Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




Harbados Ga, Advocat

THURSDAY, AVRIL 19, 1951 * .

Allies Continue Push call
Towards North: Meet
Resistance In West

TOKYO, April 18
LIEUTENANT.GENERAL Van Fleet’s Inter-
national armies in Korea continued to advance,
patrol and adjust their positions during the day,









ESTABLISHED 13895





Boy Dies After

Jump From Lorry

FOURTEEN - YEAR - OLD Wesley Vaughn

Phillips, a schoolboy of New Orleans, St.
Michael, died on the spot about 1.40 p.m, yester-
day, after jumping off the platform of the lorry,

M—246 at the junction of St. Mary’s Row and
Mason Hall Street.









Seven Dock par Sa a
Leaders Freed

The
Messrs

lorry is

1 owned by
Perkins

& Co. and



=) Pp was being driven by Garnett
fa A 7 Batson of Pine Hill, St.
Highth Army headquarters said. a eaenar wtih Te a Michee!. it saat practically
On the central front, they met no enemMy,! Stats proscontion or woven yn Will Go empty at the time of the
except along the Pukhan River, south-west of the| oficial dockexs leaders collapsed accident.
today because of disagreemeni Phillips wore only a short
Hwachon reservoir dam. amcng the jury. Nine thousand z OTTAWA April 18. fa ons ponte zy ;
The United Nations’ Task Forces —- -—~~---———- | dockers had struck every time _ The possibility of abandoning haki pants. He lay. on his
continued to probe toward Chor- the seven appeared in court. Canadian National Btenmaships back in the road with blood
wr tigate uae Sngher pens S h Pl To-day their ‘workmates greet- ) {urvics between Canada and the]eoming from his nose ¢
of the Communists’ central Cc uman a ed the accused with songs and | West Indies was discussed on ahead while around A
defence build-up until they en- | cheers as they lefi the Central w) Tuesday night before the Com » iu
countered small arms fire south. | Criminal Court as free men

west of the city and artillery fire |
to the south, |

In the eastern sector, South;
Korean troops fought a Ccommu-
nist force estimated at battalicn

Treaty Signed |

PARIS, April 18.
The Schuman Plan _ Treaty,
merging coal and steel resources

Last night the jury found the
accused guilty of conspiring to
induce dockers to stay away from
work without their employers’
consent. But they failed to agree

pte

Chances For Rescue








where *ie fatal accident took
place at the junction of St.
Mary's Row and Mason Hall

mons Committee on Railways anc
Steamships. Donald Gordon, Presi
dent of C.N\S. and the Canadiar
National Railways said the com
pany and Government will have

stood his parents and a large
crowd. There was a traffic
block in the vieinity for over
an hour.

Street yosterday afternoon, to face this year the question oi He was a pupil of the
strength. of six countries into a vast|cn the principal charge of incite- ise 6 rere a abencouing the service or getting | Modern High School and was
Communists resisted fiercely.| European pool was signed here to-| ment to illegal strike action, ° oh, aioe uml yt n toe eta sial yn for the run. He saic | just on the first week of his
On the western sector front,! day. Nations in the plan are When _ the Court assembled a jumping off a lorry , . ; moony two largest ves Easter vacation, The body
United Nations’ ‘troops advanced| France, West Germany, Italy,| today, Sir Hartley Shawcross, OW ar na seonmawihiinas OE ope th’ waue fw aa" eee ae | ‘ada Ftiieh label | y
throughout the day, finding little} Holland, Belgium and Luxem-| who as Attorney General was j renthccd in ihe Near bejwas later removed to the
at which to shoot, The Eighth] bourg. iy earn Ge ec riee: oh,» s ropes Army’s summary of the day’s Signatories were: Chancellor sal he findings oO ie eA . . + BRITAIN e 5 , ip post mortem examination was
fighting gave no indication of the] Konrad Adenauer (Germany) and | were illogical and ee IN SUBMARINE DISASTER vee West Indies service performed. An inquiry will
extent of the advance, Foreiin Ministers Paul Van Zee-| im in fairness to the Yesterday, when the Commu-| jand (Belgium), Robert Schuman| Nts to discontinue proceedings PROTESTS treaty between Canada and thefirern, erore the Coraner: of
nists fought a tenacious rearguard oun! Sarlo Sforza ° (By ALEX LENTINE) é : Tnited Wired ee and the) District “A” at 2 o'oletke tos
t u (France), Count Ca z Ne A l 5, 4 A Q United Kingdom which involved
action, Eighth Areay trecpe pies (Italy), Joseph Bech (Luxem- ot cequitta PORTS UTH, England, April 18. TO PERSIA U.K. subsidy for ship operation | 2ay.
or wounded more than 1, om. . ik Nether- : ‘itish submarine Affre The treaty an ; ha :
mutt oatatioe: baure) and Dirk Stikker (Neth be ie Sh breil Senn UTTER SILENCE from’the British submarine Affray i Ms ; The treaty and subsidy lay
Earlier

today more than 25
Russian type M.1I.G. fighters took



—Reuter.





don and three from Liverpool—
were arrested on February 8.





sunk in the English Chann
75 men aboard could be rescued alive.











dimmed hopes to-night that



everal years ago.
Transport















TEHERAN, April 18 Minister Chevrier Gives V ic
—— : 5 renee ‘ . sy | told the Committee there is vt ury Gives erdict
the air—for the first time in three i They had pleaded ae oe Over 40 hours after She, dived on practice patrol, no sbatideee are tek a < ate much Dae Stn Hanuvteh Aecimaats ”
ete Meee a ad one T naec Indians Asked Toe SS aekareareeee said] Svrvivors had been sighted.” Nor was there any sight of | Persian Perel Minutes stat (CP) In Death Inquiry
a a3 ob ihahs y € at . ve ; arker , } ‘ines j stress ce 1e Ani yy ;
over Sinuiju, near the Manchurian Th . I Fr t he would discontinue proceedings the yellow marker buoy whieh submarines in distress can | m« nt last night that the Abadat dhram Gun Oi diuenehlaaal
frontier. Oo Join n as does not amount to acquittal on send to the surface. oil strike was the fault of th GREN y
One M.1.G. was damaged be- the charge on which they were} ———-—-——-—— —+++——= After nine o'clock tonight, . if | 498!0-Tranian company Expel Occupants ‘Reitt aue ADA, April 18.
fore they flew off after a 15-min. DURBAN, April 18. | found guilty. _ * any of the trapped men were still The protest called this “misrep- esult due to the dispersal of
ute dog fight. Indians throughout South Afri-} Legaily there is no bar to new Ernest Bevin alive, their oxygen supplies would | '@Sehtation Tory M Pp U x A riotous assembly, was the ver-
Mustang pilots of the South} ca were called on by the Natal| prosecution for the same offence. be low and they would breathe}. Parlier today Anglo - Iranian ? ee ree 8 alee given by a five-man Coron.
African “Flying Cheetah” Squad-| Indian Congress today to fast] More than half of London’s dock- With difficulty, Company officials rejected — the , ors jury this morning, ending a
rons claimed two Communist] With Manilal Gandhi, second son|ers were idle today. : ( re at iq] Late this afternoon the Com- | Persian statement that the : LONDON, April 18. seven-day inquiry into the deaths
tanks damaged in the western|¢f the late Mahatma Gandhi, After enthusiastically greeting m. ec Snander-in-Chief Portsmouth, | Strike in the great oil refinery| Brigadier — Fitzroy MacLean jot two men and one woman
sector, Other South Africans over|Guring the last 24 hours of his|the freed men, their supporters Aficr studied reports from the|t®wn was the fault of the com- Conservative Member of Parlia- turing the recent agricultural
the central sector destroyed six| two-week protest fast which is to] marched to their Union head- LONDON, April 18, great fleet of rescue ships | Pary “for neglecting the workers : ee the Government t workers’ general strike, by bullets
Communist trucks and two gun|end on Friday. quarters to see their General) phe funeral of Ernest Bevitt,feaid: “There is increasing evi_| state of mind and urgent demand Chilean: gxpel Argentines and|dred by Trinidad. police in a
| positions by bombing and strafing Manilal Gandhi said he is| Secretary Arthur Deakin. Deak-| 5 itains former Foreign Secré {ence that the search is being | °f,the moment.” “leans from Paradise Harbour ‘rowd at Latante, St, David’s,
, : Pt teats t urify himself before|in and his fellow leaders have ; . —Reuter. asung to p 3 : ( tary who died last Saturday, teoxkyearried out in the correct place ? 2 7 . :
: y Ik Dependencies Joh Dugdal lice
violating the apartheid (racial)| condemned the activities of the Rane rteca he fact that the submarine } refinery were prevented fron ‘pe cies, John Jugdale,| police involved, testified before
segregation) law as a_ protest| unofficial strikers, Demonstra- me Sa di herehesded ana woes a Sa ae aaeTr. 1 uy | working “by intimidation anc | Minister of State for the Colonics | Magistrate E. A. Heyliger with
D sf 5 P. t Will against the South African Gov-| tors pushed over the doorkeeper| VEEL SEO WS, napehesd ~ mee} ; fa mien ! oy eae © Ee threats of personal violence.” implied that that could not be| Barrister Alban Radix watching
erence ac ernment’s race policy.—Reuter, | at Union headquarters but they silent, watched the hearse — the Pi Sommarcce we. progpects, oO The company had done its{4ne without warlike operations.!the interest of the deceased and
ame , . Deakin who was at-| coffin within completely hidden #Fuccess.% mated varices McLean had asked in the House|C. T. W. B. Worrell ini s
Be Announced pln “the fi 1L of Ernest] by flowers — pass slowly into the wEMeEt ta protect. workers (ECM oF ‘Commene “Whs ta tow in oc-| Sol G 1 iene
a tending the funeral o eet 5 ~~ :pass 5 y 3 ; yp vardship, they added. ; ; O28 NO! =| Solicitor General, thoge of the
Bevin, —Reutor.. cemetery where the cremation tools Realled Over c ny officials said today that} CUPation of | Paradise Island?” | police,
TO-DAY Labour Govt. Defeat ry al ar t of the B itish C i Belief was strong in thi t ine vast majority ot workers BS ane mp eth ae
? ’ esides most o ¢ British Cabi- > fas strc § Brea) Abadan were not on strike anc 5
i y ° net, a crowd of world diplomats, | naval port tonight, that the sub- | jaq ‘aie mands the} the Falkland Islands dependen * é
ea , LONDON, Segre Bud et Challen es - ression politicians, trade union leaders and | Marine had rolled on her. side =e . a ISRO: NGRERRAGR Cee: “HN eies. There are Argentine and C » i
Forecasts, that Percey Spender po , company ; E 1
ent : eae other public figures gathered te}When she struck the ccen Nal a ger ofr Abadan { Chilean posts on two islands in
Australian Foreign Minister will LONDON, April 18. rp gures 8 oY | eetings felephone reports from Abadar | tis harbour Protests against | WV oo
to-morrow announce the conclu-|| The Labour Government de- Pact? pay homage to Bevin’s memory This could have jz bd ace late to-day, said agitators were | trespass of British territory have Meet In Washington
sion of a defence agreement link- hallenge: its Among 142 wreaths from gre! iis could have jammed escape | patrolling areas where the work Se eae ae ee ev
a defence ag feated two cha ges to hatches and prevented the mark I been delivered locally to leade
ing the United States, Australia} budget proposals by 11 votes in| WASHINGTON, April 18. | world figures and humble workmen ae re - rane ed the marke | ers lived, and threats of violenc of both parties." * aReuter. WASHINGTON, April 18
and New Zealand, were confirm-] the House of Commons today. The State Department said to-} were a huge wreath of roses from | ox OV e UP ' sar ae ecsa w t men wanting to work wet Air chiefs of the United States,
ed by usually reliable sources Its proposal to increase the tax, day it had “under study” a letter! King Farouk of Egypt, one fri anes as xs het as aa; ten frequent Britain, France and Canada. will
here to-day, on petrol by four pence half| ¢eom the Italian Foreign Minister] his Cabinet colleagues, and one | te ou m CA we imo . ve Unrest appeared to be spread meet here within the next two
Britain, whose interest in the] penny per gallon was carried by! Count Carlo Sforza, suggesting | from the Unitea Nations, Tren * i da « are y aro ing among workers not employec SEDITION BI weeks, the Air Force announced
‘then ific area is vite : 286 i aty > Frence ; rnment | ** Bu, cars of 1e ev by the Anglo-Iraniz . any lay
uae mata intcteer an te Wai. Guanes also forced a ae ele aaa idee hits and So aaiiate Se Gatton: j ‘training for y sound from be A as oi en vaatherad’ tn Aus LL OT announcement said only that.
present scheme, but is understood] vote on the proposed increase in| other Communist countries a non-| and from German trade unions | | Sri ace as a taietae dan today but was: dispetead with (From Our Own Correspondent the joint meeting “will afford op
to have preferred limited agree-| tax on cinema seats and certain] 2 poression pact. the Dutch Labour Party—nearly | j pees 74 nd. Belg ie Ai cut violence, reports added ; ere portunity to review the progress
ment at this stage between the] sports including horse racing, but)", spokesman said that the] a1) countries of the world were them, Were AMOME | Little change was reported in th GRENADA, April 18 being made by Air Forces of the
two Commonwealth powers and| they were defeated ners ea letter had been transmitted tO]yepresented by flowexs Small ships with an army labour situation at the refine a _A sharp unofficial division with | four nations concerned,”
the United States. These proposals today passed | .., Acheson through the Italian Reuter, | waiting doct cruised .slowls | ‘he, world’s biggest. Last reports! vigorous criticism from members —Reuter.
—Renter| through one of several stages} A inascador here about a fort- Sees ibcut. Helicopters hovered low, | £#id_ 3,860 of the 28,000 workers | opposing, marked the second read :
dincinncicnleaintin pam before they become ed night ago. i fic a os eyoces Se aa le , | had re Bornes and Esenened peodiue ing of the Sedition Bill in the e
. oe i ——Reuter. | curse Rear be we teee the | tion officially estimated at some} Legislature this morning. ‘The
Reds Arrested In MALL. | | cussed ae tae: Seen where © | 1 800,000 gallons for the day Bill has been on the Orc F Masia! | TE FER: ARYOOATS
y . P { r | Affray dived on Menday night Reuter | since February a1 re t : \per THE NEWS
~ ‘ | is bot te signe . ness - ary yhen it was
Rio De Janeiro Brewer s ress Portuguese ennes | forces ve ary er = Pera ; - introduced along with other anti DAY OR NIGHT
4 to P up. it su rine Se 1 strike Bills, Later the second
BE DE TABLAS, AeEsS 3S Card ithdrawn President Dies | Tree etucatine Sea Devil heer? Awkward Mome oe of ‘the Bill was unant- DIAL 3113 e
cor z ess re s to- : . ae . ‘ 168 TTR . ES. 8 mously passed,
date tate i oj ght be tem MADRID, April 18, LISHON, April 18 a fexien ot Tastass in morse, which a ‘id hawerak tein mans ia poi aplasia bales
ists were arrested here during The Spanish Government has i Sok r Car | eat 7) ae piven . ' te ey to the British Treasury face
; ve Le withdrawn the press card of Sam| Marshal Antonio scar Another submarine reported re- | tery renee ae 3
the past few days. a ld President ot! ceiving the code signal “I Am|an awkward moment when he pai
“rests ‘ y ow -on-| Brewer, New York Times cor-| mona, 91-year-ol , i eee. ie sugni att ‘the banal
ake prereety, ia “0 respondent in Spain because of! Portugal, died this morning. Presi- Stuck On The Bottom a formal visit to the Argentin
nected with the demoens'ration é oo > . « , cade mince . 2 ‘ Cc » tceda
: ¥ ; i +i , le ona suddenly grew Divers stood by all day to go
against decisions of the inter-] his alleged “tenacious and insid dent Carm Yee walter aa Woter’es te Attia es While he seine atown thi
American conference in Washing-] ious campaigns which were fre-] worse yesterday after . | its Ae reid: ; B i thé Oka 1 en ‘mechanical voting apparatus, Dep
ton which Communists were| quently incompatible with the] attack of pneumonia. pinpointe ut the dmiralty

planning to hold this afternoon



truth and decorum of the country.’

A special Cabinet Meeting de-|





said that the exact position of the

uty Jose Emilo Visca, Vice-Chair



r ari + 1 ie Peronista bloc in. the
n. front Brazilian Foreigs n he asked for a specifiic] creed 15 days national mourn. | submarine could not be fixed man bf tt ~ eer rae zeke
Ministry ‘building. : eau of articles objected to, ing for the President. Ss als me ane ck Gechliehtar +b PS Sages yey ; Praasionl ae
Security police banned the Brewer was told it was to the provided that Carmona s body will ne is, fed Ie ae ue bes oe at ti n—he proposed that Mem
demonstration . general tone of his coverage that} be taken to National Assembly ee grey swell ee ace aed AP i sh ane Press dispatches from Porto exception was taken. Palace to-night and lie there unt joi hae node a A yA ae ai ‘ A vote on a regolution reaffirm
Alegre, capital Rio Grande do Brewer has been in Spain since | the funeral on Saturday. mee amted arch and more wer« wie Locate’ soveratanty Ie th
oa i so at's he tate 2040: atid glad wethed thare in 1089) wil be. eee soe ot eon be “We don't want to be ; As large patches of the seabed, Falkland Islands The vote

police and many arrests made.
—Reuter

Morrison Quizzed







Nazi Dye Trust
Will Be Split



—Reuter.



| Party Leader Dead

MONTEVIDEO, April 18.

better start printing a
fresh stock of titese.”

were eliminated from
zone and the ring of
Wally closed. —Reuter.





a

Net Accepted











the
ships

gra

searci

'“Gery Document”’|

— Reuter

| WILL ESTABLISH
EMBASSIES

BONN, April 18





ri Sixty—two-year - old Cesar Mayo ; 4razil and West Germany ars YOU CAN COOK
About Trans ort i er, ABST 18, | Gutierrez, Presidential candidate LONDON, April 18 3 1TON . ‘to establish embassies in eacl .
The Allies today announce’ j ‘ ghse F today WASHINGTON, April 18 dX
that I. G. Farben, giant Nazi|in last November elections dies The Ministry of Food to-da) The State Department today ,other’s countries, a Governmen AND BAKE WITH
In Argentina tye trust. would be split into| to-day from an heart attack, He/ refused to accept Lord Lyle’s con called the latest “peace appeal” lspokesman said here today roe ; P
7 , ae and six smaller com-|led a powerful branch of the Col-|tenition that there is no need for} oth “thited |e phkenagtt gy tid Brazil has at present a diplo pe
| LONDON, April 18. ae 2g This decision brought|orado Party and was narrowly | sugar rationing in Britain. Lord munist North Korea “a gory | mati mission with Allied Higt
i Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor- 3 an end “six years’ delib- defeated by Andrei Martinez Lyle, President of the Sugar document,” not remotely resem.|Command Commission unde
rison wes asked in the Commons avatiohte on how to break up the;Trueba—also of the Colorado | Refiners, Tate and Lyle, has writ Sling stance decar ; Mario Ibe Brandao ps
} to-day, what he had done to de-|crust which before the war con- j Party. ten to the Financial Times that or. —Reuter The Allies allowed_the Wes
fend ‘British interests in Buenos|trolled an estimated 85 per cent —Reuter. | the basis of 1951—52 the Ministry j German Government to establist
| Aires transport “in view of recent|ef Germany's chemical industry PN GE SEY would have ae ate res -— {direct diplomatic re lations witl
li * . 5 Q rom forcign countries last month
| the Argentine}|and according to the announce ° e from the Commonwea and from | nw eh 6 | es
Gieeeanank he expedite liquida- ment “played a major part in Petain Still Ml other sources end po tons — moré \ ?achers On Strike Reuts
| ic es Transport|building up the Nazi war ma-- sugar than is required to maintair
tion of the Buenos Aires Transport ee i ILE DYEU, April 18 consumption at the present level ROME, April 18, “ OGRESS’”’
| Capon On i at freauent sa : —Reuter Philippe Petain, 95-year-old of 2,200,000 tons per year One million Italian school chil NO PROGR 2
Morrison replied that ae 7 —_—o former hero of France now im-}| 7 —Reuter. dren were on holiday to-day be- PARIS, April 18 ‘my — n . ‘ ME
representations had been made in prisoned here for wartime col-| cause their 93,000 teachers went| The four Foreign Ministers SERVES THE SA 4
the Argentine Government. F Sag BOMB SHELTER laboration was still seriously iti | ar }on a one-day strike for wage in-} Deputies again — failed to make
liament had already been aasurr* See edibban iegtisce : to-night. Petain whose condition | Worrell accepts creases, headway today toward agreeing PURPOSE AS Cook-
that the British Economie Mission WASHING TON, April 18 became critical overnight has not es ae a But 300,000 other children, at-|on on agenda for Foreign Minis Sk AS :
now in Buenos Aires would try to} president PCa Ps hocks been fully conscious since. He has | KINGSTON, J’ca. April a tending private schools mostly | ters meeting. A Western anise
reach a satisfactory settlement} marked $991,000 to build a bomb) on cgering from congestion of! Frank Worrell has aevepted the/pun ~ by the Roman Catholic|mion said the Deputies meeting for 1g: ire °~@:
of this claim, he added. shelter at the White House. a, — ince last wibek ) West Indian Cricket Board’s offer | Church, had to work as usual the 32nd time made “no progress. ING HE TIreER.... iT s
‘ F ' —Reuter. —Reuter |*7° lunes s —Reuter. | to goto Australia. —€P) —Reuter, | —Reuter.



INFORMAL TALKS

(Peom Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, April 18.

; SUSPEND TRADING

NEW YORK, April 18.
The New York cotton exchange



| MACARTHUR BACK IN










AMERICA





oO



LY CHEAPER.

; : ce i le in
An informal conference * — a te icar amen Tal SAN FRANCISCO, April 18 | their 13-year-old son, Arthur, of San Francisco Bay as the sil ‘Arthur's hand The ee 2 obtainab
Le ual vlkoe tie ane at arity’ of the return of General General Douglas ee ara re ene coe Peede coe nM oe eae | Se cat ot the pre thd i ae 1 lb tins ieee Tee ees 58¢
colonies ta s a s é i aL ee Bea 7 6 ‘or e rst t », stepped on ‘ 1g “ ‘ tio wel. ae ss as
Government: Aquse bere ie uamunieanirhs ——Reuter — = + ne (i the plane to face a ae of Mrs. Jean MacArthur was the come He waved briskly Each
of OOTY eee turned to the United States late|television, newsreel and press first to leave the plane time he turned to the crowd and 5 lb tins 56¢ per lb.
last night after a fateful 14 years’ | cameras and newspaper reporter General MacArthur followed , smiled another roar agi up, , Joree tessany (ent teense femme feo P vO"9 7 ‘ labsence. Photographers dotted almost her immediately to wild cheer!ng ci After reviewing the suard ° Bs ua
‘NO OLITICS S A every window in the two-~store) Honour, the General mounted a TRY 1 TIN T0-DA}
3 The General was given a hero’s| terminal building His thirteen-year—old on | platform for a brief official wel-
3AN F NCISCO, April 18 welcome as he arrived at San There were about 5,000 pc¢ Arthur carr nes then ¢ame | come from Mayor Robinson Gov- | :
ee oe giles BYdhciaec ih his ‘plane “Bataan” at the airport for the Gene member of the former Unit ernor Farl Warren and other | On sale at all Groceries and
ee ENERAL MACARTHUR announced to-day that he does not aig aie rte Washington to ap-|arrival. This was a smaller c Natior Supreme ( de dignitaries, a
¥ intend to enter the American polit’cal scene. He told a wel- pear before a joint meeting of | tha d beer i ¢fficial party x on t te M you Bow good it is Dravidian Stopes
coming San Francisco crowd “I have just been asked if I intend to} Congress later this week g ree roa! pi Pe ; tt rm . ; s ‘. os & ; , ” csdiaater, 4 -simmpenitiniitiaanaivamn
enter politics. My reply was no.’’—Reuter i The General with his wife and crowd at the airport on th ) i k





—



PAGE TWO

it ncnen NEE





Caub Calling

M’s. FRED OLTON
Fred Eastham flew
Trinidad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. Mrs. Eastham had been
& guest here of the Oltons. Now
Mrs. Olton will be the guest of
the Easthams in San Fernando,
Mr. Eastham works in a construc-
tion company for T.L.L.

Mrs, Olton expects to be away
for abdut three weeks.

Married Yesterday

ISS ANN PARRIS, daughter

of Mr. and Mrs. R, B. Parris
of “Black Bess,” St. Peter, was
married yesterday afternoon at
St. Patrick’s, Church, Jemmotts
Lane, to Lt, Peter D. B. Short of
the Royal Artillery and son of Mrs.
Short of Boxmoor, Herts., England
end the late My. W. Short

The ceremony, which took place
shortly after 4,30 o’clock, was per-
formed by Rev. Fr. A. Parkinson,
S.J.

The Bride, who was given away
by her father, wore a dress of white
slipper satin, off the shoulder neck-
line with close fitting long sleeves
and a flared peplum, She also
wore an appliqued tulle veil. A
filagree gold and pearl hierloom
necklace completed her ensémble.
She carried a bouquet of white
rerberas, white roses and coralita

Mrs. Michael Lynch was matron
of honour. Her other two attend-
ants were Miss H. Challenor and
Miss Isobe] Cox, Their dresses of
gold figured net over white were
identical; they wore picture hats
and carried white net fans.

Bestman was Mr, Richard Parris,
the Bride’s brother. The ushers
were Mr, Michael Lynch, Mr. M

Skeete, Mr. G. Skeete and Mr.
G. Challenor. After the ceremony
a reception was held at “Black
Bess,” St. Peter and the honey-
moon is being spent at the Edge-
water Hotel, Bathsheba.

Lt. and Mrs. Short expect to
jeave for England about the end
of May or early June.

Comings and Goings
ROM Trinidad on Tuesday

and Mrs
down to

En Route to New

Appointment

R. G. ELMORE EDWARDS,

Barrister-at-Law and Chiei
Registrar of the Supreme Court of
the Windward Islands has been
appointed Crown Attorney, St
Kitts-Nevis and is at present on
his way to take up his new ap-
pointment. He is a passenger on
the Lady Nelson, His wife accom-
panied him ag far as St. Vincent,
but she is remaining there for a
holiday and will follow Mr. Ed-
wards to St, Kitts shortly.

Mr, Edwards is an Old Harrison-
jan, He qualified as a Barrister-at
Law in England and was called to
the Bar of the Middle Temple in
July 1919.

Visiting Siste.
RS. C. M, GAGNON and her
daughter Ann are spending
a three-week holiday with Mr,
and Mrs. Clayton Evelyn at Rock-
ley. Mrs. Gagnon and Mrs. Eve-
lyn are sisters, Mrs. Gagnon and
her daughter had been in Antigua
holidaying with other relatives
and they came down to see Mrs.
Evelyn before she feturns to the
U.S. where her home is in Roches
ter, N.Y,

Afternoon Flight

evening came Dr. Leonard
Hutson,

Government Veterinary
Officer in Anti-
He is here







4Major, Canadian
ATrade “ommis-
sioner for the
Eastern Carib-
bean and the
Guianas flew in
from Trinidad on
Tuesday night
and out = again
yesterday after-

noon, . . a pas. s , ;
aehger leaving R. A. S, BRYDEN, Governing
on the same Director of Messrs. A. $
T. GRANT MAJOR Bryden and Sons Ltd., was amofig
plane was Mrs, Lena Raleigh the passengers on B.W.1.A.’s after
who had been spending a short noon flight from Trinidad yester-
holiday with her niece Mrs. Jack day. Other passengers coming in
Marson. on the same plane were Mr. John
Settling In Rahr, Acting General Manager o!

ISS FRANCES CAINES and
\ Miss Hope Caines of St. Kitts
who had been holidaying in Bar-
bados have arrived safely in the
U.S. and are now settling down
in their new home.

B.W.1.A., Mr.
Staff Manager B.W.I.A,., Mr
Charlie Taylor, Manager of the
Hotel Royal and Mr. C. C. Chad
derton W.I. Supervisor of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co.

Jules Henneguy,



ADVENTURES OF PIPA.



LT. and MRS. PETER SHORT

The Sun Never Sets

HE SUN rises in the East and
sets in the West, says geogra-
phers. But there is a “West” where
there is no setting of the sun.
At the Sunset Night Club in Lon-
don’s West End, the slogan is—
“the show goes on.” For those who
cin enjoy a ‘night out’ without
alecholic drinks, the Sunset seems
an ideal place. It is acclaimed by
night club patrons as one of Lon-
con's best

Music is supplied by that versa-
tile West Indian Boscoe Holder and
his boys in an atmosphere notably
friendly. G. A. Leslie, the club-
cwner, comes from Jamaica,

Guests seat themselves comfort-
ably in uphelstered arm-chairs,
talk and dance. Waiters serve
Turkish coftee

To enjoy the best that the Sun-
set has to offer, be there between
2 am., and 3.30 a.m., for that is
the cabaret time in the Sunset,
The cabaret, compered by Tony
Kennedy, from Jamaica, includes
Hiuropean and West Indian artistes.
[iems on the programme include
‘ercbatie displays, drum-beating,
saxophone-playiilgg, special dances
featured by professional dancers
and other variety musical fea-
tures, not forgetting calvypsoes by
the “one-and-only Lord Kitchener”
of Trinidad.

Present membership of the Sun-
set toials nearly 500,



Talking Point

A man who wants to play
billiards must have no other am-
bition. Billiards is all,

—E. V. Lucas.



BY THE WAY...
7 outbreak of thatching all of slate per man-week, and the
over England is said to be vest nothing), that has already

a “gesture” to foreign tourists, been dealt with by the Govern
who are supposed to expect Ye ment scientific adviser, Sir Arnold

f

|

Is it too late to foot-lb, }
enlist a corps of old yokels in The Dalmaine coned _ slides
smocks? One of these, seated on heads are cased in velamite, and
an aluminium ale-bench at the sre entirely independent of the

Olde and Fritefullye Mertye Humbody,
Yngelonde to be covered with ai :
straw. All Purpose Traction

The result is that unauthorised
‘thatchers are at wark on Queen
Anne houses, garages, dancé+halls,
power-stations,
gas-containers.

HE new Rowlandson al
purpose traction engine wi
tram-depots and have a tractive compulsion of 37

By BEACHCOMBER

the Hobhouse steam vacuum
transfer drum-indicators, were
attached to overslung cylinder-
clamps, with bar deflectors above
the wheel-casings. If I seem to
exaggerate, go to Drigg Bridge, to
he Copplestone Works, and ask
for Mrs, Thackeray. She will show
you the B model,

Prodnose : What exactly is the
point of all this ?

Myself: It is a bid for a bigger
circulation, Something to . draw

rose-infested door of every crosshead vents and _ boilers the large, untapped public which
thatched inn, would add to the couplings, which, in the case of is interested in traction engine:
“rural charm of many a _ rustic
netting” — I quote from. the

pamphlet, “Hey Nonny Nonny.”

The Official Explanation
NSPIRED by the Postmaster
General to look into things, I

have discovered that I, as such, {ts Junior Short Story Competition.
make no contribution to
‘Treasury.



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invite all children under 12 to enter fo:

The best story will be publishec

the every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
I do net pay income a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery,

The storie

tax. What happens is that all my can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30‘

surplus goes to the Treasury.

Overall Underdelivery

Hi Secretary of the Friends of

Coal complains that my note
on the negative or overall under
delivery of coal was misleading
While conceding that a negative
delivery is a delivery of nothing
this high official of the Society
maintains that a_ delivery of
nothing or non-delivery of any-
thing is a pesitive delivery of
nothing, and, in that sense, more
in line with the best contempor-
ary thought than a negative de-
livery of something. As for what
is called underall over-delivery
(the system by which one or two
units of personne] get four lumps

SBR RRR RE Bee ee
mCHECK TAFFETA 36”

Co. Lta.,
NOTE:

Name ......55.

mLOCKNIT WHITE and PASTELS
mGUEST TOWELS PURE LINEN
COLOURS
WHITE

a
*
m MORCAIN CREPE 36’
@
=

DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOF STORE

words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The
City not later than Wedntesdaw everv week,
Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story.

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Advocat:

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

$1.85
$132 @
&
997m
887 my
$1.71

DIAL 4220

Socialistswhile her rival, Lady 40’t care so long as it is not

Caernarvon, has been enterta

of the Commons, Mr. Tom

liams, Minister of Agriculture,
Mr. George Thomas Socialist , ui

pro- lirting (
tested afterwards that nothing but Would have
tea was brewing at the confab
7 _— wondaoes if the Liber.
al left-wing oble Lady’s get-
together with the Socialists was for Anglesey, and that was nearly
not in faet riposte to what the 22 years ago, there have been peri-

party’s

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1951



Lady Of The Left

THE Liberal Party have been By EVELYN IRONS

split as often (and as noisily) as There is a story told in severa
the atem: and anciher snlit seems Variants, that when Lady Megan
o be going along niceiy this week, WS 9uIz7ze€d about the Libera
For Lady Megan Lloyd George has P@tty colour she gnswered. “i
been making contact with the 9°"'t know what it is—and

a

j Criccieth this last week-end before

the new session recalls her to
London is to put on an old skirt
(she doesn’t fancy her small,
plumish figure in slacks), and do
what work is possible in the rain-

iolet.” soakéd garden.
Violet Bonham Carter, is being VIOlCâ„¢ | :
wooed by the Tories. You will remember, also, how She enjoys a game ~< golf, too
Lady Megan, on vacation sparks flew four months ago after and she reads a lot (Trollope for
the ancestral retreat at Cri Lady Megan had voted with the choice). She can pop over to
Socialists on ee and living Anglesey in an hour (she greeted

the chairman of the Soc ¢ costs. Her conduct, Violet Princess Margaret there on Thurs-
Party. Miss Alice Bacon, Mr. (64 next month) told the Cam- day), and is often seen around }
. bridge University Liberal Club was with her two Pembrokeshire!

“huter Ede, new Socialist h

wh. “so subtle and intricate and be- corgi’, 11-year-old Sioncyn (little
yond me that I think it would be John) and his 18month-old son
only Freud.” Bilws (Little William).

Kalled ith with the A local JP (she attended petty
is ho new pastime for sessions yesterday) and urban
Megan. From the time she district , she has no time
took her seat as member or tasté for. domestic tasks; is
looked after by a staff of two anc
Ti~year-old Saran —— —
right-wing Noble Lady Odical- rumours of her switching joined the household before she
was up ro . over to that party. Mr. Herbert was born. There is also a house-
For e the heels of the news ea ee i ee Des ad- keéper in the London flat.
that the Tories had agreed to res, vain. to i ‘a-
support her, Lady Violet Bonham join him, But loyalty to her father, ete omnte Ar Lay islet
Carter announced on Wednesday the force that kept her q Liberal | But nen she lune oe
that she accepted the invitation to Still does so. er) a Ps r smile and tho
be prospective Liberal candidate She chides the Liberals fea heeree: - ths she is a
for Colne Valley, the Yorkshire drifting to the t—"a drift Winner every time—except per-
constituency whose present ing@m- away from the old tradi- haps, in Lady Violet’s constituency
bent is Mr, Glenvil Hall, chairman tion I am a Radical, and proud of 6 Goine valley.
of the Parliamentary Labour it.” But it seems that she would
Party. split them asunder rather than WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
an, EB.

Although Lady Megan

Lady
first

for

ieave them.

She is their deputy leader in
i .. the Commons: took charge for a

THERE siiould be fireworks in month when Mr. Clem ‘Davies had
the Commons if these two women his recent attack of flu.

both vice-presidents of the Liberal i
Party are elected next time. By sticking to the Libersls, she

In . z
them the feud that existed between bitlonis the Montene Pee hankiy”
their fathers, Asquith and Lloyd likely that the Liberals will be in
George flares anew.

. office in her prime (she is 48 now)
: ; but she has been assured many
B.B. C. Radio
Programme

times that her truculent brilliance
THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1951

Fireworks





RKO-RADIO'S
ADVENTURE _IN.



SUSPENSE !

would be such an asset to the
Socialists as to rate ministerial
rank. It is obvious where her
sympathizers lie (“I like to see
these people tackling privilege’’) .

‘And what an education she had




EXCITEMENT







: S it has never been
10.20 8.m—18.15 p.m. —~ 19.68 m for the Minister she has never equatied.,.with every

630 am Announcer’s Choice, 700 become! gasping thrill in
a.m. The News, 7.10 am, News Analysis, From the age of six until she

715 am _ From The Editorials, 7.25 a.m.

Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. Red ; was 20 her home was in Downing

ter







Componer of the Week. 8 30's a WHE Stee ion ot Mon 10. Onn te
and Worship, 845 am. You and t after 1916 at No. 10. | Often
News, 9.00 am The News, 9.10 am, attended her father’s famous
Home piew! From Britain, 9.15 am breakfast parties meéting the
jose own, ey ls -
ade, 11,25 am "iSitenets “Chalee iis great political figures. '
a.m. Statement of Account, 12.00 noon * iY ike “
The News, 12.10 pm. News Analysis, To Paris
12 15 pm. Close Down.
415—645 pam, — 19.76 mm, HER father whisked her from We
415 pm. Ken Mackintosh, 500 pm. SChool at Garrett's Hall. Banstead, y,
Framponse of the Week, 515 pm toa ishing schoo] at 17, F
orth merica als him
p.m, Light Music, a io tern so that she could be with
Smith, 6.00 p.m. Voice of the Violin, at the Versailles peace conference.
6.02.15 pan, — 2.5% m. She “se the men of Versailles, she
6.15 p.m, From The Third Programme, saw the treaty signed.
635 ‘pm. Interlude, 643. p.m. Pro: wards she had a year in India as

gramme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News,
m News Analysis, 7.15 pam, We

Britain, 7.45 pm Red Letter Day.

7.45—11.00 p.m, — 25,58 m., 31 32 m.

800 pm

7.10 guest of Viceroy Lord
See Reading.

But she had no aim then to be

an MP herself. Her atnbitions

Fier, Were wholly centred in “The Old

the

Radio Newsreel, 8.15
Books to Read, 8.30 p.m, As 1 Knew

& 45 pom Composer of the Week, 900 Man”. She was for years his bd
Pm Statement of A », O18 ‘
ee ee Clon Ford - Valli

p.m. Interlude, 9.30 p.m, Serious ‘Argu- him everywhere— the United
ment, 10 00 p.m The News, 10.10 p " e

; m States, Canada, South America bs |
From The Editorials, 10 16 m Fine , . . (| d "
FS ahi ona etka oves a aude Rains

When at 27 “Ll, G.’s little girl”
aes in Parliament she had not
% uJ ‘ only her father’s flashing blue
in Canada. "11'H6 ites, SoBi"in en WE** eyes, but most of his mannerisms,
s including the characteristic stab-

ae bing finger.

Snibbo will be There Welsh was her earliest language,

sh

NIBBO’S contribution Seek cr che eat di es

Festival will

to the English at three and a half, when

P probably be a she was taken to an English hotel
gigantic conveyor belt in colour- ang was unable at first to under-
ed electric lights. It will give stand what anyone said. Poetic
the impression of continuous cadences of her mother tongue stil]
movement and will give off ® acho in her speeches, although

pleasing aroma of Snibbolene,
the soap that will clean anything wth long since leet her Welsh

from a human face to a_ light-
house wall. Attached to the belt

C.B.C, PROGRAMME
THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1951

00 p.m.—10.15 p.m. News and com-

mL





BWR CEDRIC HARDWICKE
JUNE CLAYWORTH + LOTTE STEM .

Plus :—LEON ERROL in

“POPO KNOWS WORST”

Her Fortune

will be a super-loudspeaker, ad Latest
which will croon the praises of IF SHE has anissed her vocation “WORLD NEWs”
Snibbo to specially selected] in the Cabinet Lady Megan is in

classical melodies, “Visitors 3

;, ae ; to] many other ways a lucky woman.
England,” said a director yester- Her father left her a hat (after
day, “will want culture as well a8} certain bequests) of his £140,000
ba ati fortune. She has the family house
Brynawelon, at Criccieth, with its Friday 20th, 2.30 — 4.45
views of mountains and sea; a and 8.30 p.m.
large flat in South Kensington
with qa TV set and a view of Big and continuing Daily 4.45 and
Ben, and her week-end cottage at 8.30 p.m.
Churt, Surrey.

Her way of taking thaw ———

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown

LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY — 445 & 8.20 p
RKO RADIO'S THRILLING DOUBLE ! !
STEP LIVELY

Frank SINATRA
Gloria DeHAVEN

TODAY THURSDAY 1.3 p.m.
Tim Holt in (Both) {

GUN SMUGGLERS

B’TOWN

PLAZA Dial 2310



CROSSWORD











(DIAL 2310)

TARZAN TRIUMPHS

Johnny WEISSMU R
Johnny (Boy) SHEE ELD

OPENING TOMORROW
2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

THE WHITE TOWER











1. Famous decoration in oroken and
Color by Technicolor
to ae ee eloicen to i|_ UNDER THE TONTO RIM | Glenn Ford—Valli—Claude Rains
10. arerh in Boe ie oe : = ——==
eat and v es,
11. May sound Fralian but les just AIETY
mackerel.

7A DIAL
PLAZA sabe







13. Step that has pealed ? (4)

4 Tax toa tenth, (5) OISTIN (THE GARDEN) St. James

18. Mena ‘Sroken by 16 Across. (7) LAST SHOW TODAY — 8.30 p.m,

ly. This eater joys insects. (3) Last 2 Sh GENTLEMAN JOE PALOOKA

20: Gomes from 1. (5) ows Today 5 & 8.30 p.m. n Errol and

31: One age of youth, (4) RKO Radio's The Shadow in - -

22, Such a man Is a bargee. (4) “SHE” & “MASKED RAIDERS” “THE MISSING LADY”
Down Randolph Scott Tim Holt with Kane Richmond

1. Argue, (6) 2, Coal resin. (7) Midnite Sat. 2ist Tid. to Sun. 8.20)

er re te Pa {3 Midnite Sat. 2ist ))Frid., Sat, Sun. “Me. WONG in iat. Sun. 5 p.m,

5 Refer. (6) , Cisco Kid in 5 and 6.30 p.m. CHINATOWN" KO's

6. Fifty in a man-o-war's boat. (4) “SOUTH of th ¥ Boris Karloff & BLOOD the

7. Colour for a rogue. (5) ee et ‘Cisco o

9. Moss-like ae eruption, (6) a "aoe Beuenanine” “Rid ee. mor

12 Sort pedal. ( m

15. This fast is early in the day. (5) aes Pr Mel Ferrer California Trail |{ Robert Mitchum)

17 Could have been 13 Across. (4) SESS Se

18 Felt underfoot 43) i —S 2 = A =














i
,)

f
}
,)
}
)

We are fully stocked with

GARDEN REQUISITES |

Hose—3 in., 5 in., % in.



¢ ei ‘ » 2: : Saleep: @ ma ‘
\ rag 3, ene: mmy: 7, Ap }
SS Y
Complete your list ;
from these :—

iy
Thee Serer ee. Wheat » Nozzles }
~" Corn, Flakes ) Sprinklers (?
"i Buea" Whest y Hand Forks }
ins ams
Rakes
ee 5)
Sauer \ Secateurs |
ni ‘custard Powder i Shears
ne ee. sauce \ Handsprayers }
vin ae se, Salon Sates
Tins T, Butter Pyne . ts K{
Slabs of Bacon it
Sliced Bacon i )
\

STUART & SAMPSON
ai938) LTD.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.













AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8.9 pr

ROD CAMERON in “BOSS OF BOOMTOWN”

with Fuzzy KNIGHT Ray WHITLEY and His Bar-6 COWBOYS
A UNTVERSAL PICTURE
This Picture will be of apecial interest to the younger Patrons
(40 years & over)

°



MATINEES FRIDAY & SATURDAY AT 5 PM
FRIDAY TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 830





SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY MORNING AT 6 90 o'clock
Walt DISNEY'S -- “CINDERELLA” in’ Technicolor
Leeann <== ——
BRR

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street “t+

_—

Upstairs Over Newsam's







NYLON STOCKINGS . seks
in Four Shades

Prepare Now for Summes Holidays ‘
SPECIAL PRICES IN BATHING SUITS

TINY GIRL’S SIZE
SMALL BOYS’ TRUNK
GIRLS
LADIES’



per par $1.98

. $2.54
rok Whee Eo 1.69
$2.60, $3.35 & 3.71
from $4.85 up







GLOBE

TO-DAY 5.00 AND 8.30
Alan LADD

LAST SHOWS
Wanda HENDRIX

CAPTAIN CAREY U.S.A.

OPENING TO-MORROW, 5.00 AND 8.30 P.M.

PM



Aas eM Lee LCL

Screenplay by HAROLD SHUMATE and JOSEPH HOFFMAN Directed by FREDERICK de CORDOVA
Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR
PLUS :

AND HIS ORCHESTRA
AND
THE YEAR’S GRANDEST SHOW

LEE BROWN

SUPER STAR TALENT CONTEST

FITZ HAREWOOD Singing ........ “Bewildered”
CLAYTON THOMPSON Singing
KEITH SEALEY Singing
JOE CLARK Singing
PERCY WELCH Singing
GERALD DAISLEY Singing

“Song of Songs”
“Te”,
. “Bop Goes My Heart”

“Surrender”

PRICES :
Pit 24c; House 40c; Balcony 60c; Boxes 72c.
TICKETS on Sale DAILY, GLOBE THEATRE
$50.00 CASH PRIZES

aE

—

ees SS

EMPIRE

Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Tomorrow 2.30 p.m Only

ROYAL |

Last Two Shows Today
430 & 830 p.m,





Columbia Pictures Presents

«GIRL OF THE
YEAR”

Starring... .

Universal Big Double—
Lon CHANEY in .

«MUMMY’S TOMB”

Robert CUMMINGS AND
OO UCHESTER “THE EXILE”
eR A, with

ROXY

Today Only 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Republic Double—

Gene AUTRY in .

*“ ROBINHOOD OF

TEXAS ”
AND
“THE WOMAN WHO
CAME BACK”

with Nancy KELLY
and John LODER

Douglas FAIRBANKS, Jr.

OLYMPIC

‘Today Only 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Warner Bros, Double—
George BRENT and
Beverly ROBERTS in
“GOD'S COUNTRY
AND THE
WOMAN ”
AND
« CHEYENNE ”

with Dennis MORGAN
and Jane WYMAN





Opening Friday 20th

“THE YOUNGER
BROTHERS ”

Ue See hn: Mee eee

we offer
EVERYTHING FOR
YouR ROOF

At Prices that cannot he repeated

GALVANIZE SHEETS—6it., 7ft., Sit. 9ft. 10 ft.
ALUMINUM SHEETS — 6it., 7ft., Sft., Sit. 10ft.,
11ft., 12ft.
EVERITE SHEETS—6ft., 7ft., Sft., 9ft., 10ft.
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EDA ,
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$



THURSDAY, APRIL 19,

1951



Questions of Grenada -

=
Riots Answered
In House of Commons
ON WEDNESDAY APRI 4, in the House of Commons

Mr. Thomas Cook, Labour
questions on the recent Grenada disturbances.
Following are the questio





Jca_ Possesses
“Wealth of Basic
Material”
—HENRY KAISER

KINGSTON, J’ca., April 17

Henry Kaiser, American indus-
trialist and his wife ended
week’s honeymoon visit today
when they took plane for New
Orleans where Kaiser is building
a $70,000,000 plant to handle Ja
maica bauxite of which Kaiser's
permanent company controls the
vast deposits of the island

While here Kaiser inspected de-
posits in connection with which
his engineers are preparing plans
for development.

a

Kaiser, when asked if he
would build an aluminium
plant here, said this would

da@pend on future develop-
ments. Kaiser went on to Say that
Jamaica possessed the wealth of
basic materials necessary for de
velopment, but little use was being
made of it. He said that vision,
faith, and intelligence were essen-
tials in creating industry, and cap-
ital would come in for develop-
ment.——(CP)

Barbadian Dies
In Grenada

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE’S, April 17.

Mr. Alexander Grant, 86, long
retired Head Teacher of the St.
Paul’s Anglican School, died last
Sunday night.

Coming to Grenada from Bar-
bados many years ago, Mr. Grant
was engaged in teaching all his
life, for the most part in the St,
Paul’s district where he was also
a prominent member of the
Anglican Church, being a Lay
Reader for over 40 years as well
as Superintendent of the Sunday
School.

He retired a few years before
a Government Model School was
established in the district and
the Anglican and Roman Catholic
schools were closed.

One of the largest funeral at-
tendances in the history of tha
district was seen when the funer-
al took place on Tuesday. :

Re@d. John Trenam, Priest-in-
Charge, read the funeral service,
while Revd, F, EB. Layne, a form-
er Rector of St. Paul's, delivered
a moving address on the life
and work of the deceased and
Archdeacon H. G. Pigott later
committed the body to the grave
in the churchyard.

The deceased leaves five sons
and six daughters, some of them
in the United States, also a de-
voted wife.

Â¥ '

Would You Like A
. . . «

Free Trip To Paris?

An essay competition on Freneh
subjects has been organised by the
French Consul in Trinidad, and is
open to all persons of British na-
tionality resident for at least the
last five years in one of the follow-
ing territories: Barbados, British
Guiana, Jamaica, Leeward Islands,
Trinidad and Tobago and the
Windward Islands,

The competition is divided into
two parts, the Ordinary Contest
and the Special Contest. The first
prize for the Ordinary Contest 1s
a holiday in Martinique, and for
the Special Contest the first prize
will be a first class round-trip
ticket to Paris and back with a
month’s holiday in France. /

Essays need not be written in
French, but all things being equal
preference will be given to entries
in French, $Y

Full details and gecwbinmers of

ry for the Essay Competition
Saar he seen at the office of Capt.
H. H. Williams, YÂ¥.M.C.A., Pin-
fold Street.







Many British Jokes
Make Fun Overseas

If the head waiter at a London
hotel sees an enormous ink blob
on one of his tablecloths the
chances are that “the Australian
in No, 5” is to blame. :

And if he hears the crash of
breaking crockery behind him as
he bends to mop up the ink it
will probably the same guest,
airing his sense of humour.

To satisfy that sense of humour,
practical joke manufacturers in
Britain are working overtime
turning out rubber-tipped pencils,

exploding theatre tickets, non
jathering soap, disintegrating
match-boxes, and many other
“ ”

Production is being stepped up
in preparation for the BIF, which
begins this month.

Biggest overseas
the moment is Australia,
America second.

customer at
with

—L.ES.

Strike Holds Up
W.I. Exhibits

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, April 18
West Indian exhibits for the
British Industries Fair have been
held up by Britain’s token dock
strike. Unless there is a return to
full-time working at an early date
West Indian stands may not be



complete when the Exhibition
opens on April 30. f
Among exhibits which have

been affected are: a hose for St,
Vincent (Windwards). Quantities
of arrowroot and raw cotten have
been lying at London docks sinct







M.-P. for Dundee, replied to

ns and Mr. Cook’s replies :

Mr. T. Reid (Labour, Swin-
don) asked the Secretary «!
State for the Colonies what was

the extent of the damage caused
to public and private property in
Grenada during the recent riots
and to what extent the citizens
or their representatives helped
the authorities to suppress the
rioters.

Sir
Kent)
State
he has



Richard
asked
for the

Acland (Labour,
the Secretary of
Colonies whether
any further statement to
make on the recent disturbances
in Grenada, and particularly
about the circumstances which
served as the effective cause of
the ceterioration of the: situation
from relatively normal indus-

trial. dispute into a serious dis-
turbance; and whether he pro-
poses to hold any formal inquiry

into the immediate circumstances
of the disturbances and into the
general economic background

against which they have to be
considered.

Mr. Cook: I will, with per-
mission, make a further _ state-

ment on the situation in Grenada
as promised by my Right Hon.
Friend on 21st March.

The Wages Council Bill was
passed on 28th March. Independ-
ently, representatives of the Ag-
ricultural Employers’ Society and
the Grenada Mental and Manual
Workers’ Union have met under
neutral chairmanship. No inci
dents have been reported by the
Governor since the statement in
the House on 2lst March. The
resumption of work was delayed

at Plaisance and Mount Horn
Estates but is now general.
In view of the negotiations

proceeding locally I do not wish
to add anything to previous state-
ments in the House. I regret to
say that damage and losses in re-
spect of crops are reported from
some 80 estates, the latest total
estimates amounting to £195,000.
In addition, damage by arson to
Gavernment property is estimat-
ed at £8,300 and to private pro-—

perty at £9,700. Some citizens
with wireless experience greatly
assisted police communications

during the strike, others joined
the special constabulary.

Dr. Morgan (Labour. Warring-
ton): Is my hon. Friend aware of
the economic conditions of the poor
labourers of the estates in Grenada

and the other West Indian
Islands are perfectly disgrace-
ful? Would he see that machin-
ery is quickly available to take
the matter in hand

as soon as
an industrial or agricultural dis-
pute is announced in any of the
Colonies? !

Mr. Cook: We now have this
Wages Council set up and we
hope for good results from it.

Mr. Pickthorn (Conservative,
Nottingham): Could the House
be told what was the meaning
of the word “independently”
used, I think, in the early part
of the hon. Gentleman's reply? I
was not quite clear about it. Sec—
ondly, I apologise to the hon,
Gentleman but I did not hear
auite clearly the names he men-
ticned, Thirdly, is there any
means of estimating how much,
if any, of the damage caused is
covered by insurance policies?

Mr, Cook: I am not in a posi-
tion to reply to the latter part
of tha question. I mentioned
Plaisance and Mount Horn, The
word “independently” means that
they were independent of the
Wages Council.

Sir R. Acland: My hon, Friend
mentioned the question of inves-
tigations that are now proceed—
ing. If those are investigations
simply by the Minister’s Labouy
officer, I would ask whether he
is a sufficient man to investigate
alone the very important ques-
tion of why it was that some-
thing that may have started as
a labour dispute degenerated into
a disturbance and a riot with
tremendous loss by damage and
loss of life, Second, who is to
investigate the question of the
general economic and social
background of this Island, against
which this dispute arose?

Mr. Cook: It does not arise at
this point. Mr, Barltrop has the
full confidence of the Secretary
of State in handling the situation,
not only from day to day but
from hour to hour.

Mr, Henderson Stewart
tional Liberal Fife): In
the known activities of Com-
munists in other parts of the
West Indies, is the hon. Gentle~
man able to give the House an
assurance that a full inquiry into
that possibility has been made?

Mr. Cook; We have no evi-~
dence at the moment of any Com-~
munist activity so far as Grenada
is concerned, but we are watch-
ing the position very carefully
—L.ES.

(Na-

view of



Rumanian Shoots
Yugoslav Guard

BELGRADE, April 17

A Rumanian frontier guard shot
ene of Marshal Tito’s frontier
yesterday on Yugoslav ter-
Tanjug, Yugoslav official
agency said today.

Within an hour there was an-
other frontier incident when 10
Rumanians crossed the border, the
agency alleged, The first incident
Tanjug said, was near Sredeste
village, where a Rumanian shot at
a Yugoslav guard and wounded
him in the leg.





news

Within an hour ten Rumanian
soldiers had crossed “deep into

Yugoslav territory” between Man-
kovac and Socica,

Two machine-guns on the Ru-
manian side were held ready to
give them covering fire, the agency
said, and the intruders refused an
order to withdraw.—Reuter.



COSMOPOLITAN
ADELAIDE,
The first Persian ship to berth
in Australia flies the Persian flag,
is registered there, but has never










March 30. Further West an been there. The officers are
exhibits are expected to arr at Norwegian, some gf the crew are
Liverpool over the week-end. It Ge Chinese and Danish
is hoped that by then, the dockers Ever ody speaks English and
will have returned to work d the ip goes anywhere in the
that normal condition xcept to Persi



BARBADOS ADVOCATE







THE FAMOUS AMERICAN screen star Humphrey Bogart who is now on holiday in France with his

ON HOLIDAY IN FRANCE

* é



â„¢

wife, takes a picture of her together with two fam ous Paris mannequins Praline and Carrol at the re-

opening of Longchamp Races. Lauren Bacall (Mrs. Bogart in private life) is on extreme

Malaria Among
Ex-Slaves

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt,
April 12

In the heart of the Arabian
desert there are oases so highly
malarious that the wandering
bedouins visit them for only ten
days once a year to collect their
share of the date harvest, a
World Health Organization ex-
pert has reported,

The statement was made by
Dr. M. A. Farid, WHO maiari-
ologist who has just left Saudi
Arabia after a month’s study of
malaria conditions in the_country,

In the Khaibir oasis, 125 miles
northeast of Medine, he - said,
there is an indigenous population
of about 4,000 people who are
descendants of African slaves
and who ‘have a partial immun-
ity against malaria. They live in
the oasis all the, year round, and
cultivate the date’ crop. ot-
withstanding this partial im-
munity, Dr. Farid found a spleen
rate (a standard test for ma-
laria) as high as 65 per ‘cent
among the children and a malaria
blood index of 25 per cent.. dur-
ing the non-transmission season.

In the former times, Dr. Farid
said, the date cultivators were in
fact slaves and had to surrender
the entire date harvest to the
bedouin owners. With the pas-
sage of the years, however, the
date cultivators became emanci-
pated and acquired the right to
50 per cent of the crop. Tribe
numbering about 60,000 bedouins,
according to Dr. Farid, visit the
Khaibir oasis once a year to col-
lect their half of the date crop
but do not go near it at, any r
time aS they have not acquired
the partial immunity of the cul-
tivators. Bedouin tribesmen who
contract malaria succumb fre-
quently, he pointed out.

Oasis Scourge

Malaria nas been known as a
scourge in the Arabian peninsula
since the days of Mohammed and
is also locally known as oasis or
yethreb (Medina) fever Ac-
cording to Dr. Farid, it is be-
lieved that malaria was the prin-
cipal reason why the bedouins
have never settled in the numer-
ous oases but have preferred to
maintain their traditional nomadic
existence. To this day, malaria is
the major health problem of the
country and the conditions in the
Khaibir oasis are typical.

In the recent years, under: the
guidance and encouragement of
King Ibn Saud, attempts have
been made to settle the becouins
in agricultural areas. One of these
attempts in the Jabrin oasis, south
and inland of Dahran, failed be
cause of numerous deaths from
malaria, Public health authorities,
recognizing that the agricultural
gettlement project could not be
successfully carried out without
sufficient malaria control, have
appealed to the World Health
Organization to assist them in
malaria control campaigns. The
work would include spraying of
houses and stables with DDT,
draining of swamps, and suppres-
sion of breeding places of malaria-
bearing mosquitoes among which,
in Saudi Arabia, the dangerous
Anopheles gambiae are prevalent.

U.N. Experts

The need for this work in ur-
ban areas also was dramatically
demonstrated in the port of Jed
da where a new water supply
was built a few years ago. As
a consequence, old wells and cis
terns were neglected and became
ideal breeding places for mos-
quitoes. This gave rise to. a con-

siderable increase in the _ inci-
dence of malaria,

Experts from; the Food and
Agriculture Organization of the

United Nations are now in Saudi
Arabia to advise the government
cn improving agricultural meth-
eds and promoting irrigation
schemes. Great care must be
taken, Dr. Farid emphasizes, to
supplement these projects with
edequate malaria control mea-
sures. The public health authori-
ties have requested the Worlc
Health Organization to send a
malaria control demonstratior
team to train local doctors in
modern malaria control methods

In addition, Saudi Arabian ex.
perts will qualify for WHO fel.
lowships.



‘MYKEN’ BRINGS
U.S. MAIL

Twenty-six bags of reguiar and
three bags of registered American
mail arrived for Barbados on
Tuesday evening by the Alcoa
steamship Myken which called
from New York.

The Myken was
yesterday morning discharging
part of the general cargo she
brought here. Her cargo included
foodstuffs, clothing, piece goods,
shoes, engine parts, agricultural
implements and sewing machines
She left port during the evening
for Trinidad. Messrs Robert Thom
Ltd. are her agents,

still in port

Itsan Old Wild
West Custom

By
J.P. W. MALLALIEU, MP.

Fifty-two years ag a prospéctor
heading for the Klondike searched
for his straying donkey, He found
it at last and sat on gq ledge to
rest, Chipping at the ledge he
found gold.

As soon as the news spread, a
town sprang up where ne had
rested and, in all,. $125 million
worth of metal was mined,

What happened round this ledge



at Tonopah, Colorado, -happened
elsewhere in the Western States
of America, and every cinema-

goer has at last an impression of
what life in those mushroom towns
was like. To judge by Duncan
Emrich’s IT’S: AN OLD WILD
WEST CUSTOM” the West was
even wilder than the movies make
out.

It was a place of sudden wealth,
where a miner would throw a
golden fortune on to the stage for
a singer» who pleased him, or
would buy an hotel for pleasure
of firing a manager.

It was a place of sudden pover-
ty, where a seam giving out would
leu.ve a town derelict,

There Crooked-Nose Pete, Dia
mond-Tooth Daker, Slot-Machine
Ida, and Unsinkable Mrs. Brown
(who had. survived the Titanic)
lived hard an@ died hard. They
drank Tarantula Juice and Forty
Red in saloons named Road to
Ruin or Come in and Die

They gambled so continuously
that the dealers worked round
the clock in shiftsy and so fan.
tastically .that: the Governor of
New. Mexico orice lost the whole
of his territory on a single throw.

They were superstitious; some
miners refused to re-enter work
ir\t, which had been visited by a
woman until the priest had blewn
holy water all over with the air
compressor.

But they reverenced a “lady of
the line” who stayed to nurse in
> mining camp after an o*break
of smallpox had driven more re-
spectable women to safety.

They heid to a code that no one
should shoot an unarmed man or
shoot an armed man in the back.

Nor were they content with the
fantastic realities of their life
They had to invent even wilder
fantasies—fieas so large that they

barked when removed from a
bed; mosquitos which threw
rocks when. disturbed; an echo

which, if shouted at in the even-
ing, would wake a man with an
answering shout next morning;
a het. spring which, if properly
flavoured with pepper and salt,
was indistinguishable from chick-
en broth.

But in the Wild West anything
was possible, anything was believ-
able. If you want two hours of
roaring, zestful fun you should
read Emrich’s book.

* World's Work (1913), 106. 64
—L.ES.



GERMAN CAR
RECOVERY AMAZING

Output of the German motor
industry is approaching half that
of the British industry, according
to engineer K: B. Hopfinger, of
Hampton-in-Arden, near Birming-
ham.

