Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text






ESTABLISHED 1895



70-YEAR-OLD BEVE

Air War Stepp

In Korea Campaign

(By SYDNEY BROOKES)

BROTH SIDES in Korea are furiously stepping

up air war.

The Communists are throwing in many

. More Russian-type jets, and are building airstrips.
The United Nations are running a round-the-clock
attack against Communist ground and air build-up.

up.

United Nations Air Force sources said to-day that they
believed the Communists intended making greater efforts

TOKYO, April 14.

to match the United Nations air superiority.

FRENGH KILL
90 REBELS

HANOI, April 14.

French Union Forces sweeping} ..

through pockets of Vietnamh
guerilla resistance 30 miles south
of Hanoi, Tongking capital, have
killed 90 rebels and taken 300
prisoners, French army head-
quarters here said today.

Guerilla attacks on villages
inside Tongking were cantinuing.

Paratroops seeking 800 Chinese
reported to have crossed from
Yunan province into Indo-Chin
on April 1, have still mot found
tiem. - Intelligence
reports t0day said that Vietnamh
Communist-led rebels were now
in most of the border town earlier
reported: taken by Chinese
“invaders.”

—Reuter.



30 KILLED DEMINING
FIELDS IN TUNISIA

PARIS, April 14.

|
Clearing German and Allied

minefields in Tunisia, since its
liberation, cost the lives of 30
soldiers and wounded 86 others,
reported Agence France Presse
from Tunis today,

A million and a half mines have
been destroyed freeing 1,025,000
acres of arable land,

The report added that a large
srea in Southern Tunisia has still

be in
to demined,
- wT



het

Rumania Expels

Yugoslav Citizens

BELGRADE, April 14.

The Rumanian Government is
expelling Yugoslav citizens,
granting them 10 or 20 days to
settle their affairs, the official

Borba reported today.

The Yugoslav Nationals paper
said. that they were called to the
Aliens’ office of the Rumanian
Foreign Ministry, and told to
leave the country even if they had
been living in Rumania for many
years, and had families and prop-
erty there.

While some Yugoslavs were ex-
pelled, Borba added that others
who wanted to leave were re-
fused .exit_permits. :

Behind the refusal was the aim
to force these Yugoslavs to accept
Rumanian citizenship, the paper
said,

—Reuter.



BRITISH PROTEST |

BERLIN, April 14
Major General Geoffrey Bourne,
British Commandant in Berlin,

protested to-day to the Soviet re-)

presentative of the Control Com-
mission in Berlin against alleged
border raids by East German
police on British sector territory.

—Reuter.

TELL THE ADVOCATE |

THE NEWS
DAY OK NIGHT

DIAL 3113



U.S. MARINES TAKE PRISONERS



PHOTO SHOWS:—The scene as United States Ma‘ines—-continuing their drive on the Central Korean
front—surround a party of Chinese Reds, and add a few more prisoners to their ever growing collection.

Prime Ministei

Yugoslav Communist Party =a
|

The Air Force has lately seen
the Communists developing air
strips and during the week has
reacted with attacks intended to
erater their airfields and restrict
! activity.

Counting their gains and costs
the past weeks, intensified air
activity of the United Nations air-
men to-night claimed destruction
or damage of 28 M.I.G. 15 jets,
more than 600 Communist roaga
vehicles destroyed, and 350 dam-

aged.

They also claim nine loco-

motives destroyed or damaged

134 trucks destroyed and almost
qg|!C0 damaged, 4,000 buildings
qa jatiacked in Communist-held ter-
ritory, 1,000 Communist (roops

killed cr wounded mostly in tne
iine of battle.

Communist jets destroyed o
damaged included 21 hit on Thurs-

day when jets on both sides

joined in the biggest air battles
of the ten months old campaign.

Washington announced after
Thursday’s battles that two Amer-

ican B 19 Superfortresses were |
lost. Four others had been lost!

previously

United Nations planes to-day
continued heavy bombing and
strafing attacks against Com-

munist buildup and rear supplies,

areas.

Two targets were airfields}

about 30 miles south of Pyong-
yang, North Korean capital. Both
were attacked and cleared, it was
said.



—Reuter
Maharajah Deposed
NEW. Ty, April 14.
Jawaharlal

Nehru announced in Parliament
to-day, that the Indian Govern-
ment had deposed the Maharajah
Pratap Singh Gaekwar as ruler of
Baroda,

Nehru said that this action had
been taken against the ruler for
defying the authority of_the Indian
Government organising and fin-
ancing activities to undo the con-
stitution, and supporting reaction-
ary elements.

The 43-year-old Maharajah will
lose not only his title of ruler but
also his £200,000 privy purse.

The deposition order took effect
yesterday. :

The Government has given him
one month in which to appeal to
the Indian President. —Reuter.

SOUTH KOREA WILL
OPPOSE PEACE TALKS | now concentrating their efforts on

‘injuring the country’s economy.
During the past week, guerillas
man of the South Korean Nationait had burnt down railway stations,
Assembly, said here today that the} derailed trains, slashed thousands
{South Korean government would] of rubber trees, burnt buses and
“oppose any peace talks with the ! lorries, eut telephone wires, and
smashed valuable machinery.

PUSAN, April 14.
Tek Sang Ken Sun, Vice Chair-

Communist aggressors.”

He added: “We will welcome

their unconditional surrender, but

we cannot join in a political con-

ference or in talks,”
—Reuter.

10,000,000 MORE MEN

NEW DELHI, April 14

India has 10,000,000 more men
than women, according to figures

taken today,

The total population of the coun-
| try was estimated at 361,820,000,
!an increase of 12.4% in the past
| decade,

This figure includes estimates
, for the Kashmir and Assam triba!

@ @ area.—Reuter,



ARGENTINE GOVERNMENT

ed Up)

As a result of the decision of both legislative cham bers, the
ed by Congress, seized the independent Argentine Newspaper “La Prensa’. This picture was taken
during the ceremony of the taking over of the newspaper in Buenos Aires. Seated is the Public Notary
ALFRED GUIDI and standing left to right:—SEN ATOR CRUZ; two men unidentified; Reprosentative
TOMASSI; SENATOR GIAVARINI chairman of the Committee and representative ROUGGIER,

Sunday Advorat



BARBADOS, $eRIL 15, 1951

a







+ «



a



General Ridgway Is
Fully Alive To New
Responsibilities
TOKYO, April 14
new Supreme
told reporters to-day: “I am fully

alive to the tremendous
sibilities that

Commander,



“With God’s guidance, and with

utmost to discharge my
new responsibilities well’.

The General was
hand grenade—his
was dressed
in a wool khaki .
and battle trousers? ~~

He asked reporters not to ques-
tion him.on his plans for his new

“trade mark”

talking with his staff in Tokyo he
things with you, as I have done

He said “I am still very
a member of this team’,

The General in his first general
order as the Supreme Commander
Legion of Merit to
his Press Relations Officer
farewell Press Conference at the
Eighth Army headquarters to-day

Terrorists Kili 20
SINGAPORE April 14

captured by
and themselves killed 2

a Federal Government spokesman
announced here today.

Bobby Lecke Wins

JOHANNESBURG, April 14.
South African and British Open
Championship beat Norman
the Australian cham-
up and nine to play
match for £1,500 today.

loser’s purse



SEIZES

committee of five pro-Pero









“ILA PRENSA ~









n M.P.s appoint-

—Express.





MacArihur Will Be Given
3 Rousing Farewell

TOKYO, April 14,

AN ANNOUNCEMENT from the headquaiters of the
Supreme Command of the Allied Powers in Japan, to-day
indicated that General Mae Arthur will leave Tokyo next
week amid a farewell pageant unrivalled in the country’s

post-war era.

U.S. Will Not Discuss
Jap Peace Treaty
With Peking

__ LONDON, April 14,
A British Foreign Office spokes-

/man ‘would not comment today on

the announcement. that the United
States did not orice Sibert:
sions with Peking on the Japanese
Peace Treaty.

This announcement amounts to
a rebuttal of the British sugges-
tion contained in the aide memoire
to the United States that Com-
munist China should be included
in the Peace Treaty negotiations

Michael McDermott, a State De-
partment Press Officer, who made
the announcement yesterday wold
reporters that.the United States
recognised the National Govern-
ment of China, and had hot, and
did not, contemplate discussions
with the Peking regime regarding
the Japanese Peace Settlement.

He also indicated that the Unit-
ed States was not likely to act on
the British suggestion that For-
mosa should eventually be handed
over to the Chinese Communist
Government.

It was authoritatively learned
here, that though there were some
differences between the United
States and Britain about their re-
spective attitudes towards the pro-
posed Peace Treaty with Japan,
there was even a greater measure
of common agreement,

Diplomatic observers said that
these differences could not be
called a “split”, adding that
Anglo-American talks in Wash-
ington were going on to find a
solution to the divergent political
view,—Reuter.

U.S. Air Force Make
British Type Plane

WASHINGTON, April 14

The United States airforce has

ceased production of the B 45 jet

bombers, in favour of the British

Canberra, it was officially an-
nounced here to-day.

The Canberra will be built by



the Glenn Martin Company. Martin

himself recently saw the Canberra
demonstrated in Britain, and soon
afterwards asked for a licence to
build.

The British bomber is the first
modern warplane designed by the
English Electric Company.

Its top speed has not been given,
but it is believed to be at least
slightly faster than the 550 m.p.h
done by the B 4& —Renter,

_——

3 NORTH KOREAN

TOWNS TAKEN
TOKYO, April 14.

Two hundred South Korean
marines captured three North
Korean towns in a surprise land-
ing on the west coast 70 miles
south of the Communist capital of
Pyongyang on April 7, according
to a delayed report the naval
“ensor released to-day.

Naval guns covered thé landing.
Marines later linked up with
Seuth Korean guerillas

—Reuter

PETAIN RECOVERING
LA ROCHELLE. April 14

The latest reports from the Ile
D’Yeu, the island of $4-year-old



Philippe Petain. said that he was|by the Italian customs police at

reccvering from congestion of the

lungs and was “as fit as any man!

can bhe'‘after an illness.”
Petain’s chaplain, Father Bailly,
‘old reporters that the ex-Marshal

and Japanese police will line the
wi as the General drives to his

Ny m.to the United St
ae sto driv [rom=hi

residence at the former American
Embassy with his young wife and
their 13-year-old son Arthur at
6 a.m.

crowd of Japanese are expected
to turn out to wateh him go.

off at the airport, by the key mem-
bers of the headquarters staff
Commanders, staff representatives
of major ,Far East commands

Government officials

with Major General Courtney
Whitney, who last Thursday re-
quested his retirement as the Chief
of MacArthur's Government Sec-
tion on the Allied Council for
Japan, so that he might leave with
his Chief.

MacArthur are his military aides:
Colonel C. Huffand, Colonel Bun-
ker, his personal pilot, Aide Lieut.
Col, ‘Anthony Story, and his per-
sonal physician, Col, Charles
Canada,

menting on General MacArthur's
adismissal declared on her arrival
here by air today, “I do not think
a General should make policies.”

had done the only thing that could

yy alt
“There is always in our coun-

———$—————

i

On

}cross into Italy from Tessin in a
car, was wearing about 22 pounds
of gold stitched in numerous small

The headquarters published a
map of the ten-miles route to be

taken to the airport by the Su-
preme Commander, whom the

apanese have considered their

uncrowned ruler sindé the day he
landed five and a half years ago

. British and American troops,

ate aeroplane Bataan which

Despite the early hour, a large

He will be given a formal send-

diplomatic officials, and Japanese

Retirement Asked
The former Supreme Command-
ry and his family will leave Japan

Others leaving with General

Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, com-

She thought President Truman

be done under United States con-

try division of opinion, and Gen-

eral MacArthur has had consid-
erable political following as well
as great admiration generally.”

He would have welcome, with-
out question, from many people,
she added.

Mrs. Roosevelt will be staying

one night in London on her way

to represent her country at a
meeting of the United Nations
Human Rights Commission of
which she is Chairman, in Geneva
—RKeuter

Discussions Held
On Persian Oil

TEHERAN, April 14.
British Ambassador Sir Francis
Shepherd saw the Persian Prime
Minister today, to draw his at-

tention to the “utmost seriousness”

of the situation in the South Per-
sian oil area,

He told him of measures the



British. Government proposed to
take to “insure its rights”,
cording to Persian sources.

The Pershan \ParZiament at a
pecial gession last night, discus-
sed the oilfield riots in which 12
people have died.

Armoured cars broke up fresh
demonstrations yesterday in Aba-
dan, the big refinery town

—Reuter,



Golden Underclothes
GENEVA, Apri! 14
A woman smuggler literally
dressed in gold, has been arrested

the frontier outpost of Casamova
The woman, who was trying to



had said to him vesterday: “IT have| sackets in her underclothes. She

vrepared myself for the great
journey which I am now await
ing.”—Reuter,

was also carrying 600,000 machine

needles,

—Reuter.

























ac-





PRICE SIX CENTS



DIES SUDDENLY

After Planning ‘Rest Cure”

B.G. Protest |

U.K.—Cuban
Sugar Pact

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, April 14.

Members of the Legislature pro-
tested strongly against the Sugar
Pact proposal between the United
Kingdom and Cuba, and have re-
quested the Officer administering
-he Government, Hon, John Gutch,
O.B.E., to transmit their stand to
His Majesty’s Government. Hon.
W. J. Raatgever who moved the
notion, urged that such a Pact
would cause hardships to the
economy and welfare of the col-
ony and demanded that Britain
should not conclude the Pact with-
out prior consultation of the Brit-
ish West Indies Sugar Association
and various West Indies Govern-
ments.

Members referred to the great
contribution British Guiana is
making towards aiding Britain's
recovery and refused to be influ-
enced by the assurance from the
Secretary of State read by the
Acting Colonial Secretary. Hon
D. J. Parkinson that “no agree-
ment with Cuba will be reached
which would prejudice the under-
taking given to Commonwealth
sugar producers last year.”

Reference was also made to dis-
cussions being held between Can-
ada and Cuba on the sugar ques
tion and the view was expressed
that it was q threat to cut the
B.W.1. and British Guiana out of
a large share of the Canadian
sugar market, The effect, members
asserted, would be very grave not
only from sugar exports’ viewpoint,
but also on the whole question of
trade relations with Canada.



Austrian Workers
Promise Support
To Red Strike

VIENNA, April 14.

The Minister for Social Af
fairs,»Karl Maisel, who is also
President of the Metal Workers’
[rade Union, has promised 285
workers of a Russian-controlled
Engineering Works on the. out,
skirts of Vienna, who went on
itrike on Friday, “the sympathy
and suppert of the whole body of
Austrian workers.”

The strike began when the
Socialist President of the Works
Souncil, Leopo'd. Mattzinger, was
ismissed without notice by the
soviet Kommandantura for dis
ributing the Socialist paper
Fres Wort He refused to
accept the dismissal by a Rus-
lan police official, but the order
was repeated by the Russian
feneral director of the firm. As

this is directly in contradiction}

to the Ausirian Law, the Works
Counei) called the strike.”

Soviet authorities then threat
ened that all members of the
Works Council would be tried by
Russian court martial, which
usually nypans secret trial without
a chancé to detend—Reuter,



Peron Accumulates
“Black Marks”

Says Manchester Guardian
MANCHESTER, Eng. April 1
The view that there was m
alternative to General Peron i:
Argentina at present, was toda)
expressed by the Mancheste.
Guardian,

This Liberal paper warned how
ever, that if the Argentine Presi
dent insisted on “suppressing” al
opposition, there soon would b«
an alternative,

“Many, contemplating the sup
pression of La Prensa, will accus¢
Peron of a crime.”

The paper continued editorially

“If he could stop, he might wel
reflect that tomorrow he may have
to accuse himself of a blunder.”

Whatever President Peron’:
“temporary successes,” he was ac
eumulating “black marks.”

“Already at Washington, it ha
been apparent that Argentina foi
the first time since the war was
rather left on one side. And a’
home what has he gained by turn
ims on the screw?” the pape:
asked,

“Opposition thrives on martyr
La Prensa is one already.”

—Reuter



Insulted Gairy?

(From Our Own Correspondent)

The picketing to-day of a St.
Georges’s store which a crowd

dismissal because of the alleged
use of insulting language to
Gairy, did not cceur as expectec
However, it is known that Gair)
himself saw the manager fiuring
the course of the week secking
come form of redress, but the
former said he was wnable &
penalise an @mployee by dis-
missal on complaint for a matter
wholly disconnected with his
business firm as the well éstab
lished remark was not made in
the store





Oniy 1 dey leit to get in
the Advocate Year Book





—













| work




ST, GEORGE'S April 14. ¢

entered last Tuesday, terrifying
a girl clerk and demanding her



QORSSSSSSSSSS

LONDON, April 14.
MRE. ERNEST BEVIN, former British Foreign

Secretary died at his home to-night after a |
heart-attack.

Mr. Bevin resigned as British Foreign Sec-
retary for health reasons on March 9, and was suc-
ceeded by Herbert Morrison.

Mr. Bevin was 70.

Bevin became suddenly ill this afternoon, and members
of his staff hastily summoned his doctor Sir Alexander
McCall. of

Mrs. Bevin who was out during the afternoon was also
summoned by telephone, ‘

He died shortly after-5 p.m, ,Committee of Unemployed in
His death will mean a_ bye] Bristol which is a big port. From
election in the London constituen- | then on, Trade Union activities
cy of East Woolwich, which he took up most of his time.
won for the Labour Party in 1950 At the age of 30, he was the
Goneral Election with a majority Chairman of a branch of the
of 12,370 votes. Dockers’ Union.
Ten years later, the boy who
Though he was thought to have | had had little education except for
made a satisfactory recovery after a few years in the village school
his recent illness, friends noticed was known. throughout Britain as
that Bevin looked pale and hag-|“K.C" (King’s Counsel).
gard as he sat in the Common: This arose from his barrister—
this week, listening to the budget] like handling of the dockers case
speech. in the first public wage arbitra-
Bevin, yesterday, called , | tion award.
Premier Clement Attlee." in the Two years later, by merging
London hospital, where the Pre- | @ny small unions with the
mier is receiving treatment for | 20CKers’ Union, he created the
duodenal ulcer Transport and General Workers’
Sent: eee rang he held, as
yen arg . otarv ars
bedside, Bevin was planning ; arth cieralst Scand

“rest cure” a trip to the Canary When Winstan Churchill form-
Islands off the African coast (¢ad his wartime National Govern-
shortly ment in 1940, he knew that the
eo ee shed man to organise Labour must be

He was considering leaving next | one whom the workers trusted as
one of themselves. And it must
be someane with determination,
organising genius, and no {fear of

They had a chat at Attlee

week, and staying away for si
weeks. The only difficulty was
his doctors said, whether he would
be fit enough to make the journey unpopularity.

Bevin had been in poor health He chose Bevin, appointing him
for a year. Last year he had twe Minister of Labour and National
Operations for haemorrhoid and | Services.
for anal fistula and recently was Twice the Trade Union leader
Stricken with pneumonia, had tried, unsuccessfully, to get

Ernest Bevin, a seat in Parlia-
the bulky slow- ment. Now he
moving Socialist, entered the Com-
who became mons, unopposed,
Britain's Foreign as member for a

Minister at one London district.
of the most cru-

cial periods — in
history began his
career as a farm
boy.






The appoint.
ment was a big
success, Faced
with the task of
unrooting the na-
tiot from its
homes and nor.
mal lives, Beyin
Was able to get

He was born at
Winsford, Somer,
set on March 8,
1881. His farm.
hand father died








ew , 260,000,000 peo-
before ~ he'â„¢"Was ad)
born. His ragther, Ts gut a an

a general handy.
woman and mid-
wife died when
€ was four,

of 460,000,00 into
the National Ser.
vice of some sort
or another.

Then ‘an aunt,
whose husband
was a_vailway-
man took hin in-

He called up
women for the
first time in his-

Mr. ERNEST BEVIN r
to her home.. Whén still w child, he, he devised Hae ora

“= “apprenticed to a farfrier for jsend one hg? valli Me southe
few pence a Week and his keep. ‘registered for military service to
sevin was a restless and work jn the coal mines, He

strongminded boy. At 13 he ran jealously watched er the

away from the farm to seek free- | ovaries sy wi sft re, wi he he b

dom in Bristol, the nearest city | ilised "tH it i be See.
First, he got a job in a restau Car tos nig bat sr Wie houteta

re J paid him a shilling a day pane a get ee et ne
5 meals ae
Then he became a yan drives jactory welfare services develop-
at 10° shillings a week, ~— and ed as never before.

Jaunched into Labour Foreign Secretary
When Britain swept the Labour

Party to power in 1945, Bevin’s

@ On Page 5.

Union



At the age of 20, he was the
secretary to the “right to work"











K. W. V.
SWEET VERMOUTH
DRY VERMOUTH

Both Wines have excellent qualities
as beverages and for use with Gin for
appetisers or Cocktails. They are
made from pure white wines with the
addition of extracts of health-giving

~ KW
WEMMERSHOEK

—A Sweet Table Wine, to be
served slightly chilled—



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can ae CUMMINGS a
ULFIELD with Edmond O'BRIEN and
Elsa LANCHESTER Ella RAINES re



MONDAY & TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.30
Universal Double
“ COBRA’ WOMAN "
AND
“TEMPTATION "

OLYMPIC.

TO-DAY & TOMORROW

ROXY
TO-DAY & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8 15
Republic Smashing Double

George BRENT and
Lynn Bari in —

“KID FROM 4.30 and 8.30
CLEVELAND ” fae rage Smashing
Billy HALOP and .
and Bobby JORDAN in
“SINGING GUNS ” *“HELL’S KITCHEN ”
Starring . en
re “JOHNNY BELINDA”
Vaughn MONROE and Jane WYMAN and
Ella RAINES Lew AYRES




















NOW SHOWING
445 & 8.50 Daily

$e S
‘end introgucing THE 12 GUAMOUROUS CALENDAR GiRtS

Scrwen Play by Mot Peefin * Male by Horoid Arlen + twice By
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Pit 16—House 36—Balcony
Boxes 72

Children Mats only: Pit 12

48

House 16—Balcony 20-—Boxes 72





SPRING
ROUND-UP
DANCE

(WESTERN DRESS)
to be held at the
‘CRANE HOTEL

on.
SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1951
In aid of the St, Winifred’s

Building Fund
Music . . .

supplied by the Police

Band by kind permission

of the Commissioner of

Police.

DANCING 9.00 p.m.
Tickets $1.00 on sale n
Refreshments will be on sale
Support this worthy cause!

POOPOPSSOD

GIRLS’ FRIENDLY
SOCHETY
ANNUAL FETE

Under the Distinguished
Patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Lady
Savage

will be heid at
‘HE HOSTEL, Country Rd.
on SATURDAY, April 28th
from 3.30 to 6.30 p.m.
There will be the follow-
ing Stalls: Flowers and

Household, Books, Cakes and
Ices.
For the Children there
will be Pony Rides and
Lucky Dips.

Michelin, the Police Band
conducted by Capt,
will play.

ADMISSION — 6D.

SSSOSSSOSS SS SS SSS OS OSES SS SS SONOS SOOO OOOO,



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Reservations

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



H , “LLENCY the Gov-
‘ernor and Lady Savage
recompanied by the Governor's

| ADC. Maj. Dennis Vaughan were
| among the three hundred pecple
| who attended the cocktail party
;on board H.M.C.S. Magnificent
last night. Included in the Gov
ernor’s party were his daughter
Pat and Lady Savage's parenig,
Mr. and Mrs. Hopwood.

The party which was given by

the Commanding Officer
Officers of H.M.C.S. M
began at 6.30 pam. and end

| shortly after 8 p.m.
pply Officers’
Conference

ON. LOUIS COOLS-
LARTIGUE, Assistant Ad-
ministrator of St. Lucia ands
member of the St. Lucia Legigja-
ture, is in Barbados for the Supply
Officers talks. Here for about six
days he is staying at the Hastings
Hotel. Coming in by the same
plane yesterday was Mr. E
Gittens-Knight of Grenada. He is

@ guest at the Royal Hotel.

Canada Bound
M's JEANNE WARDEN ex-
pects to fly to Canada this

»



morning by T.C.A. for an in-
definite gtey with relatives at Mr. and Mrs. ERNEST
Niagara Falls, Ontario . . . Miss MAXWELL.

Sh Ince is alSo due to leave
by the same plane. Her
tion is Montreal. . . Mrs. Sophie Quiet Wedding

Kinch, widow of Mr. C. H. K ISS ELAINE GAY, dau
’ . C. A, y ghter
ae ae r by ie M of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin St.
° l,. Gav was married on April
Back Home 12th at 8.30 a.m. to Mr. Ernest

R. and Mrs. Arthur G. Maxwell at St. Leonard’s Church.
Hamilton, Ontario The bride was given away by her
ve ere since March father. Bestman was Mr. Aubrey
14th go-out by T.C.A. this morn- Maxwell, the groom's brother.
ing on their way home ..._ . The honeymoon is being spent
so also do the Albert Le Pages ®t Bathsheba.

of Toronto. By to-morrow they
| Should be back in Toronto where
Mr. Le Page is a Real Estate
Broker ... . Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Garland’s second visit to | the further agricultural de-
| Barbados ends to-day . are velopment of St. Lucia is Prof.
| among the passengers’ en route to C. G. Beasley, Economic Adviser
| Canada by T.C.A. Mr. Garland to C.D. and W. who was in St.
|is President of Red Line Ltd., in Lucia for one week. Accompany-
| Ottawa. They had been here since ing him back was Mr. Raymond
| February 3rd. Roe of Hastings House.

‘Agriculture Discussions

ACK from discussions about



nes
|
|
|

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aF §6Consultation and Advice Included
APPOINTMENTS AS FROM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH

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BROAD STREET or ALPHA PHARMACY (HASTINGS)



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‘fa

Married Yesterday

ISS GLORIA ALLEYNE,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
St. C. Alleyne of “Lynwood”

Hastings, was married yesterday
afterndon at 5 o'elock at St
Matthias Church to Mr. Eustace
Taitt, Assistant Master of Com-
bermere School and son of Mrs.
R. Taitt of Bank Hall St. Michael.

The ceremony which was fuily
choral was performed by Rev.
Griffiths.

The bride wore a dress of
anglaise with a close fitting
bodice. Cut on Princess lines, it
had a gentle fiaring collar with
loops and peal buttons. The skirt
opened revealing a graceful panel
of nylon tulle. Her headdress was
of blue forget-me-nots which
held in place a full length nylon
illusion veil. Her bouquet was of
blue forget-me-nots and Queen
Anne’s lace.

Matron of Honour was Mrs.
E. T. Smith sister of the bride
who wore a full skirted off-the-
shoulder gown made of white
anglaise. She carried a bouquet
of red roses and wore a _ broad
white crinoline hat.

Bestman was Mr. _ Stanley
Mayers and the ushers were Mr.
Fred Phillips and Mr. “Freddie”
Smith. ;

After the ceremony a reception
was held at “Lynwood” Hastings.

Flying Visit

ENEE SERRAO, former
B.W.L.A. pilot flew over from
Trinidad yesterday with two
friends in one of the Trinidad
Light Aeroplane Club’s Austers.
They expect to return to-day

after lunch. ,

Annual Leave

RS. RUBY JOHNSON was.

at Seawell yesterday to meet
her daughter Ingrid who flew up
from Trinidad to spend a short
holiday. Accompanying Ingrid
was Miss Arlene Gregorio of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co., in
Port-of-Spain, Here for her an-
nual holiday, Arlene is staying at
Acera Guest House,



SEE that there are to be
octopuses in the Dome of Dis-
covery, They will demonstrate
experiments carried out on “the
Most brainy of the lower animals”
Nothing is more amusing than
to see an octopus playing the
bagpipes. It often seems that the
bagpipes are playing the octopus.
And the kind of music which
comes from that inextricable
jumble of tentacles, chanters,
drones and bags is such that
nobody really cares which is
playing what.
Mr. Gooseboote’s Speech
HE court was crowded when
Mr. Honeyweather Goose-
boote opened the case for the
prosecution, In a masterly pas-
sage he said: “ . . We have
only to ask ourselves what would
happen if everybody painted ships
cn their dog-kennels, to be pain-

CROSSWORD a

4









ape Across
arkte attached to th to-c!
4 Oo ree ant le rue ste
- Not laughs that «
: is ivi? to) re provided, o:
ccommodation age ard,
12, Boiled potatoes have ite aye |
4g. enone. (5)
+ Must be read to be answered.
15. A broken last. (4) are
16. This anima: sounds warmer. (5)
19 There ts 1ittee doubt that part of
< ne woy tL may travel by this. (4)
21. { is Seuncl to cotton on. — ¢
\22 Ode to a D.P could be,
Ine: Cutie cr 18 Down. (3)
2% rurther. (4)
9S. Economical finding the rivet tn
the pond. (9)
Down
lL. Dcbased styie of arehitecture.
2. Puty ends a vain ‘upset. 5 We
3 SoUNd Of 2 SpIIT in tme elif. (6)
4. P'nce of refresnment, (6) |
5 Brigane ot sorts. (6)
€. Therent you see the play. (7) |
7, Many 4 schoolboy nas had this |
a parte, 18) |
4 iubes greetin;
tM. Ova. ne ce |
17 Sust A salty trickle. (4)
18 Parent ot 24 Across. (3)
20 ‘teburn of the tide. (4)
21 Found in the trapper’s outfit. (3)
" Aged (3) |
|

n of vesterday’s puzzte,—, 3
vised 10, Meats TL NA ne.
Jo Saott: 15. Reader: 28.
19. Mule BO Tits 22, Blevele:
a Cin 12 ,





‘ - Dow
> Udmote a

}
n POSS’ |
Attorneys: 5,

‘ Skn 6. BR. 8, Ty;
“ities” 27 Orver; QL, |

No neh
4 Lesson 14

w Shirtings

M@ wuite & COLOURS

-
a $128






——







& DIAL 4606

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

TL AE eR vr
Carb Calling

a

Mr.

HAROLD BISHOP.

Specia! Representative
R. HAROLD BISHOP, Gulf
Oil’s Special Representative,
flew to Venezuela yesterday for
oil talks. He expects to be back
in Barbados early this week.

St. Lucia Visit

i R. and Mrs. Donald Barnes

have gone to St. Lucia for
about four days. The same plane
which took them to St. Lucia
yesterday brought Mr. Richard
Dixon, representative of Rabone
Peterson. Richard is stationed in
Jamaica,



\\ AY eee
fully conscious of the

sibility of the accused. The fact
that the ship was painted in blue,

irrespon-

a colour odious to any town
council worthy of the name,
proves the complete contempt gor

civic consciousness manifested by .

this sailor, Benjamin Bottle. Yet
millions might have been going
carelessly about their business
to-day, ignorant of this loathsome
deed, had it not been for tha
exemplary and selfless conduct of
Mrs. Hound, the winner of tho
£5 prize for civic-mindedness._ I
shall endeavour to show that the
cynical indifference of the accused
to these principles which form
the very basis of the social con-
tract, and without which civilised
life would be a mockery, is the
hall-mark of a mind steeped in
degradation so enormous that the
imagination boggles, Not thus do

the true heirs of Trafalgar
besmirch their declining years. . .”
Interlude

Speaking on the Defence of the
Vest, hr said that we could put our
shirts « . Rearmament as a certain
winne

—(Report of speech.)

“WL * it would be much easier,”

e.mments a leader writer in

the Clothiers’ Gazette and Argus,

“to defend our vests if we kept

our shirts on. Whoever tries to

get at the vest must then first
tear off the shirt.”

Prodnose: I suspect a misprint

| for “West.”

Myself : But only a Scandinavi-
an would pronounce “vest” as
“west.”



Junior Short Story



HVS the World’s



Short Visit

ERE for about three days is
Mr. Leslie Outram, Supt..
of Police in Trinidad. He came
up yesterday by B.W.I.A.....
Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Mullen
who came in by the same plane
are from Jerome, Arizona, where
Mr. Mullen is an engineer. They
are staying at the Colony Club,
St. James....Mr. and Mrs. Har-
old E. Williams and Mr. Rubens
Milian from radio centre, Havana,
Cuba, were among the passengers
on B.W.1.A,’s flight from Trini-
dad. They are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

From World's Y.W.C.A.

ISS ELEANOR FRENCH of
Y.W.C.A. in
“Geneva touched down at Seawell
yesterday on a five-day visit to
the Y.W.C.A. branch in Barba-

dos. Leaving Geneva February
2ist, she has visited England.
U.S., Canada, British Guiana,

Surinam, Trinidad, Grenada and
finally Barbados,

Miss French has been with the
World’s Y.W.C.A. for three
years. Before that time she work-
ed with the Y.W.C.A. in the US.
Her home is in New York.

Seawell Shorts

.K. TRADE Commissioner in

the W.I., Aubrey Starck, is at
present in Barbados on a week’s
visit staying at the Windsor Hotel
sis . Vita Brown is also
here to spend a short holiday with
her mother . and Wennel
Best who is a school teacher in
South Trinidad is up on a short
vacation. . Molly O'Donnell,
former B.W.1I.A. hostess plans to
spend her two weeks holiday at
Maple Manor.

Incidental Intelligence

NEIGHBOUR of mine has an

original cure for wander-
lust he wants to hold in check.
He subscribes to the local paper
in the locality he is dreaming
about. “After reading it every
day for a month, I’m cured,” he
says. “Things are usually worse
there than here.”"—A. C. Peters,
New York.



By Beachcomber

Prodnose : What's that got to do
with it?
Myself: Absolutely nothing, I
am happy and proud to say.
It’s only a Human Being
N American woman has
created a record by sitting
on a flag-pole for 152 days, If an
English cat tried any of those
tricks the firmen of 24 counties
would have it down in no time.
Or This
S I browsed in a field of print,
my eye was caught by this
succulent morsel ;: “Offerings for a
Surbiton church are collected in
drain-pipes.”” I suppose that is
what is called “bringing religion
fnto line with modern life,” or
perhaps “bringing drain-pipes into
line with modern religion.”
Strange Behaviour
of Poet
ISS CLOACA MacSIMMER,
the novelist, was at Northolt
yesterday to meet Runamok, the
Eskimo poet. Runamook brushed
her aside, dropped the copy of
“Werewolf of the Moon’ which she
gave him (a free eopy from
Grumble and Fugge, Ltd), and
ran off into the canteen with air-
hostessette Muriel Brass, Hot-
Blooded Eskimo Ducks Out. Not
Frozen By The Book Society.
Poet's Whirlwind Romance. Re-
ceptionette Muriel On Thin Ice.
Brush-Off For Glamour Novelist.
Later, while Lady Cabstanleigh
was making inquiries at the air-
port, Runamok and Miss Brass
got into her car and told the
chauffeur to drive round a bit.

Competition



a (Cotton Prints 36° __.... 90¢
a

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for
its Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be published
every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The stories
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 300
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co, Ltd., City not later than Wednesdav every week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

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SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

(iardening Hints For Amateurs

The Garden In April

Geranium Time. The Grafted rule the fruit is easily picked
Mango Tree without any ladder climbing. Tht
Geraniums,—in flower :
are not as commonly seen in our 22¥, Position, and will stand up to 2"¢ we have shown in one of the
gardens as many of the other {Fly dry conditions, but it will earlier notes how desirous it is at
perennials, Yet they are very aturally do better if it is not too this juncture to include, wherever
lovely, are easily grown, and do Wind-blown, possible, a _ pleasurable and
excellently in garden. beds, large . During the months of May to healthy activity such as garden-
pots, tubs, window boxes, or even JÂ¥ly the mango tree puts.out fresh ing to aid the family budget. The



FARM AND
GARDEN

By AGRICOLA

FOOD PRODUCTION I.
We continue to stress the need



now— Mango tree will grow in almost {OT more self-help in the home

in a_ Rock-garden. When once Young leaves of a lovely deep fact of creating or producing
established they give little COppery our which gradually something — however simple it
trouble. They can be grown turn to m, and as the tree is may be—tills one, young or old,

from seed planted in November CVergreen it. always keeps
or from cutting. The time to #@ttractive appearance.

take cuttings is from August. to ( ’
October for by then, and during Auéust, and in the opinion of most
the rains, the plants stop flower. People the Julie mango ranks as
ing as they do not like the rain, one of the most delicious fruits,

taking a cutting, get a vivalling even the Peach. ;

sturdy bit from a well grown Mangoes are slow-growing
plant, and after having taken off “Tees, but a grafted or budded
all the leaves stick it in a box to tree will bear fruit wen only
Match. By December to January one to two years old,

the cutting will be ready “ Fruit trees planted during the

faction—just try it and see how

ment in eating one’s own healtn—

its with a sense of pride and satis—

The fruit ripens from May to enthusiastic you can become! And,
if the article be garden produce,
there is the added fun and enjoy-

giving vegetables with a possible
surplus to bring in some spare
cash to obtain that long wanted
extra that it hardly seemed fair
to take from the family budget

Lan +0. be llowanee. There ‘
planted out in its pibaanesbee next few months will start at a nea is ee ian ant ie
rr eet acs ge as they will have tickets and numerous other items
Position the long months of the rainy S .

Choose a position of semi-shade nad So Feap: them just
for your Geraniums, or a_ place be pai right stage,
where they are in| shade for a 5° Plan your fruit trees. and
part of the day. Geraniums like ORDER YOUR. JULIE MANGO
the morning sun, so an Easterly NOW.
position for them is preferable, .. Have you any Gardening ques-
Give the plants a good rich bed, tions you would like answered or
and light, but regular watering. ®@ y garden information that would
Geraniums flower from Fébru. b© of interest to other Gardeners
ary to May and _ established t© pass on?
plants will last undisturbed for Have you a surplus of seeds or
several years if they are cut back ae you would like to ex-
from time to time. Thi ing change:
back should be done. atten ine “Write to ‘GARDENING’
flowering pericd, and during the C/o The ‘ADVOCATE’
rainy weather. Cut back all the and watch this Column for a reply.
old woody looking branches, and Mrs. E. Scott writes:—
by November on the plants will I have collected all the clip-
have brave new shoots ready to pings on “Gardening Hints for
or aes Do not let rt Amateurs” from the Advocate
new S flower too young, but every nday. I wonder if you <. a
pick off the buds until the plant ,, ze a 1 to my re at Wine: alter: Se ae bus, if seems
; would give heed to my req certain, that there will be few
hgh, Serres, SNe. ROWE. jg 2nd I am sure the request of many faitures if the material we select
The commonest Geranium is others and that is to have these jrq Send ‘oitewhen, tie tke
ke) woe we aot ae a 9 ame hints in a more permanent. form— Comes—is conditioned in the
Se iiae : Fm deuaite Canlae that is, in the form of a book. manner indicated above. All aids
ties grow just as easily as the | have got a surplus of Morning to this end, home and secondary
Glory seeds, Queen Ann’s Lace ingustries included, must be

single, and are much _ more igold 1
rar to stick to 224 a ‘surplus of Marigold pressed energetically and reso-
decorative, it is best to stick to T've also got a surplus: hire

he double Geraniums. seedlings. ; 4 J
' “The Grafted Mango Tree °f seeds of a kind of Lily ats In last Sunday’s note we quoted
The grafted Mango tree is one of bears a delicate yellow. flower. I expert opinion on the state of the
the small to medium sized fruit @® not know the name of ae world’s population in respect to
trees that are well suited to be Plant and no one has been able food and we must keep this gen-
grown in a garden. Of all the to help me identify it. eral picture before us even in this
varieties, and there are several, For all these, in exchange, I small island where already much
the ‘JULIE’ is generally accepted would like a few bulbs of the has been dofie to encourage food
as the best. Eucharist Lily, some bulbs oY growing; but, if the ideas ventil-
A Julie mango tree grows into plants of what is commonly known ated above are to develop into
a neat rounded shape, seldom as the Easter Lily and some yealities, there is much more
growing very tall so that as a gerberas. needed, notably in the villages
and suburban areas, to bring
health-giving food within the
reach of all, especially those in
the lower ineome, groups. Nutri-
tious, green vegetables are a
luxury, except to those in the
with salt and soda and nuts. highest brackets and the position
Bake one hour in moderately slow is aggravated by the absence of

folk—boys and girls particulariy
—to enjoy life. It is a fine and
encouraging sight. in the rural
town in Canada where boys and
girls join their parents in the
Saturday markets, assisting in
making sales of the produce they
themselves have grown. We want
that spirit here right now on our
farms and in the villages so that,
however dark and difficult the
future, there is no need for des-
pair if the dominant keynote ot
young life is self-help, reflecting
a confidence in the ability to make
good wherever the tide of fortune
may flow. Barbados is over-
crowded and emigration schemes
are afoot. We cannot afford to be





Cookery Corner

nothing
cakes

There is
home-made

nice as
bread.

so
and

Feather Rolls are very light and oven, Crush your bananas with essential marketing facilities in
delicate, but do not *have the fine- ‘a silver fork. ; Bridgetown. A few deterrents are
grained texture of well-kneaded And now for delicious small here put forward as affecting gar-
rolls, They are extremely simple cakes. dening expansion in the villages
to make. and these are, admittedly, not
FEATHER ROLLS BABA AU RHUM easy to remedy immediately: (1)
2 cups scalded milk 1% cups flour lack of even the simplest forms of
4% cup butter 1 yeast cake dissolved in fencing to keep out roaming
V4 cup sugar 2 cup lukewarm water animals and of suitable centres for
Salt 2/3 cup butter the impounding of strays; (2) in-

1 yeast cake 4 eg

adequate water supply; (3). ab-
sence of a real community spirit
and leadership looking towards
as much self-help as possible in
the solution of joint problems;
(4) no credit facilities for com-
: munity wells and other needs as
faserdineabas. sce they present themselves; (5)
in remaining eggs, one Shortage of land in some cases,
at a time, then beat but this can often be made up by
until mixture is per- the use of boxes and similar con-
fectly smooth. Let it tainers; some really good vege-
rise until sponge tables can be grown in boxes,
doubles its bulk, com- Many farmers with small capital
bine mixture, beat have been able to obtain financial
theroughly and half fill individual help with mills and over-head
tins. Let rise. Bake in moderate jrrigation works and this is a most
oven. 2 praiseworthy development;
Cook ‘2 cup sugar with 1 cup whether it can be extended to
water for 5 minutes and add %4 village groups of smaller interests
cup of rum, Dip Baba Cakes in appears worthy of study. Mean-
sauce Be pour remaining sauce time, we must seek out every
SFONAG:: HGH available patch which is not bene-
ficially oceupied and set it to

work, Theré are some eyesores
not far from Bridgetown which
would present a different appear-
ance in gardens.

\% cup sugar

Salt.

Add half cup flour
to yeast; cover and let
it rise. Mix remain-
ing flour with butter,

2 eggs well beaten

3 to 4 cups flour

Add _ butter, sugar,
and salt to milk, When
lukewarm, add yeast
cake and when dis-
solved, egg and enough
flour to make dough a
little stiffer than cake
dough. Beat thor-
oughly. Cover, let rise
until light. Fill buttered
muffin pans full. Let
rise until pans are full.
(about one hour).

Bake ten minutes in hot oven.
This will make 24 to 30 rolls.

BANANA BREAD
3 ripe bananas
%4 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soda
% cup nuts chopped.
Crush _ bananas. Add



eggs,

beaten light, sugar, sifted flour



Te wale: pnt loacllbe

PUND'S

POND’S COLD CREAM to cleanse and soften
your skin.

POND’S VANISHING CREAM

to protect your skin by day and to hold your
powder matt.

otter these Beauty troducts

POND’S FACE POWDER: clinging,

perfumed, sceintifically blended, for
a glamorously matt complexion,



POND’S LIPSTICK $ smoocths

so easily onto your lips; the
rich vibrant colour stays on
and on and on.

Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely society women every-
where. Simple and inexpensive, they ar all you need to keep you looking

flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best at all times. You will find them
at all the best beauty counters.

|
|

not excluding thrift bank con-
tributions, which all help rural



SUNDAY

A Salt

which





gives flavour
to Britain |

LET'S have a pinch of old
salt with our Festival of Britain
to-day, You can’t imagine this
island home of ours without its
flavouring of old salts, can you?

They’re like seagulls, lobster
pots, and rusty old anchors—an
essential part of the British sea-
side scene.

The British old salt or shell-

back (Salantiquus Britannicus)
is easily recognised by his
plumage, He wears a peaked

cap, sea-boots, and a blue jerséy
with the name of the ship on
the chest.

His usual resting place is
against a bollard or in the shelter
of an upturned boat, and his cry
sounds something like “Shiver:
me timbers! Avast there!”

On fine summer days the old
salts can be heard calling, “Any
more for the Skylark?” and in
the evenings they roost in rows
on the benches at the local, where
holiday-makers ply them with
drink and encourage them to tell
the most improbable tales of ship-
wrecks and storms at sea,

Many old salts have a
curious habit of chewing
tobacco instead of smok-
ing it; they are said to be
exceptionally fond of par-
rots, and on winter nights
they can be found in
front of the fire putting
full-rigged ships into bot-
tles.

i,

A type that now seems
to be nearly extinct has
only one leg, the other
having been taken off by ©
a shark in the Timor Sea.

er

Naturally, such picturesque in-
habitants haven’t been overlooked
by our writers and artists. Ss

Coleridge and Rolsert Louis
Stevenson immortalised them, aud
in 1870, when Sir John Millais
painted a picture of an Elizabeth-
an old salt talking to a couple of
boys on the beach, he caused
such a sensation at the Royal
Academy that they had to put uy
a barrier to prevent the master-
piece being mauled by the en-
tranced British public.

Millais called it “The Boyhood
of Raleigh,’ and cartoonists have
been copying it (with apologies)

ever since,
Bliss

Personally, I have my own fay-
ourite old salt, to whom I will
now introduce you. His name is
Cyrus Stanistreet, or Old Stany
and though he is 68 he still goes
to. sea, because that’s the only
way he can get any peace from
his grandchildren,

When he’s ashore, as he is at
the moment, he lives in a Liver-
pool council house with five of his
14 grandchildren. They are all
boys and:all under ten and, as his
idea of bliss is sitting in a corner
quietly putting boats into bottles
the children drive him nearly
mad,

Old Stan has all the tattoo
marks of the genuine shellback—
bunches of flowers, Union Jacks,







ADVOCATE

BERNARD

WICKSTEED'S
PRIVATE
FESTIVAL
Ss taking readers on a tour
of the things which will

not be officially on show
in 1951, No, 4 in the series.

and women. with fiowing blue
hair. The five rows of ribbons on
his reefer jacket tell the story of
seafaring Britain over the last 50
years,

There's the plain white ribbon |
of the Polar Medal that he was |
given in 1903, when he went to
the rescue of Scott in the old!
Terra Nova and if they ever give |
a medal for the Korean War, Stan
may get that, too, for it was in a
troopship going to Pusan that 1
firstyran across him last year.

Model Ships

He was in charge of deck stores,
and had a little cubby-hole up in
the bows, where he lived and
worked ard dreamed, Part of the
day was spent issuing tackle to
the deck-hands and the rest” in
making and bottling his model
ships.

To reach his hide-out you had
to climb through trap-doors, down
iron steps and pass a notice say- |
ing: “Keep Out”. There you found
him, shaping booms out of match-

|

|

|



fll

sce — ee ewe ee ee





















j





sticks and wearing a pair

of spectacles that he
bought for sixpence 20
years ago.

Behind those spectacles
are the twinkling eyes of
humorist, When someone
asked if. he-ever built his
ships by climbing into the
bottle himself the remark
gave him an idea on
which -he went to work
all the way to China and
back |

First he rigged up the
. inside of the bottle as a
miniature carpenter’s shop, with
tiny tools and shavings on the |
floor. Then he carved a model of
himself ‘sitting. at the beach in his
sixpenny specs, building a boat
in a bottle, |

It’s a joke that will go on giving |
pleasure to people long after Star |

atte



has signed up to sail the seas of |
another world with his son, who |
was lost in the Rawalpindi.

Royal Visit

I offered to buy it from him at
any price he cared to name, but
he turned me down and, by doing

so, put me into distinguished
company, because he once said
the same thing to the King of
England.

The King and he met in the
Empress of Australia, going to
Cahada in 1939. First, Old Stan
went to the King’s cabin apd
showed him some of his models.

Then the King paid a return
visit and went to the cubby-hole
down the iron steps ¢ 3 past the
notice saying: “Keep On *

A model f the ~ >tty Sar« took
the King’s ey and he asked if
it was for saic. am sorry it is
not,” said Stan. aen he added:
“But if I should cnange my mind,
Your Majesty, you shall have first
refusal,”

Gentlemen! Charge your glass-
es! The toast is “The Old Salts
cf Old England.” —L.E-S:





%. [had >
! on test "ar
quden heretic
Ue Sim cet ead

|
|

PP SPOSSOS SODIOES PSDP S PSPSPS GDI S SG GIGS

LOC PLELLEV ELSES OCDE EEE LES SLA SPEDE SSECCSESESESS ESS SCOSPIOS,

(MACLEANS PEROXI

PAGE THREE









oe

cy >
{

>

"! must confers, i've
NEVER seen anything like <

N\A
EHOLD (LEANSER

GLUMICECSL

Keep YOUR home hygienically clean
with this S-M-O-O-T-H no-waste paste
cleanser, You'll find CHEMICO so efficient,
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Distributers

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ing “4 More's Pitle |]

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Dr.







A
TRUSTED REMEDY
FOR OVER
50 YEARS

BEWARE oF worms!
Be

sure vour family is protected with

Comstock's Worm Pellota. Made by the

makers of Dr, Morse's Lndian Root
AW -44

1 teeanncaacamasacttiiaetentinnns

ei ok



STOP
HOURS

COUNTING
ALL MGHT

BE SURE OF

ALL-OVER yelâ„¢"
grin



*
Rw with the faithful

use of DREAM —The Soar

















- of the Beautiful.

Play safe be prepared
. for your romantic mofhent
oe Get a tow cakes of DREAM
TOILET SOAP use uw

thfully in your ba

and: at the Wi:

for a oft-smoo
radiant with natura!
loveliriags :
DREAM is available at toilet goods




GIVES PAIN

ITS KNOCK.
OUT BLOW

On Sale at ove.

Knight's Drug Stores

counters throughout the island.










\ eo

1D) TOOTH PASTE





keeps TASTE Walls
and healthy

DE

aay.

For white teeth, use the PEROXI

tooth paste—use Macleais every



- “A pane. UT FA Cs HU ASE RR cy OL
alien EA taeee scare
Cree

QODOOOOP OOP PR SPOS OSCS

MODERN

OPPOSES

POP EBE LEE PPPOE LE PPP PLEA AO

RESS SHOPPE=Broad st.
5

oy SAILE

THURSDAY = FRIDAY «- SATURDAY
MONDAY = TUESDAY

ITEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED
FOR QUICK CLEARANCE

You are definitely effecting large savings by attending this CLEARANCE
SALE. Here are some of the many reductions.

TENNIS DRESSES. SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS

A fine assortment in sizes and colours, Most of these items were regularly q rH]
sold up to $8.50 Sale Price ib, pate

645% oo%eS

POMPE.

>

-









ALL

LADIES’ BETTER DRESSES oe S$ ] ? 0
Regular Sizes and Modern Shades
Also a variety in Ladies Ankle Socks
2 of these fine Towels with a Glass Tumbler
To-day’s Value 65c. per towel, Special Sale Price. All 3 in a pkg. for
LADIES’ PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK

Bea ] yi l iH

LADIES’ SKIRTS AND BLOUSES

Jersey material Blouses, Printed Cotton Skirts Specially reduced for a q fh
this Sale Only ee ay
IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS

Many Styles and Colours, All sizes. Reduced from $24 to
yf 00
Sale Price 2 prs. lor .
Lace trimmed Panties in tea rose, cream also black, Small, Medium, Large.
For ladies and children in white and many other useful colours. el il {

—SOCCOSOSSSOS FOSGOP POOP OP SSESES

SOO CE PSOE OOS COO OS

LADIES’ ART SILK STOCKINGS
LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS
$y uo
Regular priced $1.92 Sale Price
Styles, Many regular prices were up to $4.80 To Clear Maa

MEN’S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS

Men’s Polo Shirts in White only with Zip fasteners. Shirts that were a
regular $2.40. Reduced for this Sale ces e

54° WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL

That will make Skirts or Coats for travelling and can make many other Wo
useful things. Reduced from $6.00 to Per yd. snpeaae 3 “7

% LADIES’ COATS, WOOLLEN PULLOVERS, CARDIGANS

: Reduced to } Price %
$ CORSETS, CORSELETTES, TURBANS, INFANT CHRISTENING x
$ DRESSES to } Price 8
% 3
: THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE
Seasesce LLLP PBPRABLLLELLPLPLEPLLLLLLL LLDPE ANS CPN



PAGE FOUR





What:do:you know

SUNDAY

|WORRELL WAS QUOTED

‘IN AUSTRALIAN POUNDS
1951 Football Season Opened Yesterday
By 0. S. COPPIN y

Indies Cricket Board of Control] for approximately
£1,400 as was claimed by Jack Fingleton, Daily
vL Dispatch Australian correspondent and former Ats-
tralian Test piayer.

The solution to the problem is that Jack Fingleton, for reasons
| knowa to himself has quoted Worrell’s request in- Australian pounds,

The story now is that West Indies all rounders Everton Weekes
and Clyde Walcott have signed for £975 (English pounds) while Wor-
rell has asked for the same £1,075 that he received for the English

tour. EM ware



..

£100 LESS

ADVOCATE



. new-comers,

Carlton Defeats
Notre Dame 3—1
AT FOOTBALL

CARLTON scored a 3—1 vic-
tory over Notre Dame, new-
comers to first division football a=
the 1951 season got underway at
Kensington yesterday afternoon

within 15 minutes of play, while
Carlton who lined up with two
Herbert Bright an

here recently, equalized shortly
afterwards and at the interval the
score was 1+-l,

For Carlton, Clairmonte, McLeod
and Reynold Hutchinson each sent
in a goal while Freddie Daniel
netted for Notre Dame.

A slight breeze was blowing



M. Linton Victor
Ludorum Of
Notre Dame Sports

M. Linton running in the
Senior Division was the Cham-
pion Athlete in the Notre Dame
Sports metiikg wich was held

Garvey who had a better
than he at the starting line.
In the 220 yards he came in

jump

a late start im the 440 yards
Linton tried to make a bid tor
first place but his efforts only got
him a third place.

This meeting was the first one
that the Notre Dame Sports Club
has staged and it is initiated
mainly to arouse the interest of

Garner of Highways and Trans-

SUNDAY, APRIL 15,

THE OFF SEASON

Too Many Horses—Peculiar
Classification—Racing In Jamaica
EY BOOKIE

LTHOUGH ihe Union Park meeting finished
up on April 7th and there will be a Creoiq

1951



‘ rims é vell as the
at Bay Land, Beckles Road yes- meeting at arima next month, as we
: The attendance was small and terday. He carried off the 100 usual b.G. May fixture, there is no doubt that
f sources informe t vas a tame > aris dash ae’ ht le breasting is is e off season of racing in e ua
f UTHARITATIVE f d “whe tiie we game was'a tame one. yards dash in fine style breasting this is the off f the South
2. week that Frank Worrell did ask the West “Notre Dame drew first blood the tape scme yards before J. Caribbean, Some years ago wnen there was

no racing in B.G. and no Creole May meeting
it was definitely the only time that the horses
out here had any sort of enforced rest period



!

pot " Englishman and Wilfred McLeod « to H. Robinson who had : re the Trinidad June meeting opened, and
5 y om esas this oe — ee s igs? _ wie re - member of the Gren- ee iephine in the better part for quite a number who were overworked it was a welcome break.
West Ind 1050 tour t England. © got for the ada football team which toured of the race. After getting off to Nowadays it is only those who-are in the imported classes who

generally get the break and €ven they face the possibility of being
sent to B.G.

T this time of the year it was.alsu customary for racing journalists

to take a rest. Actually this 1s still possible for those in Barbados
because there is little of interest either in B.G. or at the Creole May
meeting. But it seems that readers like to be bored and so today I
must findysomething to fill this column. At one time I did stop for a
few Sundays only to find, to my amazement, that there were some

ri : across the field when Referee the youths around the Bay Land ardent fans who went so far as to phone me to find out if my column

HE West Indies Cricket Board £. Control have asked_ the profes- Neville Medford whistled the and _ Brittons Hill area iN had been suppressed. One chap, when I informed him that this was

5 read ook wa ny oe for drag nog # to om a players into action, Notre Dame athletics. ‘ ee i simply said “O.K.” and rang off, leaving me in considerable

about ENO a Auctraiian rie Passat sechaat pele Bi pl Penetish ioe who defended the goal from the _ After the — sports - K. doubt as to whether he only wanted to know so that he could stop







OOD 9SES







DO YOU KNOW the ENO

DO YOU KNOW
that ENO has a

Eno’s ‘Fruit Salt’

The words “ Eno" and “ Fruit Salt” are registered wate marhey

aie

POLES PPE PEEL LC CLELEL OES,

was thirty-three matches.

Roy Marshall, and there is no secret now that he is in the team,
as well as Weekes and Walcott, hus accepted a little less since he has
not been considered from the level of Weekes, Walcott, Worrell and
Ramadhin.

Worrell’s conditions have been communicated to the Australian
Cricket Board of Control, who consider that he should nct be paid
more than the top professionals and further state that if he canfiot
come to an agreement with the Board, that they will accept a team
without Worrell as representative.

| In the first place I must repeat that I see no reason why the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control should have treated with the pro-
| fessionals individually, nor why they should quibble over the expen.
| diture of an extra £100 when they are quite prepared to squander

it over paying the expenses of the President going to witness an Inter-

Busde +«
In any case, people like Jack Fingleton and the other sensation-
alists can do neither cricket nor journalism any good by writing what
must be regarded as half truths. ;
If an Australian pound is 16/— in English money then why not
| convert £1,400 to English pounds, if the article must appear in an
English paper.

| SENSATIONALISTS



“t

As far as Ramadhin is concerned, he, I understand has asked
for “as much as the others’. This is vague and has also to be irowed





northern end were first on the
offensive and their outside left
Freddie Daniel tried. a good one
which struck the upright and went
out of play.

Carlton then made one or two
sood attempts to score but the
Notre Dame defence would not
be overcome.

Well Placed Shot

Notre Dame soon afterwards
opened their account‘when Fred-
die Daniel on the left wing beat
King with a well placed shot.

Carlton now fought for the
eaualizer and almost found them-

their opponents’
area and were given a penalty as
the result of foul play by one of
the Carlton defence. Skipper
Daniel took the shot and sent it
straight to goalkeeper King, who
had no difficulty in saving.

Notre Dame’s goal had a nar-
row shave when Carlton launched
an attack and Freddie Hutchinson
sent across a good effort from the

port presented the | prizes to
the boys. Before doing so he
remarked upon the keenness that
Wag shown by the boys and girls
in the races,

The events were as follows ‘—
100 yds.—(Boys 12—14)
ist A. Simmons; 2nd C. Sobers; 3rd N.
Fields

Ist H.
Husbands
. 100 Yds.—(Seniors 16 & Over)

lst M. Linton; 2nd J, Garvey; 3rd S.
Clarke.

80 Yds.—(Girls 12—14 years)

lst M. Waithe; 2nd J, Osbourne; 3rd G.
Belgrave.

100 ¥Yds.—(Boys 14—16)

Bynoe; 2nd G. Sobers; 3rd D.

lst E. Nightingale and M. Collins; 3rd
I, Bynoe
Sack Race
Ist D. Mapp; 2nd R. Maynard,
880 Yds.—(Open)
Ist S. Clarke; 2nd T. Dottin;
Jordan.

3rd R.



Readwin Keeps
Tennis Crown



or start buyirig the Sunday Advocate again.
please everybody,
] OOKING around therefore for something to write about I find
4 lots of little things and perhaps it would not be a bad idea to
mention them as they run around the brain, First there is this rumour
that we may have 93 horses entered for our next August meeting.
Furthermore that we shall have to stage\a four day meeting to
accommodate them,

Now let us be reasonable. The highest. we have had was 63 and
this was only last month, It is quite true that there are 24 two-year-
olds to be added. But it is most unlikely that all of them will start
while some older horses who have been mainstays for some years
now have lately retired. I cannot therefore see where we are going
to raise this extra thirty from. I have counted 84 on the present
classification list, and, as everybody knows, it is extremely unlikely
that all eligible starters ever enter for one meeting.

But then one cannot

. : - 220 Yds.—(Boys 12—14 years) Nevertheless, I will agree that we might expect 75 to take entry.
wratislasstveaction =| ner equally nonsensical excuse," "OOTaFumm £0" GOING Or some Erk Seale Hot pom. bciybhe aot S Wile: ort cat caus Ht seems yet anather opportune moment for me to sar
| . Seas : > ee rm talking about a new track. I doubt very much if having four days
isa cor- but this time he kicked over. #20 ¥ds.—(Boys—Seniors) ‘ C ! ;
perfect I can hardly disagree with Worrell for having asked in the first From a corner kick by Freddie | ,,ist,4- Robinson: 2nd M. Linton; ard R. will relieve the congestion in each race unless there are separate
rective for stomach place for similar terms to those that obtained with regard to the 1950 Hutchinson from the right side, Ee ‘. oh eeul ones ay) k ey beduaa bation cog an Nig A ers une ntatene wee thar
tour. Ciairmonte beat goalkeeper Wil-- , st, L. ittaker; Snd 7. Clarke 12 . bth ie
and liver disorders? On the other hand I cannot imagine his turning the tour down kKinson with a hard shot to give =) Greene vas.—(Boye—Seniors) pre ge aie rey ae — aoe oe ae at oe ae
because he has not been granted this extra £100 Carlton the equalizer, Ist T, Dottin; 2nd F. Green; 3ra M, “a ose in © and C2 are not equally divided and the majority are
a , Notre Dame then carried the Linton. in the latter class, This also appears to be the case in F and F2. How
Sold in bottles for lasting freshness ball well _ in Nightinesls and MEG

then are we going to strike the happy medium ?
which I do not propose to answer here.

The day. has come when we must leave the Garrison. Yet. there”
we stay while the numbers mount, the sweepstake grows larger and
the cost of land spirals upwards, It does not make sense to me.

L OOKING at the classification list also makes me pause to remark !

¢ on the latest promotions. Why, for instance, should Best Wishes
be moved from:D to G2 for winning a classic? A race for which
there is no winning: penalty attached. When the local classifiers
moved her from E to D for winning twice at Christmas, I cotild see
nothing wrong with this, Especially as Cross Roads was moved to

It is a question

i . , right wing, the ball just missing D2. After the Guineas and the rest of the D class races it seemed ‘to
2 _ a a hae a es aera Cat he the upright. The interval was (From Our Own Correspondent) me that all that was proved was how correct the local classifiers
% | 3s vane e in the best interests o les cricket So taken with the score 1—1, GEORGETOWN, April 10 Were. But the latest method of reasoning must be that once a horse
% | team can be announced. On~ resumption, Notre Dame Edgar Readwin, BG. No. 1 has proved the classifiers correct in a particular class then it’s time
% WL. MANAGER : f were first on the offensive and tennis player a Mand he got out of it, whether he just holds his own or wins freely.

‘ The rumour is too persistent to be ignored that Chatlie Daniel at inside right sent prayer, came back after
















m|Cyril Merry, a member of the West Indies team
| to England in 1933, a former Trinidad captain in
jthe Triangular Intercolonial series and Secretary
jot Queen’s Park Cricket Club of Trinidad, will be
ithe Manager of the West Indies team to tour Aus.



in a good one which King saved,
King again came into the picture
when he kicked away what looked
a certainty from Skipper Daniel.

Carlton in a_ good

being two down, to clinch victory
from Ivan Phillips in the B.G.C.C.
Open tournament on Sunday
afternoon. The score was 4—6,
2—6, 6—2, 6—1, 6—0.

Best Wishes promotion also compares unfavourably with that of?
a horse like No-to-nite, who won two handicaps but was only moved
from C2 to C proper, and Fair Sally, who won with top weight and has
not been moved at all. I do not disagree with No-to-nite’s promotion
for one moment, But why the benefit of the doubt is given to the two

forward ; ; ;

q u - a ; importeds and not to the creole is that part which completely baffles me.

5 7 pen oan Sn hoe ten deli eciittieg tieeinn cae aed and tinue oe The match which lasted a lit- Nan Tudor is another one who has not been given the benefit of

% Jwhen I was in Jamaica I knew that as soon as Wilkinson missed “a header” from "¢ Over two hours was witnessed any doubts which existed after she wn once with very light weight-and

» |'Tom Peirce had signified his inability to make the McLeod to give Carlton their sec. P¥,,2 large crowd. then ran badly due to the state of the going. Only recently she way

* drip if selected, that the two leading candidates ond goal. . Readwin repeated his B.W.I. moved from C2 to B2 for winning two handicaps in Trinidad ‘and

. } for that position were Cyril Merry and Frankie De Kenny Centres championship — win, at Bourda while T could see nothing very wreng in this, why should she not be

% Caires of British Guiana, the latter a member of Carlton almost got their thira °°" Trinidad’s Ian McDonald in left in B2 until she has an opportunity to prove how good we really:

s the 1930-31 West Indies team to Australia and.a goal when Kenny Hutchinson the last tournament, as he found think she ‘is. Few people have a higher opinion of Nan than I do,

x cyrtL MERRY member of the British Guiana Intercolonial teams raced down the field and eentred himself in the same position after Yet placing myself in the position of a classifier I would be forced

%| in the Intercolonial tournaments prior to the outbreak of the last but the inside forwards fumbled, !0%ing the first two sets, On the to admit that quite a lot of my estimate was mere conjecture, There.

9 | world war. 4 Notre Dame missed-a good op. Previous afternoon he convine- are.so very few hard facts to go by.

; x BOTH QUALIFIED ; portunity to score when Green- i"8ly beat Frank Drayton in one HICH. brings me to a very touchy problem, although it is one.

3 1. idge centred trom the right wing our and 32 minutes, 6—4, 7—5, which applys mere to Trinidad than to anywhere else. Soma

% If either of these gentlemen were given the appointment I think and Freddie Daniel headed over °—8, 6—4. day it is inevitable that the chickens will come ‘home te roost. I

$ | that they were both qualified from the point of view of their k p, the, bar. r? : IvahV Phillipe’ went! dowh! fights would not be, surprised to, find, that they are already on the way

ss % | edge of West Indies and International cricket and- the tinal -consider4- Tt was not long after this.that ,..%° 1 le sonal athicuel tn ~ home, » But how long. I wonder did the classifiers imagine that- owners
x % | tions for managership would be the deciding factor. ’ * Carlton Iatinched another attack. on aaa Oe te yA : the 2nd trainers were going to put up with this business of rapid promotion
> If this is so, I hasten to congratulate Mr, Merry and if it is not so, Reynold Hutchinson the outside bi Yuwie “ ne did-in the deat two 7! creoles. Sensational no doubt to have it flashed across the pages of

i a $ | I should have no hesitation iy congratulating Mr. De Caires. left centred and the “keeper” sate CAH Gea GEM. the. aide ee ae ar rot ze brs a ra eae et Eline

4 is i ‘g i ima PC t of the mi etsam, had skyrocketed from o B class when on

A Tip otf Sound Advice % FPHE 1950 Football season opened at Kensington yesterday after- ear ‘o give. Carlton their third lines, he might have won. ae three vole old.” More so still to read that “Ocean Pearl had aceosn7!
x noon when Carlton defeated the newly promoted Notre Dame by ” Notre Dame were now playing match: Instead, from the a plishéd even’ more than the wonder filly Gleneggle.” These are but.

Whatever Your Requirements %$ | three goals to one. with ten men as their goal-keeper °<2,f0 Some unknown reason, h? two of many exaggerated promotions since the fad started back in 1948.

, » : Eo per started to advance to the nets, ‘It has gone on steadily until it has reached the stage where a

| The Council of the B.A.F.A. consequent upon the withdrawal W8S forced to leave: the field when Readwin would drive past mere exercise gallop may endanger ones chances of remaining put.

BUY NOW g | of the Empire team from the First Division competition decided to through illness. The se ;/% him easily down the lines ot were it not for a ptinted rule which says: “no horse can be promoted

« x | suspend the rule requiring six teams to compete in the First Division ay fictnone Gils ted ik hed ike when he did get a chance with who was a non-winner at the Jast meeting at which he raced prior to

g ccmpetition to allow five teams to compete instead. ball in their onbaaeatr ade ‘AEE pret og gs ae —— peers reclassification.” I have no doubt creoles would have been sent “up:

2 sai Pat . .. ) e orehan y= «Str j La i y

Prices of all Commodities are on the Upsurge % | It was also decided to write a letter to the Empire Club stating the | referee awarded them a ne the nets. He aid it on no ch a Sot Foetetgs are not fools and stakes are not all at
| that it was against the rules of the competition for a Club to withdraw free” kick for foul play by the fewer than 14 times in the last ome level, We shall reach the stage when nobody, not even classifiers

(Now Opening)

‘

2ODSODOSSGSSSSSS SDSS GOG DOI OOP IIIS IIIS IEG G9965S



In Stock at the moment: $

ALUMINUM WARE

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

WE HAVE =:

y
ms

JUDGE BRAND ENAMELWARE

Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets
Phone 4200.

SOOSLSSEEERE PPLE LLLP PLL LOL

from a senior competition but that in the circumstances, the only
ierms on which the Council could accept the withdrawal of the First
Division team were that Empire should submit for the approval of the
selection committee the names of their nine best players who ordinarily
would have been debarred from competing in the Second and Third
Divisions if they were competing in the First Division.

If they cannot see their way to do this they will have to with-
draw all three teams,

ciation at “Enmore”,
It will be remembered that during the lifetime’ of the late Str
Harold Austin they were four excellent tennis courts there. bE
If these negotiations are successful it would appear that this

in order again and ample accommodation can be found for players
and public alike,
Sport fans are awaiting with interest the outcome of these talks

x and hope that it materialises into something that will! make lawn

tennis an established sport in Barbados.



Carlton full back Bright. Barker
took the kick but sent the ball out-
side.

The game ended shortly after-
wards with Carlton winners by
three goals to one.

The teams were as follow:—

Carlton: King, Bright, Kennedy Mar-
shall, F. Hutchinson, Cox, K. Hutchinson,

DAVIS CUP CHALLENGE

Challenging for the Davis Cup

competition between the two coun-
tries since 1921, when an American
team defeated Japan by a score of
5 to 0 in the final round of that
year’s Davis Cup championship.







two sets. By adopting these meth-
ods he allowed the championshir
crown to slip from his grasp.



Scotland Beat

Scotland beat England by three
goals to two in their annual soc-
cer international here today, to

right Wilf Mannion being carried.

off and taken to hospital with a
fractured cheekbone in the thir-
teenth minute.

—Reuter.



or journalists, will be able to say with the slightest degree of certainty -
which are the best horses of any age group, They will all be deliber-:
ately undertrained or carefully ridden, In the past I have defended.
ewners who were accused of racing their horses carefully and others
who it was said were hiding their horses, That was long before there
was the necessity to do so. But unless some curb is placed on this
silly promotion idea, any owner who races his horses at their best all
the time will be racing in a fool’s paradise.

Clairmonte, McLeod, Lucas, R. Hutchin- E ] , That, sirs, is what will become of your fine classification -policy.
: ; ngland At Soccer __. That, sirs,
GALVANISED PAILS en : NEGOTIATIONS wire Mame: Mubinan, Sgughn, ete en ee
rowne, Ss, ” aniel, reher, . Ww. :
GALVANISED PAILS and TUBS % ‘ Gepanidge, ¢,. Daniel, Barker, Nurse, EF. By VERNON MORGAN e NOTHER ia which I noticed in the Trinidad press recently
x Negotiations are in progress for the staging of tennis games janiel. ee WEMBLEY, STADIUM, ‘ causes me to ponder the question of Jamaican champions coming»
% under the auspices of the Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis Asso- a April 14. to this side of the Caribbean. The latest is Mark Twain. Winner of

the Jamaica Guineas and Dérby and conqueror of Footmark on sev+
eral occasions, he has come to us with a reputation second only tu
that of the Brown Bomber. I understand he will be racing at the

tennis. championship, Japan is wrest the championship from June meeting and, like the-rivalry there was between Blue Streak and
coum be the heaven sent answer to the prayer for the staging of scheduled to play q preliminary Engiand, * pe ig it is be expected that himself and Footmark will renew
° ssociation Tennis. round with the United States in England for most of the game. their btruggle for supremacy. ‘
(Central Foundry Ltd.—Proprietors.) The grounds are enclosed, and will not take a fortune to be put 195), tt will be the first fensits played only 10 men, the inside This is.all very well for the public here. But what about Jamaica?

his makes the ninth Jamaica, champion which has come to the Souta

aribbean.in the last five years and at this rate I cannot see how
Jamaican racing is going to flourish if their best horses continue this
migration. Yet the root cause of all this is the fact that something .3
wrong with racing ih Jamaica and until this is remedied we will cgn-
tinue to benefit from their losses,




















































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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951
Launch Takes #2£VIN DIES
SUDDENLY

Mr. Pound Medical Aid To
Has A Kink Back Country .oc.ict. 778 cous

6 came as @ surprise to many, some Readers of this column will re-
“GEORGETOWN Annas himself. member that at the beginning of

: oat . He had no tra in we advised you that

_ British Guiana’s Medical Serv- foreign politic tls ae tS us BES wes dropping the 49

ou S. @ ices have been extended all along qualification was his experience e transmission for the special
the B.G.-Venezuela Ea

PAGE FIVE









NO. 167

The Topic

B.B.C. RADIO NOTES

B.B.C. Wavelength
Changes

From Sunday, 15th April



of

avert

LINDEN BLOSSOM ~



IMPERIAL LEATHER ¢ BLUE BYACINTH

pee sasebei . boy,
rasping
blunt manner, rae into
the intricacies intrigues of
international affairs.

Immediately on his appoint-

i



Last Tuesday Joe and Robert
Stood at the Assembly door
To hear how some the foreigners
Just soak the Bajan poor.

. . +

'

Well boys you should have listened
To speeches loud and grand
For these were all directed
To control the “Coolie” man.
. ° ‘

a (once

Take off a wrap; do!

Dont nail him to a post

He helped poor Country people

But helped the "Coolie
. . °

frontier by egotiator, acquired during i but that
the @Stablishment of a Dispensary his ‘sone of, Trade Union on Xp tee oes eel leon. how-
Launch Service bringing succour Britain’s Foreign ever, as summer is approaching
day in and day out to persons of the past had been suave, and tien conditions are
: "all races living in the remote gantly tailored : arene ee
North West District. 2 improving the changes will be
George Maleolm Thomson Tre Launch which has been adopted from Sunday, 15th April.
; christened Relief is living up The schedule from that day on-
. to its name. Manned by a fully wards will be as follows: 6.30 a.m.
THE OF : : qualified Government Dispenser to 9.00 a.m. 15.31 megacycles or
Ed. D. D, i ‘ ° and a crew of three it carries a 19.60 metres; 4.15 p.m. to 6.45
Noe © ABC OI 15 9 Kelvin inboard engine om me meee te
> Ezra P . ca of assuring speedy travel. metres. For the las '
, 6d. 206 pages. The peoples of the aheeme ere Fotdnte mnaethin nad an of an hour of this period, that is
EZRA POUND exactly when to expect the jong, was "the British Tom 6.00 p.m. there will also be
: Rellef, for it follows an itinerary delegation at the Nations. 2. beam on 11.75 megacycles,
A PATROL of Allied soldiers Italy, where he developed an which’ ensures that each settle- He fought problem 25.53 metres. This latter beam
moving ca ly forward in intense admiration for Mussolini ment is visited once in every four lem as postwar world dis- Wi!! continue until the close down
i North italy visas made - (the anti-usurer) and in due weeks on a pre-arranged sched- ~ lved into turmoil. at 11.00 p.m. and from 7.15
esting li and a. course, for Hitler who, in his we. *OHte became weary p.m.—at the start of the West
shabby man of 63. with opinion (expressed after capture ~~ Among the hundreds of patients It became more and Indies half-hour each day—there
red) beard, by ‘the Allies), could ‘only be treated since the launch service cult to his will be an additional beam on
traces of an Idaho accent, He was Compared to Joan of Arc. started in August, 1949, have been flights of stairs. 9.58 regacycles, 31.32 metres. rin
a erank about economics, and the ,, From the corres nce of some needing the attention of a hard ate, and smoked Comments on reception, particu-
‘ hi this brilliant wrong ~ headed Medical Officer. They are taken vin” iew of those changes,
leading American poet of his time ‘ y Bevin had a wry larly in view t ng
His name was Ezra Pound American there emerges, aMONZ aboard and made comfortable for humour, Once as will be welcomed by the BBC
fo stage of his he, scurrility, abuse, enthusiasm ty jong journey back to head~ trouble reigned over the and may be sent to the West In-
he had 8d good judgments, the self” quarters. ambushes in Indonesia, dies Office, Box 408, Kingston,
"for Musso- pei ininess “Anybody mux _Attived at Kumaka Stelling on raids in Trieste, riots against Bri, Scnalen Tistiness who sortie
The active aness. Any nee the Aruba River, patients are tain in Egypt tune im to the beam to North
. fae ae gellar ry stray cats conveyed by > i i : America after our direct beams
; Home Rn allo.” Districts’s 45-bed base hospital at breaks out anywhere, rn y close down at 11.00 p.m. should
Washington, D.C., to which he eo Mabaruma Hill. Here there is a know.” note that this latter service will
was despatched as mentally un- And here is Ezra feeding the Government Medical Officer and He liked ordi British peo- now continue for two hours later
ind, his ‘trial for treason being stray cats of literature — helping a staff of fully trained nurses to Ple to call him “ - than usual on the 49 metre band—
indefinitely postponed; some ttle magazine, diseovering ensure that all receive skilled _ Once at a dockers* meeting in

*" most.
.

He start off Lou in brown pumps
And in her first white Shoe
Which quarrelled like a “bluka’
But cost twelve-ninety two,

* . : * *
She wore then seven Sundays
‘Twas Cheap Shoe, not box calf



And when the white shoe break up
Lou only paid down half.
. . . .

an elegant version of the
famous Biro ballpoint pen

You cannot fail to admire the slim graceful lines and attractive

.
The “Coolie” didn't quarrel
But brought Lou “pair o° brown"

; 6.11 megacycles—and at 12.00] And when Lou reached Lord Nels
; Joyce, aivising Lascelles —— attention. Should the patient re- Lene he admitted that when midnight if you care te tune in| The shoe "cried “Taw in. terwn’ oar
There he is. affable host to crombie on in gerse yf quire specialist treatment he will unemployed, | he had stolen for as Jate as that) you can also heat} se said “Lou this eux Gach. ake colours of Biroette—the latest addition to the Biro range of
seveana — discussing and one . ao ¢ Tt, g. be placed on board the S.S. Tar- for that” He pid ts eal another beam on the frequency of | Cost thirteen forty four : ballpoint pens.
“Tf you saat tue tb talk about Flot rom Lioyés "Bank where, Yeats, you must give me twenty- for £500 a year, he is ruining bean c a h

Neither God nor nature demands

reliable service. It is small, slim and neat, yet it gives a very
it of us, and if man demands it, In

four hours’ notice, as the top layer health and stifling poetry. long writing service,

“Caribbean Voices” — the
of my mind is gone.

Last week Lou passed through

General Hospital in the City. In

Swart

r indi- then I will violate the social laws Weekly programme of West In- aaa See ee Le The attractive colours and slim neatness of Biroette is especially
, ,z The money was ceined hae 23 = gold. Je mab oe Aeeee~ he has made.” dian prose and poetry—on Sun-; tne price mark on the same shoe appreciated by ladies.
With the remeining layers, am hate See ae Governor of the most remote parts of the —Reuter, day, 15th. April you can hear an | Prought hot Gn. rae Tavs aes Sold in Chena colours: grey, blu » maroon and black, each with
Pound ° since inearceration has the Bank of England (“may be great expanse forming the North unusual story, of a vampire in] >, urine: shark 6a the Grown ahs 4 cap in gleaming argenite or plastic to match.
Doce 1200 dollar Bollingen the nation’s”) instead of O. M. West Frontier District is placed Menenntedin British Guiana, but he is not the} Was Six-ntty a pair

Prize for best American poetry.
His post-war verse includes lines
on the British General Electi
in 1948: :

PRICE
and author of Four Quartets. __ within easy reach of the best
All this is not to say that his medical facilities in the Colony.

attitude to Eliot’s work is one of

sort of vampire of whom one need BIROETTE REFILLS Price
be afraid— ever tune in for

yourselves, The story is ‘Apologia

And boys this little price tag
Threw poor Lou “out o' gear”,
° . ® . .

$86,529 lr Fines



She swanked inside the same store
un i iration. This J de Lucio’ by R. S, Malcolm of} With satin dress afloat ‘
“Oh, to be in England now that from’ a ‘ietter in the private Mootball Fixtures Collected B.G. The other half of the pro- | ;* ‘own #ir! cried “that lady a pen planned
Winston’s out, “American” dialect of Pound's gramme will be devoted to six . , * . .

‘Bitoctie

Distributors in Trinidod

Now that there’s room for doubt.
be the

ON Monday afternoon Spartan
And .the Bank may
nation’s.”

nate ee ere, meet Everton in a First Divi-

poems by a frequently heard con-}| And poor Lou paid the

Two “dolla - ten” a yard

“Coolie

for a purpose

will
‘Waal, I heerd the Murder in gion Football fixture at

tributer, E, M, Roach of Tobago.



. AB ig ag ;
wilt i the Collect ol tae radio lame ee Kensing- anon or WN Roel 0 Broadcast begin at the regular Put tou was on her guard.” SPENCER J. KIRTON LIMITED, 2 BROADWAY, PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD, a
poem written in any asylum was night. Oh, ce Cowkney a referee will be Mr. D. W. tected sum. 96 $06,580.96 was col- note tnat tar ake air he The same pink piece of Satin
} . as 80) or one twenty
eae ., Smart's Song to vores, Sie ae his ats and we Heatinen Betas. the Gaon varus Heo od moms the 49 metre band which has been | And Lou was so bewthtered

How did Pound come to broad-
cast for the Italian fo™—and to
get into that eet
of these 384 Pound
years of correspondence) will
search them in vain for signs of

Lineamen: . A. Parris 4Mount far in excess of the differ. pat hour, in this case ‘Caribbean Their tongues are sweet as spice oe
armas ee ee te di “iy and O. aha evn % . ence was still to be cpubecine, tas dices’, at 7.15 p.m. outa vat waoubler rena s tr E fi §$
ais Secnents aad’ cbeaabetons aot ord ee, Hardy, Eliot. Thursday 19: Notre Dame vs. ieee system of ‘instalment pai’- T. S. Eliot ‘ , 7
personality, with a bee in his A Me

bennet about money.

Pound was not only a poet; but
a friend and finder of poets. He

brought all his seriousness and anthology

energy to the business of litera—
ture. When he came to live in

ndon (1911), he wore a light
bjs frock coat with square emer-
ald green buttons. It was a mis-
leading costume.

Pound had the essential gravity
of one educated in Pennsylvania,
and the salty speech of the Yan-
kee: “Every man should have a
home so that he may be exempt
from any outside interference
what so n ever.”

“England@’s national sport is the

harson beat Legall 7~5, 6—1, 1948, inst. with ic of Tehaikovsky Phensi ithe ¢ hear
hepring.” tinuous narrative. Setting, eee. 4 , , ) : music ehaikovsky, . ic neither harms the heart
Se end kit Chesterton India: ‘Teche, love (1) profane, the dare "Taylor 6—3 Less Crime Elgar and Dobnanyi, and one by and the blenders of nor upsets the stomach. Be pre-
called “a Boche, a bungler (2) sacred—at least, serious. causing Jamaica to There has Thee, Symphony Orchestra on s
and a emer.” :

posishun. 1 stuck it for a while,
wot
wailin.”

There is also in this collection 7
plenty of serious, vigorous writ- VS.
ing on “culchur” and other #4

the weepin and

Linesmen: Messrs. C.

uesday 17:
Carlton.

Referee: Mr. L. F. Harris.

likes: mes (‘fa louse”), Spartan. 2
seem faneay Wells (“stew”), Referee: Mr. O. S. Coppin
Calvin (“the black devil’).

de to literature, half—

tolagy, Pound's of Read-
ing issued after 10 years’ exile
from print, presents a provoca—
tive version of the progress of
poetry. Dicta: “Bad is
the same in all tangu

$ “Lit-
erature is news that news.”
FATHER GOOSE. By pman

Mortimer. Hert-Davis. 9s. 6d
255 pages,

MORTIMER, author of sinis—
ter-brilliant tale A Stranger on
the Stair, startles his public with
a wildly different work; two
stories (fables? fairytales?) in a

and G. E, % ,
Saturday: Everton vs. Pick-
wick-Rovers.
Referee: Mr. W. F. Hoyos.
Linesmen: Messrs. K. E.
Walcott and O. M. Robinson.

FARQUAHARSON WINS
AT TENNIS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 14.

The Farquaharson-Legall match rent
evening, provided a thrilling through the

this

struggle in five sets. Legall was

beaten through inexperience and ca

fortune fluctuated much, Farqua-

J Courts duri
Following are the referees and ng
for the other first divi- ST@ase of $7,
sion fixtures this week.
Pickwick-Rovers

Fines

not less than i;
end of

There are now five Courts sit-

Smith ting in Georgetown and handling

im posed

December, 1950,

the increasing volume of work,

last year, a de-
356.67 i

with the 1949 figure. °° "Parison
i were, however.
in 1049, as at the
an

providing best reception up to
now. As told in the first paragraph
above, broadeast at that time from
London will be in the 25 and 31
metre bands, the latter beginning
at the start of the West Indies

For those interested in poetry
who can pick up the BBC’s beams
to North shown in
the first paragraph—there will be

She erfetl “its misery.”
*

When
PAIN

; .
The “Coolies" used to walk. ‘round
‘Through couniry sides afar
To-day the “Coolie - island”
Drive ‘round in motor ear,

. . . .




They ‘‘trust” the country people

They glony in the crop time

They bring cloth to your door

What in town cost 4 penny

The “Coolie” will charge four.
* . * °

The number

filed in 1950 was 6,233, as
pared with 5,625 in 1949,

5,208 for 1948,

due directly to the fact that the

jurisdiction of the Magiatssie has
been Jaerenee? from $ to $250.
e

ent Assessor also had a

will be at 11.00 p.m, on Wednes- When you feel stiff with pain and
busier time last year as tenants day next, sponsored by every movement makes you want
are now more conscious of the The Week's Musi ) '
steadily increasing charges for usie J &R BAKERIES tw cry out—remember Phensic !
and are seeking relief Musical broadcasts by the BBC ic will ickl ce
Court, in the coming week include a makere of Phensic w quickly case an
Last year there were 689 appli- concert by the London Symphony

tions for rents’ to be assessed
as against 476 in 1949 and 341 in

of Civil Cases
com-
and

The increase is

menting on some

of Chi

00 duced

at 9.00 p.m.

an interesting programme in the
coming week when T. S. Eliot
will be heard reading and com-

in a recording of the University
20 Round Table, repro-
y courtesy of NBC. This

Orchestra in ‘British Concert Hall’
on Monday, 16th

Lou went back home and
Come girls let's form a band
Let's help the House Assembly
ContrelL the “Coolie” man

‘ . .

