’ mr a. Oxiey. ; :
    pent that they could be blamed, every reason to believe that the from London on special. wave. day at 5.00 p.m., there will be 2 yee ’ ee ee

    ause it is only in recent years boys will be one hundred per cent lengths at that time. These will similar report on the first day of . 2 Fa oe. jioare (Holst $$...
    that there was any hope of fit when the comes. I notice be on the air between 5.30 and their match against Yorkshire. pownes. eee 5 a an -
    regular annual fixtures, Therefore too that most of them have been 7.15 a.m., on Thursday, 3rd May Other sporting broadcasts during a Yaa Sk
    it is also a sign that we are concentrating on the route from to describe the opening ceremony the week We 4 Tetotiied ) ¢ Bite Me Re Penis. !
    getting back to normal. Of course Bridgetown via Bay Street, Worfh- with the King and Queen driving description of the One Thousand 7 5,1, xg ee eee
    We are nowhere there up to the ing ete to Oistin. This strikes me in pint atate “te St. Paul’s Cathe Guineas at Newmarket on Friday, ‘DUNSCOMBE :
    present and perhaps we will not aS a good choice. There are little dral, the Service of Dedication in 4th. May, at 5.05 p.m., Tight after 11 am. Mr. O. Weekes. 1 p.m. Mr
    be until the Athletic Association or ne inclines along this road and St, Paul’s Cathedral, and, on the the description of the day's play se
    is placed on a sound financial if there is one thing to avoid in stroke of noon by British Summer against Worcestershire. Asp vo ine iat ates
    footing. To do this it needs the training for the type of cycle Time, His Majesty’s declaring the heard on Saturday, Sth. May are 4; am. Rey, isbie, 4 p.m. they
    support of the public at its meet- races we have, it is hill work. Festival open from the steps. of recorded descriptions of) the B. Crosby.
    ings and this it should get at the Ken Farnum will naturally be the Cathedral, BBC commentators British Hard ‘Court Championships a
    fortheoming one, which, to my Our number one man but will be stationed at various points at Bournemouth and_ the Sule i ee

    mind, promises to_be the most in-

    missed the meeting at which he

    Stuart rode so well last time that

    line up in A class. Also in this

    to describe all these ceremonies.

    and Queen will be the first visi-

    League Cup Final. These follow

    rituals in the Gilbert Islands of

    WHITE BALL



    930 am. Rev. B.

    But it’s a poor boy flying


















    teresting we have had in many he might almost be counted in The ‘al transmissions to this the report of the Yorkshire matci) | 9.90 am, Mr. G. Barker. 7 p.m. : : re
    are the same bracket. What is very in- area aa be on 19.60 and 2492 on Saturday. The Two Thousand MY F. Moore, Jo, eee Till take trip él is dgprcial ingredinate of BUCKF AS m
    I have not seen the local ath- triguing is the fact that neither of metres, 15.31 and 12.04 mega- Guineas will be reported at 5.05 4) an. Mr. G. Sinckler, 7 p.m. Boys! honey we will sip RS WANE quckiy festory to cmt
    letes in training but one or two them have met any of the formi@- cycles. Later in the day on the p.m., on Wednesday, 2nd. May. Rev. M, Thomas. . ‘ . A glass or two a day of this fich, full.
    with whom I have spoken have @ble Trinidad group which is com- normal wavelengths there will be land S 5. decal a Gee ; be Tyaseuy ert we heard bodied wine will fortify you against fever and
    told me about their efforts, I also ing over and therefore it will lend a reconstruction _ of these cere— Island Sorcery ae pectic pm, Mr dee ha ee hee donth prevent the exhaustion of long-term fatigue
    understand that many of them are to the a aness, which, monies and visits to Festival Sir Arthur Grimble, a former .. BANK HALL So sorry it aint more Take home Aa bottle today!
    hard at work. as we saw last ae foes a long Centres in Britain. These latter Governor of the Windward _®% a.m, Rev. M, Thomas, 7 p.m. : . *

    Perhaps our foremost local Way to drawing crowds. broadcasts will be at 4.15 and Islands, is well known as a most â„¢ rel MTSTOWN put OT a ences an |
    conteénder will be A. Hunte, whose The persistent Leon Carmichael 9.15 p.m. interesting raconteur in BBC 8S Bryan, 7 p.m. Mr. Is go up to America “ ' a
    nickname, I notice from the Sports Who rides with more guts than h k Exhibiti talks, On Friday next, 4th, May \. oe Pe ee Wwe ; sete
    Programme published elsewhere, "erly anv other cyclist I have The South Bank Exhibition he begins a three-part series of _B. vy. 7 pm. Some call it indiscretion XN y
    is Nugget. To be quite frank I ©Ver seen will once again be in the On Friday, 4th, May the King talks on witcheraft and magic BETHESDA And some a three months’ spree

    j 2

    broke the local 440 yards record
    but I saw him run in a few heats
    last year. Unfortunately he had

    y . inti . f we can get a free trip
    recently pulled a muscle, But Promoted from the Intermediates east descriptions of their arrival ; ’ ALKEITH I .
    even then what I saw left me with t?.7ace with the top men. and tour of the twenty-seven acres troduction to Sorcery.’ The later 2 ee ee ee cei tuedanieeea vileeieiiia
    a fayourable impression. Tali In_ the Intermediate there will of pavilions and gardens. An talks _ are Sorcerer s Revenge BELMONT Before we hardly settle Hibi AG FR MONIES OF SUCKPAST AD
    Constable Wilfred Tull from Trini. P@ D. Yard, George Hill, Mike edited | version -vi this broadcast and ‘The Spell on the Oven. 11 am. Rev.(.R.; MoCallough. 1 p.tas |. Weill-plan our homeward trip . cS OF -BUCKFAST. ABBEY
    aaa also expressed a liking for Fin a Agee Tw Foster xe Mr. G. Bascome eddane Bo, Gee gant Me Soperten.
    unte’s style. ave all won a few races t ate, f t . 9 Rev. R. MeCull »*? . Ma z ir
    my It has also been sugested that R ay Scouts Invested Mr xe st. Hu uheewe a You know whose coppers spending’
    ite Fit erratic to PROVIDENCE It's the regular old milen cow
    Quite Fi ; the erratic Sattaur of B.G. who is ° ® fe . . a.m. Mr. B. Browne. 7 p.m Take advantage everybody
    I am told that Hunte is quite now living here should be brought = On St. George Ss Day Mr. R. Linton, — 2 Never mind who “build a row
    fit now and so we are hoping he down from A into the Intermedi- Pro mime ¥ VAUXHALL ei é E .
    stays until sports day. He will be ate division and I think _ this f ON Monday St. George’s Day, gee oy BS BP Fiaerte. © Bmp. Me tho enloy soctethung iree™

    supported against the outsiders by
    Denny and McClean of the local
    Police and Oswin Hill of Holborn

    clase is the pace setter Keizer who
    never seems content to slacken
    his speed while Skinner has been

    would be a good move indeed. His
    frequent flashes of speed -have
    earned him a little in A, but I

    tors to the South Bank Exhibition,
    the centre-piece of the national
    festival, and the BBC will broad-

    SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951
    6.360 a.m.—12.15 p.m. . 19.60 “.

    the South Pacific. He will speak
    on successive Fridays at 6.15 p.m.,
    in the BBC’s General Overseas
    Service. The first talk is ‘An In-

    an Investiture and advancing
    Ceremony took place at the Head-
    quarters of tne 6lst Barbados

    11 @.m, Rev, J. S. Boulton, 7 p.m.
    Rev McCullough. 4.30 p.m. Annual
    Saer Concert.

    Crosby. 7 p.m,
    »; |

    To the land of Liberty.
    . .

    Why sometimes in Barbados
    It's hatd to catch a bus

    To-day this is the fashion
    Even in the Assembly
    . *

    To those boys who are earnest

    ree ; : : ecer th BAY STREET
    or Pickwick, I am not sure which, Should think he will keep the | 6.80 a.m. _Week-end Sports Heport. (3rd Sea Scouts) Group: Sundyys 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Go up and work your best
    ‘All of these gentlemen are prom- Intermediates on their toes. 6.45 a.m, Sandy MacPhersor we aio . After the ceremony, the D. C., SUNDAY, April 29, 1951, Just mind your business only
    ising and no doubt Denny’s visit _ The B class races will be crowd- {\0''News Analysis. une News. to LB. Waithe ana A. D. Cy G. EB. Subject of Lesson-Sermon: PROBA~ And forget all the rest.
    to Trinidad will see him return €4 no doubt with more newcom- the Bditorials. 7.25 a.m. Programme Qorbin, addressed the Group on eo gee eect, bee Suk Wedhesday abou mid-ntent

    i ers but among the regulars will 2stade. 7.30 a.m. English | Magazine oer : \ Golde’ : verbs : 16, a. i #
    to Barbados in fit and hardened ba ten. Hsed ~ gulars will Perade. ting all Forees. 9’a.m. The the aims and benefits of Scouting. The man that wandereth out of the woes Joe was on his stroll
    condition. Hill has a particularly Tackle Hosd gh ae Roett and ‘News. 910 a.m, Home News from Those invested were:— Pen a ee ee yor malar cave cells
    good stride which is more suita- here ieratant s class, unlike A, Britain 9.15 a.m. Gee Down, 1.45 Juniors; 'T. S. Chandler, G. if that followeth. after rightéousnéss ; : °
    ble. to middle distances than e giants are too prone to f#-m. Programme Parade. 11 2. Nicholls. R. Waterman and L. ayd merey findeth life, righteousness | Ob dear! don't be hard-hearted
    sprints and as I am informed he Watch and wait on each “other, Yiichacl ahd St. George, 12,00 °Noon McLean, end health ‘ Help me! it's mid-night please:
    is thinking of concentrating on the always produces all out races the News. 12.10 News Anabsi®. 12.18 — Seniors: f , SALVATION ARMY I'm soon going to Americn!

    mi ‘ 8. 12. rs: L.. Worrell, O. Gilkes BRID N To help reap tomato and peas
    latter, I suggest that he sticks more Which are the delight of the crowd. p.m. Close Down 926 mM. and O, Corbin. Pigg ed wae s p.m , :
    to quarters and half miles, He We look forward to them repeat- E145 ..9.8. ae ou 10 96 atic into Senior Troop: Company Mesting. 7 ‘p.m. Salvation | The sirl friend said my dear boy
    Advanced i S Pp

    ‘was not disgraced even in a mile
    last year and his winning of the

    va the Week. 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice Holiness Meetirg. 3 p.m |
    880 yards last October, althougn | Oo Rendesvous Players, 645 p.m. To all those we say Good Luck Company Meeting. 7 pm, Salvation | Ang when you go to sign up reme?ini er
    against yen en gave Tony Galento Will 22%.° [8 6% & Promamme ang wish them Great adventure Rng, Fae ee Next few days ih. the Park
    ae ee es ee han ome. : E rai ae a . 553 m. in Scouting. a am ie Meeting. 3 pm rit go slong beloved sama chlnt Phensic 9
    { v 1 have o * * * fompany eeting. 7 pam. Sulvation ; ; mee | e
    Archer and Blenman of Police and Fight Frazer 7 pm. The News. 7.10 pm. News Ag from Tuesday, ist May, Mees Preacher: a Gibbons. | uy will be true and honest | mes m4
    FPeORTSN. OF Mer pbe Fa) BAL ny ‘ Analysis. 7.15 p.m, Caribbean Voices. aout Headquarters will open aS 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m It's only twelve weeks dear | The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner
    against Bridgeman of the Trinidad i ne. eens, (161 Ibs.), | local kinwaita oi a Rich man and the follows:— Company Meeting, 7 p.m Salvation at | he tire a dua pe ‘. you'll feel better, for Phensic’s quick,
    Police. Archer is another who fifhtiie Yay Be boxer ee 7.45—11.00 p.m. ...... 25.53 M, 31.32 M Monday to Friday—from 3.30 Meeting Pitcher. ee wees oe See ; safe action will bring relief, lift away
    j ; ini ‘ 1 asy oy razer ah atest tdaae, ; “ 1° ine sed, i
    will be running in Trinidad in the })° ) light-heavy weight maith @ pm. Radio Newsreel, @45 p.m. PM, to 9.30 p.m. 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Send me the Yankee dollar pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness

    near future and perhaps his race
    against Bridgeman over there will
    give us pointers for our Sports. He

    * . . "5 < Holiness Meeting as .
    age sceueiyiceabr ovata egy" Toe, =". tdi Bi testiide, 10.18 in. British There will be ‘a meeting ef the Company Meeting. 7 p.m. | Salvation | Se darling — an _— Be prepared for pain keep a supply of
    ' Trotman has been away from razer came here about three (oi P"i9'30 p.m. London Forum. ive C ittee of the Coun- Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant Reld. AEDs, ey Oe es Hts Phensic handy.
    the island in recent years but weeks ago hoping to fight Kid iY pan, Reettal, ixecutive Committee of the Coun- SPEIGHTSTOWN During the thres-months holtde
    those of us who saw him win the Ralph. He is training at the * * * cil at Scout Headquarters on 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. | ve, Ons
    first hundred yards which the Brighton's Sports Club. His Cee Anan Bs Monday, 7th May at 5.00 p.m. ee aoe: AF oe sponsored by
    AA.A.B. in Sparring partners are Al Mauler |, 10 P-m.—20.36 p.m. ews ; D & « THE ST, JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
    A held at their meeting in Inck at. Science. 10.15 p.m-—10.30 ‘There will be a meeting of the

    Queen’s Park after the war, will
    hardly forget his manner in doing
    so,

    Last but not least there will be
    our Lady hope Grace Cumber-
    batch who never fails to please the
    crowd. To my mind Grace Cum-—

    berbatch was as promising in her ee ne News 710 am. be held at Government House on (From Our Own Correspondent) and the blenders of NERVE PAINS, HESCALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS
    sphere as a school girl as L. L. News Anabysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Sunday, 6th May. GEORGETOWN, April 26.
    Crichlow of Lodge School was in LEGALL BEATS Editorials. 7.25 a.m. Programme Pa- Al] Scouts and Rovers are asked The Government has approved J&R RUM

    his as a school boy. But the annoy-

    ing the performance.



    of St. Lucia. and Guadeloupe on
    Monday next week, at the Brigh-

    and Torpedo Brown.

