\ thci-e ure 1,lc -prelalized training for Choke. ao 19 churches With one Or more In mWl, r r "d gwi>el workan '""JUS*" eveni„nsh -ave om\u n,,.. ' n1 ^ '"' '•> the by the Weal Indian InstUuta hvated in TrmlSchooi oni.'eis ""apri Ha,l i Al pW-nt there re WU u youth leader ; "< 1r t' there from all ." r....w PVT>lvirish ave OTIC. \. ... lo-u M churches have ihetr own pait< -— Sunday School r !" .^ "' !,., B vr,iJ: PW teachers. Why Belli 600 p lioNi i pm ComiMaer of (lie Wafe einkni Hi" Eitlllah; 1000 The N.t; 10.10 p.m. From the EdilonaU. Brlllah Chomi 10.30 p.m. Lon I; 1100 n M Some of the eartv Rnrhndi l,lp '"wer Caribbean area pastors were K. batch. Dowricli nnd Latai T ''"" L||( Brtttah Oulani mimixT „t i m Wanda in the %  Chief of the Chun %  shin n mi try I tin Oo 9 Trumpet whirh enjoyi .1 god %  .11i.1t11.11 tn .1 medium oi contad with other Christians Lhe world around. The Church flndj Uw paoplti of Barbados avid readers and tiv u> in their hands Ihe very best Mark ol Ureaineu. 7 J a m iut dish relished Scottish novelist and Mu.| f ; (JO am. Piarticc Make. Vtilet I The Debale Cnnlinum, S 00 an writer who took part in this campaign, will talk on these landings at Oampon_ at 7.45 p.m. on hwrimme p My: if.oo MO *e-< Anal\-!<: Dowrich nnd lata. Btio .McDonald Broonn'. lln and others, TbCtV ate %  K— —.•Pveral ministers who an Wordi h> shake-ed and others preparing fo> TSe r..o„.,r ..n ,. ,„,. "S""""" „, „. ^ v 1000 -10.1S pm New* and Lrl'i Look several or till' I ".e! 0 .?! 1 ^;*, --. -, ^. wnrliinji on mi iiKiimious basis 10 11-10 30 p.m-Audience M.,1 Has while others are B< %  OSTON toward that goal as that J*.'?'V 1 Mc *""* IITS Mc. WBtrw goal held up befnrr all -.id.. Aarli -3 ii ,nP C hur * of God in 0.10 a.m.~iis >a>. to aa> M enjoys a great amount "Taa %  m The n,.. r-,.1 „ n..w !" aWTrnment. it CO-oparatea full•iv.ia: 7 15 a.m. rrwn the EdiioiwL; T.a central offices ill \\ Th* Indiana. I'SA Generally speaktajr. tne work THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. ffflCl The, Titan: t.n Wed nesday.2Sth. TnOtnas Mmarvk The next talk in the BBC scries "The Mark of Greatness" will be IS .P fln Thomas Masaryk. the maker of l£.,* ^ w Ve\. Ilorrir Ne iosraj till a.m i a m. IJ.tenet, %  noiiu-ealih sin rWSJ 15.10 pm Cloae Down. \iiwrivun Column: 1.1V—C.IA I ..'orrta lay Shake: [l<-lv .,n S>.'*. ^00 % %  ii'%  < f Oper fl InlerhMr. 1 00 pn i. Proerai 1.00 P.m. Ttie Naaw; til p m Nr Wi Sorrell and Son: T.4S rananaaj the Czechoslovak nation, and will Tetter, ssi be given by Lady Violet Bonham P" nl Cnrter. Her father, the Earl of Asquith called Thomas Masatyk "the greatest living European." Lady Violet Bonham Carter has A!> !" the highest admiration for Thomas P* The Mark Maaaryk and says that the motive ti _.. „ force of his life was truth. She — shows that his greatness in the B0 P %  Radio Newareei field of thought, philosophy and MX^^ S ,V ,: %  w "' history In particular, made him •• *^* p m B^rh* S, K at also in the field of action. !2„r m Th '' New., IOIO e will speak at 7.43 p I day. 23rd instant. No 'Peep' For The President ( %  t.M H SIS! M NF.WEU, ROGERS* NEW TOME addition hi.s .I!I-OII! I %  i MacArthui ' ;,1 "ii tonight har on his hands lence of the Sr R.A.F. Fighter Ace Flies U.S. Jet In'Korea (By JAMES STUART) c.a.c. rcH.M f MIS-.M p-m.-Canadiai i ChronKli CHURCH SERVICES MaraooiHT at'aa&gaaaaT? B uU n T pm "v „,. „rAtNl|| BAt M* T H^ach"' McCu H: T p m nrriua^-ti ,,„. R t in Korea. He is Flight D-VLKEITH U~ tm" % Stephen W. Daniel. P. M,. r. H^-P*. and Bar. 30-year-old B ^ M *""-M am Mr ^UTitn n A WARTIME lighter ace of th RAF Is flying with an American tighter wing Lieutenant DSO. DFC former commander of Nos. 72 and 145 Squadrons. RAF. Daniel, who was born nl Farnham Common, Bucks, and whose home is now at Thornhlll, Dumfriesshire, is on a two years' posting to the United Slates Air Force under the Anglo. American pilot exchange scheme. Under this plan many RAF ,J' officers are serving with USAF squadrons, and American pilots "M> are flying in British squadrons. D wH Flight Lieutenant Daniel, who .jo shot down 15 German and *** % Italian aircraft in Europe and n n the Mediterranean during the Marvin. war. is now serving with the 4th Fighter.Interceptor Wintf "* USAF in Korea, flying an F.8G tso.m Sabre jet lighter. riaT .. Crash-Landed ""'Mi:,' n !" %;' T ," m dav. a p m A m Croiby ni-TTHICT S a.m. Mr. •nare Jone* 7 p m Be, M r-HUVID*NCR—II a m Rev. M Temmae 1 p in. Mr. p r. Ortffi VAfXHALI^a* a m Ray M Thornaa. T p m Mr II *: Qifc*, HHITt: MALL 6 30 a in Mr. P. Deane. T pm J A Griffith OII.L MKMOKIAI. %  Rev R. McCulloush, 1 s it.. .-,,„ Croaby. ; P. Bn*ce BrcaMer V PM lit Till .1^ 1' Seott; 7 gm P M "* %  * ">; 'HBIST. %  whteh I lafcl.rl ,f TPINF OF ATOVBIfVT Heol _'iaM.i '" 'bS* od. Tl>tia i-hrl.i When, during the war. he took rommand of No. 72 Squadron m T the Mediterranean, he was the %  > youngest squadron leader In that theatre. He was 22. Once his airplane was hit by A-A lire, and he crjsh-4anded in rough country. He was several ,i-.u weeks in hospital. •. n( 7 *£",£* jutv* 1 !" iSHI^"* may soon be clothed in "artiflci.il p "i"-hersr Maior Gihb. *^' wolves* clothing." Stepped up aJJS?I nM !" z" •""* iraining programmes In Arc;..„ M rtaivaiJJn m M^^ r P J£Si n J region* have increased the "demand for wolf furs, while som of the supply gourees have beei cut off. So scientlirts in the United Slates Air Force Aero-Medical Laboratories at Dayton. Oh have produced a natural-looking wolf fin—from nylon. rm rORWFR-U am l.nlir,, M>.> ne 1 n m CBmpanv Veelir,| Mi-*|n Preacher| *alv>li STaine trolllnfc.. CARlTON-n ft; ; Mretlif Mr.' 1 1 7 p n In political rtrun "^ President Truman re another major issui •* —about "The Com ii; Senate." m Senator Charles Tobev e.irned "' %  this title* for his lmi thunderings at the recent T.V. crime nearti.fi; lha-/ made ganr^ters flinch and stutter. Tearfully, lie called on bis fellow citizens lo return to the paths of cfv.c honesty. Now Senator Tobey has turnel to the alleged shorten" officials In a Government IQU agency. Twice he telephoned Truman about it. First time, he says, the President accused Senators of misusing their influence to gel constituents. The second time Truman said he had Do evidence of this. And Tobey says a recorder took down Truman's words. %  'Outrageouf.." says a Truman %  •• aide. The Federal Communica. lions Commission says it is illegal *unless the recordci > E every 15 seconds over the line tj warn tho other speaker S 0 n public debate is raganf pricking' COMIC STH1PS arc going waive a day rani da v in May or June, W< lacoraa indicate a safe bet. POLICE unwitting!) %  *•a funer.-il pi' %  ,£ Georgia. Abrothatvj dead man. ;. nall-baam •lower irirls. and .1 Nog 10 *on dropped out '.o buy lottery tickets ut a house along the route just as poliro were raiding the place ANGRY MOTHERS got mny when New York's School Board said It could not get steel for a new school to replace one burned down recently. It Men Fifton. ROW the POM MATRONS—<.. Board of th< Rev Wnlter Tic* 1 who || too Chapn Wa piouclly piesenl The SILVER KING "Floating Rida" Cycle Complete le-drsiyn ol ltame anglee has raeulted in the FIRST MAJOR IMPROVEMENT in bicycle design since the War. with EASIER STEERING EASIER PEDALLING and lho FLOATING RIDE performance. Greal Beauty has Iwn rombtned with improved STRENGTH al all ihe impoilanl pointaTOUGIIER FORK TIPS STREAMLINE FORK SWEEP POLISHED CHROMIUM THIMBLES Buy the new Silver King FLOATING RIDE NOW. Why "mako-otii" with any olhor*' • A. BARNES & CO.. LTD. ^ % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  1 AOIM I The i'iiii|-iii> hope to be kbli lo < nutiefai • %  the insinuation lonf mil landli m ^ooii as Qanarailai Set now ... ., ,. in com. notice will )-• given in the i*t* as to wbaji Lloni '01 new scr tea. It h .come to oui not Us 1 era and, prospective ODD* Btovw The boipsin %  >< a sieve (i>ll 0O, t;il,< .0 u< 'Mi l.nn;it. and the Conipan> therefore conaldei It unreasonable thai additional stoves fiho-i'a be cooaeetad to Ihe supply until people whn have 1 11 tlaa ral luppUad. It i with regret therefore lhal the Company must give notice ihai l in Welding Plant ear 1 l>e connected to I" lystafll until THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. ;IKK:K-~ -m im m Vlliliiiil I linn ,.. %  :.( CLUB PM M 1 DRlbi I oil SATURDAY. Ml MAV. IMI SUB8CRIPTION .1 fl AdnHxMoa til l II t| o, I .': %  i:.: -la Thr ConimHu* V. SMITH General Manager new #" tts/iiiiu,l)ii Irif %  lW lit Y. De Lima & Co.. Ltd. "Vou' ]ewt\m" UO B?OAD STREET WONDERFUL VALUES! : ,;--'.-.-.•.•-•. ..-, ..-. %  % % %  %  %  .-. %  %  %  .•.•. %  .::v.::vf.:::;:::::::::\ I tllOHV tlWll.l US I Tnkc Ihis opporlunily nf .ihlniniiiK xn'v ipi|iiirrmrnls ! IN in GREY, BEIGE and EGGSHELL TAFFETA PLAIDS $1.34 and $1.40 yd. into\i\v AV muss sum* Where Satlsllod Customers Gather ETBBTON re/• %  Orehgatra Admission by In-. ,W,V,'.V//.V.V/*V.V//.'.'^ GALVANISED RanKing ii ,v> STEAM PIPE 1 1" upwards FI;I1: MILD STEEL Rounds. Squares in nil Size; BOLTS & NUTS All Sizet FILTER CLOTH White Cotton Twill At PRICES that cannot be repealed. FOODS s£cr rwsf NOW The Brabazon nirlinrr li to rt 0V§t Paris during the summer. The vhrit is planned n* part of g£ the French Air Show. the Nineteenth Paris Solon i national de 1'Aeronautique. arhHI is being held In the Grand Palais June lSJuly 1. Caaa*Bfal Many British l\rm are being ^y^rju. represented e-crid a A-s well as the italic exhibition, ^f.* there is to be a big flying display —.,1.. "OAWJ || | ,, ir |H | 3 r> m Coirnan." Mairlliia 1 Maaiine pn 6 rnRNnn Watlnr 1 e :i 7 pm •btlvatlo'i Mvlin ? tirr Captain Moore r>m. SMI<_ ASTHMA MUCUS loosened First Day Dftn'r. I.( eeuahinii. anaviina'. • ln anau-ka of Br-m.|.HIa or Aalhma r*lll roai alarp a-nl I nlfht with of the latest types of aircraft. commercial thl*. tfron WARNED SYDSFV of Port Lincoln. South (p-n-. IK large painted notice n the main hlfent I "We shoot cv< i traveller entering ayra; ehaasuuaa any anolhar tiring fctaW. (raal madlrlo*!* not a ami>ka. Inlacllon • %  apray. bm w.rka (lirouBh lha blo !" t, 'hua r-ai-Mn* Ihlunt-a n4 riran-hlal (ubaa Th* nrai MM ilau-fa halpln* nalur* immadiatalr %  w> 1 Malpa looaan and rano tru>h airanrllnr m'l-a. 1 THu. promotaa frear tirra'1Jrig %  mi" rafraahlng alaap. ? Ilrlpa a ata iighlng. whrrlnf. anaallr.i Quirk aailafacilon or irair bav araota** Oat MENDACO frcrn mlai todar SOCIETY VNMAI, FETE I .-•* of Hi* Excellency *. and Lady W\ Saraof I( will be held at S| THF l(OSTf;i>, Country ltd X on SATI'RnAV. April 28th ?\ It 30 pm. V There will l>e the followS Ing SUlls: Flower Needlewt k. s* I M and B leai -; For lha Children tliere \ Pony Rides and £' I-uik> 1'. By kind permission of Col. Band •<• ttii'fii i i 0tt im\i. #•• YOI'H It HO I Al Prirrs Ih.'il cannol hr rrprnlrH a \IA iM/i SHEETS—ah.. ;n.. mi. mi. III fi. Al.l MIM'M SIIIIKTS — fill.. 7fl„ Ml.. fl.. loll.. Ilfl.. 1211. i:\ I IIITI SHEETS—Ml. III.. 8ft.. Ml., loft. ALUMINUM GUTTERING III li ( EDAR SH1NCI.1 s I:I III Hum MINIUM. SURFACED ROOFING ::n WMr lIAMs (flanoaea") lb I'm M JELLY rtn RAI'ON iSlfrrdl Ih CMMM II\KI. I'faa-t S(>A HIM I IIS Tit-* I M K1AII. Kl-i 1 11 Im-, I lll( KIN IIADIiKs Tin1 HLLIT HIS! TITS Thse HAMS (Cooked) Hi MUTTON \M. PI \Tins HSII si % %  :i H| Tin, LAMB TDVIillS lin. rsAU Tins VEG JtTICI Thu I'l \f Ml < Tins fiOOSLBLKRILS Tina JAMS Tin* • Ml MLAI. Tlrw OLIVES Butt. Hun \"f! Bit pi Xnw! PLANTATIONS LIMITED I HLAM Ol \\ HEAT Pit it < PERKINS & CO., LTD. Ill AI in a 4502 K.i.1,,1, k SI ? \KI: rm: 1IHI FHO.il IS i on YHIH II tito i HI: ITEMS U'p fan Supply You willi . r:AT VAMISED MESH WIRE i LACING WIUS—In all tarn BARBED WIRE In ill AH Roiwinulily P l l n d I • 1^Tr\ is. aafon maMas rout P a rc haa t kawhata Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. (THE liorsi: FOR BABOAINS) No. If, Swan Slrml 'Phonr : 2109. <4(1B at UM I



PAGE 1

I SUNDAY. APKIL 22. 1M1 -IS1>.\\ AttVO* in PACE IllKF.E Gardening Hints For Amateurs The harden In April (Tfce Vmmpmt Heap Gn now What t cat back Cherry Tree I i Cutmust be left tg the iadividuThe decision of each gardener actui according to Ihe condition At ** w '' , according 10 ihe condition of hik Uardens are improving now ihe cwn plants. However uromning drier weather is with us. and thai the shrub. d„ need wiling inera have been reports that anback aee that the fife i* done ££,;L. We ^ B !,.iEL ,loln we Properly by cutting So within Petunias and Verbena are flowerfoot or to of the ground A halfmg and the general appearance hearted half way attempt grill of many gardens is quite gay. It only do the shrub hawn^rnonj: is however an untidy time of those shrubs that are the betti-i year with the Mahogany and for a cutting bark if theVneed 1 Flamboyant trees showering down are th e Canarlenak the "---their leaves. This means double the Oleander the' Craftea, & labour in keeping the garden trim PrMe f Barbadoa. If cut back and tidy. It must be remembered now. these shrubs will have the however that these leaves arc benefit of the rainy season ahead a valuable asset to the garden, in which to spring again and should never be wasted, but FRl'IT TREES rCoat's] i ££ !" t" W H£O b Vif d ' J b ThP Wrbrt. "rrj „ g 1 ,,, aH impost Heap. Every garden blttnv trec whlch Mn MfU ^ IU Compost Heap. Brtwn ln garden. Thu fruit-tree gardener who has Js sometimes used as a hedge. <•* should hi and for neglected to make one. now thai the leaves are dropping is a good lime to start one. This is how It Is done. Compact II. > Dig a wide deep hole in some corner of the garden where H will not be seen, as it is not a thing of beauty. Into thig hole throw all avail',"" !" -'".".. ** !" ." ,u """" able leaves, mixed with any green of ^ Barbadian fruits. Th, grass cutlinits from the l u wn <* •?' delicious eaten in wale dbreak. The cherry tree is very hardy, give* no trouble and will grow almost anywhere It does not require a hole of meat depth, but for good results it should be manured each year. and the old dead wood cut out It has several bearings of fruit during the rainy season and the fruit la one of the most useful ices. It < grass cuttings from the lawn, or any weeds or ther green refuse matter from the garden. Spread *"*? ,i lh %  %  "". or the stuff out. and as the heap mi grows, keep it damp by watering It. To promote decomposition quickly the Garden Book advises sprinkling each la,vcr with a little Nitrate of Potash. Fn be crushed and sweetl can be or Jelly. The Barbados Cherry is propogated by seed or from cutting. Have you any Gardening questions you would like answered or any garden information that will be seen that a Compost Heap ,ou d * of tatoreBt io oth*T hlng to make. Gardeners to in quite a simple thing" to make, uaraenera to pass on and yet it will provide valuable avc '0u a surplus of seeds organic matter for use in the ^"' nn8 -V 00 would ,ike to %  garden When the contents of the !" an S* Compost Heap are well rotted Write to "GARDENING they can be used as an addition CO The Advocate to beds that are being prepared, and watch this column for a reply and for potting out ferns and Airs. H. C. Klap writes other plants. 1 have two healthy vlgorouslyCMTBSS Cuttings growing plants of the creeper Besides being valuable add,. 4, non !" Venusta. As far as I know they are the only ones the island. I have had them n_.. for about five years, Two years tlon to the Compost Heap, grass cut lings from the fcMnt-sntwe tUlr^f "L a i*!?"* f0r " a ' we flwered,-not very'proI.hi:, of ur ) dcn ^. specially fusely-but since' then alihough m this very dry weather. Spread hundreds of bunches of liny ,-uds on top of the bed Uiey help to appear, they all fall off instead of keep it cool and damp, so lessening developing Into flower clusters inelabour of watering. From experience in other counThese grass cuttings ;ire vaintries. 1 know that this creeper able too when forked into a gar usually flowers for many weeks den bad. a s they both lighten and dining ihe dry season. Can It be enrich Ihe soil. that the unusual rains of the last Sometimes ihe lawn-mower twn years, have over-stimulated should be used without the box \ hv a"*'th. and kept the plant* that catches the cut grass, so allowing the grass to f;il| on th* lawn, as this acts as manure on the lawn and is good for the grass. What Should Be Cut Back This is the time of year when to many of our flowering shrub should be cut back. It is not a hard and fast rule however but happy? Also, could you please tell me where I can order a grafted •'Julie" mango? In this dhrtrfct mangoes do not seem to grow very well, but l am still anxious to try grow one. "Keewaydin" Graeme Hall Tee., Apr. 15th 'SI. Rupert and the Ice-flower — 10 Th* hire ii out oft sighr to tledgri. IOO. Wt t*n *U go IOqtucklr ifui Rupert .v. .].. s ii gcthcr." In • lew minuici ihe* no UM irvmg to catch up with him. have mei and Rupert u wiling of Making hn wjy back over the :hr wiy he aeei t o little fifurei coaiing over the snow. Hooriy. there are Bill and Algy." he think*. And thev'v both strange crramrc he hj. ._ It might be a Minh hare, ily it's a mourn too icon." ajyi O'you think *t could ut t went b*k>" ki Bill. Pi FARM AND GARDEN By AGRICOLA THE riGEON il \ ( Ar > ou !" dy tot the ques tion? Yes* Here it is: What did you eat in the way of protein or flesh-formers yesterday The answer of a housewife in the low Income group would probably run like this; 'well. 1 couldn't get meat but we had some Ash and the usual staples— rka and sweet potato; I forgot those dry Pfas a country friend gave me and. in any case, they are a both•f i shell and to cook; thhuckster with the greens did not come around so there were no -sbbage leaves to pul in the rice So there It is. a All without ,< thrill! and little Johnnie for ., growing boy. got very little protein and scarcely any vita ntins. A little more foresight and self-help from the garder would have provided atnpb* amounte of each without additional expense When animal protein (meat and fish) is scarce anJ expensive, vegetable protein in the form of pulse (peas and beans) should be used more freely than normally to supplenieni the meat and Ash ration. The 14tin-Americans consume i.uj.quantiUes of dried beans; the trench have a wonderful #aj %  preparing lentils with ihe addi tion of left-over meat scraps .etc rendering them irresistible. In India, dried pulse idhal) takes the place almost entirely of meat. In this part of the world we Incline to be thoughtless in these matters and. of course there is absolutely no reason wh; there should not be an abundant of pigeon peas. They demand little attention, grow almost any where and greatly improve the soil. Cooking dry peas U not such a problem if pre-soakln^ treatment is applied. But now, this story had a re percussion. Johnnie tackled hi* Daddy one afternoon somelhiin; like this: "Daddy, we had .. grand time those few da>s w. spent with Auntie in the country during; the Christmas holidays; lovely peg bushes were just fuil of pretty blossoms and pods of varying colours and cousin Sheila and I loved picking (ha pods and teeing who could hud the longest—some had as many as seven peas in the pod—and it wag grand fun shelling them and eating them too in rica, soup and jug-)ug. my. they were nodi Wail, you know, not long after we came home, a huckster appeared at the door and offered %  orne to Mother at a shilling a pint; Mother said my house keeping monoy won't strotch that far to-day, com* buck next week." At this point. Dad inter jected: "What, a shilling a pint for those common peas' Wasn': like that in my day. we )usl had all these things and we heard none of this new-fangled buai ness about proteins and balanced food and all, the rest of It—we just ate and plenty too" "Well," replied Johnnie, "I have been reading lhat people who pay attention to the kind of food they eat keep healthy and live long. What about you and I starting now in the backyard to fork up along the fence right round and planting some of those dry peas that Mother has" They will look pretty and give us all we need of those nice green peas and a plentiful supply of dry ones for later use. The border will be attractive and serve as a start while we Ihink of pkaiuung out a little food garden which will proAt also by ils protection from wind. The April showers have started so let's begin at once." 'Well, Son," says Dad "never thought of that, you have got something there, let's go." Ami so, while Dad and Johnnie make ready the bolder, we'll hear more n**t Sunday of this derful group of plants—the ias and beans Mrs* McPherson cuts the bills . by yiCKI SUVA WHITE N I W 1947 btnpped o( it* veiling, w • 'WS'd nit and a crown'I Ik****, Mr* McPhersoni Look hat ol 1943 does tcrvt jrvjmti tpiing. %  •cagM* Ike Ntftr.fl Iak. 1961 What next ? G lIDK for thirsty visitors to Umffon come-, i the k hap* Oj a silk scarf showing B4 a/cltknwn hostelrie*. Captions ax plain how to gel there the sort of people you may ex pi. to tlnff on arrival r SHiorrs fad roc n i induced a inanufaituu i 10 design large roses, marguerites and peonies that can Inpinned w I bathing suit Th*) grf plaMiC and you can even take ., swin without harming them L ORGNFTTES ihnt convert into dress clips, rimless spectacles with a top iim studdel with coloured stones, are a maim facturer's idea for girls whs) grail glasses. , 'White is only suitable for really sunny days—yellow will carry mv dull ones, too ") HOME WASH %  ii tram then' with a blue ".ail made lo-measure tall aligned to carry her 1 the summer. tain Idea for economv i* M Ut ynly materials that are washal > al home For inmer days she has picked up fo different remnants In pattern, i linen or silk with .. while i .kground lo be teamed with whita aceessorias. for real). hot day> For spring evenings — ana lusband usually enicrtsiu friend* at week-ends—ah* has made Cp a simple bottle green itb long sleeves wide hip pockets from j 30* remnant. For %  nu theatre in town slit* has made a taffeta patterned frock. square-iiix-ked. with short sleeves and b^nffant skirt also from a lenuiai.t During the wuiler slia knitted a white sweater for spring days The bodue has a tapestry design of flowers (Thirteen different colours on one needle were needed t' make it up ) IT GROWS J7UHNITUKE that' grows up wiUi the children" will be feature m the Hums* ; ,nd Gardens Pavilion at the Festival Small chain, "grow" by reversing the positions of the combinM baok >o produce a higher and larfer ml; the height Of adjusted by reversing the labli tops. us niir ignisie-. 141 rittt-BfM Uierr. *JIIII i. |( am msKs ears am. 171 •>•<' MI traO u sw >iiirn<:iriirr ill i.Lrr.ii t uroflUea iurn(i.l 33r*"t *' %  Rgwv*"^* i. ConUinsr. IS) Advance 1 Of Wesl Indies Sugar Industry Mk. ALAN WALKER ON CUBA TALKS LONDON. April 11' W* -X Indies ug... it advancing now as it has nevit OHM before, says Mr II Ala,> Walker, Managing-Director el Caroni and Wet indies Sugar Company, who ha* just leiumiM i i in,-, eountry Irom %  threeninths I i i the Caiibbean. That h one side of the bactun On the .thci. Mr Walker said i Met Impfassjl %  Uip was of the diasat fell throughout the British territories in the Caribbean at the news that Britain was cot %  to a trade-pact with Cuba Seated in his office, hihi, above Paik Lane, he told DW cf his plans for seeing Mr .1 Colonial Setrelarv aim IxraraasUuj to him UM eonsterMUOCI that new* at the proposed oiu't had caused in the Wrtl Indies Originally Mi Walk*! had airangeai io see Mr Qrtflttl on April lOlh but as that wu> Hudget Day. the bsgsjrvlN lUkd to be cancelled and will now take place later thH week. Mr Walker wffl lell Mr Ciiffllhs that rirM Wesi t,i the news was thai Britain did nol care what hupI MM | t.> hrr Empire. In all iipnm.i that is a fthort-Mghlcd view but. nevertheless, understandable He ill point out that th" wen of the West Indies .'. .-.ii % %  % %  production llmfeetioa imposed upon them by the Ministry of Food and that they are really i to think that Cuba is going to get a market for anything up to half a million tor..' annually. Mr. Walker said that while 1 % %  %  i Wn alp, he had bi appraoclMd by holding farmers who toM hlff they old not think Britain was treating them fuirly They b*> lieved th*t may Would \-' bttw off outside the Empire and could pa BO pBtat ui guivins far %  ,( |.i diutiui. when II was no certainty of a market But despite the views of these IndlVUluaJg Mr. Walker hotlever '.hat West Indies production is mogr'ssing as it has never rJofM %  -fore New methods, newer n nhiiien and increased pl.intmi:-i.ero all a sign of the continuing irowth of the Industry. His „wii inpany had m-cently put up two i si nMortos, on* In Trlnldud ind one In Jamaii a and Mr* ulantlnga had aln lo ensure |hey were kept fuliv praduttlva I' expicsaed the belief that l %  1*53. given anything like nomaaj cnditiuns. the West Indies would reach, if nol exeevd, the calling figure imposed upon their production by the Ministry of Food Ha remarked that 1B53 i. tho year that the new Conunob' wealth %  MI'. u;iKi-e<-'in-iit i i nics %  id that if West indies production wen realised. it would not be easy for BriUlO in explain her Cuban commitinenls. II" further ponded out that originally when Britain entered Into the new Comimuiwi ||Ul .kieemeiil. she did -i> mi the unileralanding that sho M %  narket 0 f 290,000 tons for pur i the world market Tnii was taken to mean, that with "" Of a quarter <,f ., rrUlUon torn, Britain would buj % %  ii her nigai from Kinpin ounM The rjaclaion to accord Cuba .. separate contract. hoW*vai put a different light Upojt thg ivhola ilblr. Ii now that Britain had dc.ni.,1 | her purchases of Foraigal isjaj and lha only i om lusioi Bourn-vita Wien fsWHnS (our f-ea-er er.poi J:JI'. ttmtmbtt II'I ase lh* krtomlfdj* of onr hK I' %  • HIAKIK, root ,L>uat>. faai'i *ht i os ahta, TrUSt DOROTHY GRAY W ^ %g* t^, itta ts su*iaBBt| frs %  kin lo.rt. UN L V I. i f^^^^P^^" FRESH SUPPLIES OF Id be dra %  I Empire Mile s offer accordingly M nriudad thai wi uld ba making %  big ml in. ikuu iwu nrorri ihi Eanpirs) in.nk>' II.LI. II.I<| served bar so wsjll In tl i CHIC & SWEETHEART TOILET SOAPS ARE AGAIN AVAILABLE PRICE! ONLY 15* CAKE TAKE HOME A FEW CAKES TO-DAY DON'T BE AFRAID TO TURN YOUR BACK ON THE SUN You need hi 10 fear that you v. ill rcgre( it, if you have LIMACOL in the houae. for LIMACOL has an effect on aunburn that is almoat magical. It take* the sting out almost instantly, and leaves you feeling so refreshed and cool. Pat it gently on the affected orcos of your skin and leel it aoolhing and eaajng ihe soreness and giving you a sense of comfort and refreshment like a cooling breeze. Reinem>tr too lhat for men it has lhat sanw' gentle action when used as an after-shave lotion, and will give you that well-groomed" feeling. No mailer how, hot thr weather is, as Innms ynu have .IMAC'OI. you hove the im.ni in keep riml. h.-cause LIMACOL Is truly "the freshness of a hrceie in a buttle." LIMACOL is obtainable both plain and mentholated from your favourite Drug or Department |tor*, IMACOL STOKES BYNOf A9nli



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^J SUNDAY, APRIL il. 1*S1 SLNDAT ADVO&iTF. I'\> I MM' gMiiiiHiiiiiiii.MliMMnilliilHMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIMIIIIIIHIi; THE PROBLEMS OF PAMELA A SMALL -GIVES A TAIII.I:T-JIVI AMIIIVI:I IX HHITAIX M:W TWIST TO A SM IAI. IMIOIH %  >I iBy CHAPMAN PINCH ERI The taata of HH l.inlets. arMca rude remarks about each candiA MID-TWENTIETH CENare made front chkM .,-iivll. N dte*i appearance, ability, umblTURY scientific version of the traded from fresh rpinaeh, reUona— and even about his relaviolet-scefitotl cachou, which conminded me of the juicv aM Blderata Victorian husbands stalk* you chew while watching They set him problems he cannot chewed on iheir way home from Uie village cricket match possibly solve. %  Ad minute his an evening's hard drinking, will A further domestic virtue ii efforts to cope with them. he in the shops here this week. claimed for the tablets The object ? To test his It is a tiny tablet uf concentrated (liven to agrmg dogs, which so "emotional stability" in the (oca f chlorophyll—the stuff that makes often betray iheir presence wtttltounh o-Mgrass green. out barking, they help to prolong A strong dose of chlorophyll has fireside friendships between man rMAHut TO a Tin* riLLfT or* I COMCTKTIUTtD t CMiowoewvn' At I In4 inriiiii: -THE THIRD MAN" ll ..H. Or.ce a^ain, the talents of that impressive* British Wffttei director team, Grahamv Ureene and Carol R> us "Tr Fallen idol", have been pooled and this Time tlu-y have* come up with on excellent ranJodrauri 35^S2£^i tolta — "* Orwn Wi I mean tab to IMS T ni!Hr M AN i %  and suspense, have pi Aim high in the foremu. : cinematic antaataaanant owndl tandard of The Idol, it Bsreafl stoaa, a remarkably line flam. Doth from the poanl of th. -nario and the absolutely direction. Mr. Greene, who u i Klt ted English vrttsY, has creatadj not only colourful Characters, but a plot with muiv intrigue* twists in it. all of which are skilfully accented by Mr Reed's tonishin,. "*•* of the |neongru us and unexpected — the appare.:|y unimportant appearance o; a child in the midst of an adult ntrctomps. bouncing large I.I l T ball, the balance the gcenc being shot (mm the T1IF WIIITKTOWr.K THE WHITE TOWDI . HOB V. UM novel bj JaJ leaRi of Ullman. hi at UM ye Plaza. For various reasons, a ir-majdcal power* of deodoriMng almost everything we eat and drink, scientists, claim. It will even eliminate evidence of a barcounter snack of pickled onlor.s, fcorgonzola cheese, and beer One tablet, slowly chewed in tho morning, it seem* will also spare us Ihoaa social embarrassments which, according to the and man's best friend. Behind Hand .JLDOES the harassed Health ** Service doctor find time to keep linn ell wall informed of the latest medical advances? To find out 1 put the question to a dozen representative G.P*.i That Underpin ^ THE markings on a golf bad tireotly increase its range WhyBallistics expert Majar (ilffar.I Hymaju gives this explanation • :— Markings Impart extra under,hpin when the ball is struck by the golf club. Th Only two said they had time to '""' so * much ,urlhcr ,han unmarked ball. best friends hate to ment through one issue in avail threa i the surgeries of the other s,x Medical P^'^sure to build up under the ball, forcing it to climb higher tobacco, onions, kippers, and th strongest available beer. They did not eliminate the lingering odou of garlic. But they damped it down enough to enable garliceaten t<> win more close friends. Nobody has yet discovered how the chlorophyll does the deodortlnf tuck But tests, in which hsYVe swallowed dozens of everything possible Is done to best, di the tablets at once, have proved frustrate and anger the applicants. • f n that whatever it iocs inirle the IP an almost Marx Brothers Shell Next Best? the Journals are piling up unread Tough Odds jfc, RAPIDLY gaining favour a means of picking men important jobs in An I "Straas interview," in wh body is quite harmless. ^ CONSULTING room conver* satlon piece — l>wU*r : The best thing for you to do is to give up smoking and <<>t drinking, get up early and go to tn<-' bed early. patient: I don't deserve the ctor. What's second best' ftl* totaraattitfl "C.uu*. od Rockets" Itial,A atmosphere, the examiners muke polden, J $dj. Look Out, Men—Here Comes Mrs. Edwards By FREDERICK COOK At £100 a week, her t the U.S.A. ever elects a rt I % ; e aKt-ssalr iiitn President, the historians JOD IS IO DHUK IHIW of the time will put it down to %  he werk of Mrs. India Edwards. who operated in Washington. mostly behind the scenes, in the middle of the 20th century. Mrs. Edwards ("And don't ask >ii" about the India'—I flOt it -i.y gnotajaWt India, and I uon't know where she picked it up") is the moat powerful woman in Washington, politically -iIng. Nobody on the national stage had ever heard of her before tho :r.. siv rtaj aajQj arhan aha walked Into the headquarters of the Democratic National, Committee and asked for a Job. A matronly woman of 49. wilh warm brown eves, she had Just lost her only son in the war. SHE'S THE BOSS To-day she Is the £l00-a-week %  < (hairman of the committee (lop governing body of the governing party) and supreme lommandcr of all Its women's forces. India Edwards first had the Idea that l*erle Mesia. now Minister to Luxembourg, ought to masculine closed shops. MM. INDIA EDWARDS Job. Mm Ko) n ialternate States delegate to UNO. Edith gering-up visit* to local party or gantaatlona all over the U.S.A. Here is a fairly typical -pell for her: MOMlAV. a day at the desk TH! a night flight to Boston; Tt ESOAV. work in the local office; WEDNESDAY, work again and .i full length speech at a Democratic banquet; THURSDAY, back to Washington for another speech; FRIDAV. her own office; SATURDAY. Iiack to Boston in speak again. IMv> hiter. r.|H'e.'his m Wash I K. i.'.o.ky and 00 the PaI It is a hectic pace "My husband." she :,v:. %  •would prefer it If I stayed home n bit more. But he makes no protest. He under. -lands how I feel HER HATS Home for the Edwards Is a colonial house in Maryland, where India loves to cook casserole fishes, spend her wae k en ds cl e anin g nouaa and hutufajii km %  "irtaklrai my own hats, once In a wa> a really wild one." No Socialist she is keenly in)evel uf the youngster, or the gioupofi" sudden mewing of an ordinary lain chale ire u aUey-c.it, who has become interest|>elliHl to '•<' 1*0* ed in the shoe* of someone hiding a mountain hitherto un in the ihodowa — small things in Starting off on UM adventure thesnaetvea, but used as clever a voong Eun'peau emphasis. Ann i. to C I The story concern* an American an English doctor, ;i former Nazi writer of westerns, who. on arrival officer and the Swiss guide AisM in Vienna, finds that the friend two day of clbnblng, thi with whom he was going to stay, llnds he cant take it; then the has met wlih a fatal accident Not writer is lotl and we gn lafl wUh being aatlsfled with the informsthe Nazi, whose mam Mm U H tion he was given, he decides to assert his authority m g*i do a little investigating on his own. and be as thoroughly unpleasant only to find that his erstwhile as possible; the young American friend was a blackmarket who suddenly nallsoa that the racketeer in watered-down penicilsuccess of the venture Is up to him lln, and he himself becomes inu.nt the ittrl who b. dOlefmined to volved with various Viennese of conquer the mountain because hai dubious character, his friend's father perished In .- sunlla mistress and the British ami Bustempt. These three ami the guide sian Intelligence. continue the ascent during whicl The majority of the Mm individual strengths and w"* the Local talent Shows. The %  actually shot in post-war nesses u re bared, and a rathe decision of the Judges, along with Vienna, with the climax taking obscure symbolism that man's onl tho expert help of Mr. Maurlco place n, the underground sewers | ;i| „. (l( survival rcMs in his JOUl Jones, Manager, was popular of that dty. Excellent photoaffort to this end, with other met with the crowd grapby suggests t h e shabby, Daisley sang "You Can Do No ornamental splendour of pre-war Wrong" in the Perry Como fashVienna in contrast to the utter ion. HU voice was clear ani dcsolution of its post-war ruins distinct. His style was one which Throughout the ftlr>, there is %  was neyer_before equalled at any background of zither music As played by Anton Karras, this %  trange music is 'Ird and d impending elected for Uie ascent, emph popular climaxes aa no ..iher instrument the drama of the story. humbOr "Bop, Goes My Heart." f 0 "' 0 You may be provoked by eh,. ru m has an ouUtandlni On the whole Super Star Show, ".^t i will fascinate you. CM t Including Glenn POrd, Valli with these new discoveries, was The cast include* Joseph Cotton. Sir Cednc KWdwicksj one of the best ever held. as the American pulp writer, Vadi Halns and Oscar Homolka. all of Those taking part were Clayton as the lovely and mysterious wlwim gun excellent rssrforrn "Surclax" Thompson and Kits mistress of his friend, Trevor ancea. I thought thai LVOTTI Harewood, winners of the first Howard (who will be remember<>d bridges as the NH/I was %  All Star Show, I*ercy Welch and In "Brief Encounter") as the grim miscast and though he obvtou I WrKe Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice Free THE STEPPING STONES TO SUCCESS Don't heiicite about your future Go forward, confident that The Bennett Cotleje will iee you through to a lound potition in any career The Bennett College methods ndividual. There's a friendly, personal touch that encouragrs quick progress and naket (or early efficiency. Super Star Show A Big Attraction By TONY \ \\ I i KI-IHII The Super Star Local Talent Show, a quarterly feature, am held at the Globe Theatre on Friday night. The theatre was packed and many people were turned away. First prise of $30 went to Gerald Daisley, a newcomer_to local talent show. Joe 'Shoeshine" Clarke, tho Comedy-Singer, proved himself one of the best entertainers In h the island. He won the SOCOnd ne chartfn* moods prize of $10.00 with the popular nvasklad Superbly photographed. Ibt ascent is arduous and thrilling w ith moments of DI'MIMIS'ispenac. All the outdoor scene* are actually -taken In \u. BwU Alps and the munitilicence of lln gay. insistent. blt .nery and the grandeur of Mom emphasizing Wane which was the mOunUin THE BEHNETT COLLEGE LTD. SHEFFIELD, riGlAND Gerald Daisley. winners of the second and Keith Sealey and Joe Clarke, winners of the last. Thompson sang "Let us Love You Tonight." Harewood "Ole Man Itiver." Welch. "All The Time." and Sealey, "If." The third prize, if there waa one, would have gone to either Thompson or Sealey. Although Thompson's song U ou* "t date he was ablo to put it over in o manner which thrilled the cr Seeley's, on the other hand ,. one whirh is among the first three on the Hit Parade. Percy Welch waa his old self. but as I have already said, the of u u competition Was extremely keen hanker .tfler more Fits Harewood. who won the i Hl< |„. s swinging ov first Super Star Show ever to be amt -.,„-„ HJg* u.ei held classical! v Use Island, inclined. was mure put everythini; he had into lh. d ,,, %  ,i ,\ ... Hi .ii f mm the still I' that he was just not the typa lUi.rmii. Tii In I"i plu't" graphy. Rood direction and a fir.' [ha outstanding; laaturoi 1 though you ma valanehas', prat -\ %  Mill SUffl for g""rt entertain Vibrant as sunshine on your Made with lanolin smooth fi.ith.i hii'ii texture. Cashmere Rouquet Face Powder smooths on your skin like a veil of silk . clings '.-ililv for hours and hours . gives you that natural vivid look! DARTWonns SafV^ 'aTf Sampaon. ajftoj ._ ,7 what'V gom. on to un,lca England. "England. 1 ane said, "is following the general evoluThere^ a lone Ftnng ol Fedei turn ol mm in trying ctrcUOl iiavc something more important al judges and other UNO dele. ilaisra> leading the way, so to to do than just give good parties. fi ates and Gcrvernment deputies. p,-ak They will come out all She dropped hints when the Truin u u of Ihoaa the restless a ft. nghl u, the end. mans were around. And when it 7 in. India Edwards played a deMm. Edwards thinks it quite %  %  tT she uuickly followed up cisive part. She has made a likely that u woman art" iby mentioning the name of Eucareer of breaking Into masculine elected to the White House one genie Anderson, a well-to-do closed shop' ever fdnea ahO startday. But not yet. Middle Western housewife, as a ed out at 20 as a Junior reporter "There is too much feeling ehostO for the Embassy at for Colonel MrCormtck on against our sex for the present. iKei, The appotntmen; his Chlcage Tribune (whose poltshe said. "Anyone who predicts was a brilliant success. c ies she detests). H U going in for wishful thinkSince she has been boss of the Nowadays she Is at her desk in )ng." feminine side of the Democratic her austere office In Washington Her staff say this is an examwomen have blcasomed by 8.45 evarv. morning after a pie of how she works—no crank oul in all manner of top Governt ide downtown with her husband, trying to plant a fire-cracker cement jobs Herbert. £72 a-week head of the hind the plodding feet of history There i-. Frieda Hennock. a international Films section of the but a careful lonl-ranfe g t B P a ; Fi-ii-ral ( Mimnunicatioiis comState Department She worka well aware of how to gel what I klarloasal lo-hour day. "and I always take s |,e wants. There i* Georgia Neese Clark, a brief-canhome with me at „ *, Treasurer of the United States r>kht." Wdrid L ;nd first of her sex to hold the Much of her time goes on ginTOWER JELLY CRYSTALS I'nexcelled in flavour and clarity THEY ALWAYS SET Flavours: Orangp, Lemon, Strawberry and Raspberry Paekaee 14 t Road to Assisi. You hav range the 50 wot dr. so that 1IK> the lead from PISA to ASS1S1 10 MH such a way that the relationship idea* between any one word and VM> 5. It may form next to It is governed by ono <>f ceding word nth the pr*. ,,f rules. %  oiaa The word may be an anrim of the word that pvaoad) we. i fact o 2. II may be a synonym of the word that precedes It. 3 ll may be achieved by adding one letter to. subtracting one letter from or changing OM ntt* in the preceding word. known person or plans fiction. 6 It mny bo ass'*-iit' 'l wit* Die preceding word In the title >i action of a book, ptajr, 1 1 att i composition. A typical succession of word: might be: April-Fool-Food-Flood Deluge-Delude. -IE S use Palmolive Soar* as Dortors advised for a Brightor, rtihor Complexion! D..IO., p.9.. thot P.lm.t,,, .,.,, ,.. ,m w 0 „ O mpl., 0 | He:ervf I London EsprrMHervlre 'Swim*} % tifflfr**.* l^-ldstituj jhtyrAHM Uutti \wwty yew nto/ ckavnv, GARDENIA by //0fRiUm CHILDRENS COLDS OVERNIGHT; TOWER ESSENCES Flavours: Vanilla. Almond. Strawberry and I-emnn l'er Bottle of one fluid ounce kt t ONCE TRIED ALWAYS DEMANDED TABLE BAY brand CAPE ROCK LOBSTER Ask your grocer 'or this famous brand. A shipment has just arrived. ^^___ Per 8-ounce tin This PUa&ant Ointment Brings Swift Relief in 2 Direct Ways at Once AIL OVER 7HEWOBID inOVC. ^thcbest-ki i. Ark i.nnih' -Just rublf ondM sf.Cn t and > I rauntrtesi lam rancdy nd now you can irv it in your id back IB, tool HE FEELS BETTER RIGHT AWAY! I SOOTM1S1C M'OICINAlVAPOUaS. *>i •' u itow oi • ith ever) breath, (M 11 ithe Irritation, make J i.i % %  t-.ttCI ACTION \\ I 1 | %  \ go Va theitin,; hat >|i ickly "diaws t.i THIS HKF SIMPLE TREATMENT REUEVES AIL THESE DISCOMFORTS V 1 Soothes Mi throot \ Drews oul" congethon ( | fo,m coughing WOrOJkFUl DAYTIME COMFORT FOR YOU I .. it .. %  .: t Bj NOW rwo^ins i jar or I roiiwh dJtfl lew-will i



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PACE rorRTriN si sn\v \rnll ICI4 .% HI til \ BRITAIN American bain* come an* go %  Brown habeen n:ven the British e^uiMlent of th.Broni cheer by wummoiiccU;m But perhaps Brawn shouldn't be blamed too He was ovrTWbelmed by the catonred Brituh Middleweight rhan Randolph Turpin Brown last ed two rouwK and la consideree lncky to hsv* :vni"d dio.ter Uiai loafOur puf'ire -.bows Blown colpot paid to any hop*" lapsine after a otorn at hlnw* hae* mafctna >n< fortune In Britain. The nun •wnding over him i* lUndolpr Orchids Outstanding At Horticultural Show Miss Olive n.i Rocha of River ; outMtndin* cifhibJl In %  tin' Hortirultu I bition held al Queen'i P terriay. The orchids were more Supply Talks End i aw unovi of ; riaa for anthuriums. • coll. etlOO Of mlMd colours, not inurcthan 12 specimen* by Mr. J. W. Chandler of Toddt. Anthuriuina fxanally, nf average standard. I nan nourishing %  be huge bMKkl "f rnbbhKi' were included in the M School exhlbfta, Tim .school n special prln of $5 for ihe bed cnllectJan of by a arhool. Then wen %  me bananas about number Ui*n were^n^-ed aVthe j. 0 ini : he 'ns at ir.o exhibition annual exhibition and Ihe varlo i 2 !" • %  . 52SS! i, ", r a c !" * P r,re w orally was remarkable. "...n"^^ S*. "' ""' %  Ml A A D"""""* (titaldadi because ihe season is almost rin " !" of *• JonM „ Mr I QltbMM KhlEht. | i %  shed. Miss i);, Rocha', was .. p,u r r w *' m ,ht i'""'"; 1 1 (Grenada), Mr A it cooltwhiut phalaenopati Huaritanii *•**•• w !" or l !" Urtlaiie (St. Lucia) Mr A v y A Hanta-i ... -J. hybrid ' %  at). Mi H r. first prize In IU division ..f n.ajonty of try | bjng, (Dominica), Mr %¡ \\ l/r. A. Smith U< 1> Explains His Statement Mr. L, I -.'I in ... vine ceo/ ins Party It wan %  m account of failure to Ret rl|; i thr passing of an Ad* I mbcr off TluMM "" 4 i'K'pe.11 %  %  A Dowdinl a/aa the i anil in %  Smith c\i ,. % %  that he lid i l pa 11 a lo glvv' UnU .r help bcf.rc the end of tho He added th • that he would - %  *. Saturda*, Mr. K A 1 D, p. Mat M>D White (Jamaica), i L '\ *^ ts %  as *a^Bsi i £\ 41 ofdalmi and was up f(.: ha Cup Thrtv wa* no horticuHui..! axJdbition Incc 1045 due eapc cloll}' to iiroiicht Many plan) growers were unable lo carry their flowers ul the i %  %  the rain which fell Thursday, Friday and Friday nighi A f.iluu' which was introduced .it the exhibitior was the "Garden". This formed a back. ,,„ %  ,. paiXOO who felt like dOOlg M %  'ii a cord hl el< ctl.ni f..i Pan fan ii (Oavaloprna Organiviiti.iTi i B i) and weiC A. Kiirioii Madr Assl. Lihruriuii B i: Rr.if,,,i the Development and Welfare Organlsallo i %  %  ha rotlowlng | its i d from HaaUi juatanlaj The Cortfaranoa found thai nti Mr C. A. Burton hiin iH-e.i appolntad Assistant Librarian with effect from 1st May. |M. He will """ wholilha hupply of o be required to Ul < baao inamtnlned fairly iet.^1 lr "'nint at a rocognUed Bchoo) >.1 ifutarij but shortages h Si H2S? hall Mr Burt0 . wh< '" 29 mn "f %  number of commodibes KcludrdoiAu-M Jl e holdt London Unlvcrsily ,n caitstie soda, siilpliii.i. 1 Oenei-rd F.vti-rnnl It A i V.,.,I..I. UnC BTM tin pi >t.%  products. Spetinl examinatlw Ha .'.. ducafad ii rUnlaon CoJ ha ie g e and gained u Hlfhai Bohool ln i Uu !" ,|u raj te with dlattnetlona In •* %  • In prlc iln textile i Iraak, Aneh M HJjtorj and •'" Literature and attained ..pen which were In moal dannand MS S3MABT! . He. plays \\ safe—takes no unnecessary chances. Our commercial trucks and cars are fully COVtred against loss /rom daurtage claims, lire, accident, collision and theft. And all by %  .simile one-cost (and low cost) Insurance Policy. It is a LLOYD'S "II.P. M COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE POLICY, issued here in Bridgetown by J. B. LE8UE & CO, Ii tills our need exactly. Ti^^s dCn ssS^a/Tu.'V'' 'i" 1 '-'11 Jrt*wl *X ta Bntflah, ''"". %  "!" Un plate and other metal SSL 1 ? for^whaTwouW SSL-^^ pathways in i i i had the appaarai turf. On the edge of the platform there was a hedge of flowers .n ,„ )(n Scholarship Stan d a r d. Si il ba erved on the %  tall of HaiTisiin CoUeae from September, i4i to April, law. K23J Ii %  lluik growths %  i I % %  palms and different vine ('.-In ii Touch Probably etvuif tin* tx-st Impraa. .iii> tow h among oil „ tlie flowers in the hall was th/; Tobagv. bunch of varbena In mauve and %  white, red and wttlto and Otbai __ . colour*. Tlis was MrL K 1 <>Slt |'(la\ S Kuilllull Nicholls* .r Hill View, St. Philip andwon iirstartaain III aacUon Bnortly afwr J.iri u.m yaati The Be/war which caught the Kctting out of their beds pretty and well tiea •• "**" • %  w"I b )(.,„,. yon .. Oral prtst I r bar ,: "" '' %  %  "" l %  %  ,,: ' %  ainfle specimen of lilies A.O.V. no 'vnsidcred to be heavy. Ownv,;. than one occasion com* f W ,<>" ,,ttw " ments such a* 'I am glad I did "venllled with wataf and nTSeiid mv l.liw? : !" *Sc? hraVrl J m !" Str >l £ 1 aa tlvr >.peetatorK paused the UUaa' haltai pan i y> were noticed walking through the %  perhaps ita flourishing water one %  reanaa dk) ool fare to ell „s she slipped and fell ml'. which rmric the Judges decide on the water while trying to cross f %  !okei. th? "* lU r V,,,i0 T'"' Coal ihscusse methods by which controli l. licence enuid 1K> ralaaaad over islderable range of %  soft currency areas. •-he winning fern, but all the fen had a healthy fre Trnffir lion*. No. 31 Mn no) in ii.any .idjusl. menu while (ravelling—Stop an J made them in Safety. S|..i. r nuili i\ Jil.lhl,. I>v CANAI1A 11RV far Safer Motoring s IPN t Nelson Street w,i flooded state and cyclists and drt* ers did not exercise any • %  tion for padaatrlana as they drove and rode In their usual rcckU**s i.'.ashing the water hen* and there in the countn DO damagaa wer.. reported by I'l'lue PDBtl but Dlt* tna C" ulinh had (In I %  %  rainfall <•[ one inch and seven parti was Nportnd t" i Crab Hill also rrct an inch in rainfall Other Igurtl up lo 0 .i : I * ra Central w pan*. Dhwrtet A M part-, DuTtrtet li. H pairs. District D. 02 parts, Dlstlcl F IS parts. The Weather TO DAI %  an Hues :, || j m SUP BwtM tlOpm Moon .1.4*1 Cluaneri: April Uichlini: 6 30 p m li ii Hater: 3 II i m., 3 S3 p aa. \ I BTBatDAV R.iinf..|l tl odrinclonl: I 47 Ino Total far Month | Venter day: 4 03 Ins. IVmiH-i.tun(Mm 710 F Wind Direction: (H a m I K... (II a.at.) B.B.I Wind Velocity: 4 miles per hour riarnmru-r: (t s.m > 79 B*>. til a m.) 19 971 S LADIES' SWIM SUITS by MARTIN WHITE Flowered Collon. Nylon Sci.i and Velvot. In arylea lo ami all '.atlei. Scparale bra c. .id trunks, wholo piece with ofi ghouldor SiTopo, ale. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. Ltd. 10 13 Broad Si. WfcGMH HOuSt 30 SWAN STREET estBuiislor ONE WEEK ONLY SUPER SPECIALS REMNANTS CREPES. PLAIN & FLOWERED regular up to $2.40 NOW 81.40 SPUNS PRINTED regular up to $1.44 — NOW 89c. RED & BLACK SPUN LINEN regular $1.18 — NOV. 89ft PRINTS 36" wide 58c Ladies' & Children's PANTIES & VESTS-Rduced Pric GENTS" SHIRTS-Hundred. to choose from r?> YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED S. ALTMAN Prop. Phone 2702 iO w O o C 0000'C>0^0'0'>0^0000^ / 'Look lor lha Names of (he Cycle and A Ihlelic Male and Female Stars from Ihe C.aubbean who will invade Bimshlie • Programme Etc. appears Lai. r J. W. MAYNARD Hon. Secretary I SPECIALISTS MX HIGH CLASS TAILORING OF ALL KlXttS C.B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTOX LAAE I





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\ I SUNDAY, APRIL 2i. 1931 SUNDAY M1MK \lt The Hott wh didn't think Ihej -r(<• % %  i> i.. fight nail in ri bark :— THE GLORIOUS 27TH BRIGADE 'WE'LL GO ON HITTING THEM FOR SIX' u SIII.\I-:I IIOIU\ VERY SOON UMMM Edward Cunningham of OH Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, will stand up in Ins wheel chair in an Aldershot hospital to see if he can walk on the artificial leg they are going to fit him. in.-.limit ./<•/,>/ i\ mv.v snVGOLS ton JtSTHU "The (milks will nrvrt drive the Argyll* off this hill %  |j.[ wards of Major Kenneth MMlr. V.C. of it-..Arulla Cast Land Forces: "Shoot taM, shoot tra;ht, shoot to kill. You cury the honour of the British Army and the British people." A badly wounded N.C.O remembered: "Wa felt pretty mi portent. We were Ibl Britons in Korea. A Page of Glory .... CYRIL AYNSLfcY. Sunday l Mm — Special Correspondent, in Tokyo, omblea:— The ?7th Brigade entered the Korea War at the expre-. General MacArthur. who He lost his own on November 1 in Korea. He was Just out of school and barely 1. yet he was leading his platoon, fighting in the glorious 21th Brigade. In another ward Corporal George Patta. aged 21, of the Mid. dlesex Regiment, is waiting for of them to d-id an inch and a half wanted infantry badly, of leather to his right boot heel They landed at Pusan on August *•> that he can do sway with irons. 28 from Hongkong dressed in He waii shot in both legs and his jungle green anil all raaidg for the right thigh-bone shattered In summer campaign. By November Kore;. un October 30. He, too, was & a ft-w <*exv still in jungle gre-n a soldier of the 27th. an( the brigade was tied lip in %  '•ill! In pretty desperate battle at I'vk There are more of them in this chong. hnspit.il. and in .Glasgow hosThfv reached Taechon. 40 or 5rt ultra as well. All wounded in miles south pf the Yalu Rivi-r Korea, all fighting for the 2?th— And it was from there that they months ago. Yet the 27th is still were put in reverse and began tlio in the line The brigade has been long trek back. almost continuously in action since In Front early September177day 9 out o! The | inP W a< stabili<-,,<• your men climbing hill.-, and the relief of the brigade. Yesterne did so. day they were still killing Colonel Andrew Man. %  trond In Ccmmunlsfct. rommand. was no leas a goou But unni the men thtre la n^hler I remember over a nobmernesA Without exception, whisky and soda he said: 'TheynHL* 1 proud %  belong to the great soldiers. The great pom* is -ytb. InB t we've had them away from Sharing Lieutenant Cunningmother's apron firing for a long ham's ward is MAJOR J. A. ,i me K PENMAN, or the Argyll and "Mother, and members of Parbuther lands. He was twice Uament. are the worst enemies of wounded In Korea, and won a bar Army officers They ask loo many to his M.C. In November fcr resquestions." cuing other wounded under fire. Today, the brigade are on the He said: -There is a terrilV 38th Parallel. THIS PAIKTINO. one of 9 appr-.-irmg in oolonr in LITE InWniatioiialv Apiil o Iwma, daalet* the trial if John Prior Zeitgvr. a iiewi|japr apprentice in colonial America wl •> %  brouglil to trial tot ltli*l nfur founding Ills own paper and writing an lione-t account of a rrooked election fight in 1733. RU lawyer, demanding that the jury men free Zenger iJtowu in witness boi). .aid mich a dotl-ion would secure the right "t>oth of exposing and opposing arbitrary power by •puking and writing truth". The verdict of "not guilty" not only establlaiiad the -.trength of the Jury *>-*teni in America, hut astabIlshed 4 strong precedent for freedom of the press—a principle later to '>e Included in the American Bill of Bights. LIFE commissioned artist Federlco Caxtellon to do these paintings rtrpicting memoiablo victories in the fight for Justice, and called on the Honourable Jerome Frank, eminent U.S. Judge to write the text.— Pftofu cvurtvsy LIFE lull. CopyriyUt TIME Inc 1951. brigade spirit. Morale is high. Oi men know what thev are fighting for. "and they know that their good soldiering and steady determination will tK-at Communist hordes with all then spasmodic lanali,ism." Hv!,m Strength Tntn were Just the 1st Batlahon of the Argylls. <"The Thin Red Lino") and the 1st Battalion of the Middlesex ("The Die-Hard?") when the brigade arrived In Korea in August But two battalions are only twothirds of a brigade, and atca battalion was below strength were fewer than 2.000 Iee it was a Y OU may have noticed, ir you ymir holiday free, are observant, that thi is Our soft drink expert laughed •I.ttnw .t.,i when the British "U nis cheeks were wet with OOntevOM going, t* 1 *" *>f citric acid All he ~ Have you wVwi Ui-n k> Well, what about comiil| buruugll. wln'11the %  %  ;. i,;vw. had no tanks or artillery, and little >' cl wen tu9 nephew transport. unlikely that they will meet ii Corporal Potts, therefore, echoed the immediate future unless ai the feelings of both officers and official meeting is arranged in thi men when he told mi: "We thought we were just a token force sent for political rth&ons. and too weak In numbers to be much good in a fight." Mm in Nfi'imore than a week ihey seized their chances to hit Ihe enemy*. Potts was a trainee, draughtsman when hidecided in March 1H47 to make the Army his career. He led the first patrol at the Haklong crossing before the i!r-i big advance. Two months later ffice of Mr. Patrick^ GordonWalker, the Secretary for Com mon wealth Relations. Unofficial attempts made by Seretse's cousin (a law student in London) and an English friend have failed. Seretse continues to live In to-day I,ondon with his wife, Ruth, and Nation their daughter. Jacqueline. In n Drink Maiiuacturers. Chelsea flat. His uncle is in OxTon tame" H. nil that'l all \:>u ford as the guest of Miss Marjoric know al>out conferences. Just you Perham. the authority on Colonial wait till all we soft drink manuoffalrs. But Seretse has become faeturers get together i u bklh murmur was "Super." Altar the mayor lefl the confeii-iue the delegates v.cte given n rousing lecture on "The Future of Ihe Soft Drinks Bottle." My son did not attend this. He had made friends with dren of a lemonade* manufaiU'n tr, and they had gone nff to do . gfii ; t ^ .ft dunking. The children of aof| drink turwfl play an inipoi'l.i:.1 tha trade. Their fathvis unable to trust their own palates. %  ilh I conference of the dose their offspring with queei v"f I Association of Soft concoctions and nole reactions '££]* Ixirdly Ones V*V boy. In Ihe company ol ^ III-:KNAKI) WICKSTEED*S PRIVATE l BSTIVAL (No. 5 in Uie ferles) inkes his son to a chick-tail party ... STAMP OF THE WEEK Wt'll have to run very fast to win next year T .imp Dim.< a Waiullil to ,\ tin !i" win train 1* ,u win. ct*> I B tl>•tffi; %  t naid ctl'iripK:. —lh ., \. %  • Nt> onn. Japan won ., 1 iu aas Tlie Uniip %  mbi.uig th 1 rflla I. \ H lonilta Bipreis Srrvio MILL ALIVE wltmrrd People In Britain British Council Cf Churches Hold Conference LONDON ..I scientist*, wrel %  I • in ,-onf,Tcnee at the recentl>. 1 BfwMan of colour ad oaaate in Britain and arbat %  ...] discnminatioii No miiir siiitah].' place e*uUi have tievn chosen for the confet vncr. There are in Liverpool about e.ooo Ncgrue* or paraotu of Negro descent, and S.OOO of Then are Colonials from Africa ami the West Indies The Rev E Scale. Assistan Secretary of the British Council t*f Churches, who presided, n viewed the welfare facilities al ready provided for coloured pen pli in Britain; pa callad attanuon to complaint* nmmtg Colonials livi"n In this eouniry. that maj are l'ing l.e.ited with indifferenci Than claianid. he laid, lb* 1 pn i.i'li" and >h*pe of F.nglisl A social worker from Hul' Mid the extent u. which coloured pcoata wet-e admitted into British was still narrow. He 11 tba worda of a West Indian student at Hull who had sakl: "In Britain the coloured man is invited everywhere, but accepted now hen*" A Home Office representative leplving to questions about tin of eolaurtd children dactarad tlwt measures i.^. tlu: v.. n undai active eotudderaUotl %  in ihaaa days when wa Mai MI much ot racial antajwnl n tad Una Bishop ot Uvaf pool, d ini-"i to bo pfaaent %  ) ., t'onteience which seeks tl bring about raelal understandlni through Deneeful methods." Thc Chairman Informed th thill this was a prelim Inary to a larger oonfartnoi planned to take pli.ee in tlx immediate future. Aiming others In the public nHi iy was Professor T. S Siniey. head of the Fnrulty of Social Science at the University of UvcriMxil When I "poke to him afterwards, he said" "Colou pivjudiei* is rare anumg UvoiMB children, for they appaar t" a quite uninfluetu-ed b) MaM Oilferences In their Choi •* o CANNED WATER NEW YORK s. .iiLidfo.iv In Britain laaanU) 1 ..tight 20.000 tins of w ( alerdrinklng water from the Unite, Stalew. hut the people wh lannad the watar caunc* under land wn> Remarked tha Hmt 4 the chemical services in BalU nore, "the British aft CO m pWWsll lad by water and they [et plenty from above" NO FLEAS ON THIS DOG.. 'Lorcianc' Dusting I ^Mar ; gamma B.ll.t M ^^ ivsion don pinUMtt aasd a %  4fH> %  l*HLOREXANE DUSTING POWDER (MI'IHUI 1 HIAIIC U il'll\K\1\ll lit tl*. IIMIlil) 1 ".IIMMOW .., N( in,UK 1 ii-*ii>MDiiinMWi ^. S. BRVDI N ION! II Milltltds, MMIilli L A Y E N A see |H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.Distributor. %  such accomplished RANOOON Burmaae girl In Mandalay. ceililled ai dead, WH lMsln| inn It araa found ihe . top 1..Hi" %  • '0 ratalTa the coffin. The girl's parent had flln opened; tinatrfri ayai pop wpre llnt'eiiru Tafgat) home, the h^waTshoTroundm,' upKoreans %£&£' L^S / hil !" 2P TS l£* SW' J h i C *" r who came out of a house hiding InleR* 10 '" ft" here >s a growniK of drinking through ati.r behind a familv with three chll' Pllll| 8 of hostility between them. thp wickedness of tha Governdren. His offlcer was killed on When the last effort to arrange meiit's sugnr policy the spot. a meeting at Oxford was made. ror added fun let*! take a sxiftThey were then 25 miles from Seretse decided at Ihe eleventh drink consumer along with the Manchurlan border. hour not to go. My son fPhlllp. aged 11. f s just Hardened Youni-stcrs n eM l u,n a fortnight. Seretse the Mtow for tno lob HJ "The Gooks are eood at infllwin ^ "'"'I* 'or his Bar Finals "V 'or soft drinks is astonishing. "" examinations. If successful and There TOU .,:e What did I t*fi ailed to the Bar, he will oulomayou' The iirospect of meeting pw" returned to life. Prodigy tratlog and at hiding themtolves." nakl the corporal, "but they are poor shots and too fond of running away. "Our men are young but they g| at a disadvantage, and felt (is you and I feel wnen l>ei pie t.ilk to us in a lordly *HDj about Uie merits of unknown .1, CABTAGENA. However, he sot his own back. A hen owned by < artageni.m After a passion fruit Juice, follaid an egg with throe yolks. ,,„, lowed by a pineapple squash and which weighed 170 grammes two l/Jpbarr cordials, he said: Two hours later It laid nnuthei "I must be going now. I have to :Uyoke egg weighing 150 return to the Press table" grammes. Cartagena town HKUI Arier the morning session the HI have given the her. Uver lining tlcally become a barrister. SctenOfiada rujer beer &&£. *^TliJS. So talk "'*' C P """ retse Khama is convinced that hil>'"ns ha 1for chances of becoming chief of the medlati .ught the hardened in hill warfare tacl Bamang*ato tribe are very poor. *ni I tics in Hongkong. They had got Hu uncle or. the other hand, is Bill <"' hM UtOdKt the measure of the enemv before negotiatlrg to be allowed to restone gingors and a llr*y lemon. I left. The 27th will go on hitturn to Bechuanaland. Tshekedi adc before he's half-way I ting them for .-ix as long as need wants power and progress for his The cc.nfeniue ami OtnciaJJ* he." leople. Bechuanaland for Bechu. welcomed by HM Mayor of ScarLANCE CORPORAL SYME. P nas. borough. Alderman Rodney aged 21. of Clydebank, Glaagow. There is a marked change of Chapman. AH the best confer•M shot ID the jroln on Hill 2t2 opinion of Seretse Khama's con nrp 1 nrp welcomed by mayoron September 23—in the HM troversy in coloured student cirAlderman Chapman is not action In which Major Mulr. the cles here in London. was about the seven-ounce botth*. — the family-sized bottle. nd the niething really good come 1 suggested abolllion of the "baby." to my nMM A man standing next to me He o pene d a cupboard and said: "There is only one thing you expected me to *. %  for it. We shall have to educate hotMe.s containing lirlllJant-hue most famous of all the 27th. won against Seretse bee. his VC. and died. Some students feel that Seret-e npeeeh. and found that by mis "We were short of stretchers, so Khama is 4'oid of that sense of retake, he had brought one meant I walked about 600 yards to a aponsibillty which is the prefor the Red CroM My boy. bubregimental aid post." said Syme. requisite for a chieftain's po"ling carbon dioxide, thought thai J 1 lv The lance-corporal hopes to be sitlon. Another school of coloured Wil the public up to drinkim: straight anotie fluids you rii rmm thc bottle." British conference. All that the It was a curious thing. Albottles contained was ,1 though av "" %  aa talking made in Scotland. And 1 bout the -.oft d^nk trade no one nil full-when w. The conlaranoe eontlni nd one of tl out of bed soon. And then?—"I University students hold tena. Warmed by the applause, the want to rejoin mv battalion, and clously to the view that for an mayor want on to say that all the 27th African chief to marry a "white" conferences were Before they left for Korea, thc woman is an aspersion on and a 27th w.TC told by Sir John Hardlowering of the dignity of African ing. Commander-in-Chief, Far chieftainship. III-HOYS! I I Maintain the Health of Jj your animals and preS vent Disease with S limit v nil ilium I* 1.01 a _,. %  • TI ingchief. he_/elt m his pocket lor Jjh soft dnnks wcfr hl i|(1 ibo||| ,. l( ll((lli ,„.„„„,„.,. party The boat Kefresliment Ihe same in the evening, super fun." after my junior reixirter h; RANCH BRAND MINERAL SALTS 11 mi i#r.t.M#.v n #/per It-ill" retired with a bottle ol pop I). his bad for the morning Refn Qka watar were in buiness for your %  imneral watei your ex|cnse* came oft* your inOne manufacturer came U come tax. and if vou were ..n and BBad: "If you want to Stock owners supplementing their feed with 'Ranch Brand Minerals know UWY BM supplying the finest quality minerals g each class of stock. KNU.IITS I.TU-4// Branches I chick-tail are the |un|0l •iim sui .1 rmd wii 1..un Fox. And the object Is It leit just how much pop can bonatu nad by to oqihans in on %  naenoon Ambulancaa coll a live. I have del.,, led ,„v assistan lo attend. He says it's going to 1> ti upcr-fun finding uui. I..FS G'Vf A BOX Of •BIMK MAtill (HOIOLATKS" for tl.iit Birthday Prasant Tranh slock of Chocolate" at lilil II WEATHERHEAD LTD. MOIRS 10c BARS Plnaapple Nut Milk Buddla Plain Chocolates Milk and many othars NEILSON *2c BARS Nut Rolls Roue buds nultana Ckarry Cream Macaroon Maltad Milk -Prppernunt" and many others CHOCOLATES IN BOXES Oat a Box of Candy for tlia Family over to* weok-end *V.'/,V,VA'/AW// P V///."' HARRISON'S BROAD ST liia I VJI 11 i #.'! Wire FOR IIKII rin % %  UUN III i tl In l* In.. i In 1 In .I 1 In. and Ins Ml'^ll OhUIn our IfUol.llnn. Iirl.rr buyltu rl.iMlirrr. 5 piece Toilet Sets in l.'nii.ii DMWVttm ONLY U57 prr SKT Charcoal Box Irons Tnp Lfar Kt.-nlnK I,' Ins ,il M ''i ilielli 1 V. ule. Pel v.il'i! i %  1.--i LTH -. 36 Inches tvid*—Per jrard 7h 90^ Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. Homo I 'rt-um AND SPARE FARTS INCLUDING — %  9 FLOATS. Ill II It If. ItlM.S. PINIONS TOP MJalrjHOI POWL -i'lMiiiDR1VINO Wlll-rlS WORM U lit I IS. F.tr. HARRISON'S LO sit2^ NTS -".'"."' %  %  ".'.'.'.'.'.'".'". %  •'.'•'.'. %  '. %  .'.•'.'• ^FOODHJEWS Take Advantage of These Specials. PLANTERS' SALTED I I v ptl Ha CAMI'IIKI.I.S SOUPS MAIIVKNS SI.HA WAil.l BA1XAN riNKS .„ on I' WHISK I % %  • M SI IN! \ I HAHS r I PRUNES IN urn* SU3IKO DANISH HYKW iti I SWIFTS CORNED .11 EXKTSR I'lt'NU' HAMS per 'b. I :.^ KHAPT ICE CREAM MIX ,. PASTIIV MIX III SMEDI EYS APHIC.IT JAM pel lb SWIFTS VIENNA SAUSAGES pel COCOHALT I*TUn I S3 LEMTNI MALTED MILK ; D EPHANT DATES I pkt. 1 TENDER LEAF TEA I -II -lb. M SLICED HAM per lb. IK SUCEO HAC.IN 1 .'II SLICED MORTADELLA SAUSAGE SALAMI SACSACE ... 1.41 Ill k M.I HM ,:l y|



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I'M.I Inilil -( sii.w ADVOCitTS M\H\Y, APRIL tt. 1W1 CLASSIFIED ADS. IlfMOeti IMS IBs. Marriage or Engager* •asriounceenent* in Car I chwige U 14 00 for en> number t w. U> to B* and • cent* Per word lor O** Mdillotai .n:d Terms cash. Fro-,* 1S4* between | and 4 p tn 1113 tor B*w*l Metlee* only after 4 pm Tba charge loc iiaaunffi-tnM Blrtha. Marriage* DvMha, Afknow leOginc.it*. and In |IH on •reek-der* .1.4 |1 SO on Sunday. lot -*ay DyNtbar of word* us to Mv 3 <-MMa NT ward an wewb-day* and 4 c*nt* per word on Sunday* lot ea. aO.J'-i..: *rOf I THANKS : l* (hiuufh this mfdium ..ti n ..... • %  <' nw Through Ihiiie.I..i %  inoi,s FOU KALE Mi*.-nun ther Hay* fp"-u-i Ihotr sympath/ JI our rtstent bereus emenl QCCB.ionsd | tteatl. of lONr m'NTR llunlr r.imlls Alley-tie Family %  %  1S Model V* Foid C n perfect working order ilh foul no ">rr> Appl' Mr Buhhcr. Co Hit j r, ; , ft Co laid BMI II PI HI H SA1IS rreal, par ago'* "•• -'id 12 >ewae par avofa If nimr-wn coarse II K •Ml |1 W a. JKada*. PI III .11 MHKIS u'-ek-da*,* Mill IIIVI I MNH tr aoot*> l(M tkar^a |] Ml aa.i It SB on Xaadava REAL BTATB %  •M Ii II V vum'. Alrru.il Ne„ Va-i.le Bungalow at ll Jam**. Oood Location a-id Bathing Wide Sand. Ba. %  ft Mi NOT it : rvutH i T. I.I Tha PamatMll Tirar-.icri I oa op i i'JW I C) 10* CAR-IK. i.par d* luia V^ r"J X-Wl. Partael runnlna; otdat ana! tn akcallanl randillnn A:W.>> mmrr drlvon Dial SO* B II -In 1 Badrr-om Cotlaaa al Ch Ct, Main H.I -Doui : ma (rn-n To a, ,J !" ,I CorKl.tioii %  '" i 'Modai i i . -, %  %  M* !.. <•) A T-i. *\air\ stu>taall Uiuirim and Raildanra iJirar Qatar-' Tudor r ftuay Araa. Varanl llrdlirad fro... did* In f!W A B UNB ,.I,.* T-u i. %  M Local -HI Rr-i i 1 JO* Alrooat Na IDK aakdanrr .. l.oc-...„ he^u..^i i-om a;i , to C1M* A RPaHiaisrr a( Rocklay Mam Road Naai Oood CondlUon and Lo*4Uoii. Rail'.M-m liom 3J0O to Cl.MI) Nail \ t Mr fo. .Voaily AnylhlK* In Baal E.lat* and Almoil In anv Dlilricl al Hlrj.ni ReSalc Vj| MT M..i;af u rC%Bl Wl., VJMI-Dlal :,lll D. F . who fell oit-p IBih law a drar faca Ihal Ii A dear voicr mat n •ullad %  in OUT hiimi TlJH navar can ba rillrd. Tnoaa town > platH*vv .llhrrad ai^l drravrd Bui ina love for you who i kaaaaaj I A| llt %  IMBI r.' IMI i CAB Haw Triumph M.yAawr| i p luaury car* lth .11 ti.r lalart imptovmr.rnu DfUIMuUhrd appaarancr. oulatahdlng partotmanca. Sa* lham al Cnatoaa Oaiaga ei Belajravr. Illnd-bur Sit.ibl< TRUCK: On* rood taorkin* Apply B A nthar iiaiiibairit by her lovin* Ml.ll. I. II. ... itliara•. Band... %  %  v Cotand .children M>* • •litari. Bamual CallatMl. Vitwai.t Phllllpa brolharBi. -I • .. THRU i deai 1 .. I lender i ...lied to raal Yi-ir gT-lkface Am nol lotBotter Al long a* Ufa a,-i n-mor> taal* -emamber you I know thai -hen OUT journey hen belou i* ovei. Yon ala wailing to fleet Uf In thai hjrppy land called home. Edna L 'ach .daughter >. Qnmel Ijncl . and family .al-li< 1111 I VIMrN \1 ARIJNCrON IIK.H SC'IKMJI. ( Rl WrTII\ .11)1 I WITH ntiT or rnt'CATioN I'r I.|H-II(Ml Tiiel' MM Annl It'll .irro ai CAI^0 -ifer calf Bred lloMi LIVKSTOCK me genNine '. bred ItnWtein %  aMMawtTON". Fontakelle %  buxUnf appro. |l HTM CHI tart D O'Neal I-atabelle U 4 II Hi rita Or u) bl ..(e Vidorla Stiet _. ISOkM wjuare f Ihe Sob Ii Septei-.ber tMXl. %  %  %  • %  r.ld In lha Srhoal ll.n .ii al t a.m. X Candidate, will i < Mnlnalloii who -ni the land it utanda on Price CI.S Vacant now For inapevtion and OUl pariicolar. applIn OArtv A Hc.i Also One .ion.Bungali.w with Iht land with Moch pena Apply lu D Al sett M ..in ii.,r,. ii,..! :t: ItVUI ONF. Hi ftye H F Ihree phaaa lolally icloied induct Ion motor. One ill Switch board fully filled One 2', i.,ply to HITCIIINSON A l \ MMI %  WANTED Tn Rr.N1 Can Ad 1 Mi marrl'-.l On %  quii. lodallen Horn Nnyenbe. 1S41 May Ift'l APIbrd> and car p.i-n-s A friend ol their* now tn Bt.'badu* has itsed to make arrange.nt, h p leaving Ihis month Piaata wrde giving rate*, bousv uddreaa. and phona number Full parlfecuLara tim naotherwise oRars cannot be conidcted Apply Box BU Co Advocsle ; 9 11.4 SI—4n %  Wftlinwi Saehalora American Style O nt later than Monday. th April II Ihev with Iheir KIDI ward, to sit the csaininallon. Sueli ..nplii'stion must ..Ie the boy. dale c( i„rth .upp-ited by a hirth baptism certitlcirte. It shall also state the School i dim ind %  [ %  nled by a tiriel Testimonial from the ol thai School I .tea are cspecled to piovlil.i ,i ..." pencil'*., pen. *• mler Llgt." KlreahnaHilB will bo on sal* nl the %  i; Will V..inc. -nd all other scbolsri -awnrdliig autbortn. please subtn.t i ol candidaU* In arrordance vilh Iho f..re*l rRrt'm tioiii nrrismrsT ] A Umlli ii m ..cur 1.. %  aputnbor, IBI. Hi Ihe Pn-p .i ii., ) %  %  .. Srho i Auplwallonma be --tui.ttt-.l to III. Il.4dnu.slei b psient* gutUlsn. oi : boy* who shall !-• Ml kM ol age. no. i..< nd a ii." year* of .me. t Hep;. I %  I,, ,i.i %  rriv* % %  dnad will and a ruler M. P1NDIJI Bex-nlary, \..i < iliennato REQUIRED SMMHHMKi Itiiiit. MCUMd by 1M Moriflugc on Fi'setiuld property on Frfrdrrk-k Si. I'.nt ..f Spun Contact V. P^ qu %  I OlVl *jig lnt*i Be-t offer over MOtVOU. Btiui -H4. BUI In MA1IB1JC ft tM*v u White Marble IP in.be. 1. 1 11 II liawf..nt 11 M 1. A S or PMB* *|g U 4 51 In urn i ; Black Mould suiUbU' l,n d \ppt, Ja (T Day taind 4 11 In NuX/KMA SKIN CKEAM OIKC again ,e ran offer ton Noxremu Citeawli'.. ,.-.1 rated skin Cream Get it >l Bruce PtANfTS I1e.h i ORDKU4, perleet Da Silve. alter 4 %  M 4 GREY HOUSE Church Street Speightstown l" be offered for EC lOMPFTITION I i Apill IT, M I1LADON P r •tone building with a dry <1> ui.rl gi'ieral .tore operated U-e ground floor which offer* for Ihe develoarnent i Yruiwond A Boyn J*Lkn <4. III.**!**.. A F N, f V.A I Opagiie Window S Ina wide pVjvph I %  * %  ] see,.',.,.i SI-.IHTI-NO PRINTS i high jggggg lerett are not> AltT DEPT Two PI ATK Obi iffer. Slant*Id 8.oil A Co l,. > %  : %  TI, ,Valmllne Tie SKaighl lla WATCIIK UlSCHIllI O % % %  .. J< t>rllr kVanM ssal* II JD o'clock Term> CASH IIKWMI; TROTMAN . CO Ail.hi-nrit-. LOYAL BROTHERS OF THE STAR Needieit Caics Fund VACANT POSTS Ive I III. nicer. Works and Hydraulic* l>p*rlmf>Bt. Trinidad and Tobazo. CORRECTION Applications ate invited bv ihe Government of Trinidad and Tobago 'or two ports of Executive Engineer. Works and H.vdi.iulicii Department The postn are pensionable and the salary will be in th. S3.120—120—$3,840 — 240—15.280 per annum. A commencing salary ;iliove the minimum may be i>;iid to the candidates selected if their experience, qualificall sBFvice warrant it. Appointments will be on probation for two yenrs in the llrt instance. In other respects the appointments will be subject to the Colonial Regulations and the local Civil Service Regulations and Instructions. The duties attaching to the post f Executive Engineer are as folaws; To take charge of all works o maintenance and eon letkn of buildings, roads and bridges of an Important territorial district and to be responsible for the full technical, administr.itive, financial and disciplinary control of the district. Candidates should posses oaf of lite (nlhiwing professional qualification*; Cm porate Membership of the Institution of Civil Engineers, rn .i l)i|ilniii.i of Degree exemplintt fmm Seilions A and 1' of Ihe Associate Membership Examination of the Institution of Civil Engineers wi'.h al least two (2) years post graduate experience on malnr civil engineering works. In Iht case of an overseas officer., Ihe conditions of employment in-! elude: (a) Provision of furnished, quarters for which a rental' of 10% of salary subject to' ,„ *.„,_., r***V a maximum of $50 per • _*"". ** s OB,r '' rnooUl is payable or in lieu: of quartern, payment of a house allowance equivalent' lo Ihe difference between e,i_ & rental paid for privately ** r *'* owned house and 10% of officer's monthly salary plus 5/12% of estimated value of furniture, subject to a maximum of $50 per month for a married officer, and $20 per month for Hed ofllcer; (b) Frit* fir*I class passages on Hist appointment for the officer and his family not exceeding five persons in al). SuHlect to review at any time and not as a permanent right of the officer. free passage on leave after a prescribed minimum tour not exceeding the cost of normal sea passages to the United Kingdom for the officer, his wife and children subject to a maximum of three adult fares; (.1 I'l.vincnl of outfit allowance of $288 DO to office i I mm non-lropii ;il inuntn. Ba lir-t appointment The successful candidates will be required to pass a medical ex. aniinalinn. They may also be re' X gulrad to serve and reside anyO where in the Colony at the Govt diseretic Canadian National Steamships be held on ^th and 9th June Quren's Park, the undersigned will receive entries for Ihe following: — (a) Costume Rands 10) bteel Bands (e) Ailv. iti-'M %  Hands, (ill Hifttoriral Bands In order In raise th' >i %  %  a' Carnival. Hie Steering Commlttr? would appreciate the cn-operallo' of Firm.. Clubs and Individual beinic as original as poaalblc No entrance fee will be eharged More particular* latei A Chrnlval Band of thirty wit be vlslllng Barhadci to Uke par in the parade. Closing date. 10th May SEYMOIR BBCKLEfl For Shi 11..,.11; Stall! contact C kl MORRIS, -.it Timni NO .ADY RODNKY %  IV NH.->u.. ADY RODNEY -ADY N1J.SO:; LADY RODNKY HI I II FMM M: LADY RODNBY LADY NELSON LADY BODNF.V LADY NXISON IADY RODNEY N I I May I Juno II July twite ll.-llfas Id Apr Boric* I* Apr. 11 M>y ll Juno Arrive* %  alia BMVITII IT Apr. 11 Apr. 12 May 11 June 11 July IB July IJ Aug. 14 Aug. Arrlvee %  art) SM 10 Mir 3 June 3 July .77 Jul/ W Aug. Arrive* Boston SI Slav 5 July IB Aug Arrlva* Anlroa Arrl*o %  I John tl-lHas MooUeal — M May W May — 10 June 1B JuI1 — in July %  J" 1 • a Aug u Aug. B Sept. II Sept. A.F s i %  v A Representative : GERALD WOOD filled V application to — nld storage mamj GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agenb. MAKE rOUI II I.I II \-l OF : ENAMELWARE From Our New Shipment Just Rcelved OIIIIMll sol \ l Mils (TRIOS. JEW US New Shipment opened THANIS VIMIIAI. IOIMII1V LTD. HAL lOl Niihi LTP. — rrogrltUri — Car. *f Bread a Tafac SUirU See us for the following Oflice REQUISITES Glass Ink Stands double and single Stump Racks, Rubber Slumps. Slump Puds nnd Ink. Paper Weights. Pen Trays in Glass. Stapling Machines and Staples to fit. Dnting Machines, Pins mid Slide-on-CHp Also Pencil Sharpeners UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON TUl'RSDAY IBlh bv nrd-r of Mi Auain Skumk-k we v. il< w-li hi. hou-. iruhoroiigh corner o We' T-e ..I. Il„ Up -i.i i uleSalt** %  11.... I.a,i. China Cabli i**wtll and I Ann I Hal Ci.ahlons. Coc-kt.il Tab' ...id Coflee Cilile M^l...(ta, Qlagg and thli Pfl i.lor i IS Flat Top De-k. Congnlei Bid Sleep Matt %  %  Vlalug IH.iu-.a Table. CBIM | ,i. i ... ladle with .priua. ..i.u be.li ila-ii. Chilli Tin-.. %  lairder. 1 Buniet Vnlor on I Oven. Kltche., Tabled, Klu i . i %  ., %  .ud other Item's eel lm I cundlti Ii. %  I'm %  kpri %  1.11 I II JO clock IB • ., |h BRANK1R. TROTMAN Auctioneers. roil SALE MISCELLANEOrS STUCK 1NUS 11. %  Ml New Shipment Just for you In ill modern sliadcs neve kafar* raw*r*d only 11 *4 pair Special pri. %  %  alar* Conta.1 KIBIMI.ANl s lt.'..il A Wholesale Dry flood* Store. fswari Street Dial fTll Applications should be submit^ led to the Colonial Secretary. Red Mouse. Port of Spain. u> r*at h hua not later than 30th April. 1051. Certified copies and not originals of testimonials should be submitted. J. O'CONNOR. Acting Colonial Sovietarv 8 4.51— 2n. I West Indian & British • S H>" '""* Craft-. Antiqueg''ryfy<'W'W^/^'//>'. COOKING BUTTER in full supply .-, lb. TlXSi or per lb. fiRIFHTirS Horklfy Dial 4514 FOR LONGER SUIYIII •f thi. prrvaniatlva trilal Mill available .,\^ WnSHBjsa gfdlja. %  To-da. K-Hahltshed I SMI a\u ,\ uMirm <>/ \\rir> uw; i/.f SMM now n§ t> s 11 \ ns CALL AND SECURE YOURS QUICKLY — ALSO — BATHROOM IlltS Coloured T. HERBERT Ltd. 10 A 11 Roehurk Sire* t and Macau FOR SALE MM Is ."Rim HOUIB", Hi,!.-.-.. Crow Boad -A dUtlncilve sad well.built two Moray ttoh* home sei well back in secluded ground* approii .me acre in eatenl. The %  arden* are well matured and there I* complete privacy from the roadway and adjoining prupert,. There is a lovcied ontranca porch large lounfc ilry vcrandBhs. a central alalr--, ...-_.,, ... %  .tractive feature, dining room, lour good lieJrvom*. k lichen butlei'. pan try itore12 !" •" %  .""' l on****. Ouuide ihere u a large garage, servant'* quarter*, eic An .-.trrrnrlv interiHiina and driiiable propfrty. "Ii Hlim i )tn Avenue Belleville Well maintained bungalow rurislructed <,f tUn9 „,,,„ WSllaba .h.r.gled roof. Th* 4CcornmodaUon con sis It of an eoclosed sailer), living room, dinni, room, four bedrooms, kllcheo. seratii room and double garage The propttiv haw a wide lawn at one side am small orchard and !ftfc '* ""'<"•*• Central ,e",denUI area near lown and (choolg. "WBIi-BBALL ii-M— Cedrlngton Hill. SI Mlchael-A Well pre*arved counlry borne leceally converted Into a block oi 4 *pjw'ou> luxury BaU, fitted with all "lodern convenience*. The grounds SEJ 0 ," h K2 "" ""i ^*i !.-! shiubbery and gardens and Ihere 1* a king carriageway p1*2? .^' nk 1 w,,n rna^oarany ues— "1 iri^'CSHuetit Tiruiiartv iu ii" 1 "'''' •*<*-**.',*!<&£ fKTiil""""" "" "* m "" rs;..?,rr"i"" n ,', H '"'* Ti "! : ?" ' P'nporlHWMl „. dmm. and br.aklu. room. niTSS*. '.', J** '"" '"•' %  fn IZZrZ*. L '" wnw ^. I"lcl>. .?. ^;„v jszx•.""' '•'"rtlfwy Y-. ,fp. Thar, i, ._ , ^ ron "UCt(On Mlh HSr.lM.1 SSuJS" i""" !" BrgSTJ! C *"'ai Th.rr arc 1 lundry. ""* row ^* Land. Bockley Ntw i Ullr, r,", JI "'. rtockle ih V ... C n 0, .""IWIns elopmen Fl thi rtf pop llI %  than iy — na*j/ ,1 Oolf Club. o2S B, "'i* '*>w. P,^., *A, V W.,!!^^ "t"****! lounge. -.,* Sa SKf i mm fi teoch .nd^Mf.^ing'* ""**' 1NCII MABLOff-Or. ,„„.„, H,.T— "•'" %  I* r4*o* and pina ^5t '. ~ "aw |„ 'paMnwnU but ,.y to r# convtrl. „• % %  •! me %  Pw.r IJi. inler.atir^ uiop-nv .. n..L u Ul'.J 1 ". 0010 "' n i" > %  ol lha E.lal Tnw ,lh ."i.',„r,""; "si!' "^"* * SyS^arsCS andah, |,om whkh ihara I. r IS. %  % %  %  %  '- %  The 1 blmem. .-.„ mndemlMllnn to ba 'Sirica out without (he pcioertv 9fftJ£J&Jp£yX5. %<•£'". r,ss ",'",y !" th* beach wuh eciieni baihlng FOR RENT '"AMIiy-i on Coail at Sands rurh i.hed Imm