“ery out

remember
Phensic !









of his own poetry

Don't care what cloth they bring ‘round
Though it shines like a star

Let's buy our cloth from Harrison's
And the differénce buy “J, & R.”’

soothe the agony, lift pain-caused

ENRICHED BREAD fatigue,

remove the weariness.

ama aeee ae



J&R RUM

MopnincCouc::

Thursday at 6.00 p.m. with
Tchaikovsky, Waldteufel, Harty,
Delibes and Delius,

PAKISTAN STUDIES

The establishment of a centre

rH crease in th Le a tninal
qualify for the finals with Sturd Se in the number of crimina
Pgs oad me Dadu, | a young qs st form. ” ‘cases filed in 1950 as against that
he may successfully woo a rich Trinidad will play British Gui- £0r_the previous year, Last Ana.
Senichontis Geumtier. oie j- ana singles on Monday. 25,026 criminal cases were filed.
Rant, the charts gute. t6 Mack oe At football, Q.R.C. beat the @ decrease of 980 as compared
(a) the village buffalo, and (b) Harrisonians 1—0, the goal scorer With the 1949 figure, but an in-
the village elders, Complications, being C. Palce. erease of 2,040 over the 1948

pared for sudden pain—keep a
supply of Phensic handy.



In due course, Pound fell victim
to the Douglas Credit Scheme,
and became at once, Jike all fel-
low-sufferers, an expert on
money, currency, usury, banks,
ete. “The only thing between food
and the starving is a thin bar-










of Pakistan Studies is, under way Don't let morning and righ) cou
still droller, follow, ——_--—- total! cbaens| ing, attacks of Vso: iia or Sos)
pidi Collections in 1950 were divid- t Columbia University, in New| ruth “sleep and enurey teuther a
wean poses Somme, ate oy Don’t ask what Mortimer SHIP’ S TEAM DEF EATS ed up as follows; Fines—$63,682. York City, with the introduction ee tryin fREENID At‘, Vhts whey
er strips.” means, Don’t worry if animals, ISLAND Ar BASKETBALL 16; Fees—$16,444.58; Crown Costs of two courses on the history, blood, thus reaching tan breads ° ‘
letter to Geoffrey Crowther wee and sleeping | aa P son from 7 Pee Mag- ae > dag bt pe Pinos. See nos lenmunne of tubes wand lunge. Starts haintis wn ” for quick, speedy relicf
non. the talking in his pages. aban— nificent defeated an island team n ines realised $73,533,- ‘an. e Pa in Govern— Pais Wadvowet ere
ca ry bw oe thus don your mind recklessly to picked at random 46—24 when 74; Fees — $16,444.58; Crown ment has made a grant of $25,000 | MUCUS: {hut alleviating | ae FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
emotionally: “J take it you are pleasure. Basketball at Costs — $3,620.39; and Jacket to the center, which will be the | fetresbing plrep cry 9s)

a damned liar.” X
After 1925 he lived at Rapallo,

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, (FLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

"rom your hemlet titer wu 4
oF miner bee © Hen

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PAGE SIX



BARBADOS sab ADVOGATE

Printed by ‘he Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridaétown.
cook therapies
Sunday, April 15, 1951

THE ONLY WAY

ITIS not enough for the West Indies to
protest to the Secretary of State for the
Colonies every time that sugar is being
discussed at international trade meetings.
What the West Indies should be doing is to
give effect to the formation of a Regional
Economic committee and at the same time
request the United Kingdom to allow mem-
bers of that committee to speak for the
West Indies at international meetings.
Membership of the Regional Economic
committee would have to be based on prac-
tical knowledge and experience of trade.
The committee could only function, if it
were free from political interference,
although it would naturally consult with
Governments on major matters of policy.
Tt has been long apparent to observers both
in the United Kingdom and the West
Indies that so far from gaining greater
freedom from control by the United King-
dom, the trade of the West Indies today
suffers from the fact that they cannot bar-
gain for themselves separately with indi-
vidual Dominions or other nations, but
must be represented together through ~
Downing Street.

Itis also a mistake for the West



Indies ae



tative, at all major conferences affecting
their own trade, and they must have. re-
stored to them; individually and collective-
ly, the right to bargain directly in their
own interests. Only by this means can
Great Britain ensure that irresponsible
critits of her achi¢vements in the Wes
Indies are silenced.*, 4g ir

The unsatisfactory position by”
even the hands of the Colonial Office are
tied, when the Board of Trade or the
try of Food use the big stick, is thea
obstacle to’ progress in the West Indi
teday. The United Kingdom would bew
advised to study the achievements ‘an
the solid benefits which the West Indies
have gained in the past from free direct
bargaining with Canada. The way ahead
must inevitably be signalled from the way
back. The West Indies. wait anxiously for
the United Kingdom to show signs of
awareness that the present system.does not
function properly. yi?



FOOTBALL GROUND

WHATEVER the final decision
may be ‘as tothe venue of
football matches during 1951 © the
controversy ‘between B.A:F.A. and the
Pickwick Cricket’ Club has focussed atten-
tion on a state of affairs that should be
remedied. Football in Barbados has never
reached a, high standard, One of the chief
reasons for the failure of players to rise
above’ a certain level is undoubtedly ‘due

to think only in terms of the depressions”; to the! jfact that the game in Barbados is

and slumps which affected the West Indies
inthe past. In fact the West Indies in the
past owed a great deal to the fact that they
were in the habit of bargaining for them-
selvés.
trade relations with the West Indies prior
to 1982 shows most clearly how the West
Indies benefited because they were not re-
garded collectively or uniformly as colonies
but as special geographical units in the
Atlantic, dependent on trade.with the con-
tinent of which they form a part. Z
The Royal Commission which reported
in 1910 underscored this point by saying
that “it would be unwise, except for the
gravest reasons, now to oppose the natural
desire of the West Indian colonies for close
connection with the Northern Dominion.”
It would be a mistake too for the West
Indies to suppose that the United King-
dom neglects their interests and eaves

Canada to bear the brunt of a stable*West >.

Indian economy, In fact the West Indies
have benefited from the fact that Canadian
interest in West Indian trade and -the
emergence of preferences led to the grant-
ing of similar preferences by the United
Kingdom, It would be ungracious on the
part of the West Indies not to be mindful
of and ‘grateful for the fact that the United
Kingdom has agreed to a long term pur-
chase of West Indian sugar which gives
that element of stability so necessary to the
health of the industry and the prosperity
of the people of the area. But the real loss
to the West Indies the loss of direct; -bar-
gaining with Canada, in the opinion.of
Canadians and West Indians, outweighs
much of the advantages of long term con-
tracts.

Canadians cannot understand why the
United Kingdom cannot restore freedom
of bargaining to the West Indies on mat-
tersaffecting trade. They fail-tc under-
stand why benefits which the West Indies
now receive from a favourable balance of
trade with the Dominion cannot be handed
back to the West Indies, which undoubted-
ly need them, and why the West Indies are

not allowed to encourage Canadian invest- |”
ment in hotels and market gardening, both, -

of which would strengthen West Indian
economy and reduce their dependence on
the overburdened British taxpayer.

The Toronto Globe and Mail, Canada’s.
most influential national newspaper, which
is presently campaigning for a revision. of
the moribund Canada-West Indies agree-
ment of 1925, in a leader entitled “Oppors
tunities in the B.W.1.” made an excellent
suggestion that the Government of Barba-
dos would do well to follow up,

“The present excessively high cost of
many vegetables in Canada arises from-the
fact that they are being imported from
high cost-producing centres in the United
States. While our reserves of United
States dollars are materially stronger than
a short time ago, the greatly higher price
we pay for these imports increases the
drain on that reserve fund at a time when
defense needs are also making unusual de-
mands upon it. Canadian capital and enter-
prise could create a highly profitable win-
ter garden for this country in favourable
B.W.I, areas which already are well dis-
posed towards us, The development of such
business in these colonies—some time to
become another Dominion—would auto-
matically create new markets there for our
manufactures as well as for those foods
and other natural products which we pro-
duce and which they need.”

How many excellent suggestions like
these might bear fruit if the West Indies
could regain that freedom of hargaining
which characterised her relations with
Canada from 1890 until 1932! In those days
Barbados led the West Indies. Today this
island suffers precisely from the lack of
leadership in economic matters. Trade is
in the hands of the United Kingdom.
Periodic protests about sugar however
necessary, under the present circumstances,
will not save us. Protests should be un-
neces The British West

aceredited repre

Indies must



bave a spokesman, an sen-

The whole history of Canada’s .

played’at the wrong season of the year. It
is difficult t6 Control a football when the
turf is at its firmest, yet football is played
during the driest months. Furthermore,
the football season is limited to under three
months. Playing in the wrong season and
during such a limited period is not the wish
of the football enthusiast. It is dictated. by
other. circumstances. The major fixtures,
for purposes of gates receipts have to be
played on a ground which is controlled by
lessees of Kensington. Kensington is the
headquarters, of cricket in Barbados. It is
owned by the Cricket Association and
leased to the Pickwick Club. It is primarily
a cricket ground ahd’as‘ericket is played
in the wet.season the ground is only avail-
able for. a.few months in the dry season.
Furthermore, the Football season has to be
ygurtailed in order to get the playing field
weady for cricket. Erie

The first essential then for better foot-
ball would seem to bé a separatéand-dis-
tinct playing field for football, where the
fixtures could be played during the’ wet

season and where practice would be avail-«
_,able all the year round. An cenclosed
“ ground is “essential from: ‘the ’peint. of ’

view of financé. But a game of , foot-
ball, which lasts little more than.an ‘hour,
does not need the elaborate accommodation
for spectators which cricket demands. A
natural or artificial slope which would en-
sure an adequate view of the game by
every spettator is all that is required, and
even withthe limited number‘ of ,open
spaces in Barbados it should not be beyond
the ability and finance of the B.A.F.A. to
find such a suitable location. . Until the
B.A.F.A.° make an effort ‘to disassociate
themselves from‘cricket there is little hope
of the standard.-of. foothall_in Barbados.

improving.

LAW SOCIETY
IN 1940,an Act was passéd to incorporate
the, Barbados Law Society, and it was
hoped that such a Society would have
helped to maintain the dignity of the legal
profession in this Island. ‘But the Society

was short-lived, it met with:opposition for ©

various reasons and now it is defunct.
- Never was a Law Sociéty more needed in
’ Barbados than to-day. Our Bar is fast
acquiring ‘a name as the most_undignified
and disorderly in the West Indies, and
recent conduct in the Courts has done
nothing to disprove that opinion.
Barbadians like to think that Barbados is
Little England. They are flattered when
visitors say that Barbados ‘is the “most
English” of the West Indies, and they like
* to-think that this Island enjoys, and bene-
fits from,) the traditions of England. But
the behaviour in the Courts.could not pos-
sibly be more un-English, the dignity and
decorum of\the Courts of the Mother Coun-
try are not to be found here.

When a’ young Barrister is admitted to
‘practise at) the Bar of Barbados’ he invari-
ably promises to. maintain the. “dignity and
traditions of the Barbadian Bar.” Those
who happen not to know something before-
hand about the Bar in Barbados are lia-
ble to spend the rest of their lives trying

to find that‘ dignity and those traditions.

In. England; when ‘a barrister misbe-
haves grossly in a’Court he is ordered to
leave the Court by the judge, who then.

Which’,





*

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



He Built A Private Empire

On The Hates And Fears of Men ; |

EMPEROR ERNEST
ss Hy eo Malcolm Th
NT Evy wae lll |

self-made man of the a"
list era. He had the same
hyo imagination as, in an
ear! jer, generation, was po:
‘ Paxton, the designer of the
rystal Palace. The only differ-
ence was that Paxton’s materials
were less durable. On the other
hand, Ernest Bevin’s i
house only one man was allowed
to throw stones.

Bevin's path to greatness was
not that of the ordinary capitalist
a being whom he despised and
vanquished.

He chose the less conventions
route to the ‘high places whic!
like many men of his generation,
he found mors congenial to
talents: the way of agitation, pro-
paganda, organisation. He was a
superb manager of men; and men
—their hope, fears, prejudices,
hates—men were the rungs of
Bevin’s ladder. Men the materials
with which he built. 2

His way to power
H®, powers of mind, by no
means despicable, were sec-
ondary to his intuition and hi
strength of character. Nobody who

has ever listened to Bevin ade,

dressing a mass meeting will be in’
doubt as to what is meant by
dpmanaony (of will ever despise so
formidable and dangerous an in-
strument of power.

There was no coherence.of argu-
ment, there was little formal
grammar, Y fs nobody for a mo-
ment could be in doubt of what
the man meant. As he spoke, with
a glance at his wristwatch every
five minutes so that the violence
and fury of the utterance might
be punctually intensified, the air
vibrated with his harsh, yet com-
pelling voice, the platform shook
with his passion, and the speech,
like an emanation of the speaker,
seemed to becorhe alive and pon-
derable in the hall.

The presence of the man, so
fiercely dedicated to his mission,
so utterly wrapped in the oratory

e was so carefully timing, was
felt by every hearer, like a physi-
cal load which at the same time
lifted up the heart.

This fierce and ill-formed rhe-
toric voiced the hard and ill-
formed aspirations of Britain’s
proletarian uprising. It spoke for
the ugly lives, the stunted streets,
the longings that held so much
envy and bitterness as well as so
much that was unselfish. It also
expressed the will to power of the
man who saw in those longings his

opportunity.

Last ounce

UT oratory was not, of course,
the only, or even the main,
instrument by which Bevin sought
his purpose.
"He had the personality of a
jeader; he had a gift for organi-
sation and a.greed for centralised
authority. ¥ Fee
He was a cunning negotiator

- who could always convince those

he represented that he had got the
last possible ounce out of the other
side—and, at the same time, con-
vey that his clients were still be-
ing cheated and oppressed! .

ro a natural pugnacity he soon
added the professional truculence
of the Trade Union boss. Seeing
the bulky figure, the jowl, the
determined stumpy wlk as he
emerged from a conference, who
could doubt that the ‘masters”
haq found their match, and may~
be their master !

When other men of the same
ability and the same fibre were
building up commercial king:
doms Bevin was creating an in-
dustrial: empire. -At-the moment
of its greatest extension it con-
tained 1,300,000 subjects over
whom Bevin ruled as the titular
hired seeretary, but in practice as
an absolute despot.

' ‘Hargees’ man
"Ea ee of the empire was
the Transport and General

Workers’ Union. Its dominior
stretched from bargees to grave.
diggers.

“It was. an empire’ of. workers,
built upon the card vote and the
readiness to strike at the drop of
a hat, until Bevin shrewdly real-
ised that, sometimes, it paid better
to be conciliatory. The empire
was as much a part of the liberal
capitalist system as any cotton mill
or iron foundry.

Over it Bevin’s rule was
supreme. Even when at las* he
left his office to join the Governs
ment, his power was handed ovet
to a viceroy. Alone among the
‘outstanding figures of the Trade
Union’ movement, Bevin did not

wy



THINKING ALOUD. _

There ought to be not a society
fér poor vnfortunate lovers, as
the record requests, but a society
for preserving the common sense
of the common man, Much of this
common sense is reflected in com-
mon speech. There is to-day in
the West Indies a conspiracy to
murder common speech and sub-
stitute in its place a collection
of cliches and phrases which im-
press the ignorant but bore the
common man, who is too intelli-
gent even to make the effort to
understand. Take the word em-
erging. If it means anything at

all it means what a mouse is doing
»when it is not quite out of its hole.

writes a report on his conduct to: thesioT9)Speak of a nation emerging as

Benchers of his Inn, If the Benchers-con-:

+

sider the offence sufficiently serious he’ is,
struck off the rolls,
The Judges in the West Indies have the
same course of action open to them; if they
wish to make use of it, but they are handi-
capped in their duties by the absence of a

disciplinary body to whom they can report ~

misconduct without having to exercise the
drastic powers vested in them. :

By bringing the members of the Bar to-
gether for discussions, and by using its
power of expulsion, a Law Society could
do-much to raise the standard of behaviour
in the Courts of Barbados. Perhaps it
might adopt as its motto Lord Brougham's
dictum: “Conduct without ‘eloquence is
safer to trust to for success than eloquence
without conduct.”

otherwise he is fined. ©

so. many of our academic friends
do speak is poppycock, a_ blunt
word and thérefore likely to
offend. our cultured friends. But
having with the perspicacity and
vision reserved only for their
great intellects, spotted the nation
emerging like a mouse, our aca-
demic friends grow tired of the
time the process of emerging takes
and must needs confuse the pro-
cess. The nation they say is not
just emerging It is in the melt-
ing pot or crucible. When they
talk like this I am sometimes
tempted to reflect that that is just
where they ought to be them-
selves—in the melting pot at least.
As for the crucible, well the idea

is really too fanciful to waste
much thought on it. In marked
contrast to the new mannerisms
of speech among the self styled
edueated is the lamentable de-




Mr. ERNEST: BEVIN. —

lose his hold upon his people when
tasks.

'S hé left them for other:

The foundations of the . empire
were laid at the street corneérs of
Bristol at the beginning, of the
century . : i

To Bristol Beyin had come a
waif from the West Country. He
was born in 1881 at Winsford in,
Somerset, where his mother, a
widow named Diana Mercy Bevin,
a woman of character, had some-
times helped in the local hotel.

From a farm, where he was
paid 6d, a week, and his keep to
do work he hated, young Bevin
ran away to a job washing plates
in a Bristol cafe; later he became
a salesman of mineral waters at
15s, a week. On this pay he
married his wife Florence, a
Bristol girl of working-class stock,
They had one daughter.

But the significant part of
Bevin’s career did not lie in sell-
ing lemonade. He peddled a more
explosive commodity.

After a phase as an effective lay-
preacher at Poulton Baptist Chap.
el, he drifted into the Socialist
movement and shocked Bristol by
leading the local unemployed into
the cathedral.

The Bishop, the Dean and the
Chapter all took his side, and
demanded that the town council
act. Bevin had shown his quality
as an agitator. Later he told how
at this stage in his career, he used
to steal in order to eat. He did so
with a’ good conscience. ~

Now he turned his gifts to good
use in whipping in members for
the carters’ branch of-.the Dock-
ers’ Union, of which he himself
was the first enrolled member.
It was the beginning of a career
of ‘steady building up of trade
unidnism among the _ transport
‘vorkers; in which Bevin .was as—
sociated with an older and more:
polished leader, Ben Tillett, and
which, eventually through an era
of strikes and savage unemploy-
ment, brought into being that octo—
pus of industrial power, the Trans—
port and General Workers’ Union,
with Bevin, its chief designer,
holding the post of genera’ secre—
tary.

Dockers’ KC

I T was in 1920 that the world
outside the Trade Union move—
ment began to take note of
Bevin. the symbol of work—
ing-class intransigence who never-
theless concealed so shrewd a
sense of realities. :

In 1920, at a court of inquiry
into dockers’ wage claims, Bevin
stated the case for the men with
such skill, with such a mastery
of his brief, as well as. of legal
formalities, that he became known
as. the Dockers’ K.C, His argument
lasted for 11’ hours, spread over
three days, during which the court
became more and more crowded.
The head of the court of inquiry,
the late-Lord Shaw of. Dunf
line, deeply oF
Bevin to his house for a friendly
talk. In the end, Bevin “won 90
per cent of his demands. | = *-

\A. few months later, he went
with other Labour ledders to see
Prime Minister Lloyd George, to
tell him that 6,000,000 organised
workers would not tolerate action
against Soviet Russia either by
war or by blockade.

* Itded to a bitter feud between
the two men, for the Prime Min-
ister accused the directors of the
Dally Herald of concealing the

By THE COMMON MAN

crease in the maxims and Sayings
of the common man.

Ii is-years for instance since I
heard anyone say “yuh cant teach

er grandmother to suck’ eggs.”

‘ow much better off would we
all be if that was the philosophy
of the island to-day. Instead what
awful tripe we have to listen to
every time anyone .opens his
mouth. How we miss ° grand-
mother’s eggs. Coupled: with thé
growth of cliches like progressive,
prerequisite, _ preconceived, re-
actionary, fascist, imperialist, ex-
ploit there has been born a veri-
table race of Rosy Dawncrs whose
thoughts never seem to be handi«
capped by any need of originality.
Men and women who could not re-
cite the names of all the British
possessions in the Caribbean know,
they just know that federation
will solve all the difficulties of the
Caribbean. “You just federate”
they say “and you'll see.” - One
such came to see me this week.
She had written a book, she said,
all about the West Indies ahd she
had come to check with me
whether Barbados had a represen-
tative in the Council of Empire.
She was convinced that federation
would be such a good thing. Until
I showed her a map. She was not
quite so sure then and when [| re-
commended that she buy a copy
of the Canada West Indies Year
Book and read it, she asked me for
the address. But one could for-
give.the “preconceivers” if they



¢ lenee@f-evéen the most loys
meived condone at loyal



SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

PAINT

AT










BOXES
and
BRUSHES

fact that the Soviet government
had offered money to the paper.
Bevin, .a director, resented any
imputation against his personal
conduct and did not easily forget
resentment. ;

General strike

HEN. the general strike’
threatened. in 1926, Bevin,

| SIIVER STAR

leaders, was negotiating with) %

Prime Minister Baldwin when|Â¥% With FELT BASE H

Winston Churchill arrived with :
news of a printers’ stoppage in 3 Beautiful Patterns
% Cut to Your Requirements

the Daily Mail office. Bevin
SILVER STAR


















~~ at

Ee
|

. 2
3 _ se
SQUARES

with Felt Base — 3 X 25 yds. and 3 x 3 yds.
gee Just the Floor Covering you have been
waiting for

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

*Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413

claimed later that this brought
hopeful peace moves to frustra—
tion and precipitated the general



stoppage . lesina
shaders \iehantly re * ine CONGOLEUM

struggle was inevitable, the chal-
lenge had to be accepted. He
would be no whiner, no apologist .

Events. and ambition took him
moré and more out of the field of
purely industrial struggle into
that of high, and ever higher,}
politics. Upon the basie admin-
istrative ability of the man- were
now overlaid the quality of the
policy-maker, the woolliness of
the visionary, the monotony of
the egotist.. Few public men have,
been on such intimate terms with
the first personal .pronoun.-

He upset them

W HEN war came in 1939 and

y disaster threatened in 1940,
Bevin (twice failed t6 enter Pat
liament) was the obvious choice
as Minister of Labour in the
Churchill Government. Whoever
sat in the Minister’s chair, Bevin
would in ‘fact be Minister. z

He proved to be a_ great
Minister of Labour, if not in all
respects a good one. He put 25
millions out of a population of
46 millions into work. of national
service, an effort of mobilisation
equalled by no other country. .

Sometimes he surprised and
upset his civil servants by impul-
sive plunges of policy. It is no
bad thing for a Minister to
startle his department, nor is it
necessarily bad for. him to dis-
turb his Ministerial colleagues.
Sometimes it seemed that Bevin
sought to extend his suzerainty
over the whole field of produc-
tion When others resisted this,
they could conveniently be: de-
neunced as “anarchists” secking
to subvert a natural heirachy of
power. ‘

“Stab in the hack” ore
ARTIME events likewise] $ ,6eses6soeesesoss

_ Strer @d- in Beyin, a
suspicion of unism with its
roots in ‘Red-fomenteq strikes

during the thirties, which -chal-

lenged Bevin in his own bailiwick.

‘A “Communist plot” was very
Choose from a wide

nettle ttt tdi a
oy boo Panta
trent tnt bt tvtrrtrty itr ttndnd tint OT COTTE T IIE

MR. BAKER!!

You can once again
BAKE with a SMILE «a
YES! It’s Here Again

GOLDEN
ARROW

FLOUR

THE FLOUR WITH GOOD RETURNS



AT YOUR WHOLESALER.

Rear. ito ythatydarkest* deed=iny the
Bevin. calendar. of. cri “sg
“in he : lias ibaaiass
en Bevin, after the war, be-
came. Foreign Secrets he was
therefore amply warned of. Com-
munist. wiles. . To his new. high
office, anti-climax of his career,
he brought. all. his. stubbornness
ia ina which-age had: in-
isa i
tamed ppointment not yet
‘ue enough, the Foreign Sec-
retary was crippled * the
collapse of _ his government’s
domestic policy. Increasing ill-
health, too, played its part. When
every allowance is made,, his
career” as Foreign Secretary
brought him personal .disappoint-
ment, the praise of his government
officials, the-dangerous approval
of the Opposition and a steady
diminution in public credit.

At the conference table,’ the
old trade union negotiator | met
the spokesmen of a
Socialist tr

retin p

oliey
respec! ible garments”. of
se: “His achievement was’ to


















range of fitting, single or
double breasted.
Style in fine Grade



Forentt 4 ing authority. ~WORSTEDS
oyer events. he he and GAB-
cont rok a he end he’ lor ‘the

- ERDINES,

4

‘Eve big boss”

A big assortment to’











ATHER than — the select from - - --
‘muted Bevin of these | dis-
Wlusioning last years, history

will remember the robust tribune
ef the people; the union boss who
realised that, with power, a boss
must become a statesman. And,|!

above all, the Minister of Labour

who did not fall short of his
country’s expectation in his
country’s peril,
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED,
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were really honest when they’ say
insle have no preconceived ideas.

d,* what n is that

body has arly to any ideas,
that nobody. -anything and
that tl ng out,

le they “are +

they had better ligten.to theirs. It
is an attractive line té-shoot and
our new intellectuals are trained
line shooters, They, shoot it well.
But when they xpme up against
the common man, they don’t know
what to say. Except of, course to
say that he is common, st



are

Restaurant

0

thing to say, ‘WI
way open for the)
ing squashed the ©
they look around for ah

ot oe — they tft him out
not to show how unegmmon he
is and therefore fit:to lord it
over the common man, but to
chi¢kle’) silently among them-
selves. and say, “well if this is the
best. that you can da you must
admit that you can’t«do without
us.” And be rae admit that
we can’t, ot because we agree
that ttis. is the best ‘that we ban
lo, but because the expert and
the intellectual are . not looking
for the best. from _any other
source than their own f narrow
and. self. admiring. circle,

Youll discover
its flavour

is simply





SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1

New Textile Industry In P

From the very weeds of the j:ills
of the island of Puerto Rico, a
territory of the United States in
ihe West Indies, has come a ¢e-
velopment of great interest to "li
weavers. For the weavers of the
Fibre Textile Shop, part of ‘aq
Puerto Rico Industrial Develop-
ment Company, have found a
bright future in the creatioa and
marketing of new textiles, woven



951

od

from the Jexuriant natural pro-
ducts of their fields. The project
is significant, not only in relation
to new techniques and mater'sls
in weaving, but also in a wicur,
culiural sense. This is one.of the
new industries sponsored by far-
sighted members of the island to
bring a stabilized econcmic base
to the life of the people who have
beén American citizens since 1917,



THE FIBRE TEXTILES SHOP in San Juan, Capital of Peurto Rico.

uses various native fibres in the creation of new textiles.

Window

shade material is made of the enea blades woven with maguey fibre.



HANDWOVEN fibre textiles designed by Geraldine
can designer and director of the Fibre Textiles Shop of the Puerto
Rico Industrial Development Company.



Funk, Ameri-



and, thus to wreate. a better and
more balanced way cf living.
The, groun- “of. young. men and

women employed... in the Fibre--
-capital

Textiles Shop in San Juan,
of PuertRico, have found that
the .work they are doing is: the
means"to a twefcld énd.. It is
constructive. work with tangible
results in material. producéd.
Fur erinore, it has revealéd to
them,the’ rich. opportunities “of
thei own land and _ their ; oyu
latest: creativeness,’ For * Pue™.5
Rica possesses naturalendowmeats
almost beyond comparison ‘for *he
development of the fibro text's,
Within its sma ‘crea (3.5
Squate mies) are found a pe
with keen sense of cclour aud
rhythm; raw materials waiting ‘o
be gatliered from the hills and
fields, anftithe “inspir-ttion’ which
comes from the magi¢ beauty ‘of
the land. :

The Fibre’ Textiles Shop, set up
at the invitation- of ‘the Puerto
Rican. Government, intends to
capture by colcur and by texture,
something of the’ ve~,- “essence of
Puerto Rico in every ‘extile which
comes from its looms, The way
to do this, the weavers’ believe, ix
through a deép appreciation cf the
inherent ‘values of the island’s raw
materials, And it is also in, this
way that they are securing
markets, for textiles truly Puérto
Rican in inspiration and execution.

Each fibre used brings a natural
beauty, colour, and vigour of its
own for the eraftsman to use in

the manner best suited to its in-
dividual qualities. The «strong
bark of e banana tree, the

leaves of the royal palm, or the
tall slendet green stems of the
punco ‘plant lend themselves
variously to the hahd of the
worker, and must be understcod
precisély for best effects, :

The fibre phase of the process
starts right out in the fields of the
Puerto Rican countryside. Enea
with ‘its flat paper-like blades
grows ‘by the rivers; sabutan is
found along the roadsides; bamboo
in the southwest; the soft silky
white-fibred maguey plant thrives
in the more arid sections of the
island, Throughout the land,, the
tall round sugar cane-reeds grow
wind-trushed; and bright decora-
tive seeds, as well as the .cogollo
palm, , prized for its, eream-
coloured hat straw, and the
n.ajugua tree, renowned for its
bark, can easily be found.

As it was planned to gather as
many Puerto Ricans as possible
into the various phases of creating
fibre textiles, groups cf country.
men were organized to gather the
fbres from their sections of the
island and to dry them. ‘Thus
many people have gained a’ new



aoe

.

SUNDAY

u erto Rico —By Geraldine Funk

ADVOCATE





~

.Company in San Juan are weaving colourful rugs and fabrics.

livelihood from the weeds which
formerly came to bloom only to
blow away year after year. Some
of these fibres have been used
previcusly by those with sufficient
imagination ‘to understind | their
strength as cord, rope, for ha*
néssing of country horses, and so
forth, but never have ‘they been

used as generously as now in
textiles.
The. fibres are used generally

im a natural state because thelr
rich and subtle tones give the
unique shading that is possible
only with “wild” colours. Most of
the weeds appear in a wide rang>
of .tans, grays, and green. Sugar
cane is bright golden, ‘coconu:
fibre a definite earth brown, and
maguey a creamy white. Thes»
basic. values are never disturbed
by dyeing. One fibre—maguey—
is reserved for this purpose It is
given the orange of some Puerto
Rican houses, the deep green of
the mango trees, the lively yellow



«ct genario bloom, the fire of the

flamboyant tree, Antilles green,
cinnamon, or the blue of the
coffee bloom.

As far as the technical process
of the weaving goes, colour tex-
ture and- materials are so varied
that the possibilities of simple
two-harness weaving are still not
exhausted. The looms are the
same as are used the wortd over,
with exception of the tree-type
primitive loom. Very often they
appear to be simply fodder mach-
‘nes, engaged in eating up fibre.
Coconut cord’ or sometimes yarns
are used far warp, and metallics
teo are combined with the fibres.

The organization of the Fibres
Textiles Shop took three years.
It began with the initial though.
and progressed through research
in the fields, fibre-design study,
training and teaching of workers,
construction of equipment and
vuilding, to marketing and pro.
duction on schedule. This outline

Critics Select Best Films Of 1950

New York City—American
motion picture critics recently en-
gaged in their favourite end-of—
the-year pastime of selecting the
best films of the year. The films
were selected by newspaper crit-
ics, two motion picture organiza—
tions—the New York Film Critics
and the National Board of Review
—and similar groups.

One of the biggest events in this
field will occur at the end of Feb-
ruary when the American
Academy, of Motion Picture Arts
and Sciences awards its “Oscars”
to the outstanding films and film
personalities of 1950 as selected by
members of the film industry.

The critics seemed to agree that

the best films released in 1950
were “All About Eve,” a comedy
about the theatre} “Sunset Boule-
vard,” g melodrama about a long—
forgotten actress in silent films;
“Twelve O’Clock High,” a
dramatic film about the men of an
American bomber base in England
during World War II, and “The
Titan—Story of Michelangelo.”
“The Titan” told the story of the
life of the great Italian Renais-—
sance artist through a succession of

objective images, without any
human actors.
Bosley Crowther, in the New

York Times, in addition to these
four films, also inciuded on his list
of the ten best ims of 1950,








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“Father of the Bride,” a comedy
about the tribulations of a father
attendant upon ‘getting ‘His’ daugh-
ter married; “The Asphalt Jun-
gle,” a crime melodrama; “Destin~
ation’ Moon,” a fantasy about
Tocket trip to the moon; “The
Men” dealing with paraplegic war
veterans; “Trio,” a collection of
three short films based on. stories
by W. Somerset: Maugham, and
“Born Yesterday,” a ‘sophisticated
comedy.

Mr. Crowther did not include
foreign films on his list, but put
them -in a separate category. On
this list he cited the Czechoslo—
vak film “The Distant Journey,”
the Italian rictures “The Walls of



Malapaga” and “Bitter Rice,” and
the French film “T) Affaire.”

The film critics of the New. York
Herald-Tribune, Howard Barnes
and Otis L. Guernsey, Jr., included
on their list “The Third Man”,
a British-made ‘suspense story;
“Jofroi,” g short French film about
a peasant and his love of the land;
“Orpheus,” the French. produce-—
author Jean Corcteau’s version of
the ancient Greek legend; “The
Flame ‘and the Arrow,” an adven-—
ture story; “The Winslow Boy”,
a drama about a man’s efforts to
obtain justice for his son, and
“Kind Hearts and Coronets”, a
British comedy.

“A different type of award was







inaugurated this year by Holiday
magazine. It honoured . various
films’ and filmmakers for» their
contribution “to the role 6f the
American motion picture as an
ambassador abroad,” f

The top award in this poll went
to “The Jackpot,” a comedy. about
a radio quiz show, The magazine
cited a semidocumentary titled
“Mystery Street” as a good motion
picture produced on a low budget.

Two individual awards’ weve
made to Joseph L. Mankiewicz,
the writer-director whose last
three films were all praised high
ly by the critics and the public,
and to actress~producer Ida Lupino
for her production of “low-budget
ulms or honesty and significance,”

Others with open backs

and open toes. Styles in

NOT

Consumers and
Electric Stoves.

ros’
he

notice.





——————

High class FOOTWEAR for Ladies, we Have
them in two-tone combinations with Cuban

heels, Some with closed backs and open toes.

Brown and White, and Blue and White.

Prices $12.38 & $12.44

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC
SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD.





The Company hope to be able to-commence the installation
of new services for the long outstanding: applications as soon
as the néw Generating Set now in course of erection is in
commission, It has come to our notice, however, that some
ttive' @onsumers propose
ot-plate bf », stove, full on, takes the
same current as 20 to 80 lamps, and the Company. therefore
consider it unreasonable that additional stoves should be con-
nected to the supply until? people who have been waiting for
lighting services have been first supplied.
therefore that the Company must give notice that no stoves
or Welding Plant can be conneeted to its system until further

(From “Craft Horizons’)

”

x
PUERTO RICAN workers in the Fibre Textiles Shop of the Puerto Rico Industrial Development

> TT

of the creation of the new Puerte
Rican weaving might. serve
something of an inspiration to
all Who are engaged in hand-
weaving, whether. for personial
cnjoyment, commercial | reasons
or both. For all which has. beea
accomplished in Puerto Rico has
been done in the manner of true
craftsmanship. Everyone bande }
together in a coroperative way
and used the resources of th:
land and their) own inherent
gifts to best advantage.

In whatever part of the worl«
® weaver may be, there most like-
ly is a wealth of exotic, yet fam.
liar fibres waiting to be used
woven . imaginatively into new
forms, In the production of tex.
tiles there is no neéd to be bound
by the tried and true, for this is
a field which is limitless in crea-
tive possibilities fgr those with
the power ‘to seizé and harvest
the natural products of the fields
and of their own minds

ar



-_—_—

Books Cost More

LONDON.

British publishers haye decidec
to. cut authors’ royalties to meet
thé rising costs of book production,

The Publishers’ Association has
draw up a new scale of royalties.
The cuts, except in special circum
stances at least 2) per cent, will
/apply to new contracts between
Writers, and .publishers and in
many cases to reprints.

‘After the first. 2,500 or so copies



Vv

of a novel had been sold, the
writer usually received a higher
royalty on a sliding scale,’ In

the future, the lowest royalty will
apply to the first 5,000 copies, and
after that. the graded increases
will be smaller,

A leading technical publisher
sald costs for publishers have risen
by 150 per cent since 1938 with
no corresponding inerease in sales

vrices,

LLNS



with sling straps

Black and White,

ennai,

ICE.

installing

It is with regret



THE BARBADOS. ELECTRIC
SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD.

V. SMITH
General Manager



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PAGE EIGHT

\ new standard of safety in infant care
set at a hospital in the midwestern
part of the United States

By WILLIS J. GRAY

FROM THE MODERN
HOSPITAL

SOME years ago it became
apparent that the old nursery in

Jennings Memorial Hospital at
Detroit, America’s automobile
manufacturing center, was too
small to meet current demands
for maternity service. A small |
laboratory » situated on the §
maternity voy was moved to

larger quarters and the space was
redesigned into a. new nursery
to accommodate 25, iifants. It
now forms a separate part of the
obs‘etrical department but is so
arranged that noise from
nursery is prevented from reach—
ing the mothers.

Under the old procedure, all
nursery Work was done in one
room, while under the new plan
activities are departmentalized.
This not only makes for greater
efficiency but provides greater
protection for infants and allows
the hospital to practise a_ strict
isolation technique. Too, the new
nursery arrangement has afforded
the hospital an opportunity to
develop an original method of
individualized infant care.

In planning the nursery and the
departmental units, consideration
was given to the amount of air
space and floor space needed for
the proper care of each infant.
The floor plan and room layout
cover an area of 1,280 square feet,
ideally suited for such a purpose.
It is a large, airy glass—partition
room with separate bassinet
accommodaticns. The white glazed
tile walls and composition tile
floor throughout are easily kept
clean. Five large windows permit
an abundance of air and sunlight
Soft fluorescent ceiling lights pre-
vent glare in the infants’ eyes,

Floor Plan

The floor plan is sufficient: (1)
to permit each bassinet to be
separated from every other bas=
sinet and from any wall or parti-
tion’ (2) to provide room for
other equipment needed for bed-
side care of the infant, and (3)
to allow access for nurses and
attendants to give bedside. care
of the infant and pass easily from
one bassinet to the other. Each
bassinet consists of a single metal
stand with steel-band basket,
which is removable to facilitate
cleaning. Each has a lower com-—
partment with a shelf and door,
which serves as a cabinet for
storage of a 24-hour stock ot
sterile supplies, wearing apparel,
and bed linen needed for the
infant’s cay®. Besides the general
nursery, several other rooms are
included fn the department.

The nyrsery for premature
babies is a separate room located
next to the general iursery bul
out of the*}fipcof traffic, and is so
constructedâ„¢ that environmental
conditions can be controlled con~
stantly. The eguipment provided
here is essentially the same as in
the nursery for full-term babies,
in addition to a sufficient number
of heated bassinets and modern
neubators. It ip «particularly
important that all ‘equipment for
remature babies “be Nndividual

necessary emergency
is available at all

Nursery

There is also a separate nursery
for infants under observation and
for those suspected of having an
infection or having been exposed
to infection. Infants who have
been exposed to infection, or if it,
seems likely that they are devél-
oping an infectious condition, ane
immediately transferred | here.
Simila:ly, an infant found to
have such infectious symptoms is

the |



~

AN OVER-ALL VIEW of the nursery at Jennings Memorial Hospital
at Detroit, in the midwestern State of Michigan, showing the tech-
nique of the hospital’s original method of individualized infant care.

immediately removed to this nur-

sery. The original nursery has
been converted into an _ ideal
isolation nursery. ‘This unit is

equipped with lavatory, examin-
ing table, instruments, sterilizer,
bottle warmers, and other neces-
sary supplies. It is in readiness to
receive’ an infant at any time,
and is not used for other patients
when it is not occupied by a

oes
examining and treatment
room is outside the nursery. This
adequately equipped room per-
mits the physicians to examine
the infant without going into the
nursery. It is well lighted, partly
with natural and partly with
flourescent light. It is provided
an examining table and a
- dt also contains an instru-
me and a cabinet for
The room in whica milk form-
ula feedings are made up is con-
veniently located so that the work
can be carefully supervised. The
preparation of all milk mixtures
is done here. It is situated where
the danger of contamination is
least and where supervision can
be given by a nurse who is experi-
enced in such procedures. The
equipment provided includes
sink, lavatory, sterilizer, hot
plate, refrigerator, cupboards, and
work table all of which are so
constructed that they can be
readily weshed. The milk-room
seeaediire is earried out with
strict aseptic technique. Milk
mixtures are poured into sterile
bottles, nipples and nipple caps
are put onto bottle caps in the
milk reom, and final sterilization
is doné by pressure autgclave at

a rature Of 230° degrees
Fah it for five minutes,
which Wil produce an end product

that is bacteriologically accepta—
ble,

The utility and storage,.room is
a, single unit so constructed that
there is ample space for storage
of linen and blankets, a table, a
ean for waste, ahd table space
for an electric plate and instru
ment sterilizer.

A demonstration room is pro-
vided. so that the nurses can
instruct mothers, before discharge
to their homes, in methods of
feeding, bathing, and dressing
their infants. A wall chart is
placed so that the mothers can
follow all details in the nurse’s
instruction. The room is large
enough to accommodate several
mothers.at the same time. Attrac—
4ive, simple educational materials
are. selected. by the maternity
supervisor and made available
for use by mothers upon dis-
charge.

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The staff of the nursery unit is
under the supervision of a graduate
nurse who has had advanced
training in the care of the new-
born infants. Graduate nurses and
auxiliary workers, before being
assigned to the nursery unit, must
have had supervised pediatric
experience and have demonstrated
their aptitude for nursery work.

Usually the care of premature
infants is entrusted to graduate
nurses only, and when fhis is not
possible, it is assigned only to
those who have had training in
the care of such infants. Gradu-
ate nurses and auxiliary workers
assigned to the care of newborn
infants have no other patients,
adults or children, under their
care. In effect, no one is assign
to the care of newborn infants
anless (1) approval of such
assignment has been given by the
hospital’s employe health service,
and (2) the worker’s previous
assignment has been on a nonin—
fectious service. Both day and
night, there is at least one gradu-
ate nurse, with advanced training
and experience in the care of the
new born, assigned exclusively to
their care.

Desirable

It is recognised that individual
care of each infant is desirable
and that the smaller the number
of infants cared for in a given
space the less danger there will
be of infection. Only members
of the nursing staff are permitted
to enter the nursery. The hospital
has adopted a standerd that for
each eight full-term infants, one
nurse is in sosnpetn charge. As
for premature babies, who require
more care than do full-term
infants, there is one nurse for
each four premature infants,
because this is the maximum
number that one nurse can care
for satisfactorily. The infants are
not cared for on a common bathing
and dressing table; instead,
bathing, dressing, and the com-
plete care of each infant is car—
ried on in the bassinet under
rigidly aseptic conditions.

A strict hand: washing tech~
nique is maintained by both
nurses and physicians, Hands are
washed with soap and running
water before and after handling,
diapering or feeding each infant.
Nurses are carefully instructed in
this regard because it is especially
important that they wash their
hands after diapering the infant
and before feeding him, All mem-
bers of the nursery personnel
wear fresh gowns daily. Masks

fpana
SOR TEETH

TO FIGHT >
DECAY

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Individualized Infant Care At
A United States Hospital

are also worn
mended that

.

;
:
?
}
E

ently; (3) it sharply reduces the
possibility of transmitting infec.
tion from one baby to another.
The sterile medicated toiletries
accommodated are: sterile cotton,
gauze, and applicators in three-
inch glass jars with stainless
metal covers; alcohol 70 percent
boric solution for eyes, a germi-
cidal solution, liquid soap, oil,
and lotion, all in two-ounce bot-
tles with shaker tops; taleam pow-
der in shaker bottle; small tube of
sulfa cream; rectal ometer in
glass tube; tube of vaseline for
lubricating thermometer, and safe.

ad ty pins pressed into a bar of soap.

Success

The success of this procedure
has proved that its vonuite. are not
dependent upon the judgment of
the individual who watches over
the nursery operation. It is well
known that suspicious body sur-
face blebs, sometimes characteris-
ue of impetigo and other infee-
t.yns, usually can be cleared up
through prompt treatment with an
antiseptic and careful
care, The proper care of the skin
of newborn infants is important
in preventing infection. The less
manipulation there is, the less
danger of infection. Therefore,
every questionable condition is
dealt with promptly and carefully,

Some hospital nurseries prefer
fo use soap and water as the
cleansing agent, while others have
followed the practice of using an-
tiseptic baby oil. The technique at
Jennings Memorial Hospital per-
mits the use of either method of
cleansing the baby. If i re-
fined and blended antiseptic aby
oil is preferred, the special dis-
penser bottle is provided in the
cabinet. The antiseptic ofl pro-
vides maximum protection against
cutaneous infections, setves as a
lubricating agent and prevents
chafing. As a further precaution,
babies may be anointed at birtin
and frequently thereafter with no
5 per cent sulfa cream.

As a consequence of the estab
lishment of these procedures and
the use of the special kit, impetige
has disappeared entirely from this
American hospital,

This article appeared in The Modern
Hospital, a monthly magazine published
in the United States which deals with al!
aspects of hospital procedure and admin-
istration, The writer is director of Jens
nings Memorial Hospital at Detroit,
Michigan, in the American Midwest. One
picture accompanies this article and mur’

carry this credit line: ‘“Courtes: if
Modern Hospital.” ener



A New

Way To

Stop Toothache

JAMES A. GALE, L.DS., D.P.A.

, and a two-year investi-
gation into these claims was insti-
on behalf of the Public

might accrue if in-
cidence ©. “ae could be
a the child. - Too often
we

No. of
RESULTS
Test Schools 30
Control 30
As I cannot
of removing oral sepsis

lessening of the orthodontic prob-
lems so often encountered later,
problems which we must all admit
would be better prevented than
cured.

The following is an interim re-
port after one year’s experiment.

Subjects Selected
The subjects selected for this
test were children in nursery
schools, for several reasons, in.
cluding the following:—

(a) Test was commenced with

all under 3 years of age,
as this group would, to my mind
gain the greatest benefit, and would
be under control for the necessary
two years.

(b) The children belong roughly
to the same social and economic
strata.

(c) The alternative, where a
controlled experiment is to oper-
ate, would be to use inmates of an
institution or a convalescent home,
and wuuld necessitate the use of
ailing, instead of normally healthy,
chfldren.

(d) These schools are closed for
enly a fortnight in the summer
time, not for eight weeks,

(e) The routine in these schools
is carefully ted and the
teeth are on each occasion
for five minutes under strict super—
vision. ~~. ‘ * td

9 am-—Aprrival at School —~

orange juige-brush teeth.

12 neotwrsgeceo= Deen teeth,
4 pm— bread and butter,
Children leave for

, home.

Sixty children from six schools
were selected, three of the schools
(30 childreâ„¢) being supplied with
“Amm-i-dent” tooth der, the
other three schools (30 children)
being kept as controls and being
allowed to use any dentifrice of
their choice.

Inspection and Examination

Inspection takes place at half-
yearly intervals, a most carcful
charting being carried out. In ad-
dition to the clinical examination
for caries, samples of saliva are
examined in the Bacteriological
Laboratory by Plate Count, by
Lewis Counting Method and Sny-
der Tube Method.

Method of Inspection

(a) In the forenoon careful
mirror end probe examination
and charting are carried out. The
children are given a pellet of
sterile paraffin wax (supplied by
the Bacteriological Laboratory) to
chew, and then they spit into
sterilised glass containers (also
supplied by the Laboratory and
containing sterilised glass beads).

(b) These containers are hand
ed into the laboratory at lunch
time, so that tests can be com
menced at once.

(c) The results (Lewis Count,
Snyder Tube colour change and
interpretation) are then sent to me
by the Bacteriologist, who has no

idea of the clinical findings until |

* the results are collated by me.

Total No. of Cavities
Septem- March Septem- Percent

ber er age
1949 1950 1050 Increase

60 70 89 48

35 54 83 137

These figures alone appear to |

be significant, but I may add that
one child in the test group is
responsible for an increase of 5
earious teeth; this is an excep-

tionally delicate child, is on a|
special fat-free diet, and has been |
off school for long periods, thus |
missing her treatment during her |

periods of absence, while another
child ‘has been absent for
months and is responsible for an
increase of 2. I feel justified,
however, in including these chil-
dren, to avoid any suspicion of
statistical manoeuvring.

The figures are however, even
more significant when we asses:
them as a percentage increase in
carious cavities. In the original in-
spection these indicated a much
higher incidence of caries in the
test group, and the percentage
inerease is worth noting.

An interesting feature of the
investigation was the agreement
between the Bacteriological and
Clinical findings. For example, the
child with a plate count of 274,500
has 8 carious and 2 very carious
teeth, while the child with no
growth is usually found to have
a sound dentition or very slight
caries.

I shall watch with interest the
development of this investigation
during the next twelve months,
and hope to be able to publish a
final report at a later date.

I wish to acknowledge the help
reeeived from Dr. Stuart Laidlaw,
Medical Officer of Health, whose
keen co-operation made the in-—
vestigation possible Miss Elsic
Webster, D.D_O., L.D.S., for her
meticulously careful charting and
help; Dr. Carter, the City Bac-
teriologist and his assistant, Mr.
Wilson, for their willing help and
suggestions regarding the Labora—
tory tests, and to Miss Ferguson
and her staff for the careful super-
vision of the children at the
selected nursery schools,

——$__—".





Stronger Cotton

Cotton fibres can be strength-
ened 10 per cent when treated
with hydrocyanic acid, scientists
at the University of Texas dis-
covered recently, The new pro-
cess is expected to lengthen the
wear of all types of cotton gar-
ments laundered in soap.

School Of Humanities

A School of Humanities has
been established in the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technolog
Cambridge, to provide instruc-
tion in general education for
students in seience, engineering
and architecture.











three |













SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

THE WHOLE FAMILY

@ LEAVES BODY FRESH,
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THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
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SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 195



GWENDOLYNISMS

THE HOSTESS AT 2301 FOXHALL ROAD ADDS A NEW
WORD TO THE LANGUAGE—AND MAKES A NAME BY

MIXING THE ‘UNMIXABLES

Frederick Cook

THE address is 2301, Foxhall Road, Washington.
rambling, white-brick mansion listed
in the city directory as the residence of Mr. and
To Washington's social elite,
it is much more; It is The Place, the most desirable
house in Washington to be invited to.
scene of the capital's most lavish parties where

By

It is a large,

Mrs. Morris Cafritz.

sooner or later you meet every bo
body in Washington.

old

one might expect in Hollywood. It
There is a

below.

There are colourful gardens, a
charcoal grill for open-air barbec
gymnasium, a hege living-room
Egyptian maidens and decorated in
style.
on to the patio.

There is a private cinema and

television room. And above all
the oval dining-room (cham-

pagne-coloured Swedish modern)

which is the scene of the renown-

ed Cafritz dinners.

But the biggest attraction of all
Gwen Cafritz herself. Petite
ark-haired and attractive, she is
at one ¢of
parties,” as a guest said
“like a butterfly bev,itched.”” Her ‘
_sreatest pleasure, and the secret
“of the success of her dinner par-
ties, is in mixing Washington’s un-
emixables and sitting back to
“observe the results,

Pairing

. She carefully pairs an extreme
vight-wing Republican with an
idvanced left-wing Democrat, a
olitical columnist with a Sena-
or he has just lambasted in his
Belumn, a ballet dancer with a
taid Supreme Court judge. “I
ke things to be .interesting,”
‘he says, ‘perfectly straight-faced



Waving «a six-inch-long cigarette
holder.
Mrs. Cafritz’s father—she was

orn in Hungary—was a noted
munologist, Dr. Laszlo Detre
Surany, With him she travell-
all over Europe as a child
he speaks four foreign languages

Magyar, Italian, French and
Spanish—and is a Latin scholar
o. She reads whenever she can
“stuff on polities, economics and
rt, anything. and everything.”

She likes





square-dancing, art
@xhibitions, and sleeping until 10
@m. when she can. She usually
tee at a famous hotel’s cock-
il lounge known in Washington
‘as The Snake Pit. At four she
ikes t owdrive-the youngest of her
_ three sons, Conrad, aged 12; home
from school (Calvin, aged 19, is
mt college, 14-year-old Carter at
® junior high school). The boys
nave a trust fund in which each
as an equity of 53,500 dollars.
Mrs. Cafritz (pronounced
ayfritz) has no political ambi-
“Rion. “I don’t think Morris would















sho jan snjeesercaantaianeimentianenticregttNoetasnsit

HIS week
you have to
= your way
mrom M U L —
ERR Y to
AMOCLES —
=that. is to say,
you have to ar-

ange the. 60
ords _in the
Cirde so that
Mulberry is the

first and Damo-—
cles the last, and
relationship





next to it is gov—
rned by one of
~ six rules.

In case

*you
have

trouble

with the 45th and 46th words, the
pair of them constitute a collo—
quialism for “inadequate rations.”
No comment!

3 Rules
1. ‘The word may be an ana-

‘gram of the word that precedes
it.

2. It may be a synonym of the

word that precedes it.
3. It may be achieved by add-
ing one letter to, subtracting one

* letter from, or changing one let- Brandy — Snap—Knap—Sack —

- ter in the preceding word. Jack—Tar—War—Raw—Deal. to

_ 4 Tt may be associated with —LES.

a

LOOOoOwownwn.amouwHHu9m9ao oom ro
4

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om
3

eR

AT OE

It is also the Washington end of a transatlantie
tug-of-war between two remarkable women, Mrs.
Perle Mesta, unchallenged social leader of Wash-
ington until President Truman sent her as Minister
to Luxembourgh, and Mrs. Gwen Cafritz, 41-year-
wife of a multi-millionaire » builder,
Mrs. Mesta's absence, is bidding hard for her crown.

Number 2301 Foxhall Road is the sort of, house

private night-club with curved
built-in settees, and a glass dance-floor lighted from

There are terraces looking out over the city,
and pleasant on a hot summer night.

One whole wall is of solid glass opening out



1

It is the

dy who is any-

who, in

has everything
bar,

cool

private pool, a
ues, a complete
with murals of
Swedish modern

like it,” she says. Her one ambition
is to be elected a director of
Washington's National Art
Gallery, At 2301, Foxhall Road
she employs a butler, two maids
a chauffeur and a cook, Extra
help is brought in for her large
parties.

Washington reporters have \ an
casy time covering the activitjes
of Gwen Catritz. If nothing
‘interesting’ has ha‘@yened there
are always new “Gwendolynisms”
to quote. As one writer put it
“Gwen has a way of saying
things that make you think your
ears are picking up _ static.’
Some examples. “I think it's
nice to have a European back-
ground, if you come from
Europe.” Greeting a woman
guest, “My dear, yQu_ lool: posi-
tively strategic,”

The power

Fifty-nine-year-old Morris
Cafritz is the power behind his
wife’s social throne, He started
out as a small builder (built the
first bowling alleys in Washing-
ton) and went on from there -to
establish a vast empire in real
estate. His fortune today is
estimated at more than 25 million
dollars. Few Washingtonians
could afford to pick up the bill at
one of his wife’s larger affairs
when pate de foie gras at 20
dollars a plate is served and a
battery of ten waiteg; at 18 dol-
lars a waiter are called in,

But I give few of these large
affairs,” said Mrs, Cafriz. 7
prefer a little dinner: just 20 or
22 guests, I like to haye an
Ambassador or a Supreme Court
justice) one Republican, onr
Democrat and one Person in the
Limelight, introduce a subject
and let ’em fight it out,”

Cocktails are served at 8. By
8.20 everyone is at table, for the
soup and sherry. Then there is
the fish, with a white wine, meat
or game with a rose champagne
and after dessert a pate with the
salad. Coffee is’ taken—British

DARTWORDS



the, preceding word
metaphor, or

5. It may
ceding word.the name of a well-
known person or place in fact or
fiction.

in*a_ saying
association of ideas.
form with the pre-

6. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title or
action of a book, play, or other
composition.

A typical succession of words
might be: Pop—-Dandy—Bandy—



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MRS. CAFRITZ

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Paid Holidays
On U.K. Farms

At The Cinema



MORE’S THE PITY

BY G. B.

LONDON.
Britain's Ministry of Agricul
ture and Fisheries is advertising BEFORE REVIEWING

for 110,000 volunteers to take paid
vacations on British farms

Abcut 100 camps in many parts
of the country will be open to re-
ceive them at cut rates. Farmers
near the camps will pay the volun
teers for helping with the harvest.

Many of the camps will remain
open throughout October and
November when helpers will be
urgently needed with the potato FE
harvest

As in previous years many vol-
unteers are going in parties with
friends. Most of the applications
ceme from factory and office work-
ers who find a vacation on a farm
well worth while.

Last year the ministry recruited
more than 118,000 volunteers,

oo NS

Bank . Tellers
Steal Money

HONG KONG

Thirteen tellers in the Canton
Branch of the Peoples’ Bank of
China have been behaving in a
very uncomradely manner, reports
the Homz Kong leading Red Daily
Ta Kung Po. In fact they have
been playing fast and loose with

the pictures to be shown this

weekend, I am going to mention a film which I saw during

the week, but which, for some unknown reason,
booked for the weekend, and was shown

days at the Globe Theatre.
which presents four

short

was not

for only two
I am speaking Of QUARTET, |
stories by W, Somerset}

Maugham, with an introduction by the authof

The stories chosen are “The
Faets of Life”, “Alien Corn,”, “The
- ” and “The Colonel's Lady.’

Sach one is complete in itself and
reflects a different facet of English
life. “The Facts of Life” and

‘The Kite” are both humourous,
im varying degrees, “Alien Corn”
is the most moving, while The
Colonel's Lady” is ironically
amusing. They are excellently
produced, interesting and realistic,
and the acting, without exception,
superior, The musical back.
ground, played by the Philhar-
monia Orchestra is delightful, and
there is a brilliant solo perform-
ance by the world famous pianist
Eileen Joyce,

The whole film is unusual anti
most enjoyable, and for the life of
me, I cannot.understand why en-
tertainment of this calibre should
be relegated to two mid-week
matinees and evening shows,
Surely, with the modicum of real
ly* good films that comes to this
island, it should be possible to
present a picture of this standard

the money of their Communist over a weekend, and give more
customers—and very cunningly, people a chance to see it. After
too,

In counting big bundles of Jen
Min Piao turned in by depositors
they have claimed shortages where
no shortages existed, pocketing the
difference, But they were careful
to sometimes fake stories of slight

all, the pit is not the only consid
etation of local theatre managers

FURIES

And now for this week-end's
entertainment — let’s start with
THE FURIES which has an excel-
lent cast and boasts a notable

urpluses which they themselves
style—a novel touch for ieee? i! le final performance by the late
: . made up out of their illegal gains, W: ! 7 .
Washington dinners, .« thus removing shspicion. alter Huston, Showing at the
° Missing guest FAS Finally, they were caught out oats a on ae, Se
In the Mesta-versus-Cafritz with specially checked packages of gay. gy Civa. Sen ake
tug-of-war, the absent raarked notes, and now are in gaol 4,8” 6, ae ar, ;
Minister is still one pace ahead waiting trial°for “mass corrup- ae. earne pores en, See
It is a matter regret to tion.” ands of acres acquire y fair
ot be : : sans : + 5

re, 0M she ‘and eee been The Bank called a meeting of ranang or foul mostly the

a c ave as B 0. oa Se i Sr i tn ° iE .
our the biggest prize of all, meen er es rte oette Mr, Huston plays the principal
President, and Mrs. Mesta has. ee cee _. role of T. C. Jeffords, owner of

» and apologised for this ‘un-Marxist i

i's eee nee 7 th h e Furies, a vast land empire
Of course, Mrs. Mesta’s friend- conduct, pointing nous! at the the’ has built up, but which,
ship with’ the President wicked tellers were all former through his extravagance, is in
back to the days when he was a employees of underground native jeopardy of being lost to him
Senator. Mrs, Cafritz is banks taken into its service im Pjscarding his weakling son, he
her time. “I just haven't had an order not to’ break their rice- moulds his daughter to his own
opportunity yet,” she says. bowls,” when these corrupt estab- ‘nrestrained and ruthless pattern
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED, | lishments were liquidated last and the climax of the film is a
LES. — year. violent fight to the finish, when

“OUR CHILDREN

she, to prevent her father from
marrying an acventuress, and to
retain the ranch herself, enlists
the help of a man who has been
their enemy for years but whom

she loves,
Walter Huston’s characteriza
tion of Jeffords is magnificent,

and he dominates the entire film
by his unbridled passion, vehem
ence and treachery, and yet, at
the same time, he portrays a deep
underlying affection and admira
tion for his daughter, In this lat
ter role, Barbara Stanwyck is
fiery and domineering, with an
all consuming passion for power
Her interpretation is dramatic

‘ahd sure, in what is probably one

‘of her best roles . Playing oppo-

stt@ her is Wendell Corey as the

'
be the onby one who cag keep the |
bridle on Miss Stanwyck, An ac. |
complished actor, few demands are |
made on Mr. Corey in this role,
thé’ supporting cast, are Gilbert]
Roland as q Mexican squatter and
Judith Anderson as a middle-aged |
adventuress, Miss Anderson, whose ;
acting is always of the finest, por-|
trays a scheming widow, who}
comes off second best in the battle |



with T.S.’s daughter and q pair of |

scissors — one of the dramatic |

moments of the film
Though the action of THE!

FURIES cannt be said to lag, and |
the acting is definitely good, the |
continued harshness, violence, |
avarice and uncentrolled emotions |
of its theme pall after a time. |

GIRL OF THE YEAR

The Empire is showing a colour—
ful, light and frothy semi—musical,
GIRL OF ‘THE YEAR, starring
Joan Caulfield, as the famous Pet
ty Girl and Robert Cummings as
the artist responsible for this lus- |
cious creation. The film’ is al
pleasant mixture of comedy, and |
romance, glamour and cheesecake
with plenty of the latter,, Whether |
the story is the life of George Pet-
ty, the artist, | am not prepared to
say, but it is entertaining, When
his original Petty Girl is rejected
as commefcial art, Petty falls an
easy prey to a predatory female
who thinks he should devote his
talents to highbrow art, with al

capital H! Wandering through a
museum one day, he meets Vic
toria Braymore, who, from all
ai.gles, would make a_ perfect
model, but, alas, is a college pro
fessor! However, after a series |

of gay adventures, he decides that |
the Petty Girl is definitely his line |
of art, and with the help of Miss
Braymore, who has by this time,

thrown all inhibitions to the four

winds, this now famous figure. in

Commercial Art ig launehed on its
scaring career.

Robert Cummings as
breezes through the part
obviously keen enjoyment and
caps his performance in a most
amusing scene where he gets all
mixed up with a quick change
artist and succeeds in completely
gumming up the whole act, Joan
Caulfield’s figure is one that
should please even the most dis-
criminating and her singing and
dancing are attractive. In the two
principal supporting roles, Elsa
Lanchester and Melville Cooper
are splendid, and Miss Lanches-

Petty
with

ter’s portrayal of a college pro,
fessor with a hang-over, while
only’ a matter of seconds on the
screen, is a gem in itself,

The musical numbers sparkle
and the twelve Petty Calendar

Girls will probably ensure a full
house, All in all, GIRL OF THE
YEAR is saucy entertainment and



PAGE NINE










Cope. 1950
Borden Co
Tuternat’| Copt
Reserved

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KLIM quality is always uniform

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banker-g ambler, who appears

Rupert and the Tce-flower—6

ONL



a
Fleven months’ old Annetta Roberts of Government Hill, St. Michael,
is happy only when she is “ping-ponging” the piano.

The “Sunday Advocate” wants to know wnat your child is doing.
Send us your favourite photograph—print and negative—and write on
the back of the print: your name and address,the child's name and age
and a short description of what he is doing.

For each picture published in the “Sunday Advocate” $2 50 will be
paid. Pictures should be addressed to the Art Editor, Advocate Co, Ltd.
City, and should reach him not later than Wednesday every week.

/OTION PICTURES

During its first year of opera- |
tion the Motion Picture Associa-
tion of America’s Advisory Unit
for Foreign Films has helped 113 |
film producers from 22 countries |
distribute their films in the
United States. }

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PAGE TEN



Dies As Tractor

Overturns

HIRTY - EIGHT - YEAR -OLD
Clarence Weekes of Walrond
Village, Christ Church, died on
the spot when a tractor on which
he was travelling overturned at
the corner of Charnocks and Wal

tond Roads, Christ Church, The
body was removed to the Mortuary
at District “B" Police Station.
The accident occurred at about
5.00 p.m. on Friday. The tractor,
owned by Hopefield Plantation,

was being driven by Cyril Moseley
of Walrond Village. It had three
empty carts in tow and when
going around the corner it struck
an- embankment and overturned,

Weekes was sitting on the left
fender and Kenneth Blackman on
the right. Blackman and Moseley,
the driver, ,were both injured.
They were taken to the General
Hospital where. Blackman wa.
treated and discharged. Moseley
was detained.

A-pest_mertem examination was
performed yesterday morning by
Dr. E. L. Ward. The inquiry was
begun' und adjourned until Friday
next...

TUE MEN'S ALL STAR Talent

Show at the Globe Theatre on
Friday night was one of the best
held since these shows were started
by. Mr. Maurice Jones, Manager.

The Judges’ decision was also one
that was popular with the crowd

Keith Sealy, a clerk at the Parcel
Post Department, the winner, was
awarded the Silver Cup. He sang
“Count. Every Star.” Hig pro
nunciation and timing were ex
tremely good. ‘

The second prize went to Joe
(Shoeshine) Clarke who sang
“Sunny Side of the Street.” Cla
thrilled the crowd with his an:ics
which accompanied the singing. Ife
is the most popular comedy-sin: or
on the show.

Other good vocalists were Sam
Gordon with “Night and , Day,”
Errol Barnett “My Foolish Heart”
and Holman Rayside with “Our
Very Own.”

The first Ladies All Star Talent
Show was held on Wednesday
night but the standard. of this was
poor, Joan Licorish, who sang
“Tennessee Waltz” was the .wm-
ner and second prize went to Joan
Bentham with “Mona Lisa.”

On Friday night next, the Super
Star show will take place and on
that night Sealy will meet such
vocalists as Clayton Thompson and
Fitz Harewood. .

EVEN NURSES of the General

Hospital have passed thejr fimal
éxaminations, They are: G, Ram-
say, M. Ramsay, BE. Belgrave;

C. Campbell; B. Reid; D. Gar-
rett and M. Gay.

Those passing the preliminary
examinations are: G,. Goddard,
V. Lashley, S. Welch, M. Squires,
E. Marshali, R. Webster, V. Babb
R. Holder, U) J. Headley, G. Har
per, B, Lawrence and E, St. Hill

URING LAST WEEK many
political meetings were held
in St. Andrew by the Barbados

Progressive Party and the Electors
Association, On Friday night while
the Electors Association was hold-
ing one at Hillaby in support of
their candidate Mr. J. A, Haynes,
the Labour Party held theirs at
Cane Garden in support of Mr.
Seibert: Worrell.

The polling.day for the St.
Andrew bye-¢lection, caused by
the death of Mr, D. A. Foster, will
take place tomorrow.

OEBUCK STREET was very

congested yesterday morn.
ing. Motorists.and eyelists were
held up for a considerable time.
gs labourers on motor lorriés
which were loaded swith sugar
and parked oh both sides of the
road, were busy unloading these

trucks, 9
Moiorvisis, anxious to get .on
their way were pressing their

horns, but the two policemen gh
duty found it hard to get traffic
moving, tt
YN THE EASTERN SIDE of

the Prineess Alice Playfield,
fabourers were busy, yesterday
putting up a barbed wire fence,
Three men were engaged on the
work. é



Hospital Superintendent

The Advocate understands that
‘Mr. A. G. Leacock witl not resign
from his Acting Appointment as
Superintendent , of the General
Hospital to-day,



"Lady Nelson’ Expected
Here Today
The Lady Nelson is die to ar-
rive here this morning around
daybreak,

Our Readers

Mark Up
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Mr. Alston's letter in
your Saturday issue hits the nail
on the head. There are two con-
flicting schools of thought—the
Government's and the Trade’s.
The Government say in effect

-~“In 1942 you purehased a tin
of Milk for 60e and we allowed
you to sell it Tor 80c, (at 334%
markup) You make 20 cents
and you were more or less sati*
fied that this 20 cents allowed

you to pay your expenses and left
something over for your share-
holders. But they say, this is
1947 now, and this same tin of
Milk is now costing 90 cents. If
we permit you the same markup
you will sell it for $1.20 and will
make 30 cents. If im 1942 you
were satisfied with 20 cents pro-
fit, you will be making an enor-
mous profit if you are now allow—

ed to make 30 cents. We there-
fore proppse to reduce ‘your
markup from 334% to 25% so

that you will sell this tin of milk
for $1.12. In this way you will
make 22 cents. which is much
better than the 20 cents we allowed
you to make in 1942”.

That is the Government's
theory and acting on it, without
asking anyone to comment, they,
reduced markups by an average
of approximately 6 per cent in
1947

From 1947 to 1950 the food
trade (and others) both whole-
sale and retail made pretest after
protest that this was economic
nensense. For three years every
single protest. was ignored and
would have ,.been ignored for
ever had it not “been that with

> prices continuing to rise, the Gov-

ernment felt that if their, original
reasoning was right; then there
would be room for a further cut
in markups.

So in 1950 with the dual hope
of making the protesting mer-
chants look stupid and of effect-
ing a further cut in the cost of
living by a further reduction in
markups they appointed a com-
mittee to conduct a full investiga.
tion.

Thus the trade were compell-
ed to wait for three years for an
opportuhity to state their case
and refute this nonsensical theory ..
The effect of this arbitrarily im-
posed cut was two-fold. Firstly

at was an economic impossibility

to dncrease staff wages as rising
costs made it reasonable to do.
Secondly, it involved any Com-
}eany, which had been
reasonable wages at the time of
the cut, in making a substantial
Joss on all local trade. The effect
on my company may not be with-
out interest.

in 1947, the Colonna were
selling locally approximately 800,-
000.00 and were making a net
profit of 3% or $24,000.00 before
taxation. The cut in markups of

over 5% reduced our gross profit
by over $45,000.00. We, made a

substantial loss and have contin-
ued to do so ever since, (Fortu-
nately in 1948 and. in 1949 there
was a boom re export of rum
or we mi ave had to close
Win nanteatunt aly this’ boom is
now over) .

The whole position is

made
clear as under:—
1942 Position
Item sold for .......... 80 eents
Cost ‘of ifm ~«#... 4.0%. 60 cents



Gross Profit (334%

mariWip) 3%, .. a. + 20 cents
Less Wages and all
expenseg ©2249... ua } 474 centg

Profit befare taxation.. 24 ce ty
1947 (Prior to cut Arom

334% 10 25%

Item sold for .,... 1

.20 cents
Cost of [tem

90 cents

Gross Profit
markup) aintatanls

Less jWages and all
expenses

(334
30 cents

264 cents

3h cents



Profit before taxation



, 1947 (Position after





Reduction)
Item sold for. ...... 1.12 cents
Cost of itém ..... as 90 cents
Gross Profit 26%" .. 22 cents
Wages and all expenses 26} cents

© "
LBS 6 ites tits 44 cents.

It was these figures that were
submitted ,to the. Government's
Committeé of Enquiry, The mat-
ter was very thoroughly gone into,
balance ‘gheets wae required and
everything was subjected. to {he
closest scrutiny, _

In’ view of the facts,

which

were beyond controversy, we ex-
:

paying

Say:

Government to
remedy their

of us -even
apologise for
rude yemarks

the take
action to

and some
hoped they would
their. somewhat

about capitalists and possibly ex
press their thanks to both the
capitalists and the grocery €m-
ployees both of whom had been
compelled to subsidise the public’
food for three years and more.

It was with considerable sur-
prise that we waited anxiously
month after month for action to
be .taken. It was with even
greater surprise that we heard
last month in the House that in
spite of having demonstrated to
its own committee, that the posi-
tion was desperate, no action
would be taken, and the re-
commendations of the Committee
were to be ignored.

The writing on the wall now
becomes quite clear. Merchants
and their employees are to have
their noses held firmly to the
grindstone until the merchants
no longer have the money to stay
in business and the clerks no
longer have the wages to buy the
necessities they sell.

pected
prompt
mistake

Thanking you for space,
lam, .
Yours faithfully,
DONALD SCOTT,
Sherbourne,

Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael.

Housing Area South
Of Beckles Road

Developed

The housing area south of
Beckles Road is now completely
developed. Roads have been made
and street lights put in. Four ad-
ditional standposts have been in-
stalled and also a number of fire
hydrants,

On the northern side of Beckles
Road, work is progressing. New
houses are going up, and houses
are being removed to the -area
from congested areas.

The road construction has been
held up somewhat, however.
The akea on the west side of
Culloden Road is being surveyed
with the idea of're—-planning it, It
is expeeted that when this is done
amore houses will be put there.

‘The area on the south side of
Beckles Road below the Alms-
house § been surveyed. Possi-
bly in the ne@r future, will be seen
proper roads“and other improve-
“ments in this area.



Instructions
To Voters

-. To-morrow. voters. of” St,
Andrew will elect a member
to fill a vacancy in the House
ot Assembly,

Voters are asked by 'theâ„¢

Sheriff and Returning. Offi-)
cer in.a motice published in
the Official Gazette “to meet
at the time and place afore-
said, then and there to make
choice of one qualified, able,
sufficient and discreet person.
to advise and consent th
making ef such laws as shall
be meet and convenient for
the good government of this
place and people and) pre-
servation of their estates.”

Police Band
‘At Esplanade

The Police Band will play at the
Bay Street Esplanade this after-
noon. The programme includes
two hymns, and is as follows:
1. MARCH ,... “Entry of the

Bulgars” .... Lotter
2. OVERTURE—*Poet and

Peasant” ......+-.se0 Suppe
3. SELECTION—“Mikado”
4

—Sullivan
. TWO PIECES—
“To a Wild Rose” Macdowell
“In an Old World Garden”
+Percy Fletcher



5. SUITE—“Ballet Egyptian”
—Luigine
6. SEL—“Lileae Time”—Schubert
7. DANCES—"Hungarian” 5 & 6
: —Brahms
8. CHARACTERISTIC PIECE-~

“The Butterfly”, —Bendisc
HYMNS: 31 A. &-M. Saviour

" Again to Thy Dear Name, we
aise.
202 A.& M. Rejoice, the Lord
3. King.
OD SAVE THE KING!
Conductor: Capt. C. E. RAISON,

M.B.E., A.R.C.M.






$

o
HORIZON -~
| x. Lae
atch fer the Stans |
i CHARLES MC. ENBARNEY & © CO;

LTD.

SOMETHING

ok
NEW
ey

ON THE)

*
MOTORING.
*







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





~“oriinte” PHOSFERINE

Of Barbados
Starts June






Dr. W. F. Auer, Resident f or
Manager of the Barbados Gulf or m e 4% .
Oil Co, Lid. told the Advocate | ‘

yesterday that his company ex: |

pects to start their Seismograpbh |
Survey on or about June |. This
will be im accordance with the
programme presented to the! If lack of confidence worries you

Governor-in-Executive Committee |
in Septernber 1950.

He said that the survey is to}
be carried out by the Independ-
ent Exploration Co., Ltd. which
company also contracted for the
Gravity Survey’ which was com-
pleted on January 13 this year.

By means of the Seismograph,
information obtained in the re-
cent. gravity survey can. be fur-
ther detailed and refined.

_The seismograph method con-
sits of recording minute vibra-

and you feel tired and depressed
through overwork remember how
very uSeful PHOSFERINE has been
to othérs in a similar state.



~“ PHOSFERINE may bejust what

om whisp s08 artificially set up you need to put back strength and
in ane ea 'y. means of small

charges of dynamite. These energy. PHOSFERINE soon re«
dynamite explosions will be vives the appetite and, in so doing,

spaced at intervals of 3 of a mile
to a.mile and will take place in
hallow holes drilled for the pur-

it revives keenness for work, for
enterprise. PHOSFERINE helps

pose. to build up staying power—gives
As these explosions will occur reserve of patience good-
at depths from 100 to 300 feet, oor of wa

no effect will be felt on the sur-
facé except by means of highly
sensitive detectors which will be
used for this purpose. ;

By means of these minute vi- !
brations, which are reflecteq from |
Such hard rock strata as may |
exist at depth, it is possible to
preduce a geologic map of the
sub-surface, which can, under
ideal. conditions, be of great ac-
curacy and afford the geologist a
very clear picture of possible
Structures which might be fav-
avon for the accumulation of
oil,

_ Dr. Auer said in passing, that
similar surveys had been made
by numerous oil companies in.
eluding Gulf Oil Corporation, all
over the world, Particular men-
tion he said, might be made of
the fact that such a seismograph
Survey was made by Gulf, of the
entire country of Denmark which,
with its large population and: in- |
tense agriculture, might well be
compared with Barbados,

He said that he realiseq and ap-
preciated only too well, the popu-
Jar apprehension which was felt
in connection with the use of
dynamite on an island like Bar-
bados, but the extensive experi-
ence of Gulf Oil Corporation in
other parts of the world has
proved that in reality, «uch ap-
prehension is unfounded

will when you need them most.
Try this grand tonic today. In
Q liquid or tablet form. 2 Tablets
of PHOSFERINE equal 10 drops.

THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS

for Depression, oan intigeetien, Sleeplessness, ead

fluenza.





One of your difficulties for .

MATERIALS

can now be supplied by us.

We have SHEET TIN which cannot be replaced at
its present price.

N.B. HOWELL

LUMBER & HARDWARE



Netherlands Govt, |}} Di! 3306.

Names New Carib.

Commissioner

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 14,

Her "Majesty Queen Juliana has
appointed Jonkheer Leopold Quar-
les van Ufford, Secretary of the
Netherlands Embassy. in Washing-
ton, D.C., to be a member of the
y therlands Section of the Carib-

an Commission,
_ Jhr. van Ufford is already famil-
iar with the working of the Com-
mission, having attendeq the
Eleventh Meeting of the Commis-
sion, held concurrently with the
West Indian Conference (Fourth
Session) in Curneao, » Netherland
West Indies, last year, At that
meeting, Jhr. van Ufferd acted as
a Commissioner. He has also
served during the past year as
Netherlands, member of the Com- |
mission's Working Committee,
whr. van Ufford was born at
The Hague in 1921. He graduated
in Law from the University of
Leiden, and joined the Nether
lands Foreign Service in 1942,
serving first as Attache to the
Netherlands Legation in Berne,
Switzerland, In 1946 he was at-
tached to the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs at The Hague, becoming |
Permanent Secretary to the Neth-
erlands Delegztion to the United
Nations at Lake Success the next
year. Since 1949 he has been ia
his present post in Washington.

Bay Street

——



Welcome News
You will be pleased to know
that a large shipment of GLORIA



(irradiated) Evaporated Milk has
arrived, and you can now obtain
your requirements
dealers,

GLORIA Evaporated Milk is
recommended by“ Baby Special-
ists as the next best substitute for
Mother’s milk. Use it and you
will be delighted with the won-
derful results.

from your





BIG 7

INTERCOLONIAL |
CYCLE = & ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

OF THE

-open to all, fourteen (14) prizes
given away.

Starts 2nd April closes 29th June 1951

AMATEUR ATHLETIC

_ Grand Free Competition open to all, fourteen (14)
prizes given away. Starts 2nd April closes 29th Jure, 1951,

ASSOCIATION OF “. prize 1 enly 3-Burner “Valor” Stove
nd prize. 1 case E.P.N.S. Fish Eaters
BARBADOS 3rd prize 1 only No, 6£S “Valor” Stove and Stang
4th prize 1 only No, 111 “Valor” Oven r
AT 5th prize 1% doz. Soup Spoons
‘ 6th prize 1 only Presure Stove
KENSINGTON OVAL 7th prize 1 only Porringer
8th prize 1 only Stainless Steel Bread Knife
ON 6 Consolation prizes of 1 dommussorted “Fray Bentos” Soups.
, WHIT MONDAY, _ Just collect the labels from your “Fray Bentos” Soup
4 | tins, pack them in dozen lots, and send them to T, Sydney
May 14rTu Kinck Ltg., 3rd Floor, Plantations New Building, and de-
TW mand a receipt for them. On 29th June the fourteen (14)
4 Thursday, May 17th persons sending in the largest number of labels will receive
ane their prizes according to the quantity of labels sent in.

Saturday, May 19th

° | ~ ASK YOUR DEALER FOR

Cycle and Athletic Male “PRAY BENT i
SOUPS

and Female Stars trom
the Caribbean who
will invade Bimshire

®
Programme Etc. appears
Later

J. W. Maynarp

Hon. Secretary.



Seeeeeanersaesee



















1951

SUNDAY, APRIL 15;



~ Colds,
Coughs,

| Sore Throats, Bronchitis

ae ~
ss.







For quick, sure relief

rub THERMOGENE
Medicated Rub all over
your chest, throat, and back.
its healing warmth relieves
congestion, and breathing the
Saree pleasant medicinal vapour it gives

and you breathe it in! off clears nose, throat, and lungs.
DOUBLE- ACTION

THERMOGENE

MEDICATED RUB

In big glass Jars and handy dandy Tins
TRS

It does you good in two

ways —you rub it on” »



=

BACKACHE

Try this for reliet !

If you get sharp stabs of pain :
uur back when you stoop an

af ttlae tan, these to 9 ae od
continuous ache, the cause can very
often be traced to the kidneys. These
Y ey vital organs should filter poisons out of

iW the system but sometimes they get

} sluggish and congested and the backache
oy you suffer is Nature's way of warning
you that your kidneys need assistance.

A trusted medicine for uhis purpose is
De Witt's Pills. They have a cleansing
and antiseptic action on the kidneys, helping
to soothe them, tone them up and restore them
to function naturally. There is a long record
of success behind De Witt's Pills, which have
been relieving sufferers in many parts of the
world for cver half a century.

If you could read even a few of the





















De Witt's Pills ateful

letters sent in by backache sufferers who have

oo” found relief atter taking De Witt's Pills you

would realize that your suffering may also be

LUMBAGO unnecessary. Why not try them for your

SCIATICA trouble? "They may be just what you need. Go

, JOINT PAINS to your chemist and get a spply right away.
RHEUMATIC

PAINS

OUR GUARANTEE
-De Witt’s Pills are
made under strictly
rat conditions
an conteres sana
standards of purity.

nya Ree ee

for Kidney and -Bladder...Troubles








“ax arive

_
—

N addition to the regular size, this new,

smaller pack of Andrews Liver Salt has been

introduced to enable you to try the World’s most
popular saline for a very small outlay !

A glass of effervescing Andrews, costing only a
few pence, cleans the mouth, settles the stomach,
tones up the liver, and finally clears the bowels.
Also at any time of the day one teaspoonful in
a glass of cold water makes a cooling, refreshing
drink. You can be sure of Inner Cleanliness
with Andrews.

402. 71N
|





.



a



SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN
SSS sess SSSR









BY CARL ANDERSON —













IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |



| SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only









USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
| Onions, (Per |b.) 16° “4 lb. Bag for 30 Tono, (1 lb. Tins) 123 1.08
Robertson's
Potatoes, (Per Ib) 12 8 lb. Bag for 64 Squashes, (Bots) 128 1.16
(Three Varieties)
Grapes, (Tins) 38 29 Kaviar, (Tubes of) 26 22

MICKEY MOUSE

T<¢* of QoRey!
Se epee i
GODPESS FINDS THOU HAS ESCAPED!

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ALUMINUM WARE KITCHENWARE



isis MMO lseabacn det ss dhicecemantgea Cocktail Shakers, Saucepans, Stoves, Sinks, Aluminum Drain-
: Jelly Moulds, Strainers. ~~ boards, Sanicans, Potato Ricers,
RIP” KIRBY. Mincers, Veg. Shredders, Mortars,
CHINA and Seales, Knife Sharpeners, Cake
Pans & Coolers, Icing Tubes and
EARTHENWARE Books.
; ‘lea-sets, Tea-pots, Cups & Sau-
dove, Plates, dcigs. PLASTICWARE
Baby Dishes, Egg Containers,
CLEANSERS Glasses, Cups & Saucers.
Sprayers, Flit, D.D.T., Windolene,
Harpic, Carpet Cleaner, Paint ENAMELWARE
Cleaner, Vim, Polishing Cloths. Saucepans, Mugs, Bowls, Basins,
Chambers, Pails with Covers.
GLASSWARE
Tumblers, Jugs, Jelly Pots, FLASKS
Casseroles & Baking Dishes. | 4, 8 & 10 Pint Thermos. a so
pris ay uF
CHAIRS, MATS, MIRRORS, CUTLERY, Nes Sos.
SORRY | GOTTA DO THIS+ . p : (S
a BUT | BEEN THRU TOO MUCH OWN WAY, JER AND MANY OTHER ITEMS OF INYEREST TO YOU Sa ay
JUST LIKE | LEFT IT+ THREE 4} ae NOT TO FINISH THE > é BUT DROP THAT Ye og
MILLION SIMOLEONS! mw gs oo JOB YOURE RIFLE! ; aes
ALL MINES } a : \ Y 7 ' WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. = = ee

Successors to g

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones: 4687 & 4472.

for ECONOMY. VALUE |
PITCHER'’S >. SATISFACTION.





3 and 3
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a





SEALE: Mrs Eloise Seale and relatives
gratefally return thanks to all who
wreaths

PAGE TWELVE











attended the funeral, sent







and letters of condolence or in any

other way assisted on the occasion of
Seale,
Michael

James E.
St.

the passing of Mr
late of Baxter's Road.

15,4. 51—In

—
REECE—In loving and grateful memor)

:
2
Sands
house with shingle roof and pine
flooring. 4 reception, 3 bedrooms,
Verandah; 2 bathrooms and
toilets; 2 kitchens, 2 servants’
rooms, 2 garages. Now in 2
apartments but easy to reconvert.
:
‘



Pe

IN’ MEMORIAM



BESS TOOBIN

FOR SALE

CRUSHED STONE AND
FINES.

CRETE, AND MAKING

ROADS AND PATHS.

Apply - -
J. N. HARRIMAN & CO.
LTD,, SEAWELL.











REAL ESTATE
JOHN

M4.
BLADON

A.F.S,, F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD





FOR SALE

WORTHY DOWN, Graeme Hall

Terrace—A modern bungalow of
stone construction with parnpet
100f. This property has the i-



vantage of a corner site and a ver
fine view seawards, There ar
good bedrooms with built in ward-
rebes. Large lounge/livin« ro
with 2 verandahs leading fram it.
The kitchen is well supplied with
fitted cupboards. There is a 2 car
garage, 2 servants’ rooms and
laundry.

