Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


mene

Hharvbados



ESTABLISHED 1895





Communists

WAR



maintain pressure

pushing Allied troops back

CABINET



Attlee Jeaves hospital -and
appoints Lord Privy Seal »

FRIDAY, APRIL 2%, 1951



* CRISIS §



PRICE: FIVE CENTS
Gaitskell makes new law
for income tax evaders

onservatives will force
¢ ——__-_—. debate on raw materials

PANES

U.N. WITHDRAW 20 MILES NORTH OF SEOUL

200.000 Flee Threatened

South Korean Capital

TOKYO, April 26.

UNITED NATIONS troops fell back to a new line about 20 miles
before Seoul today in the face of a renewed furious offensive by the

Chinese.

Throughout today defenders threw back furious assaults. But the Com-
munists broke through in several places and General Ridgway’s men
made a planned withdrawal. Among the defenders of dark and waterless

Seoul tonight were men of the British 29th Briga

de who fought

their way out of encirclement after bearing the brunt of an attack by



24,000 Chinese.

C.0.L. Strikers Go
Back To Work

MADRID, April 26
Cost of living strikers drifted
back to work in San Sebastian and
its province of Guipuzcoa,



All strikers returned in Zuma.
raga and it was onl’ in Zarauz
and Pasajes that the four days

old stoppage continued to affect
the main factories. Several print-
ing and metal work plants in San |
Sebastian were still idle. |

—Reuter, |

2,300 Dockers
Strike

MANCHESTER, April 26.

More than 2,300 dockers stopped!
work in Manchester port today)
in a lightning strike to protest |
against overtime.

About 20 ships were lying iale|
in the port as a result of the’
strike. They carried cargoes of
sulphur, steel, cotton and timber,

The men claim that night shift
workers, who refused to work
overtime, have been “locked out”,

—Reuter,



fyverseas Provinces |

LISBON; April 26,
Portuguese colonies will in future
be known as “overseas provinces ’
A Bill passed by the Portuguese

National Assembly today made
the change, |

The measure also defines more
clearly and improves the rights

and guarantees of Portuguese and
Foreign citizens in the colonies
—Reuter.

Czechs Take Steps
To Prevent "Air Escapes”

LONDON, April 26
Czechoslovakia has taken
steps to prevent ‘air escapes” ac-
cording to today’s Daily Telegraph. |
The paper’s Vienna correspond- |
ent says nearly every plane on}
ordinary internal flights now car-|
ries a heavily armed security
guard. “His orders are to shoot
anyone who tries to force the
pilot to alter course,’—Reuter,

new



24 HOUR STRIKE ©N

ROME, April 26. |

Public Transport stopped

throughout Italy at midnight as!

workers belonging to Communist

and non-Communist Trade Unions |

went on 24-hour strike for higher}
wages.—Reuter.

|
|
|
|
|
|
}





UNREST DENIED |
|

ECUADOR, April 26

Reports received here of politi
cal unrest and violence in Guaya-
quil were denied today by Gov
ernment Minister Francisco Sal-!
gado, “There is camplete peace
and tranquility throughout the
country” he declared. —Reuter.

LEGISLATOR ARRESTED
CAPETOWN, April 26.
The President of the South
African Legislative Assembly in
formed the House today that one
of its members, H, G. Luttig, has
been arrested on a cherge of ‘fal-
sitas’’—a form cf fraud. Luttig is
a member for Mayfair constitu-
ency of Johannesburg.—Reuter,



BY BLOCKING the southward drive on the estimated
three Chinese divisions in the past three days, they were
believed to have set the Communist time-table back 48

hours.

Seoul is now threatened with its fifth change of rule

since the conflict began.

The Communists are driving on the city along two

roads from newly captured

Munsan, south of Imjin River

and the road through Uijongbu 15 miles north of Seoul.

The capital’s remaining 200,004 ——

Mhabitants made another exodus}
when Communists opened their
Spring offensive on Sunday. Now
only military

city.

Thewmain force of the Commu-
nist thrust is from their enlarged
bridgehead southwest of the Imjin
Uijongbu was still in United
Nations hands tonight,

Eighth
said the

police patrol the

Tonight's
munique

Army Com-
Communists
mantained pressure all along the
western front today, but in the

| centre a U.N. Tank Force carried

out a local counter attack and
drove about two miles into Com.
munist held territory,

Troops holding the ieft of the
United Nations’ western front
fought a splendid rearguard action
before withdrawing. Massed
United Nations artillery today and
tonight poured a hail of fire into

the danger area.

East of the critical sector, Com-
munists also pressed hard at with-
drawing United Nations elements

and during the day surrounded an
infantry unit,

‘Tanks were thrown im to help
rescue the infantry who with this
aid fought their way clear. Chinese
also made two penetrations of the
line west of Kapyong which they
had nearly reached in their central
front breakthrough, after they had

{Smashed a South Korean division

on Sunday night,

Late reports said ‘the United

| Nations had closed the line again.

—Reuter.



Attlee Goes Home

LONDON, April 26,

Clement Attlee, British Prime
Minister to-day left St. Mary’s
Hospital, London for his country
house at Chequers, Buckingham-
shire,

The 68-year-old Premier has
made a good recovery from
cuocdenal ulcer and was expected
to resume full duties with a
Sabinet meeting next Monday:!
fe has been in hospital for five
w . —Reuter

C
I





Bucket Full Of Stolen Money



Police Break.
Up Clash

TEHERAN, April 26.

Persian Police broke up a clash
between Leftist Peace partisans
and members of a Rightwing Iran
Party in the Caspian town of
Rasht last night, a Government
source said to-day.

A few people were slightly in
jured. Isfahan and Abadan—the
main oil centres—were quiet to
day.

This source told Reuter that
strikes in the oil areas and other
parts of the country were all over
and Government was watchful
against any further trouble.

—Reuter



Rhee Dismisses

Another Minister

TOKYO, April 26.

South Korean President
Sygman Rhee to-day dismissed
shegaaad of Justice Kim Chun
fon,

This was the second dismissal
of a Cabinet Minister arising out
of the “Kochong incident”. Yes
terday the President dismissed
Home Minister Dr. Cho Pyong Ok.

In the “Kochong incident” 187
South Koreans in the Kochong
Village, 35 miles south west of
Taegu, were summarily executed
by a South Korean battalion dur-
ing anti-guerilla operations on
February 12.—Reuter.



Pass Defence Bill

WASHINGTON, April 26.

The House of Representatives
passed the $6,468,206,000 Defence
Appropriation Bill today largely to
buy weapons, It supplements an
estimated $41,000,000,000 previ-
ously appropriated for National
Defence for the fiscal year ending
next June.—Reuter.

BELGIUM, April 26.

A DETECTIVE kicked a bucket in a back garden here

and out fell 200,000 Belgian

Police held Hippoulyte Pannecouke, his friend Pierre Clotte-
mans and his son Roger Clottemans on charges of armed rob-

bery from Cassiers Colliery last
francs were stolen.—Reuter.



Princess Wants
To Emigrate

PARIS, April 26,
An Ex-Queen of Egpyt out of
work and short of cash, today
withdrew the threat to squat at
the British Embassy here until
che got visa to go to England.

Prineess Bayan Djavdan, 74
year old widow of the last Khedive
et Egypt, who once had a palace
and 65 servants, is job hunting.

he has been offered work in
Britain but the visa for which
she applied last March 20, is still
not forthcoming

She had threatened to squat at

CONFIDENCE VOTE | the Embassy here for two hours

BRUSSELS, April 26.
A virtual vote of confidence
vas obtained by Belgium’s All!
Catholic Government today when
the Chamber of Deputies passed
a Government majority resolu-
tion concerning the Belgo.CQeek
Marshall Aid. Fund dispute.
—Reuter,



|e unil it was granted.

But today she left the Embassy

| within an hour.

An Embassy spokesman said
the Princess had agreed to calf
off her squatting campaign on the
assurance that the Consulate
would notify her as soon as Lon-

| don had acted on the visa.
—Reuter.

francs. A few minutes later

month when 3,880,000 Belgian



Plane Explodes:
Crew Killed

RIO DE JANEIRO, April 26.

A B45 plane from Natal air
base exploded in the air in the
city of Monte Belo in the State
of Rio Grand Norte.

The crew of sargeants and two
lieutenants were all killed.

—Reuter.

16 Planes Downed

LONDON, April 26.
Chinese Communists claim that
their anti-aircraft guns had
brought down 16 United Nations
planes and damaged another in
Korea during the week ending
April 22.—Reuter.

VEHICLES COLLIDE

An accident occurred on Black
Rock Road near St. Stephen’s at
about 11.20 last night between a
Fire engine M.129 of the Fire
Brigade and a "bus owned by the
National ’Bus Co. Both vehicles
were slightly damaged.



More Planning Needed *

LONDON, April 26.
Sir

Frank Nixon, President
the London Chamber of Commerce
advocated today more planning
for the whole of the Brit Cc

monwealth “so rich in its variou
resources” and less for the Uniter

Kingdom's “precarious little island
economy” He warned ga
the rs€ of easy r
lay with parti Nar

i ve

“If they are to be carried up on
today’s wave of prosperity only
to drop into misery and depression
in the fairly near future—accord-
ing to the vagaries of American
purchasing — the social problem
could be immediately increased
and the task of administration
rendered nearly hopeless” he said

Sir Frank, an economic and

| financial expert way proposing the

j r nt
doption of the Or acct t

vat the ‘Annual
Chamber.

Raw materials, almost without
exception, were the most fickle
and sensitive products of the mod-
ern world, he said,

“What I am suggesting is that

Meeting of the



to meet economic problems of the
next 25 years we should proceed
to much closer harmonising of our

affairs with those of the Common-
wealth and sterling area.—Reuter










ee 5 en

CALL FOR
“ALL OUT”
ENQUIRY

WASHINGTON, April 26.

The United States Senate
Republican Policy Corgmittee
called last night for an “all out”
investigation of foreign and
military policies linked with the
dismissal of General Douglas
MacArthur.

Its Chairman Senator Robért
Taft told reporters that the
group wanted inquiry i
policies as far back as the 1
Yalta Conference with special
emphasis on what he called thé
administration’s “encouragement
of Chinese Communists.”

Senator Taft said Republicans
would demand that hearings on

MacArthur issued by the Senate}.

Armed Services and
Relations Committee on
should be. held in
New York, Major
Ourtney Whitney, General Mac-
Arthur's spokesman, said the
General had no objection to pub-
lic hearings or to being televised.
' —Reuter.

CHARGED WITH
NEGLIGENCE

MOBILE, ALABAMA, Apfil 26,
The United States coastguare
today charged the master of the
Fsso Suez with negligence in an
open sea collision with another
tanker Esso Greensbore in which
39 lives were lost. The two
Standard cil tankers collided in

Foreign
May 3,
public, In



heavy fog 200 miles south ’ of
Morgan City, Louisiana last
Friday,

All but five of the Greensbore'’s
crew of 42 were burned to death,
Captain Edwin C. Geick of
Bayonne, New Jersey was charged
with two counts of negligence
The formal hearing of the com-
plaint is to open tomorrow.

—Reuter.

Wants to Take Over
Oil Immediately”

TEHERAN, April 26.

A special session of the Majlis
Oil Committee tonight unani-
mously passed a resolution to put|
the nationalisation of Persian



into effect immediately.

The resolution will be submit-
ted to Majlis itself on Saturday
and if approved will need only
the sanction of the Senate to
become law.—Reuter.



Production Up

LONDON, April 26.
Stalingrad’s industries destroyed
during the war are now producing
31.5 per cent more than in 1939.
According to chief architect Vash-
ili Simbirstev, as quoted in a Tass

official Soviet news agency mes.
sage received in London.—Reuter.

Petain Improves

YEU ISLAND, Bay of Biscay,
April 26.

Ex-Marshal Phillipe Petain of
France spent a restful night and
had some food today.

“He might bury us all yet,”
joked the island’s doctor who has
treated the 95-year.o!ld Vichy
Chief during the crisis of his ill
ness,—Reuter,



CONNECTIONS

LONDON, April 26.
The West Indies Student Union
news bulletin has made a public
disclaimer of any connection with
the Communist-inspired “West
Indies Newsletter”,

The bulletin, issued to-day, con-
tains this statement from Presi
dent Rawle Farley of British
Guiana: “A copy of this (Com-
munist) newsletter has been for
warded to the Union. W.1.S,U's
Executive Committee wishes to
announce that it has no connection
whatsoever with this publication,
and on behalf of the Union wishes
to dissociate itself compictely
from the analysis and perspective
of the report contained therein
of findings of the Union's General
Conference of December 1950.
and the distorted, irrational and
absurd refiections cast on the past
policy of the Union”.

The disclaimer goes on to advise
all members of the W.1.S.U. never
to confuse students’ news bulletins
with those issued by the West
Indies Committee of the Commu.

| nist Party

General }.















LONDON, April 26.
Hugh Gaitskell, Chancellor of
the Exchequer, to-day announced
measures to restriet certain com
pany transactions leading to eva
ion of ineOme tax or profits tax.
They are given in the Finance
Bill published to-day which lega!-
ises the budget proposals. It
oi that evasion of income
ax or profits tax by trading con-
cerns whieh transfer their
business abroad or even transfer
any part of it to people abroad
without Treasury consent, will be
liable to heavy penalties
—Reuter.

=
=
=
@
Ms
DP

—~.



| Higher Taxes

WASHINGTON, April 26.

President Truman warning that} iearmament programme, and if |
“have not] ig

inflationary pressures
yet reached tneir peak” today ask-
ed Congress for higher taxes
tighter credit controls and “fair
ceilings” on farm and other pro-
ducts.

In a special message to Con-
gress which urged speedy action,

Truman said the “world situation the United States allowed Britai:

could explode at any time and we
must make every day count”,
o~Reuter.

MacArthar Booed
And Welcomed

CHICAGO, April 26.

A group of young people booed
and hoisted the sign — “Fade
Away”—as General Douglas Mac
Arthur passed in triumph through
the streets of Chicago to-day.

On the other side of the road |
from the Univertlity where the
group stood, an old lady held up
a sign “God Bless Our Next Presi
dent” and dismissed Commander,

The procession received § a
tumultuous welcome from Chic
ago citizens and other Midwestern
ers.—Reuter,





Stokes Named New

e loaded before the end of May
or Pr This was laid down in 2 shipment
] \ y ea schedule hurriedly drawn up after
the signature of the new Meat
LONDON, April 26. Pact three days ago
Prime Minister Attleesehose a dynamic Socialist business-| The two vessely already takin
man tonight to solve the raw material crisis which caused | meat are Highland Monarely whic!
two ministers to walk ot of his Cabinet this week started yesterday. and the Pata-
He appointed 54-year-old Richard Stokes as Lord of the | four oy ion gc cot
Privy Seal—up till now a ministerial] post without definite} to load are the Alentara, Drina
duties. At the same titne he announced | Eva Pefon and Merling
Stokes would take a new Govern Reuter
ment Department to handle raw
DISCLAIMS materials,

_ He would take this responsibil
ity over from the Board of Trade
and the Ministry of Supply

The full scope of Richard
Stokes in the new Raw Material
Department has not yet been®*
worked out. His appointment was *
decided on only yesterday, quai
ters close to the Government said

Stokes, until now Minister of
Works, is one of Britain's richest
Socialists. He resigned as Man
aging Director of Ransomes and
Rapier, heavy engineering firm,
}on beeoming Minister. In 1947 he
banned the sale of mechanical
equipment by his firm to Russin



A FRIENDLY GESTURE

Limit War
In Korea Is

U.S. Policy

WASHINGTON, April 26

President Truman said at hi
Press Conference today that
was still the polley of the United
States and the United Nations t
limit the war in Korea.“ if possi
ble.”

President Truman said
they should let the Senate Com
mittee get the facts on the Mac
Arthur controversy, and he de
clined to make any new statement
himself

to-day

The President spoke with de
liberate indifference of the current
speeches and statement being
made by General MacArthur ar
his Secretary, Major Gener
Courtney Whitney

He said that General Max
Arthur could say what he liked
and do what he liked and go

where he would now that he was
back in the United States.

After first saying that there
were no. strings on MacArthur,
the President then corrected him
self to say that as President he
did have strings on him, but he
did not intend to pull them

Truman explained that under
legislation passed with his support

Il, Generals such

Tories Want To | see
Know The Truth
About Raw Materials

LONDON, April 26
Winston Churchill's Conservatives will force » debate tn
the Commons next Tuesday on the raw materials issuc
which has caused a Labour Government crisis

PRINCE BERNHARD of the Netherlands, who is now on an ——
visit to the Argentine, lit President Peron’s cigarette when he visited

the President at the Government House, Buenos Aires. Boos
—Ewpress



the five

the

Army” held a permanent lifetime
that such

Generals were stibject to recall to
duty and pointed out that he had
reealled General Risenhower to
take charge of the North Atlantic
Army Reuter

ippointment
| He acknowledge





EVA AND JUAN

BUENOS AIRES, April 26
Peronists bloe deputies met to

They will probe deeply into allegations by Aneurin Bevan } 44y ; vp anes Sele
. ‘ 7 “¢ ~ Presolution i » lYo2 alec n
and Harold Wilson, that ihe shortage of vaw material ticket be Peron and Evita, Severa!

sections of the Peronista Party
have already published the same
view, but this was never officially
supported before

makes a £4,700,000.000 arms programme linpossible

| Sone Conservatives suspect? : : ma wat
danger and that Government ma: | NO) PROGRESS ON
BIG “4° AGENDA

danger and that Government may
be hiding same truth so. as. to py
Be and Wilson in the Wrong
During the debate, Churchill is
likely to demand that the publi PARIS. April 26,
be told all the facts of the case :

—Reuter

FIRE DESTROYS HOUSE

tiv Four ~Fereign | Minister
He will insist that nothing MUS | deputies made no progress at their A 194%. boatd and: shingled
stand in the way of fulfilling th: | sai, meeting which lasted only 40 }house situated at Goddard's Lana



1 ae ninutes todas St. Stephen and owned by Seibert
in jeoperay, the nation mus ge pathic elit ae Headley was comple telv de troyed
me: talk Andrei Gromyko’s statement on 1o™ fire last night, The fire started
, c ‘4 ey ya hehe, ag ‘fat about 10.45 p.m. and the Fire
Britain's Ally geben bet ‘Philip Jess “i ar Brigade arrived on the scene a
. : ei ; - 25 Tne wner-—occupier
Hector McNeil, Secreiary ¢ long statement quoting from a a "hia nnd My Pad sais at the
State for Scotland warned a | United Nations Commission report tit Po The ‘ohen '* ror tasuired
Nunoen, Seotland today that on June 24, 1950, a western -
spokesman said. Dr, Jessup de a
to go short of essential material | ¢lared the North Korean attack fs
the effects would be felt over tt on June 24 was | unprovoked | THE “ADVOCATE
whole field of production brutal aggression” S
av y WS
But he told the annual meetin | pays for NEW

Deputies are in the eighth week |
of discussion over the agenda
to bring their chiefs to the confer- |
ence table |

af the Scottish Trades Union Con
gress that Government was not
without hope that America would
help

He welcomed a statement or
raw materials made tast night by»
Dean Acheson, American Secre
tary of State as “forthright anc
helpful”. It showed Britain wa
being treated as an ally

No one should suppose Govern
ment was not taking steps to mee
the abnormal situation.

—Reuter

DIAL 3112
Day or Night

wmeReuter. ||



36,000 Tons Meat

For Britain

LONDON, April 26
Of the 200,000 tons of careuse
meat Argentine has undertake
to supply to Britain during the
next 12 months 36,000 tons will be







Jumps Into Street
4 ry .
From Top Floor |
BAYREUTH, Bavaria
April 26
A 52-year-old iabourer jumped
from his top floor room here t
the street and suffered dovbl
fracture of the pelvis. Investi-
gation showed that he had her

a bus starting in front of hi
house and thought it was the sire?
for an air raid warning

The labourer, who was seriously

wounded in the war \



reported








It is believed he or Sir Hartley {to have previously had similai
Shaweross, the new President of }hallucinations when he cz
the Board of Trade, will go to]/dwellers out of thei apartr
America to discuss raw materials, ! yelling ‘ir raid
Reuter —Reuter Cot ruritity your ~
i 1 Chi
‘ ‘
U.N. Might Cut Off Red China wees
Vian eae GOLD FLAKE
ARREN AUSTIN, United States representative to the United
Nations, has hinted to Congress that the United right

consider cutting off Communist China’s communicatior

to halt aggression in Korea. Aust

the House Appropriations Sub-Committee on

‘here yesterday.—Reuter

Nations






in’s remarks t

March

4635





~*

ee



PAGE TWO



Ms REX STOLLMEYER,
Trade Commissioner in
Canada for the B.W.I., B.G.
and the Balamas came in on the
B.W.1.A. “flight from Trinidad
yesterdayemaorning on a two day

visit H&S here to have dis-
cussions Se Sir George Seel,
Head lopment and Wel-
fare ¥ West Indies, and
Prof = 3easley, Financial
Riise tox@.D. and. W

Rritish Viee Consul-Manaos
R. AND MRS. P.G, TURNER

BS have come all the way from
Manaos to Barbados for a_ holi-
day Mr Turner is the Hop
British Viee Consul in | Manaos
and this is their first trip out of
Brazil Om over ten years They
are here £6&two or three months



and are » ening their Barbados
holiday atethe Enmore Hotel.

Five Years

M*. HOWARD RUSSELL is a

lesman with the Sydney
Ros. Druggists in Venezuela
An Asati. he has been living
in Venezuela for five years, He
is on a five day visit to his wife
and family Who ave. staying at

the Paradise Beach Clhib

Mr. Russell arrived from
Venezuela via Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A,.

Two Heads Meet









me eneeee come





Carib Calling BBE Ratio

Up from Grenada

BARBADOS



ramme

PRDAY. a i
6.30 am.—12.15 p. eo -_









| ARTIE® S HEADLINE RS. CARMEN MIZRAHI — 19 aM
arrived from Grenada _ yes- 6.30 a.m. Forces Favourites; 1.00 «.m
e- fhe News; 7.10 a.m N
terday by B.W.I.A She is on 7.15 am Pram ‘ihe Hews, Analysis:
two weeks’ holiday, staying at am. Programme .Purade; 7,
Abbeville Guest House. Mrs ee “seems East
re} e Orch ; 8.
— ahi is a sister of Mrs. Louis. am, semprini at the Susie: 64 aoe
Biscoito who is at present in How the Writer Does It; 9 am. The
Barbados with her husband a ere 9.10 am. Home News from Brit-
Miss Sheila de Gruz and, Miss Programme. mm. _Gewt, Pawn: M, 15, a.m.
Clare Vieira of the Singer Sewing ers" Choice; 11,45 a.m. World Affairs:
Machine in Trinidad have re- 32.00 (noon) The News; 12.10 p.m:
turned after a short holiday here, N®W* Analysis; 12.15 p.m- Close Down,
Ascot Snobbery AIBA Bote ee ices 19. 76M
NCE more the grey-toppe’ 4.15*p.m) Southern Serenade Orche:-
brigade are lining up for bm — poh. é ting eoond 5.00
ag > m. Composer ee! m,
their passes to the Royal ere Syst Muse, 8.40 Bin, ei Pp.
at Ascot. The meeting is in June ¢& 09 p.m. Merchant Navy Programmes
ALTH Applicants should have written 615 pgm Rebuilding in “London's East
NATIONAL HE by April 19 to the Ascot Office, End: 645 p m. Programfne Parade.
at St. James's Palace, over which

GLASSES

ae AND TEETH

HALF FREE
[then

we ee:





English Doors
HAT is the most extrava-

gant project in your expe-
rience?

You will answer: the
Festival of Britain. But here is
one that will make the spend-

thrifts of the South Bank writhe
with envy.

the Duke

of Norfolk presides,

In a changing world this division
of racegoers on the basis of social
standing has become an anachron-
ism, an example of preferential
treatment which leads to nothing
but snobbery.

New Manageress

HEN the Four Winds Club

reopens on October Ist.
Mrs. Susan Burke of Trinidad will
be the manageress. She will
succeed Mr. “Bro” Hamilton who
has not been manager there for

607.15 pam,
7.00 p.m. The News;
Analysis;

35.53.

7.10 p.m. News
7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary.

7AS—11.00 pom. 6... 25.53 $1.32 M





7.45 p.m. Think on These Things;
£.00 p.m, Radio oe 8.15 p.m.
English Magazine; Composer
of The Week; 9.00 “opm. P World Affairs;
915 pm Ken Mackintosh; 10.00 pm
The News; 10.10 p.m. From the Editor-
jals; 10.15 pm Light Musi¢; 10.30 p m
Rendezvous Players; 10.45 pm The De-
Late SS ovsnaeay 11 00 p.m. Ring up the
Curtain.

C.B.C. PROGRAMME













A eerste tial oa re ATE







| JAN ETTA DRESS “SHOP

Lower Broad Street -:







“ Upstairs Qyver Newsam’s



TODAY 2.0,4 46 & 8.39pm

IDA LUPINO Presents



DRESSES of all Types

4:0 9S



Ready-Made from London
Also Madeé-to—Order

BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS

ASTOR

FRIDAY to

UNIVERSAL, PICTURES Proud’

COCKTAIL, HANDBAGS

THEATRE

SUNDAY 8.30 p.m
Presents, It's Top, Adventure!

Action! Thfiller! Its rich in Beauty and Booty

~, .“BUCCANEER’S GIRL”

IN TECHNICOLOR

Starring:
EXTRA‘

YVONNE DeCARLO
EXTRA! LES BROWN

PHILIP FRIEND
and the Band of Renown

2-Reel Musical Short)





with Sally

LOUISIANA
Jimmie DAVIS
and —



_ OISTIN

Warner 2 Feature Hit!
Color by Technicolor with

Lon McALLISTER and
“CHAIN LIGHTNING”

Eleanor PARKER

Midnite Sat. 28th



SAT. 12 MIDNIGHT
and SINGING GUNS

THE KID FROM CLEVELAND
ACTION PLUS!

Don’t Miss Them

Ann CIRIO





SS
—SOPPELELELEL ALPES

GLOBE

POPP PSO

THEATRE

TO-DAY and ‘CONTINUING 5 & 8.30 p.m,

Tle STUDIO THAT Gave You The NAKED CITY" wow cives vou...



SPPPSOSEâ„¢.



EMPIRE

355569990)

«THE
TO-NIGHY at 5.30 .



FORREST, Keefe
Also LATIN RHYTHM

MIDNITE SAT. 2ath



DIAL
PLAZA on

To-day to Sunday 5 and 8.30 p.m.
“THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT”
Barry Fitzgerald Shirley Temple

Humpbrey BOGART and
(Monogram)

CALL OF THE JUNGLE
and DRIFTIN’ KID—Tom KEENE

TO-DAY at 2.30 Only
Republic Pictures presents

3RD MAN”

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

and Continuing to TUESDAY 445 &&.30 pm.

NOT WANTED

BRASSELLE, Leo PENN

Latest NEWSREEL

SATURDAY 9.30 a.m, & 1.30 p.m

cisco KID in
BEAUTY AND THE BANDIT

— and —



GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James

FRIDAY to SUNDAY 8.30 p.m
MATINEE: SUNDAY 5 p.m.

“LOST BOUNDARIES”
Starring: Beatrice PEARSON
Mel FERRER, Canada LEE
Midnite Sat. 28 (Monogram)
The CISCO KID in—
SQUTH OF THE RIO GRANDE

and Ronald WINTERS as Charlie
Chan in “THE GOLDEN EYE.”







ROYAL

TO_DAY to SUNDAY
4.30 and 8.30
Columbia Big Double .. .«

Robert YOUNG &
Marguerite CHAPMAN









SONG OF THE WASTELANDS
. Junmmy WAKELY THE LIVING GHOST
eee























a ed r * It concerns doors costing £20,- cever: h & Continuin in
R. T. J. WALNE was at g several months. FRIDAY, April 27. 1951 : mung
% : - "- 000. The figure sounds fantastic. ‘ tet 10.00 p.m. —' 10.15 N
-VE Seawell yesterday — et ning Yet that is ‘the price of two pairs St. Kitts Visit Canteanaes” ne ee Darryl F. Zenuck presents + RELENTLESS ”
to meet Mr, John H — who of steel doors now being made RS. F. H, MANIFOLD and cto 2 10-30 p.m. Canadian Irene DUNNE in
came in from , Venezuela via at Cheltenham, her daughter Sonja who hacy “Re. 25,51 M, AND
aga fe L on ed ‘ame ‘ anor will be B0ft. wide, 20ft, been bet alias Sand es = beeen » + THE MUDLARK” ee r i
- v z ye . igh. 1éy will weigh more yesterday by 0 WV sdedhey T he f if ok
eeu, is Pitennnne ot ees than 12 tons. At the touch of a Kitts via Antigua on a three-week CROSSWORD with UST ie
upply of Venezuela, In Caracas, button they will swing open, for visit. There were staying at the Alec GUINNESS &
supplic¢ TS of ‘oil well drilling tools they will be operated electrically, St, Lawrence Hotel, EER ABA eS | ‘ Constance SMITH Glenn FORD &
ett Mr. Walne is the head of The doors will be decorated with he P r ; a Ida LUPINO
the | Ni ational Supply Export panels of silvery aluminium, so Administrator Intransit ; sis y poe he alee akg ee oe ela
ako taps Sela wile ite delicate that they are being cast NTRANSIT through Barbados Dy , i ROX i
pen eat ; in, by_hand. yesterday from Grenada en
ee ene i he ee Through these mighty portals youte to Dominica via St. Lucie STEPHEN McNALLY SUE ENGLAND « CARBA TO.DAY to MONDAY OLYMPIC
tour an America. Mr, and will pass thousands of civil ser- was His Honour Mr. E. P. Arrow with d d “THE DUKES” 4.30 and 8.15 TO.DAY to MONDAY
Mrs. alné spent their ; honey - vants, For the doors are to grace smith, Administrator of Dominic. and intro ucing : ’ “7 So ane @. 45
wea ' ie ayares 480- the two main entrances to the who had been in Grenada attend A UNIVERSAL-INTERY SIONAL PICTURE M-G-M Smashing Double , . .
Brack een oomee caverta. ore an ing the Administrators’ conference & hg & Robert TAYLOR & Universal Action Double . .
eS et . going up in Whitehall Gardens, which was presided over by tne ;
Two: Americans overlooking the Embankment. Governor a the Windwarc x PLUS % peter MITCHUM John Saat antver
R. . DODGE, an attaye The Air Ministry and the Board [eionas ; : 7" y ; + andolph
M at oT han Embassy of Trade will occupy the build- hes ibtranait on the same plane % LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE % + UNDER CURRENT ” in
in Mexico “Qyho, had been on.a ing. ‘ » St. Lucia was Mr, Randy Gili $ FREDDIE SMALL “You C ” x
short visit here left yesterday Who pays the £20,000 for the toe iG Snteriatinnit Mores. rae srt pats a : . ou Can Do No Wrong % AND «THE SPOILERS ”
for Puerto Rico by BLW.LA, ca doors’? The British taxpayers, Ltd., in Trinidad + Gee ees, *% JOAN LICORISH Tennessee Waltz” % «+ MGHT MUST
me Eom Burke, American Vice From B,G. to Nyasaland Short Holiday B SoGtaS ike s forkabiire ver. ‘Buy | BRUCE MANN ‘ae % PALL” ie
. Tom Burke, American Vice eA. aNyas. n 4 iS like Kgily ” x ie
Consul in Georgetown, is holi- TR “FREDERICK SEAFORD, R. AND MRS. LESLIE] \, cee sate ia Nera tizseye Ray. 6) 1% PHYLLIS COLLY MORE ere ene % «SEVEN SINNERS ”
daying atpthe Crane Hotel. He a director of Booker Brothers HEATH are in Barbado: | 2. Sip or mistake. (5) ‘al s° IVOR HADMON “Monalisa % Starring =
has been“shere for a couple of who has just arrived in England for a four day holiday accom~-]‘; Number decapitat (3) JOAN BENTHAM Mie x with
weeks alr®Zdy and will soon be after a visit to the West Indiss, panied by their son Gerald, They] 6 Rend era) ’ GUESTS STARS “THE SUPER TALENT WINNERS” “4 Robert MONTGOMERY & John WAYNE &
returning to BG, will shortly be undertaking» an- tlew in yesterday from Trinidao} } pera e ote Wisc VO ORD. “C89 | Oy . . ? ? See Rosalind RUSSELL Brodrick CRAWFORD
Attributes of Old Age other trip abroad, At the end of by B.W.I.A. where Mr. ey 0 Broken bone. (4) : rf x GERALD DAISLEY — Joe (Bop) CLARK x —_— — ;
HAT is it exactly, being the month he will fly out to Nyase- is an engineer at Forrest Par ‘ort of fish you'd lose. ( ~ ged ; ie ¥ oe or
aes it who you are: a boxer of thirty is ers ot oi ag? ig 2 es en ee li. Short Down Bm % YOU Can Buy Tickets for Tonite all Day and %
t 1 ar Ss ¢ xer art Campbell, Booker arter, @ Sub eawe or’ 1, Carpet matertai ( ; ‘ tale ‘. ;
es tae om ie uitaphsaeeiee a sidiary of Bookers. It will be Sir OL - Il. D SoeANT'S $ ype 1 sae vole. oh % Tonite at the Ticket Booths x A DRAMA AS POWERFULLY REAL AND
the age of .twenty—yes, twenty: ents mi ve to are destination when he left : Bop vezanee ro) Fiens00001se0essdseheesonseeeneslTeenssoesoconont EMOTION wm CRAMMED AS LIFE ITSELF
‘from hour to hour we rine and He expects to be there aboul a caawell yesterday was “New| ¢. oi ! his 8 a haa een
ripe, from hour to hour we rot and month, Specialisi Haven", St, Peter. He was one] 7 Notas much Ser ee ae uae IT’S A MOVIEGOING EXPERIENCE YOU'LL
rot;) but our brain power, our éecialrsing of the passengers arriving from ey Could Make % resi race
mental alertness, is at its best yTARRY- NARAIN, Barbadian Swarvadie by B.W.LA. . . Off to is Ogvcle win cut Me hcn jake (4) o NEVER FORGET!
somewhere about thirty usually chemistry student is spe. New York via Puerto Rico yes-] ‘soiution ot saturaass uugne Accors:
and it goes, on about the same cistising at the Chelsea Polytech- terday went Mrs. Edith Friedman} p00 N° wine tS *Sania. it Anne o- Ee ae
level, very “ttle difference at all, ni. Garib understands it is his and her daughter Ingrid. . . Mr.} 17 sell” 19 “Gib “2a Sune va Urn i COU ric)
ro on eign ees 1 intention to join the Government 1 Devaux “— a in — ie gniese: 3° moat “'s ait ke vegan tay T H E C oO M M A N D j that: plunges; heart-deep
Dr artin,. Gumpert, ta a + Oe: ing . Farle ; “i re a -en re oe esin Aside » Setrie —
€5 s 5 : Vou vounter Service on his return to Barba- St. Lucia over e week-e' r i Nee + oe i A Reo
Than You ntti?" mete ee dos, r turned yesterday by B.W.LA. ms de uses Hy Bete oor |” el SA ld ill Th hl







CCU



PERFORMANCE
Picture of the Year!

is being lived ‘each year
CRA as

Girls! A.mavie you



ADVENTURES OF PIPA. AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA.





(Members Only)
MATINEES:
TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT to TUESDAY NIGHT
at 8.30

DAU



. IDA LUPINO

presents














TMG \
ey |, | Wot WearBeadt
- ROMANTIC ! é )
oe — ; An Emerald Production with

cond St0%

RKO presents

BERT MITCHUM
eOT NET LEIGH
| WENDELL COREY

in Ni MARTIAN Predioction



SALLY FORREST: KEEFE BRASSELLE - LEO PENN
eroded by TDA LUPINO one ANSON BOND: oveces oy ELMER CLIFTON

Original story by Paul Jarrico and Malvin Wald + Screenplay by Paul Jarrice and Ida Lupino
Released by FiCM CLASSICS, ING.

OPE PES ero

EMPIRE THEATRE



BY THE WAY...

bu aath* POT om :
EART ; stions iscussi 's r ove i ° AY 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
EAR RENDING questions we are discussing bowlers. from Covent Garden overran its a fair % r ‘ Y - TOD.
H have been asked about the Cocklecarrot: Mr. Fumbling, time by one minute. loli ay AM TO-DAY B..30 pm. and Continuing and Continuing Daily 4.45 and
apparent absence of the exquisite wouldn't you agree that the eas- (News item.) One: 8.30 ».m.

By BEACHCOMBER

v

iest way to sleep is to wear no hat
at all?
Fumbling (puzzled); Of course
No Words Wasted

Mimsie Slopcorner from the jam-
borees connected with the Festi
val,

Is it conceivable that, in sttch a

URELY even the millions who

are chained to their radio

sets will see the fun in that bit
of news,

“with BORDON GEBERT + Produced and Oiocted by
CON HARTMAN « Seroan Moy by Isobel Lennest

DAILY at 4.45 & 6.30 p.m.

B’TOWN (Dial 2310) ALSO! “LATIN RHYTHM”

|
|
|

























ae io; re see is no PEEVISH writer producing To the Tune of

Cee) SAD Oya Saha ee Sone elaborate and sarcastic sen- D . ’ .

of English girlhood? She has jences ¢ FOO ee eat anae rumcondra Rose B 7 TIFUL
been little before the public late» jira s shout a politician milssed LARGE picture, demonstrat- STOP THAT LEAK / E ‘A

fire completely.

Into my mind

ly, apart from a three-day game that ma nificent warning ing the horrors of going bald,

lbp! oan m Shofield as Miss ot Mr. Hilaire Belloc to Hanisiy brings unbidden to my lips the IN YOUR ROOF NOw .
Suiits Dustbin, ann 3 ae visit MacDonald: “Take care, lest 1 $08 sung by a bald man to a

to Runcorn as the Haulage and make you immortal with an “e@iry man.

Freightage Queen of 1951. One epigram!” You are very proud of your mane |

shlanati » | ivitv is aaa

oe abe ie eb Auicky; Weber iis Art Wins By A Nose mut have you forgotten this jape? We of mF

was invited to christen the new Big Ben was not broadcast at It is only the hair on a goose- :

gas-container at Shrewdleigh, she "ine o’clock last might, as the _ berry EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS

refused to be kissed by Councillor
Tudmarsh,

Fumbling Before the
Commission

R. VINCENT FUMBLING
was questioned by the Com—
mission yesterday at King’s
Knucklefurtker. Mrs. Wretch
asked him why he could not sleep

sae act of “Madam Butterfly’ That distinguishes it from a grape.

RED CEDAR SHINGLES
ROLL ROOFING — Plain
ROLL ROOFING — Red
PITCH PINE

Rupert and the Iee- flower—13

in ¢ rdi , bowler ith ¢
brim. He explained that the brim DOUGLAS FIR |
would get in the way of the ————
pillow, THE HAREHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
: Mrs, ee mies eee lie >
down slowly an yar’ y? I I rD
Fumbling: Yes, lass y held co ‘ON FACTORY L









it on with both hands.

. LUMBER DEPARTMENT $83 DIAL 4610
Cocklecarrot: Perhaps a









smaller brim would be possible? Rupert takes the le ad in the race slope and they go skidding right o: LE S .
Ww Mrs Wreten: Or harder brim he ers stent ‘tal in rhe mide om Me = SSSO99 CSO POO OSPF OVOS POP OSS OOD AD
30 keep the hat on the head? Aiton ee at he Mepettc: Skane OO ts wie he ATTENTION £! |
baat ta an’ fan isthe ie i up in the tushes, cries. "It's gra nd here. We'll
é Miss “Quayling: No doubt. But obi Their slethecea whos of the ba ane pte 7 eee ere FACTORY MANAGERS |
Po gi wl nl a nu a REE a a n = a = = Take this opportunity of obtaining yous requirements
MEN'S WORSTED TROUSERS $17.8: ; FOR ANY
= BLUE, FAWN, BROWY _— a GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
we Bi eee : a Ranging from %4” upwards COLOW. R r
‘ +
YOUTHS' LONG GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS $6.18 MILD STEEL SCHEME
2) BLUE PIN STRIPED SUIT ING 88.5: a Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes :
ode :
bes BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes
SPORT SHIRTS s3.90 475 esa © . oe ¢ to $ 1 29
a MEN’ i FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill 4 e
Pm EN'S PLASTIC BELTS Alle, bbc, Bac, Bic, = . At PRICES that cannot be repeated. AT
o BOY'S PLASTIC BELTS BB. a x
. : The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd
' Tge T 1 $ ae £ Jd La -
3 EVANS & WHITFIELDS mS nar, ace Bite Park oad, St. Michael THE CORNER STORE
DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 | Sehhemanshesala SSOCOS SISOS S SOSSOO SOS SSS SSS SOSSSSSS | || = —_—_—









gt

m3 LOREEN 7

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, -1951

eae coment ene stn eS RS SESS ENG SA

Britain Has Not
Played Fair

—C. B. MATHURA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN. April 24,

Councillor C. B. Mathura in
moving a motion at the City Coun-
cil meeting seid that he felt that
Britain has not been playing a fair
game with the sugar industry and
with: the peoples of the Colonies.

Speaking in support of the reso-
lution Councillor Randolph Mitch-
ell said that, “it would be a dis-
honest person who would oppose
the resolution.”

Councillor Mathura said that
the sugar industry was the main-
Stay of the economic structure of
more than two-thirds of the pop-

ulation of the Caribbean area, He

pointed out that the people of

these areas were solely dependent

on the fate of the sugar indusiry,
and he went on to recall the sev-
eral times during which the in-
dustry faced ruin due to lack of
a market.

Mr. Mathura said that as a re-
sult of World Wars I and U, Bri-
tain was compelled to turn her
attention to the British West In-
dies for sugar. This attention of
the British resulted in the in-
creased price of the commodity
and the wages of the workers.
Now the British Government can
do without West Indian sugar,
they are actually tralsacting with
Cuba to buy all the sugar that
country can produce at the ex-
pense of the Colonial Empire.

Judge Did Not Like
Witness’ Shirt

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24,

Mr, Justice W. H. Irwin, pre-
Siding over the Third Supreme
Court in Port-of-Spain in a divorce
case took strong objection to the
dress of a witness, When his name
was Called, Lloyd Johnson, a baker
of Success Village, Laventille,
walked into the witness stand in
what is called a “hot shirt.”

Mr. Justice Irwin: When did
you know you had to give evidence
in this case?

Johnson: “Yesterday Sir.”

The Judge: “Why are you dress-
ed like that? Why are you not
better dressed? Have you ever
given evidence in these Courts
before?”

Johnson: “I have given evidence
here once before, Sir.”

The Judge: “Then you do know
that you should be better dressed.”

Counsel then offered an apology
to the court on behalf of his
witness,







Plant Diseases Reporting

Service May Be Set Up

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24,

A Plant. Pest and Diseases
Reporting Service, providing for
telegraphic reporting of outbreaks
of

new, Or unusually large out.
breaks of _ previously-recorded,
diseases and pests of economic

lants within the Caribbean, has
een strongly... necommended. by
the Research Committee on ‘gt
culture, Fish, Wildlife and Fores-
try of the Caribbean Research
Council,

Yoshida’s Party
Get Best Of

Elections

By SYDNEY BROOKES
TOKYO, April 26,

Nationwide local election
returns today dealt another blow
to Japan’s left-wing party and
were considered likely to
strengthen the cause of Prime
Minister Yoshida in re-establishing
Japan as a Pacific power,

Tn a large turn out of voters—
90 per cent of the electora’
Japanese elected an overwhelni-
ing number of rightwing candi.
dates to Mayors posts in 199 cities
and most mayors and local assem-
bly men in small towns and
villages.

The Socialists who have been
advocating an “overall” Peace
Treaty—that is one to which Rus—
sia would agree—or none at all
and who have been opposed to
rearmament had only 11 of their
candidates ejected.

Yoshida’s Liberal Party (which
corresponds to the Conservative
Party in Britain) favours the
continued co-operation with the
United States and an early Peace
Treaty with friendly Powers
without necessarily waiting for
Soviet agreement.

—Reuter,



Egypt Allows Ship
To Pass To Israel

TEL-AVIV, April 26.

The Egyptian shore signal
station on Sinri Peninsula today
allowed an Israel-bound merchant
ship sailing under Greek colours
to enter the Gulf of Akabah with
= mixed cargo of timber, cement
and foodstuffs,

Observers here considered this
indicated a change in Egypt's
policy towards shipping move-
ments to and from the Israel port
of Elath at the head of the Gulf
on which Egypt, Israel, Jordan
and Saudi Arabia meet. Three of
these four countries have
announced plans to develop their
stretches of the Gulf coast.

Israel hopes to_ construct. an-
other port near Elath to serve
shipping to the Far East and East
Africa. Jordan plans to build a
road _ linking Akabah_ wilh
Amman. Last February the Egyp-
tian Cabinet ratified a plan to
build a deep sea port on the Gulf.

—Reuter.

R.A.F. Vampire Jets
Go Into Action

SINGAPORE, April 26

Royal Air Forcé Vampire jet
fighters today went into action for
the first time in history.

They attacked a guerilla post
in the Malayan jungle. The tar-
get was a red-roofed, bungalow
on an abandoned rubber estate in
South Central Johore, known to
be used by Communists as a
hide-out and rest house.

Two jet fighters, each equipped
with eight 60-pound rocket pro-
jectiles and cannons ed ‘the
bungalow and completely des-
troved it according to a Royal Air
Force spokesman,

—Reuter.





i :

6 w
Tell me
doctor ..

What do

you mean by
a safe antiseptic?”

‘The antiseptic for general use in the home should be highly

germicidal yet gentle on delicate tissues, non-poisonous and,

preferably, should not stain clothes or the skin. *‘ Dettol’

fulfils every one of these

* Dettol’ can be safely use




BWA. B

conditions. Absolutely reliable,

d on even very young children.

‘DETTOL

vo THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

©

RIDGETCWN



EITALIAN FILM

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

“LOOKING AT
PICTURES ”



STAR

THE GIRL with the shoulder length hair style and no make-up who
speaks very little English, but has very expressive hands, is 18-year-
old Pia Angeli from Italy who will co-star with British film star
Stewart Granger in a new film entitled “The Light Touch” to be
filmed in Tunisia. She confesses that she does not like playing love

scenes.
sion”, she said.

“It is so difficult for a schoolgirl to pretend the grand pas-

—Evxpress



Ex-Postman
Gets I.S.M.

HIS MAJESTY the King hag
approved the award of the Im.
perial Service Medal to Mr. Evan
Alphin St. Aubyn McAlister, who
has retired from the post of
Postman-Sorter, General Post
Office, after over 25 years in the
Public Service.

Mr. McAlister is 65. He is now
leading a quiet life at his home
in Seclusion Road, Black Rock,
looking after his goats and doi
a bit of weeding to his small hold.
ing. “These are my hobbies”, he
told the Advocate yesterday,

He went to the Post Office as a
postman. He served 10 years as
a postman before he was pro-
moted to the post of messenger
in 1935. He was a messenger for
15 years and the last year before
retirement, he served ag a
postman-sorter.

Mr. McAlister served under six
Postmasters. He saw the latter
days of Mr. H. W. Collymore, who
retired shortly after he was
appointed postman, During | his
term of office he served under M:
H. H. Heath, Mr. G, F. Sharpe,
Mr, H. Blackman, Mr, C. L,
Abr@hams and Mr. H. N. Arm-
strong the present Postmaster.

“Iam in good health”, saio
Mr. MeAlister, “and I will take
another job provided it is not tuc
strenuous’, However, he is quite
brepared to live on his pension
an@ take a rest. He has a wife and
five children who are all grown
up.

Mr. McAlister started life as a
carpenter. He worked at the trade
for some years before he joined
the Harbour Police in 1908, He
was a constable for four year
when tie Gecided to take a chance
at Boing abroad.

He left Barbados for the States
where he spent 12 years. He thew
came back to Barbados and tried
his hand at restaurant keeping,
but in this he failed, He soon after
joined tp the Public Service.

Britain Will Not
Revalue £ Now

LONDON, April 26.

Usually well informed London
quarters completely discount-
enanced any idea of revaluing the
pound sterling. Such a move
would be quite impracticable at
present they say. It was not even
under discussion in responsible
circles,

Revaluing sterling was advo-
cated yesterday by Roy Harrod,
in the Financial Times, He argued
that Britain could afford it be-
cayse the dollar position of the
sterling area was secure.

Most of the sterling area would



join Britain in revaluing, and
AuStralia especially would be
much helped in the solution of

ner own inflationary problem,
Harrod added that Britain’s ex-
port prices had risen far less than
ier import prices. This deteriora-
ion in the terms of trade imposed
1 bigger burden than rearma-
nent, It was impossible for Brit-
iin to carry two new burdens

imultaneously. Revaluing ster-
ing appeared to be the only
“emedy.—Reuter.



Atomic Explosion

To Cure Cancer

NEW YORK, April 26.
A tiny “atomic explosion” to
eure a cancerous tumour in her
brain failed to save the life of
51-year-old Mrs. Pearle Jamieson
The operation took place in
Brookhaven National Laboratory
on Long Island two months ago.
It was described in Colliers
magazine as an atomie explosion
because doctors injected boron
metal in liquid form into her blood
stream and when it reached the

tumour it bombarded it with
neutrons,

The laboratory said Colliers’
story was premature and un-
authorised but admitted that

three other patients were under
treatment.

Mrs. Jamieson’s husband said
the treatment benefited his wife
at first but the cancer t0o far
advanced. Reuter

wa

ng will

Animals Don’t
Go On Strike

ALTHOUGH he may actualiy
have eaten horseflesh during the
siege of London in the 1940's, Sir
George Seel told the Annual
General Meeting of the S.P.C.A,
last night that the welfare o!
animals meant everything to him

“Man”, he said, “will never be
able to exist on this planet with.
out leaning heavily on the services
of domestic animals, nor, I hope,
his culture become so
mechanised that a faithful anima’
friend means nothing to him
There is no one in Barbados, no
one in the world, who is not de-
pendent upon domestic animals
for his daily food, and for transpor+
and other services upon which his
whdle way of life depends; to say
nothing of the affection, ayd pro
tection, for which the human race
has looked to animals since the
beginning of time.

Animals are most likely to sub-
mit to ill-treatment without re-
taliation. They don't go
on strike. The cow, if it
is not fed, will not give us
milk, But that is not a voluntary
strike, and is in fact attended by
suffering on the part of the cow
iteelf

S.P.C.A. Necessary

We humans have learnt by this
time that decent treatment of
animals—which we, again in flat.
tery to ourselves, call “humane”
treatment—is both morally and
economically rewarding. But we
are ourselves far from perfect, and
our actions are liable to be govern-
ed by selfishness, even greed, and
not seldom by bad temper, The
domestic animal, if he then
happens to be in the way at such
times, is only too likely to come
off badly. That. is why it is im-
portant that, in civilised com.
munities, there should be societies
of men and women vigilant to
bring to notice the cases of ill
tfeatment which are bound to
oceur, and that there should we
legislation to which these societies
can appeal, to back up their efforts
to guard against the worst abdses,

Uncared-For Dogs

Ihave been in Barbados only for

very short time, and in any ease |
would not attempt to say whether
the standards of treatment are
better or worse, t@ken as a whole,
than in other communities, But a
very short time driving in your
streets shows a far greater use of
transport animals than in, say, the
cities of the United States or the
United Kingdom; and I am afraid
that in the country one sees a good
many dogs with a rather tell-tale
uncared-for look.

U.S. Regards
Schuman Plan
As Test

MUNICH, April 25.

John McCloy, United States
High Commissioner in Germany
said here tonight that the Schuman
Plan marked Germany’s emer-
gence as an equal partner in the
great European project.”

Speaking in German over the
Bavarian radio network, McCloy
said “In American eyes, the
Schuman Plan is a test of the
sincerity and ability of European
countries to act as One community.

“If this bold imaginative con-
cept were rejected, it would create
the danger of a disunited and
weak Eurepe and an _ isolated
Germany.’ —Reuter.

GRANTED ASYLUM

CANBERRA, April 26.
Former acting Czechoslovak
Consul-General in Sydney Josef
Felix, who resigned three weeks
ago, will be granted asylum in
Australia, Immigration Minister
Harold Holt announced to-~iay.
Felix said he had resigned his
post because he refused to supply
the Czechoslovak Government
with secret political reports on
Australia.
Holt said today he understood
Felix had served the Allied eause
in both World Wars. It had been





established that he upheld the

democratic way of life and did

not constitute a security risk.
—Reuter

Mr. John Harrison,



Art and Exhibitions Officer «
British Council, this week gave the first of a series of three and Sch. Max

of the

lectures at_the Barbados Museum on “Looking at Pictures.”
In these lectures, he said that he would discuss the way in

which different painters

of different nationalities at

different periods of history have treated the same idea.
eee This afternoon he would deal

Perhaps |
An Atom
Ship

By JOHN E. CARLOVA
LONDON.

A Ministry of Supply spokes-
man predicted today that “possi-
bly within a generation” Britons
will be riding in atomic-powered
trains, ships and aeroplanes,

Of atomic-powered automo-
biles, he said;

“The idea may sound fantastic
now, but there are British
scientists who consider it feasible
in the not too distant future.”

linister George Strauss
—govern t head responsible
for atomi¢e research in Britain—
has contracted with an engineer-
ing firm to prepare plans for an
atomic power unit suitable for
use in large merehant ships and
warships .
Sir John

Cockroft, chief o2
Britain’s largest atomic research
station at Harwell, Berkshire,

said “some of the nation’s best
atom gcientists’’ are studying thc
possibilities of atomie power for
ships, including submarines.

Atom-Driven Submarines

He refused to forecast when
their studies could be put to
practical use, but added:

“Pilot atomic plants will proba-
bly not be constructed for another
four or five yeats, and a further
three years of experiment will be
needed to tést their reliability.”