PAGE 1

I'M.I I 01 I SUNDAY ADVOCATE SI MIW. AI'KII. 22, 1S1 Wilk BARBADOS CRICKET (JETS £2,000 mil Train 24 Footballer* , n. s. aippi \ ;wBoard nt of the Barbados that the* L 2.000 allocated to ihcm by the Beard M their share %  130.000 from the !• %  Mil t> %  UMI UM Board ol Manard of Mani M leg* the w. I Control oftrcial* that this money wi.ul.1 b> 1 Kensington nti. i | it bM come. Thr Q .. made a mo* %  .it Kensington n the Cloak ROOM I l( iu in the vicinity of 11200. Then ai itmenis thai mutht prevent the Cricket As*. %  .barking at once up-a an*, new accotnmodaiHm bu tl|0 -,, %  l i.v.rhauled and i i ., nucleus for an %  Ja Uln nal % %  eoniinodati r, plan in ihe future. CANNOT SEE THE POINT I FAIL to %  %  ho* lha Barb %  """'" % %  '• % %  ten the crick* I I I f Jamal u 1 % %  %  i which ihej could not five ihe West imi %  i pie ol -in invitation I AW Trin I to gain a place In -kket controlling .. in mi king tin I Mlbfe, yel I fail %  >. ->o how the scheme can tnice Its place wltr,. Vamoose Scores Second Tornado Victory Lclril Capsized Twice i 11 \i.AIN (HUM; TO UltlTISH Ol I ANA AS A EEL O NE i' I tuUU %  to**" 0 %  British Guiana In ;|1 element ot ti %  IMI Indies i-ve to leave around Uut time. Although one might safely role otfl the memben ol It* Wi I team > i having in ti. i % %  %  i 1 tour*, yet on cannot. visuaiiM imi to Tnnldad and Britlnh Guiana in the space „, lhril nty par cant of Baa parabnaw n these twn teams belnrf llu IHM men. That being the CBS*, will they be able to obtain the necessary leave for both lours? If this Is not so, then the teams can hardly be called reproaant ASKINC. TWENTY-FOUR TO GO I UNDERSTAND that the Barbados 1'iuket Board of Management are planning to circularise twenty four players asking whether thev are willing to make both tours if selected and will then act upon the laetj raWmtaCj by this questionnaire. One ran ;t once appreciate the view thai these tours, with the •tars for the Australian team unavailable for local consumption and the majority not being BbtS to make both tours, constitute cxcelK nt scope for lesser lights lo ihOW their wares and should prove a good invest:,, Intercolonial and West Indies crteket. While itgreeing with thi* point. I must point out on the othei ha n,i tl i ""'>• "light margin between the burlesque and the experimental. HI n Ml WAS "TOPS" f WAS among a BU1 IgsjgsjcttUva audience al the Y M.P.C. Club 1 Houss .n Wilniiii Bight to hear Dr. Bertie Clarke lead of! ^^^^ — a discussion on sport with special reference to cricket Jl was the consensus of opinion that not only does Bertie know his cricket but he knows his critical Barbadian audience as well. His answers to some real posers were hones', and spontaneous and although some were not definitely decisive yet the) were Mceptad I honest. For example he did not propose ho li the better ail roundrr Went Indian professionals on coaching engageiBy our YarhUng i ormpandfnl) VfAMOOSr: was \m T the Second Tornado Regalia which was gailed ba Carlisle Bay ycslerd.v ing. She was skippered by hoi owner, Teddj Hoad, who .i proved himself ihe best helmsman In unhamiicapped in i Tho weather conditions wire ideal for Tornado raemg, Durini; the lirst half of the race the wind i I •urn but in ihe closing ;lages it ch.inged to medium to %  • %  (.otiLs sailed not' for tho first time but th, affect the hsdgssnenl i the bouna. i n I -Inl I pp i owiu-r. [van Pi rktns, turned lu I in the last lap. ll o unfoitunate that this should happt-i an are alreadj m the habit i f calling her owi ] taking | i \ .im\ Gerald Nfcholli In (xunr. t'>clne llnished third, two minutes and 45 seconds behind faaaqrr John Hladon sailed extremely well in the last lap. He had a bit of (rouble in this lap when an Alcoa boat which was leaving the harbour, crossed him. lie wag, however, able to snatch fourth place from Breakaway around the beagle in Ihe last hip Breakaway Clainnonte De|>eiia B.C.L. batIwJ^Jl 42? iSSSL^ "£ on f %  '"'•' "" %  •. team sco. Alcoa boat but finished only 22 i 2 fn on fMdav II.. >.< ulovm ( ornes came sixtn. four n.ituitev I>I ..... ,,,,,. ., ,i i,u side scorei • % %  h > 29 i^r ls 'r h ; n PI i];T-OK-SPAlN. April 11. 11 Trinidad retained the Brandon \\ Trophy tf Treatrgll and Ho II beat Stuidv and Farquharson I) of Jamaica m a thrilling Bve • *; double match 6—3, 3—fl. 1—6 and Trinidad came back with H I, 6—3. The match lasted for ten mlnutel 1-e Hong who is ill Was I by Farquharson. The Governor and Lady Ranee saw the match in line wea t her KID RALPH REACHES TRINIDAD of tn %  ana iiieiit i in the W.: i Indies. I shall a wail with interest any action which Ihe West Indies erJcket authorities might take on this advice, coming as It has from one who bafl made hit) mark In world cricket. FOOTBALLERS TRAIN FOR JAMAICA TOl'R A RRANGEMENTS hnvc been concluded for the staging of a foothall tnurnarm nt here belweon a team composed of member* of the Kingston ,-,nd Mcllxnirne t'Uibs of Jamaica. i I iptain at well as .even Jamaican caps will be taking part in the llxtures which open on Monday, May 21. To this end, Mr. O. Wilkes of the U>dge School will commence coaching twenty-four Barbadian players from whom the leains. will be selected. They begin on Wednesday next and Judging from the equipment which Mr. Wilkes has ordered the training will not be %  SUIKI.IV school :ii* tli At lea %  eiiTht I..1U ll.akNiaid. wicket stickn. jumpini: poles and tape have I I.-N i. iiin^itioiu'd and the bms ;ll ,anxion to \ reraa; w. Howorth. 12 Tdatl Cyclists For Barbados Sports (By A Correspondent) Arrangements for the Annual Athletic and Cycle Sports meeting ef (he Amateur Athletic Associa i*on of Barbados m §0 and a grand bit of newis that 12 Trinidad cyclists wih definitely be making the trip. Thi> was revealed yesterday by the. secretary of th e Association winhas been Informed officially by the Secretary of the "AH Stars'* Cvcle Club of Trinidad. Four ol these twelve will be, "A' class cyclists and among them ari Cecil Phelps. Uric Lewis an*. Alric Lewis who recently represented Trinidad at the Pan Amen con Games In South America, a well as Freddie de Peza. wel known Barbadian cyclist no* living bi Trinidad. The "U" da* men will include Horace Boyce Herman Bernard, Rupert P at en mid Lennox Long of Ail Gomez of Saddle Boys. Gerald Pal nandez of Barbican Wheelers, an Doc Carew of Whiz Wh addition thenw.n ba onfoi the Intermediate class, name) Mlkey Mendo/.i of Cyclones Cych Club These twelve men represent %  good cross section of the cycling latent in Trinidad to-day am should be worthy of the •teal which Barbados can put Ir the field against them A hoped that Gordon from V.''. ll I inaklng the trip it cun read %  •:!.: %  . evi le i;.' are in %  la whan Whitsuiuidc an The teerwtai A A A H ?lso revealed that InTltal lad to two Policenipn fron Trinidad and lo MIM Eileen Kirn away with events at Trinii'.id' who only last week waa running South~ni G..HM Connell lops Rifle Shoot Lt. Colon,! J Cornell scored 95 points out of a possible 100 to top the Qualifying Stage of the Frontenae Trophy and the Team Shoot of the Barbados Rifle Association which ran concurrently at the Government range yesterday. He made 49 points out of a possible .in in the Qualifying Stage of the Frontenae Trophy, dropping the point in his first shoot at 500 yards. Shooting conditions were good. The light was dull but steady. It was a 10-round shoot at ranges of 300 and 500 yards. Twenty-three marksmen entered for the Qualifying Stage of the Frontenae Trophy. In the first sixteen were Lt. Colonel j. Connell. 95, Mr. G. F. Pilgrim, 94. Mr. M. R. DeVerlcuil. 92. Captain C. E. Neblett. 92. Mr. T. A. L Roberts, 92. Mr M. D. Thomas, 11, Mi G. E. Martin. 90, Major A. S. Warren. 90. Captain S. Weathcrhead, 89, Major J. K Marshall, 89. Mr. M A. Tucker, Griffith, 89. R S.M. H. B. G. 89, Captain C. R. E. Warner. 88. Mr. M. G. Tucker. 87, Mr. G. C. May. 86 and Mr P. Chase. 85. Red House came llrst with 450 points in the Team Shoot, closely run by Blue House which scored 448 points. Yellow House came third with 434 points. Red House was represented bv Mr. G. Pilgrim, 94. Mr. T. A. L. Roberts. 92.. Major A. S. Warren. 90. Captain S. Weathcrhead. 8H and Mr. P. Chase, 85. KACING PERSONALITIES Stewards, Jockeys Ex-Amateur Riders Hy ROOKItt TV) DAY my column shall be. for n gv^BBjj. X about i.upliinstead of horses. I realise It is ga^BI seldom that I ever mention personalities of the { %  I I turf but 1 am sure that my friends do not mind •j,^^' II .hey Would much rather read about the %  %  f] ^B horses than H %  ^^MaBBH Honour Mr Justice K. Vincent Brown. A %  ^^^^B Vice-president and Steward of the Trinidad Turf **^B ^M %  .d also a Steward at Union Park, this is ^ %  H Mr Vlncenl Browna eaDBBd visit to Barbados for ^.m ant %  recuperative holi ^gM| ^V and thence back lo Trinidad, bga^^r"^ Brown should have taken in our •aaaas*' ..,., nul n ^ ln f au [ t y stabling arrangements he found himself without accommodation and was forced to M rrom the local track back to his home ground. He then embarked on a trip to the country of Footmark and while his stay there was too short for him to see any racing he did onng back some impressions of the racing set-up after meeting a en of the Jamaica turf Like nearly everybody nalca he feel* that they will continue to breed we do. at least for some tune to ? his slay ere he has seen both Star wltftel Hy has impressed with %  I reduce am rtrst class race ... lit i„ % %  i reaulai visitor lo our ilaorai and on v Steward nt our meetings. Universities Win AMATEUR CUP arrived he for his bout Corral Mutenii I'OltT-llF-Sl'AIN. April IV l.-oking tit, Kid Ralph, tripli %  iipion of Barb.idos Frl. April 27—Harrison College WEMBLEY Middlesex, April 21 %  n Tuesday ntghl vs. Wanderers at College. Pegasus, 'the combined Oxford ,vith Gentle Danjcl Referee O. Graham. a nd Cambridge Universities team, light heavyweight Foundation fO Combermere nt WOn the English Football Associa Foundation. tion Amateur Cup by beatinj Rafaraai L. Parris. Bishop Auckland from Durham Fmpire %  < Carlton at Black county 2—1 in the final here to Rock. day. —Renter. Referee: J. Archer. R'llmrnl eg, Everton at Garrison. Keferee" A. Parris. Police VS, Notre Dame at Park. Keferee: O. Robinson. SETS NEW RECORD Tuesday WaUraan "bat SI. Leonard!. KeftToo Mr. O. Grnham. Wedncsdiiy. April IStta Wr-ierners "A" vs. HnrktllTo %  SI Lcoruird-s. Referee Mr. C. E WASHINGTON, April Jl. rf.... .„.„ M. 0 Miss Ana n. Branger, a brnnP,„, rt .„ A '"' J '. ,h 'lX r ," "" %  "" <•'"" V.HMU.U. elaimed VrJ Archer Wmt ,,„i., v %  new world allitu.le record lor Ihe linhlcsl o( bjhtwri(M FREE FOR ALL In I25 hours in her super rub. SYDNEY she flew 26.802 feet over the The Harrison College team ivi ", i*>'£T r ." K "' %  '"" "'.", S i ^, • ccl >" l "' %  ><" which concluded Its clunfcmcnt (Vu'ton.tl. which erlehrntcd it* dashlx.aid Raune. with Q R C on Friday is expectCtllMMiy thU wttk, tad proinll The pnMDt record of 2C.770 ed homo this morning. SUT.,^ : '": „ U '"":"'' ';', ""' ir 1 "^"'' d by Pr ch *•"< %  •<*" %  They ll the.r nn.l enwsenrt hundred applicants. Then Miss Branger's claim ll lo be menl a football match r,."" ,?'^ !" s '"" Iu 1 "" 1 omc, "" y K& i£bffi TS —Hcuter. a long time. HARRISON COLLEGE TEAM HOME TODAY I lend NOTICE Correspondence addressed to columnists in this newspaper must bear the name and address of the sender, in addition plu swers f they request anappear in the EDITOR, Barbados Advocate. few of the gentl rise who better noi Nevertheless slut HI-, looks. If St..i %  Mr Vlncenl Bro occaatoB haevan %  a nrrangemint Which Incidentally I would like to see estabh-iln I on a reciprocal basis between the Turf Clubs of the colonies. I: would. I think, be the first step towards a West Indian Jockey Club, for which there is a crying need out here. Mr. Brown return In Baothai week and >>• U : ni for the T.T.C. June inaattn| will be beginning la earm Hi if.klng forward to thi renewed rlvalrj between Footmark and Mark Twain but hope* that be will ixarttngent, no matter how small N EXT are corni in ; %  band of racing folk who are leaving for I i.i. and Europe IO*4aj Among these are jocke-. FM\1 Thlrkel and Mn rhlrki who are going horm on ;i ihoii holloa) p West I II %  %  i Fred Thirkel will IKravtsllini nil %  be will ingijd to renew %  equalnl wever tn that fifteen years Fred has seen samr u^; and downs on the Turf between here lYtaldad and B.G. and perhaps if hi taken m hii tuna they would b gin I i nvondei thai M made the trip at all. Nevertheless this i< till Pre ..i on "i Uw Brat to admit. in bis Bfteen yean of riding in the Wi Indk Fred Thirkil had .1 band In mans %  < historic event. Chief among 'hese. and the one which f am i longest In Fred' hli winning the Governor*! Cup of IMS on Raj Taffare ; on othei %  had the novel experience of bUni on a horaa thai wai naarb hfte-i off the ground b> wild eyed gpei Not only did Fred ivourite colt but he was also astride their favmirite Bl hen Ihe WOD hei tii't A clamile, ui.other occasion for rloto.i i hen in,;. To himself and Mrs. Thirkel we s:iy au revoir. T HIRD member Ol the party leaving f-ir England is Jockey Blllv Wilder. With us only since last August Billy has lost no time ui impressing us with his capabilities as a rider and he was fortunate enough to have done what other English Jockeys have found, to their cost, is essential to immediate success out here. That is to ride a winner at one's first meeting in Trinidad. It has a tonic effect. No, not on the jockeys. On the public. Billy I understand is going home to take himself a bride, and. like Fred Thirki 1. hopes to be back in lime for the August meeting. We offer him our congratulations in advance and the best of luck. A STABLE MATE ol Billy Wilder's on the trip will be the other member of the racing fraternity who is making the trip. None other than Mr. Ernest Proctor himself, proprietor of Ernie's Dcmoci racy Club, ex-light weight champion of the British Army in South I Africa, member of Dr Jamieson s band of raiders, amateur heavy' i weight rider on ihe French turf, el cetera, ct cetera. Mr. Proctor is leaving on his second trip to the Continent since he evacuated France to the Germans in 1940 and discovered, like Christopher Columbus, the beautiful isle of Trinidad, to which is attached the mainland of South America. Again like Columbus he also discovered the white sands of the isle of SI. Vincent and went floating on the bay, using this manner of transport to reach his doctor rather than the main road which evidently must have been too bumpy for his bad leg. Unlike Columbus, Ernie then discovered Barbados and wh.it with discussing various problems of racing, Indulging in some leap-frog on the beach at Bathshcba and earning for himself the title or "the Gold Braid Kid", he Anally wound up in a race In which, as he admits himself, he got up In the last stride to defeat the undertaker by a short head. As he told me himself. Mr. Proctor was looking forward to the trip vary much until he discovered that it would cost him nearly £2 per day to have a bath, not to mention attendant functions. "My advice. Ernie is to sit in the bath for as long as you can. as often as possible. But please don't try eltner your famous tap dance or rumba in the bath. This will be liable to capsize the whole ship and we do want to tec you back". Otherwise "bon voyage". PROGRAMMI-: FOR FOUR DAYS S INCE the talk of a four-day meeting next August continues I would like to make a few suggestions on how the races might be divided. Although the meeting is more than three months off perhaps it would be a good idea If various owners and trainers also aired then viewa Instead of wailing until ihe programme committee draws up its schedule to start lodging complaints. It has been suggested that we have 30 races and this total strikes me as the very maximum that will be possible with the horses at our disposal. As far as I can sco, Ihe best way of dividing theso among the different classes will be as follows: 4 races for A and A2; 3 for B and B2; 4 for C proper; 2 for C2 Maidens; 3 for D and E and sub-classes; 4 for F and F2 fouryear olds and over; 3 for F and F2 three year olds; 3 for G and G2; 3 for Two-veer-old creolc?.; The Derby. As there are six horses in A and A2 and nine In B and B2 it is unlikely that we will have lo worry about numbers being too high or too low. But in C and C2 it may become necessary to prevent C2 Maidens from racing in more than one open C class race for the {Simple re'ason thai there arc twenty-one likely runners between the two Claatea without any outside opposition which mav come over. At what starling gate arc We going to line up 21 horses? Therefore unless we bar the Maidens from the open events in this class until the last day when a few withdrawals will ease the conjestion. I cannot see how we will surmount this difficulty. Similarly In F class the 4 year olds and 3 vear-olds will have ] to be separated as there are 22 when numbered together. With respect to the two-year-olds I agraa with the suggestion that the colts I should IK' SI para ted from the fillies in the first event for each group land then brought together on tinhst n.r. m one race This was I done at Arima last year and I see no reason why lt should not work I here, unless, of course-, all of them decide to go on the last day. Then. I am certain, things would not work smoothly. m& z HIS und TRUCK on \i its iXSPMTlOIK TIME XKKO xoi BK wmmmYBW TIME SEE PS FOHDUNLOP1LLO BUS SEATS LION1DE LEATHERETTE CARPET MATERIAL RUBBER MATS REAR VIEW MIRRORS • 4 12 Volt BUZZERS ROOF LAMP BULBS t SOCKH1S ELECTRIC WIRE 1 FLEX BATTERY CABLES ACCESSORY SWITCHES Flal GALVANISED SHEETS Hard Clou WHITE PAINT for Interior GREY PAINT for FloorlnJ SIGNAL RED for Body HEAT RESISTING BLACK WHITE LEAD I ZINC MUFFLERS & PIPES KING PIN SETS DECARBONIZING SETS BRAKE LINING SETS FRONT SPRINGS for Ford li Chevrolet FIRE EXTINGUISHERS AND LOTS OF OTHER ESSENTIALS ECKSTEIN BROTHERS DUI


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itttfcm j^lweatc ESTABUSHED 1895 BARBADOS. APR! a-v,. I'KICK SIX i MEATLESS SATURDAY IN BRIDGETOWN Housewives Crowd Idle Market Place Butehier* On Price Strike 9 N< JO MEAT was sold in the Public Market yes terday. The butchers carried out their threat of a meatless SaMSfday. ^^^^ %  e crowd of housewives fien-ked to the market early in the morning hoping thai Uwy would al iMSt be >Ut to puBchaso pork Tli< lefl disappointed—only vegetable* were U'ltu' sold. __„ Police Officers visited ln< market and uniformed G %  long -.:L C.I.D. mm. could to seen patrolling. [ i> MotUey. -' %  C.P could be seen lalMng io groups t butchers. Mi M rtJJ MM UM Advocalthat he fell H was unfortunat Dial the meat lawe could not hav< been settled before Baturdai which is usually the only meal day for %  gieat majority of people He had heard that during the Mreek negctiatkmi were going on. Th,. graatUt indication tti.il tbi butehen are a reasonable lot of ipeople is the '."t thai Cnvcrnment lixod ihe price of P<>rk at 42 cenir. iiier pound some two fl and the butchers did not accept ithis maximum price but not!thwart tO sell this item at 36 tents pc: [pound." Mr. Mottley said. I He s.iid that there must be :i case for them to be considered and lit is hoped that the matter will be I amicably settled without any [further delay. Butchers Ignored Caxlllle Headley, a butcher in the market for the past IS year*, said that the controversy over •die price of bulchei>' mi\it. especially beef, had liecn going on xomv time. IN'i>i<"tentiiturns," he said, "hod Sue to the Compel* Authority on several occasions. backed up by Dr. C. I*. Stoule. Acting Superintendent of tin Market. "The butchers have been ignori.l While they regret causing any inconvenience to their cu-tinncrand the general public, the. htU that their only weapon "was a meatless day". "The real question i the price of mutton, beef, veal and entrails. We • c not consider that the price of 43 cents per pound for oeer or pound for mutton id veal is unreasonable, bearing mind the price we are compelled to pay for livestock and nobody seems to protect us from the ges which owners of livestock claim. The Price Control In spec [ tors seem only interested in the price we charfe for meat". Headley said. Cecil Pierrepoint, a slnughlerc.* and Dudley Willslnic. a butcher __,d that while they agree with the suggestions made by Headley (bay consider that the prices of liver, lights, hearts, tongues and Mill should be 4U cetlti i*cr pound. Mr F A. Bhop Can trailer of Supplies. told the "Advocate" yenUrdat that there is .i slmrtJir In the Island of imported frosrit meal from Australia in* U the late arrival of steamer* a* a result uf strikes. He said that 'he onlrr for freien meat had been placet! since Vevrmber ad %  .hau'd have hr here ahl Break* arn. hul it rB0 now exeete-l t arrive on or about Mai l, Al prment. there ; %  about a month's supph o( picklrd l-ork aasl salted beer on the market as well t: approxi mately four months' suppl> of canned fish There arr also stocks of fanned meat and further quantities are due to arrive early In May He said thai the position with regard to the price of local ir.--.ii meat it now under investigation by the Government and the matter should be considered early this week. Anglo-Argentine Meat Pact Not Yet Concluded BUENOS AIRES, April 21 -Pact With Britain Surfers Another Delay", the headline la today %  Lanaeton seemed to sum up the position as the seventh week of the Anglo-Argentine "meal' talks draw u> a close. It had been no secret for some tuna that broad outlines of a new agreement covering not only meat but a wide range of financial and j j cents pci general trade matters had been drawn up by John Ed v. I nomlc Secret a r y to the British Treasury, and Dr. Roberto Area, tar of Economy. As had bean foreseen, however. I stalled crafting of the pact hau thrown up many technical dlffl(tjltics which were having lo he %  ; tiled one by one. Most acute is understood to relate to the financial provisions ch as devaluation guarantees and revaluation or Argentina's sterling balances.—Reutrr. Torquay Talks Were Not As Fruitful As Was Expected TORQUAY. Eng. April 21. The longest and most exhausting tariff Conference ever held, .-i.d.ii he,.today, after seven months of international bargainbig And only 147 bilateral agreements have been concluded 1*tween the 38 countries which took part. Ordinarily -bout 40C bilateral agreements WON expected. Although considered one of the N %  ;. % %  ; %  in.-i-sful tarilT conference Ibe Torques talks were valuable for the entry into international bargaining for the first lime oi Western Germany. Austria. Turkey, the Philippine!;. Peru ..tin tjrugui Reutei 3 Killed, 65 Injured In Train Crash (.LASC'.OW, April 21. TNIREE MEN WERE KILLED and 15 other passengers seriously injured in a rail crash Involving three U here to-day. Two trains were crowded with football fans on their way to the Scottish Cup Final match. Fifty others suffering from minor injuries wen alto*/ ed to go home after hospital treatment. THF. SUN glints on a placid MS in Uio English Channel on a far rritii placid ot. .-ion. The sesne Is that or the search Tor tho sub marine Affray which divtd at 0.15 p.m. on Monday and failed to surfscs JS wrdarad at R.30 a.m. on Tuesday. The Affray, carrying 7ft offii •!.sad man on a routlns Right deep diving patrol, carried Sn Davi* escape lungs and the new life saving suits. CONTROLS A story is told of a business in Trinidad which applied for permission lo import a number of "110 V mot oi' 50 cycles". Replied toe i "Your licence is granted to import the motors. Permission cannot be granted to import the cycles." KeasonaMc Profit Rufus Maughan. for many years ,i butcher in the market, said that ho agreed with all the other butchers hod s-id. but he was further interested in the wholesale price of carcases of beef, pork, mutton, etc., which should be re 0 that the butcher could ma** %  reasonable profit to support his family. Clarence Small, a butchci in UM market for 40 years, said that in his opinion the present (rouble with the bulchers can be placed on the shoulders of the Price Control Inspectors because on .-.vera! oc casions when be and several others asked them, while in the Public Market to look inlo the price at which they (butchers) were askeo to pay for stock on the hoot, the Officers bluntly refused. .,..: thit they were only there to see how the butcnan elthow ihey buy was a matter for them, (butchers)." To Study .Medicine NICOSIA. Cyprus Ai.r.l 2\ i-jviide-. the tt-yeaB. I lot girl who was saved from UM Creek tiring squad by Brtttsfa intervention, tailed trom bare today to study medicine in London. Bhe eras sentenced la daatti In March 1949 for co-operating wit> Greek rebels, but the sentence was commuted to life imprisonment, after British diplomats had . and quaattona had %  d in the British House of Commons about her She received puidon In October, and \v aenl back to Cyprus. Reutei U.S. Atom Pile Has Prevented War -G. ft. DEAN DAUAS. Texas. April 21 G It. Dean r Chairman of the United States Atomic, Energ> Commission, said here that the rounliy's considerable stockpile of atom weapons had prevented a third world war. How long this will remain true, depends entirely u|xm the Soviet analysis of our strength. their willingness to take risk, and naab attin.ate ..r what ,i frc world will risk in crushing aart) aggression in the hope of preventing an International cotiflic'. Reuter IT Dead, 22 Missing in Oil Tanker Collision NEW ORLEANS. April 2\ Seventeen seamen are known dead and 22 others missing and presumed dead today as the result of the collision of two tankers in the Gulf of Mexico, 200 mile. south of Morgan City. Ixmisiana, yestvrduy. Both tankers caught nre. Marine records Indicate the greatest disaster off the United States coast sine" 84 livaa jvere loft in a collision of an American tanker and freighter of! the Atl:n. tic coast on June ti. 1943. In yaetarday'i pn dawn collision during heavy fog. the 10.195 ton Esoo Greensboro gad the 17.061 ton super lankei fco# Sues, both owned by the Ban Shipping C pany, crashed, exploded and burst into flames. Only one m.m Ol the M crew of the Esao Sues wai killed in the collision, but another unidentified man died of burns Three other men on Ihe Sues wer burned. All other dead were aboard 'ho flaming GreeMSmro, carrying 32 men. Bodies of 15 men from the Greensboro v.*re recovered and f.ve survivors were puked up —Reuter. AmbuTfir %  • ihell balb i ingln^' frantically, rushed from al] over GU ,it. of t.000,000 people Routcwivea notr the i n :n UK.I honw with btankeb nd hot ('links for the stneker lll'-.d %  •1-i'iH'd tnrtan scarves lit Uii brack n hung llmpb %  First official railway aOOOUnce nent aid thai "about ;>" pai am ere Injured, some of then %  PileuBl] The accident occurred fatal Porlock Shields .-uburh v.hcn ,\ crowded train taking football %  Upporteri tO ;i Scottish cu| I ml Hamp n Pwk stadium, hit a I special train. The stationary train coped and in turn crashed ink !,other Stationary alongside. Nearby householders climbed six-fo:> walla and scrambled down a 30foot embankment to Hi ",g passengers. A police emerOfjl went out and SOOII i .is chaos as ambulance* foi?ht their way through city Street .immed with < and football traffic. Trapped. Freed About half nn hour after tht tiutatt, reafue workers report* that all trapped people freed. A nurse who had been on the train quickly organrn! Rrsl gtd and rescue work li butad available medical attppltes Doctors and nurses fought to gave the lives of critically injured p.. sengm One mbn s-id. as ne ly bleed. Ir.g by a train: "Suddenlv there i 'ash. Al' he train I could bear wo I,, i houtlag fioi" under teleii lingos." lit" -Realer I6JM0-MILE FLIGHT ENDS SYDNEY. Apr" -' Australian Premier Robert Men among the chaariai thousaadj who wekonie the Hying i-jat Frigate Bird", when it Haad % %  Rote Bay flying base %  rnon, after Ua lC.ooo i-aiiK-I'uclflV pioneering li Chile and back. rhc Fil.j0te Blrd'j /fight bega-live weeks ago. Menzies said that Australia a*at debt to men such Captain P. ti. Tayim (t • mtunUci of Ihe flying boil) who ivas "ne "f the plonears of Ausu than aviation. SAFETY lllOa Captain Taylor said it had 1 .! tup" II hid proved that an %  iii t.!!atieMl. I.llllt o land .''-' %  ihe nigh) wi •cross the Pacific" gestui 4 South Ami .i I --l —Renter. Ml VII f Souf "hands to the >\orld Situation ExtreiiH'Iv Perilous I i DSRK April 21 it should tie released when the sub BuarttM is in trouble. \a\\ \\ ilhilraus Mi 3ubb From Service ON, April 11. The Adn u -li. bfl .. withdrew. from service !• slstei su .f tin Affray whnh plunged to the Mttom of the F.nghMi Chi I All hope was given up two day: ago !"d.i Mne Arthur and hi "txpond Koiedn war" poik-lc:.. He said, however, that whig ihe IwtUe oontinued III Koie.i ;l. \.„ pi HUM United stau?s was gathering ii. aln fore thi wai but nlUtary atrength "to aver) .i [Ubarat si only frondi %  klwide pi o purU pi | ind taught In th< —Bruu- Beater. MacArthui* Was (ioiil'iilrni Of Victory NKW VOIIK | .-. Udent of victory in Korea, lha. I'reHident Truman wlu I • en i" In Europe acraedgag to ih< .r lark Iwaee wiw. Houi %  lent, Anthony lie said that the Now York Ti led access to document wurees of the Wake Island ma I Dg between tile ( Jem I Si I held six months ago. Levlero Minnii.tr nti of lha > % %  eunw nts *t foi lows:— fl) General Mac Arthui ., i thai he could make hi avaaUbte to Genera hour Hradley. the th.. he .hunt Chlafi Of fl ..'. i. Europe la I Janu n %  : %  i Harmony and igreomon %  I %  ve.i || t: %  n Ihe ne< tali I tcUV i IOUI l made In Wa huigton Thl riighl have conl ed it II i radlctad b) I U w ral Mac Arthui had materialised. Ft llowtna the crlala of what Uu IT. ral caned sn entta i. m %  war" on Nov. 21 he aaBad tot more aggressive policy i u • ind I" .! %  % %  the i'lesldeoi. -Beeser. Deputiei ot Agfeecl Agenda PARIS. April 21 11 .'r.oug an. nook ovf -n to thi I %  %  hi mil wei ihe %  that the a i .. %  : I leatrc foi could not arree with Oromvko when he claimed th.it tin %  %  il %  t.ie three Weatei Pi a* 1 the path % %  the I %  %  i* could not i the foreign M %  %  reduction of arma ra Soviet ii tinBecunfy au ii o tlnate oppoition in the G %  .. \ amUaq of ' N itlons. We-tern Wei ba i ed lo sorrow the .'i t W< lern dt i Rlci U( nt facts i 'i W< I % %  i (Grom) %  i lUonary omyko's reaction id widaned lh fered cut ion left t "i.i. in the 11 budget debeti motion < illlni for th I in primar) Ai' see Lorrafi %  i ;. rman vwas taught in all cloi r.roinkm %  ig that his dele'. i eon%  Ws Mial the Wul ihstlnary wnii-h deserved staying nt HI V .en-b?rs of Peace Mission Reach S.E. China HONG KONG April 21 Three members "f lha %  Muatton to Communist i i .. m ii" iri B i reived In Si nih.easi China, on %  : klnc the ofnctal \ reported ll-iiler TFI.I. tnv. ADVOrATB THE NKWa DAT tin Nir.HT DIAL 3113 SHIPS COLLlDt 50 Men Missing COLOMBO. Ceylon. April 21. Fifty men were missing here to-day after tho boat taking them to work across Colombo barboui collided with the Ml ton N"rwem < %  • %  go ship Taaaea The police were searching for tlf missing men and Investigating the cause of the collision Some of the nolsautg nen have been picked up .ind %  .ational affairs. U.S. Wo/if New Form 0/ Sanctions Against China WASHINGTON, April 21 The United Suites is pressing i now form of economic and diplomatic sanctions against Ci %  Ina nccording to r'|iorts .-day. The suoject was believed to sen Diacuseed whan British IVeneh and Australian ambassa%  t the State Da partment with the American AsSlstant Secretary of State fir In U.N. Forces Strike Red Defence Line (By JULIAN BATKSi WITH U N rORCES, Korea, April 21. JJNITED NATIONS ElglUh Army Iroope driving Intt North Korea have itrtlck the main Communist dtfenci line. Their new cominaiitii-i. Lleutananl ('•• %  n. Jagnct V.u Fleet, briefly lourr-l this rronl to-day by jeep and lii;i plane, and was told everywhere that Ins advancio were bumpini; into the main Chinese line <•> %  The General visited his troop. .Centurion their work. —ReaU. | — Iteau-r INSIIH A SI HMAIIIM. • ,'ca ct)Mrt*'ai' 7"T f nt away diagram ot a submarine showing tti* Affray class there are four escape hatches, thr remaining hatch In the r.un tower. %  of the simplified type with two entry chute* spaced along thr inntr, presents boll, i nng a i>cMrI handled autosnafu "'i formaUflSM told hm that reiwjrta from patrols showad thai .ved they had struck the outer screen of the major fommun Sl derenc. If in Fleer ii-M hi I a jeep and raced past lines of Koreans, working on i %  t Iti d N %  m I Korean troops. Only to-day, were reporleri .illowed to tell the stOI | ieapaal British lank pi into North Korea made %  ne — the world's most modarn tank—on Xueadaj The liutts'i fi kl gest of its kind In the campaign (roased the Imjin i K i ,i just south of the 38th ind plunged -traight into Communist territory virtually un oppeead. The Force was well Ui ti.jnlst country by tanenl k It was a triumph for '.he heavy on this front for i> l o u ghe t mgh mi Ma, whih pps and Ugnt-teacfced i r< boggad down. Along the rest of Ina Bronl United Nation.t units • patrols, and Conai . i. %  iiiiM icarguarda screen ing then•:• '> %  bnkuigle Chor won Kumhwa %  Pyonyang— jus' north <-t the Thh potnti Ofte United Nations foi pling with well entrenched enein^ . bitter flghl for ridgr't in this area, first stood %  warplanes hurled buuing napalm and guns blasted enenr. with phciaphoroi want ui with be ronat charge which won all I I %  i.-id dusk, the; It Chinese who had beer rolling hand grenade* ek Reulet. RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL BICVCll apal I S I I A slock of models always on display and ready (or you to lake away. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. SOLE DISTRIBUTORS io, ii, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET I


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I'\l.l SIX SUNDAY .\1>M HI BARBADOS & AmtXsttE t. 1 • 1— — i Advocate CO. Ltd.. 1 | H St_ BrUOTIOWS SIIIHI.I>. April 22, liJ.il IIOIMM. SELF HELP ALMOST everywhere the housing situation is in a state of crisis. The worldwide housing situation has worsened during the past thirty-flve years as a result of war, preparation for war. depressions, cassation of building, and migration. Meanwhile, aspirations for better homes have intensified and higher standards are demanded for the dwelling and its environment. As a result of worsened conditions and the demand for higher standards, there is an acute housing problem in nearly every country: for many Governments it constitutes a serious political issue. Accordingly an intensive search is being made for new means of providing the best homes possible with the resources available. This search tends to focus on methods of achieving progressively higher standards at lower cost The cost of building decent housing—the cost say of substituting even minimum sanitary houses for insanitary huts—is normally based on estimates which include the use of commercial materials and the employment of 'contractors' for construction. It is assumed that new houses will be provided Dy the labour and skill of i.!h, is Ihnn th> ptopti K wh uill Hie in the Hovers. After construction the family moves in and undertakes to pay for having the house built fry otkin than Ugllltotf, Thin is the method used in highly organised societies. A roalistic appraisal of the housing situation in the West Indies shows that this process is too costly. The cost of building is high, amounts available for subsidies are limited, and incomes are low. In rural areas the disparity between family income and the oost of building decent sanitary shelter is great. This fact applies to Governments as well as to families. In some cases a Government in trying to formulate a housing programme for its people is faced with rehousing as much as half the population. On present resources it will find it quite impossible to provide the houses required by the method of having them built by others than the families themselves. This need not lead to discouragement. There are other resources which can be mobilized and among the greatest is the manpower ot the families themselves. Most families in the tropics have always built their own homes; if the results have been poor it is because their efforts have usually been unaided. Their resources are potentially enormous if aidul by some financial and technical assistance. Suppose that only one member of every tenth family devotes a day a week to improving his home. The total monetary value of this labour even if estimated at half a dollar per man day, would greatly excel the amount which a Government could allot to Housing, out of its revenues. The monetary contribution is by no means all: there is the pride and satisfaction of accomplishment in making a better home. It is not necessary that a community should wait for a generation or two to achieve an overall economic advance. With self-help it is possible to improve the shelter of the whole population. Clearly priority should be given to solving problems of land, water and sanitation. Land with security of tenure comes first; next come water and sanitation. These are largely the concern of Government agencies but the self-help principle has already been applied to their solution with success in some territories. In Puerto Rico, for instance, toads and water supplies have been provided by aided self-help. To be successful, aided self-help requires good organisation. It has been found better to begin in a well defined area than to carryout operations in many places at once. In Jamaica, for instance such a co-operative house building effort was carried out at Bonnett by Jamaica' Welfare Ltd. Many useful lessons were learned from this experiment. Among 4hese were the need for preliminary training, the maintenance of group interest, keeping groups small enough to avoid their being idle, but large enough to do the job in a reasonable time, the need to recover loans and not to 'give' away material unloss the individuals have given their share of labour. The same experience has been found in Puerto Rico. Here the most ambitious aided self-help programme in the Caribbean has now been started. The declared task of the Social Programme Administration is to resettle 75,000 landless rural families, known as agregadoK, in new communities. The agregados who are provided with a life interest in land, are organized in groups of 12 lo 15 families for home building. The Administration provides technical supervision and brings in a vaVer supply and latrines. Trie cost to the householder of materials, use of machines, transport and professional supervision is about $300 (U.S.). This is repaid to the Administration by means of a down payment of $40 (U.S.) and the balance over a number of years—for example $26 (US.) per year for ten years. Great importance is paid to developing a proper understanding of the programme; discussion groups are formed in the villages for this purpose. Small working groups of fifteen are then formed so that a minimum of three men per day work on the project: the whole group work on Sundays. Sites are often selected by lot and it does not necessarily follow that any member of a group will actually be working on his own house. Although the householders are unskilled farm labourers it has been shown that by use of the proper methods the wholehearted co-operation ol the families can be secured; despite their lack of building knowledge the participants are developing the necessary skills. On completion the house owner has a home which it has been estimated is worth $1,500 (U.S.)—or five times the amount he has paid in cash. An aided self-help housing scheme is now under way in Jamaica known as the Tower Mill Scheme near Kingston. It provides 375 prepared lots for self-help builders, who were previously living in very bad slums. The average loan by way of materials and help of artisan labour is to be about £60. A rent is to be charged for the land which Government will lease to occupiers for 20 years with an option to renew. The average repayment will be 8 per month, which includes giound rent, water supply, and repayment of the building loan. This rent has been adjusted to the average earnings of the group. The lots vary in densities of between 10 and 14 per acre. Leases prohibit sub-letting without permission and the sub-division of the lots; they also regulate the size of buildings and their relation to roads, etc. At the beginning there was some apathy and hesitancy among the would-be homebuilders. This has now been overcome and houses are going up apace. In some cases quite remarkable improvements can be seen—all the result of aided self-holp. Social welfare and voluntary organisations are playing their part in helping those, who are old or cannot build for themselves. Aided self-help schemes have also been carried out in Trinidad (at Caroni) and St. Vincent (at Sandy Bay). The success of both schemes is due to the provision of land—in one case by a sugar company, in another by Government. In Antigua it is hoped to introduce an aided self-help housing programme to deal with both hurricane, damage and normal housing needs. The offer of free lands by a sugar company there should be a significant factor towards the success of the scheme. Arrangements are being made for an interchange of visits between that colony and Puerto Rico under President Truman's Point Four international technical aid programme. This is one of the first of such programmes of co-operation in the Caribbean orea. It will be watched with great interest. A i\ew Treatment SUNDAY, APttt It mi I AUTOGRAPH 1 SCRAPS & SNAP ALBUMS at Advocate Stationery -SUp ifi.J London Express fl""v!cYour GARDEN needs Care and Attention. Vlt have HOSE and FITTINGS RAKES FORKS PRUNING SHEARS and SECATEURS WHEEL BARROWS LAWN MOWERS V.G.M. V, in. and % ••> %  GALV. PIPE & FITTINGS WILKINSON & HAVNES CO. LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472. 4687, 4413 {***'*&,','.•.'.•.*.'.'*','.•.'.','.*.•••*•*•*'.'.', W,'.'.'S**'*'''>"'S-'.'''**''-*i. When painting your property, Whether It be Why Not A Little Theatre ? "The day ha* long since pas?cd R v ^fORGl HUNTE \ Xr T* x ? aheBd ? f -.V*f pe rf 8E m ". n< ? when %  school w!7consider to D OCWKOL HUIIIC „ d „ f Richard Wught's be of value only to children for iheiilncol company started his Native Son ot the Boltons in five hours of the dav. They are Little Theatre in Peterboro in South Kensington and the show very properly considered today as IW7 with the performance of < saw at the New Lindsay Theacommunity contres where adults three one act plays in the Collcgi off Netting Hill Gate was so who pay for them can go for ate auditorium. {*** !" ?£ %  "*••• %  " !" mstudy or recreation in their leisure Ho rented the auditorium for w* * although 1 do rememhours." That was what 1 read *25 a night, charged %\ for adJ" %  *• something to do with on March 16. 1951 in the Petermission and 850 people paid to see a fffi"*,„_,, Hl^,„ ,.., baroaih Examiner, daily newspa. the performances on each of the ,he West Indies c genuinel> per of Peterboro. Ontario. I was most impressed because I had arrived in Peterboro the day before and was hoping to laai %  lot about the town's Little Theatre movement, from Robertson Davies Canadian Playwright and Editor of the Examiner ItobeitInterestcd In Legitimate Theatre. In 1950, the Little Theatre there seems no reason why n earned $2200 when 2200 paid to should not flourish and grow see the play of the year. here if not to the stature ol There are sometimes two plays Canadian theatre at least along a year, somctimrs only one. similar lines of development Peterboro plays which have ex %  When Lord Bessborough offered u cited comment throughout the trophy to the winner of the Dominion Davies wag away in Toronto Canadian theatre world include, ion Drama Festival in 1933 popu seeing his publishers about a book. Tamil... of the Shrew and Mid" i a r drama was hardly known ir but the letters to the editor Were summer Nights Dream. RobertCanada. all full of the Theatre, because son Dav lea began with school Recounting the growth of Canasotna critic was compliining teachers mainly as members ot dian theatre In the Times of Lonabout the noise In the summer, the cast of players. Dressing don on Ju y I2) IM8i Boberl It was the depth of winter when rooms are class rooms and Uie Speaight, adjudicator of the DoI was In Peterboro, but presumauditorium is a %  cool bwUtt ngbg mlnlon IJrama FesIlva1 wrf>le ably the summer was near enough the name of 1 it discussion. What I latter learned about the Little Theatre movement In Petei boro confirmed the impression received by the two %  cnttnci quoted above. Peterboro is a much less thickly populated town than Bridget high when movement the Little Theatre ursl on,y P^y* ,n one act, know; thiouihoul •">'••• '' %  > ""> K a >"" "> a Building Furniture m v a Car THERE is a truce but no settlement in Grenada. And the truce is more unsettling than the 'disturbance' — a new word for riots in the Caribbean. From all information to hand neither the Governor nor the Administrator is to blame for the manner in which the situation got out of hand. As far as can be ascertained the Colonial Office must bear the brunt of the blame. Far removed from the focus of the troubles, the Colonial Office appears to have decided on a new treatment for these disturbances. The enforcement of law and order by governments no longer takes precedence. Differences of opinion must be settled on the spot by the leader of the mob. The Governments are no longer to be concerned with the protection of life and property. No one must be protected against unarmed mobs—stones, sticks, broken bottles and knives are not listed as armaments. Protection against murder, injury and loss of property must be sought, or bought from the big boss of the moment. There is no question that there was a case for higher wages in Grenada where cocoa has risen from £5 per bag to £25 without a corresponding increase in wages. But the matter could have been settled around the conference table. Now Grenada is in the grip of a Gestapo. No one dares discuss matters even in the privacy of his home, for next day his servants have reported his conversation to the 'big boss' who harangues his followers in the Market Place and, while being careful not to suggest violent action against the individual mentioned, tells his hangers-on that they have it in their power to deal with the individual. If Grenada could be quarantined the situation would still be serious. Grenada itself is suffering. The island was just getting a name as a tourist resort, but on the outbreak of the 'disturbances' all the visitors left and it will be many years before it lives down the name of 'trouble Island'. But Grenada cannot be isolated, and there is little doubt that the policy of disregarding law and order will within the next few months spread North to all the islands between Grenada and St. Kitts. It has been the proud boast of the British that 'Gangsters' could not flourish in the Commonwealth. Now it seems that gangsters are being encouraged. movement is known througnoul T_ ,. V .. Canada from Vancouver lo Hall"* dm ""^ !" <> £"**• ^ Y ax formed m curtains, assisted by tri In Ottawa I was fortunate to normal properties, a nd furniture see a performance by the Little and by such necessary scenic eleTheatre Ciroup of that city. Th" ments as doors and window*." theatre was converted from n Robert Speaight was impressed church, It was Cld-Vicish and by the excellence of the French and St. Michael. It has only skiers Wells in flavour, but deteams in 1MB. His praise of th 3fl.ooo people But Uie people rellc ., ous i y ground floor only. There Compagnons de St. Laurent, a gard the school not just as a place waj „ magnificent pen drawing group of professional but nonfor children to learn things in o{ Rooer uon Davies in the foyer commercial plavcrs in Montreal i* tchool hours, but as community anrt „, au dience perhaps 600 of praise indeed. "They are" he says centres where the adults who pay .., possible 800 for whom sonta -notably superior lo similar group. for them can go for ;aud> or wcrc available were there only now playing in Fiance" If Canad.eoeat.on in their leisure h.rs. because of their interest in leby lts Do minion Drama Festival An example of this use of guimate theatre. can bring into healthv nvilrv and schools was.the performance in ^y e clcfln looWng and ^m^TtforTlnerSwoMhi S? great European cultures, cannot similar Peterboro collegiate auditorium on we ii dressed and free from the St Patrick's Eve and during that affectations and mannerisms that h w SSiS SSXSJSK *" ^iuV'ex^itioT^'^ K5 Ut&| I was told that the Collegiate X, fmpresed me more than the vide enough l.ttle theatre moveor school auditorium where this rig htness of the audience was the menu to give amateur actors of al tomedy was performed is used at suitability of the stage. There racial origins the opportunity xc least three nights a week by other was no curtain. There were win a trophy, theatrical groups or clubs. three set scenes permanently "Amateur acting" as Rober And that in a nutshell is how visible to the audience but lit up apeaight admirably says in the Robertson Davies. son of Senator whenever the acts of the play ortlcle mentioned above "has th Davies started a Little Theatre demanded their use. It was advantage, that it costs very little. movement in Peterboro where he ncting of n vcrv high order. I whenever there are four board' edits a newpaper owned by his had seen nothing to equal It since and a few snarks of talent you father. Robertson Davies who i saw Renato Ricci play the most have the essence of theatrical enstudied drama In Ixindon and last interesting stage presentation of tertainment.** vear attended the Edinburgh Hamlet I've ever seen at the Surely w e can find four boards Drama Festival with a Canadian Mercndante in Naples. It was m every parish of Barbados? a Yacht You cannot afford to take chances by using cheap materials. So— SPECIFY "INTERNATIONAL and be safe SITTING OX THE FENCE By NATHANIEL GU8BINS ;erloi joke about No. sir. Smith. Sir? i matter. Y OU might have thought the weather in this country was bad I m.tigh without anybody trying lo make it worse. Yon might have thought that. If anybody tried lo make it VOfft*. It would lie our enemies, not our friends. But it seems that the Amnicnn I Government has "trcmcmlous projects for making rain this


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PACK TWO -.1 SDAV UAOt.VTfc sIMlU AI'KII. 21 IS51 .lAM.rn urn ss snor Lowrr Broad Nlri-el I'mUlm Over Newsa.m< DRESSES of all Types READYMADE and MADE TO ORDER PLAZA Theatr*—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) THE WHITCTOWER Gtann Tot*. VBM, CUnl.. P Sir CXlrir llnrdrwi.ltr in MB* I lrrl in rol*A SNOWS WOBST RKOTUai" > DviibWr %  TRYAI mo* TNI HltA. I.U Uim % % %  • pioon "** mi *•*">•• %  Krllv PLAZA D1AL I. A l l IV (THE GAUDtrl) St. James I -..... T.I.T • %  . li. bert UTTrnm in M.onn OK THE MOON" wit* Matlwra n*l GM< Othet MON A Tl'tS e. p i. -LAST nAV 01 MstVl %  Mil Rat T.m n.ll l mi. AVVNCIM. NIIII i <.l OKI To-nitc 8.30 & Continuing %  l l D R and %  plan lo-i hoUdayit-j; BI the %  %  Ontario, fed TCA fl'cht fr m < ,r%U yest< day morn.Of .Cominjfcn by i v mf plme were Mr. and ' I C. G Lynch ' Lynch who is a Rarb-dtsBi t. %  ( %  here m 1903, returning in >•?" r I holiday. This is home since then Th*v inn with Mi l.w. (dilution Rn.trl Qcutib QaUinq M" : FST" C.B.CSecret.^ A SECRETARY Mith the Car %  *• dian Broadcasting Co, i Ottawa ii Mi;.s Pamela Foil I who come n> h> T < A y-snrrj day morning to spend three week-' hnli(l;iv m the Ocean View ll >N Trinidid Businessman Tt PHILIP MARCHACK, .lad businessman, his wife and his M : Ante Kong arrived from Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A. to Two Teacher* *ftgW Y ta ££* %  M **"* Short tZl&F SZ AT PRESENT holidaying her* YJS C hurch TSE Haze.l P* !" CARLYON ft due bark Kong;,; Senior Rj^aUo^..* \ r A Mei. w. ; II Marguerite Ue Sous-, daughter of •" Montreal to-day after } A„tr of the Bishops High Mr and Mrs. Frank >.. de Sous* spending three weeks holiday ririi Oeotgetown, of Georgetown, was married to ndth hi* parent*. Cap* and Mrs R tuh Guli Ret mother who Mr j ame8 Tillson. son of Colonel T. C. W. Carlyon. capt. Carlami Mrs T A and Mrs. j otin c |r Tillson ol yor. is retired and he and his wit* W.ison. ar. ..mpmled her over $,„ Antonio. TWtBs, and an nave settled in Barbados MM. McdMs" father, Mr 3 Davidson, was a former Postmast of British Guiana. C Af^i a short Mrs Meda* will be leaving the United Kingdom, to ttend the Festival of Britain f ft* on Thursday for a holiday with I.? • %  *%  *• Wai'" her relatives In the USA. •rent yesterday was Miss Dcnta Cove-.vr— n r-wi -^ittunt teacher duck who is an sccnuntant wuh ^^SllXZwSaWlSE* demure b S dBl d l n lC ot whur the Yo,k K„ming Mills in Tor.,ffer parenls IW.^ In BroohK. ^ r n "* r hd-3re was too Is here foi three week Mrs Prescott is the wife of M auditor *uh lbs) Si Machine Co. The ceremony which took place h( llH „ Hr „ shortly after 4.30 o'clock was perh "^ formed by the Rev. Alfred T. Hatth. The bride WPS given away by father. She looked charming l dress of white Peter Is with Barclays Bank. Holidaying at Indramer Guest Miss lone St. Helene. Regular visitor to Barbados, she. i rvil %  arvaJM m St. Lucia. Locr! Talent Q UITE a colleetlon Of local oughly enjoyed hts Barbtdos hcliChurc (; for tneir annuaI wno am >art. Besides the Police Band. Mr. John Young, aasjtotant secret h r ,, r tiMes appearing on the iary of TCA. and his wife who pmffammr w m be Will ClalrIBi had been holidaying liere since monte and hi* violin. Nell Hall tvfrtTne A P"' 7,n "'rtu" d y*terday by stnginf the Ave Maria. Cedri.T-C A io his MadquatiCTl W I'hilnps. band*nian G Lovelle Monli-eal. Other TCA staff and the Weslev Guild choir. member* who were on the same Enjoyable Holiday coTonet of white for-get-mnots iht w Mr .Denis Brown, Mr. -, { ;md MHS JOSEPH KING and Mrs. Edv.ard liana who tnaw J>1 ;iUcr „ toiOffabto holiday on their honeymoon, and Ka m Barbadrt: t staving at Aquatic McMahoand her mother Mrs. Gjrc | eiu p ,, terday afm ivcr which there \ Country Fair : al ST. JAMES KIMBIMI) stntKH.. IHH.I:TI)"N MAY HTU Ki^p this datr Open S^rtnTrT^^8fe,; '*e''-' %  •" !> Y.W.C.A. "£ "SSiS;of honour. M. 1X*A -rito.Vrv.tUln Dn-rtmcnt 5|: Mr ; Kln u „,„, M ,..., •P'J" '" V| US MI1J.V APtn-ETON. MA H o !" an M.rti,u worr a „r... ..I in Montreal. William Powrty LW Branch orcn V irw lTIof thr latr Mr flaurlr Appli„ rP hlit hmraitr llrr Laura McMahon Itil.i with, urnoon by H.W I A. io Trirnxtk Ihc Her head-dres. Short Viait lii tn* C n "" *" ,Kft **"* ^'' ^, • Pnliiat of the Ti hMtnh was Mr. Norman A\*A \ MONG the dl ftlfht. )m Si. \ is the 2:id Vice Pregdenl of the -rh^ bestman was Mr. Norman > c.f San Fernando. No Marshall, doubt Y.W.C.A. activities here After the ceremony a rcccpllo:i ""• wHI be of great interest to her .. tt as held at -Sumnierhome In Tropical ..v in R at !^tt'.nn Is Mr PerHastings Hyflrne o! nnv ^ Browne who own.-, a hardEnv Leslie mn Timlne** In Port-of-Spain I -li He was last here in 1M2 A \* staunch Methodist he I* organist holr-master at the Belmntu l\ LONIrON e6otttd (jl,ifts ICIceance unlimited Wish thetn joy with the gift they'll treasure always for the treasure it is—something in silver! Look over oar selection of handsome, lustrous silver. You'll be surprised nt the tiny price tags on many of these beautiful items . delighted with the rich loveliness of every plere | Come in and choow to-day! For the gifts you give with pride let Alfonso be your L'ulde. At the Jewel Box of Barbados. ill....so II. DcLiuM t> €. Corner of Broad & McGregor Streets Canteen Sets, Sweet Dishes. Cream & Sugar Candle Sticks Cuke Forks Tea Spoons Fruit Set Cocktail Pieces F.ntree Dishes Casserole Dishes icent rndidatei m the esaininadon the Diploma Hit I n e and London University Of St. Vincent, formerly a student University. Now that hi West Indies. He Pttt England some time thl month. Wfth Cnblc & Wireless "-pONY DORMER uho Is lth 1 Cable AWitMesa in sssnnuda flew in M-iteiri;i> by T.C A frorn Bermuda lo spend a w ee k 's holiday in Barbados. Tony wa itatloned hen three j ear* ago coming in on Uie same flight *as Peter Gieig who I* Ptaytni fjiMi Mr. Charles Potter in St Petei He is here on two wm tion On Honeymoon S PENDING their honeymoon In ". life Mr in l MM Arthur Bell who flew In from Don'inleii on TV were married on April IB. Bell is with Barclays Bank In Dominica. His brother Emih w!n> was In Barbados a few oaths ajx> on holiday was in Dotntnica tor the wedding. Emde Is with the bank in St. Vbeent and Mrs. Bell are here f..r weeks staying on lh % % %  nt the end ot this month Fiftfa Vi.il C HECKING In for his fifth visito Barbados Is Mi. Arthur R. Davis ot British Gulsna who wan last here In \W. At that time he wa# en route to Bigland to attend the 9th Biennial Conference of the Stilish Empire Service League which was held In London and at which he was the official delegate representiff Britiwi Guiana His visit thl: time is for a holiday. In Georgetown besides bemR the managing proprietor of a manufacturing firm, Mr. Davis is K K .„, connected with the ork of thwhich were well received by ft Y M C A and Y W C A. He is Dutch audience. He feels that associated with the Boys' Club there is a definite mark c t .. J, 0 1 section of the Y M C.A, being a that type of song in Holland, member of the Govem.ng Body Tm giad to be back again and the Advisory Committee of Englnnd >' %  ^"""f^%  • which Mr. Justice E R L Ward seems that having regained 1S chairman. Mr. Davis is also a of its best exponentmember of the Vestry of the Calypso. London Cathedral Parish of St. George of another. which he has been a member for Kitchener l^sA*a?ttaa2n£. D Vb &*.*&* be m.k.ng th. a gut nt Leaton-on-Seo wilh Trinldad-b-im Cyrii Hlak< Back to Venezuela wn „ ls affectionatelv known R ENE VANDEN URANDEN a.am0 ng his adi companled by his wife and as "the Lou >oungest daughter Nicole flew Europe" LOUISE ST LAURENT, daoghback to Venezuela yesterday after ter-ln-law of Canada's Prlma Minisbeing here since April 13th. Mi tsr. Bew into London for hot em Vanden Branden is Avensa Air, trip abroad. She Is accompanying lines Traffic Manager in Caracas lir husband. Mr. Bensuld St. Lao .Passengers on the rant, a barrister srtth a lucrative plane were Gordon Kinch nnORTIA BOURNE has fl ST Canada to spend a hollda Quebec practic< %  liildien eldest two months. Londc They have five • eight, youngest Express Service. AQl "ATM ll.l IH I.M:MA .M.mb.r.Only| "CINDERELLA" in Technicolor *1 \ 11 s 1 1 ui %  NISDA1 IATT wn.1.1 \M m in "RACE KMI'llll To-day 4.45 and 8 3t ft t onii inn : Republic Pictures presents "THE 3rd MAN" Starring JOtOfh COTTON—VAI.I.I WHh Orson WRI.u; and Mm HOWARD no.w Today A Toinorrm, 4.46 8.15 pm Warner Bros, pns) "THE YOUNGER BROTHERS Color by TrchltlooIOT with Wavno MOHRW. Joni PAIGE and Druco BENNET Extra 'MlM Of Tl)MllltROtt~ nd •\ ll.W \T Till! Hitill" STREET" IIOYAL l.ul Two Show* Ta-day 4.30 and 8.30 20th Crnlurv Fox Double— Olivia Dt'HAVlLLAND and Mark STEVENS IN •• SMKK PIT AND •• DAKOTA UL Bod CAMEBON and Mane WINDSOR Monday and Turaday 4.M 1 .10 M-G.M and Fox Double -CAUGHT" and BATTLEGROt NO 1 OLYMPIC; La*tt Two Shows TO-DAY 4.31 and S.1K M-G-M Smashing DoubleSpencer TRACY and James STEWART IN "MALAYAAND •> HATTLKGROIWD" Starring . Van JOHNSON and John HODIAK Monday Tuesday 4.3D and 8.15 M-G-M and Fox Doi.ble HK.1NMSG OR THE END" and •1'ARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA" Dr. Roger Hernandez Gordon had been on a four day visit to hn relatives. . .his work in Venezuela takes him over three hundred miles outside of Caracas. He with the United Geophyaical by T.C.A.. Dr. Hernandez is %  > well who by STOP THAT LEAK IN YOUR ROOF .VOW We offer I VKRtTK COKRfCATED SIIFETS RED CEDAR pHINC.LES IIOI.I. Iionrivr. — Plain UOI.I. ROtlllNC —Red PITCH PINE DOUGLAS FIR mi: II mini IBM i o-iEnATivE fOIM\ I V(l Oil > LTD. llMltlH DsVAssTssI N i DIAL 4S1 Ith her brother!.: Fii-t she will visit Hilary In Montreal then over to Charles in Vancouver. Mary Lane, former headmistresnf Codringtnn High School is her way to England .. .n the Labour Departmcn! herself a Barbadian—she comes if the Venezuelan Government here every year—left ycslerdav tulle too had been here only four T C.A. for Montreal. Sn %  NOdays. He was a guest of the vember she had been holidaying Windsor Hotel. at the Hotel Hastings. This two-toned, toast and light blue silk shantung afternoon dress Is Canada t nm Capri Originals' Spring collecand Rena Caldtlen. must conaldet The bodice, fastened with gont metal buttons, slants to the side wrap of the slunJy draped skirt. T*ie stole, also two-toned, partly hides the deep cut amholes. The belt is of brown leather. AIIVI.VM iu-:s OF PIPA Ml BY THE WAY... I N recent accounts of the tragedy of the avalanches in Switzerland a name I had long forgotten caught my eye—Zemes lii the Engadine. It was the starting-place of one of the most glorious walks I ever had. over the Fluela Pass into the Orisons I spent the night at the hut o-i top of the pass. 8,000 feet up, between the Schwarzhom and the Welsshorn. I was up for the sunrise, and n t the door of the hut there was a lake of green glacierwater. I never In my life saw a more beautiful sunrise. The walk ended at Klosters. where Romansch. one of the survivnls ol the country dialects of the Roman Empire, Is still spoken Mr. Snoprfrirer's Sp*-vch M R. TINKLEBURY SNAPDRIVER, for the defence said ... .The defence will not try t" 1 BRIDGETOWN Present deny that the sailor Ben Bottle painted this ship on his doykennel. On the contrary, this attempt ot an old sailor to console himself with a memento of his days at sea will be adduced a' evidence of pardonable pride in the traditions of our race. If even judges can admit that they do not know all the law today, hew can we expect a simple mariner lo realise that his praiseworthy action might be construed as illegnr" (Here Mr. Justice COcUacarret Intervened to say thai for the purposes of the ct judge, must be presumed lo know all the laws, even if he h;id MX had time to read some of the latest). Mr. Snapdrlver continued "To soy that a ship painted on a kennel is a contravention of the By BEACHCOMBER Town and Country Planning Act Is like saying that a limerick scribbled on a boiler Li an infringement cf the Nuts. Bolts and Screws Act Rumimnk is Coming MfW I ADY CABSTANLEIGH Infonm me. through her secretary, Janetta Rawlplug, that i poet Runamok is to visit England soon as the guest of the. Friends of Eskimo poetry. He will Rive a *•<* of 13.464 lectures on Poetry as a means of Expression, and a performance of his opera, Mik-Mak. will be given In Lady Cabstanleigh's music room. It contains the beautiful aria; "O puk wagug. tik sok wagog!" The music U by Chulhakud. V-,V,',->',',.',-.->', PLAYERS r/rWW. i THE SHOP AT SLY CORNER At . TIIF. RMPIRK TIIKATRF. On MAY InTH. 17TH AND IST1I %  % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  a MEN'S TROPICAL SUITINGS %  $290 to $6.78 %  PINSTRIPES $5.84 BJ GREY FLANNEL $2.38 & 6.19 %  MEN'S READY MADE TROUSERS all Wool Worsted $17.85 %  MEN'S LEATHER SLIPPERS Black and Brown $4.84 %  EVANS & WHITFIEI.DS %  DIAL 406 YOUR SHOE STORE DIL 4*20 %  1 I


Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
f





ESTABLISHED

1895





MEATLESS SATURD

Housewives Crowd | |

Idle Market Place

Butehers On

‘Price Strike’

NO MEAT was sold in the Public Market yes-

terday.

The butchers carried out their threat of a meatless

8 ay.

A Targe crowd of housewives flocked to the market early
in the morning hoping that they would at least be able to
purchase pork. They left disappointed—only vegetables

were being sold.





Mr. F. A. Bishop, Con-
troller of Supplies, told the
“Advocate” yesterday that
there is a shortage in the
island of imported frozen
meat from Australia duc to
the late arrival of steamers
as a result of strikes,

He said that the order for
frozen meat had been placed
since Nevember avd should
have been here six weeks
ago, but it was now exnect-
el te arrive on or about
May 2.

At present, there {4 about
a month’s supply of pickled
pork and salted beef on the
market as well 2s approxi-
mately four months’ supply
of canned fish. There are
also stocks of canned meat
and further quantities are
due to arrive early in May..

He said that the position
with regard to the price of
local fresh meat is now
under investigation by the
Government and the matter
should be considered early
this week.







Anglo-Argentine
Meat Pact Not Yet
Coricluded

BUENOS AIRES, April 21.
“Pact With Britain Suffers An-
other Delay”, the headline in to-
day’s Lanacion seemed to sum up
the position as the seventh week
of the Anglo-Argentine “meat”
talks drew=to a close.

It had been no secret for some

the



time that broad outlines of a new
agreement covering not only meat
but q wide range of financial and |
general trade matters had been
drawn up by John Edwaris, Eco-
homic Secretary to the British
Treasury, and Dr, Roberto Area,
Argentine Minister of Economy.

As had been foreseen, however,
detailea drafting of the pact had
thrown up many technical diffi-
culties which were having to be
settled one by one.

Most acute is understood to re-
late to the financial provisions . ch
as devaluation guarantees and re-
valuation of Argentina’s sterling
balances.—Reuter.

Torquay Talks Were
Not As Fruitful
As Was Expected

TORQUAY, Eng. April 21.
The longest and most exhaust-



ing tariff Conference ever held,
ended here today, -after seven

months of international bargain-
ing.

And only 147 bilateral agree-
ments have been concluded be-
tween the 38 countries which
took part. Ordinarily about 400
bilateral agreements were expect-
ed.

Although considered one of the
least successful tariff conferences
the Torquay talks were valuable
for the entry into international
bargaining for the first time ol

Western Germany, Austria, Tur-
key, the Philippines, Peru ana
Uruguay .

-—Reuter



iG , ° °
To Study Medicine
NICOSIA, Cyprus April 21

Krene Pavlides, the 23—year-
old Cypriot girl who was saved
from the Greek firing squad by
British intervention, sailed from
here today to study medicine in
London.

She was sentenced to death in
March 1949 for co-operating with
Greek rebels, but the sentence
was commuted to life imprison-
ment, after British diplomats had
intervened, and questions had
been asked in the British House
of Commons about her: She re-
ceived pardon in October, and was
sent back to Cyprus.

—Reuter



diagram of a
s theré are

hate





r











Police Officers visited the
market and uniformed Constables
along wiih C.1.D. men, could be
seen patrolling.

Mr, E. D.
vould be seen
of butchers.

Mr. Mottley told the Advocate
that he felt it was unfortunate
that the meat issue could not have
been settled before Saturday,
which is usually the only meat
day for a great majority of people

He had heard that during the
week negctiations were going on.
“The greatest indication that the
butchers are a reasonable lot of
people is the fact that Government
fixed the price of pork at 42 cents
per pound some two years ago
and the butchers did not accept
this maximum price but continued
to sell this item at 36 cents per
pound,” Mr. Mottley said.

He said that there must be a
case for them to be considered and
it is hoped that the matter will be
amicably — settled without any
further delay.

Mottley, M.C.P.
talking to groups

Butchers Ignored

Carlisle Headley, a butcher in
the market for the past 22 years,
said that the controversy over
price of butchers’ meat,
especially beef, had been going on
for some time,

“Representutions,” he said, “had

been made to the Competent
Authority on several occasions,
backed up by Dr. C. P. Stoute,

Acting the
Market,

“The butchers have been ignor-
ed, While they regret causing any
inconvenience to their customers
and the general public, they feit
that their only weapon “was a
meatless. day”.

“The rehl question is the price
of mutton, beef, veal and entrails.
We «© not consider that the price
of 45 cents. per pound for. beef or
48 cents per pound for mutton
and veal is unreasonable, bearing
in mind the price we are compell-
ed to pay for livestock and nobody
seems to protect us from the
charges which owners of livestock
claim. The Price Control Inspec |
tors seem only interested in the
price we charge for meat’,
Headley said.

Cecil Pierrepoint, a slaughtere>
and Dudley Wiltshire, a butcher
said that while they agree with
the suggestions made by Headley |
they consider that the prices of
liver, lights, hearts, tongues and
tails should be 40 cents per pound,

Superintendent of





Reasonable Profit '

Rufus Maughan, for many years
a butcher in the market, said that
he agreed with all the other
butchers had said, but he was
further interested in the whole-
sale price of carcases of beef, pork,
mutton, etc., which should be re-
gulated so that the butcher could
make a reasonable profit to
support his family.

Clarence Small, a butcher in the
market for 40 years, said that in
his opinion the present trouble;
with the butchers can be placed on
the shoulders of the Price Control
Inspectors because on ...veral oc {
casions when he and several others
asked them, while in the Public
Market to look into the price at
which they (butchers) were asked
to pay for stock on the hoof, the
Officers bluntly refused, saying
that they were only there to see
how the butchers sell—how they
buy was a matter for them,
(butchers).”



U.S. Atom Pile Has
Prevented War
—G. R. DEAN

DALI.AS, Texas, April 21

G. R. Dean, Chairman of the
United States Atomic, Energy
Commission, said here that the
country’s considerable stockpile
of atom weapons had prevented
a third world war. ’

How long this will remain
true, depends entirely upon the
Soviet analysis of our strength,
their willingness to take risk, and
their estimate of what a_ free
world will risk in crushing early
aggression in the hope of prevent-
ing an international conflict.
——Reuter

ubmarine showing the two main escape hatches and compartments in which
scape hatches;
h in the gun tower


















BARBADOS, ee 1951

THE SEARCH IS ON



THE SUN glints on a placid sea
from placid occasion, The scene







in the English Channel on a far
is that of the search for the sub-

‘ e e Marine Affray which dived at 9.15 p.m. on Monday and failed to
Surface as ordeted at 8.30 a.m. on Tuesday, The Affray, carrying 75
] e 9 nyure officers and men on a routine night deep-diving patrol, carried 80

Davis escape lungs and the new life-saving suits.

In Train Crash

HREE MEN WERE KILLED and 15 other passengers :
seriously injured in a rail crash involving three trains

here to-day.

Two trains were crowded with football fans on their
way to the Scottish Cup Final match.

‘Fifty other's ‘suffering from minor injuries were allow
ed to go home after hospital treatment,

CONTROLS

A story is told of a busi-
ness in Trinidad which aps
plied for permission to im-
port a number of “110 V
motors 50 cycles”.

Replied the Control Office:
“Your licence is granted to
import the motors,

Permission cannot be
granted to import. the
cycles.”

\
17 Dead, 22 Missing
In Oil Tanker

Collision

NEW ORLEANS, April 21

Seventeen seamen are known
dead and 22 others missing and
presumed dead today as the result
of the collision of two tankers in
the Gulf of Mexico, 200 miles
south of Morgan City, Louisiana,
yesterday. Both tankers caught
fire,

Marine records indicate it as
the greatest disaster off the United
States coast since 84 lives were
lost in a collision of an American
tanker and freighter off the Atlan-
tie coast on June 6, 1943.

In yesterday's pre-dawn col-
lision during heavy fog, the 10,195
ton Esso Greensboro and the 17,061
ton super tanker Esso Suez, both
cwned by the Esso Shipping Com-
pany, crashed, exploded and burst
into flames.

Only one man of the 44-man
crew of the Esso Suez was killed
in the collision, but another un-
identified man .died of burns,
Three other men on the Suez were
burned,

All other dead were aboard: the
flaming Greernsbero, carrying 32
men. Bodies of 15 men from the
Greensboro were recovered and
five survivors were picked up.

—Reuter,

SHIPS COLLIDE
50 Men Missing

COLOMBO, Ceylon, April 21.

Fifty men were missing
to-day after the boat taking them
to work across Colombo harbour
eollided with the 501 ton Norwe
gian cargo ship Tampa.



cause of the collision.

their work. —Reutey

INSIDE A SUBMARINE

Le | rt ‘

ee NE
am

men

three of the simplified type with two entry chntes spaced along the inner, pressure hull, and the



| Sanctions Against China

|

here



The police were searching for the
missing men and investigating the|dors conferred at the State De-

Some of the missing men have d
been picked up and gone on to| ternational affairs.

ELECTRIC MOTORS]

- 16,000-MILE
FLIGHT ENDS

SYDNEY,, April 21.

GLASGOW, April 21. i

zieés was among the cheering

ing boat “Frigate Bird’, when it |

this afternon, after its
miles Trans-Pacific pioneering
flight to Chile and back.
The Frigtte Bird's flight, began
tive weeks ago.
Menzies said

Ambulifices, their betis ringing
frantically, rushed from all over

Glasgow, city of 1,000,000 people that

Housewives nesr the’ crash rar}Wes a great debt to men such |
from their homes with blanket: | 28 Captain P. G. Taylor (Com-~
and hot drinks fer theo stricken mander of the flying boat) whe

was one of the pioneers of Aus-

passengers, 2 ae
4 tralian aviation.

Blood-stained tartan scarves lit
tered the track or hung limply
irom wrecked carriages

First official railway announce
ment said that “about 50 passen

Captain Taylor said it had bee
‘a wonderful trip’.
Ii had proved that air service



sinjured: somelof then could operate between Sout!
’ pw America and Australia when in
stallations were built on Easter

The accident occurred near] 'sland and Mangareva
Porlock Shields suburb station,}| The flight was a great “hands



across the Pacific” gesture to the
people of South America he
added: —Reuter,

World Situation
‘Extremely Perilous’

FREDERICK, April 21

United States Secretary of De- |
fence) George Marshali said today
that. thé world situation was
‘perilous in the extreme”

In a speech at Hood College
here Marshall said “we are pass
ing through one of the most criti
val periods in the history of the}
world. I might put it better in
even stronger words by saying
in the history of civilisation.

Marshall

when a crowded train taking foot-
ball supporters to a Scottish Cup
Final match at the giant Hamp-
den Park stadium, hit a stationary
special train.

The stationary train was tele.
scoped and in. turn crashed intc
znother stationary alongside, Near-
by householders climbed six-foo
walls and scrambled down a 30-
foot embankment to the scream:
ing passengers. A police emer-
gency call went out and _ soon
there was chaos as ambulances
fought their way through city
streets jammed with week-end
and football traffic,



Trapped, Freed

About half an hour after the

smash, reseue workers reporteo did not refer to th:

that all trapped people l.ad been} -ontroversy raging over the dis-

freed. A nurse who had been on} Missal of General Douglas Mac-

the train quickly organised first} Arthur and his “expand Korean

aid and rescue work and distri-} war” policies.

buted available medical supplies He said, however, that while
Doctors and nurses fought to} the battle continued in Korea, the |

United States was gathering her
military strength “to avert a wa
of worldwide proportions”

iS ~—-Reuter

save the lives of critically injured
passengers

One man said, as he lay bleed-
ing by a train: “Suddenly there
was. a tremendous crash. All
along the train I could hear: wo-
meh and children screaming and
men shouting from under tele+J
scoped carriages,”

weetee . —Renter



U.S, Want New Form Of

(By JULIA

WITH U.N
UNITED NATIONS Eigh
| North Korea have struc

WASHINGTON, April 21
The United States is pressing a
new form of economic and diplo-

matic sanctions against Com- :
munist China according to reports Fleet, briefly toured this front to-<
here to-day. : plane, and was told everyw

The -supject was believed to .

have been discussed when British
French and Australian ambassa- wearing a pearl handled automatic
All formations told him that
reports from patrols showed that
they believed they had struck the
outer sereen of the major Commun
ist defence system,

Gen, Van Fleet left his plane for
a jeep and raced past lines of
Sr working on
visit United Nations
Korean troops.
| Only to-day, were
allowed to tell the
deepest British tank
into North Korea
Centurions — the world’s
modern tank—on Tuesday

The British Task Force, the big

partment with the American As-
sistant Secretary of State for In-

\ —Reuter.

and South
reporter
story of the

penetratio:z

ern Korea just south
parallel, and plunged
Communist territory virtually
opposed,
The Force was well up in Com
inist country by lunchtime, and
; the river by dusk. It
1 th t

un

can shelter. In submarines of the



Australian Premier Robert Men- |

thousands who welcome the fly, |

landed at Rose Bay flying base |
16,000 |

|

Australia |

j vaine

roads, |

of the 38th] went in
straight into|charge which won all but one ob

|



This is the submarine’s marker buoy
for which the ships search: red and
yellow with a flashing white light;
it should be released when the sub
marine is in trouble

Navy Withdraws 16

Subs From Service

LONDON, April 21.

The Admiralty to-day withdrew
from service 16 sister submarines
of the Affray which plunged to the
ottom of the English Channel on
Monday.

All hope was given up two day
ago for her 75 crew members, but
search with ‘planes and_ ships
equipped with latest detector de
vices is going on.

The dmiralty said that the
sister submarines would be kept
out of service pending the result
of investigations into the Affray’s
loss. —Reuter,

German Will Be Taught

In Alsace Lorraine
PARIS, April 21

Government sut-
fered a defeat today in the edu
cation budget debate when
motion calling for the teaching of
German in primary sehools in
Alsace Lorraine carried by
372 votes to 174,

German was taught in all classes
in primary schools in Alsace Lor-
before the war, but
liberation only French ha
used and taught in these classes

~—~Reuter. }
|

The French

was

Since
beer

U.N. Forces Strike
Red Defence Line

N_ BATES)

FORCES, Korea, April 21.

th Army troops driving int:
k the main Communist defenc«

line. Their new commander, Lieutenant Gen. James Var




ty by jeep and lighi
here that his advancing troops

nae bumping into the main Chinese line of resistance.
1e General visited his troops. Centurions

which plou ghe¢
through muddy rice fields, whik
jeeps and light-tracked vehicles
were bogged down,
Along the rest
United Nations
aggressive patrols, and Commun
ists put in local counter attacks
Communist rearguardgs screen
their defence triangle—Chor
Kumhwa—Pyonyang— just
of the Thirty - Eighth
}parallel, drove back United Na
s\tions patrols at several points
1} One United Nations force, gran

of the front,
units continues

won
north

made by giant|pling with well entrenched enemy
most|forces in a bitter fight

for ridges
in this area, first stood back while
warplanes hurled blazing napalm

gest of its kind in the campaignjand guns blasted enemy position
crossed the Imjin river into West- | with

phosphorous shells,
with

then i
bayonet in a

silent
jective.

3Jetween noon and dusk, the
cleaned out Chinese who had bee
rolling hand grenades
j ther firs erious Of
on t for week Reuter

down





ti

|
Poa
SAFETY BUOY ee Confident
|
|

SOs
Sy
SS





WY

PRICE : SIX CENTS

AY IN BRIDGETO






























ORR 4 Deputies



PARIS, April 21.

Big Four Foreign Ministers

Gties ended the 7th week of
eir talks to-day, without an:
break in their deadh over an
igenda it Foretg inisters’
Conference 3
The Deputies met for the
35th time %
The three Western Deputies
described the Soviet reaction to
the new Western agenda as “dis

appointing.”

Gromyko szid that the Western



» Rgrs were not taking part in
: tes: and were in fact drag
ing the Conference in the
reverse «ipection He repeated
that the Western Power were
irying to minimise the importance














f the reduction of armaments,
ind appeared to maintain their
lesire for an arms race
Dr. Philip Jessup, U.S. Deputy,
could not agree with Gromvko
when he claimed that the Soviet
Delegation had taken account of
he Western views. The latest
oviet agenda proposal did not
nest the fundamental views of
e three Western Powers
Davies said that there were a
number of ebstacles in the path
of disarmament, and before any
iction could be taken, the Foreign
Ministers had to remove the ob
}
acl
The four Deputies could not
lecisions on policy; that was
the job of the Foreign Ministers
hemselve
\iexandre Parodi, French De-
uty, said that progress on the
iba ceduction of armaments had been
revented by the Soviet Union,
ither by veto in the Security

‘ouncil or by its obstinate oppo-
ition in the General Assembly of
he United Nations

With their new agenda, Western
‘owers had tried to narrow the
zap between Eastern and Western

Of Vi t iows Parodi aid Gromyko
1¢ ory laims that he was not

responsi-~-
ile for any difficulties, but facts
NEW YORK, April 21 vere facts, and the West had made
General .Mac Arthur Was. 4 i step forward while he (Gromy-
confident of victory in Korea, tha Th , aa _ eerie in eee
he we itn. . ere 2 gro Ss fo saying
e offered President Truman wha) | »),4¢ yesterday Gromyko’s reaction
be regerded as his best troops fo

MaeArthur







: ; had widened the gap between
service in Europe aecording to the | yoy) mae ines
New York Times White Hou: Grortyxo, saying that his dele-
serrespondent, Anthony | Leviere sation had made far greater con-
to-day. Yassions than the Western dele-

He said that the New York Tune
iad gained access to documente
oureces of the Wake Island meet
ng between the General and th

. > Geclared. that the West
with gn obstinacy which deserved
bette purpose, were still staying
n the same spot instead of try-



*resident held six months ago ng to reach an agreement on
IrmAamMernes.
Leviero summarised the con —Reuter
tents of the documents as fol
lows:

(1) General Mac Arthut
uid that he could make his S i
Jivision available to Genera
ymar Bradley, the Chairman o

Members of Peace Mission
Reach S.E. China

the Joint Chiefs of Staff, for des- e HONG KONG April a1
atch to Europe last January Three members of the Tibetan
(2) Harmony and agreement | “e?¢e Mission to Communist
vere achieved at the conference ‘hina, ineluding their leader,
Samara Bao, have arrived in

nn the necessity of gdhering to the
»olicies made in Washington, Thi
might have continued if the victor
redicted by General Mac Arthur

‘*huneking, South-east China, on
heir way to Peking, the official
Jew China News Agency reported

ada Reute
had materialised ee Reuter. cial asiasbaiviaac
Fc nee - crisis ¢ _ it the TELL THE
jenera calec an "e irely new »
war” on Nov. 21 he asked for ¢ THE NEWS

DAY OR NIGHT
DIAL

more aggressive policy in the Fai

Fast and became increasingly out

spoken against the Presidest.
—Reuter,

3113

@
ADVOCATE |
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THE AChE eee

A stock of models always on display

and ready for you to take away.

| «o>
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10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET.

=n!





PAGE TWO







———

JANETTA DRESS SHOP To-nite 8.30 & Continuing

Lower Broad Street “i Upstairs Over Newsam’s

DRESSES of all Types
READYMADE

and

MADE TO ORDER

a











TO-DAY To TUESDAY
445 & 8.30 p.m.
Glenn Ford, Valli, Clatde Rains,
Sir Cedric Hardewicke in



Plus Leen Errol in
“POPPA KNOWS WORST”

—

Colour by Technicolor



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY — 4.45 and 3% pm HBB:

RKO-Radio’s Double Hit |! BL
“BETRAYAL FROM THE EAST” Ve Sheet MITC uM
and Barbara Bel GEDD Ss

PLAZ GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James





A ODIAL














OISTIN

Last 2 Shows Today: 5 & 8.30 p.m.



we
Scireblay Dy HAROLD SHUMATE and JOSEPH HOFFMAN
Directed by FREDERICK de CORDOVA + Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR

GLOBE

reo Lae

LICCANEERS





















SUNDAY

R. and MRS. T. H. RENTO?
plan to Spend the next 6@Wwee
holidaying at the Oceam Vie
Hotel. Théy are fran Kingst

Ontario, and cameyNin on the

| T.C.A. flight from Canieda yester-

day morning Coming#in “by the
;Same plane were Mr. and M

;}C. G. Lynch of Toronto. Mr
| Lynch who is a Kemi teft
here in 1903, returning in 9620 for
|a holiday, This is his visit
jhome since then, They aMpatiy-
} ing with Mr. Lynch’s sister ip Con-
stitution Road.

C.B,C. Secretaty

SECRETARY with the Cana-

dian Broadcasting Co,, in
| Ottawa is Miss Pamela Forbes
who came in by T.C.A., yester-
day morning to spend three weeks’
holiday at the Ocean View Hotel
m also en the T.C.A. plane
yesterday was Miss Denta Covey-
duck who is an accountant with
the York Knitting Mills in Toron-
to. She too is here for three weeks
Staying at the Ocean View Hote!
k . Murray Wallace is a pilot
| with T.C.A, Yesterday he and
his wife were among the passeng-
ers arriving. They plan to spend
one week at. the Ocean View
tel. This is Wallace’s first trip
down this way. His route is their
Trans-Atlantic flight.

\DVOCATE



Calling

Two Teachers Masried in St. John Seaweli Shorts
‘ ‘i TERDAY aftern at St.

T PRESENT holidaying rere YF uh Mine Hazell PETER CARLYON is due back
is Mrs, C. A, Medas who is Marguerite de Sousa, daughter of in Montreal to-day after

on the staff of the Bishop’s High mr. and Mrs. Frank E. de Sousa Spending three weeks’ holiday
School for girls in Georgetown, of Georgetown, was married to With his parents. Capt. and Mrs.
31itish Guiana. Her mother who My. James Tillson, son of Colonel T. C. W. Carlyon. Capt. Carl-

is related to Mr, and Mrs. T. A. and Mrs. John C, F. Tillson of
Wason, accompenied her Over. gan Antonio, Texas, and an
Mrs. Medas’ father, Mr. S. C. auditor with the Singer Sewing
Davidson, was a former Postmaster Machine Co.

of British Guiana. The ceremony which took place
shortly after 4.30 o’clock was per-

on is retired and he and his wife
ave settled in Barbados.

Peter is with Barclays Bank,
Canada in Montreal, and he thor-
oughly enjoyed his Barbados holi-

After a short holiday here : day.
Mrs. Medas will be leaving formed by the Rev. Alfred E. wr. John Young, assistant secre-
for the United Kingdom, to “4 tary of T.C.A. and his wife who

iar eer eee ey had been holidaying here since
inf dress of. white broderie April 7th returned yesterday by

anglaise over. which there was « .C_A. to his headquarters in
oF HG Rk Leortuce GES demure bridal of whiic Montreal. . .Other T.CA. staff
Her rents live in

mat e
rooklyn, organza. Her head- was 3 members who were on the same
Mrs. Prescott is the ate of . eoronet white, for-get-me-nots flight were Mr. Denis Brown, Mr.
Dalton Prescott, assistant master Which kept in place a finger-ti

( School. veil

attend the Festival of Britain... .
off On Thursday for a holiday with
her relatives in the U.S.A., went
Mrs, D, Prescott, assistant teacher

p and Mrs, Edward Mann who were

rs’ * . She carried a bouquet of on their honeymoon, and Rita
ee ee FU c lita, white Gnabiirehons and McMaho~ and her mother Mrs.
Interested in the Y.W:C.A. white gerberas, Laura McMahon. Rita is _ with

matron of honour, Mrs. T.C.A.’s Reservation Department
ormah. Marshall wore a dress of in Montreal.

tHA OF San Fetnaide cane in On orchid brocade. Her head-dress Short Visit

was of pentas and, casandra and
Thursday to spend a, short holiday she tibaey Victoria style :
at Leaton-on-Sea, Mrs. Appleton pouquet to match, R. JOE DEVAUX of St. Lucia
ie

RS. MILLY APPLETON, wife
of the late Mr, Claude Apple-

SUNDAY,

APRIL 22, 1951

Trinidad Businessman
MoM" PHILIP MARCHACK,
Trinidad businessman, his
wife and his wife's sister Miss
Aggie Kong arrived from Trini-
dad yesterday by B.W.I.A. to
spend a couple of weeks holiday
staying at the Hotel Royal, Miss
Kong is Senior Reservations clerk
in B.W.1.A’s Port-of-Spain office. . .
Holidaying at Indramer Guest
House Miss Ione St. Helene.
Regular visitor to Barbados, she
is a civil servant in St. Lucia,
Local Talent
Orr a collection of local
talent will, be on hand op
Sunday April 29th at the Bethel
Chureh for their annual sacred
ecneert. Besides the Police Band,
cther artistes appearing on the
programme will be Will Clair-
monte and his vidlin, Nell Hall
singing the Ave Maria, Cedric
Phillips, bandsman G. _ Lovelle
and the Wesley Guild choir.