    Galento’s sparring partners are
    Kenny Seaman and Sugar Ray.
    Ben Jones, Kid Ralph’s former
    Manager, is now training Galento.

    Fighting on the same ticket are
    Kenny Seaman and Al Mauler.



    VICTOR BRUCE



    4.15 pm. Music Magazine. 4.30 p.m.
    Sunday Half Hour. 5 p.m. Composer of





    Michael and St
    Interlude, 8 55 p.m.

    The Order of St
    George. 8.45 p.m,
    Frem the Editorials. 9 p.m. The Wonder-

    p.m, Audience Mail Bag.

    BOSTON
    WRUL 15.29Mc, WRUW 11.75Mc,
    * *
    WRUX 17.75Mc.
    MONDAY, APRIL 30, 1951
    6.20 a.m.—12.15 p.m 19 60 M

    Billy Cotton Band

    rade. 7.30 a.m, The Mark of Greatness.
    7 45 a.m, Souvenirs of Music. 8.30 a.m,

    Elmer Scantlebury and Hainsley
    Griffith,

    Saturdays— from 1:00 p.m, to
    9.30 p.m. :

    Executive Committee of the South
    Western Local Association at the
    Y.M.C.A. on Friday, 4th May at
    5.00 p.m.

    tt * *

    The Empire Youth Service will

    ty meet at 3.30 p.m. outside the





    Meeting. Preachér:; Major Smith,
    WELLINGTON STREET
    11 am.

    Company Meeting, 7 am,

    CHECKER HALL
    il a.m.

    7 p.m, Evensong and Sermon, Preach-

    The Patt Fev. J, B. Grant L.Th,

    B.G. Establishes
    New Hospital

    er



    the establishment of a_ hospital

    CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
    FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIEN-
    TIST, BRIDGETOWN, UPPER

    Salvation ;
    Mecting. Preacher; Lieutenant Etienne. |

    3 pom |

    No “feel-up" here to-night
    Leave me first to draw the coppers
    Then all things will work right
    . . .

    It goes a very long wa
    It buys more slacks and dresses
    To keep me fresh and gay

    J & R BAKERIES
    makers of
    ENRICHED BREAD








    TONIC WINE



    in a matter of minutes, Phensic neither
    harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach,




    for quick, safe relief
    FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBACO,

    QPP LLLP LPL LLP PDL

    ing part about such unusual ath- Practise Makes Perfcet. 8-45 gt The Western wall at Government a att — er “ SBEBOCORBOOOOO OO OOPOOO ME .
    letes in Barbados is that after they (From Our Own. Correspondent) ebate Continues. 9 a.m. The News. Touse, rmy Air base, miles up the
    } . ee ae 910 am. Home News from Britain. > i
    leave school there are not enough PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 25, 9.15 a.m. Clone Down, 1118, athe, — sph Osthe he pital ill cater for 80
    organised sports meetings to help Ralph Legall, Maple Club’s Sin- Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m, Listen- 7.45—-11,00 p.m, ....,. 25.58 M, 91 3? Mf fe: Hespigal Wit Cavey s0r
    them make the natural progress ors, Chpiee, ae a.m. gg Fig hvala aa _ 7 ape 20 women.

    i wealt! arvey. noon e News. 7.45 p.m. *rovision has been made i%
    they should. Grace Cumberbateh sented Barbados in the recent 43.10 p.m. News Analysis: 12.15 pm 8 hah. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.my the proposed plan for the ues: >
    will now have to take on Trini- Brandon Trophy tournament Close Down. Commonwealth. survey, 630. pn: ‘
    dad’s Fileen King after neatly five scored a 6—0, 6—0 victory over *15—645 Bem... o.ssereeress 19.70 M Peactign “Siskes ‘Perfect. 845 Inter. diture of $25,000 on equipment, | ¥
    months of inactivity in athletics ne i ten final |T2cR Zul Mee Aencc tenes, ORS Pin. Biein 8 Bator and $80,000 for recurrent expen-

    3 2 . Victor Bruce in a quarter fina 4.15 p.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra, 9 p.m. British Concert Hall, 10 p.m, diture, such as staffing. When
    Can she do it successfully? The fixture at the club’s court, Legall 5 p.m. Compos~r of the Week, 6.15 The News, 10.10 p.m, Interlude. eciablished, the hospital will cater
    sports must answer the question. hag benefited greatly from the P.â„¢m-, The Story Teller, 5.35 p.m. In- 1.15 Tip Top Tunes. 10.45 p.m, Sci- 7 ode
    The Cyclist at Ach. he ained in {tude 5.45 p.m. Semprini st the ence Review, 11 p.m. The Human for _ persons suffering from| %
    je Sycusts experience which he gained in piano. 6 p.m. Nights at the Opera. 6.45 Body. chronic ailments and recuperation

    The cyclists I have been seeing
    regularly at work for almost the
    whole period since our last meet.
    ing in October. There is therefore



    gles open Champion, who repre-

    the Brandon series and virtually
    swept Bruce off the court to win
    in straight sets. The match lasted
    35 minutes.

    p.m, Programme Parade
    6.00—F,15 Pom, .....5- sete) 25.58 M



    7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News
    Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Sorrell and Son



    VSB & 5
    The Mark of Greatness

    * & *
    C.B.C, PROGRAMME

    10 p.m,—10,15 p.m. News and Com-
    mentany 10.15 p.m.—10.30 p.m. Ca-
    nadian Chronicle,

    after major operations,

    Main reason for the Base Hos-
    pital is to relieve congestion at
    the Georgetown Hospital.





    — WONDER WHEELS N° 4



    i



    Lack ff
    ts r

    8



    BIG DRESS

    LADIES

    To know that we are busily engaged in opening
    DRESS MATERIALS of cli descriptions for our
    MATERIAL
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    DISPLAY which is

    LOPE LLL LALO CLE LPL

    IT’S A

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    in perfect condition rie
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    MONDAY 30th April

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    PAGE SIX



    Cole Porter:
    Of Popular

    From The Indianapol's Star

    SONGS § started. flowing from
    the brain and fingers of Cole
    Porter when he was 10 years old,
    and they have never ceased. The
    songs of this American composer
    are sung everywhere in the world
    for there is love everywhere in
    the world, and Cole Porter’s songs

    are mostly of love. Moreover,
    they have a beguiling, haunting
    style of melody, a’ sophisticated

    touch that remains in the mem
    ory. One of Porter’s most popu-
    lar songs, “Begin the Beguine,”
    has an arresting title as well as
    a haunting melody. Once heard,
    the music is difficult to forget.

    Cole Porter’s musical talents
    were early apparent. His parents,
    prosperous farmers in the mid-
    western State of Indiana, encour-
    aged this talent and gave the boy
    piano and violin lessons before he
    was big enough to reach the
    plano pedals. At the age of 10
    he wrote his first tune, “Song of
    the Birds,” which he dedicated to
    his mother.

    His next composition was “The
    3obolink Waltz,” which, though
    not a work of genius nor super-
    sophistication, alarmed his mater-
    nal grandfather, who had no wish
    to see his grandson become a
    musician and insisted that the lad
    turn his thoughts toward law and
    away from artistic professions.

    Young Cole was enrolled as a
    student at Worcester Academy in
    the east coast State of Massachu

    setts and later matriculated at
    Yale University. However, Cole’s
    musical talents were much
    stronger than his grandfather’s
    wish that he become a lawyer.
    Before he left Yale in 1913 he
    had made an unforgettable im
    pression by composing two of the
    school’s _ still popular songs,
    “Bingo” and “Bulldog.”

    Cole Porter did defer to his
    grandfather's ambitions sufficient-
    ly to enroll at Howard Law
    School, but after a year he

    changed his course of studies to
    music and by this time his grand-
    father conceded defeat of his
    hopes and agreed that he would
    help his grandson round out his
    musical education.

    Cole Porter's first musical play,
    “See America First,” was written
    in collaboration with a friend and
    was a miserable failure. Follow-
    ing this disappointment Porter
    sailed for France and joined the
    French Foreign Legion, taking
    with him a portable piano-zither-
    harpsichord instrument. He car
    ried the instrument on his back
    and played for the entertainment
    of the soldiers, Within the sound
    af German guns, during World
    War I, Porter wrote the song “An
    Old-Fashioned Garden” and
    played it for his comrades, When
    the United States entered the war
    in 1917, Porter transferred to a
    French artillery school at Fon-
    tainebleau near Paris. There he
    met Linda Lee Thomas whom he
    later married.

    When the war ended, Porter
    returned to the United States. On
    the boat coming home he met the
    late actor and theatrical producer,
    Raymond Hitchcock, who _ heard
    him play “An Old-Fashioned
    Garden” and engaged him at once
    to do the score for a new musical
    play called “Hitchy—Koo of 1919,”
    which was a tremendous success,
    Financial security did not stop
    Porter’s urge to write, but only
    seemed to enhance it.

    Today, Cole Porter is as anx-
    ious for perfection in every lyric
    and tune he composes as he ever
    was, and he is as interested in the
    reaction of the publie to his work
    as any untried young composer
    might be, Night after night he
    can be seen at “Kiss Me Kate,”
    the popular musical comedy play-
    ing in New York for which he
    wrote the lyrics. He likes to lis-
    ten to the laughter and applause
    of the audience, and to. take his
    many friends to see and hear it

    Through the years, Porter's
    output has been prolific. In 1924
    he composed the songs for “The
    Greenwich Village Follies,” and,
    although the play was not a great
    success, “I’m In Love Again”
    from the show became a most





    Composer

    Songs

    COLE PORTER, American composer of popular songs for more than a
    quarter-century, has heard his music sung from one end of the United
    States to the other. A man with “music in his heart,” his most success-
    ful songs have dealt with love, the universal and eternal verity.

    popular song. Four years later,
    Porter composed the songs for
    “Paris,” and that score was such
    a tremendous success that Cole
    Porter was a permanent star in
    the musical firmament thereafter.
    Cole Porter has written the
    lyrics for more than 20 musical
    comedies which have been suc-
    cessful on the American stage,
    notable among them the musical
    “Jubilee.” He also has written
    innumerable love songs, including
    “What Is This Thing Called
    Love,” “Night and Day,” “In the
    Still of the Night,” and, of course,
    “Begin the Beguine.” He also
    has written the lyrics for the
    songs in such motion pictures as
    “Born To Dance,” “Rosalie,” and
    “Broadway Melody,” and’ the
    motion picture “Night and Day,”
    was based on Cole Porter’s life.
    During the more than 30 years
    he has spent in theatrical busi-
    ness, Cole Porter has consistently
    written songs that are adult and
    sophisticated. He has never for--
    gotten that love is the great emo-
    tion which people like to sing
    about. Thus, although most of
    his lyrics about love are witty and
    full of unexpected rhymes, he
    usually has one entirely romantic
    song in each play. In “Kiss Me
    Kate,” that song is “So In Love.”
    Stories about how Cole Porter
    writes his songs are legion. At
    present, he lives in an apartment
    in a hotel when he is in New
    York City, but he has a house in
    the nearby east coast State of
    Massachusetts where he often
    goes for week ends. He enjoys
    writing in crowded cafes and at
    parties, and is not disturbed by
    the din of people. Many of his
    songs have been written in air—
    planes, automobiles, and on ships.
    Shortly before World War II, he
    went on a round-the-world cruise,
    taking a piano, an organ, 24
    pencils, a quire of music paper, a
    typewriter, and a metronome. He

    returned from this trip with
    words and music for the song
    “Begin the Beguine” and the

    score of “Jubilee.”

    In his apartment in New York
    City, Porter has a collection of
    dictionaries that he uses for his
    writings: a rhyming dictionary,
    a foreign language dictionary,
    medical dictionaries, and a thick
    tome marked “Words — Ancient

    and Modern.” Porter generally
    chooses the title of a song first
    and then writes the words and
    music to fit it. He first composes
    in his mind and then later at the
    piano. Often he has fitted _ his
    songs to the vocal runge of a
    particular actor already sele:ted
    for a role in one ef his musical
    plays.

    Odd incidents have inspired
    some of Porter’s most popular
    songs. “Miss Otis’ Regrets,” for
    instance, was inspired by a west-
    ern ballad he heard at a party
    in a private home. For some in-
    explicable reason, this song sold
    100,000 copies in Scandinavia and
    Hungary but, outside of New
    York City, was not particularly
    popular in the United States. The
    song “You're The Top” originated
    in Paris when Cole Porter was
    having supper at a restaurant and
    he and some of the guests began
    making a list of all the superla-
    tives they could think of which
    rhymed. '

    In person, Cole Porter is as
    suave and polished as his own
    lyrics. Even on opening nights,
    when one of his musicals goes
    before a critical audience for a
    first time, he does not get nervous.
    Although his talent has - been
    long-recognized and applauded,
    he works over each new song as
    if it were his first. The haunting
    strains of his magnificent melo-
    dies prove a constant reminder of
    this man with a heart fual of
    music,

    MUSIC HATH...!
    ADELAIDE.

