Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
he a ll eel

itl ss is tcanne



PHarbaros

ESTABLISHED 1895 : THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951

ALLIES HURL BACK RED TROOPS

Communists keep up steady pressure on U.N. forces ———

|

FORM NEW LINE ON | aow to taxe vooxs M 4 Piidids bat
WESTERN FRONT orrison Pledges

TOKYO, April25. sae Faith In America |e

UNITED NATIONS tank and infantry columns!|

lashed out northwest of Chunchon on the central A pprove i











7










front today to hurl back two Chinese divisions
which were halted on the fourth day of the Commu
nist spring offensive. Blanket fire from masses of B udg et
artillery and umbrella rocket-firing jets supported
the Allied drive which jumped off north of Kapyong

|Answers Rebel Arguments | ee fs ‘co

pany until it \ an

EE MOLE win referred to" in, the

LONDON, April 25. Fiouse of Lords during the

FOREIGN SECRETARY Herbert Morrison bees







1}.

" y . ‘| This is not reall
: © The Appropriations itte i i ‘ 2 ate a tee |
Tniehtry, snéatheaded br.. tanks * ee ee ‘iG OUI ot Rabiseamatives today by declari ing is f faith that the nited e | £1 m prospecting

would not let Britain down over the supply of; Barbados, is one of tho:
scarce raw materials. privately. owned Empire-

developing concerns abot
Speaking at the American — whee” the public hears
Chamber of Commerce ltunchec

: practically nothing
he revealed the real | differenc D af wer P . { |
between Bevan’s viewpoint ana € enc € . ac | It is t &5—vear

moved north through a_ thin m ee today approved a $64,682,000,000
screening force which had held Acheson Denies emergency Defence budget.
ae weve afer wave of, B q Ch is The amount recommended for
inese suicide attacks through avs 5 touse consideration starting to-
out the previous 36 hours. 3 | evans arges morrow, is for emergency purpos-
net fae pee Darra : WASHINGTON, April 25. *S raised by the increased cost of
kiiled hundreds o nines . United States Secretary of State ‘he Korea War. Most of it will
umns before holding forces beat Dean Acheson today cateizorical- be spent during May and June
Aa Pi gnaner te front. Unitea bY. rejected the accusation by adit emergency budget is to
Nations rect Ds fotsed hy new 3evan, former British et ements $48,000,000,000 already
; “i ees oP. Rey Minister, that the United voted to the military by Congress
solid line in tight blocking po: ; was “gobbling up” most of} fOr the fiscal year ending June 30.




a pity thet
that of the Governmen: ~ old Lord Inve
America, he said, had committe I ( . | St +
herself to global strategy “We S sOOC ep
think far too well of the Ameri
can foresight to suppose = sh LONDON, April 25

| not present at the debate,
, for he could have told
i



their lordships all about
the company. Not only i



re, acthh} would allow the whole policy t Britain considers the proposed } he chairman of Britis

tioris ready to stem a possible 4p. \orla’s strategic raWw ma A large part of the new Defence be defeated and disrupted by| defence agreement between the| Union Oil, but the world

second thrust of the new offensive. +, rials money is needed to meet the economic recession among the} United States, Australia and New | wide shipping and trading
They had withdrawn to_ thes: higher cost of equipment © and THE AMBASSADOR GIVES A PEW LESSONS.—At a party held | Allies.” a Zealand a “good first step” firm of Andrew Weir and

detence positions after beating off Acheson said it was American] supplies since the Korea war at the Soviet Embassy in Lonion to celebrate the founding of the Surrounded by London repre-| towards a wider arrangement in| Co., which he founded,

heavy Chinese night attacks. policy to take a full account of} started. ; Red Army 33 years ago, fal of the British Fleet, Lord Fraser, |sentatives of American big busi-j the Pacific, Ministry of State Ken-| the real owner of the
In the west central sector,’ the “needs of North Atlantic] Army officials said that for] learned one useful trick fe Russians—how to toss down a glass [ness and industry he pledged that] neth Younger said today, He was} business

Allied forces broke off contact Treaty powers for raw materials,| instance the improved General of vodka, with the head Bac
with Communists along the 384. which were essential for their] Patton tank which cost $193,000
Parallel and withdrew to neW pasic economies and their re-| before the Korean war, costs

in one swallow. even if there were economic] answering questions in the House

difficulties in Britain, the a of Common Anthony Edet













Of the 1,028,589 British



Y i38 ‘ :
Express Union £1 shares in issue

o_O CC Orr'''"''



: ' . : Grive would not take first cuts or| Deputy Conservative Leader, ash Andrew. Weir and Co

ines HOt me S-bieg Beis: armament programmes. He said] $240,000. —Reuter. \ | bear the main effect ed if the Government would con. holds 334,519 habeas, while

Chunchon | lateral roa t ana the United States was doing all it ia ila The Foreign Secretary had{ firm that there coulda not be an eae ar ais idi aries
No major engagements were could to ensure increased produc- - come straight to the luncheor|effective Pacitic Defence which

Bank Line, holds a athen
228,811 shares



reported from this sector, though
three Chinese divisions wer

tion and equitable use of existing N C J - from a hard hitting meeting of] did not inelude Britain and Ma
; *\ | stocks,-Reuter l omma d P be the Labour Party’s top body, the] laya as well as other countries, |
; acing > Unite e e } arty’s } ; A
eri be facing the Unite 1 n SU PHUR FROM S National Executive Committe Younger agreed Sut it might)
au 1 j ‘my . s There Aneurin Bevan once more] take a little time to get complet
Reuter. RESIGNS Confident L U.S.

tasted defeat. agreement he said.—-Reuter,









Despite nis age, Lord
Inverforth still retains a
most impwessive list of







J : 2 is 4 2 ret “ase a lirectorsfil ps Today he
‘ WASHINGTON, April 25. ee Bee tis. sedi tudees, ee fe elit oresicont. omer toas
, 4] O95 "a ‘ \ om wi z : - - r again-—thi i § ! ame yy sclor oO a7 comp.
No ‘Comment’ The Chinese spring offensive] AHE,U-S. Commerce Department announced tonight that raw’ materials shortage woul’) ~ Egypt Does Not fes engaged in seh differ
seemed to have spent the power the quota of sulphur for ail friendly countries for the second | disrupt British economy but ; as

ent activiti as Seed ’

oil, en ering, inve
ment am hking



TOKYO, April
Lieut. Gen. Matthew Ridg
the new United Nations Suprerm



of its first onslaught which in} Quarters of 1951 was established at 250,000 tons, Britain’s;found only three supporters cut P ‘roduce K nough Oil

some sectors had pushed the} allocation was 95,000 tons. The Commerce Department en-'°! 28 Party leaders
Allied lines back as much as 25





|
|
|



; i After hearing the ex-Labour| CAIRO, April 28
Commander has “no comment” to miles in three days nouncement said that age a quarters “was essential to Minister, the Executive Commit | The Egyptian Minister for Na But if Lord Inverforth’s
ke on statements that he sup- U.N. Staff Officers did not meet the bare minimu needs” of Britain and other |tee issued a statement saying it| tional Economy, Dr, Hamed Zaki list of directorships i
pra a aia ah lane Arthur’ : a belittle the Gihpers of ihe vibia. friendly countries. stood firmly behind Government | Bey, said in a newspdper inter mpressive, that of his
he ty bring the “Chinese nation tion, as the Chinese are believed ————* } The Department said that a ~ the ae budget. [ti view today that he was opposed aie Ree eatoy eee
4 4 shat Cais y hly ‘ = i ealled on a embers of the 4 1 nationalisation Seyt Alexander Morton elr
ee the fight against Communist eke wastes eee U S Plan 95 al Seeads. wRamie Tint nt Barth em fotias Ahiaitead 2 ot , monet mt ‘ a rs mt ie. even - move —iimbosing
China. " If Bevan was losking forwar: eae as ras Yow governing director
His personal aide said this tod: .y | the battle to follow up the initial tablished for the second quar- ea oe industry because she” docs nop of the andrew Weir Ship-

referring to Washington” report
that Mac Arthur's political adviser |
Major General Couttney Whitney |
claimed that General Ridgway and;

thrust. Air Force By 1957 © Hecensing period to the Labour Union for support] produce enough oil to meet

But the United Nations Com- Other second quarter quotas he ee thoroughly disappointed.| needs,” he said in an interviey.
mand seemed to feel confitient WASHINGTON, April 25 of crude sulphur—were (in long ney gave full assurance thal] with an Arab newspaper,—Reuter
that its international armies could} The rapidly expanding United |!0"S of 2,240 pounds each): India Fane Seay mee ves SADY OnE

ping and Trading Co., om
Weir sits on the boards
no fewer than 35 concerns
























































> . acks as 7 ne ; 51 7.50 rukiste ejq | ment
others sypported the former | oe nS attacks as well fost) wie ane te have 4. 1 Bae. pe nee aia ik: threat: Mabe atlva* aint Kes ae ip hf
Supreme Commander's policy on PNB esac | ate : é ings in operation by | 13 000, Colo . sympathetic to Bevan were all}, NEW YORI, April 25 rypeyy
this point.—Reuter. or ee gone pointed out | wRAS 30, and ta reach its full aa nina eae ae shetecs |ieftwing Members of Parliament |. The giant United States Steel NO JOB } K
oe a he hinese so far have | authorised strength of 95 wings in ‘ . Ian Mikardo, Tom Driberg, and| Corporation estimated today that
é 5 wae no yr to ie Allied/the autumn of 1952. a ween awe Pp | Mrs Barbara Castle tt during June government priority A rON
repower and armour. The antici This was disclose Q ianh Sete a! eve Ra tdars’ would cover at ‘ WASHINGTON, April 25
Juin Staying On pated Chinese counter offensive | House Apiaceae 13,200, France 20,000, Germany neamnaies a its ‘haar shine ith : - - General Douglas Mac Arthur has
PARIS, April 25 in nai air is so far confined to a S. Vandenberg, Air Seo aeeahane gant — sbdhenraihnsl ~— ie: set iecepted any busihe $5
, sa Juin French Sporadic appearances of fighter;Forces Chief of Staff said in|,;?3,° Bee ete Le FRENC JOVT. SURVIVES | omers. but he never confine
recite! ten oD sEssoeen who secant alone or in very small hearings, that thé fervice | had Bene haece’ ie kis a 2 Dead In Avalanche co ates ri be es hin self to z life of ‘lenis a
is also Coraiimagerin
+ y > | 5 s é abi ’ Ny a lig ‘ rT 4 ins Thi ‘ ay
a aay Win vendiniae ie i 3 O ° 560,000 men Jast December to 81 Peeke Israel 750, South Africe A second déath was reported a . ag h weve rnment | Covrtney Whitney said toda
Morocco: to complete the work | 00 n Strike wings and 700,000 mén on April | Be ee today in avalanches near here} janie. vot, at ar Ine ‘ae of con —Reuter.
that I started.” The French Na- _When the force reached its full is oneurae Finland and Portu-jlast night. News of the death on nee m at mic nig it.
tional Assembly Foreign Affairs wae os Loa April 25. {95 we seen its manpower | #4 received no arr aliases the mountain bathe quarry yes Reuter '

ee aie hel ohtnad Annidaned { early engineering workers | would number about 1,060,000 a . came in as railwaymen worker 3 8 *
Caminiiiny Lone y ote d wer gt | | here who came out on stitke over The term “wing” {gs extremely to clear the St. Gothard line into 103 DEAD IN FIRE THE ADVOCATE
in “Genexeh uin's ; | the dismissal of one of their work-|flexible. It is a self-contained Italy where an avalanche derailed YOKOHAMA. April 25 pavs for NEWS
Morocco=-Reuter, #| mates by the Soviet management |Operating uhit which may be Mass Killi an engine and two coaches of the Death toll in the fhaaina en - ' ’ ”

FRENCH MOP UP | Hi have agreed to return to work|â„¢made up of relatively fox ings Milan Zurich Express trie train disastey hare veate day DIAL 3119
bs | tomorrow. heavy bombers or fighters, HONGKONG. April 25 A dining car cook was killed} hys now reached 103. it oe Day Night ‘
SAIGON, April 25 Two hundred and eighty-five —Reuter. An Engl : 7, pri " and seven others of the train crew | efficially announce nc v : By OF a

French Union ground forces to- i : in Englishman who has just ihjuréd, three of them seriously d toca;

: Tainad. \eeRe aie ibe men employed at Teudloff Vamag arrived from China told Reuter | 444 y re lage Se oa ~~Reuter : sli -
day ome CE ee eer aa | Engineering Works struck nearly : that thousands of Chinese were Wena passengers SHEDUY 10-) § 9645436366%6G99G%GGR0G0VG9005 0 TUTTO POPP PPDD OOO”
Kationalist guerrillas for t the sixth ; | two weeks ago when Soviet Kom- Yugoslavia Wants being sentenced to death at public y/\'"** Spa *
ae meee aay. [rors eg the Socialist ’ ae meetings throughout %
$ bs : A resident of the orks Council, hina. : oun + news me »

ee et x ait i "E rs ' Leopold Matzinger for distributing $180,000,000 He said he believed Communirts Cholera Kills 275 . %
Tongking delta, they kil "ari 5 | the Sccialist paper Fries Wort, had executed about one milion , A le % Ss
more rebels and captured 700, _ 7 —_-Retiter WASHINGTON, April 25, | persons in the last six months, CALCUTTA, April 25 . 3
French Army communique said . Yugoslavia has formally asked —Reuter The cholera epidemic which .
today,—Reuter bs ’ the United States for additional Et broke out earlier this month, has AT ITS %

fi : “special aid” to help meet an claimed 275 lives, in this city of *

MR. HAROLD WILSON, who re- Invitation For Paz anticipated deficit of $180,000,009 Gold “Seized 2,500,000 people, official sources 8

cently resigned from the Cabinet, NEW YORK, April 25. jin the next two years, Said today Another 860 cases SY

wearing a “monkey nut” suit. The President of the American State Department officials said _ HONG KONG, April 25 have been admitted to the hospital BEST I xX

Newspaper Publishers Association |tOday that the United States wes! Police searching the British —Reuter. S >

Inventors of the new fibre, | today proposed inviting Dr. Albert “sympathetically considering” the Ship Glenartine (8,986 tons) for *

SEE LC.1., (Imperial Chemical Indus-} O'Gainza Paz, former editor of request, though Marshal Tito's;Several days past for drugs, have ? ~ s g

tries), were stated by an M.P. to Argentina's suppressed newspaper Government has had $150,000,000] Seized gold worth £103,000 U.S. Casualties >

SUNDAY ADVC i i be making by the ena of 1951 an | La Prenza to come to the United in United States loans and grants|}Some on passengers and some v
cee Cee ICATE estimated Sm. ibs. of the fibre, sufl- | States. —Reuter. in the’ past 18 months hidden. WASHINGTON, April 25 Ss
x eed cient if mixed with wool to a United States casualtic 3

a im. suits. worth near a propellor shaft, The] Korea rose by 969 over last week x
40 THROWN OUT rons police disclosed that they found] figures to reach 61,744 it wa $

TRIESTE, April 25 1,150,000 Hong Kong dollars} announced today, This figure in %





Police threw out some 40 Fascists Hungary Working

who started a brawl in a theatre

e e ea eo F .
arr Strikers |i eer gene se" nts] On Cosmic Rays

Liberation of Italy.—Reuter. BUDAPEST, April 25

worth on six Chinese passenger
on the “_

Since last January gold wort!
over $8,000,000 has been seizec
on ships leaving here,—Reuter.

cluded 9,380 killed, 41,428 woune

ed and 10,936 missing ;
Reuter

750,000 CASUALTIES |% K. W. V. $

y AMIE, Ae ‘

heron Peet =| SWEET VERMOUTH 3
:








ts are work-

ib icatghiieloeats _ Hungarian scient ; :
ing on cosmic rays, anc ea
Return I O Work Frank Optimism |, 4 sesvsvee aicie here

disclosed today.



a nih Oe —Reuter Today they found £36,000
4

S ° Cie
MONTEVIDEO, April 25. _ The Central Institute of Phys- Petain Sits Up
MADRID, April 25. Meat negotiations which began | ‘CS which is under construction LE D'YEU. April 25
The three days’ cost of living strike ended in the Bilbao] yesterday continued today in an|i? Budapest, is to be completed 7 1 Apr gs | Congressional. Committee _ that %

: ; Pet; ; yas 95
area this morning and the majority of workers returned atmosphere of frank optimism '>y 1955 under 4 5-year plan, it Philippe Petain, who was 95

ay : dav iin a : . Communist casualties “in Korea
without incident. But in San Sebastian a considerable num- | Z2is afternoon’ British expert says. One part of the building ig! Yesterday, was at his request,
i he c bia . ‘ed







?
eae aki i At 7h »
alres i at lifted from bed today and. sat} Vere estimated at 750,000 %
, : led by Sir Albert Feaveryear con- {#!eady in use.--Reuter, ay asa att —Reuter %
ber of workers remained on strike, though many factories | ferreq with Uruguayan counters UN se for talit? wie dal. bull ee — $
were running normally. parts headed by Stock-breeding : : “slight Lace iua 4 ei ; oi ; Fee >
Meier Pe it was believed that strikers] Minister Luis Brause—Reuter. | PAKISTAN TO NEGOTIATE | coat eerevemer ‘Knife In The Back
° ° were demanding the release. of ienigte idee W. ik J T th lines ro excelle ities
Os renee _— in San Sebastian ahd the neigh- aaa ee G lat d POTGE Biases'Becrstary, c is, oe hey ‘“ a ee eee
in San Sebastian and the neigh- HONG KONG, April 25 e Seize The United States Secretary cf â„¢ Cea : we pe
ABADAN, April 25. bouring provinee because they Russian Holiday i, een, 2S onsu State Dean Acheson said today that appetisers or Cocktails. They are

The strike at the Abadan- Oill| were involved in the organisation MOSCOW, April 25 the Pakistan Government, has| FRENCH PYRENEES, April 25
Refinery the world’s largest ended| of the strike or had been dis- Admiral Alan G. Kirk, United | arrived in Peking to conduct ne- Four hundred demonstrators led
today, 12 days after it s tarted. tributing clandestine leaflets. Also| States Ambassador in Moscow, | gotiations to establish diplomatic] by local Communist today seized

~*~ OE. OC. Drake’ Genoral!| 5°Me_ workers who struck only| left Moscow today for ten days’|relations witi. the Chinese Com.|the Spanish Vice-Consulate at

one reason why Maurice Chevalie:
was refused a visa to enter the
United States was that Chevalier
said he could not break off associa-
tion with the Communists ‘“‘withou
having the knife in his back’

made from pure white wines with the
addition of extracts of health-giving

g
x
>
*
e
>
8
herbs,
K . W s V . :
rs)
.
>
s
J
*
%

Ahmed Ali, a representative “|





rs yesterday were determined tc} holiday in Sovie' seorgia with | munist Government, accordir Carmes, near here as a gesture oi
Manager of the Anglo Iranian Oil] - , y in Soviet Georgia wit psc one niche tp} fake

Company ann ed ti rik | stage a full 48-hour protest as]|Mrs, Kirk ang four members of! a New China news agency mes.|Sympathy for the Basque strikers
pany announced the “strike 1s\

over”, He said that 24,000 work-, Sh tet
men reported for duty today There were indications that the

:
Mig its Sa aces) ota ook! «LS. Has Aid Pact With Chiang Kai Shek |
i@

} %

4

%

z

+

i

x

:

other factories had. his Embassy staff. —Reuter page —Reuter. —Reuter, Reuter,





en)

only 600 of the 28,000 wor

WEMMERSHOEK














|
remained unaccounted for |
— Reuter, > Police broke up a demon- WASHINGTON, April 25, Government laid down specifie, tha material to maintain its in-,agreed to receive America
s n by wom t night in United States Secretary of State {conditions regarding the use andjternal security or its legitimate | personnel and give them factlitic
A Warnin a, near San Sebastian, Women| Dean Acheson today announced a|disposal of aid being sent ioj self-defence. ie eae attae ee. Gas Of “oiiiitar7|
mee were demanding the release of|hitherto secret agreement between! Formosa Secondly that the Chinese Gov- | assistance furnished
HONGKONG. A; .< |meén arrested ther the United States and the Chinese| It warned that deliveries would|ernment would take security} The notes defined —A Sweet Table Wine to be
Chinese Comraunist naval Nationalist Government be stopped if Chinese nationalis lmeasures “to prevent the dis.|material as being “for the { Es '- ite.
thorities it ¢ odat |. Indications were a Under it United States military | departed from these condition ‘elosure of classified military | of Formosa against possible served slightly chilled g
all fishing boats not to enter pro~| 2b0ut 40,000 of the ete factory | aie to Nationalists on Formosa| The Chinese Nationalists Gov-|articles servicés or information | attack” | 3
vibited waters in oute nr workers in the San Sebasti aret shoul d be confined to material for| ernment in its note of February ¥,/furnished by the United States Acheson said he did not kno . ‘ a TRO >
rin , t Mar G | tween 40 and 50 r cent ]“mternal security and legitimate | accepted tte conditions Government, why the éxchange of notes ha IDEAL FOR WEDDING PARTIES. 3
Ie] +) f Hone Kor of ¥ 06.000 were on strike! self defence,” | “The conditions are “Firstly that By the third condition the |beén kest sétret oF why they %



Reuter Reuter In one note the United States the Chinese Government v se'Chinese Nationalist Government’ now being released Reuter.

LOCOVVOOCVEGOCTOVSUSCOCOSSSOOT OOS OOOO SOTSOTO OOS

piety Em



Ch Ls.

PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

R. LEONARD HUTSON, Gov-
Officer
short visit to
leave for

ernment
in Antiguay after a
Barbados isgdue to
Antigua this morning by B.W.LA

Barbados Holiday

Veterinary

R. AND MRS. WILEIAM E.

COTTRELL of Washingtor

and their son are in Barbados
for a month's holiday, Mrs. Cot-
trell is the former Audrey Good-
ridge, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
C. 8. Goodridge of Melrose, Bank
a ul Road, where Mr, and Mrs
Cc ane are staying.

evelopment Engineer




M" AND MRS. CHRISTO-
HER DYKES who had been
s ding a short holiday in Bar-
bs 1dos have left for England via
ne Mr, Dykes is Senior

velopment Engineer of B.O.A.C,

yndon

Retiring this Year
[AAR. HARRY V. ABRAHAM,
ivi Chief Clerk of the Transport
and Harbours Department, British |,
Guiana, and Secretary of the: De.
partment’s Advisory Committee
retiving from the service
in October this year and goes on

in eb



vill be





pre-retirement leave “from May
5th. Why I mention this is be-
eause Mr. Abraham has many

in Barbados and is a fre.
quent visitor te this island, Mr.
Abraham's career in the B.G,. Civil
rvice began forty-five years ago
when he joined the old Demerara
Railway Company as a clerk in
the accounts branch,

Headline of the Week

ATTACK ON GAITSKELL—
Budget Proposals Hit — Trinidad
Guardian.

friends



Docior of Laws
REYA STARK, wife of Mr.
Stewart Perowne, former Co-
lonial Secretary of Barbados is to
receive the degree of Doctor of
Laws at Glasgow University this
summer,

Student Cricketers

EST INDIAN STUDENTS

in England have been
c k to take advantage of
1 return to warm dry
weather. Through the Colonial
Office Liatsen Officer they have
nged Wo cricket matches;
gainst Clare College, Cambridge,
on May 5 and against Oriel Col-
, Oxford, on May 19, The
t Indies team will be captain-
ed by Ma..
ic








include West Indian Test
ericketer Alan Rae. Alan sat for
his Bar finals last week and

should be finished just in time to
make the Cambridge game.

ADVE



BY THE

j NOTE with rapture that the
mere act of working has now
its own jargon A chart of the
Analysis af the Elements of Work



eae is full of such things as

ynthetic set-ups, work unit
va 5; operator motion, and so
on,

My own researches have led
me to conclude that every year
637,981 work-hours are lost. by
operator—units scratching their
no during unit-hours, This



— if it means anything—
per cent. of energy out-

operator-unit per hour
; backput as to individual
Y tivity potential. Further
detailed analysis of nose-seratch
j reveals that left-handed

units tend to scratch the

e of the nose, and vice
v in the proportion of 16 to
34, and/or,

means
that 17





iivpert evidence

HE ladies’ orchestra had just

struck up “Un Peu d’Armour”
when the Cocklecarrot Commis-
sion decided to bring by air
from Paris the famous French
hatter Hégessipe Rupuytren, who
invented the bowler with a de-
tachable brim worn by a clown
at the Cirque Médrano, A man
called Munsden, whose _ father
made bowlers for the Bicester
Hunt, was asked to comment on
an article against brims in the
South Staffordshire Sentinel, and
Mr. Style, of Style and Fur
bisher, was questioned on the best





ee







position of the vents in the crown MBO ca ee cevedecers evs
of a brimless bowler, Mr. Style
said that lateral vents would give MM pee sc re Pe
a brimless hat a lop—sided appear-
ance. “The holes should be s
punctured boldly bang in_ the FOrm «26s essere eres
centre of ‘the "he said.
“Like Gruyére said Sir Home Address ....... ‘.
Archer. “‘Not necessarily,” ‘replied |
Mr. Style coldly. eeees Seebereereereue
Opening Friday May 4th and
Continuing Daily.
PLUS: Dana ANDREWS — Joan ol yy; , lage
EVANS—Farley GRANGER in ‘Oud, OF DOOM

128 BERR RR eee eee





CURE GAN

ROMANCE

1



OUR years ago when she was 16,
Nata Miss Mary Patteson, daugh

ter of the Canadian Pacific boss in

London, went to a circus.
Near her sat a young

student, Richard Fox-Linton. Last
December they met again at a
party. Next month they will be
married,

FPox-Linton is now a
officer in the R.A.F.
L.E.S.
Hutton Omitted
HE fourth Playfair
Annual (Playfair 3s,
has once again chosen
cricketers of the year,
more four touring
themselves honoured In
was Hadlee, Donnelly,
and Burtt, of New Zealand;
year it is Worrell,
Ramadhin and Valentine, of
West Indies.

Most striking omission is
Hutton acclaimed as world bats
qman number one. In his
there is a choice of three
bats—Sheppard,
Laurie Fishlock,

members

B.LF. Boss
SUCCESSOR has now been
appointed to Mr PG

Harcourt, O.B.E. who, for tt

past three years, has had charge
of the West Indies stands at the
British Industries Fair. The
choice has fallen upon Mr. W.

Lambert, one time Superintendent

of Police In Grenada and St
Lucia and former ADC to the
Governor of 3arbados. Mr
Lambert notified the West India

Committee last week of his will-



ingness to undertake the duties.

medical

medical

Cricket

6d.)
its 11
and once
find

1949 it
Sutcliffe
this
Weekes
the

Len
place

opening
Parkhouse or

Favourably Situated

R. A. LEEUWIN of the Sales

Department of K.L.M. Royal
Dutch Airlines who flew in from
Trinidad a few days ago on a one
day visit told Carib that although
Barbados is not included in
K.L.M.’s network, it is favour.
ably situated for connecting in

Trinidag with K.L.M.’s_ world
wide air system that provides
connections to Europe, Near, Mid-
dle and Far East and South
Africa

From their Caribbean head-
quarters Curacao via Havana to
Europe, there is a twice weekly
Constellation service on Tuesday
and Saturday and on Thursday
there is a Constellation service

via New York, K.L.M.’s newest
venture is the multi-stop-over-
plan. This has been launched in
co-operation with other European
airlines and allows travellers who
fly to Europe to make stop-overs
at a number of cities in Europe
without extra cost.

Tomorrow a K.L.M. aircraft,
chartered by the C.P.I.M. of
Curacao is due to arrive at Sea-
well at 1.40 p.m, from Curacao,
and will leave at 2.25 p.m. for
Curacao via Trinidad,

Joknson’s Statue

he years Dr. Samuel Johnson's

statue, which gazes up Fleet
Street from its post outside the
church of St. Clement Danes, has
needed cleaning. Some London
Johnsonians are now becoming
restive at the long delay.

They admit the statue is un-
worthy of its subject nevertheless
»y feel it should not stay so
shabby.

The matter was mentioned at a
meeting of the Johnson Society of
London a few days ago. Soon after
the war ended the Society were
given £300 to clean the statue by
Mr. F. J. Gaster, a wealthy busi-
nessman who is a member of the
Society.

They decided to do nothing until



the church of St. Clement Danes,
badly damaged by bombs, had
been restored. This has not been

done, The Society may now decide
they have waited long enough.

The statue was the work oi
Percy Fitzgerald. It was erected 1
in 1910,

Incidenta! Intelligence
[ ’D LIKE to write a book about

the Ten Great Lovers of all
Time, But darned if I can remem-
ber the names of the other nine,

—BOB HOPE
—I.N.S.



ENTURES OF

WAY...

A book for list

ee I received a copy,
sumably

for review, of
“National Gazetteer of the
sions, Districts, Groups,
Depots of British Road Servic Ss,
published at 2s. 6d. It will prob
ably be read by the large public
which made the List of Hunting

your
pre-
the
Divi

and





donshire Cabmen almost a best
seller, It contains an alphabeti
cal list of the depots, with the

names and initials of group man
agers, but the documentation is
unsatisfying. There is no bibltio
graphy, nor any means of check
ing the names and initials of the
Hroup managers without writing
to them or telephoning to them,
The Festival Volume of the List
of Huntingdonshire Cabmen, to

PIPA

Var Dos tnt, Amaterdar

By BEACHCOMBER

be published

show, I think, how much

suitable private enterprise

such special branches of

lettres.

Meat Story
MAN in a

will
more
is to
belles

next month,

restaurant the
other day was describing to
his friend the ancient trees in
the churchyard of his village.
“There's a yew,” he said,
“whieh is supposed to be eight
hundred years old.” “Try our
mutton, sir,” said the waiter with
a wry smile.
Tail-piece
N the televising of a recorded
talk on ferrets, should the
cackling of the studio audience
be ineluded?

‘Junior Short Story y Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for

its Junior Short Story Competition.

The best story will be publishee

every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery, The stories
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30C
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesdaw every week,

NOTE:

Stories must not be copied,

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name ......+:.

eee nena eenee



MEADLINE

ed
1ST PICTURES OF THE
LIFE STORY OF THE “HERO OF BATAAN”

(/ENERAL DOUGLAS Mac ARTHUR

a
wa"

eee eereees * seteee oe

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NIGHTDRESSES
LADIES’ VESTS

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COTTON VESTS $1.09, $131 & $155
CHILD'S COTTON VESTS 62c, 65c, 70c., 79¢. & 85cm

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EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

$4.16, $4.10 &

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DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Beverley Baxter M.P. Reports On

JUDY GARLAND

“A brave woman—and an artist:
Pathos without being maudlin” — ;"

One does not need the imagin-
ation of a poet nor the deductive

powers of a detective to under-

stand Miss Judy Garland’s feel-
ings as zero hour approached oi

Monday evening.

Listening from her dressing- |

room to the mounting applause

of an excited audience for a pro

gramme that was singularly clean

and diverting, she must have fel
like

t

a Christian at the ancient

Coliseum hearing the roaring of

the lions.

Ten or 12 years ago she was
the embodiment of what Ameri-

cans call “sizzling youth”.

Play-

ing opposite Mr. Astaire or Mr.
Rooney on the films her vitality
fairly burst the seams of the cel-
luloid which tried to imprison her

personality.

Then she faded from view and
there were rumours of unhappi-
ness, sickness and tragedy. Like
Dr. Miracle in the Tales of Hoff-
mann a psychiatrist came into her
life, but with somewhat happier
results. Finally a psychologist
named Val Parnell offered her a
contract to appear at the Palla-
dium although it was years since
she had appeared before a live

sudience,

The Welcoming Roar

From the time of her arrivai

1

at Southampton the candid camera

men told the story of the weigh

t

which had been added unto her,
From the pictures in the news-
papers there was little to identify
our visitor with the earlier sizzler.
From all of which we can under-

stand the nervous
Monday night.

tension of

There have been times at the
Palladium when the Dementia

Americana Microphonia

has

reached such a pitch of hysteria
that one could pnly groan and feel

ashamed for one’s countrymen

and even more for one’s country-

women. But there was no demen-
tia in the tremendous

The warmth of that welcome
was genuine, kind

princess of the movies, And

genuineness was met by genuine-

ness. This sturdy young woman

bowed and smiled as the cheering
went on, but there were no tears,

no trembling of the lips or wob-
bling of the chin.

Carefree, Buoyant
She was a trouper who had
come to give a performance. That
was what mattered to her.
Curiously enough there
nothing absurd about this Brunn-
hilde singing old favourites from
the films. She possesses a_ real
voice, a voice which even has

beauty in its softer moments, and

her face is expressive because
she plays no tricks.

In Limehouse Blues she takes
a very slow tempo and makes of
it a brooding tragic tale instead of
merely a chug-chug rhythm num-
ber. In her Easter Parade she is
so carefree and buoyant that we
saw the sizzler again hefore our
eyes, and we could almost picture
the bonnet which had played
such havoc with the young im-
pressionables.

Vibrant Sincerity

The truth is that Miss Garland
is now better than her material.
This quality of vibrant sincerity
opens up possibilities which prob-
ibly she, herself, has failed to
realise. She can command pathos
without being maudlin. She is
ibove the wailing nonsense of the
erooner who could not sleep a
wink last night and all that. sort
of drivel. In fact she is an artist.

Nevertheless, she flopped at the
Palladium—but let me hasten to
add that this is no figure of
peech. Retreating backwards for
‘he first time from the barrage of
applause, she tripped and _ sat
down on the stage with a bump.
Her astonishment was greater
than her confusion, and she made
no pretence that it was intended.

We saw a brave woman on Mon-
day, but more than that we saw
a woman who has emerged from
the shadows and finds that the
public like her as she is, even
more than for what she was.



CROSSWORD

re
Per



Across
2. Bad French tat? No duck, (7)
8. Silent. (9)
1. You couid make a meal or it. (4)
2. His “ Goodbye” Hngers on. (5)
4. It returns to the vicar’s income,
possibiy (5)

15. Brought tame to Rudolph. (5)
16. a man next door holds her

19. Trade. (4)
my, Volante, (4) 23. Juggiery. (5)

24. Usually a potter's product.
25. He changes colour. (4)
26. He may carry the additional
clause,
a7. Take your chotce, (3)
Down
1, Bxcept the clue is given, how can
we write the answer? (6)
2. Split the atom. )
3 Intention (3)
4. Funny, but it does make Helga
try. (8) 6, Berry. (4)
6 Risen out of this, (5)
‘
Â¥

(3)

. So dies a stage whisper. (5)

All square (7)

10 To be stared at In this way ts
not friendly, (7)

14 Such revenue ts partly your con-
cern. (6) 6, Fevered, (5)

18 Go this and take a message. (3)

20. Foreign coin. (4)

21. What's ‘tne right word for a
group of quails ? (4)

22. Forty-five minutes, (3)

Solution of vestercay’s Duale,—Across:
1 Calamity;
Tent:

9. Disunion; 10, Resin; 11,
J3 Catacomb: 15, Thread 17, Let:

> 21. Nucleus; Ten: 23,
24. Dentists. Cigetiate:





Asiatic Munch; Into:

‘on Av Antidotes: 9, Dendened:

: 14, Bats; 16, Rued} 18, Tune;
a

and under-
standing—greater and deeper than
ever would have been given ic
her when she was the madcap

was

roar of
welcome that greeted Miss Gar-
and as she walked on to the stage.








'
|
Elis Starring Robert MITCHUM

THURSDAY,

A ga TT En eee ae

APRIL

A@UATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

26, 1951













B.B.C. Radio





























Pin , TONIGHT NIGHT at 8.30
rogramme | GEORGE RAFT WILLIAM BENDIX
!
’ . “ ””
THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 1951 | in “RACE STREET” ee Ma eee ae.
6.9% am—12.15 p.m 19.69 M| COMMENCING FRIDAY 2ith
i RKO’s NEW PICTURE

630 a.m. Sports Diary; 6 n.} ”

Sporting Record; | 7 a.m. Tt “HOLIDAY AFFAIR
a.m. News Analysis, 7 a.m. | Starring: ROBERT MITCHUM, JANET LEIGH, WENDELL COREY

Irom the Editorials 73 an o
fremme Parade 7.0 a.m. Generally | {/- — ee
can: 1 ho Nd Sk, a ——————EEyEESE ee ESESESSSanman=SS ="
8.15 a.m. Listeners’ Choice; 8.39 a.m. / °
Eve Gettieson; 8.45 am. For Human ||| PPPLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
Bodies; 9 a.m. The News; 9.10 a.m . m
Home News from Britain; 9.15 a.m LAST TWO SHOW TODAY 445 & 8.30 p.m.
Close Down; 11,15 a.m. Progr Par- RKO-RADIO’S BIG SUSPENSE-FILLED 2 FEATURE PROGRAM!
ade; 11.25 a.m. Listeners’ Choice; 11.45 Lee Nancy “ *
a.m, Special Dispatch; 12 noon The 1 TRACY KELLY in BETRAYAL from the EAST
News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 A Past Moving Thriller
pm. Close Down, plus Rbbert mists

oe â„¢ 4Us ara b
Sapte eee or Feature Mitchum Bel Geddes “BLOOD ON MOON ”

4.15 p.m. The Pilgrim's Progre 4 No. 9 Robert PRESTON in THE
p.m, Composer of the Week; 5.15 pa mm —-—_—-—- —--
Scottish Magazine; 6.45 p.m. Music fyom TODAY 1.30 p.m.—-CI8CO KID in

TOMORROW 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

NOT. WANTED

Sally FORREST neere Bi

the Films, 6 p.m. BBC Northern Orches-
tra; 6 45 p.m. Programme Parade
6 0—7.15 p.m, 25.53 M.

RIDING THE CALIFORNIA TRAIL
— and —
MRE. WONG IN CHINATOWN
Boris KARLOFF



















rtd An Ida "Lupino Production
7 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. News
Analys.s; 7.15 pum. We See Britain = 7.45 11.00 p.m. 25.58 M., 31. a “4





DIA
PLAZA DAL;







GAIETY

7.4% p.m. Generally Speaking; 8 p.m “|









Rudio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. The Adven- OISTIN (THE GARDEN) St. Ja
tures of P.C. 49; 8.45 p.m, Composer TO-DAY * mes
of the Week; 9 p.m. Special Dispatch; ‘Only) 5 and 8.30 p.m. LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30
P 1b Sine Git Joe: O48 ae Herbert Wilcox presents— “SHE”
lo you Remember: 10 f.7. ame Seatehs Anna NEAGLE Michael WILDING RANDOLPH SCOTT and
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials 10,15 “THE COURTNEYS OF “MASKED RAIDERS”
pm. Light Music; 10.45 p.m, Moray Me c URZON a with TIM HOLT
Laren Talking; 11 p.m. From the Third = *
Prog Gener ceeapeconeennena Friday to Sunday: 8.30 p.m.
rogré Opening Friday 5 and 8.30 p.m. Matinee Sunday 5 p.m.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME (W.B.) CHAIN LIGHTNING & “LOST. BOUNDARIES”

“THE



STORY OF SEABISCUIT" Beatrice PEARSON Mel FERRER

eee eneenetpstoennere a =O

THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 6S———
10.15 p.m.
10,15-—10.30
176

195}.

Midnite
News and Commentary

“CALL

Sat, 260m — (Monogram)
OF THE JUNGLE” and

“DRIFTIN’ KID"

Midnite Sat. 28 (Monogram)
SOUTH OF THE RIO GRANDE

and THE GOLDEN EYE

JUDY GARLAND
“The public like her as she is

This week in Canada




Mes



4,








































——|\3 PPLE EELEL APP LELEPPLEP PES SEPO SD SPSS P PSPSPS,
Ie ;
is ¥,
* GLOBE THEATRE :
x 8
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3 LEON ERROL in “GALS INCORPORATED” >
% CHARLES BOYER — IRENE DUNNE *
$ “WHEN TO-MORROW COMES” %
%, s
. asians Y
: B OPENING TO-MORROW 5 and 8.30 >
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seen the base > rae Rupert when fiat ae ‘nee Gh cane ee oe % LOCAL TALENT TOO x
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% GERALD DAISLEY %
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IDA LUPING Brice STEPHEN MCNALLY Tickets oa Sale Daily }

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f mositty TDA LUPIND ons ANSON BOND cvssosoy ELMER CLIFTON

; Bites story by Poul Jarrico and Malvin Wald + $

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by Poul Jorrice and Ide Lupino
Released by Fi Cos: 16S, INC

{

PLAZA

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FRIDAY 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

and Continuing Daily 4.45 and
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“LATIN RHYTHM”

ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS
4.30 and 8.30
M-G.M Double ,

Margaret O'BRIEN
George MURPHY
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: Esther WILLIAMS

ROXY

Dirested by JFAN NEGULESCO +
Sereen Ploy by Nunnolly Johnson +

Produced by NUNNALLY JOHNSON ‘s
Based on the Novel by Theodore Bonnet







OLYMPIC





STARTING

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TODAY 4.30 and 8.15 ]
Wiriia tion Mbnble uso: Fox & M-G-M Double . { EMPIRE THEATRE
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THURSDAY,

Sugar Cannot
Be De-rationed
IN BRITAIN

LONDON, April 19

The Food Ministry today, in an
official reply to Lord Lyle, have
explained why sugar cannot be
taken off the ration in Britain at
the moment.

Lord Lyle had suggested that
the Food Ministry would have
available this year from Common-
wealth and home sources 360,000
tons more sugar than is requivet
to maintain consumption at tbe
present level of 2,200,000 tons a
year,

The Food Ministry agree that
the unrationed consumption has
been estimated at 2,550,000 but
state that the estimate is based
upon information 12 years out of
date and therefore subject to a
wide margin of error.

Room

These facts are brought to light
by Mr. W_ Shelton Smith, Director
of Public Relations, Ministry of
Food, in a letter to the Financial
Times, where Lord Lyle’s original
statement appeared earlier this
month. Mr, Smith says that for
10 years the Ministry has based its
estimates of sugar available on
quantities which will actually
come into stock in the U.K. in a
calendar year. But the “crop
year” of various Commonwealth
countries, including the U.K. itself,
falls into two calendar years.

“There is, therefore,” says Mr

For Differences

Smith, “room for differences of
opinion -on exactly how much
sugar will be available in any
calendar year.”
Higher Stocks
The latest Ministry of -F..0od

estimate is that supplies this year
from all sources “are likely almost
exactly to cover the requirements
of the U.K. at current ration
levels together with requirements
of New Zealand which, as a
full participant in the Common-
wealth sugar agreement, has a
claim on supplies which amounts
to about 100,000 tons.”

The Ministry of Food expect,
moreover, that when sugar is taken
off the ration, manufacturers, dis-
tributors and housewives’ will
carry higher stocks than they do
at present—an indication that the
originally estimated margin of
2,590,000 tons may have to be
raised considerably.

REDS PLAN CONTINUE
FIGHT AGAINST
CHURCH

VATICAN CITY, April 24
Vatican quarters said today the
recent Soviet directed Confer-
enee discussed plans for suppress-
ing the Roman Catholic Church





APRIL 26,

1951

Trinidad Loses
$250,000 A Year

From Qur Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23.
For the want of a proper slip-
way Trinidad continues to lose
$250,000 yearly, declared Captain
S. J. Barker, Supervisor of the
Campania Venezolana de Navega-
cien He was at the time
attending the taking over by his
company of the newly built
motor vessel Apure He said
that while Trinidad was looking
around in an effort to obtain
more U.S. currency, the one sure
way was neglected. This way,
he said, was in having a modern
slipway which could earry large
vessels. The last vessel on the
slipway in Trinidad had earned
Trinidad about $45,000 US.
Several other companies in Vene-
zuela are only too willing to send
vessels to Trinidad if the accom-
modation on the slipway could be
had. The slipway in Trinidad
was built to carry vessels of
1,800 tons but when completed
this was reduced to 800 tons, and
finally, when put into use, to 600
tons, this being the highest ton-
nage, which it is estimated could

be carried safely.



Henry, Smith Resign
From Grenada
Nutmeg Board

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 24

M. Henry, Chairman of the
Nutmeg Board and S. H. Smith
a member, yesterday both tender-
ed their resignations from the
Board as a result of the Board’s
recent decision to transfer the
gateman whose dismissal was de-
manded by striking workers last
week, because he stopped a man
arriving 25 minutes late,

Gairy, on intervention, had pro-
posed the suspension of the gate.
man for two weeks, but apparent-
ly under pressure of a majority,
the Board decided to compromise
by the transfer of the gateman,
agains. whom there was not a
specific charge of failure to dis-
charge his duties.



Red Office
Attacked

NICE, April 24.

Dressed as parachutists, and
armed with sub-machine guns a
group of unidentified men at-
tacked Communist party offices
here last night. Three men in the
offices were beaten up. One was
taken to hospital_—Reuter.

L.A.C. PLANE MAKES
EMERGENCY LANDING

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23.
Mr. Rene Serrao, a member of



the Light Aeroplane Club made
an emergency landing at the St.

completely in the Soviet satellitesVincent Race course on Saturday

states,

At the meeting held in Kars.

head, Bohemia. they were reportedSt.

to have decided to set up an in-

while en route to St. Lucia in the

aircraft Castor of the Aeroplane
Club. Mr. Serrao left Piarco for
Lucia but never reached
there, for while on his way he

ternational body designed to or-encountered bad weather around

ganise and-eq.ordinate.the Com- the Grenadines.

munist struggle against





——

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GREECE CELEBRATES

*

-
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BARBADSS ADVOCATE

=

et

/

costumes, worn during the Greek

revolution of 1821, flanked by two modern day fighters in khaki
battledress act as guards of honour for the Greek and American
flags above the ancient battlefield at the third anniversary celebration
of the Marshall Plan at Thefmopylal, Athens. The narrow pass
where 300 Free Spartans died in 480 B.C. while resisting hordes of
invading Persians, echoed to the strains of the Greek and American
national anthems while U.S. Ambassador John E. Peurifoy planted
an olive tree—symbol of peace—on a hillside overlooking the pass.

—Express.



Bevan Puts Labour’s
Future In Doubt

(From Our Own Correspondent) ~

LONDON, April 23.

Principles of Parliamentary democracy were made mani-
fest, but the reputation of Mr. Bevan and the future of the
Labour Party were left in doubt by a startling speech from
the resigning Minister made in the House of.sCommons

today.

Mr. Bevan was given the traditional hearing. He grasped
this as an opportunity to throw his view point very force-

fully at the Labour Party.

The House was crowded for
the great occasion. But the Con-
seryative Party kept as quiet as
possible—Mr. Churchill maintain-
ing complete silence—for this was
intra-Socialist’s quarrel. Bevan’s
arguments stormed magnificently
from the general to the particular.
He opened with the theme that
democracy can only be protected
from Communism by a rearma-
ment programme set strictly in
proportion to the achievement of
social democracy.

The substance of his complaint
against Mr. Attlee and the Chan-
cellor of the Exchequer was that
they had been led by the United
States in an armament programme
that could not be achieved and
ought not be attempted. He played
eloquently on the basic anti-
Americanism of the Labour Party
sentiment. Gradually he began to
get a grip on the Parliamentary

Labour Party with this part of
his speech,
It will be realised that the

Labour Party is very alarmed at
the actions of Bevan. He is splitting
the Party while it is in danger.
But while he was speaking on
matters of theory and the broad
aspect of policy, he undoubtedly
had the ear of the majority.

Attacks Gaitskell

But Aneurin Bevan is a cun-
ning and sometimes desperate
politician. Rancour does not do
when a minister makes a speech
after his resignation. Bevan made
some grave efforts in this extra-
ordinary speech—he made the
speech without notes for thirty

minutes of a closely packed argu-
ment.

He battled with Hugh Gaitskell,
Chancellor of the Exchequer, and
he allowed himself to suggest
quite frankly that Gaitskell was
guilty of deception in stealing
from the National Insurance Fund
to pay for rearmament.

That lost the sympathy of the
Labour Party. A few moments
later, Bevan admitted he himself
had played politics within the
Cabinet to get his way on a num-
ber of minor points during the
last three years.

When a man resigns witn the
great protest that he is resigeing
on principles he does not attract
sympathy by revealing that he
has bluffed and manoeuvred for
years. His hearers ask whether ho
is not playing politics still.

Labour Divided

Labour M.Ps_ received his
speech coldly. He has committed
the unpardonable sin of Parlia-
mentary democracy; he has
divided his party just before an
election. He has probably brought
the election nearer and has made
it certain at least by the autumn,

But the most powerful impres-
sion made by the speech of this
man who has so often been reck-
oned as the future Prime Minister,
was that he vindicated Parlia-
mentary democracy. He was at
odds with Mr. Attlee. He resigned.

Government leaders sat on the
front bench and listened in silence
to his renunciations of what he
regards as “fell out” of socialist
principals. Never has such an un-
repentant, argumentative or such
a disruptive speech been made by
a minister resigning from the
British Cabinet,

But Bevan will still vote Labour;
he will neither leave nor be ex-
pelled from his party. There need
be no dissolution or election at
once,



Marryshow Attacks
Legislature

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 24

Hon, T. A. Marryshow, mak.
ing a public appearance in the
Chureh Hall, police meeting. last
night as President of the resusci-
tated Grenada Progressive League,
Strongly criticised the legislature’s
passage last weck of a Bill to pro-
hibit the importation of publica.
tions deemed of seditious charac-
ter, saying it was a move to deny
the average West Indian what the
costermonger bought in bookstalls
of England without hindrance.

He also said—this Bill was more
dangerous than the one of general
sedition which has been referred
to a Select Committee, He de-
clared he would do his utmost to
effect the removal from the
Statute Book of any such legisla.
tion,

Other

speakers were S H,
Graham, Barrister, who outlined
the League’s programme, and

Reginald Clyne,



Unions Encourage
Machines

: LONDON,

2 The American printing operative
works much, more effective and
produces far more” than his
British counterpart but does not
work correspondingly harder.

This is one of the findings of
the British letterpress team which
visited the United States in 1950
under the auspices of the Anglo.
American Productivity Council.

The report on the visit just
published claims that American
printing, in spite of its greater
productivity, is generally below
the standard in Britain,

One of the reasons for America’s
higher productivity, says the re-
port, is “The positive approach by
Trade Unions to the question of
increasing output, together with
comparative lack of restrictive
practices.

“Not only is there no opposition

by the American unions to intro-
duction of new machinery or
methods, but such improvements
are actively encouraged, even at
the risk of displacing labour.”
The report urged that British
employers and unions should start
a joint campaign in Britain for
methods that will increase output
and reduce costs, including freer
intake of labour and wage incen-
tive schemes,
—I.N.S.



University
LIMA, Peru,

The oldest University in the
Western Hemisphere, the Univer-
sity of San Marcos in Lima, will
celebrate its fourth centennial on
May 12.

nded on that date in_ 1551
b wal Order of the Queen
Juana La Loca (the mad),
daughter of Ferdinand and Isa-
bella.’ and her son, Emperor
Charles V., San Marcos was
established just 14 years after
Lima became a city. The only
other universities on this conti-
nent which are near the antiquity
of San Marcos are the University
of Mexico, founded on September
21, 1551, and the University of
Saint Thomas of Aquinas on the
island of Santo Domingo and now
known as the Dominican Repub-
lic, inaugurated in 1558.

From its beginning, San Marcos,
which is located just a few blocks
from Plaza San Martin in down-
town Lima, was open to both lay-
men and Dominican students. It
is now a co-educational institu-
tion and consists of the Faculties
of Letters, Economics, Law, Com
mereial Science, Pharmacy, Bio-
chemistry, Education, Chemistry.
Medicine. Science Odontology and
Veterinarian Medicine.

The movement for the estab—
lishment of the university in Peru
was led by Fray Tomas de San
Martin, one of the outstanding
representatives of the Dominican
Order in Peru, and Captain Ger
onimo Aliago, one of the original
Conquistadores who under the
leadership of Francisco Pizarro
overthrew the Inca Empire.

The University was recognized
as a papal school in a Papal Bull
issued on July 15, 1571 by the

——

series of special programme:
conferences and ceremonies will
be presented during this year iu
celebration of the University’s
four-hundredth Sent vernrt: ‘

Australian Elections
Begin Saturday

MELBOURNE, April 25,
Leaders of Australia’s political
parties last night wound up the



radio electioneering for Satur
day’s general election, Govern-
ment spokesmen were confident

that. voters would continue the
swing away from Socialism, start-
ed in 1949.

Labour spokesmen were just as
convinced that they were heading
back to power.—(C.P.)

——e_

BRITAIN’S FUTURE
PRIME MINISTER

CAMBRIDGE, April 25.

Communist leader Harry Pol.
litt (60) last night prophesied he
will, one day, be Prime Minister
of Britain, addressing the Uni.
versity Debating Society.

He said that his becoming
Prime Minister “will take place
befcre you die”’.—(C_P.)





CANADA WILL RECRUIT
WOMEN FOR FORCES

OTTAWA, April 25.

Canada will begin this summer
to recruit women for the armed
forces and indications are they
will play a major role in RCAFS
radar units.

Defence Minister Claxton ended
a month's speculation when he
told the House of Commons yes-
terday a decision had been taken
to recruit women for regular
RCAF and for reserve forces of
the three services,—(C.P.)



WORKERS ENCOURAGED
TQ REMAIN. ON JOB

LONDON, April 25.

A new deal has been decreed
for Britain’s army of middle-aged
elderly workers, instead of drift.
ing into retirement at 65 or later
they will be encouraged to re-
main on the job to assist Britain
tc meet her expanding re-arma.
ment and export commitments.

This is the sequel to an appeal
for deferred retirement made by
Hugh Gaitskell, Chancellor of the
Exchequer, in his April 10 Budget
speech.—(C.P.)

Will Make A Bid For
Six World Records

LONDON, April 24.
The British speed ace Lt.-Col
A. T, (Goldie) Gardner will make
a bid for six world records on
the Salt Lake Flats, Utah, next
September.—(C. P,)



Rates of Exchange



APRIL, 25, 1951
CANADA
62°. pr Cheques on
Bankers 60% pr.
Demand
Drafts 99.85% pr,
‘tebe Sight Drafts 5 7/10% pr
62% pr. Cable } .
66 G/10% pr. Currency 58 6/10% pr
Cara e tad ES Coupons 57 8/10% pr
7
SEE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE







Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

tition,

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 word:

in length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd.
City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner wil! re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.
SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name .





B.G. Leases
Land To U.S.

(From Our Own Correspondent
GEORGETOWN, April 25

The British Guiana Government
nas concluded negotiations for the
lease of 300 acres of forest land in
the Essequibo and Pomeroon river
districts to U.S.A. lumber com
panies for the erection of a ply-
wood plant and a sawmill,

The agreement was concluded
with Ray Berney, President of the
Bookings Lumber Company.
U.S.A,, and U, S, Herrington, Vice-
President of the Inter-State Ply
weod Corporation of Oregon U.S.A.

The companies propose to invesi
$1,500,000 in the two projects. A
sawmill and plywood plant will be
set up on a 35 acre site at Aurora
Village, Essequibo Coast, and con-
struction work will begin in June
or July, when machinery
equipment arrives.

Berney intimated that when iv
operation they will employ not
less than 350 local labourers
Technicians will come from the
U\S.A., in the initial stages, but
will train local men to take over.

The company and the Govern
ment will build a giant roadway
through the forest for transporta
tion and other purposes while
suitable craft will also be utilised
for river transportation,

Don Cockell Beats
Freddie Beshore

LONDON, April 24

Don Cockell, British and Euro
pean light.beavyweight champion,
pounded out a one-sided decision
victory over Freddie Beshore of
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on
Tuesday in a non-title 10.rounde:
at Harringay arena

Beshore outweighed the Lon
coner 185 Ibs. to 181 Ibs, Blond
Freddie first lost $420 in the after
roon for weighing three pounds
over the agreed 182.—(C.P.)

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietta
Sch. Marea Henrietta, Yacht Caribbee
Sch, Wonderful Counsellor,
dom Fleary, Sch Mary M
Philip H Davidson, Sch
Smith, Sch. Amanda T
Pilgrim SS, Sch W. L
Biwe Nose Mac

ARRIVALS

8.8. ASTRONOMER, 4,524 tons
Capt. Whitehouse, from Liverpool

Sch, BELQUEEN, 44 tons net
King, from St. Vincent

DEPARTURES

S.S. HELDER, 2,24 tons net
Stevenson, for Trinidad

8.s ALCOA PIONEER,
net, Capt Devine for Newtoundland

M.V. WULLEMSTAD, 336 tons net
Capt. Merceline, for St. Vincent

M.V. SARAH BBLL, 40 tons net, Capt
Athanase, for Martinique

Sch. FRANCES W. SMITH, 74 tons net,
Capt. Hassell, for British Guiana

M.V. CARACAS, 235 tons net
Valasquez, for ' Trinidad

In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbado
Coast Station







ana



Sch. Free
Lewis, Seh
Lucille M
Seh
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Capt



S.S. Capecod, 8.8. Gronland, 5.8, Su-
garproducer, S 8 Goodwood, 8.8. Co-
lombie, 8 S. Golfite, 8.5, Baron Maclay

SS Brazil, 8.5. Fort Tewnshend, 8 8

Lady Nelson, S.S. Canadian Obsery



8.8. Alcoa Clipper, SS Uruguay, 8 S |
Aleoa Roamer, 8.8. Lady Rodney, 8 8
Sun Avis, S.S, Uruguay, 88 Alcoa
Roamer, 38 Lady Rodney, 8 8S. Sun
Avis, 8S Gundine, 8S Arakaka, S §
Elizabeth, S88 Joshua Tree, SS Ada

belle Lykes, S 8 Northemountain, §
Imperial Toronto, 8.8. Esso Rea ls
S. Monica, SS Hersilia, S 8 El Aleto,
S$ Willemstad, $8 Eseo Aumusta, \



Child’s Inquiry

PAGE THREE





.
Adjourned
4

FURTHER he in
mquest ul nding the deat y
David Goodridge of Richmon
Gap, St. Michael as adjourned FLY
until May 16, by District “A”
Coroner yesterday.