Enjoyable Holiday
R. and MRS. JOSEPH KING

after an enjoyable holiday
in Barbados, staying at Aquatic
Gardens, returned yesterday af-
ternoon by B.W.1.A. to Trini-
dad. Mr. King is with Messrs
William Fogarty Ltd’s. Branch of
Port of Spain. Mr. King was at
one time stationed here.

is

~





was en route to England to

, |’ 7 .
2 \ .. v e ‘ an is spending the week-end N.Y. FASHION
tine een auras noni MOS ok 5 & 8.90 p.m Dactor From St. Vicon ya GA. w pan aabed, No hae ert with the Dorien Cole's. “Ve came sty i
Louls De ROCHEMONTE'S «BLOOD OR he ‘9 Pau MONG the sticces: candi- Gount ¥.W.C.A, activities here After the cerem @ reception in on the B.W.1.A. flight from
“LOST BOUNDARIES” MOON dates in the examination wi} be of great interest to za Wee hela at “Suimmerhome” St. Lucia yesterday morning. ,
Beatrice Met Canada plies Ed seer cue ST. JAMES COMBINED for the Diploma in Tropical albt staying at Leaton is Mr. Ber- Hastihgs. passengers from Trinidad ers
PEARSON FERRER LEE Ot c i Medicine and Hygiene of hard Browne Who ons a Nard= Mr, and Mrs, Tilson will be day by BW I.a. were ee. AHS
SS MON. & TUES. 8.30 p.m. SCHOOL, HOLETOWN {{}|London University is Dr. Lestic ware business in Port-of-Spain. jeavini Bata a for Puerto Rico Mrs. Everett F. Gidley. Here for
Mon. & Tues. — 6 & 8.30 p.m. “LAST DAYS OF PoMPEn” Stence of St. Vincent. Ye was E ere 1049, A paving th six to eight weeks, they have
(Monogram) , f was He was. last hi in 2, at the end_of this month. . « Gat in St, Lawrence Gap. ‘
Warren Wilitam in with Preston Foster, Heals MAY 14TH yal vebank a eta at Bristol craunch Methddist he is 6 ist ; Visit taken a flat in St. Lawrence Gary e
“FEAR” — and — , jasil Rathbone niversity . ow t his studies .t j : he a
Freddie Stewart Ti ot and choir-master at the Belmont ‘ fifth visit Mr. Gidley is a sales represen- 4%
MeeCmmGn scaooL HkHO” | en a AveNGiNG ieibiee Keep this date Open oh whench TH eta te ee Methodist Church in Trinidad. cy iat ee dathuy 7 tative with Coca One. ue is based y
. est Indies. He expects to IN LONDON Javis of British Guiana’ who was in New York and his home is in
; san ni ; Kinderhook, New York. -Mrs.
ae ene some time thi Need last here in 1947. At that time (Une Gooding who had been in



Elegance unlimited Wish them joy
with the gift they'll treasure
always for the treasure it is—some-
thing in silver! Look over our
selection of handsome, lustrous
silver. You'll be surprised at the
tiny price tags on many of these
beautiful items , . . delighted with
the rich loveliness of every piecé !
Come in and choose to-day !

For the gifts you
give with pride let
Alfonso be your



Canteen Sets,

Sweet Dishes,



Cream &
Sugar
‘ Candle Sticks
J = a. Cake Forks
ewe x
of Barbados. Tea Spoons



Fruit Set
Cocktail Pieces
Entree Dishes



Alfonso B. Delima & Co.

: Casserole
Corner of Broad & McGregor Streets

Dishes





BEAUTIFUL
BAKELITE

ELECTRIC

LAMP
SHADES



37c. to $1.2

THE CORNER STORE





eames eomsenad



rr





h

With Cable & Wireless
f NY DORMER who is with
Cable & Wireless in Bermuda
flew in yesterday by T.C.A.,
from Bermuda to spend a week's
holiday in Barbados. Tony was
stationed here three years ago.. .
coming in on the same flight was
Peter Greig who is staying with
Mr. Charles Potter in St, Peter.
fa is here on two weeks’ vaca-
on.

On Honeymoon

PENDING their honeymoon. in
Mrs.

Barbados
Arthur
Dominica

Mr.
flew in
Thursday,
were married on April 18.

Mr, Bell is with Barclays Bank
in Dominica. His brother Emile
who was in Barbados a_ few
months ago on holiday was in
Dominica for the wedding, Emile
is with the bank in St, Vincent

Mr. and Mrs, Bell are here for
two weeks staying on the St.
Lawrence coast,

Two Months

ACK YEARWOOD,

Manager of the Fort Royal

Garage and his wife Eileen went

out on the T.C.A. plane yester~

day bound for Montreal. They

expect to be away about two
months.

are and

Bell who
on

froin
They

Assistant



he

attend the 9th Biennial Conference
of the British Empire Service
League which was held in London
and at which he was the official
delegate. representing _Britisn
Guiana, His visit this time is for
a holiday.

In Georgetown besides being
the managing proprietor of a
manufacturing firm, Mr. Davis is
connected with the work of the

section of the Y.M.C.A., being a
member of the Governing
and the Advisory Committee of
which Mr. Justice E. R. L.
is chairman. Mr. Davis is also a
member of the Vestry of the
Cathedral Parish of St. George of
which he has been a member for
the past nine years. Mr. Davis is
a guest At Leaton-on-Sea.
Back to Venezuela
ENE VANDEN BRANDEN ac-
companied by his wife and
youngest daughter Nicole flew

LOUISE ST. LAURENT. daugh- back to Venezuela yesterday after
ter-in-law of Canada’s Prime Minis- being here since April 13th. Mr.
ter, flew into London for her first Vanden Branden is Avensa Air-
trip abroad. She is accompanying lines Traffic Manager in Caracas
her husband, Mr. Renauld St. Lan- . . . .Passengers on the same

rent, a barrister with a lucrative plane were Gordon Kinch

Quebec practice.

and

They have five|Dr. Roger Hernandez Gordon had visit

Y.M.C.A., and ¥.W.C.A. He is Dutch audience.
associated With the Boys’ Club there is a definite

Body “I’m glad to be

Ward seems that having regained

Trinidad for the past three months
is now back in Barbados.

Calypso King

ACK IN ENGLAND after his

successful tour of Holland is
Beginner.
was in the
composed
all of
were well received by his
that
for

Calypso King, Lord
He says that while he
Low Country, he
several new calypsoes,
which
He feels
“market”
song in Holland
back
England,” says Beginner. .

that type of

of its best exponents of
Calypso, London is now

another. I hear that
for a band tour of Germany,
with Trinidad-born Cyril Blake.
who is affectionately
among his admirers in
as “the Louis Armstrong
Europe.”

Off to Canada

ORTIA BOURNE has gone to
Canada to spend a_ holiday
with her brothers. First she will
Hilary in Montreal then

oi

children: eldest is eight, youngest |been on a four day visit to his over to Charles in Vancouver. . .

two months.

relatives, . . .his work in Vene-

—London Express Service.}2uela takes him over three hun-

econ a re
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TO-NIGHT TO TUES
Walt Disney's

“* CINDERELLA ”’

MATINEE: WEDN

DAY NIGHT at 8.50

in Technicolor

ESDAY at 5 p.m.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY at 8.30

GEORGE RAFT

“RACE



& Continuing
Republic Pictures presents

“THE 3rd
MAN”?

Starring
Joseph COTTON—VALLI
With

Orson WELLS and

Trevor HOWARD

ROXY
Today & Tomerrow
4.45 & 8.15 p.m.

Warner Bros. presents—-











“THE. ,
YOUNGER
BROTHERS ”’

Color by Téchnicoldr
with Wayne MORRIS,
Janis PAIGE
and Bruce BENNET

Extra
“MEN OF TOMORROW”
and

|

“A DAY AT THE FAIR”

ROLL ROOFING — Red

PITCH PINE
DOUGLAS FIR



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
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LUMBER DEPARTMENT



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(

WILLIAM BE

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SNDIX — MARILYN MAXWELL

STREET”’





4.30 and 8.30
20th Century Fox Double—
Olivia DeHAVILLAND
and Mark STEVENS

IN
«SNAKE PIT”
AND
« DAKOTA LIL”

With. «+5
Rod CAMERON and
Marie WINDSOR

Monday and Tuesday 4.30
& 8.30

M-G-M and Fox Double

AUGHT

and :
“BATTLEGROUND”

OLYMPIC)

Last Two Shows TO-DAY
4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M Smashing Double—
Spencer TRACY
and James STEWART

“Cc

IN
«« MALAYA”
AND
«© BATTLEGROUND ”
Starring...
Van JOHNSON and
John HODIAK



Monday & Tuesday 4.30
and 8,15
M-G-M and.Fox Double
“BEGINNING OR THE
END”

and
“CARNIVAL IN COSTA
RICA”

eee
in
! S555
SSS Dem —l—— ol
EMPIRE ROYAL
To-day 4.45 and 8.30. . Last Two Shows To-day

DIAL 4610
——

|



le

{

dred miles outside of Caracas. Ho
is with the United Geophysical
Co. .. . .Dr. Hernandez is a
lawyer in the Labour Department
of the Venezuelan Government.
He too had been here only four
days. He was a guest of the
Windsor Hotel.

Mary Lane, former headmistress
of Codrington High School is on
her way to England via Canada
by T.C.A.. .. . and Rena Cald-
well who by now must consider
herself a Barbadian—she comes
here every year—left yesterday by
T.C.A. for Montreal. Since No-
vember she had been holidaying
at the Hotel Hastings.



ADVENTURES



BY THE WAY...

N
tragedy of the avalanches in
Switzerland a name I had long
forgotten caught my eye—Zernes

recent accounts of the

in the Engadine. It was the start-
ing-place of one .of the most
glorious walks I ever had, over

the Fluela Pass into the Grisons
I spent the night at the hut on
top of the pass, 8,000 feet up, be-
tween the Schwarzhorn and the
Weisshorn, I was up for the sun-
rise, and at the door of the hut
there was a lake of green glacier-
water. I never in my life saw a
more beautiful sunrise. The walk
ended at Klosters, where
Romansch, one of the survivals of
the country dialects of the Roman

Empire, is still spoken. ‘

Mr. Snapdriver’s Speech
R. TINKLEBURY SNAP-

OF

P



deny that the sailor Ben Bottle
painted this ship on his dog-
kennel. On the contrary, this
attempt of an old sailor to console
himself with a memento of his
days at sea will be adduced as

evidence of pardonable pride in
the traditions of our race

If even judges can admit that
they do not know all the laws
today, hcw can we expect a simple
mariner to realise that his praise-
worthy action might be construed
as illegal?” (Here Mr. Justice
Cocklecarrot intervened to say that
for the purposes of the case he, the
judge, must be presumed to know
all the laws, even if he had not
had time to read some of the
latest). Mr. Snapdriver continued:

again in

to lose
Lord &
Kitchener will shortly be Juanes
e &
will probably be making the trip

known
England

’



This two-toned, toast and Tent _
silk shantung afternoon dress. is
from Capri Originals’ Spring collec-
tion. i

The bodice, fastened with gold
metal buttons, slants to the side
wrap of the slimly draped skirt. The
stole, also two-toned, partly hides
the deep cut armholes,

The belt is of brown leather.

IPA



Copyright P 1S Var Ovas lot Amsterdam

By BEACHCOMBER

Town and Country, Planning Act
is like saying that a limerick scrib-
bled on a boiler is an infringement
ef the Nuts, Bolts and Screws
Act i

Runamok is Coming Here

ADY CABSTANLEIGH in-
forms me, through her
secretary, Janetta Rawlplug, that
the Eskimo poet Runamok is to
visit England soon as the guest
of the Friends of Eskimo Poetry:
He will give q series of 13,464
lectures on Poetry as a means of
Expression, and a performance of
his opera, Mik-Mak, will be given

in Lady Cabstanleigh’s music
room. It contains the beautiful
aria; “O puk wagug, tik sok

DRIVER, for the defence said “To say that a ship painted on a wagog!” The music is by Chutha-
wraetas The defence will not try to Kennel is a contravention of the kud.
ee ee ee

S
g S
4 %,
‘ :
s *.
x %
x Present .... XS
eS - «
* THE SHOP AT SLY CORNER :
x : $
‘ At...THE EMPIRE THEATRE y
s %
. On.... MAY 16TH, 17TH AND 18TH :
*
S655 OOOO OOOO SO PE POPES LOOOPTOO SEE IOSS >

$2°90 to $6.78

\\@ PINSTRIPES $5.84

M GREY FLANNEL $238 & 619

@ WEN'S READY MADE TROUSERS all Wool Worsted $17,85
@ WEN'S LEATHER SLIPPERS Black and Brown $4.84

EVANS & WHITFIELMS

DIAL 4606

YOUR SHOE STORE

wg
a
MEN’S TROPICAL SUITINGSs

DIAL

5

4220







SUNDAY, APRIL 22,

(The Compost Heap. Grass Cut-
tings. What to cut back. The
Cherry Tree.)

Gardens are improving now the
drier weather is with us, and
there have been reports that an-
nuals are at last doing well.

Petunias and Verbena are flower- fi

ing and the general appearance
of many gardens is quite gay. It
is however an untidy time of
year with the Mahogany and
Flamboyant trees showering down
their leaves. This means double
labour in keeping the garden trim
and tidy. It must be remembered
however that these leaves are
a valuable asset to the garden,
and should never be wasted, but
should always be added to the
Compost Heap. Every garden
should have its Compost Heap,
and for any gardener who has
neglected to make one, now that
the leaves are dropping is a good
time to start one. This is how it
is done.

Compost Heap

Dig a wide deep hole in some
corner of the garden where it
will not be seen, as it is not a
thing of beauty.

Into this hole throw all avail-
able leaves, mixed with any green
grass cuttings from the lawn, or
any.weeds or other green refuse
matter from the garden. Spread
the stuff out, and as the heap
grows, keep it damp by watering
it. To promote decomposition
quickly the Garden Book advises
sprinkling each layer with g little
Nitrate of Potash. From this it
will be seen that a Compost Heap
is quite a simple thing to make,
and yet it will provide valuable
organic matter for use in the
garden. When the contents of the
Compost Heap are well rotted
they can be used as an addition
to beds that are being prepared,
and for potting out ferns and
other plants.

Grass Cuttings

Besides being g valuable addi-
tion to the Compost Heap, grass
cut@ings from the hawn-mower
are useful as g Mulch for the
surface of garden beds, especially
in this very dry weather, Spread
on top of the bed they help to
keep it cool and damp, so lessening
the labour of watering.

These grass cuttings are valu-
able too when forked into a gar-
den bed, as they both lighten and
enrich the soil,

_Semetimes the lawn-mower
Should be used without the box
that catches the cut grass, so al-
lowing the grass to fall on the
lawn, as this acts as manure on
the lawn and is good for the grass.
What Should Be Cut Back

This is the time of year when
many of our flowering shrubs
should be cut back. It is not a

hard and fast rule however but

Rupert



The hare is out off sight so
quickly that Rupert decides it. is
No use trying to catch up with him.
Making his way back over the
common he sees to little figures

coming over the snow. ‘' Hooray,
there are Bill and Algy,’’ he
thinks. ‘And they've both








FRESH SUPPLIES OF |

TS

ARE
PRICE!



SWEETHEART
TOILET SOAPS

AGAIN

| TAKE HOME A FEW |
| CAKES TO-DAY

1951

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

The Garden In April

FARM AND
GARDEN

By AGRICOLA

THE PIGEOY PEA

Are you ready for the ques-
tion? Yes? Here it is: What did
must be left to the individual you eat in the way of proteins
decision of each seraener acting Or flesh-formers yesterday. The
according to the condition of his answer of a housewife in the low
own plants. Howeyer r income group would probably
that the shrubs do hepa cuting Tun like this: “well, I couldn't
back see that the ie is done 8€t meat but we had some fish
properly by cutting within a and the usual staples—rice and
oot or so of the ground. A half. *Weet potato; I forgot those dry
hearted half way will Peas a country friend gave me
only do the shrub harm. Among “4, in any case, they are a both-
those shrubs that are the better ¢ to shell and to cook; the
for a cutting back if they ne it huckster with the greens did not
are the Canariensis, the Hibis come around so there were no
the Oleander the Croton, 3 epbbage leaves to put in the rier.”
Pride of Barbados. If cut’ back So there it is, a fill without a
now, these shrubs will have the pin NB Tanna, for ia
benefit of the rainy season ahead rotei ee vere
in which to spring again, aa Sad scarcely shy

mins.

FRUIT TREES (Cont'd) ana self-help from the arden

The Barbados Cherry is a small would have provided ample
bushy tree which can easily be amounts of each. without addi-
grown in a garden. This fruit-tree tional expense. When animal pro-
is sometimes used as a hedge, or tein (meat and fish) is scarce and
as a windbreak. The cherry tree expensive, vegetable protein in
is very hardy, gives no trouble the form of pulse (peas and
and will grow almost anywhere, beans) should be used more free-
It does not require a hole of ly than normally to supplement

little
| vita—
A little more foresight

great depth, but for good results the meat and fish ration, The
it should be pal each year, Latin-Americans consume Jarge
and the old dead wood cut out. | quantities of dried beans; the

French have a wonderful way of
preparing lentils with the addi-
tion of left-over meat scraps ,etc.,

It has several bearings of fruit
during the rainy season and the
fruit is one of the most useful

: rendering them irresistible; in
Wie ie deliceas aie is wane inal died pulse Cabal lakes
ices. It can be crushed and sweet- we ten eee ot

, a meat, In this t of the world
ened with sugar, or it can be we incline . thoughtless in
made into Jam or Jelly. these matters and, of course
The Barbados Cherry is propo- there is absolutely no reason why
gated by seed or from cutting. there should not be an abundanc>
Have you any Gardening ques- of pigeon peas. They demand
tions you would like answered or little attention, grow almost any
any garden information that where and greatly improve the
would be of interest to other soil. Cooking dry peas is not
Gardeners to pass on? such a problem if pre-soaking
Have you a surplus of seeds »r treatment is applied.
cuttings you would like to ex- But now, this story had a re-
a percussion. Johnnie tackled his
Write to “GARDENING’ Daddy one afternoon something
C/O The Advocate. like this: “Daddy, we had a
and watch this column for a reply. grand time those few days we
Mrs. H. C. King writes— spent with Auntie in the country
I have two healthy, vigorously- during the Christmas holidays;
growing plants of the creeper lovely pea bushes were just fuil
Bignonia Venusta. As far as 1 Of pretty blossoms and pods of
know they are the only ones on V ng colours and cousin
the island. T have had them now Sheila and I loved picking the
for about five years. Two years pods and seeing who could find
ago, one flowered,—not very pro- the longest—some had as many
fusely—but since then although as seven peas in the pod—and
hundreds of bunches of tiny ~uds it was grand fun shelling them
appear, they all fall off instead of and eating them too in rice, soup
developing into flower clusters. and jug-jug, my, they were
From experience in other coun— good! Well, you know, not long
tries, I know that this creeper after we came home, a huckster
usually flowers for many weeks appeared at the door and offered
during the dry season. Can it be some to Mother at a shilling a
that the unusual rains of the last pint; Mother said my house-
two years, have over-stimulated keeping money won't stretch
the growth, and kept the plant that far to-day, come back next
too happy? week,” At this point, Dad inter—
Also, could you please tell me peeves “What, a shilling a pint
where I can. order a grafted for those common peas! Wasn't
“Julie” mango? In this district like that in my day, we just had
mangoes do not seem to grow very all these things and we heard
well, but I am still anxious to try none of this newfangled busi-
to grow one. ness about ‘ing and balanced

“Keewaydin” food and all the rest of it—we
Graeme Hall Tce., just ate and plenty too.” “Well,
Apr. 15th ’51. replied Johnnie, “I have been

reading that people who pay at-
iontice’’ ta the kind of food they
eat keep healthy and live long.
What about you and [ starting
now in the backyard to fork up
along the fence right reupe and
lanti some of those dry peas
i Mother has? They will lool
pretty and give us all we need
of those nice green peas and a
plentiful supply of dry ones for
later use, The border will be
attractive and serve as a start
while we think of planning out
a little food garden which will
profit also by its protection from
wind, The April showers have
started so let’s begin at once.”
“Well, Son,” says Dad “never
thought of that, you have got



2 Le

sledges, too. We can all go to-

ether.” In a few minutes they something there, let’s go.” And
ave met and Rupert is i ing of so, while Dad and Johnnie make
the strange creature he has just yeady the border, we'll hear

seen. ‘it might be a March hare,
only it's a month too soon,’ says
Algy. ‘*D'you think we could see
it if we went back?” asks Bill.

more next Sunday of this won-
derful group of plants—the peas
and beans.

CHIC



AVAILABLE
ONLY 15¢ CAKE |

——




SUNDAY

Mrs. McPherson Advance Ot |





1 rHE NEW

LOQK, 1947
Stripped of its veiling, with a
forward tilt and a crown full of
flowers, Mrs. McPherson's New
Look hat of 1947 does service for
another spring.

becomes the
i991

Sse 3



What next ?
UIDE for thirsty
Lon@on comes i. the shape of
a silk scarf showing 64 welil-
known hostelries. Captions ex—
plain how to get there and even
the sort of people you may expect
to find on arrival.

visitors to

ASHION’S fad for flowers has
induced a manufacturer to
design large roses, marguerites
and peonies that can be pinned to
a bathing suit. They are plastic

and you can even take g swim
without harming them,
wh
ORGNETTES that _ convert

into dress clips, rimless spec-
tacles with a top rim studded
with coloured stones, are a manu-—
facturer’s idea for girls who wear
glasses. ity
Most popular colours for frames
to-day: red and black.

cy * *

HAT are wome. buying for

Spring? Wives of men in
the £1,000-a-year class are often
“making do.”

Example in 1951 thrift is given
by Sybil McPherson, of Twicken-
ham, 32-year-old wife of a £1,000
a-year civil servant—a petite mid
brunette with large blue eyes and

ADVOCATE



cuts the
bills...

by gICKI SILVA-WHITE

(“White is only suitable for really
sunny days—yellow will carry me
Over thé dull ones, too.”)

HOME WASH

She will team them with a blue
tailored suit made—to~measure last
autumn designed to carry her
well into the summer.

Her main idea for economy is
to buy only materials that are
washable at home.

For summer days she has picked
up four different remnants in
patterned linen or silk with a
white background to be teamed
with white accessories, for really
het days

For spring evenii — she
and her husband Nasalih cutest
friends _at week- has
made a simple bottle green
frock long sleeves wide hip
pockets from g 30s. remnant, For
cocktails or a theatre in tewn she
has made a taffeta patterned frock,
Square-necked, with short sleeves
and bouffant skirt also from a
remnant.

During the winter she knitted

et
West Indies

Sugar Industry
MR. ALAN WALKER
ON CUBA TALKS

LONDON, April 12
The West Indies sugar industry
is advancing now as it has never

done before, says Mr, H. Alan
Walker, Managing-Director ot
Caroni and West Indies Sugar

Company, who has just returned
to this country from a_ three-
months business visit to the Carib-
bean, That is one side of the
picture

On the other, Mr. Walker said
that his chief impression of the
rip was of the dissatisfaction
felt throughout the British ter-
ritories in the Caribbean at the
news that Britain was considering
entering into a trade-pact with
Cuba.

Seated in his office, high above
London's Park Lane, he told me
ef his plans for seeing Mr. James
Griffiths, Colonial Secretary and
expressing to him the conster-
nation that news of the proposed
— had caused in the West
ndies, Originally Mr, Walker
had arrangegj to see Mr. Griffiths
on April 10th. but as that was

Budget Day, the interview had *
to be cancelled and will now
take place later this week.

Mr, Walker will tell Mr,
Grifiths that first West Indiag
reaction to the news was. that

Britain did not care what hap-

a white sweater for 5 days pened to her Empire. In _ his
The bodice has a tai esign Opinicn that is a_ short-sighted
of flowers. (Thirteen different view but, nevertheless, under-
colours on one nea@dle were standable.

needed to make it up.) He will point out that the

IT GROWS

FURNITURE that ‘ grows up with

the children” will be a
feature in the Homes and Gardens
Pavilion at the Festival.

Small chairs “grow” by revers-
ing the positions of the combined
seat and back to produce a higher
and larger seat; the height of
tables is adjusted by reversing the
table tops.

Ingenious safety “evices include
electric fires that switch off whes
tilted or lifted, power points with
automatie shutters and foolproof
gas taps.

World Copyright Reserved
—LES.



CROSSWORD



1. Norma! lanes provide a London

thoroughfare, (4)
° here's a

a ae) nee 7. Washout. (9)

v. It may make ears din. (7)

11. The cat is gore so send it Ww
Coventry. (9)

14. A neat ditterence.(4) 15, Layer.(3}

16. Pertaining to dew. (5 dent

17. its firm setting provides uprign
hock | nba) nee, (7)

1Â¥. Knock of balance.

‘ ad there were 30 more,

aR i Bagdad they, Beguenth. (0)

vuman in it.

Sugar growers of the West Indies
are already dissatisfied with the
production limitation imposed

upon them by the Ministry of
Food and that they are really
amoyed to think that Cuba is

going to get a market for any-
thing up to half a million tons
annually.

Mr, Walker said that while
he was in Jamaica, he had been
approached by several small-
holding farmers who told hin
they did not think Britain ways
treating them fairly, They be-
lieved that they would be better
off outside the Empire and could
see no point in striving for in-
creased production when there
was no certainty of a market,

But despite the views of these
individuals Mr. Walker believes
that West Indies production is
progressing as it has never done
before. New methods, newer
machinery and increased plantings
were all a sign of the continuing
growth of the industry. His own
company had recently put up two
new factories, one hi Trinidad
and one in Jamaica and new
plantings had already been made
to ensure they were kept er
productive.

EH expressed the belief that
br 1958, given anything like
normal eonditions, the West

Indies would reach, if not exceed,
the ceiling figure imposed upon
their preduetion by the Ministry
of Food. He remarked that 1953
is the year that the new Common-
wealth sugar agreement comes
into force and said that if West
Indies production were realised,
it would not be easy for Britain
to explain her Cuban commit-
ments,

He further pointed out that
originally when Britain entered
into the new Commonweaith
agreement, she did so on the un-
derstanding that she reserved a
market of 250,000 tons for pur-
chases on the world market, This
was taken to mean, thaf with the

(6) exception of a quarter of a
a flawless aki. a, Agrees oad million tons, Britain would buy
Mrs, McPherson started planning 1. Lame or mad? (anag.) (9) a all her sugar from Empire
for spring last winter, stock-piling 2. Residency OF phe poor Aol & BI —— ok se ‘esa illoaty
dress and skirt remnants bought ae che you antiseptics. (6) The ferinion 2 accord Cy in 8
on her monthly trips to the West °° Gf this would transgress. (3) — » anes ant are 1
End. 6. Shelter. ( 8 ; ;
8 je is 8 strap. (6) whole affair. It now appeared
Besides making nearly all her 10. Western farm, ( ant of that Britain had decided to in-
own clothes, she onhiean most of her '* a wosr-indiaa ® foiam ; crease her purchases of foreign
children’s clothes — she has two rs Sn Seu a wort keeping. {8} sugar and the one fens
boys aged six and two, 18. Go back ~ the sappers. ( io tnt eeniee talon” woe
¢ ». Container. Nas é D , s
Her only new purchases for 7" sr ee ee suffer accordingly.
spring were a straw bonnet, trim- Solublon of veqtergay oe a He concluded — that Britain
med with grapes, plums and veil- Baer * Aro; f “ augeagton, 21. would be making a big mistake
ing, long-sleeved silk blouse and biovort 34 Heed y vise. Parte! in breaking away from the
two pairs of washable fabric er foes ce or Casta Empire markets which had served
gloves, all in primrose yellow. fe Oapot pte: 15, Toes; 20. } her so well in the past
SADE FESS



















ee

DON’T BE



PAGE THREE







Bourn-vita

When choosing your beauty preparations, remember it's
not the knowledge of one but the team-work of m iny beauty

scientists that counts, Thas’§ why you caa always

Trust DOROTHY GRAY




&
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Wd Cleanse, Stimulate, Nourish-—these are the three

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2 Simulate Sessa Amen
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The Dorothy Gray Beauty Consultant

will be visiting us *

from 27th April to 4th May |

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—with the faithful
use of DREAM The Sout
of the Beautiul.

Play safe bs prepared,
ol our romanuc mome V
Het few cakes of DREAM
ye BOAP, use it
¢

uithfully in your bath,
shower and at the wasn
basin for a soft-smooth

clear skin, radiant with natural

loveliness. i
DREAM is available at toilet gooss

counters throughout the island.

a7"

AFRAID TO TURN



YOUR BACK ON THE SUN

You need have no fear that you will regret it, if you have
LIMACOL in the house, for LIMACOL has an effect on sunburn that
is almost magical. It takes the sting out almost instantly, and leaves
you feeling so refreshed and cool.

of your sk
and

giving you

easing

refreshment

Remembe
that same
as an aft

give you that

LIMACOL is obtainable both

your favourite Drug or Department Store.

LIMA

STOKES & BYNOE — Agents

Pat it gently on the affected areas

No matter how hot the weather is, as long as you have
LIMACOL you have the means to keep cool, because LIMA-
COL is truly “the freshness of a breeze in a bottle.”

in and feel
the

a sense of comfort and

it soothing

soreness and

like a cooling breeze.

r too that for men it has

Se
SS

gentle action when used
er-shave lotion,’ and will

“well-groomed” feeling.

plain and mentholated from



COL

eee



PAGE FOUR





BARBADOS CRICKET
GETS £2,000 |
Will Train 24 Footballers |

Wilkes
By O. S. COPPIN

f HE
| Cricke



ard of Management of the Barbados
3 Association haye announced that they
f received the £2,000 allocated to them by the

Vest Indies Cricket Board of Control as their share

V
rpc, profits of over £30,000 ftom the 1950 West
rs - ] i to
Joe
se’ agement

r to England.







ill be remembered that the Board of Man-
of the Barbados Cricket Association queried
first the division of the profits, secondly the legality of investing the
greater part of the funds and thirdly the stipulation that they use their
£2,000 to provide additional accommodation at Kensington.

This resulted’ in the withholding of the £2,000 from Barbados
until some definite pronouncement as to how these funds would be
utilised could be forthcoming.

CLINCHED THE DEAL

I understand that while in Jamaica Mr. F. A, C. Clairmonte
and Mr. John Goddard, both members of the Board of Managemen
of the Barbados Cricket Association managed to convince the West

Indies Cricket Board of Control officials that this money would be
used for improving accommodation and facilities at Kensington anc
50 it has come,

The Barbados Cricket Association have already made a mos
welcome iraprovement at Kensington in the provision of a Lad.es
Cloak Room néxt to the George Challenor Stand ei pee

This, I understand costs in the vicinity of £200. There are
other financial commitments that might prevent the Cricket Asso
ciation frem embarking at once upon any new accommodation bu



the existing one needs to be painted and overhauled and no doub,
the remainder will be reserved as a nucleus for an additional ac
commodatior, plan in the future,

CANNOT SEE THE POINT

FAIL to see how the Barbados Cricket Association would have
] justified a committing of themselves to spend th money. on
erecting additicnal accontmodation when the Cricket Bodies of Brit- |
ish Guiana, Trinidad and even of Jamaica, found theiuselves in a
position in which they could not give the West dndies Cricket Boaru |
f Contro § dertaking.
ae Tne Heated of Mant ement approved in principle of an invitation |
from the newly formed Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Association |
|



representative team to Trinidad in July of this year, :
While I ean at once agree with the Board in the r efforts to assis
the newly. formed. Association to gain a place in cricket controllins
circles in the West Indies by virtue of assisting in mé king this tourna-
ment possible, yet I fail to see how the sc heme can take its place with-
in the realms of practicality.

GOING TO BRITISH GUIANA AS WELL

NE must remember that we are committed to fulfil a touring
O engagement with British Guiana in September of this year in

» regular quadrangular Intercolonial series. : ;
= In ‘addition to this, the Barbadian element of the 1951—52 West
Indies tearm to Australia will have to leave around that time Although
one might safely rule out the members of the wae maiee a

stralia having to make either of these tours, yet one cannot visuals
oe corenetintie teams to Trinidad and British Guiana in ‘the oe
of three months without at least sixty per cent of the personnel o

se two teams being the same men. :
ag being. oc will they be able to obtain the necessary
leave for both tours? If this is not so, then the teams can hardly be
called representative. i

ASKING TWENTY-FOUR TO GO

UNDERSTAND that the Barbados Cricket Board of Management

are planning to circularise twenty-four players asking hereon
they are willing to make pee tours x —* and will then ac

e facts revealed by this questionnaire, :

ce a at once ackiuclate the view that these tours, with the
stars for the Australian team unavailable for local pommnntied 80°
the majority not being able to make both tours, constitute exce —
scope for lesser lights to show their wares and should prove a goo
investment for future Intercolonial and West Indies cricket. i

While agreeing with this point, I must point out on ‘the other
hand that too far East is West and there is only a slight margin
between the burlesque and the experimental,

BERTIE WAS “TOPS”
WAS among a most appreciative audience at the Y.M.P.C, Club

House on Wednesday night to hear Dr. Bertie Clarke lead off

‘reference to cricket. ue

It was the consensus of opinion
that not only does Bertie know his
cricket but he knows his critical
Barbadian audience as well.

His answers to some real posers
were honest and spontaneous and
although some were not definitely
decisive yet they were accepted as
honest.

For example he did not propose
to say who is the better all round-
er out of Keith Miller and Frankie
Worrell. For that matter I don’t
think anyone can. At least if
they told me I would not believe
them. Bertie said they were both
leading all-rounders in world
cricket to-day.

send











What impressed me most was
his plea first for a proper recogni-
tion of the role of a professional
in England, who he said was
earning a decent living by playing
cricket and secondly that it would
be a good thing if the West Indies
could see their way to employ
professionals on coaching engage-



4 “~ o ov)
some of the leading West Indian
ments in the West Indies, ;
I shall await with interest any action which the West Indies
cricket authorities might take on this advice, coming as it has from
one who has made his mark in world cricket.

FOOTBALLERS TRAIN FOR JAMAICA TOUR

RRANGEMENTS have been concluded for the staging of a foot-

ball tournament here between a team composed of members
of the Kingston and Melbourne Clabs of Jamaica.

The all-Jamaican captain as well as seven Jamaican caps will be
taking part in the fixtures which open on Monday, May 21.

To this end, Mr. G. Wilkes of the Lodge School will commence
coaching twenty-four Barbadian players from whom the teams will
be selected. They begin on Wednesday next and judging from the
equipment which Mr, Wilkes has ordered the training will not be a
Sunday school affair,

At least eight balls, a blackboard, wicket sticks, jumping poles
and tape have been requisitioned and the boys are anxious to get
going.

| Jack

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



Vamoose Seores Second

Edril Capsized
Twice

y our Yachting Correspondent)
VV AMOOSE was victorious in
the Second Tornado Re-
gatta which was sailed in
Carlisle Bay yesterday even-
ing. She was skippered by
her owner, Teddy Hoad, who
has so far proved himself the
best helmsman in unhandi-
capped races.
ne weather conditions were
ideal for Tornado racing. During
the first half of the race the wind



was medium but in the closing
stages it changed to medium to

light. The boats sailed north about
for the first time but this did not
affect the judgement of the helms-
men,

Edril, skippered by her owner,
Ivan Perkins, turned turtle twice
in the last lap. It is unfortunate
that this should happen us many
yachtsmen are already ie the habit

, of calling her owner “Turn Over’.

The boats taking part yesterday
were : Vamoose, skippered by
Teddy Hoad; Zephyr, skippered by
Leacock; Breakaway, skip-
peged by George Hoad, Edril, skip-
pered by Ivan Perkins: Maurice
Leach’s Comet, Thunder, with
John Bladon at the helm and
Cyclone with Gerald Nicholls at
the heim

Jack Leacock sailed



steadily but



Teddy Hoad always kept him well
-overed, He had the edge on the
other boats. Zephyr remained in
second position throughout the
race and eventually finished a
minute and 49 seconds behind
Vamoose,

“Breakaway” Overtaken

George Hoad at the helm of
Breakaway, also saited very well.
He was in third position for two
laps, but ended fifth. In the last
lap he was overtaken by Gerald
Nicholls in Cyclone,

Cyclone finished third, two min-
utes and 45 seconds behind
Zephyr. '

John Bladon sailed extremely
well in the last lap. He had a bit
of trouble in this lap when an
Alcoa boat which was leaving the
harbour, crossed him, He was,
however, able to snatch fourth
place from Breakaway around the
beagle in the last lap, Breakaway
also had a little worry with this
Alcoa boat but finished only 22
seconds behind Thunder,

Comet came sixth, four minutes
and 29 seconds behind Breakaway
while Edril was last, a minute and
24 seconds after Comet,

The Third Tornado Regatta will
be sailed on Sunday, April 29, at
10.30 a.m, It is hoped that on
this occasion Swansea, owned by
Teddy MacKinstry, and Tempest,
owned by Colles Coe, will be able
to race,

The results were as follow:



Start Time Elapsed Place

(p.m,) mins.

hrs, secs,
Vamoose 3.30 1, 2. 58 (1)
Zephyr 3.30 1, 4. 17 (2)
Cyclone 3.30 1. te 2 (3)
Thunder 3.30 1 7 26 (4)
Breakaway 3.30 1 t 48 (5)
Comet 3.30 1, 12. WV (6)
Edril 3.30 1 13. 43 (7)

_———-

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL
ASSOCIATION

Following are the results of
matches played in the above As-
sociation; —

April 12th—Westerners “B” beat
Penrode 2—1.

April 13th—Rangers beat Hark-
liffe 3—0.

April 17th—Westerners “A” beat
Maple 2—1,

April 18th—Rangers and West-
erners “B” drew 1—1,

April 20th—Harkliffe beat Pen-
rode 3—1,

This Week’s Fixtures

Tuesday April 24th—Maple vs.
Westerners “B” at St. Leonard's.
Referee Mr. O. Graham.

Wednesday, April 25th—West-
erners “A” vs. Harkliffe at St.
Leonard’s. Referee Mr. C. E.

Friday, April 27th—Rangers vs,
Penrode at St. Leonard’s. Referee
Mr. J. Archer.

FREE FOR ALL
SYDNEY.

A hotel-keeper at Euston
(Victoria), which celebrated its
centenary this week, had promis-
ed free beer and a dinner to the
first hundred applicants. There
was no rush—Euston’s population
is exactly ‘100.

| Reece.



DID IT



Tornado Victory

AGAIN

VAMOOSE, skippered by her owner Teddy Hoad,
is so far undefeated in the Tornado Regattas.

It won

the Second Tornado Regatta, sailed in Carlisle Bay yes-

terday evening.

BCL Batsman
Scores 203

Clairmonte Depeiza B.C.L. bats
man of St. John Baptist team sco
ed 203 on Friday. He was playing
for Players in a Gentlemen vs
Players game and his side scored
265 for 7 wkts declared,

The game was played at Liberty
Grounds, St, James and this is the
fifth three figure innings Depeiza
has hit this season.





T’DAD RETAINS
BRANDON TROPHY

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 21.
Trinidad retained the Brandon
Trophy as Trestrail and Ho
beat Sturdy and Farquharson
of Jamaica in a thrilling five se!
double match 6—-3, 3—6, 1—6 and
Trinidad came back with 8—6,
6—3. The match lasted for ten
minutes, Le Hong who is ill was
substituted by Farquharson. The
Governor and Lady Rance saw
the match in fine weather.

KID RALPH REACHES
TRINIDAD

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 19



Looking fit, Kid Ralph, triple
crown champion of Barbados
arrived here on Tuesday night

for his bout with Gentle Daniel
former W.I, light heavyweight
champion, on Saturday April 28,
at th Mucurapo Stadium, Port-
of-Spain.

SETS NEW RECORD

WASHINGTON, April 21.
Miss Ana B. Branger, a brun-



ette from Venezuela, claimed
today a new world altitude record
for the lightest of lightweight

aeroplanes,
In 125 hours in her super cub,

she flew 26,802 feet over the
United States, according to her
dashboard gauge,

The present record of 26,770

feet is held by a French amateur,
Miss Branger’s claim is to be
checked officially,

—Reuter.



Football Fixtures
For This Week

Division I

Mon, April 23 — Carlton — ys.
Spartan.
Referee: D. Sayers.
Linesrnen: O, Graham and J.
Archer.

Tues, April 24—Everton vs, Notre
Dame,
Referee: L. F. Harris,
Linesmen: H, D, Wilson and
O. Robinson, :

Thurs, April 26—Pickwick-Rovers
vs, Spartan,
Referee; P, Wilkin,
Linesmen: A, Thomas and L,
Parris.

Sat. April 28—Carlton vs, Everton
Referee: I, yer.
Linesmen; D, Sayers and E.
Amory.

Division I

Tues, April 24—Lodge vs, Carlton
at Bank Hall,
Referee: G. E, Amory,

Wed, April 25—Empire vs. Har-
rison College.
Referee: A. Ishmael.

Fri, April 27—Carlton vs, Spartan.
Referee: C. Smith,

Division I

Wed. April 25—Combermere vs,

Harrison College at Comber-

mere.
Referee: K. Walcott,
Y.M.P.C, vs. Sea Scouts at
Beckles Road.
Referee: W. Howorth.
Fri, April 27—Harrison College

vs, Wanderers at College.
Referee: O, Graham.
Foundation vs, Combermere at
Foundation.

Referee: L. Parris.
Empire vs, Carlton at Black
Rock.

Referee: J. Archer,

Regiment vs. Everton at Gar-
rison.

Referee: A. Parris.

Police vs, Notre Dame at Park.
Referee: O. Robinson,

HARRISON COLLEGE
TEAM HOME TODAY

The Harrison College team
which concluded its engagement
with Q.R.C. on Friday is expect-
ed home this morning.

They lost their final engage-
ment, a football match 4—3 on
Friday after being in the lead for
a long time.







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BRITISH WEST. INDIAN YAIRWAYS
B.W.I.A.. BRIDGETOWN

SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1951



12 T’dad Cyclists
‘or Barbados
Sports

(By A Correspondent)

Arrangements for the Annuai
Athletic and Cycle Sports meeting
ef the Amateur Athletic Associa
uon of Barbados are going apace
and a grand bit of news this week
is that 12 Trinidad cyclists wili
definitely be making the trip. This
was revealed yesterday by the
secretary of the Association whe
has been informed officially by the
Secretary of the “All Stars” Cycle
Club of Trinidad.

Four of these twelve will be “A’
class cyclists and among them arc
Cecil Phelps, Uric Lewis anu
Alric Lewis who recently repre
sented Trinidad at the Pan Ameri-
can Games in South America, a
well as Freddie de Peza, wel
known Barbadian cyclist now liv-
ing in Trinidad. The “B” clas
men will include Horace Boyce
Herman Bernard, Rupert Peter:
and Lennox Long of All Stars, Pa
Gomez of Saddle Boys, Gerald Fe
nandez of Barbican Wheelers, an
Doc Carew of Whiz Wheelers. I
addition there will be one for
the intermediate class, namel.
Mikey Mendoza of Cyclones Cycl
Club.

These twelve men represent a
good cross section of the cycling
talent in Trinidad to-day anc
should be worthy of the sharpest
steel which Barbados can put in
the field against them, As it i
hoped that Gordon from B.G, wil)
also be making the trip it can read
ily be seen that some first class
evcle races are in store for us
when Whitsuntide arrives.

The secretary of the A.A.A.B
also revealed that invitations havc
been issued to two Policemen fron
Trinidad and to Miss Eileen Kin;
away with events at Trinidad’
who only last week was running
Southern Games.

C ane nell ‘Tops
Rifle Shoot

Lt. Colonel J. Connell scored
95 points out of a possible 100
to top the Qualifying Stage of the
Frontenac Trophy and the Team
Shoot of the Barbados Rifle Asso-
ciation which ran concurrently at
the Government range yesterday.

He made 49 points out of a pos-
sible 50 in the Qualifying Stage
of the Frontenac Trophy, drop-
ping the point in his first shoot
at 500 yards.

Shooting conditions were good.
The light was dull but steady. It
was a 10-round shoot at ranges
of 300 and 500 yards.

Twenty-three marksmen en-
tered for the Qualifying Stage of
the Frontenac Trophy. In the
first sixteen were Lt. Colonel J.
Connell, 95, Mr. G. F. Pilgrim, 94,
Mr. M. R. DeVerteuil, 92, Captain
C. E, Neblett, 92, Mr. T. A. L.
Roberts, 92, Mr M. D. Thomas,
91, Mr. G. E. Martin, 90, Major
A. §S. Warren, 90, Captain S.
Weatherhead, 89, Major J. E.
Marshall, 89, Mr. M. A. Tucker,
Griffith, 89, R.S.M. H. B. G.
89, Captain C. R. E. Warner, 88,
Mr. M. G. Tucker, 87, Mr, G. C.
May, 86 and Mr. P. Chase, 85.

Red House came first with 450
points in the Team Shoot, closely
run by Blue House which scored
448 points. Yellow House came
third with 434 points.

Red House was represented by
Mr. G, Pilgrim, 94, Mr. T, A. L,
Roberts, 92,. Major A. S. Warren,
90, Captain S. Weatherhead, 89
and Mr, P. Chase, 85.



Universities Win
AMATEUR CUP

WEMBLEY, Middlesex, April 21
Pegasus, the combined Oxford
and Cambridge Universities team,
won the English Football Associa-
tion Amateur Cup by beating
Bishop Auckland from Durham
county 2—1 in the final here to-
day. —Reuter.



NOTICE



Correspondence addressed
to columnists in this news-
paper must bear the name
and address of the sender,
in addition to a nom de
plume, if they request an-
swers the
paper,

to appear in

EDITOR,
Barbados Advocate,





|
|



lances again.

RACING PERSONALITIES
Stewards, Jockeys Ex-Amateur.

Riders
By BOOKIE

eee my column shall be,
about people instead of horses. I realise it is
seldom that I ever mention personalities of the
turf but I am sure that my friends do not mind
since they would much rather read about the
horses than themselves. Here to-day are a few
of them who are in the parade ring.

IRST we have spending a holiday with us His

Honour Mr. Justice K. Vincent Brown, A
Vice-President and Steward of the Trinidad Turf
Club and also a Steward at Union Park, this is
Mr. Vincent Brown’s second visit to Barbados for
the year having already spent a recuperative holi-
day at Bathsheba and thence back to Trinidad.
Actually Mr. Brown should have taken in our
_ March meeting but due to faulty stabling arrange-
ments he found himself without accommodation and was forced to
retire from the local track back to his home ground.

He then embarked on a trip to the country of Footmark and
while his stay there was too short for him to see any racing he did
bring back some impressions of the racing set-up after meeting a
few of the gentlemen of the Jamaica turf. Like nearly everybody
else who visits Jamaica he feels that they will continue to breed
better horses than we do, at least for some time to come.

Nevertheless since his stay here he has seen both Star Witness
and Pride of India and the former especially has impressed with
his looks. If Star Witness docs not produce some first class race
horses, he says, he will be very surprised,

Mr. Vincent Brown is a regular visitor to our snores and on
occasion has even acted as a temporary Steward at our meetings,
an arrangement which incidentally I would like to see established
on a reciprocal basis between the Turf Clubs of the colonies. It
would, I think, be the first step towards a West Indian Jockey Club,
for which there is a crying need out here. Mr. Brown returns home
in another week and by that time preparations for the T.T.C. June
meeting will be beginning in earnest. He is looking forward to the
renewed rivalry between Footmark and Mark Twain but hopes that
he will see the usual Barbados contingent, no matter how small.

EXT we come to a band of raeing folk who are leaving for

England and Europe to-day Among these are jockey Fred
Thirkel and Mrs. Thirkel who are going home on a short holiday.
After spending nearly fifteen years in the West Indies this is, I be-
lieve, only the second time that Fred Thirkel will be revisiting his
family in England and no doubt he will be glad to renew acquaint
However in that fifteen years Fred has seen same ups
and downs on the Turf between here, Trinidad and B.G. and per-
haps if his relatives had seen some cf the spectacular spills he has
taken in his time they would begin to wonder that hé made the trip
at all. Nevertheless this is all in the game, as Fred would always
be one of the first to admit.

In his fifteen years of riding in the West Indies Fred Thirkel
has also had a hand in many a historic event. Chief among these,
and the one which I am sure will live longest in Fred’s memory, was
his winning the Governor’s Cup of 1943 on Ras Taffare. I am sure
no other jockey has ever had the novel experience of being on a
horse that was nearly lifted off the ground by wild-eyed spectators.
Not only did Fred ride Trinidad’s favourite colt but he was also
astride their favourite filly Gleneagle when she won her first A class
mile, another occasion for riotous cheering. To himself and Mrs.
Thirkel we say au revoir.

HIRD member of the party leaving for England is Jockey Billy

Wilder, With us only since last August Billy has lost no time
in impressing us with his capabilities as a rider and he was fortunate
enough to have done what other English jockeys have found, to their
cost, is essential to immediate success out here, That is to ride a
winner at one’s first meeting in Trinidad. It has a tonic effect. No,
not on the jockeys. On the public.

Billy I understand is going home to take himself a bride, and,
like Fred Thirkel, hopes to be back in time for the August meeting.
We offer him our congratulations in advance and the best of luck.

STABLE MATE of Billy Wilder’s on the trip will be the other

member of the racing fraternity who is making the trip. None
other than Mr. Ernest Proctor himself, proprietor of Ernie’s Democ-
racy Club, ex-lightweight champion of the British Army in South
Africa, member of Dr. Jamieson’s band of raiders, amateur heavy,
weight rider on the French turf, et cetera, et cetera.

Mr. Proctor is leaving on his second trip to the Continent since
he evacuated France to the Germans in 1940 and discovered, like
Christopher Columbus, the beautiful isle of Trinidad, to which is
attached the mainland of South America. Again like Columbus he
also discovered the white sands of the isle of St. Vincent and went
floating on the bay, using this manner of transport to reach his
doctor rather than the main road which evidently must have been
too bumpy for his bad leg. Unlike Columbus, Ernie then discovered
Barbados and what with discussing various problems of racing, in-
dulging in some leap—frog on the beach at Bathsheba and earning
for himself the: title of “the Gold Braid Kid”, he finally wound up
in a race in which, as he admits himself, he got up in the last stride
to defeat the undertaker by a short head.

As he told me himsclf, Mr. Proctor was looking forward to the
trip very much until he discoveted that it would cost him nearly
£2 per day to have a bath, not to mention attendant functions. “My
advice, Ernie is to sit in the bath for as long as you can, as often as
possible. But please don’t try either your famous tap dance or
rumba in the bath, This will be hable to capsize the whole ship
and we do want to see you back”. Otherwise “bon voyage”.

PROGRAMME FOR FOUR DAYS

INCE the talk of a four-day meeting next August continues I would
like to make a few suggestions on how the races might be
divided. Although the meeting is more than three months off per-
haps it would be a good idea if various owners and trainers also
aired their views instead of waiting until the programme committee
draws up its schedule to start lodging complaints.

It has been suggested that we have 30 races and this total strikes
me as the very maximum that will be possible with the horses at
cur disposal. As far as I can see, the best way of dividing thesa
among the different classes will be as follows: 4 races for A and A2;
3 for B and B2; 4 for C proper; 2 for C2 Maidens; 3 for D and E
and sub-classes; 4 for F and F2 four—year-olds and over; 3 for F
and F2 three-year-olds; 3 for G and G2; 3 for Two-year-old creoles;
The Derby.

As there are six horses in A and A2 and nine in B and B2 it is
unlikely that we will have to worry about numbers being too high
or too low. But in C and C2 it may become necessary to prevent
C2 Maidens from racing in more than one open C class race for the
simple reason that there are twenty-one likely runners between
the two classes without any outside opposition which may come over.
At what starting gate are we going to line up 21 horses? Therefore
unless we bar the Maidens from the open events in this class until
the last day when a few withdrawals will ease the conjestion, I can-
not see how we will surmount this difficulty.

Similarly in F class the 4-year-olds and 3-year-olds will have
to be separated as there are 22 when numbered together. With re-
spect to the two-year-olds I agree with the suggestion that the colts
should be separated from the fillies in the first event for each group
and then brought together on the last day in one race. This was
done at Arima last year and I see no reason why it should not work
here, unless, of course, all of them decide to go on the last day.
Then, I am certain, things would not work smoothly.

for a change,











_, As one woman
to another...



Don’t do it, Binkie! Bad dog!’

‘Poor dog, you mean, I don’t
suppose he enjoys it’.

“Well, it makes) me so angry.
Scratch, scratch, scratch, all day,
and everything covered with hairs.
Why does it have to happen to me?
I’ve noticed your Raffles never
scratches’.

‘Not like that, [ must admit.
Before I had a dog, you know, I
used to think they all scratched
naturally. Thank goodness Bill
knows about dogs. He just wouldn't
put up with it if it scratched. ‘For
the occasional tickle, yes’, he says.
‘But constant scratching, no. It’s
painful for the dog, and it can cause
bare patches or even skin
troubles like eczema’.

*Soyou bought some miracu-
lous non-scratching animal?’

‘No, of course not! Billtold _//
me to give Raffles one Bob +

BOB MARTIN'S CONDITION

From all good chemist



L. M. B. MEYERS &€ COLTD

BRIDGETOWN BARBADOS



Ts for dogs
d store



Condition Tablets. Apparently a
dog’s ordinary food just hasn't got
enough vitamins and minerals in it,
so his blood gets out of order, and
he starts this scratching business.
These vitamins and things are all
in Bob Martin’s, so Bill says’.

“You are /ucky, having a husband
who knows about dogs, though I do
adore mine, even if he does only
know about archacology’.

*I won’t hear a word against
your husband! Anyway, you try
Bob Martin's. You'll find
Binkie’s much better in every
way for it, as well as not
scratching like that and hay-
ing a_ better
my words!’

coat.

Martin’s once a day right from the
time we hai him—and I must
say he thrives on it’.
“Bob Martin's?’
*Yes, you know, Bob Martin's
Mark



INDIES |

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A

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k for and demand Mobiloil



Q-1246

Agents:— GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Ltd.







SUNDAY, APRIL 22,



1951

OUR RE ADERS SAW: Children’s Bill of Rights

Registration

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Permit me space in your
columns to make a few com-
ments on the new registration set
up now in vogue, Now there are
quite a lot of people pretend
they cant understand why
they must register now
h@nce they cannot vote, when
the time comes, and I feel
its incumbent on the Government
that posters should placed in
every district and explain more
thorough to the Baas what is
necessary for them to know, or
even use, the Mobile Cinema if it
is avi le. There a quite a Jot
of people who done even read
newspapers When the registration
Offcirs leave the forms to be
filup they just cast them aside
and when the time come for these
forms to be collected quite a few
wHl not be ready Its true that
some people done care a tinker
dam who secures a seat in the
Agsembly, but as I told a few
people it is betier to have the
Vote even if they dont use it be-
cguse everybody dont attend the
polls. I hope something will be
done now to alliviate some of the
hardships these officers are experi-
encing to explain to some people
who wont understand.

I am your obdt servant

H. S$. MAPP:
Park Road,
Bush Halil,
St. Michael.
16.4.51,
Price of Beef

_ SIR—A very annoying thing
is happening to the poor house-
wife, ‘who has to ag the already

increase in the cost-of-livi
hiawe e iving

For some time now beef has
gQne from 36c. to 40c. per Ib.
Although I do not yet know if it
is official but that is what we
paid until recently, but sending
to make purchases for the last
two weeks 'we find a scareity and
the further advance price of 2
cents which make it 42 cents per
pound, Pork is the same price,
and Veal is 45 cents, Can you
Sir, or any one help me to know
what price I should pay?. I tried
to get a schedule but there are no
new ones at the station. So I
hope this letter will catch the
eyes of the Authority and let us
know what price to pay for these
very essential commodities. Or
could I suggest a complete
schedule, or a notice saying that
the prices have been de-con-
trolled?

WORRIED HOUSEWIFE.

Markups

_ DEAR §IR,—Mr. Evans Clarke
-n Friday’s Advocate has asked
me why we give up profits on cer—
tain items and complain of in-
adequate mark-ups.

I would remind Mr. Clarke that
price cutting in a trade is usually
a sign of ill health rather than
the reverse.

Any reduction in mark-ups
imposes this problern on a mer
chant.

If it costs you $1,850.00 to sell
$10,000.00 worth of goods and
your mark-ups mit a realisa
tion of $2,250.00, you are doing
quite well,

If however your markups are
suddenly reduced to give you a

sealisation of $1,750.00, you are
losing money.
Two answers suggest them

selves to you if you are to main-
tain your original profit. You
must either reduce your expenses
from $1,850.00 to $1,350.00 or you
must increase your sales to a
point where yoy make the original
$2,250.00 on the new markup
ie. Increase apur sales from
$10,000.00 to $13,000.00 (without
increasing your expenses).
In considering the first answer
you will find on analysis that
your expenses fall into three cate-
gories: —
(a) Fixed
rent.
(b) Expenses which bear a fix
ed relationship to yolume
such as paper and string.
(c) Wages.
Of your total expenses of
$1,850.00, wages should be about

$1 -00,

You will find it difficult to do
anything to reduce types (a) and
(b) so that if you are to reduce
your expenses it must be almost
entirely at the expense of wages.
The impossibility of reducin,
wages from $1,000.00 to $600.0!
when they are too low even at
a $1,000.00 is obvious.

So you turn to the alternative
of increasing your sales by 334%
in the hope of making the same
amount of money.

334% increase means you
must take someone else’s share of
the existing business but it is now
a fight for survival with no holds
barred.

expenses such as



So you step up your advertising
~—you try to improve your service

~you impress on your staff the
need for greater politeness and
willingness to please and after a
period of intensive work you re-
view the position and find the
following: —

That your expenses have in-
creased in all three | categories
because the increased stocks
one 4 bigger overdraft to
inance them and you have had
to have extra werckttes Space to
house them.

Your staff wouldn’t produce the
owe politeness etc — while un-
appy at the old wa ‘ou
bad to raise them et AIS
volume couldn’t be handled by
the existing staff — so you had
to employ extra people and you
needed a new van — the store
looked dingy and you had to
paint it — and in brief that
although you had brought your
ross profit back to its original
gure, it had cost you so much

in extra expenses do so that
you were still losing money,
though perhaps not quite so
much.

So you start off on the second
lap to raise your sales hy another
334%—you fight off reasonable
demands for wage increases —
you try to get more work out of
the existing staff and equipment
—but by this time you know that
there is no answer — the best you
can do is to reduce your losses
to the lowest possible figure.

I tryst this provides an explan-
ation to Mr, Clarke’s question,

Yours faithfully,
DONALD SCOTT.
Sherbourne,
Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael,
20.4.51.

Roebuck Street Merchants

SIR,— We shall be very grate~
ful if you would publish the fol.
lowing for us. ~

It is quite obvious that the
General Public as a whole does
not appreciate the true position
of the Roebuck Street Brtgpion
Merchant ang the Retail op-
keepers, This section of the
Business community renders the
Island services equal to, or greater
than, most other business sec-
tions and should accordingly be
rewarded for their services.

Under the present system of
Control, in spite of the fact that

these Traders handle what is
known as perishable goods —
foodstuffs, they are allowed the

smallest profits.
The recent Price Control Com-

mittee found in general that
none of the various types of
business were making exces-

sive profits, but rather, in prac-
tically every instance the pres-
ent profits allowed were inade-
quate,

We find that the Shopkeepers
and the Provision Merchants are
the hardest hit, because their
profits are fixed on a Marginal
Basis; that is, a specific amount
per bag, box or whatever the
unit, regardless of the present
cost of the item. The hardship
of this system can fyeadily be
seen when the cost of commodi-—
ties have increased several hun-
dred per cent, and the expenses
of these Traders, such as, Wages,
Taxes, Insurance, Interest,
Transport, Paper and Paper Bags
have skyrocketed, while the fixed
profit remains the same,

The usual remark heard from
the Consumer when the price of
a few items goes up is something
along these lines:— “How can
you increase the price of goods
when the cost of living is already

so high,” or, “The higher the
price the more profit you
make,” Actually with this Trade

the reverse is the case, because
an inereased cost incurs increased
handling charges and increases
the monetary value of losses due
to shrinkage and otherwise; yet
these increased expenses have [0
be met from the same fixed
profits.

The Cost of Living is high for
all seetiongs of the community
including Provision Merchants,
Shopkeepers and the Employees
of these Traders. The Public
should realise that the real cause
cf the increased cost of Food-
stuffs originates Over-seas and
no local Body can control it.
Further they should also realise
that articles of food which are
consumed shortly after they are
acquired should be paid for
promptly and not months after,
as is offen the case.

Hoping that this will serve to
throw some light on the existing
conditions in the Provision and
Shopkeepers’ business and be of
some benefit to the Public,

We remain, Yours truly,

PROVISION MERCHANTS’
ASSOCIATION,

Let Us Show You
the ‘5-STAR’ car



‘Five-Star’ Motoring



Io The Editor, The Advecate—

SIR,—AlUow me to state’through
your columns that the paragraph
which states that “Parenis of every
baby born in New York State will
now receive a copy of the Chil
dren's Bill of Rights,” is a wonder
ful idea, and should be encouraged
in the West Indies also.

The paragraph reads that the
document will be distributed by
the State Youth Commission, and
affirms the birth-right of every
ehild to 1] aspects of welfare,
security, and affection without
regard to race or creed.

Being a youth worker myself
now for many years, things of that
sort would surely benefit the
commnaaly as a whole, and the
New York State must be highly
commended for such a move.

The child must be secured from
birth, otherwise the nation or
people must be kept in degrada-
tion.

I heartily commend the New
York $State for such a wise move.

L. B. CLARKE,

Tudor Bridge,

St. Michael.
April 17, 1951

Evening Institute

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I am net writing only on
the behalf of the Junior Electrical
Class, because I am a_ student
thereon, but for the benefit of the
whole Evening Institute.

I must first thank Dr, Bruze
Hamilton, the Principal of the
Institute,for the many visits he
has made to us, during the past
term. To Mr, Denton Sayers,
the Dean of Academic Studies,
we must extend our appreciation,
for so ably explaining to us, the
Rules and Regulations of the City
and Guilds, from which we are
taking our Course. We must say
many thanks again, to Mr.
Sayers for allowing us to be taken
to Seawell Airport, to see certain
electrical machinery, about which
we were lectured during the past
term.

Last but not least, to Mr, Alvin
Barnett, the master of the
Ancillary Classes, who has really
been patient and _ interested in
these classes during the~ past
term; and I hope that after our
four weeks’ vacation, that we will
return to our lectures forgetting
nothing we were taught.

It is to be regretted that the
Evening Institute has no building
of its own to carry out the practi-
cal work for which the boys are
hungry. Anyhow, we know that
Dr. Hamilton, Mr. Sayers and all
those persons in authority of the
Evening Classes are trying their
very best, to get a building in
which the technical side of this
work will be carried on.

CARLISLE L. SMITH,
Hanschell’s Tenantry,
Gill’s Gap,
Eagle Hall,
St. Michael, No. 8.

FISHERIES

Durin March, the sum of
$2,028.10 was repaid on loans; this
makes a total of $55,727.35~paid
oyer all loans. Interest collected
for the same period was $48.08
making a total of $703.88 collected
to date,

A sum of $3,406.63 was issued
in loans for the month making
a total of $101,982.92 Yoaned to
boat-owners to date.

One meeting of the Fisheries
Advisory Committee was held
during the month at which seven
applications for loans totalling
$655.71 were approved.

During the month a delegation
of three, comprising Sir Gerald
Wight, Hon. Victor Bryan and
Mr. Ceci] Farrell was received
from Trinidad with a view of
discussing at first hand, fishery
matters with the Director of Ag
riculture and Fishery Officer. Al!
phases of the fishery division
were shown to the delegation.

Flying Fish Out Of Range

Investigator was repainted dur-
ing the first half of the mopth,
and did not put to sea until 12th
March. On putting to sea, it was
found that south-easterly currents
had done much to hinder the easy
capture of flying fish, as the fish
had been swept by these currents
east of the Island beyond the
range of the local fishing boat,
hence poor catches were returned
on some evenings.

To compensate for the sparse-
ness of flying fish, large catches
of dolphin were made by many
boats which assisted in keeping
the marketing centres busy.

At the end of March, the cur-
rents were still south-easterly
and only eastern coast boats were
making large catches of flying
fish. Seventy boats are now using
gill nets to assist with the capture
of flying fish.

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“been previously circulated, was

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Governor Presents
Certificates To Scouts.

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage, Chief
Scout of Barbados presented King’s Scout Badge and
Royal Certificate tq two senior scouts, when the Annual
General Meeting of the IslanshQgget Council was held on
Friday at 5 p.m. ;
ante = a ae Wesley p
e
Troop (First Sea Scoutet cam
Harcourt Lewis of the 60th.
Barbados ). They

are the first uts in Barbados
to receive these certificates, e



} Servicé which will be held at
s Street Methodist Church
at 4.30 p.m.

island Commissioner
y . See announced that,
; ra general review o; n
- sine Boone unestin, the local in the Island and der canta
§ ae nen Soe, a tion with his District Commission.
ae tae te ailisicnos ri » ers, he had appointed Major J. BE.
. Griffith, E.D. to act as Island

g re aren Te aon eenisaioner and had recom-
, -L.C., » mended to Imperial H. rs
Mr. H. N, Chandler, Hony, Treas- that he be annette’ Island Gon

missioner, (Cheers). In referring
to the recent visits of Lady Baden-
Powell, Chief Guide, and Mr. J. L.
Me Gregor, Training Commission.
er from Canada, he said that they
had both expressed their appre-
ciation of what he had done for
| Scouting but that both felt he
9 could do more, He emphasised |
} — intention of doing much for |
: ‘ou



He nounced that on the
> eveni of St. George’s Day~
Monday 23rd April — he will be
» giving a Radio Broadcast message
over Rediffusion Service and
would take the opportunity to
appeal to the genera] public for
their support in further the
progress of Scouting in ados,

Mr. E. L. Bannister expressed
the hope that Scouting would also
be -established [n the man!
Secondary Boys’ Schools in the
Islands. |

a. Ge H. Williams . con-
gratula or Griffith on his ar
GOVERNOR porctiett as sland Commission :
urer, Messrs C. R. C. Springer, ee © latter suitably’ re
L. Tt. Gay, LB,” Waithe, and plied.
C. D. Spencer, District Commis-
sioners; Messrs. C, D. Cuffley,

H.E. THE



MESSAGE FROM THE
CHIEF 8s

E. a ae, A. G. Jordan COUT
and — ; arrison, Assistant “On this St, George’ :
District Commissioners; “Messrs. let us pledge Grieves ee ag

Â¥. M, Blackman, A, D, Blackman, better Scou , to th
and J. E. Turton, Seeretaries of of Got ee the making °
Local Associations; e wey MEN.”

azlewood . ajor

erend G. V. ROWALLA

C. Noott, Capt. H. H, Williams, Chief Soca
M.B.E. Hony. Auditor; Rrowns. British Commonwealth
E, C. M. Theobalds, ; ; and Empire,
Roberts, J. C. Hammond, R.

Sealy, F. L, Cozier, 8. O, Lorde,
L. Lynch, A. M, Jones and G. I.



| Though nine may walk away

APRIL 22 NO. 168
The Topic |

of |
Last Week

|



landed

Well boys Josh Haynes is
We hope the others see
The word that dominated
Was mere “siteerity:” |

Who live out in St.

Alone can truly te
How Josh Haynes helps the people
And helps them very well

Andrew

All Bajans aint ungrateful
There's always one to say
Thank you! for kindness, brother

‘ If this is a true pichire

Of how the people feel
It looks as though the island
Expects a better deal
. . * . *
We hope the other people
Who generally fire “hot steam"
Will understand the folly
To change a horse mid-stream
’ * ’ . :

A union is a union |

Only when all unite |

A_union aint a union |

if some will “cus and spite.” |
* . . .

|

To-day with those in power
As we stated before
The horse must quit the stable |
And then they shut the door
: . . .
{
|

Now face the market question
We don’t know who to blame
But this is “meatless Sunday
For, Bajans just the same
* . .

The butchers blame the contro!
The control blame the house

| And Joe now blames the woman

\ Who didn't make “pudding and

: Souse.”’

All this could be avoided
The crowds of people feel

So that both Joe and Robert
Could get their Sunday meal

: . . °

This don't affect the “big shots’
Who can eat ham and yea!

| And sometimes duck and turkey

| With every blessed mea}

. ’ .

A piege of pork on Sunday {
Is venison for the poor

For all week it is “sharkie”



Cuffley, elected members. Major
J. E. Griffith, E.D., was present
by invitation. Excuses were Sunday 22nd; Service at James
offered for the absence of Mr, Street Methodist Church at 4.30
H.R. Tucker, Mrs. F.J. Cole and pm. Cubs and Cub-Scouters
Fr. Parkington, S.J. ¥y particularly asked to assemble
R +t 4 at the Chureh not later than 4
The eport, having p.m, . es and Scouts will
The adoption of it ®S8¢mble on the Barrack Squaye
Mr Fo 7. Ge at Central Police Station at 3.30
and seconded by Mr. H, N. p.m. Commissioners may pro-
Chandier, His Bxcellency then ¢eed direct to the Church,
made a brief review of the Finan- Rovers of the Centra, Rover
cial Report, the adoption of which, Crew under Mr. 8. L. Barnwe!!,
after certain comments were A.D.C. for Rovers, will spend the
made, was unanimoysly carried, entire day in St. John. They will
The following officers were then tk Diving Service at the Pa-iso
elected to serve for the suing Sh OF 4} aeee, ‘after which
ate” Brosidatt aoe # nt ey will hold a Royer meeting 10
Cuke. MLC.: Vice Presidents * which members of the public are
Mr. H. R. Tucker and The Very ‘¥ited. Arrangements are in the
Reverend Dean Mandeville, ©’Pable bands of R- 8. 1.. Pollard
Treasurer: Mr. H. N. Chandler; of the Windward District.
Secretary: Mr. L. A. Harrison. Monday 23d: (St. George's
The following were co-opted to Day). All ranks are expected to
serve on the Island Council, the wear uniform on this day.
first ten of whom will also serve § pm. Basket Ball match at
he Executive Committee : . age. Sea’ Scouts
on t Harrjson College: Sea Scouts vs.

Calendar for St. George’s
Week

Annual

taken as read.
was proposed by

Major C. Noott, Mr. D. A. M. Harrison College.
erect Pee my Campy, 7.15 p.m. Broadcast by His
Blackman, The Reverend D.C. Excellency the Governor oyer

Rediffusion.

Moe, Me Tine Best end ee, «180 Pim. Central Comp Bire at
Parkinson, §.J., A Representative Boonie Headquarters, © Beckles
of the Girl Guides Association, , ; or gt
Prof. Sydney Dash, Capt. H. H. 7.30 p.m. Gill Memorial Troop
Williams, M.B.E., A Representa- Camp Fire at Gill Memorial
tive of the Salvation Army, grounds, Black Rock.

Messrs. G. I. Cuffley, L. A. Thursday 26th 5 p.m. Basket,
Lynch, J. C. Hammond, A. W. Ball match; James St. Boy Scouts
Roberts, E. C. M. Theobalds, vs. Sea Scouts at Modern High
A.M. Jones and The Reverend School,

B. Crosby. Saturday 28th, First Barbados

The appointment of Mr. W. H. Sea Scouts will present a Local
Carter, M.B.E., as Hony, H.Q. Show at Queens College at 8 p.m.
Commissioner was proposed by Tickets are on sale at 2/- and 1/6
His Excellency, seconded by Mr. each.

Christ Church
Rates

The increase in the rate on land in



C. R. C. Springer and agreed to
unanimously,
Mr. H. Risely Tucker was

elected to be the Vice-President
on the Executive Committee.

Chief Coming

His Excellency gave notice of
the forthcoming visit of Lord
Rowallan, Chief Scout of the Brit- gm Taare of Tinrtes’ chison gecided
ish Commonwealth and Empire, this ‘pe meeting” on ‘Thursday, .
sometime between January and At this meeting rm O .G@ are
March next year. My. Springer ('tW «the attention of the Vestry to

gave details ‘of the St e efficient manner in which the new

ad
v
eorge’s Assessor was carrying out his duties.





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Besides salt fish galore
. ’ . .

‘
In case our good friends drop in
anon will not hurt her head
She'll serve some Anchor butter
Sandwiched in Enriched Bread,
. . . *

Boys try this then at meal-time

It's still a beily ful
If joads wont move by pushing

They may move if you pull,

> ° . . .

No pork to-day to offer

Your friends who come from far
The will still be contented |
With a bottle of T&R

“Sub owt tx toe Beas”
sponsored by
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makers of
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PAGE FIVE





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PAGE SIX





[= oe wee

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown.
ee esSeSeseSeSeeFsSFesess

Sunday, April 22, 1951

HOUSING: SELF HELP

!.. ALMOST everywhere the housing situ-
ation is in a state of crisis. The world-
wide housing situation has worsened dur-
ing the past thirty-five years as a resuit of
war, preparation for war, depressions,
cessation of building, and migration. Mean-
while, aspirations for better homes have
intensified and higher standards are de-
manded for the dwelling and its environ-
ment. Asa result of worsened conditions
and the demand for higher standards, there
is an acute housing problem in nearly
every country: for many Governments it
constitutes a serious political issue. Accord-
ingly an intensive search is being made
for new means of providing the best homes
possible with the resources available. This
search tends to focus on methods of achiev-
ing progressively higher standards at low-
er cost,

The cost of building decent housing—the
cost say of substituting even minimum
sanitary houses for insanitary huts—is
normally based on estimates which include
the use of commercial materials and the
employment of ‘contractors’ for construc-
tion. It is assumed that new houses will
be provided by the labour and skill of
others than the people, who will live in the
Houses. After construction the family
moves in and undertakes to pay for having
the house built by others than themselves.
This is the method used in highly organ-
ised societies.

A realistic appraisal of the housing situ-

ation in the West Indies shows that this
process is too costly. The cost of building
is high, amounts available for subsidies are
limited, and incomes are low. In rural
areas the disparity between family income
and the cost of building decent sanitary
shelter is great. This fact applies to Gov-
érnments as well as to families. In some
cases a Government in trying to formulate
a housing programme for its people is
faced with rehousing as much as half the
population. On present resources it will
find it quite impossible to provide the
houses required by the method of having
them built by others than the families
themselves. This need not lead to dis-
couragement. There are other resources
whieh can be mobilized and among the
greatest is the manpower of the families
themselves. Most families in the tropics
have always built their own homes; if the
results have been poor it is because their
efforts have usually been wnaided.
, Their resources are potentially enorm-
ous if aided by some financial and tech-
nical assistance. Suppose that only one
member of every tenth family devotes a
day a week to improving his home. The
total monetary value of this labour even
if estimated at half a dollar per man day,
would greatly excel the amount which a
Government could allot to Housing, out of
its revenues. The monetary contribution
is by no means all: there is the pride and
satisfaction of accomplishment in making
a better home. It is not necessary that a
community should wait for a generation or
two to achieve an overall economic ad-
vance, With self-help it is possible to im-
prove the shelter of the whole population.
Clearly priority should be given to solving
problems of land, water and sanitation.
Land with security of tenure comes first;
next come water and sanitation. These are
largely the concern of Government agen-
cies but the self-help principle has already
been applied to their solution with success
in some territories. In Puerto Rico, for
instance, roads and water ‘supplies have
been provided by aided self-help.

To be successful, aided self-help requires
good organisation. It has been found better
to begin in a well defined area than to carry
out operations in many places at once. In
Jamaica, for instance such a co-operative
house building effort was carried out at
Bonnett by Jamaica Welfare Ltd. Many
useful lessons were learned from this ex-
periment. Among these were the need for



preliminary training, the maintenance of »

group interest, keeping groups small
enough to avoid their being idle, but large
enough to do the job in a reasonable time,
the need to recover loans and not to ‘give’
away material unless the individuals have
given their share of labour. The same ex-
perience has been found in Puerto Rico.
Here the most ambitious aided self-help
programme in the Caribbean has now been
started. The declared task of the Social
Programme Administration is to resettle
75,000 landless rural families, known as
agregados, in new communities. The agre-
gados who are provided with a life interest

in land, are organized in groups of 12 to 15 -

families for home building. The Admin-
istration provides technical supervision
and brings in a Water supply and latrines.
The cost to the householder of materials,
use of machines, transport and professional
supervision is about $300 (U.S.). This is
repaid to the Administration by means of
a down payment of $40 (U.S.) and the bal-
ance over a number of years—for example
$26 (U.S.) per year for ten years. Great

importance is paid to developing a proper
understanding of the programme; discus-
sion groups are formed in the villages for
this purpose. Small working groups of fif-
teen are then formed so that a minimum
of three men per day work on the project:
the whole group work on Sundays. Sites
are often selected by lot and it does not
necessarily follow that any member of a
group will actually be working on his own
house. Although the householders are un-
skilled farm labourers it has been shown
that by use of the proper methods the
wholehearted co-operation of the families
can be secured: despite their lack of build-
ing knowledge the participants are devel-
oping the necessary skills. On completion
the hause owner has a home which it has
been estimated is worth $1,500 (U.S.)—or
five times the amount he has paid in cash.
An aided self-help housing scheme is
now under way in Jamaica known as the
Tower Mill Scheme near Kingston. It pro-+
vides 875 prepared lots for self-help build-
ers, who were previously living in very
bad slums. The average loan by way of
materials and help of artisan labour is to
be about £60. A rent is to be charged for
the land which Government will lease to
occupiers for 20 years with an option to
renew. The average repayment will be
8/- per month, which includes ground rent,
water supply, and repayment of the build-
ing loan. This rent has been adjusted to
the average earnings of the group. The
lots vary in densities of between 10 and 14
per acre. Leases prohibit sub-letting
without permission and the sub-division of
the lots; they also regulate the size of
buildings and their relation to roads, etc.
At the beginning there was some apathy
and hesitancy among the would-be home-
builders. This has now been overcome and
houses are going up apace, In some cases
quite remarkable improvements can be
seen—all the result of aided self-help.
Social welfare and voluntary organisations
are playing their part in helping those, who
are old or cannot build for themselves.
Aided self-help schemes have also been
carried out in Trinidad (at Caroni) and St.
Vincent (at Sandy Bay). The success of
both schemes is due to the provision of
Jand—in one case by a sugar company, in
another by Government. In Antigua it is
hoped to introduce an aided self-help hous-
ing programme to deal with both hurri-
cane, damage and normal housing needs.
The offer of free lands by a sugar company
there should be a signifieant factor towards
the success of the scheme. Arrangements

are being made for an interchange of visits

between that colony and Puerto Rico un-
der President Truman's Point Four inter-
national technical aid programme. This
is one of the first of such programmes of
co-operation in the Caribbean area, It will
be watched with great interest.



A New Treatment

THERE is a truce but no settlement in
Grenada. And the truce is more unsettling
than the ‘disturbance’ — a new word for
riots in the Caribbean.

From all information to hand neither
the Governor nor the Administrator is to
blame for the manner in which the situa-
tion got out of hand. As far as can be
ascertained the Colonial Office must bear
the brunt of the blame. Far removed from
the focus of the troubles, the Colonial
Office appears to have decided on a new
treatment for these disturbances. The en-
forcement of law and order by govern-
ments no longer takes precedence.

Differences of opinion must be settled on
‘the spot by the leader of the mob. The
Governments are no longer to be concern-
ed with the protection of life and property.

No-one must be protected against un-
armed mobs—stones, sticks, broken bottles
and knives are not listed as armaments.
Protection against murder, injury and loss
of property must be sought, or bought from
the big boss of the moment.

There is no question that there was a
case for higher wages in Grenada where
cocoa has risen from £5 per bag to £25
without a corresponding increase in wages.
But the matter could have been settled
around the conference table.

Now Grenada is in the grip of a Gestapo.
No one dares discuss matters even in the
privacy of his home, for next day his ser-
vants have reported his conversation to the
‘big boss’ who harangues his followers in
the Market Place and, while-being careful
not to suggest violent action against the
individual mentioned, tells his hangers-on
that they have it in their power to deal with
the individual. If Grenada could be quar-
antined the situation would still be serious.

Grenada itself is suffering. The island
was just getting a name as a tourist resort,
but on the outbreak of the ‘disturbances’
all the visitors left and it will be many
years before it lives down the name of
‘trouble island’. :

But Grenada cannot be isolated, and
there is little doubt that the policy of dis-
regarding law and order will within the
next few months spread North to all the
islands between Grenada and St. Kitts.

It has been the proud boast of the British
that ‘Gangsters’ could not flourish in the
Commonwealth.

Now it seems that_gangsters are being
encouraged,

SUNDAY



Why Not A Little Theatre?!

“The day has long since passed
when a school was considered to
be of value only to children for
five hours of the day, They are
very properly considered today as
community centres where adults
who pay for them can go for
study or recreation in their leisure
hours.” That was what I read
on March 16, 1951 in the Peter.
borough Examiner, daily newspa-
per of Peterboro, Ontario.

I was most impressed because I
had arrived in Peterboro the day
before and was hoping to learn
a lot about the town’s Little The-
atre movement, from Robertson
Davies, Canadian Playwright and
Editor of the Examiner, Robert-
son Davies was away in Toronto
seeing his publishers about a book,
but the letters to the editor were
all full of the Theatre, cause
some critic was complaining
about the noise in the summer,
It was the depth of winter when
I was in Peterboro, but presum-
ably the summer was near enough
to merit discussion,

What I latter learned about the
Little Theatre movement in Peter-
boro confirmed the impression
received by the two sentences
quoted above.

Peterboro is a much less thickly
populated town than Bridgetown
and St. Michael. It has only
36,000 people. But the people re-
gard the school not just as a place
for children to learn things in
school hours, but as community
centres where the adults who pay
for them can go for study or
recreation in their leisure hours.”

An example of this use of
schools was the performance in
Peterboro collegiate auditorium on
St. Patrick’s Eve and during that
week of “Maytime in Erin” by a
Catholic Youth Organisation.

I was told that the Collegiate
or school auditorium where this
comedy was performed is used at
least three nights a week by other
theatrical groups or clubs.

And that in a nutshell is how
Robertson Davies, son of Senator
Davies started a Little Theatre
movement in Peterboro where he
edits a newpaper owned by his
father. Robertson Davies who
studied drama in London and last
year attended the Edinburgh
Drama Festival with a Canadian



SITTING ON THE FENCE

OU might have thought the

weather in this country was
bad enough without anybody try-
ing to make it worse.

You might have thought that,
if anybody tried to make it worse,
it would be our enemies, not our
friends.

But it seerns that the American
Government has “tremendous
projects for making rain this sum-
mer by dropping dry ice on
clouds.”

* . *

As most of the wet weather
comes to us across the Atlantic
the American Government “will
keep a close watch on Britain this
year” and ask the Air Ministry to
let tnem know if there is a deluge
over here, or if most of us have
been drowned,

If we are all drowned they will
hear nothing about it for a time.
But when the news does leak out
it may cause temporary embar-
rassment in Washington’s Foreign
Affairs Department.

* m *

Why have there been no mes-
sages in code or otherwise from
Britain this week, Smith?

They've all been drowned,

sir.
The whole gol durned lot of
them? i
_Every man, woman and child,
sir.
Our dry ice experiments, I sup-

pose?
Yes, sir.
Well, there’s one consolation,

Smith. We shan’t get any notes
of protest.

Hardly, sir.

In this case you might say a lot
of Marshall aid has really gone
down the drain. Eh, Smith? Ha,
ha, Smith

Yes, sir. Ha, ha, sir
Though I suppose we shouldn't



ADVOCATE





“Step this was, .r,

Bevan!”

es

By GEORGE HUNTE

theatrical company started his
Little Theatre in Peterboro in
1947 with the performance of
three one act plays in the Collegi-
ate auditorium,

He rented the auditorium for
$25 a night, charged $1 for ad-
mission and 850 people paid to see
the performances on each of the
three nights.

In 1950, the Little Theatre
earned $2200 when 2200 paid to
see the play of the year.

There are sometimes two plays
a year, sometimes only one.
Peterboro plays which have ex
cited comment throughout the
Canadian theatre world include
Taming of the Shrew and Mid~
summer Night's Dream, Robert-
son Davies began with school
teachers mainly as members of
the cast of players. Dressing
rooms are class rooms and the
auditorium is a scool building but
the name of Peterboro ranks
high wherever the Little Theatre
movement is known throughout
Canada from Vancouver to Hali-
fax.

In Ottawa I was fortunate to
see a performance by the Little
Theatre Group of that city, The
theatre was converted from a
church, it was Cld-Vicish and
Sadlers Wells in flavour, but de-
liciously ground floor only. There
was a magnificent pen drawing
of Robertson Davies in the foyer
and the audience perhaps 600 of
‘a possible 800 for whom seats
were available were there only
because of their interest in le-
gitimate theatre.

They were clean looking and
well dressed and free from the
affectations and mannerisms that
make the Old Vie worshippers
such painful exhibitionists. But
what impresed me more than the
rightness of the audience was the

suitability of the stage. There
was no curtain. There were
three set scenes permanently

visible to the audience but lit up
whenever the acts of the play
demanded their use, It was
acting of a very high order. I
had seen nothing to equal it since
I saw Renato Ricci play the most
interesting stage presentation of
Hamlet I’ve ever seen at “the
Mercadante in Naples. It was

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

joke about a serious matter.
No, sir.
Smith.
Sir?

You might cancel my_reserva-

tions for the Festival of Britain.
Yes, sir,

And Smith. As I may be rather
busy working out the reorienta-
tion of European defence, I'll have
my lunch in the office.

Yes, sir, °

Starting with the usual iced
tomato juice. Not dry ice, Smith.
Eh, Smith? Ha, ha, Smith.

No, sir. Ha, ha,ha,

Stalin’s Birthday

“Private soldiers of the Red
Army havea proportion of their
pay deducted each year to buy
Stalin a birthday present.” —
Military Intelligence report on
Russia,

E get no pay today
We get no pay tomorrow
As no one gets his pay today
We cannot steal or borrow,
The sergeant says we get no pay
Because it has to go
To buy a jolly good birthday gift
For jolly old Uncle Joe.

Jolly old Uncle Joe

Oh, we love him so

We wish a hundred happy returns
To jolly old Uncle Joe.

We get no beer to-day
We get no beer tomorrow
As no one gets his beer to-day
We're sad and full of sorrow
The sergeant says we get no beer
Beeause they take our dough
To buy a jolly good birthday
drink r
For jolly old Uncle Joe.
Jolly old ncle Joe
Oh; we love him so

London Express Service

streets ahead of the performance :

I had seen of Richard Wright’s
“Native Son” at the Boltons in
South Kensington and the show
I saw at the New Lindsay Thea-
tre off Notting Hill Gate was so

poor that I cannot even remem- ‘

ber its title although I do remem-
ber it was something to do with
a post-war topic,

¢
If the West Indies are genuinely

interested in Legitimate Theatre,
there seems no reason why it
should not flourish and grow
here if not to the stature of
Canadian theatre at least along
similar lines of development.
When Lord Bessborough offered a
trophy to the winner of the Domin-
ion Drama Festival in 1933 popu-
Jar drama was hardly known in
Canada.

Recounting the growth of Cana-
dian theatre in the Times of Lon-
don on July 12, 1948, Robert
Speaight, adjudicator of the Do-
minion Drama Festival wrote “at
first only plays in one act, or a
single act taken from a longer play,
were admitted and these were per-
formed in curtains, assisted by the
normal properties, and furniture
and by such necessary scenic ele-
ments as doors and windows,”

Robert Speaight was impressed
by the excellence of the French
teams in 1948. His praise of the
Compagnons de St. Laurent, a
group of professional but non-
commercial players in Montreal is
praise indeed, “They are” he says
“notably superior to similar groups
now playing in France.” If Canada
by its Dominion Drama Festival
can bring into healthy rivalry and
competition the players of the twc
great European cultures, cannot
the West Indies by a_ similar
healthy spirit of c»mpetition pro-
vide enough little theatre move-
ments to give amateur actors of al
racial origins the opportunity tc
win a trophy?

“Amateur acting” as Robert
Speaight admirably says in the
article mentioned above “has this
advantage, that it costs very little,
whenever there are four board:
and a few snarks of talent you
have the essence of theatrical en-
tertainment.”

_ Surely we can find four boards
in every parish of Barbados?

We have no wealth to drink the
healt
Of jolly old Uncle Joe.

We get some drill to-day
We get some drill tomorrow
To get no pay for drill all day
It fills us full of sorrow
The sergeant says we should be
glad
Our wages to forego
To buy a jolly good birthday cake
For jolly old Uncle Joe.

Jolly old Uncle Joe
3 ee one him. so

e wish a hundred years of life
To jolly old Uncle Joe. ce

April Fool

ONCE upon a time, when Eng-

land was merry, April the
First was the day when the well-
known English sense of humour
came to the surface like a drown-
ing man, gave a hideous grimace,
and disappeared till Christmas.

It was the day when mother
served an empty egg shell for
father’s breakfast. and all the
children yelled “April Fool!” as
he cracked it; when father
retaliated by giving mother a
parcel of endless wrappings round
a little box with “April Fool”
written inside.

If any humorist feels like
making a fool of somebody this
morning allow me to remind him
that nine days from now will be
Budget Day, when the Chancellor
of the Exchequer will make a
fool of everybody.

On the day after, April 11, life
may not be worth living, except
for spivs and smart Alecks. Wage
earners who like a cigarette may
not be able to afford one; those
who like an evening drink may
be forced into total abstinence

which will make them healthier

and hungrier

almost meatless

April fools in an

intr

-L.E.s. |

‘
















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The Heys who did
going to fight want

1951

n't think they were
to get back to:—

THE GLORIOUS
27TH BRIGADE

‘WE'LL GO ON
FOR

HITTING THEM
SIX’

Hy SIDNEY. RODIN

VERY SOON Lieutenant Edward Cunningham of the
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, will stand up in his
wheel chair in an Aldershot hospital to see if he can walk



“The Gooks will never
drive the Argylls off this
hill”—last words of Major
Kenneth Muir, V.C., of the
Argylls.





He lost his own on November
7 in Korea, He was just out of
school and barely 19, yet he was
leading his platoon, fighting in the
glorious 27th Brigade.