    A gramophone with a dozen re-
    cords ranging from Bach to
    boogey—woogey are being used, by
    a group of narthern terrttory
    hunters to attract crocodiles, While
    the hunters were fishing recently
    and listening to the music, three
    crocodiles cruised nearby, One was
    shot. Now the hunters are. try-





    ing to discover which kind of
    music the crocs like best.
    LONG-TERM
    BARCELONA.

    Seventy - two-year-old Luciano
    Navarro is Spain’s oldest student.
    He began studying to be a doctor
    in 1896, when he was 17, He ob+
    tained his medical degree recently,





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    EVERY WHERE

    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    IF I HAVE
    TO BUILD
    AN ARK—

    Taking the British weather as the theme this











    eek tor

    his PRIVATE FESTIVAL, BERNARD WICKSTEED *cworts’.. .

    N view of the fact that it is
    going to go on raining for

    thinking of building an ark.
    It seemed a jolly good idea at
    first, but when we looked into it

    There's the
    vulgar cubit,

    three kinds of cubit.
    Olympic cubit, the

    better stick to the legal one, don’t
    you? We'll have enough vul-
    garity . when the monkeys are

    there were a number of difficulties aboard Without any more from

    about ark building to-day
    Noah didn’t encounter.

    First of all, I suppose we shall
    have to go to the Hampstead
    Borough Council and get the
    plans passed, and as they are sure
    to regard. it as a dwelling within
    the meaning of the Act, we shall
    have to get a building licence,

    Noah’s Cubits
    HIS is going to be diffieult, be—
    cause it is a private enterprise
    ark and, as you know, they may
    be built only in the proportion of
    one to every council ark,

    We have measured our garden
    and it isn’t big enough for an
    ark-yard, So we shall have to get
    permission to work on Primrose
    Hill or the top of Hampstead
    Heath. In either case I imagine
    there will be a lot of correspon—
    dence before the matter is settled.

    As we have never built an ark
    before, we'll stick to Noah’s blue—
    prints, According to these the
    ark was 300 cubits long, 50 cubits
    wide, and 30 cubits high. If we
    only knew what a cubit was we
    might get down to the costing,

    You do know? It is the dis

    that the cubits.

    The legal cubit is a little under
    22 ins., so the size of. Noah’s
    ark was about 550 ft. by 90 ft. by
    55 ft. That’s enormous, isn’t it?
    It’s half the length of the Queen
    Mary and twice the size of Nelson's
    Victory.

    Do you think, with a vessel of
    these dimensions, we'll get an Al
    certificate of flood—worthiness?

    Noah’s Wood
    OAH built his ark of gopher
    wood. But where are we
    going to go for that? And, any-
    way, what is gopher wood ?

    Some people think it was cedar
    or pine. If so, we are in for more
    trouble, because they are soft
    woods and you have to have a
    licence to import them,

    There is a tree in Oregon that
    the Americans call a gopher.
    The wood is yellow and hard. 1
    bought a brooch made of it once
    for my wife. It costs dollars,
    so the Treasury will be tiresome.

    And what a time we are going
    to have with the inspectors once

    we start “getting the animals in.

    Boy! Oh, boy! It will be an

    tance from the elbow to the tip inspector’s dream come true.

    of the fingers. Thats fine, but
    whose elbow and whose fingers?

    Yours, mine, or those of my son spectors,

    Japhet John?

    They will pour out to Hamp-
    stead in bus-loads, sanitary in-
    livestock inspectors,

    If we don’t get it fishery inspectors, bird-sancturay

    right we'll have the Inspector of inspectors, R.S.P.C.A. inspectors,

    Weights and Measures after us. and inspectors looking for rabies, stopped ?

    As a matter of fact, there are



    anthrax, fowl pest, Colorado

    Scandal! She Fell

    For A

    THE AGE OF LONGING

    By Arthur Koestler, Collins

    12s, 6d. 448 pages,

    The melodrama of love and
    politics which is Arthur Koestler’s
    important new novel—and the
    Evening Standard Book of the
    Month—is set in Paris during a
    hot summer of international crisis.

    It is a novel of the future,
    tut a future which, Koestler seems
    t» say is not far off. The date is
    .95—. If it is not this summer, it
    might be next The Western
    world awaits the final blow from

    the “Commonwealth of Freedom
    poem | Peoples, a powerful East-
    ern State with a ruthless Com-

    munist ideology. As the weeks
    pass into autumn, the crisis grows
    more feverish. Rumours multiply.
    Signs appear in the heavens. Mys-
    terious epidemics break out.

    The question: Is way coming?
    becomes, before the novel closes
    Has war already come? Is it true
    that parachutists are dropping in
    the Channel frea? Are those
    truculent processions issuing with

    banners from the working-class
    suburbs of Paris, the advance
    guards of a Communist Fifth
    Column?

    Questions that are never an-
    swered. The crisis is not resolved.
    It remains, as a_ background
    steadily more alarming to the
    love-story if it can be called that,
    of Hydie and Fedya, Hydie an
    American, the daughter of a diplo-
    mat; Fedya Nikitin, an agent of
    the “Commonwealth”.

    Hydie would be recognised by
    any student of Communist litera-
    ture as a typical product of “de-
    eadent capitalism.” She has lost

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    her faith and divorced her hus-
    band. She seeks an anchorage
    for her life, without finding one.
    Fedya’s appeal is immediate.
    Where others question, he
    knows the answers. “That was
    the magic wand which dissolved
    the frustrating guilt in her flesh
    and made it surrender willingly
    and with joy.” Koestler, who does
    not pretend to be impartial, detesty
    what Fedya stands for—yet gives

    it a grudging admiration, There
    is a streak of fatalism in this
    author; too impressed by the

    “Monolithic” quality of Commu-—
    nism, he seems to predict its vie—
    tory over a West that talks too
    much and believes too little.
    Certainly there would be small
    hope for a civilisation made up of

    the poseurs, frauds and café
    piilosonipers whose portraits
    oestler draws, often in a mood

    of ferocious satire.

    Dupremont, for instance, the
    pornographic novelist who has
    been reconciled with the Church
    and now writes fiction more erotic
    than ever describing luscious
    temptations successfully resisted.

    Or Julien, one of Hydie’s lovers,
    who convenes a meeting to dis-
    cuss whether ‘intellectual resist-
    ance” could be maintained after
    occupation by the “Common-
    wealth.” The meeting decides,
    no; several guests insist that their
    names should not be associated
    with the idea,

    For, after all, not everybody is
    so prosperous or so provident as
    M. Touraine, who has an airplane
    standing by to take him to North
    Africa. “In all revolutions, there



    Port of London Authority,
    Ministry of Agriculture (food for

    of
    Commissicners, and the Brethren
    of Trinity House



    beetles, and dog licences.
    Noah’s Creepies

    *‘ ever, the Wicksteed family «are and the legal cubit. I think we'd -J HE mere collection of the ani-

    mals is going to be a monu-
    mental task, Tnere are about
    80,000 insects and 20,000 worms
    alone. My sons Ham Philip and
    Japhet John have volunteered. for

    this part of it.

    They reckon they can sgon
    capture “every creeping thing that
    creepeth on the earth,” and they’ve
    already started building up a sup=
    ply of match—boxes with breath-
    ing holes in the top.

    We'll let the 15,000 different
    fishes look after themselves, but

    there are still 4,000 assorted
    mammals, 4,000 reptiles, and
    15,000 birds. ,
    We'll have to get Mr. Morrison
    to deal with the Belgian Congo
    over the gorillas, because
    are a prohibited export too, —
    It’s the same with the tortoises
    from the Seychelles (ting ‘™
    Colonial Office, Whi, 2366, for =
    permit) and the duck-billed platy—
    pus (make an appointment to see
    the High Commissioner for Aus-
    tralia.
    My Authorities
    Y job is endless, There will
    still be the Board of Trade
    (safety regulations at sea), x
    the

    the animals), the Ministry of
    Health (prohibition of the import
    parrots), the Ecclesiastical

    (lighting ar-
    rangements on Mount Ararat).
    What’s that ? The rain has
    Well, thank goodness !
    —L.ES.



    are imbeciles who are sacrificed,
    What matters is to avoid being
    one of them.

    If the men of the West have lost
    the will to live, one of them as-
    sures Hydie that the French, at
    least, will die with a flourish,
    “which will merely serve to cover
    our bewilderment.” And that is
    hardly enough.

    On the other hand if the bar-
    barian in Fedya appeals to his
    American mistress his brutality
    has a machine-like quality which
    suddenly she finds unbearable.
    When she discovers that her lov-
    er’s task is to prepare “elimina-
    tion lists in readiness for the in-
    vaders, she slips a revolver into
    her handbag.

    Hydie should not have been so
    surprised, After all her father is
    busy making a list of “key”
    Frenchmen who will be flown out
    of the country when the war
    comes. Nor should she have bun-
    gled the business of killing her
    lover. Typical of Western incom-
    petence.

    Fedya is recalled (to an Aretic
    camp); Hydie’s father is recalled
    (to Washington D.C.). There is
    no police court case. If it can
    do nothing else the West can still
    hush up a scandal.

    Koestler opens his book—satire
    novel of ideas and cynical love-
    story all in one—by gathering his
    characters together in a _ party
    given by a vivacious old hedonist
    named M. Anatole. He closes it
    by collecting them once more to
    follow M. Anatole’s coffin to the
    cemetery.

    In the hired carriages, the bril-
    liant talkers continue their dia-
    lectics. M. Touraine listens anx-
    iously to the air-raid sirens. Hy-—
    die’s longing—the longing, Koest-
    ler insists of a whole generation—
    is not appeased.

    WORLD COPYRIGHT
    RESERVED
    —L.ES.



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    Clubwomen Operate A Children’s

    Home

    A businesswomen’s cab tn the jorh-
    western State of Moptana has ®stah-
    lished and is maiotaining a horre to
    abandor ms! and neglected childre

    its community,

    By Mé ARGARET HICKRY

    From LADIES HOMB JOURNAL

    In the city of Butte, in the
    north-western State ef Montana, a
    group of businesswomen have
    established & home for children
    abandoned or neglected by their
    parents. . While this home is in
    Butte, it could be anywhere, There
    are, unfortunately, sad.eyed. and
    starving children ‘in any city in
    the world. Welfare workers know
    this; police know it, and civic-
    minded people know it when they
    thouble themselves to face facts.

    In Butte, it was’ Mrs. Mary
    Phillips, at the city’s Child Welfare
    office, who first concerned herself
    with fhe plight of the town’s neg
    lected children. She herself was a
    widow with three children to rear.
    “What

    we need is a home for
    neglected children,” she kept re.
    peating. But, while people sym-

    pathised and agreed, nothing was
    done, Then Mrs. Phillips became
    one of the charter members af a
    club composed of working-women
    in executive jobs. The charter of
    the club (one unit in avnational
    organisation) made it obligatory
    for members to maintain 4 servi¢e
    programme for the ‘community.
    The club was the. Soroptimist—
    “sore for sister, optimo for the
    highest:.good”’-—and it had a na.
    tional reputation to uphold,

    Mary Phillips proposed at the
    club’s first meeting that the Butte
    Soroptjinists. make the. creation of
    a home for children their commu-
    nity sérvice. Club members dis-
    cussed; the proposal for some time;
    and finally agreed that members
    would: look for a suitable house,

    and, if they found it, start a
    campaign to buy it. wn
    In May 1947 the club found a

    house suitable for their project
    it Was near schools and churches,
    and in one of Butte’s best residen_
    tal neighbourhoods. The hovse
    was aj two-storey brick With’ 12
    rooms) and two baths. It was in
    fairly good condition, needing only.
    fresh wallpaper and paint—and
    the cost was reasonable. The club
    decidegi that it would try to raise
    enough money through voluntary
    contributions to pay for the house
    and ta furnish it,. By ahecend of
    the firbt two weeks they made a
    down payment on their house.

    Ne eRe the remainder of
    1947 the Butte Soroptimist Club
    sponsdred numerous fund-taising
    parties and projects. By the spring
    of 1948, it had-ace umulated enough

    money, to complete purchase of
    the hdus se, and to buy ‘some fur.
    niture, Also, there were sufficient

    funds ‘to buy paint, and to start a
    work project which “was. to: enlist
    the co-operatoin of all the club
    member $.

    One member, a plumbing exec-

    utive, | inspected and repaired the
    plumjing. Another, who ran a
    cleaning plant, cleaned the cur.
    tains, t bedspreads, and clothing

    whichfhad been given to the home.
    Two jmembers teansforme old
    feather mattresses into pillows:
    Husbands of the club members
    repaired toys, repaired and dec-
    orate furniture, and. transported
    donatéd crates of food. Work
    patties assembled at the house in
    the evenings to clean, scrub, and
    paint, The Soroptimist Club mem-
    bers put on the first coat of paint;
    the Acttve Club a-man’s organisa.
    tion, put on the second.

    Before starting the work project;
    however, the Soroptimist, «
    went to union, meetings,
    explained project, alfd got apt
    proval f@gimembers to-do the ren-
    ovation; (avork. They had-no diffi.
    culty i a Securing this permission








    since r townspeople were: as
    enthusiastic over the proposed
    childrerig home" ais wWeré the elub
    memb sy “Large” and’ small
    business ne gave generousty
    of both gotisSemd' migney. Food

    donated included some sweets. as



    DARTWORDS.