“Recently I was in Germany
and 1 was astonished at the
recovery there since the war,’ he
said to-day.

“Although there is a basic
48-hour-week, German workers
will work any hours at intensive
speeds and the unions and em-
ployers work in harmony.
Strikes are unheard of.”
German manufacturers, says Mr

Hopfinger, are organising big sales
schemes for their cars at home
and abroad whieh are already
bringing results.

Free enterprise and the desire
of workers to better their living
standards were responsible for the
recovery —L.E.S.



Senior Short Story Competition
The Evening Advocate invites all schoolboys and school—girts
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-
tition. Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
n length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd.
“ity not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week

vill be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

right.

LEICESTER.
Mr. C. Anson Smith, head-
master of Rushey Mead Boys’
School, Leicester, who took a

party of his schoolboys to Spain
by double-decker bus last sum-
mer, is planning a similar trip in
August to Moscow.

“I am hoping to get things
moving soon,” he told me. “It
will be a much more difficult

task than going to Spain. Per-
haps it will come off, and per-
haps it will not.”

“The running of
wil} present few difficulties, as
they are no mountains to nego-
tiate, such as we had when we
went to Spain,

the vehicle

“Our biggest difficulty will be
to get permission from the Ger-
man, Polish and Russian author.
ties to go through their territo-
ries. We shall also, of course,
have to have the permission of
our Foreign Office.

“I think it would be a good
thing, in several ways, if a party
of boys could go to Russia, It
cannot possibly do any harm.

“I think it would be a very
nice gesture on the part of the
Russian authorities if this could
be arranged,”

The proposed tour would last
five weeks. Average age of the
boys is 14.

The bus which would be used
again is an old Leicester Corpora-
tiof!â„¢ bus which has been reno-
vated and bears the name Spirit
of Leicester, and illustrations of
the city’s industries,

Last year the chief driver was
the father of one of the boys, a
Mr, Page, who is a long-distance
passenger coach driver. Mr.
Anson Smith hopes that Mr.
Page will be able to drive them
again this year,

The distance from
to Moscow, by road and sea,
approximately 1,700 miles.

—LES.

—

Will Not Accept

Ca-management

DUESSELDORF, April 17.
West Germany's strongest em-
ployers’ federation declared today
it would “decisively” oppose any
extension of co-management to in-
dustries other than coal and steel,
Warning issued the



Leicester
is



was by
North Rhine Westphalian Em-
ployers’ Federation which covers

the Ruhr.

Employers said they “rely on
the West German Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer’s promise that
egulations for steel and coal
industries cannot be transferred
to other industries.”

Trade unioniets in the chemical
industry have demanded co-
management for this industry, the
third biggest in West Germany
after stee) and coal.

Labour Minister Anton Storch
recently! advocated j that co-
management should be introduced
in most industries —Reuter.



Lord Russell Will
Return Home

LONDON, April 18

Lord Russell of Liverpool will
leave his post as Deputy Judge
Advocate General of the British
Srmy of the Rhine and return to
London at the end of the month,
the House of Commons was told
on Tuesday.

He was involved on March 31
in a clash with a German crowd
at Vlotho, North Rhine Westphalia
end made an error of judgment in
the manner and matter of his
communication with the Press,
Foreyg Secretary Herbert Mér-
rison told the Commons,—CP)











Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name

WEEE ob ii erdesdvoes



American Column:

Unseating

Armehair
Soldiers



PAGE THREE

NO ORANGES: MANGO INFLUX



During the past four days there into good season, and plenty of
een a deiinite scarcity of} limes,

1 grapefruit in Bar- The sellers seem more disap

‘ pointed with the scarcity of thesc

Housewives were hunting | fruit than the housewives, while

1 every street and alley of| they are anxiously awaiting the

he City in search of these fruit| arrival of a schooner or motor

nd only few wera lucky to pro- vessel from Trinidad and
cure one or two of them from} Dominica.

From NEWELL ROGERS

NEW YORK
strcng platoon of Senators,
te> old for war service, is launch-
ing an offensive against 20,000
Washington armchair soldiers.

The Senators want to drive
these unitormed men out of their
cheirs and into Korea’s front
*s because they are of combat

Many of the soldicrs

A















are anxiou
go and are ashamed of their
hy jobs Some mow gen
I's lawn, 1,900 do Pre work
the War’ Office, 13,000 more

on recruiting duty They

could man 12 jet-fighter groups or

six large aircraft carriers

The Senators want to replace
the men with army women or
civilians. The women want tc
take over, Says one of them
‘Don't treat us as a national
luxtry Manpowe: isn’t only

malepower .”

PARIS GLAMOUR girls of rare
old vintage dominate New York
and Chicago night life Mistia
guett, star of the French music
halls for 60 years, opens on Thurs-
day at a smart East Side boite
Josephine Baker is billed to go into
a Chicago theatre for a reported
salary of £3,900 a week

CRITICS are impatient with the
newest science thriller film, “The
Man From Planet X," which was

intended to be q spine-tingling
picture,
The man lands on an English

island in a block of ice to capture
the earth because X is perishing
from cold. The critics -too
dull and old-fashioned

IT HAPPENED in Washington.
A Government office, the Com-
modity Exchange Authority, re-
turned £10,700 of its appropri
ution to the Treasury unspent. A
Congressional committee called
for a minute’s silence to recover]
from the shock.

GOOD FOOD NEWS. Agricul
ture Secretary Charles Brannan
reports that farms are now “gear
ed” to produce 40 per cent. more
than for the years just precedin:

say

the last war. Food prices have
stopped rising. Some are going
down,

PRE-BUDGET ieaders to-day in
the Times and Herald-Tribuae
voice sympathy and admiration in
edvance for Britain's hard—pressed

reople. Burden of their refrain
Britons will not flinch
WHISKY and cigarettes are

Leing boosted in full-page adver
tisements because Americans are
not buying enough, Output shot
ip in expectation of shortages
\vhich failed to appear, Except
for Scotch whisky, prices are slip-
ying. Sample: For a quart of
Yourbon — 33s.

Research Council
Veets In Trinidad

PORT-OF-SPAIN,

The Caribbean Research Coun
cil Committee on Agriculture,
Fish, Wildlife and Forestry met
at Kent House, Trinidad, on April
16 with three of its four mémbers
present.

Those present were Mr, A. deK
Frampton, Agricultural Adviser t
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Organisation, for the Brit
ish territories; Dr. Henri Stehle
Director of Agricultural Research
for the French West Indies; ana
Dr. F. W. Ostendorf, Director of
the Agricultural Experiment Sta
tion, Surinam, /

The meeting of the Commission
considered a Commission plan t
make available to the entire Carib



bean the facilities of the West
Indies Sub-Station of the Com
monwealth Bureau of Biologica!

Control,

â„¢ surveyed the status of re
search on forage crops and grasse
in the Caribbean, and studied ¢
proposal for a technical meeting
on Home Economics Education
and Extension in the Caribbean
and the suggestion from the Foot
and Agriculture Organisation
the United Nations that FAO may
make available the services of }
Home Economist and Nutritior
Economist for that purpose

of





DECREE NISI

In the Court of Divorce and
Matrimonial Causes on Tuesday,
His Honour, Justice G. L. Tayler,
granted decree nisi in the case of
Rivoka Birsztajn, petitioner, and
$701 Birsztajn, respondent, award-
ed custody of one of the children
to the petitioner, and made an
order for costs on the lower scale.

Mr. G. B. Niles, instructed by
Messrs. G. W. L. Clarke & Co.,
appeared on behalf of the peti-
tioner,



$2,135.00

local sellers,






AVAILABLE?!

BEDFORD

The Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion told the Advocate yesterday
that ‘they did not expect the im-
mediate arrival of any vessel
from either of these ports.

Instead of the oranges and
erapefruit, they were met with
mangoes, which are now coming



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PAGE FOUR



AD

SSSsS Ponaeie 2 |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown



Thursday, April 19, 1951



SUPPLY OFFICERS

THE conference of supply officers from
British Caribbean territories was expected
to end their discussion of current supply
problems, last night. But it is possible that
there will be a further meeting today.
Conferences of Supply officers assumed
special significance after devaluation of
British sterling and the West Indian dollar
in September 1949. It was immediately
following devaluation that the first import-
ant conference of Caribbean Supply
officers was held in October 1949. There
had been an earlier conference in 1947 but
the problems discussed prior to 1949 have
little significance in the light of subsequent

» changed economic trends. There was a
major conference attended by financial
officers and high ranking administrative
officials to discuss supply problems of the
Caribbean and to review the economy of
the region in 1950. This week’s conference
is the third conference at which the urgent
questions of supply will be considered.

All three of these conferences had one
thing in common. They were discussing
supply problems of the British Caribbean
from within a closed shop. The officials
representing colonial Governments cannot
by the very fact of their official status
approach the problems of supply in the
Caribbean from any other viewpoint than
that of the official rulings which have their
origin in Whitehall. There can be no ques-
tion of the competency of officials attend-
ing these supply talks to discuss supply
problems of the Caribbean from the official
point of view. But grave doubt has been
expressed in commercial circles through-
out the area that an exclusively official
body should be discussing supply problems,
unaided by the wisdom and experience of

representatives of Chambers of Commerce
in the area.

At this particular period of crisis, when
the whole pattern of Canadian-West Indies
trade is a matter of personal concern to the
Canadian Minister of Trade and Com-
merce, it is certainly a matter for regret
that the views of West Indians experienced
in this trade should not be heard at a Sup-
ply Officers’ Conference. It is well-known
that Canada is today displeased with the
unbalance in Canadian-West Indian trade
and that a conference will be held in
Ottawa to discuss the Trade Liberalization
Plan which began to operate in January,
1951 when the “token imports” scheme
proved a failure.

Canadians are by no means convinced
that the trade Liberalization plan will be
much more successful than the unsuccess-
ful “token imports” scheme, and they are
already taking the initiative to call for a
review of the “moribund Canada-West
Indies Trade agreement of 1925,” by which
Canada is obliged to subsidise an unprofit-
able shipping service, whose only purpose
from Canada’s point of view was to in-
crease the volume of Canadian-West In-
dian Trade.

The United Kingdom has shown a mark-
ed indifference to the provision of passen-
ger shipping in the Caribbean and it would
be a catastrophe of major consequence to
Caribbean economy should the C.N.S.
liners be withdrawn from the area because
of a failure,.on the part of the United
Kingdom and the West Indian Govern-
ments whose economic policy is controlled
by the United Kingdom Governments, to
appreciate that the Government of Canada
is most perturbed at existing trade rela-
tions between the Dominion and the
Caribbean territories which it preserved
during the late war by provision of food-
stuffs and at one period by a free gift of
flour. It is too much to expect that over-
burdened supply officers in the area can
do much more than keep abreast of the
ceaseless flow of regulations and instruc-
tions that arrive at their desks via the
Colonial Office but which have their origin
in the British Board of Trade and Treas-
ury. ”

The “Closed Door” policy of conducting
British Caribbean Trade has got to end one
day, unless the British are going to go back
on their word and refuse to give the area
political independence. One method of

associating the peoples of the area in the
major responsibility of political independ-
ence—the conduct of trade and planning
of a good economy—would be to invite to
all official conferences one or more repre-
sentatives of the Chambers of Commerce
of the Caribbean and let them make public
a an open meeting the views of the trad-
ing community of the area. Such a policy of
conducting conferences would ensure that
the public through the Press would be kept
informed of what their leaders in trade
and Commerce were saying, and the views
of the commercial community would
necessarily effect the deliberations of sup-
ply officers, who would no doubt give them
more serious consideration than they can
now be expected to do

LONDON
The Scots who took a large
piece of sandstone last Christmas

mor. ing from under the corona-
tion chair of the King of England
and Scotland in Westminster

Abbey obviously had little idea
what they would do with it. They
had determined to take it back
to Scotland whence it had been
taken by an English army more
than 600 years ago. And then,
what?

The men and wome: who took
the stone were actuated by some
primitive, and mystical, motive,
They claim, in a document
describing the 1.ight they spent in
the Abbey, that
aided their theft. And the stone
itself has a claim to a kind of
religicus history as a Christian
relic that was also a trophy in war
for the various Celtic Christian
Kings of the Early Middle Ages—
the Dark Ages, as we call them.
The stone’s purloiners presumably
regard these Dark Ages as an
heroic age, and would like to re-
turn to its value and its ritual—
when political power went with
sitting on a particular bit of sand-
stone,

But the majority of their
countrymen—the Scots — do not
think that way. The future of the
stone had to be arranged in ac-
cordance with the general, and
widespread, sentiment of national
pride of the Scots—but which does
not go nearly as far as the ardour
of the extremist. In the past week
there have been two important
revelations ‘on the “Stone of
Scone.” First, the men who now
control the stone, (who are not
unknown to the Scottish National
Covenant movement which in-
cludes leading, respectable Scot-
tish citizens), attempted to arrange
with “the authorities” that the
stone would be replaced at St.
Gile’s Cathedral in Edinburgh and
remain there, symbolically, for
some time, or until the English
j ask to use it! This proposition
nearly came to fruition, but the
men of the stone suspected their
trophy would be quickly spirited
back to London—so that plan was
abandoned,.

Then news leaked cut that Scot-
land Yard had “almost completed
their inquiries” and knew who the
culprits were. So did many other
people—in fact several journalists
in London and Glasgow might
have been able to state the names
of the men two weeks after the
theft if they had thought it their
duty to ask the characters them-
selves what their names are.
Scotland Yard’s efforts have been
peculiar— to say the least. They
started by dredging canals and
Lakes in London Parks— on the

divine power

























assumption that the Scottish
nationalists were incompetent
They then started eliminating

names from known lists of Scot-

LONDON.

Lord Reith, Chairman of the
Colonial Development Corpora-
tion since five months, gave a
London audience yesterday his
first public utterance on his new
Corporation.

He sprang to the lectern from a
lone seat at the back of the
platform—of a UNESCO gather-
ing.

The former B.B.C. _ Director-
General opened with a scowl and
a growl: “I have nothing to do
with groundnuts.” On the
Gambia egg scheme: “Gambia,
yes,” and a grunt—but he ad-

mitted his Corporation's con
nexion with that,
“I don’t like talking,” he

announced but ended with a ser-
mon on the devaluation of man:
“Isn't a man devalued when he
receives without having to give?”

From staccato ejaculation—"“By
Golly” and “By God’—to slow
pontifical utterances: the black
eyebrows lifted sharply for
criticism; the black jacket tight-
ened over his chest as he adopted
the manner of the Scottish Kirk
to scatter the devils who dared
think evil of his publie corpora-
tions—the B.B.C., mO;A;C.,;
and now the C.D.C.

“How much misunderstanding
there is,” he murmured, “how
annoyed I used to get'at people
who said ‘the State runs broad-
casting? or ‘the State runs the
airways’. And now they say the
State runs colonial development.”

The eyebrows reared a_ full

inch. “The State does nothing of
‘he sort,”
What does the ‘State do?

Reith’s answer: “The State owns
but does not manage.”

A pause—and any challengers
had their last chance to defy
Reith’s right to manage anything
of which HE was in charge.

“The attitude of Sir . Hilton
Poynton, (Deputy Permanent

OUR READERS SAY:

West Indian Beaten To
Death In South Africa

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—As I write to you I have
before me a clipping from the
Cape Times (date unfortunately
not shown) relating the circum-
stances of Milton King’s death at
the hands of the police as his
two companions (also West
Indians) saw the affair. As far
as I know their version has not
yet been confirmed—a thing which
is very unlikely, considering that
the persons accused are white
policemen — but there’s never
smoke without a fire. Besides, I
also have before me a letter writ-
ten by a Barbadian member of
the s.s. Strategist to a friend of
mine which agrees with the
statements made to the police.
Sir, We in Barbados have for a
considerable time now been hear
ing of the treatment meted out to
the Africans in South Africa with
detachment and indeed com
placency. That sort of thing
doesn’t happen in Barbados and
therefore we aren’t particularly
bothered. Not being in the island
I danft know what steps have
been taken to bring an enormity
like this before the public. But I
think, Sir you owe it to your read-
ers to publicise this case as much
as possible and press in your
Editorials for action in the highest
quarters, equal in intensity to the
way all black Barbadiars feel





By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

tish Nationalists — again on the
assumption that few men out ot
thousands could be found without
an alibi on Christmas Day.
Frustrated by the obvious tendency
of the inquiries to make the Scots
stitk together, Scotland Yard in-
vited a clairvoyant from Holland
to try his skill. But at this stage
a sudden burst of intelligence
seems to have smitten the police.
They started checking public and
university libraries to discover
who had been reading about the
early history of the stone before
Christmas. This inquiry ap-
parently bore fruit in Glasgow.

Presuming that Scotland Yard
has now got its men—and at least
one woman, what will happea
now?

The Secretary of State for Scot-
land, Mr. Hector MacNeil, has to
make a difficult decision, He gan
instruct the police to arrest their
suspects and a prosecution can go
forward. It would be in England,
not in Scotland. But that would
be the only blessing for the Labour
Party. Politics has now entered
the question and this week the
leading Socialist periodical, The
New Statesman, opens it edition
with an article headed “A Stone
Best Left Unturned.” The paper
urges the Government not to make
the thieves into political martyrs.
And it admits the political im-
plications, For years the Labour
Party, when it was in opposition,
supported the plea of Scotland for
a bigger say in its own Govern-
ment. But when the Socialists
gained power in 1945 they de-
layed. “Home Rule” for Scotland
was made taboo — and “devolu-
tion”, the move for some limited
self-government, was soon frown-
ed on, Two years ago a new, and
moderate, Scottish movement was
formed called the Scottish National
Covenant, A document, the
Covenant, was circulated and
gained two million signatures, Its
aims were modest and the leaders
of the Covenant movement in-
cluded leading professional men
and members of the respected
Scottish aristrocracy. Now the
Covenant Movement is planning to
turn itself into a political party
to fight elections if the candidates
of the Parties already established
will not pledge themselves to de-
mand aq Royal Commission, (of
inquiry), which would be the first
constitutional towards “devolu-
tion.” The trial of the “Martyrs
of the stone” would be a rallying
point for the Covenant movement
and even if only a fraction of the
Covenant’s two million signatories
took it seriously, they could be a
political force to drive Labour out
of some vital Scottish con-
stituencies, The Covenant Move-
ment started very well; but now it
is in need of a new fillip to



From DOUGLAS COBBAN



Chief at the Colonial Office, who

was also on the platform), and
others, including the Secretary
ed State, is as proper as it could

e.”

Publie control? Of course, but
—the eyebrows tilted again—‘No
Interference in Management.”
The best of both worlds! Reith
thinks so,

What view does he hold on
private enterprise in the Colo-
nies? Measured words, this
time: “Private enterprise oper-
ates throughout the Colonial
Empire...with a variety of
motives... some good. ..some not
so good. But all understandable
—even the worst of them.” The
audience smiled,

“Now C.D.C's function is to do
good in the Colonial territories...
(short pause)...without losing
money.”

He agreed that, by golly!, to do
good and make profits simultan-
eously “could make things very

hard.”
Some may say that private
enterprise could do it. Lord

Reith’s answer: C,.D.C. had to
operate where profits might be



about one of their own people
being beaten to death in circum-
stances like these. Perhaps this
case may serve to impress on
public opinion how closely are
inter-twined the interests of per-
sons of African origin all round
the world.

This, Sir, is not just hot-air, I
and many other Barbadians and
West Indians are experiencing
now here in England some slight
measure of the humiliation which
impinges physically a Negro in
the States and all over Africa,
Black Barbadians have a right to
be comfortable at least in Barba-
dos and this, as we all know is
not so. One of the causes of dis-
comfort for sensitive Negroes in
Barbados is the fact that white
South Africans, admittedly such
and carrying South African pass-
ports, can, if they wish, come to
the island and exercise all the
privileges our society affords to its
white stratum. This is a patent
affront and should be recognised
as such in some way on the Stat-
ute-Book.

GEORGE GRIFFITH,
F 8 8rd Court,
St. John’s College,
Cambridge
13.4.51,

Popuiarity
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—With reference to your
leading article in today’s issue, I
hasten to correct a reckless error
in the second paragraph, which 1



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





oat News From Britain

enthusiasm. Some of its leaders
think that — but for the momem
they have overstepped opinion in
striking a medal to present to the
characters who dragged the Stone
out of Westminster Abbey. The
Scottish newspaper are vibrating
with controversy and good Scots
citizens are writing to protest at
the Covenanters’ fancy medak

which show unicorn of Scot-
land lording it over the lion cl
England. Por the moment, b;

going cautiously, the English have
succeeded in splitting the Scott:
into two factions — one admirini
the men of the stone, the othe.
deploring them. But if th
“London Government” carries of
the band of puzzled men to a tria
at the Old Bailey, I suspect th
Covenant’s medals will come ii
handy after all:

Some readers who do not find
the affair of the stone merely a
joke may ask what are the real
grievances of Scotland. England
and Scotland have been under
one King for 348 years, and under
one administration for 244 years.
Politically the. Scots claim that
they have separate problems but
everything done by half a dozen
ministries in England has to be
controlled by a single Secretary of
State for Scotland—and he has his
office in Londtén, Scottish Law is
separate from English Law—so
many Bills have to go. through
Parliament a second. time with a
different wording : why, they ask,
should not Scotland have its own
Parliament to regulate its home
affairs? Northern Ireland has!
Then there are financial griev.
ances, Scots argue that their ex-
ports are more than their imports
—and England takes the differ-
ence, They argue that they do
not even see all their own taxpay-
ers’ money back in Scotland, The
case for neither of these last
claims has ever been properly
established.

But the main grievance is that
the Scots do not feel themselves to
have a fair deal, hey are strong-
ly conscious of their national iden-
tity and their (so called) national
culture. Few of them want Home
Rule, and not many would like to
give up representation in the Par-
liament at Westminster, But they
would also like their own little
Parliament so that they could ask
their own questions, and badger
their own ministers of health and
housing, insurance and home
affairs.

The Englishman's attitude to all
this is hardly resentful in the
least, In jest he may say that if
the Scots want to keep the Eng-
lish from meddling in their affairs,
then the English will be able to
stop the Scot from, meddling
South of the Border—and what a
change that would be!

The outstanding question re-
mains—how would the English
and Scots share out the British
Empire, Would Scotland demand
its own Colonial Office?

Lord Reith On lis C.D.C.

too small to attract private enter-
prise; operate where profits
might be uncertain, too long
delayed for commercial capital to
be attracted. Think of afforesta-
tion, ranching, he argued.

And after all, C.D.C., in a
s@nse, was priming the pump for
private enterprise. How? Lord
Reith’s answer :—

When C.D.C., schemes are
running, “with decent economic
return and all the rest of it,
“they are likely to be handed
over to the local government
or, anyhow, to some local peo-
ple. Which would allow C.D.C.
to take its money out of that
part of the world to use it
elsewhere,

“But for Heaven's sake don’t
think there’s nothing but com-
mercial motivation about C.D.C.
Schemes. undertaken by C.D.C.
have serious social repercussions,”

Why does C.D.C. busy itself
with hotels? “Why on earth?”
echoed its Chairman, and ex-
plained some “unfortunate Gov-
ernors haven’t hotels to put
their visitors in and ask C.D.C.,
to please put up hotels where
visitors, commercial and other-
wise, may stay.”

Defensively, Lord Reith re-
peated that C.D.C., was tackling
50 projects all over the world.
Few of tham earning profits?
“All right,” he retorted; “There
can_be mistakes.” But to start
up 50 projects in three years with
average capitalisation of about
£600,000! No small undertaking.
Please think of that, It wasn’t
So easy to get competent manage-
ment. There were the unpre-
dictable perio’ elements, the
baked soils of Africa, soil erosion,
pests, diseases,

“We do our best,” Lord Reith
added and swept on to yet more
terrible problems — the deval-
uation of man, for example,





doubt was made by mistake when

one reads the whole article,

It states. “During the interval
between the elections in 1948
and today there has been a
gradual changq in many parts of
the island towards the attitude of
the Labour Party. Its policy was
never popular in St. Andrew and
Mr. Foster's election was due
less to the strength of the Party
than his popularity in the Parish,
The fficial Labour Candidate
Mr. Springer polled only 192
votes.”

For the public information and
yours, if you care to have it, the
official labour candidate was the
late Junior Member Mr. D, ‘
Foster. Moreover, to say that
the Labour Party was not popu-
lar in St. Andrew is another
attempt, which is usual from
your paper, to decry the Labour
Party.
_ The Labour Party held a seat
in St. Andrew since 1944. This
surely cannot be measured in
terms of unpopularity.

Yours faithfully,
F, L, WALCOTT,
General Secretary,

Barbados Progressive League.

April 18, 1951,

Ed, Note: According to Mr.
Walcott the Labour Party was
popular in St. Andrew but
has lost its popularity. Why?
Or was it that the late Mr
Foster was pular and not
the Labour Party?
































West Indies Lead The Way
Biggest Exhibition In
Commonwealth B.LF.

LONDON.

The re-entry this year of Barbados to the
West Indies section of the British Industries
Fair, opening April 30th, is an event specially
worthy of mention. It means that this year
the West Indies will be the biggest of all
Commonwealth exhibitors. Compared with
Canada and South Africa, which will each
occupy 1,015 sq. ft. of floor space, the West
Indies section takes 1,054 sq. ft. Jamaica,
Trinidad, British Guiana, Barbados, Wind-
ward Islands and Sea Island Cotton will all
be represented.

For months now, work has been progress-
ing on the construction of the British West
Indian exhibits and this week, at the West
India Committee, I was privileged to see
models showing what the final exhibition wil]
look like.

The Commonwealth section lies just inside
the door from the main road—the first spot,
to which the footsteps of the visitor are
naturally directed. The West Indies stands
are on the right of the doorway, with British
Guiana, Jamaica, Sea Island Cotton and the
Windward Islands occupying one side of the
gang-way and Barbados and Trinidad the
other.

The Jamaican stand is by far the largest,
covering 269 sq. feet compared with Trini-
dad's 240 sq. ft. Figures for the others are as
follows: British Guiana, 221 sq. ft; Barbados,
148 sq. ft; Windward Isiands, 139 sq. ft., and
Sea Island Cotton 130 sq. feet.

Considerable work and ingenuity has gone
into the construction of the West Indies
stands and they will certainly reflect great
credit upon the designers and upon the terri-
tories themselves when the exhibition opens.

In 1950, the organisers allocated the B.W.1.
site with the emphasis on depth and not on
frontage. Consequently the entrances to the
stands were narrow and many exhibits at the
back of the stand were not visible from the
gang-way. This year the West India commit-
tee asked that more space be given to front-
age and this request has been granted, There-
fore the West Indies stands will appear to
cover much more space, and, what is more
important, all exhibits will be easily view-
able from the gang-way.

Maps of each colony will be prominently
displayed in each stand and particular care
has been given to the siting of the two main
West Indian products, sugar and rum.

The flooring of the British Guiana stand
will consist of locally grown hard wood and
wall panels will also be of British Guiana
timber. On a centre table will be samples of
aluminium and bauxite which is mined in
the colony. Specially featured will be Demer-
ara rum and sugar. British Guiana rice will
also be on show as will some of the cottage
industries made for export.

A full-size model of a woman wearing a
cotton dress will decorate the centre of the
Sea Island Cotton stand. On either side of
her will be made-up exhibits of men’s and
women’s clothes from Sea Island Cotton.

Particular care is being taken in the Bar-
bados stand to see that the rum exhibit is
put in a conspicuous position. It will be placed
right in the centre of the stand so that visitors
entering the exhibition will notice it almost
as soon as they see the stand itself. On either
side of rum there will be sugar and fancy
molasses and, as a background, there will be
a large map of the colony and examples of
cottage industries.

Trinidad Leaseholds have lent a model of
a typical oilwell to the Trinidad stand. The
model, approximately 5% ft. in height, 3 ft.
wide, and 5% ft. in depth, will be shown near
the entrance. It will be flanked by asphalt
exhibits and a display of anthurium lilies.
Below them will be the cocoa and canned
citrus fruits while against the back wall
will be the rum and sugar exhibits together
with a special chart showing the Colony’s
production figures,

The Jamaica stand will have as a back-
ground a large map of the Colony which has
been flown over specially to this country. It
will be hung above a map of the world, on
which Jamaica’s relative position will be
marked. Below this map will be a number
of products of the island, including coffee,
ginger, cigars and gypsum. The booklet “In-
vest in Jamaica” will also be prominently
displayed and as with the other ¢»!onies, rum
and sugar exhibits will be featured.

The Windward Islands stand will be:
roughly divided into four sections showing
the individual products from St. Vincent, St.
Lucia, Dominica and Grenada.

A number of the helpers who were i:
charge of the West Indies stands last’ ye:
have promised to give their services again
this time but there are still several key posi-
tions which have to be filled before the exhi
bition opens at the end of this month

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19,

1951



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THURSDAY, APRIL 19,

1951



TCA. Plane Refused Landing At Seawel

NO STAFF

AVAILABLE

FOR NIGHT DUTY

A

TRANS-CANADA PLANE was refused the use of

Seawell Airport at 10 p.m. on Saturday, Mr. G. H.
King told the Council of the Chamber of Commerce yes-
terday. The plane therefore had to remain overnight in
Trinidad and return on Sunday morning, he said.

The reason given for the refusal was to the effect that Cje;

there was no staff available for night duty, Mr. King told

the members.

Mr. King is of the staff of Messrs. Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd., local agents for Trans-Canada Airlines, but said
that his reason for bringing the matter to the attention oi
the ‘Council, was in the interest of the island.

The Council expressed deep con-
cern over the matter. They de-
cided that the President Mr. D.'G.
Leacoek Jnr., and Mr. King should
see the Colonial Secretary and talk
it over with him before taking
iurther action.

Mr. King said that the decision
for refusal of permission to use
the airport was made by the Colo¢
nial Secretary, who had, apparent-
ly, discussed the matter with the
Airport Manager and the reason
given was to the effect that there
was no staff available for night
duty.

EMERGENCY

While it might be argued that
the airport had not the staff to
do regular night duty, it did appear
very unreasonable that in cases
of emergency, such a dictatorial
ittitude should have been
adopted,

“I do not propose to ask this
Chamber to fight the battles of
Trans-Canad1 Airlines, as I feel
that this question is one of general
principle and should be brought
to the attention of Government
on that basis. However, it may
be as well to bring to your notice
the circumstances surrounding
this issue, so that you can have 2
true picture of what took placa
and might happen in the future.

“Due to unfavourable weath-
er conditions in Bermuda, the
T.C.A, plane, which was to have
left Montreal on Friday last,
was delayed until Saturday
morning. The expected time of
arrival at Barbados was then
8 p.m. Saturday on her north-
bound trip, and her return trip
midnight. We were, during the
day, informed that the airport
would be closed at 10 p.m,, with
the result that arrangements
had to be made to board the
northbound passengers on the
southbound trip. Fortunately
for the passengers, but unfor-
tunately for T.C.A., the weather
forecast at Bermuda was un-
favourable for the plane’s return
that evening, Consequently,
the plane had to remain over
night in Trinidad and returned
to Barbados on Sunday morning.

COMMENTS

“T would, however, like to make
the following comments, in view
of Government’s decision that
even in a case of emergency, as
this one was, the airport will only
be opened between the hours ot
6 a.m. and 10 p.m.

Had the T.C.A, plane not ar.
rived prior to 10 p.m. the Barba-
dos passengers would have been
landed at Trinidad.

Unless the piane remained in
Trinidad until landing facilities
were made available at Barbadcs,
the northbound passengers woud
have been forced to fird other
means of transport to go north,

A similar condition would per-
tain to a lesser extent if tha
number of passengers gomge
through to Trinidad, plus those
boarding southbound for the
northbound flight, exceeds the
seating capacity of the plane.

As they know, a considerable
sum had been spent to provide
Barbados with an up-to-date air-
port, with the object that some day,
they would see several Interna-
tional Airlines include Barbados
in their schedule calls, How could
this hope be fulfilled if the spirit
of co-operation displayed on Sat-
urday was allowed to continue?
cuestioned Mr. Kirtg. He ended:
“I feel that in the interest of the
island this Chamber — should
approach Government regarding
the future operation of Seawell
Airport.”

SERIOUS MATTER

The President said that he
thought the matter a very serious
one. It did seem to him very un-
fortunate to refuse a plane the use
of the airport when it had been
delayed by weather. He did not se?
any point in the Government
refusing the use of the airport at
night when this was’ due to cir-
cumstances beyond the control of

the airline. fi :
Mr. D. A. Lucie-Smith said
that the whole business of the

jsland depended on the airport
and such a restriction did not
appear to be reasonable.

At a General Meeting of the
Chamber Mr. A. R. Toppin had
raised the point that commercial
representation on the Legislative
Council was inadequate, _ The
President was appointed to inter-
view the Colonial Secretary on the
matter as a result, and yesterday
he told the Council members that
he had done so. The Colonial
Secretury, he said, had informed
him that the Governor wished to
discuss the matter with him per-
sonally,

He had been to Government
House yesterday merning and had
put to the Governor the Cham-
ber’s point of view. Mis Excel-
lency had promised that he would
give the matter his full considera.
tion when next an appointment
was to be made to the Legislative
Council,

COMMISSIONER
WELCOMED

Mr. A. R Starck, United
Kingdom Trade Commissioner in
Trinidad for the West Indies, was
present by invitation at the Coun-

cil meeting yesterday and was
welcomed by the President
Mr Starck expressed his

pleasure at having been given the
opportunity to attend

The Secretary toa the meeting
that as regaras the appointment
of Vigilance Committees as pro-
po:cd some time ago, only oue, so
far, had been formed and that w as
by the Hardware Trade. This
committee were: Mr. N. E.
Bushell of Messrs. C. F. Harrisu.
& Co. Ltd, Mr. B. Bannister of
Messrs. C. §. Pitcher & Co., and
Mr. S. P. Withnall of the Cen.
tral Foundry Ltd.

The Council discussed a letter
from the President of the Incor-
porated Chambers of Commerce
relative to the next Congress of
the Chambers, proposed to be held
in British Guiana next year,

The Fresident and Mr. Licie-
Smith were appointed a committee
to draft amendments to the rules
of the Chamber.



nr

RAMADHIN AND

VALENTINE ARE

MATCH WINNERS
Says Bertie Clarke

x Dr, C. Bertie Ciarke gave an
interesting talk on sport last night
with special reference to cricket
at the Y.M.P.C. club house, Dr.
Clarke first gave a brief resume
of his cricket career in England
since 1939 when he visited that
country as a member of the West
Indies team,

Reviewing the victorious 1950
West Indies tour of England, Dr,
Clarke paid tribute to the ster-
ling individual batting perform-
ances of Everton Weekes, Frank
Werrell and Clyde Walcott and
observed that in Ramadhin and
Valentine the West Indies possess—
ed a pair of brilliant match win-
ning bowlers.

He had a word to say for pro-
fessional cricketers. He coun-
selled people in the West Indies
not. to consider professional
cricketers as people outside the
social pale, but as respectable
members of a community who
earn a decent and good living by
playing cricket.

Mr. Jack Kidney, Manager of
the West Indies team to England
in 1939 and 1950 moved a vote
of thanks to Dr. Clarke for his
interesting talk and welcomed the
opportunity to express publicly
his thanks to Dr. Clarke for the
professional services which he
had rendered the West Indies
team during the 1950 tour,



PEASANT
AGRICULTURE

Of the main food crops, yams
and sweet potatoes were in steady
supply during the month of March.
The reaping of yams on small
plots was almost completed by the
end of March, and sweet potatoes
from the “fall” planting were also
being harvested. Vegetable gar-
den crops were in moderate supply
and prevailing prices were rela-
tively high.

Sugar Cane. On the whole,
harvesting of the ripe canes is
proceeding satisfactorily. Some
peasants, however, complain of
difficulty in getting labour to reap
and transport their crop. The
young plant canes as_ well as
ratoons are making good progress,

Cotten. Cotton picking was
continued during the month, Some
exceptionally good yields were
reported as high as 1,600 lb. per
acre in some cases. The general
results, however, owing mainly
to the heavy rains in November
and February, have not justified
early expectations.

Tree Crops. Limited quantities
of coconuts, limes and bananas
were available in the market.

Pests and Diseases. Among the
pests reported, were the cabbage
white butterfly, scale insects and
slugs. Cultivators are being ad-
vised in methods of control.

Peavant Livestock. There were
no complaints received during the
month. Concentrated feed and
other feeding stuffs were in free

supply.

Extension Work. The
Agricultural Instructors
1,509 peasant holdings and 6
school gardens in March. Twelve
mango trees were topworked.

The preliminary judging ol
school vegetable gardens entered
for the 1951-52 annual competition
took place during the month.

Peasant
visiteu

A survey, the main purpose of
which was to discover the re-
ation of peasant cultivators to
the proposed scheme for providing
motor tractors for the cultivation
of their holdings, was begun dur-
ing the month. This survey will
be completed early in April.

Vacation Fishing

~Small fish catches are being
made by school boys in the sea
behind the Princess Alice Playing
Field, It is now vacation time,
and although it is football season,
the boys are not playing this game
on the playing field, but are taking

to fishing.
Standing on the newly repaired
break water, the boys fish for

many hours of the day with hooks
and lines,

Better Pay
Urged For
City Clerks

MBE. CHARLIE THOMAS,
President of the Barbados
ks’ Union, expressed grave
concern over the salaries paid
to grocery clerks, when the
Union held its meeting at the
Y.M.C.A. Headquarters yester-
day evening. :
The minimum wage for a
grocery clerk is $8.00 per week

and one ease disclosed that,

the ¢lerk had started to work
for $8.00 per week and after
S1X years with the firm, his in-
crease was only eight cents.
Tae Secretary of the Clerks’
Union was instructed to draft a
letter to the Provision Merchants’
Association which read;Due to the

inereased cost of living, I have
been } asked to approach your
Association and ask your assist-

ance to obtain an increase of pay
to shop assistants employed in the
grocery and provision business
This letter was sent ‘on Tuesday.

Yesterday evening the Clerks’
Union received a reply ‘from the
Provision Merchants’ .Association,
acknowledging the reccipt of the
letter, and stating that although
members of the Association were
most sympathetic towards the jus-
tiflable appeal, they could not en-
tertain any idea in this direction
at present. They, however, beg to
state that as soon as their profits
warranted it, they would be pre-
pared to consider the matter,

Resolution

The Executive Committee of the
Clerks’ Union then drafted a Res-
olution to be presented to His
Excellency the Governor. This
was read to members of the Union
yesterday and they unanimously
agreed to it. It reads as follows:

Whereas the Grocery Clerks of
this island are suffering great hard-
ships owing to the ever increasing
cost of living; and,

Whereas the grocery proprietors
are unable to increase the salaries
at present being paid owing to the
slender margin of the profits be-
ing made by them; and,

Whereas the abovesaid is sub-
stantiated by the Report of the
Price Control Committee’s Report,
1951,

Be it resolved: ,

(1) That a petition be addressed
to the Governor-in-Executive Com
mittee,

(2) That the said petition should
request that an increased mark-
up be allowed the grocery stores.

(3) That the Price Control Au-
thorities might make a condition of
the granting of an increased mark-
up a pro-ratio increase in the sal-
aries paid to grocery clerks.

Before this resolution was. reu.l,
Mr, Thomas said that the meeting
was being held mainly to assist
shop assistants in the groceries
and provision section. They were
the worst paid at the moment.

A meeting was already held, bu:
this was postponed in order to in-
form other grocery hands who
were interested in attending. In
that way that section of the Clerks’
Union would be better represented,
He still felt that there is plenty
more room in the Union for
grocery clerks.

He did not have to explain to
them that while one division of
business is suffering, others also
suffer. A clerk may be employed
with a grocery store for five years
and owing to circumstances then
have to become a hardware clerk
and vice versa. Perhaps some of
them had sons and daughters who
were in the clerical line. Their
only salvation was to stick to-
gether, He felt that if he could
improve conditions that was his
reward.

Suffering Clerks

He said that the people who
work in the grocery line were in
an awful condition. They were
suffering and he was trying to get
an increase of salaries for them.

According to the letter from the
Provision Merchants’ Association,
if the salaries of the grocery clerks
were to be increased, the mer
chants would have to get an in-
crease on their mark-up.

In October 1949 the Govern-
ment had appointed a Committee
to go into the grocery business.
This Committee, of which Sir
John Saint was a member, thor-
oughly went into the matters of
salaries, expenses, etc. of all the
firms. “They afterwards claimed
that the mark-up on certain items
was not sufficient.

He said that Sir John Saint,
the man who saved Barbaddés from
starvation, did know what he was
doing and when he said that the
mark-up was not enough, he mus
have had his reasons. In this same
report the Committee stated that
there should be an increase of
salaries.

When the report came before the
House of Assembly, it was not
implemented,

“We must believe that Report,”
Mr. Thomas said: “The merchants
are justified in not increasing sal—
aries because that Committee has
given them the power to do so.

He is only concerned with the
clerks. While the Government is
having arguments on what is right
from wrong, the clerks are Starv—
ing—they just cannot live on the
present salaries. In all other de—
partments employees were given
increases to cope with the cost of
living, but not so with the clerks.

He agreed that the cost of living
must be kept down but did mot
agree that it should be kept down
by starvation salaries to the people
employed in the city.

He said that if the population
of Barbados have to pay a cent
more for a pound of butter
they should not frown. It only
means a little more money for the
$8 a week clerk who is at present
suffering.

Mr. Arthur Kinch said that the
salaries were disgraceful. In his
epinion the minimum wage should
not be $8. A clerk should at least
start to work at $12 per week

A vote of thanks was moved t
Mr, E. C. Hewitt, Vice—Presid
of the Union He said that
Executive Committee of the Ur
Z daing and
thing for
regards











intended to do



the clerks

the res





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PRINCE



PRINCE CHARLES, now nearly

GETS Ul

S OWN WAY



two, got his own wey and was

allowed to stand on the platform with the King and Queen when
the King took the salute at a presentation of new colours to the 1st

and 2nd Battalions of the Coldstream Guards at Windsor

Castle.

Before this Prince Charles sat in Wis’ pram and repeatedly asked his

nurse “Why can’t I go on the staffs with Grannie?”

The last time

colours were presented at Windsor Castle was when King George V
presented them to the Ist Battalion of the Welsh Guards.

Jamaica’s Drought

~—Express.

Restricts Milk Supply

MR. H. McD, WHITE, ‘Trade Administrator of Jamaica
and that colony's delegate at the Supply Officers’ Talks

told the Advocate yesterday that the island is

severe drought and one of
milk supply.



‘Saratoga’
Smashed
Off Walker’s Beach
Lge te yesterday morning the

fishing beat Saratoga, owned
by Henry Overton of Fitz Village,

Si. James, fran aground and was
completely smashed off Walkers
Beach, St, Andrew, The various

parts were later washed ashore by
the current,

The boat is valued $700 and is
insured. It was manned by Daniel
Chandler of Cheapside, St. Michael]
and FitzGerald Overton of Hagle
Hall, They escaped without bein
injured,

VT THE DISTRICT “C” Polic
% Court, Mr. G. B, Griffith, Act
ing Police Magistrate, committed
Winifred Bryan and Mervyn Lash-





ley, both of Rosegate, St, John,
to stand their trial at the next
sitting. of the Court ef Grand
Sessions,

Winifred Bryan and Lashley
were charged with throwing
destructive substance on St.Clair
Bryan with intent to do grievou
bodily harm.

Mr. J, S. B. Dear is representit
Lashley. Winifred Bryan is cde
fended by Mr. B. Niles.

THIEF stole a bicycle valued
$40 from the business prem
ises of Messrs DaCosta & Co,, Ltd
between 3,15 and 3.50 pm, on
Tuesday, It is the property of John
Wilkie of Ninth Avenue, Bellevill
Herbert Clarke of Paynes Ba
St, James, reported that the gen-
erator of his bicycle was stolen
while the cycle was at Gover
ment House between 7.15 am, on
Sunday and 11.30 a.m, on Tuesday,
CANE FIRE at Neils Plant
tion, Christ Church, earlier
this week burnt half acre of second
crop ripe canes., They are th
nroperty of Neils. and Rouvens
Estates Ltd, amd were insured

In Court Of Original
Jurisdiction

Judge J. W. B. Chenery in the
Court cf Original Jurisdiction
yesterday gave judgment against
Delcina Clinton of Belair Land,
St. Michael, who had claimed
£22, 18s, 4d. fram Joseph Nicholl
of Gilkes Tenantry, Fairfield
Clinton said she was Nicholls’ do-
mestic servant and.he did not pa
her for 11 months.

Clinton told the court that st
was working when Nicholls who
had lately come from abroad asker
her to work for him, They agree
that she would be paid, but she
had not been paid for 11 months

Nicholls said that he did not
ask Clinton to work for him, but
on many ocgasions she had asked
him to allow her to dive at I
After he allowed her to live ther
she brought her children and
grandchildren to stay also He
had never employed her, but used
to do his domestic work himself

Clinton denied that her childs
and grandchildren lived
Nicholls’ home. She s she }
only brought her son at Niche
to make messages after he becam«e
sick





aid



1

said that any economist v
e the matter into considerati
full



rance if the res«







having a
the effects is to restrict their
He

lid that

ihey make con
scnsed milk and have not got any
#€u' plus. They are temporarily
Short of their requirements and

the milk people have had to reducc
issues to the trade.
The drought has

the corn crop. They
pated a surplus like last year’s
when they wete able to supply
some of the other B.W.I. colonies
with corn, but unfortunately, they

affected
had _ antici-

ilso

would not be able to do so this
year.

They have begun distribution
of textiles at their new factory,

Ariguanaboa in St. Catherine’s for
the first time this week, At
present, they are restricted to the
production of grey sheeting, but
expect later on to make other
lines,

Cement Industry

Mr, White said that their cement
factory is likely to begin produc
tion at the end of the year and
added that there was generally, a
gkadual industrial .develgpment
going on, The bauxite people have
Started to export and the building
operations of the University Col

lege are proceeding apace
There is great hope that with
the advent of the new Governor

ell sections of Government will

et together under his leadership
With . view to the preparation ot
a more clearly defined and pro
sressive policy.

When the Governor arrived two
weeks ago, Mr. White said that he
had very great reception from
il] sections and his advent had put
a fillip into the community,

He said that imports to Jamaica
were very buoyant. At the end o
March last, their import revenue
exceeded their estimate, mainly
due to increased trading activity.

partly due to the U.S,—Canada
token scheme under the B.W.I
Trade Liberalization Plan,

Jamaica had a very good tour

season and they were ineres

leir towrist accommodati«

y of erecting new hotels. At
resent, there one big hotel
how...under -construetion.by -Mi
Bob Morrow, an American citizen
who pays visits to th
colony.



was

frequent

Eoard of Health will
Consider Tenantry Roads

The meeting of the Board of
Health which was to be held yes-
erday, was postponed until next
month. Sufficient members were
not available to get a quorum

Some had to attend other meet-
ings while others are out of the
island

An



item on the agenda whict
the Board was to have considered
was suggestions by the Director
<{ Highways and Transport for
the type of roads suitable for
construction in tenantries under
the Public Health Act, The
Board wants to find a way of
ensuring that better tenantry
reads are built,



“ORANJES TAD”
CALLS TODAY

Only two passengers are ex-
pected to take the Dutch passen-
ger-freiehter Oranjestad for Eng-
land when e calls here today
from Trinidad

The Oranjestad w

consigned
Son &







Cocoa Price
Highest Ever

—In Greriada

Grenada was hoping this
year to reap the biggest sugar
crop in the colony's history,
but on account of the labour
troubles it is not yet known

q hi
what the result may be,’Mr.
E. Gittens Knight, M.B.E.,
Competent Authority and
Controller of Supplies, Gren
ada, told the Advocate yester-
aay

He said that grinding opera-
tions are however continuing
and may last for another five
or six weeks.

Mr, Knight is here for the Sup.
ply Officers Talks. He is staying
at the Hotel Royal,

He said that it is now difficult to
gauge what the annual yield cf
the cocoa crop will be on account
of the recent plundering and des-
truction of trees which has taken
place, but the price of cocoa
now the highest on record.

When he left Grenada, condi
tions . were very unsatisfactory
Although the strike was declared
finished, and an agreement
reached ‘between the Employer
Association and the Mental and
Manual Workers’ Union, there
were still acts of plundering,
stealing and intimidating on some
of the country estates and civil
disobedience had not entirely
stopped.

He said it was hoped that the
miscreants would soon take les.
sons from those who had resumed
work and decide to do likewise so
that the peace and serenity, a
particular feature of Grenada in
the past, should be maintained
onee again,

is



Inquiry
Adjourned
Until April 24

A Coroner of District “A” fur-
ther adjourned’ hearing in the in-
quest concerning the death of
Horace Lynch, a 30-year-old la
bourer of Bank Hall, St, Michael,
until April 24 yesterday

Lynch was killed on Trafalgar
Square on March 25 when he was
involved in an accident with a
motor bus while riding the bicycle
M.8916, Dr, E, L. Ward who per-
formed the post mortem examina
tion at the Public Mortuary on
Mareh 26 about 11.45 am. said
that the body of Lyneh was iden
tied to him by Caroline Lynch
who said that he was her son.

The man was dead for about 16
to 17 hours and there was a large
bruise over the right jaw and
cheek, Blood was visible from the
nose, mouth and ears. There was
haemorrhage on the brain and the
skull was fractured, The heart
was normal and the bowels con
tained a certain amount of blood.
In his opinion death was due to
haemorrhage of the brain and
fracture of the skull,

Caroline Lynch, 58-year-old
mother of the deceased, said that
she identified the body of her son
to Dr. Ward, She last saw him
alive on the morning of March 25
and about 3 p.m. the same day she
saw him lying dead on Trafalgar
Square.

Anthony Archer of White Hall,
St. Michael, said that he knew
Lynch. On March 25 he (.\rcher)
left his bieyele outside a shop in
Hindsbury Road. Later in the day
about 3 p.m. he went to Trafalgar
Square and saw his bicycle
smashed up. Lynch was lying
dead on the road at the side of a
motor bus. He never lent his
tieyele to Lynch, nor had a raf-
fie ever been organised by him
with fegard to the bicycle.

The

Poliee are bringing about
nine witnesses on Tuesday, April
24, to give an account of what

they saw. The bicycle when pro
duced in Court yesterday was ex
tensively smashed. The fron
wheel was damaged beyond re
pair, handle bars dislocated anc
front fork bent.

Used Galled Donkey

David Greenidge, a labourer o
Cave Hill, St. Michael, was finex
£5 by the Police Magistrate
District “C” yesterday for work
ing a donkey ina galled condi
on’ The offence was committed
cn Summervale Road, St, Philip

“CRUISER” DUE SUNDAY |

Tie CNS. Canadian Cruiser is
aue to arrive at Barbados
Sunday from Canada via
Bi itish Northern Islands,
She will bg leaving port the
same evening for British Guiana
via St. Vineent, Grenada and
Trinidad,
_ The Cruiser’s agents are Messrs,
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd,

|

|

on
the

(

Dress made lo

pretty styles an

Sun suits





o)F
!

very smart and chic,





Cotton Goods
Industry Given

MR. A. A. DOUGLAS,
and Exports in Trinidad, to

a

PAGE FIVE

Made In T’dad

Pioneer Status

Acting Controller of Imports
ld the Advocate yesterday that



pioneer status has been granted to a textile factory in that

colony for the manufacture

Mr. Douglas is the Tr
Officers’ Talks which ave
House to-day.



Better Lighting
For Dominica
—LETANG

Dominica will soon get better

lighting system when the hydro-
electric plant to be erected by
Cc. D. C. is completed, Mr. H. E

Letang, Controller of Supplies, told
he “Advocate” yesterday

He said that roads leading
to the site of the plant are nov
being built in order to enable the
transportation of heavy machin
ery

Living conditions have become
very difficult as compared with
pre-war years, The people are
experiencing great difieuluues with
regard to obtaining fresh meat and
frozen meat from Australia has t
be imported to relieve the
situation

At the beginning of the ye
they had a fair amount of rain
but during the last couple of
months they had very little, This
however, would hardly interfere
with two of their principal crep
limes and bananas

As far as their banana crop i
concerned, he said that they ar
hoping to reap about 500,000 stems

or more this year



of eotton piece goods.
inidad delegate at the Supply
expected to finish at Hastings

He said that the building for
the factory is in proecss of erec-
tion and substantial shinments of
machinery have already arrived.
It is expected that the erectior
xf the machinery will begin very
shortly.

The company nopes to turn ou!
sufficient piece goods of the cheap
er classes of textiles to meet the
olony’s requifements and_ to
have some availab!> for export
Reaping iieid Up
sugar crop is now being

It was impeded to some
in January and February

en acceunt of the unusually ex-

cessive rains for that time of the

year, but the weather had im.

proved during March and had

continued up to date, thereby, en

abling the harvesting of canes to

proceed uninterrupted, This
» year’s crop is now expected to be
» bigger than last year's

Mr. Douglas said that a few
, concerns abroad are showing in-
, terest in the Pioneer Industries

Ordinance, and many enquiries

regarding the starting of new in-

dustries are being made

There is also local interest in the
tarling up of new industries and
among those which have reeently
been piven consideration is the
nanufacture of cast iron, soil pip
and steel bars

The
reaped
extent





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PAGE SIX

BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY,


























HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



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APRIL 19, 1951

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‘eashonaee, Bouquet Beauty Samp.

INSPECTION

i

| SEE US FOR-

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LIONIDE LEATHERETTE
CARPET MATERIAL
RUBBER MATS

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
i D |) [ACE BIG T7ME GAMBLER Hori |




1 DIDN'T RNOWY | WAS TRAINING LET ME REM










| (Mou WERE <3 WHEN | GOT MIXED} | DOIT? IT YOu, MV NIECE Ig HY Ybu60. % JUGEAN IDGA ca yor BUREERS

BEGINNING » SOUNDS \ (ONE OF THE WORLDS Naso NV IDEAS USLIALLY w Ed

ete WHIRLPOOL. DANGEROUS )\ best oiimmens. | (ATES eee | ROOF LAMP BULBS &
CHANNEL 2 ae r—| |pame,vice? -< LETS 6oWATCH | | ae

| DOING THIS, ) ( UP WITH THAT JAIL-
| DIANA. et ;
%,



ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX

BATTERY CABLES

ACCESSORY SWITCHES

Flat GALVANISED SHEETS

Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT
for Interior

HER TRAIN. |
a —| |



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and helps you to sleep soundly.
And nothing could be nicer...

NO NEED TO ADD
MILK OR SUGAR
Maralyn is creamy milk deliciously

flavoured, and enriched with ener- | |



gising sugar, malt and yeast M A R A LYN MILK PLUS

' A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT

‘Pwvieteteniwal Street







F POPPIN O SPSS APO SFOS FOSS

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BRINGING uP FATHER 3 SHAW by Desmond McCarthy 3, 4, 6
_ x
$ ISLANDS OF THE SUN by Rosita Forbes ROYAL SCHOOL
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HERE COMES MAGGIE'S HOW DARE YOU TALK THAT 1 | . 2 THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELBRE
BROTHER BIMMY=TLL a Ay THER > 1¢ x ee: : INGELBRECHT
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(







THURSDAY, APRIL 19,







1951

























BARBADOS ADVOCATE







































































































































PAGE SEVEN































































need apply. Apply in writing





























































17.4.51—2n







LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

of Beckles Hill,

St. Michael for per-
mission to sell

Spirits, Malt Liquors &c.