In another ward Corporal
George Potts, aged 21, of the Mid.
dlesex Regiment, is waiting for
them to add an inch and a half
of leather to his right boot heel
so that he can do away with irons.
He was shot in both legs and his
right thigh-bone _ shattered ~~ in
Korea on October 30. He, too, was
a soldier of the 27th,

Still In

There are more of them in this
hospital, and in a Glasgow hos-
pital as well... All. wounded in
Korea, all fighting for the 27th—
months.ago, Yet the 27th is still
in the line. The brigade has been
almost continuously in action since
early September—177days out of
212 in the line,

And as the first severely wound-
ed heal and prepare to leave their
beds, they see more of their com-
rades arrive to take their places.

No Bitterness

War Secretary Strachey told the
Commons last week that after
seven months’ “distinguished”
action, plans are now in hand for
the relief of the brigade. Yester-
day they were still killing
Communists.

But among the men there is
no bitterness. Without exception,
all are proud to belong to the
27th,

Sharing Lieutenant Cunning-

ham’s ward is MAJOR 4. A.
PENMAN, of the Argyll and
Sutherlands. He was. twice

wounded in Korea, and won a bar
to his M.C. in November for res-
cuing other wounded under fire.

He said: “There is a_ terrific
brigade spirit. Morale is high, Our
men know what they are fighting
for, and they know that their good
soldiering and steady determina-
tion will beat Communist hordes
with all their spasmodic fanatic-
ism.”

_Below. Strength

There weré just the lst Battalion
of the Argylls. (“The Thin Red
Line’) and the ist Battalion of
the Middlesex (“‘The Die-Hards”)
when the brigade arrived in
Korea in August.

But two battalions are only two-
thirds of a brigade, and each bat-
talion was below strength. There
were fewer than 2,000 men. They
had no tanks or artillery, and little
transport.

Corporal Potts, therefore, echoed
the feelings of both officers and
men when he told me: “We
thought we were just a token
force sent for political rehsons,
and too weak in numbers to be
much good in a fight.”

But in little more than a week
they seized their chances to hit
the enemy.

Potts was a trainee draughts-
man when he decided in March
1947 to make the Army his career.
He led the first patrol at the Nek-
tong crossing before the first
big advance. Two months later
he was shot rounding up Koreans
who came out of a house hiding
behind a family with three chil-
dren. His officer was killed on
the spot.

They were then 25 miles from
the Manchurian border.

Hardened Youngsters
“The Gooks are good at infil-

trating and at hiding themselves,”
said the corporal, “but they are
poor shots and too fond of run-
ning away. ;

“Our men are young but they
were hardened in hill warfare tac.
tics in Hongkong. They had got
the measure of the enemy before
I left. The 27th will go on hit-
ting them for six as long as need
be.”

LANCE - CORPORAL SYME,
aged 21, of Clydebank, Glasgow,
was shot in the groin on Hill 282
on September 23—in the same
action in which Major Muir, the
most famous of all the 27th, won
his V.C, and died.

“We were short of stretchers, so
I walked about 600 yards to a
regimental aid post,’ said Syme.

The lance-corporal hopes to be
out of bed soon. And then?—‘“I
want to rejoin my battalion, and
the 27th.”

Before they left for Korea, the
27th were told by Sir John Hard-
ing, Commander-in-Chief, Far

SPO PPPS SOP POPP PPO OOD

POP



I= per

KNIGHTS

£55668,

ce

on the artificial leg they are going to fit him.

East Land Forces: “Shoot fast,
shoot strajzht, shoot to kill. You
earry the honour of the British
Army and the British people.”

A badly wounded N.C.O. re-
membered: “We felt pretty im-
portant. We were the first
Britons in Korea.

A Page of Glory ....
CYRIL AYNSLEY, Sunday

Express Special Correspondent

in Tokyo, cables:—

The 27th Brigade entered the
Korea War at the express request
of . General --MacArthur, who
wanted infantry badly.

They landed at Pusan on August
28 from Hongkong dressed in
jungle green and all ready for the
summer Campaign. By November
5 a few were still in jungle green
and the brigade was tied up in a
pretty desperate battle at Pack+
chong.

They reached Taechon, 40 or 50
miles south of the Yalu River,
And it was from there that they
were put in reverse and began the
long trek back.

; In Front

The line was stabilised by
General Ridgway, and after the
turn of the year the United
Nations began to advance. The
27th was there in front.

If it is still right to talk of
pages of glory the British 27th
Brigade has written itself ane.

Brigadier Coad was the first to
realise that to beat the North
Koreans and Chinese you had to
send your men climbing hills, and
he did so.

Colonel Andrew Man, second in
command, was no less a gooa
fighter. I remember over a
whisky and soda he said: “They're
great soldiers, The great point is
that we've had them away from
mother’s apron string for a long
time, sh

“Mother, and members of Par-
liament, are the worst enemies of
Army officers. They ask too many
questions,”

Today, the brigade are on the
38th Parallel,

London Express Service



———
ett tittle itn inlin

SUNDAY. ADVOCATE



AHSTORIC. MOMENT IN MAN’S STRUGGLE FOR JUSTICE



THIS PAINTING, one of 9 appearing in colour in LIFE International's April 9 issue, depicts the trial
of John Peter Zehger, a newspaper apprentice in colonial America who was brought to trial for ibél
after founding his own paper and writing an honest account of a crooked election fight in 1733. His
lawyer, demanding that the jury men free Zenger (shown in witness box), said such a decision would
secure the right “both of exposing and opposing arbitrary power by speaking and writing truth’. The
verdict of “not guilty’ not only established the strength of the jury system in America, but estab-

lished a strong precedent for freedom of the press—a principle later to be included in the American
Bill of Rights.

LIFE commissioned artist Federico Castellon to do these paintings depicting memorable victories
in the fight for justice, and called on the Honourable Jerome Frank, eminent U.S. judge to write the
text.—Photo courtesy LIFE Int'l. Copyright TIME Inc, 1951,



The Lngtich inks lovea conference...
Soft Drinks Top
The Agenda

STAMP OF THE WEEK

We'll have to run very
fast to win next year

"HIS stamp brings a warning to

British athletes who will ‘train
* senson with eyes on the
Otymopic

were re eee





, ; : Games in
No Meeting Yet Finland * next
2 . year.
our team
Between Seretse wiv flee
BA face (but not after hours) Bier gous
eo on

Khama And Uncle SCARBOROUGH. aepeareek wae a way of getting mat oe for
i é ave iced, if y your holiday free. the Games, 11
LONDON, April 13 OU may have noticed, of ah Our’ gs ft. irink e t laughed hations have
Tshekedi Khama uncle ” of are observant, that this is YUur soft ari xpert laugh just held
Geretse Khama the. exil A cites the time of year when the British till his cheeks were wet with Olymptes—the
“ets » the exiled chief vonference season gets going, tears of citric acid. All he could tirst in Asia~
designate of the Bamangwato ; : ; ahead (: H iss at New Delhi,
tribe in Bechuanaland, Have you ever been to one? No? Murmur was “Super.” Japan won
arrived in Britain nearly two Well, what about coming to Scar- After the mayor left the con- and India was

7 borough, where the season opens ference the delegates were given SOT at
months BO, but has _ not ; a rousing lecture on “The Future ote ee
yet seen his nephew. It is ST malay 9 sing on u e torch, symbolising the

unlikely that they will meet in
the immediate future unless an
Official meeting is arranged in the
cofice of Mr. Patrick Gordon-
Walker, the Secretary for Com
monwealth Relations, Unofficial
attempts made by Seretse’s cousin
(a law student in London) and
an English friend have failed.

Seretse continues to live

London with his wife, Ruth, and National
their daughter, Jacqueline, in a Drink Manuacturers?

Chelsea flat. His uncle is in Ox-

ford as the guest of Miss Marjorie know about conferences. Just you
Perham, the authority on Colonial wait till all we soft drink manu-

effairs, But Seretse has become
suspicious, I learn, of his uncle’s ©



of the Soft Drinks Bottle.” which was carried

spirit



BERNARD My son did not attend this. He ne etadtum - by relays | of
WICKSTEED’S | had made friends with the chil. ‘¥°"™ ° ae at x ke
PRIVATE FESTIVAL dren of a lemonade manufactur- London Express Sorvice

er, and they had gone off to do

5

(No,

in the series)

some serious soft drinking. ry a
takes his son to a The children of soft drink s | ILL ALIVE
chick-tail party... manufacturers play an important IGOON

Peres part in the trade. Their fathers fase ‘irl aay oat J

Pe ar eee —_———..._ ynable to trust their own palates, A SGUrMmese girl in = ar ay,

in to-day with a conference of the dose their offspring with quee1 oe ant dead, a veins
Association of Soft concoctions and note reactions shred when it was Loun os

grave was too narrow to receive

Lordiy Ones the coffin, The girl's parents had

Tao tame? Ha ha! that’s all you

Y boy, in the company of jhe coffin opened; the girls eyes
such accomplished pop were fluttering,. Taken home, the
facturers get together to talk tasters, was at a disadvantage, “corpse” returned to life.

about the syrups, the incidence and felt as you and I feel when



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intentions afd there is a growing Of drinking through straws and
feeling of hostility between them, the wickedness of the Govern.
When the last effort to arrange ment’s sugar policy.
a meeting at Oxford was made, _ For added fun let's take a soft-
Seretse decided at the eleventh drink consumer along with us.
hour not to go. My son Philip, aged 11, is just
In less than a fortnight, Seretse the fellow for the job. His capac-
will be sitting for his Bar Finals ity for soft drinks is astonishing
examinations. If successful and There you are, What did I tpll
called to the Bar, he will automa- you? The prospect of meeting 500
tically become a barrister. Se- lemonade kings and ginger beer
retse Khama is convinced that his barons has gone to his head im-
chances of becoming chief of the mediately. He has caught the
Bamangwato tribe are very poor. British conference spirit so well
His uncle on the other hand, is that he has knocked back three
negotiating to be allowed to re- stone gingers and a fizzy lemon-
turn to Bechuanaland, Tshekedi ade before he’s half-way there,
wants power and progress for his The conference was _ officially
people, Bechuanaland for Bechu- welcomed by the Mayor of Scar-
enas. borough, Alderman Rodney
There is a marked change of Chapman. All the best confer-
opinion of Seretse Khama’s con— ences are welcomed by mayors.
troversy in coloured student cir- Alderman Chapman is. not a
cles here in London. Most are soft drinker and he said so. Then
against Seretse becoming chief, he felt. in his. pocket for his
Some students feel that Seretse speech, and found that by mis-
Khama is acid of that sense of re- take, he had brought one meant
sponsibility which is the pre- for the Red Cross. My boy, bub-
requisite for a chieftain’s po- bling carbon dioxide, thought this
sition. Another school of coloured was “super fun,
University students hold tena- Warmed by the applause, the
ciously to the view that for an Mayor went on to say that all
African chief to marry a “white” conferences were rackets, If you
woman is an aspersion on and ajwere in business for yourself
lowering of the dignity of Afiean [your expenses came off your in-
chieftainship. come tax. and if vou were an

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pecple talk to us in a lordly way
about the merits of unknown
wines.

However, he got his own back.
After a passion fruit juice, fol-
lowed by a pineapple squash and
two rf/spberry cordials, he said:
“IT must be going now. I have to
return to the Press table.”

After the morning session the
delegates adjourned to the bar
for lunch. On’ all sides the talk

wag about the seven-ounce bottle,
the family-sized bottle, and the
suggested abolition of the “baby.”

A man standing next to me
said: “There is only one thing
for it. We shall have to educate
the public up to drinking straight
from the bottle.” ’

It was a_ curious thing. Al-
though . everyone was talking
about the soft-drink trade no one
seemed to be supporting it. Un-
like well-brought-up — children,
soft drinks were heard about but
not seen.

Refreshment
T was the same in the evening,
after my junior reporter had
retired with a bottle of pop by
his bed for the morning.
Refreshment flowed like water

but it was not mineral water
One manufacturer came to me
and said: “If you want to taste

Designs an
36 inches \

eo eee Se —
a

Prodigy

CARTAGENA,
A hen owned by a Cartagenian,
laid an egg with three yolks,
which weighed 170 grammes,
Two hours later it laid another
3-yoke egg weighing 150
grammes. Cartagena town coun-
cil have given the hen a brand-—

new coop with a silver lining

something really good come up
to my room,’

He opened a cupboard and if
you expected me to see rows of
bettles containing brilliant-hued
exotic fluids you don't know your
British conference, Ali that the
bottles contained was a beverage
made in Scetland. And they were
all full—when we started

The conference continues until
Tuesday, and one of the attrac-
tions to-morrow is a chick-tail
party. The hos are the junior
film stars Janette Scott and Wil-
liam Fox. And the object is to
test just how much pop can be
consumed by 50 orphans in one



afternoon, Ambulances call at
five,
I have delegated my assistant

to attend. He says it’s going to be
uper-fun finding out,

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Coloured People |
In Britain |
British Council Cf Churches |

Hold Conference
LONDON.

Over 150 sccial scientists, wel
fare workers and court _mission—
aries met in conference at the
Central Hall, Liverpool, recently,
to consider the welfare of colour
ed people in Britain and ~ what
can be done to remove any sus
picions of racial discrimination
_ No more suitable place could
have been chosen for the confer
ence, There are in Liverpoo]
about 6,000 Negroes or persons of
Negro descent, and 3,000 of them
are Colonials from Africa and the
West Indies,

The Rev. E. Seale, Assistant
Secretary of the British Council
of Churches, who presided, re
viewed the welfare facilities al-
ready provided for coloured peo
ple in Britain; he called attention
to complaints among Colonials liv-
ing in this country, that they are
being treated with indifference
They claimed, he said, that
prejudice and discrimination
against them in England were
widespread. But, Mr. Seale
pointed out, there was difficulty in
obtaining any aceurate estimate
of the degree and extent of
discrimination against coloured
colonials in industry.

The Rev, John Webster who
works among a large number of
coloured people, mainly seamen
gave statistics relating to -unem-
ployment and redundancy among
colonial seamen In their plight

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bait of the wrong type of English
women, ’

A social worker from Haul!
said the extent to which coloured
people were admitted into British
society was. still narrow. He
quoted the words of a West
Indian student at Hull who had
said: “In Britain the coloured
man is invited everywhere, but
accepted nowhere.”

A Home Office
replying to questions about the
welfare of coloured children
declared that measures for. this
were under active consideration

“In these days when. we hea
so much of racial antagonism”
commented the Bishop of Liver
pool, “it is good to be present at
a Conference which seeks _ tc
bring about racial understanding
through peaceful. methods.”

The Chairman informed _ the
delegates that this was a prelim
inary to a larger conferener
planned to take place in the
immediate future.

Ph.s7

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Among others in the poe 3 ve
gallery was Professor Co oe
Simey, head of the’ Faculty of aQiva mize ‘tre
Social Science at the University

of Liverpool. When I spoke to
him chorwarta, he solid: “Colou
prejudice is rare among Liverpoo.
children, for they appear to be



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PAGE EIGHT

Hunting Heads ;

Hy IAN GALE

CANNIBAL CARAVAN nd
Charlies C. Miller) (Mi
Press.)

Do not mistake me when I say
that this is a disgusting book,
what I mean is that the people
described in it are dis
Cennibal Ca¥avan is about wpe
headhunters of New Guinea, the
most filthy, amoral and literally
the most bloodthirsty people in the
world—but then one cannot blame
them for they are still living in
the Stone Age.

But before I say anything more
about the book ied me t you
about the author. Charles “Can-
nibal” Miller is an amazing man,
and his career reads like the-
dream-come-true of an adventur-
ous small boy.

He was born in Samarang,
Java, where his father was a cap-
tain in the East Indian Army, and
when he was still a toddler orders
came for his father to go to Dutch
New Guinea. His orders were to
stamp out cannibalism and head
hunting, and being a good soldier
he set about his task with all
possible speed,

In going to New Guinea, he took
his wife and son, and thus Mrs.
Miller became the first white
weman to visit Dutch New Guinea,
and Charles the first white ebild.

Despite many adventures the
boy survived and when he reached
high school age he was sent to
Holland, He studied engineering
at college, but found it too dul
and took up racing motorbikes,
boats and cars, and then became a
pilot. When the 1914 war came
along Miller joined the French
airforce.

After the war he did barn-
storming flying, then served a
rancher as aerial chauffeur, gave
that up to test speedboats in Sid-
ney Harbour and then went to
New Guinea again to visit his
father.

“Sail On”

When he went back to Austra-
lia he sold the photographs he had
taken in New Guinea and bet all
of it on an outsider called “Sail
On”. The horse won, and he
went to America on the proceeds.
There he raced cars, tested air-
planes and finally became a cam-
era man in Hollywood, But the
jungle was calling again, so he
went out East to lead an expedi-
tion into New Guinea for Miss
Leona Jay, a society girl who
craved adventure. Before the ex-
pedition started Miller married
Leona, and they” spent their
henevmoon among the head-~
hupters. i

hey set out from Merauke in
a motor boat, towing eleven
canoe-loads of Kaya-Kayas, and
sailed up the river until they
reached Bupul—‘a stinking little
city of some 200 souls all black in
colour and intent.” From there
on they had to go by canoe.

Eventually, after meeting up
with a tribe of pigmy cannibals
and many other adventures they
found what they were looking for
—p lost race.

These people, the Kirrirris,
were of average height and aristo-
cratic bearing, and resembled
American Indians, They had
high cheek bones and sharp
pointed nose, and, sdys Miller,
resembled the other natives of
New Guinea only in smell.

As far ag weapons were con-
cerned, their craftsmanship was
excellent. ‘Their knives instead of
being made ef bamboo were fash-
ioned out of human thigh bones,
the knob’ gt we end of each being
cleverly werked into the shape of
a human ji8ad, “As instruments
of murder,” says Miller, “they
were the icest native weapons
I had se@iip Duteh New Guinea.
The arrowsewere good too, being
straight ani@ pointed with small
crocodile h.

Their fields were well irrigated
and among the crops that were
being grown were sweet potatoes,
tobacco, sugar cane, gourds and
egg plants. These peor, though

still in the Stone Age, were ob-




viously far in advance of the other
natives in New Guinea.

Baby Meat
Now we come to a part of the
book which made me feel slightly

ng. sick. Leona, Miller’s wife was,

having a look around the village:
“She was just in time to round
the corner of the lodge as the
witch-doctor came out carrying
a two-year-old baby by the heels.
The baby was daad, all too obvi-
ously killed by a blow on the head.
Stopping by a collection of rocks
he swung the child’s corpse over
them until all were liberally
sprinkled with blood. Then he
moved on the next pile, repeating
the performance.’..”. The tiny
corpse was then plastefed with
clay until it was ed one’ big
block. By the time they returned
to the lodge a big fire had been
kindled. Into it was tossed the
baby.” When Leona told Miller
what she had seen he investigated.
He found out that the baby he

been captured from another vil-
lage. The rocks sprinkled with
its blood were g& used to ease
the pain of a w
ing birth, and en cooked the
baby’s meat would be distributed
to all. the expectant mothers in the

ila,

vill amr

“We were at the far end of the
village” he goes on “when a sud-
den commotion at the combination
bachelor and ceremonial lodge
announced that the feast was
ready. Women not already at the
fire came streaking out of their
huts like so riany dogs and in a
moment they were packed
together in a fighting mass that
would put to shame any sale in
a Broadway bargain basement.
hustled Leona into our tent bef
she became violently sick, but 4
noise coming through the
walls damaged her stomeeh almost
as much as the sights, I cam
out just in time toe head of
Leona’s little girl-friend. She
was clutching a chunk of steam-
ing, pale white meat, ‘for the
white lady’. I told her she could
have it for herself, and she went
away happy.”

Colossal Remnants

Not long after this Milley found
some la tusks in the village,

and on bi told that they came
from lizard-like cere te" Woes
cided to go in search 0} ese
creatures, He says he fgund
“colossal remnants of the age of
dinosaurs” and took pictures of
them. But sirice he reproduces no
photographs of the “remnants”
among the other super pictures
in the book I am pb bit tical.

‘The Kirrirri marriage rites are
simple and effective. The young
bucks livein the bachelors’ quar-
ters but have the run of the
village. If a youngster desires to
spend the night with the girl of
his choice he may do so, sure
that he will not be molested by
the girl’s parents, But he must
be up and away before sunrise.
lf however he oversleeps the girl's
mother pounces on him and he is
automatically married. The Kir-
rirris boast of a 100% inarriage
late! 4

Head Hunt

On the way baek, back down the
river Miller got mixed up in a
frightful orgy. He was forced
through circumstances to accom-
pany a tribe on a head hunting
expedition tg another village.
His tribe won, and here is how
he describes the decapitating pro-
cess, ‘in case’ where the vittim
was already dead, the ceremony
was brief. A quick slash across
the throat with a bamboo knife,
and then a deep cut to the spinal
eolumn as close to the shoulders
as possible. When all the neck
muscles were cut the head was
seized in a hammer-lock and
given a sharp wrench which snap-

d the vertebrae with a report
ike a pistol shot... . Victims
still unconscious or sorely wounded

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(By STEPHEN SPENDER. HAM-
ISH HAMILTON. 15s. 349 Pages).

ONE by one, beating tie.r
breasts and scattering ashes on
their hair, the boys of the pink
brigade come to the penitents’
pepeh This is Spender’s second

rip.

First was his essay in The God
That Failed when told how
he found the flaw in Kar] Marx.
Now ta a wider sweep, he

ad presents what is almest the type

the thirties era

at, the Spanish
iilusions, the days
Stalin was R,cemaarret -
“We were the Divided Gener-
ation of Hamlets,” says Spender
in, his grand way, “who found
the world out of joint and failed

to set it right.
morning in 1937,

autobiography
of the Popular
War, gen

One February
readers of the Daily Worker saw
Saas headline flare across

‘avourite per.
Stephen Spender had joined the
party! °° ecklg tak

Some of the comrades were
perplexed. Nor did the new con-
Ye’ tase any Sure of himself.

harboured heretical doubts
about the’ justice the Moseow
trials, But Harry litt, smiling

ally’ pressed’ the card

9 bis hand and announced that
there was a place for Spender
i the okernetion Brigade, then
ghting ed s Enemy in the
sierras of Spain.
penser was taken aback. “I
equid not see what qualifications
I had as a soldier”.

His gualiacetions were other-
wise, Was a poet capable of
writing The Express—

After the powerful plain

manifesto oe

The black statement of piston

without more fuss

But gliding like a queen, she



were accorded a slightly different
treatment. Before they were
sor ne from their skulls they
had to produce some sound more
Intell: than a moan, the last
sound made would be used wis 9

PP”
‘And here is his description of
the scene: ‘Reason had fled with
e first drum beat but now fol-
gwed an exhibition of violent,
mass insanity so utterly revolting
that not even the ruthlessness of
miodern civilisation in a fanatic
ood or the beastliness of the
west scavenging animals could
Match it. Absolutely berserk, men
end women fell upon the corpses
i? an abandonment of perverted
ust. They grovelled in blood
ed mud, hacked the bodies
with bamboo knives to rub their
perms and legs in the freshly
ppaied wounds, smeared them-
felves from head to foot with gory
filth, and rolled on the ground in
incontrollable convulsions, drunk
on the powerful stimulant of mass
murder. The place became an
abbatoir gone mad, Arms and
legs were cut through and
wrenched off by brute strength.
Hearts and livers were yanked
forth and tossed in a pile with
the rest of the meat that was to
be taken home for the feast .. .”
An interesting book, but per-
haps now ‘you understand why I
ed it disgusting. If you have
4 strong stomach I recommend
you to read it.



IMPERIAL LEATHER e@



LINDEN BLOSSOM °

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Spender Gets

Ashes In His
Hair Again

ase a ae

GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

leaves the station.
P distinction, even if
everybody did not like it.
cry went up from Cambridge:
lone, be our defender
aaa Stephen Spender,
1 ve us peace
From Louis MacNiece
Young Spender had been
brought up in a i i
—— high sninded Nonconform-
ist, where gihe Lloy
Geor, cl f Alfred
actesteg uhm. As te unt May,
at unketings she would
push forward, “Let me
meet Mr. George”, and then
trumpet indignantly, as if expos-
ing a plot, “Good afternoon, Mr.

George, St
From din, the
i c of oe to
then to Germany,
where the complexities of life
were (so he heard) relaxed. “M
aim,” he wrote solemnly in his
diary, “is to achieve maturity of

soul. After my work, all I live for
is my Ast dt, . f

Already there had been friends,
Marston, for instance, who when
Spender explained his affection,
replied, “Do you know, old man,
this is first time you’ve ever
talked me that I haven't beer
completely bored." ,

After that there was only one
thing to do. “I insisted,” says
Spender, “that we should not
meet again.”

Then there was Polly, toast of.
the science undergraduates, one
of whom lost 10lb. in a wee
through sheer loye of her. Polly
then turned to the poets; no record
exists of her effect on their
weight.

And in Germany, there was
Walter, unemployed and. dis-
appointingly inclined to borrow
money. After whom came Jimmy,
unemployed but Welsh, to whom
Spender gave a job as house-
man.

“The difference of class and
interest between Jimmy and me
eertainly provided some element
of mystery which corresponded
almost to a difference of sex”
Jimmy became a Communist and
felt qualified to join the Inter
national Brigade. it proved to be
an error of judgment. After »
battle with the Moors, Jimmy
decided he was a Pacifist; said to
Spender, “You must get me ou
of here.” Spender did,

But he could not bring himself
to thiyik altogether badly’ of
Jimmy. One day in Morocco h<
burst into tears at the sight of :
donkey. “I discerned something
in the donkey’s appearance which
reminded me of Jimmy”.

Spender’s own visit to Spain
Was made in rather superior com
pany—a_ Congress of Intellectuals.
When Franco began to shel!
Madrid, Andre Chamson, French
novelist, said he must leave a:
once, Were he killed, Franc«
would have to declare war o%
Franco an action which woul
lead to world war. He could not
take yesponsibility for such
catastrophe.

After Spain, beastly ag only
civil war can be, Spender’
Marxist enthusiasm was neve:
quite the same. Not for him the
single-minded zeal of bis Oxford
friend Tristan who insisted, ou.
of solidarity with the toilers, «.
being called “Bill”.

—L.E.S.



WHY SHOULD
CHILDREN PLAY?

Dictionary definitions of woPtis
are often quite misleading, anc
this is especially true of the words
‘““vork” and “play” as applied to
mapat children do. When does a
enild start “working”? Is it wher
he goes to school and first comes
fo @fips with that enormous);
complicated task of learning to
associate certain combinations of
straight and curved lines on the
printed page with meanings al-
rea more or less familiar to
him This task of learning to
read may, of course, be “work”
for the child in the sense usual-
ly attached to the word; or, on
the other hand he may look on
it as searcely different from ibe
“play” with which he has been
used to whiling away the hours
outside of school.

Much will depend on the alti-
tudes and ideas that have been
built up in the child from his
earliest years — in fact, almosi
from the moment he is born—
toward the challenge he faces in
learning to cope with the limitless
unknown that the world in whicd
he finds himself represents for
him. If his natural curiosity and
relatives Ss have not been
stifled by ose responsible for
his care, the young child will be
ikely to carry over into his
school years as well as into later
life at least some measure of that
invaluable ability to derive
leasure and “satisfaction fro:
earning new things which often
makes the distinction between
“work” and “play,’’ even for an
adult, a scarcély definable one.

Play is Work

_ Obviously, therefore, the way
in which a child is allowed and
encouraged to play, or dis-
couraged from it, has an extreme-
important bearing on his entire
later development — physical,
mental and emotional, and sociai
Mow often a small child who i
busily engaged on some task o:
other that may appear quite in-
eensequential to his elders will
say, if asked what he is doing:
“I'm working; don’t bother me
now.’ And, if it is at all possible
he should be allowed to finish the
job at hand.

To a child, his play is his work;
and in setting goals for himseii
in it—and attaining them — hx
develops abilities and gains sat-
istactions which will strongly in
fluence his attitudes toward cun
structive achievement later on
One of the great pioneers in child
education has said; “For a good
psychologist the future life of a
child is evident by observing the
way he selects his play-pastimes. '

And this, the child’s work, be
gins at the very beginning of life
itself. A newborn infant's acti
vity consists largely in spontane -
ous, unco-ordinated movements
With increasing age the ability of
co-ordination: is . gradually -ac-
quired. During his first couple
of years a child learns to sit and
stand, then to walk and run. Ali
this is: fop:him both work and
‘play, or work-play, as it might
be called, since—ds we have seen
—the two cannot he readily s*p-
arated, .

No €osiiy Gadgets

These fundamental! function
become, with the passing of tine,
almost wholly automatic, requii
ing less and less of the child's
conscious attention; and, with
this stage, Comes the opportunity

: for developing. new activities, for

helping the child constructivel)
to push back his horizons and ad
vance further on his gieat ad
venture into the unknown. It
therefore becomes essential to
provide him, with suitable educa-

oH maté@riais for this purpose.

These need not be complicated or
expensive factoery-produced toys.
In fact, such things often have
definite disadvantages, particular-
ly for the very young child
Ordinary blocks of wood, not toc
small in size; a bally a heap of
sand or loose earth, a simple
pail and spade: these may be a
source of almost endless enjoy-
ment and learning for the small
child who is not, and should not
be, confronted with that bewild
ering yariety of implements and
gadgets which, mistakenly,
parents and relatives often be-
son if they can afford to buy
them. os

Gradually, a certain separation
of “work” and “play” oecurs du-
ring the school age. The concert
of work should develop as in-
volving, among other things a
degree of social responsibility, of
co-operation with others in
achieving a common goal; whiie
play or recreation—although it,
feo, ought increasingly to em-
phasize the factor of teamwork
= may come to be regarded as
more essentially a matter of one's
responsibility to oneself to main-
tain a healthful balance between
the extremes of all work and no
play, or all play and no work.
Neither extreme is desirable,
whether for the child or for the
adult,

Should Mean Much

Playing should not cease as
the child grows older, Various
kinds of recreation, such as games
and sports, are an expression o:
the primitive and natural need for
physical exercise and of the wish to
play. These can and should mean
a great deal to everybody, bui
they are especially important fo.
persons engaged in sedentary or
monotonous work. Any person
with a sedentary occupatior
needs a break by physical exer
cise. The child generally take:
care of that for himself. However
as soon as he passes into more
or Jess regular school work, at
tention should be paid to adapt
occupations to the child’:
atural desire for variation
Physical group-exercises, some-
times accompanied by music for
rhythmic movements, and active
participation in songs and plays:
contribute substantially to the
child’s all-round development
Drawing and painting develop
his sense of preportion and
colour, and woodwerk or metal-
work encourages his inventive
powers,






The types of play, recreation
and exereise—both indoors anc
in the open air—wil], of course,
vary for children of different
ages But the importance o
sufficient amounts of it and of
materials suited -to the needs oi
the particular age-group. car
hardly be . over emphasized.
Pienty of fresh air and adequate
space in healthful dwellings.
parks, gardens and playgrounds
are to-day universally recognizec
us important prerequisites fo
sound development of children
Most communities, particularly
large cities in every part of the
world, do not yet adequately pro-
vide these prerequisites. Bu
everywhere there is a growing
ealization that every child needs

well-balanced programme oi
sufficient food and sleep, piay
and exercise—both physical and
mental—in a sound environment
This is essential if we are to rear
a new generation of human be-
ings who will be buoyantly
healthy in body and in spirit,
whose creativeness and sense of
sociel responsibility can make
the world of to-morrow a betier
place t¢ live in than the world
of to-day.



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SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1951
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SUNDAY, APRIL 22,

TL

THE

} -sONIONS!! 8
NEVER COULD
RESIST THEM!

|

A

A MID-TWENTIETH CEN-
TURY scientific version of the
violet-scented cachou, which con-
siderate Victorian husbands
chewed on their way home from
an evening’s hard drinking, will
be in the shops here this week.
It is a tiny tablet of concentrated
chlorophyll—the stuff that makes
grass green.
A strong dose of chlorophyll has
near-magical powers of deodor-
ising almost everything we eat
and drink, scientists claim. It will
even eliminate evidence of a bar-
counter snack of pickled onions,
gorgonzola cheese, and beer.
One tablet, slowly chewed in
the morning, it seems will also
spare us those social embarrass-
ments which, according to the
strip cartoon advertisements, even
our best friends hate to mention.
I tried out the tablets yester-
day. They worked with pipe
tobacco, onions, kippers, and the
strongest available beer. They did
not eliminate the lingering odour
of garlic. But they damped it
down enough to enable garlic-
eaters to win more close friends,
Nobody has yet discovered how
the chlorophyll does the deodor-
ising trick. But tests, in whieh
people have swallowed dozens of
the tablets at once, have proved
that whatever it does inside the
budy is quite harmless.

Comes

By FREDERICK COOK

NEW YORK.

If the U.S.A. ever elects a
woman President, the historians
of the time will put it down to
the werk of Mrs. India Edwards,
who operated in Washington,
mostly behind the scenes, in the
middle of the 20th century.

Mrs. Edwards (“And don’t ask
me about the ‘India’—I ot it
trom my great-aunt India, and [
don’t know where she picked it
up”) is the most powerful woman
in Washington, politically speak-
ing.

Nobody on the national stage
had ever heard of her before the
Gay, six years ago, when_ she
walked into the headquarters of
the Democratic National, Com-
mittee and asked for a job. A
matronly woman of 49, with
warm brown eyes, she had just
lost her only son in the war.

SHE’S THE BOSS

To-day she is the £100-a-week
vice-chairman of the committee

(top governing body of the
governing party) and supreme
commander of all its women’s
forces.

India Edwards first had the

idea that Perle Mesta, now Min-
ister to Luxembourg, ought to
have something more important
to do than just give good parties.
She dropped hints when the Tru-
mans were around. And when it
came off she quickly followed up
by mentioning the name of Eu-
genie Anderson, a_ well-to-do
Middle Western housewife, as a
geod choice for the Embassy at
Copenhagen . The appointment
was a brilliant success,

Since she has been boss of the
feminine side of the Democratic
Party, women have biatsomed
out in all manner of top Govern-
ment jobs.

There is Frieda Hennock, a
Federal Communications com-
missioner,

There is Georgia Neese Clark,
Treasurer of the United States
and first of her sex to hold the

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SMALE TABLET=]JUST

Look Out, Men

1951
UU Eee

MS OF

PROBLE



The taste of the tablets, which
are made from.chlorophyll. ex-
tracted from fresh spinach, re-
minded me of the juicy grass
stalks you chew while watching
the village cricket match.

A further domestic virtue
claimed for the tablets.

Given to ageing dogs, which so
often betray their presence with-
out barking, they help to prolong
fireside friendships between man
and man’s best friend.

Behind Hand
DOES the harassed Health
Service doctor find ttme to
keep himself well informed of the
latest medical advances?

‘To find out I put the question
to a dozen representative G.P’s.
who take the British Medical
Journal or the Lancet,

Only two said they had time to
read their journals regularly.
Four said they managed to skim
through one issue in every three.

In the surgeries of the other six
the journals are piling up unread.

Tough Odds.
RAPIDLY gaining favour as a
means of picking men _ for
important jobs in America is tne
“stress. interview,’ in which
everything possible is done to
frustrate and anger the applicants,

Ir an almost Marx Brothers
atmosphere, the examiners make

is

Mrs.

At £100 a week, her
job is to break into
masculine closed

shops.



MRS. INDIA EDWARDS 5

job. ¢ vine
Mrs. Edith Sampson, gifted
Negress, is alternate United

States delegate to UNO.

There’s a long string of Feder-
al judges and other UNO dele-
gates and Government deputies.

In all of these the restless 5 ft.
7 in. India Edwards played a de-
cisive part. She has made a
career of breaking into masculine
closed shops ever since she start-
ed out at 20 as a junior reporter
for Colonel McCormick — on
his Chicago Tribune (whose poli-
cies she detests).

Nowadays she is at her desk in
her austere office in Washington
by 8.45 every morning after a
ride downtown with her husband,
Herbert, £72-a—week head of the
International Films section of the
State Department. She works a
10-hour day, “and 1 always take
a brief-case home with me at
night.” b

Much of her time goes on gin-

CRYSTALS

and clarity

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ABOUT THIS
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ARRIVED IN
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DARLING!



«+e 8 WILLE

BRITAIN

A SOCIAL PROBLEM

rude remarks about each candi-
date’s appearance, ability, ambi-
tions—and even about his rela-
tives.

They set him problems he cannot
possibly solve, and ridicule his
efforts to cope with them.

The object? To test
“emotional stability” in the face of
tough odds.

That Underspin
THE markings on a golf bail
greatly increase its range.
Why?

Ballistics expert Major Clifford
Hymans gives this explana—
tion * :

Markings impart extra under-
spin when the ball is struck by
the golf club. This causes
pressure to build up
ball, forcing it to
and so go much further than an
unmarked ball,

Next Best?

CONSULTING room
sation piece :—
Doctor; The best thing for you
to do is to give up smoking and
drinking, get up early and go to

conver—

bed early.
Patient: I don’t -deserve the
best, doctor. What's second best?
* In his interesting “Guns,
Shells and Rockets” (Gale &

dwards

gering-up visits to local party or
ganisations all over the U.S.A.

Here is a fairly typical spell
for her:

MONDAY, a day at the desk
and a night flight to Boston;

TUESDAY, work in the local
office;

WEDNESDAY, work again and
a full length speech at a Demo-
cratic banquet;

THURSDAY, back to Washing-
ton for another speech;

FRIDAY, her own office;
SATURDAY, back to Boston
speak again.

Days later, speeches in Wash-
ington, Kentucky and on the Pa-
cific Coast.

It is a hectic pace. “My hus-;
band,” she says, “would prefer it
if I stayed home a bit more. But
he makes no protest. He under-
stands how I feel.”

HER HATS

Home for the Edwards is a co-~
lonial house in Maryland, where
India loves to cook casserole fish-
es, spend her week-ends cleaning
house and indulge her one hobby
“making my own hats, once in a
way a really wild one.” ,

No Socialist she is keenly in-
terested in what is going on in
England. “England,” she said,

to

THE SWEETEST
GIRL IN ALL THE

his)

SUNDAÂ¥ ADVOGATE

Hi

ELA

~\

it

YOu'RE

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\ eee ity

pa



Super Star Show
_A Big Attraction

By TONY VANTERPOOL

The Super Star Local Talent
Show, a quarter] feature, was
held at the Globe Theatre on
Friday night. The theatre was
packed and many people were
turned away.

, First prize of $30 went to
air} Gerald Daisley, a newcomer to
under the] the Local Talent Shows, The

climb higher | decision of the judges, along with

the expert help of Mr. Maurice
Jones, Manager, was popular
with the crowd.

Daisley sang “You Can Do No
Wrong” in the Perry Como fash-
ion. His voice was clear ani
| distinct. His style was one which
was never before equalled at any
local talent show.

Joe “Shoeshine” Clarke, the
Comedy-Singer, proved himself
one of the best entertainers in
the island. He won the second
prize of $10.00 with the popular
number “Bop, Goes My Heart.”

On the whole Super Star Show,
with these new discoveries, was
one of the best ever held,

Those taking part were Clayton
“Surelax” Thompson and Fitz
Harewood, winners of the first
All Star Show, Percy Welch and
Gerald Daisley, winners of the
second and Keith Sealey anq Joe
Clarke, winners of the last.

Thompson sang “Let us Love
You Tonight,” Harewood, “Ole
Man River,” Welch, “All The

Time,” and Sealey, “If.”

The third prize, if there was
one, would have gone to either
Thompson or Sealey, Although
Thompson’s song is out of date
he was able to put it over in a

’

Road to Assisi. You have to ar-
range the 50 words so that they
lead from PISA to ASSISI in
such a way that the relationship



“jg following the general evolu-

tion of man in trying circum-
stances—ieading the way, so to
speak, They will come out all

right in the end.” :

Mrs, Edwards thinks it quite
likely that a woman will be
elected to the White House one
day. But not yet. f

““There is too much feeling
against our sex for the present,”
she said. “Anyone who predicts
it is going in for wishful think-
ing.” ;

Her staff say this is an exam-
ple of how she works—no crank
trying to plant a fire-cracker be-
hind the plodding feet of history
but a careful long-range planner
well aware of how to get what
she wants.

Warid Copyright Reserved.
London Express Service.

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between any one word and the
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RULES

1. The word may be an -ana-
gram of the word that precedes
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2. It may be a synonym of the
word that precedes it,

3. It may be achieved by add-
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DARTWORDS





At The Cinema:

“THE THIRD MAN”
Hy G. 1H.

Once again, the talents of that impressive British writer-
director team, Grahame Greene and Carol Reed, who gave
us “The Fallen Idol”, have been pooled and this time they
have come up with an excellent melodramatic thriller—

“THE THIRD MAN.”

Though perhaps not up to the
overall standard of The Idol, it is
nevertheless, a remarkably fine
film, both from the point of view
of the scenario and the absolutely
first-class direction. Mr, Greene,
who is a gifted English writer,
has created not only colourful
characters, but a plot with many
intriguing twists in it, all of which
are skilfully accented by Mr.
Reed’s astonishing use of the in-
congruous and unexpected — the
apparently unimportant appear-
ance o! a child in the midst of an
adult contretemps, bouncing a
large rubber ball, the balance of
the scene being shot from the eye
Jevel of the youngster, or the
sudden mewing of an ordinary
alley-cat, who has become interest-
ed in the shoes of someone hiding
in the shadows — small things in
themselves, but used as clever
emphasis, .

The story concerns an American
writer of westerns, who, on arrival
in Vienna, finds that the friend
with whom he was going to stay,
has met wtih a fatal accident, Not
being satisfied with the informa-
tion he was given, he decides to
do a little investigating on his own,
only to find that his erstwhile
friend was a blackmarket
racketeer in watered-down penicil-
lin, and he himself becomes in-
volved with various Viennese of
dubious character, his friend's
mistress and the British and Rus-
sian Intelligence.

The majority the | film
was actually shot in post-war
Vienna, with the climax taking
place in the ynderground sewers
of that city. Excellent photo-
graphy suggests the _ shabby,
ornamental splendour of pre-war
Viemma in contrast to the utter
desolution of its post-war ruins.

Throughout the film, there is a
background of zither music. As
played by Anton Karras, this
strange music is gay, insistent,
weird and macabre, emphasizing
the changing moods and impending
climaxes as no other instrument
could. You may be provoked by
it, but it will fascinate you,

The cast includes Joseph Cotton,
as the American pulp writer, Valli
as the lovely and mysterious
mistress of his friend, Trevor
Howard (who will be remembered
in “Brief Encounter”) as the grim

manner which thrilled the crowd.
Sealey’s, on the other hand, is
one which is among the first three
on the Hit Parade,

Percy Welch was his old self,
but as I have already said, the
competition wus extremely keen,
Fitz Harewood, who won the
first Super Star Show ever to be
‘held in the island, was more
Classically inclined.

of





4. It may be associated with
the preceding word in a saying,
simile metaphor or association of
ideas

5. It may form with the pre-
ceding word a name of a wel'-
known person or place in fact or
fiction, ‘

6. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title or
action of a book, play, or other
composition,

A typical succession of words
might be: April-Fool-Food-Flood—
Deluge-Delude,

—L.ES.

bittev- weet, ».

new confidence fov vomansic meetings.

GARDENIA





MADE IN F hy GO 161

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‘>
7

PAGE NINE

Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice —Free

THE STEPPING STONES i
TO SUCCESS

Don’t hesitate about your future | Go forward,
confident that The Bennett College will see
you. through to a sound position in any career
you choose. The Bennett College methods
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personal touch that encour-



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head of the British Intelligence and
Orson Welles as the racketeer.
All acquit themselves admijrably
and are given excellent support
by local Viennese actors of het
mean talent. However, to this
observer, the star of THE THIRD
MAN is Caro] Reed, whose brilliant
direction and creation of tensfon
and suspense, have placed this
film high in the foremost ranks of
cinematic entertainment.

THE WHITE TOWER

THE WHITE TOWER, an adap-
tion of the novel by James Ramsey

makes for early
efficiency.

CHOOSE
YOUR CAREER

Accountancy Exams.
Aviation (Engineering and



All Commercial Subjects
Commercial Art
Draughtsmanship, All
Branches
G.P.0., Eng. Dept
lastitute of Municipal
Engineers
Mathematics
Matriculation

Plumbing

Quantity Surveying
Radio Service Ergincering
Radio ‘Short Wave)
Secretarial Examinations
Shorthand (Pitman’s)
Surveying

Teachers of Handicrafts
Telecommunications

Wireless)
Book -keeping
Building, Architecture
and Clerk of Works
Carpentry and joinery
Chemistry
Civil Engineering

Ullman, is now playing at the Civil Service Mining. Att Subjects Gity & Guilds
Plaz For rari . reasons Engineering, All Branches Novel Writing Television
AEA. or various reasons, @ bjects and Examina- Plastics Wireless Telegraphy and

group of people staying at a moun- Police
tain chalet in Switzerland, are im-
pelled to climb the White Tower,
a mountain hitherto unconquered
Starting off om the adventure are
a young European girl, an
American G.1., a French writer
an English doctor, q former Nazi
officer and the Swiss guide. After
two days of climbing, the doctor
finds he can’t take it; then the
writer is lost and we are left with
the Nazi, whose main idea 1s to
assert his authority in every way
and be as thoroughly unpleasant
as possible; the young American,
who suddenly realizes that the
success of the venture is up to him
aud the girl who is determined to
conquer the mountain because her
father perished in a similar ate
tempt. These three and the guide
continue the ascent during which
individual strengths and weak-
nesses are bared, and a rather
obscure symbolism that man's only
hope of survival rests in his joint
effort to this end, with other men
is revealed,

Superbly photographed, the
ascent is arduous and thrilling,
with moments of breathless
suspense, All the outdoor scenes
are actually-taken in the Swiss
Alps and the magnificence of the
scenery and the grandeur of Mont
Blanc which was the mountain
selected for the ascent, emphasize
the drama of the story,

The film has an _ outstanding
cast including Glenn Ford, Valli,
Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Claude
Rains and Osear Homolka, all of
whom giva excellent perform-
ances, I thought that Liloye
Bridges as the Nazi was woef ail:
miscast and though he obviousl)
put everything he had into the
role, it was clear from the star¢
that he was just not the type,

Glorious Technicolor —photo~
graphy, good direction and a fine
cast are the outstanding features
of this film, and though you may
hanker after more avalanches,
bodies swinging over precipices
and such like, there is still suffl-
cient action for good entertain
ment.

tions Special Course Telephony

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—



PAGE TEN

Ouistanding Hous

GLITTER BAY, ST. JAMES

IN a Way, Sir Edward (
t. is a pioneer, | i
two houses at Glitter Bay
Leeward Coast had been scorned
as a residential area The local
people said it was too hot, and
preferred to have their beach
houses-at Bathsheba or the Crane,
and. visitors were seldom taken
there. “Gradually how the
news of the beautiful est Si
Edward had created St
James coast spread,
there are more beaut
on that than in ar
part of the Island

h
the

buil



ever,

ite

or

the
to-day
house



coast

Although the house
it is the garden that make
ter Bay. When he bought the
Sir Edward told me side
avenue of casuarinas and
coconut trees there we nly
other tree breadfruit
the poor soil near
created what is perhaps
beautiful garden on the
When I was there the
Sharon was flowering,
an opportunity t
Lotus flowers. T
facés a beautift
with a circular
middle and a
whére white doves
roost.

Both of the houses at
Bay. were built by Dudley
and the Beach House
started in 1934, was built after th
Italian style of architecture. It
a lovely little house of unpainted
coral stone, with an open louny 4

nice
Gilit-
Fae
place,
be an

ome

On
ea, he has
the most

island

Rose of
and 1 had
see the , famed
house

laid out lawn,
pond in the

t the far end
used to

the





lily

}
arch



orce

Glitter
Phelps
which wis



sum 4

on the first -fl facing the sea
The coral stairs at the entrance to
the house are exquisite, and so

too are the statuettes which adorn

oor

those stairs. On the ground floor
there. is the dining room, which
opens on the patio.

Incidentally, the Beach House
serves as an excellent landmark
for fishermen, and I found it use-

ful myself. when I used to fo
yachting. otf that coast as a boy
Even when the coastline has
grown hazy one can see the Beach

House glittering on the horizon.
The main house, which was
built in 1935, has low gables which
give it a Dutch look. The dining
room is a very attractive roorn,
with a magnificent chandelier, and



THE BEACH HOUSE from the sea.

Italian style of architecture.



This house is built after the

THE DINING ROOM. Over the table hangs a magnificent chandelier.




We proudly present

SHAPED LOCKETS, CROSSES



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(





(Photo: Tom Leonard)

ANOTHER REMARKABLE THING |
ABOUT WHITE ANTS... |

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Se

it is separated from the poréh by eer collect ee eeet the
n © isit wr , ate. best in 1e «world. B as | : |

The. wating, Somny Gpethioe ie an- started collecting prints of hume | By HUGH CLELAND

other attractive room, and has ming birds, and they ought =) |

French windows opening om the look well on the walls. THE rising cost of living, which drives the house- |

balcony. From that balcony there And so I left Glitter Bay, pass+ | wife to despair, is seriously exercising the minds of

is a lovely view of the garden. ing once again through the lodge the men responsible for the upkeep of the country s|

West



64,644 ‘4
OL ALD SEO SO SESE



On the walls



EXQUISITE STONE STEPS form the entrance to the Beach House.
Tom Leonard)



On the ground floor of the Beach House is the dining room.
opens on the Patio.

A VIEW of the garden through the wronght iron gate which separ-

ates the dining room from the porch.



SOLOS PEPPERELL ALPS SOROS SO SS SSO

FOR BETTER <
FLORENCE

STOVES <

CITY

of
rooms Sir Edward has hung old
Indian prints.

Pictures by CYPRIAN LATOUCHE

DAYS: TUESDAY WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
V E N TIME: 9 to 11 a.m, 1 to 3 p.m. 9 to 11.30 a.m. '
oe Consultation and Advice Included
APPOINTMENTS AS FROM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH i
& })
1 A IE TRADING (‘0 For Appointments and further information, Dial 4584 or %
GARAGE TRADING (0. ni

SOSSSCSTeu+

SUNDAY’ ADVOCATE



iy LAN GALE

The Abbey Is
Hard-up, Too

now

most of the gates and leaving a few acres of

great cathedral churches. |
beauty for the dusty road to

St. Paul’s Cathedral, it has been revealed, will
have to sell investments to meet its financial com- |
mitments: at Westminster Abbey—which in recent |
years has seen anie to make enas meet—there is
talk of an appeal for funds in the not too distant
future.

He has «

Bridgetown.

Secret Finances

Westminster Abbey, the Collegiate Church of
St. Peter, shares with St. George’s Chapel, Windsor,
the designation ‘Royal Peculiar,” is extra-provincial,
extra-diocesan and under the personal jurisdiction
of the King, who is its Visitor.

One of the peculiarities about its finances is |
that they are not made public; the have seemed adequate then, this
| poverty-stricken parish church bears little relation to expenditure |
| may publish the sad statement of Long before, Henry VIII did?

its affairs in the magazine once a much thé same as the Ecclesias
year and thereby perhaps attract tical Commissioners. He confi }
help from wellwishers. St. Paul's cated Abbey revenue of £4,000 |
| Cathedral admits its outgoings to a year and gave instead an in- |
be £50,000 a year. Westminster come of £600, and land to the |

Abvey accounts, are a Chapter capital value of a few thousand
pounds.

Responsible for them to the ;
Chapter is the Receiver-General, _ What of the rest of the Abbey’s
revenue? An appeal issued by the

Canon Adam Fox, a former Pro- ‘ 7
| fessor of Poetry at Oxford, while then dean, Bishop Ryle, in 1922,
! the lay expert is Mr. T. Hebron, Yielded a sum reported variously
Registrar and Chief Accountant. 2S from £163,000 to £180,000,
The accounts are audited annually @"d this sum was invested. —

by an eminent accountant known Large source of revenue is the
fees paid by visitors for looking

as the ditor-~Gen ,» who has .
. o. Mudie -Ginarel, ite at the Chapels Royal in the Abbey,

as a prerequisite of his office a . ' ;

stall in the Abbey choir, But the Which were estimated before Oe

balance-sheet is not published. war to produce £3,000— £5,000 a
year; collections at services, on

‘Ep ’

| Embarrassment the other hand, yield very little, |

But for an Act of Parliament of and money from this source
63 years ago, the Abbey might be shared on a roughly fifty-fifty |
rich indeed, with an annual in- basis with a number of charitics. |
come from property up and down State occasions bring in fees, and
the country of £250,000 a year though these barely cover the ex- |
(“and that really would have been penses involved from temporary |
an embarrassment”, they say at closing of the Abbey, they usually |
the Abbey). By the Westminster mean that bigger crowds of sight- |
Abbey Act, 1888, however the seers are attracted in the follow- |

property was surrendered to the ing weeks. A quarter of a million |
Ecclesiastical Commissioners in

people paid £15,000 to see the}
return for a fixed income of Coronation setting in the Abbey. |
£20,000 a year. Though it may

-+LES. |
eBidenciceatte
|



AS. AB








is |

(Photo:

‘The Art Of Sybil Atteck

SYBIL ATTECK is an artist of
| taste and distinction. Her exhi-
.| | bition at the Museum of twenty-
i) | SiX Works is almost as exciting as
| | was Geoffrey Holder's last year.
# She is a trained artist, having
| Studied both painting and sculp-
| ture in London, Washington and
| Peru. This is reflected in her work
‘Earlier in the year she exhibited
in the Barbados Arts and Crafts
Exhibition at Queen’s Park, but
her work shown at this Exhibition
| did not indicate her power as a
| draughtsman, her delicate sense of
| colour or her skill in composition.
“For Beauty,” wrote St. Thomas
| Aquinas, ‘there are three require.
ments. First, a certain wholeness
or perfection, for whatever is in-
complete is so far, ugly; second, a
due proportion or harmony; and
‘third, clarity, so that brightly col-
oured things are called beautiful.”
Nobody expects artists today to
paint what would be pastiches of
medieval art. But, “wholeness”,
“proportion or harmony” and
“clarity” are so often completely
| ignored by many painters today,
| either through lack of training, or,
| an abandonment of all art prin-
ciples, which results in the pro-
duction of pictures that puzzle the
spectator. Some years ago I re-
member visiting an exhibition of
advanced art with a friend. who
after greatly admiring 4 painting
exclaimed “What is it?” It is true
that art is the mirror of the times,
and art today reflects all the
“isms” of modern thought includ-
ing communism. This has to some
| extent created a dictatorship in
art and a snobism about painting.
for pictures are claimed to be
understood by intellectual snobs
who wish to be considered “in
the know”, and who are often as
puzzled as a layman.

The appeal of Sybil Atteck’s
work is to a wide public, Although
her work is wholly un-academic,
she has so sure a knowledge of
picture building and of selection
that the “birth pangs” of her
| paintings is discernable. She ex-
| hibits water colours, oils and
| drawings. It is delightful to in-

spect water colours of a size that
ean be seen without magnifying-
glass. Her work is planned on a
grand scale and avoids the fault
| SO common to this medium, name-
ly, mudiness. Her colour is sub-
‘tle and she has made excellent



use of the texture of cartridge |
paper. In “Adolescent”, she has |
laid flat colour in an arresting
manner “Still Life—Vegetables”,
an overpainted subject, here em-
erges fresh and gay. “Careenage”’
is @ very typical West Indian
scene, but it has been raised far
above the commonplace by a dis- |
crete use of colour and design.

One regrets that more water col-

ours are not included in this ex-,
hibition, for there is no questio:

of the artist’s grasp of this tech-

nique.

Sybil Atteck’s skill_as a colour-
ist Appeats all thfotwh her paint-
ing. She has distilled the colour
from her subject and refined it
with subtlety. Her use of blues
and greens is especially note-
worthy. Few painters in the
tropics are wholly successful in
the handling of blue, Sybil Atteck
is not of their number. Her “Still
Life—Anthuriums”, those - hard,
unsympathetic flowers so attrac-
tive to artists, is the first really
successful painting of its kind
which I have seen. ‘Musicians
No. 1” is an outstanding composi-
tion, the curves of instruments
and. human bodies have been
worked into a delightful pattern
of unusual colour. “Musicians—
No, 2” is satisfying in its colour
harmonies, but the lighting of this
picture is worrying. The paintings
of Immortelles with their flaming
colour are skillfully balanced by
greens of other trees so that the
pictures avoid looking hot. “Bap-
tism” conveys all the sinister mys-
tery intended by the artist, the
treatment of the coconut frond in
the background might be studied
with advantage by tropical paint- |
ers. “Study of Head” lacked ap-
peal to the writer, who has a per—
sonal prejudice against any part
of the human body larger than life |
size, but, the treatment of skin
texture is admirable. “Old Lady |
—Portrait” reveals that the artist |
is also a portrait painter of talent. |

The pen and ink drawings be- |
tray the artist’s interest in seulp-
ture. Here is action; whether in
“Drawing in the Nets” or in
“Fish” the figures are plastic in
conception and excellently ar-
ranged, These drawings made one
long to see Miss Atteck at work
with hammer and chisel. |

Sybil Atteck’s, exhibition must
be seen by artists and art-lovers.

It

LT











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SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE




















PAGE ELEVEN
Na enn re a
HENRY 577. ony —
SPE Ee rs 3 : £569" lo ole" oo eo Ae at CEOS
Can 9
ANDERDON ———~



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The regular use of
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will, by its action on
the roots and sealp,

simply feel

Sleeping








nourish — every hair %

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richer growth, It a in t 1e ~——
provides nourishment g i
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roots and = corrects y Se eS SN Comfor tab &

such troubles as

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own we | SIMMONS |
PARTIAL BALDNESS 8 5

“4
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SLES LE LAL EF 3











































n AND You HAD) [NOW TLL Neve? KNOW WHAT x
SLAVE GIRL... \ THOSE LITTLE | | REALLV HAPPENED.... AND |= THIN & FALLING HAIR %
You WANDERED FIGURES. IN THOSE WERE ONCE REAL PEOPLE The daily application of this Hair .
US SET Gee Te Your ARMS! Food results unfailingly in a really ! x
- beautiful glossy head of hair. &
LANALOL No.1! With oi! (Yellow x ——_——_—_-—-——
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LANALOL No. 2 Without oil (Green | We have a limited supply of

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LANALOL CREA (Blue Label). A
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CANALOL SOLIDIFIED (Bakelite
box). An ideal fixative.

LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Red
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Local Distritutors: STS Ta ene et |
op hee General Agency’ Co., L j
Barbados) Ltd. ana 0 by bag
P.O, Box 27 gues OOT OF tye
BY CHIC YOUNG TROUBLE

j BRIDGETOWN, a Be en aa cath
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SIMMONS BEDSTEADS
SIMMONS SPRINGS
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We advise you to Buy early.

LASHLEY'S LIMITED.

Swan. Street.





446 bb ttt th Ot
POLLS AS AL LSS LLFEL LLL II

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: 7s, me SOOOCOOOL SPAMS AEE A AGES OF
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LEARN TO TURN OFF
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WELL--1 SAID \k ; - ne == ———— = —— — ——— ———

YOU WERE THE I. WASN'T

LAST ONE TO LEAVE
THE BATH ROOM

DRIPPING FAUCET
|. RUNS UP THE
WATER BILL /

}





By Appointment
Gw Distillers
to HLM. King George VI

IT SAID,“1| ALONE SURVIVE

THE OTHERS MUST HAVE BURIED THE T AN!
WHERE THE LOPEZ D. 1 KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN! WE #

GOLD, IF THEY WERE KILLED AS SHALL SOON KNOW THE 9
ANCESTOR--~ iii OTHERS HAVE BEEN KILLED” / TERT Sy

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TO KNOW,
TER OF YOUR peg TREASURE IS BURIED. ALL



Rah AO. \ae2) Gord
Stal Pett TT ds L//F ; Va : Les .
}







"MM SO.HAPPY TO SEE MY
BROTHER SO AMBITIOUS -
HE'S OLIT IN THE GARAGE :
WITH HIS ASSISTANT-- ON TEN iS A\ > hits P } PEP as ar =eEEY =e aa ae oa - = aati
THEY'RE WORKING ON A “| Che, Cee ~ * (thet

NEW INVENTION -YOU’LL y | ;

HEAR FROM HIM SOME

> AY -=


















DTT ti wer TS



IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE




































USUALLY = NOW USUALLY NOW

THEIR. GUNS, ee ee Quaker Oats (Pkgs.) 53 AG Tomato Juice (Tins) 37 32
DUGAN ! SEVEN! «.

Glace Cherries (Pkgs.) 37 32 Ovaltine (Tins Large) 124 1.08

Vegetable Soup (tins) 80 26 Velvo Kris (Pkgs) 51 AB









SiS J iM BETTINGS ©
(SPUTTER+SPUTTER




OKAY: WE UNDERSTAND EACH OTHER:
[M6IVING YOU TWO TO ONE ODDS «
HONEST JOHN





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IN FACT+{| FEEL TERRIBLE? WHAT
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CUULD AND WOULD SW/M WHIRLPOOL
CHANNEL*+ ate erat



f Se ee nmaneneanseelasenait
IF SHE FAILS «LL LOSE EVERY
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vista fl

o'~

Uf YY ' © ESSO STANDARD

OIL

R. M. JONES & CO. LTD. — Agents









PAGE TWELVE

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE
Minimum charge week 12 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week-—4 Cents a



a ~



For Births, Marriage or Bnengeinens|
@mnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 80 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m,, 3113 for Death

Notices only after 4 p.m. werd Fendave





TIGN YARD, usual hours

The char; fo nnouncements of Bungalow at St. James, Good Location | T4 jours

c ge for a AUTOMOTIVE and Bathing. Wide Sandy Beach. An 0. L. DEANE,

Births, Marriages, , Deane. Acknow- Outlook, Well Set in off Main Rd., Re- Parochial Treasurer,

ledgments, and In Memoriam notices 1s ee duced from £3,500 to £3,100. A St. Luey
MOST NEW 12 HP. Beat . Cottage | “ey

$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays! cilvantee if required, pBed ord Van. by Fontabelle, Good Condition and Loca- | 17-4.51-—6n

for any number of words up to 50, and] Piooring. Licensed and Insur

3 cents per word on week-days and] price $1,850. New one Cost. Stiss oes
4 cents per word on Sundays for each} sentiy, -_ Apply © Courtesy Garage.
additional word .





AUTOMOBILE: ’ "Teuahell 14,6. ious Yard enclosed with Stone, Vacant, , Rae t 4 :

THANKS Perfect running order excellent mileaze| Reduced from £1,000 to £850. A Two | {2° Office of the Parochial Treasurer, will

$1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Pnone-i616. | Storey Stonewall Business and Residence ; “ghee gily,on We following days

BLACKMAN—MYBTLE. The Blackman 44.51—T.F N.| with a Large Garage or Workshop in| Siturday 12th from 10 mi. to 12 noon.

family beg through this médium to Paper te euay, Are, Vacant, Redueed| Sicurauy 19th from 10 a.m. to if noon,

TAEEN (heehee to ait ttee Kind faiends| .cAR: 1938 Ford 10 hp, low mileage | 11 £2,600 to £2,300 A Bungalow Typs| Saturday 19th from 10 a.m. to 12 noon,

whe attended the funeral. sent wreaths | OWner driven 22.4.61—an | af Hastings Main e.. Good. Condition | °*'res ee eae,

he de al. yree eae nd Location, Reduced from £2,500. to 22.4.01—8n
and flowers and in ans other way CAR: Hillman 6 Suitable for Pick-up £2,300. Almost New Small Stonewall

expressed their Sympathy in our recent

22.4.51- No reasonable offer refused. G. Archer

In. 1 My Lord’s Hill,

bereavement. 22.4 51—-In









BRYAN; Through this medium we beg Blue Waters. Good Condition and Loca-| heretj, advised th.
to returm thanks to all those who i. retheat toatl oc menet Wid, ord Cer | tion, Reduiced from £3,200 to £3,000 Nett. | 1s. 1051. the Gut te ovine fee ae
attended the funeral, sent. wreaths, | yp. 7¢. Apply Mr. Butcher, C/o Mc- \C Me for \Nearly Anything in Real Estate| present location to the premises known
Cards and letters of Condolence or} giesrney & Co., Lid 9274 51—2n and Almost in any District at Bargain| ns ilfracembe, Maxwell Coast, and from
in any way expressed sympathy in . Prices with Re-Sale Values. Mortgages | that date the Club will be known as THE
our recent bereavement caused by CAR—1947 Super de luxe V-8 Ford Arranged. If I Can't—Who Will? Dial 2111.| GASUARINA RESIDENTAL CLUB
the death of my dear beloved hus-! y=) perfect ning <8 d D. F. de Abreu, Call at Olive Bough, 22.4.$1—In
band JOSEPH BENJAMIN BRYAN SS eer ere meee. SY | Samar, 22.4,51—1n ee : a
Eva Bryan (Wife), D'Arcy Bryan (Son), sptelient condition. Always owner driven, - — we
Josephine Powlett (Sister), Joseph Hunte eee 22.4.51—2n ee, Fontabelle, standing NOTICE
(Cousin), Miriam Reid «Cousin) i“ acres. Contact D. O'Neal
22.4.51—1n = SARS 40 3 New Tr Sepp Mayflower} 22.4.51—3n | PARISH OF St JAMES
as ihn lutest im isi BASTt Gtth estes the —_——~ omer Tenders for convg/ing Paupers and
HMUNTE: We beg to thank all those earanice’ Uinietetaliter i anee, oo for the Burial of the dead will be re-
who sent wreaths, cards and in|them at Dp petition at my office Victoria Street on| ceived by the: undersigned, from whom

Chelsea Garage (1950)
New Showrooms, Pinfold Street.
ee hi a A Ls Aen ee an

“"SAR—New Buneard Vanguard 18 hp. Standard Vanguard 18 h.p.

other ways expressed their sympathy Ltd.,

jn our retent bereavement occasioned
by the death of IONE HUNTE.
Hunte Family, Alleyne Family.





on approx » ‘acre’ a
Fontabelle
aes 1 will offer for sale by public com-



PUHLIC SALES PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days| Téa cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,| @%d 12 cents ber agate line on Sundays,
minmum crarge $1.5 on week-days| â„¢itimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays ; Gnd $1.80 on Sundaya.

NOTICE
PARISH OF 8ST. LUCY

The Parochial Tregsurer’s Office, St.
Lucy, will be opened as from Thursday
April 26th 1951, at HARRISONS PLAN-











|
j
{
i

REAL este



Beat It if U Can! Almost New Seaside







tion, Reduced from £1,200 to £1,050. A
3 Bedroom Cottage at Ch, Ch. Main Rad
about 7 miles from Town, Good Condition
and Li eatin, Modern Convenences, Spac-

NOTICE
PARISH OF 8T. JAMES
As from the Ist May to the lst May



Residence at Hastings Main Road., Good
Location. Reduced from £1,400 to £1,200.
A Residence at Rockley Main Road Near

NOTICE

Members of the Casuarina Club are







Friday 2%th at 2 p.m.—15,000 square feet
LAND at BELMONT adjoining Govern-
ment Woods, has an additional entrance
in Quaker Road. ALA. UTILITY

all particulars may be obtained, up to
Saturday 28th April 1951

P. H. TARILTON,
SERV- Clerk, Board Poor Law Guardians,
ICBS AVAILABLE. Dial 2947.

22.4.51—I1n 6 seater Saloons, Your last opportunity R. ARCHER McKENZIP. 22 4.51— or Sey
— 7 te buy at present low price. See them 22.4.51—4n ni connennstemertnienctinainonenaeth
IN MEMORIAM at Chelsea Gari (1950) Ltd, New me Ss PEE
nan — Showrooms, Pinfold Street. LAND—Several spots of land at
JONES—In loving memory of our dearly 18.4.51—2n | Worthing View, Ch. Ch. Good location |

















































“gust

esis Nips etic Dice iak dada etaendiaeeeeoeeaineet leon tieiianinnnndhitienenmapnanittnsimansnainaaigniians

SUNDAY
roR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over %
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HOUSES

CHANDOS, 2nd Ave. Belleville. Fully
furnished. Available May 15th. Inspec-

1



tio: by appointment. Phone 3450 or
3926 20.4.51—t.f.n
’PLAT—One (1) furnished Flat at

Dundee, St. Lawrence Gap. Suitable for
two onkh Available 15th April onward
No children no pets. Apply: Mrs. E. C
Boyce, on premises. Phone 6240.
22.4.51—1n

from May |*

HARCL. IFF, st ” Lawrenee,
ist iurnished Apartment overlooking
sea, For six months or longer, Apply
Mrs, Inniss. Phone 3750. 17.4.51—t.f.n



HOME. On St.
to October
C/o. Advocate

James Coast from Au-

1951, Write George
Co, Ltd.

8.4.51—4n

MILLVILLE, Upper Collymore Rock,
2*‘bedrooms, dining and drawing rooms,
verandah. electri¢é, Water and out-offices
Mildred Prince, Saunders Dairy, Colly-
more Rock, Phone 3936.

Hunte,



21.4,.51—2n



“MALTA”, Cattlewash for the months
of June, July, October and November.
Apply Mrs. I. Weatherhead, c/o J. N,
Harriman & Co., Led. Tel. 3838.



—_——
ROOM—At the Parisian Dress Shop,





suitable for a Beauty Shop. 22.4.51—3n

TANGLIN, Bathsheba, is no_ longer
for Rent, but for Sale. See Real Estate
column, 21.4.51—6n



WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.









ADVOCATE

Ce ee

4

21.4.51—3n | 4



PART ONE ORDERS

By
Lieut.-Col, J. Connell, 0 B E
anding,

Regiment

ED,



Os
Issue No. 16 20 Apr 51.
PARADES Training

All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday
26 Apr 51

HQ Coy will continue with weapon training—The Rifle.

“A” Coy will fire the Bren gun on the range. 2

“B" Coy will do LMG training Lesson 10—Mechanism. The obiect of this lesson
is to teach each man how the gun operates whilst it is being fired, so that if
the gun stops during firing, with the knowledge of the functions of the working

parts of the gun, he will be able to detect the stoppage and get the gun firing
again without loss of time
Band
Band practices will be heid on Monday 23, Wednesday 25 and Thursday 26
Apr 51,
ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
30 APR Si.
Orderly Officer Lieut. S_G. Lashley
Orderly Sericant 233 L/S Blackman, A. L
Next for duty
Orderly Officer Lieut. P_ LC. Peterkin
Orderly Serjeant 215 Sit. Husbands, H. A.

M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
S.0O.LF & Adjutant,
Tne Barbados Regiment.

NOTICE

The monthly Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess will be held on Saturday 28

Apr 51 at 2015 hours. Honorary Members may attend at 2045 hours,
PART Il ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
20TH APRIL, 1951
STRENGTH INCREASE
17 L/S Thomas, M. D.

SERIAL NO. 14
SHEET NO. 1.

“AW
wef 26 Apr 51

LEAVE — Sick
426 Pte Cave, W. E ”
Apr 51.

M. L, D. SKEWES-~ oes, nip,

S.O.L.P. & Adj
2 Regiment.

The wicnedos

NOTICES



SHIPPING



ROYAL NETHERLANDS

Retaken on strength of Regiment

net 2 weeks S/Leave wef



































SUNDAY,

APRIL 22, 191















beloved mother and daughter Beryl | ——— ———-—_—--__——-——— | with water and light avaflable. Prices . M.V. “Caribbee” will ac-
Joan J. s, who fell asi April CAR—One Humber 20 H. P. Suitable ‘ .
inh 1990. DO SPENT cor taxi, in excellent condition. One | spots “from 6 000; to ation ft HELP STEAMSHIP CO. cept Cargo and Pasbenpes
N pe
There is a dear face that is missing 2G. Boece dunn’ et eg fe m ae necessary terms can be arranged. D'Arcy VACANT POSTS EXPERIENCED Typist. and Steno- SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM for Dominica, Antigua,
A dear voice that is stilled ss A, Scott. 18.4.51—3n | F tiv C/o Advo-| MS. “HECUBA"—17th April 1951 Montserrat, Nevis and St.
& tite ts. Vasant in our home Pinfold St. VEGG1 Bi | hasan i ee ag xecutive Engineers, Works and jgrapher. Apply Box A BC. C/o Advo a ¥ ; Kitts. Sailing Friday, 4th
That never can be filled. eRUGKy © ee PROPERTIES FOR SALE. One einai Hydraulics Department, cate Co. td ieaettkn SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND May . ’
Those flowers placed upon your grave : One 1939 Ford V-8 Truck in} wall bungalow at Brittons X Road. It Trinidad and Tobago, | . AMSTERDAM ‘ } ay.
Have withered and decayed : eos working order with 1945 engine. | has open Verandah, drawing and dining : MI LANEOUS M.S. “ORANJESTAD'—19th April 1951,
Buk ihe over for: you who sléap Apply: B. A. Belgrave, Bogert ces 8 bedrooms, water toilet and CORRECTION SCEL SAILING 10 TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
benea : a itchenette, garage together with AND GEORGETOWN
Will never fade sway ; the land it stands on. Price £1,200. leh wecas WANTED TO RENT M.S. “HERSILLIA”—11th April 1951.
Ever to be remembered by her loving LIVESTOCK Vacant now. For inspection and other Applications are invited by the] Canadian married couple require ac-] §& “GOTTICA'—23ard ‘ApriL 1951. B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
mother and children: Muriel Philips CALF: One genuine % bred Holstein | Particulars apply to D'Arcy A, Scott Government of Trinidad and To- commodation from November 1951 to SAILING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUATRA E Cc. INO
imosieeh waned. genes, Anh, Teerenas heifer calf. Ten days old. Bire; Pure Als One stone Bungalow with three’ bago for two posts of Executive a ae Reet toat et dates. sear: CURACAO é&c. RS ASSOC., INC.
and Cola c in), Hyacin n- i ; edrooms and stand t ; = * peds and car parking space necessi mt ae : -
Ger (sister), Samuel Callender (brother- Pith eo eclde ie eae yar land with Hock vans, Pay te Dini Engineer, Works and Hydraulics] 4 friend of theirs now in Barbados has] 8.S. “GANYMEDES"—13th April 1951. Tele. 4047,
in-law}, Cameron, Vincent Phillips . 22.4.51—1n | A. Scott, Magazine Lane. Dial 3743. Department. : promised to make arrangemer.ts for them aan BON be ts. 18d
(brothers) . 22.4.51—1n. 18.4.51—3n The posts are pensionable and i hy Shy Pagel Plaage S. P. a 0. :
————~ | “GoaT: One (i) Saanen Milch Goat | ———________________| the salary will be in the scale of | write giving rates, house address, an
PARRIS — Mirriam Louise. In loving | apply to L. A. Straker, No. 60 Roebuck | We will offer for sale to public com-| $3 120-180 $3,840 — 240—$5 289| Phone number Full particulars cre ne-
memory of my dear mother who wWa4s | Street 22.4.51—1n. | petition at our office on Friday 27th. ’ ” : cessary otherwise offers cannot be con- |]. e e e
called to rest on 20th April 1945. Seek ata de ies -intioticnnctal) Mee! af: 2 sin, * per annum, A commencing salary | sidered. Apply — Box B.B, C/o Advocate t na t Ss
Your gentle face and tender smiles! “pups: ‘Terrier Pups, Good Breed.| (1) LABOSR “BLEST a stone wall] above the minimum may be paid | Co. 17.4.51—6n nadian ‘Natio eams pP
2 forgotten, ther dea Males $10.00, Females $5.00 Telephone Dwelling house and shop at St.| to the candidates selected if their ] 45, Rnpers T. faney :
re ead saben | Mavting’ st Grin, standin on "| experience, qualifications or war | pAVARD™™S,,,2crn at, Mn si! | S°PRMROPM® saa ants sag renga
I know that when our journey here seehe sro land. Dwelling service warrant it. Appointments’ Reasonable terms for permanents. Apply Montreal = Fislifax Boston B Ferbedoe
below is over, ELECTRICAL Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitch-| Will be on probation for two years , “iwarina Club. Tel. 8496. Swed Repeat 7 Ma ig a 2 may 3 thy FH May
iy teat Surtpy land called home 12 volt, 9 Plates $48.15; % vale 13 en, Toilet and Bath. Government| in the first instance. In other re- 91.4.51-—$0 | TAD BORNE. lh dake BR ie. 1 Sie BO dune” aa Sune
Edna Liynth. (daughter), Garnet Lynch | plates. $29.54; 6 volt, 18. Plates’ $25.81 water inatelied, spects the appointments will be LADY NELSON ++30 June 3 July 5 July 14July 15 July
a a family. ” 22.4.51—1n a hekeplanvan ates $25.51.) (2) Three other parcels of land con- subject to the Colonial Regula- LADY RODNEY ++30 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. —
(grandson) and family. AS nm. | Barbados Agencies 4908. 10 whines pee respectively 2 roods, loets and the local Civil Service LOYAL BROTHERS OF aapcionadiien tates
4. roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong- NORTH Sails Arri Arrives
ONE (1) five H.P. three phase totall. ing to and near to above property | Regulations and Instructions. H STAR Pove en Barbados paves St. obo Ha ieee Montreal
EDU ATIONAL wccicesl sndantipn |tnoter One (i Deen Sete os sale ae The duties attaching to the post THE LADY =oprer -10 May 12 May 21 May _ 22 May br war
Switch board fully fitted. One 2% ; re roperty or! of Executive Engineer are as fol- * LSON .. 3June 5 June 14 June - 16 June une
nica iinet -——_—- |inch delivery (Lee Howell) centrifugal separately Z _| lows: To take charge of all works Neediest Cases Fund LADY RODNEY .. 3July 5 July i4July | — 16 July 19 July
pump. All in condition “as good as ton meeeeron apply % Ba re Sri aMeiitenanikeLand constructs LADY NELSON ..27 July 29 July 7 Aug. . 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL ae "ze twa Sie ae eee Srasuitiee e owner i verton Of buildings, roads end bridgeralt ANNOUNCEMENT LADY RODNEY ..26 Aug. 28 Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept, 1) Sept.
“RU a : . ? i ; : , * *
REO AVN DEST. OF EDUCATION) | Advocate. 8.4.51—3n.| | For further particulars and conditions| an important territorial district | | N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham-
Reopens on Tuesdoy 24th April 1951 ae sn only at Har- OL OINSON, é panaeé and to be responsible for the full } eke iy and: th. Sen ab bers. Passenger Fares and freigut rates on applicatian to'—
New pupils examined to-morrow at | "sons, showroom 1s joor . tee hilar wes 11.4.5. -an.} technical, administrative, financial Buecents ween The enaartidaes ‘will
6.30 a.m re Sand , ,
. ee ss Lee ta and disciplinary control of the
G. V. BATSON, nS pear eet th ead . receive entries for the following:—
Principal. “RADIOGRAM—One seven valve H.M.V, “HILLCREST”, fully furnished, situate | “strict. —
.¢-8—in, | Bow st De Cesta & * as at Bathsheba, St. Joseph, ttormer site| Candidates should possess one of| (a) Costume Bands GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.
=| department, © Co Me Sr in, | of, ,Beachmount ° Hotels " standing on | the following professional qualifi-| _(b) Steel Bands, (EEE
MALVERN ACADEMY - — 244-493 square feet of land with several | cations: Corporate Membership of (c) Advertising Bands, E : aa
RADIO One 9- Tube Hallicrafters Radio “he hone ie tah Re ink hee aii the Institution of Civil Engineers, (d) Historical Bands. { a MAKE YOUR PURCHASES OF:
EDENVILLE, CHEAPSIDE eloioat new. ce Clarke, Mp. ie gerne tains open galleries on two: sides, draw-| Or a Diploma or Degree exempt- In order to raise the standard of
1 ais ahead reel ae raat oy ees ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms wich;ing from Sections A and P of the] Carnival, the Steering Committe: ENAMELWARE
8 ay at 9.20 a.m. ew pupils w Po 7 running water, ps ¥, 2 a
interviewed on Mond’ 0th April at | REFRIGHRATOR—One 1949 American | PUNning water, pantry, kitehen and usual} Associate Membership Examina- | would appreciate the co operatio:
10 a.m. G.E.C. 5 cubie ft. Refrigerator, Owners |G Pioe na servants rooms in vara. | tion of the Institution of Civil) of Firms, Clubs and Individual
F. L. MORRIS, esis er mot ARES mane Inspection on application to the care-] Engineers with at least two (2) | being as original as possible. From Our New Shipment Just Received
Een. y: ' : Y teker Mr. Seymour Bowne, ; se years post graduate experience on No entrance fee will be charged
pa 7 Mitt ath tee & ATEN | above will be set for sale at Pub- jor civil engineering works. ' rticulars late.
eer =a MECHANICAL lic Competition at our office in Lucas ma More particu! ©
M ERMERE SCHOOL . ] Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 27th] ,, 1m the case of an ent ant A Curnival Band of thirty wil TENTRBAL FOUNDRY LTD.
COMB BICYCLE — New Valkyrie Bicycles | April 1951 at 2 p.m. the condftions of employment in-| pe visiting Barbados to take par CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.,—Proprietors. — Cnr. of Broad & Tudor Streets
ENTRANCE PEAMINASION TO MAIN] with or without s.erect. fae Garter CARRINGTON & SEALY, clude: > ‘ Pe in the parade j
scHO Bicycles, Bicycle Parts an ccessories, olicitors, a rovision 0! furnished i
1. As previously notified in the Press,] Tyres & Tubes. See them at Chelsea 18.4.51—9n, unr quarters for which a rental Closing date, 19th May.
admissions to the School will take place | Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold Sirest. Perec see eh Sl iieatl of 10% of salary ‘subject to SEYMOUR BECKLES.
10 ge Beteanee Sxcaroination will be ee TANGLIN—situate at Beachmont, a maximum of $50 per | c/o sire, Cire’ Office, Ss fi he followi Offi
held in the Senool Hall on Friday, June} “GESTETNER | DUPLICATORS" New meee: ne Manes Ba wee ta month is payable or in lieu HeRCwe ee us for the following ce
8 a. ' receiv i) Moendiduies will be accepted for Sone (aida) iit. Bhane oa lounge, Dining Room, ‘Three double of quarters, payment of a For Booths, Stalls, and side- +
: : ree 1k a 16.4.51—t.f.n, | 2@drooms, Children’s room, Three gal- house allowance equivalent! gpow tact C MORRIS.
examination who were not over year leties, ‘Kitchen, Gare ‘and servant's a Shows, contac . A
of age on ist January last, or who will foci Sienianee ae eth eat ee a to the difference between Sobers Lane. \

TYPEWRITER: One Underwood Type-
next, This concession writer in good condition ,Price $55.00
the current year only, L. M. Clarke, No, 12 James Street.

4, Parents/Guardians must notify the] Phone 3757. 20.4.51—2n

Headmaster in writing not later than
MISCELLANEOUS

Monday, 3th April if they wish their

sons/wards to sit the examination. tee

application must state the boy's date ec <

birth supported by a birth/baptism cer- ANTIQU £8 Of every descriptio:

tifente, It shall als tate the School Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver

ifieate. t shall also state § Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto
graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Sho;

edjoining Royal Yacht Club.

not be under 11 wears on lst September

is applicable to









he is now ettending and must be accom-
panied by a brief Testimonial from the
lleadmaster of that School.

5. Candidates are expected to provide



their own -pencil(s), pen, & ruler Ligh’ BARBADOS SPORTS REVIEW—Now
refreshments will be on sale at the

en sale at leading Book Stores, ‘‘Bar-
bados Sports Review". Price 2/ all
leading’ sports covered, 22,4 51—1n.

————_ —
COOLERATOR—In

School canteen.

6. Will Vestries and all other Scholar-
sn-awarding authorities please submit
their lists of candidates in accordance
with the foregoing conditions.



good condition, 3





doors, Phone 3045. 36, St. Ann's Court,
The Garrison, 21.4.51—2n,

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT
1. A limited number of vacancies will COVERS (Saucepan) 12 doz. asstd.
occur in September, 1951, in the Prep-} sizes to clear 8 to 30¢c. WHITFIELD'S
aratory Department of the above School.| Hardware Dept. 21.4.51—2n

Applications mar be submitted to the
Headmaster, by parents/guardians on
behalf of boys who shall be not less
than eight and a half years of age, nor
more than len and a half years of age,
cn Ist September, 1951.



EVEN-FLO FERDING BOTTLES, com-
plete. The renowned American Feeder.
See jyours at KNIGHTS Ltd.

20.4 sS1—Sn







2, Closing date for applications will be INTERNATIONAL TORNADO, K, 338,
Monday 30th April,, 1951, ‘Mull built and tested by qualified Civil
3. An examination will be conducted | Engineer. Best offer over $600.00. Ring
et the School on+Saturday, June 9th at | 1274, 22.4.51—I1n.
9 ean, -_——$—$____— peomnestacearnceteasimnanemraattts
4. Candidates should arrive equipped MARBLE-—A_ piece of White Marble,
with 2 (two) pencils and a ruler, 40 inches by 17 inches. O. H, Crawford,

M. PINDER, B M.L.A.S., or Phone 8238.
Secretary, 22.4.51—In

Governing Body of Combermere
School. MOULD: Black Mould suitable for
144.51—3n | Gardens and Lawns. Going cheap.
Appky: Jas. C. Duguid, Bay Land.

=: 20.4.51—3n









NOXZEMA SKIN CREAM: Once again
ve can offer you Noxzema Greaseless
Medicated Skin Cream. Get it at Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd. 20.4.51—3n
—
PEANUTS: Fresh stock of Planters’



REQUIRED

$56,000.00 loan; secured by
ist Mortgage on Freehold





Cocktail Salted Peanuts in sealed
Vacuum Tins, Bruce Weatherhead.
22.4.51—3n



PIANO ACCORDION, perfect condition
Phone 8195, Da Silva, after 4 p.m,





property on Frederick St., {de
SHADE 4 Opaque Window Shades—

Port-of-Spain. Contact {cream}, 33 ins, wide. Apply to the
Parisian Dress Show, Shepherd Street.

Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors, 22.3.51—3n

i ” SPORTING PRINTS of high “decora-







tive value and unique interest are now
on sale at HARRISON'S ART DEPT.
20.4. a

| GREY HOUSE
Church Street
Speightstown

Instructions have been received

3n



Two PLATE Glass Display Cases, what
offers. Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, Broad
Street. 7.4.51—tin
er rer

“Those Little Pals.. Ramadhin &
Valentine are in a_ record partnership
at Harrison's Music Dept., together with











Sergeant Brown and The Straight Hair
Gal” 21.4.51—2n
WOVEN WOODEN BLINDS can be
used Venetian Style, as Curtains or as
Sereens. They have numerous othet
t uses for the home decorator with an
‘om Mrs. I. G. Jemmott for the imagination. HARRISON'S FURNITURE
eheve property to be offered for DEPT 17.4.51-—2n
sale by PUBLIC COMPETITION .
at 2.30 p.m. on Friday, April 27, WATCHES. For a limited period 10%
i801. at JOHN M. BLADON's discount on all Packard and Alton
Offices, Plantations Building Watches. 17 and 15 jewels. See “Your
G : Jewellers” Y. DeLima & Co., Ltd
rey House is a spacious 3- 19.4.51—6n
storey stone building with a dry .
Goods and general store operated 7K .
on the ground floor which offers eae i hd Heckwake "Deot.”
cppertunit, for the development e p 21.4.51—2n
of a good business in this central ae detindasumadentanetinvald
pesition. WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Wagon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
Perticulars from the Solicitors, ov 37438 22.4.51-—t.f.n.
Messrs Yearwood & Boyce, James ae

Strect,
Bladon,

or the Auctioneer, John M
Building

Plantations

MAPLE MANOR
GUEST HOUSE
HASTINGS ROCKS



OPPOSITE



Tel. 3021, 1, BOURNE,
A.F.S. F.V.A Manageress.
\
LEE ETT. |e
}
\



For inspection please telephone 3624.
Offers to be sent in writing to the
undersigned.

Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors, James
Street, Bridgetown. 21.4.51—6n,



AUC'rION

‘UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 24th by order of Mr. O. G,.
Deane, we will sell his Furniture at
“Deane Hollow”, St. Lucy, which in-
eludes Dining Table (seat 8), Upright
Chairs, M.T, Water Table, Double End
Couch; Tub Chairs and Rockers, Morris
Rockers with cushions; Liquor Case, Orna~
ment Tables all in Mahogany; Set of
nice Table Glass 51 pieces; Dinner and
Tea Services, Glass and China, New Tilly





“amp; Congoleum, Pictures, Rugs,
Gallery Chairs, Cutlery, Spoons, Forks,
&c., Single Iron Bedsteads and Beds.
Mirrored Press, Dressing Table, M.T.
Washstands, all in Mahogany; Larder,

Kitchen Tables; New 3 Valor Oil Stove,
Kitchen Utensils, Domo Crenm Seperator,
Large Chicken Run, Garden Bench,
Donkey Cart, Plants in Ferns, Rose
Trees, Palms &e in Cement Pots a geld-
ing horse and many other items., Sale
11.30 o’elock, Terms CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN
Auctioneers





& CO.

20.4.51—2n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON THURSDAY 26th by order of Mr
Adam Skurnick we will sell his house
Appointments at Gainsborough, corner of
Wekhes and Tweedside Roads which

includes
Dining Table, Upvight Chairs, veyy nice
China Cabinet, Morris Suite—Settee
(seat.3) and 3 Arm Chairs, all with Spring
Cushions, Cocktail Table (Vitrolite Top),





Ornament and Coffee Tables ali in
Mahogan?: Glass and China, Radiogram,;
Prescold Refrigerator (18 months!, Pine
Flat Top Desk, Congoleum; Double
(Simmons) Bedstead and Spring, Deep
Sleep Mattres: Mahog. Mird, Press,



Mahog. Dressing Table, Children's Bed-
stead and Cradle, with springs and beds,
Pram, Child's Trieyele and Black Boar,

Larder, 3 Burner Valor Oil Stove and
Oven, Kitchen Tables, Kitchen Utensils
and other items,
This Furniture is in excellent candition
being practically new; about 18 months
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO,









Auctioneers

22.4.51-—-2n

= *

FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS
STOCKINGS: Beautiful Nylon Stock-
ings, New Shipment. Just for you in
all modern shades never before offered

only $1.48 pair, Special price for whole-



salers, Contact: KIRPALANI'S Retail &
Wholesale Dry Goods Store, 62 Swan
Street. Dial 4715.
22.4.51—1n
~~ P 4 :
t "i "
FOR LONGER SERVICE
TAR all posts before erecting.
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative |
| material still available
it your GAS WORKS, Bay St
Price 40c. per gallon
| Get Soine To-day |

SS a a Ee Ne pen

|

rental
owned house and 10% of
officer’s monthly salary plus
5/12% of estimated value of
furniture, subject to a maxi-
mum of $50 per month for
a married officer, and $20
per month for an unmar-
ried officer;

Free first class passages on
first appointment for the
officer and his family not
exceeding five persons in,
all. Subject to review at
any time and not as a per-
manent right of the officer,
free passage on leave after
a prescribed minimum tour
not exceeding the cost of
normal sea passages to the
United Kingdom for the
officer, his wife and children

(b)

subject to a maximum of |

three adult fares;

Payment of outfit allow-
ance of $288.00 to officers
from non-tropical countries
on first appointment.