Admiral of the Fleet Lord
Fraser confirmed that atomic-
driven submarines are in the

experimental stage.

Ministry of Supply officials are
also considering plans for an
atomic energy plant to generate
power for industry and homes
Ministry experts have already
worked out ways in which
atomic power could be harnessed
to the existing electric grid sys-
tem.
At Harwell, specially selected
scientists are working out details
to provide Britain with atomic-
powered aircraft.

Round The World

The team—headed py 33~yeur-
old Dr. J. V. Dunworth—is ex-
peeted to turn out plans for a je!
plane capable of a round—the-
world flight without refuelling.

A scientist said the power plant
for the plane would probably be
a small atomic unit, a fast reactor
u pure uranium 235) on
plutonium.

Sir William Hildred, British
Director-General of the Inter~
national Air Transport Associa-:
lion, declared that atomic power
would enable airliners to com-
bine “tremendous high speed
with almost unlimited range.”

Industrialists interested in the
commercial possibilities of atomic

research are being elped by

courses under way at Harwell.
The first course, gives guid-

ance in the use of isotopes—.

radio-active elements.
Increase in Use of Isotopes
The Ministry of Supply spokes-
man said the school was set up
because of the rapid increase in
the use of isotopes and the need

to properly understand their
application.
Probably the largest-scale

private reseatth in atomic science
in Britain is being carried out by
Associated Plectrical Industries,
a £30,000,000 ($84,000,000) com-
bine.

An A.E.I. research team at
Aldermanston, Berkshire, is re—
ported to have a £ 1,000,000
($2,800,000) a year budget.

The scientists“are aided by an
atom smasher developing an
electrical pressure of 4,000,000
volts—said to be the only atom
smasher of its size in private
hands.

Head of the Aldermaston team
is 47-year-old Dr. T. E. Allibone,
one of the British atom scientists
who worked in the United States
during the war.

A spokesman said Associated
Electrical Industries directors
believe atomic power has “a big
industrial future.” —ENS

FLIGHT
WELLINGTON.

A farmer is on the first leg of
a flight from his home at a spot
118 miles from Auckland to his
birthplace on a farm in Northern
Treland, Pleasure trip? Not en
tirely. It is for a bet of a quzen
bottles of beer,

CONVICTED

DAR-ES-SALAAM.
One of Tanganyika’s wealthiest
Indians, Kapoor Singh, is now
serving 12 months’ hard labour
for a £17 offence. He was con-
victed by a British magistrate in
the goldfields area of illegally
possessing 1.4 02 of raw gold,
Anemones



Senior Short Story Competition |

eal

with portrait painting, at his
second lecture with Landscape
painting, and, lastly with the
subject or genre picture, where
people were doing something.
Mr, Harrison's talk was illustrat-
ed by pictures projected by an
epidiascope.

European portrait painting
originated with the votive picture
of a saint or the Madonna which
was to hang in a church, Tho
donor of the picture was painted
in a corner much smaller than
the subject in an attitude of
prayer. Gradually the donor
grew in size until he or she be-
came as important as the saint;
finally, the saint was ousted from
the picture completely, ang the
portrait had arrived,

State Portrait

Next came the state portrait,

which rendered the monarch as)jof the police and the aughor was |

imposing as possible. This type
of portrait was organised to show
man at his greatest so as to im-
press his subjects. The state
portrait declined as monarchs be-
came less powerful, This tradi-
tion, however, lingered on to some
extent in portraiture, an exam-
ple of it can be seen to-day in
Augustus John’s portrait of the
celebrated ‘cellist Mdme. Suggia
Here the subject is treated in the
grand manner with the panache
and effects of the monarchial
painters. The decline of the state
portrait was followed by portraits
ot dignified, wealthy and aristo-
cratic ladies. Here the artist sur-
rounded his subject with a num-
ber of objects reflecting the birth,
taste and wealth of the sitter.
Individual

In opposition to the portrait
which surrounded the sitter with
such’ paraphernalia were portraits
which made a focal point of the
Subject alone, Here the sitter was
painted on a neutral ground with
nothing to distract the eye of the
beholder. This method of portrait
painting has been used through-
out the history of art. The subject
was portrayed not as part of the
machinery of state, power ox
birth, but as an individual. Such
pictures were painted with a
great economy of colour

Another treatment of portraiture
was that of showing the subject
in everyday surroundings. Of this
there were a very large number
of examples. Again, the artist
sometimes depicted his subject in
domestic surroundings which re-
flected social and economic condi-
tions for political reasons,

Artists also frequently dressed
their subjects to represent some-
thing which they were not, as in
the case of models painted io
represent the Madonna, biblical or
allegorical persons. A frequent
representation of the artist him-
self was as St. Luke=-the patron
saint of painters. In “The Marri-
age at Cana” by Veronese, the
artist portrays as guests at the
marriage prominent contempor-
ary Venetians, and monarchs, and
he painted portraits of himself and
his fellow artists as the band of
musicians,

Haitian Painting

Mr. Harrison during his lecture |
referred to the fact that he had (
recently been in Haiti, where the
Anglican bishop has commission- |
ed a number of popular Haitian
painters to decorate the cathedral.
These paintings were most im-
pressive, One could not help be»
ing touched by the simple faith of
simple men. One of these beauii-
ful paintings was of the Marriage
at Cana, With the exception of
Our Lord and His Mother, all the
details of the painting were mod
ern Haitian. It was, in facet, a
Haitian wedding, but it was in ao
‘way incongruous. It would be
some time before the interior of
the cathedral was completed,

FOOD GOES DOWN

SAN. SEBASTIAN.

A novel method of lowering
food prices has been discovered in
San Sebastian. A group of 20
men, led by two housewives,
seized 10 tradespeople, tied their
feet, threw them into some rowing
boats; they took them half a mile
out to sea and dumped them into
the water. The police did not in
terfere, Next day the price of
food went down with a bang in
markets and shops

HEART ATTACK

OSTEND

A 50-year-old man _ stepped
ashore from the Ostend-Dover
packet boat recently while demo
lition workers in Ostend Harbour
blew up a former German instal
lation, The noise of the explosion
brought on a heart attack and the
man dropped dead.

OTL

SEL
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PAGE FOUR

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Printed by the Advocate Co.,

BARBADOS SB ADVOGATE| HBr

ges Foes

Lid., Broad St. Bridgetown



Friday, April 27, 1951

ees eR Aen
.

Rutchers Uoliday

THE meat
given rise to two alarming problems both
now being aggravated by tive butchers. In
the first place théy have disturbed the dis-
tribution of food, at least in St. Michael
and continue in their obstinacy without
accepting the invitation of the Government
to discuss the issue with a view to settle-
ment,

After the first meatless day on Saturday

1 this island has

situation 1

and despite the avowed intention of the
butchers meet the Controller of
Supplies, the. Government attempted to
settle the issue by inviting the butchers to
make’ the necessary representation or to
come by means of a delegation to discuss
it. Mr. Springer styled as President of the
Butchers’ Association and one other butch-
er met the-Controller of Supplies and the
Colonial Secretary and after preliminary
discussion were invited to bring some more
of the butchers to meet the Control Board
and the Controller to settle the issues in-
volved. Neither the:two who had met the
Controller and the Colonial Secretary nor
any other butcher attended the scheduled
meeting.

not to

In the mean-time the House having met
on Tuesday did not think the matter of
sufficient importance as to warrant their
attention ind so it was not raised in the
House which has now adjourned for three
weeks. The public must in the interim
be satisfied to wait on whatever the butch-
ers care.to do,

| FPresh* meat is an ‘essential ifem in the
diet of the Community and it is known that
there are visitors to the island who have
been suffering the greatest inconvenience
because they have been unable to get any
meat from the Public Market. They have
been in the habit of going to market and
making their purchases. Now they have
suddenly ré@alised that there is no meat
available nor any public explanation nor
any idea when fresh meat will be again
sold in quantities which would enable them
to purchase their supplies.

The butchers may have the best case in
the, world because as other commodities
have increased in price and the cost of run-
ning business increases correspondingly
with the rise in the cost of living, the over-
head expenses of the butcher are likely to
be increased.

There is no reasoiz however to arrogate
to themselves the right to take advantage
of the public whom they serve nor to bully
the Government whose duty it is to see
that the interests of ‘one section is not al-
lowed to prejudice that of others,

It was the duty of the butchers to at-
tend the meeting fixed specially for them
in order to arrive at equitable and reason-
able prices for fresh meat. They must not
be expected to run businesses at a loss;
neither can they expect to be allowed to
make exorbitant demands on the public.

it is likely that a shipment of imported
meat willbe arriving in this island-soon
and this might relieve the situation with
regard to the supplies for some time, but
the problem of the butcher and the local
stock ‘breeder will not have been settled
and will remain to be settled.

If the Control Board is willing to-diseuss
the matter with the Butchers in érder that
the public might have their supplies of
meat, and the butchers persist in refusing
to attend the meeting to discuss the prices,
they will be taking an advantage of the
public without gaining goodwill or sym-
pathy for themselves, If they attend the
meeting it is likely that the matter will be
settled soon and satisfactorily.

OUR READERS SAY:







LONDON, April 20
The difficulty in making 4
comparison between British anc
Soviet colonial systems is thar
little information of Soviet rule
in practice in Central Asia can
come the way of a British writer.
Mrs. Kathleen Stahl has had to
use Soviet documents, constitu-
tions and statistics as her evidenc

for colonial practice within th
Soviet Union, however, in the
first half of the book she can

show how British practice is ofter
different from the constitutions
and formal powers that goverii
the colonial Empire. (There is
no particular Yreason to believ?
these Soviet statistics are deliber-
ately falsified. But experience
shows that anywhere in the worlu
statistics, without knowledge of
ccnditions, can be misleading).
Nevertheless, Mrs. Stahl manages
to make some lively and provo-
cative comparisons, First, quite
rightly, she sets the scene, The
Soviet Union includes five Central
Asian republics within the area
which in old Atlases was called
Turkestan, There, the peoples
were, and many still are, Moslems.
Most of them speaking one or
other of the Turki group of
languages. The total population
is 17 millions, The first con-
clusion to draw is that the Soviet
Union has none of the general
problems of ov er-population
common in British colonies, This
figure of total population is con-

siderably less than that of Nigeria
alone. er second observation
is that the colonial population

within the Soviet Union is far
out-numbered by the European—
Russian population, As Mrs,
Stahl writes, this “has its advan-
teges. It greatly simplifies racial
issues.””. From this fact, probably,
stems the next major point in
Soviet policy. The Government
ir. Moscow is striving to unify
the peoples of the Republics in
the Soviet State. The Soviet
Union, like the British Govern-
ment, is a “de-colonising” power,
But Britain seeks to “hive off”
her Colonies; the Soviet Union
seeks to merge them socially,

culturally, and economically in
the “homeland.”
Government is centralised in

Moscow where the, Central Asian
Republics are represented in the
“Soviet of Nationalities.” But
each of the departments of these
republic governments is respon-
sible to the department of gov-
ernment above in Moscow. And
the Prime Minister is responsible
to the Presidium of the Supreme
Soviet. The aim of Soviet rule
is diametrically the reverse of
the British aim. As Mrs, Stahl
sees it in a careful study of the

Review of:—British and Soviet
Colonial Systems, By Kathicer
Stahl (Faber, London: 12/6)
{Received by:— D. T. Roberts}

method of British colonial goy-
ernment, the purpose of the
British system is to spread res-
ponsibility as widely as possible
and prepare colonial communities
to stand on their own feet. The
Soviet system aims at a unifica-
tion of the whole country, For
the Soviet Union the “problems
of a plural society” exist only tu

be dismissed with Stalin’s theory
that a_ nation, giving rise to
nationalism and a _ culture is

something quite different from a
“state,” the ruling political prin-
ciple. In practice. Soviet imperial
rule works through the tive
domination of the federal gov-
ernment and the universality of
the power of the Communist
party as a training organization.
A citizen of the Central Asian
Republic who seeks advancement
in politics must achieve member-
ship of the Communist party.

Incidentally, he cannot obtain
membership while he remains a

Moslem. For members of the
Communist party. there are
eareers in the administrative

service of the republics, and it is
a proclaimed part of Russian policy
to train local entrants for senior
positions. But high policy and
security, “both of which are
interpreted very widely in the
Soviet system,” are still dealt
with by men from Moscow, Be-
cause the two systems are
attempting to do different things
Mrs, Stahl concludes that
“Britain’s greatest contribution to
colonial rule is political .. . Soviet
Russia’s greatest contribution is
not political but economic; she
has given a new time scheme to
the process of raising the mater-
ial, economic life of colonial
people.” Mrs, Stahl should add
the qualification that some of the
claims of the Soviet rule remain
“not proven.” She admits that
the theoretical universal educa-
tion for seven years is actually a
barely four years education—and
sometimes not so universal, The
oft-quoted statistics of the num—
ber of doctors in the Central
Asian Republic, which make a
favourable comparison with fig-
ures in West Africa, are subject
to grave doubt concerning what
the Soviet Union means by “a
doctor.” What are the profes.
sional standards? At times the
Soviet Union has claimed to
create doctors far faster than
adequate medical knowledge —
of our own standards — could
be crammed into students’ heads.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Mrs. Stahl! does
overlook the far
of freedom for the person ensured
in the Britis) colonial system.
She remarks on the legal system
which is designed, in the Soviet

not, of course,
greater degree

Union, to enforce government
rather than to protect the in-
dividual. But this more fre-
quently trodden ground is not the
more interesting part of Mrs.
Stahl’s book

In her study of the British

system of rile Mrs, Stahl makes

the significant point that the
economic management of the
British Colonies — which is

mainly in the hands of private
business has an extraordin-
arily small say in Colonial
Government in London or: in tne
territories themselves, (She notes
some slight exceptions — the few
Conservative M.P.’s with Colon-
ial business interests. But
curiously, she omits to mention
the Colonial Development Cor-
poration in this context), Never-
theless the haphazard, almosi
indiverteg British economic devel-
opment or exploitation — carriec
cn without powerful politica’
influence at its back is in striking
contrast with the direct economic
control exerted by “Great Russia’
on her Central Asian Republics—
through a governmental syster
that controls virtually all tradc
and industry. The governmen
of Russia also draws taxes from
Central Asia — a practice un-
thought of by a British Chancello;
of the Ex uer,

“The U.S.S.R. has an appara-
tus of government suitable for
sustained imperialist activity,”
Mrs, Stahl concludes. This is
an unsympathetic but emphatic
judgment — a, contrast to the
confuseq but idealistic aims she
finds in the British Colonial sys-
tem. “That great ‘problem of
British Imperial policy of finding
ways of holding the Common-
wealth together, does not apply t
the U.S.S.R. now or potentially in
the future, There the problem stil’
is, and must remain, the one o!
allowing greater autonomy to its
constituent parts within an essen-
tially unified framework, / Viewed
in this light, Russian imperial
policy, in the last’ resort, is ¢
positive policy, while ‘British
policy is, in the last resort, @
negative policy.”

This quotation should — not
deceive the reader to think that
Mrs. Stahl is an apologist for the
Soviet system — far from that
she is a penetrating critic. But
her book:is ‘full of such stimulus
to careful thought on where w?
are going, with a policy of rapi¢
political evolution and fragment-
ation.





A Head Is On A Platter=
And Britain Is Blamed

WASHINGTON,

It was Secretary of State Dean
Acheson’s birthday to-day — his
58th — and Washington cynics
were not wanting to comment that
the best birthday present he
could have had was the news that
MacArthur had been fired.

The suave, moustachioed Dean
was guest of honour at a small
luncheon tendered him by Vice-
President Alben Barkley up in
Congress—and the private lun-
cheon-room was probably the
serenest spot in a Congress build-
ing that was almost visibly
seething.

My taxi-driver started on me
almost before I had got the door
shut at Washington’s Airport
building.

“Know who's behind all this?”
he inquired.

“No,” I replied, too truthfully.

“Why, the British,” he splut-
tered. “The British have got
Acheson and the, State Depart-
ment just where they want them,
and now Acheson’s finally got
MacArthur.”

Era is Over

For five 1ong years during the
big war MacArthur declared: *I
shall return.” (He was referring
to the Philippines).

Then for six more long years
after the war he kept saying: “I
shall rot return,” (He was refer-
ring to the United States).

This extraordinary man who
wins adulation, hatred, and re-
spect in almost equa) proportions,
has not been back to his native
Jand since 1937,

But now the era is abruptly
ended. And Ame::ca, not quite
sure what sort of hero really is
going to show up—cigars, corn-
cob pipes, dark glasses, ten rows
of ribbons, and all—is getting
ready to give him a ticker-tape
welcome to end
welcomes,

The Goat Again

. There are two things which you
should bear in mind in the middle

“



all ticker-tape —



R. M. MacCOLL on the Mac
ARTHUR Switch,

of the stunning development, One
is that Britain is in for an awful
lot of abuse—and not only from
taxi-drivers,

We are the goat again, make no
mistake about that. The Scripps-
Howard nation-wide chain of
newspapers says to-night:—

“Serving General MacArthur’s
head up on a platter may tem-
porarily appease the yapping
yahoos of the British Socialist
Government. But then Britain has
only 13,000 ground troops in
Korea,”

The other ¢h:ng is that, whether
he did right or wrong, and what-
ever happens from now on—and
anything may—that unusua! man
Harry Truman, President of the
United States, has once more
given proof of sheer courage,

It’s a case of the cocky captain
of the 1918 war firing the stupend-
ous general. And that ain't caviar
for the general,

Now when did Truman last see
MacArthur, and what happened’?

Truman obligingly flew thou-
sands of miles to have a talk with
Dashing Douglas on Wake Island.

The ex-captain told the five-star
general, in effect, that he would
have to start playing the game
Harry’s way.

But back in Tokyo MacArthur
whatever he may nave let the
Pt sident understand, started
again to play it Doug’s way.

Behind the scenes the rift grew
deeper and wider. MacArthur—
who is fervently backed by many
of America’s top military men—
began making it increasingly clear
that he considered it unrealistic
to try to fight a war against the
Red Chinese without
(A) bombing in Manchuria;
(B) letting Chiang § Kai-shek
back into the picture from For-
mosa,

Unyieldingly, brilliant Dean
Acheson and his State Depart-





- an ne

ment men stood against this line.

Again and again Acheson told
the President’ that Chiang must
not be called in, and that to bomb
Manchuria‘ might precipitate the
third world war, on terms and in
a place where the West does not
want it...

i ocket”

The shadows: really started to
lengthens when MacArthur’s
“home by Christmas” offensive
wound up as a full-scale war
with the Chinese: Communists,

From that time his pronounce-
ments have taken on a note of
mounting urgency and, as many
people in America have thought,
of something akin to insubordina-
tion — contempt even — for his
Commander-in-Chief and the
UNO policies.

There was “an enormous han-
dicap” complaint of last Decem-
ber when they would not let him
bomb Manchuria,

And last month everybody was
worried when MacArthur sud-
denly offered to discuss an armis-
tice in theteld with the Chinese
military commander.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff sent
MacArthur What used to be called
a “rocket” about that.

It’s Gone
As though deliberately to blow
the. lid right off the saucepan,

MacArthur last week sent a letter
to Congressman Joseph Martin,
the Republican leader, saying that
he wanted to use Chiang’s troops
and that while the “diplomats
were trying to defend Europe
with words” he was doing it with
deeds,

For a few more days ex-Captain
Harry pondered.

Then he took his*decision.

Well, Captain Harry, you are a
brave man, You have destroyed
a great A can legend, and if
there is one’ thing the Americans
cherish, it is their legends. So—
better watch out, Harry.

—LE.S,






















ag

The Right Fighter

By HUGH DUNDAS

A LARGE-SCALE air battle was fought
over Korea on Thursday involving escorted
U.S. heavy bombers and Russian MiG 15
fighters. Altogether’ 225 planes are said to
have been involved.

Study the timing of this first big clash
alongside last week's news of the MacArthur-
Truman split. It is significant. It means that
the world’s two greatest air powers, Russia
and the United States, are taking each other’s

favour the Russians. \

opportunity to try out their new MiG 15
fighters against the best bombers and escort
fighters that the United States could put up
against them.

Now they can do so with an absolute choice
of time and place and the certain knowledge

Until MacArthur went they could not be cer-
cain of these two factors.

principle of air superiority—the principle of
jestroying the enemy’s planes by bringing
them to action under conditions of your own
choosing,

What are the weapons involved?

fighters. On the other MiG 15s. The Superforts
rely for their defence not so much on speed
as on very heavy fire power. A fighter at-

all centrally controlled and aimed by radar.
VD CHOOSE—

There are few things which I would like
to do less than attack such a formation. But
if I had to do so I think I would choose an
MiG 15.

For these planes are as fast as anything

in the world, and so, having a high over-
taking speed, spend only the minimum time
in the danger area. On top of that they
carry bigger guns than R.A.F. or U.S.A.F.
fighters, which means they are lethal at
| greater range.)
The F.86 Sabre, the fastest non-Communist
| fighter in the world, appears so far to match
‘up fairly evenly with the MiG in perform-
ance,

But it has one handicap: it is comparatively
underarmed. Against the Russians’ heavy
cannons the F.86 can only muster half a dozen
0.5-inch machine guns.

lf more big-scale engagements take place
—and intelligence reports regarding the
enemy build-up suggest that they will—the

|

On the one side Superforts and F.86 Sabre|%

tacking a formation of thest bombers is faced §
by a terrifying battery of 20mm. cannons:

itish And Soviet Empires |WellSoon See li WeBacked||] AUTOGRAPH

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, {i951

SCRAPS & SNAP

ALBUMS
at




Advocate Stationery



measure under conditions which greatly f

¢4

The Communists have long wanted an|#

that their bases are inviolate from attack. |Â¥

.Thus the Americans are denied the oppor-|#
tunity of even trying to establish the first}





R,A.F. will watch results with anxious at-|'

tention,

For extra piquancy is given to the struggle
by the fact that the Russians have great
numbers of bombers of exactly the same

kind as the Superforts. They are, in fact,
carbon copies.

CHEESE-PARING

In addition, the R.A.F. has no interceptor
fighter in the same class as the swept-wing
MiGs and Sabres,

Rightly or wrongly—and most people
would say wrongly—we ' have delayed in
putting swept-wing fighters into production.

concentrating on types which are slower but ‘

have a better climb and greater mancuvra-
bility at very high altitudes,

A typical example is the de Havilland
Venom, now in production. and due for
squadron service shortly,”

There is no doubt that the choice is due
in some measure to cheese-paring. For the
Venoms could be made easily and quickly
on the same jigs used for Vampires, while
Swept-wing fighters would have to be started
from scratch.

Was the policy justified? The American

fighter pilots will find the answer the hard
way.—L.E.S.





Profits

To the Editor, The Advocdte——

Sm,—I read with interest a let-
ter written by one of your read-
ers, Mr. Evans Clarke, in today’s
Advocate, in which be asks Mr
Donald Scott of the Colonnade
what-I would term a very flimsy
question, He is enquiring how he
can afford tossell dtems cheaper



than the regular prices and still
pay such good &nd proper salaries
as he states.. If Mr: Clarke had
thought about the pasie and fun-
damental principles of business he

would remember what every real
businessman Would tell you today,
that is, that “Turnover is busi-
NeSS.” +» +

Now let me explain as simply
as possible what | mean by this

statemént.4 I should like to ask
Mr, Clarke to go through a simple
piece of clementary Arithmetic
with me. Suppose Mf. Clarke and
Mr. Scott both bought ten (10)
cans of fish at ten cents each. -Mr.
Clarke then soid his at the regular

price which was, say twelve cents,
while Mr. Scott, the more clever
businessman sold his at eleven
cents. It is umdaubtedly true that
Mr. Clarke would make the great-



ter profit but in these days of
hardship when eyery sensible per-
son tries to get tt cheapest
article I ar that Mr. Scott
would sell about fifts of fish
to every ten th h sod friend
sold. The “Tu vr? theret

eausing him to be better off fin-
ancially, than Mr. Clarke He

would therefore be able to pay
bigger and better wages than his
friend as he would have done bet-
ter business,

This is a simple matter and any-
one with the slightest idea of
business can verify it. I am no
nerchant, but I have been a clerk
in the commercial line for over
ten years and I defy Mr. Clarke
or anyone to refute this statement.

Mr. Scott may haye another
answer for him but my argument
still stands good.

I remain,
Yours respectfully,
THOMAS K., SQUIRES.
Bosvigo Land,
St. Michael,
April 24, 1951.

Registration

To the Editor, the Advocate,
SIR,—Se much babble is now
going on concerning the Regis-

tration of Voters, while the Regis-

tering ©@fficers are ‘quietly and
earnestly pursuing their hercu.
lean task, that one wonders if

many who talk know anything of
what they are talking about.

As a Registering Officer myself,
I know from experience of the
hardships encountered, and that
the only way to find many of the
people at home is to visit them at

night or on Sundays. The diffi-
culty of finding the men at home,
1€ callousness of most of the
women who view registration
with suspicion; the stark poverty
all around which confronts us,

and the persistent pleas for some
immediate help. One man refused
to register because I would not
give him a rum, Illiteracy
abounds—so many people being
unable to read or write, and all
this goes to make the work a very
tiresome job and the officer has to
do a lot more than register names,

A general knowledge of the
whole thing is needed and I would
suggest to those gentlemen who
usually use their loud.speakers at
election time, to embark on a
lebour of love and blazon this
knowledge across the air in the
various parishes that everyone
may have a real idea of what it
is all about.

I am sure that one night in each
of these districts by these gen-
tlemen on their loud speakers will
do more than all the Officers put
together, especially in the country
districts where handbills serve
very little purpose, or where
newspapers are seldom read, and
the voice of the Radio Distribu.
tion is never heard.

Come on and help us now, you
“gentlemen of the air” and even-
tually you will be helping your.
selves

A REGISTERING OFFICER.
26.4.45
Double Duties

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—One must wonder whether

this Island is so short of capable

persons other than those that are

already employed to register those
that are eligible to vote under the
Adult Suffrage. Taking into con-
sideration the rumours relative,
the similar personnel as enumera-
tors during our last census, if is
known that those that are re-
sponsible for the thorough and
satisfactory compilation of the full
registration have not given so im-
portant a matter the publicity it
deserves, therefore adding another
duty to the double duty of persons
that are entrusted with this job.
Imagine Mr. Tired Elementary
Teacher, and Mr, Leg-worn San-
itary Inspector knocking at Mr,
Weary Jones’ house at 7.30 o'clock
to-night. Mr. Weary just from
cutting canes and Mrs. Weary jst
finished dinner after cooking, and
carrying his breakfast and wash-
ing clothes the whole day, being
told “I am here to register you to
vote at the next General Electién.”
He replying: “I have a vote, I voted
last election, and I am tired. Go
away.” Mr. Inspector’s jittery
nerves are shocked, for the sur-
prise and indignation which is
apparent, is similar to the one
which Mrs, Weary had in the day
when she is told at the shop 8
cents is for the sugar when she
paid 7 cents yesterday, and one

more household unable to vote
next election. We have seen last-
poster for the Okra closed season,

we have seén rewards cn posters
for fire catchers to sugar eanes.

Can’t the same method apply in
this case and avoid the chaos and

discontentment that confronted
‘Trinidad?
> . H. LEWIS,
Water Hall Land,
St. Michael. P

April 19, 1951.

Subsidising U.S.

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SiR,—I write in strong support
of your leader in to-day’s
Advocate entitled “SUBSIDISA-
TION”. Apart from the loss to
Barbados of between $160,000—
$250,000 for the temporary em-
ployment of 4,000 labourers at
the most, for 12 weeks, itis also
in effect subsidising the harvest-
ing of American crops. The United
States has every right to obtain
labour as it thinks ft, and its
offer to employ Barbadians should
not be treated with ingratitude.
However, no person or govern-
ment has the right to grasp at an
offer far beyond his or its means—-
especially for so transitory a bene-
fit at so great a cost

Can this island afford such a
subsidy” The benefit accruing by
the employment of labour for so
short a time can seareely be dig-

nified with the name “emigra-
tion.” * The amount ef dollars
earned is surely outweighed by

the initial cost. Nor can the effect
of such employment on labour
returning to Barbados be minim-

ised, If the Barbados Governmen‘
has $160,000—$250,000 of its tax-
payers money to throw away
surely it would be preferable t
spend such a sum on the Easi
Coast road, as your leader write:
Suggests, or, on beginning opera-
tions for a deep water harbour
which in the end would be of even
greater benefit to this island.
Yours faithfully, ©
DISGUSTED TAXPAYER.

Police Band
To the Editor, The Advocate,

Sir,—I think I am representing
the view of the large crowd which
listened to the Police Band at
the St. Peter's Almshouse on
Wednesday night when I offer
congratulations to Cpl. Bernard
Morris for the able way in which
he conducted the band,

If you saw Captain Raison con-
duct the band and saw Cpl. Morris
that night, you could have easily
guessed that he was Captain
Raison’s pupil. The rhythmic
swaying of his hands reminded
me of Captain Raison. 2

His selection for the evening
was fine and he and the Band
were much applauded for their
performance,

It is pleasing when one sees
pent up/talent burst its chains to |
success.

H. O,

Church Street,
St. Peter.
April 25, 1951.

HUSBANDS.

2




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FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951

Voters Would

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE







St. Philip
Settle In

Tanganyika

—Garner

FORTY-THREE-YEAR

cv,

-OLD Mr. D. D. Garner, M.C.P.,
Senior Member for St. Philip for the past three years, has,

on many occasions: suggested in the House of Assembly
that negroes in the West indies should be repatriated to

Africa,
scme members
uggestion, while others though.
Mr. Garner a practical joker. * “i
however feel this suggestion wouk
be of great assistance to the negre
Mr. Garner told tne
avecate yesterday.

Mr. Garner spent nine years i
tne U.S.A. and returned to Bar-
bados in 1932, He was a member
vf the Uniyersal Negro Improve
ment Association of which
Hon. Mareus Garvey, first Pro-
visional President of Africa, was
the Founder and _ President-
General. At the time the Associa-
tion had a membership of over six
million,

He returned home and has been
a member of the St. Philip Vestry
for the past ten years. He has so
far represented the same parish

race,”



4





in the House of Assembly for
seven years,
Wile Mr. Garner agrees with

emigration to the U.S.A., he told
the Advocate “this is only a means
of relieving the unemployment
tuation for a few months. When
the workers return home they
spend all the money they have
saved. By this time they are now
accustomed ‘to the standard. of
living in the United States which
West Indies is not able to
maintain. They becom e* dts-
gruntled workers and some remain
until ‘another emigration
scheme crops up.” — ee



the

idle
wa

Repatriation

“At present the negro race are
beggars. It is working for, the
upkeep of Europeans. We want
omething consistent and I think
repatriation of negroes to Africa
should be given priority over any
other type of emigration”, i

He thinks that all West Indians
of African origin should be re
patriated to Africa to form a colony
or two. They should be give:
lands so that they could settle:
permanently. This would mean
progress in Africa,

“It is left to us, who have at-
tained the western civilization, to
contribute materially and spirit-
ually to the development of our
native brothers and sisters who
are yet exploited on the mother-
land.”

Mr. Garner, who was born at
Chureh Village, St. Philip, lived
at Brooklyn while in the U.S.A
He feels sure ‘that the American
and West Indian negroes in the
U.S.A. would gladly pool their
resources to found a negro colony

on the continent of Africa to
further the race educationally,

economically, industrially, com-
mereially, agriculturally and spir-
jtually. s

“When such a colony comes into
power it would spread its in-
fluence among other African
natives who are at _ present
terribly exploited at the hands of
their European masters.”

Workers Underpaid

He said that at present the eyes
of the European war lords are
focussed on the continent of Africa
solely for the purpose of getting
cheap raw materials at the ex-
pense of the underpaid African
worker which “we in the West
Indies abhor and are quite willing
to assist in correcting.”

He thinks that the West Indies
should definitely cease trade with
South Africa. “This is the only
means of really affecting the
vicious system now perpetrated
against the African natives as a
whole in the Union by Dr. Malan
and his clique,

Mr. Garner has put the ques-
tion of repatriation to Africa to
the majority of the electorate
cf St. Philip and they are all
agreeable, provided they are giv-
en adequate lands for cultivation
and stock-keeping, all other
things being equal.

He said that Tanganyika and
Togoland would be the most suit-
able places for West Indians tO
settle. Tanganyika is 374,085
square miles and the average
temperature yearly is 72 degrees
Fahrenheit. The crops are sugar,
rice, rubber, sisal, coffee, cotton,
ete, The majority of these crops
are popular with West Indians.
They are also many mineral re-
sources,

“The American negro will have

to pool, along with the West
Indian, to give this scheme . the
impetus and stccess it desires.

The majority of rich negroes are
living in the U.S.A. and they are
very interested in such a‘scheme.”

“We were brought to the West
Indies from Africa as slaves. Now
that we have acquired the “know
how” of western civilisation and
have contributed materially to the
welfare, not only. of the West
Indies, but of British reconstruc-
tion, it is only fair that we be
assisted by a large grant from the
Chancellor of the Exchequer to
return to ie continent of Afric:

laughed at’ this

the |



Mr, D. D. GARNER, M.C_P.
..+.ds all for Africa

and do for ourselves, what we are
willingly doing for others, with-
out any security.”

“Human: society, as we’ know
it teday, recognises only organised
groups of people forming a nation
with a flag and doing ‘business
with other nations in‘a reciprocal

. Juanper,. but- dispersed, 5 we are

among the various natig@is of the
world, begging shelter nder-their
wings, as though we were children
and. mot a. grewn, up race, spells
doom™for the whole negto ra¢e in
the near future as in the remote
past.”



EMIGRATION

The number of men reg-
istering as unemployed at
the mployment Agency,
-Queen's Park, is now going
towards the seven thousand
mark, Up to 2.45 o'clock
yesterday afternoon an addi.
tional thirty-four men reg-
istered. One man told the
“Advocate” that he is will
ine to go to Africa or any
other place “so long as
money. for work”.

wir, Garner said; “ine West
Indies are cosmopolitan,’ In these
islands can be found Chinese,

Indians, anq all types of races.
As regards race, the West Indies
is a ‘‘no man’s land.” On the other
hand the kuropeans. are now
gradually ousting the native
Africans out of Africa.. For this
1us
away to Rhgland and other coun-
tries to escape the cruelty, Event-
ually the negro race. will be
nomads with no place to’ rest.”

“The militant spirit of the
“civilised negro” is causing his
former rulers some disquietude
and my fear is that if the negro
is not given his rightful place
under the sun and helpé@ along
the road to progress in all activities
of human endeavour by those,
whom he helped io build in the
past with his free labour, not only
shall we have riots in the West In-
dies, but on the mainland of Africa
where hundreds of millions of
Africans are awaiting the hour for
their emancipation and redemp-
tion.”

“With any established colony in
Africa, a steamship company could
be formed to exchange trade be-
tween Africa and the West Indies
and remove the now existent
“iron curtain” between these two
places.”

Mr. Garner said, “If the negro
Yace cannot stand on its own feet
today, it will never be able to. We
have. qualified brains in every
sphere.” 3

When the Advoeate visited Mr.
Garner he was supervising work
on his cosy plantation at Vale
View, St. Philip. He felt that the
same work he was doing then, he
could be doing in an. African
colony. tire

He also has his store at St.
Philip and told the Advocate, “1



have—ne rwent-to -3ed with an
enipty /stemach, but Tham one in
a thousand, I know there are

7
many. -negroes who go-to bed
hyngry seme night.” z
Footnote: 4

The Statesman’s Year Book “4950 ,giyes
the following. statistics of population: in
some parts of British Africa.

South Africa (1946); Buropean 2,372,690;
non-European 9,019,259,

Kenya and Protectorate (1948): Total
population 5,373,078; Africans 5,218,232,

Uganda (1948): Total populatian’ 4,993,-
965; Africans 4,953,000,

Zanzibar (19481: Total
264,162; Africans 199,860.

Tanganyika (1948); Europeans
Asiaties 77,000; Africans 7,335,291.

Southern Rhodesia (1946): Total popu-
lation 1,764,000; Africans 1,674,000.

population

Northern Rhodesia (1948): Europeans
28,800; Africans 1,690,000.
Nyasaland (1948): Europeans 3,000;

Africans 2,400,000.
NNigeria (1948):—Africans 21,800,000
Gold Coast (1948) ‘inclusive of Togo-
land: Non-Africans 6,773, Africans 4,095,-

276 +

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Govt. Investigates Matter

After a foureday hold off, butchers of the Public Market
sold meat on Wednesday again. There is still unrest in the

market, however, and most

of the meat sold was meat the

butchers had in the frigidaire. There was not much killing.



Prices of W.1.
Products Are
Satisfactory

MR. REX STOLLMFYER,
Trade Commissioner in Canada
for the British West Indies, Brit-
ish Guiana and the Bahamas, told
the Advocate yesterday | that
the prices of most commodities
produced in the West Indies are
good at the present time.

He said that prices for cocoa in
Grenada and Trinidad, recently
touched an all-time high and there
has been a very strong demand
in world markets for cocoa, par-
ticularly from Europe, in recent
months,

Mr. Stollmeyer who has just
returned from a visit to the North-
ern Islands arrived here yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad to discuss with officials of the
Development and Welfare Organi-
sation, the Trade Commissioner
Service in Canada.

He said that shippers of toma-

toes from Montserrat to Canada
had a _ successful season, and
prices ruling in the Canadian
market were better than for many
years.
_ There was a strong demand for
lime produets. espécially lime
juice and that demand exceeded
the supply in Montserrat, St.
Lucia, Dominica, Trinidad and
British Guiana.

The demand for black strap or
wicuum pan molasses had also
been great and the selling price
in Canada had been higher than
at any time during the past sev
eral years:

‘od Development

In Deminica, he said that there
had’ been a lot of development
within the last couple of years.
Colonial Development Corporation
had established a modern citrus
packing plant; a plant had also
been established for canning

- grapefruit sections and grapefruit

juice, and experiments in~ the
canning of bananas had met with
wood success.

The growing of bananas was
increasing very rapidly and it
was now estimated that there
were about one and a half million
trees on the island of the Lacatan
variety. Practically 100% of
those bananas were destined for
®xport to the United Kingdom
and Europe.

Mr, Stollmeyer said that he had
found more 1.¢w development in
Dominica than in any of the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands since
he last visited them in 1947.

He expects to leave Trinidad at
the end of May for Jamaica and

: , the Bahamas after which he will
4% many Africana are stowing

be returning to Montreal.



Oilmeal Comes

The Argentine State liner Rio
Juramento cleared port yesterday
evening after she had finished
discharging the 1,100 tons of
oilmeal she brought here from
the Argentine and Montevideo,

The Rio Juramento arrived here
on Saturday. She is now going
on to Tampico, Mexico, Messrs.
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd., are
her agents.



*
Died |

HELEN, MULLIN of Sandy
Ground, St. Philip died on her
way to the General Hospital at
about 5.15 o'clock yesterday
evening. She was a patient of the
St. Philip’s Almshouse and was

being transferred.

APPOINTMENTS
Messrs. J. A. H. Sealy and G.
Nehaul have been appointed
Assistant Engineer and Draughts-
man, respectively in the Public
Works Department, with effect
from September 1, 1950.

Music At
‘The Rocks’

The Police Band will give their
usual fortnightly concert at
Hastings Rocks this evening. The
programme begins at 8 o'clock
and will feature some selected





celebrating the

of his singing career this week.
PROGRAMME
American March—

THE WASHINGTON POST Sousa
Overture— LE RIO D’'YS -Lala
Operatic Excerpts—

CARMEN Bizet

Waltzes from...,,.
THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER
; Oscar Strauss
Two Popular Ballads—

AT DAWNING e¢. Cadman
COME SING TO ME . ‘Thompson
Potpourri—

“The Songs Bing Crosby made
Famous” .... -...+,, Selected
Tango— LA PALOMA (The Dove}
. Gradier
Characteristic—
THE WHISTLER AND HIS DOG

.Pryor

Rhythmic
Theme from the current Film
THE 3RD MAN

GOD SAVE THE KING

Murrell

—- The main

contention
the beef price, though
on principle had stopped — killing
and selling ali types of meat
There is not much unity of action
amohg them though, and. it) was
no agreement among themselves

is over
butchers

which caused them to sell
again.

It just happened that one
butcher took some meat from

the frigidaire and began selling
and the others followed suit
Augustus Skeete, one of the
outchers told the Advocate yes
terday

One of the reasons why they
are selling is because if they had
kept the meat-much longer in the
frigidaire it would have — spoilt
Another reason is that they had

prewiously bought animals from
speculators and the animals
which they kept in pens were

losing much weight

George Greaves, an old butch-

er, killed animals to avoid a
bigger loss when they would
have reduced in weight. He is

uncertain whether he will kil! or
sell on Saturday. He does not
cbject to buying animals to keep
at home, since he is looking
forward to a change in the gitice
schedule.

Some butchers think that
was stretching the principle too
far when they decided to stop
killing pigs when they decided
against’ killing cattle. These
will continue to kill pigs.

it

Butchers To Blame

Dan Springer, another butcher,
said that the butchers have
themselves to blame for not get-
ting things put right. He spoke
to Mr. Bishop, Controller ot
Supplies, about the meat situation
and was told to get half a dozen
butchers and return. He _ went
to some of the best established
butchers, but they refused to go
along with him.

Regardless of what the other
butchers do; he said, he would be

killing whenever he gets any
animals. Yesterday most of the
housewives were around his
stall,

Asked whether he had not
stopped killing beef because he
was selling at a loss and whether
he would not be still selling at a
loss now, he said that was his
business, but he would sell.

George Greaves said that the
trouble is that there are only
two fixed prices instead of three.
The two are that at which the
rearer is allowed to sell and the
other that at which the butcher,
must sell. No allowance is made
for the speculator who buys from
the rearer and sells to the
butchers. “And a_ speculator is
as necessary 4 part to the deal as
a lighter is to the bringing
ashore of goods,” he said.

Another butcher said that
rearers should stick to the con-
trolled price for selling livestock.
Owing tc the scarcity of animals,
owners demand prices in excess
of those fixed by the price
contro.1 There are no Price
Control Officers at such transac-
tions as is the case in the market
and the people show their stocks
in a “take it or leave it” manner.
After the speculator has had his
gain, the butcher loses .

When the Advocate interview.
ed Mr. F. A. Bishop, Controller
of Supplies on the matter yester-
day he said: “Government is still
investigating it.”





6s

A'stronomer” Calls

On Maiden Cruise

The 8,150-ton Harrison Liner
Astronomer, now in port dis-
charging sicge from Liverpool,
has put Barbados “first on the
map” of her maiden cruise.

e was recently launched in
England and loaded with cargo
for the West Indies, She sailed
direct for Barbados, taking 13
days on the trip.

Captain Whitehouse, who came
to Barbados some times before as
skipper of the S.S. Naturalist,
another Harrison liner, has
brought down the Astronomer.

The Astrenomer’s net tonnage
is 4,524. She carries a crew of
45. She will be going on to

, Puerto Cabello and Curacao from
song hits of Bing Crosby, who is! Barbados.
Sotn anniversary | Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

Her agents are Messrs,

















Butchers Sell. Iced Meat J ury Return Verdict:

At Yesterday’s Inquiry

Of Manslaughier |

A verdict of manslaughter by a person or persons unknowr
was returned by a nine-man jury yesterday when the in-
quiry into the death of 12-year-old Marjorie Maloney oi |

Cave Wood, St. Michael, was conducted.

Mr. C. L. Walwyn.

Marjorie Maioney died sudden-
ly at her home on April 24. She
was admitted ta the General
Hospital and treated on Apri] 23
for a wound on the left side of
her head which she received on

April 22 while returning home
from a dance

Dr A. 8 Cato who per-

formed the post mortem exam-

ination at the Public Mortuary
on April 24, said that the
apparent age of the girl was
14 years and she was dead for
about ten hours, In his opin-
ion death was due to cerebral

haemorrhage from injuries
received. Dr, Cato said that
this haemorrhage, could have

been caused by a blow such as
from a stone,

Selina Gill who identified the
body to Dr. Cato said that she
was the adopted mother of the

deceased. On April 22, about 106
p.m, they went to a dance at the
Progressive Club at Rouen
Village, St. Michael. They left
the dance hall about 3 a.m. but
while on the way Marjorie sud-
denly turned to her and _ said,
“Lord, I cut.” When she looked
at Marjorie she was lying on the
ground holding her head

Wound Dressed

She managed to get her home
and put coconut oil on the wound
which was on the left part of the
head. The next day about 6
a.m. she took her to the Hospital
where she was given an injection
and the wound dressed She
was not detained.

About 9.30 a.m. the same day
—April 24—the girl started to
groan, tossed and kicked in thé
bed and said that her head was
hurting her. She became delirn-
ous and died.

Police Constable 139 Warner
attached to District “A” said that
on April 24 in consequence of 4
report, he went to Howells Cros:
Road where he saw the deceased
lying dead in her bed,

On looking at the body he
noticed that there was a wound
on the left side of the head below
the ear about an inch in length

About 2 p.m. the same day
Selina Gill showed him the
stone which was alleged to have

struck the deceased. This stone
was handed in to the Police,

Mr. Walwyn at ‘ris stage
summed up for the jury who
after a short deliberation return-
ed a verdict of death by man-
slaughter by 4 person or persons
unknown

REMANDED
Cyril Bynoe _of Lodge Road,
Christ Church, was yesterday
remanded with bail until May 3,



S.P.C.A. Plan Mobile
Clinie For Animals

THE BARBADOS SOCIETY for the Prevention of Cruelty

The Coroner was !

when he appeared before al
District “A” Police Magistrate ‘
on a charge of breaking and!
entering the house of Dalton!

Babb at Worthing, Christ Chur-}
and stealing articles to the value
of £8 5/3

The offence was alleged to have
been committed sometime or





April 13. Cpl. Devonish arrestec !
Bync Set. G. Murrell is |
prosecuting for the Police in the
preliminary hearing

FINED 10/-

Joseph Crichlow of Deacor
Road was fined 10/-— in one mon:h
or one month’s imprisonment by |
a City Police Magistrate fo»
driving the motor car ‘M-1468
with inefficient brakes on Decem-
ber 30, 1950.



l‘vergreeas Pianted
At Playing Field

Barbed wire is being placed
around part of the Princess Alice
Playing Field A caretaker of
the field and pavilion
Advocate yesterday that a fence
will be grown near the Wire to
help prevent animals from com-
ing on the field,

Most of the pasture is overrun
with grass nearly a foot long,
but there is one patch which is
kept well trinimed. This is about
as big as a tennis lawn and is
near the pavilion.

Lately two evergreen trees
were planted on the grounds,
one to the east and the other to
the west of the pavilion, These
are enclosed by wire ‘to ‘prevent
sheep from biting at them and
are growing well.

Much refuse is thrown near
the coast side of the field to
build up a decline there. Yes-
terday women were levelling the
stuff which the refuse lorries had
dumped

No children have been plaving
on the field lately though it is
vacation period, Many, however,
bathe and fish in the sea behind



».
ix
%

COSOOPSOPPOOO ES CS



"Athelbrook" Returns

The 286-ton molasses tanker
Athelbrook returned to the island
yesterday to take another load of

GOODSS

oe



vacuum pan molasses for Trini-
dad.

Since the crop began, the
Athefbrook has been making al-
most weekly calls here for mo-
lasses,

She left port yesterday for



Her agents are Messrs,
Ltd,

Trinidad,
H. Jason Jones & Co.,

to Animals presented its forty-fifth Annual Report at the
Annual General Meeting held at “Wakefield”, Whitepar,

last night.

The report showed that the
balance in hand at the end of the
year was $4,079.02 as against
$3,317.05 at the end of 1949

The S.P.C.A,., which is sup-
ported by a number of private
subscribers, plantations, govern-
ment grants-in-aid and _ special
donations have included these in
alphabetical order at the end of
the annual report and this gives
it the look of a telephone direc-
tory, the number
are so varied and_ scattered al!
over the island. *

Plans for the establishment o/
a mobile Clinic for draugh
animals are under way, the

of subscribers

Congress of the World
for the Protection of animals held
at The Hague during the summer.

The report appealed to Gov-
ernment to expedite the enact-
ment of the dog li¢ensing bill and
also to co-operate with the Society
in their plans for ah Anima
Refuge Another problem, — the
report stressed, was the disposal
of large carcases (mules, donkey
and horses).

The owners of old and _ sich
horses, it said, were willing for
the Society to carry out human:
destruction but they had ne
burial ground or money for
providing transport of the ‘corp:

League |





report states and this has been to the sea
made possible because the Bir- Land was therefore needed foi
mingham Branch of the Wn animal cemetery.
R.S.P.C.A. has donated throug)
Mrs. C. Walcott the sum o |, is |
$50.40 with the request that i y vr “e ~ BABY " LOVES y
be used in that manner \ a? (si santine a Cun,
‘ , +! Taloum Powder, It ts
Donation CO) ecqudsely testensd ws
The Branch donated $9.6° ) koopa baby’s skin cool,

towards the expenses of the Firs





QopEX S0ap

FOR

THE WHOLE FAMILY

@ LEAVES BODY FRESH,

SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN

@ MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR







More hangers needed?

We have a New Assortment of Painted and Decorated
HANGERS for Dresses and Skirts

LARGE DRESS HANGERS—Ea
SKIRT HANGERS—Ea
DECORATED HANGERS—Ea
LARGE KHUS KHUS HANGERS—Ea
SMALL CHILDREN’S HANGERS—Ea

$0.14

PAIRS OF BABY KHUS KHUS HANGERS, Pair $1.08



102 11,.-12







& 13 BROAD STREET.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.








breakfast
thet builds! Save ‘em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.



10 tithgys

| CORN FLAKES |
today!

|
~




SPECIFY
EVERITE
ASBESTOS-CEMENT

CORRUGATED SHEETS

a,



“TURNALL’

ASBESTOS





told the 30969906

THE PRICE

ADVANCES
=e







WE HAVE LARGE STOCKS OF.

ARDATH cork Tiepep



CIGARETTES

Packages of 10's & 20's which we
are reducing,

Original price 10’s—19¢. now 16c.

Cartons of 200 for $3.00

Civarette guaranteed
perfect condition,

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

.

%
“

|
|



HARRISON'S aroao sr.





Galvanized Wire
Netting

FOR FISH POTS, GARDENS, ETC,
In '% in,, % in., 1 in., 1% ins. and 2 ins, MESH

Obtain our Quotations before buying elsewhere.



Charcoal Box Irons

Top “ever Fastening
6% ins, at $4.68 Each
7 ins. at $4.81

: 5 piece Toilet Sets

in Assorted Decorations
ONLY $14.57 per SET





Warehouse Trucks
Agricultural Forks with Rubber Tyred Wheels
Full Size — Solidly Built

Sugar Bag Twine

2- SACK CAPACITY





Domo Cream
Separators

AND SPARE PARTS



INCLUDING —



TOP BEARINGS, BOWL

WHEELS, WORM WHEELS, Ete,

HARRISON'S

LALLA LEP LLL ELL AEE





CAL AGENTS









FAVOURITE

BEER

iS MERE AGAIN



18g a HOTTLE
$4.00 a CARTON









PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951
HENRY ==

BY CARL ANDERSON ee ate ae . = B
F a .]] 1OUMS leed!
ANY HAT if
























OOK Gi a Mouth and Loose
“U EW te eect have Pyorrhea,
< Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
esi 7 that will sooner or later cause your teeth

te fall out and may sine cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble.

bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
{and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your

NO FINER mouth well and save your teeth or
TOOTH PASTE TO | Mee" Saicaa trom youn, chemie’
HELP Amosan antee protects

AVOID a
TOOTH
DECAY























TM KINDA
NERVOUS !
TODAY'S SHOW |S THUH
FIRST L'VE TRIED TO SING ON!

AND NOW, YALL ...WORE COWBOY “@
BUDDY ... DRY-GULCH GOOFYS GONNA JS
SING “THUH COWBOY'S LAMENT“!





Bach soothing and delicious

; f ‘Vicks Cough Drop medicates
Gun Great, 0; dry, irritated throat
Yow Sone amen O membranes for 12 to

15 full minutes.

LISTERINE Tooth Paste helps sto¢ tooth decay 3 important ways.
1. LISTERINE Tooth Paste actually helps remove
destructive bacteria.
2. It attacks dull film which holds bacteria against
tooth surfaces.



3. It even helps to remove mouth acids!
Hurry now and buy LISTERENE Tooth Paste... brush after every
meal and fight tooth decay...clean teeth brighter... KEEP BREATH
FRESH FOR HOURS AND HOURS!













BY CHIC YOUNG

TOON Th

You'll like
its refreshing
mint flavor, too.

BLONDIE

FIRST HELP ME --

Ry.. | DAGWOOD, DON'T
: nT MY ZIPPER IS CAUGHT

| TLL CLEAR THE mm TRY TO CARRY



} TABLE WHILE YOU a IN MY HAIR
i Dia. CHANGE YOUR Gh? B
AR tS RE ie .
| Bi A . Va “ONE TRIP,
=| | @, <->, { BUMSTEAD,
pi THEY CALL
\ ROS)
ir ye Ra BD
ANS 3 rion 39
(i fare? hee iD ,
* ce ff
| ._y
a" FS J mS
- [Pye | F
7 Wo euieinaaseeeneeemaemear ——





DEAL HERE









~o |. IT PAYS Y
|

OU TO





























WHY DOES THAT












oo) .
seawoos \ Creu nm OLD PRUNE-FRCED. ASRNe. % rie Sa SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only
WANTS TO 1S HERE IN Pod JUST A BAD /|












USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Tins GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 24 21 Pkgs MACARONI 35 31

Tins JACOB'S
CRACKERS 171 145

Tins PLANTERS’ PEANUTS 96 86 Bots. GROTSCH BEER 24 18

Tins COCOMALT 133













a Birds Of A Feather
ADVOCATE by ANDREW SPILLER
HAS THE Strictly Speaking

by. JOAN BUTLER
BEST

TAF NSIBLON 2 01 eee > eae om
ORDO PPPOE POTS PO COCCSOOO 80990800 9988S 9 Oe

4









BRINGING UP FATHER

{ HUM-I TOLD yiGGS TO

BY GEORGE MC.MANUS

_BY GEORGE MC.MANUS |
GAG 22 = hy | bl!







LLL LL SPF PLP PPI IAAP IPP PSP IPE


















| BE HOME AT SIX --1T’S | | Te Wrtreoue | OH 4 YOU ARE AT 1 I “ e 4
| SEVEN NOW -I SUPPOSE | || OF HIS LOW -BROW { mS
A GAY HE WAS TIED | | FRIENOS LL CALL UP! WELL: WHY yt | Ai ay
{ < UP AT THE OFFICE “ 9-0 | YOL COME HOME ? \ ° 8
Ss eq | : BOOKS by HOWARD KIRBY :
ye C eX ; (i Ee

IN Modern Colonization
by R. J. HARRISON CHURCH >

ROC PO POOP

pow

ane eae ia fC tect SF TOWN .
RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND | ADVOCATE STAT

\
AOE
LOBE OBS OCLC AAOA OLEAAA SS
a wen eee cenarreap eos en

oe








GALEE WITH MEAT

eos IMPRUVES THE MEAL

SAUSAGES (Palethorpes Cold Storage) in H.P. SAUCE — a Digestive Relish
‘t E a id — L Ib. Cellophane Pks. — 60 BRANSTON SAUCE (by Crosse & Black-
158 ~ Ee rs HAMS — “Swifts” Argentina-Picnic * at well)
es, eee EAE 8 NAD ;
e 4s? _,_ $1.25 per Ib. Ee LAINGS — Worcestershire Sauce

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES SAUSAGES in 14.02. Tins — Palethorpes BLACK BUCK — Weecestershire Sauce

Pork and Oxford LEA & PERRINS ” ”
Steak & Kidney Pudding — in tb, Tins at HOLBROOKS ” ”

40¢. FARROWS ”









HE'D NEVER DO THAT UNLESS HE
WAS WARNING ME « HE SENSES
DANGER*HE CANT POINT If
OUT~ BUT HE KNOW6 ITS HERE |
| DONT SEE



”







FOOD DRINK ORDER THESE FROM.....
COCOMALT — a Malted Food Drink
OVALTINE — A Perfect Food Beverage ALLEYNE ARTHUR
MILO (by Nestles) a Fortified Tonic Food
LACTOGEN (by Nestles) prepared es-

pecially for Infant Peeding K CO LTO
a9 e

rONO — Chocolate Malt & Milk Beverage
BOURNVITA (by Cadbury’s)—The Food

> Drink for Seund Sleep. “your GROE€ ER: _-°







SS Pct rn
+ “SEE. SER,
= ee tie ir





—

OC ll ES







27,

FRIDAY, APRIL



51

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPH



For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for esch
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices t=
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

IN ' MEMORIAM



BOYCE—In loving memory of our dear
beloved husband and father Clifford
C. A. Boyce, who fell asleep on April
27th 1949.

Alwa;s in our thoughts
Forever in our hearts
As long as life and memory
We shall remember, thee.
Matilda Boyce (Widow), Evelyn Sisnett
und Dr. Frederick F. Boyce (children).
* 27.4.51—In.

last



EASTMOND—iIn ever loving memory of
our dearly beloved daughter and
sister Glen Sheila Barbara Maxwell,
(nee Eastmond) who was called to rest
on 27th April, 1947.

Asleep in God's beautiful gorden

Free from all sorrow and pain

Some day when life’s journey
ended,

We hope to meet you again.

is

Ever to be remembered by Mr. and Mrs.
George D, Eastmond and family.
27.4, 51—In.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES

OLD AGE PENSIONS

The Old Age Pension Paying
Office in Bay Street has been
removed to “Hartsdale” a cottage
in White Park Road, opposite the
Barbados Foundry Ltd. Pensions
will be paid there as from Mon-
day, 30th April, 1951.

H. N. ARMSTRONG,
Colonial Postmaster,
General Post Office,
25th April, 1951.





27.4.51—2n



THE MAYOR AND TOWN
COUNCIL OF NEW
AMSTERDAM, BERBICE,

BRITISH GUIANA

Invite applications from Mechani-
cal and Electrical Engineers for
the post of

CHIEF ENGINEER TO THE
COUNCIL

Appiicants, who should be
qualitied Mechanical or Electrical
Engineers and have had good ex-
perience of internal combustion
engines, will be required to ad-
minister and supervise the Coun-
engineering services com.
prising a suction producer gas
engine and Diesel driven electric
power station with an installed
capacity of 596 K.W’s, the 2,300
volts primary, 110—220 volts sec
ondary, 60 cycles alternating cur-
rent overhead electricity distribu.
tion system, the Water Works
pumping plant (250 h.p.) and the
water mains system; and exercise
general supervision over the work











of the Council’s Town Superin-
tendent,

Previous experience in an
executive capacity is mecessary

and preference will be -given

applicants who are, or are eligible] serjes
for, corporate membership of the\ fund

ONE 2508



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sunde ’

AUTOMOTIVE

ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van.
Guarantee if required, Extra Masonite
Flooring. Licensed and Insured. Upset
Price $1,850, New one Cost $2,125 pre-
sently. Apply Courtesy Garage. -

CAR—One Singer Car $350.00. Apply
FE. Jordan, James Street, Bicycle Re-
pairer. 27.4. 51—2n.

CAR—"One (1) 6 Cylinder two seater
De Soto. Suitable for making pick-up.
Tyres very good. Engine in good work-
ing order. Phone 3430." 27.4.51—3n,

















CAR—Morris 8 Touring vers good con-
citioh. Phone George Skeete 4277 or
3366, 26.4.51—3n

CAR—1938 Buick 8 cyls, in sound
mechanical condition and good tyres.
Suitable especially for hire, Dial 4616.

36.4.51—6n
—_—_———
CAR—Vauxhall Wyvern, done just over



500 miles, as new. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4616. 26 4.51—6n
datenintye einer See

CAR-—One S§.S. 2. Black Sports Saloon
1937, laid up through war. Excellent

cordition, $550.00 or nearest offer. Phone
De Laney: 2216 or 4204. 24.4.51—4n,

WAGGON; One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

FURNITURE

—.

At Ralph Beard’s Furnishing Show-
reoms, Hardwood Alley, Morris type
Cane and Rush Easy Chairs in Pine and
Birch $26.00 per pair, Also Rush Bottom
Upright Chairs $3.75 with Arms $4.50 and
Rockers $5.00 each not forgetting a
numerous variety of new and second
hand furniture. Open daily, 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. including Breakfast, closed mid-
day Saturday. 25.4.51—in.

LIVESTOCK

One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve
in three weeks, Gave 36 pints with
third calf. C. Branch, near Paynes
Road, Jackmans, St. Michael. .

27.4.51—3n.

MECHANICAL

a
RALEIGH BICYCLE—One Boy's Raleigh
Bicycle 18” frame. In good condition,
complete with lock, bell and tools. Price
$45.00, Phone 3354, Oliver Johnson.
25.4.51—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

ERICKS—For building or garden walks
$3.00 per 100, also Fire Bricks. Apply
The Old Ice Co., Prince Wm, Henry St.

25.4.51—5n.

ESCHALOT—We haye a Fresh Ship-







cow













ment. See us for prices. John D.
Taylor & Sons Ltd., Roebuck Street,
Dial 4335. 25.4.51—2n,.
PLAY PEN—One (1) Child's Folding
Play Pen. Dial 3810. 27.4.51—I1n.
-
STOVES—Valor single, 2, 3 and 4

kerosene oil burner.
fore advance in price.
Dial 4391.

Secure yours be-
Courtesy Garage.
26.4.51—6n



“You can’t be floored in the matter
of coverings for your floors if you
visit HARRISON'S FURNITURE DEPT.,
where you will find a large selection
of Linoleum and Congolevm, Carpets,
Rugs and Straw Mats’, 26.4.51—3n



Trans Empire Oils
Has Interest In 38
Oil Wells

Prospectus issued in connection
with the sale of $1,500,000 of 5%
“A” convertible sinking
secured notes of

oad : Trans
Institutions of Mechanical or Elec. Empire Oils Ltd, outlines the a.

trical Engineers. Experience of
Suction Producer Gas and Diesel

pany’s interest in producing wells
which it acquired and of current

engines would also be an advan. and future development and ex-

tage.

Applicants must not be more
than 45 years of age and must
state age and nationality in their
applications. The person selected
for appointment to the post will
be required to submit himself to
a medical examination as to his
fitness.

The salary of the post is £1,000
per annum, and free current for
domestic purposes is provided.

The appointment which will
on the basis of a three-year con-
tract in the first instance, is sub-
ject to the previous approval of
the Governor in Council of the
Colony of British Guiana, and
carries leave privileges at the
rate of one month for each year
of service. Passages for the
Engineer, his wife and up to two
children will be paid in the case
of a successful applicant resident
outside of British Guiana.

Applications which should be
addressed to the undersigned
must be received in New Amster-
dam before the 26th May, 1951.

D. DOW,
Town Clerk,
New Amsterdam, Berbice,
British Guiana.
27.4.51,—3n.





NOTICE 10

CANASTA FANS

HEINEKEN'’S BREWERY _ has
made a gift of Canasta Score
pads to players in Barbados.
Drink Heineken’s Beer as you
play Canasta. Score Pads will
be given to players on paying
a visit to Messrs K. R. Hunte
& Co., Ltd, Lower Broad Street,

GS SOOO TOES

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

: THANI'S

SaaS

FURNISH

FOR ENJOYMENT

THE MONEY-SAVING WAY

SDS,









DIAL
3466



NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
and other Wardrobes, Dresser-
robes, Chests-of-drawers and
Linen Presses—Vanities, Dressing
Tables, Stools, Screen Frames—
Single and Double Bedsteads,
Separate Side Rails, Laths, Wash-
stands

Dining, Kitchen and Fancy
Tables, Sideboards $17 up, China,
Kitchen and Bedroom Cabinets
—Larders, Waggons, Liquor Cases,
and many other things

L.S. WILSON

SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069.

































ploration projects. As of Decem-
ber 30, 1950, company acquired
the business of Globe Oil Co., Ltd.,
British Empire Oil Developments
Ltd,, East-Leduc Oil Co., Ltd. and
Leduc-West Oil Co., Ltd. for
which 1,920,002 shares of common
stock were issued, Interest in
producing oil wells are stated to
be as follows: in the Leduc Field,
a 100% interest in 11 wells, a 50%
interest (after costs) in 2 wells, a
50% interest in 3 wells and a 15%
interest in 2 wells; in the Stettler
Field, a 100% interest in 4 wells;
in the Redwater Field, a 6.8%
interest in 4 wells; and in the
Lloydminster Field, a 3% interest
in 2 wells and a 25% interest in 10
wells east of the Alberta border.

Future recoverable reserves of
these wells are estimated at
2,428,233 barrels.

Company has five projects

underway or under contemplation
as follows; ‘a) 50% interest. in
Trans Empire-Phillips Oil Nos, 1
and 2 in the South Calmer sector
of Leduc near Mic-Mac D2 oil well.
No. 1 has recently been drilled
to production in the D2 zone.
Operations will commence in, the

early spring on well No. 25 (b)
100% interest in drilling out’thtee

prospective sites at Stettler, ad-
joining the company’s 4 D2 pro-
ducers and 1 failure; (c) 40%
interest in further drilling in the
Bashaw area, scene of recent D3
zone wet gas discovery; (d)
Probable commencement of a well
in Big Valley and (e) a geophysical
survey covering 21,000 acres in
South Princess area.

Statement of combined earnings
of predecessor companies and in-
eluding operations of Taylor
Petroleum Operators Limited, 4
wholly-owned subsidiary which
supervises drilling operations, is
given for the fiscal periods 1948 to
1950, inclusive. Net earnings be-
fore interest, recovery of develop-
ment costs, depletion and taxes
amounted to $580,228 in 1948,
$851,317 in 1949 and $582,457 in
1950. After charges, including
yrovision for recovery of develop-
ment costs of $468,039, $796,664
and $559,145, respectively. net
income was $100,080, $48.396 anc
$21,057, resnretively.



In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station





‘Round Tip| Top | Table,

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
mmmum cnarge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.20 om Sundays



REAL ESTATE

LAND—One outstanding site of
19,806 sq. ft. of Land situated in
Gardens. Dial 3950. 26.4.5

land







1 will offer for sale by public com-
petition at my office Victoria Street on
Friday 27th at 2 p.m.—15,000 square fcet
LAND at BELMONT adjoining Govern-
ment Woods, has an @dditional entrance
in Quaker Road. ALI, UTILITY SERV-
ICES AVAILABLE. Dial 2947.
R. ARCHER McKENZLE,
22.4.51—4n

LAND—Approximat iy 3,000 square feet
of land at Stream Road, Christ Churen











adjoining the Public Road. Appar: Mr
R. C, Chapman C/o Messrs. Carringtor
& Sealy. 27.4.51—5n

TANGLIN--situate at Beachmont,

Bathsheba, and standing on 1 rood 2 3/5
perches of land thereto, containing
jounge, Dining Roo, Three double
bedrooms, Children’s room, Three ,al-
leries, Kitchen, Garage and servant's
room. Furnished or unfurnished.

For inspection please telephone 3625
Offers to be sent in writing to
undersignea,
Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors,
Street, Bridgetown,

James



We will offer for sale to public com-

petition at our office on Friday 27th.
April at 2 p.m.

(1) LABOSR BLEST a stone wall
Dwelling house and shop at St.
Martins St. Philip, standing on 2!
acres, 2 roods of land. Dwelling
house comprises Drawing and

Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitch- |
en, Toilet and Bath. Government |
water installed.
Three other parcels of land con-
taining respectively 2 roods, 3
roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong-
ing to and near to above property
will also be offered for saie either
together with above property or
separately.
For inspection apply on the prem-
ises to the owner Mr. Everton
Greenidge.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to :—

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD.

(2)





11.4.5).—6n

“HILLCREST”, fully furnished, situate
at Bathsheba, St. Joseph, (former site
of Beachmount Hotel) standing on

244,433 square feet of land with several
full grown cocoanut trees thereon.

The house is built of stone and con-
tains open gallerfes on two sides, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with
running water, pantny, kitchen and usual
out. offices,

Garage and servants rooms in yard.

Inspection on application to the care-
taker Mr. Seymour Downes,

The above will be set for sale at Pub-
lic Competition at our office in Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 27th



April 1951 at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
18.4,51—9n.
AUC?ION
By instructions received from the

Secretary of the General Hospital I will
sell by public competition on Thursday
mext the 3rd May at 2 o'clock, onc
Piino by Kohler and Campopeil.







D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer,
27.4.591—on
Fy instructions received I will sel

‘
by Public Auction on Wednesday next |
2nd May at 2 o'clock, one house at Bank
Hall Main Road, 4th house from All
Souls Church. Inspection on applica-
tion to
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane,

Dial 3743. 27.4.51—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



ON TUESDAY Ist May by order o1 +
Miss M. Hobson we will sell her
Furniture at ‘‘Woodstone House’, Gar-

rison which includes

Upright and
Berbice Chairs, Settee, Sideboard, Wag-
gon, Liquor Case, Leather Uphols. Arm
Chairs, Ornament Table, Floor Lamps;
(very nice}, all in Mahogany: Glass
Ware, Dinner and Tea Services, Pitd,
Ware in Tea Service, Waiters &c,)
Cutlery and Brass; Good Linen, Con-
goleum and Carpet, Single Iron Bedsteads
Springs and Hair Beds, Simmons Bed-
stead very good, Linen Press, Dressing
Table, and Chest of Drawers; Child's
Press, Flat Top Desk all in Mahogany:
Rush Chairs and Rockers; Treadla
Machine, Norge Refrigeratoty,; (working
order), Carpet, 2 Burner Hd@ Plate, 2
Burner Florence Oil £tove and Oven,
Kitchen Utensils, Garden Bench, Lad/'s
Raleigh 3-Speed Bicycle (practically
new), Ferns and Palms, Tennis Net and
Poles and other items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms cash,

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers



27.4.51

85,000 Tons
More For U.S.

NEW YORK, April 25.

R. M. Fowler, President of the
Newsprint Association of Canada
today told United States publish-
ers that they would probably re-
ceive close on 6,000,000 tons of
newsprint this year from all
sources.

Addressing the United States
Newspaper Publishers Associa-
tion, he added: “That will be
85,000 tons more than you re-
ceived in 1950 and about 65,000
tons more than you consumed in
1950.”

He said that in 1945 when
rationing was still in force they
consumed 3,480,000 tons. They
would therefore be over 2,500,000
tons better off in 1951 compared
with 1945—72 per cent increase
in supply in six years, he said.

Nearly 80 per cent or 4,775,000
tons would probably come from
Canada, almost 200,000 tons from
overseas and the remainder from
United States mills, Fowler said.

—Reuter.

2n










CRUSHED
STONE & FINES
IDEAL FOR CONCRETE,
AND MAKING ROADS
AND PATHS.

ARMS. ‘ste ke
J. N. HARRIMAN
& CO., LTD.,
Seawell.
Phone 8444, Extension 8
26.4.51.—7n.



434,





the |



21.4.51—6n. |

MINN | |
FOR SALE |





PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and

| 96 cents Sundays 24 words -— over 24

and 12 sents, eee agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days|
> and $1.80 on Sundays. }





Cost Accounting, Com-



pany Sec yship, book -Keeping —
Course (Recognised for award of Diplo-
ma as Associate or Fellow) will qualify
A Six months’ “Intensive Method”
you for higher status by spare-time
postal study. For details, write now:
The Principal, LONDON SCHOOL OF
ACCOUNTANCY, 12, Duke Street; St.
James's, London, S.W. 1. England.

13.4.51—3n

NOTICE

IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-
‘ttntion of the Vestry of the Parish of
Saint Andrew to be caused to be
imiveduced into the House of Assembly
of this Island a Bill to authorise the
| Vestry to borréw a sum not exceeding
| $8,000.00 for the purpose of building
} suitsble quarters for the Nurses at the
| Almshouse at Belleplane, the loan to
| cerry interest at the rate of not exceed-
ing, &% per annum and to be repaid
by 15 equal annual instalments out of
the rates of the said parish r
Cc. A. SKINNER,
j Vestry Clerk, St. Andrew
27 .4.5i1—3n.





| -—————

TAKE NOTICE

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,,
® corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East, 44th Street, New York City,
U.S.A., Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing cocoa, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 24th, day of Apri,
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my o Jce

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
24.4.51.—23n,

W.LP ultting Up Very

Big Show

| bo:
| 60

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.



APARTMENT for rent to approved
tenant. Fully furnished apartment in

hotel area, Hastings, 3 bedrooms, garage
ond servants. reom, From ist June
Write P.O, Box 257. 27,.4.51—6n

BOULOGNE, St. Lawrence Gap, fully
furnished, Dial 8459





CHANDOS, 2nd Ave. Belleville. Fully
furnished, Available May 15th. Inspec-
tion by appointment. Phone 450 or
3926. 20.4.51—t.f.n.

TANGLIN, Bathsheba,
for Rent, but for Sale.
column,



is no longer
See Real Estate
21.4.51—6n

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
werds 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word Sundays.

eee







EXPERIENCED Typist

grapher,
cate Co.





and Steno-
Apply Box ABC. C/o Advo-

15.4.51—t.£.n.



TWO GIRLS who can
machines, for Cap-making
person as soon as possible,

Vernon Walcott, Ivy Road

use treadle
Apply in
to Mrs

26.4.51—2n

————

YOUNG LADY for our Office.Age 18
to 25. Must have knowledge of Book-
work, Shorthand and Typing and be
quick and intelligent. Good salany and
prospects. Apply by letter. C. B, Rice





& Co. 26.4.51—2n
MISCELLANEOUS
HOUSE—Unfurnished House 3 bed-

rooms between Bay Street and Rockley
Dial 4910 or 3601 after 4,30
27.5.51—2n

Rates of Exchange

CANADA
APRIL 26, 1951





62% pr Cheques on

Bankers 60 1/10% pr.

Demand

Drafts 59.95% pr
Sight Drafts 59 8/10% pr.

* pr Cable cay

5/10°% pr Currend’ 58 6/10 pr
Coupons 57 9/10% pr

AtB.LF.

LONDON, April 26.

THE WEST INDIES section at the British Industries Fair
this year is expected to make a great impression on hun-

dreds of thousands of people

who throng to Olympia.

George Roberts from Trinidad, employed by the West India
Committee, thinks it is one of the biggest shows ever put
up by the West Indies. He ought to know, for this is the
19th year he has helped to assemble stalls.

Today he stood waist deep in
erates, packing cases, parcels and
cartons of every kind. When he
has finished with Customs Offi-
cials tomorrow he moves off to
the exhibition hall to start work
on his section of the show that
opens on Monday.

Grouped Together

Stalls. representing the Carib-
bean will be grouped together on
two sides of an aisle running
through an area allocated to the

t

i
t

|

Commonwealth. Five stalls will!!
be devoted to British Guiana,
Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago,

the Windward Islands, and Bar
bados.
What the West Indies want peo.

1

vle from all over the world to see| British \
first time since

has been sent over in six ships
and three airliners. The
Planter has unloaded at a London
Port, the Ariguani at Bristol. The
Mulberry Hill and Tribesman are
due in the Thames; and the
Cavina at Bristol.

Part of a Trinidad shipment of
Sea Island Cotton has come by
air; so have some examples of
local timber from Jamaica which
are to be used as parts of the’
Jamaican stand, ’

The last consigninent will be
Anthurium Lilies from Trinidad
They will be met at an airport by
expert London florists who will
take them to the Fair.

f
la

i
l

Sugar, Rum, Handicrafts

Sugar, rum and handicrafts will
be prominent on all stands repre
senting individual islands. _Brit-
ish Guiana will display hardwood
for floors; rice, sugar, cottage and
rural industries, straw hats, bags
and fancy goods.

Jamaica will goin for rum,
cigarettes, embroidery, straw



Se ee

FOR LONGER SERVICE

TAR all posts before erecting.
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative
material still available
your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price is..,/+% 40c, per gallon.
Get Some To-day.

at



SSS SS

GOooD
THINGS
for YOU

WINCARNIS WINE

i

fresh fruit

| bottles and stacks of jars of lime
oil, guava jelly and boxes of the

s.S.|W



work, sugar, pimento, sarsparilla
and honey.

On the front counter
will be a special show of
including Ugli which

known in London
hough it has appeared at one big

here

is not yet

store.
rinidad and Tobago will con-
Sia eat

ate on rum and sugar, An

gostura Bitters, oils, asphalt and
handicrafts.

The Windward Islands will
show the world some charming
yeach hats from Grenada and St.
ucia. There will be rows of

nevitable cigars.

Barbados: Entering at the
Industries Fair for the
before the war
ill show off all sorts of things
rom cigar boxes to needlework
nd pottery. —Reuter.

BARTER

NEW DELHI.
A 28-year-old Indian bought a



wife for £30, After three months
he exchanged her for a British
#03 pattern rifle.
was sentenced to eight months’ |

Recently he
mprisonment for carrying an un— !
icensed gun, Which was confis

1
1

cated.

POLICE

9

DUDLEY BUTCHER
Alias: “Francis”
Address: Nurse

Spe



Large Bots. .. $2.88
Small Bots... $1.56
RESERVA WINE
Large Bots. .. $2.38
CRAWFORDS CLUE
CHEESE BISCUITS
Tin ........... $1.26

PEEK FREANS
BISCUITS in Tins
OLIVE OIL—in Tins









the following ships through their Bar- GOSS GOO FOG 7S {
cia, Scotia" ee cee 18 THE PARADISE BEACH $|f) CHEE SAUCE
Hardeman “Arakaka. Colombia, Aseei Be Bel vaicchiiae 7
fron kaee, Pat SEER Game CLUB IMD. = Sh pelle
Sistine, sods: Ancap Tercera. S\8 gAUCEe mes, ad
‘ov NOTICE TO MEMBERS % wh -
x Ww Indi & Briti h In accordance with Rule FOR GOOD VALUE
1 aiene mae Cra _Antith, x : the siaag will be closed ; | INCE & Co., Ltd.
| R vert, Decoration House, §: Big °° Members from 6 Pp m. on ¥ |} ¢ 4,3 & 9 Roebuck Street.
‘ James, Tel, 91-74. hahiee % Saturday, the 28th April. % if Dial 2236 !
¢ 5656089596666 OOO OOOO | ‘3255 as

ee ‘
1 9999699699096 99999 SOOO,



Michael.
40 years.
Black.
5 ft. 4 ins,
Medium,

Age:
- Colour:
Height:
Build:
Face:
Jaws: Sunken
Cheek bones:
Mouth:

Hair:
patch.

Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown.
25th April, 1951.







{ with short tail

|

j

26.4.51—2n ;



Land,

Anyone giving any information leading to
man’s arrest will be suitably rewarded.

R.



LOST & FOUND
FOUND

large Black
Owner



DOG One



ples



PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

(The Provost Marshal's Act 190t
’ (1904-0) & 30

On Friday the 4th day of Mev 1961
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after
will be sold at my to the high
bidder for any not under the
appretsed \alue.
All that certain piece of Land cd











sur



taining by estimation 2 roods situaige in
laine

Parteh of St. Michael
bounding on lands of S. Thompson
Yands of C. Quintyne, on lands
R. Alleyne. on lands of Friendship Plan
tation and on other lands of Florencc
W. Prescod, near St. Matthews Chure
appraised as follows:—

The whole area of land appra
Five Hundred and Sixty-eight

butting
o
o



(568.00). Attached from said Fi €
W. Prescod for and towards satis/a
tion, &c
N.B.--25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase

T. T. HEADIEY

Provost Marshat
Provost Marshal's Office,

20.4.51—-3n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of G. S. Millar
holder of Liquor Licens No, 226 of
1951, granted to him in respect of ground
floor of a wooden building at Charnock's

& Co



Christ. Church, within District “B", for
permission to use said Liquor License
at a wooden and galvanized shop with
shedroof attached at Bank Hall Cross
Road, St, Michae!

Dated this 25th. day of April, 1951
To E. A. McLEOD, Esq,

Police Magistrate, Dist A”

Signed G. S. MILLAR,



Applicant

N.B.—This application will be con
sidered at a Licensing Court to be helc
at Police Court, District “A on Monda
the 7th day of May 1961, at 11 o'clock
am.

E. A
Magistrate,

McLEOD,
Dist
27 4

Police A
In



Acid Stomach -
Quiet reliet

De Witt’s Antacid Tablets
are the most convenient,
easy way to deal with di-
gestive pain and discomfort
when away from home, NO
WATER NEEDED —iwst
dissolve a tablet or tw@ oi |
the tongue for prompt relief
from indigestion, heartburn,
flatulence and other sym
toms of emeens. e

Pablets

















Witt's Antacid

leave a_ pleasant, fresh
taste in the mouth. Easily
carried in cell-sealed strips
—handy for pocket or hand-
bag. ‘

ANTACID
TABLETS

No water needed
Easily carried anywhere






Cell-sealed
@ For home use !
Here's the family standby

@ Quickly soothes Da WITT’S
and settles ANTACID |

upset stomach
@ Lasting effects POWOER |
eid

ao
MAKE YOUR PARTY
A SUCCESS
with
Bots Cocktail Cherries
Onions
” ” Peanuts
Tins Vienna Sausages
Bots Olive
Tins





Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple
Peaches

Pkg Jellos, l4c., 12c. & 22c.
Ting Custard Powder
" Coffee
” Nescofe
Nesta.



STUART & SAMPS
(1938) LTD.

HEADQUARTERS FOR
RUM



NOTICE



WANTED

For escaping from custody at Central Police Station
on the night of 19th instant.





pt.

Tweedside Road, §

Long features, rough and frowning.

High—small scar on left,
Corners white.

Teeth: Some of upper front missing.
Receding from front of head leaving a

this

T. MICHELIN,

Commissioner of Police

27.4.51—3n



|

a a re

]



PAGE SEVEN





































bald |

SHIPPING NOTICES *
ti
C Lis N o : 1 1 ‘ ore
.
Janadian National Steamships —
SOUTHROUND ;
Se Sala Saile Arrives Sails
, Vrolifax Boston Parbaces Barbados
ee =- 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 28 Apr 23 Apr. _
. 7 May 10 May 12 May 21 May 22 May ss
r 5 June 6 June 11 June 20 June 2a June i
WADY 3 July 14 July 15 Juiy
LADY 2 Aug 13 Aug, 14 Aug.
NORTHBOUND Arrives Bails Arrives Arrives,
ui er Borbados Berbador Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
LADY RODNE’ 10 May May 21 May ~ 22 May M
LADY NELSON 3 June 14 June ~ 16 June 19 June
LADY 'RODNEY July 14 July — 16 July Wvuly “
BADY ‘NELSON Tuy 7 Aug. > 9 Aug. 2° Rue. 7
LADY RODNEY Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11 Sept, «9+
N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vess fitt
bers. Pass © Fares and ireigui taier ont aspeeasien — a
‘ - —s.
ny
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. ~
ROYAL NETHERLANDS ~~
FRENCH LINE STEAMSHIP CO, -
Cie Gle Transatlantique untae enon amevenpAm |
MS. Le pr i a,
; SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND 14
SAILING TO ee na eee ; ¢
INGLZ . F vary S. “ORAN AD"—19th April 1961. :
ENGLAND & FRANCE SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMABIBO | .../
curt k-ipeaeenes ; AND GEORGETOWN :
GASC OGNE May 12th, M.S. “HERSILLIA"—llth April 1951. —
ait 1951 Po S. “COTTICA"—23rd April 1991. \
via : sucia, artinique, SALLING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAL _
Guadeloupe and Antigua. CURACAO &e, Ane .
in a >. tateenncne ae: April 1981,”
.P. SON, SON & Co, ‘
SOUTHBOUND Ame.
“GASCOGNE". May 3rd, RODIN IIIT,
1951 % oa
Grenada, Trinidad, Demer- : M.V. CACIQUE Del CARIBE
ara and Fr. Guiana % will accept Cargo and Passengers
a. for St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Gren-
ts ada and Aruba. Sailing Satgrday hi
28th inst te
Accepting Deck passengers
to Grenada, Trinidad, St, _M.V. CARIBBEE wili accept
Lucia and Martinique also : eee cee for Domin-
Cargo ¢ Mai a “anes . ntigua, ontserrat, Nevis
* a Mail to all Ports and St, Kitts. Sailing Friday ath
f 1 \
R. M.JONES& Co.,Ltd, |] Bx, scHOONER own.
soc,, INC.
AGENTS f
Phone ::: 3814 Tele. 4047,
2
SOROS OSG D GLO OS Nts
x ain 55 +s SOOO.
els ELE ELL e
; PASSAGES TO EUROPE
Ce nt ret Antille s Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
pores * eope sgh roe The usual ports of call are- b
, London, or Rotterdam. Single 270;
‘ reduction for children, , ingle: fare £70; usual
PIO LNG GGG
Church Street
Speightstown $50,000 LOAN at 5%
Secured by First Mortgage aa
Instructions have been received on Valuable Freehold
from Mrs. FT. @. Jemmott for the a‘ .
ebeve property to be offered for Property in Barbados 3
mile by PUBLIC COMPETITION
at 280 pm, TO-DAY ot JOHN i *
M, ADON'S OMee, Plantations Opportunity : cue Led
te aaa SSS
(Gtey House is a spacious 3+ PPP PATE
storey stone ding a y 4
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Particulars from the Solicitors, Contact; “B. A. & P. 8. BRQOKS” *
Mes rs Yearwood & Boyce, James ‘ hol
dtrect, or the Auctioneer, Job M,
Sesser tana CONTRACTORS
We draw your Plans.
and endeavour hed give you
the $
| Dot ed. BBiadom For further particulars Phone ‘paas
or 8162. _
21.4.51-—1n
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MEM GM RT







PAGE EIGHT



First Win
For Season

EVERTON got their irst
victory for the seas when th
beat Pickwick-Rovers 5-1! in .a
First Division football mateh

which was played at Kensington
Oval yesterday afternoon

For Everton, S. Blades kicked
in three goals while White and
Yearwood netted one each. Jones
the Pickwick-Rovers centre
forward scored the lone goal for
his team.

Reece at his old position in ti

goal, proved an able foi] for the
Pickwick-Rovers forwards and h¢
was backed up by the accurate

kicking of Blades who went {
centre-forward in the second half
of the game. Jones, the Pickwick-

Rovers forward tested Reece on
many occasions with well-placed
shots and _ right-winger Well

played a good game for his team.

The game opened with Pickwick
Rovers defending the south end
of the pitch. Wells on the righ
wing soon after the kick-off re-
ceived a long pass from his for
wards and was running down
unmarked to score when both
Everton backs intercepted. White,
one of the Everton forwards took
a try at the Pickwick goal about
five minutes after play in the firs
half but the ball went wide of the
goal posts.

Resistance

The Everton forwards started
moving. down to the Pickwick
Rovers“area but Lewis and Hui
put up stiff resistance, Both tear is
were now trying for mastery <
on two occasions Jones at cent
forward for Pickwick-Rov
tested Reece with low shots, The
Pickwick — Rovers goalkeeper
Foster also had a busy time
White and Blades were alwn
trying to score. At half-time b
teams had failed to score.

After half-time, Everton
took the initiative and about twe
minutes after the second half
started, Blades drew first blood

for Everton in a melee in tie
Pickwick-Rovers goal area, Short-
ly after, White kicked in the
second goal after receiving a lon

pass outside the Pickwick-Rovei

goal area, Everton now was deii
nitely on the offensive and about
two minutes after the second gual
Yearwood kicked in the third.

A Header

Play now was concentrated i*



agaist

the Pickwick-Rovers goal aiea
and Blades again headed in the
fourth goal after a melee. A long
pass to Jones from one of his

packs gave Pickwick-Rovers thei:
first goal as Jones who was mid
field and unmarked took tne
opportunity and scored The score
was now 4—1 in Everton’s favour.
The Everton forwards again moved
down on their opponents and about
five minutes before the end ot
play Blades kicked in fifth
goal for Everton,

The teams were:

Everton : Reece, Weekes, Hall,
Culpepper, Scale, Maynard, White,
Blades, Hope, Murray and Year-

the

wood,

Pickwick-Rovers : M Foster,
Lewis, Hunte, Worme, Carter,
Kelly, Wells, Yearwood, Jones,

Foster and Robinson,
The Referee was Mr, D, Sayers.

GOALLESS
DRAW

ROME, April 25

A Brazilian Football team com-
posed of players from the Sac
Paulo and Bangu Clubs drew wil
Lazio, an Italian First Division
side in a rough and goalless maten
here today.

Some 20,000 soccer fans watched
a fast-paced game in bright sun-
shine, but were disappointed by

the absence of Brazilian stat
Zizinho (inside right) laid up
with a sudden cold.

He was replaced by inside left

Bibe, who in turn wes substituted
by reservist Teixernha

The Brazilians. were slightly
superior throughout the game, bu*
they lost many promising chance:
in front of the Italian goal by
complicated passing and repassin
of the ball.

Teixernha in the attack an
half-backs Aliredo and Baue
were in very good form, but failed
to get through. Both teams treat-
ed the spectators to a gooct ex
hibition of ball control.—F/uter.

r
58 Moves To Draw
LONDON, April 25

The eighteenth game in _ the
World Chess Championship match
between Mikhail Botvinnik and
David Bronstein was drawn today,
Moscow radio reported. The game
went to 58 moves. The score now
stands at nine points each, The
next game in the series will be
played on Friday.—Reuter.



| They'll Do ‘Tt Every Time

|





; team raised by

S





_ CHALLENGE




oy

MATCH

PS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Everton Beat Pickwick-Rovers 5-1

sixth hole (164 yards) at Mowbray, near Cape Town, while his opponent looks on.
The hole was halved in three.



S. African Team
Play One Day Match

LONDON, April 26.
England’s spell of summer
weather—temperatures rose to 72
degrees in London today—was

irticularly welcome to South
Africa’s cricketers who played a
one-day charity type fixture at
Maidstone yesterday against a
the Kent captain
Davtm Clark

It was not cricket of too serious
1 character and it gave the South
\fricans a chance to loosen up.
But they had a rude shock when

their first three wickets fell for
four runs—the first two from the
the first two deliveries by Jack
Martin whose only appearance
wa against South Africa four
years ago

George Fullerton however
came along with a not out century
of 118 and South Africa 191 for
five, nearly won the game. Clark’s
team had declared at 199 for three

South Africans were also in the
news at lawn tennis where six of
their players including three of
their Davis Cup team played,
reached the last cight of the Sur-
rey hardcourt, men’s singles
championships. Only Tony Mot-
tram, England’s number one, and
Paddy Roberts—remain to chal-
lenge a south African bid for the
title. —Reuter.

B.G. WILL PLAY
HOCKEY IN TRINIDAD

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24.
The British Guiana Hockey
Association have accepted an invi
tation from the Trinidad Hockey
Board of Control to send a team
here for a series of Intercolonial
matches from June 3 to June 17
Trinidad visited Brilish Guiana
last year, and lost the series after
drawing their first four Test

matches,



TTT

By M. Harrison-Gray §
aS? Dealer : North, 5
Game all, :
N.
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@KS :
BRAD? ,
i South had to make the key
§ bid on this hand from main
§ play. In both rooms Nov

opened One Diamond. Sv
bid One Heart. and Norin
made the forcing rebid o
Two Spades. South bid ‘Iw
No-Trumps and Nort’
umped to Four Hear
his strong bidding induced
both South players to
asiam try. {he first
Five Clubs, but North
still see too many gaps !: *
hand and closed the biceing ¢
at_Five Hearts %
In Room 2 South read t
artiner’s distributior
—4—4—-9, 9 which mee
that @A was of little vate
He therefore made the mo
helpful cue bid of Fiy
Diamonds, and North could

seesecresrese

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tricks,

NARRURASEREcneeaneeen



—_—

“* Regt ed U.S. Patent Often,

Kip RAM



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>



TO BE ERECTED

|__| @JUST SIGN UP ONE O

ob aga yt

Regatta On
Saturday

The seventh regatta of the 1951
Yacht Season will be sailed in Car-
lisle Bay to-morrow, under the
auspices of the Royal Barbados
Yacht Club,

Starting time and handicaps are
as follows:—

‘

i








Vlass No. Yacht Start at Flas old is very stylish, and alsa |
BH. 10 Wisard 230. Red showed the large crowd that he
in could be rough if required. He
: 2 1
D_. 8 Peter Pan” 231 Yellow has a very good left hook, and at
; So 2.33 ed times was a very difficult target
D 4 Seabird 232 #
. to hit as he kept moving away
_D 10 Van Thorndyke 2.83 Yellow from many punehes.
B 3 Ranger
D 12 Rainbow 2.34 Red ee eee eae =
B 3 War Cloud ; :
- 9
Bb 6 Flirt 4 hh T d
401 Fantasy 2 veiw | What's on Today
D 1 Buccaneer E macale :
en ~ Velice Courts—10.00 a.m,
3B 9 Okept 28 Red Exhibition of British Car-
B86 Raseal 2.37 Yellow ne Cue Notes “
—- the egislative Council
D 9 Olive Blossom 2.38 Red — Chamber—10.00 a.m.
B 7 Moyra Blair 2.39 Yellow “Grey Hawke”, Church St
’ ; St.
D 2 Imp 240 =Red Speightstown, will be
D 7 Sinbad 241 Yellow offered for sale—2.30 p.m.
" * i
B 5 Mischief 242 Red PGs eel te on
B 1 Gipsy 2.43 Yellow CINEMAS
K 35 Eadril
i 9 Dauntless 244 Red “Local Talent Show"—8.30 p.m,
‘ —— - Aquatic—"“Holiday Affair" — 5.00
oC 1 Miss Behave Globe—City Across Tie River and
C 8 Routy Nan 2.45 Yellow and ae oe os as
1 6 Eagle Empire—The ' r an—2.50 p.m,
‘ : a Mudlark'"—#.0 aa.
Cc 9 Folly Plaza Bridgtown—".ot Wanted" —
> 11 Magwin 2.46 Red 2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 pm
~~ - Plaza Oistins—"Chain Lightning’
cS 2 Scamp and "The Stery of Seabiseuit'—
K 44 Comet So and 8.0) pom
’ waren 2.47 Yellow Gaiety — “Lost Boundaries’ —8.00
i 7 Mohawk p.m.
my Olympie—"The | Spoilers” |. and
12 Dawn 248 Red “Seven Sinners’—1.40 and 4.15
pm
1 ll Reen 2.49 Yellow Roxy — “Under Current’ and
’ ‘Night’ Must Fall’—4.20 and 8.15
I 1 Gnat 250 Red Pm.
Royal— “Relentless” and “Lust For
K 29 Cyclone Geld’ — 10 and 8.30 pom.
K 1) Vamoose
1 4 Coronetta 3,52 Yellow
I 1s Clytic
10 Gannet 2.53 Red
c 7 Rogue 2.54 Yellow
Abed si ol following dates have been TO-DAY
ixed for Resattas : i ;
8th Regatta, Saturday Sth May, 1951 oon Rises: 5. 46 a.m,
a, Saturday 19th May, 1951, Sun Sets: 6.30 p.m,
» Thursday, 24th May, 1951 Moon (Last Quarter):
. 26th May, 1981 April 28
2nd June, 1951 Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
Cup, Thursday, 7th | June, High Water: 8.01 a.m,,

Birthday)
H. BLAIR BANNISTER
Starter.



adies’ Water Polo
This Afternoer

THERE will be a ladies’ water
0lo practice mateh at the Barba-
des Aquatic Club this afternoon
between the following two teams:
‘ Team “A”, Roberta Vidmeyr,
eggy Pitcher, Jean McKinnon,
Dorothy Warren, Joyee Allen,
Marion Taylor and Ann Eckstein.

Team “B”, Gill Gale, Frieda
Carmichael, Christine McKinnon,
*hyllis Chandler, June Hill, Ann
Raison and Phyllis Fitzpatrick

Reserve; Joyce Eckstein.

Both teams are asked

ready on the pier at 4.45
Match begins at 5 p.m.
_ After this game, another prac.
tice match will be arranged be
tween the other ladies whe have
turned up for practice,

be
p.m,

to

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

Rangers v. Penrode at St. Leon-
ard’s, Referee: Mr. Robert Par-



ris |

















_—



TWO SINGING PUPILS,
ji AND SOMETHING LIKE
THs HAPPENS NEXT DOOR»

WILLIAM :

TH AIL

PLL Pte Soll I LI A BPD Ott te ult bt bd

DORI ELL COP OEEE CT COERCION.
LILIA IL OA AE OOO

heavyweight

p

—Evxrpress

Kid Ralph Gives
Fine Display
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24.
Kid Ralph, Barbados light-

gained many sup-
orters for his bout with Gentle



Daniel when he gave a fine dis-
play this week in an eight round
exhibition,









Ltn ele

oF

The Barbadian who is 24 years









9.51 p.m,

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil
Total for Month to Yester.

day: 5.15 ins,
‘Temperature (Max): 85.5° F
Temperature (Min): 73.5° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)
E.S.E., (3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity:
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.995,
(3 p.m.) 29.924

10 miles per



OIL

SEE
SUNDAY ADVOCATE

CITE

I Can See...

?

*
8
1%

—t

wos

\\

vt

|

|

















SPORTS
WINDOW

FOOTBALL FILMS

Those interested jin the
finer points of feotbali will
have a treat tonight if they
visit “Wakefield” at 8 30
o'clock,

The Honorary Secretary
of the B.A.F.A,, Mr. O, 8.
Coppin, has made arrange
ments with the British
‘Council for players and
others interested in feotball
te see three training films
at Wakefield entitled “At.
tack”, “Ball Control” and
“The Great Game”.

SECOND DIVISION
Carlton vs. Spartan at Bank
Halt
THIRD DIVISION
College vs. Wanderers at

College
Foundation vs. Combermere

at Foundation
Empire vs, Carlton at Black

Rock

Regiment vs. Everton at
Garrison
Police vs. Notre Dame at
Park
BASKETBALL
(First Division)
Fortress vs. Pickwick at
YM.P.C,
H.C.0O.B. vs. H.C. af
Y.M.P.C.
NETBALL
Foundation Girls’ v. Oveen’s
Collece OM Girls at
Queen's Collere
HOCKEY

A demonstration hockey
match will be played at
Kensington today at 4.45
p.m. This is to awaken
interest in the game. Only
men will be playing during
the first half of the game
In the second half, eight
ladies and two Combermere
boys will take over from
ten of the players of the
first half.

The teams are: G, Jones,
T. Knight, 5. Dungney, D.
Worme, Adams (Comber.
mere), A, Farmer, D. Bad-
Jey, George Allen and
two policemen; Warren, J,
Worme, Taylor, M, Leach,
Hon’ble R. N. Turner, Kelly,
Col, Michelin, M, Stoute, R.
\Creney, Edwards,
member of the Police team.

The ladies are: Mrs. Wells,
Mrs, Lewis, Mrs. Roger's,
Mrs. P. Pitcher, Mrs, M.
Griffith, Miss Pam _ Cress-
well, Miss Worme and Miss
Jean Chandler,

Globe





It’s so easy
to see those

extra fine

aw Jl

points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the
Top Scorers
in Tailoring
to be on the
SMART
side.

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co.,, Ltd

% Prince Wm. Henry Street
Roncenqe seen eeee TOTTI FOLENS GEES <
(

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and a

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A

LPLPL LLLP LLLP L LLL LIL LAA ILA Dl ba de

OOD IO E EEE OP CPE TTF ATP

pas









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packed tin!

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Copr. 1950 Borden Co, Internat’l Copr, Reserved,

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to blame, for your kidneys, along
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So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
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|
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IN THE
| WEEKLY ADVOCATE













Theatre
TO-NIGHT
GUEST STAR

Li
JOSEPH CLEMENDORE
celebrated CONTORTIONIST
of The O’LINDY TROUPE









{

' T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

ee
STACK-A-BYE CHAIRS
The All Steel Arm Chairs
$11.50 Each
at

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND
HARDWARE

GIRLS’ FRIENDLY
SOCIETY
ANNUAL FETE

Under the Distinguished
Patrorage and presence of
His Excellency the Governor

and Lady Savage

will be held at
THE HOSTEL, Country Rd.
on SATURDAY, April 28th
Opened

from 3.30 te 6.30 p.m,

There will be the follow-
ing Stalls: Flowers and
Variety, Needlewerk, Sweets,
Household, Books, Cakes and
Ices.

For
will be Pony
Lucky Dins.

By kindypermission of Col,
2 IWichelin, “he Police Band
% conducted by Capt. Raison
3 will play.
+
%





}
|



]



|

Sr

CO

POD OEIN

4s
o

heerenes
ROSS

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oF

there
and

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Rides

the

ot
SS

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COOP OOOO OPT TOTO FCPS

ADMISSION — 6D.



_—_— Oe

NO

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951

————



Queen
Scots













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ean



Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY, APRIL M, ltll BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Britain Has Not Played Fair -C 8. MATHURA Yoshida's PartyGet Beat Of Elections ITAL1.W I II >l STAR B, SIDNEY BROOKES TOKYO. April 26. Nationwig. local election returns today dealt another blow is party and llkaly PCM I >F-S1>AI1S April 2*. COUIUIILH c H M..thura ... moving a mUion :,! the CK> Counto Japan's left-\. ril rneehug asld that he felt that ware considered Britain has run been plavuig a fair strength** the CIUN of Prime Yoshida in re-establishing %  p tos of the Culooie*. Japan as a Pacific powar. Speaking in support of the reaoIn a large turn cut of voters— lution Councillor Randolph M.tch0 per cent of the electorate— ell said that, it would be di*Japanea* elected an overwhelmhonest person who would oppose ing number of right wing candi the resolution." date to Mayors posts in 199 cities Councillor Mathura said that -nd moat mayors and local aasen-.the sugar industry was the main*y men ,n small towns and May of the economic structure of village*. more* than two-thir %  would agree—or none at all on th. Ml of the sugar Indus.',. nntl who hav e P** n oPP*<> the Sevan* whirl, %  uin due to lack of and B4 went era! times Vt ili;,vss" Shirt TEL-A-V1V. April 2 The Egyptian shore sigr..i'. Mat ion on Sinri Peninsula today allowed an Israel-bound merchant ship sailing under (iraek colourto enter the Oulf of Akabah with %  • mixed cargo of timber, cemen: Mr. Justice W H. Irwin. preObservers here considered this siding over the Third Supremo Indicated a change in Egypt".Court in Port-of-Spain in n dlvdros P""<*y towards shipping movecase took strong objection to th mp nt* to and from the Israel port dress of a wanes?. When his naniof Elath a lhe head of the Oulf •d, Lloyd Johnson, a baker wi'ch Egypt. Israel. Jordan nf Success Village, Laventille, and Sau, h Arabia meat. Three of walked into the witness stand in lhcsc four countries have what is called a 'hot shirt" announced plans to develop tluir Mr. Justice Irwin: When did slre,ch * ' " Gulf coast. in Incase? oIher l>on Map Elim ... Johnson: Yeaterday Sir." shipping to the Pni The Judge: "Why are you dressAfi "LOOKING AT PICTURES Mr J ihn Harrison. Art and Exhibitions Oirlcor ol the British Council, this week gave the first of a aeries of thrte lectures gt^the Barbados Museum on "Uooking at Pn I In these lectures. he said that hewould discuss the way in wh'fti different painters of different nationalities at dilTtrant periods of history have treated the gam* idea. 1 %  '" W"""" This afternoon he would deal with portrait painting, at hisecond lecture with Landscape painting, and. lastly with the subject or genre picture, when. people ware doing somethinr Mr Harnson"* talk was Mlustra;•41 ha u-lurea projected by an epidiascope. European portrait psmi.n;, originated wiUi the votive picture of a saint or the Madonna whtru wag to hang in a church TV.donor of the picture was panilts: m a corner mueh smaller than Hi., subject in jn attitude of prayer. Gradually Um donor grew in size until he or she beHarbour Log In Carlisle Bay M V ..:.. Mark. HiM %  *t+tM II D-s... % %  1 I .... %  AH* IV ALA Perhaps An Atom Ship By JOHN i TABLOVA LONDON A Min, .try of Supply spokeaprec.rted today that "possi. MAIL NOTICES i M V Canqur Hi Carlbr bri] M rluwj •i tnr (.menu Port Oflk "'# %  !%  >< Ordtnaiv Mall << 11m Wn >W A, Kttlh ft* M*n.-i.,„.1.. ihr r| niMunl Ft**" will lw %  Uianl .1 IPr i Pkrvrl. Ra^uUlHl ami Oldii .1 fl .1 m > L00KY0UR BEST bly will be rnuig in alomic-powered tralna, ships and aeroplanes.. Of at' urne powered autbmotiles, he -aid. 'The klra may sound tantastie now. but there are linii scientists who consider it feasible of puritan was organised tu m the no* loo distant future '• m n at n '^ sieatesl so av to miSupply IMInlater George Strau-i Pf" 1 *" h >* subjects. The s-tati responsible "* the picture completely, and portrait had arrived. Slate Portrait MM cams the stat<. aortnll STtUjoB i'-ndere imposing at possible This type THE OIRL with th" %  •houldir length hair ntyla and no nuke np who spaakH very littls English, but has very •xpr*t HdnM bugm.t Hero the subject is treuu-l m iln grand nwnner with tin and effects of the wn painters. The decline of the stale portrait was followed by portra, East 1 HIS MAJESTY •proved th* aw... penal Ser\Ico Med rTof|;hV Jm h ^ THOUGH h possibilities of atomic power fut of dignified, wealthy and arr (n hehalf of hi _, *. ; ll i.* Go Into Action — Sir C.e,.rge Seel told the Annu.i disease?, and pests of economk S lants within the Caribbean, has ten strongly reconsmended ay the Be.-nr.Ti 1 Agti bungalow and culture. Fish. Wildlife end Fan try of the Caribbean He.fji.-^ the 0>•• • %  U, I, W Conymore.„„„ •* ""*"' """• %  n. pM mta p !" nll ",rtly 'Kr ho w M < li.tton T lie y don't Ml cannon illncked IBe "I'Buimcd poalmai,. Uuriiig it," T'^ T H? ow ' '" not fe worked prgSrlds Britain with atnmn powered an craft. Round The World The ten m— headed by 3S^yeur J. V. Dunworth—I-, exported to turn out plans for a j erotic ladies Here the artist rounded his -ultlect with a number ol objects reflecting the birth. la>fe and wealth of the -ittr, Individual In opposition to the purl rut' which surrounded the sitter with ;UCfl paraphernalia were portrait fotal point ol LHl subject alone Here the sitter palnted on a neutral ground with 11 lining to distract the eye of UM beholder Thi* method of poiu.ui p.ilniuig has been u^ed thrwugh"Ui i"hist.i t,i tt The subject * portrayed not a.s part of the machinery of state. posaM ai birth, but as an individual Bm 1 pictures were painted with .greHt economy of CMIIHII Anothar treatment of portrairuiv was that -if shnwuiK the subjet-l .v Surroundings Of thi' thor" were a very large nuii.1-1 of examples. Again, th* srtisl "-metinu-t depicted his .ubjact In domestic surroundings which reflected socul and economic auditions for political reasons. ArtiMs nKo lYsjquntl* ihessed tiieu %  uhjaiti to repn-. m plane c-apable of ,. round-theunna which Ihey IH "I .1' Co t according to a Royal Aii spokatman. —Heuter. ipletely desi? !" }, 0 m(-e "• •WVed under M. H. H. Heath. Mr. U. F. ShurpvMr H Biackman, Mr. releralily. -Ii-.ul.t i..t -i.un fgataWl or lhi I11II1U e\er> um* nl llii'' eoiiditions. Ab" Itetlol' can he ral'cly u-e.1 un even irrv tiu1 isioaM behighly likfiif*. IIOU-|>OI-IIIIUUB and •kin. • Detlol' ilnlely reliable, touna children. DETTOL .* THB MODERN ANTISEPTIC s.p.t.A. Hntmus We humans have learnt by thi; :,< %  .: %  w i „ . n.s pens,o, ( ; n,ma -*" *• %  "f')" in n { He has 1 wife and Hs-2 urBvlv ;* s cal nun,a fm children who are all treatment is: Ixith morally -conomically rewarding. But wc are ourselves far from perfect, an I isS^AII .._ , r actions ore liable to he govern ca"oenu. ie w ST, S. S ? * '^''ncss, even greed, an,: gg £ w..ik.ii .it the tradcnot seldom by bad temper. Th. for some years before he joiiie l dom^ij,:. atilmal. if he tlicr the Harbour PoUca in 1WI8 He happens to l>e In the wav at sue, wtl."• %  *'"-" sl *'" 1 '".'"' J" 1 vc -" 0mm, is only too llkelv to come ,^ u"I teXF 1 %  ***** mt badly That m why it ,s ..n '• 1 fc porb.nl tout, in civilised coin. He left Harbado. foi th,States mufll |ies, there should bo soc.eUei where he bpent 12 years. He the. ^ mPn Dnd worncn viKlUinl lo came back to Hiirbados ami trice! .,,,„ Ul notlce the emm ot ,||. his hand nt restaurant keeping, treatment which anbound t-> the case of modelpainted 1 %  %  iiililic.il or .illvgoinul p*-i .tepre^entation of tin srtisl %  all ".*-.1 Lux.the patron aJM of painterIn fl age at Cuna" by \\,. srtast portraat 1 fu ; "'.in .!,(. 11 i: 'iient i-imteinporary Venetian", and monarch!, and 1 pj katad portraits of himself and his fellow nrti'ts as the band I Haitian fainting Mr Itarrlaon danni 1 1 referred t.i the fatt thai he had Britain Will .Not Revalue £ No* occur, and that there should uc legislation to which these societies can appeal, to bock up their elTuit> to guard against the worst at>B' %  ;I have been in Barbados only fo vary short time, and hi any case l would not attempt to hay whethci LONDON, April 20. the sundaids of treatment are Usually well informed London better or worse, t&ken as a whole. quarters completely discountthan in other communities. But n cnanced any Idea of revaluing the very short time driving In your pound sterling. Such a mow streets shows n far greater use of would be quite impracticable at transport animals than In. say. the present ihcy say. It was not even eltfcn of the United States or the under discussion n responsiblo United Kingdom; and I am afraid circles tnat ,n "^ eountry one sees a goHi Revaluing sterling was advc many dogs with a rather tell-Ule cated yesterday by Roy Harrod. neared-for look in the Financial Times. He argued that Britain could afford it because the dollar position of the sterling area w is secure. Most of the sterling area would join Britain In revaluing, ana Australia especially would bmuch helped in the solution ol ler own Inflationary problem. Harrod added that Britain'* r x%  ort prices hnd risen far less than icr import prices. This deteriorainn in the terms of trade imposed 1 bigger burden than rearmament. It was impossible for Britiln world (tight without refuelling A scientist said the power plant for the plane would probably !' a small Btonrta unit, a fast raactnr usCM punuranium 235 .. Plutonium Sir William llildrcd. British I> in tni General of H> Int.i national Air Transport AISOCIII Uon. d< la red that atomle |owe arauU snabla aJrjUners to combine tremendous high speed mth ihiiost unllmite-l ranga." Indusiiiallsts interested In th fommer. tal poasibllilie<, of atonu research are being .helped hcourses under way at Harwell The drat course, gives guidrecently been in Haiti, wlu-r,. |h ance in the use of Isotopes— Anglican blstlOB kju ran radio-nctive elements ed a number of p-jpular htalUari lnerenaa in Us* of Isotopes i^" 1 '" to iaoaeajtg the cathedral The Ministry of SuppK s|M.kesibese paintings srare moa| unman .aid the school was set up P"**"'**. One could not help 1. because of the rapid Increase In '"g touched by the %  .mats faiih ol tho use of isotopes and the need -innulo men One of HUM to p.-oparl.. understand then '"' paintings was of th, application at Cana With tin Probably the largest-sc.ilc Our Lord and His Mi Mm .11 in private* research in stpmic science details of the naJntlng in Bri'iiin is being carried out in em Haitian. It was, m tact, l Associated Wes-trlcul Industrie-., Haitian wedding. I LH I 1 £30.000.0011 (84.WJ0.OOO) comwa.v incongruous. 1! would be binesome time before the Interim ol An A E.I research tenm at the cathedral was completed A1 derm, mat on. Berkshire, is r#— %  %  % %  — ported to hove a f 1.000 000 FOOD GOES DOWN (•2.BOO.OO0) a year budge' aasj c F ,i,w T ,. The selenUsts are aided by an a, riovp mAhod of I.wVnn tf atom smasher developing an fr JJi S2 h Z .. Ll^ eCie^,, prure of^vooouoo gS' HGS.JS. 1 ^ $SF S volta-sald to be the only atom men, led by two housewives, smasher of its size in private „i 2 ed 10 tradespeople. I „* -. ... (M ''. ,h ,w 'hem Into some rowing Heart of the Aldermaston team boots; they Uok them half a mile is 47 year-old Dr. T E. Allibone out to sea and di.mp.-d Utasn Into one of the British atom scientists the water. The police did not in ho worked In the Unlled States tcrfere. Next day the price of U.S. Regards Sc-human Plan As Teit MUNICH. April 25. John McCloy, United SUIra HiBh Commlasloner in (Jecmauy aald heiclunight that thp Schuman Plan marked Oermany'i emer,;.. i' .. 1111 %  ...I !• .rtm r m the to carry two new burdens reat Luropean project imultaneously. ing appeared emedy~ Revaluing sterbe the only BWIA Atomic Explosion To Cure Cancer HEW YORK. April 28. A tiny "atomic explosion" to. cure s cancerous tumour in her brain failed to save the Ufa I 31-year-old Mrs. Pearle Jamieson The operation took place in Bronkhaven National Iiil be granted asylum In Au-rtrali... Immigralt'm Minirtei metal in liquid form lato her blood „„.„,,, j,^,, jnnounced (o-day. stream and when it reached the rcUx j,,,,. h( had resigned his tumour it bombarded with p,,,, u-rause he refused to supply neutrons. the Czechoslovak Government The laboratory said CoUstaV with secret political reports on story was premature and unAustralia. authorised but admitted that Holt said todny he understood three oUser patients wera under Felix h.d terved the Allied csuse Treatment In both World Wars. It had been Mrs. Jarnleson's husband %  that he upheld the the treatment iKtiefHcd los will democratic way of life and did at first but the 'risk. advanced —Heater WANTED: NOSL ba obi ...m H YiilfK .Id poet-aM thought I ene.1 to kidn.ip .1 child hold hutr for ran was to be *pent for %  blackmail notes 1 'he .tufhor ^as %  use Vaseline HAIR TONIC ROBINSONS 'PATENT' B ARLEY nuke, milk more digeitibls for baby •PATENT' C ROATS mskei ajaaskaj s hsppr thm for and rnoaVr BE SURE OF aria the faithful ujc of UKKAM -The boop or Ihs BaantliuL PI iv .it" %  1 prepared. for your romantic moment. a,\ ., few eakai 1 ( ORFAM Ton.rr KOAP. use it ,u bath. 1 1 ;i( Hie *nUB I -in foi a -vift-smooUB. 1 lanl n lh natural fi'tf W ,. %  vailable nt toilet goods r I'ighout the island. Senior Short Story Competition The Evening Advscate Invites all SchooUboys and nehool gfVtJ between the ages of 12—19 to enter for Ikj ftenler Shert SUry Cempettlen. Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed MO word 1 • %  "ig'h and must reach the Mharl Story Editor. Adveeate Cm I.tM Ity not lau-r than Wednesday everv week The beit tnr each week ell! be published In the Evenlna Advocate and the winner will re ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/fl Send this coupon with your story SR.VIOst SHOBT STORY COMPETITION TONFC'it BflrfM tal' a I row unk. j, NXr-&*. row iwih aitfi ...I ntmkf, lrak. • %  •in S* U,r (.^/..r, tr. tnsas %  [ %  -• an ,. %  When you smile in the mirror... Are your teeth as white as hers? Have vou smiled into pott mirror unlay? Were your teeth brifht — did ihiry sparkle? Or could dkS) be whiter still? Yen! with IVpsodent ihcy could! Because I'cp-i-teni contains Inum, special in^r'.-Ju-m whi*.h lloats away dull him from iceth, gives them a wonderful new sparkle! THE TOOTHPASTE WITH IRIUM*



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 FRIDAY. APRIL 1951 PRICE IT I ^%  r %%' \ S| Con.munisls muintain pressure 1 pushing Allied troops back \|||'>|"|' A "' l*v hospitali and appoints Lord Privy S*al f |||%si|sW Conservatives will force — %  " % %  debate on raw materials TAXES CnitskeU tnakeo ttcy. law* „ for inrnm.' tax evaders U.N. WITHDRAW 20 MILES NORTH OF SEOUL 200,000 Flee Threatened South Korean Capital TOKYO, April 26. UNITED NATIONS troops fell back to a new line about 20 miles before Seoul today in the face of a renewed furious offensive by the Chinese. Throughout today defenders threw back furious assaults. But the Com munists broke through in several places and General Rulgway's men made a planned withdrawal. Among the defenders of dark and waterless Seoul tonight were men of the British 29th Brigade who fought their way out of encirclement after bearing the brunt of an attack by 24,000 Chinese. BY BLOCKING', the southward drive on the estimated Ihit'tChinese division* in the past three dnys they were believed to have set the Communist time-tnhle hack 18 C.O.L. Striken Go Hack To Work MADimi. April 2 Cost of living strik. I luck to work in Si iw province of <; All strikers return,-, i Taga and It was onl %  in Zarauz i.nd Pasaje* that tru four iliis-' old stoppage cool the main factoi H % %  ing and metal work pin Sebastian were Mill idle. — Kctilrr. linl) 11 _:*of rule hour Seoul is now threatened with since the conflict bewail. The Communists are driving on the city alone tw roads from newly captured Munsan. south of Imjin Rive and the road through I'ijongbu IS mile-, north of Seoul. IW capttDal'l remain) IIK 200.00'-. — ., i—-i.i n i %  i.n II I I,; 1UU.OV". ,f u mriiioIUnu made another exodus "when Communists opened their Spring offensive on Sunday. Now Only military police patrol the I It) Thy-main force of the Communist thrust is from their enlarged bridgehead southwest of the Imjin Uitongbu wan still in 1'micd rinds tonight. Tonight's Eighth Army Communique said the Communists n II ried pranm uil along the western front loday but in the %  sn '£* ££?%£"£ work m Manchester port loday drove about two mile* into Com. in a lightning strike to protest i numis hrM urrHsW against overtime. About 20 shiptn lying idle j Troops holding the left of the In the port as a result of the United Nation*' western front strike. They carried ought a splendid rearguard action sulphur, steel, cotton and timber, before withdrawing. Massed The men claim that night shift United Nations artillery today and workers, who refused to work tonight poured a hail of Are into OVOItuM, hOTC boon lockod 0Ut".l UaB danger area. —Renter. I r*a>t of the critical WctOt 00B % %  — I munist.'t also pressed hard al withdrawing United Nations elements Overseas I r<>\ meets j-i.'^""" 11 ?• dav surrounrtert an %  infantry inin. 2,300 Docket Strike MANCHESTER. April 26. Portuguese colonies w II be k a A Hill patted l.v Hi. P IM.itiim.il Assembly toda tho glu The ii %  clearly and Ii and guarantee! ol Pa Fnreli'ii citlgoni In ll %  —Renter 00 thrown in lo help excuo the infantry who wilh this: id fought their way clear. Chinese • two |>enotra1iom of the of KopyoAJ which they h;ii TOKYO. April 26 t h Korean President Ithee to-day dismissed of Justice Kim Chun This was ihe second dismissal of i C ilnnct Minister arising out Of the Kochong incident". Yes terday the President dismissed HO Minister l)i ("ho Pyong Ok In the "Kochong incident" 187 South Koreans in the Kochong Village, 35 miles south west of Taegu, were summarily executed by a South Korean battalion dur big anti guerilla operations on Pabruar) 11 —Reater Pass Defence Bill WASHINGTON, Apiil 26 The House of Representatives passed the J6.468.206.000 Defence Appropriation Bill today largely to buy weapons, it supplements an lanillOlOl] W 1.000,000,000 previously appropriated to.* National Dclrnee lor the fiscal year ending nox( June —Reuter UNREST DENIED ECUADOR. April 26 Reports received here nf pehti t caj unrest and violence i I gull were denied toda) eminent M:in-'' gado. "There la complete peace inquUltJt throughout the i-iuntrv" he ^OClared. —Reuter LEGISLA 7Y>/f UtRESTED CAPETOWN'. April 26. The President of the Soutn Attican l.--isl; ( live A'Stmbly In fofmod thO Hou*e lodav that one el its numbers H, G. i.uttig, has I SjOfl ..ii d OH a chM'ge of "fala.tas"--a foim of fraud Lnttig is ,i membei for Mayfai eicy of Johannesburg Reuti-r. Bucket full Of Stolen Money DELGIUM. April 26 A DETFCTIVF kicked a bucket In a back garden here rind out fell 200.000 Belgian franc*. A few minutes later Police held Hlppoulyte Pannecouke. his friend Pierre Clolte mans and his son Roger Clottemans on charges of armed rob berv from Cassiers Colliery last month when 3.880.000 Belgian %  ire stolen.—Reuter CONFIDENCE VOTE BRUSSl A ;ial vole of confidence vas obtained by Belgium's All Catholic I > the Chamber of 0 u Government majority resolution comeniing the Belgo.Cti*,.-.. Marsha:i —Rruter. Prineess Vfc'adts 'l'o Emigrate PARIS, April 26. An Ex-(jucon of Kgpyt dbl ol work mid short of cuh. lodav withdrew th Ukf*al to squat at Ii Embassy here until he pot visa to go to England. Princess Ha van Djavdan. 74 > ear old widow of the last Khedive 'l Egypt, who ome had a palace rind 6s servants, is job hunting She has been offered work In Ifritain but the vU| (Off which she applied last March 20. is still not forthcoming I i threatened to squat at I "> %  here for two houri daily nnil it was granted But today she left the Embassy within an hour. An Embassy spoke-i the Princesi. had agreed to calf quattuu campaign on ih that the Consulate CALL FOR "ALL OUT" ENQUIRY WASHINGTON. Ap.il M, The Una*d States Senate Ihrpublican Pivlicv Coittiniitee lied last night for an "all ou* v-esaigation mio policies as lir back as the 1048 Yalta Conference with spex-nd mphasis on what he called the dministration's 'encouragement ( Chinese Communists.*' Senator Taft said Republican* would demand that hearings on MacArthur issued by the Senate Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committee on May 3 should be held in public In lew York, Major Oeuetal Ourtnev Whitney, General MacArthur's spokesman, said the icral had no objection to public healings or to being felevlsed -Reuter CHARGED WITH NEGLIGENCE MOBIIj;. AI^BAMA. April 26 The United States coastguan today charged the master i>f the Fo Sues with negligence in *• %  cpen sea collision with another tanker Eaao t.rrensewa in which lives were lost. Tiie fcano Standard oil tankers collided \/y fog 200 miles Morgan City. T^ilsiana laat Friday. All but live of the fluinabiJsfj crew of 42 were burned to daaWa Captain Edwin C Gelck ol Bavonne. New Jersey was charge i wllti two count* of negligence The formal hearing of the complaint is to open tomorrow Wants to Take Over Oil Immediately TEHERAN, April 26. A special session of the Majlis Oil Committee tonight ununi' %  'ii ii' is ... :i reaolutlori i<> i ut the nationalisation of Persian ell into effect immediately. The resolution will be submitted to Majlis itself on Saturd.i> and if approved will need only the sanction of the Senate m become law—Reuter. .. A IIIIIMin 4.1 si I III New Law For Tax Evaders U^NDON. April 26 High <;..itskeii. Chancellor >t the Exchequer, to-day annouic> d measures to restrict ccrt.nu coi pion of incomt.tor profit. I.ix h> tiadlng conbrrni which transfer thai r busMeag abroad <* even transfei %  nj part of it to people abroad without Treasury consent will !-e liable to heavy pen alt ie* —ReuUi Truman. Asks Higher Tax3s PRINCE BKKNHARD of iho Nr tbo it anils, who ll now oil *n oB visit to UiArgentine lit Pre^Hc Peroa %  igsiette when Ut VtstWd the President t the aovetmnent Hoire. BiituoAim 1 26 !" rotiiirtifin U|> LONDON, April 26 Slaliajrexfi Indvatrioi Mtroyed luring (he war are now producing 31.5 per cent more than in 1930 According, to chief architect Vash> ill Simbirstev, as quoted In a Tata official Soviet news Bfesjaw btea. sage iereivel in tendon—Keuter. WASHINGTON Truman warning tint mtlalionnrv pressures .ei reached tnetr peak" todaj aak -d Congress for higher taxes tighter credit controls and fair (eilings" on farm and other products. in a special message to ConSMH wlmh urged speesh action, Truman aafc) the worid sltuatli %  > plode at any tine and we oiii^t roake evai %  day oouni M Tories Want To Know Tlw Truth About Haw Mutvriah WIN 1X1*. \| Winston ChurehiU'a Coi W tore* di I the ('<.iniu.li, M..i Tinaad tw UM raw I leri wh'ch has caused ,i I -il>"i t ; %  %' They will probe dooph Inl %  i i and Harold Wilson, ilia' Iha %  oortl p m ike i I I.7IMI.000.0IM .,i Some ConservaU\e% that the -tins d| iv. ii n i ml thai Oo %  BJJ U, .1 .. %  In pi WiUiai i the ifcbate. rhi.rchill i hke)} in demand that the puuli bo teiu all the faefe ol He frill irul'd that aothlng mm sl.-inO in the way of fuliilhnii ill i i %  ..'.It] ii-o|iarJ'. the nation nttll be fold nrilalta\ Ally Ho. t. Mi %  1 .t. leg Scotland # <>unt>en. %  Botfand tod < *. %  HnitoH Stale* gHoD gUrlal %  ll'llt ll( I the • ii'-' t did Hfltlal i Pefain Improves YEU ISLAND, ltay of Biscay. April 20. Ex Mjrshal Phiillpe Petain of France spent a lestful night and had some food todav. "He might bury us all yel." ioked the island's doctor who ha-. heated the 95.vear.nM Vlcn Chief dt MacArthur Booed And Welcomed CHICAGO. April 20 A group of young pn.ple booed and hoisted the sign — "Fade Away" i <: %  rteral ."..iiias Ma. Arthur passed In triumph through Ihe streets of Chicago todiiv On the other side of the road from the Univertjfet) where the group *ond, an old ladv hi hi up a sign 'God Bless Our Next Presi dent" and dismrsed Commanuer The procilllon received n tumultuous welcome from Chic og the crlsia of his 111ago dtigens and othei Midwestern es—Reut*r era.—Reuter Plane Explodes; Crew Killed Kit) I)E JANEIRO. April 28. A lltfi plane from Natal an* %  ifed in Ihe air in the clfy of Monte Bclo in the State of Rio Grand N"i H The crew of sargeants and two lieutenantwere all killed —Reuter. 16 Planes Downed LONDON. April 20. Chinese Communists claim that their antl.aircrafi guns had brought down 16 United Nations S 'anes and damaged another in orea during the week ending Apr.l 22.—Reuter. VEHICLES COLLIDE An accident occurred on Black Rock Road near St Stephen's at about 11.20 last night between a Fire engine M 120 of the Fire would notify her as soon u LonBrigade ond a 'bus owned by the don had acted on the visa. Naii->nal 'Bus Co Roth vehicle? -Reuter were slightly damaged. Stokes Named New Lord Privy Seal LONDON. April 2fi Prime Minister Attlcc Chose a dynamic Socialist bt Liv man tonight to solve the raw material crisis which COU ed two ministers to walk out of hia Cabinet thu, w.-t-k He appointed M-year-oId Richard Stokes as Lord of the Privy .Seal—up till now a miniaterial poat without deflntti ^ At the same t he announced Mi-kewould take a new Govern ment Depertmenl to handle tag material fjutlaj ttliolr field ut prod Hut lie Inl, I IhO ''I the %  i hope thai An.. help He welcomed a itatament m %  night '• %  Dean Acheson, Anerk no of St.lie .i %  ii niit inin an helpful" f showed Brfl %  No one stsOUld ment was not t'iking si' • ibnormal iltu Kriili i 86,000 Tam Mal Tor Kriliiiii lX)NI)ON. April Of Ihe JiMi.Hl.il n.i,. nt %  meat At t<. %  hipply i" Dntali lurti next 12 i boded i: ild den %  %  i gchedula hw rledl %  I'.ict DIM %  v, ll lltcliUild Mnii.Kli Wh I f nay Nur whlei Pour other voaaob o i"'' read \lrnt -i* Hrln Kva Pr'aw, I MnMne K.ulei More Planning Needed LONDON. Apt Sir Frank Nb advocated tod.i. for the ^ %  %  rionwealth a i kh in resources" and le-s foi i economy"' Hi %  'If they are to be carried uj ave oi prosi"-; to drop into misery and depression i ly near future—according to the vagaries of American .; — the social problem could be Immediately Increased and the task of administration rendered nearly hopeless'' he said nk, an economic and financial expert wa* proposfne the at the Annual Meeting of tin Chamber. Haw materials*, %  bneet wMfeMt exception, were the m and sensitive prod •rn world, tie said. What I am suiigesting is that to meet economic problems of the next 2S yean we should proceed to much closer harmonising of otn affairs wfth tho*.. of the Common Adoption of the report and accounts wealth and sterlinij a DISCLAIMS CONNECTIONS LONDON. April 28 The West Indies Student Union news bullatm has made a public disclaimer '.( any connection with the Communist inspired ""West indie. N ew al e tte i". The i)ulletin. issued to-day. con tains this statement from Preml dent Rawlc Farley of BcitUh Guiana' "A copy of thi(Com %  until i newsletter has been for warded to the Union W I.S.U's Executive Committee a announce that It baa no whatsoever with this pul and on iKhalf of the On •o dissociate iteetl KMnptetet) from the analysis and peni^ctivc af the report contained therein of Cndings of the Union's General Conference of December 19S0 and the distorted, Irratloi abaurd r^flocUons caM on the past poh.v of ?hill The disclaimer goes on to advise all members of thu W.I S.U never oulletin" with those .siued by the We.Indies Committee of Hie Copimunilt Party He would take this u ponaibil ily over trom the Board of Tradi and the Hlni'trr of Suppl. full a-ope of RicharIII the new Raw Mat^in 1 has not I. Hla appointment Wat only yesterday, quai ud NO PHOGRESSON mi, -l \;I:M>\ %  -. %  Hll I i l I %  I Korea yeati t PI .. m repoi i m Juw I < ..llsl III J. lorlh K %  ii June %  %  %  %  %  —Ure baa ; thev shOUld let tl • fact Aitiiiu cox be de ti Th. Pregld itli de liberate lia %  % %  i Courtni W i Hi tn.it General M.HArthui coul and 'I" •' hai in a %  %  Uiek in thAft. i hi were IHI strtnap on M.. '.lent In did nave iti Lngi on him, oul be iini not Intend to pull mem Trum u it umlei %  %  %  %  of the \itii'. IK I lent i %  duty and i>t he had recalled General Bsaeahowei t< %  Rl Hll I EVA AlSIt Jl A\ i.i i NO | AIM . Rpril M i. i i.iv .mil ii.-ni.i DU Ij voted raeolul that '. IMJ ., %  %  %  kly published tl —Itruirr FIRE DESTROYS HOUSF. 12x8 b %  |* | %  St Stephen end owned b; Beadlej •/ %  :.' t| p and I 11,18 pjn, The D ih '' l|me The hetap i THH ADVOCATF." r ;tv 5 for NF.WS DIAL 3113 Duy or Nif/ht The Stoke* Depart n workd decider! .. ...,,„.,. ler* CIIIM tu the (iovernment aHokee, until now Mlnlsu, Works, Is one of Britain's richest Socialist". He resigned ai Man aging Director of Hans.-.. u Rapier, heavv eiiKiueering firm, on becoming Minister. In 1947 he banned ihe nte m mechanical equipment b> his Ihn, U It Is believed he or Sir Hartley Bhaweregg, UM I the Hoar' Ti ,n. ..ill go In Am< rt< ti to dutcu Steuler Jiiiups Into Streel From Top Floor BAYREUTH I A 52 year old labouier jumped .lom his top flu the street mid >ufTci<-. fracture of UM gatlen showed thai ., n.i itarUng In hoot ol hi* house ..rul thoUgJ %  for an air raid M The lilwrurer M I %  hauuctnation arhi I ,, i i — Heeler U.N. Mighi Cul Off Red China WASHlNOTOl W ARRFN AUSTIN bna. has hinted to (Umgress thai the United Nntio, consider cutting off Communist China*! ti halt :., the Hou'f Aoproprialion* ubCot.-



mene

Hharvbados



ESTABLISHED 1895





Communists

WAR



maintain pressure

pushing Allied troops back

CABINET



Attlee Jeaves hospital -and
appoints Lord Privy Seal »

FRIDAY, APRIL 2%, 1951



* CRISIS §



PRICE: FIVE CENTS
Gaitskell makes new law
for income tax evaders

onservatives will force
¢ ——__-_—. debate on raw materials

PANES

U.N. WITHDRAW 20 MILES NORTH OF SEOUL

200.000 Flee Threatened

South Korean Capital

TOKYO, April 26.

UNITED NATIONS troops fell back to a new line about 20 miles
before Seoul today in the face of a renewed furious offensive by the

Chinese.

Throughout today defenders threw back furious assaults. But the Com-
munists broke through in several places and General Ridgway’s men
made a planned withdrawal. Among the defenders of dark and waterless

Seoul tonight were men of the British 29th Briga

de who fought

their way out of encirclement after bearing the brunt of an attack by



24,000 Chinese.

C.0.L. Strikers Go
Back To Work

MADRID, April 26
Cost of living strikers drifted
back to work in San Sebastian and
its province of Guipuzcoa,



All strikers returned in Zuma.
raga and it was onl’ in Zarauz
and Pasajes that the four days

old stoppage continued to affect
the main factories. Several print-
ing and metal work plants in San |
Sebastian were still idle. |

—Reuter, |

2,300 Dockers
Strike

MANCHESTER, April 26.

More than 2,300 dockers stopped!
work in Manchester port today)
in a lightning strike to protest |
against overtime.

About 20 ships were lying iale|
in the port as a result of the’
strike. They carried cargoes of
sulphur, steel, cotton and timber,

The men claim that night shift
workers, who refused to work
overtime, have been “locked out”,

—Reuter,



fyverseas Provinces |

LISBON; April 26,
Portuguese colonies will in future
be known as “overseas provinces ’
A Bill passed by the Portuguese

National Assembly today made
the change, |

The measure also defines more
clearly and improves the rights

and guarantees of Portuguese and
Foreign citizens in the colonies
—Reuter.

Czechs Take Steps
To Prevent "Air Escapes”

LONDON, April 26
Czechoslovakia has taken
steps to prevent ‘air escapes” ac-
cording to today’s Daily Telegraph. |
The paper’s Vienna correspond- |
ent says nearly every plane on}
ordinary internal flights now car-|
ries a heavily armed security
guard. “His orders are to shoot
anyone who tries to force the
pilot to alter course,’—Reuter,

new



24 HOUR STRIKE ©N

ROME, April 26. |

Public Transport stopped

throughout Italy at midnight as!

workers belonging to Communist

and non-Communist Trade Unions |

went on 24-hour strike for higher}
wages.—Reuter.

|
|
|
|
|
|
}





UNREST DENIED |
|

ECUADOR, April 26

Reports received here of politi
cal unrest and violence in Guaya-
quil were denied today by Gov
ernment Minister Francisco Sal-!
gado, “There is camplete peace
and tranquility throughout the
country” he declared. —Reuter.

LEGISLATOR ARRESTED
CAPETOWN, April 26.
The President of the South
African Legislative Assembly in
formed the House today that one
of its members, H, G. Luttig, has
been arrested on a cherge of ‘fal-
sitas’’—a form cf fraud. Luttig is
a member for Mayfair constitu-
ency of Johannesburg.—Reuter,



BY BLOCKING the southward drive on the estimated
three Chinese divisions in the past three days, they were
believed to have set the Communist time-table back 48

hours.

Seoul is now threatened with its fifth change of rule

since the conflict began.

The Communists are driving on the city along two

roads from newly captured

Munsan, south of Imjin River

and the road through Uijongbu 15 miles north of Seoul.

The capital’s remaining 200,004 ——

Mhabitants made another exodus}
when Communists opened their
Spring offensive on Sunday. Now
only military

city.

Thewmain force of the Commu-
nist thrust is from their enlarged
bridgehead southwest of the Imjin
Uijongbu was still in United
Nations hands tonight,

Eighth
said the

police patrol the

Tonight's
munique

Army Com-
Communists
mantained pressure all along the
western front today, but in the

| centre a U.N. Tank Force carried

out a local counter attack and
drove about two miles into Com.
munist held territory,

Troops holding the ieft of the
United Nations’ western front
fought a splendid rearguard action
before withdrawing. Massed
United Nations artillery today and
tonight poured a hail of fire into

the danger area.

East of the critical sector, Com-
munists also pressed hard at with-
drawing United Nations elements

and during the day surrounded an
infantry unit,

‘Tanks were thrown im to help
rescue the infantry who with this
aid fought their way clear. Chinese
also made two penetrations of the
line west of Kapyong which they
had nearly reached in their central
front breakthrough, after they had

{Smashed a South Korean division

on Sunday night,

Late reports said ‘the United

| Nations had closed the line again.

—Reuter.



Attlee Goes Home

LONDON, April 26,

Clement Attlee, British Prime
Minister to-day left St. Mary’s
Hospital, London for his country
house at Chequers, Buckingham-
shire,

The 68-year-old Premier has
made a good recovery from
cuocdenal ulcer and was expected
to resume full duties with a
Sabinet meeting next Monday:!
fe has been in hospital for five
w . —Reuter

C
I





Bucket Full Of Stolen Money



Police Break.
Up Clash

TEHERAN, April 26.

Persian Police broke up a clash
between Leftist Peace partisans
and members of a Rightwing Iran
Party in the Caspian town of
Rasht last night, a Government
source said to-day.

A few people were slightly in
jured. Isfahan and Abadan—the
main oil centres—were quiet to
day.

This source told Reuter that
strikes in the oil areas and other
parts of the country were all over
and Government was watchful
against any further trouble.

—Reuter



Rhee Dismisses

Another Minister

TOKYO, April 26.

South Korean President
Sygman Rhee to-day dismissed
shegaaad of Justice Kim Chun
fon,

This was the second dismissal
of a Cabinet Minister arising out
of the “Kochong incident”. Yes
terday the President dismissed
Home Minister Dr. Cho Pyong Ok.

In the “Kochong incident” 187
South Koreans in the Kochong
Village, 35 miles south west of
Taegu, were summarily executed
by a South Korean battalion dur-
ing anti-guerilla operations on
February 12.—Reuter.



Pass Defence Bill

WASHINGTON, April 26.

The House of Representatives
passed the $6,468,206,000 Defence
Appropriation Bill today largely to
buy weapons, It supplements an
estimated $41,000,000,000 previ-
ously appropriated for National
Defence for the fiscal year ending
next June.—Reuter.

BELGIUM, April 26.

A DETECTIVE kicked a bucket in a back garden here

and out fell 200,000 Belgian

Police held Hippoulyte Pannecouke, his friend Pierre Clotte-
mans and his son Roger Clottemans on charges of armed rob-

bery from Cassiers Colliery last
francs were stolen.—Reuter.



Princess Wants
To Emigrate

PARIS, April 26,
An Ex-Queen of Egpyt out of
work and short of cash, today
withdrew the threat to squat at
the British Embassy here until
che got visa to go to England.

Prineess Bayan Djavdan, 74
year old widow of the last Khedive
et Egypt, who once had a palace
and 65 servants, is job hunting.

he has been offered work in
Britain but the visa for which
she applied last March 20, is still
not forthcoming

She had threatened to squat at

CONFIDENCE VOTE | the Embassy here for two hours

BRUSSELS, April 26.
A virtual vote of confidence
vas obtained by Belgium’s All!
Catholic Government today when
the Chamber of Deputies passed
a Government majority resolu-
tion concerning the Belgo.CQeek
Marshall Aid. Fund dispute.
—Reuter,



|e unil it was granted.

But today she left the Embassy

| within an hour.

An Embassy spokesman said
the Princess had agreed to calf
off her squatting campaign on the
assurance that the Consulate
would notify her as soon as Lon-

| don had acted on the visa.
—Reuter.

francs. A few minutes later

month when 3,880,000 Belgian



Plane Explodes:
Crew Killed

RIO DE JANEIRO, April 26.

A B45 plane from Natal air
base exploded in the air in the
city of Monte Belo in the State
of Rio Grand Norte.

The crew of sargeants and two
lieutenants were all killed.

—Reuter.

16 Planes Downed

LONDON, April 26.
Chinese Communists claim that
their anti-aircraft guns had
brought down 16 United Nations
planes and damaged another in
Korea during the week ending
April 22.—Reuter.

VEHICLES COLLIDE

An accident occurred on Black
Rock Road near St. Stephen’s at
about 11.20 last night between a
Fire engine M.129 of the Fire
Brigade and a "bus owned by the
National ’Bus Co. Both vehicles
were slightly damaged.



More Planning Needed *

LONDON, April 26.
Sir

Frank Nixon, President
the London Chamber of Commerce
advocated today more planning
for the whole of the Brit Cc

monwealth “so rich in its variou
resources” and less for the Uniter

Kingdom's “precarious little island
economy” He warned ga
the rs€ of easy r
lay with parti Nar

i ve

“If they are to be carried up on
today’s wave of prosperity only
to drop into misery and depression
in the fairly near future—accord-
ing to the vagaries of American
purchasing — the social problem
could be immediately increased
and the task of administration
rendered nearly hopeless” he said

Sir Frank, an economic and

| financial expert way proposing the

j r nt
doption of the Or acct t

vat the ‘Annual
Chamber.

Raw materials, almost without
exception, were the most fickle
and sensitive products of the mod-
ern world, he said,

“What I am suggesting is that

Meeting of the



to meet economic problems of the
next 25 years we should proceed
to much closer harmonising of our

affairs with those of the Common-
wealth and sterling area.—Reuter










ee 5 en

CALL FOR
“ALL OUT”
ENQUIRY

WASHINGTON, April 26.

The United States Senate
Republican Policy Corgmittee
called last night for an “all out”
investigation of foreign and
military policies linked with the
dismissal of General Douglas
MacArthur.

Its Chairman Senator Robért
Taft told reporters that the
group wanted inquiry i
policies as far back as the 1
Yalta Conference with special
emphasis on what he called thé
administration’s “encouragement
of Chinese Communists.”

Senator Taft said Republicans
would demand that hearings on

MacArthur issued by the Senate}.

Armed Services and
Relations Committee on
should be. held in
New York, Major
Ourtney Whitney, General Mac-
Arthur's spokesman, said the
General had no objection to pub-
lic hearings or to being televised.
' —Reuter.

CHARGED WITH
NEGLIGENCE

MOBILE, ALABAMA, Apfil 26,
The United States coastguare
today charged the master of the
Fsso Suez with negligence in an
open sea collision with another
tanker Esso Greensbore in which
39 lives were lost. The two
Standard cil tankers collided in

Foreign
May 3,
public, In



heavy fog 200 miles south ’ of
Morgan City, Louisiana last
Friday,

All but five of the Greensbore'’s
crew of 42 were burned to death,
Captain Edwin C. Geick of
Bayonne, New Jersey was charged
with two counts of negligence
The formal hearing of the com-
plaint is to open tomorrow.

—Reuter.

Wants to Take Over
Oil Immediately”

TEHERAN, April 26.

A special session of the Majlis
Oil Committee tonight unani-
mously passed a resolution to put|
the nationalisation of Persian



into effect immediately.

The resolution will be submit-
ted to Majlis itself on Saturday
and if approved will need only
the sanction of the Senate to
become law.—Reuter.



Production Up

LONDON, April 26.
Stalingrad’s industries destroyed
during the war are now producing
31.5 per cent more than in 1939.
According to chief architect Vash-
ili Simbirstev, as quoted in a Tass

official Soviet news agency mes.
sage received in London.—Reuter.

Petain Improves

YEU ISLAND, Bay of Biscay,
April 26.

Ex-Marshal Phillipe Petain of
France spent a restful night and
had some food today.

“He might bury us all yet,”
joked the island’s doctor who has
treated the 95-year.o!ld Vichy
Chief during the crisis of his ill
ness,—Reuter,



CONNECTIONS

LONDON, April 26.
The West Indies Student Union
news bulletin has made a public
disclaimer of any connection with
the Communist-inspired “West
Indies Newsletter”,

The bulletin, issued to-day, con-
tains this statement from Presi
dent Rawle Farley of British
Guiana: “A copy of this (Com-
munist) newsletter has been for
warded to the Union. W.1.S,U's
Executive Committee wishes to
announce that it has no connection
whatsoever with this publication,
and on behalf of the Union wishes
to dissociate itself compictely
from the analysis and perspective
of the report contained therein
of findings of the Union's General
Conference of December 1950.
and the distorted, irrational and
absurd refiections cast on the past
policy of the Union”.

The disclaimer goes on to advise
all members of the W.1.S.U. never
to confuse students’ news bulletins
with those issued by the West
Indies Committee of the Commu.

| nist Party

General }.















LONDON, April 26.
Hugh Gaitskell, Chancellor of
the Exchequer, to-day announced
measures to restriet certain com
pany transactions leading to eva
ion of ineOme tax or profits tax.
They are given in the Finance
Bill published to-day which lega!-
ises the budget proposals. It
oi that evasion of income
ax or profits tax by trading con-
cerns whieh transfer their
business abroad or even transfer
any part of it to people abroad
without Treasury consent, will be
liable to heavy penalties
—Reuter.

=
=
=
@
Ms
DP

—~.



| Higher Taxes

WASHINGTON, April 26.

President Truman warning that} iearmament programme, and if |
“have not] ig

inflationary pressures
yet reached tneir peak” today ask-
ed Congress for higher taxes
tighter credit controls and “fair
ceilings” on farm and other pro-
ducts.

In a special message to Con-
gress which urged speedy action,

Truman said the “world situation the United States allowed Britai:

could explode at any time and we
must make every day count”,
o~Reuter.

MacArthar Booed
And Welcomed

CHICAGO, April 26.

A group of young people booed
and hoisted the sign — “Fade
Away”—as General Douglas Mac
Arthur passed in triumph through
the streets of Chicago to-day.

On the other side of the road |
from the Univertlity where the
group stood, an old lady held up
a sign “God Bless Our Next Presi
dent” and dismissed Commander,

The procession received § a
tumultuous welcome from Chic
ago citizens and other Midwestern
ers.—Reuter,





Stokes Named New

e loaded before the end of May
or Pr This was laid down in 2 shipment
] \ y ea schedule hurriedly drawn up after
the signature of the new Meat
LONDON, April 26. Pact three days ago
Prime Minister Attleesehose a dynamic Socialist business-| The two vessely already takin
man tonight to solve the raw material crisis which caused | meat are Highland Monarely whic!
two ministers to walk ot of his Cabinet this week started yesterday. and the Pata-
He appointed 54-year-old Richard Stokes as Lord of the | four oy ion gc cot
Privy Seal—up till now a ministerial] post without definite} to load are the Alentara, Drina
duties. At the same titne he announced | Eva Pefon and Merling
Stokes would take a new Govern Reuter
ment Department to handle raw
DISCLAIMS materials,

_ He would take this responsibil
ity over from the Board of Trade
and the Ministry of Supply

The full scope of Richard
Stokes in the new Raw Material
Department has not yet been®*
worked out. His appointment was *
decided on only yesterday, quai
ters close to the Government said

Stokes, until now Minister of
Works, is one of Britain's richest
Socialists. He resigned as Man
aging Director of Ransomes and
Rapier, heavy engineering firm,
}on beeoming Minister. In 1947 he
banned the sale of mechanical
equipment by his firm to Russin



A FRIENDLY GESTURE

Limit War
In Korea Is

U.S. Policy

WASHINGTON, April 26

President Truman said at hi
Press Conference today that
was still the polley of the United
States and the United Nations t
limit the war in Korea.“ if possi
ble.”

President Truman said
they should let the Senate Com
mittee get the facts on the Mac
Arthur controversy, and he de
clined to make any new statement
himself

to-day

The President spoke with de
liberate indifference of the current
speeches and statement being
made by General MacArthur ar
his Secretary, Major Gener
Courtney Whitney

He said that General Max
Arthur could say what he liked
and do what he liked and go

where he would now that he was
back in the United States.

After first saying that there
were no. strings on MacArthur,
the President then corrected him
self to say that as President he
did have strings on him, but he
did not intend to pull them

Truman explained that under
legislation passed with his support

Il, Generals such

Tories Want To | see
Know The Truth
About Raw Materials

LONDON, April 26
Winston Churchill's Conservatives will force » debate tn
the Commons next Tuesday on the raw materials issuc
which has caused a Labour Government crisis

PRINCE BERNHARD of the Netherlands, who is now on an ——
visit to the Argentine, lit President Peron’s cigarette when he visited

the President at the Government House, Buenos Aires. Boos
—Ewpress



the five

the

Army” held a permanent lifetime
that such

Generals were stibject to recall to
duty and pointed out that he had
reealled General Risenhower to
take charge of the North Atlantic
Army Reuter

ippointment
| He acknowledge





EVA AND JUAN

BUENOS AIRES, April 26
Peronists bloe deputies met to

They will probe deeply into allegations by Aneurin Bevan } 44y ; vp anes Sele
. ‘ 7 “¢ ~ Presolution i » lYo2 alec n
and Harold Wilson, that ihe shortage of vaw material ticket be Peron and Evita, Severa!

sections of the Peronista Party
have already published the same
view, but this was never officially
supported before

makes a £4,700,000.000 arms programme linpossible

| Sone Conservatives suspect? : : ma wat
danger and that Government ma: | NO) PROGRESS ON
BIG “4° AGENDA

danger and that Government may
be hiding same truth so. as. to py
Be and Wilson in the Wrong
During the debate, Churchill is
likely to demand that the publi PARIS. April 26,
be told all the facts of the case :

—Reuter

FIRE DESTROYS HOUSE

tiv Four ~Fereign | Minister
He will insist that nothing MUS | deputies made no progress at their A 194%. boatd and: shingled
stand in the way of fulfilling th: | sai, meeting which lasted only 40 }house situated at Goddard's Lana



1 ae ninutes todas St. Stephen and owned by Seibert
in jeoperay, the nation mus ge pathic elit ae Headley was comple telv de troyed
me: talk Andrei Gromyko’s statement on 1o™ fire last night, The fire started
, c ‘4 ey ya hehe, ag ‘fat about 10.45 p.m. and the Fire
Britain's Ally geben bet ‘Philip Jess “i ar Brigade arrived on the scene a
. : ei ; - 25 Tne wner-—occupier
Hector McNeil, Secreiary ¢ long statement quoting from a a "hia nnd My Pad sais at the
State for Scotland warned a | United Nations Commission report tit Po The ‘ohen '* ror tasuired
Nunoen, Seotland today that on June 24, 1950, a western -
spokesman said. Dr, Jessup de a
to go short of essential material | ¢lared the North Korean attack fs
the effects would be felt over tt on June 24 was | unprovoked | THE “ADVOCATE
whole field of production brutal aggression” S
av y WS
But he told the annual meetin | pays for NEW

Deputies are in the eighth week |
of discussion over the agenda
to bring their chiefs to the confer- |
ence table |

af the Scottish Trades Union Con
gress that Government was not
without hope that America would
help

He welcomed a statement or
raw materials made tast night by»
Dean Acheson, American Secre
tary of State as “forthright anc
helpful”. It showed Britain wa
being treated as an ally

No one should suppose Govern
ment was not taking steps to mee
the abnormal situation.

—Reuter

DIAL 3112
Day or Night

wmeReuter. ||



36,000 Tons Meat

For Britain

LONDON, April 26
Of the 200,000 tons of careuse
meat Argentine has undertake
to supply to Britain during the
next 12 months 36,000 tons will be







Jumps Into Street
4 ry .
From Top Floor |
BAYREUTH, Bavaria
April 26
A 52-year-old iabourer jumped
from his top floor room here t
the street and suffered dovbl
fracture of the pelvis. Investi-
gation showed that he had her

a bus starting in front of hi
house and thought it was the sire?
for an air raid warning

The labourer, who was seriously

wounded in the war \



reported








It is believed he or Sir Hartley {to have previously had similai
Shaweross, the new President of }hallucinations when he cz
the Board of Trade, will go to]/dwellers out of thei apartr
America to discuss raw materials, ! yelling ‘ir raid
Reuter —Reuter Cot ruritity your ~
i 1 Chi
‘ ‘
U.N. Might Cut Off Red China wees
Vian eae GOLD FLAKE
ARREN AUSTIN, United States representative to the United
Nations, has hinted to Congress that the United right

consider cutting off Communist China’s communicatior

to halt aggression in Korea. Aust

the House Appropriations Sub-Committee on

‘here yesterday.—Reuter

Nations






in’s remarks t

March

4635





~*

ee
PAGE TWO



Ms REX STOLLMEYER,
Trade Commissioner in
Canada for the B.W.I., B.G.
and the Balamas came in on the
B.W.1.A. “flight from Trinidad
yesterdayemaorning on a two day

visit H&S here to have dis-
cussions Se Sir George Seel,
Head lopment and Wel-
fare ¥ West Indies, and
Prof = 3easley, Financial
Riise tox@.D. and. W

Rritish Viee Consul-Manaos
R. AND MRS. P.G, TURNER

BS have come all the way from
Manaos to Barbados for a_ holi-
day Mr Turner is the Hop
British Viee Consul in | Manaos
and this is their first trip out of
Brazil Om over ten years They
are here £6&two or three months



and are » ening their Barbados
holiday atethe Enmore Hotel.

Five Years

M*. HOWARD RUSSELL is a

lesman with the Sydney
Ros. Druggists in Venezuela
An Asati. he has been living
in Venezuela for five years, He
is on a five day visit to his wife
and family Who ave. staying at

the Paradise Beach Clhib

Mr. Russell arrived from
Venezuela via Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A,.

Two Heads Meet









me eneeee come





Carib Calling BBE Ratio

Up from Grenada

BARBADOS



ramme

PRDAY. a i
6.30 am.—12.15 p. eo -_









| ARTIE® S HEADLINE RS. CARMEN MIZRAHI — 19 aM
arrived from Grenada _ yes- 6.30 a.m. Forces Favourites; 1.00 «.m
e- fhe News; 7.10 a.m N
terday by B.W.I.A She is on 7.15 am Pram ‘ihe Hews, Analysis:
two weeks’ holiday, staying at am. Programme .Purade; 7,
Abbeville Guest House. Mrs ee “seems East
re} e Orch ; 8.
— ahi is a sister of Mrs. Louis. am, semprini at the Susie: 64 aoe
Biscoito who is at present in How the Writer Does It; 9 am. The
Barbados with her husband a ere 9.10 am. Home News from Brit-
Miss Sheila de Gruz and, Miss Programme. mm. _Gewt, Pawn: M, 15, a.m.
Clare Vieira of the Singer Sewing ers" Choice; 11,45 a.m. World Affairs:
Machine in Trinidad have re- 32.00 (noon) The News; 12.10 p.m:
turned after a short holiday here, N®W* Analysis; 12.15 p.m- Close Down,
Ascot Snobbery AIBA Bote ee ices 19. 76M
NCE more the grey-toppe’ 4.15*p.m) Southern Serenade Orche:-
brigade are lining up for bm — poh. é ting eoond 5.00
ag > m. Composer ee! m,
their passes to the Royal ere Syst Muse, 8.40 Bin, ei Pp.
at Ascot. The meeting is in June ¢& 09 p.m. Merchant Navy Programmes
ALTH Applicants should have written 615 pgm Rebuilding in “London's East
NATIONAL HE by April 19 to the Ascot Office, End: 645 p m. Programfne Parade.
at St. James's Palace, over which

GLASSES

ae AND TEETH

HALF FREE
[then

we ee:





English Doors
HAT is the most extrava-

gant project in your expe-
rience?

You will answer: the
Festival of Britain. But here is
one that will make the spend-

thrifts of the South Bank writhe
with envy.

the Duke

of Norfolk presides,

In a changing world this division
of racegoers on the basis of social
standing has become an anachron-
ism, an example of preferential
treatment which leads to nothing
but snobbery.

New Manageress

HEN the Four Winds Club

reopens on October Ist.
Mrs. Susan Burke of Trinidad will
be the manageress. She will
succeed Mr. “Bro” Hamilton who
has not been manager there for

607.15 pam,
7.00 p.m. The News;
Analysis;

35.53.

7.10 p.m. News
7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary.

7AS—11.00 pom. 6... 25.53 $1.32 M





7.45 p.m. Think on These Things;
£.00 p.m, Radio oe 8.15 p.m.
English Magazine; Composer
of The Week; 9.00 “opm. P World Affairs;
915 pm Ken Mackintosh; 10.00 pm
The News; 10.10 p.m. From the Editor-
jals; 10.15 pm Light Musi¢; 10.30 p m
Rendezvous Players; 10.45 pm The De-
Late SS ovsnaeay 11 00 p.m. Ring up the
Curtain.

C.B.C. PROGRAMME













A eerste tial oa re ATE







| JAN ETTA DRESS “SHOP

Lower Broad Street -:







“ Upstairs Qyver Newsam’s



TODAY 2.0,4 46 & 8.39pm

IDA LUPINO Presents



DRESSES of all Types

4:0 9S



Ready-Made from London
Also Madeé-to—Order

BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS

ASTOR

FRIDAY to

UNIVERSAL, PICTURES Proud’

COCKTAIL, HANDBAGS

THEATRE

SUNDAY 8.30 p.m
Presents, It's Top, Adventure!

Action! Thfiller! Its rich in Beauty and Booty

~, .“BUCCANEER’S GIRL”

IN TECHNICOLOR

Starring:
EXTRA‘

YVONNE DeCARLO
EXTRA! LES BROWN

PHILIP FRIEND
and the Band of Renown

2-Reel Musical Short)





with Sally

LOUISIANA
Jimmie DAVIS
and —



_ OISTIN

Warner 2 Feature Hit!
Color by Technicolor with

Lon McALLISTER and
“CHAIN LIGHTNING”

Eleanor PARKER

Midnite Sat. 28th



SAT. 12 MIDNIGHT
and SINGING GUNS

THE KID FROM CLEVELAND
ACTION PLUS!

Don’t Miss Them

Ann CIRIO





SS
—SOPPELELELEL ALPES

GLOBE

POPP PSO

THEATRE

TO-DAY and ‘CONTINUING 5 & 8.30 p.m,

Tle STUDIO THAT Gave You The NAKED CITY" wow cives vou...



SPPPSOSEâ„¢.



EMPIRE

355569990)

«THE
TO-NIGHY at 5.30 .



FORREST, Keefe
Also LATIN RHYTHM

MIDNITE SAT. 2ath



DIAL
PLAZA on

To-day to Sunday 5 and 8.30 p.m.
“THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT”
Barry Fitzgerald Shirley Temple

Humpbrey BOGART and
(Monogram)

CALL OF THE JUNGLE
and DRIFTIN’ KID—Tom KEENE

TO-DAY at 2.30 Only
Republic Pictures presents

3RD MAN”

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

and Continuing to TUESDAY 445 &&.30 pm.

NOT WANTED

BRASSELLE, Leo PENN

Latest NEWSREEL

SATURDAY 9.30 a.m, & 1.30 p.m

cisco KID in
BEAUTY AND THE BANDIT

— and —



GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James

FRIDAY to SUNDAY 8.30 p.m
MATINEE: SUNDAY 5 p.m.

“LOST BOUNDARIES”
Starring: Beatrice PEARSON
Mel FERRER, Canada LEE
Midnite Sat. 28 (Monogram)
The CISCO KID in—
SQUTH OF THE RIO GRANDE

and Ronald WINTERS as Charlie
Chan in “THE GOLDEN EYE.”







ROYAL

TO_DAY to SUNDAY
4.30 and 8.30
Columbia Big Double .. .«

Robert YOUNG &
Marguerite CHAPMAN









SONG OF THE WASTELANDS
. Junmmy WAKELY THE LIVING GHOST
eee























a ed r * It concerns doors costing £20,- cever: h & Continuin in
R. T. J. WALNE was at g several months. FRIDAY, April 27. 1951 : mung
% : - "- 000. The figure sounds fantastic. ‘ tet 10.00 p.m. —' 10.15 N
-VE Seawell yesterday — et ning Yet that is ‘the price of two pairs St. Kitts Visit Canteanaes” ne ee Darryl F. Zenuck presents + RELENTLESS ”
to meet Mr, John H — who of steel doors now being made RS. F. H, MANIFOLD and cto 2 10-30 p.m. Canadian Irene DUNNE in
came in from , Venezuela via at Cheltenham, her daughter Sonja who hacy “Re. 25,51 M, AND
aga fe L on ed ‘ame ‘ anor will be B0ft. wide, 20ft, been bet alias Sand es = beeen » + THE MUDLARK” ee r i
- v z ye . igh. 1éy will weigh more yesterday by 0 WV sdedhey T he f if ok
eeu, is Pitennnne ot ees than 12 tons. At the touch of a Kitts via Antigua on a three-week CROSSWORD with UST ie
upply of Venezuela, In Caracas, button they will swing open, for visit. There were staying at the Alec GUINNESS &
supplic¢ TS of ‘oil well drilling tools they will be operated electrically, St, Lawrence Hotel, EER ABA eS | ‘ Constance SMITH Glenn FORD &
ett Mr. Walne is the head of The doors will be decorated with he P r ; a Ida LUPINO
the | Ni ational Supply Export panels of silvery aluminium, so Administrator Intransit ; sis y poe he alee akg ee oe ela
ako taps Sela wile ite delicate that they are being cast NTRANSIT through Barbados Dy , i ROX i
pen eat ; in, by_hand. yesterday from Grenada en
ee ene i he ee Through these mighty portals youte to Dominica via St. Lucie STEPHEN McNALLY SUE ENGLAND « CARBA TO.DAY to MONDAY OLYMPIC
tour an America. Mr, and will pass thousands of civil ser- was His Honour Mr. E. P. Arrow with d d “THE DUKES” 4.30 and 8.15 TO.DAY to MONDAY
Mrs. alné spent their ; honey - vants, For the doors are to grace smith, Administrator of Dominic. and intro ucing : ’ “7 So ane @. 45
wea ' ie ayares 480- the two main entrances to the who had been in Grenada attend A UNIVERSAL-INTERY SIONAL PICTURE M-G-M Smashing Double , . .
Brack een oomee caverta. ore an ing the Administrators’ conference & hg & Robert TAYLOR & Universal Action Double . .
eS et . going up in Whitehall Gardens, which was presided over by tne ;
Two: Americans overlooking the Embankment. Governor a the Windwarc x PLUS % peter MITCHUM John Saat antver
R. . DODGE, an attaye The Air Ministry and the Board [eionas ; : 7" y ; + andolph
M at oT han Embassy of Trade will occupy the build- hes ibtranait on the same plane % LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE % + UNDER CURRENT ” in
in Mexico “Qyho, had been on.a ing. ‘ » St. Lucia was Mr, Randy Gili $ FREDDIE SMALL “You C ” x
short visit here left yesterday Who pays the £20,000 for the toe iG Snteriatinnit Mores. rae srt pats a : . ou Can Do No Wrong % AND «THE SPOILERS ”
for Puerto Rico by BLW.LA, ca doors’? The British taxpayers, Ltd., in Trinidad + Gee ees, *% JOAN LICORISH Tennessee Waltz” % «+ MGHT MUST
me Eom Burke, American Vice From B,G. to Nyasaland Short Holiday B SoGtaS ike s forkabiire ver. ‘Buy | BRUCE MANN ‘ae % PALL” ie
. Tom Burke, American Vice eA. aNyas. n 4 iS like Kgily ” x ie
Consul in Georgetown, is holi- TR “FREDERICK SEAFORD, R. AND MRS. LESLIE] \, cee sate ia Nera tizseye Ray. 6) 1% PHYLLIS COLLY MORE ere ene % «SEVEN SINNERS ”
daying atpthe Crane Hotel. He a director of Booker Brothers HEATH are in Barbado: | 2. Sip or mistake. (5) ‘al s° IVOR HADMON “Monalisa % Starring =
has been“shere for a couple of who has just arrived in England for a four day holiday accom~-]‘; Number decapitat (3) JOAN BENTHAM Mie x with
weeks alr®Zdy and will soon be after a visit to the West Indiss, panied by their son Gerald, They] 6 Rend era) ’ GUESTS STARS “THE SUPER TALENT WINNERS” “4 Robert MONTGOMERY & John WAYNE &
returning to BG, will shortly be undertaking» an- tlew in yesterday from Trinidao} } pera e ote Wisc VO ORD. “C89 | Oy . . ? ? See Rosalind RUSSELL Brodrick CRAWFORD
Attributes of Old Age other trip abroad, At the end of by B.W.I.A. where Mr. ey 0 Broken bone. (4) : rf x GERALD DAISLEY — Joe (Bop) CLARK x —_— — ;
HAT is it exactly, being the month he will fly out to Nyase- is an engineer at Forrest Par ‘ort of fish you'd lose. ( ~ ged ; ie ¥ oe or
aes it who you are: a boxer of thirty is ers ot oi ag? ig 2 es en ee li. Short Down Bm % YOU Can Buy Tickets for Tonite all Day and %
t 1 ar Ss ¢ xer art Campbell, Booker arter, @ Sub eawe or’ 1, Carpet matertai ( ; ‘ tale ‘. ;
es tae om ie uitaphsaeeiee a sidiary of Bookers. It will be Sir OL - Il. D SoeANT'S $ ype 1 sae vole. oh % Tonite at the Ticket Booths x A DRAMA AS POWERFULLY REAL AND
the age of .twenty—yes, twenty: ents mi ve to are destination when he left : Bop vezanee ro) Fiens00001se0essdseheesonseeeneslTeenssoesoconont EMOTION wm CRAMMED AS LIFE ITSELF
‘from hour to hour we rine and He expects to be there aboul a caawell yesterday was “New| ¢. oi ! his 8 a haa een
ripe, from hour to hour we rot and month, Specialisi Haven", St, Peter. He was one] 7 Notas much Ser ee ae uae IT’S A MOVIEGOING EXPERIENCE YOU'LL
rot;) but our brain power, our éecialrsing of the passengers arriving from ey Could Make % resi race
mental alertness, is at its best yTARRY- NARAIN, Barbadian Swarvadie by B.W.LA. . . Off to is Ogvcle win cut Me hcn jake (4) o NEVER FORGET!
somewhere about thirty usually chemistry student is spe. New York via Puerto Rico yes-] ‘soiution ot saturaass uugne Accors:
and it goes, on about the same cistising at the Chelsea Polytech- terday went Mrs. Edith Friedman} p00 N° wine tS *Sania. it Anne o- Ee ae
level, very “ttle difference at all, ni. Garib understands it is his and her daughter Ingrid. . . Mr.} 17 sell” 19 “Gib “2a Sune va Urn i COU ric)
ro on eign ees 1 intention to join the Government 1 Devaux “— a in — ie gniese: 3° moat “'s ait ke vegan tay T H E C oO M M A N D j that: plunges; heart-deep
Dr artin,. Gumpert, ta a + Oe: ing . Farle ; “i re a -en re oe esin Aside » Setrie —
€5 s 5 : Vou vounter Service on his return to Barba- St. Lucia over e week-e' r i Nee + oe i A Reo
Than You ntti?" mete ee dos, r turned yesterday by B.W.LA. ms de uses Hy Bete oor |” el SA ld ill Th hl







CCU



PERFORMANCE
Picture of the Year!

is being lived ‘each year
CRA as

Girls! A.mavie you



ADVENTURES OF PIPA. AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA.





(Members Only)
MATINEES:
TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT to TUESDAY NIGHT
at 8.30

DAU



. IDA LUPINO

presents














TMG \
ey |, | Wot WearBeadt
- ROMANTIC ! é )
oe — ; An Emerald Production with

cond St0%

RKO presents

BERT MITCHUM
eOT NET LEIGH
| WENDELL COREY

in Ni MARTIAN Predioction



SALLY FORREST: KEEFE BRASSELLE - LEO PENN
eroded by TDA LUPINO one ANSON BOND: oveces oy ELMER CLIFTON

Original story by Paul Jarrico and Malvin Wald + Screenplay by Paul Jarrice and Ida Lupino
Released by FiCM CLASSICS, ING.

OPE PES ero

EMPIRE THEATRE



BY THE WAY...

bu aath* POT om :
EART ; stions iscussi 's r ove i ° AY 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
EAR RENDING questions we are discussing bowlers. from Covent Garden overran its a fair % r ‘ Y - TOD.
H have been asked about the Cocklecarrot: Mr. Fumbling, time by one minute. loli ay AM TO-DAY B..30 pm. and Continuing and Continuing Daily 4.45 and
apparent absence of the exquisite wouldn't you agree that the eas- (News item.) One: 8.30 ».m.

By BEACHCOMBER

v

iest way to sleep is to wear no hat
at all?
Fumbling (puzzled); Of course
No Words Wasted

Mimsie Slopcorner from the jam-
borees connected with the Festi
val,

Is it conceivable that, in sttch a

URELY even the millions who

are chained to their radio

sets will see the fun in that bit
of news,

“with BORDON GEBERT + Produced and Oiocted by
CON HARTMAN « Seroan Moy by Isobel Lennest

DAILY at 4.45 & 6.30 p.m.

B’TOWN (Dial 2310) ALSO! “LATIN RHYTHM”

|
|
|

























ae io; re see is no PEEVISH writer producing To the Tune of

Cee) SAD Oya Saha ee Sone elaborate and sarcastic sen- D . ’ .

of English girlhood? She has jences ¢ FOO ee eat anae rumcondra Rose B 7 TIFUL
been little before the public late» jira s shout a politician milssed LARGE picture, demonstrat- STOP THAT LEAK / E ‘A

fire completely.

Into my mind

ly, apart from a three-day game that ma nificent warning ing the horrors of going bald,

lbp! oan m Shofield as Miss ot Mr. Hilaire Belloc to Hanisiy brings unbidden to my lips the IN YOUR ROOF NOw .
Suiits Dustbin, ann 3 ae visit MacDonald: “Take care, lest 1 $08 sung by a bald man to a

to Runcorn as the Haulage and make you immortal with an “e@iry man.

Freightage Queen of 1951. One epigram!” You are very proud of your mane |

shlanati » | ivitv is aaa

oe abe ie eb Auicky; Weber iis Art Wins By A Nose mut have you forgotten this jape? We of mF

was invited to christen the new Big Ben was not broadcast at It is only the hair on a goose- :

gas-container at Shrewdleigh, she "ine o’clock last might, as the _ berry EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS

refused to be kissed by Councillor
Tudmarsh,

Fumbling Before the
Commission

R. VINCENT FUMBLING
was questioned by the Com—
mission yesterday at King’s
Knucklefurtker. Mrs. Wretch
asked him why he could not sleep

sae act of “Madam Butterfly’ That distinguishes it from a grape.

RED CEDAR SHINGLES
ROLL ROOFING — Plain
ROLL ROOFING — Red
PITCH PINE

Rupert and the Iee- flower—13

in ¢ rdi , bowler ith ¢
brim. He explained that the brim DOUGLAS FIR |
would get in the way of the ————
pillow, THE HAREHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
: Mrs, ee mies eee lie >
down slowly an yar’ y? I I rD
Fumbling: Yes, lass y held co ‘ON FACTORY L









it on with both hands.

. LUMBER DEPARTMENT $83 DIAL 4610
Cocklecarrot: Perhaps a









smaller brim would be possible? Rupert takes the le ad in the race slope and they go skidding right o: LE S .
Ww Mrs Wreten: Or harder brim he ers stent ‘tal in rhe mide om Me = SSSO99 CSO POO OSPF OVOS POP OSS OOD AD
30 keep the hat on the head? Aiton ee at he Mepettc: Skane OO ts wie he ATTENTION £! |
baat ta an’ fan isthe ie i up in the tushes, cries. "It's gra nd here. We'll
é Miss “Quayling: No doubt. But obi Their slethecea whos of the ba ane pte 7 eee ere FACTORY MANAGERS |
Po gi wl nl a nu a REE a a n = a = = Take this opportunity of obtaining yous requirements
MEN'S WORSTED TROUSERS $17.8: ; FOR ANY
= BLUE, FAWN, BROWY _— a GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
we Bi eee : a Ranging from %4” upwards COLOW. R r
‘ +
YOUTHS' LONG GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS $6.18 MILD STEEL SCHEME
2) BLUE PIN STRIPED SUIT ING 88.5: a Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes :
ode :
bes BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes
SPORT SHIRTS s3.90 475 esa © . oe ¢ to $ 1 29
a MEN’ i FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill 4 e
Pm EN'S PLASTIC BELTS Alle, bbc, Bac, Bic, = . At PRICES that cannot be repeated. AT
o BOY'S PLASTIC BELTS BB. a x
. : The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd
' Tge T 1 $ ae £ Jd La -
3 EVANS & WHITFIELDS mS nar, ace Bite Park oad, St. Michael THE CORNER STORE
DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 | Sehhemanshesala SSOCOS SISOS S SOSSOO SOS SSS SSS SOSSSSSS | || = —_—_—






gt

m3 LOREEN 7

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, -1951

eae coment ene stn eS RS SESS ENG SA

Britain Has Not
Played Fair

—C. B. MATHURA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN. April 24,

Councillor C. B. Mathura in
moving a motion at the City Coun-
cil meeting seid that he felt that
Britain has not been playing a fair
game with the sugar industry and
with: the peoples of the Colonies.

Speaking in support of the reso-
lution Councillor Randolph Mitch-
ell said that, “it would be a dis-
honest person who would oppose
the resolution.”

Councillor Mathura said that
the sugar industry was the main-
Stay of the economic structure of
more than two-thirds of the pop-

ulation of the Caribbean area, He

pointed out that the people of

these areas were solely dependent

on the fate of the sugar indusiry,
and he went on to recall the sev-
eral times during which the in-
dustry faced ruin due to lack of
a market.

Mr. Mathura said that as a re-
sult of World Wars I and U, Bri-
tain was compelled to turn her
attention to the British West In-
dies for sugar. This attention of
the British resulted in the in-
creased price of the commodity
and the wages of the workers.
Now the British Government can
do without West Indian sugar,
they are actually tralsacting with
Cuba to buy all the sugar that
country can produce at the ex-
pense of the Colonial Empire.

Judge Did Not Like
Witness’ Shirt

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24,

Mr, Justice W. H. Irwin, pre-
Siding over the Third Supreme
Court in Port-of-Spain in a divorce
case took strong objection to the
dress of a witness, When his name
was Called, Lloyd Johnson, a baker
of Success Village, Laventille,
walked into the witness stand in
what is called a “hot shirt.”

Mr. Justice Irwin: When did
you know you had to give evidence
in this case?

Johnson: “Yesterday Sir.”

The Judge: “Why are you dress-
ed like that? Why are you not
better dressed? Have you ever
given evidence in these Courts
before?”

Johnson: “I have given evidence
here once before, Sir.”

The Judge: “Then you do know
that you should be better dressed.”

Counsel then offered an apology
to the court on behalf of his
witness,







Plant Diseases Reporting

Service May Be Set Up

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24,

A Plant. Pest and Diseases
Reporting Service, providing for
telegraphic reporting of outbreaks
of

new, Or unusually large out.
breaks of _ previously-recorded,
diseases and pests of economic

lants within the Caribbean, has
een strongly... necommended. by
the Research Committee on ‘gt
culture, Fish, Wildlife and Fores-
try of the Caribbean Research
Council,

Yoshida’s Party
Get Best Of

Elections

By SYDNEY BROOKES
TOKYO, April 26,

Nationwide local election
returns today dealt another blow
to Japan’s left-wing party and
were considered likely to
strengthen the cause of Prime
Minister Yoshida in re-establishing
Japan as a Pacific power,

Tn a large turn out of voters—
90 per cent of the electora’
Japanese elected an overwhelni-
ing number of rightwing candi.
dates to Mayors posts in 199 cities
and most mayors and local assem-
bly men in small towns and
villages.

The Socialists who have been
advocating an “overall” Peace
Treaty—that is one to which Rus—
sia would agree—or none at all
and who have been opposed to
rearmament had only 11 of their
candidates ejected.

Yoshida’s Liberal Party (which
corresponds to the Conservative
Party in Britain) favours the
continued co-operation with the
United States and an early Peace
Treaty with friendly Powers
without necessarily waiting for
Soviet agreement.

—Reuter,



Egypt Allows Ship
To Pass To Israel

TEL-AVIV, April 26.

The Egyptian shore signal
station on Sinri Peninsula today
allowed an Israel-bound merchant
ship sailing under Greek colours
to enter the Gulf of Akabah with
= mixed cargo of timber, cement
and foodstuffs,

Observers here considered this
indicated a change in Egypt's
policy towards shipping move-
ments to and from the Israel port
of Elath at the head of the Gulf
on which Egypt, Israel, Jordan
and Saudi Arabia meet. Three of
these four countries have
announced plans to develop their
stretches of the Gulf coast.

Israel hopes to_ construct. an-
other port near Elath to serve
shipping to the Far East and East
Africa. Jordan plans to build a
road _ linking Akabah_ wilh
Amman. Last February the Egyp-
tian Cabinet ratified a plan to
build a deep sea port on the Gulf.

—Reuter.

R.A.F. Vampire Jets
Go Into Action

SINGAPORE, April 26

Royal Air Forcé Vampire jet
fighters today went into action for
the first time in history.

They attacked a guerilla post
in the Malayan jungle. The tar-
get was a red-roofed, bungalow
on an abandoned rubber estate in
South Central Johore, known to
be used by Communists as a
hide-out and rest house.

Two jet fighters, each equipped
with eight 60-pound rocket pro-
jectiles and cannons ed ‘the
bungalow and completely des-
troved it according to a Royal Air
Force spokesman,

—Reuter.





i :

6 w
Tell me
doctor ..

What do

you mean by
a safe antiseptic?”

‘The antiseptic for general use in the home should be highly

germicidal yet gentle on delicate tissues, non-poisonous and,

preferably, should not stain clothes or the skin. *‘ Dettol’

fulfils every one of these

* Dettol’ can be safely use




BWA. B

conditions. Absolutely reliable,

d on even very young children.

‘DETTOL

vo THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

©

RIDGETCWN



EITALIAN FILM

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

“LOOKING AT
PICTURES ”



STAR

THE GIRL with the shoulder length hair style and no make-up who
speaks very little English, but has very expressive hands, is 18-year-
old Pia Angeli from Italy who will co-star with British film star
Stewart Granger in a new film entitled “The Light Touch” to be
filmed in Tunisia. She confesses that she does not like playing love

scenes.
sion”, she said.

“It is so difficult for a schoolgirl to pretend the grand pas-

—Evxpress



Ex-Postman
Gets I.S.M.

HIS MAJESTY the King hag
approved the award of the Im.
perial Service Medal to Mr. Evan
Alphin St. Aubyn McAlister, who
has retired from the post of
Postman-Sorter, General Post
Office, after over 25 years in the
Public Service.

Mr. McAlister is 65. He is now
leading a quiet life at his home
in Seclusion Road, Black Rock,
looking after his goats and doi
a bit of weeding to his small hold.
ing. “These are my hobbies”, he
told the Advocate yesterday,

He went to the Post Office as a
postman. He served 10 years as
a postman before he was pro-
moted to the post of messenger
in 1935. He was a messenger for
15 years and the last year before
retirement, he served ag a
postman-sorter.

Mr. McAlister served under six
Postmasters. He saw the latter
days of Mr. H. W. Collymore, who
retired shortly after he was
appointed postman, During | his
term of office he served under M:
H. H. Heath, Mr. G, F. Sharpe,
Mr, H. Blackman, Mr, C. L,
Abr@hams and Mr. H. N. Arm-
strong the present Postmaster.

“Iam in good health”, saio
Mr. MeAlister, “and I will take
another job provided it is not tuc
strenuous’, However, he is quite
brepared to live on his pension
an@ take a rest. He has a wife and
five children who are all grown
up.

Mr. McAlister started life as a
carpenter. He worked at the trade
for some years before he joined
the Harbour Police in 1908, He
was a constable for four year
when tie Gecided to take a chance
at Boing abroad.

He left Barbados for the States
where he spent 12 years. He thew
came back to Barbados and tried
his hand at restaurant keeping,
but in this he failed, He soon after
joined tp the Public Service.

Britain Will Not
Revalue £ Now

LONDON, April 26.

Usually well informed London
quarters completely discount-
enanced any idea of revaluing the
pound sterling. Such a move
would be quite impracticable at
present they say. It was not even
under discussion in responsible
circles,

Revaluing sterling was advo-
cated yesterday by Roy Harrod,
in the Financial Times, He argued
that Britain could afford it be-
cayse the dollar position of the
sterling area was secure.

Most of the sterling area would



join Britain in revaluing, and
AuStralia especially would be
much helped in the solution of

ner own inflationary problem,
Harrod added that Britain’s ex-
port prices had risen far less than
ier import prices. This deteriora-
ion in the terms of trade imposed
1 bigger burden than rearma-
nent, It was impossible for Brit-
iin to carry two new burdens

imultaneously. Revaluing ster-
ing appeared to be the only
“emedy.—Reuter.



Atomic Explosion

To Cure Cancer

NEW YORK, April 26.
A tiny “atomic explosion” to
eure a cancerous tumour in her
brain failed to save the life of
51-year-old Mrs. Pearle Jamieson
The operation took place in
Brookhaven National Laboratory
on Long Island two months ago.
It was described in Colliers
magazine as an atomie explosion
because doctors injected boron
metal in liquid form into her blood
stream and when it reached the

tumour it bombarded it with
neutrons,

The laboratory said Colliers’
story was premature and un-
authorised but admitted that

three other patients were under
treatment.

Mrs. Jamieson’s husband said
the treatment benefited his wife
at first but the cancer t0o far
advanced. Reuter

wa

ng will

Animals Don’t
Go On Strike

ALTHOUGH he may actualiy
have eaten horseflesh during the
siege of London in the 1940's, Sir
George Seel told the Annual
General Meeting of the S.P.C.A,
last night that the welfare o!
animals meant everything to him

“Man”, he said, “will never be
able to exist on this planet with.
out leaning heavily on the services
of domestic animals, nor, I hope,
his culture become so
mechanised that a faithful anima’
friend means nothing to him
There is no one in Barbados, no
one in the world, who is not de-
pendent upon domestic animals
for his daily food, and for transpor+
and other services upon which his
whdle way of life depends; to say
nothing of the affection, ayd pro
tection, for which the human race
has looked to animals since the
beginning of time.

Animals are most likely to sub-
mit to ill-treatment without re-
taliation. They don't go
on strike. The cow, if it
is not fed, will not give us
milk, But that is not a voluntary
strike, and is in fact attended by
suffering on the part of the cow
iteelf

S.P.C.A. Necessary

We humans have learnt by this
time that decent treatment of
animals—which we, again in flat.
tery to ourselves, call “humane”
treatment—is both morally and
economically rewarding. But we
are ourselves far from perfect, and
our actions are liable to be govern-
ed by selfishness, even greed, and
not seldom by bad temper, The
domestic animal, if he then
happens to be in the way at such
times, is only too likely to come
off badly. That. is why it is im-
portant that, in civilised com.
munities, there should be societies
of men and women vigilant to
bring to notice the cases of ill
tfeatment which are bound to
oceur, and that there should we
legislation to which these societies
can appeal, to back up their efforts
to guard against the worst abdses,

Uncared-For Dogs

Ihave been in Barbados only for

very short time, and in any ease |
would not attempt to say whether
the standards of treatment are
better or worse, t@ken as a whole,
than in other communities, But a
very short time driving in your
streets shows a far greater use of
transport animals than in, say, the
cities of the United States or the
United Kingdom; and I am afraid
that in the country one sees a good
many dogs with a rather tell-tale
uncared-for look.

U.S. Regards
Schuman Plan
As Test

MUNICH, April 25.

John McCloy, United States
High Commissioner in Germany
said here tonight that the Schuman
Plan marked Germany’s emer-
gence as an equal partner in the
great European project.”

Speaking in German over the
Bavarian radio network, McCloy
said “In American eyes, the
Schuman Plan is a test of the
sincerity and ability of European
countries to act as One community.

“If this bold imaginative con-
cept were rejected, it would create
the danger of a disunited and
weak Eurepe and an _ isolated
Germany.’ —Reuter.

GRANTED ASYLUM

CANBERRA, April 26.
Former acting Czechoslovak
Consul-General in Sydney Josef
Felix, who resigned three weeks
ago, will be granted asylum in
Australia, Immigration Minister
Harold Holt announced to-~iay.
Felix said he had resigned his
post because he refused to supply
the Czechoslovak Government
with secret political reports on
Australia.
Holt said today he understood
Felix had served the Allied eause
in both World Wars. It had been





established that he upheld the

democratic way of life and did

not constitute a security risk.
—Reuter

Mr. John Harrison,



Art and Exhibitions Officer «
British Council, this week gave the first of a series of three and Sch. Max

of the

lectures at_the Barbados Museum on “Looking at Pictures.”
In these lectures, he said that he would discuss the way in

which different painters

of different nationalities at

different periods of history have treated the same idea.
eee This afternoon he would deal

Perhaps |
An Atom
Ship

By JOHN E. CARLOVA
LONDON.

A Ministry of Supply spokes-
man predicted today that “possi-
bly within a generation” Britons
will be riding in atomic-powered
trains, ships and aeroplanes,

Of atomic-powered automo-
biles, he said;

“The idea may sound fantastic
now, but there are British
scientists who consider it feasible
in the not too distant future.”

linister George Strauss
—govern t head responsible
for atomi¢e research in Britain—
has contracted with an engineer-
ing firm to prepare plans for an
atomic power unit suitable for
use in large merehant ships and
warships .
Sir John

Cockroft, chief o2
Britain’s largest atomic research
station at Harwell, Berkshire,

said “some of the nation’s best
atom gcientists’’ are studying thc
possibilities of atomie power for
ships, including submarines.

Atom-Driven Submarines

He refused to forecast when
their studies could be put to
practical use, but added:

“Pilot atomic plants will proba-
bly not be constructed for another
four or five yeats, and a further
three years of experiment will be
needed to tést their reliability.”

Admiral of the Fleet Lord
Fraser confirmed that atomic-
driven submarines are in the

experimental stage.

Ministry of Supply officials are
also considering plans for an
atomic energy plant to generate
power for industry and homes
Ministry experts have already
worked out ways in which
atomic power could be harnessed
to the existing electric grid sys-
tem.
At Harwell, specially selected
scientists are working out details
to provide Britain with atomic-
powered aircraft.

Round The World

The team—headed py 33~yeur-
old Dr. J. V. Dunworth—is ex-
peeted to turn out plans for a je!
plane capable of a round—the-
world flight without refuelling.

A scientist said the power plant
for the plane would probably be
a small atomic unit, a fast reactor
u pure uranium 235) on
plutonium.

Sir William Hildred, British
Director-General of the Inter~
national Air Transport Associa-:
lion, declared that atomic power
would enable airliners to com-
bine “tremendous high speed
with almost unlimited range.”

Industrialists interested in the
commercial possibilities of atomic

research are being elped by

courses under way at Harwell.
The first course, gives guid-

ance in the use of isotopes—.

radio-active elements.
Increase in Use of Isotopes
The Ministry of Supply spokes-
man said the school was set up
because of the rapid increase in
the use of isotopes and the need

to properly understand their
application.
Probably the largest-scale

private reseatth in atomic science
in Britain is being carried out by
Associated Plectrical Industries,
a £30,000,000 ($84,000,000) com-
bine.

An A.E.I. research team at
Aldermanston, Berkshire, is re—
ported to have a £ 1,000,000
($2,800,000) a year budget.

The scientists“are aided by an
atom smasher developing an
electrical pressure of 4,000,000
volts—said to be the only atom
smasher of its size in private
hands.

Head of the Aldermaston team
is 47-year-old Dr. T. E. Allibone,
one of the British atom scientists
who worked in the United States
during the war.

A spokesman said Associated
Electrical Industries directors
believe atomic power has “a big
industrial future.” —ENS

FLIGHT
WELLINGTON.

A farmer is on the first leg of
a flight from his home at a spot
118 miles from Auckland to his
birthplace on a farm in Northern
Treland, Pleasure trip? Not en
tirely. It is for a bet of a quzen
bottles of beer,

CONVICTED

DAR-ES-SALAAM.
One of Tanganyika’s wealthiest
Indians, Kapoor Singh, is now
serving 12 months’ hard labour
for a £17 offence. He was con-
victed by a British magistrate in
the goldfields area of illegally
possessing 1.4 02 of raw gold,
Anemones



Senior Short Story Competition |

eal

with portrait painting, at his
second lecture with Landscape
painting, and, lastly with the
subject or genre picture, where
people were doing something.
Mr, Harrison's talk was illustrat-
ed by pictures projected by an
epidiascope.

European portrait painting
originated with the votive picture
of a saint or the Madonna which
was to hang in a church, Tho
donor of the picture was painted
in a corner much smaller than
the subject in an attitude of
prayer. Gradually the donor
grew in size until he or she be-
came as important as the saint;
finally, the saint was ousted from
the picture completely, ang the
portrait had arrived,

State Portrait

Next came the state portrait,

which rendered the monarch as)jof the police and the aughor was |

imposing as possible. This type
of portrait was organised to show
man at his greatest so as to im-
press his subjects. The state
portrait declined as monarchs be-
came less powerful, This tradi-
tion, however, lingered on to some
extent in portraiture, an exam-
ple of it can be seen to-day in
Augustus John’s portrait of the
celebrated ‘cellist Mdme. Suggia
Here the subject is treated in the
grand manner with the panache
and effects of the monarchial
painters. The decline of the state
portrait was followed by portraits
ot dignified, wealthy and aristo-
cratic ladies. Here the artist sur-
rounded his subject with a num-
ber of objects reflecting the birth,
taste and wealth of the sitter.
Individual

In opposition to the portrait
which surrounded the sitter with
such’ paraphernalia were portraits
which made a focal point of the
Subject alone, Here the sitter was
painted on a neutral ground with
nothing to distract the eye of the
beholder. This method of portrait
painting has been used through-
out the history of art. The subject
was portrayed not as part of the
machinery of state, power ox
birth, but as an individual. Such
pictures were painted with a
great economy of colour

Another treatment of portraiture
was that of showing the subject
in everyday surroundings. Of this
there were a very large number
of examples. Again, the artist
sometimes depicted his subject in
domestic surroundings which re-
flected social and economic condi-
tions for political reasons,

Artists also frequently dressed
their subjects to represent some-
thing which they were not, as in
the case of models painted io
represent the Madonna, biblical or
allegorical persons. A frequent
representation of the artist him-
self was as St. Luke=-the patron
saint of painters. In “The Marri-
age at Cana” by Veronese, the
artist portrays as guests at the
marriage prominent contempor-
ary Venetians, and monarchs, and
he painted portraits of himself and
his fellow artists as the band of
musicians,

Haitian Painting

Mr. Harrison during his lecture |
referred to the fact that he had (
recently been in Haiti, where the
Anglican bishop has commission- |
ed a number of popular Haitian
painters to decorate the cathedral.
These paintings were most im-
pressive, One could not help be»
ing touched by the simple faith of
simple men. One of these beauii-
ful paintings was of the Marriage
at Cana, With the exception of
Our Lord and His Mother, all the
details of the painting were mod
ern Haitian. It was, in facet, a
Haitian wedding, but it was in ao
‘way incongruous. It would be
some time before the interior of
the cathedral was completed,

FOOD GOES DOWN

SAN. SEBASTIAN.

A novel method of lowering
food prices has been discovered in
San Sebastian. A group of 20
men, led by two housewives,
seized 10 tradespeople, tied their
feet, threw them into some rowing
boats; they took them half a mile
out to sea and dumped them into
the water. The police did not in
terfere, Next day the price of
food went down with a bang in
markets and shops

HEART ATTACK

OSTEND

A 50-year-old man _ stepped
ashore from the Ostend-Dover
packet boat recently while demo
lition workers in Ostend Harbour
blew up a former German instal
lation, The noise of the explosion
brought on a heart attack and the
man dropped dead.

OTL

SEL
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PAGE FOUR

tase" ==

Printed by the Advocate Co.,

BARBADOS SB ADVOGATE| HBr

ges Foes

Lid., Broad St. Bridgetown



Friday, April 27, 1951

ees eR Aen
.

Rutchers Uoliday

THE meat
given rise to two alarming problems both
now being aggravated by tive butchers. In
the first place théy have disturbed the dis-
tribution of food, at least in St. Michael
and continue in their obstinacy without
accepting the invitation of the Government
to discuss the issue with a view to settle-
ment,

After the first meatless day on Saturday

1 this island has

situation 1

and despite the avowed intention of the
butchers meet the Controller of
Supplies, the. Government attempted to
settle the issue by inviting the butchers to
make’ the necessary representation or to
come by means of a delegation to discuss
it. Mr. Springer styled as President of the
Butchers’ Association and one other butch-
er met the-Controller of Supplies and the
Colonial Secretary and after preliminary
discussion were invited to bring some more
of the butchers to meet the Control Board
and the Controller to settle the issues in-
volved. Neither the:two who had met the
Controller and the Colonial Secretary nor
any other butcher attended the scheduled
meeting.

not to

In the mean-time the House having met
on Tuesday did not think the matter of
sufficient importance as to warrant their
attention ind so it was not raised in the
House which has now adjourned for three
weeks. The public must in the interim
be satisfied to wait on whatever the butch-
ers care.to do,

| FPresh* meat is an ‘essential ifem in the
diet of the Community and it is known that
there are visitors to the island who have
been suffering the greatest inconvenience
because they have been unable to get any
meat from the Public Market. They have
been in the habit of going to market and
making their purchases. Now they have
suddenly ré@alised that there is no meat
available nor any public explanation nor
any idea when fresh meat will be again
sold in quantities which would enable them
to purchase their supplies.

The butchers may have the best case in
the, world because as other commodities
have increased in price and the cost of run-
ning business increases correspondingly
with the rise in the cost of living, the over-
head expenses of the butcher are likely to
be increased.

There is no reasoiz however to arrogate
to themselves the right to take advantage
of the public whom they serve nor to bully
the Government whose duty it is to see
that the interests of ‘one section is not al-
lowed to prejudice that of others,

It was the duty of the butchers to at-
tend the meeting fixed specially for them
in order to arrive at equitable and reason-
able prices for fresh meat. They must not
be expected to run businesses at a loss;
neither can they expect to be allowed to
make exorbitant demands on the public.

it is likely that a shipment of imported
meat willbe arriving in this island-soon
and this might relieve the situation with
regard to the supplies for some time, but
the problem of the butcher and the local
stock ‘breeder will not have been settled
and will remain to be settled.

If the Control Board is willing to-diseuss
the matter with the Butchers in érder that
the public might have their supplies of
meat, and the butchers persist in refusing
to attend the meeting to discuss the prices,
they will be taking an advantage of the
public without gaining goodwill or sym-
pathy for themselves, If they attend the
meeting it is likely that the matter will be
settled soon and satisfactorily.

OUR READERS SAY:







LONDON, April 20
The difficulty in making 4
comparison between British anc
Soviet colonial systems is thar
little information of Soviet rule
in practice in Central Asia can
come the way of a British writer.
Mrs. Kathleen Stahl has had to
use Soviet documents, constitu-
tions and statistics as her evidenc

for colonial practice within th
Soviet Union, however, in the
first half of the book she can

show how British practice is ofter
different from the constitutions
and formal powers that goverii
the colonial Empire. (There is
no particular Yreason to believ?
these Soviet statistics are deliber-
ately falsified. But experience
shows that anywhere in the worlu
statistics, without knowledge of
ccnditions, can be misleading).
Nevertheless, Mrs. Stahl manages
to make some lively and provo-
cative comparisons, First, quite
rightly, she sets the scene, The
Soviet Union includes five Central
Asian republics within the area
which in old Atlases was called
Turkestan, There, the peoples
were, and many still are, Moslems.
Most of them speaking one or
other of the Turki group of
languages. The total population
is 17 millions, The first con-
clusion to draw is that the Soviet
Union has none of the general
problems of ov er-population
common in British colonies, This
figure of total population is con-

siderably less than that of Nigeria
alone. er second observation
is that the colonial population

within the Soviet Union is far
out-numbered by the European—
Russian population, As Mrs,
Stahl writes, this “has its advan-
teges. It greatly simplifies racial
issues.””. From this fact, probably,
stems the next major point in
Soviet policy. The Government
ir. Moscow is striving to unify
the peoples of the Republics in
the Soviet State. The Soviet
Union, like the British Govern-
ment, is a “de-colonising” power,
But Britain seeks to “hive off”
her Colonies; the Soviet Union
seeks to merge them socially,

culturally, and economically in
the “homeland.”
Government is centralised in

Moscow where the, Central Asian
Republics are represented in the
“Soviet of Nationalities.” But
each of the departments of these
republic governments is respon-
sible to the department of gov-
ernment above in Moscow. And
the Prime Minister is responsible
to the Presidium of the Supreme
Soviet. The aim of Soviet rule
is diametrically the reverse of
the British aim. As Mrs, Stahl
sees it in a careful study of the

Review of:—British and Soviet
Colonial Systems, By Kathicer
Stahl (Faber, London: 12/6)
{Received by:— D. T. Roberts}

method of British colonial goy-
ernment, the purpose of the
British system is to spread res-
ponsibility as widely as possible
and prepare colonial communities
to stand on their own feet. The
Soviet system aims at a unifica-
tion of the whole country, For
the Soviet Union the “problems
of a plural society” exist only tu

be dismissed with Stalin’s theory
that a_ nation, giving rise to
nationalism and a _ culture is

something quite different from a
“state,” the ruling political prin-
ciple. In practice. Soviet imperial
rule works through the tive
domination of the federal gov-
ernment and the universality of
the power of the Communist
party as a training organization.
A citizen of the Central Asian
Republic who seeks advancement
in politics must achieve member-
ship of the Communist party.

Incidentally, he cannot obtain
membership while he remains a

Moslem. For members of the
Communist party. there are
eareers in the administrative

service of the republics, and it is
a proclaimed part of Russian policy
to train local entrants for senior
positions. But high policy and
security, “both of which are
interpreted very widely in the
Soviet system,” are still dealt
with by men from Moscow, Be-
cause the two systems are
attempting to do different things
Mrs, Stahl concludes that
“Britain’s greatest contribution to
colonial rule is political .. . Soviet
Russia’s greatest contribution is
not political but economic; she
has given a new time scheme to
the process of raising the mater-
ial, economic life of colonial
people.” Mrs, Stahl should add
the qualification that some of the
claims of the Soviet rule remain
“not proven.” She admits that
the theoretical universal educa-
tion for seven years is actually a
barely four years education—and
sometimes not so universal, The
oft-quoted statistics of the num—
ber of doctors in the Central
Asian Republic, which make a
favourable comparison with fig-
ures in West Africa, are subject
to grave doubt concerning what
the Soviet Union means by “a
doctor.” What are the profes.
sional standards? At times the
Soviet Union has claimed to
create doctors far faster than
adequate medical knowledge —
of our own standards — could
be crammed into students’ heads.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Mrs. Stahl! does
overlook the far
of freedom for the person ensured
in the Britis) colonial system.
She remarks on the legal system
which is designed, in the Soviet

not, of course,
greater degree

Union, to enforce government
rather than to protect the in-
dividual. But this more fre-
quently trodden ground is not the
more interesting part of Mrs.
Stahl’s book

In her study of the British

system of rile Mrs, Stahl makes

the significant point that the
economic management of the
British Colonies — which is

mainly in the hands of private
business has an extraordin-
arily small say in Colonial
Government in London or: in tne
territories themselves, (She notes
some slight exceptions — the few
Conservative M.P.’s with Colon-
ial business interests. But
curiously, she omits to mention
the Colonial Development Cor-
poration in this context), Never-
theless the haphazard, almosi
indiverteg British economic devel-
opment or exploitation — carriec
cn without powerful politica’
influence at its back is in striking
contrast with the direct economic
control exerted by “Great Russia’
on her Central Asian Republics—
through a governmental syster
that controls virtually all tradc
and industry. The governmen
of Russia also draws taxes from
Central Asia — a practice un-
thought of by a British Chancello;
of the Ex uer,

“The U.S.S.R. has an appara-
tus of government suitable for
sustained imperialist activity,”
Mrs, Stahl concludes. This is
an unsympathetic but emphatic
judgment — a, contrast to the
confuseq but idealistic aims she
finds in the British Colonial sys-
tem. “That great ‘problem of
British Imperial policy of finding
ways of holding the Common-
wealth together, does not apply t
the U.S.S.R. now or potentially in
the future, There the problem stil’
is, and must remain, the one o!
allowing greater autonomy to its
constituent parts within an essen-
tially unified framework, / Viewed
in this light, Russian imperial
policy, in the last’ resort, is ¢
positive policy, while ‘British
policy is, in the last resort, @
negative policy.”

This quotation should — not
deceive the reader to think that
Mrs. Stahl is an apologist for the
Soviet system — far from that
she is a penetrating critic. But
her book:is ‘full of such stimulus
to careful thought on where w?
are going, with a policy of rapi¢
political evolution and fragment-
ation.





A Head Is On A Platter=
And Britain Is Blamed

WASHINGTON,

It was Secretary of State Dean
Acheson’s birthday to-day — his
58th — and Washington cynics
were not wanting to comment that
the best birthday present he
could have had was the news that
MacArthur had been fired.

The suave, moustachioed Dean
was guest of honour at a small
luncheon tendered him by Vice-
President Alben Barkley up in
Congress—and the private lun-
cheon-room was probably the
serenest spot in a Congress build-
ing that was almost visibly
seething.

My taxi-driver started on me
almost before I had got the door
shut at Washington’s Airport
building.

“Know who's behind all this?”
he inquired.

“No,” I replied, too truthfully.

“Why, the British,” he splut-
tered. “The British have got
Acheson and the, State Depart-
ment just where they want them,
and now Acheson’s finally got
MacArthur.”

Era is Over

For five 1ong years during the
big war MacArthur declared: *I
shall return.” (He was referring
to the Philippines).

Then for six more long years
after the war he kept saying: “I
shall rot return,” (He was refer-
ring to the United States).

This extraordinary man who
wins adulation, hatred, and re-
spect in almost equa) proportions,
has not been back to his native
Jand since 1937,

But now the era is abruptly
ended. And Ame::ca, not quite
sure what sort of hero really is
going to show up—cigars, corn-
cob pipes, dark glasses, ten rows
of ribbons, and all—is getting
ready to give him a ticker-tape
welcome to end
welcomes,

The Goat Again

. There are two things which you
should bear in mind in the middle

“



all ticker-tape —



R. M. MacCOLL on the Mac
ARTHUR Switch,

of the stunning development, One
is that Britain is in for an awful
lot of abuse—and not only from
taxi-drivers,

We are the goat again, make no
mistake about that. The Scripps-
Howard nation-wide chain of
newspapers says to-night:—

“Serving General MacArthur’s
head up on a platter may tem-
porarily appease the yapping
yahoos of the British Socialist
Government. But then Britain has
only 13,000 ground troops in
Korea,”

The other ¢h:ng is that, whether
he did right or wrong, and what-
ever happens from now on—and
anything may—that unusua! man
Harry Truman, President of the
United States, has once more
given proof of sheer courage,

It’s a case of the cocky captain
of the 1918 war firing the stupend-
ous general. And that ain't caviar
for the general,

Now when did Truman last see
MacArthur, and what happened’?

Truman obligingly flew thou-
sands of miles to have a talk with
Dashing Douglas on Wake Island.

The ex-captain told the five-star
general, in effect, that he would
have to start playing the game
Harry’s way.

But back in Tokyo MacArthur
whatever he may nave let the
Pt sident understand, started
again to play it Doug’s way.

Behind the scenes the rift grew
deeper and wider. MacArthur—
who is fervently backed by many
of America’s top military men—
began making it increasingly clear
that he considered it unrealistic
to try to fight a war against the
Red Chinese without
(A) bombing in Manchuria;
(B) letting Chiang § Kai-shek
back into the picture from For-
mosa,

Unyieldingly, brilliant Dean
Acheson and his State Depart-





- an ne

ment men stood against this line.

Again and again Acheson told
the President’ that Chiang must
not be called in, and that to bomb
Manchuria‘ might precipitate the
third world war, on terms and in
a place where the West does not
want it...

i ocket”

The shadows: really started to
lengthens when MacArthur’s
“home by Christmas” offensive
wound up as a full-scale war
with the Chinese: Communists,

From that time his pronounce-
ments have taken on a note of
mounting urgency and, as many
people in America have thought,
of something akin to insubordina-
tion — contempt even — for his
Commander-in-Chief and the
UNO policies.

There was “an enormous han-
dicap” complaint of last Decem-
ber when they would not let him
bomb Manchuria,

And last month everybody was
worried when MacArthur sud-
denly offered to discuss an armis-
tice in theteld with the Chinese
military commander.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff sent
MacArthur What used to be called
a “rocket” about that.

It’s Gone
As though deliberately to blow
the. lid right off the saucepan,

MacArthur last week sent a letter
to Congressman Joseph Martin,
the Republican leader, saying that
he wanted to use Chiang’s troops
and that while the “diplomats
were trying to defend Europe
with words” he was doing it with
deeds,

For a few more days ex-Captain
Harry pondered.

Then he took his*decision.

Well, Captain Harry, you are a
brave man, You have destroyed
a great A can legend, and if
there is one’ thing the Americans
cherish, it is their legends. So—
better watch out, Harry.

—LE.S,






















ag

The Right Fighter

By HUGH DUNDAS

A LARGE-SCALE air battle was fought
over Korea on Thursday involving escorted
U.S. heavy bombers and Russian MiG 15
fighters. Altogether’ 225 planes are said to
have been involved.

Study the timing of this first big clash
alongside last week's news of the MacArthur-
Truman split. It is significant. It means that
the world’s two greatest air powers, Russia
and the United States, are taking each other’s

favour the Russians. \

opportunity to try out their new MiG 15
fighters against the best bombers and escort
fighters that the United States could put up
against them.

Now they can do so with an absolute choice
of time and place and the certain knowledge

Until MacArthur went they could not be cer-
cain of these two factors.

principle of air superiority—the principle of
jestroying the enemy’s planes by bringing
them to action under conditions of your own
choosing,

What are the weapons involved?

fighters. On the other MiG 15s. The Superforts
rely for their defence not so much on speed
as on very heavy fire power. A fighter at-

all centrally controlled and aimed by radar.
VD CHOOSE—

There are few things which I would like
to do less than attack such a formation. But
if I had to do so I think I would choose an
MiG 15.

For these planes are as fast as anything

in the world, and so, having a high over-
taking speed, spend only the minimum time
in the danger area. On top of that they
carry bigger guns than R.A.F. or U.S.A.F.
fighters, which means they are lethal at
| greater range.)
The F.86 Sabre, the fastest non-Communist
| fighter in the world, appears so far to match
‘up fairly evenly with the MiG in perform-
ance,

But it has one handicap: it is comparatively
underarmed. Against the Russians’ heavy
cannons the F.86 can only muster half a dozen
0.5-inch machine guns.

lf more big-scale engagements take place
—and intelligence reports regarding the
enemy build-up suggest that they will—the

|

On the one side Superforts and F.86 Sabre|%

tacking a formation of thest bombers is faced §
by a terrifying battery of 20mm. cannons:

itish And Soviet Empires |WellSoon See li WeBacked||] AUTOGRAPH

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, {i951

SCRAPS & SNAP

ALBUMS
at




Advocate Stationery



measure under conditions which greatly f

¢4

The Communists have long wanted an|#

that their bases are inviolate from attack. |Â¥

.Thus the Americans are denied the oppor-|#
tunity of even trying to establish the first}





R,A.F. will watch results with anxious at-|'

tention,

For extra piquancy is given to the struggle
by the fact that the Russians have great
numbers of bombers of exactly the same

kind as the Superforts. They are, in fact,
carbon copies.

CHEESE-PARING

In addition, the R.A.F. has no interceptor
fighter in the same class as the swept-wing
MiGs and Sabres,

Rightly or wrongly—and most people
would say wrongly—we ' have delayed in
putting swept-wing fighters into production.

concentrating on types which are slower but ‘

have a better climb and greater mancuvra-
bility at very high altitudes,

A typical example is the de Havilland
Venom, now in production. and due for
squadron service shortly,”

There is no doubt that the choice is due
in some measure to cheese-paring. For the
Venoms could be made easily and quickly
on the same jigs used for Vampires, while
Swept-wing fighters would have to be started
from scratch.

Was the policy justified? The American

fighter pilots will find the answer the hard
way.—L.E.S.





Profits

To the Editor, The Advocdte——

Sm,—I read with interest a let-
ter written by one of your read-
ers, Mr. Evans Clarke, in today’s
Advocate, in which be asks Mr
Donald Scott of the Colonnade
what-I would term a very flimsy
question, He is enquiring how he
can afford tossell dtems cheaper



than the regular prices and still
pay such good &nd proper salaries
as he states.. If Mr: Clarke had
thought about the pasie and fun-
damental principles of business he

would remember what every real
businessman Would tell you today,
that is, that “Turnover is busi-
NeSS.” +» +

Now let me explain as simply
as possible what | mean by this

statemént.4 I should like to ask
Mr, Clarke to go through a simple
piece of clementary Arithmetic
with me. Suppose Mf. Clarke and
Mr. Scott both bought ten (10)
cans of fish at ten cents each. -Mr.
Clarke then soid his at the regular

price which was, say twelve cents,
while Mr. Scott, the more clever
businessman sold his at eleven
cents. It is umdaubtedly true that
Mr. Clarke would make the great-



ter profit but in these days of
hardship when eyery sensible per-
son tries to get tt cheapest
article I ar that Mr. Scott
would sell about fifts of fish
to every ten th h sod friend
sold. The “Tu vr? theret

eausing him to be better off fin-
ancially, than Mr. Clarke He

would therefore be able to pay
bigger and better wages than his
friend as he would have done bet-
ter business,

This is a simple matter and any-
one with the slightest idea of
business can verify it. I am no
nerchant, but I have been a clerk
in the commercial line for over
ten years and I defy Mr. Clarke
or anyone to refute this statement.

Mr. Scott may haye another
answer for him but my argument
still stands good.

I remain,
Yours respectfully,
THOMAS K., SQUIRES.
Bosvigo Land,
St. Michael,
April 24, 1951.

Registration

To the Editor, the Advocate,
SIR,—Se much babble is now
going on concerning the Regis-

tration of Voters, while the Regis-

tering ©@fficers are ‘quietly and
earnestly pursuing their hercu.
lean task, that one wonders if

many who talk know anything of
what they are talking about.

As a Registering Officer myself,
I know from experience of the
hardships encountered, and that
the only way to find many of the
people at home is to visit them at

night or on Sundays. The diffi-
culty of finding the men at home,
1€ callousness of most of the
women who view registration
with suspicion; the stark poverty
all around which confronts us,

and the persistent pleas for some
immediate help. One man refused
to register because I would not
give him a rum, Illiteracy
abounds—so many people being
unable to read or write, and all
this goes to make the work a very
tiresome job and the officer has to
do a lot more than register names,

A general knowledge of the
whole thing is needed and I would
suggest to those gentlemen who
usually use their loud.speakers at
election time, to embark on a
lebour of love and blazon this
knowledge across the air in the
various parishes that everyone
may have a real idea of what it
is all about.

I am sure that one night in each
of these districts by these gen-
tlemen on their loud speakers will
do more than all the Officers put
together, especially in the country
districts where handbills serve
very little purpose, or where
newspapers are seldom read, and
the voice of the Radio Distribu.
tion is never heard.

Come on and help us now, you
“gentlemen of the air” and even-
tually you will be helping your.
selves

A REGISTERING OFFICER.
26.4.45
Double Duties

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—One must wonder whether

this Island is so short of capable

persons other than those that are

already employed to register those
that are eligible to vote under the
Adult Suffrage. Taking into con-
sideration the rumours relative,
the similar personnel as enumera-
tors during our last census, if is
known that those that are re-
sponsible for the thorough and
satisfactory compilation of the full
registration have not given so im-
portant a matter the publicity it
deserves, therefore adding another
duty to the double duty of persons
that are entrusted with this job.
Imagine Mr. Tired Elementary
Teacher, and Mr, Leg-worn San-
itary Inspector knocking at Mr,
Weary Jones’ house at 7.30 o'clock
to-night. Mr. Weary just from
cutting canes and Mrs. Weary jst
finished dinner after cooking, and
carrying his breakfast and wash-
ing clothes the whole day, being
told “I am here to register you to
vote at the next General Electién.”
He replying: “I have a vote, I voted
last election, and I am tired. Go
away.” Mr. Inspector’s jittery
nerves are shocked, for the sur-
prise and indignation which is
apparent, is similar to the one
which Mrs, Weary had in the day
when she is told at the shop 8
cents is for the sugar when she
paid 7 cents yesterday, and one

more household unable to vote
next election. We have seen last-
poster for the Okra closed season,

we have seén rewards cn posters
for fire catchers to sugar eanes.

Can’t the same method apply in
this case and avoid the chaos and

discontentment that confronted
‘Trinidad?
> . H. LEWIS,
Water Hall Land,
St. Michael. P

April 19, 1951.

Subsidising U.S.

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SiR,—I write in strong support
of your leader in to-day’s
Advocate entitled “SUBSIDISA-
TION”. Apart from the loss to
Barbados of between $160,000—
$250,000 for the temporary em-
ployment of 4,000 labourers at
the most, for 12 weeks, itis also
in effect subsidising the harvest-
ing of American crops. The United
States has every right to obtain
labour as it thinks ft, and its
offer to employ Barbadians should
not be treated with ingratitude.
However, no person or govern-
ment has the right to grasp at an
offer far beyond his or its means—-
especially for so transitory a bene-
fit at so great a cost

Can this island afford such a
subsidy” The benefit accruing by
the employment of labour for so
short a time can seareely be dig-

nified with the name “emigra-
tion.” * The amount ef dollars
earned is surely outweighed by

the initial cost. Nor can the effect
of such employment on labour
returning to Barbados be minim-

ised, If the Barbados Governmen‘
has $160,000—$250,000 of its tax-
payers money to throw away
surely it would be preferable t
spend such a sum on the Easi
Coast road, as your leader write:
Suggests, or, on beginning opera-
tions for a deep water harbour
which in the end would be of even
greater benefit to this island.
Yours faithfully, ©
DISGUSTED TAXPAYER.

Police Band
To the Editor, The Advocate,

Sir,—I think I am representing
the view of the large crowd which
listened to the Police Band at
the St. Peter's Almshouse on
Wednesday night when I offer
congratulations to Cpl. Bernard
Morris for the able way in which
he conducted the band,

If you saw Captain Raison con-
duct the band and saw Cpl. Morris
that night, you could have easily
guessed that he was Captain
Raison’s pupil. The rhythmic
swaying of his hands reminded
me of Captain Raison. 2

His selection for the evening
was fine and he and the Band
were much applauded for their
performance,

It is pleasing when one sees
pent up/talent burst its chains to |
success.

H. O,

Church Street,
St. Peter.
April 25, 1951.

HUSBANDS.

2




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FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951

Voters Would

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE







St. Philip
Settle In

Tanganyika

—Garner

FORTY-THREE-YEAR

cv,

-OLD Mr. D. D. Garner, M.C.P.,
Senior Member for St. Philip for the past three years, has,

on many occasions: suggested in the House of Assembly
that negroes in the West indies should be repatriated to

Africa,
scme members
uggestion, while others though.
Mr. Garner a practical joker. * “i
however feel this suggestion wouk
be of great assistance to the negre
Mr. Garner told tne
avecate yesterday.

Mr. Garner spent nine years i
tne U.S.A. and returned to Bar-
bados in 1932, He was a member
vf the Uniyersal Negro Improve
ment Association of which
Hon. Mareus Garvey, first Pro-
visional President of Africa, was
the Founder and _ President-
General. At the time the Associa-
tion had a membership of over six
million,

He returned home and has been
a member of the St. Philip Vestry
for the past ten years. He has so
far represented the same parish

race,”



4





in the House of Assembly for
seven years,
Wile Mr. Garner agrees with

emigration to the U.S.A., he told
the Advocate “this is only a means
of relieving the unemployment
tuation for a few months. When
the workers return home they
spend all the money they have
saved. By this time they are now
accustomed ‘to the standard. of
living in the United States which
West Indies is not able to
maintain. They becom e* dts-
gruntled workers and some remain
until ‘another emigration
scheme crops up.” — ee



the

idle
wa

Repatriation

“At present the negro race are
beggars. It is working for, the
upkeep of Europeans. We want
omething consistent and I think
repatriation of negroes to Africa
should be given priority over any
other type of emigration”, i

He thinks that all West Indians
of African origin should be re
patriated to Africa to form a colony
or two. They should be give:
lands so that they could settle:
permanently. This would mean
progress in Africa,

“It is left to us, who have at-
tained the western civilization, to
contribute materially and spirit-
ually to the development of our
native brothers and sisters who
are yet exploited on the mother-
land.”

Mr. Garner, who was born at
Chureh Village, St. Philip, lived
at Brooklyn while in the U.S.A
He feels sure ‘that the American
and West Indian negroes in the
U.S.A. would gladly pool their
resources to found a negro colony

on the continent of Africa to
further the race educationally,

economically, industrially, com-
mereially, agriculturally and spir-
jtually. s

“When such a colony comes into
power it would spread its in-
fluence among other African
natives who are at _ present
terribly exploited at the hands of
their European masters.”

Workers Underpaid

He said that at present the eyes
of the European war lords are
focussed on the continent of Africa
solely for the purpose of getting
cheap raw materials at the ex-
pense of the underpaid African
worker which “we in the West
Indies abhor and are quite willing
to assist in correcting.”

He thinks that the West Indies
should definitely cease trade with
South Africa. “This is the only
means of really affecting the
vicious system now perpetrated
against the African natives as a
whole in the Union by Dr. Malan
and his clique,

Mr. Garner has put the ques-
tion of repatriation to Africa to
the majority of the electorate
cf St. Philip and they are all
agreeable, provided they are giv-
en adequate lands for cultivation
and stock-keeping, all other
things being equal.

He said that Tanganyika and
Togoland would be the most suit-
able places for West Indians tO
settle. Tanganyika is 374,085
square miles and the average
temperature yearly is 72 degrees
Fahrenheit. The crops are sugar,
rice, rubber, sisal, coffee, cotton,
ete, The majority of these crops
are popular with West Indians.
They are also many mineral re-
sources,

“The American negro will have

to pool, along with the West
Indian, to give this scheme . the
impetus and stccess it desires.

The majority of rich negroes are
living in the U.S.A. and they are
very interested in such a‘scheme.”

“We were brought to the West
Indies from Africa as slaves. Now
that we have acquired the “know
how” of western civilisation and
have contributed materially to the
welfare, not only. of the West
Indies, but of British reconstruc-
tion, it is only fair that we be
assisted by a large grant from the
Chancellor of the Exchequer to
return to ie continent of Afric:

laughed at’ this

the |



Mr, D. D. GARNER, M.C_P.
..+.ds all for Africa

and do for ourselves, what we are
willingly doing for others, with-
out any security.”

“Human: society, as we’ know
it teday, recognises only organised
groups of people forming a nation
with a flag and doing ‘business
with other nations in‘a reciprocal

. Juanper,. but- dispersed, 5 we are

among the various natig@is of the
world, begging shelter nder-their
wings, as though we were children
and. mot a. grewn, up race, spells
doom™for the whole negto ra¢e in
the near future as in the remote
past.”



EMIGRATION

The number of men reg-
istering as unemployed at
the mployment Agency,
-Queen's Park, is now going
towards the seven thousand
mark, Up to 2.45 o'clock
yesterday afternoon an addi.
tional thirty-four men reg-
istered. One man told the
“Advocate” that he is will
ine to go to Africa or any
other place “so long as
money. for work”.

wir, Garner said; “ine West
Indies are cosmopolitan,’ In these
islands can be found Chinese,

Indians, anq all types of races.
As regards race, the West Indies
is a ‘‘no man’s land.” On the other
hand the kuropeans. are now
gradually ousting the native
Africans out of Africa.. For this
1us
away to Rhgland and other coun-
tries to escape the cruelty, Event-
ually the negro race. will be
nomads with no place to’ rest.”

“The militant spirit of the
“civilised negro” is causing his
former rulers some disquietude
and my fear is that if the negro
is not given his rightful place
under the sun and helpé@ along
the road to progress in all activities
of human endeavour by those,
whom he helped io build in the
past with his free labour, not only
shall we have riots in the West In-
dies, but on the mainland of Africa
where hundreds of millions of
Africans are awaiting the hour for
their emancipation and redemp-
tion.”

“With any established colony in
Africa, a steamship company could
be formed to exchange trade be-
tween Africa and the West Indies
and remove the now existent
“iron curtain” between these two
places.”

Mr. Garner said, “If the negro
Yace cannot stand on its own feet
today, it will never be able to. We
have. qualified brains in every
sphere.” 3

When the Advoeate visited Mr.
Garner he was supervising work
on his cosy plantation at Vale
View, St. Philip. He felt that the
same work he was doing then, he
could be doing in an. African
colony. tire

He also has his store at St.
Philip and told the Advocate, “1



have—ne rwent-to -3ed with an
enipty /stemach, but Tham one in
a thousand, I know there are

7
many. -negroes who go-to bed
hyngry seme night.” z
Footnote: 4

The Statesman’s Year Book “4950 ,giyes
the following. statistics of population: in
some parts of British Africa.

South Africa (1946); Buropean 2,372,690;
non-European 9,019,259,

Kenya and Protectorate (1948): Total
population 5,373,078; Africans 5,218,232,

Uganda (1948): Total populatian’ 4,993,-
965; Africans 4,953,000,

Zanzibar (19481: Total
264,162; Africans 199,860.

Tanganyika (1948); Europeans
Asiaties 77,000; Africans 7,335,291.

Southern Rhodesia (1946): Total popu-
lation 1,764,000; Africans 1,674,000.

population

Northern Rhodesia (1948): Europeans
28,800; Africans 1,690,000.
Nyasaland (1948): Europeans 3,000;

Africans 2,400,000.
NNigeria (1948):—Africans 21,800,000
Gold Coast (1948) ‘inclusive of Togo-
land: Non-Africans 6,773, Africans 4,095,-

276 +

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TILES Coloured



Established
1860

THERBERT Ltd.

Incorperated
1926

10 & 11, Roebuck Street and Magazine Lane

amy.



Govt. Investigates Matter

After a foureday hold off, butchers of the Public Market
sold meat on Wednesday again. There is still unrest in the

market, however, and most

of the meat sold was meat the

butchers had in the frigidaire. There was not much killing.



Prices of W.1.
Products Are
Satisfactory

MR. REX STOLLMFYER,
Trade Commissioner in Canada
for the British West Indies, Brit-
ish Guiana and the Bahamas, told
the Advocate yesterday | that
the prices of most commodities
produced in the West Indies are
good at the present time.

He said that prices for cocoa in
Grenada and Trinidad, recently
touched an all-time high and there
has been a very strong demand
in world markets for cocoa, par-
ticularly from Europe, in recent
months,

Mr. Stollmeyer who has just
returned from a visit to the North-
ern Islands arrived here yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad to discuss with officials of the
Development and Welfare Organi-
sation, the Trade Commissioner
Service in Canada.

He said that shippers of toma-

toes from Montserrat to Canada
had a _ successful season, and
prices ruling in the Canadian
market were better than for many
years.
_ There was a strong demand for
lime produets. espécially lime
juice and that demand exceeded
the supply in Montserrat, St.
Lucia, Dominica, Trinidad and
British Guiana.

The demand for black strap or
wicuum pan molasses had also
been great and the selling price
in Canada had been higher than
at any time during the past sev
eral years:

‘od Development

In Deminica, he said that there
had’ been a lot of development
within the last couple of years.
Colonial Development Corporation
had established a modern citrus
packing plant; a plant had also
been established for canning

- grapefruit sections and grapefruit

juice, and experiments in~ the
canning of bananas had met with
wood success.

The growing of bananas was
increasing very rapidly and it
was now estimated that there
were about one and a half million
trees on the island of the Lacatan
variety. Practically 100% of
those bananas were destined for
®xport to the United Kingdom
and Europe.

Mr, Stollmeyer said that he had
found more 1.¢w development in
Dominica than in any of the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands since
he last visited them in 1947.

He expects to leave Trinidad at
the end of May for Jamaica and

: , the Bahamas after which he will
4% many Africana are stowing

be returning to Montreal.



Oilmeal Comes

The Argentine State liner Rio
Juramento cleared port yesterday
evening after she had finished
discharging the 1,100 tons of
oilmeal she brought here from
the Argentine and Montevideo,

The Rio Juramento arrived here
on Saturday. She is now going
on to Tampico, Mexico, Messrs.
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd., are
her agents.



*
Died |

HELEN, MULLIN of Sandy
Ground, St. Philip died on her
way to the General Hospital at
about 5.15 o'clock yesterday
evening. She was a patient of the
St. Philip’s Almshouse and was

being transferred.

APPOINTMENTS
Messrs. J. A. H. Sealy and G.
Nehaul have been appointed
Assistant Engineer and Draughts-
man, respectively in the Public
Works Department, with effect
from September 1, 1950.

Music At
‘The Rocks’

The Police Band will give their
usual fortnightly concert at
Hastings Rocks this evening. The
programme begins at 8 o'clock
and will feature some selected





celebrating the

of his singing career this week.
PROGRAMME
American March—

THE WASHINGTON POST Sousa
Overture— LE RIO D’'YS -Lala
Operatic Excerpts—

CARMEN Bizet

Waltzes from...,,.
THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER
; Oscar Strauss
Two Popular Ballads—

AT DAWNING e¢. Cadman
COME SING TO ME . ‘Thompson
Potpourri—

“The Songs Bing Crosby made
Famous” .... -...+,, Selected
Tango— LA PALOMA (The Dove}
. Gradier
Characteristic—
THE WHISTLER AND HIS DOG

.Pryor

Rhythmic
Theme from the current Film
THE 3RD MAN

GOD SAVE THE KING

Murrell

—- The main

contention
the beef price, though
on principle had stopped — killing
and selling ali types of meat
There is not much unity of action
amohg them though, and. it) was
no agreement among themselves

is over
butchers

which caused them to sell
again.

It just happened that one
butcher took some meat from

the frigidaire and began selling
and the others followed suit
Augustus Skeete, one of the
outchers told the Advocate yes
terday

One of the reasons why they
are selling is because if they had
kept the meat-much longer in the
frigidaire it would have — spoilt
Another reason is that they had

prewiously bought animals from
speculators and the animals
which they kept in pens were

losing much weight

George Greaves, an old butch-

er, killed animals to avoid a
bigger loss when they would
have reduced in weight. He is

uncertain whether he will kil! or
sell on Saturday. He does not
cbject to buying animals to keep
at home, since he is looking
forward to a change in the gitice
schedule.

Some butchers think that
was stretching the principle too
far when they decided to stop
killing pigs when they decided
against’ killing cattle. These
will continue to kill pigs.

it

Butchers To Blame

Dan Springer, another butcher,
said that the butchers have
themselves to blame for not get-
ting things put right. He spoke
to Mr. Bishop, Controller ot
Supplies, about the meat situation
and was told to get half a dozen
butchers and return. He _ went
to some of the best established
butchers, but they refused to go
along with him.

Regardless of what the other
butchers do; he said, he would be

killing whenever he gets any
animals. Yesterday most of the
housewives were around his
stall,

Asked whether he had not
stopped killing beef because he
was selling at a loss and whether
he would not be still selling at a
loss now, he said that was his
business, but he would sell.

George Greaves said that the
trouble is that there are only
two fixed prices instead of three.
The two are that at which the
rearer is allowed to sell and the
other that at which the butcher,
must sell. No allowance is made
for the speculator who buys from
the rearer and sells to the
butchers. “And a_ speculator is
as necessary 4 part to the deal as
a lighter is to the bringing
ashore of goods,” he said.

Another butcher said that
rearers should stick to the con-
trolled price for selling livestock.
Owing tc the scarcity of animals,
owners demand prices in excess
of those fixed by the price
contro.1 There are no Price
Control Officers at such transac-
tions as is the case in the market
and the people show their stocks
in a “take it or leave it” manner.
After the speculator has had his
gain, the butcher loses .

When the Advocate interview.
ed Mr. F. A. Bishop, Controller
of Supplies on the matter yester-
day he said: “Government is still
investigating it.”





6s

A'stronomer” Calls

On Maiden Cruise

The 8,150-ton Harrison Liner
Astronomer, now in port dis-
charging sicge from Liverpool,
has put Barbados “first on the
map” of her maiden cruise.

e was recently launched in
England and loaded with cargo
for the West Indies, She sailed
direct for Barbados, taking 13
days on the trip.

Captain Whitehouse, who came
to Barbados some times before as
skipper of the S.S. Naturalist,
another Harrison liner, has
brought down the Astronomer.

The Astrenomer’s net tonnage
is 4,524. She carries a crew of
45. She will be going on to

, Puerto Cabello and Curacao from
song hits of Bing Crosby, who is! Barbados.
Sotn anniversary | Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

Her agents are Messrs,

















Butchers Sell. Iced Meat J ury Return Verdict:

At Yesterday’s Inquiry

Of Manslaughier |

A verdict of manslaughter by a person or persons unknowr
was returned by a nine-man jury yesterday when the in-
quiry into the death of 12-year-old Marjorie Maloney oi |

Cave Wood, St. Michael, was conducted.

Mr. C. L. Walwyn.

Marjorie Maioney died sudden-
ly at her home on April 24. She
was admitted ta the General
Hospital and treated on Apri] 23
for a wound on the left side of
her head which she received on

April 22 while returning home
from a dance

Dr A. 8 Cato who per-

formed the post mortem exam-

ination at the Public Mortuary
on April 24, said that the
apparent age of the girl was
14 years and she was dead for
about ten hours, In his opin-
ion death was due to cerebral

haemorrhage from injuries
received. Dr, Cato said that
this haemorrhage, could have

been caused by a blow such as
from a stone,

Selina Gill who identified the
body to Dr. Cato said that she
was the adopted mother of the

deceased. On April 22, about 106
p.m, they went to a dance at the
Progressive Club at Rouen
Village, St. Michael. They left
the dance hall about 3 a.m. but
while on the way Marjorie sud-
denly turned to her and _ said,
“Lord, I cut.” When she looked
at Marjorie she was lying on the
ground holding her head

Wound Dressed

She managed to get her home
and put coconut oil on the wound
which was on the left part of the
head. The next day about 6
a.m. she took her to the Hospital
where she was given an injection
and the wound dressed She
was not detained.

About 9.30 a.m. the same day
—April 24—the girl started to
groan, tossed and kicked in thé
bed and said that her head was
hurting her. She became delirn-
ous and died.

Police Constable 139 Warner
attached to District “A” said that
on April 24 in consequence of 4
report, he went to Howells Cros:
Road where he saw the deceased
lying dead in her bed,

On looking at the body he
noticed that there was a wound
on the left side of the head below
the ear about an inch in length

About 2 p.m. the same day
Selina Gill showed him the
stone which was alleged to have

struck the deceased. This stone
was handed in to the Police,

Mr. Walwyn at ‘ris stage
summed up for the jury who
after a short deliberation return-
ed a verdict of death by man-
slaughter by 4 person or persons
unknown

REMANDED
Cyril Bynoe _of Lodge Road,
Christ Church, was yesterday
remanded with bail until May 3,



S.P.C.A. Plan Mobile
Clinie For Animals

THE BARBADOS SOCIETY for the Prevention of Cruelty

The Coroner was !

when he appeared before al
District “A” Police Magistrate ‘
on a charge of breaking and!
entering the house of Dalton!

Babb at Worthing, Christ Chur-}
and stealing articles to the value
of £8 5/3

The offence was alleged to have
been committed sometime or





April 13. Cpl. Devonish arrestec !
Bync Set. G. Murrell is |
prosecuting for the Police in the
preliminary hearing

FINED 10/-

Joseph Crichlow of Deacor
Road was fined 10/-— in one mon:h
or one month’s imprisonment by |
a City Police Magistrate fo»
driving the motor car ‘M-1468
with inefficient brakes on Decem-
ber 30, 1950.



l‘vergreeas Pianted
At Playing Field

Barbed wire is being placed
around part of the Princess Alice
Playing Field A caretaker of
the field and pavilion
Advocate yesterday that a fence
will be grown near the Wire to
help prevent animals from com-
ing on the field,

Most of the pasture is overrun
with grass nearly a foot long,
but there is one patch which is
kept well trinimed. This is about
as big as a tennis lawn and is
near the pavilion.

Lately two evergreen trees
were planted on the grounds,
one to the east and the other to
the west of the pavilion, These
are enclosed by wire ‘to ‘prevent
sheep from biting at them and
are growing well.

Much refuse is thrown near
the coast side of the field to
build up a decline there. Yes-
terday women were levelling the
stuff which the refuse lorries had
dumped

No children have been plaving
on the field lately though it is
vacation period, Many, however,
bathe and fish in the sea behind



».
ix
%

COSOOPSOPPOOO ES CS



"Athelbrook" Returns

The 286-ton molasses tanker
Athelbrook returned to the island
yesterday to take another load of

GOODSS

oe



vacuum pan molasses for Trini-
dad.

Since the crop began, the
Athefbrook has been making al-
most weekly calls here for mo-
lasses,

She left port yesterday for



Her agents are Messrs,
Ltd,

Trinidad,
H. Jason Jones & Co.,

to Animals presented its forty-fifth Annual Report at the
Annual General Meeting held at “Wakefield”, Whitepar,

last night.

The report showed that the
balance in hand at the end of the
year was $4,079.02 as against
$3,317.05 at the end of 1949

The S.P.C.A,., which is sup-
ported by a number of private
subscribers, plantations, govern-
ment grants-in-aid and _ special
donations have included these in
alphabetical order at the end of
the annual report and this gives
it the look of a telephone direc-
tory, the number
are so varied and_ scattered al!
over the island. *

Plans for the establishment o/
a mobile Clinic for draugh
animals are under way, the

of subscribers

Congress of the World
for the Protection of animals held
at The Hague during the summer.

The report appealed to Gov-
ernment to expedite the enact-
ment of the dog li¢ensing bill and
also to co-operate with the Society
in their plans for ah Anima
Refuge Another problem, — the
report stressed, was the disposal
of large carcases (mules, donkey
and horses).

The owners of old and _ sich
horses, it said, were willing for
the Society to carry out human:
destruction but they had ne
burial ground or money for
providing transport of the ‘corp:

League |





report states and this has been to the sea
made possible because the Bir- Land was therefore needed foi
mingham Branch of the Wn animal cemetery.
R.S.P.C.A. has donated throug)
Mrs. C. Walcott the sum o |, is |
$50.40 with the request that i y vr “e ~ BABY " LOVES y
be used in that manner \ a? (si santine a Cun,
‘ , +! Taloum Powder, It ts
Donation CO) ecqudsely testensd ws
The Branch donated $9.6° ) koopa baby’s skin cool,

towards the expenses of the Firs





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FOR

THE WHOLE FAMILY

@ LEAVES BODY FRESH,

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@ MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR







More hangers needed?

We have a New Assortment of Painted and Decorated
HANGERS for Dresses and Skirts

LARGE DRESS HANGERS—Ea
SKIRT HANGERS—Ea
DECORATED HANGERS—Ea
LARGE KHUS KHUS HANGERS—Ea
SMALL CHILDREN’S HANGERS—Ea

$0.14

PAIRS OF BABY KHUS KHUS HANGERS, Pair $1.08



102 11,.-12







& 13 BROAD STREET.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.








breakfast
thet builds! Save ‘em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.



10 tithgys

| CORN FLAKES |
today!

|
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SPECIFY
EVERITE
ASBESTOS-CEMENT

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a,



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told the 30969906

THE PRICE

ADVANCES
=e







WE HAVE LARGE STOCKS OF.

ARDATH cork Tiepep



CIGARETTES

Packages of 10's & 20's which we
are reducing,

Original price 10’s—19¢. now 16c.

Cartons of 200 for $3.00

Civarette guaranteed
perfect condition,

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

.

%
“

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HARRISON'S aroao sr.





Galvanized Wire
Netting

FOR FISH POTS, GARDENS, ETC,
In '% in,, % in., 1 in., 1% ins. and 2 ins, MESH

Obtain our Quotations before buying elsewhere.



Charcoal Box Irons

Top “ever Fastening
6% ins, at $4.68 Each
7 ins. at $4.81

: 5 piece Toilet Sets

in Assorted Decorations
ONLY $14.57 per SET





Warehouse Trucks
Agricultural Forks with Rubber Tyred Wheels
Full Size — Solidly Built

Sugar Bag Twine

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Domo Cream
Separators

AND SPARE PARTS



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$4.00 a CARTON






PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951
HENRY ==

BY CARL ANDERSON ee ate ae . = B
F a .]] 1OUMS leed!
ANY HAT if
























OOK Gi a Mouth and Loose
“U EW te eect have Pyorrhea,
< Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
esi 7 that will sooner or later cause your teeth

te fall out and may sine cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble.

bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
{and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your

NO FINER mouth well and save your teeth or
TOOTH PASTE TO | Mee" Saicaa trom youn, chemie’
HELP Amosan antee protects

AVOID a
TOOTH
DECAY























TM KINDA
NERVOUS !
TODAY'S SHOW |S THUH
FIRST L'VE TRIED TO SING ON!

AND NOW, YALL ...WORE COWBOY “@
BUDDY ... DRY-GULCH GOOFYS GONNA JS
SING “THUH COWBOY'S LAMENT“!





Bach soothing and delicious

; f ‘Vicks Cough Drop medicates
Gun Great, 0; dry, irritated throat
Yow Sone amen O membranes for 12 to

15 full minutes.

LISTERINE Tooth Paste helps sto¢ tooth decay 3 important ways.
1. LISTERINE Tooth Paste actually helps remove
destructive bacteria.
2. It attacks dull film which holds bacteria against
tooth surfaces.



3. It even helps to remove mouth acids!
Hurry now and buy LISTERENE Tooth Paste... brush after every
meal and fight tooth decay...clean teeth brighter... KEEP BREATH
FRESH FOR HOURS AND HOURS!













BY CHIC YOUNG

TOON Th

You'll like
its refreshing
mint flavor, too.

BLONDIE

FIRST HELP ME --

Ry.. | DAGWOOD, DON'T
: nT MY ZIPPER IS CAUGHT

| TLL CLEAR THE mm TRY TO CARRY



} TABLE WHILE YOU a IN MY HAIR
i Dia. CHANGE YOUR Gh? B
AR tS RE ie .
| Bi A . Va “ONE TRIP,
=| | @, <->, { BUMSTEAD,
pi THEY CALL
\ ROS)
ir ye Ra BD
ANS 3 rion 39
(i fare? hee iD ,
* ce ff
| ._y
a" FS J mS
- [Pye | F
7 Wo euieinaaseeeneeemaemear ——





DEAL HERE









~o |. IT PAYS Y
|

OU TO





























WHY DOES THAT












oo) .
seawoos \ Creu nm OLD PRUNE-FRCED. ASRNe. % rie Sa SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only
WANTS TO 1S HERE IN Pod JUST A BAD /|












USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Tins GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 24 21 Pkgs MACARONI 35 31

Tins JACOB'S
CRACKERS 171 145

Tins PLANTERS’ PEANUTS 96 86 Bots. GROTSCH BEER 24 18

Tins COCOMALT 133













a Birds Of A Feather
ADVOCATE by ANDREW SPILLER
HAS THE Strictly Speaking

by. JOAN BUTLER
BEST

TAF NSIBLON 2 01 eee > eae om
ORDO PPPOE POTS PO COCCSOOO 80990800 9988S 9 Oe

4









BRINGING UP FATHER

{ HUM-I TOLD yiGGS TO

BY GEORGE MC.MANUS

_BY GEORGE MC.MANUS |
GAG 22 = hy | bl!







LLL LL SPF PLP PPI IAAP IPP PSP IPE


















| BE HOME AT SIX --1T’S | | Te Wrtreoue | OH 4 YOU ARE AT 1 I “ e 4
| SEVEN NOW -I SUPPOSE | || OF HIS LOW -BROW { mS
A GAY HE WAS TIED | | FRIENOS LL CALL UP! WELL: WHY yt | Ai ay
{ < UP AT THE OFFICE “ 9-0 | YOL COME HOME ? \ ° 8
Ss eq | : BOOKS by HOWARD KIRBY :
ye C eX ; (i Ee

IN Modern Colonization
by R. J. HARRISON CHURCH >

ROC PO POOP

pow

ane eae ia fC tect SF TOWN .
RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND | ADVOCATE STAT

\
AOE
LOBE OBS OCLC AAOA OLEAAA SS
a wen eee cenarreap eos en

oe








GALEE WITH MEAT

eos IMPRUVES THE MEAL

SAUSAGES (Palethorpes Cold Storage) in H.P. SAUCE — a Digestive Relish
‘t E a id — L Ib. Cellophane Pks. — 60 BRANSTON SAUCE (by Crosse & Black-
158 ~ Ee rs HAMS — “Swifts” Argentina-Picnic * at well)
es, eee EAE 8 NAD ;
e 4s? _,_ $1.25 per Ib. Ee LAINGS — Worcestershire Sauce

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES SAUSAGES in 14.02. Tins — Palethorpes BLACK BUCK — Weecestershire Sauce

Pork and Oxford LEA & PERRINS ” ”
Steak & Kidney Pudding — in tb, Tins at HOLBROOKS ” ”

40¢. FARROWS ”









HE'D NEVER DO THAT UNLESS HE
WAS WARNING ME « HE SENSES
DANGER*HE CANT POINT If
OUT~ BUT HE KNOW6 ITS HERE |
| DONT SEE



”







FOOD DRINK ORDER THESE FROM.....
COCOMALT — a Malted Food Drink
OVALTINE — A Perfect Food Beverage ALLEYNE ARTHUR
MILO (by Nestles) a Fortified Tonic Food
LACTOGEN (by Nestles) prepared es-

pecially for Infant Peeding K CO LTO
a9 e

rONO — Chocolate Malt & Milk Beverage
BOURNVITA (by Cadbury’s)—The Food

> Drink for Seund Sleep. “your GROE€ ER: _-°







SS Pct rn
+ “SEE. SER,
= ee tie ir





—

OC ll ES




27,

FRIDAY, APRIL



51

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPH



For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for esch
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices t=
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

IN ' MEMORIAM



BOYCE—In loving memory of our dear
beloved husband and father Clifford
C. A. Boyce, who fell asleep on April
27th 1949.

Alwa;s in our thoughts
Forever in our hearts
As long as life and memory
We shall remember, thee.
Matilda Boyce (Widow), Evelyn Sisnett
und Dr. Frederick F. Boyce (children).
* 27.4.51—In.

last



EASTMOND—iIn ever loving memory of
our dearly beloved daughter and
sister Glen Sheila Barbara Maxwell,
(nee Eastmond) who was called to rest
on 27th April, 1947.

Asleep in God's beautiful gorden

Free from all sorrow and pain

Some day when life’s journey
ended,

We hope to meet you again.

is

Ever to be remembered by Mr. and Mrs.
George D, Eastmond and family.
27.4, 51—In.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES

OLD AGE PENSIONS

The Old Age Pension Paying
Office in Bay Street has been
removed to “Hartsdale” a cottage
in White Park Road, opposite the
Barbados Foundry Ltd. Pensions
will be paid there as from Mon-
day, 30th April, 1951.

H. N. ARMSTRONG,
Colonial Postmaster,
General Post Office,
25th April, 1951.





27.4.51—2n



THE MAYOR AND TOWN
COUNCIL OF NEW
AMSTERDAM, BERBICE,

BRITISH GUIANA

Invite applications from Mechani-
cal and Electrical Engineers for
the post of

CHIEF ENGINEER TO THE
COUNCIL

Appiicants, who should be
qualitied Mechanical or Electrical
Engineers and have had good ex-
perience of internal combustion
engines, will be required to ad-
minister and supervise the Coun-
engineering services com.
prising a suction producer gas
engine and Diesel driven electric
power station with an installed
capacity of 596 K.W’s, the 2,300
volts primary, 110—220 volts sec
ondary, 60 cycles alternating cur-
rent overhead electricity distribu.
tion system, the Water Works
pumping plant (250 h.p.) and the
water mains system; and exercise
general supervision over the work











of the Council’s Town Superin-
tendent,

Previous experience in an
executive capacity is mecessary

and preference will be -given

applicants who are, or are eligible] serjes
for, corporate membership of the\ fund

ONE 2508



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sunde ’

AUTOMOTIVE

ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van.
Guarantee if required, Extra Masonite
Flooring. Licensed and Insured. Upset
Price $1,850, New one Cost $2,125 pre-
sently. Apply Courtesy Garage. -

CAR—One Singer Car $350.00. Apply
FE. Jordan, James Street, Bicycle Re-
pairer. 27.4. 51—2n.

CAR—"One (1) 6 Cylinder two seater
De Soto. Suitable for making pick-up.
Tyres very good. Engine in good work-
ing order. Phone 3430." 27.4.51—3n,

















CAR—Morris 8 Touring vers good con-
citioh. Phone George Skeete 4277 or
3366, 26.4.51—3n

CAR—1938 Buick 8 cyls, in sound
mechanical condition and good tyres.
Suitable especially for hire, Dial 4616.

36.4.51—6n
—_—_———
CAR—Vauxhall Wyvern, done just over



500 miles, as new. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4616. 26 4.51—6n
datenintye einer See

CAR-—One S§.S. 2. Black Sports Saloon
1937, laid up through war. Excellent

cordition, $550.00 or nearest offer. Phone
De Laney: 2216 or 4204. 24.4.51—4n,

WAGGON; One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

FURNITURE

—.

At Ralph Beard’s Furnishing Show-
reoms, Hardwood Alley, Morris type
Cane and Rush Easy Chairs in Pine and
Birch $26.00 per pair, Also Rush Bottom
Upright Chairs $3.75 with Arms $4.50 and
Rockers $5.00 each not forgetting a
numerous variety of new and second
hand furniture. Open daily, 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. including Breakfast, closed mid-
day Saturday. 25.4.51—in.

LIVESTOCK

One Zebu-Holstein Cow to calve
in three weeks, Gave 36 pints with
third calf. C. Branch, near Paynes
Road, Jackmans, St. Michael. .

27.4.51—3n.

MECHANICAL

a
RALEIGH BICYCLE—One Boy's Raleigh
Bicycle 18” frame. In good condition,
complete with lock, bell and tools. Price
$45.00, Phone 3354, Oliver Johnson.
25.4.51—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

ERICKS—For building or garden walks
$3.00 per 100, also Fire Bricks. Apply
The Old Ice Co., Prince Wm, Henry St.

25.4.51—5n.

ESCHALOT—We haye a Fresh Ship-







cow













ment. See us for prices. John D.
Taylor & Sons Ltd., Roebuck Street,
Dial 4335. 25.4.51—2n,.
PLAY PEN—One (1) Child's Folding
Play Pen. Dial 3810. 27.4.51—I1n.
-
STOVES—Valor single, 2, 3 and 4

kerosene oil burner.
fore advance in price.
Dial 4391.

Secure yours be-
Courtesy Garage.
26.4.51—6n



“You can’t be floored in the matter
of coverings for your floors if you
visit HARRISON'S FURNITURE DEPT.,
where you will find a large selection
of Linoleum and Congolevm, Carpets,
Rugs and Straw Mats’, 26.4.51—3n



Trans Empire Oils
Has Interest In 38
Oil Wells

Prospectus issued in connection
with the sale of $1,500,000 of 5%
“A” convertible sinking
secured notes of

oad : Trans
Institutions of Mechanical or Elec. Empire Oils Ltd, outlines the a.

trical Engineers. Experience of
Suction Producer Gas and Diesel

pany’s interest in producing wells
which it acquired and of current

engines would also be an advan. and future development and ex-

tage.

Applicants must not be more
than 45 years of age and must
state age and nationality in their
applications. The person selected
for appointment to the post will
be required to submit himself to
a medical examination as to his
fitness.

The salary of the post is £1,000
per annum, and free current for
domestic purposes is provided.

The appointment which will
on the basis of a three-year con-
tract in the first instance, is sub-
ject to the previous approval of
the Governor in Council of the
Colony of British Guiana, and
carries leave privileges at the
rate of one month for each year
of service. Passages for the
Engineer, his wife and up to two
children will be paid in the case
of a successful applicant resident
outside of British Guiana.

Applications which should be
addressed to the undersigned
must be received in New Amster-
dam before the 26th May, 1951.

D. DOW,
Town Clerk,
New Amsterdam, Berbice,
British Guiana.
27.4.51,—3n.





NOTICE 10

CANASTA FANS

HEINEKEN'’S BREWERY _ has
made a gift of Canasta Score
pads to players in Barbados.
Drink Heineken’s Beer as you
play Canasta. Score Pads will
be given to players on paying
a visit to Messrs K. R. Hunte
& Co., Ltd, Lower Broad Street,

GS SOOO TOES

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

: THANI'S

SaaS

FURNISH

FOR ENJOYMENT

THE MONEY-SAVING WAY

SDS,









DIAL
3466



NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
and other Wardrobes, Dresser-
robes, Chests-of-drawers and
Linen Presses—Vanities, Dressing
Tables, Stools, Screen Frames—
Single and Double Bedsteads,
Separate Side Rails, Laths, Wash-
stands

Dining, Kitchen and Fancy
Tables, Sideboards $17 up, China,
Kitchen and Bedroom Cabinets
—Larders, Waggons, Liquor Cases,
and many other things

L.S. WILSON

SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069.

































ploration projects. As of Decem-
ber 30, 1950, company acquired
the business of Globe Oil Co., Ltd.,
British Empire Oil Developments
Ltd,, East-Leduc Oil Co., Ltd. and
Leduc-West Oil Co., Ltd. for
which 1,920,002 shares of common
stock were issued, Interest in
producing oil wells are stated to
be as follows: in the Leduc Field,
a 100% interest in 11 wells, a 50%
interest (after costs) in 2 wells, a
50% interest in 3 wells and a 15%
interest in 2 wells; in the Stettler
Field, a 100% interest in 4 wells;
in the Redwater Field, a 6.8%
interest in 4 wells; and in the
Lloydminster Field, a 3% interest
in 2 wells and a 25% interest in 10
wells east of the Alberta border.

Future recoverable reserves of
these wells are estimated at
2,428,233 barrels.

Company has five projects

underway or under contemplation
as follows; ‘a) 50% interest. in
Trans Empire-Phillips Oil Nos, 1
and 2 in the South Calmer sector
of Leduc near Mic-Mac D2 oil well.
No. 1 has recently been drilled
to production in the D2 zone.
Operations will commence in, the

early spring on well No. 25 (b)
100% interest in drilling out’thtee

prospective sites at Stettler, ad-
joining the company’s 4 D2 pro-
ducers and 1 failure; (c) 40%
interest in further drilling in the
Bashaw area, scene of recent D3
zone wet gas discovery; (d)
Probable commencement of a well
in Big Valley and (e) a geophysical
survey covering 21,000 acres in
South Princess area.

Statement of combined earnings
of predecessor companies and in-
eluding operations of Taylor
Petroleum Operators Limited, 4
wholly-owned subsidiary which
supervises drilling operations, is
given for the fiscal periods 1948 to
1950, inclusive. Net earnings be-
fore interest, recovery of develop-
ment costs, depletion and taxes
amounted to $580,228 in 1948,
$851,317 in 1949 and $582,457 in
1950. After charges, including
yrovision for recovery of develop-
ment costs of $468,039, $796,664
and $559,145, respectively. net
income was $100,080, $48.396 anc
$21,057, resnretively.



In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station





‘Round Tip| Top | Table,

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
mmmum cnarge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.20 om Sundays



REAL ESTATE

LAND—One outstanding site of
19,806 sq. ft. of Land situated in
Gardens. Dial 3950. 26.4.5

land







1 will offer for sale by public com-
petition at my office Victoria Street on
Friday 27th at 2 p.m.—15,000 square fcet
LAND at BELMONT adjoining Govern-
ment Woods, has an @dditional entrance
in Quaker Road. ALI, UTILITY SERV-
ICES AVAILABLE. Dial 2947.
R. ARCHER McKENZLE,
22.4.51—4n

LAND—Approximat iy 3,000 square feet
of land at Stream Road, Christ Churen











adjoining the Public Road. Appar: Mr
R. C, Chapman C/o Messrs. Carringtor
& Sealy. 27.4.51—5n

TANGLIN--situate at Beachmont,

Bathsheba, and standing on 1 rood 2 3/5
perches of land thereto, containing
jounge, Dining Roo, Three double
bedrooms, Children’s room, Three ,al-
leries, Kitchen, Garage and servant's
room. Furnished or unfurnished.

For inspection please telephone 3625
Offers to be sent in writing to
undersignea,
Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors,
Street, Bridgetown,

James



We will offer for sale to public com-

petition at our office on Friday 27th.
April at 2 p.m.

(1) LABOSR BLEST a stone wall
Dwelling house and shop at St.
Martins St. Philip, standing on 2!
acres, 2 roods of land. Dwelling
house comprises Drawing and

Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitch- |
en, Toilet and Bath. Government |
water installed.
Three other parcels of land con-
taining respectively 2 roods, 3
roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong-
ing to and near to above property
will also be offered for saie either
together with above property or
separately.
For inspection apply on the prem-
ises to the owner Mr. Everton
Greenidge.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to :—

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD.

(2)





11.4.5).—6n

“HILLCREST”, fully furnished, situate
at Bathsheba, St. Joseph, (former site
of Beachmount Hotel) standing on

244,433 square feet of land with several
full grown cocoanut trees thereon.

The house is built of stone and con-
tains open gallerfes on two sides, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with
running water, pantny, kitchen and usual
out. offices,

Garage and servants rooms in yard.

Inspection on application to the care-
taker Mr. Seymour Downes,

The above will be set for sale at Pub-
lic Competition at our office in Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 27th



April 1951 at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
18.4,51—9n.
AUC?ION
By instructions received from the

Secretary of the General Hospital I will
sell by public competition on Thursday
mext the 3rd May at 2 o'clock, onc
Piino by Kohler and Campopeil.







D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer,
27.4.591—on
Fy instructions received I will sel

‘
by Public Auction on Wednesday next |
2nd May at 2 o'clock, one house at Bank
Hall Main Road, 4th house from All
Souls Church. Inspection on applica-
tion to
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane,

Dial 3743. 27.4.51—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



ON TUESDAY Ist May by order o1 +
Miss M. Hobson we will sell her
Furniture at ‘‘Woodstone House’, Gar-

rison which includes

Upright and
Berbice Chairs, Settee, Sideboard, Wag-
gon, Liquor Case, Leather Uphols. Arm
Chairs, Ornament Table, Floor Lamps;
(very nice}, all in Mahogany: Glass
Ware, Dinner and Tea Services, Pitd,
Ware in Tea Service, Waiters &c,)
Cutlery and Brass; Good Linen, Con-
goleum and Carpet, Single Iron Bedsteads
Springs and Hair Beds, Simmons Bed-
stead very good, Linen Press, Dressing
Table, and Chest of Drawers; Child's
Press, Flat Top Desk all in Mahogany:
Rush Chairs and Rockers; Treadla
Machine, Norge Refrigeratoty,; (working
order), Carpet, 2 Burner Hd@ Plate, 2
Burner Florence Oil £tove and Oven,
Kitchen Utensils, Garden Bench, Lad/'s
Raleigh 3-Speed Bicycle (practically
new), Ferns and Palms, Tennis Net and
Poles and other items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms cash,

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers



27.4.51

85,000 Tons
More For U.S.

NEW YORK, April 25.

R. M. Fowler, President of the
Newsprint Association of Canada
today told United States publish-
ers that they would probably re-
ceive close on 6,000,000 tons of
newsprint this year from all
sources.

Addressing the United States
Newspaper Publishers Associa-
tion, he added: “That will be
85,000 tons more than you re-
ceived in 1950 and about 65,000
tons more than you consumed in
1950.”

He said that in 1945 when
rationing was still in force they
consumed 3,480,000 tons. They
would therefore be over 2,500,000
tons better off in 1951 compared
with 1945—72 per cent increase
in supply in six years, he said.

Nearly 80 per cent or 4,775,000
tons would probably come from
Canada, almost 200,000 tons from
overseas and the remainder from
United States mills, Fowler said.

—Reuter.

2n










CRUSHED
STONE & FINES
IDEAL FOR CONCRETE,
AND MAKING ROADS
AND PATHS.

ARMS. ‘ste ke
J. N. HARRIMAN
& CO., LTD.,
Seawell.
Phone 8444, Extension 8
26.4.51.—7n.



434,





the |



21.4.51—6n. |

MINN | |
FOR SALE |





PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and

| 96 cents Sundays 24 words -— over 24

and 12 sents, eee agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days|
> and $1.80 on Sundays. }





Cost Accounting, Com-



pany Sec yship, book -Keeping —
Course (Recognised for award of Diplo-
ma as Associate or Fellow) will qualify
A Six months’ “Intensive Method”
you for higher status by spare-time
postal study. For details, write now:
The Principal, LONDON SCHOOL OF
ACCOUNTANCY, 12, Duke Street; St.
James's, London, S.W. 1. England.

13.4.51—3n

NOTICE

IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-
‘ttntion of the Vestry of the Parish of
Saint Andrew to be caused to be
imiveduced into the House of Assembly
of this Island a Bill to authorise the
| Vestry to borréw a sum not exceeding
| $8,000.00 for the purpose of building
} suitsble quarters for the Nurses at the
| Almshouse at Belleplane, the loan to
| cerry interest at the rate of not exceed-
ing, &% per annum and to be repaid
by 15 equal annual instalments out of
the rates of the said parish r
Cc. A. SKINNER,
j Vestry Clerk, St. Andrew
27 .4.5i1—3n.





| -—————

TAKE NOTICE

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,,
® corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East, 44th Street, New York City,
U.S.A., Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing cocoa, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 24th, day of Apri,
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my o Jce

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
24.4.51.—23n,

W.LP ultting Up Very

Big Show

| bo:
| 60

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.



APARTMENT for rent to approved
tenant. Fully furnished apartment in

hotel area, Hastings, 3 bedrooms, garage
ond servants. reom, From ist June
Write P.O, Box 257. 27,.4.51—6n

BOULOGNE, St. Lawrence Gap, fully
furnished, Dial 8459





CHANDOS, 2nd Ave. Belleville. Fully
furnished, Available May 15th. Inspec-
tion by appointment. Phone 450 or
3926. 20.4.51—t.f.n.

TANGLIN, Bathsheba,
for Rent, but for Sale.
column,



is no longer
See Real Estate
21.4.51—6n

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
werds 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word Sundays.

eee







EXPERIENCED Typist

grapher,
cate Co.





and Steno-
Apply Box ABC. C/o Advo-

15.4.51—t.£.n.



TWO GIRLS who can
machines, for Cap-making
person as soon as possible,

Vernon Walcott, Ivy Road

use treadle
Apply in
to Mrs

26.4.51—2n

————

YOUNG LADY for our Office.Age 18
to 25. Must have knowledge of Book-
work, Shorthand and Typing and be
quick and intelligent. Good salany and
prospects. Apply by letter. C. B, Rice





& Co. 26.4.51—2n
MISCELLANEOUS
HOUSE—Unfurnished House 3 bed-

rooms between Bay Street and Rockley
Dial 4910 or 3601 after 4,30
27.5.51—2n

Rates of Exchange

CANADA
APRIL 26, 1951





62% pr Cheques on

Bankers 60 1/10% pr.

Demand

Drafts 59.95% pr
Sight Drafts 59 8/10% pr.

* pr Cable cay

5/10°% pr Currend’ 58 6/10 pr
Coupons 57 9/10% pr

AtB.LF.

LONDON, April 26.

THE WEST INDIES section at the British Industries Fair
this year is expected to make a great impression on hun-

dreds of thousands of people

who throng to Olympia.

George Roberts from Trinidad, employed by the West India
Committee, thinks it is one of the biggest shows ever put
up by the West Indies. He ought to know, for this is the
19th year he has helped to assemble stalls.

Today he stood waist deep in
erates, packing cases, parcels and
cartons of every kind. When he
has finished with Customs Offi-
cials tomorrow he moves off to
the exhibition hall to start work
on his section of the show that
opens on Monday.

Grouped Together

Stalls. representing the Carib-
bean will be grouped together on
two sides of an aisle running
through an area allocated to the

t

i
t

|

Commonwealth. Five stalls will!!
be devoted to British Guiana,
Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago,

the Windward Islands, and Bar
bados.
What the West Indies want peo.

1

vle from all over the world to see| British \
first time since

has been sent over in six ships
and three airliners. The
Planter has unloaded at a London
Port, the Ariguani at Bristol. The
Mulberry Hill and Tribesman are
due in the Thames; and the
Cavina at Bristol.

Part of a Trinidad shipment of
Sea Island Cotton has come by
air; so have some examples of
local timber from Jamaica which
are to be used as parts of the’
Jamaican stand, ’

The last consigninent will be
Anthurium Lilies from Trinidad
They will be met at an airport by
expert London florists who will
take them to the Fair.

f
la

i
l

Sugar, Rum, Handicrafts

Sugar, rum and handicrafts will
be prominent on all stands repre
senting individual islands. _Brit-
ish Guiana will display hardwood
for floors; rice, sugar, cottage and
rural industries, straw hats, bags
and fancy goods.

Jamaica will goin for rum,
cigarettes, embroidery, straw



Se ee

FOR LONGER SERVICE

TAR all posts before erecting.
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative
material still available
your GAS WORKS, Bay St.
Price is..,/+% 40c, per gallon.
Get Some To-day.

at



SSS SS

GOooD
THINGS
for YOU

WINCARNIS WINE

i

fresh fruit

| bottles and stacks of jars of lime
oil, guava jelly and boxes of the

s.S.|W



work, sugar, pimento, sarsparilla
and honey.

On the front counter
will be a special show of
including Ugli which

known in London
hough it has appeared at one big

here

is not yet

store.
rinidad and Tobago will con-
Sia eat

ate on rum and sugar, An

gostura Bitters, oils, asphalt and
handicrafts.

The Windward Islands will
show the world some charming
yeach hats from Grenada and St.
ucia. There will be rows of

nevitable cigars.

Barbados: Entering at the
Industries Fair for the
before the war
ill show off all sorts of things
rom cigar boxes to needlework
nd pottery. —Reuter.

BARTER

NEW DELHI.
A 28-year-old Indian bought a



wife for £30, After three months
he exchanged her for a British
#03 pattern rifle.
was sentenced to eight months’ |

Recently he
mprisonment for carrying an un— !
icensed gun, Which was confis

1
1

cated.

POLICE

9

DUDLEY BUTCHER
Alias: “Francis”
Address: Nurse

Spe



Large Bots. .. $2.88
Small Bots... $1.56
RESERVA WINE
Large Bots. .. $2.38
CRAWFORDS CLUE
CHEESE BISCUITS
Tin ........... $1.26

PEEK FREANS
BISCUITS in Tins
OLIVE OIL—in Tins









the following ships through their Bar- GOSS GOO FOG 7S {
cia, Scotia" ee cee 18 THE PARADISE BEACH $|f) CHEE SAUCE
Hardeman “Arakaka. Colombia, Aseei Be Bel vaicchiiae 7
fron kaee, Pat SEER Game CLUB IMD. = Sh pelle
Sistine, sods: Ancap Tercera. S\8 gAUCEe mes, ad
‘ov NOTICE TO MEMBERS % wh -
x Ww Indi & Briti h In accordance with Rule FOR GOOD VALUE
1 aiene mae Cra _Antith, x : the siaag will be closed ; | INCE & Co., Ltd.
| R vert, Decoration House, §: Big °° Members from 6 Pp m. on ¥ |} ¢ 4,3 & 9 Roebuck Street.
‘ James, Tel, 91-74. hahiee % Saturday, the 28th April. % if Dial 2236 !
¢ 5656089596666 OOO OOOO | ‘3255 as

ee ‘
1 9999699699096 99999 SOOO,



Michael.
40 years.
Black.
5 ft. 4 ins,
Medium,

Age:
- Colour:
Height:
Build:
Face:
Jaws: Sunken
Cheek bones:
Mouth:

Hair:
patch.

Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown.
25th April, 1951.







{ with short tail

|

j

26.4.51—2n ;



Land,

Anyone giving any information leading to
man’s arrest will be suitably rewarded.

R.



LOST & FOUND
FOUND

large Black
Owner



DOG One



ples



PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

(The Provost Marshal's Act 190t
’ (1904-0) & 30

On Friday the 4th day of Mev 1961
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after
will be sold at my to the high
bidder for any not under the
appretsed \alue.
All that certain piece of Land cd











sur



taining by estimation 2 roods situaige in
laine

Parteh of St. Michael
bounding on lands of S. Thompson
Yands of C. Quintyne, on lands
R. Alleyne. on lands of Friendship Plan
tation and on other lands of Florencc
W. Prescod, near St. Matthews Chure
appraised as follows:—

The whole area of land appra
Five Hundred and Sixty-eight

butting
o
o



(568.00). Attached from said Fi €
W. Prescod for and towards satis/a
tion, &c
N.B.--25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase

T. T. HEADIEY

Provost Marshat
Provost Marshal's Office,

20.4.51—-3n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of G. S. Millar
holder of Liquor Licens No, 226 of
1951, granted to him in respect of ground
floor of a wooden building at Charnock's

& Co



Christ. Church, within District “B", for
permission to use said Liquor License
at a wooden and galvanized shop with
shedroof attached at Bank Hall Cross
Road, St, Michae!

Dated this 25th. day of April, 1951
To E. A. McLEOD, Esq,

Police Magistrate, Dist A”

Signed G. S. MILLAR,



Applicant

N.B.—This application will be con
sidered at a Licensing Court to be helc
at Police Court, District “A on Monda
the 7th day of May 1961, at 11 o'clock
am.

E. A
Magistrate,

McLEOD,
Dist
27 4

Police A
In



Acid Stomach -
Quiet reliet

De Witt’s Antacid Tablets
are the most convenient,
easy way to deal with di-
gestive pain and discomfort
when away from home, NO
WATER NEEDED —iwst
dissolve a tablet or tw@ oi |
the tongue for prompt relief
from indigestion, heartburn,
flatulence and other sym
toms of emeens. e

Pablets

















Witt's Antacid

leave a_ pleasant, fresh
taste in the mouth. Easily
carried in cell-sealed strips
—handy for pocket or hand-
bag. ‘

ANTACID
TABLETS

No water needed
Easily carried anywhere






Cell-sealed
@ For home use !
Here's the family standby

@ Quickly soothes Da WITT’S
and settles ANTACID |

upset stomach
@ Lasting effects POWOER |
eid

ao
MAKE YOUR PARTY
A SUCCESS
with
Bots Cocktail Cherries
Onions
” ” Peanuts
Tins Vienna Sausages
Bots Olive
Tins





Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple
Peaches

Pkg Jellos, l4c., 12c. & 22c.
Ting Custard Powder
" Coffee
” Nescofe
Nesta.



STUART & SAMPS
(1938) LTD.

HEADQUARTERS FOR
RUM



NOTICE



WANTED

For escaping from custody at Central Police Station
on the night of 19th instant.





pt.

Tweedside Road, §

Long features, rough and frowning.

High—small scar on left,
Corners white.

Teeth: Some of upper front missing.
Receding from front of head leaving a

this

T. MICHELIN,

Commissioner of Police

27.4.51—3n



|

a a re

]



PAGE SEVEN





































bald |

SHIPPING NOTICES *
ti
C Lis N o : 1 1 ‘ ore
.
Janadian National Steamships —
SOUTHROUND ;
Se Sala Saile Arrives Sails
, Vrolifax Boston Parbaces Barbados
ee =- 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 28 Apr 23 Apr. _
. 7 May 10 May 12 May 21 May 22 May ss
r 5 June 6 June 11 June 20 June 2a June i
WADY 3 July 14 July 15 Juiy
LADY 2 Aug 13 Aug, 14 Aug.
NORTHBOUND Arrives Bails Arrives Arrives,
ui er Borbados Berbador Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
LADY RODNE’ 10 May May 21 May ~ 22 May M
LADY NELSON 3 June 14 June ~ 16 June 19 June
LADY 'RODNEY July 14 July — 16 July Wvuly “
BADY ‘NELSON Tuy 7 Aug. > 9 Aug. 2° Rue. 7
LADY RODNEY Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11 Sept, «9+
N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vess fitt
bers. Pass © Fares and ireigui taier ont aspeeasien — a
‘ - —s.
ny
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. ~
ROYAL NETHERLANDS ~~
FRENCH LINE STEAMSHIP CO, -
Cie Gle Transatlantique untae enon amevenpAm |
MS. Le pr i a,
; SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND 14
SAILING TO ee na eee ; ¢
INGLZ . F vary S. “ORAN AD"—19th April 1961. :
ENGLAND & FRANCE SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMABIBO | .../
curt k-ipeaeenes ; AND GEORGETOWN :
GASC OGNE May 12th, M.S. “HERSILLIA"—llth April 1951. —
ait 1951 Po S. “COTTICA"—23rd April 1991. \
via : sucia, artinique, SALLING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAL _
Guadeloupe and Antigua. CURACAO &e, Ane .
in a >. tateenncne ae: April 1981,”
.P. SON, SON & Co, ‘
SOUTHBOUND Ame.
“GASCOGNE". May 3rd, RODIN IIIT,
1951 % oa
Grenada, Trinidad, Demer- : M.V. CACIQUE Del CARIBE
ara and Fr. Guiana % will accept Cargo and Passengers
a. for St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Gren-
ts ada and Aruba. Sailing Satgrday hi
28th inst te
Accepting Deck passengers
to Grenada, Trinidad, St, _M.V. CARIBBEE wili accept
Lucia and Martinique also : eee cee for Domin-
Cargo ¢ Mai a “anes . ntigua, ontserrat, Nevis
* a Mail to all Ports and St, Kitts. Sailing Friday ath
f 1 \
R. M.JONES& Co.,Ltd, |] Bx, scHOONER own.
soc,, INC.
AGENTS f
Phone ::: 3814 Tele. 4047,
2
SOROS OSG D GLO OS Nts
x ain 55 +s SOOO.
els ELE ELL e
; PASSAGES TO EUROPE
Ce nt ret Antille s Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
pores * eope sgh roe The usual ports of call are- b
, London, or Rotterdam. Single 270;
‘ reduction for children, , ingle: fare £70; usual
PIO LNG GGG
Church Street
Speightstown $50,000 LOAN at 5%
Secured by First Mortgage aa
Instructions have been received on Valuable Freehold
from Mrs. FT. @. Jemmott for the a‘ .
ebeve property to be offered for Property in Barbados 3
mile by PUBLIC COMPETITION
at 280 pm, TO-DAY ot JOHN i *
M, ADON'S OMee, Plantations Opportunity : cue Led
te aaa SSS
(Gtey House is a spacious 3+ PPP PATE
storey stone ding a y 4
toods fe nko alore spersnd Are you thinking of Building $
on the ground floor which offers Houses, Roads and Yards ?
eppertunit for the development n, a
or: ood business in ris centre
o a Ko 1 this central IF So
Particulars from the Solicitors, Contact; “B. A. & P. 8. BRQOKS” *
Mes rs Yearwood & Boyce, James ‘ hol
dtrect, or the Auctioneer, Job M,
Sesser tana CONTRACTORS
We draw your Plans.
and endeavour hed give you
the $
| Dot ed. BBiadom For further particulars Phone ‘paas
or 8162. _
21.4.51-—1n
OOOO
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REMEMBER “tes ui
when you purchase from
nr Aa x
rae CENTRAL EMPORIUM
our motor van delivers the goods to your door.
: CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD,,—Proprictors. — Cnr, of Broad & Tudor Streets
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Backless & Toeless with Dutch Heels i
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LLL LLLP PESO PSS SSCS SSS SSSCOSOS? S4Ge0*

























MEM GM RT




PAGE EIGHT



First Win
For Season

EVERTON got their irst
victory for the seas when th
beat Pickwick-Rovers 5-1! in .a
First Division football mateh

which was played at Kensington
Oval yesterday afternoon

For Everton, S. Blades kicked
in three goals while White and
Yearwood netted one each. Jones
the Pickwick-Rovers centre
forward scored the lone goal for
his team.

Reece at his old position in ti

goal, proved an able foi] for the
Pickwick-Rovers forwards and h¢
was backed up by the accurate

kicking of Blades who went {
centre-forward in the second half
of the game. Jones, the Pickwick-

Rovers forward tested Reece on
many occasions with well-placed
shots and _ right-winger Well

played a good game for his team.

The game opened with Pickwick
Rovers defending the south end
of the pitch. Wells on the righ
wing soon after the kick-off re-
ceived a long pass from his for
wards and was running down
unmarked to score when both
Everton backs intercepted. White,
one of the Everton forwards took
a try at the Pickwick goal about
five minutes after play in the firs
half but the ball went wide of the
goal posts.

Resistance

The Everton forwards started
moving. down to the Pickwick
Rovers“area but Lewis and Hui
put up stiff resistance, Both tear is
were now trying for mastery <
on two occasions Jones at cent
forward for Pickwick-Rov
tested Reece with low shots, The
Pickwick — Rovers goalkeeper
Foster also had a busy time
White and Blades were alwn
trying to score. At half-time b
teams had failed to score.

After half-time, Everton
took the initiative and about twe
minutes after the second half
started, Blades drew first blood

for Everton in a melee in tie
Pickwick-Rovers goal area, Short-
ly after, White kicked in the
second goal after receiving a lon

pass outside the Pickwick-Rovei

goal area, Everton now was deii
nitely on the offensive and about
two minutes after the second gual
Yearwood kicked in the third.

A Header

Play now was concentrated i*



agaist

the Pickwick-Rovers goal aiea
and Blades again headed in the
fourth goal after a melee. A long
pass to Jones from one of his

packs gave Pickwick-Rovers thei:
first goal as Jones who was mid
field and unmarked took tne
opportunity and scored The score
was now 4—1 in Everton’s favour.
The Everton forwards again moved
down on their opponents and about
five minutes before the end ot
play Blades kicked in fifth
goal for Everton,

The teams were:

Everton : Reece, Weekes, Hall,
Culpepper, Scale, Maynard, White,
Blades, Hope, Murray and Year-

the

wood,

Pickwick-Rovers : M Foster,
Lewis, Hunte, Worme, Carter,
Kelly, Wells, Yearwood, Jones,

Foster and Robinson,
The Referee was Mr, D, Sayers.

GOALLESS
DRAW

ROME, April 25

A Brazilian Football team com-
posed of players from the Sac
Paulo and Bangu Clubs drew wil
Lazio, an Italian First Division
side in a rough and goalless maten
here today.

Some 20,000 soccer fans watched
a fast-paced game in bright sun-
shine, but were disappointed by

the absence of Brazilian stat
Zizinho (inside right) laid up
with a sudden cold.

He was replaced by inside left

Bibe, who in turn wes substituted
by reservist Teixernha

The Brazilians. were slightly
superior throughout the game, bu*
they lost many promising chance:
in front of the Italian goal by
complicated passing and repassin
of the ball.

Teixernha in the attack an
half-backs Aliredo and Baue
were in very good form, but failed
to get through. Both teams treat-
ed the spectators to a gooct ex
hibition of ball control.—F/uter.

r
58 Moves To Draw
LONDON, April 25

The eighteenth game in _ the
World Chess Championship match
between Mikhail Botvinnik and
David Bronstein was drawn today,
Moscow radio reported. The game
went to 58 moves. The score now
stands at nine points each, The
next game in the series will be
played on Friday.—Reuter.



| They'll Do ‘Tt Every Time

|





; team raised by

S





_ CHALLENGE




oy

MATCH

PS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Everton Beat Pickwick-Rovers 5-1

sixth hole (164 yards) at Mowbray, near Cape Town, while his opponent looks on.
The hole was halved in three.



S. African Team
Play One Day Match

LONDON, April 26.
England’s spell of summer
weather—temperatures rose to 72
degrees in London today—was

irticularly welcome to South
Africa’s cricketers who played a
one-day charity type fixture at
Maidstone yesterday against a
the Kent captain
Davtm Clark

It was not cricket of too serious
1 character and it gave the South
\fricans a chance to loosen up.
But they had a rude shock when

their first three wickets fell for
four runs—the first two from the
the first two deliveries by Jack
Martin whose only appearance
wa against South Africa four
years ago

George Fullerton however
came along with a not out century
of 118 and South Africa 191 for
five, nearly won the game. Clark’s
team had declared at 199 for three

South Africans were also in the
news at lawn tennis where six of
their players including three of
their Davis Cup team played,
reached the last cight of the Sur-
rey hardcourt, men’s singles
championships. Only Tony Mot-
tram, England’s number one, and
Paddy Roberts—remain to chal-
lenge a south African bid for the
title. —Reuter.

B.G. WILL PLAY
HOCKEY IN TRINIDAD

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24.
The British Guiana Hockey
Association have accepted an invi
tation from the Trinidad Hockey
Board of Control to send a team
here for a series of Intercolonial
matches from June 3 to June 17
Trinidad visited Brilish Guiana
last year, and lost the series after
drawing their first four Test

matches,



TTT

By M. Harrison-Gray §
aS? Dealer : North, 5
Game all, :
N.
@AKS4 :
f : z at 9 f
i 095 :
i w. BE. t
2 Qx63 @sjyi ‘
AS‘6 ya? S
@62 @5874 :
SQu74 HKIGSS |
' aus? :
Â¥K 1085 .
@KS :
BRAD? ,
i South had to make the key
§ bid on this hand from main
§ play. In both rooms Nov

opened One Diamond. Sv
bid One Heart. and Norin
made the forcing rebid o
Two Spades. South bid ‘Iw
No-Trumps and Nort’
umped to Four Hear
his strong bidding induced
both South players to
asiam try. {he first
Five Clubs, but North
still see too many gaps !: *
hand and closed the biceing ¢
at_Five Hearts %
In Room 2 South read t
artiner’s distributior
—4—4—-9, 9 which mee
that @A was of little vate
He therefore made the mo
helpful cue bid of Fiy
Diamonds, and North could

seesecresrese

bie
b

ould







faeeeeeeee Ren nese csseerscousugeaeasannnseresaneuesanesen

now bid Six Hearts Sou
ruffed two smal}! Clubs
Dummy to make sure of 1!
tricks,

NARRURASEREcneeaneeen



—_—

“* Regt ed U.S. Patent Often,

Kip RAM



ii. ee
>



TO BE ERECTED

|__| @JUST SIGN UP ONE O

ob aga yt

Regatta On
Saturday

The seventh regatta of the 1951
Yacht Season will be sailed in Car-
lisle Bay to-morrow, under the
auspices of the Royal Barbados
Yacht Club,

Starting time and handicaps are
as follows:—

‘

i








Vlass No. Yacht Start at Flas old is very stylish, and alsa |
BH. 10 Wisard 230. Red showed the large crowd that he
in could be rough if required. He
: 2 1
D_. 8 Peter Pan” 231 Yellow has a very good left hook, and at
; So 2.33 ed times was a very difficult target
D 4 Seabird 232 #
. to hit as he kept moving away
_D 10 Van Thorndyke 2.83 Yellow from many punehes.
B 3 Ranger
D 12 Rainbow 2.34 Red ee eee eae =
B 3 War Cloud ; :
- 9
Bb 6 Flirt 4 hh T d
401 Fantasy 2 veiw | What's on Today
D 1 Buccaneer E macale :
en ~ Velice Courts—10.00 a.m,
3B 9 Okept 28 Red Exhibition of British Car-
B86 Raseal 2.37 Yellow ne Cue Notes “
—- the egislative Council
D 9 Olive Blossom 2.38 Red — Chamber—10.00 a.m.
B 7 Moyra Blair 2.39 Yellow “Grey Hawke”, Church St
’ ; St.
D 2 Imp 240 =Red Speightstown, will be
D 7 Sinbad 241 Yellow offered for sale—2.30 p.m.
" * i
B 5 Mischief 242 Red PGs eel te on
B 1 Gipsy 2.43 Yellow CINEMAS
K 35 Eadril
i 9 Dauntless 244 Red “Local Talent Show"—8.30 p.m,
‘ —— - Aquatic—"“Holiday Affair" — 5.00
oC 1 Miss Behave Globe—City Across Tie River and
C 8 Routy Nan 2.45 Yellow and ae oe os as
1 6 Eagle Empire—The ' r an—2.50 p.m,
‘ : a Mudlark'"—#.0 aa.
Cc 9 Folly Plaza Bridgtown—".ot Wanted" —
> 11 Magwin 2.46 Red 2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 pm
~~ - Plaza Oistins—"Chain Lightning’
cS 2 Scamp and "The Stery of Seabiseuit'—
K 44 Comet So and 8.0) pom
’ waren 2.47 Yellow Gaiety — “Lost Boundaries’ —8.00
i 7 Mohawk p.m.
my Olympie—"The | Spoilers” |. and
12 Dawn 248 Red “Seven Sinners’—1.40 and 4.15
pm
1 ll Reen 2.49 Yellow Roxy — “Under Current’ and
’ ‘Night’ Must Fall’—4.20 and 8.15
I 1 Gnat 250 Red Pm.
Royal— “Relentless” and “Lust For
K 29 Cyclone Geld’ — 10 and 8.30 pom.
K 1) Vamoose
1 4 Coronetta 3,52 Yellow
I 1s Clytic
10 Gannet 2.53 Red
c 7 Rogue 2.54 Yellow
Abed si ol following dates have been TO-DAY
ixed for Resattas : i ;
8th Regatta, Saturday Sth May, 1951 oon Rises: 5. 46 a.m,
a, Saturday 19th May, 1951, Sun Sets: 6.30 p.m,
» Thursday, 24th May, 1951 Moon (Last Quarter):
. 26th May, 1981 April 28
2nd June, 1951 Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
Cup, Thursday, 7th | June, High Water: 8.01 a.m,,

Birthday)
H. BLAIR BANNISTER
Starter.



adies’ Water Polo
This Afternoer

THERE will be a ladies’ water
0lo practice mateh at the Barba-
des Aquatic Club this afternoon
between the following two teams:
‘ Team “A”, Roberta Vidmeyr,
eggy Pitcher, Jean McKinnon,
Dorothy Warren, Joyee Allen,
Marion Taylor and Ann Eckstein.

Team “B”, Gill Gale, Frieda
Carmichael, Christine McKinnon,
*hyllis Chandler, June Hill, Ann
Raison and Phyllis Fitzpatrick

Reserve; Joyce Eckstein.

Both teams are asked

ready on the pier at 4.45
Match begins at 5 p.m.
_ After this game, another prac.
tice match will be arranged be
tween the other ladies whe have
turned up for practice,

be
p.m,

to

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

Rangers v. Penrode at St. Leon-
ard’s, Referee: Mr. Robert Par-



ris |

















_—



TWO SINGING PUPILS,
ji AND SOMETHING LIKE
THs HAPPENS NEXT DOOR»

WILLIAM :

TH AIL

PLL Pte Soll I LI A BPD Ott te ult bt bd

DORI ELL COP OEEE CT COERCION.
LILIA IL OA AE OOO

heavyweight

p

—Evxrpress

Kid Ralph Gives
Fine Display
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 24.
Kid Ralph, Barbados light-

gained many sup-
orters for his bout with Gentle



Daniel when he gave a fine dis-
play this week in an eight round
exhibition,









Ltn ele

oF

The Barbadian who is 24 years









9.51 p.m,

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil
Total for Month to Yester.

day: 5.15 ins,
‘Temperature (Max): 85.5° F
Temperature (Min): 73.5° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)
E.S.E., (3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity:
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.995,
(3 p.m.) 29.924

10 miles per



OIL

SEE
SUNDAY ADVOCATE

CITE

I Can See...

?

*
8
1%

—t

wos

\\

vt

|

|

















SPORTS
WINDOW

FOOTBALL FILMS

Those interested jin the
finer points of feotbali will
have a treat tonight if they
visit “Wakefield” at 8 30
o'clock,

The Honorary Secretary
of the B.A.F.A,, Mr. O, 8.
Coppin, has made arrange
ments with the British
‘Council for players and
others interested in feotball
te see three training films
at Wakefield entitled “At.
tack”, “Ball Control” and
“The Great Game”.

SECOND DIVISION
Carlton vs. Spartan at Bank
Halt
THIRD DIVISION
College vs. Wanderers at

College
Foundation vs. Combermere

at Foundation
Empire vs, Carlton at Black

Rock

Regiment vs. Everton at
Garrison
Police vs. Notre Dame at
Park
BASKETBALL
(First Division)
Fortress vs. Pickwick at
YM.P.C,
H.C.0O.B. vs. H.C. af
Y.M.P.C.
NETBALL
Foundation Girls’ v. Oveen’s
Collece OM Girls at
Queen's Collere
HOCKEY

A demonstration hockey
match will be played at
Kensington today at 4.45
p.m. This is to awaken
interest in the game. Only
men will be playing during
the first half of the game
In the second half, eight
ladies and two Combermere
boys will take over from
ten of the players of the
first half.

The teams are: G, Jones,
T. Knight, 5. Dungney, D.
Worme, Adams (Comber.
mere), A, Farmer, D. Bad-
Jey, George Allen and
two policemen; Warren, J,
Worme, Taylor, M, Leach,
Hon’ble R. N. Turner, Kelly,
Col, Michelin, M, Stoute, R.
\Creney, Edwards,
member of the Police team.

The ladies are: Mrs. Wells,
Mrs, Lewis, Mrs. Roger's,
Mrs. P. Pitcher, Mrs, M.
Griffith, Miss Pam _ Cress-
well, Miss Worme and Miss
Jean Chandler,

Globe





It’s so easy
to see those

extra fine

aw Jl

points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the
Top Scorers
in Tailoring
to be on the
SMART
side.

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co.,, Ltd

% Prince Wm. Henry Street
Roncenqe seen eeee TOTTI FOLENS GEES <
(

Lo PP PLLA LLL ILL LAL AL PLP LD IDL OD IPD DDD Db bt Derk |

PILL GS PIII OO es

and a

|
|

A

LPLPL LLLP LLLP L LLL LIL LAA ILA Dl ba de

OOD IO E EEE OP CPE TTF ATP

pas









specially
packed tin!

First in Preference the World Over

Copr. 1950 Borden Co, Internat’l Copr, Reserved,

Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with the liver, must filter out im-
purities from the bleodstream.

So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
achy—with the uagging pain of an
aching back—lock. to doth your kid-
neys and liver. That’s why Cana-
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Chase’s Kidney-Liver Pilla for over
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Give your system a_chance to
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\MIDNEY-LIVER PILLE

|
| ADVERTISE

IN THE
| WEEKLY ADVOCATE













Theatre
TO-NIGHT
GUEST STAR

Li
JOSEPH CLEMENDORE
celebrated CONTORTIONIST
of The O’LINDY TROUPE









{

' T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

ee
STACK-A-BYE CHAIRS
The All Steel Arm Chairs
$11.50 Each
at

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND
HARDWARE

GIRLS’ FRIENDLY
SOCIETY
ANNUAL FETE

Under the Distinguished
Patrorage and presence of
His Excellency the Governor

and Lady Savage

will be held at
THE HOSTEL, Country Rd.
on SATURDAY, April 28th
Opened

from 3.30 te 6.30 p.m,

There will be the follow-
ing Stalls: Flowers and
Variety, Needlewerk, Sweets,
Household, Books, Cakes and
Ices.

For
will be Pony
Lucky Dins.

By kindypermission of Col,
2 IWichelin, “he Police Band
% conducted by Capt. Raison
3 will play.
+
%





}
|



]



|

Sr

CO

POD OEIN

4s
o

heerenes
ROSS

2s
oF

there
and

Child¥en
Rides

the

ot
SS

bottetvttubvtvtntntvtebbeb-bub bbls bt tebetbeb.

COOP OOOO OPT TOTO FCPS

ADMISSION — 6D.



_—_— Oe

NO

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951

————



Queen
Scots













Sole Importers:
W.S.MONROE &CO.LTD.,
Bridgetown, s

& MUIR LTD

Distillers
Leith, Scotland
2

BE WISE ECONOMISE

USE

BOWRANITE

ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT

THE PROVED PROTECTOR OF IRON AND STEEL‘
GOES FARTHEST aif LASTS LONGEST

One Gallon will cover 800—1000 sq. ft.
Supplied in - -
PERMANENT GREEN
RED, GREY, BLACK and
SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting)
in Tins of Imperial Measure.

*Phone 4456 23 Agents

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.





We now have in Stock a Limited Number of SUIT-
CASES and with IMMIGRATION to the U.S.A. in
sight we advise those interested to purchase before
it is too late. We have a Variety of Sizes all very
Smart and Strong.

Prices from $2.45
$4.55

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

to





SPECIALISTS |

IN

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TAILORING

Or ALL

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ean



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FILES



PAGE 1

nuns*, .iron, n, m, BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAOC FIVE St. Philip Voters Would Settle In Tanganyika — Garner FORTY-THREE-VEAR-OLD Mr. D. D. Garner, M.C.P.. Senio.Member for St Philip for ihe past three years, has. CCuiORI suggested in the House ol Assembly Ii jted to %  Mr Owner i %  lie of great assUmm-v I i Mr. Garner t %  I Mr. Garner spent nine years U ine USA and relumed to iui Ml ammbei %  i f ersal Negro Improvc itlon of which th< II itcua Garvcy. visional President of Afncu. w ndtr and Pn At Ihr lime the rVSSCH lation had n luambtnttip of yver six iroad home and has been I member of the St PL: for the past ten year*. He has ?o f-ir rep:* ISM parish Uk I! AM Of Assembly for vvan. .. th i" S A., he told .tie this 1* only a means ( Ml..ving the unemMoymeiit "IT a frwmonths Whr.i teturn home they spend all the money they have and do for ouratlvaa, *nat we are %  ved My this time they are now willingly doing for others, wilh%  I to the standard of DUI any security." i .itcd Stale* wineb "Human' society, ag M I h H I iniNcs li not iiiile io it today, recognises only oru&nurd i They b '• C 0 ITI •• dlssreops of people forming a nation gninUed workers and some remain with .. Sag ami doing, business il another emigration with ,.ther ii.tinr.? In ;i reciprocal scheme crops up." ,, jQftpjMr,*. it„u riMppgaad a-we are %  "noim the vanmi' ii.itiy. of the Repatriation nOrM, begsmi; shelter ifijder their "At present the negro race aiv wings, as though we were ihlldreu beggars. It is working for. the and not grown, up race, gpelb upkeep of Europeans. We won-, dowm-for the ivhoWnegfo r*e>> In istenl and 1 think the ..ear future as in the remote repatriation of negroes to Africa past." Butchers Sell Iced Meat Govt. Investigates Mailer a four-di Jury Return Verdict Of Manslaughter Prices of WJL Products Are Satisfactory MH At Yesterday** Inquiry lid of mtsmUughtu by i pi %  leroa) whan After a four-day hold off. butchers of the Public Market sold meat on Wednesday again. There is still unrest in the market, however, and most of the meat sold was meat the txitchers had in the fhgida ire There was not much tailing -^—————— — ft,,, nijiti contention is ot ihe href price, limit*, bw tts A vardict of manalau£trter toy a pi % %  ",'""'; "' " %  % %  WM raturnad by ^ nlM-roan lui whan ti* InT^I: X, ;.. i -.u. .i w... M.-, Itom though, and It -< -w \\ IKXI. M. Michael, was conducted. The C omner was no agreement among ihemselve* Mr C. L. Walwyn. which caused them to sell Marjorie Maionev'died suiMrnwhen he appeared bat "tain ly at her home on April :* BaM Ml rid "A" Police Magistrate It Just happened that one was adnUtted t. the Geneial on a charge of breaking ana Rrv c „, .,J.,_ ""***•,f' 00 • om %  "•"* " m Ha-pital and treated OB April ZJ entering the house of Daltoti rf>lJ.MEYER, the fiigidaire and began afiling lor I woumi oa the left side jf Babb at Worthing. Chnst Chur-' others followed .uil her head which she received on and stealing articles ta V %  Skeete. one of lie April 2'J while rv'.i:nr-i. : Mm of t8 5/1 Tilde (V.mmisioner in Canada lor the British West Indies. Brit ish (luiana and the Bahamas, told the Advocate yesterday that the prices of most commodities produced in lhcsl ^ aj b 'i-^ l* when llw morning by B.W.I.A. from Trini have reduced manil dai. x ho oflagsta ;is alleged „ Dr. A S. Cato WbO IH-I 1K-.'II Mstsulttfd %  OBBfUtBC .i rormM tli<' p v nApril 13 C'pl IJevotush inauon at itw Publa Mortui • Bynot Sirt <; MurrwU I 00 Apnl 24. said that tinproaOCUttU tor the P..lire m thai apparent *.• of th. dimlnary hearing %  nd % %  ' was dead to) — FINED 1CJmeph li.1i. R-ma was hned io In o %  Mil I %  : %  %  City Polk* Magistrate i %  M-MiW Mr. n !>. OAUm, M C P . it all for Africa about ten hours. In in. .nuncerebral rhasM from injuries I Dr. Cato laid id..: this haeniorrhdtfe could hav* %  used by .i dl" i; i from a stone. SOUM c.iii who kftanUnad tthc drlvtna; the mot-. body to Dr Cato said thai she with ineflt, U was the adopted mo'.her ol U,e her 30. 1050 He doea not deceased On April 22. abwit 10 tbieet to buying animals to keep p m Om went to .. dance *t the at home, since he it lookup Progreaatvv Club .it Rouen lorward to a change in the price Village, Si Micruiel Tl,. 1. ft "' ''' the dance hall about 3 a.m. but Some Hncbars ihmk that tl ,vMie on Use aru Karjoris sud. was stretehinc the pruu-iple too ,,,,„[, lur ned t-> her and said when they divided to op "Lord. I cut." Wli-n sha [OOfcad derided „i Maijorie she *u lytnj These ground holding lie. bead >( rgrei .is Planted Al Pluvillf; |.i,.|,| should be flvan pnotft] othar type o' emigration". .,11 Wast Indians al African csrlgln should be re leg to form a colony or two. Thcv should be givci lands so that they could settle ,1.1 riwan propTai %  '' I i: i,. bave at. i tai i ,\ %  %  tOd spiritually to the development of our native brothers and slaters who tad on the motherMr. Gamer, who was born at Church Village. St. Philip, lived at Brooklyn while in the U S.A He (Mil sure that the American I' ,\ n aid (iladly pool their continent of Afrin. to im| ^ turo ^ ani further the race cucat.on.di> adiwl| olwUl |n %  %  "1 nil not i-i nil v J r. EMIGRATION The number of men regMerluc an unemplayrd at l*sr Employment Agency. tfuern^s Park. g| now going towards the seven thousand mark. l*p Io 1 *5 o'clock yeaterdar afternoon an addi tlunal ihlrty-faur men registered. One man told thn "Advocate" that he Is will ii-to go to Africa er anv nlher r lace "o long at money for wort 25St 3S ,,, iSi w gSS 1 S25^ -•" —*> Service in Canada. He said that shippers of toma toes from MonUerrst to Canada had a successful season, and prices ruling in the Canadian market were better than for many ~,'~ >e:u far hen they decided to *lop -Lord I cut" When it* jattH .. There was a strong demand for hi" ng pigs when they dgMOltd al Maijorie she was u,.i i: hep! ' N lime products, especially Hmr • M killing cattle. These ground holding bar h.-..d S, *\. caretaaai of luleg BM that demand exceeded w 11 continue lo kill pigs >e Wd Mid pavll (old the> the supply in Montserrat, St Wiiiind DfffMps] IV "' Lucia, Domimra. Trinidad and Butrhi n. To Rhime „. Wl *** S 1 ^*" ""ar the wlrg Io Bntish Guiana. She managed to ;ri %  Wl The demand for black strap or r 8n springer, another butm'-i. and pul coconut oil on the wound "> on the Held mcuuni jan molasses had also ra, d 'hat the butchers have which was on the left pan or |bj %  oat "f thf. pasture is overrun bk her to the Hospital put there is onu patch which i* at any lime during the past scv ' Mr. Bishop, Controller i where she was given an InJatUon k ''i" ""'" trintmed. This is about ernl yn-S. Supplies, about Ihe mea: situalnn and the wound dr. bl| U .L tennis lawn and U Develupinent and % %  ,ol d 1 f" h;df a do?cn was not detained. np ;'r the pavilion In Dominica he said that there hutches and return Ho Went About 9 30 a.m. the SUM da] lonely Iwp evergreen tnga had been a lot nt development '" * mp of ,hr t< 1 Pib4islieil —April 24the RIII started lo ,v ''" P*and On the ground.' within tha last emiplr Ol raan butchers, bul they refused to % %  groan. IIAMKI and kickwl ID the ' u '" ""' > i L|1 nd the other to Colonial Development Corporation alan " w h him. bed and said that her head was tn ** weal of the pavilion. These had established a modem citrus rtcgardles* of what the Other hurting her She bacarna daUtl: WCloaed bl wire lo prevent packing plant; a plant had also butchers do. he said, he would lie MLand died. ahcep from lutim* nl ihem ud leen established for canning killing whenever he geUt an) Police Conttabk! ':*'< Warn wp "grapefrull sections and grapefruit animals Yesterday moat of die attached to Pi-'.iut \ aid thai aMlen ragUaa hi thrown near juice, ami experiments in Ihe housewives were around his on April M m COnaequanM "' "'•' ,u,| >' '" camiiiiK of banana; had mel with stall report, he went to II, v< i ,l 1 1 ,lu %  'lecllne Ihara Ye good success. Asked whether he han not Road where he aged ,M i L l > '•"""•Il War, i. veiling the The growing of bananas was stopped killing beef because he King dead in bat bad %  w urh "• "' U ^' T l rrip h d easing very rapidly and it was selling at a loss and whether On looking at the body he """'i* <' there he would not be still selling lit a noticed that there was a wound Uion loss now. he said that was he on the led side of the bead baton SPECIFY "EVERITF. ' ASBESTOS-CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND TIBIVALL ASBESTOS WOOD. i ', '.-v. '.•.'.•.'.•s.'ss.'ssssss.'ss.;'.*,',*,*,',: -.',-,*,-.',',',-,-,-,-, -, % -,-.. Oarner bam; "Ine Wesi Indies are cosmopolitan. In incse l be found Chinese. 14 all types or races. rts regardrace, the West Indie.; is a "HO man's land." On the other now native oconomically, liniuatrtaUy comAfi ; ,. r Afr(ia F lhls turall) and spirII n leafBk many African* are it6nn& away to Etigland and other counII • ci nelty Eventually the negro race will When MUII 11 colony comaa Into I would spread "a ln..mong other African nom ^ n their European master, formw ^ ^ JSJ Worker* Imlerpaid 1;id my Ua[ u haI if lht n( HJl He said that al present the eyej, no| $ Vf n his righUgl place of Ihe European war lords are under lhe BUn an(| he|p-(| al foeussed on the continent of Africa he road Q progrei i s in a u aPt i v | t ies solely for thh their emancipation and redemp%  Africa Tins is the only lion i iffeetU the "WUh any established colony In A perpetrated Africa, n steamship company could Afrt 1 itlvi %  a bo lonned lo exchange trade beiha Union by i>r Ualan tween Airka and the we*t indies nd bb and remove the now existent Mi. Oarner has put Ihc ques"iron curtain" between these two uon ol repatrtgUon lo Africa 10 puces." .i..uiy of the electorate Mr. Garner said. "If the neuro f St Philip tndi Ihey ire all Yace cannot stand on its own feet %  rovtded they ..re givtoday, it win never be able to. We U %  l..nds for cultivation have qualified brains in every • lock-keeping, all other N ,„oro" things being equal. when lhe Advoeate visited Mr II,. s..id that Tanganyika and Garner he was supervising work Tugolnnd would he the most &udon hlg cosy plantation at Vale aide place! foi West Indians to view, St. Philip. He fell that the Tanganyika 11 3i4,OH5 Mm( work he was doing then, he square miles and the average could be doing in an Afriran ttmperature yearly is .2 defresf colony. Fahrenheit. The crops are sugar. n e a [g 0 has his store at St rice, rubber, sisal, coffee, cotton, phlllp and told the Advacate. "1 Otc. The majority of these crop* i^jya neV cr lW ent to -bed with an are popular with West Indians. c hjpi> stomach, but liam one lo Tliey are also many mineral rea thousand. I know rhere are sources. many negroes who go t lo l>ed •The American negro will have hungry *me night •. w .'?. r VE'S;....„.,,, „, n !" k oi*on unknown REMANDED of 1. idea iioad yesterday BEFORE THF. PRICE ADVANCES I.AR.il. STOCKS (>' ARDATH CORK TIPPED CIGARETTES hMfeOacn of IDs 20'i are rrdu.Nu (Irhrinal ptice 10's< arlon* of UO for S3.00 Bears Ifsretle etursntred in lierfeel ronditfiin. k.MGIHS MM sroitis discharging the 1.100 tons oil mea I she brought here from the Argentine and Montevideo. The Rio JursmenU arrived here on Saturday. She is now going f ml h e .'* ouk '. OH to Tnmpico. Mexico. Gardiner Austin & O her agents. Died Messrs! "> a • kp "r leave it Ltd. are ^fer the speculator has had hi* gain, the butcher loses. When lhe Advcrate mterMewe esligating It." her .^^_^^^_ HEIJ.N. MULLIN ol Ground, St. Philip died way to the General Hospital _. aboul 5.15 o'clock yesterday fc. &f .'.„ %  i- M .v-,** i* ..II,. evening She was .. patient of thi \.8lrOnOIlU k r I .itlN St. Philip's Almshouse and being transferred On Maiden Cruie The 8,150-ton Harrison Luier Astronomer, now m port g^. Nehaul have been appointed charging cargo from Liverpool, S.P.C.A. Plan Mobile Clinic For Animals THE BARBADOS SOCIETY for ihe Prevention ol *' %  %  llj to Annn.ils pcaanntarJ its forty-flfth Annual Report at thi Annual Genwral Ifoatlnfl lielcl at "Wjkelield". Whitepark, last II,; h' Congress of Ihe Wort Im QM 1'ioie. lion ol animals held at The Hague during Ulg ninUnei 1 ini< port %  ppealed to Go\ • eminent to ixpedite ihc enactni'iit of the iiog Ucenatnf bill % %  a .1 ,, ^-operate with the Sol Me APPOINTMENTS A. H. Scaly and G. Assistant Engineer and Draughtsman, respectively In the Public Works Department, with effect from September 1. 1950. Music At 'The Rock** The Police Band will give their usual fortnightly concert at Hastings Rocks this evening. The is 4.524. She carries programme begins at 0 O'clock '5. She will be going on lo and will feature some selected Puerto Cubello and Curacao from song hits of Uing Crosby, who is' Barbados Her agent* are Me In.. , In 1 In 11, Ins and 2 Ins Ml-H Obtain our (JuoUtloni before huylns elsewhere. 5 piece Toilet Sets In Assorted Dei-orations ONLY 114.57 per HET Charcoal Box Irons .ever fastening t. at *4 81 1 .. %  h at 14 II „ has put Barbados -iirst o n thi map" of her maiden cruise She was recently England and loaded for lhe West Indies. She sailed direct for Barbados, taking 13 days on tho trip Captain Whitehouse, wh, tame to Barbados :mmc limes before as skipper of the SS Naturalist another Harrison liner. has brought down Ihe Astronomer The Astronomer's net tonnage Ihe island Plans for the establishment Ol n mobile Clinic for draught animals are under way. Ihe report stales and this has beermade |Hi-sibli l-eeiiuse the Birmingham B r a 11 c of Mi. use \ has donated througi Mr: C. Walcotl lhe sum o ISO 40 with the raqueM I horses, it said, wan willing IO* the Noneu to cam out RUB ai ,(iinn tmii I nit they had n burial around oj money roi provldina tranaport of the corps to lhe sea. Land was therefore 111 il cenv 1 that 1 1 anna Indian, lo give this scheme the %  nd *ucce*s it desires rfty f.f rich negroes arc living in the USA and they are %  m nich I scheme." We wore brought lo the West ^v'/fiAw, Indies front Africa as slave*. Now •"**•* that we have ocquircd the 'know "TJM,,* ,' how" of western civilisation and AMSPM n, iterlally to the Of the West Indies, hut of British reconstructh* (•llowiiui %  lulilllrt Kl IMOUIBIIOII ...itiw paru of Brltlnh Ainu s an Alr.1,1 d4ll t*>*ran 13T3.SSO: --lnr~pr.n V "If SM K-n^ B r>d Prolcrlnratc IStHi %  Total piioiilstlun 5.U3.0TS. Aftlnna SI1B.331. i:*n,u >)U' T.a.,1 population 4MJ %  alpati population ; Mo-i... IMSin anvika 'IMS, aras*a and %  7I.00U; AlrkUl 7JJ. Ml Wm Bho*r-ia <148, Tntal popnI.5S4DSO. Af.l.an. I.SHOOO. toeS llh.-lr.l.1-4*. %  •••* % %  • AtflHH 1 %  •"1.000 ( innciJlor of ihe Exche<*m *.tmt. return lo l:.e continent of Afrir" ST8 %  na..ttn.ia>t(jnst>jpia.. y "Pt T niXA" %  \ noG-niow ; %  see i V ^H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Dutributor.. celebrating the 20lh anni of his singing career thi* week. raooBAMMi: Ar.i#frf. aOtfCfl TIIK WASHINGTON fi 1ST Snuw ftwtture1J-. RIO D'VS IJIU <'A11MRN Rlfrl W..lii irum Tltn rilOC-OI^TK W>I.DDTR Oarar Strnu— 1o PofAilar BallndAT DAWNING • C-dman niMi: SING TO ME Thompao rlpoiirrt— TinSons< nnx rrnaby made I' I %  S, 1 %  -1 Tanfo IA PAI.OMA TIL.Dovr> . Oradler CT— %  m anil THF. WH1srnj AND 111.1 IKKi Pryor Rhylhmlt ; . UOD VX THX I Da Costa & Co Ltd. Initiation The Branch toward thf expensei >>i tin* Pin w FOR *^ WHOLE FAMILY '. f"rtBABl ioti -, li • N-lllWlMlM< ubr> % %  !" aUhaakal Cuticur a X.^ TALCUM ** .>/.! I LIMITED 0/.I.VWI tl4l*Mfl/.K si.ti.tm.x.s in its 11 is CALL AND SECURE YOURS QUICKIY ALSO — DATIIROOM TILES Coloured %  ST T. nERBERT Ltd. h *^T 10 & 11. Roebuck Slrevt and Maiarine Lane More hangers needed? W> havr u \rw Assorlmrnt ol Puinlrd and Dcruralrd HANGERS l..r l)i,-... %  and Skirl. LARGE DRESS HANGERS-Ea SO .14 SKIRT HANGERS -Ea I1.M DECORATED HANGERS—Ea fI.N LARGE KHUS KHUS HANGERS—Ea SIM SMALL CHILDREN'S HANGERS—Ea So.14 PAIRS OF BABY KHUS KHUS HANGERS, Pair *1.8 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET. Agricultural Forks and Sugar Bag Twine Warehouse Trucks ,llli I'n: %  ftni W'hrrl* Full Nlfr — Solidly Bulll 1.SACK CAPACITY Homo (ream Kt'|iaralorw AND SPARE PARTS INCLUDING. — HUMS. HI RBI B RINIiS. PINION'S TOP III VIUV..S II.IHI. SPINTIl.KS DSIVINO HTIrlfXS. WORM WMEKI.S. Ilr. HARRISON'S LOCAL TEL AGENTS 2344 ;-,'.'.'.'.-.'.;;', ;;'.;v.'.l and Swap 'am ... 40 Cards in the Serial. CORNFLAKES tod.yl PERLSTEIN inn ruin HI rt-: BEER 0*-Va. / &f > III III IrV.lf.V IHE PRICE IHC %  IMM I I I SI.OO a lAHTO.N STAMSfEMM. SIOIT A IO.. LTD.



PAGE 1

I nl R' rIVIW\l">S AIIVOCATK PRIDA. \rmi Piloted bj lb* AdYocata Co.. LU. Bro*4 IL. BHdS*lwa \|1T'I %  Irifish And Soviet Empires V\c il Soon See If We Backed BnlrherV llol.ilu* TOE • ,;IS lm,h :;,YlfvC bg lift I uli In %  [,] turbed the cHaMichael without i trnment Ul dtoOUBI the lHIM With %  View U) M-tt lenient. |) on Saiurday itention <>! "*' huu-ln i CUIIIIHII.I .'f Supplies, the GovD*nm*1 i • settle. ,: i n\ iting iiie but make the ncc entatton or lu delegation to discuss it. Mr. Springer styled as President of the Butchers S i\ andout other butcher met thi Controller oC Supplies and the n preliminary .1 to bring sonic man ha Control Board Controller to wttia 'he lanu li twa *h<> ha'i met the i the Colonial Secrtjtarj nor her butcher atl clieduled tinf, [n the mean-time trHouse having mat day did not think the mutter of sufficient imp) i 1 inca u to warrant their attention and so it was not raised in the m adjourned for three Thpublic must in tinIntarlm on whatever the hutcherf ear.' tntial it' m in the ty and it is known that '< i the island who have • inconvenience %  .11 unable to K*M any meat from the i .at They have been in to market and Now they have %  i no meat ublic explanation nor any idei ih meal will be again 'in.ii would enable them to ; The !>.. he beat caaa I!' the other cornmoditlea I that tol runMii • ini %  u inci ea ndlngly will ; i of .Win the. overhead i itcher are likely to There is no rtjfiSPb however to arrogate to themaalvaa the right to take advai I < %  the pabHe wliom they serve nor to bully the Qovenunent whose duty it is to see that the interests of one Motion is nut alJowed to prejudice that of olhers. It was the duly oj the butcban to atig fixed epedaUy for them In braer to arrive al equitable and reasonable prices for fresh meat. They must not be expected to run business*:; at a loss. neither can they aspect to be allowed to i i xorbitaht demands on the public. i thipmertt of imported meat will be arrivnu: in this Inland soon and this might relieve tha aituatlon with regard to the atlbpliea for tome time, but the problem of the butcher and the local Stock breeder will not have been settled and will remain to be settled. If the CunUnl Board is willing to discuss the Mattel with the Butchers in order that the public might haw their supplies of %  i UM D ftcfaerg pania) In refusing Lhepricea, tl 1 Will I taking an advantage of the public without gaining goodwill %  %  If they attend the it is likely that the matter will be nettled SOOn and satisfactorily. LONDON N Hr*i*u of -Rrllioh mri Sovrl Ml StBhl %  '>. Of course. The d.fncultv m < MI'MIUI %  paeaam Hy RaaaaWa, overlook UM >:rcater degree comparison between British and Slahl itabrr. Luodun: 12 ui of Irwdwn fi ;lir person ensuced rulonlul systems IS tha* |Rerrhrd b>:— I> I K< brrttj I .vstetn. little information of Soviet rule a icKa \ system in pract %  tnod of Br "h colonial S ovwhich | S d Soviet system aims ut a un,a.MStahl's book riall of the l**'k she a ., lh( who|e courn^.^ Fftr In h ,. r „ „ )v (lf ,hr British Brttkatnrad %  Soviet Union the "problcniv lyttem Of b M Btatll make? UM ton-inun^N. Ii( a p|urB) sWcly .. exist |inlj tlli . i; nal thc i.nrt fonniil powers that r'"'-i*? .li>mlsed with Stalin's theory economie niai.agement of tht the colonMl Emplr iinere lhm a nation, giving rise t- British Colonies which U no partk-iilar reason tobv nationalttm and a culture Is mainly in the hands of private -.net statistics are dcliorrj^mething quite different from a business — has n cct ice Soviet imperial Govern,-ient In London or in tnc statistics, without knowledge ol ul( wor k s through the positive territories thems-lves. (She note* Misleading), dumination of the federal govMBM slight nreapUoni — tb* few Ne\ertheless. Mrs. Slahl manages tTnrnen i an d the universality of Conservative M.P '| with Colonto make some lively and provolhP power of the Communist iul busln. sv interests But . ompanaons. First, quite parly ^ a training organization, curiously, n %  omits to iLKntly. she seU the scene. Thr x cltlsen of the Central Asian the Colonial Development CorUnion includes five Central Republic who seeks advancement [."ration in thla context). NeverAMan republics within Ule area i n politics must achieve membertheless the haphazard, almost which in i'1'i Atlases was cauM pjilp ..f in.tVunmunist patty. indivertd Bi.tish economic *U-vc! TurhBatan, There, the pe"pl • opment or exploitation — carrier .-.. i•. ,.n c | many still are, Moslems. Incidentally, he cannot obtain ,„ withou' powerful polilica Mn.i r second observation Soviet system." ar e still dealt uf the Exitiequer. la that the colonial population with by men from Moscow. Be"The '' S S.R. has an apparawithin the Soviet Union Is far cauce the two systems arc tus of government suitable fo. out-numbered by the Europeanattempting to do different things sustained imperialist activity. Russian population. As Mrs. Mrs. Stahl concludes that Mrs. Stahl concludes. This b Slahl writes, this "has its advan"Britain's greatest contribution to an unsympathetic but emphatli utges. It ureatlv simplifies racial colonial rule Is political . Soviet judgment t— a, contrast to th. I-MII^ %  Kn in tin, fact, probably, Russia's greatest contribution Is confused bu' Idealistic aims she the next major point In not political but economic; she finds |i. the British Colonial syssivict policy. The Government has given u new time scheme to tem. "That great problem of M Miscow is striving t„ unify the process of raising the materBritish Imperial policy of findlnr ti.peopMl Of too Republics in ial, economic life of colonial ways of holding thc Commonthe Soviet State. The Soviet people" Mrs. Slahl should add wealth together, does not apply t< Union, like the British Governthe qualification that some of the the USSR, now or potentially ir. ment. is a "do-colonising" power, claims of the Soviet rule remain the future T*ere the problem Mir But Britain seeks to "hive ofl" "not proven." Sh e admits that (p, and must remain, the one ol her Colonies; the Soviet Union the theoretical universal educiallowing greater autonomy to It* seeks to merge them socially, lion for seven years is actually a constituent parts within an essen(ulturally, and economically in barely four years education—and uaU/ unified framework./ Viewee the "homeland." sometimes not so universal. The m ,| Hs light. Russian imperla' (M.vernment is centralised In oft-nuoted statistics of the numpolicy, in the lost resort, is I M< -1 State Dean Acheson's birthday to-day — his S8th and Washington cynics The Righi Fighter ty MUGil rXJNDAS A I.ARfiE-fCAI.E air battle was fought over Kon-a on Thursd i.v involving escorted U.S. heavy bombers and Russian MiG 15 fighters. Altogether 225 planes are said to have been involved. Study the timing of this first big clash alongside last week's news of the MacArthurTruman split. It is significant. It means that the world's two greatest air powers. Russia and the United States, are taking each other's measure under conditions which greatly favour the Russians. The Communists have long wanted opportunity to try wt their new MiG 15 Sghtaia a^ain.st t he best bombers and escort lighters that the United States could put up against them. Now they can do so with an absolute choice of time and place and the certain knowledge ;hat their bases are inviolate from attack. Until MacArthur went they could not be cer.i.:. of these two factors. .Thus the Americans are denied the opportunity of even trying to establish the first principle of air superiority—the principle of lestroying the enemy's planes by bringing them to action under conditions of your own choosing. What are the weapons involved? On the one side Superforts and F.86 Sabre fighters. On the other MiG 15s. The Superforts rely for their defence not so much on speed ds on very heavy fire power. A fighter attacking a formation of these bombers is faced by a terrifying battery of 20mm. cannonsall centrally controlled and aimed by radar. I'D CHOOSE— There are few things which I would like to do less than attack such a formation. But ,f I had to do so I think 1 would choose an MiG 15 For these planes are as fast as anything tn the world, and so, having a high overiiknn; speed, spend only the minimum time in the danger area. On top of that they ?arry bigger guns than R.A.F. or U.S.A.F lighters, which means they arc lethal at greater range. The F.86 Sabre, the fastest non-Commuuiot fighter in the world, appears so far to match AUTOGRAPH SCRAPS & SNAP ALBUMS at Advocate Stationery MILK WILL NOT BOIL OVER OR RI'RS IF YOU USE OJR : SAFEBOIL Stand '•SAKEBOILin pan baton pouring in required quantity of liquid—use a medium flame and the pan 'nay safely be left. Easy to Use, Easy to Clean WILKINSON & IIAVNES CO. LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phone* : 4472 & 4687 When painting your property, whether it be : "Arhcjion loid U P fairly evenly with the MiG in performer M, on thr Mae rrsWll ARTIII'R Switch Agi tlu* President that Chiang must j ailCC 'opment. n* not he called in. and that 5 hmb j a !" C „ Manchuria might preolpltata the "'U has one liandlcap: it is comparatively third world war. ( ,n n-rms and in underarmed. Against the Russians' heavv a uluci' %  — %  '%  uf—• i~~—~• i J want it where the West does not Of the stunning de arm not wuttnelo'eMninmTtKat %  ,nn "ritam is In for an awful the itr^t birthday present he '"t * abuse—and not only from could have had was the news Ih-it taxi-drivers. MacArthur had been flred We?" *he goat BRuln. make no Thc suave, mouslachioert Dean mistake about that. The BCTlpp was gueat of honour at a small Howard nation-wide chain • "Rocket luncheon tendered him by Vicenewspapers says to-night:— m All^n Barkley up In "Servinn General MacArthur.. The shadows really started U CollKress—an 1 1 1 1 "*; MfaWlf and. as man> a. Washington's Airport T ^ ot her ,h:n ,s ,hs,t he nr P^'l'<" '" America have thought inir *^ he did rmht or wrong, and what0 r sot ever happens from now on—and anything may—that unusua. man Harry Truman. President of the United States, has once more given proof of sheer 00U ,", ",' It's a ease of the cecky captain ii them ot lhe 1918 war nnn ,,IC "oP^dous general And tha' ain't caviar for the general Era |g 0\er % %  i live long year;, during the big war MacArthur declared: 1 : i. (He u-ns rcferrl'ig to IIM /'liil:i>|ilnos). Then for six more l'ig yet"** %  tft.-i the war he kept saying: "I shall rot return*" (He u-os referring m rhr United Sfatva). Tills extraordin.il> man who wins adulation, hntrcd. and re.spett in almost equal proportions, has not been back to his native land since 1937. Hut now the era Is abruptly ded. And Ame\ ca, not q Now when did Truman last sec MarArthur. and what happened 1 Truman obligingly Hew thousands of miles to have a talk with Darning Douglas on Wake Islam. The ex-captain told Ihe tive-stnr general. In elTect, that he would have to start ploying the game Harry's way. But ba-k" In Tokyo MacArthur whatever hi Pi udent understand, startea again to play it Doug's way something akin to insubordination — contempt evn — for his Command'T-in-Chtcf and the UNO policies. There wafl "an emamous hanoicap" complaint of last December when thoy would not let him bomb Mamhuria. And last month everybody was worried wnen MacArthur suddenly offr*si to discuss an armisUce U) the Held With the Chlnetc | (Ommnnder. (lie Joinl Chiefs of Staff sent \ "tut *hnt used to be called a "rocket" about (hat It's GOM As thougli (IchUt.u lid right oil UM to blo\ m the lid right ofl Uw saucepan, ,y nave let the MacArthur lost week sent a letter to ("onxres-man Jo s eph Martin. the KepublKSin leader, saying that he wanted to use Chiang's troops Behind the scenes the rift grew and that while the "diplomat* deeper and wider. MacArthur were tr> ing to defend Europe who is fervently backed by many with words" h e was doing it wiih of America's top military men— deeds. For a f. i dai x-Captai sure what sort of hero really is began making ft InCTMSingly deal goUtf to show up—cigars, cornthut he considered it unrealistic Harry pum.crvo tol. pipes, dark glasses, ten row* to try to fight a war against the Then he TOT* his daemon, of ribbons, and all—U getting Red Chinese without Well. Captain Marty vou are a ready t<> give him I ticker-tape ( A) bombing in Manchuria; brave man. You have destroyed welcome to end all ticker-tape |B ) letting Chiang Kai-shek a grpat American legend, and u* welcomes back into the picture from ForHere is one thing the Americar.The (MM Aenin mosa. cherish, it i; their legends. goThere are two things which you Unyieldingly. brilliant Dean better watctt out, Harry. should bear in mind in the middle Acheson and his State Depart—L-B.8. OI'll IH VIM Its SAY: cannons the F.86 can only muster half a dozen j 0.5-inch machine ffung. i If more big-scate engagements take place —and intelligence reports regarding the enemy build-up suggest that they will—the R.A.F. will watch results with anxious attention. For extra piquancy is given to the struggle by the fact that (be Russians have great numbers of bombers of exactly the same kind as the Superforts. They are. in fact. carbon copies. CHEKSK-PARINC, In addition, the R.A.F. has no interceptor fighter in the same class as the swept-wing MiOs and Sabres. Rightly or wrongly—and most people would say wrongly—we have delayed in putting swept-wing fighters into production concentrating on types which are slower but have a better climb and greater manceuvrability at very high altitudes. A typical example is the de Havilland Venom, now in production and due for squadron service shortly. There is no doubt that the choice is duo in some measure to cheese-paring. For the Venoms could be made easily and quickly on the same jigs used for Vampires, while swept-wing fighters would have to be started from scratch. Was the policy justified? The American fighter pilots will find the answer the hard way.—L. E.S* -—* 1 Building Furniture a Car jyri'n I Yacht you cannot afford to take chances :• by using cheap materials. So— SPECIFY INTERNATIONAL' | and be safe INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD. DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents. I SlH. I %  %  out readi Ageo ate, in which hi i \li:,i v •.. ry Alms and the persistent plei UnUMdUte help. One n to rcftiMer because I him a rum. i for some already employed to regisior thoea Can't the same method applv in .sed If the Rirha/tm r-.„. B — .... M llmt a.e eh^ble to vole under Inthis ea and nv,,,, the chKsanJ £ 5160 OetE$ISelo } £xZx would nol Adult SufTrase. Taking into ,ondUcontentmart that confronted payers UMtarai aaratkon the rumours rel:it|\-e, Tiinidnd'' money throw %  %  %  I remain Vein i in I\)AS K BejVl %  -. Land that that er is busl%  1 I idioid.t I i Mr. Clarke I Arithmetic lughl ten 110) M i '.is id the regular | while Mi i I wouM make the greut% %  I %  would therefore be able to pay %  nl W-ttcr wane* than his he would have done bettei buatai This l a simple mutter and any. abounds—w> many people being the similar personnel as onu: erai[ LEWIS Hi the slightest Idea of unable to read or write, and all tors duniiR mir Utt ceiums, l| is Water Hdl Land '" %  '• < %  "< ven(> \X IU DO 11, | Mt0 make Uli W %  k .i vei N OOWB T! U thOM thai n HISt M-chnel' '"*!!„ "Uf" I ,' | V *t .' ; tiresome )ob and the otllrer has to ponslb!e for the thorough and April 19. 1951. satisfactory compilation of tinfur. registrntion have not given so imSubniititinjt fj'.S. may have another ; 'T m t Z" -•• Pw1ant a matter tho put li.'. it To The Editor. The Adrocole— answer lor him But my argument """Vf '" ']"-' x *? t 1 ZX£* ho 'i^^V^lV "''* Sll( Tll m M,r " t *"*> uittelly uso their l oud jn aa lr a ra at duty to tlie aesaafa dtay of persone of your leader in to-day'* %  faction Uma, to embatii on .that are entruatad with xu %  .oh. Advocate entitled "SUBSIDISAPulivo Hantt lebour of love and blaiotl tin.imagine Mr. Tnx-d ElementaT) TION" Apart from the lo-s to To the Ediror. The Adrocole. knowtedga aereai the all In the Teacher, and Mr. Log-wori 1; j,., l>r between Jieo.OOO— Sir.—I think I am representing vaiious pan*e* liiat ewryone .:.,,> in.(pector knocking at Mr. *?5o,0O0 for the temporary em" 1C v,,w ,f l "e large crowd whicr may have a real Idea of what l| Wear>'Jones'houw T 7 M &i -k ploymeot of 4,IMKJ Ij-bourers at ''Mened t" ihe police Band al is all -"ut ^ to-iilahi Mr. Wtarj fust i am UM moat, for 12 week*, it h also £L ' %  Peer's Almshoure on I am sure that east night in each rutting ranea and Mr Wears bai u effeet subsidising the haneatWcd,ic,da y night when 1 offer g-' n ; utished ..inner after coasting, end n U of American crip*. The United ^'^ratulationa to Cpl Bernard v -"i^ for the able way i n which surely it would be preferabl. .. spend such a sum on the Eas; Coast rood, as your leader wxitei suggests, or. on beginning operations for a deep water harbour which in the end would be of ever greater benefit to th island. Yours faithfully, DISGUSTED TAXPAYER. rVlrel vtfully riMS. Si Mnhael April 24. 1951. Ki'j-int nil ion 7'. Ihe Editor, Ihe Adrnr Sill.—So much babble ingratUude awer, no person or govemment has ihe rikht to grasp at an oiler far beyond his or its means—specially for so transitory a benethese dfattrtCUJ by th> tieim-n en theii loutl speaker ,MI| carrying his breakfast and waihautci haa every right to obtal .. n :' s *iinwre than aU the Offtcot put „,.. cV ^ |be whole da* bajrat labour ai It Ihttuai tn. Bad ha the Regw. totather. atpocfalry m the voui.t.y ,„,., .., ani hl ir ,„ llftl o[Tcr ^ Barbadmn5 !hould or Voters, wh le tlu He^idistricts where handbills sen." voloal thc next Gencrnt Elertidh." not IKtreated with inura *• UHU a n Whan Hcrephinr'lhavcavote.I. Btwapapai an seMon read, and i nst ..icrtlon. and I am tired that one wooden II Uu Vllliv o( Ulo R J(t ,o Dtatribu away .. Mr Insprctor s ,,, nerves are shocked, for the 1 prlae and indignation which is u t go'great a coat apparent, is similar tn the .me Can this Island afford such a which Mrs. Weary had in tho (ay lubsidy? The beneilt accruing by wnen sltr M tOM at the shop 8 the employment Of labour for so cents is for Ihe sugar when :.he abort a tmK ,..,. scarcely lxdi tf paid 7 cents yeMerriay. and M mflcd with the name more household unabh .,„i of doOon iuvcesa • rely outweigned by H O poster for the Okra ctoaod Lnrtial cost. Nor can the effect Chur.h Street, hav,ra oi Mich employment on labour St. Peter. their hercu wonda who talk know anything ..f l0n )s tirver heard what they are talkmu about. COTM on and help us now, yon As a Heglstering OfOMr myself, "gentlemen of the air and ran I know from experience of tho luallv vou will be helping your 1. 1 that ai nlj way to And many of the > HKCISTEHING OFFICER m 28 A V Bundnys The dim. u> 1 1 at home, IhiuhliDulir* Mi he conducted the band If you saw Captain Ralson conduct the band and saw. Cpl Morris that night, you could have easily KUe'sed that he was Captain Raison's pupit. The rhythmic swaying or his hands reminded me of Captain Raison. Ifis selection for the evening was fine and he and the 3anN'S GIN BURNETT'S GIN COCKTAIL SAUSAGES COCKTAIL BISCUITS VITA WHEAT BISCUITS PATI DE FCHS GRAS MEAT PASTES /\/|\/|N SELECT THESE: FISH PASTES PRL'NKS CHEESK PI ENTER'S MTS SALAMI .1 K it HREAD TOOTH PICKS HORSE RADISH MODERN CLEANING AIDS SHINIO SILVO MIN CREAM OVEDAR POLISH NUGGET lOLISli STARCH—BUcs. STARCH—Pkp.! BEER ,n 1 USA. I uw ro ii., MMor. Thr AAwcde-M ha vuu 1 1 'vhetlicr I is .0 riiort ol capable HCSBANDS. PIIOM: GODBAMtS — H/: DELIVER around which cc-nfi %  nl other than those thut arc for Are catchers to sugar canes, returning' to B-.-'rcdos be nunlmAprll 25, 1951.



PAGE 1

I mow. M'isii J;, ii:.i I1AKIIUKK AllWlCATI. I'M. I M\I"V CLASSIFIED ADS. -iLtFHOHi 1501 r. %  % %  > .v.. %  .chaige up lo 90 and %  additional -era between ( ju MIM i menu la cant* < 13 M for any mut.l*i ol word* and a cent* par word lor e.!i Term, cam J ton* 1*. d pm 1111 fur l*eh FOII SAI.K Tod chare* for at. nou icemen vi ef BlrtJi*, Marriage*. UiUii. A.-kniw MMtk, and In Jdemorii' UN on w**k-d*)i and ir> S.ndayi •or an* numMr a* word* up to St. and S rent* pw word on week-day* and 4 cant* par word on Sunday* for Men additional word. IN Mfc-HOIUAM %  • %  ,i Bl l 'derick V. l\ lard .-> April Evrtyn SUn." |N 'Children• 31 4 M-ln BASTMON-ln eve* loving our dearly beloved dmhirr *<\a • % %  Mr Glen Sheila Barbara M-.weLI. new Eaatmondi mho waa called to r*l IIUi April IS4T Aaleeit In Ca would tlao be an ndvan. tap Applkaati muil not ba mom than 4.'> %  Ind must state age and rationality in their applications Tt H for appointment to the post will I I a medical examination as to his 1 Wi-i-m thorp* ward cea.li Saadowa M u M-Oi j real* word .. -i WMMMm j.rnied and Injured Upaet r.-e liss-i New o"i Coat Oils preaantty. Apply Courteay Oarage t AH •anger Car CAR— One. n a o luiori i.n • De Solo s.niabktor making puk Tyre* very rood Engine In good wo Ing order ITiot.e 34J0 %  XT < 51%  M.iiiu %  Touring vot %  good UNI. Pnonat Oaorfa Mealr 4ST1 or H 4 SI In CA* itxa %  Hah %  M Hi"• > iditton :iall (or I'IIIIH saxn Ta* reafa par aaala tiaa a* wal•<* % %  < d 1] cew n pa* aoa'a Haa ua aaaoMa. niatman ratfrpa W oa f<<-4*y, •4 |l H on i*d*v* REAJ. fcSTATt Dial -le o( Und ( Land aitu..'. mo M 4 MH, 1 will orte* lor -ale by public? competition ai n.y awe* >lda. nui .1 1 pm ll.no.) aqoara fia> LAND at BeaLMUNT adjou inoa.1 W\>oda, na. an aaVliliona. cntrarw. ll, Kua.ei Ht'l AI I H* AVAILAMU UU. SMI K AiacrOBH M.KIMZLS; n 4 si ., ..t land at Woa-ti Road. 0 adjolnlnd tha Fa>u, Boat It C, inaim.ni (' o Ui Sa.lv App. Mi 1 %  IT 4 SI Sri %  ad Btfd hire, Dial S84 S 'AH Vamhall Wvvern. don* ) Sax miiea. aa new. Courteay Dial 4414 Bt c AH One 9S J 1101. laid up in IVL.n BIS or Ml Ipatai BaJaoa h war tscellent arrmt ..Her Phon* L }4.4 SI la. WAOOONOne ttaa v- Ford Statw.i '•rai In perfacl coodlUan Apply BM* r 3143. a 4 11 UJL K'RMTI'RK M i HhowAllrs. Mutila i i te and Kuan Baay Chair, in fine n..d r*i STSoa par pair Alao Ku>h Uotl. m 1'l.ria*! Chair. BIS with Anna 14 M a.d -n lloktain Cow to calve Gave> M plnta with Branch, near Paj.nea i, St Michael. Tt I SI—In RfBCHANlCAL RALEIGH BICYCLE One tt Haleieh BteTtle |t" frame In food cundltlon, c-ninplcle with lock, bell and toola. Price "~ M Phnna BU, Oliver Johnaon IS 4 Sl-Jr, MISCrXLANEOUS I'.IUCK^ H M DM The Old l< r hinldlna or larde alao fireBuck. o Prince Wm K* *-tCHAJ-OT We have ••I. See u. (or m Taylor & Soni e*h fthlpricca John I). Roebuck "4 ret I IS 4 51-bi KTOVKBValor aloalr. 1. 3 and 4 Froarae oil burner Secure youra beire advance In price. Courteay Garaee I1...I 43BI M 4 Sl-dn "You cant be |i Bai „...('. flnoia If M 'lilt HAJfJUSOrl'R rVRJilTUH*: IiEJi find a lane aeleclln. >f Linoleum ai 1 Con* Ie.no. Carpet*. Iud> and Straw Mala". 4 91 li XI t postal £1,000 per annum, and free current for domestic purposes is provided. The ippolntment which wlU l* .,!. lhDaCll Or! .1 tairt* tract in the lirst Inatanea, is sub. jOCt to U i %  the Governor in Council of the I British Guiana, and carries leave phviUgea at the rate of one month for I \i usages for Ihc Engineer, his wife and children will be paid Hi of ,i n taful i| plli nil raaidtni IV. inEmpire Oils Has Interest In 88 Oil Wells Prospectus issued in connection with tne sale o* fl,8M,M of a 1 series "A" convertible sinking fund secured notes of Trans Empire Oils Ltd. outlines the comLercst in producing wells hich it acquired nd "! currant and future developmani ind PXploratlon projecti, As ( i Dtcemlier 30. I50. cOmpajl) SCq U [rtd the business ^l (;!"!-• Ilil CO Ltd British Bmptn Oil Dew > Ltd.. East-U-duc OH 0D 1 Id and l*Uic-West Oil Co Ltd, '">r v >;.. i ;i2ii.f)02 -h.iri,.( i HHITI stock weie issued Interest In producing oil wells are si.iteii to be i's follow; in the l.educ Field. laraal In n wells, a so*; ..tter costs) in 2 wells, a real in :t wells and a ii% In i walls; In the Stattlar Fiald, .1 1001 interest in 4 wells; m tni Itedwiitii Plaid, a 6.8% interest In 4 wells; and in the Lloydmlnster Field, a 3 in I wells and a 25% interest in 10 wells east of the Alberta border Future recoverable reserves of these wells are estimated at 2.42R.233 barrels Company hat five projects lion at our oflke on PrkL>> IHk i I.AUO.R BUE8T a alone wall i>weliing houae and thup -t H M_II.IL. : % %  Pi i .,.. • %  I.H' | m 1 acrea, 3 rood* of :>nd houa.> cunipnaea Drawlna and Dlr.lnc room.. I bedrocien. Toilet and Bath Government waler Inalalled Uier paicelo of Lind conlaiTima re*pc.. Cn lllLUHr-r I i. (uT..ihed. aliuaW %  t IlaUi.heba. St Joaepn. ilormer nu L.( Beachmount ll.iteli iLindlna on J44.433 aijuare feel ul land with .rveral full crown tocoamit trees thereon. The houae at built of atone and contain* open gatlrrtea on two aide*, drawInd and dlnintf rooma. 3 bedroom* with running water, p.nui kitchen and uau'l i adppM (laran and aervanla room* iii-pwti.iii on appIWatlOu U aber Mr H.->IIHIII D The above will be -el tor *. i yard. April ISM at 3 p.m. CARMNOTOW A SEAI.Y. SolicitorlUll Hi AUC.ION By in.tri.--ii..>-. i...u.rt rMNIt VcreUry of the Genei.il Hoapn.l I ell by i-.i ,e %  ni'tr... I %  by Pubik AtatUen <*• Waatoaada. 2nd M.o "I I ...l.-k Hall Main Road. 4th houae ti Soul. Churrb. Ihapeetion on a< UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Mlaa I Hoora'*, G-l "-.. %  laon which Nr.a.14 Tlpi Top Ta-k.. Upeiabl rterbl.e Chalra. Splt.e. BMeboiir inn Uq .or rare, Leather Uphon rua I . 1 Ml I loof l-inv ivery mcei. all in MalWK Ware, Dinner and Te* Sri. PIM Ware In T... %  aTTk. Waltera *c. | | i nraai; Cood I K.-le..m ii'"' S|,n i i; .. iii I Ti.bi.-. and I i ..,.:. M..hn.any Pi.ah Chair. ami Machine, Nme Refrla. %  rpet. 3 llur.ni llw, Town Caork. New Amsterdam. B 27 *.51.—3n. PI HI ir >OI It KS Taa ceata pa* aoafe liae pa, ireeh-da* aaa 13 cenii pee apote liae oa Swadava. %  ,,, r 'Reeoaniaed lor award of Dipaama aa Aarociale or l*eil.. ,i) ajiaalif* Inletua.e Method" -her alaiu. by apare.Ua>* portal aludy For del.lit. v.. acooM 5CMOO! or IKCV. U Duke S4ree. M los w I *n4iand 13 4 113n NOTICE inutanv orvxx ih* u i .• V.iiry of ihe Parlab at M Ai.ii.la be eauaad |o be reduced H-ln Ihe llau-r TANGL1N .ituate at Beachroont. %  athaheba. and dandlruj vn I rood I J perche* of land thereto, conlaimn, Muiuie. Dimn Ron.... rnree douba %  \ bedroorna. ChUdiena room. Three aal ..lie-, hit.-hen. Uaiaale and ..i\am.' room. Furniabed or uitfurnlahad. i Tor mipeclion please telephone 3SM Ofler* to bo tent in willing, u> llir uiiUenineo Yearwood a> Boyce, Solic.tora, Jame%  Street. BtMUetown. II t M an daWOl lor i lie i Ik. k .i-ra al UM %  %  ihe loan t< I \ ..I to* rate a* not <***ed Ml ^ ner ai.num and It I e ,d p.-h A VeekT] l i.ree.lt> ITI I OK IIIM Miai-am rhm-e M ce-ia Xa-dairj week Tl ceall aad 14 jo-da — m* M IHMSIS I'VIII'.O.N I %  ei ant Fully 'umlafaed ..,. >tel area. HaaUrut-. 3 Wdtwoi..*. aaraee .1 -rwi.U room rrean lei June A Ma I'O H..a ta*. IT 4 II dei BOUUMKK. at. Lawrence dap. lull* barnMbaa nui NH aa 4 n an CMArlOOS. and Ave. Belleville Fully 1 1 -t Available Ma) ISth In.pe.tlon by appointment Pr-ane34*1 0.BaM S 4 >t tin I4IST A. IOI Ml FOl IIND SHIPPING HOTICES (Canadian Mational Steamships >"l Till .'' %  "•> • .in Barhedoa ll Apr. 31 Apr 13 Apr lit M .11 May 31 May 31 May ra Jon* 11 J re 1 July • 1* Ju.y 1 A 4 Aug. 13 Aua 14 A,i( %  . Ainv— Bnatae, *\. Ic.h„ Mahlaa 1 May — :: Has %  M 0 f. June June It June ik Juea • 1 l( July r Jeer Aug. 11 HUM Auf Ifta*. %  Sept 11 fcpt TAKE NOTICE That Tlir NESTLE COMI'ANV isr. .i-iirpoi -lion or.. under aivd b. virtue of Ihe |gwi "' UM Slate ol New York. Vnlt.-.i %  IIS. Baat. 44ld Streel. New Vert C*t. USA.. Manulacturar*. baa applied for Ihe rearW.li at Ion ol a trade mark in Pan "A* of Riglater In reapecl of HibaOnce* %  aad Bl food or ai ingredientm (001I. eapaclally product* containing cocoa, Mid will be entitled to regi.ler the aame alter one month Irom the 34th day of \prri. ItM. unlea* aoma peieon ahall 1 1 the me at my office of oppoalUon ol iwh legntialiun The trade mark ran be aeen on ap|-ltealion nl my o .tea Owled tinloth d.. ..( Anil 1M 11 W 11 I 1AMS. Regiarar 1 l Trade Mark* 14 4 II -in H tlllll If.alrnan rboep* u-eel TJ cewll Saaddvi 14 .. '-"1 1 irnti a irord weak—4 *eai "d kaadavi. IS 4 SI I OIK]* who ran u*e treadle %  Bt. I.r Cap-nuMlmg Apply In a* aoon aa pouiii. 1 I Road M 4 11 GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Afenu. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. %  eVBJBM PROM AMatlBllAM MS. "HSCfRA" ITU, Ajirll 1801. BAIIJNU TO PITHOITBJ A sp AMkTKRMAM MS ORA>jntTAt>-1HI, April 1I. -tlUM. Ill T.I.MHAII rAimtino VMi i.liilii.i l-in s Ulh April |M. I ITUA 3Jrrt A.ill ll. -MUM. IO TRIMIIMI | \ ,.( M (V < I N\t AO aa, YCJ HO I \'i\ I.., ..ur oa*H-e Age IB M. | 1,-M. knowledge M Book-oik Sbi.rUurad and T>iiiul an.1 Ire uu-k add intelligent Good, aalaa/ Apply bt h-Her C B H.cr M 4 II-tn MISIKM ANKOIS omi between I., I 4S10 Ratefl of E\rhung< t w \ AI'KIL aa Cheque* on Banker* SO I I 1>, ....i Dralt* MM 1 Sight Drill. r* %  10I %  W.I. Putting Up Very Big Show At B.I.F. LONDON. April M THK WEST INDIES section m the Brttlah Induatrfw K.ur lhi.s year is expected to mab' a great imnression on hundreds •>! ihousands of people \t'ho throng to Olympia. (iiurqi' Huberts from Trinidad, employed by Ihe West India Committee, thinks it is one of 'he bigtjest shows ever put up by Ihe West Indies. He ou^hl to know, for this LS the HHh year he has helped to atevmMr stalls. Today %  packing ivaist dtep In kind When tie Iheri will bo .1 special Offl IT to %  tarl i"i+ of Leduc near Mic-Mac D2 oil well Nil 1 has recently been drilled production in the D2 7.one :. will commence in the early spring on well No. 2: U>) lOo'; interest in drilling out three prospective sites at Stettlcr, ad"ng the company's 4 D2 producers and 1 failure; (c> 40% interest In further drilling In the Mashaw area, scene of recent D3 gal discovery; (d) .ratable commencement of a well n Big Valley and (el a geophysical mrvey covering 21.000 acres in leuth Princess area. Statement of combined earning! if predecessor companies and in-ludlnii operations of TaylrPetroleum Operators Limited, wholly-owned subsidiary which "iipervisea drilling opcratii i^iven for the liscal periods 'MO, Inclusive. Net earnings be•nre interest, recovery of develop ment rusts, depletion and taxe%  •mounted to $580,228 In IM8 U9IJ11 m I9 and S582.457 ir 1M0. After charges, including -rovision for recovery .? ment cosU nf 68,03. 7l*6.6fiJ and 8559.145, resoeclivelv ITM 8100.080, $48390 ane 1 057. re*' 85,000 Tons More For U.S. NEW YORK. April 25 H. M. rowktr, President of the Newsprint Association of Canada today lolU Unlisd Stilts pu bU sl V ers that they would probably receive close on 6.000,000 tons of newsprint this year from all MUilir Addre"mg the United Statey News^itper 1'nhlr.l.T A*".i 1.1tion, he added: ••That will <•< S5.000 tons more than you received in 1950 and about 65,000 tons more than you consumed in 1950." cartons • %  nut n the exhibition hall his section of the itvovi that openn on Monday Grouped Together Slnllre preventing the CarlhIHMII will !• gruuped tonelher M lWQ suits of an aisle running through an area allocated lo the Commonwealth. Five stalls will be devoted to British Guiana, Jamaica. Trinidad and TOtaco, the Windward Islands, 11 B What Ihe Wi-^1 Indlig w.m! |1 nl> (1 'in ill raf the worl.l t(. Ml sent over in and three airliners. The S S Planter has unloarlem<1oii thouch II has appeals! nt one btg He said that in 1945 when ntksalni wi MHI In (orce lt*> consumed 3,480.0011 tOfl TPatO would theref%  % %  1 tons better off in 1951 compared with 1945—72 per cent increas, supply in six years, he aajd Nearly B0 per cent Of I ITS. 000 tons woultt probably come froill Canada, almost 200.000 ten '<" overseas and the remainder from United State? mills. Kc.wler said —Reuter. .•.V.'.WS.WA'.'.V %  .-.-.v.:-* In Touch . A amall quanlllv of IhLa a o i p"' material atlll available l.\ WORKS. Bay SI"rice 4dc per gallon. Get Some To-day. noon THi.XiiS tor YOI7 WINCARNIS WINK Urea ii"i. *2.88 Small Bolo. .. S1.56 RF.SERVA WINE lartr Bon. .. $2.38 CRAWK1RDS (Ll'E CHEESE BISCt'lTS Tin $1.26 PEEK IREANS I1ISI IITS in TinOLIVE OIL—la Tint IIEF SAL'CE in bols KM II & .i|i|..l i.in %  BLACKBtH K'' s\l ( I l.„l. J8 .24 EOR GOOD VALUE INCE & Co., Ltd. 8. 7. 8 1 Roebdrk Street. | Dial 3238 nl and Tobagi We Hi iir on rum and sugar. An gostUra Hitli-rs. nils, asphalt and handici-alti. Ihe Windward Islands will 'shov. the world some charming heach hats from Grenada and St lAicia. Tin i. .-ill D4 rows uf hottles and slat bl Of J.I of I M %  :i. fuava jeii> end boacea ot Lbe %  Barbadi>' tot*]rin| at the Brttli ii IndU h >K.i %  for the lirst tini. the war will show off all sorts of things h*aa) %  i.'.ii !' % %  %  t" in • '1' %  i > % %  Hauler. BARTER NEW l.KI.IU A 28-year old Indian bought .1 %  rife for £30. Aft.'i three monthi he exchanged her for .1 British •003 pattern rille. Kcvently lo ma >< iitiruod lo tight months' | 01 priMiiiineiil ftu carrying an ui I gun, which u %  \iB$$*mnrfs t/ii> 4111 it ill **f .1 .Xoir Ship,1,1 ui of J SHOES I liwts wim.: M-Buck &. KID Backless & Toeless with Dutch Heels ^ LADIES' 111 \ K SUEDE & KID IJIHII KY BUTCHEK Alms. "Francis" A'ldn-s Nui :.;.! ! Michael. ARC: 40 years. • Colour; Black. Height: B ft 4 ins. Iluil'l: Medium. Face: Long features, RMIgh tfld f: .'wning. Jaws; Sunken ("iu-.k bOMB! ffifjfa rn.ill 8CBJ 041 left. Mouth: Corners white. Teeth: Some of ULtpi-r frtmt DUMUlg, Hair: Receding from front of head SB patch. Anyone Rivini; any information leBfJ man's arrest will be suitably rewarded. R. T. MICMH CommiiBiioiter ol ; ;.liters, 25th April. 1951. l-3n. Backless & Toeless with Dutch Heels h (IIIIDIIEVSWIIIIEKID SHOES Backless & Toeless — Sizes 8-2 *> i; ^FAMS' WHITE KID ? also Brown & Black Patent — Sizes 3 — 6 i 11 Mills IIAIIIEK SUPPEBS with Soft Soles I S Wm. FOGARTY LTD.



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PACK I WO HlKHAIMiS AMD, 1 IT: FRIDAY. APRIL It, 1M1 Ccuub gaUmy M' ; B.B.C Radio Programme and NTOU.MEYER -.ic Commliioner i B W.I B.C rltAamaj. camp m on Utc BW.I.A.^JUghl from Trinidad ^B-'rn.ng on a two day vwii >QE1> hers have disammmu rjf )' %  A iioi 3> Weat Indie S i fl.i w Rrrlith Vree Consul Manaos M i: ANI have ram* nil the way from lo Barbados for n holiithe Hoo IB Manat* %  %  .: r nyei leu ji.irs rtie\ toCiwo or thnv month* .urn <• i-WhitunR th.-lr Barbados %  m yre FT%  I Five Year* M R HOWABD I I'SM I ii. the Sydney i Dnigidsb. in \ • An American he hai i-ren livinr In \'i :.i %  .; i if*. Ill" U on a nvi his wire i fmil> wlm ailthe Paradise Beach Club. arrived f v. ARTIE'S HEADLINE Up from Grenada M CARMEN MIZRAMI .irnvcd from Grens i -. rtiNi I \: m teuU^rn ImnM, OTVMMU. %  —-win. at m, ? „ 0 | Ul Writer Do.. 11. | a n T*le ffci HitCbM Dwn. II IS m %  '" %  r.nun. P. rxtr. II ,. ,„ |.i.tt->. r" n< ,: "J* • m Wo,| *-".-{* ninoix Ttw Nrw.. u 19 p m *'•' Analynl.. II IS %  m (HH D.wn. IB ;* S in. Southern smiiaM Orrti*.I %  m -*..rti.< Ir*.. M t-npi 0*1*WerlTTll p m Juki Music IV >m. PMP Coop-r s 00 p m Mefrtiwvl Navy PioflianuiM. r. IS pan Rebuild.!* in laMMl i Cnrd. 141pm Pi*.-mlh* p,., dl ..•—: is %  >. ekauaf' • n>l)ii< T 11 a ti %  c.-ii •• pas Sew*. T 10 pi> JAXKTTA r Broad Slrert %  Mil SS SHOP I Man Ovn• %  • DRESSES of all Types Ready-Made from London Also Made-to-Order HATHiNfi aurra uMQgsa trtoi K N COCKTAIL HANDHACiS IS/TMI I III till I rhIDAT lo RCKKAV s JO p in I IVBftlAO. ."ICTURTK PT-HMI, l-ro^-nl^ If. Top. AdVM 11 ArUon' T^^lll• lu flfti in Brauly and Bonly "BUCCANEERS GIRL" m TDCMNCM/>B aiaarm. VVOHNE DrCABl.O Plltt.1T s-RDWD 'v B*TBAI US HHuU'v .'d IK. pand ..i Hm-n iA IB"I Mil<-..l shurt. MAT %  na ils Thaw Ttiu n"l I IS OMnaeea irf Tha Wk l^w m(iim|v.w. t|> m Kwl K^idnioBh; ltw pnl an I-VIH liniFN tnF IO 10 p m From IK B.W.I.A., for St. Al :ti. noofa "i .' Kltta vis Anslgua on a thraa wool o4 \rrifiupb in, Caracas. button hcv „,„ sw „. i L Tnl .„. w c ,p rtajing al thi II drilling tools lh ,. v w(l b^ 01)< rJle ,i aiecirically, B| Lawranea Hotel. "ZZiJH Th door s wii (i ... X ^ P'-* of llverv C.B.C. PROGRAMME GLOBE THEATRE TODAY and CONTINl'INC 5 & 8.30 p.m. rniDAV. Apri put — 10.lt pjn. ilary. 10 a* p.m Canaaliai m si M. Adn.inistrator Intransit south America M and wlll pm lh(lll ., (n ls lf (lvil s „. !" J ^ „ unour Mf E p Arrow '"" vants. For the dois arc to fcTrace Bn nlh, Administrator of IJomiim ^Lr. ?, B ,ne ,wo mam < ntra r< s *" ,,li ivbo had been in Grenada attend nun one new Government ofnecs now |n g t he Administrators' conference -r. —. going up m Whitehall Gardens. wmcn Wils presided over by ti I wrr^Amencans overlookin;; thiKmbankment Governor of the Windwa i atla.'.p The Air Hlalstry on,i the Board Emliasav ' Trade will OCeuP) the litiildin Mexico *Jchft had been on n hi* Khort \imt here Inft yesterday Win f„r Puerto : IIW.I.A, f3 doors' Ihe flrrt leg of hi* Journey home _ n rrom B.Ci. to Nyasafand 2IR FREDERICK SEAFORD. dlret<.i ,( BooMb Hrither% Waldf siwnt thai i here Bavaral riaaSsJMffl "' r '' M R JOtJJI DODGE, a at tlaAmerican I %  2n.0D0 for tha j The British I.T.I Tom Burke, American Vice (I .. %  .,. %  ... -, -.,::. I hoh• the Crane Hotel. He 0 Jiere for a i-oiiple o* klVaW and v ill ->ooii be return. | I. fj AttrlSutrs of Old Age 'W/HAT > %  "t exactly, beln: Wold" W'H. il ;ill depends op who you an.1 l>oxeiof thirty i: an o'd man OJ; a lwxer. We ttar; to a • down (he hill phj of twenty—yea, twe n ty; %  nr 3o hour ripe, from hour to hour Islands A) p Iran II on the same plan for SI Lucia WAS Mr. Handy Gib wfto i' >> lib International Aciadu Ltd., in Trinidad. Short Holiday M R. AND MRS LESLIE HEATH are in Barbado. rho ho %  %  Enojaod lor a four day holiday accoml to Wl I Ind initd by their son Gerald The> Will shortly **' undertaking^ anHew in yesterday from Trinidao other trip %  broad At the end i-f by B.W I.A. where Mr. Heat! the month he Will By out to Nya< Ii an engineer at Forrest Park land and Northern Rhodtala lo E-stale. They are staying look over iin Inter en of cacrobo r t:* but our brain power. mental alertness, is at Its best tre about thirty usually and it gtea On about the *nme level, very n ltV difference at all, PS. I .ml. Utklna In n '" I 1l.an VoTnMik*" pbell. Hooker Cartel i kttarj ol Bookers, it will be > %  i k'S first visit to Africi ,. BtS expects lo l-e therr aboni rot and month. Specialising f TARRY NAIIAIN. Mat b .,n..n chemistry student in upc tiali'iii* ..1 Iht OhH I I I l'..lvl<.hI I.I I. bsteauoti lo i"i'i the Oovernn w Servitc on in return to Barbs* clos Seawcll Shorts C OL. K. I. D. STEWART'S nation when he left Seaweii yesterday *•& "K Haven", st Peter, He was one of the passengers arriving from Grenada by n.w.i A. . Off to Nw Yi i k via Puerto Rico yest.i.l.i, went Mrs. Edith Friedman and her daughter Ingrld. . Mr. .in.Devatnt who flew in from sr i.in in oval the weak-end re turned yesterday b v B.W.I.A. AWVENTI m.s IMIA BY THE WAY ... , *Kam H EART have win we are discussing be Coekleearrot: Mr Fuiiiblini;, wouldn't you %  gree thai the M lest way I OU no hat at all? Fumbling (pw tied); Of course \n Won/. Wasted A PEEVISH writer producing riahoniti and ssrcsi I tence* abul a poUUeisn mlsstd Art Bompleti ly Into my ml&d came that nUfnlflcenl of Mr. nn in. BeUoc bo Ramsay MaeDonald akc you Take Unmoi t;ii with puTJVDlrlG ojueatlons bean asktd about the %  baenoB ol the exquisite Blopcoraer from the jiim borees connected with the Feetl \ i I conceivable ihm. ti n :iv ourii then Heit for this rose : DOOdT She DM been little before the public late it Crorn a e ni Sh4ftfnold as Miss •ustbiD, ami n brief visil to Runcorn si the Baulage and %  Queen of ifi.il. One cpi((rum her Inactivity is . u . ,, u i SO flnlckl When she -" H '"" ". %  Ww< to christen the new B'O Hen UBI not hrnadrmil ! gas container al Shrewdleigh. she "lie o'clock lost iii u hl. as the %  d to be IflSSSll by Councillor second ait <./ %  Msagsm BHtTerfl|f' < Tudni;u-h Fmmbilmg Hefurv ihiI'nmmhxioii M il. VINCENT Fl'Mlll.INCi was Questioned by the Com mission yesterday at King's Knueklefurtl er. Mr-. Wretch askid him why he could not sleep in an ordinary bowler with a brim He eatplsined that the brim would get in the Way Of tlu pillow. >bWirteb: Even U ftta Ke down slowly ami careCUUy? Fumbiine: Yea, unless I held U i n with both bands, tvektrearrot; P e i h a p %  n brim would be possible? M.X WresfJu Oi .. hardi i brim, %  UM the pillow, and thi head? "Ziup" Malncr: A cap is the %  %  leap Miss Quay ling: No doubt. But i Cos r bi/oi Garde i tt'errai Hi (News item.) S UBE1 v even the millions w re chained to their radio sets will see the fun in thai bll of news, Tn Hi.Tunv of 'Drumromlm Rnsr' A LARGE picture, demonstrat Ing thi horrors Ol going bald, brings unbidden to my Upi the ..ii to a i ing b) | bald Hairy .._ You are ivri; proud ol* pour man? of liair. |NN foroollen llitj jnpe? Jf is oi'lp ilie hair Of) a uooseberru Tnnt diilinuuiihei II from a grape. Rupert and the Ice-flower—13 Koprn itktS downh.ll. and hi ISII hi* ft ira.l nenki i hn iptsd. **W"d eatc m tut ihc ice H ton th oil* He pu ': i %  I ft slop. Thrii lopt i :oppki id ihcy oo skidding t ghi o. Ihfl l.kf. Bil od. hf II UM .vf thtrrtully In Rupert. "Oamf oi\ PJI to m." h< 0 .-. "h'l in..M and l ,. iiu t r u QU I IStt." MEN'S WORSTED TROUSERS 817.8.. BLIK ATW V BKOWA YOUTHS' LONG GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS *.ia BLUE PIN STRIPED SUITING SB.. !" SPORT SHIRTS s:i.-io %  .TS ..i:i MEN'S PLASTIC BELTS lie, tS% .t.tc, .V BOYS PLASTIC BELTS :I8 C EVMS a WHrrriELn., CROSSWORI i %  r %  J--B ( p | ::_ : i r _, ~^Z Zl %  r^ p r %  Hi -^-^ r r XL r r -1 r %  .Or Urn ur h. it Uis %  ft Sound. wnm Some uu sup or i NH ibei il^rs IXIimp* Biunsd i I tattm a nit iwou ifits 1 v uoinealicaMO HI n Broften bone i4l II tk>rl ur.Mi you'd lose a A* Mm tor nlon. U. Airs*. (Si three l. Carpst msli-riai (Bi 1 rat in %  nil i Have VJ ItoroM hi MS a O.S IS I iouteomv oi a a-mi mi i Not a* mum i*i a rney eouid min • re Vouns nH'P iSi IM Veoiaoie nut .AY 4*1 *30 T,"in L U Po— • NOT WANTED MII.MTS: AT I I.. I ISIANA Jlmmlr DAVIS PLAZA oivrix DIAL 8404 INltiri Hit' rat niosv or MAWUI Calui b. Teihnirolor wlUt BBtn I iianald Smrlej Tempi* \„u M< AUaATTJt and i nils i wiawn Hmi>pta**v BOOAKT and EWrw PABKsai v %  I M I Ol INI 11 SOI I Ann Cllim ana UKIIIIN Kill—T.m SUMM1 I. All! V (THE GARDW) St. James FRIDAY in SUNDAY I 10 o ny MATtNEt SL'NDAV 5pm LOST BOUNDARIES Siamni Btrlt* PURSON Mel rraUUOR Cannda IXI %  IO (illND i >II>IIII: TO-DAY >i .'i Only Republic Pictures presents Tin; 3RD MAX TO NH.lt I si I M . & < "I'diunn.: Darrvl F. Zenuck presents Irene DUNNE In •• Tin; MUDLARK wilh Alee T.UINNESS A Constance SMITH HOW TODAY lo MONDAY 4 36 and 8 16 M-G-M Smashing Double . Bobert TAYLOR & Robert MITCHUM imDBt CNUUSVT' AND ucin FALL msr nnhert MONTGOMERY Rosalind RUSSELL ROYAL TO DAY to S1NDAY 4.31 and t 36 Columbia BlK Double . Robert YOUNG Ac Marguerite CHAPMAN In • RKLE.\TLESS ( AND %  L IST FOR GOLD" Starring Glenn FORD & Ida LUPINO OLYMPIC TODAY to MONDAY 4.30 and K 1:. Universal Action Double . John WAYNE & Randolph SCOTT in •• THE SPOILERS AND %  •tWKTA SI.WERS" with John WAYNE & BrodricK CRAWFORD EMPIRE THEATRE / 11-11 II II. -IO /i. III. iiii.l I mi I in ni HI/ It.lll.y Hi 1.1.1 A U..IH p.m. A MM If.I AS POWERFULLY REAL AND EMOTIONCRAMMED AS LIFE ITSELF .... IT'S A MOVIECOING EXPERIENCE YOU'LL NEVER FORGET! %  ::'.'.'.';;/.: %  .:'.' NOW STOP THAT LEAK IN YOUlf ROOF We offer EVERITt CORRUGATED SHEETS RED CEDAR SHINGLES ROLL, ROOFING — Plain ROLL ROOFING Rd ri it II PINE DOUGLAS FIR w4CHforiZ&a£ SALLY FORREST KEEFE BRASSELLE • LEO PENM iND-.w.,llM[BCll,,ON s,-IA\ Af.L IIS Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirement* IN GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranging Irom 14" upwards MILD STEEL Flats, Rounds. Squares in all SiZM BOLTS & NUTS-All Size. FILTER CLOTH-White Cotton Twill At PRICES that cannot be repeated. DIAL 4220 $ Thv II I It It IIHIS Ml XIHtY 1.1,1. J DIAL 4328 '. %  .: %  .: %  r.::::;:;::::::::::::::;:::::vs.:::l.:::: White Park Road, St. Michael FOR LV1 < OI.OI It SCME3tE 37^ to $1.29 AT THE CORNER STORE 1



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PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. APRIL IT. l51 DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW Tins GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 24 21 Pkgs MACARONI 35 31 Tins JACOBS CRACKERS 171 143 Tins PLANTERS' PEANUTS 96 B Bots. GROTSCH BEER 24 I* Gums Bleed! BtaMIBf 0IM lor. Month •** l*~ M.Ulh -.11 %  > •• ••" 'f*'* f* %  .., Met m eetur. o •••**'* Araonn ?• •••'•" Par >frrfct %  > % %  > NHM MORE Cough Relief! Eh woth.ni %  lkl : !" u Vlck Coogh Drap m^S"* diy, icriulri rto*> U full minu'tt. D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street v'^A^v^-.'yvv^vv'-'.n.^-.v**'^'-'^'-'''''*'^''; Birds Of A Feather by ANDREW SPILLER Strictly Speaking by JOAN BUTLER Curious Laughter by HOWARD KIRBY Modern Colonization by R. J. HARRISON CHURCH \l>VOCATE STATIONERY SAUCE WITH MEAT IMPMIVES THE MEAL sjy0txs II.P -Mil — i Dtietlive Relbh BRANSTON SAUCE (b Crose* 4 Black writ) r UMGfl — \Voreeter*hlre Saure BLACK BITK — Wr.-eeitenhre Saui Li:A & PERKINS IIOLBKOOKS FARROWS „ „ FOOD lUllMi COCOMALT — a Malted Feed Drink '<\ -Al.TIM: — A Frrfeel Fend Be verier MHO (kv N>-.I1.T) a Forllfled Tonlr Feod • \( rOOBM '' Ne*Ue*> prepared e* -Ull> lor liifint Feedlm TOMO — t— The FMMJ lirluk for Sound Sleep. OilIH II THESE ERO.M... ALLEYNE ARTHUH ii CO., LTD. ••># i.not EHS"





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r.u.i i i< .111 II.\KI1.\IH>S ADVOCATi: IICIDW. APK1I. n. 1MI Ever ton Deal Pickwick-Rovers 5-1 First Win For Season EVERTON Victniy for the season uhn UHT beat Pickwick hich a Oval > noon. Fat %  vert in three goals while tt YMrwo.Ni MMd ... the Pickwick I. forward scored the lt i nit team ; Reece llm in Ihe goal, proved an Pick wick R was backed up b) tin kicking ,-t Black .• . centre farward in the second hjir of the came. Jones, thr P Rovers forward Mated Reecr on many occasions ertta wall platwi shots and right.wjm;. played u good game toi The game opened with Pickwick Rovers defend HIK thi south en<: of the pitch Wells on the mowing soon after the kick off received a long imss Ira wards and eras run unmarked to icon when botli Everton backs Intarc one of the Evei n try at the Pickwick coal about five mlnii'half but th.baU went ..' -i i Resistance The Evcrton I moving down to Uia 1'KKWHRovera area bill %  put up stiff regM were BO* Wftmt on tw„ %  forward for Plckwick-Rov tested Re> Pickwick Hoveis Foster also had a bu Wime and Bis** trying to icon. At MM I After balf-Um took the Initiative and about no minutes after the second hall started. Wood Ih fas Bvi: ton In w a l e e In Uw Pickwici. : ly after. ed in Ih. aaoond goal afw pass out-.: k* Rov<. .... i %  nitely on the aflgfieive and about two minuteslu*r the %  d stand la Ihe X Header %  A irk -Rowi-. loa] 81OJ fourth go < HALMWi.t M\HH NOMAN sixth hole Thi' hoi on N1DA in a challenge match with Bobby Locke plays hi* tee-shot to the green at the hort 4 yaids( at Mowbtay, near Cape Town, while hts opponent look* on. t halved In three. —Erpreu ftrat goal Held and unmarked took UM obporl %  U now 4—1 In 1 . down on i IHe BDlBUtaa bwlOK the t ,,l... Blades l %  i %  ii '''• %  Iftli goal for K. The r. ii Bwwrtan i Raece, Culpepper, a k Haj Blades Hope, ktOtTaJ wood Plrkwlrk K veis : \l Lwi.s, Hunk % % %  me, Carti Kelly, Wi "<1 Foster and '( %  W The Refer* S. Afrirurf IVani Ha> One Day \tauh LONfX>N. A) BajgdajMri pell of summer % %  in Leodca) & d to Sooth %  store :it Maidstone yesterday against a Uw Kent captain i Hark •.*> serious %  gavf the Boutfa inea to loosen up. %  Hire wickets fell for 'he first two from the %  Martin loutl \.. H I%  %  not out ewnturj %  souin Afrtea ii for i j won the game Clark*! rad id ITO for thriM' I were alee la the :i lawn basal whet. ludlng three of i %  Davl Cup Regatta On Saturday The tevenlh ragaWa el Lie 11*51 %  1: le Bay to-morrow, under the auspices' of thii yacht club. time ind handicaps are :,lollows:— reached Ok the Suricv li.irdioiirt, men' 1 i only Tony Motigtand'i number one. and Padd) Roberts—remain lo chalrnith African bid foi Hi.' ill. Heater. 8.G. WILL PLAV HOCKEY IN TRINIDAD GOALLESS DRAW PORT-OsT-SPAlN, April .'I n eta A*1.11 II .j i i .iv gec< ptad .'it ni\ i 1 %  [dad Hockey %  I | . %  here for | Wrlai of lidei.oloniiil i June ii %  %  lied Brill b 0 %  .i .i lo, : it., i : 'IV i IM. s. V.. 1,1 Marl -i K.I 11 H .. llrd ;. %  Jil TeUwa i> SMMM 1U ke 2.M B.-.I i w i> i IS 1 I NaaM %  % %  1 Fantaa) RiHi-aawr j;i4 I1.-I D Teas* %  Okapi 13S e..i a BaaMi 1.W Vauaw i n 1 1 n. 1W %  IM. IM yellow D -' bwp im neri %  T %  %  Ml 1 fettea n*d h Oip-y DM 'is I M V-lhK %  t Had i %  Eaah141 s*s Veil... ;. 11 %  I II laagwMi K..I H i %  lllVXl.l %  : Tenaw i .'U Had i i K K > %  %  1 1 Veaaa 0 >M YsHaw Kid K.if|>li (rivos Fill*' Displuy •r-otri 0 %  senskaMU I'ORT-OF-SI'AIN April 24. Ki'l Hitlph. Barhndoughti Isjht gained many aupi.i hU bout with Gentle i ijiivc a line di>eck in :m eight round %  sBnsrttM The Barbadian who Ii 24 yean old is vet> stylil'. and also thowwd the large crowd that he could be rough if required. He' -' good left hook, and at tunes was a very diflicult target to hit as ho kept moving away from many punches. V Hal"* on Today i I.IM. < ..II.Iiii Mam. I shiiui %  ( BritMt far Ibbeaa Carrenry Notea al (be I^ilalatlve < i. u .n rhJmber—10 00 a m. •G House SpeighUtown effered for %t ( nureh SI, will be le— 2.JO pjn %  diee rUnd t'oneerl al llailings Km ks X "ii ii in. ^Slw third Wan M.,.14 1 ROMF. April A U-zd: in i %  %  posed i.t %  hr Paulo and Bangu I Lezto. an Italian I % %  ..i, rough and goalhi here today. i.oOO r-necer Uw a fast-paed n-im 1 Ut bl shine, but win the absence of Bra Zudnhu (Inside with a sudden i He ' Jbbe. who ba turn by reservist Trlxcrnhii The BrailUani wara superior throiiKhout the they lost many praaalalnd chsaeei • of the lutlian oofnpUcatad passing and r of the ball. Toivi'Thhii in the attack an half-barks Alfredo wore In v l kul nUtad io SM ihrougl ed the %  tsNwaton la %  • hibltion of bail conl r) ater. Miii ii i nil La 58 Mbvefl Vo Draw LON1XJN. A| The eighteenth game in the World Chess Championship match bt l waan Mikhail Bowlnnik and David Bronslein was drawn today, Moscow radio rcpoiied. The game went to SB mawM Iwj stands at BUM next game in tl played e: FI.I;. Rvater. By M. Harrison-Cray Dealer : North. S A K I 6 J11 • u in • %  fill* m i tl &f • %  SUi turn, i i a % %  %  %  •in Ua ISO. Ma. rnnndi %  i M,> m All! %  outh had to mage thf t*v hid on Hiehand ll play. In boih roi opened One DMU bid One i: made tlir lot TwoSpudea. BeW No-Trump Jumped t Tins strong bkkjing i. %  %  both Bouui playi i %  Fire Club., v. still ace too man' hand av! A was oi HtUe He tiWrafori helpful cm ".'I ol Diamond! ami N i ruffed lao saial Dummv to nisi I ,udW's" Witter Polo This Vflcrnoor THERI will i Itch .it the lUrl.. leg Aquatic Club this between the following Iwo teaou Team • A' R< bertl Vidme. Vggi Pitcher, Jean MclCwnoi 'tonothy Wairen, Jovce Allen, 1 tylor and Ann reom B' GUI Ogle, rV*ede ".irmieh.i. I. Chrl Chandler, Juna Hill. Ann itaison and PhyUli ntgpatriek m i i a i H.ith t. .,!•.. are .,sked lo be n the pier at 4.4ft p.m Match begins at ft p.m. After this game, another practab will be arranged be twei %  UH otswf bsdtai turned up for practice. The Weather TO-DAY Sun Ilines: ft 46 a m. Sun sets: A :io p m Mo.in il^sl tjiurlen: April 2B i IghHag: ( lit m. nigh Water: mil a m., in % %  VKSTFRHAV i: UI.I H < %  %  i%  .i .-..Nil Total lor Month \m Veter agfl S 1ft In nperalure Mi. Temperature (Mini: Hind in... '.. % %  tl t: s i:. i i p m. i Wind Velocity: 10 n hour Barometer: l Ih. II A I A.. M. II. s ( tippm. Han made arrange mrnl. wfe Ihe Urn. Ii < ooiiiil for player* and other* inlere-ded in feolball to see three training hlirr, at Hakelleld entitled M tack'. Ball (ontrwl and The fireal Game" NCCONO DIVISION ( irlton vs. Spartan al Bank IUH THIRII DtVISION College fg, Wanderers g| College r'nuniLiliun g f'nmbrrmere at Foundation I MIIHN v.. < uh..,, t Blaek Reek Regiment vs. Fverton JI f.arrUon Police vw Notre Dame l Park BAftKKTBALL < First Divivlnnl lortre-* v*. Plekwiek at V M P C. II C O B vs. II C. af V M P r MTBtll. lonnH-iion C-'Hs' v Ommm'* Cclle*^ OM Cllrl* at Queen's Cnlleae BJOCKR A demonstration hockev match will he plated it Kenhluiton today at 4 4ft p m Thi* is to awaken interest in the game, unit men will be playing dunn; the first half of the game In the -.errtnd h;ilf. eight ladies and two 4'embermere: boys will lake over from ten of the players of the first half. The leatna are: < %  Jane-<. T. Knight, S. Dungney. D Wurme. Adaans (Comber n:erei. A Farmer. i> Bad ley. George Allen and two policemen: Warren. J. Worme. Taylor. M. I.earh. M", %  R N. Turner. Kelly. Col. Mtehelln. M. stoule. R Craney. Edward*, and a member ol the Police team The I idles are: Mm Well" Mrs. Lewla, Mrs. Roger, Mm P. Pitcher. Mm. M Grtnith. Mta Pam Ofwga. well. Mi Worme and Mbs Jean Chandler. KUM specially packed tin! fW., In r.f.r, XLIM pert safe MILK i th* WarhJ Os-*i i cubfccl to weak. %  i Im.K back. Often the k-h. %  an to MJIIW. for tear kilney. along with lb* Hear, muil Alter nut inpairilira from I lie blnodjlrMn. So if you feel tiiwd, worn-out, Udaehy with the nagging pain of ID aching back-k"to bulh your kidund livar. That's why Cana%  t,. rxen rolyini n Dr. relying Kidney-Uvcr Villa half a orniury. Qtee vour svatem %  chance to work pmperlv. 'I rv Dr Chaw's Kidnrv l.n.r I'ilbt -In ,. Tlif inline "Dr. Cluiw" la your aaauranos. 3 Dr. Chase's KIDHtY-LIVia PIUS ntDKSefBK flv rut: RSSXr ADVOCATE BOWRANITE ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT THE PROVED PROTECTOR OK IRON' AND STEEL GOES FARTHEST LASTS LONGEST One Gallon will i„vcr HOfc—1000 sq. ft, Supplied in PERMANENT GREEN RED, GREY, BLACK and SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting) to lint of Imperial Mcaiur* 'Phone 445C : Agents WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. ( %  lobe* Theatre TOMGIIT GUEST STAR OIL ars 91 UM1 IHIVK.I7V. JOSEPH CLEMENDORE lelihnilcil CONTORTIONIST of The O'LINDY TROUPE Immigrants gel We now have in Stock I l.intiled Vninlur l SI'IT(ASKS and with IMMIGRATION lo the I'.S.A. In siilhl we :nivise I huso interested In purchase before It is i.in lute. We have a Variety %  I Sizes all very Smart and Strony. Prices from $2.45 to 84.55 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. ; 10-IIAVS NEWS HASH si \( h-X-rtV,: (HAIRS The All Steel Aim Chair*, III 50 fcarh at JOHNSON S VI ATlONmV AND ii \i;m\ u:i l^eO<>S>OOV>O'^-''^'e'XXX*V0ai GIRLS" FRIENDLY ANNUAL FETE f'nder Ihe Dfirtiriiiuished %  Oj I i %  .. %  ihe Oavi nsot and I.uil Saraur V be held at THI IIOSTEU Counlrv Rd. ,n S\T1'HDAV. April 2Bth i (pen t'd 8 from 5 SO to 0 SO p.m. u WtB % %  ' the followg Ing StallsFlewers and ft ; : %  Needlewi fk, | H K..k the Children there ; p Pony Rides and ; ; By k.r.d permiision of CoL ; I Band C:ipt. Ralson ; will play. ADMISSION — 6D. PHH IM %  Cakes and fi SPECIALISTS HIGH CLASS TAILORING OF A Li. Ki.XHS C. B. RICE & Co. Of BOLTOX LAMS