The application of Stanley Brathwaite}San Antonio de Padua,













beccme well-established economis}to preserve these vestiges of the











San ‘Luis}{or the monuments of the Fran-
Arcangel ciscans caused more than one t

Nuestra| disappear. Others crumbled unti
an Carlos|"othing more than_ silent wall
San|â„¢arked their sites. Fortunately :

Purisima Concepcion,
Obispo, San Miguei

Sefera de la Soledad, S
de Borromea, Santa Cruz,























Voice of Hitler's





















In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station

























SOUTHBOUND







= oe ee ee ~_—— ~~~ +e
i rl , |
CLASSIFIED ADS. PUBLIC NOTICES | PUHLIC SALES | LOST & FOUND WANTED FOR RENT PERSONAL
* | Ten cents per apate tine on ys| Ten cents | Mt
per agate tine on week-days! —— Ss Minimum charge week 72 cents and/
TELEPHONE 2508 Ghd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,| and 12 cents per agave ti s 86 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24|\ a," i™imtm charge week 12 cents and on
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| minimun cnarge “si nt eg es LOST pod. | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — “4
ba ge $i.5 a wert: 3 cents a word week—4 Cente a over
For Births, Marriage or Engagement and $1.80 on Sundays. Misa mwa: “7 ress m fe word Sundays, | we ae @ word week—4 cents a| The Public is hereby warned against
announcements in Carib Calling the FOR SALE i ial a a | » NOTE BOOK—Containing money, Race | r Cemiaine 2 Siving. any credit to my wile MRS.
charge 18 $048 for éAy thumbér of words 5 — | elaine | Ticket No. J and other receipte, HO aber. BACKETS , (nee MURIEL.
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for esch REAI ESTATE Between and the Route to HELP | USES Sponaiuie tor her ct any Sebr or alee
Pdditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 Minimum charge week 72 cents and NOTICE ee .— Marlesy St. Phiip. Finder rewarded | ————_- cen Bol " in ay haine éacept w a wittten aes
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death| 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 PARISH OF ST. PETER ee a ON returning to Edward Prathwatty EXPERIENCED Typigt and Steno-| ,P° ILOGNE St. Lawren Fully }oigned by me : .
Notices only after 4 p.m. words 3 cents a word week—4@ cents | As froth April lth to May 16 t THE RHONDA. 1 |©@ General Motor Bus Co étaphet. Apply Box A BC. Cro Advo- | {UTM hed ant May ist Dial 8456.1 Mk CYRM, ST IR HACKPET?T
an charge for nee ot] Word Sundae Parochial Treasurer will not be at his] on the Sea near Carraheuk, We el jeer tie igs ene Ml | 8.4. 82S living at) Sufferciert Dorp,
! - office except on th ig aa i : nk, Worthing | nmcnsenin coseatiens mL AMA tn _- F "
ieemertans Saas ‘os Saturday April Bist from ie can The above will be set up for sale .t|/TQRE CERTIFICATES KNIGHTS LID Hee, iy Tasting 2 oe
ietguinte, ania : Pi 10 a Cur OMice in Lucas Street on Friday | , NOTICE ie hereby given that applica: 1s nished. D Sitting roon Cuvacme.
po Siete at rculde teeta thane AUTOMOTIVE "Getrag April 28th from 10 the 20th day of April 1951 at 2 pan tioh hat been made the Board ‘of MISCE LLANEOUS eer Hing water, kithen with’ gy iagroes
3 2 om am nepeet : tree above pa nines a nec ° $ oF ehildr wa
3 cents word on week-days and} AUTOMOBILE: Vauxhall 14/6, B-151 | /7."0°%; trom April, teth. ae Pg ASstiga an | Executor “en Mee hie ob. Dudley WANTED TO REN Dial ee 9 +51 “arf
4 cents word on Sundays for each} Perfect running order excellent mileage | Saturday May 8th from 10 a.m.—12 Carrington & Sealy NPP 104.$1--tn} Cameron Hawkits deceased for the tasue | Canadian married cxuple require ac. | — ee
caditionat word. * $1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Phone-i6i6. | "°°"- f hlledtaadiipicetdenicp aap JP saicncdiaihecdi {et o Share Certificate for two hundred | CO™™Medation from November 1951 tw] HARCL WV. SU Eawrekes. trom May
4.4.51—T.F N. 3 Saturday May 12th from 10 a.m.—i! (200) Shares Nos. 18654 to LA2=3 joven May 1982. Approximate dates. Twin! Ist furn vishea? Apartinent | over iooking TAKE NOTICE
“CAR: eres an “HILLCREST”, fully furnished, situate‘ dated 3rd May, 1921, and one neuive; | beds and ‘car parking space necessary.| sea. For six months or longer. Apple
GOVERNMENT NOTICE wea: One Prefect Ford Car in vers G. S, CORBIN, at Bathsheba, St. decesh eae at: | itor Shares hee, staat we atSae teaated | A friend of theirs now in Barbados has | Mrs. 1: Phone 3750. 17,4.51—t.f£.n
a too gAbely to L. M. Clarke, Parochial bie ayy tk = Bischimount Hotel) standing on dated 26th February 1943, in place of the yeomeee to make arrangemer.te for theity |) mann - — - NORMOCYTIN
HARRIS: COLLE a Phone » Peter, square feet of land with’ seveta! | original Certificates which have been lost] CfOT* leaving = this month Please | WAVERLEY—On the Sea, St. Lav
ON oe tata hip iatinictitte aire .4.518n 14.4.51—~€ full grown cocoanut trees theredn. | of Gestroyea and not depo ni ed with cue t write giving rates, house address, a rence Gap Furnished. 3 adioamna r That AMERICAN CYANAMID COM-
BARBADOS, B.W.1. The house is built of stone a: | one as t one number Pall particulars ere ne g 1 ; : a
CARS—Morris Oxford in A-1 condition iains open gaileries o ae ORY OF otherwise, ‘and notic®) cacsary otherwise offers Bite | ato: tea nee merator, Gab | BARS. 2 Seen Senate
REQUIRED: if possible in oe 18,000 miles. Standard &@ HP. done NOTICE hg and Gluing roome” SVaaratia an ta oe en that within 30 devs from siete Asatte — tex . 3c ag bye Radio Telephone Gargge. Inspection by | existing under the laws of the State of
* 6,000 miles and in excellent os runnin . with | the date hereof if no claim or represen 4 \ ointment. Phone 8%8 Maine, United States of America, whose
September 1951. Ford Prefect done 14.000 fede tae oe is PARISH OF ST. LUCY Ut often et Pantny, Ikitehen and suai) tation in respect of such original Certi- ut e 18.4 Sa—tu] trade or business address is 30 e-
ie test Parochial Treasurer e 1 “32 | fieetes is made to the Directors they will 7 ae feller Plaro, New York, Stati lew
() A GRADUATE to teach Agencies wa Sing 4008. Apply B'dos/ Lucy will be closed on uiaky hor yareee and Servants rooms in yatd. | then proteed to deal with such applica- “EMPTY THREE Gi. BOTTLES. An York, U.S.A‘, has applied or he ine. regi
SPANISH with FRENCH if 24th 1951. ‘ x Spection on application to the eare-| on for a Duplicate. quantity, dirty or clean, Deliver M.V T " tration of a trade mark in a
possible 15.4.51—~6n ok bee ' i Se ne Downe. By order of the Board of Directors a mare, Inner Basin, Saroenage AKE NOTICE of Register in respect of pnaiden and
. ._ L. DEANE, y above Wi set for sale at Pub C. N. TAYLOR, pla ntree ea resceusicsl peene
(2) A GRADUATE to teach ELECTRICAL Parochial Treasurer, Eg etition at our office in Lueas| Reeretary “CAMPHOR CHEST. Faisly lore That J, BIBBY & SONS LIMITED. fo cenatied “te Sgunes Ga cae oS
HISTORY with ENGLISH. Sour a na eenkine Te \17.4.51—4n shee; wet eee Friday the =| 18.4,.51—3n | jy AMPHOR CHEST: Fairly large “and Britian Company, Manufacturers, whisk me totith from the 16th tay of Age
TTERIES fully char, . . + a as oe e ade or business address is 21, King, » unless some person in e
HARRISON COLLEGE IS a day! 9 voit, 9 Plates $46.15; 6 volte si NOTICE CARRINGTON & SEALY, | SWEEPSTAKE TICKET BOOK Series | Telephone 8606 19°%.bi-oa | Edward Street, Liverpool J, Engient | meantime give netiee in duplionts We igne
GRAMMAR SCHOOL of 580 boys| Plates $29.54;°6 volt, 15 Plates $25.51 Solicitors. | L. 1210 to 1219 Finder will be rewarded has applied for the registration of a trade | t my office of opposition of such regis-
taking the Oxford and Cambridge | B@rbades Agencies 4908 This is to notify the generat publ 18.4,51—9n.} on returning to Austin Layne, Shop-| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE|"™ wk in Part “A” of Register in respect | tration. The trade mark can be seen on
that we are pr I r ee | keeper, Brittons Hill 19.4. 51—In ae *| of soaps of all kinds, perfumery, toilet | application at my office.
“rr . : ~ .
»General Certificate and working 18.4. 8160 | esse ee egg Eee emploved \] The application of Leonard Jones & | articles, proparstions for the teeth and | Dated this 6th day of April, 1901
to Open Scholarship standard, It} ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts, but will however be able to conting AUC'HION | Rhoda Pile holders of Liquor License No. | 8 rid will be entitled to register the H. WILLIAMS,
has a Sixth Form of 120, and is| 0 Sars, << watts, with lamps an ov leat of Typewriters, Addin TAKE NOTICE ee er shiv = 3 ee a ae eine tea an a ae rare tis ene See fr eee byt or
* res . achines, and u t 4 Oe s fe shop with = sheer is 1951 unless some person shall ir \ in
represented or the Headmasters’ & Co a ._ | the. nearest or hogs idl ae teenie ea HERMASTIC attached Beckles Road, St. Michael,| the meantime give notice. in duplicate
Conference as an Overseas School. .51—t.£. E. W. TAYLOR. = order of the Insurance Co, 1 wi ¥ permission te use the satd Liquor | t® me at ray office of opposition of such
> sell on FRIDAY 20TH That WAILES DOVE BITUMASTIC , at bottom floor of a 2-storey | Pexistration” The trade mark can be
SALARY: For First or Second MECHANICAL Oe oe Foreman. | GENERAL MOTOR SUS eae wiradn LIMITED, a British Company, Manu- | 2rd and shingle building opp. “Stork | *eeh 9M application at my office TAKE NOTI E
Class Honours Degrees: ALTERS, STREET. One AUSTIN MOTOR TROCK | Lecturers. whose trade or business ad ub" Nelson Street. City Dated this @th day of Apgil, 191
$1,920 rising by $96 to] ,.BIXES—on terms, Hercules Silver | 1¢ eRe SS si—2h Assistant. | with platform. DAMAGED by ac K) dress is Hebburn, Co. Durham, England, | Dated this 16th day of April 1681 H. WILLIAMS
3 Hike "ALL by aceidert.} 0 : ; Yo: 4 . , tog T IA
$2,880 and th ng, models in stock. Remember Austins » a 7 has applied for the registration of a o: A. W. HARPER, Esq Registrar of Trade Marks.
. a en by $144 A Ss are ependable, . >, “ae Sin bans i Police " *
A. BARNES & CO. LTD. TERMS CASH trade mark in Part “A” of Register in Ag. Polic@ Magistrate, 18.4.51-——30t That THOMAS WARD
to $3,456 plus $216 per 11.4.51.—T. FN, R. ARCHER McKENZIE. respect of chemical substances used in District “A LIMITED, © Br: od
annum for an Educa- ee Auctioneei manufactures, photography or philo- R. PILE, ’ turers, whose = Conpasy. eee
tional Diploma. LIVESTOCK “es en = 8ST. LUCY 18.4.5)—-2: { one Sete a rene sa Wil sehaas aatlind ae for | Seruonn TAKE NOTICE is Wardonia Buildings, Suez Street,
peasure! ° . ardicy ‘ elie : . ‘ 3 e consic W
For GRADUATES: ALF—One genuine ® H Lucy, will be opened as a eeeals M BILL MAN MINX 1989 MODEL tural, hortic uitural, | veterinary and sani- | sred ai a Licensimm@ourt to be neld a} BITUMASTIC ete ee Mi 4 pee “AY
$1,728 rising by $72 to sina calt. Ten dave Sate — April 26th 1951, at HARRISONS PLAN tow e are instructed by the owner who tary Durpossss raw of partly prepared. | olice Court, District “A” on Thursday of Register in yemect af cule and
$2,160 and then by $96] Bred Holstein Bull Prince Albert. Vv. wv. TATION YARD, usual hours souna vette 1. te Rute = oe perfectly | vainen Wake a ramnilaataape sub, he 26th day of April 195) at 11 o'clock That WAILES DOVE BITUMASTIC | edge 1 and shaving brushes sua
Lod jie j ‘ ae e : 1 TE Q : e :
to $2,928 plus $216 per Clarke, Ivy e, Ivy Road. ; pesoane 1 aomeiee careae at 2 p.m, on Friday abth an | included in other cl manufactures A. W. HARPER rine aay atieae Wreste “otal a be Ngee to yoeluter the saeerere
= a 5 ” a etn nan f . a se vy ~ » p n
annum for an Bduca- 16,4.61—Sn Ste Lucy — JOHN M. BLADON valtinge car ER PR rica Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “A” | dress 1s Hebburn, Co, Durham, England. | tps, unless yan: pectel Shan it yee
. y ‘ tt ¢ 5 Y wlie . ° _
tional Dipioma, ($480— MISCELLANEOUS 17.4. felaigkmotibiiialibemia ie baie Set Auctioneer, architectural and building contrivances; |!” cai en ‘iat oo tapas. “Atak Monee, in pray Sed § SY st nolice, ti Gupliave: Saale
| naval arehitectural f i : at a aT at my ee oO ith
a2 Aaa oar an a | Seen aed eee aes respect of chemical substances "used in| ‘ration. ‘The trade mark can be aces on
The position on the Salary Scale | ,, ANM-T-DENT :—At last, AMM-I-DENT MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY | _ BY instructions received 1 will sell by | animal and vegetable substances; bitu D S manufactures, photography or philo-| cypiication oi my office
would be decided by teaching ex- ste has arrived. Amm-I-Dent is| ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING | Public Competition or at jot | £ rugs muss e CN eee ee rer! | ated. this. oh 6
e iy ching ex ne toothpaste - with the Ammonium Ion} NOTICE is hereby gi a ion on the spot at | minous preparations (in the nature of chemical substances used for agricul- ated this day of April, 1951.
perience including an allowance | Which helps to stop tooth d ereby given that the One venue, Alleyne’s Land Bush Hall, on | paint), bituminous preparations for use tural, horticultural, vetert y and sani H. WILLIAMS,
hi lecay. It is| Hundred and Tenth Yearly Ordinary | Thursday next the 1s 2 ’ s preservatives emains' at a . horticultural, veterinary and sani-
pleasant tasting and ret ys he 19h at 2pm. TY as preservativ against ru nd against t . ; “ ~ Registrar of Trade Marks
for War Service. mouth, Get yours, now. from your a = ine Meeting of the above-named | houses 17 x 8 and 18 x 10 with shed.) deterioration of — wood; eee ni oO ase n vegelabie attimal, Sad rtaernl aus 18.4,.51—3n
PASSAGE EXPENSES to Bar-/ £ist's or notion counter.—15.4.51—6n. rus- ciety will be heid at the ay 5} Can remain on the spot. Inspection 9) ¢mamels (in the noture of paint), var tances Used in " nufacture not
b ee, | OCC. Beckwith Place, Bridgetown. application to Mrs. Moore, owner nishes and lacquers: also coatings for oMe: ose 7 ma ures,
ados not exceeding $960 will be Friday, 20th April, r ore, owner | ‘ . “ 1880 ir neluded in other classes; manufactures
‘ BASKETS: Verandah pril, 1951, at 2 o'clock DARCY A, SCOTT | cisterns and other vessels, containing Eds url ps mtg
aid against ropriate hers anging Baskets | p.m. for thi , | ; saa = from mineral ond other substances for
paid ag approp vouchers, | with Firns and other Plants, Phone 3180 | '"}) fecchone eee ees Auctioneer, | [olilas, avd will be entitied to register ; ; DULSINS 7_BE . GeCOrehion, ”, Ane meering, TAKE NOTICE
Up to the present no passage; *5, St. Ann's Court, Garrison, elving from the Directors their 15.4,51—4): | liquids, and will he entitled to register LOS ANGELES, April 18 | architectural and building contrivances
Report on the transactions of the | the same after one month from the .
money is available for leave. 19.4.51—1n Bociety for the year ended 3irt; —< j ith day of April, 1951, unless some per Drugs, worth from about $25,000 revel arcitectara) send spevel equip-
i Res war b e meat > give se | (0 $125 ), hav ae 4) | ments; goods manufactur rom ani-
The post is pensionable under BATHS — In Porcelain finamel, in| (2) pert a sais ae gO ae Le, earn. ive. hecian ; - an nays Deen. smuggled | at and vegetable substances; bitumin- BIBBY
the Barbados Teachers’ Pension | White, Primrose with matching an Auditor “TAKE NOTI | in duplicate at my office of op-}irto the United States aboard the] 5us preparations (in the nature of
Act. Ni ibuti unite % complete colour suites. To; for the current year, position of such registration. The trade American 45,000 ; battlest t). bit t ti ft That J. BIBBY & SONS LIMITED. a
i. fo contributions are pay-| grade, F c. K. BROWNE mark can be seen on application at my | 4 can 49,000 - ton battleship! paint), ftuminous preparations for se} British Company, Manufacturers, Whose
ae . BARNES & Co., Ltd. ‘ es preservatives inst rust ond against
able, but the minimum qualifying 20.1.81—t.¢. s / That J, BIBBY & SONS LIMITED 4 | office Missouri, detectives said here. mite Ge neds wa of trade or busineds address is 21, King
iod is*ten years Servi t 0 ‘4 _| British Company, Manufacturere whos Dated this 6th day of April, 1951 One of the crew, a 20-year-old | GecerGration OF woods ot paint) war. | Rdward Street, Liverpool 3. Enalind,
period is years. ice at] —Coerain BRPTiNGS por Pitinteisiigctislthiecnkis ane. | ade or ‘tmeinese eadtee a Et, ; H. WILLIAMS, dunt itincad time er] Chamels (in the nature of paint), var- | jas applied for the registration of a trade
Harrison College is counted 43] aow light control, wahnake win- THE BARBADOS CIVIL Edward Street, Liverpool 3, Engiani Registrar of Trade Marks LOSE COTE TO oe ny ee en eters: iesla “containing | Mork in Part “AY Of Register in Bement
palsies. wane Se. Tenglist BARNES. Kirsch. ‘Dial 4476 a SERVICE ASSOCIATION has applied for the registration of a trade 18.4.51-—an }charged with illegally importing) oahle Water” and other” alimentary | %, S0aps of all Kinds, perfumery, toilet
Teachers’ Superannuation Act, & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.t.n . mark in Part “A" of Register in. respect morphine, He is held under $5,000] jiquias, and will be entitled to register articles, preparations for the teeth and
licants should tion sub-| 72 ae NOTICE | Sule and washing preparations and RATES OF EXCHANGE |]tail. the same after one month from the | Hair, and will be entitled to register the
ane > hi — EVENFLO” BABY BOTTLES, Amer-| 1S HEREBY GIVEN that a poli wiil be | some after one month trom the auth ane APRIL 18, 1951 Assistant United States Attorney | 18th doy of April, 1991, unless some pets tor Ari 196) unl me 1 shall-in
ary subjects which they offer,|ica’s most popular Nurser. New Ship-|taken in the C 1 Ch p @ month trom-we 6th Gay | CANADA . con shall in the meantime give notice v 961 unless some person #i
and out~of-School activties which | â„¢e"t at Bruce Weatherhead Ltd. - Buildings, on ons amber, Public | of April 1951 unless some person shall in} oo 7/19; pr. Cheques on Richard Hayden, said morphine is] jy quplicate to me at my office of op- | the meantime give notice in duplicate
i at Reatate 18.4,31—Sn Sakura tee hanno ny April 28th inst. | te meantime give notice in duplicate 5 a eanker 60 810% pr [believed to have been bought] position of such registration, ‘The trade fo me at my. office of opposition of such
they are prepared to undertake. ———— for the elect ts San and 3 p.m. | \o me at my office of opposition of such Demnad cheaply in Yokohama, Japan mark can be seen on application at my |te@istration, The trade mark can be
APPLICATIONS together wilh| GOLDEN RETRACTO INK PENCILS—|FIVE persons to serve on ihe Couren | seth on application wade, inark can be Drafts 60.65 : t eeieliter | omen €; | 9908 an. application «ty. ote,
three recent testimonials, the he. pipes Eclipse Pens and Pencils} for the year 1961 r ert “Dated Gh ech any of Aor het Sight Drafts 605/10% pr euter Dated this 6th dey we SC a ee eee a Witt 1AM
are here again separat " ‘ : a ty 627/10°) pr. Cable yILL Ss, ~ .
names of two Referees, and 4] g; 59 ara ae a. Poet aaa cw SOMBanparce, | M. WILLIAMS, 1 2/10" pr. Currency 59 3/10°% pr Registrar of Trade Marks Registrar of Trade Marks.
photograph, should be sent by air- | 52.28 and $4.06. KNIGHTS DRUG STORES. | 18.4.51—3n Mey ete ee ee rae fiver es Stock Market ae ee
mail to J. C. Hammond, Esq., 19.4, 51—2n preter eae Stiver * a at oa SS alist
M.A, (Cantab), Harrison College. | "“G@gsteTNER DUPLI u °
“A, “ ICATORS"—New Si F
Barbados B.W.1., to arrive Not! models just received, A. 'S. Bryden & ° e e e ° e Sows firmness
See eee storic Amer Mi Prail
16.4.51—t.£.n, LONDON, April 18.
20th March, 1951, sissies an tot A. 1c@an Ssion Tal : , AP Semele
1.4.51.—3n.|” LAUNDRY STARCH; 5.B, _ Fresh buying gave renewed | WONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
tal Laundry Starch timporied Quality) Iky AUDREY NE ASH AM firmness to many sections of the ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED (fen,
in ‘% Mb Packages. Ask your Wholesaler, ° a ; 4 4%) “mi stock market today, Although "
PERSONAL Grocer, Shopkeeper. 17.4.81—3n domestic stocks continued to re. (MLA.N.Z, LINE) resi ta' “Carnes” Aa
——_——_——_ - Bie s 4 ‘ . “ _- . bee’ ri
LUMBER — 10,000 ft of 1%” Groove| From AMERICAN HERITAGE j the fate of older mission systems, Distinguished for their archi- sist bearish items such as sulphur M.S. “TONGARIRO” saiied iii ° he M.V. “Car «A we
& Tongue Pi i i i ; j shortage and Britain's adverse | Marct » accept cargo and passengers
Would Miss Griffith who aR ie Pine at 30c. per foot, Foy cai A chain f 21 Fr it as they had radiated outwardftecture, the California missions sh ) age an ee es iy aerer: 24th, Arriving at Barbados Nay for Dominica Antigua
worked at Doctor Birch call Se ii ree 4.51—2n lines site alone Ping nae ee their beginnings in the! Will continue to serve as exam a ae it = ee rat * sdetlarent esis SRA St
4 ‘acific)} West Indies, Centre riég [ples of artistic, yet practical en-|Mvestors — are aoe ore \ ', + "ie cae
at Carlyon, Pinfold Street. tts One bod ek Leite, Cle Baan Coast of the United States, from|South America ro woneee ny Beast uee Sale. ee ee selective, Good class industrials, | care? tarePitenntoncnt at eibe Kitts, Sailing 20th instant.
. 19.4,51—I1n. 15.3.51-tt.n, |the City of San Diego to the vil-|j : : P 4 al).ty reel particularly those whose dividends | for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
] into Mexico. SSS SAW SHANDRIGR One Girccla’ ace = re aes a distance of}noted in California, however,jarched colonnades, graceful en-{&"¢ well covered by earnings were | #24 Leeward Islands. WT, cae. we
ORIENTAL Sawn feiss ator % ser" hie. one = uae sayelent ran ty This was the last major frontier,ttances, tiled roofs, cloistered Sots eo a ant. at coe For further particulars apply:— ERS ASSOC, s
is machine er oOftof the Spanis' 1" passa eways and hig beamed | Glectrica equipments, 1g en-
has been overhauled and is ready for|Spain’s influence on the region.| ¢ aa 2 eras) eee Oe a” ta Ge ae ae ah ¥- gine rings and tobaccos showed| *URNESS, WITHY & CO, LTD, and Tele, 4047,
SOUVENIRS, CURIOS, work. The price is very reasonable. Re-|Here, in the Stat such, was the last mission chain.} ceilings, ‘together with a host of oe . 4 zm
JEWELS Box 4727 C/o Advocate Advertising | whore the *s “8 of aan Therefore, the California mis.jother details, bespeak an earlie: useful gains, Shipping also were Da COSTA So
New Shipment opened st 17.4.51—an. |¥ : paniard made his/sions have an added interest as}generation which built well and] Wanted, ation.
Two PLATE Glass Display Cases, $120.00 Worl great effort in the New|the surviving remnants of an old|in a manner pleasing to the eye.|, The start of a new account “nwa we J
THANITS DIAL each Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, ; ean orld to colonize for the “Glory system, Fringed with mission gardens, the brought a revival of interest inj 00 CU eaiciaste
ses St. 7451—t.f.n, 1A gn a. we King,” thes Were these missions successfull mission structures were ‘like|Oils. Prices advanced under the
me ssions symbolize the end of wu ax . ile . lead of Anglo-Iranian
4 ry A ~ : in their tasks of christianizing|jJewels set in simple settings, Al os mt, .
ee eee ee savanna ten we Tishaa eT cee rae ned explored nd and clviliging?. It soph that{though not all have retained the ine on vin ape were aeeaty
sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476. ast areas of the Westithey were. Bravi ; £ lic f the inal set-| Steady. earish press commen
T y . : rs r } re, raving the harc hips} implicity o 1eir original set
% \ A. BARNES & Co., Ltd Indies, North and South America : i vi ; mais ave {depressed Japanese bonds at th
Y WANTED x ° * Seek s}of the frontier, and even martyr-]tings, a surprising number have presse apanese bonds a 1e
R 5 4 ee 13.2.81-t.f.n.Jand t he Philippine’ Islands.} qom, the mission fathers of Cali-! Those which have not continue tofoutset but losses had generally
y t WAT CHiEs for limited period only. 10% eat waaicion nae re fornia converted multitudes ofiresist the inroads of a modern an eooereres by cle. cil
diseount for cash on all. Packard and buck: Ss 0 IC] Ho j a : a Th et *ivilizati Nestling ids he affir developers made resh
x joes ; sagan minds and souls to Christi-] civilization. estling midst th ; ¥ : SERVICE
+ A male Office Accountant | | Alton Watches 15 and 17 Jewels. See frontier, they now are important Sie Mi sj ss hs silently{cosmopolitan atmospheres of the}S#ins. Coppers were strong with 8.8. MYKPN” sails Ja Pisa rives Barbados 19th April
‘ “S] your Jewellers, Y. DeLima & Co., Ltd. rmanent reminde th Bess ission records silently) cos porte : 8 : ; ! f XL sails 6th Apr an ae pri,
e < a 3 : vamra erehl . rese they “onstan re. , é osts Steamer saile 27th April ~ prives rhados nN May
‘4 for the + 19.4 81-8 pe m. rs in e his testify to the years spent in the] present, ne) are cons t local and - overseas interests A ' Barbados #th M
% % ee toric, mosaic which makes upleffport, Secularization in itself{minders that what is today was| buyers, British Government stocks en Soeemsnentind ttt wre < coer een
% = WEST INDIA BISCUIT %| WOVEN WOODEN BLINDS can be California’; past, was perhaps the greatest indica.Jmade possible by those who recorded an advance of up to NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
x Co. Ltd., Gills Rd ss] used Venetian Style, as Curtains or as . tev : i even od ‘ked. in the past Viewed in|three-eighths 8.8. “ALCOA ROAMER” sails 4th April — arrives Barbados 20th April.
. ” s . %|Sereens. They have numerous other] San Diego de Alcala, at San] tion that Padre Serra and thosc, worked in the past. iewed in f ' 8. “ALCOA PATRIOT” soils 18th April arrives Barbados 4th May.
Oniv those: with " uses for the home decorator- with an Diego, was the first in the pro- who followed him had succeed-|this light, Americans may be —Reuter.
y w experience y (aaE Osten. HARRISON'S FURNITURE cession of missions to be estab-|¢4 in their task. The missions hac thankful that steps were taken en tie CANADIAN SERVICE
8
y
+















x lichiaalin lished along E] Camino Real (the
pa hoe on iad y airest, royal samat to the north ate units of great value, Thousands}past. The fast-moving world of Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salle Matifax Arrives B'dos
0 e W.I.B.C,, Seiy Street, issi f 4 , Poase| of cattle ranged under the watch-;tme present allows too little iat nn Rt. 8.5. “ALCOA PARTNER’ ; April 9th April 10th
: mission, founded by Page sai ; 2 «| Friend Tells T » | SS. “ALCOA PEGASUS April 27th April 30th May 9th
ODOC OCS CP OVSC LES Junipero Serra on July 16, 1709,|f4l eyes of mission American|time for such reflection, And yet riend Leis Lime | 3s) «Aveak Prionren” Marr 1th May 14th Moy 24th
SF BITUROS along with a military post near|!." dian cowboys, Vineyards |how important the missions-- ET
That WAILES DOVE BiITUMasTic|What is now called “Old Town,”| Planted by the padres and their) representative of all of the great VIENNA, April 18 NORTHBOUND
, rte j rav ali ‘ © tel we “J » as rj > > en e . 4)
RIMITED, a British Company, Manu-|was moved in 1774 to its present|"¢ophytes first gave California its’ works of the past will be to} A Viennese newspaper said 10-} 25 “ALCOA PIONEER" dve April 19th Sails for St. Jobn,
turers, whose trade or business ad*|cite in the valley of the San|Wine. Countless other activities;the generations of the future.} day that the "Golden Voice” whict and St. Lawrence
eee Hebburn, Co. Durham, England, |niego River, The parent mission|Which are known in Calli fornia) Preserved and interpreted, these] gives Viennese telephone sub- River Porte
Soha Thiele ia ate tae at cite ie Calif > Men eute'|today were given their start by!monuments to the patient en-|scribers the exact time, is that of] $5: "FOLIRE BERNADOTTR” due April 2th Sails for St. John,
respect of chetntonl aiideress hied in = "es me aed So a (ine the Francisean fathers ‘deavors of the Franciscan fathers) Hitler's film ‘at tre frie nd ‘Let pee Ri eee
sions on e west bank of the ancises é ' s i SCE u : itler’s fi actress friend Le eteldbeebailindinile
ROBIGH TaRGAKOR, De entice ieotoe Colorado River had been found- Support? ’ 1 ' oe e eed Teen . ae Riefenstahl, who was also a weil These veosels have limited passenger accommodation,
chemical substances used for agricui-}ed as part of the Franciscan|,.~ orting ~vhe glory of the neophytes wi Ong exer 1elr?} known producer, Her films ar
tural, horticultural, veteri i+ ; i * Cross in the California issions! influence throughout the United |p,» . Cen nn EET
ane Oth t thin n tary ‘purposes; raw or. partly prepared, aa raienaenee: Toten was the power of the ‘Spanis h States : aoa voice records were mad ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE,
nim: . _ s é E . ” voice records we 4 ‘
A er i § tee ae ir Series, a more than any other the hope: +throne. The missions served as ai if i ia {in Berlin in 1940, the newspape APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
at included in other classes; manufactures }and aspirations of the brown- [important medium in the prep-, | id. —Reuter, ——————————————————————————————————
a ira pe Gines substaoee cer clad fathers who thrust north- ‘ro vied pose rule. In Cali-; ODEL MOTHER {
M Savi Pri architectural and building contrivances: }|ward into a land _ theretofore : his time of preps uration | M | ere
oney - saving Frices naval architectural contrivances and}only casually explored. As early| “88 comparatively short, as Me t L PASSAGES TO EUROPE
naval uipments; goods manufactured th ixteenth t th secularization occurred only al} ar pour og ,
NEW and Renewed Furniture for from animal and’ vegetable substances; |25 the sixteenth century the ex=|)07 0 ore than half ¢ sas i ? \ ail }
Home and, Office in Mahogany, senenndanne preparations (in the nature |olorers Cabrilla, Drake, Cermeno | (7 the first eiikath a nyse In Carlisle B Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia, for sail- \
Cedar, Oak, Birch, Pine, L o! aint) ituminou: é e 5 SSion Was estab-
we Oh PE A as ieemervatives apie rust and and. Vineaing, emong others haa) jished. Undoubtedly, Mexican in. ee ing to Europe. Tae usual poris of call are Dublin, uae “ 7
Bedsteads, Springs, Beds, Laths, against deterioratior £ wood; d * r wa " Sai ye M.V. $ fie < 3 let
lroring ‘a. Washing routes, paints, enamess (in the-nature of ‘paint, tempting permanent settlements ee from Spain hurried ama oe we nee ere po mae: feanlbbee Rotterdam Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. Hi
Tubs, Easel $2. varnishes, and lacquers; also coatings He | process. Thus with the Sch. Emeline, Sch, Lydia Adina S., Sch —_—
3 cisteene and es vessels, contain- That the faith of Juniper! Spanish military posts, towns Wonderful Counsellor Beh ibow M SS
Sewl Machines, it ng potable water and other alimentar, i é anches >» missions were VV. Willemstad, M.V. Daerwood, Sch
bik” Ris, eiontets Borie liquids, and will be entitled te Sealer Serra and his companions was {and ranches, = miss ons were Finances W. Smith, MV. Sarah’ Bell
Changer, Gramophone Records. the same after one month frum the|Justified may be seen in the es- merged into the affairs of 1e Sch, Enterpris 3 q
«. up. , 18th day of April, 1951, unless some per-Jtablishment of other missions;mew republic. RRIVALS | Our lone expected shipment of - - i
gt 3 oe seaniee gee noticelafter that of San Diego. Pro Af 58. eee Nic on nd, apt Dol- \
in duplica’ me at m if - ‘ali i a > ¢ ar en, from New ork via Martinique
position of such registration, ‘The tradeferessing northward, other links} | the Un oe became a part DEPARTURES CEMENT
mark can be seen on application at my |forged into the chain during the e United States, the mission M.V. Moneka, 100 tons net,, Capt, Hut-
eo We office. next half century included: San establishments for the most part on, for Dominica } i 4
Dated this 6th day of April, 1951. Luis Rey a Juan Cx pis continued the disintegration which M.V. Precise, 364 tons net, Capt. Riteh,| | has arrived and we can now take care of
H. WILLIAMS, , u ’ 5 or Trinida’ anes
SPRY ST. Registrar of Trade Marks trano, San Gabriel Arcangel, San an = patiod ol omy Atheibrook, 286 tons net, Capt |, YOUR ORDERS.
18.4.51—3n FFernando Rey, San Buenaventura 5 arizauion, cay, isuse took, for Trinide 7
, Schoone , wh er, 50 tone
DIAL 4069 : |Santa Barbara, Santa Inés, La|#relessness, and lack of concern ddt. Capt. peas Rene. hares CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY L4D,—Proprietors, — Cnr, of Broad & Tador Streets

at doubl fed b rev
GREY HOUSE 8 Geuble ioted. gard and shingle Juan Bautista, Santa Clara de few a vevertiog the origina Cable and Wireless West Indien BARBADOS
ichael. : Asis, San José, San Francisco de nership and unction of the ness i anes pam ey, - now = HORTI LTURAL 1ETY EXHIBITION
tore Anica no "een of = ees 1951" Asis, San Rafael Arcangel, anc rete ba placed ie ube ows iarcush their Barbados Const. Station m
‘oO: lip, were protected against en SS P r
Francisco Solano, established Ship, & Genale, 8.8. Oranjestad, $.8. Sun z
Church Street "pene tA oes Y ‘as 1823, All were establish-|croachments of time. Be: 2 Ran FR Alpes Cavalier TO BE HELD AT
. wip ro . a 35. Lady Nelson, 8.5 ueen Elizabeth
1. BANNISTER, inder the protection of the , 5.8. Rorona, 8 § 8.8 *~
Speightstown for Applicant. Sent Crowe, except the last _As with other areas in the Monte “Albertia $s pon leet: ss QUEEN 8 PARK
N.B.—This application will be consid-}G5, Francisco Solano at Sonoma United States, time, itself. eame Agios Gerors 8.8 duseno, 5.5. Rosa ON
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at|* : to the rescue. Realizing that the S SS Paula/wkek, $.5 onte Urbasa :
j ict “A tt ‘ This came} ,. con r 5 S. Alcoa Pi . eS, 8 1 s . {
Police Court, District “A" on Thursday |tae most northern S$ ca Franciscan missions were valu- > ee ae Cte oe Man. SATURDAY, 21ST APRIL, 1951

Instructions have been received



the 26th day of April 1951 at 11 o'clock





into being almost simultaneously





















From 1—6 p.m.

‘ “ ; df akieahih' a0 §. Bonito, $8, Hestia, $.§
from Mrs. 1. G. Jémmott for the Mt a.m ¢ the new Re- able vestiges of an histOric past te 8. oe
cbeve property to be offered for A. MALEOD, wit a aeoniso wha had suc-the people of California under- manana MR Rinehieeilion Be AiCOK : } j
sale by PUBLIC COMPETITION Police Magistrate, Dist, “A” {PUbUC Oo ' took a programme of protectior Polaris, $8. | Athelchief, $8 Temore Public are invited to Exhibit ..
at 2.30 pm. on Friday, April 27, 19.4.51—1n ceeded in throwing off the rule sng inn, $8, Canadian Challenger, $ ing Pl in Tub Pots
1951. at JOHN M. BLADON's of Spain, much as the United and restoration. Some were ré Covhae ’ nallenger, 58.8 1. Growing Plants tn Tubs or
Offces, Plantations Building. A ngland half constructed in the form of thi ee 2. Flowering Plants
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE|S*‘*t¢s, h#4 that of England original from the ground wp . tae th Bh
Grey House is a spacious 3- a century earlier. Most, having retained some o MAIL ‘ 5. Orchids in oom
storey stone building with a dry The application of Edna Bradshaw 7 e | NOTICES 4. Cut Flowers
gcods and general store operated holder of Liquor License No. 704 of 1951] The missions were established|the original features, have bees se .
cppern ity fo “the evel criet oor at a Pt wooder building at as institutions of the frontier for|repaired and restored in tht Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser 5. Vegetables and Fruit
cprertu: ; rt yi t y uildin ge q it, NW s and & ‘ s MV
of a good bushel th np erie Eagle Hall, St. Michael for permission|the purpose of christianizing and|Gegree needed. Only one, mueetrs Cartbbee will hacia at chur OUTRO Good Money Prizes Awarded
pesition. to use said Liquor License at bottom|civilizing the pagan American carta od peep its s wa Pont Office as Under! E A Special Prize of $5.00 will be awarded for Floral Decoration
loor of a 2-storey wooden building at Indian Theoretically, once this artialiy standing as ghostly re-| Parcel Moil at 10 am Registered f Lunch Table
Portieular: , Baxters Rad. City. naan, ‘ ; . rig A ! wrareel, Mall at 10 a.m. R of a c
Musee teateiee bition honk Dated this Ith day of April 191, |task had been completed, the minders of ten — ee 30 neni eS A Special Prize of $5.00 will be awarded for the Best Collection
Street, or the Auctioneer, John M. To: A. W. HARPER, Esq he mission converts were to be been restore P ere a Mails for Antigua by the Sch. Wonder- of Vegetables exhibited by a school.
Bladon, Plantations Building. ‘Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. "A", turned over to the ministration is preserved. Perhaps of all t fl Counsellor will be closed at the Bar and Refreshments on Sat
eS oe of the secular clergy. The mission missions, it represents more than General Post Office as under:-
pplicant. : ton aie f , ~ ne > 1 ¢ Parcel Mail, Pre Ms
N.B.—This application will be consid-|lands, likewise, were r to be any ze the esr the ge aia es | Orainar Mall at thon on the = For all information apply to
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at/divided among the subjects of of the past. Lacking the arti-| . , April 1951 THE SECRETARY at WILKINSON & HAYNES
John ¥4 Biaden Police Court, Dist. “A” on Monday the/the king ficiality of the present, Soledad! Ciaudine is 21-year-old wife Mails for St. Lacia by the Sch. Enter- LTD. OFFICE
e th day of April 1951 at 11 o'clock. : alone may claim that every part and chiel mannequin of designer prise S. will be closed at the General ‘ co. Sy. 3 2 +
ie A ARPER, This step, called secul: 1- of itself, however little may re+' Brian Hart. She has given birth Post Office on under Admission : Adults 36c., Sere ene jz years 18¢.,
. Wi g at a ee ae T'S Ae oh The baby’ Parcel Ma Registered Maii na e ery School Children 12c.
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist “A. tion, took place in California du- main, seen and touched a ee ae ea Says. | Gatemey Mane 236 pin. on the Seen Elementesy Sek
19.4.51-—In ting the early 1830's, It repeated loved by the mission fathers oe See April 1951









BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY,

Knowing The West|—
Indies =

“THE BRITISH WEST "24 A
|

is, 1951

et

PAGE EIGHT APRIL

M.C.C. Will Tour Canada
TWO TEST MATCHES
INCLUDED IN GAMES

TORONTO, April















RALPH FOR TRINIDAD



INDIES”






CANADA AND ENGLAND will meet au two By W. L. Burn, Hutchinson & Co; 7/6
cricket matches this summer it was announced ‘Tuesday
nicht. The Canadian Cricket A

Reviewed by E. B. Timothy

eileen de sos ja. tion, announcing the schedule for : Hall i

* the Canadien tour of the famer Pi ~ ee com

a Marylebone Cricket Club, said LONDON, April 10. ert an joughitul serv-

On First Team the first test match will. be held Pp | too which have made PAA
at Calgary, September 3 and! 4

IT MUST BE a severe exercise in discipline for a his-,
torian writing on so colourful and entertaining a subject}
as the history of the West Indies to compress his text into

Sep

the second at Toronto
tember 8 and 9.—(C P.)



“first choice” of veteran
travelers the werld over.





a

MacDONALD BAILEY

25a LONDON

E. McDonald Bailey, Trinidad’
3ritich sprint champion is includ
ed in the first representative
Athletics team of the seasor
ing, London University at Motsou
Park on May 9th. Mac, who has
just returned from a visit to West
Africa with Arthur Wint, will be
taking part in the 100 yards—at
which distance he is British A.A.A
Champion iS,

meet

ent

H. College Beat
Queen’s Royal

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 19.
Harrison College beat Q.R.C, in






(From Our Own Cori sspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 19.

Trinidad won the first singles
against British Guiana. Kenny
fTrestrail beat Bernard Gonsalves

63, 6—3, 6—1. Hunter Archer
defeated Ivan Phillips 6—1, 7

t
“Oy








6--1. These were easy victories.

The homesters are favoured to
retain the Brandon Trophy in the
finals inst Jamaica on Friday.
Saturday and Sunday Leahong
who has an attack of influenza
may rniss the final He returns

home on Saturday

GRE

RENADA RACES
WILL START MAY 14
Pe SRORORS Apri i

The Grenada Turf Club meet-
ing which could not be staged at

Easter due to difficulties caused
by the strike in the preceding
weeks will be held on ,Monday,

May 14, and Thursday, May 17.

WINDWARD TENNIS
MAY BEGIN MAY 29

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, April 17.
May 29 is the provisional date
fixed for the recently postponed
Windward Islands tennis tourna-
ment which is to be played at the
Riehmond Hill courts,









Traffie Don’t
No. 29

DO NOT DRIVE WITH
YOUR ELBOW ON ..
THE WINDOW LEDGE.
IP RESTRICTS YOUR
MOVEMENTS IN AN ..,
EMERGENCY.

e
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.



"Sunshine Cruise”



a volume which can be easily slipped into the pocket. |
~ 8 Y We oe Professor Burns’ work is never- / NEW Y OR
Cricket Gear For theless extraordinarily detailed Mand for better living conditions! K

Barbados Boys

English cricxeiers, mostly con-
nected with, the Surrey Club,
have contributed funds fcr the pro-
vision of cricket equipment tor
dispatch to pcor beys’ clubs in
British’ Guiena and Barbadcs
This is the second year in succ
sion that boys’ clubs in the Wes?
Indies heve benefited by such
giits; last year, equipment was
sent to Jamaica and Trinidad.

In addition to gifts of money,
with which new cricket gear w
purchased, some English enthu
asts contributed second-hand bats
balls, wickets and pads. By ar-
rangement with the shipping
company, the gifts, which were
dispatched last week by the Soci:
Services Department of the Colo
nial Office, were carried free oi
charge —W LCC

Barbados
Rated ‘Tops”
By Visitor














Free rum and a plain clothe:
police escort were among the
many amenities enjoyed by one
recent visitor to Barbados. He
was Mr. E Tappan Rodgers
Travel Editor of the Advertise

Tribune of Ohio, U.S.A., and he
records his impressions of _ his
in the West

‘Indies aboard the Mauretania, He



the second cricket match after aj writes on his newspaper of Tri
thrilling finish Q.R.C. who ha joes) Martinique, and othe:
scored 66 for the loss of seve aces a
wickets ended their second inning _This is what he wrote of Bo
at 212 runs. The visitors given wados :
78 runs to score for victory in TI islar Pia ls (pro
§ »g at deven’* wicket 1¢ islanc arbé Ss i
ie mates Tort eaven wickels in jcuneed: BAR-BAY-Dose) is one
Rudy Crouch 50 saved the day of the _ choice and outstand ne
for the Royalians. The Ro islands in the West Indies. M ast
were Harrison College 208 and of the he tied: oa have rated oo
84 for seven wickets Q.R.C island as tops of all places ve
74 and 212 z ? far visited. It is located 1,50
etic miles from New York and the
z most easterly island of the Wes!
2 Indies.
Trestrail Beats The island is small, 21 miles
long by 14 miles wide, with an
Gansalwves area of 166 square miles. Th

population is nearly 200,000 with
a smail percentage of whites. It
is said to be the most English of
West Indies as to trade and char
acter of its inhabitants. Some-
times it is called ‘Little England.’
The colour of the sea is of the
deepest blue

There is a story circulated to
the effect that in 1751 George
Washington came to Barbados to
recover from lung trouble and
the house in which he stayed with
his brother, Lawrence, s‘ill s¢ands
in Bay Street overlooking the
bay.

Bathing

There is excellent bathing, sea
fishing, yachting, golf listed in the
numerous recreations of the is
land. The tour of the city pro-
eeeds through Trafalgar Square.
in the centre of the town passing
a statue of Lord Nelson, then
down Broad Street, the principal
shopping district, after passing
many interesting spots the trip
goes up to Shop Hill from which
there is a splendid view over
Bridgetown and the harbour.
stop is made at St, John’s Church

situated on the biuff of a hill,
Crane Hotel with its famous
Crane Beach is on the list of

stops. The tropical vegetation is
beautiful which may be seen all
along the roads. This island lives,
on sugar and the sugar cane it
produces. This being Saturday
most of the stores closed at noon
not giving passengers much of a
chance at shopping. Several of
the best stores, needing the busi
ness I suppose, remained open
until six p.m. These = stores
reaped a harvest as buying here
and prices have not been equal!
ed at any other port so far vis
ited. All

available which were purchased
freely Late in the afternoon I
visited the headquarters of the
Police department and was treat-
ed as a royal guest Free rum
and given personal escort, by a
plain-clothes officer, during the

balance of my stay
Bridgetown, Barbados is one of
the places I believe a person
would care to revisit,

in the City



Aq Ietered U. 5 Patent Offce

A the RAC Club, Epsom, has be«

English products were

KID RALPH (left) light heavyweight champion of Barbados is going to Trinidad to fight Gentle
Daniel, idol of boxing crowds in that colony. This pi

at the Yankee Stadium in which
champion.

Hosts To In

Ralph demonstrated

dian Boxers

(By GEORGE WHITING)

THREE
gomp
tournaments this summer.
India—represented by the I
played generous host to Bri
have a chance of repaying a
In 1949 Yorkshire’s Ron Latham

was flown to Bombay to outpoint
the India and Ceylon light-wei
champion Gene Raymond I
year London’s Charlie Dox
made a similar trip, and brougi
off a double against Raymond and
welter-weight Ron Willmer, holde:
ef the India and Ceylon middle
weight titles.

STAR-CLASS







Raymon? and Willmer are
now paying us a return visit in
June, and with them
Percy Khatau, an 18-year-old
fly-weight with a Western India

come

title among his 43 wins in 45
appearances,
Trainer Ike Sassoon accom-

panies the party, which will be in
the charge of Bombay’s Assis {
Police Commissioner Superintend
ent Terry Adams—the Englishman
who first thought of these n.uch-t

be-desired exchange visits




What happens
here? That end of the busiress
is being looked after by Davii
Myers, honorary secretary of the
enterprising West Ham BC, who
will see that both food and fights
await Raymond and Co

when they get



Club officials will lodge the
Contests are being arranged
them at West Ham's ‘“Festiv.l’
show at Canning Town on Jine
28, and at the Stepney and %
George’s BC tournament
Stepney on July 10.

Senior Street BC, Charlie Dor-
mer’s Club, are also playing t
part to the extent cf a third b



Gleneagles Golf
Post For McLean
By James Goodfellow

Jack McLean, professional at

n

appointed to Gleneagles—one ol
the British Railway owned golf
courses,

Choice was made from hu-
dreds of applications from il

over the country.

McLean, who
most brilliant of amateurs, turn
professional at 26 because
iound the game was too expensive

He had been a Walker Ci
player, three times Scottish an
teur champion and runner-upg
the American amateur champion
ship.

of



vas one

1e
“dd
ip
i

McLean tied with Cyril Tolley
as leading amateur in the Britis!
Open in 1933, y leading am
teur a.year later.








amatedr in the Melbourne Cr
tenary tournament in 1934
McLea professional for 14
years, w given his first appoint
ment at Buchanan Castle Golf
Club, Stirlingshire, He was six
years at Worthing, and for the

past four years has been at the
RAC.
L.E.S

immy Hatlo





=

GOO DOCTOR AT THE



| They'll Do It Every Time
“Te FAMILY MEETS THE
DOOR THUS AND WE QUOTE











7 OH, DOCTOR»-WE'RE SO
GLAD YOU'VE. COME“ LITTLE
YORICK |S S0-0-0 SICK
HE CAN HARDLY HOLO
HIS LITTLE HEAD uP!

©
UT BE THAT AS IT
MAY“ IT TAKES FIVE
OF THEM TO HOLD
LI'L’ YORICK DOWN
SO'S DOC CAN GET
A THERMOMETER

IN HIS ws po @

——}





| PHILADELPHIA, PA.



He was also first j

AMATEURS from India aré

(6 lend London a hand with their Festival of Britain

Twice in the last 18 mor.ths
Rangers’ Club, of Bombay—has
tish light-weights, and we now
little of this hospitality.

for each









of these very welcome
visitors,

Win or lose, I think we car
assure Terry Adams and his lads
of an entertaining three weeks,

Newcomer

Getting Danny O'Sullivan dow
to Sst. bid, for the det © Ol
british bantam-weignt i

1a’s Peter Keenar 3
next month will 1 ae
nsibility of trainer Honey



rrancis—a newcomer to the ¢ mp

Jim Pettengell who has lookea
after Danny since he was fignting
in a schoo: playground at Isling
ton, has acquired new commit

ments as a manager,



Francis, who gets results with
a smile, will have no iiusion
upout tne job that faces him
when he and O'Sullivan move
into camp at either Brighton o:
Betchworth, Fortunately, he wil:
find Danny a willing “subject,
whatever the demands of th
diet sheet.



Should any little problems arisc,
“Honey” will be able to call upots
the experience he gathered while
preparing such _ celebrities a
Henry Armstrong, Larry Gains,
Chalky Wright, Eric Boon, Davy:
Crowley and that other “wai
line” subject, Billy Thompson

Inability

to compromise



weights may have ruined a bright
idea to match South Africa’s
middle-weight champion, Ge €



Angelo, with French welter-we
Charles Humez in London
month.

*

Australia’s newspapers are say-
ing that Dave Sands has lost h
punch. He’d better find it again
before he tackles Randolph Turpin
next June.



* *

South African champion Geraid
Dreyer has asked for and got
an extra pound added to the
stipulated weights for his fignt
with Joe Lucy at the Albert Liall
on Tuesday. These two unbeaten
light-weights now go in at 93t
12lb.

—L.ES



| TF North opens One Heart
and South's responsi
| Two Spades, the latter con-

Suitutes a forcing take-out.
South is so strong that he
vinsualises a certain game,

| even though North may have
: opened on minimum values





A similar situation exists when
Yorth opens One Diamond on
following hand and South
responds One Heart
aa ¥Q 10 6 5;
@AK IAS: on
| North could only bid One
Diamond in the first place
game is unlikely unless Soi
has some values in the
| place. The picture chang as



soon as he hears tlie respense of
One Heart. A game in this sum
is virtualy guarantecd. and North
must make sure that the bidding
will not. be dropped short of
vame. He is too strong for a
i direct raise to Four Hearts. The
| solution is a forcing rebid of Two
| Spades.

III AAPA LEILA LILI PDIP LDL OED
SLEEP TT OE



cture was taken during the fight with Kid Francis
his superiority in this class, and crowned himself
He received a belt at the conclusion of the fight.

London Clubs Play :











HOW TO USE

is











and informative. There is a short
introductory first chapter followed
by a second which takes the story
up to the time of the Restoration;
a third continues it to the end of
Queen Anne’s reign. Chapter four
sives a deseriptisn of the 18th
rentury plantation system which
is more sympathetically balanced
lan some modern, politically-
nspired, views on the subject.
Chapter five continues the his
tory to the early 19th century and
leals with the establishment of a

treat sugar industry with its
counterpart interests and econo
mic theories and conflicts. It also

examines the slavery topic and the
strange anomalies in public opin-
ion upon this and other social
problems of the time. The dom-
inating theme of this chapter is,
in fact, the application of the so
‘ial conscience of the 19th century
to the problems of the West Indian

colonies.
Post War
The last chapter brings the his-
tory of the colonies to the post-
war period. The problem of Free

} Trade principles in conflict with
the economic interests of the colo-
nies is seen resulting in the estab-

SPORTS
WINDOW

Spartan meet Carlton in a First
Division fixture at Kensington this
afternoon at 5 p.m, The fixture
should be an interesting one since
Carlton bave won both their First
Division fixtures since the season
opened and Spartan, last season's

lishment in 1897 of the prototype
of Imperial Preference in the
' Canada—West Indies trade agree-
ments. i

champions, have won the only a tae
match they have played this The striking feature as one
season, réads this remarkably detailed,

NETBALL
Queen's Collece vs, St. Michael
Old Girls at St. Michael's Girls’
School — 4.50 p.m,

but condensed history of the West
Indies, is the continuity of the
main problems. The geographic
and economic facts of the situation
has made this continuity inevita-
ble. Dependence of the colonies
upon the American mainland and
upon Britain for supplies has al-
ways been the underlying trouble
The price of sugar has always
governed prosperity or adversity,
and that price has generally been
at the mercy of economic forces
beyond the control of the colonies
There has always been the prob-
lem of the absentee proprietor and

W hat’s on Today

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m
Meeting of St. Thomas Ves-
try — 1.00 p.m

Meeting of Christ Church
Vestry — 2.00 p.m. of the settler who comes to make
Death Inquiry at District money and to leave again. Agains
“A” Court — 2.00 p.m as veneers pea ae the
> if : | white man in the West Indies was
eee tae re 7 | both very rich and very wicked
James — 7.30 p.m . " it is shown that throughout - the
i - , jislands’ history, he has had his

Meeting of “Alliance Fran | share of pond and bad fortune.

caise” at British Council, Social
Whitepark—8.00 p.m, In social matters, the book re-
veals the falsity of current belief
CINEMAS | that nothing was done to alleviate
‘ ar | the condition of the people untii
eee a et an Rae ees U.S.A” |modern times. Throughout the
Royal: “Mummy's Rome: ane | 18th and 19th centuries, constant
“The Exile’ — 4.30 p.m. and | endeavour was made to provide
8.30 p.m | education, to improve morality
Pisses (Bridgetown); “Aten mivaly” and to maintain a_ reasonable
and “Tarzan Triumphs” — 4.45 sto ¢ ivi it is in-
Dm. and 8.30 eg | standard of living. But it is in

j teresting to see that in the 18th
| century, the gathering momentum
of the sugar industry led public
opinion to believe it to be inde-
finitely expansible and to their
fear that with money being poured
back into industry, less would be
| available for social advances, Pub

Aquatic: “Boss of Boomtown"
—5 pom. and 8.30 p.m.

lic opinion was proved wrong,
On the political side, it is inter-
; esting to trace the long history of
‘colonial government in these old
colonies. From the earliest times,
the local communities played a
principal part in the management
of their own affairs. To-day, in-
creasing government control over
|economic policies in modern times
‘has had the effect of placing in
|the hands of the mother country,
power over the destiny of Britain's
fold colonies undreamed of even
{in the heyday of mercantilism, Lo-
cally, the later Crown Colony
Governments were never dictato-
{rial though often blundering, and

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.51 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Full) April 21
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Water: 2.02 a.m., 2.18
rom,
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .35 in,
Total for Month to yester-
day: 1.45 ins,
Temperature (Max.) 85.5°F
Temperature (Min.) 73,5°F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.,
(3 pm.) E.S.E.



Wind Velocity: 12 miles per seldom corrupt though often in-
bour competent.

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.990, |! Problem
(3 p.m.) 29.901 } The modern problem of the

{ West Indies is that posed by the
Moyne Commission: that the de-

THE FORCING REBID

RET TTT TTS es eae ee et hable ons
Four Hearts he is_ entitled to

by M. HARRISON-GRAY

Properly handled,

make a cue bid of Four Spades
which North will convert to Six
Hearts.

the forcing
rebid signals great strength and It may be necessary on occa-





often serves to paint a very pre- 3!0n to make a forcing rebid in |
cise picture of North's distribu. 8D unbiddable suit. provided the
tion If South’s rebid. for ‘!atter is lower in rank to the
instance. is Two _No-Trumps intended trump — suit North
Rote Diamonds or Three Clubs. holds :
orth bids Pour Hearts This a 5
unnecessary jump in a forcing a’ =o 108593; @4Q983; SHEPHERD
situation not only means four 7
irumps in support of a suit that H 5 € :
has not been rebid. but also aiuth Soi o'Ose eee |
shows the 5-4-4-0 suit pattern Nortn must force to game with
South will read bim with four Chree Clubs. There ts no danger & Co Ltd
Spades and tour Hearts. while jf South should raise Clubs. as ’ ¢
his Diamonds must be longer North can always return to
Since he bid the lower-ranking Spades at the same level. South
sult first ; will draw the same inference as 10-73 Broad St.
; The knowledge that North 1s pefore—that North has a single-
void in Clubs is most useful if ton at most in the unbid suit
South has a_hand like this: Hearts :
@KW; 9K I9S: © Q87; .
@KECHS WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
Although his strength ts mode- London Express Service. =



- SONOS OOS
DEEL OLAS



3

l
J «© R EnricuHep

@ ¢

ke

THE

LO LIIT ESTE FETS

BUILDING
FOR THE

ppb pbtt tlt letn ttt tnltttt.

PRAIA

BREAD

ENERGY-
FOOD

FOOT-BALLER
'§ ann ATHLETE






I Prt tr grt pnmm 9 SO
POLL OPIS INT Fae
/



PRISED FOOD RA, It

comes ct a time when economic}
circumstances make them difficult |
to achieve. Professor Burn right-
ly points out that many “prob-
lems’ of the West Indies cannot
be “solved”, and that if indeed |
they could be, so also could almost |
any problem anywhere. His whole
book goes to demonstrate that the |
West Indian colonies are indis—j|
solubly linked with the British
Commonwealth and is a tacit ex-
planation of the fact that there i:
no important demand in the West
Indies today for severance from
he mother country. |

This book is thoreughty infor-
mative and is designed to suit the

needs of those seeking a sound
basic knowledge of the back-

ground to the West Indies of to-
day. It is as entertaining as so
tightly compressed a work could
be.



a



\

4, 29S X
West Indian & British :
Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach-
werr, Decoration House, St ¢
Jumes. Tel, 91-74,

14,4,51—)m,

SSO S SOSH FSOOV8 OSM '

IMPERIAL LEATHER e

—s

to suit all pockets.
$2.32, $2.58, $12.75
e
GENTS’
Backs
$2.46, $9.34









)———_

ry \ryy
OTe
|

LINDEN BLOSSOM





| HAIR BRUSHES



LADIES’ HAIR BRUSHES
of all kinds at a range of prices

Each 84c., $1.09, $1.16, $1.83

HAIR BRUSHES
From Rubber Backs to Wooden

Each 57c., $1.64, $1.74, $1.92,





Via San Juan or by connecting air-
lines from Miami. Reduced 15-day,
round-trip Excursion Fares now in
effect from San Juan.
Effective April 18th, all flights
land at New York Interna-
tional Airport in Idlewild
instead of La Guardia Field.

MIAMI

Daily flights—non-stop service from
San Juan. Special 15-Dey Round
Trip Excursion Fares now in effect.

ST. CROIX
ST. THOMAS

Frequent flights by swift Convair-
type Clipper*. Convenient depar-
ture times.

You can now “fly PAA’’ to
EUROPE, SOUTH AMERICA,
AFRICA, MEXICO, the FAR
EAST—in fact, completely around
the world.

For 22 years the leading
internationa! airline—PAA
was first to link the Amer-
icas by air, first to fly to
all six continents.

For reservations, see your
Travel Agent or





WORLD'S
MOST EXPERIENCED
aeses AIRLINE

Pin ERICAN

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Wa Coste & Co., Ltd.

RS Sry

Broad St. —- Bridgetown
’Phone 2122 (After business hours

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EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS

6’, 7, 9’, 10° Lengths

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STANDARD HARDBOARD |

Thick

WILKINSON & HAYNES CoO.,, LTD.