The successful candidates will
be required to pass a medical ex-
amination.
quired to serve and reside any-
where in the Colony at the Gov-
ernor’s discretion.

| Applications should be submit
, ted to the Colonial Secretary, Red

(e)

ee House, Port of Spain, to reach him

not later than 30th April, 1951,
Certified copies and not originals
of testimonials should be sub-



mitted.
J, O'CONNOR,
Acting Colonial Secretary.
= 8.4,51—2ny
\POOSes >
%

ys
% West Indian & British §
x Hand made Crafts, Antiques, 4S
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach- yy
g weer, Decoration Hoyse, st
% ves. Tel. 91-74 %
} 14.4,51—Im, vs
>

Me ete te

COOKING BUTTER

in full supply
olb. TINS

or per Ib.

GRIFFITH'S —Roekley
Dial 4514

COOKING BUTTER |







paid for privately |

They may also be re-! %

Â¥ A LIMITED QUANTITY AVAILABLE
SIMMONS BEDSTEADS

Glass Ink Stands double and single

Stamp Racks, Rubber Stamps,

Stamp Pads and Ink. Paper Weights,

Pen Trays in Glass, Stapling Machines and
Staples to fit.

Dating Machines, Pins and Slide-on-Clip

Also... ...

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS

DIAL
3466





Pencil Sharpeners

i

ATHLONE GUEST
HOUSE



Roberts & Co. = Dial 3301





FONTABELLE

' PERMANENT | Won

| OR FRIIS
TRANSIENT : :

BOARD AND LODGING }
FOR RESERVATION . . . }},
{
(
{



DIAL 4837
21.4.51.—2n.
wrens PPPS SSO POO

oO.

Are you thinking of Building 3
Houses, Roads and Yards ? %
‘ a

1F so a



N. E. Wilson & Co.

New Arrivals inelude....







“B. A. & P. 8. BROOKS”

CONTRACTORS

Contact;

POCPSOPSOOPSS

Pillow Cases









. m o ;
FR BP og 19 X 30 @ aie siseessess $1.12 egeh
the best
For further Bereeu late Phone 8335
2 .
“ue aasi-m 31% White Sheets
Boe e Cease 80X100@.......... iveueeresesss $6.67 each
LEARN NOW!
By one whg Brent beginning 45” wide GD isitanees, see edersnseseonss — easteegees sioees SLBO yd.










Oral and written.

ish taught.
Brew (speed

Typewriting & Shorthand
writing).

Plastic Tabling

Coloured Blankets

stn classes at Black Rock, near in two sizes @:

. Stephens, 10-4, Evening_class-
ph “at Mr, Rudder’s School, Consti-
tution Road, 7—9.



Piastic Table Covers

Special attention to Elementary
Teachers and Sales people.

$2.10 to $4.72 each

Terms reasonable



GLADSTONE BOWEN,
Black Rock.

Damask Table Cloths

Assorted sizes & Colours from $2.42 to $2.98 each

N. E. Wilson & Co.

The Ultra Modern Store with the Bread Street

“Rockridge”,



















| CALL AND SECURE YOURS QUICKLY Goods at the Swan St. Prices
— ALSO — Dial: 3676 fet wan
| BATHROOM TILES Coloured 7 it me .
|
Established Incorperated |
| 1860 T. HERBERT Lid. “1926
10 & 11, Roebuck Street and Magazine Lane : 1 33



eee

ri

AOA AOAC OG

Sof

Sees

SIS

SSIS











LA RO
A House Spots at L
N Stanmore Lodge A

TY Black Rock
2,400 & 8,000 Sa. Ft.



Just Received

FRESH STOCK
OF 45. 4..

DOBIE’S
FOUR SQUARE

YELLOW & PURPLE
TOBACCO
202 & 402 Tins

_

C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813



a

REAL ESTATE
JOHN
MM.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD

FOR SALE
Py tien Pika

CKE!
tony tineti
well-bu sidheg stone YE dtiee

set well back in secluded grounds
approx. one acre in extent. The
gardens are well matured and
there is complete privacy from the
roadway and adjoining property.

re is a covered entrance porch

ears, wide airy verandahs,
latge lounge With a central stair-

making an attractive feature,

iit ih good bedroo:

, four
. butler’s

try,
Tooms_ oust
there if a laree garage, ith
quarters, ete. tremely
esting an sh able proper
“RICHELIEU”,
ley

ell iaytat i \~
low rece ee at

Hailaba shingled ac-
comimodation cons’ >
fibecs sori. a . “dink ;
‘oom, four bed sere
vant's room sue dou .
The property has a wide la
* one side and args 2 and
ully enc! r i
Bent area near town a Schodis.
“WHITEHA: FLATS", Cod-
Bogen § Hill, St. Michael—A well

country home recen:

poeterved into a block of 4 or
id luxury flats, fitted with all

a gpnveniences. The grounds
app 5 acres are laid out with
‘tin shrubbery and gardens and
there is a long carriageway ap-
proach flanked with mahogany
trees. An investment P or
suitable for conversion into Guest

‘ous: Ni
rege ursing Home. 3% miles

“MEDMENHAM”,
very fine 2-storey property pleas-

near Government House.
spacious and well propor
commodation co: prising 2 fe ep.
oh dining and nd brea
rooms, (1 with ~
ing room), ‘butler’s vate ‘grew:
en, servants’ ms, garage, f
Sty. boultry houses, ete, ere ts
0-way entrance driv
freuhds are well laid +a cine
wns, flowering shrubs and flower
fardens. The whole broperty Sas
{ 4 pleasant character ical
ome of the older lished

homes in this exe
very sound buy’ af thine pe 4

Modern S

Hall Reva a da

of stone seen

roof. This siruction With

vantage of a corner la

fine view seawards.
ees a built-in

‘ loun:

with 2 verandahs ieaging

from it. The k
Hed with flied cupbostat’ tees

IS a 2- s¢
Punt pune ee 2 servants’ rooms

Building " Lana,

ea Rockley
apes then eee building plot of

lar new
Golf ous

TRE BUNGALOW, Pa'
ynes Bay
termed St. John the Baptist
—a 2-storey house with 3
i upstairs lounge, 1-
eries, dining room, kite’ en and
+eun offices. Very fine sandy
each and safe bathing,



“INCH MARLOW"—on PorO:
rhe ofneins near | Sliver
Ma

iorise ite shingle and oo
Sap . 4 reception, bedrooms,

andah; 2 bathrooms a
toilets; 2 kitchens, tervanta
rooms, 2 garages, frow
apartments but easy to taeuuniah
“SWEET FIELD” — St Peter.

This interest propert,
offered for sale as the ioner lk
The house
Boobie 2
barapeted roof. There is a ainune
room, large lounge with french
windows leading into coy. ver-
andahs from which there is a
unobstructed view of the sea
short distance away. ad $3
large and airy,

rooms are
bathroom with ue “path

its
jand hot water. ae is” le
inex;

scope improve-
ments and mo ernlention to fe

arried out without the
fosing its “Old World” atettepnaed.
The grounds are approx. 24, acres
in extent well planted with trees
pod Agvering shrubs of all varie-
ee There are two carriageways
i eee e is a right of way over
h with excellent bathing.

———es

FOR RENT

“IN CHAN a
Silver Sands. PR rcidine: Gomnt ot

St
coast,
verandah,

Immediate Possession.

“WAVERLEY”, St.
—Attractive 3 bedtocmed Tre furnish

ed seaside b
lang lease is pe peed Available

letemeetnameaal
REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
"Phone 4640











‘Eaggl eihy Bb aaa



|



6.30 a.m, The Billy Cotton Band Show: os ei infaney but is expanding as the }
World War and particularly com- 7.00 am. The News, 10 aime Nowe ae eee ao et hee needs arise, The Church here toa
memoratés the Anzac landings at 4!ysis:_7.15 a.m, From the Editorials; 7.25 ; m *SOM) has a growing Burial Association
' . ‘ a.m. Programme Parade; 7.30 am. The Indiana, U.S.A. : hd iain .
Gallipoli, Compton Mackenzie, the Mark of atness:: 7.45. gn. Souventis of 4 say. ond a Ministers’ Aid Fund which i
po Greatness; 7.45 91 Generally speakin tl vork
Gistinguished Scottish novelist and Music; 8.30 a.m. Practice Makes Perfect; Ag g, © Wor’ is owned and controlled by the} ooo mCW | |
writer who took part in this cam- a Waa eae ee ee ike ak ; ministers, Various policies are | :
paign, will talk on these landings pritain; 8.5 a.m, Close Down; U5 am. American Column: adepted which will help those |
Gampon, at 7.45 p.m. On Programme Parade; 11.25 a.m, Listeners who wish to help themselves, }
Heane 95th Choice jas a.m, Commonwealth Sur- Much of the succé@sg of the
esday, ; X69, 12.00 noon, ‘The. News: 1210 p.m. 6 en Chureh {8 a ha Sento ee
Phowas Masaiyh ws Analysis: 12.15 p.m. Close Down. oO ee ae uadiai eee ee owt ae |
; 415645 pam. 19.07 M yeni ties Chale hanes rine
..The next. talk in the BBC series oe of persecutions; iia ” Segeey y
ey 15. p.m. Wi hak: 54.45 J a y forces |
“The Mark of Greatness” will be , 4!5,pm, ws phakeanenrs; 4.46 k or j ‘he trying to divide ‘it, but through it @ostume Jewelry
&n Thomas Masaryk, the maker r of the We 35.15 p.m. The Story all it has made steady ress
the Czechoslovak nation, and will Teller; 5.35 p.m, Interlude; 5.45 p.m. Sem- , A the steady _ brogres:
be given by Lady Violet Bonham Prini_at the Piano; 6.00 p.m. Nights at e- and the opposing forces only |
Cater, x {ath the Earl of ‘® Opera; 6.45 p.m, Programme Parade. resi ent pists purify and test its real '
ith 6007.15 pm. ............,...,,95.59 Sk i
pacity oe : Wie Boe hee p.m 5.53" M Representative here of the now at | in GREY, BEIGE and EGGSHELL
est eet 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m, News (By NEWELL ROGER Missionary Board of the Churen
. Lady Violet Bonham Carter has Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Sorrell : y GERS) j i
the highest admiration for Thomas p.m. The Mark of Greatness” aoe tee NEW YORK. is Rev. Walter Tiesel who is

SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1931 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN

HRC Radic Notes: FAITHS BA RBADIANS

Review Of Mittelholzer’s LIVE BY—9 Foot .fch ( use New

New Novel THE CHURCH OF GOD K : | i e d in A a ys
In BB'S Caribbean Voices By JAMES F. BRATHWAITE ! hi . saeneiiehaae a,
On Sunday next, 22nd instant, Se 7 | Pain and itching fr i | eRe NEN






















; : + nadine attics re is t-J 4

Gloria Escoffery of Jamaica will THE CHURCH OF GOD reformation movement is an out- }

pmo on. ener? Move growth of the holiness agitation of the last century had | Stopped it

mong Them” the new novel by its i i ut the year 1880, when Daniei S. Warner |

Ciolenee SSeS acne Britian and weber it state in the | Jnited States severed their con- | 7 Minutes

Guianese novelist whose previous and other min ‘ ae ates § teeta

book “A Morning at the Office” nection with humanly orgenized churches and maintained |

attracted much attention in Eng- that the scriptural, all-sufficient standard for Christians is
membership in the body of Christ.

land last year. The latter you will
On this account Rey. Warne. on the Island comes under the

remember was laid in Port-of-
Spain while his new production is
and his associates made n headings of Preaching, Education,
attempt to organize a: churel: Literaturé, Social,






‘ ‘ i a>».

The special ingredients of RUCKE AST
TONIC WINE quickly Feetore Toei energy

A glass or two & dav of hE rich, ful.

j bodied wihe will fortify on apaintt fever and

prevent the ekhauttiot of finpetermn faciens,

Take home
|
|

a bartle today!
set in the upper reaches of the
Mazaruni River in British Guiana.
Miss Escoffery’s talk will be in the



inati : ; ‘ D ermé, tom, Ana fu! onsite
along denominational lines. The gospel is preached from nchojy "Quy, feet, Hteh, s0 Badly, that, they | ger Tnect Yomt Tetecklense ah aul be Ring.
BBC’s “Caribbean Voices” the They made instead, direct appea pulpit, street corner and _ radio, YOUF feet crack hd peel? Are there bits. wornt a2 k atone ti ite ‘and ry ei
weekly pragramme of West Indian i y to the teaching of Scripture leclaring the message that Christ your feet? Do these blisters break and run| the skin soft, cleat, and abot
prose and poetry broadcast each } contending that spiritual fellow- died for all, and through His and cause more blisters to form? Do your Guaranteed Tes
Sunday at 7.15 p.m, This will be & : ship with Christ and with eac> death on the cross, atonemeni fect gets? MOU atiier fiema Chine tock | Ciek bibeadbain Free your tet todas. |
the second half of the programme, oe | other, and devotion to scripturz! was made for sins. | The church troubles, you should fealize that the real fool. ote Sek Ok. ind Beewe B |
‘tthe first being a short story by } ideals constitute a sufficient bon: in no way believe in the speaking can mot geterid oF your trouble until. yoo Linna Wate’ tae Re will have ted
George Phillips of Trinidad. You for the followers of Christ in tongues as many have though}, ral the germs or parasites responsible for “iter ode ube 84 you can eee |
can hear it on the 25 or 31 metre Thirty-nine years ago the earl cue to the fact that they bear the a : yourself that your § aptly wale
bands, 11.75 or 9.58 megacycles, Missionaries of the Church of Go.| same name as many of that faith * Kills the Cause , | rot eee ait apd Dealthy, Bas eek
ae % hye rhe he ee i inistry as Ordinary ointments and liquids can not | t . ; t~
Th ‘Anas < came _ to _ Barbados. Thes The preaching _ ministry has | oj ears Stameata Wane Taide onn nop that the Fas ts ary ve ietely pall ative
ree nhiversaries MITTELHOLZER pioneers were Reverends N. S_ recently been intensified by kill the underlying cause of your trouble ety oe hat rupted y :
Th 7 E. Duncan, George Q. Coplin and JJ. locally airing the Christian | Fortunately it at last is possible ko over: } feet § peel Ne
yrammes will niet tarde SIG tO <8 Frank Shaw. They preache.| Brotherhood Hour Radio Pro-! come these toot tr y
é anniver- 5

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC
SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD.

i your }
tire, Nike
< r this |
s—S | most stubborn ringworm iotection with the dorm wh wort 4 34 uit
‘ * ’ ; j ? e_. the gospel first at Mile-and—a- gramme which is the international doctor's prescription Nixederm—based on | nntee Bil 90 ss ie a teen ort |
peare’s Biren pay. Shakes. Radio Quarter, St. Peter, where the firs! voice of the Church of God. in|} the.prsseription of a famous English skin | dermite Whe i | ory was eral
ihe fat wal ee me Oey . aes building still stands and the this programme “A United| chemists. Nixederm spo: ey eoera eS i ee rely Bet i you
ane gg be a feature a y. . y congregation worship to this day, Church For a Divided World” is| feed tg ene your, foot trouble. amy the | cueuist today. The gu
gramme “Concerning the English Pro TOAMMME S00 the cospel wae ects Bax, Chere
st Poe Solace ee Crumpton Street, Bridgetown, in . Education forms a great part of
Phire teak tah tose of Calais by Sunday, April 22, 1991, @ rented hall, with the result that the work here; education through
episode hh scailbeigcrtey atier 6.30 a.m.—12.15 pum, cscss:+: 19.60 M six years Vater the church ai preaching, teaching and training. %
'
)
{
)





ee ee ee Chapman Street, the Centra) Strong emphasis is laid on Sunday
aera canteen x Se. &i- So Siete sediment Te eisai Church was built and dedicated. School teaching work. A cortene'l
most simultaneous miracle of Dun- Organ;, 7,00 am. The News: 7.10 am. An addition is Hw being made pondence course from the Ander-
kirk. Against these battle scenes Qu Anaivsits ds am Prom the Hj to this Church for Sunday Schoo) son . College and Theological
coricerned the Bogiah it bee am English Magazine: 8.00 am Calling Tooms, modern kitchen and Seminary is offered in classes,

NOTICE.



























° | } The Company hope to be able . comet re ime
‘ : 4 j ro vf new services r the long outstanding applications as s s
; res; ‘m. The News; 9.10 am, Youth Fellowship Room, If wili and upon completion of the pre- of new services for the é se se
oe etna ant of Ral- Hore New rom Beitate: 9.1 a.m, Clase also serve the paises of accom- scribed courses the College -and an See aaron cates, ae ke iver ik th, Press “s ts wheg
eigh, ti Tr rers, Di ; 11.15 am, Programme Parade; ati veh Sy ef inary re: i a, The mission, and due notice will be given pa GE
the defeat Of tne cae ana ae 11.20" a.m. Interhude:, 11.30 ai 18.10. pat tinge ind an Biat er Chueh Gide tie athing ce the We proudly present applications for new services will be accepted, It has come to
overthrow of Napoleon, the social Hove Kahivear AIS ake Close: vente mon the math, Oupding. ar mind with ‘an einphasis on a The SILVER KING “Floating Ride” Cycle | our notice, however, that some Consumers and prospective Con-
and economic progress ‘of the late ui is,” A Growth And Present Work liveable wvorkab! > and ‘dynamic ~desi { frame angles has sumers propose installing Electric Stoves. The hotplate of a
nineteenth century, the growth of *!5—045 p.m, .. eee +++, 19.76 M The work of the Church of faith ih ‘Goa Cee. ok Complete eee SS ae VEMENT stove full on, takes the same current as 20 to 30 lamps, and the
the Empire, the ‘defeat of the “4.15 p.m, Music Magazine; 4.30 p.m, GOd has spread from one parish “The specialized training for resulted in the FIRST MAJOR IMPRO Company therefore consider it unreasonable that additional
Kaiser and the overthrow of Hitler, Sunday Service; 5.00 ‘p.m. Composer of to another until today there are ministers and gospel workers is in bicycle design since the War, with stoves should be connected to the supply until people who have
Thi ill 7 ngs} the Week; 5.15 p.m. Listeners Choice; 6.00 19 churches With one or more in aes bite hl BOS} iy, I 'EERING been waiting for lighting services have been first supplied. It is
5 pragramme will be broadcast 5’, "Rendezvous Players; 615 pin Ray's eck : <. carried on by the West Indian EASIER ST. ; ae iy ice that
at 9.00 pm., on Sunday, 22nd Paden eds p.m, Programme ’. every parish save one. All these Bible Institute located Trini- N with regret therefore that the Company must give notice tha’
April, St. George’s Day being on 6.00—7.15 pam...” voers #053 M Churches have their own pastor, dad. At. em ent th pat are | EASIER =PEDALLING no stoves or Welding Plant can be connected to its system until
the 23rd instant “Soe eee oe News Sunday School officers and Shieh is thee fran all parte. ab] and the FLOATING RIDE pertormance. further notice
The commemoration of Shakes: analysts tas Dim. ‘Caribbean Voices. Sone ce te the lower Caribbean area, as thr Great Beauty has been combined with
peare’s ecthaey we a Ee “s 7A5—11.00 p.m. ci. Pe Set oe eh eee pastors were Reverends Cumber. Church ot God has spread to} improved STRENGTH at all the important
programmes, “Words by akeS- 7.45 p.m. Why I Believe; 8.00 p.m. batch, Dowrict = : . Trinidad, sritish Guiana and a §
3 83 ’ ny , Services ‘ h and later nh : a . points— Pe O
Best known lyrics set to.musie by 38 "i" Comper” ot the Woak! so «yp ge No ggg Bn getty oa a a TOUGHER FORK TIPS HE BARBADOS ELECTRIC
a -m, Concerning the English; 10.00 p.m. lin and others. ere are today whe we a ; 7 o
British Composers and “Sketch for Tne Newer dete pum, From the Editorials; Paap ; Chief of the Church's wide STREAMLINE FORK SWEEP
. 3.10.10 p.m, : several ministers who are ordain- ,,,~ teat ; " O @)
Er = 10.15 p.m, i irs; 10.30 p.m. Lon- . rature strv is p Gos > 2c
fire progaimme atimnpting’ to Sen Forint Se Wour ay Shake eal ond. others. prepering’ apy Mieratur aninistry is the “Gospa} POLISHED CHROMIUM THIMBLES SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD.
= peare. ordination. Bidal.- wean ae fa Buy the new Silver King FLOATING RIDE NOW.
sketch the character of the man PR 'c. PROGRAMME, April 22, 1951. Several of the Chutches ; local circulation, This is @ _ 7. >
as reflected in his work. The for- 10.00—-10.15 pan. —News and Let's Look $oraing ayerk Tate t ote medium of contact with other Why "make-out" with any other? i V. SMITH
i ~ Je clence. r € Ze} § ,aSIS f # ahs » ated .
mer will be at 4.15 co Mon 10.15~10:30 p.m.—Audience Mail Bag. while others are advanein ee the Wor ld around. base @ A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
day, 23rd an na ies: toward that goal as that is the Chureh finds the peoples of Bar- |
birthday, and the latter at 10.15 : é s_ the

General Manager

BOSTON : bados avid readers and try te aaa

i U1, 15.98 Me, WRUW 11.75 Mc, WRUW goal held up before all, While eco a" F Rei,

ene Dey Sean ae Tae of m8 ie Ménaay, Apri 2s, 1951 ‘He Church of God in Barbado: Ri iiteratiiee Wd eae ee
eee ar rm ‘ As eheny, April 58.190 ehjoys & preat Smount of self. 3 anc s

the Australian and New Zealand 6.30 a.m.—12.15 p.m, 19.60

y Corps who fell in the first government, it co-operates fully The social programme is in its



SSNS SSS SEE









ST













{ : In addition to his all-out Pastor of the Chapman Street
ary! e = : :
aor oe iby tev weet ane FEN Dis Baa: rene 25.58 M 31.32. M political struggle over MacArthur, Church.
r Presid ps ight has
t atnes e@ 8.00 p.m, Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p. ; esident 4ruman = tonight las a ;
field of thought. philosophy * qd Commonwealth Survey; 8.30 p.m, Practice another major issue on his hands | Stereos ii
%

TAFFETA PLAIDS

$1.34 and $1.40 yd.

Makes Perfect; 845 p.m. ser be “ Np ae F S| Ss
history in particular, made him the Week. soa pit yam. Ggemoveer of about “The Conscience of the 3
3

bprn none.
SITS IO ELS IOGSS.

Y. De Lima & Co, Lid.

“Your Jewelers’

SSO

, ' : Senate.”
in the field of action, 19.00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From .
ee ane ie Ue 7.45 am on Mon: Poy tattarialy; 10.15 pm. Tip Top Tunes; | Senator Charles Tobey earned

Annual Dance

poe

nr wy
SORE Et

Science





. Review; 11.00 p. ; i 5 i impatient 14 z 7 , ,elé) &) p
Perch AAR ages MOMENTO ES, aise Yar ate gate ee ya aude vee BROADWAY DRESS SOI
C.B.C. PROGRAMME crime hearings; they made gang- THE MEMBERS OF
Monday, April 23, 1951

Where Satisfied Customers Gather

%







ster ing! CLUB PREMIERE
: 10.00~10.15 pm , 2 sters flinch and stutter, ,
A.F Fi t sate, 15 _p.m.—News and Comment- Tearfully, he called on his at the
. é OE “ 16.15-16.30 p.mn—canadian Chronicle fellow citizens to return to the DRILL HALL























































OPP POOOD DLV OSSOPE SSE L ACPO EC EV OTF ee )
Se “ ———. aths of civic honesty. n care ‘ > |
A Flic { S , PNow Stiiitor Tosee has turhed SATURDAY, Sth MAY, 1951 APVTENTION 1! |
ce 1es eWJe CHURCH SERVICES ie the alleged shortcomings of SUBSCRIPTION — 3/6 >
officials in a Government loan : heat Std nad ‘nD SS
Jet In'Korea eee gaency” Tite be slopnonel | AdNston, by vitaton FACTORY MANAGERS 3
JAMES STREET ruman about it. . , 22.4.57—8n
11 a.m. Rev. J, S. Boulton, 7 p.m. First time, he says, the Presi- + : rie uirements
R. McCullough: dag’ dent accused Senators’ of misusing Debatetonteehrehnnonioniehohehece. Take this opportunity of obtaining your req
By JAMES S RT x
(By JAM TUART) Bi" S50 Ran nts, BAY i their influence to get loans for] ¢%6%%%G9%9%39145995559000, IN $
A_ WARTIME fighter ace of the mr, ach 1 eo constituents. 5 . % The Committee & Members ;
RAF is flying with an American pm. Mr. A. tm, Rev. B. Crosby, 7 The second time Truman said Bee GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE %
fighter wing in Korea, He is Flight * DALKEITH i1 es nae gee cas he had no evidence of this. And] > . T Lieutenant Stephen Daniel, 7 .p.m. G. Harper” / «+ Sruce. Tobey says a recorder took down % EVERTON CLI Ranging from %4” upwards :
DSO, DFC and Bar, Yppeth i BELMONT 11 am. Mr. G. Brewster. Truman’s words, request your company }
former commander of Nos. 72 and ‘ Sound DistRICE’ = ‘am. Mr. Clar- dita See Vaden, gi oa ae MILD STEEL %
145 Squadrons, RAF. ence Jones. 7 p.m. Rev. M. A, f, “ide. The Federal Communica- t 1 Dz .- ; ' > SELECT THESE NOW
Daniel, who was born at a a ons, Commission says it is illegal | » Annua ance Flate, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes %
gnben age ences, aNd Thomas T p.m, Mr D,'. Grimin. © wer iB Seconth Shes The hess 8 at QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE : HAMS (Smoked) ...... Ib. ROYAL JELLY ..... Pas.
Hit, Dumtriseshire, is on q,ing Tne Tom. is ae cle” © Warn the otier speaker, % on SATURDAY NIGHT, BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes Beg hE COCRTAL, BnbUiis ties
7S ti to thy United State WHITE HALL So a public debate is raging | ¥ 28TH APRIL, 1951 y SODA BISCUITS aoe ns, © ISCUITS, 1
years’ posting e Unite ares 9.30 a.m. Mr. P, Deane; 7 p.m. Mr. For such a thing, shouldn't the } ¥ Mr P Greenis re \ % CHICKEN HADDIES Tins. UFILLIT BISCUITS .. 'Tins
Kmeritae pice mnalibe sdhenes mr or OTLL MEMORIAL conscience of the Senate’s Con- % eee Orchestra ; FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill ; HAMS (Cooked) Ys aes MUTTON AND PEAS. 7
t 11 am. Rev. R. McCull ; _m, science ricking? si ‘ ao ny 9/ * FISH SUPREME . Tins LAMB TONGUES .... Tins
Under wis pla many RAP vey 3s. ‘bowie, ne “COMIC” STRIPS” are going on} \ CUBRCAE ION. fi . At PRICES that cannot be repeated. % PEARS _. Pins VEG, JUICE . ... Ping
feuaare” d ae me ‘pilots 8.20 a.m, Mi Husbands: mr. exhibition—first time anywhere — | Qa neemmnsmetseeennnnttcite S$ |) PEACHES . Tins GOOSEBERRIES .... Tins
squadrons, ani headin +00 atehaadll i“ aeliaetata +7 Pm Mr- at the Metropolitan Art Museum, Det % JAMS . Tins OAT MEAL . Tins
7 igh Lintemet Caries: whs 9.30 ab ee which is New York's British |} DUNDRY Ltd $ OLIVES ; Bots.
‘5 “FP Moor 7 5: Boulton; 7 pm. Wuseum and National Galle ry in TAT TOL > , ‘OW 4 % CREAM OF WHEAT. Pkes
shot oe 2 German and Mr F pox shale one, Says the museum authority: ANNUAL DANCE The BARBADOS IF : re ;
Italian a in Europe a 11 am. Mr. W. St. Hil; 7 p.m. Mr. G. “Part of America’s culture.” White Park Road, St. Michae ¥ | PERKINS & co. U TD.
the Mediterranean during the Marviile adiche: FLAT owners of St. Petersbure of the DIAL 4528 % | 5
war, is now serving wit the 11 ain. Mr. D. Scott: 7 p.m, P.M. Florida resort, are offering to, EMPIRE CLUB % i ali eT DIAL 2072 & 4502 Roebuck St. \
4th Fighter-Interceptor ng. BETHESDA waive a day’s rent for each rainy on the SECO LOLVL PLL PLLLLAL LL
Sabre jet fighter, oe 37 FSS Oh am Me aeetts pm PM = day in May or June. wenenes 23rd MAY 1951 POTS OOD DEMME Rt 0 SDD ALAS SLE LI
abre jet fighter. ? ’ records indicate a safe bet. ae the ee
Crash-Landed sunpardtPer Bay Breet POLICE unwittingly broke up CLUB'S. PAVILION
When, during the ‘ar, he tOok alterna vBartes tii, Letnee, a, funeral procession at Atlanta, Bank Hall
command of No. 72 Squadron if Testimonies of Christian Suge! Heal- Georgia. eae aks Subscription 3/- . sites 4 ‘
the Mediterranean, he was the ing. dead man, a pall-bearer, two Music: Mr. Percy Green's TAKE VFHE
youngest squadron leader in that . Sunday, April 22, 1951. flower girls, and a Negio Orchestra o-d
theatre. He was 22, TRINE OF ATowemENTTm"? DOC: preacher's son dropped out to Admission by Invitation j
Once his airplane was hit by maciden Text; 1.Timothy 2: 5, ¢, buy lottery tickets at a house 7” 7 | V4 AL Pe] TIME FROM
A-A fire, and he crash-landed ;.00r% "ove Fir ne ee eacistar, be. along oe wire suet as police | |) eee eens | freee t pn, Soe
ntry, He was several Jesus: ‘ rist were raiding the place. Opts Ostet sty Pptghgtyty io,
Weeks in Woaphial. all, to be taetinea in'aiae Hage" (° ANGRY MOTHERS. got _busy ere noe ite
For a time after the war he was BRIDGETOWN ep, ARMY when New York's pa col oars g 2 | /\Deccee
i instructor to the + -NTRAL—11 a.m. said it could not get steel for al % GIRIS FRIENDLY x
Sicicen University Air Meeting em Saivailon eockinny new school te Seance std peraeG $ J iy we offer Vor VOUR
n, acher: Major Smith * down recently. elephoned | ¥
Squadro ‘ * ecu Ent Mealy, SRERT—L, am. Washington, Now the steel is on | § SOCIETY Nt EVERYTHING FoR one
American airmen in the Arctic ting. 7 p.m. Salvation Mn ¥ the site. : at r
Sie cana Goeth oS SRO hn muy oe ae eee Tee Bee a ms YOUR noor HARDW
; ip .,SPE s —l1 a.m. Holi a day— ee ’ ,
fraining ‘programmes in. Arcie Mt"S.,3,.0m,, Compan” Metine'® Rosenberg, mamer of two, con-|% ANNUAL FETE | ITEMS
fegions have increased the Caninin Cane tS ee coe 30 cast gi % | Under. the Distinguiehed ¥% At Prices that cannot be repeated i\
. ; PIE CORNER—11 a.m. __ Holiness “ecrets to Russia, Mrs, Rose > is Excell ING : i
ree ee ettay aus Sene MetNad com AMMEN: ieee ee hen neal tiene te P the Govrthes sha tatu" GALVANIZE SHEETS—6lt., 7ft., 8ft. 9ft, 10 ft. ij We Can Supply You with...
of the supply p.m, Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr her lawyers’ appeal has caused? § = Rhy ‘ ' SHEETS — 6ft., 7ft., 8f., 9ft., 10ft., | : : pee wee
cut off, Major Hollingsworth r yer: en 4 { Savage {% ALUMINUM SHEETS sft., “ » Oft., CALVANISED MESH WIRE-in all sizes
ti in the United | CARLTON—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, her execution to be postpone al YALVANISE Hae aay AT celia
So scientists L 11ft., 12£t il
te Air Force Aero-Medical 2. ».™. Company Meeting. 7 p.m will be heid at “9 i of | 2 LACING WIRE--in all sizes
States Air Fore " " vation Meeting. Preacher: Captain THE HOSTEL, Country Rd. EVERITE SHEETS—6{t., 7ft., 8ft., Oft., 10ft. j ’ ARBED WIRE—in all sizes
Laboratories at Dayton, Ohio, Bourne. Fogg Bp , 1” 9 2 5 aS AT . Bi y
have produced a natural-looking “FOUR ROADS—11 a.m. Holines THMA UCU -—from nylon, Meeting. 3; p.m. Company Meeting 7 Dd Seni ere el aes : * RED CEDAR SE aLES ’ All Reasonably Priced !
be ee ae * - iit aah pevetinsi sees d Fi { Da 8 _ There will be the follow- % RUBEROID MINERAL SURFACED ROOFING y \
The Brabazon airliner is to fly DIAMOND CORNER— 11 am. Moll- Loosene Irs! y js ing Stalls: Flowers and $ Wide j ®
over Paris during the summer. _ jess Méeting. 3 p.m. Campane Meet- Don’t let coughing, sneezing. chok- | Variety, Needlework, Sveets, % 3it. Wide
a e hen sehold, Books, Cakes ¢ y $i ok gy chase elsewhere
The visit is eee Ser ee Pretthier: Chptsia Moore tuln your sleep nd energy another 12) ee aes ate % Be Try Us, before making your Purchase elsewhere
Kineteenth Paris. Salon ' Inter. Aco. This great medicine is not a i% For the Children there 3 i +
; } b ray, but works % wil be Pony ides and $
Scaeseetes At wae, eres | rioncaa as wT PLANTATIONS :
i-being held in the Grand Pa ‘ , SYDNEY. aban hess Waiee Satere immedt- ie By kind permission of Col. $ | | H rdware Co. Ltd. :
June 15—July 1. } Citizens of Port Lincoln, South veee ee: {He loosen and re- | % sjichelin, the Police Band | arpados a ,
Many British firms are being australia (pop. 6,000) have move thick strabgling mucus, 2. Thus | & conducted by Capt. Raison %j HE ISE F RGAINS)
iotecontil ee MiAtEA notice promotes freer breathing andeounaer, | s conducted by C son | . , LIMITED (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAIN
wig ti hibition, £% ar Re |. P more refreshing sleep. 3. Helps allevi- % will play. x Buy Now! d
As well as the static exhib ay beard on the main highway. It 9 coughing, wheezing, sneezing, | $f ADMISSION 6D % . » oe = ‘ ‘ Ph : 2109, 4406 or 3534
there is to be a big flying display peas. “We shoot every tenth Quick satisfaction. or money back | \ 1.4.51--6n % 2 No. 16, Swan Street = -:- one : £109,
of the latest types of aircraft. commercial traveller entering guaranteed. Get MENDACO from =}, ‘ % | J DM aa oe wet vt a we
+L.E.S. this town.” abemist today. SAAS LCCC CC ODOR OGOIOIOY POA DDES OSSD SISOS LONE ORIOO SOOO EE















| oe f



PAGE FOURTEEN

AMERICAN HEATEN

BRITAIN ha » all ort

sorts of
American boxers come and go in}
the last few years One Billy;
Brown—has been given the British)

equivalent of the
unanimous acclaim
Brown shouldn't be
much.

But
blamed

ed two rounds, and

put paid to any hopes he had

lapsing after a storm of blows hac
The
man standing over him is Randolph

making his fortune in Britain.

Turpin.

Orchids
Outstanding

At Horticultural Show

Miss Olive Da Rocha of Rive:
Read won the Cup for the most
outstanding exhibit in the orchid
section of the Horticultural Exhi
bition held at Queen’s Park yes-
terday. The orchids were more in
number than were exhibited at the
annual exhibition and the various
specimens were to exhibition
standard,

The bloom of the orchids gen-
erally was remarkable, especially
becfllse the season is almost fin
ished, Miss Da Rocha’s was
white phalaenopsis — stuartiana
F. A. Hunte’s cattleya hybrid got
first’ prize in its division of
orchids and was a near runner-
up for the Cup

There was no_ horticultural
exhibition since 1945 due espe
cially to drought. Many plant
growers were unable to carry
their flowers at the exhibition
yesterday because of the rain

whith fell Thursday, Friday and
Friday night.

Afeature which was introduced
at the exhibition was the
“Garden”. This formed a back-
grotind to all the many varieties
and colours of flowers in the
Park House hall,

The garden was on a platform
The grass which was strewn
across to form what would be
pathways in a normal garden,
had the appearance of fresh cut
turf. On the edge of the platform
there was a hedge of flowers in
vases while the garden was of
thick growths of lilies, crotons,
palms and different vines,

Delicate Touch

Probably giving the best impres
sion of a delicate touch among all
the flowers in the hall was the
bunch of verbena in mauve and
white, red and white and. other
colours. This was Mrs. L. K
Nicholls’ of Hill View, St. Philip
and won first prize in its section.

The flower which caught the
eye of most of the spectators was
ea blooming collection of sun-
flowérs—all one colour.

The lilies as a whole were
pretty and well developed. Miss
P. Harris won a first prize for her
single specimen of lilies A.O.V.
On more than one occasion com-
ments such as, “I am glad I did
not send my lilies,” were heard
as the spectators passed the lilies’
table, ;

It was perhaps its flourishing
look as it hung over its wire pov
which made the judges decide on
the winning fern, but all the ferns
had a healthy freshness.







Traffie Don’t
No. 31

Do not make any adjust.
ments while travelling—Stop
and make them in Safety.

e
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.












TWO WIT
PLENTY MUSTARD!
COMIN’ UP! WiLLYA
PASS THESE OVER |
IF YOU'LL BE SO /s
COOPERATION s+,




Bronx cheer by
perhaps
too
He was overwhelmed by the
coloured British Middleweight cham
pion, Randolph Turpin. Brown last
is considered
lucky to have sverted disaster that
long. Our picture shows Brown col-

{ They'll Do ft Every I ime

my

PUT TOGETHER! Zs

of

First prize for anthuriums, a
collection of mixed colours, not
more*than 12 specimens, was won
by Mr. J. W. Chandler of Todd
Anthuriums generally, were only
of average standard, but Mr
Chandler’s were more flourishin

Six huge heads of cabbage
were included in the Mt. Hillaby
School exhibits. This school won

a special prize of $5 for the best
collection of vegetables exhibited
by a school.

There were some bananas about
10 inches long at the exhibition.
Carrots, peas, bonavists and toma-
toes were undersized, but the
beans and chives were big.

Only a second prize was given

for guavas. This went to Ruth
Bovell of St. John,
Upstairs were the luncheon

tables with floral decoration, The
winner of this was decided by a
majority of the attendance, Each
person who felt like doing so,
wrote on a card his selection for
a winner,

C. A. Burton Made

Asst. Librarian

Mr. C, A. Burton has been
appointed Assistant Librarian with
effect from Ist May, 1951. He will
be required to undergo a course of
training at a recognised School of
Librarianship,

Mr, Burton, who is 29 years of
age, holds a London Universit;
General External B.A, in English,
English History and Latin (1946)
He was educated at Harrison Col-
lege and gained the Higher School
Certificate with distinetions in
Latin, Greek, Ancient History and
Literature and attained





open
Scholarship Standard, Since
leaving secnool he served on the
staff of Harrison College from
September, 1941 to April, 1950,




when he appointed a Senior

Master at Bishop's High School,

Tobago

Yesterday's Rainfall
Shortly after 3.15 a.m. yester

day a heavy fall of rain fell in

the island and this continued to

fall intermittently up to 10.30 a.m.
Some housewives were surprised
on getting out of their beds to
see their yards well soaked and in
some cases flooded as the fall was
not considered to be heavy,

In the City the gutters were
overfiled with water and in
James Street water covered the
better part of the street. Shopper.
were noticed walking through the
water. One woman did not fare so
well as she slipped and fell into
the water while trying to cross the
street.

Nelson Street was also in a semi-
flooded state and cyclists and driv-
ers did not exercise any considera-
tion for pedestri as they drove
and rode in their usual reckless
manner splashing the water here
and there,

In the country no damages wer¢
reported by Police Posts but Dis-
trict “C’ which had the heaviest
rainfall of one inch and seven
parts was reported to be “very
wet.” Crab Hill also received over
an inch in rainfall. Other figures
up to 6 a.m. yesterday were:

Central 56 parts, District A 59
parts, District B, 50 patts, District
D, 92 parts, Distict F 16 parts.










fnsslorsd 6,9, Pree Cl By




















Supply
‘Talks End

The Ce

ference of Supply
Oimeci

under the Cnhair-
Professor C a.
ended here yes
Saturday,

hed
manship of
Beasley, C.M.G

terday morning,
2ist

It was attended by: Mr. F. A
Bishop, [.S.0, (Barbados), Mr.
G, F. Messervy (British Guiana),

Mr. H. McD. White (Jamaica Di
Mr. A..A. Douglas (Trinidad),
Mr. E. Gittens Knight, M.B.E.

(Grenada), Mr A. R Cools-
Lartigue (St. Lucia), Mr. A. V
Sprott (St. Vincent), Mr. H..E,
Letang, (Dominica), Mr, D. ‘A.
Percival (Development and Wel-
fare Organisation).

Mr. B. E. Rolfe of the Devel-
opment and Welfare Organisatio
acted as Secretary of the Confer-
ence The following statement
was issued from Hastings House
yesterday

The Conference found that on
the whole the supply of consumer
goods has been maintained fairly
regularly
cently appeared in the supply of

a number of commodities includ- |

ing caustic soda, sulphuric acid.
zine and tin plate and other metal
products Special
was made of the difficult prob-
lems arising from the rapid in
crease in prices of certain textile

goods particularly in those type
which were in most demand
amongst the lower income groups

The Conference welcomed th:
recent liberalisation of trade with
Canada and U.S.A. and found



that the recent revision of th
token imports scheme had at
ready produced good results
Ways and means were discusse

of removing a few minor difficul-
ties of





but shortages have re- |

examination |



) Mr. L. Smith MCP

| Explains His
Statement

Mr, L. E. Smith, Labour mem-
ber in the House of Assembly,
was referred to In a weekly news

paper vesterday as having cenJ

ured the members of his Party
in the House on Tuesday, It was
ym account of failure to get his
motion for the passing of an A@
dress seconded by
the Party. This was the address
relative to the provision of proper

sanitary conveniences for work
ers’ houses,

Mr, H. A. Dowding was the
scconder of the motion and in

icknowledging this support, Mr.
Smith expressed the hope that he
would be

imilar help before the end of the!

ession,
indecided
for

He added
that. he
election: again,

Twisted

Mr. Smith told the Advocate
yesterday that he had got the im-
ression from the weekly news-
»aper that there was the inference
e might leave his Party. His
tatement relative to Mr. Dowd-
ng’s support was somewhat twist
ad, he thought.

that he
would

was
stand

What he had really said was,
It is the second time that Mr.
Dewding has. supported a state
ment of mine, and I hope before

thre House dies, the time will come
hat | will have-to support him,
»ecause I am not sure if I may
stand for election acain as I am
| undecided.”





Mr, Smith said that he was cer-



ly coming forward again for

; constituency and was sur> that
be

woud returned to

|

|

|

|

Li
es >.
|

i





CRYPTOQUOTE NO, 11
$2G PTHB RES MWNVTEB
QF/ E’ CHQDF/’ GHPT/ PTQ
NQGEOF,’ AC’ HSHIWHPX
EVPB
Last Crypt
In Nature
melanctoly
a wanainae alineaiaai

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.

ROEBUCK 8ST.
MORAVIAN CHURCH
ANNUAL FAIR
at
THE MORAVIAN MANSE
| Country Road

there i
Coleridge

nothing

(Proceeds in aid of Church
Funds}
on THURSDAY, May
34 p.m
Refreshments Games
Rides
Children (under 14's)
Faney Costume Competition
By Kind permission of the
Commissioner of Police
Captain Raison will be in
Police Band wnder
attendance
Admission



3rd 1951

Stalls and

Poni;

the

12 cents
24 cents

Children
Adults

OOS
LLL
PEGE I EIT FESO AIA,

red

NOTICE 10 :
CANASTA FANS
oe

BREWFRY

| _————————

poten r~

ee ee

has

HEINEKEN'S





mode a gift of Canasta Score
pads to players in Barbatios,
Drink Heine! vs Betr as you
play Canasta, Seore Pads will
be giveh to players: on. paying
“a visit to Messrs K. R. Hunte
& Co., Ltd, Lower Broad Street

ry

GIO ODIO OOOO OOOO FOS FE



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Stanley Gibbons Postage |
|






| Stamp Catalogue, 1951

|

- ine administrative nature | Part 3 (Foreign Countries)
which iad arisen in connection | arict 23 ricd
with this scheme. It was hope | Anais as ons RY
that there might shortly be fur- ‘ o 3
ther moderate extensions of thi GLASS WATER JUGS
trade le at

1 " !

The Conference also discussea JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
methods by which controls by

licence could be released over ;
considerable range of goods from
soft currency areas.



The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.49 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter):
April 28
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 3.34 a.m.,
3.33 p.m,
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):
1.47 ins
Total for Month to Yester-
day: 4.03 ins,
Temperature (Min,): 72.0° F
Wind Direction: (9 am.) E£,,
(11 a.m,) E.S.B,
Wind Velocity: 4 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.989,
(11 a.m.) 29.977



Jimmy Hatlo |
Fe a —=!



eqertcatiaiin

YM / Wey;Mac?

_

js







IASS

BEEN PASSING
MORE ‘THAN






~\
oe)

LADY, WILLYA
FASS THiS THOITY
CENTS OVER® :

4, \ THANKS ! youRE Ze Oe
A FAL

THE |\CE+

MORE! WHERE'S

( MAKE IT TWO {
|







T's THE Guys IN THE
MIDDLE SEATS WHO
BUY EVERYTHING +s

THANX TO TWO FANS,

JACK SHEA,24 CANARY ST,

ROCHESTER, N.%
HARRY “DOC” DOUGHERTY,
NORRISTOWN, F.

















and HARDWARE

King’s Birthday

A GRAND DANCE will be
held at the Aquatic Club on
June 6th (Eve of H.M, Birth.
day Observance) at 9 p.m.

|

Cc, B. Browne’s Orchestra.
Full particulars shortly

Please book this date.

—~~



INTERCOLONIAL
CYCLE & ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

OF THE
AMATEUR ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION OF

|
| BIG

BARBADOS
AT
KENSINGTON OVAL
| a
WHIT MONDAY,
| May 14TH
Thursday, May 17th
and
Saturday, May 19th
|=
Look for the Names of the

Cycle and Athletic Male
and Female Siars from
the Caribbean who
will invade Bimshire
e
Programme Etc. appears
Later
J. W. Maynarp
Hon. Secretary.







member of}

By snow |
in a position to give

the










\
|





Co













CRONE NON S B
ee ee el

Anos

tt, 4A tf 64 fe,
LLLP LEA LSI AAAS IF

SOCIO

OS9GSF

o

*

“4,

>













PLE EEE SPS EE EE EEE EELS ALLL LAE EA LALLA OOOO OEE

MY BOSS

SPOOLS ELE LL OED
een ng ee eras nee ere

SUNDAY ADVOCATE






opey
TRE FAMIL?

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€) Banishes perspiration odor
© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that is
mild and gentle for face, hands and daily
baths. Odex is ideal for family use.

OFFENDING —USE ODEX





SPOT!








AN OLD FRIEND IN A

Among a
Planter’s Peanuts
Neilson’s Chocolate Bars—
a Variety
Marshmallows in

tins
THE COSMOPOLITAN
PHONES: 4441 and 2041

Just a few yards from the «
Prince Willam Henry Str

NEW
Recent Arrivals.
Noxzema Cream
Evenfiow Feeding Bottles
Small Ice Jat
Nervone

few

pkgs. &











tf tae +,4,4,4¢,%



PELE SPSL LSS ISDS LDS



OOOO LOCOS LES 665A PALL LAA LAI

IS SMART ! $

He. plays it safe—takes no unnecessary chances. §
Our and

against

commercial trucks cars are fully covered $

loss from damage claims, fire,

And all by

(and low cost) Insurance Policy.

accident, %

collision and theft. a single one-cost &
It is a LLOYD'S ¥
“H.P.”, COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE POLICY, %
issued here in Bridgetown by J. B. LESLIE & CO, It 8

fills our need exactly. x

What’s good for my boss might be good for your
boss, too. Why not have him investigate?



J. B. LESLIE & Co. LTD. ¢ INSURANCE
BRIDGETOWN
BARBADOS, B. W. }.

COLLINS BUILDING

DIAL 3006

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LEO LLL

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USE

BOWRANITE

ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT
THE PROVED PROTECTOR OF IRON AND STEEL
GOES FARTHEST ui: LASTS LONGEST

One Gallon will cover 800—1000 sq. ft.

Supplied in - -
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SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting)

In Tins of Imperial Measure.

*Phone 4456 +3
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Agents











dtl ctt rte ni mln tm
ee POF LLL LLL IIL —





See...

it's so easy
to see those
extra fine
points in a
well tailor-



ed suit that
you should
always
contact the
Top "Scorers

in Tailoring

to be on the

SMART |

|

side. iq]

os

P.C.S, MAFFEI & Co.,Ltd |}
3 Prince Wm. Henry Street 5 3







SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1951
}
|
\ A
SOAP wr) abet

ly

. Keg
faut
yw

LADIES
SWIM
SUITS



by
MARTIN WHITE

Flowered Cotton,
Nylon Satin and
Velvet. In styles
to suit all tastes.
Separate bra cad
trunks, whole piece
with off shoulder
Siraps, etc.

CAVE



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& Co., Ltd.
10-13 Broad St.













oe)
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30 SWAN STREET |

Best Buys for
ONE WEEK ONLY
SUPER

speclats REMNANTS

CREPES, PLAIN & FLOWERED |
. regular up to $2.40 — NOW $1.40

SPUNS — PRINTED

| regular up to $1.44















NOW 89e.

_ RED & BLACK SPUN LINEN |
| regular $1.18 NOW 89c |

PRINTS — 36” wide 5 8c.

Ladies’ & Children’s
PANTIES & VESTS—Reduced Prices

GENTS’ SHIRTS—Hundreds to

choose from

ZS» YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED

_$. ALTMAN — Prop. — Phone 2702 |









SPECIALISTS

IN

HIGH CLASS
TAILORING

OF ALL KINDS

C. B. RICE & Co.

Or





*



Full Text

PAGE 1

TAGE EIGHT Sl'NDAV ADVOCATE Sl'NDAY. APRIL 22'•*' Hunting Heads IIl.\\ I.A1K ( \\\IK\l CARAVAN >•) Charles Miller* (MHMW %  ) Do ru>i mistake me when I say thai Uiii is disgusting book. what I mean la that the people dcfinbod in II axe disgusting Onwieei Caravan Is about Uuhen'ihunteir of New Guinea, the filihy. .imorni and liteiall.jkHJihli*t> people In th.world—but then one rannot blan:< them for they ihc Stone Agv. Rut before J ruiy ;m> thing more about the bor* let me tell you about the author Charles "Cannibul" Mill. r B an amazing man. and hi* eaxeet reeda like thedre.in;-rome-tiUP of an edventur%  n boy. He WM born in Snmarang. Java, wherf us tmthm waa a captain In '.he East Indian Army, and vlously far in advance of the other natives in New Guinea Baby Meat Now we coM to a pert of UM book which made me feel slightly sick. Leona. Miller'a wife *J*. having a look around the village "She was Just in Um to round the comer of tha> lodge aa the witch-doctor cam* out carrying two-vcar-old baby by the heels ii.II living in The baby was doad. all too obviously killed by a blow on the head Stopping by a collection of rock* he swung the child's corpse over them until all were liberally sprinkled with blood. Then he corpse was then plastered with clay until it waa juat one big block By the time the* returned ln £ to the lodge a big lire had been Spender Gets Ashes In His Hair Again WHY SHOULD CHILDREN PLAY? — BY — GfORGl MALCOLM THOMSON. worn.ft WITHIN UOKIJI %  By STEPHEN SPFXDIJt II VM ISII HAM11TON 15a JO Pare*) ONI by one, 0*-'tng '...<.. scattering nihea on pink brigade come to the penitent*' bench This is Spender'> MM-IU Oxford,—and then to Wherf the complexities of li(< (so ho heard) relaxed"Mj/ likely he wrote abiemnl. in The Goii i.I.ld when he told how come fur his father to go to Dutch baby." When U-ona told Miller h * 'ouiW the flaw/in Karl Marx Sew Guinea His orders were to what *he had *een he investigated Now taking a wider sweep, ho rtamp out cannibalism and hend He found out thai the baby had preaenU what is almost the type hunting and being a good soldier been captured from another vilautobiography of the Hurtle* era he set about his ta;k with all lage The rocks sprinkled with of the Popular Front, the Spanish possible speed. ita blood were being need to ease War, generous Illusions, the days In going to New Guinea, he took the pain of a womgn who waa givwhen Stalin was a democrat, his wife and son, and thus Mri. mg birth, and wheo cooked the "We were (he DipieVd GenerMillcr heeamc the first white baby's meat would be distributed atton o/ Hamlets," :avs Spender vwnan to vEt Dut'-ti New Guinea, in ..11 he expectant mothers in the In his grand way. "(-•ho found and Ciiarle* the first while child village. .. the world our vf joint and failed De-wile many adventures the -we were at the far end or tho j G sei u right. bov survived and when he reached village" he goes on "when a sudOne February morning in 1MT. high school aae he was sent to den commotion at the combination readers of the Daily Worker saw Holland, He studied engineering bachelor and ceremonial lodge a triumphal headline flare across .it college, but found It too dull announced that the feast waa their favourite new and took up raring motorbikes, ready. Women not already at the Stephen Spender had boats and car*, and then became a ^f^ earns streaking out of Ihelr partyl When the 1914 war came „„,, lll(P 0 many dogs and In a _* along Miller joined the French moment they were packed yf together in a fighting mass thai Some of the comrades were. wcnUd put to shame any sale m perplexed Nor did the new conBroadway bargain basement 1 vert seem any too ure of rumaalf rustled Leona into our tent before He harboured heretical doubt: Spender explained h's affection *he became violently sick, but the about the Justice of the Moscow replied, "Do you know, old man noise coming through the thin trfaut But Harry Potti'.t. imlUru Una it the first time you've avai alls damaged her stomoch iil-ii; st genially pressed the party card talked with me that 1 haven't been a much as the sights. I came into bis hand and announced that eomplgifly bored" cut just in Uiw to bead off there was a place for Spender After that there was only oni Leona'* little girl-friend. She in the Inleniational Brigade, then thing to do. "I insisted." say." was clutching a chunk of steumfighting the Class Enemy in lhiSptnder, "thai we shouio not mg. pale white meat, 'for the alerres of Spain. -•' again" white lady' 1 told her she could Spender waa taken aback "I Hen there was Polly, toast of it for herself, and she went could not ice what qualifications Ihc science undcigi.K Btefctonary destniiioa are often auile misleading, ..-produced lay•bis baapsaaUj %  : i gnil* -liudvji,luges, particular wtnat children do. When due, a %  ft the very young child cidld start "working" I : il -' r >" blocks of wood, not Uhe oes to achool and first conic i SiBflU in ****'• • ball: • heap ot u gn, W |i| oi loose e.uU.. with a almpie compUcalod task of learning t'. P* u nn ^ *P">: these may be J Msoclate certain cosBbip une r aunost endless enjoystraight aiid curved lira "* '*>r the small i^age with ni< 'not, and sliould But „ ready more or U*s f;. ev *U l hln,? This \;,*k of lewnlo In en afjBssjge* gnJ ' I may, of courw be v w li i c h, mistakenly, foi the child itivtt often Inly jU.i.hcd t-> the word; or. o!i s ow i;,l v "• %  a 'nl 'o bu.. the other hansj he m^y look on lj It as scarcely dill llitf _-_.. "play" with which h ""'i'*"" Parti..n bOUld develop as in Much will depend on I : -niong other things .. and ideas thai i... the child i: with others in imon goal; while n .ri.<,n—tiTUiough It, increasingly to emfyctor of lc.oi.wui ^S' .. ")""'•" Wf uiUuiown that Ihc wori ""ne to be regarded ai • %  ••rye. Good bve" he finds himself repreaepu [ 1 1 mouessentially matter of one > rrom these surrounding!. (:'• him If hi f natui,l cjtlo.it ; iil > to oneself to main" %  ted generation moved to inouiaitiveness have not been t ln healthful balance between (1 ;i .^ ._ >lJ(>( the extretDM 4 el work and n his care. Iho young en •> P'y and no work lv to carrv over into hi. Neither Uavm ihc s'oiioii I'oetry of distiitcUon ••lybody did not like it The r> went up from Cambridge: lord, be oar defender .'• %  vaintt Steplten Spf.di A d UK %  us peace from touij AJacAu-ciYosnis; Spender had beoii lougtu up in i high -nunded N >m.onfonnwhere father admired Uoyd K and Uncle Alfred Ul iv .„, s-Jr?. A> tot A ,"" 1 "•?; ou '" u ' %  "• liberal lunkMings sho would earliest years .. '; herself forward < tlu momvM he u ,, uin „ play rt Mr. Georoe'. and then (c vvjrt | Uie challengihe I pet iudignantl;. .eurmng to cope with the limitless ""*>* %  * to carry over into hi < Mremc is desirabl-school years as well as Into l-l-i whether for the child or for th* r0 ""' WtauJi. pleasure and saUsfociio,, froi.alrforct. After the war he did barnstorming flying, then served rancher ej aerial chauffeur, gave that up to test speedboats In Sidney Hiibour and then went New Guinea again to visit his father. >ready there had been friends stop, for instance. wlu> when "Sail On" When he went bad', to Australia he sold the photographs he had inken in New Guinea and bet all of It on an outsider called "Sail On M The horse won. and he ha %  ent to America on the proceeds, away happy." There he raced cars, tested alrplanes mid finally became a camera man In Hollywood. But the jungle was railing again, so he some large tusks in the village. went out East u> lead an expedland on being told that they came tlon into New Guinea for Miss from lizardilke animals he de1 had ss a soldier" '" of whoro l^t ioib". in a wttfc Ills uualiflcatJons were otherthn ugh sheer love of her. Polly Colossal RemnaBU wise. He wag a poet capable of then turned to the Mats: no record Not long after this Miller found writing The Express— fxufl -t her effect on their Lepna Jav. a society r.irl wh< crgved adventure. Before the egMflUon itariaa Miller married Leona, and they apfni theit honevinoon among the headhunters Thev set out fiojn Meiauke in t i motor i-ii towing eleven canoe-loadk of K^ya-Knyas, aAd aefled uo the river until the> read I Hupiil—"a stinking little ena 200 rouls ail black in ided to go in search of these creatures. Hg says he found 'colossal remnants of the age of dinosaurs" and took pictures of them But since he reproduces no photographs of the "remnant." among ihe other superb picture* in the book I am a bit sceptic*! The Klrrtrri marriage rites a ^fler Ihe pou-er/ul plain weight manifesto — Ami in Germany, ihj i Tie black Mlement of piston Welter, unemployed and disu'ltJioul more fuss nppointingly Inclined to borrow Bui plldlno llfcr a queen, she money Soarni oyed but Welsh, to whon. ' I. i %  i ipander gave a job as hoi man ware accorded a hlightly diff-cnf "The difference of class and treatment. Before they were interest between Jimmy and ma -Should Mean Much learning new things which often makes the distinction beiwc. Playing should not cease a"work' and "play.' even for -n the child grows older. Vgriouadult, a scarcely definable one. kinds of recreation, such B. gameMe* la W.vrlf ?, nd *? orU •*• an **Pf"ton o. na> u. work the primitive and natural need fot n.,,.,,,,.1,. -------— .. physical exercise and of the wish t< te^Suehf* Mit / llJ "hOtlW mean in which a child Is aliowtt. anu .. great deal t„ evervbods l,Ti 0 # %  ./.mportonlfo, \y.\ ermaged in sedentary oi wait* monotonous work. Any perso. sedentary occupatioi • needs a bieak by phvslcal exer generally take. i rttalf. HMvevei soon as be paaeas Into ner* .-•bool work, ai nould be paid to adapt r. Ing to ihe child'! MtM^JlP'lJW^r.alu for .....aUon %  • <:.. i"P.inied by music fo emenU, nnd active In It—and %  develops abilities and gains Ifrfaetiona v/Weh win ra^rangly Hucncr hi. .tUU „, propur ,,„ n nP • ouraged from i important bearing -ter devclopmeni utaiital and emotional. IIew i Nn ;, small child who i busily engaged on aonM other that may appear oenseqiienlial to his eb* say. ir naked what he Is doing' "I'm working; don'; | he -Oiould be allowed to linijl: job at hand. ubetanUally to th* ll'-. %  '!o]>ment ing nnd painting develop I..J ;o ptiKiuio .on* ,ounu nw „f ,„;,„.,•, which corroBoidi oncourtfti "' Hrl's parenu. But he must njsss insiuuty w utterly revolting Spender. "You must get ma ou —a toil race be up and away before sunrise. %  not even the ruthlcpsness of of hare." Spender did The** na-fmle the Kin irn> H IlQWevcj he oversleeps tile girl'* modern Civilisation ilk a fanatic But he could not bring himself roood i were of average height and nrlstomother pounces on him and he — criticbeariiig. and rewrnbied automatically niarrkd, The JQra?vst scovengUig American Indians. They had high cheek bones and sharp pointed nose. and. seys Millet. icsembled the other natives ot New Guinea only in smell. As far as weapons were concerned, their craftsmanship was excellent Their knives instead of !*liig made of bamboe were fashioned i/iuV of human Hugh bones. the knob'Bt the end of each being cleverly wock'-d inlo the shape of a luimarf W-'id. "As Instruments of murdesLj anyi Miller, "they were '.h o eaaieesr 'live weapons 1 bad sa*esl'l£ Dutu New Guinea. Tfje arroww-v iflte' boast of a too' 1 : Head Hunt On the way back, back down th river Miller got ml frightful orgy. He through circumstances to nccoinas. pany a tribe on a head hunting ZZiZZr, satpedUlon to ajiolher village. His iritM' won. and here is how ho describes the decapitating process, 'tin rtgsel where the victim was already doad, the eeiem. n> was brief. A quick slash aiTOSt the throat with a bamboo knife, o| the to think altog. U r ....... could Jimmy One day in Morocco h. marriage njatch it. Absolutely berserk, men bumf into tears at the sight of rpd women fell upon the corpses donkey "I discerned somethlnin an abandonment of pei*\erted In the donkey's appearance Which lust TThey grovelled In blood reminded me of .fimmv" aoaked — eduiatioii lu^ ia|a I p i hi .I--: DM .I child is snid hi elai his %  gins at It.> itself. A newboti vity CCSMSgbJ largely In I ous. unco-ordlnated mOV< With incrcasitui age the abllilj healthful dwellingy gardens and playground i is:ill> iccognizei %  I paa Of play, recreation reiaabotii indoors an* n the open an— will, of course. '.iHiien of differoi ages Hut the Importance i amounta of it and Ltea to the needs %  of years a child laarng i" ail an< st.nul. then to walk and run. Ai. this l foe hini oulh play* or worit-jJav, be called, since—as we I ed"up"n"a • 0 h t '•* % %  hacked the bodies Spender's" own^ visit to Spain U called, sinceV":"^ was forced wiu -"'"Jw k"iv;es to rub their w „ made In rather superior com -• two cannot b. n sa-ms and legs in the freshly pany— a Congrcs'. of Intellectuals. %  • % % %  large ciMo; in every pert of th, wounds, smeared them When Franco good loo being ,ru lne a <1 C *'P *'Ul •** the spinal 31 column as clortc to the shoulders as possible. When all the neck erociidiie-trjeU inflcTds ... and among the crops that were *-*i*cd in a hammer-lock and being grown were sweet potatoes, k'ven a sharp wrench which snapsugai cant, gourds and P*'d Uu.vertebrae with a report egg plants These people, though like a pistol shot .... Victims. still In 'h" Stone Age, were obvtlll unconscious or sorely wounded began to world, do not yet adequately pro selves from head to foe* with gory Madrid. Andie Chamson. French \„ (' 0 ,||\ (iadL'els v,l <' '''r^ prerequisites r.a filth, and rolled on the ground m novelist, said he must leavi i %  %  ahare there is growin, im-oniroUiible convulsions, drunk once. Wenhe killed, fram n,. M i. thai • \.ry child need, iiii the pc.werrui siiniuUit ir iiiaw would have -.. d. i rcome, wit .[ ell Kilnneed programme o jnurder -pie place lf,nir n" >Y,na. an j..,o'i Wolcb frould in< I wholh food and sleep. pia> abbatoir gone mad Arms and I,.„I li( .. .; u • eouM n. .ng less and child a and • %  • -boMi phystoal am legs were cut through and take rospoiisibiln %  Cor raioh conscious iltention; olid. Wl a sound environment wrenched off by brute strength catastrophe. *hla sUige, Com... .; | H we Bla to rear Hearts and liven, were yanked After Spain, beastly a only roe developing he* ad:. • K eiieration of human betorth :ind tossed m a pile with piyil war can be. Spender helping the child who il| be buoyantly the rest of the meal.that was t;Marxist enthusiasm was neve, to push hacJ healthy in body and in spirit. oo taken home for the feast q mi t Uie same. Not for him tlu vnncc fuithe. mxitivcnes* and sense a *n interesting book, but perMngle-minded zeal of his Oxford venture] Into the uhkno onaibills) can maki Haps NOW you undeiHtand wnv i friend Tiiston who Insisted, ou. therefuie becomes ewentiul lo the of to "i-.rrow o better called It disgusting ir you havo of aoildanty with the toilers. .,,.„. ,, ,. *| ,. u ||v e in than the world being colled "Hill". ^wnal materials foi Uu i.i to-dyou to read it. s-uooal ALL OVKR THE WORLD flenHLsHai Good inornin^s begin with Gillette Sheiks of Afaby loudly oral** Tho fiiu >i of all shaving ways, Tbc sharpt*>i edge the world has met Go tlh? faoioua Mude called Blue Gillette. Keenwitted sons of lh desert, like up-to-date mcti ihc world over, enjoy the same clean, easy,economical shave. They know no blade has so keen an edge or lasts w long as Blue Gillette IMPI.RU1. IAA1HLB a. rases P*** 5 BUd t 30C Blue Gillette Blades v\WiNr;j YEASTVITEI THERE'S PAIN RELIEF AND TONIC BENEFIT I Yci! Ytur-Viif quickly aoothes away a e adach es, neuralgia, nerve and rbeumatic pains but it does something else tool Because of its valuable tonic properties Yeaat-Vit* helps you to fed brighter, look better, sleep more easily and en*oy more eners*y. Nest time U you waat pain relief take Yeair-Vile and get tonic benefit tool .* ITS FRAGRANT GL>-C E RIMS'FILM' protest* SMOOTH SURFACES and ptwofila e/ouditu? and emvwaton CHEMaCO ii tic towriin rseasMbotd rican-er — It ckaos, poli-Jtc* and praecU kiiLben utemiU. poreslain. tiles. etc. IM highl) rs*rVatnl S-M-*>0-r-H **u*> aOion removes gremw,grime .ind lurfaca ruaitho.a liarsli --•• ulng Of rattdkinn —and to fhlgraM gryea rents ckniding" on poiivhtd r*arssara and ha on mtiais. iavc *rnkyou maka nerytl las — with LIILMIiri. (he i pnonuotl .•! dcanun. And renumber CNCMICO i, tu Lind to your hands I TRADg %  Npt-'IRUS TO T OIDOCI OgANI Iltf-ITIX* I THI tOUNP CMtrilCAL CO. iro SHISLSV. eia-IINGMAfl. INCIAND When Colds strike remember Phensic Two tablets of Phensic with a little water will quickly check a cold or chill. Phensic soon clears the head, takes away the bumins; pain behind the eyes, the aches in tbc limbs, the distracting headache, and helps to bring the temperature down. But best of all, Phensic relieves the depression and I fatigue that to often accompanies colds and chiib. Be prepared for colds—keep a supply of Pbeosic handy. Vusttake* 2 Tablets. {Phensic I for quici, safe relief FMM HEADACHES. RHEUMATIC PAIH, LUMBA60 i NERVE PUNS, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS j WhatfdGvyou know about ENO? DO YOU KNOW im HMO ii cooling and refreshing, an untiviOed health drink fix ycaing and old? DO YOU KNOW that ENO has a reniie laxstivcac**aoo and b a perfect corrective for stomach and liver disorder*? SeJd im bottle* for tasting frathm— Eno's Fruit Salt' n* ear* Mm %  ml %  %  %  • M gej aa^raval iraassjsjss, fattier DIESEL ENGINES ALL STATIONARY £ HARINI DUTIES Knginf* l>eaeins; these interDsimoally firrmi't namee are doing -id. ndid assW iu a Uuaagh* out i li\i* and type fee rMsggy duly. Thry are aappLird in a coDvenu'iit rsuge of powers from 1| to 1.440 B.H.P. CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. DISTRIBUTORS



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MCI I'l \ Sl\ll\Y ADVOCATE SUNDAY. APRIL 22. 19S1 Oulvl.tll.lillL ll.>ns<—i | %  is I \.\ UJUM GLITTER BAY, ST. JAMES IN ;. Ik. i* %  i two bawi ..i i Ijvward COM had ii vnnrd as a mi> The local people MM i* MI too ho*, tad pnamd la lave '"iir heaen nouses at Bal .init rtafb om taken there. Gradually howi %  %  Edv.ird %  James co there arc more on i hi<> coast than in pan of the Island. Although the %  i the gtu >< n ter Bay When % %  i %  avenue %  %  the poor created i beautiful gard< i M I > %  | | %  Sharon was flowering, and I hid an oggx rtunit Loiu' flowers The main house n'lih B fin ulai middle and nn arch ul Ihi a uaed to %  H..1I1 f tlhoum M Glitter B and Hie Be* sinned in 1034, waa built nfler tr %  l%  a lovely little hi coral atone, with an open luunj %  t floor fatmj %  ni, and so I > italuetle* which MjOrn Ira, (n the around floor haa dining room, whu-h i. the patio. Icvidcntally. the il.-arh House nerve* aa an excellent landmark i n and I found if use%  yachting bo? an eiqabtfte wrought in Eton whwn the co.-.stline hi* The v. rtUng room upstair* Is ai,House giifierirg on the h The main hati • hull! in IMS. has low rable* which Rive It a Ihitcb look The rffntruj • '• %  room, wltJl I m.ijimflrrnt chandelier ..no tir*cllve room, I lOsJaWS opening oti f.e balcony From that balconv Ir-iie .'^rdaii On Ihe wall* of most of the Edward h.ts hung oil W. it Indian prints He has u perl taps rid. Ma has I 1 rtta of h ming bird*, and they nughi look well "Ti the walls. And M I left Glitter Bay. p ing once again through the U fBta> and leaving a feu acn beauty for the dusty road wn. Pictures by CYPRIAN LATOUCHE ''IIP T > a/SB %  *V -^-^^siBsa IH F * TUT. BEACH HOUSE frc Italian style of architect!! built After the gagBBBBJ BJ The Abbey h Hard-up, Too By HUGH CLEI.AND THE rising coat (a* living, which drives the house*n* -i, despair, is seriously exercising the minds of OM nen responsible for the upkeep of the country's great cathedral churches. St Pauls Cathedral, it has beam revealed, will nave to sell Investments to meet its financial commitments' at Westminster Abbcv—which in recant years has tweri ante to mane ami l talk of sn appeal for funds in thr nol loo distant future. Reerert Finances Westminster Abbey, the Collegiate Church of St Peter, shares with St. George's Chapel. Windsor, the designation 'Royal Peculiar." ta ext.a-i.si ^ a ..,-,. 'he other hand, yield very little. But for an Act of Parliament ol i,nd money from this source hi 63 years ago. the Abbey might be shared on u rough I v flftV-flfO rich indeed, with an annual Inbasis with a number of rharitu s. come rrom Property up.and down state occasions bring in fees, and th* country of £250,000 a year though these barelv ever the > K ("and that really woi'ld have been penses Involved from temporary an embarrassment", they say at closing of the Abbey, thev usuallv J 1 A bb J ) '!' B> t h e Westminster mean that bigger erowda'of MghtAbbe) Act. 1888. however the seers are attracted in the followproperty was surrendered to the „,g weeks. A quarter of a million Ecclesiaslicnl Commissioners in people paid £15.000 to see the eaa&a*'? a '"ffif "L C5m0 nf c W*tJon sottinfm the Abba) £20,000 0 year Though it may —L.ESl The Art Of Sybil Atteck THE DININO ROOM Over the table liaugi niKKUlnceiit ctianileller (Photo: Tom LaaMrif) SYBIL ATTECK is an arUst of taste and distinction. Her axH bition at the Museum of twenty•ix works is almost as exciting as was Geoffrey Holder's last vear. She is 1 trained artist, having studied both painting and sculpture in London. Washington and Peru This is reflected in her work Earlier in the year she exhibited Ip the Barbados Art! and Crafts %  xhlbfttan at Queen's Park, but her work shown at this Exhibition did not indicate her power as a draughtsman, her delicato sense of colour or her skill In composition. For Beauty." wrote St. Thomas Aquinas, "there are three require. ments. First, a certain wholeness or perfection, for whatever is incomplete Is so far, ugly; second, a due proportion or harmony; and third. OlaJlty, HO lhat brightly coloured thinas are called beautiful." Nobody expects artists today to paint what would be pastiches of medieval art. But, "wholeness", %  proportion or harmony" and "clarity" an so often completely iKnorcd by many painters today, either through lack of training, or. an abandonment of all art principles, which results in the production of pictures that pux/le the spectator. Some years ago I remember visiting a n exhibition of advanced art with n friend, who after greatly admiring a painting exclaimed "What is it?" It is true that art is the mirror of the times, uid art todav reflects all the "isms" of modern thought including communism. This has to some extent created a dictatorship in art and a snobism about painting, for pictures are claimed to be understood by intellectual snobs who wish to be considered "in the know", and who are often as puzzled as a layman. The appeal of Sybil Atteek's work is to a wide public. Although her work is wholly un-academic, she has so sure a knowledge of pMUfl building and of selection that the "birth pangs" of her paintings Is discernable. She exhibits water colours, oils and drawings. It is delightful to inspect water colours of a size that can be seen without magnifvingHer work |a planned'on glass. A VI1W of the garden through the wrought iron gate which separate* the dining room from the porch. \ \ \ \ grand scale and avoids" the faulT so common to this medium, name. I Iv. mudiness. Her colour Is suble and she has made excellent use of the texture of cartridge I paper. In "Adolescent", she ha* 1 laid flat colour in an ail ailing manner "Still Lite—Vagi an overpainted subject. %  re gfl erges fresh and gay. "Careenage" Is a vary typical Wast IflggM •-cene. bul it has been raised far above the commonplace by a dis' crete use of colour and design One regrets that more water colours are not included in this exhibition, for there is no qufl of the artist's grasp of this technique. Sybil Atteek's skill as a coloursl appears all throttgh her pfiinting. She has distilled the colour from her subject and rellned it with subtlety Her use of blues and greens is especialhnoteworthy. Few painters in the tropics are whollv successful In the handling of blue. S\bil Atteck "s not of their'mi.nl.rr lit s-,l Life Anihuruims thosehard.' unsympathetic flowers so attrac' live to artists. Is the first really Jiicccisful painting of its kind which I have seen. "Musicians No. 1 la an outstanding composition, the curves of instruments and human bodies have bean w-nrked Into a delightful pattern ft unusual colour. "MusiclaneNo 3" |g satisfying in its colour harmonies, but the lighting of this PlctUM IS worrying The paintings >r Immortelles with their flaming' colour are skillfully balanced by I greens of other trees so that the pictures avoid looking hot, "Baplism conveys all the sinister mvs. "•ry intended by the artist, the treatment of the coconut frond in the background might be studied with advantage by tropical painters. Study of Head" lacked appwal to the writer, who has • per tnai prejudice against nny part nf the human body larger than life Use, but, the treatment of kni texture Is admirable. "Old I^dv —Portrait" reveals that the artist is also a portrait painter of talent The pen and ink drawings be1 1 ray the artist's interest in sculp ture. Here is action; whether in 'Drawing In the Nets" or in "Fish" the figures are plastic In conception and excellentlv ar%  ranged. These drawings made one t long to see Miss Atteck at woik I wan hammer nnd chisel. Sybil Atteek's, exhibition rmi*' hr seen by artists and art-lover: ggejgtffrftf] sous iiic^ Don't ufir* 1 he Ions* drawn out agony of boils, ulcna and eruptions. D.D.D. Preemption quickly bring* relief by pcnttfjiiiitf deep below ihe ikin to kill the poisonous gvrma and bring, healing even to the most per.i.ient aoras. GET A BOTTLE TODAY. Obtainable from all Cbemiita. f ftisa u'.a 0-01>. Soae 1 t a. *rm*tr>s %  tarMfisitiwiWsJ T a „, „ *** %  ufiDPfEscfiption Don t let MORNING MISERY^ become all-day misery When laic hourv imi much good csiing and drinkiriK. ruin >our nHiriiinK unit h.-.,|jihc. fatigue and upset stonia.h . don't let your entire dn> he IC^MttrL find o,uick rebel nh Alka-Vlcrer. Take it on anting, again-if needed 1>itcr in the day. tu eeaaHnJag aaearal ssadkioai effective against these di-imloris. AILJ -Scli/er Jtitwo wa>s ...relieving headache and neutralizing e*i> uhlet^ into a gftaai ot mnv. WuA h anarfch into a -iit.-.hmg. plcaasnteaairag M. Union ihen drink it. Quick acting Alka tals nr .11 *m* ttw day" lor you. Keep a supply on hand — Slwaril Alha-Scltzer helps f Wm milliois daily Alka -Seltzer iinadg^ JEWEI-Bl THE ELEGANT & EXCLUSIVE GIFT v*' aasoi iment of GOLD HIKlllNitiM SHiM 1 RINGS HFNI1ANTS. 1IIAKT SIIAPr.ll MH'Kl.Ts KOKSI v AK.. S.t Dl Gobi.Mounted CacagffSin RINQR, EARBaNOH I'lMiwiHi;oiiriir.> Thes*emphasise X corraol Hylr. I.1H I % #.. BJWLEY IHI.T1N LANE m V HgasauilaUss ot itm.tx HAT* HIS P UDL O WATERPROOFING CEMENT is Iho Ideal Material for damp walls. Fresh supplies have just been received. .VII. 1IOWELL u MillK & HARDWABE PlgJ IIMi Bay Street 'JAMOTMEU REMARKASLE THIN( AI0UT WHITE AMTS . About 1S00 differ. jl ant soets of white 1 ants are known, — and most of Cbam i. mainly on catlulosa which means wood I B safa — nmtmber tATLAS'A f UNIVgStlAL — Dip 01 brush for poiitiva protect io' agW'iit White Antt, Borers Rat and Fungi. No odour No firc-rn*. rcONOMlCAL.. conrant'jted-^ivicarrli|e I When d.iutej for use' gon further and com leu PiBMANtNt-Canno' | wash'.'*•+*.;'.;;;•.-. %  .:'.% FOR BETTER COOKiA'G FLORENCE OIL STOVES AND OVENS ATLAS A ft PRFSF RVATIVE Cm GAIA6E TRADING M. ITO. 1 V/.V^W,W,WV,'.V,V.V.V,^ BKSggkgCJ JWWlUtV/,V,V Innoxa *• /•••ftiMu Ikml Imili m £i(li—w.... Nou oirm you Ih. mr.nt ol rmurlnt IhU. -!i. M1 THOMAS of INNOXA S BOND STREET SALON. INNOXAS BEAUTY SPECIALIST Now „(!,„ hr aSMM TmlMk b, AK>bo:_ (I) Fl'LL FACIAL TRFATMF.NT (1 Hrl •< .. 181 CLFANKI: MASK i MAKI' IP TuTlLn) ^"S .3, ,-LEANSE t MAKI OTO. MUS,)""* \ \ \ !. ". . A OOSaal OF SIX nXL FACIAL TREATMENTS lor 2S 0 • DAIS: TIESDAV WEDNESDAT A TIII'IISDAT TIME: 0 Io II %  m ,„ 3 m 9 to II Jt m W I omulHiioa anj Adtlto larludm APFOINTMENTS AS ,ROM TIESDAV. FERRrARY tlTII For Appomlnimt. and further information. Dial 45H4 or Apply . Booker's


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SUNDAY. APRIL 22, 1951 SUNDAY ADVCM ATE PACI I I I \ I s HENRY MICKEY MOUSE BY CARL ANDERSON BY WALT DISNEY ''O \( A-*O >JJ -ip -Z i T-OSE i_TT..£ ANDttfiP Y es,5 E 5 N O* -"WE J >0.S AS: we I SOW '. _*. N.2NS3 ..sew w-V-\ BEAL.N HAPPENED AV"" = ~-CSE WEZE C^CK SE4_ "sC-E BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG a. WELL-1 SAID I WASN'T MENTIONING ANY NAVES T fi 7 ^ 1*1. '/-• %  %  THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER ITSAIO.-I ALONE SURVIVE TO KNOW WHERE THE LOPEZ TREASURE IS BURIED ALL OTMERS HAVE BEEN KILLED" BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS J C, f DO V.XJ I ,— '** T* TH1V WEnT • • J MF.. , THAT-A# %  I jl_*W* J V WAY.' P "Iff r JxiP.KIRBY^ BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES WklMilll R HEAD! A/tO YOU CANT CO WRONG! The icguUi u%e of I anaktl Hair I mxl *ill. h i^ .xii.in on notunli ecry fuir llUn.l jn.t MWONnfl ichi frowib. ii RWtiH now i-hnieni > <>w ~.-iln jnd hair Kl. ...l.l x-h troutta .tDANDRUFF PARTIAL BALDNESS THIN & FALLING HAIR The lull itppludiinn of i inHull.'.! renuli> itnlj|lh>ul> lit I %  ) h.-.uinttil itloma)head oi MlT. LANALOL No. I With oil (Yellow Lifted lor dr icatp. LANALOL No. 2 W.thout Oil (Green Label) tor Kair lhai n rolurilly oily— aitiiftMRi and toolm*. LANALOL CREAM (Blue Label) tlouy hair drewine LANALOL SOLIDIFIED (takeliie An .deal flxaiive LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO ted Label). A hguid soap de lu*e. W. ,'. %  ---,'.•.•.-.',•.'--.', %  „','.'.-,',-.'.'. [When Daylight Dawns | * | You simply feel s like Sleeping in the I PWaK*--^ Comfortable SIMMONS BEDSTEAD \ We have a limited supply of SIMMONS BEDSTEADS SIMMONS SPRINGS SIMMONS PILLOWS ',IVr JI.I ; %  ..'on l lln rurlv. ; ;/ OttfrfAnapvt. BRIDOI rOWN. WHAT IF SHE alii/ IM BETTIN6 AllTTLE MEADf(SPUTTER-SFUTTEE AOtt-oectXP [', lw Cm ii.ri - II M KtagOMir VI Stands Sup'c& ESSO STANDARD R. M. JONES ft CO. LTD. *o" OIL