“INCH MARLOW"—On approx.
acres coastiand .near Silver
A solidly constructed stone

“MEDMENHAM™ Pine Hill A
very fine 2-storey property
antly situated on approx, 1% acres
near Government House. There
is spacious and*well proportioned
accommodation

ception, dining
rooms, 4 bedrooms,
dressing room) butiler'’s. pantry,
kitch¢n, servants’ rooms, gérage,
fernery, poultry houses ete, There
is a two way entrance arive and
the grounds are well laid out with
1

pleas-

comprising 3 re-
and = bréakfast
(1 with fare:




is, flowering phrubsa and flower
The vhole property
has @ pleasant character typipal
of some of the older cstablished
homes in this exclusive area
at £5,500

dens

A very sound buy

“TOBRUK” — Cattlewash, St,
Joseph. A picturesque holiday
home situated right on the beach
with approx, %4 acre of land The
construction is of timber raised
on stone pillars with shingle roof-
ing and is of sound condition
throughout. There are 3 bedrooms
(with basins), lounge, wide roofed
gallery overlooking the ocean,
kitchen, servants’ rooms, outside
bathing cubicles and garage space,
Offers invited.

St
two-storey

“BAGATELLE HOUSE” —
Thomas. A_ spacious
country house with approx. 5
acres plus additional 31/2 acres
if required. There are 5 bed-
rooms, 2 lounges, dining room, 2
enclosed galleries, 2 bathrooms,
kitchen, pantry, servants’ rooms,
2 garages and various outside
buildings This property is well
elevated and commands excellent
views of the St. James coastline,

“SILVERTON"”—Cheapside. Com-
modious 2-storey stone house
standing in approx. 1% acres
planted with fruit trees. 2 large
reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2
galleries, kitchen, 2 bathrooms,
ete, Centrally located and suitable
for conversion into flats or board-
ing house.

VILLA ROSA — Passate Road
City. Attractive and centrally lo-
cated stone bungalow with double
carriageway. Approx. 14,000 sq.
ft. This well built property
coniains a front gallery, large
Jounge. separate dining room, 3
large bedrooms, toilet, pantry and
kitchen, Good courtyard at rear.

HOTEL PROPERTY — We are
instructed to offer an old estab-
lished hotel business as a going

concern. Full details are available
of this highhy recommended
proposition.

DOWER GARAGE, St
Gap--A substantially built and
almost new building suitable for
use a8 a garage, store, workshop
or a variety of other purposes

Matthias



FOR RENT

“IN CHANCERY"—Modern
nished bungalow on coast
vble immediately

fur-
avail-

“WINDY WELLOWS"—Prospect,
St James. Unfurnished house on
ce with % bedrooms, lounge,
verandah overlooking seat etc.
Immediate possession.





REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

IDEAL FOR CON-

Phone 8444, Extension 8.
12.4.51.—6n.
ROSS SOS S OOS

Oe



|
|























































12.4.51—4n | from £2,500 to £2,300. A Bungalow Typ

Le eee at Hastings Main Rd., Good Condition
CAR—Hillman 10 Car, 1039. Perfect and Location, Reduced from £2500 to
running order. Owner leaving island. | £2,300. Almost New Small Stonewall!
Ring—2593 12.4.51—3n, | Residence at Hastings Main Road., Good

12.4.51—4n. |and Almost in any District
Prices with Re-Sale Values. Mortgages
FORD PICKUP—in good condition and | Arranged. If I Can't—Who Will? Dial 3113

D de Abreu, Call

at Bargain





s Bt Olive Bough,
of r dear husbend Petersen Reece, | 4 new tyres, City Garage Trading Co. : at

hic wen celled home to rest on the } Ltd. 11.4.51—t.f.n, | Hastings 15.4.51—1n

Mth of April, 1948 $$$ $$$ . ee ee
Ma he continue to rest in peace PICKUP—Austin A. 70. Pickup, Almost eel ; In house spots at Black Rock
Always remembered by his loving wife, | new. Dial 4725. General Engincering | mity Lodge Worthing View, Christ
children and family Co., Spry Street, 14.4.51—2n Chure h Dial 2947. R Archer. Mc
Kenzie, Victoria Street. 15.4.51—la







~ PROPERTY

Containing dwel ling
house with three bedrooms (Partly watt
standing on one rood, 14% perches of
land situated at Forde’s Gap, hee



ELECTRICAL

















BULBS (Electric) 100 only at Se. | Hill. Apply to: C. M_ Greenidge
230V. 40W. Bargain at Whitfieids Haid-| Hutchinson & Banfield, James Street
| ware Dept. 14.4.51—2n 8.4.51—6n

ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts.| “Offers will be received up to the Doth
| 30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps an | day of April 1061 by the” dndeenieneg
spares. A. Barnes & Co. Ltd. for that substantially built stone

143.51—t.f.>, | bungalow called Allenby situate at

_- — Welches, Christ Church on the sea where

there is excellent bathing. It consists
LIVESTOCK of Open Verandah, Drawing and Dining
Rooms, Three spacious Bedrooms, Laya-
$] — alas and Bath, Kitchenette, Double
% COW—One Guernsey Cow giving 23 nts’ room, and a Garage; and stands
3; | pts milk, (First calf), Apply E. v, | 0n 6.664 sq. ft. of land.
# Davis, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch Inspection by appointment,
% 10.4.51—3n DARCY A. SCOTT,



Real Estate Agent,







GOAT—Alpine Goat. Fresh in milk. Magazine Lane,
Second litter, Dial 4983. 14,4.51—2n { Dial 3743. 13.4.51—-4n,

MILCH GOAT, “Sally Laurator”’, Reg We will offer for sale to public com-
No. 656. Apply S. C. Skinner, “Laura- | Detition at our office on Friday 27th
tor”, Rockley eersece ie Da Costa & Co,,; April at 2 p.m,

Lid” Phone 8280 or (1) LABOSR BLEST a
Dwelling house

Martins St.

stone wall
shop at St.
standing on
acres, 2 roods of iand, Dwelling
house comprises Drawing and
Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitch-
en, Toilet and Bath. Government
water installed.

Three other parcels of land con- |
taining respectively 2 roods, 3
roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong- |
ing to and ne tg above property
will also be offéred for sale either

10.4 51.—t fn

MECHANICAL

Allen Motor Driven GRASS CUTTER-—
Recently overhauled. Can be seen at
Jeson Jones Garage 13,4.51-—3n

BIKES—on terms, Hercules

King, All models in stock,
A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
11.4,51,—T.F

and
Philip,







(2
Silver






Aileen . oad oe together with above property or |
“GESTETNER DUPLICATORS" —New separately.

models just received, A. S. Bryden & For inspection apply on the prem-

Sons (B'dos) Ltd) Phone 4675. isés {6 the owner Mr, Fverton
16.4,.51—t.f.0 Greenidge.

For further particulars
of sale apply to :—

and condition:

ONE (1) five H.P. three phase totally























-
ao draulic Jacks, 4 Blow Lamps, 3 Shifting

MISCELLANEOUS Wrenches, Flat, Round and Half-round

AMM-I-DENT :—At last, AMM-I-DENT | Files. Tyres, 1 Clutch, Plate,

Toothpaste has arrived. Amm-I-Dent is D'Arcy, A. Scott,

the toothpaste with the Ammonium Ion Gov't: Auctioneer.

which helps to stop tooth decay. It is 11.4. 51—4n. ¢

pleasant tasting and refreshing to the hdl i





ns —
I have been







and is the right thing for a Cricket o7

@raphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop Tennis Club

edjoining Royal Yacht ne .

It can be seen at Seawel



































a &c, all Painted met n: Electric 3 Burne
square compartments. New half-inch
mesh throughout. Suitable as Brooder,| Moffat Stove (very good) Electric. Ho
Rearing Pen or Cockerel Pen. Plates, Steamers, 2 Burner Valor Oi

ARCHIE CLARKE, Phone 4530 from Stove. (Practically new), Primus Stove

8 am. to 4 p.m y 14.4,51—2n} Cream Separator, Churns, Freezer

: rd ‘ Kitchen Utensils Aquarium, Large
Parrot Cage, Roller, Tennis Net anc
As Gaels cna erdatr Bik Gir wramnene, Poles, Quorts; Preserving Pan, Westing
: ‘ . 15.9.51—tf.n. house Refrigerator in good working
. ia i. order,

TYPEWRITER RIBBONS & CARBON] Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms cash.
PAPER Fresh stock ‘ust received, get BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
your requirements at T. Geddes Grant
Lta 7 4.51-—7n Auctioneers

ene — ———_—_— 13.4.51-

“Two F PLATE Glass Display Cases, $120, “| — etn as
each Stansfeld Scott & Co,, Ltd, Broad
St 7.4.51—t.f.0

GOVERNMENT nonce

OFFICE ACCOMMODATION







VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-air:
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to you
sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4474
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

13.2.51—t.f.n



office accommoda-

tion (approximately 18,000 square

Temporary







VAN HOUTENS drinking chocolate : ; : At
Add a dessertspoonful to a glass of feet), within one half mile radius
milk to obtain a refreshing beverage of f Of the . Public Buildings, is
exouisite Mavour, Only 38 cents for ‘| required, immediately, to house a
Ib tin Compare the price with com- Government Organisation

titors’ 11.4.51—3n % :
pe Offers in writing should be
fg ACHES — Ladies and Gants ae and submitted to the Financial Secre—

jJewe wrist watches in G and ic i i ater
Stainless Steel, Attractive prices, Alex tary, Public Buildings, not later

Yearwood Jeweller, Bolton Lane than the 18th instant.
15 4 51—1n 14.4.51.—3n.





ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS




T armone quest |

HOUSE




DIAL









3466 FONTABELLE
= PERMANENT
OR
MAPLE. MANOR TRANSIENT

BOARD AND LODGING
FOR RESERVATION

GUEST MOUSE
OPPOSITE HASTINGS ROCKS





the supply of ‘the
to be delivered at



birth supported by

their own pencilis), pen,

SUNDAY



















ADVOCATE











































Ss
LARGE HOUSE & FLAT—The Camp,

- i"
Secretary. NOTICE St. Lawrence Gap. On-the-Sea. Fuly
54.51—4n, BYE - ELECTION furnished Dial 6357. Miss K. Hunt.
= Parish of St. ANDREW Maxwell Coast 31,3.51—t.f.n.

NOTICE

— | Location. Reduced from £1,400 to 21,200 PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
CAR—Morris Minor Saloon 1949 (Green: | A Residence at Rockley Main Road Near Sealed Tenders (Marked on
Mileage 15,600, very good condition. New | Blue Waters, Good Condition and Loca- | enve lope “Tender for will
Battery. Apply: S. P. Edghill. Telephone | tion, Reduced from £3,200 to £3,000 Nett. | received by me at muy office up to
4266, C/o R. & G. Chalienor. C Me for \Nearly Anything in Real Estate| p.m. on Tuesday, 17th April, 1951



following commodities
the Christ Church

More than one person having beer
duly nominated at the election of per-
sons to serve as members in the Gen-

———

THE RHONDA, Large dwelling house



on the Sea near Cacrabank, Worthing.
the eral’ Assembly for the Parish of St. |The above will be set up for sale ot
‘00 Andrew in the place of D. A. Foster| our Office in Lucas Street on Friday
oe the 20th day of April 1951 at 2 p.m.
Sos Thereby | notify my intention of inspection from 4 to 6 p.m. ery day
faking 4 poll for the determination of |¢o5. April 16th. or on application to

the said election on Monday next the

10.4.51—Ta





Almshousé in euch quantities and ai }l6th, day of April 1951 at the Alleyne | Carrington é& Sealy. ete
such times as the Board of Guardians }School, Belleplaine beginning between ire
shall from time to time direct: the hours of seven and eight o'clock in} THE SNUGGERY, Lower Westbury Ra
(a) FRESH MILK the morning. near Brandon's Beach Comprising 4 large
The amount of milk required is Polling Station No.1.— The Alleyne | rooms newly painted, toilet, bath, elee-|
approximately 3,000 pints per pint, |School—the North wing for all persons | tric light, also Radio Distribution and

and the Board





reserves the r
to accept the tender of more than

whose surnames begin with the
._ to J. inclusive.
Polling Station No. 2.

letter | telephone ut your disposal to an approved

ean tenant 15.4, 51—1n

— The Alleyne













Tas) Sentara tain be eae’ School — the South wizg for all per- VICTORIA—On the sea-side near
anied by a certificate signed by 2 |S0% whose Surnames begin with the | Worthings Post Office. Ideal locality;
eae se, o ae yo. | letter K, to Z. inclusive. fully furnished with telephone refrig-
qualified Veterinary Practitioner Signed erator, Radio, Electric; running water
that the cattle from which the F. A. INGRAM, in bedrooms, Servant’s room and garage.
milk is supplied are free of Sheriff and Special terms for long-stay tenant.
Tuberculosis, Returning Officer. Dial 8150 or 8671 Victoria.
(b) FRESH BREAD 10.4.51—6rn 14.4.51—t.f.n
(c) FRESH MEAT inde on aieies ao a n — ae a
(d) PROVISIONS
Ineluding:
Unit to be tendered for, PART ONE ORDERS
Biscuit# per carton
Rice (State grade) per bag of Lieut.-Col i Sorell, OBE,ED.,
180 Ibs. Sommandin#,
Flour per half bag of 98 ibs. [{ 2 _ The Barbados Regiment .
Cornmeal per half bag of 98 Ibs 4 Issue No. 15 13 Apr 51.
gir . ate Grade) per bag i PARADES—Training on Thursday 19 Apr 5I at 1700 hours.
_ Ibs. H@ Goy will continue weapon training—The Rifle Lesson 7—the lying position
Soap, Blue mottled per box and hold,
Split Peas per bag of 98 Ibs. A” Coy will do LMG training—Lesson 4, aiming and holding, the object of this
Salt Pork per 1b. lesson is to prepare personne! of the Coy to fire the Bren gun on the range the
Salt Fish per Qntl. following Thursday.
Coffffee per Ib. “B" Coy will do LMG training—Lesson 9—Introductory Shoot (single rounds).
Oat Flakes per Ib The object of this lesson is to give each man practical experience in firing the
Sago per Ib. gun.
Tapioca per Ib. Band
Cotton seed oil per gln Band practices will be held on Monday 16, Wednesday 18 and Thursday 19
Wallaba Firewood per ton. | 8 NiGHT
a Matches pat oaren oust’ aint ‘ There will be a voluntary night for NCOs on Thursday 17 Apr at 1700 hours
ach person tendering h from {we The lessons for voluntary night will be those lessons which have been published
two sureties of £50 each from in orders for Thursday. NCOs are asked to make every effort to attend this
properly qualified persone wee to parade,
become bond with the successfu en- , oPICE J e r és SAN 2 PE oN iG
derer for the due performance of the RE OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
| Contract. 7 Orderly Officer Lieut. P. L. C. Peterkin
The Board of Guardians do not bind Orderly Serjeant 381 Sit Robinson, V. N.
themselves to accept the lowest or any Next for duty
tender. i Orderly Officer Lieut. S. G _Lashley
E. FE. ASHBY, Orderly Serjeant oo .- 233 L/S Blackman, A. L. O.
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians,

Christ Church.
10,4.51—3n,

EDUCATIONAL









2. The Entrance Examination will be
held in the Sehool Hall on Friday, J
8th at 9

a.m.

3. Candidates will be accepted

examination who were not over 12 years
or who will
not be under 11 wears on lst September

of age on Ist January last,

mouth, Get yours, now, from your drug- instructed by the Gov-] next. This concession is applicable t

gist'’s or notion counter.—15.4.51—6n, Ree ate eaon Te eee cae the current year only. : ce e

eee —— - vB ae : = oo 4. Parents/Guardians must notify the ° 2

oANTIQu as: =o every scription on Wednesday next the eth April at Headmaster in writing not later than aa a ganas Time is approaching, we are in a
88, ina, © ewels,” fine Silver re or ais * Monday, 3¢th April if they wish their osition to

Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto- Mower. It is a collection of Six Mowers | 7)! vlads to sit the examination. Suck D n EPAIR TRUCKS and VANS, Adjusting Brakes,

ipplication

ts ere ot wae ina ee Berroa te tificate. It shall also state 38
“BATHS — In Porcelain tr ' . q Pik) ne is now attending and must be accom-
alte Pisin ee tO een Enamel, ze eee patina dey panied by a brief Testimonial from
nite tt - ican matching 12.4.51—4n || Headmaster of th t School “
@rade. A. Co., ae 7 5. Candidates are expected to provid

& ruler







UNBREAKABLE POTS!

You can still get a few of the
Medium and Small Sizes of
OLD TRON METER CASES

Some people have used them for :

VIOLETS
CARNATIONS
{PINKS
GERANIUNS ete.
. Price only 1/3 and 2/6 .
See Them at Your
GAS WORKS,

BAY 8T,

——_—_—

GREY HOUSE

Church Street
Speightstown



Instructions have been received
fiorh Mrs. 1. G. Jemmott for the
ebeve. property to be offered for



tale by PUBLIC COMPETITION
at 2.30 p.m. on Friday, April 27,
1981. at JOHN M. BLADON'’s
Of ces, Plantations Building

Grey House is a spacious 3-
storey stone building with a dry
goods and generg) store operated
on the ground floor which offers
cprertunit for the development
of a good business in this central
pesition

Particulars from the Solicitors,
Messrs Yearwood & Boyce, James
Street, or the Auctioneer, John M
Bladon, Plantations Building

—



Tel. 2021, I. BOURNE, DIAL 4837 |
Manageress, 14.4.51,—2n
SSS | FS SS SSS cdl

~ Ta i

joha 4. Biadon

A.F.\S., F.V.A.



must state the boy's date et
a birth/baptism cer-
Schoo!

Ligh





M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
S.O.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.



PART Il ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT

12TH APRIL, 1951 Geis Kor

SHEET NO. 1.



















anclosed induction motor. One (1) HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD - — 1 SEPOINTMEN s & PROMOTIONS
Switch board fully fitted, One 2 11,4.51,—6n. MODERN HIGH SCHOOL Sit K “A Appointed CQMS of “A” & “B”
neh delivery (Lee Howell) centrifuge! ' —| his School will re-open on Tuesday 7 L/Sit Mlackett, i. 1 Coys respectively wef 1 Apr 51,
sump. All im condition “as good as AUCTION 24th April and will be in session al di 234 L/Sit Williams, BE, D.
1ew. Price two_ thirds (2/3) Ruling oe on that date ; 3; Husbands, HUA Promoted to the rank of Serjeant
ig seed taps Reply Box iy a Sh HILLMAN MINX 1939 MODEL A limited number of new pupils, owing 407 Guintees : rie wef 1 Apr. 51
aaa aia ¥ We are instructed by the owner who is| t© considerations of space will be eee 409 Reid, NE.
SPANNERS: (Cycle) “Universal” -| leaving the Colony to sell this perfectly | viewed at 10 aim, on Wednesday 18th} oo) D.
way nut, Peg & Cone 40 doz. to clear | sound vehicle by Public Auction, at Cole’s | inst. # abr os aed = Promoted to L/Sjt wef 1 Apr 51
at 12e, each ~=Whitfields Hardware Dept. | Garace at 2 p.m, on Friday, April, L. A, LYNG A 427 1./Cpl Glasgow, R. W
4 4.61—-2n. ) 1951 Principa 2 » Smith, A Promoted to Cpl wef 1 Apr 51.
a — detente JOHN M ae 15.4.5] Qn 391 Belgrave, J. S
uctioneer.
POULTRY Team eo. M. LD, SKEWES-COX, Major,
, ee eee —_ S.O.L, > djutant,
By “instructions received I will sell at The Bar s t,
5 ene -———_————] Central Police Station on Monda iat F _COMBERMERE SCHOOL. jarbados Regimen
COCKS—Four (4) Pure Leghorn Cocks | the 16h April, 1951 at 2 p.m. the fol-| ENTRANCE EXAMINATION TO MAI}
F ere Sie Bees S50 srahs Apply vy ee items: 25 cartons Biscuits, 10 ae Orie in the Press
3 ryan, Little Yorkshire, Ch, Ch ‘ins Condense . s ' 8 previously no’ Ly — “44 3% .
or Dial 2425.—15 4 51—1n, 528 Tins ‘Beare at atte packages pen admissions to the School will take place POTOVTSOSIOSS PROSSER POS ESE S SOOO SPSS SOOO
Boots, Foot and Fuel Pumps, 2 Hy-]| in September next.

une

SMITHS ENGINEERING WORKS

Roebuck Street (Next Combermere).

for

Dial 4947

Body Repairs and General Engineering at your Convenience.
We also repair Trailer and Cane Carts over the week-end.
@m Satisfaction Guaranteed !

LLLP AINE

PPPS PP EPSP PSAP EEE

the

é PO

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%,
y
x,
aH

* CODES SEBS SS SSS S555655

*

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MALIN

MSs















efreshments will be on sale at tht
>. School canteen
: ee es eee sire UNDER THE SILVER 6, Will Vestries and all other Scholar " AYLOR’S OF ROEBU
vite Taken before meni it serves HAMMER o-awarding authorities please submit ’ , CK STREET
aitbet hha” qiatmentemns OBEN. WE de teganon oeabes et
sith the foregoin Bi . 5 .
"0 RAN CR) at leading On TOMBE 17h. uflerder of Mrs are the Blenders of the famous
pti as | E. M. Watson we will sel her Furni }
CROQUET Be dics and fully| ture at “The Canteen" Garrison. (Nea: PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT ’ $
equipped at Halvisehe Sports “Dept. ist} Married Womens’ Quarters). Whicl 1. A limited number of vacancies wil) })
Floor 12.4.51-—3n naaveent = po eosien 5 ad Tabl | secur in September, 1951, in the Prep |)
——— pono {Seats}. Square Tip-Top. Dining Table ratory Department of the above School | }
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win.| Sideboards, — Hatstand, _ Book-shelves J Applications mo be submitted to the |) (With the Distinctive Flavour)
tow styling, ight control, Valances and Pump Waiter, Flat Top Desk; Tea Trol feadmaster, by parents/guardians or |}
{raperies. By Kirsch. “Dial 4476 A A Settees, Upright and Corner Chairs vehalf of boys who shall be not less re
3ARNES & co., LTD. 19.2.51—t.n rris Chair with Cushions; Antiau § than eight and a half years of age, no |, Ask for this Blend and you will be assured
Uphols; Ottoman; Ornament Tabi 1 :
: , ee Ea sechalot | 12 Mahogany; Silvertone Radio “Gins Woe! on ea a eae Cr Oe 7
25 The. at T—Best Quanity | Bschalot and China, Dinner, Tea and ‘Coffee sar ge Se date for applications will be ‘ of getting the Best.
tities at 36c, per tb HAROLD | Setvices; Old China Dinner Service tonday 30th April,, 1951
PROVERBS & CO, LTD, High Street ee eae Bie’ an ae aed wo. An. ekarnination will be conducted }}
ii 5 stable and Sweet dishe Re 5 » 9 at
me 15.4-Birrmn paandlestions, Spoons, Forks and Cut oa BYR RUF SABIE RY: Spe eto \ JOUN Y ne ye
CHAIRS—2 | tery; Bridge Tabie and 4 Chairs; Rug: a erat « arrive e . D. f | c vy
inte heecien pis ease: at Har Congoleum, Pictures; Verandah Chairs 4 Candidates: should AoC eculppen { 4 5 "AY LOR A SONS LTD.
= 12.4.51-3n Dress Foun, Single Mahog: Bedstead f. “ith 2 (two) pencils M PINDER. Y
For Boulders, Concrete Stone, Grit Mahog, "3 "Winged Wardrobe; ‘Dressin esribaer ae
and Dust. Contact WILLIAM HINKSON,| TeDles. Military Washstand — Cheva Governing Body of Com Tee ; POO TOTO PROS POSPOR IOP
Sealy Hail St. John r 13.4.51—3n__ glass, M.T Washstand Single Iror hoo’ ny
eas Ble ; | Bedstead, Cradle, Press; Painted Green LaAol est
POULTRY PEN—Newly Constructed | €2™V¥8s Cot; Breakfast Table, einen
Double Decker, Containing 8 by 3 fect | L@t4ers, Kitchen Cabinet Waggor



4

Just opened, the Popular Charm Bracelet, in Silver.
Also 9et, Gold Charms—Bell, Jug, Shoe, Ballerina,
Elephant, Saucepan, Horse-shoe, etc.

Drop Pearl Earrings, in 9ct, Gold and Silver
All Reasonably Priced

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

Bolton Lane
Sole Representatives for Rolex Watches

AEA AEE EEE CCDC OEE SSOOO EO SVOVSO EG
A large assortment of
BIRTHDAY CARDS and BIRTHDAY
WRAPPING PAPER, GETWELL CARDS
WEDDING GIFT CARDS
also

PASSE PARTOUT and SPEEDFIX TAPE

in two sizes





Roberts & Co. = Dial 3301 }

rn os = Se |





\] 100 NIGHTIES

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951









as aararanERTEETON suaD tp stearsenscennssnessesnmassatsioetenieasensliapesttatiimnnnmaiagtionmnsitiil
<— | wey ;
CS L A S S I FIE D A D fy PUBLIC SALES | PUBLIC NOTICES | WANTED FOR RENT | _| SHIPPING NOTICES
* :
Ten cents per agate tine on week-days Tea cents per agate line on week-da Minimum charge week 72 cents and
TELEPHONE 2508 and 12 cone por sate ing om Sunag, | and ia conta borage tine on Sunny | 2 c's Sundays 24 Sard, [over Bt | oe Mennte Bushags al sSorat oT Seer —
mimmum cnarge $1.50 on week-days/| minimwm charge 1. is 3 cents a word wee a -
ae % — and $1.80 om Sundays | Gnd $1.80 on Sundays. ve” week-daus | word’ Sundays. naa. oe Eee NETHERLANDS
! j 4
For Births, Marriage or Engagement * } ; aa at
anrouneements in Cari Calling ine) = WORE SALE é NOTICE HELP ——| STEAMSHIP CO, Py
charge is $3.00 for any number of words | REAL ESTATE ‘ PARISH OF ST. PETER ae oy ee ee HOUSES * } Paramaribo, Sailing Thursda bh
tp to 50 and 6 cents per word for each| Minimum charge week 72 cents and As from Aptil 16th to May 40 the | py, -ERK.—at the Barbados Ice Co SANANG FROM {3% instant. oe
i na’ rms cas hone 2508| 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 insipid Parochial Treasu: © | Ltd., principally for Sales and Delivery rae y prod M AMSTERDAM | nstant.
edditional word. Terms cash. Fhon rer will not be at his BUNGALOW-—Navy Gardens, 3 bed- M.S. HECUBA"—17th
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a By instructions reteived I will sell by | office except on the following days of Ice Cream at Factory. For further rooms. F; 1 ae . aoe ’ Willir Bp. —lith April 1961. The M.V. “Moneka” will accept
Nottees only after 4 p.m. | word Sundays. Public Competition on the spot at Jst| Saturday April 2ist from 10 yg | Particulars, apply to the Secretary.” ct an lee ee - ae SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND Cargo and Passengers for Domi-
eal ee ese | Avenue, Alleyne’s Land Bush Hall, on|noon; Rees 11.4.51—5n. | 19 ere: eet ee AMSTERDAM nied, Antigua, Montserfat, Nevis
| Thursday next the i8th at 2 pm, TNo| Saturday April 28th from 16 a.m— Earenihomy 7: Tae . . M.S. “ORANJESTAD”—19th April 1951. = = ere: Sailing Monday
houses 17 x 6 and 18 x 10 with shed. | 12 noon; ‘ x PT oS, Nene: | “BEWDLEY"—Navy Gardens, Ch. Ch.,| SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO | sy
_ ED AUTOMOTIVE Can remain on the spot. Inspection on} Saturday May 8th from 10/gum—i2 |—te Go, sta, SS’ AV btumnianed or “unfurnished. tor 51/3] | AND GRORGETOWN accept Cargo and ‘Pemsengers Yor
a ce eae Pt meee noon. te months — from Ist May to 15th Septem-| M.S SILAJA”.—11th April 1951. pt Cargo an ‘assengers
GREFFITH—On April 2nd 1961 at _Phila- Sal wae ane tekaicea Be ene F! % Ps > ol Saturday May 12th from 10° afm.—1i2 }— i yi SABLA OT Apply. G@. Branlieed; Thal 3718 8S, “COTTICA”—23rd April 1951. Dominica vg Aneiaua, C Montaer tat,
ancis ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van. psonee: roon 14.4.51—2n } « * N a 3 s. ing
SR ee had eet eadart tn Guarantee a required. Extra Masonite 15.4.51—4n A ‘Rane py t MANAGERESS ewe bite emt or SAILING wad oe of ons Fridey 20th instant.
U.S.A." for over 40 years coring. poset and lmeured. Upset | ee a cas? ar . Manageress. Previous experience — FLAT—One (1) furnished flat at] gs “GANYMEDES—Isth April 1951 TELE. 4047.
a Price $1,650. New 12: i Beat It if U Can! Almost New Seaside experience = in S.S. 13th April 1951. | 7
ne eteiect, as sently. Apply Coultesy agrees. a iee Bungalow at St. James, Good Location Peter. catering for Restaurants or Hotels or| Dundee St. Lawrence Gap. Suitable for | B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS
Peter ¥y ley yo aici ond Bathing, Wide Bandy, Beach. 4n 44.91—6n | similar experience is desirable two only. Avatiable 15th April, onward S. P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Ltd. | Assoc, INC.
Honel Grit. 0S Avis @31in, | AUTOMOBILE: Vauxhall 14/6. E151 | Outlook, Well Set in of Main Rd.. Re | °~ THE BARBADOS Applications should be submitted in No children, no Pets. Apply Mrs. EB. C Agents,
i Perfect running order excellent mileage | @uced from £3,5 3 A Seaside | woTUAL LIFE AS8U . writing giving details of previous ex-|Boyee on premises, Phone—6240,
“—<— $1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Pionc-4616, | Residence at % Acre, 1 to a ahs oe '¥ | perience and enclosing copies of tes 11.4.51.—2n en —
THANKS , erage Tnone sete: | Reduced trom ‘A New| ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING | timonials and 4 recent passport sir
y A aoneioe Facies’ men Riaha at ae te wt ICE is hereby given that the One | photograph, and should be addressed | HOME. On St. Jarnes Coast from Au- Cana nl National tea mshir s
HOLDER: The Holder Family beg through | GARS—Mortis Oxtofd in Ac] condifion | 8&4. Going to St, James, Good Location Hundred and Tenth Yearly Ordinary | to Messrs, Da Costa & Co,, Lid., P.O. | gust to October 1. Write George
thie medium to thank all those who] onty 18.000 miles. Standard ® HP. done | 2" Bathing, off Main Rd., Reduced from} G nerst Meeting of the above-named | Box 103, Bridgetown.” 10.4.51.-6n | Hunte. C/o. Advocate Co. Ltd sou
gent us wreaths, cards and leters, or} 16,600 miles and in excellent condition. | £3,000 to £2,700. A Cottade by Fonta-}Svciety will be held at the Society's — 8.4.51—3n. Sails Sails Arrivi
in any way expressed their sympathy | ford Prefect cena 14000 leg ete. | belle, Good Condition and Location, Re-|OTice. Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on MisCELLANEOUS —_—_ I Barbea parbad
with Ys in attr recent bereavement} in first clues condition. Apply B'dos |7Ced from £1,200 to £1,050. A 3 Bed Frida. 20th April, 1951, at 2 oelock | oo INGRID—Marine Gardens, The house] CAN, CHALLENGER Falitax a jos Sets jos
caused by the death of our dear} Agencies Ltd. Ring 4908 : " [Fog Cottaee at Ch. Ch. Main Hibs abouts Pn, SoF the. purnose. of WANTED TO RENT _ contains living rooms, Three (3) Bed-) LaDy mers See ve ace me
nother RUTH HOLDER, who died . 7 Miles from Town, Good Condition ant] (J) Receiving from the Directors their " RENT wean : ae ~ Wat RODNEY 16 Apr. —‘:18 Apr. 2? Apr. 27 Apr.
mother LDER. P 15.4.51~-6ri | Location, Modern Conveniences, Spacious Report én the transhetions ot th A FURNISHED STONE HOUSE, 3 bed- | 00ms, and usual conveniences. Water | LADY NELSON 10 May 12 May 21 May 22 May
lith April, at Sandfor? Tenantry, St f . ¢ | rooms, situated on the beach, preferably | and Electricity throughout. For further] LADY"RODNEY J 20 Jun 21 J
Philip CAR—(1) one Standard 8 H.P. 1989) qorta roeed, ith Stone, Vacant, Re- Socket eT gth® Year ended 31st |worthing. Apply to The Advocate Adver. | Particulars apply Messrs. Yearwood &] LADY NELSOF" oe te Sune i" ge gee 18 Sure
; “harle , , a uct from £1 to £850. A Two- December, 1950. : arene Pt Sohints ea eee : uly uly uly uly
Joe, Charles, Edwin, Armenta, Anna} model; in very good order, Mileage 19,960 \Storey Stonewall’ Business and Residence (2) Electing Directors ana an Auditor tising Department. Box No. } Boyce, Solicitors, James Stree: ny LADY RODNEY 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug.
ro 15.4.51—In Apply to C, A. Proverbs C/o, Jame ‘with a Large Garage or Workshop in for the current year. 15.4.51—2n Sara
pews A. Lynch & Co, Lid, Phone 3643 Tudor St., Busy Area, Vacant, Reduced c. K. BROWNE, ene arate tee cts







NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
LADY RODNEY ..10 May. 12 May 21 May _- 22 May lay
LADY NELSON .. 3 June 5 June 14 June - 16 June 19 June
LADY RODNEY .. 3 July 5S July 14 July - 16 July 19 July
LADY NELSON, ..27 Juky 29 July 7 Aug. 7° * 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
LADY RODNEY .,26 Aug. 28 Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11. Sept.

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessets fitted witn cold storage cham-
bers. Passenger Fares and freigiut rates on application to:—

ea
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.

OVOOFOS

44,6654
PPPOE PPPS

959969089 +, 5% > Seo o> +, POSOOOOSS
Yes. Sir!
I¢’s Our

CHANCE



POOLE PEP SELOO POOP POOP IPE
LLL S

Â¥
NS GENTLEMAN S WEEK }
% my
9
; AT WILSON’S
. *
g In answer and satisfaction to our numerous gen- $
x tlemen customers who complain that they are not given
ss the same opportunity to Bargains as our Lady Custom- %
$ ers, we have decided to have as from :
x :
: s
MONDAY, 14th APRIL A :
+
g GENTS’ WEEK 2
3 offering the very best that money can buy in $
% WORSTED in a variety of Pin Stripes, PARSONS’ %
$ GREY in four shades, CREAM FLANNEL, CREAM &
% SERGE, CREAM DOESKIN, CREAM GABARDINE, %
x TROPICAL SUITINGS:in a large variety, SHARK- ¥
s SKIN in WHITE, FAWN & GREY, Genuine IRISH ¥$
% LINEN, TUSSORES, KHAK3 and WHITE DRILLS. 5
%
We unhesitatingly say that prices on these definitely
cannot be repeated. %

SHIRTS! SHIRTS !!

Our range of shirts by the World’s Best manufacturers
are too numerous to mention. We can only invite your
inspection and feel certain that you will buy your-
selves SIX or more shirts.

The famous SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS. and
PYJAMAS are among the range.

_ Other interesting lines are SOCKS, TIES, SHOES,
BELTS, PYRAMID HANDKERCHIEFS, OTIS VESTS
ete.

Wise Men will buy now before it is too late, at - - -

N. E. Wilson & Co.

The Ultra Modern Store well known as the
GENTS’ EMPORIUM

31, Swan Street —

POOLS LAE RES

PP PLPPDDPPPP LPP PPP EPEGIPE A ALTO?

Dial 3676
AAAS POOR

POL ACLS PPE LOE LLP

59 0 SPOON









POS












®
| White, Pink & Blue at $3.00

| 300 CHILDREN PANTIES |
Rayon & Cotton sizes 4—8 3 for $1.20

PANTIES

American Style in
White, Pink, Blue,

Black ? for $1.70
NYLONS - $136 - $1.86

|
|
|
MEADOQUARTERS for — |
BORDERED SPUNS |



CREPES & LINENS
In shades you'll like

°
THE BARGAIN HOUSE

30, Swan Street

S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
PHONE 2702








a

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951





‘Here comes Sis’s young man on a LOVELY NEW MOTOR-BIKE!”

ondon Express Service





-

PPPS OSY

eS P00 1SG5G998590060",
. eae ‘
West Indian & British %

Faiths Barbadians 8-.B-C. Radio |. wes indian & snes §
a Programme 3° 3 §
i Live By—8 SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951. + eee %

e .
14.4.51—Im. @
6.90 a.m.—12.15 p.m, 0.00 M g

. . *
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH “G90 ait, Weskzend Bporis Ravan, Gail “cere eee

diy MacPherson at the Theatre
By JAMES F. BRATHWAITE T H f N |





Members of Adventist Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials,

Seventh-day Adventists began alcoholic beverages. Forces, 2) ge it bree oie oon hcl

work in the island of Barbados The denomination operate: lesa Some 38 sm, Close Down,
‘ L nomi S 161 News from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close

To-day there are over 2,100 adher- medical institutions in various 11.15 am. Programme Parade, St ea

ents who worship each Sabbath countries ‘of the world. One hos- interlude, 11.30) a.m Sunday Service,

(Saturday) in the fourteen Ad- pital is located in Kingston, Ja— 12,,\noom! The News, 12.10 p.m. New

5 : : . Analysis, 12.15 se Down
ventist churches on the island. maica, Another is under ‘con- 415645 3 1S p.m, Close Dow



the Or aim. The News, 7.10 a.m. News
NEARLY fifty years ago Church neither smoke or drink 7-25 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m
B R O S e
{



The Seventh-day Adventist Struction in Puerto Rico. In Port. —— ae

church was organized nearly one ©*-Spain, Trinidad, an out-patient . 4:15 4m. Music Magazine, 4.30 a.m

hundred years ago and accepted Clinic was established about three ${\"“®, aie pin Listeners" Chotée, ued

as their watchword the statement Y@ars ago. During 1950 this clinic ti pm. Rendezveds Plavers, bls oo

of Christ, “Go ye into all the world ©@"ed for over 12,000 patients, Ray's a Laugh, 645 p.m. Programme HAR VEST ,
and preach the Gospel.” Today The Voice of Phophecy radio !*rade. 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m, News

they are carrying forward their broadcast heard over Rediffu- Amalss's 7.15 pm. Caribbean Voices



7.15 p.m, 5.58 M

programme of religious, medical, sion here at 7.30 on Sunday 11.00 pam 25.58 M. 31 M

and literature work in more lands ™Ornings is part of the church's ——— ; :
and tongues than any other Pro- Wrld-wide: effort at evangelizing 49.2)", Woy | Bgleve. Spm. Radio
testant denomination. They have the world, This programme is re. jin Composer of the Week, 9 pm. The
more than doubled their member. leased on over 730 stations and is Wonderful Year 1851, 10 p.m. The News IS THE
ship every ten years since 1845, heard in Spanish, German, French, 20.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
and there are now 718,000 mem- Dutch, Chinese, and other ied eee ee OF THE
bers thieaghout the world. languages in the various countries BosTON

of the world. A few months ago | WRUL 15.29 Mc, WRUW 11.75 Me,

This denomination believe the there were started two broadcasts WRUX 17-75 Me

Bible teaches that Christ will visi- on the television systems in the
bly come back to this earth again;





SALE

TALK
TOWN
YOU CAN'T AFFORD

‘ MONDAY APRIL 16, LOM.
United States, They are the first 6.30 a.m—12.15 p.m, ;

tas s Pe 4 j CC
that conditions in the world at the church to sponsor a_ television —————————_- TO MISS IT
present time are ag fulfilment of broadcast. 6,30 a.m, The Billy Cotton Band Show

fi am, The News, 7.10 am. New

Bible prophecy and indicate that 7 Analysis, 7.15 a.m, From the Editorials
this event is in the near future. In connection with these broad- 425 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m! |
Like many others, they believe Casts there have been started the ‘he Mark of Greatness, 7.45 a.m. |
that there is only one way to gain “Bible Correspondence Courses” Souvenirs of Music, 8.30 am. Practice |

‘ o>

Thousands are
taking real ad- |

i ; é Makes Perfect, 845 « The Debate |
eternal life, and this 1s by accept. that now have an enrollment of Continues, 9 am. The News, 910 a1. |
ing Christ as one’s Saviour. almost a million students. These Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close |

vaniage of gen-
uine Reductions
») in
\ Ladies

mony with the Ten Command. languages, English, Spanish, Por-~ 11,25 a Mayet anes At48 e m

ments, keep holy the seventh-day tuguese, Italian, French, German, ta: io ie Nowe Abaiven 218 pm,

of the week — Saturday — as the Dutch, Danish, Japanese, Chinese, Close Down.

- that Christ hallowed and pe regen Arabic, Amharic, Fili- 415-45 p.m 19.16 M.
essed. They find no scriptural pino Dialect, Indonesian, Korean, Opera Orchestra, 5 p.m.

evidence that this Commandment Vietnamese, Malya, Singhalese acon ot the Week, 6.18 pai the

was ever abrogated or changed. Hindi Siamese, Afrikaans, Sesuto, Storyteller, 5.:
In addition to the religious and Xhosa, Zulu. They are also avail- "20", Champ!









p.m. Star World Ball-
iships, 6 p.rn, Nights at

‘Seventh-day Adventists in har- lessons are available in 25 Down, 11.15 am, Programme =
| Piress



other uctivities already mentioned, able in Braille, bi She ae BE ee
the church also engage in publish. There has been an ever-increas— ———————__________—_ Goods C onis
ing, educational, and welfare ing programme of welfare work, ,7 Pâ„¢ oe News, 7 10 Pan News 3 2
work, conducted in mahy | countries, $uaii", “2° Pm Sorrel ane =|
During the last four-year period 7.45—11.00 p.m. ... 25 31.9¢ M.} Wear and
As part of their educational pro- over 14,000,000 persons received ;





7.45 p.m. The Mark of Greatness, 8 p.m. |

gramme they operate three ele. help. This came as a result of





mentary schools here in Barbados. 1,750 tons of clothing and reliet eae Ke ee eee Make Woollens and
They send their students to Trini- packages sent into 41 countries Perfect, 8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week
Caribbean Training College where The financial structure of the News 1010 pm. Fram tne peter
students prepare for the British church is built around the Bible ‘science’ Review, 11 p.m. Samoan Ad

external examinations, or take principle of tithe-paying, Each venture.
courses in Theology, Teaching, or member is taught to give one-
Business. As part of their educa. tenth or ten per cent of his net as,
tion they work in one of the fol- earnings for the support of the

lowing industries: Printshop, ministry, Apart from the tithe, €C,B.C. PROGRAMME
Broomshop, Bakery, Laundry, and each member contributes liberal

Woodwork shop. This is part of offerings for the support of SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1961

the Church's world-wide pro- foreign mission work. OA Dee NES BOS adie

| other
|
|
|

Departments

EVERYDAY

What about
you ? |

dad for advanced work at the from the churches’ watehouses, ° p.m. British Concert Hall, 10 py. Tho)

gramme of teaching students the Headquarters of the work in cea ae teas ae

dignity of labour. Opportunity this Mission is located at Colly MONDAY, APRIL 16, 1951
is provided for the student to earn more Rock, Britton'’s Crossroad. 10—10.15 p.m, News and Commentar y
part or all of his way through Flder §S. E. White is the president ':!5—10%° p.™ Canadian Chronicle
school. One young man from of the Mission; Mr. Charles Kum,
Bridgetown went to the Caribbean the Secretarytreasurer, and
Training College with five shil- pastor F. J. Parchment the Educa-—
lings in his pocket and worked for tional Secretary as well as the
all of bis expenses at college. Director of the missionary activi-
Over twenty members in Barba. ties of the church, Mr, George
dos spend their time selling Ad- McMillan supervises the work of
ventist‘books and magazines deal- the gospel literature salesmen, In
ing with the events ich are tak- addition to the officers of the
ing place in the world. Last year Mission, the controlling com-
these Colporteurs or Gospel Sales- mittee membership are Mr, E. J.
men throughout the world, solé Parchment, Mr. O. P. Reid, Mr.
over $12,456,770 worth of liter- Ww. H. Lewis, and Mr, C. M.
ature in 195 languages. Greenidge,







Itching, Burning and Smarting of

Stopped In A>
23 Minutes (* _”~

Since the discovery of Nixo@erm by
an American physician it is no longer
necessary for anyone to suffer from
ugly. 2isgusting and disfiguring skin
plemishes such as Eczemn, Pimples,
Rash, Ringworm, Psoriasia, Acne,
Blackheads, Scabies and Red Blotches,
Don’t let a bad siktin make you feel In-
ferior and cause you to lose your] the scientific treatment you have been
friends, Clear your skin this new scien- | needing to clear your skin—the treat-
tific way, and don’t let a bad skin make | ment to make you look more attractive,
people think you are diseased. “V4 cir Page | win stent. ge eae hae

sroug clearer, nea er 6

a A New Discovery thousands, such as Mr. R. K. who

Nixoderm ig an ointment, but differ- | writes; “I sulfered from terribly itch-~
ent from any ointment you have ever |ing, burning and smarting Kezema for-
seen or felt, It is a new discovery, and|12 years, Tried everything, At last I
is not greasy but feels almost like a|heara of Nixederm, It stopped the itch-
powder when you apply it. It penetrates | ing in 10 minutes. I could see my skin
rapidly into the pores and fights the | clearing up on the second day. All the
cause of surface akin blemishes, Nixo- | red disfiguring blotches and seaty skin
derm contains 9 ingredients which | disappeared in 10 days, My friends were
fight skin troubles in these 3 ways, 1, It | ama at the improvement in,my ap-
fights oon kills the pRIOEODeR OF Fee pearance,""
sites often responsible for skin disor-

) p ;| Satisfaction Guaranteed

ders. 2. It stops itching, burning 1 "Ra daeesituien coaeie chacintede ties hing
in 7 to 10 minutes, and ‘ ern opts abao i &
oe ontien the skin. 3. It helps 1 f unless it clears your skin to your com-
heal the skin clear, soft and velvety | Pete satisfaction, Get Nixoderm from
a - 2 Ee: chemist today. Look tn the mirror


























] y 1 Major Smith :
; WELLINGTON STREET: 11 a.m. Holi-
ness Meeting; 3 p.m, Company Meeting;

7 p.m, Salvation Meeting; Preacher: Sr.
Major Gibbs



PX. %
BEFORE

SUNDAY. APRIL Gan ise FOUR ROADS: 11 a.m.Holiness Meet-

. ing; 3 pan, Company Meeting; 7 p.m.
an Sisbhant ae Aniress, Th SS ecense Salvation Me¢tting; Preacher; Lieutenant
& Sermon, 3 p.m. Sunday School, 7 Gwnthorpe. 5
p.m. Evensong and Sermon. Vicar W LONG BAY: 11 a.m Holiness Meet-
D, Woode ing; 3 p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m.

MORAVIAN Salvation Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant
ROEBUCK STREET—11 a.m. Rev. B. Etienne
Crosby, 7 p.m. Mr. F. Barker. OISTIN: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3
GRACE HILL—1i! a.m. Mr. U. Reid. p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation
7 p.m. Mr. F. G. Downes. Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant Gibbons.
FULNECK—il am. Mr. O, Weekes, CHECKER HAUL; 11 aan. Holiness
7 p.m. Mr, W. Deane. Meeting; 3 p.m, Company Meeting: 7
MONTGOMERY~—7 p.m, Mr. I. Oxley. p.m. Salvation Meeting: Preacher: Lieu-
SHOP HILL-—7 p.m, Mr. F. G. Smith. tenant Reid.
DUNSCOMBE--11 a.m. Mr. A. Alleyne CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Bridge-
METHODIST town, Upper Bay Street
JAMES STREET—11 a.m, Rey. F. Law- Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 pam.
rence, 7 p.m. Rev, J. §. Boulton. SUNDAY, April 15, 1951
PAYNES BAY: 9$.30 am. D. Scott, Subject of Lesson-Sermon: ARE SIN,
7 p.m. Mr. J. Layne. DISEASE AND DEATH REAL?
WHITE HALL: 9.30 a.m. Rev. R. Golden Text; Psalins 68: 20. He that is
MeCollougn (S.); 7 p.m. Mr. G, Barker. our God is the God of salvation; and

GILL MEMORIAL: 11 am, Mr, P, Unto God the Lord belong the istue’
Denne: 7 p.m. Mr, G. Harper from death

HOLETOWN:: 8.30 a.m. Rev. J. S. Boul-
ton, (S.); 7 p.m. Supply.
BANK HALL; 9.30 a.m. Miss G. Oxley LIFELIKE FOREARM
7 p.m. Rev. R. McCullough ‘ r 1. rearm
eGHTSTOWN: 11 am. Rev, J. s, A lifelike synthetic fo _o
Boulton; 7 p.m, Rev. F. Lawrence. with a simulated blood supply is
SELAH: 11 a.m, Mr. Bennett; 7 p.m. being used to teach U.S. medical
BETHESDA: il a.m, Mr. Blackman; 7 students how to give hypodermic
PORETHEL: 11 a.m. Rev. M. A. E, injections or how to withdraw

Thomas, 7 p.m. Rev. B. Crosby blood from the human body. The

AFTER



























smooth.

in the morning and you wiil be amazed
Works Fast at the improvement. Then just keep on
Because Nixoderm is seclentifically | using Nixoderm for one week and at
compounded to fight skin troubles, it | the end of that time it must have made
works faster than anything you have | your skin soft, clear, smooth and mag-
seen in your life before. lt stops the | netieally attractive—must give you the
itching, burning and smarting in a few | kind of skin that will make you admired
minutes, then starts to work immedi- | wherever you go, or you simply return
ately, clearing and healing your skin, |the empty package and your money
making it softer, whiter and velvety | will be refunded in full, Get Nixoderm
smooth. In just a day or two yeour | from your Cheinist toeay, 34 guaraa-

mirror will tell you that here at last is | tee protects you >







SEE US FOR:—

GALVANISED MESHED WIRE
CORRUGATED SHEETS

|
|





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OIL STOVES & OVENS



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DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Rey. R. Mc. uchin” of the arm is + fiesh—col-
Thomas, 7 p.m. Mr. A. B. Curwen.
Crosby, 7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant latex tubes that duplicate the arm
VAUXHALL: 11 a.m. Mr. C. Jones
THE SALVATION ARMY U.S. scientists
Pourne, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting, C« elasticity at 212 degrees Fahren-
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL: 11

Cullough, 7 p.m. Mr. H. E. Giikes, . :

BELMONT: 9 a.m. Rev. M. A. E. oured plastic material, under
LTH ISTRICT: 9 sm. Rev, B, Which are a series of light 4nd dark
PROVIDENCE: 11 am. Mr. J. veins.

Clarke. 7 p.m. Rev. M. A. E,. Thomas.

7 p.m. Mr. C. Brathwaite f J .

BRANKER-—2.37 P.M SYNTHETIC RUBBER

have developed

CARLTON 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; . * i aaa

2 p.m. Company Meeting; Preacher: Capt a synthetic rubber that retains

¢ucted by Major A. E. Moffett (Divis- heit (100 degrees Celsius) above
ional Commander) m, Zero, and at 123 degrees Fahren-
Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Compary Meet- heit (50.5 degrees Celsius) be-|

ing: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting; Preacher: low.

SUNDAY ADVOCATI

-
ee

PAGE THIRTEEN









at ne “Sabeeeoenaneet - : ;
LECCE EE SECO LPL LLLP PEL PLLA PBPLPPLPLPPP PLLA PLL LLPLPLELLPLELLPLE LLLP AIEEE AED LT

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a veritable tower of strength against infection.

if you are strong you will not fall a ready victim to
every germ thet is in the atmosphere around you.

That's why FERROL should be given to all school
children during the holideys, to prepare them for the
strenuous term ahead and help them ward off illnesses.

SOLS OOOO

Give your child a course of FERROL this
vacation and see the difference it makes.

FERROL



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(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) {
No. 16, Swan Street -:- ‘Phone : 2109, 4406 or 3534 (









PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE









































FHE STONE IS BACK Housing Experts \F

ryt. 2?
lour Antigua
From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, April 14
Four experts have toured An-
tigua’s hurricane-stricken villages
this week with a view to advising
now best the £175,000 allocated
by the British Government can be
spent to replace as many as possi
ble of the 1,400 houses required
Personnel were D. W. Spruell
| Town-planning Officer, Jamaica

Ellery Foster of U,S. Housing
Authority; Lorenzo Munoz of the
Puerto Rico Planning Board, and

“ MONATION CHAIR
BEHIND ALTAR









SUNDAY, APRIL: 15, 1951
pa ee ey es.’
1
|
|
.

| Mr W. M. Woodhouse, Build-
ing Research Officer of C.. and
Ww. Mi Foster says that the
poor heusing problem is similar
lto that in other parts of. the
world, and they are agreed
that the hurricane destruction
provides Antigua with . an op-
pertunity to start log range real
improvement of permanent hous-
ng through introduction of “aided
f-nelp approach.”

re é
STONE DRAGGED THROUGH A
: DOOR IN SCREEN _

]





OF A HOMELESS
THREE!



Life can be fine after forty if you can keep your
energy, high spirits and a round digestion. Don’t
let the years get you down! If you think you
are. beginning to feel your age, start taking .
Phgllosan tablets to-day! If you take Phyltosan
tablets regularly, you will soon begin to find
that your nerves are steadier, your appetite
and digestion are improving, and your

energy and capacity for enjoyment
of life steadily increasing. .. ott

USED TO
DREAD
WORK

THE CORONATION STONE, stolen from the room shown above, on Christmas day 1950 was returned UNTIL***
to Loudon on Friday. It will be kept in a secret place for some time.
The stone was removed from the Coronation Chair hehind the High Altar in Westminster Abbey,

and the picture shows how the Altar Christmas: Tree hampered the thieves. Dotted line shows how. the
stone was dragged past it















































YES! It was in the dead of the night that the

cruel hands of FIRE snatched their only little home.

4 Can you imagine their plight ?... A LLOYD’S HOUSE-
OWNERS’ COMPREHENSIVE POLICY will protect

you against this and ALL the usual, risks: to which



Life can be fine after forty!

your home is exposed including that of Burglary. PH if LLOSAN |

fortifies the over-forties

He Lost the Pains inhis Aris

SCOUTS OFF TO CAMP B'dos Guide See

Seouts of the 84th Barbados Parades. Campfires, Good Turns Capt. Heads going to work, for rheumacic

(Good Shepherd) Group under Hikes. etc pains in his arms made it torture

their G.S.M., Mr. G. O. Mose, left On Sunday 22nd, there will be : T ’ ° to use them, Yet to-day he fees
ee , * ay < on Friday for camp at Oldbury a Central Service at James Strect 6 \\ “i: Guiders fitter than ever an hi :
AY 3 - als at Jd s § t - : is letter :

Woads, St. Philip, where they will Methodist Church beginning pleasure, as he tells in his

All in one low cost policy.




INVESTIGATE!



° : “ r @
be in camp until Tuesday 17th insti. 4.30 p.m, at which all Scouter VISITING ENGLA ND I had been suffering from
Scouts of the 36th Barbados nd scouts of all ranks are expect rheumattsm very badly and had

ge Write, Phone or Call

‘ . such pains in my arms I scarcely
eee. knew how to use them. Then -
was told to try Krusehen Salts,
and after using one bottle I

(Holy Trinity) Group, under act- ed to be present They will as
ing 5.M. Mr. Carol Lorde, also semble in the church yard at 3,1! Six West indian girl guiders)
left for camp at St. Mark’s Boys’ p.m. Colours will be carried brought nere by the British Coun-



Sch6ol on Friday this service, and there will be . Cl tor a three months stay, were f. So, of course, I have Ps P= _
included in their programme practice for Colour Bearers cn t~-O4y Setting down to enjoy the et it, am now thor- J.B. LESLIE & Co. LTD. ¢ INSURANCE
was-a Campfire which took place Saturday 2ist April at 2.59 a... “ething course outside London,| oyghly better and have never felt COLLINS BUILDING RIDGETOWN
Jast night and a Church Parade at James Street Church u.sauged in co-operauion with the| go fit for years. I used to feel ;
whieh takes place to-day. They Those Groups which find it im- Gril Guiaes Association miserable and siuggish, but now DIAL 3006 ADOS,. B.W.1
will break camp on Monday. possible to attend this Centr Miss Marjorie Pemberton, Guide| it is a pleasure to work instead
The D.C., Mr. C, D, Spencer and Service are asked to attend some Captain and Commissioner in| of a dread." —8.B.
the-G.S.M., Mr. W. C, O. Mar- other place of worship, prefer- %#!bades, heads the party as the The pains and stiffness of
shall, plan to visit the camp ibly at the same time as thar /Jshest in rank and oldest. Mrs.’ pheumatism are usually caused |?
Also in camp over the week- scheduled for the Central Service. “: 4: Douglas, a certificated teach-| py deposits of excess uric acid in
end. is a patrol of scouts of the On Monday 28rd, St. George's “ 2/0™M St. Kitts, is next in seni-| the muscles and joints. Kruschen

79th, Barbados (St, Patrick’s R.C.) Day, Scouters and Scouts of all °°: ‘ i stimulates the kidneys =F pupae
Group at their Headquarters, ranks will wear Uniform from The rest of the party are Miss | intestinal organs to ones r
Jéeniinott’s Lane. punrike 40 Gunect Jessica Smith, customs clerk} healthy action so that all the
We wish them all good Scout On Mor day night 93rd. there tom Port-of-Spain, Trinidad;| excess uric acid is expelled
ee Wi wan oe “4 aM _ 3 eg a Miss Rita Clarke, stenotypist in| through the natural channels,
7 Memorial for rodent ‘ahd a furniture store’in Trinidad; Misa) When SN ee eet wigaus
- 1 “— my 8 é S vhgy arlis 7 eors , too. Pres S pour
‘ANNUAL GENERAL friends of the group, and anothe ercas pimps Prin ree eon Are restored.
1 "¢ "Pht By . Sea itis sulana ¢ Miss Mé 3
MEETING ecktas 3 th i map annar ire. Arscott from Jamaica. If you are troubled witn rheu-
Th : 4 , ay RG 730 ore ig of these wi't All next week they will be| matism, give Kruse hen @ trial
e Annual General Meeting D¢sin at 7.30 o cloc going through a comprehensive| yourse!f You can get it from
of the Island Scout Council will.b ourse of inspecting packs and| ell Chomists apd Stores,

held at Scout Headquarters on Schooners Bring

Friday next, 20th April, begin-

Remember, a comfortable
fitting suit is our first con-
sideration. There are in-
creasing numbers who
recognise for themselves
the consistently superb cut,
fit and finish of the







companies and seeing how |
Brownies” are trained. On April








ningat 5.00 p.m ° 23 they return to London and | CRYPTOQUOTE No: 7

HE, the Governor, Sir Alfred Rice, Cabbages tart a long programme of sight- ZVLNFR © ZQOES SNW JNNR IDEAL TAILORING
se = C.M.G., Chief Scour, 5 seeing, There will be more visits XOROEJT NB wy ae
will preside. The schooner Franklyn D. R., to training courses and camps ib x a ‘

On Saturday 24th March, a &82-tons net, brought rice, wallaba various places with stays of sev- Last Crpyt: What dies but whee We will welcome the oP
patrol of Scouts of the 4th Bar- posts, charcoal, fibre, firewood and eral days in the more important had ite ¢ndism portunity of proving this to
bados (James Street) Group, moulding sand here yesterday 8uide centres | “apr your in our
hitch-hiked to St. Alban’s where from Demerara. The schooner i In the third week in May they

they camped over the Easter
week-end,

The boys carried out various
seout activities while in camp,
and thoroughly enjoyed them-
selves.

TABLE TENNIS

The Scouts Table Tennis
Tournament which opened = at
Scout Headquarters on Friday
night, 16th March, came to a suc-
cessful completion 0; Friday
night, 6th April,

Those who were present on this
cecasion saw some really fine per-
formances, especially in the Finals,
when in each division the con-
lestants displayed keen rivalry and
played careful nevertheless at-
tractive tennis.

In the Senior division, Scott
of Y.M.C.A, lost to Blackett, also
of Y.M.C.A. 23—21, 21—23, 16—
21, 21—15 and 18—2),

In the Junior division, N. Cecii
of James Street won from E
Inniss, also of James Street, who
beat Cecil in the first two games
21-—7 and 21—8; but Cecil seemed
to pull himself together, anc
came back to win the last three
games 2)—-11, 21--15 and 2)--16
and so emerged champion of the
Junior Division,

St. George's Week









skippered by G. I. Sealy.

Fresh fruit and cabbages were
brought to the island yesterday by
the Motor Vessel Moneka from
Dominica The Moneka carries a
erew of 13 Captain R. Hudson
mans this 100 tornage sc'\ooner

Our Peasauts

Not less than 125,000 out of a
total population of 192,841 are
concerned in peasant holdings in
3arbados, according to “Peasant
Agriculture in Barbados,”

The total number of all peasant
holdings under ten acres as defined
in the Barbados census 1946, was
30.752, comprising ar estimated
area of 17,283 acres.

Peasant holdings between | to 10
acres were 4,237, Peasant hola
ings # and 1 acre were 238,383.
Peasant’ hokiings under % acre
were 3,132.

Of the holdings of %& to 10 acres
7.963 ore estate renters and 19,657
“other” or “more or less free-hold
holdings.”





|

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay





will set off on a nine day trip to | 3. A. CORBIN & SONS.



Edinburgh, There they will ex~ | quam eeeeememaemm, ©
SSS;

plore more camps and see some of
the beauties of Scotland

Back in London once more, they (
will visit the Festival of Britain
and spend a day at Oxford. Next

A BAND
fordcOn-Aven where in the ‘bast CONCERT

ble surroundings for Shake- By kind permission of




: plays, they will see Col. Michelin
‘Richard” and “Henry V” i and under the direction of
They are being left plenty of Capt, Raison

time for visiting places and see-
ing things that interest them in-
dividually, and by the time they
leave London for the West indies
on June 15 or 16, there will not,
be much of importance that they |
will heve missed, |

—Reuter, |

will be held at
HASTINGS ROCKS
on April 18th at 8 p.m,
ENTRANCE $33 1/-
In aid of
G.F.S. Holiday Home



lll





EXCHANGE
The Americar Labour Educa- |
tion Service, a national v kers’ |
education group is strengthen
ing imternational understanding
through the exchange of worker
and students between the Unite
States and other countries

The Weather

The Committee and Mem-
bers of the
EVERTON CLUB
request your company
to their



=

Annual Dance

at QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE
on SATURDAY NIGHT,
28TH APRIL, 1951
Music by Mr. Percy Green's



Orchestra
SUBSCRIPTION 2/-




















































TAILORING DEPARTMENT

on the first floor of

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD.

10-13, Broad Street



HAND PAINTS

FOR ALL PURPOSES
“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT

in Cream, t:reen end. Whute.
For interior decoraticn of Walls,
Ceilings and Woodwork.
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White and Cream
HARD GLOSS TULIP GREEN
PAINT
HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT
For exterior or interior use,
“SPECIAL” HOUSE PAINTS
In Tropical White, Oak Brown,
Barbados Light and Dark Stone,












: ai f , %, oe
vor To-day , 4 Y 5 Grey and Dark Grey.
St. George’s Week will be cele M.V. Sedgefield, Schooner Gloria Het : rae) aa a gt -” - rey.
brated thioughout this island from rietta, Schooner Marea Henrietta, Yach: Sun Rises: 5.54 a.m Ba Somos ss 1 . Ly For exterior or interior use,
22nd-to 29th April with Church Caribbee, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner Sun Sets; 6.10 p.m, CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
oan ee P nN Barene a maboohey Erieling Foon Meon (Full) April 21 ) In Grey and Mid Green
4 é na 5.. Schooner on ul Z
Counsellor, MLV. th Radar, Schooner | Lighting: | 6.30 p.m. Y. M. P.C. an PAINT REMOVER
Harriet Whittaker, Schooner Turtle Doye igh Water; i _m, el : :
Traffic Don’t Schooner Cyril E. Smith, pcg yea hs Rain- P bidet sie' Nin A tit ‘ . Ss pa : ‘ For the easy removal of old paint.
bow M., MV. Willemstad, Schooner " poe ‘RTE ® :
ae ee Yesterday dif lee Rect We cake ith CITY GARAGE TRADING Co.. Lid. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD
. ARRIVALS : ais ora .
ecaiteds’ er: A Me or con. Cant ls ia enecial reference to Cricket on VICTORIA STREET AGENTS.
e Frances W. | Hassell, from Demerara 16. asa. WEDNRADAY ‘AONT dhik Nr maw ( ,
Do not forget to stop your Oil. tanker Rufina for St. Lucia Tt ar pone to Yester- at 8.30 p.m
2 Z akes eeenreeeerennee ay: ins, ;
engine and apply your brakes RATES OF EXCHANGE At the Y.M.P.C, Beckles Road

when quitting your vehicle

4 Temperature (Min.) 74.0°F
APUANADA Wind Direction (9 ; a.m.) | A}! sportsmen interested are
© 629/10°, pr, Cheques on E.N.E, (11 a.m.) E.NE
Space made available by Bonkers: 61% pr

Wind Velocity 9 miles per

===") 7 Can See... || SPECIALISTS

,








Demand HT
} Drafts 60,85". pr hour. eitihaates Si :
A Soin waa Sight Drafts 60°7/10% pe Barometer (9 a.m.) 30,017 OPP x
‘ . v2 p/ioes pr: Cable 385/107 pe (11 am.) 30,004 tee 1 It’s so easy %
20 : 68 8/10% pr al it
Silver $a ‘J T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH x





















IN

to see those



Repivered U 5 Potent Ofer

The

| SAXOPHONE REEDS




‘Ml Do It Every Time

By Jimmy I Hatlo



GOOD SECOND HAND

BRIDGE HAS LONG BEEN COMPLETED~ Deer ats

I PROMISED A LOWER TAX RATE+»
IT HAS BEEN ACCOMPLISHED -~
I PROMISED AN ADDITION TO
THE SCHOOL» THAT AND ALL
MY PROMISES HAVE BEEN
| FAITHFULLY FULFILLED=:

CHRISTMASES AGo,
AND I’M STILL
WAITING »*s

MUD CREEK BRIDGE:::

———"

a omcare's 7 wae Z E b Alto, B b Tenor, extra fine
é - LAS HE C Melody |
es neat 7 UNCLE WILLY* PROMISED THE FERRY- |} | fj = CLARINET REEDS points in a
T PROMI se vobeanar ~~ SEE“HE PROMISED 4 goaT INTERESTS THAT | | 9) B b, E b.
A BRIDGE OVER MU Ek. ME A BIKE TWO HE'D TEAR DOW! THE |g well tgitor-
|
|

ed suit that






HE SWORE TO
EMMA HE’O BE

( | |@! JOHNSON’s STATIONERY
HOME EARLY »+-BUT
/

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HOLD YOUR BREATH
TILL YOU GET IT,
ELMO-YOU CAN'T vere! \
HE PROMISED MY SISTER jj\
A LOT OF THINGS
BEFORE THEY WERE

TAILORING

ONCE HE STARTS
TALKING, THATS
ANOTHER PROMISE
Tos




always










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contact the

Just Received

—
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OF ALL KINDS

MARRIED +++ AND OF.... in Tailoring
ALL SHE GOT
WAS HIM*s DOBIE’S to be on the @



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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE Two *.##!# 01 mm MI \ i IMS ARE BEST BY TEST DON'T ONLY OIL IT-GERM IT CENTRAL FOFXDHY I III. Gasolene Station—Trafalgar Si. AVI\\TII(UIII\i:MA ;MnW.OrJy) T>.Ml.Hr at <0 TMVIII FAKHAM OI VM JOHNS in "FRIFIlA" "A WOMAN'S VEN'4.1 \MI in BOSS Of HOOMTOHV MATINEES %  FRIDAY *. SATURDAY .1 FRIDAY TO TUESDAY NIGHT al II SPECIAL MATINEE SATVHDAY MORNING "CINDERELLA" uTTechnico.i G L o 11 #•; TONTTE S 30 MONDAY. TtT.SDAY 5 anil R 3(1 Barbara STANWYCK and Wcndel COREY in "THE FURIES" EXTRA — TOP FIGURE CHAMPIONS WEDNESDAY Ala,, LADD in t.pl. CAREY TALENT AUDITION TODAY 9.30 n m PLAZA Tm*mtr*-Bridg*town (DiAl 2310) TO-DAY K ."ir" ST m VS2?~ TO TUFSDAY M1TCHUM DOUnOfE BAINS ,„ ."."* "WHERE DANGER LIVES" Abo IXON r.HROL In "HfUTIME HIOBIt s I >IIIUK I SUNDAY ADVOCATE SI \DAY. APRIL IS, 11,1 >r> i THlfni (onlyi wilt) li.,n .*> B.W i> m HKO-RMm. Thrllllm. DOkil.li> '•TIT LIVELY" SINATRA .1..1 OtorU DMAVrN PLAZA DIAL •ISTIN 8404 LAST SHOWS TODAY "*OOD ON* W P MOON KU Hobt MITCHUM ana BirTbi-.i Brl OKPDLCB "*" ACTION ALI.-THK-WAY tAIETl (THE GARDEN) St. Jam LAST 1 SHOW* TODAY l. K I'A.-Al.l EMPIRi: lei-da, 4..S and I M id OonUnnlu Columbia \um Presents •Tin: cua. OF THE YEAS" Starring .... Robert CUMMINGS Joan CAULFIELD with Klso LANCHESTER HOW TO-DAY TOMORROW 4 3* and B.15 Republic Smashing Double George BRENT ami Lynn Borl in — "KID FROM CLEVELAND and "SINGING GU.\S Starring . Vnuthn MONROE OH) Elln RAINES ROYAL LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY 4 3* and 8 31 Universal Big Double Yvonne DeCAKU) .uid Brian DONLEVY in "SONG or SCUEIIEMAZADE •• %  lid THE WEB with Edmnnd O'BRIEN and Ella RAINKS MONDAY 4 TTEHDA1 4 34) and 8 ill) Universal Double COBRA WOMAN AND TEMPTATION OLYMPIC TO DAY & TOMORROW 4 30 and 8 30 Warner Bros. Smashing Double Hilly MAI i l 1 Hid Bobby JORDAN in •HELLS KITCHEN" •jvw/wi wunoM" Jane WYMAN .nil Lew AVRKS PRICES: Adult*— Mallnre 4 Night %  It If—Haane 3B f*uVin> 48 Base* n < hlldrcn MaU only; PR 18 I.IIMll>—Balrony 20—tk-in 72 SPRING ROUND-UP DANCE (WESTERN DREAS) lo be hirid at the CRANE HOTEL on SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1SSI In aid of the St. Winifred's Building Fund Music supplied by the Police Band by kind permission of the Commissioner of Police. DANCING JOO pm Ticket* SI 00 OB sale new Refreshment* will be on sale Support Oik worthy cans*. 1 GIRLS' FRIENDLY' SOCIETY ANNUAL FETE Under the DUlinouishrd Patronage of His Excellency Che Governor and Lady Savao? .LLEVCY I he OovrtMr and Lady Savage •aoiad by A.D.C. Mai Dennis Vnughau wet,.tmong the three hundred people who attended the cocktail party on board II.Mt S Magnlnrrnr 1—1 night. Included in the Go\ einor's party were nis daughter Pat and Lady Savage'-poreeiu, Mr. and Mrs. Hopwood The party wh.cn was given by (he Commanding Oltlcer gad Officers of H.M.C.S MacnihcriO began at t 3o pjn. and endt-IJ shortly aflat 8 pm. Supply Officer*' Conference H O N. LOU S COOLSI-ARTIGITE, Assistant Ad Biinistrotor of St. Lucia and a member or the St. Lurfa I-egisJi S ire. Is In Barbados for the Supply fncers UH:. Here lor about soi days he ir slaying at the Hastings Hotel. Coming in by tne >ame plane yesterday was Mr E G'ttens-Knight of Grenada. He Is • guest at the Royal Hotel Canada Bound WilSS JEANNE WARDEN ex T peels to fly to Canada this morning by T.C.A. for an in definite stay with relatives t\ Niagara Palls. Ontario . Mis Sheila Ince is also due lo lea>>< by the same plane. Her destlna lion is Montreal . Mm. Soph,. Kinch, widow ot Mr. C H KSK.I Is another passenger by T C^k J\l Married Yesterday M ISS GLORIA ALLEYNE daughter of Mr. and Mrs St. c AUeya* oi Lynwood" Hastings, was married yesterday afternoon al 5 "Work at St Matthias Church U Mr. Eustace Taitt. A.-siatnnt Master of Comix rnere School and son of Mrs R Taitt of Bank Hall St Michael The ceremony which win fully ehoral wa< performed by Rev Griffiths Short Visit rasi iv H E Mr U The :-nlai<. bodice. had a loops UriUe wore a dress of with a cloae fiUing Cut on Prince*I gentle flaring collar with id peal buttons. The skirl to-day for Montreal Back Home ^^ B ._ * d **" Arthur I. 12lli at 6 30 a.m. lo Mr. Erneal Maxwell nt St Leonard's Church. Wrlgtil of Hamilton. Ontario Thi bride was given away by her who have been here since March father Bcstman was Mr Aubrey 14th go out by T.C.A. this mornMaxwell, the groom's brother, ing on their way home T|w honeymoon is being spen so also do the Albert Le Pages ul Bath*heba. of Toronto By to-morrow they should be beck in Toronto wher Mr. Le Page is o Real Estat. %  Broker Mr. and Mrs Charles Garland's second visit U Barbados ends to-day. They nr> among the passengersen route t. Canada by T C.A. Mr Carlanr Is President of Rod Line Ltd., n. Otuwa They had been here sin. February 3rd. opened revealing a graceful panel of nylon tulle Her headdress was of blue forget-me-nots which held In place a full length nylon illusion veil. Her bouquet was of blue forget-me-nots and Queen Anne's lace. Matron of Honour was Mrs E. T. Smith sister of the bride who wore a full skirted off-theshoulder gown made of while anglaisc. She carried a bouquet of red roan, and wore n broad white crinoline hat Bestman was Mr. Stanley ISS ELAINE (.AY. daughter Mayers and the ushers were Mr of Mr and Mrs Edwin St Fred Phillipi and Mr "Freddie" was married on April Smith Ir and Mrs ERNEST MAXWELL Quiet Wedding After the ceremony a reception as held at "Lynwood" Hastings M Flying Visit TJENEE SERRAO. Agriculture Discussions lormeiB.W.I.A. pilot flew over from Trinidad yesterday with two friends In one of the Trinidad Light Aeroplane Club's A^usterMr HAROLD BISHOP Special Representative Ty*H HAROLD BISHOP. bout three days is ,lie Outran, lupl of Pouce in Trinidad He came up vesterday by BW I.A... Mi and Mr Richard C. Mullen who came in by the RSStta plane •re fixim Jerome. Arirona. where M> Mullen is an engineer. They an narlng at the Coi*.n> Ckab Mr and Mrs. liar old E Williams and Mr Ruben-. Milian from radio centre, Havani. Cuba, were among the passenger-. I H l A.'s flight from Trimdad. They are staying at the Ocean View Hotel From World's Y.W.C.A. ISS i.I.EANOR FRENCH Of W.C.A Geneva touched down nt Seawell yesterday on a live-day visit l<> BM Y W C'.A brunch in Barbados. Leaving Geneva February 21st. she has visited England. U S.. Canada, BHtlrh Guiana. Surinam, Trinidad. Grenada and finally Barbados. Miss French has been with the World's Y.W.C.A. for three years. Before that time she worked with the Y.W.C.A. in the U.S. Her home is in New York. Senwcll Shorts K. TRADE Commissioner in he W.I., Aubrey Star. k. is .r piesent in Barbados on a week's vim staying at the Windsor Hotel ... Vita Brown Is also :iere to spend a short holiday with tier mother . and Wennel Baa* %  Jho is a school teacher in South Trinidad is up on a short vaaaftkaV . Molly O'Donnvll, former B.W I A hostess plans to spend her two weeks holiday at U? Oil's Special Representatl... ,. They expect to return to-dny new to Venezuela yeslerdav for M ap i c Manor after lumti. ,„, ulks. He expects to be back Annual Leave m B^ 00 ~ r, y *' s wwk Incidental Intelligence RUBY JOHNSON was Si. Lucia Visit Seawell yesterday lo meet Lucia for one week. Accompanyher daughter lugnd who flew up AA nig him back wan Mr. Raymond irom Trinidad to spend a short J-Y* Roe of Hastings House B ACK from discursions about the further agricultural development of St. Luriu Is Prof. C G BoaaaW, BwiF>m*t Adviser C D and W who was in St acTi and Mrs Donald Bamcs will be held at THE HOSTEL. Country Rd. on SATURDAY. April 28lh from 3 30 to 6.80 p.m. There will be the following Stalls: Flowers and Variety, Needlework. Sweets. Household. Books, Cakes and lees. For the Children there will be Pony Rides and Lucky Dips. By kind permission of Cul Mtchelln, the Police Band conducted by Cap!. Rai: will play. ADMISSION — 6D. 1.4.51—On CLUB MORGAN lor ihf vnlvrlaini—vnl nt llull, ill. i. s. .IfAfaVA'fl i< i:\i anil MKMAC A NEIGHBOUR of mine has an original cure for wanderlust he wants to hold in check, have gone to St. Lucia for H e subscribes to the local paper holiday. Accompanying Ingnri about four days The same plane ,,, tn<1 lcc M ,„. ,, (lri amm was Miss Arlene Oregono of the which look them to St Lucia n bout. After reading it vn % %  Singer Sewing Machine Co., in yesterday brought Mr. Richard dav lor a month I'm cured"' ha Port-of-Spain. Here for her anDixon, representative of Pobone ayB "Things are usually worsj nual holidav, Arlene i* staying at Peterson. Richard Is stationed in there than here." A C Accra Guest House. Jamaica. New York. Phone 4920 for all Airline & Hotel Reservations HOLIDAY TRAVEL offers all Travel Information FREE Leave your travel pmbtrm* ta . HOLIDAY TRAVEL LTD. Main Floor: Cave. Shrpherd 4M9 Phanes 492S Few Furnished House* and ii.it, u. let. WE OFFER FOR YOUR COWVEWME1VCE PHILIPS Electric Bulbs . Walls — 200 Watts Screw A Dayonel THE I OICNI It STORE Inn oxa "* l**limon thai ImtU m tiivlirm.Now OHtn Yau thr niran. of ri^urinc thb. • LEARN THE AT OF MAKE IT THE "INNOXA WAVMISS ANN THOMAS 01 jNNOXA 1 BOND STREET SALON. INNOXAS BEAUH SPECIALIST Now offpni Ihr following Treatment* hy Appolntrnpnta:— (1) FULL FACIAL TREATMENT II Hoar) 15.at It) CLEANSE MASK .1 MAKE UP t'-. Hour) S U 13) CLEANSE A MAKE IT CM Minute*) inn • A COURSE OF SIX FULL FACIAL TREATMENTS far 2S • DAYS: TUESDAY WEDNESDAY A THURSDAY TIME: t) ta II a m I lo 3 p m. lullKia. %  V ConvuHatloa. and Advtrr Inrluded APPOINTMENTS AS FROM TUESDAY. FEBRUARY MB • Tor Appointments and further information. Dial -i.'.R i or Apply ... ( Bookers saw* Dni^ Stores Ltd. BROAD srstr.i i or ALPHA PHARMACY (HASTINGS) We are fully stocked with GARDEN REQUISITES Hose—} in., -*' S in., 3 4 In. Nonica Sprinklers Hand forks Rakes Secateurs Shears Hand sprayers Garden Manure Flower Puts Vll\ I VI I HIS OF I'lIM THE BARBADOS ni-UlMHll IVI COTTOIV FACTORY LTD. BY THE WAY ... % Beachcomber 1 SEE that there are to be octopuses In the Dome of Discovery. They will demonsuralr experiments carried out on "thi.nost brainy of the lower animals" Nothing Is more amusing than to see an octopus playing the bagpipes It often seems that the bagpipes are playing the octopus. And the kind of music which comes from that inextricable jumble of tentacles, chanter-, drones and bags is such thai lobody really cares which %  flaying what. '//. '-<,,(-.'/.'> %  %'> Spiwtt T HE court was crowded when Mr. Money weather Gooseboot e opened the case for the prosecution. In a masterly pa.'-age he said: "... We hav. only to ask ourselves what would happen If everybody painted ship., en their dog-kennels, to be painCROSSWORD r ) L-j" r r34 T. 1 C Lr t *" T J nz — Anon DlirK'c StUCIlM ty tUS AUtO-ClUt —Idas u-" apiiuai, ii| buatM Iht., ar> pro-tdcU. oi KTSZA *,''-" .'.' ,w tikl M. il td 18 Down. I3i •-:)-( 11 .ains the rivet in gSMESj .< % %  -i archlteeture. (61 . v.iln upj.fi. 151 '!• ("It |). %  '.:.'. |6| Sully conscious of the irresponsibility of the accused. The fact that the ..hip was painted in blue. ,. colour odious to any town .ouncil worthy of the name, proves the complete contempt t oi civic consciousness manifested uy this sailor, Benjamin Bottle. Yet .nillions might have been goinfi carelessly about their business to-day, ignorant of this loathsome deed, hart it not been for i.ha exemplary and selfless conduct of Mrs. Hocnd, the winner Oj In.£5 prize for civic-mindedness. I shall endeavour to show that th" lynical indifference of the accused lo these principles which form the very basis of the social connect, and without which civilised life would be a mockery, is the hall-mark of n mind steeped in degradation so enormous that the imagination boggles. Not thus do the true heirs of Trafalgar besmirch their declining yc:nInterlude .Speakiiio on the Defence of the Vest, h. said thoi we could ptil our shirts ( Rearmament as a certain urtnne —(Report of speech.) ">l. ii would be much easier." Dc^mmenU a leader writer in the Clothiers' Gazette and Argus. "to defejid our vests if we kept our shirts on. Whoever tries to get at the vest mutt then nut tear off the shirt." Prodaase: I suspect n misprint for "West." Myself : But only a Scandinavian would pronounce "vest" as "west." Prodnose : What's lhat got to do with it? Mraslf: Absolutely nothing. I am happy and proud to say It's only a Human Bring A N American woman has created a record by sitting on a flag-pole for 152 days. If an English cat tried any of those tricks the firman of 24 counties would have it down in no time. Or Thin A S I browsed in a field of print. my eye was caught by this succulent morsel: "Offerings for a Surbiton church are collected in drain-pines" I suppose that IS what is culled "bringing religion Into line with modern life." or perhaps "bringing drain-pipes into line with modem religion." Strangr Behaviour of Foil M ISS CLOACA MacSIMMER, the novelist, was at Northolt yesterday to meet Runamok. the Eskimo poet. Runamook brushed her aside, dropped the copy of "Werewolf of the Moon' which she gave him (a free copy from. Grumble and Fugge, Ltd.), and ran off Into the canteen with airhoslessette Muriel Brass. Hot. Blooded Eskimo Ducks Out. Not Frozen By The Book Society. Poet's Whirlwind Romance. Receplionette Muriel On Thin Ice. Brush-Off For Glamour Noveli-t. Latei. while Lady Cabstanlcigh was making inquiries nt the airport, Hun amok and Miss Brass got into her car and told the chauffeur to drive round a bit. -e| | Junior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate Invites all children under 12 to enter for Ms Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be published every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receiva a prize to the value of 7/8 In either books or stationery. The stories can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 300 words in length, and must reach The Children's Editor, The Advocate Oo. Ltd., CHy not later than Wedncsdsv evrrv week. NOTE : Stories must not be copied. Send this coupon with your story. JTTNIOR SHORT STORY COMPFTTTION *L Nil i lt (nettle 141 i* ACTOR* I'll •'•Horn ol in* DO, I4> ,I\" ln !" ,T *D*r'i mitflt. 13 srsftTsar! Foraa II.a.' Aadrra ^m Cotton (phintA 36 W ShihihxqA fiaipnA WHITE & COLOURS TAFFETA PASTEL SHAKS 79? $123 BROCADES „ „ 85? EVMS & WHITFIEI.DS YOUR SH0F STORE DIAL 4220








ESTABLISHED 1895



70-YEAR-OLD BEVE

Air War Stepp

In Korea Campaign

(By SYDNEY BROOKES)

BROTH SIDES in Korea are furiously stepping

up air war.

The Communists are throwing in many

. More Russian-type jets, and are building airstrips.
The United Nations are running a round-the-clock
attack against Communist ground and air build-up.

up.

United Nations Air Force sources said to-day that they
believed the Communists intended making greater efforts

TOKYO, April 14.

to match the United Nations air superiority.

FRENGH KILL
90 REBELS

HANOI, April 14.

French Union Forces sweeping} ..

through pockets of Vietnamh
guerilla resistance 30 miles south
of Hanoi, Tongking capital, have
killed 90 rebels and taken 300
prisoners, French army head-
quarters here said today.

Guerilla attacks on villages
inside Tongking were cantinuing.

Paratroops seeking 800 Chinese
reported to have crossed from
Yunan province into Indo-Chin
on April 1, have still mot found
tiem. - Intelligence
reports t0day said that Vietnamh
Communist-led rebels were now
in most of the border town earlier
reported: taken by Chinese
“invaders.”

—Reuter.



30 KILLED DEMINING
FIELDS IN TUNISIA

PARIS, April 14.

|
Clearing German and Allied

minefields in Tunisia, since its
liberation, cost the lives of 30
soldiers and wounded 86 others,
reported Agence France Presse
from Tunis today,

A million and a half mines have
been destroyed freeing 1,025,000
acres of arable land,

The report added that a large
srea in Southern Tunisia has still

be in
to demined,
- wT



het

Rumania Expels

Yugoslav Citizens

BELGRADE, April 14.

The Rumanian Government is
expelling Yugoslav citizens,
granting them 10 or 20 days to
settle their affairs, the official

Borba reported today.

The Yugoslav Nationals paper
said. that they were called to the
Aliens’ office of the Rumanian
Foreign Ministry, and told to
leave the country even if they had
been living in Rumania for many
years, and had families and prop-
erty there.

While some Yugoslavs were ex-
pelled, Borba added that others
who wanted to leave were re-
fused .exit_permits. :

Behind the refusal was the aim
to force these Yugoslavs to accept
Rumanian citizenship, the paper
said,

—Reuter.



BRITISH PROTEST |

BERLIN, April 14
Major General Geoffrey Bourne,
British Commandant in Berlin,

protested to-day to the Soviet re-)

presentative of the Control Com-
mission in Berlin against alleged
border raids by East German
police on British sector territory.

—Reuter.

TELL THE ADVOCATE |

THE NEWS
DAY OK NIGHT

DIAL 3113



U.S. MARINES TAKE PRISONERS



PHOTO SHOWS:—The scene as United States Ma‘ines—-continuing their drive on the Central Korean
front—surround a party of Chinese Reds, and add a few more prisoners to their ever growing collection.