    OUND ands
    I round the 50 TARTS j
    words in the
    \ circle you solvers must
    go until. yous -have
    arranged them’ so that

    they lead from WHALE
    to CHASTE. in such a
    way that the relation-
    ship between any one
    word andthe next tb
    it is goyerned hy one
    of six rules. No tule/é
    may he -irivoked more

    than, twice consecu-

    tively, <=

    f ‘RULES.

    1, The w
    an A@nagsam
    Ww Tita mie precedes

    may be
    the

    it,

    a

    Ai ther ord.
    that DreceRes. ;

    3. Inmay be achieved
    by adding ‘®ne letter to,
    subtracting bie- letter
    changing one letterin.
    ceding word.

    4. It may be associated with
    the poe word in a saying,
    a metaphor or association
    of ‘- deas,

    It may form with the pre-
    coulis word a name of a wWell-
    knoWn person or place tn fact or
    a

    It may

    from. 0?
    the pre-

    be associated with
    we preceding word in the title or
    action of a book, play or other
    composition,

    A typical succession of waerds-
    might © be: Spear = totes steal

    spat









    clinic

    ub-



    MACLEANS
    PAROMMDIE TOOTH PASTE
    keeps, WBE! W Es



    IN



    DISCUSSION |



    MR. NAT CARMICHAFL. (fourth from left facing camera) who has

    been appointed
    “here leading a disctission
    together at. the home of the

    Mr. ©.
    brother of

    Y
    +

    well as ample supplies of staples.

    Clothes were contributed in
    abundance, Local doctors gave
    free medical . examinations , and
    treatment to ‘the children taken
    into the home; the hospitals allow-
    ed_hait, rates for -tonsiltectomies
    and other ailments requiring hos-
    pitalisation. The mental-health
    promised free psychiatric

    care should it be needéd,
    By November 1948 the house
    was ready for. occupaney, The

    Child Welfare Department of. Butte
    had helped the club find a matron
    — an. experienced. child care
    worker, with three children of her
    own: There was new linoleum on
    the floor of the play-room, and in
    the kitchen the big electric refrig-
    erator oe stove were in perfect
    onder. Clothes were clean, pressed,
    mehded, ‘and ‘in. elosets—waiting
    for thé childrén te wear them

    Before the frst children moved
    in, the Soroptimist Club opened
    the house to visitors’ on two occa.
    sions. Members of the organisation
    entertained the Soroptimist North-
    west Conference in Butte. The
    guésis brought gifts of clothing
    and houge linens, and the regional
    board of the organisation made a
    cash gift. On the second occasion,
    the club invited the townspeople
    of Butte and Silver Bow County,
    in. which the .city is located, to
    visit the house.

    The Soroptimist Receiving Home
    for children of Silver Bow County,
    Montana, opened on November 1,
    1948. Eight children were the
    charter residents; ‘Within two
    weeks there wer@ 25. In the first
    18 mionths the home sheltered
    more: than 176 smial,.guests. ,

    Complaints about neglected
    £hijd@rermmay come from any inter-
    ested person—neighbour, teacher,
    police, minister, or even the child
    himself, All complaints go first to
    the Ghild Welfare office-in Butte.
    It decides if the child Should be
    rent to the home. ‘The home is
    intended to be a receiving home
    only—where the child “fiay sta
    until a foster home is found for

    “hint GF Until his own parents will

    give him proper care. However,
    until two years ago there was no
    real Josie s-homeé care available in
    Silver Béw Cotinty. Due, to the
    efforts a the Welfare Department,
    there are now 17 foster homes.
    Mast.of the abandoned, deserted,
    or negtected children come from
    homés. where the problems are
    psyehological as well as financial.
    There fs relatively little unemploy-
    ment * Butte aut the population

    there is of mixed background $0

    have vastly
    that the, childre:
    and and feligious in.

    ferent ferent bfologival,

    aha

    Mow—Bow—Arrow,
    .@ Solution.in Evening Advocate
    Sipe aa tatlf incite penenysmenpneesinn i

    REMANDED
    TRIESTE.

    A&A German resident of Trieste

    enior Science Master at Harrison College is =

    “Religion Society".

    an of the University of Western Ontario.

    ael, who is on the University Staff is a Barbadian, and a
    . PSiac Carmichael of the Education Department.

    He is expected in Barbados today.

    heritance in their homes.

    The Soroptimists have found
    that the club’s job was far from
    done when the home was opened.
    They have added an infirmary and
    a fire @s¢ape to comply with: state
    requirements. In February 1950
    the home received its state license.
    Butte’s newly formed Community
    Chest, an organisation for raising
    funds for all charitable institutions
    in} @ community, appropriated
    funds to the home.

    The children for whom the home
    was éstablished thrive on the love
    and good care given then. Part
    of the’ homeé’s success has been
    due to the mere fact that it exists.
    But part also has been due to its
    basically sound organisation. The
    Soroptimist’s standards and goals
    are those ‘of the professionally
    trained: welfare departments of
    the city, county, and State. Their
    maintenance budget is based on a
    four-way plan: part Community
    Chest, part club, part Welfare De-
    partment, and part city generosity.
    Typical of its well-rounded basi
    is its citizen board of directors
    elected by the club. And typical
    of its community contacts is the
    list of other clubs and businesses
    which work with the Soroptimist.

    Not that the home has no prob-
    lems. There undoubtedly always
    will be staff problems in such an
    institution, as well as maintenance
    problems. Despite all the prob-
    lems, however, the Soroptimists of
    Butte Sem to have come comfor.
    tably close to their dream of mak-
    ing their home *‘a true children’s
    home—and as close to perfect in
    all ways as possible.”



    ie) All About Eve,

    B excellence

    SUNDAY

    At the Cinema

    THE MUDLARK
    iy 6.1.

    THE more moving picturés } see, the more I am becom-
    ing convinced that an all-star cast ae
    contributing factor to the suceess o
    a great advantage, as is a well-

    ced
    rson of whom the audience hears iy
    lar ely responsible for suceets 2 fail

    lya

    tly, we have had several ch
    opistanding examples of directio
    at its fnest— ure and,
    The Fallen Idol
    and The Third Man, and this weelt
    THE MUDLARK showing at the
    Empire, is ano’ example of the
    that results when
    direction is in expert hands.

    With an English cast—all but

    Irene Dunné—Jean Negulescu,
    an American director, has turned
    out a film, (based on a legendary
    episode in the reign of Queen
    Victoria), which was chosen for a
    Royal Command performance, and
    his eminent success is no mean
    feat of accomplishment. The choice
    of Irene Dunne as Queen Victoria
    may seem strange, but I can assure
    you her portrayal of that great
    lady is authoritative and convine-
    ing, as is the role of. Disraeli,
    played by Alec Guinness. Both
    these performances are far be-
    yond any expectation and will
    undoubtedly rank with the best
    that the cinema and stage have
    offered.

    The story is bused on Theodore
    Bonnett’s book “The Mudlark” and
    relates the tale of a small ten-
    year-old derelict, who finds a
    plaque of Queen Victoria in the
    pocket of a dead searnan, lying in
    the mud on the bank of the
    Thames, and determines he is
    going to see her. He eventually
    arrives at Windsor where the old
    lady has shut herself up for fifteen
    years, since her husband’s death,
    and makes an unceremonidus en-
    try via the coal chute. His arrival
    coineides with the more formal
    entrance of the Rt. Hon. Mr, Dis-
    raeli, whose efforts to persuade
    the quéen to return to public life
    have been unsuccessful. Seeing
    the mudlark in the castle, the
    Prime Minister realizes he can use
    the child as a symbol of the
    unwanted children of England,
    who are denied the right to be-
    come worthy citizens, and thus
    push the passage of his reform
    bill before Parliament. Furious at

    . his inference that she is respon-

    sible for the homeless mudlarks,
    the queen hints at a successor to
    Disraeli, but on the sudden reap-
    pearance of the child, she is moved
    by his obvious sincerity and in-
    tense desire to see her, and con-
    sents to make her long awaited
    reappearance before her people.

    Andrew Ray plays the Mudlark,
    and a most appealing and en-
    gaging little cockney tramp he is.
    There is nothing sloppy or senti-
    mental about the child’s portrayal,
    ahd only a minimum of pathos has
    been permitted, As Queen Vic-
    toria, _Trene Dunne at last has a

    ouR CHILDREN

    Gross Road,
    The ‘Sunday Afivocate” wants





























    BABY BURKE, 7 months son of Mr. and Mrs. William Burke of Britton’s
    ets a knock on his father’s Cuban

    Druins.
    to know what Your child is doing.

    Send us your favourite photograph—print and negative—and write on

    the back of the print: your name and address, the child’s name and age,
    * and a short description of what he is doing.

    For each picture published in the “Sunday Advocate” $2.50 will be
    paid. Pictures should be addressed to the Art Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd.,

    City, and should reach him not later than Wednesday every week.
    pepe hbo OSS OSG OS OI GG

    SNe

    INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE

    MOMBASA.
    The battered skull . of a man,
    killed with a hatchet, was passed

    prefers’ Stalin. ‘to his mother-in- round the Court when an African

    law. ‘Remanded’ for
    her witha pisto!
    he wanted to
    East Prussia rather ti

    threatening

    n live with

    his mother-in-law ormaghts side of the accused had committed the

    the Iron Curtain.



    he told the judge ne was
    he. Tépatriated to crime.

    so

    was charged with murder. But
    found not guilty of the
    The court could not find

    sufficient evidence to show tha

    murder,

    DEMAND....

    ONE-0-ONE
    CLEANING








    ADVOCATE







    ORR e en te |

    | FREE YOURSELF
    22, from the
    BONDS OF
    CONSTIPATION

    . a





    ot the most important
    The film. It is certain-
    lot, but the one
    little, but who is
    is the director.
    nee {@)prove that she is ca
    ble rious charactertantien.
    Magi@ally transformed by make-
    up, her face and tigure resemble
    the queen as Closely as possible,
    While her speech and manneér are
    always in character. One of the
    director’s difflculties was to bring
    out the sympathy and warmth in

    amen oe
    ————




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    ec ivincing performances I have
    witnessed, Many fine actors have
    portrayed this famous statesman
    and I would say — that
    Guinness is nearly on a par with
    the late. George Arliss, whose
    charactetization was probably tic
    finest. The high point of the filn Tee
    is the Prime Minister's speec! Ms
    in. the House of Dowmaee, where
    Mr. Guinness, is suaye and
    biting, Sarcastic and pleading—
    a polished, persuasive orator, who
    fears neither the people nor his
    queen,

    The third grincipal role of Johr
    Brown, the queen's ghillie i:
    played by Finley Currie. A huge
    brawny Scot, his performance i:
    a delight from start to finish anc
    his Scottish accent like a stream
    rippling over bbles.

    Filmed in England, the back.
    ground is authentic where possi
    ble, while portions of Windsoi
    Castle have been faithfully re
    produced to give realistic atmos
    phere, A. neatly woven trifle of
    English gistory, THE MUDLARK
    has char and humour, excellent
    acting .and expert direction, I
    hope you like it.

    HOLIDAY AFFAIR
    HOLIDAY AFFAIR, showing
    at the Aquatic Club, is a light
    romance with humour and pathos, |

    >











    EDGE WATER
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    BATHSHEBA

    Reduced Rates Ist May to
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    HOW TO END
    ‘DOMESTIC
    FRICTION

    Of course she’s always
    borrowing it for the house and
    maybe she does forget to put

    starring Robert Mitchum, Janet it back in the toolshed —
    Leigh and Wendell Corey, witi ; but when one oil does so
    aoe So as a captivating | \ many jobs so well
    ve-year-old, t XX , Fj if,

    With a background setting aI yawn nae ies
    the excitement, bustle and tur ee, tne eS |
    moil of Christmas time in New | re ae |
    York department stores, it tells | cant of ESSO

    the story of a young widow wita| # HANDY OIL,

    small

    a son, Who has to choose} : ‘
    between het childhood sweet | Big 8oz. can with |
    heart who is kindly and un-! curved spout
    imagine tive, but secure finan. | E \

    Clally, and.a young salesman, whe
    offers romance, but not much |
    else.

    Janet Leigh is charming. as the | â„¢. AND PREVENTS RUST
    young widow, while Wendell x
    Corey and Robert Mitchum are
    in good contrast to each other}
    and the latter shows a nice flair}

    { lt pays fo say
    for light comedy. Young Gordon .

    Gebert carries off a demanding | (

    role with a poise and assuranc,
    o>

    |

    IT CLEANS AND LUBRICATES

    which are in no way hampered

    by two missing front teeth,
    An unpretentious film

    pleasant entertainment,

    but,
    * * ry

    Both the Plaza and the Globe}
    theatres are showing films de-
    picting major social problems in|
    the United States, NOT WANTED
    at the Plaza is a semidocumentary,
    and presents the problem of the
    young unmarried mother, This
    subject is treated with sincerity
    and integrity and the film has
    genuine emotional power. Sally
    Forrest and Keefe Brasselle ail
    exceptional performances in ta
    leading roles, while Leo Penn as
    a talented but frustrated musi
    cian who deserts Miss Forrest |
    is exceHent, The supporting cast |
    is good, the settings realistic and }
    the photography and _ musica'|
    score deserving of special praise.’
    Intelligent and thoughtful aduit
    entertainment:

    At the Globe, CITY ACROSS
    THE RIVER presents the case of
    juvenile delinquency. The story |

    . M. JONES
    co,, LTD |
    Agents.