AGENTS,



\

SS
Oe



Full Text

PAGE 1

1'AC.E SIX IIAKHADOS ADVOCATE Tllllt-.f)AY. APRIL H, IHl D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street vw///.v////.v/.v/.v.Sv5SwvWw!ww^^^^^^^%wJw!v — ""' -^4 .'. %  %  af i oirfu . ,r %  !" c %  Mf Ifel %  H „ "- NEW BOOKS ELEPHANT DILI. by Lt.-Col. J. H. Willinms VENUS THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskino SHAW by Desmond McCarthy ISLANDS OE THE SUN by Rosita Forbes THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELBRECHT by Maurice Richardson f HAMPIONSHIP FIGHTING SCHOOL BOOKS ROYAL READERS 3, 4. S ROYAL SCHOOL PRIMER WEST INDIAN READER 142 ADVOCATE STATIONERY ^V^V////,V////^//////,V////////^V//;V,y,.,',V,V/./...., RIP KIRBY iU'S und TRUCK OWXERS I.XSPECTMOX TM3ME SEED XOTBE WOHRYiSG TIME SEE FS FORDUNLOP1LLO BUS SEATS LION1DE LEATHERETTE CARPET MATERIAL HUBIIER MATS REAR VIEW MIRRORS 6 & 12 Volt BUZZERS ROOF LAMP BULBS ft socicfrrs F.LF.CTIUC WIRE & FLEX BATTERY CABLES ACCESSORY SWITCHES Flat GALVANISED SHEETS Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT for ltitffior Maralyn it %  fine bed-time drink Md brtpa you to tleep wundly. And Dothint could be Maralyn i< creamy milk d.licioudy Davourcil, and enriched filing •uRir. malt and real. KVItlL QUALITY PRODUCT GREY PArNT for Ploorlnf SIGNAL RED for Body MEAT RESISTING BLACK 11 WHITE LEAD ZINC MUFFLERS PIPES KING Pit! SETS DECARBONIZING SETS BRAKE LINING SETS FRONT SPRINGS lor Ford & ChPvrolM FIHE EXTINGUISHERS AND LOTS OF OTHER fSIF.VTMLS ECKSTEIN BROTHERS PT Mm DUI t LL



PAGE 1

TIH'KMJAY. APRIL I, 1KI HAKII.MMIS IIIVOI \ il twr.r si \ EN CLASSIFIED ADS. additional word TWB. cash. Ptona MM mm SSS and 4 pm. 3111 far %  >•*• Nat**** ,:n.y attar par ran SAI.I: ta'o'J Sul-i %  and tl M on Sun-la-ii AUTOMOTIVE J (DIU HI ard • Mill* pSr word on • uai'iori.i word GOVERNMENT NOTICE HARRISON COLLEGE iniiu iW 1 REQUIRE!) it %  o i < i u 1 %  September 1941. O) A GRADUATE to teach SPANISH with FKKSi.ll possible. (2) A GRADUATE lo teach HISTORY with ENGLISH HARK1SON COLLEGE IS a day GRAMMAR SCHOOL of 580 boys taking the Oxford and Cambridge General Certificate and working to Open Scholarship standard. It h*is a Sixth Form of 120, and IN represented or the Headmasters' Conference as an Oversea.' School. SALARY For First or Second Class Honours Degrees: 91,920 rising by IBS to $2,880 and then by $144 to $3,456 plus S21fl per annum for an Educational Diploma. For GRADUATES: $1,728 rising by $72 to $2,190 and then by $9* to $2,938 plus $218 per annum for an Educational Diploma. (9480— £100.) The position on the Salary Scale would be decided by teaching experience including Ml allowance for War Service PASSAGE EXPENSES to Barbados not exceeding $960 will be paid against appropriate vouchers. Up to the present no passage money is available for leave. The post Is pensionable under the Barbados Teachers' Ponton Act. No contributions are payable, but the minimum yia llfying period is ten years. Service it Harrison College Is counted ai qualifying under the English Teachers' Super an nuatlon Act. Applicants should mention subsidiary subjects which they Offer, nd out-of-School activates which they are prepared to undertake. APPLICATIONS together wilt) three recent testimonials, t h e name* of two Referees, and n photograph, should be sent by airmail to J. C. Hammond. Esq.. M.A. (Cantab). Harrison College. Barbados B W.I. lo arrive "•* later than 2flth May. 1951 ?0th March, 1951. 1.4. '51 —3n ALTOMOBILX: Prrfacl luMtlnd o all I4 Bill • %  I MMtaM il...... Oaiaa* Ptaacia *|H •AM—T F H. I'llllK MMIIIS al U fdmta par opa'a Uaa am _.. •ntm-.*-. caarpo II on NVI unJ II SB am S*+4*yt CAROna •nod rand tl ion Ann MO IS. Jun*, Straat friar. Ford Car in v M Cl"k. Jtrt 14 U--*toi r*rd I'frtr, i aan 14,01 ELECTRICAL YOLTiO'S BATTTRIIS II volt, t Plata. SM 1 Plata. SSS St. S volt. IS Barbado, Afanciaa BM NOTICE PA KM a oi i rrna A• fin**April letn lo Ua% IS Parochial Traaauirr mill *•* ba at •arurda* Aarrt tin from. 10 am SMinrday AprH -Ma fiom IS a IF <) noan. flalurdv May Sth from 10 a m.ftatirdav May ifu, from IS am•*• %  O. S i Para***!*; Tran*u.>t. SI. Prtai , PI HIM S.\l.i:s MINI A I OI Ml P** • %  > %  *> tiii MI w a a b-d.. NOTICE I** BUM Ol tl I I I 1 Tha 1'arartn.l Ti.LXitS b r U ~ d on T "" d *<" Q I DCANX. 17 51—4n 1 %  ONAN—LlchUna* PUnt. 1|-1S volt* paraa. A. Darn** A Co Lid 11* SII f MECHANICAL BIKXS oi, lumi. ll.i. ife* SIIVVI Lii.M. All modal* lit .lock A. BARMEA Si CO LTD. insi-T rs LIVESTOCK CALF-Ona amuinr '. brad HoMain ufar Mir. Tan da>* M. SHr PUTC Brad lfol*tn Bun Punr* AlbrH V W K. Ivy Lodav Ivy lluad NOTICE .. I. IO Mtat) ,,., ,,,,„, p^y %  • ant io kMigm *mpk>)>d i' T <;*aar. • til no.fvrr b* *bb> lo itwin t „( Tyaei HMdB, Bnd ,|| ol*^, i rtlajiH | n—fat fiHur* W TAVLOB. %  tan H I. L WALTERS. SI-* V "" TATIOS YAIH> NOTICE PUUHH or ST III r rarahlal T.rai your., now, from nut d ru %  Atwm v lf |-h lUsatM B..1 SHI h.n ... Ml II VI | HI A ., K vs , fc „, ,, , ? **"** OSStaAL MEITTMG N.rrfc-1; I. hrreby flvon (hot Ihc Onr Hunorra and T*n(h Vvailv Ordln-n Onwral Vtin| ol IH* abovr-namft oc*My will b MM at M, OfTlcr. Brf-wllh Platp. Bt.4drt-< P Fr.d* S"ih April. ISM. -I S o'clock Hi i |, :,-. Whuo Orttn. Prlmroao wllh atchln| •" *o^Pl^u colotar auMM Toi *•. A. BAJUCBB a, c U d I9| U. CUBTAW FTTTWaa-P-. %  ,, wln dow .(yllnt, Uafil control. VaUitM. .. drapersB> Klrwh Dial %  <. A MABNxa a co.. LTD. u i*i n i rVrNFLO* BABY BOTTLB. Anwr•'• '*>• %  popular Nurarr **>•> "Ihip•nt al Bruc* Wal>,rrhpad Lid IS 4 'I u I Ihr ] vsefata iiri tllona ol In* naM ... • REAL ESTATE KM i .if.ihrciaai w TM abc,. mm ossrc n Ltw_t *. %  •a* Shh ,i 4 nr Ap|ll ,„, ^ iupdrtion rroan tv> m r>" d !• an ,,, C-a.r*r>Vm %  *•;> %  Ml, 99191 f ,n. ,.,.„ Bhtlbabrba. Bi Joa*pf>. .f—Tr*r t> < "' "••'Mr MM U ,,r ii '' % %  '•*" %  •<' %  ..—On " .•• and f* .**• oprn (ailn.ri „ • ,.,,, J, •* %  •"' b^... %  %  • %  i r ,. i %  nM .ai Mr •%nu>ui IVI-IW. The Hf, ,!, h, „, (#r ^ w p^ 'tion al *ur oAV m Ui.. April IBS) a' i pm CAFBINnTON A WALT %  ollcHo. it.Jl-a, AITVION %  •"'tL..' ,h l,, ""'* •' % %  i art MM „,, riUnAY SBTII at u m_ %  %  : %  %  %  A,.-I„„ .... a n i n i T NhrTMH , li,..l. .1 '„ ::^*r in %  irpr. %  i pr*rc*d in "W.-i.m II M . 'Wrff-TAKr TK-KrT BOOK *^ ,%  -Ill br tc-Mdrrl %  ,-*n*t. BrwH is It—In TAKE NOTICE HERMASTC 11 M Kis/xr. %  i •ill i %  *,•, MINK M Pi.blir I -SOIll |. l—lr.. JOHN M BLMtoN A ,1 !...,„., AvrllUP. AW I Tbuiaoav ntil th IWh i i p ,, T Houan It a a a nd le la i Aurtldi n fjr, IMM I %  Irada m.-' .hMotral lUbMiacn uird kJ maxulaiiuraa, phot our*|ah> %  -t pririllurml, lion M and aalillary piupw*. raw or purity m.i'iiini ibSRil aub and MM I prrpai iiion. |o( ui %  rand. m .1.. .. |>roarii*tivi' i( ... tnimrb tin Iho n ain an iiQiod*. an* for tho ;i WEST INDIA BISCUIT S Co. Ltd.. Gills Rd. \ Only those with experience S need apply. Apply in writing J ;nd in person to the manager S of the W I.BC Si r> Street ;< (iOOD FURNITURE i[in 'Mh i ibings at Money Saving Prices NSTW nnd Bt.,.*rd HaS IU l H loItnnir and Offlrv In Mahogam. t I-.'-I. Oak. B.rch. Pine. Deal L. S. WILSON M'ln ST. DIAL SOSB 1 DAYI.1TB MOVOt BCftZEN id ordw. rill. Clk. P>irniac^. 1H J.1I I I .. RAW 5lllARPr.NRB—On* Circular Bo* NarpHwr and Ou Idtac Buliablr l..i %  • from 10to J Thl. m..(.,,,. aa bran overhauled and > %  r*ad\ fa rot* Tha pnea u vary rt-aaonabla Br ply Box 47TT r .. Advoraia Advl^,.,| an* it 4 M t im PLATE Ola*. Dlaplay Caaaa. |ISD 9 i BUnifld Broil a Co. ltd. ptMa 91. 14*I-i I it VENETIAN BLINDS. Klrach Sun-alM all maul UaLuxa VanalUn blind*, to yom thraa dailvarr 1 - Dial 44M BAHNSA Co, Lid. II.f .11—I.I n. THE BARBADOS CTVIL SKRVKF \-;sii(IMiir, NOTICE I*> HEREBY GIVEN that M -ul I' %  i in lha Coui^ll Chamber, PUOIi. I lldliiBVo,, 8alurda> April .Ith imi w<\ (ha houri ot s in and 3pm' lha alaciiwi ..I ,. RECHFTABY and riVST DTIUIK to MTTC Ml tna Council / lor tha im IMI C W CUMBEBBATO. A'-.' .. | '--i,l ,%  4 'I On TAKE NOTICE Thai J llinitY A HONs badar huait>a^* nrtdrr* Ed.iid BbW i. E>ih>' h.. jri>i, n i l,„ n„. ri -A" ol Kaajiaiar of MUX and -...bn, r i^rpar will be •ntillaU 1 .MI ahall l ,n .ii,i ... paaftlBW i *th In ..., •M — — day >l April ISSI nnlaaa aoma pM ,M inaanllma |lv* %  .i iippontion of auch o*Hrr Dalad lb Slh a*, M AprU H Sllll' %  B.-*>ilrr ..I Trada Ma- i IS4 IISi. .' RATES OF EXCHANGE Historic American Mission Trail iiy ii imi i \I:.\MI.\>I WATCHIK f,,i l,,r, ta.1 pi od only 10-. Packaid m-U Alton W.t. BSS IS ;.i.d 11 o.ir Jao-ailari Y DrUn a co., ud IS 4 S1-* WOVEN WOODEN IHJNI^cm br nad Vrnalian Blvla. ... C lor Vilh ai .rnagmatlon HABJIISON-S H'HNITUBI DEPT IT 4 I-Jn TAKE NOTICE BITUROS tat WAILT-S DOVE IIITL'MA'ITIC LIMITED, a Bntlili Company. MannffSvlunrn. whoaa trada or bu.tnn, ada it Habburn. Co Durham. Enflnnd. -ivlia.1 for Ihr ir|i*tiauan ,,f a Irada mark in Part 'A" of Mmfmm in raapact of rhaanical aubatanca* utad 11 annlanurw. pholoaraphy or philoilirnnrtl lubaunraa uaad foi asitcul* lural. bortlcullural. vatarinary and •anllarV purpMPi; raw or partly prapanad. vrgalahlr. animal, and mtnanal -ub%  Unrai uaad In man u fact uraa.. not inrludrd In Mlirr (laiari. manklf*.cturra from minaral and otbar lubiuccn far bulldlnR or davorallnn. anibMarlng iri-hitn tnrnl and buiidniaT cciilrlvaiicaa: naval arthitactiual rontrtvanrM anal luval raulpmrnU. |ooda mam, farti. Tad from anbnal and vaganblr nibaunm: bliiinunouB praparalloni i In lha nature Of paml 1 bilummoui orriatralKi^fat Train AMFRICAN RtUTACB A chain of 21 V mission sites along the 1'ncilii Coast or tho United Stales, from the City of San Diego to the vil Jage of Sonoma, a distant i about son miles, ragaalng tinforemost physical reminder of Spain's influence on the region Hero, in the State of California where the Spaniard made his last great effort in the New World to colonize for the "Olor) df God :ind Hie King." these inivM. II mbol % %  in regime which had eirplored and roloiu/ed van arMf r>f i he West Indies, North and South Amcnc, lllllippnir Never intetided to b> more th.-ni ttKaponn ingUtuuoni ..i thi frontier, tha) BOB impoitaiii permanent rcmindce. in the bis* torie mosaic wluih r California'-. ptmX. San Diego de Alcaln, at San Diego, was the first in ttic pro cession of missions lo Ii batMd .ilong El Camino Real (the royal road) to the north Thi: lision. founded B9 l'-^< Junipcro Sena on July 10. 1709. ilong with a military potn lies ifhat la now called "Old Town was moved in 1774 to its present site in the valley ol UM Ban DICKO Hiver. The parent miuiot of California—two earlier mi< sions on the west busk %  >( lb Colorado River had been found part of the frai group in the wctern Btatg >i Aritonn — ia4W99Bnt ptrlatfi re than any other U varnKha*. and Ix'iuara. abto roatlna I rid polabla water aitd nUirr nla-rmary IMiulda. and will ho antUlad la *Mi>'ar lha lama alter one month fMni lha Itth da> of April. IMI. uMax %  <"!>• aon ahall In Ihe i ranttma atvr m In dupllrala lo ma al my orrlr* of oppoallien of mn rraittrntHMt. Tha t mark can he aaan on application Dalad 1 ;u Sth day of Apr,I II H WILLIAMS. BfKtrar of Trada Mar I they had raiii •. i ooiward fn-m thoir (>eglniiiius in the Witt Ii Amenr: South America, and norUtW into Mexico. A diffeiene* i ""V. wall-type bell noted in California, liowi'i '. major front in4 Uu Spanish crown, and ai Mien, WAS the last mi's Therrfon-. the California mis 'ions have an added interest a,-i "'I'm w, e lb insks of chr btlnit Ii a|i|Mra thai Braving Ihr ( of the frontier, and rven many i than of I %  rornla i oovvrtad Builtttudai tnlnda and souls to ChriBt Mission records silent testify to the years s'iciit in I effort Sts ulai kxaUon m it--. %  hapa lha graati Uon thai PaoM Barn who ( %  •liowed him had l in Uieii task Tho ml i>rf< mr well-establlshei DttUagU % %  •iiarchilei ture. the | aiiioi i i i %  %  plea of iirti.t.i Iluffc v. bad ii-efui hieil rOOfS. ipaasagaways, and huh beamed hont otlit i dJotaUa, hespeak an earl n .vhli'i Inn It teal] %  nei (ilensinE -.1. ru In.I %  1 though not ah bava rtlalnad t %  • i %  boi bava TL, .nrhii ii ban nol i onUnua t.i I Inroadi of %  rnodarn ritriluaUori Neatlln| n '... % %  .. i. they .ui' < %  i rriado i-*sii>le by those who worked In the pail > lull Ufttit, Amarkanj may be thankful thai b*| '.ere taken preserve Uiaai raaWa) .. J great value. Thousands.past. The f:. i mmim nf eatUa rangad undar lha watch ,"•• praaani allows i'-> Uttla iui ajraa of mission Amerlcai (tune for puch reflection Ami < Indlin em portarii the plantad b) tha atdres and iheirfreproaentative of all of the g i Ufomlri wine. Countiesother actlvllH which are known Ir I %  %  %  %  !' i %  W AMI II Aifnii-iuft chdrsa tcdaaj tl t— M and M ili Sundaaia 14 irons* orar *. r*a S catMi a leord uaa* -* cata t %  H tteaaMji IOK IIIM Hii %  -.*- M raila II exit and MISI \ LI.WIOIS 1MJ lasi .._ dalaa. T> "retad rat paifetnc apac A '.rand ol 1h.ii. „" m aV.rbaofax %  %  %  -oi.w addrM*. .... %  •uinad AMII Hoi 3. c • FMPTV Tl %  %  S*ralt halkr. innar Ba..n Cararna). 1SM-.I > laioa a.~l Vlrpbona aBM is". Ji V I.IQI'OK UCENSK NOTK I (" %  l.i Pita habSrr* D i April IMI "•I IJVIH'l I AaaaaNMl ha hat.t I A IIARPEB Drugs Siuii^h-d lulls IS. On "Mixaiouri" 11 a BMOILB}, Apru ii Mirth from about 925.UIH. %  |in,0M muasled ii to the (''Hie, state* aboard Ui* IJ 'it.. an -'. teetl HI I One of lha en .v. M raau el ho i %  !..! corpainah, baa b> %  %  i larfM With illrgnlH DrphlTM Hi ball imdrr S,OfH< 111 \ i i ml i tad BtaN Aiujnvf] %  I... let Bad I i i pin"! i la rad in Vnkohamu. Jap HI Reiitir 8upportni| ha glory of 11 Croes in tha Callfoml i was the power of thi I MaM iner the hope i I h,onr 1 "T"" snir.tlnns of the lirnwti"" |,or,u "' mrdium ,u the prti lad flftmTZto^l^.li^'g' ^"^n /llI( raid into a land therelofoie f ,r la h llinr ' '"' f |.. rill b* I (.( the future % %  • • :tent en deavors <>l tha 1 n n d their American India! neophytes will long i influence thumghoul the Unib Stink Market Shown FirmiK'SH LONDON. April 18. Fios.ii buybuj aava lasujwad lo many section*. Of ihe Although ItOtkl continued to re%  bt items such B) Ipht ind Brttaln'i advene trade llgurr*. It was apparent thai bri-f k >'•"•• %  elacttva. '"..-Hi olaai indusiriaia. paiUeulnrly tln>t.r wlne .livulciidr ituwell i oven 1 '! by earnings were %  IfUfted • ml f.i! supiMii I Textile-electrical equipment*, light eninaa Mini lotkBOCoa shipping also were %  The start of .i BM BCCOuni nival ul nit r rest u PrlCl I i.'lvaiued under th %  T ,(1. %  I I .IT. I.HI i .. i.,(,(.• i .VPIC baral Baarlah press comment i lapajiaaa bonds at the ourael hi,i Bataaa had gem-mll> beef] iprerad i>> dose. ida (reah i i poet wran local and overseps* hnSnatl M.I>II r. luah I rovararnanl Mock reeonlad an advance of up ti i Ightni —Reub-r Vo'u'i' of Hitler's lii ml Tells Time VIKNNA. April 19 A Viennese newspaper said to UM tjiiiiun voli %  % %  I \'n %  %  .• • h ph< at ,. that M .,, i,. friend in hi, vho was al km un produeei Mer diman %  Tim.' m 1B40. the i. Itrtilrr. HOUSES UTN II Al Dtsl BM i* 9l. l-.rnr. In.* id' Aaxiit 1%  ohm. ',1 %  rhor- j7" M *.\'i HIJV 0 irnra Cap rurnumad. S ... %  I ,iMr* r.araj ?s*r "TAKE NOTICE British Company Manuiarturrt'. Had* or biislnaaa addrau t. i\ Ki l.t.a.d Bu m LlVWBMl aiagll. %  >l anapm of .i; hind, ptrlin. tar llw tartn %  %  I %  V .: ISAl ii WBJ.1AI K.S..I... ( .l T..^. M.i>,. ll*>l | I'MNIMI. %  ,vtnd in| urde So > v..r* hfBv IT I %  • I da MO' hol„ hat or ana**.* or d*b' %  KFTT *. .. . 0 CSIM i %  %  TAKE NOTICE N0RM0CYTIN DIIUCAM CYAMAMtf COB) PANV a 'orpaaMUn omanlrad ar I S Utlaic undar tha law* of lha ttaia tin*, I'ai-ad SfMaa ol Amat-aa. wMa Ada or bur.lr.a-. addrai. H ID B.>a 'liar PlMo, Haw VorS. *ota of Mr. V. a* partly praparad %  .•dalablr. animal. and nilnaim rdal lirrparall "i %  ,M. I .in lb.I %  in f-paralldn* tor uaa illtra agam-l rul ami iiain.i dalnlora'Hxi of ••). rnvd palm.. %  naanai. un IHr naltira of palnli. va. laha* IIIHI U.a.urr> ah., .-ontindBM ..larm. and tdhar vaaaal*. rontaimm iMabla alar ai ,\ muni', and will ha rnlltlad t.i i-rulf lir ama of tar MM ...nnlli Horn tlip um BB1 ul April IMI i.nlrM aamr par%  M -I,.ui ,, II-..niaaitlima gprs nolko n duiliralr i.> ma al my ad MUMI -4 •uttl .r..lr.tM.. Tha irada %  iBBM Dalad thl* Slh Hay of Apnl 1*>'I H ll I I AM %  R.Bi.li... ,<< Trada M.-h. aama paraon thall In lh* """""r' O'va nottra in d.ip. .il my ofBrr of fippoaitinp of auati raftl'trataan Tha irada mark ran bo a-dai 0 apUr>tMn al m> ofnt* Dated Ihla Str. day nf April, )tsi II WILLIAM*. Ka>M...T c Trada Mark. IIAll -On TAKE NOTICE WARDONIA Thai TrltMA WARD A SON'* I l-JTBIV BrilKh (-nina.i> atanafor iL,rrra .Una Irada m u Hdr< I* WardonU Bnlldina*. Si— > Btrdfri. "arrlnW..i Enalanri li .-irpiaM l .aai.in.iio-1 nf a irada mark in Part "A lian-l liar. Md ,li..l t ..'!. Il d -a* paraun .hall M UM maanllma | • %  tu aa* nf oppnaltiv.i Of aax-h i*t• allinlad Ihla Sh day •>! Apnl 1—.1 II WllJ.ltvMS. Ita|iiira> f Trada Mark. IS.4.H-JTAKE NOTICE BIBBY Thai J BIBBV BON* I'MtTTP I Btiu % %  i • pan* H i aMsss %  Jdraaj i21. Hmi —t Uvarpnal 1 p.ml 14I ,. appla-il to. lha raMalrMlnarh In Part A ol Baalali anapa ul all kinda arrtiannv li'il" lu-lat. pranaianona for tha iratn .-ul hair, and will ha anIIIUd t.. i'(i>l lh •aina aflrr mia inonlh from lha ISlh d>> of Apt" lSl "niaa* —inpar ami -na" 1. . 1I1 olh-air i.i.u. Th. ti-l. .nark ran ba an on aaaplti-ali'Hi .1 <•!*" Ita'-tl Ihi. air, da. ul \prll IMI H A II I 1AM*. %  1 SHIPPING NOTICES MONTREAL. AUSTRALIA. NKW ZRAI.AND LINE. I ntiilii tM.AN 7 1 P CMOS anapWd 1 i.iimi —itii ironahlpniBi M llnllili UUIHVI. lUlbart' I ll.lLdlo. liiiitirr p.irlicnlara a iuii.vEs.1. •rniv a co Da COSTA ('<> I Tl) BSMBMBWB, Tilntdad. n.il.-.l, .. 11 W I B W I t *5*5.*.lW'.W4*S?.5*Sa*t The M V "CaHbtoeewill aecepl rargi> and pejaeriaara for Dominica, Antigua, • .nat. Navki and St Kitf Sailing 20th Instant Ale oa, StaamAhip go. fas NEW YORK • <* MVKtN ..II. Slh Apt 11 %  Apiil NEW RI.EAN HERVIC-f usually explorwl As eurly is tho sixternth rpnhiry the cxilorers Cabrilla, Driike. Cannano ind Vizcaino among othci s baa fislted California without t cm])tinK pariaaBMnl "• %  .tlrmrnlf. GREY HOUSE Church Street Speighfatown flMB Mi' I %¡ Jrmmmi fo. ttirbeva ptopnrv lo !>• oBarod for ..la by PUMJC COMPfTITTON al 1 TO pm. or Friday. April S*. :M ai JOHN M BlADONi On-.a-. Planiatlona B.nldiriR Crav IfaMiw Ii a apaclaua 1i-a.oy aiana bulldinS wllh a Srv ">* and aanaral rlnra oparatart Of lb* ground RAOI wh>rh oRari 1 tna davaWipman*. ot :, good bixlnaan in ihla fntral rfuu-i IMM-1 tha V> intori. 1 Yaam*adl a B.ra. Jama* M |fta A...ticnan. Jnhn at a, P1 a 11 • al inn 1 Bui Idme. Jaaaaaa V#J. Blaa|i A E S. F V.A That the fuit'i Ol Barra and bit lasnpanao n e was JlUjUAad may be seen In the e*;ubllnhment of other miwion*. after that of San Dief. Pro STr-mlng northward, other link*. forged into the rhain during file next half century included. Snn LUBI Key. San JUtt 11.1110. San Gabriel An .1 Fernando Rey. San Buer. i Santa Barbarii, Santji 1 1 Puriainu* Concepclon, San Luis LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE! Olnsun. San Mnuel Arcangrl Antonio de Padua. Nuetra Sencra rie In Soledad. Ban < ;•!' % %  1 %  re (nan hall niter the first inis.111.11 *v-i nU'i lished Undoubtedly. Mrxuan In Spain buri %  v .11. ru Spanish rnlUlai mi ranch* ion *r.r n of lh new leiuiblit. Tha appllratlon of Itanlay Bralh*a... of Backlaa Hill. Bt Mirhaal for parmlolon lo aall Hplrli*. Mall Llqi-M* *c ai a douhla roofad board and .'iiiijlr%  top al IX A 1 -m J a Barkla. Hill, si \' I -1 Datad thl. Itlli day "' April 1441 To: E A UrSBOO, Eaq Polira IdaiiMrata Putriti A 1 1 nAW.'tTT>R for Appl-atii N B —Till. apphc*lt'*ii Will ba roruid. r 1 1 Pol-a D.atr.r I A M.I run LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Tha apBlk-alkin of Edna Bradt I m... ftnor of I-aaoray woodan buildin| al BBKlar. H1 CSfef n.lad ihli IBUl day Of Ap.,1 ISil ToA W HAF."TW Eaq %  At Polira Mafirlrala n. ( \ CLABrsr HOPE. ApplK-anl N B Thi. uppirf-aimr .ill ba C O n MS ar-tl at a Lawnalna Cfturl ta ba bald at Polna Court Da* "Aon Maaidaw th* join da> of April IMI ai 11 orldrk. %  Borromea. Santa li.an Bautlstn, Santn Clara de _. San Jos*. San Fr.n A.vis, San Rafael Arc.,' San Francisco Solano, r*ublished .. latamh Crown, except the l'*t Franclaco Solano at Sonoma the most northern This came nlO being almost simultaneous! with the birth ol tha new K< public of Mexico, which harj sue ceded in throwing off Ihrruk nf Spain, much a* lha id that of England half century earlier. The missions were established _.; institutions of the fr the purpose of Christian I ring and After California became 1 nf tha 1 %  lha n establiohii' tontinue.1 im which had started with the pi %  cult i/ition. Decay. dJauae ciirelessness, nnd lack t>! caiMai tOf the iii.iuunenls .,( M | •d %  ore tii.1:1 oat it oisappear. Others irumblad unl* nothing more than silent wnlt marked their sltea. Fnr(tW, ifvertiny to \h, and Funetlon ..t th %  'H I lll-MI Ml BBBBS af Bblp ,11 1 v r un 1*1 %  • 1/..' %  *1 -AI.COA I'lONTia CANADIAN SERVICE ..il. Maalrral •all. NalMa* April Slh April Mil. MiHlrlKiil ml 9 s Alfo.i ~n >srsv s rni itr nr-nwAnoTTT ,l.if Ap-.l MB Bail* for Ii J<*n ROrlFRT TIIOM LTD. NEW YORK AND C.CLF SERVICE. AFI-I.Y:-DA COHTA CO, LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE As arlUl %  in thi .'c %  un.'. I lh;it Uli I %  .. able vestiges of un hi 1 th.peoi 1 took a programme Of | and restoration. Some conatructed In the f^.rm of in original from the ground up Moat, having retained some o the original fe;it'irrhave of repairefT and reitoreri m 1 h degree ne?ded < % %  iviUsing the pagan American Senora He la Soledad nawa Theoretically, once OlU ,>;.rtlal ( y sUndlnc as idwatly 1 to* had been completed, the minder, of another day. has r mission convert* were to IH* Veen restored^However, its turned over to the rnliuatratk-n i prc*>er\-ed. T^rliaps of all t of the secular clergy The mission Dl linds likewise wento hi 991* "f ihe other: the get divided amonr ,h P*' 1 Lariclng ;, %  ', ***•"< alone may claim tt This stop. I II •-' 'nay retlon took place umain wag seen and touched and ring the early lWO'a It repeated loved by the mlsiion father*



PAGE 1

I'M.I IK.Ill HMJIlVnOS ADV(K \ I I THURSDAY. APRIL I*. 151 M.C.C. Will Tour Canada TWO TEST MATCHES 1MIADED IN GAMES TORONTO. April rs. il was .inn'' nedian (net-. j, iicn. annoiii %  I ..r i.1|. : • %  n H %  and thr eronri al Ton BS* UP) II \I. I'll I OH I III* I Is Ilk On First Team Ha IIOVM.'I imov LONDON %  in in ... tar, who ha* %  %  -:i'. V..II be i %  o i i. m Cricket Hoar For Ikirbaitos Hoys r*JJ vision ol
RALPH (fcttl ttahl henvywright champion cr BarttdM in guiai to Ti DaalaL idol of bctin; rr'md* in that colony. Thlr rieiurs was Ukcn luring UM *I ihe Y-nse* B'til.'uii in wMofe ItBipli dtraowitratod hi' superiority ii this rUi champion. He received a oclt at tha ronrlutien of tlii fight. light Osntle t Kid Francis jwned him-Hf Barbados Rated 'Tops By Visitor olu %  "l! //. College Heat Queen 's Royal .i ctothci %  iii' the lies enjoyed 03 '" %  '' Ji.il'lwdOji London Clubs Play Hosts To Indian Boxers (Bj GEOBQE WHITING) THREE STAR-CLASS AMATEURS from i 0 lend London a hand with their Festival ol I ui i nti tfjJi summer. Twice in Ihe lust 18 mor.thi i bj the Rangtra' Club, ol Boml..h i playeri gemerOUl hnsl LQ I'.ntish. tlght-WCighta and i dance 4 re-pay inj a little of tins boapltftlity. In IBta Y rkihira Ron L JI C was Aowi to B to oulpofi welcome %  I.. r i-i. h u) •>rrr.pa,nli Of SPAIN, Apnl lfl Mai i .-, Q.R.C. the % %  . .. i •' : • %  I wvc I nd I'IIIH. I %  06 Biiiin' in.. %  the da tor the Royaluu The i i stare Harrison Collet 208 .nd 84 for seve ^ i; < 74 and for each ... the In.n.i and Cej -igh; visitors. '.' ., ,„...,,.. o, I n S A, ... %  I think wo car. %  : •<"' %  '•• Tarry Adanu and I I i, SiSatoa' 1 S n.. I <** %  *"• Ciuise" in the WP-I off a double against Rayn., weltl i '.vi nliT Rein VYilImn .( the bid weight m SPORTS WINDOW board the afsnsrwtttols He .i-wspeprr of Tii Martinique, and othei Nowo HIT hat lie SrYOtl Of I Trvstrail Heals; Can salvos %  I 1 Choice Tha lahudl ol Bartaa lo of the ehOioa and oiiljflund n Islands in Ihc West Indus M I i,( tha passenger* hove rated I il IB" of all places xa 1 .i visited It %  located 1*00 milaw from New York and t*vmost entterlv Island of UM W* I'..inThe Island is small. lon| b) H miles wide, with an ,n., of IM lOJUore miles. ThpOpulaUon is nearly 200,000 wilri u small percentage of w Aid t.. l>e the most EnKhh of %  %  %  %  briuao bn1 it mom %  %  Jim PetieiiKell who hai after Danny nnce he w i nor: -:' I .i manager, Franci.s, who gets Raymon-' and Will now pe June, ano with then Percy Khalau, an rij wtliht wiUi V/oattrn Indie title among in: i-t a ii mn< ee %  l,i,m Uar IWi I I.M • %  B*ndrm> PORT-OF SPAIN. April 19. Trinidad won the finrt %  >'•' I %  aa to Ud* and against British Guiana Kenny actor "i its inhabitants. *0 !" *~ times It I caUtd Utlto KnftlMd. Hunter Archer Tha colour of the sen is of the Phillips —1. 1 '' l,Ul . , There is a atOT) elreulatod I i tho effect that In 1751 cioorgr Washington came to Barbados l<> tram lung tnoublo and %  .ii which he st.i>i.l with -i Than wen* easy victories The home tars ant w retain H ihj In tha Ai Solun' who has an attack %  till .1 influeru • i* rotu i.i. Ijiwrenec. s'41l Oand Bov SU-cet overlooking the Bathing There Ii axeaUenl iwihing. soa nahinft yachUnd aoll Hated In Un r, %  : i i :.. rv.itions o( the is land. The tOUt at the cily pro reeds through Trafalgar Square. In the centre, of the town passing ST eivtIUl'.'*%"AiirA II %  l1gtua of lrd Nelson. Uien Th/,. %  B. I Mk ixxptai %  "-"< %  < %  "'; y-in* i.m.uu... nunl ".nv f n wrUn_reoU b] 111*' illil.i til lie D4 1 party, wbld the charge if lion PoUca Cornralaa4oner Sui ent Terry Adams—the Englishman who first thought of these he desired a ban (e What happona when QMV hat end of the busiress i tin looked sflei i>> Ds Myers, honorary saeratary of the enterprising West Ham HI", \h. will see that both (ood ID awall Raymond i I Club officials will lod Contests are being arranged r them at West Mar: I ; show It Canning Town :8, and at tha Btepne i,. %  i toun amant Btopney on Julj 10 i re i pjirt to the %  %  third b C'.BNADA RACES WILL START MAY 14 Glaneagles Goli Po*t For Ul.nui £y James Good/e//ow H, nn.l T I Mas I WINDWARD TENNIS MAY BEGIN VAY 29 ram -iH>n(ii is o plen-iiugar ;• %  ';;' prof, This beng Satin.i... ,,,„„,..„ ,,.„.,.„. u „pen %  i H had b en %  Walk* I .1 player, inn %  itish at mpio i and runner upa I %  •. \ %  , beauUful which may be seen all along the ronds This island li suga nrlll riavi ..01 in tne |ob that when he and 0*SuWvai into camp at either Brighton o. iietchworth Fortunaialy, ha wiJ and Danny ., %  Hi whatever the d* Is of 1 diet heet. Should any little problems ar.M, "Honey" will be able to CSJJ up the expei : %  ilie^ ;iHann At Larry O Chalk) Wright, Bra Cnrwhry and that othi 1 BUI) TI %  Inability to nay have rulnt d \! middle-weight eha Angelo, with French weH Charles Humez In London thll month. Australia's newspape. n>g that Dave Sal punch. He'd tackles Randolph Turpln next June, %  Dreyer has asked for — and gm pound added to the stipulated weights for his tlg.it with Joe Lucy at UM All on Tuesday Ft* light-weight.-; now go in at 9 1 I2lb. — L r. s. \\ liut's on Today Toller Courts — 10.00 a.m Meeting ol Si Thomas YesIry — l.M pit) Merlins % %  ( Christ Church Vestry — 2 00 p m Death Inquiry al District "A" Court — 2.00 p m I'nlire Rand roiirrrl and tilm • how a I Thorpe's, SI. James — 7.30 p m Me.Una ol V11 Franfafctr • at llrftish fminiil \\ ini.-i. n k oo p in. Bans" 1 naamla* the stores closed at 1100 5 &j£$ <2ZL" SS^fo, hopping the beat stores, nreding UM bust 1 %  1 uppo s 11-.1. -.111111 opt n uniti six p in Thaaa 1 ban eat as buying i" : IfeLean tied th Cyril and prices have not been MUt ssading amateur in the Brit ed at any other port so f.i Open ile.1 All English products %  t ,. ,v. i, %  M, . available which mn pui %  | .: %  1 %  %  %  fn.'h Late ui ihe afternoon 1 tartan tot 1 ant in 1934 visited the headquarters of lb/ %  pai tmonl nd wi treal McLean prof%  .1 tot U guest. Free rum year, was given Ins bTSt appotr,; and ttvOn inrronal escort. b> .1 BMNII II B %  :'K'I-I. during the Club, Stirlingshire He balance of my stav In the Cltj yes >' 1 :.n. Barbados is one of pa.t f' ur yearhas be the places 1 believe a person RAC. WOUld i item which nriy problem anywhere. His arhols is more sympa %  iralanrtd l>ook goes to demonstrate that the, n* nsodeen, potrUeallyWoat Indian celoaaea are indisFLY the nbjei I The Weather TODAY Sun Rinra: 5 SI a.m. sun SefBi 6 10 p.m. Moon (Full) April 21 l.iihlins: 6 JO p.m. llish Water: l.M a.m.. 2 18 p m YFSTFHDAY r .HI i..11 i oilnnri > 3.S In. i %  .1 '"i Month lo MBfSBN da> L4J in*. Tcmperaturr (Max.t R5 !l F Temperature (Mln ) ?S.S F Wind iPiM.iii 901 l tory to tha early lDih century and teals wish me i stabUsbment of a luatry wlUa Hi eounterparl interests and econb mic theories and eonflicU. It al< examines the slavery topic and thr strange anomalies In public opinion upon this and other social Of the time The dom inating theme of this chapter is. in fact, the appliention of tha SO %  Inl conscience of the 19th century to the problems of the W, colonies. Post VW The last chapter brings the hi %  i, of tin %  OlOOlOl %  'he post :ir period. The problem of Fre. Trade principles in conflict with Dsnic Intorcats of the colo nies Is seen resulting in the sstab lishment In 1B97 of the prototype of Imperial Preference in th" i ii tnda sgrts The striking fonlirreads this remarkably detailed, %  torv of the West thr continuity of the main problems. The geographic and economic facts of the situation lias made this continuity inevitable. Dependence of the colonies upon the American mainland and upon Britain for SUDpUl %  A the underlying trouble The price ot sugar h. BOVernsd prosperity or adversit>. ; 1 thai price has generally bun at the mere) of economic force* the control of the colonies There has always been the prnlilem of tintbasntss propt of ihe vrttler who comes to make tnonvv and |o leave again Again* the Ill-founded belief that the white man in Ihe West Indies was both vary rich and very wicked II is shown that throughout tha islands' historv. hr h.i< had • i share of p !" i and bad fortune Snrial In social matters, the book ie veals the falsity of current belief that nothing was done to alleviate the condition of the people unlii modern times. Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, constant endeavour was made lo provide education, to improve morality and to maintain a reasonable standard of living. But it is interesting to see that in the iat;. century, the gathering momentum of the sugar industry led puh'ii opinion IO believe it Io l>e LndS lUUtel) txpar.sible and to their fear that with money being poured back into Industry* l ( *s would be available for social advars lie opinion was proved wrong. On the p illUosu csting io trace the long hlstorj Bf | colonial government in these old colonies From the earliest times, j the local communities played I ] principal part In the management of their own affairs, To-day. in-1 creasing government control n\rr | economic policies in modern time has hod the effect of placing in the hands of the mother country, power over the destiny of Britain's old colonies undreamed .1 ovei in the heyday of mercantilism. Locally, the later Crown Colony C.ovt riurients WOTO never dictatorial though often blundering, and seldom corrupt though often incompetent Problem The medern problem of the West Indies is that pos< Moyne Commission: that the de solubly linked with the Briti Commonwealth and is a tacit explanation of the fact that there I no iup i:-nt dsmsnd In the West Indus today for severance frorr. hit mother country This book is thoroughly In.'or] mntive and is designed to suit the ihose seeking a sound, bsuaC knowledge of the backKrouad to the West Indies of toI day It is as entertaining as so | tightly compressed a work could i *£*AA Enjoy lha hospitality, comfort ond thoughtful service which have made PAA "first choice" of vetsran travelers the world Over. NEW YORK \ I.I SJII ISBM or Irv COSH* t;edKl ISnlay. res now fen -Hi-i t Irnm S.ni |n ai. f-rrtfeeApftffrt.afli f Af. Inml ' NS* 1'orfc Inlrmulitmal Alriiorl •'< 1 Si-' THpatsrssnsoa THEQAMDOJJ West Indian & British $ Hand bio DeroiaUon Tat BI-:. ST. CROIX ST. THOMAS resqHBBl flights hy SWtfl I Upr t^lipprT*. Convenient dtparture rhnss. You can now "fly PAA" to Et ROPE, SOI! II AMI UK \ M Kit A. MEXICO, the FAK |. \SI u, i 1. around lbs world. For 11 years lha leading inlornalional airline-PAA was first to link the Americas by air, first to fly to all six conlinents. For revrrofloni. see your TmfI Agent or PAN MfHfCA/v llllKll) l/'/H II \ .>a I'liU A To.. I.ld. Itrnari SI Bridcrloun 'Phonr Utl (AflW bMIMH hour. VMWMMMM1iMM %  gaj c^ aw LUXURY ,I;T SOAPS |MI>RIAI. I-KAIIIKB LLMILN BIOSseiM an i. \\\ \( IMII HOW TO USE THE FORCING REBID i".... by M. HARRISON-GRAY They'll Do h livery Time .—..•—— By Jimmy Harlo I "THE FAM'.LV MEETS THE SOOC DOCTOR AT THE DOOR -VOS-ANO IVE QUOTE^UT BE TUATAS IT MAV-lT T4KES PiVE f OH, OOCTOR-WE'KE So"*) I SLAP WA'E COME-LITTLE I VDRiCK IS So-o-o SICK \ HE CAU HARDLY HOLD ^ iWEMTD HOLD VHIS LITTLE HE/>DUP/,_. <£} y% Rlc Z DQ^ 1 SOS DOC C/M C5ET hi A THERMOMETER J IN HIS KISSER North and so..ui i rcspona' la rwo Bpod ilitutes a forcing take-out Ith is so .strong lh;.I he visualises a certain game even thdugh N'orth may hi re opened on in tn j u North opens Unr Uiamonn on : 4> A <• : . *> l) Id it s : &f s h I i Noil!. i in thnr^t place *' %  iiBJ> sonic vaiue* m % %  i p sngc* -i : 11.. Heart A ganir in . v guanmird ai must nuki* -ui. will mv t.*: game llr is too Itrana Ii J direr I rai.M BHUI on %  Pro ly iiandtra. ti,%  roid -igim:.area; strength and Often asrvee io paint a very prearc oi Norma : <". II South'* rebid lor instance is THO No-Trumus rhiei Diamonds or Three Clubs d h.' ii Htarts This ir lump in a torcmg not oniv meai trump* in .support of a suit that l.a noi b" ShOWS l fie vl-t i> Hou'h will read mm with lour and lour Heir lib Diamond.-mil*: be long''' mncr he i id Hie ;,••. sun nr-rii-' snowleOgc that Norih ivoid in < ... [tn u mode r-'e nc K-OS dull an of nis niBli ards arc invaluable Over i UI Mi-art-hr is entitled to tnase a cur Old ol Pour 9pade •inch Nonh Hearts Ii may be necessary on occato make a forcing rebid in on unbiddablr suit provided the latter l lower in rang to the nr.'nded trump ratt North lie di : • R J II ; f 1 ; • \ > i He opens One Diamond sno reaponae One Spade Norm mu.M lorrr Co game with lifts llirre is no danger il South should raise Clubs. a< North can alaaya reiurn io spades ai (he same level South. will draw thr amr inference a* Before— that North has a lngleion at most in the unold suit runuta WonLU coi'VHltlHT RKUUtVKXJ a)fa*jaBB| ws5iisJ5;Ki^* J & R ENRICHED BREAD Till-: KMIM.1 III IIIIIM. iooi> FOR THE FOOT-BALLER AND ATHLETE \,*V 'D\ HAIR BRUSHES LAMES' HAIR BRUSHES : PHONE 4267 for EVERYTE CORRUGATED SHEETS 6'. 7', 9\ 10' Ix'iiBlhs CEDAR SHINGLES No, 1 and No. 2 Grades OIL-TEMPERED HARDBOAH1) '." I X t, S. Ill' l^inu STANDARD HARDBOARD '" and 3 16" Thick WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.





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TIILKSDAV. APRIL l. 1951 I;AKIEAIH>S ADVOCATK PAGE TIIRKF. Questions of Grenada Riots Answered In House of < 1.1 n m •>ns ON WEDNESDAY APHII. 4. in %  i I 'ommons Mr. Thomas Cook. Labour UP. for DundM replied to questions on the recent Grenada disturbs net FoJlo'.ving are the questl* replies: (LafcOMT, Sxxln lory %  ' of the damage ru>nl • .v:ii.ptnportj in Grenada during the recent not* %  Mctan %  %  •. %  ti.atives helped the authorities lo suppress Uie i man %  hard Arland tljihour, etary of whether Itatff statement to rrwKc on the recent disturbances in drenada. and particularly %  bcui the uV effect %  cause nf of tha sttuat. p LaUvei) normti IndusIrial dispute into a tee. and wh< ther ha pro%  hold any forn hnmedlata • r.uinstances %  ennoniic background >gain* u va to ha o\ mil ii w i\ IIIWI i JVa Possesses ••Wealth of Basic Material" -HENRY KAISER KINGSTON Henix triihst and hu week's honeymoon when the] rca., April 17 '.merlci.li xvift ended isit lod.ix for Nr Orleans build a $7ll.0tKM>0u plant lo h inalcu bauxit* of win. strati the wi*t Jaao aiu of Iho .stand While here Kalaer in pi poalu in connection with which his engineers era preparing plans for development. Ka when asked if he would build an aluminium plant here, said this would d o p e n d on future develop* menis. Mr Conk I make till, with perfurther stateKabar went on to say-that TMfnX on lnr situation in Grenada Jamaica poaaaaaod • Of a Xtrrmlt ^ tl „ v mv Kl basic material, necessary fo. velopmcnlbut little use was bring Thv Wa ( ,. made of rt H MarcE tndependfai h. and intelligence were easenenily. npif ntalhai of the A*creating IlldUltl Employers' Society aaS ln..iilr>v ii* i. _: Malaria Among It'san Old Wild Ex-Slaves W est Custom Hal would comr In fr>r rirvrins lh.. ... V u.| „„,| M Jm „,| IB mcnl.—ICP> Barbadian Dies Iir Grenada Workers' Union have met neutral chainnanaalp, No mcl reported bv the Governor .-ince the statement in reft, The at I'l i Estates but is i the negoUai wish ALEXANDRIA, Bgypt, April 12 J f %  MALLM-IEf. M.I* the heart of the Arabian PUty two yean ..g- a pinf.pe.-toi rit trt there are oases so highK heading for UW Klondike seurehed ider nTa'^rlous that the wandering lor his straying donkey Me round bedouins visit them rot Ofll} MB It at last and sat on a llge to Mi days once a year u> collect their real. Chipping at the ledge he mast' %  hart ..f the date harvest, a w 'i.i Health Drsanb it* .....k xx.,. tfalayw <*V r l • '"ESS , and Mount Horn „ Thp „ %  tfaasnoot WM Z ppn-rai Dr. M A. Farid, WHO ma tanST GEORGE'S, Apnl 17. ln V L.-W of the ncvotiationa 't who has ,ul left Saudi Mr. Alexander Grant. •. long proceeding locallx I do not wish Ar bln tter %  rnonth's saw reUred Head Teacher .if the St. t , add anything u. oravloua siato '"-I*"* condiUons In ihe_coinuiPaul's Anglican School, died last mrl;; in tS lfuiuK I rearet to %  n ""* Khaibir oosU. I* Sunday night. u y thai damage and losa in ). % %  nf>rth ''' is • ,l Medinr.. Coming to Grenada from Barupeci 0 f crops arc reuoi-lefl from tneee '* "n uidigenotis population bados many years ago. Mr. Grant mmc no ,-slal.;.. iho latest total r oblJUl 4 000 P 00 ^ w no •"* wai engaged In teaching all Ms eothnatas amumtine to £195 000 dcsrendaiita of Afriean KlJrWSt It ,, gg. j„ Bf ;, m ,,, and who have a part la", hwnui menl u ropaj |U )s trmat '*•' • l a,,,lrt malaria. Thc\ li\. In too ,,1 a ep,300 ari d to |..j v;iIr .„„ tho oasis all the year round amparty al £^.700. some cimens cultivate the date orop Noi with wlreieai experteru? standing this partial lmcommunJcaUon-i munlty. Dr. Farid found a auteen duiinc the Stltke others joined. !" t *' 1 ndard **"** f( > r notarial as high aa 6a per eenl Dr. Morgan (Labour Warring">"" the children and a malaria ton i: Is my hon. Friend aware of blo d Uldex f •• "' 1 ""' '"" therconotnie eondiUon--of the poor ,nfi lnc nn-tranirolsalon season *• •> labcurc: .. Qrenoda in U "" l>on "' r time*. Dr FarW Ij '.'in. %  scam giving out the aid. the dale eultiyalors weio 11. .In. •ni'fii mi I ••liimn: Unseating \rmvhuir Soldiers Fram KlfffsSX KlKiKM %  .'•V, A ftp : Senaturs. t 1 Id f. WasUrjaSon §n rl 'I hi s. raati 1 lo drive %  %  rnnrs ajid into Korea's front ..111 becauw thev ..re of eomhaa^ Many at to iio .in,! are %  I are >ti I DIlM DUB 11 I %  The Sena to -, %  lake en li %  4 thoan iiaiiMii.il n't onij '1MUUi (ilAMOK an 1 CMaaajo guetl. star of Bag ft* halls for 60 years, opens on Thursday at a smart BMI Slds borM J MpUi • %  i to go into a Chicago theatre foj | salary of £3.900 g CKITICS are imp.UnBV 1 n>.M M-ien.e thrtlln tillll. 'T\ Man FroM PlaaW X winch an intended to !-• a spltM UtigUnfl ptctura LEICESTER The man lands .11 an Kiwi Anson Smith, headlalashf in a block of ire RUSIH-> Mead Boys' the earth because X Is perishing found gold. School. Leicester, who took a irom cold. The critics say—I As soon ax the news spread, a party ,,f his schoolboys to Spain ,\ u \\ alu) 0 (,i fgakdO town sprang up where re I I MCkll DU| klM IUSBrested and, in all, fISa mlW lanning a similar trip In "T HAPrT.NFD n W.cni-inev owm-i Itlon loM tha Ueeeaat reabrday Instead rat tho oianges andl that U> | apefrmi. they were mel with I mediate arrival of any mtnfwi which are now comlnf|from either of these ports lu Trip To Moscow Planned Lay life, for the must part Paul's district where ho 1 a prominent member Anglican Church, being Reader for over 40 yi as Superintendent of the Sunday School. lie retired %  f.-w nan befme a Government Model School was established in the district ">d tho Anglican and Roman Catholic schools were closed One of the largest funeral atelsewhere in the Western States or Am.-iu.i. and avory cifssraagoer hen at l.i-l ,m bnpffl what Ufa in thof Tiiushroom towns was like. To judge bv Duncan Enin.h's IT'S AN OM* WILD WKttT CISTOM the West wns even xxllder than the DtOVkH Stake out. It was a place ol sudden wealth, uner wouM ttVO* will be a much more difltctilt ta>K than going to Spain Perhaps tutpit < -ThiII X ill CM" III to Spa 1 %  a off. and pergolden fortu a singer who pleased hi WOuld buy an hotel (or pleasure a Buusaajer pleos Of sudden povcrmild running or the vebulc HI.' fpw diffHrulties, as BO inountainH lo negotiate siuii as we had when we went to Spain. aylMoM difficulty will be to gel permission from the Geri.tion to the Treasury til Congressional eominiilee egeeaal for a minute's lllanoi to lajgoVeT from the shock. M LM Skua for ntan. PolUh and Russian author!. ties 'u go through their territodown. rlaa. Wo shall also, of coui have to ruVM the permission our ForeiBB Office. t;oon FtMJO NEWS* tura Bacrot reports that turn ed" to produce than for the vc the last ajsn topped rising. /ujrteul Hranntin r cent mf 1st precodin %  prices have %  MO sajeg %  n een\henthc funerI 5l J n 1f r %  '•' i rfcvtly delfTac*'"f 1 *•*• %  and h ad to surrender fuiv diitriet al took place on Tuesday. Re>i. John Trrna'n PrM Iw^t*S5?r* iSSmSSt *" *** or-agrieultuTal e-r Reetor of St Paul's, delivered £",£_ <""iced in any of the P*ted and acquired the right to a moving address on th*. llfei Would he se. (hat machin,ne entire date harveat to tlw mend-Tooth Dakar, SlotMaehi available u. lake lied.ajln owners. With the pasIda, ...id I'nstBgabl) Mn Bro matter in hand aa soon ns "****' ' the >*ra, however, the (w ho had survived the Trtanli I date cultivators Iteenme emanel..iid work of the deceased and Archdeacon H O, Pifiotl later committed the body to the grave 1 the churchyard. Colonies? 50 per rent of the crop Mr. Cook We now have this numbering about Ofl.oon bsMMutM Wages Council soi up ;md we according to D r F,ud. xi-K tin ErOtn it Khaibir oasis once a yen to eolMr. Pickthorn (Consei NotUiWjhauBJ: Could attve, lact their half of the daU cMl lived hard and* died hard Thi drank Tarantula Allot .md Folly Rod in saloons onmed 1 Ruin or COtns In and Hie They gambled so continuously :.i..t llie dealers woik.-d 1 our,J ihifti 1 think It would be a good thiiu. in se oral way .1 .1 |>.Mx of l ild go to Hu.-..i Ii cann ibly do any harm • 1 think it would BSJ 1 v 1 x nice > on the part of the Huss horities 1 this %  MIB Aasaseahi nge Of the bays IS 14. I'BF. HI IKiET leaders lo-day • Tbnea BBHj Herald Iribo.* ce synipalhy ami adm which would bs* used 1 old Lolesotot Corporawhiih ha.tK-eii leno ;ouiCI the House but do noX go .r U at w^ •*,. and six ^daughter,1. some of thern Je told ^was ^ =! ^J^'L^S^L ^SHS **• Mexico once M ,he who.e M|[._** %  "LUj^y^ u c 1 think. LB idvance for Britain's haio pros! Burden of then lefr. Brituiu will not baOi h WHISKY and ekOUl I cing boosle-l in Rill | sementa because Arna rot buying enough <>i *i l 1 1 in i'xi'i lation "i Haita Men tailed to sppaai aaun .11 %  nre si 1 nig Sitmpl. F< .' 'i 1.0 %  I gtfpon — 3B| Oasis Scourge "independently the partial immunity of the eulIhe early part tlvators. Bedouin tribeKmen who f %  '' ken. Gentleman's reply I contract malaria sue ,. ., *' % %  !" quite clear about it. Sec quenlly. he n-iinted out WttuM Vskll I.Jke V n %  POtafJaM to the hon, iVOUHI I fill L>IK< . OeWlemon hut I did not hear Free Trip To Paris? S^ TiiiiK.'Tr'txA'S Mi,,ari nM %  **" known a %  ,, T,SUI I, n aoa n s of sstlmatlng how much, *ourge in the Aral 1 An essay compe'Minn "" r ,*' If anv. of (lie damage caused Is mrc "•<* Oan ol MotUUrUTawJ ami subjects has l-n oruan:*.-.! % %  i( S(lr mcr paUokatT to fja tocojL known ai French Consul in TTtmdnd. and 1 Mr Conh am not iJTaSoailT'tltrek 'Mcllnu) fever. Acopen to all irsons of Briiwh na, ion lQ rcply lo he a „ rr irf ceding to Ur. Farid, it is betionalily resident for at least the „f ,|, a ouestu.n I mentioned lleVOd that malaria was the prin last live years in one oi I | Usuignce and Mount Horn. The cipal reason why the i>edouin.* ing teiliterler Barbados, aWttoh .,„ 1 %  ^ratepatMlantiy*' means thai ssitni never sallaati in the ntunor. Guiana. Jamaica. I^eixx.iii I Ual . . j .. ossssl but baVl pftrfi Trinidad and Tobago and the WtUM Council. ">ainlain their traditional nomadic Windxvarrt Islands. Sir R. Acland Mv hon. Frienn existence. To UUs day, malaria is The competition is divided Into menHOoed tha OjUOStlon of lnvesWe mnior health problem or the Tbey had to invent even wiiriei two aorta, the Ordinary Contest ugations that are now proceedcountry and the conditionin '.he fantasies--fieas so lurg^ U aad the So.-. i,d Contest. The On.t Ing If thos 0 are investigations Khaibir oasis are t barked when removed from a prlr.e for the Ordinary Contest i* snnply by the Minister's Labour In the recent years, lander lh" bed: mosquito, sytalch threw holiday in Martinique, and for ofBcer, I would ask whether he guidance and eneourage.-nent of rocks when disturbed. f hi> territory on a single th They were superstitious some nuilgn refused to rO'SaSli ir •. winch n.i.l Ite. n x. wosnu iuitil the prlast had Mcwn holy water .,11 0V0I With the air i-ompressor. Bul tin y ICXCICI ceo i H lad)i of the lino" who gtoyt d 1 S mining camp gftOl .. %  of smallpox had driven more re spec table women to SoMl They held to a rode that no one should shoot an unarmed man or shoot an armed man in the back. Nor were they content with the as ol their Itfs ol Leicester, and illu lbe etty*S Industries. Ijst year the chief driver win tie father of c of Use boys, a Mr. Page, who is a long-distance assenger COOflb driver. Mr. Anson Smith hopes that Mr I "ago will be able to drive then ..on this year. Th.. distance from to Moscow, by road and sea. Is ..mately 1,700 miles. _LK S tteseureli Cloiunil VleclH fn Ii iiiid.id The fn Will Not A< < ept Cu-iiiuiiugeiuenl the Special Contest ihe tlrst prtcu is %  sufficient man to Investigate King Ibn Sand, atti will be a Brst class !' IS with three Of its four mrmlsrrs preaent. Thoae present were Mr A dK Ki.iinpton. AfpiculturaJ Adt Iset %  thi Colonial invelopment BAd WsUhrs Oraantoatlon foi tho BrM jsli territories; Dr. H" I Director of Aajrlculturs i f< r the IVench Wosl to i Dr F. W Ostendorf. Director of tli Agricultural aUUHUTasnl Sta tJon, Surinam. The meattni of the Commission considered a OomrnlSSaon puul •>keavallgblo to thei %  •,. RTasf i coel and steel out wilhout &A£' t S' t £eff&. i^nr^!^!^"-' 1 ^ H WUMama, V M C \ fold Street. Manv Brilisli Jokes Make Fun Overseas the known ICCmtlSS Of Com|f the head sralMT M %  Londi In other parts of tlio hotel sec* an enormous ink the hon. Gentleon one of his table. Ssan nhle to give trie House nn chances are that 'the Australian ossurenco that which this dispute nrose? appealed to the World HeaJtfa ook it dooa not arias al OrganliaUor. to assist them in AU point. Mr. li.nlt.op has the malaria control cimpaigns The (Hue pf tfa Secretary wcrK wou d lnr i u de spraying o* %  i handling the situation, hfluse* and stables with DDT. not onlv from day to day bul dralnln|( & ^.^^ nn d supprearom hour to hour. Ion „, |, ieKiinf pieces of malaria%  wan (Nabmrtng .,.. (J Ttpe< tmosuj which Hut in Iho Wild West anything wax possible, anything gaaj bl UV .I|)|.'. If you want 'wo hours of roorins; teatful sun i i Ei rich' book. araeeis Work dtiai. IfM ta —LES. d'tstnes other th: Warning was issued by the ,„„,, i^,. fa^ilit Hlune Wrstphalian f ployers* Federation which covers „,. | .. the Ruhr r T) „nt Kmployers MM they 'rely on ^J^-71 the West German Chancelloi ?? fj*fS?J ol ihe O n i %  Blolog* i i thO Canbliean. and in No. 5" Is to blarnC And if he hear* the crash of breaking crockery behind him he bends to mop it. will probably the some guest. airing his BSflM of humour. To satisfy that sense Of humour. piactical joke manuf* tun i i Britain ore working overtime turning out rublwr-tlppe-1 pencils, exploding theatre tick lathering soap. disintegrati. it match-bcxes. and many other %  gags." Production i being stepped un in preparation for the BIF %  begins this month. Biggest overseas customer at the moment is Anstr... America second ^_ thai full inquiry bite has been made? air. Cook: We have no eviMnea St the moment of anv Comwas built the ink II "'•' so (ar ** G 1 0 ** 1 a co "* K l In Saudi Arabia, the dangerou Anopheles uombioe are ; U.N. Kxperts The in %  ban areas also a demonstrated in the port of Jed da where a nan* anstss i few/ years ago As WO, old wells and eis mod 'but we are watchtarn* *uv in-;lecled and became ng the i osltion very carefully ideal breeding places for mo*. —L.E.S. quitocs. This gave rise to. eon %  sid.iahle increaao In Uie bad dence of malaria. Experts from i the Food anu AgrlcultumOrganisation of the L'nlted Nations are now in Saudi Arabia to advise the government rn Improving agricultuul Baeth Cd" and orTmotir.g Irrlgat GERMAN CAR RECOVERY AMAZING Output of the Germ^-. industry <" approiuhiui; ball uroi the British tadnstry, socornuai lo engineer K. M. ssOpflB Hampton-in-Arden. new BrrnuOg ham. "hc.eiilly I was lo Gcnna:.;, and 1 -*a* astonished at the recovery there .mtv tin w.u. In .•-.nd to-day. "Althougli there is j basic 48-hour-week. Oennan workers will work any I. pceds and the union* and TSlSur^mi" .n the chemical .Ml u lustr% have demanded co" d ^rricuHure Oi^.maatlon o i..anacem<-nt tor ihe mdu-trv. the the United rUUoni that FAO ma> thud biggest in Weal (iennany make available ths after steel and coal. HOaW ateODOaT aaat Labour Minister Anton Storch Economist for lh.it purpose 'ecently* advocated I than eo___^_^^ %  isnagement should he introduced in most Industries—Reotee. Lord RUHHCII \\ ill Return Home ifiiinanian Shools Yugoslav Guard BELGRADE. April 17 A Rumanian (ronliit (uard ihot ^Mni" SmT~Sn wS* kl Ktam to 'oUTiikn' u'titmi l/JNDON. April 1 l*-rd Russell of UvorpOO) ss ill leave hu post as Deputy Judge Seasonal ,,( ti (( British \-" M itnmoni.il Cm oi l'i" d,ix His Honour. Ju-tH .• <; I. TOylOt granted decree hJ Rivoka Birsr.tajn. petitioner, and 1tol BlrsiUln. respondent, award. of OTIC ol the i to Ihe petlttora*Ti and made a On the lower sral III Q li Nltoo, instrucled by Measrs. C. W I. Ctarka A < anpeared on behalf of the j>etit loner. TodMj NtfTmutoott Th,. the d T *mic aneMilk •rhifh i <-r naw Cew Oala lamvus an* poeular a vholnemt anargiaing food (or i brain an* I.-.-I,. blandad onlr from i assafajoai, Ane T N.T.'a grst nrxewaga to yeu is TA*glT"Jo-OAY|JoTXo-MOg|tOWI! 391 Tono P Chocolate Malt &MUk BEVERAGE • ACtmS Cm IV a W a rt a mill i. rn I TI> RINSO washes BRIGHTER;kerf All your coloured clothes are so much brighter when washed with Rineo—and your whites are whiter tool Rinso's rich suds soak out the dirt so tiKvoughly, so quicklyyet so gently 1 For easier washing, and a cleaner, gayer result, always use Rinso. R/NSOforqt/ your wash/ OIVOS AStafJBV <\YAII..\HI.K... "NOXZEMA" Yam lav.Miftie St-m < ie* n leal Mcdgskl a%to l icon presents StiNgt'ltN S. BK hc ami Heal* Mm llTaaatoM MOXCEMA allOWS MSB i<> mm xiir llolNla>x. or VAretends WgfenUI Fear ei Wonx about BUlaSatT K.mcmhr. iix NOXZfiMA /., w..i i ...' < rtam ih, liiii, Wltti lm ,n rSjanj S./es l/J. t,V. and .. id abroad which are already ,,\ VToUio. North Rhine Westphali bringing results. I made an error of judgment in Free enterprise and Ihe desire UaO manner and matter of his of workers to better their living ommunlcatlon witn the I*r<---. standards were responsible for th" f %  e published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re eive a prwe of books or Stationery to the value of 12/8. Send this coupon with your story. aFNIOft SnORT iTOB COMrETTTION m AVAILABLE!! I^BFORD 1 10 -"^ VMS $2,135.00 Usual Fleet Owner's Diseoum IOIIMISV GARAC.E ROBERT THOM. LTD. — White Park Rd. — Dial 4391