Prime Ministei

Yugoslav Communist Party =a
|

The Air Force has lately seen
the Communists developing air
strips and during the week has
reacted with attacks intended to
erater their airfields and restrict
! activity.

Counting their gains and costs
the past weeks, intensified air
activity of the United Nations air-
men to-night claimed destruction
or damage of 28 M.I.G. 15 jets,
more than 600 Communist roaga
vehicles destroyed, and 350 dam-

aged.

They also claim nine loco-

motives destroyed or damaged

134 trucks destroyed and almost
qg|!C0 damaged, 4,000 buildings
qa jatiacked in Communist-held ter-
ritory, 1,000 Communist (roops

killed cr wounded mostly in tne
iine of battle.

Communist jets destroyed o
damaged included 21 hit on Thurs-

day when jets on both sides

joined in the biggest air battles
of the ten months old campaign.

Washington announced after
Thursday’s battles that two Amer-

ican B 19 Superfortresses were |
lost. Four others had been lost!

previously

United Nations planes to-day
continued heavy bombing and
strafing attacks against Com-

munist buildup and rear supplies,

areas.

Two targets were airfields}

about 30 miles south of Pyong-
yang, North Korean capital. Both
were attacked and cleared, it was
said.



—Reuter
Maharajah Deposed
NEW. Ty, April 14.
Jawaharlal

Nehru announced in Parliament
to-day, that the Indian Govern-
ment had deposed the Maharajah
Pratap Singh Gaekwar as ruler of
Baroda,

Nehru said that this action had
been taken against the ruler for
defying the authority of_the Indian
Government organising and fin-
ancing activities to undo the con-
stitution, and supporting reaction-
ary elements.

The 43-year-old Maharajah will
lose not only his title of ruler but
also his £200,000 privy purse.

The deposition order took effect
yesterday. :

The Government has given him
one month in which to appeal to
the Indian President. —Reuter.

SOUTH KOREA WILL
OPPOSE PEACE TALKS | now concentrating their efforts on

‘injuring the country’s economy.
During the past week, guerillas
man of the South Korean Nationait had burnt down railway stations,
Assembly, said here today that the} derailed trains, slashed thousands
{South Korean government would] of rubber trees, burnt buses and
“oppose any peace talks with the ! lorries, eut telephone wires, and
smashed valuable machinery.

PUSAN, April 14.
Tek Sang Ken Sun, Vice Chair-

Communist aggressors.”

He added: “We will welcome

their unconditional surrender, but

we cannot join in a political con-

ference or in talks,”
—Reuter.

10,000,000 MORE MEN

NEW DELHI, April 14

India has 10,000,000 more men
than women, according to figures

taken today,

The total population of the coun-
| try was estimated at 361,820,000,
!an increase of 12.4% in the past
| decade,

This figure includes estimates
, for the Kashmir and Assam triba!

@ @ area.—Reuter,



ARGENTINE GOVERNMENT

ed Up)

As a result of the decision of both legislative cham bers, the
ed by Congress, seized the independent Argentine Newspaper “La Prensa’. This picture was taken
during the ceremony of the taking over of the newspaper in Buenos Aires. Seated is the Public Notary
ALFRED GUIDI and standing left to right:—SEN ATOR CRUZ; two men unidentified; Reprosentative
TOMASSI; SENATOR GIAVARINI chairman of the Committee and representative ROUGGIER,

Sunday Advorat



BARBADOS, $eRIL 15, 1951

a







+ «



a



General Ridgway Is
Fully Alive To New
Responsibilities
TOKYO, April 14
new Supreme
told reporters to-day: “I am fully

alive to the tremendous
sibilities that

Commander,



“With God’s guidance, and with

utmost to discharge my
new responsibilities well’.

The General was
hand grenade—his
was dressed
in a wool khaki .
and battle trousers? ~~

He asked reporters not to ques-
tion him.on his plans for his new

“trade mark”

talking with his staff in Tokyo he
things with you, as I have done

He said “I am still very
a member of this team’,

The General in his first general
order as the Supreme Commander
Legion of Merit to
his Press Relations Officer
farewell Press Conference at the
Eighth Army headquarters to-day

Terrorists Kili 20
SINGAPORE April 14

captured by
and themselves killed 2

a Federal Government spokesman
announced here today.

Bobby Lecke Wins

JOHANNESBURG, April 14.
South African and British Open
Championship beat Norman
the Australian cham-
up and nine to play
match for £1,500 today.

loser’s purse



SEIZES

committee of five pro-Pero









“ILA PRENSA ~









n M.P.s appoint-

—Express.





MacArihur Will Be Given
3 Rousing Farewell

TOKYO, April 14,

AN ANNOUNCEMENT from the headquaiters of the
Supreme Command of the Allied Powers in Japan, to-day
indicated that General Mae Arthur will leave Tokyo next
week amid a farewell pageant unrivalled in the country’s

post-war era.

U.S. Will Not Discuss
Jap Peace Treaty
With Peking

__ LONDON, April 14,
A British Foreign Office spokes-

/man ‘would not comment today on

the announcement. that the United
States did not orice Sibert:
sions with Peking on the Japanese
Peace Treaty.

This announcement amounts to
a rebuttal of the British sugges-
tion contained in the aide memoire
to the United States that Com-
munist China should be included
in the Peace Treaty negotiations

Michael McDermott, a State De-
partment Press Officer, who made
the announcement yesterday wold
reporters that.the United States
recognised the National Govern-
ment of China, and had hot, and
did not, contemplate discussions
with the Peking regime regarding
the Japanese Peace Settlement.

He also indicated that the Unit-
ed States was not likely to act on
the British suggestion that For-
mosa should eventually be handed
over to the Chinese Communist
Government.

It was authoritatively learned
here, that though there were some
differences between the United
States and Britain about their re-
spective attitudes towards the pro-
posed Peace Treaty with Japan,
there was even a greater measure
of common agreement,

Diplomatic observers said that
these differences could not be
called a “split”, adding that
Anglo-American talks in Wash-
ington were going on to find a
solution to the divergent political
view,—Reuter.

U.S. Air Force Make
British Type Plane

WASHINGTON, April 14

The United States airforce has

ceased production of the B 45 jet

bombers, in favour of the British

Canberra, it was officially an-
nounced here to-day.

The Canberra will be built by



the Glenn Martin Company. Martin

himself recently saw the Canberra
demonstrated in Britain, and soon
afterwards asked for a licence to
build.

The British bomber is the first
modern warplane designed by the
English Electric Company.

Its top speed has not been given,
but it is believed to be at least
slightly faster than the 550 m.p.h
done by the B 4& —Renter,

_——

3 NORTH KOREAN

TOWNS TAKEN
TOKYO, April 14.

Two hundred South Korean
marines captured three North
Korean towns in a surprise land-
ing on the west coast 70 miles
south of the Communist capital of
Pyongyang on April 7, according
to a delayed report the naval
“ensor released to-day.

Naval guns covered thé landing.
Marines later linked up with
Seuth Korean guerillas

—Reuter

PETAIN RECOVERING
LA ROCHELLE. April 14

The latest reports from the Ile
D’Yeu, the island of $4-year-old



Philippe Petain. said that he was|by the Italian customs police at

reccvering from congestion of the

lungs and was “as fit as any man!

can bhe'‘after an illness.”
Petain’s chaplain, Father Bailly,
‘old reporters that the ex-Marshal

and Japanese police will line the
wi as the General drives to his

Ny m.to the United St
ae sto driv [rom=hi

residence at the former American
Embassy with his young wife and
their 13-year-old son Arthur at
6 a.m.

crowd of Japanese are expected
to turn out to wateh him go.

off at the airport, by the key mem-
bers of the headquarters staff
Commanders, staff representatives
of major ,Far East commands

Government officials

with Major General Courtney
Whitney, who last Thursday re-
quested his retirement as the Chief
of MacArthur's Government Sec-
tion on the Allied Council for
Japan, so that he might leave with
his Chief.

MacArthur are his military aides:
Colonel C. Huffand, Colonel Bun-
ker, his personal pilot, Aide Lieut.
Col, ‘Anthony Story, and his per-
sonal physician, Col, Charles
Canada,

menting on General MacArthur's
adismissal declared on her arrival
here by air today, “I do not think
a General should make policies.”

had done the only thing that could

yy alt
“There is always in our coun-

———$—————

i

On

}cross into Italy from Tessin in a
car, was wearing about 22 pounds
of gold stitched in numerous small

The headquarters published a
map of the ten-miles route to be

taken to the airport by the Su-
preme Commander, whom the

apanese have considered their

uncrowned ruler sindé the day he
landed five and a half years ago

. British and American troops,

ate aeroplane Bataan which

Despite the early hour, a large

He will be given a formal send-

diplomatic officials, and Japanese

Retirement Asked
The former Supreme Command-
ry and his family will leave Japan

Others leaving with General

Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, com-

She thought President Truman

be done under United States con-

try division of opinion, and Gen-

eral MacArthur has had consid-
erable political following as well
as great admiration generally.”

He would have welcome, with-
out question, from many people,
she added.

Mrs. Roosevelt will be staying

one night in London on her way

to represent her country at a
meeting of the United Nations
Human Rights Commission of
which she is Chairman, in Geneva
—RKeuter

Discussions Held
On Persian Oil

TEHERAN, April 14.
British Ambassador Sir Francis
Shepherd saw the Persian Prime
Minister today, to draw his at-

tention to the “utmost seriousness”

of the situation in the South Per-
sian oil area,

He told him of measures the



British. Government proposed to
take to “insure its rights”,
cording to Persian sources.

The Pershan \ParZiament at a
pecial gession last night, discus-
sed the oilfield riots in which 12
people have died.

Armoured cars broke up fresh
demonstrations yesterday in Aba-
dan, the big refinery town

—Reuter,



Golden Underclothes
GENEVA, Apri! 14
A woman smuggler literally
dressed in gold, has been arrested

the frontier outpost of Casamova
The woman, who was trying to



had said to him vesterday: “IT have| sackets in her underclothes. She

vrepared myself for the great
journey which I am now await
ing.”—Reuter,

was also carrying 600,000 machine

needles,

—Reuter.

























ac-





PRICE SIX CENTS



DIES SUDDENLY

After Planning ‘Rest Cure”

B.G. Protest |

U.K.—Cuban
Sugar Pact

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, April 14.

Members of the Legislature pro-
tested strongly against the Sugar
Pact proposal between the United
Kingdom and Cuba, and have re-
quested the Officer administering
-he Government, Hon, John Gutch,
O.B.E., to transmit their stand to
His Majesty’s Government. Hon.
W. J. Raatgever who moved the
notion, urged that such a Pact
would cause hardships to the
economy and welfare of the col-
ony and demanded that Britain
should not conclude the Pact with-
out prior consultation of the Brit-
ish West Indies Sugar Association
and various West Indies Govern-
ments.

Members referred to the great
contribution British Guiana is
making towards aiding Britain's
recovery and refused to be influ-
enced by the assurance from the
Secretary of State read by the
Acting Colonial Secretary. Hon
D. J. Parkinson that “no agree-
ment with Cuba will be reached
which would prejudice the under-
taking given to Commonwealth
sugar producers last year.”

Reference was also made to dis-
cussions being held between Can-
ada and Cuba on the sugar ques
tion and the view was expressed
that it was q threat to cut the
B.W.1. and British Guiana out of
a large share of the Canadian
sugar market, The effect, members
asserted, would be very grave not
only from sugar exports’ viewpoint,
but also on the whole question of
trade relations with Canada.



Austrian Workers
Promise Support
To Red Strike

VIENNA, April 14.

The Minister for Social Af
fairs,»Karl Maisel, who is also
President of the Metal Workers’
[rade Union, has promised 285
workers of a Russian-controlled
Engineering Works on the. out,
skirts of Vienna, who went on
itrike on Friday, “the sympathy
and suppert of the whole body of
Austrian workers.”

The strike began when the
Socialist President of the Works
Souncil, Leopo'd. Mattzinger, was
ismissed without notice by the
soviet Kommandantura for dis
ributing the Socialist paper
Fres Wort He refused to
accept the dismissal by a Rus-
lan police official, but the order
was repeated by the Russian
feneral director of the firm. As

this is directly in contradiction}

to the Ausirian Law, the Works
Counei) called the strike.”

Soviet authorities then threat
ened that all members of the
Works Council would be tried by
Russian court martial, which
usually nypans secret trial without
a chancé to detend—Reuter,



Peron Accumulates
“Black Marks”

Says Manchester Guardian
MANCHESTER, Eng. April 1
The view that there was m
alternative to General Peron i:
Argentina at present, was toda)
expressed by the Mancheste.
Guardian,

This Liberal paper warned how
ever, that if the Argentine Presi
dent insisted on “suppressing” al
opposition, there soon would b«
an alternative,

“Many, contemplating the sup
pression of La Prensa, will accus¢
Peron of a crime.”

The paper continued editorially

“If he could stop, he might wel
reflect that tomorrow he may have
to accuse himself of a blunder.”

Whatever President Peron’:
“temporary successes,” he was ac
eumulating “black marks.”

“Already at Washington, it ha
been apparent that Argentina foi
the first time since the war was
rather left on one side. And a’
home what has he gained by turn
ims on the screw?” the pape:
asked,

“Opposition thrives on martyr
La Prensa is one already.”

—Reuter



Insulted Gairy?

(From Our Own Correspondent)

The picketing to-day of a St.
Georges’s store which a crowd

dismissal because of the alleged
use of insulting language to
Gairy, did not cceur as expectec
However, it is known that Gair)
himself saw the manager fiuring
the course of the week secking
come form of redress, but the
former said he was wnable &
penalise an @mployee by dis-
missal on complaint for a matter
wholly disconnected with his
business firm as the well éstab
lished remark was not made in
the store





Oniy 1 dey leit to get in
the Advocate Year Book





—













| work




ST, GEORGE'S April 14. ¢

entered last Tuesday, terrifying
a girl clerk and demanding her



QORSSSSSSSSSS

LONDON, April 14.
MRE. ERNEST BEVIN, former British Foreign

Secretary died at his home to-night after a |
heart-attack.

Mr. Bevin resigned as British Foreign Sec-
retary for health reasons on March 9, and was suc-
ceeded by Herbert Morrison.

Mr. Bevin was 70.

Bevin became suddenly ill this afternoon, and members
of his staff hastily summoned his doctor Sir Alexander
McCall. of

Mrs. Bevin who was out during the afternoon was also
summoned by telephone, ‘

He died shortly after-5 p.m, ,Committee of Unemployed in
His death will mean a_ bye] Bristol which is a big port. From
election in the London constituen- | then on, Trade Union activities
cy of East Woolwich, which he took up most of his time.
won for the Labour Party in 1950 At the age of 30, he was the
Goneral Election with a majority Chairman of a branch of the
of 12,370 votes. Dockers’ Union.
Ten years later, the boy who
Though he was thought to have | had had little education except for
made a satisfactory recovery after a few years in the village school
his recent illness, friends noticed was known. throughout Britain as
that Bevin looked pale and hag-|“K.C" (King’s Counsel).
gard as he sat in the Common: This arose from his barrister—
this week, listening to the budget] like handling of the dockers case
speech. in the first public wage arbitra-
Bevin, yesterday, called , | tion award.
Premier Clement Attlee." in the Two years later, by merging
London hospital, where the Pre- | @ny small unions with the
mier is receiving treatment for | 20CKers’ Union, he created the
duodenal ulcer Transport and General Workers’
Sent: eee rang he held, as
yen arg . otarv ars
bedside, Bevin was planning ; arth cieralst Scand

“rest cure” a trip to the Canary When Winstan Churchill form-
Islands off the African coast (¢ad his wartime National Govern-
shortly ment in 1940, he knew that the
eo ee shed man to organise Labour must be

He was considering leaving next | one whom the workers trusted as
one of themselves. And it must
be someane with determination,
organising genius, and no {fear of

They had a chat at Attlee

week, and staying away for si
weeks. The only difficulty was
his doctors said, whether he would
be fit enough to make the journey unpopularity.

Bevin had been in poor health He chose Bevin, appointing him
for a year. Last year he had twe Minister of Labour and National
Operations for haemorrhoid and | Services.
for anal fistula and recently was Twice the Trade Union leader
Stricken with pneumonia, had tried, unsuccessfully, to get

Ernest Bevin, a seat in Parlia-
the bulky slow- ment. Now he
moving Socialist, entered the Com-
who became mons, unopposed,
Britain's Foreign as member for a

Minister at one London district.
of the most cru-

cial periods — in
history began his
career as a farm
boy.






The appoint.
ment was a big
success, Faced
with the task of
unrooting the na-
tiot from its
homes and nor.
mal lives, Beyin
Was able to get

He was born at
Winsford, Somer,
set on March 8,
1881. His farm.
hand father died








ew , 260,000,000 peo-
before ~ he'â„¢"Was ad)
born. His ragther, Ts gut a an

a general handy.
woman and mid-
wife died when
€ was four,

of 460,000,00 into
the National Ser.
vice of some sort
or another.

Then ‘an aunt,
whose husband
was a_vailway-
man took hin in-

He called up
women for the
first time in his-

Mr. ERNEST BEVIN r
to her home.. Whén still w child, he, he devised Hae ora

“= “apprenticed to a farfrier for jsend one hg? valli Me southe
few pence a Week and his keep. ‘registered for military service to
sevin was a restless and work jn the coal mines, He

strongminded boy. At 13 he ran jealously watched er the

away from the farm to seek free- | ovaries sy wi sft re, wi he he b

dom in Bristol, the nearest city | ilised "tH it i be See.
First, he got a job in a restau Car tos nig bat sr Wie houteta

re J paid him a shilling a day pane a get ee et ne
5 meals ae
Then he became a yan drives jactory welfare services develop-
at 10° shillings a week, ~— and ed as never before.

Jaunched into Labour Foreign Secretary
When Britain swept the Labour

Party to power in 1945, Bevin’s

@ On Page 5.

Union



At the age of 20, he was the
secretary to the “right to work"











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DRY VERMOUTH

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WEMMERSHOEK

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DAVID FARRAR, GLYNIS JOHNS

in “FRIEDA”

MONDAY & TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE: TUESDAY at 5 p.m

CHARLES BOYER, ANN BLYTH

“& WOMAN’S VENGEANCE”

MATINEE: WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
ROD CAMERON
in “BOSS OF BOOMTOWN”

MATINEES : FRIDAY & SATURDAY at 5 p.m.
FRIDAY TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30 p.m.
SPECIAL MATINEE: SATURDAY MORNING at 9.30 o'clock,,
Walt Disney's
“CINDERELLA” in Technicolor









GLOBE

TONITE 8.30 MONDAY, TUESDAY 5 and 8.30
Barbara STANWYCK and Wendel COREY

“THE FURIES”

EXTRA — TOP FIGURE CHAMPIONS

WEDNESDAY — Alan LADD in Capt. CAREY
TALENT AUDITION TODAY 9.30 a.m

a
PLAZA Theatre—sridgetown (DIAL 2310)
TO-DAY RKO. RADIO'S SUSPENSE THRILLER!

Robert Paith Claude
To TUESDAY aa

MITCHUM RAINS in
445 and 8.30 pam.

“WHERE DANGER LIVES”
Also:

LEON ERROL in “WEDTIME STORIES"



WED. & THURS. (only) 4.45 & 8,30 p.m. RKO-Radio's Thrilling Double | !
“STEP LIVELY”
with Frank SINATRA and Gloria DeHAVEN

— and —
“TARZAN TRIUMPHS”
with Jonny Weissmuller — Frances Grifford — Johnny (Boy) Sheffield

PLAZA DIAL GAIE
OISTIN 8404 (THE GARDEN) x oi

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY
5 LAST 2 ers TODAY

& 830 p.m. (RKO)
“BLOOD ON THE MOON™
Robert MITCHUM and ae
Barbara Bel GEDDES
It'S ACTION ALL-THE-WAY!

(Warner)

Humphrey BOGART in

James CAGNEY in
Mon. & Tues. 5 & ¥.80 P.m. (RKO) “CHAIN LIGHTNING”

“ST. LOUIS KID” and
“THE LAST DAYS OF
POMPEN" MON. & TUES. 8.30 p.m. (Warnet)
“GOING PLACES”
with Dick Powell &
“DARK PASSAGE”
with Humphrey Bogart

With Preston Foster
Basil Rathbone &
“THE AVENGING RIDER”
with Te Holt ha




: EMPIRE ROYAL
‘o- 45 and 8.30 ana { @LAST TWO sHOWS
Continuing TOWAY 4.30 and 8.30

Columbia * ‘ures Presents —— ae and

Brian DONLEVY in

“THE GikL OF THE “SONG OF

YEAR ” SCHEHERAZADE ”
Starring.) .. i
“ ”
can ae CUMMINGS a
ULFIELD with Edmond O'BRIEN and
Elsa LANCHESTER Ella RAINES re



MONDAY & TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.30
Universal Double
“ COBRA’ WOMAN "
AND
“TEMPTATION "

OLYMPIC.

TO-DAY & TOMORROW

ROXY
TO-DAY & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8 15
Republic Smashing Double

George BRENT and
Lynn Bari in —

“KID FROM 4.30 and 8.30
CLEVELAND ” fae rage Smashing
Billy HALOP and .
and Bobby JORDAN in
“SINGING GUNS ” *“HELL’S KITCHEN ”
Starring . en
re “JOHNNY BELINDA”
Vaughn MONROE and Jane WYMAN and
Ella RAINES Lew AYRES




















NOW SHOWING
445 & 8.50 Daily

$e S
‘end introgucing THE 12 GUAMOUROUS CALENDAR GiRtS

Scrwen Play by Mot Peefin * Male by Horoid Arlen + twice By
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Adults—Matinee & Night

Pit 16—House 36—Balcony
Boxes 72

Children Mats only: Pit 12

48

House 16—Balcony 20-—Boxes 72





SPRING
ROUND-UP
DANCE

(WESTERN DRESS)
to be held at the
‘CRANE HOTEL

on.
SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1951
In aid of the St, Winifred’s

Building Fund
Music . . .

supplied by the Police

Band by kind permission

of the Commissioner of

Police.

DANCING 9.00 p.m.
Tickets $1.00 on sale n
Refreshments will be on sale
Support this worthy cause!

POOPOPSSOD

GIRLS’ FRIENDLY
SOCHETY
ANNUAL FETE

Under the Distinguished
Patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Lady
Savage

will be heid at
‘HE HOSTEL, Country Rd.
on SATURDAY, April 28th
from 3.30 to 6.30 p.m.
There will be the follow-
ing Stalls: Flowers and

Household, Books, Cakes and
Ices.
For the Children there
will be Pony Rides and
Lucky Dips.

Michelin, the Police Band
conducted by Capt,
will play.

ADMISSION — 6D.

SSSOSSSOSS SS SS SSS OS OSES SS SS SONOS SOOO OOOO,



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Airline & Hotel
Reservations

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Variety, Needlework, Sweets, y

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



H , “LLENCY the Gov-
‘ernor and Lady Savage
recompanied by the Governor's

| ADC. Maj. Dennis Vaughan were
| among the three hundred pecple
| who attended the cocktail party
;on board H.M.C.S. Magnificent
last night. Included in the Gov
ernor’s party were his daughter
Pat and Lady Savage's parenig,
Mr. and Mrs. Hopwood.

The party which was given by

the Commanding Officer
Officers of H.M.C.S. M
began at 6.30 pam. and end

| shortly after 8 p.m.
pply Officers’
Conference

ON. LOUIS COOLS-
LARTIGUE, Assistant Ad-
ministrator of St. Lucia ands
member of the St. Lucia Legigja-
ture, is in Barbados for the Supply
Officers talks. Here for about six
days he is staying at the Hastings
Hotel. Coming in by the same
plane yesterday was Mr. E
Gittens-Knight of Grenada. He is

@ guest at the Royal Hotel.

Canada Bound
M's JEANNE WARDEN ex-
pects to fly to Canada this

»



morning by T.C.A. for an in-
definite gtey with relatives at Mr. and Mrs. ERNEST
Niagara Falls, Ontario . . . Miss MAXWELL.

Sh Ince is alSo due to leave
by the same plane. Her
tion is Montreal. . . Mrs. Sophie Quiet Wedding

Kinch, widow of Mr. C. H. K ISS ELAINE GAY, dau
’ . C. A, y ghter
ae ae r by ie M of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin St.
° l,. Gav was married on April
Back Home 12th at 8.30 a.m. to Mr. Ernest

R. and Mrs. Arthur G. Maxwell at St. Leonard’s Church.
Hamilton, Ontario The bride was given away by her
ve ere since March father. Bestman was Mr. Aubrey
14th go-out by T.C.A. this morn- Maxwell, the groom's brother.
ing on their way home ..._ . The honeymoon is being spent
so also do the Albert Le Pages ®t Bathsheba.

of Toronto. By to-morrow they
| Should be back in Toronto where
Mr. Le Page is a Real Estate
Broker ... . Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Garland’s second visit to | the further agricultural de-
| Barbados ends to-day . are velopment of St. Lucia is Prof.
| among the passengers’ en route to C. G. Beasley, Economic Adviser
| Canada by T.C.A. Mr. Garland to C.D. and W. who was in St.
|is President of Red Line Ltd., in Lucia for one week. Accompany-
| Ottawa. They had been here since ing him back was Mr. Raymond
| February 3rd. Roe of Hastings House.

‘Agriculture Discussions

ACK from discussions about



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|
|
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APPOINTMENTS AS FROM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH

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‘fa

Married Yesterday

ISS GLORIA ALLEYNE,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
St. C. Alleyne of “Lynwood”

Hastings, was married yesterday
afterndon at 5 o'elock at St
Matthias Church to Mr. Eustace
Taitt, Assistant Master of Com-
bermere School and son of Mrs.
R. Taitt of Bank Hall St. Michael.

The ceremony which was fuily
choral was performed by Rev.
Griffiths.

The bride wore a dress of
anglaise with a close fitting
bodice. Cut on Princess lines, it
had a gentle fiaring collar with
loops and peal buttons. The skirt
opened revealing a graceful panel
of nylon tulle. Her headdress was
of blue forget-me-nots which
held in place a full length nylon
illusion veil. Her bouquet was of
blue forget-me-nots and Queen
Anne’s lace.

Matron of Honour was Mrs.
E. T. Smith sister of the bride
who wore a full skirted off-the-
shoulder gown made of white
anglaise. She carried a bouquet
of red roses and wore a _ broad
white crinoline hat.

Bestman was Mr. _ Stanley
Mayers and the ushers were Mr.
Fred Phillips and Mr. “Freddie”
Smith. ;

After the ceremony a reception
was held at “Lynwood” Hastings.

Flying Visit

ENEE SERRAO, former
B.W.L.A. pilot flew over from
Trinidad yesterday with two
friends in one of the Trinidad
Light Aeroplane Club’s Austers.
They expect to return to-day

after lunch. ,

Annual Leave

RS. RUBY JOHNSON was.

at Seawell yesterday to meet
her daughter Ingrid who flew up
from Trinidad to spend a short
holiday. Accompanying Ingrid
was Miss Arlene Gregorio of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co., in
Port-of-Spain, Here for her an-
nual holiday, Arlene is staying at
Acera Guest House,



SEE that there are to be
octopuses in the Dome of Dis-
covery, They will demonstrate
experiments carried out on “the
Most brainy of the lower animals”
Nothing is more amusing than
to see an octopus playing the
bagpipes. It often seems that the
bagpipes are playing the octopus.
And the kind of music which
comes from that inextricable
jumble of tentacles, chanters,
drones and bags is such that
nobody really cares which is
playing what.
Mr. Gooseboote’s Speech
HE court was crowded when
Mr. Honeyweather Goose-
boote opened the case for the
prosecution, In a masterly pas-
sage he said: “ . . We have
only to ask ourselves what would
happen if everybody painted ships
cn their dog-kennels, to be pain-

CROSSWORD a

4









ape Across
arkte attached to th to-c!
4 Oo ree ant le rue ste
- Not laughs that «
: is ivi? to) re provided, o:
ccommodation age ard,
12, Boiled potatoes have ite aye |
4g. enone. (5)
+ Must be read to be answered.
15. A broken last. (4) are
16. This anima: sounds warmer. (5)
19 There ts 1ittee doubt that part of
< ne woy tL may travel by this. (4)
21. { is Seuncl to cotton on. — ¢
\22 Ode to a D.P could be,
Ine: Cutie cr 18 Down. (3)
2% rurther. (4)
9S. Economical finding the rivet tn
the pond. (9)
Down
lL. Dcbased styie of arehitecture.
2. Puty ends a vain ‘upset. 5 We
3 SoUNd Of 2 SpIIT in tme elif. (6)
4. P'nce of refresnment, (6) |
5 Brigane ot sorts. (6)
€. Therent you see the play. (7) |
7, Many 4 schoolboy nas had this |
a parte, 18) |
4 iubes greetin;
tM. Ova. ne ce |
17 Sust A salty trickle. (4)
18 Parent ot 24 Across. (3)
20 ‘teburn of the tide. (4)
21 Found in the trapper’s outfit. (3)
" Aged (3) |
|

n of vesterday’s puzzte,—, 3
vised 10, Meats TL NA ne.
Jo Saott: 15. Reader: 28.
19. Mule BO Tits 22, Blevele:
a Cin 12 ,





‘ - Dow
> Udmote a

}
n POSS’ |
Attorneys: 5,

‘ Skn 6. BR. 8, Ty;
“ities” 27 Orver; QL, |

No neh
4 Lesson 14

w Shirtings

M@ wuite & COLOURS

-
a $128






——







& DIAL 4606

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

TL AE eR vr
Carb Calling

a

Mr.

HAROLD BISHOP.

Specia! Representative
R. HAROLD BISHOP, Gulf
Oil’s Special Representative,
flew to Venezuela yesterday for
oil talks. He expects to be back
in Barbados early this week.

St. Lucia Visit

i R. and Mrs. Donald Barnes

have gone to St. Lucia for
about four days. The same plane
which took them to St. Lucia
yesterday brought Mr. Richard
Dixon, representative of Rabone
Peterson. Richard is stationed in
Jamaica,



\\ AY eee
fully conscious of the

sibility of the accused. The fact
that the ship was painted in blue,

irrespon-

a colour odious to any town
council worthy of the name,
proves the complete contempt gor

civic consciousness manifested by .

this sailor, Benjamin Bottle. Yet
millions might have been going
carelessly about their business
to-day, ignorant of this loathsome
deed, had it not been for tha
exemplary and selfless conduct of
Mrs. Hound, the winner of tho
£5 prize for civic-mindedness._ I
shall endeavour to show that the
cynical indifference of the accused
to these principles which form
the very basis of the social con-
tract, and without which civilised
life would be a mockery, is the
hall-mark of a mind steeped in
degradation so enormous that the
imagination boggles, Not thus do

the true heirs of Trafalgar
besmirch their declining years. . .”
Interlude

Speaking on the Defence of the
Vest, hr said that we could put our
shirts « . Rearmament as a certain
winne

—(Report of speech.)

“WL * it would be much easier,”

e.mments a leader writer in

the Clothiers’ Gazette and Argus,

“to defend our vests if we kept

our shirts on. Whoever tries to

get at the vest must then first
tear off the shirt.”

Prodnose: I suspect a misprint

| for “West.”

Myself : But only a Scandinavi-
an would pronounce “vest” as
“west.”



Junior Short Story



HVS the World’s



Short Visit

ERE for about three days is
Mr. Leslie Outram, Supt..
of Police in Trinidad. He came
up yesterday by B.W.I.A.....
Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Mullen
who came in by the same plane
are from Jerome, Arizona, where
Mr. Mullen is an engineer. They
are staying at the Colony Club,
St. James....Mr. and Mrs. Har-
old E. Williams and Mr. Rubens
Milian from radio centre, Havana,
Cuba, were among the passengers
on B.W.1.A,’s flight from Trini-
dad. They are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

From World's Y.W.C.A.

ISS ELEANOR FRENCH of
Y.W.C.A. in
“Geneva touched down at Seawell
yesterday on a five-day visit to
the Y.W.C.A. branch in Barba-

dos. Leaving Geneva February
2ist, she has visited England.
U.S., Canada, British Guiana,

Surinam, Trinidad, Grenada and
finally Barbados,

Miss French has been with the
World’s Y.W.C.A. for three
years. Before that time she work-
ed with the Y.W.C.A. in the US.
Her home is in New York.

Seawell Shorts

.K. TRADE Commissioner in

the W.I., Aubrey Starck, is at
present in Barbados on a week’s
visit staying at the Windsor Hotel
sis . Vita Brown is also
here to spend a short holiday with
her mother . and Wennel
Best who is a school teacher in
South Trinidad is up on a short
vacation. . Molly O'Donnell,
former B.W.1I.A. hostess plans to
spend her two weeks holiday at
Maple Manor.

Incidental Intelligence

NEIGHBOUR of mine has an

original cure for wander-
lust he wants to hold in check.
He subscribes to the local paper
in the locality he is dreaming
about. “After reading it every
day for a month, I’m cured,” he
says. “Things are usually worse
there than here.”"—A. C. Peters,
New York.



By Beachcomber

Prodnose : What's that got to do
with it?
Myself: Absolutely nothing, I
am happy and proud to say.
It’s only a Human Being
N American woman has
created a record by sitting
on a flag-pole for 152 days, If an
English cat tried any of those
tricks the firmen of 24 counties
would have it down in no time.
Or This
S I browsed in a field of print,
my eye was caught by this
succulent morsel ;: “Offerings for a
Surbiton church are collected in
drain-pipes.”” I suppose that is
what is called “bringing religion
fnto line with modern life,” or
perhaps “bringing drain-pipes into
line with modern religion.”
Strange Behaviour
of Poet
ISS CLOACA MacSIMMER,
the novelist, was at Northolt
yesterday to meet Runamok, the
Eskimo poet. Runamook brushed
her aside, dropped the copy of
“Werewolf of the Moon’ which she
gave him (a free eopy from
Grumble and Fugge, Ltd), and
ran off into the canteen with air-
hostessette Muriel Brass, Hot-
Blooded Eskimo Ducks Out. Not
Frozen By The Book Society.
Poet's Whirlwind Romance. Re-
ceptionette Muriel On Thin Ice.
Brush-Off For Glamour Novelist.
Later, while Lady Cabstanleigh
was making inquiries at the air-
port, Runamok and Miss Brass
got into her car and told the
chauffeur to drive round a bit.

Competition



a (Cotton Prints 36° __.... 90¢
a

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for
its Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be published
every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The stories
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 300
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co, Ltd., City not later than Wednesdav every week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Name ....

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PO oi ces esls Gwen Ueanwuets tyeneetene seve geuenes

School .....

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eee ee eee eee eee eee eee eater rere eee

Home Addresp .......6.. esc ce reece eee ennteereneeet

Rayons

TAFFETA PASTEL SHADES 79¢

BROCADES __,, ” 85¢

YOUR SHOF STORE DIAL 4220

eee

er


SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

(iardening Hints For Amateurs

The Garden In April

Geranium Time. The Grafted rule the fruit is easily picked
Mango Tree without any ladder climbing. Tht
Geraniums,—in flower :
are not as commonly seen in our 22¥, Position, and will stand up to 2"¢ we have shown in one of the
gardens as many of the other {Fly dry conditions, but it will earlier notes how desirous it is at
perennials, Yet they are very aturally do better if it is not too this juncture to include, wherever
lovely, are easily grown, and do Wind-blown, possible, a _ pleasurable and
excellently in garden. beds, large . During the months of May to healthy activity such as garden-
pots, tubs, window boxes, or even JÂ¥ly the mango tree puts.out fresh ing to aid the family budget. The



FARM AND
GARDEN

By AGRICOLA

FOOD PRODUCTION I.
We continue to stress the need



now— Mango tree will grow in almost {OT more self-help in the home

in a_ Rock-garden. When once Young leaves of a lovely deep fact of creating or producing
established they give little COppery our which gradually something — however simple it
trouble. They can be grown turn to m, and as the tree is may be—tills one, young or old,

from seed planted in November CVergreen it. always keeps
or from cutting. The time to #@ttractive appearance.

take cuttings is from August. to ( ’
October for by then, and during Auéust, and in the opinion of most
the rains, the plants stop flower. People the Julie mango ranks as
ing as they do not like the rain, one of the most delicious fruits,

taking a cutting, get a vivalling even the Peach. ;

sturdy bit from a well grown Mangoes are slow-growing
plant, and after having taken off “Tees, but a grafted or budded
all the leaves stick it in a box to tree will bear fruit wen only
Match. By December to January one to two years old,

the cutting will be ready “ Fruit trees planted during the

faction—just try it and see how

ment in eating one’s own healtn—

its with a sense of pride and satis—

The fruit ripens from May to enthusiastic you can become! And,
if the article be garden produce,
there is the added fun and enjoy-

giving vegetables with a possible
surplus to bring in some spare
cash to obtain that long wanted
extra that it hardly seemed fair
to take from the family budget

Lan +0. be llowanee. There ‘
planted out in its pibaanesbee next few months will start at a nea is ee ian ant ie
rr eet acs ge as they will have tickets and numerous other items
Position the long months of the rainy S .

Choose a position of semi-shade nad So Feap: them just
for your Geraniums, or a_ place be pai right stage,
where they are in| shade for a 5° Plan your fruit trees. and
part of the day. Geraniums like ORDER YOUR. JULIE MANGO
the morning sun, so an Easterly NOW.
position for them is preferable, .. Have you any Gardening ques-
Give the plants a good rich bed, tions you would like answered or
and light, but regular watering. ®@ y garden information that would
Geraniums flower from Fébru. b© of interest to other Gardeners
ary to May and _ established t© pass on?
plants will last undisturbed for Have you a surplus of seeds or
several years if they are cut back ae you would like to ex-
from time to time. Thi ing change:
back should be done. atten ine “Write to ‘GARDENING’
flowering pericd, and during the C/o The ‘ADVOCATE’
rainy weather. Cut back all the and watch this Column for a reply.
old woody looking branches, and Mrs. E. Scott writes:—
by November on the plants will I have collected all the clip-
have brave new shoots ready to pings on “Gardening Hints for
or aes Do not let rt Amateurs” from the Advocate
new S flower too young, but every nday. I wonder if you <. a
pick off the buds until the plant ,, ze a 1 to my re at Wine: alter: Se ae bus, if seems
; would give heed to my req certain, that there will be few
hgh, Serres, SNe. ROWE. jg 2nd I am sure the request of many faitures if the material we select
The commonest Geranium is others and that is to have these jrq Send ‘oitewhen, tie tke
ke) woe we aot ae a 9 ame hints in a more permanent. form— Comes—is conditioned in the
Se iiae : Fm deuaite Canlae that is, in the form of a book. manner indicated above. All aids
ties grow just as easily as the | have got a surplus of Morning to this end, home and secondary
Glory seeds, Queen Ann’s Lace ingustries included, must be

single, and are much _ more igold 1
rar to stick to 224 a ‘surplus of Marigold pressed energetically and reso-
decorative, it is best to stick to T've also got a surplus: hire

he double Geraniums. seedlings. ; 4 J
' “The Grafted Mango Tree °f seeds of a kind of Lily ats In last Sunday’s note we quoted
The grafted Mango tree is one of bears a delicate yellow. flower. I expert opinion on the state of the
the small to medium sized fruit @® not know the name of ae world’s population in respect to
trees that are well suited to be Plant and no one has been able food and we must keep this gen-
grown in a garden. Of all the to help me identify it. eral picture before us even in this
varieties, and there are several, For all these, in exchange, I small island where already much
the ‘JULIE’ is generally accepted would like a few bulbs of the has been dofie to encourage food
as the best. Eucharist Lily, some bulbs oY growing; but, if the ideas ventil-
A Julie mango tree grows into plants of what is commonly known ated above are to develop into
a neat rounded shape, seldom as the Easter Lily and some yealities, there is much more
growing very tall so that as a gerberas. needed, notably in the villages
and suburban areas, to bring
health-giving food within the
reach of all, especially those in
the lower ineome, groups. Nutri-
tious, green vegetables are a
luxury, except to those in the
with salt and soda and nuts. highest brackets and the position
Bake one hour in moderately slow is aggravated by the absence of

folk—boys and girls particulariy
—to enjoy life. It is a fine and
encouraging sight. in the rural
town in Canada where boys and
girls join their parents in the
Saturday markets, assisting in
making sales of the produce they
themselves have grown. We want
that spirit here right now on our
farms and in the villages so that,
however dark and difficult the
future, there is no need for des-
pair if the dominant keynote ot
young life is self-help, reflecting
a confidence in the ability to make
good wherever the tide of fortune
may flow. Barbados is over-
crowded and emigration schemes
are afoot. We cannot afford to be





Cookery Corner

nothing
cakes

There is
home-made

nice as
bread.

so
and

Feather Rolls are very light and oven, Crush your bananas with essential marketing facilities in
delicate, but do not *have the fine- ‘a silver fork. ; Bridgetown. A few deterrents are
grained texture of well-kneaded And now for delicious small here put forward as affecting gar-
rolls, They are extremely simple cakes. dening expansion in the villages
to make. and these are, admittedly, not
FEATHER ROLLS BABA AU RHUM easy to remedy immediately: (1)
2 cups scalded milk 1% cups flour lack of even the simplest forms of
4% cup butter 1 yeast cake dissolved in fencing to keep out roaming
V4 cup sugar 2 cup lukewarm water animals and of suitable centres for
Salt 2/3 cup butter the impounding of strays; (2) in-

1 yeast cake 4 eg

adequate water supply; (3). ab-
sence of a real community spirit
and leadership looking towards
as much self-help as possible in
the solution of joint problems;
(4) no credit facilities for com-
: munity wells and other needs as
faserdineabas. sce they present themselves; (5)
in remaining eggs, one Shortage of land in some cases,
at a time, then beat but this can often be made up by
until mixture is per- the use of boxes and similar con-
fectly smooth. Let it tainers; some really good vege-
rise until sponge tables can be grown in boxes,
doubles its bulk, com- Many farmers with small capital
bine mixture, beat have been able to obtain financial
theroughly and half fill individual help with mills and over-head
tins. Let rise. Bake in moderate jrrigation works and this is a most
oven. 2 praiseworthy development;
Cook ‘2 cup sugar with 1 cup whether it can be extended to
water for 5 minutes and add %4 village groups of smaller interests
cup of rum, Dip Baba Cakes in appears worthy of study. Mean-
sauce Be pour remaining sauce time, we must seek out every
SFONAG:: HGH available patch which is not bene-
ficially oceupied and set it to

work, Theré are some eyesores
not far from Bridgetown which
would present a different appear-
ance in gardens.

\% cup sugar

Salt.

Add half cup flour
to yeast; cover and let
it rise. Mix remain-
ing flour with butter,

2 eggs well beaten

3 to 4 cups flour

Add _ butter, sugar,
and salt to milk, When
lukewarm, add yeast
cake and when dis-
solved, egg and enough
flour to make dough a
little stiffer than cake
dough. Beat thor-
oughly. Cover, let rise
until light. Fill buttered
muffin pans full. Let
rise until pans are full.
(about one hour).

Bake ten minutes in hot oven.
This will make 24 to 30 rolls.

BANANA BREAD
3 ripe bananas
%4 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soda
% cup nuts chopped.
Crush _ bananas. Add



eggs,

beaten light, sugar, sifted flour



Te wale: pnt loacllbe

PUND'S

POND’S COLD CREAM to cleanse and soften
your skin.

POND’S VANISHING CREAM

to protect your skin by day and to hold your
powder matt.

otter these Beauty troducts

POND’S FACE POWDER: clinging,

perfumed, sceintifically blended, for
a glamorously matt complexion,



POND’S LIPSTICK $ smoocths

so easily onto your lips; the
rich vibrant colour stays on
and on and on.

Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely society women every-
where. Simple and inexpensive, they ar all you need to keep you looking

flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best at all times. You will find them
at all the best beauty counters.

|
|

not excluding thrift bank con-
tributions, which all help rural



SUNDAY

A Salt

which





gives flavour
to Britain |

LET'S have a pinch of old
salt with our Festival of Britain
to-day, You can’t imagine this
island home of ours without its
flavouring of old salts, can you?

They’re like seagulls, lobster
pots, and rusty old anchors—an
essential part of the British sea-
side scene.

The British old salt or shell-

back (Salantiquus Britannicus)
is easily recognised by his
plumage, He wears a peaked

cap, sea-boots, and a blue jerséy
with the name of the ship on
the chest.

His usual resting place is
against a bollard or in the shelter
of an upturned boat, and his cry
sounds something like “Shiver:
me timbers! Avast there!”

On fine summer days the old
salts can be heard calling, “Any
more for the Skylark?” and in
the evenings they roost in rows
on the benches at the local, where
holiday-makers ply them with
drink and encourage them to tell
the most improbable tales of ship-
wrecks and storms at sea,

Many old salts have a
curious habit of chewing
tobacco instead of smok-
ing it; they are said to be
exceptionally fond of par-
rots, and on winter nights
they can be found in
front of the fire putting
full-rigged ships into bot-
tles.

i,

A type that now seems
to be nearly extinct has
only one leg, the other
having been taken off by ©
a shark in the Timor Sea.

er

Naturally, such picturesque in-
habitants haven’t been overlooked
by our writers and artists. Ss

Coleridge and Rolsert Louis
Stevenson immortalised them, aud
in 1870, when Sir John Millais
painted a picture of an Elizabeth-
an old salt talking to a couple of
boys on the beach, he caused
such a sensation at the Royal
Academy that they had to put uy
a barrier to prevent the master-
piece being mauled by the en-
tranced British public.

Millais called it “The Boyhood
of Raleigh,’ and cartoonists have
been copying it (with apologies)

ever since,
Bliss

Personally, I have my own fay-
ourite old salt, to whom I will
now introduce you. His name is
Cyrus Stanistreet, or Old Stany
and though he is 68 he still goes
to. sea, because that’s the only
way he can get any peace from
his grandchildren,

When he’s ashore, as he is at
the moment, he lives in a Liver-
pool council house with five of his
14 grandchildren. They are all
boys and:all under ten and, as his
idea of bliss is sitting in a corner
quietly putting boats into bottles
the children drive him nearly
mad,

Old Stan has all the tattoo
marks of the genuine shellback—
bunches of flowers, Union Jacks,







ADVOCATE

BERNARD

WICKSTEED'S
PRIVATE
FESTIVAL
Ss taking readers on a tour
of the things which will

not be officially on show
in 1951, No, 4 in the series.

and women. with fiowing blue
hair. The five rows of ribbons on
his reefer jacket tell the story of
seafaring Britain over the last 50
years,

There's the plain white ribbon |
of the Polar Medal that he was |
given in 1903, when he went to
the rescue of Scott in the old!
Terra Nova and if they ever give |
a medal for the Korean War, Stan
may get that, too, for it was in a
troopship going to Pusan that 1
firstyran across him last year.

Model Ships

He was in charge of deck stores,
and had a little cubby-hole up in
the bows, where he lived and
worked ard dreamed, Part of the
day was spent issuing tackle to
the deck-hands and the rest” in
making and bottling his model
ships.

To reach his hide-out you had
to climb through trap-doors, down
iron steps and pass a notice say- |
ing: “Keep Out”. There you found
him, shaping booms out of match-

|

|

|



fll

sce — ee ewe ee ee





















j





sticks and wearing a pair

of spectacles that he
bought for sixpence 20
years ago.

Behind those spectacles
are the twinkling eyes of
humorist, When someone
asked if. he-ever built his
ships by climbing into the
bottle himself the remark
gave him an idea on
which -he went to work
all the way to China and
back |

First he rigged up the
. inside of the bottle as a
miniature carpenter’s shop, with
tiny tools and shavings on the |
floor. Then he carved a model of
himself ‘sitting. at the beach in his
sixpenny specs, building a boat
in a bottle, |

It’s a joke that will go on giving |
pleasure to people long after Star |

atte



has signed up to sail the seas of |
another world with his son, who |
was lost in the Rawalpindi.

Royal Visit

I offered to buy it from him at
any price he cared to name, but
he turned me down and, by doing

so, put me into distinguished
company, because he once said
the same thing to the King of
England.

The King and he met in the
Empress of Australia, going to
Cahada in 1939. First, Old Stan
went to the King’s cabin apd
showed him some of his models.

Then the King paid a return
visit and went to the cubby-hole
down the iron steps ¢ 3 past the
notice saying: “Keep On *

A model f the ~ >tty Sar« took
the King’s ey and he asked if
it was for saic. am sorry it is
not,” said Stan. aen he added:
“But if I should cnange my mind,
Your Majesty, you shall have first
refusal,”

Gentlemen! Charge your glass-
es! The toast is “The Old Salts
cf Old England.” —L.E-S:





%. [had >
! on test "ar
quden heretic
Ue Sim cet ead

|
|

PP SPOSSOS SODIOES PSDP S PSPSPS GDI S SG GIGS

LOC PLELLEV ELSES OCDE EEE LES SLA SPEDE SSECCSESESESS ESS SCOSPIOS,

(MACLEANS PEROXI

PAGE THREE









oe

cy >
{

>

"! must confers, i've
NEVER seen anything like <

N\A
EHOLD (LEANSER

GLUMICECSL

Keep YOUR home hygienically clean
with this S-M-O-O-T-H no-waste paste
cleanser, You'll find CHEMICO so efficient,
80 eeonomical—-and so kind to the hands

EVELYN, ROACH & CO. LTD.
Distributers

ad

Don’t let constipation anc a siuegish liver
slow wo down ., . keep you copstantty fee) |
ing “4 More's Pitle |]

u alt-sick, halt-well.”
wne's OU gentle but effective overnight
relief, without griping of discomfort to
distarb yourrest. One of their »
dients of fruits, vegetables

special TONIC agent, which helps restore s
normal bowel condition after harmful wastes
are cleared out. Get Dr
Mome’s indian Reot
Pills today

Dr.







A
TRUSTED REMEDY
FOR OVER
50 YEARS

BEWARE oF worms!
Be

sure vour family is protected with

Comstock's Worm Pellota. Made by the

makers of Dr, Morse's Lndian Root
AW -44

1 teeanncaacamasacttiiaetentinnns

ei ok



STOP
HOURS

COUNTING
ALL MGHT

BE SURE OF

ALL-OVER yelâ„¢"
grin



*
Rw with the faithful

use of DREAM —The Soar

















- of the Beautiful.

Play safe be prepared
. for your romantic mofhent
oe Get a tow cakes of DREAM
TOILET SOAP use uw

thfully in your ba

and: at the Wi:

for a oft-smoo
radiant with natura!
loveliriags :
DREAM is available at toilet goods




GIVES PAIN

ITS KNOCK.
OUT BLOW

On Sale at ove.

Knight's Drug Stores

counters throughout the island.










\ eo

1D) TOOTH PASTE





keeps TASTE Walls
and healthy

DE

aay.

For white teeth, use the PEROXI

tooth paste—use Macleais every



- “A pane. UT FA Cs HU ASE RR cy OL
alien EA taeee scare
Cree

QODOOOOP OOP PR SPOS OSCS

MODERN

OPPOSES

POP EBE LEE PPPOE LE PPP PLEA AO

RESS SHOPPE=Broad st.
5

oy SAILE

THURSDAY = FRIDAY «- SATURDAY
MONDAY = TUESDAY

ITEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED
FOR QUICK CLEARANCE

You are definitely effecting large savings by attending this CLEARANCE
SALE. Here are some of the many reductions.

TENNIS DRESSES. SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS

A fine assortment in sizes and colours, Most of these items were regularly q rH]
sold up to $8.50 Sale Price ib, pate

645% oo%eS

POMPE.

>

-









ALL

LADIES’ BETTER DRESSES oe S$ ] ? 0
Regular Sizes and Modern Shades
Also a variety in Ladies Ankle Socks
2 of these fine Towels with a Glass Tumbler
To-day’s Value 65c. per towel, Special Sale Price. All 3 in a pkg. for
LADIES’ PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK

Bea ] yi l iH

LADIES’ SKIRTS AND BLOUSES

Jersey material Blouses, Printed Cotton Skirts Specially reduced for a q fh
this Sale Only ee ay
IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS

Many Styles and Colours, All sizes. Reduced from $24 to
yf 00
Sale Price 2 prs. lor .
Lace trimmed Panties in tea rose, cream also black, Small, Medium, Large.
For ladies and children in white and many other useful colours. el il {

—SOCCOSOSSSOS FOSGOP POOP OP SSESES

SOO CE PSOE OOS COO OS

LADIES’ ART SILK STOCKINGS
LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS
$y uo
Regular priced $1.92 Sale Price
Styles, Many regular prices were up to $4.80 To Clear Maa

MEN’S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS

Men’s Polo Shirts in White only with Zip fasteners. Shirts that were a
regular $2.40. Reduced for this Sale ces e

54° WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL

That will make Skirts or Coats for travelling and can make many other Wo
useful things. Reduced from $6.00 to Per yd. snpeaae 3 “7

% LADIES’ COATS, WOOLLEN PULLOVERS, CARDIGANS

: Reduced to } Price %
$ CORSETS, CORSELETTES, TURBANS, INFANT CHRISTENING x
$ DRESSES to } Price 8
% 3
: THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE
Seasesce LLLP PBPRABLLLELLPLPLEPLLLLLLL LLDPE ANS CPN
PAGE FOUR





What:do:you know

SUNDAY

|WORRELL WAS QUOTED

‘IN AUSTRALIAN POUNDS
1951 Football Season Opened Yesterday
By 0. S. COPPIN y

Indies Cricket Board of Control] for approximately
£1,400 as was claimed by Jack Fingleton, Daily
vL Dispatch Australian correspondent and former Ats-
tralian Test piayer.

The solution to the problem is that Jack Fingleton, for reasons
| knowa to himself has quoted Worrell’s request in- Australian pounds,

The story now is that West Indies all rounders Everton Weekes
and Clyde Walcott have signed for £975 (English pounds) while Wor-
rell has asked for the same £1,075 that he received for the English

tour. EM ware



..

£100 LESS

ADVOCATE



. new-comers,

Carlton Defeats
Notre Dame 3—1
AT FOOTBALL

CARLTON scored a 3—1 vic-
tory over Notre Dame, new-
comers to first division football a=
the 1951 season got underway at
Kensington yesterday afternoon

within 15 minutes of play, while
Carlton who lined up with two
Herbert Bright an

here recently, equalized shortly
afterwards and at the interval the
score was 1+-l,

For Carlton, Clairmonte, McLeod
and Reynold Hutchinson each sent
in a goal while Freddie Daniel
netted for Notre Dame.

A slight breeze was blowing



M. Linton Victor
Ludorum Of
Notre Dame Sports

M. Linton running in the
Senior Division was the Cham-
pion Athlete in the Notre Dame
Sports metiikg wich was held

Garvey who had a better
than he at the starting line.
In the 220 yards he came in

jump

a late start im the 440 yards
Linton tried to make a bid tor
first place but his efforts only got
him a third place.

This meeting was the first one
that the Notre Dame Sports Club
has staged and it is initiated
mainly to arouse the interest of

Garner of Highways and Trans-

SUNDAY, APRIL 15,

THE OFF SEASON

Too Many Horses—Peculiar
Classification—Racing In Jamaica
EY BOOKIE

LTHOUGH ihe Union Park meeting finished
up on April 7th and there will be a Creoiq

1951



‘ rims é vell as the
at Bay Land, Beckles Road yes- meeting at arima next month, as we
: The attendance was small and terday. He carried off the 100 usual b.G. May fixture, there is no doubt that
f sources informe t vas a tame > aris dash ae’ ht le breasting is is e off season of racing in e ua
f UTHARITATIVE f d “whe tiie we game was'a tame one. yards dash in fine style breasting this is the off f the South
2. week that Frank Worrell did ask the West “Notre Dame drew first blood the tape scme yards before J. Caribbean, Some years ago wnen there was

no racing in B.G. and no Creole May meeting
it was definitely the only time that the horses
out here had any sort of enforced rest period



!

pot " Englishman and Wilfred McLeod « to H. Robinson who had : re the Trinidad June meeting opened, and
5 y om esas this oe — ee s igs? _ wie re - member of the Gren- ee iephine in the better part for quite a number who were overworked it was a welcome break.
West Ind 1050 tour t England. © got for the ada football team which toured of the race. After getting off to Nowadays it is only those who-are in the imported classes who

generally get the break and €ven they face the possibility of being
sent to B.G.

T this time of the year it was.alsu customary for racing journalists

to take a rest. Actually this 1s still possible for those in Barbados
because there is little of interest either in B.G. or at the Creole May
meeting. But it seems that readers like to be bored and so today I
must findysomething to fill this column. At one time I did stop for a
few Sundays only to find, to my amazement, that there were some

ri : across the field when Referee the youths around the Bay Land ardent fans who went so far as to phone me to find out if my column

HE West Indies Cricket Board £. Control have asked_ the profes- Neville Medford whistled the and _ Brittons Hill area iN had been suppressed. One chap, when I informed him that this was

5 read ook wa ny oe for drag nog # to om a players into action, Notre Dame athletics. ‘ ee i simply said “O.K.” and rang off, leaving me in considerable

about ENO a Auctraiian rie Passat sechaat pele Bi pl Penetish ioe who defended the goal from the _ After the — sports - K. doubt as to whether he only wanted to know so that he could stop







OOD 9SES







DO YOU KNOW the ENO

DO YOU KNOW
that ENO has a

Eno’s ‘Fruit Salt’

The words “ Eno" and “ Fruit Salt” are registered wate marhey

aie

POLES PPE PEEL LC CLELEL OES,

was thirty-three matches.

Roy Marshall, and there is no secret now that he is in the team,
as well as Weekes and Walcott, hus accepted a little less since he has
not been considered from the level of Weekes, Walcott, Worrell and
Ramadhin.

Worrell’s conditions have been communicated to the Australian
Cricket Board of Control, who consider that he should nct be paid
more than the top professionals and further state that if he canfiot
come to an agreement with the Board, that they will accept a team
without Worrell as representative.

| In the first place I must repeat that I see no reason why the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control should have treated with the pro-
| fessionals individually, nor why they should quibble over the expen.
| diture of an extra £100 when they are quite prepared to squander

it over paying the expenses of the President going to witness an Inter-

Busde +«
In any case, people like Jack Fingleton and the other sensation-
alists can do neither cricket nor journalism any good by writing what
must be regarded as half truths. ;
If an Australian pound is 16/— in English money then why not
| convert £1,400 to English pounds, if the article must appear in an
English paper.

| SENSATIONALISTS



“t

As far as Ramadhin is concerned, he, I understand has asked
for “as much as the others’. This is vague and has also to be irowed





northern end were first on the
offensive and their outside left
Freddie Daniel tried. a good one
which struck the upright and went
out of play.

Carlton then made one or two
sood attempts to score but the
Notre Dame defence would not
be overcome.

Well Placed Shot

Notre Dame soon afterwards
opened their account‘when Fred-
die Daniel on the left wing beat
King with a well placed shot.

Carlton now fought for the
eaualizer and almost found them-

their opponents’
area and were given a penalty as
the result of foul play by one of
the Carlton defence. Skipper
Daniel took the shot and sent it
straight to goalkeeper King, who
had no difficulty in saving.

Notre Dame’s goal had a nar-
row shave when Carlton launched
an attack and Freddie Hutchinson
sent across a good effort from the

port presented the | prizes to
the boys. Before doing so he
remarked upon the keenness that
Wag shown by the boys and girls
in the races,

The events were as follows ‘—
100 yds.—(Boys 12—14)
ist A. Simmons; 2nd C. Sobers; 3rd N.
Fields

Ist H.
Husbands
. 100 Yds.—(Seniors 16 & Over)

lst M. Linton; 2nd J, Garvey; 3rd S.
Clarke.

80 Yds.—(Girls 12—14 years)

lst M. Waithe; 2nd J, Osbourne; 3rd G.
Belgrave.

100 ¥Yds.—(Boys 14—16)

Bynoe; 2nd G. Sobers; 3rd D.

lst E. Nightingale and M. Collins; 3rd
I, Bynoe
Sack Race
Ist D. Mapp; 2nd R. Maynard,
880 Yds.—(Open)
Ist S. Clarke; 2nd T. Dottin;
Jordan.

3rd R.



Readwin Keeps
Tennis Crown



or start buyirig the Sunday Advocate again.
please everybody,
] OOKING around therefore for something to write about I find
4 lots of little things and perhaps it would not be a bad idea to
mention them as they run around the brain, First there is this rumour
that we may have 93 horses entered for our next August meeting.
Furthermore that we shall have to stage\a four day meeting to
accommodate them,

Now let us be reasonable. The highest. we have had was 63 and
this was only last month, It is quite true that there are 24 two-year-
olds to be added. But it is most unlikely that all of them will start
while some older horses who have been mainstays for some years
now have lately retired. I cannot therefore see where we are going
to raise this extra thirty from. I have counted 84 on the present
classification list, and, as everybody knows, it is extremely unlikely
that all eligible starters ever enter for one meeting.

But then one cannot

. : - 220 Yds.—(Boys 12—14 years) Nevertheless, I will agree that we might expect 75 to take entry.
wratislasstveaction =| ner equally nonsensical excuse," "OOTaFumm £0" GOING Or some Erk Seale Hot pom. bciybhe aot S Wile: ort cat caus Ht seems yet anather opportune moment for me to sar
| . Seas : > ee rm talking about a new track. I doubt very much if having four days
isa cor- but this time he kicked over. #20 ¥ds.—(Boys—Seniors) ‘ C ! ;
perfect I can hardly disagree with Worrell for having asked in the first From a corner kick by Freddie | ,,ist,4- Robinson: 2nd M. Linton; ard R. will relieve the congestion in each race unless there are separate
rective for stomach place for similar terms to those that obtained with regard to the 1950 Hutchinson from the right side, Ee ‘. oh eeul ones ay) k ey beduaa bation cog an Nig A ers une ntatene wee thar
tour. Ciairmonte beat goalkeeper Wil-- , st, L. ittaker; Snd 7. Clarke 12 . bth ie
and liver disorders? On the other hand I cannot imagine his turning the tour down kKinson with a hard shot to give =) Greene vas.—(Boye—Seniors) pre ge aie rey ae — aoe oe ae at oe ae
because he has not been granted this extra £100 Carlton the equalizer, Ist T, Dottin; 2nd F. Green; 3ra M, “a ose in © and C2 are not equally divided and the majority are
a , Notre Dame then carried the Linton. in the latter class, This also appears to be the case in F and F2. How
Sold in bottles for lasting freshness ball well _ in Nightinesls and MEG

then are we going to strike the happy medium ?
which I do not propose to answer here.

The day. has come when we must leave the Garrison. Yet. there”
we stay while the numbers mount, the sweepstake grows larger and
the cost of land spirals upwards, It does not make sense to me.

L OOKING at the classification list also makes me pause to remark !

¢ on the latest promotions. Why, for instance, should Best Wishes
be moved from:D to G2 for winning a classic? A race for which
there is no winning: penalty attached. When the local classifiers
moved her from E to D for winning twice at Christmas, I cotild see
nothing wrong with this, Especially as Cross Roads was moved to

It is a question

i . , right wing, the ball just missing D2. After the Guineas and the rest of the D class races it seemed ‘to
2 _ a a hae a es aera Cat he the upright. The interval was (From Our Own Correspondent) me that all that was proved was how correct the local classifiers
% | 3s vane e in the best interests o les cricket So taken with the score 1—1, GEORGETOWN, April 10 Were. But the latest method of reasoning must be that once a horse
% | team can be announced. On~ resumption, Notre Dame Edgar Readwin, BG. No. 1 has proved the classifiers correct in a particular class then it’s time
% WL. MANAGER : f were first on the offensive and tennis player a Mand he got out of it, whether he just holds his own or wins freely.

‘ The rumour is too persistent to be ignored that Chatlie Daniel at inside right sent prayer, came back after
















m|Cyril Merry, a member of the West Indies team
| to England in 1933, a former Trinidad captain in
jthe Triangular Intercolonial series and Secretary
jot Queen’s Park Cricket Club of Trinidad, will be
ithe Manager of the West Indies team to tour Aus.



in a good one which King saved,
King again came into the picture
when he kicked away what looked
a certainty from Skipper Daniel.

Carlton in a_ good

being two down, to clinch victory
from Ivan Phillips in the B.G.C.C.
Open tournament on Sunday
afternoon. The score was 4—6,
2—6, 6—2, 6—1, 6—0.

Best Wishes promotion also compares unfavourably with that of?
a horse like No-to-nite, who won two handicaps but was only moved
from C2 to C proper, and Fair Sally, who won with top weight and has
not been moved at all. I do not disagree with No-to-nite’s promotion
for one moment, But why the benefit of the doubt is given to the two

forward ; ; ;

q u - a ; importeds and not to the creole is that part which completely baffles me.

5 7 pen oan Sn hoe ten deli eciittieg tieeinn cae aed and tinue oe The match which lasted a lit- Nan Tudor is another one who has not been given the benefit of

% Jwhen I was in Jamaica I knew that as soon as Wilkinson missed “a header” from "¢ Over two hours was witnessed any doubts which existed after she wn once with very light weight-and

» |'Tom Peirce had signified his inability to make the McLeod to give Carlton their sec. P¥,,2 large crowd. then ran badly due to the state of the going. Only recently she way

* drip if selected, that the two leading candidates ond goal. . Readwin repeated his B.W.I. moved from C2 to B2 for winning two handicaps in Trinidad ‘and

. } for that position were Cyril Merry and Frankie De Kenny Centres championship — win, at Bourda while T could see nothing very wreng in this, why should she not be

% Caires of British Guiana, the latter a member of Carlton almost got their thira °°" Trinidad’s Ian McDonald in left in B2 until she has an opportunity to prove how good we really:

s the 1930-31 West Indies team to Australia and.a goal when Kenny Hutchinson the last tournament, as he found think she ‘is. Few people have a higher opinion of Nan than I do,

x cyrtL MERRY member of the British Guiana Intercolonial teams raced down the field and eentred himself in the same position after Yet placing myself in the position of a classifier I would be forced

%| in the Intercolonial tournaments prior to the outbreak of the last but the inside forwards fumbled, !0%ing the first two sets, On the to admit that quite a lot of my estimate was mere conjecture, There.

9 | world war. 4 Notre Dame missed-a good op. Previous afternoon he convine- are.so very few hard facts to go by.

; x BOTH QUALIFIED ; portunity to score when Green- i"8ly beat Frank Drayton in one HICH. brings me to a very touchy problem, although it is one.

3 1. idge centred trom the right wing our and 32 minutes, 6—4, 7—5, which applys mere to Trinidad than to anywhere else. Soma

% If either of these gentlemen were given the appointment I think and Freddie Daniel headed over °—8, 6—4. day it is inevitable that the chickens will come ‘home te roost. I

$ | that they were both qualified from the point of view of their k p, the, bar. r? : IvahV Phillipe’ went! dowh! fights would not be, surprised to, find, that they are already on the way

ss % | edge of West Indies and International cricket and- the tinal -consider4- Tt was not long after this.that ,..%° 1 le sonal athicuel tn ~ home, » But how long. I wonder did the classifiers imagine that- owners
x % | tions for managership would be the deciding factor. ’ * Carlton Iatinched another attack. on aaa Oe te yA : the 2nd trainers were going to put up with this business of rapid promotion
> If this is so, I hasten to congratulate Mr, Merry and if it is not so, Reynold Hutchinson the outside bi Yuwie “ ne did-in the deat two 7! creoles. Sensational no doubt to have it flashed across the pages of

i a $ | I should have no hesitation iy congratulating Mr. De Caires. left centred and the “keeper” sate CAH Gea GEM. the. aide ee ae ar rot ze brs a ra eae et Eline

4 is i ‘g i ima PC t of the mi etsam, had skyrocketed from o B class when on

A Tip otf Sound Advice % FPHE 1950 Football season opened at Kensington yesterday after- ear ‘o give. Carlton their third lines, he might have won. ae three vole old.” More so still to read that “Ocean Pearl had aceosn7!
x noon when Carlton defeated the newly promoted Notre Dame by ” Notre Dame were now playing match: Instead, from the a plishéd even’ more than the wonder filly Gleneggle.” These are but.

Whatever Your Requirements %$ | three goals to one. with ten men as their goal-keeper °<2,f0 Some unknown reason, h? two of many exaggerated promotions since the fad started back in 1948.

, » : Eo per started to advance to the nets, ‘It has gone on steadily until it has reached the stage where a

| The Council of the B.A.F.A. consequent upon the withdrawal W8S forced to leave: the field when Readwin would drive past mere exercise gallop may endanger ones chances of remaining put.

BUY NOW g | of the Empire team from the First Division competition decided to through illness. The se ;/% him easily down the lines ot were it not for a ptinted rule which says: “no horse can be promoted

« x | suspend the rule requiring six teams to compete in the First Division ay fictnone Gils ted ik hed ike when he did get a chance with who was a non-winner at the Jast meeting at which he raced prior to

g ccmpetition to allow five teams to compete instead. ball in their onbaaeatr ade ‘AEE pret og gs ae —— peers reclassification.” I have no doubt creoles would have been sent “up:

2 sai Pat . .. ) e orehan y= «Str j La i y

Prices of all Commodities are on the Upsurge % | It was also decided to write a letter to the Empire Club stating the | referee awarded them a ne the nets. He aid it on no ch a Sot Foetetgs are not fools and stakes are not all at
| that it was against the rules of the competition for a Club to withdraw free” kick for foul play by the fewer than 14 times in the last ome level, We shall reach the stage when nobody, not even classifiers

(Now Opening)

‘

2ODSODOSSGSSSSSS SDSS GOG DOI OOP IIIS IIIS IEG G9965S



In Stock at the moment: $

ALUMINUM WARE

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

WE HAVE =:

y
ms

JUDGE BRAND ENAMELWARE

Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets
Phone 4200.

SOOSLSSEEERE PPLE LLLP PLL LOL

from a senior competition but that in the circumstances, the only
ierms on which the Council could accept the withdrawal of the First
Division team were that Empire should submit for the approval of the
selection committee the names of their nine best players who ordinarily
would have been debarred from competing in the Second and Third
Divisions if they were competing in the First Division.

If they cannot see their way to do this they will have to with-
draw all three teams,

ciation at “Enmore”,
It will be remembered that during the lifetime’ of the late Str
Harold Austin they were four excellent tennis courts there. bE
If these negotiations are successful it would appear that this

in order again and ample accommodation can be found for players
and public alike,
Sport fans are awaiting with interest the outcome of these talks

x and hope that it materialises into something that will! make lawn

tennis an established sport in Barbados.



Carlton full back Bright. Barker
took the kick but sent the ball out-
side.

The game ended shortly after-
wards with Carlton winners by
three goals to one.

The teams were as follow:—

Carlton: King, Bright, Kennedy Mar-
shall, F. Hutchinson, Cox, K. Hutchinson,

DAVIS CUP CHALLENGE

Challenging for the Davis Cup

competition between the two coun-
tries since 1921, when an American
team defeated Japan by a score of
5 to 0 in the final round of that
year’s Davis Cup championship.







two sets. By adopting these meth-
ods he allowed the championshir
crown to slip from his grasp.



Scotland Beat

Scotland beat England by three
goals to two in their annual soc-
cer international here today, to

right Wilf Mannion being carried.

off and taken to hospital with a
fractured cheekbone in the thir-
teenth minute.

—Reuter.



or journalists, will be able to say with the slightest degree of certainty -
which are the best horses of any age group, They will all be deliber-:
ately undertrained or carefully ridden, In the past I have defended.
ewners who were accused of racing their horses carefully and others
who it was said were hiding their horses, That was long before there
was the necessity to do so. But unless some curb is placed on this
silly promotion idea, any owner who races his horses at their best all
the time will be racing in a fool’s paradise.

Clairmonte, McLeod, Lucas, R. Hutchin- E ] , That, sirs, is what will become of your fine classification -policy.
: ; ngland At Soccer __. That, sirs,
GALVANISED PAILS en : NEGOTIATIONS wire Mame: Mubinan, Sgughn, ete en ee
rowne, Ss, ” aniel, reher, . Ww. :
GALVANISED PAILS and TUBS % ‘ Gepanidge, ¢,. Daniel, Barker, Nurse, EF. By VERNON MORGAN e NOTHER ia which I noticed in the Trinidad press recently
x Negotiations are in progress for the staging of tennis games janiel. ee WEMBLEY, STADIUM, ‘ causes me to ponder the question of Jamaican champions coming»
% under the auspices of the Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis Asso- a April 14. to this side of the Caribbean. The latest is Mark Twain. Winner of

the Jamaica Guineas and Dérby and conqueror of Footmark on sev+
eral occasions, he has come to us with a reputation second only tu
that of the Brown Bomber. I understand he will be racing at the

tennis. championship, Japan is wrest the championship from June meeting and, like the-rivalry there was between Blue Streak and
coum be the heaven sent answer to the prayer for the staging of scheduled to play q preliminary Engiand, * pe ig it is be expected that himself and Footmark will renew
° ssociation Tennis. round with the United States in England for most of the game. their btruggle for supremacy. ‘
(Central Foundry Ltd.—Proprietors.) The grounds are enclosed, and will not take a fortune to be put 195), tt will be the first fensits played only 10 men, the inside This is.all very well for the public here. But what about Jamaica?

his makes the ninth Jamaica, champion which has come to the Souta

aribbean.in the last five years and at this rate I cannot see how
Jamaican racing is going to flourish if their best horses continue this
migration. Yet the root cause of all this is the fact that something .3
wrong with racing ih Jamaica and until this is remedied we will cgn-
tinue to benefit from their losses,




















































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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951
Launch Takes #2£VIN DIES
SUDDENLY

Mr. Pound Medical Aid To
Has A Kink Back Country .oc.ict. 778 cous

6 came as @ surprise to many, some Readers of this column will re-
“GEORGETOWN Annas himself. member that at the beginning of

: oat . He had no tra in we advised you that

_ British Guiana’s Medical Serv- foreign politic tls ae tS us BES wes dropping the 49

ou S. @ ices have been extended all along qualification was his experience e transmission for the special
the B.G.-Venezuela Ea

PAGE FIVE









NO. 167

The Topic

B.B.C. RADIO NOTES

B.B.C. Wavelength
Changes

From Sunday, 15th April



of

avert

LINDEN BLOSSOM ~



IMPERIAL LEATHER ¢ BLUE BYACINTH

pee sasebei . boy,
rasping
blunt manner, rae into
the intricacies intrigues of
international affairs.

Immediately on his appoint-

i



Last Tuesday Joe and Robert
Stood at the Assembly door
To hear how some the foreigners
Just soak the Bajan poor.

. . +

'

Well boys you should have listened
To speeches loud and grand
For these were all directed
To control the “Coolie” man.
. ° ‘

a (once

Take off a wrap; do!

Dont nail him to a post

He helped poor Country people

But helped the "Coolie
. . °

frontier by egotiator, acquired during i but that
the @Stablishment of a Dispensary his ‘sone of, Trade Union on Xp tee oes eel leon. how-
Launch Service bringing succour Britain’s Foreign ever, as summer is approaching
day in and day out to persons of the past had been suave, and tien conditions are
: "all races living in the remote gantly tailored : arene ee
North West District. 2 improving the changes will be
George Maleolm Thomson Tre Launch which has been adopted from Sunday, 15th April.
; christened Relief is living up The schedule from that day on-
. to its name. Manned by a fully wards will be as follows: 6.30 a.m.
THE OF : : qualified Government Dispenser to 9.00 a.m. 15.31 megacycles or
Ed. D. D, i ‘ ° and a crew of three it carries a 19.60 metres; 4.15 p.m. to 6.45
Noe © ABC OI 15 9 Kelvin inboard engine om me meee te
> Ezra P . ca of assuring speedy travel. metres. For the las '
, 6d. 206 pages. The peoples of the aheeme ere Fotdnte mnaethin nad an of an hour of this period, that is
EZRA POUND exactly when to expect the jong, was "the British Tom 6.00 p.m. there will also be
: Rellef, for it follows an itinerary delegation at the Nations. 2. beam on 11.75 megacycles,
A PATROL of Allied soldiers Italy, where he developed an which’ ensures that each settle- He fought problem 25.53 metres. This latter beam
moving ca ly forward in intense admiration for Mussolini ment is visited once in every four lem as postwar world dis- Wi!! continue until the close down
i North italy visas made - (the anti-usurer) and in due weeks on a pre-arranged sched- ~ lved into turmoil. at 11.00 p.m. and from 7.15
esting li and a. course, for Hitler who, in his we. *OHte became weary p.m.—at the start of the West
shabby man of 63. with opinion (expressed after capture ~~ Among the hundreds of patients It became more and Indies half-hour each day—there
red) beard, by ‘the Allies), could ‘only be treated since the launch service cult to his will be an additional beam on
traces of an Idaho accent, He was Compared to Joan of Arc. started in August, 1949, have been flights of stairs. 9.58 regacycles, 31.32 metres. rin
a erank about economics, and the ,, From the corres nce of some needing the attention of a hard ate, and smoked Comments on reception, particu-
‘ hi this brilliant wrong ~ headed Medical Officer. They are taken vin” iew of those changes,
leading American poet of his time ‘ y Bevin had a wry larly in view t ng
His name was Ezra Pound American there emerges, aMONZ aboard and made comfortable for humour, Once as will be welcomed by the BBC
fo stage of his he, scurrility, abuse, enthusiasm ty jong journey back to head~ trouble reigned over the and may be sent to the West In-
he had 8d good judgments, the self” quarters. ambushes in Indonesia, dies Office, Box 408, Kingston,
"for Musso- pei ininess “Anybody mux _Attived at Kumaka Stelling on raids in Trieste, riots against Bri, Scnalen Tistiness who sortie
The active aness. Any nee the Aruba River, patients are tain in Egypt tune im to the beam to North
. fae ae gellar ry stray cats conveyed by > i i : America after our direct beams
; Home Rn allo.” Districts’s 45-bed base hospital at breaks out anywhere, rn y close down at 11.00 p.m. should
Washington, D.C., to which he eo Mabaruma Hill. Here there is a know.” note that this latter service will
was despatched as mentally un- And here is Ezra feeding the Government Medical Officer and He liked ordi British peo- now continue for two hours later
ind, his ‘trial for treason being stray cats of literature — helping a staff of fully trained nurses to Ple to call him “ - than usual on the 49 metre band—
indefinitely postponed; some ttle magazine, diseovering ensure that all receive skilled _ Once at a dockers* meeting in

*" most.
.

He start off Lou in brown pumps
And in her first white Shoe
Which quarrelled like a “bluka’
But cost twelve-ninety two,

* . : * *
She wore then seven Sundays
‘Twas Cheap Shoe, not box calf



And when the white shoe break up
Lou only paid down half.
. . . .

an elegant version of the
famous Biro ballpoint pen

You cannot fail to admire the slim graceful lines and attractive

.
The “Coolie” didn't quarrel
But brought Lou “pair o° brown"

; 6.11 megacycles—and at 12.00] And when Lou reached Lord Nels
; Joyce, aivising Lascelles —— attention. Should the patient re- Lene he admitted that when midnight if you care te tune in| The shoe "cried “Taw in. terwn’ oar
There he is. affable host to crombie on in gerse yf quire specialist treatment he will unemployed, | he had stolen for as Jate as that) you can also heat} se said “Lou this eux Gach. ake colours of Biroette—the latest addition to the Biro range of
seveana — discussing and one . ao ¢ Tt, g. be placed on board the S.S. Tar- for that” He pid ts eal another beam on the frequency of | Cost thirteen forty four : ballpoint pens.
“Tf you saat tue tb talk about Flot rom Lioyés "Bank where, Yeats, you must give me twenty- for £500 a year, he is ruining bean c a h

Neither God nor nature demands

reliable service. It is small, slim and neat, yet it gives a very
it of us, and if man demands it, In

four hours’ notice, as the top layer health and stifling poetry. long writing service,

“Caribbean Voices” — the
of my mind is gone.

Last week Lou passed through

General Hospital in the City. In

Swart

r indi- then I will violate the social laws Weekly programme of West In- aaa See ee Le The attractive colours and slim neatness of Biroette is especially
, ,z The money was ceined hae 23 = gold. Je mab oe Aeeee~ he has made.” dian prose and poetry—on Sun-; tne price mark on the same shoe appreciated by ladies.
With the remeining layers, am hate See ae Governor of the most remote parts of the —Reuter, day, 15th. April you can hear an | Prought hot Gn. rae Tavs aes Sold in Chena colours: grey, blu » maroon and black, each with
Pound ° since inearceration has the Bank of England (“may be great expanse forming the North unusual story, of a vampire in] >, urine: shark 6a the Grown ahs 4 cap in gleaming argenite or plastic to match.
Doce 1200 dollar Bollingen the nation’s”) instead of O. M. West Frontier District is placed Menenntedin British Guiana, but he is not the} Was Six-ntty a pair

Prize for best American poetry.
His post-war verse includes lines
on the British General Electi
in 1948: :

PRICE
and author of Four Quartets. __ within easy reach of the best
All this is not to say that his medical facilities in the Colony.

attitude to Eliot’s work is one of

sort of vampire of whom one need BIROETTE REFILLS Price
be afraid— ever tune in for

yourselves, The story is ‘Apologia

And boys this little price tag
Threw poor Lou “out o' gear”,
° . ® . .

$86,529 lr Fines



She swanked inside the same store
un i iration. This J de Lucio’ by R. S, Malcolm of} With satin dress afloat ‘
“Oh, to be in England now that from’ a ‘ietter in the private Mootball Fixtures Collected B.G. The other half of the pro- | ;* ‘own #ir! cried “that lady a pen planned
Winston’s out, “American” dialect of Pound's gramme will be devoted to six . , * . .

‘Bitoctie

Distributors in Trinidod

Now that there’s room for doubt.
be the

ON Monday afternoon Spartan
And .the Bank may
nation’s.”

nate ee ere, meet Everton in a First Divi-

poems by a frequently heard con-}| And poor Lou paid the

Two “dolla - ten” a yard

“Coolie

for a purpose

will
‘Waal, I heerd the Murder in gion Football fixture at

tributer, E, M, Roach of Tobago.



. AB ig ag ;
wilt i the Collect ol tae radio lame ee Kensing- anon or WN Roel 0 Broadcast begin at the regular Put tou was on her guard.” SPENCER J. KIRTON LIMITED, 2 BROADWAY, PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD, a
poem written in any asylum was night. Oh, ce Cowkney a referee will be Mr. D. W. tected sum. 96 $06,580.96 was col- note tnat tar ake air he The same pink piece of Satin
} . as 80) or one twenty
eae ., Smart's Song to vores, Sie ae his ats and we Heatinen Betas. the Gaon varus Heo od moms the 49 metre band which has been | And Lou was so bewthtered

How did Pound come to broad-
cast for the Italian fo™—and to
get into that eet
of these 384 Pound
years of correspondence) will
search them in vain for signs of

Lineamen: . A. Parris 4Mount far in excess of the differ. pat hour, in this case ‘Caribbean Their tongues are sweet as spice oe
armas ee ee te di “iy and O. aha evn % . ence was still to be cpubecine, tas dices’, at 7.15 p.m. outa vat waoubler rena s tr E fi §$
ais Secnents aad’ cbeaabetons aot ord ee, Hardy, Eliot. Thursday 19: Notre Dame vs. ieee system of ‘instalment pai’- T. S. Eliot ‘ , 7
personality, with a bee in his A Me

bennet about money.

Pound was not only a poet; but
a friend and finder of poets. He

brought all his seriousness and anthology

energy to the business of litera—
ture. When he came to live in

ndon (1911), he wore a light
bjs frock coat with square emer-
ald green buttons. It was a mis-
leading costume.

Pound had the essential gravity
of one educated in Pennsylvania,
and the salty speech of the Yan-
kee: “Every man should have a
home so that he may be exempt
from any outside interference
what so n ever.”

“England@’s national sport is the

harson beat Legall 7~5, 6—1, 1948, inst. with ic of Tehaikovsky Phensi ithe ¢ hear
hepring.” tinuous narrative. Setting, eee. 4 , , ) : music ehaikovsky, . ic neither harms the heart
Se end kit Chesterton India: ‘Teche, love (1) profane, the dare "Taylor 6—3 Less Crime Elgar and Dobnanyi, and one by and the blenders of nor upsets the stomach. Be pre-
called “a Boche, a bungler (2) sacred—at least, serious. causing Jamaica to There has Thee, Symphony Orchestra on s
and a emer.” :

posishun. 1 stuck it for a while,
wot
wailin.”

There is also in this collection 7
plenty of serious, vigorous writ- VS.
ing on “culchur” and other #4

the weepin and

Linesmen: Messrs. C.

uesday 17:
Carlton.

Referee: Mr. L. F. Harris.

likes: mes (‘fa louse”), Spartan. 2
seem faneay Wells (“stew”), Referee: Mr. O. S. Coppin
Calvin (“the black devil’).

de to literature, half—

tolagy, Pound's of Read-
ing issued after 10 years’ exile
from print, presents a provoca—
tive version of the progress of
poetry. Dicta: “Bad is
the same in all tangu

$ “Lit-
erature is news that news.”
FATHER GOOSE. By pman

Mortimer. Hert-Davis. 9s. 6d
255 pages,

MORTIMER, author of sinis—
ter-brilliant tale A Stranger on
the Stair, startles his public with
a wildly different work; two
stories (fables? fairytales?) in a

and G. E, % ,
Saturday: Everton vs. Pick-
wick-Rovers.
Referee: Mr. W. F. Hoyos.
Linesmen: Messrs. K. E.
Walcott and O. M. Robinson.

FARQUAHARSON WINS
AT TENNIS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 14.

The Farquaharson-Legall match rent
evening, provided a thrilling through the

this

struggle in five sets. Legall was

beaten through inexperience and ca

fortune fluctuated much, Farqua-

J Courts duri
Following are the referees and ng
for the other first divi- ST@ase of $7,
sion fixtures this week.
Pickwick-Rovers

Fines

not less than i;
end of

There are now five Courts sit-

Smith ting in Georgetown and handling

im posed

December, 1950,

the increasing volume of work,

last year, a de-
356.67 i

with the 1949 figure. °° "Parison
i were, however.
in 1049, as at the
an

providing best reception up to
now. As told in the first paragraph
above, broadeast at that time from
London will be in the 25 and 31
metre bands, the latter beginning
at the start of the West Indies

For those interested in poetry
who can pick up the BBC’s beams
to North shown in
the first paragraph—there will be

She erfetl “its misery.”
*

When
PAIN

; .
The “Coolies" used to walk. ‘round
‘Through couniry sides afar
To-day the “Coolie - island”
Drive ‘round in motor ear,

. . . .