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    is laid in the tenement section |
    of Brooklyn and = shows the}
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    fluences responsible for a decent |
    boy’s degeneration,

    The cast is composed of “un-
    knowns,” with the exception of
    Steve MeNally, and as is so often
    the case, the result produces a
    strong feeling of reality.. Though
    no soltition to the problem ig at-
    tempted, an honest ‘ort is made

    SACROOL is
    to point out some of the reason on sale at
    for delinquency. The whole film | ¥%

    is restrained and well done, and} % KNIGHT'S at



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    PAGE EIGHT





    Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
    Sunday, April 29, 1951



    Knowing The Law

    Everyone is presumed in English law to
    know the law and that applies to Barba-
    dians as well. The Barbadian is, however,
    at a special disadvantage in acquainting
    himself with what the law is at any given
    moment. This is due to the fact that the
    annual volume of the laws is brought out
    in insufficient numbers and appears never
    to be reprinted.



    At the present moment it is still possible
    to. obtain the volumes of the laws which
    were consolidated in 1942 but the annual
    volumes which have come out since 1942
    are for the most part unobtainable. Nor
    does this unfortunate situation apply only
    to Statutes. In recent years the spate of
    Regulations which must be obeyed have
    increased considerably and it is impossible
    for persons to refrain from infringing the
    law unless the Regulations are easily avail-
    able. Traffic control and most traffic
    offences are the result more of Regulations
    than provision in the Motor Vehicles and
    Road Traffic Act.

    Those whose duty it is to advise persons
    on the intricacies of the law are particu-
    larly faced with great inconvenience. To
    the scarcity of the volumes of the Laws
    and Regulations must be added the non-
    existence of the Rules of Court which are
    so essential to a legal practitioner. The
    rules for the Petty Debt Court. and
    the Assistant Court of Appeal were printed
    very many years ago and were apparently
    néver reprinted. The few copies now in
    existence show in a marked degree the
    passage of the years and the pages are
    liable to turn to dust in the reader’s hands.

    The Rules of the Divorce Court are of
    more recent date and the copies in exist-
    ence can be read without risk of disintegra-
    tion but copies are no longer available for
    purchase, The Rules for the various
    branches of the High Court are likewise
    unobtainable.

    Such a condition of affairs is as unsatis-
    factory as it is unnecessary. The legal
    department should be given a grant so that
    these important books might be, available
    to those who require access to them. When
    this is done’ the opportunity should be
    taken to revise, if need be, the Rules of
    Court but no delay should be allowed be-
    yond that which is absolutely necessary.

    It is not only litigants and their advisers
    who complain about these matters. Many
    Laws and Regulations provide that certain
    notices be exhibited in certain places and
    cases have arisen whete persons have
    broken the law because of their inability
    to obtain the requisite notices. Govern-
    ment should investigate the supply of all
    government books’ and documents and
    take steps to ensure that there is an ade-
    quate supply.

    mr ~



    Nobedy’s Business?

    BARBADOS has a name for beaches, in
    fact they are our main tourist attraction.
    But do we try to preserve them, beautify
    them or even keep them clean? The
    answer is no. Except for one’ memorable
    oceasion when the Christ Church Vestry
    cleaned up Rockley Beach, our beaches
    have remained nobody’s business.

    Tourists complain, travel agents com-
    plain and local people voice their disgust,
    but nothing is done. And how are the
    scavengers helping? The beaches are
    certainly not their business! If someone
    with a house adjoining a beach cuts his
    hedge what can he do with the clippings ?
    The scavengers refuse to take them away,
    since apparently “bush” and “refuse” are
    quite different things. Their advice is:
    “Put them on the beach and burn them.”

    At one time people living in Bridgetown
    had some:of the best bathing in the island
    at thei? doorstep. The water in Carlisle
    Bay was clear and sparkling, aid the bath-
    ing. at Brown’s Beach and Gravesend was
    excellent, But it is not so to-day, the
    water in the Bay has gradually become
    dirtier and dirtier. Fishermen, residents
    on the seashore and ships discharging
    refuse in the Bay.are to blame.

    ‘From Hamilton, Ontario, comes the
    answer to our problems. The by-laws of
    the Corporation of the Hamilton Harbour
    Commissioners are strict, practical and
    well worth quoting,

    (1) No rubbish, refuse, ashes or other
    material. shall be thrown into the Har-
    bour .

    (2) No person shall encumber navigable
    water within the limits of the Harbour of
    Hamilton or shall in any way
    obstruct the navigation thereof with
    stones, filth, rubbish, etc.

    (3) No person, Company or Corporation
    shall throw, drain or discharge into the
    waters of the Harbour, or deposit on the
    shores of the said harbour, or to discharge
    or cause or permit any water or material
    to flow into the Harbour of Hamilton or
    into any stream or sewer running into the
    Harbour of Hamilton, in which water or
    material, there is gas, tar, oil, lees,

    dregs

    or solid matter, « an likely to

    ythins
    cause such ¢«
    pediment or injury or to injuriously affect

    vessels, property, water-fowls, fish life, o1

    iction, im-

    bathing, or to cause a nuisance of any
    kind or to cause danger t: alt!
    Well, that is a good lead to follow. Re-

    member, there are plenty of other beauti-
    ful islands in the Caribbean, and they are
    going out of their way to aiiract tourists
    while we complacently imagine that the
    natural attractions of Barbados are enough.
    In the meantime throug), sloth, neglect,
    and lack of an appreciation of beauty we
    are fast allowing our natural attractions
    to be spoiled.

    Indulgences

    THE Report of the findings of the Royal
    Commission on gambling issued last week
    in London, will shock the Mrs. Grundys in
    our midst and will revolutionise some of
    the picturesque beliefs about the road to
    ruin and perdition which have become
    associated with gambling. The Report does
    not praise or advocate gambling, neither
    does it condemn gambling, it treats it in a
    factual manner and stresses that the
    danger is not in gambling but in immoder-
    ate gambling,

    “From our general observation and from
    the evidence which we have heard we can
    find no support for the belief that gam-
    bling, provided that it is kept within
    reasonable bounds, does serious harm
    either to the character of those who take
    part in it or to their family circle and the
    community generally,” states the Report.

    The Commission found that the average
    expenditure on gambling was considerably
    less than the average expenditure on other
    indulgences, such as alcoholic liquor and
    tobacco. Nor did they find that gambling
    itself was the cause of crime. On the other
    hand the Commissioners in no way sug-
    gested that gambling should be encouraged
    on a wholesale basis. They did not find
    that National lotteries would be an econo-
    mic proposition. Many persons put for-
    ward Monte Carlo as a place where gam-
    bling finances the state and where, because
    of gambling the resident in Monte Carlo
    lives tax free, but no doubt, the Commis-
    sioners took the realistic view that Monte
    Carlo is a special exception to the general
    rule. Monte Carlo is known world-wide
    as an international gambling haven and
    the inveterate gambler as well as the pro-
    saic businessman is attracted to risk a
    flutter at the tables. It is the foreign ele-
    ment which boosts the funds in the treas-
    ury in Monte Carlo. Any place without
    the world-wide reputation of Monte Carlo
    would have to rely on gaining profits from
    its own nationals which in effeet would be
    taking “Peter’s money to pay for Paul,” The
    Report recommends that it is time that the
    gambling laws — outdated for centuries—
    should be revised. Gambling should not
    be forced underground, it should be legal-
    ized and controlled. “In the first place we
    consider that the State should not inter-
    fere with the amusement of its citizens
    except so far as it can be shown that these
    amusements involve serious social conse-
    quences. Secondly, if the State restricts a
    form of amusement it has no assurance
    that anything better will take its place.”
    “The spread of gamblingis one of the
    symptoms of an age in which people have
    more leisure and cannot or do not know
    how to make good use of it.”

    The remedy lies not in restrictive legis-
    lation but in education and the provision
    of facilities for more healthy recreation.

    The ‘Tenm

    THE publication of the West Indies
    cricket team to tour Australia comes as an
    anti-climax. The public were keyed up
    to fever pitch a month ago but as the
    weeks passed without news of the per-
    sonnel of the team interest gradually
    waned,

    { There are no real surprises, and few
    will disagree with the selectors’ choice.
    As soon as it was learnt that a specialist
    wicket-keeper was to be included certain
    names automatically suggested themselves
    and no doubt the selectors’ choice has
    fallen on the best of not a very impressive
    bunch of specialist keepers. In any event
    it is unlikely that the specialist will be
    seen in the test, for he would’ have’ to

    ‘ improve out of all recognition to depose

    Walcott behind the stumps. Ferguson again
    finds a place in the team and so do Trim,
    Atkinson and Rickards, who toured India.

    . All the wild and woolly rumours. have
    at last been scotched. No fault can be found
    with the selectors although it is a pity that
    they never saw Mason and Crick in action
    for undoubtedly the inclusion of one or
    more youthful fast bowlers would have
    strengthened t}e team immeasurably. The
    seventeen players include all the outstand-
    ing cricketers of these islands who were
    called upon to show their paces before the
    selectors, and with a seasoned and experi-
    enced captain in John Goddard to lead
    them, it should be possible to build up a
    test combination that should not be easily
    event should extend

    defeated, and in any

    to the utm ny team that the A



    ians can put in the field.























    SUNDAY

    ADVOCATE

    T° GLLLLLLLLLLLL LLL LLL LLL LLL CC CCC CT,



    (



    THE STAGE 47% WAKEFIELD HOUSE, showing the “curtain set”, The central figure is Mr. Risley
    Tucker, British Council Representative in Barbados.

    Barbados Has A Little

    (From A Correspondent)

    Barbados flow has a _ Little

    Theatre, It is a very little theatre
    indeed, for the duditorium seats
    only ‘sixty; but it presents fea-
    tures, none the less, that ought to
    render it of high value in the
    development of theatrical pro-
    duction in the island.
    - The birth of the theatre can be
    dated to an evening in last
    November when Mr. Charles
    [Thomas of the British Drama
    League, who was touring the
    West Indies under the auspices
    of the British Council, was giving
    a lecture in a downstairs room—
    which is divided by an archway
    into two parts—at Wakefield
    House, the Council’s Barbados
    headquarters.

    He had been speaking of the
    disadvantages under which
    amateur dramatic societies labour-
    ed when they tried to put on
    plays in halls and theatres — that
    were quite unsuited for the pur-
    pose. There was, of course, the
    expense of hiring the hall in the
    first place: the auditorium was
    generally too large, and_ badly
    designed: the acoustics were
    often shocking; and, above alli,
    the proportions of the stage were
    almost always wrong. What one
    got in a cinema theatre or village
    hall was a wide front_to the
    auditorium and only a few feet
    of depth, measuring from the foot-
    lights to the back of the stage
    The players, in fact, were trying
    to do their show on nothing but
    a large shelf.

    The lecturer paused and looked
    around him.

    “You know,” he = said reflec-
    tively, ‘you could make some-
    thing better than that out of this



    room. Here, where I am stand-
    ing, would be the stage, of
    course, It’s small; but it’s just
    in the right proportion-—plenty
    of depth in relation to the pro-
    secernium arch, You wouldn't.
    need a raised stage: you could
    \just use the floor, Naturally,

    you'd have a simple curtain set
    [The auditorium would be where
    you are all sitting. It
    have to be built up in a
    but that shouldn’t be too diffi-
    cult. There is room for a_ nice
    little lighting equipment; and the
    whole affair ought to be quite big
    enough to give your local produc-
    ers something to experiment with,
    and a place in which they coulk?
    put on really good plays without
    having to bother whether they
    would take in enough money at
    the box-office to cover expenses.”

    would
    ramp;

    In Gue course, Mr. Thomas
    sailed for England; but he left

    behind him the plans for a little
    theatre to be constructed in that
    room at Wakefield House, and
    Mr,. Risely Tucker, the British
    Council representative in Barba-
    dos, helped by his assistant, Mr.
    R. Le Fanu, has constructed it.
    Mr. Tucker calls it a “pocket
    theatre” and insists that it is not
    intended to take the place of the
    much larger and more elaborate
    Little Theatre that he hopes
    Barbados will have one day. But
    it is at least a start; and there is
    Mr. Thomas’ authority for be-
    lieving that it will prove a yery
    valuable one.

    *TPOHE decline in the morale of
    3ritish doggies was noted
    here recently. Since then it has
    been reported that an airedale
    was found drunk and smelling
    strongly of whisky after a wed-
    ding reception at Southend,

    It won't be long now before
    the rot sets in, and dogs come
    home late with staring eyes and
    a silly smile on their faces,

    Where have you been, Rover?

    Pardon?
    You heard the first time,

    where?

    Where ? Oo,
    and lots of places.
    With whom, Rover?

    Um?

    Whom did you meet?

    Just a lot of dogs.
    What kind of dogs?

    Big dogs, little dogs, hairy
    dogs, spotted dogs. But ‘all
    jolly dogs, mind you. Jolly fine

    lots and lots

    1)

    dogs
    Friends of yours?

    Oo, rather, All friends, All
    pals. “Dear old pals, jolly old
    pals.”