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VI SUNDAY. APMI. 22, 1951 SUNDAY ADV(K \TF. OlJt ICI \IM;HS SAY: <****>* ****** Governor Presents APWL22 NO I68 PAGE FIVE Hi'tiiftrutiint To The* Editor. The A>i SIR cefcirrini i, lWll menti n trie M up now in voftM quite ;i lot of people pretend tla?> cam understand why Ib' must regu:. tinii phafl lb* lime cornea, and I f m t US incumbenl on the Government that posters should placed in every district and explain more thorough to the people what i* nfreuary for them to know, or cvfii MM in,Mobil.Cinema il it is available There u quite a lot of people who clou.| n Wi pi n When the registration Offlrirs leave the form' Ui b-> flllup they |uat east them asid*' aqd when lb* tune COOM for these forms to be collected quite a few will <•' be n'iid.v Its true that some people done care a tlnki.dam who secures n ^eal in tru* Assembly, but ax I told a IV v people it is beuer to have ih %  Vote even if they dont us* it beemm %  vaty b od y dont attend the poll*. I hope aomttblzuj win be dope now to alllviate some of the hardship* ibcic officers an %  >.,,., eacmg to explain to aon wfco wont understand. 1 am your obdt servant H S MAI'l' Park Road. Bush Kail. St. Michael. 16.4.51. Price of IU-ef SIR.—A very annoying thing is happening to tne poor housewire, who has to meet the already ifh increase in th e cost-of-liv.ng For ioine time now beef das KQn e from 36c. to 40c. per lb. Although I do not yet know if it is official but that is what we paid until recently, but itcndiDf to make purchases for the last two weeks we find %  Miircilv and toe further advance price of 2 cants which make it 42 cents per pound. Pork is th c same price, and Veal is 45 cents. Can you Sir. or any one help me to know what price 1 should pay?. I tried to get a schedule but there arc no new ones at the station. So 1 hope this letter wlU catch the eyes of the Authority and let us know what price to pay for tries-.veiy i-<;-i)Ua| commodities. Or could I suiutcst a coropl'-te scbedu'e w a notice saying that !h prices have been de-controlled WORRIED HOUSEWIFE. Harkmp* DEAR SIR,--Mr. Evans Clarke n Friday's Ad vacate has asked iu4' why we give up profits on cer tain itams and cornplnln of In adequate mark lips. 1 would remind Mr Clarke thai price cutting in a trad>> a sign of ill health rathir than i he reverse. Any reduction in markups imposes this problem on a imr chant. If it costs you SI.650.00 to sell $ 10,000 00 worth of goods and your mark upa permit a reallsa tion of S2.25O.O0. you are doing quite well. If however ynur markups are suddenly reduced to give you a .ealisation of S 1,750.00. you are losing moncv. Two anawCTl %  VM**) 'licm selves to you if you are to maintain your original profit. You mu-l cither rf-diicc your \%  from $1,850.00 to $1350 00 or you must increase >i>ur Mies lo a point where '" %  v make nicoriginni $2,250.09 on Uw DfW markup i.e. Increase your sales from $10,00000 to sisuou oo (without increasing your expenses). In conyidering the first answer you will find on analysis thai your expenses fall into three cateHuiies: (a) Fixed expenses such as rent. (b) Expenses which bear a llx ed relationship to volume such as paper and string. (c) Wages. Of your total expense* of S1.S50.00, wages should be about $1,000 00. You will find it difficult to do anything to reduce types and (bl so that if you are to reduce your expenses it must be almost entirely at the expense of wages. The "impossibilitv of reducing wages from SI.000.00 to $600.00 wficn they ore too low even at a $1,000.00 Is obvious. So you turn to the alternative of increasing your sales by 33jr; in the hope of making the same amount of money. A 33>r* increase means you must take someone else's share of the existing business but It Is now a fight for survival with no holds barred. So you step up your advertising —you Knpreaa on four staff the need for greater politeness and "IP • %  % %  UN and am .. period of intetanve work you re— position and find the following: — That your expenses have increased in all three categories because the mcreaa\i bigger overdralt to finance them and you have hud to have extra warehouse space to hwuse them. Your staff wouldn't produce the extra politeness etc — while unhappy t the old wages so you bad t„ raise them — the extra volume couldn't be handled bv the existing staff — so you had 10 employ extra people and you needed a new van — the store looked dingy and you had to paint it and In brief that although you had brought your ( loss profit back to it* original cure, It had cost you so much in extra expenses to do so that BfO still losing money, though perhaps not quite so much. So you start ofl on the sect;.! lap to raise your sales by another 3JJ*5—you fight off reasonable demands for wage increases — you try to get more work out of the existing staff and equipment —but by this time you know that m*r i* no answer — the best you can do Is to reduce your losses to the lowest possible figure. I trui this provides an explanation to Mr. Clarke'* question. Yours faithfully, DONALD SCOTT. Sherboume. Two Mile Hill, St. Michael. 20 4 51. Roebuck Slrvtl McrchanlM SIR.— Wo shall be very grateful If you would publish thc fol. lowing for UlIt Is quite obvious thnt the General Public as a whole does not appreciate the true position or the Roebuck Street Provision M reliant and "* Retail ffhopkeepers. This section of the community renders the Island services equal to, or greater than, most other business sections and should accordingly be rewarded for their services. Under the present system of Control, in spite of the fact thai these Traders handle what W known a, perishable goods — foodstuffs, they are allowed the smallest profits. The recent Price Control Committee found In general that none of ih r various types "t making exces%  %  bill rather, in practically every instance the present profits allowed were inadeouate. We lind that the Shopkeeper* ana thf Provision Merchants are the harden hit. because their B ofltS are fixed on a Marginal asis; that is, a specific amount per bag, box or whatever the unit, regardless of the present cost of the item. The hardship of this system can readily be seen when the <<-st nf commodities have increased several hundred per cent, and the expense-; of these Traders, such as. Wages. Taxes, Insurance, Interest, It, Paper and Paper Bag; have skyrocketed, while the fixed profti remains the same. The usual remark heard from imer when the price of g few item:; u<*>; UD If SO along these lines— "How can you Increase the price Of goods •rhen the coal of living is already Ro high." or. "The higher the price the more p.otit J/OU make." Actually with this Trade the reve r se is the case, because an increased cost Incurs Increased handling charges and increases tiic monetary value of losses due to shrinkage and otherwise: yet t!.ic iiHTiM.-t'i cxienses have 1* be met from the same fixed I roflb The Cost of living is high *'"-' all arctlons <>f the eommunity including Provision Merchants. Bbonkgwpers and ibe Brnployeefi ol ttiese Traders. The Public rhould realise that the reol cau'e p> of the Chi) of Rights," K a wonde, ful idea, and should be cmouiagej f : ir.dic atop The paragraph reads that the will bv dlati the Stale Youlh Commi>*ion. and affirms the birth righ' child to II aapects of welfare, security, and affection without regard to race or creed. Being a youth worker myself now for many years, things of that sort would surely benefit the community as a whole, and the I Sute must ue highly commended for such •• The child must be a* birth, otherwise the people must be kept in degradation. I heartily commend the New York ftate for such a wise move. L. B. CLARKF. Tudor Bridge. St. Mh April 17. 1951 y.rvniiifi l'i~iiiut> To The Editor. The Adroen.c— SIR.—I am net writing only on the behalf of the Jtjnioi i Class, because I am thereon, but for the benefit of the e Kveiung Institute I must first thank 111. 13iI Hamilton, the Principal of it IlMtltutgJer the many visits he has made to us, during the pa. t term. To Mr. Denlon Soyer the Dean of 4cadjesnlc Studio-. we must extend our apt'' for -o ably explaining to us, the Ruleand Regulations of the City and (iullds, from which we arc taking our Course. We must say many thanks again. to Mr. Sayers for allowing us to be taken to Seawell Airport, to see certa!;i electrical machinery, about wha 'i we were lectured during the pu-t term Last but not least, to Mi AJvin Balm'/., the master of the Ancillary Classes, who has really been patient and interested in these classes during the pas r tcrm. and I hope that aftSfl QUJ four weeks' vacation, that yg will le'iirn to our Iw-tuits forajetliug nothing we were taught. II l| U) be regretted thai the Evening Institute hasno builuin* of it! own to carry out the practical work for Which the boys en* hungry Anyhow, we know tha' Di Han .lion, Mr Savers and all those persons in author,' Evening Clast.es are trying their very best, to get a building in which the technical gfda Of Una work will IK* carried on CAKMSI.K 1. SMITH HanaohelTs Tenantry', Gill's Gap. Eagle Hall, St Mithael. NO Certificates To Scouts Ills Excellency trie Qoveffnor, Sir Alfred Sav&fie. Chu-1 Scout o[ Barbados presenled tia Kin^'a Seoul Bade and i CtrUflcate tq two senior scouu. when the %  (ieneral Marling ol thc Island Saaut Council waa held on Friday at 5 p.m. %  sJi* S"'.k• ^ • %  If 0 "WM '' D* Sarvica-*ich wUI be hald .it TT^S ^„?*f b "'^ *" s ""< Me'bod,,. Church ireourt Jewli of the Both BarbadOe Troop (Bethel), They are the first Seouts in Barpeoos ee these certificates. At the same ineeting the loeal i-hler S-out revealed that he had i eroninNiultd Major J. E. Gnfflih. to be Island Commissioner Members present wenH. A. Cuke, M L.C Pre Mr H N ITiaroiVl| r Hon. i-iand Cornmisaiofier H %  Kxcellency announced thai, aftr .1 general leview of Scouting In the Island and after consultation *,th h^ District ComnUssi. •ra, in had appotnted Maior J. Gtifflth ED. to act as Island Conm >auoner and had recom!" "'' mend, i to Imperial Heaskuiarte re that he be appointed ldand Con-. rrusstoner, (Cheers). In referring ecent visits of Lady Baden; Owef Guide, and Mr. J 1. "gor. Training Commission. Canada, he said that they tXBreeaad their appre%  whut he had done foi g but that iKith BtU 11 i BON He emphasinivl doing much foi 'anr Seoull He Announced that on the eveningf of St (ieorge'fc Dav Monday 23rd April — he will bj giving a Radio Broadcast messag • j ovef Keoitfusion Service ml would lake the opportunity appeal to the general public fc their support in furthering tho progress of Scouting in Barbado Mr £ L. Bannister express, i the hope that Scouting would alJ be established '.n the man Secondary Boy*' Schools in Hi Midi Mr II H Williams con > gratulated Major Grifflth oo his a' oolntmcnt as Island Commission. I to which the latter suitably a plied. | MCBBAOR FROM THE CHIEF HOOUT "On tinst, Oeorgs'a Day 1-t n pledge onrteWe^ to aren i't-i gcouUng. to tiir alary of Uvd and tiie aagiag of hSH." KOWALLAM. Chief Scout. British ContnonwislUi and Bmpiie. Calendar fur St, (.aoriic* Ws*k "*and*> 2im4. Service at Jiimo* FISHERIES During March, the 12.028 10 was repaid on I makes a total of S55.7: 1 over all loans. Interest illected (or the Mime periwi was $43 OH making n total of $703 88 collected to date. A sum of $3,408 €3 was issued in loans for the inonUi making a total of $I0I.82B2 lo-uici t, boat-owners to dgli Mm of us Advisory Committee was held dmiii*: thc month ;-i win application^ for |PUJ tJiaUn,; $655 il weic ap, i During U .on.piisti.i: So Qerajd wight, IIOJI v.. Mi i Farml wa from Trliiida'l with %  vli it l II % %  i %  %  matters with the Dircctoi of Ai rlculture and Fishery Offle. r Al' phases of the nahe. OWn tO thC -U'legatlon Fly INK Fish Out Of Range Invbtir.ju>r "s repainted during the ilrst half of ti i and did not put to .-ea unld 12th March On puttini: to found Ihut south eaitei 1. Iu>d done much to hinder the easy capture of flying fish, as the fUh had been swept by these BSBTreritJ east of the Island be>ond <)• %  range of the local Mail hence poor catches were returned on some evenings. To compensate for the sparsepeas of Hying fish, large catches of dolphin were made by many boat-; which assisted in keeping; the marketing entrcs busv. At the end of March, ihe cur HI arera still south-easter]> and only eastern coast boats were making large catches of flying fish Seventy boats ft"' 00 gill nets tr. assist with the captoiof living lab. H.E THE GOVERNOR nrer. Messrs C. R, C. Springer, L. T. Gay. L. B. Woithe. and C. D. Spencer, District CommisMoners; Messrs. C. D. Cufney. E. L. Bannister. A. G. Jordan and U A. Harrison. Aastntant District Commissionerv Messrs. f. M. Blackmail. A. D. Blackmail. and J. E. Turton, Seqetanei of ]."..:! Associailon*. Tli,. R#verend O. V". Harlewood. Majoi I N ;•. Capt. H. II. William*, M H %  : Hony. Auditor; Messrs E. C. M. Theobalds. A. \V. Roberta. J. C. Hammond. RSealv. F I. Co/iei, U O. I-orde. 1. I.>neh. A. M. Jones and O. I. Cuffiey. elected member*. Major J. E. Griffith. E.I>.. wa* preseid by invilatiun. Exrusea were otfered for the absence of Mr. Street MctiiodiM Church at 4 SO II R. Tucker. Mrs. f. J Cole and pm Cuba and Cub-fcouters FT |*arkington, S J. are pui iiudarly asked to a %  The Annual Report, having "J** B nur ^ n * J**g •" i.vn prfv*oualj ciieulaietl. was P D "J ****• %  d 8cou, *'" tiiken as lead. The adoption of it %  *•">bie on the Barrack Squuie e.cs proposed by Mr. L. T C-y ?' !" 1 W fj tlOD at 3 30 and bocoiuled by Mr. H N. P m < omnils-tioners may prot.hapdlor HiBxvelU-my ihen tv d d,r "' '' lh c Church ir an, biicf review of the FmanRtrVeri of Ihe Centiaj Ro.er nal Report, the adoption of which, Crs* under Mr S I. Barnwe' 1 nfier certain comments were ADC for Rovers, will impend tie made, was unanimously tarried. entire u^y in Si. John. They will .,„ _,. attend Divine Service at the w iiuwiiiK olllceis were then Chutvli u o'clock, after wh .h eleoiod to SBryg (or ihe ensuing „ will h R „ iVCU „ t VJ cX £K VirTiS' wS SmBm or the „ u wic .u. Reverend Dean Mandeville. "* ehaii ds of R b I. Rollaid Treasurer. Mr. H. N. Cliandlsr; <>f the w.ndward D.M.I M 1 A llarimon Monday 23Td: (St. Ocurgi'j; The following were co-opted to i>jy). All ranks, arc expected lo ; ..vc on ihe Island Council, the we r unUorri \ on thll day. Aral ten of whom will also wt 5 ,, „, Basket Ball match al the Executive Committee: n ar rlson College Sea B Harrison College 7 1ft p m Broadcast by He ..i.a i„, >( .i,iui If,' Klndi.^.. to., li % %  ii> nltm *lh -4^ %  im* Kin.i M ti-u,/. tli* H0>nd r.i*ci Wr hope thr ..ihfi iwnvlr Wh aenermui r. will uiasentena n ro dune* %  harej niia-.in.,A UIIKIII aim • iiiiiun i( •"". v u Ts-d ~.ttd bebn Tt* iwn* moo wlt 111* >tal>l* Anaj then *) -hui Mm •!• < • %  W* am hnuw wh.. to ni.ni.Tli# b.irtwra blame Uw tualr And JM t...* bUnm Itv %  Kiu> dldnl maka padiluxa Majoi t; Noott. Mr D A. M i (.,1 A II Campbell. Mi r. JCu/iei. Mr f M lllaikman. The Reverend D. C. Moore, Mr*. F j Cots). Hon. J. A. Mahon. Thf Reverend Fr. rarkuison, S.J.. A Ruprescntahve 0( Ihe Gul tluides AleOCWtlon, Prof. Sydney Dah. Capt. Il H Williams, M U E A Representative of the Salvation Arm>. Mcssr;. G. I. Cuffiey, 1,. A. lynch. J (' Hammond, AW. B CM Theobaldi. A M. Jones and Tin B. Crosby. The uppoiiitnu-nt of Mr. W. H. I UE as Hony. 11 Q. 1 "iier was proposed by His Excellency, seconded by Mr >' I C Springer and agreed lo unanimously Mr 11 Risely Tucker was elected lo be the Vice-President on the Executive Committee Chief Coming I cell 'j the Governor over RcdjJTii Ion ;.S0 p.m. Central Camp Fire n •it Headquarters, Bechlei Roe*. 7 30 p in Gill Memorial tT< op ( jinp Fire al Gill Mcmoi.al grcuna... Black Hotk TtiHi.Mli.) 2lb a pni. Basket Ball match. James St. Roy Bcoutl vs ftea Scouts at Modem Higi> Reverend School. Saturday .mil. Fir.i Barbadi Scouts will present a \*>< %  lit yueeiis College at 0 p.m • I :nv mi jle .it 1' M .1 |/l Christ Church Kates Hi Excellency gsve notice of the forthcoming Viait of Lord _**• ^"*f ,'"S" '""" 0 1 nd l Rowallan, Chief Scout of the Britr ^' vw.V.i'ri.^iC.ri.*! 1st) Commonwealth and Empire. lhn at Owir meallnf on Tiuraday aonaeUlJia between January and * ''>'; """'* *''" „"£$"?„ .,*l yea, Mr. toringer Sr-sX-'aaSS, !rf X^lSTJ^ gave details of the St. George*' a %  **- was carrying • %  hi* *uu#> Let Us Show You the'S-STAR'car THE r, n N s u 'M^iev-Stur' Motoring Thv Hfsi ml I. mi -f-s* I 'list I CHARLES Mc ENEARNEY & CO. LTD. fe*s>MOe*e*f*eOsM"M*e)e?s>sWW STOMACH PAINS DUE TO INDIGESTION If you .u.-.T frora gTOMAf II PAIKS. PUsTULEKCB, HhARraUJRN, NAbaatA A(.Ii>Il V doc lo Ind.gouon, i'.'Is DOM sf MuV !l "HHA.N1) SIOMAI H iM'X'Dlist, This KMnugeallv balanced formula give* you really quick relief? li at asss available In TABLBT torra MACLEAN B RAND Stomach i Pwder riay safe! RryLcrccm your hair. Dandruff oo your collar, loroc hair on your cumt)—these arc danger a J Pas 'hat point thc need for Btykrecro's JoubU btru-Ju: (l| Da4ong imertne.t (1) Lailmaj hair heallfc. Massage with Brylcrecm Uimulaica thc scalp, cacourages natural hair growth. wards oft Darulrutf. Ii> pure cmuUitied oils put hfe nun Dry Hair and impart a splendid gloss. Don't take any chances Brylcrecm your hair — moit men dol i ." %  .. ...r an-1 lurbrn CeaH er^llwir flimdav mal 1 ^n*^i the • i.t -h..it Wli can rat lutni aial v*i And aomeUansH duck and i.ni. with *vn* bMwd m*a) A >MVa of Mk M. hiaav Il "Hi..." (Ol • % %  -il " %  >-,k,.. %  lalcr*. So bey. lhai %  No [iik hi, j,„ la-gaj Hell ha.* loirv n. •_ aifiwraS to mmy i ' aa tnai-idi,iu Uj. will n^lT.ift har h*-l | aSlCl aponaored by J & R BAKERIES makert of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM SKIP ((HINTING HOUKS All MCII1 / , ) SACROOL GIVES PAIN ITS KNOCK OUT BLOW On Sale at .... knighl'N llni); Stores V TRANQUILLITY NERVONE IT BUILDS UP NERVE POWER "N>rvoin ,, •..,, nerve nutriant %  i tak< u|. ti'i %  |iri't na>i i i iiiiul faaiUu ol culm tin n itural ." ompanlrnani < %  ( -.iHind nerves. %  '.*"'IH :l. ilrriple and ugii'rubliw uke Jiist lhc i"tigu..i nualUmfs. That bvond "i aUTerenee. Until you have expertanced thai wonderlul reJeaea (resri 'iiervee*' \ V w cannot rrallse ofH. M: NHJ TO ASK r<>K .Vf.'lll O.VI: IIII-: KIV Til M i:\l limn On Salr at all 11.u SUarra BACKACHE Try thf. for rafiV ... IlrMalnstaai(Bsia in rour back •rhea yoa ttoop •nd, M other Umce. there to a 0a0 and CS jah aj ea a atlie. thc oaaee na/ be in your IbdiieTm. Theaac .rtaJ orraae alueld oormalir filar pouoos eaat af ttai -"i but a otne tiipce get alu^* The la m rk a ct M voa mail il Narurr i way of wa/ini.j juu that your kid neyi need aaattfaiM i A Uuetcd tnodirinc for thta papoee is Dc WiU'a Kidney ajjd Bladder Pin* Tbep act oo th* ludneyj dtrectly eoothe tbeaii. tone them op mnO tptc^lj reatot e them to their natural /unction. ( There M a lone record el eacceaa behunl Oe WiU'l PiJU, whrh hac bean relieving auflerera in anaury paru of Uw world lor over halt a *ii( ui j Go to your ctia>riuat and 1-et-aupply today. SOU AOEHfS I M m MtTERS CO Ml' rv. ox 1:1 aVU.etvwa. OUR GUAJIANTU Oe Witt't Pi|la>aic maaiafactwed under atnctly nrg-orac condiUuua and the irigredicatt coav 1 torn^to nfid atwida/ds of purity. DE WITT SPILLS Win. FOGARTY ITD. GENTLEMEN READ All ABOUT If.,. WY have junl opened u Miuirt i .in.r of — "CHERWELL" TROPICAL j 2-Piece Suits ? 'Quality and Cut leave nothing lo lie desired, j Avail yourself of this op-j I portunity of possessiin; one of these smart Suits, at the attractive price I f $40.69 ^ per suit. For (" %  in. Uigh-Orade Cloth in*: Sh|i al — Wm. F0(JARTY LTD. 1


f





ESTABLISHED

1895





MEATLESS SATURD

Housewives Crowd | |

Idle Market Place

Butehers On

‘Price Strike’

NO MEAT was sold in the Public Market yes-

terday.

The butchers carried out their threat of a meatless

8 ay.

A Targe crowd of housewives flocked to the market early
in the morning hoping that they would at least be able to
purchase pork. They left disappointed—only vegetables

were being sold.





Mr. F. A. Bishop, Con-
troller of Supplies, told the
“Advocate” yesterday that
there is a shortage in the
island of imported frozen
meat from Australia duc to
the late arrival of steamers
as a result of strikes,

He said that the order for
frozen meat had been placed
since Nevember avd should
have been here six weeks
ago, but it was now exnect-
el te arrive on or about
May 2.

At present, there {4 about
a month’s supply of pickled
pork and salted beef on the
market as well 2s approxi-
mately four months’ supply
of canned fish. There are
also stocks of canned meat
and further quantities are
due to arrive early in May..

He said that the position
with regard to the price of
local fresh meat is now
under investigation by the
Government and the matter
should be considered early
this week.







Anglo-Argentine
Meat Pact Not Yet
Coricluded

BUENOS AIRES, April 21.
“Pact With Britain Suffers An-
other Delay”, the headline in to-
day’s Lanacion seemed to sum up
the position as the seventh week
of the Anglo-Argentine “meat”
talks drew=to a close.

It had been no secret for some

the



time that broad outlines of a new
agreement covering not only meat
but q wide range of financial and |
general trade matters had been
drawn up by John Edwaris, Eco-
homic Secretary to the British
Treasury, and Dr, Roberto Area,
Argentine Minister of Economy.

As had been foreseen, however,
detailea drafting of the pact had
thrown up many technical diffi-
culties which were having to be
settled one by one.

Most acute is understood to re-
late to the financial provisions . ch
as devaluation guarantees and re-
valuation of Argentina’s sterling
balances.—Reuter.

Torquay Talks Were
Not As Fruitful
As Was Expected

TORQUAY, Eng. April 21.
The longest and most exhaust-



ing tariff Conference ever held,
ended here today, -after seven

months of international bargain-
ing.

And only 147 bilateral agree-
ments have been concluded be-
tween the 38 countries which
took part. Ordinarily about 400
bilateral agreements were expect-
ed.

Although considered one of the
least successful tariff conferences
the Torquay talks were valuable
for the entry into international
bargaining for the first time ol

Western Germany, Austria, Tur-
key, the Philippines, Peru ana
Uruguay .

-—Reuter



iG , ° °
To Study Medicine
NICOSIA, Cyprus April 21

Krene Pavlides, the 23—year-
old Cypriot girl who was saved
from the Greek firing squad by
British intervention, sailed from
here today to study medicine in
London.

She was sentenced to death in
March 1949 for co-operating with
Greek rebels, but the sentence
was commuted to life imprison-
ment, after British diplomats had
intervened, and questions had
been asked in the British House
of Commons about her: She re-
ceived pardon in October, and was
sent back to Cyprus.

—Reuter



diagram of a
s theré are

hate





r











Police Officers visited the
market and uniformed Constables
along wiih C.1.D. men, could be
seen patrolling.

Mr, E. D.
vould be seen
of butchers.

Mr. Mottley told the Advocate
that he felt it was unfortunate
that the meat issue could not have
been settled before Saturday,
which is usually the only meat
day for a great majority of people

He had heard that during the
week negctiations were going on.
“The greatest indication that the
butchers are a reasonable lot of
people is the fact that Government
fixed the price of pork at 42 cents
per pound some two years ago
and the butchers did not accept
this maximum price but continued
to sell this item at 36 cents per
pound,” Mr. Mottley said.

He said that there must be a
case for them to be considered and
it is hoped that the matter will be
amicably — settled without any
further delay.

Mottley, M.C.P.
talking to groups

Butchers Ignored

Carlisle Headley, a butcher in
the market for the past 22 years,
said that the controversy over
price of butchers’ meat,
especially beef, had been going on
for some time,

“Representutions,” he said, “had

been made to the Competent
Authority on several occasions,
backed up by Dr. C. P. Stoute,

Acting the
Market,

“The butchers have been ignor-
ed, While they regret causing any
inconvenience to their customers
and the general public, they feit
that their only weapon “was a
meatless. day”.

“The rehl question is the price
of mutton, beef, veal and entrails.
We «© not consider that the price
of 45 cents. per pound for. beef or
48 cents per pound for mutton
and veal is unreasonable, bearing
in mind the price we are compell-
ed to pay for livestock and nobody
seems to protect us from the
charges which owners of livestock
claim. The Price Control Inspec |
tors seem only interested in the
price we charge for meat’,
Headley said.

Cecil Pierrepoint, a slaughtere>
and Dudley Wiltshire, a butcher
said that while they agree with
the suggestions made by Headley |
they consider that the prices of
liver, lights, hearts, tongues and
tails should be 40 cents per pound,

Superintendent of





Reasonable Profit '

Rufus Maughan, for many years
a butcher in the market, said that
he agreed with all the other
butchers had said, but he was
further interested in the whole-
sale price of carcases of beef, pork,
mutton, etc., which should be re-
gulated so that the butcher could
make a reasonable profit to
support his family.

Clarence Small, a butcher in the
market for 40 years, said that in
his opinion the present trouble;
with the butchers can be placed on
the shoulders of the Price Control
Inspectors because on ...veral oc {
casions when he and several others
asked them, while in the Public
Market to look into the price at
which they (butchers) were asked
to pay for stock on the hoof, the
Officers bluntly refused, saying
that they were only there to see
how the butchers sell—how they
buy was a matter for them,
(butchers).”



U.S. Atom Pile Has
Prevented War
—G. R. DEAN

DALI.AS, Texas, April 21

G. R. Dean, Chairman of the
United States Atomic, Energy
Commission, said here that the
country’s considerable stockpile
of atom weapons had prevented
a third world war. ’

How long this will remain
true, depends entirely upon the
Soviet analysis of our strength,
their willingness to take risk, and
their estimate of what a_ free
world will risk in crushing early
aggression in the hope of prevent-
ing an international conflict.
——Reuter

ubmarine showing the two main escape hatches and compartments in which
scape hatches;
h in the gun tower


















BARBADOS, ee 1951

THE SEARCH IS ON



THE SUN glints on a placid sea
from placid occasion, The scene







in the English Channel on a far
is that of the search for the sub-

‘ e e Marine Affray which dived at 9.15 p.m. on Monday and failed to
Surface as ordeted at 8.30 a.m. on Tuesday, The Affray, carrying 75
] e 9 nyure officers and men on a routine night deep-diving patrol, carried 80

Davis escape lungs and the new life-saving suits.

In Train Crash

HREE MEN WERE KILLED and 15 other passengers :
seriously injured in a rail crash involving three trains

here to-day.

Two trains were crowded with football fans on their
way to the Scottish Cup Final match.

‘Fifty other's ‘suffering from minor injuries were allow
ed to go home after hospital treatment,

CONTROLS

A story is told of a busi-
ness in Trinidad which aps
plied for permission to im-
port a number of “110 V
motors 50 cycles”.

Replied the Control Office:
“Your licence is granted to
import the motors,

Permission cannot be
granted to import. the
cycles.”

\
17 Dead, 22 Missing
In Oil Tanker

Collision

NEW ORLEANS, April 21

Seventeen seamen are known
dead and 22 others missing and
presumed dead today as the result
of the collision of two tankers in
the Gulf of Mexico, 200 miles
south of Morgan City, Louisiana,
yesterday. Both tankers caught
fire,

Marine records indicate it as
the greatest disaster off the United
States coast since 84 lives were
lost in a collision of an American
tanker and freighter off the Atlan-
tie coast on June 6, 1943.

In yesterday's pre-dawn col-
lision during heavy fog, the 10,195
ton Esso Greensboro and the 17,061
ton super tanker Esso Suez, both
cwned by the Esso Shipping Com-
pany, crashed, exploded and burst
into flames.

Only one man of the 44-man
crew of the Esso Suez was killed
in the collision, but another un-
identified man .died of burns,
Three other men on the Suez were
burned,

All other dead were aboard: the
flaming Greernsbero, carrying 32
men. Bodies of 15 men from the
Greensboro were recovered and
five survivors were picked up.

—Reuter,

SHIPS COLLIDE
50 Men Missing

COLOMBO, Ceylon, April 21.

Fifty men were missing
to-day after the boat taking them
to work across Colombo harbour
eollided with the 501 ton Norwe
gian cargo ship Tampa.



cause of the collision.

their work. —Reutey

INSIDE A SUBMARINE

Le | rt ‘

ee NE
am

men

three of the simplified type with two entry chntes spaced along the inner, pressure hull, and the



| Sanctions Against China

|

here



The police were searching for the
missing men and investigating the|dors conferred at the State De-

Some of the missing men have d
been picked up and gone on to| ternational affairs.

ELECTRIC MOTORS]

- 16,000-MILE
FLIGHT ENDS

SYDNEY,, April 21.

GLASGOW, April 21. i

zieés was among the cheering

ing boat “Frigate Bird’, when it |

this afternon, after its
miles Trans-Pacific pioneering
flight to Chile and back.
The Frigtte Bird's flight, began
tive weeks ago.
Menzies said

Ambulifices, their betis ringing
frantically, rushed from all over

Glasgow, city of 1,000,000 people that

Housewives nesr the’ crash rar}Wes a great debt to men such |
from their homes with blanket: | 28 Captain P. G. Taylor (Com-~
and hot drinks fer theo stricken mander of the flying boat) whe

was one of the pioneers of Aus-

passengers, 2 ae
4 tralian aviation.

Blood-stained tartan scarves lit
tered the track or hung limply
irom wrecked carriages

First official railway announce
ment said that “about 50 passen

Captain Taylor said it had bee
‘a wonderful trip’.
Ii had proved that air service



sinjured: somelof then could operate between Sout!
’ pw America and Australia when in
stallations were built on Easter

The accident occurred near] 'sland and Mangareva
Porlock Shields suburb station,}| The flight was a great “hands



across the Pacific” gesture to the
people of South America he
added: —Reuter,

World Situation
‘Extremely Perilous’

FREDERICK, April 21

United States Secretary of De- |
fence) George Marshali said today
that. thé world situation was
‘perilous in the extreme”

In a speech at Hood College
here Marshall said “we are pass
ing through one of the most criti
val periods in the history of the}
world. I might put it better in
even stronger words by saying
in the history of civilisation.

Marshall

when a crowded train taking foot-
ball supporters to a Scottish Cup
Final match at the giant Hamp-
den Park stadium, hit a stationary
special train.

The stationary train was tele.
scoped and in. turn crashed intc
znother stationary alongside, Near-
by householders climbed six-foo
walls and scrambled down a 30-
foot embankment to the scream:
ing passengers. A police emer-
gency call went out and _ soon
there was chaos as ambulances
fought their way through city
streets jammed with week-end
and football traffic,



Trapped, Freed

About half an hour after the

smash, reseue workers reporteo did not refer to th:

that all trapped people l.ad been} -ontroversy raging over the dis-

freed. A nurse who had been on} Missal of General Douglas Mac-

the train quickly organised first} Arthur and his “expand Korean

aid and rescue work and distri-} war” policies.

buted available medical supplies He said, however, that while
Doctors and nurses fought to} the battle continued in Korea, the |

United States was gathering her
military strength “to avert a wa
of worldwide proportions”

iS ~—-Reuter

save the lives of critically injured
passengers

One man said, as he lay bleed-
ing by a train: “Suddenly there
was. a tremendous crash. All
along the train I could hear: wo-
meh and children screaming and
men shouting from under tele+J
scoped carriages,”

weetee . —Renter



U.S, Want New Form Of

(By JULIA

WITH U.N
UNITED NATIONS Eigh
| North Korea have struc

WASHINGTON, April 21
The United States is pressing a
new form of economic and diplo-

matic sanctions against Com- :
munist China according to reports Fleet, briefly toured this front to-<
here to-day. : plane, and was told everyw

The -supject was believed to .

have been discussed when British
French and Australian ambassa- wearing a pearl handled automatic
All formations told him that
reports from patrols showed that
they believed they had struck the
outer sereen of the major Commun
ist defence system,

Gen, Van Fleet left his plane for
a jeep and raced past lines of
Sr working on
visit United Nations
Korean troops.
| Only to-day, were
allowed to tell the
deepest British tank
into North Korea
Centurions — the world’s
modern tank—on Tuesday

The British Task Force, the big

partment with the American As-
sistant Secretary of State for In-

\ —Reuter.

and South
reporter
story of the

penetratio:z

ern Korea just south
parallel, and plunged
Communist territory virtually
opposed,
The Force was well up in Com
inist country by lunchtime, and
; the river by dusk. It
1 th t

un

can shelter. In submarines of the



Australian Premier Robert Men- |

thousands who welcome the fly, |

landed at Rose Bay flying base |
16,000 |

|

Australia |

j vaine

roads, |

of the 38th] went in
straight into|charge which won all but one ob

|



This is the submarine’s marker buoy
for which the ships search: red and
yellow with a flashing white light;
it should be released when the sub
marine is in trouble

Navy Withdraws 16

Subs From Service

LONDON, April 21.

The Admiralty to-day withdrew
from service 16 sister submarines
of the Affray which plunged to the
ottom of the English Channel on
Monday.

All hope was given up two day
ago for her 75 crew members, but
search with ‘planes and_ ships
equipped with latest detector de
vices is going on.

The dmiralty said that the
sister submarines would be kept
out of service pending the result
of investigations into the Affray’s
loss. —Reuter,

German Will Be Taught

In Alsace Lorraine
PARIS, April 21

Government sut-
fered a defeat today in the edu
cation budget debate when
motion calling for the teaching of
German in primary sehools in
Alsace Lorraine carried by
372 votes to 174,

German was taught in all classes
in primary schools in Alsace Lor-
before the war, but
liberation only French ha
used and taught in these classes

~—~Reuter. }
|

The French

was

Since
beer

U.N. Forces Strike
Red Defence Line

N_ BATES)

FORCES, Korea, April 21.

th Army troops driving int:
k the main Communist defenc«

line. Their new commander, Lieutenant Gen. James Var




ty by jeep and lighi
here that his advancing troops

nae bumping into the main Chinese line of resistance.
1e General visited his troops. Centurions

which plou ghe¢
through muddy rice fields, whik
jeeps and light-tracked vehicles
were bogged down,
Along the rest
United Nations
aggressive patrols, and Commun
ists put in local counter attacks
Communist rearguardgs screen
their defence triangle—Chor
Kumhwa—Pyonyang— just
of the Thirty - Eighth
}parallel, drove back United Na
s\tions patrols at several points
1} One United Nations force, gran

of the front,
units continues

won
north

made by giant|pling with well entrenched enemy
most|forces in a bitter fight

for ridges
in this area, first stood back while
warplanes hurled blazing napalm

gest of its kind in the campaignjand guns blasted enemy position
crossed the Imjin river into West- | with

phosphorous shells,
with

then i
bayonet in a

silent
jective.

3Jetween noon and dusk, the
cleaned out Chinese who had bee
rolling hand grenades
j ther firs erious Of
on t for week Reuter

down





ti

|
Poa
SAFETY BUOY ee Confident
|
|

SOs
Sy
SS





WY

PRICE : SIX CENTS

AY IN BRIDGETO






























ORR 4 Deputies



PARIS, April 21.

Big Four Foreign Ministers

Gties ended the 7th week of
eir talks to-day, without an:
break in their deadh over an
igenda it Foretg inisters’
Conference 3
The Deputies met for the
35th time %
The three Western Deputies
described the Soviet reaction to
the new Western agenda as “dis

appointing.”

Gromyko szid that the Western



» Rgrs were not taking part in
: tes: and were in fact drag
ing the Conference in the
reverse «ipection He repeated
that the Western Power were
irying to minimise the importance














f the reduction of armaments,
ind appeared to maintain their
lesire for an arms race
Dr. Philip Jessup, U.S. Deputy,
could not agree with Gromvko
when he claimed that the Soviet
Delegation had taken account of
he Western views. The latest
oviet agenda proposal did not
nest the fundamental views of
e three Western Powers
Davies said that there were a
number of ebstacles in the path
of disarmament, and before any
iction could be taken, the Foreign
Ministers had to remove the ob
}
acl
The four Deputies could not
lecisions on policy; that was
the job of the Foreign Ministers
hemselve
\iexandre Parodi, French De-
uty, said that progress on the
iba ceduction of armaments had been
revented by the Soviet Union,
ither by veto in the Security

‘ouncil or by its obstinate oppo-
ition in the General Assembly of
he United Nations

With their new agenda, Western
‘owers had tried to narrow the
zap between Eastern and Western

Of Vi t iows Parodi aid Gromyko
1¢ ory laims that he was not

responsi-~-
ile for any difficulties, but facts
NEW YORK, April 21 vere facts, and the West had made
General .Mac Arthur Was. 4 i step forward while he (Gromy-
confident of victory in Korea, tha Th , aa _ eerie in eee
he we itn. . ere 2 gro Ss fo saying
e offered President Truman wha) | »),4¢ yesterday Gromyko’s reaction
be regerded as his best troops fo

MaeArthur







: ; had widened the gap between
service in Europe aecording to the | yoy) mae ines
New York Times White Hou: Grortyxo, saying that his dele-
serrespondent, Anthony | Leviere sation had made far greater con-
to-day. Yassions than the Western dele-

He said that the New York Tune
iad gained access to documente
oureces of the Wake Island meet
ng between the General and th

. > Geclared. that the West
with gn obstinacy which deserved
bette purpose, were still staying
n the same spot instead of try-



*resident held six months ago ng to reach an agreement on
IrmAamMernes.
Leviero summarised the con —Reuter
tents of the documents as fol
lows:

(1) General Mac Arthut
uid that he could make his S i
Jivision available to Genera
ymar Bradley, the Chairman o

Members of Peace Mission
Reach S.E. China

the Joint Chiefs of Staff, for des- e HONG KONG April a1
atch to Europe last January Three members of the Tibetan
(2) Harmony and agreement | “e?¢e Mission to Communist
vere achieved at the conference ‘hina, ineluding their leader,
Samara Bao, have arrived in

nn the necessity of gdhering to the
»olicies made in Washington, Thi
might have continued if the victor
redicted by General Mac Arthur

‘*huneking, South-east China, on
heir way to Peking, the official
Jew China News Agency reported

ada Reute
had materialised ee Reuter. cial asiasbaiviaac
Fc nee - crisis ¢ _ it the TELL THE
jenera calec an "e irely new »
war” on Nov. 21 he asked for ¢ THE NEWS

DAY OR NIGHT
DIAL

more aggressive policy in the Fai

Fast and became increasingly out

spoken against the Presidest.
—Reuter,

3113

@
ADVOCATE |
®



RALEIGE

THE AChE eee

A stock of models always on display

and ready for you to take away.

| «o>
| CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET.

=n!


PAGE TWO







———

JANETTA DRESS SHOP To-nite 8.30 & Continuing

Lower Broad Street “i Upstairs Over Newsam’s

DRESSES of all Types
READYMADE

and

MADE TO ORDER

a











TO-DAY To TUESDAY
445 & 8.30 p.m.
Glenn Ford, Valli, Clatde Rains,
Sir Cedric Hardewicke in



Plus Leen Errol in
“POPPA KNOWS WORST”

—

Colour by Technicolor



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY — 4.45 and 3% pm HBB:

RKO-Radio’s Double Hit |! BL
“BETRAYAL FROM THE EAST” Ve Sheet MITC uM
and Barbara Bel GEDD Ss

PLAZ GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James





A ODIAL














OISTIN

Last 2 Shows Today: 5 & 8.30 p.m.



we
Scireblay Dy HAROLD SHUMATE and JOSEPH HOFFMAN
Directed by FREDERICK de CORDOVA + Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR

GLOBE

reo Lae

LICCANEERS





















SUNDAY

R. and MRS. T. H. RENTO?
plan to Spend the next 6@Wwee
holidaying at the Oceam Vie
Hotel. Théy are fran Kingst

Ontario, and cameyNin on the

| T.C.A. flight from Canieda yester-

day morning Coming#in “by the
;Same plane were Mr. and M

;}C. G. Lynch of Toronto. Mr
| Lynch who is a Kemi teft
here in 1903, returning in 9620 for
|a holiday, This is his visit
jhome since then, They aMpatiy-
} ing with Mr. Lynch’s sister ip Con-
stitution Road.

C.B,C. Secretaty

SECRETARY with the Cana-

dian Broadcasting Co,, in
| Ottawa is Miss Pamela Forbes
who came in by T.C.A., yester-
day morning to spend three weeks’
holiday at the Ocean View Hotel
m also en the T.C.A. plane
yesterday was Miss Denta Covey-
duck who is an accountant with
the York Knitting Mills in Toron-
to. She too is here for three weeks
Staying at the Ocean View Hote!
k . Murray Wallace is a pilot
| with T.C.A, Yesterday he and
his wife were among the passeng-
ers arriving. They plan to spend
one week at. the Ocean View
tel. This is Wallace’s first trip
down this way. His route is their
Trans-Atlantic flight.

\DVOCATE



Calling

Two Teachers Masried in St. John Seaweli Shorts
‘ ‘i TERDAY aftern at St.

T PRESENT holidaying rere YF uh Mine Hazell PETER CARLYON is due back
is Mrs, C. A, Medas who is Marguerite de Sousa, daughter of in Montreal to-day after

on the staff of the Bishop’s High mr. and Mrs. Frank E. de Sousa Spending three weeks’ holiday
School for girls in Georgetown, of Georgetown, was married to With his parents. Capt. and Mrs.
31itish Guiana. Her mother who My. James Tillson, son of Colonel T. C. W. Carlyon. Capt. Carl-

is related to Mr, and Mrs. T. A. and Mrs. John C, F. Tillson of
Wason, accompenied her Over. gan Antonio, Texas, and an
Mrs. Medas’ father, Mr. S. C. auditor with the Singer Sewing
Davidson, was a former Postmaster Machine Co.

of British Guiana. The ceremony which took place
shortly after 4.30 o’clock was per-

on is retired and he and his wife
ave settled in Barbados.

Peter is with Barclays Bank,
Canada in Montreal, and he thor-
oughly enjoyed his Barbados holi-

After a short holiday here : day.
Mrs. Medas will be leaving formed by the Rev. Alfred E. wr. John Young, assistant secre-
for the United Kingdom, to “4 tary of T.C.A. and his wife who

iar eer eee ey had been holidaying here since
inf dress of. white broderie April 7th returned yesterday by

anglaise over. which there was « .C_A. to his headquarters in
oF HG Rk Leortuce GES demure bridal of whiic Montreal. . .Other T.CA. staff
Her rents live in

mat e
rooklyn, organza. Her head- was 3 members who were on the same
Mrs. Prescott is the ate of . eoronet white, for-get-me-nots flight were Mr. Denis Brown, Mr.
Dalton Prescott, assistant master Which kept in place a finger-ti

( School. veil

attend the Festival of Britain... .
off On Thursday for a holiday with
her relatives in the U.S.A., went
Mrs, D, Prescott, assistant teacher

p and Mrs, Edward Mann who were

rs’ * . She carried a bouquet of on their honeymoon, and Rita
ee ee FU c lita, white Gnabiirehons and McMaho~ and her mother Mrs.
Interested in the Y.W:C.A. white gerberas, Laura McMahon. Rita is _ with

matron of honour, Mrs. T.C.A.’s Reservation Department
ormah. Marshall wore a dress of in Montreal.

tHA OF San Fetnaide cane in On orchid brocade. Her head-dress Short Visit

was of pentas and, casandra and
Thursday to spend a, short holiday she tibaey Victoria style :
at Leaton-on-Sea, Mrs. Appleton pouquet to match, R. JOE DEVAUX of St. Lucia
ie

RS. MILLY APPLETON, wife
of the late Mr, Claude Apple-

SUNDAY,

APRIL 22, 1951

Trinidad Businessman
MoM" PHILIP MARCHACK,
Trinidad businessman, his
wife and his wife's sister Miss
Aggie Kong arrived from Trini-
dad yesterday by B.W.I.A. to
spend a couple of weeks holiday
staying at the Hotel Royal, Miss
Kong is Senior Reservations clerk
in B.W.1.A’s Port-of-Spain office. . .
Holidaying at Indramer Guest
House Miss Ione St. Helene.
Regular visitor to Barbados, she
is a civil servant in St. Lucia,
Local Talent
Orr a collection of local
talent will, be on hand op
Sunday April 29th at the Bethel
Chureh for their annual sacred
ecneert. Besides the Police Band,
cther artistes appearing on the
programme will be Will Clair-
monte and his vidlin, Nell Hall
singing the Ave Maria, Cedric
Phillips, bandsman G. _ Lovelle
and the Wesley Guild choir.

Enjoyable Holiday
R. and MRS. JOSEPH KING

after an enjoyable holiday
in Barbados, staying at Aquatic
Gardens, returned yesterday af-
ternoon by B.W.1.A. to Trini-
dad. Mr. King is with Messrs
William Fogarty Ltd’s. Branch of
Port of Spain. Mr. King was at
one time stationed here.

is

~





was en route to England to

, |’ 7 .
2 \ .. v e ‘ an is spending the week-end N.Y. FASHION
tine een auras noni MOS ok 5 & 8.90 p.m Dactor From St. Vicon ya GA. w pan aabed, No hae ert with the Dorien Cole's. “Ve came sty i
Louls De ROCHEMONTE'S «BLOOD OR he ‘9 Pau MONG the sticces: candi- Gount ¥.W.C.A, activities here After the cerem @ reception in on the B.W.1.A. flight from
“LOST BOUNDARIES” MOON dates in the examination wi} be of great interest to za Wee hela at “Suimmerhome” St. Lucia yesterday morning. ,
Beatrice Met Canada plies Ed seer cue ST. JAMES COMBINED for the Diploma in Tropical albt staying at Leaton is Mr. Ber- Hastihgs. passengers from Trinidad ers
PEARSON FERRER LEE Ot c i Medicine and Hygiene of hard Browne Who ons a Nard= Mr, and Mrs, Tilson will be day by BW I.a. were ee. AHS
SS MON. & TUES. 8.30 p.m. SCHOOL, HOLETOWN {{}|London University is Dr. Lestic ware business in Port-of-Spain. jeavini Bata a for Puerto Rico Mrs. Everett F. Gidley. Here for
Mon. & Tues. — 6 & 8.30 p.m. “LAST DAYS OF PoMPEn” Stence of St. Vincent. Ye was E ere 1049, A paving th six to eight weeks, they have
(Monogram) , f was He was. last hi in 2, at the end_of this month. . « Gat in St, Lawrence Gap. ‘
Warren Wilitam in with Preston Foster, Heals MAY 14TH yal vebank a eta at Bristol craunch Methddist he is 6 ist ; Visit taken a flat in St. Lawrence Gary e
“FEAR” — and — , jasil Rathbone niversity . ow t his studies .t j : he a
Freddie Stewart Ti ot and choir-master at the Belmont ‘ fifth visit Mr. Gidley is a sales represen- 4%
MeeCmmGn scaooL HkHO” | en a AveNGiNG ieibiee Keep this date Open oh whench TH eta te ee Methodist Church in Trinidad. cy iat ee dathuy 7 tative with Coca One. ue is based y
. est Indies. He expects to IN LONDON Javis of British Guiana’ who was in New York and his home is in
; san ni ; Kinderhook, New York. -Mrs.
ae ene some time thi Need last here in 1947. At that time (Une Gooding who had been in



Elegance unlimited Wish them joy
with the gift they'll treasure
always for the treasure it is—some-
thing in silver! Look over our
selection of handsome, lustrous
silver. You'll be surprised at the
tiny price tags on many of these
beautiful items , . . delighted with
the rich loveliness of every piecé !
Come in and choose to-day !

For the gifts you
give with pride let
Alfonso be your



Canteen Sets,

Sweet Dishes,



Cream &
Sugar
‘ Candle Sticks
J = a. Cake Forks
ewe x
of Barbados. Tea Spoons



Fruit Set
Cocktail Pieces
Entree Dishes



Alfonso B. Delima & Co.

: Casserole
Corner of Broad & McGregor Streets

Dishes





BEAUTIFUL
BAKELITE

ELECTRIC

LAMP
SHADES



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THE CORNER STORE





eames eomsenad



rr





h

With Cable & Wireless
f NY DORMER who is with
Cable & Wireless in Bermuda
flew in yesterday by T.C.A.,
from Bermuda to spend a week's
holiday in Barbados. Tony was
stationed here three years ago.. .
coming in on the same flight was
Peter Greig who is staying with
Mr. Charles Potter in St, Peter.
fa is here on two weeks’ vaca-
on.

On Honeymoon

PENDING their honeymoon. in
Mrs.

Barbados
Arthur
Dominica

Mr.
flew in
Thursday,
were married on April 18.

Mr, Bell is with Barclays Bank
in Dominica. His brother Emile
who was in Barbados a_ few
months ago on holiday was in
Dominica for the wedding, Emile
is with the bank in St, Vincent

Mr. and Mrs, Bell are here for
two weeks staying on the St.
Lawrence coast,

Two Months

ACK YEARWOOD,

Manager of the Fort Royal

Garage and his wife Eileen went

out on the T.C.A. plane yester~

day bound for Montreal. They

expect to be away about two
months.

are and

Bell who
on

froin
They

Assistant



he

attend the 9th Biennial Conference
of the British Empire Service
League which was held in London
and at which he was the official
delegate. representing _Britisn
Guiana, His visit this time is for
a holiday.

In Georgetown besides being
the managing proprietor of a
manufacturing firm, Mr. Davis is
connected with the work of the

section of the Y.M.C.A., being a
member of the Governing
and the Advisory Committee of
which Mr. Justice E. R. L.
is chairman. Mr. Davis is also a
member of the Vestry of the
Cathedral Parish of St. George of
which he has been a member for
the past nine years. Mr. Davis is
a guest At Leaton-on-Sea.
Back to Venezuela
ENE VANDEN BRANDEN ac-
companied by his wife and
youngest daughter Nicole flew

LOUISE ST. LAURENT. daugh- back to Venezuela yesterday after
ter-in-law of Canada’s Prime Minis- being here since April 13th. Mr.
ter, flew into London for her first Vanden Branden is Avensa Air-
trip abroad. She is accompanying lines Traffic Manager in Caracas
her husband, Mr. Renauld St. Lan- . . . .Passengers on the same

rent, a barrister with a lucrative plane were Gordon Kinch

Quebec practice.

and

They have five|Dr. Roger Hernandez Gordon had visit

Y.M.C.A., and ¥.W.C.A. He is Dutch audience.
associated With the Boys’ Club there is a definite

Body “I’m glad to be

Ward seems that having regained

Trinidad for the past three months
is now back in Barbados.

Calypso King

ACK IN ENGLAND after his

successful tour of Holland is
Beginner.
was in the
composed
all of
were well received by his
that
for

Calypso King, Lord
He says that while he
Low Country, he
several new calypsoes,
which
He feels
“market”
song in Holland
back
England,” says Beginner. .

that type of

of its best exponents of
Calypso, London is now

another. I hear that
for a band tour of Germany,
with Trinidad-born Cyril Blake.
who is affectionately
among his admirers in
as “the Louis Armstrong
Europe.”

Off to Canada

ORTIA BOURNE has gone to
Canada to spend a_ holiday
with her brothers. First she will
Hilary in Montreal then

oi

children: eldest is eight, youngest |been on a four day visit to his over to Charles in Vancouver. . .

two months.

relatives, . . .his work in Vene-

—London Express Service.}2uela takes him over three hun-

econ a re
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MATINEE: WEDN

DAY NIGHT at 8.50

in Technicolor

ESDAY at 5 p.m.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY at 8.30

GEORGE RAFT

“RACE



& Continuing
Republic Pictures presents

“THE 3rd
MAN”?

Starring
Joseph COTTON—VALLI
With

Orson WELLS and

Trevor HOWARD

ROXY
Today & Tomerrow
4.45 & 8.15 p.m.

Warner Bros. presents—-











“THE. ,
YOUNGER
BROTHERS ”’

Color by Téchnicoldr
with Wayne MORRIS,
Janis PAIGE
and Bruce BENNET

Extra
“MEN OF TOMORROW”
and

|

“A DAY AT THE FAIR”

ROLL ROOFING — Red

PITCH PINE
DOUGLAS FIR



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

LUMBER DEPARTMENT



baer =z
oO

(

WILLIAM BE

STOP THAT LEAK
IN YOUR ROOF NOW
We offer
EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS

RED CEDAR SHINGLES :
ROLL ROOFING — Plain







SNDIX — MARILYN MAXWELL

STREET”’





4.30 and 8.30
20th Century Fox Double—
Olivia DeHAVILLAND
and Mark STEVENS

IN
«SNAKE PIT”
AND
« DAKOTA LIL”

With. «+5
Rod CAMERON and
Marie WINDSOR

Monday and Tuesday 4.30
& 8.30

M-G-M and Fox Double

AUGHT

and :
“BATTLEGROUND”

OLYMPIC)

Last Two Shows TO-DAY
4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M Smashing Double—
Spencer TRACY
and James STEWART

“Cc

IN
«« MALAYA”
AND
«© BATTLEGROUND ”
Starring...
Van JOHNSON and
John HODIAK



Monday & Tuesday 4.30
and 8,15
M-G-M and.Fox Double
“BEGINNING OR THE
END”

and
“CARNIVAL IN COSTA
RICA”

eee
in
! S555
SSS Dem —l—— ol
EMPIRE ROYAL
To-day 4.45 and 8.30. . Last Two Shows To-day

DIAL 4610
——

|



le

{

dred miles outside of Caracas. Ho
is with the United Geophysical
Co. .. . .Dr. Hernandez is a
lawyer in the Labour Department
of the Venezuelan Government.
He too had been here only four
days. He was a guest of the
Windsor Hotel.

Mary Lane, former headmistress
of Codrington High School is on
her way to England via Canada
by T.C.A.. .. . and Rena Cald-
well who by now must consider
herself a Barbadian—she comes
here every year—left yesterday by
T.C.A. for Montreal. Since No-
vember she had been holidaying
at the Hotel Hastings.



ADVENTURES



BY THE WAY...

N
tragedy of the avalanches in
Switzerland a name I had long
forgotten caught my eye—Zernes

recent accounts of the

in the Engadine. It was the start-
ing-place of one .of the most
glorious walks I ever had, over

the Fluela Pass into the Grisons
I spent the night at the hut on
top of the pass, 8,000 feet up, be-
tween the Schwarzhorn and the
Weisshorn, I was up for the sun-
rise, and at the door of the hut
there was a lake of green glacier-
water. I never in my life saw a
more beautiful sunrise. The walk
ended at Klosters, where
Romansch, one of the survivals of
the country dialects of the Roman

Empire, is still spoken. ‘

Mr. Snapdriver’s Speech
R. TINKLEBURY SNAP-

OF

P



deny that the sailor Ben Bottle
painted this ship on his dog-
kennel. On the contrary, this
attempt of an old sailor to console
himself with a memento of his
days at sea will be adduced as

evidence of pardonable pride in
the traditions of our race

If even judges can admit that
they do not know all the laws
today, hcw can we expect a simple
mariner to realise that his praise-
worthy action might be construed
as illegal?” (Here Mr. Justice
Cocklecarrot intervened to say that
for the purposes of the case he, the
judge, must be presumed to know
all the laws, even if he had not
had time to read some of the
latest). Mr. Snapdriver continued:

again in

to lose
Lord &
Kitchener will shortly be Juanes
e &
will probably be making the trip

known
England

’



This two-toned, toast and Tent _
silk shantung afternoon dress. is
from Capri Originals’ Spring collec-
tion. i

The bodice, fastened with gold
metal buttons, slants to the side
wrap of the slimly draped skirt. The
stole, also two-toned, partly hides
the deep cut armholes,

The belt is of brown leather.

IPA



Copyright P 1S Var Ovas lot Amsterdam

By BEACHCOMBER

Town and Country, Planning Act
is like saying that a limerick scrib-
bled on a boiler is an infringement
ef the Nuts, Bolts and Screws
Act i

Runamok is Coming Here

ADY CABSTANLEIGH in-
forms me, through her
secretary, Janetta Rawlplug, that
the Eskimo poet Runamok is to
visit England soon as the guest
of the Friends of Eskimo Poetry:
He will give q series of 13,464
lectures on Poetry as a means of
Expression, and a performance of
his opera, Mik-Mak, will be given

in Lady Cabstanleigh’s music
room. It contains the beautiful
aria; “O puk wagug, tik sok

DRIVER, for the defence said “To say that a ship painted on a wagog!” The music is by Chutha-
wraetas The defence will not try to Kennel is a contravention of the kud.
ee ee ee

S
g S
4 %,
‘ :
s *.
x %
x Present .... XS
eS - «
* THE SHOP AT SLY CORNER :
x : $
‘ At...THE EMPIRE THEATRE y
s %
. On.... MAY 16TH, 17TH AND 18TH :
*
S655 OOOO OOOO SO PE POPES LOOOPTOO SEE IOSS >

$2°90 to $6.78

\\@ PINSTRIPES $5.84

M GREY FLANNEL $238 & 619

@ WEN'S READY MADE TROUSERS all Wool Worsted $17,85
@ WEN'S LEATHER SLIPPERS Black and Brown $4.84

EVANS & WHITFIELMS

DIAL 4606

YOUR SHOE STORE

wg
a
MEN’S TROPICAL SUITINGSs

DIAL

5

4220




SUNDAY, APRIL 22,

(The Compost Heap. Grass Cut-
tings. What to cut back. The
Cherry Tree.)

Gardens are improving now the
drier weather is with us, and
there have been reports that an-
nuals are at last doing well.

Petunias and Verbena are flower- fi

ing and the general appearance
of many gardens is quite gay. It
is however an untidy time of
year with the Mahogany and
Flamboyant trees showering down
their leaves. This means double
labour in keeping the garden trim
and tidy. It must be remembered
however that these leaves are
a valuable asset to the garden,
and should never be wasted, but
should always be added to the
Compost Heap. Every garden
should have its Compost Heap,
and for any gardener who has
neglected to make one, now that
the leaves are dropping is a good
time to start one. This is how it
is done.

Compost Heap

Dig a wide deep hole in some
corner of the garden where it
will not be seen, as it is not a
thing of beauty.

Into this hole throw all avail-
able leaves, mixed with any green
grass cuttings from the lawn, or
any.weeds or other green refuse
matter from the garden. Spread
the stuff out, and as the heap
grows, keep it damp by watering
it. To promote decomposition
quickly the Garden Book advises
sprinkling each layer with g little
Nitrate of Potash. From this it
will be seen that a Compost Heap
is quite a simple thing to make,
and yet it will provide valuable
organic matter for use in the
garden. When the contents of the
Compost Heap are well rotted
they can be used as an addition
to beds that are being prepared,
and for potting out ferns and
other plants.

Grass Cuttings

Besides being g valuable addi-
tion to the Compost Heap, grass
cut@ings from the hawn-mower
are useful as g Mulch for the
surface of garden beds, especially
in this very dry weather, Spread
on top of the bed they help to
keep it cool and damp, so lessening
the labour of watering.

These grass cuttings are valu-
able too when forked into a gar-
den bed, as they both lighten and
enrich the soil,

_Semetimes the lawn-mower
Should be used without the box
that catches the cut grass, so al-
lowing the grass to fall on the
lawn, as this acts as manure on
the lawn and is good for the grass.
What Should Be Cut Back

This is the time of year when
many of our flowering shrubs
should be cut back. It is not a

hard and fast rule however but

Rupert



The hare is out off sight so
quickly that Rupert decides it. is
No use trying to catch up with him.
Making his way back over the
common he sees to little figures

coming over the snow. ‘' Hooray,
there are Bill and Algy,’’ he
thinks. ‘And they've both








FRESH SUPPLIES OF |

TS

ARE
PRICE!



SWEETHEART
TOILET SOAPS

AGAIN

| TAKE HOME A FEW |
| CAKES TO-DAY

1951

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

The Garden In April

FARM AND
GARDEN

By AGRICOLA

THE PIGEOY PEA

Are you ready for the ques-
tion? Yes? Here it is: What did
must be left to the individual you eat in the way of proteins
decision of each seraener acting Or flesh-formers yesterday. The
according to the condition of his answer of a housewife in the low
own plants. Howeyer r income group would probably
that the shrubs do hepa cuting Tun like this: “well, I couldn't
back see that the ie is done 8€t meat but we had some fish
properly by cutting within a and the usual staples—rice and
oot or so of the ground. A half. *Weet potato; I forgot those dry
hearted half way will Peas a country friend gave me
only do the shrub harm. Among “4, in any case, they are a both-
those shrubs that are the better ¢ to shell and to cook; the
for a cutting back if they ne it huckster with the greens did not
are the Canariensis, the Hibis come around so there were no
the Oleander the Croton, 3 epbbage leaves to put in the rier.”
Pride of Barbados. If cut’ back So there it is, a fill without a
now, these shrubs will have the pin NB Tanna, for ia
benefit of the rainy season ahead rotei ee vere
in which to spring again, aa Sad scarcely shy

mins.

FRUIT TREES (Cont'd) ana self-help from the arden

The Barbados Cherry is a small would have provided ample
bushy tree which can easily be amounts of each. without addi-
grown in a garden. This fruit-tree tional expense. When animal pro-
is sometimes used as a hedge, or tein (meat and fish) is scarce and
as a windbreak. The cherry tree expensive, vegetable protein in
is very hardy, gives no trouble the form of pulse (peas and
and will grow almost anywhere, beans) should be used more free-
It does not require a hole of ly than normally to supplement

little
| vita—
A little more foresight

great depth, but for good results the meat and fish ration, The
it should be pal each year, Latin-Americans consume Jarge
and the old dead wood cut out. | quantities of dried beans; the

French have a wonderful way of
preparing lentils with the addi-
tion of left-over meat scraps ,etc.,

It has several bearings of fruit
during the rainy season and the
fruit is one of the most useful

: rendering them irresistible; in
Wie ie deliceas aie is wane inal died pulse Cabal lakes
ices. It can be crushed and sweet- we ten eee ot

, a meat, In this t of the world
ened with sugar, or it can be we incline . thoughtless in
made into Jam or Jelly. these matters and, of course
The Barbados Cherry is propo- there is absolutely no reason why
gated by seed or from cutting. there should not be an abundanc>
Have you any Gardening ques- of pigeon peas. They demand
tions you would like answered or little attention, grow almost any
any garden information that where and greatly improve the
would be of interest to other soil. Cooking dry peas is not
Gardeners to pass on? such a problem if pre-soaking
Have you a surplus of seeds »r treatment is applied.
cuttings you would like to ex- But now, this story had a re-
a percussion. Johnnie tackled his
Write to “GARDENING’ Daddy one afternoon something
C/O The Advocate. like this: “Daddy, we had a
and watch this column for a reply. grand time those few days we
Mrs. H. C. King writes— spent with Auntie in the country
I have two healthy, vigorously- during the Christmas holidays;
growing plants of the creeper lovely pea bushes were just fuil
Bignonia Venusta. As far as 1 Of pretty blossoms and pods of
know they are the only ones on V ng colours and cousin
the island. T have had them now Sheila and I loved picking the
for about five years. Two years pods and seeing who could find
ago, one flowered,—not very pro- the longest—some had as many
fusely—but since then although as seven peas in the pod—and
hundreds of bunches of tiny ~uds it was grand fun shelling them
appear, they all fall off instead of and eating them too in rice, soup
developing into flower clusters. and jug-jug, my, they were
From experience in other coun— good! Well, you know, not long
tries, I know that this creeper after we came home, a huckster
usually flowers for many weeks appeared at the door and offered
during the dry season. Can it be some to Mother at a shilling a
that the unusual rains of the last pint; Mother said my house-
two years, have over-stimulated keeping money won't stretch
the growth, and kept the plant that far to-day, come back next
too happy? week,” At this point, Dad inter—
Also, could you please tell me peeves “What, a shilling a pint
where I can. order a grafted for those common peas! Wasn't
“Julie” mango? In this district like that in my day, we just had
mangoes do not seem to grow very all these things and we heard
well, but I am still anxious to try none of this newfangled busi-
to grow one. ness about ‘ing and balanced

“Keewaydin” food and all the rest of it—we
Graeme Hall Tce., just ate and plenty too.” “Well,
Apr. 15th ’51. replied Johnnie, “I have been

reading that people who pay at-
iontice’’ ta the kind of food they
eat keep healthy and live long.
What about you and [ starting
now in the backyard to fork up
along the fence right reupe and
lanti some of those dry peas
i Mother has? They will lool
pretty and give us all we need
of those nice green peas and a
plentiful supply of dry ones for
later use, The border will be
attractive and serve as a start
while we think of planning out
a little food garden which will
profit also by its protection from
wind, The April showers have
started so let’s begin at once.”
“Well, Son,” says Dad “never
thought of that, you have got



2 Le

sledges, too. We can all go to-

ether.” In a few minutes they something there, let’s go.” And
ave met and Rupert is i ing of so, while Dad and Johnnie make
the strange creature he has just yeady the border, we'll hear

seen. ‘it might be a March hare,
only it's a month too soon,’ says
Algy. ‘*D'you think we could see
it if we went back?” asks Bill.

more next Sunday of this won-
derful group of plants—the peas
and beans.

CHIC



AVAILABLE
ONLY 15¢ CAKE |

——




SUNDAY

Mrs. McPherson Advance Ot |





1 rHE NEW

LOQK, 1947
Stripped of its veiling, with a
forward tilt and a crown full of
flowers, Mrs. McPherson's New
Look hat of 1947 does service for
another spring.

becomes the
i991

Sse 3



What next ?
UIDE for thirsty
Lon@on comes i. the shape of
a silk scarf showing 64 welil-
known hostelries. Captions ex—
plain how to get there and even
the sort of people you may expect
to find on arrival.

visitors to

ASHION’S fad for flowers has
induced a manufacturer to
design large roses, marguerites
and peonies that can be pinned to
a bathing suit. They are plastic

and you can even take g swim
without harming them,
wh
ORGNETTES that _ convert

into dress clips, rimless spec-
tacles with a top rim studded
with coloured stones, are a manu-—
facturer’s idea for girls who wear
glasses. ity
Most popular colours for frames
to-day: red and black.

cy * *

HAT are wome. buying for

Spring? Wives of men in
the £1,000-a-year class are often
“making do.”

Example in 1951 thrift is given
by Sybil McPherson, of Twicken-
ham, 32-year-old wife of a £1,000
a-year civil servant—a petite mid
brunette with large blue eyes and

ADVOCATE



cuts the
bills...

by gICKI SILVA-WHITE

(“White is only suitable for really
sunny days—yellow will carry me
Over thé dull ones, too.”)

HOME WASH

She will team them with a blue
tailored suit made—to~measure last
autumn designed to carry her
well into the summer.

Her main idea for economy is
to buy only materials that are
washable at home.

For summer days she has picked
up four different remnants in
patterned linen or silk with a
white background to be teamed
with white accessories, for really
het days

For spring evenii — she
and her husband Nasalih cutest
friends _at week- has
made a simple bottle green
frock long sleeves wide hip
pockets from g 30s. remnant, For
cocktails or a theatre in tewn she
has made a taffeta patterned frock,
Square-necked, with short sleeves
and bouffant skirt also from a
remnant.

During the winter she knitted

et
West Indies

Sugar Industry
MR. ALAN WALKER
ON CUBA TALKS

LONDON, April 12
The West Indies sugar industry
is advancing now as it has never

done before, says Mr, H. Alan
Walker, Managing-Director ot
Caroni and West Indies Sugar

Company, who has just returned
to this country from a_ three-
months business visit to the Carib-
bean, That is one side of the
picture

On the other, Mr. Walker said
that his chief impression of the
rip was of the dissatisfaction
felt throughout the British ter-
ritories in the Caribbean at the
news that Britain was considering
entering into a trade-pact with
Cuba.

Seated in his office, high above
London's Park Lane, he told me
ef his plans for seeing Mr. James
Griffiths, Colonial Secretary and
expressing to him the conster-
nation that news of the proposed
— had caused in the West
ndies, Originally Mr, Walker
had arrangegj to see Mr. Griffiths
on April 10th. but as that was

Budget Day, the interview had *
to be cancelled and will now
take place later this week.

Mr, Walker will tell Mr,
Grifiths that first West Indiag
reaction to the news was. that

Britain did not care what hap-

a white sweater for 5 days pened to her Empire. In _ his
The bodice has a tai esign Opinicn that is a_ short-sighted
of flowers. (Thirteen different view but, nevertheless, under-
colours on one nea@dle were standable.

needed to make it up.) He will point out that the

IT GROWS

FURNITURE that ‘ grows up with

the children” will be a
feature in the Homes and Gardens
Pavilion at the Festival.

Small chairs “grow” by revers-
ing the positions of the combined
seat and back to produce a higher
and larger seat; the height of
tables is adjusted by reversing the
table tops.

Ingenious safety “evices include
electric fires that switch off whes
tilted or lifted, power points with
automatie shutters and foolproof
gas taps.

World Copyright Reserved
—LES.



CROSSWORD



1. Norma! lanes provide a London

thoroughfare, (4)
° here's a

a ae) nee 7. Washout. (9)

v. It may make ears din. (7)

11. The cat is gore so send it Ww
Coventry. (9)

14. A neat ditterence.(4) 15, Layer.(3}

16. Pertaining to dew. (5 dent

17. its firm setting provides uprign
hock | nba) nee, (7)

1Â¥. Knock of balance.

‘ ad there were 30 more,

aR i Bagdad they, Beguenth. (0)

vuman in it.

Sugar growers of the West Indies
are already dissatisfied with the
production limitation imposed

upon them by the Ministry of
Food and that they are really
amoyed to think that Cuba is

going to get a market for any-
thing up to half a million tons
annually.

Mr, Walker said that while
he was in Jamaica, he had been
approached by several small-
holding farmers who told hin
they did not think Britain ways
treating them fairly, They be-
lieved that they would be better
off outside the Empire and could
see no point in striving for in-
creased production when there
was no certainty of a market,

But despite the views of these
individuals Mr. Walker believes
that West Indies production is
progressing as it has never done
before. New methods, newer
machinery and increased plantings
were all a sign of the continuing
growth of the industry. His own
company had recently put up two
new factories, one hi Trinidad
and one in Jamaica and new
plantings had already been made
to ensure they were kept er
productive.

EH expressed the belief that
br 1958, given anything like
normal eonditions, the West

Indies would reach, if not exceed,
the ceiling figure imposed upon
their preduetion by the Ministry
of Food. He remarked that 1953
is the year that the new Common-
wealth sugar agreement comes
into force and said that if West
Indies production were realised,
it would not be easy for Britain
to explain her Cuban commit-
ments,

He further pointed out that
originally when Britain entered
into the new Commonweaith
agreement, she did so on the un-
derstanding that she reserved a
market of 250,000 tons for pur-
chases on the world market, This
was taken to mean, thaf with the

(6) exception of a quarter of a
a flawless aki. a, Agrees oad million tons, Britain would buy
Mrs, McPherson started planning 1. Lame or mad? (anag.) (9) a all her sugar from Empire
for spring last winter, stock-piling 2. Residency OF phe poor Aol & BI —— ok se ‘esa illoaty
dress and skirt remnants bought ae che you antiseptics. (6) The ferinion 2 accord Cy in 8
on her monthly trips to the West °° Gf this would transgress. (3) — » anes ant are 1
End. 6. Shelter. ( 8 ; ;
8 je is 8 strap. (6) whole affair. It now appeared
Besides making nearly all her 10. Western farm, ( ant of that Britain had decided to in-
own clothes, she onhiean most of her '* a wosr-indiaa ® foiam ; crease her purchases of foreign
children’s clothes — she has two rs Sn Seu a wort keeping. {8} sugar and the one fens
boys aged six and two, 18. Go back ~ the sappers. ( io tnt eeniee talon” woe
¢ ». Container. Nas é D , s
Her only new purchases for 7" sr ee ee suffer accordingly.
spring were a straw bonnet, trim- Solublon of veqtergay oe a He concluded — that Britain
med with grapes, plums and veil- Baer * Aro; f “ augeagton, 21. would be making a big mistake
ing, long-sleeved silk blouse and biovort 34 Heed y vise. Parte! in breaking away from the
two pairs of washable fabric er foes ce or Casta Empire markets which had served
gloves, all in primrose yellow. fe Oapot pte: 15, Toes; 20. } her so well in the past
SADE FESS



















ee

DON’T BE



PAGE THREE







Bourn-vita

When choosing your beauty preparations, remember it's
not the knowledge of one but the team-work of m iny beauty

scientists that counts, Thas’§ why you caa always

Trust DOROTHY GRAY




&
Ne
Ves \

Wd Cleanse, Stimulate, Nourish-—these are the three

= Ww basic steps to skin beauty. Trust Dorothy Gra
“aH have created basic beautitiers to keep your type of
\\\ hag, skin lovely through the years.

£ ee

Salon Cold Cream

KIN T
. f ‘
1 Cleanse Ory Skin Cleansor Dry
Liquefying Cleansing Cream . . y
ge Fi k Lotion : KN C
2 Simulate Sessa Amen
cial Dry Skin Mix e. ‘ N
3 Nourish — See! Dry mies ‘| On rt

Suppiing Crea



Boautifed Chip tleenily

To advise you on all aspects of your beauty care

MISS BLAINE KINKEAD

The Dorothy Gray Beauty Consultant

will be visiting us *

from 27th April to 4th May |

COLLINS LTD. oy }
























































—with the faithful
use of DREAM The Sout
of the Beautiul.

Play safe bs prepared,
ol our romanuc mome V
Het few cakes of DREAM
ye BOAP, use it
¢

uithfully in your bath,
shower and at the wasn
basin for a soft-smooth

clear skin, radiant with natural

loveliness. i
DREAM is available at toilet gooss

counters throughout the island.

a7"

AFRAID TO TURN



YOUR BACK ON THE SUN

You need have no fear that you will regret it, if you have
LIMACOL in the house, for LIMACOL has an effect on sunburn that
is almost magical. It takes the sting out almost instantly, and leaves
you feeling so refreshed and cool.

of your sk
and

giving you

easing

refreshment

Remembe
that same
as an aft

give you that

LIMACOL is obtainable both

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plain and mentholated from



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eee
PAGE FOUR





BARBADOS CRICKET
GETS £2,000 |
Will Train 24 Footballers |

Wilkes
By O. S. COPPIN

f HE
| Cricke



ard of Management of the Barbados
3 Association haye announced that they
f received the £2,000 allocated to them by the

Vest Indies Cricket Board of Control as their share

V
rpc, profits of over £30,000 ftom the 1950 West
rs - ] i to
Joe
se’ agement

r to England.







ill be remembered that the Board of Man-
of the Barbados Cricket Association queried
first the division of the profits, secondly the legality of investing the
greater part of the funds and thirdly the stipulation that they use their
£2,000 to provide additional accommodation at Kensington.

This resulted’ in the withholding of the £2,000 from Barbados
until some definite pronouncement as to how these funds would be
utilised could be forthcoming.

CLINCHED THE DEAL

I understand that while in Jamaica Mr. F. A, C. Clairmonte
and Mr. John Goddard, both members of the Board of Managemen
of the Barbados Cricket Association managed to convince the West

Indies Cricket Board of Control officials that this money would be
used for improving accommodation and facilities at Kensington anc
50 it has come,

The Barbados Cricket Association have already made a mos
welcome iraprovement at Kensington in the provision of a Lad.es
Cloak Room néxt to the George Challenor Stand ei pee

This, I understand costs in the vicinity of £200. There are
other financial commitments that might prevent the Cricket Asso
ciation frem embarking at once upon any new accommodation bu



the existing one needs to be painted and overhauled and no doub,
the remainder will be reserved as a nucleus for an additional ac
commodatior, plan in the future,

CANNOT SEE THE POINT

FAIL to see how the Barbados Cricket Association would have
] justified a committing of themselves to spend th money. on
erecting additicnal accontmodation when the Cricket Bodies of Brit- |
ish Guiana, Trinidad and even of Jamaica, found theiuselves in a
position in which they could not give the West dndies Cricket Boaru |
f Contro § dertaking.
ae Tne Heated of Mant ement approved in principle of an invitation |
from the newly formed Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Association |
|



representative team to Trinidad in July of this year, :
While I ean at once agree with the Board in the r efforts to assis
the newly. formed. Association to gain a place in cricket controllins
circles in the West Indies by virtue of assisting in mé king this tourna-
ment possible, yet I fail to see how the sc heme can take its place with-
in the realms of practicality.

GOING TO BRITISH GUIANA AS WELL

NE must remember that we are committed to fulfil a touring
O engagement with British Guiana in September of this year in

» regular quadrangular Intercolonial series. : ;
= In ‘addition to this, the Barbadian element of the 1951—52 West
Indies tearm to Australia will have to leave around that time Although
one might safely rule out the members of the wae maiee a

stralia having to make either of these tours, yet one cannot visuals
oe corenetintie teams to Trinidad and British Guiana in ‘the oe
of three months without at least sixty per cent of the personnel o

se two teams being the same men. :
ag being. oc will they be able to obtain the necessary
leave for both tours? If this is not so, then the teams can hardly be
called representative. i

ASKING TWENTY-FOUR TO GO

UNDERSTAND that the Barbados Cricket Board of Management

are planning to circularise twenty-four players asking hereon
they are willing to make pee tours x —* and will then ac

e facts revealed by this questionnaire, :

ce a at once ackiuclate the view that these tours, with the
stars for the Australian team unavailable for local pommnntied 80°
the majority not being able to make both tours, constitute exce —
scope for lesser lights to show their wares and should prove a goo
investment for future Intercolonial and West Indies cricket. i

While agreeing with this point, I must point out on ‘the other
hand that too far East is West and there is only a slight margin
between the burlesque and the experimental,

BERTIE WAS “TOPS”
WAS among a most appreciative audience at the Y.M.P.C, Club

House on Wednesday night to hear Dr. Bertie Clarke lead off

‘reference to cricket. ue

It was the consensus of opinion
that not only does Bertie know his
cricket but he knows his critical
Barbadian audience as well.

His answers to some real posers
were honest and spontaneous and
although some were not definitely
decisive yet they were accepted as
honest.

For example he did not propose
to say who is the better all round-
er out of Keith Miller and Frankie
Worrell. For that matter I don’t
think anyone can. At least if
they told me I would not believe
them. Bertie said they were both
leading all-rounders in world
cricket to-day.

send











What impressed me most was
his plea first for a proper recogni-
tion of the role of a professional
in England, who he said was
earning a decent living by playing
cricket and secondly that it would
be a good thing if the West Indies
could see their way to employ
professionals on coaching engage-



4 “~ o ov)
some of the leading West Indian
ments in the West Indies, ;
I shall await with interest any action which the West Indies
cricket authorities might take on this advice, coming as it has from
one who has made his mark in world cricket.

FOOTBALLERS TRAIN FOR JAMAICA TOUR

RRANGEMENTS have been concluded for the staging of a foot-

ball tournament here between a team composed of members
of the Kingston and Melbourne Clabs of Jamaica.

The all-Jamaican captain as well as seven Jamaican caps will be
taking part in the fixtures which open on Monday, May 21.

To this end, Mr. G. Wilkes of the Lodge School will commence
coaching twenty-four Barbadian players from whom the teams will
be selected. They begin on Wednesday next and judging from the
equipment which Mr, Wilkes has ordered the training will not be a
Sunday school affair,

At least eight balls, a blackboard, wicket sticks, jumping poles
and tape have been requisitioned and the boys are anxious to get
going.

| Jack

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



Vamoose Seores Second

Edril Capsized
Twice

y our Yachting Correspondent)
VV AMOOSE was victorious in
the Second Tornado Re-
gatta which was sailed in
Carlisle Bay yesterday even-
ing. She was skippered by
her owner, Teddy Hoad, who
has so far proved himself the
best helmsman in unhandi-
capped races.
ne weather conditions were
ideal for Tornado racing. During
the first half of the race the wind



was medium but in the closing
stages it changed to medium to

light. The boats sailed north about
for the first time but this did not
affect the judgement of the helms-
men,

Edril, skippered by her owner,
Ivan Perkins, turned turtle twice
in the last lap. It is unfortunate
that this should happen us many
yachtsmen are already ie the habit

, of calling her owner “Turn Over’.

The boats taking part yesterday
were : Vamoose, skippered by
Teddy Hoad; Zephyr, skippered by
Leacock; Breakaway, skip-
peged by George Hoad, Edril, skip-
pered by Ivan Perkins: Maurice
Leach’s Comet, Thunder, with
John Bladon at the helm and
Cyclone with Gerald Nicholls at
the heim

Jack Leacock sailed



steadily but



Teddy Hoad always kept him well
-overed, He had the edge on the
other boats. Zephyr remained in
second position throughout the
race and eventually finished a
minute and 49 seconds behind
Vamoose,

“Breakaway” Overtaken

George Hoad at the helm of
Breakaway, also saited very well.
He was in third position for two
laps, but ended fifth. In the last
lap he was overtaken by Gerald
Nicholls in Cyclone,

Cyclone finished third, two min-
utes and 45 seconds behind
Zephyr. '

John Bladon sailed extremely
well in the last lap. He had a bit
of trouble in this lap when an
Alcoa boat which was leaving the
harbour, crossed him, He was,
however, able to snatch fourth
place from Breakaway around the
beagle in the last lap, Breakaway
also had a little worry with this
Alcoa boat but finished only 22
seconds behind Thunder,

Comet came sixth, four minutes
and 29 seconds behind Breakaway
while Edril was last, a minute and
24 seconds after Comet,

The Third Tornado Regatta will
be sailed on Sunday, April 29, at
10.30 a.m, It is hoped that on
this occasion Swansea, owned by
Teddy MacKinstry, and Tempest,
owned by Colles Coe, will be able
to race,

The results were as follow:



Start Time Elapsed Place

(p.m,) mins.

hrs, secs,
Vamoose 3.30 1, 2. 58 (1)
Zephyr 3.30 1, 4. 17 (2)
Cyclone 3.30 1. te 2 (3)
Thunder 3.30 1 7 26 (4)
Breakaway 3.30 1 t 48 (5)
Comet 3.30 1, 12. WV (6)
Edril 3.30 1 13. 43 (7)

_———-

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL
ASSOCIATION

Following are the results of
matches played in the above As-
sociation; —

April 12th—Westerners “B” beat
Penrode 2—1.

April 13th—Rangers beat Hark-
liffe 3—0.

April 17th—Westerners “A” beat
Maple 2—1,

April 18th—Rangers and West-
erners “B” drew 1—1,

April 20th—Harkliffe beat Pen-
rode 3—1,

This Week’s Fixtures

Tuesday April 24th—Maple vs.
Westerners “B” at St. Leonard's.
Referee Mr. O. Graham.

Wednesday, April 25th—West-
erners “A” vs. Harkliffe at St.
Leonard’s. Referee Mr. C. E.

Friday, April 27th—Rangers vs,
Penrode at St. Leonard’s. Referee
Mr. J. Archer.

FREE FOR ALL
SYDNEY.

A hotel-keeper at Euston
(Victoria), which celebrated its
centenary this week, had promis-
ed free beer and a dinner to the
first hundred applicants. There
was no rush—Euston’s population
is exactly ‘100.

| Reece.



DID IT



Tornado Victory

AGAIN

VAMOOSE, skippered by her owner Teddy Hoad,
is so far undefeated in the Tornado Regattas.

It won

the Second Tornado Regatta, sailed in Carlisle Bay yes-

terday evening.

BCL Batsman
Scores 203

Clairmonte Depeiza B.C.L. bats
man of St. John Baptist team sco
ed 203 on Friday. He was playing
for Players in a Gentlemen vs
Players game and his side scored
265 for 7 wkts declared,

The game was played at Liberty
Grounds, St, James and this is the
fifth three figure innings Depeiza
has hit this season.





T’DAD RETAINS
BRANDON TROPHY

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 21.
Trinidad retained the Brandon
Trophy as Trestrail and Ho
beat Sturdy and Farquharson
of Jamaica in a thrilling five se!
double match 6—-3, 3—6, 1—6 and
Trinidad came back with 8—6,
6—3. The match lasted for ten
minutes, Le Hong who is ill was
substituted by Farquharson. The
Governor and Lady Rance saw
the match in fine weather.

KID RALPH REACHES
TRINIDAD

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 19



Looking fit, Kid Ralph, triple
crown champion of Barbados
arrived here on Tuesday night

for his bout with Gentle Daniel
former W.I, light heavyweight
champion, on Saturday April 28,
at th Mucurapo Stadium, Port-
of-Spain.

SETS NEW RECORD

WASHINGTON, April 21.
Miss Ana B. Branger, a brun-



ette from Venezuela, claimed
today a new world altitude record
for the lightest of lightweight

aeroplanes,
In 125 hours in her super cub,

she flew 26,802 feet over the
United States, according to her
dashboard gauge,

The present record of 26,770

feet is held by a French amateur,
Miss Branger’s claim is to be
checked officially,

—Reuter.



Football Fixtures
For This Week

Division I

Mon, April 23 — Carlton — ys.
Spartan.
Referee: D. Sayers.
Linesrnen: O, Graham and J.
Archer.

Tues, April 24—Everton vs, Notre
Dame,
Referee: L. F. Harris,
Linesmen: H, D, Wilson and
O. Robinson, :

Thurs, April 26—Pickwick-Rovers
vs, Spartan,
Referee; P, Wilkin,
Linesmen: A, Thomas and L,
Parris.

Sat. April 28—Carlton vs, Everton
Referee: I, yer.
Linesmen; D, Sayers and E.
Amory.

Division I

Tues, April 24—Lodge vs, Carlton
at Bank Hall,
Referee: G. E, Amory,

Wed, April 25—Empire vs. Har-
rison College.
Referee: A. Ishmael.

Fri, April 27—Carlton vs, Spartan.
Referee: C. Smith,

Division I

Wed. April 25—Combermere vs,

Harrison College at Comber-

mere.
Referee: K. Walcott,
Y.M.P.C, vs. Sea Scouts at
Beckles Road.
Referee: W. Howorth.
Fri, April 27—Harrison College

vs, Wanderers at College.
Referee: O, Graham.
Foundation vs, Combermere at
Foundation.

Referee: L. Parris.
Empire vs, Carlton at Black
Rock.

Referee: J. Archer,

Regiment vs. Everton at Gar-
rison.

Referee: A. Parris.

Police vs, Notre Dame at Park.
Referee: O. Robinson,

HARRISON COLLEGE
TEAM HOME TODAY

The Harrison College team
which concluded its engagement
with Q.R.C. on Friday is expect-
ed home this morning.

They lost their final engage-
ment, a football match 4—3 on
Friday after being in the lead for
a long time.







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B.W.I.A.. BRIDGETOWN

SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1951



12 T’dad Cyclists
‘or Barbados
Sports

(By A Correspondent)

Arrangements for the Annuai
Athletic and Cycle Sports meeting
ef the Amateur Athletic Associa
uon of Barbados are going apace
and a grand bit of news this week
is that 12 Trinidad cyclists wili
definitely be making the trip. This
was revealed yesterday by the
secretary of the Association whe
has been informed officially by the
Secretary of the “All Stars” Cycle
Club of Trinidad.

Four of these twelve will be “A’
class cyclists and among them arc
Cecil Phelps, Uric Lewis anu
Alric Lewis who recently repre
sented Trinidad at the Pan Ameri-
can Games in South America, a
well as Freddie de Peza, wel
known Barbadian cyclist now liv-
ing in Trinidad. The “B” clas
men will include Horace Boyce
Herman Bernard, Rupert Peter:
and Lennox Long of All Stars, Pa
Gomez of Saddle Boys, Gerald Fe
nandez of Barbican Wheelers, an
Doc Carew of Whiz Wheelers. I
addition there will be one for
the intermediate class, namel.
Mikey Mendoza of Cyclones Cycl
Club.

These twelve men represent a
good cross section of the cycling
talent in Trinidad to-day anc
should be worthy of the sharpest
steel which Barbados can put in
the field against them, As it i
hoped that Gordon from B.G, wil)
also be making the trip it can read
ily be seen that some first class
evcle races are in store for us
when Whitsuntide arrives.

The secretary of the A.A.A.B
also revealed that invitations havc
been issued to two Policemen fron
Trinidad and to Miss Eileen Kin;
away with events at Trinidad’
who only last week was running
Southern Games.

C ane nell ‘Tops
Rifle Shoot

Lt. Colonel J. Connell scored
95 points out of a possible 100
to top the Qualifying Stage of the
Frontenac Trophy and the Team
Shoot of the Barbados Rifle Asso-
ciation which ran concurrently at
the Government range yesterday.

He made 49 points out of a pos-
sible 50 in the Qualifying Stage
of the Frontenac Trophy, drop-
ping the point in his first shoot
at 500 yards.

Shooting conditions were good.
The light was dull but steady. It
was a 10-round shoot at ranges
of 300 and 500 yards.

Twenty-three marksmen en-
tered for the Qualifying Stage of
the Frontenac Trophy. In the
first sixteen were Lt. Colonel J.
Connell, 95, Mr. G. F. Pilgrim, 94,
Mr. M. R. DeVerteuil, 92, Captain
C. E, Neblett, 92, Mr. T. A. L.
Roberts, 92, Mr M. D. Thomas,
91, Mr. G. E. Martin, 90, Major
A. §S. Warren, 90, Captain S.
Weatherhead, 89, Major J. E.
Marshall, 89, Mr. M. A. Tucker,
Griffith, 89, R.S.M. H. B. G.
89, Captain C. R. E. Warner, 88,
Mr. M. G. Tucker, 87, Mr, G. C.
May, 86 and Mr. P. Chase, 85.

Red House came first with 450
points in the Team Shoot, closely
run by Blue House which scored
448 points. Yellow House came
third with 434 points.

Red House was represented by
Mr. G, Pilgrim, 94, Mr. T, A. L,
Roberts, 92,. Major A. S. Warren,
90, Captain S. Weatherhead, 89
and Mr, P. Chase, 85.



Universities Win
AMATEUR CUP

WEMBLEY, Middlesex, April 21
Pegasus, the combined Oxford
and Cambridge Universities team,
won the English Football Associa-
tion Amateur Cup by beating
Bishop Auckland from Durham
county 2—1 in the final here to-
day. —Reuter.



NOTICE



Correspondence addressed
to columnists in this news-
paper must bear the name
and address of the sender,
in addition to a nom de
plume, if they request an-
swers the
paper,

to appear in

EDITOR,
Barbados Advocate,





|
|



lances again.

RACING PERSONALITIES
Stewards, Jockeys Ex-Amateur.

Riders
By BOOKIE

eee my column shall be,
about people instead of horses. I realise it is
seldom that I ever mention personalities of the
turf but I am sure that my friends do not mind
since they would much rather read about the
horses than themselves. Here to-day are a few
of them who are in the parade ring.

IRST we have spending a holiday with us His

Honour Mr. Justice K. Vincent Brown, A
Vice-President and Steward of the Trinidad Turf
Club and also a Steward at Union Park, this is
Mr. Vincent Brown’s second visit to Barbados for
the year having already spent a recuperative holi-
day at Bathsheba and thence back to Trinidad.
Actually Mr. Brown should have taken in our
_ March meeting but due to faulty stabling arrange-
ments he found himself without accommodation and was forced to
retire from the local track back to his home ground.

He then embarked on a trip to the country of Footmark and
while his stay there was too short for him to see any racing he did
bring back some impressions of the racing set-up after meeting a
few of the gentlemen of the Jamaica turf. Like nearly everybody
else who visits Jamaica he feels that they will continue to breed
better horses than we do, at least for some time to come.

Nevertheless since his stay here he has seen both Star Witness
and Pride of India and the former especially has impressed with
his looks. If Star Witness docs not produce some first class race
horses, he says, he will be very surprised,

Mr. Vincent Brown is a regular visitor to our snores and on
occasion has even acted as a temporary Steward at our meetings,
an arrangement which incidentally I would like to see established
on a reciprocal basis between the Turf Clubs of the colonies. It
would, I think, be the first step towards a West Indian Jockey Club,
for which there is a crying need out here. Mr. Brown returns home
in another week and by that time preparations for the T.T.C. June
meeting will be beginning in earnest. He is looking forward to the
renewed rivalry between Footmark and Mark Twain but hopes that
he will see the usual Barbados contingent, no matter how small.

EXT we come to a band of raeing folk who are leaving for

England and Europe to-day Among these are jockey Fred
Thirkel and Mrs. Thirkel who are going home on a short holiday.
After spending nearly fifteen years in the West Indies this is, I be-
lieve, only the second time that Fred Thirkel will be revisiting his
family in England and no doubt he will be glad to renew acquaint
However in that fifteen years Fred has seen same ups
and downs on the Turf between here, Trinidad and B.G. and per-
haps if his relatives had seen some cf the spectacular spills he has
taken in his time they would begin to wonder that hé made the trip
at all. Nevertheless this is all in the game, as Fred would always
be one of the first to admit.

In his fifteen years of riding in the West Indies Fred Thirkel
has also had a hand in many a historic event. Chief among these,
and the one which I am sure will live longest in Fred’s memory, was
his winning the Governor’s Cup of 1943 on Ras Taffare. I am sure
no other jockey has ever had the novel experience of being on a
horse that was nearly lifted off the ground by wild-eyed spectators.
Not only did Fred ride Trinidad’s favourite colt but he was also
astride their favourite filly Gleneagle when she won her first A class
mile, another occasion for riotous cheering. To himself and Mrs.
Thirkel we say au revoir.

HIRD member of the party leaving for England is Jockey Billy

Wilder, With us only since last August Billy has lost no time
in impressing us with his capabilities as a rider and he was fortunate
enough to have done what other English jockeys have found, to their
cost, is essential to immediate success out here, That is to ride a
winner at one’s first meeting in Trinidad. It has a tonic effect. No,
not on the jockeys. On the public.

Billy I understand is going home to take himself a bride, and,
like Fred Thirkel, hopes to be back in time for the August meeting.
We offer him our congratulations in advance and the best of luck.

STABLE MATE of Billy Wilder’s on the trip will be the other

member of the racing fraternity who is making the trip. None
other than Mr. Ernest Proctor himself, proprietor of Ernie’s Democ-
racy Club, ex-lightweight champion of the British Army in South
Africa, member of Dr. Jamieson’s band of raiders, amateur heavy,
weight rider on the French turf, et cetera, et cetera.

Mr. Proctor is leaving on his second trip to the Continent since
he evacuated France to the Germans in 1940 and discovered, like
Christopher Columbus, the beautiful isle of Trinidad, to which is
attached the mainland of South America. Again like Columbus he
also discovered the white sands of the isle of St. Vincent and went
floating on the bay, using this manner of transport to reach his
doctor rather than the main road which evidently must have been
too bumpy for his bad leg. Unlike Columbus, Ernie then discovered
Barbados and what with discussing various problems of racing, in-
dulging in some leap—frog on the beach at Bathsheba and earning
for himself the: title of “the Gold Braid Kid”, he finally wound up
in a race in which, as he admits himself, he got up in the last stride
to defeat the undertaker by a short head.

As he told me himsclf, Mr. Proctor was looking forward to the
trip very much until he discoveted that it would cost him nearly
£2 per day to have a bath, not to mention attendant functions. “My
advice, Ernie is to sit in the bath for as long as you can, as often as
possible. But please don’t try either your famous tap dance or
rumba in the bath, This will be hable to capsize the whole ship
and we do want to see you back”. Otherwise “bon voyage”.