They ‘‘trust” the country people

They glony in the crop time

They bring cloth to your door

What in town cost 4 penny

The “Coolie” will charge four.
* . * °

The number

filed in 1950 was 6,233, as
pared with 5,625 in 1949,

5,208 for 1948,

due directly to the fact that the

jurisdiction of the Magiatssie has
been Jaerenee? from $ to $250.
e

ent Assessor also had a

will be at 11.00 p.m, on Wednes- When you feel stiff with pain and
busier time last year as tenants day next, sponsored by every movement makes you want
are now more conscious of the The Week's Musi ) '
steadily increasing charges for usie J &R BAKERIES tw cry out—remember Phensic !
and are seeking relief Musical broadcasts by the BBC ic will ickl ce
Court, in the coming week include a makere of Phensic w quickly case an
Last year there were 689 appli- concert by the London Symphony

tions for rents’ to be assessed
as against 476 in 1949 and 341 in

of Civil Cases
com-
and

The increase is

menting on some

of Chi

00 duced

at 9.00 p.m.

an interesting programme in the
coming week when T. S. Eliot
will be heard reading and com-

in a recording of the University
20 Round Table, repro-
y courtesy of NBC. This

Orchestra in ‘British Concert Hall’
on Monday, 16th

Lou went back home and
Come girls let's form a band
Let's help the House Assembly
ContrelL the “Coolie” man

‘ . .

“ery out

remember
Phensic !









of his own poetry

Don't care what cloth they bring ‘round
Though it shines like a star

Let's buy our cloth from Harrison's
And the differénce buy “J, & R.”’

soothe the agony, lift pain-caused

ENRICHED BREAD fatigue,

remove the weariness.

ama aeee ae



J&R RUM

MopnincCouc::

Thursday at 6.00 p.m. with
Tchaikovsky, Waldteufel, Harty,
Delibes and Delius,

PAKISTAN STUDIES

The establishment of a centre

rH crease in th Le a tninal
qualify for the finals with Sturd Se in the number of crimina
Pgs oad me Dadu, | a young qs st form. ” ‘cases filed in 1950 as against that
he may successfully woo a rich Trinidad will play British Gui- £0r_the previous year, Last Ana.
Senichontis Geumtier. oie j- ana singles on Monday. 25,026 criminal cases were filed.
Rant, the charts gute. t6 Mack oe At football, Q.R.C. beat the @ decrease of 980 as compared
(a) the village buffalo, and (b) Harrisonians 1—0, the goal scorer With the 1949 figure, but an in-
the village elders, Complications, being C. Palce. erease of 2,040 over the 1948

pared for sudden pain—keep a
supply of Phensic handy.



In due course, Pound fell victim
to the Douglas Credit Scheme,
and became at once, Jike all fel-
low-sufferers, an expert on
money, currency, usury, banks,
ete. “The only thing between food
and the starving is a thin bar-










of Pakistan Studies is, under way Don't let morning and righ) cou
still droller, follow, ——_--—- total! cbaens| ing, attacks of Vso: iia or Sos)
pidi Collections in 1950 were divid- t Columbia University, in New| ruth “sleep and enurey teuther a
wean poses Somme, ate oy Don’t ask what Mortimer SHIP’ S TEAM DEF EATS ed up as follows; Fines—$63,682. York City, with the introduction ee tryin fREENID At‘, Vhts whey
er strips.” means, Don’t worry if animals, ISLAND Ar BASKETBALL 16; Fees—$16,444.58; Crown Costs of two courses on the history, blood, thus reaching tan breads ° ‘
letter to Geoffrey Crowther wee and sleeping | aa P son from 7 Pee Mag- ae > dag bt pe Pinos. See nos lenmunne of tubes wand lunge. Starts haintis wn ” for quick, speedy relicf
non. the talking in his pages. aban— nificent defeated an island team n ines realised $73,533,- ‘an. e Pa in Govern— Pais Wadvowet ere
ca ry bw oe thus don your mind recklessly to picked at random 46—24 when 74; Fees — $16,444.58; Crown ment has made a grant of $25,000 | MUCUS: {hut alleviating | ae FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
emotionally: “J take it you are pleasure. Basketball at Costs — $3,620.39; and Jacket to the center, which will be the | fetresbing plrep cry 9s)

a damned liar.” X
After 1925 he lived at Rapallo,

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, (FLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

"rom your hemlet titer wu 4
oF miner bee © Hen

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PAGE SIX



BARBADOS sab ADVOGATE

Printed by ‘he Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridaétown.
cook therapies
Sunday, April 15, 1951

THE ONLY WAY

ITIS not enough for the West Indies to
protest to the Secretary of State for the
Colonies every time that sugar is being
discussed at international trade meetings.
What the West Indies should be doing is to
give effect to the formation of a Regional
Economic committee and at the same time
request the United Kingdom to allow mem-
bers of that committee to speak for the
West Indies at international meetings.
Membership of the Regional Economic
committee would have to be based on prac-
tical knowledge and experience of trade.
The committee could only function, if it
were free from political interference,
although it would naturally consult with
Governments on major matters of policy.
Tt has been long apparent to observers both
in the United Kingdom and the West
Indies that so far from gaining greater
freedom from control by the United King-
dom, the trade of the West Indies today
suffers from the fact that they cannot bar-
gain for themselves separately with indi-
vidual Dominions or other nations, but
must be represented together through ~
Downing Street.

Itis also a mistake for the West



Indies ae



tative, at all major conferences affecting
their own trade, and they must have. re-
stored to them; individually and collective-
ly, the right to bargain directly in their
own interests. Only by this means can
Great Britain ensure that irresponsible
critits of her achi¢vements in the Wes
Indies are silenced.*, 4g ir

The unsatisfactory position by”
even the hands of the Colonial Office are
tied, when the Board of Trade or the
try of Food use the big stick, is thea
obstacle to’ progress in the West Indi
teday. The United Kingdom would bew
advised to study the achievements ‘an
the solid benefits which the West Indies
have gained in the past from free direct
bargaining with Canada. The way ahead
must inevitably be signalled from the way
back. The West Indies. wait anxiously for
the United Kingdom to show signs of
awareness that the present system.does not
function properly. yi?



FOOTBALL GROUND

WHATEVER the final decision
may be ‘as tothe venue of
football matches during 1951 © the
controversy ‘between B.A:F.A. and the
Pickwick Cricket’ Club has focussed atten-
tion on a state of affairs that should be
remedied. Football in Barbados has never
reached a, high standard, One of the chief
reasons for the failure of players to rise
above’ a certain level is undoubtedly ‘due

to think only in terms of the depressions”; to the! jfact that the game in Barbados is

and slumps which affected the West Indies
inthe past. In fact the West Indies in the
past owed a great deal to the fact that they
were in the habit of bargaining for them-
selvés.
trade relations with the West Indies prior
to 1982 shows most clearly how the West
Indies benefited because they were not re-
garded collectively or uniformly as colonies
but as special geographical units in the
Atlantic, dependent on trade.with the con-
tinent of which they form a part. Z
The Royal Commission which reported
in 1910 underscored this point by saying
that “it would be unwise, except for the
gravest reasons, now to oppose the natural
desire of the West Indian colonies for close
connection with the Northern Dominion.”
It would be a mistake too for the West
Indies to suppose that the United King-
dom neglects their interests and eaves

Canada to bear the brunt of a stable*West >.

Indian economy, In fact the West Indies
have benefited from the fact that Canadian
interest in West Indian trade and -the
emergence of preferences led to the grant-
ing of similar preferences by the United
Kingdom, It would be ungracious on the
part of the West Indies not to be mindful
of and ‘grateful for the fact that the United
Kingdom has agreed to a long term pur-
chase of West Indian sugar which gives
that element of stability so necessary to the
health of the industry and the prosperity
of the people of the area. But the real loss
to the West Indies the loss of direct; -bar-
gaining with Canada, in the opinion.of
Canadians and West Indians, outweighs
much of the advantages of long term con-
tracts.

Canadians cannot understand why the
United Kingdom cannot restore freedom
of bargaining to the West Indies on mat-
tersaffecting trade. They fail-tc under-
stand why benefits which the West Indies
now receive from a favourable balance of
trade with the Dominion cannot be handed
back to the West Indies, which undoubted-
ly need them, and why the West Indies are

not allowed to encourage Canadian invest- |”
ment in hotels and market gardening, both, -

of which would strengthen West Indian
economy and reduce their dependence on
the overburdened British taxpayer.

The Toronto Globe and Mail, Canada’s.
most influential national newspaper, which
is presently campaigning for a revision. of
the moribund Canada-West Indies agree-
ment of 1925, in a leader entitled “Oppors
tunities in the B.W.1.” made an excellent
suggestion that the Government of Barba-
dos would do well to follow up,

“The present excessively high cost of
many vegetables in Canada arises from-the
fact that they are being imported from
high cost-producing centres in the United
States. While our reserves of United
States dollars are materially stronger than
a short time ago, the greatly higher price
we pay for these imports increases the
drain on that reserve fund at a time when
defense needs are also making unusual de-
mands upon it. Canadian capital and enter-
prise could create a highly profitable win-
ter garden for this country in favourable
B.W.I, areas which already are well dis-
posed towards us, The development of such
business in these colonies—some time to
become another Dominion—would auto-
matically create new markets there for our
manufactures as well as for those foods
and other natural products which we pro-
duce and which they need.”

How many excellent suggestions like
these might bear fruit if the West Indies
could regain that freedom of hargaining
which characterised her relations with
Canada from 1890 until 1932! In those days
Barbados led the West Indies. Today this
island suffers precisely from the lack of
leadership in economic matters. Trade is
in the hands of the United Kingdom.
Periodic protests about sugar however
necessary, under the present circumstances,
will not save us. Protests should be un-
neces The British West

aceredited repre

Indies must



bave a spokesman, an sen-

The whole history of Canada’s .

played’at the wrong season of the year. It
is difficult t6 Control a football when the
turf is at its firmest, yet football is played
during the driest months. Furthermore,
the football season is limited to under three
months. Playing in the wrong season and
during such a limited period is not the wish
of the football enthusiast. It is dictated. by
other. circumstances. The major fixtures,
for purposes of gates receipts have to be
played on a ground which is controlled by
lessees of Kensington. Kensington is the
headquarters, of cricket in Barbados. It is
owned by the Cricket Association and
leased to the Pickwick Club. It is primarily
a cricket ground ahd’as‘ericket is played
in the wet.season the ground is only avail-
able for. a.few months in the dry season.
Furthermore, the Football season has to be
ygurtailed in order to get the playing field
weady for cricket. Erie

The first essential then for better foot-
ball would seem to bé a separatéand-dis-
tinct playing field for football, where the
fixtures could be played during the’ wet

season and where practice would be avail-«
_,able all the year round. An cenclosed
“ ground is “essential from: ‘the ’peint. of ’

view of financé. But a game of , foot-
ball, which lasts little more than.an ‘hour,
does not need the elaborate accommodation
for spectators which cricket demands. A
natural or artificial slope which would en-
sure an adequate view of the game by
every spettator is all that is required, and
even withthe limited number‘ of ,open
spaces in Barbados it should not be beyond
the ability and finance of the B.A.F.A. to
find such a suitable location. . Until the
B.A.F.A.° make an effort ‘to disassociate
themselves from‘cricket there is little hope
of the standard.-of. foothall_in Barbados.

improving.

LAW SOCIETY
IN 1940,an Act was passéd to incorporate
the, Barbados Law Society, and it was
hoped that such a Society would have
helped to maintain the dignity of the legal
profession in this Island. ‘But the Society

was short-lived, it met with:opposition for ©

various reasons and now it is defunct.
- Never was a Law Sociéty more needed in
’ Barbados than to-day. Our Bar is fast
acquiring ‘a name as the most_undignified
and disorderly in the West Indies, and
recent conduct in the Courts has done
nothing to disprove that opinion.
Barbadians like to think that Barbados is
Little England. They are flattered when
visitors say that Barbados ‘is the “most
English” of the West Indies, and they like
* to-think that this Island enjoys, and bene-
fits from,) the traditions of England. But
the behaviour in the Courts.could not pos-
sibly be more un-English, the dignity and
decorum of\the Courts of the Mother Coun-
try are not to be found here.

When a’ young Barrister is admitted to
‘practise at) the Bar of Barbados’ he invari-
ably promises to. maintain the. “dignity and
traditions of the Barbadian Bar.” Those
who happen not to know something before-
hand about the Bar in Barbados are lia-
ble to spend the rest of their lives trying

to find that‘ dignity and those traditions.

In. England; when ‘a barrister misbe-
haves grossly in a’Court he is ordered to
leave the Court by the judge, who then.

Which’,





*

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



He Built A Private Empire

On The Hates And Fears of Men ; |

EMPEROR ERNEST
ss Hy eo Malcolm Th
NT Evy wae lll |

self-made man of the a"
list era. He had the same
hyo imagination as, in an
ear! jer, generation, was po:
‘ Paxton, the designer of the
rystal Palace. The only differ-
ence was that Paxton’s materials
were less durable. On the other
hand, Ernest Bevin’s i
house only one man was allowed
to throw stones.

Bevin's path to greatness was
not that of the ordinary capitalist
a being whom he despised and
vanquished.

He chose the less conventions
route to the ‘high places whic!
like many men of his generation,
he found mors congenial to
talents: the way of agitation, pro-
paganda, organisation. He was a
superb manager of men; and men
—their hope, fears, prejudices,
hates—men were the rungs of
Bevin’s ladder. Men the materials
with which he built. 2

His way to power
H®, powers of mind, by no
means despicable, were sec-
ondary to his intuition and hi
strength of character. Nobody who

has ever listened to Bevin ade,

dressing a mass meeting will be in’
doubt as to what is meant by
dpmanaony (of will ever despise so
formidable and dangerous an in-
strument of power.

There was no coherence.of argu-
ment, there was little formal
grammar, Y fs nobody for a mo-
ment could be in doubt of what
the man meant. As he spoke, with
a glance at his wristwatch every
five minutes so that the violence
and fury of the utterance might
be punctually intensified, the air
vibrated with his harsh, yet com-
pelling voice, the platform shook
with his passion, and the speech,
like an emanation of the speaker,
seemed to becorhe alive and pon-
derable in the hall.

The presence of the man, so
fiercely dedicated to his mission,
so utterly wrapped in the oratory

e was so carefully timing, was
felt by every hearer, like a physi-
cal load which at the same time
lifted up the heart.

This fierce and ill-formed rhe-
toric voiced the hard and ill-
formed aspirations of Britain’s
proletarian uprising. It spoke for
the ugly lives, the stunted streets,
the longings that held so much
envy and bitterness as well as so
much that was unselfish. It also
expressed the will to power of the
man who saw in those longings his

opportunity.

Last ounce

UT oratory was not, of course,
the only, or even the main,
instrument by which Bevin sought
his purpose.
"He had the personality of a
jeader; he had a gift for organi-
sation and a.greed for centralised
authority. ¥ Fee
He was a cunning negotiator

- who could always convince those

he represented that he had got the
last possible ounce out of the other
side—and, at the same time, con-
vey that his clients were still be-
ing cheated and oppressed! .

ro a natural pugnacity he soon
added the professional truculence
of the Trade Union boss. Seeing
the bulky figure, the jowl, the
determined stumpy wlk as he
emerged from a conference, who
could doubt that the ‘masters”
haq found their match, and may~
be their master !

When other men of the same
ability and the same fibre were
building up commercial king:
doms Bevin was creating an in-
dustrial: empire. -At-the moment
of its greatest extension it con-
tained 1,300,000 subjects over
whom Bevin ruled as the titular
hired seeretary, but in practice as
an absolute despot.

' ‘Hargees’ man
"Ea ee of the empire was
the Transport and General

Workers’ Union. Its dominior
stretched from bargees to grave.
diggers.

“It was. an empire’ of. workers,
built upon the card vote and the
readiness to strike at the drop of
a hat, until Bevin shrewdly real-
ised that, sometimes, it paid better
to be conciliatory. The empire
was as much a part of the liberal
capitalist system as any cotton mill
or iron foundry.

Over it Bevin’s rule was
supreme. Even when at las* he
left his office to join the Governs
ment, his power was handed ovet
to a viceroy. Alone among the
‘outstanding figures of the Trade
Union’ movement, Bevin did not

wy



THINKING ALOUD. _

There ought to be not a society
fér poor vnfortunate lovers, as
the record requests, but a society
for preserving the common sense
of the common man, Much of this
common sense is reflected in com-
mon speech. There is to-day in
the West Indies a conspiracy to
murder common speech and sub-
stitute in its place a collection
of cliches and phrases which im-
press the ignorant but bore the
common man, who is too intelli-
gent even to make the effort to
understand. Take the word em-
erging. If it means anything at

all it means what a mouse is doing
»when it is not quite out of its hole.

writes a report on his conduct to: thesioT9)Speak of a nation emerging as

Benchers of his Inn, If the Benchers-con-:

+

sider the offence sufficiently serious he’ is,
struck off the rolls,
The Judges in the West Indies have the
same course of action open to them; if they
wish to make use of it, but they are handi-
capped in their duties by the absence of a

disciplinary body to whom they can report ~

misconduct without having to exercise the
drastic powers vested in them. :

By bringing the members of the Bar to-
gether for discussions, and by using its
power of expulsion, a Law Society could
do-much to raise the standard of behaviour
in the Courts of Barbados. Perhaps it
might adopt as its motto Lord Brougham's
dictum: “Conduct without ‘eloquence is
safer to trust to for success than eloquence
without conduct.”

otherwise he is fined. ©

so. many of our academic friends
do speak is poppycock, a_ blunt
word and thérefore likely to
offend. our cultured friends. But
having with the perspicacity and
vision reserved only for their
great intellects, spotted the nation
emerging like a mouse, our aca-
demic friends grow tired of the
time the process of emerging takes
and must needs confuse the pro-
cess. The nation they say is not
just emerging It is in the melt-
ing pot or crucible. When they
talk like this I am sometimes
tempted to reflect that that is just
where they ought to be them-
selves—in the melting pot at least.
As for the crucible, well the idea

is really too fanciful to waste
much thought on it. In marked
contrast to the new mannerisms
of speech among the self styled
edueated is the lamentable de-




Mr. ERNEST: BEVIN. —

lose his hold upon his people when
tasks.

'S hé left them for other:

The foundations of the . empire
were laid at the street corneérs of
Bristol at the beginning, of the
century . : i

To Bristol Beyin had come a
waif from the West Country. He
was born in 1881 at Winsford in,
Somerset, where his mother, a
widow named Diana Mercy Bevin,
a woman of character, had some-
times helped in the local hotel.

From a farm, where he was
paid 6d, a week, and his keep to
do work he hated, young Bevin
ran away to a job washing plates
in a Bristol cafe; later he became
a salesman of mineral waters at
15s, a week. On this pay he
married his wife Florence, a
Bristol girl of working-class stock,
They had one daughter.

But the significant part of
Bevin’s career did not lie in sell-
ing lemonade. He peddled a more
explosive commodity.

After a phase as an effective lay-
preacher at Poulton Baptist Chap.
el, he drifted into the Socialist
movement and shocked Bristol by
leading the local unemployed into
the cathedral.

The Bishop, the Dean and the
Chapter all took his side, and
demanded that the town council
act. Bevin had shown his quality
as an agitator. Later he told how
at this stage in his career, he used
to steal in order to eat. He did so
with a’ good conscience. ~

Now he turned his gifts to good
use in whipping in members for
the carters’ branch of-.the Dock-
ers’ Union, of which he himself
was the first enrolled member.
It was the beginning of a career
of ‘steady building up of trade
unidnism among the _ transport
‘vorkers; in which Bevin .was as—
sociated with an older and more:
polished leader, Ben Tillett, and
which, eventually through an era
of strikes and savage unemploy-
ment, brought into being that octo—
pus of industrial power, the Trans—
port and General Workers’ Union,
with Bevin, its chief designer,
holding the post of genera’ secre—
tary.

Dockers’ KC

I T was in 1920 that the world
outside the Trade Union move—
ment began to take note of
Bevin. the symbol of work—
ing-class intransigence who never-
theless concealed so shrewd a
sense of realities. :

In 1920, at a court of inquiry
into dockers’ wage claims, Bevin
stated the case for the men with
such skill, with such a mastery
of his brief, as well as. of legal
formalities, that he became known
as. the Dockers’ K.C, His argument
lasted for 11’ hours, spread over
three days, during which the court
became more and more crowded.
The head of the court of inquiry,
the late-Lord Shaw of. Dunf
line, deeply oF
Bevin to his house for a friendly
talk. In the end, Bevin “won 90
per cent of his demands. | = *-

\A. few months later, he went
with other Labour ledders to see
Prime Minister Lloyd George, to
tell him that 6,000,000 organised
workers would not tolerate action
against Soviet Russia either by
war or by blockade.

* Itded to a bitter feud between
the two men, for the Prime Min-
ister accused the directors of the
Dally Herald of concealing the

By THE COMMON MAN

crease in the maxims and Sayings
of the common man.

Ii is-years for instance since I
heard anyone say “yuh cant teach

er grandmother to suck’ eggs.”

‘ow much better off would we
all be if that was the philosophy
of the island to-day. Instead what
awful tripe we have to listen to
every time anyone .opens his
mouth. How we miss ° grand-
mother’s eggs. Coupled: with thé
growth of cliches like progressive,
prerequisite, _ preconceived, re-
actionary, fascist, imperialist, ex-
ploit there has been born a veri-
table race of Rosy Dawncrs whose
thoughts never seem to be handi«
capped by any need of originality.
Men and women who could not re-
cite the names of all the British
possessions in the Caribbean know,
they just know that federation
will solve all the difficulties of the
Caribbean. “You just federate”
they say “and you'll see.” - One
such came to see me this week.
She had written a book, she said,
all about the West Indies ahd she
had come to check with me
whether Barbados had a represen-
tative in the Council of Empire.
She was convinced that federation
would be such a good thing. Until
I showed her a map. She was not
quite so sure then and when [| re-
commended that she buy a copy
of the Canada West Indies Year
Book and read it, she asked me for
the address. But one could for-
give.the “preconceivers” if they



¢ lenee@f-evéen the most loys
meived condone at loyal



SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

PAINT

AT










BOXES
and
BRUSHES

fact that the Soviet government
had offered money to the paper.
Bevin, .a director, resented any
imputation against his personal
conduct and did not easily forget
resentment. ;

General strike

HEN. the general strike’
threatened. in 1926, Bevin,

| SIIVER STAR

leaders, was negotiating with) %

Prime Minister Baldwin when|Â¥% With FELT BASE H

Winston Churchill arrived with :
news of a printers’ stoppage in 3 Beautiful Patterns
% Cut to Your Requirements

the Daily Mail office. Bevin
SILVER STAR


















~~ at

Ee
|

. 2
3 _ se
SQUARES

with Felt Base — 3 X 25 yds. and 3 x 3 yds.
gee Just the Floor Covering you have been
waiting for

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
Successors to

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*Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413

claimed later that this brought
hopeful peace moves to frustra—
tion and precipitated the general



stoppage . lesina
shaders \iehantly re * ine CONGOLEUM

struggle was inevitable, the chal-
lenge had to be accepted. He
would be no whiner, no apologist .

Events. and ambition took him
moré and more out of the field of
purely industrial struggle into
that of high, and ever higher,}
politics. Upon the basie admin-
istrative ability of the man- were
now overlaid the quality of the
policy-maker, the woolliness of
the visionary, the monotony of
the egotist.. Few public men have,
been on such intimate terms with
the first personal .pronoun.-

He upset them

W HEN war came in 1939 and

y disaster threatened in 1940,
Bevin (twice failed t6 enter Pat
liament) was the obvious choice
as Minister of Labour in the
Churchill Government. Whoever
sat in the Minister’s chair, Bevin
would in ‘fact be Minister. z

He proved to be a_ great
Minister of Labour, if not in all
respects a good one. He put 25
millions out of a population of
46 millions into work. of national
service, an effort of mobilisation
equalled by no other country. .

Sometimes he surprised and
upset his civil servants by impul-
sive plunges of policy. It is no
bad thing for a Minister to
startle his department, nor is it
necessarily bad for. him to dis-
turb his Ministerial colleagues.
Sometimes it seemed that Bevin
sought to extend his suzerainty
over the whole field of produc-
tion When others resisted this,
they could conveniently be: de-
neunced as “anarchists” secking
to subvert a natural heirachy of
power. ‘

“Stab in the hack” ore
ARTIME events likewise] $ ,6eses6soeesesoss

_ Strer @d- in Beyin, a
suspicion of unism with its
roots in ‘Red-fomenteq strikes

during the thirties, which -chal-

lenged Bevin in his own bailiwick.

‘A “Communist plot” was very
Choose from a wide

nettle ttt tdi a
oy boo Panta
trent tnt bt tvtrrtrty itr ttndnd tint OT COTTE T IIE

MR. BAKER!!

You can once again
BAKE with a SMILE «a
YES! It’s Here Again

GOLDEN
ARROW

FLOUR

THE FLOUR WITH GOOD RETURNS



AT YOUR WHOLESALER.

Rear. ito ythatydarkest* deed=iny the
Bevin. calendar. of. cri “sg
“in he : lias ibaaiass
en Bevin, after the war, be-
came. Foreign Secrets he was
therefore amply warned of. Com-
munist. wiles. . To his new. high
office, anti-climax of his career,
he brought. all. his. stubbornness
ia ina which-age had: in-
isa i
tamed ppointment not yet
‘ue enough, the Foreign Sec-
retary was crippled * the
collapse of _ his government’s
domestic policy. Increasing ill-
health, too, played its part. When
every allowance is made,, his
career” as Foreign Secretary
brought him personal .disappoint-
ment, the praise of his government
officials, the-dangerous approval
of the Opposition and a steady
diminution in public credit.

At the conference table,’ the
old trade union negotiator | met
the spokesmen of a
Socialist tr

retin p

oliey
respec! ible garments”. of
se: “His achievement was’ to


















range of fitting, single or
double breasted.
Style in fine Grade



Forentt 4 ing authority. ~WORSTEDS
oyer events. he he and GAB-
cont rok a he end he’ lor ‘the

- ERDINES,

4

‘Eve big boss”

A big assortment to’











ATHER than — the select from - - --
‘muted Bevin of these | dis-
Wlusioning last years, history

will remember the robust tribune
ef the people; the union boss who
realised that, with power, a boss
must become a statesman. And,|!

above all, the Minister of Labour

who did not fall short of his
country’s expectation in his
country’s peril,
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were really honest when they’ say
insle have no preconceived ideas.

d,* what n is that

body has arly to any ideas,
that nobody. -anything and
that tl ng out,

le they “are +

they had better ligten.to theirs. It
is an attractive line té-shoot and
our new intellectuals are trained
line shooters, They, shoot it well.
But when they xpme up against
the common man, they don’t know
what to say. Except of, course to
say that he is common, st



are

Restaurant

0

thing to say, ‘WI
way open for the)
ing squashed the ©
they look around for ah

ot oe — they tft him out
not to show how unegmmon he
is and therefore fit:to lord it
over the common man, but to
chi¢kle’) silently among them-
selves. and say, “well if this is the
best. that you can da you must
admit that you can’t«do without
us.” And be rae admit that
we can’t, ot because we agree
that ttis. is the best ‘that we ban
lo, but because the expert and
the intellectual are . not looking
for the best. from _any other
source than their own f narrow
and. self. admiring. circle,

Youll discover
its flavour

is simply


SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1

New Textile Industry In P

From the very weeds of the j:ills
of the island of Puerto Rico, a
territory of the United States in
ihe West Indies, has come a ¢e-
velopment of great interest to "li
weavers. For the weavers of the
Fibre Textile Shop, part of ‘aq
Puerto Rico Industrial Develop-
ment Company, have found a
bright future in the creatioa and
marketing of new textiles, woven



951

od

from the Jexuriant natural pro-
ducts of their fields. The project
is significant, not only in relation
to new techniques and mater'sls
in weaving, but also in a wicur,
culiural sense. This is one.of the
new industries sponsored by far-
sighted members of the island to
bring a stabilized econcmic base
to the life of the people who have
beén American citizens since 1917,



THE FIBRE TEXTILES SHOP in San Juan, Capital of Peurto Rico.

uses various native fibres in the creation of new textiles.

Window

shade material is made of the enea blades woven with maguey fibre.



HANDWOVEN fibre textiles designed by Geraldine
can designer and director of the Fibre Textiles Shop of the Puerto
Rico Industrial Development Company.



Funk, Ameri-



and, thus to wreate. a better and
more balanced way cf living.
The, groun- “of. young. men and

women employed... in the Fibre--
-capital

Textiles Shop in San Juan,
of PuertRico, have found that
the .work they are doing is: the
means"to a twefcld énd.. It is
constructive. work with tangible
results in material. producéd.
Fur erinore, it has revealéd to
them,the’ rich. opportunities “of
thei own land and _ their ; oyu
latest: creativeness,’ For * Pue™.5
Rica possesses naturalendowmeats
almost beyond comparison ‘for *he
development of the fibro text's,
Within its sma ‘crea (3.5
Squate mies) are found a pe
with keen sense of cclour aud
rhythm; raw materials waiting ‘o
be gatliered from the hills and
fields, anftithe “inspir-ttion’ which
comes from the magi¢ beauty ‘of
the land. :

The Fibre’ Textiles Shop, set up
at the invitation- of ‘the Puerto
Rican. Government, intends to
capture by colcur and by texture,
something of the’ ve~,- “essence of
Puerto Rico in every ‘extile which
comes from its looms, The way
to do this, the weavers’ believe, ix
through a deép appreciation cf the
inherent ‘values of the island’s raw
materials, And it is also in, this
way that they are securing
markets, for textiles truly Puérto
Rican in inspiration and execution.

Each fibre used brings a natural
beauty, colour, and vigour of its
own for the eraftsman to use in

the manner best suited to its in-
dividual qualities. The «strong
bark of e banana tree, the

leaves of the royal palm, or the
tall slendet green stems of the
punco ‘plant lend themselves
variously to the hahd of the
worker, and must be understcod
precisély for best effects, :

The fibre phase of the process
starts right out in the fields of the
Puerto Rican countryside. Enea
with ‘its flat paper-like blades
grows ‘by the rivers; sabutan is
found along the roadsides; bamboo
in the southwest; the soft silky
white-fibred maguey plant thrives
in the more arid sections of the
island, Throughout the land,, the
tall round sugar cane-reeds grow
wind-trushed; and bright decora-
tive seeds, as well as the .cogollo
palm, , prized for its, eream-
coloured hat straw, and the
n.ajugua tree, renowned for its
bark, can easily be found.

As it was planned to gather as
many Puerto Ricans as possible
into the various phases of creating
fibre textiles, groups cf country.
men were organized to gather the
fbres from their sections of the
island and to dry them. ‘Thus
many people have gained a’ new



aoe

.

SUNDAY

u erto Rico —By Geraldine Funk

ADVOCATE





~

.Company in San Juan are weaving colourful rugs and fabrics.

livelihood from the weeds which
formerly came to bloom only to
blow away year after year. Some
of these fibres have been used
previcusly by those with sufficient
imagination ‘to understind | their
strength as cord, rope, for ha*
néssing of country horses, and so
forth, but never have ‘they been

used as generously as now in
textiles.
The. fibres are used generally

im a natural state because thelr
rich and subtle tones give the
unique shading that is possible
only with “wild” colours. Most of
the weeds appear in a wide rang>
of .tans, grays, and green. Sugar
cane is bright golden, ‘coconu:
fibre a definite earth brown, and
maguey a creamy white. Thes»
basic. values are never disturbed
by dyeing. One fibre—maguey—
is reserved for this purpose It is
given the orange of some Puerto
Rican houses, the deep green of
the mango trees, the lively yellow



«ct genario bloom, the fire of the

flamboyant tree, Antilles green,
cinnamon, or the blue of the
coffee bloom.

As far as the technical process
of the weaving goes, colour tex-
ture and- materials are so varied
that the possibilities of simple
two-harness weaving are still not
exhausted. The looms are the
same as are used the wortd over,
with exception of the tree-type
primitive loom. Very often they
appear to be simply fodder mach-
‘nes, engaged in eating up fibre.
Coconut cord’ or sometimes yarns
are used far warp, and metallics
teo are combined with the fibres.

The organization of the Fibres
Textiles Shop took three years.
It began with the initial though.
and progressed through research
in the fields, fibre-design study,
training and teaching of workers,
construction of equipment and
vuilding, to marketing and pro.
duction on schedule. This outline

Critics Select Best Films Of 1950

New York City—American
motion picture critics recently en-
gaged in their favourite end-of—
the-year pastime of selecting the
best films of the year. The films
were selected by newspaper crit-
ics, two motion picture organiza—
tions—the New York Film Critics
and the National Board of Review
—and similar groups.

One of the biggest events in this
field will occur at the end of Feb-
ruary when the American
Academy, of Motion Picture Arts
and Sciences awards its “Oscars”
to the outstanding films and film
personalities of 1950 as selected by
members of the film industry.

The critics seemed to agree that

the best films released in 1950
were “All About Eve,” a comedy
about the theatre} “Sunset Boule-
vard,” g melodrama about a long—
forgotten actress in silent films;
“Twelve O’Clock High,” a
dramatic film about the men of an
American bomber base in England
during World War II, and “The
Titan—Story of Michelangelo.”
“The Titan” told the story of the
life of the great Italian Renais-—
sance artist through a succession of

objective images, without any
human actors.
Bosley Crowther, in the New

York Times, in addition to these
four films, also inciuded on his list
of the ten best ims of 1950,








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attendant upon ‘getting ‘His’ daugh-
ter married; “The Asphalt Jun-
gle,” a crime melodrama; “Destin~
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Men” dealing with paraplegic war
veterans; “Trio,” a collection of
three short films based on. stories
by W. Somerset: Maugham, and
“Born Yesterday,” a ‘sophisticated
comedy.

Mr. Crowther did not include
foreign films on his list, but put
them -in a separate category. On
this list he cited the Czechoslo—
vak film “The Distant Journey,”
the Italian rictures “The Walls of



Malapaga” and “Bitter Rice,” and
the French film “T) Affaire.”

The film critics of the New. York
Herald-Tribune, Howard Barnes
and Otis L. Guernsey, Jr., included
on their list “The Third Man”,
a British-made ‘suspense story;
“Jofroi,” g short French film about
a peasant and his love of the land;
“Orpheus,” the French. produce-—
author Jean Corcteau’s version of
the ancient Greek legend; “The
Flame ‘and the Arrow,” an adven-—
ture story; “The Winslow Boy”,
a drama about a man’s efforts to
obtain justice for his son, and
“Kind Hearts and Coronets”, a
British comedy.

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magazine. It honoured . various
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ambassador abroad,” f

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a radio quiz show, The magazine
cited a semidocumentary titled
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picture produced on a low budget.

Two individual awards’ weve
made to Joseph L. Mankiewicz,
the writer-director whose last
three films were all praised high
ly by the critics and the public,
and to actress~producer Ida Lupino
for her production of “low-budget
ulms or honesty and significance,”

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The Company hope to be able to-commence the installation
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(From “Craft Horizons’)

”

x
PUERTO RICAN workers in the Fibre Textiles Shop of the Puerto Rico Industrial Development

> TT

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-_—_—

Books Cost More

LONDON.

British publishers haye decidec
to. cut authors’ royalties to meet
thé rising costs of book production,

The Publishers’ Association has
draw up a new scale of royalties.
The cuts, except in special circum
stances at least 2) per cent, will
/apply to new contracts between
Writers, and .publishers and in
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Vv

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writer usually received a higher
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apply to the first 5,000 copies, and
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sald costs for publishers have risen
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PAGE EIGHT

\ new standard of safety in infant care
set at a hospital in the midwestern
part of the United States

By WILLIS J. GRAY

FROM THE MODERN
HOSPITAL

SOME years ago it became
apparent that the old nursery in

Jennings Memorial Hospital at
Detroit, America’s automobile
manufacturing center, was too
small to meet current demands
for maternity service. A small |
laboratory » situated on the §
maternity voy was moved to

larger quarters and the space was
redesigned into a. new nursery
to accommodate 25, iifants. It
now forms a separate part of the
obs‘etrical department but is so
arranged that noise from
nursery is prevented from reach—
ing the mothers.

Under the old procedure, all
nursery Work was done in one
room, while under the new plan
activities are departmentalized.
This not only makes for greater
efficiency but provides greater
protection for infants and allows
the hospital to practise a_ strict
isolation technique. Too, the new
nursery arrangement has afforded
the hospital an opportunity to
develop an original method of
individualized infant care.

In planning the nursery and the
departmental units, consideration
was given to the amount of air
space and floor space needed for
the proper care of each infant.
The floor plan and room layout
cover an area of 1,280 square feet,
ideally suited for such a purpose.
It is a large, airy glass—partition
room with separate bassinet
accommodaticns. The white glazed
tile walls and composition tile
floor throughout are easily kept
clean. Five large windows permit
an abundance of air and sunlight
Soft fluorescent ceiling lights pre-
vent glare in the infants’ eyes,

Floor Plan

The floor plan is sufficient: (1)
to permit each bassinet to be
separated from every other bas=
sinet and from any wall or parti-
tion’ (2) to provide room for
other equipment needed for bed-
side care of the infant, and (3)
to allow access for nurses and
attendants to give bedside. care
of the infant and pass easily from
one bassinet to the other. Each
bassinet consists of a single metal
stand with steel-band basket,
which is removable to facilitate
cleaning. Each has a lower com-—
partment with a shelf and door,
which serves as a cabinet for
storage of a 24-hour stock ot
sterile supplies, wearing apparel,
and bed linen needed for the
infant’s cay®. Besides the general
nursery, several other rooms are
included fn the department.

The nyrsery for premature
babies is a separate room located
next to the general iursery bul
out of the*}fipcof traffic, and is so
constructedâ„¢ that environmental
conditions can be controlled con~
stantly. The eguipment provided
here is essentially the same as in
the nursery for full-term babies,
in addition to a sufficient number
of heated bassinets and modern
neubators. It ip «particularly
important that all ‘equipment for
remature babies “be Nndividual

necessary emergency
is available at all

Nursery

There is also a separate nursery
for infants under observation and
for those suspected of having an
infection or having been exposed
to infection. Infants who have
been exposed to infection, or if it,
seems likely that they are devél-
oping an infectious condition, ane
immediately transferred | here.
Simila:ly, an infant found to
have such infectious symptoms is

the |



~

AN OVER-ALL VIEW of the nursery at Jennings Memorial Hospital
at Detroit, in the midwestern State of Michigan, showing the tech-
nique of the hospital’s original method of individualized infant care.

immediately removed to this nur-

sery. The original nursery has
been converted into an _ ideal
isolation nursery. ‘This unit is

equipped with lavatory, examin-
ing table, instruments, sterilizer,
bottle warmers, and other neces-
sary supplies. It is in readiness to
receive’ an infant at any time,
and is not used for other patients
when it is not occupied by a

oes
examining and treatment
room is outside the nursery. This
adequately equipped room per-
mits the physicians to examine
the infant without going into the
nursery. It is well lighted, partly
with natural and partly with
flourescent light. It is provided
an examining table and a
- dt also contains an instru-
me and a cabinet for
The room in whica milk form-
ula feedings are made up is con-
veniently located so that the work
can be carefully supervised. The
preparation of all milk mixtures
is done here. It is situated where
the danger of contamination is
least and where supervision can
be given by a nurse who is experi-
enced in such procedures. The
equipment provided includes
sink, lavatory, sterilizer, hot
plate, refrigerator, cupboards, and
work table all of which are so
constructed that they can be
readily weshed. The milk-room
seeaediire is earried out with
strict aseptic technique. Milk
mixtures are poured into sterile
bottles, nipples and nipple caps
are put onto bottle caps in the
milk reom, and final sterilization
is doné by pressure autgclave at

a rature Of 230° degrees
Fah it for five minutes,
which Wil produce an end product

that is bacteriologically accepta—
ble,

The utility and storage,.room is
a, single unit so constructed that
there is ample space for storage
of linen and blankets, a table, a
ean for waste, ahd table space
for an electric plate and instru
ment sterilizer.

A demonstration room is pro-
vided. so that the nurses can
instruct mothers, before discharge
to their homes, in methods of
feeding, bathing, and dressing
their infants. A wall chart is
placed so that the mothers can
follow all details in the nurse’s
instruction. The room is large
enough to accommodate several
mothers.at the same time. Attrac—
4ive, simple educational materials
are. selected. by the maternity
supervisor and made available
for use by mothers upon dis-
charge.

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The staff of the nursery unit is
under the supervision of a graduate
nurse who has had advanced
training in the care of the new-
born infants. Graduate nurses and
auxiliary workers, before being
assigned to the nursery unit, must
have had supervised pediatric
experience and have demonstrated
their aptitude for nursery work.

Usually the care of premature
infants is entrusted to graduate
nurses only, and when fhis is not
possible, it is assigned only to
those who have had training in
the care of such infants. Gradu-
ate nurses and auxiliary workers
assigned to the care of newborn
infants have no other patients,
adults or children, under their
care. In effect, no one is assign
to the care of newborn infants
anless (1) approval of such
assignment has been given by the
hospital’s employe health service,
and (2) the worker’s previous
assignment has been on a nonin—
fectious service. Both day and
night, there is at least one gradu-
ate nurse, with advanced training
and experience in the care of the
new born, assigned exclusively to
their care.

Desirable

It is recognised that individual
care of each infant is desirable
and that the smaller the number
of infants cared for in a given
space the less danger there will
be of infection. Only members
of the nursing staff are permitted
to enter the nursery. The hospital
has adopted a standerd that for
each eight full-term infants, one
nurse is in sosnpetn charge. As
for premature babies, who require
more care than do full-term
infants, there is one nurse for
each four premature infants,
because this is the maximum
number that one nurse can care
for satisfactorily. The infants are
not cared for on a common bathing
and dressing table; instead,
bathing, dressing, and the com-
plete care of each infant is car—
ried on in the bassinet under
rigidly aseptic conditions.

A strict hand: washing tech~
nique is maintained by both
nurses and physicians, Hands are
washed with soap and running
water before and after handling,
diapering or feeding each infant.
Nurses are carefully instructed in
this regard because it is especially
important that they wash their
hands after diapering the infant
and before feeding him, All mem-
bers of the nursery personnel
wear fresh gowns daily. Masks

fpana
SOR TEETH

TO FIGHT >
DECAY

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Individualized Infant Care At
A United States Hospital

are also worn
mended that

.

;
:
?
}
E

ently; (3) it sharply reduces the
possibility of transmitting infec.
tion from one baby to another.
The sterile medicated toiletries
accommodated are: sterile cotton,
gauze, and applicators in three-
inch glass jars with stainless
metal covers; alcohol 70 percent
boric solution for eyes, a germi-
cidal solution, liquid soap, oil,
and lotion, all in two-ounce bot-
tles with shaker tops; taleam pow-
der in shaker bottle; small tube of
sulfa cream; rectal ometer in
glass tube; tube of vaseline for
lubricating thermometer, and safe.

ad ty pins pressed into a bar of soap.

Success

The success of this procedure
has proved that its vonuite. are not
dependent upon the judgment of
the individual who watches over
the nursery operation. It is well
known that suspicious body sur-
face blebs, sometimes characteris-
ue of impetigo and other infee-
t.yns, usually can be cleared up
through prompt treatment with an
antiseptic and careful
care, The proper care of the skin
of newborn infants is important
in preventing infection. The less
manipulation there is, the less
danger of infection. Therefore,
every questionable condition is
dealt with promptly and carefully,

Some hospital nurseries prefer
fo use soap and water as the
cleansing agent, while others have
followed the practice of using an-
tiseptic baby oil. The technique at
Jennings Memorial Hospital per-
mits the use of either method of
cleansing the baby. If i re-
fined and blended antiseptic aby
oil is preferred, the special dis-
penser bottle is provided in the
cabinet. The antiseptic ofl pro-
vides maximum protection against
cutaneous infections, setves as a
lubricating agent and prevents
chafing. As a further precaution,
babies may be anointed at birtin
and frequently thereafter with no
5 per cent sulfa cream.

As a consequence of the estab
lishment of these procedures and
the use of the special kit, impetige
has disappeared entirely from this
American hospital,

This article appeared in The Modern
Hospital, a monthly magazine published
in the United States which deals with al!
aspects of hospital procedure and admin-
istration, The writer is director of Jens
nings Memorial Hospital at Detroit,
Michigan, in the American Midwest. One
picture accompanies this article and mur’

carry this credit line: ‘“Courtes: if
Modern Hospital.” ener



A New

Way To

Stop Toothache

JAMES A. GALE, L.DS., D.P.A.

, and a two-year investi-
gation into these claims was insti-
on behalf of the Public

might accrue if in-
cidence ©. “ae could be
a the child. - Too often
we

No. of
RESULTS
Test Schools 30
Control 30
As I cannot
of removing oral sepsis

lessening of the orthodontic prob-
lems so often encountered later,
problems which we must all admit
would be better prevented than
cured.

The following is an interim re-
port after one year’s experiment.

Subjects Selected
The subjects selected for this
test were children in nursery
schools, for several reasons, in.
cluding the following:—

(a) Test was commenced with

all under 3 years of age,
as this group would, to my mind
gain the greatest benefit, and would
be under control for the necessary
two years.

(b) The children belong roughly
to the same social and economic
strata.

(c) The alternative, where a
controlled experiment is to oper-
ate, would be to use inmates of an
institution or a convalescent home,
and wuuld necessitate the use of
ailing, instead of normally healthy,
chfldren.

(d) These schools are closed for
enly a fortnight in the summer
time, not for eight weeks,

(e) The routine in these schools
is carefully ted and the
teeth are on each occasion
for five minutes under strict super—
vision. ~~. ‘ * td

9 am-—Aprrival at School —~

orange juige-brush teeth.

12 neotwrsgeceo= Deen teeth,
4 pm— bread and butter,
Children leave for

, home.

Sixty children from six schools
were selected, three of the schools
(30 childreâ„¢) being supplied with
“Amm-i-dent” tooth der, the
other three schools (30 children)
being kept as controls and being
allowed to use any dentifrice of
their choice.

Inspection and Examination

Inspection takes place at half-
yearly intervals, a most carcful
charting being carried out. In ad-
dition to the clinical examination
for caries, samples of saliva are
examined in the Bacteriological
Laboratory by Plate Count, by
Lewis Counting Method and Sny-
der Tube Method.

Method of Inspection

(a) In the forenoon careful
mirror end probe examination
and charting are carried out. The
children are given a pellet of
sterile paraffin wax (supplied by
the Bacteriological Laboratory) to
chew, and then they spit into
sterilised glass containers (also
supplied by the Laboratory and
containing sterilised glass beads).

(b) These containers are hand
ed into the laboratory at lunch
time, so that tests can be com
menced at once.

(c) The results (Lewis Count,
Snyder Tube colour change and
interpretation) are then sent to me
by the Bacteriologist, who has no

idea of the clinical findings until |

* the results are collated by me.

Total No. of Cavities
Septem- March Septem- Percent

ber er age
1949 1950 1050 Increase

60 70 89 48

35 54 83 137

These figures alone appear to |

be significant, but I may add that
one child in the test group is
responsible for an increase of 5
earious teeth; this is an excep-

tionally delicate child, is on a|
special fat-free diet, and has been |
off school for long periods, thus |
missing her treatment during her |

periods of absence, while another
child ‘has been absent for
months and is responsible for an
increase of 2. I feel justified,
however, in including these chil-
dren, to avoid any suspicion of
statistical manoeuvring.

The figures are however, even
more significant when we asses:
them as a percentage increase in
carious cavities. In the original in-
spection these indicated a much
higher incidence of caries in the
test group, and the percentage
inerease is worth noting.

An interesting feature of the
investigation was the agreement
between the Bacteriological and
Clinical findings. For example, the
child with a plate count of 274,500
has 8 carious and 2 very carious
teeth, while the child with no
growth is usually found to have
a sound dentition or very slight
caries.

I shall watch with interest the
development of this investigation
during the next twelve months,
and hope to be able to publish a
final report at a later date.

I wish to acknowledge the help
reeeived from Dr. Stuart Laidlaw,
Medical Officer of Health, whose
keen co-operation made the in-—
vestigation possible Miss Elsic
Webster, D.D_O., L.D.S., for her
meticulously careful charting and
help; Dr. Carter, the City Bac-
teriologist and his assistant, Mr.
Wilson, for their willing help and
suggestions regarding the Labora—
tory tests, and to Miss Ferguson
and her staff for the careful super-
vision of the children at the
selected nursery schools,

——$__—".





Stronger Cotton

Cotton fibres can be strength-
ened 10 per cent when treated
with hydrocyanic acid, scientists
at the University of Texas dis-
covered recently, The new pro-
cess is expected to lengthen the
wear of all types of cotton gar-
ments laundered in soap.

School Of Humanities

A School of Humanities has
been established in the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technolog
Cambridge, to provide instruc-
tion in general education for
students in seience, engineering
and architecture.











three |













SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951

THE WHOLE FAMILY

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SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 195



GWENDOLYNISMS

THE HOSTESS AT 2301 FOXHALL ROAD ADDS A NEW
WORD TO THE LANGUAGE—AND MAKES A NAME BY

MIXING THE ‘UNMIXABLES

Frederick Cook

THE address is 2301, Foxhall Road, Washington.
rambling, white-brick mansion listed
in the city directory as the residence of Mr. and
To Washington's social elite,
it is much more; It is The Place, the most desirable
house in Washington to be invited to.
scene of the capital's most lavish parties where

By

It is a large,

Mrs. Morris Cafritz.

sooner or later you meet every bo
body in Washington.

old

one might expect in Hollywood. It
There is a

below.

There are colourful gardens, a
charcoal grill for open-air barbec
gymnasium, a hege living-room
Egyptian maidens and decorated in
style.
on to the patio.

There is a private cinema and

television room. And above all
the oval dining-room (cham-

pagne-coloured Swedish modern)

which is the scene of the renown-

ed Cafritz dinners.

But the biggest attraction of all
Gwen Cafritz herself. Petite
ark-haired and attractive, she is
at one ¢of
parties,” as a guest said
“like a butterfly bev,itched.”” Her ‘
_sreatest pleasure, and the secret
“of the success of her dinner par-
ties, is in mixing Washington’s un-
emixables and sitting back to
“observe the results,

Pairing

. She carefully pairs an extreme
vight-wing Republican with an
idvanced left-wing Democrat, a
olitical columnist with a Sena-
or he has just lambasted in his
Belumn, a ballet dancer with a
taid Supreme Court judge. “I
ke things to be .interesting,”
‘he says, ‘perfectly straight-faced



Waving «a six-inch-long cigarette
holder.
Mrs. Cafritz’s father—she was

orn in Hungary—was a noted
munologist, Dr. Laszlo Detre
Surany, With him she travell-
all over Europe as a child
he speaks four foreign languages

Magyar, Italian, French and
Spanish—and is a Latin scholar
o. She reads whenever she can
“stuff on polities, economics and
rt, anything. and everything.”

She likes





square-dancing, art
@xhibitions, and sleeping until 10
@m. when she can. She usually
tee at a famous hotel’s cock-
il lounge known in Washington
‘as The Snake Pit. At four she
ikes t owdrive-the youngest of her
_ three sons, Conrad, aged 12; home
from school (Calvin, aged 19, is
mt college, 14-year-old Carter at
® junior high school). The boys
nave a trust fund in which each
as an equity of 53,500 dollars.
Mrs. Cafritz (pronounced
ayfritz) has no political ambi-
“Rion. “I don’t think Morris would















sho jan snjeesercaantaianeimentianenticregttNoetasnsit

HIS week
you have to
= your way
mrom M U L —
ERR Y to
AMOCLES —
=that. is to say,
you have to ar-

ange the. 60
ords _in the
Cirde so that
Mulberry is the

first and Damo-—
cles the last, and
relationship





next to it is gov—
rned by one of
~ six rules.

In case

*you
have

trouble

with the 45th and 46th words, the
pair of them constitute a collo—
quialism for “inadequate rations.”
No comment!

3 Rules
1. ‘The word may be an ana-

‘gram of the word that precedes
it.

2. It may be a synonym of the

word that precedes it.
3. It may be achieved by add-
ing one letter to, subtracting one

* letter from, or changing one let- Brandy — Snap—Knap—Sack —

- ter in the preceding word. Jack—Tar—War—Raw—Deal. to

_ 4 Tt may be associated with —LES.

a

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4

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om
3

eR

AT OE

It is also the Washington end of a transatlantie
tug-of-war between two remarkable women, Mrs.
Perle Mesta, unchallenged social leader of Wash-
ington until President Truman sent her as Minister
to Luxembourgh, and Mrs. Gwen Cafritz, 41-year-
wife of a multi-millionaire » builder,
Mrs. Mesta's absence, is bidding hard for her crown.

Number 2301 Foxhall Road is the sort of, house

private night-club with curved
built-in settees, and a glass dance-floor lighted from

There are terraces looking out over the city,
and pleasant on a hot summer night.

One whole wall is of solid glass opening out



1

It is the

dy who is any-

who, in

has everything
bar,

cool

private pool, a
ues, a complete
with murals of
Swedish modern

like it,” she says. Her one ambition
is to be elected a director of
Washington's National Art
Gallery, At 2301, Foxhall Road
she employs a butler, two maids
a chauffeur and a cook, Extra
help is brought in for her large
parties.

Washington reporters have \ an
casy time covering the activitjes
of Gwen Catritz. If nothing
‘interesting’ has ha‘@yened there
are always new “Gwendolynisms”
to quote. As one writer put it
“Gwen has a way of saying
things that make you think your
ears are picking up _ static.’
Some examples. “I think it's
nice to have a European back-
ground, if you come from
Europe.” Greeting a woman
guest, “My dear, yQu_ lool: posi-
tively strategic,”

The power

Fifty-nine-year-old Morris
Cafritz is the power behind his
wife’s social throne, He started
out as a small builder (built the
first bowling alleys in Washing-
ton) and went on from there -to
establish a vast empire in real
estate. His fortune today is
estimated at more than 25 million
dollars. Few Washingtonians
could afford to pick up the bill at
one of his wife’s larger affairs
when pate de foie gras at 20
dollars a plate is served and a
battery of ten waiteg; at 18 dol-
lars a waiter are called in,

But I give few of these large
affairs,” said Mrs, Cafriz. 7
prefer a little dinner: just 20 or
22 guests, I like to haye an
Ambassador or a Supreme Court
justice) one Republican, onr
Democrat and one Person in the
Limelight, introduce a subject
and let ’em fight it out,”

Cocktails are served at 8. By
8.20 everyone is at table, for the
soup and sherry. Then there is
the fish, with a white wine, meat
or game with a rose champagne
and after dessert a pate with the
salad. Coffee is’ taken—British

DARTWORDS



the, preceding word
metaphor, or

5. It may
ceding word.the name of a well-
known person or place in fact or
fiction.

in*a_ saying
association of ideas.
form with the pre-

6. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title or
action of a book, play, or other
composition.

A typical succession of words
might be: Pop—-Dandy—Bandy—



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MRS. CAFRITZ

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Paid Holidays
On U.K. Farms

At The Cinema



MORE’S THE PITY

BY G. B.

LONDON.
Britain's Ministry of Agricul
ture and Fisheries is advertising BEFORE REVIEWING

for 110,000 volunteers to take paid
vacations on British farms

Abcut 100 camps in many parts
of the country will be open to re-
ceive them at cut rates. Farmers
near the camps will pay the volun
teers for helping with the harvest.

Many of the camps will remain
open throughout October and
November when helpers will be
urgently needed with the potato FE
harvest

As in previous years many vol-
unteers are going in parties with
friends. Most of the applications
ceme from factory and office work-
ers who find a vacation on a farm
well worth while.

Last year the ministry recruited
more than 118,000 volunteers,

oo NS

Bank . Tellers
Steal Money

HONG KONG

Thirteen tellers in the Canton
Branch of the Peoples’ Bank of
China have been behaving in a
very uncomradely manner, reports
the Homz Kong leading Red Daily
Ta Kung Po. In fact they have
been playing fast and loose with

the pictures to be shown this

weekend, I am going to mention a film which I saw during

the week, but which, for some unknown reason,
booked for the weekend, and was shown

days at the Globe Theatre.
which presents four

short

was not

for only two
I am speaking Of QUARTET, |
stories by W, Somerset}

Maugham, with an introduction by the authof

The stories chosen are “The
Faets of Life”, “Alien Corn,”, “The
- ” and “The Colonel's Lady.’

Sach one is complete in itself and
reflects a different facet of English
life. “The Facts of Life” and

‘The Kite” are both humourous,
im varying degrees, “Alien Corn”
is the most moving, while The
Colonel's Lady” is ironically
amusing. They are excellently
produced, interesting and realistic,
and the acting, without exception,
superior, The musical back.
ground, played by the Philhar-
monia Orchestra is delightful, and
there is a brilliant solo perform-
ance by the world famous pianist
Eileen Joyce,

The whole film is unusual anti
most enjoyable, and for the life of
me, I cannot.understand why en-
tertainment of this calibre should
be relegated to two mid-week
matinees and evening shows,
Surely, with the modicum of real
ly* good films that comes to this
island, it should be possible to
present a picture of this standard

the money of their Communist over a weekend, and give more
customers—and very cunningly, people a chance to see it. After
too,

In counting big bundles of Jen
Min Piao turned in by depositors
they have claimed shortages where
no shortages existed, pocketing the
difference, But they were careful
to sometimes fake stories of slight

all, the pit is not the only consid
etation of local theatre managers

FURIES

And now for this week-end's
entertainment — let’s start with
THE FURIES which has an excel-
lent cast and boasts a notable

urpluses which they themselves
style—a novel touch for ieee? i! le final performance by the late
: . made up out of their illegal gains, W: ! 7 .
Washington dinners, .« thus removing shspicion. alter Huston, Showing at the
° Missing guest FAS Finally, they were caught out oats a on ae, Se
In the Mesta-versus-Cafritz with specially checked packages of gay. gy Civa. Sen ake
tug-of-war, the absent raarked notes, and now are in gaol 4,8” 6, ae ar, ;
Minister is still one pace ahead waiting trial°for “mass corrup- ae. earne pores en, See
It is a matter regret to tion.” ands of acres acquire y fair
ot be : : sans : + 5

re, 0M she ‘and eee been The Bank called a meeting of ranang or foul mostly the

a c ave as B 0. oa Se i Sr i tn ° iE .
our the biggest prize of all, meen er es rte oette Mr, Huston plays the principal
President, and Mrs. Mesta has. ee cee _. role of T. C. Jeffords, owner of

» and apologised for this ‘un-Marxist i

i's eee nee 7 th h e Furies, a vast land empire
Of course, Mrs. Mesta’s friend- conduct, pointing nous! at the the’ has built up, but which,
ship with’ the President wicked tellers were all former through his extravagance, is in
back to the days when he was a employees of underground native jeopardy of being lost to him
Senator. Mrs, Cafritz is banks taken into its service im Pjscarding his weakling son, he
her time. “I just haven't had an order not to’ break their rice- moulds his daughter to his own
opportunity yet,” she says. bowls,” when these corrupt estab- ‘nrestrained and ruthless pattern
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED, | lishments were liquidated last and the climax of the film is a
LES. — year. violent fight to the finish, when

“OUR CHILDREN

she, to prevent her father from
marrying an acventuress, and to
retain the ranch herself, enlists
the help of a man who has been
their enemy for years but whom

she loves,
Walter Huston’s characteriza
tion of Jeffords is magnificent,

and he dominates the entire film
by his unbridled passion, vehem
ence and treachery, and yet, at
the same time, he portrays a deep
underlying affection and admira
tion for his daughter, In this lat
ter role, Barbara Stanwyck is
fiery and domineering, with an
all consuming passion for power
Her interpretation is dramatic

‘ahd sure, in what is probably one

‘of her best roles . Playing oppo-

stt@ her is Wendell Corey as the

'
be the onby one who cag keep the |
bridle on Miss Stanwyck, An ac. |
complished actor, few demands are |
made on Mr. Corey in this role,
thé’ supporting cast, are Gilbert]
Roland as q Mexican squatter and
Judith Anderson as a middle-aged |
adventuress, Miss Anderson, whose ;
acting is always of the finest, por-|
trays a scheming widow, who}
comes off second best in the battle |



with T.S.’s daughter and q pair of |

scissors — one of the dramatic |

moments of the film
Though the action of THE!

FURIES cannt be said to lag, and |
the acting is definitely good, the |
continued harshness, violence, |
avarice and uncentrolled emotions |
of its theme pall after a time. |

GIRL OF THE YEAR

The Empire is showing a colour—
ful, light and frothy semi—musical,
GIRL OF ‘THE YEAR, starring
Joan Caulfield, as the famous Pet
ty Girl and Robert Cummings as
the artist responsible for this lus- |
cious creation. The film’ is al
pleasant mixture of comedy, and |
romance, glamour and cheesecake
with plenty of the latter,, Whether |
the story is the life of George Pet-
ty, the artist, | am not prepared to
say, but it is entertaining, When
his original Petty Girl is rejected
as commefcial art, Petty falls an
easy prey to a predatory female
who thinks he should devote his
talents to highbrow art, with al

capital H! Wandering through a
museum one day, he meets Vic
toria Braymore, who, from all
ai.gles, would make a_ perfect
model, but, alas, is a college pro
fessor! However, after a series |

of gay adventures, he decides that |
the Petty Girl is definitely his line |
of art, and with the help of Miss
Braymore, who has by this time,

thrown all inhibitions to the four

winds, this now famous figure. in

Commercial Art ig launehed on its
scaring career.

Robert Cummings as
breezes through the part
obviously keen enjoyment and
caps his performance in a most
amusing scene where he gets all
mixed up with a quick change
artist and succeeds in completely
gumming up the whole act, Joan
Caulfield’s figure is one that
should please even the most dis-
criminating and her singing and
dancing are attractive. In the two
principal supporting roles, Elsa
Lanchester and Melville Cooper
are splendid, and Miss Lanches-

Petty
with

ter’s portrayal of a college pro,
fessor with a hang-over, while
only’ a matter of seconds on the
screen, is a gem in itself,

The musical numbers sparkle
and the twelve Petty Calendar

Girls will probably ensure a full
house, All in all, GIRL OF THE
YEAR is saucy entertainment and



PAGE NINE










Cope. 1950
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ONL



a
Fleven months’ old Annetta Roberts of Government Hill, St. Michael,
is happy only when she is “ping-ponging” the piano.

The “Sunday Advocate” wants to know wnat your child is doing.
Send us your favourite photograph—print and negative—and write on
the back of the print: your name and address,the child's name and age
and a short description of what he is doing.

For each picture published in the “Sunday Advocate” $2 50 will be
paid. Pictures should be addressed to the Art Editor, Advocate Co, Ltd.
City, and should reach him not later than Wednesday every week.

/OTION PICTURES

During its first year of opera- |
tion the Motion Picture Associa-
tion of America’s Advisory Unit
for Foreign Films has helped 113 |
film producers from 22 countries |
distribute their films in the
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PAGE TEN



Dies As Tractor

Overturns

HIRTY - EIGHT - YEAR -OLD
Clarence Weekes of Walrond
Village, Christ Church, died on
the spot when a tractor on which
he was travelling overturned at
the corner of Charnocks and Wal

tond Roads, Christ Church, The
body was removed to the Mortuary
at District “B" Police Station.
The accident occurred at about
5.00 p.m. on Friday. The tractor,
owned by Hopefield Plantation,

was being driven by Cyril Moseley
of Walrond Village. It had three
empty carts in tow and when
going around the corner it struck
an- embankment and overturned,

Weekes was sitting on the left
fender and Kenneth Blackman on
the right. Blackman and Moseley,
the driver, ,were both injured.
They were taken to the General
Hospital where. Blackman wa.
treated and discharged. Moseley
was detained.

A-pest_mertem examination was
performed yesterday morning by
Dr. E. L. Ward. The inquiry was
begun' und adjourned until Friday
next...

TUE MEN'S ALL STAR Talent

Show at the Globe Theatre on
Friday night was one of the best
held since these shows were started
by. Mr. Maurice Jones, Manager.

The Judges’ decision was also one
that was popular with the crowd

Keith Sealy, a clerk at the Parcel
Post Department, the winner, was
awarded the Silver Cup. He sang
“Count. Every Star.” Hig pro
nunciation and timing were ex
tremely good. ‘

The second prize went to Joe
(Shoeshine) Clarke who sang
“Sunny Side of the Street.” Cla
thrilled the crowd with his an:ics
which accompanied the singing. Ife
is the most popular comedy-sin: or
on the show.

Other good vocalists were Sam
Gordon with “Night and , Day,”
Errol Barnett “My Foolish Heart”
and Holman Rayside with “Our
Very Own.”

The first Ladies All Star Talent
Show was held on Wednesday
night but the standard. of this was
poor, Joan Licorish, who sang
“Tennessee Waltz” was the .wm-
ner and second prize went to Joan
Bentham with “Mona Lisa.”

On Friday night next, the Super
Star show will take place and on
that night Sealy will meet such
vocalists as Clayton Thompson and
Fitz Harewood. .

EVEN NURSES of the General

Hospital have passed thejr fimal
éxaminations, They are: G, Ram-
say, M. Ramsay, BE. Belgrave;

C. Campbell; B. Reid; D. Gar-
rett and M. Gay.

Those passing the preliminary
examinations are: G,. Goddard,
V. Lashley, S. Welch, M. Squires,
E. Marshali, R. Webster, V. Babb
R. Holder, U) J. Headley, G. Har
per, B, Lawrence and E, St. Hill

URING LAST WEEK many
political meetings were held
in St. Andrew by the Barbados

Progressive Party and the Electors
Association, On Friday night while
the Electors Association was hold-
ing one at Hillaby in support of
their candidate Mr. J. A, Haynes,
the Labour Party held theirs at
Cane Garden in support of Mr.
Seibert: Worrell.

The polling.day for the St.
Andrew bye-¢lection, caused by
the death of Mr, D. A. Foster, will
take place tomorrow.

OEBUCK STREET was very

congested yesterday morn.
ing. Motorists.and eyelists were
held up for a considerable time.
gs labourers on motor lorriés
which were loaded swith sugar
and parked oh both sides of the
road, were busy unloading these

trucks, 9
Moiorvisis, anxious to get .on
their way were pressing their

horns, but the two policemen gh
duty found it hard to get traffic
moving, tt
YN THE EASTERN SIDE of

the Prineess Alice Playfield,
fabourers were busy, yesterday
putting up a barbed wire fence,
Three men were engaged on the
work. é



Hospital Superintendent

The Advocate understands that
‘Mr. A. G. Leacock witl not resign
from his Acting Appointment as
Superintendent , of the General
Hospital to-day,



"Lady Nelson’ Expected
Here Today
The Lady Nelson is die to ar-
rive here this morning around
daybreak,

Our Readers

Mark Up
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Mr. Alston's letter in
your Saturday issue hits the nail
on the head. There are two con-
flicting schools of thought—the
Government's and the Trade’s.
The Government say in effect

-~“In 1942 you purehased a tin
of Milk for 60e and we allowed
you to sell it Tor 80c, (at 334%
markup) You make 20 cents
and you were more or less sati*
fied that this 20 cents allowed

you to pay your expenses and left
something over for your share-
holders. But they say, this is
1947 now, and this same tin of
Milk is now costing 90 cents. If
we permit you the same markup
you will sell it for $1.20 and will
make 30 cents. If im 1942 you
were satisfied with 20 cents pro-
fit, you will be making an enor-
mous profit if you are now allow—

ed to make 30 cents. We there-
fore proppse to reduce ‘your
markup from 334% to 25% so

that you will sell this tin of milk
for $1.12. In this way you will
make 22 cents. which is much
better than the 20 cents we allowed
you to make in 1942”.

That is the Government's
theory and acting on it, without
asking anyone to comment, they,
reduced markups by an average
of approximately 6 per cent in
1947

From 1947 to 1950 the food
trade (and others) both whole-
sale and retail made pretest after
protest that this was economic
nensense. For three years every
single protest. was ignored and
would have ,.been ignored for
ever had it not “been that with

> prices continuing to rise, the Gov-

ernment felt that if their, original
reasoning was right; then there
would be room for a further cut
in markups.

So in 1950 with the dual hope
of making the protesting mer-
chants look stupid and of effect-
ing a further cut in the cost of
living by a further reduction in
markups they appointed a com-
mittee to conduct a full investiga.
tion.

Thus the trade were compell-
ed to wait for three years for an
opportuhity to state their case
and refute this nonsensical theory ..
The effect of this arbitrarily im-
posed cut was two-fold. Firstly

at was an economic impossibility

to dncrease staff wages as rising
costs made it reasonable to do.
Secondly, it involved any Com-
}eany, which had been
reasonable wages at the time of
the cut, in making a substantial
Joss on all local trade. The effect
on my company may not be with-
out interest.

in 1947, the Colonna were
selling locally approximately 800,-
000.00 and were making a net
profit of 3% or $24,000.00 before
taxation. The cut in markups of

over 5% reduced our gross profit
by over $45,000.00. We, made a

substantial loss and have contin-
ued to do so ever since, (Fortu-
nately in 1948 and. in 1949 there
was a boom re export of rum
or we mi ave had to close
Win nanteatunt aly this’ boom is
now over) .

The whole position is

made
clear as under:—
1942 Position
Item sold for .......... 80 eents
Cost ‘of ifm ~«#... 4.0%. 60 cents



Gross Profit (334%

mariWip) 3%, .. a. + 20 cents
Less Wages and all
expenseg ©2249... ua } 474 centg

Profit befare taxation.. 24 ce ty
1947 (Prior to cut Arom

334% 10 25%

Item sold for .,... 1

.20 cents
Cost of [tem

90 cents

Gross Profit
markup) aintatanls

Less jWages and all
expenses

(334
30 cents

264 cents

3h cents



Profit before taxation



, 1947 (Position after





Reduction)
Item sold for. ...... 1.12 cents
Cost of itém ..... as 90 cents
Gross Profit 26%" .. 22 cents
Wages and all expenses 26} cents

© "
LBS 6 ites tits 44 cents.

It was these figures that were
submitted ,to the. Government's
Committeé of Enquiry, The mat-
ter was very thoroughly gone into,
balance ‘gheets wae required and
everything was subjected. to {he
closest scrutiny, _

In’ view of the facts,

which

were beyond controversy, we ex-
:

paying

Say:

Government to
remedy their

of us -even
apologise for
rude yemarks

the take
action to

and some
hoped they would
their. somewhat

about capitalists and possibly ex
press their thanks to both the
capitalists and the grocery €m-
ployees both of whom had been
compelled to subsidise the public’
food for three years and more.

It was with considerable sur-
prise that we waited anxiously
month after month for action to
be .taken. It was with even
greater surprise that we heard
last month in the House that in
spite of having demonstrated to
its own committee, that the posi-
tion was desperate, no action
would be taken, and the re-
commendations of the Committee
were to be ignored.

The writing on the wall now
becomes quite clear. Merchants
and their employees are to have
their noses held firmly to the
grindstone until the merchants
no longer have the money to stay
in business and the clerks no
longer have the wages to buy the
necessities they sell.

pected
prompt
mistake

Thanking you for space,
lam, .
Yours faithfully,
DONALD SCOTT,
Sherbourne,

Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael.

Housing Area South
Of Beckles Road

Developed

The housing area south of
Beckles Road is now completely
developed. Roads have been made
and street lights put in. Four ad-
ditional standposts have been in-
stalled and also a number of fire
hydrants,

On the northern side of Beckles
Road, work is progressing. New
houses are going up, and houses
are being removed to the -area
from congested areas.

The road construction has been
held up somewhat, however.
The akea on the west side of
Culloden Road is being surveyed
with the idea of're—-planning it, It
is expeeted that when this is done
amore houses will be put there.

‘The area on the south side of
Beckles Road below the Alms-
house § been surveyed. Possi-
bly in the ne@r future, will be seen
proper roads“and other improve-
“ments in this area.



Instructions
To Voters

-. To-morrow. voters. of” St,
Andrew will elect a member
to fill a vacancy in the House
ot Assembly,

Voters are asked by 'theâ„¢

Sheriff and Returning. Offi-)
cer in.a motice published in
the Official Gazette “to meet
at the time and place afore-
said, then and there to make
choice of one qualified, able,
sufficient and discreet person.
to advise and consent th
making ef such laws as shall
be meet and convenient for
the good government of this
place and people and) pre-
servation of their estates.”

Police Band
‘At Esplanade

The Police Band will play at the
Bay Street Esplanade this after-
noon. The programme includes
two hymns, and is as follows:
1. MARCH ,... “Entry of the

Bulgars” .... Lotter
2. OVERTURE—*Poet and

Peasant” ......+-.se0 Suppe
3. SELECTION—“Mikado”
4

—Sullivan
. TWO PIECES—
“To a Wild Rose” Macdowell
“In an Old World Garden”
+Percy Fletcher



5. SUITE—“Ballet Egyptian”
—Luigine
6. SEL—“Lileae Time”—Schubert
7. DANCES—"Hungarian” 5 & 6
: —Brahms
8. CHARACTERISTIC PIECE-~

“The Butterfly”, —Bendisc
HYMNS: 31 A. &-M. Saviour

" Again to Thy Dear Name, we
aise.
202 A.& M. Rejoice, the Lord
3. King.
OD SAVE THE KING!
Conductor: Capt. C. E. RAISON,

M.B.E., A.R.C.M.






$

o
HORIZON -~
| x. Lae
atch fer the Stans |
i CHARLES MC. ENBARNEY & © CO;

LTD.

SOMETHING

ok
NEW
ey

ON THE)

*
MOTORING.
*







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





~“oriinte” PHOSFERINE

Of Barbados
Starts June






Dr. W. F. Auer, Resident f or
Manager of the Barbados Gulf or m e 4% .
Oil Co, Lid. told the Advocate | ‘

yesterday that his company ex: |

pects to start their Seismograpbh |
Survey on or about June |. This
will be im accordance with the
programme presented to the! If lack of confidence worries you

Governor-in-Executive Committee |
in Septernber 1950.

He said that the survey is to}
be carried out by the Independ-
ent Exploration Co., Ltd. which
company also contracted for the
Gravity Survey’ which was com-
pleted on January 13 this year.

By means of the Seismograph,
information obtained in the re-
cent. gravity survey can. be fur-
ther detailed and refined.

_The seismograph method con-
sits of recording minute vibra-

and you feel tired and depressed
through overwork remember how
very uSeful PHOSFERINE has been
to othérs in a similar state.



~“ PHOSFERINE may bejust what

om whisp s08 artificially set up you need to put back strength and
in ane ea 'y. means of small

charges of dynamite. These energy. PHOSFERINE soon re«
dynamite explosions will be vives the appetite and, in so doing,

spaced at intervals of 3 of a mile
to a.mile and will take place in
hallow holes drilled for the pur-

it revives keenness for work, for
enterprise. PHOSFERINE helps

pose. to build up staying power—gives
As these explosions will occur reserve of patience good-
at depths from 100 to 300 feet, oor of wa

no effect will be felt on the sur-
facé except by means of highly
sensitive detectors which will be
used for this purpose. ;

By means of these minute vi- !
brations, which are reflecteq from |
Such hard rock strata as may |
exist at depth, it is possible to
preduce a geologic map of the
sub-surface, which can, under
ideal. conditions, be of great ac-
curacy and afford the geologist a
very clear picture of possible
Structures which might be fav-
avon for the accumulation of
oil,

_ Dr. Auer said in passing, that
similar surveys had been made
by numerous oil companies in.
eluding Gulf Oil Corporation, all
over the world, Particular men-
tion he said, might be made of
the fact that such a seismograph
Survey was made by Gulf, of the
entire country of Denmark which,
with its large population and: in- |
tense agriculture, might well be
compared with Barbados,

He said that he realiseq and ap-
preciated only too well, the popu-
Jar apprehension which was felt
in connection with the use of
dynamite on an island like Bar-
bados, but the extensive experi-
ence of Gulf Oil Corporation in
other parts of the world has
proved that in reality, «uch ap-
prehension is unfounded

will when you need them most.
Try this grand tonic today. In
Q liquid or tablet form. 2 Tablets
of PHOSFERINE equal 10 drops.

THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS

for Depression, oan intigeetien, Sleeplessness, ead

fluenza.





One of your difficulties for .

MATERIALS

can now be supplied by us.

We have SHEET TIN which cannot be replaced at
its present price.

N.B. HOWELL

LUMBER & HARDWARE



Netherlands Govt, |}} Di! 3306.

Names New Carib.

Commissioner

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 14,

Her "Majesty Queen Juliana has
appointed Jonkheer Leopold Quar-
les van Ufford, Secretary of the
Netherlands Embassy. in Washing-
ton, D.C., to be a member of the
y therlands Section of the Carib-

an Commission,
_ Jhr. van Ufford is already famil-
iar with the working of the Com-
mission, having attendeq the
Eleventh Meeting of the Commis-
sion, held concurrently with the
West Indian Conference (Fourth
Session) in Curneao, » Netherland
West Indies, last year, At that
meeting, Jhr. van Ufferd acted as
a Commissioner. He has also
served during the past year as
Netherlands, member of the Com- |
mission's Working Committee,
whr. van Ufford was born at
The Hague in 1921. He graduated
in Law from the University of
Leiden, and joined the Nether
lands Foreign Service in 1942,
serving first as Attache to the
Netherlands Legation in Berne,
Switzerland, In 1946 he was at-
tached to the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs at The Hague, becoming |
Permanent Secretary to the Neth-
erlands Delegztion to the United
Nations at Lake Success the next
year. Since 1949 he has been ia
his present post in Washington.

Bay Street

——



Welcome News
You will be pleased to know
that a large shipment of GLORIA



(irradiated) Evaporated Milk has
arrived, and you can now obtain
your requirements
dealers,

GLORIA Evaporated Milk is
recommended by“ Baby Special-
ists as the next best substitute for
Mother’s milk. Use it and you
will be delighted with the won-
derful results.

from your





BIG 7

INTERCOLONIAL |
CYCLE = & ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

OF THE

-open to all, fourteen (14) prizes
given away.

Starts 2nd April closes 29th June 1951

AMATEUR ATHLETIC

_ Grand Free Competition open to all, fourteen (14)
prizes given away. Starts 2nd April closes 29th Jure, 1951,

ASSOCIATION OF “. prize 1 enly 3-Burner “Valor” Stove
nd prize. 1 case E.P.N.S. Fish Eaters
BARBADOS 3rd prize 1 only No, 6£S “Valor” Stove and Stang
4th prize 1 only No, 111 “Valor” Oven r
AT 5th prize 1% doz. Soup Spoons
‘ 6th prize 1 only Presure Stove
KENSINGTON OVAL 7th prize 1 only Porringer
8th prize 1 only Stainless Steel Bread Knife
ON 6 Consolation prizes of 1 dommussorted “Fray Bentos” Soups.
, WHIT MONDAY, _ Just collect the labels from your “Fray Bentos” Soup
4 | tins, pack them in dozen lots, and send them to T, Sydney
May 14rTu Kinck Ltg., 3rd Floor, Plantations New Building, and de-
TW mand a receipt for them. On 29th June the fourteen (14)
4 Thursday, May 17th persons sending in the largest number of labels will receive
ane their prizes according to the quantity of labels sent in.

Saturday, May 19th

° | ~ ASK YOUR DEALER FOR

Cycle and Athletic Male “PRAY BENT i
SOUPS

and Female Stars trom
the Caribbean who
will invade Bimshire

®
Programme Etc. appears
Later

J. W. Maynarp

Hon. Secretary.



Seeeeeanersaesee



















1951

SUNDAY, APRIL 15;



~ Colds,
Coughs,

| Sore Throats, Bronchitis

ae ~
ss.







For quick, sure relief

rub THERMOGENE
Medicated Rub all over
your chest, throat, and back.
its healing warmth relieves
congestion, and breathing the
Saree pleasant medicinal vapour it gives

and you breathe it in! off clears nose, throat, and lungs.
DOUBLE- ACTION

THERMOGENE

MEDICATED RUB

In big glass Jars and handy dandy Tins
TRS

It does you good in two

ways —you rub it on” »



=

BACKACHE

Try this for reliet !

If you get sharp stabs of pain :
uur back when you stoop an

af ttlae tan, these to 9 ae od
continuous ache, the cause can very
often be traced to the kidneys. These
Y ey vital organs should filter poisons out of

iW the system but sometimes they get

} sluggish and congested and the backache
oy you suffer is Nature's way of warning
you that your kidneys need assistance.

A trusted medicine for uhis purpose is
De Witt's Pills. They have a cleansing
and antiseptic action on the kidneys, helping
to soothe them, tone them up and restore them
to function naturally. There is a long record
of success behind De Witt's Pills, which have
been relieving sufferers in many parts of the
world for cver half a century.

If you could read even a few of the





















De Witt's Pills ateful

letters sent in by backache sufferers who have

oo” found relief atter taking De Witt's Pills you

would realize that your suffering may also be

LUMBAGO unnecessary. Why not try them for your

SCIATICA trouble? "They may be just what you need. Go

, JOINT PAINS to your chemist and get a spply right away.
RHEUMATIC

PAINS

OUR GUARANTEE
-De Witt’s Pills are
made under strictly
rat conditions
an conteres sana
standards of purity.

nya Ree ee

for Kidney and -Bladder...Troubles








“ax arive

_
—

N addition to the regular size, this new,

smaller pack of Andrews Liver Salt has been

introduced to enable you to try the World’s most
popular saline for a very small outlay !

A glass of effervescing Andrews, costing only a
few pence, cleans the mouth, settles the stomach,
tones up the liver, and finally clears the bowels.
Also at any time of the day one teaspoonful in
a glass of cold water makes a cooling, refreshing
drink. You can be sure of Inner Cleanliness
with Andrews.

402. 71N
|





.
a



SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN
SSS sess SSSR









BY CARL ANDERSON —













IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |



| SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only









USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
| Onions, (Per |b.) 16° “4 lb. Bag for 30 Tono, (1 lb. Tins) 123 1.08
Robertson's
Potatoes, (Per Ib) 12 8 lb. Bag for 64 Squashes, (Bots) 128 1.16
(Three Varieties)
Grapes, (Tins) 38 29 Kaviar, (Tubes of) 26 22

MICKEY MOUSE

T<¢* of QoRey!
Se epee i
GODPESS FINDS THOU HAS ESCAPED!

as










SET 7007)

= 2 Bas





> T CAN 0O WHATEVER |

BD || (2 WANT-ANd OH, BOY, | |

i ae | 1 I FEEL 4
ss =A DEVILISH )}

Peels Ear






Fe ee

af NLL PUT GARLIC
ON MY SANDWICH










By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to H.M. King George VI



SU





















Cans MAN, GIVE ve)



1ANT Ser CX ligt 2 RP TMEN GRE. Y ,
itis s Xa "LL KEEP IT UNTIL
j & yu YOU GET YOUR > r
>: 2% WORK DONE JT ORK. 2
rear ; ws i
| eal



| Rey
A

atte Ry ed











3

Ro OOOO ROO EDO OE OOS FSF
ti 9 & ;
< \ t<<=a} e
— = Rat,
ae ‘
OY cc : j
| 7 b 2
i ‘iS s
betel tntbt tent lebih AROS L OOS OO Ob bbb nt bbb tb pt tt ttt ttt! titi tntbebb. {LDN CY
s6g5ee5es SIS NIONSS SbF: ~ S555S5 OO gene pepe npr nit tt Ns

RGSS

| EVERYTHING YOU NEED

=) = a Par ag

poe





dl
.

Ao £8 SS

, : pt

4
, 4

THERE'S LONG-JAW
LOOSE !

â„¢,

BUT WHEN THEY
FIND THE GOLD, THEY,
WILL KILL US /

“
Wii "
“4

ig!

‘

‘|

look!



ae ee



i ie a ee
ee

he
iz &. ic. am
en
.
ee
> hee TBEH

\ wr we eee Soe eee
ce
*
yin

t=
toe
il
2
es
4
;
:

‘

SO SOOO



ALUMINUM WARE KITCHENWARE



isis MMO lseabacn det ss dhicecemantgea Cocktail Shakers, Saucepans, Stoves, Sinks, Aluminum Drain-
: Jelly Moulds, Strainers. ~~ boards, Sanicans, Potato Ricers,
RIP” KIRBY. Mincers, Veg. Shredders, Mortars,
CHINA and Seales, Knife Sharpeners, Cake
Pans & Coolers, Icing Tubes and
EARTHENWARE Books.
; ‘lea-sets, Tea-pots, Cups & Sau-
dove, Plates, dcigs. PLASTICWARE
Baby Dishes, Egg Containers,
CLEANSERS Glasses, Cups & Saucers.
Sprayers, Flit, D.D.T., Windolene,
Harpic, Carpet Cleaner, Paint ENAMELWARE
Cleaner, Vim, Polishing Cloths. Saucepans, Mugs, Bowls, Basins,
Chambers, Pails with Covers.
GLASSWARE
Tumblers, Jugs, Jelly Pots, FLASKS
Casseroles & Baking Dishes. | 4, 8 & 10 Pint Thermos. a so
pris ay uF
CHAIRS, MATS, MIRRORS, CUTLERY, Nes Sos.
SORRY | GOTTA DO THIS+ . p : (S
a BUT | BEEN THRU TOO MUCH OWN WAY, JER AND MANY OTHER ITEMS OF INYEREST TO YOU Sa ay
JUST LIKE | LEFT IT+ THREE 4} ae NOT TO FINISH THE > é BUT DROP THAT Ye og
MILLION SIMOLEONS! mw gs oo JOB YOURE RIFLE! ; aes
ALL MINES } a : \ Y 7 ' WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. = = ee

Successors to g

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones: 4687 & 4472.

for ECONOMY. VALUE |
PITCHER'’S >. SATISFACTION.





3 and 3
3
z 3
| esanoneonconoesooscobeoheeeoeneclobietllltlC os 66 SSSSOS LOSSLESS SS SSIES LOSING openethet NOSES SONS
| Yereorrnnnsresrnrcenneenny rene eennee nner ne een thet Ciera ees Cif GG ICL LL NANT
} ' r


a





SEALE: Mrs Eloise Seale and relatives
gratefally return thanks to all who
wreaths

PAGE TWELVE











attended the funeral, sent







and letters of condolence or in any

other way assisted on the occasion of
Seale,
Michael

James E.
St.

the passing of Mr
late of Baxter's Road.

15,4. 51—In

—
REECE—In loving and grateful memor)

:
2
Sands
house with shingle roof and pine
flooring. 4 reception, 3 bedrooms,
Verandah; 2 bathrooms and
toilets; 2 kitchens, 2 servants’
rooms, 2 garages. Now in 2
apartments but easy to reconvert.
:
‘



Pe

IN’ MEMORIAM



BESS TOOBIN

FOR SALE

CRUSHED STONE AND
FINES.

CRETE, AND MAKING

ROADS AND PATHS.

Apply - -
J. N. HARRIMAN & CO.
LTD,, SEAWELL.











REAL ESTATE
JOHN

M4.
BLADON

A.F.S,, F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD





FOR SALE

WORTHY DOWN, Graeme Hall

Terrace—A modern bungalow of
stone construction with parnpet
100f. This property has the i-



vantage of a corner site and a ver
fine view seawards, There ar
good bedrooms with built in ward-
rebes. Large lounge/livin« ro
with 2 verandahs leading fram it.
The kitchen is well supplied with
fitted cupboards. There is a 2 car
garage, 2 servants’ rooms and
laundry.