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PAGI. ld UAKUADOS ADVOCATE TIIUI.MiU M'fill r* IKI Qahib Qaliinq Lady Of The Left M PS. FRED OLTON tad Mr %  Trinid.'d M.-.lcrday afternoon b> B.W.IJ had been I gm*it ten oi i),r oiutiu Now UH Often v. >U bo the RUCM ot the Fast ham* In San Mr. Eailham % %  lion company for T L L. Mrs. Otioti expects to I* awn/ for about three aio nu i Married Yesterdov M ISS ANN PARRIS, daughter oi Alt. and Me R. B. Parrls of Black Be*. M I married yesterday af>< n St. Patrick's Church, JcmmotU Lane, to Li. P moon is being spent at the Edgehut she is remaining there For %  water Hold. Biilhshcbu. lit.liday and will follow Mi. EdLt. and Mrs. Short expect t< wards to SI. Kilts short' >. %  MM for England about the end of May or early June. Comings and Goings i F ROM Trinidad on Tuesday i-vening came t)r Lr-nnardl Hutson. Oovwnment Veterinar\| Officer in AnilIton afftaaa By EVELYN IRONS M Criccieth this la it week-end before tod '" *T!* the new session recalls her to **" London Is to put on an old skirt (she doesn't fancy her small. plumish figure in slack*) and do hat work is possible In the rainthat know wnat it i-nd ivai, Lady don f*" " *** m w toakM garden being vinrei. You will remembe; LT ft4 MRS PETER SHORT PssTtf have been split as often (and as nol th-" atom sjul nm .i.ii along niceiy thw weak B *l uu d about In* LiDera. far Lady Mtgan Lloyd George has nny 5* our *"* •V>* w e !" <" been making onta<' with th* Oo la ner by the Tories. ^' ou wl remember. ato, how She enjoys a asm* golf, b Megan on vacation it 'P* 1 "** n w ,our months ago after and she reads a lot (Ticllope for •-he ancestral retreat at CrlrcfMh l -" d y Megan had votad with the choice; She can pop over to rnarvon, has been entertain*** Socialists on housing and living Anglesey in an hour (she greeted chairman of the Soc.ails: coats. Her conduct. Lady Vlolei Princess Margaret mere on ThursParty Miss Alice Bacon. Mr 1*4 neat month) told the Camday), and is olten seen around Chuter Rde. new Socialist leader bridge University Liberal Club was rftth her two Pembrokeshire of ihe Commons, Mr. Tom Wll"*> subtle and intricate and becarets. 11-year-old Sloncyn (littl* Mams. Minister of Agriculture, and vond "** *"*< Xhink it would be Jarui) and hi* isVmonth-old son Mr George Thomas Roriali-t Ml" understood oniby Freud." Bllw* (Little William). Although Lady Megan pfoFUrting tor wnatever Freud ... „ _, would have called it) with the A local JP (she attanded petty Socialists is no new pastime for ***<** yesterday) and urban Lady Megan From the time she district councillor, she has no time Aral took her seat as member or tast for domestic tasks; i' for Anglesey, and lhat was nearly looked aft*bv a staff of two anc" fact rposte to what the 22 years ago. there have been peri 77-raar-old S, !" h ,. JO 7' a *! right-wing Noble 1*0odlcal rumours of her switching lomed the household before sh< over t thst party. Mr. Herben was born. There i also a houseMorrison whom she greatly adkeeper in the I-ondon flat mires, has vainly cajoled her to join him. But loyalty to her father, the force that kept her Liberal Mill docs so. She chides the Liberal* for drifting to the Right— %  drift \4>l YTI4 4 | Ml < |\| H A .Members Only) .' T AT • p ROD CAMgRUN |B 'flOSS Off ROOMTOM \ otin Tu> KNtOHT v Hi' WHiTil\ %  .iHOVS A ItNIVFRSAL Thi> Pll S Sil Mill k. •( i*(i a | mill M UM IIMIll F.I.— X-TIMI, IHIUAV a ~AT1*SI)*V !PI rmn-'i o "imi utn.n •uimn HOkNINfl *T '<-••.U.k UNSIV ii-iimnn i..i..Ur UM tctcd afterwards that nothing but tea was brewing at the confabula tinti. people wandered if the Llbar I left-wing Noble Lady's gat. together with the Socialists I rnUV was Uf For on the heels of the new %  at the Tories had agreed is i .r: her. I*idy Violet Bonhair Carter announced on Wednesdav that she accepted the invitation 11 he prospective Liberal candldot. for Colnc Valley, the Yorkahln JA.MZTTA MsES§ SBW Lower Rioad Streel i puirs Ovar Nifnasatll M", En Route to Ne?w Appointment Th" Sun Nevei Sett i-onstituency whose present tndkmaway from the old Radical tradibent la Mr Qknvfl Hall. chairTu-u 'ton I am a Radical, and proud of of the Parliamentary Labour '•** But It seems that she would T 11F BUN rtaaa m H.r East and .. %  ' '' %  *'! ; %  t %  where Itegiktrai Of th. Supnn .. of nc un I.e Wir | %  Atii-i i 81 Parliamentary PI re works Difllcull" Sometimes. Temperainenf Plenty As Lady Violet knows. But when she turns the Lloyd George niil •>"* Lloyd Geoi< -k-m>. "he I winner every time—except perhaps. In Ladv Violet's constituency of Colne Valley. under rather lha: WORLD COTTKICHT StSEStvr.0 _L E S THERE s'.ould be flrewuikt i: them the feud that existed bet we%  i. ,, i njoj i %  rJon's best. Fot those who %  IIC %  if I. Ill loy l "nlihl out' without 10m ,h * rud l J rx 1 """ 1 V*' WP bition. she may have. It Is hardlv .drinks, the Sunset seem?f! r ''-*"• A quith and Uo>,i •'kel*lhat the Uberal. will be m 1 place. It is acclaimed h> Gpor,e flarw AnfW "mce in her prime (she i* 48 now) lUt.C. Radio Programme iplit Uiem >ave them. She is their deputy leader m the Commons: took charge for a month when Mr. Clem Davles had ins recent attack of llu. — % % % %  ; y %  .; %  %  — By sticking to th e Liberals she ___ ^^ ^_--,, NVLON HfHSUNUa r r II 1 in Poui Vrrpsr* Nw f" Summc. llolidj>^; -I'M HI PRICES IS BAIIIIM; SIIT TINY CIRL-K SIT.t ** ** SMALL BOIT IKIM.. GIRLS I* • "" s LADIES* rom %  ** si up GLOBE AND U r M I CAPTAIN CAREY U.S.A. OPENING TO-MOKROH SOD AMI 8 50 I* M TOI1W y— AND J* r M LAST SHOW* Alsn LADD Wanda HWDBUC ifcsd by that versaMr. Edward* is an Old HarrisontHe West 1 Ian, HaqualWed •*. i Ban bn t his boys In an atmosphere noUblv Law in England nn^l wl idly. 0. A I^slle. the dubha Bai Of Hi.' Middle Temple in v . Julv 1BIP r.uesls seat themselves enmfort ViiitiiiB Sute. r.i>in uphol ler> arnxhalrR, RS C, M UAONOh d bai talk and iantja, waiters j.-er\-c itaughUf AMI Grant three-week holiday with Mr. **?•' m 9 jassj Malor, Canadian and Mn Claytoii Bw it hV To enjoy the t.^-st that the Sun. ^TLCI".-; "• Trade Pommls**>'• Mrs. Cisgnou mid Mrs Evi^et has to oner, be there between N-. oon %  > Thp K*w*. sloner tor the lyn are sisters Mrs. Gagnon ami U am. and 3.30 a.m.. for lhat I* ££ !" p""' i'i""' ."""'-.Eastern (aribher daughter had i. %  the cabaret time in the Sunset. M ,( Annnnnrtt •. T is aim. N*w> Analr-u !W l,IM^...I T | fl %  ir 7a* am Hwi LMtn MUIIC. SIS bean and t h Guianas dew in from Trinidad on Tuesday night %  nd out again vesterdav afternoon a pas. sengi-i leaving holidaying with other ratattvas The cabaret, compered by Tony ami they cama down to %  DOdy, from .l-naica. includes Evelyn "before -he ret in its In UM m opean and West Indian jirti-les. U.S. where hrr home i' in Rot-hf(,,„, ,,,, (he i_ioKramme include ter, N Y LiM*n*r Choif* Ainwni. Ir.os sac I. 11.10 p III Sir*. Analvii... Down > m — IB.1S m but she has been assured times that her truculent brilliance would be such an asaet to the Socialists as to rate ministerial rank It is obvious where her sympathisers lie ("I like to see these people tackling privilege"). And what an education she had for the Minister she has never i H become'. From the agi* of six until she was 20 her home was In Downing Street. Aril In No. 11 and then after 1016 at No. 10. Often she attended her father's famous breakfast pnrtiemeeting the great political figures. ADVENTURE IN SUSPENSE I 'jtt To Paris Afternoon Flight M R. A. S. BRYDEN. <-.v< : .i n|:. special dancn %  Hied by professional dancer* %  Dirvctut of \I< . %  '' %  r OSANT MAioa" Hryden and Sons Ltd, was hi forgetting ealvpsoes by plane was Mrs. Lena Raleigh the passengers on BW 1 A. • %  .H:I lha "aa an"" who had been spending %  short noon Might from Trinidad holiday with her niece Mrs Jack day. Other psM tnfei | Marion. on the same plane l "a*a M Settling: In Rahr, Acti-iu Qeneral Mai M ISS FRANCES CAINES and B.W.I.A.. Mr. Jules Hen.,., | Misa ItopeCalnesot St. Kllt4 Staff Manager It W I A who had been holidaying in liarCharlie Taylor. M.n *:dos have arrived safely in the Hotel Royal and Mi i\ C. Chad I* S. and are now settling down derton W 1 Buparvtsoi r u>* IM. 5 is p ... ^ l g rl J".' 1 ':'! 1 11 ". w a ik:.aji 0 (,,,( %ht c„, | Slnlrmrnl ..I An-iuiil. S.I3 n p. it Ainartran l.nirnlna Wrk. •* Inii-iiii.i-. mo pm s*rioua Arau Ttis ts..; The Nn !'• VltVIMIIIIN OF I'll'A '-^ %  ^-X--*r %  fe BY THE WAY... By fifACHCOA^8£R r*Ha outbreak of thatching all over England is said to be slate per man-"' the llnbhousc steam othlrtg), lhat has ilread; fr drtim-hidx "gesture" to foreign tourists, been dealt with b; who are supposed to expect Yc mant wientldc advisei 9 Olde and Fritefullye Merrye lu-mbody. Yngelonde to be covered witli straw III tur/in^r Irurlioit The result is |h d unauthorised thalchers arc at work on Queen T^HK new RowlajKbaM aj Anne houses, garages, dance-halls. A purpose tMclion %  power-stations, iram-dcpots and haw a tractive cumpui i gas-ccntamers. Is it too late to laoMb enlist a corps of old yokels in The DalmalM aanad smocks* One of these, seated on heads ore cased m an aluminium ale-bench at the ata . Overall L mlttrdelivery T ut. Bacratnrf of the Friends ot Coal complains that my not< on the negative or overall undo delivery of coal was misleading While conceding that a negative delivery is a delivery of nothing this high official of Ihe Soeien maintains that a delivery of nothing or non-delivery of anything is ,i fMsltive delivery of r.othmg, and. in that sense, mare In line with the best contempoiniy thought than a negative delivery of something. As for what I. called undcrall 0VtT-ds1vat> (the system by which one or two units of p< i .onnel get [our lump-BUUD1 ere I atnkhad to oavrahusg cylindar< il:ini|.-. with hodefleclo':. above : -i-nsings. If I seem to !, go io l>rig Bridge | Works, and ask [nackarav. She will show :nodcl. Prodnaae: What cxaelh is nut ol all this'.' %  i i %  bid for ;i blga> r rculatlon. Something to dra ned publtl Whal aitad in lracti*>n mpi' Junior Short Story Competition The Evening Adracite invite* all children under 12 to enter f< Its Junior Short Starv CompatittaaV Thd MM 1*017 will (>e publisher every Monday n The Evening AdXacate. and the winner will rcccivi a prize to fie value of ? 6 in either books or stationery. Thp sloric can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30' words In length, and must reach Hie Children'* Editor. The Advecal< Co. Ltd.. Ctty not later than Wedrtesdav r V .-rv week. NOTS l Stories must not I copied. Send this coupon with your story. JUNIOR BHORT STORY COMPETITION Nasaa Aga Sebeal Hume Addresa !* %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  CHECK TAFFETA 36" $1.85 a %  LOCKNIT WHITE and PASTELS $1321 %  GUEST TOWELS PURE LINEN I %  COLOURS 99^| %  WHITE 88^ | %  MORCAIN CREPE 36 $1.71| %  EV/UVS & WHITFlEinS i I DIAL 4606 YOUR 5H0F STORE DIAL 4220 I vo** at Th* violin" Ji Ihe Versailles peace conference. v Vl %  > %  She met the men of Versailles, she w saw the treaty signed After*o wards she had a year in India as io guest of the Viceroy Lord Reading. But she had no aim then to be an MP herself. Her ambitions !" were w ijlly centred in "The Okl oo Man". She was for years his closest companion, going with him everywhere—to the United States, Canada. South America, all over Europe. When al 27 "LI. Q.'s little gtrt" arrived in Parliament she had not Dmonly her father's flashing blue '*** eyes, but most of his mannerisms, including the characteristic stabbing finger. Welsh wag her earliest language, she learned her first words of the English at three and a half, when lie was taken to an English hote nlournnd was unable at drat lo understand what anyone said Poetic cadences of her mother tongue still ho In her speeches, although oa,_ia"eS aja, mt w^' The Third Proi Snihlui will hr Thvrv S NTBDCn contribution tc Festival will probably be giRnntit eonvayoi bcM in k lights it will give t h e impression of continuous und will give off r. nleaslng aroma of Snil>i>lcne, „ fc llM • ..„ Uul will cln m.vthlnt "**T from a human face to a lightnouaa wnu, Atlnched lo the belt will be a super-loudspeaker, which will croon the praises of Snibbo to specially selected lassical melodies. "VisitL._ England." *ald a director yester> day, Mill want culture as well as enteitalnment." accent. Her Fortune Glenn Ford Valli Claude Rains Oscar Homolka THE WHITETOWER m OATWHH • mm siis Plus r—LEON mm in •POPO KNOWS WORST" Scw^ptlj b) HWOLD SHUHW infl '1Um HOtFWN &tfdM 6) niEDIMCK dtCOKDOTA Pro) yH ( %  BOttRl mm* PLUS LEE BROWN ASK HI* OKrllMTRA AND THE YEAR'S GRANDEST HHOW THE SUPER STAR TALENT CONTEST CROSSWORD i 1 P i r 1 r 1 i • 1 r r r 1 r f i i fasa o uj drcor.ttlon in orosi %  ; laid lba< DII| mean x degi<>t II a Itajoice. ti rrn in tn a*y i: contain' meat <>nd vacetublea. Ml %  —-1 aound riaitaa but lt' lunt : JO mn.. a Cr. I* Urall 1-. VB ..%  ; IX Hun is tn~n. IM V.., raATmS? 4^-a -w Complete your Hat from iheac :— ..I" -I WhMt Corn Fl-Hea Cn'ti.m PawiWr Sola WoiThealfT Jiiiu— .. CC, aae Tomato Krii-hup run Aaup iCttickan. n>(. OstalL rtilrkrt. NaoJU' STUAB1 & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. IF RMR has missed her vocation In the Cabinet. Lady Megan is in many other ways a lucky woman. Her father left her a half (after certain bequests) of his fl40,000 fortune. She has the family house Brynawelon. at Criccleth. with its views of mountains and sea: a larsje flat in South Kensington with a TV set and a view of Big Ben, and her week-end collage at Churt, Surrey. Her way of taking It oasy at PLAZA Th+mtrr>-Bridgetown(DiAL 2310) FIT?, I1AREWOOD Singing CLAYTON THOMPSON Singing KEITH SEALEY Singing JOE CLARK Singing PERCY WELCH Singing GERALD DA1SLEY Singinit •newlldercd "Song of Songs" "If. -Bop Qoaa M. !i-;m" "Surrender" YOU, Csm Di. No Wrons" ratoN Pit Mr: IWUftc r: Halrony 69c; Boxen 7!. TICK ITS on SJIC DAILY. ULORC THKATRI H5IMHI CASH PUI/KS BMPDIC Today 4.45 A 8.30 p m. TMnorrow 2.SB p m Only Columbia Picture* Present* %  CIRl. OF THK YEAR" Starring .... Robert CUMMINGS JOOTI CAULFIELD with ElM LANCHESTEK IMIXY Taday Only ... %  . i -. ,. ,%  Republic Double— AUTRY in . %  ROBIMIOOD or TEXAS AND %  THE eoatA VHO CAME BACK with Nancy KEI.l.Y and John LODER Opening Friday 20th •• THE YOUSGER BROTHERS ROYAL last Two Show* Today 4 30 8.30 pm. ITnivers.il Big Double— LOO CHANEY in . "MIMMVS TOMB" AND Tin: EXILEwith P'.ugl:.. FAIRBANKS. Jr. OLYMPIC Today Only 4.30 A% 15 p.m. Warner Bros. DoubleGeorge BRENT and Beverly ROBERTS In •GOD'S COUNTRY t \/> THE tt"OWl\ AND •• CHEYEWE with Dennis MORGAN and Jane WYMAN B&3S&SS2S&SSSSSS&fKSWS.W'lW ir+ otter FA'EBVTniXK FOH yoi it nooF Al Prices thai eannol lie repented GALVANIZE SHEETS—Ml.. 7(t.. 1(1. Bit. 10 ll. ALUMINUM SHEETS — fill.. 7ft.. ML, "It.. 1011.. 11(1.. 12ft. EVEK1TE SHEETS—6ft.. Mt, 8ft., 9(1., lfl. ALUMINUM GUTTERING RED CEDAR SHINGLES „ .,—,,„ RUDEROID MINERAL SUSFACBD ROOFING 3fl. Wide Biff .Xnir! Bu}§ you-! PLANTATIONS



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PAGE FOU* BARBADOS ADVOCATE TlUrtsIIW. \PRII. 19. 1*51 BARBADOS AD\OCmr, Printed bj UM Advocit* Co. Ll4. Oiod I liMnUwn Thursday. April 19. 1951 Ml 1*1*1.1 OIIIHIIS THE conference ol .supply officers from British Caribbean territories was expected to end their discussion of current supply problems, last night But it is possible thai there will be a further meeting today. Conferences of Supply officers assumed special significance after devaluation of British sterling and the West Indian dollar in September 1949. It was immediately following devaluation that the first important conference f Caribbean Supply officers was held in October 1949. Thenhad been an earlier conference in 1947 but the problems discussed prior to 1949 have littli' significance in the light of subsequent changed economic trends. Then major conference attended by financial officers and high ranking administrative offlcials to discuss supply problems of the Caribbean and to review the economy of the region in 1950. This week's conference is the Ihird conference at which the urgent questions of supply will be considered. All three of these conferences had one thing in common They were discussing supply problems of the British Caribbean from within a closed shop. The officials representing colonial Governments cannot by the very fact of their official status approach the problems of supply in the Caribbean from any other viewpoint than that of the official rulings which have their origin in Whitehall. There can be no question of the competency of officials attending these supply talks to discuss supply problems of the Caribbean from the official point of view. But grave doubt has been expressed in commercial circles throughout the area that an exclusively official body should be discussing supply problems, unaided by the wisdom and experience of representatives of Chambers of Commerce in the area. At this particular period of crisis, when the whole pattern of Canadian-West Indies trade is a matter of personal concern to the Canadian Minister of Trade and Commerce, it is certainly a matter for regret that the views of West Indians experienced in this trade should not be heard at a Supply Officers' Conference. It is well-known that Canada is today displeased with the unbalance in Canadian-West Indian trade and that a conference will be held in Ottawa to discuss the Trade Liberalization Plan which began to operate in January, 1951 when the "token imports" scheme proved a failure. Canadians are by no means convinced that the trade Liberalization plan will be much more successful than the unsuccessful "token imports" scheme, and they are already taking the initiative to call for a review of the "moribund Canada-West Indies Trade agreement of 1925." by which Canada is obliged to subsidise an unprofitable shipping service, whose only purpose from Canada's point of view was to increase the volume of Canadian-Wcs*. Indian Trade. The United Kingdom has shown a marked indifference to the provision of passenger shipping in the Caribbean and it would be a catastrophe of major consequence to Caribbean economy should the C.N.S. Hners be withdrawn from the area because of a failure, on the part of the United Kingdom and the West Indian Governments whose economic policy is controlled by the United Kingdom Ciovernments, to appreciate that the Government of Canada is most perturbed at existing trade relations between the Dominion and the Caribbean territorial which it preserved during the late war by provision of foodstuffs and at one period by u free gift of flour It is too much to expect that overburdened supply officers In the area can do much more than keep abreast of the W Md ftW flow of regulations and instructions thai arrive at their desks via the Colonial Office but which have their origin in the British Board of Trade and Treasury. • The "Closed Door" policy of conducting British Caribbean Trade has got to end one day, unless the British are going to go back on their word and refuse to give the area political independence. One method of associating the peoples of the area in the major responsibility of political independence—the conduct of trade and planning of a good economy—would be to invite to all official conferences one or more representatives of the Chambers of Commerce of the Caribbean and let them make public *.i ^n open meeting the views of the trading community of the area. Such a policy of conducting conferences would ensure that the public through the Press would be kept informed of what their leaders in trade and Commerce were saying, and the views of the commercial community would necessarily effect the deliberations of supply officers, who would no doubt give them more serious consideration than they can now be expected to do. News From Britain LONDON Bv DAVID TEMPI 1 ROBERTS enthusiasm. Some of lU laadail .1 large think thai — but for the moment piece of sandstone last Christmas tish Nationalists — again on the tne y have overstepped opinion hi D| from under Ihe coronaassumption thai lew men out ol unking a medal lo present to the lion chair of the King of England thousands could be leund without characters who drjgRed the Ston' and Scotland in Westminster an alibi on Christmas Day. out of Westminster Abbey. Th> Abbey obviously had little idea Fru % %  ..UM by the obvious tendency Scottish newspaper are vibrating wli.ii ihey wou] U) make the Scots with controversy and good So had determined to take it back stick to,.' /ens are writing to protest at [land whence n hod been vltcd • clairvoyant from Holland the Covenanter-' fancy medtiL taki by an English sVSV more to ly hi* skill Hut at this stage wn ich show th* unicorn of Scotthan 600 yean ago. And the.i. „ sudden burst <-f intelligence | an d lording It over the lion cl whal? aeems to have smitten the police. England. For the moment, b; The men and womei who took They started Checking public and going cautiously, the English hav. the stone were actuated by some university libraries to discover succeeded In splitting the Scott primitive, and mystical, motive, who had been reading about the into two factions — one admirini They claim, in a documc.it early history of the stone before the men of tile atone, the oihe describing the %  ig'" Haty Spent In Christmas. This inquiry apdeploring them. But if th< the Abbey, that divine power parently bore fruit in Glasgow. "London Government" carries oi lided their theit. And the .>to.e Presuming that Scotland Yard the band of puzzled men lo a tria has now got its men—and at least at the Old Bailey, 1 suspect th nan. what will happc.i Covenant's medals will come ii handy after all. The Secretary of Slat* for Scot,Son l t reade !" wh do not find land, Ml Hector MacNail. ha E to £•**£ ?L**u* "IT'?*! m -i, i.m i. ^ ...... u_ -. loke may ask what are the real peels and a prosecution can go one K| for J48 v -nd unf|er forward It would be in England. onf administration for 244 yean. when political power went with na n Scotland. But that would politically theScots claim that sitting on n particular hit of snndbe the only blessing for the Labour they have sepanitc problems but s ,„ m Party. Politics has new entered everything done by half a dozer the question and this week the ministries in England has to be but the majority ct their U-'-dmg Socialist periodical, The controlled by a slnalc Swiclmv ol %  ounlryinen -the Boot! — do not rw statesman, opei.s It edition State for Scotland—and he has hi* think that way The future of tho with an article headed "A Stone office in I-ondan. Scottish Law i> %  tone had lo be arranged in acisi Left Unturned.'* The paper separate from English Law—sc cordance with the general, and urges Ihe Government not to make many Bills have to go through widespread, sentiment of national UM tnicvcs into political martyr*. Parliament a second time with a pride of Ihe Scots—but which doe* And it admits ihe political imdifferent wording why. they ask. not go nearly as far as Ihe ardour plications. For years Ihe labour f !" ", nOX Scotland have its own of the extremist In the past week Party, when It was In opposition. Parliament lo regulate Its home there have been two important supported Ihe plen of Scotland for SP" !" -... Northern Ireland has! %  JOBS on the "Stone of a bigger say in its own GovernThf>n tb r % are """" %  • %  I £*• %%  Bcone" Plrst, the men who ndw ment. Bui when tho Socialist* ^rnT'-.^S t fh U e ^K 1 %  ^ C,P *V ,.,nu.,l .he stone, (who are not ^med power In 1945 Ihey de"f. n £,TZ **i***" ,mu "" ,„,sh Nalional lave... Vrne Ruleto, Scotland S? SS TL ^TH S^t*^ iself has a claim to a kind nsllgllHtl history as a Christi* relic that was also a trophy in war for the various Celtic Christian Kings of the Eaily Middle Au ha Dark Age*, M we call ihem. The Btone*g purlotoan presumably regard these Dark Age heroic age. and would like to return to Its value and its ritual— inknown In the Scollls CM mov-m-m whirl, ,n„i. m .do taboo nnd "o>vol.2ft_S2 £ffi,' %  """ "" y "" eludes leading, respectable Scot||QQ", the move for some limited leading, respectable ScotHtm", the move Tor some limited {,'"„'• nioneT^bacVuV'scotran^^hr tish citizens), attempted to arrange M>|f.government, was soon frowncase for neither of Ihese last with the authorities" thai the ed on Two years ago a new, and claims has ever been properly stone would be replaced at St moderate. Scottish movement was established. Gilr'v cathedral in Edinburgh and formed called the Scottish National B ,., ho „„i, „ri au -n-. u n,.* .remain there, symbolically, for Covenant. A aaa^tsett the. ^TC *.? %  I W* %  ** Isome time, or until the English Covenant, was circulated and RfTlaftaal ^mSTSSa ask to use It! This proposdion g,, lne d iwo million signatures Ms Iy consclous of thrir natlon .| idm nearly came to fruition, but the aims were modest and the leaders tl t y a „d their (so called) national men 01 the stone siiS|iected their of the Covenant niovemrni inculture. Few of Ihem want Home trophy would be quickly spirited eluded leading professional men Hule, and not mnny would lik back to I*ondon—so that plan wan n ml members of ihe respected give up representation in the Pnr^ abandoned. Scottish aristrocracy. Now the liamer.i at Westminster. But they Then news leaked i ut that ScotCovenant Movement Is planning to would also like their own little land Yard had "almost completed t ur n Itself Into a political party Parliament so that they could ask their Inquiries" and knew who the to light elections if the candidates 'heir own questions, and badger culprits were. So did many other of the Parties already established 'heir own ministers of health and people—In fact several Journalists W ui not pledge themselves to dehousing, insurance and home in London and Glasgow might mand a Royal Commission, (of ff Jli r *'_ i have been able to state the names inquiry), which would be the first Thc Englishman i attitude to all of the men two weeks after Ihe constitutional towards "devolu! nis 1S nard 'y, "senlful In the theft if they had thought it Iheir tjon." The trial of the "Martyrs ast In 1 *" t ft "if* "^ ** %  < ,f duty to ask the characters themof the stone" would be a rallying K#^J2BLS ^£ f he i :n,, selve, what their names are. point for the Covenant movement m I n ,h" FSIUK ^ d. iS ."w! 1 ?' Scotland Yard's efforts have been and even if only a fraction of the ? !" X^'if K-L ^fflL?j peculiarto say the least They Covenant two million slgnator.es ^th of' the^rder^a'nri what started by dredging canals and took It seriously, they could be a change [hat woukl be" Lakes In London Parks— on Ihe political force to drive labour out The outstanding question r n London Parks— on lh< issumptlon thai i h c Scottish of some vital Scottish nationalists were incompetent s'.ltuencics. The Covenant Moveand Scots share out the British They then started eliminating ment started very well; but now it Empire. Would Scotland demand names from known lists of Scotu In need of a new fillip to its own Colonial Office? nmains—how would ihe English Lord lit .Hi On Ilis C.D.C. LONDON Lord Reilh. Chairman of the Colonial Development Corporalion since five months, gave a London audience yesterday hi* Urst public utterance on his new Corporal i or t He sprang lo the lectern from n tone seat at the back ot the platform—of a UNESCO gather Ing. The former B.B.C. DirectorGeneral opened with a scowl and growl "I have nothing lo do ith groundnuts." On the Gambia egg arheme: "Gambia. and a grunt—but he admitted his Cor porn lion's con;ion with thai I don't like talking," he, announced but ended with a scribe devaluation of man: "tont From staccato ejaculation— "\U Golly" and By God"—to slow be. From DOUGLAS COBBAN loo small lo attract private enterprise: opeiate where profits %  night be uncertain, loo long delayed for commercial capital to be attracted. Think -*f afforestation, ranching, he argued. And after all, C.D.C., In a *onse, was priming the pump for private enterprise. How? Lord Reith's Wr*ii I mill's I mil The W'u Biggest Exhibition In Commonwealth B.I.F. LONDON The re-entry this year of Barbados to the. West Indies section of the British Industries Fair, opening April 30th, is an event specially worthy of mention, h means that this year the West Indies will be the binai'st ds. ml 3 X 3 yds. 2HF" Just tho Floor Covering you have hecn wailing for WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER 'Phones : 4472. 46K7. 4413 Enjoy il with pleasure Again ! PETER DAWSONS SPECIAL WHISKY THE OLD FAVOURITE Tin: 4. i i. K I\< II ro„ I.TII.— AgMtV Chief at ihe Colonial Office, u-ho "But fo r Heaven's sake don't an devalued when he iras also on fhe plat/orml. and think there's nothing but comwiinout having hi give; others, including the Secretary mercial motivation about C.D.C. of State, is as proper as it could Schemes undertaken by C.D.C. have serious social repercussions" pontifical utterances: Ihe hlnrk lniblic control? Of course, but Why does C.D.C. busy Itself %  s drtcd sharply for —tho eyebrows tilted again—"No with hotels? "Why on earth?crlUclsm; the black Jacket tight Interference in Management." echoed its Chairman, and exgtMd over his chest us he adopted Hie best ol DOtt Msidtl Rcittl DUtbgd MOM '*uafoTtUn*ti 0o the manner of the Scottish Kirk thinks so. ornors haven't hotels to put to scatter the devils who dared their visitors in and ask C DC think evil of his public corporaWhn view doe* he hold on to please pul up nole 5 wherP lions—the B.B.C., B.O A C. [" v f ''"^'' '"''^ ,n l 11 c ?ivisitor*, commercial and othermul now the C.D.C. ^'"*ur,xl words. this , ... :h mlnrndersUimlinr ffi uSu^~t?^Oolffi De'-^-ely. uord Reith nmurmured, "how Emplri w „ h „ ViiripIy of poated lhat C DC. was tackling motives., some good...some not £? ProJJrts aU over the world so good. Hut all understandable :^W, *. „^T earning profits'' even the worst <>( them" The A r nt \ h retorted; "There iu.li.iAc smiled, can be mislakM." But to start up SO projects in three years with Now C.D.C's function is to do overage capitalisation of about there is." he murmured, "how IDJKOfd I used lo get at people who said 'the SUito runs broadcasting" or tlve BUM runs the drws** 1 And now they sav UH SUte rum (olonial development" The eyebrows reared a full nch. "The State doe* nothing of good he %  ort." Whal does tho Slate do? Heilh's answer"The State owns mt does not manage '* A pause—and any challengers had their l.isi ehaan lo defy Ueith's light lo manage tnjrtbiafl which UK was in charge. The aUUuA OS W* Hilton the Colonial territori=... "00.000! No small undertaking. (short pause)., without losing Please think of that. It wasn't motMP." w> easy u get competent manageHe agreed that, by golly!, lo do ment. There were the unprc%  Dod and make profits simultanJlictable tropical elemonts. the eously "could innko things verv baked soils of Africa, soil erosion hard.'* pests, diseases. I ma may say that private "We do our bt." Lord Retih enterprise could do il. Lord added and swept on to yet more problems — the dcvalHi-ithv answer : C.D.C. had to terrible Poynhm. (Depulu Permanent operuta where pmflts might be nation of man. for example Oil! Ill AIM IIS SAY : IM/ Indian /.'. %  <•! lK-,n .onllrnii-ll :i Ihiim wlurh Ihe Slain anil all over Africa. M os" |< vory unlikely. ciniderin lh.nl Black Barbadian, have a right lo SC h ,.„,,.. ,. Ihe ptraOM areiucd are hile l comfortable al least In Barba*Z If .' !? '"'T !" 1 !" %  ""' policemen but there', never do, and this, u we all know is J2 1 "'. i„L .'T^.dijrt 5* moke wlttwt i lire. IIMdci. I nol %  One of Ihe causes of dis bita 1, n !" v.mhl. Mr n "a* alK> have before n„a letter -nl comf.,,1 for -emdive Negroe. In p,,„ r JU "w'JJf !" l ";„ "*• %  P ,„ A Ifcr in St. Andrew U anouicr attempt, which Is usual from all the your P*P cr to decry Ihe Labour iffordstoiu PB ** y accused i — but there's never ithout i fire. Besides. I > ber.n-e me a letter writconifoi: f..r sculttva Negroe* i Barhadian meml>er of Barbados is the fact that white SlraleeUI to a friend ol South Africans, admittedly such hich agrees with Ihe ami cariyinn South African pasa statements made to the police. ports, can. if Ihey wish, come to Sir. We in Barbados have for a ihe island and < M .siderable time now been hear privileges our society Maps of each colony will be prominently displayed in each stand and particular carthas been given to the siting of the two main West Tndian products, sugar and rum. The floorinK of the British Guiana stand will consist of locally grown hard wood and wall panels will also be of British Guiana timber. On a centre table will be samples of aluminium and bauxite which is mined in the colony. Specially featured will be IJomerara rum and sugar. British Guiana rice will also be on show as will some of the cottage industries made for export. A full-size model of a woman wearing a cotton dress will decorate the centre of tho Sea Island Cotton stand. On either side of her will be made-up exhibits of men's and women's clothes from Sea Island Cotton. Particular care is being taken in the Barbados stand to sec that the rum exhibit is pul in a conspicuous position. It will bo placed right in the centre of the stand so that vialton entering the exhibition will notice it almost as soon as they see the stand itself. On either side of rum there will be sugai and f-,ncy molasses and, as a background, there will be a large map of the colony and examples ol cottage industries. Trinidad Leaseholds have lent a model a typical oilwell to the Trinidad stand. The model, approximately 5'-2 ft. in height. ;* ft wide, and 5'*i ft. in depth, will be shown near the entrance. It will be Manned hv a;phalt exhibits and a display of anthurium lilies Below them will be the cocoa and canned citrus fruits while against the back wall will be the rum and sugar exhibits logelhei with a special chart showing the Colony's production figures. The Jamaica stand will have as a background a large map of the Colony which has been flown over specially to this country. It will be hung above a map of the world, on which Jamaica's relative position will be marked. Below this map will bo a numbei of products of the island, including coffee, ginger, cigars ami gypsum. The booklet "In vest in Jamaica" will also be prominently displayed and as with the other c rioflln run and sugar exhibits will be featured ing of Ihe treatment meted out to white stratum This Is a patent th* Afru ans in South Africa with .((front and should be recognised detachment and indeed com as such in some way on Ihe Stat placency Thai sort of thing utc-Book. docMi'i b.,ppeii in Barbados and (.GORGE GRIFFITH. tharafora M aranl particularly F (t 3rd Court. bothered. Not iing in the island St. John's College. I doitft know uhal steps have Cambridge. ..ken to bung an enormity 13 4 51 like thi, before the public. But 1 n i , think, Sir you oi it lo your readI'ofwinntv :".is case as much T<> Th* Editor, IV Adrocatc— Ibta an





Harbados Ga, Advocat

THURSDAY, AVRIL 19, 1951 * .

Allies Continue Push call
Towards North: Meet
Resistance In West

TOKYO, April 18
LIEUTENANT.GENERAL Van Fleet’s Inter-
national armies in Korea continued to advance,
patrol and adjust their positions during the day,









ESTABLISHED 13895





Boy Dies After

Jump From Lorry

FOURTEEN - YEAR - OLD Wesley Vaughn

Phillips, a schoolboy of New Orleans, St.
Michael, died on the spot about 1.40 p.m, yester-
day, after jumping off the platform of the lorry,

M—246 at the junction of St. Mary’s Row and
Mason Hall Street.









Seven Dock par Sa a
Leaders Freed

The
Messrs

lorry is

1 owned by
Perkins

& Co. and



=) Pp was being driven by Garnett
fa A 7 Batson of Pine Hill, St.
Highth Army headquarters said. a eaenar wtih Te a Michee!. it saat practically
On the central front, they met no enemMy,! Stats proscontion or woven yn Will Go empty at the time of the
except along the Pukhan River, south-west of the| oficial dockexs leaders collapsed accident.
today because of disagreemeni Phillips wore only a short
Hwachon reservoir dam. amcng the jury. Nine thousand z OTTAWA April 18. fa ons ponte zy ;
The United Nations’ Task Forces —- -—~~---———- | dockers had struck every time _ The possibility of abandoning haki pants. He lay. on his
continued to probe toward Chor- the seven appeared in court. Canadian National Btenmaships back in the road with blood
wr tigate uae Sngher pens S h Pl To-day their ‘workmates greet- ) {urvics between Canada and the]eoming from his nose ¢
of the Communists’ central Cc uman a ed the accused with songs and | West Indies was discussed on ahead while around A
defence build-up until they en- | cheers as they lefi the Central w) Tuesday night before the Com » iu
countered small arms fire south. | Criminal Court as free men

west of the city and artillery fire |
to the south, |

In the eastern sector, South;
Korean troops fought a Ccommu-
nist force estimated at battalicn

Treaty Signed |

PARIS, April 18.
The Schuman Plan _ Treaty,
merging coal and steel resources

Last night the jury found the
accused guilty of conspiring to
induce dockers to stay away from
work without their employers’
consent. But they failed to agree

pte

Chances For Rescue








where *ie fatal accident took
place at the junction of St.
Mary's Row and Mason Hall

mons Committee on Railways anc
Steamships. Donald Gordon, Presi
dent of C.N\S. and the Canadiar
National Railways said the com
pany and Government will have

stood his parents and a large
crowd. There was a traffic
block in the vieinity for over
an hour.

Street yosterday afternoon, to face this year the question oi He was a pupil of the
strength. of six countries into a vast|cn the principal charge of incite- ise 6 rere a abencouing the service or getting | Modern High School and was
Communists resisted fiercely.| European pool was signed here to-| ment to illegal strike action, ° oh, aioe uml yt n toe eta sial yn for the run. He saic | just on the first week of his
On the western sector front,! day. Nations in the plan are When _ the Court assembled a jumping off a lorry , . ; moony two largest ves Easter vacation, The body
United Nations’ ‘troops advanced| France, West Germany, Italy,| today, Sir Hartley Shawcross, OW ar na seonmawihiinas OE ope th’ waue fw aa" eee ae | ‘ada Ftiieh label | y
throughout the day, finding little} Holland, Belgium and Luxem-| who as Attorney General was j renthccd in ihe Near bejwas later removed to the
at which to shoot, The Eighth] bourg. iy earn Ge ec riee: oh,» s ropes Army’s summary of the day’s Signatories were: Chancellor sal he findings oO ie eA . . + BRITAIN e 5 , ip post mortem examination was
fighting gave no indication of the] Konrad Adenauer (Germany) and | were illogical and ee IN SUBMARINE DISASTER vee West Indies service performed. An inquiry will
extent of the advance, Foreiin Ministers Paul Van Zee-| im in fairness to the Yesterday, when the Commu-| jand (Belgium), Robert Schuman| Nts to discontinue proceedings PROTESTS treaty between Canada and thefirern, erore the Coraner: of
nists fought a tenacious rearguard oun! Sarlo Sforza ° (By ALEX LENTINE) é : Tnited Wired ee and the) District “A” at 2 o'oletke tos
t u (France), Count Ca z Ne A l 5, 4 A Q United Kingdom which involved
action, Eighth Areay trecpe pies (Italy), Joseph Bech (Luxem- ot cequitta PORTS UTH, England, April 18. TO PERSIA U.K. subsidy for ship operation | 2ay.
or wounded more than 1, om. . ik Nether- : ‘itish submarine Affre The treaty an ; ha :
mutt oatatioe: baure) and Dirk Stikker (Neth be ie Sh breil Senn UTTER SILENCE from’the British submarine Affray i Ms ; The treaty and subsidy lay
Earlier

today more than 25
Russian type M.1I.G. fighters took



—Reuter.





don and three from Liverpool—
were arrested on February 8.





sunk in the English Chann
75 men aboard could be rescued alive.











dimmed hopes to-night that



everal years ago.
Transport















TEHERAN, April 18 Minister Chevrier Gives V ic
—— : 5 renee ‘ . sy | told the Committee there is vt ury Gives erdict
the air—for the first time in three i They had pleaded ae oe Over 40 hours after She, dived on practice patrol, no sbatideee are tek a < ate much Dae Stn Hanuvteh Aecimaats ”
ete Meee a ad one T naec Indians Asked Toe SS aekareareeee said] Svrvivors had been sighted.” Nor was there any sight of | Persian Perel Minutes stat (CP) In Death Inquiry
a a3 ob ihahs y € at . ve ; arker , } ‘ines j stress ce 1e Ani yy ;
over Sinuiju, near the Manchurian Th . I Fr t he would discontinue proceedings the yellow marker buoy whieh submarines in distress can | m« nt last night that the Abadat dhram Gun Oi diuenehlaaal
frontier. Oo Join n as does not amount to acquittal on send to the surface. oil strike was the fault of th GREN y
One M.1.G. was damaged be- the charge on which they were} ———-—-——-—— —+++——= After nine o'clock tonight, . if | 498!0-Tranian company Expel Occupants ‘Reitt aue ADA, April 18.
fore they flew off after a 15-min. DURBAN, April 18. | found guilty. _ * any of the trapped men were still The protest called this “misrep- esult due to the dispersal of
ute dog fight. Indians throughout South Afri-} Legaily there is no bar to new Ernest Bevin alive, their oxygen supplies would | '@Sehtation Tory M Pp U x A riotous assembly, was the ver-
Mustang pilots of the South} ca were called on by the Natal| prosecution for the same offence. be low and they would breathe}. Parlier today Anglo - Iranian ? ee ree 8 alee given by a five-man Coron.
African “Flying Cheetah” Squad-| Indian Congress today to fast] More than half of London’s dock- With difficulty, Company officials rejected — the , ors jury this morning, ending a
rons claimed two Communist] With Manilal Gandhi, second son|ers were idle today. : ( re at iq] Late this afternoon the Com- | Persian statement that the : LONDON, April 18. seven-day inquiry into the deaths
tanks damaged in the western|¢f the late Mahatma Gandhi, After enthusiastically greeting m. ec Snander-in-Chief Portsmouth, | Strike in the great oil refinery| Brigadier — Fitzroy MacLean jot two men and one woman
sector, Other South Africans over|Guring the last 24 hours of his|the freed men, their supporters Aficr studied reports from the|t®wn was the fault of the com- Conservative Member of Parlia- turing the recent agricultural
the central sector destroyed six| two-week protest fast which is to] marched to their Union head- LONDON, April 18, great fleet of rescue ships | Pary “for neglecting the workers : ee the Government t workers’ general strike, by bullets
Communist trucks and two gun|end on Friday. quarters to see their General) phe funeral of Ernest Bevitt,feaid: “There is increasing evi_| state of mind and urgent demand Chilean: gxpel Argentines and|dred by Trinidad. police in a
| positions by bombing and strafing Manilal Gandhi said he is| Secretary Arthur Deakin. Deak-| 5 itains former Foreign Secré {ence that the search is being | °f,the moment.” “leans from Paradise Harbour ‘rowd at Latante, St, David’s,
, : Pt teats t urify himself before|in and his fellow leaders have ; . —Reuter. asung to p 3 : ( tary who died last Saturday, teoxkyearried out in the correct place ? 2 7 . :
: y Ik Dependencies Joh Dugdal lice
violating the apartheid (racial)| condemned the activities of the Rane rteca he fact that the submarine } refinery were prevented fron ‘pe cies, John Jugdale,| police involved, testified before
segregation) law as a_ protest| unofficial strikers, Demonstra- me Sa di herehesded ana woes a Sa ae aaeTr. 1 uy | working “by intimidation anc | Minister of State for the Colonics | Magistrate E. A. Heyliger with
D sf 5 P. t Will against the South African Gov-| tors pushed over the doorkeeper| VEEL SEO WS, napehesd ~ mee} ; fa mien ! oy eae © Ee threats of personal violence.” implied that that could not be| Barrister Alban Radix watching
erence ac ernment’s race policy.—Reuter, | at Union headquarters but they silent, watched the hearse — the Pi Sommarcce we. progpects, oO The company had done its{4ne without warlike operations.!the interest of the deceased and
ame , . Deakin who was at-| coffin within completely hidden #Fuccess.% mated varices McLean had asked in the House|C. T. W. B. Worrell ini s
Be Announced pln “the fi 1L of Ernest] by flowers — pass slowly into the wEMeEt ta protect. workers (ECM oF ‘Commene “Whs ta tow in oc-| Sol G 1 iene
a tending the funeral o eet 5 ~~ :pass 5 y 3 ; yp vardship, they added. ; ; O28 NO! =| Solicitor General, thoge of the
Bevin, —Reutor.. cemetery where the cremation tools Realled Over c ny officials said today that} CUPation of | Paradise Island?” | police,
TO-DAY Labour Govt. Defeat ry al ar t of the B itish C i Belief was strong in thi t ine vast majority ot workers BS ane mp eth ae
? ’ esides most o ¢ British Cabi- > fas strc § Brea) Abadan were not on strike anc 5
i y ° net, a crowd of world diplomats, | naval port tonight, that the sub- | jaq ‘aie mands the} the Falkland Islands dependen * é
ea , LONDON, Segre Bud et Challen es - ression politicians, trade union leaders and | Marine had rolled on her. side =e . a ISRO: NGRERRAGR Cee: “HN eies. There are Argentine and C » i
Forecasts, that Percey Spender po , company ; E 1
ent : eae other public figures gathered te}When she struck the ccen Nal a ger ofr Abadan { Chilean posts on two islands in
Australian Foreign Minister will LONDON, April 18. rp gures 8 oY | eetings felephone reports from Abadar | tis harbour Protests against | WV oo
to-morrow announce the conclu-|| The Labour Government de- Pact? pay homage to Bevin’s memory This could have jz bd ace late to-day, said agitators were | trespass of British territory have Meet In Washington
sion of a defence agreement link- hallenge: its Among 142 wreaths from gre! iis could have jammed escape | patrolling areas where the work Se eae ae ee ev
a defence ag feated two cha ges to hatches and prevented the mark I been delivered locally to leade
ing the United States, Australia} budget proposals by 11 votes in| WASHINGTON, April 18. | world figures and humble workmen ae re - rane ed the marke | ers lived, and threats of violenc of both parties." * aReuter. WASHINGTON, April 18
and New Zealand, were confirm-] the House of Commons today. The State Department said to-} were a huge wreath of roses from | ox OV e UP ' sar ae ecsa w t men wanting to work wet Air chiefs of the United States,
ed by usually reliable sources Its proposal to increase the tax, day it had “under study” a letter! King Farouk of Egypt, one fri anes as xs het as aa; ten frequent Britain, France and Canada. will
here to-day, on petrol by four pence half| ¢eom the Italian Foreign Minister] his Cabinet colleagues, and one | te ou m CA we imo . ve Unrest appeared to be spread meet here within the next two
Britain, whose interest in the] penny per gallon was carried by! Count Carlo Sforza, suggesting | from the Unitea Nations, Tren * i da « are y aro ing among workers not employec SEDITION BI weeks, the Air Force announced
‘then ific area is vite : 286 i aty > Frence ; rnment | ** Bu, cars of 1e ev by the Anglo-Iraniz . any lay
uae mata intcteer an te Wai. Guanes also forced a ae ele aaa idee hits and So aaiiate Se Gatton: j ‘training for y sound from be A as oi en vaatherad’ tn Aus LL OT announcement said only that.
present scheme, but is understood] vote on the proposed increase in| other Communist countries a non-| and from German trade unions | | Sri ace as a taietae dan today but was: dispetead with (From Our Own Correspondent the joint meeting “will afford op
to have preferred limited agree-| tax on cinema seats and certain] 2 poression pact. the Dutch Labour Party—nearly | j pees 74 nd. Belg ie Ai cut violence, reports added ; ere portunity to review the progress
ment at this stage between the] sports including horse racing, but)", spokesman said that the] a1) countries of the world were them, Were AMOME | Little change was reported in th GRENADA, April 18 being made by Air Forces of the
two Commonwealth powers and| they were defeated ners ea letter had been transmitted tO]yepresented by flowexs Small ships with an army labour situation at the refine a _A sharp unofficial division with | four nations concerned,”
the United States. These proposals today passed | .., Acheson through the Italian Reuter, | waiting doct cruised .slowls | ‘he, world’s biggest. Last reports! vigorous criticism from members —Reuter.
—Renter| through one of several stages} A inascador here about a fort- Sees ibcut. Helicopters hovered low, | £#id_ 3,860 of the 28,000 workers | opposing, marked the second read :
dincinncicnleaintin pam before they become ed night ago. i fic a os eyoces Se aa le , | had re Bornes and Esenened peodiue ing of the Sedition Bill in the e
. oe i ——Reuter. | curse Rear be we teee the | tion officially estimated at some} Legislature this morning. ‘The
Reds Arrested In MALL. | | cussed ae tae: Seen where © | 1 800,000 gallons for the day Bill has been on the Orc F Masia! | TE FER: ARYOOATS
y . P { r | Affray dived on Menday night Reuter | since February a1 re t : \per THE NEWS
~ ‘ | is bot te signe . ness - ary yhen it was
Rio De Janeiro Brewer s ress Portuguese ennes | forces ve ary er = Pera ; - introduced along with other anti DAY OR NIGHT
4 to P up. it su rine Se 1 strike Bills, Later the second
BE DE TABLAS, AeEsS 3S Card ithdrawn President Dies | Tree etucatine Sea Devil heer? Awkward Mome oe of ‘the Bill was unant- DIAL 3113 e
cor z ess re s to- : . ae . ‘ 168 TTR . ES. 8 mously passed,
date tate i oj ght be tem MADRID, April 18, LISHON, April 18 a fexien ot Tastass in morse, which a ‘id hawerak tein mans ia poi aplasia bales
ists were arrested here during The Spanish Government has i Sok r Car | eat 7) ae piven . ' te ey to the British Treasury face
; ve Le withdrawn the press card of Sam| Marshal Antonio scar Another submarine reported re- | tery renee ae 3
the past few days. a ld President ot! ceiving the code signal “I Am|an awkward moment when he pai
“rests ‘ y ow -on-| Brewer, New York Times cor-| mona, 91-year-ol , i eee. ie sugni att ‘the banal
ake prereety, ia “0 respondent in Spain because of! Portugal, died this morning. Presi- Stuck On The Bottom a formal visit to the Argentin
nected with the demoens'ration é oo > . « , cade mince . 2 ‘ Cc » tceda
: ¥ ; i +i , le ona suddenly grew Divers stood by all day to go
against decisions of the inter-] his alleged “tenacious and insid dent Carm Yee walter aa Woter’es te Attia es While he seine atown thi
American conference in Washing-] ious campaigns which were fre-] worse yesterday after . | its Ae reid: ; B i thé Oka 1 en ‘mechanical voting apparatus, Dep
ton which Communists were| quently incompatible with the] attack of pneumonia. pinpointe ut the dmiralty

planning to hold this afternoon



truth and decorum of the country.’

A special Cabinet Meeting de-|





said that the exact position of the

uty Jose Emilo Visca, Vice-Chair



r ari + 1 ie Peronista bloc in. the
n. front Brazilian Foreigs n he asked for a specifiic] creed 15 days national mourn. | submarine could not be fixed man bf tt ~ eer rae zeke
Ministry ‘building. : eau of articles objected to, ing for the President. Ss als me ane ck Gechliehtar +b PS Sages yey ; Praasionl ae
Security police banned the Brewer was told it was to the provided that Carmona s body will ne is, fed Ie ae ue bes oe at ti n—he proposed that Mem
demonstration . general tone of his coverage that} be taken to National Assembly ee grey swell ee ace aed AP i sh ane Press dispatches from Porto exception was taken. Palace to-night and lie there unt joi hae node a A yA ae ai ‘ A vote on a regolution reaffirm
Alegre, capital Rio Grande do Brewer has been in Spain since | the funeral on Saturday. mee amted arch and more wer« wie Locate’ soveratanty Ie th
oa i so at's he tate 2040: atid glad wethed thare in 1089) wil be. eee soe ot eon be “We don't want to be ; As large patches of the seabed, Falkland Islands The vote

police and many arrests made.
—Reuter

Morrison Quizzed







Nazi Dye Trust
Will Be Split



—Reuter.



| Party Leader Dead

MONTEVIDEO, April 18.

better start printing a
fresh stock of titese.”

were eliminated from
zone and the ring of
Wally closed. —Reuter.





a

Net Accepted











the
ships

gra

searci

'“Gery Document”’|

— Reuter

| WILL ESTABLISH
EMBASSIES

BONN, April 18





ri Sixty—two-year - old Cesar Mayo ; 4razil and West Germany ars YOU CAN COOK
About Trans ort i er, ABST 18, | Gutierrez, Presidential candidate LONDON, April 18 3 1TON . ‘to establish embassies in eacl .
The Allies today announce’ j ‘ ghse F today WASHINGTON, April 18 dX
that I. G. Farben, giant Nazi|in last November elections dies The Ministry of Food to-da) The State Department today ,other’s countries, a Governmen AND BAKE WITH
In Argentina tye trust. would be split into| to-day from an heart attack, He/ refused to accept Lord Lyle’s con called the latest “peace appeal” lspokesman said here today roe ; P
7 , ae and six smaller com-|led a powerful branch of the Col-|tenition that there is no need for} oth “thited |e phkenagtt gy tid Brazil has at present a diplo pe
| LONDON, April 18. ae 2g This decision brought|orado Party and was narrowly | sugar rationing in Britain. Lord munist North Korea “a gory | mati mission with Allied Higt
i Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor- 3 an end “six years’ delib- defeated by Andrei Martinez Lyle, President of the Sugar document,” not remotely resem.|Command Commission unde
rison wes asked in the Commons avatiohte on how to break up the;Trueba—also of the Colorado | Refiners, Tate and Lyle, has writ Sling stance decar ; Mario Ibe Brandao ps
} to-day, what he had done to de-|crust which before the war con- j Party. ten to the Financial Times that or. —Reuter The Allies allowed_the Wes
fend ‘British interests in Buenos|trolled an estimated 85 per cent —Reuter. | the basis of 1951—52 the Ministry j German Government to establist
| Aires transport “in view of recent|ef Germany's chemical industry PN GE SEY would have ae ate res -— {direct diplomatic re lations witl
li * . 5 Q rom forcign countries last month
| the Argentine}|and according to the announce ° e from the Commonwea and from | nw eh 6 | es
Gieeeanank he expedite liquida- ment “played a major part in Petain Still Ml other sources end po tons — moré \ ?achers On Strike Reuts
| ic es Transport|building up the Nazi war ma-- sugar than is required to maintair
tion of the Buenos Aires Transport ee i ILE DYEU, April 18 consumption at the present level ROME, April 18, “ OGRESS’”’
| Capon On i at freauent sa : —Reuter Philippe Petain, 95-year-old of 2,200,000 tons per year One million Italian school chil NO PROGR 2
Morrison replied that ae 7 —_—o former hero of France now im-}| 7 —Reuter. dren were on holiday to-day be- PARIS, April 18 ‘my — n . ‘ ME
representations had been made in prisoned here for wartime col-| cause their 93,000 teachers went| The four Foreign Ministers SERVES THE SA 4
the Argentine Government. F Sag BOMB SHELTER laboration was still seriously iti | ar }on a one-day strike for wage in-} Deputies again — failed to make
liament had already been aasurr* See edibban iegtisce : to-night. Petain whose condition | Worrell accepts creases, headway today toward agreeing PURPOSE AS Cook-
that the British Economie Mission WASHING TON, April 18 became critical overnight has not es ae a But 300,000 other children, at-|on on agenda for Foreign Minis Sk AS :
now in Buenos Aires would try to} president PCa Ps hocks been fully conscious since. He has | KINGSTON, J’ca. April a tending private schools mostly | ters meeting. A Western anise
reach a satisfactory settlement} marked $991,000 to build a bomb) on cgering from congestion of! Frank Worrell has aevepted the/pun ~ by the Roman Catholic|mion said the Deputies meeting for 1g: ire °~@:
of this claim, he added. shelter at the White House. a, — ince last wibek ) West Indian Cricket Board’s offer | Church, had to work as usual the 32nd time made “no progress. ING HE TIreER.... iT s
‘ F ' —Reuter. —Reuter |*7° lunes s —Reuter. | to goto Australia. —€P) —Reuter, | —Reuter.



INFORMAL TALKS

(Peom Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, April 18.

; SUSPEND TRADING

NEW YORK, April 18.
The New York cotton exchange



| MACARTHUR BACK IN










AMERICA





oO



LY CHEAPER.

; : ce i le in
An informal conference * — a te icar amen Tal SAN FRANCISCO, April 18 | their 13-year-old son, Arthur, of San Francisco Bay as the sil ‘Arthur's hand The ee 2 obtainab
Le ual vlkoe tie ane at arity’ of the return of General General Douglas ee ara re ene coe Peede coe nM oe eae | Se cat ot the pre thd i ae 1 lb tins ieee Tee ees 58¢
colonies ta s a s é i aL ee Bea 7 6 ‘or e rst t », stepped on ‘ 1g “ ‘ tio wel. ae ss as
Government: Aquse bere ie uamunieanirhs ——Reuter — = + ne (i the plane to face a ae of Mrs. Jean MacArthur was the come He waved briskly Each
of OOTY eee turned to the United States late|television, newsreel and press first to leave the plane time he turned to the crowd and 5 lb tins 56¢ per lb.
last night after a fateful 14 years’ | cameras and newspaper reporter General MacArthur followed , smiled another roar agi up, , Joree tessany (ent teense femme feo P vO"9 7 ‘ labsence. Photographers dotted almost her immediately to wild cheer!ng ci After reviewing the suard ° Bs ua
‘NO OLITICS S A every window in the two-~store) Honour, the General mounted a TRY 1 TIN T0-DA}
3 The General was given a hero’s| terminal building His thirteen-year—old on | platform for a brief official wel-
3AN F NCISCO, April 18 welcome as he arrived at San There were about 5,000 pc¢ Arthur carr nes then ¢ame | come from Mayor Robinson Gov- | :
ee oe giles BYdhciaec ih his ‘plane “Bataan” at the airport for the Gene member of the former Unit ernor Farl Warren and other | On sale at all Groceries and
ee ENERAL MACARTHUR announced to-day that he does not aig aie rte Washington to ap-|arrival. This was a smaller c Natior Supreme ( de dignitaries, a
¥ intend to enter the American polit’cal scene. He told a wel- pear before a joint meeting of | tha d beer i ¢fficial party x on t te M you Bow good it is Dravidian Stopes
coming San Francisco crowd “I have just been asked if I intend to} Congress later this week g ree roa! pi Pe ; tt rm . ; s ‘. os & ; , ” csdiaater, 4 -simmpenitiniitiaanaivamn
enter politics. My reply was no.’’—Reuter i The General with his wife and crowd at the airport on th ) i k





—
PAGE TWO

it ncnen NEE





Caub Calling

M’s. FRED OLTON
Fred Eastham flew
Trinidad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. Mrs. Eastham had been
& guest here of the Oltons. Now
Mrs. Olton will be the guest of
the Easthams in San Fernando,
Mr. Eastham works in a construc-
tion company for T.L.L.

Mrs, Olton expects to be away
for abdut three weeks.

Married Yesterday

ISS ANN PARRIS, daughter

of Mr. and Mrs. R, B. Parris
of “Black Bess,” St. Peter, was
married yesterday afternoon at
St. Patrick’s, Church, Jemmotts
Lane, to Lt, Peter D. B. Short of
the Royal Artillery and son of Mrs.
Short of Boxmoor, Herts., England
end the late My. W. Short

The ceremony, which took place
shortly after 4,30 o’clock, was per-
formed by Rev. Fr. A. Parkinson,
S.J.

The Bride, who was given away
by her father, wore a dress of white
slipper satin, off the shoulder neck-
line with close fitting long sleeves
and a flared peplum, She also
wore an appliqued tulle veil. A
filagree gold and pearl hierloom
necklace completed her ensémble.
She carried a bouquet of white
rerberas, white roses and coralita

Mrs. Michael Lynch was matron
of honour. Her other two attend-
ants were Miss H. Challenor and
Miss Isobe] Cox, Their dresses of
gold figured net over white were
identical; they wore picture hats
and carried white net fans.

Bestman was Mr, Richard Parris,
the Bride’s brother. The ushers
were Mr, Michael Lynch, Mr. M

Skeete, Mr. G. Skeete and Mr.
G. Challenor. After the ceremony
a reception was held at “Black
Bess,” St. Peter and the honey-
moon is being spent at the Edge-
water Hotel, Bathsheba.

Lt. and Mrs. Short expect to
jeave for England about the end
of May or early June.

Comings and Goings
ROM Trinidad on Tuesday

and Mrs
down to

En Route to New

Appointment

R. G. ELMORE EDWARDS,

Barrister-at-Law and Chiei
Registrar of the Supreme Court of
the Windward Islands has been
appointed Crown Attorney, St
Kitts-Nevis and is at present on
his way to take up his new ap-
pointment. He is a passenger on
the Lady Nelson, His wife accom-
panied him ag far as St. Vincent,
but she is remaining there for a
holiday and will follow Mr. Ed-
wards to St, Kitts shortly.

Mr, Edwards is an Old Harrison-
jan, He qualified as a Barrister-at
Law in England and was called to
the Bar of the Middle Temple in
July 1919.

Visiting Siste.
RS. C. M, GAGNON and her
daughter Ann are spending
a three-week holiday with Mr,
and Mrs. Clayton Evelyn at Rock-
ley. Mrs. Gagnon and Mrs. Eve-
lyn are sisters, Mrs. Gagnon and
her daughter had been in Antigua
holidaying with other relatives
and they came down to see Mrs.
Evelyn before she feturns to the
U.S. where her home is in Roches
ter, N.Y,

Afternoon Flight

evening came Dr. Leonard
Hutson,

Government Veterinary
Officer in Anti-
He is here







4Major, Canadian
ATrade “ommis-
sioner for the
Eastern Carib-
bean and the
Guianas flew in
from Trinidad on
Tuesday night
and out = again
yesterday after-

noon, . . a pas. s , ;
aehger leaving R. A. S, BRYDEN, Governing
on the same Director of Messrs. A. $
T. GRANT MAJOR Bryden and Sons Ltd., was amofig
plane was Mrs, Lena Raleigh the passengers on B.W.1.A.’s after
who had been spending a short noon flight from Trinidad yester-
holiday with her niece Mrs. Jack day. Other passengers coming in
Marson. on the same plane were Mr. John
Settling In Rahr, Acting General Manager o!

ISS FRANCES CAINES and
\ Miss Hope Caines of St. Kitts
who had been holidaying in Bar-
bados have arrived safely in the
U.S. and are now settling down
in their new home.

B.W.1.A., Mr.
Staff Manager B.W.I.A,., Mr
Charlie Taylor, Manager of the
Hotel Royal and Mr. C. C. Chad
derton W.I. Supervisor of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co.

Jules Henneguy,



ADVENTURES OF PIPA.



LT. and MRS. PETER SHORT

The Sun Never Sets

HE SUN rises in the East and
sets in the West, says geogra-
phers. But there is a “West” where
there is no setting of the sun.
At the Sunset Night Club in Lon-
don’s West End, the slogan is—
“the show goes on.” For those who
cin enjoy a ‘night out’ without
alecholic drinks, the Sunset seems
an ideal place. It is acclaimed by
night club patrons as one of Lon-
con's best

Music is supplied by that versa-
tile West Indian Boscoe Holder and
his boys in an atmosphere notably
friendly. G. A. Leslie, the club-
cwner, comes from Jamaica,

Guests seat themselves comfort-
ably in uphelstered arm-chairs,
talk and dance. Waiters serve
Turkish coftee

To enjoy the best that the Sun-
set has to offer, be there between
2 am., and 3.30 a.m., for that is
the cabaret time in the Sunset,
The cabaret, compered by Tony
Kennedy, from Jamaica, includes
Hiuropean and West Indian artistes.
[iems on the programme include
‘ercbatie displays, drum-beating,
saxophone-playiilgg, special dances
featured by professional dancers
and other variety musical fea-
tures, not forgetting calvypsoes by
the “one-and-only Lord Kitchener”
of Trinidad.

Present membership of the Sun-
set toials nearly 500,



Talking Point

A man who wants to play
billiards must have no other am-
bition. Billiards is all,

—E. V. Lucas.



BY THE WAY...
7 outbreak of thatching all of slate per man-week, and the
over England is said to be vest nothing), that has already

a “gesture” to foreign tourists, been dealt with by the Govern
who are supposed to expect Ye ment scientific adviser, Sir Arnold

f

|

Is it too late to foot-lb, }
enlist a corps of old yokels in The Dalmaine coned _ slides
smocks? One of these, seated on heads are cased in velamite, and
an aluminium ale-bench at the sre entirely independent of the

Olde and Fritefullye Mertye Humbody,
Yngelonde to be covered with ai :
straw. All Purpose Traction

The result is that unauthorised
‘thatchers are at wark on Queen
Anne houses, garages, dancé+halls,
power-stations,
gas-containers.

HE new Rowlandson al
purpose traction engine wi
tram-depots and have a tractive compulsion of 37

By BEACHCOMBER

the Hobhouse steam vacuum
transfer drum-indicators, were
attached to overslung cylinder-
clamps, with bar deflectors above
the wheel-casings. If I seem to
exaggerate, go to Drigg Bridge, to
he Copplestone Works, and ask
for Mrs, Thackeray. She will show
you the B model,

Prodnose : What exactly is the
point of all this ?

Myself: It is a bid for a bigger
circulation, Something to . draw

rose-infested door of every crosshead vents and _ boilers the large, untapped public which
thatched inn, would add to the couplings, which, in the case of is interested in traction engine:
“rural charm of many a _ rustic
netting” — I quote from. the

pamphlet, “Hey Nonny Nonny.”

The Official Explanation
NSPIRED by the Postmaster
General to look into things, I

have discovered that I, as such, {ts Junior Short Story Competition.
make no contribution to
‘Treasury.



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invite all children under 12 to enter fo:

The best story will be publishec

the every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
I do net pay income a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery,

The storie

tax. What happens is that all my can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30‘

surplus goes to the Treasury.

Overall Underdelivery

Hi Secretary of the Friends of

Coal complains that my note
on the negative or overall under
delivery of coal was misleading
While conceding that a negative
delivery is a delivery of nothing
this high official of the Society
maintains that a_ delivery of
nothing or non-delivery of any-
thing is a pesitive delivery of
nothing, and, in that sense, more
in line with the best contempor-
ary thought than a negative de-
livery of something. As for what
is called underall over-delivery
(the system by which one or two
units of personne] get four lumps

SBR RRR RE Bee ee
mCHECK TAFFETA 36”

Co. Lta.,
NOTE:

Name ......55.

mLOCKNIT WHITE and PASTELS
mGUEST TOWELS PURE LINEN
COLOURS
WHITE

a
*
m MORCAIN CREPE 36’
@
=

DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOF STORE

words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The
City not later than Wedntesdaw everv week,
Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story.

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Advocat:

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

$1.85
$132 @
&
997m
887 my
$1.71

DIAL 4220

Socialistswhile her rival, Lady 40’t care so long as it is not

Caernarvon, has been enterta

of the Commons, Mr. Tom

liams, Minister of Agriculture,
Mr. George Thomas Socialist , ui

pro- lirting (
tested afterwards that nothing but Would have
tea was brewing at the confab
7 _— wondaoes if the Liber.
al left-wing oble Lady’s get-
together with the Socialists was for Anglesey, and that was nearly
not in faet riposte to what the 22 years ago, there have been peri-

party’s

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1951



Lady Of The Left

THE Liberal Party have been By EVELYN IRONS

split as often (and as noisily) as There is a story told in severa
the atem: and anciher snlit seems Variants, that when Lady Megan
o be going along niceiy this week, WS 9uIz7ze€d about the Libera
For Lady Megan Lloyd George has P@tty colour she gnswered. “i
been making contact with the 9°"'t know what it is—and

a

j Criccieth this last week-end before

the new session recalls her to
London is to put on an old skirt
(she doesn’t fancy her small,
plumish figure in slacks), and do
what work is possible in the rain-

iolet.” soakéd garden.
Violet Bonham Carter, is being VIOlCâ„¢ | :
wooed by the Tories. You will remember, also, how She enjoys a game ~< golf, too
Lady Megan, on vacation sparks flew four months ago after and she reads a lot (Trollope for
the ancestral retreat at Cri Lady Megan had voted with the choice). She can pop over to
Socialists on ee and living Anglesey in an hour (she greeted

the chairman of the Soc ¢ costs. Her conduct, Violet Princess Margaret there on Thurs-
Party. Miss Alice Bacon, Mr. (64 next month) told the Cam- day), and is often seen around }
. bridge University Liberal Club was with her two Pembrokeshire!

“huter Ede, new Socialist h

wh. “so subtle and intricate and be- corgi’, 11-year-old Sioncyn (little
yond me that I think it would be John) and his 18month-old son
only Freud.” Bilws (Little William).

Kalled ith with the A local JP (she attended petty
is ho new pastime for sessions yesterday) and urban
Megan. From the time she district , she has no time
took her seat as member or tasté for. domestic tasks; is
looked after by a staff of two anc
Ti~year-old Saran —— —
right-wing Noble Lady Odical- rumours of her switching joined the household before she
was up ro . over to that party. Mr. Herbert was born. There is also a house-
For e the heels of the news ea ee i ee Des ad- keéper in the London flat.
that the Tories had agreed to res, vain. to i ‘a-
support her, Lady Violet Bonham join him, But loyalty to her father, ete omnte Ar Lay islet
Carter announced on Wednesday the force that kept her q Liberal | But nen she lune oe
that she accepted the invitation to Still does so. er) a Ps r smile and tho
be prospective Liberal candidate She chides the Liberals fea heeree: - ths she is a
for Colne Valley, the Yorkshire drifting to the t—"a drift Winner every time—except per-
constituency whose present ing@m- away from the old tradi- haps, in Lady Violet’s constituency
bent is Mr, Glenvil Hall, chairman tion I am a Radical, and proud of 6 Goine valley.
of the Parliamentary Labour it.” But it seems that she would
Party. split them asunder rather than WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
an, EB.

Although Lady Megan

Lady
first

for

ieave them.

She is their deputy leader in
i .. the Commons: took charge for a

THERE siiould be fireworks in month when Mr. Clem ‘Davies had
the Commons if these two women his recent attack of flu.

both vice-presidents of the Liberal i
Party are elected next time. By sticking to the Libersls, she

In . z
them the feud that existed between bitlonis the Montene Pee hankiy”
their fathers, Asquith and Lloyd likely that the Liberals will be in
George flares anew.

. office in her prime (she is 48 now)
: ; but she has been assured many
B.B. C. Radio
Programme

times that her truculent brilliance
THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1951

Fireworks





RKO-RADIO'S
ADVENTURE _IN.



SUSPENSE !

would be such an asset to the
Socialists as to rate ministerial
rank. It is obvious where her
sympathizers lie (“I like to see
these people tackling privilege’’) .

‘And what an education she had




EXCITEMENT







: S it has never been
10.20 8.m—18.15 p.m. —~ 19.68 m for the Minister she has never equatied.,.with every

630 am Announcer’s Choice, 700 become! gasping thrill in
a.m. The News, 7.10 am, News Analysis, From the age of six until she

715 am _ From The Editorials, 7.25 a.m.

Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. Red ; was 20 her home was in Downing

ter







Componer of the Week. 8 30's a WHE Stee ion ot Mon 10. Onn te
and Worship, 845 am. You and t after 1916 at No. 10. | Often
News, 9.00 am The News, 9.10 am, attended her father’s famous
Home piew! From Britain, 9.15 am breakfast parties meéting the
jose own, ey ls -
ade, 11,25 am "iSitenets “Chalee iis great political figures. '
a.m. Statement of Account, 12.00 noon * iY ike “
The News, 12.10 pm. News Analysis, To Paris
12 15 pm. Close Down.
415—645 pam, — 19.76 mm, HER father whisked her from We
415 pm. Ken Mackintosh, 500 pm. SChool at Garrett's Hall. Banstead, y,
Framponse of the Week, 515 pm toa ishing schoo] at 17, F
orth merica als him
p.m, Light Music, a io tern so that she could be with
Smith, 6.00 p.m. Voice of the Violin, at the Versailles peace conference.
6.02.15 pan, — 2.5% m. She “se the men of Versailles, she
6.15 p.m, From The Third Programme, saw the treaty signed.
635 ‘pm. Interlude, 643. p.m. Pro: wards she had a year in India as

gramme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News,
m News Analysis, 7.15 pam, We

Britain, 7.45 pm Red Letter Day.

7.45—11.00 p.m, — 25,58 m., 31 32 m.

800 pm

7.10 guest of Viceroy Lord
See Reading.

But she had no aim then to be

an MP herself. Her atnbitions

Fier, Were wholly centred in “The Old

the

Radio Newsreel, 8.15
Books to Read, 8.30 p.m, As 1 Knew

& 45 pom Composer of the Week, 900 Man”. She was for years his bd
Pm Statement of A », O18 ‘
ee ee Clon Ford - Valli

p.m. Interlude, 9.30 p.m, Serious ‘Argu- him everywhere— the United
ment, 10 00 p.m The News, 10.10 p " e

; m States, Canada, South America bs |
From The Editorials, 10 16 m Fine , . . (| d "
FS ahi ona etka oves a aude Rains

When at 27 “Ll, G.’s little girl”
aes in Parliament she had not
% uJ ‘ only her father’s flashing blue
in Canada. "11'H6 ites, SoBi"in en WE** eyes, but most of his mannerisms,
s including the characteristic stab-

ae bing finger.

Snibbo will be There Welsh was her earliest language,

sh

NIBBO’S contribution Seek cr che eat di es

Festival will

to the English at three and a half, when

P probably be a she was taken to an English hotel
gigantic conveyor belt in colour- ang was unable at first to under-
ed electric lights. It will give stand what anyone said. Poetic
the impression of continuous cadences of her mother tongue stil]
movement and will give off ® acho in her speeches, although

pleasing aroma of Snibbolene,
the soap that will clean anything wth long since leet her Welsh

from a human face to a_ light-
house wall. Attached to the belt

C.B.C, PROGRAMME
THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1951

00 p.m.—10.15 p.m. News and com-

mL





BWR CEDRIC HARDWICKE
JUNE CLAYWORTH + LOTTE STEM .

Plus :—LEON ERROL in

“POPO KNOWS WORST”

Her Fortune

will be a super-loudspeaker, ad Latest
which will croon the praises of IF SHE has anissed her vocation “WORLD NEWs”
Snibbo to specially selected] in the Cabinet Lady Megan is in

classical melodies, “Visitors 3

;, ae ; to] many other ways a lucky woman.
England,” said a director yester- Her father left her a hat (after
day, “will want culture as well a8} certain bequests) of his £140,000
ba ati fortune. She has the family house
Brynawelon, at Criccieth, with its Friday 20th, 2.30 — 4.45
views of mountains and sea; a and 8.30 p.m.
large flat in South Kensington
with qa TV set and a view of Big and continuing Daily 4.45 and
Ben, and her week-end cottage at 8.30 p.m.
Churt, Surrey.

Her way of taking thaw ———

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown

LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY — 445 & 8.20 p
RKO RADIO'S THRILLING DOUBLE ! !
STEP LIVELY

Frank SINATRA
Gloria DeHAVEN

TODAY THURSDAY 1.3 p.m.
Tim Holt in (Both) {

GUN SMUGGLERS

B’TOWN

PLAZA Dial 2310



CROSSWORD











(DIAL 2310)

TARZAN TRIUMPHS

Johnny WEISSMU R
Johnny (Boy) SHEE ELD

OPENING TOMORROW
2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

THE WHITE TOWER











1. Famous decoration in oroken and
Color by Technicolor
to ae ee eloicen to i|_ UNDER THE TONTO RIM | Glenn Ford—Valli—Claude Rains
10. arerh in Boe ie oe : = ——==
eat and v es,
11. May sound Fralian but les just AIETY
mackerel.

7A DIAL
PLAZA sabe







13. Step that has pealed ? (4)

4 Tax toa tenth, (5) OISTIN (THE GARDEN) St. James

18. Mena ‘Sroken by 16 Across. (7) LAST SHOW TODAY — 8.30 p.m,

ly. This eater joys insects. (3) Last 2 Sh GENTLEMAN JOE PALOOKA

20: Gomes from 1. (5) ows Today 5 & 8.30 p.m. n Errol and

31: One age of youth, (4) RKO Radio's The Shadow in - -

22, Such a man Is a bargee. (4) “SHE” & “MASKED RAIDERS” “THE MISSING LADY”
Down Randolph Scott Tim Holt with Kane Richmond

1. Argue, (6) 2, Coal resin. (7) Midnite Sat. 2ist Tid. to Sun. 8.20)

er re te Pa {3 Midnite Sat. 2ist ))Frid., Sat, Sun. “Me. WONG in iat. Sun. 5 p.m,

5 Refer. (6) , Cisco Kid in 5 and 6.30 p.m. CHINATOWN" KO's

6. Fifty in a man-o-war's boat. (4) “SOUTH of th ¥ Boris Karloff & BLOOD the

7. Colour for a rogue. (5) ee et ‘Cisco o

9. Moss-like ae eruption, (6) a "aoe Beuenanine” “Rid ee. mor

12 Sort pedal. ( m

15. This fast is early in the day. (5) aes Pr Mel Ferrer California Trail |{ Robert Mitchum)

17 Could have been 13 Across. (4) SESS Se

18 Felt underfoot 43) i —S 2 = A =














i
,)

f
}
,)
}
)

We are fully stocked with

GARDEN REQUISITES |

Hose—3 in., 5 in., % in.



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ne ee. sauce \ Handsprayers }
vin ae se, Salon Sates
Tins T, Butter Pyne . ts K{
Slabs of Bacon it
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ai938) LTD.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
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AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8.9 pr

ROD CAMERON in “BOSS OF BOOMTOWN”

with Fuzzy KNIGHT Ray WHITLEY and His Bar-6 COWBOYS
A UNTVERSAL PICTURE
This Picture will be of apecial interest to the younger Patrons
(40 years & over)

°



MATINEES FRIDAY & SATURDAY AT 5 PM
FRIDAY TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 830





SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY MORNING AT 6 90 o'clock
Walt DISNEY'S -- “CINDERELLA” in’ Technicolor
Leeann <== ——
BRR

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street “t+

_—

Upstairs Over Newsam's







NYLON STOCKINGS . seks
in Four Shades

Prepare Now for Summes Holidays ‘
SPECIAL PRICES IN BATHING SUITS

TINY GIRL’S SIZE
SMALL BOYS’ TRUNK
GIRLS
LADIES’



per par $1.98

. $2.54
rok Whee Eo 1.69
$2.60, $3.35 & 3.71
from $4.85 up







GLOBE

TO-DAY 5.00 AND 8.30
Alan LADD

LAST SHOWS
Wanda HENDRIX

CAPTAIN CAREY U.S.A.

OPENING TO-MORROW, 5.00 AND 8.30 P.M.

PM



Aas eM Lee LCL

Screenplay by HAROLD SHUMATE and JOSEPH HOFFMAN Directed by FREDERICK de CORDOVA
Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR
PLUS :

AND HIS ORCHESTRA
AND
THE YEAR’S GRANDEST SHOW

LEE BROWN

SUPER STAR TALENT CONTEST

FITZ HAREWOOD Singing ........ “Bewildered”
CLAYTON THOMPSON Singing
KEITH SEALEY Singing
JOE CLARK Singing
PERCY WELCH Singing
GERALD DAISLEY Singing

“Song of Songs”
“Te”,
. “Bop Goes My Heart”

“Surrender”

PRICES :
Pit 24c; House 40c; Balcony 60c; Boxes 72c.
TICKETS on Sale DAILY, GLOBE THEATRE
$50.00 CASH PRIZES

aE

—

ees SS

EMPIRE

Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Tomorrow 2.30 p.m Only

ROYAL |

Last Two Shows Today
430 & 830 p.m,





Columbia Pictures Presents

«GIRL OF THE
YEAR”

Starring... .

Universal Big Double—
Lon CHANEY in .

«MUMMY’S TOMB”

Robert CUMMINGS AND
OO UCHESTER “THE EXILE”
eR A, with

ROXY

Today Only 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Republic Double—

Gene AUTRY in .

*“ ROBINHOOD OF

TEXAS ”
AND
“THE WOMAN WHO
CAME BACK”

with Nancy KELLY
and John LODER

Douglas FAIRBANKS, Jr.

OLYMPIC

‘Today Only 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Warner Bros, Double—
George BRENT and
Beverly ROBERTS in
“GOD'S COUNTRY
AND THE
WOMAN ”
AND
« CHEYENNE ”

with Dennis MORGAN
and Jane WYMAN





Opening Friday 20th

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Ue See hn: Mee eee

we offer
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At Prices that cannot he repeated

GALVANIZE SHEETS—6it., 7ft., Sit. 9ft. 10 ft.
ALUMINUM SHEETS — 6it., 7ft., Sft., Sit. 10ft.,
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$
THURSDAY, APRIL 19,

1951



Questions of Grenada -

=
Riots Answered
In House of Commons
ON WEDNESDAY APRI 4, in the House of Commons

Mr. Thomas Cook, Labour
questions on the recent Grenada disturbances.
Following are the questio





Jca_ Possesses
“Wealth of Basic
Material”
—HENRY KAISER

KINGSTON, J’ca., April 17

Henry Kaiser, American indus-
trialist and his wife ended
week’s honeymoon visit today
when they took plane for New
Orleans where Kaiser is building
a $70,000,000 plant to handle Ja
maica bauxite of which Kaiser's
permanent company controls the
vast deposits of the island

While here Kaiser inspected de-
posits in connection with which
his engineers are preparing plans
for development.

a

Kaiser, when asked if he
would build an aluminium
plant here, said this would

da@pend on future develop-
ments. Kaiser went on to Say that
Jamaica possessed the wealth of
basic materials necessary for de
velopment, but little use was being
made of it. He said that vision,
faith, and intelligence were essen-
tials in creating industry, and cap-
ital would come in for develop-
ment.——(CP)

Barbadian Dies
In Grenada

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE’S, April 17.

Mr. Alexander Grant, 86, long
retired Head Teacher of the St.
Paul’s Anglican School, died last
Sunday night.

Coming to Grenada from Bar-
bados many years ago, Mr. Grant
was engaged in teaching all his
life, for the most part in the St,
Paul’s district where he was also
a prominent member of the
Anglican Church, being a Lay
Reader for over 40 years as well
as Superintendent of the Sunday
School.

He retired a few years before
a Government Model School was
established in the district and
the Anglican and Roman Catholic
schools were closed.

One of the largest funeral at-
tendances in the history of tha
district was seen when the funer-
al took place on Tuesday. :

Re@d. John Trenam, Priest-in-
Charge, read the funeral service,
while Revd, F, EB. Layne, a form-
er Rector of St. Paul's, delivered
a moving address on the life
and work of the deceased and
Archdeacon H. G. Pigott later
committed the body to the grave
in the churchyard.

The deceased leaves five sons
and six daughters, some of them
in the United States, also a de-
voted wife.

Â¥ '

Would You Like A
. . . «

Free Trip To Paris?

An essay competition on Freneh
subjects has been organised by the
French Consul in Trinidad, and is
open to all persons of British na-
tionality resident for at least the
last five years in one of the follow-
ing territories: Barbados, British
Guiana, Jamaica, Leeward Islands,
Trinidad and Tobago and the
Windward Islands,

The competition is divided into
two parts, the Ordinary Contest
and the Special Contest. The first
prize for the Ordinary Contest 1s
a holiday in Martinique, and for
the Special Contest the first prize
will be a first class round-trip
ticket to Paris and back with a
month’s holiday in France. /

Essays need not be written in
French, but all things being equal
preference will be given to entries
in French, $Y

Full details and gecwbinmers of

ry for the Essay Competition
Saar he seen at the office of Capt.
H. H. Williams, YÂ¥.M.C.A., Pin-
fold Street.







Many British Jokes
Make Fun Overseas

If the head waiter at a London
hotel sees an enormous ink blob
on one of his tablecloths the
chances are that “the Australian
in No, 5” is to blame. :

And if he hears the crash of
breaking crockery behind him as
he bends to mop up the ink it
will probably the same guest,
airing his sense of humour.

To satisfy that sense of humour,
practical joke manufacturers in
Britain are working overtime
turning out rubber-tipped pencils,

exploding theatre tickets, non
jathering soap, disintegrating
match-boxes, and many other
“ ”

Production is being stepped up
in preparation for the BIF, which
begins this month.

Biggest overseas
the moment is Australia,
America second.

customer at
with

—L.ES.

Strike Holds Up
W.I. Exhibits

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, April 18
West Indian exhibits for the
British Industries Fair have been
held up by Britain’s token dock
strike. Unless there is a return to
full-time working at an early date
West Indian stands may not be



complete when the Exhibition
opens on April 30. f
Among exhibits which have

been affected are: a hose for St,
Vincent (Windwards). Quantities
of arrowroot and raw cotten have
been lying at London docks sinct







M.-P. for Dundee, replied to

ns and Mr. Cook’s replies :

Mr. T. Reid (Labour, Swin-
don) asked the Secretary «!
State for the Colonies what was

the extent of the damage caused
to public and private property in
Grenada during the recent riots
and to what extent the citizens
or their representatives helped
the authorities to suppress the
rioters.

Sir
Kent)
State
he has



Richard
asked
for the

Acland (Labour,
the Secretary of
Colonies whether
any further statement to
make on the recent disturbances
in Grenada, and particularly
about the circumstances which
served as the effective cause of
the ceterioration of the: situation
from relatively normal indus-

trial. dispute into a serious dis-
turbance; and whether he pro-
poses to hold any formal inquiry

into the immediate circumstances
of the disturbances and into the
general economic background

against which they have to be
considered.

Mr. Cook: I will, with per-
mission, make a further _ state-

ment on the situation in Grenada
as promised by my Right Hon.
Friend on 21st March.

The Wages Council Bill was
passed on 28th March. Independ-
ently, representatives of the Ag-
ricultural Employers’ Society and
the Grenada Mental and Manual
Workers’ Union have met under
neutral chairmanship. No inci
dents have been reported by the
Governor since the statement in
the House on 2lst March. The
resumption of work was delayed

at Plaisance and Mount Horn
Estates but is now general.
In view of the negotiations

proceeding locally I do not wish
to add anything to previous state-
ments in the House. I regret to
say that damage and losses in re-
spect of crops are reported from
some 80 estates, the latest total
estimates amounting to £195,000.
In addition, damage by arson to
Gavernment property is estimat-
ed at £8,300 and to private pro-—

perty at £9,700. Some citizens
with wireless experience greatly
assisted police communications

during the strike, others joined
the special constabulary.

Dr. Morgan (Labour. Warring-
ton): Is my hon. Friend aware of
the economic conditions of the poor
labourers of the estates in Grenada

and the other West Indian
Islands are perfectly disgrace-
ful? Would he see that machin-
ery is quickly available to take
the matter in hand

as soon as
an industrial or agricultural dis-
pute is announced in any of the
Colonies? !

Mr. Cook: We now have this
Wages Council set up and we
hope for good results from it.

Mr. Pickthorn (Conservative,
Nottingham): Could the House
be told what was the meaning
of the word “independently”
used, I think, in the early part
of the hon. Gentleman's reply? I
was not quite clear about it. Sec—
ondly, I apologise to the hon,
Gentleman but I did not hear
auite clearly the names he men-
ticned, Thirdly, is there any
means of estimating how much,
if any, of the damage caused is
covered by insurance policies?

Mr, Cook: I am not in a posi-
tion to reply to the latter part
of tha question. I mentioned
Plaisance and Mount Horn, The
word “independently” means that
they were independent of the
Wages Council.

Sir R. Acland: My hon, Friend
mentioned the question of inves-
tigations that are now proceed—
ing. If those are investigations
simply by the Minister’s Labouy
officer, I would ask whether he
is a sufficient man to investigate
alone the very important ques-
tion of why it was that some-
thing that may have started as
a labour dispute degenerated into
a disturbance and a riot with
tremendous loss by damage and
loss of life, Second, who is to
investigate the question of the
general economic and social
background of this Island, against
which this dispute arose?

Mr. Cook: It does not arise at
this point. Mr, Barltrop has the
full confidence of the Secretary
of State in handling the situation,
not only from day to day but
from hour to hour.

Mr, Henderson Stewart
tional Liberal Fife): In
the known activities of Com-
munists in other parts of the
West Indies, is the hon. Gentle~
man able to give the House an
assurance that a full inquiry into
that possibility has been made?

Mr. Cook; We have no evi-~
dence at the moment of any Com-~
munist activity so far as Grenada
is concerned, but we are watch-
ing the position very carefully
—L.ES.

(Na-

view of



Rumanian Shoots
Yugoslav Guard

BELGRADE, April 17

A Rumanian frontier guard shot
ene of Marshal Tito’s frontier
yesterday on Yugoslav ter-
Tanjug, Yugoslav official
agency said today.

Within an hour there was an-
other frontier incident when 10
Rumanians crossed the border, the
agency alleged, The first incident
Tanjug said, was near Sredeste
village, where a Rumanian shot at
a Yugoslav guard and wounded
him in the leg.





news

Within an hour ten Rumanian
soldiers had crossed “deep into

Yugoslav territory” between Man-
kovac and Socica,

Two machine-guns on the Ru-
manian side were held ready to
give them covering fire, the agency
said, and the intruders refused an
order to withdraw.—Reuter.



COSMOPOLITAN
ADELAIDE,
The first Persian ship to berth
in Australia flies the Persian flag,
is registered there, but has never










March 30. Further West an been there. The officers are
exhibits are expected to arr at Norwegian, some gf the crew are
Liverpool over the week-end. It Ge Chinese and Danish
is hoped that by then, the dockers Ever ody speaks English and
will have returned to work d the ip goes anywhere in the
that normal condition xcept to Persi



BARBADOS ADVOCATE







THE FAMOUS AMERICAN screen star Humphrey Bogart who is now on holiday in France with his

ON HOLIDAY IN FRANCE

* é



â„¢

wife, takes a picture of her together with two fam ous Paris mannequins Praline and Carrol at the re-

opening of Longchamp Races. Lauren Bacall (Mrs. Bogart in private life) is on extreme

Malaria Among
Ex-Slaves

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt,
April 12

In the heart of the Arabian
desert there are oases so highly
malarious that the wandering
bedouins visit them for only ten
days once a year to collect their
share of the date harvest, a
World Health Organization ex-
pert has reported,

The statement was made by
Dr. M. A. Farid, WHO maiari-
ologist who has just left Saudi
Arabia after a month’s study of
malaria conditions in the_country,

In the Khaibir oasis, 125 miles
northeast of Medine, he - said,
there is an indigenous population
of about 4,000 people who are
descendants of African slaves
and who ‘have a partial immun-
ity against malaria. They live in
the oasis all the, year round, and
cultivate the date’ crop. ot-
withstanding this partial im-
munity, Dr. Farid found a spleen
rate (a standard test for ma-
laria) as high as 65 per ‘cent
among the children and a malaria
blood index of 25 per cent.. dur-
ing the non-transmission season.

In the former times, Dr. Farid
said, the date cultivators were in
fact slaves and had to surrender
the entire date harvest to the
bedouin owners. With the pas-
sage of the years, however, the
date cultivators became emanci-
pated and acquired the right to
50 per cent of the crop. Tribe
numbering about 60,000 bedouins,
according to Dr. Farid, visit the
Khaibir oasis once a year to col-
lect their half of the date crop
but do not go near it at, any r
time aS they have not acquired
the partial immunity of the cul-
tivators. Bedouin tribesmen who
contract malaria succumb fre-
quently, he pointed out.

Oasis Scourge

Malaria nas been known as a
scourge in the Arabian peninsula
since the days of Mohammed and
is also locally known as oasis or
yethreb (Medina) fever Ac-
cording to Dr. Farid, it is be-
lieved that malaria was the prin-
cipal reason why the bedouins
have never settled in the numer-
ous oases but have preferred to
maintain their traditional nomadic
existence. To this day, malaria is
the major health problem of the
country and the conditions in the
Khaibir oasis are typical.

In the recent years, under: the
guidance and encouragement of
King Ibn Saud, attempts have
been made to settle the becouins
in agricultural areas. One of these
attempts in the Jabrin oasis, south
and inland of Dahran, failed be
cause of numerous deaths from
malaria, Public health authorities,
recognizing that the agricultural
gettlement project could not be
successfully carried out without
sufficient malaria control, have
appealed to the World Health
Organization to assist them in
malaria control campaigns. The
work would include spraying of
houses and stables with DDT,
draining of swamps, and suppres-
sion of breeding places of malaria-
bearing mosquitoes among which,
in Saudi Arabia, the dangerous
Anopheles gambiae are prevalent.

U.N. Experts

The need for this work in ur-
ban areas also was dramatically
demonstrated in the port of Jed
da where a new water supply
was built a few years ago. As
a consequence, old wells and cis
terns were neglected and became
ideal breeding places for mos-
quitoes. This gave rise to. a con-

siderable increase in the _ inci-
dence of malaria,

Experts from; the Food and
Agriculture Organization of the

United Nations are now in Saudi
Arabia to advise the government
cn improving agricultural meth-
eds and promoting irrigation
schemes. Great care must be
taken, Dr. Farid emphasizes, to
supplement these projects with
edequate malaria control mea-
sures. The public health authori-
ties have requested the Worlc
Health Organization to send a
malaria control demonstratior
team to train local doctors in
modern malaria control methods

In addition, Saudi Arabian ex.
perts will qualify for WHO fel.
lowships.



‘MYKEN’ BRINGS
U.S. MAIL

Twenty-six bags of reguiar and
three bags of registered American
mail arrived for Barbados on
Tuesday evening by the Alcoa
steamship Myken which called
from New York.

The Myken was
yesterday morning discharging
part of the general cargo she
brought here. Her cargo included
foodstuffs, clothing, piece goods,
shoes, engine parts, agricultural
implements and sewing machines
She left port during the evening
for Trinidad. Messrs Robert Thom
Ltd. are her agents,

still in port

Itsan Old Wild
West Custom

By
J.P. W. MALLALIEU, MP.

Fifty-two years ag a prospéctor
heading for the Klondike searched
for his straying donkey, He found
it at last and sat on gq ledge to
rest, Chipping at the ledge he
found gold.

As soon as the news spread, a
town sprang up where ne had
rested and, in all,. $125 million
worth of metal was mined,

What happened round this ledge



at Tonopah, Colorado, -happened
elsewhere in the Western States
of America, and every cinema-

goer has at last an impression of
what life in those mushroom towns
was like. To judge by Duncan
Emrich’s IT’S: AN OLD WILD
WEST CUSTOM” the West was
even wilder than the movies make
out.

It was a place of sudden wealth,
where a miner would throw a
golden fortune on to the stage for
a singer» who pleased him, or
would buy an hotel for pleasure
of firing a manager.

It was a place of sudden pover-
ty, where a seam giving out would
leu.ve a town derelict,

There Crooked-Nose Pete, Dia
mond-Tooth Daker, Slot-Machine
Ida, and Unsinkable Mrs. Brown
(who had. survived the Titanic)
lived hard an@ died hard. They
drank Tarantula Juice and Forty
Red in saloons named Road to
Ruin or Come in and Die

They gambled so continuously
that the dealers worked round
the clock in shiftsy and so fan.
tastically .that: the Governor of
New. Mexico orice lost the whole
of his territory on a single throw.

They were superstitious; some
miners refused to re-enter work
ir\t, which had been visited by a
woman until the priest had blewn
holy water all over with the air
compressor.

But they reverenced a “lady of
the line” who stayed to nurse in
> mining camp after an o*break
of smallpox had driven more re-
spectable women to safety.

They heid to a code that no one
should shoot an unarmed man or
shoot an armed man in the back.

Nor were they content with the
fantastic realities of their life
They had to invent even wilder
fantasies—fieas so large that they

barked when removed from a
bed; mosquitos which threw
rocks when. disturbed; an echo

which, if shouted at in the even-
ing, would wake a man with an
answering shout next morning;
a het. spring which, if properly
flavoured with pepper and salt,
was indistinguishable from chick-
en broth.

But in the Wild West anything
was possible, anything was believ-
able. If you want two hours of
roaring, zestful fun you should
read Emrich’s book.

* World's Work (1913), 106. 64
—L.ES.



GERMAN CAR
RECOVERY AMAZING

Output of the German motor
industry is approaching half that
of the British industry, according
to engineer K: B. Hopfinger, of
Hampton-in-Arden, near Birming-
ham.

“Recently I was in Germany
and 1 was astonished at the
recovery there since the war,’ he
said to-day.

“Although there is a basic
48-hour-week, German workers
will work any hours at intensive
speeds and the unions and em-
ployers work in harmony.
Strikes are unheard of.”
German manufacturers, says Mr

Hopfinger, are organising big sales
schemes for their cars at home
and abroad whieh are already
bringing results.

Free enterprise and the desire
of workers to better their living
standards were responsible for the
recovery —L.E.S.



Senior Short Story Competition
The Evening Advocate invites all schoolboys and school—girts
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-
tition. Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
n length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd.
“ity not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week

vill be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

right.

LEICESTER.
Mr. C. Anson Smith, head-
master of Rushey Mead Boys’
School, Leicester, who took a

party of his schoolboys to Spain
by double-decker bus last sum-
mer, is planning a similar trip in
August to Moscow.

“I am hoping to get things
moving soon,” he told me. “It
will be a much more difficult

task than going to Spain. Per-
haps it will come off, and per-
haps it will not.”

“The running of
wil} present few difficulties, as
they are no mountains to nego-
tiate, such as we had when we
went to Spain,

the vehicle

“Our biggest difficulty will be
to get permission from the Ger-
man, Polish and Russian author.
ties to go through their territo-
ries. We shall also, of course,
have to have the permission of
our Foreign Office.

“I think it would be a good
thing, in several ways, if a party
of boys could go to Russia, It
cannot possibly do any harm.

“I think it would be a very
nice gesture on the part of the
Russian authorities if this could
be arranged,”

The proposed tour would last
five weeks. Average age of the
boys is 14.

The bus which would be used
again is an old Leicester Corpora-
tiof!â„¢ bus which has been reno-
vated and bears the name Spirit
of Leicester, and illustrations of
the city’s industries,

Last year the chief driver was
the father of one of the boys, a
Mr, Page, who is a long-distance
passenger coach driver. Mr.
Anson Smith hopes that Mr.
Page will be able to drive them
again this year,

The distance from
to Moscow, by road and sea,
approximately 1,700 miles.

—LES.

—

Will Not Accept

Ca-management

DUESSELDORF, April 17.
West Germany's strongest em-
ployers’ federation declared today
it would “decisively” oppose any
extension of co-management to in-
dustries other than coal and steel,
Warning issued the



Leicester
is



was by
North Rhine Westphalian Em-
ployers’ Federation which covers

the Ruhr.

Employers said they “rely on
the West German Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer’s promise that
egulations for steel and coal
industries cannot be transferred
to other industries.”

Trade unioniets in the chemical
industry have demanded co-
management for this industry, the
third biggest in West Germany
after stee) and coal.

Labour Minister Anton Storch
recently! advocated j that co-
management should be introduced
in most industries —Reuter.



Lord Russell Will
Return Home

LONDON, April 18

Lord Russell of Liverpool will
leave his post as Deputy Judge
Advocate General of the British
Srmy of the Rhine and return to
London at the end of the month,
the House of Commons was told
on Tuesday.

He was involved on March 31
in a clash with a German crowd
at Vlotho, North Rhine Westphalia
end made an error of judgment in
the manner and matter of his
communication with the Press,
Foreyg Secretary Herbert Mér-
rison told the Commons,—CP)











Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name

WEEE ob ii erdesdvoes



American Column:

Unseating

Armehair
Soldiers



PAGE THREE

NO ORANGES: MANGO INFLUX



During the past four days there into good season, and plenty of
een a deiinite scarcity of} limes,

1 grapefruit in Bar- The sellers seem more disap

‘ pointed with the scarcity of thesc

Housewives were hunting | fruit than the housewives, while

1 every street and alley of| they are anxiously awaiting the

he City in search of these fruit| arrival of a schooner or motor

nd only few wera lucky to pro- vessel from Trinidad and
cure one or two of them from} Dominica.

From NEWELL ROGERS

NEW YORK
strcng platoon of Senators,
te> old for war service, is launch-
ing an offensive against 20,000
Washington armchair soldiers.

The Senators want to drive
these unitormed men out of their
cheirs and into Korea’s front
*s because they are of combat

Many of the soldicrs

A















are anxiou
go and are ashamed of their
hy jobs Some mow gen
I's lawn, 1,900 do Pre work
the War’ Office, 13,000 more

on recruiting duty They

could man 12 jet-fighter groups or

six large aircraft carriers

The Senators want to replace
the men with army women or
civilians. The women want tc
take over, Says one of them
‘Don't treat us as a national
luxtry Manpowe: isn’t only

malepower .”

PARIS GLAMOUR girls of rare
old vintage dominate New York
and Chicago night life Mistia
guett, star of the French music
halls for 60 years, opens on Thurs-
day at a smart East Side boite
Josephine Baker is billed to go into
a Chicago theatre for a reported
salary of £3,900 a week

CRITICS are impatient with the
newest science thriller film, “The
Man From Planet X," which was

intended to be q spine-tingling
picture,
The man lands on an English

island in a block of ice to capture
the earth because X is perishing
from cold. The critics -too
dull and old-fashioned

IT HAPPENED in Washington.
A Government office, the Com-
modity Exchange Authority, re-
turned £10,700 of its appropri
ution to the Treasury unspent. A
Congressional committee called
for a minute’s silence to recover]
from the shock.

GOOD FOOD NEWS. Agricul
ture Secretary Charles Brannan
reports that farms are now “gear
ed” to produce 40 per cent. more
than for the years just precedin:

say

the last war. Food prices have
stopped rising. Some are going
down,

PRE-BUDGET ieaders to-day in
the Times and Herald-Tribuae
voice sympathy and admiration in
edvance for Britain's hard—pressed

reople. Burden of their refrain
Britons will not flinch
WHISKY and cigarettes are

Leing boosted in full-page adver
tisements because Americans are
not buying enough, Output shot
ip in expectation of shortages
\vhich failed to appear, Except
for Scotch whisky, prices are slip-
ying. Sample: For a quart of
Yourbon — 33s.

Research Council
Veets In Trinidad

PORT-OF-SPAIN,

The Caribbean Research Coun
cil Committee on Agriculture,
Fish, Wildlife and Forestry met
at Kent House, Trinidad, on April
16 with three of its four mémbers
present.

Those present were Mr, A. deK
Frampton, Agricultural Adviser t
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Organisation, for the Brit
ish territories; Dr. Henri Stehle
Director of Agricultural Research
for the French West Indies; ana
Dr. F. W. Ostendorf, Director of
the Agricultural Experiment Sta
tion, Surinam, /

The meeting of the Commission
considered a Commission plan t
make available to the entire Carib



bean the facilities of the West
Indies Sub-Station of the Com
monwealth Bureau of Biologica!

Control,

â„¢ surveyed the status of re
search on forage crops and grasse
in the Caribbean, and studied ¢
proposal for a technical meeting
on Home Economics Education
and Extension in the Caribbean
and the suggestion from the Foot
and Agriculture Organisation
the United Nations that FAO may
make available the services of }
Home Economist and Nutritior
Economist for that purpose

of





DECREE NISI

In the Court of Divorce and
Matrimonial Causes on Tuesday,
His Honour, Justice G. L. Tayler,
granted decree nisi in the case of
Rivoka Birsztajn, petitioner, and
$701 Birsztajn, respondent, award-
ed custody of one of the children
to the petitioner, and made an
order for costs on the lower scale.

Mr. G. B. Niles, instructed by
Messrs. G. W. L. Clarke & Co.,
appeared on behalf of the peti-
tioner,



$2,135.00

local sellers,






AVAILABLE?!

BEDFORD

The Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion told the Advocate yesterday
that ‘they did not expect the im-
mediate arrival of any vessel
from either of these ports.

Instead of the oranges and
erapefruit, they were met with
mangoes, which are now coming



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PAGE FOUR



AD

SSSsS Ponaeie 2 |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown



Thursday, April 19, 1951



SUPPLY OFFICERS

THE conference of supply officers from
British Caribbean territories was expected
to end their discussion of current supply
problems, last night. But it is possible that
there will be a further meeting today.
Conferences of Supply officers assumed
special significance after devaluation of
British sterling and the West Indian dollar
in September 1949. It was immediately
following devaluation that the first import-
ant conference of Caribbean Supply
officers was held in October 1949. There
had been an earlier conference in 1947 but
the problems discussed prior to 1949 have
little significance in the light of subsequent

» changed economic trends. There was a
major conference attended by financial
officers and high ranking administrative
officials to discuss supply problems of the
Caribbean and to review the economy of
the region in 1950. This week’s conference
is the third conference at which the urgent
questions of supply will be considered.

All three of these conferences had one
thing in common. They were discussing
supply problems of the British Caribbean
from within a closed shop. The officials
representing colonial Governments cannot
by the very fact of their official status
approach the problems of supply in the
Caribbean from any other viewpoint than
that of the official rulings which have their
origin in Whitehall. There can be no ques-
tion of the competency of officials attend-
ing these supply talks to discuss supply
problems of the Caribbean from the official
point of view. But grave doubt has been
expressed in commercial circles through-
out the area that an exclusively official
body should be discussing supply problems,
unaided by the wisdom and experience of

representatives of Chambers of Commerce
in the area.

At this particular period of crisis, when
the whole pattern of Canadian-West Indies
trade is a matter of personal concern to the
Canadian Minister of Trade and Com-
merce, it is certainly a matter for regret
that the views of West Indians experienced
in this trade should not be heard at a Sup-
ply Officers’ Conference. It is well-known
that Canada is today displeased with the
unbalance in Canadian-West Indian trade
and that a conference will be held in
Ottawa to discuss the Trade Liberalization
Plan which began to operate in January,
1951 when the “token imports” scheme
proved a failure.

Canadians are by no means convinced
that the trade Liberalization plan will be
much more successful than the unsuccess-
ful “token imports” scheme, and they are
already taking the initiative to call for a
review of the “moribund Canada-West
Indies Trade agreement of 1925,” by which
Canada is obliged to subsidise an unprofit-
able shipping service, whose only purpose
from Canada’s point of view was to in-
crease the volume of Canadian-West In-
dian Trade.

The United Kingdom has shown a mark-
ed indifference to the provision of passen-
ger shipping in the Caribbean and it would
be a catastrophe of major consequence to
Caribbean economy should the C.N.S.
liners be withdrawn from the area because
of a failure,.on the part of the United
Kingdom and the West Indian Govern-
ments whose economic policy is controlled
by the United Kingdom Governments, to
appreciate that the Government of Canada
is most perturbed at existing trade rela-
tions between the Dominion and the
Caribbean territories which it preserved
during the late war by provision of food-
stuffs and at one period by a free gift of
flour. It is too much to expect that over-
burdened supply officers in the area can
do much more than keep abreast of the
ceaseless flow of regulations and instruc-
tions that arrive at their desks via the
Colonial Office but which have their origin
in the British Board of Trade and Treas-
ury. ”

The “Closed Door” policy of conducting
British Caribbean Trade has got to end one
day, unless the British are going to go back
on their word and refuse to give the area
political independence. One method of

associating the peoples of the area in the
major responsibility of political independ-
ence—the conduct of trade and planning
of a good economy—would be to invite to
all official conferences one or more repre-
sentatives of the Chambers of Commerce
of the Caribbean and let them make public
a an open meeting the views of the trad-
ing community of the area. Such a policy of
conducting conferences would ensure that
the public through the Press would be kept
informed of what their leaders in trade
and Commerce were saying, and the views
of the commercial community would
necessarily effect the deliberations of sup-
ply officers, who would no doubt give them
more serious consideration than they can
now be expected to do

LONDON
The Scots who took a large
piece of sandstone last Christmas

mor. ing from under the corona-
tion chair of the King of England
and Scotland in Westminster

Abbey obviously had little idea
what they would do with it. They
had determined to take it back
to Scotland whence it had been
taken by an English army more
than 600 years ago. And then,
what?

The men and wome: who took
the stone were actuated by some
primitive, and mystical, motive,
They claim, in a document
describing the 1.ight they spent in
the Abbey, that
aided their theft. And the stone
itself has a claim to a kind of
religicus history as a Christian
relic that was also a trophy in war
for the various Celtic Christian
Kings of the Early Middle Ages—
the Dark Ages, as we call them.
The stone’s purloiners presumably
regard these Dark Ages as an
heroic age, and would like to re-
turn to its value and its ritual—
when political power went with
sitting on a particular bit of sand-
stone,

But the majority of their
countrymen—the Scots — do not
think that way. The future of the
stone had to be arranged in ac-
cordance with the general, and
widespread, sentiment of national
pride of the Scots—but which does
not go nearly as far as the ardour
of the extremist. In the past week
there have been two important
revelations ‘on the “Stone of
Scone.” First, the men who now
control the stone, (who are not
unknown to the Scottish National
Covenant movement which in-
cludes leading, respectable Scot-
tish citizens), attempted to arrange
with “the authorities” that the
stone would be replaced at St.
Gile’s Cathedral in Edinburgh and
remain there, symbolically, for
some time, or until the English
j ask to use it! This proposition
nearly came to fruition, but the
men of the stone suspected their
trophy would be quickly spirited
back to London—so that plan was
abandoned,.

Then news leaked cut that Scot-
land Yard had “almost completed
their inquiries” and knew who the
culprits were. So did many other
people—in fact several journalists
in London and Glasgow might
have been able to state the names
of the men two weeks after the
theft if they had thought it their
duty to ask the characters them-
selves what their names are.
Scotland Yard’s efforts have been
peculiar— to say the least. They
started by dredging canals and
Lakes in London Parks— on the

divine power

























assumption that the Scottish
nationalists were incompetent
They then started eliminating

names from known lists of Scot-

LONDON.

Lord Reith, Chairman of the
Colonial Development Corpora-
tion since five months, gave a
London audience yesterday his
first public utterance on his new
Corporation.

He sprang to the lectern from a
lone seat at the back of the
platform—of a UNESCO gather-
ing.

The former B.B.C. _ Director-
General opened with a scowl and
a growl: “I have nothing to do
with groundnuts.” On the
Gambia egg scheme: “Gambia,
yes,” and a grunt—but he ad-

mitted his Corporation's con
nexion with that,
“I don’t like talking,” he

announced but ended with a ser-
mon on the devaluation of man:
“Isn't a man devalued when he
receives without having to give?”

From staccato ejaculation—"“By
Golly” and “By God’—to slow
pontifical utterances: the black
eyebrows lifted sharply for
criticism; the black jacket tight-
ened over his chest as he adopted
the manner of the Scottish Kirk
to scatter the devils who dared
think evil of his publie corpora-
tions—the B.B.C., mO;A;C.,;
and now the C.D.C.

“How much misunderstanding
there is,” he murmured, “how
annoyed I used to get'at people
who said ‘the State runs broad-
casting? or ‘the State runs the
airways’. And now they say the
State runs colonial development.”

The eyebrows reared a_ full

inch. “The State does nothing of
‘he sort,”
What does the ‘State do?

Reith’s answer: “The State owns
but does not manage.”

A pause—and any challengers
had their last chance to defy
Reith’s right to manage anything
of which HE was in charge.

“The attitude of Sir . Hilton
Poynton, (Deputy Permanent

OUR READERS SAY:

West Indian Beaten To
Death In South Africa

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—As I write to you I have
before me a clipping from the
Cape Times (date unfortunately
not shown) relating the circum-
stances of Milton King’s death at
the hands of the police as his
two companions (also West
Indians) saw the affair. As far
as I know their version has not
yet been confirmed—a thing which
is very unlikely, considering that
the persons accused are white
policemen — but there’s never
smoke without a fire. Besides, I
also have before me a letter writ-
ten by a Barbadian member of
the s.s. Strategist to a friend of
mine which agrees with the
statements made to the police.
Sir, We in Barbados have for a
considerable time now been hear
ing of the treatment meted out to
the Africans in South Africa with
detachment and indeed com
placency. That sort of thing
doesn’t happen in Barbados and
therefore we aren’t particularly
bothered. Not being in the island
I danft know what steps have
been taken to bring an enormity
like this before the public. But I
think, Sir you owe it to your read-
ers to publicise this case as much
as possible and press in your
Editorials for action in the highest
quarters, equal in intensity to the
way all black Barbadiars feel





By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

tish Nationalists — again on the
assumption that few men out ot
thousands could be found without
an alibi on Christmas Day.
Frustrated by the obvious tendency
of the inquiries to make the Scots
stitk together, Scotland Yard in-
vited a clairvoyant from Holland
to try his skill. But at this stage
a sudden burst of intelligence
seems to have smitten the police.
They started checking public and
university libraries to discover
who had been reading about the
early history of the stone before
Christmas. This inquiry ap-
parently bore fruit in Glasgow.

Presuming that Scotland Yard
has now got its men—and at least
one woman, what will happea
now?

The Secretary of State for Scot-
land, Mr. Hector MacNeil, has to
make a difficult decision, He gan
instruct the police to arrest their
suspects and a prosecution can go
forward. It would be in England,
not in Scotland. But that would
be the only blessing for the Labour
Party. Politics has now entered
the question and this week the
leading Socialist periodical, The
New Statesman, opens it edition
with an article headed “A Stone
Best Left Unturned.” The paper
urges the Government not to make
the thieves into political martyrs.
And it admits the political im-
plications, For years the Labour
Party, when it was in opposition,
supported the plea of Scotland for
a bigger say in its own Govern-
ment. But when the Socialists
gained power in 1945 they de-
layed. “Home Rule” for Scotland
was made taboo — and “devolu-
tion”, the move for some limited
self-government, was soon frown-
ed on, Two years ago a new, and
moderate, Scottish movement was
formed called the Scottish National
Covenant, A document, the
Covenant, was circulated and
gained two million signatures, Its
aims were modest and the leaders
of the Covenant movement in-
cluded leading professional men
and members of the respected
Scottish aristrocracy. Now the
Covenant Movement is planning to
turn itself into a political party
to fight elections if the candidates
of the Parties already established
will not pledge themselves to de-
mand aq Royal Commission, (of
inquiry), which would be the first
constitutional towards “devolu-
tion.” The trial of the “Martyrs
of the stone” would be a rallying
point for the Covenant movement
and even if only a fraction of the
Covenant’s two million signatories
took it seriously, they could be a
political force to drive Labour out
of some vital Scottish con-
stituencies, The Covenant Move-
ment started very well; but now it
is in need of a new fillip to



From DOUGLAS COBBAN



Chief at the Colonial Office, who

was also on the platform), and
others, including the Secretary
ed State, is as proper as it could

e.”

Publie control? Of course, but
—the eyebrows tilted again—‘No
Interference in Management.”
The best of both worlds! Reith
thinks so,

What view does he hold on
private enterprise in the Colo-
nies? Measured words, this
time: “Private enterprise oper-
ates throughout the Colonial
Empire...with a variety of
motives... some good. ..some not
so good. But all understandable
—even the worst of them.” The
audience smiled,

“Now C.D.C's function is to do
good in the Colonial territories...
(short pause)...without losing
money.”

He agreed that, by golly!, to do
good and make profits simultan-
eously “could make things very

hard.”
Some may say that private
enterprise could do it. Lord

Reith’s answer: C,.D.C. had to
operate where profits might be



about one of their own people
being beaten to death in circum-
stances like these. Perhaps this
case may serve to impress on
public opinion how closely are
inter-twined the interests of per-
sons of African origin all round
the world.

This, Sir, is not just hot-air, I
and many other Barbadians and
West Indians are experiencing
now here in England some slight
measure of the humiliation which
impinges physically a Negro in
the States and all over Africa,
Black Barbadians have a right to
be comfortable at least in Barba-
dos and this, as we all know is
not so. One of the causes of dis-
comfort for sensitive Negroes in
Barbados is the fact that white
South Africans, admittedly such
and carrying South African pass-
ports, can, if they wish, come to
the island and exercise all the
privileges our society affords to its
white stratum. This is a patent
affront and should be recognised
as such in some way on the Stat-
ute-Book.

GEORGE GRIFFITH,
F 8 8rd Court,
St. John’s College,
Cambridge
13.4.51,

Popuiarity
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—With reference to your
leading article in today’s issue, I
hasten to correct a reckless error
in the second paragraph, which 1



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





oat News From Britain

enthusiasm. Some of its leaders
think that — but for the momem
they have overstepped opinion in
striking a medal to present to the
characters who dragged the Stone
out of Westminster Abbey. The
Scottish newspaper are vibrating
with controversy and good Scots
citizens are writing to protest at
the Covenanters’ fancy medak

which show unicorn of Scot-
land lording it over the lion cl
England. Por the moment, b;

going cautiously, the English have
succeeded in splitting the Scott:
into two factions — one admirini
the men of the stone, the othe.
deploring them. But if th
“London Government” carries of
the band of puzzled men to a tria
at the Old Bailey, I suspect th
Covenant’s medals will come ii
handy after all:

Some readers who do not find
the affair of the stone merely a
joke may ask what are the real
grievances of Scotland. England
and Scotland have been under
one King for 348 years, and under
one administration for 244 years.
Politically the. Scots claim that
they have separate problems but
everything done by half a dozen
ministries in England has to be
controlled by a single Secretary of
State for Scotland—and he has his
office in Londtén, Scottish Law is
separate from English Law—so
many Bills have to go. through
Parliament a second. time with a
different wording : why, they ask,
should not Scotland have its own
Parliament to regulate its home
affairs? Northern Ireland has!
Then there are financial griev.
ances, Scots argue that their ex-
ports are more than their imports
—and England takes the differ-
ence, They argue that they do
not even see all their own taxpay-
ers’ money back in Scotland, The
case for neither of these last
claims has ever been properly
established.

But the main grievance is that
the Scots do not feel themselves to
have a fair deal, hey are strong-
ly conscious of their national iden-
tity and their (so called) national
culture. Few of them want Home
Rule, and not many would like to
give up representation in the Par-
liament at Westminster, But they
would also like their own little
Parliament so that they could ask
their own questions, and badger
their own ministers of health and
housing, insurance and home
affairs.

The Englishman's attitude to all
this is hardly resentful in the
least, In jest he may say that if
the Scots want to keep the Eng-
lish from meddling in their affairs,
then the English will be able to
stop the Scot from, meddling
South of the Border—and what a
change that would be!

The outstanding question re-
mains—how would the English
and Scots share out the British
Empire, Would Scotland demand
its own Colonial Office?

Lord Reith On lis C.D.C.

too small to attract private enter-
prise; operate where profits
might be uncertain, too long
delayed for commercial capital to
be attracted. Think of afforesta-
tion, ranching, he argued.

And after all, C.D.C., in a
s@nse, was priming the pump for
private enterprise. How? Lord
Reith’s answer :—

When C.D.C., schemes are
running, “with decent economic
return and all the rest of it,
“they are likely to be handed
over to the local government
or, anyhow, to some local peo-
ple. Which would allow C.D.C.
to take its money out of that
part of the world to use it
elsewhere,

“But for Heaven's sake don’t
think there’s nothing but com-
mercial motivation about C.D.C.
Schemes. undertaken by C.D.C.
have serious social repercussions,”

Why does C.D.C. busy itself
with hotels? “Why on earth?”
echoed its Chairman, and ex-
plained some “unfortunate Gov-
ernors haven’t hotels to put
their visitors in and ask C.D.C.,
to please put up hotels where
visitors, commercial and other-
wise, may stay.”

Defensively, Lord Reith re-
peated that C.D.C., was tackling
50 projects all over the world.
Few of tham earning profits?
“All right,” he retorted; “There
can_be mistakes.” But to start
up 50 projects in three years with
average capitalisation of about
£600,000! No small undertaking.
Please think of that, It wasn’t
So easy to get competent manage-
ment. There were the unpre-
dictable perio’ elements, the
baked soils of Africa, soil erosion,
pests, diseases,

“We do our best,” Lord Reith
added and swept on to yet more
terrible problems — the deval-
uation of man, for example,





doubt was made by mistake when

one reads the whole article,

It states. “During the interval
between the elections in 1948
and today there has been a
gradual changq in many parts of
the island towards the attitude of
the Labour Party. Its policy was
never popular in St. Andrew and
Mr. Foster's election was due
less to the strength of the Party
than his popularity in the Parish,
The fficial Labour Candidate
Mr. Springer polled only 192
votes.”

For the public information and
yours, if you care to have it, the
official labour candidate was the
late Junior Member Mr. D, ‘
Foster. Moreover, to say that
the Labour Party was not popu-
lar in St. Andrew is another
attempt, which is usual from
your paper, to decry the Labour
Party.
_ The Labour Party held a seat
in St. Andrew since 1944. This
surely cannot be measured in
terms of unpopularity.

Yours faithfully,
F, L, WALCOTT,
General Secretary,

Barbados Progressive League.

April 18, 1951,

Ed, Note: According to Mr.
Walcott the Labour Party was
popular in St. Andrew but
has lost its popularity. Why?
Or was it that the late Mr
Foster was pular and not
the Labour Party?
































West Indies Lead The Way
Biggest Exhibition In
Commonwealth B.LF.

LONDON.

The re-entry this year of Barbados to the
West Indies section of the British Industries
Fair, opening April 30th, is an event specially
worthy of mention. It means that this year
the West Indies will be the biggest of all
Commonwealth exhibitors. Compared with
Canada and South Africa, which will each
occupy 1,015 sq. ft. of floor space, the West
Indies section takes 1,054 sq. ft. Jamaica,
Trinidad, British Guiana, Barbados, Wind-
ward Islands and Sea Island Cotton will all
be represented.

For months now, work has been progress-
ing on the construction of the British West
Indian exhibits and this week, at the West
India Committee, I was privileged to see
models showing what the final exhibition wil]
look like.

The Commonwealth section lies just inside
the door from the main road—the first spot,
to which the footsteps of the visitor are
naturally directed. The West Indies stands
are on the right of the doorway, with British
Guiana, Jamaica, Sea Island Cotton and the
Windward Islands occupying one side of the
gang-way and Barbados and Trinidad the
other.

The Jamaican stand is by far the largest,
covering 269 sq. feet compared with Trini-
dad's 240 sq. ft. Figures for the others are as
follows: British Guiana, 221 sq. ft; Barbados,
148 sq. ft; Windward Isiands, 139 sq. ft., and
Sea Island Cotton 130 sq. feet.

Considerable work and ingenuity has gone
into the construction of the West Indies
stands and they will certainly reflect great
credit upon the designers and upon the terri-
tories themselves when the exhibition opens.

In 1950, the organisers allocated the B.W.1.
site with the emphasis on depth and not on
frontage. Consequently the entrances to the
stands were narrow and many exhibits at the
back of the stand were not visible from the
gang-way. This year the West India commit-
tee asked that more space be given to front-
age and this request has been granted, There-
fore the West Indies stands will appear to
cover much more space, and, what is more
important, all exhibits will be easily view-
able from the gang-way.

Maps of each colony will be prominently
displayed in each stand and particular care
has been given to the siting of the two main
West Indian products, sugar and rum.

The flooring of the British Guiana stand
will consist of locally grown hard wood and
wall panels will also be of British Guiana
timber. On a centre table will be samples of
aluminium and bauxite which is mined in
the colony. Specially featured will be Demer-
ara rum and sugar. British Guiana rice will
also be on show as will some of the cottage
industries made for export.

A full-size model of a woman wearing a
cotton dress will decorate the centre of the
Sea Island Cotton stand. On either side of
her will be made-up exhibits of men’s and
women’s clothes from Sea Island Cotton.

Particular care is being taken in the Bar-
bados stand to see that the rum exhibit is
put in a conspicuous position. It will be placed
right in the centre of the stand so that visitors
entering the exhibition will notice it almost
as soon as they see the stand itself. On either
side of rum there will be sugar and fancy
molasses and, as a background, there will be
a large map of the colony and examples of
cottage industries.

Trinidad Leaseholds have lent a model of
a typical oilwell to the Trinidad stand. The
model, approximately 5% ft. in height, 3 ft.
wide, and 5% ft. in depth, will be shown near
the entrance. It will be flanked by asphalt
exhibits and a display of anthurium lilies.
Below them will be the cocoa and canned
citrus fruits while against the back wall
will be the rum and sugar exhibits together
with a special chart showing the Colony’s
production figures,

The Jamaica stand will have as a back-
ground a large map of the Colony which has
been flown over specially to this country. It
will be hung above a map of the world, on
which Jamaica’s relative position will be
marked. Below this map will be a number
of products of the island, including coffee,
ginger, cigars and gypsum. The booklet “In-
vest in Jamaica” will also be prominently
displayed and as with the other ¢»!onies, rum
and sugar exhibits will be featured.

The Windward Islands stand will be:
roughly divided into four sections showing
the individual products from St. Vincent, St.
Lucia, Dominica and Grenada.

A number of the helpers who were i:
charge of the West Indies stands last’ ye:
have promised to give their services again
this time but there are still several key posi-
tions which have to be filled before the exhi
bition opens at the end of this month

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APRIL

19,

1951



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WHEN IT’S
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Beet Root
Corn
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Cucumber
MEATS Turnips
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Chicken (Jellied) M

Turkey (Jellied) Spinach

Hams in tins a

Luncheon Tongues D s

Meat and Fish Pastes Mixed Vegetables

Steak and Kidney Pudding ena

Sliced Ham For SNACKS

Sliced Bacon
Fresh Pork Sausages

Dutch Cheese

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Golden Tree Beer

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COCO TS
THURSDAY, APRIL 19,

1951



TCA. Plane Refused Landing At Seawel

NO STAFF

AVAILABLE

FOR NIGHT DUTY

A

TRANS-CANADA PLANE was refused the use of

Seawell Airport at 10 p.m. on Saturday, Mr. G. H.
King told the Council of the Chamber of Commerce yes-
terday. The plane therefore had to remain overnight in
Trinidad and return on Sunday morning, he said.

The reason given for the refusal was to the effect that Cje;

there was no staff available for night duty, Mr. King told

the members.

Mr. King is of the staff of Messrs. Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd., local agents for Trans-Canada Airlines, but said
that his reason for bringing the matter to the attention oi
the ‘Council, was in the interest of the island.

The Council expressed deep con-
cern over the matter. They de-
cided that the President Mr. D.'G.
Leacoek Jnr., and Mr. King should
see the Colonial Secretary and talk
it over with him before taking
iurther action.

Mr. King said that the decision
for refusal of permission to use
the airport was made by the Colo¢
nial Secretary, who had, apparent-
ly, discussed the matter with the
Airport Manager and the reason
given was to the effect that there
was no staff available for night
duty.

EMERGENCY

While it might be argued that
the airport had not the staff to
do regular night duty, it did appear
very unreasonable that in cases
of emergency, such a dictatorial
ittitude should have been
adopted,

“I do not propose to ask this
Chamber to fight the battles of
Trans-Canad1 Airlines, as I feel
that this question is one of general
principle and should be brought
to the attention of Government
on that basis. However, it may
be as well to bring to your notice
the circumstances surrounding
this issue, so that you can have 2
true picture of what took placa
and might happen in the future.

“Due to unfavourable weath-
er conditions in Bermuda, the
T.C.A, plane, which was to have
left Montreal on Friday last,
was delayed until Saturday
morning. The expected time of
arrival at Barbados was then
8 p.m. Saturday on her north-
bound trip, and her return trip
midnight. We were, during the
day, informed that the airport
would be closed at 10 p.m,, with
the result that arrangements
had to be made to board the
northbound passengers on the
southbound trip. Fortunately
for the passengers, but unfor-
tunately for T.C.A., the weather
forecast at Bermuda was un-
favourable for the plane’s return
that evening, Consequently,
the plane had to remain over
night in Trinidad and returned
to Barbados on Sunday morning.

COMMENTS

“T would, however, like to make
the following comments, in view
of Government’s decision that
even in a case of emergency, as
this one was, the airport will only
be opened between the hours ot
6 a.m. and 10 p.m.

Had the T.C.A, plane not ar.
rived prior to 10 p.m. the Barba-
dos passengers would have been
landed at Trinidad.

Unless the piane remained in
Trinidad until landing facilities
were made available at Barbadcs,
the northbound passengers woud
have been forced to fird other
means of transport to go north,

A similar condition would per-
tain to a lesser extent if tha
number of passengers gomge
through to Trinidad, plus those
boarding southbound for the
northbound flight, exceeds the
seating capacity of the plane.

As they know, a considerable
sum had been spent to provide
Barbados with an up-to-date air-
port, with the object that some day,
they would see several Interna-
tional Airlines include Barbados
in their schedule calls, How could
this hope be fulfilled if the spirit
of co-operation displayed on Sat-
urday was allowed to continue?
cuestioned Mr. Kirtg. He ended:
“I feel that in the interest of the
island this Chamber — should
approach Government regarding
the future operation of Seawell
Airport.”

SERIOUS MATTER

The President said that he
thought the matter a very serious
one. It did seem to him very un-
fortunate to refuse a plane the use
of the airport when it had been
delayed by weather. He did not se?
any point in the Government
refusing the use of the airport at
night when this was’ due to cir-
cumstances beyond the control of

the airline. fi :
Mr. D. A. Lucie-Smith said
that the whole business of the

jsland depended on the airport
and such a restriction did not
appear to be reasonable.

At a General Meeting of the
Chamber Mr. A. R. Toppin had
raised the point that commercial
representation on the Legislative
Council was inadequate, _ The
President was appointed to inter-
view the Colonial Secretary on the
matter as a result, and yesterday
he told the Council members that
he had done so. The Colonial
Secretury, he said, had informed
him that the Governor wished to
discuss the matter with him per-
sonally,

He had been to Government
House yesterday merning and had
put to the Governor the Cham-
ber’s point of view. Mis Excel-
lency had promised that he would
give the matter his full considera.
tion when next an appointment
was to be made to the Legislative
Council,

COMMISSIONER
WELCOMED

Mr. A. R Starck, United
Kingdom Trade Commissioner in
Trinidad for the West Indies, was
present by invitation at the Coun-

cil meeting yesterday and was
welcomed by the President
Mr Starck expressed his

pleasure at having been given the
opportunity to attend

The Secretary toa the meeting
that as regaras the appointment
of Vigilance Committees as pro-
po:cd some time ago, only oue, so
far, had been formed and that w as
by the Hardware Trade. This
committee were: Mr. N. E.
Bushell of Messrs. C. F. Harrisu.
& Co. Ltd, Mr. B. Bannister of
Messrs. C. §. Pitcher & Co., and
Mr. S. P. Withnall of the Cen.
tral Foundry Ltd.

The Council discussed a letter
from the President of the Incor-
porated Chambers of Commerce
relative to the next Congress of
the Chambers, proposed to be held
in British Guiana next year,

The Fresident and Mr. Licie-
Smith were appointed a committee
to draft amendments to the rules
of the Chamber.



nr

RAMADHIN AND

VALENTINE ARE

MATCH WINNERS
Says Bertie Clarke

x Dr, C. Bertie Ciarke gave an
interesting talk on sport last night
with special reference to cricket
at the Y.M.P.C. club house, Dr.
Clarke first gave a brief resume
of his cricket career in England
since 1939 when he visited that
country as a member of the West
Indies team,

Reviewing the victorious 1950
West Indies tour of England, Dr,
Clarke paid tribute to the ster-
ling individual batting perform-
ances of Everton Weekes, Frank
Werrell and Clyde Walcott and
observed that in Ramadhin and
Valentine the West Indies possess—
ed a pair of brilliant match win-
ning bowlers.

He had a word to say for pro-
fessional cricketers. He coun-
selled people in the West Indies
not. to consider professional
cricketers as people outside the
social pale, but as respectable
members of a community who
earn a decent and good living by
playing cricket.

Mr. Jack Kidney, Manager of
the West Indies team to England
in 1939 and 1950 moved a vote
of thanks to Dr. Clarke for his
interesting talk and welcomed the
opportunity to express publicly
his thanks to Dr. Clarke for the
professional services which he
had rendered the West Indies
team during the 1950 tour,



PEASANT
AGRICULTURE

Of the main food crops, yams
and sweet potatoes were in steady
supply during the month of March.
The reaping of yams on small
plots was almost completed by the
end of March, and sweet potatoes
from the “fall” planting were also
being harvested. Vegetable gar-
den crops were in moderate supply
and prevailing prices were rela-
tively high.

Sugar Cane. On the whole,
harvesting of the ripe canes is
proceeding satisfactorily. Some
peasants, however, complain of
difficulty in getting labour to reap
and transport their crop. The
young plant canes as_ well as
ratoons are making good progress,

Cotten. Cotton picking was
continued during the month, Some
exceptionally good yields were
reported as high as 1,600 lb. per
acre in some cases. The general
results, however, owing mainly
to the heavy rains in November
and February, have not justified
early expectations.

Tree Crops. Limited quantities
of coconuts, limes and bananas
were available in the market.

Pests and Diseases. Among the
pests reported, were the cabbage
white butterfly, scale insects and
slugs. Cultivators are being ad-
vised in methods of control.

Peavant Livestock. There were
no complaints received during the
month. Concentrated feed and
other feeding stuffs were in free

supply.

Extension Work. The
Agricultural Instructors
1,509 peasant holdings and 6
school gardens in March. Twelve
mango trees were topworked.

The preliminary judging ol
school vegetable gardens entered
for the 1951-52 annual competition
took place during the month.

Peasant
visiteu

A survey, the main purpose of
which was to discover the re-
ation of peasant cultivators to
the proposed scheme for providing
motor tractors for the cultivation
of their holdings, was begun dur-
ing the month. This survey will
be completed early in April.

Vacation Fishing

~Small fish catches are being
made by school boys in the sea
behind the Princess Alice Playing
Field, It is now vacation time,
and although it is football season,
the boys are not playing this game
on the playing field, but are taking

to fishing.
Standing on the newly repaired
break water, the boys fish for

many hours of the day with hooks
and lines,

Better Pay
Urged For
City Clerks

MBE. CHARLIE THOMAS,
President of the Barbados
ks’ Union, expressed grave
concern over the salaries paid
to grocery clerks, when the
Union held its meeting at the
Y.M.C.A. Headquarters yester-
day evening. :
The minimum wage for a
grocery clerk is $8.00 per week

and one ease disclosed that,

the ¢lerk had started to work
for $8.00 per week and after
S1X years with the firm, his in-
crease was only eight cents.
Tae Secretary of the Clerks’
Union was instructed to draft a
letter to the Provision Merchants’
Association which read;Due to the

inereased cost of living, I have
been } asked to approach your
Association and ask your assist-

ance to obtain an increase of pay
to shop assistants employed in the
grocery and provision business
This letter was sent ‘on Tuesday.

Yesterday evening the Clerks’
Union received a reply ‘from the
Provision Merchants’ .Association,
acknowledging the reccipt of the
letter, and stating that although
members of the Association were
most sympathetic towards the jus-
tiflable appeal, they could not en-
tertain any idea in this direction
at present. They, however, beg to
state that as soon as their profits
warranted it, they would be pre-
pared to consider the matter,

Resolution

The Executive Committee of the
Clerks’ Union then drafted a Res-
olution to be presented to His
Excellency the Governor. This
was read to members of the Union
yesterday and they unanimously
agreed to it. It reads as follows:

Whereas the Grocery Clerks of
this island are suffering great hard-
ships owing to the ever increasing
cost of living; and,

Whereas the grocery proprietors
are unable to increase the salaries
at present being paid owing to the
slender margin of the profits be-
ing made by them; and,

Whereas the abovesaid is sub-
stantiated by the Report of the
Price Control Committee’s Report,
1951,

Be it resolved: ,

(1) That a petition be addressed
to the Governor-in-Executive Com
mittee,

(2) That the said petition should
request that an increased mark-
up be allowed the grocery stores.

(3) That the Price Control Au-
thorities might make a condition of
the granting of an increased mark-
up a pro-ratio increase in the sal-
aries paid to grocery clerks.

Before this resolution was. reu.l,
Mr, Thomas said that the meeting
was being held mainly to assist
shop assistants in the groceries
and provision section. They were
the worst paid at the moment.

A meeting was already held, bu:
this was postponed in order to in-
form other grocery hands who
were interested in attending. In
that way that section of the Clerks’
Union would be better represented,
He still felt that there is plenty
more room in the Union for
grocery clerks.

He did not have to explain to
them that while one division of
business is suffering, others also
suffer. A clerk may be employed
with a grocery store for five years
and owing to circumstances then
have to become a hardware clerk
and vice versa. Perhaps some of
them had sons and daughters who
were in the clerical line. Their
only salvation was to stick to-
gether, He felt that if he could
improve conditions that was his
reward.

Suffering Clerks

He said that the people who
work in the grocery line were in
an awful condition. They were
suffering and he was trying to get
an increase of salaries for them.

According to the letter from the
Provision Merchants’ Association,
if the salaries of the grocery clerks
were to be increased, the mer
chants would have to get an in-
crease on their mark-up.

In October 1949 the Govern-
ment had appointed a Committee
to go into the grocery business.
This Committee, of which Sir
John Saint was a member, thor-
oughly went into the matters of
salaries, expenses, etc. of all the
firms. “They afterwards claimed
that the mark-up on certain items
was not sufficient.

He said that Sir John Saint,
the man who saved Barbaddés from
starvation, did know what he was
doing and when he said that the
mark-up was not enough, he mus
have had his reasons. In this same
report the Committee stated that
there should be an increase of
salaries.

When the report came before the
House of Assembly, it was not
implemented,

“We must believe that Report,”
Mr. Thomas said: “The merchants
are justified in not increasing sal—
aries because that Committee has
given them the power to do so.

He is only concerned with the
clerks. While the Government is
having arguments on what is right
from wrong, the clerks are Starv—
ing—they just cannot live on the
present salaries. In all other de—
partments employees were given
increases to cope with the cost of
living, but not so with the clerks.

He agreed that the cost of living
must be kept down but did mot
agree that it should be kept down
by starvation salaries to the people
employed in the city.

He said that if the population
of Barbados have to pay a cent
more for a pound of butter
they should not frown. It only
means a little more money for the
$8 a week clerk who is at present
suffering.

Mr. Arthur Kinch said that the
salaries were disgraceful. In his
epinion the minimum wage should
not be $8. A clerk should at least
start to work at $12 per week

A vote of thanks was moved t
Mr, E. C. Hewitt, Vice—Presid
of the Union He said that
Executive Committee of the Ur
Z daing and
thing for
regards











intended to do



the clerks

the res





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PRINCE



PRINCE CHARLES, now nearly

GETS Ul

S OWN WAY



two, got his own wey and was

allowed to stand on the platform with the King and Queen when
the King took the salute at a presentation of new colours to the 1st

and 2nd Battalions of the Coldstream Guards at Windsor

Castle.

Before this Prince Charles sat in Wis’ pram and repeatedly asked his

nurse “Why can’t I go on the staffs with Grannie?”

The last time

colours were presented at Windsor Castle was when King George V
presented them to the Ist Battalion of the Welsh Guards.

Jamaica’s Drought

~—Express.

Restricts Milk Supply

MR. H. McD, WHITE, ‘Trade Administrator of Jamaica
and that colony's delegate at the Supply Officers’ Talks

told the Advocate yesterday that the island is

severe drought and one of
milk supply.



‘Saratoga’
Smashed
Off Walker’s Beach
Lge te yesterday morning the

fishing beat Saratoga, owned
by Henry Overton of Fitz Village,

Si. James, fran aground and was
completely smashed off Walkers
Beach, St, Andrew, The various

parts were later washed ashore by
the current,

The boat is valued $700 and is
insured. It was manned by Daniel
Chandler of Cheapside, St. Michael]
and FitzGerald Overton of Hagle
Hall, They escaped without bein
injured,

VT THE DISTRICT “C” Polic
% Court, Mr. G. B, Griffith, Act
ing Police Magistrate, committed
Winifred Bryan and Mervyn Lash-





ley, both of Rosegate, St, John,
to stand their trial at the next
sitting. of the Court ef Grand
Sessions,

Winifred Bryan and Lashley
were charged with throwing
destructive substance on St.Clair
Bryan with intent to do grievou
bodily harm.

Mr. J, S. B. Dear is representit
Lashley. Winifred Bryan is cde
fended by Mr. B. Niles.

THIEF stole a bicycle valued
$40 from the business prem
ises of Messrs DaCosta & Co,, Ltd
between 3,15 and 3.50 pm, on
Tuesday, It is the property of John
Wilkie of Ninth Avenue, Bellevill
Herbert Clarke of Paynes Ba
St, James, reported that the gen-
erator of his bicycle was stolen
while the cycle was at Gover
ment House between 7.15 am, on
Sunday and 11.30 a.m, on Tuesday,
CANE FIRE at Neils Plant
tion, Christ Church, earlier
this week burnt half acre of second
crop ripe canes., They are th
nroperty of Neils. and Rouvens
Estates Ltd, amd were insured

In Court Of Original
Jurisdiction

Judge J. W. B. Chenery in the
Court cf Original Jurisdiction
yesterday gave judgment against
Delcina Clinton of Belair Land,
St. Michael, who had claimed
£22, 18s, 4d. fram Joseph Nicholl
of Gilkes Tenantry, Fairfield
Clinton said she was Nicholls’ do-
mestic servant and.he did not pa
her for 11 months.

Clinton told the court that st
was working when Nicholls who
had lately come from abroad asker
her to work for him, They agree
that she would be paid, but she
had not been paid for 11 months

Nicholls said that he did not
ask Clinton to work for him, but
on many ocgasions she had asked
him to allow her to dive at I
After he allowed her to live ther
she brought her children and
grandchildren to stay also He
had never employed her, but used
to do his domestic work himself

Clinton denied that her childs
and grandchildren lived
Nicholls’ home. She s she }
only brought her son at Niche
to make messages after he becam«e
sick





aid



1

said that any economist v
e the matter into considerati
full



rance if the res«







having a
the effects is to restrict their
He

lid that

ihey make con
scnsed milk and have not got any
#€u' plus. They are temporarily
Short of their requirements and

the milk people have had to reducc
issues to the trade.
The drought has

the corn crop. They
pated a surplus like last year’s
when they wete able to supply
some of the other B.W.I. colonies
with corn, but unfortunately, they

affected
had _ antici-

ilso

would not be able to do so this
year.

They have begun distribution
of textiles at their new factory,

Ariguanaboa in St. Catherine’s for
the first time this week, At
present, they are restricted to the
production of grey sheeting, but
expect later on to make other
lines,

Cement Industry

Mr, White said that their cement
factory is likely to begin produc
tion at the end of the year and
added that there was generally, a
gkadual industrial .develgpment
going on, The bauxite people have
Started to export and the building
operations of the University Col

lege are proceeding apace
There is great hope that with
the advent of the new Governor

ell sections of Government will

et together under his leadership
With . view to the preparation ot
a more clearly defined and pro
sressive policy.

When the Governor arrived two
weeks ago, Mr. White said that he
had very great reception from
il] sections and his advent had put
a fillip into the community,

He said that imports to Jamaica
were very buoyant. At the end o
March last, their import revenue
exceeded their estimate, mainly
due to increased trading activity.

partly due to the U.S,—Canada
token scheme under the B.W.I
Trade Liberalization Plan,

Jamaica had a very good tour

season and they were ineres

leir towrist accommodati«

y of erecting new hotels. At
resent, there one big hotel
how...under -construetion.by -Mi
Bob Morrow, an American citizen
who pays visits to th
colony.



was

frequent

Eoard of Health will
Consider Tenantry Roads

The meeting of the Board of
Health which was to be held yes-
erday, was postponed until next
month. Sufficient members were
not available to get a quorum

Some had to attend other meet-
ings while others are out of the
island

An



item on the agenda whict
the Board was to have considered
was suggestions by the Director
<{ Highways and Transport for
the type of roads suitable for
construction in tenantries under
the Public Health Act, The
Board wants to find a way of
ensuring that better tenantry
reads are built,



“ORANJES TAD”
CALLS TODAY

Only two passengers are ex-
pected to take the Dutch passen-
ger-freiehter Oranjestad for Eng-
land when e calls here today
from Trinidad

The Oranjestad w

consigned
Son &







Cocoa Price
Highest Ever

—In Greriada

Grenada was hoping this
year to reap the biggest sugar
crop in the colony's history,
but on account of the labour
troubles it is not yet known

q hi
what the result may be,’Mr.
E. Gittens Knight, M.B.E.,
Competent Authority and
Controller of Supplies, Gren
ada, told the Advocate yester-
aay

He said that grinding opera-
tions are however continuing
and may last for another five
or six weeks.

Mr, Knight is here for the Sup.
ply Officers Talks. He is staying
at the Hotel Royal,

He said that it is now difficult to
gauge what the annual yield cf
the cocoa crop will be on account
of the recent plundering and des-
truction of trees which has taken
place, but the price of cocoa
now the highest on record.

When he left Grenada, condi
tions . were very unsatisfactory
Although the strike was declared
finished, and an agreement
reached ‘between the Employer
Association and the Mental and
Manual Workers’ Union, there
were still acts of plundering,
stealing and intimidating on some
of the country estates and civil
disobedience had not entirely
stopped.

He said it was hoped that the
miscreants would soon take les.
sons from those who had resumed
work and decide to do likewise so
that the peace and serenity, a
particular feature of Grenada in
the past, should be maintained
onee again,

is



Inquiry
Adjourned
Until April 24

A Coroner of District “A” fur-
ther adjourned’ hearing in the in-
quest concerning the death of
Horace Lynch, a 30-year-old la
bourer of Bank Hall, St, Michael,
until April 24 yesterday

Lynch was killed on Trafalgar
Square on March 25 when he was
involved in an accident with a
motor bus while riding the bicycle
M.8916, Dr, E, L. Ward who per-
formed the post mortem examina
tion at the Public Mortuary on
Mareh 26 about 11.45 am. said
that the body of Lyneh was iden
tied to him by Caroline Lynch
who said that he was her son.

The man was dead for about 16
to 17 hours and there was a large
bruise over the right jaw and
cheek, Blood was visible from the
nose, mouth and ears. There was
haemorrhage on the brain and the
skull was fractured, The heart
was normal and the bowels con
tained a certain amount of blood.
In his opinion death was due to
haemorrhage of the brain and
fracture of the skull,

Caroline Lynch, 58-year-old
mother of the deceased, said that
she identified the body of her son
to Dr. Ward, She last saw him
alive on the morning of March 25
and about 3 p.m. the same day she
saw him lying dead on Trafalgar
Square.

Anthony Archer of White Hall,
St. Michael, said that he knew
Lynch. On March 25 he (.\rcher)
left his bieyele outside a shop in
Hindsbury Road. Later in the day
about 3 p.m. he went to Trafalgar
Square and saw his bicycle
smashed up. Lynch was lying
dead on the road at the side of a
motor bus. He never lent his
tieyele to Lynch, nor had a raf-
fie ever been organised by him
with fegard to the bicycle.

The

Poliee are bringing about
nine witnesses on Tuesday, April
24, to give an account of what

they saw. The bicycle when pro
duced in Court yesterday was ex
tensively smashed. The fron
wheel was damaged beyond re
pair, handle bars dislocated anc
front fork bent.

Used Galled Donkey

David Greenidge, a labourer o
Cave Hill, St. Michael, was finex
£5 by the Police Magistrate
District “C” yesterday for work
ing a donkey ina galled condi
on’ The offence was committed
cn Summervale Road, St, Philip

“CRUISER” DUE SUNDAY |

Tie CNS. Canadian Cruiser is
aue to arrive at Barbados
Sunday from Canada via
Bi itish Northern Islands,
She will bg leaving port the
same evening for British Guiana
via St. Vineent, Grenada and
Trinidad,
_ The Cruiser’s agents are Messrs,
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd,

|

|

on
the

(

Dress made lo

pretty styles an

Sun suits





o)F
!

very smart and chic,





Cotton Goods
Industry Given

MR. A. A. DOUGLAS,
and Exports in Trinidad, to

a

PAGE FIVE

Made In T’dad

Pioneer Status

Acting Controller of Imports
ld the Advocate yesterday that



pioneer status has been granted to a textile factory in that

colony for the manufacture

Mr. Douglas is the Tr
Officers’ Talks which ave
House to-day.



Better Lighting
For Dominica
—LETANG

Dominica will soon get better

lighting system when the hydro-
electric plant to be erected by
Cc. D. C. is completed, Mr. H. E

Letang, Controller of Supplies, told
he “Advocate” yesterday

He said that roads leading
to the site of the plant are nov
being built in order to enable the
transportation of heavy machin
ery

Living conditions have become
very difficult as compared with
pre-war years, The people are
experiencing great difieuluues with
regard to obtaining fresh meat and
frozen meat from Australia has t
be imported to relieve the
situation

At the beginning of the ye
they had a fair amount of rain
but during the last couple of
months they had very little, This
however, would hardly interfere
with two of their principal crep
limes and bananas

As far as their banana crop i
concerned, he said that they ar
hoping to reap about 500,000 stems

or more this year



of eotton piece goods.
inidad delegate at the Supply
expected to finish at Hastings

He said that the building for
the factory is in proecss of erec-
tion and substantial shinments of
machinery have already arrived.
It is expected that the erectior
xf the machinery will begin very
shortly.

The company nopes to turn ou!
sufficient piece goods of the cheap
er classes of textiles to meet the
olony’s requifements and_ to
have some availab!> for export
Reaping iieid Up
sugar crop is now being

It was impeded to some
in January and February

en acceunt of the unusually ex-

cessive rains for that time of the

year, but the weather had im.

proved during March and had

continued up to date, thereby, en

abling the harvesting of canes to

proceed uninterrupted, This
» year’s crop is now expected to be
» bigger than last year's

Mr. Douglas said that a few
, concerns abroad are showing in-
, terest in the Pioneer Industries

Ordinance, and many enquiries

regarding the starting of new in-

dustries are being made

There is also local interest in the
tarling up of new industries and
among those which have reeently
been piven consideration is the
nanufacture of cast iron, soil pip
and steel bars

The
reaped
extent





Sas SHER RT EOE

JUST

“PURINA”

ST
b

see

H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.

ARTENA



RECEIVED ....

“PEGGY SAGE”

NAIL

ne

A VARIETY

POLISHES

Mees

OF SHADES

. including...

THE NEW SHIM

MERING SHADES

Also A Fresh
ELIZABETH

ARDEN'S

Shipment of
PREPARATIONS

KNIGHT'S



Tee

Fa Ha
ASS

x
2



Torino

Dresses and Suits for the Kids

cally and overseas.
d varied. $3.50, $4.50,

for boys and girls
2.40,

Bs BO, id donininemaniten a.
sciatilieMnsisssedilcssdeaoidaaadion



' CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD

ne







= VERMOUTH

Produced by Martini & Rossi



LIMITED





Wherever you find the best
find Martini



.. you'll



Vermouth,




(Italy)





Very
$5.75

$3.29
2.88

——-_——

STREET


PAGE SIX

BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY,


























HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



GRAB HOLD!
QvuicK }

Printed in guaranteed fast colours

Stocked by all leading Stores

BLONDIE

















Rinso, (pkgs.)
Heineken’s
(bots.)

Gloria Evap. Milk, (tins) 27 24

Quaker Corn Flakes,

(pkgs.) 30 26 Beer,

T. Margarine,

APRIL 19, 1951

‘

ignt your
\ ale pubes
PT ad ee
When headaches start —
due to worry, overwork, over in-
dulgence —be smart, take Alka-
Seltzer right away. Sparkling
effervescence makes Alka-Seltzer
-tasting, helps its pain-

killing analgesic go to work
fast. Keep it handy.

Alka-Seltzer









1s

| T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH |

PLAYING CARDS WITH
BARBADOS EMBLEM
ideal as Souvenir Gift

GLASS WATER JUGS

at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND
HARDWARE

WE SPECIALISE

te Pea

in you

IN HIGHCLASS
PRINTING

ADVOCATE
PRINTING





ol IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL | HERE

SBE bee » Se cai sian nella aeikcin

Taree) SAN rast SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only

FRANKFURTERS Pu = al ec ee a

Lobster, _ (tins) 69 62 Glow Spread

(1 Ib) 59 34
58 52

26 21



















SESE EPP POPS FETS SOOO FOO OOOO 9OO

NEW BOOKS»

ELEPHANT BILL Ly Lt.-Col. J. H. Williams

+,

~
x

ODES FOP SESE IOS

VENUS THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskine


























%
x
» in
x



SECC SOO SSCSOOOS







ONLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN
THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE
a Your skin willbe Sanne:

desirably dainty from head-to-toe



pith se .
AND HERE COME

\ WHITEY AND.
pis. JOE SEVEN! 4




‘it yeu bathe | with ) fragrant; e



‘eashonaee, Bouquet Beauty Samp.

INSPECTION

i

| SEE US FOR-

DUNLOPILLO BUS SEATS
LIONIDE LEATHERETTE
CARPET MATERIAL
RUBBER MATS

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
i D |) [ACE BIG T7ME GAMBLER Hori |




1 DIDN'T RNOWY | WAS TRAINING LET ME REM










| (Mou WERE <3 WHEN | GOT MIXED} | DOIT? IT YOu, MV NIECE Ig HY Ybu60. % JUGEAN IDGA ca yor BUREERS

BEGINNING » SOUNDS \ (ONE OF THE WORLDS Naso NV IDEAS USLIALLY w Ed

ete WHIRLPOOL. DANGEROUS )\ best oiimmens. | (ATES eee | ROOF LAMP BULBS &
CHANNEL 2 ae r—| |pame,vice? -< LETS 6oWATCH | | ae

| DOING THIS, ) ( UP WITH THAT JAIL-
| DIANA. et ;
%,



ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX

BATTERY CABLES

ACCESSORY SWITCHES

Flat GALVANISED SHEETS

Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT
for Interior

HER TRAIN. |
a —| |



Maralyn is a fine bed-time drink
and helps you to sleep soundly.
And nothing could be nicer...

NO NEED TO ADD
MILK OR SUGAR
Maralyn is creamy milk deliciously

flavoured, and enriched with ener- | |



gising sugar, malt and yeast M A R A LYN MILK PLUS

' A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT

‘Pwvieteteniwal Street







F POPPIN O SPSS APO SFOS FOSS

SCHOOL
BOOKS

x ROYAL READERS
BRINGING uP FATHER 3 SHAW by Desmond McCarthy 3, 4, 6
_ x
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| % PRIMER
HERE COMES MAGGIE'S HOW DARE YOU TALK THAT 1 | . 2 THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELBRE
BROTHER BIMMY=TLL a Ay THER > 1¢ x ee: : INGELBRECHT
Bare nese BBS ee Ser ee tan i= AND MW | FS - & by Maurice Richardson WEST INDIAN
FEiPTikiG BECESNNS : ent
oe * CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHTING 1&2

/ ADVUCATE STATIONERY

BUS and
TRUCK OWNERS

TIME NEED

NOT BE WORRYING TIME
YOU'RE SURE TO LIKE e

Maralyn

MILK PLUS

GREY PAINT for Flooring
SIGNAL RED for Body
HEAT RESISTING BLACK
WHITE LEAD & ZINC
MUFFLERS & PIPES
KING PIN SETS
DECARBONIZING SETS
BRAKE LINING SETS
FRONT SPRINGS for Ford
& Chevrolet
FIRE EXTENGUISHERS

AND LOTS OF OTHER
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SOS SE LEE O OO OOOOEE OCC OLESS PAA IOS E PES SS SCE SS FOGG SCOTS o -—- Boor OF - > S S * S 5
(




THURSDAY, APRIL 19,







1951

























BARBADOS ADVOCATE







































































































































PAGE SEVEN































































need apply. Apply in writing





























































17.4.51—2n







LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

of Beckles Hill,

St. Michael for per-
mission to sell

Spirits, Malt Liquors &c.



The application of Stanley Brathwaite}San Antonio de Padua,













beccme well-established economis}to preserve these vestiges of the











San ‘Luis}{or the monuments of the Fran-
Arcangel ciscans caused more than one t

Nuestra| disappear. Others crumbled unti
an Carlos|"othing more than_ silent wall
San|â„¢arked their sites. Fortunately :

Purisima Concepcion,
Obispo, San Miguei

Sefera de la Soledad, S
de Borromea, Santa Cruz,























Voice of Hitler's





















In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station

























SOUTHBOUND







= oe ee ee ~_—— ~~~ +e
i rl , |
CLASSIFIED ADS. PUBLIC NOTICES | PUHLIC SALES | LOST & FOUND WANTED FOR RENT PERSONAL
* | Ten cents per apate tine on ys| Ten cents | Mt
per agate tine on week-days! —— Ss Minimum charge week 72 cents and/
TELEPHONE 2508 Ghd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,| and 12 cents per agave ti s 86 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24|\ a," i™imtm charge week 12 cents and on
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| minimun cnarge “si nt eg es LOST pod. | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — “4
ba ge $i.5 a wert: 3 cents a word week—4 Cente a over
For Births, Marriage or Engagement and $1.80 on Sundays. Misa mwa: “7 ress m fe word Sundays, | we ae @ word week—4 cents a| The Public is hereby warned against
announcements in Carib Calling the FOR SALE i ial a a | » NOTE BOOK—Containing money, Race | r Cemiaine 2 Siving. any credit to my wile MRS.
charge 18 $048 for éAy thumbér of words 5 — | elaine | Ticket No. J and other receipte, HO aber. BACKETS , (nee MURIEL.
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for esch REAI ESTATE Between and the Route to HELP | USES Sponaiuie tor her ct any Sebr or alee
Pdditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 Minimum charge week 72 cents and NOTICE ee .— Marlesy St. Phiip. Finder rewarded | ————_- cen Bol " in ay haine éacept w a wittten aes
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death| 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 PARISH OF ST. PETER ee a ON returning to Edward Prathwatty EXPERIENCED Typigt and Steno-| ,P° ILOGNE St. Lawren Fully }oigned by me : .
Notices only after 4 p.m. words 3 cents a word week—4@ cents | As froth April lth to May 16 t THE RHONDA. 1 |©@ General Motor Bus Co étaphet. Apply Box A BC. Cro Advo- | {UTM hed ant May ist Dial 8456.1 Mk CYRM, ST IR HACKPET?T
an charge for nee ot] Word Sundae Parochial Treasurer will not be at his] on the Sea near Carraheuk, We el jeer tie igs ene Ml | 8.4. 82S living at) Sufferciert Dorp,
! - office except on th ig aa i : nk, Worthing | nmcnsenin coseatiens mL AMA tn _- F "
ieemertans Saas ‘os Saturday April Bist from ie can The above will be set up for sale .t|/TQRE CERTIFICATES KNIGHTS LID Hee, iy Tasting 2 oe
ietguinte, ania : Pi 10 a Cur OMice in Lucas Street on Friday | , NOTICE ie hereby given that applica: 1s nished. D Sitting roon Cuvacme.
po Siete at rculde teeta thane AUTOMOTIVE "Getrag April 28th from 10 the 20th day of April 1951 at 2 pan tioh hat been made the Board ‘of MISCE LLANEOUS eer Hing water, kithen with’ gy iagroes
3 2 om am nepeet : tree above pa nines a nec ° $ oF ehildr wa
3 cents word on week-days and} AUTOMOBILE: Vauxhall 14/6, B-151 | /7."0°%; trom April, teth. ae Pg ASstiga an | Executor “en Mee hie ob. Dudley WANTED TO REN Dial ee 9 +51 “arf
4 cents word on Sundays for each} Perfect running order excellent mileage | Saturday May 8th from 10 a.m.—12 Carrington & Sealy NPP 104.$1--tn} Cameron Hawkits deceased for the tasue | Canadian married cxuple require ac. | — ee
caditionat word. * $1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Phone-i6i6. | "°°"- f hlledtaadiipicetdenicp aap JP saicncdiaihecdi {et o Share Certificate for two hundred | CO™™Medation from November 1951 tw] HARCL WV. SU Eawrekes. trom May
4.4.51—T.F N. 3 Saturday May 12th from 10 a.m.—i! (200) Shares Nos. 18654 to LA2=3 joven May 1982. Approximate dates. Twin! Ist furn vishea? Apartinent | over iooking TAKE NOTICE
“CAR: eres an “HILLCREST”, fully furnished, situate‘ dated 3rd May, 1921, and one neuive; | beds and ‘car parking space necessary.| sea. For six months or longer. Apple
GOVERNMENT NOTICE wea: One Prefect Ford Car in vers G. S, CORBIN, at Bathsheba, St. decesh eae at: | itor Shares hee, staat we atSae teaated | A friend of theirs now in Barbados has | Mrs. 1: Phone 3750. 17,4.51—t.f£.n
a too gAbely to L. M. Clarke, Parochial bie ayy tk = Bischimount Hotel) standing on dated 26th February 1943, in place of the yeomeee to make arrangemer.te for theity |) mann - — - NORMOCYTIN
HARRIS: COLLE a Phone » Peter, square feet of land with’ seveta! | original Certificates which have been lost] CfOT* leaving = this month Please | WAVERLEY—On the Sea, St. Lav
ON oe tata hip iatinictitte aire .4.518n 14.4.51—~€ full grown cocoanut trees theredn. | of Gestroyea and not depo ni ed with cue t write giving rates, house address, a rence Gap Furnished. 3 adioamna r That AMERICAN CYANAMID COM-
BARBADOS, B.W.1. The house is built of stone a: | one as t one number Pall particulars ere ne g 1 ; : a
CARS—Morris Oxford in A-1 condition iains open gaileries o ae ORY OF otherwise, ‘and notic®) cacsary otherwise offers Bite | ato: tea nee merator, Gab | BARS. 2 Seen Senate
REQUIRED: if possible in oe 18,000 miles. Standard &@ HP. done NOTICE hg and Gluing roome” SVaaratia an ta oe en that within 30 devs from siete Asatte — tex . 3c ag bye Radio Telephone Gargge. Inspection by | existing under the laws of the State of
* 6,000 miles and in excellent os runnin . with | the date hereof if no claim or represen 4 \ ointment. Phone 8%8 Maine, United States of America, whose
September 1951. Ford Prefect done 14.000 fede tae oe is PARISH OF ST. LUCY Ut often et Pantny, Ikitehen and suai) tation in respect of such original Certi- ut e 18.4 Sa—tu] trade or business address is 30 e-
ie test Parochial Treasurer e 1 “32 | fieetes is made to the Directors they will 7 ae feller Plaro, New York, Stati lew
() A GRADUATE to teach Agencies wa Sing 4008. Apply B'dos/ Lucy will be closed on uiaky hor yareee and Servants rooms in yatd. | then proteed to deal with such applica- “EMPTY THREE Gi. BOTTLES. An York, U.S.A‘, has applied or he ine. regi
SPANISH with FRENCH if 24th 1951. ‘ x Spection on application to the eare-| on for a Duplicate. quantity, dirty or clean, Deliver M.V T " tration of a trade mark in a
possible 15.4.51—~6n ok bee ' i Se ne Downe. By order of the Board of Directors a mare, Inner Basin, Saroenage AKE NOTICE of Register in respect of pnaiden and
. ._ L. DEANE, y above Wi set for sale at Pub C. N. TAYLOR, pla ntree ea resceusicsl peene
(2) A GRADUATE to teach ELECTRICAL Parochial Treasurer, Eg etition at our office in Lueas| Reeretary “CAMPHOR CHEST. Faisly lore That J, BIBBY & SONS LIMITED. fo cenatied “te Sgunes Ga cae oS
HISTORY with ENGLISH. Sour a na eenkine Te \17.4.51—4n shee; wet eee Friday the =| 18.4,.51—3n | jy AMPHOR CHEST: Fairly large “and Britian Company, Manufacturers, whisk me totith from the 16th tay of Age
TTERIES fully char, . . + a as oe e ade or business address is 21, King, » unless some person in e
HARRISON COLLEGE IS a day! 9 voit, 9 Plates $46.15; 6 volte si NOTICE CARRINGTON & SEALY, | SWEEPSTAKE TICKET BOOK Series | Telephone 8606 19°%.bi-oa | Edward Street, Liverpool J, Engient | meantime give netiee in duplionts We igne
GRAMMAR SCHOOL of 580 boys| Plates $29.54;°6 volt, 15 Plates $25.51 Solicitors. | L. 1210 to 1219 Finder will be rewarded has applied for the registration of a trade | t my office of opposition of such regis-
taking the Oxford and Cambridge | B@rbades Agencies 4908 This is to notify the generat publ 18.4,51—9n.} on returning to Austin Layne, Shop-| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE|"™ wk in Part “A” of Register in respect | tration. The trade mark can be seen on
that we are pr I r ee | keeper, Brittons Hill 19.4. 51—In ae *| of soaps of all kinds, perfumery, toilet | application at my office.
“rr . : ~ .
»General Certificate and working 18.4. 8160 | esse ee egg Eee emploved \] The application of Leonard Jones & | articles, proparstions for the teeth and | Dated this 6th day of April, 1901
to Open Scholarship standard, It} ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts, but will however be able to conting AUC'HION | Rhoda Pile holders of Liquor License No. | 8 rid will be entitled to register the H. WILLIAMS,
has a Sixth Form of 120, and is| 0 Sars, << watts, with lamps an ov leat of Typewriters, Addin TAKE NOTICE ee er shiv = 3 ee a ae eine tea an a ae rare tis ene See fr eee byt or
* res . achines, and u t 4 Oe s fe shop with = sheer is 1951 unless some person shall ir \ in
represented or the Headmasters’ & Co a ._ | the. nearest or hogs idl ae teenie ea HERMASTIC attached Beckles Road, St. Michael,| the meantime give notice. in duplicate
Conference as an Overseas School. .51—t.£. E. W. TAYLOR. = order of the Insurance Co, 1 wi ¥ permission te use the satd Liquor | t® me at ray office of opposition of such
> sell on FRIDAY 20TH That WAILES DOVE BITUMASTIC , at bottom floor of a 2-storey | Pexistration” The trade mark can be
SALARY: For First or Second MECHANICAL Oe oe Foreman. | GENERAL MOTOR SUS eae wiradn LIMITED, a British Company, Manu- | 2rd and shingle building opp. “Stork | *eeh 9M application at my office TAKE NOTI E
Class Honours Degrees: ALTERS, STREET. One AUSTIN MOTOR TROCK | Lecturers. whose trade or business ad ub" Nelson Street. City Dated this @th day of Apgil, 191
$1,920 rising by $96 to] ,.BIXES—on terms, Hercules Silver | 1¢ eRe SS si—2h Assistant. | with platform. DAMAGED by ac K) dress is Hebburn, Co. Durham, England, | Dated this 16th day of April 1681 H. WILLIAMS
3 Hike "ALL by aceidert.} 0 : ; Yo: 4 . , tog T IA
$2,880 and th ng, models in stock. Remember Austins » a 7 has applied for the registration of a o: A. W. HARPER, Esq Registrar of Trade Marks.
. a en by $144 A Ss are ependable, . >, “ae Sin bans i Police " *
A. BARNES & CO. LTD. TERMS CASH trade mark in Part “A” of Register in Ag. Polic@ Magistrate, 18.4.51-——30t That THOMAS WARD
to $3,456 plus $216 per 11.4.51.—T. FN, R. ARCHER McKENZIE. respect of chemical substances used in District “A LIMITED, © Br: od
annum for an Educa- ee Auctioneei manufactures, photography or philo- R. PILE, ’ turers, whose = Conpasy. eee
tional Diploma. LIVESTOCK “es en = 8ST. LUCY 18.4.5)—-2: { one Sete a rene sa Wil sehaas aatlind ae for | Seruonn TAKE NOTICE is Wardonia Buildings, Suez Street,
peasure! ° . ardicy ‘ elie : . ‘ 3 e consic W
For GRADUATES: ALF—One genuine ® H Lucy, will be opened as a eeeals M BILL MAN MINX 1989 MODEL tural, hortic uitural, | veterinary and sani- | sred ai a Licensimm@ourt to be neld a} BITUMASTIC ete ee Mi 4 pee “AY
$1,728 rising by $72 to sina calt. Ten dave Sate — April 26th 1951, at HARRISONS PLAN tow e are instructed by the owner who tary Durpossss raw of partly prepared. | olice Court, District “A” on Thursday of Register in yemect af cule and
$2,160 and then by $96] Bred Holstein Bull Prince Albert. Vv. wv. TATION YARD, usual hours souna vette 1. te Rute = oe perfectly | vainen Wake a ramnilaataape sub, he 26th day of April 195) at 11 o'clock That WAILES DOVE BITUMASTIC | edge 1 and shaving brushes sua
Lod jie j ‘ ae e : 1 TE Q : e :
to $2,928 plus $216 per Clarke, Ivy e, Ivy Road. ; pesoane 1 aomeiee careae at 2 p.m, on Friday abth an | included in other cl manufactures A. W. HARPER rine aay atieae Wreste “otal a be Ngee to yoeluter the saeerere
= a 5 ” a etn nan f . a se vy ~ » p n
annum for an Bduca- 16,4.61—Sn Ste Lucy — JOHN M. BLADON valtinge car ER PR rica Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “A” | dress 1s Hebburn, Co, Durham, England. | tps, unless yan: pectel Shan it yee
. y ‘ tt ¢ 5 Y wlie . ° _
tional Dipioma, ($480— MISCELLANEOUS 17.4. felaigkmotibiiialibemia ie baie Set Auctioneer, architectural and building contrivances; |!” cai en ‘iat oo tapas. “Atak Monee, in pray Sed § SY st nolice, ti Gupliave: Saale
| naval arehitectural f i : at a aT at my ee oO ith
a2 Aaa oar an a | Seen aed eee aes respect of chemical substances "used in| ‘ration. ‘The trade mark can be aces on
The position on the Salary Scale | ,, ANM-T-DENT :—At last, AMM-I-DENT MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY | _ BY instructions received 1 will sell by | animal and vegetable substances; bitu D S manufactures, photography or philo-| cypiication oi my office
would be decided by teaching ex- ste has arrived. Amm-I-Dent is| ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING | Public Competition or at jot | £ rugs muss e CN eee ee rer! | ated. this. oh 6
e iy ching ex ne toothpaste - with the Ammonium Ion} NOTICE is hereby gi a ion on the spot at | minous preparations (in the nature of chemical substances used for agricul- ated this day of April, 1951.
perience including an allowance | Which helps to stop tooth d ereby given that the One venue, Alleyne’s Land Bush Hall, on | paint), bituminous preparations for use tural, horticultural, vetert y and sani H. WILLIAMS,
hi lecay. It is| Hundred and Tenth Yearly Ordinary | Thursday next the 1s 2 ’ s preservatives emains' at a . horticultural, veterinary and sani-
pleasant tasting and ret ys he 19h at 2pm. TY as preservativ against ru nd against t . ; “ ~ Registrar of Trade Marks
for War Service. mouth, Get yours, now. from your a = ine Meeting of the above-named | houses 17 x 8 and 18 x 10 with shed.) deterioration of — wood; eee ni oO ase n vegelabie attimal, Sad rtaernl aus 18.4,.51—3n
PASSAGE EXPENSES to Bar-/ £ist's or notion counter.—15.4.51—6n. rus- ciety will be heid at the ay 5} Can remain on the spot. Inspection 9) ¢mamels (in the noture of paint), var tances Used in " nufacture not
b ee, | OCC. Beckwith Place, Bridgetown. application to Mrs. Moore, owner nishes and lacquers: also coatings for oMe: ose 7 ma ures,
ados not exceeding $960 will be Friday, 20th April, r ore, owner | ‘ . “ 1880 ir neluded in other classes; manufactures
‘ BASKETS: Verandah pril, 1951, at 2 o'clock DARCY A, SCOTT | cisterns and other vessels, containing Eds url ps mtg
aid against ropriate hers anging Baskets | p.m. for thi , | ; saa = from mineral ond other substances for
paid ag approp vouchers, | with Firns and other Plants, Phone 3180 | '"}) fecchone eee ees Auctioneer, | [olilas, avd will be entitied to register ; ; DULSINS 7_BE . GeCOrehion, ”, Ane meering, TAKE NOTICE
Up to the present no passage; *5, St. Ann's Court, Garrison, elving from the Directors their 15.4,51—4): | liquids, and will he entitled to register LOS ANGELES, April 18 | architectural and building contrivances
Report on the transactions of the | the same after one month from the .
money is available for leave. 19.4.51—1n Bociety for the year ended 3irt; —< j ith day of April, 1951, unless some per Drugs, worth from about $25,000 revel arcitectara) send spevel equip-
i Res war b e meat > give se | (0 $125 ), hav ae 4) | ments; goods manufactur rom ani-
The post is pensionable under BATHS — In Porcelain finamel, in| (2) pert a sais ae gO ae Le, earn. ive. hecian ; - an nays Deen. smuggled | at and vegetable substances; bitumin- BIBBY
the Barbados Teachers’ Pension | White, Primrose with matching an Auditor “TAKE NOTI | in duplicate at my office of op-}irto the United States aboard the] 5us preparations (in the nature of
Act. Ni ibuti unite % complete colour suites. To; for the current year, position of such registration. The trade American 45,000 ; battlest t). bit t ti ft That J. BIBBY & SONS LIMITED. a
i. fo contributions are pay-| grade, F c. K. BROWNE mark can be seen on application at my | 4 can 49,000 - ton battleship! paint), ftuminous preparations for se} British Company, Manufacturers, Whose
ae . BARNES & Co., Ltd. ‘ es preservatives inst rust ond against
able, but the minimum qualifying 20.1.81—t.¢. s / That J, BIBBY & SONS LIMITED 4 | office Missouri, detectives said here. mite Ge neds wa of trade or busineds address is 21, King
iod is*ten years Servi t 0 ‘4 _| British Company, Manufacturere whos Dated this 6th day of April, 1951 One of the crew, a 20-year-old | GecerGration OF woods ot paint) war. | Rdward Street, Liverpool 3. Enalind,
period is years. ice at] —Coerain BRPTiNGS por Pitinteisiigctislthiecnkis ane. | ade or ‘tmeinese eadtee a Et, ; H. WILLIAMS, dunt itincad time er] Chamels (in the nature of paint), var- | jas applied for the registration of a trade
Harrison College is counted 43] aow light control, wahnake win- THE BARBADOS CIVIL Edward Street, Liverpool 3, Engiani Registrar of Trade Marks LOSE COTE TO oe ny ee en eters: iesla “containing | Mork in Part “AY Of Register in Bement
palsies. wane Se. Tenglist BARNES. Kirsch. ‘Dial 4476 a SERVICE ASSOCIATION has applied for the registration of a trade 18.4.51-—an }charged with illegally importing) oahle Water” and other” alimentary | %, S0aps of all Kinds, perfumery, toilet
Teachers’ Superannuation Act, & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.t.n . mark in Part “A" of Register in. respect morphine, He is held under $5,000] jiquias, and will be entitled to register articles, preparations for the teeth and
licants should tion sub-| 72 ae NOTICE | Sule and washing preparations and RATES OF EXCHANGE |]tail. the same after one month from the | Hair, and will be entitled to register the
ane > hi — EVENFLO” BABY BOTTLES, Amer-| 1S HEREBY GIVEN that a poli wiil be | some after one month trom the auth ane APRIL 18, 1951 Assistant United States Attorney | 18th doy of April, 1991, unless some pets tor Ari 196) unl me 1 shall-in
ary subjects which they offer,|ica’s most popular Nurser. New Ship-|taken in the C 1 Ch p @ month trom-we 6th Gay | CANADA . con shall in the meantime give notice v 961 unless some person #i
and out~of-School activties which | â„¢e"t at Bruce Weatherhead Ltd. - Buildings, on ons amber, Public | of April 1951 unless some person shall in} oo 7/19; pr. Cheques on Richard Hayden, said morphine is] jy quplicate to me at my office of op- | the meantime give notice in duplicate
i at Reatate 18.4,31—Sn Sakura tee hanno ny April 28th inst. | te meantime give notice in duplicate 5 a eanker 60 810% pr [believed to have been bought] position of such registration, ‘The trade fo me at my. office of opposition of such
they are prepared to undertake. ———— for the elect ts San and 3 p.m. | \o me at my office of opposition of such Demnad cheaply in Yokohama, Japan mark can be seen on application at my |te@istration, The trade mark can be
APPLICATIONS together wilh| GOLDEN RETRACTO INK PENCILS—|FIVE persons to serve on ihe Couren | seth on application wade, inark can be Drafts 60.65 : t eeieliter | omen €; | 9908 an. application «ty. ote,
three recent testimonials, the he. pipes Eclipse Pens and Pencils} for the year 1961 r ert “Dated Gh ech any of Aor het Sight Drafts 605/10% pr euter Dated this 6th dey we SC a ee eee a Witt 1AM
are here again separat " ‘ : a ty 627/10°) pr. Cable yILL Ss, ~ .
names of two Referees, and 4] g; 59 ara ae a. Poet aaa cw SOMBanparce, | M. WILLIAMS, 1 2/10" pr. Currency 59 3/10°% pr Registrar of Trade Marks Registrar of Trade Marks.
photograph, should be sent by air- | 52.28 and $4.06. KNIGHTS DRUG STORES. | 18.4.51—3n Mey ete ee ee rae fiver es Stock Market ae ee
mail to J. C. Hammond, Esq., 19.4, 51—2n preter eae Stiver * a at oa SS alist
M.A, (Cantab), Harrison College. | "“G@gsteTNER DUPLI u °
“A, “ ICATORS"—New Si F
Barbados B.W.1., to arrive Not! models just received, A. 'S. Bryden & ° e e e ° e Sows firmness
See eee storic Amer Mi Prail
16.4.51—t.£.n, LONDON, April 18.
20th March, 1951, sissies an tot A. 1c@an Ssion Tal : , AP Semele
1.4.51.—3n.|” LAUNDRY STARCH; 5.B, _ Fresh buying gave renewed | WONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
tal Laundry Starch timporied Quality) Iky AUDREY NE ASH AM firmness to many sections of the ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED (fen,
in ‘% Mb Packages. Ask your Wholesaler, ° a ; 4 4%) “mi stock market today, Although "
PERSONAL Grocer, Shopkeeper. 17.4.81—3n domestic stocks continued to re. (MLA.N.Z, LINE) resi ta' “Carnes” Aa
——_——_——_ - Bie s 4 ‘ . “ _- . bee’ ri
LUMBER — 10,000 ft of 1%” Groove| From AMERICAN HERITAGE j the fate of older mission systems, Distinguished for their archi- sist bearish items such as sulphur M.S. “TONGARIRO” saiied iii ° he M.V. “Car «A we
& Tongue Pi i i i ; j shortage and Britain's adverse | Marct » accept cargo and passengers
Would Miss Griffith who aR ie Pine at 30c. per foot, Foy cai A chain f 21 Fr it as they had radiated outwardftecture, the California missions sh ) age an ee es iy aerer: 24th, Arriving at Barbados Nay for Dominica Antigua
worked at Doctor Birch call Se ii ree 4.51—2n lines site alone Ping nae ee their beginnings in the! Will continue to serve as exam a ae it = ee rat * sdetlarent esis SRA St
4 ‘acific)} West Indies, Centre riég [ples of artistic, yet practical en-|Mvestors — are aoe ore \ ', + "ie cae
at Carlyon, Pinfold Street. tts One bod ek Leite, Cle Baan Coast of the United States, from|South America ro woneee ny Beast uee Sale. ee ee selective, Good class industrials, | care? tarePitenntoncnt at eibe Kitts, Sailing 20th instant.
. 19.4,51—I1n. 15.3.51-tt.n, |the City of San Diego to the vil-|j : : P 4 al).ty reel particularly those whose dividends | for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
] into Mexico. SSS SAW SHANDRIGR One Girccla’ ace = re aes a distance of}noted in California, however,jarched colonnades, graceful en-{&"¢ well covered by earnings were | #24 Leeward Islands. WT, cae. we
ORIENTAL Sawn feiss ator % ser" hie. one = uae sayelent ran ty This was the last major frontier,ttances, tiled roofs, cloistered Sots eo a ant. at coe For further particulars apply:— ERS ASSOC, s
is machine er oOftof the Spanis' 1" passa eways and hig beamed | Glectrica equipments, 1g en-
has been overhauled and is ready for|Spain’s influence on the region.| ¢ aa 2 eras) eee Oe a” ta Ge ae ae ah ¥- gine rings and tobaccos showed| *URNESS, WITHY & CO, LTD, and Tele, 4047,
SOUVENIRS, CURIOS, work. The price is very reasonable. Re-|Here, in the Stat such, was the last mission chain.} ceilings, ‘together with a host of oe . 4 zm
JEWELS Box 4727 C/o Advocate Advertising | whore the *s “8 of aan Therefore, the California mis.jother details, bespeak an earlie: useful gains, Shipping also were Da COSTA So
New Shipment opened st 17.4.51—an. |¥ : paniard made his/sions have an added interest as}generation which built well and] Wanted, ation.
Two PLATE Glass Display Cases, $120.00 Worl great effort in the New|the surviving remnants of an old|in a manner pleasing to the eye.|, The start of a new account “nwa we J
THANITS DIAL each Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, ; ean orld to colonize for the “Glory system, Fringed with mission gardens, the brought a revival of interest inj 00 CU eaiciaste
ses St. 7451—t.f.n, 1A gn a. we King,” thes Were these missions successfull mission structures were ‘like|Oils. Prices advanced under the
me ssions symbolize the end of wu ax . ile . lead of Anglo-Iranian
4 ry A ~ : in their tasks of christianizing|jJewels set in simple settings, Al os mt, .
ee eee ee savanna ten we Tishaa eT cee rae ned explored nd and clviliging?. It soph that{though not all have retained the ine on vin ape were aeeaty
sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476. ast areas of the Westithey were. Bravi ; £ lic f the inal set-| Steady. earish press commen
T y . : rs r } re, raving the harc hips} implicity o 1eir original set
% \ A. BARNES & Co., Ltd Indies, North and South America : i vi ; mais ave {depressed Japanese bonds at th
Y WANTED x ° * Seek s}of the frontier, and even martyr-]tings, a surprising number have presse apanese bonds a 1e
R 5 4 ee 13.2.81-t.f.n.Jand t he Philippine’ Islands.} qom, the mission fathers of Cali-! Those which have not continue tofoutset but losses had generally
y t WAT CHiEs for limited period only. 10% eat waaicion nae re fornia converted multitudes ofiresist the inroads of a modern an eooereres by cle. cil
diseount for cash on all. Packard and buck: Ss 0 IC] Ho j a : a Th et *ivilizati Nestling ids he affir developers made resh
x joes ; sagan minds and souls to Christi-] civilization. estling midst th ; ¥ : SERVICE
+ A male Office Accountant | | Alton Watches 15 and 17 Jewels. See frontier, they now are important Sie Mi sj ss hs silently{cosmopolitan atmospheres of the}S#ins. Coppers were strong with 8.8. MYKPN” sails Ja Pisa rives Barbados 19th April
‘ “S] your Jewellers, Y. DeLima & Co., Ltd. rmanent reminde th Bess ission records silently) cos porte : 8 : ; ! f XL sails 6th Apr an ae pri,
e < a 3 : vamra erehl . rese they “onstan re. , é osts Steamer saile 27th April ~ prives rhados nN May
‘4 for the + 19.4 81-8 pe m. rs in e his testify to the years spent in the] present, ne) are cons t local and - overseas interests A ' Barbados #th M
% % ee toric, mosaic which makes upleffport, Secularization in itself{minders that what is today was| buyers, British Government stocks en Soeemsnentind ttt wre < coer een
% = WEST INDIA BISCUIT %| WOVEN WOODEN BLINDS can be California’; past, was perhaps the greatest indica.Jmade possible by those who recorded an advance of up to NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
x Co. Ltd., Gills Rd ss] used Venetian Style, as Curtains or as . tev : i even od ‘ked. in the past Viewed in|three-eighths 8.8. “ALCOA ROAMER” sails 4th April — arrives Barbados 20th April.
. ” s . %|Sereens. They have numerous other] San Diego de Alcala, at San] tion that Padre Serra and thosc, worked in the past. iewed in f ' 8. “ALCOA PATRIOT” soils 18th April arrives Barbados 4th May.
Oniv those: with " uses for the home decorator- with an Diego, was the first in the pro- who followed him had succeed-|this light, Americans may be —Reuter.
y w experience y (aaE Osten. HARRISON'S FURNITURE cession of missions to be estab-|¢4 in their task. The missions hac thankful that steps were taken en tie CANADIAN SERVICE
8
y
+















x lichiaalin lished along E] Camino Real (the
pa hoe on iad y airest, royal samat to the north ate units of great value, Thousands}past. The fast-moving world of Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salle Matifax Arrives B'dos
0 e W.I.B.C,, Seiy Street, issi f 4 , Poase| of cattle ranged under the watch-;tme present allows too little iat nn Rt. 8.5. “ALCOA PARTNER’ ; April 9th April 10th
: mission, founded by Page sai ; 2 «| Friend Tells T » | SS. “ALCOA PEGASUS April 27th April 30th May 9th
ODOC OCS CP OVSC LES Junipero Serra on July 16, 1709,|f4l eyes of mission American|time for such reflection, And yet riend Leis Lime | 3s) «Aveak Prionren” Marr 1th May 14th Moy 24th
SF BITUROS along with a military post near|!." dian cowboys, Vineyards |how important the missions-- ET
That WAILES DOVE BiITUMasTic|What is now called “Old Town,”| Planted by the padres and their) representative of all of the great VIENNA, April 18 NORTHBOUND
, rte j rav ali ‘ © tel we “J » as rj > > en e . 4)
RIMITED, a British Company, Manu-|was moved in 1774 to its present|"¢ophytes first gave California its’ works of the past will be to} A Viennese newspaper said 10-} 25 “ALCOA PIONEER" dve April 19th Sails for St. Jobn,
turers, whose trade or business ad*|cite in the valley of the San|Wine. Countless other activities;the generations of the future.} day that the "Golden Voice” whict and St. Lawrence
eee Hebburn, Co. Durham, England, |niego River, The parent mission|Which are known in Calli fornia) Preserved and interpreted, these] gives Viennese telephone sub- River Porte
Soha Thiele ia ate tae at cite ie Calif > Men eute'|today were given their start by!monuments to the patient en-|scribers the exact time, is that of] $5: "FOLIRE BERNADOTTR” due April 2th Sails for St. John,
respect of chetntonl aiideress hied in = "es me aed So a (ine the Francisean fathers ‘deavors of the Franciscan fathers) Hitler's film ‘at tre frie nd ‘Let pee Ri eee
sions on e west bank of the ancises é ' s i SCE u : itler’s fi actress friend Le eteldbeebailindinile
ROBIGH TaRGAKOR, De entice ieotoe Colorado River had been found- Support? ’ 1 ' oe e eed Teen . ae Riefenstahl, who was also a weil These veosels have limited passenger accommodation,
chemical substances used for agricui-}ed as part of the Franciscan|,.~ orting ~vhe glory of the neophytes wi Ong exer 1elr?} known producer, Her films ar
tural, horticultural, veteri i+ ; i * Cross in the California issions! influence throughout the United |p,» . Cen nn EET
ane Oth t thin n tary ‘purposes; raw or. partly prepared, aa raienaenee: Toten was the power of the ‘Spanis h States : aoa voice records were mad ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE,
nim: . _ s é E . ” voice records we 4 ‘
A er i § tee ae ir Series, a more than any other the hope: +throne. The missions served as ai if i ia {in Berlin in 1940, the newspape APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
at included in other classes; manufactures }and aspirations of the brown- [important medium in the prep-, | id. —Reuter, ——————————————————————————————————
a ira pe Gines substaoee cer clad fathers who thrust north- ‘ro vied pose rule. In Cali-; ODEL MOTHER {
M Savi Pri architectural and building contrivances: }|ward into a land _ theretofore : his time of preps uration | M | ere
oney - saving Frices naval architectural contrivances and}only casually explored. As early| “88 comparatively short, as Me t L PASSAGES TO EUROPE
naval uipments; goods manufactured th ixteenth t th secularization occurred only al} ar pour og ,
NEW and Renewed Furniture for from animal and’ vegetable substances; |25 the sixteenth century the ex=|)07 0 ore than half ¢ sas i ? \ ail }
Home and, Office in Mahogany, senenndanne preparations (in the nature |olorers Cabrilla, Drake, Cermeno | (7 the first eiikath a nyse In Carlisle B Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia, for sail- \
Cedar, Oak, Birch, Pine, L o! aint) ituminou: é e 5 SSion Was estab-
we Oh PE A as ieemervatives apie rust and and. Vineaing, emong others haa) jished. Undoubtedly, Mexican in. ee ing to Europe. Tae usual poris of call are Dublin, uae “ 7
Bedsteads, Springs, Beds, Laths, against deterioratior £ wood; d * r wa " Sai ye M.V. $ fie < 3 let
lroring ‘a. Washing routes, paints, enamess (in the-nature of ‘paint, tempting permanent settlements ee from Spain hurried ama oe we nee ere po mae: feanlbbee Rotterdam Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. Hi
Tubs, Easel $2. varnishes, and lacquers; also coatings He | process. Thus with the Sch. Emeline, Sch, Lydia Adina S., Sch —_—
3 cisteene and es vessels, contain- That the faith of Juniper! Spanish military posts, towns Wonderful Counsellor Beh ibow M SS
Sewl Machines, it ng potable water and other alimentar, i é anches >» missions were VV. Willemstad, M.V. Daerwood, Sch
bik” Ris, eiontets Borie liquids, and will be entitled te Sealer Serra and his companions was {and ranches, = miss ons were Finances W. Smith, MV. Sarah’ Bell
Changer, Gramophone Records. the same after one month frum the|Justified may be seen in the es- merged into the affairs of 1e Sch, Enterpris 3 q
«. up. , 18th day of April, 1951, unless some per-Jtablishment of other missions;mew republic. RRIVALS | Our lone expected shipment of - - i
gt 3 oe seaniee gee noticelafter that of San Diego. Pro Af 58. eee Nic on nd, apt Dol- \
in duplica’ me at m if - ‘ali i a > ¢ ar en, from New ork via Martinique
position of such registration, ‘The tradeferessing northward, other links} | the Un oe became a part DEPARTURES CEMENT
mark can be seen on application at my |forged into the chain during the e United States, the mission M.V. Moneka, 100 tons net,, Capt, Hut-
eo We office. next half century included: San establishments for the most part on, for Dominica } i 4
Dated this 6th day of April, 1951. Luis Rey a Juan Cx pis continued the disintegration which M.V. Precise, 364 tons net, Capt. Riteh,| | has arrived and we can now take care of
H. WILLIAMS, , u ’ 5 or Trinida’ anes
SPRY ST. Registrar of Trade Marks trano, San Gabriel Arcangel, San an = patiod ol omy Atheibrook, 286 tons net, Capt |, YOUR ORDERS.
18.4.51—3n FFernando Rey, San Buenaventura 5 arizauion, cay, isuse took, for Trinide 7
, Schoone , wh er, 50 tone
DIAL 4069 : |Santa Barbara, Santa Inés, La|#relessness, and lack of concern ddt. Capt. peas Rene. hares CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY L4D,—Proprietors, — Cnr, of Broad & Tador Streets

at doubl fed b rev
GREY HOUSE 8 Geuble ioted. gard and shingle Juan Bautista, Santa Clara de few a vevertiog the origina Cable and Wireless West Indien BARBADOS
ichael. : Asis, San José, San Francisco de nership and unction of the ness i anes pam ey, - now = HORTI LTURAL 1ETY EXHIBITION
tore Anica no "een of = ees 1951" Asis, San Rafael Arcangel, anc rete ba placed ie ube ows iarcush their Barbados Const. Station m
‘oO: lip, were protected against en SS P r
Francisco Solano, established Ship, & Genale, 8.8. Oranjestad, $.8. Sun z
Church Street "pene tA oes Y ‘as 1823, All were establish-|croachments of time. Be: 2 Ran FR Alpes Cavalier TO BE HELD AT
. wip ro . a 35. Lady Nelson, 8.5 ueen Elizabeth
1. BANNISTER, inder the protection of the , 5.8. Rorona, 8 § 8.8 *~
Speightstown for Applicant. Sent Crowe, except the last _As with other areas in the Monte “Albertia $s pon leet: ss QUEEN 8 PARK
N.B.—This application will be consid-}G5, Francisco Solano at Sonoma United States, time, itself. eame Agios Gerors 8.8 duseno, 5.5. Rosa ON
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at|* : to the rescue. Realizing that the S SS Paula/wkek, $.5 onte Urbasa :
j ict “A tt ‘ This came} ,. con r 5 S. Alcoa Pi . eS, 8 1 s . {
Police Court, District “A" on Thursday |tae most northern S$ ca Franciscan missions were valu- > ee ae Cte oe Man. SATURDAY, 21ST APRIL, 1951

Instructions have been received



the 26th day of April 1951 at 11 o'clock





into being almost simultaneously





















From 1—6 p.m.

‘ “ ; df akieahih' a0 §. Bonito, $8, Hestia, $.§
from Mrs. 1. G. Jémmott for the Mt a.m ¢ the new Re- able vestiges of an histOric past te 8. oe
cbeve property to be offered for A. MALEOD, wit a aeoniso wha had suc-the people of California under- manana MR Rinehieeilion Be AiCOK : } j
sale by PUBLIC COMPETITION Police Magistrate, Dist, “A” {PUbUC Oo ' took a programme of protectior Polaris, $8. | Athelchief, $8 Temore Public are invited to Exhibit ..
at 2.30 pm. on Friday, April 27, 19.4.51—1n ceeded in throwing off the rule sng inn, $8, Canadian Challenger, $ ing Pl in Tub Pots
1951. at JOHN M. BLADON's of Spain, much as the United and restoration. Some were ré Covhae ’ nallenger, 58.8 1. Growing Plants tn Tubs or
Offces, Plantations Building. A ngland half constructed in the form of thi ee 2. Flowering Plants
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE|S*‘*t¢s, h#4 that of England original from the ground wp . tae th Bh
Grey House is a spacious 3- a century earlier. Most, having retained some o MAIL ‘ 5. Orchids in oom
storey stone building with a dry The application of Edna Bradshaw 7 e | NOTICES 4. Cut Flowers
gcods and general store operated holder of Liquor License No. 704 of 1951] The missions were established|the original features, have bees se .
cppern ity fo “the evel criet oor at a Pt wooder building at as institutions of the frontier for|repaired and restored in tht Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser 5. Vegetables and Fruit
cprertu: ; rt yi t y uildin ge q it, NW s and & ‘ s MV
of a good bushel th np erie Eagle Hall, St. Michael for permission|the purpose of christianizing and|Gegree needed. Only one, mueetrs Cartbbee will hacia at chur OUTRO Good Money Prizes Awarded
pesition. to use said Liquor License at bottom|civilizing the pagan American carta od peep its s wa Pont Office as Under! E A Special Prize of $5.00 will be awarded for Floral Decoration
loor of a 2-storey wooden building at Indian Theoretically, once this artialiy standing as ghostly re-| Parcel Moil at 10 am Registered f Lunch Table
Portieular: , Baxters Rad. City. naan, ‘ ; . rig A ! wrareel, Mall at 10 a.m. R of a c
Musee teateiee bition honk Dated this Ith day of April 191, |task had been completed, the minders of ten — ee 30 neni eS A Special Prize of $5.00 will be awarded for the Best Collection
Street, or the Auctioneer, John M. To: A. W. HARPER, Esq he mission converts were to be been restore P ere a Mails for Antigua by the Sch. Wonder- of Vegetables exhibited by a school.
Bladon, Plantations Building. ‘Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. "A", turned over to the ministration is preserved. Perhaps of all t fl Counsellor will be closed at the Bar and Refreshments on Sat
eS oe of the secular clergy. The mission missions, it represents more than General Post Office as under:-
pplicant. : ton aie f , ~ ne > 1 ¢ Parcel Mail, Pre Ms
N.B.—This application will be consid-|lands, likewise, were r to be any ze the esr the ge aia es | Orainar Mall at thon on the = For all information apply to
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at/divided among the subjects of of the past. Lacking the arti-| . , April 1951 THE SECRETARY at WILKINSON & HAYNES
John ¥4 Biaden Police Court, Dist. “A” on Monday the/the king ficiality of the present, Soledad! Ciaudine is 21-year-old wife Mails for St. Lacia by the Sch. Enter- LTD. OFFICE
e th day of April 1951 at 11 o'clock. : alone may claim that every part and chiel mannequin of designer prise S. will be closed at the General ‘ co. Sy. 3 2 +
ie A ARPER, This step, called secul: 1- of itself, however little may re+' Brian Hart. She has given birth Post Office on under Admission : Adults 36c., Sere ene jz years 18¢.,
. Wi g at a ee ae T'S Ae oh The baby’ Parcel Ma Registered Maii na e ery School Children 12c.
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist “A. tion, took place in California du- main, seen and touched a ee ae ea Says. | Gatemey Mane 236 pin. on the Seen Elementesy Sek
19.4.51-—In ting the early 1830's, It repeated loved by the mission fathers oe See April 1951






BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY,

Knowing The West|—
Indies =

“THE BRITISH WEST "24 A
|

is, 1951

et

PAGE EIGHT APRIL

M.C.C. Will Tour Canada
TWO TEST MATCHES
INCLUDED IN GAMES

TORONTO, April















RALPH FOR TRINIDAD



INDIES”






CANADA AND ENGLAND will meet au two By W. L. Burn, Hutchinson & Co; 7/6
cricket matches this summer it was announced ‘Tuesday
nicht. The Canadian Cricket A

Reviewed by E. B. Timothy

eileen de sos ja. tion, announcing the schedule for : Hall i

* the Canadien tour of the famer Pi ~ ee com

a Marylebone Cricket Club, said LONDON, April 10. ert an joughitul serv-

On First Team the first test match will. be held Pp | too which have made PAA
at Calgary, September 3 and! 4

IT MUST BE a severe exercise in discipline for a his-,
torian writing on so colourful and entertaining a subject}
as the history of the West Indies to compress his text into

Sep

the second at Toronto
tember 8 and 9.—(C P.)



“first choice” of veteran
travelers the werld over.





a

MacDONALD BAILEY

25a LONDON

E. McDonald Bailey, Trinidad’
3ritich sprint champion is includ
ed in the first representative
Athletics team of the seasor
ing, London University at Motsou
Park on May 9th. Mac, who has
just returned from a visit to West
Africa with Arthur Wint, will be
taking part in the 100 yards—at
which distance he is British A.A.A
Champion iS,

meet

ent

H. College Beat
Queen’s Royal

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 19.
Harrison College beat Q.R.C, in






(From Our Own Cori sspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 19.

Trinidad won the first singles
against British Guiana. Kenny
fTrestrail beat Bernard Gonsalves

63, 6—3, 6—1. Hunter Archer
defeated Ivan Phillips 6—1, 7

t
“Oy








6--1. These were easy victories.

The homesters are favoured to
retain the Brandon Trophy in the
finals inst Jamaica on Friday.
Saturday and Sunday Leahong
who has an attack of influenza
may rniss the final He returns

home on Saturday

GRE

RENADA RACES
WILL START MAY 14
Pe SRORORS Apri i

The Grenada Turf Club meet-
ing which could not be staged at

Easter due to difficulties caused
by the strike in the preceding
weeks will be held on ,Monday,

May 14, and Thursday, May 17.

WINDWARD TENNIS
MAY BEGIN MAY 29

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, April 17.
May 29 is the provisional date
fixed for the recently postponed
Windward Islands tennis tourna-
ment which is to be played at the
Riehmond Hill courts,









Traffie Don’t
No. 29

DO NOT DRIVE WITH
YOUR ELBOW ON ..
THE WINDOW LEDGE.
IP RESTRICTS YOUR
MOVEMENTS IN AN ..,
EMERGENCY.

e
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.



"Sunshine Cruise”



a volume which can be easily slipped into the pocket. |
~ 8 Y We oe Professor Burns’ work is never- / NEW Y OR
Cricket Gear For theless extraordinarily detailed Mand for better living conditions! K

Barbados Boys

English cricxeiers, mostly con-
nected with, the Surrey Club,
have contributed funds fcr the pro-
vision of cricket equipment tor
dispatch to pcor beys’ clubs in
British’ Guiena and Barbadcs
This is the second year in succ
sion that boys’ clubs in the Wes?
Indies heve benefited by such
giits; last year, equipment was
sent to Jamaica and Trinidad.

In addition to gifts of money,
with which new cricket gear w
purchased, some English enthu
asts contributed second-hand bats
balls, wickets and pads. By ar-
rangement with the shipping
company, the gifts, which were
dispatched last week by the Soci:
Services Department of the Colo
nial Office, were carried free oi
charge —W LCC

Barbados
Rated ‘Tops”
By Visitor














Free rum and a plain clothe:
police escort were among the
many amenities enjoyed by one
recent visitor to Barbados. He
was Mr. E Tappan Rodgers
Travel Editor of the Advertise

Tribune of Ohio, U.S.A., and he
records his impressions of _ his
in the West

‘Indies aboard the Mauretania, He



the second cricket match after aj writes on his newspaper of Tri
thrilling finish Q.R.C. who ha joes) Martinique, and othe:
scored 66 for the loss of seve aces a
wickets ended their second inning _This is what he wrote of Bo
at 212 runs. The visitors given wados :
78 runs to score for victory in TI islar Pia ls (pro
§ »g at deven’* wicket 1¢ islanc arbé Ss i
ie mates Tort eaven wickels in jcuneed: BAR-BAY-Dose) is one
Rudy Crouch 50 saved the day of the _ choice and outstand ne
for the Royalians. The Ro islands in the West Indies. M ast
were Harrison College 208 and of the he tied: oa have rated oo
84 for seven wickets Q.R.C island as tops of all places ve
74 and 212 z ? far visited. It is located 1,50
etic miles from New York and the
z most easterly island of the Wes!
2 Indies.
Trestrail Beats The island is small, 21 miles
long by 14 miles wide, with an
Gansalwves area of 166 square miles. Th

population is nearly 200,000 with
a smail percentage of whites. It
is said to be the most English of
West Indies as to trade and char
acter of its inhabitants. Some-
times it is called ‘Little England.’
The colour of the sea is of the
deepest blue

There is a story circulated to
the effect that in 1751 George
Washington came to Barbados to
recover from lung trouble and
the house in which he stayed with
his brother, Lawrence, s‘ill s¢ands
in Bay Street overlooking the
bay.

Bathing

There is excellent bathing, sea
fishing, yachting, golf listed in the
numerous recreations of the is
land. The tour of the city pro-
eeeds through Trafalgar Square.
in the centre of the town passing
a statue of Lord Nelson, then
down Broad Street, the principal
shopping district, after passing
many interesting spots the trip
goes up to Shop Hill from which
there is a splendid view over
Bridgetown and the harbour.
stop is made at St, John’s Church

situated on the biuff of a hill,
Crane Hotel with its famous
Crane Beach is on the list of

stops. The tropical vegetation is
beautiful which may be seen all
along the roads. This island lives,
on sugar and the sugar cane it
produces. This being Saturday
most of the stores closed at noon
not giving passengers much of a
chance at shopping. Several of
the best stores, needing the busi
ness I suppose, remained open
until six p.m. These = stores
reaped a harvest as buying here
and prices have not been equal!
ed at any other port so far vis
ited. All

available which were purchased
freely Late in the afternoon I
visited the headquarters of the
Police department and was treat-
ed as a royal guest Free rum
and given personal escort, by a
plain-clothes officer, during the

balance of my stay
Bridgetown, Barbados is one of
the places I believe a person
would care to revisit,

in the City



Aq Ietered U. 5 Patent Offce

A the RAC Club, Epsom, has be«

English products were

KID RALPH (left) light heavyweight champion of Barbados is going to Trinidad to fight Gentle
Daniel, idol of boxing crowds in that colony. This pi

at the Yankee Stadium in which
champion.

Hosts To In

Ralph demonstrated

dian Boxers

(By GEORGE WHITING)

THREE
gomp
tournaments this summer.
India—represented by the I
played generous host to Bri
have a chance of repaying a
In 1949 Yorkshire’s Ron Latham

was flown to Bombay to outpoint
the India and Ceylon light-wei
champion Gene Raymond I
year London’s Charlie Dox
made a similar trip, and brougi
off a double against Raymond and
welter-weight Ron Willmer, holde:
ef the India and Ceylon middle
weight titles.

STAR-CLASS







Raymon? and Willmer are
now paying us a return visit in
June, and with them
Percy Khatau, an 18-year-old
fly-weight with a Western India

come

title among his 43 wins in 45
appearances,
Trainer Ike Sassoon accom-

panies the party, which will be in
the charge of Bombay’s Assis {
Police Commissioner Superintend
ent Terry Adams—the Englishman
who first thought of these n.uch-t

be-desired exchange visits




What happens
here? That end of the busiress
is being looked after by Davii
Myers, honorary secretary of the
enterprising West Ham BC, who
will see that both food and fights
await Raymond and Co

when they get



Club officials will lodge the
Contests are being arranged
them at West Ham's ‘“Festiv.l’
show at Canning Town on Jine
28, and at the Stepney and %
George’s BC tournament
Stepney on July 10.

Senior Street BC, Charlie Dor-
mer’s Club, are also playing t
part to the extent cf a third b



Gleneagles Golf
Post For McLean
By James Goodfellow

Jack McLean, professional at

n

appointed to Gleneagles—one ol
the British Railway owned golf
courses,

Choice was made from hu-
dreds of applications from il

over the country.

McLean, who
most brilliant of amateurs, turn
professional at 26 because
iound the game was too expensive

He had been a Walker Ci
player, three times Scottish an
teur champion and runner-upg
the American amateur champion
ship.

of



vas one

1e
“dd
ip
i

McLean tied with Cyril Tolley
as leading amateur in the Britis!
Open in 1933, y leading am
teur a.year later.








amatedr in the Melbourne Cr
tenary tournament in 1934
McLea professional for 14
years, w given his first appoint
ment at Buchanan Castle Golf
Club, Stirlingshire, He was six
years at Worthing, and for the

past four years has been at the
RAC.
L.E.S

immy Hatlo





=

GOO DOCTOR AT THE



| They'll Do It Every Time
“Te FAMILY MEETS THE
DOOR THUS AND WE QUOTE











7 OH, DOCTOR»-WE'RE SO
GLAD YOU'VE. COME“ LITTLE
YORICK |S S0-0-0 SICK
HE CAN HARDLY HOLO
HIS LITTLE HEAD uP!

©
UT BE THAT AS IT
MAY“ IT TAKES FIVE
OF THEM TO HOLD
LI'L’ YORICK DOWN
SO'S DOC CAN GET
A THERMOMETER

IN HIS ws po @

——}





| PHILADELPHIA, PA.



He was also first j

AMATEURS from India aré

(6 lend London a hand with their Festival of Britain

Twice in the last 18 mor.ths
Rangers’ Club, of Bombay—has
tish light-weights, and we now
little of this hospitality.

for each









of these very welcome
visitors,

Win or lose, I think we car
assure Terry Adams and his lads
of an entertaining three weeks,

Newcomer

Getting Danny O'Sullivan dow
to Sst. bid, for the det © Ol
british bantam-weignt i

1a’s Peter Keenar 3
next month will 1 ae
nsibility of trainer Honey



rrancis—a newcomer to the ¢ mp

Jim Pettengell who has lookea
after Danny since he was fignting
in a schoo: playground at Isling
ton, has acquired new commit

ments as a manager,



Francis, who gets results with
a smile, will have no iiusion
upout tne job that faces him
when he and O'Sullivan move
into camp at either Brighton o:
Betchworth, Fortunately, he wil:
find Danny a willing “subject,
whatever the demands of th
diet sheet.



Should any little problems arisc,
“Honey” will be able to call upots
the experience he gathered while
preparing such _ celebrities a
Henry Armstrong, Larry Gains,
Chalky Wright, Eric Boon, Davy:
Crowley and that other “wai
line” subject, Billy Thompson

Inability

to compromise



weights may have ruined a bright
idea to match South Africa’s
middle-weight champion, Ge €



Angelo, with French welter-we
Charles Humez in London
month.

*

Australia’s newspapers are say-
ing that Dave Sands has lost h
punch. He’d better find it again
before he tackles Randolph Turpin
next June.



* *

South African champion Geraid
Dreyer has asked for and got
an extra pound added to the
stipulated weights for his fignt
with Joe Lucy at the Albert Liall
on Tuesday. These two unbeaten
light-weights now go in at 93t
12lb.

—L.ES



| TF North opens One Heart
and South's responsi
| Two Spades, the latter con-

Suitutes a forcing take-out.
South is so strong that he
vinsualises a certain game,

| even though North may have
: opened on minimum values





A similar situation exists when
Yorth opens One Diamond on
following hand and South
responds One Heart
aa ¥Q 10 6 5;
@AK IAS: on
| North could only bid One
Diamond in the first place
game is unlikely unless Soi
has some values in the
| place. The picture chang as



soon as he hears tlie respense of
One Heart. A game in this sum
is virtualy guarantecd. and North
must make sure that the bidding
will not. be dropped short of
vame. He is too strong for a
i direct raise to Four Hearts. The
| solution is a forcing rebid of Two
| Spades.

III AAPA LEILA LILI PDIP LDL OED
SLEEP TT OE



cture was taken during the fight with Kid Francis
his superiority in this class, and crowned himself
He received a belt at the conclusion of the fight.

London Clubs Play :











HOW TO USE

is











and informative. There is a short
introductory first chapter followed
by a second which takes the story
up to the time of the Restoration;
a third continues it to the end of
Queen Anne’s reign. Chapter four
sives a deseriptisn of the 18th
rentury plantation system which
is more sympathetically balanced
lan some modern, politically-
nspired, views on the subject.
Chapter five continues the his
tory to the early 19th century and
leals with the establishment of a

treat sugar industry with its
counterpart interests and econo
mic theories and conflicts. It also

examines the slavery topic and the
strange anomalies in public opin-
ion upon this and other social
problems of the time. The dom-
inating theme of this chapter is,
in fact, the application of the so
‘ial conscience of the 19th century
to the problems of the West Indian

colonies.
Post War
The last chapter brings the his-
tory of the colonies to the post-
war period. The problem of Free

} Trade principles in conflict with
the economic interests of the colo-
nies is seen resulting in the estab-

SPORTS
WINDOW

Spartan meet Carlton in a First
Division fixture at Kensington this
afternoon at 5 p.m, The fixture
should be an interesting one since
Carlton bave won both their First
Division fixtures since the season
opened and Spartan, last season's

lishment in 1897 of the prototype
of Imperial Preference in the
' Canada—West Indies trade agree-
ments. i

champions, have won the only a tae
match they have played this The striking feature as one
season, réads this remarkably detailed,

NETBALL
Queen's Collece vs, St. Michael
Old Girls at St. Michael's Girls’
School — 4.50 p.m,

but condensed history of the West
Indies, is the continuity of the
main problems. The geographic
and economic facts of the situation
has made this continuity inevita-
ble. Dependence of the colonies
upon the American mainland and
upon Britain for supplies has al-
ways been the underlying trouble
The price of sugar has always
governed prosperity or adversity,
and that price has generally been
at the mercy of economic forces
beyond the control of the colonies
There has always been the prob-
lem of the absentee proprietor and

W hat’s on Today

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m
Meeting of St. Thomas Ves-
try — 1.00 p.m

Meeting of Christ Church
Vestry — 2.00 p.m. of the settler who comes to make
Death Inquiry at District money and to leave again. Agains
“A” Court — 2.00 p.m as veneers pea ae the
> if : | white man in the West Indies was
eee tae re 7 | both very rich and very wicked
James — 7.30 p.m . " it is shown that throughout - the
i - , jislands’ history, he has had his

Meeting of “Alliance Fran | share of pond and bad fortune.

caise” at British Council, Social
Whitepark—8.00 p.m, In social matters, the book re-
veals the falsity of current belief
CINEMAS | that nothing was done to alleviate
‘ ar | the condition of the people untii
eee a et an Rae ees U.S.A” |modern times. Throughout the
Royal: “Mummy's Rome: ane | 18th and 19th centuries, constant
“The Exile’ — 4.30 p.m. and | endeavour was made to provide
8.30 p.m | education, to improve morality
Pisses (Bridgetown); “Aten mivaly” and to maintain a_ reasonable
and “Tarzan Triumphs” — 4.45 sto ¢ ivi it is in-
Dm. and 8.30 eg | standard of living. But it is in

j teresting to see that in the 18th
| century, the gathering momentum
of the sugar industry led public
opinion to believe it to be inde-
finitely expansible and to their
fear that with money being poured
back into industry, less would be
| available for social advances, Pub

Aquatic: “Boss of Boomtown"
—5 pom. and 8.30 p.m.

lic opinion was proved wrong,
On the political side, it is inter-
; esting to trace the long history of
‘colonial government in these old
colonies. From the earliest times,
the local communities played a
principal part in the management
of their own affairs. To-day, in-
creasing government control over
|economic policies in modern times
‘has had the effect of placing in
|the hands of the mother country,
power over the destiny of Britain's
fold colonies undreamed of even
{in the heyday of mercantilism, Lo-
cally, the later Crown Colony
Governments were never dictato-
{rial though often blundering, and

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.51 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Full) April 21
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Water: 2.02 a.m., 2.18
rom,
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .35 in,
Total for Month to yester-
day: 1.45 ins,
Temperature (Max.) 85.5°F
Temperature (Min.) 73,5°F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.,
(3 pm.) E.S.E.



Wind Velocity: 12 miles per seldom corrupt though often in-
bour competent.

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.990, |! Problem
(3 p.m.) 29.901 } The modern problem of the

{ West Indies is that posed by the
Moyne Commission: that the de-

THE FORCING REBID

RET TTT TTS es eae ee et hable ons
Four Hearts he is_ entitled to

by M. HARRISON-GRAY

Properly handled,

make a cue bid of Four Spades
which North will convert to Six
Hearts.

the forcing
rebid signals great strength and It may be necessary on occa-





often serves to paint a very pre- 3!0n to make a forcing rebid in |
cise picture of North's distribu. 8D unbiddable suit. provided the
tion If South’s rebid. for ‘!atter is lower in rank to the
instance. is Two _No-Trumps intended trump — suit North
Rote Diamonds or Three Clubs. holds :
orth bids Pour Hearts This a 5
unnecessary jump in a forcing a’ =o 108593; @4Q983; SHEPHERD
situation not only means four 7
irumps in support of a suit that H 5 € :
has not been rebid. but also aiuth Soi o'Ose eee |
shows the 5-4-4-0 suit pattern Nortn must force to game with
South will read bim with four Chree Clubs. There ts no danger & Co Ltd
Spades and tour Hearts. while jf South should raise Clubs. as ’ ¢
his Diamonds must be longer North can always return to
Since he bid the lower-ranking Spades at the same level. South
sult first ; will draw the same inference as 10-73 Broad St.
; The knowledge that North 1s pefore—that North has a single-
void in Clubs is most useful if ton at most in the unbid suit
South has a_hand like this: Hearts :
@KW; 9K I9S: © Q87; .
@KECHS WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
Although his strength ts mode- London Express Service. =



- SONOS OOS
DEEL OLAS



3

l
J «© R EnricuHep

@ ¢

ke

THE

LO LIIT ESTE FETS

BUILDING
FOR THE

ppb pbtt tlt letn ttt tnltttt.

PRAIA

BREAD

ENERGY-
FOOD

FOOT-BALLER
'§ ann ATHLETE






I Prt tr grt pnmm 9 SO
POLL OPIS INT Fae
/



PRISED FOOD RA, It

comes ct a time when economic}
circumstances make them difficult |
to achieve. Professor Burn right-
ly points out that many “prob-
lems’ of the West Indies cannot
be “solved”, and that if indeed |
they could be, so also could almost |
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PAGE 1

Allies Continue Push Towards North: Meet Resistance In West l\l\I AM llftIM Seven Dock TOKYO, April lb" LIEUTENANT GENERAL Van Fleet's Inter' national armies in Korea continued to advance,' , patrol and adjust their positions during the day,! I_4-CACICI*S V I*t?t?U Eighth Army headquarters said. On the central front, they met no enemy, — %  **g 0K L.Ag3..tt-. except along the Pukhan River, south west of the "JJfJ" 1 nr lM lcrtd,1 > poihpmi Hwachon reservoir dam t'nited Nations' Task Fo Th continued to probe toward Choi. nor point nf the Communists' contra) defatM l.uild-up until they encountered small arms fire southwest of the city und artillery fire to the south. In the eastern sector, South Korean Troops fought MM torn estimated at baltnllcn strength. Communist* resisted fiercely. On the western sector front .[da. Nations' troops advanced I Fit ihroughout the day. finding little %  I which to shoot. The Eighth Army's summary of the day's lighting gave no indication of the extent of the advance Yesterday, when the Comrmi; ugtat a lnacioui n action. Eighth Army troops killed or wounded more than 1,500 Com. munlit soldiers. Earlier today more thnn 25 Russian type M.I.G. fighters took the air—for the first time in three dan—against 16 Ameiir.-in F 85 Sabre Jets In "MIC. Alleyover Siiiiiiju. near the Manchurian frontier One M I G was damaged he. fore they Hew off after a 15-min. utc dog fight Mustang pilots of the South African %  'Fl>lng Cheetah'' Squml rons claimed two Communist tank* damaged in the tern sector. Other South Africans over the central se;tor destroyed fix Communist trucks and two gun i-.. -it-r-iin 1 oinblOi *od %  trafui I —Reuter. Schuman Plan Treaty Signed PARIS. April 18 Tba Schuman Plan Trca:y. merging coal and steel resources of six countries into a vast European pool was signed here toN.itions in the plan are I Vast Go/many. Italy, Luxcm| Holland. Belgium bourg. Signatories wereChCDCaBoi Konr^d Adenauer (Gent... %  Forefejn Minister* Paul ^ land (Belgium), Robert Schuman (France), Count Carl" Sfona (Italy), Joseph Bech i Luxembourg) and Dirk Stikker (Netherlands!. —Beuter. Defence Pact Will Bo \ii iH>nii4-'f 1 TO-DM LONTX)N. April IS. Fi recasts, that Percey Spender. Australian Foreign Minister will tomorrow announce the conclusion of a defence agreement Unking the United Slates. Australia and New Zealand, were conltrm cd by usually rallabla source* I • ra to-day. Britain, whose interest in the daft nea Of the Pacific areo is vital, is not dimtly involved In the i lu-riie. but is understood to have preferred limited agreement at thin stage between the two Commonwealth povrai and the United States Reuter Reds Arrested In Rio De Janeiro KIO He JANEIRO. April iH According to press reports today n large numoer if L'om-nunastad here during the past few days. apparently were connected wiin the .lemons'rauon against decisions of the biterAim rlcan conference in Washing ton which Communists wen to hold this afbsrnoo. in fron". of the Brazilian Forcigi MUdatry bull Security police banned the (ii-munsl r.i lion Press dispatches from Port'j Ai'Ti'. capital Bia (irande do Sul Buba. said the CommuoJat inspired strike movement among nraa stopped by police and many arrests made. —Rruler Indians Asked To Join In Fast DURBAN, April 18 Indians throughout BOUth Africa were called on by the Natal Indian Congress today to fast with Manila) Gandhi, second son I f the Lite Mahatma Oandhl, during the last 24 hours of hit two-watk protest fast which is to end on Friday. Manila! Gandhi said he if lasting to purify himself before violating the gfuUwId (racial) Kegregati-wi) law as a protest against the South African Government's race policy —Renter l i .;i In MI r Govt. Defeat Budget Challenges LONDON, April 18. The Labour Government defeated two challenges to it:, budget proposals by 11 votes in the House of Commons today Its proposal to increase tinla* OH i->iul b> four pence half nanny per gallon was carried by 30o votaa to 289 The Opposition also forced a vote on tha proposed increase in tax on cinema seatand certain sports including horse racing, but thai wan defeated by 304 to 289. These proposals today passed through one of several stages before they become law. —Reuter today because of disagreemen strung the Jury. Nine thousand dockets had struck every tkna the seven appeared in rouri To-do v their, workmates greeted the accused with songs and cheers as they lef. lb. Criminal Court as free men Last night the jury found the accused guilty ol conspiring t, 'ndure dockers to Hay away from work without then employer." consent But Uicy failed to agree t n the principal charge of incitemanl to illcRal strike action. When the Court assembled today. Sir Hartley Shun. cms*. who as Attorney Genera] win In charge of the prosecution, said the findings of the jury WM Illogical and compelled him in fairness to the dtflsttdanU to discontinue proceeding* Not Acquittal Tiif seven nun foul trosn Lon< (ton and three from Liverpoolwere arrested on February 8 They had pleaded not guilty Today's decision discharging then nftcr Sir Hartley Shawcroas sab hn would discontinue proceedmus dees not amount to acquittal on the charge on which they wnra fi-und guilty. Legally there i:. no bar to new B rosecutton for the same offence lore than half of London's dock t n wpro idle today. After cn'hu'ii^tirully greetini the freed men, their supporter marched to" their Union hear.quarters to see their Genera Secretary Arthur Deakin, Deukin arid his fellow leaders have icndemned tha activities of the unofficial strikers. Demonsti tors pushed over the doorkeeir at Union headquarters but the v did not sen Deakin who was at lending the funeral of ErneBevln.—fteat >r Boy Dies After Jump From Lorry pOURTEEN YEAH OLD Wesley Vaughn Phillips, a schoolboy of New Orleans, St. Michael, died on the .-.pot lbout 1.40 p.m. yester day, after jumping on ihe platform of the lorry, M 246 at the junction of St. Mary's Row and Mason Hall Street. The !m iv -; owned by C1.JM.S. Ships Will Go Chances For Rescue Now Appear Small IN SUBMARINE DISASTER (By ALEX \\U;NT!Nr:i I'HRTbMOrTIl England. April 18. UTTEK SILENCE front tar Hni ibmonne Affray sunk tn the English Chiming : •• 7S men aboard could bo rescued alive Over 40 houn after IhfMdived on praci guivivnrs had hoari sighted" Mor wat there any i ihe yellow market hnoy whaVH lubmurines In distn stud to the surface. • Aflar nine o'elork tonight, if ti i ;• I BM .-upylten would low ami thaj would breathe tn diflleulty. %  afternoon tfk I Chief Pertainoulh, . from 0i %  • • %  %  reocua ahlpi 'There is inereiiig e\ithat the r in tha coir., t plat a { he fact that the submarine hjii lot s||,|l ;, lung rfdu< %  plai'o nf tlir iiiiirtion of 81 Maivf.ow and MaMMi Hall Miaal yMterday afternoon. when 14 yam old —hooll.ov a/aalay V.imhu Plnlhu. dte.l after lumping oil a lorry tJTTAWA. April 18 Tile iMwaibihtj nf abandonin • %  N : %  %  arvK.< oetween C'anad.i inol Wt : B ... ,,, %  ti, Coo Sti %  ">hip DonaM Ooi I ci Pn d ft.S ind thi Natioi Rallwaj ninant win i.*v luagtlon I th gatUn Efnesl Bevin BrfHtt's Pivss Card Withdrawn MADRID, April 18. The Spanish Government ha^ withdrawn the preas eard of Sam Brewer. New York Tone* correspondent in Spain because of his alleged "(enncious and insidious campaigns which were frequently incompatible with the truth and decorum of the country.' When he asked for a speciftic example of articles objected to, Brewer was told it was to the general tone of his coverage that exception was taken. Brawar taM been in Spain since 1949 and also worked there in 1916 and 1947. —Reutei Morrison Quizzed About Transport In Argentina LONDON. April IB. Foreign Secretary Hartaan Hi %  rison was asked in the Commons to-day, what he had done to defend British interests in Buenos Aires transport "in view of recent measures taken by the Argentine Government to expedite liquidation of the Buenos AireA Transport t orporatton." Morrison replied ItU representations had been made t>: the Argentine Government. Parliament had already been agaured llrltish Eeonor now In Buenos Aires would try t reach a satisfactory of this claim, he added. —Beutrr Non-Aggression Pact? WASHINGTON. April 18 The State Department Plrfd I day it had -under study" a lattei from the Italian Foreign Mim>l Count Carlo Sforia.. isjajaaaUnf that the North Atlantir Traat) powers should ofler Russia and other Communist countries a nonaggression pact. A spokesman said that the letter had been transmitted ti Dean Acheron through the Halm' Ambassador here about a fort night ago. —Heater LONDON. April )ft The funeral of %  rnan it.-vi Britain's former Pol tarj who died last Saturday lofiit plaea loda*. A vast crowd, bareheaded and silent, wa (ottn: A it I 'tn cniiipleulv liV IlllWl'l i Hllo 'i cemetei y where tha eroinutlon tool; paaafe Beside* most of the |ii %  net, a crowd tf world dii'tomats, politicians, trade union 1other public liuure* Bihar, i pay homage ii> Bavlni manv i Among 142 wreaths fi world figures and bunMf I were a huge wreath of i King Faroiik ol Igypt, %  his Cabinet colleagues, and om from the United Nations. Prom the French Governm"i to Cabinets of the (ominonwealtl. and from German trade union* • thi Duti h Labour Partji <•• a all countries Lisbon where the bodies of fain< tea rest —Keuter INFORMAL TALKS GRENADA. April IB An .nformal conference of Aditors of four W colonies Ukes place this week at Government House hare. Ooaanu undall will preside Nazi Dye Trust Wilt Be Split BONN. April 1B\ The Allies today announced that I O. Farben, giant Nazi Irun would be split UMo tftraa larajg and fix smaller companieThis decision brought an end six years' dclih ttalions on how to break up th .rust which before the war controlled an estimated 85 per cent of Germany's chemical mdustr> and according to the announce n„ nt plaved a major pan in bulldlni >.) the Nan aru ma.l:ili.-' — Reuter BOMB SHELTER IVASHINQ '.<>. April 18 PiMlden*. Tnunui Ii"' earmarked SBHIOOO Ir. I.ull.l .. btaM shpl'.fi*. "<• WhM H —BaatH Party Leader Dead •• / -. -.^*t %  . 1 tim oT JM We don f riant 10 bi -r.c'ir napping. Frttgby — ? %  %  • ifdn prrnU.0 o tratH ttock of t'icie" ,.„ %  1 ,. i n. %  >"" staffed Over Balatf was strong in tingn I naval pon toolght, that tba nib marine had rolls I he n ihe struck tha 11 a bottom ild havi jaiiutu | %  km up tha i i of VJ Id %  %  Ships fi Stati Prance and B Bmall ship waiting do Hi I arch fo %  Affray diva I %  in cause of .nut Itgnall and tapi bm rinei •i-T-iy bodnj Ihe aubmaru o sea IJevii h i I %  u ".-, El %  ba %  B.OiS ibn ai In n pi-ried renjni a \ \ Tha Bottom" %  , nelow as "' M i' %  % pllipoilltad. But the -aid that tb< MII of tha %  ubmaiine i ould aot be llxed night, with laareJiUghi %  P( tour majoi sh.|. alaad lha search an %  %  I l reaul at %  atrmlnated rrom lbn Lof i Oiillv eioaed —Itruler. I1RITAI1S PROTESTS TO PERSIA I 1 HKHAN. April 18 through bet I %  hi r toda) Biatnai th< PWiton I i man* laat nbjht that th< K\ lb. fa Anglo Iranli n i ompanj I tton ti da, Anglo Iranian %  tamant %  trika In ihe great Oil "Mini tha fault nr th. I'iinpanj foi "electing tba m rfcan ind ind urgent dernand J| IJW innment • ware prevented fron working by intimidation am threats nf personal viol-i %  The cornpanj bad dona lot protoi '-i %  %  'T •!,rdlu|., UMU al<(ect Cotuswny oaheials tutid •edajr inut %  majority o' wa ib. I on % % %  Ifco in ... i i idN n larn indi "ti tin %  r< i> phone reports rn>m Abadar %  %  .1 patrolling area i loarne i %  %  quanl %  I %  mployi' ii in Ian eompanv %  %  %  %  i Laat report ,,i i %  U MO •rorkari %  i i | ... It.ut.-r MONTEVIDEO. April 18 Sixty-lwo.year (.Id Cesar Mayi| Gutierrez. Presidential candid*teI n last November elections die-, I\ol Accepted LONDON. April 18 The Ministry of Food to-da;. to-day from on heart attack. He TP f u sed to accept lnl l.yle's eon led a powerful branch of the CothcMion that there is no W I orado Party and was narrowly Uugar rationing in Britain. Lort defeated by Andrei Martinez: Lylc president of the Sugar ieba—also of the Colorado p;pr iner5> Tale and Lyle. n 1en to ti Financial Times that or. the basis of 1951— 52 the MJ&btr} would huve available tl from the Commonwealth 0 nd from other sources 860.000 b B sugar than is raqu onsumplinn at the present lew Petain Still III ILE DYEU. April 18 France now un*l*" ' former hero of prisoned here for wartime laboratlon was still aeriously IL lO'iilght. Petain whose condition became critical overnight has not been fully conscious since He bas Barbie ,roni congestion of the lungs iincc last week Renter. Worrell aec6ptai "Cory Document" WASHINGTON. April 18. The Stale Departnienl liHt,.y called the laii*t paai lO the United NatMMM ) ( 01 munist NI*I th Korea a m • dtcumi nt." not n i. —Reulri T sachen On Strike HOME, April IB. On* %  aauaa th, %  %  graa H KINGSTON. Jca. April Frank Worrell has aaci by the Roman West Indian Cricket Boards Oflai |Church, had i<> srorh as usual to go to Australia. —'0*> Wkuaril Moiinul BUENOS Aims ^prll in I | ,,n aa/kw nil rnornenl ^; • Argentm %  pparal I" i i %  ., t > %  he be given a | %  %  .. %  i |,i, \ %  :i t. in th. lie tiler Will I SI SHUSH t:\w\ssns liilNN April 18 Bi nril and Waat Oan I >ln establish %  "" i a Qovermnen pievr.t a diplo Kb l unde I,. , %  n< i %  uruona will %  %  Reup" "NO PROGRESS" I'AIUS, April 18 tour I again railed fi i |gn Ifinii t W. U II! v(>lll mpany'i ra Ii raa vt i tha elderl) i^a> NeiMn an i dv Ra.ney will hav,. t.. i pi." %  in tin reasons. tin. i -,. %  %  %  nit of a trackat) between Canada and the united Uruadoan adilcb Involve l K ubt Mj i. i | .. operetta dj lap* varal raw 11 inaport Mini: ti i % % %  Li tha < lotnmlttat thi r% i-h hope al %  oea tntda traal ICPI Expel OocapaUtaai Tory MJ*. Drgefl LONDON, Apni t. H idiei ntsro) i i % %  ''•i%  • %  !,. .nve llambai ol Parlianent, urge,! the 0ov< aspeJ Argantli Chllaana from ParodUa Marboi i r the Falkland Maud-. V I %  •pendencies. John IhigdalMinister of Slate for lh,. Colonii %  implied that thai could not be i :. %  -ilhmit warlike. i %  %  U I i .HI h,i,| Shketl m thg lln of Common "Wlm is now in <> %  %  upeUoii r.ii %  island'' Dugdnle i in,refei once in to Paradise RarbOUr In Falkland Island* dj Tnera are An. D Chilean pOail on two islands n. II.Is harbour. P trespasi of-Ilnti-li bMTll boon delivered if both pa —Reuter SEDITION BILL GRENADA. April 18 A sharp unotn.i.d dlvl %  i %  riUclsm rrom .... opposing, rked i' %  %  %  ; '>.' M n %  Bedltli : inn | n thi ifti % %  %  tu, t lh ' morning. The Dm has been nn ii h n i,., | tine Fabfuar] II wban it ami ntroducad alona ivlth otl %  • ,r %  "trike Hills LaUl th, ....,,. aadlng ..f thr MHI „ un i i . was being drtvem b] GanaaM Pint Hill. St. Michael .t waa piatlically empty at the time a4 the accident. Philll|>s wore only a short khaki pant* He Jay on hi.s back in the roj.,1 avith blood waning from ins RAM an was .i pupil of the Uod.rn High Bonool and was liisl on Ihe lii^t vcek of his Banter vacation. Tho body l.iut removed to the Morluary where a inoi lam I vumination was I An nufuiry will iI..-Ici before the Coroner of ; i %  ft al 5 i lock tolas Jury Givep WrdiH In l>'alli Inquiry %  it. !" i O.r. tevei easaari %  GRENADA, April 18. esull due to the dispersal of itous assembly," was the vergivca h v a five-man Coronjur> llu. morning, ending a nqulr) mio the gaaUM raro nun and one woman %  ring tha reeenl aarlauhural orkara' general strike, by bullets ed by Tiimdud police m | I ..taute. St. David's. vdnesses. Including the police involved, testified before Magiatrata F A Iteyliger wilh Ml.an Radix wal.-hini; ol the deeagajad und T W F Wnrrell. Tr,...dad's %  Oltcttof General, those of tho BgiKe, Air Chiefs Will Meal In Washington WABrlfNOTON, April IR '. nited Bbib Britain, fn %  and Canada, anil ne< l hat. artthbi the next two weaka, tha Air Foreo aroMtineed odaj The announcaenenl said only th^ will afford op tii'ituiiity fo review the progresi being made by Air Forces of tho .•rncd Reoter TELL TnE ADVOCATE THE M \vs DAY OR Ninirr DIAL 3113 gfft0 BJ*; TA GI5 soi> VEP SUSPEND TRADING NEW YORK. April 18 The New York eotton •lading for three hours on Friday BsWrnoOB a hrni'-.ir nf the return of (Icneral hui Renter MACARTHUR BACK IN AMERICA NO POLITICS* SA YS MAC S\N Fit KM IM <) \prll 18 G ENERAL M.MARTHIR Baabaaawad lod4 that he does not Intend to enter the American polit al scene. He told a wel%  aaaaag Ran ria.llail erod %  I have Just been a*ked If I Intend In enter politic* Mv rerly an no -Reuter SAN FRANCISCO. April 1* General Douglas MaeArthiir. %  horn Of his romir.and in the Fai East bv President Tniman re turned to the United States late last night after %  fateful 14 years' absence. The General was given a hero's is he arrived |l Ban Francirco in his plane "Bataan" on his way to Washing'. r e a Joint meeting of Congress later this week. •icral with his wife and Heir 13-. Arthur, who iso ung th. rot the .. • from the plant l a battery >' %  %  i PhotOgr ovary adndo. in the terminal building There were about t&X at the airport f<' %  than had beet, antldp A great roar nn crowd at the airport on the shoi as %  • Mrs. Jean MacArthui first to ;• General MacArthui %  His old son Arthur a Unite.-: r mander'r ; arty. illed thickly as they pressed forward to shake MacArlhur's hand. Tl.. was plain I v enjoying every %  if Ihe tumultuous wel. come. He waved briskly. Each turned tbi i I smiled another -oar an i neral mounted 'platform fm .i iai

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TllVRSDAT. APRIL 19. 151 H.ARI: urns \nvoc ATP. '' PAGE FIVE T.C.A. Plane Refused Landing At Seawell NO STAFF AVAILABLE FOR NIGHT DUTY Better Pay Urged For City Clerks I-IIIM i SBM m% awn \\w ijytR CHARLIE THOMAS, President ol the Barbados A TRANS CAN \KA PLANE was refused the use f Seawell Airport at III p.m. on Saturday. Mr. (".. H. Kins tnlri the Council ol the Chamber o( GHMM fmV terdav. The plane therefore had to remain overniuht in Trinidad and return on Sunday morning, he said. The reason siven for the refusal was to thr effect that r\ there was no staff available for night duty. Mr. Kin* told n n, !" ,?. .i' X| "', SS the members. !" ""**" %  er *• sal.ru-s paid Mr. K.in C is of the staff of Messrs Gardiner Austin i, uJStoZ S ^, ", Ifc Co.. Ltd, local anents for Trans-Canada Airlift*, but su,d M r A H' 1. n that his reason for bringing the matter to the %  ttmtion oi d, !" 'owni !" '''' the Council, was in the interest of the bland Th~._i~ am minimum wa| The Council expressed ricci) t(o ri:e Saoatanr lum me meeting grocery clerk is $8-10 per week can am the matter They deth:,i is raarfa the np^intmrnt and one case disclosed that cid*.l that the Prcidcnt Mr n O. of Vigilance Committees as prothe clerk h "iri , ,, I. i I-carak .inr ana Ml Km, „l,l p„ , , ,,, r K ,, „„ lv r .J. i f„ S d Sl '"l cd '", w rk see the Colonial Secretary and talk fa, h ... I.. .. r„,i„cl ;„„i ih.i .. ,. 0 00 Per week and after it over with him before taking by the Hardware Trade This slx years with the firm, bis in; ";'.'" r „* c on \, committee were: Mr N E crease was only eight cents M. K,n said that the dec. „,BuduO ol Mean. c. % Itamsuj Tin Reeiw .. ,., cSn.for letuial of pcrmti.lo.1 to use Co Ltd, Mr 11 BannHHi „i Unkaa Ma insirurted to draft. ibrtneC M. ., s ...tchcr .v %  „...„„ lute, t„ the Previsi^ MercnVoJnlal Secretary, who had. apparent. Mr S P Withnall of the On. Association which read Uue^the ly. dimmed the mauerwith_the „ a | Foundry Ltd. UOUM coat of llvms I hav". The Council dUcuMrt a letter *£*££?J! *££'JZ Horn the President ol the Incor„„ce to obt.m ;„ to .lraft_ ?m endment. to t,„. rate. .cknoSds Airport Manager and the given wai lo the effect that therv was no staff ovailabl duty. FMKRCFAC) Wiule it might be argued 'TIC tin* airport had not U < do tegular nu'ht duly, it did appea very unreasonable that in eases of the Chambi* or emergency, nidi a dietatorial ttitude should have been ;i.n ptad I do not propose to 'ink Um Chamber to fight the battles of Tran'-L'anadT Airlines, aI tea. tl.at this question is one of general principle -md should be brought w A Tftl' IT/1\T JITF*t C to tho attention of Government M/\ i G/f WIlXl\ftilS RAMADIIIN AND VALENTINE ARE on that basis. However, be as well to bring to your nollcu thr circumstanres surrounding this Isnue, so thai you can have i true picture of what took place, and might happen in the future. Saw It, 11, Chirk, IVi'.pl (if the inter, gad Mailng that although ol the \ e\ itton were npalhette towards UM JUS tiflable appeal, they could not enlertain any idea in Ihhi due.tn.ii at present. They, however, ties to shite that as soon as their profltg warranted it. they would be prepared lo consider the mutter Kc ; as J "'*mber of the West cost o( Uv.ng; and. moming. The expected time of „*.* t „?,'' m ., .„ Whereas the grocery proprietors arrival at Barbados was then w", *."? .l h *' &£$£** l !S? *> "nl>le.to increase the .,U, -> Cocoa Price Hig/tipst Beer —Iii [muni* of %  n i. .1 the .— ...,.i, %  'Hi* and to for export DonUnka will i i gh"m i %  r i) ii~ complctad, Mr I ataiu Contr \. 1 .,.,.i, i gpinf ii.-.o Lp He said that L f sugar crop is tlOm 0 IhC • :' % %  %  ix-d. It was impeded to sopie o. tng unit "i oirdi r to I %  %  %  11ons are however conunuiA| iranaportat at ol lha unusually *xand may last for another t,' or six wi'ck.-t I i cowUUoni bava bacoi • <<<-\ bul the vaal Hi Katght U hare IM Uw Sup. no ouB pi) Ofllcan Talks He in Staying pro-wtil >ears. The pcopli p to data, thai ..I the Hole, Hoval He said that It is now diDU uii t • n-nui-.l t.i K.IUKI" what ihe annual yield it troxen meal trom Ausiralla ha I the cocoa crop will be on account t*l ivtl had it..i taural] %  toppaiL He tatd n arag hopod thai the miscreants would soon lake kjg. •ons from IhotS who had rcumed i .it.ul. tn do likew.Mst. trial the peace and %  amity, .1 lar feature of OraBadg 1 the past, should be maintained %  1 |i |i •IMIII.W" tiume 'Why can't I fo on th* UMTV with Qraaaw?*' Thr l.\-i tmif colour" wore presenud at Windsor OaaUa • %  when Kuiit OCOIKV V presented them to tbe lt Bituiion | the WeUh Ouaros. I pre**. nidnmh! We were, during thi day. informed thai the airport would be closed at 10 p m., w;lh the result thai arrangements had to be made to board tho northbound pa*seners Saturday on her north^l^ na,e l "SE ? f n & !" <*> Dr. a t pras-nt being p-nd owing to tho bound trip, and her return trip L\, ^,^1...., "a,;I !" ,! !" flendor mar,:in of th l """'• Individual batting performm^ made In tham: and ancaa of Kverton Weeke*. Frank Wharaag the ibovasald is ub.v.ii.ii and Clyde WiiU-nit and aianttatcd bj Ihg Rapoti observed that In Ramodhm .md Puce Control Committee's Report. |t Valentine the West Indies |>ossess1951 the etl P"' 1 r brilliant match winBe it resolved: ng bowlers. "I would, however, like to mahe ihe following comments. In law of Government's decision Ul %  even in a ease of emergency, a* this one was. the airport will only l>e opened batwatn the hours .ol 6 a.m. and 10 p.m Had Ihe T.CA. plane not irrived prior to 10 p.m. the Barba dos passetigers would have been landed at Trinidad. Unless the pnne remained in Trinidad until landing facilities were made available at Harbidi %  '. the northbound passengers wouid have been forced to Prd other means of transport to go north. ( It That a pet it to the Governor in-Exceulive <cery cleiks llJTW; indfeifleam ^ig\and !"!" £. rjjolut.on . ,.-, I. in 1939 and 1950 moved a vote Mr Thoma. -u, thai -he n.ee-. of thank, to Dr Clarke for his w * l*"B he d mainly to at*il IntaraaUng talk and wakamad the sh P assistants in the %  grneen,-. opportunity to express publicly f. nd ^^""^T' 2. his thanks to Dr Clarke for the the woral paid at the mnrncnl professional services which he A meeting was already held. southbound trip. Fortunately for the p uwaagan. but unlorUe had 0 wor0 ; „ (i tunately for T.C.A.. the wealher f esi ii ona | cricketers He foraCHl at r.ermudo was un^,1^, ppopi.,. tn !hp West Indie> favourable for the plane s return „ „ ,„ pon^f r professional that evening Consequently, cricketers as people outside the the plane had to remain over j^,-,, ^j^ bu( M rcS|JOC alj ie night in Tnnlriad and returned members of a community to Barbados on Sunday morn—* COmW&fTS Jamaica's Drought Restricts Milk Supply MR II McD WHITK. Tn. i, Adinmislratot of .Iiiin.ua and that colony's dalagata ai Ihe Supplj Offlterg' Talks told tinAdvocate yt-sierday thai the island b rvivlog a sevendrouuht and oni of tie effeel tricl thru milk supply. % %  %  Inquiry Adjourned Until April 24 %  CALF STARTENA %  svv M. 1AS0N 10NES & CO.. LTD.-D..tr>b u tor.. had tei rendered the West during the 1950 tOUl PEASANT AGRICULTURE Indies ,h s u as posiponed in order it form other granar y hands who were interested in attending In that way thai Motion of tha Curies' Union would be battar rapt %  Me .till felt that lline is plenty more room in the Union for grocery clerks. He did tut have lo explain lo :hat while one divis %  ; I r.ivt un' %  t .i--> Jii'olus ti.oir rssatlran %  %  tskuot to tin 1 %  >.. %  due \\ 11 • n 1 gntlciUfl WlllkrrH llrurll **'•• i years able to Hippb he othei 11 W Baraaraps, own bul unfartun bg lit iu> ovtiton ,,( ma V... 11 %  v.-ii.i rba] havs i-emir distribution Baach, 8 of taxi UN I U 1 rx a r part.s were lah-i %  , the current the Arsl Ums thl ueek AI The boal d valued |700 and la pre-enl, |h ted to tha Insured. It Sting, hut 'Saratoga' Smaslwtt E AKl.V M-.tciilay inuriiinji If.e Mnu* Of Ih. main food crops, vams Lualncs is sufforinu. other, ako f,,!'lrt 'r^r. "" %  crops were m As they know, a comiderable and prevailing prices were relasum had been spent to provide lively high. Barbados with an up-to-date airlort wlih the object that some day. Sugar Cane. On the whole. ihev would see several interna harvesting of the ripe canes Is tlonal Airlines include Barbados proreeding ntlSfaCtOrOy. Some in their schedule calls. How could peasants, however, complain ol this hope be fulfilled if the spirit o lmcu u y | n getting labour to reap of co-operation displayed on Sat;,„,. tran ,po r t their crop. The urday was allowed to continue. ycung p| anl rrt nes as well as oussUonad Mr Kill*. He ended: raIoons atf making good progress "I feel thnt in Ihe interest of me island Ihlf Chamber shoul11 Gotten. Cotton picking was gelhei. He felt that if he could Improve condition* that wai his reward. Suf.er.iii. Clerks He said that the people who work in the ••roecry line were in an awful condition. They wsra suffer.iik .. an increase of salaries for them. According lo the lellei 1 Provision MerchanU* Association, if the salaries, of the .rmvr) i-lcik %  were *o bi* IIKI-.C iiuii. Thaj %  ...[ %  i red A T IU IHSTUM 1 <•" I'uli. %  Court, Mr, <; B Griffith, Ad ln| Polli mnlfrad Bryan andalervynLaah1 .i.in. i.. itand their trial at the next, a*aduai llmg of the Court nf Grat I % %  Sesnion*. Winifred Bryan mdl Lashlc^ •nged with it 11 deMluellve ill Bryan with intent to d I bodily I \ti .1 s H 1 tea* n pn rath Winifred ii' Mi B, Niles. bfl people ti \ Con ni 1 ol District "A" furIher adjnurned hsarlng la Uv Inocernliifl tindasth of n.-i.it 1 1. MI. h. ,1 N-vaoi old Is M 1 of Bank HsU, st Mi, ii.ei until April 24 yesterday. Lynch WSS killed mi Trafalgar Squan on afsreh .!.'i whan bs snu Involved In an aeeidanl with a while iitiiriK tha blcyi it M Mid i>i I 1. Ward who pat formed the jif morlgai SXJUl linn at the I'llblie Mulln n ..ft March 26 al>out 11.4ft a.m. said that the body ol Lynch w>. iden tided to him by Caroline Lwni who said that he wa.. hat HI was dead lor about 1 ti lo 17 hours and there was a large I '.ii'invei the iitihl 1.iv ..1 .' check llltiirfj wj.s visible lio.i, Ih. now, mouth iitut ears There a/ai li.irtnorrhat.e nn the 1'iaili and Ihe trad Ths haari nnrmal and the Imwe] MO thay talnsd .1 esrtaln smounl of blood in hia opinion death wai due lo I %  mm rhsjs f the bsalii sad re Of the skull ( .....lint Lynch, aR-yearold 1 ol UM dacagssd, said thnt n ideiitille-l the body of hn son lo Dr W,.I.I She last saw htm alive on Ihe morning of M.H. I, I!.'. 1' :i p in ihe tame s;,^ him lylni dead on I aqusra. Anthony Archer of White II.,II. SI afiCIUM, sin.vlX'n 7.1 that island depended on ^ und auc" appear 10 be i alarics, aaasnaas, tte. of all the Sunday sad 11 *'• •,m ot A CAKB IKI t\ 1 MD this week t.i.rii! 1 I pertv ol li 1 approach Govrrnmcn, ^ rcMrdln. co ^n^a durln iho monlh Sum, ?•"<•'"^•"JZJ* "" '" ,h, fulun op.ration of Saawrll „„.„„„„.„,. Iwl yl old. wore '""^.'.'X, \H ,S C„.„„*"*" %  reported a. hl.h a, IM 11. per Jj, ^"^JJIS, TcSSSit %  .//,•/<.( S M 1 TTF.K "'" '" !0m< ca *" V" ""?•?' in o Inlo ther*ry Imalnna. Sf.KHII !< ttlir.lt rmOt*. however. owin malnlj Thls ,•„ mm |„ P ,., „t Which Su o. t n...l,l.iil aU thai he to t* 1 hcav y raln ,n November John j^m, wu R mPm hcr. Hi.., %  lhourt.1 th !" rnSter a .r>, iriou. • %  %  Frtruary have no. U ,.l.led „„„„,, „,.,„ „„„ „., ,,,:.. gtJB !" u, ^^-s; %  "—--• sirnr s Th"rss„ ;!;v-'" JIL ssrass : .^s^airaflss: ss s asa-* """ b) v.e.tne. HedltfnotseJ wcr(i avaiUble in lhe m arket. He said that Sir Job. any point m the ^" r n ? c '" PesU and IHaeaaea. Among the the man who sav%  refusing the use of the airport at reoorted were the cabbage starvation, did know what he was nlChl when .hi. was ,1, e to enJJJ -^ ^f %  £ J a ,,„,„, ;im wh ,. n h( s;ilri 1(u; the <; •"' ( %  mart-up wai not enough 1, ";,*"'" 1 r A u-,e-sm„ii N ld 5SS ln C n?KnoS r/ToSS! '-', %  had hi. reason. In thl, Whole bttSlasai of the Pea-aat Mveatoeh Theie the airport no complain tn received during me restriction did not month Concentrated feed and reasonable. other feeding sluff were in fres supply. At n General Meeting cf tho Chamber Mr A. H Tnppin had Entenslon Wark. The Peasant Mr. Thomas said: The merchants raised the point that commercial Agricultural Instructors vlslteu ar0 justified In not increasing Mlr core SCI it at ion on ihe legislative 1,509 peasant holdings and 6 ar ies because that Committee haCounctl was inadequate. The school gardens in March Twelve given them the power to do so. President wai appointed lo Inlcrmango trees were topworked He is only concerned "i:the (Hli ,, view the Coh.rn.tl Secretary on the clerk* While the Government imailer as a result, and yesterday The preliminary judging ot having arguments on* hat Is ngm h(r f w n M he told the Courwi members that JC hool vegetable gardens entered from wrong, the clerk are mrv done so. The Colonial f 0r the 1B51-52 annual competition mg-they just cannot live on the lVjL u/orking % %  report the Committee stated thai there ihOUld ba %  alajiei When the rejwrt came before the House of Assembly, it was not implemented. We musl Ixdieve that Ttonnrt." When th I > %  %  i tn %  ., %  thai i" had %  vei i ni had p n a uiiip into tha communlly, en *erj b toyi DI Al I import revenue . %  . trad partly due to the UM tho it v. i Tradi %  %  i — tuition by Mi III t i MI rl t f\ \ 1 1 i -i 11 I % %  JiirisilirlioM w n. Chen Court < t onfi i Dgalrtsi Delclns uintoa ol Bal i I St Mleha i iaho i .-I claimed 1 ft, IH4aj %  iiggssllmn by the NlCholb .'aid thnt t. VB ltn( | Trannpoit foi .,-k Clinton lo 'Aoi' foi in tenantries und him to ... %  lloweil hrr to livr UlC %  ohs brought hei vtay also. He i never employed hei b Health aranta to tind %  boilt. A.' Th way o COmTOSSIOKia VKI.COVh.D Vacation Fishing they should not frown, it onlj to do his i means a little more moosy for the Clinton