PROGRAMME FOR FOUR DAYS

INCE the talk of a four-day meeting next August continues I would
like to make a few suggestions on how the races might be
divided. Although the meeting is more than three months off per-
haps it would be a good idea if various owners and trainers also
aired their views instead of waiting until the programme committee
draws up its schedule to start lodging complaints.

It has been suggested that we have 30 races and this total strikes
me as the very maximum that will be possible with the horses at
cur disposal. As far as I can see, the best way of dividing thesa
among the different classes will be as follows: 4 races for A and A2;
3 for B and B2; 4 for C proper; 2 for C2 Maidens; 3 for D and E
and sub-classes; 4 for F and F2 four—year-olds and over; 3 for F
and F2 three-year-olds; 3 for G and G2; 3 for Two-year-old creoles;
The Derby.

As there are six horses in A and A2 and nine in B and B2 it is
unlikely that we will have to worry about numbers being too high
or too low. But in C and C2 it may become necessary to prevent
C2 Maidens from racing in more than one open C class race for the
simple reason that there are twenty-one likely runners between
the two classes without any outside opposition which may come over.
At what starting gate are we going to line up 21 horses? Therefore
unless we bar the Maidens from the open events in this class until
the last day when a few withdrawals will ease the conjestion, I can-
not see how we will surmount this difficulty.

Similarly in F class the 4-year-olds and 3-year-olds will have
to be separated as there are 22 when numbered together. With re-
spect to the two-year-olds I agree with the suggestion that the colts
should be separated from the fillies in the first event for each group
and then brought together on the last day in one race. This was
done at Arima last year and I see no reason why it should not work
here, unless, of course, all of them decide to go on the last day.
Then, I am certain, things would not work smoothly.

for a change,











_, As one woman
to another...



Don’t do it, Binkie! Bad dog!’

‘Poor dog, you mean, I don’t
suppose he enjoys it’.

“Well, it makes) me so angry.
Scratch, scratch, scratch, all day,
and everything covered with hairs.
Why does it have to happen to me?
I’ve noticed your Raffles never
scratches’.

‘Not like that, [ must admit.
Before I had a dog, you know, I
used to think they all scratched
naturally. Thank goodness Bill
knows about dogs. He just wouldn't
put up with it if it scratched. ‘For
the occasional tickle, yes’, he says.
‘But constant scratching, no. It’s
painful for the dog, and it can cause
bare patches or even skin
troubles like eczema’.

*Soyou bought some miracu-
lous non-scratching animal?’

‘No, of course not! Billtold _//
me to give Raffles one Bob +

BOB MARTIN'S CONDITION

From all good chemist



L. M. B. MEYERS &€ COLTD

BRIDGETOWN BARBADOS



Ts for dogs
d store



Condition Tablets. Apparently a
dog’s ordinary food just hasn't got
enough vitamins and minerals in it,
so his blood gets out of order, and
he starts this scratching business.
These vitamins and things are all
in Bob Martin’s, so Bill says’.

“You are /ucky, having a husband
who knows about dogs, though I do
adore mine, even if he does only
know about archacology’.

*I won’t hear a word against
your husband! Anyway, you try
Bob Martin's. You'll find
Binkie’s much better in every
way for it, as well as not
scratching like that and hay-
ing a_ better
my words!’

coat.

Martin’s once a day right from the
time we hai him—and I must
say he thrives on it’.
“Bob Martin's?’
*Yes, you know, Bob Martin's
Mark



INDIES |

{

BRITISH WEST

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@ MOBILOIL has proven its me-
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with oil made b
MOBILOIL, L
Wiikins and Ki:
used MOBILOIL

For a few cents extra you can
get this same protection for 4
engine

es
















Why let inferior motor oil 3
beaten your engines effi y a on ilies ewes
und power—run up costly re
pairs? JOE DE BONA
Use nd get peak treaked 2010 miles from Cal,
cono of to ¢ ve at an average
5, mai of 0.136 iles per
s he Fic d MOBILOIL.

A

ow

k for and demand Mobiloil



Q-1246

Agents:— GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Ltd.




SUNDAY, APRIL 22,



1951

OUR RE ADERS SAW: Children’s Bill of Rights

Registration

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Permit me space in your
columns to make a few com-
ments on the new registration set
up now in vogue, Now there are
quite a lot of people pretend
they cant understand why
they must register now
h@nce they cannot vote, when
the time comes, and I feel
its incumbent on the Government
that posters should placed in
every district and explain more
thorough to the Baas what is
necessary for them to know, or
even use, the Mobile Cinema if it
is avi le. There a quite a Jot
of people who done even read
newspapers When the registration
Offcirs leave the forms to be
filup they just cast them aside
and when the time come for these
forms to be collected quite a few
wHl not be ready Its true that
some people done care a tinker
dam who secures a seat in the
Agsembly, but as I told a few
people it is betier to have the
Vote even if they dont use it be-
cguse everybody dont attend the
polls. I hope something will be
done now to alliviate some of the
hardships these officers are experi-
encing to explain to some people
who wont understand.

I am your obdt servant

H. S$. MAPP:
Park Road,
Bush Halil,
St. Michael.
16.4.51,
Price of Beef

_ SIR—A very annoying thing
is happening to the poor house-
wife, ‘who has to ag the already

increase in the cost-of-livi
hiawe e iving

For some time now beef has
gQne from 36c. to 40c. per Ib.
Although I do not yet know if it
is official but that is what we
paid until recently, but sending
to make purchases for the last
two weeks 'we find a scareity and
the further advance price of 2
cents which make it 42 cents per
pound, Pork is the same price,
and Veal is 45 cents, Can you
Sir, or any one help me to know
what price I should pay?. I tried
to get a schedule but there are no
new ones at the station. So I
hope this letter will catch the
eyes of the Authority and let us
know what price to pay for these
very essential commodities. Or
could I suggest a complete
schedule, or a notice saying that
the prices have been de-con-
trolled?

WORRIED HOUSEWIFE.

Markups

_ DEAR §IR,—Mr. Evans Clarke
-n Friday’s Advocate has asked
me why we give up profits on cer—
tain items and complain of in-
adequate mark-ups.

I would remind Mr. Clarke that
price cutting in a trade is usually
a sign of ill health rather than
the reverse.

Any reduction in mark-ups
imposes this problern on a mer
chant.

If it costs you $1,850.00 to sell
$10,000.00 worth of goods and
your mark-ups mit a realisa
tion of $2,250.00, you are doing
quite well,

If however your markups are
suddenly reduced to give you a

sealisation of $1,750.00, you are
losing money.
Two answers suggest them

selves to you if you are to main-
tain your original profit. You
must either reduce your expenses
from $1,850.00 to $1,350.00 or you
must increase your sales to a
point where yoy make the original
$2,250.00 on the new markup
ie. Increase apur sales from
$10,000.00 to $13,000.00 (without
increasing your expenses).
In considering the first answer
you will find on analysis that
your expenses fall into three cate-
gories: —
(a) Fixed
rent.
(b) Expenses which bear a fix
ed relationship to yolume
such as paper and string.
(c) Wages.
Of your total expenses of
$1,850.00, wages should be about

$1 -00,

You will find it difficult to do
anything to reduce types (a) and
(b) so that if you are to reduce
your expenses it must be almost
entirely at the expense of wages.
The impossibility of reducin,
wages from $1,000.00 to $600.0!
when they are too low even at
a $1,000.00 is obvious.

So you turn to the alternative
of increasing your sales by 334%
in the hope of making the same
amount of money.

334% increase means you
must take someone else’s share of
the existing business but it is now
a fight for survival with no holds
barred.

expenses such as



So you step up your advertising
~—you try to improve your service

~you impress on your staff the
need for greater politeness and
willingness to please and after a
period of intensive work you re-
view the position and find the
following: —

That your expenses have in-
creased in all three | categories
because the increased stocks
one 4 bigger overdraft to
inance them and you have had
to have extra werckttes Space to
house them.

Your staff wouldn’t produce the
owe politeness etc — while un-
appy at the old wa ‘ou
bad to raise them et AIS
volume couldn’t be handled by
the existing staff — so you had
to employ extra people and you
needed a new van — the store
looked dingy and you had to
paint it — and in brief that
although you had brought your
ross profit back to its original
gure, it had cost you so much

in extra expenses do so that
you were still losing money,
though perhaps not quite so
much.

So you start off on the second
lap to raise your sales hy another
334%—you fight off reasonable
demands for wage increases —
you try to get more work out of
the existing staff and equipment
—but by this time you know that
there is no answer — the best you
can do is to reduce your losses
to the lowest possible figure.

I tryst this provides an explan-
ation to Mr, Clarke’s question,

Yours faithfully,
DONALD SCOTT.
Sherbourne,
Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael,
20.4.51.

Roebuck Street Merchants

SIR,— We shall be very grate~
ful if you would publish the fol.
lowing for us. ~

It is quite obvious that the
General Public as a whole does
not appreciate the true position
of the Roebuck Street Brtgpion
Merchant ang the Retail op-
keepers, This section of the
Business community renders the
Island services equal to, or greater
than, most other business sec-
tions and should accordingly be
rewarded for their services.

Under the present system of
Control, in spite of the fact that

these Traders handle what is
known as perishable goods —
foodstuffs, they are allowed the

smallest profits.
The recent Price Control Com-

mittee found in general that
none of the various types of
business were making exces-

sive profits, but rather, in prac-
tically every instance the pres-
ent profits allowed were inade-
quate,

We find that the Shopkeepers
and the Provision Merchants are
the hardest hit, because their
profits are fixed on a Marginal
Basis; that is, a specific amount
per bag, box or whatever the
unit, regardless of the present
cost of the item. The hardship
of this system can fyeadily be
seen when the cost of commodi-—
ties have increased several hun-
dred per cent, and the expenses
of these Traders, such as, Wages,
Taxes, Insurance, Interest,
Transport, Paper and Paper Bags
have skyrocketed, while the fixed
profit remains the same,

The usual remark heard from
the Consumer when the price of
a few items goes up is something
along these lines:— “How can
you increase the price of goods
when the cost of living is already

so high,” or, “The higher the
price the more profit you
make,” Actually with this Trade

the reverse is the case, because
an inereased cost incurs increased
handling charges and increases
the monetary value of losses due
to shrinkage and otherwise; yet
these increased expenses have [0
be met from the same fixed
profits.

The Cost of Living is high for
all seetiongs of the community
including Provision Merchants,
Shopkeepers and the Employees
of these Traders. The Public
should realise that the real cause
cf the increased cost of Food-
stuffs originates Over-seas and
no local Body can control it.
Further they should also realise
that articles of food which are
consumed shortly after they are
acquired should be paid for
promptly and not months after,
as is offen the case.

Hoping that this will serve to
throw some light on the existing
conditions in the Provision and
Shopkeepers’ business and be of
some benefit to the Public,

We remain, Yours truly,

PROVISION MERCHANTS’
ASSOCIATION,

Let Us Show You
the ‘5-STAR’ car



‘Five-Star’ Motoring



Io The Editor, The Advecate—

SIR,—AlUow me to state’through
your columns that the paragraph
which states that “Parenis of every
baby born in New York State will
now receive a copy of the Chil
dren's Bill of Rights,” is a wonder
ful idea, and should be encouraged
in the West Indies also.

The paragraph reads that the
document will be distributed by
the State Youth Commission, and
affirms the birth-right of every
ehild to 1] aspects of welfare,
security, and affection without
regard to race or creed.

Being a youth worker myself
now for many years, things of that
sort would surely benefit the
commnaaly as a whole, and the
New York State must be highly
commended for such a move.

The child must be secured from
birth, otherwise the nation or
people must be kept in degrada-
tion.

I heartily commend the New
York $State for such a wise move.

L. B. CLARKE,

Tudor Bridge,

St. Michael.
April 17, 1951

Evening Institute

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I am net writing only on
the behalf of the Junior Electrical
Class, because I am a_ student
thereon, but for the benefit of the
whole Evening Institute.

I must first thank Dr, Bruze
Hamilton, the Principal of the
Institute,for the many visits he
has made to us, during the past
term. To Mr, Denton Sayers,
the Dean of Academic Studies,
we must extend our appreciation,
for so ably explaining to us, the
Rules and Regulations of the City
and Guilds, from which we are
taking our Course. We must say
many thanks again, to Mr.
Sayers for allowing us to be taken
to Seawell Airport, to see certain
electrical machinery, about which
we were lectured during the past
term.

Last but not least, to Mr, Alvin
Barnett, the master of the
Ancillary Classes, who has really
been patient and _ interested in
these classes during the~ past
term; and I hope that after our
four weeks’ vacation, that we will
return to our lectures forgetting
nothing we were taught.

It is to be regretted that the
Evening Institute has no building
of its own to carry out the practi-
cal work for which the boys are
hungry. Anyhow, we know that
Dr. Hamilton, Mr. Sayers and all
those persons in authority of the
Evening Classes are trying their
very best, to get a building in
which the technical side of this
work will be carried on.

CARLISLE L. SMITH,
Hanschell’s Tenantry,
Gill’s Gap,
Eagle Hall,
St. Michael, No. 8.

FISHERIES

Durin March, the sum of
$2,028.10 was repaid on loans; this
makes a total of $55,727.35~paid
oyer all loans. Interest collected
for the same period was $48.08
making a total of $703.88 collected
to date,

A sum of $3,406.63 was issued
in loans for the month making
a total of $101,982.92 Yoaned to
boat-owners to date.

One meeting of the Fisheries
Advisory Committee was held
during the month at which seven
applications for loans totalling
$655.71 were approved.

During the month a delegation
of three, comprising Sir Gerald
Wight, Hon. Victor Bryan and
Mr. Ceci] Farrell was received
from Trinidad with a view of
discussing at first hand, fishery
matters with the Director of Ag
riculture and Fishery Officer. Al!
phases of the fishery division
were shown to the delegation.

Flying Fish Out Of Range

Investigator was repainted dur-
ing the first half of the mopth,
and did not put to sea until 12th
March. On putting to sea, it was
found that south-easterly currents
had done much to hinder the easy
capture of flying fish, as the fish
had been swept by these currents
east of the Island beyond the
range of the local fishing boat,
hence poor catches were returned
on some evenings.

To compensate for the sparse-
ness of flying fish, large catches
of dolphin were made by many
boats which assisted in keeping
the marketing centres busy.

At the end of March, the cur-
rents were still south-easterly
and only eastern coast boats were
making large catches of flying
fish. Seventy boats are now using
gill nets to assist with the capture
of flying fish.

CODA



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“been previously circulated, was

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Governor Presents
Certificates To Scouts.

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage, Chief
Scout of Barbados presented King’s Scout Badge and
Royal Certificate tq two senior scouts, when the Annual
General Meeting of the IslanshQgget Council was held on
Friday at 5 p.m. ;
ante = a ae Wesley p
e
Troop (First Sea Scoutet cam
Harcourt Lewis of the 60th.
Barbados ). They

are the first uts in Barbados
to receive these certificates, e



} Servicé which will be held at
s Street Methodist Church
at 4.30 p.m.

island Commissioner
y . See announced that,
; ra general review o; n
- sine Boone unestin, the local in the Island and der canta
§ ae nen Soe, a tion with his District Commission.
ae tae te ailisicnos ri » ers, he had appointed Major J. BE.
. Griffith, E.D. to act as Island

g re aren Te aon eenisaioner and had recom-
, -L.C., » mended to Imperial H. rs
Mr. H. N, Chandler, Hony, Treas- that he be annette’ Island Gon

missioner, (Cheers). In referring
to the recent visits of Lady Baden-
Powell, Chief Guide, and Mr. J. L.
Me Gregor, Training Commission.
er from Canada, he said that they
had both expressed their appre-
ciation of what he had done for
| Scouting but that both felt he
9 could do more, He emphasised |
} — intention of doing much for |
: ‘ou



He nounced that on the
> eveni of St. George’s Day~
Monday 23rd April — he will be
» giving a Radio Broadcast message
over Rediffusion Service and
would take the opportunity to
appeal to the genera] public for
their support in further the
progress of Scouting in ados,

Mr. E. L. Bannister expressed
the hope that Scouting would also
be -established [n the man!
Secondary Boys’ Schools in the
Islands. |

a. Ge H. Williams . con-
gratula or Griffith on his ar
GOVERNOR porctiett as sland Commission :
urer, Messrs C. R. C. Springer, ee © latter suitably’ re
L. Tt. Gay, LB,” Waithe, and plied.
C. D. Spencer, District Commis-
sioners; Messrs. C, D. Cuffley,

H.E. THE



MESSAGE FROM THE
CHIEF 8s

E. a ae, A. G. Jordan COUT
and — ; arrison, Assistant “On this St, George’ :
District Commissioners; “Messrs. let us pledge Grieves ee ag

Â¥. M, Blackman, A, D, Blackman, better Scou , to th
and J. E. Turton, Seeretaries of of Got ee the making °
Local Associations; e wey MEN.”

azlewood . ajor

erend G. V. ROWALLA

C. Noott, Capt. H. H, Williams, Chief Soca
M.B.E. Hony. Auditor; Rrowns. British Commonwealth
E, C. M. Theobalds, ; ; and Empire,
Roberts, J. C. Hammond, R.

Sealy, F. L, Cozier, 8. O, Lorde,
L. Lynch, A. M, Jones and G. I.



| Though nine may walk away

APRIL 22 NO. 168
The Topic |

of |
Last Week

|



landed

Well boys Josh Haynes is
We hope the others see
The word that dominated
Was mere “siteerity:” |

Who live out in St.

Alone can truly te
How Josh Haynes helps the people
And helps them very well

Andrew

All Bajans aint ungrateful
There's always one to say
Thank you! for kindness, brother

‘ If this is a true pichire

Of how the people feel
It looks as though the island
Expects a better deal
. . * . *
We hope the other people
Who generally fire “hot steam"
Will understand the folly
To change a horse mid-stream
’ * ’ . :

A union is a union |

Only when all unite |

A_union aint a union |

if some will “cus and spite.” |
* . . .

|

To-day with those in power
As we stated before
The horse must quit the stable |
And then they shut the door
: . . .
{
|

Now face the market question
We don’t know who to blame
But this is “meatless Sunday
For, Bajans just the same
* . .

The butchers blame the contro!
The control blame the house

| And Joe now blames the woman

\ Who didn't make “pudding and

: Souse.”’

All this could be avoided
The crowds of people feel

So that both Joe and Robert
Could get their Sunday meal

: . . °

This don't affect the “big shots’
Who can eat ham and yea!

| And sometimes duck and turkey

| With every blessed mea}

. ’ .

A piege of pork on Sunday {
Is venison for the poor

For all week it is “sharkie”



Cuffley, elected members. Major
J. E. Griffith, E.D., was present
by invitation. Excuses were Sunday 22nd; Service at James
offered for the absence of Mr, Street Methodist Church at 4.30
H.R. Tucker, Mrs. F.J. Cole and pm. Cubs and Cub-Scouters
Fr. Parkington, S.J. ¥y particularly asked to assemble
R +t 4 at the Chureh not later than 4
The eport, having p.m, . es and Scouts will
The adoption of it ®S8¢mble on the Barrack Squaye
Mr Fo 7. Ge at Central Police Station at 3.30
and seconded by Mr. H, N. p.m. Commissioners may pro-
Chandier, His Bxcellency then ¢eed direct to the Church,
made a brief review of the Finan- Rovers of the Centra, Rover
cial Report, the adoption of which, Crew under Mr. 8. L. Barnwe!!,
after certain comments were A.D.C. for Rovers, will spend the
made, was unanimoysly carried, entire day in St. John. They will
The following officers were then tk Diving Service at the Pa-iso
elected to serve for the suing Sh OF 4} aeee, ‘after which
ate” Brosidatt aoe # nt ey will hold a Royer meeting 10
Cuke. MLC.: Vice Presidents * which members of the public are
Mr. H. R. Tucker and The Very ‘¥ited. Arrangements are in the
Reverend Dean Mandeville, ©’Pable bands of R- 8. 1.. Pollard
Treasurer: Mr. H. N. Chandler; of the Windward District.
Secretary: Mr. L. A. Harrison. Monday 23d: (St. George's
The following were co-opted to Day). All ranks are expected to
serve on the Island Council, the wear uniform on this day.
first ten of whom will also serve § pm. Basket Ball match at
he Executive Committee : . age. Sea’ Scouts
on t Harrjson College: Sea Scouts vs.

Calendar for St. George’s
Week

Annual

taken as read.
was proposed by

Major C. Noott, Mr. D. A. M. Harrison College.
erect Pee my Campy, 7.15 p.m. Broadcast by His
Blackman, The Reverend D.C. Excellency the Governor oyer

Rediffusion.

Moe, Me Tine Best end ee, «180 Pim. Central Comp Bire at
Parkinson, §.J., A Representative Boonie Headquarters, © Beckles
of the Girl Guides Association, , ; or gt
Prof. Sydney Dash, Capt. H. H. 7.30 p.m. Gill Memorial Troop
Williams, M.B.E., A Representa- Camp Fire at Gill Memorial
tive of the Salvation Army, grounds, Black Rock.

Messrs. G. I. Cuffley, L. A. Thursday 26th 5 p.m. Basket,
Lynch, J. C. Hammond, A. W. Ball match; James St. Boy Scouts
Roberts, E. C. M. Theobalds, vs. Sea Scouts at Modern High
A.M. Jones and The Reverend School,

B. Crosby. Saturday 28th, First Barbados

The appointment of Mr. W. H. Sea Scouts will present a Local
Carter, M.B.E., as Hony, H.Q. Show at Queens College at 8 p.m.
Commissioner was proposed by Tickets are on sale at 2/- and 1/6
His Excellency, seconded by Mr. each.

Christ Church
Rates

The increase in the rate on land in



C. R. C. Springer and agreed to
unanimously,
Mr. H. Risely Tucker was

elected to be the Vice-President
on the Executive Committee.

Chief Coming

His Excellency gave notice of
the forthcoming visit of Lord
Rowallan, Chief Scout of the Brit- gm Taare of Tinrtes’ chison gecided
ish Commonwealth and Empire, this ‘pe meeting” on ‘Thursday, .
sometime between January and At this meeting rm O .G@ are
March next year. My. Springer ('tW «the attention of the Vestry to

gave details ‘of the St e efficient manner in which the new

ad
v
eorge’s Assessor was carrying out his duties.





BRINGS

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FROM

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HEARTBURN, MAUSEA or ACIDITY due to loess,
try just ONE DOSE of MACLEAN BRAND STO, -

POWDER: This scientifically balanced formula gives you
really quick relief! It is also available in T. T form.

MACLEAN

BRAND
Stomach . Powder

L. M. B. MEYERS & CO., L7D
PY. BOX 171,
Bridgetown.

SOLE AGENTS

Besides salt fish galore
. ’ . .

‘
In case our good friends drop in
anon will not hurt her head
She'll serve some Anchor butter
Sandwiched in Enriched Bread,
. . . *

Boys try this then at meal-time

It's still a beily ful
If joads wont move by pushing

They may move if you pull,

> ° . . .

No pork to-day to offer

Your friends who come from far
The will still be contented |
With a bottle of T&R

“Sub owt tx toe Beas”
sponsored by
J & R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM
SSS

He'll have to try the next thing
|

We're not prepared to say
. ‘ .
|

STOP COUNTING
HOURS ALL NIGHT







SACROOL |

GIVES PAIN

ITS KNOCK.

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| NERVONE

PAGE FIVE





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[= oe wee

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown.
ee esSeSeseSeSeeFsSFesess

Sunday, April 22, 1951

HOUSING: SELF HELP

!.. ALMOST everywhere the housing situ-
ation is in a state of crisis. The world-
wide housing situation has worsened dur-
ing the past thirty-five years as a resuit of
war, preparation for war, depressions,
cessation of building, and migration. Mean-
while, aspirations for better homes have
intensified and higher standards are de-
manded for the dwelling and its environ-
ment. Asa result of worsened conditions
and the demand for higher standards, there
is an acute housing problem in nearly
every country: for many Governments it
constitutes a serious political issue. Accord-
ingly an intensive search is being made
for new means of providing the best homes
possible with the resources available. This
search tends to focus on methods of achiev-
ing progressively higher standards at low-
er cost,

The cost of building decent housing—the
cost say of substituting even minimum
sanitary houses for insanitary huts—is
normally based on estimates which include
the use of commercial materials and the
employment of ‘contractors’ for construc-
tion. It is assumed that new houses will
be provided by the labour and skill of
others than the people, who will live in the
Houses. After construction the family
moves in and undertakes to pay for having
the house built by others than themselves.
This is the method used in highly organ-
ised societies.

A realistic appraisal of the housing situ-

ation in the West Indies shows that this
process is too costly. The cost of building
is high, amounts available for subsidies are
limited, and incomes are low. In rural
areas the disparity between family income
and the cost of building decent sanitary
shelter is great. This fact applies to Gov-
érnments as well as to families. In some
cases a Government in trying to formulate
a housing programme for its people is
faced with rehousing as much as half the
population. On present resources it will
find it quite impossible to provide the
houses required by the method of having
them built by others than the families
themselves. This need not lead to dis-
couragement. There are other resources
whieh can be mobilized and among the
greatest is the manpower of the families
themselves. Most families in the tropics
have always built their own homes; if the
results have been poor it is because their
efforts have usually been wnaided.
, Their resources are potentially enorm-
ous if aided by some financial and tech-
nical assistance. Suppose that only one
member of every tenth family devotes a
day a week to improving his home. The
total monetary value of this labour even
if estimated at half a dollar per man day,
would greatly excel the amount which a
Government could allot to Housing, out of
its revenues. The monetary contribution
is by no means all: there is the pride and
satisfaction of accomplishment in making
a better home. It is not necessary that a
community should wait for a generation or
two to achieve an overall economic ad-
vance, With self-help it is possible to im-
prove the shelter of the whole population.
Clearly priority should be given to solving
problems of land, water and sanitation.
Land with security of tenure comes first;
next come water and sanitation. These are
largely the concern of Government agen-
cies but the self-help principle has already
been applied to their solution with success
in some territories. In Puerto Rico, for
instance, roads and water ‘supplies have
been provided by aided self-help.

To be successful, aided self-help requires
good organisation. It has been found better
to begin in a well defined area than to carry
out operations in many places at once. In
Jamaica, for instance such a co-operative
house building effort was carried out at
Bonnett by Jamaica Welfare Ltd. Many
useful lessons were learned from this ex-
periment. Among these were the need for



preliminary training, the maintenance of »

group interest, keeping groups small
enough to avoid their being idle, but large
enough to do the job in a reasonable time,
the need to recover loans and not to ‘give’
away material unless the individuals have
given their share of labour. The same ex-
perience has been found in Puerto Rico.
Here the most ambitious aided self-help
programme in the Caribbean has now been
started. The declared task of the Social
Programme Administration is to resettle
75,000 landless rural families, known as
agregados, in new communities. The agre-
gados who are provided with a life interest

in land, are organized in groups of 12 to 15 -

families for home building. The Admin-
istration provides technical supervision
and brings in a Water supply and latrines.
The cost to the householder of materials,
use of machines, transport and professional
supervision is about $300 (U.S.). This is
repaid to the Administration by means of
a down payment of $40 (U.S.) and the bal-
ance over a number of years—for example
$26 (U.S.) per year for ten years. Great

importance is paid to developing a proper
understanding of the programme; discus-
sion groups are formed in the villages for
this purpose. Small working groups of fif-
teen are then formed so that a minimum
of three men per day work on the project:
the whole group work on Sundays. Sites
are often selected by lot and it does not
necessarily follow that any member of a
group will actually be working on his own
house. Although the householders are un-
skilled farm labourers it has been shown
that by use of the proper methods the
wholehearted co-operation of the families
can be secured: despite their lack of build-
ing knowledge the participants are devel-
oping the necessary skills. On completion
the hause owner has a home which it has
been estimated is worth $1,500 (U.S.)—or
five times the amount he has paid in cash.
An aided self-help housing scheme is
now under way in Jamaica known as the
Tower Mill Scheme near Kingston. It pro-+
vides 875 prepared lots for self-help build-
ers, who were previously living in very
bad slums. The average loan by way of
materials and help of artisan labour is to
be about £60. A rent is to be charged for
the land which Government will lease to
occupiers for 20 years with an option to
renew. The average repayment will be
8/- per month, which includes ground rent,
water supply, and repayment of the build-
ing loan. This rent has been adjusted to
the average earnings of the group. The
lots vary in densities of between 10 and 14
per acre. Leases prohibit sub-letting
without permission and the sub-division of
the lots; they also regulate the size of
buildings and their relation to roads, etc.
At the beginning there was some apathy
and hesitancy among the would-be home-
builders. This has now been overcome and
houses are going up apace, In some cases
quite remarkable improvements can be
seen—all the result of aided self-help.
Social welfare and voluntary organisations
are playing their part in helping those, who
are old or cannot build for themselves.
Aided self-help schemes have also been
carried out in Trinidad (at Caroni) and St.
Vincent (at Sandy Bay). The success of
both schemes is due to the provision of
Jand—in one case by a sugar company, in
another by Government. In Antigua it is
hoped to introduce an aided self-help hous-
ing programme to deal with both hurri-
cane, damage and normal housing needs.
The offer of free lands by a sugar company
there should be a signifieant factor towards
the success of the scheme. Arrangements

are being made for an interchange of visits

between that colony and Puerto Rico un-
der President Truman's Point Four inter-
national technical aid programme. This
is one of the first of such programmes of
co-operation in the Caribbean area, It will
be watched with great interest.



A New Treatment

THERE is a truce but no settlement in
Grenada. And the truce is more unsettling
than the ‘disturbance’ — a new word for
riots in the Caribbean.

From all information to hand neither
the Governor nor the Administrator is to
blame for the manner in which the situa-
tion got out of hand. As far as can be
ascertained the Colonial Office must bear
the brunt of the blame. Far removed from
the focus of the troubles, the Colonial
Office appears to have decided on a new
treatment for these disturbances. The en-
forcement of law and order by govern-
ments no longer takes precedence.

Differences of opinion must be settled on
‘the spot by the leader of the mob. The
Governments are no longer to be concern-
ed with the protection of life and property.

No-one must be protected against un-
armed mobs—stones, sticks, broken bottles
and knives are not listed as armaments.
Protection against murder, injury and loss
of property must be sought, or bought from
the big boss of the moment.

There is no question that there was a
case for higher wages in Grenada where
cocoa has risen from £5 per bag to £25
without a corresponding increase in wages.
But the matter could have been settled
around the conference table.

Now Grenada is in the grip of a Gestapo.
No one dares discuss matters even in the
privacy of his home, for next day his ser-
vants have reported his conversation to the
‘big boss’ who harangues his followers in
the Market Place and, while-being careful
not to suggest violent action against the
individual mentioned, tells his hangers-on
that they have it in their power to deal with
the individual. If Grenada could be quar-
antined the situation would still be serious.

Grenada itself is suffering. The island
was just getting a name as a tourist resort,
but on the outbreak of the ‘disturbances’
all the visitors left and it will be many
years before it lives down the name of
‘trouble island’. :

But Grenada cannot be isolated, and
there is little doubt that the policy of dis-
regarding law and order will within the
next few months spread North to all the
islands between Grenada and St. Kitts.

It has been the proud boast of the British
that ‘Gangsters’ could not flourish in the
Commonwealth.

Now it seems that_gangsters are being
encouraged,

SUNDAY



Why Not A Little Theatre?!

“The day has long since passed
when a school was considered to
be of value only to children for
five hours of the day, They are
very properly considered today as
community centres where adults
who pay for them can go for
study or recreation in their leisure
hours.” That was what I read
on March 16, 1951 in the Peter.
borough Examiner, daily newspa-
per of Peterboro, Ontario.

I was most impressed because I
had arrived in Peterboro the day
before and was hoping to learn
a lot about the town’s Little The-
atre movement, from Robertson
Davies, Canadian Playwright and
Editor of the Examiner, Robert-
son Davies was away in Toronto
seeing his publishers about a book,
but the letters to the editor were
all full of the Theatre, cause
some critic was complaining
about the noise in the summer,
It was the depth of winter when
I was in Peterboro, but presum-
ably the summer was near enough
to merit discussion,

What I latter learned about the
Little Theatre movement in Peter-
boro confirmed the impression
received by the two sentences
quoted above.

Peterboro is a much less thickly
populated town than Bridgetown
and St. Michael. It has only
36,000 people. But the people re-
gard the school not just as a place
for children to learn things in
school hours, but as community
centres where the adults who pay
for them can go for study or
recreation in their leisure hours.”

An example of this use of
schools was the performance in
Peterboro collegiate auditorium on
St. Patrick’s Eve and during that
week of “Maytime in Erin” by a
Catholic Youth Organisation.

I was told that the Collegiate
or school auditorium where this
comedy was performed is used at
least three nights a week by other
theatrical groups or clubs.

And that in a nutshell is how
Robertson Davies, son of Senator
Davies started a Little Theatre
movement in Peterboro where he
edits a newpaper owned by his
father. Robertson Davies who
studied drama in London and last
year attended the Edinburgh
Drama Festival with a Canadian



SITTING ON THE FENCE

OU might have thought the

weather in this country was
bad enough without anybody try-
ing to make it worse.

You might have thought that,
if anybody tried to make it worse,
it would be our enemies, not our
friends.

But it seerns that the American
Government has “tremendous
projects for making rain this sum-
mer by dropping dry ice on
clouds.”

* . *

As most of the wet weather
comes to us across the Atlantic
the American Government “will
keep a close watch on Britain this
year” and ask the Air Ministry to
let tnem know if there is a deluge
over here, or if most of us have
been drowned,

If we are all drowned they will
hear nothing about it for a time.
But when the news does leak out
it may cause temporary embar-
rassment in Washington’s Foreign
Affairs Department.

* m *

Why have there been no mes-
sages in code or otherwise from
Britain this week, Smith?

They've all been drowned,

sir.
The whole gol durned lot of
them? i
_Every man, woman and child,
sir.
Our dry ice experiments, I sup-

pose?
Yes, sir.
Well, there’s one consolation,

Smith. We shan’t get any notes
of protest.

Hardly, sir.

In this case you might say a lot
of Marshall aid has really gone
down the drain. Eh, Smith? Ha,
ha, Smith

Yes, sir. Ha, ha, sir
Though I suppose we shouldn't



ADVOCATE





“Step this was, .r,

Bevan!”

es

By GEORGE HUNTE

theatrical company started his
Little Theatre in Peterboro in
1947 with the performance of
three one act plays in the Collegi-
ate auditorium,

He rented the auditorium for
$25 a night, charged $1 for ad-
mission and 850 people paid to see
the performances on each of the
three nights.

In 1950, the Little Theatre
earned $2200 when 2200 paid to
see the play of the year.

There are sometimes two plays
a year, sometimes only one.
Peterboro plays which have ex
cited comment throughout the
Canadian theatre world include
Taming of the Shrew and Mid~
summer Night's Dream, Robert-
son Davies began with school
teachers mainly as members of
the cast of players. Dressing
rooms are class rooms and the
auditorium is a scool building but
the name of Peterboro ranks
high wherever the Little Theatre
movement is known throughout
Canada from Vancouver to Hali-
fax.

In Ottawa I was fortunate to
see a performance by the Little
Theatre Group of that city, The
theatre was converted from a
church, it was Cld-Vicish and
Sadlers Wells in flavour, but de-
liciously ground floor only. There
was a magnificent pen drawing
of Robertson Davies in the foyer
and the audience perhaps 600 of
‘a possible 800 for whom seats
were available were there only
because of their interest in le-
gitimate theatre.

They were clean looking and
well dressed and free from the
affectations and mannerisms that
make the Old Vie worshippers
such painful exhibitionists. But
what impresed me more than the
rightness of the audience was the

suitability of the stage. There
was no curtain. There were
three set scenes permanently

visible to the audience but lit up
whenever the acts of the play
demanded their use, It was
acting of a very high order. I
had seen nothing to equal it since
I saw Renato Ricci play the most
interesting stage presentation of
Hamlet I’ve ever seen at “the
Mercadante in Naples. It was

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

joke about a serious matter.
No, sir.
Smith.
Sir?

You might cancel my_reserva-

tions for the Festival of Britain.
Yes, sir,

And Smith. As I may be rather
busy working out the reorienta-
tion of European defence, I'll have
my lunch in the office.

Yes, sir, °

Starting with the usual iced
tomato juice. Not dry ice, Smith.
Eh, Smith? Ha, ha, Smith.

No, sir. Ha, ha,ha,

Stalin’s Birthday

“Private soldiers of the Red
Army havea proportion of their
pay deducted each year to buy
Stalin a birthday present.” —
Military Intelligence report on
Russia,

E get no pay today
We get no pay tomorrow
As no one gets his pay today
We cannot steal or borrow,
The sergeant says we get no pay
Because it has to go
To buy a jolly good birthday gift
For jolly old Uncle Joe.

Jolly old Uncle Joe

Oh, we love him so

We wish a hundred happy returns
To jolly old Uncle Joe.

We get no beer to-day
We get no beer tomorrow
As no one gets his beer to-day
We're sad and full of sorrow
The sergeant says we get no beer
Beeause they take our dough
To buy a jolly good birthday
drink r
For jolly old Uncle Joe.
Jolly old ncle Joe
Oh; we love him so

London Express Service

streets ahead of the performance :

I had seen of Richard Wright’s
“Native Son” at the Boltons in
South Kensington and the show
I saw at the New Lindsay Thea-
tre off Notting Hill Gate was so

poor that I cannot even remem- ‘

ber its title although I do remem-
ber it was something to do with
a post-war topic,

¢
If the West Indies are genuinely

interested in Legitimate Theatre,
there seems no reason why it
should not flourish and grow
here if not to the stature of
Canadian theatre at least along
similar lines of development.
When Lord Bessborough offered a
trophy to the winner of the Domin-
ion Drama Festival in 1933 popu-
Jar drama was hardly known in
Canada.

Recounting the growth of Cana-
dian theatre in the Times of Lon-
don on July 12, 1948, Robert
Speaight, adjudicator of the Do-
minion Drama Festival wrote “at
first only plays in one act, or a
single act taken from a longer play,
were admitted and these were per-
formed in curtains, assisted by the
normal properties, and furniture
and by such necessary scenic ele-
ments as doors and windows,”

Robert Speaight was impressed
by the excellence of the French
teams in 1948. His praise of the
Compagnons de St. Laurent, a
group of professional but non-
commercial players in Montreal is
praise indeed, “They are” he says
“notably superior to similar groups
now playing in France.” If Canada
by its Dominion Drama Festival
can bring into healthy rivalry and
competition the players of the twc
great European cultures, cannot
the West Indies by a_ similar
healthy spirit of c»mpetition pro-
vide enough little theatre move-
ments to give amateur actors of al
racial origins the opportunity tc
win a trophy?

“Amateur acting” as Robert
Speaight admirably says in the
article mentioned above “has this
advantage, that it costs very little,
whenever there are four board:
and a few snarks of talent you
have the essence of theatrical en-
tertainment.”

_ Surely we can find four boards
in every parish of Barbados?

We have no wealth to drink the
healt
Of jolly old Uncle Joe.

We get some drill to-day
We get some drill tomorrow
To get no pay for drill all day
It fills us full of sorrow
The sergeant says we should be
glad
Our wages to forego
To buy a jolly good birthday cake
For jolly old Uncle Joe.

Jolly old Uncle Joe
3 ee one him. so

e wish a hundred years of life
To jolly old Uncle Joe. ce

April Fool

ONCE upon a time, when Eng-

land was merry, April the
First was the day when the well-
known English sense of humour
came to the surface like a drown-
ing man, gave a hideous grimace,
and disappeared till Christmas.

It was the day when mother
served an empty egg shell for
father’s breakfast. and all the
children yelled “April Fool!” as
he cracked it; when father
retaliated by giving mother a
parcel of endless wrappings round
a little box with “April Fool”
written inside.

If any humorist feels like
making a fool of somebody this
morning allow me to remind him
that nine days from now will be
Budget Day, when the Chancellor
of the Exchequer will make a
fool of everybody.

On the day after, April 11, life
may not be worth living, except
for spivs and smart Alecks. Wage
earners who like a cigarette may
not be able to afford one; those
who like an evening drink may
be forced into total abstinence

which will make them healthier

and hungrier

almost meatless

April fools in an

intr

-L.E.s. |

‘
















SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 195i



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SUNDAY, APRIL

o9
-—



The Heys who did
going to fight want

1951

n't think they were
to get back to:—

THE GLORIOUS
27TH BRIGADE

‘WE'LL GO ON
FOR

HITTING THEM
SIX’

Hy SIDNEY. RODIN

VERY SOON Lieutenant Edward Cunningham of the
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, will stand up in his
wheel chair in an Aldershot hospital to see if he can walk



“The Gooks will never
drive the Argylls off this
hill”—last words of Major
Kenneth Muir, V.C., of the
Argylls.





He lost his own on November
7 in Korea, He was just out of
school and barely 19, yet he was
leading his platoon, fighting in the
glorious 27th Brigade.

In another ward Corporal
George Potts, aged 21, of the Mid.
dlesex Regiment, is waiting for
them to add an inch and a half
of leather to his right boot heel
so that he can do away with irons.
He was shot in both legs and his
right thigh-bone _ shattered ~~ in
Korea on October 30. He, too, was
a soldier of the 27th,

Still In

There are more of them in this
hospital, and in a Glasgow hos-
pital as well... All. wounded in
Korea, all fighting for the 27th—
months.ago, Yet the 27th is still
in the line. The brigade has been
almost continuously in action since
early September—177days out of
212 in the line,

And as the first severely wound-
ed heal and prepare to leave their
beds, they see more of their com-
rades arrive to take their places.

No Bitterness

War Secretary Strachey told the
Commons last week that after
seven months’ “distinguished”
action, plans are now in hand for
the relief of the brigade. Yester-
day they were still killing
Communists.

But among the men there is
no bitterness. Without exception,
all are proud to belong to the
27th,

Sharing Lieutenant Cunning-

ham’s ward is MAJOR 4. A.
PENMAN, of the Argyll and
Sutherlands. He was. twice

wounded in Korea, and won a bar
to his M.C. in November for res-
cuing other wounded under fire.

He said: “There is a_ terrific
brigade spirit. Morale is high, Our
men know what they are fighting
for, and they know that their good
soldiering and steady determina-
tion will beat Communist hordes
with all their spasmodic fanatic-
ism.”

_Below. Strength

There weré just the lst Battalion
of the Argylls. (“The Thin Red
Line’) and the ist Battalion of
the Middlesex (“‘The Die-Hards”)
when the brigade arrived in
Korea in August.

But two battalions are only two-
thirds of a brigade, and each bat-
talion was below strength. There
were fewer than 2,000 men. They
had no tanks or artillery, and little
transport.

Corporal Potts, therefore, echoed
the feelings of both officers and
men when he told me: “We
thought we were just a token
force sent for political rehsons,
and too weak in numbers to be
much good in a fight.”

But in little more than a week
they seized their chances to hit
the enemy.

Potts was a trainee draughts-
man when he decided in March
1947 to make the Army his career.
He led the first patrol at the Nek-
tong crossing before the first
big advance. Two months later
he was shot rounding up Koreans
who came out of a house hiding
behind a family with three chil-
dren. His officer was killed on
the spot.

They were then 25 miles from
the Manchurian border.

Hardened Youngsters
“The Gooks are good at infil-

trating and at hiding themselves,”
said the corporal, “but they are
poor shots and too fond of run-
ning away. ;

“Our men are young but they
were hardened in hill warfare tac.
tics in Hongkong. They had got
the measure of the enemy before
I left. The 27th will go on hit-
ting them for six as long as need
be.”

LANCE - CORPORAL SYME,
aged 21, of Clydebank, Glasgow,
was shot in the groin on Hill 282
on September 23—in the same
action in which Major Muir, the
most famous of all the 27th, won
his V.C, and died.

“We were short of stretchers, so
I walked about 600 yards to a
regimental aid post,’ said Syme.

The lance-corporal hopes to be
out of bed soon. And then?—‘“I
want to rejoin my battalion, and
the 27th.”

Before they left for Korea, the
27th were told by Sir John Hard-
ing, Commander-in-Chief, Far

SPO PPPS SOP POPP PPO OOD

POP



I= per

KNIGHTS

£55668,

ce

on the artificial leg they are going to fit him.

East Land Forces: “Shoot fast,
shoot strajzht, shoot to kill. You
earry the honour of the British
Army and the British people.”

A badly wounded N.C.O. re-
membered: “We felt pretty im-
portant. We were the first
Britons in Korea.

A Page of Glory ....
CYRIL AYNSLEY, Sunday

Express Special Correspondent

in Tokyo, cables:—

The 27th Brigade entered the
Korea War at the express request
of . General --MacArthur, who
wanted infantry badly.

They landed at Pusan on August
28 from Hongkong dressed in
jungle green and all ready for the
summer Campaign. By November
5 a few were still in jungle green
and the brigade was tied up in a
pretty desperate battle at Pack+
chong.

They reached Taechon, 40 or 50
miles south of the Yalu River,
And it was from there that they
were put in reverse and began the
long trek back.

; In Front

The line was stabilised by
General Ridgway, and after the
turn of the year the United
Nations began to advance. The
27th was there in front.

If it is still right to talk of
pages of glory the British 27th
Brigade has written itself ane.

Brigadier Coad was the first to
realise that to beat the North
Koreans and Chinese you had to
send your men climbing hills, and
he did so.

Colonel Andrew Man, second in
command, was no less a gooa
fighter. I remember over a
whisky and soda he said: “They're
great soldiers, The great point is
that we've had them away from
mother’s apron string for a long
time, sh

“Mother, and members of Par-
liament, are the worst enemies of
Army officers. They ask too many
questions,”

Today, the brigade are on the
38th Parallel,

London Express Service



———
ett tittle itn inlin

SUNDAY. ADVOCATE



AHSTORIC. MOMENT IN MAN’S STRUGGLE FOR JUSTICE



THIS PAINTING, one of 9 appearing in colour in LIFE International's April 9 issue, depicts the trial
of John Peter Zehger, a newspaper apprentice in colonial America who was brought to trial for ibél
after founding his own paper and writing an honest account of a crooked election fight in 1733. His
lawyer, demanding that the jury men free Zenger (shown in witness box), said such a decision would
secure the right “both of exposing and opposing arbitrary power by speaking and writing truth’. The
verdict of “not guilty’ not only established the strength of the jury system in America, but estab-

lished a strong precedent for freedom of the press—a principle later to be included in the American
Bill of Rights.

LIFE commissioned artist Federico Castellon to do these paintings depicting memorable victories
in the fight for justice, and called on the Honourable Jerome Frank, eminent U.S. judge to write the
text.—Photo courtesy LIFE Int'l. Copyright TIME Inc, 1951,



The Lngtich inks lovea conference...
Soft Drinks Top
The Agenda

STAMP OF THE WEEK

We'll have to run very
fast to win next year

"HIS stamp brings a warning to

British athletes who will ‘train
* senson with eyes on the
Otymopic

were re eee





, ; : Games in
No Meeting Yet Finland * next
2 . year.
our team
Between Seretse wiv flee
BA face (but not after hours) Bier gous
eo on

Khama And Uncle SCARBOROUGH. aepeareek wae a way of getting mat oe for
i é ave iced, if y your holiday free. the Games, 11
LONDON, April 13 OU may have noticed, of ah Our’ gs ft. irink e t laughed hations have
Tshekedi Khama uncle ” of are observant, that this is YUur soft ari xpert laugh just held
Geretse Khama the. exil A cites the time of year when the British till his cheeks were wet with Olymptes—the
“ets » the exiled chief vonference season gets going, tears of citric acid. All he could tirst in Asia~
designate of the Bamangwato ; : ; ahead (: H iss at New Delhi,
tribe in Bechuanaland, Have you ever been to one? No? Murmur was “Super.” Japan won
arrived in Britain nearly two Well, what about coming to Scar- After the mayor left the con- and India was

7 borough, where the season opens ference the delegates were given SOT at
months BO, but has _ not ; a rousing lecture on “The Future ote ee
yet seen his nephew. It is ST malay 9 sing on u e torch, symbolising the

unlikely that they will meet in
the immediate future unless an
Official meeting is arranged in the
cofice of Mr. Patrick Gordon-
Walker, the Secretary for Com
monwealth Relations, Unofficial
attempts made by Seretse’s cousin
(a law student in London) and
an English friend have failed.

Seretse continues to live

London with his wife, Ruth, and National
their daughter, Jacqueline, in a Drink Manuacturers?

Chelsea flat. His uncle is in Ox-

ford as the guest of Miss Marjorie know about conferences. Just you
Perham, the authority on Colonial wait till all we soft drink manu-

effairs, But Seretse has become
suspicious, I learn, of his uncle’s ©



of the Soft Drinks Bottle.” which was carried

spirit



BERNARD My son did not attend this. He ne etadtum - by relays | of
WICKSTEED’S | had made friends with the chil. ‘¥°"™ ° ae at x ke
PRIVATE FESTIVAL dren of a lemonade manufactur- London Express Sorvice

er, and they had gone off to do

5

(No,

in the series)

some serious soft drinking. ry a
takes his son to a The children of soft drink s | ILL ALIVE
chick-tail party... manufacturers play an important IGOON

Peres part in the trade. Their fathers fase ‘irl aay oat J

Pe ar eee —_———..._ ynable to trust their own palates, A SGUrMmese girl in = ar ay,

in to-day with a conference of the dose their offspring with quee1 oe ant dead, a veins
Association of Soft concoctions and note reactions shred when it was Loun os

grave was too narrow to receive

Lordiy Ones the coffin, The girl's parents had

Tao tame? Ha ha! that’s all you

Y boy, in the company of jhe coffin opened; the girls eyes
such accomplished pop were fluttering,. Taken home, the
facturers get together to talk tasters, was at a disadvantage, “corpse” returned to life.

about the syrups, the incidence and felt as you and I feel when



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intentions afd there is a growing Of drinking through straws and
feeling of hostility between them, the wickedness of the Govern.
When the last effort to arrange ment’s sugar policy.
a meeting at Oxford was made, _ For added fun let's take a soft-
Seretse decided at the eleventh drink consumer along with us.
hour not to go. My son Philip, aged 11, is just
In less than a fortnight, Seretse the fellow for the job. His capac-
will be sitting for his Bar Finals ity for soft drinks is astonishing
examinations. If successful and There you are, What did I tpll
called to the Bar, he will automa- you? The prospect of meeting 500
tically become a barrister. Se- lemonade kings and ginger beer
retse Khama is convinced that his barons has gone to his head im-
chances of becoming chief of the mediately. He has caught the
Bamangwato tribe are very poor. British conference spirit so well
His uncle on the other hand, is that he has knocked back three
negotiating to be allowed to re- stone gingers and a fizzy lemon-
turn to Bechuanaland, Tshekedi ade before he’s half-way there,
wants power and progress for his The conference was _ officially
people, Bechuanaland for Bechu- welcomed by the Mayor of Scar-
enas. borough, Alderman Rodney
There is a marked change of Chapman. All the best confer-
opinion of Seretse Khama’s con— ences are welcomed by mayors.
troversy in coloured student cir- Alderman Chapman is. not a
cles here in London. Most are soft drinker and he said so. Then
against Seretse becoming chief, he felt. in his. pocket for his
Some students feel that Seretse speech, and found that by mis-
Khama is acid of that sense of re- take, he had brought one meant
sponsibility which is the pre- for the Red Cross. My boy, bub-
requisite for a chieftain’s po- bling carbon dioxide, thought this
sition. Another school of coloured was “super fun,
University students hold tena- Warmed by the applause, the
ciously to the view that for an Mayor went on to say that all
African chief to marry a “white” conferences were rackets, If you
woman is an aspersion on and ajwere in business for yourself
lowering of the dignity of Afiean [your expenses came off your in-
chieftainship. come tax. and if vou were an

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pecple talk to us in a lordly way
about the merits of unknown
wines.

However, he got his own back.
After a passion fruit juice, fol-
lowed by a pineapple squash and
two rf/spberry cordials, he said:
“IT must be going now. I have to
return to the Press table.”

After the morning session the
delegates adjourned to the bar
for lunch. On’ all sides the talk

wag about the seven-ounce bottle,
the family-sized bottle, and the
suggested abolition of the “baby.”

A man standing next to me
said: “There is only one thing
for it. We shall have to educate
the public up to drinking straight
from the bottle.” ’

It was a_ curious thing. Al-
though . everyone was talking
about the soft-drink trade no one
seemed to be supporting it. Un-
like well-brought-up — children,
soft drinks were heard about but
not seen.

Refreshment
T was the same in the evening,
after my junior reporter had
retired with a bottle of pop by
his bed for the morning.
Refreshment flowed like water

but it was not mineral water
One manufacturer came to me
and said: “If you want to taste

Designs an
36 inches \

eo eee Se —
a

Prodigy

CARTAGENA,
A hen owned by a Cartagenian,
laid an egg with three yolks,
which weighed 170 grammes,
Two hours later it laid another
3-yoke egg weighing 150
grammes. Cartagena town coun-
cil have given the hen a brand-—

new coop with a silver lining

something really good come up
to my room,’

He opened a cupboard and if
you expected me to see rows of
bettles containing brilliant-hued
exotic fluids you don't know your
British conference, Ali that the
bottles contained was a beverage
made in Scetland. And they were
all full—when we started

The conference continues until
Tuesday, and one of the attrac-
tions to-morrow is a chick-tail
party. The hos are the junior
film stars Janette Scott and Wil-
liam Fox. And the object is to
test just how much pop can be
consumed by 50 orphans in one



afternoon, Ambulances call at
five,
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to attend. He says it’s going to be
uper-fun finding out,

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Coloured People |
In Britain |
British Council Cf Churches |

Hold Conference
LONDON.

Over 150 sccial scientists, wel
fare workers and court _mission—
aries met in conference at the
Central Hall, Liverpool, recently,
to consider the welfare of colour
ed people in Britain and ~ what
can be done to remove any sus
picions of racial discrimination
_ No more suitable place could
have been chosen for the confer
ence, There are in Liverpoo]
about 6,000 Negroes or persons of
Negro descent, and 3,000 of them
are Colonials from Africa and the
West Indies,

The Rev. E. Seale, Assistant
Secretary of the British Council
of Churches, who presided, re
viewed the welfare facilities al-
ready provided for coloured peo
ple in Britain; he called attention
to complaints among Colonials liv-
ing in this country, that they are
being treated with indifference
They claimed, he said, that
prejudice and discrimination
against them in England were
widespread. But, Mr. Seale
pointed out, there was difficulty in
obtaining any aceurate estimate
of the degree and extent of
discrimination against coloured
colonials in industry.

The Rev, John Webster who
works among a large number of
coloured people, mainly seamen
gave statistics relating to -unem-
ployment and redundancy among
colonial seamen In their plight

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bait of the wrong type of English
women, ’

A social worker from Haul!
said the extent to which coloured
people were admitted into British
society was. still narrow. He
quoted the words of a West
Indian student at Hull who had
said: “In Britain the coloured
man is invited everywhere, but
accepted nowhere.”

A Home Office
replying to questions about the
welfare of coloured children
declared that measures for. this
were under active consideration

“In these days when. we hea
so much of racial antagonism”
commented the Bishop of Liver
pool, “it is good to be present at
a Conference which seeks _ tc
bring about racial understanding
through peaceful. methods.”

The Chairman informed _ the
delegates that this was a prelim
inary to a larger conferener
planned to take place in the
immediate future.

Ph.s7

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Among others in the poe 3 ve
gallery was Professor Co oe
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Social Science at the University

of Liverpool. When I spoke to
him chorwarta, he solid: “Colou
prejudice is rare among Liverpoo.
children, for they appear to be



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i


PAGE EIGHT

Hunting Heads ;

Hy IAN GALE

CANNIBAL CARAVAN nd
Charlies C. Miller) (Mi
Press.)

Do not mistake me when I say
that this is a disgusting book,
what I mean is that the people
described in it are dis
Cennibal Ca¥avan is about wpe
headhunters of New Guinea, the
most filthy, amoral and literally
the most bloodthirsty people in the
world—but then one cannot blame
them for they are still living in
the Stone Age.

But before I say anything more
about the book ied me t you
about the author. Charles “Can-
nibal” Miller is an amazing man,
and his career reads like the-
dream-come-true of an adventur-
ous small boy.

He was born in Samarang,
Java, where his father was a cap-
tain in the East Indian Army, and
when he was still a toddler orders
came for his father to go to Dutch
New Guinea. His orders were to
stamp out cannibalism and head
hunting, and being a good soldier
he set about his task with all
possible speed,

In going to New Guinea, he took
his wife and son, and thus Mrs.
Miller became the first white
weman to visit Dutch New Guinea,
and Charles the first white ebild.

Despite many adventures the
boy survived and when he reached
high school age he was sent to
Holland, He studied engineering
at college, but found it too dul
and took up racing motorbikes,
boats and cars, and then became a
pilot. When the 1914 war came
along Miller joined the French
airforce.

After the war he did barn-
storming flying, then served a
rancher as aerial chauffeur, gave
that up to test speedboats in Sid-
ney Harbour and then went to
New Guinea again to visit his
father.

“Sail On”

When he went back to Austra-
lia he sold the photographs he had
taken in New Guinea and bet all
of it on an outsider called “Sail
On”. The horse won, and he
went to America on the proceeds.
There he raced cars, tested air-
planes and finally became a cam-
era man in Hollywood, But the
jungle was calling again, so he
went out East to lead an expedi-
tion into New Guinea for Miss
Leona Jay, a society girl who
craved adventure. Before the ex-
pedition started Miller married
Leona, and they” spent their
henevmoon among the head-~
hupters. i

hey set out from Merauke in
a motor boat, towing eleven
canoe-loads of Kaya-Kayas, and
sailed up the river until they
reached Bupul—‘a stinking little
city of some 200 souls all black in
colour and intent.” From there
on they had to go by canoe.

Eventually, after meeting up
with a tribe of pigmy cannibals
and many other adventures they
found what they were looking for
—p lost race.

These people, the Kirrirris,
were of average height and aristo-
cratic bearing, and resembled
American Indians, They had
high cheek bones and sharp
pointed nose, and, sdys Miller,
resembled the other natives of
New Guinea only in smell.

As far ag weapons were con-
cerned, their craftsmanship was
excellent. ‘Their knives instead of
being made ef bamboo were fash-
ioned out of human thigh bones,
the knob’ gt we end of each being
cleverly werked into the shape of
a human ji8ad, “As instruments
of murder,” says Miller, “they
were the icest native weapons
I had se@iip Duteh New Guinea.
The arrowsewere good too, being
straight ani@ pointed with small
crocodile h.

Their fields were well irrigated
and among the crops that were
being grown were sweet potatoes,
tobacco, sugar cane, gourds and
egg plants. These peor, though

still in the Stone Age, were ob-




viously far in advance of the other
natives in New Guinea.

Baby Meat
Now we come to a part of the
book which made me feel slightly

ng. sick. Leona, Miller’s wife was,

having a look around the village:
“She was just in time to round
the corner of the lodge as the
witch-doctor came out carrying
a two-year-old baby by the heels.
The baby was daad, all too obvi-
ously killed by a blow on the head.
Stopping by a collection of rocks
he swung the child’s corpse over
them until all were liberally
sprinkled with blood. Then he
moved on the next pile, repeating
the performance.’..”. The tiny
corpse was then plastefed with
clay until it was ed one’ big
block. By the time they returned
to the lodge a big fire had been
kindled. Into it was tossed the
baby.” When Leona told Miller
what she had seen he investigated.
He found out that the baby he

been captured from another vil-
lage. The rocks sprinkled with
its blood were g& used to ease
the pain of a w
ing birth, and en cooked the
baby’s meat would be distributed
to all. the expectant mothers in the

ila,

vill amr

“We were at the far end of the
village” he goes on “when a sud-
den commotion at the combination
bachelor and ceremonial lodge
announced that the feast was
ready. Women not already at the
fire came streaking out of their
huts like so riany dogs and in a
moment they were packed
together in a fighting mass that
would put to shame any sale in
a Broadway bargain basement.
hustled Leona into our tent bef
she became violently sick, but 4
noise coming through the
walls damaged her stomeeh almost
as much as the sights, I cam
out just in time toe head of
Leona’s little girl-friend. She
was clutching a chunk of steam-
ing, pale white meat, ‘for the
white lady’. I told her she could
have it for herself, and she went
away happy.”

Colossal Remnants

Not long after this Milley found
some la tusks in the village,

and on bi told that they came
from lizard-like cere te" Woes
cided to go in search 0} ese
creatures, He says he fgund
“colossal remnants of the age of
dinosaurs” and took pictures of
them. But sirice he reproduces no
photographs of the “remnants”
among the other super pictures
in the book I am pb bit tical.

‘The Kirrirri marriage rites are
simple and effective. The young
bucks livein the bachelors’ quar-
ters but have the run of the
village. If a youngster desires to
spend the night with the girl of
his choice he may do so, sure
that he will not be molested by
the girl’s parents, But he must
be up and away before sunrise.
lf however he oversleeps the girl's
mother pounces on him and he is
automatically married. The Kir-
rirris boast of a 100% inarriage
late! 4

Head Hunt

On the way baek, back down the
river Miller got mixed up in a
frightful orgy. He was forced
through circumstances to accom-
pany a tribe on a head hunting
expedition tg another village.
His tribe won, and here is how
he describes the decapitating pro-
cess, ‘in case’ where the vittim
was already dead, the ceremony
was brief. A quick slash across
the throat with a bamboo knife,
and then a deep cut to the spinal
eolumn as close to the shoulders
as possible. When all the neck
muscles were cut the head was
seized in a hammer-lock and
given a sharp wrench which snap-

d the vertebrae with a report
ike a pistol shot... . Victims
still unconscious or sorely wounded

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(By STEPHEN SPENDER. HAM-
ISH HAMILTON. 15s. 349 Pages).

ONE by one, beating tie.r
breasts and scattering ashes on
their hair, the boys of the pink
brigade come to the penitents’
pepeh This is Spender’s second

rip.

First was his essay in The God
That Failed when told how
he found the flaw in Kar] Marx.
Now ta a wider sweep, he

ad presents what is almest the type

the thirties era

at, the Spanish
iilusions, the days
Stalin was R,cemaarret -
“We were the Divided Gener-
ation of Hamlets,” says Spender
in, his grand way, “who found
the world out of joint and failed

to set it right.
morning in 1937,

autobiography
of the Popular
War, gen

One February
readers of the Daily Worker saw
Saas headline flare across

‘avourite per.
Stephen Spender had joined the
party! °° ecklg tak

Some of the comrades were
perplexed. Nor did the new con-
Ye’ tase any Sure of himself.

harboured heretical doubts
about the’ justice the Moseow
trials, But Harry litt, smiling

ally’ pressed’ the card

9 bis hand and announced that
there was a place for Spender
i the okernetion Brigade, then
ghting ed s Enemy in the
sierras of Spain.
penser was taken aback. “I
equid not see what qualifications
I had as a soldier”.

His gualiacetions were other-
wise, Was a poet capable of
writing The Express—

After the powerful plain

manifesto oe

The black statement of piston

without more fuss

But gliding like a queen, she



were accorded a slightly different
treatment. Before they were
sor ne from their skulls they
had to produce some sound more
Intell: than a moan, the last
sound made would be used wis 9

PP”
‘And here is his description of
the scene: ‘Reason had fled with
e first drum beat but now fol-
gwed an exhibition of violent,
mass insanity so utterly revolting
that not even the ruthlessness of
miodern civilisation in a fanatic
ood or the beastliness of the
west scavenging animals could
Match it. Absolutely berserk, men
end women fell upon the corpses
i? an abandonment of perverted
ust. They grovelled in blood
ed mud, hacked the bodies
with bamboo knives to rub their
perms and legs in the freshly
ppaied wounds, smeared them-
felves from head to foot with gory
filth, and rolled on the ground in
incontrollable convulsions, drunk
on the powerful stimulant of mass
murder. The place became an
abbatoir gone mad, Arms and
legs were cut through and
wrenched off by brute strength.
Hearts and livers were yanked
forth and tossed in a pile with
the rest of the meat that was to
be taken home for the feast .. .”
An interesting book, but per-
haps now ‘you understand why I
ed it disgusting. If you have
4 strong stomach I recommend
you to read it.



IMPERIAL LEATHER e@



LINDEN BLOSSOM °

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Spender Gets

Ashes In His
Hair Again

ase a ae

GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

leaves the station.
P distinction, even if
everybody did not like it.
cry went up from Cambridge:
lone, be our defender
aaa Stephen Spender,
1 ve us peace
From Louis MacNiece
Young Spender had been
brought up in a i i
—— high sninded Nonconform-
ist, where gihe Lloy
Geor, cl f Alfred
actesteg uhm. As te unt May,
at unketings she would
push forward, “Let me
meet Mr. George”, and then
trumpet indignantly, as if expos-
ing a plot, “Good afternoon, Mr.

George, St
From din, the
i c of oe to
then to Germany,
where the complexities of life
were (so he heard) relaxed. “M
aim,” he wrote solemnly in his
diary, “is to achieve maturity of

soul. After my work, all I live for
is my Ast dt, . f

Already there had been friends,
Marston, for instance, who when
Spender explained his affection,
replied, “Do you know, old man,
this is first time you’ve ever
talked me that I haven't beer
completely bored." ,

After that there was only one
thing to do. “I insisted,” says
Spender, “that we should not
meet again.”

Then there was Polly, toast of.
the science undergraduates, one
of whom lost 10lb. in a wee
through sheer loye of her. Polly
then turned to the poets; no record
exists of her effect on their
weight.

And in Germany, there was
Walter, unemployed and. dis-
appointingly inclined to borrow
money. After whom came Jimmy,
unemployed but Welsh, to whom
Spender gave a job as house-
man.

“The difference of class and
interest between Jimmy and me
eertainly provided some element
of mystery which corresponded
almost to a difference of sex”
Jimmy became a Communist and
felt qualified to join the Inter
national Brigade. it proved to be
an error of judgment. After »
battle with the Moors, Jimmy
decided he was a Pacifist; said to
Spender, “You must get me ou
of here.” Spender did,

But he could not bring himself
to thiyik altogether badly’ of
Jimmy. One day in Morocco h<
burst into tears at the sight of :
donkey. “I discerned something
in the donkey’s appearance which
reminded me of Jimmy”.

Spender’s own visit to Spain
Was made in rather superior com
pany—a_ Congress of Intellectuals.
When Franco began to shel!
Madrid, Andre Chamson, French
novelist, said he must leave a:
once, Were he killed, Franc«
would have to declare war o%
Franco an action which woul
lead to world war. He could not
take yesponsibility for such
catastrophe.

After Spain, beastly ag only
civil war can be, Spender’
Marxist enthusiasm was neve:
quite the same. Not for him the
single-minded zeal of bis Oxford
friend Tristan who insisted, ou.
of solidarity with the toilers, «.
being called “Bill”.

—L.E.S.



WHY SHOULD
CHILDREN PLAY?

Dictionary definitions of woPtis
are often quite misleading, anc
this is especially true of the words
‘““vork” and “play” as applied to
mapat children do. When does a
enild start “working”? Is it wher
he goes to school and first comes
fo @fips with that enormous);
complicated task of learning to
associate certain combinations of
straight and curved lines on the
printed page with meanings al-
rea more or less familiar to
him This task of learning to
read may, of course, be “work”
for the child in the sense usual-
ly attached to the word; or, on
the other hand he may look on
it as searcely different from ibe
“play” with which he has been
used to whiling away the hours
outside of school.

Much will depend on the alti-
tudes and ideas that have been
built up in the child from his
earliest years — in fact, almosi
from the moment he is born—
toward the challenge he faces in
learning to cope with the limitless
unknown that the world in whicd
he finds himself represents for
him. If his natural curiosity and
relatives Ss have not been
stifled by ose responsible for
his care, the young child will be
ikely to carry over into his
school years as well as into later
life at least some measure of that
invaluable ability to derive
leasure and “satisfaction fro:
earning new things which often
makes the distinction between
“work” and “play,’’ even for an
adult, a scarcély definable one.

Play is Work

_ Obviously, therefore, the way
in which a child is allowed and
encouraged to play, or dis-
couraged from it, has an extreme-
important bearing on his entire
later development — physical,
mental and emotional, and sociai
Mow often a small child who i
busily engaged on some task o:
other that may appear quite in-
eensequential to his elders will
say, if asked what he is doing:
“I'm working; don’t bother me
now.’ And, if it is at all possible
he should be allowed to finish the
job at hand.

To a child, his play is his work;
and in setting goals for himseii
in it—and attaining them — hx
develops abilities and gains sat-
istactions which will strongly in
fluence his attitudes toward cun
structive achievement later on
One of the great pioneers in child
education has said; “For a good
psychologist the future life of a
child is evident by observing the
way he selects his play-pastimes. '

And this, the child’s work, be
gins at the very beginning of life
itself. A newborn infant's acti
vity consists largely in spontane -
ous, unco-ordinated movements
With increasing age the ability of
co-ordination: is . gradually -ac-
quired. During his first couple
of years a child learns to sit and
stand, then to walk and run. Ali
this is: fop:him both work and
‘play, or work-play, as it might
be called, since—ds we have seen
—the two cannot he readily s*p-
arated, .

No €osiiy Gadgets

These fundamental! function
become, with the passing of tine,
almost wholly automatic, requii
ing less and less of the child's
conscious attention; and, with
this stage, Comes the opportunity

: for developing. new activities, for

helping the child constructivel)
to push back his horizons and ad
vance further on his gieat ad
venture into the unknown. It
therefore becomes essential to
provide him, with suitable educa-

oH maté@riais for this purpose.

These need not be complicated or
expensive factoery-produced toys.
In fact, such things often have
definite disadvantages, particular-
ly for the very young child
Ordinary blocks of wood, not toc
small in size; a bally a heap of
sand or loose earth, a simple
pail and spade: these may be a
source of almost endless enjoy-
ment and learning for the small
child who is not, and should not
be, confronted with that bewild
ering yariety of implements and
gadgets which, mistakenly,
parents and relatives often be-
son if they can afford to buy
them. os

Gradually, a certain separation
of “work” and “play” oecurs du-
ring the school age. The concert
of work should develop as in-
volving, among other things a
degree of social responsibility, of
co-operation with others in
achieving a common goal; whiie
play or recreation—although it,
feo, ought increasingly to em-
phasize the factor of teamwork
= may come to be regarded as
more essentially a matter of one's
responsibility to oneself to main-
tain a healthful balance between
the extremes of all work and no
play, or all play and no work.
Neither extreme is desirable,
whether for the child or for the
adult,

Should Mean Much

Playing should not cease as
the child grows older, Various
kinds of recreation, such as games
and sports, are an expression o:
the primitive and natural need for
physical exercise and of the wish to
play. These can and should mean
a great deal to everybody, bui
they are especially important fo.
persons engaged in sedentary or
monotonous work. Any person
with a sedentary occupatior
needs a break by physical exer
cise. The child generally take:
care of that for himself. However
as soon as he passes into more
or Jess regular school work, at
tention should be paid to adapt
occupations to the child’:
atural desire for variation
Physical group-exercises, some-
times accompanied by music for
rhythmic movements, and active
participation in songs and plays:
contribute substantially to the
child’s all-round development
Drawing and painting develop
his sense of preportion and
colour, and woodwerk or metal-
work encourages his inventive
powers,






The types of play, recreation
and exereise—both indoors anc
in the open air—wil], of course,
vary for children of different
ages But the importance o
sufficient amounts of it and of
materials suited -to the needs oi
the particular age-group. car
hardly be . over emphasized.
Pienty of fresh air and adequate
space in healthful dwellings.
parks, gardens and playgrounds
are to-day universally recognizec
us important prerequisites fo
sound development of children
Most communities, particularly
large cities in every part of the
world, do not yet adequately pro-
vide these prerequisites. Bu
everywhere there is a growing
ealization that every child needs

well-balanced programme oi
sufficient food and sleep, piay
and exercise—both physical and
mental—in a sound environment
This is essential if we are to rear
a new generation of human be-
ings who will be buoyantly
healthy in body and in spirit,
whose creativeness and sense of
sociel responsibility can make
the world of to-morrow a betier
place t¢ live in than the world
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SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1951
amie



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SUNDAY, APRIL 22,

TL

THE

} -sONIONS!! 8
NEVER COULD
RESIST THEM!

|

A

A MID-TWENTIETH CEN-
TURY scientific version of the
violet-scented cachou, which con-
siderate Victorian husbands
chewed on their way home from
an evening’s hard drinking, will
be in the shops here this week.
It is a tiny tablet of concentrated
chlorophyll—the stuff that makes
grass green.
A strong dose of chlorophyll has
near-magical powers of deodor-
ising almost everything we eat
and drink, scientists claim. It will
even eliminate evidence of a bar-
counter snack of pickled onions,
gorgonzola cheese, and beer.
One tablet, slowly chewed in
the morning, it seems will also
spare us those social embarrass-
ments which, according to the
strip cartoon advertisements, even
our best friends hate to mention.
I tried out the tablets yester-
day. They worked with pipe
tobacco, onions, kippers, and the
strongest available beer. They did
not eliminate the lingering odour
of garlic. But they damped it
down enough to enable garlic-
eaters to win more close friends,
Nobody has yet discovered how
the chlorophyll does the deodor-
ising trick. But tests, in whieh
people have swallowed dozens of
the tablets at once, have proved
that whatever it does inside the
budy is quite harmless.

Comes

By FREDERICK COOK

NEW YORK.

If the U.S.A. ever elects a
woman President, the historians
of the time will put it down to
the werk of Mrs. India Edwards,
who operated in Washington,
mostly behind the scenes, in the
middle of the 20th century.

Mrs. Edwards (“And don’t ask
me about the ‘India’—I ot it
trom my great-aunt India, and [
don’t know where she picked it
up”) is the most powerful woman
in Washington, politically speak-
ing.

Nobody on the national stage
had ever heard of her before the
Gay, six years ago, when_ she
walked into the headquarters of
the Democratic National, Com-
mittee and asked for a job. A
matronly woman of 49, with
warm brown eyes, she had just
lost her only son in the war.

SHE’S THE BOSS

To-day she is the £100-a-week
vice-chairman of the committee

(top governing body of the
governing party) and supreme
commander of all its women’s
forces.

India Edwards first had the

idea that Perle Mesta, now Min-
ister to Luxembourg, ought to
have something more important
to do than just give good parties.
She dropped hints when the Tru-
mans were around. And when it
came off she quickly followed up
by mentioning the name of Eu-
genie Anderson, a_ well-to-do
Middle Western housewife, as a
geod choice for the Embassy at
Copenhagen . The appointment
was a brilliant success,

Since she has been boss of the
feminine side of the Democratic
Party, women have biatsomed
out in all manner of top Govern-
ment jobs.

There is Frieda Hennock, a
Federal Communications com-
missioner,

There is Georgia Neese Clark,
Treasurer of the United States
and first of her sex to hold the

aa

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1951
UU Eee

MS OF

PROBLE



The taste of the tablets, which
are made from.chlorophyll. ex-
tracted from fresh spinach, re-
minded me of the juicy grass
stalks you chew while watching
the village cricket match.

A further domestic virtue
claimed for the tablets.

Given to ageing dogs, which so
often betray their presence with-
out barking, they help to prolong
fireside friendships between man
and man’s best friend.

Behind Hand
DOES the harassed Health
Service doctor find ttme to
keep himself well informed of the
latest medical advances?

‘To find out I put the question
to a dozen representative G.P’s.
who take the British Medical
Journal or the Lancet,

Only two said they had time to
read their journals regularly.
Four said they managed to skim
through one issue in every three.

In the surgeries of the other six
the journals are piling up unread.

Tough Odds.
RAPIDLY gaining favour as a
means of picking men _ for
important jobs in America is tne
“stress. interview,’ in which
everything possible is done to
frustrate and anger the applicants,

Ir an almost Marx Brothers
atmosphere, the examiners make

is

Mrs.

At £100 a week, her
job is to break into
masculine closed

shops.



MRS. INDIA EDWARDS 5

job. ¢ vine
Mrs. Edith Sampson, gifted
Negress, is alternate United

States delegate to UNO.

There’s a long string of Feder-
al judges and other UNO dele-
gates and Government deputies.

In all of these the restless 5 ft.
7 in. India Edwards played a de-
cisive part. She has made a
career of breaking into masculine
closed shops ever since she start-
ed out at 20 as a junior reporter
for Colonel McCormick — on
his Chicago Tribune (whose poli-
cies she detests).

Nowadays she is at her desk in
her austere office in Washington
by 8.45 every morning after a
ride downtown with her husband,
Herbert, £72-a—week head of the
International Films section of the
State Department. She works a
10-hour day, “and 1 always take
a brief-case home with me at
night.” b

Much of her time goes on gin-

CRYSTALS

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ABOUT THIS
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PA

DARLING!



«+e 8 WILLE

BRITAIN

A SOCIAL PROBLEM

rude remarks about each candi-
date’s appearance, ability, ambi-
tions—and even about his rela-
tives.

They set him problems he cannot
possibly solve, and ridicule his
efforts to cope with them.

The object? To test
“emotional stability” in the face of
tough odds.

That Underspin
THE markings on a golf bail
greatly increase its range.
Why?

Ballistics expert Major Clifford
Hymans gives this explana—
tion * :

Markings impart extra under-
spin when the ball is struck by
the golf club. This causes
pressure to build up
ball, forcing it to
and so go much further than an
unmarked ball,

Next Best?

CONSULTING room
sation piece :—
Doctor; The best thing for you
to do is to give up smoking and
drinking, get up early and go to

conver—

bed early.
Patient: I don’t -deserve the
best, doctor. What's second best?
* In his interesting “Guns,
Shells and Rockets” (Gale &

dwards

gering-up visits to local party or
ganisations all over the U.S.A.

Here is a fairly typical spell
for her:

MONDAY, a day at the desk
and a night flight to Boston;

TUESDAY, work in the local
office;

WEDNESDAY, work again and
a full length speech at a Demo-
cratic banquet;

THURSDAY, back to Washing-
ton for another speech;

FRIDAY, her own office;
SATURDAY, back to Boston
speak again.

Days later, speeches in Wash-
ington, Kentucky and on the Pa-
cific Coast.

It is a hectic pace. “My hus-;
band,” she says, “would prefer it
if I stayed home a bit more. But
he makes no protest. He under-
stands how I feel.”

HER HATS

Home for the Edwards is a co-~
lonial house in Maryland, where
India loves to cook casserole fish-
es, spend her week-ends cleaning
house and indulge her one hobby
“making my own hats, once in a
way a really wild one.” ,

No Socialist she is keenly in-
terested in what is going on in
England. “England,” she said,

to

THE SWEETEST
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his)

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ELA

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pa



Super Star Show
_A Big Attraction

By TONY VANTERPOOL

The Super Star Local Talent
Show, a quarter] feature, was
held at the Globe Theatre on
Friday night. The theatre was
packed and many people were
turned away.

, First prize of $30 went to
air} Gerald Daisley, a newcomer to
under the] the Local Talent Shows, The

climb higher | decision of the judges, along with

the expert help of Mr. Maurice
Jones, Manager, was popular
with the crowd.

Daisley sang “You Can Do No
Wrong” in the Perry Como fash-
ion. His voice was clear ani
| distinct. His style was one which
was never before equalled at any
local talent show.

Joe “Shoeshine” Clarke, the
Comedy-Singer, proved himself
one of the best entertainers in
the island. He won the second
prize of $10.00 with the popular
number “Bop, Goes My Heart.”

On the whole Super Star Show,
with these new discoveries, was
one of the best ever held,

Those taking part were Clayton
“Surelax” Thompson and Fitz
Harewood, winners of the first
All Star Show, Percy Welch and
Gerald Daisley, winners of the
second and Keith Sealey anq Joe
Clarke, winners of the last.

Thompson sang “Let us Love
You Tonight,” Harewood, “Ole
Man River,” Welch, “All The

Time,” and Sealey, “If.”

The third prize, if there was
one, would have gone to either
Thompson or Sealey, Although
Thompson’s song is out of date
he was able to put it over in a

’

Road to Assisi. You have to ar-
range the 50 words so that they
lead from PISA to ASSISI in
such a way that the relationship



“jg following the general evolu-

tion of man in trying circum-
stances—ieading the way, so to
speak, They will come out all

right in the end.” :

Mrs, Edwards thinks it quite
likely that a woman will be
elected to the White House one
day. But not yet. f

““There is too much feeling
against our sex for the present,”
she said. “Anyone who predicts
it is going in for wishful think-
ing.” ;

Her staff say this is an exam-
ple of how she works—no crank
trying to plant a fire-cracker be-
hind the plodding feet of history
but a careful long-range planner
well aware of how to get what
she wants.

Warid Copyright Reserved.
London Express Service.

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between any one word and the
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RULES

1. The word may be an -ana-
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2. It may be a synonym of the
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DARTWORDS





At The Cinema:

“THE THIRD MAN”
Hy G. 1H.

Once again, the talents of that impressive British writer-
director team, Grahame Greene and Carol Reed, who gave
us “The Fallen Idol”, have been pooled and this time they
have come up with an excellent melodramatic thriller—

“THE THIRD MAN.”

Though perhaps not up to the
overall standard of The Idol, it is
nevertheless, a remarkably fine
film, both from the point of view
of the scenario and the absolutely
first-class direction. Mr, Greene,
who is a gifted English writer,
has created not only colourful
characters, but a plot with many
intriguing twists in it, all of which
are skilfully accented by Mr.
Reed’s astonishing use of the in-
congruous and unexpected — the
apparently unimportant appear-
ance o! a child in the midst of an
adult contretemps, bouncing a
large rubber ball, the balance of
the scene being shot from the eye
Jevel of the youngster, or the
sudden mewing of an ordinary
alley-cat, who has become interest-
ed in the shoes of someone hiding
in the shadows — small things in
themselves, but used as clever
emphasis, .

The story concerns an American
writer of westerns, who, on arrival
in Vienna, finds that the friend
with whom he was going to stay,
has met wtih a fatal accident, Not
being satisfied with the informa-
tion he was given, he decides to
do a little investigating on his own,
only to find that his erstwhile
friend was a blackmarket
racketeer in watered-down penicil-
lin, and he himself becomes in-
volved with various Viennese of
dubious character, his friend's
mistress and the British and Rus-
sian Intelligence.

The majority the | film
was actually shot in post-war
Vienna, with the climax taking
place in the ynderground sewers
of that city. Excellent photo-
graphy suggests the _ shabby,
ornamental splendour of pre-war
Viemma in contrast to the utter
desolution of its post-war ruins.

Throughout the film, there is a
background of zither music. As
played by Anton Karras, this
strange music is gay, insistent,
weird and macabre, emphasizing
the changing moods and impending
climaxes as no other instrument
could. You may be provoked by
it, but it will fascinate you,

The cast includes Joseph Cotton,
as the American pulp writer, Valli
as the lovely and mysterious
mistress of his friend, Trevor
Howard (who will be remembered
in “Brief Encounter”) as the grim

manner which thrilled the crowd.
Sealey’s, on the other hand, is
one which is among the first three
on the Hit Parade,

Percy Welch was his old self,
but as I have already said, the
competition wus extremely keen,
Fitz Harewood, who won the
first Super Star Show ever to be
‘held in the island, was more
Classically inclined.

of





4. It may be associated with
the preceding word in a saying,
simile metaphor or association of
ideas

5. It may form with the pre-
ceding word a name of a wel'-
known person or place in fact or
fiction, ‘

6. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title or
action of a book, play, or other
composition,

A typical succession of words
might be: April-Fool-Food-Flood—
Deluge-Delude,

—L.ES.

bittev- weet, ».

new confidence fov vomansic meetings.

GARDENIA





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‘>
7

PAGE NINE

Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice —Free

THE STEPPING STONES i
TO SUCCESS

Don’t hesitate about your future | Go forward,
confident that The Bennett College will see
you. through to a sound position in any career
you choose. The Bennett College methods
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head of the British Intelligence and
Orson Welles as the racketeer.
All acquit themselves admijrably
and are given excellent support
by local Viennese actors of het
mean talent. However, to this
observer, the star of THE THIRD
MAN is Caro] Reed, whose brilliant
direction and creation of tensfon
and suspense, have placed this
film high in the foremost ranks of
cinematic entertainment.

THE WHITE TOWER

THE WHITE TOWER, an adap-
tion of the novel by James Ramsey

makes for early
efficiency.

CHOOSE
YOUR CAREER

Accountancy Exams.
Aviation (Engineering and



All Commercial Subjects
Commercial Art
Draughtsmanship, All
Branches
G.P.0., Eng. Dept
lastitute of Municipal
Engineers
Mathematics
Matriculation

Plumbing

Quantity Surveying
Radio Service Ergincering
Radio ‘Short Wave)
Secretarial Examinations
Shorthand (Pitman’s)
Surveying

Teachers of Handicrafts
Telecommunications

Wireless)
Book -keeping
Building, Architecture
and Clerk of Works
Carpentry and joinery
Chemistry
Civil Engineering

Ullman, is now playing at the Civil Service Mining. Att Subjects Gity & Guilds
Plaz For rari . reasons Engineering, All Branches Novel Writing Television
AEA. or various reasons, @ bjects and Examina- Plastics Wireless Telegraphy and

group of people staying at a moun- Police
tain chalet in Switzerland, are im-
pelled to climb the White Tower,
a mountain hitherto unconquered
Starting off om the adventure are
a young European girl, an
American G.1., a French writer
an English doctor, q former Nazi
officer and the Swiss guide. After
two days of climbing, the doctor
finds he can’t take it; then the
writer is lost and we are left with
the Nazi, whose main idea 1s to
assert his authority in every way
and be as thoroughly unpleasant
as possible; the young American,
who suddenly realizes that the
success of the venture is up to him
aud the girl who is determined to
conquer the mountain because her
father perished in a similar ate
tempt. These three and the guide
continue the ascent during which
individual strengths and weak-
nesses are bared, and a rather
obscure symbolism that man's only
hope of survival rests in his joint
effort to this end, with other men
is revealed,

Superbly photographed, the
ascent is arduous and thrilling,
with moments of breathless
suspense, All the outdoor scenes
are actually-taken in the Swiss
Alps and the magnificence of the
scenery and the grandeur of Mont
Blanc which was the mountain
selected for the ascent, emphasize
the drama of the story,

The film has an _ outstanding
cast including Glenn Ford, Valli,
Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Claude
Rains and Osear Homolka, all of
whom giva excellent perform-
ances, I thought that Liloye
Bridges as the Nazi was woef ail:
miscast and though he obviousl)
put everything he had into the
role, it was clear from the star¢
that he was just not the type,

Glorious Technicolor —photo~
graphy, good direction and a fine
cast are the outstanding features
of this film, and though you may
hanker after more avalanches,
bodies swinging over precipices
and such like, there is still suffl-
cient action for good entertain
ment.

tions Special Course Telephony

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—



PAGE TEN

Ouistanding Hous

GLITTER BAY, ST. JAMES

IN a Way, Sir Edward (
t. is a pioneer, | i
two houses at Glitter Bay
Leeward Coast had been scorned
as a residential area The local
people said it was too hot, and
preferred to have their beach
houses-at Bathsheba or the Crane,
and. visitors were seldom taken
there. “Gradually how the
news of the beautiful est Si
Edward had created St
James coast spread,
there are more beaut
on that than in ar
part of the Island

h
the

buil



ever,

ite

or

the
to-day
house



coast

Although the house
it is the garden that make
ter Bay. When he bought the
Sir Edward told me side
avenue of casuarinas and
coconut trees there we nly
other tree breadfruit
the poor soil near
created what is perhaps
beautiful garden on the
When I was there the
Sharon was flowering,
an opportunity t
Lotus flowers. T
facés a beautift
with a circular
middle and a
whére white doves
roost.

Both of the houses at
Bay. were built by Dudley
and the Beach House
started in 1934, was built after th
Italian style of architecture. It
a lovely little house of unpainted
coral stone, with an open louny 4

nice
Gilit-
Fae
place,
be an

ome

On
ea, he has
the most

island

Rose of
and 1 had
see the , famed
house

laid out lawn,
pond in the

t the far end
used to

the





lily

}
arch



orce

Glitter
Phelps
which wis



sum 4

on the first -fl facing the sea
The coral stairs at the entrance to
the house are exquisite, and so

too are the statuettes which adorn

oor

those stairs. On the ground floor
there. is the dining room, which
opens on the patio.

Incidentally, the Beach House
serves as an excellent landmark
for fishermen, and I found it use-

ful myself. when I used to fo
yachting. otf that coast as a boy
Even when the coastline has
grown hazy one can see the Beach

House glittering on the horizon.
The main house, which was
built in 1935, has low gables which
give it a Dutch look. The dining
room is a very attractive roorn,
with a magnificent chandelier, and



THE BEACH HOUSE from the sea.

Italian style of architecture.



This house is built after the

THE DINING ROOM. Over the table hangs a magnificent chandelier.




We proudly present

SHAPED LOCKETS, CROSSES



RINGS, PENDANTS
correct style.
pee ss

LOUIS L.

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(





(Photo: Tom Leonard)

ANOTHER REMARKABLE THING |
ABOUT WHITE ANTS... |

About 1500 differ- Ne

ent sorts of white
ants are known,
and most of them fi
mainly on cellulose -
which means wood! B
safe — remember

tit ctinteets
GOPSSE SEPP OPS SPAS

UNIVERSAL—Dip o: |
brush for positive protectior
against White Ants, Borers |
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ECONOMIC AL—Highi)

concentrated—saves carriage. |
When diluted for use—
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PERMANENT—Canno' |
wash-out or evaporate |
Combines with the fibres, |
toughens the timber: and

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Agents:
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Briagetown, Barbados.

For permanent’ protection

Gnsist on —




te

Pee sidine
tT



Se

it is separated from the poréh by eer collect ee eeet the
n © isit wr , ate. best in 1e «world. B as | : |

The. wating, Somny Gpethioe ie an- started collecting prints of hume | By HUGH CLELAND

other attractive room, and has ming birds, and they ought =) |

French windows opening om the look well on the walls. THE rising cost of living, which drives the house- |

balcony. From that balcony there And so I left Glitter Bay, pass+ | wife to despair, is seriously exercising the minds of

is a lovely view of the garden. ing once again through the lodge the men responsible for the upkeep of the country s|

West



64,644 ‘4
OL ALD SEO SO SESE



On the walls



EXQUISITE STONE STEPS form the entrance to the Beach House.
Tom Leonard)



On the ground floor of the Beach House is the dining room.
opens on the Patio.