“INCH MARLOW"—On approx.
acres coastiand .near Silver
A solidly constructed stone

“MEDMENHAM™ Pine Hill A
very fine 2-storey property
antly situated on approx, 1% acres
near Government House. There
is spacious and*well proportioned
accommodation

ception, dining
rooms, 4 bedrooms,
dressing room) butiler'’s. pantry,
kitch¢n, servants’ rooms, gérage,
fernery, poultry houses ete, There
is a two way entrance arive and
the grounds are well laid out with
1

pleas-

comprising 3 re-
and = bréakfast
(1 with fare:




is, flowering phrubsa and flower
The vhole property
has @ pleasant character typipal
of some of the older cstablished
homes in this exclusive area
at £5,500

dens

A very sound buy

“TOBRUK” — Cattlewash, St,
Joseph. A picturesque holiday
home situated right on the beach
with approx, %4 acre of land The
construction is of timber raised
on stone pillars with shingle roof-
ing and is of sound condition
throughout. There are 3 bedrooms
(with basins), lounge, wide roofed
gallery overlooking the ocean,
kitchen, servants’ rooms, outside
bathing cubicles and garage space,
Offers invited.

St
two-storey

“BAGATELLE HOUSE” —
Thomas. A_ spacious
country house with approx. 5
acres plus additional 31/2 acres
if required. There are 5 bed-
rooms, 2 lounges, dining room, 2
enclosed galleries, 2 bathrooms,
kitchen, pantry, servants’ rooms,
2 garages and various outside
buildings This property is well
elevated and commands excellent
views of the St. James coastline,

“SILVERTON"”—Cheapside. Com-
modious 2-storey stone house
standing in approx. 1% acres
planted with fruit trees. 2 large
reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2
galleries, kitchen, 2 bathrooms,
ete, Centrally located and suitable
for conversion into flats or board-
ing house.

VILLA ROSA — Passate Road
City. Attractive and centrally lo-
cated stone bungalow with double
carriageway. Approx. 14,000 sq.
ft. This well built property
coniains a front gallery, large
Jounge. separate dining room, 3
large bedrooms, toilet, pantry and
kitchen, Good courtyard at rear.

HOTEL PROPERTY — We are
instructed to offer an old estab-
lished hotel business as a going

concern. Full details are available
of this highhy recommended
proposition.

DOWER GARAGE, St
Gap--A substantially built and
almost new building suitable for
use a8 a garage, store, workshop
or a variety of other purposes

Matthias



FOR RENT

“IN CHANCERY"—Modern
nished bungalow on coast
vble immediately

fur-
avail-

“WINDY WELLOWS"—Prospect,
St James. Unfurnished house on
ce with % bedrooms, lounge,
verandah overlooking seat etc.
Immediate possession.





REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

IDEAL FOR CON-

Phone 8444, Extension 8.
12.4.51.—6n.
ROSS SOS S OOS

Oe



|
|























































12.4.51—4n | from £2,500 to £2,300. A Bungalow Typ

Le eee at Hastings Main Rd., Good Condition
CAR—Hillman 10 Car, 1039. Perfect and Location, Reduced from £2500 to
running order. Owner leaving island. | £2,300. Almost New Small Stonewall!
Ring—2593 12.4.51—3n, | Residence at Hastings Main Road., Good

12.4.51—4n. |and Almost in any District
Prices with Re-Sale Values. Mortgages
FORD PICKUP—in good condition and | Arranged. If I Can't—Who Will? Dial 3113

D de Abreu, Call

at Bargain





s Bt Olive Bough,
of r dear husbend Petersen Reece, | 4 new tyres, City Garage Trading Co. : at

hic wen celled home to rest on the } Ltd. 11.4.51—t.f.n, | Hastings 15.4.51—1n

Mth of April, 1948 $$$ $$$ . ee ee
Ma he continue to rest in peace PICKUP—Austin A. 70. Pickup, Almost eel ; In house spots at Black Rock
Always remembered by his loving wife, | new. Dial 4725. General Engincering | mity Lodge Worthing View, Christ
children and family Co., Spry Street, 14.4.51—2n Chure h Dial 2947. R Archer. Mc
Kenzie, Victoria Street. 15.4.51—la







~ PROPERTY

Containing dwel ling
house with three bedrooms (Partly watt
standing on one rood, 14% perches of
land situated at Forde’s Gap, hee



ELECTRICAL

















BULBS (Electric) 100 only at Se. | Hill. Apply to: C. M_ Greenidge
230V. 40W. Bargain at Whitfieids Haid-| Hutchinson & Banfield, James Street
| ware Dept. 14.4.51—2n 8.4.51—6n

ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts.| “Offers will be received up to the Doth
| 30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps an | day of April 1061 by the” dndeenieneg
spares. A. Barnes & Co. Ltd. for that substantially built stone

143.51—t.f.>, | bungalow called Allenby situate at

_- — Welches, Christ Church on the sea where

there is excellent bathing. It consists
LIVESTOCK of Open Verandah, Drawing and Dining
Rooms, Three spacious Bedrooms, Laya-
$] — alas and Bath, Kitchenette, Double
% COW—One Guernsey Cow giving 23 nts’ room, and a Garage; and stands
3; | pts milk, (First calf), Apply E. v, | 0n 6.664 sq. ft. of land.
# Davis, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch Inspection by appointment,
% 10.4.51—3n DARCY A. SCOTT,



Real Estate Agent,







GOAT—Alpine Goat. Fresh in milk. Magazine Lane,
Second litter, Dial 4983. 14,4.51—2n { Dial 3743. 13.4.51—-4n,

MILCH GOAT, “Sally Laurator”’, Reg We will offer for sale to public com-
No. 656. Apply S. C. Skinner, “Laura- | Detition at our office on Friday 27th
tor”, Rockley eersece ie Da Costa & Co,,; April at 2 p.m,

Lid” Phone 8280 or (1) LABOSR BLEST a
Dwelling house

Martins St.

stone wall
shop at St.
standing on
acres, 2 roods of iand, Dwelling
house comprises Drawing and
Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitch-
en, Toilet and Bath. Government
water installed.

Three other parcels of land con- |
taining respectively 2 roods, 3
roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong- |
ing to and ne tg above property
will also be offéred for sale either

10.4 51.—t fn

MECHANICAL

Allen Motor Driven GRASS CUTTER-—
Recently overhauled. Can be seen at
Jeson Jones Garage 13,4.51-—3n

BIKES—on terms, Hercules

King, All models in stock,
A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
11.4,51,—T.F

and
Philip,







(2
Silver






Aileen . oad oe together with above property or |
“GESTETNER DUPLICATORS" —New separately.

models just received, A. S. Bryden & For inspection apply on the prem-

Sons (B'dos) Ltd) Phone 4675. isés {6 the owner Mr, Fverton
16.4,.51—t.f.0 Greenidge.

For further particulars
of sale apply to :—

and condition:

ONE (1) five H.P. three phase totally























-
ao draulic Jacks, 4 Blow Lamps, 3 Shifting

MISCELLANEOUS Wrenches, Flat, Round and Half-round

AMM-I-DENT :—At last, AMM-I-DENT | Files. Tyres, 1 Clutch, Plate,

Toothpaste has arrived. Amm-I-Dent is D'Arcy, A. Scott,

the toothpaste with the Ammonium Ion Gov't: Auctioneer.

which helps to stop tooth decay. It is 11.4. 51—4n. ¢

pleasant tasting and refreshing to the hdl i





ns —
I have been







and is the right thing for a Cricket o7

@raphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop Tennis Club

edjoining Royal Yacht ne .

It can be seen at Seawel



































a &c, all Painted met n: Electric 3 Burne
square compartments. New half-inch
mesh throughout. Suitable as Brooder,| Moffat Stove (very good) Electric. Ho
Rearing Pen or Cockerel Pen. Plates, Steamers, 2 Burner Valor Oi

ARCHIE CLARKE, Phone 4530 from Stove. (Practically new), Primus Stove

8 am. to 4 p.m y 14.4,51—2n} Cream Separator, Churns, Freezer

: rd ‘ Kitchen Utensils Aquarium, Large
Parrot Cage, Roller, Tennis Net anc
As Gaels cna erdatr Bik Gir wramnene, Poles, Quorts; Preserving Pan, Westing
: ‘ . 15.9.51—tf.n. house Refrigerator in good working
. ia i. order,

TYPEWRITER RIBBONS & CARBON] Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms cash.
PAPER Fresh stock ‘ust received, get BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
your requirements at T. Geddes Grant
Lta 7 4.51-—7n Auctioneers

ene — ———_—_— 13.4.51-

“Two F PLATE Glass Display Cases, $120, “| — etn as
each Stansfeld Scott & Co,, Ltd, Broad
St 7.4.51—t.f.0

GOVERNMENT nonce

OFFICE ACCOMMODATION







VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-air:
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to you
sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4474
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

13.2.51—t.f.n



office accommoda-

tion (approximately 18,000 square

Temporary







VAN HOUTENS drinking chocolate : ; : At
Add a dessertspoonful to a glass of feet), within one half mile radius
milk to obtain a refreshing beverage of f Of the . Public Buildings, is
exouisite Mavour, Only 38 cents for ‘| required, immediately, to house a
Ib tin Compare the price with com- Government Organisation

titors’ 11.4.51—3n % :
pe Offers in writing should be
fg ACHES — Ladies and Gants ae and submitted to the Financial Secre—

jJewe wrist watches in G and ic i i ater
Stainless Steel, Attractive prices, Alex tary, Public Buildings, not later

Yearwood Jeweller, Bolton Lane than the 18th instant.
15 4 51—1n 14.4.51.—3n.





ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS




T armone quest |

HOUSE




DIAL









3466 FONTABELLE
= PERMANENT
OR
MAPLE. MANOR TRANSIENT

BOARD AND LODGING
FOR RESERVATION

GUEST MOUSE
OPPOSITE HASTINGS ROCKS





the supply of ‘the
to be delivered at



birth supported by

their own pencilis), pen,

SUNDAY



















ADVOCATE











































Ss
LARGE HOUSE & FLAT—The Camp,

- i"
Secretary. NOTICE St. Lawrence Gap. On-the-Sea. Fuly
54.51—4n, BYE - ELECTION furnished Dial 6357. Miss K. Hunt.
= Parish of St. ANDREW Maxwell Coast 31,3.51—t.f.n.

NOTICE

— | Location. Reduced from £1,400 to 21,200 PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
CAR—Morris Minor Saloon 1949 (Green: | A Residence at Rockley Main Road Near Sealed Tenders (Marked on
Mileage 15,600, very good condition. New | Blue Waters, Good Condition and Loca- | enve lope “Tender for will
Battery. Apply: S. P. Edghill. Telephone | tion, Reduced from £3,200 to £3,000 Nett. | received by me at muy office up to
4266, C/o R. & G. Chalienor. C Me for \Nearly Anything in Real Estate| p.m. on Tuesday, 17th April, 1951



following commodities
the Christ Church

More than one person having beer
duly nominated at the election of per-
sons to serve as members in the Gen-

———

THE RHONDA, Large dwelling house



on the Sea near Cacrabank, Worthing.
the eral’ Assembly for the Parish of St. |The above will be set up for sale ot
‘00 Andrew in the place of D. A. Foster| our Office in Lucas Street on Friday
oe the 20th day of April 1951 at 2 p.m.
Sos Thereby | notify my intention of inspection from 4 to 6 p.m. ery day
faking 4 poll for the determination of |¢o5. April 16th. or on application to

the said election on Monday next the

10.4.51—Ta





Almshousé in euch quantities and ai }l6th, day of April 1951 at the Alleyne | Carrington é& Sealy. ete
such times as the Board of Guardians }School, Belleplaine beginning between ire
shall from time to time direct: the hours of seven and eight o'clock in} THE SNUGGERY, Lower Westbury Ra
(a) FRESH MILK the morning. near Brandon's Beach Comprising 4 large
The amount of milk required is Polling Station No.1.— The Alleyne | rooms newly painted, toilet, bath, elee-|
approximately 3,000 pints per pint, |School—the North wing for all persons | tric light, also Radio Distribution and

and the Board





reserves the r
to accept the tender of more than

whose surnames begin with the
._ to J. inclusive.
Polling Station No. 2.

letter | telephone ut your disposal to an approved

ean tenant 15.4, 51—1n

— The Alleyne













Tas) Sentara tain be eae’ School — the South wizg for all per- VICTORIA—On the sea-side near
anied by a certificate signed by 2 |S0% whose Surnames begin with the | Worthings Post Office. Ideal locality;
eae se, o ae yo. | letter K, to Z. inclusive. fully furnished with telephone refrig-
qualified Veterinary Practitioner Signed erator, Radio, Electric; running water
that the cattle from which the F. A. INGRAM, in bedrooms, Servant’s room and garage.
milk is supplied are free of Sheriff and Special terms for long-stay tenant.
Tuberculosis, Returning Officer. Dial 8150 or 8671 Victoria.
(b) FRESH BREAD 10.4.51—6rn 14.4.51—t.f.n
(c) FRESH MEAT inde on aieies ao a n — ae a
(d) PROVISIONS
Ineluding:
Unit to be tendered for, PART ONE ORDERS
Biscuit# per carton
Rice (State grade) per bag of Lieut.-Col i Sorell, OBE,ED.,
180 Ibs. Sommandin#,
Flour per half bag of 98 ibs. [{ 2 _ The Barbados Regiment .
Cornmeal per half bag of 98 Ibs 4 Issue No. 15 13 Apr 51.
gir . ate Grade) per bag i PARADES—Training on Thursday 19 Apr 5I at 1700 hours.
_ Ibs. H@ Goy will continue weapon training—The Rifle Lesson 7—the lying position
Soap, Blue mottled per box and hold,
Split Peas per bag of 98 Ibs. A” Coy will do LMG training—Lesson 4, aiming and holding, the object of this
Salt Pork per 1b. lesson is to prepare personne! of the Coy to fire the Bren gun on the range the
Salt Fish per Qntl. following Thursday.
Coffffee per Ib. “B" Coy will do LMG training—Lesson 9—Introductory Shoot (single rounds).
Oat Flakes per Ib The object of this lesson is to give each man practical experience in firing the
Sago per Ib. gun.
Tapioca per Ib. Band
Cotton seed oil per gln Band practices will be held on Monday 16, Wednesday 18 and Thursday 19
Wallaba Firewood per ton. | 8 NiGHT
a Matches pat oaren oust’ aint ‘ There will be a voluntary night for NCOs on Thursday 17 Apr at 1700 hours
ach person tendering h from {we The lessons for voluntary night will be those lessons which have been published
two sureties of £50 each from in orders for Thursday. NCOs are asked to make every effort to attend this
properly qualified persone wee to parade,
become bond with the successfu en- , oPICE J e r és SAN 2 PE oN iG
derer for the due performance of the RE OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
| Contract. 7 Orderly Officer Lieut. P. L. C. Peterkin
The Board of Guardians do not bind Orderly Serjeant 381 Sit Robinson, V. N.
themselves to accept the lowest or any Next for duty
tender. i Orderly Officer Lieut. S. G _Lashley
E. FE. ASHBY, Orderly Serjeant oo .- 233 L/S Blackman, A. L. O.
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians,

Christ Church.
10,4.51—3n,

EDUCATIONAL









2. The Entrance Examination will be
held in the Sehool Hall on Friday, J
8th at 9

a.m.

3. Candidates will be accepted

examination who were not over 12 years
or who will
not be under 11 wears on lst September

of age on Ist January last,

mouth, Get yours, now, from your drug- instructed by the Gov-] next. This concession is applicable t

gist'’s or notion counter.—15.4.51—6n, Ree ate eaon Te eee cae the current year only. : ce e

eee —— - vB ae : = oo 4. Parents/Guardians must notify the ° 2

oANTIQu as: =o every scription on Wednesday next the eth April at Headmaster in writing not later than aa a ganas Time is approaching, we are in a
88, ina, © ewels,” fine Silver re or ais * Monday, 3¢th April if they wish their osition to

Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto- Mower. It is a collection of Six Mowers | 7)! vlads to sit the examination. Suck D n EPAIR TRUCKS and VANS, Adjusting Brakes,

ipplication

ts ere ot wae ina ee Berroa te tificate. It shall also state 38
“BATHS — In Porcelain tr ' . q Pik) ne is now attending and must be accom-
alte Pisin ee tO een Enamel, ze eee patina dey panied by a brief Testimonial from
nite tt - ican matching 12.4.51—4n || Headmaster of th t School “
@rade. A. Co., ae 7 5. Candidates are expected to provid

& ruler







UNBREAKABLE POTS!

You can still get a few of the
Medium and Small Sizes of
OLD TRON METER CASES

Some people have used them for :

VIOLETS
CARNATIONS
{PINKS
GERANIUNS ete.
. Price only 1/3 and 2/6 .
See Them at Your
GAS WORKS,

BAY 8T,

——_—_—

GREY HOUSE

Church Street
Speightstown



Instructions have been received
fiorh Mrs. 1. G. Jemmott for the
ebeve. property to be offered for



tale by PUBLIC COMPETITION
at 2.30 p.m. on Friday, April 27,
1981. at JOHN M. BLADON'’s
Of ces, Plantations Building

Grey House is a spacious 3-
storey stone building with a dry
goods and generg) store operated
on the ground floor which offers
cprertunit for the development
of a good business in this central
pesition

Particulars from the Solicitors,
Messrs Yearwood & Boyce, James
Street, or the Auctioneer, John M
Bladon, Plantations Building

—



Tel. 2021, I. BOURNE, DIAL 4837 |
Manageress, 14.4.51,—2n
SSS | FS SS SSS cdl

~ Ta i

joha 4. Biadon

A.F.\S., F.V.A.



must state the boy's date et
a birth/baptism cer-
Schoo!

Ligh





M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
S.O.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.



PART Il ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT

12TH APRIL, 1951 Geis Kor

SHEET NO. 1.



















anclosed induction motor. One (1) HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD - — 1 SEPOINTMEN s & PROMOTIONS
Switch board fully fitted, One 2 11,4.51,—6n. MODERN HIGH SCHOOL Sit K “A Appointed CQMS of “A” & “B”
neh delivery (Lee Howell) centrifuge! ' —| his School will re-open on Tuesday 7 L/Sit Mlackett, i. 1 Coys respectively wef 1 Apr 51,
sump. All im condition “as good as AUCTION 24th April and will be in session al di 234 L/Sit Williams, BE, D.
1ew. Price two_ thirds (2/3) Ruling oe on that date ; 3; Husbands, HUA Promoted to the rank of Serjeant
ig seed taps Reply Box iy a Sh HILLMAN MINX 1939 MODEL A limited number of new pupils, owing 407 Guintees : rie wef 1 Apr. 51
aaa aia ¥ We are instructed by the owner who is| t© considerations of space will be eee 409 Reid, NE.
SPANNERS: (Cycle) “Universal” -| leaving the Colony to sell this perfectly | viewed at 10 aim, on Wednesday 18th} oo) D.
way nut, Peg & Cone 40 doz. to clear | sound vehicle by Public Auction, at Cole’s | inst. # abr os aed = Promoted to L/Sjt wef 1 Apr 51
at 12e, each ~=Whitfields Hardware Dept. | Garace at 2 p.m, on Friday, April, L. A, LYNG A 427 1./Cpl Glasgow, R. W
4 4.61—-2n. ) 1951 Principa 2 » Smith, A Promoted to Cpl wef 1 Apr 51.
a — detente JOHN M ae 15.4.5] Qn 391 Belgrave, J. S
uctioneer.
POULTRY Team eo. M. LD, SKEWES-COX, Major,
, ee eee —_ S.O.L, > djutant,
By “instructions received I will sell at The Bar s t,
5 ene -———_————] Central Police Station on Monda iat F _COMBERMERE SCHOOL. jarbados Regimen
COCKS—Four (4) Pure Leghorn Cocks | the 16h April, 1951 at 2 p.m. the fol-| ENTRANCE EXAMINATION TO MAI}
F ere Sie Bees S50 srahs Apply vy ee items: 25 cartons Biscuits, 10 ae Orie in the Press
3 ryan, Little Yorkshire, Ch, Ch ‘ins Condense . s ' 8 previously no’ Ly — “44 3% .
or Dial 2425.—15 4 51—1n, 528 Tins ‘Beare at atte packages pen admissions to the School will take place POTOVTSOSIOSS PROSSER POS ESE S SOOO SPSS SOOO
Boots, Foot and Fuel Pumps, 2 Hy-]| in September next.

une

SMITHS ENGINEERING WORKS

Roebuck Street (Next Combermere).

for

Dial 4947

Body Repairs and General Engineering at your Convenience.
We also repair Trailer and Cane Carts over the week-end.
@m Satisfaction Guaranteed !

LLLP AINE

PPPS PP EPSP PSAP EEE

the

é PO

s
%,
y
x,
aH

* CODES SEBS SS SSS S555655

*

e

MALIN

MSs















efreshments will be on sale at tht
>. School canteen
: ee es eee sire UNDER THE SILVER 6, Will Vestries and all other Scholar " AYLOR’S OF ROEBU
vite Taken before meni it serves HAMMER o-awarding authorities please submit ’ , CK STREET
aitbet hha” qiatmentemns OBEN. WE de teganon oeabes et
sith the foregoin Bi . 5 .
"0 RAN CR) at leading On TOMBE 17h. uflerder of Mrs are the Blenders of the famous
pti as | E. M. Watson we will sel her Furni }
CROQUET Be dics and fully| ture at “The Canteen" Garrison. (Nea: PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT ’ $
equipped at Halvisehe Sports “Dept. ist} Married Womens’ Quarters). Whicl 1. A limited number of vacancies wil) })
Floor 12.4.51-—3n naaveent = po eosien 5 ad Tabl | secur in September, 1951, in the Prep |)
——— pono {Seats}. Square Tip-Top. Dining Table ratory Department of the above School | }
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win.| Sideboards, — Hatstand, _ Book-shelves J Applications mo be submitted to the |) (With the Distinctive Flavour)
tow styling, ight control, Valances and Pump Waiter, Flat Top Desk; Tea Trol feadmaster, by parents/guardians or |}
{raperies. By Kirsch. “Dial 4476 A A Settees, Upright and Corner Chairs vehalf of boys who shall be not less re
3ARNES & co., LTD. 19.2.51—t.n rris Chair with Cushions; Antiau § than eight and a half years of age, no |, Ask for this Blend and you will be assured
Uphols; Ottoman; Ornament Tabi 1 :
: , ee Ea sechalot | 12 Mahogany; Silvertone Radio “Gins Woe! on ea a eae Cr Oe 7
25 The. at T—Best Quanity | Bschalot and China, Dinner, Tea and ‘Coffee sar ge Se date for applications will be ‘ of getting the Best.
tities at 36c, per tb HAROLD | Setvices; Old China Dinner Service tonday 30th April,, 1951
PROVERBS & CO, LTD, High Street ee eae Bie’ an ae aed wo. An. ekarnination will be conducted }}
ii 5 stable and Sweet dishe Re 5 » 9 at
me 15.4-Birrmn paandlestions, Spoons, Forks and Cut oa BYR RUF SABIE RY: Spe eto \ JOUN Y ne ye
CHAIRS—2 | tery; Bridge Tabie and 4 Chairs; Rug: a erat « arrive e . D. f | c vy
inte heecien pis ease: at Har Congoleum, Pictures; Verandah Chairs 4 Candidates: should AoC eculppen { 4 5 "AY LOR A SONS LTD.
= 12.4.51-3n Dress Foun, Single Mahog: Bedstead f. “ith 2 (two) pencils M PINDER. Y
For Boulders, Concrete Stone, Grit Mahog, "3 "Winged Wardrobe; ‘Dressin esribaer ae
and Dust. Contact WILLIAM HINKSON,| TeDles. Military Washstand — Cheva Governing Body of Com Tee ; POO TOTO PROS POSPOR IOP
Sealy Hail St. John r 13.4.51—3n__ glass, M.T Washstand Single Iror hoo’ ny
eas Ble ; | Bedstead, Cradle, Press; Painted Green LaAol est
POULTRY PEN—Newly Constructed | €2™V¥8s Cot; Breakfast Table, einen
Double Decker, Containing 8 by 3 fect | L@t4ers, Kitchen Cabinet Waggor



4

Just opened, the Popular Charm Bracelet, in Silver.
Also 9et, Gold Charms—Bell, Jug, Shoe, Ballerina,
Elephant, Saucepan, Horse-shoe, etc.

Drop Pearl Earrings, in 9ct, Gold and Silver
All Reasonably Priced

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

Bolton Lane
Sole Representatives for Rolex Watches

AEA AEE EEE CCDC OEE SSOOO EO SVOVSO EG
A large assortment of
BIRTHDAY CARDS and BIRTHDAY
WRAPPING PAPER, GETWELL CARDS
WEDDING GIFT CARDS
also

PASSE PARTOUT and SPEEDFIX TAPE

in two sizes





Roberts & Co. = Dial 3301 }

rn os = Se |





\] 100 NIGHTIES

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951









as aararanERTEETON suaD tp stearsenscennssnessesnmassatsioetenieasensliapesttatiimnnnmaiagtionmnsitiil
<— | wey ;
CS L A S S I FIE D A D fy PUBLIC SALES | PUBLIC NOTICES | WANTED FOR RENT | _| SHIPPING NOTICES
* :
Ten cents per agate tine on week-days Tea cents per agate line on week-da Minimum charge week 72 cents and
TELEPHONE 2508 and 12 cone por sate ing om Sunag, | and ia conta borage tine on Sunny | 2 c's Sundays 24 Sard, [over Bt | oe Mennte Bushags al sSorat oT Seer —
mimmum cnarge $1.50 on week-days/| minimwm charge 1. is 3 cents a word wee a -
ae % — and $1.80 om Sundays | Gnd $1.80 on Sundays. ve” week-daus | word’ Sundays. naa. oe Eee NETHERLANDS
! j 4
For Births, Marriage or Engagement * } ; aa at
anrouneements in Cari Calling ine) = WORE SALE é NOTICE HELP ——| STEAMSHIP CO, Py
charge is $3.00 for any number of words | REAL ESTATE ‘ PARISH OF ST. PETER ae oy ee ee HOUSES * } Paramaribo, Sailing Thursda bh
tp to 50 and 6 cents per word for each| Minimum charge week 72 cents and As from Aptil 16th to May 40 the | py, -ERK.—at the Barbados Ice Co SANANG FROM {3% instant. oe
i na’ rms cas hone 2508| 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 insipid Parochial Treasu: © | Ltd., principally for Sales and Delivery rae y prod M AMSTERDAM | nstant.
edditional word. Terms cash. Fhon rer will not be at his BUNGALOW-—Navy Gardens, 3 bed- M.S. HECUBA"—17th
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death| words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a By instructions reteived I will sell by | office except on the following days of Ice Cream at Factory. For further rooms. F; 1 ae . aoe ’ Willir Bp. —lith April 1961. The M.V. “Moneka” will accept
Nottees only after 4 p.m. | word Sundays. Public Competition on the spot at Jst| Saturday April 2ist from 10 yg | Particulars, apply to the Secretary.” ct an lee ee - ae SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND Cargo and Passengers for Domi-
eal ee ese | Avenue, Alleyne’s Land Bush Hall, on|noon; Rees 11.4.51—5n. | 19 ere: eet ee AMSTERDAM nied, Antigua, Montserfat, Nevis
| Thursday next the i8th at 2 pm, TNo| Saturday April 28th from 16 a.m— Earenihomy 7: Tae . . M.S. “ORANJESTAD”—19th April 1951. = = ere: Sailing Monday
houses 17 x 6 and 18 x 10 with shed. | 12 noon; ‘ x PT oS, Nene: | “BEWDLEY"—Navy Gardens, Ch. Ch.,| SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO | sy
_ ED AUTOMOTIVE Can remain on the spot. Inspection on} Saturday May 8th from 10/gum—i2 |—te Go, sta, SS’ AV btumnianed or “unfurnished. tor 51/3] | AND GRORGETOWN accept Cargo and ‘Pemsengers Yor
a ce eae Pt meee noon. te months — from Ist May to 15th Septem-| M.S SILAJA”.—11th April 1951. pt Cargo an ‘assengers
GREFFITH—On April 2nd 1961 at _Phila- Sal wae ane tekaicea Be ene F! % Ps > ol Saturday May 12th from 10° afm.—1i2 }— i yi SABLA OT Apply. G@. Branlieed; Thal 3718 8S, “COTTICA”—23rd April 1951. Dominica vg Aneiaua, C Montaer tat,
ancis ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van. psonee: roon 14.4.51—2n } « * N a 3 s. ing
SR ee had eet eadart tn Guarantee a required. Extra Masonite 15.4.51—4n A ‘Rane py t MANAGERESS ewe bite emt or SAILING wad oe of ons Fridey 20th instant.
U.S.A." for over 40 years coring. poset and lmeured. Upset | ee a cas? ar . Manageress. Previous experience — FLAT—One (1) furnished flat at] gs “GANYMEDES—Isth April 1951 TELE. 4047.
a Price $1,650. New 12: i Beat It if U Can! Almost New Seaside experience = in S.S. 13th April 1951. | 7
ne eteiect, as sently. Apply Coultesy agrees. a iee Bungalow at St. James, Good Location Peter. catering for Restaurants or Hotels or| Dundee St. Lawrence Gap. Suitable for | B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS
Peter ¥y ley yo aici ond Bathing, Wide Bandy, Beach. 4n 44.91—6n | similar experience is desirable two only. Avatiable 15th April, onward S. P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Ltd. | Assoc, INC.
Honel Grit. 0S Avis @31in, | AUTOMOBILE: Vauxhall 14/6. E151 | Outlook, Well Set in of Main Rd.. Re | °~ THE BARBADOS Applications should be submitted in No children, no Pets. Apply Mrs. EB. C Agents,
i Perfect running order excellent mileage | @uced from £3,5 3 A Seaside | woTUAL LIFE AS8U . writing giving details of previous ex-|Boyee on premises, Phone—6240,
“—<— $1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Pionc-4616, | Residence at % Acre, 1 to a ahs oe '¥ | perience and enclosing copies of tes 11.4.51.—2n en —
THANKS , erage Tnone sete: | Reduced trom ‘A New| ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING | timonials and 4 recent passport sir
y A aoneioe Facies’ men Riaha at ae te wt ICE is hereby given that the One | photograph, and should be addressed | HOME. On St. Jarnes Coast from Au- Cana nl National tea mshir s
HOLDER: The Holder Family beg through | GARS—Mortis Oxtofd in Ac] condifion | 8&4. Going to St, James, Good Location Hundred and Tenth Yearly Ordinary | to Messrs, Da Costa & Co,, Lid., P.O. | gust to October 1. Write George
thie medium to thank all those who] onty 18.000 miles. Standard ® HP. done | 2" Bathing, off Main Rd., Reduced from} G nerst Meeting of the above-named | Box 103, Bridgetown.” 10.4.51.-6n | Hunte. C/o. Advocate Co. Ltd sou
gent us wreaths, cards and leters, or} 16,600 miles and in excellent condition. | £3,000 to £2,700. A Cottade by Fonta-}Svciety will be held at the Society's — 8.4.51—3n. Sails Sails Arrivi
in any way expressed their sympathy | ford Prefect cena 14000 leg ete. | belle, Good Condition and Location, Re-|OTice. Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on MisCELLANEOUS —_—_ I Barbea parbad
with Ys in attr recent bereavement} in first clues condition. Apply B'dos |7Ced from £1,200 to £1,050. A 3 Bed Frida. 20th April, 1951, at 2 oelock | oo INGRID—Marine Gardens, The house] CAN, CHALLENGER Falitax a jos Sets jos
caused by the death of our dear} Agencies Ltd. Ring 4908 : " [Fog Cottaee at Ch. Ch. Main Hibs abouts Pn, SoF the. purnose. of WANTED TO RENT _ contains living rooms, Three (3) Bed-) LaDy mers See ve ace me
nother RUTH HOLDER, who died . 7 Miles from Town, Good Condition ant] (J) Receiving from the Directors their " RENT wean : ae ~ Wat RODNEY 16 Apr. —‘:18 Apr. 2? Apr. 27 Apr.
mother LDER. P 15.4.51~-6ri | Location, Modern Conveniences, Spacious Report én the transhetions ot th A FURNISHED STONE HOUSE, 3 bed- | 00ms, and usual conveniences. Water | LADY NELSON 10 May 12 May 21 May 22 May
lith April, at Sandfor? Tenantry, St f . ¢ | rooms, situated on the beach, preferably | and Electricity throughout. For further] LADY"RODNEY J 20 Jun 21 J
Philip CAR—(1) one Standard 8 H.P. 1989) qorta roeed, ith Stone, Vacant, Re- Socket eT gth® Year ended 31st |worthing. Apply to The Advocate Adver. | Particulars apply Messrs. Yearwood &] LADY NELSOF" oe te Sune i" ge gee 18 Sure
; “harle , , a uct from £1 to £850. A Two- December, 1950. : arene Pt Sohints ea eee : uly uly uly uly
Joe, Charles, Edwin, Armenta, Anna} model; in very good order, Mileage 19,960 \Storey Stonewall’ Business and Residence (2) Electing Directors ana an Auditor tising Department. Box No. } Boyce, Solicitors, James Stree: ny LADY RODNEY 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug.
ro 15.4.51—In Apply to C, A. Proverbs C/o, Jame ‘with a Large Garage or Workshop in for the current year. 15.4.51—2n Sara
pews A. Lynch & Co, Lid, Phone 3643 Tudor St., Busy Area, Vacant, Reduced c. K. BROWNE, ene arate tee cts







NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
LADY RODNEY ..10 May. 12 May 21 May _- 22 May lay
LADY NELSON .. 3 June 5 June 14 June - 16 June 19 June
LADY RODNEY .. 3 July 5S July 14 July - 16 July 19 July
LADY NELSON, ..27 Juky 29 July 7 Aug. 7° * 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
LADY RODNEY .,26 Aug. 28 Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11. Sept.

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessets fitted witn cold storage cham-
bers. Passenger Fares and freigiut rates on application to:—

ea
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.

OVOOFOS

44,6654
PPPOE PPPS

959969089 +, 5% > Seo o> +, POSOOOOSS
Yes. Sir!
I¢’s Our

CHANCE



POOLE PEP SELOO POOP POOP IPE
LLL S

Â¥
NS GENTLEMAN S WEEK }
% my
9
; AT WILSON’S
. *
g In answer and satisfaction to our numerous gen- $
x tlemen customers who complain that they are not given
ss the same opportunity to Bargains as our Lady Custom- %
$ ers, we have decided to have as from :
x :
: s
MONDAY, 14th APRIL A :
+
g GENTS’ WEEK 2
3 offering the very best that money can buy in $
% WORSTED in a variety of Pin Stripes, PARSONS’ %
$ GREY in four shades, CREAM FLANNEL, CREAM &
% SERGE, CREAM DOESKIN, CREAM GABARDINE, %
x TROPICAL SUITINGS:in a large variety, SHARK- ¥
s SKIN in WHITE, FAWN & GREY, Genuine IRISH ¥$
% LINEN, TUSSORES, KHAK3 and WHITE DRILLS. 5
%
We unhesitatingly say that prices on these definitely
cannot be repeated. %

SHIRTS! SHIRTS !!

Our range of shirts by the World’s Best manufacturers
are too numerous to mention. We can only invite your
inspection and feel certain that you will buy your-
selves SIX or more shirts.

The famous SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS. and
PYJAMAS are among the range.

_ Other interesting lines are SOCKS, TIES, SHOES,
BELTS, PYRAMID HANDKERCHIEFS, OTIS VESTS
ete.

Wise Men will buy now before it is too late, at - - -

N. E. Wilson & Co.

The Ultra Modern Store well known as the
GENTS’ EMPORIUM

31, Swan Street —

POOLS LAE RES

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POS












®
| White, Pink & Blue at $3.00

| 300 CHILDREN PANTIES |
Rayon & Cotton sizes 4—8 3 for $1.20

PANTIES

American Style in
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Black ? for $1.70
NYLONS - $136 - $1.86

|
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BORDERED SPUNS |



CREPES & LINENS
In shades you'll like

°
THE BARGAIN HOUSE

30, Swan Street

S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
PHONE 2702





a

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951





‘Here comes Sis’s young man on a LOVELY NEW MOTOR-BIKE!”

ondon Express Service





-

PPPS OSY

eS P00 1SG5G998590060",
. eae ‘
West Indian & British %

Faiths Barbadians 8-.B-C. Radio |. wes indian & snes §
a Programme 3° 3 §
i Live By—8 SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1951. + eee %

e .
14.4.51—Im. @
6.90 a.m.—12.15 p.m, 0.00 M g

. . *
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH “G90 ait, Weskzend Bporis Ravan, Gail “cere eee

diy MacPherson at the Theatre
By JAMES F. BRATHWAITE T H f N |





Members of Adventist Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials,

Seventh-day Adventists began alcoholic beverages. Forces, 2) ge it bree oie oon hcl

work in the island of Barbados The denomination operate: lesa Some 38 sm, Close Down,
‘ L nomi S 161 News from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close

To-day there are over 2,100 adher- medical institutions in various 11.15 am. Programme Parade, St ea

ents who worship each Sabbath countries ‘of the world. One hos- interlude, 11.30) a.m Sunday Service,

(Saturday) in the fourteen Ad- pital is located in Kingston, Ja— 12,,\noom! The News, 12.10 p.m. New

5 : : . Analysis, 12.15 se Down
ventist churches on the island. maica, Another is under ‘con- 415645 3 1S p.m, Close Dow



the Or aim. The News, 7.10 a.m. News
NEARLY fifty years ago Church neither smoke or drink 7-25 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m
B R O S e
{



The Seventh-day Adventist Struction in Puerto Rico. In Port. —— ae

church was organized nearly one ©*-Spain, Trinidad, an out-patient . 4:15 4m. Music Magazine, 4.30 a.m

hundred years ago and accepted Clinic was established about three ${\"“®, aie pin Listeners" Chotée, ued

as their watchword the statement Y@ars ago. During 1950 this clinic ti pm. Rendezveds Plavers, bls oo

of Christ, “Go ye into all the world ©@"ed for over 12,000 patients, Ray's a Laugh, 645 p.m. Programme HAR VEST ,
and preach the Gospel.” Today The Voice of Phophecy radio !*rade. 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m, News

they are carrying forward their broadcast heard over Rediffu- Amalss's 7.15 pm. Caribbean Voices



7.15 p.m, 5.58 M

programme of religious, medical, sion here at 7.30 on Sunday 11.00 pam 25.58 M. 31 M

and literature work in more lands ™Ornings is part of the church's ——— ; :
and tongues than any other Pro- Wrld-wide: effort at evangelizing 49.2)", Woy | Bgleve. Spm. Radio
testant denomination. They have the world, This programme is re. jin Composer of the Week, 9 pm. The
more than doubled their member. leased on over 730 stations and is Wonderful Year 1851, 10 p.m. The News IS THE
ship every ten years since 1845, heard in Spanish, German, French, 20.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
and there are now 718,000 mem- Dutch, Chinese, and other ied eee ee OF THE
bers thieaghout the world. languages in the various countries BosTON

of the world. A few months ago | WRUL 15.29 Mc, WRUW 11.75 Me,

This denomination believe the there were started two broadcasts WRUX 17-75 Me

Bible teaches that Christ will visi- on the television systems in the
bly come back to this earth again;





SALE

TALK
TOWN
YOU CAN'T AFFORD

‘ MONDAY APRIL 16, LOM.
United States, They are the first 6.30 a.m—12.15 p.m, ;

tas s Pe 4 j CC
that conditions in the world at the church to sponsor a_ television —————————_- TO MISS IT
present time are ag fulfilment of broadcast. 6,30 a.m, The Billy Cotton Band Show

fi am, The News, 7.10 am. New

Bible prophecy and indicate that 7 Analysis, 7.15 a.m, From the Editorials
this event is in the near future. In connection with these broad- 425 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m! |
Like many others, they believe Casts there have been started the ‘he Mark of Greatness, 7.45 a.m. |
that there is only one way to gain “Bible Correspondence Courses” Souvenirs of Music, 8.30 am. Practice |

‘ o>

Thousands are
taking real ad- |

i ; é Makes Perfect, 845 « The Debate |
eternal life, and this 1s by accept. that now have an enrollment of Continues, 9 am. The News, 910 a1. |
ing Christ as one’s Saviour. almost a million students. These Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close |

vaniage of gen-
uine Reductions
») in
\ Ladies

mony with the Ten Command. languages, English, Spanish, Por-~ 11,25 a Mayet anes At48 e m

ments, keep holy the seventh-day tuguese, Italian, French, German, ta: io ie Nowe Abaiven 218 pm,

of the week — Saturday — as the Dutch, Danish, Japanese, Chinese, Close Down.

- that Christ hallowed and pe regen Arabic, Amharic, Fili- 415-45 p.m 19.16 M.
essed. They find no scriptural pino Dialect, Indonesian, Korean, Opera Orchestra, 5 p.m.

evidence that this Commandment Vietnamese, Malya, Singhalese acon ot the Week, 6.18 pai the

was ever abrogated or changed. Hindi Siamese, Afrikaans, Sesuto, Storyteller, 5.:
In addition to the religious and Xhosa, Zulu. They are also avail- "20", Champ!









p.m. Star World Ball-
iships, 6 p.rn, Nights at

‘Seventh-day Adventists in har- lessons are available in 25 Down, 11.15 am, Programme =
| Piress



other uctivities already mentioned, able in Braille, bi She ae BE ee
the church also engage in publish. There has been an ever-increas— ———————__________—_ Goods C onis
ing, educational, and welfare ing programme of welfare work, ,7 Pâ„¢ oe News, 7 10 Pan News 3 2
work, conducted in mahy | countries, $uaii", “2° Pm Sorrel ane =|
During the last four-year period 7.45—11.00 p.m. ... 25 31.9¢ M.} Wear and
As part of their educational pro- over 14,000,000 persons received ;





7.45 p.m. The Mark of Greatness, 8 p.m. |

gramme they operate three ele. help. This came as a result of





mentary schools here in Barbados. 1,750 tons of clothing and reliet eae Ke ee eee Make Woollens and
They send their students to Trini- packages sent into 41 countries Perfect, 8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week
Caribbean Training College where The financial structure of the News 1010 pm. Fram tne peter
students prepare for the British church is built around the Bible ‘science’ Review, 11 p.m. Samoan Ad

external examinations, or take principle of tithe-paying, Each venture.
courses in Theology, Teaching, or member is taught to give one-
Business. As part of their educa. tenth or ten per cent of his net as,
tion they work in one of the fol- earnings for the support of the

lowing industries: Printshop, ministry, Apart from the tithe, €C,B.C. PROGRAMME
Broomshop, Bakery, Laundry, and each member contributes liberal

Woodwork shop. This is part of offerings for the support of SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1961

the Church's world-wide pro- foreign mission work. OA Dee NES BOS adie

| other
|
|
|

Departments

EVERYDAY

What about
you ? |

dad for advanced work at the from the churches’ watehouses, ° p.m. British Concert Hall, 10 py. Tho)

gramme of teaching students the Headquarters of the work in cea ae teas ae

dignity of labour. Opportunity this Mission is located at Colly MONDAY, APRIL 16, 1951
is provided for the student to earn more Rock, Britton'’s Crossroad. 10—10.15 p.m, News and Commentar y
part or all of his way through Flder §S. E. White is the president ':!5—10%° p.™ Canadian Chronicle
school. One young man from of the Mission; Mr. Charles Kum,
Bridgetown went to the Caribbean the Secretarytreasurer, and
Training College with five shil- pastor F. J. Parchment the Educa-—
lings in his pocket and worked for tional Secretary as well as the
all of bis expenses at college. Director of the missionary activi-
Over twenty members in Barba. ties of the church, Mr, George
dos spend their time selling Ad- McMillan supervises the work of
ventist‘books and magazines deal- the gospel literature salesmen, In
ing with the events ich are tak- addition to the officers of the
ing place in the world. Last year Mission, the controlling com-
these Colporteurs or Gospel Sales- mittee membership are Mr, E. J.
men throughout the world, solé Parchment, Mr. O. P. Reid, Mr.
over $12,456,770 worth of liter- Ww. H. Lewis, and Mr, C. M.
ature in 195 languages. Greenidge,







Itching, Burning and Smarting of

Stopped In A>
23 Minutes (* _”~

Since the discovery of Nixo@erm by
an American physician it is no longer
necessary for anyone to suffer from
ugly. 2isgusting and disfiguring skin
plemishes such as Eczemn, Pimples,
Rash, Ringworm, Psoriasia, Acne,
Blackheads, Scabies and Red Blotches,
Don’t let a bad siktin make you feel In-
ferior and cause you to lose your] the scientific treatment you have been
friends, Clear your skin this new scien- | needing to clear your skin—the treat-
tific way, and don’t let a bad skin make | ment to make you look more attractive,
people think you are diseased. “V4 cir Page | win stent. ge eae hae

sroug clearer, nea er 6

a A New Discovery thousands, such as Mr. R. K. who

Nixoderm ig an ointment, but differ- | writes; “I sulfered from terribly itch-~
ent from any ointment you have ever |ing, burning and smarting Kezema for-
seen or felt, It is a new discovery, and|12 years, Tried everything, At last I
is not greasy but feels almost like a|heara of Nixederm, It stopped the itch-
powder when you apply it. It penetrates | ing in 10 minutes. I could see my skin
rapidly into the pores and fights the | clearing up on the second day. All the
cause of surface akin blemishes, Nixo- | red disfiguring blotches and seaty skin
derm contains 9 ingredients which | disappeared in 10 days, My friends were
fight skin troubles in these 3 ways, 1, It | ama at the improvement in,my ap-
fights oon kills the pRIOEODeR OF Fee pearance,""
sites often responsible for skin disor-

) p ;| Satisfaction Guaranteed

ders. 2. It stops itching, burning 1 "Ra daeesituien coaeie chacintede ties hing
in 7 to 10 minutes, and ‘ ern opts abao i &
oe ontien the skin. 3. It helps 1 f unless it clears your skin to your com-
heal the skin clear, soft and velvety | Pete satisfaction, Get Nixoderm from
a - 2 Ee: chemist today. Look tn the mirror


























] y 1 Major Smith :
; WELLINGTON STREET: 11 a.m. Holi-
ness Meeting; 3 p.m, Company Meeting;

7 p.m, Salvation Meeting; Preacher: Sr.
Major Gibbs



PX. %
BEFORE

SUNDAY. APRIL Gan ise FOUR ROADS: 11 a.m.Holiness Meet-

. ing; 3 pan, Company Meeting; 7 p.m.
an Sisbhant ae Aniress, Th SS ecense Salvation Me¢tting; Preacher; Lieutenant
& Sermon, 3 p.m. Sunday School, 7 Gwnthorpe. 5
p.m. Evensong and Sermon. Vicar W LONG BAY: 11 a.m Holiness Meet-
D, Woode ing; 3 p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m.

MORAVIAN Salvation Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant
ROEBUCK STREET—11 a.m. Rev. B. Etienne
Crosby, 7 p.m. Mr. F. Barker. OISTIN: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3
GRACE HILL—1i! a.m. Mr. U. Reid. p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation
7 p.m. Mr. F. G. Downes. Meeting; Preacher: Lieutenant Gibbons.
FULNECK—il am. Mr. O, Weekes, CHECKER HAUL; 11 aan. Holiness
7 p.m. Mr, W. Deane. Meeting; 3 p.m, Company Meeting: 7
MONTGOMERY~—7 p.m, Mr. I. Oxley. p.m. Salvation Meeting: Preacher: Lieu-
SHOP HILL-—7 p.m, Mr. F. G. Smith. tenant Reid.
DUNSCOMBE--11 a.m. Mr. A. Alleyne CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Bridge-
METHODIST town, Upper Bay Street
JAMES STREET—11 a.m, Rey. F. Law- Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 pam.
rence, 7 p.m. Rev, J. §. Boulton. SUNDAY, April 15, 1951
PAYNES BAY: 9$.30 am. D. Scott, Subject of Lesson-Sermon: ARE SIN,
7 p.m. Mr. J. Layne. DISEASE AND DEATH REAL?
WHITE HALL: 9.30 a.m. Rev. R. Golden Text; Psalins 68: 20. He that is
MeCollougn (S.); 7 p.m. Mr. G, Barker. our God is the God of salvation; and

GILL MEMORIAL: 11 am, Mr, P, Unto God the Lord belong the istue’
Denne: 7 p.m. Mr, G. Harper from death

HOLETOWN:: 8.30 a.m. Rev. J. S. Boul-
ton, (S.); 7 p.m. Supply.
BANK HALL; 9.30 a.m. Miss G. Oxley LIFELIKE FOREARM
7 p.m. Rev. R. McCullough ‘ r 1. rearm
eGHTSTOWN: 11 am. Rev, J. s, A lifelike synthetic fo _o
Boulton; 7 p.m, Rev. F. Lawrence. with a simulated blood supply is
SELAH: 11 a.m, Mr. Bennett; 7 p.m. being used to teach U.S. medical
BETHESDA: il a.m, Mr. Blackman; 7 students how to give hypodermic
PORETHEL: 11 a.m. Rev. M. A. E, injections or how to withdraw

Thomas, 7 p.m. Rev. B. Crosby blood from the human body. The

AFTER



























smooth.

in the morning and you wiil be amazed
Works Fast at the improvement. Then just keep on
Because Nixoderm is seclentifically | using Nixoderm for one week and at
compounded to fight skin troubles, it | the end of that time it must have made
works faster than anything you have | your skin soft, clear, smooth and mag-
seen in your life before. lt stops the | netieally attractive—must give you the
itching, burning and smarting in a few | kind of skin that will make you admired
minutes, then starts to work immedi- | wherever you go, or you simply return
ately, clearing and healing your skin, |the empty package and your money
making it softer, whiter and velvety | will be refunded in full, Get Nixoderm
smooth. In just a day or two yeour | from your Cheinist toeay, 34 guaraa-

mirror will tell you that here at last is | tee protects you >







SEE US FOR:—

GALVANISED MESHED WIRE
CORRUGATED SHEETS

|
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RED CEDAR SHINGLES
OIL STOVES & OVENS



——_—+











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10 & 11, Reebuck Street and Magazine Lane



DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Rey. R. Mc. uchin” of the arm is + fiesh—col-
Thomas, 7 p.m. Mr. A. B. Curwen.
Crosby, 7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant latex tubes that duplicate the arm
VAUXHALL: 11 a.m. Mr. C. Jones
THE SALVATION ARMY U.S. scientists
Pourne, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting, C« elasticity at 212 degrees Fahren-
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL: 11

Cullough, 7 p.m. Mr. H. E. Giikes, . :

BELMONT: 9 a.m. Rev. M. A. E. oured plastic material, under
LTH ISTRICT: 9 sm. Rev, B, Which are a series of light 4nd dark
PROVIDENCE: 11 am. Mr. J. veins.

Clarke. 7 p.m. Rev. M. A. E,. Thomas.

7 p.m. Mr. C. Brathwaite f J .

BRANKER-—2.37 P.M SYNTHETIC RUBBER

have developed

CARLTON 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; . * i aaa

2 p.m. Company Meeting; Preacher: Capt a synthetic rubber that retains

¢ucted by Major A. E. Moffett (Divis- heit (100 degrees Celsius) above
ional Commander) m, Zero, and at 123 degrees Fahren-
Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Compary Meet- heit (50.5 degrees Celsius) be-|

ing: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting; Preacher: low.

SUNDAY ADVOCATI

-
ee

PAGE THIRTEEN









at ne “Sabeeeoenaneet - : ;
LECCE EE SECO LPL LLLP PEL PLLA PBPLPPLPLPPP PLLA PLL LLPLPLELLPLELLPLE LLLP AIEEE AED LT

IT WON’T BE LONG NOW

fo

before she's back at school again, meeting up with the inevitable colds
and coughs and other infections common to school life





But she wili be in no danger of contracting any of these ills if
she has been prepared during the holidays with a course o
FERROL, because FERROL is a wonderful resistance bwider,
a veritable tower of strength against infection.

if you are strong you will not fall a ready victim to
every germ thet is in the atmosphere around you.

That's why FERROL should be given to all school
children during the holideys, to prepare them for the
strenuous term ahead and help them ward off illnesses.

SOLS OOOO

Give your child a course of FERROL this
vacation and see the difference it makes.

FERROL



66644 :
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COCKTAIL BISCUITS, Tins
CHICKEN HADDIES Tins

UPFILLIT BISCUITS .. 'Tins
HAMS (Cooked) Ib MUTTON AND PEAS. Tins
FISH SUPREME Tins LAMB TONGUES .... Tins
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TIME FROM
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ror Your |
GALVANIZE SHEETS—6ft,, 7ft., 8ft. 9ft. 10 ft. |
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We Can Supply You with...
GALVANISED MESH WIRE-~in all sizes
EVERITE SHEETS—6it., 7ft., 8ft., 9ft., 10ft. ‘
ALUMINUM GUTTERING
RED CEDAR SHINGLES
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LACING WIRE—in all sizes
BARBED WiRE-—in all sizes

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we =o Try Us, before making your Purchase elsewhere

PLANTATIONS

e@
Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd.
LIMITED

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) {
No. 16, Swan Street -:- ‘Phone : 2109, 4406 or 3534 (






PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE









































FHE STONE IS BACK Housing Experts \F

ryt. 2?
lour Antigua
From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, April 14
Four experts have toured An-
tigua’s hurricane-stricken villages
this week with a view to advising
now best the £175,000 allocated
by the British Government can be
spent to replace as many as possi
ble of the 1,400 houses required
Personnel were D. W. Spruell
| Town-planning Officer, Jamaica

Ellery Foster of U,S. Housing
Authority; Lorenzo Munoz of the
Puerto Rico Planning Board, and

“ MONATION CHAIR
BEHIND ALTAR









SUNDAY, APRIL: 15, 1951
pa ee ey es.’
1
|
|
.

| Mr W. M. Woodhouse, Build-
ing Research Officer of C.. and
Ww. Mi Foster says that the
poor heusing problem is similar
lto that in other parts of. the
world, and they are agreed
that the hurricane destruction
provides Antigua with . an op-
pertunity to start log range real
improvement of permanent hous-
ng through introduction of “aided
f-nelp approach.”

re é
STONE DRAGGED THROUGH A
: DOOR IN SCREEN _

]





OF A HOMELESS
THREE!



Life can be fine after forty if you can keep your
energy, high spirits and a round digestion. Don’t
let the years get you down! If you think you
are. beginning to feel your age, start taking .
Phgllosan tablets to-day! If you take Phyltosan
tablets regularly, you will soon begin to find
that your nerves are steadier, your appetite
and digestion are improving, and your

energy and capacity for enjoyment
of life steadily increasing. .. ott

USED TO
DREAD
WORK

THE CORONATION STONE, stolen from the room shown above, on Christmas day 1950 was returned UNTIL***
to Loudon on Friday. It will be kept in a secret place for some time.
The stone was removed from the Coronation Chair hehind the High Altar in Westminster Abbey,

and the picture shows how the Altar Christmas: Tree hampered the thieves. Dotted line shows how. the
stone was dragged past it















































YES! It was in the dead of the night that the

cruel hands of FIRE snatched their only little home.

4 Can you imagine their plight ?... A LLOYD’S HOUSE-
OWNERS’ COMPREHENSIVE POLICY will protect

you against this and ALL the usual, risks: to which



Life can be fine after forty!

your home is exposed including that of Burglary. PH if LLOSAN |

fortifies the over-forties

He Lost the Pains inhis Aris

SCOUTS OFF TO CAMP B'dos Guide See

Seouts of the 84th Barbados Parades. Campfires, Good Turns Capt. Heads going to work, for rheumacic

(Good Shepherd) Group under Hikes. etc pains in his arms made it torture

their G.S.M., Mr. G. O. Mose, left On Sunday 22nd, there will be : T ’ ° to use them, Yet to-day he fees
ee , * ay < on Friday for camp at Oldbury a Central Service at James Strect 6 \\ “i: Guiders fitter than ever an hi :
AY 3 - als at Jd s § t - : is letter :

Woads, St. Philip, where they will Methodist Church beginning pleasure, as he tells in his

All in one low cost policy.




INVESTIGATE!



° : “ r @
be in camp until Tuesday 17th insti. 4.30 p.m, at which all Scouter VISITING ENGLA ND I had been suffering from
Scouts of the 36th Barbados nd scouts of all ranks are expect rheumattsm very badly and had

ge Write, Phone or Call

‘ . such pains in my arms I scarcely
eee. knew how to use them. Then -
was told to try Krusehen Salts,
and after using one bottle I

(Holy Trinity) Group, under act- ed to be present They will as
ing 5.M. Mr. Carol Lorde, also semble in the church yard at 3,1! Six West indian girl guiders)
left for camp at St. Mark’s Boys’ p.m. Colours will be carried brought nere by the British Coun-



Sch6ol on Friday this service, and there will be . Cl tor a three months stay, were f. So, of course, I have Ps P= _
included in their programme practice for Colour Bearers cn t~-O4y Setting down to enjoy the et it, am now thor- J.B. LESLIE & Co. LTD. ¢ INSURANCE
was-a Campfire which took place Saturday 2ist April at 2.59 a... “ething course outside London,| oyghly better and have never felt COLLINS BUILDING RIDGETOWN
Jast night and a Church Parade at James Street Church u.sauged in co-operauion with the| go fit for years. I used to feel ;
whieh takes place to-day. They Those Groups which find it im- Gril Guiaes Association miserable and siuggish, but now DIAL 3006 ADOS,. B.W.1
will break camp on Monday. possible to attend this Centr Miss Marjorie Pemberton, Guide| it is a pleasure to work instead
The D.C., Mr. C, D, Spencer and Service are asked to attend some Captain and Commissioner in| of a dread." —8.B.
the-G.S.M., Mr. W. C, O. Mar- other place of worship, prefer- %#!bades, heads the party as the The pains and stiffness of
shall, plan to visit the camp ibly at the same time as thar /Jshest in rank and oldest. Mrs.’ pheumatism are usually caused |?
Also in camp over the week- scheduled for the Central Service. “: 4: Douglas, a certificated teach-| py deposits of excess uric acid in
end. is a patrol of scouts of the On Monday 28rd, St. George's “ 2/0™M St. Kitts, is next in seni-| the muscles and joints. Kruschen

79th, Barbados (St, Patrick’s R.C.) Day, Scouters and Scouts of all °°: ‘ i stimulates the kidneys =F pupae
Group at their Headquarters, ranks will wear Uniform from The rest of the party are Miss | intestinal organs to ones r
Jéeniinott’s Lane. punrike 40 Gunect Jessica Smith, customs clerk} healthy action so that all the
We wish them all good Scout On Mor day night 93rd. there tom Port-of-Spain, Trinidad;| excess uric acid is expelled
ee Wi wan oe “4 aM _ 3 eg a Miss Rita Clarke, stenotypist in| through the natural channels,
7 Memorial for rodent ‘ahd a furniture store’in Trinidad; Misa) When SN ee eet wigaus
- 1 “— my 8 é S vhgy arlis 7 eors , too. Pres S pour
‘ANNUAL GENERAL friends of the group, and anothe ercas pimps Prin ree eon Are restored.
1 "¢ "Pht By . Sea itis sulana ¢ Miss Mé 3
MEETING ecktas 3 th i map annar ire. Arscott from Jamaica. If you are troubled witn rheu-
Th : 4 , ay RG 730 ore ig of these wi't All next week they will be| matism, give Kruse hen @ trial
e Annual General Meeting D¢sin at 7.30 o cloc going through a comprehensive| yourse!f You can get it from
of the Island Scout Council will.b ourse of inspecting packs and| ell Chomists apd Stores,

held at Scout Headquarters on Schooners Bring

Friday next, 20th April, begin-

Remember, a comfortable
fitting suit is our first con-
sideration. There are in-
creasing numbers who
recognise for themselves
the consistently superb cut,
fit and finish of the







companies and seeing how |
Brownies” are trained. On April








ningat 5.00 p.m ° 23 they return to London and | CRYPTOQUOTE No: 7

HE, the Governor, Sir Alfred Rice, Cabbages tart a long programme of sight- ZVLNFR © ZQOES SNW JNNR IDEAL TAILORING
se = C.M.G., Chief Scour, 5 seeing, There will be more visits XOROEJT NB wy ae
will preside. The schooner Franklyn D. R., to training courses and camps ib x a ‘

On Saturday 24th March, a &82-tons net, brought rice, wallaba various places with stays of sev- Last Crpyt: What dies but whee We will welcome the oP
patrol of Scouts of the 4th Bar- posts, charcoal, fibre, firewood and eral days in the more important had ite ¢ndism portunity of proving this to
bados (James Street) Group, moulding sand here yesterday 8uide centres | “apr your in our
hitch-hiked to St. Alban’s where from Demerara. The schooner i In the third week in May they

they camped over the Easter
week-end,

The boys carried out various
seout activities while in camp,
and thoroughly enjoyed them-
selves.

TABLE TENNIS

The Scouts Table Tennis
Tournament which opened = at
Scout Headquarters on Friday
night, 16th March, came to a suc-
cessful completion 0; Friday
night, 6th April,

Those who were present on this
cecasion saw some really fine per-
formances, especially in the Finals,
when in each division the con-
lestants displayed keen rivalry and
played careful nevertheless at-
tractive tennis.

In the Senior division, Scott
of Y.M.C.A, lost to Blackett, also
of Y.M.C.A. 23—21, 21—23, 16—
21, 21—15 and 18—2),

In the Junior division, N. Cecii
of James Street won from E
Inniss, also of James Street, who
beat Cecil in the first two games
21-—7 and 21—8; but Cecil seemed
to pull himself together, anc
came back to win the last three
games 2)—-11, 21--15 and 2)--16
and so emerged champion of the
Junior Division,

St. George's Week









skippered by G. I. Sealy.

Fresh fruit and cabbages were
brought to the island yesterday by
the Motor Vessel Moneka from
Dominica The Moneka carries a
erew of 13 Captain R. Hudson
mans this 100 tornage sc'\ooner

Our Peasauts

Not less than 125,000 out of a
total population of 192,841 are
concerned in peasant holdings in
3arbados, according to “Peasant
Agriculture in Barbados,”

The total number of all peasant
holdings under ten acres as defined
in the Barbados census 1946, was
30.752, comprising ar estimated
area of 17,283 acres.

Peasant holdings between | to 10
acres were 4,237, Peasant hola
ings # and 1 acre were 238,383.
Peasant’ hokiings under % acre
were 3,132.

Of the holdings of %& to 10 acres
7.963 ore estate renters and 19,657
“other” or “more or less free-hold
holdings.”





|

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay





will set off on a nine day trip to | 3. A. CORBIN & SONS.



Edinburgh, There they will ex~ | quam eeeeememaemm, ©
SSS;

plore more camps and see some of
the beauties of Scotland

Back in London once more, they (
will visit the Festival of Britain
and spend a day at Oxford. Next

A BAND
fordcOn-Aven where in the ‘bast CONCERT

ble surroundings for Shake- By kind permission of




: plays, they will see Col. Michelin
‘Richard” and “Henry V” i and under the direction of
They are being left plenty of Capt, Raison

time for visiting places and see-
ing things that interest them in-
dividually, and by the time they
leave London for the West indies
on June 15 or 16, there will not,
be much of importance that they |
will heve missed, |

—Reuter, |

will be held at
HASTINGS ROCKS
on April 18th at 8 p.m,
ENTRANCE $33 1/-
In aid of
G.F.S. Holiday Home



lll





EXCHANGE
The Americar Labour Educa- |
tion Service, a national v kers’ |
education group is strengthen
ing imternational understanding
through the exchange of worker
and students between the Unite
States and other countries

The Weather

The Committee and Mem-
bers of the
EVERTON CLUB
request your company
to their



=

Annual Dance

at QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE
on SATURDAY NIGHT,
28TH APRIL, 1951
Music by Mr. Percy Green's



Orchestra
SUBSCRIPTION 2/-




















































TAILORING DEPARTMENT

on the first floor of

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD.

10-13, Broad Street



HAND PAINTS

FOR ALL PURPOSES
“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT

in Cream, t:reen end. Whute.
For interior decoraticn of Walls,
Ceilings and Woodwork.
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White and Cream
HARD GLOSS TULIP GREEN
PAINT
HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT
For exterior or interior use,
“SPECIAL” HOUSE PAINTS
In Tropical White, Oak Brown,
Barbados Light and Dark Stone,












: ai f , %, oe
vor To-day , 4 Y 5 Grey and Dark Grey.
St. George’s Week will be cele M.V. Sedgefield, Schooner Gloria Het : rae) aa a gt -” - rey.
brated thioughout this island from rietta, Schooner Marea Henrietta, Yach: Sun Rises: 5.54 a.m Ba Somos ss 1 . Ly For exterior or interior use,
22nd-to 29th April with Church Caribbee, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner Sun Sets; 6.10 p.m, CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
oan ee P nN Barene a maboohey Erieling Foon Meon (Full) April 21 ) In Grey and Mid Green
4 é na 5.. Schooner on ul Z
Counsellor, MLV. th Radar, Schooner | Lighting: | 6.30 p.m. Y. M. P.C. an PAINT REMOVER
Harriet Whittaker, Schooner Turtle Doye igh Water; i _m, el : :
Traffic Don’t Schooner Cyril E. Smith, pcg yea hs Rain- P bidet sie' Nin A tit ‘ . Ss pa : ‘ For the easy removal of old paint.
bow M., MV. Willemstad, Schooner " poe ‘RTE ® :
ae ee Yesterday dif lee Rect We cake ith CITY GARAGE TRADING Co.. Lid. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD
. ARRIVALS : ais ora .
ecaiteds’ er: A Me or con. Cant ls ia enecial reference to Cricket on VICTORIA STREET AGENTS.
e Frances W. | Hassell, from Demerara 16. asa. WEDNRADAY ‘AONT dhik Nr maw ( ,
Do not forget to stop your Oil. tanker Rufina for St. Lucia Tt ar pone to Yester- at 8.30 p.m
2 Z akes eeenreeeerennee ay: ins, ;
engine and apply your brakes RATES OF EXCHANGE At the Y.M.P.C, Beckles Road

when quitting your vehicle

4 Temperature (Min.) 74.0°F
APUANADA Wind Direction (9 ; a.m.) | A}! sportsmen interested are
© 629/10°, pr, Cheques on E.N.E, (11 a.m.) E.NE
Space made available by Bonkers: 61% pr

Wind Velocity 9 miles per

===") 7 Can See... || SPECIALISTS

,








Demand HT
} Drafts 60,85". pr hour. eitihaates Si :
A Soin waa Sight Drafts 60°7/10% pe Barometer (9 a.m.) 30,017 OPP x
‘ . v2 p/ioes pr: Cable 385/107 pe (11 am.) 30,004 tee 1 It’s so easy %
20 : 68 8/10% pr al it
Silver $a ‘J T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH x





















IN

to see those



Repivered U 5 Potent Ofer

The

| SAXOPHONE REEDS




‘Ml Do It Every Time

By Jimmy I Hatlo



GOOD SECOND HAND

BRIDGE HAS LONG BEEN COMPLETED~ Deer ats

I PROMISED A LOWER TAX RATE+»
IT HAS BEEN ACCOMPLISHED -~
I PROMISED AN ADDITION TO
THE SCHOOL» THAT AND ALL
MY PROMISES HAVE BEEN
| FAITHFULLY FULFILLED=:

CHRISTMASES AGo,
AND I’M STILL
WAITING »*s

MUD CREEK BRIDGE:::

———"

a omcare's 7 wae Z E b Alto, B b Tenor, extra fine
é - LAS HE C Melody |
es neat 7 UNCLE WILLY* PROMISED THE FERRY- |} | fj = CLARINET REEDS points in a
T PROMI se vobeanar ~~ SEE“HE PROMISED 4 goaT INTERESTS THAT | | 9) B b, E b.
A BRIDGE OVER MU Ek. ME A BIKE TWO HE'D TEAR DOW! THE |g well tgitor-
|
|

ed suit that






HE SWORE TO
EMMA HE’O BE

( | |@! JOHNSON’s STATIONERY
HOME EARLY »+-BUT
/

and HARDWARE |

you should







WELL, DON'T
HOLD YOUR BREATH
TILL YOU GET IT,
ELMO-YOU CAN'T vere! \
HE PROMISED MY SISTER jj\
A LOT OF THINGS
BEFORE THEY WERE

TAILORING

ONCE HE STARTS
TALKING, THATS
ANOTHER PROMISE
Tos




always










ane

contact the

Just Received

—
FRESH STOCK tn Top. Scorers

OF ALL KINDS

MARRIED +++ AND OF.... in Tailoring
ALL SHE GOT
WAS HIM*s DOBIE’S to be on the @



PEGI POD OOOO COO OG

FOUR SQUARE SMART
YELLOW & PURPLE ‘ C B RIC
eOmkeEs side. e e KE &: Co.
202 & 462 Tins 9 ;



oe
ISS

Or
BOLTON LANE

DIP e
ao

|
OE esis oak
C. CARLTON BROWNE

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd

Prince Wm. Henry Street
PNR

Wholesale & Retail Druggist

A.W. KAURPMAN , {
136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
{

CORUNNA, MICH,






eeerweennemnteneee: po gn

Dod PPP tl rb ble

CIDA

DROS Dr
BFR





Oey IS





Po
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PAGE 1

PAfiF. Mil i: M\I.\Y ADVOCATE M NDAT, APRIL i What do you know about ENO? DO YOU KNOW dm ENO is cooling and icfiething, an uarivillcJ health drink tot ; and old? 00 YOU KNOW dm UNO has a gentk laxatireacdea •nd in perfect corrective for ttOBMCfa •nd liver disorders? SoM t bollli, for laitmg/,.,),... Eno's Fruit Salt' r*. %  %  + -Bm-md •'From 5M" n S'''''*'''''''"*^''*'*'''^**'V-^0^*^',-,^^V,*,*,V,*,^V*V^^'***'*V/%'*V .#£# %  WORRELL WAS QUOTED IN AUSTRALIAN POUNDS 1951 Football Season Oftened Yesterday itv o. s. corns A UTHAHITA1IVE 'out,.* informed me th* r(* that ftank Worrell did ask the WMI Indies Cricket Board of Control for approximately £1.400 :.s ra daimod I'V Jack Flnslctrm. IIBHV l>Us*trs. Australian C Of TMp ond—H mi'l former At-%  ,..*.' Irnlliin Ta*i pUyel '-• % %  l*^ However this does not make Worrell's story kkH l950 tour I EnRlnikl. The solution to the problem is that Jark Fmnleton. [or reasons known to himself has quoted Worrell's lequesl in Australian pounds. The story now U that West Indies all rounder! Everton WeHtr* and Clyde WaU-ott have aiftned for £975 (English pounds) whilWorrell has asked for the same £1.075 that he received for the English tour. -if, ^ 1100 1-KSS T ill! West Indies Cricket Hoard of Control hav..asked tin sionals whom they consider Hey profession.!Is to accept Clim leas than they did for the lt>5" Engl^h 'enn since, they point out. its Australian tour is roughly sixteen matches while the English tour w,*'s thirty .three matches. Hoy Marshall, and there is no secret now that he Is in the team. las well aa Weekes and Walcotl. has :i-c?p|ed ; %  little less since he hus I not been considered from the level of Wit-ke*. Walcott. Worrell anil Ramadhin. Worrell's conditions have been communicated to the Australian I Cricket Board of Control, who consider that he should net be paid more than the top professionals and further state that if he cannot %  come to an agreement with the Board, that they will accept a teim (without Worrell as representative. In the firs* place I must repeat that I see no reason why the West Indies Cricket Board of Control should have treated with the professionals individually, nor why they should quibble over the expen. diture of an extra £ 100 when they are quite prepared to squander it over paying the expenses of the President going to witness an International tour and then grant him an honorarium for going or some 1 other equally nonsensical excuse. 1 can hardly disagree with Worrell for having asked in the first place for similar terms to thoae that obtained with regard to the If i tour. On the other hand I cannot imagine his turning the tour dow.i because he has not been granted this extra f.100. SENSATIONALISTS %  Mr*** In any case, people like Jack Finglelon and the other sensationalists can do neither cricket nor Journalism any good by writing what I must be regarded as half truths. If an Australian pound is 16 in English money then why nol i convert n '00 to English pounds, if the article must appeal |n u i English paper. As far as Ramadhin is concerned, he. I understand has asked | for "as much as the others". This is vague and has also to be iro.Ved One hopes that these differences will be smoothed out as soon the best interests of West Indies cricket so that (he nounced. W.I. MANAGER The rumour is too persistent to be ignored thai Cyril Merry, a member of the West Indies team to England in 1933. a former Trinidad captain in the Triannular Intercolonial series and Secretarv of Queens Park Cricket Club of Trinidad, will be the Manager of the West Indies team to tour Australia later this year I can get no official confirmation here but when I was in Jamaica I knew that as soon as Tom Peirce had signified Ml inability to make the trip If selected, that thtwo leading candidates for that position were Cyril Merry and Frankie Ue Cuiies of British Guiana, the latter a member of the 11430-31 West Indies team to Australia and a member of the British Guiana Intercolonial team. uments ..rior to the outbreak of the last Carlton Defeats \olre Dame 3 —/ AT FCOT&AIL \t. Union Victor I,informn Of Notre DunnSports THE OFF SEASON Too Many Horses — Peculiar Classification — Racing In Jamaica M. Linton running kj the Senior Division was the Champion Atlib I I 're Dame %  ... %  . nd. bariilaj I (AHI.TON sswansd %  I I M. f Notre Danw. newt-oiners to fnt division fa •he 1051 %  Kinviiiglon .<~t'>rdav afternoon The an .., ftff tn# 100 yards dash in r.ne style bn Notre Dame drew first blood (>,• ij.pc srme yards lefone J. sftthln 15 minutes of play, while Garvcy who had a better Jump who lined up with l\v > l!lan n ,. ,,ne %  rs, Herbert Bright an fj, the 220 yards he came In Rngh-hinan and Wilfred McLood %  MOM) to H R ob sll to tl who hid who was a member of the Grenbeen leading in the better part J>" quite .ida football iMim which lours--! of thracenlly, equalized shortlv n late start IY BOOKIE A LTHOUGH LiM Union Park meeting finished up on April ?tn and tnere will be a Creole, meeting at ATimJI next n.oiitn. as well as the usual h-d i: DO uoubi tnji this is the ofl season Of racing in the South Caribbean. Some years ago ncn there was no racing In H li. and no Creole May meeting it was definitely the onl] IJM honws had any sort of enforced rest period before the Trimnaa June meeting opened, and ber who were overworked it was a welcome break %  tttog oft to Nowadays it is only those who.arc in the imported classes who the 440 yards generally get the break and cVtn Ihty toot the posMbility of being nterval Uie Union tried to make a bid lor it to BO first place but hi* efforts tnly got AT this time of Uu >< ui It mi i afterwards and .it the I wore was I—|. nrst place but his efforts tnly got AT this time of the pen II aau also customary for racing j. But then one cannot offensive and their outside left P rl prcsenhjl ""; P nxc lo please everybody. Freddie Dan'el trie; „ g,„„( ilUV the boys. Before doing Jo ne OOK1NG around therefore for something to write about I find and went remarked upon the keenness that ^ J which struck the upright i %  ml of play Carlton then made one or two "ood attempts to score but the Notre Dame defence would not be overcome. Well Placed Shot Notre Dame soon afterwards "fiened their account'when Freddie Daniel on the left wing bent King with a well placed shot Carlton now fought for the equalizer and almost found them selves two down when Daniel on the left wing again got possession bat this time he kicked over From a corner kick bv Freddie Hutchlnson from the right side. Clairmonte bent goalkc kinson with a hard shot to give Carlton the equalizer. Notre Dame then carried the ball well in their opponents' area and were given a penally as the result of foul play I the Carlton defence. Skip|x-r Dante) took the shot and sent it straight to goalkeeper King, who had no difficulty In saving. Notre Dame's goal had a narrow shave when Carlton launchc! an attack and Freddie Hui sent across a good effort from the right wing, the ball just missing the upright The interval was tiikcn with the score 1 l. On resumption. Notre Dame were first on the offensive and Charlie Daniel at inside right senl m a good one which King saved King again came Into the plet •TSM siv-wn by the boys und girls fej the races. The events were at follows %  — — — ri.i. IS III Sn4 C *obej; 3rfl N in. Vd. -IT... I lots of little things and perhaps it would not be a bad idea to mention 1hem as ihey run around UM brain First there is this rumour that we may have M horses entered for our next August meeUng. Furthermore that we shall have to stage a four day meeting to accommodate them. Now let us be reasonable. The highest we have had was 63 und this was only last month. It is quite true lhat there are 24 two-yearolds to be added. But it is most unUkoty that all of them will start while some older horses who have been mainstays for some years now have lately retired. I cannot therefore sec where we are going to raise this extra thirty from. 1 have counted 84 on the present classification list, and. as everybody knows, it is extremely unlikely that all eligible starters ever enter for one meeting. Nevertheless. I will agree that we mi*ht expect 75 to take entry In that case it seems yet another opportune moment for me to start talking about a new track. I doubt very much if having four days will relieve the congestion in each race unless there are separate races framed for C and C2. and again for F and Ft It might even II r.rr*nldar ll-i < % %  'It.... "nl-Mi l.t T. Dotlin: 2nd 9. Own. 3rd M. HI Y4i.—inifb it— MI \*\ r NifMinaalv mid U Collin. 3rd I. Brnoe -..' (:. %  Ind R. Moynaid. MM Id*—rOsm) I.I S OBSSBSM l>wt T Dotlin: Jrd B. Readwin Keeps Tennis Crown iFroin Our 0r Correspondent i < t mi. MR in the Intercolonial to world war. ^t Tip nt Snunil Ailrirv WhatcMt their nine Ix^t piayon who ordinarily WOUM have la-en debarred from competuig in Us! DSHOCtd Ud TfcM I Divisions if they v\cre tunipetnig in the First Division. If they cannot see their way to do this they will have to with( draw all three teams. NKGOTIATIONS Negotiations are in progress for the staging of tennis games under the auspices of the Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis Asso. elation at %  'Enniore". It will be remembered that during the lifetime of the late Sir Harold Austin they were four excellent tennis courts there. If these negotiations are successful it would appear that this would be the heaven sent answer U> the prayer for the staging of Association Tennis. The grounds are enclosed, and will not lake u fortune lo be put in order again and ample accommodation can be found for players and publie alike. Sport fans are -waiting with Interest the outcome of these talks and hope that it materialises into something that will make lawn lennis nn established sport in Uarbados, L whiitM*r ; and T. curkr and be found necessary to divide the two-vear-oicts into two lots if thev number more than 16. But the trouble here seems lo lie in the fact lhat those tn C and C2 are not equally divided and the majorltv are in the latter class. This also appears to be the case in F and FJ. Howthen are we going to strike the happy medium ? It is a question which I do not propose to answer here. The day has come when we must leave the Garrison. Yet. there we stay while the numbers mount, the sweepstake grows larger and the cost of land spirals upwards. It does not make sense to me. L OOKING at the classification list also makes me pause to remark on tho latest promotions. Why. for instance, should Best Wishes be moved from D to C2 for winning a classic? A race fur which there Is no winning penalty attached. When the local classifiers moved her from E to D for winning twice at Christmas. I cotild see nothing wrong with this. Especially as Cross Ro.ds was moved to D2. After the Guineas and the rest of the D el rstoed to me that all that was proved was how coirr-ct the local classifiers GEORGETOWN. April 10 ere But ,h £ ,atP,, method of reasoning must be that once a horse Edgar Readwin B.G No 1 P** P rove d the classifiers correct in a particular class then its time T ..nnis player, came back after ho B ' oul of %  whether he just holds his own or wing freelv. of a^ !" ^'"B l *o down, to clinch victory BeBl Wlshes promotion also compares untavoui ibly with that of from Ivan Phillips in the B.G.C C J horse like No-to-nite, who won two handicaps but was onlv moved hen he kicked nwa'v what ViaAerf f* n ,0 r >"'ent on Sunday tTO "! C2 lo c proper, and Fair Sally, who won with top weight and has a certainty from Skini-ci Dinlel ""crnoon The score was 4—6 not been moved nt all. I do not disagree with No-to-nite's promotion Carlton in a good foi'w-ird 2 -•• •—'• •—1. •—<>• for one moment. But why the benefit of the doubt is given to the two movement atlacked their onpon^w importers and not to the creole Is that part which completely baffles me ents' goal and their ''keeper'' .. match which lasted a litNan Tudor Is another one who has not been given the benei'.t A Wilkinson missed "a header' 1 from \ ovcr lwo hours was witnessed any doubts which existed after she wdn once vith very light weight an i McLeod to give Carlton their secy a lflr e r *wd. then ran badly due to the stale of the gouv Onlv recently she wir. Ottd KSM] Readwin repeated his B.W.I, moved from C2 to B2 for wlAnhtl two handicaps in Trinidad and' Kennv Centres ihampionshlp win, at Bourda while I could see nothing very wrong in thir. why fhotild she not be Carlton glmnsl got their third ^ er T *'* lUlads I; "' McDonald in left In B2 until she has an opportunity to prove how good we reallv goal when Kennv Hutchlnson '' Z tmv ^ amvnt "..^ fou n ' 'hink she Is. Pew people have a higher opinion of Nan than I d. on himself in the same position after Yet placing myself in the position of a classifier I would bfoittn lCsrill| the first two sets. On the to admit that quite a lot of my estimate was mere conjecture There l.rcvious afternoon he eonvincare so very few hard facts to g) by. ngly beat Frank Dray ton in one \X7HICK brings me to a very touchy problem, although it is one. B— 4 "~ 5 ~ which npplys mere to Trinidad lhan lo anywhere else Somo day It Is inevitable that the chickens will come home to roost. : . Ivan Phiniirt went flbssrh Hahtwou "' ,l 1 "** aurprisej to find dial they ore already on the w I long after th.s that .'""^S a sSsffi^SoJ hom ut """ lon *•"*" ,| 1 !•• claaslnen Unagsa* th -.t ownaai aced down the Held and centred but the inside forwards fumbled. i>sme missed-a good opportunity to score when Green.dge centred Irom the right wing and Freddie Daniel headed over the biir. hour and 32 minutes. 3—0, 6—4. Carlton Uuncttcd another altaek. JT Reynold llutchinson the OUttid* [,,,„ hit centred and the "keeper" missed to give Carlton their third goal Had he he did i nd driven (b lines, he might h ii. I i the first two wn the side won the advance to the nets. with tafl men as th.,r | %  was forced to leave the lleM 2S?5 iI n eW K T h Dn m es, %  %  '" him easily down the lines spite of their btftftce* itOI t.-ied wh( n u dW Bct a chtm< ,. „„,, the (.ill i. II h:s racquet, he drove on the forehand volley stiaight UM DSSB Be dni it on no fewer than 14 times In the lasl to decrease this lead and had th ball in their opponents* aj| the referee %  warded them a free" kick for foul play by the Carlto-i full back Bright, llarker and trainers were going M put no with this business of rapid promotic 01 Creoles. Sensational no doubt to have it Hashed across the p the press, or broadcast over the radio, that "the mighty Llgan, brother <".f the mighty Jels-im. had skyrocketed from E to B class when only three years old." More so still to read that "Ocean Pearl had accom-' plished even more than the wonder I" 11 v nlnnnMW These are hot two of many exaggerated promotions since the fod started back in 1948. 'It has gone on steadily until it has reached the stage Wo. K !" mx".\iz .K. .? !" pa ,!. si^t xcr rr " l a m T y v nda L'r r " .%  ..., put. Were it not for a printed rule which says: 'no horse con be promote'! who was a non-winner al the list meeting at which he raced prior |p reclassillcation I have no doubt crcoU WouM have been sent u|> just for "looking pretty." But owners and trainers -ire not (boh and RakCi arc not all al one level. We shall reach the stage when nobody, not even match. Instead, from the third Notre Dame were new playlr .,. unkri m „ r ,.„ ( M h started l..k !!„• k Ik tal wnl (he ball oul'"" t''"\\" -''"<;'•"" ,""'"' '"••,"'"' Journalist., will be able to say ith IlK llllllttM dMTM at nrSEu) iiX-ri UU MiK UUI "Till II1C U.lll OUl ,.,,. ,., ., llUOI 111' I hltKI ilfinshll ,.->..x.1. —^ Ik. I^M k..^. -.f _^^. ~^ %  >_._ WSV-^i ...:•! -.11 t-*. J_i:i side quo ended shortly aftei wards with Carlton winnci^ l.y three goals to one. The Mini Were an follow rirli*n: Knia. HiUlii. Kvmiedr Mar%  hall. F Hutehmton. C„x K Hui." t. ClalrmMit-. Mel..-1. l.uca<. R. lliilthinods he allowed the ehampionshli crown to slip from his grasp. S-i.lli.ml Beat Englund At Soccer HIS und nn tk, on we-:us I.XSPEVTIO.X TIME XII It \oi in ii on it i v*. 11 MI; SEE FS ionirtuch are the best horses of any age group. They will all be deliberately under-trained or carefully ridden. In the past 1 have defended i wners who were accused of racing their iyi"es carefully and otlni i who II was said were hiding their horses. TtuH was long before there was the necessity to do so. But unleeg • me curb Is placed op this silly promotion idea, any owner who races h:s horses at their beat all the time will be racing In a fool's pered ii e That, sirs. Is what will become of your fine classification policv. Neither you nor the owner will suffer. But the public:: Well 'wonder whenthey come in? A NOTHER item which I noticed in the Trinidad press recentlv causes me to ponder the question of Jamaican champions comtnu*to this side of the Caribbean. The latest Is Mark Twain Winner or Scotland beat England by three the Jamaica Guineas and Derbv and conqueror of Footmark on sevgoals to two in iheir annual geecral occasions, he has come to us with a reputntion second only t Challenging for the Davis Cup cer international here today, tt that of the Brown Bomber. I understand he will be racing at tho tennis ebajuplonehlp, Japin is wrest the championship from June meeting and. like the rivalry there was between Blue Streak and scheduled to play a preliminary England. Raphael, It is to be expected thai himself and Footmark will renew round with the United States In England for most of the %  game their struggle for supremacy. 1951. It will be the llrst lennis played only 10 men. the inside This ut all very well for the publie here. But what about Jamaica 1 competition between the two counrigid Wilf Mannion being carrie J< This makes the ninth Jamalcr. champion which has come to the Soutn tries since 1921. when an American off and taken to hospital with Caribbean in the lost live years and at Uu rate 1 cannot see how teem defeated Japan bv %  score of fractured cheekbone in the thirJamaican racing is going to flourish if thor best horses continue this .1 to 0 in the final mind of that teenth minute. migration Yet the root cause of all th s is the fact that something .* year's Davis Cup championship. — Renter *rn* with racing in Jamaica and until this is remedied wc will connrowne. OfMtilds lion Id C. Dank %  1. Barkrr. A.rhr By VERNON MORGAN WEMBLEY. STADIUM. April 14. DAVIS CUP CHALLENGE tlnue lo benefit from iheirlowii. DUNLOPILLO BUS SEATS I.IONIDE I.EATIIEIlFTTF CARPET MATERIAL RUBBER MATS REAR VIEW MIRRORS 6 & 12 Voll BUZZERS ROOF LAMP BULBS 4 SOCKETS ELECTRIC WIRE 4 FLEX BATTEHY CABLES ACCESSORY SWITCHES Flat GALVANISED SHEETS Hatd C.lo. WH1TF PAINT for interior r.REY PAINT (or Flooring SICNAL RED for Bo ColfaU'a corrvetly. The UM DJOU effe