    Don’t sing, Rover. The neigh-

    bours will hear



    Who cares about the neigh-
    bours?
    I do
    Well, I don't
    Your disrepute
    not improved yC mar
    Rover

    SITTING ON

    Did I?
    Pull yourself together, Rover, ,
    Where have you been?
    Me? Out.
    I know that, Rover, But




    Theatre

    The lecturer's
    “curtain set’? was
    by his audience,

    reference to a
    well understood
    who had heard

    him speak o1 the subject at
    previous talks.
    Why on ear.1, he asked, did

    amateurs go to the expense and
    pains of cons cucting elaborate
    sets of painted canvas, which only
    looked doubtfully realistic in any
    case? It was perfectly possible to
    give a play with the use of
    curtains at the back of the stage
    and in the wings which would
    provide an acceptable setting for
    almost any type of play. With
    the right “props” and costumes
    and other accessories, an audience
    would forget in about two
    minutes that they were not
    actually looking at a drawing-
    room or a library. The problem

    was a little more difficult when
    it came to outdoor scenes, but
    even so—and ir. Thomas went

    into technical cetails of how the
    illusion of a wood or a _ wide
    landscape cou'd be sustained
    without a single square inch of
    painted scenery.

    The pocket theatre at Wake-
    field House has therefore been
    erected on the lines of these
    recommendations; and all lovers
    of the drama in the island will
    be extremely interested to see
    how they work out in practice.
    The theatre owes its existence
    entirely to the British Council:
    and the relatively small sum of
    money that has been expended on
    it has come solely from British
    Council funds. Before the work
    had gone far, however, Mr.
    Tucker invited two officials of the
    Development and Welfare Or-
    ganization to luncheon. Both of
    them had had a good deal of ex-
    perience of dramatic production;
    and their host found that they
    were as enthusiastic about the
    possibilities of his “pocket
    theatre” as he was. An informal
    committee was formed on _ the
    spot; and, before the meal was
    over, discussion on a play which
    might be put on by way of
    launching the new venture, and

    the players that could be invited

    to take part
    idvanced .

    One of tnese omcials, Mr. C
    A. Grossmith, the Administra-
    tive Secretary at Hastings House,
    is acting as producer of the play
    that was eventually selected. It
    is Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion”
    ~-a brilliant play in itself and one
    that is of a particular topical
    interest since it is concerned with
    the subject of phonetics; for the
    study of which the author left
    most of his fortune in_ his will.
    Incidentally, it has just been
    revived in London with great
    success,

    The cast has been chosen
    among enthusiasts for the drama
    in Barbados who happened to be
    available, and without reference
    to their membership of any parti-
    cular group. Some of the players,
    including Mr. Grossmith, who is
    playing the part of Doolittle, the
    Cockney dustman, as well as
    producing, have not been seen by

    in it, was well



    By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

    You insulting my friends?
    I shall

    say what I like about

    them.
    Ooo, no you won't. Nobody's
    gomg. to insult my friends.

    Shall I tell you something?
    Yes, Rover,

    I don't like you.
    That'll do, Rover,

    I don't like you, never did
    like you, never shall like you.
    Pompous prig. That's you.
    Come along, Rover. Time for

    bed,

    Gubbins’ Survey

    F THE Government thinks it

    can compete with Old Moore
    Gubhins, the world-famous
    astrologer, in predicting disaster
    it will have to think again.

    The Economic Survey for 1951
    says that “in many, ways our
    prospects are harsh and un-
    pleasant.”

    Old Moore Gubbins, who said
    much the same thing in a New
    Year message to his readers, now
    says that our prespects will not
    only be harsh and unpleasant,
    but almost unendurable in every
    possible way.

    ae B >
    3eginning on Tuesday (Budget
    day), we shall enter a period of
    national misery unparalleled in
    our history.

    As the wind was, blowing from

    thé north-east on March 21 it will

    rémain (according to O.M.G.’s
    rvations over a_ number of
    s) roughly in that direction



    until June

    mear bitte old

    a Barbados audience before, Oth-
    ers, including Miss Thelma Vallis,
    Mrs. Golde White and Mr. Idris
    Mills, have appeared in produc-
    tions of the Bridgetoyn Players or
    the Barbados Dramatic Club.

    The problem of the audience is
    in some ways a more difficult one
    than that of the cast, With only
    sixty seats available, it is obvious
    that only a few of those whe
    would like to see the Show will
    be able to do so. I am asked te
    say that if any of those who have
    already shown their interest in
    the theatre
    tendance at one or more of Mr.
    Thomas's lectures will send in
    their names immediately to the
    British Council at Wakefield
    House, stating whether they
    would like one seat or two, every
    effort will be made to fit them in
    at one or other of the four o
    five performances that are likely
    to be given. An announcemen*
    regarding the public at large wil!)
    be made in due course. The date
    of the first performance has not
    yet been fixed. It will not, in any
    case, be before May 19th. It is
    proposed to make a charge of ¢
    dollar a seat—the proceeds to be
    retained for eventual payment
    into any fund that may be organ-
    ized to assist in the establishmen
    of a genuine Little Theatre,

    It must be emphasized that,
    whatever is decided in detail
    about “Pygmalion”, the produc-
    tion is simply intended to christen
    the new theatre, and to give thosc
    interested some idea of what can,
    be done on a stage of this sizc
    with the use of a curtain set,

    The real idea behind the whole
    project is that all drama group:
    in Barbados, including those con-
    nected with churches and schools
    who would like to experiment
    with the production of somethin:
    better than the ordinary “com
    mercial” light comedy or thrillér
    (which doesn’t necessarily mea
    something solemn or highbrow)
    should have somewhere in which,
    free of charge or on payment oi
    only a very small sum to mee
    actual expenses, they can try out
    their ideas. If any group charges
    admission for its performances
    and makes a profit, it will be
    asked to devote it to the Littic
    Theatre fund, ;
    oe Bettien Council
    Gelighted if anyone wou
    a shot at Shakespeare; a ass
    delighted still if some work by <
    local dramatist could be per
    formed—even if, in one or tw
    particulars, it fell slightly below
    the Shakespeare standard. Mr
    Tucker himself is going shortly o;
    four months’ leave. Mr, Le Fanu.
    during his absence, will be gla:
    to receive any applications for use
    of the theatre; and the informal
    poerurs ae ae. remain in heine
    Oo give any elp th
    required, trial adit

    —_ so, ladies
    who care for the art of the
    and the glories of the englien
    language (not that the Alliance
    Francaise would be turned down
    if they felt inspired to give us
    a glimpse of the French classica’
    stage), you have your theatre—a
    small thing, but your own.

    The rest is up to you,

    would be

    and gentlemen

    THE FENCE

    spring and early summer with
    fruit crops. ruined by frosts
    bigger bills for fuel with less
    money to pay them, and another

    influenza epidemic,

    It also means that the Festival
    of Britain may open in a blizzard
    which will drive Americar
    visitors out of the country
    quicker than boiled cod ano
    parsley sauce, bruss
    and English coffee, ae aes

    Frozen to the marrow an
    Weakened by flu, this unhapp,
    breed will then search the shop
    for warm underelothing, whic),

    will be in short supply
    § supply becaus
    rearmament, rt

    Alarmed at the declining healt
    of the population, and the in
    creasing cost of free medicine, thy
    Government will then switen
    factories producing war material
    back to making warm under
    clothing, just in time to fill the
    shops on the first day of summe1

    Because of the heat, nobod
    WUL buy the warm underclothing
    It will be sold to the Eskimos it
    exchange for whale blubber
    which will be included jn the
    meat ration,

    . *

    Summer will end in less than

    a week Shivering citizens will
    then demand the warm undev-
    clothing, no longer available

    About the end of July there will
    be another flu epidemic
    Heavy rain in August will ruin

    the harvest. Nobody will have
    any money 10 spend on holidays
    Hotels and bars will be half emp
    ty ving to higher taxation. Th

    national revenue wi

    in Barbados by at-'

    SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951



    SSF

    | AUTOGRAPH my

    | SCRAPS & SNAP

    ALBUMS

    at
    Advocate Stationery



    aS
















    Do
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    COCKTNIS





    td



    |


    SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951



    - Meat At 3d.
    A Pound

    EaT is so plentifui tuat it is

    eaten for breakfast, lunch, tea
    and dinner and costs only 3u. a
    pound. Income tax is almost negli-
    gible. Only about 250 of the popu-—
    lation pay it at the rate of 1s, in
    the £1. Families are paid children’s
    allowances There is no housing
    shortage. Sounds like Utopia but
    it isn’t. Its an extract from
    Donald McCormick’s “Islands for
    sale” (Peter Garnett 10s, 6a.) a
    written to “titillate your
    palate” and send you running off
    to buy the nearest island, which in





    our case would be Pelican, The
    world is full of islands, so full
    that there ave more than 5,000

    around the British Isles, I thought
    that would shake you and _ they
    are so deliciously individual with
    no craze for centralization uni-
    tcrmity or any of those twentieth
    century signs of petulance against
    the Creator’s handiwork, Islands
    they were created and islards they
    remain, distinet, different, delight-
    ful--and depressing. Take Jersey
    for instance. Income Tax in Jersey

    is ofly 4s. in the £1. With a
    large budget surplus, ‘ersey is
    quite independent of the United

    Kingdom, and _ trading profits on
    vegetable crops last year amount-
    ed to more than £4,000,000. And
    in Jersey a married man with two
    children can earn up to £10 a
    week before he starts paying in-
    come tax and then only at 2s. in
    £1. And then there is Sark.
    Two years ago there were 180 ap—
    plicants from all over- the British
    Isles for the post of assistant en-
    gineer for Sark’s private enter—
    prise electricity scheme. Yet the
    salary offered was only £200 a
    year. But some of the applicants
    were willing to give up salaries of
    £750 a year to take on the job and
    to have a house
    THERE jis no mention of Peli-
    can but the Grenadines are given
    a good name and Capri, Majorca
    and the Aegean Islands get the
    credit that is eternally theirs. The
    merit of this book lies chiefly in
    the great love that its writer feels
    for islands, It is with reluctance
    that he writes about the disadyan—
    tages of certain islands, but he
    never attempts to delude the read—
    ers that there is anywhere an
    island paradise. It is a book that
    ought to be read by all those who
    tend to dogmatise about islands.
    There are really so many of them
    and most of us are so ignorant of
    their whereabouts. We may not
    want to buy an island,—most of
    us wonder whether we'll ever be
    able to buy even a house—but
    we ought to read “Islands for
    sale” if only to break down that
    huge chunk of ignorance which
    we possess on the subject, island
    livers though we be.
    HETHER you travel to Eng-
    land this year, or next you
    take with you or buy
    at the earliest opportun—
    ity the Sunday Times Travel
    and Holiday Guide of the Brit-
    ish Isles and Ireland. If you
    think you know these countries
    already pay 10 shillings just for
    the pleasant surprise of finding out
    your mistake. The Guide is
    illustrated and its information up-
    to date (1951). There are modern
    maps. Whether you go to Englang
    or not, you can learn a lot from
    this Guide. For those who are
    fortunate enough to get to the
    Continent the Sunday Times has
    published at the same price a
    Companior Travel and Holiday
    Guide to the Continent of Europe
    Maps about Cyprus, Malta and
    East Africa are also included,
    A NOTHER Sunday Times pub-
    £\ lication to reach me is “Go”,
    the Travel and Leisure magazine.
    It will look well on the tables and
    waiting rooms of those who travel

    must

    and of those who don’t. The
    April—May number (price 3s.
    6d.) contains a book in brief

    scenes from the lives of the Marx
    Bros,

    Max in Rapallo tells the story of
    Max Beerbohm. And for flower
    lovers there is a special article on
    an English Flower Festival.

    GEORGE HUNTE.



    Grenada Civil

    Service Turn
    Down COL Bonus

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    GRENADA, April 27,

    The Civil Service Association
    here has turned down an offer
    from the Government on an

    interim increase of 334 per cent
    cost of living bonus as approved by
    the Secretary of State for the
    Colonies pending the receipt ox
    the report of the commission in-
    quiring into the cost of living of
    the Windwards,

    C.S.A seeks a 100 per cent
    increase as a “very reasonble one,
    that the interim offer would mean
    nothing to them and therefore they
    decided to await final settlement
    of the matter’’,

    The Association also passed a
    resolution asking for assisted
    passages of officers going abroad
    on leave, as obtains in many other
    colonies, or failing this, to revoke
    regulation compelling them to go
    abroad if granted more than thre>
    months’ leave.

    GOOPOOOSS > ;
    3
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    = KNIGHTS DRUG STORES %
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    Y $669969956959966569669996 e: |





    A



    BY IAN GALE



    ONE OF THE DELIVERY VANS.

    —_—



    THE COWS are milked twice



    a day, at 4 a.m. and 12 noon.

    Faiths Barbadians
    Live By



    10

    The Christian Science Church

    By JAMES F.

    THE Christian Science Church
    was organised in Barbados as a
    Society in 1915. A few years
    prior to that date a Barbadian
    jady returned to the island from
    the U.S.A. with the news that
    through Christian Science treat—
    ment she had been healed of a
    nervous condition. The Misses
    Law.and Carrington were in
    England and Miss Carrington’s
    brother, about this time too, in the
    U.S.A., had just received a heal
    ing through. Christiar Science
    treatment, of tuberculosis in its
    last stages.

    On arrival in Barbados the two
    ladies spoke of this healing and
    they and a few friends began to
    have Sunday Services at the Gar-
    rison. After a short while these
    Services were held in the home
    of one of these individuals,

    Soon after, a room was rented
    in Broad Street, and besides other
    meetings, a Wednesday evening
    Testimony Meeting was held once
    a month. A Reading Room was
    started. A few years after, the
    Services and Reading Rocm were
    held in two large rooms on the
    ground floor of the B.M.L.A.
    Buildings in Lower Broad Street.

    The membership grew and a
    disused Garrison building was
    bought and remodelled and is now
    the present church building.

    -The Church was dedicated in
    1933 free of debt and became
    First Church of Christ, Scientist
    Bridgetown.

    This, as every other Christian
    Science Church, is a Branch of
    the Mother Church, the First
    Church of Christ, Scientist, in
    Boston, Mass., which was organ—
    ised they say: “to commemorate
    the word and works of our Master,
    which should reinstate» primitive
    Christianity and its lost element of
    healing.” (Page 17, Church
    Manual, by Mary Baker Eddy).

    In 1866 Christian Science was
    discovered. In “Retrospection and
    Introspection,” a work by M. B.
    Eddy, the Discoverer and Founder
    of Christian Science, we read,....
    “In the latter part of 1866 I gained
    the scientific certainty that all
    @ausation was Mind, and every
    effect a mental phenomenon. My
    immediate recovery from the
    effects of an injury caused by an
    accident, an injury that neither
    medicine nor surgery could reach,
    was the falling apple that led me
    to the discovery how to be well
    myself, and how to fthake others

    iv
    SSSOSP A PPOVOOOF OSS,











    BRATHWAITE

    so......I then withdrew from
    society about three years, — to
    ponder my mission, to search the
    Scriptures, to find the Science of
    Mind that should take the things
    of God and show them to the
    creature, and reveal the great
    curative Principle—Deity.

    “The Bible was my textbook, It
    answered my questions as to how
    I was healed; but the Scriptures
    had to me a new meaning, a new
    tongue, their spiritual signification
    uppeared; and I apprehended for
    the first time their spiritual mean-
    ing, Jesus’ teaching and demon-
    stration, and the principle of
    spiritual Science and metaphysical
    healing,—in a word Christian
    Science.” (Page 24—25.)

    Christian Science has now
    spread all over the globe and its
    only preachers are the “Bible”
    and “Science and Health”, with
    Key to the Scriptures by Mary
    Baker Eddy, which are read by
    two Readers at the Sunday
    Services. There is a Service on
    Wednesday evenings when these
    books are read and testimonies of
    Christian Science healing are
    given,

    The aim of Christian Scientists
    is to know the Scriptures from
    the basis that God's creation is
    good only, as is spoken of in
    Genesis I, The Master said>‘‘Ye
    do err not knowing the Scrip-—
    tures.” Tenet I reads: “As ad
    herents of truth, we take the in—
    spired Word of the Bible as our
    sufficient guide to eternal Life.
    (Page 497. S. and H.)

    There are many in Barbados
    who find solace and healing from
    the study of Christian Science.

    Some one once said: “The
    noblest charity is to teach a man
    how to do without charity”, and
    although Christian Scientists do
    not turn away from the immediate
    need, they decidedly know what
    is meant by “The Lord is my
    Shepherd, I shall not want”, and
    “Son, thou are ever with me, and
    all that I have is thine.”

    Every Church of this denomina-
    tion is guided by the rules of the
    Chureh Manual, which is the work
    of the Discoverer and Founder.

    The literature is freely dis-
    tributed by the Distribution Com
    mittee and includes the weekly
    Sentinel, the monthly Journal,
    (the official organ of the Mother
    Church, a publication which in~
    cludes the list of the Churches





    - Ph





    POLIS STITT O OOOO



    St

    MODEL

    This week I met Maggie, Syi-.
    via,. Rese and Matilda, among
    others, at Bulkeley Dairy. At this
    dairy, which only started in 1942
    and now has 75 cows, 2 bulls ana
    15 calves, each animal has a
    name, One of the bulls, incidental.
    ly, is a ferocious characteg, called
    Sam, +

    No better situation for a,
    than Brighton could hav@sbeen
    found, It is cool, breezy, afi iso-
    ‘ated, and although The cows ma?
    not appreciate it, there is a good
    view, s

    The cows are milked twwice®a
    day, at 4 am, and) 12 and
    after the early milking they are
    turned out into a large meadow
    for a few hours. There are four

    iry

    different breeds of cows at the
    dairy — Holsteins, Ayrshires,

    Guernsies and Zebus. It has been
    found that while the first three
    breeds’ give a large quantity of
    milk, the Zebus though they give
    less, have a higher percentage of
    butter fat in their milk.

    The cows are milked by hand
    and by machine. At the moment,
    since the dairy is not, quite fin-

    ished yet, there is omly one
    mechanical milker, whidh cau
    milk two cows. at a time. Mr,

    Cuke, the manhger, is very .en-
    thusiastic about it.
    A large dairy stall is the ome

    of the cows, and it is “kept
    remarkably clean. Every day,
    when the cows are let out into

    the meadow, the stall is’ Washed
    out with E.C., which ts made ‘at
    Bulkeley Factory, and before the
    men milk, they wash their
    with the same disinfectant
    the crop is over Mr. Carrington,
    the manager of Bulkeley, plans
    to re-design the stall so that it
    can ko'd twice as many cows.



    arms
    After

    Durittg the crop season the
    cows are fed on cane tops, and

    out of crop they get sour grass,
    Besides that, throughout the year,
    they are given a special concen
    trated cow feed. In front af each
    cow in the stall hangs a black
    beard which gives such informa-
    tion as ti name of the cow, tim
    fed, amount fed and the name of

    the milker.
    Although Mr. Cuke starts work
    at 3 a.m. and consequently ha

    Civil Service Asso.
    Elects Officers

    At the Annual General Meet-
    ing of the Civil Service Associa-
    tion yesterday, Mr. L. A. Hall
    was elected General Secretary.
    Mr, Hall got 131 votes to win
    from Mr. R. P. Parris who was
    also nominated.

    Five members were elected to
    the Council of the Association,
    They are: Messrs. A. E. Lewis,
    A. G. Jordan, F. H. Barker, L.
    T. Gay and L. EB. Smith, A. E.
    Lewis won 63 votes and A, G.
    Jordan 61 to be elected on thd
    Council. The other three’ with
    another member got 57 each
    Those three were decided on by
    the casting vote of the President,
    Mr, C. A. Coppin,

    Mr. C. A. Coppin was elected
    President before this meeting
    Judge H. A. Vaughn is the Vice
    Presiaent, C. D. Gittens, Treas-
    urer and C,. W. Cumberbatch,
    Assistant Secretary.

    The returning officers were
    Messrs. D. A. Haynes and C, B.
    Long, of the Peasants’ Loan Bank

    C. C. Barrow, St. Judes, G. C.
    Bishop, Government Industrial
    School, and Miss Yearwood of

    the Mental Hospital,



    13 Get Through

    Sixty-eight candidates — forty-
    eight girls and twenty boys—took

    the Junior School Certificate
    examination in December last
    year.

    The following 13 were success-
    ful:

    INDUSTRY SCHOOL
    K. C. Agard, L. E. Best

    PRIVATE CANDIDATES

    K. A, Carew

    INDUSTRY SCHOOL

    D. A. Brathwaite, A. E. Burke, 0. C
    Callender, M. D. Nicholls, ©. A. Sealey,
    J. B. Smith

    ROYAL ACADEMY

    A.C. Griffith
    PRIVATE CANDIDATES

    E. Clarke, M. FE. Roach, E Weekes,

    ee

    Pp

    and practitioners of the move-
    iment). There is also the Christian
    Science Monitgr, an international
    daily newspaper, The Herald is
    published in several languages.

    Tiere is a Board of Lectureship
    in Boston and every Christian
    Science Church gives at least one
    free lecture a. year. r

    The Reading Room
    island is now located
    Broad Street (over
    Sons) The Bible and Mr:
    Eddy’s works and all authorigs
    literature on Christian
    may be read, borrowed
    chased.

    A cordial invitation is always
    extended to all to attend the
    Services, and the lectures and to
    visit the Reading Room,

    this
    «J

    in
    at No
    Bowen _ and

    d
    Science
    or pur









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    AFTER the early milking the cows are turned out into a meadow
    tor a few hours,



    THE COW STALL is large and airy—and clean,

    to go to bed at the time that
    most people are having dinner
    he likes his job, and he told ine
    proudly that when he started

    City Building
    Dug Down

    THE two buildings on Prince
    William Henry Street which used
    to comprise the Manhattan Club,
    W. A. Medford & Co., groceries,
    and Evelyn Roach & Co., Ltd's
    Ice Depot are being pulled down
    The 10,000 square teet of land cn
    which the buildings were standing

    and which belong to Mr, Evelyn
    Roach, will be sold. Soon some
    new structure will be set up
    there.

    The old building was built most-
    ly of brick, rubble and_ block
    stones. There used to be livery
    stables in the buildings some years
    ago.

    The man who has bought the

    building is selling the stones and
    wood,

    Less Aloes Wantec
    From D. West Indies

    In a bulletin from the Carib-
    bean Commission, Mr. E. Nord-
    fohne, economist to the Imforma-
    tion Institute of the Economic
    Planning Bureau of the Nether-
    lands West Indies in Amsterdam
    said that during the last few
    years, the demand for aloes from
    the Netherlands had decreased.

    Mr. Nordlohne who is working
    for a Doctor’s degree at the
    University College of Economics
    at Rotterdam, Holland, had
    visited the territory to familiar-
    ise himself with the social and
    economic problems of the area.

    Among other things, he studied

    the commercial aspects of the
    cultivation of aloes which ar¢
    grown on the islands of Aruba

    and Bonaire and attributed t.>»
    decrease in the demand. for that
    crop to various causes,

    He said that in the first place
    there was considerably les
    demand for the crop in the
    United States; secondly, the cost
    of the material was generally too
    high in the Netherlands West
    Indies because of high labou:
    costs and thirdly, there was strong
    competition from South Africa

    Yesterday, the Advocate inter-
    viewed the Director of Agricul-
    ture as to the possibility of
    growing aloes in Barbados on a
    commercial basis He said that
    at the beginning of the present
    century, the crop was grown on
    a small commercial seale, but it
    did not pay and kad to be dis-
    continued,

    The crop, he said, is one of
    those which thrive on relatively
    poor moisture conditions.

    At present negligible quantities
    of aloes are however found in
    peasants backyards among fruit
    trees,

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    work at Bulkeley Dairy last Ju
    they were producing 450 pints
    milk a day but now the

    at
    figure

    Meat Could Be Had
    Yesterday

    There was of

    the Public

    plenty
    Market

    meat i
    yesierua

    morning. Some housewives weie
    making sure by purchasing mewt
    for the next day (to-day) so wist
    even if the butchers did decias
    on a. “meatless Sunday” tuey
    would have olready had theu
    supplies.

    A merchant told the Advocat»
    yesterday that approximately i4)
    tons of frozen meat are due to
    arrive here on Tuesday by th»
    S.S. Tongariro from Australie,
    via Trinidad, The ship is alsu
    bringing large quantities of but

    ter and cheese,

    Mr. William Patterson of the
    firm of Messrs, J. N. Goddard &
    Sons said that his firm hag no
    meat at all and is depending on
    this shipment. For many week

    now they have had to turn away

    housewives who wanted to pur
    chase meat

    The firm, however, has lar:
    quantities of deep sea fish an‘!
    during the butchers’ strike mu

    of this was sold

    Fined 10/- For
    Stealing Cane

    A City Police Magistrate ye:
    terday told 68-year-old Ernes
    Thorpe of Baynes Gap, Spooner
    Hill, “I find you guilty of larcen)
    but I am taking into consideratioi
    your age,” when he appeared be

    ore him chanted by the Polic
    with the larceny of sugar cam
    valued at 2/-

    Thorpe was fined 10/- for thr

    larceny. Failing to pay the fin
    he will have to undergo 14 day:
    imprisonment The cane is th
    property of Warren’s Plantation
    The watchman of the plantatior
    said that on April 27 about 4.3
    p.m. he was told something }
    the Manager and going into th
    cane field saw the defendant wit!
    a bag. Pieces of canes were in thi
    bag.
    Putting

    up a defence, Thorp:

    told the court that on April 2
    he was walking near Warren
    canefield and saw a piece of can

    in the road, He took up the pie
    and put it into a bag and th
    Manager passed the same _ tim
    and saw him, Later the watch
    may came to him and took hur
    to «he office.

    “RODNEY” ARRIVES

    Over 400 tons of general cr



    from Canada and a quantity of
    fruit. from the British Northerr
    Islands were landed here yester

    cay by the R.M.S. Lady Rodney
    She also landed %3 passenger:
    The Rodney left port last night
    for British Guiana via St, Vincent
    Grenada and Trinidad, She
    consigned to Messrs,
    Austin & Co,, Ltd.

    wa

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    PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE



    ee AT

    Failing Hair?

    SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1951

    IL IN THE. LORDS CAUSES



    Paling hair is a definite sign that your hair roots are starved of vital

    organic sulystances normally supplied by the body. That’s why you








    1
    need SilVikiTh, urgently. For Silvikrin contains, in concentrated form,
    the fourteen essential hair-forming substances, Massaged into the | HOUSE OF LORDS, April 17 id ‘ ti A
    cates Zilvik ‘ohn, Stik. she ake rabekee : | , April 17 wou receive a prospecting arra ents. s._I have said, American company, ’so eager to in the domestic affairs of Barbados. the economic rivalries of t he
    Dysitvikrin one Sourishes the hair rar and — hair ows licence over the whole island, the Myr, ‘Tanber was called in and the get into the island that apparently May I glance, for a moment, at the Metropolitan Powers, and they
    AZARGANUN healthy, handsome vigour. Pure Silvikrin will get your hair | Lord Teviot rose to call atten- company entered into negotiations matter was going to be dealt with they were ed to gake any Constitution of Barbados? As your dread what may be happening be-
    priiehgeRaba trivilig again and keep it healthy. tion to the ry position of the with ac Leaseholds Limit- on the Alberta system. In our terms, did ecept, but the Lordships may know, it consists of hind the closed doors of the Cuban
    to British Union Oi Lim- ed, who are the principal oil view, for a small island like Bar- §B.Y.0,C.’s attitude was fully jus- a Legislature, which is the Gov- negotiations. I gather that, as in
    UsSee Trin in severe cases of dandruff ited in Barbados, arising from the operators in Trinidad and own bddos, that was ridiculous. tified, as the originally put ernor, the Legislative Council of photography, a darkened room is
    ankQGUMFIair. As a daily dressing use Bee ee om. by oon be — —e in the ‘ Since _ the terms to ee Gulf forward by the Government prov- fiiteen members, and a House of pecessary for development and the
    Silvtke Tonic Lotion or, for dry heads, e os vern é mpire. s company Company have been greatly modi- orka they 4 semb fi members. j i i
    the newsbiw ein Lotion with Oil. ask His have vast experience of deep fied, as will be seen from. the 04: ae a nee oe Fe ae pacer See dhag Rea a yg Poses



    since had to be greatly relaxed "Phe Governor has a negative voice

    Barba
    foreign company, and Pp ; d
    Majesty's Crane for . drilling, and they undertook to do copy of which I have the picture, so they wait, dread-
    ti A ee ¢ ee “aul idence of




    ; m ; The Barbados Petroleum Act, in the making and passing of laws jng lest they are to be sacrificed,
    ot ond ea em on arringesnent with a oie iaveur displayed to- 1950, provided for payments by and, in the : phraseology, jutchered to make a Cuban holi-
    oe to mens tor Papers The U fin Company. They had wards sag can ra n, Way of royalty to land owners in laws are passed with the advice gay Let us leave the West Indies
    ‘noble Lord said | My Lords, 1 Waiting all the uipment requir- And it.ghould be emphasised that £Teas where oil may be found, and consent of the Legislath® and go to East Africa, where the

    “apologise for brini this Bd. tb DERE. Work Bt | OnGe. the G poration had e no- 2nd also for compensation to land Council and General DIY settlers of our own race await with
    important matter you at October, 1948, the Colonial Office thi ‘ island: they had Cwners for the taking over of of the island, who may make all Geepest apprehension the dogmatic
    this fate hour, but 1 found on jn- *Ppolnted the late Mr. C. M. made fo 3, and had bought ‘ncillery rights, such as the right such laws as may from time to 1 -onouncements of Whitehall doc-
    quiry that there was no other date Lepper, 2 highly qualified mining no ipment’ whereas the ‘to enter on land to search for and time be required for the pegc® tinsires. They, too, fear lest all
    aoa Op eg ree | oad Ss te Me Pee UO Sec, My eme, id Pein, oe and Pe fags vee OF NS che ean tar nay be oh fr
    ing- 3 y i in cu an ‘or e on of island, a “ ”
    ves ae eu, loration developments. to His the island, have done a great deal buildings, tanks ond "the like. Se inuch fot legislation, But een iy Quantity, not quality” —
    beat with me thls Ph ‘Ag is ‘ajesty’s Mint of Fuél of valuable work and, as I have Feople receiving royalties from an you may ask, who has executive the miscarriage of democracy.

    HOME- eTHE custiconey a J has WG wer from 1936 1946. What a stated, have incurred “ating well, or the lessee of an power in the island? The answer And so on. One could go round
    e interest at all if iy matter on I am going to tell your Lordships heavy expenditure. Put simply, ¢ i well are entitled to com- is, the Governor, his Executive the Empire, but there is no time
    « a tran on€ now is of great importance. Mr. the Government of Barbados went pensation, bu sati t i ide ephére, a showi A is art
    raises in thiS Hous must say Le ’s te of tef wei Pp , t no compensation Council and, in a wide sp , 4 showing the inconsistencies which
    will set you on the right that 5 have & ea Be th: the pper’s terms ce were bark Rags. 2 mis jeg e she whatsoever is pyricee for the body called the Executive Com~- arise from lack of consistent pur-
    J £2 course for success British Union Oil Company. This ‘to advise the Governor of Barbados on pecti i" Be over the Shoe Joss of the right to drill for oil, mittee. The Executive Council pose and lack of consistent princi-

    You make sure of planned progress in the career of your choice when is a somewhat unusual matter to the subject of oll mining legislation and ng such as was possessed by the the

    consists of the Governor,
    Colonial Secretary and the Attor-
    ney-General, ex officio, and suc?
    others as His Majesty may ap-
    peint — at the present moment,
    tnree others. The Executive Com-
    mittee was created by local Statute
    and consists of all mem of
    the Executive Council ex officio,
    plus one member of the Legisla-
    tive Council, plus four members of
    the House of Assembly are

    island, which, be it noted, under
    the usual Colonial legislation,
    calls for a_ selection of the
    aH and therefore ba 4 by place
    stitute a monopoly. In its ce
    tay offered the Bue. a licence
    a auaster of the island, on terms
    one qui is! on

    which were so unworkable that
    they were consequen ed in
    the case of the Gulf Co ation
    after the B.U.O.C. had withdrawn.

    ples. We seem to be getting the
    worst of both worlds. We dis-
    courage the British investor, on the
    one hand, and we undermine the
    confidence of nascent Dominions,
    on the other. I repeat that the
    case before us is not creditable to
    the Barbados Government and
    merits the intervention of His
    Majesty’s Government. I claim
    that that is so because it is their

    4 . on the subsequent issue of licences, and
    bring before your Lordships and, {to furnish a te a

    port.”’

    before doing so, I took steps to That report, which is dated Jan-
    find gut Whether it was a proper uary, 1949, definitely recommend-
    matter to raise, With your Lord. ed, In Paragraph 122, that the
    ship’s leave I will read this short British Union company, which
    letter from the Colonial Office. It had secured a fi ass opera
    says} artni in Trinidad €
    mited, should be given the sole
    pisenretse licence over the whole

    land. Mr. Lepper —T am

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    B.U.0.C. before the passing of
    this Act, In other words, so far as
    the B.U.0.C. are concerned, the
    measure has resulted in complete
    confiscation of their rights. with,
    out compensation, and this as
    your ips must be aware,
    is completely contrary to all prac-
    tice in areas under British influ-
    ence, That these mining rights
    are extremely Valuable is clearly




    there is no rear why a Suestion

    , the ect of Bi
    Crete ie erbados should not we asked

    n
    “Barbados Figs a Legislative
    of its own it is still adi

    reading his words from his
    report— ;





























    ; ly : proved b @ willingness of Tri- e Hov vic duty to try and preserve tradition- %
    nr rte, lon See te In. gdaltion, to oll, research ‘dad LansenGlae LIIEG 1 An ee ne a saa a ner cdionies atl under ‘eel

    Parilamen work, of the company’s r eseiOn | Oo! ss
    iS YOUR CAREER HERE? ithe saqae why send ot ae” been MAR © of geologists Sy ery in Ime] pro- esata bt the | i PLP the Lega Teele ieee esos and ae ; In nee

    M Z the’ British i Company and the V. n.of a -plass water su ation to get into the i: id at is, et, the prit ‘ - sion, I say that I am loth to loo!
    IF NOT, WRITE FOR FREE ADVICE There tae ee ja. pi BP ologists.”” ; Ely, ai the teport on the atol i peroe ay price ena 0 ina the test of kovernment, i’ ae. oe and aia 5 os, eo aah
    comuptancy Exgme. Draughtsmanship, All Police, I Course ; i » ¢ tigatio! ~ great expense of déep ing. ces a e es, _ prepa’ overnm n the role of Gallio.
    eet ee er impor, Tabeid he rar On Mae 2g MR the Acting eau ner esotee Jn aris, te BUDE, bo efor i ue Danas ana te AUG 1 not hin hat ale stl
    ers Subjects and cxamina- Radio Service Engineering ing this matter in your Lordships’ to the British Unioa Oil Com- bated ei. We br NesAh is te tice and a fair deal, fo g ernie te ine tor the ae ee en . a ear i a
    oor a ‘Short W: é ’ : " ernment w ernment, ni nd
    Cambridge School Corti» Education Examinations secretarial rama Meters. moving the, Motion, Government did not intehd %6 de: SRE have aso AE RN Me Bie: al management of Government pro- ciples of publi honesty, and T hope
    cate Beomiantion Institute of Municipal . | should like to give a short history viate fram the Lepper take Lars Saye Bee Bre iehami. Ditraty Sapenode Be sae Barbados perty. The four members who that they will yet relent from the
    Chemisty res schemata 7 of Hand| | of the British Union Oil. Company® late..as Beeicey 80, 3949, this ve oP BArEaGoR et by, import- ore ale 1 ee a on come to the Bxecutive Committee attitude which they have taken up.
    Ai'commerealkinets Retottninetag To and its operations. in Barbados. ee ae eed cabled ko the iE, {RE DECESSREY SPD orks rasttaken Ofer under the Pe. om, the, House of Miuct of pub. , The Parliamentary Under-Secre-
    Diesel nginas ” Pane Wireless Telegraphy and’! hear PO ated tse tea Colonia ce.in London. an as- og Sabled Be te eats the troleum Act, but compensation ji pisiméss in that House, But in ‘ary of State for Commonwealth
    <2" “iByour requirements are nat listed above, Sri - 1914 with capital of £6,000,000, surance that the Barbados Gov- qj YEE a te oot eee nas Will be payable and a claim has spite of their acceptance af collec- [eiations (Lord = Ogmore): My
    wanes inted anapneney t+ 8 107 free didiies 1914 with a capital of £6,000,000, Cr ent would not depart in any {urel gay has BAD been filed. However, although ; : the Lords, I must first express my
    ; ~ its main object, being to acquire Way froth the Lepper Y tural has also proved @ Ese , tive responsibility for policy, the

    ——s=r—Direct Mail to DEPT. 188
    ¢ THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD. -

    SHEFFIELD, E ND.

    f eport, Re-,
    lying upon the assurance given,
    the company gave up theit leases
    to the Government and did not
    oppose the Petroleum Bill intro-

    the gas was taken over, the pipe-
    line and accessories necessary to
    operate the gas were not taken
    by the Act. The company, in the
    course of business, naturally de-



    appreciation to the noble Lord,
    Lord Teviot, for consenting to ad-
    journ this debate from its original
    date to to-day, in order to meet my

    ,}oil and petroleum-bearing lands
    ‘Land to explore, work, exercise,

    ~“jand develop them. In the year
    ‘| 1919 the company obtain

    boom to-all in the ;
    ever, so far as we can see,

    ne unde ft nothing hte

    Executive Committee would not
    resign if defeated in the House, in
    that they ‘are responsible to the
    yovernor and not to the House.








    convenience,





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    are registered Trade Marks,

    ses
    over 78 per cent. of the available
    drillable area of Barbados. I would
    mention, in pes , that no one
    else had explored this area for oil;
    it was an entirely new venture.
    These leases were granted by the
    “owners of over 340 estates and a
    number of peasant proprietors
    holding ten ‘acres or. less, Between
    the years 1919 and 1940, the com-
    pany drilled no fewer than fifty-





    two wells, the greates: depth
    reached belhg 4,015 feet. The
    sroduction amounted to only

    137,000 barrels, which, while not
    a commercial gu tity, néverthe-
    less confirmed the opinion of
    eminent geologists that the island
    had | gréat potentialities ‘a5 a
    source of commercial oil ‘once
    deep drilling had beén carried out,
    In addition, nineteen exploratory

    _| boreholes were drilled and ‘a vast

    amount of geological survéy work
    carriert out.

    The total. expenditure by the
    British Union, Oil. Company was
    coughly £1,000,000, and the evi-
    dence obtained for the expenditure
    of this sum and the great amount
    of work it entailed proved that oil
    “an commercial quantities was not
    available at shallow depths, and
    it would be necessary to drill deep
    down to 10,000 or 19,000 feet. The
    company had this .» mind when
    war broke out in 193% - and the
    outbreak of war, of course, seri-
    wusly interrupted its plang. I
    vi sy nor poe - et | eee
    ial equipment. In fact, permis.
    sion to acquire it was refused.
    ‘ull report by the company’s
    jeologist, the late Dr, Sehn, dated
    January, 1941, Was given by the
    sompany to: Sir Frank Stockdale,
    Controller of the ‘West Indian
    Development and Welfare Com-
    mission, and forwarded by him to
    he Colonial Office. here with a
    ttpong "plea! for action, ~
    : In June’ and July, 1941," the
    jompany ‘made My Seen to
    dis pubis s Government for
    Jnited States dollars exchange
    ‘or the purpose of carrying out a

    ophysical* survey in Barbados,

    t this ee sed, and the
    company, refore, had to break
    off its negotiations with the United
    States Reoph teal survey ¢on-
    tractors. In 1945, the company
    called for estimates from 4rilling
    contractors in the United States
    of America, and also approached
    a contractor operating In Haiti. It
    was evident that deep drilling was
    qoing to be a costly business,
    amounting, roughly speaking, to
    somewhere between £250,000 and
    £300,000 for each. well, and a
    minimum of. three deep wells was
    aecessary. The company felt that
    it was not justified in incurring
    such ex ess it could
    certain t it would -be protect
    against pirate competitors who
    would not have borne: any. share
    of the expense of the discovery.

    in March, 1946, Colonial Sec-
    retary in Barbados told the British
    Union Oil Company’s manager
    there that the Government pro-
    posed to take over all underground
    rights and that they would give
    the company a prospecting licence
    oyer the whole island. On July
    28, 1947, the company’s