A VIEW of the garden through the wronght iron gate which separ-

ates the dining room from the porch.



SOLOS PEPPERELL ALPS SOROS SO SS SSO

FOR BETTER <
FLORENCE

STOVES <

CITY

of
rooms Sir Edward has hung old
Indian prints.

Pictures by CYPRIAN LATOUCHE

DAYS: TUESDAY WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
V E N TIME: 9 to 11 a.m, 1 to 3 p.m. 9 to 11.30 a.m. '
oe Consultation and Advice Included
APPOINTMENTS AS FROM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH i
& })
1 A IE TRADING (‘0 For Appointments and further information, Dial 4584 or %
GARAGE TRADING (0. ni

SOSSSCSTeu+

SUNDAY’ ADVOCATE



iy LAN GALE

The Abbey Is
Hard-up, Too

now

most of the gates and leaving a few acres of

great cathedral churches. |
beauty for the dusty road to

St. Paul’s Cathedral, it has been revealed, will
have to sell investments to meet its financial com- |
mitments: at Westminster Abbey—which in recent |
years has seen anie to make enas meet—there is
talk of an appeal for funds in the not too distant
future.

He has «

Bridgetown.

Secret Finances

Westminster Abbey, the Collegiate Church of
St. Peter, shares with St. George’s Chapel, Windsor,
the designation ‘Royal Peculiar,” is extra-provincial,
extra-diocesan and under the personal jurisdiction
of the King, who is its Visitor.

One of the peculiarities about its finances is |
that they are not made public; the have seemed adequate then, this
| poverty-stricken parish church bears little relation to expenditure |
| may publish the sad statement of Long before, Henry VIII did?

its affairs in the magazine once a much thé same as the Ecclesias
year and thereby perhaps attract tical Commissioners. He confi }
help from wellwishers. St. Paul's cated Abbey revenue of £4,000 |
| Cathedral admits its outgoings to a year and gave instead an in- |
be £50,000 a year. Westminster come of £600, and land to the |

Abvey accounts, are a Chapter capital value of a few thousand
pounds.

Responsible for them to the ;
Chapter is the Receiver-General, _ What of the rest of the Abbey’s
revenue? An appeal issued by the

Canon Adam Fox, a former Pro- ‘ 7
| fessor of Poetry at Oxford, while then dean, Bishop Ryle, in 1922,
! the lay expert is Mr. T. Hebron, Yielded a sum reported variously
Registrar and Chief Accountant. 2S from £163,000 to £180,000,
The accounts are audited annually @"d this sum was invested. —

by an eminent accountant known Large source of revenue is the
fees paid by visitors for looking

as the ditor-~Gen ,» who has .
. o. Mudie -Ginarel, ite at the Chapels Royal in the Abbey,

as a prerequisite of his office a . ' ;

stall in the Abbey choir, But the Which were estimated before Oe

balance-sheet is not published. war to produce £3,000— £5,000 a
year; collections at services, on

‘Ep ’

| Embarrassment the other hand, yield very little, |

But for an Act of Parliament of and money from this source
63 years ago, the Abbey might be shared on a roughly fifty-fifty |
rich indeed, with an annual in- basis with a number of charitics. |
come from property up and down State occasions bring in fees, and
the country of £250,000 a year though these barely cover the ex- |
(“and that really would have been penses involved from temporary |
an embarrassment”, they say at closing of the Abbey, they usually |
the Abbey). By the Westminster mean that bigger crowds of sight- |
Abbey Act, 1888, however the seers are attracted in the follow- |

property was surrendered to the ing weeks. A quarter of a million |
Ecclesiastical Commissioners in

people paid £15,000 to see the}
return for a fixed income of Coronation setting in the Abbey. |
£20,000 a year. Though it may

-+LES. |
eBidenciceatte
|



AS. AB








is |

(Photo:

‘The Art Of Sybil Atteck

SYBIL ATTECK is an artist of
| taste and distinction. Her exhi-
.| | bition at the Museum of twenty-
i) | SiX Works is almost as exciting as
| | was Geoffrey Holder's last year.
# She is a trained artist, having
| Studied both painting and sculp-
| ture in London, Washington and
| Peru. This is reflected in her work
‘Earlier in the year she exhibited
in the Barbados Arts and Crafts
Exhibition at Queen’s Park, but
her work shown at this Exhibition
| did not indicate her power as a
| draughtsman, her delicate sense of
| colour or her skill in composition.
“For Beauty,” wrote St. Thomas
| Aquinas, ‘there are three require.
ments. First, a certain wholeness
or perfection, for whatever is in-
complete is so far, ugly; second, a
due proportion or harmony; and
‘third, clarity, so that brightly col-
oured things are called beautiful.”
Nobody expects artists today to
paint what would be pastiches of
medieval art. But, “wholeness”,
“proportion or harmony” and
“clarity” are so often completely
| ignored by many painters today,
| either through lack of training, or,
| an abandonment of all art prin-
ciples, which results in the pro-
duction of pictures that puzzle the
spectator. Some years ago I re-
member visiting an exhibition of
advanced art with a friend. who
after greatly admiring 4 painting
exclaimed “What is it?” It is true
that art is the mirror of the times,
and art today reflects all the
“isms” of modern thought includ-
ing communism. This has to some
| extent created a dictatorship in
art and a snobism about painting.
for pictures are claimed to be
understood by intellectual snobs
who wish to be considered “in
the know”, and who are often as
puzzled as a layman.

The appeal of Sybil Atteck’s
work is to a wide public, Although
her work is wholly un-academic,
she has so sure a knowledge of
picture building and of selection
that the “birth pangs” of her
| paintings is discernable. She ex-
| hibits water colours, oils and
| drawings. It is delightful to in-

spect water colours of a size that
ean be seen without magnifying-
glass. Her work is planned on a
grand scale and avoids the fault
| SO common to this medium, name-
ly, mudiness. Her colour is sub-
‘tle and she has made excellent



use of the texture of cartridge |
paper. In “Adolescent”, she has |
laid flat colour in an arresting
manner “Still Life—Vegetables”,
an overpainted subject, here em-
erges fresh and gay. “Careenage”’
is @ very typical West Indian
scene, but it has been raised far
above the commonplace by a dis- |
crete use of colour and design.

One regrets that more water col-

ours are not included in this ex-,
hibition, for there is no questio:

of the artist’s grasp of this tech-

nique.

Sybil Atteck’s skill_as a colour-
ist Appeats all thfotwh her paint-
ing. She has distilled the colour
from her subject and refined it
with subtlety. Her use of blues
and greens is especially note-
worthy. Few painters in the
tropics are wholly successful in
the handling of blue, Sybil Atteck
is not of their number. Her “Still
Life—Anthuriums”, those - hard,
unsympathetic flowers so attrac-
tive to artists, is the first really
successful painting of its kind
which I have seen. ‘Musicians
No. 1” is an outstanding composi-
tion, the curves of instruments
and. human bodies have been
worked into a delightful pattern
of unusual colour. “Musicians—
No, 2” is satisfying in its colour
harmonies, but the lighting of this
picture is worrying. The paintings
of Immortelles with their flaming
colour are skillfully balanced by
greens of other trees so that the
pictures avoid looking hot. “Bap-
tism” conveys all the sinister mys-
tery intended by the artist, the
treatment of the coconut frond in
the background might be studied
with advantage by tropical paint- |
ers. “Study of Head” lacked ap-
peal to the writer, who has a per—
sonal prejudice against any part
of the human body larger than life |
size, but, the treatment of skin
texture is admirable. “Old Lady |
—Portrait” reveals that the artist |
is also a portrait painter of talent. |

The pen and ink drawings be- |
tray the artist’s interest in seulp-
ture. Here is action; whether in
“Drawing in the Nets” or in
“Fish” the figures are plastic in
conception and excellently ar-
ranged, These drawings made one
long to see Miss Atteck at work
with hammer and chisel. |

Sybil Atteck’s, exhibition must
be seen by artists and art-lovers.

It

LT











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ies .
pele 5

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Tom

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SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE




















PAGE ELEVEN
Na enn re a
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PAGE TWELVE

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE
Minimum charge week 12 cents and
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words 3 cents a word week-—4 Cents a



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charge is $3.00 for any number of words
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Notices only after 4 p.m. werd Fendave





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ledgments, and In Memoriam notices 1s ee duced from £3,500 to £3,100. A St. Luey
MOST NEW 12 HP. Beat . Cottage | “ey

$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays! cilvantee if required, pBed ord Van. by Fontabelle, Good Condition and Loca- | 17-4.51-—6n

for any number of words up to 50, and] Piooring. Licensed and Insur

3 cents per word on week-days and] price $1,850. New one Cost. Stiss oes
4 cents per word on Sundays for each} sentiy, -_ Apply © Courtesy Garage.
additional word .





AUTOMOBILE: ’ "Teuahell 14,6. ious Yard enclosed with Stone, Vacant, , Rae t 4 :

THANKS Perfect running order excellent mileaze| Reduced from £1,000 to £850. A Two | {2° Office of the Parochial Treasurer, will

$1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Pnone-i616. | Storey Stonewall Business and Residence ; “ghee gily,on We following days

BLACKMAN—MYBTLE. The Blackman 44.51—T.F N.| with a Large Garage or Workshop in| Siturday 12th from 10 mi. to 12 noon.

family beg through this médium to Paper te euay, Are, Vacant, Redueed| Sicurauy 19th from 10 a.m. to if noon,

TAEEN (heehee to ait ttee Kind faiends| .cAR: 1938 Ford 10 hp, low mileage | 11 £2,600 to £2,300 A Bungalow Typs| Saturday 19th from 10 a.m. to 12 noon,

whe attended the funeral. sent wreaths | OWner driven 22.4.61—an | af Hastings Main e.. Good. Condition | °*'res ee eae,

he de al. yree eae nd Location, Reduced from £2,500. to 22.4.01—8n
and flowers and in ans other way CAR: Hillman 6 Suitable for Pick-up £2,300. Almost New Small Stonewall

expressed their Sympathy in our recent

22.4.51- No reasonable offer refused. G. Archer

In. 1 My Lord’s Hill,

bereavement. 22.4 51—-In









BRYAN; Through this medium we beg Blue Waters. Good Condition and Loca-| heretj, advised th.
to returm thanks to all those who i. retheat toatl oc menet Wid, ord Cer | tion, Reduiced from £3,200 to £3,000 Nett. | 1s. 1051. the Gut te ovine fee ae
attended the funeral, sent. wreaths, | yp. 7¢. Apply Mr. Butcher, C/o Mc- \C Me for \Nearly Anything in Real Estate| present location to the premises known
Cards and letters of Condolence or} giesrney & Co., Lid 9274 51—2n and Almost in any District at Bargain| ns ilfracembe, Maxwell Coast, and from
in any way expressed sympathy in . Prices with Re-Sale Values. Mortgages | that date the Club will be known as THE
our recent bereavement caused by CAR—1947 Super de luxe V-8 Ford Arranged. If I Can't—Who Will? Dial 2111.| GASUARINA RESIDENTAL CLUB
the death of my dear beloved hus-! y=) perfect ning <8 d D. F. de Abreu, Call at Olive Bough, 22.4.$1—In
band JOSEPH BENJAMIN BRYAN SS eer ere meee. SY | Samar, 22.4,51—1n ee : a
Eva Bryan (Wife), D'Arcy Bryan (Son), sptelient condition. Always owner driven, - — we
Josephine Powlett (Sister), Joseph Hunte eee 22.4.51—2n ee, Fontabelle, standing NOTICE
(Cousin), Miriam Reid «Cousin) i“ acres. Contact D. O'Neal
22.4.51—1n = SARS 40 3 New Tr Sepp Mayflower} 22.4.51—3n | PARISH OF St JAMES
as ihn lutest im isi BASTt Gtth estes the —_——~ omer Tenders for convg/ing Paupers and
HMUNTE: We beg to thank all those earanice’ Uinietetaliter i anee, oo for the Burial of the dead will be re-
who sent wreaths, cards and in|them at Dp petition at my office Victoria Street on| ceived by the: undersigned, from whom

Chelsea Garage (1950)
New Showrooms, Pinfold Street.
ee hi a A Ls Aen ee an

“"SAR—New Buneard Vanguard 18 hp. Standard Vanguard 18 h.p.

other ways expressed their sympathy Ltd.,

jn our retent bereavement occasioned
by the death of IONE HUNTE.
Hunte Family, Alleyne Family.





on approx » ‘acre’ a
Fontabelle
aes 1 will offer for sale by public com-



PUHLIC SALES PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days| Téa cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,| @%d 12 cents ber agate line on Sundays,
minmum crarge $1.5 on week-days| â„¢itimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays ; Gnd $1.80 on Sundaya.

NOTICE
PARISH OF 8ST. LUCY

The Parochial Tregsurer’s Office, St.
Lucy, will be opened as from Thursday
April 26th 1951, at HARRISONS PLAN-











|
j
{
i

REAL este



Beat It if U Can! Almost New Seaside







tion, Reduced from £1,200 to £1,050. A
3 Bedroom Cottage at Ch, Ch. Main Rad
about 7 miles from Town, Good Condition
and Li eatin, Modern Convenences, Spac-

NOTICE
PARISH OF 8T. JAMES
As from the Ist May to the lst May



Residence at Hastings Main Road., Good
Location. Reduced from £1,400 to £1,200.
A Residence at Rockley Main Road Near

NOTICE

Members of the Casuarina Club are







Friday 2%th at 2 p.m.—15,000 square feet
LAND at BELMONT adjoining Govern-
ment Woods, has an additional entrance
in Quaker Road. ALA. UTILITY

all particulars may be obtained, up to
Saturday 28th April 1951

P. H. TARILTON,
SERV- Clerk, Board Poor Law Guardians,
ICBS AVAILABLE. Dial 2947.

22.4.51—I1n 6 seater Saloons, Your last opportunity R. ARCHER McKENZIP. 22 4.51— or Sey
— 7 te buy at present low price. See them 22.4.51—4n ni connennstemertnienctinainonenaeth
IN MEMORIAM at Chelsea Gari (1950) Ltd, New me Ss PEE
nan — Showrooms, Pinfold Street. LAND—Several spots of land at
JONES—In loving memory of our dearly 18.4.51—2n | Worthing View, Ch. Ch. Good location |

















































“gust

esis Nips etic Dice iak dada etaendiaeeeeoeeaineet leon tieiianinnnndhitienenmapnanittnsimansnainaaigniians

SUNDAY
roR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over %
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HOUSES

CHANDOS, 2nd Ave. Belleville. Fully
furnished. Available May 15th. Inspec-

1



tio: by appointment. Phone 3450 or
3926 20.4.51—t.f.n
’PLAT—One (1) furnished Flat at

Dundee, St. Lawrence Gap. Suitable for
two onkh Available 15th April onward
No children no pets. Apply: Mrs. E. C
Boyce, on premises. Phone 6240.
22.4.51—1n

from May |*

HARCL. IFF, st ” Lawrenee,
ist iurnished Apartment overlooking
sea, For six months or longer, Apply
Mrs, Inniss. Phone 3750. 17.4.51—t.f.n



HOME. On St.
to October
C/o. Advocate

James Coast from Au-

1951, Write George
Co, Ltd.

8.4.51—4n

MILLVILLE, Upper Collymore Rock,
2*‘bedrooms, dining and drawing rooms,
verandah. electri¢é, Water and out-offices
Mildred Prince, Saunders Dairy, Colly-
more Rock, Phone 3936.

Hunte,



21.4,.51—2n



“MALTA”, Cattlewash for the months
of June, July, October and November.
Apply Mrs. I. Weatherhead, c/o J. N,
Harriman & Co., Led. Tel. 3838.



—_——
ROOM—At the Parisian Dress Shop,





suitable for a Beauty Shop. 22.4.51—3n

TANGLIN, Bathsheba, is no_ longer
for Rent, but for Sale. See Real Estate
column, 21.4.51—6n



WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.









ADVOCATE

Ce ee

4

21.4.51—3n | 4



PART ONE ORDERS

By
Lieut.-Col, J. Connell, 0 B E
anding,

Regiment

ED,



Os
Issue No. 16 20 Apr 51.
PARADES Training

All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday
26 Apr 51

HQ Coy will continue with weapon training—The Rifle.

“A” Coy will fire the Bren gun on the range. 2

“B" Coy will do LMG training Lesson 10—Mechanism. The obiect of this lesson
is to teach each man how the gun operates whilst it is being fired, so that if
the gun stops during firing, with the knowledge of the functions of the working

parts of the gun, he will be able to detect the stoppage and get the gun firing
again without loss of time
Band
Band practices will be heid on Monday 23, Wednesday 25 and Thursday 26
Apr 51,
ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
30 APR Si.
Orderly Officer Lieut. S_G. Lashley
Orderly Sericant 233 L/S Blackman, A. L
Next for duty
Orderly Officer Lieut. P_ LC. Peterkin
Orderly Serjeant 215 Sit. Husbands, H. A.

M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
S.0O.LF & Adjutant,
Tne Barbados Regiment.

NOTICE

The monthly Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess will be held on Saturday 28

Apr 51 at 2015 hours. Honorary Members may attend at 2045 hours,
PART Il ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
20TH APRIL, 1951
STRENGTH INCREASE
17 L/S Thomas, M. D.

SERIAL NO. 14
SHEET NO. 1.

“AW
wef 26 Apr 51

LEAVE — Sick
426 Pte Cave, W. E ”
Apr 51.

M. L, D. SKEWES-~ oes, nip,

S.O.L.P. & Adj
2 Regiment.

The wicnedos

NOTICES



SHIPPING



ROYAL NETHERLANDS

Retaken on strength of Regiment

net 2 weeks S/Leave wef



































SUNDAY,

APRIL 22, 191















beloved mother and daughter Beryl | ——— ———-—_—--__——-——— | with water and light avaflable. Prices . M.V. “Caribbee” will ac-
Joan J. s, who fell asi April CAR—One Humber 20 H. P. Suitable ‘ .
inh 1990. DO SPENT cor taxi, in excellent condition. One | spots “from 6 000; to ation ft HELP STEAMSHIP CO. cept Cargo and Pasbenpes
N pe
There is a dear face that is missing 2G. Boece dunn’ et eg fe m ae necessary terms can be arranged. D'Arcy VACANT POSTS EXPERIENCED Typist. and Steno- SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM for Dominica, Antigua,
A dear voice that is stilled ss A, Scott. 18.4.51—3n | F tiv C/o Advo-| MS. “HECUBA"—17th April 1951 Montserrat, Nevis and St.
& tite ts. Vasant in our home Pinfold St. VEGG1 Bi | hasan i ee ag xecutive Engineers, Works and jgrapher. Apply Box A BC. C/o Advo a ¥ ; Kitts. Sailing Friday, 4th
That never can be filled. eRUGKy © ee PROPERTIES FOR SALE. One einai Hydraulics Department, cate Co. td ieaettkn SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND May . ’
Those flowers placed upon your grave : One 1939 Ford V-8 Truck in} wall bungalow at Brittons X Road. It Trinidad and Tobago, | . AMSTERDAM ‘ } ay.
Have withered and decayed : eos working order with 1945 engine. | has open Verandah, drawing and dining : MI LANEOUS M.S. “ORANJESTAD'—19th April 1951,
Buk ihe over for: you who sléap Apply: B. A. Belgrave, Bogert ces 8 bedrooms, water toilet and CORRECTION SCEL SAILING 10 TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
benea : a itchenette, garage together with AND GEORGETOWN
Will never fade sway ; the land it stands on. Price £1,200. leh wecas WANTED TO RENT M.S. “HERSILLIA”—11th April 1951.
Ever to be remembered by her loving LIVESTOCK Vacant now. For inspection and other Applications are invited by the] Canadian married couple require ac-] §& “GOTTICA'—23ard ‘ApriL 1951. B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
mother and children: Muriel Philips CALF: One genuine % bred Holstein | Particulars apply to D'Arcy A, Scott Government of Trinidad and To- commodation from November 1951 to SAILING TO TRINIDAD, LA GUATRA E Cc. INO
imosieeh waned. genes, Anh, Teerenas heifer calf. Ten days old. Bire; Pure Als One stone Bungalow with three’ bago for two posts of Executive a ae Reet toat et dates. sear: CURACAO é&c. RS ASSOC., INC.
and Cola c in), Hyacin n- i ; edrooms and stand t ; = * peds and car parking space necessi mt ae : -
Ger (sister), Samuel Callender (brother- Pith eo eclde ie eae yar land with Hock vans, Pay te Dini Engineer, Works and Hydraulics] 4 friend of theirs now in Barbados has] 8.S. “GANYMEDES"—13th April 1951. Tele. 4047,
in-law}, Cameron, Vincent Phillips . 22.4.51—1n | A. Scott, Magazine Lane. Dial 3743. Department. : promised to make arrangemer.ts for them aan BON be ts. 18d
(brothers) . 22.4.51—1n. 18.4.51—3n The posts are pensionable and i hy Shy Pagel Plaage S. P. a 0. :
————~ | “GoaT: One (i) Saanen Milch Goat | ———________________| the salary will be in the scale of | write giving rates, house address, an
PARRIS — Mirriam Louise. In loving | apply to L. A. Straker, No. 60 Roebuck | We will offer for sale to public com-| $3 120-180 $3,840 — 240—$5 289| Phone number Full particulars cre ne-
memory of my dear mother who wWa4s | Street 22.4.51—1n. | petition at our office on Friday 27th. ’ ” : cessary otherwise offers cannot be con- |]. e e e
called to rest on 20th April 1945. Seek ata de ies -intioticnnctal) Mee! af: 2 sin, * per annum, A commencing salary | sidered. Apply — Box B.B, C/o Advocate t na t Ss
Your gentle face and tender smiles! “pups: ‘Terrier Pups, Good Breed.| (1) LABOSR “BLEST a stone wall] above the minimum may be paid | Co. 17.4.51—6n nadian ‘Natio eams pP
2 forgotten, ther dea Males $10.00, Females $5.00 Telephone Dwelling house and shop at St.| to the candidates selected if their ] 45, Rnpers T. faney :
re ead saben | Mavting’ st Grin, standin on "| experience, qualifications or war | pAVARD™™S,,,2crn at, Mn si! | S°PRMROPM® saa ants sag renga
I know that when our journey here seehe sro land. Dwelling service warrant it. Appointments’ Reasonable terms for permanents. Apply Montreal = Fislifax Boston B Ferbedoe
below is over, ELECTRICAL Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitch-| Will be on probation for two years , “iwarina Club. Tel. 8496. Swed Repeat 7 Ma ig a 2 may 3 thy FH May
iy teat Surtpy land called home 12 volt, 9 Plates $48.15; % vale 13 en, Toilet and Bath. Government| in the first instance. In other re- 91.4.51-—$0 | TAD BORNE. lh dake BR ie. 1 Sie BO dune” aa Sune
Edna Liynth. (daughter), Garnet Lynch | plates. $29.54; 6 volt, 18. Plates’ $25.81 water inatelied, spects the appointments will be LADY NELSON ++30 June 3 July 5 July 14July 15 July
a a family. ” 22.4.51—1n a hekeplanvan ates $25.51.) (2) Three other parcels of land con- subject to the Colonial Regula- LADY RODNEY ++30 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. —
(grandson) and family. AS nm. | Barbados Agencies 4908. 10 whines pee respectively 2 roods, loets and the local Civil Service LOYAL BROTHERS OF aapcionadiien tates
4. roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong- NORTH Sails Arri Arrives
ONE (1) five H.P. three phase totall. ing to and near to above property | Regulations and Instructions. H STAR Pove en Barbados paves St. obo Ha ieee Montreal
EDU ATIONAL wccicesl sndantipn |tnoter One (i Deen Sete os sale ae The duties attaching to the post THE LADY =oprer -10 May 12 May 21 May _ 22 May br war
Switch board fully fitted. One 2% ; re roperty or! of Executive Engineer are as fol- * LSON .. 3June 5 June 14 June - 16 June une
nica iinet -——_—- |inch delivery (Lee Howell) centrifugal separately Z _| lows: To take charge of all works Neediest Cases Fund LADY RODNEY .. 3July 5 July i4July | — 16 July 19 July
pump. All in condition “as good as ton meeeeron apply % Ba re Sri aMeiitenanikeLand constructs LADY NELSON ..27 July 29 July 7 Aug. . 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL ae "ze twa Sie ae eee Srasuitiee e owner i verton Of buildings, roads end bridgeralt ANNOUNCEMENT LADY RODNEY ..26 Aug. 28 Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept, 1) Sept.
“RU a : . ? i ; : , * *
REO AVN DEST. OF EDUCATION) | Advocate. 8.4.51—3n.| | For further particulars and conditions| an important territorial district | | N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham-
Reopens on Tuesdoy 24th April 1951 ae sn only at Har- OL OINSON, é panaeé and to be responsible for the full } eke iy and: th. Sen ab bers. Passenger Fares and freigut rates on applicatian to'—
New pupils examined to-morrow at | "sons, showroom 1s joor . tee hilar wes 11.4.5. -an.} technical, administrative, financial Buecents ween The enaartidaes ‘will
6.30 a.m re Sand , ,
. ee ss Lee ta and disciplinary control of the
G. V. BATSON, nS pear eet th ead . receive entries for the following:—
Principal. “RADIOGRAM—One seven valve H.M.V, “HILLCREST”, fully furnished, situate | “strict. —
.¢-8—in, | Bow st De Cesta & * as at Bathsheba, St. Joseph, ttormer site| Candidates should possess one of| (a) Costume Bands GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.
=| department, © Co Me Sr in, | of, ,Beachmount ° Hotels " standing on | the following professional qualifi-| _(b) Steel Bands, (EEE
MALVERN ACADEMY - — 244-493 square feet of land with several | cations: Corporate Membership of (c) Advertising Bands, E : aa
RADIO One 9- Tube Hallicrafters Radio “he hone ie tah Re ink hee aii the Institution of Civil Engineers, (d) Historical Bands. { a MAKE YOUR PURCHASES OF:
EDENVILLE, CHEAPSIDE eloioat new. ce Clarke, Mp. ie gerne tains open galleries on two: sides, draw-| Or a Diploma or Degree exempt- In order to raise the standard of
1 ais ahead reel ae raat oy ees ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms wich;ing from Sections A and P of the] Carnival, the Steering Committe: ENAMELWARE
8 ay at 9.20 a.m. ew pupils w Po 7 running water, ps ¥, 2 a
interviewed on Mond’ 0th April at | REFRIGHRATOR—One 1949 American | PUNning water, pantry, kitehen and usual} Associate Membership Examina- | would appreciate the co operatio:
10 a.m. G.E.C. 5 cubie ft. Refrigerator, Owners |G Pioe na servants rooms in vara. | tion of the Institution of Civil) of Firms, Clubs and Individual
F. L. MORRIS, esis er mot ARES mane Inspection on application to the care-] Engineers with at least two (2) | being as original as possible. From Our New Shipment Just Received
Een. y: ' : Y teker Mr. Seymour Bowne, ; se years post graduate experience on No entrance fee will be charged
pa 7 Mitt ath tee & ATEN | above will be set for sale at Pub- jor civil engineering works. ' rticulars late.
eer =a MECHANICAL lic Competition at our office in Lucas ma More particu! ©
M ERMERE SCHOOL . ] Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 27th] ,, 1m the case of an ent ant A Curnival Band of thirty wil TENTRBAL FOUNDRY LTD.
COMB BICYCLE — New Valkyrie Bicycles | April 1951 at 2 p.m. the condftions of employment in-| pe visiting Barbados to take par CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.,—Proprietors. — Cnr. of Broad & Tudor Streets
ENTRANCE PEAMINASION TO MAIN] with or without s.erect. fae Garter CARRINGTON & SEALY, clude: > ‘ Pe in the parade j
scHO Bicycles, Bicycle Parts an ccessories, olicitors, a rovision 0! furnished i
1. As previously notified in the Press,] Tyres & Tubes. See them at Chelsea 18.4.51—9n, unr quarters for which a rental Closing date, 19th May.
admissions to the School will take place | Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold Sirest. Perec see eh Sl iieatl of 10% of salary ‘subject to SEYMOUR BECKLES.
10 ge Beteanee Sxcaroination will be ee TANGLIN—situate at Beachmont, a maximum of $50 per | c/o sire, Cire’ Office, Ss fi he followi Offi
held in the Senool Hall on Friday, June} “GESTETNER | DUPLICATORS" New meee: ne Manes Ba wee ta month is payable or in lieu HeRCwe ee us for the following ce
8 a. ' receiv
i) Moendiduies will be accepted for Sone (aida) iit. Bhane oa lounge, Dining Room, ‘Three double of quarters, payment of a For Booths, Stalls, and side- +
: : ree 1k a 16.4.51—t.f.n, | 2@drooms, Children’s room, Three gal- house allowance equivalent! gpow tact C MORRIS.
examination who were not over year leties, ‘Kitchen, Gare ‘and servant's a Shows, contac . A
of age on ist January last, or who will foci Sienianee ae eth eat ee a to the difference between Sobers Lane. \

TYPEWRITER: One Underwood Type-
next, This concession writer in good condition ,Price $55.00
the current year only, L. M. Clarke, No, 12 James Street.

4, Parents/Guardians must notify the] Phone 3757. 20.4.51—2n

Headmaster in writing not later than
MISCELLANEOUS

Monday, 3th April if they wish their

sons/wards to sit the examination. tee

application must state the boy's date ec <

birth supported by a birth/baptism cer- ANTIQU £8 Of every descriptio:

tifente, It shall als tate the School Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver

ifieate. t shall also state § Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto
graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Sho;

edjoining Royal Yacht Club.

not be under 11 wears on lst September

is applicable to









he is now ettending and must be accom-
panied by a brief Testimonial from the
lleadmaster of that School.

5. Candidates are expected to provide



their own -pencil(s), pen, & ruler Ligh’ BARBADOS SPORTS REVIEW—Now
refreshments will be on sale at the

en sale at leading Book Stores, ‘‘Bar-
bados Sports Review". Price 2/ all
leading’ sports covered, 22,4 51—1n.

————_ —
COOLERATOR—In

School canteen.

6. Will Vestries and all other Scholar-
sn-awarding authorities please submit
their lists of candidates in accordance
with the foregoing conditions.



good condition, 3





doors, Phone 3045. 36, St. Ann's Court,
The Garrison, 21.4.51—2n,

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT
1. A limited number of vacancies will COVERS (Saucepan) 12 doz. asstd.
occur in September, 1951, in the Prep-} sizes to clear 8 to 30¢c. WHITFIELD'S
aratory Department of the above School.| Hardware Dept. 21.4.51—2n

Applications mar be submitted to the
Headmaster, by parents/guardians on
behalf of boys who shall be not less
than eight and a half years of age, nor
more than len and a half years of age,
cn Ist September, 1951.



EVEN-FLO FERDING BOTTLES, com-
plete. The renowned American Feeder.
See jyours at KNIGHTS Ltd.

20.4 sS1—Sn







2, Closing date for applications will be INTERNATIONAL TORNADO, K, 338,
Monday 30th April,, 1951, ‘Mull built and tested by qualified Civil
3. An examination will be conducted | Engineer. Best offer over $600.00. Ring
et the School on+Saturday, June 9th at | 1274, 22.4.51—I1n.
9 ean, -_——$—$____— peomnestacearnceteasimnanemraattts
4. Candidates should arrive equipped MARBLE-—A_ piece of White Marble,
with 2 (two) pencils and a ruler, 40 inches by 17 inches. O. H, Crawford,

M. PINDER, B M.L.A.S., or Phone 8238.
Secretary, 22.4.51—In

Governing Body of Combermere
School. MOULD: Black Mould suitable for
144.51—3n | Gardens and Lawns. Going cheap.
Appky: Jas. C. Duguid, Bay Land.

=: 20.4.51—3n









NOXZEMA SKIN CREAM: Once again
ve can offer you Noxzema Greaseless
Medicated Skin Cream. Get it at Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd. 20.4.51—3n
—
PEANUTS: Fresh stock of Planters’



REQUIRED

$56,000.00 loan; secured by
ist Mortgage on Freehold





Cocktail Salted Peanuts in sealed
Vacuum Tins, Bruce Weatherhead.
22.4.51—3n



PIANO ACCORDION, perfect condition
Phone 8195, Da Silva, after 4 p.m,





property on Frederick St., {de
SHADE 4 Opaque Window Shades—

Port-of-Spain. Contact {cream}, 33 ins, wide. Apply to the
Parisian Dress Show, Shepherd Street.

Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors, 22.3.51—3n

i ” SPORTING PRINTS of high “decora-







tive value and unique interest are now
on sale at HARRISON'S ART DEPT.
20.4. a

| GREY HOUSE
Church Street
Speightstown

Instructions have been received

3n



Two PLATE Glass Display Cases, what
offers. Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, Broad
Street. 7.4.51—tin
er rer

“Those Little Pals.. Ramadhin &
Valentine are in a_ record partnership
at Harrison's Music Dept., together with











Sergeant Brown and The Straight Hair
Gal” 21.4.51—2n
WOVEN WOODEN BLINDS can be
used Venetian Style, as Curtains or as
Sereens. They have numerous othet
t uses for the home decorator with an
‘om Mrs. I. G. Jemmott for the imagination. HARRISON'S FURNITURE
eheve property to be offered for DEPT 17.4.51-—2n
sale by PUBLIC COMPETITION .
at 2.30 p.m. on Friday, April 27, WATCHES. For a limited period 10%
i801. at JOHN M. BLADON's discount on all Packard and Alton
Offices, Plantations Building Watches. 17 and 15 jewels. See “Your
G : Jewellers” Y. DeLima & Co., Ltd
rey House is a spacious 3- 19.4.51—6n
storey stone building with a dry .
Goods and general store operated 7K .
on the ground floor which offers eae i hd Heckwake "Deot.”
cppertunit, for the development e p 21.4.51—2n
of a good business in this central ae detindasumadentanetinvald
pesition. WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station
Wagon in perfect condition. Apply 3508
Perticulars from the Solicitors, ov 37438 22.4.51-—t.f.n.
Messrs Yearwood & Boyce, James ae

Strect,
Bladon,

or the Auctioneer, John M
Building

Plantations

MAPLE MANOR
GUEST HOUSE
HASTINGS ROCKS



OPPOSITE



Tel. 3021, 1, BOURNE,
A.F.S. F.V.A Manageress.
\
LEE ETT. |e
}
\



For inspection please telephone 3624.
Offers to be sent in writing to the
undersigned.

Yearwood & Boyce, Solicitors, James
Street, Bridgetown. 21.4.51—6n,



AUC'rION

‘UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 24th by order of Mr. O. G,.
Deane, we will sell his Furniture at
“Deane Hollow”, St. Lucy, which in-
eludes Dining Table (seat 8), Upright
Chairs, M.T, Water Table, Double End
Couch; Tub Chairs and Rockers, Morris
Rockers with cushions; Liquor Case, Orna~
ment Tables all in Mahogany; Set of
nice Table Glass 51 pieces; Dinner and
Tea Services, Glass and China, New Tilly





“amp; Congoleum, Pictures, Rugs,
Gallery Chairs, Cutlery, Spoons, Forks,
&c., Single Iron Bedsteads and Beds.
Mirrored Press, Dressing Table, M.T.
Washstands, all in Mahogany; Larder,

Kitchen Tables; New 3 Valor Oil Stove,
Kitchen Utensils, Domo Crenm Seperator,
Large Chicken Run, Garden Bench,
Donkey Cart, Plants in Ferns, Rose
Trees, Palms &e in Cement Pots a geld-
ing horse and many other items., Sale
11.30 o’elock, Terms CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN
Auctioneers





& CO.

20.4.51—2n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON THURSDAY 26th by order of Mr
Adam Skurnick we will sell his house
Appointments at Gainsborough, corner of
Wekhes and Tweedside Roads which

includes
Dining Table, Upvight Chairs, veyy nice
China Cabinet, Morris Suite—Settee
(seat.3) and 3 Arm Chairs, all with Spring
Cushions, Cocktail Table (Vitrolite Top),





Ornament and Coffee Tables ali in
Mahogan?: Glass and China, Radiogram,;
Prescold Refrigerator (18 months!, Pine
Flat Top Desk, Congoleum; Double
(Simmons) Bedstead and Spring, Deep
Sleep Mattres: Mahog. Mird, Press,



Mahog. Dressing Table, Children's Bed-
stead and Cradle, with springs and beds,
Pram, Child's Trieyele and Black Boar,

Larder, 3 Burner Valor Oil Stove and
Oven, Kitchen Tables, Kitchen Utensils
and other items,
This Furniture is in excellent candition
being practically new; about 18 months
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO,









Auctioneers

22.4.51-—-2n

= *

FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS
STOCKINGS: Beautiful Nylon Stock-
ings, New Shipment. Just for you in
all modern shades never before offered

only $1.48 pair, Special price for whole-



salers, Contact: KIRPALANI'S Retail &
Wholesale Dry Goods Store, 62 Swan
Street. Dial 4715.
22.4.51—1n
~~ P 4 :
t "i "
FOR LONGER SERVICE
TAR all posts before erecting.
A small quantity of this
R o t preventative |
| material still available
it your GAS WORKS, Bay St
Price 40c. per gallon
| Get Soine To-day |

SS a a Ee Ne pen

|

rental
owned house and 10% of
officer’s monthly salary plus
5/12% of estimated value of
furniture, subject to a maxi-
mum of $50 per month for
a married officer, and $20
per month for an unmar-
ried officer;

Free first class passages on
first appointment for the
officer and his family not
exceeding five persons in,
all. Subject to review at
any time and not as a per-
manent right of the officer,
free passage on leave after
a prescribed minimum tour
not exceeding the cost of
normal sea passages to the
United Kingdom for the
officer, his wife and children

(b)

subject to a maximum of |

three adult fares;

Payment of outfit allow-
ance of $288.00 to officers
from non-tropical countries
on first appointment.

The successful candidates will
be required to pass a medical ex-
amination.
quired to serve and reside any-
where in the Colony at the Gov-
ernor’s discretion.

| Applications should be submit
, ted to the Colonial Secretary, Red

(e)

ee House, Port of Spain, to reach him

not later than 30th April, 1951,
Certified copies and not originals
of testimonials should be sub-



mitted.
J, O'CONNOR,
Acting Colonial Secretary.
= 8.4,51—2ny
\POOSes >
%

ys
% West Indian & British §
x Hand made Crafts, Antiques, 4S
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach- yy
g weer, Decoration Hoyse, st
% ves. Tel. 91-74 %
} 14.4,51—Im, vs
>

Me ete te

COOKING BUTTER

in full supply
olb. TINS

or per Ib.

GRIFFITH'S —Roekley
Dial 4514

COOKING BUTTER |







paid for privately |

They may also be re-! %

Â¥ A LIMITED QUANTITY AVAILABLE
SIMMONS BEDSTEADS

Glass Ink Stands double and single

Stamp Racks, Rubber Stamps,

Stamp Pads and Ink. Paper Weights,

Pen Trays in Glass, Stapling Machines and
Staples to fit.

Dating Machines, Pins and Slide-on-Clip

Also... ...

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS

DIAL
3466





Pencil Sharpeners

i

ATHLONE GUEST
HOUSE



Roberts & Co. = Dial 3301





FONTABELLE

' PERMANENT | Won

| OR FRIIS
TRANSIENT : :

BOARD AND LODGING }
FOR RESERVATION . . . }},
{
(
{



DIAL 4837
21.4.51.—2n.
wrens PPPS SSO POO

oO.

Are you thinking of Building 3
Houses, Roads and Yards ? %
‘ a

1F so a



N. E. Wilson & Co.

New Arrivals inelude....







“B. A. & P. 8. BROOKS”

CONTRACTORS

Contact;

POCPSOPSOOPSS

Pillow Cases









. m o ;
FR BP og 19 X 30 @ aie siseessess $1.12 egeh
the best
For further Bereeu late Phone 8335
2 .
“ue aasi-m 31% White Sheets
Boe e Cease 80X100@.......... iveueeresesss $6.67 each
LEARN NOW!
By one whg Brent beginning 45” wide GD isitanees, see edersnseseonss — easteegees sioees SLBO yd.










Oral and written.

ish taught.
Brew (speed

Typewriting & Shorthand
writing).

Plastic Tabling

Coloured Blankets

stn classes at Black Rock, near in two sizes @:

. Stephens, 10-4, Evening_class-
ph “at Mr, Rudder’s School, Consti-
tution Road, 7—9.



Piastic Table Covers

Special attention to Elementary
Teachers and Sales people.

$2.10 to $4.72 each

Terms reasonable



GLADSTONE BOWEN,
Black Rock.

Damask Table Cloths

Assorted sizes & Colours from $2.42 to $2.98 each

N. E. Wilson & Co.

The Ultra Modern Store with the Bread Street

“Rockridge”,



















| CALL AND SECURE YOURS QUICKLY Goods at the Swan St. Prices
— ALSO — Dial: 3676 fet wan
| BATHROOM TILES Coloured 7 it me .
|
Established Incorperated |
| 1860 T. HERBERT Lid. “1926
10 & 11, Roebuck Street and Magazine Lane : 1 33



eee

ri

AOA AOAC OG

Sof

Sees

SIS

SSIS











LA RO
A House Spots at L
N Stanmore Lodge A

TY Black Rock
2,400 & 8,000 Sa. Ft.



Just Received

FRESH STOCK
OF 45. 4..

DOBIE’S
FOUR SQUARE

YELLOW & PURPLE
TOBACCO
202 & 402 Tins

_

C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813



a

REAL ESTATE
JOHN
MM.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD

FOR SALE
Py tien Pika

CKE!
tony tineti
well-bu sidheg stone YE dtiee

set well back in secluded grounds
approx. one acre in extent. The
gardens are well matured and
there is complete privacy from the
roadway and adjoining property.

re is a covered entrance porch

ears, wide airy verandahs,
latge lounge With a central stair-

making an attractive feature,

iit ih good bedroo:

, four
. butler’s

try,
Tooms_ oust
there if a laree garage, ith
quarters, ete. tremely
esting an sh able proper
“RICHELIEU”,
ley

ell iaytat i \~
low rece ee at

Hailaba shingled ac-
comimodation cons’ >
fibecs sori. a . “dink ;
‘oom, four bed sere
vant's room sue dou .
The property has a wide la
* one side and args 2 and
ully enc! r i
Bent area near town a Schodis.
“WHITEHA: FLATS", Cod-
Bogen § Hill, St. Michael—A well

country home recen:

poeterved into a block of 4 or
id luxury flats, fitted with all

a gpnveniences. The grounds
app 5 acres are laid out with
‘tin shrubbery and gardens and
there is a long carriageway ap-
proach flanked with mahogany
trees. An investment P or
suitable for conversion into Guest

‘ous: Ni
rege ursing Home. 3% miles

“MEDMENHAM”,
very fine 2-storey property pleas-

near Government House.
spacious and well propor
commodation co: prising 2 fe ep.
oh dining and nd brea
rooms, (1 with ~
ing room), ‘butler’s vate ‘grew:
en, servants’ ms, garage, f
Sty. boultry houses, ete, ere ts
0-way entrance driv
freuhds are well laid +a cine
wns, flowering shrubs and flower
fardens. The whole broperty Sas
{ 4 pleasant character ical
ome of the older lished

homes in this exe
very sound buy’ af thine pe 4

Modern S

Hall Reva a da

of stone seen

roof. This siruction With

vantage of a corner la

fine view seawards.
ees a built-in

‘ loun:

with 2 verandahs ieaging

from it. The k
Hed with flied cupbostat’ tees

IS a 2- s¢
Punt pune ee 2 servants’ rooms

Building " Lana,

ea Rockley
apes then eee building plot of

lar new
Golf ous

TRE BUNGALOW, Pa'
ynes Bay
termed St. John the Baptist
—a 2-storey house with 3
i upstairs lounge, 1-
eries, dining room, kite’ en and
+eun offices. Very fine sandy
each and safe bathing,



“INCH MARLOW"—on PorO:
rhe ofneins near | Sliver
Ma

iorise ite shingle and oo
Sap . 4 reception, bedrooms,

andah; 2 bathrooms a
toilets; 2 kitchens, tervanta
rooms, 2 garages, frow
apartments but easy to taeuuniah
“SWEET FIELD” — St Peter.

This interest propert,
offered for sale as the ioner lk
The house
Boobie 2
barapeted roof. There is a ainune
room, large lounge with french
windows leading into coy. ver-
andahs from which there is a
unobstructed view of the sea
short distance away. ad $3
large and airy,

rooms are
bathroom with ue “path

its
jand hot water. ae is” le
inex;

scope improve-
ments and mo ernlention to fe

arried out without the
fosing its “Old World” atettepnaed.
The grounds are approx. 24, acres
in extent well planted with trees
pod Agvering shrubs of all varie-
ee There are two carriageways
i eee e is a right of way over
h with excellent bathing.

———es

FOR RENT

“IN CHAN a
Silver Sands. PR rcidine: Gomnt ot

St
coast,
verandah,

Immediate Possession.

“WAVERLEY”, St.
—Attractive 3 bedtocmed Tre furnish

ed seaside b
lang lease is pe peed Available

letemeetnameaal
REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
"Phone 4640











‘Eaggl eihy Bb aaa
|



6.30 a.m, The Billy Cotton Band Show: os ei infaney but is expanding as the }
World War and particularly com- 7.00 am. The News, 10 aime Nowe ae eee ao et hee needs arise, The Church here toa
memoratés the Anzac landings at 4!ysis:_7.15 a.m, From the Editorials; 7.25 ; m *SOM) has a growing Burial Association
' . ‘ a.m. Programme Parade; 7.30 am. The Indiana, U.S.A. : hd iain .
Gallipoli, Compton Mackenzie, the Mark of atness:: 7.45. gn. Souventis of 4 say. ond a Ministers’ Aid Fund which i
po Greatness; 7.45 91 Generally speakin tl vork
Gistinguished Scottish novelist and Music; 8.30 a.m. Practice Makes Perfect; Ag g, © Wor’ is owned and controlled by the} ooo mCW | |
writer who took part in this cam- a Waa eae ee ee ike ak ; ministers, Various policies are | :
paign, will talk on these landings pritain; 8.5 a.m, Close Down; U5 am. American Column: adepted which will help those |
Gampon, at 7.45 p.m. On Programme Parade; 11.25 a.m, Listeners who wish to help themselves, }
Heane 95th Choice jas a.m, Commonwealth Sur- Much of the succé@sg of the
esday, ; X69, 12.00 noon, ‘The. News: 1210 p.m. 6 en Chureh {8 a ha Sento ee
Phowas Masaiyh ws Analysis: 12.15 p.m. Close Down. oO ee ae uadiai eee ee owt ae |
; 415645 pam. 19.07 M yeni ties Chale hanes rine
..The next. talk in the BBC series oe of persecutions; iia ” Segeey y
ey 15. p.m. Wi hak: 54.45 J a y forces |
“The Mark of Greatness” will be , 4!5,pm, ws phakeanenrs; 4.46 k or j ‘he trying to divide ‘it, but through it @ostume Jewelry
&n Thomas Masaryk, the maker r of the We 35.15 p.m. The Story all it has made steady ress
the Czechoslovak nation, and will Teller; 5.35 p.m, Interlude; 5.45 p.m. Sem- , A the steady _ brogres:
be given by Lady Violet Bonham Prini_at the Piano; 6.00 p.m. Nights at e- and the opposing forces only |
Cater, x {ath the Earl of ‘® Opera; 6.45 p.m, Programme Parade. resi ent pists purify and test its real '
ith 6007.15 pm. ............,...,,95.59 Sk i
pacity oe : Wie Boe hee p.m 5.53" M Representative here of the now at | in GREY, BEIGE and EGGSHELL
est eet 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m, News (By NEWELL ROGER Missionary Board of the Churen
. Lady Violet Bonham Carter has Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Sorrell : y GERS) j i
the highest admiration for Thomas p.m. The Mark of Greatness” aoe tee NEW YORK. is Rev. Walter Tiesel who is

SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1931 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN

HRC Radic Notes: FAITHS BA RBADIANS

Review Of Mittelholzer’s LIVE BY—9 Foot .fch ( use New

New Novel THE CHURCH OF GOD K : | i e d in A a ys
In BB'S Caribbean Voices By JAMES F. BRATHWAITE ! hi . saeneiiehaae a,
On Sunday next, 22nd instant, Se 7 | Pain and itching fr i | eRe NEN






















; : + nadine attics re is t-J 4

Gloria Escoffery of Jamaica will THE CHURCH OF GOD reformation movement is an out- }

pmo on. ener? Move growth of the holiness agitation of the last century had | Stopped it

mong Them” the new novel by its i i ut the year 1880, when Daniei S. Warner |

Ciolenee SSeS acne Britian and weber it state in the | Jnited States severed their con- | 7 Minutes

Guianese novelist whose previous and other min ‘ ae ates § teeta

book “A Morning at the Office” nection with humanly orgenized churches and maintained |

attracted much attention in Eng- that the scriptural, all-sufficient standard for Christians is
membership in the body of Christ.

land last year. The latter you will
On this account Rey. Warne. on the Island comes under the

remember was laid in Port-of-
Spain while his new production is
and his associates made n headings of Preaching, Education,
attempt to organize a: churel: Literaturé, Social,






‘ ‘ i a>».

The special ingredients of RUCKE AST
TONIC WINE quickly Feetore Toei energy

A glass or two & dav of hE rich, ful.

j bodied wihe will fortify on apaintt fever and

prevent the ekhauttiot of finpetermn faciens,

Take home
|
|

a bartle today!
set in the upper reaches of the
Mazaruni River in British Guiana.
Miss Escoffery’s talk will be in the



inati : ; ‘ D ermé, tom, Ana fu! onsite
along denominational lines. The gospel is preached from nchojy "Quy, feet, Hteh, s0 Badly, that, they | ger Tnect Yomt Tetecklense ah aul be Ring.
BBC’s “Caribbean Voices” the They made instead, direct appea pulpit, street corner and _ radio, YOUF feet crack hd peel? Are there bits. wornt a2 k atone ti ite ‘and ry ei
weekly pragramme of West Indian i y to the teaching of Scripture leclaring the message that Christ your feet? Do these blisters break and run| the skin soft, cleat, and abot
prose and poetry broadcast each } contending that spiritual fellow- died for all, and through His and cause more blisters to form? Do your Guaranteed Tes
Sunday at 7.15 p.m, This will be & : ship with Christ and with eac> death on the cross, atonemeni fect gets? MOU atiier fiema Chine tock | Ciek bibeadbain Free your tet todas. |
the second half of the programme, oe | other, and devotion to scripturz! was made for sins. | The church troubles, you should fealize that the real fool. ote Sek Ok. ind Beewe B |
‘tthe first being a short story by } ideals constitute a sufficient bon: in no way believe in the speaking can mot geterid oF your trouble until. yoo Linna Wate’ tae Re will have ted
George Phillips of Trinidad. You for the followers of Christ in tongues as many have though}, ral the germs or parasites responsible for “iter ode ube 84 you can eee |
can hear it on the 25 or 31 metre Thirty-nine years ago the earl cue to the fact that they bear the a : yourself that your § aptly wale
bands, 11.75 or 9.58 megacycles, Missionaries of the Church of Go.| same name as many of that faith * Kills the Cause , | rot eee ait apd Dealthy, Bas eek
ae % hye rhe he ee i inistry as Ordinary ointments and liquids can not | t . ; t~
Th ‘Anas < came _ to _ Barbados. Thes The preaching _ ministry has | oj ears Stameata Wane Taide onn nop that the Fas ts ary ve ietely pall ative
ree nhiversaries MITTELHOLZER pioneers were Reverends N. S_ recently been intensified by kill the underlying cause of your trouble ety oe hat rupted y :
Th 7 E. Duncan, George Q. Coplin and JJ. locally airing the Christian | Fortunately it at last is possible ko over: } feet § peel Ne
yrammes will niet tarde SIG tO <8 Frank Shaw. They preache.| Brotherhood Hour Radio Pro-! come these toot tr y
é anniver- 5

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC
SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD.

i your }
tire, Nike
< r this |
s—S | most stubborn ringworm iotection with the dorm wh wort 4 34 uit
‘ * ’ ; j ? e_. the gospel first at Mile-and—a- gramme which is the international doctor's prescription Nixederm—based on | nntee Bil 90 ss ie a teen ort |
peare’s Biren pay. Shakes. Radio Quarter, St. Peter, where the firs! voice of the Church of God. in|} the.prsseription of a famous English skin | dermite Whe i | ory was eral
ihe fat wal ee me Oey . aes building still stands and the this programme “A United| chemists. Nixederm spo: ey eoera eS i ee rely Bet i you
ane gg be a feature a y. . y congregation worship to this day, Church For a Divided World” is| feed tg ene your, foot trouble. amy the | cueuist today. The gu
gramme “Concerning the English Pro TOAMMME S00 the cospel wae ects Bax, Chere
st Poe Solace ee Crumpton Street, Bridgetown, in . Education forms a great part of
Phire teak tah tose of Calais by Sunday, April 22, 1991, @ rented hall, with the result that the work here; education through
episode hh scailbeigcrtey atier 6.30 a.m.—12.15 pum, cscss:+: 19.60 M six years Vater the church ai preaching, teaching and training. %
'
)
{
)





ee ee ee Chapman Street, the Centra) Strong emphasis is laid on Sunday
aera canteen x Se. &i- So Siete sediment Te eisai Church was built and dedicated. School teaching work. A cortene'l
most simultaneous miracle of Dun- Organ;, 7,00 am. The News: 7.10 am. An addition is Hw being made pondence course from the Ander-
kirk. Against these battle scenes Qu Anaivsits ds am Prom the Hj to this Church for Sunday Schoo) son . College and Theological
coricerned the Bogiah it bee am English Magazine: 8.00 am Calling Tooms, modern kitchen and Seminary is offered in classes,

NOTICE.



























° | } The Company hope to be able . comet re ime
‘ : 4 j ro vf new services r the long outstanding applications as s s
; res; ‘m. The News; 9.10 am, Youth Fellowship Room, If wili and upon completion of the pre- of new services for the é se se
oe etna ant of Ral- Hore New rom Beitate: 9.1 a.m, Clase also serve the paises of accom- scribed courses the College -and an See aaron cates, ae ke iver ik th, Press “s ts wheg
eigh, ti Tr rers, Di ; 11.15 am, Programme Parade; ati veh Sy ef inary re: i a, The mission, and due notice will be given pa GE
the defeat Of tne cae ana ae 11.20" a.m. Interhude:, 11.30 ai 18.10. pat tinge ind an Biat er Chueh Gide tie athing ce the We proudly present applications for new services will be accepted, It has come to
overthrow of Napoleon, the social Hove Kahivear AIS ake Close: vente mon the math, Oupding. ar mind with ‘an einphasis on a The SILVER KING “Floating Ride” Cycle | our notice, however, that some Consumers and prospective Con-
and economic progress ‘of the late ui is,” A Growth And Present Work liveable wvorkab! > and ‘dynamic ~desi { frame angles has sumers propose installing Electric Stoves. The hotplate of a
nineteenth century, the growth of *!5—045 p.m, .. eee +++, 19.76 M The work of the Church of faith ih ‘Goa Cee. ok Complete eee SS ae VEMENT stove full on, takes the same current as 20 to 30 lamps, and the
the Empire, the ‘defeat of the “4.15 p.m, Music Magazine; 4.30 p.m, GOd has spread from one parish “The specialized training for resulted in the FIRST MAJOR IMPRO Company therefore consider it unreasonable that additional
Kaiser and the overthrow of Hitler, Sunday Service; 5.00 ‘p.m. Composer of to another until today there are ministers and gospel workers is in bicycle design since the War, with stoves should be connected to the supply until people who have
Thi ill 7 ngs} the Week; 5.15 p.m. Listeners Choice; 6.00 19 churches With one or more in aes bite hl BOS} iy, I 'EERING been waiting for lighting services have been first supplied. It is
5 pragramme will be broadcast 5’, "Rendezvous Players; 615 pin Ray's eck : <. carried on by the West Indian EASIER ST. ; ae iy ice that
at 9.00 pm., on Sunday, 22nd Paden eds p.m, Programme ’. every parish save one. All these Bible Institute located Trini- N with regret therefore that the Company must give notice tha’
April, St. George’s Day being on 6.00—7.15 pam...” voers #053 M Churches have their own pastor, dad. At. em ent th pat are | EASIER =PEDALLING no stoves or Welding Plant can be connected to its system until
the 23rd instant “Soe eee oe News Sunday School officers and Shieh is thee fran all parte. ab] and the FLOATING RIDE pertormance. further notice
The commemoration of Shakes: analysts tas Dim. ‘Caribbean Voices. Sone ce te the lower Caribbean area, as thr Great Beauty has been combined with
peare’s ecthaey we a Ee “s 7A5—11.00 p.m. ci. Pe Set oe eh eee pastors were Reverends Cumber. Church ot God has spread to} improved STRENGTH at all the important
programmes, “Words by akeS- 7.45 p.m. Why I Believe; 8.00 p.m. batch, Dowrict = : . Trinidad, sritish Guiana and a §
3 83 ’ ny , Services ‘ h and later nh : a . points— Pe O
Best known lyrics set to.musie by 38 "i" Comper” ot the Woak! so «yp ge No ggg Bn getty oa a a TOUGHER FORK TIPS HE BARBADOS ELECTRIC
a -m, Concerning the English; 10.00 p.m. lin and others. ere are today whe we a ; 7 o
British Composers and “Sketch for Tne Newer dete pum, From the Editorials; Paap ; Chief of the Church's wide STREAMLINE FORK SWEEP
. 3.10.10 p.m, : several ministers who are ordain- ,,,~ teat ; " O @)
Er = 10.15 p.m, i irs; 10.30 p.m. Lon- . rature strv is p Gos > 2c
fire progaimme atimnpting’ to Sen Forint Se Wour ay Shake eal ond. others. prepering’ apy Mieratur aninistry is the “Gospa} POLISHED CHROMIUM THIMBLES SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD.
= peare. ordination. Bidal.- wean ae fa Buy the new Silver King FLOATING RIDE NOW.
sketch the character of the man PR 'c. PROGRAMME, April 22, 1951. Several of the Chutches ; local circulation, This is @ _ 7. >
as reflected in his work. The for- 10.00—-10.15 pan. —News and Let's Look $oraing ayerk Tate t ote medium of contact with other Why "make-out" with any other? i V. SMITH
i ~ Je clence. r € Ze} § ,aSIS f # ahs » ated .
mer will be at 4.15 co Mon 10.15~10:30 p.m.—Audience Mail Bag. while others are advanein ee the Wor ld around. base @ A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
day, 23rd an na ies: toward that goal as that is the Chureh finds the peoples of Bar- |
birthday, and the latter at 10.15 : é s_ the

General Manager

BOSTON : bados avid readers and try te aaa

i U1, 15.98 Me, WRUW 11.75 Mc, WRUW goal held up before all, While eco a" F Rei,

ene Dey Sean ae Tae of m8 ie Ménaay, Apri 2s, 1951 ‘He Church of God in Barbado: Ri iiteratiiee Wd eae ee
eee ar rm ‘ As eheny, April 58.190 ehjoys & preat Smount of self. 3 anc s

the Australian and New Zealand 6.30 a.m.—12.15 p.m, 19.60

y Corps who fell in the first government, it co-operates fully The social programme is in its



SSNS SSS SEE









ST













{ : In addition to his all-out Pastor of the Chapman Street
ary! e = : :
aor oe iby tev weet ane FEN Dis Baa: rene 25.58 M 31.32. M political struggle over MacArthur, Church.
r Presid ps ight has
t atnes e@ 8.00 p.m, Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p. ; esident 4ruman = tonight las a ;
field of thought. philosophy * qd Commonwealth Survey; 8.30 p.m, Practice another major issue on his hands | Stereos ii
%

TAFFETA PLAIDS

$1.34 and $1.40 yd.

Makes Perfect; 845 p.m. ser be “ Np ae F S| Ss
history in particular, made him the Week. soa pit yam. Ggemoveer of about “The Conscience of the 3
3

bprn none.
SITS IO ELS IOGSS.

Y. De Lima & Co, Lid.

“Your Jewelers’

SSO

, ' : Senate.”
in the field of action, 19.00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From .
ee ane ie Ue 7.45 am on Mon: Poy tattarialy; 10.15 pm. Tip Top Tunes; | Senator Charles Tobey earned

Annual Dance

poe

nr wy
SORE Et

Science





. Review; 11.00 p. ; i 5 i impatient 14 z 7 , ,elé) &) p
Perch AAR ages MOMENTO ES, aise Yar ate gate ee ya aude vee BROADWAY DRESS SOI
C.B.C. PROGRAMME crime hearings; they made gang- THE MEMBERS OF
Monday, April 23, 1951

Where Satisfied Customers Gather

%







ster ing! CLUB PREMIERE
: 10.00~10.15 pm , 2 sters flinch and stutter, ,
A.F Fi t sate, 15 _p.m.—News and Comment- Tearfully, he called on his at the
. é OE “ 16.15-16.30 p.mn—canadian Chronicle fellow citizens to return to the DRILL HALL























































OPP POOOD DLV OSSOPE SSE L ACPO EC EV OTF ee )
Se “ ———. aths of civic honesty. n care ‘ > |
A Flic { S , PNow Stiiitor Tosee has turhed SATURDAY, Sth MAY, 1951 APVTENTION 1! |
ce 1es eWJe CHURCH SERVICES ie the alleged shortcomings of SUBSCRIPTION — 3/6 >
officials in a Government loan : heat Std nad ‘nD SS
Jet In'Korea eee gaency” Tite be slopnonel | AdNston, by vitaton FACTORY MANAGERS 3
JAMES STREET ruman about it. . , 22.4.57—8n
11 a.m. Rev. J, S. Boulton, 7 p.m. First time, he says, the Presi- + : rie uirements
R. McCullough: dag’ dent accused Senators’ of misusing Debatetonteehrehnnonioniehohehece. Take this opportunity of obtaining your req
By JAMES S RT x
(By JAM TUART) Bi" S50 Ran nts, BAY i their influence to get loans for] ¢%6%%%G9%9%39145995559000, IN $
A_ WARTIME fighter ace of the mr, ach 1 eo constituents. 5 . % The Committee & Members ;
RAF is flying with an American pm. Mr. A. tm, Rev. B. Crosby, 7 The second time Truman said Bee GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE %
fighter wing in Korea, He is Flight * DALKEITH i1 es nae gee cas he had no evidence of this. And] > . T Lieutenant Stephen Daniel, 7 .p.m. G. Harper” / «+ Sruce. Tobey says a recorder took down % EVERTON CLI Ranging from %4” upwards :
DSO, DFC and Bar, Yppeth i BELMONT 11 am. Mr. G. Brewster. Truman’s words, request your company }
former commander of Nos. 72 and ‘ Sound DistRICE’ = ‘am. Mr. Clar- dita See Vaden, gi oa ae MILD STEEL %
145 Squadrons, RAF. ence Jones. 7 p.m. Rev. M. A, f, “ide. The Federal Communica- t 1 Dz .- ; ' > SELECT THESE NOW
Daniel, who was born at a a ons, Commission says it is illegal | » Annua ance Flate, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes %
gnben age ences, aNd Thomas T p.m, Mr D,'. Grimin. © wer iB Seconth Shes The hess 8 at QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE : HAMS (Smoked) ...... Ib. ROYAL JELLY ..... Pas.
Hit, Dumtriseshire, is on q,ing Tne Tom. is ae cle” © Warn the otier speaker, % on SATURDAY NIGHT, BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes Beg hE COCRTAL, BnbUiis ties
7S ti to thy United State WHITE HALL So a public debate is raging | ¥ 28TH APRIL, 1951 y SODA BISCUITS aoe ns, © ISCUITS, 1
years’ posting e Unite ares 9.30 a.m. Mr. P, Deane; 7 p.m. Mr. For such a thing, shouldn't the } ¥ Mr P Greenis re \ % CHICKEN HADDIES Tins. UFILLIT BISCUITS .. 'Tins
Kmeritae pice mnalibe sdhenes mr or OTLL MEMORIAL conscience of the Senate’s Con- % eee Orchestra ; FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill ; HAMS (Cooked) Ys aes MUTTON AND PEAS. 7
t 11 am. Rev. R. McCull ; _m, science ricking? si ‘ ao ny 9/ * FISH SUPREME . Tins LAMB TONGUES .... Tins
Under wis pla many RAP vey 3s. ‘bowie, ne “COMIC” STRIPS” are going on} \ CUBRCAE ION. fi . At PRICES that cannot be repeated. % PEARS _. Pins VEG, JUICE . ... Ping
feuaare” d ae me ‘pilots 8.20 a.m, Mi Husbands: mr. exhibition—first time anywhere — | Qa neemmnsmetseeennnnttcite S$ |) PEACHES . Tins GOOSEBERRIES .... Tins
squadrons, ani headin +00 atehaadll i“ aeliaetata +7 Pm Mr- at the Metropolitan Art Museum, Det % JAMS . Tins OAT MEAL . Tins
7 igh Lintemet Caries: whs 9.30 ab ee which is New York's British |} DUNDRY Ltd $ OLIVES ; Bots.
‘5 “FP Moor 7 5: Boulton; 7 pm. Wuseum and National Galle ry in TAT TOL > , ‘OW 4 % CREAM OF WHEAT. Pkes
shot oe 2 German and Mr F pox shale one, Says the museum authority: ANNUAL DANCE The BARBADOS IF : re ;
Italian a in Europe a 11 am. Mr. W. St. Hil; 7 p.m. Mr. G. “Part of America’s culture.” White Park Road, St. Michae ¥ | PERKINS & co. U TD.
the Mediterranean during the Marviile adiche: FLAT owners of St. Petersbure of the DIAL 4528 % | 5
war, is now serving wit the 11 ain. Mr. D. Scott: 7 p.m, P.M. Florida resort, are offering to, EMPIRE CLUB % i ali eT DIAL 2072 & 4502 Roebuck St. \
4th Fighter-Interceptor ng. BETHESDA waive a day’s rent for each rainy on the SECO LOLVL PLL PLLLLAL LL
Sabre jet fighter, oe 37 FSS Oh am Me aeetts pm PM = day in May or June. wenenes 23rd MAY 1951 POTS OOD DEMME Rt 0 SDD ALAS SLE LI
abre jet fighter. ? ’ records indicate a safe bet. ae the ee
Crash-Landed sunpardtPer Bay Breet POLICE unwittingly broke up CLUB'S. PAVILION
When, during the ‘ar, he tOok alterna vBartes tii, Letnee, a, funeral procession at Atlanta, Bank Hall
command of No. 72 Squadron if Testimonies of Christian Suge! Heal- Georgia. eae aks Subscription 3/- . sites 4 ‘
the Mediterranean, he was the ing. dead man, a pall-bearer, two Music: Mr. Percy Green's TAKE VFHE
youngest squadron leader in that . Sunday, April 22, 1951. flower girls, and a Negio Orchestra o-d
theatre. He was 22, TRINE OF ATowemENTTm"? DOC: preacher's son dropped out to Admission by Invitation j
Once his airplane was hit by maciden Text; 1.Timothy 2: 5, ¢, buy lottery tickets at a house 7” 7 | V4 AL Pe] TIME FROM
A-A fire, and he crash-landed ;.00r% "ove Fir ne ee eacistar, be. along oe wire suet as police | |) eee eens | freee t pn, Soe
ntry, He was several Jesus: ‘ rist were raiding the place. Opts Ostet sty Pptghgtyty io,
Weeks in Woaphial. all, to be taetinea in'aiae Hage" (° ANGRY MOTHERS. got _busy ere noe ite
For a time after the war he was BRIDGETOWN ep, ARMY when New York's pa col oars g 2 | /\Deccee
i instructor to the + -NTRAL—11 a.m. said it could not get steel for al % GIRIS FRIENDLY x
Sicicen University Air Meeting em Saivailon eockinny new school te Seance std peraeG $ J iy we offer Vor VOUR
n, acher: Major Smith * down recently. elephoned | ¥
Squadro ‘ * ecu Ent Mealy, SRERT—L, am. Washington, Now the steel is on | § SOCIETY Nt EVERYTHING FoR one
American airmen in the Arctic ting. 7 p.m. Salvation Mn ¥ the site. : at r
Sie cana Goeth oS SRO hn muy oe ae eee Tee Bee a ms YOUR noor HARDW
; ip .,SPE s —l1 a.m. Holi a day— ee ’ ,
fraining ‘programmes in. Arcie Mt"S.,3,.0m,, Compan” Metine'® Rosenberg, mamer of two, con-|% ANNUAL FETE | ITEMS
fegions have increased the Caninin Cane tS ee coe 30 cast gi % | Under. the Distinguiehed ¥% At Prices that cannot be repeated i\
. ; PIE CORNER—11 a.m. __ Holiness “ecrets to Russia, Mrs, Rose > is Excell ING : i
ree ee ettay aus Sene MetNad com AMMEN: ieee ee hen neal tiene te P the Govrthes sha tatu" GALVANIZE SHEETS—6lt., 7ft., 8ft. 9ft, 10 ft. ij We Can Supply You with...
of the supply p.m, Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr her lawyers’ appeal has caused? § = Rhy ‘ ' SHEETS — 6ft., 7ft., 8f., 9ft., 10ft., | : : pee wee
cut off, Major Hollingsworth r yer: en 4 { Savage {% ALUMINUM SHEETS sft., “ » Oft., CALVANISED MESH WIRE-in all sizes
ti in the United | CARLTON—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, her execution to be postpone al YALVANISE Hae aay AT celia
So scientists L 11ft., 12£t il
te Air Force Aero-Medical 2. ».™. Company Meeting. 7 p.m will be heid at “9 i of | 2 LACING WIRE--in all sizes
States Air Fore " " vation Meeting. Preacher: Captain THE HOSTEL, Country Rd. EVERITE SHEETS—6{t., 7ft., 8ft., Oft., 10ft. j ’ ARBED WIRE—in all sizes
Laboratories at Dayton, Ohio, Bourne. Fogg Bp , 1” 9 2 5 aS AT . Bi y
have produced a natural-looking “FOUR ROADS—11 a.m. Holines THMA UCU -—from nylon, Meeting. 3; p.m. Company Meeting 7 Dd Seni ere el aes : * RED CEDAR SE aLES ’ All Reasonably Priced !
be ee ae * - iit aah pevetinsi sees d Fi { Da 8 _ There will be the follow- % RUBEROID MINERAL SURFACED ROOFING y \
The Brabazon airliner is to fly DIAMOND CORNER— 11 am. Moll- Loosene Irs! y js ing Stalls: Flowers and $ Wide j ®
over Paris during the summer. _ jess Méeting. 3 p.m. Campane Meet- Don’t let coughing, sneezing. chok- | Variety, Needlework, Sveets, % 3it. Wide
a e hen sehold, Books, Cakes ¢ y $i ok gy chase elsewhere
The visit is eee Ser ee Pretthier: Chptsia Moore tuln your sleep nd energy another 12) ee aes ate % Be Try Us, before making your Purchase elsewhere
Kineteenth Paris. Salon ' Inter. Aco. This great medicine is not a i% For the Children there 3 i +
; } b ray, but works % wil be Pony ides and $
Scaeseetes At wae, eres | rioncaa as wT PLANTATIONS :
i-being held in the Grand Pa ‘ , SYDNEY. aban hess Waiee Satere immedt- ie By kind permission of Col. $ | | H rdware Co. Ltd. :
June 15—July 1. } Citizens of Port Lincoln, South veee ee: {He loosen and re- | % sjichelin, the Police Band | arpados a ,
Many British firms are being australia (pop. 6,000) have move thick strabgling mucus, 2. Thus | & conducted by Capt. Raison %j HE ISE F RGAINS)
iotecontil ee MiAtEA notice promotes freer breathing andeounaer, | s conducted by C son | . , LIMITED (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAIN
wig ti hibition, £% ar Re |. P more refreshing sleep. 3. Helps allevi- % will play. x Buy Now! d
As well as the static exhib ay beard on the main highway. It 9 coughing, wheezing, sneezing, | $f ADMISSION 6D % . » oe = ‘ ‘ Ph : 2109, 4406 or 3534
there is to be a big flying display peas. “We shoot every tenth Quick satisfaction. or money back | \ 1.4.51--6n % 2 No. 16, Swan Street = -:- one : £109,
of the latest types of aircraft. commercial traveller entering guaranteed. Get MENDACO from =}, ‘ % | J DM aa oe wet vt a we
+L.E.S. this town.” abemist today. SAAS LCCC CC ODOR OGOIOIOY POA DDES OSSD SISOS LONE ORIOO SOOO EE















| oe f
PAGE FOURTEEN

AMERICAN HEATEN

BRITAIN ha » all ort

sorts of
American boxers come and go in}
the last few years One Billy;
Brown—has been given the British)

equivalent of the
unanimous acclaim
Brown shouldn't be
much.

But
blamed

ed two rounds, and

put paid to any hopes he had

lapsing after a storm of blows hac
The
man standing over him is Randolph

making his fortune in Britain.

Turpin.

Orchids
Outstanding

At Horticultural Show

Miss Olive Da Rocha of Rive:
Read won the Cup for the most
outstanding exhibit in the orchid
section of the Horticultural Exhi
bition held at Queen’s Park yes-
terday. The orchids were more in
number than were exhibited at the
annual exhibition and the various
specimens were to exhibition
standard,

The bloom of the orchids gen-
erally was remarkable, especially
becfllse the season is almost fin
ished, Miss Da Rocha’s was
white phalaenopsis — stuartiana
F. A. Hunte’s cattleya hybrid got
first’ prize in its division of
orchids and was a near runner-
up for the Cup

There was no_ horticultural
exhibition since 1945 due espe
cially to drought. Many plant
growers were unable to carry
their flowers at the exhibition
yesterday because of the rain

whith fell Thursday, Friday and
Friday night.

Afeature which was introduced
at the exhibition was the
“Garden”. This formed a back-
grotind to all the many varieties
and colours of flowers in the
Park House hall,

The garden was on a platform
The grass which was strewn
across to form what would be
pathways in a normal garden,
had the appearance of fresh cut
turf. On the edge of the platform
there was a hedge of flowers in
vases while the garden was of
thick growths of lilies, crotons,
palms and different vines,

Delicate Touch

Probably giving the best impres
sion of a delicate touch among all
the flowers in the hall was the
bunch of verbena in mauve and
white, red and white and. other
colours. This was Mrs. L. K
Nicholls’ of Hill View, St. Philip
and won first prize in its section.

The flower which caught the
eye of most of the spectators was
ea blooming collection of sun-
flowérs—all one colour.

The lilies as a whole were
pretty and well developed. Miss
P. Harris won a first prize for her
single specimen of lilies A.O.V.
On more than one occasion com-
ments such as, “I am glad I did
not send my lilies,” were heard
as the spectators passed the lilies’
table, ;

It was perhaps its flourishing
look as it hung over its wire pov
which made the judges decide on
the winning fern, but all the ferns
had a healthy freshness.







Traffie Don’t
No. 31

Do not make any adjust.
ments while travelling—Stop
and make them in Safety.

e
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.












TWO WIT
PLENTY MUSTARD!
COMIN’ UP! WiLLYA
PASS THESE OVER |
IF YOU'LL BE SO /s
COOPERATION s+,




Bronx cheer by
perhaps
too
He was overwhelmed by the
coloured British Middleweight cham
pion, Randolph Turpin. Brown last
is considered
lucky to have sverted disaster that
long. Our picture shows Brown col-

{ They'll Do ft Every I ime

my

PUT TOGETHER! Zs

of

First prize for anthuriums, a
collection of mixed colours, not
more*than 12 specimens, was won
by Mr. J. W. Chandler of Todd
Anthuriums generally, were only
of average standard, but Mr
Chandler’s were more flourishin

Six huge heads of cabbage
were included in the Mt. Hillaby
School exhibits. This school won

a special prize of $5 for the best
collection of vegetables exhibited
by a school.

There were some bananas about
10 inches long at the exhibition.
Carrots, peas, bonavists and toma-
toes were undersized, but the
beans and chives were big.

Only a second prize was given

for guavas. This went to Ruth
Bovell of St. John,
Upstairs were the luncheon

tables with floral decoration, The
winner of this was decided by a
majority of the attendance, Each
person who felt like doing so,
wrote on a card his selection for
a winner,

C. A. Burton Made

Asst. Librarian

Mr. C, A. Burton has been
appointed Assistant Librarian with
effect from Ist May, 1951. He will
be required to undergo a course of
training at a recognised School of
Librarianship,

Mr, Burton, who is 29 years of
age, holds a London Universit;
General External B.A, in English,
English History and Latin (1946)
He was educated at Harrison Col-
lege and gained the Higher School
Certificate with distinetions in
Latin, Greek, Ancient History and
Literature and attained





open
Scholarship Standard, Since
leaving secnool he served on the
staff of Harrison College from
September, 1941 to April, 1950,




when he appointed a Senior

Master at Bishop's High School,

Tobago

Yesterday's Rainfall
Shortly after 3.15 a.m. yester

day a heavy fall of rain fell in

the island and this continued to

fall intermittently up to 10.30 a.m.
Some housewives were surprised
on getting out of their beds to
see their yards well soaked and in
some cases flooded as the fall was
not considered to be heavy,

In the City the gutters were
overfiled with water and in
James Street water covered the
better part of the street. Shopper.
were noticed walking through the
water. One woman did not fare so
well as she slipped and fell into
the water while trying to cross the
street.

Nelson Street was also in a semi-
flooded state and cyclists and driv-
ers did not exercise any considera-
tion for pedestri as they drove
and rode in their usual reckless
manner splashing the water here
and there,

In the country no damages wer¢
reported by Police Posts but Dis-
trict “C’ which had the heaviest
rainfall of one inch and seven
parts was reported to be “very
wet.” Crab Hill also received over
an inch in rainfall. Other figures
up to 6 a.m. yesterday were:

Central 56 parts, District A 59
parts, District B, 50 patts, District
D, 92 parts, Distict F 16 parts.










fnsslorsd 6,9, Pree Cl By




















Supply
‘Talks End

The Ce

ference of Supply
Oimeci

under the Cnhair-
Professor C a.
ended here yes
Saturday,

hed
manship of
Beasley, C.M.G

terday morning,
2ist

It was attended by: Mr. F. A
Bishop, [.S.0, (Barbados), Mr.
G, F. Messervy (British Guiana),

Mr. H. McD. White (Jamaica Di
Mr. A..A. Douglas (Trinidad),
Mr. E. Gittens Knight, M.B.E.

(Grenada), Mr A. R Cools-
Lartigue (St. Lucia), Mr. A. V
Sprott (St. Vincent), Mr. H..E,
Letang, (Dominica), Mr, D. ‘A.
Percival (Development and Wel-
fare Organisation).

Mr. B. E. Rolfe of the Devel-
opment and Welfare Organisatio
acted as Secretary of the Confer-
ence The following statement
was issued from Hastings House
yesterday

The Conference found that on
the whole the supply of consumer
goods has been maintained fairly
regularly
cently appeared in the supply of

a number of commodities includ- |

ing caustic soda, sulphuric acid.
zine and tin plate and other metal
products Special
was made of the difficult prob-
lems arising from the rapid in
crease in prices of certain textile

goods particularly in those type
which were in most demand
amongst the lower income groups

The Conference welcomed th:
recent liberalisation of trade with
Canada and U.S.A. and found



that the recent revision of th
token imports scheme had at
ready produced good results
Ways and means were discusse

of removing a few minor difficul-
ties of





but shortages have re- |

examination |



) Mr. L. Smith MCP

| Explains His
Statement

Mr, L. E. Smith, Labour mem-
ber in the House of Assembly,
was referred to In a weekly news

paper vesterday as having cenJ

ured the members of his Party
in the House on Tuesday, It was
ym account of failure to get his
motion for the passing of an A@
dress seconded by
the Party. This was the address
relative to the provision of proper

sanitary conveniences for work
ers’ houses,

Mr, H. A. Dowding was the
scconder of the motion and in

icknowledging this support, Mr.
Smith expressed the hope that he
would be

imilar help before the end of the!

ession,
indecided
for

He added
that. he
election: again,

Twisted

Mr. Smith told the Advocate
yesterday that he had got the im-
ression from the weekly news-
»aper that there was the inference
e might leave his Party. His
tatement relative to Mr. Dowd-
ng’s support was somewhat twist
ad, he thought.

that he
would

was
stand

What he had really said was,
It is the second time that Mr.
Dewding has. supported a state
ment of mine, and I hope before

thre House dies, the time will come
hat | will have-to support him,
»ecause I am not sure if I may
stand for election acain as I am
| undecided.”





Mr, Smith said that he was cer-



ly coming forward again for

; constituency and was sur> that
be

woud returned to

|

|

|

|

Li
es >.
|

i





CRYPTOQUOTE NO, 11
$2G PTHB RES MWNVTEB
QF/ E’ CHQDF/’ GHPT/ PTQ
NQGEOF,’ AC’ HSHIWHPX
EVPB
Last Crypt
In Nature
melanctoly
a wanainae alineaiaai

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.

ROEBUCK 8ST.
MORAVIAN CHURCH
ANNUAL FAIR
at
THE MORAVIAN MANSE
| Country Road

there i
Coleridge

nothing

(Proceeds in aid of Church
Funds}
on THURSDAY, May
34 p.m
Refreshments Games
Rides
Children (under 14's)
Faney Costume Competition
By Kind permission of the
Commissioner of Police
Captain Raison will be in
Police Band wnder
attendance
Admission



3rd 1951

Stalls and

Poni;

the

12 cents
24 cents

Children
Adults

OOS
LLL
PEGE I EIT FESO AIA,

red

NOTICE 10 :
CANASTA FANS
oe

BREWFRY

| _————————

poten r~

ee ee

has

HEINEKEN'S





mode a gift of Canasta Score
pads to players in Barbatios,
Drink Heine! vs Betr as you
play Canasta, Seore Pads will
be giveh to players: on. paying
“a visit to Messrs K. R. Hunte
& Co., Ltd, Lower Broad Street

ry

GIO ODIO OOOO OOOO FOS FE



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Stanley Gibbons Postage |
|






| Stamp Catalogue, 1951

|

- ine administrative nature | Part 3 (Foreign Countries)
which iad arisen in connection | arict 23 ricd
with this scheme. It was hope | Anais as ons RY
that there might shortly be fur- ‘ o 3
ther moderate extensions of thi GLASS WATER JUGS
trade le at

1 " !

The Conference also discussea JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
methods by which controls by

licence could be released over ;
considerable range of goods from
soft currency areas.



The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.49 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter):
April 28
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 3.34 a.m.,
3.33 p.m,
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):
1.47 ins
Total for Month to Yester-
day: 4.03 ins,
Temperature (Min,): 72.0° F
Wind Direction: (9 am.) E£,,
(11 a.m,) E.S.B,
Wind Velocity: 4 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.989,
(11 a.m.) 29.977



Jimmy Hatlo |
Fe a —=!



eqertcatiaiin

YM / Wey;Mac?

_

js







IASS

BEEN PASSING
MORE ‘THAN






~\
oe)

LADY, WILLYA
FASS THiS THOITY
CENTS OVER® :

4, \ THANKS ! youRE Ze Oe
A FAL

THE |\CE+

MORE! WHERE'S

( MAKE IT TWO {
|







T's THE Guys IN THE
MIDDLE SEATS WHO
BUY EVERYTHING +s

THANX TO TWO FANS,

JACK SHEA,24 CANARY ST,

ROCHESTER, N.%
HARRY “DOC” DOUGHERTY,
NORRISTOWN, F.

















and HARDWARE

King’s Birthday

A GRAND DANCE will be
held at the Aquatic Club on
June 6th (Eve of H.M, Birth.
day Observance) at 9 p.m.

|

Cc, B. Browne’s Orchestra.
Full particulars shortly

Please book this date.

—~~



INTERCOLONIAL
CYCLE & ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

OF THE
AMATEUR ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION OF

|
| BIG

BARBADOS
AT
KENSINGTON OVAL
| a
WHIT MONDAY,
| May 14TH
Thursday, May 17th
and
Saturday, May 19th
|=
Look for the Names of the

Cycle and Athletic Male
and Female Siars from
the Caribbean who
will invade Bimshire
e
Programme Etc. appears
Later
J. W. Maynarp
Hon. Secretary.







member of}

By snow |
in a position to give

the










\
|





Co













CRONE NON S B
ee ee el

Anos

tt, 4A tf 64 fe,
LLLP LEA LSI AAAS IF

SOCIO

OS9GSF

o

*

“4,

>













PLE EEE SPS EE EE EEE EELS ALLL LAE EA LALLA OOOO OEE

MY BOSS

SPOOLS ELE LL OED
een ng ee eras nee ere

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PAGE 1

SUNDAY, APRIL 22, ll SI \|>.\\ \II\4H. All PAGE IIIIKILI N HIU Kadio Xole%: Review Of Mittelholzer's New Novel In B B.t'\ Caribbean \ .... On Sunday next. ttnd instant, oior.a EscoiTery of Jamaica will ii.mmm on Shadow* Move Among Them" the new novel by Edgar Mittelholser. the British Guianese novelist whose previous hook A Morning at the Office' t.ttracw.1 much attention in England last year. Thf latter you will lemember was laid In Port-ofBpoUi while his new production is set In the upper reaches or the Mazaruni River in British Guiana. Ml*s Escoffery's talk will be in the BBC's "Caribbean Voices" the weekly programme of West Indian prose and poetry broadcast each Sunday at MS p.m. This will be the seevnd hair or the programme, Ihe first being a short story by George Phillips of Trinidad. You can hear it on the 25 or 31 metre bands, n.7.1 or 9 58 megacycles. Three Anniversaries In the coming week BBC programmes will murk three anniversaries—St. George's Dav. Snake. peares Birthday and Anzac Dav. rue first will be a feature programme "Concerning the English" in which the framework is the story of the defence of Calais bv three English battalions in 1940. in episode in contemporary history rather overshadowed by the almost simultaneous miracle of Dunkirk. Against these battle scenej some of the events which have concerned the English will be arrayed—the achievements of Raleigh, tne merchant adventurers, . the iitfe.it of the Armada and the "•" %  "" ff**aaj i overthrow of Napoleon. Ihe social SSfSj^Blft and economic progress of the latu nineteenth century, the growth of •'*-* •** • the Empire, the defeat of the '4 is pm Music Ma Kaiser ami the ovei throw of Hitler Bunds* aanrke; 5*> t This programme will be broadcast **• w ** k ; " %  %  at 9.U0 p.m., on Sunday. 22nd i^."V. .VVi-, April. St. George's Day being on Ma-ui • %  the 2:tni instant. %  % %  The commemoration of ShakesA.-.I,.,H % .iT 1 !" ".'. peare's birthday will be in two programmes. "Words by Shakespeare" with some of Shakespeare's beat known lyrics set to music by British Composers and "Sketch for ,,. a Portrait of Shakespeare" a feaKBj ture programme attempting to sketch the character of Ihe man as reflected in his work. The former will be at 4.15 p.m. on Monday. 23rd instant. Shakespeare'-! birthday, and the latter at 10 15 p.m. on Tuesday, 24th instant. Anzac Dav honours the men of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps who fell in the first World War and particularly cominrmorates the Anzac landings at Gallipoli. Compton Mackenzie, the FAITHS B \RBADI iNS LIVE BY-9 THE CHURCH OF GOD By JAMES F. BKATHWAITE THE CHURCH OF GOD reformat m outgrowth of the hoUneaa agitation It '>" its inception about the yai • lfWi. wra i Danio] s Warner and other ministers in Ihe 'nlttd State! wveiptd their COO' nection with humanly orr -?ed churehw and maintained that the scriptural, all-sutli lent atandard for Christians is membership in the bodv ol Christ. Foot -Ich Cause Killed in 4 Days Pain and Itching Stopped in 7 Minutes B.B.C. Radio Programme Say. April It 1*11 On this account It. and his aatoctati attempt to organize a churci along deno %  <:,.. 1 hey made instead, direct appvrto the teaching o( Scripture contending that spiritual fellow ship with Christ and with e*w other, and devotion ho Ideals constitute a vufficicnt ban POUOWOTI of Chitpt. Thlrty-nino ye %  came to Barbadwen Rcvern Duncan. George . CopUfl an.l J Frank Shaw. the gospel first at MilQuarter. St. Peter, where the fin building still Ft..mis m .i U congregation worship lot! Soon the gospel was pn Crumptun Street Bridgetown. -m HIP Island comes headings of Preaching. Education, lira, Social. The gospel Is preached from ett iorner and radio. ieclanng the message that Chris' ui. and through HI: lealh on the cross, IThe church %  %  • tliounht fact that they bear the %  Mental mini hi been iiit.i the Christian 1 Brotherhood Hour Radio Pi"%  nnuni which i.s the tab UM Church ..f 1 -i.imrnc. A United Church For %  Divided World" l* 1 ged_ %  ...m* De loir Jet art to anrr at Inner, thai the. a much goaH twain* Hen* (W BSI Blil • t\irtial>atrti It al laaa train <*ur 'hatotM I I i .n .1 % .! % %  i .1 I >>>tlM SI %  •J-Hal lf --' | ,,|*W 1( ^" "l rare.. ^ h 1 "* %  n ifa a loaaUUi ,-i K•de*a* laal tQ> 1 dan and i .i4tt aalialital U\ he. !" >n at n Irgaii. ".00 a.m. The NCWa; hrwi Analyaii. T IS am. Fror i>nal.. T. a n. Prociainii* Parada; EnaMah Mim-m.v — ,11 r'orrn: 00 a in Th lomr NaarI;. II, '. Thealrr great part o' .ii. -nu tini-i--iiii mat me worn nere; eoucadoni six years later the church at preaching, Mchlna and Chapman Street, the Cent) i-hasls is laid on Sundn\ Chinch was built (inrt aching ,-ik am. An addition Is now l>^i .^g to this Church fttr Sunday Sehoo wn ("Urge and Thei caiUM rcoms, modern kttfhen and Seminar; %  *.v t to a.m. Youth Fellowship Room II will and ujinn cotnpleti %  trl rlm# PintdT 1 0 serv< tnP PurP 0 *^ of |ceomrTlbM mursrs the Collegi am. Runday niodating overflow nudN^i-1 E 'Vi?Jl"'' ttvm lho "T* 1 hu|Idlng rhtnrh urges the training of Hit to* Down Crow||| An( p„^ ent WorK ...... „i, h m ,.,,,. i*:>. M Tinwnrk of Ihe Chunh ,r: 4M pm. c "" i >"> spread fioni .Mic paiisl *"}}' m Compoa*r oi to another until to