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SUNDAY. APRIL 13. 1131 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE MM GWENDOLYNISMS THE HOSTESS AT 2301 FOXHALL ROAD ADDS A NEW I WORD TO THE LANGUAGE—AND MAKES A NAME BY Paid IlolidiitOn U.K. Farms \l The Ciiirmii MORES THE PITY MIXING THE UNMIXABLES LONDON itrj of Agrtcollure ami Fisheries is advcrt-Wing lo r 110.000 volunteers to Ukc paid %  Ab< nt : -iiy part* or the country will be open to real Ml rate* Farme'S .1 p] the \uluniccn for (wiping with the harvest >I in,, campi will remain BY G. B. /tank Tellers Steal Money HONG KONb Thirteen tellers MI |1V %  Bruct f the Peoples' Hank of China have b*tn behaving adventures*. Miss Anderson, whose ; acting I5 always of the in tray* a scheming widow, who %  eeend beat in Hat battle daugbui and scissors — one oi tba oranaaali moments of the lllni Though the llll FURIES eenn| %  Uld to lag. and I the aetlni is definitely good, the continued humhne, avarice anil uncontrolled emottonl c i it-theme Dttll ..ftr GIRL OF THE YEAR The Empire IN showing .i colour, two midweek f u l. li r -nt and frothy s^tm-rnusieal, evening showy GIRL OF THE VKAR starrine IVv I i-*-il'I-irk < link THE address Is 2301, Foxhall Road. Washington. rambling. wbit**br1ck mansion listed In the cltv direct* n 'lie residence of Mr. and Mrs, Morris Cafrlt7 To Washington's social elite, it is much mor: It is The Place, the most dc house In Washington to be invited to. Il is the scene of the capital's most lavish parties where sooner or later you meet everybody who Is anybody in Washington 11 Is also the Washington end of a transatlantic tug-of-war between two remarkable women, Mrs Perle Mesta. unchallenged social leader of Washington until President Truman sent her as Bib to Luxembourgh. and Mrs. Gwen Cafrit/, it-yi old trtft of a multi-millionaire builder, who. in Mrs. Mesta's absence, is bidding hard for her crown Number 2301 Foxhall Road Is the sort of, house nnimight expect In Hollywood It ha* everything Tin re is ,i private night-club with curved bar. built-in SCUMS, .ind a da** dance-door lighted fri-m There are terraces looking out over the < r %  i | hoi summer night. There are colourful gardens, a private pool, a charcoal grill for open-air barbecues, a complete gymnasium, a heie living-room with murals of Egyptian maidens and decorated in Swedish modern ifyle One whole wall is of solid glass opening out 0CI '.ii the patio. There is a private cinema and like It," atkt egye. He*" OM tmbttton I television room. And above all is to be elected a director of I the oval dining-room (chflmWashington's National A r t Ipegne-ooloured Swedish modern) Gallery. At 2301. Foxhall R< %  which is the scene of the renownshe %  %  i. tier, two maids |cd Cafrit* dinners a chauffeur and a eook. Kxtr.i But the biggest attraction of all help is brought In for her large Gwen Cafritz herself. Petite parties dark-haired and attractive, she tl Washington mwrtari have an 'everywhere at once at one (i v T ma COVOTUU Ihe actlvC'e? fy !" %  **-— — %  n:aoe up out oi uieir iiicgai aim, w.itn." 11...1 „, 8th ," irr part.es." a„ a guest saido. Gwen CalrlU If nothing W.ishington dinners. thus removu.,s1. M ST*"? g"" 0 ?., %  ?* % %  %  * %  %  Ulente to highbrow art, w.th_ 'like a butterfly latched." Her "interesting" hj-.s ha e 'ened there Missing guest Finally, they were caught out J ,0 J' w "„ B ',V', ?,"' ca >""' 1 ' ' %  > %  through pleasure, and the secret .ire always new Gw.-nd.-lynisms' In the j Cafrltl mU\ fpeciallj checked package* of *,' „.'"*ST. A '! uj T^ museum one day, he f the success of her dinner pa 1 1.. .|u.>te put it tug-uf-w:n. the abaeni Madam .,.,,-,. % %  and now an la gaol E" .,,,1 w „ ,' ,f n;,a inaymore. woo, n 1, Is In mixing Washington's un"Gwen has n way of saying Minister la still one 1 ee uhea.l .,,,,, „ ( ,, : :; ,,-orrup. J3_ ^Z^JE^SmJSE+uTVSi %  •*•. ""> ll,t %  *•* %  vnxables and silting back t things that make you think your It is .. matter nf regret to Mis „„ n m !nnor (il ^T mnsilv th. m'***'. uul %  %  puserve the results. ears are picking up stttUc." CaBrlti thai aha hai no) yet been T | K Uilllk ca |ied a meetinet of u,,*' mosuy m. tr ^ n ^ries Some examples "I Ui'.ik gt BbM to ...IMas ba naatt Of hoav Communist authorities and Its cu. *" M 7 Huslon ,4-v. hc wirw-ioul of %  >' adventu.e.. he de. ides that t lr MUiSri S Thf ILL—ISenator. Mrs. Cafrilj Is bMIM lnk< lakm into ,u rviw In |)|,,, rdlll(1 hl> ,S.klm ion, ho CommateUl Art It Iwintkl rtumn a SUM SSSr with. ^ h" """• '' "' """"'' "'"" '" t hr, ak """.' "T m "" 1 1 h ' %  luhler to hu 'own % % %  . I f-.ri>-ninc-yoar-old IIorr11 oppoHunlfr >,aha Mm S !" *". whe ".^ M t, c ?' !" . J w ',".!;; onrratr.in,,! ami ruthlM.patwni <" %  Cu mwU ia. H Potty PatriitK BEFORE REVIEWINt; tinplot! nvn thia weekend. I am KOIHK to mi'iuuni %  film which I sw dttrtnfl the week, but which, (or %  OHM unknown reason, was not booked for the weekend, and was 'I v two daya at the Globe Theatre. 1 am speakm,: '.f QUARTET, which presonts lour short itorlfl l>> U' SomcnMl .Maugham, with an Introduction bj the author Ttio Mtorios cho.cn are "flic be tlic ontv otc who t,i„ throufhout iv-tober ana raeta of Lire".-Alien f..m.-. The bridle on An ar•n.ber when helpers IU be Kile." and "The Colonel'. Ladi few .leniandl am nl y neede, wttk .he ootal.i | eh one Is complane in nselr and ma* _. "''lectsa different facet of FIIBII.II the ' I ry and office workis the moat moving, while The vho find a vacation on a fnrm colonel's Lady" is ironically worth v. %  lamusing. They are exeellenil* -: ft nthe iruiiistry recruited produced, interesting and • than 118.000 volunteers. and the acting, without .\.. y. -INS superior. The ktouakaj bark ground, played by the Philhar menia Orchestra is dehghtt there is a brilliant solo ;ttM tt.uid famou pianist F.'lecii Joyce. The whole nim is unusual ar rabto, and (or the Ufa ol me, i .jfinut undaatitaod why an lertainmant of this calibre should 1" relegated 1 j.uttlnaea and Ta Kiini Po In fuel they have .^id. It should be possible to been playing Tast and loose with prese nt .1 picture of this slandaid u,e mono " %  COnfUl to soinetiine fakf Itoriaa of sliglil sin piu-e s whlea lhaf abaanaatv made up out of their Illegal gains, ty t;ui and Robei*. Cummlnga ai thp artist responsible for this llll clous reatlon. The film is ., pleasant mixture of CORM raaasinca, glamour and cheesecake Witt |lenl> ..I the I.ilier. WlielhCi %  FW ty, the aroat, I nni not prapan say. but il la entertaining. When his nuni.il ivtty I in 1 w rejected etnnruefri.il ;u' (' %  %  1 easy ,ne, to .1 aaatdator) lamafc lat who thinkha sh..uhi devote his Supreme Court judge things to be .interesting," Cafritz is the power behind hi? lie savs. 'perfectly straighl-faced wife's social throne. He started Laving u six-inch-long cigarette out as a small builder (built 'he Wilder first bowling alleys in Washing I Mrs. Cafritz s father—she wa? ton) and went on from there-to n Hungary—was a noted establish a vast empire In real mmunologist, Dr. Laszlo Detrc estate. His fortune today is I Surany. With him she travellestimated at more than 25 million ] all over Europe as a child dollars. Few Washingtonian* |hespeaks four foreign languages could afford to pick up the bill at Magyar, Italian. French and one of his wife's larger affair* cinish—and is a Latin scholar when pete de foie gras at 20 She reads whenever she can dollars a plate is served and a f-"stuff on politics, economics and battery ol ten waltOS at 18 dplrt, anything and everything." lars a waiter are called in. She likes squnre-dnncir. nrt But I give few of these larfja aihiliitifins. and sleeping until 10 affairs," said Mrs. Cofrtz. "I when she can. She usually prefer a little dinne-. Just 20 or [inches at a famous hotel's cock22 guests. I like lo have an Hi lounge known in Washington Ambassador or a Supremo Coun Hie Snake Pit. At four ah< justice} one Republican, ont" <"*ri'-* ihe youngw. of her Democrat and one .Per-fnn In the tons. Conrad, aged 12, home Limelight, introduce u subject school (Calvin, aged 19. i> and let 'em light It out." bi college, 14-year-old Carter at Cocktails are served at 8 Ry unior high BChool). The boys 8 20 everyone is at table, for the re B trust fund in which each soup and sherry. Then IN< I .111 equity of 53,500 dollars. the fish, with %  white wine, meal Mrs. Cafritz (pronounced or game with a ruse champagne ayfntz) has no political ambl and after dessert a pile with the "I don't think Moms would salad. Coffee is taKcn—llritish won LI ItetunenH year. ..inlicjuidaled last 01 11 1 mi IH 1 EN in t no HIPS -*HIS week you have to llnd your way M U L E R R Y to .DAMOCLES phat is to say, hawe to arBraiige the 50 >;ords In the that Ml % %  : rry the %  rsl and Damo <]' %  the last, and |he relationship itwaan a n > word and the one (next to it is govicd by one of six rules. In case you e troubh |with the 45th and 46ih wonls, ihe the preceding word in -n saying" Jir of them constitute a collometaphor, or asaoclattafl of w 1 and the Cataaaal 'f the iliin is a breexea through the part with violent tight to the llnish. when obvloind> keen cn)e>ment ami she. to prevent ner lather from cops his performance in a moat Tiurying an adventuress, and t' amusing siene where he geta ell retain the ranch heisclf. enlists mixed up with a quick change the help of a man who hai bgatl lltlal and succeeds In oomplaiau Iheir enemy for ye.us but wlioi ahe loves Walter Huston's choracterlza Uon of Jeffords Is ma ami l* niinates the entue Aim bv in' tininiillnl patfrfm. vehem enre and treachery, and yet, at 1-ancheatcr and the same Ume, he portrays a deep are -pkndid. undevlving affection and admira ter's poctiayal of tion for his daughter In thi lat fesstir w ter role. Barbara Stanwyck .un'. domineering, with gumming up the whole act. Joan Catdnelara figure is one thai %  hoUld please even Ihe inoal discriminating ami hat Miiifing and dancing are attractive In the two principal suppoilmk %  M.iviilt Coopi %  1 Mr I .0.. he %  .1 college piong-ovei. while .ccoiiti'. on the in ilnell J ...nsuming passion for power The 11.u1U.al numban sparkle Her interpretation is dramati. and the twelve Petty Calendar and sure, in what tit probably one On l | ensure a full 0* her best role* Playing oppohouse All 111 all, C.llll. OF THF atte her is Wendell Potey is the YEAR saucy entertainment and banker-gamhler. who appears tu you WTOB.1 BtM ii toe hard U) take Rupert and the Ice-floiver—6 isoticc* th.t then i<* no longti • %  • iei paHsitm on ilx gUsi but th -Ulm RHHI ie gl no 't Then be gm a btighi daa and, running lo th* lumber '•aow, h. xirthi %  round until IK ota : 10 M'. H. .. h* co... -IMurnmy doti rha I W r *hlJi he i*kr I MV, DiddV ..I 4 lumbl* and WJIH ITM to go befiusc my boon slip on n. D"TOJ thinll (he'd mind Kd this md VI on h r Ihcn iMe-i fall again." faulallaaB for "inadequate rations." No comment! Kules 1. The word may be an anafgram of Ihe word that precedes 111. 2 11 may be a synony word that precedes ,it. 1 3. Tt may be achieved bv add |K ->ne letter to. subtracting one letter from, or changing one letin the preceding word. It may be associated with II may form with the preecding word the name of I wall known person or place in fact or fiction. 6. It may be associated with the preceding word in the title or 11 the action of a book, play, or other composition. A typical succession of woros might be. Pop—Dandy B Brandv — Snap—Knap—Sack — Jack—Tar—War—Raw—Deal. I l *. Bk D nniithH' old Annetta Robert* of Oovrnm.nt Bill, BtMichael, it happy onlf when sin i" "ping ponging" the piano. The "Sunday Advorale" wanU to know waat your child Is down Send us your fsvourit* photographprint and negative -and wrlto on the back of the print, your name and addrc<..tfae child-; name and atte and a ohort dasciiptlon of what be is doing Tor each picture published in the "Sunday Advocate" 12 M will be paid. Picture-. .Iiould be addressed to the Art Bailor, Advocate Co. Ltd. City, and should raach him not later than Wednesday every week. Z-TKM PICTURES During Us llrst year of operaUon the Motion picture h tion of An %  -' %  "ry Unit for Foreign Film; hu help--.! 113 film producers from 22 countries i to distribute their films in ihe. United Stales. eT--rX^v^.^^_^^ ONLY ONI SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN fm, \ THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE 1 Your akin will be cooler,tweefer... / dtlirubly damly from riiad lo too *\\^^*^**$^F y If you bathe wllh Irogrant ,\ Al'IM.V TO — R. M. JONES & COMPANY, LTD. OR DIAL .1X14.



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SUNDAY. AMUI. 15, 1M1 SUNDAY ADVOCATF PACE FITE Mr. Pound Has A Kink About £ s. d. my <.evrit* >fulrolm Tbonsou C4 D D Fftlcr feber t*. 44 peChe watte*.'*'* Until than the moat famous poem written In any asylum was Christopher Smart's Song to David (lTWj. American" dialect more playful mood: •Waal. I heard the Murder in ihr Cafrdrawl on the radio lass night. Oh. them Cawkney voices, them Cawkney woices! M/./r Shakzpctr rtill retains his posishun. 1 stuck it for a, while. wot wiff the weepin and wailin." There is also In this collection plenty of serious, vigorous writ"culchur" and other iibHow did Pound come to broadcast for the Italian fofe—and to get Into tht asylum'' The reader „ work; two "England's national sport Is the stories (fables? fairy-tales?) In n *ban.iun. he admitted that when unemployed, he had slolen for ft! I'^PSv" 1 mako no a P 1 C' 'or that.'' He said "i w ,u Mvcr &&* >' *-* "s refused me Neither God nor nature demand* i. of us, and if man demands it then 1 Mil violate lhe 553 Uw.' he hit* made." —Healer IB.C. RADIO NOTtS S86.529 In Fines Collected IIT Georgetown GEORGETOWN. AJST'IO A lum of I86.SM SS ,, ,.„|. Coun, dunn, laat .ear, a de. with the 1919 njure. co !" l r '" on Fines Impoaad were, howevar IS "". "S" "' '** %  tXe end of December lulr; an amount far In exceaa of the differ. enoji waa atlll to b. co U aeMd, due to tho stn of •Inatalmem pay. „£""',."' no !" !" Coima nit. ing m Georaetown and handlini the lncroaui volume of work rhe number of Civil Caaea Hied in I9S0 was 8.233. a. 'SS pared With 5,625 in 1M9 and S.208 for lots' The mVrease due directly to the fact that the jurisdiction of the Magistrate ruu. been increased from $100 to $130 The Rent Assessor also had a busier time last year as tenants "a !" .?. ow moro conscious of the •teadily increasing charges for rr nt nd sre seekinc rliei through the Court. Last yefir there were 630 applications for rents to be assessed M acalnst 476 In 1M9 and 341 In Les* Crime SHIP'S TEAM DEFEATS ISLAND AT BASKETBALL A team from II M.C S. Maca-Acent defeated an island team picked at random 46—24 when they met at Basketball at Y M.I* r last night. The game was played under flood lighting There has been a alig.it decrease in tho number of criminal c.ises died in 1930 as against that, lor the previous year. Last yair 25,026 criminal cases were filed a decrease of S80 as compared with the 1949 figure, but an in crease of 2.040 over lhe 1948 total! Collections In 1950 were divlded up as follows: Fines J63,682, Igj Fee^_$iB > 444.38; Crown Costs —3.620,39. Jacket Costs $267 5*\ In 1949 Fines realised $73,538 %  74; Fees — $18,444.58; Crown Costs — $3.62039; and Jacket Costs—$267 36, a total of $•$.88622 B.B.C. Wavelength Changes I ...m Sttnday, lSth April I radars of this column will feme iber that at the beginning < la t mosath we advised you that thj BBC was dropping the 4* metre transmission for the special West Indies halffiours but that this plan wss changed. Now. ru.ever, as summer is approaching an., propagation conditions are improving the changes will be ad ,led from Sunday. 15th April. The -chedule from that day onward* will be as follows. 6 30 a m to 9 00 a m. 15.31 megacycles or 19 60 metres; 4 15 p m to 43 pm. 16 16 megacycles, 19.76 meties For the last uSree-quarten. of an hour of this period, that i. from 6 00 p m there will also be a beam on 11.73 megacycle-. 83 33 metres. This latter beam will continue until the close down at II 00 p.m. and from 7.13 p.m —at the start of the West Indies half-hour each day—there wti: be an additional beam en 9.36 megacycles, 31.32 metre* Co'iimenu on reeepWm, particular)) in view of thosr change'. will be welcomed by the lun and may bo sent to the West Indies Office, Box 408, Kingston. Jumalca. Listeners who sometime tune in to the beam to Nort i America alter our direct beams clow down at 11.00 p.m. shoulJ note that this latter service wi'l now continue lor two hours lat< than usual un the 49 metre band— 8 II megacycles—*m I at 12.09 midnight (if you care to tune fa as late as that) you can also hn another beam on the frequency >f 1.58 megs in the 31 metre band Caribbean Voices In "Caribbean Voices" — tl. weekly programme of West Indian prose and poetry—on Sunday. 15th. April you can hear a unusual story, of a vamplrv i British Guiana, but he is not 11 sort of vampire of whom one need be afraid—however tune in for yourselves. The story is 'Apologl" do Luclo' by R S. Malcolm of B C The other half of the prouramme will be devoted to six ptms by a frequently heard contributor. EM Roach of Tobago. Broadcast begins at the reguli. lime of 7 13 p.m and you should not* that you cannot hear this on the 19 metre band which has beei providing best reception up t< now As told In the first paragraph above, broadcast at that time from London will be in the 25 and $1 metre bands, the latter beginning •t the start of the West Indies half-hour, in this case 'Caribbean Voices', at 7 15 p.m T. S. Eliot For those interested in poeti\ who can pick up the BBC's beamto North America—a shown in the Oral paragraph—there will be an Interesting programme In tag coming week when T S Eliot will be heard reading and a meriting on some of his own poeti in a recording of the University o< Chicago Round Tuble. reproduced by courtesy of NBC. This will be at II 00 p.m on Wednesday next. The Weeks Musi, Musical broadcast* by the BBC In the coming week include concert by the London Svmphon. Orvliestra In 'British Concert Hall* at 9 00 p m. on Monday. 16th int. with music of Tchaikovsky. Firar and Dohnanyl, and one by Hie BBC Symphony Orchestra oil Thuraday at IM pm with lehaikovsky. Waldteurel. Hartv I'fiibea and Deli us, APRIL 15 — NO. 167 The Topic of Last Week *j6jes" c^* ••;l i \i Ki ion i i stKi's PAKISTAN STUUIES The establishment of a centre of Pakistan Studies Is under way at Columbia University. In New York City, with the mtrodudioi. of two courses on the history, development, and language gf Pakistan. The Pakistan Govern ment has mad* a grant of $25 Out) to the center, which will be the second unit In Columbia's prapOMM Near nnd Middle Fast Institute -WONDER WHEELS N 3 Why Hercules is the finest bicycle built to-day The beat designers and ctgineers in the cycle industry use the finest mgenah to build your Hercules. Even the smallest parts are tested many times and each Hercules bicycle is built separstely. Add a brilliant finish of tughest quality, and you have the reasons why Hercules k "The Fioest Bicycle Built To-day." SHOES (/> SHOES SHOES IN'JMIUl IOANO IMNS COMrON-*T| Hercules TH8 HinCULIS CVCLE ft MOTOR COMPANY LTD. I*MIRGHAM INCUND. 7ke faest Bicycfe Bui/f Te S w so H-e O > CO X o m CO Wm. FOGARH LTD. Announces the arrival of SHOES from America REPTILE Slinc-Buk Spike RMI in Brawn ft Cray White, Black and Blue Suede With Dutch lleeU Toele ft Bawkbu Mulii.Coloured Imitation Reptile ToeUu ft UackUw Black SuWe Ballerbias CaU Early at . V Wm. F0GAR1T Ltd. CO X o m CO si o 3 w o s > s w •—< o > CO X o m CO I TwnSa* JOT ana Hot-.,'. -.-_** .t %  *• A-MBOaiy aass To hr.i r... un* letr (otvlSNfn Jul M>k lb Btojan •*. %  We'll bora you aivnlld hjive IMe-Tir* In mmhri Inid aiN F.w th*>a> .e-t* all dirnrtse To roaiirol \hm C>*w m,,, 1 klM ..It a wrap So < tV-ttnl o.)tti nail inn, t^ a paa>i lliwlprd pB>u fnunlty imple Ufl ha.Ji.-4 UW -toU.rM. M" -art alt ltl In !• % %  >, |HiretpA-d in H.r ftm ,,„ sh.. WhKn Q,^trrUr4 ilk. a -bluSBt># taor* ihrn aarvrn Sunday. T*as l-tatsap Shor. no) Boa r*|f And ahrix In* •hit*ihr Dreak up Um •"! PftM .n luM Th* raanll*" dlrtnl aauaricl Jut akrousht Lou pair m I A.td -ken It, rmheil I*.rd Nrlav. Ttr khoar rriad "Lou in ksin H*> Mid -Lou „,), BulB | (,,„.„ _w_ MSSI t.i-t tout S-. pits gs*n hall IM. • Ci".h help in* pooi t-akl rk leu paistad IHtouih Sa And In hi gTMi iurpi-r %  >"• SO" IMifll OK lh* unvr thr pdr* maik on Ihr brown lho .. Su-liny %  sftlr And bova ihu IlllaC prlc* ln| Tliiw poot Lou "Sut ' S*kx" l-.M iMHt* lha aam. MBI* W.ih Mini drf*. aitoai A laon mi tnl ih.t ladv Draaa In bar p-nnx-ai And pooi Urn paid UnI Tw dulla la* yard *• %  ava aihrd "tea* doll* Hui Lou waa on hn sn"l Tlia wm plnh piw* of Saim Wold lor ona twaniy And laou waa to twolldnxl hi* ft-* -n, sHaan ThS CMkll gtrd %  • walk roupal liti-oush roun.iv .kdo. .ifai l.i-day theloaltr • MhkaM" D'lvr 'round In mtilor car V..u buy .it Ttwv lor In Hi.. rro p IUTVF Tkaty bring (loin lo >ovdoor Tnc Cuolla will thaur Cour I-ou **.l back hniiif n.vl %  .n Cii* SIIU l#l. lorn a band l't • help lha llouw Aa.,., l>U Control tho "CoolM" man Don't 1 khlim Ilka a nU| %  it. IrtMM Harr|m..nAnd Undilfaroncc but "J a R sponsored by JAR BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and ihr blenders of J & R RUM MtRNINGCOUGv DSfa't 1*1 _ •Hit MUvoka I liti nkln .I,-.,. -„ %  wiutout u UitanuYl IMl'ISUl Ilk ^ an elegant version of the famous Biro ballpoint pen cofo-an .vi Hnettc—the latni a.Uiti.>n to the Him isiur of bllp.'iiii %  bWOI la rlrslaafd lo aivc mseatet cwiraauriur M well • rdikkble Mmec. Ii t. iinull, ,lm. sad Beat, yet it m et v? Tta iittai nu, esean uui ata iK-utneM. Hnttai u opc.uliv BMeadaMd i. utic *" %  ' %  ..—.!. *nd |ilskfc,n.hwiib %  "'T M *lBini 'i | i match. met BmOFTlE RfFllLS Price ihjoeU£ for a purpose *v. eoar of seaiM TRINIDAD. a W I When ._. PrVl^ strikes rememberPhensic When yon ftel Mill mth eeery niovcnurni miikc. you u'jnr ID Cry out rcmrml'i Pbcmic will quickly case and aoothc the agony, lilt paio-causcd fatifue, remove the ttvirincPbcnsic iicitlwr harms the heart nor upsets the -.IOH-UK h. Be pre pared for sudden pain—keep a supply of Phensic handy. SHOES SHOES SHOES YOUIl EHSO OKAI.KK nivea you qualilv prmlurl. and the worM famotn KSSO F.Ura Motor Oil, logaUatf uiili prompt and efficient aervice. VWSMT rOIH KSSO IMA Mi. TO SAVES WEAB@) \



PAGE 1

I I H I I \ I M NIaM fcDVO" I n >l M>\V AI'KU. I CLASSIFIED ADS. ";"*?•*"* TELKPttOftl ISM Iw Itirr v.--iaaTin gagen.r' i Calling IM %  i.. r C r la <* for M number of word. up ii :* and • ranta pa* word tar MC* -erg Trrmaraali nMW 10 an* pm. 11IJ far PWt K.H< If ftfW KJ> r.n ; M. 'April ind l*l 1 I K A Ret-iurl .he Red aeon ••" i over *0 year* i -I., r 19 4 St—In i M i tin Eioaar teala Md raUtlwaa n.ti-fi.K nwm thank to oil win. %  ihr (unwrrnL aenl wraatRa M "l €""> &f or m anj %  -,n ie ocraatoi thr l M IN MEMORIAM ion SALE AinoHonvi ALMOST NEW It HP Bedford Von uarantre If irqoiifO I.lr. M. i*K and ln-ud Upon M MJM Nr MM (M UIH •entiy Apply Courteay ITOMOTIII-R: VB-inal Prrfert running orilcr ear* 1 I! Mj nn <-..,irte-y QaaTaatl E-ISI \|. B <* )5ll . CArl III ,mr Standard I HP IMt n.ndel. in .rrv (ml order Miaragr ISJK1 Apply to r A. Proverb. C/o Jama. Lyneh 4 c u Lid. Ptione *t II 11 -4n rjg l-rrfrr-. 19 11 PAR Hlllman in Tar. II emit i*' ayofa UH un • % %  UOK. !• IMtM SI H M %  '••••itfl %  0 oa -..dd** REAL KSTATK m> i ai i -it -n v ii on the apol at J.t %  Bta -(" I Mr. M II A** 1 A I >f I I %  > BataMi May he %  FOR KALE CRUSHED STONE AND • FINES. IDEAL FOR CONCKKTK. AND MAKING ROADS AND PATHS. ... v ,.., ibi ,. .. y good condition Nr* P Edghill Trlrprio-i %  llAal—4r> gt si Jamaa. Oood Locatl. %  ltd B-tlii'a. Wide **i'd> %  V'I-'I An ii.iil.nh. Wrll Hi-1 .. %  • Main R.I HotJ*U to IJ.Ite A S.aMdr Re-idrnce al St Jam**, oln.it ', Ant B-d—oil from C1VN) M 3.a0 A N Bungalow radio *ra. Huht of Wat to -I L.wal ton and Botl.nn. ..rt Main H.I Rod C1.0M In Jtl.loo. A %  %  LIJM l CIMO A3 nod I.M. in Cottage al t'li CH M_ 7 M,lrIi..m Trmrv Oood IBndll-.ii and l'**K.n, Mudrrn Convonhft-. Yard %  nrloord orith St.mo. v. out R. duodd from ciJS* t„ IM A T„ Slurry Snno-i.lt n.i.i, ... and Roaidonci • tin a Laiaa Qoraio of Wua.h.* ,. rudor *' Tl:,*\ Ana Varan!. Rrdnrrd Iron. CUM lo CIJDO A Bi.. %  I HaallitgMain I and LnralMMi, Bodnc-d frnn. fiua CI.3O0 Alrooat Now Small "AonOI iti-idrnr* al lloilma. Main Kind. Oood l.iratlnf hrdn<*d ftt-„ I 1 aao ' riW A Rooldmco al R-.rl.lrv Main Road Not Blur W-'rt. (IL.I-1 C.niiin,,., ., \ ., lion. Radium from 1! :i*> i In 1 onn *^,.II C Mr f..r Naitrly AnylhliLB .n Hr.,1 Kolai and Almon In any Di.li.it .i Itrpl.tl. llrSalr Vatuoa MruMol Arramrd II 1 Cant. i... *.1|Dial Sill n T or Ahf Call llO.t,!,*. IM ill ii Minns n i coali par oot lint oo vrr*k-da|fl lid IJ .ml. por otrata Una on anmd H *. NOTICE PABBBM OF *T rnm from April 14th to May If |h f-rorhlal Troaaurrr -ill not bo at hn %  ind da<> Saturday April 1IM from %  • a.m-IS Soimda. AMfl BTlh from |* lm tlh from IS am -IJ inn f.om is a.ir. -ij a iniii 11* •*%  Apply B.I. ABC M'r Co -.td i BJBW •. Por mil-. I Mr r%r!rl.. ( " *l HI" \-'l M K SCKifTl ORBISART OIMUAI 111 I is.. NOTICE I. hr.ob. ...... 0..I tlH On* H..nd>od ai %  rU Oidiur, %  >'vo^m*d bo In hi .1 II* SorirM .. Br.H-.iii PUrr BridaWfVWa. on r\prtl ll .1 I .ili-l, fur itr pui| H ..r nl I 'i inr Dtrorti.r. Ihoir Boporl on lb", tr.r "JKlH.i.al lh t.ii tl... -rar rnd*d llai Data aMr, itso >.< Ol-rolm. and mi Audltai %  WANTED %  dir.uBi rharpa o*d %  <> t >"•( %  a frd aandtaft. %  CUtBK . print %  , Iro t-raa. t Uarbadoa lor Sain atMl raclory Fc Hnllll ! %  • HtMCrilU -aramy nMU for t Ro Irf -.r.. Manaa-rrrw prov lowa rapaiiorxr ratorlna lor Rx'auranl. or Hetah or Mm liar raprfirnra M daoirablo AppiKaliorta thaald bo •ubmltl-l in w.itin, BIM„ drlall. uf ; prrlrr.r ..nfl r...loalii| roplaa ol IM tlmor.ia* and a ro.ont oa.^ert am MHMbarapl> ana >nouM I' adoioaam %  ox UH. Br-IC-t.... IM 4 '.I t. RENT SHIPPING NOTICES BUNGALOWNj (l.idn. MM*M Prom 1st Miv, IMI I trajar Apply IIUKOB horw Oil or JUI I, S bodI bar. Apply I PLAT—OBi -i.rd flai Uunrhro St Lnwtonca Gap too onlv Avatlablr ISth April, oaia. ar.l Mr. r. I'trmln. pivira—MM 1J S.1 ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. •AJMNO mo. AHSTIBDAM MS -HECUBA -nil, April IMI in pni ro II i v,m IM AN AMSTIRBAM MS ORANJEBTAD* —1Mb April IMI Ml IM. m IM.MIIAI, PARAMARIBO M> I.IOKI.I in., v MS MPPSIIXIA ||1R Apr.1 IMI r tHA SSrd April IMI. SAHAMII TO THIMIIMI II i.l MII ( I R( Ml Rf R.I GNVMD>r-* — ISth April IMI Tbo | orrrp P-rart wmtmmmmmmmmmmm M V "Daorwood" o/Ul 8 Cargo and Piannaara lor 8 rtbo. Sallins Thuraday l%th 0 TtM C-rta MV and 1 ii Ki Manrka arlll uri.arr. lot MonUarrat. 1SaiUng N Doroi Navli %  it •III _.. Tor AntMua Montorrroi. and SR. Kill. SoUlng HHn incUml TRXE 4M1 S Hi,i\JI (ft) --Tl". **K INC II'.Ml H Ml>CELlaANEOUS v. MMI rii MI si BMIRIIIP RTCMI %  .1 i %  .. | man. ulualrd on tlio brorb. ixrfrrabiy *..rll -i Ain>: lo Ti.. A,1. tna Dro..ii>ioi Boo No. 10 UVtJI 2>. r K RROWNP. B4..M • ii'Kir v..i. A 70 P knp. Al.noDial T s, %  s,,.. 144 11> ELECTRICAL REAL ESTATE JOHN hi. Ill 1DON A F.S.. r.v A. ItrprpsrnUlivr : C.ERALll WOOD FOR SALE W0RTB1 IMIHN Oi...n.r H.i.i ion! Thl Rraptll) H.iInr ad> \avitalr ..I n cornar -ita and a —rv Tri vlraoaward. Ttorrnr %  :v %  uofl Imlimim. with built Irl -r.lli'l i' l-.rajc loiingr • It'i 1 vrraiidab* loading frojn II. Th< hiirhrn la wall iiippllod wil'i ftllrd rupboanli. Trtara la a 1 car garagr. 2 %  rrvanta' mama and 1MB KAKI.OW' On apomn I arm couiland itrar Slltrr Sand* A -olldly rorvdriirtad Mono houar with ahlnglo tool and plnr Boorlng. 4 roropHon. S bodrooma, wrrandab. S bathrnum* and lollrti. 1 kilrhri'. 1 MWanM' room.. 2 garage. Now In 1 -ii oaty lo raronvart. -'IIIMISII\M .-,,,. mi) A wry line X-*toary i>i> .anil, fatuatcd on appioi 1'. uriri -.M> TlUllt Ii apacloua and wall pruporllmir-d am "iiraxUllmi ccinnn-inr 3 i. dtnlng ..nil hrr-11^,1 bcajn | .. !% %  i ol aotno ol tbo old... I %  A Btt) ManMl buy at J TOBRI K HI a i .i home Mtuni.-.! HUM -itli ^| t.r.,v t.pli-.l %  Mi. "I'd H i ol lln.boi .... %  in .t.mplllam -ith -l.inali tnK and Ii of aound condltroi Ihroi.about TrtrT* .in* J bodrooma .-It" % %  atnal. bningr. -idr inafrd taHary uvn looking tho oraai. :. r.ind aaraar RBa fO oflara invliad. • rlAOATH.IJHOI il -' Thomaii. A aparUi.it-.. .i.>rrrounlry houar with appro*. 1 arm plua additional 1 I 2 ROTM if i.guirtH) Thrir arc S brdrooma. 1 lounge, dining room. illirir3 bathroonit. 7 aaiagn building. i %  i.' RM nr-. i.f (In •JRI i i-oaatl ml id. %  miVIRTONr-r.io.ldr Com. mod lot.. 3-alorry itonr houar rtandlng In nppma I 1 a.r'i pUnlod o.th ln.it iraoa 1 lalga raoovnaon roorni. 4 bodrooma, 1 k'.'iin"K.uhrn. 3 bathroom'. M Caartrall) roratad and .uitablv (or ronlrr.lort into ftata or boanlIng hollar. MM \ ROSA I'a.aavr ll-md CitJ ABMctttro and .rntrali, |or. ml -l.inr tiui-|lalo— -ltd itooblr A f >T i r i • • 14.0011 MJ %  Unod ard l I rilabmiTti. rgormti I lo oRrr an lnharf Imtrl bu.m... rorHorn Pull drt.ll. -ir avalUblo of Ihta high! r-i.imnMnl I(.WR t.ARA<; H ItananM Cap-A aubalanllall. built and B ..rRUladbM M.H-hlr [01 uar ..a a garaga. .loro. woikahotr ^i ,. MPtttJ B ""irr purpi-r. FOR RENT ( HIM HV Modem RTTMB1 rllll.OWa' I'rorpoct. 'nmlahrd houar on at, with 1 bodrooma, kniPaTa. Mats* -'..-ilookblf -r4t OW. mrdlnir po.*ialon. IM U I -.1 ATI. \C.KNT Al'CTIIIMrH II \s I ^ lliiv^ RMLniNO I'hoi., 4£40 — awawai ONAN-LlgtiUnaT PUnt, It-IS voltn 10 ompa. 400 watta. with Umpi an. ipar'a. A. Bamra A Co. Lid 1B.3M tf.%  %  Wmin and Am.iv Lndgr 1 CI.oi.ri DUI BMT Ikrnr.r Virto.la St.rot Bla. I rrhrr M II .StI d-alUnr %  rtl> -all' A llinflrid. Jn i n-ill br i NOTICE PtRII^ Or CRRlnr ( HI'Rf'H %  M Tno>r> iMarkrd on t : % %  H.I fag % %  -III up to 4 n on T.idny. Ilth Ai tH* aupplv of thr lollowlna romnndit.. to ha aMivorod at Iho I Almaho ..•• %  i at M tinBoard ol Guardian' M Itonr to tlmr dur.l iai MII -n iii K Thamount of milk rrqulrod Ii appriKlmalrlv 3.0M pint, par pint and Iho Board r-arrvr. tho njnl lo arrrpt Ihr Irndrr of MOM tna on* poranii tor trie -uppl> of tm. panlad by i irrtiflralr iignrd by : milk II uippllrd air Itao X Tubrrrulo... MM II BRIAI) olv I lo tho JOt! UVBSTOCR nr Guornaoy Cow glvlna SI 'Plrat ralfi Apply E. U Sn„.ll Bldgo Plnnlallon tl. !h 10.411 3J, Praali In milk. r sin r". Rrg i Da Coata tt Co.. 1 4 II.-I MECHANICAL Motor Drivon GRASS Cll ovrrhaulrd Can br onn Gar ago IS. 4 I ...lr taR. BARNES A CO I TD II 4.11 TFN OMI Hi II I%  nelwrd lr-lurtlon i-lirti board fully On* 2* nmrucal All in rondlllon "ai aood •• %  ... |wd Ir.Ir.1 Il 31 Hlllln. pilro Roplv Bn. XVr r o S 4 IIIn SPVHNFRS iC-.iln a* nui. Pag A t'mto 41 Itr. rarh WhllrV. IdI WMTLTKV II X" r leghorn Cock. 1^ rarl. Applv Mr. If v. rmhiir Ch Ch SI MIS! r.l.LANFOUS MM.I-DENT Al tbpa.tr haa aril. whnh hrlp> to atop phraaant lo.tlna and rrfroahlm moutb Oal youl I AMM-l-nENT Ao.in.l linn ii Ammonium Ion II I AJfTMbda Of a* llaia. China, old Jawal OUaa. China, old Jawala." flna s'llvar itrrroloura Early booka. Mapo. Aula* (Taprta *ic at Gortlng> Antlqua So? •djoinlug ii..va: Yacht Club ^ l.t.M—t fa BATHS In Poiealaln Knamal, Ir Whit*. Graori. Prlmroaa with maUhlnr ........ .-itcolour xillra. To| %  rado. AiiAiiNBB a. CaUd. Ml by I for llv.l -ubatantlally Inillt alon* bungalow railed Allanby .lluota al Wei.hr. ciui.i church on lha an whan I line .. ,...l|.,u balhlna I. of HI,., yatai dak, Dr.,-i.. Po.i.. TSrro >|iatMui llrdrnnma. I.avaIRFJ ...I Bath. Kltrh.n.ll,. Double arrvanta room, and a Oaiagr. and stand. on now -g fi of land. InaprclMni b/ appointment !>AH*"Y A SCOTT. Real I Dial 374J 114 M II rf.r PraaW M ofBrr on Fridav Apn, .1 ; p.m. Hi 1.ABOJR BLEST n -ton* wall D'.lllnii bouao and (hop ul SI Mnrtin. St Philip, alandlng oil ? acre*. 2 rood, of land. Dwrlllna rompriar* Drawlnn ii Dining ronini. 3 bodrooma. Kil.h gR, Toilet and Bath Rotmimrnl wntar in.tailed U. I>e o Be rod for aale t-iihaloaelhrr with .iboa* proper' r.m BUOKI ... Unit lo b. In lllarulta i*r railoii Flour per hall bag • Sugar .St..tr Cradr. MA lb-. Soap. Blue •patl PaM per na* m "i >' Salt Pork per lb Salt Pl.h par Qnil Coftffeo par lb Oal Flake. |.. It. Rago per In. Tapli--. per II. %  % %  it I %  > i i I .rrwnod per inn. Match*. NOTICE BYF • EI.F.CTION Pailah ol St ANDREW than on* parson having brer the rlortlon of prri* a. mombrn In Iho Genibly for tho Pariah of At l\.ri||i I IABGE HOUSE a PI.ATTho Cam St Lawrence Gap On-lhe-*** F-l l.irnl*h*d Dial AT M... K llur Cuaat SI 1 H—4 f. Canadian National Steamships BOtTBBOt'S CAN. CHALLTNGFJI 1ADY RODNI %  LADY NELSON l^\DY ROD.SFV IADV NELSO!' LADY HOIINEY t Map S Juno W Juna 30 July IS API. IS May II Juna ri Apr 21 Mav so Juna 14 Jab 13 Aug. I Apr Tt Apr. a May 31 Juna IS July 14 Aug. aval An Andrew docoawd. hereby notify my intention of taking a poll for the determination of .Id rtortlo.i on Monday n*<( the lay of April IMI at tha Alh-yn* 'not Bellopl.ine beginning Iwtweon %  • houra of aavon and right o'clock In %  morning PolMna Station No I — Th* AllajnBrhol-tha North wing for all pmrnu whaar ...rnamaa bagin wlih the lettar A to J Inrlualvo Polling Station Wo I Thr All.vnc School tha South wi-g for all p*. aoua oboao Surnai-• boffin with thr l*tlor K to Z Incluuva Signed F A INGBAM BhoTlfT and Irturninff Officer THE lUinsnA IdR-MJ dwelling houar on tb* S, near Carr.bank. Worthing Thr above v. ill l>* ••! up for aaVr ..t nur ORV-o In Luca. Slrrot in Friday lha Mth day of April IMI at 3 p.m. naportMM. from, 4 to a p • i lth or on „ppl>ratlan to -.rnngton A Seal. I" 4 '-I la THE SNUGGERY. Lowrr Wntbui\ Rd ni-r Br.iiid....'. Bearh Cnmprlalnff 4 large iom> nowlv palntrd, tollrl. I tnr light, alio Radio Dlitrlh.i 1 Irlrphone ,it your dlapoaal to an approved III M in VICTORIA -On Woilhin •lb i gj ai Idai I.;.. V '.I •a-.lde .... Radio. Eloctrlr: runnlna W in bedroom.. Servant'* room ind g.^r Sporlal term, for long-.tay ton r>i •! ir or MTi VN-iona 14 31—t PART ONE ORDERS ...i'.. of CM OH ,-' i. %  iiMpact n IMR in Ihr C.reonldae ID tCHIN %  %  HI'I tha i A IUNHIU1 AUCTION till I MAS wlS\ !'.. % %  .I..-I i We ar* < led i.. leavim tha Cnmnv to %  * thl. per Icily amand ..hrrle by Publie Auction at c.i-Oai... at > p.m on Fudav Mth Apill JOHN M lll-ADON. Aurtlonocr IS 4 tl~4n lion, rrcolvrd I will M" *< Contral Police Station on KOIKIJ Ihr I*h April. ItSl at 1 p . inwliut Item.: enrtona III— nli II MMad Milk. 13 paihour. Tea 1U Tina Href. M Me.. Tina, II Pair" Roota. Fool and Furl Pumpa. S Hyimdiiy n i Iho I mile Jack.. < I 4 "1 *n. III... i Rtdftn tin If -round IMOIIYNAMIN for hillly Takrn •> .in ipprtirn '.IN-4TRANCE. Drofrl.1. or Dli i IJI-I.IM oblalniiBt* I TIM t-ROQtTT met*. quipped ., %  ii.rri H PtRM Bo. eg %  ..,! ( '. Sport. IMpt 13 AM CUI'TAIN flTTINOS—For amart •__ low clyllng. light control, Valance* inn Irapttla*. By Klrarh. Dial 4418 i • AHNtS A CO. LTD HIM II "IIUVEBIIN A CO AKOIJI Street 4.51Sn Moll. r-. Concrrto Hton*. Olil lart WII I lAaf HINKSdV John. II i M POUI.TBY PENNr*. i. CoRatruata Double Dackn CdntoMIRaj R b 3 f*x |uara rnmpartmrnti New haH-Inc ,r.h thriiiigho.n. Snltabl* a. Broodai raring Pm or Cockerel Pan ARCHIE CLARKE. Phone 4S30 Iron a.n lo 4 pm 14 4 SI— I BOLlrLT DAYt.ITE B-OVIE PCItEEN i> c.. (food order. Pitt, Cl. Pliaimacy. nan-l.f.n. TYI'PWltlTEII IIIBBONS A CARBON APEst Flaah atock *UM rerrl.td. art our r*qulrament, al T G*d.!.. Oraarl Two PI.ATE Ola.. Di.play Caari. II oth Stan.lrld Scolt A C" l-l'L Brill I 74SI I have been Inalructod by the GoVrrnnr-in-Eotii'lvrCommlttra lo arl' I., I M % % %  • "•'H Seawall Air Pr on Wednradny next Iho IBth April ill 1 o'clock Ono trartor drawn lawn Mower It la a rolloclio.1 nf St* Mower. and I. Ihe right thing for a Cricket "war* beltr DARCY A SCOTT Urn! Aurlinnrer MA '.l*n UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER M Oarr Ul... Married Wamen. i^narlai in ludu E.tin.ion Dining I n. • Haal.i Hinaar. Tip-Top Dningj Tahl.Sideboard.. IL.i.land, B.-ik-hrK.Dumb Waiter. Flat Top Dank; Tea Trot lay. Srltae. Upn K m and Corner Chain Mbrrr. Ch..ir With CHlMliii; Amkiu I'pholi: Ottoman. Ornamrnl Table, al in Mahog.iny Mlverton* rt.igl.i. tinChina, Duii.cr. Taa and Cofle* n i Platod .-d Hat Fork. .. VENETIAN BLINDS, Kir.-h B.n-alf II m*tal Del.u.* Venetian blind*, to -o irri delivery S weeka. Dial ** %  i BAHKB& A .v Ltd. IS I 51-II" VAN II oU TENS drinking chocolatr idd a deawrtiponnful to a lla.. -f i nh I., obtain %  irirr.hina bevriagr -" < II" % %  M i rnti fi*r ', IR, tiOmp.ie me a>Kc with rnm. II 4 SI 3i CandtoaUrk. sp,, lery. Brldae Tabl_ _.. Congoleiim. I'lrUiroa; Verandah Chair. Drew P.iun. Single Mahug Hed.lr.o Deep serp Mattm. > rry nice ol Mahog J Wlnard Wnrdridir. Dre.nn Trblea. MIIII.IT. Waahatand Cbr.a RUaa. M T Waahatand Suuilr Ir.n taaahnood Cradle. Pre P .Inled Uieen i IlrrakfaM Table. Chain LMdei.. Kilchen Cablnel Tea Waggpi *C. all Painled tiicr.Electric J Bum* MofTal Stove I.OI, good. Elertitc Ho PUtaa. St,-amcra. 1 Burner Valor Ol sto.e %  •. ... i...ii ,,*. Pranag Maaa (ream -i.. rr.ri.i Kllchtn Uterudat AQnarlum. Larg. %  %  %  %  II. %  Pule.. Quoita. Prearrvlng Pan. Writing Imiia* Rafrlgaiatoi In looa -orklni BRANKFR TROTMAN A l \lll tl.UH .1 v GOVERNMENT NOTICE OmCI ,\('COMM(lll\TI(N Temporal v utttw ED lion (approximately 18.000 square feell. wilhln one hfllf mile i.i.luiof the PubUC lluiMinfis. Is r4<|iiirnl. Immei1ialel>. to lumar a Gnwtrnintml Orgi %  Offers in wntinii (.ubiniltixl to the KituuK-ial STal.-nv. public Rulldfngs, not Inter tHl ti UN I9th ItaEtkaOl N 4 .. n from arlUlM -..,,r..r,.. F ASHBY. ChfiM t'burrh. inirvnowi wtinKRN IIIOM SCHOOL Hrl • % %  %  r %  2iti. Aiwil ..nrt -III he m einn all da: COMBtRMERE SCHOOL nLUfCI i.l'HMi[.i\ TO MAI 1 HCHOOI Aa previou-ly notified in Ihr Pre.. muton. In ihr Sthool Will takr pine rxt The Enlrancr Examination will H i •!,. S. hool Hall on Frkl-v. Ju 3. Candidate* will br arceplad fo „i r......v.' .. .,,, If pMi or who wll .1 br umlct II mly. dlan. I i, April If Ir atu '•• -" 0OY data e iftr.tr 11 ahall %  tn -t .. |... ganiM ,K and i IIKI be aceom tawafti bv .. bit. %  -I „ lelr own pai.nl -.. pan. k ruhrr I.lgh l-RAUF—Tralnlat aa Tharaday II IIU t:... —II ...ntimir weapon Ham u .id hotd. \ Civ will do UaO „„ i lolkrWMf Thoradav ii to. -ill do i.MG irainintLaaaoR a Inin Tna utijcrl of thl. laawin 11 lo Rrrf I I Band llano prU'T.re. "ill be held on Monday Hi VI Apr 51. VOI.rNT4.RV NIOBT Tiaora w.ll he .. ...luntaiv n.al.t (M MOO Tna fcrw... aht -.il he ibo^ in .-rder. for Th .|*dav NCO. are a.krd I. ORIIRRI.t IIIIHM. ASH nlUIIVIi s %  APR •! orderly Ofncar Or.lnl. Snjrant N..I for daiy Orderly Ofncrf OMerlv Sorleani and Thurdaj l:n wi i We also icpair Trailer and Cane Carts over the week %  ind > .hall be not I •ear. of ... • il septen.l". IMI cii-aing dati (oi apnllcalloi doratoy SMI. AIT, ... IMI 3 An e.ao-.. itlon will be t • ih'I i. Sal i will ii i %  Candidate, .hoold n.rlva equip) .1 a ruler M PINDEK •vaeniliB Bod> ol Comlrrnnrie School I N'BRFAkABLE POT* You ran atill art a frw of Ih Mrdum and s.oall Si of OLD IRON MTTFR CASgs Some par*?!* hav* uatd thru, foi VIOIJETS CARNATIONS II'INKS OERANU'NS rtr Prlr* oaly I i and ( See Them at Vour — (. \4 WORKS RAY ST GREY HOUSE Church Street Speightstown 4toJbBjMtoBa have breti f.Mfi Mr. 1 G Ji toi i 0 proper!s M IK ofrr.-l UV H, ll'IB IC COMITTITIilN I %  ... .. JOHN M Bl.ADON Bi.lldnig i. J apacloua V .ir .mid ganaraj .lore op*rnta.t tie around Roi.r wharb i.rT*ra %  lt In thi. central Ml %  I A Boyre Jan i rer. .lohn plantation. Building J.a>. % *. Bleat*. A r s.r.v.a TAYLOR'S OF ROEBUCK STREET are the Blenders nf the fiimoug TAYLORS SPECIAL BLENDED RIM (With the nisllnetlvr Flavour) Ask for this niend and yon will he assured of Helling the B4kn MHtX IK i I II 0Ht A S10XS l.TIK NOKTBROIMn LADY RODNEY UDV NEIAON I-ADY RODN1EY LADY NTLBOM LADY RODNEY* GARDINER laaaaaaaaaaa 1V'. Arrival EM lor. SI May %  %  % %  14 July 7 Aug. I. Sept, Arrivea Arrl* Arrive. St. John H.Ii/a, Uontrra May > %  K*y It June Jxne 14 July l auly • Aug. 1 Aug. g Sept. II EP> LTD. — AfenU. it's Out CHANCE GENTLEIVIANS WEEK AT WILSONS fa iiTISWer Mid satisfaction to our numerous i;on\ ilcmcn cuslonicrs who complain that they arc not given i; tin same opportunity to Bargains as our Lady Custom; no, W have decided to have as from i: MONDAY. 14th APRIL GENTS' WEEK "fferinR the very best lhat monev can buy in WORSTED in a variety of Pin Stripes. PARSONS' CIREY in four shndes. CREAM FLANNEL. CREAM SERGE. CREAM DOESKIN. CREAM GABARDINE. *J TROPICAL SUITINGS-in a largo variety SHARK, i SKIN in WHITE. FAWN & GREY, Genuine IRISH > LINEN. TUSSORES. KHAKI and WHITE DRILLS. ;. We iinrit'MiiitineJ.v MIV that price*, on these definitely Just opened, the Popular Charm Bracelet, In Silver Also Oct. Oold Charms—Bell. Jug. Shoe, Ballerina, Elephant, Saucepan. Horse-shoe. etc. Drop Pearl Earrings, in Act. Gold and Sliver AH Reasonabl I.OI IS L. %  Priced BAYtMY Button I-.-Miintatlves for Rolex :<**^**f**S'~*S.'&rt>s^w>M* t '*s*iis* t t ;: *.;'.::;'.'.'S.': large aisortment of BIRTHDAY CARDS and BIRTHDAY WRAPPING PAPER, CETWEU. CARDS WEDDING GIFT CARDS also PASSE PARTOUT and SPEEDFIX in two sizet Hnbvrls A f'. — lUml :I:HH cannot be repeated. SHIRTS! SHIRTS ! Our rugs ol shirts by the World's Best manufacturers are too numerous to mention. We can only invite your inspection and tool certain that you will buy yourIS selves SIX or more shirts. *! The fa mum, SKA ISLAM) COTTON SHIRTS and >J PYJAMAS are among the range. Other interesting lines are SOCKS, TIES. SHOES, S BELTS. PYRAMID HANDKERCHIEFS. OTIS VESTS J etc ^ Wise Men will buy now before it is too late, at I* N. E. Wilson & Co. I The I Itr.t Modern Store well known as the S GENTS' EMPORIUM 31, Swan Street — Dial 3676 WEEK-END &m& 100 NIGHTIES onn White. Pink & Blue at fj/rW 300 CHILDREN PANTIES Rayon & Cotton si zes 4-8 J lo r \\.DJ PANTIES American Style in White. Pink, Blue, Black I for C1 7Q NYLONS S1.36 ~W> HI:\IHPI iHIKHS for -, R0RDEREI) SPUNS CREPES & LINENS In li.nl. .ou'll like O THE BARGAIN HOUSE M, Swan SlrMl — — S. ALTMAN, Propnelor PHONE J703



PAGE 1

I'W.I Tl MTNDAf AIiVOC \Tr srvnw \rnil. IS; IMI Digs \Truelor Overturn-. Our Readers Say: Uwu i n %  a-ftiaJisti u -In 194 %  J M.ik r Mi and MM .... wad % %  •'< i-n< .1 i, ,,,.„, v, pubUi vim I.. ,ll ir I.., K.i. IKI foi three ajpei and more w '" Y.ai miit*> 20 <-i-nla It %  V .? •* %  vo wl ^ m,,k "* s ,,n • nor Th" wnlir* on W profit II you -re now allowb^vme* quite ck* W <'< %  Ujd the.r emplnve, VarA to *• Ow •*T>HIRM lll.HT ILKAR OLD To Th* Editor. The AdeocaieP"*"^ arti *> i Clarence Weeke* of Walrood SIR.—Mr. Alstons letter in nrntaae ..nd Vill.ipe :• lane hit*; the nail r^ 01 head There are I I I h ought—the |h* corlh i aim W.il C.witmmnirs and the Trade's 10ml !. %  %  %  fi| Distrni %  ): pnlln Tin .. bout Sou Dm an FMda) owned by Hog •* „ waabelnKdriv. 1. :n .1 rt„s A rrnu ut w.,irond Village. It had ini ',k* n imply GMtl in I .Mid going an embankment tad OVOTtWIMd. n the left fender tad K tun the right. Blucknun uml Moselev. the driver, were both injured They were taken 11 i>< liosp.'.al ului. Us_icd and was detained. A peel rnrrh m 1 %  i>r r iward. The li begun and Odjourped until Friday -xt TMii; MKVS AM. STAR Talent vou lo make ln mr Shtw iii tin Globe Tatar* oa Thai 11 the Onvamment^ Friday night wu one >r the l>est theory ant \ acting on it, without t*ld since these showa were atarted nuking; anyone to comment they by Mr. Maurice Jones. Manager reduced markups bv an average The lodges' dnision was alao one of appruximateh par reft III that was popular with the crowd IO-JT Keith Scaly, a clerk at the Parcel F.om IHito 1950 1 he (ood Post Departmenl. the winner, was trade (and others) r*
M .asonlng wa right; then ther %  Is the most popular .nmcdy-sliv T would be room for a further cut mi the show. In markups. Other good vocalists were Sam Gordon with 'Night mid .Day." S<> in I HO with the dual hop" Errol Daniet; M> Kooluo Heart'* of making the protesting me. and Holmnn Ray aide with "On* chants look stupid and of effectVery Own ' %  further cut The first Ladies All Star Talent living by a furthe >riMiiogra|>h Sur\ *•) Of Barbados Starts Jun' a in lo tak* to remedy their some of us a'ould apoiogiae for irks Ht W F Auei. Ri |y px Mniugrr of the Ik.rDados ..0K1 lo lioth UN '>•! Cot, Wd lold the Advocate r n11 '1 slari 1: %  I 'I hi arilh th* bta lt( prBgwwnaaa prconiii -surface. which ran. unriei ideal conditions, be of great ac curacy and afford the geologist 11 very clear picture of possible structures which might be lev1 Ournhle for the accumulation of oil. Dr Auer said in passniK. that PHOSFERINBBMTbehWwht! you need to put back strength and energy. PHOSFBRJNBl vivc* the appetite and. In so doing* it revive* keenness for work, for enterprise. PHOSFERJNE helps to build up staying power—gives you reserve of pa t ien ce and goodwill wben you need them most. Try this grand tonic today. la liquid or tablet farm, a Tablets of PHOSFER1NB equal 10 d 7 n^ / It does you good 1 n two ways — you r-.ib a on' Ond you breathe it in! For quick, sure relief rub THERMOGENE Medicated Rub all over your chett, throat, and back. Its healing warmth relieves congestion, and breathing the pleasant medicinal vapour it gives off clears nose, throat, and lungs. Of Beckles Koad Developed THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS ft Dip.'tiiiun, Debility, Indention, offer InfliMtiie. DOUBLE-ACTION THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB In big f/oss jars and handy dandy Tins The housing area south of Heckles Hoad u now complete t> developed. Hands have been made similar MM-VCW" had" been made and street lights put in Four adbv numerous oil companies in ditional standposts have been mdudioja Dull Oil Corporation, all .-tailed and alao a number of lire over the world. Particular menthe cost of hydrants. lion he said, might be made <>f radueOoo Hi On the northern MU of Beckle* the fa.l thai lucjl %  seismograph Show was held on Wednesduv markup, they appointed a com Hoad. work is piogressing New survey was made bv T.ulf. of the night bul ihc standard of this wa* mlUae to conduct a full invefliguhouses are going up. and house* entire country of Denmark which, poor. Joan Licoruh. who *-na lion. >r being removed to the area svith '•• l"rjte population and in• %  Tenneswe Walt/" *as the .winThu< the trade were compel!( rom contested areas. >ll t ariculture. might well be ner and second prise went to J**ai) ed to wad for uaree years for an j n e iond con'tructioo haa been <-"Cniparod with Barbados Bent ham wiih "Mona Lisa." oppdrtuhlty to state their case hfW Un nomvwhat however. Hl *" i .' 1 "V' "*• rei, "6Pd and ap On Friday night next, the Super and refute this nonsensical thcor> Ti,e atea on the west side of ^reci-iien paly too *''M. the i>opuStar show will lake place and .-n The effect o< this arbltra.il> i.n ,.„, "^.J ioid UtoetiM surveyed r •PPrehenalon which was W tbat night S<-aly will mcel such ixatrd cut was two-fold. Firstl-. S}"^ n ,!,. ,f ,,,!,, .^1. !" conr f c "n *"> < % Utg ef voeat.su as Clavton Thompson ar-1-it was an economic impo.bility KeSbad^Siif wtettnTu iss fi. ml ? 11 ,,, n -, nrt h ? FU7 Harcwood to 4ntrmstaff wages as riling '" •*P TC thai when tnu is ewne \ iaii0i but the extensive expert. OFVEN NURSES of the Getters! Doflti nade it reaaonable to do !" w houses will lw pu. ibere ^ Qf Gu)1 on C orporati, n in IS Hospital have pasncdthcpfinal Secondly, 11 involved any com„*! "g .? *?J?"^ *£-* g!?, %  * %  ' '"f *W "" examinations Thev .re G. Kan. 1'"> which had been payirt* *£T**" S!_!? S i£T KSK,"? 1 J"^, ^' urtl •*>" Ramsay F, Belgrave. reasonable wages at the lime yf '"*"* "*" been durveyed. r* fnaion is unfounded C, 'CampbelT; B* Reid; D. On| Ihn nil, in making a tuMaotdS rett and M Gay. 1O " •'" local trade. The effect Those passing the preliminary on my company may not be with examinations arc (1. Goddard out interest V. Lashley. S Welch. M S>|Uires. i" 194., the Ci-Iomiade were E Marshall, R Webster. V. Bnbh selling locally approximately 800 R Holder. I' J Hendley, G Hnr 000 00 and were making a net per B Lawrence and E St. Hill pmlll of 3% or 124.000.00 before rV'RINO LAST WKEH nianv taxnutn The nil in markups of U pellt.eal mii'tltnn were held ov ''' 5 "^med nur gran nront In St Andrew by thn Barbados am 45.OO0.0O We made ... Ptoaressivc Parlv aiui the Electors substantial Ios* and hove eontlnAa-octaUon, On PtUtoj night f/hflg r'i.i'J .o ^e vcr J in0 t n ,I F ^ ,u '" the Eli-eton. Avsociation was holdnal l > r n 1!l n ' m IM there 1 at Hillaby in support of %  • **". m the export of rum bl in the near future, will be see n proper roads 'and other improvements In this sres thvii .andidate Mr J A. HnyneJ. ^ rt l '_""P xt h vc ,,;,u lu de down—unfortunately ihlt'V-.om 1 iow ovor) The whole position la mail Si >1ear :•under' — 1*42 fN.Hi(io rti m Did/or Com M iu in maiktip) .. I < .' %  m -nd all kpensei tho labour Party held tin' Cane Hnrdcn in suppt.rl of Mr S. 11 M Worrell. The polling day for the Andrew bye-election, caused b> the death of M. i> At. %  ike 1 .1 a legnorrow R ill III i K STRH T loiiaeMed >esteick> morn. ,.,. ing. MotOTkrtl and >get M% _ t.r.>v PrOAl (SI) f^S T1IK KAslKKN BBsl of niarku|.) Ul ,. p, .... \i 1 pi ^fleld %  swaga a and all labourers were busy yoMarday expenses S';i !" "- %  — -""work IT' eenti |j ental Instructions To Voters To-morrow voters of Sl Andrew will elect a member to All a vacanc> in the House ol Assembly. Voters are asked by thnSheriff and Returning Offli.'i in a notice published •>• the OnUlal Garotte to meet at the time and place aforesaid, then and fhere to make choice of one qualified, MinVieiil and discreet person tt. advise and consent to the 1 making of such laws as .Kill be meet nnd convenient foi the g.Hxl government ol tinplace and people and preservation of their estates Netherlands Govt. Names New Carib. Commissioner Mr. Tinsmith One of yout difficulties for . MATERIALS can now bo supplied by us. We have SHEET TIN which cannot be replaced at its present price. If.8. nmvni LUMBF.R & HARDWARE I*"' i:i(Ki. Bay Slreel I'tTf I* IM; (Pri.ir lu cut %  fault :Ui% U tS% M l< I J Hospital Superintendent INI'M. 1'. ,.,,.„, gftr, Kcduclioiil •ol.l lui .. 112 coin. COM of 1NV.1 Th<> Advc,l* undortlanda thai Mr. A. U. Lcutlt w.M not roamn irom hi, Actlnit AppoHilmonl a* ,. Supcr,„,c„dcn. ol .he Oen.r.1 *~ ^l'l^^. Hospital to-day. POIJT-OF-SPA1N. April 14 Her iviajcbiy yueen Juliana has aplJOinted Jonkheer Leopold o u ar les van Ufford. Secretary of the Neiherlanda Embassy in WaahtngWn, D.C., to be a member of the Hrlherlunds Section ol tbjg 1 HI' %  bean Commission. Jhr. van Ufford Is alrean. fggnfl iar with the working of the Cl He graduated in Law Irom the CuiversHy of l-iden and .Pitied the Nethi 1 Ian 1 Foraagn laiiln in I9' 1 M'IVIIIK lust ,N AI ladle to the Kethananda UagaUoa in % %  arm BwltUMrtand In i4o he was atlailied lo the MlnlBtr) al p'OTeigX Affair-, at The Hague, beconunjt Peasant" .S'uppe Permanent Secretary 10 the NclhSELECTION—"Mikado" erlands Deleg.^1011 u, the United SM1UH Nations at Lake Suet ess the next TWO PIECES year. Since 1649 he has been in "To .. Wild HUM'" Afnedoucll his present post in Windi'mitim "In an Old World Garden Police Band Al Esplatwde 20 cenl :m eenis Xh.Police Band will pwj at tho Hay Sl.cel Espl.uiade tins .die. noon. The programme Include* .10 ceni | WO hymns, and Is a* follows. — 1. MARCH "Entry of the 2i|renu BtOaara" . Loiier — .'. OVEKTt'ltK 1'n.t :uid 22 centHflJ cent; "lady Nelson" Expected Here Today The Lady Nehon la due to arrive here this mornlnit around daybreak. !•*• %  %  %  %  * •• cvuU It was these HgUres that were submitted t" the Go*yernaajnt'g Iteinmittea of Enquiry. Tho m.i* ;er was very tnoroujirily pone into, balance sheets were required and cvarythiggj was sub-erUM 10 Uu 1 loaesl scrutiny In view nf the facts, which -Percy Fletcher r. SUITE— Ballet Egyptian" -Lufglm6 SEL—' Lilcac Time" -Xchub. rr l>ANCES-"llungarian-94a %  BraJims . CHARACl'KRISTIC I H i -The Butterfly' --Bnidht, HYMNS :tl A M. Saviour AH. un to Thy Dear Name, we 102 A i M Reioice. the Lord is King GOtt SAVE THE KtNGf rmidnclor: Cant, C. E RAISON M B E \ R C M. Wel-COBleS News You will \>v plensed to know that .1 laij!.' -hipmein of OLORIA (iriudiated) Evaporated Milk has arrived, and you eon no* your requirements from your dealers OLOHIA Evatx.raled Milk )-, recommended by Baby Special %  %  next best nubslituie (QI Mother's milk Use it anil ygsj will Ixdelighted with the WODin tul results De Witt's Pills J't mod. i~.Ojll.lcBACKACHE LUMBAGO SCIATICA JOINT PAINS HHIUMATIC PAINS OUR GUARANTEE De Witt's Pige era made under stncUy hyKienu: condition! ana conform to ntjid standards of puritj. BACKACHE Try this for relief! If you get sharp stabs of pain in .f\ a, _r yoni back wben you stoop and, WMm at other UmM, theie is a dull and conuniKMia ache, the cause can very often IK traced to the kidneys. These yital organs ahould filter poiaona out of Ihc ay stem but aometimes they grl diajEgiah and con^eated and the backache you suff.T 13 Natures way ot warning you thai your kidneys need aasistance. A trualrd incdicine for i.lis purpose is Oa Will Pills. They have a (learning and antiseptic action 00 the kidneys, helping to soothe them, tour (hern, up and restore them to fuiK<*oii na.arally. There M a long record of eurcess behind De Witt* Pills, which have been relieving sufferers in many parts of the world for e/et hnli a cci"my If you 1 .mil! ITAII even a few of the giateful letters sent in by batkachc suflereis who have found irhef attrt uking De Wilt's Pills you would realise that your suffering may alao be unne(esMiy. Why not try them for your trouble? They may be ail what vou need. Go to your chemist and gtt a i ipply right away. DE WITTS PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles SOMETHING CBABUS MC KNE/VRNEY & (O., LTD. I.NTEKIOI.OMAI. CYCLE & ATBLST1C SPORTS MEETING or THE AMATEUR ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF BARBADOS AT KENSINGTON OVAI. ON WHIT MONDAY. MAY 14TH 'Thursday. May 17th and Satuiday. May 19th Look lot tho Names ol Ihc Cycle and Athletic Male and Female Stars trom lt>% (taubbean who wj/i invade Bimsh.re • Programme Etc. appears Later J. W. MAVNABD Hon. Secretary. GRAND FREE COMPETITION *i% £•# %  open lo all. fourteen (14) prizes given auay. Starts 2nd April cloaca29th June 1951 Grand Free Competition open to all. fourteen (14) prues given .>., St.„t 2nd April closes th Jui.e. 1951. lat prise 1 MIK S-Burnei "Vt£m stove 2nd prlre. I caae E.P.N.S. Fish Eaters 3rd prize 1 ( >ni> No. BfS "V.ilor" Btovc and Stand 4th prize I only No III V.ilur" ().,,, 5th prize > t d>/ Soup Spoons Bth 1 1 -th p. 1 D orrinflct 8th pny. 1 onlj SUinleeg Steel Bread Knife %  COneolatlon prim of 1 doaa*orted Tray Bentos" 3oups. Just coUed the labels from your "Frav Bentos" Soup Una, paek them m do/en Iota, jnut send ihem to T, Svdnev Iviitck Lid.. 3rd Floor. Plantutions New Building, aiid demand .. receipt f. theor On 29th June the fourteen (14) -persons sending In the largest number of labels will receive their prizes according to the lUBOnty Ot labels sent in. tsz — ASK mi li in .11 n: ton "FRAV BENTOS" SOUPS 402. TM I N addition 10 lite regular si^c, this new. smaller pack of Andrews Liver Salt has been introduced to enable you to try the World's mo-: popular -.aline lor a very small outlay A glass of effervescing Andrews, coiling only a Jtu pence, cleans the mouth, settles the stomach, tones up the liver, and finally clears the bowels Also at any time of the day one icaspoonful in a glass of cold water makes a cooling, rcfreshin,drink. You can be *urc of Inner Cleamtint's with Andrews.



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PAGE EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE Sl'NDAY. APRIL 1J, 15I Individualized Infant Care At A United States Hospital h-llal IB U. p.n lit. MM Bv ..MIJ nir • ROM THE MODERN %  OMI years ago il becsme apparent that the old noiwry in jnlm lAaMiial RotpHa] -it Duron. America* .uitumobUe manufacturing center, was too %  .mall In meet current demand* (or maternity wrvice. A small laboratory •situated •*! the mntemUv stuor wax moved t* i.sieasined Into a new nuwrj to accommodate 33 infantIt now forms a separate part of the obs'etrical department but Is to arranged that noise from the nursery la prevented from reaching the r >ther. Under the old procedure, all nursery work was done in one room, while Under the new plan activities are departmentalized Thii not only makes for greater hut piavide* greater lOB for infants and allows the hospital to practise a strict isolation technique. Too. the new mmcry arrangement has afford**! tha hospital an opportunity to develop an original method of Individualized infant care are also worn and It is recommended that they be changed frequently so as to prevent droplet infection A New Way To Stop Toothache JAMtS A. GALE, L.D.S.. DP.A. THE WHOLE FAMILY Important An important feature of it.*new programme has baen to* perMelhod of Inspection (a) In the 0BMUUOU mirror nu probe examination nd charting are carried out Tbsj children are given a pellet KEPORTS from the Unit*) Slate* reveal that research workara in America had achieved remarkable results in the prevention or reduction of dental cartes rr — rr* 7 "> %  uie c( in ammoruated lll ,. ullI1 ... ...., „ ^.nahzed technique kit which dentifrice, and a two-year taveatieterlla paraffin wax (supplit bring., a new standard of nursery cation into these claims was instlthe Bacteriological Labor.i quality a new measure of scenetuted on behalf of the PubUc ch ew. and then they spit into my and .. new factor ur safety to Health and Welfare Department aitriiUeo. glass container* (also I the h^pital nursery Thsuver-ell of Glasgow In September. 1*4t supplied by the Laboratory and; ^nchet'wSe.'^ '?t~>he* A. Chief Dent.1 Office of a SSk*! %  *•* %  high. It Ik destined of an entec>x with school population of {u( These contalni I ncr steel %  hell with a removable Hg "*H6 * ""' %  %  p*"" <-d into the laboratory at lunch eLinles. metal Interior shell re^T** 1 "'a* 1 aecrue the inllm 0 lna ,,, SIs ;m ceased for iltbrui containers. The ^SV^. "f "5." could ,. *". menced at once, door rolls open and deed It %£"** .J* StX JBT**2Sl I'I The results iLnra (Mat. container* for all the u * n# cn d and medications In EveO* %  >,<*•! J; J?Zl (c) The result* cl>ewis IWMI. supplies containers for all the "* *• C "JJ, J £f? Snyder Tube csissir chain* and toiletries and nutation, neces*• ""* "SLSf ^'"^L'.Sld taterpreiaiian, are then sat* to m. ?7 t0 l £* [?"""• ~ !" of the Jg*2 %  Hg-'^^y-'W 1 by the B-cteriologiit. who has no baby. Each container 1. ceramljgM_! %  jM £•• %  idea of the clinical findings unt.l cally marked in black to ineticate P or rv "• " bsyont repjir the content* The finish is bakedAN OVER ALL VIEW of tk* nursery at Jennings Masaoriai Hespital jt Detroit in the sa.dws.Urn State of Klehlgan, *belng the tech11 J if n e of tkr honpital'* origin*! nvthod of individualised Infant ear* whiw anamel. tmooth and easy to clean. Tha kit is adjustable and made to fit convenient., •-t the head of the bassinet. RESULTS Test Schools Control Schools No. o/ Children 3D the result* ure collated by me Total No. of Cavities SeptemMarch SeptemFernber U, %  IMS 1S0 loso \n % %  CO TO 89 a 35 M a 1J7 These figures alone appear to immediately removed to this nurThe kit oilers a combination of advantages; (l, it provide, a fcm Ie wurce of supply of everyAa I cannot over-emphasise the The staff of the nursery unit is !" n t that serves the baby's need*: importance of removing oral septls be significant, but I may ad In piauming the nursery;^j^d the (Jt r Th( ungln ,i nursery has under the supervision of a graduate t*> peTmlU the nurse to carry from the young child, irrespective one child in the test group is] departmental units, comttseratlon j^,, conV prted into an kleel nurse who has had advanced out all treatments at tha Infant's of later potential irregular it ier responsible for an increase of & %  v.u> given to the amount of a.r (^lafjon nursery This unit la training In the care of the newbedsidn efficiently and conveniI ooaalder thlt any reduction In carious teeth; this Is an excep' naca and floor space needed lor fquiptMli with lavatory, examinborn iniaaU. GraduaU nurses and etiUy: (3) it sharply reduces the dental disease In these pre-acneol tionally deUeetchild, Is on a, il* proper care af each inram^ lnfl la hle. lntruments. sterilizer, auxiliary workers, before being possibility of transmitting inferyear* would cause an important Kpecial fat-free diet, and hn< been plan ^roon. layout Mlit WKrr ^ ni ano" other necesassigned to the nursery unit, must tjon frotn one ^^ t0 ano(hf r j.^^,,,pf the orthodontic proboff school for long periods, ihu^ ( supplies It Is in readiness to have had supervised pediairic The sterile medicated toiletries Jems w often encountered later, mlsslug her treatment during her periods of absence, while another child has been absent for three months and is responsible for an increase of 2. I feel The following is an interim rehowever, in including these chilidal solution, liquid soap, oil. !>•** jftw •>• year's experiment. dren lo av0 ) d ony suspicion of ind lotion, all In two-ounce botstatistical manoeuvring, les with shaker top*, talcum nowSubject-. Selected The figures are how< The subjects selected for this more significant when we aasest eat were children In nursery them as a percentage rover an area of 1.280 square foet. ^Uy suited, for such a purpow^ racetve an infant at any time, experience and have demonstrated nccommodated are: sterile cotton, Droblcms which we must all adrmi room wiT len^^^SSSS "i* nffl lwd for ^er patlenu, their aptitude for nvu^ery work. gaure. and applicators in threev^u^^Uer presented thai, room wiin sepai.ui l !" 11 '' 'vben it is not occupied by a inch glass jar* with Mamie*. .--,4 aceommndatlrns. The white glazed w ^ v Usually the care of premature metal covers aU An in ^ !" Cun d b*by. Usually the care of premature m etal til walls and compoaiMon tilr The examining and treatment infants is entrusted to graduate floor throughout are easily kept ^n, is oubjjde t h e nursery. Thia nurses only, and when This is not lean Five large windows permit ade,,^^!;, equipped room perpossible, it is assigned only to mils the physicians to examine those who have had training in the infant without going into the the cure of such infant*. Gradunuraarv It it well lighted, partly ate nurses and auxiliary workers altohol 70 percent, bone solution for eyes, a germii abundance of air and sunlight encent i etllnsj liirhi-! pre vent glare in the infanta' eyes. YEAST-VIIEl THERE'S PAIN RELIEF AND TONIC BENEFIT Yes — Yaast-Vit* quickly soothes sway ueadachea, n e u r al gi a. nerve and rheumatic pains — but it does aooMChing else too I Because of Its valuable tonic properties Yeaw-Vitc helps you to feel brighter, look better, sleep more easily and enjoy more energy. Nexx time you want pain relief take Ycast-Vite and get tonic benefit tool floor Plan with rVlth signed to the care of newborn natural and partly l.ou raw-em with an examining ._ The door plan is aufflaenl: (1) desk. It also contains an instrucare. In effect, no one is aligned \.i penmt each basinet to IKllwn t *uniltxar and a cabinet tor to the care of newborn infante separated from every other basaannlieunless 11) approval of such sinet and from any wall or partiassignment has been given by the tionr (2) lo provide room for The room in wlu The routine in these schools keen co-*)perstion made |h> testlxnllon possible Miss Elsie carefully regulsted and the Webster, D.D.O L D.S.. fur her equipment for ,.. in f,., waste, and M individual f U| an siscUlc plate and Instru emergence niP iit sterili/ei Il available at all A demonstration room is provided so that the nurses can instinct mothers, before discharge bathing, dressing, and the comlubricating agent und prevents <30 chl-dres, being supplied wlUi plete -are of each in'aal i^ 0SJTchafing As a further precaution. M Asnea-l-^le*rttooth-powder, the B the bassinet under babies may be anointed at btftn other three schools (SO chlljren) rigidly aseptic conditions. and frequently thereafter with o baing kept as control* and being Nur$ery Tlxre is also a separate hand washing techmaintained by botii 5 per cent sulfa cream As a consequence of the estab their choice. Cotton fibres can be strengthinstd in per cent when mn hydrocyanic acid, scientists ur*ery their io their Home*, in meiriwis oi n kiue s maintained bv botii ,, ^ -i-.v-r ..i. ... 1Mb,.. bathln,. and dreln, nur.es and physician.". Ha'nd.1^ S*^XSfirttfS--9H nfnnt all ehan the use of the special kit. impetlge *i.i.-iiu. oiai a II-'< '•*•/ iiM-ir iiiiiiinn -n ."-* >wgsiifu with soap and i umunc i ~n f —,, — -— %  *-.•for infants under observation and placed so that the mother* can |PT f and after hnnd Ins 'l" ""PP? ared entirtly from thi i r those suspected of having an follow all detail* In the nurse. dtalierUlg or S^ZJTM^ An r rt *. hoi P*. t ?L-. allowed to use any dentifrice of B t the University of Texas discovered recently. The new process Is ejtpccled to lengthen the wear of all types of cotton gar!:^.^r;:c gars &£&•£& aaSlSSS SSiBRMPB* i.-fec-ious condition, are are. aeleiu-d by the -natemitv hinf < s . diapering the mfant itely transferred he-re. supervisor and made avallabU I-, an infam found to for use by mothers upon dlsD r J H* nursery personnel liave such infectious symptoms is charge. naiir der Tuba Method. students in science, engineering id architecture.