David Goodridge 14-month-oid
son of Mildred Goodridge of

Richmond wore * Michael, Enjoy the hospitality, com-
was admitted to r Bayley’s serv-
Hospital on April 20, but died fort and thoughtful
suddenly there on April 22 ice which have made PAA

The body was removed to the ” tag vete:
Public Mortuary where a_ post First choice” of os
morter examination was travelers the world over.
formed by Dr, A. S. Cato. Only
evidence taken yesterday Wa
from David Taylor who identified NEW YORK
the body of his son to Dr. A. S
Cato at the Public Mortuary

He said that his son started t\
complain about his health some
time in January when he instruct
ed his wife to carry the boy to
Dr, Roberts, On Thursday, April
19, Dr. A, W. Seott saw his son at
home and gave him an injection
During the night of April 19, the
boy never showed signs of im
provement and the next day he

teok him to Dr, Bayley’s Hospital

where he was detained. On the
morning of April 22, he saw his
son dead at the Hospital

Before adjourning the inquest
the Coroner informed the jury that
an adjournment was needed as
parts of the deceased had been
removed at the post mortem

examination and handed in to the

Government Analyst
received a report yet

He had not



T'dad Customs Excise
Guards Want Pay Increase
From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23
Customs and Excise guards in
Trinidad are “peeved” over their
present salaries, and are seeking



the introduction of a wage re-
grading scheme They = claim,
“that no attention is being paid
us at all by the authorities, and
we are about the lowest paid
servants in the Service,” They
claim that they have had no
increase Since 11 years ago
ACCIDENT

Shortly after 2.30 p.m. yester
day the motor lorry X-1117
owned by Cyril Atkins of Christi
Chureh and driven by Bradford
Atkins was involved in an acci-
dent on Haggatt Hall Road with
the motor lorry P-107 owned by
Three Houses Plantation and
driven by Oswald Alleyne — of

Graves Hill, St

Philip

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS &9 ADVOGATE

Reese ee fae)

Printed Dy the Advocate Co.,





Thursday, April 26, 1951



SUBSIDISATION

THE resolution passed by the House of
Assembly involving the sum of $440,000 to

send between two and four thousand la-
bourers to the United States of America
was one of the most unbusinesslike de-

cisions ever taken by that body.

When deductions have been made from
labourers’ wages towards transportation
and other costs, the Gevernment is still
likely to lose approximately $192,000 on
the agreement,

Mr. Adams, introducing the resolution,
was at pains to point out that the telegram
asking for the decision of the Government

had arrived over the week-end and they
had a short time to consider the matter
because it called for an early reply to the
Chief Liaison Officer in Washington. It
was for the House to give careful consid-
eration to the matter. It was necessary to
consider whether the amount of money
expended was so great.as to make it pos-
sible for the advantages which would ac-
crue to Barbados to be outweighed by the
huge expenditure,

The Government had sent down the
resolution to the House but they were
fully aware of the difficulties of the situa-
tion. It would be discovered on a rough
calculation of the figures that even if all
the emigrants worked for the full duration
of their 12-week contracts and each paid
his third of the return fare, that the Gov-
ernment would sink a sum of between
$160,000 and $250,000 in the venture. It was
estimated that at least $192,000 would not
be recoverable. “t was the duty of the
House to decide whether the scheme would
be undertaken.

The House decided in an unbusiness-
like way that Barbados could not afford to
refuse any offer of emigration, even though
it was costly and not likely tu exceed 3
months’ duration. The question which the
House did not decide despite the speeches
of Mr. Garner end Mr, Crawford was
whether the expenditure was not a method
of subsidising temporary emigration at the
expense of local development. It is pos-
sible tHat because of the short duration of
the employment now offered there will be
many who will discard their present em-
ployment, go to the United States and then
return to join the ranks of unemployed.
This has happened before.

It was Mr. Garner who pointed out in
the House that the whole scheme was mere-
ly a palliative. It was Mr. Crawford who
said —and it is to his credit—that if the
Government knew that there was a cer-
tainty of losing between $160,000 and
$250,000 in the venture it would have been
better to have spent such a sum on a local
project which would be of benefit to the
island. If that money was spent on the
East Coast Road it was possible to provide
employment for about 8,000 people over a
period of about six months. Even after
this amount had been spent there would
be something to show for it which would
be of lasting benefit to the island and which
would make possible further schemes for
local employment.

The House would appear to regard emi-
gration as a political issue and neither of
the two major parties seemed. prepared to
stress that temporary employment which
would cost the island more than it earned,
would lead to greater unemployment. Yet
there is no doubt that that fact ought to
have been stressed and Mr. Crawford de-
serves the thanks of the community for
stressing it.

Barbados needs emigration. It must have
it. But the island will only suffer if what
appears to be emigration, but is really tem-
porary employment, should cost the island
approximately $192,000 for three months’
employment of some 4,000 men.

a a i eaieeeiicieieeiiamaienbianiaidienaninernceninanahnaaannaMniai, Seniaiartniniviiinaieniyn acer mn nanan yee Senet SN er einen at etn eT,

OUR READERS SAY:

Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown



Economic Policies For MACARTHUR IS DOWN
A Lasting Peace

The free world is faced with a
grace crisis and perhaps its
greatest challenge to survival. We
must develop—and we have mad
a good beginning—the strength of
the free nations to counteract the
aggressive moves of communism
and to force their abandonment
We must also establish and main-
tain a just and lasting peace
which includes friendly cultural
intercourse among nations as well
as mutually advantageous trade
among nations.

The present world situation
requires an expression of utmjst
responsibility and leadership from
the United States, from American
businessmen, In the past, many
of us have been most reluctant to
accept this responsibility. We
have appeared to be inexperienced
and, in fact, we are inexperienced.
This is because the United States
is a relatively young nation and
we have few precedents on which
to base our policies.

But surely it is now manifest
that the Nation’s future depends
en how widely and how wisely
it carries out the responsibilities
of leadership. The central point
must be the unification of the
free world in the face of aggres-
sion atid threats of aggression.
Each member of the free world
acting alone is too weak to
counteract these or to _ resist
attack. Not even the United
States standing alone can be
powerful enough for self-defense,
Acting together, the free nations
by moral standards and _ pro-
ductive achievements will bring
about the currently lacking
balance of power.”

In all these endeavours our
basic aim must always remain the
same: The maintenance of peace
but without sacrifice of freedom.

The first question that now
arises is: What should be the
short-range, or immediate, inter-
national economic policy of the
United States?

Development of strength at a
rapid pace to offset the military
power of the nations in the Soviet
orbit should be, I should think,
objective number one. Plans to
do this are now being carried out
by the United States and other
free nations.

I am confident that rapid re-
armament of the non-Soviet world
will—within «a short period—
create superiority of political,
economic, and military strength
on our part. Such a state of con-
ditions would make the Kremlin
stop, look, and listen before em-
barking on other diversionary
invasion movements. The Western
world must concentrate its efforts
for the next two or three yearg
on harnessing its resources for
defence

At the same time, we in the
United States must expand our
economic capacity to such an ex-
tent that we can offer to both
our own people and the people in
the underdeveloped areas increas-
ed standards, both material and
moral, that dictatorships of any
kind are in no position to provide.

Therefore, it stanas to reason
that the free world must move
forward to expand its productive
facilities, its economic strength,
its scientific knowledge.







o e Even so, it must be thought that Mac-
A Pre-view Or The Festival Arthur has overplayed his political hand.

LONDON, April 21, 1951,

On May 8rd the King will de-
clare it open, and the exhibits
are crowding into the Dome of
Discovery, The Dome is the larg-
est single span in the world—a
publicity officer told me it was the
largest building in the world but
it does not seem as big as St.
Peter’s. Probably that is what
encouraged the authorities to let
too much get into the Dome, I am
afraid it gives an impression of
overcrowding. The gallery run-
ning round half the Dome is
divided into two sections, Arriv-
ing at the top of the stairs the
visitor is faced with a_ signpost.
To the right he is directed “To
Outer Space” and to the left he is
directed “To the Sky”. There is
still much work to be done, in the
last ten days, on The Sky. But
Outer Space is almost complete
and includes a glimpse of cosmic
radiation and a short course in
practical astronomy. At the far
end of outer space, the visitor
will be pleased to find a moving
staircase that will take him down
to the ground floor, In the centre
of the Dome of Discovery is a
totem pole and only a few yards
away is a device for giving the
visitor the chill impression that
he is exploring the Antarctic—
complete with a perspective pan-
orama of glaciers.

At a preview of the show—ad-
mittedly without most of the ex-
hibits—I had the impression that
“Lion and the Unicorn” was the
most attractive pavilion. The peo-
ple who have worked on it say
it has been a delight for the art-
ists. But I can testify that they
have not run riot, and this pavilion
which is designed to reveal some-



By GEORGE A. SLOAN
Chairman, United States Council of the
International Chamber of Commerce

The second objective should be
to assure an adequate supply of
strategic raw materials for all the
countries participating in the com-
mon defence against Soviet im-
perialism, It is gratifying te

know that a start in the direction be

of international allocation and
procurement of materials is now
being made. It is essential, how-
ever, that private channels be as-
signed, wherever possible, the re-
sponsibility to carry out this raw
material goal. Also, any interna-
tional arrangement should — be
maintained only for the period of
the emergency. When that period
ends, it is imperative that free
market competition be reinstitut-
ed.

It behooves businessmen
look beyond this period of emer-
gency to the period when the free
world shall have reached a bal-
ance of power.

What will we do then with the
resources in materials and man-
power that have been increased’?
Will we have to cut back and ex-
pose ourselves to the fear of poss-
ible depression and unemploy-
ment?

I think that. every businessman
in the United States, and business-
men in the other free nations,
should look ahead to that future
date and punder over the possi-
bility of formulating a programme
that would assist in furthering
economic growth and apply the
gains made to the common good,
This would enable us to minimize
unemployment and to utilize the
expanded resources in such a way
that they will be available to more
and more people.

At the forthcoming Congress of
the International Chamber of
Commerce, which will be held in
Lisbon, Portugal, June 10—16, the
world business community, in-
cluding the American representa-
tives, will discuss such a pro-
gramme. {

If the free nations of the world
do not succeed in avoiding econo-
mic maladjustments—if they fail
to establish an environment in
which communities can advance
materially and spiritually—there
is always the danger that the peo-

le will be driven into commun-
sm. Only by our performance,
can we hope to contain the ad-
vance of the international com-
munist movement.

Take the example of the Chin-
ese, The Chinese farmer who has
accepted or even welcomed com-
munism as a relief from the mis—
ery, oppression, and corruption of
his lot will learn in time that the
promises of the Communists are
hollow. Collectivism will soon
take back the land made available
to him. The cancellation of debts,
which was made possible through
liquidation of the money lender,
will be replaced by oppressive
taxes. Communism will soon be-
come a yoke.

An economic strategy for 4
lasting peace should certainly
include a drive to reform tradi-
tional modes of production and
distribution and_ to increase
sharply the productivity of men
and machines,

A major step in that direction
would be to demonstrate the



By D: T, ROBERTS

thing of the character and aspir-
ations of the British Common-
wealth will be,a quiet and
pleasant contrast from the Power
and Production pavilion, the loco-
motives, and all the rest of the
“13-year-old interest”. The de-
signers have not neglected either
English humour or English taste
for eccentricities. The man “in
charge of humour” canvassed
widely for contributions to illus-
trate the British flair for eccentric
inventions. As he explained to
me he received many offers that
were too big for his sideshows.
For instance, a collapsible bus
made of rubber. Then there was
a man who wanted to sell him
rainbows. He would put a rain-
bow anywhere—-even across the
Thames. And a_ metaphysical
weather—man wrote to the Festi-
val Office last December and ‘said

that for an all-inclusive charge
he would fix the weather this
summer. The Festival unfortun-

ately turned down this offer, The
metaphysical weather-man an-
swered with a bitter and threat-
ening letter. Since that day it has
rained continuously for almost
four months.

The chief joy of the man who is
in charge of humour is an exhibit
which will be on show, and to
which he refers as an “electrical
parody”. It is the smoke-grinding
machine. Smoke is fed in one end,
ground, and comes out the other
In the process, lights flash, buzzers
buzz, dials spm and the machine
crackles and purrs quietly. Some
great achievements in invention
and industry will also be on show
here—rather than in the Dome of
Discovery. For instance, the self-

to sbeen true.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, APRIL ?6, 1951

AUTOGRAPH

SCRAPS & SNAP

ALBUMS

at
Advocate Stationery



















BUT NOT OUT

adaptability and flexibiuty of AT once flamboyant and austere, Douglas

oe productty system, MacArthur is a figure more often manifest
is abroad. : * . #
American capitalisn has learned} in Latin than in Anglo-Saxon countries, more

ee ne alt nate the eee frequent in South America than in North.
ate >
sy Other men live or behave--MacArthur
























i
if

aS ES



MILK WILL NOT BOIL OVER OR BURN
; IF YOU USE OUR:

SAFEBOIL

Stand “SAFEBOIL” in pan before
pouring in required quantity of
liquid-—use a medium flame and the
pan may safely be left.

that the mang cannot have what
a Tie tiers exo a gives the impression of performing before
ars . ae . .
# 4 when compared|an invisible mirrer. There is a touch of
Ww eriéan capitalism o1
today, Unhappily, the same can- Bonaparte about him, a sniff of Cesar.
ont me seid or Europes capital-| It is fourteen years since he last set foot.
4 Ne Of the gers - .
nesses in the armour ayes Wact.| in his own democratic country. Before that,
=) ni economic. policy is te he was brought up in a military home. His
+ wo a ie *
Puropean capitalism. °") father, General Arthur MacArthur laid the
n the United States the living i iz
siphderdé-and working cqsdiions wemaetions of the full-blooded MacArthur
of = average citizen have shown| literary style. He was educated at a military
constant and remarkable improve- i
fukcthe. Miwore thie = a ichool, watched over by a doting mother, a
on igure who may explain much to the probing
ere are many reasons for i wae
this, including the trend to #aetal- psychologist. Then came an endless series
ism) and the emphasis which| of military camps.
European capitalism places on an) Pew men have ever lived so exclusively in

cutmode@ carte! system. Many ;

Europea: yoy é digas 1 world dominated by the ideas of hierarchy | $ Zw Easy to Use, Easy to Clean
mpe' i er . $3

great danger in “this state of} a obedience. But the watchwords of|%



mind, We must distinguish be-
tween capitalism which works
for the few and capitalism which
works for the many.

The trend of European capi-
talism has been away from a
sense of responsibility to the
community, | am = sure
morals of the people of Europe
would rise if they could identify

democracy are equality and dispute. It is
10 wonder that MacArthur has seemed to] %
grow steadily more remote from the habits| %
f thought of many ordinary Americans and
nost ordinary British.
HE IS. FEARLESS
At the same time, and to some extent for

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masepents —— wae a} he same reasons, he has come to gain an| Seems
positive rather n a negative| 4. - , F SASSOON Roo oGoo}
poliey. eves ascendency over the imagina- CDSS SPSS POTF ESP OSE EEE
: . : %
We ‘deet Mikn pleninc-ee seek ion 0 the Japanese, an Asiatic people with $
as diplomatic and military battles,] an appetite for idolatry matching the gen- %
if we hope to stop communism, » . : ‘ gia ‘ %
Se ae te eR cen naleing| ©f@l’s appetite for atithority. His pro-consular/% When painting your property, %

-vule in defeated Japan has, however depend-

-d on something more than his assumed (or
natural) despotism.

progress in countries where op-
pression and poverty exist. Our
long-range international economic
policy must keep in mind that a
ee of these conditions is an He has displayed a total physical fearless-
obligation,

Private U.S. investment going] ess which appeals to the Japanese. He has

whether it be

a Building

Furniture

abroad also is a desirable way to} shown a remarkable i $ ; fi

fortify the economies and raise]. ble imaginative understand

the standards of living of ie ng of Japanese psychology.

countries. It is a most effective If there is ro ; ttas ;

counter-move to the conditions ‘ ; BPP val + Britain of President

that breed poverty and oppression, } [ruman’s act it will cause in Japan a con-

Pevete Ae, Dy A isectoens ‘rary and even greater emotion of dismay

wou , c * : ;

taxpayer of the burden of pro- and shock. That is something which should

viding through his Government) not be forgo oe

direct assistance and grants to gotten when MacArthur is judged.

other nations, When private on MacArthur has repeatedly and openly

capital goes abroad, it brings with} -halle Sari sa .

it American “know-how” and al nged the civil political authority of the

managerial skill and thus directly United States. He has counted on the

See the welfare of the} patience or the weakness of Truman. He has

Spier aroOe- either miscalculated or it may well be, has
we would pe. ria * rekin deliberately courted dismissal.

much on the fai at economic

improvement and development, It should not be assumed that MacArthur,

widely shared and agaieved by although out, is down. If he returns to the

co-operative efforts, will make . c :

more likely that the free nations United States after all these years, he will

oe ee, — ree certainly not be silent. He may speak loud a Car

in the future, the Soviets wit | ane often. He has plenty to say and the

realize the futility of their efforts, right to sav it. His iti ses

to undermine the free nations e 2 political ambitions are

and will suspend their struggle patent. And a vast number of Republicans

for world domination. We must] will see in the man who challenged and out-

be ready to work in this direction] .. 8 F r

and to rise above the problems of iaced Truman a heaven-sent Presidential

the day and plan as business] candidate for 1951.

eee HANDICAPS



Think with how much greater subtlety it
would have been played by, say Eisenhower!
The impatien i i
garded as a revelation of the - Pe PAROS Ney = OR WOR,
character ‘of their inventor rather contempt for democratic susceptibilities,
than a contribution to the world’s} should not disguise the fact that in some

knowledge. This corner of the . ile
Pavilion will be dominated by the | "espects his political hand was a good one.

wiping goggles for motor-cyclists
worked by a small windmill
strapped above the head are re-





White Knight. He will be riding i i ; %
his charger equipped with a single He found himself fighting a war which you cannot afford to take chances x
horn strapped to its nose—to make | Was for two reasons, peculiar and unsatis- $
it i eer Ftd will be equip- factory b . h %
ped wi all the traditional ap- 4 i —
pes tocluding the mnnuse-trap Nominally the conflict was an undertaking Y vane : wer materials. So 3
an ec spikes to yuard against , : : %
the bites of sharks. He will also| Of the United Nations. One consequence was
e carrying the regulation fire- ”
he carving the remdations Oaer that the general had no clearly defined pol- a $
fire regulations of the London itical direction, %
County Council, Another was that he could not strike back x
The highest achievement in this] at the foe in hi i .
corner is the “morale raiser”, This techni syieaniagiae aren which were on and be safe %
isan electrical device ‘ss be worn| technically neutral territory. Exactly the %
under the jacket which, when re-| sq i i i
adn nakone wadethins same situation had existed on a smaller scale 3
remarks such as “Well done, old| in Greece, where it had prolonged the fight- ;

chap; you're doing fine,” or “You
are handsome, such a_ brilliant
tation. i can, be edjusted to} MacArthur was expected by some of his
augh at its master’s jokes—when it «

miconewaled. button ts pHesseane Tt masters to hold the 58th Parallel—a line

is believed also to be able to pat}drawn on the map but not on the ground
’

him on the back. foaled bas a 7
At this point in my preview of existing as a political figment, not as a mil-
the Festival, Mr. Gerald Barry, the| itary reality. He was forbidden to bomb the

Director-General, arrived;—hap- enemy’s bases in Manchuria

Py. bustling, just a little anxious. M
“It’s people it needs,” he said. ontgomery has said: “Political battles
tee neue oe oe are the graveyard of generals’ reputations.”
—no, Tmean 11 and a half days.” | MacArthur protested loudly. He enlisted
Does Mr, Barry need a morale, support in American public life and among
raiger, gt i ee Geena ! American newspapers. All this was dis-
Har worle out of this fairyland turbing in America, Britain and elsewhere.
where men in trucks are just} Many people were reluctant even to con-
caries the sand ta She gsatide template. war with China, and willing to shut
In a few days the Festival will their oye to war when China insisted on
open. waging it. Many more believed that ,ener-
als should obey their orders and keep their
protests for the seclusion of secret telegrams.
REDS’ TARGET
The deplorable effect was that MacArthur,

ing for many months,

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DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents. :
Enjoy Moments

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SSSSSSESSELGF656 9







-Aceuse the BAW.A. of—’










far too narrow to develop any pro-
gress in constructive football, but
causing more injuries to players

T yehe geunt, 7 } 6 Aaa Oe er other five seasons put to-
be painfully aware of the_ fact ge}uet
that most of the members of the In the three tours to Barbados,
B.AF.A, are definitely retro- of Which the secretary boasted, the
gressive, obviously unenterprising Barbados team was published a
and continuously tactless. day or.two before the actual
. ‘ match, and put on the field with-
We have only to make a hasty out any previous coaching or
comparison of the achievements of training as a team. Because the
the Barbados Cricket Association B.A.F.A, can sit back on the pro-
to realise that while the latter. is fits from these tours, they feel they
expanding, blossoming and_ bear- have accomplished something
ing fruit. the B.A.F.A. is shrivel- | wonderful.
ling, s king i ying.
PE pois! and oy Carlton, who started with a
A few weeks ago, in his sports small piece of ground now have
eolumn, the Secretary was boast- more than the B.A.F.A.—a full
ing of the achievements of the sized playing field and a pavilion.
BAF.A. What achievements? Y.M.P.C. likewise have more than
With much bickering and quar- the B.A.F.A. although they started
relling the B.A.F.A. managed to in Gollymore Rock with a tennis
ftage two asons at Kensington, lawn. These clubs did not have
two seasons in which matches had six first division sides to play for
to be ri together in the final them for nothing and the public
stages so that cricket—God bless willing to pay 12c. a head to see
u hould i n ti Two theif teams play; but the B.A.F.A
seasons played 1 twe four has. Then why can’t it get any
r e of next to the farther? I'll tell you why
cricke I I e of ground a Because they have always



been blessed with a short-sighted,
unenergetic, unenterprising secre-
tary, who holds meetings at the
last possible moment and ar-
ranges a hasty schedule which
comes to light a few days before
the season commences——-sometimes
after.

b. Because the main body of
the B.A.F.A. comprises of persons
of lethargic and disinterested dis-
positions, who make no effort to
further the interests of football.

ce. Because the Barbados Cric-
ket Association arrange the cric-
ket season when they wish and
for as long as they wish, while
the subsidiary body known as the
B.A.F.A. scramble up the remain-
ing weeks and stage a hurriedly
put together series of matches
called a football season.

d. Because football is
in the dry season.

e. Because this same lethargic
group have been incapable during
the last four or five years of ar-

played

ranging a tour to any of the
neighbouring colonPs. If they did
the standard would improve be-
cause al) players ‘would try to

make the team.

Are these bunglers going to gr
on and on failing to develop the
B.A.F.A.? Year after year trying
to borrow, lease or beg for
grounds?

Football is important because it
can make money. But it is more
important (a) because it offers a
source of healthy and interesting
entertainment to the public, (b)
because it offers a source of phy-
sical activity to the youths who
take part and (c) because it offers
a source of intercolonial fellow-
ship among the colonies.

Football is doomed unless the
younger and more enterprising
members of the B.A.F.A. get to-
gether and reorganise the B.A.F.A.
first electing a secretary capable
of organising and planning an
effective football campaign.

The Public are willing to pay,
the players are willing to play;
the only stumbling block is a cer-
tain nucleus in the B.A.P.A.—Get
them out!

FAN.
Bridgetown,
r April 25, 1951



by his methods and his personality, drove
many who are neither Communists nor fel-

ee into a temporary acquiescence



oO” ‘O- N be ae aie wl

NAN AAS Ase

i SELECT THESE:-
OLD BRAID RUM FISH PASTES
)

|

in certain Communist purposes: for instance
the desire to give to the Communists in the
Far Eastern war as many strategic advant-
ages as possible.
_ MacArthur, railing in public against the
limitations imposed on his strategy became a
useful bogy of the Communists,
_ “MacArthur” was added to the propagand-
ist jargon of the Cominform as a convenient
portmanteau word to represent “Americar
Imperialism” bent on the destruction of the
emergent “free forces” of “the New Asia.”

In fact, the United States is bent on nothing of
the kind. Ever since General Marshall wrote off
| Chiang Kai-shek and his regime as a total loss, the
| United States have been willing to let China evolve
in her own way. MacArthur photographed kissing
the hand of Mme, Chiang, could be made to give
life to a very different legend.

When Marshall became Secretary for Defence, it
should have been clear that MacArinur’s authority
| would either be limited or its days would be num-
bered. “Only God or the U.S. Government,” said
MacArthur “can keep me from fulfilling my mis-

| sion.” The Government have acted first,
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THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Shell Trainees : B.E.I- STUDENTS ABOARD LORD re arate
For Curacao

Five young men left Barbados about a fortnight ago for
Curacao to take up employment as firemen with the C.S.M.
(Shell) Co., tanker fleet. Another man is due to leave on
Friday and three others will be leaving shortly.
This opportunity has been made possible by the co-ordinated
effort of Mr. Vernon Knight of Messrs DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd., Agents for the Oil Company in Curacao and the De-
partment of the Barbados Evening Institute.
when the Advocate visited the the Institute, and was in many
Lord Combermere yesterday other {ways an extremeky busy
V the men were undergoing man
their training, the four of them During the period that Mr.
were doing final tests prior to Sayers was conducting the class,
their departure for Curacao. Dy. Hamilton said that he gave
Their training course extended hitmself-practieally no rest and he
over a period of one manthy, and believed that Mr. Sayers Had made
comprised théory in the first’In- a splendid success of it. %

*, then practical demonstra- He hoped that when the time
he applied theory and then next’ cami: tor recruitment and
ual practical work When training of other young men, some
t was underway. other sufficiently qualified person
ially, the students worked. would be available in order to
from 7 a.m, to 4 p.m. daily with prevent Mr, Sayers having again
i of the Government er to suffer the intolerable pressure
provided no shins were in the har- of work which this course had
bour, but very often, they were meant,
brought out as early as 3 am. as He said that he appreciated the

ssary and worked stead. kindness of the Harbour Master
day and through the in permitting the S.T. Lord Com- he believes tha - naan
iataibed to BA ead aes ietiaeatoas e beheves that more of such men

see
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will be available to benefit from
and workshop for the purpose of ; 4 ‘ ihatas
the ategehge ke tahoe Cotntnis. STUDENTS of the Barbados Evening Institute (Tech.) taking a final test at flashing up the boiler of wider

experience in the Upper a 4 a Ti B a 2 SB a we we @ oe @ S
sioner who arranged that the men 5.T. Lord Combermere yesterday morning under the direction of eagine driver George Green extreme left. House of the truly imperial Parlia- SSS ll >’\Ru vom

Mr. Knight told the Advocate would be included in the Govern- Also seen in the picture is Mr. Denton Sayers, (barsheaded) Denn of Technical Studies of the Evening







Will Colonies

Have Direet hs, Ma y
Representation or ee

IN. PRIVY COUNCIL?



Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder





+» » 80 velvety smooth

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, April 25. +». delicately perfumed
A novel proposal to give
the colonies “real participa-
tion” in the Commonwealth
affairs is put forward today
in a letter to the Times, Dis-

«+. Clings softly for hours
and hours, giving you

that natural vivid look.



greeing with the idea of the
Council of Empire on the lines
of the Council of Europe
Suggested recently by Capt
Gammans, M.P., Mr. William
Aitken, Conservative M.P.,
writes: “The reactivated Pri
Council giving its members
from overseas the right to
speak and legislate in the re-
formed House of Lords might
capture the imagination of
many colonial leaders.’





FACE POWDER
FOR THAT NATURAL VIVID LOOK



ass

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The colonies he eays, have al
ready produced some outstanding -
ly able men and as political ex-
Ferience is gained in the territories
with more advanced constitutions |



night



POLICE TAKEN







ment.”
sterd : ; Pr With eligibility for the ste- , ——
yesterday that the question of re~- ment scheme of Accident Insur- Institute. " : y fe e ministe aan ’ ,
cruiting employees for the Shell ance. a rial office at Westminister, such ONCE AGAIN AD AILABL veee
Oil Co. in Curacao first came up Mr.-D, W. Sayers said that it men “would enrich and invigorate
around 1939 when Da Costa and was a pleasure to observe the |

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; @ me the affairs of an empire which
Co,, Ltd, started off by taking a whole hearted co-operation which | e oO ass eso ution or many would like to see: united
few men for the company as the engine room crew of the Lord e ° K strategically,, economically and
Police, Combermere gave. by way of de- :
yd said that ae of Weta men ‘tailed demonstration to the men ———-———— oe
to be recruited, was still serving who were being trained. Be e
with the company, but in a con- The four mont leaving are Gor- Shipping Held Up
eae , higher pager ier don Sandiford ot rae Hall, Ash.
added that it was not unti § ron Oxley of ensington New
that they shipped in the vicinity, Road, George Linton of Richraend YESTERDAY
of 300 labourers.for werk in Gap and St, Clair Gibbs of Bay Shipping activities in the
Land, Beckles Road. harbour were oecasionally in- British Constitution in his view
terrupted yesterday by intermit-

Curacao,
t st eral The Legislative Council met at 12 noon yesterday and in a should make it possible to devise
MIXED CARGO “Over 18 lighters, loaded with session that ended at 1.15 p.m., passed a resolution for the Sate ae ee Sant esha rapes
ane sons "ae Gelewesd, aie sot Phe Harrison Liner Astro; feed and other cargo, were kept sum of $440,000 to assist’in the emigration of labourers (o of our own and their affairs”
asons 4 arpe s sre sent ' arris¢ iner Astronomer . : manling ani . ’ aart
5 i , ; ; ye i tarpaulins while oh S46 :
out. At the same time, young arrived here yesterday with cat'go ereress we Shibe in” cease the U.S.A. ae iene alk scien Asia Shenae Dominion Status
men ; holding — the preset from Liverpool including | 1.820 Bay and schooners in the Careen. Ne Council also concurred in a resolution fixing é Dominion status as understood i:
School Certificate were also re- . ; \

tat bags of: potatoes, Dutch ‘stoves, age which were either discharg- payable to producer and rate of tax payable to the Fancy commonwealth countries with
cruited for training in laboratory jams, .confeétionery, cocoa. salt. ® : ; ; 1 »slasses C rol and Marke s Board on Fancy Molasses more advanced economic develop- a = ———.
ams, y» sa", ing or loading cargo had their Molasses Control and Marketing Board on Fancy Molas: adve dl ¢ k ae < “
work, : soap, hardware, and enamelware. hatches Hathehed down roduced during the crop vear 1950-51 at not less than ment and greater experience in the POCO EEE SOOO LE LLL LLLO
In recent years he said nat very Her agents are Messrs. Da Costa i : p ; § AR fs h nny “6 and one @t of Government would be for
few men had been taken on for & Co., Ltd. After midday, the rain held tifty-four cents a wine gallon in the first instance and one mall or largely undeveloped
work in the senpery, put oars up and the waterfront was busy and a half cents a wine gallon in the second instance. é colonies “economic, political and
had been a_ steady and limite , again. Almost every berth “was In moving that the Council con- and in twelve weeks would have social disaster’
number of men taken on for work !n The Court Of Ordinary cecupied w ith vessels, the cur in the passing of the resolution repaid the whole advance. It was
with the tanker fleet i ajority of which were handling the Hon'ble the Colonial Secretary al sronosed that B W.I. $4 A political correspondent com
; Te In the Court of Ordinar es- Majority of which were & the Hon’ble the Colonial Secretary also f SEC @ I c
The working cogditions of the terday His Honour the Y chiet cargo, . a. #LA!' said that the Chief Liaison Officer, should be deducted each week from ments © “'T tre possibilities of Mr
men in Curacao ee excellent Judge, Sir, Allan Collymore, did sue lighters began to unload Washington, had asked whether the worker's account in Barbados Aitken’s suggestion ; sweeping
and the same remarks are aD~ not. admit'in common form the the feed again, but they were this Government would permit and applied in repayment of the The Conservatives arty’s Plai
plicable to the Scale of Day wai of Benjamin Alleyne. kept partly covered with the from 2,000 to 4,000 Barbadians to cost of his repatriation, If he re- for the House of Lords is to maki
a wee dig er aar The matter of the will of Ed- tarpaulins in preparation for any accept contracts of employment turned to Barbados at the end of it stronger and more effective by
Hate i oot nap areata wee ward Mc Lean was adjourned. further showers. for 10 to 12 weeks from early in twelve weeks, he would have re- giving it greater prestige
2arbados, g » the © with » mini rate yaic ‘ yu J.1, $24 of The Marquis of Salisbury o
obtained a high conversion rate — June with a minimum rate of pay paid, in that way, B.W r juis o sbury pr
of exchange which as a conse.

es 66 3 “pope ea 99 of 75 cents per hour, He had ask- the estimated cost of nie ees pores ine meeetiations, with the
ance tec oir salary a ed for an immediate reply. tion from Jamaica to Barbados and Labour Governmen our vear,
eee pooste > thSH BRUALY. us nem lo d the cost of his recruitment (B.W.1 g
however wanted to make it ¥ 9 e

politically” | Your Favourite Skin € ream
@ Mr. Aitken asks if this isnt the prevents SUNBURN

GN alternative t the situatio in Skin Irritations as
9 O ssist future in whioh the eolontes “NOXZEMA” allows you to enjoy your Holidays, or |

“must suffer the painful break-u; Weekends without Fear or Worry about NCoEEM A”
of Empire into the ‘phoney Remember its oo a

° e a a : > Jay”
. Geminion or poverty-stricken Re- The Medicated Cream in ve —- on ad ne
y-s : 3 « er Ja
n sme ra 10n publies” The flexibility of the in Three Sizes 1/3, y, anc > Pp




Subsequently, skilled artisans
such as trainers, fitters and greas.





Obtainable at - -

BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES
Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings







%



o



BRIGHTEN

44

and





MAGHTEN

£4,5460%
—POEEFAS PSPSPS AP APS

YOUR HAM

OS








































































ago that a hereditary principle | % '
: ‘osts id $7: » he remaine : ) ne he ¢ 1% , !
clear that allotments payable in Shi ven ee satis: $72) If he rem ined te ~ hould be eae 1 to the appoint % to new natural looking |
Barbados were always in local nder the original, s y United States for 36 weeks he ment of a ‘life peers” represent Os dar
currency, p e 4 temporary work im the United would eventually repay the whole ative of different interests in the x beauty with
Mr, Knight said that over 2,000 ‘ re e istere States, the marine, Coreen amount ef B.W.I, $72 realm, The suggestion aired it x ; e :
men had been recruited from time had paid al] costs of transportation Repayment the Times this morning is tha x F
: tga Stace cr Aa of the workers. Since 1948, how- The ’ jeductions as well as these representatives o | § %,
to time for services‘in Curacao ‘ istered with. the The fortnightly ri a % ,
and in all probability, something OVER TEN THOUSAND people have registere with ever the workers had had to repay from the worker's earnings in the professional, industrial and labou $ %
like 700 men were still serving in Employment Agency at Queen's Park for emigration. They the cost of ata passages nO U S.A. were estimated to be: seer in Britain there shoul x x '
the employ of the company. have all claimed that they are unemployed. paren to the place of employ ae fe Se ae aes "ae Tine eae = x HILTONE’S famous slogan “AS LIGHT AS YOU LIKE
. ri A 4 eu . ¢ ; yo transporte vomles spe R. & ane 24 ee bn r rey Yh 1
SUCCESSFUL SCHEME Of this amount 6,164 are men. This number includes _ The passage money from Bar- For board legislating in the House of Lords |& |. . AND NO LIGHTER” can be yours as well, TRY IT %
ex-servicemen, whom, the Labour Commissioner He WT ane ta tarnaion Cor ite BduiVas For: Insurance sand They do not necessarily have to b: | & 8
The scheme had been one of other things equal, will be given preference.” lent) had been advanced by thit B.W.I.C.L.O, 5% 9 gp Peers with the title of “Lord” + 1% HILTONE BLEACH is on sale at - - x
outstanding success and thd found ‘: sea ‘ Pau Government, and that from of wages ; ; 3.60 front of their name That i x PRE B x
up to the present, steady employ- The number of unempioyed tion as to the rate of boa Jamaica to the place of employ- For U.S. Govt. Social after all a matter of form only | yer ay & GG ST v
ment for the past ten years for men is increasing daily. Some, charges. rant in ih asdan had been -ad- Security (142%) 1.08 Colonial representatives — in "an x KNIGHT Ss DRE G ST ae x
indreds f arbadians, N yhose nz S were ir 2 pad . co id save » For transmis: ar- an Past tip " 4 .
ht ngredt of . Barb eee From Ww noes ; n ee ks ny ee ba Transporation vanced by the employer, The For tr un mission ‘to a ; House of Lords would be choser LCCC PEPE S
the beginning of the scheme, Da regis er because hey di oO cost of repatriation of the work- bados to worker's ¢ it by the King to sit on his owr
Costa and Co,, Ltd,, as agents for think it wa worthwhile to renew “The cost of the employer re ta the satisfactory comple- 15% wages 10.80 Privy Council, so that the , woule
the Oil Company in Curacao, had their registration, are now renew- obtain Barbadian workers is now ers on %& ee mie ae had- bash have tne:+ Sy. f Rt H, pees
paid out almost $1,750,000 in ing with the hope of wetting to exactly the same as that to obtain tion of their cont ac s 1ac ae US. $ 6c 18 have ue itle ‘ oO Rt. on. anr
allotments to the families of the the U.S.A. when the emi- Jamaican workers. This is be met, without repayment, by th Ea dit ah a forth be warn thus the Privy Council woul
men recruited in Barbados. Apart grants are picked for Wisconsin, cause the Barbados Government employer (from the place of em- ings of U.S, $72 he come alive again »s a special bods
from that, several men remitted U.S.A. is again proposing to advance the ployment to Jamaica) and by would receive 11.82 ‘© advise the King on Imperial
money direct to their relatives by Since 1944, when emigration to cost of transportation between this Government (from Jamaica »- £ffair
means of bank drafts and that the U.S.A. started, nearly 12,000 Karbados and Jamaica, or its to Barbados). In this way it US. $ 72.0
amount was quite appreciable men have been sent there under ee t i had cost employers in the Unite! di
" Within the last year or so. it ¢comtract. Included in this num- “The Governmen proposes tO tates the same for the trans- y e
y vee ae ane aan Phrolding ber ave seme men who emigrated recover the amounts advanced for aa tatiie ot Barbadians as fo. Hon. G. B. Evelyn said that Case Of Negligent
oe ene Noa An veaeaee to the U.S.A. on more than one transportation to see or = Saralhane Government had looked at the Dp gang Di :
: © “A é py p= . + TAY ne £ a s. ;
’ ; ae ; any Occasion. The largest group for equivalent, from the workers, an ; , optimistic side that people would , y ‘ 4
ee, Seereenae ns ogee be a year was in_1945 when 4,384 deductions will be made from the Off To Wisconsin 2 iat toy 8 wees: hare wae riving ISITLISS¢ d
Obtained. and ae a conse eee nee Were” emigrated. ‘The Labour workers’ wages to repay these It appeared that the pice in no guarantee for 12 weeks and A District “A” Police Magistrat
obtained, and as a consequence, Department has handled as many advances. The cost of the work— employment would be Wisconsin, any calculation should be made yesterday dismissed scare ater,
he suggested to the representative 4. 6.000 Barbadian emigrants In. ers’ passages from Jamaica to the and it was estimated that the cost for 16; demas? dP hee really hy the Police cualuine Molvh
of the C.P.I.M. in Curacao. that. the UBAy to§ 4 Fa place of employment in the U.S.A. o¢ transportation there (by air) of (Or. 4% adenine 3 phot” Wooten eo ae ae Men aals
the Government here very greatly | “’someé‘of ‘the emigtarits returned will be advanced by the employer Gach worker would be U.S. $108 Hon, V. C. Gale said that it en ing bien with ne niger t drivi g of
appreciated the necessity of find. home and went)to other places and he will also recover the Of that amount U.S. ‘$36 (the tailed a very high price for send- a mule cart on February 3 ‘alanit
ing employment for people and such as Curacao and Aruba, amount advanced by deductions equivalent of the cost of trans: jing people to work in the United. Werther tes ary 2, 1
would be willing to train men as Others got work locally but there from the workers wages . portation to Jamaica) would have States ' They all wanted the H fe ni a te “presented by My You can enjoy Britain’s
arr er Sae ie eneee, 1 gee we Brena ea Gu tot a HS xate an rt eer to be advanced by the Barbados emi layment situation in Barbados g Ww, ecae Miss. H Week favourite tobaccos, Six
Representations were made jobs. They registered again at tion deductions wi be ede Tt gd di era, hin ania sae ; , = soe Pet ebaatan teint eek Z se frome=
to the Labour Commissioner, the the Employment Agency in Currency) per fortnight (as in Gove ere bec a bea nt an to € va ‘ang : ” pene Pee who was driving her car said tha aS ee so. ;
Department of Education, the Queen's Park. 1949-50), plus 25 per cent. of the cost of repatriation from Jamé 4 ounci a villing to 4% on February 2, she saw the muir every one a balanced
Harbour Master and other Gov- Fewer Emigrants amount of earnings in excess of U.S. $36, would also need to be they could, ite ft tha S2't Boing along Westbury Roa: blend of vintage leaf
ernment Officials, As a result, Dr. For the last three years the $50 (U.S. Currency) in-a fort~ paid by this Government They would be PP the in the direction of Bridgetown
Bruce Hamilton, Principal of the number of emigrants to th U.S.A. night,” Mr. Burrowes said. This would result in g contingent 4000 pe ople were le aving uns She stopped her car just as sh«
Barbados Evening Institute, kind- pag shown. a-decrease,~ In 1948 He said that arrangements for sjjability of U.S. $72 or B.W.1. shore of Barbados as emigrants jesched St Leonard’s Chureh a
ly arranged to set up a syllabus only’ 486 émigrated. In 1949 the repatriation gene ae pi fat ie $124) in’ respect of each worker "Ot to return tre mule wre in oa ‘or the tre ir a ‘ z will be embodied in the; workers ™qherefore if 4,000 workers were , ; tail saw a motor car 5 comin,
eridiers ea ee re Cid ae ene agreement with the Goyernor-in sent B.W.I. $496,000 would be Big Sum Needed from the opposite direction anc
Up to the present, five men had Mr. ES, Burrowes, Labour Executive Committee and the roquired, In addition, the cost of ‘The sum which was needed was just. as the motor car almos
been trained, five of whom had al- Commissioner, told the Advocate ei earet ee ead recruitment was estimat.d at a ver big sum to add to their 'eached the mule cart the mul
ready left for Curacao and it was yesterday that the men who will Fy Agena entice to the period B.W.1. $40,000. expenses in one year, an esti- ¢ rt yfwerved fe the right an
anticipate : r icke emi i yi Ns neg cs § yas ated $192,000, The vere not struck the motor cé en she
anticipated that the other four kn ieee oF enone ed ee for which he remains in the U.S.A. As an amount of $100,000 was es é x r - Back ’ Ea Ant dan the cae ie Wil ans
would shortly be despatched, able—bodi unemploye mer The actual agreement has not yet provided in the emigration vote in begrudging 1@ amoun peing y ne rapes.
See i k . “dsuwh Up : the Annual Estimates for 1951-52, Spent but were rather pleased at about 20 to eet : e ay the
NEW CLASS ~Y See “Oa ee ene. engince the beginning of this a further sum of $440,000 was now = something ae a atte m age = Pao ee atin
He said that it was gratifying to ei agaist have a chenes if they year a cree ee er on mee CeavOnaes = ap — yep, pi goa We Se ee tone,
ae 4 w cs ass for ; F ' y 4 i- half per cent. o' a iy x PROSDIG, VO, ESEOVES Peo 5 the horse in dashing to the right
repos that 2 new an ai ie: coe Pete tage "tab Wieden earnings has been made in transportation both from Barbados on, J, Mahon said that he He sd that the evidence shoulc
training of six men to be trained grants v Yo ase ” accordance with the new Social 4, Jamaica and from Jamaica to wanted the Colonial Secretary to , nf : . i é
: f th
s fir vill soon be started on hv chartered planes, ; ited States be discounted for none o’ 1
as firemen will s a “ . Security Act of the United States. po iados from the worker, but the give him some idea of the nature eterna: ad KEG AE “Sls Ghtane
the basis submitted by the com- It is known that some work- ° ti f five per cent. be : vould Witnesses had seen if his
nea ‘Cu¥agaio ers, who are at present em- The pone ue ‘Accident and Period of employment in the ef employment the workers sae had pulled the reins,
ae Te as debply appreciative of ployed, register as unemployed De cn tnaewanes ol the workers United States might be too short be nets faa’ Mikey no oe dane The Police alleged that th:
See ony : . » Dea Lr ; the ne he be done. For reeruiting 4,000 workers and ae a : the: defen : rae
“ ; 3 d get a chance to go to the > cost of the to enable that to be donc aecident wae ducite thecde lianas
the co-operation and assistance an e and for meeting the cos spayme M rtation to the finding that after they were sent Aenea teed SOLE AGENTS:
given by tie Slovertisnent cf Bese Eee ea Ssnanean | a British West Indies Central La- pe ahora deductions Sire they did ‘net like tha trpe — 0 ee ey ™ MESSRS. A. S. BRYDEN*& SONS (SARBADCS), LTD,
bados through voting e CeS- * bour rganisation, § é nese eT elt If they eventually y “eins to the caus hi SETOWN, BARBADOS
; . , » Inetructi employed men,” Mr. Burrowes » welfe e workers would be made from each worker's 2 sule to dash to that side of the BRIDGE N, BARB: f
sary funds for. iristruction piete re ane process of selection after the, weltare of, the oe par at the rate of US. $14 per Stayed a Groviee ported theis-th nule to Sagh so. See ae oe
Commisohar the Harbour Mas-. is a long one and tho weed made.” fortnight plus 25% of the amount a ee ee eee he motor car
ter. the Director of Education, Dr- ary Stages have’ ape y Any surplus from these deduc- of earnings in excess of U.S. $50 roopea
. : ayers. Teachedy’ aoe ions we be returned. to. the a fortnight , : 7 ' =
Hamilton and Mr. D. W. Sayers. p : aecads tions would. be ret L. to inva rf shed Ae Made cleus: tn tha
oped that the training of Bes} ath he not yet.*e Government of Barbados in reim- ae it - Se those workers what work they would
_ He hoved sers would be. He saidethat hamhas,: tification bursement of emigration expenses. The employer would By : ee Co They st id r :
firemen and grea ceiv copy’ of anytertifica very deductions first collect the ammount be having to do, They shou Th » Is
come a regular feature given 4. YR cA” erhploywpent service! "Fifteen ‘per cent. ot. every om eee him eethviaicd ut $7h1 ba Inka’ to und aretRe thiatsthay ere
under the, auspices of the Barba~ <1.4 therefote he is not yet aWare worker's earnings is also deducted advancec sductions would be used were being assisted to get work
s Evening Institute: whereby ° o> ticstypei of work the meni Will and remitted to’ Barbados for then the deductions wou d be used Ehe woul help to Bey back thse
dos Eve S 7 f to find. 2 ewe vever expects credit to his aceount here. The to repay the advance of U.S. $36 and sh I pe; ; Y
more men would be able to find) pve 'to do. He however expects vredit to his 5. Curreney) is Government expense to the taxpayer. If he ; For every type of
positions, not only with the ghel) that. the work will be piasing Head Sat ete ee poten by this eee ; were sah under false pretences; WR) (Ay "i? YT
os ois vi yers aRUS corn anc er. has still to be paid by every -paymen Ste aoe tata” os gs P off :
Pemvons. ee employers © asparaghs, peas, corn and ot ae Ve. enteting the. United i, pha canned the. $7008 be Sean one Vase. 8 . arning CCH / LY Hy Figure
i r elsew i crops. ae c a re Tatiatiey a work é S. $72 a arbados would’ lo
labou : He thinks tHat:75,eents (U.S. States of America. ‘ mel a fortnight, he would be repaying He said that in the sugar in- 0
He said that the island of Bar- (rrancy) per hour is a very employer advances oe t the rate of U.S. $14 4 U.S. dustry here, it was quite possible '
hados owed a deep debt of a high minimum wage but so far ag woe oe cay it from (his 22/4 U.S. $19.50 a fortnight; @ on page 7
S } 3 3 re reived i na- firs rtnight’s pa See Me . i }
owe oe eer as he has not yet aera ved. inigine— cla x e nent Sa ‘ teed ed a that See ee We have them in the following Styles ae
hav > dn hae heirs tie i
seh » lates seme Se oe ‘ddin’s L ALLO-ETTE Cotton in Peach and White,
Sa How Aladdin's PY and Nylon in Peach only. Sizes : 32 to 3
tanker fleet . y es x ie 2
Dr, Bruce Hamilton said that.gs © won the Princess» VARIATION Cotton in White and Peach
Principal of the Barbados Even- Sizes : 32 to 40
MG dian neha deacree, aabiateh STRAPLESS HOLD-TIGHT and .. ee
to be in a small degree, associated ee Fees. Sen at
with the valuable work which Mr. MAIDENETTE in Satin and Lace anc Hines a :
Knight had described. There a Satin and Nylon, Sizes : 32 to 38 ae ; >
no reason why that class shoul: ; : ae
not become a regular one. He | ? :
very much hoped it would | (
: | | Lave SNnepner 0 )
TECHNICAL STUDIES 7 '
. . The Princess had refused many i ‘ ' }
He expressed his feeling of how Once a poor youhg man named “hora addin asked the genii how he But when Aladdin offered her a d Yes, everyone loves Royal Puddings, ; 10, 1 a 12 & 13 Broad Street.
nm t : found a magic lamp. Whenever he } One day Aladdin askec gi “ od. ““It'sd They’re so rich and smooth. So nutritious, |
much was owed to the energy, rubbed the lamp a genii would appear } could get the Princess to marry him. | Royal Pudding, she cried, “It's dc F neekerhe tats ome ee | oe
vot of r. Sayer: : q uf 2 ” said the genii,and hand- I will marry him if he promises tc too. 3 wonderful fla |
devotion of Mr. Sayer and grant his every wish. Now Aladdin Here, Master,” said the ge al Pudd day’ nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today.
among other things, was in love with a beautiful princess. | ed him a package of Royal Pudding me Royal Pudding every day ’ . prs — - oo
, *) stiid > as
I he 1ical studies for
4



PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951

For a radiant shine

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON












The quality
Metal Polish



‘

MICKEY MOUS -
et EN Cera O wes MYRTLE SUB'S REALLY THE
4 MICKEY.» pies - STAR OF THE SHOW!

> MYRTLE SUE



















‘TO-DAY’ NEWS FLASIE

|
| STACK-A-BYE CHAIRS

The All Steel Arm Chairs
$11.50 Each

at














JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
AND
Tom good looks tell you they‘re just right. | HARDWARE
5 You know, too, when you look at the price AE = ERS AES
=) a
a= tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated 4



















|| MAKE YOUR PARTY
A SUCCESS
with
Bots Cocktail Cherries

is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right °!
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

SST] TT

___BY_CHIC YOUNG

Whiniaine
a Ota,
THINK OF IT ---THEY }
BPo MAY HAVE COLOR
gm ( TELEVISION BY THEN, TOO!
me
wh OS

“gk _ ae 5
i BUT THINK OF ALL . me, ee

__( THOSE PEANUT-BUTTER “i
P| SANDWICHES } Bi 4
aa e. — : hal Wea












Peanuts

Pry, Tins Vienna Sausages

WE WANT] | 2
(M_ FIGURING \ ABIG
OUT IF WE CAN ) Jr SCREEN J

AFFORD A € =
TELEMISION. ) PG
~ SET

I FIGURE IF YOU TAKE
YOUR LUNCH TO WORK
FOR 162 WEEKS, WE
CAN AFFORD A SET

Tomatoe Juice
Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple





= $ s *
WA é ND » Peaches
Cs \ Pkgs Jellos, i4c., 12c. & 22c,
Tins Custard Powder
i Coffee

Nescofe

Ye STUART & SAMPSON
oe | (1938) ITD.

HEADQUARTERS FOR BEST
RUM





J

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only






A WE'LL TAKE CHARGE OF THE CROOKS,
THE SPANISH GOLD! ONTO | |SENOR LOPEZ!
MY FAMILY AS FOR THE
TREASURE! J TREASURE-~






IWILL GIVE THIS GOLD TO THE
PAI FOR A MISSION, IT WILL BE
A TRIBUTE TO THE MASKED MAN

WHO SAVED MY DAUGHTERS LIFE









USUALLY = NOW USUALLY NOW
Tins GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 24 21 Pkgs MACARONI 35 31

Tins JACOB'S
CRACKERS 171 145

Tins PLANTERS PEANUTS 96 86 Bots. GROTSCH BEER 24 18

Tins COCOMALT 133



MOON: SPEC/AL AGENT "



THE GAMBOLS BY BARRY APPLEBY

NO - | WON'T COME SHOPPING WELL -BYE -BYE — | WON'T
WITH YOU ‘






bE MULLO, DEAR > BACK ALREADY - THESE CHAPS




























: - THOSE PAINTERS | LONG BUT YOU'D GAY THAT \'VE GOT TAE FINEST COLLECTION OF Alii
WILL ONLY WASTE TIME SOME. FORM BOOKS THEY'VE EVER SEEN PH NP
sae oie ie rsomenenses 1) lhl pro rm He
= | | ey cet, ff; Na ‘iad ODDO MCI D CLOT C TOE TTY PALER AAL EEC AONTOOOT SDT
LRAT all say pa. ; i *
& ped) bien. rin ohh Fa, . THRE ADVOCATE
nN | \\ uN “kt (35 REP w) \ a : ‘ re N erg
oT ET ies } ce a «C&S HAS THE BEST
r omit ]
| Ce SN 6§ BOOKS IN TOWN
BY GEORGE MC. MANUS iS JUST A FEW TO CHOOSE FROM... %
aa ye YR DEBBY—A Novel by Max Steele
a caer seein g THE CONSUL AT SUNSET
QUIET WALK AFTER x s
STOW i —By Gerald Hanley
if MODERN COLONIZATION :
= : —By Harrison Church, Ph. D. :
: ADVOCATE STATIONERY x

y,
VQ9G99G 599999566 55955955665565666566666044

er rrrsr
°LP°APLPLGLLPLPPOSPELCG LL LLG PALL COSE LALLA ALD
SEED ete det







ro oe

fons Synibiepee, tne, Wrorkd ‘ site : ask for
SEO ——

ALEX RAYIIGNO | — , —
LUXURY










(32





FOLLET:SOAPS INSPECTION TIME NEED

IMPERIAL LEATHER ° LINDEN BLOSSOM ° BLUE HYACINTH
a TT

V4 ; re ~

$ THEY VE cy 9
REACHEDA S$ Ar)

STALEMATE... SHALL.

NOT BE WORRYING TIME
e

Nowadays you SEE US FOR-





——, JOE
Be (oe iF YOU TRY

ANY TRICKS, TLL
START SHOOTING !









eat Harem ATA, = ({ DUNLOPILLO BUS SEATS
need the Str th of LIONIDE LEATHERETTE GREY PAINT for Flooring
BY LEE FALK eng CARPET MATERIAL SIGNAL RED for Body i
RUBBER MATS HEAT RESISTING BLACK
re fome ON, FELLA. STOP )_WILSDN, REAR VIEW MIRRORS WHITE LEAD & ZINC
WHY DOESN'T THE CAR START? 0H, WY —7 Gore ee Ve {*\ s2_| |PIANAS GOT TO Lote tain nae & MING bur Bate
aa poner TO TURN THE vr | DANGER, SWIM “HEY DEVIL y ce DECARBONIZING SkTS
NITION KEY* WHATS : i
THE terre 7 , DEVIL BARKS p \ WN ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX BRAKE LINING SETS
WiTHDEVIL? s " : al S BATTERY CABLES FRONT SPRINGS for Ford
Ss ACCESSORY SWITCHES & Chevrolet
* Remember BOVRIL Flat GALVANISED SHEETS FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
s Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT AND LOTS OF OTHER
makes excellent for Interior ESSENTIALS
sandwiches, and
&
inag_roves all dishes. S
Bay Street Dial 4269



Bc 4 GE awe | euvans + 2 a





THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHON





For Births, Marriage or Engagement
@nnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for eoch

edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 208 | 6 cents

between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Achnov
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices 1s
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up fo 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days ané
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES





Attention is drawn to the
Defence (Control of Drug and
Patent and Proprietary Medicine
Prices) Order, 1951, No. 7 which
will be published in the Official
= of Thursday 26th April,
23rd April, 1951.

26.4.51—1n.

SHIRTS FOK POSTMEN

Tenders



are invited for

the] Birch $26.00 per pair.

FOR SALE

Mintmum charge week 172
Sundays 24 words
words 3 cents a word week
word Sundews



AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—1938 Buick 8 cyls, in sound
mechanical condition and good tyres.
Suitable especially for hire. Dial 4616.

26.4.51—6n.

Sn STE neree

CAR—Veuxhall Wyvern, done just over
500 miles, as new. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4616 26 4.51









dition.
36

Phone George Skeete 4277 or

26.4. 51—In.





CAR—Onre SS. 2. Black Sports Saloon
1937, laid up through war, Excellent
condition, $550.00 or nearest offer. Phone
De Laney: 2216 or 4204, 24.4.51—4n.

WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station

Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

FURNITURE





At = sa iy Show-
rooms, jaradw: Alley, Morris ty
Cane and Rush Easy Chairs in Pine and

Also Rush Bottom

manufacture of Khaki Shirts for] Upright Chairs $3.75 with Arms $4.50 and

Postmen and Porters for the Post | ck’

Office Department during
financial year
Postmen it has been decided to
issue shirts im the place of jackets.
Full particulars can be obtained
from the Colonial Postmaster,
Tenders in sealed envelopes

. the | hana
ending on 31st]¢ p.m, including Breakfast, closed mid-
March, 1952. In the case of the} day Saturday.

$5.00 each not forgetting
numerous variety of new and
furniture.

a
second
Open daily, 8 a.m. to

addressed to the Colonial Secre-| 2! 4346 for appointment.

tary and marked “Tender for the
manufacture of shirts” should
reach the Colonial Secretary’s
Office not later than 12 noon on
Wednesday the 2nd of May, 1951.

26.4.51—1n.

TAKE NOTICE

IDEAL MiLic
®





1

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East 44th Street, New York City,
USA, Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing milk,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 24th day of
April 1951 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April 1951.

H. eae
4.4

TAKE NOTICE

NESCAFE

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation, organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address *
is 155, East 44th Street, New York City, |
US A., Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing coffee, and
will be entitied to register the same
after one month from the 24th day of
April 1951 uniess some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks. {

TAKE NOTICE

ANAC

That THE LeBLANC CORPORATION,
a corporation organized under the laws of
the State of Louisiana, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 210 Fast Vermilion Street, Lafayette,
Louisiana, ‘ Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A" of Register in respect
of dietary supplement containing Vita-
mins Bl, B2, and Niacin, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 24th day of April, 1951,
unléss some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
one month from the day of April,
24.4,.51—23n

TAKE NOTICE

LACTOGEN

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation organized and existing under
and by virtue of the laws of the State of
New York, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 155,
East, 44th Street, New York City, U.S.A.
Manufacturers, has applied for the reg-
istration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in vespect of substances used
os food or as ingredients in foods, espec-
jially products containing milk, and wtil
be entitled to register the same after
ore month from the 24th doy of April,
1851 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
et my office of opposition of such regis-
tation. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951.

HW. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
24.4.51—3n















O9SOCCDOSDTCCIODOSOE |

West Indian & British |

OOLO

*

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Pottery, Hand biocked Beach- ~
wert, Decoration House, Sr
James. Tel. 91-74. rm)
14.4.51—Im, |
© POSSE IOS

~



=

REQUIRED

$50,000.00 loan; secured by
on Freehold
property on Frederick St.,
Port—of-Spain.
Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors.











1st Mortgage

SS AR

Contact













|
(
}

25.4.51—n.

MECHANICAL
BICYCLE — Gent's Humber Bicycle,
new, never ridden. Complete with
electric lighting, deluxe saddle etc.
26,4.51—1n.



“GESTETNER DUPLICATORS"—New
models just received) A. S, Bryden &
Sons (B'dos) Ltd, Phone 4675.

16.4.51—t.f.n.

RALEtGH BICYCLE—One Boy's Raleigh
Bicycle 18” frame. In good condition,
complete with lock, bell and tools, Price
$45.00. Phone 3354, Oliver Johnson,
25.4.51—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

LL
PRICKS—For building or garden walks
$3.00 per 100, also Fire Bricks. Apply
The Old Ice Co., Prince Wm. Henry St.
25.4.51—5n.

STOVES—Valor single, 2, 3 and 4
kerosene oil burner. Secure yours be-
fore advance in price. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4391. 26.4.51—6n



ee peterinnelneetge tie

YACHT—Buccaneer 15 x 5 keel, screw
fastened (copper) D-class, second in
Royal B'dos Yacht Club races, E. A. V.
Williams, E.C. Factory. 25.4.51—2n
————_— —-—

“You can’t be floored in the matter
of coverings for your floors if you
visit HARRISON’S FURNITURE DEPT.,
where you will find a large selection
of Linoleum and Congoleum, Carpets,
Rugs and Straw Mats’. 26.4.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE

i.










That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
u corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East, 44th Street, New York City.
U.S.A., Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of substances
ised as food or as ingredients in foods,
will be entitled to register the same one
month from the 24th day of April, 1951,
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.

Dated thts 10th dav cf April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
24.4.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE

NESPRAY-

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East 44th Street, New York City,
US A, Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing milk, and
will be entitled to register the same
efter one month from the Mth day of
April 1951 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office,

Dated this 10th day of April 1951.

H ‘WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
24.4.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE







That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
® corporation organized and existing
under and by’ virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
{9 155, East, 44th Street, New York City,
US. Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods.
especially products containing cocoa, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 24th. day of April,
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office -

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951”

Hi. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Mark;
24,4.51.-—3n





MAIL NOTICES

MAILS for St. Vincent, Grenada, Trin-
idad and British Guiana by the R.M.S.
LADY PODNEY will be closed at fhe
General Post Office as under;—

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at 3
p.m., Ordinary Mail at 4 p.m. on the
27th April 1951.

MAILS for St.

Vincent, Martinique.

| Antigua, St. Kitts, St. Thomas, V.I. and

New York by the S.S. FORT

will be closed at the General Post Office
as under:+-
Parcel Mail at 12 Noon, Registered
Mai) at 1.30 p.m., and Ordinary Mail at
2.20 p.m, on the ist May 1951



POLL OCESE LES” OG ES

6









CAR—Morris 8 Touring ver; good con-

eee e
&

v

S$ NOTICE

% ATTnACTIVE ROOM and Board %
X for Bachelors. For particulars e
X% apply: Casuarina Club Tel. %
% 8496. 25.4.51—1In. Q)
? »

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per apate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays
mrumum cnarge $1.5¢ on week-days

and $1.80 om Sundays



REAL ESTATE

_—

LAND: One outstanding sight of land
19,806 sq. ft. of Land situated in Navy
Gardens. Dial 3950. 26.4.51—2,

1 will offer for sale by public com-
petition at my office Victoria Street on
Friday 27th at 2 p.m.—1i5,000 square feet
LAND at adjoining Govern-

has an additional entrance
Road. ALL UTILITY SERV-



full grown cocoanut trees thereon.

The house is built of stone and con-
teins open galleries on two sides, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with

running water, pantny, kitchen and usual
out offices.

\ Garage and servants fooms in yard.
Inspection on application to the care-
taker Mr. Seymour Downes,
The above will be set for sale at Pub-
lic Competition at our office in Lucas
» Bridgetown, on Friday the 27th

April 1951 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

FOR RENT

Mintmum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over %
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

word Sundays,







PUBLIC NOTICES

Ter cents per agate line on week-day: |
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays. |
wminewm charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTICE



1
' ns
NOTKCE is herehy given that William
HOUSES | Patterson of Kensington, St. Michael,
Barbados, British West Indies is apply-
BOULOGNE. § ing to the Governor for naturalization,
be = a 4 ha St. Lawrence Gap, full¥ | and that any person who knows any
‘ shed al 8409 26.4.51-—-2n | reason why naturalization should not be
ace remem | granted should send a written and
F CHANDOS, 2nd Ave Belleville. Fully | signed Statement of the facts to the
urnished. Available May 15th. Inspec- | Colonial Secretary. :
} tion by appointment. Phone 3450 a: | Dated this 25th day of April, 1951,
| 3026 20.4.51—t.f.n. 28.4.51—2n.
| FLAT--Beaumont, Hastings unfur-

nished. Dining and Sitting room 2 bed-



WANTED

Mmimum charge sec w 72 ceu*s



HLUP










w6 cents Sundays $4 words — ie
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents @

NOTICE





= ‘ rooms, running water, Kitchen with eos, | .Miss NICHOLLS of the Banford Beauty

x seen tes zim, -| usual conveniences. No pets or thilizes | Salon, Bolton Lane informs her clients

22 4.51 Dial—2636. 24.4.51.—3n. | that her Salon will be closed for repsirs

‘S-t—ta (a | from Monday 30th April to Monday 7th

“HILLCREST, fully furnished, situat ANGLIN, Bathsheba, is no longer | May, 1681. 28.4.51—1n.

at Bathsheba, &t. J . eco site | for Rent, but for Sale. See Real Estate LIQUOE ae
° eachmount Hotel) standing on | °°!!!" 21.4.51—€6n EN OTI

244.433 square feet of land with several errr Q ci Se cs

The application of Albert T. Clarke
holder of Liquor License No. 961 of 1951
sranted to Neville E. Gill in respect
of a board and shingle shop at Fitz
Village, St. James, for permission to use
said Liquor License &c. at bottom floor
of a 2-storey wall building opposite
Stanmore Lodge, Black Rock, St, Michael,

Dated this 25th day of April. 1951.
To: EB. A. MeLBOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”

ALBERT T. CLARKE,
Applicant
—This application will be consid-

|
N.B





| EXPERIENCED a ered ata Licensing Court to be held at
uth grapher. Apply nrc S ye | Police Court, District “A™ on Monday

Mh | cate Co. td. the 7th day of May 1951 at 11 o'clock

TANGLIN—situate at | Beachmont, 15.4.51—.f.n, | °° ™

Bathsheba, and standing on 1 rood 2.3/3} —=<-——__-—-—_—— en E. A. McLEOD,_

perches of land thereto, containing} TWO GIRLS who can use treadle| . Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”

lounge, Dining Room, Three double} ™@chines, for Cap-making. Apply in / 7° ¢.51—In

bedrooms, Children’s room, Three gal-| P&"S0N as soon as possible, to Mis

leries, Kitchen, Garage and servant's; Vernon Walcott, Ivy Road

room, Furnished or unfurnished. ' 26.4. 51—2n

For inspection please telephone 3626. |

Offers to be sent
undersigned.

Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors, James
Street, Bridgetown. 21.4.51—fn,

That desirable two storied freehold
dwellinghouse known as “Culloden
View", situate at the junction of Cul-
foden and Dalkeith Roads, with the
land thereto containing 10,585 square
‘¥Yeet. The house contains drawing and
dining rooms, library, kitchen, bath and
teilet downstairs and upstairs, four
bedrooms (one with bath and toilet)
Two servants rooms, garage for 1 car
and tool room (all built of stone), in the
yard,

The date of sale will
later.

Inspection between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.
any day except Sundays on appoiit-
ment with the owner Mr, St. Clair Hunte,

(Phone 3229),
G, L. W. CLARKE & CO.,
Solicitors.
26.4.51—4n,

in writing to the





be published

td

Se

YOUNG LADY for our Office. 18
to 25. Must have knowledge oe eee
work, Shorthand and Typing and be
quick and intelligent. Good salany and
brosptcts Apply by letter. C. B. Rice
& Co. 26.4.51—2n

JUNIOR ASSISTANT RADIO ENGIN-
EER, with ability to mix, Must
have sound knowledge of transmitters
and receivers and to be able to sell as
well as engineer radio schemes. Travel
opportunities throughout Caribbean and
Central America exist. Ability to write
good business letters is important.
Apply in writing to R, D. Stewart,
Supervising Engineer (Caribbean Area)
Pye Ltd., P.O. Box 260, Barbados,





26.4.51—3n,

ROOM — Required immediately by
couple. room with meals in quiet
private“home, Hastings, Worthing, shore-
side, good bathing, quote moderate
monthly rate. Reply; Box X.Y.Z. C/o
Advocate. 26.4.51—1n.



Oils Firm
LONDON, April 25.

Hesitancy returned to the Lon-
don stock exchange today and
price changes in domestic issues
were irregular, Early morning
business gave firmness to Govern-
ment funds and leading industrials
but gains were generally lost in
the absence of any follow through
to this business. Funds were
finally fractionally easier on
balance and _ industrial share
movements were mainly to
slightly lower levels. Engineering
however held firm.

Union Castle shippings were a
weak feature with a loss of four
shillings at 41/6 with group profits
showing a decline of £592,000
at £1,579,000. Dividend however
was increased from eight per cent
to 10 per cent for the year,

Oils were consistently firm
with investment buying of lead-
ers but rubbers were dull.

Press talks of sterling revalu-
ation checked gold shares at the
outset but prices later recovered
when this talk was discredited.
Coppers agajn featured with
useful gains.

—Reuter.

Rubber Conirol

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya,
April 25

The Malayan Federal Govern-
ment said in a written parliamen-
tary reply today that they did not
think there was any need for the
rubber market to be apprehensive
over the Government’s powers to
impose control on the destination
of rubber exports.

The Government said it was not
intended to interfere with the
normal rubber export trade of the
federation,

In the past, 60 per cent of rub-
ber exports had gone to Britain,
the United States and self govern-
ing members of the British Com-
monwealth,

“Such exports are not subject to
destinational control. As to exports
to other countries, it is common
knowledge that exports to Com-/
munist China, have in reteni
months risen to levels out of all
proportion to the normal domes-
tic requirements of that country.
As a result less rubber has been
available for the United Kingdom
and other friendly countries” tne



let nsec tesa i” tein epee a eels TeieetnhiiinaTali ddiectetaceicteieinaticiaomshioliiies

|statement added.

—Reuter.

Worrell And
Ramadhin In
Benefit Game

LONDON, April 25
West Indies Test Cricketers
Frank Worrell and Sonny Rama-
dhin will play in a benefit match
i. Jack Parker of Surrey on May





_ ‘The West Indies players will be
included in Parker’s side to meet
the local club on Mitcham Green,
Southeast London.

Parker’s Eleven will be com.
pleted by the full Surrey County
side with the exception of Ber-
nard, Constable and Lock who
will be playing for the M.C.C.
against Essex,

Parker coached in the West
Indies in 1938—39 and Arthur
aaa pri and England
wicketkeeper also coac 7
in 1949—50, we Te

Laurie Fishlock opening bats-
man and Jim Laker off spinner
toured with Ramadhin and Wor-
rell on the recent Commonwealth
tour of India.—Reuter.

ge en eengesocee ede:
(WUBI, =

NOTICE TO MEMBERS
In accordance with Rule
34 the Club will be closed

.
3
>
rn)



SOOOPPOPPPOPFPOS

65

to members from 8 p m. on

Saturday, the 28th April.

.
POCO

Red China Is Not

Moscow’s Satellite

. TORONTO, April 25.

Sir Benegal Rau, India’s
permanent representative in the
United Nations said here today
that “to the best of our informa-
tion,” there was “little likelihood”
of the Chinese People’s Republic
being overthrown by internal
opposition or disruption,

In a lecture at Victoria Univers-
ity here, Sir Benegal said new
China was “in a state of transition
with g modified Communism or
en of its own as a distant
goal”,

“Soviets appear fully to recognise
and accept the Peking variation of
Communism, and there has there-
fore never been any question of
bringing Chinese Communists into
line” he declared,

No Cominform direction of
Chinese policy had been attemp-
ted and Communist China was not
a satellite of Moscow, he said,

—Reuter,



S. Korean Home
Minister Resigns

TAEGU, April 25.

The South Korean Home
Minister resigned today following
the execution of 187 villagers
accused of collaborating with
Communist guerillas. A Gov-
ernment statement earlier today
announced that a South Korean
battalion commander’ executed
villagers after a summary Court
Martial at Kochang, 35 miles
southwest of Taegu.

After they were sentenced the
Battalion Commander — ordered
his information officer to execute
them on the spot. “He executed
them individually and buried
them”, the statement said.

A statement issued after the
inquiry into what was called the
“Kochang Incident” said the
villages were sheltering Com
munist guerillas and giving
them arms, food and information

The army originally confined
600 people in a_ village school
but children under 14, men over
60, women and girls and a few
others were released. -Others—
almost the entire fit male popula-
tion of the village—were execut-
ed.

—Reuter,

Horse Trouble

LONDON, April 25.
At a London Airport tonight the
£13,000 race horse Helioscope, son
of the famous Derby winner
Hyperion struggled and kicked as
15 people tried in vain to get him



| The Colonies
In Commons

LONDON, April 25.

Trade negotiations between
Britain and Cuba are still in pro-
gress but no agreement has yet
been made Mr. T. F. Cook, Under-
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies said today. He gave this
written answer in the House of
Commons to Colonel Arthur D.
Dodds — Parker (Conservative)
latest member to ask what steps
are being taken 4o protect the
interests of Jamaica. Colonel
Dodds-Parker emphasised that
the Jamaican cigar industry
had already suffered a_ setback
from the contraction in sales in
the United Kingdom due to the
high rate of duty and the reduced
spending power of the British
| people.
, Another Conservative Member
Mr. Cyril, Osborne sed the
Colonial Secretary Mr James
| Griffiths for an assurance that
the proposed agreement between
Cuba and the United Kingdom
would not be detrimental to the
pineapple, cigar and sugar indus
tries of Jamaica.

In a_ written reply Mr, Cook
merely recalled What was said by
the President of the Board of
Trade on March 15—that no
agreement would be made with
Cuba which would prejudice the
undertaking given to Common-
wealth sugar producers when the
Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
ment was negotiated last year.

The United Kingdom Govern-
ment, he said, was fully aware of |
Jamaican views on pineapples |
and cigars and was bearing them +:
in mind,

Grenada Riots

Replying to a question about
reeent disorders in Grenada, Mr,
Cook said the Secretary of States
for the Colonies did not intend to
publish a report. Only preliminary
comments had been received from
the Labour Adivser now in the
West Indies. When he had returned
to Britain the Minister would be
in a position to answer in greater
detail questions on the causes of
the strike. Commander A, H. P
Noble (Conservative) put ques-
tions arising out of the closing
down of the naval dockyards at
Bermuda.

He wanted to know: how were
the medical and other surplus}
stores disposed of ? Were any
dumped ? What is the future of the
floating dock ? When was this
decided ? Has any refit equipment
been sent out since the dockyard
started closing down?

Mr. W. J. Edwards replied for
the Admiralty, that it was decided
as recently as last month, that in
view of altered circumstances, the
large floating dock in Bermuda
should be retained for continued
use by the Royal Navy.

Instructions had now been giv-
en for it to be towed to the
United Kingdom,

All serviceable stores not sur-
plus to the requirements of the
Navy had been returned to the
United Kingdom,

Certain surplus medical stores
had been sold to the King Edward
Memorial Hospital, Bermuda.

Other Naval stores and plant
not required by the Navy were
sold locally, Remaining small
quantity of stores unserviceable
or impracticable to bring back
were dumped. No refit equipment
had been sent out since the dock
|yard started to close down—only

jsome spares for small craft.
Reuter,







aboard a plane to fly him to} .
Caracas, South America. e
For several hours the men) Planes Collid
struggled and tried to coax the KEY WEST FLORIDA, April 25
horse up the special gangway. A commercial airliner and a

offering grass and fruit, Fifteeo

feet from the ground, Helioscope |

reared up and lashed out with his
hind legs.

The men held tightly on to the
ropes. A veterinary surgeon gave
the horse injections and half
pint of medicine. Then after blind-
folding him and covering his face
with a sack the men got the horse
into a box but he lashed out and
almost turned it over,

2

United States Navy training plane
collided over the ocean one mile
|from Key West and crashed into
the sea today, Soon afterwards a
woman’s body was found at the
seene of the crash. :
Later Pan-American Airways
reported that a four-engined sky-
master, operated by its oT.tic-ed
company Compania Cubana De
Aviation, was overdue on the
Miami-Havana flight with 34 pas.

Colonel T. C. Irvine said, ‘ic | Sengers—Reuter,
would be impossible to send him| |"; ss San...
by aie now ater what bs|[ ORPENTAL

happened. He will have to go by

sea. After all, the new owners
want a whole horse, not half one.”
Helioscope went back to New
Market to wait for a boat,
—Reuter.
[POCO POOP EE,
Are you thinking of Building
Houses, Roads and Yards ?
*.

: IF so

Contact: “B. A. & P. §. BROOKS”

CONTRACTORS

We draw = your
endeavour to
the best

oo

CSOCD

Plans
give

and you

For further particulars Phone 8335
or 8162.

CPSSSSSSISF

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened



THANI’S "3
Laos 594 3A



NOTICE 10
CANASTA FANS

HEINEKEN’S BREWERY has
made a gift of Canasta Score
pads to players in Barbados.
Drink Heineken’s Beer as you

Â¥ play Canasta Score Pads will
| be given to players on paying

a visit to Messrs K. R. Hunte
& Co., Lid, Lower Broad Street.

| Rrppornnrnnns bibibbmewbtbids
! AOC OOOO OOO wee




PERSONAL



‘ERLINE
1 do not
or
or

The public heret
giving credit to m
KELLMAN (nee Prescod)
hold myself responsible for her
one ¢ise contracting any debt

are w

debt



in try name unless by a written order
signed by me
Signed SAMUEL KELLMAN,
Ivy Land,
St. Michael
25.4.51-—2









The public are hereby warned ag:
giving credit to any person or pers
as I do not hold myself responsible for
‘one contracting any debt or debts tr
my name unless by a written orde
signed by me.

Signed BERESFORD LASHLEY
Maxwell Rood,
Christ Chureh
25.4, 51—2n

nst
on





Concern Over
Colonies
Expressed in Letter to Times



LONDON, April 25.

Concern ai disintegrating forces
in the Colonial Empire expressec
by Conservative member cf Pat
liament, David Gammans in ®&
letter to the Times is shared by
others today. But they~do not
agree that a Council of the Empire’
on the lines of the Council ot
Europe is the best remedy.

Gilbert McAllister, Labour
member, who was one of | the
Empire Delegation to East Africa
some years ago, wrote today that
the Commonwealth Federation had
its obvious theoretical attractions,
but the view of raost people. is
that however desirable, it is, fot
the time being, impracticable
They consider, he contended that
such a federation would undoubt
edly result in the secession from
the Commonwealth of some of
its oldest countries.

Each Has A Say

McAllister suggested that there
already exists an institution which
cculd be adopted to serve the
end in view—the Council of the
Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association on which are repre-
sented the United Kingdom, al
the Dominions and 21 Colonia!
territories.

He said that at the recent Can-
berra Comference of the Associa-
tion, attended by representatives
of 40 Commonwealth Parliaments
Sangster, Minister of Social Wel-
fare in Jamaica said “it is the
cnly place in the British Common-

wealth at which the colonies
ave able to say their little
piece and give you _ their
viewpoint. In this great

gathering of the Commonwealth,
we are happy and preud to be
able to stand on a_ ground of
equality and give our views on
the various subjects that are being
debated” .

McAllister explained that the
Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association and the Council which
row binds it together have been
growth of the last 40 years and
; an experiment in voluntary
co-operation between Parliament
arians of nations within the
Commonwealth,

“From its modest beginning:
he added, “it has expanded i
prestige and in influence, that its
translation into something wit!
statutory rights and obligation
would only be in line with the
characteristic developments of
historical events in Britain”.

—Reuter.

Reds Tell Indians
To Unite With China

BOMBAY, April 25.
The Indian Communist party
today called on the nation’s “toil
ing miliions” to unite to make ar
Indian People’s demeeracy alliec
with Soviet Russia and China,
Communists denounced Nehru’



Government as ‘anti-democratic
and anti-popular” and said it
should be replaced with <

“People’s Democracy on the basi:
of the coalition of all democratic
anti-feudal, anti-imperialist foree,
in the country”.



In a 4,000 “fundamental pro-
gramme” the Communists an
nounced that the party's polit-

buro had decided on “radical re-
orientation of our tactical line”.

The Communist manifesto listec
a 30 point political and economic
“emancipation” programme for
the Indian people. It claims th
confiscation of all feudal estates
without payment, and nationalisa~-
tion of industrial banking, ship-
ping and commercial enterprises

Highlights of the party’s foreign
policy are:

Withdrawal from the Common-
wealth, and alliance and friend-
ship with Pakistan and Ceylon.

The announcement did not in-
dicate the party’s programme of
action to realise its objectives.

—Reuter.

“FAIR PRICES”
LONDON, April 25

“Fair prices” scale to guide
buyers came into operation today
in the Malan Federation,

“Fair price’ lists are ‘being
issued to shoppers to help reduce
the excessive price marging? of
local dealers. Prices wall nat be
the legal maximum prices, A
similar scheme is already in oper-
ation in Singapore. A price con.
trol for all kinds of imported
cigarettes is to come into force on
April 30.—Reuter,

=

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A small quantity of this
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material still available
your GAS WORKS, Bay St
Price . . 40c, per gallon.
Get Some To-day.



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.| In Prague Missi

:






















PAGE SEVEN



A.P. Corr spondent| Council Pass

BE, April 23











|

lovak employees of the Associated
Press in Prague are believed t«
have been arrested recently and
1 third disappeared last week,

United States Embassy here

this afternoon sent a note to the
Czechoslovak Government re-
porting the disappearance of
William Oatis, Prague -orrespond-
ent of the Associated

asking for an investigation con-
cerning his whereabouts
welfare, on the most

basis possible.

The American note, sent to the
Czechoslovak Foreign

office in Prague on Monday after-
noon and has not been heard
from by the Embassy since.

bassador Hotel (his residence)
since Monday morning, although
nis personal effects are reportedly
still in his room there,” the note





America, whose. trade
US A, Manufacturers, has
“A” of Register -in
especially products
one montl
meantin
tration The
Dated this 10th day of April 1951,







th day of April,

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW





“He has not been in the Am-





5.8. “ALCOA PATRIOT” sails 18th April





\OUTHBOUND
Name of Ship





/ORTHBOUND

3S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE"



on ee

*These

:

‘Contact Antilles Products,
sailing to Europe fortnightly.
Dublin, London, or

reduction for children.

REMEMBER

our motor





This Exceller

eonta



2 acres



William Oatis, Associated Press |
corresponde in Prague, has not
been seen at his office for th
last 24 hours

The United State Embassy
here has asked Czechoslovak
authorities to make inquiries as
to his whereabouts

Oatis is reported to
last seen on Monday
when he left his o He is

A United States Embassy
official disclosed today that Oati
callect at the United States
Embassy here on” Sunday night
and express concern because
he’ was beitig “closely followed
24 hours a day.” Two Czechos

Press and/the taxpayers

and ,; sary.
urgent }

|

Sails Montreal

due April 20th.



vessels have limited passenger

Limited,

Rotterdam,

when you purchase from

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM =

van delivers the goods to your door.

; es — — =
lp 1 144 ” .
run SAL “CASABLANCA” MAXWELI
Moderr Property set in walled gardens of about
1 Large Verandah
There
and the Gardens are beautifully laid out, Well recommended.

"8 Resolution

for a cane cutter to earn what
it was estimated the emigrant
would earn after reductions.
Hon. R. N. Turner said that he
understood that on previous oc-
casions work of this sort was.
agrieultural ang the work would
be of the same nature as before,

Hon. J. v. Chandler, President,
said that it appeared to him that
in fairness to the taxpa of
Barbados who had to pay for the
povericen trip, those who were’
going should afford to 0}
than $2 a week. ee ae

He was of the opinion that the
Government's estimate was very
optimistic with regard taking a
basis of 12 weeks instead of 10,
Besides they had made no allow-
ance for workers saying they did
not like the job and wanted to
return as had happened already,

from page 1

They should not, he said, ask

to subsidize the

more than was neces-
!

Hon. G. D. L. Pile said that in
this instance, the term emigration
was wrong. They were only as-
sisting labourers to find employ.

workers

‘ Ministry,) ment and it was not emigration
said Oatis was last seen at his/in the true sense of the word;

U.S. PAPER BACKS
BEVAN

WASHINGTON, April 24,
The Washington Post agreéd in









said, an editorial today with Aneurin
His whereabouts is unknown Bevan’s view that the American
to his effice, His Automobile | Rearmament Programme prevent-
likewise has disappeared but n0] 44 Britain getting scarce materials.
Known friend or aSsociate of The editorial said the Unit i
Oatis knows of any intended | 1.165 had besi "heseing" a
trip.” Fae 7
The note followe@ oral repre- | Material for Defence and called
sentations made at the Ministry | the policy the “product of hysteria
for Foreign Affairs this morning] and lack of faith in the Allies.”
—Reuter. \ —Reuter.
That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC., a corporation organized and_ existing \
under and by virtue of the laws ‘of the State of New York, United States .ot

1951, unless some person shall in the

n duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such regts-
trade mark can be seen on application at my office,

HH. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
24,4.513n



SHIPPING NOTICES

















ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |: ~
(M.A.N.Z, LINE) % ae aes; PREM I

M.S. “TONGARIRO" sailed Brisbane | ¢ Sy eae te aac
March 24th, Arriving at Rertadae tae 3 will accept Cargo and Pa es
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8.8. “ARABIA" ‘js scheduled to nail ish os lle 2d i a
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th nstant.

May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane “ 2ce
16th June, Sydney 23rd June, orriving Mi 4 Caribbee"* will aecept
Mt Trinidad during latter half of duly, Cargo and . Patsengers for
ind proceeding thereafter to Barbados Dominica, Antigua, soo ae
ind, Liverpool Nevis and St. Kitts.

In addition to general eargo this Friday 4th May, r aad :
vessel has ample space for chilled and tnt
hard frozen cargo baynamp rey
Cargo accepted on through Bills of B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to '

British Guinna, Leeward and Windward ERS ASSOC,, INC.
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For further particulars apply Tele, 4047, =
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A Steamer sails 27th April - arrives Barbados 9th May.
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

38. “ALCOA ROAMER” sails 4th April arrives Barbados 20th April.

arrives Barbados 4th May.

Oe

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Sails Halifax Arrives B'dos.

8.5. “ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May 9th
8.8, “ALCOA PIONEER” May = Iith May lath May = 24th
58, “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May — 25th May = 28th

June ~ 7th

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ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

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iness address js 155, East 44th Street, New York City, —
applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part ~
t of substances used as food or as ingredients in foods,
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i. ¥

7.

ah tO



PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THURSDAY,





APRIL 26, 1951



AUSTRALIANS ANXIOUS TO SEE W.1. CRICKETERS

College Win
Football Game
From Empire 4—2

College defeated Empire 4—2
when they played Second Divis-
ion football at Bank Hall yester-
day. :

The game was fast from begin-
hing to end with College showing





much better form than their op-
ponents

Five of the six goals wer
scored during the first half, J
Williams scored two for College
while C. W. Smith and Mr, Al-
bert Williams, scored one each
Harper and Brewster scored fui
Empire.

College’s goalie, Roach delight.
ed the spectators with his many
well-timed saves He overshad-
owed his counterpart Clarke,

The Game
The game started with the
Blues defending the south goal

Empire got the kick off, but im-
mediately College was on the
offensive and were pressing hard
to open their scoring.

Ten minutes later they got their
first success when C, W. Smith at
eentre forward got the ball fron
the left wing and made no mis
take in netting a left foot shot





College were soon after tw
goals in the lead. A penalty wa
awarded them for Bynoe_ putt ns

his hands to a powerful shot fron
Tudor in the penalty area on
right wing. J. A. Williams t
the penalty and scored to
goalie’s right. The score was t
2—0,

Mr. Albert Williams notchec
the third goal for College with <
beautiful long distance shot, com-
pletely beating the goalie.

Empire, who were kept most!)



ne
er

on the defensive, however, took
over for a short while and thi:
resulted them a_ goal. Harper,

their centre forward, got past the
College’s backs and then deceived
their goalie with a fairly low shot
The score was 3—1,

Shortly before half time, Col.
lege took the score to 4—-1 and
this was still the score at the in-
terval. J. A, Williams, after
being intercepted in the penalty
area by one of the Empire backs,
got hola of the ball again, and
shot with his left foot to the righ!
of a motionless goalie.

Second Half

The game was almost unevent
ful after resumption, This time
College was down in the Empir«
area and then Empire would tak«
over, but some time elapsed be-
fore the score changed.

However, a few minutes before
the end of the game, Empire go
in another goal,

Brewster, playing at inside left
for Empire, finally got possession

of the ball after a melee in the A modern version of Jesse
College goal area and scored into Owens, a slim New Yorker named
an empty goal, At close of play Andy Stanfield, is to show his
the score was 4—2 in favour of paces to a British crowd for the
College. first time.

The teams were :— Stanfield will be a member of a

College: Roach, Griffith, Ford,-small American team running at
Simmons, Mr. Williams, Dash, White City, London, in a series of
Williams, Smith, P. Tudor, |, international races on May 5 an
Tudor, 7. He will be accompanied by

Empire : Clarke,



Hutchinson, Harper, Brewster, ready well known to British
Norville. athletic crowds.
Réferee: Mr, B. Hoyos. Stanfield’s likeness to Jesse
- -— Owens is shown not only in
sprinting but he is said to be

T'DAD WILL FIND
NEXT BRANDON CUP
SERIES HARDER

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23.

The colourful Jamaican act
tennis player, Ron Sturdy, depu-
teing for his skipper Donald
Leahong, who was ill, told a big
crowd on Sunday evening that
Trinidad would not fing it as
easy next year in the Brandon
Cup series, Sturdy on behalf of
Jamaica said the tour was very
pleasant, the tennis very good,
and. that Trinidad was the best
team. Sturdy made special
mention of Ralph Legall, who
had been playing the game fo
only three years, He said.
“Legall was absolutely outstand-
ing.” Ralph Carter for Barbados
paid high tribute to the orgi
isation, and so did Bernard Go
salves who spoke on behalf
British Guiana.





Traffie Don't

No. 34
©
DO NOT FORGET TO
CONCENTRATE ON
YOUR DRIVING.
eo
Space made available by

CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.







Gardner Will Not

European

training
ha
in
month,—Reuter,

Series



Billed As—
“World Championship”

MELBOURNE.

The West Indeis tour of Australia has already been much
publicised and Australian crowds are eagerly looking for-
ward to comparing the West indians with their players,
particularly their champion batsmen, Weekes and Worrell,
and bowlers Ramadhin and Valentine writes Lyall Rowe,
Reuter’s correspondent from Melbourne, Monday



K. MILLER

Fight On May 22

LONDON, April 25,
Gardner, British
heavy weight

Jack

tine heavyweight, at Harringay
m May 22,
Jack Solomons, the London

promoter, said today: “It’s no use
waiting
our
left
as we had hoped, and it is
likely to be ready for May 22.
John
Simpson, Gardner’s rmanager, and
have decided not to risk Jack's
ands in an important fight until
he is thoroughly fit,”

any make
minds,

thumb

longer to
Gardner’s
has not come

“In the circumstances,

Gardner injured his thumb
and hurt it again
Joe Weiden of
European title fight
IN.S.

beat
the



A Modern

Jesse Owens
LONDON,



3ynoe, Jordan, Mal Whitfield, Horace Ashenfeiter
Wilson, Rudder, D, Clarke, Morris, end John Twomey, who are al

fine hurdler and has long-jumped
over 25 feet,



BY M. HAARISON-GRAY

It is vital
keep an
opponents’

at
eye on your
score as well as
Much of the pla
on the rival po:
xuinple

Canasta to

i
;
'
;













with









. * game

& po ity (but not the

s certainty) of making one or

s two more Canastas. before

§ East-West have made thetr

s Initial meld

: hould the East-West score

a r the 4000 mark, unles
1-South are within one



Janasta of game, they should
s fo OUut-—it is most tmportant
t this stage of the game to
ch East-West for a minus

With both sides between
3400 and 4000, North-South
should first assess their
chances of winning the game
on the hand. Unless these are
xeeptionally bright, they
should elect to go out, their
objective being to start the
next, and probably the last,
hand with a lead of 800 or
900 while the opponents still
require 120 for the Initial

meld
however,

It,
their score



subtracting
Fasy.West are
likely to be below the 3000
mark, and therefore needing
90 only for their meld on the
next hand, it ts better to con-
tinue the game—otherwise
much of the North-South
acd tage would be lost

It ulso follows that if both
scores are just below 3000, it
is usually advisable not to go
out until the opponents have
melded, so that they will have
the same disadvantage of
120 f peer first

by






requiring








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They'll Do It Every Time

woe BICEPS SPENDS HOURS
IN HIS BACK YARD KEEPING
FIT WITH HIS WEIGHT-LIFTING

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and
champion
will not fight Cesar Brion, Argen-

up
injured

along
not

when
Austria
last

his

cReeeneceses : /eeeessrsezsererseneens: ceeevsstccetzccar easreseerrssaeeseorsarseasares

Bur wio HAs 70
LUG THE DUMBBELLS
IN ier IT RAINS =

ASK WIFEY *s**s
SHE KNows!

The West Indians can feel con-



fident that they will get re-
ceplicn from Australinn crowds
milar to that given the popular
M.C.C. team on its recent tour
No Bredman
Australian cricket is at the

crossroads, The indifferent show-
ing of its Test team in the recentiy
completed Test series against Eng-
land has caused some critics here
to say Australia’s world supremacy
in post-war cricket has ended

It was the first season since 1928
that Australia has had to play a

series against England without
Bradman.
No cricket country, with the

possible exception of the West In-
dies, queried Australia’s claim to
the title of world cricket cham-
pions, until the M.C.C. team
rroved Anstralinn cricketers were
far from invincible

It is quite obvious that an “over-
haul” of candidates is needed be-
fore the Test team is selected
meet the renowned West Indians
here next summer. This series is
being billeqd here “cricket
championship of the world.”

Australia retained the ashes
against England, but a survey of
the Test matches shows how easily
one of the biggest upsets in Test
cricket history could have oc-
curred,

England was blighted with bad
luck. After losing the toss in the
first Test at Brisbane, it bundled
the Australians out for 228 only,
to encounter a Brisbane “sticky
tiog,” easily the worst batting pitch
in the world. Even then they
nearly pulled the game out of the
fire,

to

as

Injuries

From England's point of view
the less said about tie second Te
in Meibourne the better, for here
rngiand had the game won ye
lost. Injuries did not help Engianc
in the Third and Fourth Tests.

England’s win in the last Tesi
by a team that was not expected
to prove troublesome astonisheu
the critics. Many unkind thing:
were said about the team early 1:
the tour, some of which may have
been deserved, But under the
grand leadership of rreddie
wrown, the team showed it could
svercome adversities and fight
back.

Full biame ine Austrajian
slump must be taken by its bets-
men. They failed repeatedly on
pitehes full of runs even though
they did not come up to the heart-
breaking standard to which bowl-
ers in tnis country have become
accustomed.

Star opening batsman, Artrur
Morris except for his 206 in the



ava

fourth Test at Adelaide, was a
failure. He had three partners
during the — seriés Moroney,

Archer and Burke—but none was
& success.

Dashing left-hander, Neil
Harvey, from whom much was
expected after his success on the
South African tour, proved a
thaney player. Too often it was
left to the captain, diminutive
Lindsay Hassett, to halt) what
looked like a complete collapse

A Star







One success was all-rounder
Keith Miller. When he was bai-
ting or bowling there was always
a feeling that something was
about to happen. Events pro\ ed



that this was no fallacy. In the
field he was superb, 7
Australian bowlers, witt

“freak” off-spinner, Jack Iversor

starring and speedster, Ray
Lindwall, still able to wreak
havoc in a bowling spell, per-
formed well. But Iverson's

retirement from first-class cricket



for business reasons has left thr
selectors a big gap to fill
Critics here generally agree

that several Australian cricketers

who have served their country
well in post-war series have
passed their best and that new

stars must be found.

One case in particular is
wicketkeeper Don Tallon Eng-
lish reporters who saw lis

brillianee on the 1948 English
tour could not believe it was the
same Tallon on the recent tour

Tallon missed easy stumpings
dropped catches and fumbled
returns from fieldsmen throug!

out, To replace him is not goine

By Jimmy Hatlo |










OPPONENTS

R. LINDWALL





8. RAMADHIN

SOME of the top stars expected to clash in the forthcoming W.I.-

Australian games,



NEWCASTLE'S EIGHTH
GUP FINAL

By PETER DITTON

LONDON, April 16.

When Newcastle United, led by Director Stan Seymour,
step out on to the brilliant green turf at Wembley on April
28th for the F.A. Cup final of 1951, they will be equalling a
record by their mere appearance, >

It will be the eighth octasion
on which a Newcastle United team
Aas contested an F.A, Cup Final

_® performance previously
whicved oniy by Aston Villa and
Wee? Bromwich Albion. Three
times they have been successful
in the Final and four times they
have tasted defeat. Victory oven
Blackpool will put them among
the few clubs to have won the
Cup four times Aston Villa and
Blackburn lead the field with 6
wins each, the now defunet
Wanderers come next with five
wins and Sheffield) United are
fourth with four,

Win or lose, it s
the Newcastle team spirit that
they have reached the final this
year without the guiding hand of
a Manager to direct them, The
man who held the job at the be-
ginning of the season, Mr. George
Martin, is now with Asten Villa
ond the Newcastle club is run bs
the Board of Directors, all of -vhorn
have an equal share in the affair
of “the Magpies” — a& they ar
known, :





much for

“$1,000,000 Team”
Most famous of the Newcast}
Board is undoubtedly the Chair



_

o be easy as Australia
other wicketkeeper
rear Test standard,
vho officiated in South Africa,
was kept out of cricket this
season with an injured leg.

Youngsters

Australia has two young crick-
eters from whom much should be
heard in the next few years, They
are right-hand batsmen,
Burke and Greame Hole.

Burke scored a century in hit
first Test match and Hole played
a id fighting knock after Aus-
s leading batsmen had failed
the Fifth Test in Melbourne
Others showing promise are
dashing right-hand batsmen Rich
ie Benaud and Jim de Courcy.
both of New South Wales, and
medium-pace Western Australia!

has 1
anywhere
Ron Saggers




I
in

right-arm bowler, Harry Price:
who flashed into Sheffield Shield
cricket with a blaze of succe

this year.

These players and others seem
certain to oust several of the stars
who have kept Australia on top
in cricket in recent years,

LPG ES

J&R ENRICHED BREAD

FOOTHALLER'S

HE
i 0
4

moa





man, Stan Seymour. He is a
former player with the club ana
it was he who scored one of the
two goals for Newcastle from the
outside-left position in the 1923-24
Final against Aston Villa.
Newcastie United have always
been a famous name in English
Football. Since the end of tix
war and the resumption of peace-
time soecér this has been partic-

ularly true. Much of their fame

— sore people might term it
notoriety—-has come about because
of their dealings in the transfer
market They have bought ana

sold players with a frequency that
has earned them the title of “the
million dollar team.”

And yet that title is not strietly
deserved. Although Newcastle
have been frequent participants in
the transfer market, their
penditure on new men has been
offset by the amount received in
respect of outgoing players — in-
volving cash around £200,000,

ex-

6 Local Players

If you want proof, iook at the
team expected to take the field
against Blackpool in the Final.
Six are local players, who cost the
tlub only the usual £10 signing-
on fee, The only real big-money
player in the side is Chilean-born
George Robledo, for whom they
paid about £22,000 when signed
from Barnsley last season, The
others for whom Newcastle laid
out a transfer fee are Bobby
Mitchell, outside-left; Frank Bren-
nan, centre-half; Joe Harvey,
Tight-half and Captain; and Jack
Fairbrother, goal-keeper,

The local plavers are outside-
right Walker; inside-right Taylor,
one of the smallest, and at the
same time, cleverest players in
the First Division; centre-forward
Milburn, who began his career as
an outside-right, and won an
England ‘cap’ when converted
into the leader of the attack; left-
half Crowe; and full-backs Cowell
and Corbett.

Too Smali

An amusing story concerning
Taylor is that during the war he
was spotted by a Newcastle scout
and invited to play for the club
game at. St, James’s Park.




CHOICE



Mexican

Swimmer

Visiting Barbados

Gustavo Olguin de Rodrigo,

twenty-six-year-old Mexican

on his way home after attending the Pan-American Olym-
pics in Argentina is in Barbados. He is an intransit pas-
senger on the Rio Juramento, an Argentine ship at present
anchored in Carlisle Bay. Gustavo, a member of the Mexi-
can water polo team was also covering the games for the

t

Mexican television station XHTV-Channel 4 (of which he is
the sports producer), and “Ovaciones”, a sports magazine
in Mexico. He is married and has three children

He tock part in several of the
practice games against Brazil,





Chile and the U.S., but did not
play in any of the final games.
His three brothers, Jose, Otilio
and Tonatiuh were also on the
team, Otilio was their chief
goal-getter and Tonatiuh broke
two swimming records, the 1.500

metre and 800 metre free style

Water Pulo

Of the water polo games which
were won by Argentina, he
thought there was little to choose
between the Argentine and
Uruguay teams.

During his stay here he has
seen several of the local water
polo teams in action. He thinks
that they are below the standard
of the Mexican team, but he
thought . that our island team
must be quite formidable. How-
ever, he said, we lacked properly
organised strategy. Players here
kept the ball too long. In
Mexico they are taught, “if
you're not in a position to shoot
right away, get rid of the ball.’
Quick passing must be developed
Another feature of their training
is working out different tactics
and moves on a blackboard, Then
before trying them out in the
water, they are performed first
on land to obtain complete per-
fection. Organised movements
are essential and secret signs
between members of a team’s
forward line is another necéssity

Gusiavo went on to say that
what he and his brothers knew
about swimming was all due to
their father Gustavo de Rodrigo,
Senior, who was a contemporary
swimmer of Johnny Weissmuller
and he had swam against him.
My father, he said, has devoted
much of his life to developing
water polo and aquatics in
Mexico.

Film Lost

The only unpleasant part oi
Gustavo’s trip was that his movie
camera was stolen while he was
visiting the military school in
Argentina. It was worth about
15,000 Argentine pesos. He also
lost five rolls of film, three of
which had been used. However
Gustavo says the Police still have
hopes of finding it.

The other members of the
Mexican team returned to Mexicu
by air. He left Argentina March
29th for Montevideo and was
there nine days. There, he

Taylor was in the army at the time
but he changed into civilian
clothes to go ylong to the ground.
tle knocked at the door of the
Players’ entrance and explained to
the doorkeeper that he had come



te play for Neweastle. The door-
keeper decided that Ernie was

pulling his leg; that he was
small to be playing for Newcastle.
Ernie drew himself up to his full
five feet two inches and tried
again. But the doorkeeper was
adamant and not until the arrival
of one of the Newcastle Directors,
who knew Ernie, was he able to
get into the ground,

Marking Matthews

Hardest task confronting any
of the Neweastle players at
Wembley looks to be that facing
left-back Corbett. To him falls
the task of marking the inimitable
Matthews. If he can hold up
the Blackpool genius then New-
custle’s hopes of winning the F.A.
Cup for the fourth time will be
considerably brighter. But if he



fails — as so many full-backs have}

failed before him—-Mortensen, the
Blackpool centre-forward, will be
ready and willimg to take any ad-
vantage of the slight suggestion of
slowness on
by the big raw-boned, Brennan

But whatever the result New-
eastle can be relied upon to play
clever, constructive football, They
are, like Blackpool, great be-
lievers in attack and the 100,000
who are lucky enough to have
tickets for the match may be pro-
vided With more goals than one
usually expects from such an event
as the F.A. Cup Final,

OIL

SEE
SUNDAY ADVOCATE

.





BEST IN 3
FLAVOUR

©

BEST

IN
TEXTURE §&
°

BEST
IN
NUTRITION

pod,



the turn displayed’

GUSTAVO de RODRIGO
our father taught us.

and
via

joined the Rio Juramento
arrived here five days ago
Trinidad.

The ship is expecied to leave
Barbados this afternoon.

Also on board are thirty
polo ponies on their way
Mexico.

nine
to

Gussy May Play

LONDON,

“Gorgeous” Gussy Moran, No. |
glamour girl of lawn tennis, is ex-
pected to grace British courts
again this year.

Officials at Wembley plan to
stage a professional tournament in
July, as part of the Festival of



{LAN BROWN MUST
WISS CUP FINAL

LONDCN, April 25.
Alan Brown, Blackpool’s inside
left, will not_be fit for the F.A,
Cup Final against Newcastle on
Saturday. He was to have had
a test today in a Lancashire
midweek league game with Old-
ham, but after training yester-
day he limped slightly and com-
plained of pain in his injured

knee,

Today it felt worse and he had
to declare himself unfit, —Reuter.

WINT TO RUN IN PARIS

LONDON, Apri: 24.

Arthur Wint, the Jamaican
holder of the Olympic 400-metre
title has been chosen to represent
the University of London in the
400 and 800 metres in the athle-
tic match against Paris University
in Paris on Sunday.—Reuter.

What's on Today

Pelice Courts and
Original
10.00 a.m,

Second Division Basketball
—Sea Seouts will play
James St. Bey Scouts at
the Modern High School
—5.00 p.m.

Pickwick-Revers and Ever-
ton will meet this after.





‘curt of
Jurisdiction

noon in a First Division
football match at Ken-
sington, This match was

to have been played last

Saturday but was post-
poned due to rain—5.00
p.m.

Inter.Club Table Tennis at
Y.M.C.A.—
Y.M.C.A, vs. Foundation
6.00 p.m.
Everton vs. Hampton —
6.00 p.m,

Barna vs. Police — 7.30

p.m,
Y.M.P.C, vs. Fox—7.30
p.m.

Annual General Meeting of
the Society for the Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Ani-
mals at Wakefield, White
Park—8.15 p.m.

CINEMAS
Empire: “The Third Man” 4.45
and #.30 p.m.
Olympic: “Bathing Beauty” and

“Dangerous Millions”
Globe: “Gals Incorporated” and
“When Tomerrow Comes" 4.45
and $30 p.m,
> “Race Street” 8.30 p.m,



and “Blood on the Moon" 4.45
and 8.30 Dm,







Britain sporting celebrations, and Roval: ‘Tenth Avenue Angel’
Satara, they want to feature wae oe To Wed" 4.30 and
American tennis stars.
It is also hoped that Jack
Kramer and Pancho Segura wiil |
also compete. sie: The Weather
TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.46 a.m,
Sun Seis: 6.10 p.m,

POLICE BEAT B’DOS
REGIMENT 25—15

Police defeated the Barbados
Regiment by 25 goals to 15 in a
Second Division basketball
match which was played at
District “A” yesterday afternoon



The Police team playing at home
were on top ail through the
fame.

The netball match between St.
Michael's Girls’ and Erdiston at
St. Michael’s Girls’ School Was
postponed owing to the condition
cl the pitch The match has
now been fixed for ‘Tuesday
May 1.

Moon (Last Quarter):
April 28
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 6.58 a.m.,
7.25 p.m,
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):
-22 in,
Total fer month to yester-
day: 5.15 ins.
Temperature (Max): &83.5° F
Temperature (Min): 73.0° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E.,
(3 p.m.) ELN
Wind Velocity:
hour
Barometer:
(3 p.m.)



12 miles per

(9 a.m.) 29,979,
29.905

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Full Text

PAGE 1

TIH'RSn.W. APRIL 26. 1*51 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Sugar Cannot Be I)e-r aliened IN BRITAIN LONDON. April 19 The Food Mini official reply to L-irj Lyie, have explained why sugar cannot be taken off the ration in Britain at the moment. Lord Lyle had suggested that the Food Minuirv would have available this year from Commonwealth and home sources 360 GOO tons more sugar than Is requi-e I to maintain consumption at tre present level 0 r 2.300,000 tons : %  year. The Food Ministry nitree that the unratloncd consumption has i>een estimated at 2.550.OOO but state that the estimate ,, ba.-crt upon informalim date and therefor* subject to -t wide margin Q| error Room For DinVrmces These facts are brought to light by Mr. W Shelton Smith. Director of Public' Relations. Ministry i>( Food, in a letter to Ibi I'I tines, wh m I-.rd Lyles original statement appcare.) earlier this month. Mr. Smith says that for 10 y*ar& the Ministry has based its estimates of sugar available on quUMttkg which witl actually come into stock in the I' K • Alendar year. But I year" of various Commonwealth ecuatrtaa, including Iho U.K. itsert, falls into two calendar years "There is. therefore." says Mr Smith, 'room for hpwa> m Trinidad drag built to carry vessels of 1.800 tons but when completed this was reduced to 800 tons, and iinally. when put into use. to 800 ions, this being the highest tonnage, which It Is estimated could be carried safely. Henry, Smith Resign From Grenada Nutmeg Board (.RF.NADA, April 24 M. Henr>. Chairman of the Nutmeg Iktard and S. H Smith %  manor, yesterday both tender. cd their resignations from the Board as a result of the Board's % %  i' letision to transfer the Kate man whose dismissal was demanded by striking worker* last week, because he slopped a man arriving 25 minutes late. Gciry. on intervention, had proposed the suspension of the galeman for two weeks, but apparent1;under pressure of a majority. the Board decided to compromise b.. the transfer of the gattman. againsi whom there was not specific charge of failure to discharge his duties. The Oldest B.G. Leases University Land To U.S. In New World Chi Urn Inquiry \djournvd GEORGETOWN. Apr.l 25. FCRTHER %  %  M ding th. RllhlTUMl" The British Guiana i~. Michael was adjourne* IIUA Dnaai coNhidad utfollitli >>-!rici -A* **. ,J_ H l l,H A u .. leaseol S0O acres of forest land in i WeU,, Hr.rJ;£l£ r ?i£ itMulS" ,n E " u,l >" %  Porn'ruon river D. J7.r*V '•"""i.K^ .r,nmwill 0, ,ri '-" tp l,SA ^""ber com %  iVLv.1... .1 m "; PS**" '"' U %  %  nd Gap st lelebrate Its fourth centennial on WOOi( mwJ ^ .,.,, ',., „ w ,..rf*.i !" IK.I fiat* *.. it Tn<1 "dreement w*i rone; bj na>U Order" of the QueVn 'th Ray Berney. PreMd.-nMotsser Juana La Loca (the madi. I^"*" .{-.""IT S? 1 ^"*' nSf b ?? y WM daughter of Ferdinand and IsatTS.A.. and U. S. Herringion. \ i vhere a post iwlla. and her son. Emperor '''"'dent of the Inter-State Pi ., porCharTc. V. San Marcos was wood Corporation of Orcr.. US.A. e-tab i'hed just 14 years after The eompanMa propoae to Invel W4 1.imn t fcame a .it.. The only $1,500,000 in the two prcdaett A ti m David Tayloi who othei .mversit.e*. on this contisawmill and plywood plant will Mi ion to Or A I nent *hich are near the antiquity et up on a 35 acre sna al Aurora Cato at lha Plil of So.i Marcus are the University Village. E Coagl of MfxiiM. founded on September utrmliun %  roTfe will begin In Jut 21, 1*51, and the I'mvemity at or July, when m.ichiner. and time in January when he m Saint Thtmtas of Aquinas on the c^ulptnem Mrtl i*lanul If On is located |ust a few blocks \J S.A.. in the initial slan-' bill BOJ I ilgnt .f im II train local men to take ovt %  day he The company ami in. fJovi Ol aim '" Di Baylay's Hoapital ment will build a gi.mt i..adwa> win through the forest for tranaPM • saw his lion and other piii|He% \M PIT from I'i tnwn l.ii men an< i Martin in down% %  open to both lay Dominican student! is now a eo educational institutun and consists of the Facullit of Letter* Economics. IJIW, Com merdal Science. Pharmacy, Mo hemi*try. Education. CrMsmlatr) MadH Science Odontology and Velerrarian Medicine. The movement fur the i*t;ii Hlmu'iit n( the university in IVI.I wa led by Fray Tomas de San Martir. one of the outslandin: represiiitalives of the Domini.a Order in Fern, and Capt-m ii.> nnlmo Aliago. one of the Qfiflni 1 C oBjsjitl s tadorw who umler ihc leadership of Francisco Pian\> overthrew the Inca Empire. The University was recognize.I n> a papal chool in a Papal llo I issued on July 15, 1571 by tl' %  Pope. A si ries of special programme' conference* and ceremonies wi I be pienteo during this year !• %  celebr-tion of the University four-hundredth anmv< suitable craft will also be utilised D*fi re inquest for river Ilanafioclatton the-' ^— — — urnment was need iiari*. if *iu ram ved M the i aal maeteai 1 in In tie toalyat m had nui 7'dad Customs Excise Guards Want Pay Increase 1 !!S r fc s REDS PLAN CONTINUE k FIGHT AGAINST CHURCH Red Offices Attacked NICE. April 24. Dressed as parachutists, ann armed with sub-machine guns a group of unidentified men attacked Communist party offices Henlast night. Three men in the ere beaten up. One to hospital.—Reuter. L.A.C. PLANE MAKES EMERGENCY LANDING VATICAN CITY. April 24 '*"""" *>"' "> cnMponi. Vatican quartan said today ihe JOKt OF-SPAIN. Apr.l 23. ;.! %  •< ted ConferMr Rene Serrao. a member of -.usied plan< for suppress tht u ht Aeroplane Club made tag the Roman CatboUf Church"" '" ie '^ nc >' uinduig at the St. completelv In the Soviet satellite*Vincent Race course on Saturday Ml ;,. wluic en route to St Lucia in thiaircraft Castor of the Aeroplane At Ihe meeting held in Kars. Cluo Mr Serrao left Piarco foi bead Boharoia. thay wata repottadStLucia but never reached U have decided to set uy an in-there. for while on his way he ternationui body designed to or-encountered bad weather around gauise and co.ordinnle the Comthe Grenadines. He spent the aiunlst struggle against religion night in St Vincent and returu—Renter M to Trinidad via Grenada. B4CKAGAM! ^-*air ---ANDSO % %  — ^BK WELCOME fat* reiief lor iMM* nostl 11$. ONCk AGAIN \ nk\ Va-tro-nol Is ... IICV YOU C\H PREVENT tlie dcvelopnxr.t of rmnv colds h" using Vicka :... t^wl-.iMsniiilcorsnccie. NOW ^OU CAN CUAg cold-clogged nose JI seconds with a few drops of Vkka Va tro general election. Govern%  nent spokesnifn were confident thit voters would conlinue thswing away from Socialism, HUM'. ed In 1MB Labour spokesmen were Just a^ hcadinc Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay VI V Snlgrrtvld. S. h (lli.rta Hvntlri PORT-Or-SPAIN, Ap Customs ."' %  Excise guards H "•I tlH'l preaant salansw. ind am saekinf t th.> inn. wafa icgritiling scheme Tl"that no attention is being paid us at all hy Vu %  houl lha low ii th< it i ties" ratj etalm thai lha* havt hid u .II .•*.. %  PAA Enioy the haepitolity, c !" feel and tho johttol service which hoee mad* PAA "first choice of veteran travelers the world over. NEW YORK s . %  luiri lioni Mioiiil. H'lhmxl lVday. %  eastd hip Kaoanssa i'" now in ttt. t tioiii Smi |agfk Fferhie A|W Ulk a U #^ui haW r \,„ fait IntrnaUonml Airport In fdiVwlJd iaafead ot La Gtwniia Field. MIAMI Dsfly Hights-non Sjn |jn Spei i. .!>... n... II.. I now In cint ST. CWOIX ST. THOMAS Wm %  i %  i %  i %  %  IkCasi i>% ssnH c^vaistpr (lin-i' (m%rii.rtil iiri>*rture tlnim. Tou can now "l\y PAA" to KrilOPi:. StM'TII AMKHICA. I ERICA, Ml \l %  < !>• FAR 1 UF1 A, \ M -i, liU'lc-h aiouod ii..warhl For 32 years the leading international airline—PAA was first to link th* Americas by air. first to fly lo all sis continents. Fur r#en nilom. are gear Fret.i Agsiif or Philip amiih. Pugrn ARKIX AI ASTW1HOMBI iitrtaii K*. a s AU'OA i irj %  ... .,,! I--, %  • %  l„, \.., M V WU4XSISTAP l.vl M V SARAH I1C1.1 i^ '". AIK.IOM. lot U.MIiil*..* ach ntAMnui w %  .nun Cap! Hll. ' Himh Oil ACCIDENT SllOltl> ..(!.! .' h'llv X-lll rjwnad b) Cyril Atktns ed Chrh Church and ruivan bj BrtKUor AII. ins >.i rtvol denl on Haagati Hall Road srtl i..i i p i. ownad b Three rlousu i ml rtion in drtvan ba Oswald A]kf*na %  Oravag H.II si I'hiiip IK* "Jutla f*w drops up ooch ncsfr/l" cry at i ve Party kept as quiet possible—Mr. Churchill maintaining complete silence—for this war mtra-Sociailst's quarrel. Bevan'* arguments stormed ir-agnlficenth fr< m the general to the particular He opened with the theme thai democracy can only be protected from Communism by a renrmament programme Sat strictly in proportion to the achievement of social democracy. lb* '.utiatance of his complaint pgainst Mr. Attlee and thr Chan* cellor of thr Exchequer was that they had been le.l b) the Unite! States in an armament programme that could not be achieved Communist leader Harry I'ol. UU (tiu, last night prophesle.1 he will, one day. be Prime Minul'-r %  f i_ 4 a* I *"'• onp ^ a y< * Prime Minislfr Irl&rrVSnOW AttaCKS ^ Britain, addressing the Uni"Society Legislature i|i.i.d'i GRENADA. April 2* Hon. T. A. M.irryshow. mak. Ing a public appearance in the Church Hull police meeting last night as President of the resuscitated Grenada Progressive League. OTTAWA. April 25 strongly criticised the legislature's Canada will begin this summer passnge last week of a Bill to proI recruit women for the armed Elmb.ii. a a hibit the importation of publics, forces and Indications are ihev *'"' l,k ; % lions deemed of seditious characWlU pla> a major role in BCAFS l.'i. J>UIK ".. .i move I'denj udur unitthe average West Indian what the Defence Minister Claxton end.>.l costermongcr bought in bookstalls a month's speculation when h of England without hindrance. told the House of COBunoi lso said—this Bill was more lerday a decision had been taken ous than the one of general UJ recruit women foi rvgulal seilitlon which has been referred IICAF unJ 'or rescrvr force* ( .f u a Select Committee. He dethe three services —(C P ) larod he would do his utmost to ftect the removal from thi In Touch with Barbados Coastal SUtion Caatt sna WirtiwM Wl> IM aVH lh*i I I *hip tnr.ii •iii %  aaasd u in%  a I'lmiMii ". n *s UHIV H h PAH AMERICAN Mango AtAWAts |>S CtsU & Uft, Ltd. Broad St HridsrUiwn 'Phone HM i After buslneM hears —MOV | BRUSH UP....YOUR... .SMILE... •w r irfr w Mat* r^t*K. _) WITH fHE CORRECT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH rlv R~1n Joy.ua TIM S S Ada S NorOmiMHMUIn. % a J BaaSlaat, S %  Wisdom ^ W.ll... .1 Americanism of the Utbour Party QraduaU] ta get a j-rip on the Parliamentary cni VICKS< VA-TRO-NOL , oiHSO ^ ashCS ccis r ,vQ tion. Uie Party while it is in danger. But while he wag speaking on mailers of theory and the brond aspect of policy, he undoubtedly had the car of the majority. Allacks Oailskell Unions Em-mirage Macliines But Aneunn Bevan nlng ( and sometimes politician. Rancour does not desperato Th ? American printing operative Hu, n Ciliskell. Chancellor "s much ino're effective an i Kx. nequer. In his April 10 Budget TQ REMAIN. ON JOB I/)NDON. April 23 A new tic*! has been decreed for Brltsm's army of middle.aged ildrly workers, instead of drift. %  Jig into retirement at 8ft or later that will be encouraged to re main on the job to assist Britain ti meet her expanding re-arma. ment and export commitments T'lis Is the sequel to an appeal for deferred retiietnent made bv f the when a minister makes a speech K'-,,,^ far more" than aftor his resignation. Bevan mad* ril !" T n but d0Ca n t some grave efforts .„ this extraThi, T. ^" n ^ V h r ",t r ordinary speech-he made the ,hj Hr,rUhT n u lh " ndin * ( 5 |...ch-1pe.l IM l.i Col H-ou use Rimof Rinw's rx.i h;rd-working suds cork through and through e\>cry article, desning out all the dirt, so thonsughly — yet so gentiy. ll .£(. %  .iv ivomuch hctter v.-hen you\i>kinw in the wssh. MNSOforqll your wash / a-a sea •• blnet to get hia way on a nun. N o* only is there no opposition inor points during the by the American unions to introduction of new machinery or When a mnn rMiim u^m IKP m **hod. but such improvements vesr. His hearers ask whether hr jj^. ^Twfu irlre^out^ Bl not playmg politic, still iind rwIucp ^^ lni .] udlllR fr ^ %  L n „ intake of labour and wage mecnLobour Divided t.ve scheme^. Labour M.Ps received his •peech coldly He has committed 'he unpardonable sin of Parliamentary democracy; he has livlded his party just before an flection. He has probably brought •he election nearer and has mad'. t certain at least by the autumn. But the most powerful impres-.on made by the speech of this man who has so often been reckoned as the future Prime Minister was that he vindicated Parliamentary democracy. He was at "dds with Mr Attlee He rcsjgnc.1 Government leaders sat on the front bench and listened In silence to his renunciations of what T\ • regards as -fell out" of socialist principals. Never has such an un> repentant, argumentative or such a disruptive speech been made by a minister resigning from the British Cabinet. But Bevan will still vote Labour; he will neither leave nor be expelled from his party There nee*i be no dissolution or election at onoe. Feras .Mil iqu*i en n .... On.,ana Drain SlBM Draft i Cabl* Cirr-ii'. Coupon* /use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP OIL UK 8V\DAY ADVOCXTK Senior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate Invites all school-boys and school-flri) between the ages of 12—19 to enter for it* Benler Short Story Comaelltlnn. Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 wordn length and must reach the Sheet Story Editor. Advocate Ce, Lid latar than Wednesday every week The best story each wecr will be published In the Evealag AdveaaV and the winner will re celve a prire of books or SUtionery to the value of 12/6. Send this coupon with your story. SENIOR SHOET STORY COMPETITION You'll feel \o frt-sh anj full of vigour sfter you've washed with lifebuoy Toilet Soap. Its deep-clearning lather trees you of wesriness, anil keeps you fresh the whole day through. Keep %  tablet ol" Lifebuoy Toilet Soap handy snd use it regulsrly for day tastes*! I fOit PERSONAL FRESHNESS l/.MO.s Naa .. An ... Srha.1 Hwat AVAILABLE!! 1DF0RD mmm VAUS $2,135.00 Usual Flset Owners Discount COITnTEKY faAHAGE ROBERT THOM, LTD. — While Park Rd. — Dial 4391



PAGE 1

TIM BSD IT APRIL M, 1431 B\KlltnOS ADVOCATE PACE si \ I N CLASSIFIED ADS •fiB^HONl 2901 For Birthi. MairUnf or Engagement announcement! In Cat lb Charge M t3D0 for an> nun' BT> W H and S cent, per ward fr • ch additional word. Term* ea-is Between IM and 4 pea. 1111 foe U.ata. HeUcea onI alter p m TM (Mrtt lor ei.no-jneernenta cf %  Ulna. MutUm. DNUU. Ae> — ledgmer.ta. and In Mernorum nolica i. •' ec-iaa and |1 M on Sundara 3 MH r of V.DIW .piH. and word an %  • d<)i and %  rord on Sundai. i^r BaaS IIOYHIYMIM Mill! IS ArU'nUon is drawn to UM 'Control o{ Dm* anc Patent .um pn.j Order, 1951. No. 7 which will be published in the Official Gazette ol Thursday 26th April. INI. 23rd April. 1951. 26 4.51 —In SHIRTS KOk I'OSTMr.N Tenders art invited for the Shirts for l' .-md Porters fur the Post Office Department during the financial year ending on 31 et March. 1952. [p Postmen it has been decided !.. JMUC -hirt. Mi the place of Jackets. Full p. t itie\ilars ran M Iroin the Colonial Postmaster. In sealed envelopes addressed to the Colonial Secretary and marked "Taw i manufactui should necta ihe Cotoi Office not later than 12 noon on Wednesday the 2ml of Kay, I9S1. 2645!—In. TAKE NOTICE IDEAL MIL* FOII MALE %i 11 "i u "ii c*tii*v u-aak T> Null ami I teaia Ikada^a M k — o-eer Ba vra, j mil a word uMk-i (data a -J S.a*-• AtTO.wmVE I. bli especially foi ai MI ,, I ve. good aim am M M 4 M—4B1 Black Sport. Saloon laid up through war Kirellent •n. SJfJOOB at neareat oiler Ptuoo nejr: HU or UM. hIM -4n. IM i ii SALES 1*011 RE.vr I'lIMM MINUS IMItSO\\l and IS ce-aapr .I'I BH BSBBW BMrsej H n'd 11 as o* * office Victoria htieel an Friday mn al 1 p m u.aou eauar* fi| la.VONT adHunWc Oowrn. nenl Wood*, naa an addit.ci %  jQ %  -. Bnad AI 1 iti. .TV • f RV %  CXS AVAILABIJ: Dial M ; %  ARCIIt4l MiKB"N7.1E. r avai a HUtSES NOTICE CHA.NDO*. 2nd A** Bellevii.e ruil* urnien.d Available M* I Mis Ina**, ""> u> appointment phone MM a. ID I SI ll.. [ranted akould aand ... -a S-..I..r* | H ^ 1 -..-,.. -"-. .in.' D-led Ihi. Mth 4a> HlehM v.rltl.11 a. J of Ap.ll IMI HAt fc,., !" lU-luut. uT.(ur%  m 1 nad.-. arMk ri N.. im. or t Ml ill III Dail id)-. 14 4 11 ,., um.! acsr 1 Balhahaba. Il'-iiliiu.v H• 1 m mn \< TAMOUM, PUI — NOTICE MUM NHMOIJ-1 of thr Pjanronl aW. Falon. Bolton Lanr inlorrna hn < %  > % %  ihai har Balon kill or.-l.ad fni >r (10m Monday Mlh April lo Monday T!h 1V8I m • 91-1 --%  w KM* 'i IMS VI Fore Station candll^n Apply 3304 a :/; \ pai %  at i ai mini r— !" nanu %  *• U*raoo. nouaa u bulll ol alonr and >•">' %  pan |alkrU-a on Iwo atdaa, d<—d an.mi i.m.. 3 brdroom. wi|n d Blai. pnlr\ k.trhrn and uiual FL'KMTIKE At Halph Brard'a Furni>h|na J|hDV>-.,mt Hardwood Allay. MorrU t>pr Cana and Ruah b>y iluiMa M Plna ani Birc.1 ttm per pan Afao Kurti Botli.m L-prlCM Ch.ir. 7i will. Arm. MM and Roakan Wi aach not (orialtina nutnrroua variety of na and aacond Hand Iimiitura Opan dally. I am lo an : ...'.. S3 4 ll-n MECHANICAL %  add la etc •OaSTETNBT DUPLICATOruf'-Naw nodl luat rocaivad A. 8. Brydan m tBduai Ud. Phono afll II49I—IJ.n. NMNH. 1 and The .. 'rvanL room, in yard. application lo In* caieir ; %  fpjaj I ba aal lui ula at Pubuc Compatitlon al our ..fflo in L.. CARRINUTOK a StAl.Y. U4.il in. WA^IIO I.IQl'OR UCENSE NOTICE P .ppliemon of Albrt' Brian No Ml of IMI ..1 ii Neville e am in raaparl board 4 %  r %  an i TANdt.lN .ituata al Baimhaba. and Handing on pwchaa of land Iharaio, louiiae. Ihnins Room. II %  tadrooma. ChiMtran'i room larlaa. Kltanan. (Jaraaa BL, room. Furniahad or unfurnlahad For Inapaciion plra^ U 1 Offara lo ba aanl in wrllnuj, to undenliiird Yaaiwood a Soyca. Solicitora, J Strrat. Bridartown II 4 SI t \i 1 .n s, 10 sra v : c/o AdvoIMJI Ifn OaaVJI who ajn ,1 aa aoon •TaaMt) m (MM Laquor |jr>iiaa At M 1 'taiunna* lodfla. Black Rock SI Mkcbael I Uth dav of Api|| ;W1 1. A M.ixon em I'llwa M-ai-H'.le Ih.i A AU4BMT T CLARKE. Appltcanl • T> Iw ron.id% %  al a Laranatnd Couit t.< 1RM .1 D %  \ on Mdnda) i Ith day of Kay IMI ' E A I H II Ttiat THE KlBTLal COMPANY IM a coiporalion oraanlrad and ralitiruf i by viriua ..f tha lawa of the suta of New Vmk. United Amerita whouiraitr or buainaaa addraaa t IS*. Ea>t 44th Htrrcl. Ktu V. r* CHy, USA. Manufarturar-, hai applied for the reBintration of a Hadmaik In Part A of RadUlar In mpacl of ubaUncaa uaad aa food or a> Inaraoir I aapacuily product! conlalnm* milk. and will ba mOtled ln lr i.trr the .„(„<• -flar one monlh frcin Ih. litl, da] „f April IMI unlr.. rafM nar-on (halt In tha maanllme diva notice In dupl.ala In ma at my office of opposition of tuch TdfOatraUon Tha irpda mark ran lie aaan on application al m* nfflca Dated Ihia IDlh dav of Anril 1S-.1 II WIT I l\V SI TAKE NOTICE tiMi€MI .1111* Thai TtOJ rtaWTI %  a rarporatlon oraapucii and under and by Vlrtua i.l the !• l Ihe Siata of Naw York. United State, of America. wh Fire Brlcki Appl' rhe Old Ira Co Prince Wm Henry SI IS.4 11 -In 1TOVER -Vai. Ingle. J. 3 and %  rumer. Secure your, bein pin < %  Couiteiv liaiaae M 4 SI—n YAf-HT Duccanaar IS I keel, acre* >|ip*ri D-claa*. aecond In Itoyal lido. Yarhl Club race. F A V Wllluma. EC Fbcloey. IS.4.SI—m i be floored in Ihe mailer V Untied si Marina %  ...i.i %  •e.t. I-afavrlte i Pan "A" of Beaut" iry aupplrment containing Vlta1. B>. and Niac.n. and will bo name aftet nai, Ihe Mth I emeu .hall In Ih. n duplrate to me at my . %  >> i.in be jeen ..n appli"fllce 10th dav nf April. IMI. H wn 1 \ IM Hc(Li.-r if Trad %  iom Ihe d-lof April. W 4 Si 3n TAKE NOTICE LACTOGEN lagl.t irrn on appHralK Dated Una 10th ..i %  %  al % %  y of April IMI. II "VIUJAMS, Reglilrar of Trade Mar TAKE NOTICE Tl • 1 I ANY INC rianiaad and aaMling under Hi tha law* of Ihe S'ate ..f etew i-i-r, i,ule>t State, of Amer r a . %  %  %  FJ.I. 44th Street. Manufact -. of Reat.trr In mi-I i food oi n. Incredlcn'. In ( %  Inllv proo.... and will 4 to reBl.ler the Una tl'*o-. month from Ihe Mth dfl* of April. 1111 unleu romc peraon aha II In Ih* rreanllme give MMbM In d. T at my office nf oppo-ition of such raciafi ition The Iradi.' mark can ba aaen on anan ir wn '.:: West Indian & British i HRBS Ctafta, A. %  1 I'ollrrv. Hand blocked BeachV wm. ne.-..i .it.on Houae. Si K : 11-74. ? 14.4 81-lM. ||^ That THE NFITTU: COMPANY. INC. .• rorporallon organliad and eilalln. under and U v irlue of tha law. of inMale of New York. United State, o Ainrrlia. whoae trade or bu.lnn. adore. In ISS. E**t. 44th Ulreet. New Yoi h til. USA. Manufaclurera. Haa applied to the legtatrallon of a Irade mark In Par A"" of Hitlter In reaped of aubat^nce aiad aa food or aa ingredient' In foodi • •leciall) |. a. 1 W CLARKE A CO. s Ion U ^ (M our Oil, e Age II lo 25 MM*, have kniAdg, i... v-otB. ShorUUMad or cent to 10 per cent for tinM ,i Oils war* %  mi Mantl) Brm with investment luiyii. %  tl Imt rubbers were dull. Press talks of sterling revaluation checked gold shares at the outset bui prtcea latei n .viicn Utli talk u..-. diacredMed. Coppers ofajii faatured with iseful Main —Reuter. Rubber Control KCAI.A LrUMl April n. %  %  %  %  i nra. menl saiti m .1 v i;iry npi.v toda] thai the) did not itnnk than was any need tot nia rubber market to be aopirhensive over the Ci.vrrr.: | %  itrol on the A of rubber exports. iv.• <; .. 1 m %  Inti rffjra WUH UM noiouil rubber export ti. federation. In the past. 60 per etnt nf ruhtier exports ii.i.i ragraa to llnUun. tho United States and self governing members of the Bril • ..Ith. 'Sin h exports are not destinatlonal control A* I to other couiitm-.. ii is common I 10 O munlat t Una, havs In retan months risen to lavali out oi all proportion to (hi110rirt.1l dnmestic requirements of that country. As a result less rubber has been aWmliabla f(* the United Kingdom and other friendly fXMjnti slalement added. Reuter. Red China Is Not MoBooVfl Satellite TORONTO. April 25 Sir Ucncgal H. nl representative in Hi, United Nations said here todav Mt Of our informa. on. ijipr,. anaa Im],. likelihood"' i tha ti, : paople'i itepublic be4n| ovarthroar* i.v inu-nml •PIXMitlun f Jamall I In a wiitten n pi Mr. Conk rnerely recalwd what was said by DM President nf the Hoard of Ti.nle on March If. that no asrcenient would ba mada "ith Cuba whu h would prejudice the % riven to f'.iinmnnarealtb nigar producers when the 1 SuCai Agreen %  tlated ited Kin 1 laft, WM lollv aware of on plneappli i nnii cigars and was bearing them nee rraace.1 %  %  %  • : -•.1 %  M or debt. n maaan ngned by me %  % %  ' s ua 'U In %  I %  %  ......n> a %  "i a| %  JUBBPORD I^'.o: 1 1 Mat. %  JS 4 M S. Korean Home Minister Keaigns Grenada Riois (Co II, TAEGU. April 25. The South Korean Home l rollowini ,u the cxeculion of 1H7 aecuaad Ol eollaboratmn with I N i,i Communist guerilla':. A (iovons %  .nl..-. today dpsrn ..f ins announced thiit a South Korean & battalion enmmander executed villager;, alt. t .. uoni ..ry Conn Martial at Kochang. Bouthersrt of TSSflU, After they were Hcnteneiil tin H.iHaiioii Cinnniniider ordered his Informaiion oflal I 1 to 1 KSi fK -'ii on thispot 'lie executes! them individually and butted UM n". the statement said. A st.iti'inent IsSUSd Bitsi I in inquiry into what was called the "Koehang liuulrnl" ran sheltering Com munist gue-illas and Kivm, f them arms, food and lOftl Rl ph ing to %  'in. -lion about assent disorder s In Grenada, Mr. tha Se c retary of States 1 lollies did not int.inl to .1 had bean recsdvsd urom the Labour AdlVSST now m the W. t Indie When he had returner! to Britain the Minister would (> % %  hi a position to am .'.. 1 ll mi ihe causes of ,\ ll P stive) put qua nt Of tin ival dock] Concern Over Colonies Fxpfessed in Letter to Times LONDON A. %  the I by COfrSSI I %  letter lo Ihe Time* is rh others todav l. %  0B the lines Of tl Buri i' • the Otlberi UcAll rl 1. ijiuout r oam bet sri o '.v.. 1 1 1 • \'II.'. some years ago, a the ci mr • Ihe-iU'tiKil ..' 1 ut the vli of %  wsl people thai raowevet di rabl< the time iiein, Eu? coiUi inted that %  uch a ladarataon srouM i %  tho O rnmonweialth "i aotna its oldest countries Hatch HM A Snv %  ,. uld i"' ado] • %  and la view the Council of tha 1 tlon on which -"• %  rapro %  seated the Unlti 1 R the Dominions and L'l COtonis %  that al I"tooanl Can be its CoMOrenes of the A %  1 -.1 1 bj 1 %  1 rsosntative) of 40 Coninonwealth Parliaments Banister, Mlnlstei ol B. i....m .1 11 -. and HI the British Common wealth at which i?.. ., able to ny thofa Ufdo pit eiand fcive you then V ISB w point In ti pthsrina "f Ihe O rnnv .•.%  am nappj i proud lo bo able (o stand n .1 mound ol aq lality and slva our t %  debated'' McAlllsti 1 1 gpli %  d that the Commonwi .iltn Pai llamenuiry AssocisUon and thicouncil which %  %  .. i..ive l-evi .1 growth ol tha Ii I 10 |. ;m eXpSI itueiit In Vi .r, in".... i n Parliament n %  ( nations Within thimnwnwi -I'III "From its modes I bej I affdod, "i' nss Kariinded n ... %  translsUon Into statutory rights and ol would only be In line with thi %  .1 H '-' i irtat aSnTSSOMI : %  .in" %  I pair MAIL NOTICES US for St Vincent. Grenada. Timjnd Brltiat. Guiana fa' the RMS I-MVY PODNEY will be cloaed al the Port OfHce a* under Regi,tared Mall at 3 REQUIRED HLsi rtSI $50,000.00 loan: secured by ft on Freehold property on Frederick St., Port-of-Spain Contact Ycarwoodf. Boye v M.rtlnWtoe Thomaa. VI and S FORT ASTHI3UIT %  General Po,t OtBce Wowell And Ramadhin In Benefit Game LONDON, April 21 West Indies Test Cricketers Frank Worrell and Sonny lUmndhin will ploy in a benefit match for Jack Parker of Surrey on May The West bull.-; players will be included in Parker's side to meet Ihe local club on Mitcham Green Southeast London. Parker's Fleven will be com. pleted by the full Surrey County side with the exception of Bcr" %  J* 1 '. Constable and UM k who will be playing for the M C C against Essex. Parker coached in the West Indiss In 1038—M and Ailh Mae In tyre Sunn and Rngland wickelkeeper also coached Ih in 1949—50 Laurie Fishlock opening bats. man and Jim Laker off spinnet toured with Ramadhin rell on the recent Coinn tour of India—Reuter V/.V/V,V,V,V,' /V '.',-,'.', ; I IHE PARADISE BEAdl := CLUB LTD. The army originally rontine,i •00 poopls but children under 14. men over •JO. women and girls and a few others were released. Others— ilrnoht the entire fit mala | tkNI of Ihe village—WCTS SOfSj Ul ;it equipmen, had been sent out since the dock yard started lo close down—only i; for small rraft Reuter. LONDON. April 25. At a London Airport tonight lbs CI3.000 race horse Helioscope, so-' of the famous Darby wlruvti ^tiuggled and kicke,| m 15 people tried in vain to get runaboard a plane to fly him lo Caracas. South Aniein.i UM several hours thn man struggled and tried to coax the K EY WEST FLOH1DA. April 25 2 up the special gangway.' £ commci 1(1 i .IrlUver and a "fferln* grass and fruit Fifloe %  ..,., ulin .ng plaM feet from the ground. Helioscope /'/anes Col lido rron, the ground. Helioscope ,.„,,„, „ vcr tlw IH ,. J „ om 1Tllk ed up and lnshed out with hu. from Kcv W est and crsshed into tho .nn tnday. Soon afterwards a body was found at the The men held tigntiy on to the :opcs A veterinary surgeon gave tl. .....r-,injections as | i )iut nf medicine. Then after blind folding him and rwvsrlna; nil f %  '" witii a sack the men go". I into n box but he lnshed out and %  imod It over Colonel T. C. Irvine said, "u would be impossible to sand hint by air BOW after What 1 < happened. He will have to go by OSS After .11. trie law owner.want a whole hOCM, not half cne Helioscope went back to Nc-* Maiket to wait for a boat. ReuU-r. the sea voman scene of the crash Later Pan-American Airways reported thai a rdur-engi 'i company Compama Cubans Ii •ivbiti"!'. was overdue on tti Miami-Hat Bight with 34 pa MSUJSrt Reuter Efcdfl Tell Indiaim To UnileWilli China HOMHAV A| Tha todlan Commun %  I.I.Icalled "ii tin* natioi ing miliUMis" I., ui Indian Peopli racy alltei ith Soviet RuaalS and I I CoinuiHiii't. denOunot d Qovernnteni as antl*dei irath ami antt-popular*' and should be pus ad People's Dernocracy on lbs baali of tha coalition ol all • i anti-fetio.il. B&tl Imp" the '' 'i In a 4.U0II "funrtaiiii iit:.l pro the Commun %  I bat tin psJi bun bad d i | .1 line" The Communist manr.i |Q potDi political and aconontii %  eui.iiK ip.i'i'ifi" i rogi anuns ti MI psopla It claims Ih eonfl itlon of nil htud i without payment, and natlonallss r.rlustruil bariki' %  Higiilighl of the i polil | .i" Withdrawal from th<( .i nd Mendship with Paki-t.. The .iiiiiouiicement dad BOl Ut dicate the party'., prosa aetJon k n — Reult r 1./' < brrespondeni] In Prague Missing %  %  Council Pass liesoliilion -. aim %  %  %  week. : %  noon semi a nob %  portattsj %  %  nl of the A--. %  ecrning i i %  %  nl '.o th. | Mnustiv %  i n heanl ,i Uie Ambasssdor hotel (his ii %  Monday i mini repot '1'iiv • frosn suge I < utter to earn wha: %  t ths emigrant Sum after n-ductions i: raBr said that he understood that on previous ocsort was the work would same nature as before. U Chandler, 1 ired to him that Ihe taxpayers of Harl % %  .. ..! ;., pjy (,„ %  t he %  i . i I Hi. irgi-oatmn nf a Hade nuuU In Pen uaad a* f.d or aa IndreilienlIn food.. I oil! lpOallli>n of nidi legr,n IIIV office. II WILLIAMS. ii... i. .. ..f tratfa Marha. 14 4 It—jn SHIPPING NOTICES i'i\ %  •; %  \i \i -niMii NI v\ /l \l UfSJ I IM-. I.IMITFD I i iNr. %  i . ...II. II. i .,,., i %  %  %  %  i im-;. D iiitnxii: niWN HAitHAnoH. it w i v...1... InaUnl. \t U %  .,,l,l.e." Will I ... ii. A mi| Naval srul st Kni. f l.ula, 4th May. B.W I. SCIHMINrR OWNERS ASSOC INC. T.I.4047. %  F AIR PRICES LONDON Apnl U "Fair piicei" Male to gun buyers came into operation tod. in the Mai | I "Fair price" lists a|S bet] issued to shoppei '. in lp rsduos Ihe saea n Brims' ol loeal dealei!' %  i will ry,t In the legal maximum prices A similar scheme || already in OpCI aun ni Sinsjaporr A i 'il foi .di kinds of Imported cigarettes is lo come Into April 30.-Healer ^M> . CANADIAN SERVICE ot rsnoi MI Raaaa af BOls %  A I .. \ i ..ll Kl 111*1(1 — ii. Nallfaa April Mth Arri.ea B'da. I"IKI iir.liNAOOTTClUiniltl I HUM LTD. — NEW YORK AND tiULF SERVICE. Ari'I.V:-DA tlOSTA St CO.. LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE PASSAGES TO EUROPE i ?ir sail Ins I.. Eurupfortn I %  ususl porU of call era Dublin. I m. Single fare £70; usual jl IIIIIIMVI SOUVENIRS. CCRIOS. JEWELS New Shipment opened y/.'.-.v/.v.'-v.'///////-'.'--; ATT..CTIVI ROOM and Board Rachelora. Por particular a y. Caauarlna Club Tel 4 M-ln. NOTICE TO MEMBERS I In accordsr.ee with Hu!e J; 34 the Club a to members from 8 1 king of Bulldin kruaea. Rnada and Yard. T IF Ml *^ t-.e. %  B A d r H BROOKS ^ Saturday, the 28th April. I I o>f HAI runs 5 „ .. ( I .IB II im Mil.. I III 1-i.BrlrUr. — Car. at Bread TeSar BUeeU J* um NUI: "CAS/ABLANCA" Mwwnrs IOAST port: ist In walled gardens of about t Reo ,.'ii I I i rooms, l • ...... m Weil recooai JOHN M. BLADON 'Phiine ifilO PlanUtlons nutldias %  I I i: \.. tit —Auctioneer—Surveyor


he a ll eel

itl ss is tcanne



PHarbaros

ESTABLISHED 1895 : THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951

ALLIES HURL BACK RED TROOPS

Communists keep up steady pressure on U.N. forces ———

|

FORM NEW LINE ON | aow to taxe vooxs M 4 Piidids bat
WESTERN FRONT orrison Pledges

TOKYO, April25. sae Faith In America |e

UNITED NATIONS tank and infantry columns!|

lashed out northwest of Chunchon on the central A pprove i











7










front today to hurl back two Chinese divisions
which were halted on the fourth day of the Commu
nist spring offensive. Blanket fire from masses of B udg et
artillery and umbrella rocket-firing jets supported
the Allied drive which jumped off north of Kapyong

|Answers Rebel Arguments | ee fs ‘co

pany until it \ an

EE MOLE win referred to" in, the

LONDON, April 25. Fiouse of Lords during the

FOREIGN SECRETARY Herbert Morrison bees







1}.

" y . ‘| This is not reall
: © The Appropriations itte i i ‘ 2 ate a tee |
Tniehtry, snéatheaded br.. tanks * ee ee ‘iG OUI ot Rabiseamatives today by declari ing is f faith that the nited e | £1 m prospecting

would not let Britain down over the supply of; Barbados, is one of tho:
scarce raw materials. privately. owned Empire-

developing concerns abot
Speaking at the American — whee” the public hears
Chamber of Commerce ltunchec

: practically nothing
he revealed the real | differenc D af wer P . { |
between Bevan’s viewpoint ana € enc € . ac | It is t &5—vear

moved north through a_ thin m ee today approved a $64,682,000,000
screening force which had held Acheson Denies emergency Defence budget.
ae weve afer wave of, B q Ch is The amount recommended for
inese suicide attacks through avs 5 touse consideration starting to-
out the previous 36 hours. 3 | evans arges morrow, is for emergency purpos-
net fae pee Darra : WASHINGTON, April 25. *S raised by the increased cost of
kiiled hundreds o nines . United States Secretary of State ‘he Korea War. Most of it will
umns before holding forces beat Dean Acheson today cateizorical- be spent during May and June
Aa Pi gnaner te front. Unitea bY. rejected the accusation by adit emergency budget is to
Nations rect Ds fotsed hy new 3evan, former British et ements $48,000,000,000 already
; “i ees oP. Rey Minister, that the United voted to the military by Congress
solid line in tight blocking po: ; was “gobbling up” most of} fOr the fiscal year ending June 30.




a pity thet
that of the Governmen: ~ old Lord Inve
America, he said, had committe I ( . | St +
herself to global strategy “We S sOOC ep
think far too well of the Ameri
can foresight to suppose = sh LONDON, April 25

| not present at the debate,
, for he could have told
i



their lordships all about
the company. Not only i



re, acthh} would allow the whole policy t Britain considers the proposed } he chairman of Britis

tioris ready to stem a possible 4p. \orla’s strategic raWw ma A large part of the new Defence be defeated and disrupted by| defence agreement between the| Union Oil, but the world

second thrust of the new offensive. +, rials money is needed to meet the economic recession among the} United States, Australia and New | wide shipping and trading
They had withdrawn to_ thes: higher cost of equipment © and THE AMBASSADOR GIVES A PEW LESSONS.—At a party held | Allies.” a Zealand a “good first step” firm of Andrew Weir and

detence positions after beating off Acheson said it was American] supplies since the Korea war at the Soviet Embassy in Lonion to celebrate the founding of the Surrounded by London repre-| towards a wider arrangement in| Co., which he founded,

heavy Chinese night attacks. policy to take a full account of} started. ; Red Army 33 years ago, fal of the British Fleet, Lord Fraser, |sentatives of American big busi-j the Pacific, Ministry of State Ken-| the real owner of the
In the west central sector,’ the “needs of North Atlantic] Army officials said that for] learned one useful trick fe Russians—how to toss down a glass [ness and industry he pledged that] neth Younger said today, He was} business

Allied forces broke off contact Treaty powers for raw materials,| instance the improved General of vodka, with the head Bac
with Communists along the 384. which were essential for their] Patton tank which cost $193,000
Parallel and withdrew to neW pasic economies and their re-| before the Korean war, costs

in one swallow. even if there were economic] answering questions in the House

difficulties in Britain, the a of Common Anthony Edet













Of the 1,028,589 British



Y i38 ‘ :
Express Union £1 shares in issue

o_O CC Orr'''"''



: ' . : Grive would not take first cuts or| Deputy Conservative Leader, ash Andrew. Weir and Co

ines HOt me S-bieg Beis: armament programmes. He said] $240,000. —Reuter. \ | bear the main effect ed if the Government would con. holds 334,519 habeas, while

Chunchon | lateral roa t ana the United States was doing all it ia ila The Foreign Secretary had{ firm that there coulda not be an eae ar ais idi aries
No major engagements were could to ensure increased produc- - come straight to the luncheor|effective Pacitic Defence which

Bank Line, holds a athen
228,811 shares



reported from this sector, though
three Chinese divisions wer

tion and equitable use of existing N C J - from a hard hitting meeting of] did not inelude Britain and Ma
; *\ | stocks,-Reuter l omma d P be the Labour Party’s top body, the] laya as well as other countries, |
; acing > Unite e e } arty’s } ; A
eri be facing the Unite 1 n SU PHUR FROM S National Executive Committe Younger agreed Sut it might)
au 1 j ‘my . s There Aneurin Bevan once more] take a little time to get complet
Reuter. RESIGNS Confident L U.S.

tasted defeat. agreement he said.—-Reuter,









Despite nis age, Lord
Inverforth still retains a
most impwessive list of







J : 2 is 4 2 ret “ase a lirectorsfil ps Today he
‘ WASHINGTON, April 25. ee Bee tis. sedi tudees, ee fe elit oresicont. omer toas
, 4] O95 "a ‘ \ om wi z : - - r again-—thi i § ! ame yy sclor oO a7 comp.
No ‘Comment’ The Chinese spring offensive] AHE,U-S. Commerce Department announced tonight that raw’ materials shortage woul’) ~ Egypt Does Not fes engaged in seh differ
seemed to have spent the power the quota of sulphur for ail friendly countries for the second | disrupt British economy but ; as

ent activiti as Seed ’

oil, en ering, inve
ment am hking



TOKYO, April
Lieut. Gen. Matthew Ridg
the new United Nations Suprerm



of its first onslaught which in} Quarters of 1951 was established at 250,000 tons, Britain’s;found only three supporters cut P ‘roduce K nough Oil

some sectors had pushed the} allocation was 95,000 tons. The Commerce Department en-'°! 28 Party leaders
Allied lines back as much as 25





|
|
|



; i After hearing the ex-Labour| CAIRO, April 28
Commander has “no comment” to miles in three days nouncement said that age a quarters “was essential to Minister, the Executive Commit | The Egyptian Minister for Na But if Lord Inverforth’s
ke on statements that he sup- U.N. Staff Officers did not meet the bare minimu needs” of Britain and other |tee issued a statement saying it| tional Economy, Dr, Hamed Zaki list of directorships i
pra a aia ah lane Arthur’ : a belittle the Gihpers of ihe vibia. friendly countries. stood firmly behind Government | Bey, said in a newspdper inter mpressive, that of his
he ty bring the “Chinese nation tion, as the Chinese are believed ————* } The Department said that a ~ the ae budget. [ti view today that he was opposed aie Ree eatoy eee
4 4 shat Cais y hly ‘ = i ealled on a embers of the 4 1 nationalisation Seyt Alexander Morton elr
ee the fight against Communist eke wastes eee U S Plan 95 al Seeads. wRamie Tint nt Barth em fotias Ahiaitead 2 ot , monet mt ‘ a rs mt ie. even - move —iimbosing
China. " If Bevan was losking forwar: eae as ras Yow governing director
His personal aide said this tod: .y | the battle to follow up the initial tablished for the second quar- ea oe industry because she” docs nop of the andrew Weir Ship-

referring to Washington” report
that Mac Arthur's political adviser |
Major General Couttney Whitney |
claimed that General Ridgway and;

thrust. Air Force By 1957 © Hecensing period to the Labour Union for support] produce enough oil to meet

But the United Nations Com- Other second quarter quotas he ee thoroughly disappointed.| needs,” he said in an interviey.
mand seemed to feel confitient WASHINGTON, April 25 of crude sulphur—were (in long ney gave full assurance thal] with an Arab newspaper,—Reuter
that its international armies could} The rapidly expanding United |!0"S of 2,240 pounds each): India Fane Seay mee ves SADY OnE

ping and Trading Co., om
Weir sits on the boards
no fewer than 35 concerns
























































> . acks as 7 ne ; 51 7.50 rukiste ejq | ment
others sypported the former | oe nS attacks as well fost) wie ane te have 4. 1 Bae. pe nee aia ik: threat: Mabe atlva* aint Kes ae ip hf
Supreme Commander's policy on PNB esac | ate : é ings in operation by | 13 000, Colo . sympathetic to Bevan were all}, NEW YORI, April 25 rypeyy
this point.—Reuter. or ee gone pointed out | wRAS 30, and ta reach its full aa nina eae ae shetecs |ieftwing Members of Parliament |. The giant United States Steel NO JOB } K
oe a he hinese so far have | authorised strength of 95 wings in ‘ . Ian Mikardo, Tom Driberg, and| Corporation estimated today that
é 5 wae no yr to ie Allied/the autumn of 1952. a ween awe Pp | Mrs Barbara Castle tt during June government priority A rON
repower and armour. The antici This was disclose Q ianh Sete a! eve Ra tdars’ would cover at ‘ WASHINGTON, April 25
Juin Staying On pated Chinese counter offensive | House Apiaceae 13,200, France 20,000, Germany neamnaies a its ‘haar shine ith : - - General Douglas Mac Arthur has
PARIS, April 25 in nai air is so far confined to a S. Vandenberg, Air Seo aeeahane gant — sbdhenraihnsl ~— ie: set iecepted any busihe $5
, sa Juin French Sporadic appearances of fighter;Forces Chief of Staff said in|,;?3,° Bee ete Le FRENC JOVT. SURVIVES | omers. but he never confine
recite! ten oD sEssoeen who secant alone or in very small hearings, that thé fervice | had Bene haece’ ie kis a 2 Dead In Avalanche co ates ri be es hin self to z life of ‘lenis a
is also Coraiimagerin
+ y > | 5 s é abi ’ Ny a lig ‘ rT 4 ins Thi ‘ ay
a aay Win vendiniae ie i 3 O ° 560,000 men Jast December to 81 Peeke Israel 750, South Africe A second déath was reported a . ag h weve rnment | Covrtney Whitney said toda
Morocco: to complete the work | 00 n Strike wings and 700,000 mén on April | Be ee today in avalanches near here} janie. vot, at ar Ine ‘ae of con —Reuter.
that I started.” The French Na- _When the force reached its full is oneurae Finland and Portu-jlast night. News of the death on nee m at mic nig it.
tional Assembly Foreign Affairs wae os Loa April 25. {95 we seen its manpower | #4 received no arr aliases the mountain bathe quarry yes Reuter '

ee aie hel ohtnad Annidaned { early engineering workers | would number about 1,060,000 a . came in as railwaymen worker 3 8 *
Caminiiiny Lone y ote d wer gt | | here who came out on stitke over The term “wing” {gs extremely to clear the St. Gothard line into 103 DEAD IN FIRE THE ADVOCATE
in “Genexeh uin's ; | the dismissal of one of their work-|flexible. It is a self-contained Italy where an avalanche derailed YOKOHAMA. April 25 pavs for NEWS
Morocco=-Reuter, #| mates by the Soviet management |Operating uhit which may be Mass Killi an engine and two coaches of the Death toll in the fhaaina en - ' ’ ”

FRENCH MOP UP | Hi have agreed to return to work|â„¢made up of relatively fox ings Milan Zurich Express trie train disastey hare veate day DIAL 3119
bs | tomorrow. heavy bombers or fighters, HONGKONG. April 25 A dining car cook was killed} hys now reached 103. it oe Day Night ‘
SAIGON, April 25 Two hundred and eighty-five —Reuter. An Engl : 7, pri " and seven others of the train crew | efficially announce nc v : By OF a

French Union ground forces to- i : in Englishman who has just ihjuréd, three of them seriously d toca;

: Tainad. \eeRe aie ibe men employed at Teudloff Vamag arrived from China told Reuter | 444 y re lage Se oa ~~Reuter : sli -
day ome CE ee eer aa | Engineering Works struck nearly : that thousands of Chinese were Wena passengers SHEDUY 10-) § 9645436366%6G99G%GGR0G0VG9005 0 TUTTO POPP PPDD OOO”
Kationalist guerrillas for t the sixth ; | two weeks ago when Soviet Kom- Yugoslavia Wants being sentenced to death at public y/\'"** Spa *
ae meee aay. [rors eg the Socialist ’ ae meetings throughout %
$ bs : A resident of the orks Council, hina. : oun + news me »

ee et x ait i "E rs ' Leopold Matzinger for distributing $180,000,000 He said he believed Communirts Cholera Kills 275 . %
Tongking delta, they kil "ari 5 | the Sccialist paper Fries Wort, had executed about one milion , A le % Ss
more rebels and captured 700, _ 7 —_-Retiter WASHINGTON, April 25, | persons in the last six months, CALCUTTA, April 25 . 3
French Army communique said . Yugoslavia has formally asked —Reuter The cholera epidemic which .
today,—Reuter bs ’ the United States for additional Et broke out earlier this month, has AT ITS %

fi : “special aid” to help meet an claimed 275 lives, in this city of *

MR. HAROLD WILSON, who re- Invitation For Paz anticipated deficit of $180,000,009 Gold “Seized 2,500,000 people, official sources 8

cently resigned from the Cabinet, NEW YORK, April 25. jin the next two years, Said today Another 860 cases SY

wearing a “monkey nut” suit. The President of the American State Department officials said _ HONG KONG, April 25 have been admitted to the hospital BEST I xX

Newspaper Publishers Association |tOday that the United States wes! Police searching the British —Reuter. S >

Inventors of the new fibre, | today proposed inviting Dr. Albert “sympathetically considering” the Ship Glenartine (8,986 tons) for *

SEE LC.1., (Imperial Chemical Indus-} O'Gainza Paz, former editor of request, though Marshal Tito's;Several days past for drugs, have ? ~ s g

tries), were stated by an M.P. to Argentina's suppressed newspaper Government has had $150,000,000] Seized gold worth £103,000 U.S. Casualties >

SUNDAY ADVC i i be making by the ena of 1951 an | La Prenza to come to the United in United States loans and grants|}Some on passengers and some v
cee Cee ICATE estimated Sm. ibs. of the fibre, sufl- | States. —Reuter. in the’ past 18 months hidden. WASHINGTON, April 25 Ss
x eed cient if mixed with wool to a United States casualtic 3

a im. suits. worth near a propellor shaft, The] Korea rose by 969 over last week x
40 THROWN OUT rons police disclosed that they found] figures to reach 61,744 it wa $

TRIESTE, April 25 1,150,000 Hong Kong dollars} announced today, This figure in %





Police threw out some 40 Fascists Hungary Working

who started a brawl in a theatre

e e ea eo F .
arr Strikers |i eer gene se" nts] On Cosmic Rays

Liberation of Italy.—Reuter. BUDAPEST, April 25

worth on six Chinese passenger
on the “_

Since last January gold wort!
over $8,000,000 has been seizec
on ships leaving here,—Reuter.

cluded 9,380 killed, 41,428 woune

ed and 10,936 missing ;
Reuter

750,000 CASUALTIES |% K. W. V. $

y AMIE, Ae ‘

heron Peet =| SWEET VERMOUTH 3
:








ts are work-

ib icatghiieloeats _ Hungarian scient ; :
ing on cosmic rays, anc ea
Return I O Work Frank Optimism |, 4 sesvsvee aicie here

disclosed today.



a nih Oe —Reuter Today they found £36,000
4

S ° Cie
MONTEVIDEO, April 25. _ The Central Institute of Phys- Petain Sits Up
MADRID, April 25. Meat negotiations which began | ‘CS which is under construction LE D'YEU. April 25
The three days’ cost of living strike ended in the Bilbao] yesterday continued today in an|i? Budapest, is to be completed 7 1 Apr gs | Congressional. Committee _ that %

: ; Pet; ; yas 95
area this morning and the majority of workers returned atmosphere of frank optimism '>y 1955 under 4 5-year plan, it Philippe Petain, who was 95

ay : dav iin a : . Communist casualties “in Korea
without incident. But in San Sebastian a considerable num- | Z2is afternoon’ British expert says. One part of the building ig! Yesterday, was at his request,
i he c bia . ‘ed







?
eae aki i At 7h »
alres i at lifted from bed today and. sat} Vere estimated at 750,000 %
, : led by Sir Albert Feaveryear con- {#!eady in use.--Reuter, ay asa att —Reuter %
ber of workers remained on strike, though many factories | ferreq with Uruguayan counters UN se for talit? wie dal. bull ee — $
were running normally. parts headed by Stock-breeding : : “slight Lace iua 4 ei ; oi ; Fee >
Meier Pe it was believed that strikers] Minister Luis Brause—Reuter. | PAKISTAN TO NEGOTIATE | coat eerevemer ‘Knife In The Back
° ° were demanding the release. of ienigte idee W. ik J T th lines ro excelle ities
Os renee _— in San Sebastian ahd the neigh- aaa ee G lat d POTGE Biases'Becrstary, c is, oe hey ‘“ a ee eee
in San Sebastian and the neigh- HONG KONG, April 25 e Seize The United States Secretary cf â„¢ Cea : we pe
ABADAN, April 25. bouring provinee because they Russian Holiday i, een, 2S onsu State Dean Acheson said today that appetisers or Cocktails. They are

The strike at the Abadan- Oill| were involved in the organisation MOSCOW, April 25 the Pakistan Government, has| FRENCH PYRENEES, April 25
Refinery the world’s largest ended| of the strike or had been dis- Admiral Alan G. Kirk, United | arrived in Peking to conduct ne- Four hundred demonstrators led
today, 12 days after it s tarted. tributing clandestine leaflets. Also| States Ambassador in Moscow, | gotiations to establish diplomatic] by local Communist today seized

~*~ OE. OC. Drake’ Genoral!| 5°Me_ workers who struck only| left Moscow today for ten days’|relations witi. the Chinese Com.|the Spanish Vice-Consulate at

one reason why Maurice Chevalie:
was refused a visa to enter the
United States was that Chevalier
said he could not break off associa-
tion with the Communists ‘“‘withou
having the knife in his back’

made from pure white wines with the
addition of extracts of health-giving

g
x
>
*
e
>
8
herbs,
K . W s V . :
rs)
.
>
s
J
*
%

Ahmed Ali, a representative “|





rs yesterday were determined tc} holiday in Sovie' seorgia with | munist Government, accordir Carmes, near here as a gesture oi
Manager of the Anglo Iranian Oil] - , y in Soviet Georgia wit psc one niche tp} fake

Company ann ed ti rik | stage a full 48-hour protest as]|Mrs, Kirk ang four members of! a New China news agency mes.|Sympathy for the Basque strikers
pany announced the “strike 1s\

over”, He said that 24,000 work-, Sh tet
men reported for duty today There were indications that the

:
Mig its Sa aces) ota ook! «LS. Has Aid Pact With Chiang Kai Shek |
i@

} %

4

%

z

+

i

x

:

other factories had. his Embassy staff. —Reuter page —Reuter. —Reuter, Reuter,





en)

only 600 of the 28,000 wor

WEMMERSHOEK














|
remained unaccounted for |
— Reuter, > Police broke up a demon- WASHINGTON, April 25, Government laid down specifie, tha material to maintain its in-,agreed to receive America
s n by wom t night in United States Secretary of State {conditions regarding the use andjternal security or its legitimate | personnel and give them factlitic
A Warnin a, near San Sebastian, Women| Dean Acheson today announced a|disposal of aid being sent ioj self-defence. ie eae attae ee. Gas Of “oiiiitar7|
mee were demanding the release of|hitherto secret agreement between! Formosa Secondly that the Chinese Gov- | assistance furnished
HONGKONG. A; .< |meén arrested ther the United States and the Chinese| It warned that deliveries would|ernment would take security} The notes defined —A Sweet Table Wine to be
Chinese Comraunist naval Nationalist Government be stopped if Chinese nationalis lmeasures “to prevent the dis.|material as being “for the { Es '- ite.
thorities it ¢ odat |. Indications were a Under it United States military | departed from these condition ‘elosure of classified military | of Formosa against possible served slightly chilled g
all fishing boats not to enter pro~| 2b0ut 40,000 of the ete factory | aie to Nationalists on Formosa| The Chinese Nationalists Gov-|articles servicés or information | attack” | 3
vibited waters in oute nr workers in the San Sebasti aret shoul d be confined to material for| ernment in its note of February ¥,/furnished by the United States Acheson said he did not kno . ‘ a TRO >
rin , t Mar G | tween 40 and 50 r cent ]“mternal security and legitimate | accepted tte conditions Government, why the éxchange of notes ha IDEAL FOR WEDDING PARTIES. 3
Ie] +) f Hone Kor of ¥ 06.000 were on strike! self defence,” | “The conditions are “Firstly that By the third condition the |beén kest sétret oF why they %



Reuter Reuter In one note the United States the Chinese Government v se'Chinese Nationalist Government’ now being released Reuter.

LOCOVVOOCVEGOCTOVSUSCOCOSSSOOT OOS OOOO SOTSOTO OOS

piety Em
Ch Ls.

PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

R. LEONARD HUTSON, Gov-
Officer
short visit to
leave for

ernment
in Antiguay after a
Barbados isgdue to
Antigua this morning by B.W.LA

Barbados Holiday

Veterinary

R. AND MRS. WILEIAM E.

COTTRELL of Washingtor

and their son are in Barbados
for a month's holiday, Mrs. Cot-
trell is the former Audrey Good-
ridge, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
C. 8. Goodridge of Melrose, Bank
a ul Road, where Mr, and Mrs
Cc ane are staying.

evelopment Engineer




M" AND MRS. CHRISTO-
HER DYKES who had been
s ding a short holiday in Bar-
bs 1dos have left for England via
ne Mr, Dykes is Senior

velopment Engineer of B.O.A.C,

yndon

Retiring this Year
[AAR. HARRY V. ABRAHAM,
ivi Chief Clerk of the Transport
and Harbours Department, British |,
Guiana, and Secretary of the: De.
partment’s Advisory Committee
retiving from the service
in October this year and goes on

in eb



vill be





pre-retirement leave “from May
5th. Why I mention this is be-
eause Mr. Abraham has many

in Barbados and is a fre.
quent visitor te this island, Mr.
Abraham's career in the B.G,. Civil
rvice began forty-five years ago
when he joined the old Demerara
Railway Company as a clerk in
the accounts branch,

Headline of the Week

ATTACK ON GAITSKELL—
Budget Proposals Hit — Trinidad
Guardian.

friends



Docior of Laws
REYA STARK, wife of Mr.
Stewart Perowne, former Co-
lonial Secretary of Barbados is to
receive the degree of Doctor of
Laws at Glasgow University this
summer,

Student Cricketers

EST INDIAN STUDENTS

in England have been
c k to take advantage of
1 return to warm dry
weather. Through the Colonial
Office Liatsen Officer they have
nged Wo cricket matches;
gainst Clare College, Cambridge,
on May 5 and against Oriel Col-
, Oxford, on May 19, The
t Indies team will be captain-
ed by Ma..
ic








include West Indian Test
ericketer Alan Rae. Alan sat for
his Bar finals last week and

should be finished just in time to
make the Cambridge game.

ADVE



BY THE

j NOTE with rapture that the
mere act of working has now
its own jargon A chart of the
Analysis af the Elements of Work



eae is full of such things as

ynthetic set-ups, work unit
va 5; operator motion, and so
on,

My own researches have led
me to conclude that every year
637,981 work-hours are lost. by
operator—units scratching their
no during unit-hours, This



— if it means anything—
per cent. of energy out-

operator-unit per hour
; backput as to individual
Y tivity potential. Further
detailed analysis of nose-seratch
j reveals that left-handed

units tend to scratch the

e of the nose, and vice
v in the proportion of 16 to
34, and/or,

means
that 17





iivpert evidence

HE ladies’ orchestra had just

struck up “Un Peu d’Armour”
when the Cocklecarrot Commis-
sion decided to bring by air
from Paris the famous French
hatter Hégessipe Rupuytren, who
invented the bowler with a de-
tachable brim worn by a clown
at the Cirque Médrano, A man
called Munsden, whose _ father
made bowlers for the Bicester
Hunt, was asked to comment on
an article against brims in the
South Staffordshire Sentinel, and
Mr. Style, of Style and Fur
bisher, was questioned on the best





ee







position of the vents in the crown MBO ca ee cevedecers evs
of a brimless bowler, Mr. Style
said that lateral vents would give MM pee sc re Pe
a brimless hat a lop—sided appear-
ance. “The holes should be s
punctured boldly bang in_ the FOrm «26s essere eres
centre of ‘the "he said.
“Like Gruyére said Sir Home Address ....... ‘.
Archer. “‘Not necessarily,” ‘replied |
Mr. Style coldly. eeees Seebereereereue
Opening Friday May 4th and
Continuing Daily.
PLUS: Dana ANDREWS — Joan ol yy; , lage
EVANS—Farley GRANGER in ‘Oud, OF DOOM

128 BERR RR eee eee





CURE GAN

ROMANCE

1



OUR years ago when she was 16,
Nata Miss Mary Patteson, daugh

ter of the Canadian Pacific boss in

London, went to a circus.
Near her sat a young

student, Richard Fox-Linton. Last
December they met again at a
party. Next month they will be
married,

FPox-Linton is now a
officer in the R.A.F.
L.E.S.
Hutton Omitted
HE fourth Playfair
Annual (Playfair 3s,
has once again chosen
cricketers of the year,
more four touring
themselves honoured In
was Hadlee, Donnelly,
and Burtt, of New Zealand;
year it is Worrell,
Ramadhin and Valentine, of
West Indies.

Most striking omission is
Hutton acclaimed as world bats
qman number one. In his
there is a choice of three
bats—Sheppard,
Laurie Fishlock,

members

B.LF. Boss
SUCCESSOR has now been
appointed to Mr PG

Harcourt, O.B.E. who, for tt

past three years, has had charge
of the West Indies stands at the
British Industries Fair. The
choice has fallen upon Mr. W.

Lambert, one time Superintendent

of Police In Grenada and St
Lucia and former ADC to the
Governor of 3arbados. Mr
Lambert notified the West India

Committee last week of his will-



ingness to undertake the duties.

medical

medical

Cricket

6d.)
its 11
and once
find

1949 it
Sutcliffe
this
Weekes
the

Len
place

opening
Parkhouse or

Favourably Situated

R. A. LEEUWIN of the Sales

Department of K.L.M. Royal
Dutch Airlines who flew in from
Trinidad a few days ago on a one
day visit told Carib that although
Barbados is not included in
K.L.M.’s network, it is favour.
ably situated for connecting in

Trinidag with K.L.M.’s_ world
wide air system that provides
connections to Europe, Near, Mid-
dle and Far East and South
Africa

From their Caribbean head-
quarters Curacao via Havana to
Europe, there is a twice weekly
Constellation service on Tuesday
and Saturday and on Thursday
there is a Constellation service

via New York, K.L.M.’s newest
venture is the multi-stop-over-
plan. This has been launched in
co-operation with other European
airlines and allows travellers who
fly to Europe to make stop-overs
at a number of cities in Europe
without extra cost.

Tomorrow a K.L.M. aircraft,
chartered by the C.P.I.M. of
Curacao is due to arrive at Sea-
well at 1.40 p.m, from Curacao,
and will leave at 2.25 p.m. for
Curacao via Trinidad,

Joknson’s Statue

he years Dr. Samuel Johnson's

statue, which gazes up Fleet
Street from its post outside the
church of St. Clement Danes, has
needed cleaning. Some London
Johnsonians are now becoming
restive at the long delay.

They admit the statue is un-
worthy of its subject nevertheless
»y feel it should not stay so
shabby.

The matter was mentioned at a
meeting of the Johnson Society of
London a few days ago. Soon after
the war ended the Society were
given £300 to clean the statue by
Mr. F. J. Gaster, a wealthy busi-
nessman who is a member of the
Society.

They decided to do nothing until



the church of St. Clement Danes,
badly damaged by bombs, had
been restored. This has not been

done, The Society may now decide
they have waited long enough.

The statue was the work oi
Percy Fitzgerald. It was erected 1
in 1910,

Incidenta! Intelligence
[ ’D LIKE to write a book about

the Ten Great Lovers of all
Time, But darned if I can remem-
ber the names of the other nine,

—BOB HOPE
—I.N.S.



ENTURES OF

WAY...

A book for list

ee I received a copy,
sumably

for review, of
“National Gazetteer of the
sions, Districts, Groups,
Depots of British Road Servic Ss,
published at 2s. 6d. It will prob
ably be read by the large public
which made the List of Hunting

your
pre-
the
Divi

and





donshire Cabmen almost a best
seller, It contains an alphabeti
cal list of the depots, with the

names and initials of group man
agers, but the documentation is
unsatisfying. There is no bibltio
graphy, nor any means of check
ing the names and initials of the
Hroup managers without writing
to them or telephoning to them,
The Festival Volume of the List
of Huntingdonshire Cabmen, to

PIPA

Var Dos tnt, Amaterdar

By BEACHCOMBER

be published

show, I think, how much

suitable private enterprise

such special branches of

lettres.

Meat Story
MAN in a

will
more
is to
belles

next month,

restaurant the
other day was describing to
his friend the ancient trees in
the churchyard of his village.
“There's a yew,” he said,
“whieh is supposed to be eight
hundred years old.” “Try our
mutton, sir,” said the waiter with
a wry smile.
Tail-piece
N the televising of a recorded
talk on ferrets, should the
cackling of the studio audience
be ineluded?

‘Junior Short Story y Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for

its Junior Short Story Competition.

The best story will be publishee

every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery, The stories
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30C
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesdaw every week,

NOTE:

Stories must not be copied,

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name ......+:.

eee nena eenee



MEADLINE

ed
1ST PICTURES OF THE
LIFE STORY OF THE “HERO OF BATAAN”

(/ENERAL DOUGLAS Mac ARTHUR

a
wa"

eee eereees * seteee oe

see w ew enees sae tet e eee

eee eeeeee eee ree eersaceee

seeeee Reem e ween eeeeene







PLAZA—BIOWN

NIGHTDRESSES
LADIES’ VESTS

@
f
Pe
a
gm PANTIES
Ls)
gi
a

DIAL 4606

$3.91,
$147 & $169

COTTON VESTS $1.09, $131 & $155
CHILD'S COTTON VESTS 62c, 65c, 70c., 79¢. & 85cm

99¢, $1.03, $1.07, $113, $1.14, $116, $1.32,$153 gy
(CHILD'S PANTIES 50c., 59c., 68c., 71lc., 77c., 97c.

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

$4.16, $4.10 &

ti

$4.95

DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Beverley Baxter M.P. Reports On

JUDY GARLAND

“A brave woman—and an artist:
Pathos without being maudlin” — ;"

One does not need the imagin-
ation of a poet nor the deductive

powers of a detective to under-

stand Miss Judy Garland’s feel-
ings as zero hour approached oi

Monday evening.

Listening from her dressing- |

room to the mounting applause

of an excited audience for a pro

gramme that was singularly clean

and diverting, she must have fel
like

t

a Christian at the ancient

Coliseum hearing the roaring of

the lions.

Ten or 12 years ago she was
the embodiment of what Ameri-

cans call “sizzling youth”.

Play-

ing opposite Mr. Astaire or Mr.
Rooney on the films her vitality
fairly burst the seams of the cel-
luloid which tried to imprison her

personality.

Then she faded from view and
there were rumours of unhappi-
ness, sickness and tragedy. Like
Dr. Miracle in the Tales of Hoff-
mann a psychiatrist came into her
life, but with somewhat happier
results. Finally a psychologist
named Val Parnell offered her a
contract to appear at the Palla-
dium although it was years since
she had appeared before a live

sudience,

The Welcoming Roar

From the time of her arrivai

1

at Southampton the candid camera

men told the story of the weigh

t

which had been added unto her,
From the pictures in the news-
papers there was little to identify
our visitor with the earlier sizzler.
From all of which we can under-

stand the nervous
Monday night.

tension of

There have been times at the
Palladium when the Dementia

Americana Microphonia

has

reached such a pitch of hysteria
that one could pnly groan and feel

ashamed for one’s countrymen

and even more for one’s country-

women. But there was no demen-
tia in the tremendous

The warmth of that welcome
was genuine, kind

princess of the movies, And

genuineness was met by genuine-

ness. This sturdy young woman

bowed and smiled as the cheering
went on, but there were no tears,

no trembling of the lips or wob-
bling of the chin.

Carefree, Buoyant
She was a trouper who had
come to give a performance. That
was what mattered to her.
Curiously enough there
nothing absurd about this Brunn-
hilde singing old favourites from
the films. She possesses a_ real
voice, a voice which even has

beauty in its softer moments, and

her face is expressive because
she plays no tricks.

In Limehouse Blues she takes
a very slow tempo and makes of
it a brooding tragic tale instead of
merely a chug-chug rhythm num-
ber. In her Easter Parade she is
so carefree and buoyant that we
saw the sizzler again hefore our
eyes, and we could almost picture
the bonnet which had played
such havoc with the young im-
pressionables.

Vibrant Sincerity

The truth is that Miss Garland
is now better than her material.
This quality of vibrant sincerity
opens up possibilities which prob-
ibly she, herself, has failed to
realise. She can command pathos
without being maudlin. She is
ibove the wailing nonsense of the
erooner who could not sleep a
wink last night and all that. sort
of drivel. In fact she is an artist.

Nevertheless, she flopped at the
Palladium—but let me hasten to
add that this is no figure of
peech. Retreating backwards for
‘he first time from the barrage of
applause, she tripped and _ sat
down on the stage with a bump.
Her astonishment was greater
than her confusion, and she made
no pretence that it was intended.

We saw a brave woman on Mon-
day, but more than that we saw
a woman who has emerged from
the shadows and finds that the
public like her as she is, even
more than for what she was.



CROSSWORD

re
Per



Across
2. Bad French tat? No duck, (7)
8. Silent. (9)
1. You couid make a meal or it. (4)
2. His “ Goodbye” Hngers on. (5)
4. It returns to the vicar’s income,
possibiy (5)

15. Brought tame to Rudolph. (5)
16. a man next door holds her

19. Trade. (4)
my, Volante, (4) 23. Juggiery. (5)

24. Usually a potter's product.
25. He changes colour. (4)
26. He may carry the additional
clause,
a7. Take your chotce, (3)
Down
1, Bxcept the clue is given, how can
we write the answer? (6)
2. Split the atom. )
3 Intention (3)
4. Funny, but it does make Helga
try. (8) 6, Berry. (4)
6 Risen out of this, (5)
‘
Â¥

(3)

. So dies a stage whisper. (5)

All square (7)

10 To be stared at In this way ts
not friendly, (7)

14 Such revenue ts partly your con-
cern. (6) 6, Fevered, (5)

18 Go this and take a message. (3)

20. Foreign coin. (4)

21. What's ‘tne right word for a
group of quails ? (4)

22. Forty-five minutes, (3)

Solution of vestercay’s Duale,—Across:
1 Calamity;
Tent:

9. Disunion; 10, Resin; 11,
J3 Catacomb: 15, Thread 17, Let:

> 21. Nucleus; Ten: 23,
24. Dentists. Cigetiate:





Asiatic Munch; Into:

‘on Av Antidotes: 9, Dendened:

: 14, Bats; 16, Rued} 18, Tune;
a

and under-
standing—greater and deeper than
ever would have been given ic
her when she was the madcap

was

roar of
welcome that greeted Miss Gar-
and as she walked on to the stage.








'
|
Elis Starring Robert MITCHUM

THURSDAY,

A ga TT En eee ae

APRIL

A@UATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

26, 1951













B.B.C. Radio





























Pin , TONIGHT NIGHT at 8.30
rogramme | GEORGE RAFT WILLIAM BENDIX
!
’ . “ ””
THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 1951 | in “RACE STREET” ee Ma eee ae.
6.9% am—12.15 p.m 19.69 M| COMMENCING FRIDAY 2ith
i RKO’s NEW PICTURE

630 a.m. Sports Diary; 6 n.} ”

Sporting Record; | 7 a.m. Tt “HOLIDAY AFFAIR
a.m. News Analysis, 7 a.m. | Starring: ROBERT MITCHUM, JANET LEIGH, WENDELL COREY

Irom the Editorials 73 an o
fremme Parade 7.0 a.m. Generally | {/- — ee
can: 1 ho Nd Sk, a ——————EEyEESE ee ESESESSSanman=SS ="
8.15 a.m. Listeners’ Choice; 8.39 a.m. / °
Eve Gettieson; 8.45 am. For Human ||| PPPLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
Bodies; 9 a.m. The News; 9.10 a.m . m
Home News from Britain; 9.15 a.m LAST TWO SHOW TODAY 445 & 8.30 p.m.
Close Down; 11,15 a.m. Progr Par- RKO-RADIO’S BIG SUSPENSE-FILLED 2 FEATURE PROGRAM!
ade; 11.25 a.m. Listeners’ Choice; 11.45 Lee Nancy “ *
a.m, Special Dispatch; 12 noon The 1 TRACY KELLY in BETRAYAL from the EAST
News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 A Past Moving Thriller
pm. Close Down, plus Rbbert mists

oe â„¢ 4Us ara b
Sapte eee or Feature Mitchum Bel Geddes “BLOOD ON MOON ”

4.15 p.m. The Pilgrim's Progre 4 No. 9 Robert PRESTON in THE
p.m, Composer of the Week; 5.15 pa mm —-—_—-—- —--
Scottish Magazine; 6.45 p.m. Music fyom TODAY 1.30 p.m.—-CI8CO KID in

TOMORROW 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

NOT. WANTED

Sally FORREST neere Bi

the Films, 6 p.m. BBC Northern Orches-
tra; 6 45 p.m. Programme Parade
6 0—7.15 p.m, 25.53 M.

RIDING THE CALIFORNIA TRAIL
— and —
MRE. WONG IN CHINATOWN
Boris KARLOFF



















rtd An Ida "Lupino Production
7 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. News
Analys.s; 7.15 pum. We See Britain = 7.45 11.00 p.m. 25.58 M., 31. a “4





DIA
PLAZA DAL;







GAIETY

7.4% p.m. Generally Speaking; 8 p.m “|









Rudio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. The Adven- OISTIN (THE GARDEN) St. Ja
tures of P.C. 49; 8.45 p.m, Composer TO-DAY * mes
of the Week; 9 p.m. Special Dispatch; ‘Only) 5 and 8.30 p.m. LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30
P 1b Sine Git Joe: O48 ae Herbert Wilcox presents— “SHE”
lo you Remember: 10 f.7. ame Seatehs Anna NEAGLE Michael WILDING RANDOLPH SCOTT and
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials 10,15 “THE COURTNEYS OF “MASKED RAIDERS”
pm. Light Music; 10.45 p.m, Moray Me c URZON a with TIM HOLT
Laren Talking; 11 p.m. From the Third = *
Prog Gener ceeapeconeennena Friday to Sunday: 8.30 p.m.
rogré Opening Friday 5 and 8.30 p.m. Matinee Sunday 5 p.m.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME (W.B.) CHAIN LIGHTNING & “LOST. BOUNDARIES”

“THE



STORY OF SEABISCUIT" Beatrice PEARSON Mel FERRER

eee eneenetpstoennere a =O

THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 6S———
10.15 p.m.
10,15-—10.30
176

195}.

Midnite
News and Commentary

“CALL

Sat, 260m — (Monogram)
OF THE JUNGLE” and

“DRIFTIN’ KID"

Midnite Sat. 28 (Monogram)
SOUTH OF THE RIO GRANDE

and THE GOLDEN EYE

JUDY GARLAND
“The public like her as she is

This week in Canada




Mes



4,








































——|\3 PPLE EELEL APP LELEPPLEP PES SEPO SD SPSS P PSPSPS,
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THURSDAY,

Sugar Cannot
Be De-rationed
IN BRITAIN

LONDON, April 19

The Food Ministry today, in an
official reply to Lord Lyle, have
explained why sugar cannot be
taken off the ration in Britain at
the moment.

Lord Lyle had suggested that
the Food Ministry would have
available this year from Common-
wealth and home sources 360,000
tons more sugar than is requivet
to maintain consumption at tbe
present level of 2,200,000 tons a
year,

The Food Ministry agree that
the unrationed consumption has
been estimated at 2,550,000 but
state that the estimate is based
upon information 12 years out of
date and therefore subject to a
wide margin of error.

Room

These facts are brought to light
by Mr. W_ Shelton Smith, Director
of Public Relations, Ministry of
Food, in a letter to the Financial
Times, where Lord Lyle’s original
statement appeared earlier this
month. Mr, Smith says that for
10 years the Ministry has based its
estimates of sugar available on
quantities which will actually
come into stock in the U.K. in a
calendar year. But the “crop
year” of various Commonwealth
countries, including the U.K. itself,
falls into two calendar years.

“There is, therefore,” says Mr

For Differences

Smith, “room for differences of
opinion -on exactly how much
sugar will be available in any
calendar year.”
Higher Stocks
The latest Ministry of -F..0od

estimate is that supplies this year
from all sources “are likely almost
exactly to cover the requirements
of the U.K. at current ration
levels together with requirements
of New Zealand which, as a
full participant in the Common-
wealth sugar agreement, has a
claim on supplies which amounts
to about 100,000 tons.”

The Ministry of Food expect,
moreover, that when sugar is taken
off the ration, manufacturers, dis-
tributors and housewives’ will
carry higher stocks than they do
at present—an indication that the
originally estimated margin of
2,590,000 tons may have to be
raised considerably.

REDS PLAN CONTINUE
FIGHT AGAINST
CHURCH

VATICAN CITY, April 24
Vatican quarters said today the
recent Soviet directed Confer-
enee discussed plans for suppress-
ing the Roman Catholic Church





APRIL 26,

1951

Trinidad Loses
$250,000 A Year

From Qur Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23.
For the want of a proper slip-
way Trinidad continues to lose
$250,000 yearly, declared Captain
S. J. Barker, Supervisor of the
Campania Venezolana de Navega-
cien He was at the time
attending the taking over by his
company of the newly built
motor vessel Apure He said
that while Trinidad was looking
around in an effort to obtain
more U.S. currency, the one sure
way was neglected. This way,
he said, was in having a modern
slipway which could earry large
vessels. The last vessel on the
slipway in Trinidad had earned
Trinidad about $45,000 US.
Several other companies in Vene-
zuela are only too willing to send
vessels to Trinidad if the accom-
modation on the slipway could be
had. The slipway in Trinidad
was built to carry vessels of
1,800 tons but when completed
this was reduced to 800 tons, and
finally, when put into use, to 600
tons, this being the highest ton-
nage, which it is estimated could

be carried safely.



Henry, Smith Resign
From Grenada
Nutmeg Board

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 24

M. Henry, Chairman of the
Nutmeg Board and S. H. Smith
a member, yesterday both tender-
ed their resignations from the
Board as a result of the Board’s
recent decision to transfer the
gateman whose dismissal was de-
manded by striking workers last
week, because he stopped a man
arriving 25 minutes late,

Gairy, on intervention, had pro-
posed the suspension of the gate.
man for two weeks, but apparent-
ly under pressure of a majority,
the Board decided to compromise
by the transfer of the gateman,
agains. whom there was not a
specific charge of failure to dis-
charge his duties.



Red Office
Attacked

NICE, April 24.

Dressed as parachutists, and
armed with sub-machine guns a
group of unidentified men at-
tacked Communist party offices
here last night. Three men in the
offices were beaten up. One was
taken to hospital_—Reuter.

L.A.C. PLANE MAKES
EMERGENCY LANDING

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23.
Mr. Rene Serrao, a member of



the Light Aeroplane Club made
an emergency landing at the St.

completely in the Soviet satellitesVincent Race course on Saturday

states,

At the meeting held in Kars.

head, Bohemia. they were reportedSt.

to have decided to set up an in-

while en route to St. Lucia in the

aircraft Castor of the Aeroplane
Club. Mr. Serrao left Piarco for
Lucia but never reached
there, for while on his way he

ternational body designed to or-encountered bad weather around

ganise and-eq.ordinate.the Com- the Grenadines.

munist struggle against





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costumes, worn during the Greek

revolution of 1821, flanked by two modern day fighters in khaki
battledress act as guards of honour for the Greek and American
flags above the ancient battlefield at the third anniversary celebration
of the Marshall Plan at Thefmopylal, Athens. The narrow pass
where 300 Free Spartans died in 480 B.C. while resisting hordes of
invading Persians, echoed to the strains of the Greek and American
national anthems while U.S. Ambassador John E. Peurifoy planted
an olive tree—symbol of peace—on a hillside overlooking the pass.

—Express.



Bevan Puts Labour’s
Future In Doubt

(From Our Own Correspondent) ~

LONDON, April 23.

Principles of Parliamentary democracy were made mani-
fest, but the reputation of Mr. Bevan and the future of the
Labour Party were left in doubt by a startling speech from
the resigning Minister made in the House of.sCommons

today.

Mr. Bevan was given the traditional hearing. He grasped
this as an opportunity to throw his view point very force-

fully at the Labour Party.

The House was crowded for
the great occasion. But the Con-
seryative Party kept as quiet as
possible—Mr. Churchill maintain-
ing complete silence—for this was
intra-Socialist’s quarrel. Bevan’s
arguments stormed magnificently
from the general to the particular.
He opened with the theme that
democracy can only be protected
from Communism by a rearma-
ment programme set strictly in
proportion to the achievement of
social democracy.

The substance of his complaint
against Mr. Attlee and the Chan-
cellor of the Exchequer was that
they had been led by the United
States in an armament programme
that could not be achieved and
ought not be attempted. He played
eloquently on the basic anti-
Americanism of the Labour Party
sentiment. Gradually he began to
get a grip on the Parliamentary

Labour Party with this part of
his speech,
It will be realised that the

Labour Party is very alarmed at
the actions of Bevan. He is splitting
the Party while it is in danger.
But while he was speaking on
matters of theory and the broad
aspect of policy, he undoubtedly
had the ear of the majority.

Attacks Gaitskell

But Aneurin Bevan is a cun-
ning and sometimes desperate
politician. Rancour does not do
when a minister makes a speech
after his resignation. Bevan made
some grave efforts in this extra-
ordinary speech—he made the
speech without notes for thirty

minutes of a closely packed argu-
ment.

He battled with Hugh Gaitskell,
Chancellor of the Exchequer, and
he allowed himself to suggest
quite frankly that Gaitskell was
guilty of deception in stealing
from the National Insurance Fund
to pay for rearmament.

That lost the sympathy of the
Labour Party. A few moments
later, Bevan admitted he himself
had played politics within the
Cabinet to get his way on a num-
ber of minor points during the
last three years.

When a man resigns witn the
great protest that he is resigeing
on principles he does not attract
sympathy by revealing that he
has bluffed and manoeuvred for
years. His hearers ask whether ho
is not playing politics still.

Labour Divided

Labour M.Ps_ received his
speech coldly. He has committed
the unpardonable sin of Parlia-
mentary democracy; he has
divided his party just before an
election. He has probably brought
the election nearer and has made
it certain at least by the autumn,

But the most powerful impres-
sion made by the speech of this
man who has so often been reck-
oned as the future Prime Minister,
was that he vindicated Parlia-
mentary democracy. He was at
odds with Mr. Attlee. He resigned.

Government leaders sat on the
front bench and listened in silence
to his renunciations of what he
regards as “fell out” of socialist
principals. Never has such an un-
repentant, argumentative or such
a disruptive speech been made by
a minister resigning from the
British Cabinet,

But Bevan will still vote Labour;
he will neither leave nor be ex-
pelled from his party. There need
be no dissolution or election at
once,



Marryshow Attacks
Legislature

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 24

Hon, T. A. Marryshow, mak.
ing a public appearance in the
Chureh Hall, police meeting. last
night as President of the resusci-
tated Grenada Progressive League,
Strongly criticised the legislature’s
passage last weck of a Bill to pro-
hibit the importation of publica.
tions deemed of seditious charac-
ter, saying it was a move to deny
the average West Indian what the
costermonger bought in bookstalls
of England without hindrance.

He also said—this Bill was more
dangerous than the one of general
sedition which has been referred
to a Select Committee, He de-
clared he would do his utmost to
effect the removal from the
Statute Book of any such legisla.
tion,

Other

speakers were S H,
Graham, Barrister, who outlined
the League’s programme, and

Reginald Clyne,



Unions Encourage
Machines

: LONDON,

2 The American printing operative
works much, more effective and
produces far more” than his
British counterpart but does not
work correspondingly harder.

This is one of the findings of
the British letterpress team which
visited the United States in 1950
under the auspices of the Anglo.
American Productivity Council.

The report on the visit just
published claims that American
printing, in spite of its greater
productivity, is generally below
the standard in Britain,

One of the reasons for America’s
higher productivity, says the re-
port, is “The positive approach by
Trade Unions to the question of
increasing output, together with
comparative lack of restrictive
practices.

“Not only is there no opposition

by the American unions to intro-
duction of new machinery or
methods, but such improvements
are actively encouraged, even at
the risk of displacing labour.”
The report urged that British
employers and unions should start
a joint campaign in Britain for
methods that will increase output
and reduce costs, including freer
intake of labour and wage incen-
tive schemes,
—I.N.S.



University
LIMA, Peru,

The oldest University in the
Western Hemisphere, the Univer-
sity of San Marcos in Lima, will
celebrate its fourth centennial on
May 12.

nded on that date in_ 1551
b wal Order of the Queen
Juana La Loca (the mad),
daughter of Ferdinand and Isa-
bella.’ and her son, Emperor
Charles V., San Marcos was
established just 14 years after
Lima became a city. The only
other universities on this conti-
nent which are near the antiquity
of San Marcos are the University
of Mexico, founded on September
21, 1551, and the University of
Saint Thomas of Aquinas on the
island of Santo Domingo and now
known as the Dominican Repub-
lic, inaugurated in 1558.

From its beginning, San Marcos,
which is located just a few blocks
from Plaza San Martin in down-
town Lima, was open to both lay-
men and Dominican students. It
is now a co-educational institu-
tion and consists of the Faculties
of Letters, Economics, Law, Com
mereial Science, Pharmacy, Bio-
chemistry, Education, Chemistry.
Medicine. Science Odontology and
Veterinarian Medicine.

The movement for the estab—
lishment of the university in Peru
was led by Fray Tomas de San
Martin, one of the outstanding
representatives of the Dominican
Order in Peru, and Captain Ger
onimo Aliago, one of the original
Conquistadores who under the
leadership of Francisco Pizarro
overthrew the Inca Empire.

The University was recognized
as a papal school in a Papal Bull
issued on July 15, 1571 by the

——

series of special programme:
conferences and ceremonies will
be presented during this year iu
celebration of the University’s
four-hundredth Sent vernrt: ‘

Australian Elections
Begin Saturday

MELBOURNE, April 25,
Leaders of Australia’s political
parties last night wound up the



radio electioneering for Satur
day’s general election, Govern-
ment spokesmen were confident

that. voters would continue the
swing away from Socialism, start-
ed in 1949.

Labour spokesmen were just as
convinced that they were heading
back to power.—(C.P.)

——e_

BRITAIN’S FUTURE
PRIME MINISTER

CAMBRIDGE, April 25.

Communist leader Harry Pol.
litt (60) last night prophesied he
will, one day, be Prime Minister
of Britain, addressing the Uni.
versity Debating Society.

He said that his becoming
Prime Minister “will take place
befcre you die”’.—(C_P.)





CANADA WILL RECRUIT
WOMEN FOR FORCES

OTTAWA, April 25.

Canada will begin this summer
to recruit women for the armed
forces and indications are they
will play a major role in RCAFS
radar units.

Defence Minister Claxton ended
a month's speculation when he
told the House of Commons yes-
terday a decision had been taken
to recruit women for regular
RCAF and for reserve forces of
the three services,—(C.P.)



WORKERS ENCOURAGED
TQ REMAIN. ON JOB

LONDON, April 25.

A new deal has been decreed
for Britain’s army of middle-aged
elderly workers, instead of drift.
ing into retirement at 65 or later
they will be encouraged to re-
main on the job to assist Britain
tc meet her expanding re-arma.
ment and export commitments.

This is the sequel to an appeal
for deferred retirement made by
Hugh Gaitskell, Chancellor of the
Exchequer, in his April 10 Budget
speech.—(C.P.)

Will Make A Bid For
Six World Records

LONDON, April 24.
The British speed ace Lt.-Col
A. T, (Goldie) Gardner will make
a bid for six world records on
the Salt Lake Flats, Utah, next
September.—(C. P,)



Rates of Exchange



APRIL, 25, 1951
CANADA
62°. pr Cheques on
Bankers 60% pr.
Demand
Drafts 99.85% pr,
‘tebe Sight Drafts 5 7/10% pr
62% pr. Cable } .
66 G/10% pr. Currency 58 6/10% pr
Cara e tad ES Coupons 57 8/10% pr
7
SEE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE







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The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

tition,

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 word:

in length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd.
City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner wil! re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.
SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name .





B.G. Leases
Land To U.S.

(From Our Own Correspondent
GEORGETOWN, April 25

The British Guiana Government
nas concluded negotiations for the
lease of 300 acres of forest land in
the Essequibo and Pomeroon river
districts to U.S.A. lumber com
panies for the erection of a ply-
wood plant and a sawmill,

The agreement was concluded
with Ray Berney, President of the
Bookings Lumber Company.
U.S.A,, and U, S, Herrington, Vice-
President of the Inter-State Ply
weod Corporation of Oregon U.S.A.

The companies propose to invesi
$1,500,000 in the two projects. A
sawmill and plywood plant will be
set up on a 35 acre site at Aurora
Village, Essequibo Coast, and con-
struction work will begin in June
or July, when machinery
equipment arrives.

Berney intimated that when iv
operation they will employ not
less than 350 local labourers
Technicians will come from the
U\S.A., in the initial stages, but
will train local men to take over.

The company and the Govern
ment will build a giant roadway
through the forest for transporta
tion and other purposes while
suitable craft will also be utilised
for river transportation,

Don Cockell Beats
Freddie Beshore

LONDON, April 24

Don Cockell, British and Euro
pean light.beavyweight champion,
pounded out a one-sided decision
victory over Freddie Beshore of
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on
Tuesday in a non-title 10.rounde:
at Harringay arena

Beshore outweighed the Lon
coner 185 Ibs. to 181 Ibs, Blond
Freddie first lost $420 in the after
roon for weighing three pounds
over the agreed 182.—(C.P.)

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietta
Sch. Marea Henrietta, Yacht Caribbee
Sch, Wonderful Counsellor,
dom Fleary, Sch Mary M
Philip H Davidson, Sch
Smith, Sch. Amanda T
Pilgrim SS, Sch W. L
Biwe Nose Mac

ARRIVALS

8.8. ASTRONOMER, 4,524 tons
Capt. Whitehouse, from Liverpool

Sch, BELQUEEN, 44 tons net
King, from St. Vincent

DEPARTURES

S.S. HELDER, 2,24 tons net
Stevenson, for Trinidad

8.s ALCOA PIONEER,
net, Capt Devine for Newtoundland

M.V. WULLEMSTAD, 336 tons net
Capt. Merceline, for St. Vincent

M.V. SARAH BBLL, 40 tons net, Capt
Athanase, for Martinique

Sch. FRANCES W. SMITH, 74 tons net,
Capt. Hassell, for British Guiana

M.V. CARACAS, 235 tons net
Valasquez, for ' Trinidad

In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbado
Coast Station







ana



Sch. Free
Lewis, Seh
Lucille M
Seh
Eunicia



Unite
Seh

net

Capt

Capt

4,015 tons

Capt



S.S. Capecod, 8.8. Gronland, 5.8, Su-
garproducer, S 8 Goodwood, 8.8. Co-
lombie, 8 S. Golfite, 8.5, Baron Maclay

SS Brazil, 8.5. Fort Tewnshend, 8 8

Lady Nelson, S.S. Canadian Obsery



8.8. Alcoa Clipper, SS Uruguay, 8 S |
Aleoa Roamer, 8.8. Lady Rodney, 8 8
Sun Avis, S.S, Uruguay, 88 Alcoa
Roamer, 38 Lady Rodney, 8 8S. Sun
Avis, 8S Gundine, 8S Arakaka, S §
Elizabeth, S88 Joshua Tree, SS Ada

belle Lykes, S 8 Northemountain, §
Imperial Toronto, 8.8. Esso Rea ls
S. Monica, SS Hersilia, S 8 El Aleto,
S$ Willemstad, $8 Eseo Aumusta, \



Child’s Inquiry

PAGE THREE





.
Adjourned
4

FURTHER he in
mquest ul nding the deat y
David Goodridge of Richmon
Gap, St. Michael as adjourned FLY
until May 16, by District “A”
Coroner yesterday.

David Goodridge 14-month-oid
son of Mildred Goodridge of

Richmond wore * Michael, Enjoy the hospitality, com-
was admitted to r Bayley’s serv-
Hospital on April 20, but died fort and thoughtful
suddenly there on April 22 ice which have made PAA

The body was removed to the ” tag vete:
Public Mortuary where a_ post First choice” of os
morter examination was travelers the world over.
formed by Dr, A. S. Cato. Only
evidence taken yesterday Wa
from David Taylor who identified NEW YORK
the body of his son to Dr. A. S
Cato at the Public Mortuary

He said that his son started t\
complain about his health some
time in January when he instruct
ed his wife to carry the boy to
Dr, Roberts, On Thursday, April
19, Dr. A, W. Seott saw his son at
home and gave him an injection
During the night of April 19, the
boy never showed signs of im
provement and the next day he

teok him to Dr, Bayley’s Hospital

where he was detained. On the
morning of April 22, he saw his
son dead at the Hospital

Before adjourning the inquest
the Coroner informed the jury that
an adjournment was needed as
parts of the deceased had been
removed at the post mortem

examination and handed in to the

Government Analyst
received a report yet

He had not



T'dad Customs Excise
Guards Want Pay Increase
From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23
Customs and Excise guards in
Trinidad are “peeved” over their
present salaries, and are seeking



the introduction of a wage re-
grading scheme They = claim,
“that no attention is being paid
us at all by the authorities, and
we are about the lowest paid
servants in the Service,” They
claim that they have had no
increase Since 11 years ago
ACCIDENT

Shortly after 2.30 p.m. yester
day the motor lorry X-1117
owned by Cyril Atkins of Christi
Chureh and driven by Bradford
Atkins was involved in an acci-
dent on Haggatt Hall Road with
the motor lorry P-107 owned by
Three Houses Plantation and
driven by Oswald Alleyne — of

Graves Hill, St

Philip

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS &9 ADVOGATE

Reese ee fae)

Printed Dy the Advocate Co.,





Thursday, April 26, 1951



SUBSIDISATION

THE resolution passed by the House of
Assembly involving the sum of $440,000 to

send between two and four thousand la-
bourers to the United States of America
was one of the most unbusinesslike de-

cisions ever taken by that body.

When deductions have been made from
labourers’ wages towards transportation
and other costs, the Gevernment is still
likely to lose approximately $192,000 on
the agreement,

Mr. Adams, introducing the resolution,
was at pains to point out that the telegram
asking for the decision of the Government

had arrived over the week-end and they
had a short time to consider the matter
because it called for an early reply to the
Chief Liaison Officer in Washington. It
was for the House to give careful consid-
eration to the matter. It was necessary to
consider whether the amount of money
expended was so great.as to make it pos-
sible for the advantages which would ac-
crue to Barbados to be outweighed by the
huge expenditure,

The Government had sent down the
resolution to the House but they were
fully aware of the difficulties of the situa-
tion. It would be discovered on a rough
calculation of the figures that even if all
the emigrants worked for the full duration
of their 12-week contracts and each paid
his third of the return fare, that the Gov-
ernment would sink a sum of between
$160,000 and $250,000 in the venture. It was
estimated that at least $192,000 would not
be recoverable. “t was the duty of the
House to decide whether the scheme would
be undertaken.

The House decided in an unbusiness-
like way that Barbados could not afford to
refuse any offer of emigration, even though
it was costly and not likely tu exceed 3
months’ duration. The question which the
House did not decide despite the speeches
of Mr. Garner end Mr, Crawford was
whether the expenditure was not a method
of subsidising temporary emigration at the
expense of local development. It is pos-
sible tHat because of the short duration of
the employment now offered there will be
many who will discard their present em-
ployment, go to the United States and then
return to join the ranks of unemployed.
This has happened before.

It was Mr. Garner who pointed out in
the House that the whole scheme was mere-
ly a palliative. It was Mr. Crawford who
said —and it is to his credit—that if the
Government knew that there was a cer-
tainty of losing between $160,000 and
$250,000 in the venture it would have been
better to have spent such a sum on a local
project which would be of benefit to the
island. If that money was spent on the
East Coast Road it was possible to provide
employment for about 8,000 people over a
period of about six months. Even after
this amount had been spent there would
be something to show for it which would
be of lasting benefit to the island and which
would make possible further schemes for
local employment.

The House would appear to regard emi-
gration as a political issue and neither of
the two major parties seemed. prepared to
stress that temporary employment which
would cost the island more than it earned,
would lead to greater unemployment. Yet
there is no doubt that that fact ought to
have been stressed and Mr. Crawford de-
serves the thanks of the community for
stressing it.

Barbados needs emigration. It must have
it. But the island will only suffer if what
appears to be emigration, but is really tem-
porary employment, should cost the island
approximately $192,000 for three months’
employment of some 4,000 men.

a a i eaieeeiicieieeiiamaienbianiaidienaninernceninanahnaaannaMniai, Seniaiartniniviiinaieniyn acer mn nanan yee Senet SN er einen at etn eT,

OUR READERS SAY:

Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown



Economic Policies For MACARTHUR IS DOWN
A Lasting Peace

The free world is faced with a
grace crisis and perhaps its
greatest challenge to survival. We
must develop—and we have mad
a good beginning—the strength of
the free nations to counteract the
aggressive moves of communism
and to force their abandonment
We must also establish and main-
tain a just and lasting peace
which includes friendly cultural
intercourse among nations as well
as mutually advantageous trade
among nations.

The present world situation
requires an expression of utmjst
responsibility and leadership from
the United States, from American
businessmen, In the past, many
of us have been most reluctant to
accept this responsibility. We
have appeared to be inexperienced
and, in fact, we are inexperienced.
This is because the United States
is a relatively young nation and
we have few precedents on which
to base our policies.

But surely it is now manifest
that the Nation’s future depends
en how widely and how wisely
it carries out the responsibilities
of leadership. The central point
must be the unification of the
free world in the face of aggres-
sion atid threats of aggression.
Each member of the free world
acting alone is too weak to
counteract these or to _ resist
attack. Not even the United
States standing alone can be
powerful enough for self-defense,
Acting together, the free nations
by moral standards and _ pro-
ductive achievements will bring
about the currently lacking
balance of power.”

In all these endeavours our
basic aim must always remain the
same: The maintenance of peace
but without sacrifice of freedom.

The first question that now
arises is: What should be the
short-range, or immediate, inter-
national economic policy of the
United States?

Development of strength at a
rapid pace to offset the military
power of the nations in the Soviet
orbit should be, I should think,
objective number one. Plans to
do this are now being carried out
by the United States and other
free nations.

I am confident that rapid re-
armament of the non-Soviet world
will—within «a short period—
create superiority of political,
economic, and military strength
on our part. Such a state of con-
ditions would make the Kremlin
stop, look, and listen before em-
barking on other diversionary
invasion movements. The Western
world must concentrate its efforts
for the next two or three yearg
on harnessing its resources for
defence

At the same time, we in the
United States must expand our
economic capacity to such an ex-
tent that we can offer to both
our own people and the people in
the underdeveloped areas increas-
ed standards, both material and
moral, that dictatorships of any
kind are in no position to provide.

Therefore, it stanas to reason
that the free world must move
forward to expand its productive
facilities, its economic strength,
its scientific knowledge.







o e Even so, it must be thought that Mac-
A Pre-view Or The Festival Arthur has overplayed his political hand.

LONDON, April 21, 1951,

On May 8rd the King will de-
clare it open, and the exhibits
are crowding into the Dome of
Discovery, The Dome is the larg-
est single span in the world—a
publicity officer told me it was the
largest building in the world but
it does not seem as big as St.
Peter’s. Probably that is what
encouraged the authorities to let
too much get into the Dome, I am
afraid it gives an impression of
overcrowding. The gallery run-
ning round half the Dome is
divided into two sections, Arriv-
ing at the top of the stairs the
visitor is faced with a_ signpost.
To the right he is directed “To
Outer Space” and to the left he is
directed “To the Sky”. There is
still much work to be done, in the
last ten days, on The Sky. But
Outer Space is almost complete
and includes a glimpse of cosmic
radiation and a short course in
practical astronomy. At the far
end of outer space, the visitor
will be pleased to find a moving
staircase that will take him down
to the ground floor, In the centre
of the Dome of Discovery is a
totem pole and only a few yards
away is a device for giving the
visitor the chill impression that
he is exploring the Antarctic—
complete with a perspective pan-
orama of glaciers.

At a preview of the show—ad-
mittedly without most of the ex-
hibits—I had the impression that
“Lion and the Unicorn” was the
most attractive pavilion. The peo-
ple who have worked on it say
it has been a delight for the art-
ists. But I can testify that they
have not run riot, and this pavilion
which is designed to reveal some-



By GEORGE A. SLOAN
Chairman, United States Council of the
International Chamber of Commerce

The second objective should be
to assure an adequate supply of
strategic raw materials for all the
countries participating in the com-
mon defence against Soviet im-
perialism, It is gratifying te

know that a start in the direction be

of international allocation and
procurement of materials is now
being made. It is essential, how-
ever, that private channels be as-
signed, wherever possible, the re-
sponsibility to carry out this raw
material goal. Also, any interna-
tional arrangement should — be
maintained only for the period of
the emergency. When that period
ends, it is imperative that free
market competition be reinstitut-
ed.

It behooves businessmen
look beyond this period of emer-
gency to the period when the free
world shall have reached a bal-
ance of power.

What will we do then with the
resources in materials and man-
power that have been increased’?
Will we have to cut back and ex-
pose ourselves to the fear of poss-
ible depression and unemploy-
ment?

I think that. every businessman
in the United States, and business-
men in the other free nations,
should look ahead to that future
date and punder over the possi-
bility of formulating a programme
that would assist in furthering
economic growth and apply the
gains made to the common good,
This would enable us to minimize
unemployment and to utilize the
expanded resources in such a way
that they will be available to more
and more people.

At the forthcoming Congress of
the International Chamber of
Commerce, which will be held in
Lisbon, Portugal, June 10—16, the
world business community, in-
cluding the American representa-
tives, will discuss such a pro-
gramme. {

If the free nations of the world
do not succeed in avoiding econo-
mic maladjustments—if they fail
to establish an environment in
which communities can advance
materially and spiritually—there
is always the danger that the peo-

le will be driven into commun-
sm. Only by our performance,
can we hope to contain the ad-
vance of the international com-
munist movement.

Take the example of the Chin-
ese, The Chinese farmer who has
accepted or even welcomed com-
munism as a relief from the mis—
ery, oppression, and corruption of
his lot will learn in time that the
promises of the Communists are
hollow. Collectivism will soon
take back the land made available
to him. The cancellation of debts,
which was made possible through
liquidation of the money lender,
will be replaced by oppressive
taxes. Communism will soon be-
come a yoke.

An economic strategy for 4
lasting peace should certainly
include a drive to reform tradi-
tional modes of production and
distribution and_ to increase
sharply the productivity of men
and machines,

A major step in that direction
would be to demonstrate the



By D: T, ROBERTS

thing of the character and aspir-
ations of the British Common-
wealth will be,a quiet and
pleasant contrast from the Power
and Production pavilion, the loco-
motives, and all the rest of the
“13-year-old interest”. The de-
signers have not neglected either
English humour or English taste
for eccentricities. The man “in
charge of humour” canvassed
widely for contributions to illus-
trate the British flair for eccentric
inventions. As he explained to
me he received many offers that
were too big for his sideshows.
For instance, a collapsible bus
made of rubber. Then there was
a man who wanted to sell him
rainbows. He would put a rain-
bow anywhere—-even across the
Thames. And a_ metaphysical
weather—man wrote to the Festi-
val Office last December and ‘said

that for an all-inclusive charge
he would fix the weather this
summer. The Festival unfortun-

ately turned down this offer, The
metaphysical weather-man an-
swered with a bitter and threat-
ening letter. Since that day it has
rained continuously for almost
four months.

The chief joy of the man who is
in charge of humour is an exhibit
which will be on show, and to
which he refers as an “electrical
parody”. It is the smoke-grinding
machine. Smoke is fed in one end,
ground, and comes out the other
In the process, lights flash, buzzers
buzz, dials spm and the machine
crackles and purrs quietly. Some
great achievements in invention
and industry will also be on show
here—rather than in the Dome of
Discovery. For instance, the self-

to sbeen true.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, APRIL ?6, 1951

AUTOGRAPH

SCRAPS & SNAP

ALBUMS

at
Advocate Stationery



















BUT NOT OUT

adaptability and flexibiuty of AT once flamboyant and austere, Douglas

oe productty system, MacArthur is a figure more often manifest
is abroad. : * . #
American capitalisn has learned} in Latin than in Anglo-Saxon countries, more

ee ne alt nate the eee frequent in South America than in North.
ate >
sy Other men live or behave--MacArthur
























i
if

aS ES



MILK WILL NOT BOIL OVER OR BURN
; IF YOU USE OUR:

SAFEBOIL

Stand “SAFEBOIL” in pan before
pouring in required quantity of
liquid-—use a medium flame and the
pan may safely be left.

that the mang cannot have what
a Tie tiers exo a gives the impression of performing before
ars . ae . .
# 4 when compared|an invisible mirrer. There is a touch of
Ww eriéan capitalism o1
today, Unhappily, the same can- Bonaparte about him, a sniff of Cesar.
ont me seid or Europes capital-| It is fourteen years since he last set foot.
4 Ne Of the gers - .
nesses in the armour ayes Wact.| in his own democratic country. Before that,
=) ni economic. policy is te he was brought up in a military home. His
+ wo a ie *
Puropean capitalism. °") father, General Arthur MacArthur laid the
n the United States the living i iz
siphderdé-and working cqsdiions wemaetions of the full-blooded MacArthur
of = average citizen have shown| literary style. He was educated at a military
constant and remarkable improve- i
fukcthe. Miwore thie = a ichool, watched over by a doting mother, a
on igure who may explain much to the probing
ere are many reasons for i wae
this, including the trend to #aetal- psychologist. Then came an endless series
ism) and the emphasis which| of military camps.
European capitalism places on an) Pew men have ever lived so exclusively in

cutmode@ carte! system. Many ;

Europea: yoy é digas 1 world dominated by the ideas of hierarchy | $ Zw Easy to Use, Easy to Clean
mpe' i er . $3

great danger in “this state of} a obedience. But the watchwords of|%



mind, We must distinguish be-
tween capitalism which works
for the few and capitalism which
works for the many.

The trend of European capi-
talism has been away from a
sense of responsibility to the
community, | am = sure
morals of the people of Europe
would rise if they could identify

democracy are equality and dispute. It is
10 wonder that MacArthur has seemed to] %
grow steadily more remote from the habits| %
f thought of many ordinary Americans and
nost ordinary British.
HE IS. FEARLESS
At the same time, and to some extent for

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masepents —— wae a} he same reasons, he has come to gain an| Seems
positive rather n a negative| 4. - , F SASSOON Roo oGoo}
poliey. eves ascendency over the imagina- CDSS SPSS POTF ESP OSE EEE
: . : %
We ‘deet Mikn pleninc-ee seek ion 0 the Japanese, an Asiatic people with $
as diplomatic and military battles,] an appetite for idolatry matching the gen- %
if we hope to stop communism, » . : ‘ gia ‘ %
Se ae te eR cen naleing| ©f@l’s appetite for atithority. His pro-consular/% When painting your property, %

-vule in defeated Japan has, however depend-

-d on something more than his assumed (or
natural) despotism.

progress in countries where op-
pression and poverty exist. Our
long-range international economic
policy must keep in mind that a
ee of these conditions is an He has displayed a total physical fearless-
obligation,

Private U.S. investment going] ess which appeals to the Japanese. He has

whether it be

a Building

Furniture

abroad also is a desirable way to} shown a remarkable i $ ; fi

fortify the economies and raise]. ble imaginative understand

the standards of living of ie ng of Japanese psychology.

countries. It is a most effective If there is ro ; ttas ;

counter-move to the conditions ‘ ; BPP val + Britain of President

that breed poverty and oppression, } [ruman’s act it will cause in Japan a con-

Pevete Ae, Dy A isectoens ‘rary and even greater emotion of dismay

wou , c * : ;

taxpayer of the burden of pro- and shock. That is something which should

viding through his Government) not be forgo oe

direct assistance and grants to gotten when MacArthur is judged.

other nations, When private on MacArthur has repeatedly and openly

capital goes abroad, it brings with} -halle Sari sa .

it American “know-how” and al nged the civil political authority of the

managerial skill and thus directly United States. He has counted on the

See the welfare of the} patience or the weakness of Truman. He has

Spier aroOe- either miscalculated or it may well be, has
we would pe. ria * rekin deliberately courted dismissal.

much on the fai at economic

improvement and development, It should not be assumed that MacArthur,

widely shared and agaieved by although out, is down. If he returns to the

co-operative efforts, will make . c :

more likely that the free nations United States after all these years, he will

oe ee, — ree certainly not be silent. He may speak loud a Car

in the future, the Soviets wit | ane often. He has plenty to say and the

realize the futility of their efforts, right to sav it. His iti ses

to undermine the free nations e 2 political ambitions are

and will suspend their struggle patent. And a vast number of Republicans

for world domination. We must] will see in the man who challenged and out-

be ready to work in this direction] .. 8 F r

and to rise above the problems of iaced Truman a heaven-sent Presidential

the day and plan as business] candidate for 1951.

eee HANDICAPS



Think with how much greater subtlety it
would have been played by, say Eisenhower!
The impatien i i
garded as a revelation of the - Pe PAROS Ney = OR WOR,
character ‘of their inventor rather contempt for democratic susceptibilities,
than a contribution to the world’s} should not disguise the fact that in some

knowledge. This corner of the . ile
Pavilion will be dominated by the | "espects his political hand was a good one.

wiping goggles for motor-cyclists
worked by a small windmill
strapped above the head are re-





White Knight. He will be riding i i ; %
his charger equipped with a single He found himself fighting a war which you cannot afford to take chances x
horn strapped to its nose—to make | Was for two reasons, peculiar and unsatis- $
it i eer Ftd will be equip- factory b . h %
ped wi all the traditional ap- 4 i —
pes tocluding the mnnuse-trap Nominally the conflict was an undertaking Y vane : wer materials. So 3
an ec spikes to yuard against , : : %
the bites of sharks. He will also| Of the United Nations. One consequence was
e carrying the regulation fire- ”
he carving the remdations Oaer that the general had no clearly defined pol- a $
fire regulations of the London itical direction, %
County Council, Another was that he could not strike back x
The highest achievement in this] at the foe in hi i .
corner is the “morale raiser”, This techni syieaniagiae aren which were on and be safe %
isan electrical device ‘ss be worn| technically neutral territory. Exactly the %
under the jacket which, when re-| sq i i i
adn nakone wadethins same situation had existed on a smaller scale 3
remarks such as “Well done, old| in Greece, where it had prolonged the fight- ;

chap; you're doing fine,” or “You
are handsome, such a_ brilliant
tation. i can, be edjusted to} MacArthur was expected by some of his
augh at its master’s jokes—when it «

miconewaled. button ts pHesseane Tt masters to hold the 58th Parallel—a line

is believed also to be able to pat}drawn on the map but not on the ground
’

him on the back. foaled bas a 7
At this point in my preview of existing as a political figment, not as a mil-
the Festival, Mr. Gerald Barry, the| itary reality. He was forbidden to bomb the

Director-General, arrived;—hap- enemy’s bases in Manchuria

Py. bustling, just a little anxious. M
“It’s people it needs,” he said. ontgomery has said: “Political battles
tee neue oe oe are the graveyard of generals’ reputations.”
—no, Tmean 11 and a half days.” | MacArthur protested loudly. He enlisted
Does Mr, Barry need a morale, support in American public life and among
raiger, gt i ee Geena ! American newspapers. All this was dis-
Har worle out of this fairyland turbing in America, Britain and elsewhere.
where men in trucks are just} Many people were reluctant even to con-
caries the sand ta She gsatide template. war with China, and willing to shut
In a few days the Festival will their oye to war when China insisted on
open. waging it. Many more believed that ,ener-
als should obey their orders and keep their
protests for the seclusion of secret telegrams.
REDS’ TARGET
The deplorable effect was that MacArthur,

ing for many months,

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far too narrow to develop any pro-
gress in constructive football, but
causing more injuries to players

T yehe geunt, 7 } 6 Aaa Oe er other five seasons put to-
be painfully aware of the_ fact ge}uet
that most of the members of the In the three tours to Barbados,
B.AF.A, are definitely retro- of Which the secretary boasted, the
gressive, obviously unenterprising Barbados team was published a
and continuously tactless. day or.two before the actual
. ‘ match, and put on the field with-
We have only to make a hasty out any previous coaching or
comparison of the achievements of training as a team. Because the
the Barbados Cricket Association B.A.F.A, can sit back on the pro-
to realise that while the latter. is fits from these tours, they feel they
expanding, blossoming and_ bear- have accomplished something
ing fruit. the B.A.F.A. is shrivel- | wonderful.
ling, s king i ying.
PE pois! and oy Carlton, who started with a
A few weeks ago, in his sports small piece of ground now have
eolumn, the Secretary was boast- more than the B.A.F.A.—a full
ing of the achievements of the sized playing field and a pavilion.
BAF.A. What achievements? Y.M.P.C. likewise have more than
With much bickering and quar- the B.A.F.A. although they started
relling the B.A.F.A. managed to in Gollymore Rock with a tennis
ftage two asons at Kensington, lawn. These clubs did not have
two seasons in which matches had six first division sides to play for
to be ri together in the final them for nothing and the public
stages so that cricket—God bless willing to pay 12c. a head to see
u hould i n ti Two theif teams play; but the B.A.F.A
seasons played 1 twe four has. Then why can’t it get any
r e of next to the farther? I'll tell you why
cricke I I e of ground a Because they have always



been blessed with a short-sighted,
unenergetic, unenterprising secre-
tary, who holds meetings at the
last possible moment and ar-
ranges a hasty schedule which
comes to light a few days before
the season commences——-sometimes
after.

b. Because the main body of
the B.A.F.A. comprises of persons
of lethargic and disinterested dis-
positions, who make no effort to
further the interests of football.

ce. Because the Barbados Cric-
ket Association arrange the cric-
ket season when they wish and
for as long as they wish, while
the subsidiary body known as the
B.A.F.A. scramble up the remain-
ing weeks and stage a hurriedly
put together series of matches
called a football season.

d. Because football is
in the dry season.

e. Because this same lethargic
group have been incapable during
the last four or five years of ar-

played

ranging a tour to any of the
neighbouring colonPs. If they did
the standard would improve be-
cause al) players ‘would try to

make the team.

Are these bunglers going to gr
on and on failing to develop the
B.A.F.A.? Year after year trying
to borrow, lease or beg for
grounds?

Football is important because it
can make money. But it is more
important (a) because it offers a
source of healthy and interesting
entertainment to the public, (b)
because it offers a source of phy-
sical activity to the youths who
take part and (c) because it offers
a source of intercolonial fellow-
ship among the colonies.

Football is doomed unless the
younger and more enterprising
members of the B.A.F.A. get to-
gether and reorganise the B.A.F.A.
first electing a secretary capable
of organising and planning an
effective football campaign.

The Public are willing to pay,
the players are willing to play;
the only stumbling block is a cer-
tain nucleus in the B.A.P.A.—Get
them out!

FAN.
Bridgetown,
r April 25, 1951



by his methods and his personality, drove
many who are neither Communists nor fel-

ee into a temporary acquiescence



oO” ‘O- N be ae aie wl

NAN AAS Ase

i SELECT THESE:-
OLD BRAID RUM FISH PASTES
)

|

in certain Communist purposes: for instance
the desire to give to the Communists in the
Far Eastern war as many strategic advant-
ages as possible.
_ MacArthur, railing in public against the
limitations imposed on his strategy became a
useful bogy of the Communists,
_ “MacArthur” was added to the propagand-
ist jargon of the Cominform as a convenient
portmanteau word to represent “Americar
Imperialism” bent on the destruction of the
emergent “free forces” of “the New Asia.”

In fact, the United States is bent on nothing of
the kind. Ever since General Marshall wrote off
| Chiang Kai-shek and his regime as a total loss, the
| United States have been willing to let China evolve
in her own way. MacArthur photographed kissing
the hand of Mme, Chiang, could be made to give
life to a very different legend.

When Marshall became Secretary for Defence, it
should have been clear that MacArinur’s authority
| would either be limited or its days would be num-
bered. “Only God or the U.S. Government,” said
MacArthur “can keep me from fulfilling my mis-

| sion.” The Government have acted first,
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THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Shell Trainees : B.E.I- STUDENTS ABOARD LORD re arate
For Curacao

Five young men left Barbados about a fortnight ago for
Curacao to take up employment as firemen with the C.S.M.
(Shell) Co., tanker fleet. Another man is due to leave on
Friday and three others will be leaving shortly.
This opportunity has been made possible by the co-ordinated
effort of Mr. Vernon Knight of Messrs DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd., Agents for the Oil Company in Curacao and the De-
partment of the Barbados Evening Institute.
when the Advocate visited the the Institute, and was in many
Lord Combermere yesterday other {ways an extremeky busy
V the men were undergoing man
their training, the four of them During the period that Mr.
were doing final tests prior to Sayers was conducting the class,
their departure for Curacao. Dy. Hamilton said that he gave
Their training course extended hitmself-practieally no rest and he
over a period of one manthy, and believed that Mr. Sayers Had made
comprised théory in the first’In- a splendid success of it. %

*, then practical demonstra- He hoped that when the time
he applied theory and then next’ cami: tor recruitment and
ual practical work When training of other young men, some
t was underway. other sufficiently qualified person
ially, the students worked. would be available in order to
from 7 a.m, to 4 p.m. daily with prevent Mr, Sayers having again
i of the Government er to suffer the intolerable pressure
provided no shins were in the har- of work which this course had
bour, but very often, they were meant,
brought out as early as 3 am. as He said that he appreciated the

ssary and worked stead. kindness of the Harbour Master
day and through the in permitting the S.T. Lord Com- he believes tha - naan
iataibed to BA ead aes ietiaeatoas e beheves that more of such men

see
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and workshop for the purpose of ; 4 ‘ ihatas
the ategehge ke tahoe Cotntnis. STUDENTS of the Barbados Evening Institute (Tech.) taking a final test at flashing up the boiler of wider

experience in the Upper a 4 a Ti B a 2 SB a we we @ oe @ S
sioner who arranged that the men 5.T. Lord Combermere yesterday morning under the direction of eagine driver George Green extreme left. House of the truly imperial Parlia- SSS ll >’\Ru vom

Mr. Knight told the Advocate would be included in the Govern- Also seen in the picture is Mr. Denton Sayers, (barsheaded) Denn of Technical Studies of the Evening







Will Colonies

Have Direet hs, Ma y
Representation or ee

IN. PRIVY COUNCIL?



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(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, April 25. +». delicately perfumed
A novel proposal to give
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in a letter to the Times, Dis-

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greeing with the idea of the
Council of Empire on the lines
of the Council of Europe
Suggested recently by Capt
Gammans, M.P., Mr. William
Aitken, Conservative M.P.,
writes: “The reactivated Pri
Council giving its members
from overseas the right to
speak and legislate in the re-
formed House of Lords might
capture the imagination of
many colonial leaders.’





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The colonies he eays, have al
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with more advanced constitutions |



night



POLICE TAKEN







ment.”
sterd : ; Pr With eligibility for the ste- , ——
yesterday that the question of re~- ment scheme of Accident Insur- Institute. " : y fe e ministe aan ’ ,
cruiting employees for the Shell ance. a rial office at Westminister, such ONCE AGAIN AD AILABL veee
Oil Co. in Curacao first came up Mr.-D, W. Sayers said that it men “would enrich and invigorate
around 1939 when Da Costa and was a pleasure to observe the |

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; @ me the affairs of an empire which
Co,, Ltd, started off by taking a whole hearted co-operation which | e oO ass eso ution or many would like to see: united
few men for the company as the engine room crew of the Lord e ° K strategically,, economically and
Police, Combermere gave. by way of de- :
yd said that ae of Weta men ‘tailed demonstration to the men ———-———— oe
to be recruited, was still serving who were being trained. Be e
with the company, but in a con- The four mont leaving are Gor- Shipping Held Up
eae , higher pager ier don Sandiford ot rae Hall, Ash.
added that it was not unti § ron Oxley of ensington New
that they shipped in the vicinity, Road, George Linton of Richraend YESTERDAY
of 300 labourers.for werk in Gap and St, Clair Gibbs of Bay Shipping activities in the
Land, Beckles Road. harbour were oecasionally in- British Constitution in his view
terrupted yesterday by intermit-

Curacao,
t st eral The Legislative Council met at 12 noon yesterday and in a should make it possible to devise
MIXED CARGO “Over 18 lighters, loaded with session that ended at 1.15 p.m., passed a resolution for the Sate ae ee Sant esha rapes
ane sons "ae Gelewesd, aie sot Phe Harrison Liner Astro; feed and other cargo, were kept sum of $440,000 to assist’in the emigration of labourers (o of our own and their affairs”
asons 4 arpe s sre sent ' arris¢ iner Astronomer . : manling ani . ’ aart
5 i , ; ; ye i tarpaulins while oh S46 :
out. At the same time, young arrived here yesterday with cat'go ereress we Shibe in” cease the U.S.A. ae iene alk scien Asia Shenae Dominion Status
men ; holding — the preset from Liverpool including | 1.820 Bay and schooners in the Careen. Ne Council also concurred in a resolution fixing é Dominion status as understood i:
School Certificate were also re- . ; \

tat bags of: potatoes, Dutch ‘stoves, age which were either discharg- payable to producer and rate of tax payable to the Fancy commonwealth countries with
cruited for training in laboratory jams, .confeétionery, cocoa. salt. ® : ; ; 1 »slasses C rol and Marke s Board on Fancy Molasses more advanced economic develop- a = ———.
ams, y» sa", ing or loading cargo had their Molasses Control and Marketing Board on Fancy Molas: adve dl ¢ k ae < “
work, : soap, hardware, and enamelware. hatches Hathehed down roduced during the crop vear 1950-51 at not less than ment and greater experience in the POCO EEE SOOO LE LLL LLLO
In recent years he said nat very Her agents are Messrs. Da Costa i : p ; § AR fs h nny “6 and one @t of Government would be for
few men had been taken on for & Co., Ltd. After midday, the rain held tifty-four cents a wine gallon in the first instance and one mall or largely undeveloped
work in the senpery, put oars up and the waterfront was busy and a half cents a wine gallon in the second instance. é colonies “economic, political and
had been a_ steady and limite , again. Almost every berth “was In moving that the Council con- and in twelve weeks would have social disaster’
number of men taken on for work !n The Court Of Ordinary cecupied w ith vessels, the cur in the passing of the resolution repaid the whole advance. It was
with the tanker fleet i ajority of which were handling the Hon'ble the Colonial Secretary al sronosed that B W.I. $4 A political correspondent com
; Te In the Court of Ordinar es- Majority of which were & the Hon’ble the Colonial Secretary also f SEC @ I c
The working cogditions of the terday His Honour the Y chiet cargo, . a. #LA!' said that the Chief Liaison Officer, should be deducted each week from ments © “'T tre possibilities of Mr
men in Curacao ee excellent Judge, Sir, Allan Collymore, did sue lighters began to unload Washington, had asked whether the worker's account in Barbados Aitken’s suggestion ; sweeping
and the same remarks are aD~ not. admit'in common form the the feed again, but they were this Government would permit and applied in repayment of the The Conservatives arty’s Plai
plicable to the Scale of Day wai of Benjamin Alleyne. kept partly covered with the from 2,000 to 4,000 Barbadians to cost of his repatriation, If he re- for the House of Lords is to maki
a wee dig er aar The matter of the will of Ed- tarpaulins in preparation for any accept contracts of employment turned to Barbados at the end of it stronger and more effective by
Hate i oot nap areata wee ward Mc Lean was adjourned. further showers. for 10 to 12 weeks from early in twelve weeks, he would have re- giving it greater prestige
2arbados, g » the © with » mini rate yaic ‘ yu J.1, $24 of The Marquis of Salisbury o
obtained a high conversion rate — June with a minimum rate of pay paid, in that way, B.W r juis o sbury pr
of exchange which as a conse.

es 66 3 “pope ea 99 of 75 cents per hour, He had ask- the estimated cost of nie ees pores ine meeetiations, with the
ance tec oir salary a ed for an immediate reply. tion from Jamaica to Barbados and Labour Governmen our vear,
eee pooste > thSH BRUALY. us nem lo d the cost of his recruitment (B.W.1 g
however wanted to make it ¥ 9 e

politically” | Your Favourite Skin € ream
@ Mr. Aitken asks if this isnt the prevents SUNBURN

GN alternative t the situatio in Skin Irritations as
9 O ssist future in whioh the eolontes “NOXZEMA” allows you to enjoy your Holidays, or |

“must suffer the painful break-u; Weekends without Fear or Worry about NCoEEM A”
of Empire into the ‘phoney Remember its oo a

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ago that a hereditary principle | % '
: ‘osts id $7: » he remaine : ) ne he ¢ 1% , !
clear that allotments payable in Shi ven ee satis: $72) If he rem ined te ~ hould be eae 1 to the appoint % to new natural looking |
Barbados were always in local nder the original, s y United States for 36 weeks he ment of a ‘life peers” represent Os dar
currency, p e 4 temporary work im the United would eventually repay the whole ative of different interests in the x beauty with
Mr, Knight said that over 2,000 ‘ re e istere States, the marine, Coreen amount ef B.W.I, $72 realm, The suggestion aired it x ; e :
men had been recruited from time had paid al] costs of transportation Repayment the Times this morning is tha x F
: tga Stace cr Aa of the workers. Since 1948, how- The ’ jeductions as well as these representatives o | § %,
to time for services‘in Curacao ‘ istered with. the The fortnightly ri a % ,
and in all probability, something OVER TEN THOUSAND people have registere with ever the workers had had to repay from the worker's earnings in the professional, industrial and labou $ %
like 700 men were still serving in Employment Agency at Queen's Park for emigration. They the cost of ata passages nO U S.A. were estimated to be: seer in Britain there shoul x x '
the employ of the company. have all claimed that they are unemployed. paren to the place of employ ae fe Se ae aes "ae Tine eae = x HILTONE’S famous slogan “AS LIGHT AS YOU LIKE
. ri A 4 eu . ¢ ; yo transporte vomles spe R. & ane 24 ee bn r rey Yh 1
SUCCESSFUL SCHEME Of this amount 6,164 are men. This number includes _ The passage money from Bar- For board legislating in the House of Lords |& |. . AND NO LIGHTER” can be yours as well, TRY IT %
ex-servicemen, whom, the Labour Commissioner He WT ane ta tarnaion Cor ite BduiVas For: Insurance sand They do not necessarily have to b: | & 8
The scheme had been one of other things equal, will be given preference.” lent) had been advanced by thit B.W.I.C.L.O, 5% 9 gp Peers with the title of “Lord” + 1% HILTONE BLEACH is on sale at - - x
outstanding success and thd found ‘: sea ‘ Pau Government, and that from of wages ; ; 3.60 front of their name That i x PRE B x
up to the present, steady employ- The number of unempioyed tion as to the rate of boa Jamaica to the place of employ- For U.S. Govt. Social after all a matter of form only | yer ay & GG ST v
ment for the past ten years for men is increasing daily. Some, charges. rant in ih asdan had been -ad- Security (142%) 1.08 Colonial representatives — in "an x KNIGHT Ss DRE G ST ae x
indreds f arbadians, N yhose nz S were ir 2 pad . co id save » For transmis: ar- an Past tip " 4 .
ht ngredt of . Barb eee From Ww noes ; n ee ks ny ee ba Transporation vanced by the employer, The For tr un mission ‘to a ; House of Lords would be choser LCCC PEPE S
the beginning of the scheme, Da regis er because hey di oO cost of repatriation of the work- bados to worker's ¢ it by the King to sit on his owr
Costa and Co,, Ltd,, as agents for think it wa worthwhile to renew “The cost of the employer re ta the satisfactory comple- 15% wages 10.80 Privy Council, so that the , woule
the Oil Company in Curacao, had their registration, are now renew- obtain Barbadian workers is now ers on %& ee mie ae had- bash have tne:+ Sy. f Rt H, pees
paid out almost $1,750,000 in ing with the hope of wetting to exactly the same as that to obtain tion of their cont ac s 1ac ae US. $ 6c 18 have ue itle ‘ oO Rt. on. anr
allotments to the families of the the U.S.A. when the emi- Jamaican workers. This is be met, without repayment, by th Ea dit ah a forth be warn thus the Privy Council woul
men recruited in Barbados. Apart grants are picked for Wisconsin, cause the Barbados Government employer (from the place of em- ings of U.S, $72 he come alive again »s a special bods
from that, several men remitted U.S.A. is again proposing to advance the ployment to Jamaica) and by would receive 11.82 ‘© advise the King on Imperial
money direct to their relatives by Since 1944, when emigration to cost of transportation between this Government (from Jamaica »- £ffair
means of bank drafts and that the U.S.A. started, nearly 12,000 Karbados and Jamaica, or its to Barbados). In this way it US. $ 72.0
amount was quite appreciable men have been sent there under ee t i had cost employers in the Unite! di
" Within the last year or so. it ¢comtract. Included in this num- “The Governmen proposes tO tates the same for the trans- y e
y vee ae ane aan Phrolding ber ave seme men who emigrated recover the amounts advanced for aa tatiie ot Barbadians as fo. Hon. G. B. Evelyn said that Case Of Negligent
oe ene Noa An veaeaee to the U.S.A. on more than one transportation to see or = Saralhane Government had looked at the Dp gang Di :
: © “A é py p= . + TAY ne £ a s. ;
’ ; ae ; any Occasion. The largest group for equivalent, from the workers, an ; , optimistic side that people would , y ‘ 4
ee, Seereenae ns ogee be a year was in_1945 when 4,384 deductions will be made from the Off To Wisconsin 2 iat toy 8 wees: hare wae riving ISITLISS¢ d
Obtained. and ae a conse eee nee Were” emigrated. ‘The Labour workers’ wages to repay these It appeared that the pice in no guarantee for 12 weeks and A District “A” Police Magistrat
obtained, and as a consequence, Department has handled as many advances. The cost of the work— employment would be Wisconsin, any calculation should be made yesterday dismissed scare ater,
he suggested to the representative 4. 6.000 Barbadian emigrants In. ers’ passages from Jamaica to the and it was estimated that the cost for 16; demas? dP hee really hy the Police cualuine Molvh
of the C.P.I.M. in Curacao. that. the UBAy to§ 4 Fa place of employment in the U.S.A. o¢ transportation there (by air) of (Or. 4% adenine 3 phot” Wooten eo ae ae Men aals
the Government here very greatly | “’someé‘of ‘the emigtarits returned will be advanced by the employer Gach worker would be U.S. $108 Hon, V. C. Gale said that it en ing bien with ne niger t drivi g of
appreciated the necessity of find. home and went)to other places and he will also recover the Of that amount U.S. ‘$36 (the tailed a very high price for send- a mule cart on February 3 ‘alanit
ing employment for people and such as Curacao and Aruba, amount advanced by deductions equivalent of the cost of trans: jing people to work in the United. Werther tes ary 2, 1
would be willing to train men as Others got work locally but there from the workers wages . portation to Jamaica) would have States ' They all wanted the H fe ni a te “presented by My You can enjoy Britain’s
arr er Sae ie eneee, 1 gee we Brena ea Gu tot a HS xate an rt eer to be advanced by the Barbados emi layment situation in Barbados g Ww, ecae Miss. H Week favourite tobaccos, Six
Representations were made jobs. They registered again at tion deductions wi be ede Tt gd di era, hin ania sae ; , = soe Pet ebaatan teint eek Z se frome=
to the Labour Commissioner, the the Employment Agency in Currency) per fortnight (as in Gove ere bec a bea nt an to € va ‘ang : ” pene Pee who was driving her car said tha aS ee so. ;
Department of Education, the Queen's Park. 1949-50), plus 25 per cent. of the cost of repatriation from Jamé 4 ounci a villing to 4% on February 2, she saw the muir every one a balanced
Harbour Master and other Gov- Fewer Emigrants amount of earnings in excess of U.S. $36, would also need to be they could, ite ft tha S2't Boing along Westbury Roa: blend of vintage leaf
ernment Officials, As a result, Dr. For the last three years the $50 (U.S. Currency) in-a fort~ paid by this Government They would be PP the in the direction of Bridgetown
Bruce Hamilton, Principal of the number of emigrants to th U.S.A. night,” Mr. Burrowes said. This would result in g contingent 4000 pe ople were le aving uns She stopped her car just as sh«
Barbados Evening Institute, kind- pag shown. a-decrease,~ In 1948 He said that arrangements for sjjability of U.S. $72 or B.W.1. shore of Barbados as emigrants jesched St Leonard’s Chureh a
ly arranged to set up a syllabus only’ 486 émigrated. In 1949 the repatriation gene ae pi fat ie $124) in’ respect of each worker "Ot to return tre mule wre in oa ‘or the tre ir a ‘ z will be embodied in the; workers ™qherefore if 4,000 workers were , ; tail saw a motor car 5 comin,
eridiers ea ee re Cid ae ene agreement with the Goyernor-in sent B.W.I. $496,000 would be Big Sum Needed from the opposite direction anc
Up to the present, five men had Mr. ES, Burrowes, Labour Executive Committee and the roquired, In addition, the cost of ‘The sum which was needed was just. as the motor car almos
been trained, five of whom had al- Commissioner, told the Advocate ei earet ee ead recruitment was estimat.d at a ver big sum to add to their 'eached the mule cart the mul
ready left for Curacao and it was yesterday that the men who will Fy Agena entice to the period B.W.1. $40,000. expenses in one year, an esti- ¢ rt yfwerved fe the right an
anticipate : r icke emi i yi Ns neg cs § yas ated $192,000, The vere not struck the motor cé en she
anticipated that the other four kn ieee oF enone ed ee for which he remains in the U.S.A. As an amount of $100,000 was es é x r - Back ’ Ea Ant dan the cae ie Wil ans
would shortly be despatched, able—bodi unemploye mer The actual agreement has not yet provided in the emigration vote in begrudging 1@ amoun peing y ne rapes.
See i k . “dsuwh Up : the Annual Estimates for 1951-52, Spent but were rather pleased at about 20 to eet : e ay the
NEW CLASS ~Y See “Oa ee ene. engince the beginning of this a further sum of $440,000 was now = something ae a atte m age = Pao ee atin
He said that it was gratifying to ei agaist have a chenes if they year a cree ee er on mee CeavOnaes = ap — yep, pi goa We Se ee tone,
ae 4 w cs ass for ; F ' y 4 i- half per cent. o' a iy x PROSDIG, VO, ESEOVES Peo 5 the horse in dashing to the right
repos that 2 new an ai ie: coe Pete tage "tab Wieden earnings has been made in transportation both from Barbados on, J, Mahon said that he He sd that the evidence shoulc
training of six men to be trained grants v Yo ase ” accordance with the new Social 4, Jamaica and from Jamaica to wanted the Colonial Secretary to , nf : . i é
: f th
s fir vill soon be started on hv chartered planes, ; ited States be discounted for none o’ 1
as firemen will s a “ . Security Act of the United States. po iados from the worker, but the give him some idea of the nature eterna: ad KEG AE “Sls Ghtane
the basis submitted by the com- It is known that some work- ° ti f five per cent. be : vould Witnesses had seen if his
nea ‘Cu¥agaio ers, who are at present em- The pone ue ‘Accident and Period of employment in the ef employment the workers sae had pulled the reins,
ae Te as debply appreciative of ployed, register as unemployed De cn tnaewanes ol the workers United States might be too short be nets faa’ Mikey no oe dane The Police alleged that th:
See ony : . » Dea Lr ; the ne he be done. For reeruiting 4,000 workers and ae a : the: defen : rae
“ ; 3 d get a chance to go to the > cost of the to enable that to be donc aecident wae ducite thecde lianas
the co-operation and assistance an e and for meeting the cos spayme M rtation to the finding that after they were sent Aenea teed SOLE AGENTS:
given by tie Slovertisnent cf Bese Eee ea Ssnanean | a British West Indies Central La- pe ahora deductions Sire they did ‘net like tha trpe — 0 ee ey ™ MESSRS. A. S. BRYDEN*& SONS (SARBADCS), LTD,
bados through voting e CeS- * bour rganisation, § é nese eT elt If they eventually y “eins to the caus hi SETOWN, BARBADOS
; . , » Inetructi employed men,” Mr. Burrowes » welfe e workers would be made from each worker's 2 sule to dash to that side of the BRIDGE N, BARB: f
sary funds for. iristruction piete re ane process of selection after the, weltare of, the oe par at the rate of US. $14 per Stayed a Groviee ported theis-th nule to Sagh so. See ae oe
Commisohar the Harbour Mas-. is a long one and tho weed made.” fortnight plus 25% of the amount a ee ee eee he motor car
ter. the Director of Education, Dr- ary Stages have’ ape y Any surplus from these deduc- of earnings in excess of U.S. $50 roopea
. : ayers. Teachedy’ aoe ions we be returned. to. the a fortnight , : 7 ' =
Hamilton and Mr. D. W. Sayers. p : aecads tions would. be ret L. to inva rf shed Ae Made cleus: tn tha
oped that the training of Bes} ath he not yet.*e Government of Barbados in reim- ae it - Se those workers what work they would
_ He hoved sers would be. He saidethat hamhas,: tification bursement of emigration expenses. The employer would By : ee Co They st id r :
firemen and grea ceiv copy’ of anytertifica very deductions first collect the ammount be having to do, They shou Th » Is
come a regular feature given 4. YR cA” erhploywpent service! "Fifteen ‘per cent. ot. every om eee him eethviaicd ut $7h1 ba Inka’ to und aretRe thiatsthay ere
under the, auspices of the Barba~ <1.4 therefote he is not yet aWare worker's earnings is also deducted advancec sductions would be used were being assisted to get work
s Evening Institute: whereby ° o> ticstypei of work the meni Will and remitted to’ Barbados for then the deductions wou d be used Ehe woul help to Bey back thse
dos Eve S 7 f to find. 2 ewe vever expects credit to his aceount here. The to repay the advance of U.S. $36 and sh I pe; ; Y
more men would be able to find) pve 'to do. He however expects vredit to his 5. Curreney) is Government expense to the taxpayer. If he ; For every type of
positions, not only with the ghel) that. the work will be piasing Head Sat ete ee poten by this eee ; were sah under false pretences; WR) (Ay "i? YT
os ois vi yers aRUS corn anc er. has still to be paid by every -paymen Ste aoe tata” os gs P off :
Pemvons. ee employers © asparaghs, peas, corn and ot ae Ve. enteting the. United i, pha canned the. $7008 be Sean one Vase. 8 . arning CCH / LY Hy Figure
i r elsew i crops. ae c a re Tatiatiey a work é S. $72 a arbados would’ lo
labou : He thinks tHat:75,eents (U.S. States of America. ‘ mel a fortnight, he would be repaying He said that in the sugar in- 0
He said that the island of Bar- (rrancy) per hour is a very employer advances oe t the rate of U.S. $14 4 U.S. dustry here, it was quite possible '
hados owed a deep debt of a high minimum wage but so far ag woe oe cay it from (his 22/4 U.S. $19.50 a fortnight; @ on page 7
S } 3 3 re reived i na- firs rtnight’s pa See Me . i }
owe oe eer as he has not yet aera ved. inigine— cla x e nent Sa ‘ teed ed a that See ee We have them in the following Styles ae
hav > dn hae heirs tie i
seh » lates seme Se oe ‘ddin’s L ALLO-ETTE Cotton in Peach and White,
Sa How Aladdin's PY and Nylon in Peach only. Sizes : 32 to 3
tanker fleet . y es x ie 2
Dr, Bruce Hamilton said that.gs © won the Princess» VARIATION Cotton in White and Peach
Principal of the Barbados Even- Sizes : 32 to 40
MG dian neha deacree, aabiateh STRAPLESS HOLD-TIGHT and .. ee
to be in a small degree, associated ee Fees. Sen at
with the valuable work which Mr. MAIDENETTE in Satin and Lace anc Hines a :
Knight had described. There a Satin and Nylon, Sizes : 32 to 38 ae ; >
no reason why that class shoul: ; : ae
not become a regular one. He | ? :
very much hoped it would | (
: | | Lave SNnepner 0 )
TECHNICAL STUDIES 7 '
. . The Princess had refused many i ‘ ' }
He expressed his feeling of how Once a poor youhg man named “hora addin asked the genii how he But when Aladdin offered her a d Yes, everyone loves Royal Puddings, ; 10, 1 a 12 & 13 Broad Street.
nm t : found a magic lamp. Whenever he } One day Aladdin askec gi “ od. ““It'sd They’re so rich and smooth. So nutritious, |
much was owed to the energy, rubbed the lamp a genii would appear } could get the Princess to marry him. | Royal Pudding, she cried, “It's dc F neekerhe tats ome ee | oe
vot of r. Sayer: : q uf 2 ” said the genii,and hand- I will marry him if he promises tc too. 3 wonderful fla |
devotion of Mr. Sayer and grant his every wish. Now Aladdin Here, Master,” said the ge al Pudd day’ nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today.
among other things, was in love with a beautiful princess. | ed him a package of Royal Pudding me Royal Pudding every day ’ . prs — - oo
, *) stiid > as
I he 1ical studies for
4
PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951

For a radiant shine

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON












The quality
Metal Polish



‘

MICKEY MOUS -
et EN Cera O wes MYRTLE SUB'S REALLY THE
4 MICKEY.» pies - STAR OF THE SHOW!

> MYRTLE SUE



















‘TO-DAY’ NEWS FLASIE

|
| STACK-A-BYE CHAIRS

The All Steel Arm Chairs
$11.50 Each

at














JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
AND
Tom good looks tell you they‘re just right. | HARDWARE
5 You know, too, when you look at the price AE = ERS AES
=) a
a= tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated 4



















|| MAKE YOUR PARTY
A SUCCESS
with
Bots Cocktail Cherries

is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right °!
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

SST] TT

___BY_CHIC YOUNG

Whiniaine
a Ota,
THINK OF IT ---THEY }
BPo MAY HAVE COLOR
gm ( TELEVISION BY THEN, TOO!
me
wh OS

“gk _ ae 5
i BUT THINK OF ALL . me, ee

__( THOSE PEANUT-BUTTER “i
P| SANDWICHES } Bi 4
aa e. — : hal Wea












Peanuts

Pry, Tins Vienna Sausages

WE WANT] | 2
(M_ FIGURING \ ABIG
OUT IF WE CAN ) Jr SCREEN J

AFFORD A € =
TELEMISION. ) PG
~ SET

I FIGURE IF YOU TAKE
YOUR LUNCH TO WORK
FOR 162 WEEKS, WE
CAN AFFORD A SET

Tomatoe Juice
Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple





= $ s *
WA é ND » Peaches
Cs \ Pkgs Jellos, i4c., 12c. & 22c,
Tins Custard Powder
i Coffee

Nescofe

Ye STUART & SAMPSON
oe | (1938) ITD.

HEADQUARTERS FOR BEST
RUM





J

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only






A WE'LL TAKE CHARGE OF THE CROOKS,
THE SPANISH GOLD! ONTO | |SENOR LOPEZ!
MY FAMILY AS FOR THE
TREASURE! J TREASURE-~






IWILL GIVE THIS GOLD TO THE
PAI FOR A MISSION, IT WILL BE
A TRIBUTE TO THE MASKED MAN

WHO SAVED MY DAUGHTERS LIFE









USUALLY = NOW USUALLY NOW
Tins GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 24 21 Pkgs MACARONI 35 31

Tins JACOB'S
CRACKERS 171 145

Tins PLANTERS PEANUTS 96 86 Bots. GROTSCH BEER 24 18

Tins COCOMALT 133



MOON: SPEC/AL AGENT "



THE GAMBOLS BY BARRY APPLEBY

NO - | WON'T COME SHOPPING WELL -BYE -BYE — | WON'T
WITH YOU ‘






bE MULLO, DEAR > BACK ALREADY - THESE CHAPS




























: - THOSE PAINTERS | LONG BUT YOU'D GAY THAT \'VE GOT TAE FINEST COLLECTION OF Alii
WILL ONLY WASTE TIME SOME. FORM BOOKS THEY'VE EVER SEEN PH NP
sae oie ie rsomenenses 1) lhl pro rm He
= | | ey cet, ff; Na ‘iad ODDO MCI D CLOT C TOE TTY PALER AAL EEC AONTOOOT SDT
LRAT all say pa. ; i *
& ped) bien. rin ohh Fa, . THRE ADVOCATE
nN | \\ uN “kt (35 REP w) \ a : ‘ re N erg
oT ET ies } ce a «C&S HAS THE BEST
r omit ]
| Ce SN 6§ BOOKS IN TOWN
BY GEORGE MC. MANUS iS JUST A FEW TO CHOOSE FROM... %
aa ye YR DEBBY—A Novel by Max Steele
a caer seein g THE CONSUL AT SUNSET
QUIET WALK AFTER x s
STOW i —By Gerald Hanley
if MODERN COLONIZATION :
= : —By Harrison Church, Ph. D. :
: ADVOCATE STATIONERY x

y,
VQ9G99G 599999566 55955955665565666566666044

er rrrsr
°LP°APLPLGLLPLPPOSPELCG LL LLG PALL COSE LALLA ALD
SEED ete det







ro oe

fons Synibiepee, tne, Wrorkd ‘ site : ask for
SEO ——

ALEX RAYIIGNO | — , —
LUXURY










(32





FOLLET:SOAPS INSPECTION TIME NEED

IMPERIAL LEATHER ° LINDEN BLOSSOM ° BLUE HYACINTH
a TT

V4 ; re ~

$ THEY VE cy 9
REACHEDA S$ Ar)

STALEMATE... SHALL.

NOT BE WORRYING TIME
e

Nowadays you SEE US FOR-





——, JOE
Be (oe iF YOU TRY

ANY TRICKS, TLL
START SHOOTING !









eat Harem ATA, = ({ DUNLOPILLO BUS SEATS
need the Str th of LIONIDE LEATHERETTE GREY PAINT for Flooring
BY LEE FALK eng CARPET MATERIAL SIGNAL RED for Body i
RUBBER MATS HEAT RESISTING BLACK
re fome ON, FELLA. STOP )_WILSDN, REAR VIEW MIRRORS WHITE LEAD & ZINC
WHY DOESN'T THE CAR START? 0H, WY —7 Gore ee Ve {*\ s2_| |PIANAS GOT TO Lote tain nae & MING bur Bate
aa poner TO TURN THE vr | DANGER, SWIM “HEY DEVIL y ce DECARBONIZING SkTS
NITION KEY* WHATS : i
THE terre 7 , DEVIL BARKS p \ WN ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX BRAKE LINING SETS
WiTHDEVIL? s " : al S BATTERY CABLES FRONT SPRINGS for Ford
Ss ACCESSORY SWITCHES & Chevrolet
* Remember BOVRIL Flat GALVANISED SHEETS FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
s Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT AND LOTS OF OTHER
makes excellent for Interior ESSENTIALS
sandwiches, and
&
inag_roves all dishes. S
Bay Street Dial 4269



Bc 4 GE awe | euvans + 2 a


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHON





For Births, Marriage or Engagement
@nnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for eoch

edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 208 | 6 cents

between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Achnov
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices 1s
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up fo 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days ané
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES





Attention is drawn to the
Defence (Control of Drug and
Patent and Proprietary Medicine
Prices) Order, 1951, No. 7 which
will be published in the Official
= of Thursday 26th April,
23rd April, 1951.

26.4.51—1n.

SHIRTS FOK POSTMEN

Tenders



are invited for

the] Birch $26.00 per pair.

FOR SALE

Mintmum charge week 172
Sundays 24 words
words 3 cents a word week
word Sundews



AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—1938 Buick 8 cyls, in sound
mechanical condition and good tyres.
Suitable especially for hire. Dial 4616.

26.4.51—6n.

Sn STE neree

CAR—Veuxhall Wyvern, done just over
500 miles, as new. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4616 26 4.51









dition.
36

Phone George Skeete 4277 or

26.4. 51—In.





CAR—Onre SS. 2. Black Sports Saloon
1937, laid up through war, Excellent
condition, $550.00 or nearest offer. Phone
De Laney: 2216 or 4204, 24.4.51—4n.

WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station

Waggon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f.n.

FURNITURE





At = sa iy Show-
rooms, jaradw: Alley, Morris ty
Cane and Rush Easy Chairs in Pine and

Also Rush Bottom

manufacture of Khaki Shirts for] Upright Chairs $3.75 with Arms $4.50 and

Postmen and Porters for the Post | ck’

Office Department during
financial year
Postmen it has been decided to
issue shirts im the place of jackets.
Full particulars can be obtained
from the Colonial Postmaster,
Tenders in sealed envelopes

. the | hana
ending on 31st]¢ p.m, including Breakfast, closed mid-
March, 1952. In the case of the} day Saturday.

$5.00 each not forgetting
numerous variety of new and
furniture.

a
second
Open daily, 8 a.m. to

addressed to the Colonial Secre-| 2! 4346 for appointment.

tary and marked “Tender for the
manufacture of shirts” should
reach the Colonial Secretary’s
Office not later than 12 noon on
Wednesday the 2nd of May, 1951.

26.4.51—1n.

TAKE NOTICE

IDEAL MiLic
®





1

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East 44th Street, New York City,
USA, Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing milk,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 24th day of
April 1951 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April 1951.

H. eae
4.4

TAKE NOTICE

NESCAFE

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation, organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address *
is 155, East 44th Street, New York City, |
US A., Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing coffee, and
will be entitied to register the same
after one month from the 24th day of
April 1951 uniess some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks. {

TAKE NOTICE

ANAC

That THE LeBLANC CORPORATION,
a corporation organized under the laws of
the State of Louisiana, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 210 Fast Vermilion Street, Lafayette,
Louisiana, ‘ Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A" of Register in respect
of dietary supplement containing Vita-
mins Bl, B2, and Niacin, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 24th day of April, 1951,
unléss some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
one month from the day of April,
24.4,.51—23n

TAKE NOTICE

LACTOGEN

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation organized and existing under
and by virtue of the laws of the State of
New York, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 155,
East, 44th Street, New York City, U.S.A.
Manufacturers, has applied for the reg-
istration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in vespect of substances used
os food or as ingredients in foods, espec-
jially products containing milk, and wtil
be entitled to register the same after
ore month from the 24th doy of April,
1851 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
et my office of opposition of such regis-
tation. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951.

HW. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
24.4.51—3n















O9SOCCDOSDTCCIODOSOE |

West Indian & British |

OOLO

*

Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Pottery, Hand biocked Beach- ~
wert, Decoration House, Sr
James. Tel. 91-74. rm)
14.4.51—Im, |
© POSSE IOS

~



=

REQUIRED

$50,000.00 loan; secured by
on Freehold
property on Frederick St.,
Port—of-Spain.
Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors.











1st Mortgage

SS AR

Contact













|
(
}

25.4.51—n.

MECHANICAL
BICYCLE — Gent's Humber Bicycle,
new, never ridden. Complete with
electric lighting, deluxe saddle etc.
26,4.51—1n.



“GESTETNER DUPLICATORS"—New
models just received) A. S, Bryden &
Sons (B'dos) Ltd, Phone 4675.

16.4.51—t.f.n.

RALEtGH BICYCLE—One Boy's Raleigh
Bicycle 18” frame. In good condition,
complete with lock, bell and tools, Price
$45.00. Phone 3354, Oliver Johnson,
25.4.51—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

LL
PRICKS—For building or garden walks
$3.00 per 100, also Fire Bricks. Apply
The Old Ice Co., Prince Wm. Henry St.
25.4.51—5n.

STOVES—Valor single, 2, 3 and 4
kerosene oil burner. Secure yours be-
fore advance in price. Courtesy Garage.
Dial 4391. 26.4.51—6n



ee peterinnelneetge tie

YACHT—Buccaneer 15 x 5 keel, screw
fastened (copper) D-class, second in
Royal B'dos Yacht Club races, E. A. V.
Williams, E.C. Factory. 25.4.51—2n
————_— —-—

“You can’t be floored in the matter
of coverings for your floors if you
visit HARRISON’S FURNITURE DEPT.,
where you will find a large selection
of Linoleum and Congoleum, Carpets,
Rugs and Straw Mats’. 26.4.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE

i.










That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
u corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East, 44th Street, New York City.
U.S.A., Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of substances
ised as food or as ingredients in foods,
will be entitled to register the same one
month from the 24th day of April, 1951,
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.

Dated thts 10th dav cf April, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
24.4.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE

NESPRAY-

That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
a corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
is 155, East 44th Street, New York City,
US A, Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods,
especially products containing milk, and
will be entitled to register the same
efter one month from the Mth day of
April 1951 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office,

Dated this 10th day of April 1951.

H ‘WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
24.4.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE







That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC.,
® corporation organized and existing
under and by’ virtue of the laws of the
State of New York, United States of
America, whose trade or business address
{9 155, East, 44th Street, New York City,
US. Manufacturers, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of substances
used as food or as ingredients in foods.
especially products containing cocoa, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 24th. day of April,
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office -

Dated this 10th day of April, 1951”

Hi. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Mark;
24,4.51.-—3n





MAIL NOTICES

MAILS for St. Vincent, Grenada, Trin-
idad and British Guiana by the R.M.S.
LADY PODNEY will be closed at fhe
General Post Office as under;—

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at 3
p.m., Ordinary Mail at 4 p.m. on the
27th April 1951.

MAILS for St.

Vincent, Martinique.

| Antigua, St. Kitts, St. Thomas, V.I. and

New York by the S.S. FORT

will be closed at the General Post Office
as under:+-
Parcel Mail at 12 Noon, Registered
Mai) at 1.30 p.m., and Ordinary Mail at
2.20 p.m, on the ist May 1951



POLL OCESE LES” OG ES

6









CAR—Morris 8 Touring ver; good con-

eee e
&

v

S$ NOTICE

% ATTnACTIVE ROOM and Board %
X for Bachelors. For particulars e
X% apply: Casuarina Club Tel. %
% 8496. 25.4.51—1In. Q)
? »

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per apate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays
mrumum cnarge $1.5¢ on week-days

and $1.80 om Sundays



REAL ESTATE

_—

LAND: One outstanding sight of land
19,806 sq. ft. of Land situated in Navy
Gardens. Dial 3950. 26.4.51—2,

1 will offer for sale by public com-
petition at my office Victoria Street on
Friday 27th at 2 p.m.—1i5,000 square feet
LAND at adjoining Govern-

has an additional entrance
Road. ALL UTILITY SERV-



full grown cocoanut trees thereon.

The house is built of stone and con-
teins open galleries on two sides, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with

running water, pantny, kitchen and usual
out offices.

\ Garage and servants fooms in yard.
Inspection on application to the care-
taker Mr. Seymour Downes,
The above will be set for sale at Pub-
lic Competition at our office in Lucas
» Bridgetown, on Friday the 27th

April 1951 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

FOR RENT

Mintmum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over %
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

word Sundays,







PUBLIC NOTICES

Ter cents per agate line on week-day: |
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays. |
wminewm charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTICE



1
' ns
NOTKCE is herehy given that William
HOUSES | Patterson of Kensington, St. Michael,
Barbados, British West Indies is apply-
BOULOGNE. § ing to the Governor for naturalization,
be = a 4 ha St. Lawrence Gap, full¥ | and that any person who knows any
‘ shed al 8409 26.4.51-—-2n | reason why naturalization should not be
ace remem | granted should send a written and
F CHANDOS, 2nd Ave Belleville. Fully | signed Statement of the facts to the
urnished. Available May 15th. Inspec- | Colonial Secretary. :
} tion by appointment. Phone 3450 a: | Dated this 25th day of April, 1951,
| 3026 20.4.51—t.f.n. 28.4.51—2n.
| FLAT--Beaumont, Hastings unfur-

nished. Dining and Sitting room 2 bed-



WANTED

Mmimum charge sec w 72 ceu*s



HLUP










w6 cents Sundays $4 words — ie
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents @

NOTICE





= ‘ rooms, running water, Kitchen with eos, | .Miss NICHOLLS of the Banford Beauty

x seen tes zim, -| usual conveniences. No pets or thilizes | Salon, Bolton Lane informs her clients

22 4.51 Dial—2636. 24.4.51.—3n. | that her Salon will be closed for repsirs

‘S-t—ta (a | from Monday 30th April to Monday 7th

“HILLCREST, fully furnished, situat ANGLIN, Bathsheba, is no longer | May, 1681. 28.4.51—1n.

at Bathsheba, &t. J . eco site | for Rent, but for Sale. See Real Estate LIQUOE ae
° eachmount Hotel) standing on | °°!!!" 21.4.51—€6n EN OTI

244.433 square feet of land with several errr Q ci Se cs

The application of Albert T. Clarke
holder of Liquor License No. 961 of 1951
sranted to Neville E. Gill in respect
of a board and shingle shop at Fitz
Village, St. James, for permission to use
said Liquor License &c. at bottom floor
of a 2-storey wall building opposite
Stanmore Lodge, Black Rock, St, Michael,

Dated this 25th day of April. 1951.
To: EB. A. MeLBOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”

ALBERT T. CLARKE,
Applicant
—This application will be consid-

|
N.B





| EXPERIENCED a ered ata Licensing Court to be held at
uth grapher. Apply nrc S ye | Police Court, District “A™ on Monday

Mh | cate Co. td. the 7th day of May 1951 at 11 o'clock

TANGLIN—situate at | Beachmont, 15.4.51—.f.n, | °° ™

Bathsheba, and standing on 1 rood 2.3/3} —=<-——__-—-—_—— en E. A. McLEOD,_

perches of land thereto, containing} TWO GIRLS who can use treadle| . Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”

lounge, Dining Room, Three double} ™@chines, for Cap-making. Apply in / 7° ¢.51—In

bedrooms, Children’s room, Three gal-| P&"S0N as soon as possible, to Mis

leries, Kitchen, Garage and servant's; Vernon Walcott, Ivy Road

room, Furnished or unfurnished. ' 26.4. 51—2n

For inspection please telephone 3626. |

Offers to be sent
undersigned.

Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors, James
Street, Bridgetown. 21.4.51—fn,

That desirable two storied freehold
dwellinghouse known as “Culloden
View", situate at the junction of Cul-
foden and Dalkeith Roads, with the
land thereto containing 10,585 square
‘¥Yeet. The house contains drawing and
dining rooms, library, kitchen, bath and
teilet downstairs and upstairs, four
bedrooms (one with bath and toilet)
Two servants rooms, garage for 1 car
and tool room (all built of stone), in the
yard,

The date of sale will
later.

Inspection between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.
any day except Sundays on appoiit-
ment with the owner Mr, St. Clair Hunte,

(Phone 3229),
G, L. W. CLARKE & CO.,
Solicitors.
26.4.51—4n,

in writing to the





be published

td

Se

YOUNG LADY for our Office. 18
to 25. Must have knowledge oe eee
work, Shorthand and Typing and be
quick and intelligent. Good salany and
brosptcts Apply by letter. C. B. Rice
& Co. 26.4.51—2n

JUNIOR ASSISTANT RADIO ENGIN-
EER, with ability to mix, Must
have sound knowledge of transmitters
and receivers and to be able to sell as
well as engineer radio schemes. Travel
opportunities throughout Caribbean and
Central America exist. Ability to write
good business letters is important.
Apply in writing to R, D. Stewart,
Supervising Engineer (Caribbean Area)
Pye Ltd., P.O. Box 260, Barbados,





26.4.51—3n,

ROOM — Required immediately by
couple. room with meals in quiet
private“home, Hastings, Worthing, shore-
side, good bathing, quote moderate
monthly rate. Reply; Box X.Y.Z. C/o
Advocate. 26.4.51—1n.



Oils Firm
LONDON, April 25.

Hesitancy returned to the Lon-
don stock exchange today and
price changes in domestic issues
were irregular, Early morning
business gave firmness to Govern-
ment funds and leading industrials
but gains were generally lost in
the absence of any follow through
to this business. Funds were
finally fractionally easier on
balance and _ industrial share
movements were mainly to
slightly lower levels. Engineering
however held firm.

Union Castle shippings were a
weak feature with a loss of four
shillings at 41/6 with group profits
showing a decline of £592,000
at £1,579,000. Dividend however
was increased from eight per cent
to 10 per cent for the year,

Oils were consistently firm
with investment buying of lead-
ers but rubbers were dull.

Press talks of sterling revalu-
ation checked gold shares at the
outset but prices later recovered
when this talk was discredited.
Coppers agajn featured with
useful gains.

—Reuter.

Rubber Conirol

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya,
April 25

The Malayan Federal Govern-
ment said in a written parliamen-
tary reply today that they did not
think there was any need for the
rubber market to be apprehensive
over the Government’s powers to
impose control on the destination
of rubber exports.

The Government said it was not
intended to interfere with the
normal rubber export trade of the
federation,

In the past, 60 per cent of rub-
ber exports had gone to Britain,
the United States and self govern-
ing members of the British Com-
monwealth,

“Such exports are not subject to
destinational control. As to exports
to other countries, it is common
knowledge that exports to Com-/
munist China, have in reteni
months risen to levels out of all
proportion to the normal domes-
tic requirements of that country.
As a result less rubber has been
available for the United Kingdom
and other friendly countries” tne



let nsec tesa i” tein epee a eels TeieetnhiiinaTali ddiectetaceicteieinaticiaomshioliiies

|statement added.

—Reuter.

Worrell And
Ramadhin In
Benefit Game

LONDON, April 25
West Indies Test Cricketers
Frank Worrell and Sonny Rama-
dhin will play in a benefit match
i. Jack Parker of Surrey on May





_ ‘The West Indies players will be
included in Parker’s side to meet
the local club on Mitcham Green,
Southeast London.

Parker’s Eleven will be com.
pleted by the full Surrey County
side with the exception of Ber-
nard, Constable and Lock who
will be playing for the M.C.C.
against Essex,

Parker coached in the West
Indies in 1938—39 and Arthur
aaa pri and England
wicketkeeper also coac 7
in 1949—50, we Te

Laurie Fishlock opening bats-
man and Jim Laker off spinner
toured with Ramadhin and Wor-
rell on the recent Commonwealth
tour of India.—Reuter.

ge en eengesocee ede:
(WUBI, =

NOTICE TO MEMBERS
In accordance with Rule
34 the Club will be closed

.
3
>
rn)



SOOOPPOPPPOPFPOS

65

to members from 8 p m. on

Saturday, the 28th April.

.
POCO

Red China Is Not

Moscow’s Satellite

. TORONTO, April 25.

Sir Benegal Rau, India’s
permanent representative in the
United Nations said here today
that “to the best of our informa-
tion,” there was “little likelihood”
of the Chinese People’s Republic
being overthrown by internal
opposition or disruption,

In a lecture at Victoria Univers-
ity here, Sir Benegal said new
China was “in a state of transition
with g modified Communism or
en of its own as a distant
goal”,

“Soviets appear fully to recognise
and accept the Peking variation of
Communism, and there has there-
fore never been any question of
bringing Chinese Communists into
line” he declared,

No Cominform direction of
Chinese policy had been attemp-
ted and Communist China was not
a satellite of Moscow, he said,

—Reuter,



S. Korean Home
Minister Resigns

TAEGU, April 25.

The South Korean Home
Minister resigned today following
the execution of 187 villagers
accused of collaborating with
Communist guerillas. A Gov-
ernment statement earlier today
announced that a South Korean
battalion commander’ executed
villagers after a summary Court
Martial at Kochang, 35 miles
southwest of Taegu.

After they were sentenced the
Battalion Commander — ordered
his information officer to execute
them on the spot. “He executed
them individually and buried
them”, the statement said.

A statement issued after the
inquiry into what was called the
“Kochang Incident” said the
villages were sheltering Com
munist guerillas and giving
them arms, food and information

The army originally confined
600 people in a_ village school
but children under 14, men over
60, women and girls and a few
others were released. -Others—
almost the entire fit male popula-
tion of the village—were execut-
ed.

—Reuter,

Horse Trouble

LONDON, April 25.
At a London Airport tonight the
£13,000 race horse Helioscope, son
of the famous Derby winner
Hyperion struggled and kicked as
15 people tried in vain to get him



| The Colonies
In Commons

LONDON, April 25.

Trade negotiations between
Britain and Cuba are still in pro-
gress but no agreement has yet
been made Mr. T. F. Cook, Under-
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies said today. He gave this
written answer in the House of
Commons to Colonel Arthur D.
Dodds — Parker (Conservative)
latest member to ask what steps
are being taken 4o protect the
interests of Jamaica. Colonel
Dodds-Parker emphasised that
the Jamaican cigar industry
had already suffered a_ setback
from the contraction in sales in
the United Kingdom due to the
high rate of duty and the reduced
spending power of the British
| people.
, Another Conservative Member
Mr. Cyril, Osborne sed the
Colonial Secretary Mr James
| Griffiths for an assurance that
the proposed agreement between
Cuba and the United Kingdom
would not be detrimental to the
pineapple, cigar and sugar indus
tries of Jamaica.

In a_ written reply Mr, Cook
merely recalled What was said by
the President of the Board of
Trade on March 15—that no
agreement would be made with
Cuba which would prejudice the
undertaking given to Common-
wealth sugar producers when the
Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
ment was negotiated last year.

The United Kingdom Govern-
ment, he said, was fully aware of |
Jamaican views on pineapples |
and cigars and was bearing them +:
in mind,

Grenada Riots

Replying to a question about
reeent disorders in Grenada, Mr,
Cook said the Secretary of States
for the Colonies did not intend to
publish a report. Only preliminary
comments had been received from
the Labour Adivser now in the
West Indies. When he had returned
to Britain the Minister would be
in a position to answer in greater
detail questions on the causes of
the strike. Commander A, H. P
Noble (Conservative) put ques-
tions arising out of the closing
down of the naval dockyards at
Bermuda.

He wanted to know: how were
the medical and other surplus}
stores disposed of ? Were any
dumped ? What is the future of the
floating dock ? When was this
decided ? Has any refit equipment
been sent out since the dockyard
started closing down?

Mr. W. J. Edwards replied for
the Admiralty, that it was decided
as recently as last month, that in
view of altered circumstances, the
large floating dock in Bermuda
should be retained for continued
use by the Royal Navy.

Instructions had now been giv-
en for it to be towed to the
United Kingdom,

All serviceable stores not sur-
plus to the requirements of the
Navy had been returned to the
United Kingdom,

Certain surplus medical stores
had been sold to the King Edward
Memorial Hospital, Bermuda.

Other Naval stores and plant
not required by the Navy were
sold locally, Remaining small
quantity of stores unserviceable
or impracticable to bring back
were dumped. No refit equipment
had been sent out since the dock
|yard started to close down—only

jsome spares for small craft.
Reuter,







aboard a plane to fly him to} .
Caracas, South America. e
For several hours the men) Planes Collid
struggled and tried to coax the KEY WEST FLORIDA, April 25
horse up the special gangway. A commercial airliner and a

offering grass and fruit, Fifteeo

feet from the ground, Helioscope |

reared up and lashed out with his
hind legs.

The men held tightly on to the
ropes. A veterinary surgeon gave
the horse injections and half
pint of medicine. Then after blind-
folding him and covering his face
with a sack the men got the horse
into a box but he lashed out and
almost turned it over,

2

United States Navy training plane
collided over the ocean one mile
|from Key West and crashed into
the sea today, Soon afterwards a
woman’s body was found at the
seene of the crash. :
Later Pan-American Airways
reported that a four-engined sky-
master, operated by its oT.tic-ed
company Compania Cubana De
Aviation, was overdue on the
Miami-Havana flight with 34 pas.

Colonel T. C. Irvine said, ‘ic | Sengers—Reuter,
would be impossible to send him| |"; ss San...
by aie now ater what bs|[ ORPENTAL

happened. He will have to go by

sea. After all, the new owners
want a whole horse, not half one.”
Helioscope went back to New
Market to wait for a boat,
—Reuter.
[POCO POOP EE,
Are you thinking of Building
Houses, Roads and Yards ?
*.

: IF so

Contact: “B. A. & P. §. BROOKS”

CONTRACTORS

We draw = your
endeavour to
the best

oo

CSOCD

Plans
give

and you

For further particulars Phone 8335
or 8162.

CPSSSSSSISF

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened



THANI’S "3
Laos 594 3A



NOTICE 10
CANASTA FANS

HEINEKEN’S BREWERY has
made a gift of Canasta Score
pads to players in Barbados.
Drink Heineken’s Beer as you

Â¥ play Canasta Score Pads will
| be given to players on paying

a visit to Messrs K. R. Hunte
& Co., Lid, Lower Broad Street.

| Rrppornnrnnns bibibbmewbtbids
! AOC OOOO OOO wee




PERSONAL



‘ERLINE
1 do not
or
or

The public heret
giving credit to m
KELLMAN (nee Prescod)
hold myself responsible for her
one ¢ise contracting any debt

are w

debt



in try name unless by a written order
signed by me
Signed SAMUEL KELLMAN,
Ivy Land,
St. Michael
25.4.51-—2









The public are hereby warned ag:
giving credit to any person or pers
as I do not hold myself responsible for
‘one contracting any debt or debts tr
my name unless by a written orde
signed by me.

Signed BERESFORD LASHLEY
Maxwell Rood,
Christ Chureh
25.4, 51—2n

nst
on





Concern Over
Colonies
Expressed in Letter to Times



LONDON, April 25.

Concern ai disintegrating forces
in the Colonial Empire expressec
by Conservative member cf Pat
liament, David Gammans in ®&
letter to the Times is shared by
others today. But they~do not
agree that a Council of the Empire’
on the lines of the Council ot
Europe is the best remedy.

Gilbert McAllister, Labour
member, who was one of | the
Empire Delegation to East Africa
some years ago, wrote today that
the Commonwealth Federation had
its obvious theoretical attractions,
but the view of raost people. is
that however desirable, it is, fot
the time being, impracticable
They consider, he contended that
such a federation would undoubt
edly result in the secession from
the Commonwealth of some of
its oldest countries.

Each Has A Say

McAllister suggested that there
already exists an institution which
cculd be adopted to serve the
end in view—the Council of the
Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association on which are repre-
sented the United Kingdom, al
the Dominions and 21 Colonia!
territories.

He said that at the recent Can-
berra Comference of the Associa-
tion, attended by representatives
of 40 Commonwealth Parliaments
Sangster, Minister of Social Wel-
fare in Jamaica said “it is the
cnly place in the British Common-

wealth at which the colonies
ave able to say their little
piece and give you _ their
viewpoint. In this great

gathering of the Commonwealth,
we are happy and preud to be
able to stand on a_ ground of
equality and give our views on
the various subjects that are being
debated” .

McAllister explained that the
Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association and the Council which
row binds it together have been
growth of the last 40 years and
; an experiment in voluntary
co-operation between Parliament
arians of nations within the
Commonwealth,

“From its modest beginning:
he added, “it has expanded i
prestige and in influence, that its
translation into something wit!
statutory rights and obligation
would only be in line with the
characteristic developments of
historical events in Britain”.

—Reuter.

Reds Tell Indians
To Unite With China

BOMBAY, April 25.
The Indian Communist party
today called on the nation’s “toil
ing miliions” to unite to make ar
Indian People’s demeeracy alliec
with Soviet Russia and China,
Communists denounced Nehru’



Government as ‘anti-democratic
and anti-popular” and said it
should be replaced with <

“People’s Democracy on the basi:
of the coalition of all democratic
anti-feudal, anti-imperialist foree,
in the country”.



In a 4,000 “fundamental pro-
gramme” the Communists an
nounced that the party's polit-

buro had decided on “radical re-
orientation of our tactical line”.

The Communist manifesto listec
a 30 point political and economic
“emancipation” programme for
the Indian people. It claims th
confiscation of all feudal estates
without payment, and nationalisa~-
tion of industrial banking, ship-
ping and commercial enterprises

Highlights of the party’s foreign
policy are:

Withdrawal from the Common-
wealth, and alliance and friend-
ship with Pakistan and Ceylon.

The announcement did not in-
dicate the party’s programme of
action to realise its objectives.

—Reuter.

“FAIR PRICES”
LONDON, April 25

“Fair prices” scale to guide
buyers came into operation today
in the Malan Federation,

“Fair price’ lists are ‘being
issued to shoppers to help reduce
the excessive price marging? of
local dealers. Prices wall nat be
the legal maximum prices, A
similar scheme is already in oper-
ation in Singapore. A price con.
trol for all kinds of imported
cigarettes is to come into force on
April 30.—Reuter,

=

| FOR LONGER. SERVICE

TAR all Dats before erecting
A small quantity of this
Ro t preventative
material still available
your GAS WORKS, Bay St
Price . . 40c, per gallon.
Get Some To-day.



at





GREETS,

FOR SALE

CRUSHED
STONE & FINE



Ss



IDEAL FOR CONCRETE, 2 rooms, Kitchen, Pantry, ete,
AND MAKING ROADS 3
AND PATHS. ;
Apply. | JOHN M
| J. N. HARRIMAN | .
& CO,, LTD, #1} A.F.S
Seawell, % | hs 4640
Phone 8444, Extension 8 | Phone 664 a3
| 26.4.51,—7n, # Real Estate Agent—Auctione
| rod 7

_—

.| In Prague Missi

:






















PAGE SEVEN



A.P. Corr spondent| Council Pass

BE, April 23











|

lovak employees of the Associated
Press in Prague are believed t«
have been arrested recently and
1 third disappeared last week,

United States Embassy here

this afternoon sent a note to the
Czechoslovak Government re-
porting the disappearance of
William Oatis, Prague -orrespond-
ent of the Associated

asking for an investigation con-
cerning his whereabouts
welfare, on the most

basis possible.

The American note, sent to the
Czechoslovak Foreign

office in Prague on Monday after-
noon and has not been heard
from by the Embassy since.

bassador Hotel (his residence)
since Monday morning, although
nis personal effects are reportedly
still in his room there,” the note





America, whose. trade
US A, Manufacturers, has
“A” of Register -in
especially products
one montl
meantin
tration The
Dated this 10th day of April 1951,







th day of April,

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW





“He has not been in the Am-





5.8. “ALCOA PATRIOT” sails 18th April





\OUTHBOUND
Name of Ship





/ORTHBOUND

3S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE"



on ee

*These

:

‘Contact Antilles Products,
sailing to Europe fortnightly.
Dublin, London, or

reduction for children.

REMEMBER

our motor





This Exceller

eonta



2 acres



William Oatis, Associated Press |
corresponde in Prague, has not
been seen at his office for th
last 24 hours

The United State Embassy
here has asked Czechoslovak
authorities to make inquiries as
to his whereabouts

Oatis is reported to
last seen on Monday
when he left his o He is

A United States Embassy
official disclosed today that Oati
callect at the United States
Embassy here on” Sunday night
and express concern because
he’ was beitig “closely followed
24 hours a day.” Two Czechos

Press and/the taxpayers

and ,; sary.
urgent }

|

Sails Montreal

due April 20th.



vessels have limited passenger

Limited,

Rotterdam,

when you purchase from

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM =

van delivers the goods to your door.

; es — — =
lp 1 144 ” .
run SAL “CASABLANCA” MAXWELI
Moderr Property set in walled gardens of about
1 Large Verandah
There
and the Gardens are beautifully laid out, Well recommended.

"8 Resolution

for a cane cutter to earn what
it was estimated the emigrant
would earn after reductions.
Hon. R. N. Turner said that he
understood that on previous oc-
casions work of this sort was.
agrieultural ang the work would
be of the same nature as before,

Hon. J. v. Chandler, President,
said that it appeared to him that
in fairness to the taxpa of
Barbados who had to pay for the
povericen trip, those who were’
going should afford to 0}
than $2 a week. ee ae

He was of the opinion that the
Government's estimate was very
optimistic with regard taking a
basis of 12 weeks instead of 10,
Besides they had made no allow-
ance for workers saying they did
not like the job and wanted to
return as had happened already,

from page 1

They should not, he said, ask

to subsidize the

more than was neces-
!

Hon. G. D. L. Pile said that in
this instance, the term emigration
was wrong. They were only as-
sisting labourers to find employ.

workers

‘ Ministry,) ment and it was not emigration
said Oatis was last seen at his/in the true sense of the word;

U.S. PAPER BACKS
BEVAN

WASHINGTON, April 24,
The Washington Post agreéd in









said, an editorial today with Aneurin
His whereabouts is unknown Bevan’s view that the American
to his effice, His Automobile | Rearmament Programme prevent-
likewise has disappeared but n0] 44 Britain getting scarce materials.
Known friend or aSsociate of The editorial said the Unit i
Oatis knows of any intended | 1.165 had besi "heseing" a
trip.” Fae 7
The note followe@ oral repre- | Material for Defence and called
sentations made at the Ministry | the policy the “product of hysteria
for Foreign Affairs this morning] and lack of faith in the Allies.”
—Reuter. \ —Reuter.
That THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC., a corporation organized and_ existing \
under and by virtue of the laws ‘of the State of New York, United States .ot

1951, unless some person shall in the

n duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such regts-
trade mark can be seen on application at my office,

HH. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
24,4.513n



SHIPPING NOTICES

















ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |: ~
(M.A.N.Z, LINE) % ae aes; PREM I

M.S. “TONGARIRO" sailed Brisbane | ¢ Sy eae te aac
March 24th, Arriving at Rertadae tae 3 will accept Cargo and Pa es
tet ’ for St, Vineent, Grenada and

8.8. “ARABIA" ‘js scheduled to nail ish os lle 2d i a
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th nstant.

May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane “ 2ce
16th June, Sydney 23rd June, orriving Mi 4 Caribbee"* will aecept
Mt Trinidad during latter half of duly, Cargo and . Patsengers for
ind proceeding thereafter to Barbados Dominica, Antigua, soo ae
ind, Liverpool Nevis and St. Kitts.

In addition to general eargo this Friday 4th May, r aad :
vessel has ample space for chilled and tnt
hard frozen cargo baynamp rey
Cargo accepted on through Bills of B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to '

British Guinna, Leeward and Windward ERS ASSOC,, INC.
stands

For further particulars apply Tele, 4047, =
*URNESS WITHY & CO, Ltd, TRINI-

IAD, B.WA, and

DA COSTA & CO, LTD, BRIDGE-| }%

TOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.1 ‘ =

Abcoa Steamship C
0.
gnc.
NEW YORK SERVICE
5.5. MYKEN" sails 6th April - arrives Barbados 19th April.
A Steamer sails 27th April - arrives Barbados 9th May.
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

38. “ALCOA ROAMER” sails 4th April arrives Barbados 20th April.

arrives Barbados 4th May.

Oe

CANADIAN SERVICE

Sails Halifax Arrives B'dos.

8.5. “ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May 9th
8.8, “ALCOA PIONEER” May = Iith May lath May = 24th
58, “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May — 25th May = 28th

June ~ 7th

ooo

Sails for St. John and Montreal,
a

accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

MMOL EEE
PASSAGES TO EUROPE

a

we

Roseau, Dominica, or”
The usual ports of call are
Single fare £70; usual

EEG EEG ARES
PELE AL LE MAM MEL
ts





CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.,—Proprietors, — Cnr. of Broad & Tudor Streets

bas. 4 Se emaamnes
PEEGEEIE ELE TE ETL ETAT ETA TEL









oo
i)

COAST

2 Reception, 5 large Bed-
is a double eutrance drive





F.V.A.

Plantations Building

er—Surveyor
aaah pcos

—"

oor

i

’



4

'

ae

(i ceSty

ee

iness address js 155, East 44th Street, New York City, —
applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part ~
t of substances used as food or as ingredients in foods,
sining milk, and will be entitled to register the same after



i. ¥

7.

ah tO
PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THURSDAY,





APRIL 26, 1951



AUSTRALIANS ANXIOUS TO SEE W.1. CRICKETERS

College Win
Football Game
From Empire 4—2

College defeated Empire 4—2
when they played Second Divis-
ion football at Bank Hall yester-
day. :

The game was fast from begin-
hing to end with College showing





much better form than their op-
ponents

Five of the six goals wer
scored during the first half, J
Williams scored two for College
while C. W. Smith and Mr, Al-
bert Williams, scored one each
Harper and Brewster scored fui
Empire.

College’s goalie, Roach delight.
ed the spectators with his many
well-timed saves He overshad-
owed his counterpart Clarke,

The Game
The game started with the
Blues defending the south goal

Empire got the kick off, but im-
mediately College was on the
offensive and were pressing hard
to open their scoring.

Ten minutes later they got their
first success when C, W. Smith at
eentre forward got the ball fron
the left wing and made no mis
take in netting a left foot shot





College were soon after tw
goals in the lead. A penalty wa
awarded them for Bynoe_ putt ns

his hands to a powerful shot fron
Tudor in the penalty area on
right wing. J. A. Williams t
the penalty and scored to
goalie’s right. The score was t
2—0,

Mr. Albert Williams notchec
the third goal for College with <
beautiful long distance shot, com-
pletely beating the goalie.

Empire, who were kept most!)



ne
er

on the defensive, however, took
over for a short while and thi:
resulted them a_ goal. Harper,

their centre forward, got past the
College’s backs and then deceived
their goalie with a fairly low shot
The score was 3—1,

Shortly before half time, Col.
lege took the score to 4—-1 and
this was still the score at the in-
terval. J. A, Williams, after
being intercepted in the penalty
area by one of the Empire backs,
got hola of the ball again, and
shot with his left foot to the righ!
of a motionless goalie.

Second Half

The game was almost unevent
ful after resumption, This time
College was down in the Empir«
area and then Empire would tak«
over, but some time elapsed be-
fore the score changed.

However, a few minutes before
the end of the game, Empire go
in another goal,

Brewster, playing at inside left
for Empire, finally got possession

of the ball after a melee in the A modern version of Jesse
College goal area and scored into Owens, a slim New Yorker named
an empty goal, At close of play Andy Stanfield, is to show his
the score was 4—2 in favour of paces to a British crowd for the
College. first time.

The teams were :— Stanfield will be a member of a

College: Roach, Griffith, Ford,-small American team running at
Simmons, Mr. Williams, Dash, White City, London, in a series of
Williams, Smith, P. Tudor, |, international races on May 5 an
Tudor, 7. He will be accompanied by

Empire : Clarke,



Hutchinson, Harper, Brewster, ready well known to British
Norville. athletic crowds.
Réferee: Mr, B. Hoyos. Stanfield’s likeness to Jesse
- -— Owens is shown not only in
sprinting but he is said to be

T'DAD WILL FIND
NEXT BRANDON CUP
SERIES HARDER

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 23.

The colourful Jamaican act
tennis player, Ron Sturdy, depu-
teing for his skipper Donald
Leahong, who was ill, told a big
crowd on Sunday evening that
Trinidad would not fing it as
easy next year in the Brandon
Cup series, Sturdy on behalf of
Jamaica said the tour was very
pleasant, the tennis very good,
and. that Trinidad was the best
team. Sturdy made special
mention of Ralph Legall, who
had been playing the game fo
only three years, He said.
“Legall was absolutely outstand-
ing.” Ralph Carter for Barbados
paid high tribute to the orgi
isation, and so did Bernard Go
salves who spoke on behalf
British Guiana.





Traffie Don't

No. 34
©
DO NOT FORGET TO
CONCENTRATE ON
YOUR DRIVING.
eo
Space made available by

CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.







Gardner Will Not

European

training
ha
in
month,—Reuter,

Series



Billed As—
“World Championship”

MELBOURNE.

The West Indeis tour of Australia has already been much
publicised and Australian crowds are eagerly looking for-
ward to comparing the West indians with their players,
particularly their champion batsmen, Weekes and Worrell,
and bowlers Ramadhin and Valentine writes Lyall Rowe,
Reuter’s correspondent from Melbourne, Monday



K. MILLER

Fight On May 22

LONDON, April 25,
Gardner, British
heavy weight

Jack

tine heavyweight, at Harringay
m May 22,
Jack Solomons, the London

promoter, said today: “It’s no use
waiting
our
left
as we had hoped, and it is
likely to be ready for May 22.
John
Simpson, Gardner’s rmanager, and
have decided not to risk Jack's
ands in an important fight until
he is thoroughly fit,”

any make
minds,

thumb

longer to
Gardner’s
has not come

“In the circumstances,

Gardner injured his thumb
and hurt it again
Joe Weiden of
European title fight
IN.S.

beat
the



A Modern

Jesse Owens
LONDON,



3ynoe, Jordan, Mal Whitfield, Horace Ashenfeiter
Wilson, Rudder, D, Clarke, Morris, end John Twomey, who are al

fine hurdler and has long-jumped
over 25 feet,



BY M. HAARISON-GRAY

It is vital
keep an
opponents’

at
eye on your
score as well as
Much of the pla
on the rival po:
xuinple

Canasta to

i
;
'
;













with









. * game

& po ity (but not the

s certainty) of making one or

s two more Canastas. before

§ East-West have made thetr

s Initial meld

: hould the East-West score

a r the 4000 mark, unles
1-South are within one



Janasta of game, they should
s fo OUut-—it is most tmportant
t this stage of the game to
ch East-West for a minus

With both sides between
3400 and 4000, North-South
should first assess their
chances of winning the game
on the hand. Unless these are
xeeptionally bright, they
should elect to go out, their
objective being to start the
next, and probably the last,
hand with a lead of 800 or
900 while the opponents still
require 120 for the Initial

meld
however,

It,
their score



subtracting
Fasy.West are
likely to be below the 3000
mark, and therefore needing
90 only for their meld on the
next hand, it ts better to con-
tinue the game—otherwise
much of the North-South
acd tage would be lost

It ulso follows that if both
scores are just below 3000, it
is usually advisable not to go
out until the opponents have
melded, so that they will have
the same disadvantage of
120 f peer first

by






requiring








eve steE CASO eeeeeceenccecensesecrac recesEsPRSEEnEeEeene emoessess



2 seen



Registered U 5S. Parent Offer



They'll Do It Every Time

woe BICEPS SPENDS HOURS
IN HIS BACK YARD KEEPING
FIT WITH HIS WEIGHT-LIFTING

| EQUIPMENT =







and
champion
will not fight Cesar Brion, Argen-

up
injured

along
not

when
Austria
last

his

cReeeneceses : /eeeessrsezsererseneens: ceeevsstccetzccar easreseerrssaeeseorsarseasares

Bur wio HAs 70
LUG THE DUMBBELLS
IN ier IT RAINS =

ASK WIFEY *s**s
SHE KNows!

The West Indians can feel con-



fident that they will get re-
ceplicn from Australinn crowds
milar to that given the popular
M.C.C. team on its recent tour
No Bredman
Australian cricket is at the

crossroads, The indifferent show-
ing of its Test team in the recentiy
completed Test series against Eng-
land has caused some critics here
to say Australia’s world supremacy
in post-war cricket has ended

It was the first season since 1928
that Australia has had to play a

series against England without
Bradman.
No cricket country, with the

possible exception of the West In-
dies, queried Australia’s claim to
the title of world cricket cham-
pions, until the M.C.C. team
rroved Anstralinn cricketers were
far from invincible

It is quite obvious that an “over-
haul” of candidates is needed be-
fore the Test team is selected
meet the renowned West Indians
here next summer. This series is
being billeqd here “cricket
championship of the world.”

Australia retained the ashes
against England, but a survey of
the Test matches shows how easily
one of the biggest upsets in Test
cricket history could have oc-
curred,

England was blighted with bad
luck. After losing the toss in the
first Test at Brisbane, it bundled
the Australians out for 228 only,
to encounter a Brisbane “sticky
tiog,” easily the worst batting pitch
in the world. Even then they
nearly pulled the game out of the
fire,

to

as

Injuries

From England's point of view
the less said about tie second Te
in Meibourne the better, for here
rngiand had the game won ye
lost. Injuries did not help Engianc
in the Third and Fourth Tests.

England’s win in the last Tesi
by a team that was not expected
to prove troublesome astonisheu
the critics. Many unkind thing:
were said about the team early 1:
the tour, some of which may have
been deserved, But under the
grand leadership of rreddie
wrown, the team showed it could
svercome adversities and fight
back.

Full biame ine Austrajian
slump must be taken by its bets-
men. They failed repeatedly on
pitehes full of runs even though
they did not come up to the heart-
breaking standard to which bowl-
ers in tnis country have become
accustomed.

Star opening batsman, Artrur
Morris except for his 206 in the



ava

fourth Test at Adelaide, was a
failure. He had three partners
during the — seriés Moroney,

Archer and Burke—but none was
& success.

Dashing left-hander, Neil
Harvey, from whom much was
expected after his success on the
South African tour, proved a
thaney player. Too often it was
left to the captain, diminutive
Lindsay Hassett, to halt) what
looked like a complete collapse

A Star







One success was all-rounder
Keith Miller. When he was bai-
ting or bowling there was always
a feeling that something was
about to happen. Events pro\ ed



that this was no fallacy. In the
field he was superb, 7
Australian bowlers, witt

“freak” off-spinner, Jack Iversor

starring and speedster, Ray
Lindwall, still able to wreak
havoc in a bowling spell, per-
formed well. But Iverson's

retirement from first-class cricket



for business reasons has left thr
selectors a big gap to fill
Critics here generally agree

that several Australian cricketers

who have served their country
well in post-war series have
passed their best and that new

stars must be found.

One case in particular is
wicketkeeper Don Tallon Eng-
lish reporters who saw lis

brillianee on the 1948 English
tour could not believe it was the
same Tallon on the recent tour

Tallon missed easy stumpings
dropped catches and fumbled
returns from fieldsmen throug!

out, To replace him is not goine

By Jimmy Hatlo |










OPPONENTS

R. LINDWALL





8. RAMADHIN

SOME of the top stars expected to clash in the forthcoming W.I.-

Australian games,



NEWCASTLE'S EIGHTH
GUP FINAL

By PETER DITTON

LONDON, April 16.

When Newcastle United, led by Director Stan Seymour,
step out on to the brilliant green turf at Wembley on April
28th for the F.A. Cup final of 1951, they will be equalling a
record by their mere appearance, >

It will be the eighth octasion
on which a Newcastle United team
Aas contested an F.A, Cup Final

_® performance previously
whicved oniy by Aston Villa and
Wee? Bromwich Albion. Three
times they have been successful
in the Final and four times they
have tasted defeat. Victory oven
Blackpool will put them among
the few clubs to have won the
Cup four times Aston Villa and
Blackburn lead the field with 6
wins each, the now defunet
Wanderers come next with five
wins and Sheffield) United are
fourth with four,

Win or lose, it s
the Newcastle team spirit that
they have reached the final this
year without the guiding hand of
a Manager to direct them, The
man who held the job at the be-
ginning of the season, Mr. George
Martin, is now with Asten Villa
ond the Newcastle club is run bs
the Board of Directors, all of -vhorn
have an equal share in the affair
of “the Magpies” — a& they ar
known, :





much for

“$1,000,000 Team”
Most famous of the Newcast}
Board is undoubtedly the Chair



_

o be easy as Australia
other wicketkeeper
rear Test standard,
vho officiated in South Africa,
was kept out of cricket this
season with an injured leg.

Youngsters

Australia has two young crick-
eters from whom much should be
heard in the next few years, They
are right-hand batsmen,
Burke and Greame Hole.

Burke scored a century in hit
first Test match and Hole played
a id fighting knock after Aus-
s leading batsmen had failed
the Fifth Test in Melbourne
Others showing promise are
dashing right-hand batsmen Rich
ie Benaud and Jim de Courcy.
both of New South Wales, and
medium-pace Western Australia!

has 1
anywhere
Ron Saggers




I
in

right-arm bowler, Harry Price:
who flashed into Sheffield Shield
cricket with a blaze of succe

this year.

These players and others seem
certain to oust several of the stars
who have kept Australia on top
in cricket in recent years,

LPG ES

J&R ENRICHED BREAD

FOOTHALLER'S

HE
i 0
4

moa





man, Stan Seymour. He is a
former player with the club ana
it was he who scored one of the
two goals for Newcastle from the
outside-left position in the 1923-24
Final against Aston Villa.
Newcastie United have always
been a famous name in English
Football. Since the end of tix
war and the resumption of peace-
time soecér this has been partic-

ularly true. Much of their fame

— sore people might term it
notoriety—-has come about because
of their dealings in the transfer
market They have bought ana

sold players with a frequency that
has earned them the title of “the
million dollar team.”

And yet that title is not strietly
deserved. Although Newcastle
have been frequent participants in
the transfer market, their
penditure on new men has been
offset by the amount received in
respect of outgoing players — in-
volving cash around £200,000,

ex-

6 Local Players

If you want proof, iook at the
team expected to take the field
against Blackpool in the Final.
Six are local players, who cost the
tlub only the usual £10 signing-
on fee, The only real big-money
player in the side is Chilean-born
George Robledo, for whom they
paid about £22,000 when signed
from Barnsley last season, The
others for whom Newcastle laid
out a transfer fee are Bobby
Mitchell, outside-left; Frank Bren-
nan, centre-half; Joe Harvey,
Tight-half and Captain; and Jack
Fairbrother, goal-keeper,

The local plavers are outside-
right Walker; inside-right Taylor,
one of the smallest, and at the
same time, cleverest players in
the First Division; centre-forward
Milburn, who began his career as
an outside-right, and won an
England ‘cap’ when converted
into the leader of the attack; left-
half Crowe; and full-backs Cowell
and Corbett.

Too Smali

An amusing story concerning
Taylor is that during the war he
was spotted by a Newcastle scout
and invited to play for the club
game at. St, James’s Park.




CHOICE



Mexican

Swimmer

Visiting Barbados

Gustavo Olguin de Rodrigo,

twenty-six-year-old Mexican

on his way home after attending the Pan-American Olym-
pics in Argentina is in Barbados. He is an intransit pas-
senger on the Rio Juramento, an Argentine ship at present
anchored in Carlisle Bay. Gustavo, a member of the Mexi-
can water polo team was also covering the games for the

t

Mexican television station XHTV-Channel 4 (of which he is
the sports producer), and “Ovaciones”, a sports magazine
in Mexico. He is married and has three children

He tock part in several of the
practice games against Brazil,





Chile and the U.S., but did not
play in any of the final games.
His three brothers, Jose, Otilio
and Tonatiuh were also on the
team, Otilio was their chief
goal-getter and Tonatiuh broke
two swimming records, the 1.500

metre and 800 metre free style

Water Pulo

Of the water polo games which
were won by Argentina, he
thought there was little to choose
between the Argentine and
Uruguay teams.

During his stay here he has
seen several of the local water
polo teams in action. He thinks
that they are below the standard
of the Mexican team, but he
thought . that our island team
must be quite formidable. How-
ever, he said, we lacked properly
organised strategy. Players here
kept the ball too long. In
Mexico they are taught, “if
you're not in a position to shoot
right away, get rid of the ball.’
Quick passing must be developed
Another feature of their training
is working out different tactics
and moves on a blackboard, Then
before trying them out in the
water, they are performed first
on land to obtain complete per-
fection. Organised movements
are essential and secret signs
between members of a team’s
forward line is another necéssity

Gusiavo went on to say that
what he and his brothers knew
about swimming was all due to
their father Gustavo de Rodrigo,
Senior, who was a contemporary
swimmer of Johnny Weissmuller
and he had swam against him.
My father, he said, has devoted
much of his life to developing
water polo and aquatics in
Mexico.

Film Lost

The only unpleasant part oi
Gustavo’s trip was that his movie
camera was stolen while he was
visiting the military school in
Argentina. It was worth about
15,000 Argentine pesos. He also
lost five rolls of film, three of
which had been used. However
Gustavo says the Police still have
hopes of finding it.

The other members of the
Mexican team returned to Mexicu
by air. He left Argentina March
29th for Montevideo and was
there nine days. There, he

Taylor was in the army at the time
but he changed into civilian
clothes to go ylong to the ground.
tle knocked at the door of the
Players’ entrance and explained to
the doorkeeper that he had come



te play for Neweastle. The door-
keeper decided that Ernie was

pulling his leg; that he was
small to be playing for Newcastle.
Ernie drew himself up to his full
five feet two inches and tried
again. But the doorkeeper was
adamant and not until the arrival
of one of the Newcastle Directors,
who knew Ernie, was he able to
get into the ground,

Marking Matthews

Hardest task confronting any
of the Neweastle players at
Wembley looks to be that facing
left-back Corbett. To him falls
the task of marking the inimitable
Matthews. If he can hold up
the Blackpool genius then New-
custle’s hopes of winning the F.A.
Cup for the fourth time will be
considerably brighter. But if he



fails — as so many full-backs have}

failed before him—-Mortensen, the
Blackpool centre-forward, will be
ready and willimg to take any ad-
vantage of the slight suggestion of
slowness on
by the big raw-boned, Brennan

But whatever the result New-
eastle can be relied upon to play
clever, constructive football, They
are, like Blackpool, great be-
lievers in attack and the 100,000
who are lucky enough to have
tickets for the match may be pro-
vided With more goals than one
usually expects from such an event
as the F.A. Cup Final,

OIL

SEE
SUNDAY ADVOCATE

.





BEST IN 3
FLAVOUR

©

BEST

IN
TEXTURE §&
°

BEST
IN
NUTRITION

pod,



the turn displayed’

GUSTAVO de RODRIGO
our father taught us.

and
via

joined the Rio Juramento
arrived here five days ago
Trinidad.

The ship is expecied to leave
Barbados this afternoon.

Also on board are thirty
polo ponies on their way
Mexico.

nine
to

Gussy May Play

LONDON,

“Gorgeous” Gussy Moran, No. |
glamour girl of lawn tennis, is ex-
pected to grace British courts
again this year.

Officials at Wembley plan to
stage a professional tournament in
July, as part of the Festival of



{LAN BROWN MUST
WISS CUP FINAL

LONDCN, April 25.
Alan Brown, Blackpool’s inside
left, will not_be fit for the F.A,
Cup Final against Newcastle on
Saturday. He was to have had
a test today in a Lancashire
midweek league game with Old-
ham, but after training yester-
day he limped slightly and com-
plained of pain in his injured

knee,

Today it felt worse and he had
to declare himself unfit, —Reuter.

WINT TO RUN IN PARIS

LONDON, Apri: 24.

Arthur Wint, the Jamaican
holder of the Olympic 400-metre
title has been chosen to represent
the University of London in the
400 and 800 metres in the athle-
tic match against Paris University
in Paris on Sunday.—Reuter.

What's on Today

Pelice Courts and
Original
10.00 a.m,

Second Division Basketball
—Sea Seouts will play
James St. Bey Scouts at
the Modern High School
—5.00 p.m.

Pickwick-Revers and Ever-
ton will meet this after.





‘curt of
Jurisdiction

noon in a First Division
football match at Ken-
sington, This match was

to have been played last

Saturday but was post-
poned due to rain—5.00
p.m.

Inter.Club Table Tennis at
Y.M.C.A.—
Y.M.C.A, vs. Foundation
6.00 p.m.
Everton vs. Hampton —
6.00 p.m,

Barna vs. Police — 7.30

p.m,
Y.M.P.C, vs. Fox—7.30
p.m.

Annual General Meeting of
the Society for the Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Ani-
mals at Wakefield, White
Park—8.15 p.m.

CINEMAS
Empire: “The Third Man” 4.45
and #.30 p.m.
Olympic: “Bathing Beauty” and

“Dangerous Millions”
Globe: “Gals Incorporated” and
“When Tomerrow Comes" 4.45
and $30 p.m,
> “Race Street” 8.30 p.m,



and “Blood on the Moon" 4.45
and 8.30 Dm,







Britain sporting celebrations, and Roval: ‘Tenth Avenue Angel’
Satara, they want to feature wae oe To Wed" 4.30 and
American tennis stars.
It is also hoped that Jack
Kramer and Pancho Segura wiil |
also compete. sie: The Weather
TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.46 a.m,
Sun Seis: 6.10 p.m,

POLICE BEAT B’DOS
REGIMENT 25—15

Police defeated the Barbados
Regiment by 25 goals to 15 in a
Second Division basketball
match which was played at
District “A” yesterday afternoon



The Police team playing at home
were on top ail through the
fame.

The netball match between St.
Michael's Girls’ and Erdiston at
St. Michael’s Girls’ School Was
postponed owing to the condition
cl the pitch The match has
now been fixed for ‘Tuesday
May 1.

Moon (Last Quarter):
April 28
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 6.58 a.m.,
7.25 p.m,
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):
-22 in,
Total fer month to yester-
day: 5.15 ins.
Temperature (Max): &83.5° F
Temperature (Min): 73.0° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E.,
(3 p.m.) ELN
Wind Velocity:
hour
Barometer:
(3 p.m.)



12 miles per

(9 a.m.) 29,979,
29.905

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PAGE 1

r M.I i I>I H HVKIIvnns MUlKATE IHIK-II\ \ri.ii HAKBADOS ^& Ai>\t)c*rrE !.._.—1 IV.nv 1 I.) — T— 1 Br M d l_ arMMlow April 26. ••'SI MUSUUSMIOV .. was on, like de! een made irom transportation %¡ 0YCC1 I |1 0,00(1 "i %  Introducing the resolution, it tl of the Govrnm*nl tnd Ihey %  i matter ply to the n Officer in fl tot H %  %  oration to the natter, li wag noceenry to consider whether the amount of money expended was su gTMl as to make it posM iilr tor tl ifM which would accrue to Barbados to ixoutweighed by the huge expend The (lowrninenl had sent uown Ihe resolution to the House hut they were fully aware of the difluultic ol UN ritttftlion. Ii would be diseovertd on ;> rough calculation of the figure* that even if all the emigrant! worked for the lull duration of their 12-week contracts and each paid his third of the return fare, that ernment would sink g sum of between $160,000 and $250,000 in the venture. It was estimated that at least $192,001) would not I %  was the duty of the le wh< Iher the scheme would be undertaken. The House decided In an unbusinesslike way that Barbados could not afford to refute any off avan though it was costly and no! likely to aXCO I months' duration. The question which the House did not decide despite the sperehes of fcft n 1 Mr. Crawford was wheoei the expi ndHure was not a meirwxl of subsidising temporary emigration at the Kpeosc ol local d< /i lopment. It Is possible that because ol the short duration of the employiueni now ofl red then will be many who will discard 'hen presenl employmant, edS at and tl"-" return to Join thi unemployed. This ha before I who pointed "Ut in Bouse that Lh whole seheme wai DJtrely a palliative. It was Mr. Crawford who And it is that if the l ernrnertt knew that there was a ceri ....... -160,000 and 0,0001 th< intuit It would have been better to tnn on %  local Ich would be of benefH to the is!,. was spent on the i toSsJble, to provide emp I bOUt H.TOO people over a period ol month Kven after bl i n ipenl there would be aometl li to it which would bevflasting beneflt to the island and which would mal i l.ulher schemes tor local employment. The House would appear to regard emi. | litlcal Issue and neither of the two DM eemed prepared to %  M thai temporal} employment which would cost the island more than it earned, would lea I inemployment Yet there is no doubt thai that tact ought to have 'eon stressed an I Mr. Crawford deserves the thanks of the community for nng it. Barbadi esnlgraUoB:. It must have it. Hut the island will only suffer if what Stlon, but is really temporary employment, should cost the island approximately 1192,000 for three months' employment of some 4,000 men. I o mtimi Policies For MACARTHl'R IS DOWN A Lasting Peaee >: I I l>RGI LOAN 1 second objective should be The free world is fa-. i..l perhaps IU hiilanga to M %  % %  .. |ood | liquate supply V/f %  '' ,Ll %  to counteract uv u Ki€ ,.. lW Mlil „.„.,, nty is to e*in aggressive move* of communiMr. ..nnlries pnrtielpating in the coinlhat "^ >"-"-> '' hen abandonment mon defence against Soviet tmth,m We must also establish and ma.'n perialism, It in gratifying just and iMtlnj peace know that a start in the endt, u la imperative Ihatfr** on the average mr.cnhave shown have %  appeared lo be inexperienced market competition brelnstiUUconstant and re. ...k-blc improvciSSSdluU. behoove, businesamen to .S true. "* a relaJiv.lv v i nation and '<" lk ->' 1 "" 1 thU ^ riod ot rmer ^^ re to base <: *" ri; %  "-' ,, S" "• nch ** ,1 a "" $ m tnd lh Rni Jrelv U £ now maniie** an "" "' 1,,inc European capit. tl, B U, ,he U N,tion's"hSSre depend. What will we do then with the -tmodjd eartr how w,dely.and h.w .wisely "gSXafl-STSSS lee.2 -pSn. b ? Will we have to cut back and extreat dange nlrd. We mu t my reasons for %  trend to socialemphasis which ism place a on an systeRi. Vany .lislike think llv lh it carriaa out the responsibilities of leadership. The central point • '*" Sa aU1 ."" B^ ^SKT'lSi'TnS.jSS: ss v,; P ,uV menf I think that every bus) nt is man i the United States, and buaineasIree world i Mi,n an" T I. %  .-.. 1 Each member of the free world (tislingutith berhtefc • the few ami capitalism works for th inany. weak to the olher free nations, The trend ( Kuropesn eastl i'iiin i..been away from %  sense of responsibility to the community I am sure the morals of the people of Europe would rise If Uiey eeuld Identify European %  mil tlism with positive rather than a neall polk* ..cling alone w „, m ..„ counteract these or to iW hou i d look ahen.l to that futu attack. ot even the United ( al( a|)d lfl „ rtvl ovcr (he posslStates standing alone can be l)(m Qf f ormu i a Ung a programme powerful enough for self-defense. tha( wou |,( ans ,,t in furthering Acting together, the free nations economic growth and apply the hv run 1 standards imd proSa ) n s made to the common good duetive ichievcmenui will bring y mil WO uld enable un to minimize rboul the currently lacking unemployment and to utilize the balance of power. expanded resources In such a way nr;^ "g 6 but without sacrifice of treedom. the International Chamber of Communism has J^j^J !" &rM question that now Commerce, which will be held In PngBM %  • !" 2 e *"" ^J .houid be the ^gJ^SSnn y ^iS! ESStfSjnSSti eluding the American representapolicy imist k< i tives. will discuss such a proremoval Of tin ., Private U.S. If the free nations of the world 3broa( | a |jo lg a desirable way U do not succeed in avoiding econofoilify ^^ %  xanotnlei and raise mlc maladjustments if they rail n sinndards of living of foieigi t., establish an environment in hich communities can advance arises OgO, or immediate, international economic policy of the United Slates? Development <>( strength at a rapid pace lo offset the military power of IhS DatlOOS In the Soviet orbit should be, I should think, objective number one. Plans to do this arc now being carried out l>y the United States and olher free nations I am confident that rapid In mind that a coiiditmns countries. It hi a most effective which communities %  ""* %  "£• counter move to the condition! materially and spiritually -there poviy and oppreaalon. Is always the danger that the pool !" v lU L .£ T nV e*tmem abroad pic wilt be driven Into commun. .. Jhv American %  %  pic wilt be driven Into rnianu-nt of the non Soviet world I, m Only by our perfun.ia..v r a< _, lv „_ of t i, ^,11—wiihln %  short period con wc hope to eontain the ad '., "' reate SUBOrlorltj 1 of poliu.al. V an.e of the inteiiiationat com ... 'and military %  trsnsjQi mumst movement. r part. Such a state of conTake the example of the Chinoiner .nauon d.tions would make the Kremlin ese. The Chinese farmer who has "P* !" *"", top. look, und listen before emaccepted or even welcomed rombarkuiK on ether diversionary munlsm as a relief from UM mis n -iiovementa. The Weatr.ni cry. oppression, and rorruptii n oi to him. The cancellation of debts, which was made possible through '. liquidation of the w ill bo replaced 11 i.in II..' take bi At the m • tune, we >" the to hi Unite,! Slates must expand our HMtk enpiieil.v lo suth an %  l^il. Will IK' ivpifll. !" .• u KF i. !" -oner m boin Uxvs communism will soon bcteni ihal our own people and the people in ( ome a >okc |ha underdevvloped areas increasAn oconom ed standards, both material and j as it n g peace moial. that dictatonhtps of any | nr | u dc a drive kuid are In no positnm to provide, nonal mdes of production and and will suspend their st Therefore, il stanos lo reason distribution and to Increase for world domination. We Ihal the fn-e world musl move .hnrply the pro worh In this dirriimii forward to oxpend its productive ami maehlnai. and io ri*e ibove Ihe probltrns of rtcIUUes, its OCODOmk strength. A major utep in that direction the day and plan as business |bj KientlAc ItnowledfpJ, would be to demonstrate the statesmen. A Pri'-iiew Of The I Y siiviil LONDON. April 21. 1951. 3rd the Kmg will dedare it open, and the exhibits are crowding into the Dome of Discover) TM Dome is Ihe largspan m 'no world s publicity ofRoar told ma r %  iiildfng in the world I: By D T ROBERTS It does not seem as big as Si. Peter's. Probably Ihal is what encouraged the authorities to let too much get into ihe Dome 1 am afraid It gives U impression of overcrowding. The gallery runOtng mUnd half the Dmne >' dlvidol into two sect ions. Arriving at the top t-f the stairs the visitor Is fared with n signpost. T., the rlgllt he is directed "To Outer Space" and lo the left he i-.dirccted "To the Sky". Then is sllll much work to bo done. In th. Invonlli me he fcelvod many County were too big for his stdt ihova For instanci. a eollapt-ihle bus made of rubber. Then there as n man who wanted to sell him rainbows. He would put a raln]a-i icn days, on The Sky. But how anywhere even across the Outer Space is almost complete Thames And a metaphysical and Includes a glimpse of cosmic weather-man WTOW to the Fe.diradiatioo and •> short course in vni oniee lasl Dacerabai and said .. practical astronomy. At the far that for an nii-.nelu>ive chai*e arc h nd %  -* hx the wsatner laii •alkei ml of outer space, the viffUer ** would lix the weather tl.i,.,\ kll i, m ba will be pleased to nd a moving """imer. The Festival unforlun, au8h n |t sialrcaielhaj w,u take him down *2L22&* !" JBlZ!2V? a !" ^ button I rtalroass thin will taka him ci< to Ihe ground floor. In the centPI of the Dome of DISI ... i %  i a t.tem pole and only a tew yards away is a device for giving lh" visitor the chin Inuaresstori thai he Is exploring the Antarctic complete with %  penpaethn panorama of glaciers. At I preview of the shOW—admitte OBOBOS MALCOLM THOMSON ol AT " %  flamboyant and austere. DOUIJUS ... sy.trni! MacAnhur is a fiqunmore often manifest ^"V, ****< •* Utin than In A.„:lo.s.,xon cunt,,, „ frequent in South America tluin in North. Other men li\-* or behave— Mac Arthur gives the impression of performing before nvisible mirrorThere is a touch of Bonaparte about him. a sniff of Caesar. It is fourteen years since he lasl set fool n his own democratic country. Before that. he was brought up in a military home. His father. General Arthur MacArthur laid the foundations of the full-blooded MacArthur literary style He was educated at a military xhool, watched over by a doting mother, a igure who may explain much to the probing psychologist. Then came an endless series >f military camps Few men have ever lived so exclusively in i world dominated by the ideas of hierarchy ind obedience. But the watchwords of democracy are equality and dispute. It io wonder that MacArthur has seemed to •row steadily more remote from the habits f thought of many ordinary Americans and nost ordinary British. HE IS FEARLESS At the same time, and to some extent for he same reasons, he has come to gain an istonishing ascendency over the imaginalon of the Japanese, an Asiatic people with spects his political hand was a good one He found himself fighting a war which was for two reasons, peculiir and unsatisfactory. Nominally the conflict was an undertaking of the United Nations. One consequence was that the general had no clearly defined political direction. Another was that lie could not strike back at the foe in his remoter bases which were on technically neutral territory. Exactly the same situation had existed on a smaller scale in Greece, where it had prolonged the fight•ng for many months. MacArthur was expected by some of his masters to hold the o8th Parallel—a line drawn on the map but not on the ground, txisting as a political figment, not as a military reality. He was forbidden lo bomb the enemy's bases in Manchuria. Montgomery has said: "Political battles are the graveyard of generals' reputations." MacArthur protested loudly. He enlisted AUTOGRAPH SCRAPS & SNAP ALBUMS at Advocate Stationery ZAY.'SSSA:-sss.'.'. MILK WILL NOT BOIL OVER OK BIRN IF VOU USE OUR : SAFE BOIL Stand "SAEEBOIL" in pan before pouring in required quantity of liquid—use a medium flame and the inn inay safely be left. • E^~ Easy lo Use. Easy lo Clemi WILKINSON & IIAYNES Successors to C.S. I'll,, a,-: 4472 & 4SX7 PITCHER & CO. M wuulil ulso relieve the Amer burden of pro_ vldtng through his Govi-rnmenl staiucund grants ** nations. W l.ro.. I private U S t brings with American -know-how" and managerial skill and thus direct!' ci uirlbutes to lha welfare of the recipient nation Wo would I"' rlaW in risking; much on th faith that tea n o tnfc j improvement and develop.nem. widely shared and achieved i>\ money lender, ro-operative efforts, will make it i., oppiv-sivr i ir< PiVUlon wil] be dominated by the motives, and all the rest of the W >'f "nigh.£• -ill he rid ••IS-year-old Inter**". Th, deSl^ggf. &&£* with a sjnnft tismara hava not Msdcetad either horn strapped to it^ HOMto make SSdSh tUSt STBSSS. v2S fyafTff-.ffjiffliiS ,__~ ,__,_,.^ lln TK.. ITHI "Hii I"d with nil ihe lradition.il SSC for contribuUons to Uluaff Jfe S^A^Jf* 1 M le Brltiata M.,r tor ecnenbic £ J^ ^\, ^ if ^ j*. l *' extinguisher as required by the n "ili" lli.il „__ rn „, 1 i n ,i Hn Ogulauons Of the I^>ndon ril The highest achievement in thi corner is the "morale raiser". Thi* is tn eleetrlcal device to l>e worn under the lackol which, when required, will murmur comforting remarks such as "Well done, old chap; you're InutUns, |US4 B Uttis anxious In charge of humour is an exhibit ''lit people it needs." he said which will be on show, and to "Imagine It with 50.000 people. 12 which he refers as an "electrical days to go"-looking at his watch parody". II 15 Ihe smoke-grinding no. 1 mean 11 and a half days machine Smoke t| fed in one end, Does Mr. Harry need a moral* support in American public life and among nd. and comes out the other rauer. do you think? lights flush, bUHCrs So wc alk.d back to the nor( >rii and the machine mal world, ct of this fairyland pie who have w.rk.-d on it nay rrjckles'and purr;, quietly Some where men .:i trucks nre just it ha been a delight tor the angmt aehievemen'a In invention carrying the sand to the seaside isis. But 1 can testify that they „nd induslrv will also he on show A million UckftS have been sold have not run riot, and this pavilion here—rather than in the Dome of In a few days the Festival will which Is dvalsmed to ravtral someDiscovery. For Instance, ihe selfopen In the process lights flush. bUBCTl st attracllve pavilion. The peohu „ dlaU Ollt IIH \III.IIS SAY: %  leeates th* at UF. I. /—* To r I ill %  be pa that most i'f the members of the I areaj v IH: sonti %  ''iless. %  %  %  tl .1; %  to res -! IMIinr. ; hrlvelI ( i tllBU ing i %  %  %  %  %  %  far loo narrow to develop any progresi i" eonslructiva rootbap. but nuui les li' pla>-ei > i live seasons put tocausing than any olb* In the three tours to narbado.*. of which the lecretar) boasted, the Barbados team was published a day or two before thi actual mulch, and put on the Held withprevious coaching W Because ihe i sit back on Ihe proStl from these tours, they fed they v < %  accomplished tMpathing nonderful. %  1th a n \ y \ Carlton. who ,. a "' ground now have iru re than U* B A i',\ %  fuu Iced playing field and a pavilion. have more than the it A F A although Ihey started ui Cotlymore Ro*-k w iih i tannti i %  .did ii"'' have %  i nothing and the public willing to I iicid io see but ihe B.A.F A has Then whv can't in tell )-ou a ii. Bet.. 'een blessed with a shert-sighlcd, nenertew, unenterprising secre i,.iy. uho hold* ipeetings at the last possible monie:i* and i inasa %  hasty schexlule which .nines to light n few da the season commences -aonwtimca %  ftet b Beeauss the main body of the It.AFA. compnse. ol |MTSOIIS of lethargic and dfilnteiestod dllvositions. who make no effort to rurther lbs Intereeti %  >( football. c Her a use the Barbados I'IUket Association arrange the cricket %  sason when they wish and for as long us thS) i-h, while the subsi.i MI as the D A f A scramble up iru i ir,i! '. i-.K> and stage hurriedly ( matches called a football season. d. Because '< %  >i in the • PeoSUll 'bi-.inie U thargic abls during Hie last four or live \ears of aringmg a tour lo any of Ihe l Hie standard would Imp cause aU players would try to make the team. ilerg going to a** develop the rs trying ic or be tant be-1 Kut ii is more n.ge it ofW %  id Interesting he public (bt i e of phyyouths who Are these Inn. tnd on failin ilAKA Yoai to bon grounds? Football can make monej important (a i I-. source of haalthy entertainment ti> liecausc it offers : steal aclivit> to take part ar.d (c) because it offers a source of inlercoloniat fellowrbip among the i Football is doomed unless the vr.nnger ami more enterprising of the n \ FA gelber an i e HA FA. first eleellng a seeietary capable Of organising anil planning an •ft/active football campaign. The Pill ;n iv ins 'o pun. %  tain nucleus In Uv I \ KJ\ 0*1 them out! %  %  TAN AflksVican newspapers All this was disturbinji in America. Britain and elsewhere. Many people were reluctant even to contemplate-war with China, and willing to shut their eyes to war when China insisted on waging it. Many more believed that generuls should obey their orders and keep their protests for the seclusioi. of secret telegrams. REDS' TARGET The deplorable effect was that MacArthur. by his methods and his personality, drove many who are neither Communists nor fel! \v travellers into a temporary acquiescence in certain Communist purposes; for instance the desire to Rive lo the Communists in the Kar Eastern war as many strategic advantages as possible. MacArthur, railing in public against the limitations imposed on his stiau-gy became a useful bogy of the Ceimmumsts "MacArthur" was added to the propagandist jargon of the Cominform as a convenient portmanteau word to represent "American Imperialism" bent on the destruction of the emergent "free forces" of "the New Asia In net the United Slates Is bent on nothing of Ihe kind Ever since General Marshall wrote off I Chiang Kai-shek and his regime as a total loss, the United States have been willing lo let China evolve in her own way. MacArthur photographed kissing tho hand of Mme. Chiang, could be made to give life lo a very different legend. When Marshall became Secretary for Defence, it •In uid h.ive I ecu clear thai M.^cArinur's authority would either be limited or its days would be numlered "Only God or Ihe U S. Government." said MacArthur "can keep mo from fulfilling my mission." The Government have acted first. Yacht you cannot afford to take chances by using cheap materials. SoSPECIFY "INTERNATIONAL and be safe INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD. DA COSTA & CO., LTD.-Agenli. Enjoy Moim-iit* (.-._. Of f'hinunifith n,n,,h,fi.i X^/B \ ~.o-' • -'\V \ / JLl COCKTAILS I. • % ^fh/K'J0T -o-oo; SELECT THESE ::c o\ SOLD BRAID RUM (iOHDOXM (UN HURNETT'S (UN "CX'KTAIL SAUSAGES COCKTAIL BISCUITS /ITA WHEAT BISCUITS PATI DE FOIS GRAS MEAT PASTES FISH PASTES PRUNES CHEESE PLANTERS NUTS SALAMI J R BREAD TOOTH PICKS HORSE P*DISH %  %  i MODERN CLEiUllrSAlUn^:' SHINIO 3ILVO MIN CREAM OCEDAR POLISH NL'GOET l-OUSil iTARCIl—Biles STARCH—Pkgc %  i U.SA. 12-0/ COLDEN TREE BEER 10-.!/ FRESH vnoci DAILY PHOSK i.OIHHHIPS — \\i: IILUUK



PAGE 1

THUMDAY, \rnil M i HI BAKHAIMIs \llvu< Ml I'M.I 111, Shell Trainees For Curacao ana l<-fi Barbados aboul a Fortnight a i Idn upempVsymeni %  %  with u> C S M ISIulli Co., tanker fleet. Another man is duo 10 V %  (than will be lavil\| -hnrtly %  Hurt of Mr. Vornon Kniiihl ot Mmtl DtCotH Lltl Agents for Hie Oil Campari) in Curacao and the Delta Barbodol Evening In I itiia ii %  tha n„. Ihautuu, ml n ,n nan i., I "ii'tf %  ..It-i'lav imi'i „n rxTremufcbusy UM • %  •in (if Them During the period (hat Mr ."G imal leM* prior lo Savers u conducting the claai %  man. IW Hamilton laid that he nwi Their training courae rxlcndc.1 rititvclf practicallv no real and >'r over a period of one manthsaJM trfk-ved thai Ml Saver. Had made s of it 8 etlcal dcmonslraHe hopet that when the time i 'hen new4 -arm ly K.K.Ivrrnrvrs YI. o\iu I.OIIII lotiniiKiiiii Iron 7 ; %  other sufficiently'qualified person %  tuthml mfe OUU be available in order to > 4 p.m. daily with prevent Mi Savers having agam ift, to suffer the Intolerable pi ships wore in the harof wnra whirh this con mi i i| that he appreciated Ihc kindness of Ihc Harbou Una ihcS T |,urd Car, be r mere In be used as a laboratory and workshop (or the purpose of Ihc claw nnd the Laboui I rionw who eiranged th.it the men would pi included in Ihc Government scheme of Accident ln>urt n ihcy 3 am H was necessary and worki 111 enrh •!..> and till night row i /IA/\ Will Colonies Haw Dtreci Reprt'sohl sfiof! IN PRIVY COUNCIL? %  >N. April 25, novtl propoMJ 'real parttripain ihc Commonwealth Mr. D. W Sayers said thai pleasure to observ .hole hearted co-operation as the engine room crew of thi Combcrmere Rave by way „ %  i>( the firs. men tailed demonstration to the men -Xdvocatr lion "I i.' %  %  1 around mn when Da i %  "if b] takttifl a lot the company i that % %  • in* wh^^er'e 'D^m'i["Ir'anod ompany. but in a conThe four men leaving are GorSllllHi IH\\f\l\ I It -SIE^ ."',*""' ,)OV ,0n X£ dnn Snd,ford of Bank Hall. Ash. Bi PP"i " "" l P fh.'L' ha, J' Wa B n Oxley of Kensington New "J nt "!• % % %  *• vtcimty. Boad, George .Union, of R,chmond labourers for work ,n c.ap and" St Clair Gibbs of Ila. turacao. Land. Bevklcs Road. •qutntly, skilled an %  ) —_*__ -.icas. %  ';'well as r. including masons and carpentsi The Harrison Unai Af.-ont.m At Ui.same tune, young arrlv " holding the Cambridge f ron STUDF.NTS of tli-* Barbados Evening Institute (Techl taking a unai u-\ tt.T. Lord Combdrotere yesterday moriting under ike du.-oung arrived here yesterday wdh^rgo ^ vvvv ^ w 1 1 1 t^P-i'lin* *hilnbridjki mm Umnoo] rncknluig ii-a h 1Jln rel1 SW P S m Carlisle School Ccrtill.-atc were also iebaM n t. nJtSL. r,,,Jh .„?„ ,l ">' a,lri schooners m the l ai.-. nfor training ,n laboratory HR ^KS^l"'^ f* — %  attber 'oa P ; haXar^S e3 g h r ^f"* ean he said mat very Her agent! are Messrs. Da Costa na!th battened down. had be* n taken on (or ACo ltd i ... the ntonm but there Aftei mldda,. the .an. held had bean a Heady and limited x _, „ .. up and the waterfront waa bus, ii.imin on tar work '" The Court 01 Ordinary KIU Alm "" "erth HLes. Co. Pass Resolution For of do~ $440,000 To Assist In Emigration YESTFRDAY The Lriiisliilive Council met at 12 imon \eslrnln\ anil in a sevsion (hat ended at 1.15 p.m.. pa\scd u r*suliiitoii |gf ilusum of S1I0.IHH) t*. assist in the emipratiun of lahmirers in the U.S.A. The Council als<> concurred in a rasolution Axing the rate payable to produci'r and i.ite *f lax pa\ ihlc I Molasses Control ajul Mjikeinn; Board <>ri Fancy Molasses produced aurmu the crop jresu I960 ">l ..' not li th m %  %  %  nperio The working conditions of th.men in Curacao wore excellent 522? .iinl the 'inne retnuiks were applicable to the scale ot pay which was of a considerably higher Mandard than that in In addition, the men %  %  %  i .mn rate of exclti quanea lxx>sie> re handling the .lou'hlr the Colonud Bocrot .-,, that H W I Vt -#JtaV said that the Chief Liaison OflU H Uictcd each w>ck frtio to unload Washington, had they were hb Gov the A Ihe tton inn forward t gbij tier to the Times. Diathe idea of tho Council of Empireori the line.-. Council ol Europe ad recently by Capt (iammans. M P Mr WUIIaOi Aitken. Ccaiaervatlvej M.P.. wrltea; "Thr u.utivatcd Priv>Council Jiving its members from overseas the right to i i i m> d Houae ol Lot i Capture the Lnutftaatlon ori many colonia %  ban ,,i %  %  gained in the territorial %  '•'' "> i' adv..i > ,si ..-n.uiution: SUCh Mien > ill bf Bvailablt to uenellt from %  vperieaca In UM uppe rial ParliaI • tdblUb r UM iuii offlce at wcsrtninlstei nioh vouid em ich and lw '"' "ftUn .M, h uld hke lo a* itrateglcall) economM a|h aim Mi Aitken ."kv || t*ii,.,L th* altemaUva t„ UM tdtueUori U i ilura HI which the nnlnalaa •must suffer the painful l Bmptra nun ihe Vhonsrj i p) verty-strtckan K.-The IWailblllb m UM %  lUon in by t km ito devUM l ol I la loin in the due, %  ,.. %  %  % %  .nt,i iheh affairs" Ihiniiiiion Status Dominion status as uninniic ilciclop. th I >M DI largely i tei' "tit.i M t>>i %  %  political and isked whetb. I >vould 10,000 "Unemployed Are Registered 81 CCE8SW /. SCHEMA The scheme had been one Of Ing success and >fid found present, steady employ• i ihe past ten years for of Barbadians. From The posstbiUUi kei -. account In Barbados AiUunl aigfielinii are sweepini u|-plied in repayinett <.f th*' The Cot erval > %  Party'i I'la, from 2,000 to 4,00(1 Barbadians <• <">t ol his repatriation If he rel-.r the House of Lords la to mak> contracts "( employ me: : i lV .| %  .,,. efTecllrt b' for 10 to u weeks from early in twelve woi h a, ha would have ragiving it greater prestige June with a minimum rate ol | thai any, It W I $24 of The Ma. i JI *5 cents per hour, iiehadnskUw astlmatod cost of hlg repatrlaiK.sed m nesotlaUoni -nil th. cd for on Immediate reply. tlon from Jamaica to Barbi vemmenl Foui voan %  ni tB W i o thai %  heredltan pt nelpli *'•' %  • if U remained p i"riould H .. I.I. I I.. the .ippomtimited Btatsa for .tit ewe* be ,. %  %  ,,i ., -ni,. pean" represanl ul I eventually repay th-' whole Uva of tUOarenl Interaati In UM mount of B W I S7'J tlon I ",l h Itepuv IIK'MI l Imes i The fortnightl} de.iuctioi % %  LSCI iluarorkers ear n i ngs in UM i\ were isttmab I leresti In goitaln theea -i i 1 ^ I al preeeatai vas • %  |L| ;" %  % %  king, %  %  J5 2u leglriatlng In the I 'ii.ev tin M>( necessarily have to i> Coata HuiH Unocr the original scheme foi temporary work in the llnltad Stales, tne American Qovernrneni :ir had paid all costs of transports of the workers Since 11MB. Iiov OVER TEN THOUSAND people have restored with the cver lhe worWers ha(1 ha(l u , F.mployment Agency at Queens Park for emigration. They the seal of then passages from ; have all claimed that they ore unemployed. Barbados to the place of imph.Of this amount 6,164 are men. This number includes 412 '""'"L *"" Uengpoftadioa ex-servicemen, whom, the Labour Commissioner said "with J?j\^*,,, m T" !""' '"" E? !""" other things equa!. wi.I bo given presence." ^h^b^d^^UU. ^ KTSSCTV The number of unemployed Hon as to the rate of board men is increasing daily. Some, charges. names were In the dead ing ol the scheme. Da register because they did not Transportation i Co Lot, as agents for think It waworthwhile to renew The cost of the employer to the Oil Company in Curacao, bad 'In M registration, are now renewobtain Barbadian workers is now paid out almost $1,750,000 in ing with the hope of .getting to xactly the some as that to obtain %  its to the familiar. Of UM UW I S A when the emiJamaican workers. This is hemen recruited in Barbados. Apart grants are picked for Wisconsin, cause the Barbados Government from that, several men remitted U.S.A. is ngain proposing to advance the money direct lo their relatives bv ^in*e 1914. when emigration to cost of transputtation I' of bank drafts and that < hr CS A started, nearly 12.000 Harbados and Jamaica, or Its Qovemment, and hast Jonwlea to the place of en ment in America had baa v a need by the employer, cost of repatriation of the from ployi odTh* irkof wages Oovt r 'i 'i %  i bado %  • ."M, ass eis on tlie satisfactory ,< mpst* tlon of their contracts had born met, without reuarnu ibt „ u s $ or la employer tlrom the plate of ems out of a fi ploymenl to Jamaica) and by ln * "' u amount was quits appreciubl Within ihe last year or so, it in i thai the men holding Uia ti'i.'lilications and reuulre, %  company In Cut i %  longer be and as a consequence, ted to the rep P 1 M in Curaci the Government here very greatly .'.%  of Bod. ing employment for people and e willing to tram men as %  US A men have i %  ntrn -.. bar are to the M I been sent there under equivalent". Includol in this nutn-The Government proposes ^•me men who emigrated recover the amounts uvanesd tor USA. on more than one transportation to Jamaica, The largest group for equivalent, from the worke Its year was in 1945 when 4.384 deductions will be wen enttgrateo. The Laboi Department has handled as man as 6.000 Barb.idt.in the I'fcA • • %  Some'df the emigrants returned home ,md went.'to other places such as Curncao and Aruba OUMfl got work locally but there were still a large number out of i Government I from Jamaica to Barbados). In this way | had cost employers in the Unite I State, the game foi ihe trans}.....:. r, Jamaicans, Off To Wisconsin It apiwared that the nil wi uld n eeive li .' i:s | TJ.Oa pcen with the Utk I Lord" ' %  Bl Of Mu-u n;^., ,.„ % %  "' • -'li %  • mattei ol form onli ,w t i. i.i ,, repiesent-h* f Lord vould ..-.. %  hv Jhe KltiK l„ MI ( i'i .\ s Couni ii go thai thej wouli have the nthof nt H thus the I'i .. % r. II,, ,| \,,, Ul %  % %  asain ,.s a *," i '< advise the King on Imperial III H,l Of that amount U.S JSB from the workers wages". e*iuivalei.' of DM OOSt OtUm.minK M .._.. ..„. ..„.„„. „... .„ -The rate uf these trunsportaporimion t,, Jamaica > would nave st.tt, KepresentatlorHi were made job?.They registered again at lion deductions will be $14 (U.S. %  • "> e advanced by the Barbad* lo the labour Commissioner, the the Employment Agency in Currency) per fortnight (as in Government. In due course, thi lo , .. ti ., B e Wueonsui "" BtMrantee ( %  %  mlsrams In ers' passages from Jamaica to tne and It wa# estimated tha-. the . ( ,' " |l place of employment ,i the USA. nf IHIIIBTIISIIUII lime ill, elll i I 1 '" *' ,k M> will be advanced by the employer l h 3„ Z'|7|* ^ 1 " "' "•'' %  "'" ,; Properly and he will also recover the f, V rK ', w '' U \'Z %  ,,,' aid UuTfl en aunt advanced by AduelkW !" ,,!?LT! U -l l U J!i V.J!^ lafled a verj high p %  I %  pie i.. woik In the i b .. Road They all wanted the Hope waa repr. W li. H Mbs H. i i .II Hid th. PV tmiars g, ihe %  ,.-. U n ul Westburj ROM the iiite.iii.ii of Brldgetow] to ttopoed her car IU -• %  . i.t inn — jhauihty .if U.S. $72 or It Y> I %  > %  '• oi n.u ., ... pa gylUbus onl> a emigrated, in 1949 the repatriation/and other expstisse|a 12 4, ,„,„.„.,, 1(( ( ath ,, „„„ training or firemen and number had dropped lo 205 ami -.11 be embody... the workers %  rll) n fo|C r 4>000 workrr ^ -* %  > awi last year.U. 100. agreement with the Governor in „ w uw|| n „,„„,,, ,,„ Big Sum Seeded ,|H '" l "" ,-,,,. ftre men hid Mi-. K s. Burrewek, Labour Executive Committee and ihe !" ."i w %  '• .HBS*.JI^SJ. 2 '" V M """ ,lirectl " ^ been trained, live of whom bad al. Commissioner, told the Advorale Government propod that the '"""'V' 1 !" ,dl, l n -. ,hff .'".*< ' The sum which was needed was just the motor ear n her of i night," Mr. Burro Thisv uld rrsull i conUngani 400*1 shors *if B. not to retun by M. Week. men isly -t tor Curacao and it was votts/dsj that Ihe men wh ad that the other four be picked for emigration w would shortly be despatched. able-bodied unemployed with a good record. \/\ U CLASS 'Those who have prev visited the USA on cmigiaU.. id that it was grntifying to will again have a chance if they report that a new CUSS for the are now unemployed. The emitrainlng of six men to he trained grants will leave for Wisconsin 111 Boon be started on hv chart* red pJanei I submitted by the com"It U known lht some sjerb"r, who are at present ill worker shall contribute toward ill be the cost in proportion to the per ICK for which he remains in the USA. recruitment noo B W I $40,000 amount of $100,000 was As the real -f The mm which al i v.i\ big Him t,i add lo then expom i In on< %  %  i iBted $192,000 They wwn n04 ^aMiita ^ovetut / ( %  iiK"i Bouquet Fare Powder . •<• >fl>ti) . delicataly perfumed . clings softly fur huuie and hour*, giving %  that natural w.U look. %  act cowote FO> tl'AT NATURAL VIVID LOOK acMMSakvaiaiaaisiB •I'lUIXA" ? L A Y E N A see H. 1AS0N 10NES & CO., LTD.-D,.trib u *or.. owev ifcif.v 11'i##. AHI.I-::.. "NOXZEMA" Youi Paiouros sin t res fhii Medicated Skin (ream praventi s i Nl KN VHih*- tnd Hsah sfcui (mi.moos NOXZHMA" "i '" '"io\ >our Holidays, oi \, ;. •rhh* at I ot wot %  !.i Sunburn HcmcniK, Hs NOXZ1 M V I if, % %  me Unai taw n rhrea s > ' l ** %  aad * per l t>hii BOOKERS (Barbadosj DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. Hastings The actual agreement has not yet provided in the emigration voh m bsfputlsiuil the pany in C He was deeply appreciative of the co-operation and assistance given by the Government of Bar. bados through voting the necessary funds lor instruction of the classes, as well as lo the Labour Commissioner, the Hsrl ter, the Director of Education, Dr. and Mr D W Saver*. He hoped that UM (raining of nreeaaa ami t r i ason ould become a regular frahire given u.idrr ihr SUSplOSO f the lUrbj da. F.vrni i InsliUite whereb* mure men v. mild be ..hie lo lind asseUans MH *>I* tiii tin>iu-n tampan* but ilh employer* of labour asesvtakra. He yjul tlm the island of Bar' %  %  IOB owed a deep debt ol r.rall. lude to the Shell Company for inline found employment for %  *aeh a large number of men. both in their retinery and on their Linker fleet e Hamilton laid that as Principal of the Barbados Evening Institute proud to be in a small degree, associated with the valuable work which Mr". Knight had d> : % %  wee %  hy that class shouli not become a regular one He would, in n\i< \i. sworn ,'=ed Ml feeling of how much v M owed to the energy. ... levot who was, amot.g other things. %  :echnical studies for III'.J.-I I iii.-1-i.i ... unemployed and LI i a chance to so to the II.S A inn every effort Is made 'o ,1-ii't only the genuinely unemployed men.' Mr Burrowrs saM is a Ions one and the prellmln i>ecn drawn up. s .. UM oeglnning of this year a deducttot SM and half jier rent of the workers' earnings has been made in mmi accordance with the new fcjwiai „ Jainjlll( and /ron Security Act of the united States The deduction of five per rent. tta UM Blljh llOSi. Accident and Death Insurance of the WOrtMffl and for meeting the cost of fhe spent but omething amouni being rather i hud tin • paying the Annual Estimates for 1951-52 further mm of $440,000 was ?eded It wa proposed, possible, in reei i cost of ,IJ h %  tranBpnrtation both from Barb >lw || ol j M M | 1(1 „ m $t ,in! M smaaad has Osfstdal Baxeelar] t eiaoaMally the USA, continues to bo vago* at the rate Of U 9 114 Of *• ht.rUr period Ikaa th tnve already beei estimated 10 u> |l enolOI II i cost the HarHad*-v made." f*>rtnighl plus 2S*& of thi Any surplus from th.-.daduc„f earnings in ex<-e', of r S s50 Uooi arould > %  • returned to UM m n fortmph* %  ";"' ,, : %  i L v wt ha^^.n*>t vet '• Government of Barbados in reimit snoutd tie n eeivem* of work the men-wll! si luclloni would be med w, 'y .being assisted to act %  t hed the mule cart the m ,t swerved t.. the rLpt an nek the motoi %  •" Vv %  %  i houi I I i thai the, %  %  llgence %  • thing thai scan i lbs rlfhi I %  L the i leounti -i foi nt.ne ni the had aaee if his eUeri i. i |, iiied the n The Pa that th li iue t-i UM gefoi Bssdlgenca bj pulling tl %  whirh caused the ., %  to da h % %  % %  %  % %  < 1 thu. coming into COflUct wllln 111114,1111 \ IIKItl iM.ilII \ v in a unit In new mil ii ml la *.• beauty with ikiuu HILT0NE BLEACH ml TONI ra AND No I,Mill Ii I AS LIGHT Afl YOU LIKE yOUn as well THY IT %  111.TDM I.I i U'H is AAK.//IS ilttiU STORKS //AW.W-V/ .%',*,:; ,: r 's*'s.'.*S''.:'*'**.**'. t i'ss>*.'.'.'. 'nirnenl H, bow will corn an: lo do. that die work %  • % % % %  crops. • •>', (l'S i per hour li ".ige hut so fir he has not yet received mfeM The eswecfa 'radii to bis account here Mead Tax of M {US I %  I QQMJI has si paid bj eeerj worker on entering UM United States of America. V l .ii! tbi^ amount ami dsducti it from his epay the by this Oovernment. KepM>inenl If o wi I s fortnight, he v-" its of U S |14 U %  S22 4 U s $19 M .i %  expense to er. If hi were sen I he would onhj but Borba'i'.' arould It i H Hhj thai in U* I %  • on page n t • MESSRS. A. S. MYDEN** SONS (9A1BAOCS LTD., r.BOX 403, BWTXJBTOWN, LTARBADOa I'll). I There is a vrmbm every type Figure Wr have them in Ihr fi.llov. ir-ij Slyln . AIXO-GTm Orlton ill I'rarh anil Ul.ilr ...ul Nylmi in IVtirh only. Sires : :t^ to *!* VAKIATION Cnllon in White unrl I'enili Sues : 32 tu 111 STRAPLESS IIOI.Ii-TKaiT unrl M Mill NKTTi: 111 Siitin 111H l.nrc anil Satin and Nylnn. Sin. : :S2 to 38 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd, 10, II. 12 t I) Broad Street.



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%  AGE six BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. APRIL M. 1W1 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON For a radiant ihine rpilRIR good lootleD yon they're fust right. You know, too, when you look at the price lap, thai vou ran"t Ret liner value. Illustrated U a Tan Oxford "hoe for Boys and Youth*. Tied l" -\LT\ pair i the John White Guarantr,SUl M—the sign which |MM l just right 7 Look for it in leading stores in Barbados. made by JOHN WHITE means made just right USUALLY NOW Tins COCOMALT 133 Tins PLANTERS PEANUTS 96 The quality Metal Polinh TO-DAY S NEWS HASH STACK-A-B YE CHAIRS Th All Sl**l Arm Chair* til 50 Each at JOHNSONS STATIONERY AND HAHinVAKr MAKK YOUR PARTY A SUCC FSS IVtl* CockUil Ch#rrWi Onion, FVamil* Tin* Vn-niu Sntii.BrSot. OUvti Tir. TomaUH rirttW Tomaloe .line* MlMd Vt>|etablr< PlittappW PWhH !• % % %  J>11o. He. lie. Mr Tin. Curtartl J*oiWr COIIM Nwolr N*ttB. STUART & SAMPSON t; (1938) LTD. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW Tins GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 24 21 Pkgs MACARONI 35 31 Tins JACOB'S rill CRACKERS 171 MS 8tt Bots. GROTSCH BEER 24 IS D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street %*,;*.<.**•,**'.• %  ','*** %  '*'>"'*'*>'**';'*: ADVOCATE mi BEST HOOKS i\ TOWN JUST A FEW TO CHOOSE FROM . DEBBY-A Novel by Max Steele THE CONSUL AT SUNSET By Gerald Hanley MODERN COLONIZATION By Harrison Church, Ph. D. ADVOCATE STATIONERY %',;',',',',','*','*'*','>'''>'' '*''**'''*''''-''''''**'*''"-'''-*'*-*''-'-"'''*''*'*^^ ,S ask/o r^ LUXURY ILET SOAPS Ills and THICK OWNERS MXSPECTIOX TIME NEED XOT BE nOHIIYIXK TIME • turn rs FOHDUNLOP1LLO BUS SEATS LIONIDE LEATHERETTE CARPET MATERIAL RUBBER MATS REAR VIEW MIRRORS 6 Si 12 Volt BUZZERS ROOF LAMP BULBS 1 SOCKETS ELECTRIC WIRE t FLEX BATTERY CABLES ACCESSORY SWITCHES Flat GALVANISED SHEETS Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT for Interior GREY PAINT for Flooring SIGNAL RED for Body HEAT RESISTING BLACK WHITE LEAD ZINC MUFFLERS PIPES KING PIN SETS DECARBONIZING SETS BRAKE LINING SETS FRONT SPRINGS for Ford & Chevrolet FIRE EXTINGUISHERS AND LOTS OF OTHER ESSENTIALS ECKSTEIN Pay Mrrrl





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I'U.I TWO BARBADOS ADVOC \TE rill'RSDAV. APRIL 26. 1931 Cahib galling D R LEONARD IIUTSON.aov%  Dt Veterinary Officci HI Aiucua. after R shori vilt tu narbados i ,iiur |g ti n %  % %  Anli. ;bj n W I.A Bsrbjdos Holiday M R. AN!) VKS Wli.llAM I COTTRELL t,f Washington end their can arc U Barbados day, Mr*. Cot:.,rm*r Audrey Goodi %  Ilank I III 'oprr.cnt Engine** M R, ANIi VKS CHIUSTODYKB8 who bi %  M I hotkhi) in Barbados have left (or England via Mr. Dy] • n of D.OA.C. Retiring this Year M \Ht!Y V AIIHAHAM. | Hi. Tiansuorl %  intent, BrfUth ..lid Secretary of Ihe Dc\ .<. or? Commlttes retiring (rain %  1,1 October tinraw and i (mm May %  A .ham has many badoa and 1* a fre_ %  i %  thai %  I i ,tUM &U chm I, years ago ... ; U I %  clerk in brandi. Headline of the Week 1TTACK ON (iAITSKELL— Budget PrOfMWll tDi -Tnmdfl.l Cwral Doctor of Laws F REYA STARK, will uf Mr. Stewart Perownc. former Coi otary "i harbados is to % %  %  : Doctor of Laws at Ulasgow University thai Student Cricketera W INDIAH STUDENTS in Enjtand haw been .'il.'lgo Of %  Through the Colonial TU" criekat matches; Clare < oUeaje. Cambridge. B and agamai Oriel Coi.<— %  Oxford, on May 19. The ,: will be captained by NU.i. 1 iril MilU and ma> Erx Ian Teat %  .. % %  A .m %  .1 %  I., i week and • • luii:hed ju't in linnt" mi %  Ihe CaMbridgc game. 4 1114 IS llll.l\ Ma* Mid* .HI. roUR ynrago whan she wai 16. Manas Mm Mary Pattcaon. daugh tot of the Canadian l'.iuUc boa* in Laadaa, want to a circiu. Hear bar oat a young medical student. Richard Fox Luiton. Last December thy met again at a party Nut month th*y anil be married. Pox-L;)i ton u uo* a iBadlcal Officer In the K.vf LEB. Hutton Omitted T lfF. fourth Playfair Cricket Animal I|'!.,VI..I. hag once %  Q its I i cricketers of the year, and onci more four touring nun. %  %  was Hadiec. Donnelly, Butcllffc and Burn, uf New Zealand; tin. %  i. WMIICII. Wrekes Hainadhm and Valentine, >f the West in i; I 1T Hutton an nrld ball ^ II-.TI mimUi DM In I there is %  choice \-< r rent. Of cnvi,;> out I inll pai boui indlvldu 1 poti ntlal rurthei i %  i thai left handed .' lend lo scratch the ii the noae, and vice i '. .11 of 111 to ;. e/ftri v*r/dVJtei T HF ladlea' orehaatra hail just : i,|. i.ii I*. ,i d'Aiinour" i (locaiI.' 'loroosliled to bail 1 mOU I i tiirh P Itupuylren. who owlet with a !'i i -i to eommenl on an article %  gaJaarl bruna In the South Slatfordshlie Sentinel, and Mr. Style, nf Style and Fur •loned on the beat | %  v l.i Mr. Style lateral ventwould give li.p-.id.-cl appearance. "The holt;: vhuuld he ban| in the %  I %  gli Archer Uy." rapUed %  I hwil: for your ti*l T )DAY i reci Ivid n on %  umably fru Oazett tlorut, Diati U Gro ipa, and Ii.-) % %  la :, %  %  publish.' %  bly lie i •.MI bj the laige public k? the U I ol Hunting donahlre Cal I beel seller. It contains an alph.ilw'.i e eight hundred years old" "Try our mutton, sii." raid the wailer with %  mile. iuil-pivcv I N the leloviatng of n recorded talk en ferrets, should the •ckling > %  ( Ihe studio audience bl included? Junior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate invites nil children under 12 lo entct for Us Junior Short Story Competition. The best s'ory will bo publishec very Monde? n The Lvenlne Advocate, and the winner will rccelvi prize lo the value of 7/6 in cither books or stationery. The storlei ran be on any subject under Ihe sun but should nol be more than 3nf words in length, and must reach The Children'a Kdllor, The AdvecaU 'o Ltd.. City not later than Wedne*H:i" every week. NOTE : Stories must not he copied. Send this coupon with your story. JUNIOR SHOUT STORY COMPETITION Name :?. Age School Form Home Address One does not need the imaginI poet nor the deductive powers of a detective to understand Mi Judy Garland's feeling* as rero hour approached m. Monday evening. Listening from her dressingroom to the mounting applause of an excited audieimBog a jgn> gramme lhat was singularly clean and diverting, she must have felt s-. ,i Christen .,t Uie ancient Coli&eum hearing th,. roaring of the lions. Ten or 12 years ago she was ihe embodiment of what Amer,cans call "sizzling youth". Playing opposite Mr. Astalre or Mr Rooney on the hlms her vitality fajrly burst the seam; of the celluloid which tried to imprison her personality. Then she faded from view and there were rumours of unhappineas. sickness and tragedy. Like Dr. Miracle In the Talos of Hoffmann a psychiatrist came into her life, but with somewhat happier iBBuHa, Finally a psychologist named Val Parnell offered her %  contract lo appear at the Paula•Hum although It was years sine.' she had appeared before a llv%  'udlence. The Welcoming Roar From the time of her arrival at Southampton the candid camera men told the story of Ihe weight which had been added unto her From the pictures in the newspapers there was little to Identttj OUT visitor with the earlier sirzler From all of which we can understand the nervous tension of Monday night. There have been times at the Palladium when the Dementia Americana Micj-ophonla has reached such m pitch of hysteria that one could pnly groan and feel ashamed for one's countryme:, and even more for one's countrywomen. But there, was no dementia In the tremendous roar of saalooBW ihu' greeted Miss Garland as she walked on to the stag?. The warmth of that welcome was genuine, kind and underMandmg—greater and deeper than ever would have been given lo her when she was the madcap princess of the movie* And genuineness was met by genuine* ness. This sturdy young woman bowed and smiled as the cheering went on, but there were no tears, no trembling of the lips or wobbling of the chin. Carefree, Buoyant She was a trouper who had .me to give a performance. Thai as what mattered t^ hei. Curiously enough there was .thine absurd about this Brunnhilde singing old favourites from the (Urns. She possesses a real re, a voice which even ha* beauty in its softer moment*, and her face Is expressive because die plays no tricks. In Limchouse Blues she taJtei i very slow tempo and makes of t a brooding tragic tale instead of in id. i chug-chug rhythm number in her Faster Parade she is carefree and buoyant that wc t the itailtr again before our eyes, and we could nlmosl picture the bonnet which had played such havoc with the young impress ion a bles. Vibrant Sincerity The truth |g thai Miss Garlan now belter than her material ThU quality of vibrant sincerity opens up possibilities which probibly she. herself, has failed lo realise. She can command pailm without being maudlin Bha i above ihe wailing nonsense of Ihe %  rooner who could not sleep a wink last night and all that sort >l drivel. In fact she is an artisi 'Nevertheless, she flopped at the Palladium—but let n.e hasten lo add that this is no flgure of pecch. Retreating backwards for tie ilrsl time from the barrage of ipplause. she tripped and sat lown on the stage with a bump Her astonishment was greater than her confusion, and she made no pretence lhat it was intended. We saw a brave woman on Monday, but more than that we saw a woman who hns emerged from the shadows and lino's that the public like her as she is, even more than for what she was. \Ot Y I 11 " Mks Rup*M Sffl 'hi ihrf palt Ait (ogfthff %  fass, No. We Ret • b*!irr iil*j rhn iiuaiiAg haifi m this wsaihtr." asyi Alty. "Look it iht like down iStre. It' (ro:en ill ovrr. %  ?pp 'a ''*pi u-ad* if n. Ut'i ukc our ilrdgrt I ;it and then we may be able to make a tlide on the ice." "Thai'a '^PP'ifl" iei Rupert. ** I do •ope ihe > *,,!! be :rong snough In a few minuiei they -J£ iv, pu,hcd off t for .lown th. *y %  • %  > TODAY 1.1.1 and 8.30 p.m. (Ijist Shows) LEON ERROL in "GALS INCORPORATED" CiiAHl.ES BUYER — IRENE DUNNE "WHEN TO-MOKROW COME?" OPENING TO-MORROW S and 8.30 LOCAL TALENT TOO JOAN LICORISII "Trnimae Waltz" . Hit I M i AS POWERFULLY REAL AND EMOTION. CRAMMED AS LIFE ITSELF .... IT'S A MOVIEGOING EXPERIENCE YOU'LL NEVER FORGET' IDA lUPINO SAILY FORREST • REEFE BRASSELLE • LEO PENN —,^. ELMER CLIFION < UUNNWnitll FLASH! in: i in. i\i: XK n 'si 1ST I'ICTCKES OF THK 1 IFF STORY Of THE "HFJiO OF UATAAN'"! iENERAl DOUGLAS MACARTIIIR Openiaa. I'ridsy May 4lh jnd ('.iimnu.ni Ually. :-%  -tilMii: oi DOIIC PlAZA-nowN ! % % %  %  NIGHTDRESSES $3.91, S4.16. $4.10 & $4.95 | LADIES VESTS $1.47 & S1.69 | COTTON VESTS $1.09, S1.31 & $1.55 | CHILD'S COTTON VESTS 82c 65c, 70c, 79c. 8. 85c. PANTIES 99?. $1.03. $1.07. $1.13. $1.14. $1.16. $1.32. $1.53 CHILD'S PANTIES 50c. 59c. 68c, 71c. 77c, 97c. EVMS M wnnTimis T^r' J' r r^ I it *] r n-,4l L ^T _] -T 9 pm PH ftj a —i J—i M 1 7b II i FI.-U-I 1J. Ill Ii -KIII.* Unceri i ituroi i' in* i No due*. 171 Hot It. HI %  jgag DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 I I nugni lame to Ruoolpn. i5i I a. lhu min na\l aooi Quids i. I4| lj Trade i i. Vehibte. (i 93 Jussierv. M. Usually a potter* product. (3) ii H* ehansea colour. (4) .'ij He may carry tbs addllloDa: eiauae, is) al. Take rour cnolca. (31 Down I. except ihi ciue la glien. how can we write ihe answer T (6) l. Spin ihe atom. {> J inientlou 131 \ Funny, but u d.-re cni.f Ufa trv ( %  ->. Btrrjr. iil B Riaett out oi ihla. ib\ i So 1:<* a %  uae atitiptr. tl M All aquara ill in To he atarvd at In thla way tt not triendiy, |7| it Such rrifnurU partly your i cern. |6| 18, rerred. .iand lake a meaaage. (Jl 20 Foreign coin, <4I il What* tne rleM word for s iroup of qualia r (| ti Fuily-flva mlnutea. i3) .-^ jSHa .%  BJM -,, • i .II, .urwi i m r <: ': %  %  an unio JI Kucui. irj Teo: z.v lrnltt %  !•* % %  I titeulil*; p M.nu.4. hn; 14. R.ri; It. Twi,; IVOR HADMON "Monu Lisa" JOAN BENTHAM -IF" IliEDDIE SMALL "" "Yi.u Can Do No Wronif" PHYLLIS COLLYMORE "Silver Dollar" BRUCE MANN "IF" GUEST STARS JOE (Bop) CLARK GERALD DAISLEY Pil 20; House 3: Balcony 18; Boxc-i 60 Tickets o.i Sole Daily (.1 nlil MI'S III ill AT LAST! The Stor>' ol the Kid who wanted to sit on a Queen's Throne! ST.MITl.Wi AT EMPIRE THEATRE TOMOimmV al Jt.lO p.m. ?% %  &£*<* ROirj : >^M* oiler I '-.'I I IIYIIIIXt. FOR YIH It ItOIH Al Prices that cannot be repeated GALVANIZE SHEETS—6ft.. 7ft., 8ft. 9fl. 18 ft. ALUMINUM SHEETS — 6ft.. 7ft.. 8ft.. Sft., I0ft„ 11(1.. 12(1. IVIHITE SHEETS—6ft.. 7ft.. 8ft.. ft., 10ft. ALUMINUM GUTTERING RED CEDAR SHINGLES 1:1 !'.I I: MINERAL SURFACED ROOFING 3ft. Wide It II fi Xatr! Itii II Xtm!



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ESTABLISHED 1895 JRSDAY. APr'U. ALLIES HURL BACK RED TROOPS Communists keep up steady pressure on U.N. forces FORM NEW LINE ON WESTERN FRONT TOKYO, April 25. UNITED NATIONS tank and infantry columns lashed out northwest of Chunchon on the central front today to hurl back two Chinese divisions which were halted on the fourth day of the Commu nist spring offensive. Blanket fire from masses of artillery and umbrella rocket firing jets supported the Allied drive which jumped off north of Kapyong this morning. Inf.mtry. ipl whM d id oy U Vein-son Denies Bevun's Charges n.cvrd north through %  %  %  %  against wave after Chinese u oul ttW picviou: Mi I An Allied ..I'llKiv barr.iRcl killed hundreds of C> linn" before hoi U oft iii< ittaekai On ihe western fr"> Nations troops formed :i new solid line in tight blocking posl tlons rr:idy t,, siem .1 posslbt second thrust of the new offensive Thev had withdrawn to the* dcim... position* ifln baattni . wU American heavy Chinese nixhl ;.;:. ,.,,. ., f„u tccounl of In tin ,. r N ',„th Atlantic Allied force* brofea oil o.nt.i-t -j,,..,,, powvn f"i rlH material*, with Communists ulong the .( II .-niial foi then Parallel and withdrew to ;mrt ncir re lines north of the vital Seoul; imumC nt programme* He said Chunchon lateral road lothf all It WASHINGTON. April 25. 1 ..I S:.ite ladaj raffljprifali l,v rejected the accusation by UntisK That '-he United 1 ling up" iuM( of %  teak raw %  No major engagement*, wei, ifported from this -ector. though three Chinee* s were lielieved to be facing ihc Untie Nations line. Reuter CCUld l" ensure increased produi lion ind equitable use of existing No fc Comii.< k nf TOKYO. April :' %  Lieut. Gen MulUi.w Ridgway, the new United N Commander has "no connnc.ii" t-> make on statement-, thai ho supported General Ml Arl *dre to bring the Chir:. i into the fight aRalni Communist Chins His pen referring to Washington rep that Mac Arthur's politic Ma)r General CotiMni claimed that GeneraF*' : others stiuix-' %  I I Ii • torn* Supreme Cetnman Icr'i policy i this point —Renter Juin Staying On PARIS. Ai General Alphons;i Join Hi" resident General is alw commander-in-O Allied Army Force* if i%  said todev "1 am f" %  Morocco to complete : worl that 1 started." The Fmith National Assembly I Commltu. in General JuuVl policy w Moroc r< — Reuter. FRENCH MOP UP SAIGON April ?5 French Union ground I -lay continued I ping lip npei P Nationalist gueirilias ror the sixth successive In the Vietminh Tongking delta. that mire rebels Md C Ipt I French Army communique 'lin •rjtav.—Itruler Approve Budget WASHINGTON. Apr.l .' The Appropriations Comiiiif.ee %  '. ;he House of Represent.itive* today approved a $64.68*2,000,000 emergency Defence budget. The amount recommended for House consideration starting tomorrow, is for emergency puvpos"s raised by the in* cased coal of >h, Korea War Moat of it will he spent during May and June The emergency budget |i to supplement S8.000.000.000 already voted tt> the military by Congress for the fiscal year ending June M A large part of the new Defence money is needed to meet the higher cost of equipment and ;upplles since the Korea war ftarted. Army officials said that fo' fi.stance the improved General Patton tank which cml tlBS.OW bcfoie the Korean war. CO^U J240.rof -Reuter L.N. Command Confident TOKYO. April 25 The Chinese spring offensive seemed to have spent the powi of !' %  > Brat onslaught which in same sectors had pushed the Allied hues back as much as 25 mil* in three days. U N. Staff Ofluers did not belittlo the dangers of the situa li 'ii, ai the Chinese arr baiieveu to have possibly half a million troop ready to be thrown the battle to follow up the initial thrust But the United Nations Com %  -ned to leel ronfUiei '. that Its international armies coul.l famll. all further .-tluck>Bj well i-s the first one Military observers polntad oul that Ihe Chinee w f.r have showed no abihiv to maieh AJIh i I rcpower and armour. The ant in palwl Chinese counter offensive In the air is so fur COBflMd to sporadic appearance %  • of lighter oircrafl alone or in very BDMll troups —Reuter. HOW TO I Ahl UIIIKA THE AHBU8AUOR 01VB8 A TXW LESSONS At a party bald at Uie Soviet Emb'-j in Leufoi to ctlsbrate tba founding of thRd Array 33 year* Ago. Adgai.al ^l the British Fleet. Lotd Fraoei learned oue ueful trick frail V UUB. how IB toss down a glas, or vodka, with Ike bead m.k, In on* swaUow. Karpresi bead Mck, la BRITAIN WILL GE1 SULPHUR FROM U.S. WASHINGTON. April 25. THE Us r< iniM'.rce DnMftmiil announced tonight tlia' the quota of sulphur for all fni'iullv countries for the quarters of 1951 v ed at 250,000 ions. Britain's allocation was flS.WX) ton Tin* Commerce Dcparlmcnl n nouncement said thai second quarters "was essential to meet Ihc bare minimum or needs" of Britain and oflttt friendly countri"*;. %  Dvpinti Morrison Pledges Faith In \inrrica An steers Rebel A ran men Is (By R. B MACLURE) LONDON. April 25. J.'OREIGN SECRETARY Herbert Morrison answered the arguments of Government rebels today by declaring his faith that the United States would not let Britain down over the supply of scarce raw materials. U.S. Plan 9.-> Win* Air Force By 195T %  300 On Strike VIENNA, April 25 300 enKinecring workers came out on t".kc over .sal i,f one of their workthe Soviet management eed to return to work i hundred and eighty-live nan employed at Teudioft Vamag Eigineering Wurks stunk ne.irl> twi wtafci ago when Soviet Kommandutura diimisned the Socialixt President of the Works Council. Leopold Matzlnger for dlnrlbutin.-: UM SacJalial paper F'iea Harl. Reuter. WASHINGTON. April 25 The rapidly ckpmidnig United Stiite5 air folt* pliinn lo have 6" eombai wlnft in oparaUofi \a June 30. and i u reach Ita fnl of u the autumn nl HW2 Thi. .;,s dlMloaod loo) House ApprupriatuMis (' %  Oonaral s Vandaabai Foi.es Chief of Staff said In that the itn I increased its total miliUry atrengih from 58 wings and .160.000 men la>t Deceinliei to 81 riHs and 700.00C men on win ii the rot %  bed itfull 05 wing itrenith. it '.mild number athnit l (IIIH> The term %  win**' (aaxuacneb BaXlbto. I! i %  •.t'lf-rontaiue*) niH>rnting unit which" may be BdO u\> i| ichitjvclv (,.• heavy Ixunljer* oi fighters. —ReutPt MR HAROLD WILSON. Who cenUy revignad from the Cabinet. wearing a %  •monkey nut 1 unit. Inventor*, of toe net, fibre. I.C.I (Irrp'Ti'l Chemical Indus I van *ut*d by n f.P. to be runklnK by the ena of 1051 an estimated 8m. Ibi. of Use fibre, mfflciant if railed im nulta. Invitation For Pas NEW YORK, April 25 The President of Ihe ruMtican News]>aper Publishers Asflociaiion todiiy propoaed inviting Ur Alben O'Gaima Pai. former editor of Argentina's suppressed newspapei La Prenaa to come !o the Ufllttd tnu iiu.e. Hume...,_„ p_,.|-, wool w fa 1" m mm 40 THROWN OUT Spanish Strikers Return To Work MADRID. April 25 The three days' cost of living strike ended in the Bilbao UH this, morning and the majority of workers returned without incident. But in San Sebastir.ii a considerable number of workers remained on strike, though many factories were running normally. It waa believed thai strikers %  • %  demanding the release of .'Ho had been arrested i San Sebastian a nd ti i Oil Strike End* ABADAN. A The strike at the ARefinery the world's lnr taday. 12 ttayi altti II A. E C Manager of the Anglo Iranian O.l Company announo .iver '. He aaM lhat -'4.000 wprkman raported for duly today Allowing for leave nnd sickness otilv H00 of Ihe 28.000 workmen remained unaeeounted for —iteuler. A Warning HONC.KOV %  | boats not to i %  %  Keuto-r TRIESTE, April 25 Police threw out some 40 Fascist: A ho sturted a brawl In a theatn here to-day during the Fifth Anniversary celebrations of th illieratlon of Italy —Reulrr Frank Optimism MONTEVIDEO. April 25. Meat negotiations which began yesterday continued today in au atmosphere of frank optimism This afternoon British 'xpt.i led by Sir Albert Fcavervrar conferred with Uruguayan counte.parts headed bv Stock-breeding Mlnistei Luis Brause—Reuter Speaking t the Aniem.i Caambar ol Commarca luncheoi wvraled the real between Bo a n*i aioirpolrd a that of the Oov< he said, had I herself to globed rtraieg> "W think r.n too well of the Amen can fn-eslirhi to sUpf would .illow iiv whole poUcj le defeated and dttntpaad I eeonomle leeesslon BD AJttaa Bui I m nded b) Londo . ntastvaa "t Amati in i>i bw ness and industry he pet own it than uuiu iiiin TI Britain, i MI ivo "<"iiii not i ika bear the -nan. aftagt The Faratgn Boaratai traltM to the lunebai from .i hard hltUna %  the l-aboui Purl i IHHIV. I National Exeniiivc Commltt< Than Aneurln 1 Ho put hll anli >bu BfBln Unt the ;>nnI I.I ui.iU'i i.tlIn it. He v\. .ii disrupt BrlUgi m j rount eota Uarai er -jfl Parq loa After haarlna ihe Mlruater, the EaecuUvi i %  West India* 2.300, A ust mi 2.800. Boffluni || no Fran i lOJtOj I S.000. Nether hinds 125. Sweden 1.400. Switzerland 4,000. Ausi tin 21 Bahrei French North Afrle.i 2.700. In %  Q i raal 7r.o. Somh Afric.14.500 Honrhiraa, Finland and Ptartugal received no B w aa t lBn —Renter B i i t'astle Mass Kilting* Yugoslavia Wunt^ $180,000,000 WASHINGTON, April zfi Yuiioslavin has form the United States foi addition, •"special aid" to help moal nticipated deficior tlSO.uoo.ooo i the next two years. State Ileportment offlcials %  ,i, today that the United States w. "sympathetically considering the request, though Marshal Tlto'l Government has had llMi.ooo.000 In United States loans and grants In the past 18 i: Renter Hungary Working On Cosmic Kays BUDAPEST. Api .1 U i. i % %  • ntM % % %  • worl Ing on cosmic rays, and nueleai physics. %  par art da run disclosed today. The Central Instituto 01 Physics, which is under construction %  n Budapest, is to bv corn|ttatad by 1955 under I 5-yea r plan. It *ay. One pail of th i i Iready in use.—Reuter HONfJKONCi. April 2V An Englishman who has Just arrived from China told Reuter thai Ihouaandi of Chinese were being sentenced to death at public '' minrlatlon meetings throughout 1 He said he believed Communi-:had eaecuted about one million I In the last six months, —Reuter AlltOLO. Apnl U St .1; V .. tbday in nviilmuhem last night New oi iha the mountain ol a quaiT) awrfcl I cine in BJ railwayman workei to clear tin Si OoUiard Una Ii Bab when.HI avalaneha daralli I i i % %  • %  • r ind two com I %  Milan Kurt i> %  xpraaa. A dinini cm cook wns kllle i othera ol Ihe Ii Injured, three ol Ihem and two passengers slightly In. Jurad Rrnlrr Defence Pael Is Good Step LONDON, April M loa l the proposed % %  %  %  fnite.l Btataa, AuatralU and New I rial and a "goe-i Ai I %  irj of Stati Km ; neth Voun Hi rai %  i %  iha Housa i Deputy Cona I I %  Uld con. firm that thru, could nql I-.i" %  nd MiI.IV.I .i untrhM greed %  %  Id Reulrr. Egypl Doea \t*i PrixiiHtEnough Oil I i. Nit %  H i i lhat ha wax oppoa> r tv .oi %  oil t<> m"i h*a said III in II with Br A Itrnirr GOVT. PRIORITY % %  Pha i during jn %  Id i .i hall i f 1 Kent) I HI MII GOVT. >T/f Wl/.s PARIS, A .11 2S 1 the Pranch Qot %  %  i %  .. —Reuler 103 DEAD IN FIRF. (ioM Seized MONO KONG. April ZA Pollca searching Ihe British ship filenanlne (8.986 tons) foi Several days past for drugs, havi sei/..,( gold worth KI:I.I"MI aome on passengers and stain hidden. Today they found £ 38.00' %  riaft The police disclosed lhat they found I.1I00QO Hong KOIIK dollai Chlneae passenger: on the ship Blnct last January ol.i wortl |over S8.00d.000 has lx*n M on ships leaving here RoatM Chopra Kills 2T:> %  AU t'TTA. A W1 | |S Th' chOh %  i %  i. wl i broka out month, i 275 lives in II 2.500.000 pi ( ( ple. oOlcial soun said lodaj Another 800 ca KdmlHad lo the hospu.i —Reulrr Ur U.S. i .:^.|.;illi. wAsnmoTON, ADI ted States raauall Korea rme by NS Ii 81,1 M annouooad t or Night bourlng province because they were involved in the organisation of the strike or had been distributing clandestine leaflets. Alsc some workers who struck only were determined h [till 48-hour j '' I 'lories had. There were indications lhat th to work in San SabasI < intensify later in the day lice broke up a demonstration by women UMt night In Tolosa, near San Sebastian. Women mding the relea.r '•' men arrested H I liHlications yesterday were that nOO of the 5O.000 factory workers in the San SebI I par cent %  % % %  were r^r. %  irike — Reuler RusBian Holidu\ MOSCOW. April 25. Admiral Alan G. Kirk, United State Ambassador in Moscow. left Moscow today for ten du>"' holiday in Soviet Georgia wltn Mrs. Kirk and f"r RHM hit Embassy siafT Reuter New China i leg -Reuler. %  P^lain Sits Up ll.K i>'YRf. A Philippe Petaln, who *•• M yesterday, was at his request, lifted from bed today and sat for .i while in an armchair Tonight's official bulletin Mid hfht gi %  ditto KOI PAX/31 \\ TO VSGOTiATK KIT/I PKKIM, OOVT. HONC, KON'i Apnl | Ahmed All, a representative of the Pakistan niiiliniiiOII|_ has arrived m Peking to cOnduet negotiattcms to estabhh dlpton di relations wit. the Chines* Com munis: Government eecordtng to Clrmai, near here as a j* Consulate St'izrd FItENCIl PYRENEES. April 25 %  odred demonstrators led by local Communist tod;.', in. %  paBUh Viee-mnsulaic ( t •ympaihy foi Iha Baaqua stiiaari feaatai 750,000 CASUALTIES WASHINGTON April 25 a wal stated b eral J Lawton Collins, Unlu States Army Chlaf of staff, told Congressional Commit*. 1 .in u. laltlet in K-o • rso.ooo — Rruler -Knife lit I'liiHa. k WASHINGTON A| The United Stall Slate Dean Ache.on said to>l.iv Ull %  . wa iclosed a VISM lo antsi th< Inirl ChtvalhK ild net breah oil theComi having tho kmU, in his Pack" Renter U.S. Has Aid Pact With Chiang Kai Shek K. W. V. SWEET VERMOUTH DRY VERMOUTH WASHINGTON. April 25. United States Secretary of Stale Denn Acheson today announced urtlcles services or informalio: athitk" furnished by the Unib -aid he did Government. wHy Uie exchange of notes ha By the third condition the been keg! secret i Chinese Nationalist Governmeni now being released Reuter. Wines have excellent qualities H in*i for use with Gin for i i CockUillfl Thai} made from pure white willH With ill. %  on ol extracts' *>i health' herbs. K. W. V. WEMMF.RSHOEK —A Sweel T.blt Win., lo served slightly ctiilled nil u. IIIK aXBRDWG l'\Ril TIES. §


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PAGK IK.ill ADVOCATE THI'KSIIW. XI'Bll. It. 1931 AUSTRALIANS ANXIOUS TO SEE W.I. CRICKETERS CoUegf \\ in loot bit/I Game Iram Empire 1—2 CollrK< Ion foolhull lil H day. The tut i nine to end with Collci Then opponent* ilf. J A n v. Mile ( H I Mi. AlbOil William*. Hnrper II Empire. College*! goalie cd the M his mnnj nv He i counlcrpart Clarke. The GUM With ihe Blues dcfi i ith Roiil Empire 1 but immedmtel> Clleiie v. „ on ihe -ma. hard to open iheir tearing. Ten minute* later they *ol their first urc**s when O W. Smith U %  tilre fui ward |iot the 1 •he lefi luke In netting n left foot *hot. <\ Liege .ir Coals in the le.l A pi awarded them fl his hanilt lo ;i powi Tudor m ihe pi I right wing .! A W I ihe paatto and tcorad to b> goalie's rmht. The tcore was t en 2—0. Mr Alberl Williams nolrhet the third goal lor College with a lieautifi'l long distance pletcly beating the goalie. Empire, who were kept mosllv on the defensive. DOW I over for u short while resulted them %  go.tl Harpei their centra forward, K\ past m> College's backs and un their goalie with ,1 rail 1 The score was 3—I. Shortly before half | lege took the score lo 4 I at* this was still the score at the interval. J A. wnUaa being intercepted in the pan all Series Billed \s— "World Championship" The 9 %  much %  j Australian loot In farina 4VgRI iinfi.inwith thaii players. 0 batanian, %  %  %  worrall. .'. in Rimiflhin and VRI Lyall Rowa, lieiili-r 1 enl f r-.ni \l< I %  11 pti< n %  %  %  : I a Its p No Brt dmin .n ertckM 1 %  rani show. ing of its Test learn in the recent iv d Test scries against England has caused some critics here uprarnacy %  u ami the m • %  I ..is had to play %  without Br adman. untry. with the %  %  -led Australia^ the UUe plona, unlil the If.C.C -. lan were far from Invtncfbal It la quite obvious lhal haul" of candidate?, Ii r.< I fore NM !' %  meet iba ranownad Waal Indian:. • summer. Tin being hilled here aj championship of the world." Australia retained the ashes i inland, hut .1 mrvai oi matches shows hoe tine of the biggest up*"'* neket history mold I cut rao. England was blighted with bad luck. After losing the tos. In 111 OI'IMIMMS K MILLER Gtfdner Will Not Flghl (hi Mbaj 22 J?tu I?., < %  ; %  .::: \ • *>*** shot with in left foot to the rlsjh' of a motionless goalie. Second Half The pame was nlmost umvenl fui trier rasumpUon Tim tun. College was dawn in the Knipn. nren and then Empire would laki over, but some I fore the score 'hanged. However, %  few mil uti the end of Ihe game. Empire go; in another goal. Brewster, playing at inside left for Empire, anally not pa i u of the ball altar (1 melee in th. College goal area and scored into an empty goal. Al close or piny ihe score was 4—1 In College. The teams were :-— College: Itoach LONDON. April 2.'. Jsrk Oaranar, iinmh and velahi champion %  %  1 Bi 1 \ weight, si H ant, the Lnndri' 1:1st Test tt Brisbane, it bimdlei! Ha the Australians out for 221 only. waiting t&J longer to make UJI io encounter n Brisbane "sticky I ta-dner*! Injured dog." easily the worst lintllriy piti n left thumb hag BO! come aJonG in Ihe world. Even men th-.. Id hoped, and it is n> I pearl] pullea lha game out of the I ready for May 2?.. )irr "In 1 ho circumstance*. John md 1. I %  Ad in mi important fight until %  roughly fit." thumb m %  'I hurl it again when Mexican Swimmer Visiting Barbados 1/. i\ HKOW \ M ST //>> 11 /• m \L % % % %  N. April 28. Ulackpool's ms.de the FA. -lie on Octavo OlKU.n Rod-iKO twenty-sii-ycr-old ItoUcn V'uT^ TftESjR on h's way homo after attending llicPan-Amcricin .... ..„.. , Mtk oicipici in Argentina is in Barbados. He is an Lntrmnsll L.mlnu yesterMnfei on the Rio Jur.mmto. an Argentine ship at present Jay to limprt M.Bhily .„d com,n Carlisle Hay (uaavo, a member of the Mexi^ d "' pnln '" "" "" ur i ;w it fait worse and he had %  — Iteulrr polo team was als<> covering Mexican lewvttloh itntlon JCHTV-ChaniM l 4 (ol which he If %  >' %  >. and "Ovoi-iotics", j Ip rl !lis marrietl gnd has three (hiklitn He lock pan In several of |l i i %  % %  n imet aga i I Brazil. 1 the* US but I . m any of the Anal game* His three brothers. Jose. Otih i o on the team. Otilio was their chie* er and Tonatluh brok tw wfmminr records, elre rind 800 I I Water Polo r WORRELL Ihe 1.501 %  -hi. Of the water pol- gu. DU by Arteiitm;i. DB thought there was little tn ehotaa the Argentine and %  i Iguaj teams. in,line his stay here he has %  i al of the local water in tetlon He Uunkii •h-ii they are below th* standard ol the Mexican leam. but lit %  Ought that our island UMU] rurta forrtuaablt, Hoa • i laekeaji properly organised strategy. PI;-' Kept the ball too loot: In Mexico they are taught. "if wiu'ie not in ; %  position to shoo*. right away, get rid of ihr ball.' Quick passing must be developed Another feature of their trilning i 0 ** 8 ?. Is working out different tact" and moves on a blackboard. Thei before trying ihem out In water, they are i n land to obtai WINTTORUN IN PARIS %  >N. April 24. Arthur Wint. the Jamaican holder of the Olympic 400-metre %  tie hi been chosen t,t represent the University ol London in the 400 and 800 metres In the athletic match against Paris un In Paris on Sunday—Ureter W hut's on Todav urn 111 uu 1 lit 1.ill. L1NDWALI. RAMADIIIN Injuries From England pOUtl Of Via* %  id tboul Uuj tece ITj t-jiKiana had me game SOME of the top Ur AiKtrallnn game*. expected f> clatb In the forthcoming W.I. did not help B n gla ik l .in Htia It cuter light latl i N I A Modern /BMS Owen* LOfTOON. A modern MrtUM Of .'i Owens, n .thin New Yorker naiwt And> Slanlield. Is In %  !'! ii i rowd fui ti %  BtanfleM Will IH> t memlM-r -f | Grifnth. Foul small American team running in the Ihird and Fourtn .. EngUnds win in Ihe las! Tes. by p laam that was not exaacteti l.i prOfl troublesome BttOKUttM the critic*. Many unkind UUBg about tne teiini eiuly i the tour, some of which may haVf been deserved. Bui IBM bV grand leauershlp of rreddie urown, the leam showed It could overcome adversities and tight back. NEWCASTLE'S EIGHTH HUP FINAL teem'; ftn ward Imo U another necessity GusUivo went on to say thin what he and hi* brothers knew about swimming was all due to tnetr father Gustavo de Hodrigo. Senior, who was a iwimmer of Johnn. md he had swain against him M) father, he said, has devoted much of his life to developing water polo and aquatics in Mexico. OUSTAVO d RODRIOO our /other taught us. the Rio JuramenU and arrived here five days ago via Trinidad The ship is expected to leave performed first Barhado* this afternoon. \ complete perA,BO on uo r< arr thirty ,ed movement gg P 0 "'^ !" > **>> id lecret signs Mexico. nine Gussy May Play Film Lost The only unpleasant part <>; Gustavo's trip was that his movie Hv Pi;Ti;it DITTOS mmm was stolen while he was LONDON. April 16. gSSj* %  .^''worTh^bx!," %  i l ii(,, ,. Argenuna. It was worth tuout led by Director Wan Seymour. l5 .ooo Argentuie pesos. He also Mt-p mil on to ihe brilliant "-reen lurf ol Wembley on April lost five rolU of tUm. three oi JHth tor the F.A. Cup final of 1951, Ihev will he equalhnr i "hich had been used. Howev.-.record by their mere appcaennee (; " ,v "gUJ Uu P" 11 ;i,,,, hav II will I* the eighth occasion man. Stan Seymour W **& ^JST'lLt-,. ^ .a. When Newcastle United, IX>NDON. Corpeous" t;.issy Moran. No. I We7' m die. ' %  """" fW "' "IWH tennis. I| rx 1,1 peeled in grace B I again this year. Offlcials at Wembley plan tt slage a professional tournament in July, as part of Ihe Festiv.il i | Britain sporting eclcbrat naturally, they want to feature tn tennis stars. It is also hoped that .tad. Kramer and Pancho Segura w. also compete. BeeetaJ lllvition n.-kr u.,11 —Sea Seoul-. Mill pla> I.1111., St. Ho* Heoutn al Uie Mmlrrn Hlffh School —5 tt p m. I'ick Alrk-Rcvers and Everton will meet thb> after 1 MIL In a I II-L llivltilon football match at Kenilniton. This malrh was to have been played la*! Salnrdav but wan rtpened due to rain—S at p m Inlrr flub Table TennU at V M t A.— V M 0 A. ft Foundation 00 p m. Dverton ta. Hampton — g.M p m. Kama \. Police — 1 N o m V M.P V. vs. Fox—1.3 p m Annual General Meetlnr of the Society fer the Tre vrntlon of Oueltv tn Anl1,1 % %  at w ik.-ti.-ld. White park 8 is am. CINEMAS I >-plr# 1 Tk Thl>4 Un" tJM OKmnlr -Rathlm IVialr" *i DlMINM Motion** (;ib*'dais lncoiptS and "In ., 1„ m I .n"" II"—INS POLICE BEAT BDOS REGIMENT 25—15 Full blame .... i:if AUattallan lump muii ! %  takan bn Wa bp'smom. Mr. Williams Da While (in London, In %  aartw """• J''^ '•'"* "SS?" WUllam., Smilh, I' Tudoi rial i... or. II • '" '"" •" "•'•' f"" '"""'" Tudor. 7. Mr vvllliId uj They did lull come up K. Ihe l.corlEmplre: Clarke, n>, l 1 I iMni -Inmh.id lo which oowiWilaon. Rudder. I> flail., Mon I I 'Ohll twnlMy, who no :.l m In IOK counlry ha IONIC in"lcam reiu'r^l'*! M. ,',','u PmUe drfoalcd .. ..as contMled un FA Cup rim.1 II .,. hi by a, lie ie 1 A lie luia Ma, '"•'"<"" • -J !" %  pnfonnanrc previou-i i.,„ ,, M i, ror NtweaaUa t>o„, lha h „ MwivE Sd ,.Sond Division baakatba Villa nml ouUldi in Ihe 1923--'! lucre lime ,l.v. Th.re iL match which win pliiyeu 1 I Three Final Malml Aaton Villa lucre inn, days. There, h. 1Jillnol A „ V| . limes ihev have been niccaarfljl NowcaaUa UnHad nave alwaya 'laylor wan in Iheaimy al Ihelitne T,)c PHcc leam playind al hon 'Ii."..-?'. F ,l "! 1 f|n d .' oll f." m cs they bam a rainoua naiw In i bul he chanped into civilian W(,ro Qn lo P llutchin Norvillc. Rahira : Mi II II T'DAD WILL FIND NEXT BRANDON CUP SERIES HARDER iFrcin <>>ir snald Ltali) tig, ilf, told .1 bii crowd on Bui Trinidad would not IMI.I easy next year In Ihe 1V| Cup senc* II ol Jamaica takl lha t pleasant, the lannlt vary good, and thai Trinidad n team. Sturdy mada ipaclal mantlon of Ralph Leajtll, who had been phiymi; the gaiU only three raar*. ne "Lognll WHS nhsuliilely OUtttand ing. Ralph Ciiiai for ('..-. .1 I high tribute to the orgi isation. and so did Bernard Oo kc on behalf British 1 %  read) wail known t.. Brill h accuatorned rowd 1 panlog baui ian, AI %  • %  si.mil.-id's likcnesi to Si ' %  '' ""' .. nit i.nlv m hi n ntli t %  %  tprtntlng hm he nld la be %  lallure lie ruv 1 has long-Jumped durihaj Ihi "< gforonajr, over 25 Mt Anini and Burke bul none wat Dathlng left-hander. I irutn whom much wat tat on Ihe South Afrtoan lour, proved %  fchanej playar. Too oflan it wat left to the 1.11 % %  iln diminutive Kai eli, lo hall what mpleic collapse mm WATCHING THt SC0 IV M NAtlllStR-filAV t L''.l;.li ot ItJMig >lUt : %  • %  Gtaasiai n %  .; ii-. Ii Trallir llon't No. 34 • DO NOT FORGET TO CONCENTRATE ON YOUR DRIVING. Space made available by CANADA DRY lor Safer Motoring. IPf 40(KI n 1 rimili DI uni.i1: .... . ... ,it 1 hi* -laot* "I HIP name lo Hi %  in.a minus 1 boiweeii J4QO anu 4000 v llou!d r.r-M n I thr %  limp 1 v brigrit. %  Hey 1 oi MCUH bed.4 to ne*i. and piohibly ihr l-i. bapd *..l\ • Irid ol MK) or nu -iii sas khfual iiHi.i png HOTS Riw %  Hi be twlow lie 30O0 .... and ihrr.'Iore neMluii %  ii liinu. 1; is better lo con % % %  ell ul the Norili-Sout.il w.mifl ne io>t y. tlml II both rea are ju-i br:ow :woo. IL kilvl-able not to go cut unlil ih ppoonenU| iiave : ii.r, *i!| havti ior ttielr ftt -1 nai .1 • Vletori avi 1 Blnelcpooi will pul them amons have won ihe Cup foui un.. Aaton Vlllt and Blackburn lead lha Arid wftn a %  % %  each i, %  next with 1 v. %  fBeM United are fourth with four. Win or i lha New Uiev have reached Iba Bnal ihi rnuib.iii. Sin.e tinc.i ol • %  ; '' %  go .,! %  igj ... the) ground. Ram uwar and the resumption of p< %  Ho knocked .it the door .>t Ihe lima M-III ink has been parti Players* entrance and expUUnedl to nlnrlv true Much of theli r.n.n111 that he had come tome poople might lern 11 U plaj foi Newcealic The dm nkieper ilecided thai Fmie WU lhal doaluuaj m Ihg tramfei rolling his leg; that h,. was 10.. riioj have boughi small to be playtog for Htweatll told plarers with 1 noquency ti %  hlmteil up lo ins full has earned them the title oi "the 'ive feet two Inches and tried ii.. all through million doUai teaa And vet that title vit null rewirtnt A Stnr Keith Miller When I" Una <>r bowlini I reeling lhal omathlng wat happen Bvani [hal tin wt no railacv in the %  B wat tuperb. An-tiaiian bowlers. "ill -freak" eff-iplnnar, Im k Ivoi 01 %  tarring and tpead Rgr^ %  UadwaU, still tale t<. wreat havo In %  howling spell, performed well. hut iverton lellrement from llrst-i 1 ftn bualneai reason* has latl Ihi ton a big gup 10 nil. %  that several Auatrallan erleketan who have served their count!) well in poat-v then beat and that new lain %  iual be found One ease in particular i; wlcketkeepar Don Till 'ish raportert who saw iiii 1 on Ihe MM lour couM not beUevo it wat U o ume Tailon on lha recei Tallon ml tuniiiii ri throuRl ...ii To raplaea nln 1 n ot Miletly %  MM I III AlthouRh IN n Manager to dfracl them The ham bean frequant participants In man who held th,. job ..! the l the transfer market, their •*' %  "" '" %  • %  ,l "' %  ndlture on new man has been %  NI -" ,I %  %  % %  lwl DfTBd hv me unounl i ved • %  Mewi ., lub n I .irBoardorD .,,, ,:IMI.OOO. have tn equal share In the tfl i the tfagglltt*H thei known. • 1 MMM Team" M f the 1 The y'll I)o It Every Time &CEPS SPENDS HOURS IN HIS 8AX YARD KEEPING FIT WITH HIS WE'GHT-LIFTING EQJiPMENT — 0 be 1 .. AuttraUa hu n< rther wlcketkeepet lear Test itandara it-" vho officiated In South Africa, A'as kept out of crickel iiu season with an injured leg Youngsters Austrahn hna two goUDg crick tten hon, whom much should be ihe next few yearfikej are right-hand batam %  Burba 'mv \ n \ itch md Hi Uplayed -"" r smallcsi. and ot the 1 grand lighting knock after Auaiama lime, ctoveraal players In again. But ihe doorkeeper was adumnnt and not until the rr Ol one of Ihe Newcastle Directors. who knew Frnie. was he tMe :> get into Ola ground. Miirkinji MiilthewN 1 lardeti ta k confronting of the Newcastle pl.ivns Wembley looks to be lhal lncin> left-hack Corbett. To him falls the unk of marking the mbnttabtt Matthews. If he can hold up the Hlackpo i tej la 1 inoan-bora ..1 I." Whom the;, laid .ihout £32,000 when signed 1 %  r-.lt v last tat had fail" In Ihe Fifth Tott in M. %  dathlng rlght-haj %  1 ti Jloj de Courcw. i>oih or New South Walea, •" medium •pace Western Auitrasiai rlH'ii-aiiT 1 ry Pi % %  cricket with a bleu this year. These ; certain to <>ii*t tevi rtl of ti who haitki-|.t AuatraTj In crieKet tn recenl years. the First Division; centre-fd Milhnrn. who began his an outside-tight, and won an England 'cap' when 1 Into the leader of the attack, lelthnlf Crowe: and full-backs Cowell Too Small An amusing ttory eoncarnl.ig hal during the war he was spotted in.1 Rbwcatl imi uti itad lo p'-'v ti'i uk lames'* Park s-ho are lucky enough to hav ickets for ihe match may be prodded with more goals than on I'uallv expect* from mieh an even U the p A Cup Final J&R ENRICHED BREAD TIII: 1 00111 \i 11 n s 1 iiou 1 ^JrO0*' OIL SM. SVftDAl ADVOCATB The netball match between s Mlchaart Olrla' and Rrdiston Si Miili.i.-I'; Olrlf BchOOl Wl pottponed oaring to the i.I the |)il.h The n licen tixrtl f..i i 1. The Weather IO-II/W fun K.,ev & 4b a.m. >un Ratii 8 10 p m. Mum il.asl ((uarler): April M l-o-h'.mb St p m High Water: 6 58 a m. 7 .w p ta, VESTFRDAY %  .sinrall (Codrington): .22 In Total for month to veiterday: 5 16 ill*. Trmprralure (Max): H!*..*• F ti-mpi-raliire (Mini: 73 0 F Wind DveeUaB! I9 a.m.! B. (I p ml E N.F. Wind Veli ilv 11 miles per hour niremelrrr 19 a m.) 29.9. illiml H M* Remember, a coinfoilable fitting SUIT is our first consideration. There are increaaing numbers who rerognise for themselves ihe contiatenily superb cut. (it and finish of the . IDRAL TAILORING we will wolcome Ihe opportunity of proving this lo you in our . TAILORING DEPARTMENT on Ih first floor o! CAVE SHEPHERD & TO. LTD. BEST IN FLAVOUR BEST IN TEXTURE &f BEST IN NUTRITION BOWRANITE ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT THE PROVED PROTECTOR OF IRON AND STEEL GOES FARTHEST LASTS LONGEST One Gallon will cover SOU—10(10 *q. It. Srjpplird In PERMANENT GREENRED. GREY. P.LACK onrt SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting) In Tim of 'Phone 41.V. Imptr,al Mtatttrt. Asents WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. '. tree: '. %  ^^r-i wy.t^we ssc wtwg aggaBBBaaants s ; ^-^-^7—