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r.u;i i\ SUNDAl ADVOCATE i .11 V\ It-Mi. li. 151 R\KBADOS^Am r OfrfrE t. i f -1 "- Advoratt Co.. Ltd.. Broad Si. BrMartswn Sunda\, April IS, 1951 THE OXLY WAY IT IS not enough for the Weefl Indies to protest to the Secr*Ur> of State for UM Colonies .very time that sugar is being discussed at International trade raj What the Weal Indlaa should be doing is to .1 to the formation of a Regional Economic committee and at the same time request the United Kingdom to allow members of that committee to speak for the West Indies at international meetings. Membership of the Regional Economic committee VOUM have to be based on practical knowledge and experience of trade. The committee could only function, if it were free from political interference, although it would naturally consult with Governments on major matters of policy. It has been long apparent to observers both in the United Kingdom and the West Indies that so far from gaining greutei freedom from control by the United Kingdom, the trad.of the West Indies today suffers fnun OILfact that they cannot bargain for themselves separately with individual Dominions or other nations, but must be represented together through Downing Street. It is also a mistake for the West Indle# to think only in terms of the depression* and slumps which affected the West Indies in the past. In (act the West Indies in the past owed a great deal to the fact that they were in the habit of bargaining for themselves. The whole history of Canada's trade relations with the West Indies prior to 1932 shows most clearly how the West Indies benefited because they were not regarded collectively or uniformly as colonies but as special geographical units in the Atlantic, dependent on trade with the continent of which they form a part. The Royal Commission which reported in 1910 underscored this point by saying that "it would be unwise, except for the gravest reasons, now to oppose the natural desire of the West Indian colonies for close connection with the Northern Dominion." It would be a mistake too for the West Indies to suppose that the United Kingdom neglects their interests and leave* Canada to bear the brunt of a stable Weit Indian economy. In fact the West Indus have benefited from the fact that Canadian interest in West Indian trade and OH emergence of preferences led to the granting of similar preferences by the United Kingdom. H would be ungracious on the part of the West Indies not to be mindful of and grateful for the fact that the United Kingdom has agreed to a long term purchase of West Indian sugar which gives that element of stability so necessary to the health of the industry and the prosperity of the people of the area. But the real loss to the West Indies the loss of direct bargaining with Canada, in the opinion-of Canadians and West Indians, outweighs much of the advantages of long term contracts. Canadians cannot understand why the United Kingdom cannot restore freedom of bargaining to the West Indies on matters affecting trade. They fail 4c understand why benefits which the West Indies now receive from a favourable balance of trade with the Dominion cannot be handed back to the West Indies, which undoubtedly need them, and why the West Indies are not allowed to encourage Canadian investment in hotels and market gardening, both of which would strengthen West Indian economy and reduce their dependence on the overburdened British taxpayer. The Toronto Globe and Mail, Canada's most influential national newspaper, which is presently campaigning for a revision of th* moribund Canada-West Indies agreement of 1925. In a leader entitled "Opportunities in the B.W.I." made an excellent suggestion that the Government of Barbados would do well to follow up. "The present excessively high cost of many vegetables in Canada arises from-the fact that they are being imported from high cost-producing centres in the United States. While our reserves of United States dollars are materially stronger than a short time ago. the greatly higher price we pay for these imports increases the drain on that reserve fund at a time when defense needs are also making unusual demands upon it. Canadian capital and enterprise could create a highly profitable winter garden for this country in favourable B.W.I, areas which already arc well disposed towards us. The development of such business in these colonies—some time to become another Dominion—would automatically create new markets there for our manufactures as well as for those foods and other natural products which we produce and which they need." How many excellent suggestions like these might bear fruit if the West Indies could regain that freedom of bargaining which characterised ner relations with Canada from 1890 until 1932! In those days Barbados led the West Indies. Today tins island suffers precisely from the lack of leadership in economic matters. Trade is in the hands of the United Ki] Periodic protests about sugar bov necessary, under the present clrcunutaneei, will not save us Protest* should be unnecessary. The Indies must have a spokesman, an Mttedit* tative at all major conferences affecting a D trade, and they must have reto them, individually and collectively, the right to bargain directly in their own interests. Only by this means can Great Britain ensure that irresponsible critics of her achievements in the West Indies are silenced. W The unsatisfactory position by which even the hands of the Colonial Office arttied, when the Board of Trade or the Mln: try of Food use the big stiik, is the obstacle to progress in the West Indi* today. The United Kingdom would be%  advised to study the achievements an< the solid benefits which the Wes: Indies have gamed in the past from free direct bargaining with CanadaThe way ahead must inevitably be signalled from the way back. The West Indies wait anxiously for the United Kingdom to show signs of awareness that the present system does not function properly. He Built A Private Empire On The Hates And fears of Men EMPEROR ERNEST If. Grortfe Malroln Thomson .VOH II Ml .1111.1 PAINT HUXES and inn '.in::. rfU.ifc El FOOTBALL 4.HOI Ml WHATEVER the ti n a 1 decision may be as to the venueof football matches I during 1951 the controversy between B.A.F.A. and the Pickwick Cricket Club has focussed attention on a state of affairs that should be remedied Football in Barbados has never reached a high standard. One of the chief reasons for the failure of players to rise above a certain level is undoubtedly due to the Jact that the game in Barbados is played at the wiwui season of the year. It is difficult to Control a football when the turf is at its firmest, yet football is played during the driest months. Furthermore, the football season is limited to under three E RNF-ST BEVIN was a typical %  clf-made mnn of thc %  OBI He ii|s'l fciinn idow named Diana Mercy Bev in. \1|7HEN war came in 1939 and " disaster threatened in 1940. There was menl. there was little "T^iA^Mof'wnrt a woman of "character, had some: y?s.ySSan? As he sooke with tings helped In the local hotel. Bevin (twice failed to enter Pa* 0 iT£ at hi* wrislwatch every From a farm, where he was liament) was thc obvious chol ?We mmufes !" X?K vioteS paid 6d. a week? and hi. keep to M Minister of Labour in the nd furv of the utterance might do work he hated, young Bevin Churchill Government^ Whoever J I^IIIIS7IIIIBI1I intensified, the air rsn away to a job washing plates sat in the Minister's chair. Bevin months. Playing in the wrong season and bapgjlwjg gmmg+m ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ utw he bc ^ flme would ln facl ^ Mlmster pclUng voice, the platform shook a salesman of mineral waters at He proved to be a great with his passion, and the speech, I5. a week. On this pay he Minister of Labour, if not in all like an emanation of the speaker, married his wife Florence, a respects a good one. He put 25 M-emed to become alive and ponBristol girl of working-class stock, millions out of a population of derablo In the hall. They had one daughter. millions Into work of national The presence of the man, so But thc significant part of service, an effort of mobilisation fiercely dedicated to his mission, Bevin's career did not lie In sellequalled by no other country' so utterly wrapped in the oratory i ng lemonade. He peddled a more Sometimes he surprised and he was so carefully timing, was CJ( pi 0 sive commodity. "P"' hi civl1 servants by impulduring tiich a limited period is not the wish of the football enthusiast. It is dictated by other circumstances. The major fixtures. for purposes of Kates receipts have to he played on a ground which is controlled by lessees of Kensington. Kensington is thc J;I Cdi IIL i cat utii Kirn uayiifft v.tiat^r*. .T a — %  ^" ~— lifted up the heart. c j he drifted into the Socialist % lar "< 1 his department, nor is it This fierce and "J-'ormed rhemovomcnI and shocked Bristol by nc 5f ss "' ly „ bad fo r him to dislorlc voiced the hard and. m| eadlng ^ loca i unemployed into J, urb !" M " s tenal colleagues. formed aspiraUons of Britain s CB h „ dr .i Sometimes it seemed that Bevin proletarian uprising. It spojeejor Thc BUhQp ^ ^ and ^ sought to extend his suzerainty his side and f, ver the . whole fleld of Produccnvy .... ,-, demanded that the town council much >.m i MMWM. m uu pf, w j r< !Re U |S&w*'ihrt helT"I£ch I h "^,L," 1 L', 0 /i,e''t'^v'n'" !" ,, r. minrt ih_. nd biucrncss HI well ai n UrmaniUKi tut ui town council a d „„„„.„,.. ^, d t„.t w. unui,h. lt_l.o .ct Bevj.h.d *o,v„ hi, nuallty „ C Z, M ns ?KSSS' JS*lng opportunity. to steal in order to eat. He did so with a good conscience. I.lisf Ollllcf Now he turned his gifts to good m not of course. "• lr > whipping in members for main, 'he carte /hich Bcvln sought era" Union of the first B UT oratory 1 the only, or even the "Slab In il.. bark" ^yARTIME events likewise vhlch he himself suspicion of Communism with enrolled member, rootg in Red-fomented strikes h*-adQuavtors of cricket in Barbados. It is felt by every hearer like a physlArttT a phasc M „„ effeetive lay *'ve plunges of policy It L< TTi .. ...^ ,j^h. R „J cat load which at the same ume pre achcr at Poulton Baptist Chaphad thing for a Minister owned by the Cricket Association and ... leased to the Pickwick Club. It is primarily a cricket ground and as cricket is played in the v.'et season the ground is only available for a few months in the dry season. Furthermore, the Football season has to be curtailed in order to get the playing field •fcady (or cricket. The first essential then for better football would seem to be a separate and'distinct playing field for football, where the RxtUTM could be played during the wet season and where practice would be available all the year round. An enclosed ground is essential from the point of view of finance. But a game of football, which lasts little more than an hour, does not need the elaborate accommodation for spectators which cricket demands. A natural or artificial slope which would ensure an adequate view of the game by every spectator is all that is required, and even with the limited number of open spaces in Barbados it should not be beyond tho ability and finance of the B.A.F.A. to find such a suitable location. Until the B.A.F.A. make an effort to disassociate themselves from cricket there is little hope instrument by "'HrfflT'the personality of a tt%*U the" beginning Ot acireer during ^e thirties;"which challcadet he had a gift tor organ!of steady building up of trade I*nged Bevin In his own bailiwick. TSmmi a greed* for centralised unionism among the transport r C r !" nl Pjf *'"? ^uthorilv. workers, in which Bevin w as???**[ ."hat; darkest deed In th : lie was a cunning negotiator BO eiated with an older and more who could always convince those po u S hed leader. Ben Tillett, anc he represented that he had^gcrtthe wnic h eV cntually through nn era i stab Bevin calendar of crinr In the back." When Bevin, after the war. be1^HE£ s3ggcS3g S !" l£^ To a UUlS puSKcUy he soon port and Ccneral Workm Union, he brought all his .RibbornncBs added ihe protcssional Iruculence with Bevin, l chief denliuier, and a vanity which aee had Inof the Trade Union bc*s. Seeing holding Ihe iioit of uenerp necreHated and disuppointment not vet the bulky ngurc. the Jowl, the tary t !" d. ..,.„, detern>lncd atumpy wlk as he „-, Tru enough, the Foreign Secemerged from a inference, who %  >••• U.rs K 'y wa, crippled b, th E&LK5-S! anTma": I was In ,0 tha, the world pSto policy" ngSETSi. ^iairnnier' l out-.lde the Trade Union movehealth, too. played it. part. Imen When other men ot the same ment began to uke note of ever, allowance I, made, his nhd.tv and the same fibre were Kevin, the symbol of workcareer M Foreign Secretary building up commercial king. Ing-class Intransigence who neverbrought Mm personal disappointdoms Bevin was creating an In theless concealed so shrewd a rnent, the praise of his government oC the standarU 0 foolbll_in Barbdo .u^uiai empire. At th. monwnt sense of realities. -ffi&fJSgg'Zg' „ app ,"~," of its srealest extension it eonIn 1820, at a court of inquiry or the opposition and a steady tuned 1,300.000 subjects over into dockers' wage claims, Bevin diminution in public credit, whom Bevin ruled as the titular .tatad th. case for the men with „ %  *'," f?!!* rcn fL ,l"" r ,n hired secretary, but In practice as ue „ ,|U, with such a mastary n ; a '""'T n .' Dn negotiator mci an absolute despot. of hi. brief, as * a. of legal £j ta fiJ*Cg m <>' • grinune, gfarg^.".- asTe'^rK^rar^nt gSWVvii rpHE.ruim. of the empire was lasted for 11 hours spread ov.r p J r ^g b C Hl ," !" b!?vem„, w^K nurartl tnol sucn a aocieiy wouiu n..r | Uu Trmvon and General three days, during which the court prMWe wMi-Hbrinklng authority helped to maintain tho diljnity of the legal Workers' Union Its domlnloc became mor. andi more """• over ever.1. which he eouU n.i i ,t i i-.j u„l •!,. du-lolu stretched from bargees to grave. Th. head of the courl of Inquiry. Qmirol ^ Io y,. CTd hc ,„,, „, prolession In this Island. But the Society JjSr7 the late Lord Shaw of Duntormconildence of ev ihe most loyal It was an empire of workers, line, deeply impressed. In.lted conservative, built upon the card vote and the Bevin to his house for a friendly readiness to strike at thc drop ot la i K In thc end. Bevin won 90 Thr hilt lllsHH a hat, until Bevin shiewdly real-^ ^om 0 f his demands. Ta ATHFn iK QH it. ... HM a. ,sed that, sometimes. II paid belter "" A tcw momh later, he went R A !" ,," „"' "J'„,""""* ,„ be conciliatory. The empire „.„„ olher L,^, lcadcrs 10 ,, J.V* U,M "cvm of these dll._ ; _^ ui.ui r i\ n A (•..„ %  !-„ * *"**"" J S4M II IV improving. IN 1940 n Act was passed lo incorporate the Barbados Law Society, and it was hoped that such a Society would have ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE SILVER STAR C0NG01EUM With FELT BASE Beautiful Patterns Cul lo Your Requirements SILVER STAR C0NG0LEUM SQUARES with Fell Base — 3 X 2J yd*, and 3 X 3 yds. Jf Just the Floor Covering you have been waiting; for WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472. 4687, 4413 viv/,v/r',w/.v^//#/.wiw-v^vA'iy/>!'//*'-";; MR. BAKER!! You can once again BAKE with a SMILE.., YES'. IC* Here Again GOLDEN ARROW FLOUR THE FLOUR WITH GOOD RETURNS OBTAINABLE AT YOUR WHOLESAUR. VS. was short-lived, it met with opposition for vurious reasons and now it is defunct.Never was a Law Society more needed in Barbados than to-day. Our Bar is fast acquiring a name as the most undignified and disorderly in the West Indies, and recent conduct in the Courts has done nothing to disprove that opinion. Barbadians like to think that Barbados is Little England. They are flattered when visitors say that Barbados is the "most English" of the West Indies, and they like in think that this Island enjoys, and benefits irom, the traditions of England. But the behaviour in the Courts could not possibly be more un-English, the dignity and decorum of the Courts of the Mother Country are not to be found here. When a young Barrister is admitted to practise at the Bar of Barbados he invariably promises to maintain the "dignity and traditions of the Barbadian Bar Those who happen not to know something beforehand about the Bar in Barbados are liable to spend the rest of their lives trying to And that dignity and those traditions. In England, when a barrister misboIntves grossly in a* Court he is ordered to leaVe the Court by the judge, who then writes a report on his conduct to tho Benchers of his Inn. If the Benchers consider the offence sufficiently serious he is struck off the rolls, otherwise he is lined. The Judges in the West Indies have the same course of action open to them, it they wish to make use of it. but they arc hand!ClpMd In their duties by thc absence of a disciplinary body to whom they can reporf misconduct without having to exercise the drastic powers vested in them. By bringing the members of the Bar together for discussions, and by using its power of expulsion, a Law Society could do much to raise the standard of behaviour in the Courts of Barbados. Perhaps it might adopt as its motto Lord Brougham's dictum: "Conduct without eloquence is SUM to trust to for success than eloquence without conduct." much a'part of the liberal ^ !" v wnileriJoyd^wiie'to > i, ** ,onm S J y<*>rs. history Italis; ,.v.,.m a. an, cotlon miM J^^VJSSl. o.."n sed WF^&£2ZX2V£, vorkers would nol tolerate action realised that, with power a bos. gainst Soviet Russia either by mu ,, becom, „ s t,tesman. And m war or by blockade. above nil, the Minister of Laboui meni'lll. power was handed #><"<> ^"V^.' ^Z" h d '-i %  %  U ^...J iFii 111ai irii %  nt ihi> u ii-t.i' or Iron foundry Ovcr il Bevin's rule w a supreme. Even when at las" h left his office to loin the Govei ictroy Alone Colon movement. Bevin did not B*T Herald of concealing the WOaLD COPYRIGHT RESriWED. IIII\KI\<. ALOUD There ought to be not a society for poor vnfortunatc lovers, as the record requests, but a society fur preset vlng the common sense of the common man. Much of this common sense Is reflected In common speech. There U to-day in the West Indies n conspiracy to murder common speech and sub>tituUin its place a collection %  i cliches and phrases which impress the ignorant but bore the rommon man, who Is too intelligent even to make thc cITort to understand. Take the word emerging. If it means anything ai nil It means what a mouse is doiiu: wh0n it is not quite out of its holr. To ipeak of a tuition emerging .is so many of our academic friend* do speak is poppycock, a blunt word nnn man they look around for"g)ie urunm mon man, and they tr$t him out nol to show how uncommon h is and therefore tit to lord i over Uie common man, but t. • %  huckle silently among themselves and sgy. "well If this Is the best that you can do; you m sdmit that you can't do with us." And we must admit that we can't. Not because we agree that this is the best that wc < do, but because the rtcpert | fbe Intellectual ar not look for the best from any other source than their own narrow and self admiring circle. ,, to the men of H.M C S. While I vintling the Clubs and Godij third's Restaurant domanu GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM. %  M *#/ tti sitt i ft **** tlli I 1)1,1 is tiiHptfj Wlaqni^



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SUNDAY APRIL 15. 1*51 M \II\Y \ll\(K.\TI PACf. TIITR1I I N Faiths Barbadians BB -V> Radio Live By — 8 SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Programme I'M \mn i OlR-n. 7 „ „ 1 Anal-ay. 7.15 I i It—•* By JAMES F. BRATHWA1TE Mtmberc of Ihe Advent ist NEARLY fifty years ago Church neither smoke ,i dunk Severu.i-da.v AdventlstG began alcoholic beverages. work in the Island of Baituidos. The denomination operates 161 s To-day there are over 2.100 adhorm*1wal uuHitutioiis in various ll ents who worship each Sabbath COUOlrlM af ih,world. One hasu ;Saturday) in the fourteen Ad. P*l is located in Kingston, ja '' vent 1st churches on the island maica. Another is uiuii-i The Seventh-day Advenlist Mruclion in Puerto Rico. In Portchurch was orwnized nearly one 'ySpam. Trinidad, an out-patient Hundred years ago and accepted t-hnic was established about three as Iheir watchword the statement • voa|,R *<•• Durlnj; 1950 this clinic of Christ. "Go ye Into all the world ca I cd 'or over 12.000 patients and preach thGospel." Today *" e v "lce of Phopheorede* they are carrying forward their broadcast heard over Rediffuprogrnmme o( religious, medical. 5,on ner t 130 on Sunday 7.w MMY and literature work in more lands niwrnngs is part of the church's "T " and tongues than any other Prownrld-wideeffort at evangeluing v.!*?,—!''.' teitant denomination. They have * world, This programme i re,. >• %  Cnw more than doubled their member' CMP > i over 750 stations and H W ship every ten years since IMS. h *ra m Spanish. German. French JJ l0 I"" '' and there are now 718.000 memp*"**. Chinese. and other "' berr. tin ..ighout the world. languages in the various countries BOSTON of the world. A few months BB %  i"' innHrali .Itl II a." I 4 Ii Ml %  %  "! %  l>I ih.Wrrk. S IB p.n Ray • a La* there # havc been Matted the fS that there is only one way to gain "Bible Correspondence Cow • %  eternal life, and this is by accept, 'hat now have an enrollment of *„,"„,,', ing Christ as one's Savioui almost i( million .students Thcoe Home news Seventh-day Ad van lists in harlessons are available In 2! M " Ir •"" '•"<•"' reran* mony with the Ten Command, languages. English. Spanish. Porft&tfrasMB Vi^££ ThrV %  M u at %  As part of their educational proover 14.000,000 persona recelvvd — gramme they operate three ele. help. This came as a mult t .. V mentary schools here in Barbados. 1.750 long of cloihing and Mllel They send their students to Trinipackages sent into 41 countm dad for advanced work nt the from the churdaw' warehouses •"> n-.n-h ..,.,.i M-II I Caribbean Training College where The financial struelurr afthe^J .'.'.'pm students prepare for the British church is built around the Bibl. M n external examinations, or take principle of lithe-paving Each %  > courses in Theology. Teaching, or member is taught to give oneBusiness. As part of their educa. tenth or ten per cent of his net lion they work in one of the folearnings for the support of the lowing Industries: Printshop. ministry. Apart from th. Uthi Hroom"hop, Bakery, Laundry. an uU )r F J Parchment the Educa lings in his pocket and worked for n, im ,i Secrct.uv as well as th* all of his expenses at college Director of the missionary oetiviOvei twenty members in Barba. tics of the cnureh. Mr. C.enr„c rtos spend their time selling AdMcMillan supervises the work ol ventist books and magazines dealthe gospel literature salesmen. In mg wilh the events which are takaddition to the officers of th< mg place in the world. Last year Mission the controlling com these Colporteurs or Gospel Salesm fee membership are Mr. E J men tiroiighout the world, soUT Parchment. Mr O. P. Rcid. Mi over I2.45.770 worth of literRr. H. Lewis, and Mr. C M ature in 195 languages Oreenidge. C.B.C. PROGRAMME .i IS, IS&l „. IB.II Lst'l — 'I %  :.(ml I'nv H0MDAV. A'Mtn. ifl. ISM. 10 III IS pm Nri %  !) I i 1 THANI BROS. HARVEST SALE or Tin: rott \ Mil f.WI MI(IHI) 111 HISS //" Thousands are taking real advantage of genuine Reductions in /.tidies '"-ens Good*, <'nt8 Wear anil Woollens ami other De/Hirlnivnls EVERYDAY < licit alum I CHURCH SERVICES sujor a !" llh rn OfOTOK Itching, Burning and Smarting oi Ecze Stopped In 23 Minutes u i I. Com pan' ••Iins: P"i ST LEONARDS CHURCH "y^t^'sSslsa u .mlUJii. SUNDAY. APRIL in.. 1HI ***>* HOAIW 11 ..mile n. 4 m Chor.1 KucharUl. t a .it. Cho%  N Campan, UMS| ral rufh.ntl a, Addrni. Ham Malina Sairi.. J pm. Mr. F RarknCIltACS IULL-lt am. Mr. V. R>id Mr r. Q. __ m.VTJTK—11 am. Mr. O W**kr7 p.m Mr W. DWBS*. MuNT;oMKV—7 p.m. Mr I. 0l*^ %  HO* IIII.1~T pm Mr F C. Stuitli mrNSCOMHE--ll am. Mr. A MMTaS MITHODIS1 JAMRS fTlrTarr 11 a.m. R#v I I^ %  m Me* 1 S. rVitiHur PAYS104 RAY: • SO m D Arm). J p m Mr J I-irmWHITE IIAIX' I.M l> McColloiitn laVli 7 pm Mr Q. Rark-r OIIJUKMORIAt.II a m Mr P rv. %  < %  1 pm Mr. C Harper H"l ETOWN I JO am Rs J Haulton. If.ii 7 pm *>ppl> RAVK HA1.I n m Mn< f. OaVl pm Rav R McCuIloush jftuuii rarowM n nm P'\ J s gAUlInn p m Krv F. IdWrrurr •JKI^M II am. Mr Bannrtt; 7pm DRTHCSDA 11 am Mr Blar/kman 1 G—1l...rpc IXtNIi RAY II a m Hmina— M-ti,. 3pm Compai-v Hell"! 7pm Salvation MKlIn*. Pl*chr UaaSbMMM Waasw OUIT1N 11 a.m llnllii p.m. Company Mn-ljm(. T p Balvallnn Mtelina: PiaK. I-**' 1 %  .-MrTKEB HAllll BJB Mrii"(; 3 P.m. Camp-n) Mr-tin prn Salwattan Mr-hnf Prrart" I.*lr-"ar,l Rrld I hill I I -v -, l| \< > Til* Church ol ChrlM. **i" I i..in t'ppr* Bav *rt AuMdavi II a.m. and 7 r ST>AV. April IS 1SSI %  •t* %  '-"•• %  -"•*• A in: SIN nisKAsr. AND DCAT ii vr--" T.t: P*a Cod Ha rf NiSfWIarrn h i. it la nn lOMri ir, „|ffT fr.. % %  ol-tlurtfiu k i Mmpli gln^c th&;*r„v, aseasssiy for any uslf 'lasiiallns n olainltlira *U< h Bl lla-h. Rlnrorm hla-khasas. 1— innl I'f n bad akin miika yta CMI ir,torlor and cauao toil lo loaa your r.-w -cl-r.tinc war. and don't lt a bad -kin m.iH" pseplo trunk you am dl s saaad. • A Nw Discovery NlTodvrm la an ointment, t •!| V -.[. .. %  % % %  --•••> of laU. It la n naw ahaROTaiT. an1 la not sraaay lint — la almost Ilka a .. % %  i. %  ken raw apply It. It j rnpldly Into tha p.<. and fluhia tliimw of •nrf<-r> akm !.!• nil*li*a. Klio. dTia r->i:t;ui,a 0 lngra
  • tita win, h riKhl ajlln iroublM In thMio :: %  tlatiiand kill* itimicrobes IT paraD rnpoii'ibifir akin dlaorden. it. It oop Itrlilnar. burrlni: n*l ..i>rtle In 7 l" lo mii.iitt.. r„ and aoothetl.a akin. h-l tha gam* Works Tut Sanaa MsoOrm It *clant:fritllv ikln 11 -. •|...„i a u RFTIiri II horn-.. T p rr DAI-KFITH llR Rav M A I Croaby Ra%R M. I (MM WJI.'TM DISTRICT Croat.) torn Mr II Ptto\iniiNCK 11 CUrk-. 7pm Rev I fXJIAII. 1HI *.I.VAT10N CARt-TON 11 an, Hnln LIFEXIKE FOREARM A lifelike svnUrrtkforejrm wltll :i sitnulatfxi blood supply is being used to teach US. medical students how to giv* hypodermic injections or how to withdraw blood from the human body. The • skin' of the arm Is flesh-coluiired plastic material, under which are a series of light ind dark latex tubes that duplk;r SYNTHETIC RUBBER US scientists have developed vnihetic rubber that reta at !" ; cT .rastkit, at 212 r MCP.v, i .'.v.. %  p.-r .,-'.\r< lew hett (100 degrees Celsius) above and at 123 degrees Fahrenheit (50 5 degrees Celsius) be,r Ufa batr.. iiniK and " li AFTBR flf treatment you ham r*en ur akin—Ihe trrat>. yew |osh pMr*anraetlM, i win Irli-mlNUodrrm h.>e 1-nr-r. h-nlihi. r aklna t Mi R K. t I'X ii i Italy tl'ii_ ,| .m"irtin|r lixmi fur tii-.| fvrr,'hlns. At teat I I.-an. of HHiilllllll It atopped tl.a Ibrhln| In ID mlniitrr. I rnuld aeo mv %  '> • I ". All 11n %  %  '• and aasty akin %  ir,.n.l* %  'a •hr improvrmenc H < -,'.--%,V.^fcVl^V-VV*,--%-^%-.*^.'^^^ IT WONT BE LONG NOW hriore sh*"s Iv.^ir at school again, mooting up wilh the tasw U fAal ni.l roughs OK! othei inloctaori'. common to school lite But oho r*iii (to in no dang** ol contiactuu, any ol those i>ls ii •ho has boon profNnod dunnq th* holiday with a rou-t* ol FERFOL. bacot"* fllRROL is a wondotlul re*, 'ance ba a vincible towei ol stionqlh agamst mlection. Ii you atr strono you will noi fall a ready victim lo ovory qerm that is in the atmoophere around you n.a's why rtRROL Khouid be givon to all s. hool children during aW holidays, to j)r-paie ihem lot the airenuoua tmrm arread and help Ihom ward oH illm Give youi child a course ol TERROL thu vacation and *e>* thdifferonc* it makos. FERROL VXW/////,W,V,VX','.v,V..'.'.'.W/.v.'.v. S.'OKfS & IVNOf tTD-Agenu ts)tjttfjtacj-.t'i-.r ;-.t;-,-.-.'.;-.-.-,;; i West Indian 8. British J ? I K-JL/ ... n ew 1 OSfll/IHJi'lVflVf/ now at Y. De Lima & Co.. Ltd. "Vour ItwflHt 20 BROAD STREET (P, Wo proudly present ThiSILVER KING Floaling Rid" Cyclt Complflo re-dANiqn ol trame angles has mulled in Iho IIRST MAIOR IMPROVEMENT In biryclr ruia.it ;ou k SEE US FOR:GALVANISED MVSHED WiBl 1 RED CEDAB SHIN': I OIL ST< > PlMllW 001 T.nFRBKRTMd. 1* 11 R<>.hii.k Mr.*t -ml Sm*l*i LaniHUH A'H-.' ^ ATTBNnmNtt I F.UTOIIV >I\V\.I IIS S i.ikr (his upiMirlunilv of • %  hliiiiiint; \t\r /iniiirrmriil [ GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE K Rancinjj from \k m upwards MILD STEEL Flatr-. Itnunds. Squares III all >>i/e BOLTS & NUTS All Size* FILTER CLOTH While Cotlon Twill Al PRICES that cannot be repeated. I InIt Mill MH/S I Ol Mill) I.Id. While Park Kt.ad. St. Michael : in M. on iff ajannja* i 11 in HUM, ran MH ll It inn \l I'rirr. Ihal uniK.I hr r.-p.Mlnl GALVANIZE BBBTS—(ill., "ll.. sfi. 9ft. It) It. • ALUMINUM SHEETS — lt„ Mb, ML, Mi lilt.. 1211. I VI HITI SHEETS—lit,. Tit.. Mi.. fi„ ion. ALUMINUM GUTTERING KEII CEIIAK SHINGLES UIBKKOII) MINERAL SURFACED ROOFING ^fl Wide PIAiM AilOiNS LIMITED Vi-.'..'*;'-'.*.'.'^; %  :',;.--.'.'-?;;v*,.^c-,*,;;'.: %  ;,',v-c,;*.'.-'.'-•-'-;'--,'.;-.'-i.^. | I



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    M MIAY. APRIL 15, 1S31 M MIAY ADVOCATE PACE H I VI \ HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY -Ev! TUB P-A=i3 PULL O^ ) l^T )* 7-y %  BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG oooo won rfi^ V.E M MCt TCwOffBCW #?• ll 31 AT AUNT EMMYS FCQ THE MJMT I'M A B*C"ELOO-*AS Fi?ce AS TM£ SPEEDS %  • ^ f V, VOUNC MAN GVE ME THAT TiME V.AST£C lit KEEP IT UNTi L vctl GET MX z vsopit.e j. *>,*. — *-> Bl fol .!> THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS %  i ANP 'M H \ -L, ... %  E ..., RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES SC*fN I 60TTA CO THISWTI BtEN THRU TOO MUCH J NOTTOFINIWTMEJ 77.. :%  JOB."—— -^ /VOUSEV 3. HOYOU DIEDji1 HAVE IT VC06 IN THE KANE JfcwAj WAY JEFF., UMM_7J Mi. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEOAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW Onions. (Pet lb.) 16 4 lb Bag lor .10 Tono. (1 lb. Tins 1.23 I .OH Robertson's Potatoes, (Per lb) 12 8 lb Bag lo. • Squashes. (BoisJ 1.28 ••! (Three Varieties) Grapes. (Tint) 33 %  Kaviar. (Tubes of 26 If D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street <3% t o* tl M kia. l.~.r V| Gordons vxav^-aravxix^,v^.-.^^^^ EVERYTHING YOl XEEU tftfh I-H1M / $e I Tl; I 1HT/' .: .-,._ p t i -\ n s r, ALUMINUM WARE ( MI ki.nl Shakers. Saurepuns, Jelly Moulds. Strainers. CHINA and EARTHENWARE lea-sets. Tea-pots. Cup* & Sourent, Platen, Jugs. CLEANSERS Sprayer*. Mil DDT. Windolene. Ilarpir, Carpel Cleaner. Pain! Cleaner. Vim, Polinhing Cloths. GLASSWARE Tumblers. Jugs, Jelly Pots. Casseroles & Raking Dishes. KITCHENWARE Sloven. Sinks. Aluminum l>r;iinboards. Sanicans. Potato Ulcers. Mincers, Vei;. Shredder*. Mortars, Scales. Knife Sharpeners. Cake Pans & Coolers. Irinn Tubes .mil Hooks. PLASTICWARE Baby Dishes, I ;;-. Containers. ( %  lasses. Cups & Saurers. ENAMELWARE Saucepans, Mm;. Bowls, Basins. Chambers. Palls with Covers. FLASKS I %  A III Pinl Thermos. ^CHAIRS, MATS, MIRRORS, CUTLERY, AND MANY OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO YOU WILKINSON & IIAVM:s CO.. LTD. Successor* I" C S. PITCHER & CO. Phones: 40HT & l2 PITCH i:irs rr ECONOMY, VALUE and SATISFACTION. VzV.,W."*A*".'*"',' C



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    I'U.I IOIKTEEN SUNDAY AIA'OCATK M MlAY, APRIL IS. 185! Till: SHIM IS li.%1 K Housing Expert* Tour Vfltigua ANTKIUA, April 14 1 >. i**-rts have toured Anllgua'i ) vM A to advising i iTft.OOO allocate! nieiu S ,i* many as pOft Lof the 1.400 houses n %  i t Town pi-. JamaK Blery I v Housing ; MM of the Rico Planning Board, and i Hi W M Wnodhmi %  i.h Officer of Cn and W M Pa Mi say. i |ng problem is similar :.. iM it in ether parts of th. world, n-d thoy are avreed hurricane destruction Antiitua w.th an op|. rtur.lt) to start \n.%i range real i tit o| pennantnt hou .Uitrodacnon of "aided elp approach USED TO THE "ORONATION STONE, stolen (tow tU room Hftwu abovt. ou Cbn-tm* day I9V> was ..-turned to London on FMday. It will t. k-pt m secret place lor some umr Th? vtane was amoved ITM th* Coronation Chan bchtud th* Hifl. Altai in Wertam..tcr Abbey. aua BH pu-turr -no* now mp Alwr Cnnatmas Trm hampered tiie tlilvva* Dotwrt line -hows how t mi ii[*R*Pd iM-t it SCOUTS OFF TO CAMP B'dos Guidi wim-" of tne 84th Barbadu.(Good Shcphcidi Group under tneiriisu M GO i n VT\ la) for camp al Oldburj Woods, S Hnlip. *hm they will if in i-.ii i .i.ii: Tui "iv 17m iu>.. Scouts of the 36lh i (Holy Trtnit) i Group, undn ... inf KM Mr Carol Lnrdr. als lull toi i imp al Si M : S-hOol on Friday 'ncludcd in then programme was o CampAre which n.k plan last night and a Church Pal %  .! % %  which takeplaci lo-dsj The. .oil break amp oi Wondaj The D.C.. Mr C. D. S| itie O.S M Mr W r u M irshaO, plan lo visll the camp over the week"9th Barbados %  S1 Patrick 1 R I (irmip at then Headquarters, •IMMIOV YTc wlh them all no ANNUAL GENERAL MrKTIM. The Annual General Meeting i the Island s. mil Council will |> t-e|g] at Seoul Headquarter* on Friday next, 30th April. hegmng al 5 "0 p.m HE C vornor. Sir Alfred Savage, h C M G Chief Scour. ill preside. .:4th March, ,. patrol of Scouti i>f the 4th Rai hadoa (James Street) Group. hittfc-hlkod to SI Alhan's where they camix'd over the Easter weak-end. The i. i .i various jcout BCUWtkN while in .ump. and thoroughly enjoyed ihemi sfeea. TABLE TBNMS Th' ScouU Tsble Tennis :ieh oocncil .iv H %  r %  niKin. IMl 1 %  lo a BUCDCwafU] ConipteUon 0t Friday niKht till. April, Those who were prcsc'nt on lhi< 'ccasion saw lomo really Due pcr•. %  11> in the Finals, •Than In sscn dlvblon the conic*! ml' displayed keen rivalry and played cartful nevertheless attractive tennis. In the Senior division, Scott nlY.M ( A lost to Blacketl. also .if Y.M C A 23—21. 21—23. 16— II 21 18 .u"l 18 21. In the Junior dlrlston, N. Cadi I i Stiwal won from T. Inniss. ;.l 0 ef jam Btnat, wh beat I Dell In the Brst two name-. 21— 7 an:l 21-. but Cf 10 pull liimsclf lofcther. ap<> eanic back to t n the last three L-umw 11—11, 21 15 and 21 Id ..nd so emerged champion Of the .lunior Divl&ion. St. George's Week St. George's Week will 1Mcele iTaiaa thioughcul 1hi.s Isl-md from 22nd to 28th April with Church Campers. Good Tur !" %  %  On Bundaj MM, iiu-re will be .1 Central Service al Ja I Church bcKiniuru; 430 p m. .it whirh nil I U of ull ranks are ixpn i i in bs praaani tlsn %  111 %  semble in the eburch jrsi i loon Hill ba i %  i than wiii in practice for Colour Ba Saturday SIM April pi S.31 t JanHM Stieet ChuCh. Tboao Orouna which find n lmh to atiemi Uiti Ccnti ra jskel to ai( olher place of worship, prefer bfa a' the same lime as tha: % %  NsdUlad < %  < %  the Centr.,i oday SSrd, st r.rwir iiav Bcwulsi uid Scouti <>t al! lank* 1.111 wear Filiform from Minriae Ut SunM-l Ot. Moi.day niglit, ttl I a CampHre al GUI' Memorial for membery and rrlands of the group, and anothe" Caniprlre ;.t Scout Headquarter' ifoad. Both ol begin at 1 30 o'clock ^•hooiiors Bring \\'\Vi\ ( ..lllllili'i The M'hooner Franklin D. It I'J-tnns net. brought riee. wrallstM ""• %  Brow I and moulding sand from Danarsrt riie sch %  kippered by G. I. Scaly Frcih fruit and ralmnges w brouifal in I'H i the MotOl Ws-el Moneka DornlnlCJ The Maueka crew of 13 Captain R Hudsi mail, this 100 lornaxe t Traffic %  -•."-. No. 26 Vo not lorcl to uiKiniand %  I'l'l' >• when (iiiittinc you i. HI your jr brakes vehicle Spare made avallablr by CANADA DRV for viler Malorlni. Our PeUSUltb Not less ttlBfl ISS.PM ou! of total population oi tMJMi concerned bi nsa s ii n i hoMlsn In Barbiidos. bccOTatng to Agrlcultun i*. B a The total nuiniier of all peasant holdings under ten .,i lev in the Barbados census 1940. was 30.752. roinprisinri ar estimated :7.283 ncres. Peasant holdings Iwtwccn 1 to 10 Sens were 4 237. Peasant hnln ings ft and 1 acre were 23.383 Peasant holding unriet '. BH r< :1.132. h.ddlniu o( Mi to 10 acres 7.9A3 ana SalStS renter* and \9fi*>~' !: %  i m "mni'e or less free-hcld holdings" Harbour Log In Csrliale Bay M V ScdseArld S %  %  rfabae Stwaawai ijtitOaipa*. natwi %  w sn........ Ba .-ii 1/,'rtUl Adr-n Brl % % %  r.H.n^HM \ l B SaSar. I %  ••met Whiliaker, Srhuwuei t.niir Ho"<|>m,.x.i cnu %  > |„, M. M V Wiiiemrt..fl • M w inana, H %  i>arf*id AJOUVALS W ugi ., cerui caicd teed) m Km U rWUI m ine rest of the party an btlsi Bmtih, custon Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. Miss Rita Clarke, -trnotypist in a furnlturt Idad Hue GWofl ParilS, iiniiL Ga Oulana and Mlsi U % % %  Alteon Ii All next week Ihey will IHgoing thmugh a cotnj %  i inn pecks and ii tn p %  eeing how %  ra 1 rained. On April return to London and tari a long proeramme of stghticeina. There will be mi i to training courses and camps In iscas with stays of several days In the more ii %  it res third week In M IT ot! .i nine day ti ip tj Edinburgh There Uurj will BX• %  eamps and see some of Back in Umdnn once %  will visit the restive! ..f Britain and %  pend %  dej H Oxford. Nexi ther Inp norU ioid-On-Av..n possible surrotindiiiKs I No wondsr tbla man Crsaded golnf to work, for rheums .ie pains in his *rm msd" II _. them. Yet to-Oay be f*.* fltter than ever and Work .• a plsssore. as hs tells in his Isttor : "1 had been suffering flron rbsumattsm erv badly anil had aurh pains in my arms I scarcely knsw how to use them. Ther was told to try Kruscben Baits, and after oalng one bottle I found relief. Bo. of course. I nave kept oa with It. m now thoroughly better and hate n-ver fel! ao fit for ysars. 1 used to feel miserable and s;ufish. but now K is a pleasure to work instead B.B KATF.S OF FXt II W'.l \eitu n istl I iNUH C-hle %  %  I ThcN They'll Do It Every Time I PROMISED MV CDNSTlTUEMTS A Bl.OSt OVER MUD CREEl<""njT BP.3SE -IS -O^S SEES C0MLETEC I PROV.SEP A LOWER TOX WTE IT MAS BEEN 40MMPUSHED-" I PROV SEC A< 4JEJTIOM TO TME SCH30.-T.MT A^y ALL MV PROMISES MAVE BEEN FAlTHPt/LLy FULFILLED yw Tl\r\ ,n.. limn '."-ti pli'i.U >. time lor visllttiK placet uid thtm Individually, and by tha ii>Uiay Londo n ft tha Waal in.n..11 Juna IS or 16. there will nol IMmurh of (miMirlnnco that the) will neva —Raatar LOOK-IT'S UI.CLE WILLySEE-HE PRDMiSEP ME A &.5S BEFORE THEV HERE ST5NIM3 TO TWB ftiL;T:C!A\ OiTWS FAWiLy 7 SVc AN ACC


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    SUNDAY. APBII. 15. IftSl ^1 Ml \\ llll.H Ml I'M.I A New Textile Industry In Puerto Rico —Bv id. The proj-ot slgnifeam. not only in relation to new techniques and mater -U M weaving, but alin a gftw, iul.uril rense. ThU is one of thv new .nnxntnca tponsored by faisightert numbers of the Inland to Ubilfad voottomlg base • %  • ii.v iikof the paopU who has* l*fn Ainci ,„,.. I9i 7 THE FIBRE TEXTILES SHOP In San Juan. Capital of Peurto Rico MM rarloiw native Bbres In the creation of now textiles Window •liade mate ml in made of tin* enea blade* woven with maiuey fibre „ i y —T ~ kl En IIS P ^ r*l 1 j3l*_. '•is, £ ; f HANDWOVEN fibre textiles designed by QeraMine Punk, Aratrtcm designer and director of the Fibre Textile* Shop of Us Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company. and thus lo -crtau, a better and more UaJ-.ncecJ way cl living The groxm. of young men ana womeq employed in tits -FibreTfgjlile* Shop ux Sin Juan, e-pllaf %  I Puem Rico, have lound that tfie Wotk the> are sHmig is mo mean? lo a twcfthl end. It it constructive work with tangible y* lr > mitejUl produced. Furthermore, it has loc.ilri \u there, the rich cppori.iniWi of i heir! own land and ihefr vn i.itm ntaUvgngea,' For I'm .%  UcOjnMiM natural did ow meals almesr beyond ccm-iatuon (or *V (trvrtoument of fhe pbr c V\tP* s. Within lu smt!t rea (if **. .• %  quwre mlesi S r :ouml a pt .* e with keen sense of ctlour t, u d rhythm. iaw materials waiting to be K-itliered from the hilli and fields, arm-fhe'tnspirnion uh'ch ccmes.frpm the magic beauty nt ihe land The Fibre Textiles Shop, set up at the invitation of the Am Rlcan Government, intend.to capture by colcur and by texture, something of ihe vc %  essence of IHterto Rico in every Textile which comes from its looms. The wajr to do this, the weavers believe, in through a deep ippreciatkm cf thr inherent values of the Island's r material*. And it is also in tnis way that they are securing markets for textiles truly Puerto Rican in ins pint ion and execution. Each fibre used brings a natural beauty, colour, and vigour of its own for the craftsman lo use in the manner besl suited to its individual qualities. The strong bark of the banana tree, the leaves of the royal palm, or Ihe tall slender green stems of V punco plant lend thtrnjelvei variously to the hand of the worker, and must be understcoJ precisely for best effects. The fibre phase of the process starts right out in the fields of the Puerto Rican countryside. Enea whh its flit paper-like blades prows by the rivers; •tabut.m is found along the roadsides, bamboo in the southwest: ihe soft silky white-fibred maguey plant thrive; In the more arid sections of ih< isl.md. Throughout the land, the tall round sugar cane reeds grow wind-crushed; and bright decorative seeds, as well a* Ihe cogollo palm, prized for its cream•vcloured hat straw, and the n.ajugua tree, renowned for its bark, can easily be found. As it was planned to gather as many Puerto Ricans as possible Into the various phases of creating fibre textiles, groups cf country men were organized to gather th fbres from their sections of the i-land and to dry them. Thu> many people have gained a new iFrum 'Craft R> Do what says Baby can't talk hut baby can tell you in baby's way which milk Is best for hott!.* tccJs — by steady progress, by contentment, and sweet sleep. How gladly a mother welcomes these signs that baby is happiest on Osicrmilk, Why can mother pin her faith so firml* on Osicrmilk r Because, where breast feeding is dilHcult or imposuble ii is inc perfect substitute tot mother'-. milk. (Hiernulk is finest grade cow's milk, dried under the moM nvgirnnconditions. The protein, great bodybuilder, is made easily digestible by Ubt rotter drying process. And Stea>e> progrmt telli you important add ii ions are gassl M dirk h the baoad — sugar | ttkt lood li'i tun dlseatkeM—Vitamin 1> to help build -troog bones and teeth. Owumll i aim i>y Glaxo Ijiboratoi' 1 | gtkM loolt, have been ptimerrt in the development of (he best possible foods for babies. OSTERMILK PUERTO RICAN Wjrkc Company iu (tan Juan si i in tbe ribre TexUlee Shop of tae Puerto Ktc< i wesvine: colourful rug and fabries. Industrial Development 'feeasM livelihood from the weeds which %  ^.in.. 11\ cam* to bloom only to blow away year after >e;ir. Seme of these fibres have been used |,revicmly by Uiow with niflcjenl ;magination to iinrierstind thci' strength as cord, rope, tor hs* nessing ot country horn, ond s* forth, but navti tuivi tti.y ban used as generouslv gs now In textiles The fibres are used genei 11 v in a natural state because their rich and subtle tores r;ive the unique shading that is possibl" only with "wild" colours Most pf the weeds appear in a wide rang • of tans, grays, and green Sue %  cane is bright golden, coconu flbre a definite earth brown, and maguey a creamy white. That. %  basic values are never disturbed by dyeing. One fibre—magueyIs reserved for this purpose It iglven the orange of some Puerto Rican houses, the deep green of the mango trees, the lively yellcv. i i ganarto btoora, the fire of thk M:inibcy;iiit tree. Antilles green. cinnamon, or the blue of the COffM bloom. As far as the technical process cf the weaving goes, colour tex. lure and materials are so vain 1 that the poagtMlhaaa or simple i n weaving arc still not exhausted The looms are ".he rame as are tweet the world over. with exception of the Irev-lyp • pr.mitive loom Very olicn the/ i-l peui to be simply (odder m ich-tirs. engaged in eating up ilbre Coconut oord or sometimes yents me used for warp, and metallic. too arc combined with the fibre.* The o.-Kamiotion of the Fibres Textiles Shop took throe years It began with the initial though.nil progressed through research m the pelds, flbre-dealgn study. training ind teaching of workers, i "nMrnrtion of equipment and nuilding. to marketing and production en rchedule. This outline D1 Hie nil whu re engaged in hundweaving, whether for pertcnul i njoymenl, coininetciul leasuns Ot both FtV all which has becii iics-omplij-hed in Puerto Itico l.. Uen done in the manner i.| Inn craftsmanship Everyone gauge) | togelker in a co-cpeiativ.yga and usexl the n-m.il i of th %  land and their Dim inhei-.m Bifts to besl udvuntnge In whatever t>art cl the work %  weaver may be. there most like ly Is a wealth of exotic, yet fam liar Hbres waiting to be used woven imaginatively into new forms. In the production of lex tiles there is no need to be bound by the tried and true, for this l'i field which is limitless In creative possibilities for those with the power to seize and harvest the natural products of the Held, and of their own minds Critics Select Best Films Of 1950 New York City—American motion picture critics recently engaged in their favourite end-ofthe-year pastime of selecting the best films of the year The Dims were selected by newspaper critics, two motion picture organizations—the New York Film Critics and the National Board of Review —and similar groups. One of the biggest events in this field will occur at the end of February when the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awards its "Oscars" to the outstanding films and film personalities of IDSti as selected by •neinbeis of the film industry. The critics f-eemed to agree that the best films released in I9SQ were "All About Eve.*.' a comedy about the theatre; "Sunset Boulevard." a melodrama about a longforgotten actress in silent films; "Twelve O'clock High." a dramatic film about the men of an American bomber base in England during World War II. and The Titan—Story of Michelangelo." "The Titan" told the story ot the life or the great Italian Renaissance artist through a succession of objective images, without any human actors. Bosley Crowther. in the New York Times, in addition to these four films, also included on his list of the t-r. best films of 1B50, "Father of the Bride." a comedy about the tribulations of a father attendant upon getting his daughter married; "The Asphalt Jungle," a crime melodrama; "Destination Moon," a fantasy about rocket trip to the moon; "The Men" dealing with paraplegic war veterans; "Trio." a collection of three short films based on stories by W. Somerset Maugham,' a nd "Born Yesterday," a sophisticated comedy. Mr. Crowther did not include foreign films on his list, but put them in a separate category. On this list he cited the Czechoslovak film "The Distanl Journey," the Italian pictures "The Walls of Malopaga" and "Bitter Rice," an<> the French film "L'Aflalre." The film critics ofl the New York Herald Trlbtine Howard Bar.ics and Otis I. Guernsey, Jr included on their list "The Third Man', a British-made suspense story; "Jofroi." a short French film ab-m a peasant and hie love of the lan-1; "Orpheus." th French produce.--author Jean Coctcau's version of the ancient Greek legend: "The Flame and the Arrow." an advel %  ture story; "The Winslow Boy". a drama about a man's effort* te obtain Justice for his son, and "Kind Hearts and Coronets", a British comedy. A different type of awa.'d wag igurated lhi> ; ,.'.ir by llellday ii........iMiIt honoured various films and film-makers tor their contribution "to the role of the American motion picture as an' ambassador abroad." The top award in this poll went to "The Jackpot," a comedy obout radio quit show The magazine cited a semldocuineniary titled M.v.Uiy Stiec!" ns n good motion i.lrlure produced on a low budget. Two individual awards we.c made to Joseph L. Manklewu/.. the writer-director whose last three films were all praised highly by the critics and the public, and to actress-producer Ida !.upino for her oroducUon of "low-budget • %  liiis 01 ronesty and significance.' •YOU JUST DON'T AVOW YOVRF; WFARISG IT' em thins* about Tatnpai It". %  neat. o omall. to woii-lertglly reinf enable. And beeaiue Tampa* n u..in iawrullr l( I* r.niiblrtrly .nvxibte >o durirvi iliat thi.M> "dlflUub %  era" remain a eloa**uai rratiirlion on -I'ni. or oiher activities. feHi mfort and ish (or them to peal I in ronfldenrr to their IHF at all chrniitta-KVitf_*eia*a naeetai. or Super Mxorbent Tampax No. S irot afeairr b*ort*ncv\ enea e*e per packcl of 10 Sanitary Prat §>r lion TAMPAX Worn Intrrnalty KAIGHT*S DBIG SlpMMSS ONV10N3 'aiamaHS Oil 3931103 113NN39 88i 'Xdaa o) /Ply ^j/o !" 3H1 Buii|j„:,i|,..,,.„ (*ff|a f *o> iLMII^Ip.!,!.^ *-nt'M **m •""*e^aa—e4| enaf •••we** in %  •"win %  SBTJI iqiliuw.) %  "•o ia"9 i • 'Jnmien aaaakl <,....; i~. <...-..) •himiiini nu 33IAOV 33Hd Od 31IUM i 3M3H M33UVD HOOA ION 31 SI MO|q u odoo> m sod AVO-Ol •*• *J'J "Nt 1W 'uosiised tut 'piTd-nsM t JOJ a*eu iinui no' alpaj-ou^ pa-'|fidi o 4 i MUM no* dinba a fuiu.tJi renpiAipoi %  X|pou( Xg ivod SKji iilnojui noX iieo> p|iOM nijlojg lsoui ayi ia| noJ *'< %  ajicnj) J'IOX fj turn am w rtejloid pauvtrd jo ajni eirrui no\ $?Mns JO/ osjtioj ji/iiu Mji uo no\ /,• ///, 1D1TIOD 113NN33 mil anOAMiE 3HX Mooks Cost More LONDON. British publishers have decide* Jo cut authors' royalties to meet the rising costs of bock production The 1'ublinhcrs" Association has drgjlte Up a new scale ol royalties The cut*, except in special circum%  ttances at leant J| per cent, will apply lu new contracts between writers and publisher* and in iiuny cuses to reprint*. After the first 2.500 or so cople of a novel had been sold, thi writer usually received a liiidicr royalty on a sliding scale. In the future, Ihe lowest royalty will apply to the first 5,000 copies, and after that the graded Increase* will bo smaller. A leading technical publisher said costs for publishers have risen by 150 per cent since 1938 with no corresjending increase In sales i-rice*. .is 8 lliKh clus* FOOTWKAR for Ladle*, wo h"avo them in two-tone combinations with Cuban fuels. Some With closed backs and open tow. Others with open back", with slinr; straps and open tots. Style* In Rlnck and White, IJrown and White, nnd Blue and White. PnVfs $12.38 & $12.44 Cave Shepherd & Co., ltd. II), II. 12 & 13 Broad SlrMt. THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. XOTM*:. 1 !orapan> how ap l>e able to commence the installation of new services fm the long outstanding applications as soon .. QenCratlnH Bet m-v. i.. course of erection is in It hns rorne to cm notice, however; that some Consumers and prospective Consumers propose installing Electric Stnves The hot-plate of :• stove, full on. takes Ihe same current as 20 to 80 l.mps, and the Company theref. re consider it unreason.-ibb ttnit Additional stove* should be connected to the 'iipply until iieople who have been waiting for lighting services have Iwen flr supplied. It Is with regret therefore that the Company must :nve notice that no stoveor Weld in i! Plant can be einncti.l lo its system until further I* right For your fre copy of illustrated Baby Book-Phone 4675 %  %  %  %  %  % %  % %  a %  %  %  %  %  • -PI RIXA" a %  LAYEXA %  a %  *"* %  ajH. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-D;.,,;^,,,,,. J %  % % % % % % % % % % % %  • IBI a c HARRISONS BROAD ST. "JGXE~ FAMILY HAND SEWING | MACHINES on wood base and mmplrte with rover A Compact Liuhtwciuhl Machine nnd n Wonderfnllv Kfllcient Worker rnpuhle of liirniii!; nut ihr lnn\l llentlfiflil I tTci :. M almost every iniiiginable lype o{ job. — THE PERFECT — HAND SEWING MACHINE Simple, Silent and Ba4) Kuiuiiiiu Sews Darkvinrds mid Korwardi as KetMiirrtl. Special Cash Price $93.74 The "JONES" Electric Motor with Needle I'olnt Light Con be fitted quickly and easily to any type of "JONES'" DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINI Thr running f.t* are nrcliglble jnd the operjlor has both fund* fire lo guide Ihe week OUR PRICEONLY 146.37 EACH HARRISON'S IOCM 3 AGENIS ILL /J64 EX JOY THIS VAHMETY THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. V. SMITH General Manager AUSTIIAI.IAN I.KillT AMIllll! IIONK\ HEINZ TOMATO Kl PCHUP HKIN/ CCK KTAI1 ..Mo-. I HOUKKTSONS KASl'ltKHHV JA SOUTHWELLS STRAWBERRY JA LIN CAN t'KAS par III. HEINZ VEC SALAf> IN MAY< INN.MSI: per Tin FHKNC'II MHSHIICHIMS ... Tn. COCKTAIL CIIEKHIKS Larfl SI II: Med. 7tc: Small WHITE I1EO OHAI'EK l.,i IB %  : Small KIIAF1 CHEESE A MAI AMMNI par Tin SOUTH AEHICAN UJBSTEK irt-r Tin SUSSEX I.AMHS TONGUES pel Tin JACOllS I REAM ( KACKEIIS MAHVENS SODA BISCUITS DM 1 WAI.US 1'OHK SAUSAGES in J.n WAI 1 s OXFORD SAI'SAOFS ,, POTTED MEAT — Per Tin I'ATE DE FOIE pel T SARDINES | T n S4 .M . .31 -69 . I.M 1.4a .11 •h l .1* .IC COCKADE FINi: iUM STA.XSFELO. SCOTT A COL. flit.



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    SHTCBNTS ESTABLISHED I BBS BARBADOS. HIL 15. M6I 70-YEAR-OLD BEVIN DIES SUDDENLY Air War Stepped Up In Korea Campaign (By SYDNEY BROOKES) TOKYO, April 14 JJOTH SIDES in Korea nro furiously stepping up air war. The Communists are throwing in many more Russian type jets, and are building airstrips. The United Nations are running a round the clock attack against Communist ground and air build up up. United Nations Air fDRM sources said to-day that they believed the CommuniMs intended making greater efforts to match the United Nations air superiority. FREtfGH KILL 90 REBELS HANOI. April 14. French Union Fore** sweeping through pockets of Viclnamh guerilla remittance 30 miles south of Hanoi, Tongking capital, have killed 10 rebels and taken 300 prisoners, French army head quarters here said today. Guerilla attacks on villages inside Tongking were continuing. Paratroops seeking 800 Chinese reported to have crossed from Yunan province Into Indo-Chinu "i April 1. two still nut found them. stench Army Intelligence reports today said that Vietnam!) Communiat-led rebels were now In most of t**e border town earlier reported taken by Chinese "invaders." —Reuler 30 KILLED DEMINING FIELDS IN TUNISIA PARIS. April 14 Clearing German and Allied minefields in Tunisia, since its liberation, cost the lives of 30 soldiers and wounded 86 others, reported Agence France Press* from Tunis today. A million and a half mines have been destroyed freeing 1.029,000 acres of arable land. The report added that a large •iea in Southern Tunisia has still to be demined. — %  cuter. The Air Fort" ha. lately seen [he Communists developing aii string and during the WIM bus reacted with attacks intended t crater their airfields and restrict ictivily. Counting their gains and cost.* •t the past weeks, intct ictivity of the United Nations airmen to-night claimed destruction ir damage of 2U M l G l& Jets, more than 600 Communist rooj vehicles destroyed, and 35u damaged They also claim nine loco] motives destroyed or damaged 134 trucks destroyed and almost ICO damaged. 4.000 building) ..Hacked iu Communist-held teirltory. 1.000 Communist troap> killed r wounded mostly in tri' line of buttle Communist jets de;troyed o damaged Included 21 hit on Thursday when Jets on both sides joined In the biggest nir battles of the ten months old campaign I Washineton announced aftc* Thursday's battles thai two American B 19 Superfortresses; were lust. Four others had been lost TOKYO, April 14 previously General Matthew Ittdgewny Uniied Nations planes to-dayi the new Supreme Commander, continued heavy bombing and toM reporters to-day "I am full' strafing attacks against Com-[alive to the tremendous responHumauia Expels Yugoslav Citizens BELGRADE. April 14. The Rumanian Government is expelling Yugoslav citizens. granting them 10 or 20 days to settle their affairs, the official Yugoslav Communist Party paper Barb* reported today. The Yugoslav Nationals paper said thai they were called to the Aliens' office of the Rumanian Foreign Ministry, and told to leave the country even if they had been living in Rumania for many years, and had families and property there. While some Yugoslavs were expelled. Sorbs added that others who wanted to leave were refused exit permits. Behind the refusal was the aim to force these Yugoslavs to accept Rumanian citizenship, the paper M d It.llli VIU.IMIM l.(IUII\MIMSH/IS l..\ lRK \V\ As • result of tha demion or both legislative chambers, the committee of five pro Peren M.P* appoint <-d by Congress. elr.ed the Independent Argentine New-paper "La Prenaa Thi* platan iv i.km during the ceremony of the taking over of the newspaper in Buenos Aires. Rented ithe Public Notary AI.FRFIi OUIDI and rtandllifj left to right:—SEN ATOR CRUS. tsfs men unidentified. Representative TOMA88I. SENATOR OtAVARINI chairman of the Committee and reprc'oit.uve ROUUUIER —Express. MacArthur Will Be Given Rousing Farewell General Ridgwuy Is Fully Alive To .New Responsibilities munist buildup and i upplic Two targets were airfields about 30 miles soutri of Pyongyang. North Korean capital. Botli were attneked and cleared, it gnu said. —Reuler Mahtirajah Deposed NEW DELHI. April 14. Prime Mlnbrter Jawaharlal Nehru announced in Parliament to-day. ihat the Indian Govern mem had deposed the Maharajah Pratap Singh Gaekwnr ns ruler of Baroda. Nehru ndd that (In* action had been tuken against the ruler for defying the authority of the Indian Government organising and financing activities to undo the constitution, and supporting reaclionaiy elements. The 43-year-old Maharajah will lose not only his title of ruler but also his £200.000 privy purse. The deposition order took effect yesterday The Government has given him one month in which to appeal tc tha Indian President —Reuter. fdbiiitles that have Hist become mine. "With God's guidance, and with all my heart and mind. I shall do my utmost to discharge my >w responsibilities well" The General wai cariyiiiK %  hand grengQO—DU irnde inaik" —and was dressed simplv and austerely m u wool kbaki shirt and battle IrQUsgi He ask. I %  10 quej Uon him on his plans for hla new command but added that after talking with his staff In Tokyo he would be "very glad to share things with you. as I have done before". He said I 'ii till v. i' raw. t memDcr of thlf I The General in hiBrit general order as the Supremo Commander the linn of Merit to Rttb UOM OflUcr at i farewell Press Conference at the Eighth Army headquarters to-day — Keuter BRITISH PROTEST BERLIN, April 14 Major General Geoffrey Bourne. British Commandant in Berlin, protested to-day to the Soviet re. preseniative of the Control Commission in Berlin against alleged border raids by East German police on British sector territory. —Sealer SOUTH KOREA WILL OPPOSE PEACE TALKS PUSAN. April 14. Tek Sang Ken Sun. Vice Chairmen of the South Korean Notiona Assembly, said here today thai tha South Korean government would] of nihbci "oppose any peace talks with the Communist aggressors." He udded : "We will welcome their unconditional surrender, but we cannot join in a political con. ferem-e or in talks." —ii. iii,i Terrorists Kill 20 SINGAPORE Apnl 14 Terrorists in Maluya lost All billed or captured by security orces. and themselves kilted 2a civilians during the past week, a Kadti.i! Government .-.pufcesmaii announced here today. He WA\ that terrorists were now concentrating their efforts on Injuring tha country*! teononu During the past week, guerilla:. had burnt down railway stations. dersIU i trains, slashed thousands trees, burnt buses and TELL THE ADVOCATE THE NEWS DAT OR NIGHT DIAL 3113 10,000,000 MORE MEN NEW DELHI. April 14 India has IO.00U.00O more mei than women, according to figure. tt-Ke.i today. The total population of the country was estimated at 361.820,000. an increase of 12 4', in the past decade. This figure iiicludcfor the Kashmir and A.. telephone win machinery —Reuler TOKYO, April 14. AN ANNOUNCEMENT from Ih, headquai ten ol th.Supremo Command of the A Hie*; Powers in Japan, to-day ind'eated that General Mac Artl'nr will leave Tokyo nexl week amid a farewell pageant unrivalled hi ll posl-war era. Tli' headquarters published a map U.S. Will Not Discuss Jap Peace Treaty With Peking IX)MH)N, April 14 & British Foreign Office spokesman "would not comment today on the announcement th-i la; Uoitec' States did not contemplate discuslions with Peking on the Japanr Peace Treaty. This announcement amounts to rebuttal of the British tvgaaa* Uon contained In the ride memolre to the Unite .irnl da-tn.nide*! that Britain houltl not conclude the I'.ul withlatton of the British West Indies Sugar Association ui West rndles Oovei n liembers re fan aj bo the great contribution BrtUgh Gutani king towards SjkUng MrU..in%  used to b.> infiueneed \-\ tiu assurance from the ol Btata read by the Ad Colonial Secretary, lion 1 J Parkinson that "no agrecnanl \Mlh Cuba will be reached aVtUcn .vould prejudice the undertaking given io Commonwealth %  aigar producers last year." Rftferenca was also made to dlsaing held UMweeii Canada and Cuba on Ihe sugar ques%  Ih* view .#s i that it was a threat :.i nH thr i! w i and BriUah Qusgna oul --f a ligraa khani of the CanafllaTi %  kbtt P I i B> i. meinlH' %  nrotdd W vm i only from sugar focp t is 1 but also on the wln.le i| i. %  %  LONDON, April 14. \]R ERNEST BEVIN, former British Foreign Secretary died at his home to night after a heart attack. Mr. Bevin resigned as British Fortign Sec retary for health reasons on March 9, and was succeeded by Herbert Morrison. Mr. Bevin was 70. Bevin became suddenly ill this afternoon, and members of his staff haatily sumnnm.-d his doctor Sir Alexander McCall. ; Mis. Hevin vvho was out during the afternoon was also summoned by telephoosx i-nimillee aif I'lieniployeal Bristol which at a big p<-rt He died shortly after 5pm His death will mean a bye election in the 1-ondon constituen ey of Basl Woolwich, watch hr won for the Labour Party m IfaM Genend Kkclton ith I ma|ority of 12.3"" %  Though he was though! to hlW made a satisfacioi> pgeover] sftei his recent B looked pale bag gard as he sat m the • this "k hsta-niiiK to the Iniiliiet speech. Bevin. yester-Uy. | ll, I Premier Clomtni Atti.. London baapltol l„ n llM Premier h rocaivlog broatntent nai dliiMlenal nhei They had a rhal Bj Aul..' BOVUI snM |i|,inning r" a trip to ihe Ganan >ff ihe African cos bedside 'rest 01 Islands shortly He wi week. weeks hi* da < i Hobby Lo^ke Wins JOHANNESBURG. April 14 Bobby Locke, holder of the South African and British Open Gaill Championship beal Normal' Von Nldo. the Australian chum l n u ti.v ii up and nine to play In their 144 holes eliallenfA' match for £1,500 today. Locke won £1.000 and Vor Nida look the loser's MTM oi £300. —Reuler |]JL MARIKKK TAKE I'llISOM:IIS RSMSBg tgHUr atnve en the Central Koroan priMners to their sver growing collection —ITxpress. U.S. Air Forr-e Maki* British Type Piano WASHINGTON. April 14 The United States alrforce has ceased production of the B 45 jet bombers, in favour of the British %  Canberra. It was officially an. nounced here to-day. The Canberra will be built iv (heGlenn Martin Company. Martm himself recently saw tbe Canberra demons!rated in Britain, and soon afterwards nsked for ii licence in build The British bomber is the first modem warplane designed by the English Electric Company. Its top speed has not been given, but it b believed to be .it least slightly faster than the 550 m p h done b;the B 4f —Aeider 3 NORTH KOREAN TOWNS TAKEN TOKYO. April 14 Two hundred Souln Korean maiines captured three Nairth Korean towns in a surprise landing on the west coast 70 miles south of the Con.n ui Pyongyang on April 7 to a delayed report the naval -ensor nleased • Naval gUM loveied the landing. Maiines later linked up with BooU K %  %  II pistil — %  eater PETA1N RECOVERING port by the Su S horn thi* ipaiiese have tonatdered iheii uncrowned ruler -met the day he Itindtil five and :• half >i;n ,.*;" DtlUsli and American troops, and Japanese police will Une the way na the General drive in private aeroplane Hulanii which wj"' fly bin* taihe United State* atfl.A: E isldence at Ihe former American mbassy with hi* voting wife god their 13-yanr-old son Arllun at t; l m Despite (hi "ih hour, a laigt Crowd ol Japanese are expected im go id will be given %  nai off at ibo airport, b) thaka) mom* Mrs of the headquarters staff Commanders, stal Of major lal Bast "inmands U| tonssuc %  J-iwinese Oi .. rnr eni %  fl i Retirement f\aksl Tha fi'Mini Supreme ( ianniaD0> %  %  with Major Qenoral t'nurtney Whltnoy, who last Tl urrdav rs> thi Chief of MacArthui i Government Sea tion on the AUll D Kg %  -h.it be n nil' Iiwg ..'.nil his Chief. CMntl *i General MacArthur -re hll unlit Colonel C. HaaYaod, Colooei Bun ker. his pei>onal pilot. Aide Ueut Col Anthoro Bfors and his perph> Choelei Canada Mrs Eleanor Roosev it oom> mentlng on General MaeArtlmr's dismissal declared on htl arrival in i .ui today, I do not think a General should make policies.' She thought I're ident Truman bad done the only thing thai be dons uno> r united m %  Ututtonata-avalenk "Thercis always In our country diviMon of opinion) and Qan* iral MacArthui ha had COaTastd' eiable poUUcol toUoWln as great admiration generally." it.sNHild havg wolooma, wiihout riueslloii, Irom many people, ihe added Mi. Raoaevtll will be slaying one nlfht in Ix>ndon on her way to represent her enuntry at a meeting ol tha United Nations Hv : %  I which she Is Chall —Keuter Austrian Workrrs I'nnni-iSupport To Kvd ^triktVIENNA. April 14 The Minister for Social Af %  Ka.l Maisel, who Is also r the Metal WoikeiV rrade Union, has promised M5 WAafCeni of u Itussian i onii-illa-it ihe out. Vienna, who went ^n • 'the sympathy | POrl of the whole bodv tt Auatrlan workers Tho strike began when the I.LII' I'resident of the Workiiin ii. l.i)"M Mattfinger, wa* m.sseJ without notiae i>. the >viet Kommandanlurn foi dla loilllng the Socialist MpOl Fret Wiirt He refused to M> i p| ItU .irini-s.d b) .i RtM %  bin police Ith lal. bUl %  %  itOd I" UM ... ,. director % %  the im. As UrtCtl) in ion' hi ii,e Km rlan Law, iht Wort i c;illed Ihe strika." Sonet authorities than threat ..11 mcrnliers of Ih.VT< i < ouncll would he tried by i-imrt martial which I'y na?ans gg c gaf trial without lnunehtl i —Renter. I work At the age .if 20. %  i %  ui sfajrbni The only didh ll r said. whsnsU be ii' tnough to make th. Levin had bean la pa for a year. Last year he liad twi operatioiiN for haeniorrhmd and natula .md rootntly stileken with pneumonia the bulkv slow moving N, ,., tT ho h e c a n Britain's 'orcli MIIIISIII .,1 ,, of the most en rial periods Natary began I career as a fai hev Frorr then on. Trade Union activities ok up most of his tune At Ihe age of 30. he was the Chairman of a branch of th** Dockers' Union Ten years later, the boy who had had lutlr education except for few years in the village school was known throughout Britain as K C" (King's Counsel) This aroee from his barrister tig of the dockers csse in the first public wage arbilra lion award. Two yean later, by merging many .mail unions with the Dockers* Union, he created ihe Transport nnd General Worker Union, whose rebut he held, a i o-ncial Sai-retaiA for IH ve.n When Winston Churchill form ed his wartime National Government in 1840. hr knew that th" nun Ui organise Lalxmr must b* %  me whom the workers trusted as 4M of themselves Anal it must no with determination, organising geniu*. and no tear of unpopularity. He ehoee Bevin. appointing him Minister Seivice Twiee tin hritl tiled. Me wa> born %  '• Wm li.m Soniei set on March 8 " His farm. hand f.tber died baton he "V-as born Ifis moiber, bandy, woman ami inidirUai died when he wa.* four. Then an auni. ll • lll|s|,.,n,| was a railway man took him inMr F.KN to he. home. Whib still ... wa* aparenUeed %  %  u lev, ,_ Wa kp ,. p Labour nnd National Trade Union leader isuccessfully. Io get a seal in rarlls ment Now he ^ entered the Com", mons. unopposaNl. I I as memlier fm %  London dJatrlct The appointment was a big success. Faced With the task of unrooting the naUon from Its homes and nor. mal lives, Bevin was able to get g*O,OOU.Q00 people put of the total population of 46O.0O0.(XI into Ihe National Service of some sort oi .mother stiohg-iiutidfil boy At 13 hu Mnu front ahe farm t.. %  aOni II. Bristol, th nearest clt\ rirst. he got %  )ofa ,, ram It (Mid hln pill II i nk Then he liecumu hillings a week, ind into Labour Union He called up women for tbe aarssaa. nral Um '" n 'i i 'he iMllot system to end one oul ui rvogf 10 youUis registered foi military service to In the coal mines. He "Jealously watched over the %  f.ue, while he mobUised the nation's manpower I %  ntaaM, raat homes, and hoateU s prang up all over BriUln. and van drivei 1 0, we,ruro service, developI.A RiK-HF.t.1.5 Apnl 14 Th< lates. upotts from the lie D*Ycu. ihaisland of 84->ear-bUi Philippe Pataln, taid thai ho wn I from congestion of thi turn iri on the screw?" the pape. %  r ives on martyr l.t prtans) "i'.e already." —Sealer eal an never liefore. Foreign Secretary When Britain nwept the Labout he want the!Part] to |>ower In 194S. Bevln's • On Page 5 '-'--;;•.','.'.',:',%',; *-w////i' ITS BEST IS K.W.V. K. W. V. SWEET VERMOUTH DRY VERMOUTH Insulted Gairy? ,r. !" ., oar o earn ST OlOROaTS April It hi p %  ..: to-day of a S (:• . >>„, which a <'mw entered last Tuesday, terrifytni a girt clerk And demanding hei di'miaaal bexaue of the allege.' n a of Insulting language la Gai'v. did no' < ceui .. • %  .1 is known that Gate gw the mmager dormi i ol thaweek * %  l"'ii rm •>' ledress. hut the formcT said he was u*.Me %  %  inployee bv dis or g matter wh r lly diacennected w" fc, t iH/riness firm is Ihe %  amark was not made 'i (he store. Bolh Wina havfl cxceilrnt qualities as beverai;cs .ind for use with Gin for appetiser* or Covktalli Tiwy ire marie from pure white wines with Ih.addition of extracts of health-giving K.W.V. WEMMFRSHOEK A \ Sweet ervt Toble alighlly Wine. to i Silled be 10K.il. KlUt KOUl\0 P.iRTlKS. :::-A.V.'SJV.



    PAGE 1

    S NBAY, APRIL I SI M>AY AIIVtN \tl Gardening Hints For Amateurs Th* ...r.l, i, In April Geranium Time. The Grafied rulthe tn.ii i „,„, p rtM Manyo Tree 'if any ladder ilimblna. Th, FARM WD GARDE1S By AGRICOLA I i.i.i) PRODI CTIOV II We continue to stress the neeil Geraniums.-_in flower now— '"•"So tre will *row m ainiysl /or morc •*••"% %  %  ? 'n the home ^.y aa commonly seen in our an v P**l. and win ,tand up fo • md ** h v **wn in one of the Harden* an many of ihe othei ,1,ir, V dry cnnditu ns. l>ut n will r,,, her notes how desirous .1 U at perwu.il. Yet they are VITV n*toml9 do better if it is not too "'* juncture to Include, wherever lovely, are eanlv grown, down, possible. a pleasurable and uxcelicnUy in aarden beds. Large during the months of Miry to healthy activity such as gardent-ois. tuba, window boam, r ,-v."i July the mango tree puts out ft*sh ing to aid the family budget The "L Rocl< '*' ,rder >Whirl onac l "'.ing leaves ol ;i iuvciv deep /act of creating or producing established lhe i-slotir which graduaLly something — however simple it trouble. They can be umwn ,um <<• %  *•'". ">d * MW troe Is may be—nils one. young or old, from seed planted in NovMnbai %  vergte*n %  always keeps its with a sense ..f pride and at Ivor from cutting. The dm :,. ul "J ct > w appaarantca f*.-tiii-inst try it and aaa how take cutting* Is Iron. Auount t.. '"" WW ripen, from May u, enthusiastic you can become' Ami October for by then, and during Aupisl. and in the opinion of most ,f the article be garden produce the rains, the plant* stop flowerm-i'l" "'Julie mango ranks as there is the added fun and enioyingi,* they do not like the ram ,, "<' < "•* most delicious fruit*. m ent in eating one's u wn heii.tti"When taking .. rutting, get „ "vglllnj even the Peach. g^n, ves-tablr, with a possible sturdy bit from ,i well grown Mangoes QIC slow-growing .mrpius t u brnu in some anara phnE god after having taken off -. but 3 grafted or budded ra JJ to Obtain fha' iSTwIKT. all do leaves .stick il ,,, a box U) • "'" f !" H .vnen only „ lra ,„„ |t nard ^^, f milch. By December to January '""' t two >rs old. ,^ ih7fmmlv budget the cutting will he ,.. planted during the iuo'vanre Sere areT*L planted out in its permanent * %  t** months will surt at a *" !" "£„ bl !" 7 ^ ;, !" .. iw.it.Qn. kdvaatMt us they will have *" Position ""' '""* mnths i Choose I position of semi-shaue ^H*".*^ h lp thcm J Tor your Geraniums, or a place al J, he f'* nt *"**,L... where they are in shade for a ^ p,an vour fn,lt lIW and — part of the. day. Cranium. like ORDER YOUR^JUUE MANGO M*ZSS**+1 in Canada where boys and join their parents in the A Salt which m n WHO nifhSTM.irs /•Mil irr; t'MMMMVAJL %  nig readers on a tour %  : the things which will not be oftVially on show i 1951. No. 4 in the series gives flavour to Britain 'I must conies, I've NEVER scan anything like %  owtnf biu. of ribbons on bus !" "V "**• %  **J* **** >fcW W*—, pew." and rusty old anchorman ot excluding thrift bank eonoarentlal part of the British scathe morning sun. so ,m EBaUrly NOW. position for them is preferable. H-vc >'u %  %  J' Gardening quesGive the plants a good rich bed. ww >"" W r "' interest to other Gardeners arp to Mav and eatablisned ^.P"" on? plants will last undisturbed for Havt ?"' %  surplus of seeds or several years if thev are cut back cuttings you would like to exrrom time to time. This cuttiiu cn Iwick should be done after too Write to -GARDENiNG 1 flowering period, nnd during the C 0 The 'ADVOCATi: 1 miny weather. Cut back all the and watch this Column for a reply. old woody looking branches, and Mrs E Seott writes:— by November on the plantl will 1 have collected all the cliphave brave new shoots ready 10 pings on "Gardening Hlru for (lower again IV, not let these Amateurs" from the Advocate new shoots (lower too young, but every Sunday. I wonder it you pick off the buds until the plant w mll glve hccd to mv request and I am sure the request of OUU) others and that is to have these hints in a more permanent form— that is, in the form ol a book. 1 have got a surplus of Morning are much more Glory aaada, yueen Ann's Lace ,, lt | UsI rl included, best to aUch to a n 5. a ^ ir|,Iu ? Gf Mar, 8" ,u pressed energetical I > iWurm, „i 3d SB. „„ Uf ^'•"" Br,uin %  " '"> 5 Thej-re hk, WMUIU. louier r '_... ,. „. I Here the plain while ribbon pi Ike Polar Medal Ibal IK' irlbuttona, whleh all help rural Mile -tene. 1V 1 in I9C3. when he went lo folk—boya and girls particular!. Tin' British eld salt or shell,hr 'esetaof beoll In Ihe old —lo enjoy life. II Is a fine and hark l.Salanllquua Brilannlcual t*era Neva und if they ever give Hre niral i< easily recognised by hla a n'idal fur the Korean War. Stan plumage Ho wears a peaked ml IM thai, too, for it rt.ihi rap. sea-boou, and a blue Jersey troo pship going to Pusan that I arfOl the name of the ship on flTat ran across him last slai i lie chest Model Whips Ills usual reeling plan K 11a was in charge ol deeK Mcmt. against a bollard or In the shcllcr „„ d n u , MOr ciihbv-hnle up 111 of an upturned boat, and hla ery ,.„ ,.,„,,._ h „ .' %  ', sounds something like "Shiver: '.',1^"Jl. J^LJl o.. .2 IM umbers: Avast Ihere!" ~! ^.T^J^"^ P "." £ "" on loa summer day, Ihe old "" "• P"' 1-ulng laekle to salu can be heard calling. Any tbe deek-hands and ihe ie.1 ,n more lor Ihe Skyl.nk'" and In making and bottling his model the evenings Ihey roost In rowa *"'** on the benches at the local, where '" 'each hla htde.out you had holiday-makers ply Uiem v/ith M rllmb thiough trap-doors. gsMrtl drink and encourage them lo tell iron gtapa and pass —•i~ "-L> iifoot. We cannot afford to be The m m improbable tales of shipBUOyTHE m VIPU-CLOW M OFHEALTH 5>. •rrm ^' •"MORSE5 i "SSeVPILLS i Zr-ass _. • *": %  : %  | iikaiwiitoairnai I.IM %  ", ''ieftt>J nun.. ...' r . _^ {(SiMICO M^EHOID UEANStB 'tea-filmou Keep tut R home • %  •uU cajan %  ,, s I .k,nd to the tun.!. r vri.w RO4( ii A co LTD. DaMaalti i Kirl markeu, assisting making sales of the produce they H ha\e ,mwn. We want ihat M>'""'t here right now on our farms and in the villages a thai. however dark and difficult the future, tin re is no need for despair if the dominant keynote Of young life Is self-help, reflecting a conlldenee in the ability to make good wherever the tide •*! fortune rted and emigration scheme-: ltlink Jlll( ,. M enurage them to tell BEWAMO"FW>RM~SI'! I I Kg attained TTlo commonest Geranium the single red. but then pink, white and t> • varieties As the dOubte raiiav ties grow Just asj easily as the .Ingle. dec-M-atlve, Many old salts have a inn us habit of chewing tobacco Instead of smok ing It; they are said tu be exceptionally fond of par;, and on winter nights af lues 'in be found In ~, the doub.e Oemrums seedlings. I've also got a surplus iuUjlv — tAlaaJ^e?feff^ The Grafted Man K o Tree J f L '" ^ 5 l-M Sunday's note we quoted ffi, The raftad Mai./ % %  % % %  i I ne of *"** f ^ h, aU ; i vt Uo ^i low er t K;I < *P,rt '^"""n on the state of the the small to medium sized fruit d f '* now tile am r ' V"* world's population in re•t^e<^ to A tvpe that now seems trees that are well suited to be P !" an f no 1 _S.^_ „ "**" aDI '•"'' a iul must keep this gento be nearly extinct has " manner indicated above. All aids to this end. home and secondary must be wrecks and storms at eea. garden. Of all the to hel P ,,ie i<"'"ti(y H eral picture before us even in thta mly one leg. the other grown _. „ —-a — varietiea. and there nre severnl %  "** all thaw, In exchange I sm „n ,t,i nn( | where already much the 'JULIEis gener-IIy accepted would like a few bulbs of the has been done to encourage food as the best. Eucharist Lily, some bulbs or ,, r owing; but. If the ideas ventilA Julie mango tree grows into plants of what is commonly known a(e d above are to develop Into neat rounded shape, seldom as the Easter Lily and some realities, there ,, niurh nSDM growing very tall Milages bring having been t.iken off by a shark in the Timor Sea. Naturally, such picturesque lnhabitanla haven't tsflM OWl T lool t ad by our writers and irtists. • {'olerulge and Hobert Ixiu Stevenson immortalised them, 'Xtremely ilmpta rolls. They to make. FEATHER ROLLS 2 cups scalded milk A cup butter •4 cup sugar Salt 1 yeast cake 2 eggs well beaten 3 to A cups flour Add butter, sugar, and salt to milk. When lukewarm. adtS cake and when .lisolved, egg and enoush flcur to make dough a little suffer than cake dough. Beat thoroughly. Cover, let rire until light Fill huttered muffin pans full. Let rise until pans are full, (about one hour). Bake ten minutes in hot oven. This will make 24 lo 30 rolls. BAN'AN A BREAD 3 ripe bananas % cup sugar 2 eggs 2 cups flour I teaspoon sail 1 U-ii.jiof.n %  -. 1 '* cup nuts chopped Cruh bananas. A beaten light. sutfar. sifted floMr that as a gerberas needed. notabK in the and suburban areas, tu health-giving food with each of all, especially those in the knear lueome groups Nutritious, green vegetables are •• luxury, except to those In the ",7^ ,1 sensation at the Royal was and soda and nuts, highest* brackets and tho position Academy that they had u. put u-> bow in moderately alow 1. aggravated by the absence of „ barrier to prevent the maatar* Crush your banaai with eaaaotiaj marketing facilities hi place being mauled by the • % %  Bridgetown A few deterrents are lr need British public." ffectme garMlllais oalksd it "The Boyhood ? ny „ |M "*" Cookery Corner 1870. when Sir John Millais If' painted .1 picture of an Elizabethplaaan old salt talking to a couple ot has boya on the beach, he caused aOOth 'Keep Out" Tnere rou fouiid shaping booms out of matchslicks and wearing a pair of spectacles that bought for sixpence years ago. Behind those spectacles an the twinkling eyes uf humoi 1st When asked If he ever built hiv ships hy elimhlng Into th Imt'lr himself the remark fava him an idea on A Inch he went to work II the way to China and hark First he rigged up the inside of the Imllle .is a tuft caiuaaiUH'a shop, with 'M.IIand shavings <>n the Then he carved .1 model ol If silting at the benvh in hi Lita aupeniu specs. Uuildum a boat ud in a liottl' tiny flooi Mr.,., SACROOL GIVES PAIN ITS KNOCK OUT BLOW I 'n SBIC ai ..., knight N llrui; SttTN There is nothing so nire ., wit:i home-made cakes ami bread. Bake Feather Rolls are very light and oven, delicate, but do not have the line& silver fork. grained_ texture of well-kneaded And now for delicious small here put forward a ioke Ihat will eo on giving ne lo people limn aftei St.n, %  ••• up to sail the sewH of %  i' world \> ill. his -011 who Dei in the Rawalpindi ifi _-—tw &ti*r vV faitliful of I1RK it,mi llnv s.ilr t c orepared roma mo. Dl TtHI.Er M\f u c il %  %  radinr.t v ilh I nnr.\M u available at toii.t J. le.s Ihroughout Ihe island. Boyal Vlall I offarad \BABA ATI RIH-M \'t cups Hour I yeast cake dissolved ii '-j cup lukewarm water 2/3 cup butter 4 eggs cupsugar .Salt dening expansion in the villages „, RaJetgh." and and those are, admiUedly, nol | iecn oopving it (with apeloalw. easy t () remetly immediately; (li ev< T lack of even the simplest forms of fencing to keep out roaming buy il from him at ired to name, but cartoonists n-^v "• *' me down and. by doing put cOBBpani the sam Kngland lo yeast; cover nnd let it rise. Mix remaining Hour with butter. MM P< i-ni,.ii]',. 1 have my own fav"?** ^g 1 *^ *Otty ?* ounte old salt, to v. horn I will Tie King now introduce you His name is Fmptsaa af Cyrus Stamstreet, or Old Stnn. Canada l( | and though he U 88 he "III gnos went to the sea. because that's the oiilv showed hirn into distinguished < '" %  he i-iK-o said thing to the Klnif of the impounding of strays; (2) adequate water supply; (ft) abreai community spirit ,i-4 u.ii -.,.. %  %  ar 1 leadership looking toward-; Add half cup flour h „ u hp n ,. -.-..K much self-help a* possible m the solution of Joint problem(41 no credit facilities for com.... ha cm get is grandt hildreo. When he's peace from The and tie mot in the Australia going t-. I3. First. Old Siao King's cabin BpQ if his niiiii 1> King paid a return id went to the cubby-hole ing (lour with butter. _•' !" wells and other VuWis as Whrn ho s a8norr as hc ,f mt dnwn lh lrnn *** %  ' P"* 1 tht 2 eggs, sugar and Mil. munit.* wjs %  "f^^J !" 9 ." the moment, he UVM in a Livernotice saying: Keep On. Beat .horoughly. Beat 'SS^J^VUK^Sl 1 JS I-"' ~SS house with (ive of his A nodd "7 the St^ ^. remaining eggs, one shortage of land in some csaes. nt a time, then beat but this can ofton be made up by until mixture Is perthe use of boxes and simitar confeclly smooth. Let it tainers; some really good vegerlse until sponge tables can be grown in boxes. doubles its bulk, comMany farmers with small capital Imie mixture. beat have been able to obtain financial t.mruughly and half fill individual help with mills and over-head tins. Let rise. Bake in moderate in Igatlon works and lids is a most oven praiseworthy development; Cook_ ', _c l ip_su| ar with I cup whcther „ „„ ^ extended to pool cotinnl house with five of his A node' he -'ly U Miamtrhildren. They are all the King'' ev u.d he asked if boys and ail mule, ban and, eg his it was for **ic, am aorry it is idea of bliss is sitting in a corner not." 'aid .Slan. .ten he aeided quietly putting boats into botUea "But if I should cnange my mind, the children drive him nearly Your Majesty, you shall have first mad refusal." Old Stan has nil the tattoo Gentlemen' Charge your glassmarks of the genuine shellback— %  •' The toast is The Old Salts bunches of flowers. Union Jacks, 1 f Old England." —L E R •MACLEANS keeps ff JX3MI WSIH^S and healthy TOOTH PASTE WaaMtaath, ROJUDB ',-.'.'.*.V'.'/'.'*'*'.'.'.'^.'.'-'.*.'.'.'.'-0-.'.'.',*. MODERN DRESS SH0PPE-B.ad st minutes and add up of rum. Dip Baba Cakes in nice and pi.ui remaining sauce round them. village groups of smaller interests appears worthy of study. Meantime, we must seek out every available patch which is not beneficially occupied and set it to wOTfc. There are some eyesores not far from Bridgi town which would present a different appearance in gardens. lo M-UL4<£, you. tov&lii i&r POND'S %  ••SB'S tOID CREAM to cleanse and gotten your skin. PtNs VANISHING CMEAM to protect your skin by day and to hold youi powder matt. JSur 4W 'Buiuty VoclcuJ* r* FACE 1"0>\SIH: clinging. perfumed, sceintilically blended, for a clamorously matt complexion. ar*Na>* LIPSIICK smooths •n easily onto your lips; the rich vibrant colour stays on and on and on. Day Till It Sitll I III II \Y SMI Hit \Y MOXntY IIISII.W •"" „oO'l' |lR .(U>B.lira eorM goal "V^'V.hU"" 1 *' >a t* '*•• jjiiii-~r MI" ** la"' 1 — " r^.'" -•" ZZ^rt*?;,•;„ a-*. M0* ftK* ,|M"Here is a range of beauty products user! by lovely society women everywhere. Simple and inexpensive, they an all you need to keep you looking flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best at all times. You will find them at all the best beauty counters. ALL ITEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED FOR QUICK CLEARANCE You ore definitely effecting large lavings by attending this CLEARANCE SALE. Here arc tome of the many reductions. TENNIS DRESSES SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS A Hnr .ixuirtmrnl In slir" and (oliiuri. Moat ol llirac llrma Wan rriularly ,[, a ,. .. -aid up III $8.50 Sale Price ^^ #K^l LADIES' BETTER DRESSES •>! 1 III! Man. Kttlra and I i.lourv All Nam Krdli.id from VI In N I f aBU LADIES' ART SILK STOCKINGS Regular Slirs aad M.xirm Shadea iji I .... Alao a varlrl.1 In Ladlrs Analr Sorka Haar Prlrr ^__2 nrfl. |*|||fN | IIII LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS 3 of inllnr Xawda with a lilaaa Tumblrr -Ta-dav'a Value Ma. per lowel. Sperlal Sale Prlre. All s In a pki lor Jk I • II11 LADIES' PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK Lace li hum. d Panlle. In lea roiie rream ..I... blaeb, SaaaU. Madlum. Laraa. ,j, •. „ ,. Reiular prlerd I a.le Prk-e ._.^JS I LADIES' SKIRTS AND BLOUSES Jeraey malerlal Matm Mated I ollon sklru Speebllv redured for ,,, m .... %  I" %  %  Onl. V I ..III IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS For : "In and ehtldrni In white and manv othrr uteful aalm Many A| .... Style*. Many recolar prlre* were up to M.SO To Clear fc VI*"' MEN'S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS Men'* I'olo Shlrti In While on I, with Zip raalenrra. Shirt* that were regular $2.40 Rrdu>rd for thU Sule $J.D0 54" WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL That Hill aaatfl Skirl, or r mis i.,r trjv^lllni and u-i-ral Ihlnc*. Hi-durrd trnm SO.00 to vrllini and fan nuke many iln-r^ ( d i .• %  1.00 LADIES' COATS. WOOLLEN PULLOVERS. CARDIGANS Reduced lo | Price CORSETS. CORSELETTES. TURBANS. INFANT CHRISTENING DRESSES lo | Price THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE