Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
GE THREE

Harvbados

ESTABLISHED 1895

etn

OIL




SATURDAY, APRIL, 14,





Persian oil workers Riot:

Allied troops move forward
Seamen killed, others wounded

y Senate invites the General ‘ ‘
WAR oeyond the 38th parallel ¢.D.C.

to address Armed Services Group -

| Prineess

Elizabeth ““

Rumours say mismanagement
in running the Corporation





MACARTHU







TWELVE KILLED IN PERSIAN RIOTS

Martial law regulations to be

TWO BRITONS DEAD:
INJURED

EIGHT

shouting

TEHERAN, April 13.
‘TWELVE PEOPLE were killed and nineteen
injured in last night’s rioting at Abadan, the
Persian oil town. Two British seamen and an Ital-
ian were battered to death by oilfield apprentices

“Kill the British!’’ The injured included

two British children. Persian security forces stop-

ped the rioters just before they reached the Anglo- |

Iranian Oil Company’s great oil refinery.

MacArthur
Will Address
Senate Group

forcements
called out by the Government last
night, to-day reached the city.

Crowds were gathering again
to-day and the situation was re-
ported tense. Persian troop rein-
with armoured cars

Press reports that British troops

were in the area were categorical-
ly denied here.



Fp eancopmaanais a Ae

ee
a emnetil



enforced in A

INSPECTS GUARD

Nea ee 7 , ' rn



Yongchon, key road and

General Matthew Ridgway’s
men threw it back after a two|
hours fight and advanced again.

Patrols on the western front
probed into Communist-held terri.
tory north of the Imjin River. On
the eastern front a slow advance

| UN. Troops Beat Off
Red Counter-attack

UNITED NATIONS troops in rapidly warming
weather advanced further north to-day beyond

of the thirty-eighth parallel.

For yet another day major Communist resist-
ance failed to materialise, though a counter-attack
was thrown against United Nations troops about
20 miles southeast of Yongchon.

Sees Pope
b d VATICAN CITY, April 13,
a a hn | OPE PIUS XII 75-year-old

pontiff of the Roman
Catholic Church to-day re-
ceived Princess Elizabeth and
ge Philip in audience: in
his Vatican palace,

There was staged a cere-
mony of solemn grandeur for
the sixth visit in 50 years of
members of the British Royal
family.

The Pope chatted for 20 min-—
utes in his private libvary with
the Princess and the Duke.

Princess Flizabeth wore a black
dress reaching to the ground with
a black veil of Spanish lace hang-
ing loosely from her head over
her shoulders to her knees,

For jewellery she wore a dia—
nond necklace and a diamond
oxracelet. Prince Philip was in
naval uniform,

Pope Pius asked after the Royal
souple’s children and sent his
respects to King George VI and
Queen Elizabeth,

After the audience, the Princess
ind the Duke were led by Court
Prelates around the most famous
sections of the Vatican palace.





























TOKYO, April 13.

rail centre 10 miles north

Communists
Active InB.G.?

( : N They saw sumptuous rooms

The rioting began when striking “ Twa : oo anes (From Our Own Correspondent) _ idded to the oanes by ‘ths Hor :

apprentices shouting “kill the oid of Communists holding a ° : il 13 tias, and finally the splendid

WASHINGTON, April 13. | British” led a crowd from the stubbornly in most places east- GRORGETOWN, F.C, ong nite Sistine Chapel with its walls and

The Senate Armed Services| Bazzar area in a march towards wards from Yongehon to the} The Waterfront Inquiry Com Foot entirely covered by the last

Committee decided today tc| the residential quarter. Hwachon reservoir. /mission now sitting at Georgetow! 4 A : .
invite General Douglas Mac-| Persian security forces stopped

Arthur to appear before the
committee to discuss the United
States policy in the Far East.
Announcing the invitation the
Chairman Democrat Senator
Richard Russell said “The Ameri-

one section of the marchers before
they reached the Abadan Oil Re-
finery, one of the biggest in the
world.

Another section was diverted to

a big cinema on the town’s out-

HIS EXCELLENCOY the Governor Sir Alfred Savage inspecting the Guard of Honour aboard H.M.C.8.

“Magnificent” yesterday.



With good weather United Na-
tions aircraft kept up attacks to-
day. Pilots claimed 325 Commu-
nist troop casualties and 36 mili-
tary vehicles destroyed on North
Korean roads.

and a former Union shop stewara
in

rreat work of Michael Angelo.
Guard of Honour
The Royal visitors were greeted
»y a Guard of Honour of the
Pope's Palatine guards—Corps of
Roman volunteers in nineteenth





had a lively session on Thursd
night when Edward Lewis, :
waterfront worker for 22 years

evidence said that political
agents and Communists are very

Throughout last night United active on the waterfront. century uniforms of blue and gold
a peeks ae pec ae vale “has cinema was badly roe bombers and fighters had Lewis said Communist propa- with antique muskets.
a acts involved except] damaged. as

those which cannot be released
for reasons of security about the
clash in policies advocated by
President Truman and Mac
Arthur in Asia.

The Europeans were attacked

before police could disperse the

crowd.

The strike began last month

when the Anglo-Iranian Company

Ghost Ship
Will Come

at great Communist con.
voys to prevent a further buildup
against advancing ground troops.
Pilots claimed 130 vehicles des-
troyed.—Reuter,

THE CORONATION STONE
GOES BACK TO LONDON








After inspecting the Guard,
Princess Elizabeth was led into
colourful procession which accom-
panied her to the Pope's apart--
ment.

ganda first appeared on the water-
front three years ago and had be-
come stronger, Talking about the
effect on workers, Lewis said

i * ee Ben ae the} Prince Philip followed behind
‘ ‘ r alk aSlé rear , io a tee 4 z oa

MacArthur is expected in the}cut certain special bonuses to I d " alk is Russia. You cant hear eT accompanied by another prelate

United States early next week.| workers. The trouble followed oO n 1es AFTER THREE MONTHS waves for Russia, Lewis als

He has indicated through an aide | the assassination of Persian Prime

his willingness to appear before

; ‘ lenders working on the waterfront As 300 British and Canadian
LONDON, April 13 GLASGOW, April 13 Pr s yho are in fe , itions im , ee
i the Persian decision to nation- ‘ ” : ‘ @ 5 ie L4 r ne ’ ae m who are in favoured pos joné of fF priests and students in Roman
be aang ag gy Ser- Sie the company’s oil. adntt et Cae oie tay _ The stolen Coronation Stone, the 336-pound slab ot| 0 Ship the B.G, Labour Union Execu-f colleges watched in silence, chiefs
vices Committee made it certain] The Persian Government has! sential lighting, state rooms and sandstcne upon which Kings of England have been crowr.: (From Our Own Cortespondent) tive, of the Vatican ceremonial greeted |
that the General would: have at '

least a limited Congressiona’
forum for his views.

Republican Leaders in Con-
gress have been insisting that the
General should be askéd to

address a joint Senate-House of) sein Ala who announced last night |york—West Indies “millionaires”

Minister General Asmara Razmara

blamed Communists for agitation ),yblic rooms deserted, and no pas-
leading to the spreading strike and nae. . P

the Abadan rioting.

The Company’s representative | ¢ 2,500,000 Ocean Monarch (13,600
in Teheran was today in touch|tons) latest bid by British ship-

with Persian Prime Minister Hus-











She is the Furness Withys

owners to earn dollars on the New






Woman Missing

ed for centuries left here on Friday in police convoy for
London. After two days of secrecy a large black cer crep!
out of Glasgow police headauarters at dawn.

Nee A oe Hi ead In front were three other cars,
| 3 |
_ IN OUR TOWN

GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 13, ;
Mrs, Harold Martin-Sperry |
wife of the Netherlands Consul in
British Guiana is reported lost at
sea between Barbados and Trini-

one on its own carrying plaip| gaq on Thursday morning while

clothes detectives was apparently






















of the court and behind him were

















said there is a clique of money-§ yembers of the Royal Suite.

the Royal visitors, These then
joined the Royal procession, The
Princess and the Duke were, intro-
duced together into the library
where the Pope in white silk
robes sat silent with armchairs

Avalanches Destroy
Timber And Huts





returning from a U.K, holiday BELGRADE, April! 13 placed ready for visitors,
| Om a decoy . F Rem ne During th lienc »
n, hat the situation was under con. 5 e ial with her husband aboard the During the audience the Pope ,
Representatives session, ie: : a pleasure run, one of the most ; 4 @ These... elaborate .-precautions| } yg. Colombie. Arrivin 8 | Giant avalanches are pyrthing chee aahbecvigitar.ageiek tnndal. 4
rol. ‘ lucrative in ‘the world. | You can even dig up’ the were’ taken because Scottish - & dewn the higher »motifitains 0 ehar'h GOctainuter GanvernA..
3 Days Before Dispatch of troop reinforce-} “Eventually she goes also to St.|| road in Barbados for a six- Nationalists had threatened an} Geersetown to-day by plane her| Slovenia causing “enormous dam- tion, members of the Royal Suite
ments to Abadan was reported last};awrence and New Foundland|| pence. Yesterday on Tudor en war if the stone was taken | 2usSband said he spent a pleasant | age", Belgrade Press reported to-{ (Ol mein itl vine ee
‘ ight ; : | Pp A open N evening aboard tt Col bi were presented to the Pope.
Authoritative sources — stated/ "ght. . : ‘ and will assist the larger Queen| | Street a sixpence dropped back to London. Nationalists \ ening aboard the Colombie on | day. On thelt way, Gaek from: tha
here today that Truman had , The Shah and his Cabinet acted | 9¢ Bermuda (22,000 tons) in New|} from one of the passengers admitted having organized its|Wednesday evening when he last} They had destroyed timber and] oi e.ce still in procession, the
decided to dismiss General Bac )iastieasy to-day. They dismiss-|yor;-——Bermuda trade during the]! on one of the ‘buses of the || pemoval from beneath the Corona. |S&W her on retiring to her cabin }]mountain huts in Troiglav Julian} 200000" sha the Duke a oe
Arthur five days before he issued! ed the Governor General of Khuz-! more popular seasons, when thou. National Motor Bus Com- || tien Chair in Westminster Abkcy |i% the night-time. On awaking on} where most damage was done. | ar with aay ris € where
®je actual order. istan province which includes the | sands of Americans like to spend|| pany. as BRAY Thursday his wife was missing.:No casualties are so far reported, | reeled with = ceatening cheers
: Truman made up his mind|riot-torn oil town, Abadan, and | their holidays in the sunny Carib-|| It rolled a short distance ‘They claim the Stone belongs|The former Mary Dixon, her —Reuter. a edhe an and students
when he read a_ statement by aevenal other Fatman St officials | bean. and then disappeared to Scotland and should stay there. | mother’s first cousin, was Charles hommes ee Reuter.
Republican Leader Joseph W./and high naval and military off-| Below decks, the Ocean Mon.|| through one of the many’ | )Miss Wendy Wood, tartan kilted | Kingsley and also distant cousin Weaetree 9 PE eit etek ethtoets,
Leet ce Apel D that Mex Arthur | 0888. eae yD . arch is like a series of elaborate | manholes that line the side || Witionalist’. Leader is going to|of Thomas Hardy, TRYGVE LIE SEES TIN PRICES DROP
had written him on March 20,| The Cabinet's decision was tak-|fimsets. Her architects have cen-| | Of this strect.— London this week-end to campatgn 2 eet
backing Martin’s demand that en at a special meeting as Persian |treq their plans on the spacious} | Inimediately about twelve for yunport a eee { MARSHAL TITO SINGAPORE, April 13.
5 : ne sed armoured cars patroiled the {coun deck overlooking the swim-| | people went into action to riaerantioa \nneal dnicaied A . ; 7 i Tin prices reacting to General
Chiang Kai Shek’s troops be u } ‘ recover the sixpence and in After police looked in va A oe Tr k BELGRADE, April 13 ,
against Chinese Communists streets. ; _.) {ming pool. There is a handsomely) | oe ceo, Sa ahere there three months the stone appeared Poe ntina Lakes Trygve Lie, General Secretary |MacArthur’s dismissal, dropped
gi : s : i. They also decided that Genet al “Coral Cafe’ which will be used a few seconds w nere there a erate P Fatt nied ah yev ab re) 3 el Marly here again tosday
Martin told the House of Revle-| cy anbaki who has the reputation | 46°. «pj ht club”. In all public| | had been three | inanholes mysteriously on Wednesd Ov . of the United Nations today |Sharply 8 a
sentatives that he had asked Mac} + «strong man” should leave Be nie ee ‘ ich pile a car.| | there were only “holes” in aro eo om ved to | et ie tat Dy er Cruisers poranied an, Marshal Tite at - —Reuter.
Arthur’s views on the use of Teheran for Abadan to enforce s are 4 | the road. ationalists drove up with it to private villa in a Belgrade suburb, ates wine 2
; ‘ : : s antly upholstered arm. ; : | rot Abbe where he :
Chinese Nationalist troops now 1"| ;,artial law regulations which are Dee, eS oitiat wail decova. | ‘The sixpence was finally pore Ae Soot Py ah a PAL siti 45 _ He met the Marshal for the first ATE
Formosa. still in force in southern Persia | tiong ng manmifestit ' grand recovered and. taken to a eclaration of “ ap, naane n i fp ae April . time. TELL THE ADVOC |
~ : Seana | © . * ‘ She S. . . . i })} ence was signed in e rgentina 1as aken over n ‘ : 4 ‘
Men Aaitiae, Sad” regites ‘ith though lifted in the capital. lounge extends from side to side eee ee a || They carried it to the High| United States li ght Cities Boise This morning Lie was received THE NEWS
views and recommendations wit —Reuter 4 1 must have joined other coins & by M. Vlah th, wh jeputis DAY OR NIGHT
i ‘tuati , ’ fof the ship. Here are two sculp- f sibl eater detiom- Altar, covered it with the blue|and Phoenix, famous ships in:the} 2”: Y ahovich, who is cleputis-
pospptt, the eis ee cee tured figures of Prospero and Mir-| | fi one ited in celebrating | {cross flag of Scotland's Patron|last war. They were taken from Ke for Woretgn binister Roverd DIAL 3113
R na’s entry into the anda from Shakespeare’s “Temp- ree int St. fad foe om Wa tic) Ft vadal ge : : ardelj on sick leave in Slovenia.
i ; 7 F 8 the event. Saint, St. Andrewsanc left it with! the reserve fleet and were the fifth
against us in Korea, have been est” first performed in 1611 and : psi £19; Re aemnty aati i —Reuter, @
‘ the ; ¢ : a “keep off” warning to the Eng-|and sixth to be sold to South a
submited to | Amglo-Egypt Talks: |sugzeste by Six Gearse Somers, | ——-—————— lish. Pep) American countries.
“1 SHIPWTh 9 oer be ae t 3razil bought Philadelphia oS
“Generally these views are well 2 : x B ital C and Lonle and Chile the Brett ;
: E 4 ; yn
now aod any undarned | May Be A Failure | ATE | vritain Cuts | CZECH MISSION |i Xtsivite
they ar ap ee Sk” one CAIRO, April 13. | INVESTIG. S E _ iy Argentina took over the 10,000
of m A “ ae ‘i m 13-year sruisers in a brie
maximum counter force as wel | The independent Caira ewe: | SMUGGLING teel Exports | LIQUIDATED _ jj 8 yer os crusers in a anes
have never failed to do in the past.” paper sirmeantie 2 Anglo- : q Philadelphia naval base
‘ : 2 to) a “serious development” in Anglo ; re VIENNA, April 13. ua witdk ded '
“Your view with Peers. eat Egyptian talks, BONN, April 13. es ae ,_ LONDON, April 18, The Czechoslovak military mis- lhe price was not disclosed, but
utilisation of Chinese force: h As a result it said, talks were} Smuggling between East and Britain is to reduce exports of} i “Vienna has been liquida-|® Navy spokesman said it was
Formosa is in conflict with aan no longer likely to be successful. West Germany estimated by steel, Supply Minister George)) 4 according to reports in the | ®bout 10 per cent of the $24,000,000
logic nor tradition. “Here we fi ‘I It gave no details of the de-|Some experts to be four times Strauss announced today. Slitenna presa to-day. they cost to build.—Reuter,
Europe’s war with arms, while ; .| the vaiue of legal trade, is being He told the Commons that sup- 9 en Fa taht ie
diplomats there still fight it with velopment, but quoted a eR investigated by the All-German | plies to the domestic market would The Czechoslovak Legation here
Pp .| sible Egyptian source as saying: pean > : ‘i . P declared it was not competent to " *
words. If we lost the war ee “The tepuan side insists on|Affairs Committee of the Bun-|also be restricted because of the} -omment on these reports. I rench Will Close ;
munlém in Asia, ate st it abrogation of the 1945 treaty or | destag viene cee PEFEROS BE OSCEIEENS, Newspaper stories said that ‘ i
is inevitable and Se would| the evacuation of British troops} Committee Chairman, Herbert| Licensing control would be ex-|Colonel Odrich Krystof who wa: Czech Consulate REACH EV ERYWHERE I
mare) Oy | “ye freedom , rom, Egypt. It will not shift on@] Wrener, Social Democrat who| tended to exports of semi-finished) head of the mission was recently dh
avoid a war and preserv aie inch.” _ | lived in Russia for several years, 'steel and alloys of steel from next|recalled to Prague and arrested : PARIS, April 13,
a rm ‘| British and Egyptian official)toiq a news conference ‘toaay Monday and all other types of steeljas he crossed the frontier into The French Government an
R GETS circles would not comment OM|that North African, Dutch! from May 14, he added. British | Czechoslovakia, During the war | nounced _today that the Czecho
MACARTHU the report. Swedish and Belgian firms were| steel production was likely to fall’ Colonel Krystof fought in Yugo-| slovak Consulate in Algiers an
A NEW JOB —Reuter. involved in illegal interzonal| this year because of the difficulty ;slavia among partisans and before| the Masaryk Institute in Paris i
FLORIDA, April 13, trade ef getting raw materials, he said. | the breach between Yugoslavia| would be closed as reprisal foi
MIAMI, ay will. 4Ot sees S mal 5 7 and the Cominform, was a close|similar measures taken by th .
1 Mac Arthur will join Reuter. —Reuter. i
a f the typewriter firm left in 7 [friend of Marshal Tito. Czech Government against the
ae Doan. aaa a assume an| Only 2 days to get Aa ea > a a _ a nn + —Reuter French Consulate in Bratislava,
in i irs within 99 oca o .e7? 7 and the French Institute ir
oo Re i stan dames Rand | the Advocate Year Book Civilian Wanted May Postpone | Prague,
Gaye: seed here to-day —Reuter: | DOCTORS CONCERNED | Masaryk Institute is a cultural
ennggne’ WASHINGTON, April 13. ott association mainly for Czechs in
ng New York, Times suggested to- etirement OVER VANDENBERG || paris. r
day that following the dismissal : The Czech Embassy in Paris re- 4
M s d W men But of General MacArthur a — Ai aes NEW ee e GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan, mains open ag usual.—Reuter,
rrie O High Commissioner should ap- erican press reports fro’ April 13 ey
a pointed to the task of “continu-|Washington today said General






Doctors said today



“hh nf they felt
ing Jap reconstruction”. Among | Omar Bradley, Chairman of the “inereasing concern” over Seriator | ¢s 3
e ® the reasons for success of Mac-|Joint Chiefs of Staff, aged 58, dtchiae “Vanden ern, 66, who has ENEMIES OF PEACE
Still S insters Arthur in Japan had been his | mig oot waked t0 Postpone His) meen seriously ill’ at his home BUDAPEST, April 13
knowledge of the Orient and his| retire’ , y @ : nie 7 oad art
Pp ability to devote all his attention |, He had planned to retire when ee —"S ublican Party’s iceer anaes hee ttae siieaaa
and energy to Japanese recon-|his two-year period of office ex- | e is t va ar Expert EBACE oa am ae ae. entes
1 : *) 46 struction between World War | Pires on August 16, but President leading Foreign a ae : = “es ee “9 sie Sets seg ai
BONN, April 13. Two and the Korean war Truman is said to desire that he| He had a relapse recently after a}Roman Catholic Bishops )
Y Hae i hy . nN ; continues for another term series of major operations, fused to sign a Communist peti-
married women will ues a , ‘ f
More than 4,000 West, Sarma All —Reuter, —Reuter. —Reuter. tion. —Reuter,
soon be made spinsters again by a streke of the pen. se Ba anal ee aa ah a . a ue et ateT ac aa
were “married” during the war to soldiers who had already n
been killed in action. : ‘ tart, I C D C
The Government has decided that these rere iwmana emen umoure n e e e
c i “steel helmet marriages” are to be
worth a at ns eee: Tamer tty = tee ped that “it would be for him a matter
null and void. x (From Our Own Correspondent) ° ffi ce l ° of enduring regret — a Gace \y
Under Nazi war _ legislation, Pretisa Argentine LONDON, April 13. Senior O 11a uits cessor Lord Reith heard | ese ‘
women could “marry” dead et Mr. R. V. Cabel, senior Colonial charges in abs é é

diers if they could prove that they
were engaged to them or that the
soldiers had intended to marry
applicants.

The women are to be allowed fo
keep the names of their “hus-

1

|} pendent daily La Prensa accord-

BUENOS AIRES, April 43,

A new newspaper to be knowh
as Prensa Argentine wil! soon be
rolling off the press of the inde-

ing to the English language Thr
Standerd to-day. Commenting o1




Development Corporation official,
has resigned. He was Operations
Controller for the Caribbean.
Announcing this today, the
C.D.C, spokesman said Cabel re-
signed for health reasons. He
jenied his resignation had any





lowed them to go unanswered,”

Cabel's resignation leaves an
important gap in the Corporation's
activities in the West Indies. He
recently returned from a visit to
the Caribbean and one of his chief
concerns is understood to be the

heard of these rumours, “but ‘as
far as I know,” he went on, “they
have no foundation”.

Certain members of the Board
of C.D.C. are said to be thinking
of getting out because they con-

next Wednesday, “Tf he will make
a statement on resignations that
are about to take place from the
Board of C.D,C.”

tumours were strengthened this
week when Lord Trefgarne made









, onnection with strong rumours Sider there is a good deal of mis- 4 personal statement in the House improvement in shipping services
hands” but they will be deprived | La Prensa’s appropriation by tn’ | iat are circulating in London to management at the top. of Lords denying that he had between the United Kingdom and
of all claims to widows’ pensions | Government, The Standard said he effect that a number of resig- An attempt to get to the bottom “acted in an arbitrary and high- the Southern Caribbean.
or other aid, Children from such | “Our readers will _understanc ations from the Board of the of the rumours is to be made by handed manner” while he was He joined C.D.C, in November |
marriages will receive al] benefits |when we say we come to bury oration are about to take Mr. F. Erroll, Conservative M.P. an of the Corporation 1949. Before that he was Financia! | |
accorded to children of the war | La PreMsa, not to praise it for Altringham who is to ask the > ggestions that had riser to several Argentine Rail- cars ie ea i Soe ie ste :
dead, —Reuter. } —Reuter. spokesrnan said he had Secretary of State for the Colonies been made to this effect and added Companies ha ANE IC A ARREST a SN AIRES ERS NS PERE REY EN EATER EO TEES OE ES









?





<
o

M?; VICTOR CUNARD, Sir
Edward's brother is off on
a visit to Martinique to-day by
B.W.1.A. via St. Lucia.

En route

EV. JOHN W. CLEMENT-
SON is on his wav back to
Montserrat from British Guiana.
He will spend a week in Barbados
staying at Codrington College
before going on to Montserrat
where he is stationed at the St.
George’s Rectory. He is a Church

of England minister.

Continuing W.I. Holiday
R. JOE SELLIER’S | sister,
Jeanne, who had been spend-
ing a short holiday in Barbados
staying at the Hotel Royal checked
Gui yesterday by B.W.I.A. for
trinidad to continue her holiday
in the West Indies. Miss Sellier
lives in the U.S.; she is a nurse
at the Roosevelt Hospital in New
York.
Back to Trinidad
R. and MRS. FRANCIS CARY
who have been in Barbados
since April 4th, were among the
passengers by BAW.1.A. for Trini-
dad yesterday afternoon. They
were staying at the Ocean View

Hotel. . on the same plane
went Mr. John Campbell,
1.C.T.A. lecturer who had been

here on a short visit.

Nelson and the Navy
AILORS from the Canadian
shigs added a touch of colour
to Bridgetown yesterday as they
simply “swarmed” ashore. Each
one had a camera. Most popular
subjects they chose to photograph
were the statue of Nelson and the

Fountain Gardens.

Avensa’s Traffic Manager
R and Mrs. Rene Van den
Branden and their youngest

daughter Nicole have come over

from Caracas for a brief stay,

Their other two daughters Car-

mencita and her sister used to go

to school at the Ursuline Con+
vent here. Mr. Van den Branden

is Traffic Manager of Avensa
Airlines in Caracas, They are
guests at the Paradise Beach
Club. vod

The Churchili Trust
ERE is news of a Scottish land
deal. I quote from the
Weekly Scotsman:

“Acting on behalf of the Win-
ston ChurchiJl Literary Trust, a
London firm of estate agents are
negotiating the purchase of more
than two.thirds of the 7,000-acre
Biel estate, East Lothian.

“The estate is being sold to meet
death duties, stated Vice-Admiral
Basil C. B. Brooke, managing di-
rector of the Biel and Dirleton
Estates, Ltd.

“*People are interested because
they think that Winston Churchill
has bought himself a house here.
I do not think he is personally con.
nected. No houses are involved;
it is simply a block of farms.’ ”



ADVENTURES



BY THE

AMARA wabad mul, mul Jimo.

lak. So runs the Afghan prov-
erb, the meaning of which eludes
me. “The thud of her fall,” says a
description of ballet, “seems to
stop the music.”

And well it might. When the
Tavistock Tiger throws the Bill-
erieay Butcher, does not the
cot tee pits agp | 2 the bar
stop playing “In onaster.
Garden”? .

The brimless bowler

FTER a breakfast of dried

Peruvian egg, Mr. Vincent
Fumbling adjusted the brimless
bowler in which he is to go to bed
at 11.43 (Greenwich time) this
morning. The judges examined
the hat, and certified that there
was no trace of a brim. There
was a scuffle when a party of:
young women carrying a banner
bearing the words “Down With
Vaccination!” tried to force their
way into the yard where the test
is to take place. Police took the
names and telephone numbers of
the two prettiest girls.

Hoofbeat corner

T F the Stewards of the Jockey
Club (“Steward! A basin! A
basin! Flashaway is feeling ill”)
compel owners. of racehorses to
tattoo their nags. I understand
that romantic marks will be dis-
couraged. A horse will not be
allowed to have a heart pierced
by an arrow tattooed on its chest,
with the legend underneath: “I
Love Gipsy Queen.” Ever since
unlucky Simon turned out to be a
camouflaged cow, and lost the
Penzance Plate by 1,389 yards, the
Stewards have had their eyes on
a widow in Bruton-street, who
does her “ringing” through a group
of sailors living above an iron-
monger’s shop in Suffolk-street.



ARTIE’S HEADLINE

“1 keep finding Communist
leaflets in MY jar.’



Welcome

HE Y.M.C.A. have extended

a welcome to the personnel of
both the Canadian naval ships at
present in Carlisle Bay offering
them all of their facilities at their
headquarters in Pinfold Street.
Facilities include reading room,
writing room, billiards, table ten-
nis, draughts, dominoes etc., and
sleeping accommodation up to 50
men can be provided. They have
also offered to give all information
in connection with the islands
many beauty spots.

Flying Visit

P from B.G. for a few days
is Mrs. Lena Raleigh, She
is staying with Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Marson until Tuesday. Mrs,
Marson is her niece. She told
Carib that her brother and sister-
in-law Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Psaila expev. to leave for England

later this month on a holiday.
On Tuesday Mrs. Raleigh will
fly down to Trinidad to visit

other relatives.

U.K. Bound
P bases pnd WILLS of Georgetown,
B.G. is on her way to the
U.K. But first she is spending
two weeks in Barbados en route,
staying at Dulce Domin, Fonta-

belle.
B.G. Boys
AYMOND SHANKS and
George Manly, two B.G.

boys are in the Royal Canadian
Navy. Raymond is stationed on
board the H.M.C.S. Magnificent
and George is with H.M.C.S.
Miemac. They were granted
special leave to visit their relatives
in B.G. and yesterday they were
on B.W.1.A’s B.G. flight as they
come over to rejoin their ships
George's parents Maj. and Mrs.
PE anly were in Barbados
a few months ago on holiday.

WAY...

Plastic Eggs
Y appetite was whetted by a
cutting sent to me which an-
nounced Inflated Plastic Eggs. For
a moment, I thought it was a quo-
tation from this column, but I
read on and discovered that they

are already on sale in America.

It is true that they are onl
Easter eggs. However, the publi-
city says that they are “pre-inflat-
ed and electronically welded,”
which is good news for progres-
sive children. They are sold in
paper bags, “with acetate win-
dows.” The eggs are made of
“Heavy gauge vinyl film.” Eng-
land is still a long way behind

America in these matters.

An passing
HE incident at the Shah’s
wedding, when the train-

bearers were almost unable to



Carb Calling

Mind the Doors!

ONDONERS who believe it
impossible for a tube train to
move until all the automatic doors
are shut are confounded by the
experience of the man who was
dragged into the tunnel at Charing
Cross the other night with his foot
caught in the sliding doors.

Truth is ,a train can move even
if every door is open. There is no
automatic device to prevent it.
It depends on the guard.

When all the doors close, an
eleetric contact is made and a
light flashes in the guard’s com-
partm “nt. He rings the bell, the
driver starts the train.

London Transport think the
man at Charing Cross had a thin
instep. Thus, although the doers
were open at the bettom, they
could be closed at the top, and the
guard would have received the
“all elear.”

Nobody in the train used the
ved-handled emergency stop.
There is ome in every carriage.
London Transport say no one has
pulled it for more than a year.

Project Put Off

N Essex vicar, the Rev. Hugh
Cuthbertson, was going to
turn his home into a guest house

this summer. He planned to put s

people up at Tilty Vicarage, near
Dunmow, for £5. 5s. a week.

Now, his wife says, she and
the vicar haye changed their
minds, “We were going to. make
structural alterations,’ she says,
“but with labour difficulties, we
decided to put it off this year.”

The Cuthbertsons had ‘sent out
a leaflet advertising their project.
Their publicity was a little ahead
of their achievement, it seems.
_ If the plan ever does material-
ise, they will need to print a new
leaflet. The present one is headed:
“Your Holiday 1951,” And it
warns:

Accommodation will be short
during the Festival of Britain,

R.A.F. Visitor



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Athletic Stimulus

eter - WEST AFRICAN

REVIEW this month, refer-
ring to the visit to the Gold Coast

of the two West Indian athl

Arthur

O” LEAVE in London last
week was R.A.F. Sergeant

Keith Blake of St, Mary’s Parish,
Jamaica, He is attached to the
R.A.F. Camp at Grimsby, Lin-
colnshire. He joined the service
in 1944 and says he hopes to be
demobilised next year, Once
back in “civvy street” he intends

to become a sanitary inspector

and has already started a corres-
pondence course with a view to
obtaining the Associa’ diploma
of the Royal Sanitary Institute.

Incidental Intelligence

ore people sleep in the tops
of their pyjamas, some in
the bottoms. With taxes going up
as they are they’ll soon be sleep -
ink in the strings.”—U.S.
TV comedian Arthur Godfrey.
—L.E,S8.



OF PIPA

Copyright - P10 - Vas Dias int. Amiterdgam

By Beachcombe~

support the weight of the bride’s
fabulous dress, recalls the corona-
tion of Napoleon as Emperor.
Josephine’s dress was so heavy
that she could hardly walk. Her
sisters-in-law, Elisa Caroline, and
Pauline, loathed her. So, at a
critical moment in Notre-Dame
(aceording to Mme. de Rémusat,
who was there), they brought
Josephine to a full-stop by their
deliberate clumsiness. Napoleon
spoke to them sharply, and Jos-
ephine was able to move again.
Another account says that the
amiable ladies dropped the train
and that Josephine nearly fell
backwards.
Tail-piece

The loss of 23 stone in one day
by a Mrs, Ntnge is not so startling
when one realises that it was

potatoes.
(Ministry of Diet).

Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites

its Junior Short Story Competition.
every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner w

a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. ‘1
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more

all children under 12 to en’
The best story will be

for
dished
,eceive
Stories
an 306

words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co, Ltd., City not later than Wednesdaw every week.

NOTE:

Stories must not be copied,

Send this coupon with your story.
JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Stee teen eee er fee

a Cotten Prints 36’
a

m Shirtings

M@ wuite & coLtours

$128

DIAL 4606

Rayons

TAFFETA PASTEL SHADES

BROCADES ‘_,,

EVANS & WHITFIEILDS

YOUR SHOE STORE

sstiasten OOF,

nT

79¢
so 85¢

DIAL 4220

Wint and Me
Bailey, says that their appear-
ance will do much to stimulate
the ambitious plans of the logal
Sports Council for a stadium
worthy of the rapidly
interest, Mac and Arthur, who
will be in West Africa by the
time you read this,

ago. has followed

emergence of a first-class team in
the inter-Colonial Championships.
at Achimota, and the
ful tour of
last year by Gold Coast athletes,

Sybil Atteck

SYBIL ATTECK, whose exhi-
bition of paintings opens at the
Museum to-day (Saturday), is a
member of a well known Port-
of-Spain family, and a founder
of the Trinidad Art Society. This,
however is her first one-man ex-
hibition here and her work is
full of interest.

In 1935, the artist spent a year
in London studying sculpture a
painting at t Steg

chool of Art of t Gt



Lon

Polytechnic, In 1942, she visited
Peru, where she studied painting
under the South American painter
Julia Cordicido and sculpture un-
der professor Pro, at the Escuela
de Belles Artes. Anxious to gain a
fuller knowledge of the meaning
and technique of art, Sybil Atteck
gave up her post with the Agri-
cultural Department, St. Clair, and
went to Washington University.
Here she studied for three years
under the Canadian symbolist
painter Philip Guston and the
expressionist painter Max Beck-
man, and obtained the degree of
Bachelor of Fine Arts. An exhi-
bition of her paintings was held
at the Public , St. Louis,
Missouri in 1947.

Last year, Sybil Atteck spent
three mc iths in England studying
art on a British Council scholar-
ship, and during her visit had
one of her paintings exhibited at
the Royal Institute of Painters in
Oils, Piccadilly. She has also to
her credit a large mural depict-
ing the history of rum which was
commissioned by the Fernandes
arenes Trinidad, for its new

ices.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1951.
6.30 am—t215 pom. .......... 19.60 M.

—_—_— eee

6.30 a.m, Forces Favourites, 7 aum. The
News, 7.10 a.m, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.
From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme
Perade, 7.30 am. From the Third Pro-
gramme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude, 8 a.m.
Montmartre Players, 8.15 a.m, Composer
of the Week, 8.30 a.m. Elton Hayes,
8.45 a.m. Colonial Questions, 9 a.m, The
News, 9.10 a.m. Home News from Britain,
£.15. a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m, Pro-
gramme Parade, 11.25 a.m. England vs,
Scotland, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down.
4156.00 Pom. 6. - 19.96 M.
4.15 p.m, Listeners’ Choice, 5 p.m.
Composer of the Week, 5,15 p.m. BBC
Seottish Variety Orchestra, 6 p.m. Music
.or Dancing.
007.15 p.m.



25.64 M. 31.32 M. 48.45 M



6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m
The News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15
p.m, Behina the News.
145—11,00 pom. .. 2.2...

745 p.m, Sandy MacPherson at the
Theatre Organ, 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
8.15 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.30
p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15
pm. Take it from Here, 10,45 pm. Yours
Faithfully, 11 p.m. Southern Serenade
Orchestra.

©.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1951.
1010.15 p.m. News and Canadians.

3L.32 M. 48.43 M.



10.15—10,30 p.m. Neighbourky News.
11,76 Me 25.51 M.
CROSSWORD

eo



1 Grain goes cre

0 Or @ change, (9
0. Fuel, 8 ff Nothing? (3) rt
2. Used by angler: ur footbatiers 16:
3 st about foo (5)
; e (6)
Â¥
0
2

A symbol of stubbeurnness (4)
Is tt a blue river? (4)

You
(7)
Containers

may be trans;

(a)

rted oy it,
Dilfter ? (5)

Whatever msden moo
f
You will have bdo this artar *
bww out of 22 Across
yen Bg as ae 16)
e se w
> de otficers

untidy (4)
ure, ¢ ‘ indian soldier, (4)
Take this measure trom leve:

jand only. (4)

Phe year doetor 1s buring

Thess Ups to the mudisc.
res caugh

“eturming tide (3) he

Not so wet. surely (5)

Hang backwards (3)

; -. Of yesterday s purate

(6)
(6)
the

=~ Oe @O9 #6 Kr

eo ee

Across
9. North 65 Anthem. +. Co
ar tchggrins 3 st
en; 16 Sees ‘is “pales id: Orme



oon: 21 Warsi fa, tithe
Eneores: 3, Atire. 4 Soa 45 ‘ant

hime: &, Gradient Tee,” V0

+ % d

14 Near’ 15 choad. i

rrerroOwnwna

Complete your list
from these :—
Tins Rolled Oats

Pkgs, Cream Wheat

. Corn Flakes

All Bran

” Puffed Wheat
Tins Hams

, Fruit Salad

» Peaches
- » Peas

” Custard Powder
Bots Worchester Sauce

» CX, Sauce

» Tomato Ketchup
Tins Soup (Chicken, Beef,

Oxtail, Chicken Noodle)
Tins T. Butter
Slabs of Bacon
Sliced Bacon

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

onsen








Britain undertaken

SATURDAY, APRIL 14,



chief, giving news to-day

By JAMES STUART

The man who taught the King
to fly stubbed his cigarette-end
into the on his desk. He
pointed to the bookcase, where
there were half a dozen ashtrays
all surmounted by modern
types of airplanes. “We have
deposited them in the bookcase
as being out of date,” he
chuckled,

For, rising vertically from the
centre of the one now in use was,
in beautifully turned bronze, a

1 of a rocket projectile.

It wag a symbol of his office
Air Chief Marshal Sir Alec
Coryton, DFC, is Chief Execu-
tive, Guided Weapons, at the
Ministry of Supp'y.

In his room seven floors up
above the river at Millbank
today, he told me of some of the
work that is going on 12,000 miles
away in the South Australian
scrub country that will make any
new Battle of Britain a very dif-
ferent affair from the summer

days of 1940,
1,200 Miles Range
Coryton just
& visit to oy an rocket testing

north of Adelaide, where, tar
away from prying eyes the work

of testing both defensive and
offensive rocket projectiles _ is
progressing.

“There is room there for ex-
pansion,” he said, “There is a
range of about 1200 miles over-
land, and that is plenty to start
with. j

“Out there the rainfall is only
about 5jin. or 6 in. a year, There
is good weather for 360 days of
the year, so there is no fear of
the experimental work _ being
held up through weather.”

Woomera—named after the
Aborigines’ word for launching
a boomerang—has been built
into a substantial village with








his way home very sadly and care-
fully and puts his purchases on the
table. Mrs. Bear looks grave when
she sees the broken eggs. ** It war

all my fault."’ says the little bear.
“Tf [ hadn’t turned to laugh at

TO-DAY R.K.O,

4.45 ard 8.30 p.m,

and Continuing
Daily

LEON ERROL in

Also:
SPECIAL TO-DAY 9.30 a.m,
The CISCO KID in

“SOUTH OF THE RIO GRANDE”
with DUNCAN RENALDO











PLAZA DIAL
OISTIN rrow 5 and

8.20 p.m, R.K.O's
“BLOOD ON THE MOON"
Robert MITCHUM and
Barbara Bel GEDDES
IT’S ACTION ALL-THE-WAY!
——
Midnite TONITE (Monogram)
Boris KARLOFF as Mr. Wong in
“MR. WONG IN CHINATOWN”
and CISCO KID in
RIDING the CALIFORNIA

TRAIL
with GILBERT ROLAND

The most Beautiful Night

Nozzles

Rupert and the Ice-flower—5

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

RADIO'S SUSPENSE THRILLER!
Robert
MITCH

‘““WHERE DANGER LIVES”

and 1,30 p.m,




CLUB MORGAN

with a world-wide reputation for good food
Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations



THE ROCKET MAN
Scraps His Ash-trays

Reason? They’re out of date, said the Guided Missiles

of the developments that

are providing Britain with new weapons.

prefab. houses, church, hospital,
shops, school and two airfields.

Eighteen miles away from the
village is a radar station for
tracking the guided weapons as
they are tested,

More than three hundred
miles away in a former muni-
tions factory, is the base where
the Australians are building up
all the supperting acfivities—
electronics, rocket propulsion
and aerodynamics, This base is
headed by Mr. H. C. Pritchard
40-year-old Oxford Double Blue

What are the prospects for
British industry?

“There are various schemes
afoot, One British aircraft firm
have already started out there.”
Sir Alec said. aad

How are we doing on rockets?
Sir Alec was careful to give no
secrets away. “In relation to the
total effort that has been put into
guided weapons, progress » has
been satisfactory,” he said.

Fifty-six years old Coryton,
tall and slim, with hair that is
going white, usually prefers to
wear a lounge suit with a white
stiff collar

His ‘Old Crock’

An old Etonian, he joined the
Rifle Brigade after leaving Cam-
bridge during the 1914-18 war
transferring to the Royal Flying
Corps in 1917. Two years after

he became an airman he was the
King’s flying instructor at
Cranwell,

What does the man who is in
charge of all Britain’s supersonic
“rocketry” do in bis spare time?
He loves engineering, and has his
own pfrfvate workshop, Another
of his joys is an “old crock” car.
“IT did 160 miles in it the other
day at an average of 24 m.p.h.”
he said.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.ES.










SARS Te
SS ROS A |
RSIS

He ey WA ||








n Cy), ei
A itt a

tr Algy | saouldn’t have tum-
Pied.” ** Well, 1? oe you've
blamed yourself and 1 else,”
sighs his mother, ‘* and

scold you, but the roads are too
slippery for your boots, You'd
better stay in,"’ So Rupert watches
the weather from another window.





Faith
UM DOMERGUE

Claude
RAINS in

“WEDTIME STORIES”

(Monogram Double)
Ro!

land WINTERS as
Charlie Chan in
“THE GOLDEN EYE”

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James

To-day to Sunday 8.30 p.m.
Mat. Sunday 5 p.m.

James CAGNEY in (Warner's)
“ST. LOUIS KID” and

Humphrey BOGART in
“CHAIN LIGHTNING”
Midnite TONITE (R.K.0,)
Tim HOLT in (Both)

“GUN SMUGGLERS” &
“UNDER PHE TONTO RIM”

eae eee nate







&







To-night

visit

Club from Miami to Rio

GARDEN REQUISITES |

Hose—} in., 5¢ in., %4 in.

Sprinklers
Hand Forks

i ' Rakes

Secateurs

Shears

Flower

COTTON



: We are fully stocked with
(
"
i
i
)
i

Handsprayers
Garden Manure



:
| THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE i
FACTORY LTD. i



Pots

SOS OO



$

says to you:
“Lux Toilet Soap brings
Why envy the quick new loveliness.
Stars? You, too, Give your skin this gentle




can have a clear,
radiant complexion
and soft, smooth skin.

nt, creamy
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then rinse with cold. Your
skin will take on new love-
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LUX

TOILET SOAP

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ANN SHERIDAN

beautifying care.”

1951











THE FRAGRANT WHITE SOAP OF THE FILM STARS



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AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT at 8.30

DAVID FARRAR — GLYNIS

JOHNS — FLORA ROBSON

and the New Swedish Star MAI ZETTERLING

“FR

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MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHT at 5.30
MATINEE:

TO-DAY 5 AND 8.30 AND CONTINUING

The “FURIES”

BARBARA
STANWYCK

Extras:—
WEDNESDAY:—

WE
Cc

CAPT. CAREY

NOW SHOWING

NDEL
OREY

WALTER
HUSTON

TOP FIGURE CHAMPIONS

ALAN LADD
U.S.A.

AT

EMPIRE THEATRE

Matinee 4.45; Night 8.30 — DAILY

exb emanating WE 1? COUROVE CALEMOAD OLS + Sereen Play
Produced By NAT PERRIN +

PRICES: Adults—Matinee & Night
Pit 16—House 36—Balcony 48—Boxes 72
Children Mats only: Pit 12—House 16 Balcony 20—Boxes 72

EMPIRE

Wo-day 445 and 8.30 and
Continuing

Columbia Pictures Presents

* THE GIRL OF THE
YEAR ”
Starring. ...

Robert CUMMINGS
Joan CAULFIELD with
Elsa LANCHESTER

ROXY

To-day To Monday
4.30 and 8.15

Republic Smashing Double

George BRENT and
Lynn Bari in —

“KID FROM
CLEVELAND ”

and
«SINGING GUNS”
Starring .

Vaughn MONROE and
Ella RAINES



eee eg nm cs ener eel



by Not Perrin + hese by Horold Arien*tysies by johe Mercer
Directed by HENRY LEVIN:

ROYAL

‘To-day and To-morrow 4.30
and 8.30

Universal Big Double

Yvonne DeCARLO and
Brian DONLEVY in

“SONG OF
SCHEHERAZADE ”

and
“THE WEB”
-with

Edmond O’BRIEN and
Ella RAINES

OLYMPIC

To-day to Monday 4,30 and
8.15





Warner Bros. Smashing
Double

Billy HALOP and
Bobby JORDAN in

“HELL’S KITCHEN”
and
“JOHNNY BELINDA”

Jane WYMAN and
Lew AYRES

==













:
}
i
'
:
~

SATURDAY, APRIL 14,

1951





ccc 4 tenement eee

Knowledge Of Land
Grows By Exchange

By Dr. DOUGLAS ENSMINGER

‘Americans are exchanging visits by , in greatly expanded
the thousand with people of other lands | 4gricultural improvement
From FOREIGN AGEICULTI KY

programme of

THE exchange of agricultural knowledge through the
exchange of people is growing. From July 1950 until July
1951, more than 3,000 agricultural leaders from 77 friendly
countries will have visited the United States to learn about
American agriculture. Conversely, American farm leaders,
farmers, and agricultural scientists and students by the

thousands are seeking to bro

visiting other lands.

This first-hand
the ways of life in other ecoun-
trigs on such a large scale is
something new to history, It
reflects educational policies that
should contribute substantially to
greater cooperation and trust
among the participating nations.

Recently the U.S. Department
ef Agriculture received a letter of
thanks from a German forester
who had been studying the fores-
try methods of the United States.
It is typical of the many that are
reeeived from _ visitors from
other lands. It said, in part: “1
started this year my trip with a
little suspicion. After a lost war
and all the bad things made by
the Nazi regime, I could under-
stand if your people would be a
little ma@ on the German visi-
tors. But it happened only
contrary. All the American peo-
ple I met were very kindly, and
I felt myself never an foreign
guest. Sometimes it happened I
met old soldiers—we fought
against each other in the last war;
today we made nice parties,
Only a crazy politick started this
war. You have a real freedom
here and I hope all the other
world may get it too.”

U.S. Leadership

The vast populations of
world are pressing today
improved living conditions,
enly ‘proper that the United
States should aid their agricul-
tural leaders in their quest for
ways and means of making their

observing of

the
for
It is

agricultural resources’ provide the world-wide exchange of Hospital but died shortly after en-
higher and more secure levels of prurighes 3 and to give guid- . the gate and before being
living. The way to early and ®nce to it. : . 4, admitted to the ward. The truck
lasting unproestient must of ,Other international activities was Jaden with sugar being con-
necessity come through an im. 2!so are adding to the exchange. veyed from Montpelier Factory
yrovement of their agricultural The U.S. Economie Cooperation to’ st, John’s, Steel band “Red
‘echniques. Administration, for example. Army” from Greenbay played in
during 1951 is sponsoring the ~bbott's funeral procession
The United states is in a visit to the United States. of
fortunate position to give some 1,400 agricultural leaders

leadership to this venture. It
is a progressive nation whose
very foundation stones were
laid through an exchange of
Knowledge. When the Pilgrim
Fathers landed on this new
continent, they had _ brought
with them some seeds, a few
implements, and the farming
knowledge of the Old World.
In order to survive they had to
add to their competence by
adopting the crops and many of

means of applying these answers.
high
American standard of living and
American
marketing
methods are the products of this

In no smali measure the

the advancement in
preduction and

joint federal-state activity.

Public Law 535

The broadening of the domes-
agriculture in-
world proportions
accompaniment of
re-

tie exchange of
formation to
is a natural

the expanding international
sponsibilities of the

States. The activity has
rapidly in the decade

US. Congress passed the
legislation to facilitate
Initially, the legislation was

concerned with
ideas with Central
America,

and

aden their knowledge by

South 5!
The first law called for tion Me
the 8® exchange of information and School, Trinidad, where she stud-
students with the other American ied
republics, and later was expand- 8Â¥ and physics, she entered Lon-



POCKET CARTOON |
by OSBERT LANCASTER



(Ie that the Director of
Recruiting, Admiralty? A
rather interesting point has
just arisen—”’

Gets M.D.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S April 11.

Mrs. Hilda Gibbs Bynoe, daugh-
United tet of Mr. Joseph Gibbs, retired
grown Head. Teacher of the Crochu R.
since -
cae oo Gibbs, has qualified in Medicine
it, at London University.
; A former pupil of the St. Jos-
interchanging @Ph’s Convent High School where
Matricula-
High

School and the late Mrs.

she took her London

and later Bishop's

ed when money was appropriated ¢on University on a C.D. & W.
to the U.S. Department of State Scholarship in 1945.

for awarding training grants to
American

Central and South

In 1948 she was married to Mr.
Peter Bynoe, a Trinidad student

technicians and leaders for study Of architecture in England.

in the United States.

Legislation making
change
was passed in
increasing number of
from other areas visited the
United States to study many
phases of agriculture. Then in
June 1950 Public Law 535, an
“Act for International Deyelop-
ment,” was passed. Under this
new romt Four
is possible to further

1948,

expand

from the Marshall Plan countries

To direct this world exchange,
the American land-grant colleges
and universities and the s.
Department of Agriculture have
created a Joint Committee of
Technical Services to Foreign
Areas. One of the Committee's
important decisions is that the
state institutions and the Depart-
ment of Agriculture must accept
the leadership in this exchange
of agricultural knowledge as a

the methods of the American major and highly important pro-

Indians. Thereby they set in

motion an exchange of agricul- The

tural abilities between the Old
World and the New that
through the decades has .con-

gramme for the next generation.
sincere feeling has been
expressed that through _this
accelerated exchange of agricul-
tural. knowledge the free people

i and zathered of the world may gain new hope,
Denuantiy ‘ improve their level of living, and
For many years. the U.S. more actively engage in the
Department of Agriculture and business of helping demoeracy to
the land-grant colleges and spread to other lands throughout




universities have been Americé
principal storehouses .and distri-

§ the world.



the ex-
programme world-wide
and an
people

programme it



Death From “Hop”

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA.
In attempting to hop on toa
truck last Monday Carton Abbott,
a labourer of Greenbay, was fa-
tally wounded when he fell from
the moving vehicle and the
wheels ran over his body. He
Was rushed off to the Holberton



Factories Change To Syrup

Some of the local tactories have
stopped making sugar for the
time being and are making syrup.
Because of this many labourérs
are out of work.

A planter told the Advocate
yesterday that the factories have
turned over to making syrup to
fulfil orders from Canada.

So far this month 9,042 tons of
erystal sugar were shipped to
the U.K., 3,100 tons to Canada
and 52 to Dominica.

White Crystal Sugar shipped
to the U.K. this year amounted to
1,050 tons while 70 tons were
sent to Dominica.

Faney molasses shipped is as
follows: 302,384 gallons to
Canada, 3,896 gallons to the
U.S.A., and 102 gallons to Mont-
serrat. Vacuum Pan Molasses:
236,926 gallons to the U.K.









preliminary chemistry, biolo-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





$250,000 For
Red Regime

BERLIN,
Germany's former Imperial
family has donated, indirectly,
nearly a‘ quarter million dollars
to the Soviet Zone Communist
regime.
The puppet government § an.
nouneed that salvage in the
recently demolished Kaiser's
palace in East Berlin yielded

4,500,000 East marks ($225,000) in
“historic and artistic treasures,”
Ihcluded in this trove were 900
pounds of 18th century silver-
ware found in one of the base-

ment vaults, the government
reported,
The palace, one of Berlin's

most famous landmarks, has been
torn down to clear space for a
vast Communist “Red Square”
for official demonstrations and
parades.—I.N.S.



Club Makes London
Less Lonely

LONDON, April 12.

At the All-Nations Social Club,
2.000 members meet every night to
shatter the loneliness of people
stranded in London. But as some
of the loneliest people in London
are Londoners, scores of local
young men and women turn up
alter shop, office and store hours
to greet visitors from all parts of
the world.

Viscount Stansgate, remarking
oa the extraordinary mixture of
races there last night in honour of
Indonesian Ambassador Dr, Su-
bandrio, said: “This is a model of
what the world could be and ought
to be, if only people were intelli.
gent,”

Leslie Blanckenhee, who found-
ed the club just over three years
ago, is a manufacturing jeweller
by trade. The club, which meets
in the huge basement of the An-
glican Church in Marble Arch, ‘is
his almost full time hobby.

More than 100 West Indians go
there for games and table tennis;
Membership costs about two pence
a night.

“I started this club” Blancken.
hee told Reuter, ‘because I was al-
ways coming up against the prob-
lem of loneliness, and wanted to
do something about it. The
trouble in London for strangers
is that they cannot join a club
until they have found someone to
propose them. As very often they
cannot do this, they cannot join
and don’t star{ meeting people as
they should.—Reuter,



Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school~girts
between the ages of 12-19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-
Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
n length and must reach the Short Story Editor,
Jity not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6,

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

tition.

NAGE... esaccaens





HOME -

DRESSMAKERS

ARE

THRILLED WITH

Labour Notes







The International Confedera
bi of Fre: Trade Unions i
(ICPTU) the world-wide anti- the versatile,
communist labour organization,
now

has about 8,000,000 members
in Asia. ICFTU has been joined by
labour unions in Pakistan, Ceylon,
India, Malaya, Hong Kong, For-
mosa, Korea, and Japan. According
to ICPTU officials, these unions
have an aggregate membership
about three times greater than that
of Communist controlled labour
gvoups in Asia, ¢

A.F.L. DISPLAY

A series of displays depicting
the formation and growth of the
American Federation of Labour
(AFL) will highlight the AFL
Union Industries Show in Chicago
in May. Officials of the AFL say
the event will be an example of
labour-management cooperation in
the United States. In addition tc
union exhibits, the show will in-

long-lasting beauty

FABRICS

‘Want your home-sewing to be a
success? Want clothes that look
like a million yet cost next-to-
nothing? Then you want ‘Celanese’
Fabrics, For the unusual quality

clude displays by the U.S, Depart- f s chign Sitelik: edi Aeeeaet en
ment of Labour and other Govern- A oi — sorics, thei we

ment agencies showing their ser~ ff versatility of texture gives a
vices to the American people. ” / professional perfection to every-



PAGE THREE

Blood Pressure
Kills Men & Women

Twice as many women as men suf-
fer from High Bieod Pressure, which
is a mysterious disease that starts
about the time of Change of Life and
is the real cause of much trouble
and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
mon symptoms of High Blood Pres-
sure are: Nervousness, headaches at
top and back of head and above eyes,
aressure in head, dizziness, short

reath, paing in heart, patpitation,
poor steep, loss of memory and energy,
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don’t
delay treatment a single day, because
your Hfe may be in danger. Noxco
(formerly known as Hynox), a new
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the first dose, takes a
heavy load off the heart, and makes
you feel years younger in a few days.
Get Nexco from your chemist teday,
ft is guaranteed to make you feel at
and strong or money bask,

e

a

t Just Received
FRESH
OF









STOCK

thing you make, Day-dresses, °“

LABOUR LEADERS HELP Niece, Givtdag ieee, nd DOBIE'S

American labour leaders are ee it will be th mesa ahs .
helping to advise President Tru- ee s vag - all wi the FOUR SQUARE
man on U.S. foreign eeonomic envy of your friends. ie . ade
policy. Jacob S$ Potofaky, vice oy YELLOW & PURPLE
President of the Congress of In- TOBACCO
dustrial Organizations; Lewis G.
Himes, special representative of the em . 202 & 402 Tins
American Federation of Labour g¥ yre
and three other union officials est co” ee
were included on the 17-man In- e
ternational Development Advisory e ce | is C. CARLTON BROWNE
Board appointed by the President ce

to study U.S. economic aid to
underdeveloped countries.

ADDRESSES
JAP WORKERS

Mrs, Gladys Dickason, vice Pres-
ident of the Amalgamated Cloth-
ing Workers of America, recently
addressed the opening session of
the general council of Japanese
labour unions in Tokyo, The group,
which represents 3,200,000 work-
ers, indorsed the action taken by
the United Nations against the
communist aggressors in Korea,

FORTUNATE NINE
The United States was one of
nine countries in which unemploy-
nrent was lower at the end of 1950
than at the close of 1949, accord-
ing to statistics gathered by the
International Labour Office. Other
countries showing a decrease in
unemployment in this period were
Canada, Hawaii, the United King-
dom, Ireland, Finland, Switzer-

land, Tsrael and South Africa.







VOU'LL

GARDEN HOSE—'” and 34”
GARDEN HOSE FITTINGS
GARDEN SHEARS

TRUCK JACKS

GREEN CANVAS—69”
FRICTION TAPE

PLASTIC LEATHER CLOTH
NUMBER PLATES & DIGITS
TUBE VALVES—Truck and Car



ROBERT THOM, LTD.

SSS ETO SE





Advocate Co., Ltd,

5



NEED THESE

LICENCE
RUBBER MATTING

REAR VIEW MIRRORS,
WINDSCREEN WIPERS (Vacuum)
COOL CUSHION

White Park Rd.



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MODERN DRESS SHOPPE-Broad st





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136 Roebuck St.

Dial 2813



HOLDERS

COURTESY GARAGE

GAS TANK LOCKS (English and
American Cars)
HAND SOAP
CHROME CLEANER
_ Dial 4391

PPS



butors of agricultural knowledge.
Traditionally, farm families have
taken their problems in farming
and homemaking to them for
solution. The Department olf
Agriculture and the state institu-
tions in turn have sought the
answer to these problems in their a
research laboratories, in field tribesmen involved in an inter-
testing plots, and through 4 tribal feud to three years hard
continuous examination and sift- jabour and six strokes of the lasn
ing of experience throughout the each, Twenty-three people were
world. Meanwhile the coopera- killed in the rioting.

tive agricultural extension work- The 27 were among 190 charged
ers have been active in taking after a tribal battle last, October.
the answers so found back to A fight arose from a_ 100-year-
American farm families and in olq feud over the chieftainship.
helping to work out ways and —(C.P.)

27 Sent To Gaol
After Tribal Feud

UMTATSA, April 13.
judge sentenced 27 African




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DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING
COMPANY LIMITED

(ECKSTEIN ~ BROS.)



SPSS9SO PO SSO SPO D ISS SSS

Day

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THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY

MONDAY =- TUESDAY



ALL

You

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ITEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED
FOR QUICK CLEARANCE

are definitely effecting large savings by attending this CLEARANCE
SALE. Here are some of the many reductions.

TENNIS DRESSES. SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS

A fine assortment in sizes and colours, Most of these items were regularly
Sale Price _ $4.98

sold up to $8.50 dene ieee
Many Styles and Colours, All sizes, Reduced from $24 to

__..$] 2-0
LADIES’ ART SILK STOCKINGS
Regular Sizes and Modern Shades 4 1 {} ]
Also a variety in Ladies Ankle Socks Sale Price a prs. for .
LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS
2 of these fine Towels with a Glass Tumbler
To-day's Value 65c, per towel, Special Sale Price.

LADIES’ BETTER DRESSES

All 3 in a pkg. cor_§ | 00

LADIES’ PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK

Lace tiinmed Panties in tea rose, cream also black, Small, Medium, Large. (7 rf (l
Regular priced $1.92 Sale Price $ |:

ee ef fa

LADIES’ SKIRTS AND BLOUSES ,

Jersey material Blouses, Printed Cotton Skirts Specially reduced for qf
this Sale $0 co daccsa oA

IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS
For ladies and children in white and many other useful colours. Many {] i
Styles, Many regular prices were up to $4,80 To Clear oe ] ‘
MEN’S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS
Men’s Polo Shirts in White only with Zip fasteners. Shirts that were 4 oo
regular $2.40. Reduced for this Sale piliccasciith
54” WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL
That will make Skirts or Coats for travelling and can make many other jy ig
useful things. Reduced from $6.00 to Per yd. A eaaeen .
LADIES’ COATS, WOOLLEN PULLOVERS, CARDIGANS
Reduced to | Price

CORSETS, CORSELETTES, TURBANS, INFANT CHRISTENING
DRESSES to ! Price



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~

PAGE FOUR â„¢

[ee ees |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.



Saturday, April 14, 1951



TRAINING

THE sending of two members of the
Civil Service attached to the Government
Savings Bank for training in British Guiana
where there is a system of mechanical
accounting is a step which will be wel-
comed not merely by members of the Ser-
vice but by the general public.

Nor is this the first instance of local offi-
cers being given training in other colonies.
There is at present an officer studying
modern statistical methods in Kingston.

The system of training members of the
Civil Service outside Barbados has long
been recommended and the advice given
is apparently now being taken.

At its last meeting the Civil Service
Association made it plain to His Excellency
the Governor that there was dissatisfac-
tion because of lack of opportunity given to
local candidates for higher grade posts;
and this newspaper has on more than one
occasion pointed out that the only remedy
was to utilise the $25,000 voted by the Leg-
islature in. giving officers of various de-
partments opportunities for training out-
side the island.

His Excellency gave the Association an
undertaking that something would be done
to have the scheme working and it is pre¢?
sumably due to his interest in the matter
that there has been no delay. It is bound
to be of great benefit to the Civil Service
and the public generally.

BYE-ELECTION

THE St. Andrew bye-election caused by
the death of Mr. D. A. Foster of the Bar-
bados Labour Party will be concluded with
the polling on Monday.

The keenest interest is being taken in the
contest between the two candidates repre-
senting the only two political parties com-
peting.

Mr. Haynes is the candidate of the Elec-
tors’ Association and Mr. Worrell is the
candidate of the Barbados Labour Party.

The election will be based on the old
electoral roll with its low income qualifica-
tion of £20 per annum. On the same vot-
ing qualification in 1948 a candidate of the
Labour Party was elected. Ifa greater
number of votes in favour of the candidate
of the Electors’ Association is obtained it
will conclusively prove that the voters of
St. Andrew are no longer’ supporting
Labour,

The loss of the seat by the Labour Party
will reduce their numbers to the low level
of 11 in a House of 24, A gain by the Elec-
tors’ Association will increase their num-
bers from 9 to 10. In either event “party”
government by majority is hardly possible.



WAY OF LIFE

WHAT has America‘to offer the world?
Is there an American Way of Life ? Russell
Davenport, writing in Life recently sums
up likes this :

“It is wrong, at the present stage of the
U.S.’s evolution to expect some great ‘cul-
tural’ development in America, equivalent
to the culture of Europe that extends back
for twenty or twenty-five creative cen-
turies. The intellectuals who castigate
Americans on this score miss the point.
In the first place, they overlook the fact
that there is a great activity in the creative
arts throughout the country, especially at
the community level; and second they too
easily forget that American culture is of
necessity a popular culture, and hence in-
herently different from that which we
inherit from Europe. Yet even after these
modifications have been made, the fact
remains that high culture is not what
Americans have primarily to give. The
big American contribution to Western
civilization has to do, rather, with certain
qualities of the heart deriving from demo-
cratic ideals.”

“Everything in America,’ Mr, Daven-
port claims, “be it national, regional, sub-
regional or local, comes back somehow to
the individual. And the American can
live his life on two planes at once in such
a strenuous way precisely because he
recognizes that the human individual may
have — must have — ideals. That is the
inner secret of the Amer‘can way of life.
It is a way of life to permit and encourage
the development of the human individual,
by his own free will, toward his own
ideals.”

It is the U.S. ideal of equality, however,
which “next to their belief in the ‘natural
rights of the individual, is the most valu-
able contribution that Americans have to
offer the world.”







































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

&) nour Overseas Visitors And

Siudenits In Britain
....And He Dreams On

LONDON.

You would not imagine after a
first look at Addiscombe Grove
(Croydon, near London) that it
was the birthplace of an experi-
ment of world significance, one
which in eleven years has proved
that men of all races, given a
chance, CAN live together as
brothers.

Addiscombe Grove has no out-
standing town-planning devices
or architectural wonders about
it. It looks like any other resi-
dential street in an old-estab-
lished saiellite town. Yellow—
bricked, grey-—slated, mid—Victo—
rian villas, whose bay windows
are discreetly draped with Not-
tingham lace and chintz, stand
on parade each side of it.

But 416 of the 28 villas in the
Grove house represent a pro-
gressive ideal. They form part
of the International Club — a
home from home — for overseas
students and visitors of 50 nations
who live there as friends and
equals.

With them live 200 British —
mostly professional and business
men With their. wives and chil-
dren. Basic aim of the Club is
that overseas residents shall live
in an atmosphere as close as pos-
sible to that of a normal English
home.

Opened in one house with eight
European students, the Club has
expanded in thirteen years to 38
houses — all of them situated
within a few yards of the Head-
quarters in the Grove. Five
hundred students live there now.
More than 12,000 who passed
under its old-fashioned wooden
porticos have returned to India,
Burma, Africa, China, the West
Indies and a dozen other places.

Some have gone back to be-
come leading figures in ado
lescent democracies. From what
present overseas students at the
Club tell me, if is clear that prac—
tically all return well-disposed
towards Britain and grateful for
being given a home and a warm
welcome.

Unhappily, it had not always
been like that. Before this Club
came into being the most that
many coloured students could
expect was to be segregated like
animals in a gloomy hostel.
They returned home disillusioned

Anyone so ill-advised as to
write about. women is bound,
sooner or later, to find himself
faced with having to write. about
men. ‘The reason for this is be.
cause it is only fair that the read~
ing public should be given the
low-down about men also, And
because, unless they were, many
men might be misled into getting
an entirely wrong impression
about the relative virtues of the
two sexes,

I mention men only as being
likely to be: misled, because it
would be a pretty dumb woman
who does not already know more
about men than any article by a
man could tell her, The truth is
that men like to be known as the
sterner sex. They therefore hide
the weakness of their velvet hands
in iron gloves and get away with
it, The reason they get away with
it is because, as women do not
like to be considered the sterner
sex, they hide their dear little iron
hands under the softest of velvet
gloves, thus helping to keep up the
illusion, And what is more im-

| portant they do in a way that

leaves a man in the happy belief
that his achievement of this
masterly distinction is entirely
due to his own masculine efforts.

The average man is far too
modest to write about himself.
The reason for this is that if he
did write what he honestly be-
lieves to be the truth about him-
self, it would be extremely diffi-
cult for him to avoid creating the
impression of being a_ braggart.
Another reason is that it is diffi-
cult for any average man to be-
lieve that he is merely an average
man,

Few men can, however, resist
reading anything written’ about
themselves. And the reason they
can’t is because if it is complimen-
tary, he has the satisfaction of
knowing that the writer has only
erred on the side of understate-
ment, On the other hand, if it is
uncomplimentary, it gives him a

Emigration

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR—It is the established
practice of the Barbados Tabour
Party to claim responsibility for
certain beneficial results to the
Community, that neither its ac-
tivities nor policy did anything
to bring about.

We have heard them claim that
their party is wholly responsible
for the economic improvement in
the Island during the last ten
years. They never mention that
the cane harvest is three times the
tonnage that it was in former
decades; that sugar is six times
the price. They claim responsi-
bility for development and welfare
projects. They never mention
that Colonial Development and
Welfare Act was passed by a
Conservative Parliament before
the Barbados Labour Party was
born, They claim their leaders
got the latest increase in Sugar
prices, when in truth and fact
they came into the picture only
after every other Labour Party in
the British Caribbean had sup-
ported from the beginning their
respective Sugar producers’ dele-
gation to London. They claim that
their efforts brought emigration to
the U.S. in 1944, when the reading
public knows their leader spoke
against it, They claim to have
made Barbados the most progres-
sive Colony in the British Empire.
Only they know how this miracle
was accomplished in the last ten
years. We know that if it is true
that Barbados is the most progres-
sive Colony in the Empire, it is
on unconscious-.tribute..to . the

4

By £.B. TIMOTHY

and, often,
embittered .

Terence John Driscoll, an
English engineer, born at West-
minster 39 years ago, began the
Club in-1938. He then bought
the first house after receiving a
legacy of £1,000.

Today the Club is valued at
£150,000, with an annual turnover
at £60,000.

The house he bought originally
is one of four which now com-
prise what is called the Club
centre. It has 16 dining and
common rooms, and here the
students — some of whom stay
for three. years — eat together,
talk, attend lectures and discuss-
iens, play games, dance; listen to
the radio, watch ‘television (which
is very popular), or just relax
and read. Studying is done in
the solitude of the living quar-
ters. Every resident has his own
room the charge for which, with
meals, is £3 a week.

politically hostile and

Every week, visits are arranged
to cultural centres, such as Strat-
ford-on-Avon (the birthplace of
Shakespeare); to factories, coal-
mines, theatres and other cen-
tres which depict various aspects
of the British way of life.

At the International Club no
one bothers to lock his door, The
Club has no crime record; nor
has there ever been a_ serious
quarrel between residents, On
the other hand, there have been

93 marriages, of which only one
was “mixed,”

Driscoll, in stature, is in inverse
ratio to his ideals and aims, He
is short, stocky, _ prematurely
bald, has a square, jutting chin.
The lines of his face are softened
by a slight plumpness — and a
small smile. He wears his ties
gay and his carefully manicured
fingernails long.

His success, the overseas resi-
dents say, is ‘due to a rare com-
bination — ideals and the ability
to put them into practice. He

works 14 hours a day, most of
the time in his shirt sleeves. He

knows everyone of the 500 resi-
dents by their first names and
they call him “Terry

The idea of the Club first came
to him when, as a traveller for
an engineering firm he became



appalled at the mistrust between
nations.

A few days‘ after being left
the legacy, he was_ strolling
through the Grove with a Chinese
officer when he ‘saw a “For Sale”
notice. Three days later, he had
bought the Club’s first house and
abandoned his engineering career.

Almost every day, “Terry” is
called upon to perform some
minor miracle in the way of find-
ing accommodation for overseas
visitors and students. He was
nonplussed one day, however,
when the Colonial Office asked
him if he could find rooms for
750 Maltese.

On one occasion a batch of 120
students from India and Pakistan
arrived at short notice and there
was nothing to do but put them
in a marquee on the back lawn.
An Indian official who visited
the Club late that night leoked
into the ma ec in wonder—
ment. “Amazing,” he said to
Terence Driscoll. “At home
they wouldn’t even live in the
same town, and here you've got
them ‘sléeping im the same tent.”

“That was nothing extraordin—
ary,” Terry told me when I vis-
ited the Club recently. “Come
upstairs and look into the billiard
room.”

~*~.

We did so and saw five youths
happily playing snooker. “One
from Tanganyika, one from In-
dia, one from Pakistan, one from
Trinidad and one from Switzer—
land,” said Terry. The youths
smiled, said ‘Hallo, Chief,” and
went on with their game.

Terry looked at me again, then
turned to me. “Two Christians,
one Jew, one Hindu and one
Moslem,” he said, “and yet they
say the world Gan’t live at peace.
Here, at the International -Lan-
guage Club, we know that peace
is possible.”

The old spirit dies hard and one
battle won by Terry in his strug—
gle to establish the centre has
been over a few local diehards
who couldn’t.tolexgte the idea-of
white men and coloured men liv—
ing in the same quarters.

“Terry” has further dreams.
He hopes some day to be able to
build a great Empire Students’
Centre, which will cost anything
up to £2,000,000.

Sea eames maanetenatinatn as



MEN

By ¢. G.
heaven-sent excuse to call atten.
tion to those merits the writer
failed to mention. Oddly enough,
although women have nothing to
learn from articles written about
men, they too cannot resist read-
ing them, Their reason for doing
so is because it is gratifying to
have their opinion of the trans.
parent simplicity of the male con-
firmed,

The real difference between the
male and the female of the spe-
cies is that the male believes he
is being subtle when he pretends
to be simple while the female
knows perfectly well the more
subtle he tries to be, the easier
it is for the feminine mind to
realise how very simple he real-
ly is. These diametrically op—
posed points of view are the real
reason why articles like this one
get written. The tired bread
winner wearily wending his way
home in his motor car after toil
ing during the only hours his
trade union allows him to work,
is much too simple to understand
why he should have to be both-
ered with finicky domestic de~
tails about how his wife can be
expected to provide a £10 stand-
ard of living on £5 a week's
housekeeping money. He is far
too simple to comprehend why
she seems incapable of under—
standing that a man who has just
received his income tax assess-
ment anda _ notice that next
month the rent will be increased,
is not in the best frame of mind
to be confronted with the knowl-
edge that the cook has walked
out on them, or that young Billy
has had another of his front
teeth knocked out and his new
trousers torn in a free for all with
the boy next door. He can’t help
wondering why women are so
unreasonable. After all, she has
nothing to do all day long except



tr

OUR READERS SAY:

Conservative Governments that

have preceded this Bushe Labour
Experiment,

Well now, they tell’ the St.
Andrew Electorate in this bye-
clection that their leaders are re-
sponsible for the prospective
Emigration to the U.S., and that
in particular it is one of their
Jeaders who made the suggestion
regarding the possibile emigration
of women, The people of Barba-
dos shouid be made to understand
that it was the Bustamante Gov-
ernment of Jamaica which took
the leading action get B.W.I1.
workers to the.UlS., this year.
Mr, Bustamante was so concerned
over the matter and so anxious
for its complete success that he
did not entrust it into the hands
cf any incapable junior. He per-
sonally led the delegation.

It was the woman member of
the Jamaica House of Represen-
tatives Mrs. Rose Leon, one of
the Jamaica delegation to Wash-
ington, who, along with Mr.
Bustamante made strenuous ef-
forts to secure mass employment
of Jamaica domestic help by
American families. Mrs, Leon
stayed over in Washington after
the delegation had left, further
to discuss the question. On her
return to Jamaica she said that
she had not been as successful
as she would have wished. She
added that the lodging difficulties,
in addition to immigration re—
strictions, has made any mass re—
cruitment of Jamaica female la—
bour for America impossible at
the present time.

TRUTH
April

13, 1951.

provide the family with suitable
meals, see that their clothes are
washed and mended, the house
kept spick and span, his socks
darned, the cocktail shaker filled
and ready at appropriate mo-
ments, the children kept out of
mischief, and to make herself
attractive and look cheerful
against his coming home with an
unexpected and thirsty guest.

Why, oh why, is it that we
poor men are never given credit
for what we are? Why should our
being too modest to press agent
ourselves result in women being
too blind to see the fine fellow
that lies beneath the veneer of
humility we wear. Why should
they expect us to put up with
having no flying fish for dinner
merely because the fishermen
have caught none; or because
they’ve sold whatever they caught
to the hotels

Just because the Foreign Secre—
taries of the Great Powers have
been unable after 27 meetings to
decide what they want to talk
about, and because women can
talk about anything, agenda or
no agenda, is that any reason why
they should jump to the absurd
conclusion that they are our in-
tellectual equals?

With a war going on in Korea,
and a cold war everywhere else,
what is a wretched man to do if,
when you come home, you are
either irritated by trivial domestic
details, or infuriated by being
met with a too cheerful smile and
an overdone care-free manner as
if there was nothing to worry
about in this sad world? You
don’t know? Well, with apologies
to Kipling, Ill tell you:

The cure for this ill is not to
sit still

And grumble and grouse in
your ire;

ee a very big calomel
Pi

And next morning the salts,
you require.



Mark-Ups

' SIR,—I have read with interest
tthe Debate in the Chamber of
Commerce on the question of
controlled price park upe but it
seems to me mat the real “bone
of contention” between the Gov-
ernor and the merchants was not
emphasized. The General Public
will remain indifferent unless it
is able to understand what it is
all about and I am wondering if
the following example would not
Bimplify the issue:—

If an article in 1940 costs a
merchant $3 and he was allowed
a 15% mark-up, then he was
making a gross profit of 45c. If
today that same article costs the
merchant $4.50 or more probably
$6, he is now making a gross
Profit of from 67c. to 90c. In
other“words the higher the cost
of the article the greater the
gross profit and in these days of
inflation it is likely that the gross
profit of the merchant will be
upward @wather than downwards.
Now everybody will admit that
the merchant’s overhead expenses
have also been steadily rising
since 1940 due to.inereased values
of stock, staff salaries, rent etc.
ete., and I presume that, it is
Government’s cotitention that the
increase in profits takes care of
the increase in expenses, If this
is not so and it can be proved
that any particular trade is not
making its normal percentage of
profit as in 1940 when controls
were instigated, then surely it
would be a simple matter for the
experts to arrive at a formula
which would take care of any
discrepancy between Profits and
Overhead expenses.

W. L, ALSTON.
St. Thomas.
1951,

Landscane
April 13,

SATURDAY,

APRIL 14, 1951



NOBODY'S DIARY

Monday — The agave is in bloom outside my
window. I had always called it a may-
pole but today I learned its true name,
the Agave. It is a beautiful thing. It is
yellow and shaped like my lady’s powder
puff. But it is huge. The yellow breasts
love it and so do the humming birds. Its
beauty, to quote my encyclopedia, is re-
markable. More remarkable certainly
than my ignorance of the Agave, And
that is remarkable indeed. No mean
scholar myself, fed on Tibullus and
fashioned by Lucan, licked into shape
by Demosthenes, one who has. read
Hardy and been aware of the Joyces,
Lawrences, Day Lewis, Huxleys and the
Picasso, Matisse, Ibsen firmament, I am
the veriest fool when it comes to Agave.
I can plagiarise Hamlet and cry “What’s
Agave?” And my precious little ency-
clopedia cheap at £12. 0s. 0d. replies
“Agave, a genus of plants belonging to
the order Amaryllidaceae found mostly
in Mexico. It somewhat resembles the
aloe, and on that account is often com-
pared with it. Its beauty is remark-
able.”

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BLUE HYACINTH

There's a bit too about the roots being
used for soap, but I’m afraid of infringing
the copyright. Buy an encyclopedia and

read it for yourself. That’s enough Successors to
knowledge for 5 cents. ¢. S. PITCHER & co.
* * * ’Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413

Tuesday—lI am iooking out of a window. The

Wednesday — Today I saw a man _ with

Thursday — Glorious news tonight.






Friday — It’s been a day of horns.

Saturday — Suppose you stop blowing your

fields are under snow and the trees are
graceful outlines, flickering as it were
with the promise of spring leaves, naked
against the white background, finely cut.
A picture far more beautiful than a
painting. Is the revolt against scenic
painting a revolt against beauty? Is the
smug laughter against the week-end
“bird” school of poets, the witless chuckle |
of those who carinot enjoy naturé? I}g,
shouldn’t be surprised,

* *

You can once again
BAKE with a SMILE...

YES! It’s Here Again




















































*

threadbare trousers, close and tightfit-| $
ting. He was carrying a bunch of flowers | $
in one hand. I followed him and saw him
turn down an alley noted for its dirt
and watched him toil up a winding stair-
case and deposit them lovingly in a bowl.
Later in the evening I touched him on his

cap and whispered “Mister why do you
do it ?”



THE FLOUR WITH GOOD RETURNS

OBTAINABLE AT YOUR WHOLESALER.
He replied with a thin cracked voice :
“It’s my contribution to a cleaner city.”

I was so touched that I dug up all my

tuberoses and put them out to dry. You

will know me next time you see tube-
roses in Nelson Street.

* *

LOUNGE
SUITS
ready
to
wear

Choose from a wide

*
I can
double my whisky and soda before
dinner. Did I say whisky and soda ? How
careless of me. Women only drink gin
and lime. But whatever diet I am on,
I can double it because there is a man in
the Evening Star. I proved it tonight.
The moon came up and I looked her over
and over with my naked eye. There
was no man in the moon, but sure
enough, there he was as big as the hero
in King Solomon’s Mines bending ‘his
gigantic arms across thé Evening Star. range of fitting, single or
Husband pour me a stiff rum and soda.

double breasted.
Iam annoyed. After a morning shop- :

ping in all the big Broad Street stores,
I had to return home without my pattern.
The girls did their best. They offered’ me
some English patterns. I looked at them
but they are not for me. I can imagine
some people liking English patterns here
but now that I’ve qualified at the Singer
sewing course, I think I’ll make my own
patterns, until they let the Canadian
patterns back.

*

Style Grade
WORSTEDS and GAB-
ERDINES.

in fine

A big assortment to

select from - - -

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* * Dry Goods Dept.

There
was the one that makes a noise like a
peasant in distress. It is the one that
goes ha-di-hah. That’s meant to be
musical.

Then there is the hornblower. Some
drivers tap their horns and a muffled
whisper comes out. These seem to say
“I wonder if you would mind moving
over just a little to let me pass.” An-
other driver will put his whole weight
on his horn, I interpret this to mean “if
you reverse any further you'll smash
into me and I'll fix you....” Then there
is the driver who waits till he is passing
you out and hails you. His horn says;
Sorry to do this. But I am ina hurry.

ENERGY FOODS
KELLOGG’S ALL BRAN
KELLOGG’S CORN

FLAKES

PUFFED WHEAT
CHOCOLATE LUNCH
BISCUITS

BARLEY SUGAR STICKS

CALVES LIVER

DANISH BACON

DANISH LUNCH
TONGUES

J & R ENRICHED BREAD




FRESH VEGETABLES

CARROTS
Must. pass you.” SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL BEET ROOT
ee CANADIAN, APPLES STRING BEANS
Then there is my horn. ‘It either sticks ine RokE: CHOCOLATE ‘CHRISTOPHENES
and blows when I don’t want it to blow, CANADIAN CHOCOLATE
or it doesn’t blow at all. This seems to BARS



|
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be the best horn of all, and I really find

it possible to do without it.
" |

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SMOKED HADDOCK
SMOKED KIPPERS
RED SALMON
RED SNAPPER

ae Wee

horn and tell us who you are. How are
you looking at snow through a train
window one day, and buying patterns
from Bridgetown the next. What sex
are you anyhow ? Peace, restless soul,
I’m nobody, nobody at all and were it
not for my friend in the Evening Star,
the Editor would never receive my copy
in time for -you to read it in bed every
Saturday. Pip, Pip.

order early from

CODDARDS

RIASS

SOOO OOOO LAO OOO OD
PIPELIE SII E OTF ETE EE TEE Et PATI



SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1

951

Trade Commissioner Reviews

Local Supply Situation Appeat court

MR. A. R. STARCK, O.B.E., United Kingdom Trade
Commissioner in the British West Indies with headquar-
ters in Trinidad, told the Advocate yesterday that he would
do his best through the Board of Trade in London to ensure
that traders in Barbados are getting supplied with goods

from the United Kingdom w

ithin the limits of the essential

requirements of the island from the resources of the Mother

Country.

Many Care Little
For Adult Suffrage’

Now that every Barbadian over
21 can vote when the .General
Election comes off, the estimated
number who are qualified to vote
is 107,000.

Mr. L. A. Chase, who is con-
nected with the registration of
voters, told the Advocate yester-
day that the progress in the work
of registering voters is good.

Formerly a voter had to go to
a Justice of the Peace and get
him vouch for the legitimacy of
his qualifications, The voter then
had to go and register himself.
Now a voter does not have to go
to a Justice of the Peace nor to go
and get himself registered, An
officer comes around to each home
and registers those who can vote.

There are many, however, who
do not care a straw about voting.
Besides the hundreds who are too
old and who tell you they
think it is too much for them to
hobble down to a centre to vote
for anyone, there are many who
would not even get registered,
furthermore think of voting
when it is election time.

Some people are giving some
funny arguments to strengthen
their decisions not to vote..

One woman who could not have
voted under the old system but
who can now vote, asked what
Government had done for her.
She did not think much of the
suggestion that.she would be able
to decide who would do something
for her.

Mr. Chase said that there
should be a few people paid to
go around and tell the people at
meetings what is behind register-
ing and voting.

Out of the 107,000 estimated
qualified voters. 7,000 are in
Bridgetown, 38,000 in St. Michael,
13,000 in Christ Church, 7900 in
St. Philip, 7,000 in St. George,
3,000 in St. Andrew, 4,000 in St.
Lucy. 5,000 in St. John. 4,000 jn



St. Thomas, 4.000 in St. Peter,
6.000 in St. James and 3,000 in
St. Joseph.

—_—- = |

Can. Challenger
Brings Flour, Eggs

THE motor vessel Ganadian
Challenger landed a cargo of 900
bags of flour, 70 cases of eggs, 140,
barrels of potatoes and quantities
of peanuts and pickled meat from
Halifax during her 15-hour stay
at Barbados yesterday.

She also landed cabbages, car—
rots, provisions and fruit from the
British Northern Islands.

The Challenger left port last
night for British Guiana via St.
Vincent,’ Grenada and Trinidad.
She is consitned to Messrs. Gar-
diner Austin & Co,, Ltd.

——



FOWL TYPHOID

Isolated outbreaks of Fowl Ty-
phoid still occur in the island,
and at least two of these were
confirmed by the Government
Veterinary Officer during the last
month. ;

Poultry keepers, he said, must
sti therefore be aware of the
presence of the disease and con-
tinue to take the precautionary
measures previously outlined,
chief cf which is to avoid the
purchase of adult poultry for
addition to their flocks_ unless
they are known to come from a
clean source.»

Mr. Starck is now on one of his
regular tours through his terri-
tory. He arrived here on Thursday
evening by B.W.I.A. from An-
tigua after visiting the Leeward
Islands. From’ Barbados he goes
to Dominica on Thursday. He is
staying at the Windsor Hotel.

Asked about conditions in the
nerthern islands, Mr. Starck said
that the earth tremors in St.
Kitts and Nevis appeared to have
died down and the people are
quickly recovering from a most
terrifying experience.

The sugar crop is very good
and is being gathered according
to schedule and it is anticipated
that a record tonnage of sugar
will be produced.

In Antigua there, are still many
signs of the ‘terrible damage
caused by the hurricane, but the
Government have taken vigor-
ous action to house the people
and conditions will gradually be-
come normal, it is hoped, towards
the end of the year.

The Government seems to have
done a most commendable job;
for it was faced with the problem
of replacing some 1,400 houses.

There is a very good sugar crop
in Antigua, but there is some
doubt as to whether it would all
be gathered, as unfortunately,
there was'a stoppage of about
four weeks which is now happily
settled. If the labourers continue
to give a full day’s work, there is
every hope of the full crop being
taken off the fields.

Estates’ Flood

Mr. Starck said that when he
was here in February, there were
terrific rains and some fear was
expressed as to whether the Bar-
bados sugar crop would come up
to expectations, as he had himself
seen the serious flood which had
taken place on the estates and in
the country generally.

He is delighted to see that the
rains have ceased and that we have
had plenty of good sunshine here
with every prospect of getting an
all time high in sugar production.

Speaking on the question of

supplies of goods from the
United Kingdom, Mr. Starck
said that certain items includ-
ing most metal goods and any-
thing in connection with paper
or card board were very diffi-
cult to be obtained owing to the
necessity of carrying out a vig-
orous and determined rearma-
ment programme,

Production in the United King-
dom is increasing on demands, and
the resources of the country are
also rising and, unfortunately,
supplies are becoming _ scarcer.
However it is to be hoped that
the international situation may
eventually be eased and that the
necessity for rapid expansion of
armaments will gradually dimin-
ish and that manufacturers gen-
erally will be able to turn their
attention to the needs of a peace-
ful world.

On Cali At C.C.

Mr. Starck said that owing to
the Intercolonial Cricket games in
February, he wag unable to see
all the traders he would have
liked and this is his reason for
spending another week here.

He is using the offices of the
Chamber of Commerce as _ his
headquarters and although he
proposes to call on as many firms
as possible, anyone wishing to
see him on any particular matter
can telephone the Chamber of
Commerce where arrangements
will be made for him to call on
them.



Canadian

Warships

Visiting Barbados

SHIPS of the Canadian Navy are at anchor in Carlisle
Bay for the second time since the war. Since Thursday,
Barbadians have been seeing the 18,000-ton aircraft carrier

H.M.C.S. Magnificent sole ai

reraft carrier of the Canadian

Navy, and the 2,300-ton destroyer Miemac from shore, and
to-day hundreds of guests will see them at close quarters.

On Sunday between 2 p.m.

open to all visitors.

The Magnificent, which is the
senior ship, is under the command
of Commodore K, F. Adams,
R.C.N., and has a complement of
1,000 including 160 officers. The
Micmac is under Lieutenant-Com-
mander F. C. Frewer, R.C.N.,
and has«a complement of 230
including 12 officers.

The Micmac was here in 1947,
but this is the Magnificent’s first
voyage to Barbados.

Three Trinidadians are sailors
on the ships. Two are with the
Micmac and one with the Magnifi-
cent, All other personnel are Can-
adians .@

Both ships came in from Trini.
dad on Thursday. They started
their cruise from Halifax early
this month and made their first
call at Trinidad where they spent
three days.

They will.spend four days here
before leaving for Boston,

Except for the sweltering heat
and the tiring effects of their daily
routine of keeping their ship clean
and going through the various
exercises, the cadets are enjoying
their cruise.

They met fine weather through- |
out the trip and were very pleased
with their first glimpses of the
West Indies, Barbados in particu-

lar.
Rescued “Gilbert Junior”

On the way down from Halifax,

when about 190 miles off =|

the Micmac rescued the passenger |

ship Gilbert Junior with a crew of
16, 12 passengers and two horses
on board. Eight of the passengers \
were women. i

The Gilbert Junior had run out}
of fuel and had been adrift for!
over 40 hours. The Micmac escort. '
ed by the Magnificent, towed the ;
passenger ship into Curacao. As
soon as the passenger ship was |
safe, the Micmac and the Magnifi-



and 4 p.m. the ships will be

cent steamed out of Curacao at 20
knots for Trinidad.

The Magnificent carries 27 air-
craft and was built in Belfast in
1946 at a cost of approximately
seven million dollars. It costs 20
million dollars a year to operate.

The Micmac, the ‘plane guard
to the Magnificent, is one of the
first warships built in Canada.
She was launched from the Hali-
fax dock yard sometime in 1942.

'. In February 1947 the Micmac
was accompanied by the Nootka
also of the Canadian Navy.

\

SSC O NOSIS

Your Deli.
Facourite Here
Again!

'

CHOCOLATE
BARS

Liquid Cherry
Nut Roll




NEILSON'S



Tasty Crisp
Malted Milk
Rosebuds

Macaron

THE CHILDREN WILL ENJOY THESE

KNIGHT'S LIED. -- Ali

DSOROGOD EC EEE EE TELE





Judges Uphold
Earlier Decision

; The Assistant Court of Appeal
judges, Mr. W. B. Chenery
and Mr. H. A. Vaughan yester-
day agreed with a decision of
Petty Debt Court Judge .
J. H. Hanschell who ordered
Reginald Knight of Bush Hall to
pay Edwin Lovell, undertaker of
Spooners Hill £7. 18s. 4d.

In the Lower Court, Lovell
brought the case against both
R. Knight and Edith Collymore
who Knight told the court used
“to do” for him.

On June 29 last year Knight
went to Lovell and told him that
he wanted him to bury Rudolph
Collymore, Edith’s son who was
dead. Lovell said that he asked
Knight who wouid be responsi-
ble for paying the bill and Knight
told him that it would be a cash
deal as he would pay him on the
following Friday.

Knight kept him waiting for
the money, saying that he was
about to collect a meeting turn.
In December Knight came to him
and told him that Edith and
himself were no longer friendly
and suggested that he go and
ask Edith whether she would be
willing to pay part of the money.
Edith paid $2 before he brought
the case and $5 after he did so.

Knight tried to prove to the
court that he only went to Lovell
because Edith Collymore had
asked him to do so, but the
arrangements as to who would
pay were all between Collymore
and Lovell. Lovell, however,
said that all the talk concerning
the burial were between Knight

and himself. Judgment was
therefore given against Knight
only.



Appeal Judges
Impose 25/- Fine

Their Honours Mr. J. W. B.
Chenery and Mr. H. A. Vaughan,
Judges of the Assistant Court of
Appeal yesterday varied a
decision of Kis Worship Mr. C
L. Walwyn, Acting Police Magis-
trate of District “A”.

Mr. Walwyn had fined Harold
Bishop of Kew Road, St. Michael
40/- and 1/— costs to be paid in
28 days or in default two months’
imprisonment for wounding
Kenneth Goodridge on February
11, 1951 with a drill.

Their Honours after reviewing
the evidence imposed a fine of
25/— to be paid in 14 days or in
default two months’ imprison-
ment.

.

£5 For Speeding

Sherlock Jordan of Eckstein
Village, St. Michael was ordered
to pay a fine of £5 to be paid by
monthly instalments by is
Worship Mr. E, A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A”
yesterday.

Jordan was found guilty of
exceeding the speed limit while
driving a motor van on Black
Rock Road on March 7, The van
was reported by the Police to be
driven at over 48 miles per hour
and the speed limit on that road
is 20 miles per hour. Sst. Forde
prosecuted for the Police.



BYE-ELECTION
OFFICERS

THE Governor-in-Executive
Committee has, on the recom-
mendation of the Returning
Officer, appointed two Officers to
preside at the bye-election of a
member to serve in the Genera!
Assembly for the parish of St.
Andrew for the remainder of the
Legislative Session 1948-51. They
re:
F Mr. Darnley C Cumberbatch,
and Mr. Daniel F. Best.

This is in accordance with the
provisions of Rule 8 (1) as con-
tained in Section 3 of tl\< ballot
(Amendment) Act, 1944.

a ania
7) SUDDENLY

Fifty-six—-year-ola Joseph Ben-
tain ta eben of Padmore Village,
St. Philip, died suddenly at his
residence on Thursday night.

The body was removed to
mortuary at the Almhouse where
a post mortem examination was
performed yesterday by Dr. E. A.
Kinch. He attributed death toa
natural causes.

the®

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



sant

—

AIRCRAFT TRAINING

THE PILOT fixes his harness in the “Dilbert Dunker”’, used by



Wyn
‘pM
yt

} ee

abet
pen
pee

eprnl pase
ie "

yam

M peeteey
i =

pilots of the United States Air Force and Navy training at the Naval

Air Station at Pensacola, Florida.
slipway into the water, just as an

. The machine rushes down the
aircraft would crash into the sea.

The pilots learn to release themselves from the harness before they

are dragged under the water by the suction.

American Labour



And The World
Struggle For Freedom

By MATTH

Vice President, Americar

IN RECENT YEARS, the area of human freedom has
been shrinking rapidly. Totalitarianism, in one form or
another, has been sweeping over the world. To-day it is
holding one out of every three human beings in subjection.
In such a state of affairs, the ideals of freedom, of human
dignity, are challenged as never before.

EW WOLL

Federation of Labour

desperate conflict with the forces of despotism.

Contrary to the belief of some,
the present world crisis is not
to be attributed to any conflict
between different forms of prop—
erty ownership or of economic
systems. Nor is it due to a conflict
over boundaries or territories
between two nations or bloes of
nations. It is utterly false to say
that the present world crisis is
one between the forces insisting
on the status quo and other forces
seeking constructive social
changes.

If there is any country in the
world that is the classic example
of status quo that country is
Russia, It is in Russia where no
one dare whisper a desire for
change, It is in Russia where it is
politically and physically danger-
ous to organize for or in any way
further any change whatsoever,

CONTRAST

In refreshing contrzst America
is the land where there has oeen
the highest rate of economic and
social change, change for the bet—
ter, truly progressive change. This
country, with its economy based
on private enterprise and personal
adventure, represents an economy
with a growing sense of social
responsibility and a growing re-
cognition of labour’s rights and
responsibilities in the life of the
Nation. This is the economic ana
philosophic pasis of America’s
free society.

Here in the United States, al-
leged by the Soviets to symbolize
capitalism in extreme form and
control, organized labour enjoys
far more and greater rights in
factories and workshops, yes, even
in relation to production policies,
than anywhere else in the world.
Despite all references to “Wall
Street” and alleged great capital-

ists past and present, American
workers have a far greater and
more effective voice in industry,
in mining, and in transportation



From Student Nurse To Sister

Mi Enid M. Skinner has been appointed Sister at the
General Hospital with effect from 31st March, 1951.
Miss Skinner entered the General Hospital on ist June, 1944,

as a Student Nurse,

and was selected in July, 1945, under the

Colonial Development and Welfare Scheme for the London County

Council training course for

nurses,

She completed her training as a General Nurse at Whittington

Hospital in
at the same

November, 1948, and then took a course in Midwifery
Hospital and afterwards at Epsom Hospital.

She held

an appointment as Staff Midwiie at St. James’ Hospital from
Septernber, 1950, to February, 1





951.





and so too would you







than those of any other land.
That is why American
prizes collective bargaining

Nation’s economy.

RUSSIAN RIGHTS

When we compare the “rights”
of labour in Russia with the rights
enjoyed by labour in America, we
find, first and foremost, no real
in
its satellite countries
The Russian worker has nothing
to say about choice or change of
jobs. The Russian worker is sub
in

trade or labour unions exist
Russia or

ject constantly to the most

__ Carib Service |

Democracy is in

labour
so
highly. It provides the vital spirit
and the most powerful vehicle for
the extension of democracy in the

tensive exploitation and speed-up

system. He is severely punished for

the slightest infraction of factory

rule or discipline



term.
@ on page 7
Are you proud of your
INDUSTRY? Well tell the

World about it.

Send in your details to-
day. You have 2 days left
only to get in the YEAR
BOOK,

t
;

with one. of these Canadian

BLACK RAIN COATS

An excellent coat for Seamen of all ranks as well as
Watchmen, Porters or anyone who has to work out-



Lateness of
work may be punished by a prison






At your grocer’s in convenient size packages
also in improved filter tea balls

REFRESHING





He laughs at the weather



Jason Jones & Co, Ltd.

PAGE FIVE



B.O.A.C. Will |

Expand Inier |











Sir Edward
Frankland

was among the first to develop
the theory of valency, which
explains how the atoms twit
constitute all matter are held

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON.

The B.O.A.C. are to expand j
inter Caribbean services. :
Parallel with this, improve-
ments are to be made in ser- |
vices between the North
American mainland, the
Bahamas and Jamaica. As a
result, cuts may be made in
the B.O.A.C.’s west coast
South American service.

This was revealed to-day by
Sir Miles Thomas, B.O.A.C
Chairman, who leaves _ to-
morrow morning for a busi-_ tae existence of helium in the sun,

ness visit to South America! = dic nati bacteri
: ; tem for the periodic examination of water for bacteria
and the Caribbean. He will “““" supply, and instituted a system fo ar f
visit Trinidad, Jamaica and which brought him widespread renown.
Stacee ahamas among other Bor in Churchtown, Lancashire, in 1825, Frankland was apprenticed to a druggist
Sir Miles in an exclusive in- | in Lancaster until he went to London at the age of twenty to study chemistry. In 185%

terview explained that contrary . ‘
to rumours which had been cir- he was appointed professor of chemistry at Owens College, Manchester. Returning to
culated, it was the B.O.A.C’s , : itati
intention By ce the eckivibies London in 1857, he held appointments at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, The Royal Institution
3. wit =. palbean teat oes and The Royal School of Mines. He was President of the Chemical

Society from 1871-3, and of the Institute of Chemistry from 1877-80.

The Royal Society awarded him its highest honour—the Copley Medal—

in 1894. Frankland was knighted in 1897, five years before his death,

Trade Mark of Imperial Chemica: :ndustries Ltd., London, England.

together. This theory played an
important part in the subsequent
growth of chemistry. With Sir
Norman Lockyer, British

= astronomer, Frankland discovered

In addition, he was one of the leading authorities on

vices must be consolidated and }
expanded. They must be adequate

to meet the traffic demands of the

West Indies area now and in the

future,” he said.

Sir Miles pointec out that when
he became B.O.A.C. Chairman
in 1949, he set out to do three
things. Firstly he pruned the in-
ternal organisation of the B.O.A.C.
from 24,000 to just over 15,500,
Secondly he sought and obtained |
a new aireraft and thirdly he
aimed to make the Company into
a sound commercial proposition,
This task hgs been successfully
undertaken in North America,
Australia, India and Africa and
now was to be approched in the
Caribbean and South American
areas,



SONI NOO GS “3

HARRISON'S saroap sr.



ttt PPLE LLL bw

“JONES” FAMILY
HAND SEWING
MACHINES

on wood base and complete with cover

Financial Loss
_He revealed that or the finan-
cial year ended March 31, the
B.O.A.C, sustained the loss of
four and three quarter million
pounas. This was a reduction of
nearly three million in the previous

year, A big loss had been sus- . s ‘

tained on the. west NOeEE Manes A Compact Lightweight Machine and a

American service Wonderfully Efficient Worker capable of
He explained that the B.O.A.C turning out the most Beautiful Effects on

wanted to play its part and share
in the commercial expansion of
eastern South America, but he
added “I shall have a critical loots
at the Jamaica-Panama-Santiago
route”,

He told me that the B.O.A.C.
would shortly introduce Constel-
lation operated services between
New York and Jamaica and New
York and Bermuda. These de-
cisions might result in reduced
activities south of the Caribbean,

He went on to explain that the

.O.A.C. were satisfied that the
present services through Bermuda
and Nassau with a junction at
Kingston were adequate to meet
the demands of the West Indies.
An attempt to bring in additional
services would disturb the bal-
ance between local operators and
trunk lines,

This did not however mean such
places as Trinidad or Barbados or
any other West Indian territories
in the Southern Caribbean would
not be able to attract and enter-
tain American tourists, The saleg
effort of the B.O.A.C’s New
York office was applied to all
West Indian ‘territories and tickets
would be direct for any of them

Sir Miles will be away for ape
proximately four weeks returning
via New York about May 5,

almost every imaginable type of job.

SRF RA TS

THE PERFECT
HAND SEWING MACHINE

Simple, Silent and Easy Running

Sews Backwards and Forwards as Reguired.
Special Cash Price

$93.74
Credit terms on application

The “JONES” Electric Motor

with Needle Point Light
Can be fitted quickly and easily to any type
of “JONES” DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINE

The running c(sts are negligible and the
operator has both hands free to guide the

work,

OEE TTA TET OTA OOO

OUR PRICE— ONLY $46.37 EACH

HARRISON'S LOCAL AGENTS

TEL. 2364

"Athelbrook” Takes
Molasses To Trinidad

THE molasses tanker Athelbrook
left Barbados for Trinidad yester-
day evening with a full losd of
vacuum pan molasses, She «rrived
at daybreak for her load,

She is consigned to Messrs. H





oof

9965S









LAVOR







doors in all weathers .........0000000. 000000 $16.59 y SERGE BE ESU EB REEEe
SOUWESTER HATS a “PURINA” a
To match — Each ......... 66. 0e sees sense $ 3.79 a €
a 4 = LAYENA §
rw ama | Cave Shepherd & Co.,Ltd. : .
Peppermint | 2 see e
BrancHes fh Ce ae gil. JASON JONES & CO,, LTD.—Distributore.

sosseeed:

SRS







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, APRIL HM, 1951





—



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BRINGING UP FATHER





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LASTIKON WHITE,’ CUVRALL, all RHELGLOS, ADMIRALTY MARINE
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PAINT, RED-HAND COPPER PAINT
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OPAQUE WHITE, PERQUITE WHITE, ENAMELS
TINTS—all colours RHELGLOS, LIFEGUARD, BRUSSELS
all colours
|
|
|



WALL PAINTS = bs e
MATROIL, all colours VAS a PS
: DUSSEAL for waterproofing HRUSHES of all sizes
y There’s a—- LINSEED OIL.

TURPENTINE. PUTTY.
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OF
ARM! THERE: ~ (aw
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EI
A
ye

| at
| . for ECONOMY. VALUE
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t













ATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2506

announcements of FOR SALE



Sejepenenpenens
charge for

Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and

3 cents per word on week-days and! %
4 cents per word on Sundays for each! “ 3 cents a word week—4 cents «
additional word. word Sundays.





















DIED

CRAWFORD—On April 13th, 195%, at her
residence Bird Hill, Haggatt -
Michael, Edith Udora Crawford. Her
funeral leaves the above residence at
430 pm to-day for St. Barnabas
Church.

Issabel Callendar, Sjtira Alleyne,

Mary Lovell (U.S.A.), Geraldine

Alleyoe, Rita Barker (sisters), Edith

and Ulrick Jordan, Maria and

McGregor Allevne inephews and

Nieces). 14.4.51—1n.

AUTOMOTIVE

ALMOST NEW 12 H.-P. Bedford Van.
Guarantee if required. Extra Masonite
Flooring. Licensed and Insured. Upset
Price $1,850. New one Cost $2,125 pre-
sently. Apply Courtesy Garaz

e.
a one Standard
â„¢ : in very order. ie 19,
Appiy to Cc. "Wee cee sake
A. Lynch & Co. Ltd. Phone 3643
12.4.51—4n



8 HP. 1949



IN ' MEMORIAM
TAYLOR—In loving memory of our dear
beloved mother Florence Taylor who
fell asleep on the 12th April,
Some think you are forgotten
Though on earth you are no more,
But in memony you are still with us
As you ever were before.





SL

CAR—Hillman 10 Car, 1939, Perfect
running order. Owner leaving island.
Ring—2583 12.4.51—8n.
_—

CAR—Morris Minor Saloon 1949 (Green)
Mileage 15,600, very good condition. New

1950.

Battery. Apply: S. P. Edghill. Teleph
Children—Mrs. Allsopp, Alma, Joseph . . Telephone
Taylor (Trinidad) ison), | (Grana- | #86, C/o R. & G. Challenor,
children). Lorna, Joyce. (Son-in-law) 12.4.51—4n,
Thomas Allsopp. 14.4.51—I1n

a RSeseeeeremeneee

FORD PICKUP—in good condition and
4 new tyres, City Garage Trading Co,
Ltd. 11.4.51—t fn.

Rae

?ICKUP—Austin A. 70. Pickup. Almost
new. Dial 4725, General Engineering
Co., Spry Street, 14.451--20

ELECTRICAL

relbaiteenintcibh eatin casein ia

ONAN—Lighting Plant, voits,
30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps ane
spares. A. Barnes & Co. Ltd.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES
MAIL NOTICE

AIR MAILS
Effective immediately and until
end of April, the following changes
affecting air mails to the under
mentioned places are notified.
Schedules should be amended ac-
cordingly :—



12-15





Bermuda—11.45 a.m, Tuesdays} —_. Nee nls Sey
do — 2.00 p.m. Fridays
*Canada—11.45 a.m, Mondays LIVESTOCK
an — 2.00 p.m, Fridays
U.S.A.—11.45 a.m, Tuesdays aries
do — 2.00 p.m, Fridays secopa tian De a 1agi 38

*By Monday’s opportunity to’
Canada the higher rate of postage,

namely 30 cents per 4 oz., will be tor", Rockley Terrace or Da Costa & Co,
charged. 13.4,51—2n,. | Ltd. Phone 8280 or 2122.
10.4 51—tfn

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION|
MECHANICAL

Registration of Relief Teachers,
PibsDrtnpianaechmctesirineytaiamamsadinedk
Allen Motor Driven GRASS CUTTER—

—
MILCH GOAT, “Sally Laurator", Reg
No, 656. Apply S. C. Skinner, “Laura-

1951-52

Applications are invited from

. Recently overhauled. Ca se it

suitably qualified persons for re-| Jason Jones Garaae a 13.4518.
istration as Relief Teachers,

ference will be given to per- BIKES—on terms, Hercules Silver

King, All models in stock.
A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
114,51.—T.F.N.

SEWING MACHINE—One Singer Sew-
ing Machine, Cost $116.00. As good ‘as
new going for $90.00. Phone’ 3201.

14.4.51—1n

sons holding the School Certificate
or other equivalent qualifications.

Applications, to be submitted on
Form E/7 M (Men) or Form E/7
W (Women) obtainable from the
Department of Education, should
reach the Director of Education









ee er Saturday, the 21st MISCELLANEOUS
oO pril, 1951.
Registered Relief Teachers, who | .BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites. Top

grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1.51—t.f.n.

BULBS (Blectric) 100 only at 25e.
230V. 40W. Bargain at Whitfields Hard-
ware Dept. 4.51—2n.

CALF’S FOOT JELLY.—Fresh stock
of Calf's Foot Jelly. Orange flavour. A
10 oz. jar for 60c. Get it at Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd. 12.4,51—3n.

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and

wish to have their names retained
on the Revised List, MUST in-
form the Department by letter not
later than Saturday, the 21st of
April, 1951.
Department of Education,
5th April, 1951.
10.4.51—2n.

It is notified for general in~
formation that the 14th Interna—
tional Bookeeping Congress will
be held at Leamington Spa in the





United Kingdom from September | BARNES a Go. cao DM TO A
3rd to 8th, 1951. Further particu- siediempeipininads

For Boulders, Concrete Stone, Grit

lars regarding the Congress can}. Q°huct Contact WILLIAM HINKSON,



be had from Miss eae cee Sealy Hail, St. John. 13.4.51—3n.
Honorary Organising ecretary,
: : LAMP JURNERS, holesale nd
The Vicarage, Wragby, Lincoln, Retail. This offer canine be repeated
England. as next shipment will cost 15% more.
14,4,51.—In. Chandler’s Hardware and Bicycle Store,
ue inpaiienbandinaednns Reed & Tudor Streets,
OFFICE ACCOMMODATION 14.4.51—1n



Temporary office accommoda— One Galvanised Iron Tank 400 Gallons

tion (approximately 18,000 square} capacity, 4’x4’x4 with 18”.Manhole and
feet), within one half mile radius wtapply to M Sndibas Se iecica Tick

of the Public Buildings, is
required, immediately, to house a
Government Organisation.

Offers in writing should be
submitted to the Financial Secre—
tary, Publie Buildings, not later
than the 18th ere .

ATHLONE GUEST
HOUSE

13.4,51—2n.

POULTRY PEN—Newly Constructed
Double Decker. Containing 8 by 3 feet
square compartments. New half-inch
mesh throughout. Suitable as Brooder,
Rearing Pen or Cockerel Pen,

ARCHIE CLARKE. Phone 4530 from
8 am, to 4 p.m. 14.4.51—2n





51—1In.





ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN
in case, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy.
46.3.51—t.f.n,

SPANNERS; (Cycle) “Universal” 3-
way nut, Peg & Cone 40 doz. to clear
at 12c. each, Whitficlds Hardware Dept,

14,4,51—2n.









FONTABELLE 1; TYPEWRITER ae aoe & re
YAPER. Fresh st “us eived, ge’
PERMANENT = your seguiecmamate at 1. ‘Geddes Grant
OR so Ltd. 7 4.51—in

TRANSIE

Two PLATE Glass Display Cases. $120.00
each Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, Broad
St. 7.4,51—t.f.n.

VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-atre
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4478.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd,

13.2.51—t.4.n.

“VAN HOUTENS drinking chocolate

Add a dessertspoonful to a glass of
milk to obtain a refreshing beverage of
exquisite flavour, Only 38 cents for ‘s
lb tin. Compare the price with com-
petitors’. 11.4,.51—3n.

EDUCATIONAL

COMBERMERE SCHOOL

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION TO MAIN
SCHOOL

1. As previously notified in the Press,
admissions to the School will take place
in September next.

2. The Entrance Examination will be
eran Oe Oe ee ees held in the School Hall on Friday, June
or 8th at 9 am,

i 3. Candidates will be accepted for

’ 7 "| examination who were not over 12 years

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH of age on Ist January last, or who will

I not be under 11 wears on Ist September

| next. This concession is applicable to
the current year only.

4. Parents/Guardians must notify the

Headmaster in writing not later than

BOARD AND LODGING

FOR RESERVATION .
DIAL 4837

14.4.51.—2n.



FOR SALE

CRUSHED STONE AND -

FINES. IDEAL FOR CON-
CRETE, AND MAKING
ROADS AND PATHS.

Apply - -
J. N. HARRIMAN & CO.
LTD., SEAWELL, -

Phone 8444, Extension 8.
12,4.51.—6n,

























SOOO OOO



SAXOPHONE REEDS
E b Alto, B b Tenor,



C Melody Monday, 3th April if they wish aS
cons/wards to sit the examination. ue

ea apaoe application must state the boy's date cf

2 birth supported /e7, ei Pe ee bes a

tificate. It shall ai e 00)

GOOD SECOND HAND he is now attending and must be accom-

SHOT GUNS panied by a brief Testimonial from the

} Headmaster of that School.

, 5, Candidates are expected to provide
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY net own pencil te), pen & Tuler et
tefreshments Ww! on le 9
and HARDWARE School canteen.
re 6. Will Vestries and all other Scholar-
ship-awarding authorities please submit
their lists of candidates in accordance
with the foregoing conditions.

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT
1. A limited number of vacancies will
occur in September, 1951, im the Prep-
aratory Department of the above School.

,

CHOICE

CHINA CABINETS





Applications mar be submitted to the
Headmaster, by parents/guerdians on
CHOOSE NOW a Charm of behalf of boys w. be not less

than eight and @ half years of age, nor
more than ten and a half years of age,
cn ist September, 1951, fists te

2. Closing date for
Monda April, .

3. An examination will be conducted
at the School on Saturday, June $th at
9 wm.

4. Candidates should arrive equipped
with 2 (two) pencils and a ruler.

M. PINDER,

a CHINA CABINET, New or
renewed, in Mahogany or
mahoganized, Birch or Fir—
$39 to $120.

SMART STYLES on cab-
riole legs or bases show up
your ware and glass every
time you pass.

BF Some of these cabinets

are on the simpler graceful
lines equally suitable as your

BOOK CASES

L. §, WILSON

SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069

Secretary.
Governing Body of Combermere
School.
14.4,51—4n

e



UNBREAKABLE POTS!

You can still get a few of the
Medium and Small Sizes of
OLD IRON METER CASES

Some people have used them for :

VIOLETS
CARNATIONS
PINKS

{
GERANIUNS ete.

Price only 1/% and 2/6
See Them at Your —

GAS WOPKS, BAY sT.





\

PUBLIC SALES

Tee cents per agate tine on week-days

mimmum cnarpe $1.5 on week

-days
and $1.80 om Sundays



REAL ESTATE





BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 bed-
rooms, every convenience including
oo water supply. As new, £3,000

4476. 15.3.51—t.f.n.

PROPERTY —

Containing dwelling
house with three bedrooms (Partly wall)
standing on one rooa, id‘ perches of
land situated at Forde’s Gap, Britton's
Hin. Apply to: Cc. M Gréenidge or
Hutchinson & Banfield, James Street

8.4.51—6n |

HOUSE—One (1) Board and Shingled
House 22 x 1) x 9. Shedroof and Kiichen,
Situated Brereton’s Village, St. Philip
Apply to Mrs. Joseph Bartiett, Breretons
Village. 14.4.51—1n
——

By instructions received I will sell b
P v

day next the 19th at 2 p.m. Two houses
17 x 8 and 18 x 10 with ched at Ist
Avenue, Bush Hall,
D'ARCY A. SCOTT.
Auctioneer.
14.4.51—4n.



eileen recannmanennnartitiglinssttactetinats ad

Offers will be received up to the 20th
day of April 1951 by the undersigned
for that substantially built stone
bungalow called Allenby _ situate ut
Welches, Christ Church on the sea where
there is excellent bathing. It consists
of Open Verandah, Drawing and Dining
Rooms, Three spacious Bedrooms, Lava-
tory and Bath, Kitchenette, Double
servants’ room, and a Garage; and stands
on 6,664 sq. ft. of land.

Inspection by appointment.

DARCY A. scorTt,
Real Estate Agent,
Magazine Lane.

Dial 3743. 13.4.51--49



We will offer for sale to public com-
petition at our office on Friday 27th.
April at 2 p.m. oi

(1) LABOCSR BLEST a
Dwelling house and
Martins St. Philip,
acres, 2 roods of land. Dwelling
house comprises Drawing and
Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kiteh-
en, Toflet and Bath. Government
water installed.

Three other parcels of land con-
taining respectively 2 = roods,

roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong-
ing to and near to above property
will also be offered for sale either

Stone wall
shop at St

standing on 2

(2)

together with above property of

separately.

For inspection apply on the prem-
ises to the owner Mr. Everton

Greenidge.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to :—
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD
11.4,51.—6n

AUCTION .

By instructions received I will sell at
Central Police Station om Monday next
the 16h April, 1951 at 2 p.m., the fol-
jowing items: 25 cartons Biscuits, 10
Tins Condensed Milk, 13 packages Tea,
528 Tins Beef. 90 Mess Tins, 11 Pairs
Boots, Foot and Fuel Pumps, 2 Hy-
draulie Jacks, 4 Blow Lamps, 3 Shifting
Wrenches, Fiat, Round and Half-round
Files, Tyres, 1 Clutch Plate

D'Arcy. A. Scott,
Gov't Auctioneer
11,4. 51-—4n, -

a prices etahtainangagtinas arcane

I have been instructed by the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee to sell
by publie auction at Seawell Air Port
on Wednesday next *e 18th April at
2 o'clock. One tractor drawn Lawn
Mower. It is a collection of Six Mowers
and is the right thing for a Cricket or
Tennis Club. It can be seen at Seawel!











any day except Sunday between the
hours of 9 a.m, to $2 R
DARCY A. SCOTT.
Govt. Auctioneer
13.4.51—4n



American Labour
And The World

© From page 5

In Russia, as in her satellites,
we see the most reckless destruc-
tion of the critical spirit, the
most systematic and thorough
abuse and annihilation of all
human rights. Russia of to-day
is the model of twentieth-century
slavery, Forced labour has be-
come an integral part and
organic phase of the entire Soviet
economy, Indeed, the old Marxist
battleery: “Workers of the world
unite, you have nothing to lose
but your chains” holds true in
‘Russia far more than in any other
country,

Clearly, the roots of the present |
crisis are deeply imbedded in the,
challenge ‘of Soviet slavery to|
human freedom, The struggle for
human freedom has taken on a
new meaning. To-day, it is not
merely a struggle to extend and
expand freedom. It is a desperate
struggle to preserve and protect
freedom. .

TOTALITARIANISM

In this struggle to preserve,
protect, and promote human free-
dom American labour has done
its part and will continue to do
much more than its part. We of
labour recognize that we have
more to lose than any other group
im society, if democracy is re-
tarded or destroyed. Experience
has clearly demonstrated that
there can be no free labour with-
out democracy, We sincerely hope
and trust that all other social
groups understand that there
can be no democracy without a
healthy and powerful free labour
movement. If Communist totalit-|
arianism should ever triumph,
labour can “win” only one thing
—the most brutal and brutalizing
form of slavery,

_ It is this realization that has
impelled us in the labour move-
ment to be in the forefront of |
the fight for freedom. Labour is
best equipped to be the spearhead
in the fight against every brand
of totalitarian tyranny.

_ American labour will intensify
its activities to help strengthen}
the ranks of free labour and of
other democratic forces abroad,
We welcome the recent setbacks
to communism in Italy, India,
Germany, and in other countries.
We will continue every possible
effort to advance still further
this disintegration of the forces
of communism now taking place
in those areas and elsewhere,

American labour is determined
to hold itself in readiness at all
times to help make available
American techniques in health,
industry, and self-government on
a world. scale to economically
underdeveloped regions and to
render every service possible to
humankind.

It is our firm conviction that
with world labour rallying vig-
orously. on the side of democracy,
neither the Communist nor any
other brand of totalitarianism or
slave statism can ever win, or







ition on the spot on Thurs. |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
| PUBLIC NOTICES |





Tea cents per agate line on week-days |
and 12 cent per agate line on Sundays. | "4 12 cents per agete Hine on Sundays,

minimum charge
| and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTICE
| BYE - ELECTION
| Parish of
cre . ~*
1 non:inates
| sons to serve ». members in the
} eras Assembly for the Parish of
Andrew in the place of D.
deceased,

I hereby notify my intention
taking a poll for the determination
the said election on Mond. next
16th. day of April 1951 at the



St. ANDREW
person having















Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Schooner Gloria He
rietta,
Ca
Adina S., Schooner
MV

Lydia
Counsellor,

net, Capt. Clarke, for St. Vineent,



be«
the election of p





Schooner Marea Henrietta, Yacht
bbee, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner
Gardenia W., Schooner Emeline, Schoon
Woaderful
T. B. Radar, Schooner
harriet Whittaker, Schooner Turtle Dove,
Schooner Cyril E. Smith, Schooner Rain-

$1.50 on week-days |

ri]



e

A. Foster

of
of
the

Alleyne



n

bow M., M.V, Willemstad. Sehooner
Cc. M. W. Ipana, M.V. Daerwood.
ARRIVALS
M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
| yet, Capt. Clarke, for Halifax via St
Lucia.
M.V. Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt
Cook, from Trinidad.
DEPARTURES
M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons

M.V. Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt

Cook, for Trinidad,

In Touch with Barbados

Coastal Station





Cable and Wireless advise that they
can now communicate with the following |
hips through their Barbados Coast
Station

s,s, Golfito, ss, Bonaire, 8.8, Edison
Skipper, ss. Ravnanger, 8.5. Polifemo,
ss. Cavina, 8.8. Colombie, s.s. Brazil,
s.s. Fort Amherst, 5.8. Helena, s.s. Alcoa
Pennant, s.s. Mormacreed, 8.8. Alcoa
Polaris, § Canadian Challenger,
Mails for St. Licia, Dominica, Mont
serrat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal by the
5.8, Lady Nelson will be closed at the
General Post Office as under;—

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Regis\ered
Mail at 1.30 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at
2.20 p.m, on the 16th April, 195!

RATES OF EXCHANGE

APRIL. 13, 1951
CANADA
Cheques on
Bankers
Demand
Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currency
Coupons
Silver

63 2/10% pr.

G1 2/10"
61.05 pr
@ 9 10%.
63 2/10%
1 7/10%

rT.

59° pr

pr

pr

pr

SS,





SECOND ANNUAL
BENEFITSHOW & DANCE

DRILL HALL (GARRISON)
On

FRIDAY MAY 4TH,
at 8.20 p.m.
In ald of the Christ Church Baby
Welfare League Clinic

1951

MADAME IFILL Presents
THE “STAR BUDS" of 1951
Patrons:

Honourable V. C. Gale, M.LC.,
Mr, E. D. Mottley, M.C.P,
By kind permission of Colonel

Michelin and under the Direction
of Captain C. E, Raison, A.R.C.M.,
M.B.E, the Police Band will supply

the music.
ADMISSION: :—: $1.00
Dancing after show. Bar and
Refreshments

Evening Dress Optional









Christian Science
livading Room

Nourt: 10 am-—2 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

10 agit o'clock.
Saturdays.

i> 4, >. i, a. 4D

Tiristian Science $



GERM LUBRICATING

OILS

ARE BEST BY TEST
DON’T ONLY OIL IT—GERM IT

Gasolene Station—Trafalgar St.

|
| CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.



PAGE SEVEN

NOTICE

FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
86 cents Sundays 34 words



—_——
)
|
|





WANTED

charge week

GOVERN ME!



Mfnimur



72 cents and

















nda m — over 24)
warts cane - gaa a ‘cane | words 3 cents a word week—4 Centa o
word Sundays. ae a ents © | word Sundays. Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
;}menty) Order, 1951, No. 9 Which will be published in the Official
neLY HOUSES eve . aa '
} Gazette of Thursday 12th April, 1951
| “CUERK.—at the Barbados Ice Co. |, ee me _ peceeee a nee 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
Lt, pineioalty ie Sales atid Delivers o lean Apply Winston Johneor, | Prices of “Cornmeal”, “Margarine--(c) Mello-Kreem Brand” and
: am at Factor r further | Phone 82 ; poe ’ ; "
particilars, apply to the Secretary.” | PDOne 4921 or a2 14.4.51—2n | “Cement” are as follows:-—
i 4 —_—_—_——
11 .4.51--Sn BEWDLEY "-~Nawy Gardens. h upatomrsicnanrer onsciagenn frien Spepnereneene-cgpomnn animate aaaa ae

Ch. €

ARTICLE |



“Sa nad We ed, Gr unfurnished, for ; WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE
! 3 — fro y to 15th Se

A vacancy exinte for @ Re let Mees PR wig ie che dor 1S Sateen (not more than) (not more than)
Manageress Previous experience in * ‘ 14.4.83-_2s as mortatulaniiat = > oe

catering for Restaurants or Hotels 0: Ome —tp





similar experience is desirable

a






















































i
|
School, Belleplaine beginning between} Applications should be submitted in | ¢hUATS: Two completely new de Luxe | Cornmeal . | $10.58. per bag of |
the hours of seven and eight o’clock in| Writing giving details of previous ex- | [UY furnished flats at Four Aces, St } 98 Ibs }12 Ib
the morning perience and enclosing copies of tes Lawrence Gap. From June onwards ‘oe t ‘ | 5 ven | t | _ Polling Station No.1.— The Alleyne a and a ent passport six ee aes — serine war | Margarine: } ;
) Sehool—the North wing for all persons | photograph, and should be addressed ans us ‘© house flats. It is not oe 9 nap & :
whose surnames beni” with the letter /to Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd., P.O. | ® Teconverted residence. Apply Mrs. L (c) Mello-Kreem $2.55 per 5 Ib. tim 56c. per lb. or le&s
Ja to J. inclusive : Box 103, Bridgetown.” 10.4.51.—Gn | Hassell, phone 4003. 10.4.51—5n Brand than % Ib. 4¥%r.
| Polling Station No. 2. — The Alleyne | eee an —— ctieidigtan } =
| School — the South wing for all pe | . a INGRID—Marine Gardens. The house per oz.
; sons whose Surnames begin with th: MISCELLANEOUS contains living rooms, Three (3) Bed- ‘
pre ny ee POSITION WANTED as maid or ng | end Elec arielty throughout. "Fer ens ve gee TH On We. per lb. ae
a Ae t rsing J - - 1 at. or turther 1 :
©. A. INGRAM. fa sick, Willing to live Write Mrs. | particulars apply Messrs. Yearwood -& | than % Ib, 4%.
Sheriff and = {Constance McConney Beckles Hill, St. | Boyce, Solicitors, James Stree: }
: Returning Officer | Michael 14.4.51—1n 14,4.51—2 ;, oe
—6:
4.5 Sonnniinshitesatlinneeincsircei —_—__oo
ae ac ees ae ear eee ARCH wantea: Apply to BROS | LARGE HOUSE & FLAT—The Camp.| Cement 5s cs _ |$2.09 per bag éf
© BARBADOS MUTUAL BENEFIT! xniTTING & SPINNING co. Wp. | 5t. Lawrence Gap. On-the-Sea. Puliy ' } 94 lbs :
NOTICE } Coleridge Street, 10.4.51—4n paraished et 8357. Miss , Hunt ’ 7 :
pl Maxwe'! ‘coast 31.3.51—t.t.n. | ——_— ~ ;
1S HEREBY GIVEN that the 44 12.4.51—2n.
Annual General Meeting of the abo “| Fee gga = ello Beachmont, Bathahebs an
ciety will be held on Monday, 28rd re , = from ; 7 enema nip npn ene peetnengeeneinnsetife
. : apa ety se, 3 double bedrooms with sing)
April oe * = pine ot Mane ; it The ed it way Re Simmons bedsteads, children’s room WN
mee < aon mae a the ‘Wepaut tl to lief from. x dining .room and lounge. Refrigerato
eres © 2 : . mee garage, servant's room, Apply: Howe gua :
th Committee of Management and | ee ‘ 5 s RS ke Ring 3626 —
: . , 13.1,.51—t.f.1
Treasurer's Account for the past year, AC IN 1ON- ; & y
» Electing Officers and a Committe 5 ’ 1D. ‘ DIGEST , ‘ * ‘Vic TeaAte. ts manatee | cae LONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, ees
of Management for the current year. | ©syyq 7 Worthings Post Office. Ideal locaiity;| ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED | Th yo . i
fand ‘c) Dealing with any other matters; Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste fully furnished with telephone refrig- (M.A.N.Z. LINE) 2 dale Pesrmossy nr
before the Meeting ‘rator, Radio, Electric; running water accept Cargo and Passengers for
By Order of the Committee, and sparkling effervesce! nce in badeouings Baniedie tei wa Ba, . MS. “TONG L Paramaribo, Satling Thursday 33th
E ssures gentle efficiency. Special = % OM a garag § ARLRO” sailed Brisbane instant
‘i “A 1g. Selrelary Drop oth or teu tatlets into Dial B15 “Or eet V ion ee 9 ag Mth, “Astiving at Barbados Noy The MLV. “Monek i
c § etary a 50 or ictoria s ve y. “Mo: a’ will accept :
11.4,52.—2n a of water, watch it fizz, i44.5i—teon |” Cargo and Pawnee Haeat
_ - b
H then drink it. Keep a —e ~ fw oes Cargo accepted on through Bills of nica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
NOTICE | BA) suppty handy always! |wsee Gan Purnmied: Bedroom, | Bian Guten ert weeseeg gt isin inant” SNE Monday
yi ¥ , z
PARISH OF ST. PRILIP | i fae ‘ing water waets Retrigavater, ” ae for Bvitish Guiana, Barbados, Windward instant. :
Sealed Tenders — marked on envelope. | Padio, Telept Ne . * he ind Leeward Islands, The MLV. “Caribbee" will :
' Tender for Residence’’ — are Inyited for p nd a : oD pints ae 5 "Pho oa paver ae Cargo and Passengers for
the purehase of the Head Teacher Alka Seltzer > ppointmen one—8278 Seas For further particulars apply:-- te Mnica, Antigua, Montserrat,
House at the St. Philip's Boys’ Schoo! ree Nevis and. St Kitts. Salling -
The House is of board and shingle and) — ae Be RRS AUIS eo eS Oe pee *URNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD, and Priday 20th instant
can be inspected on application to Mr a fees Da COSTA & CO. LTD. ae TELE. 4037.
Alleyne the present occupant. } ne Ne ‘= Bridgetown, VI. SCHOONER OWNE! “tv
All Tenders will be received by thc'| GOVERNMENT NOTICE Sehaiies ee ASSOC. INC -
undersigned not later than the id4th Apri! : : Bw . Borhos 08, ;
1951. oF ‘ Fadi oa Attention is drawn to the Price of Goods (Defence) (Amend- | 2 < ore
S 88: urchaser must be p' pc z ' ; ‘ ; ; cbiyenirrane ——— aan
PI ctieapiy oy from the spot in two/ ment) Order, 1951, No. 3 which will be published in the Official -
weeks’ time after sale. eis | Gazette of Thursday, 12th April, 1951 i HARRISO .
The Vestry doe t bind itse ao sell} © : e ‘ +
to ‘the Sigeeni oe ane tenet { 2. In this Order the percentage of mark-up on “Canvas” is as
P. 8. W. SCOTT, follows: —
Clerk, to the Vestry, | Sa —_ er
St. Philip. | P mn R
33.81—1r | ; ap. Can: OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
NOTICE Canvas: — ‘
PARISH OF ST, PETER | (a) All kinds including duck and materials used for Due
As from April 16th to May 16 th: 7 BS EF SRES ara __Vessel From Leaves Barbados
Parochial Treasurer will not bé at hi covering motor vehicles inside and out 25 3S. “TACOMA STAR” Liverpool 22nd Mar 7th April
OOS See Se Mey heer 10 ae (b) The retail price of any canvas when sold to 38. “HERDSMAN” London 10th Apr. 28rd Aprit
Saturds hil 21s rom ar 3 7G ¢ s
beet a | persons producing a certificate signed by or on oe! pera s London lith Apr. 26th Aprib
Saturday April 28th from 10 a.m behalf of the Fishery Officer authorising that per- 3s. “PLANTER sAverneol 10th April 23rd April
: 2 : > Ly . ‘ .
tiny aes bh teem 10m son to purchase the amount of canvas named in S.S. “DALESMAN” Glacntn vi 20th April 3rd May ©
noon at certificate » us s ij : ¥ 8 a :
co eee seam ieibaiceiaaeste van. | that certificate to be used in connection with the Liverpool 15th April 8th May
eee repairs, construction or refitting of fishing boats HOM ——— ot ST _ ssmumrarinessnbasnnD sipnitie~ensienneninmnniieni eens
G. 3. CORBIN. shall be the landed cost excluding Customs duty EWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGD
Parochial Treasurer, i on kk EB ,
St, Peter plus 25% mark-up Vessel F ° :
$.51—6 . . ; or Closes in ‘bados ©
toe 14.4,51—I1n. S.S. “STATESMAN” .. London =

End of April





Por further information apply te - -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

\me, ALcoa

NEW YORK SERVICE
S.S. MYKEN” sails 6th April arrives Barbados 19th April.
A Steamer satly 27th April arrives Barbados 9th May,
pacer ene peeriegipisinrtimeteshindiiiesion er



Make sure you ask for Sloan’s Liniment
apply it to your rheumatism—then—











NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
S.8. “ALCOA ROAMER” eailx 4th April arrives Barbados 20th April.
8.8, “ALCOA PATRIOT” snile 18th April arrives Barbados 4th May
(ee



You cannot get anything better
for your muscular pains than
Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it
lightly — don’t rub — and relief is
quick and certain,

LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET.



CANADIAN SERVICE



SOUTHBOUND









Name of Ship Sails Montreal Satis Hatifax Arrives dow
83. "ALCOA PARTNER" April 9th April 19th
a 5.3, “ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May %th
d SS. “ALCOA PIONEER Ma, ith May 14th May Mth @
a —
\s. NORTHBOUND z
—— : -
From all chemists and stores. — S. “ALCOA PIONEER” due April 19th Sails for St, John,
Dininth meee Deatailech . - oo ee aa — and St. Lawren
‘ / ————— —} | | River Ports, -
d h % ORIENTAL 3.8. “FOLKE BRRNADOTTE” due April 20th ‘Sails for St. John,
f sie > i and Montreal
West Indian & British 3% % fogtren Te
Hand made Crafts, Antiques, % SOUVENIRS, CURIOS, These vessels have limited ‘passenger accommodation.
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach- y | * oe .
‘er, Deooration House, 8 ew ment opene oOo
AE ar | , - ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
14.4.51—1m * | THANT'S i APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
LOOP LL VEE | — a









| PASSAGES TO EUROPE

| Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia , for saifl-

ing to Europe. The usual poris of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children,



“Good News” for Asthmatics... !

A New Guaranteed Remedy for the Relief of ASTHMA

} +. JOHN'S ASTHMA REMEDY

This skillfully blended preparation, assures you of
immediate relief in this most distressing disease and
is the result of years of intensive study in Asthmatic
conditions,

Keep a Bottle handy and relieve yourself of the
constant threats of Asthmatic attacks.
Retail Price :—12/- Per Bottle

Obtainable at...

BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES

Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings









100 NIGHTIES

WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD, ||] write price suc or 9300
° 300 CHILDREN PANTIES

Bring the World | Rayon & Cotton sizes 4—8 3 for $1.20

in your Home ona }\}
KOLSTER-BRANDES (K.B.) PANTIES

COMBINATION’ RADIOGRAM ||} White, Pink, Blue

Black ? for $I 10
11 to 550 Meter Band Spread with Garrard ®

Automatic Record Changer. NYLONS - $136 - $1.86

These Changers will play the Standard 78 R.P.M.
SFADOUARTERS for —-

Record and the New 33.1/3 and 45 R.P.M.
Slow Speed
BORDERED SPUNS
CREPES & LINENS
In shades you'll like









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Beautiful Cabinet

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and Stability.

Used by the “Queens” of the Sea.

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.



°
| THE BARGAIN HOUSE

S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
2702

PHONE

30, Swan Street

















PAGE EIGHT



ISLAND BEAT. NAVY 3—1 TUE GAMBOI.< 8
IN FOOTBALL GAME

, AN Island side defeated a team’ from H.M.C.

\
: * 4 7 The Vi a as . 2» > ormé ty was
Magnificent and Micmac three—one in their foothall match , a ae - Bie may peggy f between 8 and 9 o'clock to-night exehenes for German, unity — we U r
at the Garri esterday ; ISG ee See woe First information was that it}4% iusion and | > i
atthe Garrison. yesterday evening. 500 cc NSU machine on a_ six cent. of the German people,

Ships

The goals for the island were scored by Desmond
Johnson, Reynold Hutchinson and Arthur Wilkes. Johnnie

. : Dorval at 8.30 a.m. to-day.
. oba class. bi Dr. Adenauer was answering R A D I @ sS
prcoct. at centre half for the Navy,sepred the lone goal es me. Saeeer Pek as ie questions after addressing report-
or his team. 500 cc machine with sidebar y 2 ers at a lunch giv by the asso-
dhe Barbados teok the .touch .off over a measurei mile in 28.774 Y.M.C.A. Wins ciation of fren Diplomatic We. ha
with the Navy defending the seconds, an average speed of 126 I the Seidler imran “ae Journalists. ‘ " ; ; ve a complete range
northern 1 A few seconds miles per hour. > e L nen ‘ . MCA Dr. Adenauer ‘said: “I have ef models including the
S orts later Drayton, on the right. wing The old record established by ¥-M.C.A. L. Gill o HMCS been asked whether I and the latest EBS15. This can be
Pp * for the island, received the bail Henne, was 115 miles per hour, Won from Sairbrun of H.M.CS.|German people would accept adapted to work off vevious
. and centred. Johnson collected —Reuter, Magnificent 46—44. S. Smith also] neutralisation of Germany if the voltages from 220 to 110.
Window it, ane shot well out of the as . per ek aga beat E. Browne ao somes Se re-estab- $118.00
: reaches of Brown, the -Navy eS ‘{ is! . a ree elections were ‘
The 1951 football season custodian. BRONSTEIN RESIGNS eta ate Raat Cc. guaranteed. — : :
opens this afterncon at Ken- The Navy after got their arding an a ute! sen lobes This question is very theoreti -
sington with a First. Divi- equaliser when Johnnie Hancock. CHESS GAME from Coryell and Hawkins cal; but I will reply frankly. Also other models with and

sior fixture between Carlton
and Notre Dame.

Carlton is one of the most
vopular of the First Division
veams while Notre Dame
are making their bow to
senior football, They won
the Third Division competi-
tion and promotion to the



in the geal -area, received a
through pass. He shot hard and
low to beat Marshall, the island's
goalie. /

The island made attacks on
their opponents’ goal but»the full
backs for the visitors, Johnson
and Dickinson, were always in
position, Johnson especially used



Good Shooling
This Week

Major J. E. Griffith and- Mr.
M. G. Tucker with scores of 98
out of a possible 100 were the best
marksmen in this week’s shooting

Motor Cycle Speed

Record Broken
MUNICH,

April 12. Gardiner Austin Co, Ltd. PARIS, April 138
Wilhelm Herz today broke the [T C.A. agents, have been in- German Chancellor Dr. Konrad
world motor cycle speed record formed that the T.C_A. aircraft|Adenauer to-day said in Paris

with 180 miles per hour

miles stretch.
Two other records were estab-

LONDON, April 11.
David Bronstein to-day resigned
the 42th game without renewing
play in the World Chess Cham-
pionship in Moscow, aceording to
a Tass Soviet News Agency mes-
sage received in London. When



T.C.A. Plane
Coming To-night

is expected to arrive at Seswell

would arrive this morning. It is
now, however, scheduled to leave



60. L. Fields, Y.M.P.C. beat
Bairbrun 100—32.

BARBADOS WINS
AT WATER POLO

Barbados’ defeated H.M.C.S.
Magnificent seven — nil in the

| Germany Belongs



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SATURDAY,

APRIL 14, 1951



To The West

that to buy German neutrality in

including those in the Soviet east
zone, shared his opinion.

Germany belongs to the West: and
does not want to be separated
from the West. That is a decisive
point... Anybody who thinks
neutralisation is possible in the

face of pressure from develop-
ments in Asia misconstrues the
—Reuter.

facts.













e without the famous Teleflic

Device. Prices from
$80.00 to $168.00

CAVE



4 Sout ad > the game was adjourned yester-
Second Division two years his head to good advantage and Practice of the Small Bere Rifle day, Wael cumapita Michail water polo game played at the GRYPTOQUOTE NO. 6.
ago and last year they car- | at one time saved what looked Club. ; ._ Botvinick held a material Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon. || pyogq gcpl xAG ENOG NOQ
ried ‘off the championship | like a certain goal. ‘TO, CUS pest. scores a Bs advantage. Aa Barheses, Lary aa gees SCKP 0ZQ ICZ?
‘ . eth. 6.5 points to 5.5 Owen Johnson and Billy Manning —DCSGFZ. SHEPHERD

= guy = ih gm ed ry Soon after goalie Brown was 100 pale croee Je C2 * Pavers each scored two goals, while Tim Last Crypt: Heard melodies are
to the First Divisi this called upon to save two good Major J. E. Griffith ........ 98 —Reuter, | Yearwood scored the seventh for sweet, but those unheard are
Renan’ : on shots. One he snatched out of the Mr. M. G. Tucker .,...... 98 team. sweeter, ‘

mt. air while he dived and gathered ,, B. W. Clarke .... 96 ¢ \ KEATS. & Co Ltd

rhe: felewins seams win | Other of the groan’) | wg: Bk Mas «= Saecer Results ~~ RCRA & BONS i Led.

nein MEG d's XT | centred and Wilkes headed goal- ..°\T. A. L. Robert ...... 92 Lonvon, april 13. Britain Threatens 10-13 Broad St
Basketball at YMPO a wards, Brown reached the bali ,, H.U G. Webster .. 92 Results of soccer matches ek ‘ E 156565655 POOSPEPEEAD .
night: Edghill L, Greenidge. and managed to push it out. Mrs. H. W. Webster . 88 played in the United Kingdom on Action In Persia POOP

r Sy : was

W. Greenidge and Hunte
(Y.M.P.C.), Forde and Git-
tens (Pirates) Weatherhead
and Symmonds, (H.C.0.B.),



Archer (Â¥.M.C.A,), Stanford Both teams fought hard to . Division III (Northern) Bar- British lives and her giant oil con- ra _
(Fortress) . , ee eetiine hin we wie, Polo AtThe Garrison ee va . a q cession in Iran, following riots i, Sa Sener s
: accompli is when 8 er match:—Brighton an hich 12 ted
received the ball and beat Brown DURING the past few weeks)Hove, Albion 4, Saint Johnstone filled. eee ener eee COTTON DRESS DANCE
with a beautiful shot along the no serious Polo has been played| 1,—(CP)

Island Beat Navy
At Table Tennis

ALL the



Reynold Hutchinson, who
boring through, made no mistake,
beating Brown with a well placed
shot.

ground,

Half time soon after found the
island two goals in the lead.

In the second, the island missed
many opportunities and again
Johnson at full back was respen-



There will be another practice
shoot of the Rifle Club to-day at
2 p.m.



owing to cracks in the field and
general hard condition of the soil
resulting from lack of rain, but
it is hoped that the few showers
during the last two days will so
improve the surface that mem-



Thursday :—

English League Division I1:—
(Southern):—Leyton Orient 0;
Newport County 3.



RUGBY RESULTS

LONDON, April 13.
Results of Rugby matches



LONDON, April 13.
Britain threatened on Friday to
take action of her own to protect

In response to a question by
Deputy Conservative Leader,
Anthony Eden, as to whether Brit-
ish naval vessels are available and
whether others are proceeding to
the neighbourhood, Herbert Mor-







a :— TO-NITE

At Queen’s Park

CLEVIE GITTENS Ork.
Subscription — 3/-
14.4.51

CE Sae ae

SPeores







=



raN
i he car that
C.VPresses you!

island players won sible for warding off the majoriiy bers will be able to get a game : ; i rison, Foreign Secretary, said that
their games against the players of, attacks, shits ‘atiarfoon. if there pas i itane sane gg “re the matter is being considered,
of the team from the H.M.C.S. The teams were as follows: Polo players among the men of Union: Northam Aon eunie: “er {fit is true that a man expresses himself in
Magnificent at table tennis a: the = Navy: Brown, Johnson; Dickin- H.M.C. Ships in harbour, they] 45, 13: Bridge fb r and Albi
Y.M.C.A. yesterday afternoon. son, Shirley, Fox, Gregory, will be welcome at the Club.]g path o aerate we . fon DENIED PLOT ¥ u mi a § m the clothes he wears, how much more
Owing to some difficulty only Stewart, Cuttral, Hancock, Arn- Should it be impossible to play, Berta 0 (HED) Ae wpeRt: ' : evident is the taste he exhibits in the car
three players of. the Magnificent old, and Bell Irvine. They were some of the members will no|° Ruane Te : 2 ar BOMBAY, April 13. Setces Wolseley “ ak
turned up to play. Three gamés accompanied by Mr. Carey doubt be exercising their horses.| ,. ey Hull 20, Batley....Former Premier of Kashmir, he drives. The Wolseley “ Four-titt
were played in each set and the Coach. a 5; Widnes 2, St. Helens 5; Work. Pandit Kak today denied that he ‘ac re is for the man who demands the highest
sailors tried their best but perhaps ~ [slamd: Medford, Ishmael COLLEGE DEFEAT Eee a Barrow 0; Hudders- had been organising q plot against mechanical achievements of the auto-
they were still suffering from their prayton, Cadogan, Gittens OLYMPIA 9 teld 2, Wakefield Trinity 16; Liv- Kashmir in collaboration with ; ;
“sea legs”. Grant, Marshall, Wilkes, Hutchin 11— “pot 5, Bradford North- pakistan, rae bead n ee mobile age, expressed in coachwork of
ern — 4 ssivai ei
The results were :— son, ae L. F. Harris, QUEEN’S COLLEGE defeated} —————— ea) Flush Kidneys With Cystex and You'll Feel Fi. superb comfort, with the restrained exterior
Magnificent vs. Islana Referee; Mr. Olympia 11—9 in ‘their netball ends all tro prescription of a famous doctor styling that stamps his good judgment.
S. J. Fairbairn vs. R. Spéncer game -at Queen's College grounds e Soutle sae hg dl fe sayy. ianay Retin |b
18—21, 10—21 e B yesterday evening. For Queen’s Bare. heats. Neuritis, Lumbogo, Backacho, Luxuriously Roomy Interior, Five sit comfortably
E. Brown ee V. Chase 16—21 Jamaica eal Collége Jean Vaughan and ° ¢ beh wy be as, © eziness, i Foor tr on genuine hide seats, cushioned in soft, resilient
> anata ‘ A ‘ , foam rubber. Car heater and id Jemist
he Barbad SE gy Mangehcpan 28 Sa ater Pat ae Pe, | it Sega
18—81. ii SOQ aly an aa r 06 their shooting weak. ae ahd be At’end ‘well next week, yo ON? Fee ene seinen ene core oe
E. Beawa ae EB McLeod 21 16, (From. Our Own Correspondent) Cc Hel N Way: feet for switcases, golf equipment, etc. Separate
ac ae PORT-OF- SPAIN, April 13, an atex ps ature 3 Ss compartment for spare wheel saves disturbing
aa. Fairbeii J a Doubles players Donald tDecialy compounded 1 to sont vy ents took i
airbairn vs. J. Hoad 19— amaica Do - ’ Se SAG Sins Adjustable Front Seats and Telescopic Steering
nit atone Hone ag: | What’s on Today Sipiiieetimierecr gs | Sei ie Mee oe
‘ is ars! rivers are not ¢ same height. all or
Exhibition Game Carter 6~8,!6—4, 6-3, 6—1 as | police ‘Courts ...... 10,00 theseld wavy tovend Your troublen =~ works ia | hott, you drive in absolute fatique-free comfort
the Brandorr Trophy tennis series Athletic Meet, Notrs Dame (1) Starts killing the germs which are attack. with perfect control.
20°” oo lost to R. Leslie, 22— entered the second day at Tran- Sports Club — ‘Bay tem in two hours; yet is absolutely habmizss
—21 and 19—21, Both of J a 1 - ; Tt
S a quility. this afternoon. Jamaic Grounds ........ 2 pm, to human tissue.
these boys play for the Y.M.C-A. now "lead 31, fhe eee Fogtball—Cariton ve Notre S k he Sees sais nae whist yous. aystans ‘as
so play pressively y > e vision) a mMmokers a nen.
sy oOrrow sin- Kens! ton .... 5.00 _m. 4 ) Srstene tee and reinvigorates the kidneys,
S i Cl] ges See. are. “Rerepahatson Feotwall" Inter-ship match @ Bivack c on the’ delicate filter organism, ‘ond
avaniiah Club (Jamaica) vs. Legall, ,(B’dos), —Gurison .... 5.00 p.m stimulates the entire system.
Te “ni T Sturdy © (Jamaica) vs. . Tayloi I tee nae of experience 9, Weeks in Hosp Hat-ntiow Well
énnis Tourriament (pros). = G_ aulee ‘. pent : Bladder trouble, also Rhewmatic pains ond Stuf
ol “= — Joints. | was not able to raise my arms and
THURSDAY'S RESULTS FORTRESS DEFEAT Sea WY ant Weuals Staal om 5.00 p.m. spent nine weeks in hospital, They said I would

MIXED DOUBLES (Final)
Mrs. R. S, Bancroft and P. McG. Pat-

Y.M.P.C. 13—7
FORTRESS defeated ¥.MP.C.

Basketball

H.M.C, Ships vs Is‘and,

choose —_.-”




not be able to work, but after ae I ee years
younger, well and Strong,” "—(Sgd.
























1 Health Improv
terson beat Miss D. Wood and Dr. C, G. College vs Pickwick “I had not felt reall ally eved in 2 Daye
Manning $10. 6—3, 6—3 ; 13—7 in a game of Basket ball YMPC. .... 7.45 p.m. Sou ieneiy: from Dackaches and headaches. |
after. te mmatoh 1 a afer last night at the Y¥.M.P.C)! Billiards— lasting relic) Finally 1 decided to give Cystes ¢
President. in the unavoidable absence of Y.M,P.C's usual surprise attack H.M.C, Ships vs Y.M.C.A fein one wish T hed tried it long ago and saved ;
Lady Savage. could not penetrate the Fortress —Y¥M.CA. .. 7.30 p.m. my health more in two of three days thar other
The following are the winners of the Jines, G, Rocheford scored 8 for Dance for men of H.M.C tings have done for months.’—Mrs. B.
several. events:— . "]
Ladies’ Singles—Miss G. Pilgrim Fortress. \ Ships Aquatic Club 8.30

Men's Singles—Dr, C. G,.

Ladies’ Doubles—Miss G
Miss 1. Lenagan.

Men's Doubles—Dr, C. G, Manning and
Â¥. P, Taylor,

Manning.
Pilgrim and

The teams. were ;—

Fertress: G. Stanford, J’ Archer,
C. Byer, B. Mayeock, C., Hinds,
G. Rocheford and C. Parris.

CINEMAS
Empire—‘The Girl of the Year”
4.45 & 8.20 pom
ghia ‘The Furies" —6.00 & 8.30



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an * . a . ~ : £ . —e?
MIXED DOUBLES (Handicap) Greenidge, D. Greenidge, C. Al- Plaza (Bridgetown)—‘Where Dan- outstandi uality. well in 1 week or your money as J
ign ileen Bowen ad kins, D. O'Neil, M, Hunte, M. | eer Lives—448) 6 830 p.m. ng panty, back if you asl oe Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504
cKinstry.



Navy Beat Island

The H.M.C.S. Magnificent and
Micmae combined team defeated
the Island 38-21 in a basketball
game at Y.M.P.C, last night. This
win for the ships’ team followed
an earlier win when they beat
Y.M.P.C. 12-6.





Traffie Don’t

No. 25 duction was being still further Rainfall (Codrington) 21
e stepped up.—Reuter. in. Sole Importers:
Sree Total for Month to Yestcr- W.S. MONROE &CO, LTD.
DO NOT FORGET TO BUSTA ACQUITTED day: .97 in. Bridgetown,
RESPECT PEDESTRIAN KINGSTON, April 12. Temperature (Max,) 86.5 °F dos,

CROSSINGS

e
Space made available by

Thomas and G. Greenidge.



U.K. EXPORTED 1473
RADIO ACTIVE
ISOTOPES

LONDON, April 13,

Britain’s atomic energy plant is
supplying radio active isotopes for
medical and other research to 25
foreign countries, the Ministry of
Supply announeed to-day,

Out of the past year’s total of
6,171 isotopes, 1,473 were sent
overseas, nearly seven times as
many as during the previous year.

The total was nearly double
that of the previous year and pro-

Bustamante was today acquit-
ted of the charge of using abusive
and calumnous language against
the police at the end of the third

Moon”"—5.00 & 8.50 p.m.

Astor—‘‘South of the Rio Grande”
& “The Golden Eye"—#.30 a.m,
& 1.30 p.m.





The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.54 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) April
4

14
Lighting: 6.30 p.in.
High Water: 8.22 a.m.,

p.m.
YESTERDAY

11.11

Temperature (Min.) 72.5 °F

Wind Direction
(3 p.m.) E.S.E.

Wind Velocity 12 miles per
hour.

(9.a.m.) E

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Full Text

PAGE 1

BATUBDAY, APRH. II, ij.i B IBB WOE IDVOI \i I CLASSIFIED ADS. VM.l TlLimOHl 2901 The ch.r N tor Blrtha. Mai r.eg*.. Dwath.. A.-kno* ky w m aod la NMMIW notice* %  %  i M M wooa-da*. and |i i aw** tor an* MMHMT of IMI up to M. and J rant* par ward an wNklv r mkt,^ F al pin. io-da< lor St RarnaSpa su.rh Ubl CsHerdar. A t,r* AUapne, Mary Lovell IU.SA.. Oeraloms Kila r*-r sister*', r.dlth aod Ulrica Jord.n Maria and McGregor Allane mephewi and *' 144SI — In IN T.^l 1 \V[ -ir ; %  |M fell J frp or the Iltn April. II lam* think la Though on aarth you air no mar*. Bui m mrmor you are mil wllh u< A )ou ever am* before Cr.ild.rn—Mr*. Allaopp. Alma. Jeaop h Taylor (Trinidad. "ni. 'Grindi-hildrem Lnrr*. Joyce ifton-in-lawo %  Allaopp l iUrla roil SAU AUTOWrtrriVE ALMOST NEW 19 MJ Bedford Van. Uuarant., If required. Extra I E?T?"S %  J Jc y* *-* ln,u d Priao lib) New on. Con UIU "MIT. Apply Cotertaap OaraSr %  HP IK* Prrfpn nlur MIIS j I'IIHII \o i IM s •tt2£REAL FSTATK rUhCMOV* -S.,. Q, % %  . every eorvarUMtr garden. .,t„ uppi>. Aa raw, *l L oM rnor-r •?. is.9H-tfn PttOPUlTV houaa >iui Inrr* badroora. I aUndlni on on* rooo. 14<-, pan*. I Pardr** Qap. Button's r M o tssseag ... Bai.flrM. Jaraa* Blra.) %  All fa NOTUt: nvr n %  Par-**f B. ANDBEW "n 4-l^raar. having b*. %  %  runalr. thealertlon of arservemember* in th* Qrn erai Aanb:. (or the Pa, wn ., ,. Andrew an ihp glare ol D A I rtrrraard. • Mj %  life my land nlualed g Mm. Apply a )i iitrngaasn ^ l<0l K — 'I' Board .^. £ -.,,. _uar a .11 a bedraaf .nd K. -a,.., Situated Btereto'. • Village St Philip Apply lo Mr. Joarph Ba-ie. BirreAoru. Vilraee. election on Monday ne1 ih_ day •( April ll a( me AIWy* ^aaaaol. aMIap'^na Mtwi fc.i-i tna hour* 4 r\m and MfM or lark in Pvllinf ttaimn Ho I — Tkr AU> I •wa-oi-iN* N-.ih *>,+ lar ail par.. %  *• ihr in-" By 1 r. alt i in lor. %  > PublriCotnpatitwr. m> i day M\i ihr lMrM .a > •, and ia %  | wi %  1 Mllracr ll.aoo vrr> food m Ballrr> Appl/ 1 %  >. Edchiil '. C o I. a O ChallanoTrlrpha. flfJI 4 GOVERNMENT NOTICES MAIL NOTICE AIR MAILS Effective immediately and until ond of April, the following changes affeclitiat air mails to the under mentioned places are noli tied. Schedules should be amended RO eordinaly :— Bermuda—11.45 a.m. Tuesday! do — 2.00 p.m. Fridays •Canada^—11.45 a.m. Mondays do — 2 00 p.m. Fridays U.S.A.—11.45 a.m. Tuesdays do — 2.00 p.m. Fridays "By Monday's opportunity to Canada the higher rate of postage, namely SO cents p*r OE.. will be charged. 13.4.51.—2n. FXJFD PICKUP-in (nod onditUw. acJ i.e>. ITH. Cm datumTraduce Co* d llaSl-ifjv %  *ICKOP— Alunn A. T Pickup All w nial 4TtS Ornra A Co. Lad. 1MIIt.-. LIVESTOCK Dial BBfl 14.4)1 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Kegl'tiatlon of Belief Tmcher*. 1961-62 Applications are Invited from suitably qualified persons for reK 'stratum as Relief Teachers, ••ference will be given to persons holding the School Certificate or other equivalent qualifications Applications, to be submitted on Form E 7 M (Men) or Form E/7 W (Women) obtainable from the Department of Education, should reach the Director of Education not later than Saturday, the 21st of April, 1951. Rryiniered Relief Teachers, who irish fo hon.' their names retained M fh Kei'Ued List. MUST inform the Department by letter not later than Saturday, the 2ltt of April. 1951. Department of Education, 5th April. 1951. 10 .4.51—in. It is notified for general information that the 14th International Bookecping Congress will be held at Leamington Spa in the United Kingdom from September 3rd to 8th. 1951. Further particular* regarding the Congress can be had from Miss Nancy Ironside, Honorary Organising Secretary. Th Vicarage. Wragby. Lincoln. England. 14.4.51.—In MILCH GOAT. "Sally Laurator", Bad No. 650. Apply S. C Bkinnar, La,lator". Horklry Trrrarr or Da Cola A Co Lid Phonr MID or JIM It t ft) —I t n OFFICE ACCOMMODATION Temporary office accommod tion (approximately 18,000 aquar* feet), within one half mile radius of the Public Buildings, Is required, Immediately, to house a Covemmenl Organisation. Offers in writing should be submitted to the Financial Secretary, Public Buildings, not later than the 18th instant 14 4 51—In. MECHANICAL i <;ll\st Cl'TTTB — MIS! EI.LANr.OUS BATHS in PorrclaU) Bnarnal. in Whllr. Grran. Prlmroaa wllh maWhlruj wiit* lo complrta rolour aulU* Top aradr. A. BAANES A Co., Ltd. 8fT.fl lira HI'l.B-4 ifarclnri 100 only at JJr *V 40W Bargain at Whill..d M.irdwtr DrpL DABCY A WVIT Aucti..at 14 *Sl-4i A to J U*rlualvf PaUbM Btat'on No • The AUr Srhakal — the Souaa wi-< tor all f> •>na whoar Wiroamr* befm wuh MtM 1 | 7 "^luaivr A IHOKAW Irtwrnlni OAcar 4.S1-* fc-or-i J .-•(. %  UO'd IN** —4 •*• IlclLP CLEJUX.-M Lid. ptaw4w.ll a K. Craaaji IK. Marttadw Icr far SMea .j r>l %  lo Hotra, „ arwiBW ahuuld be aubrnttted In • rtlln. giving detalla o< (lOMooa wx%  orient* and ewckMmg cdplaa od le. tlmoaaaM oad a receati paa*port fix pHadean-aph. and ahould be addraaaro to Mewrr* Da Coal* A Co Ltd P i> BOB 101. Bridgetown 10 4 91 —on Ofle*. will be rrewved up lo the Stth day ol April IMI by th, toy thit %  ubatant... t. bunawlow r.-,llrd JM*| .inutr ,t WMH.C... ew. h. Slk-rw M • %  caN-.t iMhanl M twnalal< el Open VerarMUti D •M apacnu* iW4i'>o< lavatory and Bath. Kltrhenrilr. I> >.d**>' arrvanta P-*II and a Ojuir. pad) Hands on 1AM t (t el land. Ii\-pecti-iii la/ uppomtment DAfaTY A SCOTT. Br*l EkUir A : M-i./. ••' "*S 13.411 -4-1. W. .iiil .ifii for lair to public COmpeution .1 our ornce on Fra>j nth April H t p.ra. i I^BO.R BLEST a xtonr *M Owelhns ho. !" ., and .hop ut si Martin* St. PedUB. Mondjl arroa, t rood, of land. Dwrl.md •" %  • ron*n^. Drawn., and Ulnlnc room* 2 bed room*. Kitrhrn. T.iiri and Bath .; %  water InaUlled. 1 Throo other perccla ol land <-* %  >lamina retnatllvrlr J rood.. S rood*, and 1 acre 1 rood* belonp iraf lo and near to above prop<-rt> will o> be •fter.-d for toolbar with abo.c pr. %  Fparately For mrperllon applv pn %  >,. ,. Ihr Hi Htpn Onmktm For further parlicii •ale apply lo : HITCHINHON A IIANFlEI.tl I AUCTION By inalrurtlona roceivod 1 will at" CeiLiral Polite sulian on Monday next the Idh April. 1*91 at Spa-, the loi owinn Ham*. cariraw B ri* cini.iai#.t Muk, u m iSS Tina Bead. PJ Meaa Tina. II Pa>n> Hoot-. Fol and Furl I'LIBUH. 3 H' draulir Jack*. 4 Btaw Unun Wrrnchn, rial. Bound anil File.. TyrrI> An* A. Sroit. OpV't AUtl!.. %  !••.'• 11 4 11—4n. have been inatructrel n. Ibe <;... nr.'n-Ercuiivr Commuter te *rll pubhr auction -t Srwwrll Air Pot Wrdnradaj nrkt -nr Itlh April •>• I'etock One Uactor drawn Lawn Mown II ii a roUrrllar. of SIB MOWCIand la tho rlfhl thing for a Ctwkrt M Teni'la Club II can be arm aa Seawl gaj ricepl Sundai brtwoan ti' raoftam to 4 p m D'ARCV A BCOTT dovi Aurtlonrr' IS 4 *t—dn TYPFWniTER RIBBONS ft CARBON 1APKR Frrrh atflp. SHI receivrd. -i %  rrojil/rmrnt.. at T. nrddra Grin' 7 4J1 In Two PLATE C.laa* Dilpl>. Caar*. IISiW racn Slanafrld Sroll A Co., Ltd Broad 14.91—if n VKNBTIAN ai.tNDS. Ktrarh S-in-aUr II metal DeLure Venetian blii.da. lo yo-ir lira deliver* 9 week*. Dial 44!d I HABNEa A Cp. L4d. 19 9 H—t.f.r VAN HOUTENS drinking chocolate dd a Jaaaai t*p DPI itul to a tfaaa it ilk to obtain a radrfthing beverage ol iqulrJIe navour Only 9a rent* far %  i IIn Compare the prler wllh romretiton'. II 4 Bl J" EDUCATIONAL I IIOirE CHINA CABINETS CHOOSE NOW a Charm -.f a CHINA CABINET. New or re.iewed, in Mahogany or m.ihoganled. Birch or Fir— $39 to $120 SMAHT STYLES on cabriole legs or bases show up your ware and glass every time you pass. J88F* Some of these cabinets are on the simpler graceful lines equally suitable as your BOOK CASES C0MBERMERE SCHOOL n;\\i i FXAMINATION TO MAIN %  08WOI A* previously notified In the Prraa. a^n MlPlP lkl to Ihr Brhool will take place 9 The Entrance Exarnl'iallon wilt be held In the Brhool Hull on Friday. June 9 Candid-tr. will be accepted for r.amir-nion who were not over 19 year* M age on lit January lait. or who will rot be under II /car. on lit Seplembr< next. Ttila conccaalon I* applicable in th* current yaar only. 4 Parent*/ Guardlana murt notify the llradmerter In writing not later thar Monday. 9Tth April If thev wlah their ona.'warda to all the eaaapiaallori Such jpplurallon murt alale the boy a date cf binh aupporled by a btrth/bapUn Vccminl fur the hf fmiuj Ueafari and a b/ Uanadrrneal a th anv oth. Meeting By Order ol the CoaamltUr. C W UFF.VEP. NOTICE i MI H Or I-1 i mill Sealed Trnderi marked on roveloi" TenaVr for Ba*ldeare -re taarMed t thHead Taeehr: I'hinp Boys' Sch-x The Hoiar la ol board and shlnglr an ran be inspected an appucatioa to MAlleytMthe present All Tenjera will be rrcrlved / lh. undefMgned not later than Ihe 144h Apr IMI. Succefful purrharer murt h. prrpan to rrmovr nuililing fmrn u.c -pot in tw %  M allrr eale. .v doe> not bind llarlf to • lo the hlgnewt o. any icilrr. ^^ i s w, M'OTT. Clerk, lo lh# VerAry. •I I'i.ili, 9JJ1-1 NOTICE r\m-M tn -T riiih As Horn April Mi" to May Id laParochlal Treasurer will not be a tii.: on the l.-llowing day. AtMil list tt.,ni 10 a gfV I "sati.rdav April BBh from 10 a as 19 noon a-May Mh rrcmi 10 amu May 19th from 10 am 1. a. *. conms Par*-hi.rt TPNH %  MIM:ELLANEOUS %  %  T ; .MH... %  Ifarrki. II, I \ |1D %  KWTTIKQ CO ritji I CoarrMaw atreet in4ll \ I MM I, K IHHSrS Fhone 4911 01 M* ;*I A, riM-hed or RMtat) Orhr. 1951. No 9 which will ue pubtkiirMil in '.).•uiTteLal 1 rhursstay IM AgaTtl '-' III A i laslg Order the n ,.le inu retail sellt0g prices of Comma*!", Margar.ne— u Mello-Kreem Brai Cemei.' .— Hr.i U.I 911* 1* 4 M Fl^TB Two complawly nrw da Luna rj flat* at Pour Am St Lawrrnr. Gap From June onward> approved tenant* Thl* building ., MtlH M houM ft.t. It i. pal a raronvmed realdanre Apply Mr. L r UaaaM. phonr MM %  MOBIs*—Uarlte U-rden, The IkOPM -ontalns living room*. Three iji Bp|. "— w'atr plv Mran Yrarwoed ft LA full' HUCHE FI.AT-Tha Camr S" li.i'im Gap On-the-Sea pyi. 1 rurn.ihnd Dial 9991 Mlae K Hum Oaaaa i 9 91-tin TANGLIN Beachnvont. Bain.h.b. Win, February onwarda. monihlv p Hhrralsa, 9 double bedroom, with .ingl. bmmon* bedetrad*. rhlldrrns roon ItsMsuj room and lounge Hrfrige*
  • n !•< ppoinlment Phone oTnl 11.4 94-In CornnvMl Margarine. (cl Melln-Kreem Brand .. WHOLESALE PHICF (not more than) $10 58 per bag of 98 lbs $2 55 par 5 Ih %  53c per lb tin RaTTAIL PRICK (not more than) 12c per lb 54V per lb or Id* than v lb. 4\ic per oi 58c. per lb or leg-i than 4 Ih. 4V*c per or. IU.09 per bag *i 94 lbs. 12 4.St—3*1 SHIPPING NOTICES >10Mm_ AI'STRAI-IA. Nr, ZEALAND UN. LIMITED "i A N ; i iNr. uovKiivmvr \ori4>: Attention is drawn lo the Price of Good* .Defen iAmiu,iment) Order. IMI. No. 1 which will be published ir. th. OAclal Gnrette of Thursday, Itlh April. 1951. 2. In IMi Order the pirxniaM| of m..rk-up on "Canvas" is a* hallowi Per Cent Canvas: — (a) All kinds including duck and materials used for covering motor vehicles inside and out. (b) The retail price of any canvas when sold to persons producing certificate signed by or on behalf nf the Ei-hery Officer authorising that per. son to purrhiisi the amount of canvas mimed in thai parl 'ised in connection wtth the repuii%  or rein ting of Ashing boals shall be % %  ? landed cost Xclu*ftB| I plu* 2.'>'" BbVi k-uji L S. WILSON ST. SPRY DIAL J PKf.FAB4.TnsV BEFABTMENT A llm.i'.i • uniier of varai.< -ill ir in Arptrmber IBM, Pi U*r Pn-pnr> Drp-rliiLi ..t of Ihe above S> hooi Appl-.iiio'.. mat' O* auAanniad to thi Hradmaatrr. bf p ar —11.'guardian' an %  If ol boyi whP onawl ba apt lew eight and a half year* of aae not •t Seple' Cloeing M..-.I m An e*.i the A '-r MtL J ita far apptWMb—I arm be ApTSV, IMI. •..nation will be oand %  ii I on Satin day. June t-v. at ill! Candld^tei ahauM arrive epu 9 itwo rn-i'ilt and a ruler M PlNDeUl. Governing Body • American Labour And The World gj From pi.r I In Ruaaia, as in her saWLIites. we see the most recklc*-. destru.tion of the critical spirit, the most systematic and thorough itbuse and annihilation of all human rights. Russia of to-day i, the model of iweiitn-Ul-centur.v :l;ivirv Furi TII labour has become an integral part ond organic phase of the entire Soviet economy Indeed, the old Marxist battlecry: "Workers of the world unite, you have nothing to lose but your chains" balds' true In .Russia far more than in %  country. the routs of the present ct i-i i in am gjy taw cMcsj In U challenge nf Soviet slavery 1 human freedom. The struggle for human freedom has taken on %  new meaning;. To-day, it Is not merely a struggle to extend and expand freedom. It la n desperate struggle to preserve and protect freedom. TDTAUTARIAMSM In this struggle to preserve, protect, and promot human freedom American labour has done its part and will continue to do much more than its port. We of labour recogni/.e that we have more to lose than any other group m society, if democracy is retarded or destroyed. Experience has clearly demonstrated that there can be no free labour without 1 democracy. We sincerely hopa and trutt thai all other social Kroups understand that ihere an be no democracy without :i real thy and powerful free labour movement. If Communist totalitarianism should ever triumph, labour can "win" only one thing, —the moat brutal and brutalizing] form of slavery. It is this realization that has impelled us in the labour move inent to be in the forefront of', the flajht for freedom. Labour |a| beat equipped to be the spearhead in the light against every brand I of totalitarian tyranny. American labour will intenslfvf it* activities to help strengthen the ranks of free labour and of other democratic forces abroad. v.v well-":.i.the raeajoi Mfbtckal communism in Italy, India,! Germany, and in other countries Wc will continue every possible! effort to advanre still further' this disintegration of the force* Of communism now taking place In those areas and el* American labour is determined lo hold itatlf HI reMdhal t.mdi to help rnako Amartran technique• "ai ; M W lpana. MV Uarrwood U V Ai"rlbrook. IM ton. rwt. Capl .v,k Irom Trinidad IILrAKIl PAS M V Canadian Challenger. 9B99 Ion* not, Capl Clarkr. fo> bl. VlpganA MV AlheUMooN. SM ton* net. dpi Cook, (or Trinidad In Touch -vith Barbados Coastal Station ., '... gh BMi laVapM -•-' IP, %  Bonai-r. Skipper. * Bavnanpn. %  • Pnlirrnm. ; Cevlne. •Col.mibir. n Branl. .Fort A'nhrral. .* Helm%  %  M.ar.eed. % %  Alcoa c MAIL NOTICE Vi I I Kntli I Kit Make turr? you ask for Sloan's liniment %  •apply it to your rheumatism—then—• pains and You cannot get anything better for your muscular pains than Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it lightly — don't rub — and relief Is quick and certain. tool NK IMI riouai or. aa. UO.H aa M FMBSI. SLOANS Liniment M 111 i U. Antigu.i. m %  %  Ml v the %  MMSP will be %  General Port n.ii"ii m i" a M i %  Sight Draft. M • I"'saSS 9 IS* pr. Can** ..r Currenrv SECOND ANNUAL BESEFITSHOWKDAME riRtli. HAU .GABBISON' PBIBAY *t 4TH l^l in aid of the ChrUt CaMr Welfare league Clinic MAIIAME 1FILL PraaanU THI. -IAS Bl DS of IMI WVf SS'''*'''ys<'*;-.. ORIENTAL SOfVFMftH, (CHIOS New Rhlpment npeaed THANI'S %  1-NBBrAKABLI PATS I You can lull get a few of th Medium and Small Sue* i.f OLO IBON Mirih CAHIS Some people Bars uiad thasn fm VI .11 IN CARNATION* I PINK GEBANIUKB et. Prler ealr I > and t • See Them at Yotir OA* worst BAT ST "$ood TUuoi $DA (iilluncdici... A New Guaranteed Remedy lor Ihe Rellel ol ASTHMA [;. JOHNS ASTHMA REMEDY This skillfully blenda-d pieparallon, aaauiea you of immediala zonal in ihia moal diaUaaaing disease and is the result ol yeais ol intensiva atudy in Asthmatic conditions. Keap a Bottle handy and telieva youisali ol I ha constant thieais ol Aslhtnalic attacka. Retail Prica:^12/Pat Bottle Obtainable at . BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and AtPHA PHAHMACY, Hastings l E D MottlCY. I I kind prrmlralc-i of < %  de. Ihe Dl B E y At-li -% -AtTftA April IMh 4 AI." IIA I'll.ANl -s Al.-i \ PIUNI II: ASBJ aiT llll a i M Ml, Al/'OA %  loNEEB roi KInrjt:. vi..aT> Hui. April Itlh Sulla lor I l-uwr'iiit m<-r Porli dtM April /Oth Bail* for st John, and Montreal Intlon ItOIUKT TltOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND f'.I'LF SER%TCR APPLV :-D\ rOUTA A 00., LTD—CANADIAN SERV1CI PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, DomirJa for sailing to Europe. The usual por.a of call are Dublin, London, oi Rottetdaui. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. WEEK-END 100 NIGHTIES M nn White. Pink & Blue at •Sj-t/V W0 CHILDREN PANTIES Rayon & Collon sizes 4-8 J lor J>I.ZU PANTIES American Style in Whits Pink Blue. Black 2 tor gjg NYLONS • $1.36 $1.86 IIIIIWI llin.HS for -# HOHDKHKI) SPUiNS CREI'KS & LINENS In tiliudVh\oull like o THE BARGAIN HOUSE ::o gWan Sirrrl — S. ALTMAN. Proprietor PHONE 21*2



    PAGE 1

    PAfiF. FOl'R BARBADOS ADVOCATF. BAH IDA1 M'llll. 11, 151 BARBADOS t,—i PrlntM by "> Advocate Co ADVDfifTE Ltd. BIMI St.. Bili—ls—. Saturday April 14, 1*51 THMMM. THE sending of two members of the Civil Service attached to the Government Savings Bank for training in British Guiana where there Is a system of mechanical accounting is a step which will be welcomed not merely by members of the Service but by the general public. Nor is this the first instance of local officers being given training in other colonies. There is at present an officer studying modern statistical methods in Kingston. The system of training members of the Civil Service outside Barbados has long been recommended and the advice given is apparently now beinn taken. At its last meeting the Civil Service Association made it plain to His Excellency the Governor that there was dissatisfaction because of lack of opportunity given to local candidates for higher grade posts; and this newspaper has on more than one occasion pointed out that the only remedy was to utilise the $25,000 voted by the Legislature in giving officers of various departments opportunities for training outside the island. His Excellency gave the Association an undertaking that something would be done to have the scheme working and it is prey" sumably due to his interest in the matter that there has been no delay. It is bound to be of great benefit to the Civil Service and the public generally. BYE-ELECTION THE St Andrew bye-election caused by the death of Mr. D. A. Foster of the Barbados Labour Party will be concluded with the polling on Monday. The keenest interest is being taken in the contest between the two candidates representing the only two political parties competing. Mr. Hnyncs is the candidate of the Electors' Association and Mr. Worrell is the candidate of the Hnrbados Labour Party, The election will be based on the old electoral roll with its low income qualification of £20 per annum. On the same -roting qualification in 1948 a candidate of the Labour Party was elected. If -a greater number of voles in favour of the candidate of the Electors' Association is obtained it will conclusively prove that the voters of St. Andrew are no longer supporting Labour. The loss of the seat by the Labour Party will reduce their numbers to the low level of 11 in a House of 24. A gain by the Electors' Association will increase their numbers from 9 to 10. In either event "party" government by majority is hardly possible. Overseas Visitors And Students In Britain And Hv Dreams On By E. B. TIMOTHY LONDON You would not imagine after a first look at Addlwoml-Oran ^ Ui politically hostile and (CrortOB near London, thai l e mbiU—i "".^ fi ?^".. T^ Tcrn.ee John Drlscoli. an men! of world significance. one F |uh cngmcer bom al W est~* minster 30 ycr. -go. began the Club in 1938. He then bought the first house after receiving a legacy of £1,000. Today the Club is valued at ining wvwaa tn l00 o w „ n „ n annual turnOWl onders about .., ntoooo The house he bought ongin.-illv is one of four which now comprtai what i railed the Club i-'Ntn!t ha. Hi dining and cjrnmon rooms, and here the .%  indent.". — some of whom stay /or three years — eat together, talk, attend lectures and discussions, play games, dance; listen to the radio, watch television (which is very popular), or Just relax and read. Studying Is dona In the solitude of the living quarters. Every resident has his own room the charge for which, with meals, is £3 a week. which in eleven years has proved Uial men of all races, given a chance, CAN live together a* brothers Adcttal otnba Qrova hi l ID standing town-planning dev.< architect It looks like any other residential street in an old-established saiellite town. Yellowbricked, gr+y-slated, mid-Victorian villas, whose bay windows are discreetly draped with Nottinghum lace and chintz, stand i parade each side of it. But to ol the 28 villas in the rove house represent a prograsatve ideal They form part of the International Club — a home from home — for overseas students and visitors of 50 nations ho live tbtf* s friends and equal*. With '.hem live 200 British — appalled ;.t the mistrust nations. A few day* after being left the legacy, ha was strolling through the Grove with a Chinese officer when he saw a "For Sale'" notice. Three di>ys later, he had bought the Club'* first house and abandoned his an^incenng career Almost every day, "Terry" is called upon to perform some %  !> %  i i ..t and ing accommodation for oversell* viiitOTN and students. He was nonplussed one day. hoim when the Colonial Office asked him if he could find rooms 750 Maltese. On one occasion a batch of 120 students from I rail.i and Pakistan arrived at short notice and thi was nothing to do but put then in a marquee on the back lawn An Indian official who visited the Club late that night looked into the marquee in wonder menl "Amazing," he said i< Terence Driscoll "At hone they wouldn't even live in U-c Kvi'iy week, visits are arranged same town, and here you've got mostly professional and business i cultural centres, such as Stratthem sleeping in the same tent." men with their wives and chilford-on-Avon (Ihe birthplace of "That was nothing extraordmtiien. Basic aim of the Club is Shakespeare); to factories, coalary." Terry told me when I visthat overseas residents shall live mines, theatres and other cenited the Club recently "Come in an atmosphere as close as pastres which depict various aspects upstairs and look into the billiard sible to that of a normal English of the British way of life. room." home At the International Club no Opened in one house with eight one bothers to lock his door. The We did • *nd > w v c youths European students, the Club has Club haa no crime record; nor happily playing snooker. "One fxpanded in thirteen years to 38 has there ever been a serious from Tanganyika, one from In houses — all of them situated quarrel between residents. On dia, one from Pakistan, one from within a few yards of the Head ihe other hand, there have been Trinidad and one from Switzerquarters In the Grove. five 93 marriages, of which only one land," said Terr. The youths hundred students live there now *as "mixed." smiled, said "Hallo. Chief," and More than 12.000 who passed Driscoll in BSSBBBM la in tnutteu. WPnl ~ Burma, Africa, China, the West ba |d ( n-s a square. Jutting chin. Indies and a dozen other places. The lines of his face are softened Some have gone back to beby a slight plumpness — and come lc*fttnaj figures in adosmall smile. He wears his ties lescent democracies. I nun what gay and his carefully manicured present overseas students at the Hngernails long. Club tell me. it is clear that pracHis success, the overseas resitically all return well-disposed dents say, is due to a rare com__. towards Britain and grateful for bination — ideals and the ability gle to establish ihe centre hat being given a home and a warm to put them into practice. He been over a few local diehards welcome. works 14 hours a day, most of who couldn't WlQTjttDMIdea of Unhappily, it had not always the lime in his shirt sleeves. He white men and coloured men livbeen like that Before this Club knows everyone of the 500 resiing in the same quarters. into being the most tha*. denu by their first names and "Terry" has further dreams many coloured students could they call him "Terry." He hopes some dav to be able to expect was to be segregated like The idea of the Club find came build a great Empire Students animals in a gloomy hostel, to him when, us a troveller for Centre, which will cot anything They returned home disillusioned an engineering firm he became up to £2,000.000. NOBODY'S DIARY Monday — The agave is in bloom outside my window. I had always called it a maypole but today 1 Isjgfned its trot name. the Agave. It is a beautiful thing. It is wllnw and shaped like my lady's powder puff. But it is huge. The yellow breasts love it and so dn the humming birds. Its to quote my encyclopedia, is remarkable More remarkable certainly than my ignorance of the Agave. And that is remarkable indeed. No mean scholar myself, fed on Tibullus and fashioned by Lucan. licked into shape by Demosthenes, one who has read Hardy and been aware of the JogCtU, Lawrences, Day Lewis. Huxleys and the Picasso. Matigsc, Ibsen firmament, I am the veriest fool when it comes to Agave. I can plagiarise Hamlet.and cry "What's Agave?" And my precious little encyclopedia cheap at £12. 0s. Od. replies "Agave, a genus of plants belonging to the order Amaryllidaceae found mostly in Mexico. It somewhat resembles the aloe, and on that account is often compared with it. Its beauty is remarkable." There's a bit too about the roots being used for soap, but I'm afraid of infringing the copyright. Buy an encyclopedia and read it for yourself. That's enough knowledge for 5 cents. IMPUUAL inrHEa one Jew. one Hindu and Moslem." he said, "ami 1 say the world can't live at peace. Hen-, nl the International Language Club, we know that peace s possible." The old spirit d}<~> hard and one i l.v THI In his si nig bottle % %  Anyone so ill-advised ns to write about women is bound, later, to llnd himself MEN cheerful Tuesday—I am '.ooKing out of a winnow. The fields are under snow and the trees are graceful outlines, flickering as it were with the promise of spring leaves, naked against the white background, finely cut. A picture far more beautiful than a painting. Is the revolt against scenic painting a revolt against beauty? Is the smug laughter against the week-end "bird" school of poets, the witless chuckle of those who cannot enjoy nature? shouldn't be surprised. WAY OF LIVE WHAT has America to offer the world? i Is there an American Way of Life ? Russell Davenport, writing in Life recently sums up likes this : "It is wrong, at the present stage of the U.S.'s evolution to expect some great 'cultural' development in America, equivalent to the culture of Europe that extends back for twenty or twenty-five creative centuries. The intellectuals who castigate Americans on this score miss the point. In the lirst place, they overlook the fact that there is a great activity in the creative arts throughout the country, especially at the community level; and second they too easily forget that American culture is of necessity n popular culture, and hence inherently different from that which we inherit from Europe. Yet even after these modifications have been made, the fact remains that hi^h culture is not what Americans have primarily to give. The big American contribution to Western civilization has to do, rather, wilh certain qualities of Ihe heart deriving from democratic ideals." "Everything in America," Mr. Davenport claims, "he il national, regional, subicilional or local, comes back somehow to the individual. And the American can live his life on two planes at once in such a strenuous way precisely because he recognizes that the human individual may have — must have — ideals. That Is the inner secret of the Amer'can way of life. It is a way of life to permit and encourage the development of the human individual, by his own free will, toward his own ideals." It is the U.S. ideal of equality, however, which "next to their belief in Ihe natural rights of the individual, is the most valuable contribution thai Americans have to offer the world." provide the family with suitable meals, see that their clothes are washed and nieinlcd the house faced with having to write about heaven-sent excuse to call alien, kept spick and span, his socks men. The reason for this is be. t(on lo tnosc mer its the writer darned, the cocktail shaker filled cause it is only tair that the readtmla\ to mention. Oddly enough, and ready at appropriat. ing public should be given the although women have nothing to nwnti, the children kept out of low-down about men also. And lrqrn lrom ar | k .| M wrlIu n a bout mischief, and to make herself because unless they were, many mcn hey loo cunnot res iat readattractive and look men might be misled into getting inR u,em. Their reason for doing iiguinst his coming home an entirely wrong impression so ls because It is gratifying to unexpected and thirsty guest ibout the relative virtues of the have lhrlr op)n |on of the trans. „,. , ,. , % %  parent simplicity of the male con" l,v oh wn '* thal * I mention men only as being jj rnwo P*r men are never given credit likely to be misled, because it lor what we are? Why should our would be a pretty dumb woman The real difference between Ihe being too modest to press agent ho does not already know more male and the female of the speourselves result in women brin* about men than any article by a cies Is that the male believes he too blind to see the line ftUow man could tell her. The truth is b being subtle when he pretends that lies beneath the veneer Off that men like to be known as the to lie simple while the femole humility we wear. Why should sterner sex. They therefore hide knows perfectly well the more they expect us lo put up with he weakness of their velvet hands subtle he tries to lie, Uie easier having no flying llsh for dinner in iron gloves and get away with it Is for the feminine mind to merely because the fishermen The reason they gel awuy wilh realise how very simple he realhave caught none; or because it is because, as women do not ly is The..' diametrically ipthey've sold whatever they caught like to be considered the sterner posed points of view arc the real ta the hotel* sex. they hide their dear little Iron reason why articles like this one Just because the Foreign Secrehands under the softest of velvet get written. The tired bread taries of the Great Powers have gloves, thus helping to keep up the winner wearily wending his way been unable after 27 meeUngs to illusion. And what is more Imhome in his motor car after toildecide what they want to talk portant they do in a way that ing during the only hours his about, and because women can leaves a man in the happy belief trade union allows him to work, talk about anything, agenda or that his achievement of this Is much too simple to understand no agenda, ia that any reason why masterly distinction is entirely why he should have to be boththey should Jump to the absurd due to his own masculine efforts, creel with finicky domestic deconclusion that they are our inThe average man Is far too tails about how his wife can be tellectual equals': modest to write about himself, expected lo provide a £ 10 stnndWith a war saimr on in Koren The reason for this is that if he nrd of living on Ell week's aild J £ t a wu^, Jwhere ^E£ did write what he honestly behousekeeping money He is fur w hat Li a wretched man to do if l.eves to be the truth about himtoo simple to comprehend why when you come home, vou are self it would be "tremelv dim. she seems incapable of undereither irritated by trivial domestic cull nw him to avoid creating the standing that a man who has just details, or Infuriated bv being %  mpres*ion of being a braggart, received his income lax assessmet with a too cheerful .smile and Another reason is that it is dimmerit and n notice that neat ., overdone care-free manner as cult for any average man to bemonth the rent will be increased, if there was nothing to worry Jieve that he is merely an average is not in the best frame of mind atx>ul in thb sad world" You to be confronted with the knowldon't know Well, with apologies men can. however, resist edge that the cook has walked to Kipling. I'll tell you reading anything written about out on them, or that young Billy themselves. And the reason they has had another of his front can't is because if It is complimenteeth knocked out and his new tary, he has the satisfaction of trousers torn In a free for all with knowing that the writer has only the boy next door. He can't help erred on the side of understatewondering whv women are so ment. On the other hand. If it is unreasonable. After all, she has uncomplimentary, it gives him a nothing to do all day long except The cure for this ill Is not to sit still And grumble and grouse in your Ire; Just take a very big calomel pill And next morning the salts, you require. out Emigration III AIM IIS SAYt Mark-Up* _ SIR,—I hav y read with interest Conservative Governments that -the Debate in the Chamber of have preceded this Bushc Labour Commerce on the question Experiment. controlled price mark-ups. but Well now, they tell the St. %  *•*>> %  to me that the real "bu Andrew Electorate in this bye' contention" between the Govilection that their leaders are re*rnor and the merchants was not .-.ponsiblc for the prospective emphasized T e General Public Emigration to the U.S., and that will remain ni.i.fferent unless it ities nor policy did anything in particular it Is one of the|c '* ab ' to unoeistand what it is to bring about. leaders who made the suggestion ?'' a boul an wondering regarding; the possibile emigration ,h V?, ,w i ns "* am Ph' would not To The Editor, The Advocate— SIR—It is Ihe established practice of the Barbados *abqur Party to claim responsibility far certain beneficial results to tho Community, thai neither Its We have heard them claim that c f women The peopta of Batba% lm Phf>' the ne:— their party is wholly responsible ,los shou.d be made lo understand If %  article in 19 in thai it was the Bustamante CtOTnJ n 3 ""'' he for the economic improvement Uie Island during the last ten m iment of Jamaica which took years. They never mention that the leading action to get BV/I. the cine harvest Is three time, thiwortoin 10 Ibi U.S.. this year, tonnage that it was in former Mr. Bustamante was so concerned decades: that sugar is M. ttm ,„er the matter and so anxious the price. They claim redponsi!or j l5 complete success that he billty for development und clfai\llK i no t entrust it into the hand* project*. They never mention f nn v incapable Junior. Hi that Coloniil Development and -oiially led the delegation. Welfare Act was passed by I per..JS allowed 15% mark-up, then he wax making a gross profit of 45c. If today that same article costs the merchant $4.50 r more probably $6, he is now making a gross rroflt of from (i7c. to 90c. In ether "words the higher the cost of the article the greater the gross profit and in these days of Inflation it to likely that the gross Conservative Parliament befonIt was the woman member of I" !" 1 of £" n ^ rch ". nl i %  the Barbados Lnbour Party was the Jamaica House of RepreaciiSP*." !" T? ^ ihn downwards born They clam, their leaders latives Mrs. Hose Leon, one of JI w .J2^ Pb ? tly 25 '^ dmlt a ,hi,, got the latest increase In Sugar the Jamaica delegation to Washh h /J !" !^Jljr^dr l^ prices, when In truth and fact ington. who, along with Mr. J^ ,S&duM2 IrSaaed i"2S they came into the picture only Bustamante made strenuous ef f'Jf^'f A0 ,?!*£ ^i-SssTnitTJS^ after every other Labour Party in forts to secure mass employment ^Ic uid I JSm\S' that it I the British Caribbean had supat Jamaica domestic help by ^vernmU-.^enUon ?L the ported from the beginning their American families Mrs. I^on incrM5e ln prottls takes care of rfJBpaetlve Migar producers dele. Stayed over in Washington after h increase in *•**. If ihls ::;.ti.m to Lond.m. They claim that the delegation had left, further i, i*il iTiiu? ii^STta m-nvrvi the-r efforts brought emigration to lo discuss the question. On her thal ,nv irtiA a 7lrdo K ,,' the U.S. in 1944. wbfffl thi reeding return ... Jamaica she said that making it/norr^iiiM^tatt^f public knows their leader spoke she had %  M.evessful profit os n 1940 ivhcn control.gainst it. They claim to have as she would have wished. She w ,. ro in stiKateur tor America Impossible at Overhead expenses, thnt Barbados is the most \ i iflra UM pfft %  Dd time. \v \, ALSTON. %  ihe Empire, it is TRUTH I-and'cnne. St Thomas, rn unconscious tribute. to the April is. 1051. April 19, 195). • • • Wednesday — Today I saw a man with threadbare trousers, close and tii;htlitting. He was carrying a bunch of flowers in one hand. I followed him and saw hi turn down an alley noted for its dirt and watched him toil up a winding staircase and deposit them lovingly in a bow!. Later in the evening I touched him on his cap and whispered "Mister why do you do it ?" He replied with a thin cracked voice: "It's my contribution to a cleaner city. I was so touched that I dug up all my tuberoses and put them out to dry. You will know me next lime you see tuberoses in Nelson Street. • • • Thursday — Glorious news tonight. I can double my whisky and soda before dinner. Did I say whisky and soda ? How careless of me. Women only drink gin and lime. But whatever diet I am on. I can double it because there is a man in the Evening Star. I proved it tonight. The moon came up and I looked her over and over with my naked eye. There was no man in the moon, but sure enough, (here he was as big as the hero in King Solomon's Mines bending his gigantic arms across the Evening Star. Husband pour me a stifT rum and soda. I am annoyed. After a morning shopping in all the big Broad Street stores. I had to return home without my pattern. The girls did their best. They offered me some English patterns. I looked at them but they are not for me. I can imagine some people liking English patterns here but now that I've qualified at the Singer sewing course. I think I'll make my own patterns, until they let the Canadian patterns back. • • • Friday — It's been a day of horns. There was the one that makes a noise like a peasant in distress. It is the one that goes ha-di-hah. That's meant to he musical. Then there is the hornblower. Some drivers tap their horns and a muffled whisper comes out These seem to say "I wonder if you would mind moving over just a little to let me pass." Another driver will put his whole weight on his horn. I interpret this to mean "if you reverse any further you'll smash into me and I'll lix you Then there is the driver who waits till he is passing you out and hails you. His horn says; Sorry to do this. But I am in a hurry Must pass you." Then there is my horn. It either sticks and blow.s when I don't want it to blow, or it doesn't blow ut all. This seems to be the best horn of all, and I really find it possible to do without it. • • • Saturday — Suppose you stop blowing your horn and tell us who you are. How are you looking at snow through a train window one day. and buying patterns from Bridgetown the next. What sex are you anyhow ? Peace, restless soul. I'm nobody, nobody at all and were not for my friend in the Evening Star, the Editor would ntver receive my copy in lime fnr you lo irad it in bed every Saturday. Pip, Pip. SILVER STAR CONGOLEIM With FELT BASE lilMllliflll P.lll.TII. Cul lo Your Requirements SILVER STAR C0NG0LEUM SQUARES wilh Fell II.,-, — 3 X 21 yds. and ly] yds. WW Just Ihe Floor Covering you have heen wailing for WILKINSON & HAYNF.S CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phones : 4472. 4687. 4413 MR. HAKERU ) ou vim MM n. um HAKK ir.tfi n SHII.K... >/>.' //' //.'TV ll"' GOLDEN ARROW FLOUR THE FLOUR WITH GOOD RETURNS OBTAINABLE AT YOUR WHOLESALER. Choose from a wide yr£ range of fitting, single or double breasted. Style in fine Crude ^ WORSTEDS and GABERDINES. A big assortment to select from DA COSTA *\ Dry (.noils (O.. LTD. I.I.I. TASTY BAKERY GOODS ENERGY FOODS KELLOCCS ALL BRAN KELLOGGS CORN FLAKES PUFFED WHEAT CHOCOLATE LUNCH BISCUITS HAHLEY SUGAR STICKS CALVES LIVER DANISH BACON DANISH LUNCH TONGUES JAR ENRICHED BREAD ^r^^'BrnvTifcX %  ^T. %  %  LLUJaaaa* I 'jMiiiiMam -mil i MINI, fcXTRA BPfXCUl CANADIAN APPLES CANADIAN MlfH-OLATi: Nt'T ROLL CANADIAN CHOCOLATE: BARS order rarly from IKrSH VEGETABLES C-U'.ltOTS BEET HOOT CABBAGE STRING BEANS CHKISTOI'HENES FISH SMOKED HADDOCK SMOKED KIPPERS RED SALMON RED SNAPPER GRADE A MEATS vsp^^^w^wfr w rsww^-x^^y^ ? iw w '^^fcwaaaw



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    \II IDA) \ri;ii 14, I:,I UAUHAIMI-, AOVUCATI. i'\.,i i nit) iKnow ledge Of Land Grows By Exchange By Dr. MM '-I. As I NSMD4QOI ..i ..-. %  THE exchange of agricultural knowledge through the exchange of people is growing. From July 150 until July 1951, more than 3.000 agricultural leaders (nun 77 fnendlv counines will have visited ihe United SUtgg to learn about American agriculture. Conversely. American farm leaders, farmers, and agricultural scientists and students by the thousands are seeking to hrnadi their knowledge bv Visiting other lands. mean of applying thwo MMm, In no small measure the high uier MumAiwrHin suuidere. o< living u a ' the advancement in Amencnn *KM l ,rcduol >' and marktun^ 1 * n fthods are the products of this This first-hand ohm the wayi of life ii tries on such a large som histor reflects educational r>oliriei among the participating nations. _. ._ ,w *** * Recently the U.S. Department broadening at the domes( ,,( p *cnanga o| agriculture inthank* from a German fores proportionwho had been studying the fores f. ,K "" ri1 arrompaniment of ity methods i the Unit.-d S' ' l '" K internatkmal reIt is typical of the many thai ire *•* l 1 ^ 11 "? 8 f "> Unl,ed received tram visiton from 8 torlsy hu grown other lands. It said, in part: "| '•; i t ". v *" the decade since the started this year im trip with a UA -. Con eress passed the first POCKET CARTOON by OSBTRT LAHCAST1 K Is lae. id. D1...1... of K-> ii.iriu*, Admiralry.' A rather Iniereiting point ha j-mi arittn—" $250,000 for Ret I Regime MERLIN. Oin—il'l former I %  perial :'..mi.;. has donated quarter million dollars fo the Soviet Tone Communist 1 eguue The puppet government an. n.uneed that salvage. iu lag recently demolished Kaiser's East Berim yaslflflfl 4.MH-.000 East marks (SZ25.000) in .utd artistic treafcuras." Included in this trove were 900 ;. .nds Of 18th centur> silverware found In one of the base%  uat vaults, the government The palace, one of Berlin's %  BOB, fgano 1 buko^Mrka, b bean lorn down to clear space for a vast Communist "Red Square" for official demonstrations and parades -UM %  I Cong: mile suspkaoet. AjfcWVsvat''war SS£S? . to ft *' u *<' nd nil the bad things mad,%  i. .11 was the Nazi rem'nw, I could undai "'" %  '' with interchanging world may get it too." I' V l.i a del.i.ip The vast population* <.f Un world are pressing improved living conditions. It is inly proper th;it tinUnited States should aid their agricultural leaders in their quest for ways and means of making their agricultural resources' provide higher and more secure levels of living. The way to early and lasting Improvement must of necessity come through an Im •lavement of their agr Vchnlques. The United .Mates fortunate positii is ft and if your i*vple would he a iM ^ w,,h •"•nil and South little mad on the Qenaai tftaj %  •* %  Tho flrst bm eadlad DM tors. But il happened on v the "" ''"^oaikge ol information and contrary. All the American PS0. ,tU0 *'J !" <"** "tf-er American pie 1 met were very kindlv. and IC P lll | u>. cxpandI felt myself never an foreign *" '"' ;. mon f > was appropriated guest Sometimes it hai.iened I V* Ul u ? Department of State met eld soldiers—wo fought S* wardln g training grants to against each other in the last war!" liraJ and South American today we made nice parties technicians and leaders for study Only a crazy politick stared this m """ United State? war. You have a real freedom Leaislatlon making the exhere and I hope all the other rn anpe programme world-wide i other lands throughout universities have been Am erica' the world, principal storehouses and d __^^_^^_^^^_ butors of agricultural knowledge. Traditionally, farm families have taken their problems In faimin,II nd homemaking u> them foi solution The Department ol Agriculture and the state institutions in turn have sought trie answer to these problems it; thur research laboratories, in held ,,7 LH .^| 1:( .,~ involved in an intertesting plots, and through a llll);(1 {cud lo ^f^ years hard continuous examination and sift| ;i i, our ftn ,[ ^ IX strokes of the Usn ing of experience throughout the eiu n Twentv-three people were world. Meanwhile the cooperakilled in the rioting. tlve agricultural extension workfjal 2". were among 190 charged ers have been active in tnUl bribal b.itile last October, the answers so found back to A tight arose Trom a 100-yenrAmerican farm families and in old feud over the chieftainship, helping to work out ways and —(C.F.) Gets M.D. %  item Oir OM (ui.-. ha", -iu..lined -n Hadiclaw at London University A former pupil of the St. Josfph'l Convent High School ulieiu she took her London Hatrleulat.on and later Bishop'. High Scho.il. Trinidad, where she studled preliminary chemistry, biology and physics, she entered London Univenily on a CD. at W. scholarship in 1945 In 1948 she was married to Mr. Peter Bynoe. a Trinidad student of architecture in England. Death From "Hop" • tram Oar Own fXerceSMMbetl ANTIGUA. In attempting to hop on to a truck last Monday Carton Abbott. a labourer of Greenbay. was fatally wounded when he fell from the moving vehicle and the wheels ran over his body. He was rushed on" to the HeiMrtea] Hospital but died shortly after entering the gat? a nd before being admitted to the ward. The truck was laden with sugar being conveyed from Montpelier Factory to St. John's. Steel band "Ked Aimy" from Greenbay playtd in Abbott's funeral procession Factories Change To Syrup Some of the local factories have stopped making sugar for the time being and are making syrup. Because of this many laboureis are out of work. A planter told the Advocate yesterday that the factories have turned over to making syrup to fulfil orders from Canada So far this month 9.042 tons of crystal sugar were shipped to the U.K.. 3,100 tons lo Canada and 52 to Dominica. White Crystal Sugar shipped to the U.K. this year amounted to 1.050 tons while 70 tons w sent to Dominica. Fancy molasses shipped is follows: 302.384 gallons Canada. 3,896 gallons to the U.S.A., and 102 gallon,. t„ MontMrrat Vacuum Pan Molasses: 236.926 gallons to the IT K Club Makes London Less Lonely LONDON, April 12. At the All-Nations Social Club. 2.000 members meet every night lo shatter the loneliness of people stranded in London. But as some of the loneliest people in ler*hu L out Ihree times greater than that of Communist controlled labour ggoups in Asia. A.F.L. DISPLAY A series of displays depicting V %  • formation and growth of tin A nerian Federation of Labour (AFL) will highlight the AFL Union Industries Show In Chicago In May. Ofnelals of the AFL SB) th. event will be an example of labour-management cooperation in th.United Suiea. In %  union exhibits, the show will in plgya by the L' S. Depart ment of Labour and other Government agencies showing their services to the American people LABOUR LEADERS HELP AntarlOBn labour leaders are helping to advise President Tru%  Aao on US. loreign eeonomn f lu-y Jacob S Potofsky. vice I of the Congn %  trial Organisations. Lewis G Khncs, ipecial reprosenlative of tin i Federation of Labour and three other union official! were included on the K-tnan Inti rnutluiial Development Advisory -pointed by the Presklen' to study U S. economic aid to underdeveloped countries. HOMr DRESSMAKERS AR£ THRILLED WTTH the versatile, long-lasting btauty of ADDRESSES JAP WORKERS 'ii Gladys EHckasi n, vice Pres idem of the Amalgamated Cloth i' %  { Workers of America, recently addressed tho opening session of the general council of Japanese labour unions in Tokyo. The grouy. which representa 3.200.000 workfi. iiidoiwd th,. action taken the United Nations agaat th C'liimunlat aggreasors in Korea FORTUNATE NINE The United States was one o nine countries in which unemploy ment was lower at the end of IMu than at the close of 19, according to statistics gathered by the %  IHI l-ibour OIHce Other c untrles showing I JtrToBBe in unemployment In this period were C inada, Hawaii, the United King n i'i. Ireland, Finland. Swluer Ignd, '*rnel and South Africa. 27 Sent To Gaol After Tribal Feud UMTATSA, April 13. A jfdge sentenced 27 African HEATINGS KILLS Senior Short Story lompetition The Evening Advocate Invites BU school-hoys and scho-d girtbetween the ages of 12 -10 to enter f..r its SenUr Short Story ComaeUllon. Stories can be on any subject, hut should not exceed 500 word' n length and must reach the Short gear* Cdltar, Advocate Co, Ltd -ity not later than Wednesday every week The best story each week vill be published In the Eveeing Advocate and the winner will re elve a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12 fl. Send this coupon with your itory. SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION Nanse Age Rchaol Farm Home Address 'CeA**i* High Blood Pressure Kills Men &Woewi I rr from Hiaii SM If — ei^ %sah I .bout th> linx of Chang* of U( aa4 %  %  th iral mw ( inn. K har1 trculila indMltrni .-f u.t.iti. NPNMCMIm* •vmpuxnu of High Bloo PTM. %  *• aea, Nirlllt Hi'ir.f doar. UUl t r*a^ l.aa vrt lha hari. and mahas i"u rval yaar* i.puna.r ID a fr* Jan. II Nxaa frani you. rhsnit tadar. U i. suaranlrad |o ma*( „u f,.| dl sag a > % ** *e c*%  tu Lii-.itrd. (onJri, trilf."/?rin rfIAt TrodtMo'k 'C./omM Jusl Received FKESH STOCK OF ... DOBIE'S nn I MjiARl VfXLtlW PI'RPL*; IHK \t ( 0 n: /. <: iiuC. CARLTON BROWNE Hhutoulc A Krull D'Uflliil IJ6 Korburk SI. Mi-I ?Hi: -' DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING COMPANY LIMITED (ICKSTEIN ItHX) MODERN DRESS SHOPPE-B !" ^ st 5 Day Tin sD §it liny s.iiiiiniY IW.Vttir TUESDAY ALL ITEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED FOR QUICK CLEARANCE | You are definitely effecting large uvingi by attending this CLEARANCE SALE. Here are tome of the many reductions. TENNIS DRESSES SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS A Imp ii-Mirlmvtil In lw*t and roldura. Haat of Ihrar Hem* urrr rraularly .'. %  .. aold up la SS.S0 Sale Prke ^ V I . I (I LADIES' BETTER DRESSES & f n .... Manr Sl.l !" and Colour.. All thin. Itrducad Irom : lo \ Xc^'''" LADIES' ART SILK STOCKINGS Hrsular Hltra and Mod.rn Shade* l' | % %  %  Aim a varlMy In \..M. -.,,,-k. Sab Vtkt 2 prS. Ilir V 1 ** LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS ? of aaajl nnr TowrU nllh a (.laaa I unil.l.i .. .. I.. .I..-. -..lu Sic. i..r lowel. Special laic Prka All S In a pkc lor S I • " LADIES' PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK IJICC lilmni'd Panllca In Ira roar, rream alaa black. Small Medium, Laric ^j ( a .. .. Ianlu prkod 1 2 Hata Prk. \ I U II LADIES' SKIRTS AND BLOUSES. Jcrsry malrnal III....... Printed Cation Skirl* Specially reduced for | nil tho. Sale Oaly_ B A IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS I ... ladlea and rhlldrrn In while and many other uaeful colour*. Many a .. .. Styles. Many resular prkea were up lo 14.10 To Clear aa--aauaaia*sBB -


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    BARBADOS AOVOC'ATK SATI Itl.AV APRIL 14, IMI Cwiib galting M R. VICTOR CUNARD. Hi Edwards brother is off on a visit To Martinique to-day by O.W.I A. via St. Lucia. En route R EV JOHN W CLEMENTMM M on his wav back to Montscrrat from British Guiana In vrill qMOd a week In Barbados nf at Codringlon College baton going on to Montserral where ha Is stationed at the St. George's Rectory. He Is n Church of England minister. Continuing W.I. Holiday F h. JOI SFLLIEK"S sister, Jaanne. who had l>oeii spend.11* a snort liolld^\ m Itaruadua %  ayuuj M tinHoWl Royal c-rtrcitca ftatm B.W.I A i"i gad io continue nag huhdu) in uc West indie*. Miss Scllier lives In the U.S.: the Is a nurw at the Rooaevelt Hospital in New York. Bark Io Trinidad D li .iid MltS FRANCIS CARY who have been in Barbados since April Mb. wenumong thu passengers by BtW.I.A. for Trinidad yesterday afternoon They were staying at the Ocean View Hotel. . on the same plane went Mr. John Campbell, I.C.T.A. lecturer who had been here on a short visit. Nelson and thr Navy S AILORS from the Canadian ihi^j added a touch of colour to Bridgetown yesterday as they simply "swarmed" ashore. Each one had a camera. Most popular subjects they choae to photograph were the statue of Nelson and the Fountain Gardens. Avensa'g Traffic Manager M R and Mrs. Rene Van den Branden and their youngest daughter Nicole have come over from Caracas for a brief slay. Their other two daughters Car. menclta and her sister used to g* K school at the Ursullne Con. vent here. Mr. Van den Branden is Traffic Manager of Avcnsa Airlines in Caracas. They ar tucsts a' the Paradise Beach) Club. ,**j The Churchill Trust H ERE is news of %  Scottish land deal. I quote from the Weekly Scotsmaa: "Acting on behalf of the Win. ston Churchill Literary Trust, a London lirm of estate agents are negotiating the purchase of more than two-thirds of the 7,000-acre Biel estate. East Lothian. "The estate Is being sold to meet death duties, stated Vice-Admiral Basil C. B. Brooke, ms'iaging director of the Biel and Dirleton Estates, Ltd. "People are interested because they think that Winston Churchill has bought himself a house here. I do not think he Is personally con. nccted. No houses are involved; it is simply a block o.' farms.'" •flTIE'S HEADLINE "1 let I' finding Co itafl.M in MY fat. Welcome T HE Y MCA. have extended a welcome to the personnel of both the Canadian naval ships at present in Carlisle Bay offering them all of their facilities at their l:eiirtqunrtcr* in Pinfold Street. Facilities include reading room. wntlng room, billiards, table iciiiii*. draughts, dominoes etc and sleeping accommodation up to 50 men can be providrd. They have also offered to give all information in connection with the islands many beauty spots. Flying Vitit U P fiom B G for a few days is Mrs. Lena Raleigh. She is staying with Mr. and Mr*. Jack Marson until Tuesday. Mrs. Marson is her nine She told Carib that her brother and sisterin-law Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Psaila cxpev. to leave for England later this month on a holiday. On Tuesday Mrs. Raleigh will fly down to Trinidad to visit other relatives. U.K. Bound J OANNE WILLS of Georgetown. Hi; Is on her way to Uw V K Hut lirst she Is spending two weeks in Barbados en route, r toying at Dulce Domin. Fontabelle. B.C. Boys R AYMOND SHANKS and George Manly, two B.G. boys are in the Royal Canadian Navy. Raymond is stationed on board the H.M.C.S. Maanlnrcnt and George is with II M C S Mlcmae They were granted special leave to visit their relatives in B G. and yesterday they wan on It W I A's B.G. night as they come over to rejoin their ships Georges j>n rents Muj. and Mrs F. T. Manly were in Barbados n few months ago on boUdas Mind the Doors! L ONDONERS who believe it impossible for a tube train to move until all the automatic doors are shut are confounded by the exparknea of the man who was dragged into the tunnel at Charing Cross the other night with his foot caught in the sliding doors. Truth is .a train con move even if every door is open. There is no automatic device to prevent it. It depends on the guard When all the doors dose, an eleetric contact U mad* and a hfM flashes m the guard's compartn nt. He rings the bell, the igrtw Start* the train london Transport think the man at Charing Cross had a thin in*u?p Thus, although the dorrs were open at the bottom, they could be closed at the top and the guard would have received the all clear." Nobody in the train used the ied-h*ndled emergency atop. There is one in every carriage. London Transport say no one has pulled it for more than a year Project Pot Off A N Essex vicar, the Rev. Hugh Cuthbertson, was going to turn his home Into a guest house this summer. He planned lo put people up at Tilty Vicarage, near Dunmow, for 1.1. 5s. a week. Now. his wife says, she and the vicar have change-( their minds. "We were going to make structural alterations," she says. "but with labour difficulties, ws aeridcd lu put it off this year." The CuUibertsons had sent out %  leaflet advertising their project Their publicity was a little ahead of their achievement, it seems. if the plan ever does materialise, they will need to print a new leaflet rtu. pr-sent one Is headed: "Your Holiday 1951 %  And it warns: Accommodation will be short during the Festival of Britain. R.A.F. Vi.itor O N LEAVE in London last week was R.A.F. Sergeant Keith Blake of St. Mary* Parish Jamaica. He is attached to the HA F. Camp at Grlmsby. Lincolnshire. He Joined the service in 11M4 and says he hope* to be .(••mobilised next year. Once back In "civvy street" he intend-, lo become a sanitary inspector and has already started a correspondence course with a view to obtaining the Associate diploma of the Royal Sanitary Institute. incidental Intelligence S OME people sleep In the tops of their pyjamas, some in the bottoms. With taxes going up as they are they'll soon be sleep • ins: in the strings."—U.S. TV f-."irtdn Arthur Gotf/rry. —L.f.S. Athletic Stimulus *-pHE WEST AFRICAN %  i. REVIEW this month, referring to the visit to the Gold Coast of the two West Indian athletes, Arthur Wint and McDonald Bailey, says that their appear. ance will do much to stimulate the ambitious plans of the local Sports Council for a 'tadlum worthy of the rapidly growing interest. Mac and Arthur, who will be in West Africa by tha time you read tiu, have been wamed that spectators there art a lot more critical and enthusus/ lie than there were twelve montA ago. This has followed the emergence of a first-class team in the utter-Colonial Champioosnipa at Achimota, and the -successful tour ef Britain undertaken last year by Gold Co*t athlete*. Sybil Attack SYBIL ATTBCK. whose exhibition of paintings opens at the Museum to-day (Saturday), Is a member of a well known Portof-Spain family, a.id a founder of the Trinidad Art Society. This, however is her first one-man exhibition here and her work Is full of interest. In 111*5, the artist spent a year in London studying sculpture and painting at the Regent Street School of Art of the LondoB Polytechnic. In 1942. she visited Peru, where she studied painting under the South American painter Julia Cordicldo and sculpture under professor Pro, at the Escuela de Belles Aries. Anxious to gain a fuller knowledge of the meaning and technique of art, Sybil Atteck cave up her post with the Agri'-ultural Department, St. Clalr, and went to Washington University. Here she studied for three years under the Canadian symbolist painter Philip Guston and the expressionist painter Max Beckman, and obtained the degree of Itachelor of Fine Arts. An exhibition of her paintings was held at the Public Library, St. Louis, Missouri in IM7. Last year, Sybil Atteck spent three m< ths In England studying art on a British Council scholarship, and during her visit h one of her paintings exhibited -nt the Royal Institute of J'aintcn Oils, Piccadilly. She has also to her credit a large mural depicting the history of rum which srai commissioned by the Fernandes Distilleries, Trinidad, for its new office,. THE ROCKET MAN Scraps His Ash-trays { %  Ml They'rr out of tlati; uiiil the Guided Minilrt chief, giring IWWH to-ilay of the deri'lopmentn lhal are providing Britain with note weapon*. AIIVl.MIIIIS OF I'lIM ~-^nw %  •>>^£#%ii BY THE WAY ... By BeachcombeJ AM AHA u'Obad mul, muJ Jlmo. lak. So runs the Afghan proverb, the meaning of which eludes me. 'The thud of her fall," says a description of ballet, "seems lo stop the music." And well it might. When the Tavlstock Tiger throws the BII1erlcay Butcher, does not the three-piece orchestra In the bar stop playing "In A Monastery Garden"? The hriinh'.%  hinder A FTER a breakfast of dried Peruvian egg. Mr. Vincent Fumbling adjusted the brimlcss bowler in which he Is to go to bed at 11.43 (Greenwich time) this morning. The Judges examined the hat, and certified that there was no trace of a brim. There was a scuffle when a party of young women carrying a banner bearing the words "Down With Vaccination!" tried to force their way Into the yard where the test Is to take place. Police took the names and telephone numbers of the two prettiest girls. Hoofbeat corner I F the Stewards of the Jockey Club ("Steward! A basin! A basin! Flashaway is feeling ill") compel owners of ttetjfifl. I If tattoo their nags I understand that romantic marks will be discouraged. A horse will not be allowed lo have a heart pitrcccl by an arrow tattooed on Its chest, with the legend underneath: "I Love Gipsy Queen." Ever since unlucky Simon turned out to be n camouflaged cow, and lost the Penrance Plate by 1.38a yards, the Stewards have had their eyes a widow in Bruton-street, who noes her "ringing" through a gro of sailors living above an liii monger's shop In Suffolk-street Pliulir Eggs M Y appetite was whetted by a cutting sent to me which anIHJUI,'-.I Inflated Plastic Eggs. For a moment, I thought it was a quotation from this column, but I read on and discovered that they are already on sale In America. It Is true that they are only Easter eggs. However, the publicity says that Ihey are "pre-Inflated and electronically welded," which is good news for progressive children. They are sold In paper bags, "with acetate windows." The eggs are made of "Heavy gauge vinyl lllm" England is still n long way behind America in these matteis. in paining T HE incident it the Shah's wedding, when the trainbearers were almost unable to Junior Short Story Competition Use Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to en' for Its Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be ished every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner w fceive a prise to the value of 7/8 In either books or stationery. 1 stories can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more in 300 words in length, and must reach The Children's Editor. The Advocate Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesdav everv week. NOTE : Stories must not be copied. Send this coupon with your story, JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION support the weight of the bride's fi.bulous dress, recalls the coronation of Napoleon as Emperor, .l.isophinc's dress was so heavy that she could hardly walk. Her sisters-in-law. Elisa Caroline, and Pauline, loathed her. So, at a critical moment In Notre-Dame (according to Mine de Rtmusat. who was there), they brought Josephine to a full-stop by their deliberate clumsiness. Nupoleon spoke to them sharply, and Jos• phliie was able to move again. Another account says thst the %  luiltasa ladles dropped the train and that Josephine nearly fell backwards. TaU-pivcv The loss oj 23 stone in one day by a Mrs. Ntnge is not so sfartUnp; u'hen one realises that II teas potatoes. (Ministry of Diet). Age Seheel Form iionr Address) Ration fikmU 36 .90* ShvdinaA WHITE & COLOURS tRaipnA TAFFETA PASTEL SHADES 79? $1 .23 BROCADES 85? B.B.C Radio Programme BM S.JS m. rorrr* r.vounu-. T a.m. Th* l*>wi, HO m N**i Analywi. ?.|S am. frum th. Editorial.. T .., ProcrammiP-Md,. 1*1 a.m. rw, m tha Thlid l*io•MMilmartr* PUrvrra, BIS <> m Compoar' t lbWeak, SJU ..... tlton Hay... BU am. CotoKlal QunlUn.1. • %  it.. The I*"' *Ut am Hume Nrw. from (l.l(.lii t IS am. Cleat Dawn, 1111 a i. ftO!'•">" %  Paiad-. ll.Sft ••> R.^la..a %  •roltand. I .-I <.ta-s.se ,m i *.-,a M. PH. U.lnirr.' Chow v. a p i _' of Ihr Wcrk. IJ pm III! •>ltit Varlttv OrcnaaKa. pm Mm I Uancin. i-US pa.. %  :. ..I M. it :• M a U It p.m. r>n*riiiiin* Parade. 7 p The Nm*>, 1.10 p.m. Nr> AmUtm. : llenlna tha I"-, pjn. SI.K H. Mil IS pm S-n.lv M*.-'hr(-.i. .1 Ih. The-lra Oisan. B p m. Radio N. .. %  ,. Hi pm. Cntnpoacc ot tbe Wni. * HIT. P.rtl. Thealra. ID p.m. The New 10 10 pin from the EdllorlaLi, 10 1 p in Take It Iron. Urn-, 10 4* p.m. Youri Faithfully, tl pm So.iihem SWrvnad. On heitr a. I', i SLAOIO rnnQBAMMC SATURDAY. APH1I. I*. ISS1 CHOSSVVORD r f i y p ;i • %  • J-< mm ^# -4+-ff 1 ;s £££s9^* ff 0 -'* 1 *b>it luciwwuin J Hr iiiai mm bt-ifca dearer ,o. IS ro al*e up iSi 30 t ?i'J""Slue**r.lI?**T4. n *"" '*' ,J T?V l "** * imn^porlefl ay a . A*'. * Up)iit*r > lai -i ( iintai:)r'a Hi %  an I Whalaivt md( UU m t Touwili ntft to So thi. .fi,. r oatlora * }!" land uolr. ISi riio trar doeio, ^Upernuuiu U MM nud.; iu riirea naure. eaiuhi il fjes as'mV'-uienT ., f na %  aratMrda is" .7.. HtfiPS ".">V,;"" %  By JAMES STl'ART The man who taught tne KinR • H.v stubbed his cigarette-enu Into tha asbtray on his desk. He pointed to the bookcase, where there were hjir %  tfocsn ashtrays •ill surmounted by modem •ypes of atrplanes "We have deposited them in the bookcase as being out of date." ha i Inns )ij For. rising vertically from the centre of the one now in use was, In beautifully turned bronie, a model of a rocket proj>'<"il<.'. It was a symbol of his office Air Chief Marsh;.I Sir Alee Coryton, DFC. is Chief Executive, Guided Weapons, at the Ministry uf Supp y. In his room seven floors up above tha river at Miilben* today, he told me of some of the work thai is going on 12.000 miles ..way in the South Australian scrub country that will make any now Battle of Britain a very difrent affair from the summer day* of 1M0. 1.200 Miis K ....... Corytoa has lust returned from a visit to the vast rocket testing north of Adelaide, aahsff*, BU away (nun prying eyes the work of t eating both defensive and offensive rocket projectiles is progressing. "There is room there for expansion." he sold. "There Is a range of about 1200 miles overland, and that is plenty to start *ith. "Out there Ihe rainfall is only -bout 5|in. or in. a year. There is good weather for 360 days of "ie year. n there is no fear of the experimental work being held up through weather." Woomera—named after the Aborigines' word for Liuiuhin^ n boomerang—has been built into a substantial village with prefab, houses, church, hospital, shops, school and two airfields. Eighteen miles away from the village u> a radar station for tracking the guided weapons at they are tested. More than three bundled miles away in a former munitions factory, la the base where ihe Australians are building up all tha suppartlng acflviti) electronics, rocket propulsion and aerodynamics. This base is headed by Mr. H. C. Pritchard 40-year-old Oxford Double Blue What are the prospects for British industry? "There are various schemes afoot. One British aircraft Arm have already started out there." Sir Alec said How are we doing on rockets 1 Sir Alec was careful to give no secrets away. "In relation to the total effort that has been put into guided weapons, progress has been satisfactory." he said. Fifty-six years old Coryton. tall and slim, with hair tnat going white, usually prefers to wear a lounge suit with white stiff collar His Old Crock' An old Etonian, he joined th. Rifle Brigade after leaving Cambridge during the 1914-18 war transferring to the Royal Hying Corps in 1917. Two years after he became an airman he was the King's flying instructor Cr-n well What does the man who Is in charge of all Britain's supersonic % %  rocketry" do in i)ls spare time? H loves engineering, and has his own pfTvate workshop. Another of his joys is an "old crock" car. "I did 160 miles in it the other day at an average of 24 m.p.h." he said. woai.n COPYRIGHT prsravE" Rupert and the Ice-flower—5 After hit accident Rupert make hi* way home very sadly >nd cate hilly snd pots hit purchasei on tfn table. Mn. Br looki grave whei sht tee* the broken ..... It wa 1 aH my "11 I hadn't sea 1 C t Algy I %  louldr.'t hav< I." "Wall. I'm gisd blamed youtarlf and nobody ugh* hii mother, "and I .cold you, but ths roadi a dippery lor your boot*. belter sray %  So Rupert • laugh at ihs weather ficeri another w You'd rairhei InoW. PLAZA Themirm— Bridgetown (DIAL 23IOJ r gTg|B. BB M UBy HKO HADIOS lUWfJNSS! T1IRHJWT %  ff %  MFil %  Hasan P-IU. l-laadr 4 4* -I %  n. MITCHUM UOMOtOUE KAINS in "WHERE DANGER LIVES" Alt..: 1JN EHROI. I" WrDTHSB STOBlrs" SPECIAL TO-DAY .S am. and I SO Tha CISCO KID fa % %  SOI til 0 TUP. RIO t.SAND*. with DUNCAN REN A I.IMI & M. sagei %  DasSMi Rnland WUNTKIta aa Charlie Chan In %  'TBS (.OLDEN lS PLAZA DIAL OIVTIK 8404 Midnllr rONrTB i Monoftn B.l. KARLOFT ap Mr. Woi '•HI HONG IN CHINATd and CISCO KID In RIDINIi Ifer ( Mlloltsi with i;i:.-imi ROI.AN U AIKTY (THE GAIDW] St. James T^^lay lo Slunda) S30 p m. ,V:.i Sunday 5 p.m. IdJBMfej CAaHKY in iWirwr'n •ST. LOUIS BJBsat Humphrey BOOAitT in %  MAIN LlOH I NINIi' Mldnitr TONITE . % % %  % %  A LEVER rsoo-xs Al ATH t II II Cl.\i:>l,\ ;M.mb.r.Only' MATDVET TO-DAY TO-NIGHT TO SUNDAY ] DA%1D FARJtAR GLYNIS -.ETTraMJM". FRIEDA' 1 •LiONDAY ,md TUESDAY NIOHT Bl MATtNBE •nrSKDAY al 5 p in CHARLXS BUYER ANN m vni IK A WONVVS UMilAMI GLOBE TO-DAV 5 AND 8 S AND TONTINt'lNG The "FURIES" BARBARA STANWYCK WEN DEL COREY TOP FIGURE CHAMPIONS WALTER HUSTON WEDNESDAY:— CAPT. ALAN LADD CAREY U.S.A. .VOW SltOWIXG AT EMPIRE THEATRE M.ilin.T 4.45: Night 8.30 — DAILY COMINGS ^CHULFIELB f£uhHU... Cw %S" PRICES: Adults— Matinee & Night Pit 16—House 3G—Balcony 48—Boxes 72 Children Mats only: Pit 12—House 16 Balcony 20— Boxes 72 EMPIRE To-dsy 4 45 and 8 30 and Cr>nti..Liiii. Columbia Pictures Presents '•77iW GIRL OF ill/; YEAR* 9 Robert CUMMINCS Joan CAULPIELI) with El** LANCHESTKR HOW To-dty To Mondav 4 2* snd 1.15 Republic Smashing Double Georgr BRF.NT snd Lynn Bar! In — '•KID FROM CLEVELAND and *• SISGISG GU\S Starring . Vaughn MONROE and Ells RAINES ROYAL To-day and Te-msrrow 4.30 and 8 30 Universal Big Double Yvonne DeCARLO and Brian DONLEVY in "SONG OF SCHEHERAZADE anil THE WEH .with Edmond O'BRIEN and Ella RAINES OLYMPIC To-day u, Monday 4.30 and 8 15 Warner Bros. Smashing Double Billy HALOP and Bobby JORDAN in •HELLS KITCHE\" and JDIIWY BELIMM" Jane WYMAN .-.nd Lew AYRES


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    PAGE I H.Ill BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1S1 ISLAND BEAT NAVY3-1 IN FOOTBALL GAME AN bland side defeated a leahv from II.M f Ships Magnificent and Mirinuc three—one in then football mated at the Garrison yesterday evening. The goals for the island were scored by Desmond Johnson. Reynold Hutchinson and Arthur Wilkes. Johnnie Hancock, it centre half for the Navy, acored the loi for his team BarbaoU t#ok the touch off with (he Navy drfending th< northern BMI. A few second?later Drnyli.n. on the right m:-.; fcr the island. received the I,.I;I and rentred. Johnso i eoQtaMd It. and shot writ mi of the roaches of Brown. the Navy mstodian. The Navy after jot the|i equaliser when Johnnie Hancock, in the gcsl area, received ; %  through pan. He shot hard and low to beat Marshall, the island i goalie. The island made attacks on their opponents' goal but the lull backs for the visitors, and Dickinson, fe[to'7 Motor Cycle Speed Hooord Broken T.C.A. Plane Coming To-night MUNICH. April 12. Sports Window The 1951 football •vena this aftentenn at KenHi.inn with a First Dlvl%  lor fixture between < arltow and Notre Dsme i u Hi %  linnof the moat i "i'ii.i <>i the FinH IMvtoton .ijuis while Notre Dame air iiukini tlirir bow to aenlor i.ilnii The* won the Third IMvfcuen cseaaetlU"i. and promotion to the Second Division two vests >Ko and lat jrar they carried off Ihe cl.ampkm-.hlp of the v,. ,,n,t IMVIMI n and *• have earned atomoUon te the l IT-' IIUIM,,,, thb. _J I V*MT \tX CMMptO ATTt+JTION 1*1 V0MM6 *TH\ TAK MON __*rdlnrr Austin Co., Ltd., W.lhclm Herz today broke the T A agent*, have hern inworld motor cycle speed recoru formed that the T C A. aircraft with 180 miles per hour ,„ . x parted to arrive at Sc; w. II The 3B-yearold German, e-rtabbetween B and 9 o'clock l—night jutted "" "">">" dawn " h Pii i was that d \SU machine on a MX WOUM :i nVe h| nuirm „ g lt .. %  *• aarwen. now. however, scheduled to leave Two other record* were eetabD^,, „ 8 M u m |. Stanford iFortreas) position. Johnson especially used marksmen in this wet*> >h( M rting thrgame *! hiThead to god advanUK* -ml BTJ** "' ,h S,,,dl ,! '"' '""' --'• at one time saved what looked Clu ^ _,^.^ like a certain goal. The e,ghl best s, i% %  .ivunlage Soon after goalie Brown was 100 called upon to nave two good Major J. E. Criffllh 88 shrrta. One he matched out of lh>clalion of rren Diplomatic lournalists. Dr Adenauer said: "I have been asked whether I and the German people would accept neutralisation of Germany if the inity of Germany were re—established, and free election* were guaranteed. This question is very theoreti cat. but I will reply frankly Germany belongs to the West anl does not want lo be separated from the West. That is a decisive point. Anybody who thinks neutralisation is possible in the face of pressure from development* in Asia misconstrues the f-n -t.s —Renter. Newport County 3. Division III (Northern) row 2, Wrexham 0. Other match:—Brighton and it-eks Hove. Albion 4, Saint John*tone l 871 ALL the island play their games against the playen of the team from the H M.C.S. Magnificent ,,\ table tennis u' the Y M.C.A. yesterday afternoon Owing to some difficulty only m three players of ihe Mscsltioent old turned up to play Three games accompanied were played in each set and the I'oarh sailors tried their best but perhaps island: Medford, Ishinacl they were still suffering from their Drayton Cadogan. Gilten> "sea legs". Grant. Marshall. Wilkes, Hutchm The result* were:— son J hnw,n Munificent vs. Inland S. J Fairbaim vs. H Spencer 18—21. 10—21. E. Brown vs V. Chase 16—21, 18—21. A Mooney vs C. Worrell 1—2L 18—81. E. Brown vs E. MrLcod 21 — 16, 16—21. 16—21. SJ. Fslrbairnvs. J Head 1— 21, 19—21. %  I pi .ill %  %  •> Heferee: T. Harris Jamaica Beat Barbados Exhibition Game C Shield* lost to R Lesll 20. 13—21 and 19—21. Both of these boys play for the YMl A Savannah Club Tennis Tournament THIRSOAtK RgltrtTI MIXRD DOUBLaa tfinal %  Mr. H S Il.ntioll and V McO P).!iw>n Iwat Mu< D. Wood and Dr. C. G M..II..IUB ala. s 30 3 Atlri Oik iiuitrh lhr rupi *ertpr.%  anWd b> MM A S B gavaae, The tollowina ,.ir the •imrri of ih.I*ll.Sliislr*Ml* r. r Men's StnalN—Dr. C O. M*III,II> Ladlr. Oo.il.lr* ML. Cl PllSrl"' ad Mm* I Ii-iuifiii Mvn'i Double. -Dr C. Q M*n"ina ni X. P. Taylor. Mrd Doublea—lln R S Baivcrnfl and P. MeG. PalUnen. MIXED IKHmiJA illandli'aii> Mia* Kiimi Bo-cn and J W MelGsstrs trrnm Ou, Own ('ortweondaiiti POHT-OE-SPAIN. April 13. Jamaica Doubles players Donald l^ahong and Ron Sturdv beal Barbados' Eric Taylor and Ralph Carter 6—8, 6-4. 6—3. 6—1 •" the Brandon Trophy tennis series 22— entered the second day at Trnnqullitv thid aftcrntKin. now lead 2—1. The Barbadiaii.playen impressively wominu Bk llrst set B—6. Ti>-morrow*s sing.es gamOB are Farnunhai (Jsmaical vs. Legall (B'dof), Sturdy (Jomaico) vs. Tayloi < B'dos) FORTRESS DEFEAT Y.M.P.C. 13—7 FORTKE.SS defeated Y M.PC. II 7 in a game of Basket ball last night at the Y M P C. Y.M.P.C's usual surprise atta.k could not penetrate the Fortress lines G Rochefunt scoreration rith naTeroqiorr NO. OG qC'PI XAG ENOO NOQ KH ozq ir .• —Dcsxirz it Crypl: llrard melodm % %  *• 1 A t osnis a SONS. Stop:— TO-NITE Al Queen's Park MILTON BONNETT'S (OTTON DRESS DANCE CLEVIE GITTENS Ork. Subscription — 8/I'SII AIM IIS We have a complete rinse of models Inclsdlnc Ihe latest I MM:. This eaa badspled to week off vr.tous vohages from ??a to 118 $118.00 Also other models with and without Hie famous IH.11. Device. Prices from $80.00 to $168.00 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10-13 Broad St. Rheumatism arid Back'aclfe Gone In 1 Week nrnS KM>wi WMS Cum - '0. 11 fMl I'M c 1 •<•'—< n _pr*MripiH> OoubU .. .... •Mll'. PSHV A-hl.-v H.f-, %  tmuttltm •*— % % % %  •• !> %  .• (rrii.U( I* 6.1 -w NisS n so to youi IO>IM tosor lor cr* %  nd M fli and **U >r.i -r-. Cyife. Hclpi Nature 3 Ways K Cy—n iitmtmriM u hlinli loritlfli. W.| —lolllrurnpo^mUd is uilx. Ion* ood oor.. >life kioorn nd kIMoWr and lo if HU and pouona from t> %  lo •n man.), itaddtr i abaolii'dT harmln rill 1 he car that ej'presses you! If it utrnc (hut a maoe:nrcsv-i The total wa nearly doubL* that of the previous year ond production was being still further stepped up.—Reuler. BUSTA ACQUITTED KINGSTON. April 12 Bustomantc waa today ariniitled of the charge of using abil.ive and caltimnoua language agiunst the police at the end of the third daVl hearing of the trial. Hearing of the other four charge! continues to-morrow. \ Theyll Do It Every Time /IRS. CUWPAWS THINKS irs CUTE TO SHOP By T0JCH AND BRUISE THE FRUIT— "MATINTO" FLAT PAINT in Cre^m. i.'nn pnd Wh.tt. For interior deeoratkn of Walls, Ceilings and Woodwork. "S" KNAMKI. FINISH PAINT in White and c>eam HARD GLOSS TULIP GREENPAINT HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN PAINT Fu' "tenor or interior use. "SPECIAL" HOUSE PAINTS In Tropical White. Oak Brown, Barbados Light and Dark Stone, Grey and Dark Grey. For exterior or interior use CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS In Grey and Mid Green. PAINT REMOVER For the easy removal of old paint. & HAYNES CO., LTD.


    GE THREE

    Harvbados

    ESTABLISHED 1895

    etn

    OIL




    SATURDAY, APRIL, 14,





    Persian oil workers Riot:

    Allied troops move forward
    Seamen killed, others wounded

    y Senate invites the General ‘ ‘
    WAR oeyond the 38th parallel ¢.D.C.

    to address Armed Services Group -

    | Prineess

    Elizabeth ““

    Rumours say mismanagement
    in running the Corporation





    MACARTHU







    TWELVE KILLED IN PERSIAN RIOTS

    Martial law regulations to be

    TWO BRITONS DEAD:
    INJURED

    EIGHT

    shouting

    TEHERAN, April 13.
    ‘TWELVE PEOPLE were killed and nineteen
    injured in last night’s rioting at Abadan, the
    Persian oil town. Two British seamen and an Ital-
    ian were battered to death by oilfield apprentices

    “Kill the British!’’ The injured included

    two British children. Persian security forces stop-

    ped the rioters just before they reached the Anglo- |

    Iranian Oil Company’s great oil refinery.

    MacArthur
    Will Address
    Senate Group

    forcements
    called out by the Government last
    night, to-day reached the city.

    Crowds were gathering again
    to-day and the situation was re-
    ported tense. Persian troop rein-
    with armoured cars

    Press reports that British troops

    were in the area were categorical-
    ly denied here.



    Fp eancopmaanais a Ae

    ee
    a emnetil



    enforced in A

    INSPECTS GUARD

    Nea ee 7 , ' rn



    Yongchon, key road and

    General Matthew Ridgway’s
    men threw it back after a two|
    hours fight and advanced again.

    Patrols on the western front
    probed into Communist-held terri.
    tory north of the Imjin River. On
    the eastern front a slow advance

    | UN. Troops Beat Off
    Red Counter-attack

    UNITED NATIONS troops in rapidly warming
    weather advanced further north to-day beyond

    of the thirty-eighth parallel.

    For yet another day major Communist resist-
    ance failed to materialise, though a counter-attack
    was thrown against United Nations troops about
    20 miles southeast of Yongchon.

    Sees Pope
    b d VATICAN CITY, April 13,
    a a hn | OPE PIUS XII 75-year-old

    pontiff of the Roman
    Catholic Church to-day re-
    ceived Princess Elizabeth and
    ge Philip in audience: in
    his Vatican palace,

    There was staged a cere-
    mony of solemn grandeur for
    the sixth visit in 50 years of
    members of the British Royal
    family.

    The Pope chatted for 20 min-—
    utes in his private libvary with
    the Princess and the Duke.

    Princess Flizabeth wore a black
    dress reaching to the ground with
    a black veil of Spanish lace hang-
    ing loosely from her head over
    her shoulders to her knees,

    For jewellery she wore a dia—
    nond necklace and a diamond
    oxracelet. Prince Philip was in
    naval uniform,

    Pope Pius asked after the Royal
    souple’s children and sent his
    respects to King George VI and
    Queen Elizabeth,

    After the audience, the Princess
    ind the Duke were led by Court
    Prelates around the most famous
    sections of the Vatican palace.





























    TOKYO, April 13.

    rail centre 10 miles north

    Communists
    Active InB.G.?

    ( : N They saw sumptuous rooms

    The rioting began when striking “ Twa : oo anes (From Our Own Correspondent) _ idded to the oanes by ‘ths Hor :

    apprentices shouting “kill the oid of Communists holding a ° : il 13 tias, and finally the splendid

    WASHINGTON, April 13. | British” led a crowd from the stubbornly in most places east- GRORGETOWN, F.C, ong nite Sistine Chapel with its walls and

    The Senate Armed Services| Bazzar area in a march towards wards from Yongehon to the} The Waterfront Inquiry Com Foot entirely covered by the last

    Committee decided today tc| the residential quarter. Hwachon reservoir. /mission now sitting at Georgetow! 4 A : .
    invite General Douglas Mac-| Persian security forces stopped

    Arthur to appear before the
    committee to discuss the United
    States policy in the Far East.
    Announcing the invitation the
    Chairman Democrat Senator
    Richard Russell said “The Ameri-

    one section of the marchers before
    they reached the Abadan Oil Re-
    finery, one of the biggest in the
    world.

    Another section was diverted to

    a big cinema on the town’s out-

    HIS EXCELLENCOY the Governor Sir Alfred Savage inspecting the Guard of Honour aboard H.M.C.8.

    “Magnificent” yesterday.



    With good weather United Na-
    tions aircraft kept up attacks to-
    day. Pilots claimed 325 Commu-
    nist troop casualties and 36 mili-
    tary vehicles destroyed on North
    Korean roads.

    and a former Union shop stewara
    in

    rreat work of Michael Angelo.
    Guard of Honour
    The Royal visitors were greeted
    »y a Guard of Honour of the
    Pope's Palatine guards—Corps of
    Roman volunteers in nineteenth





    had a lively session on Thursd
    night when Edward Lewis, :
    waterfront worker for 22 years

    evidence said that political
    agents and Communists are very

    Throughout last night United active on the waterfront. century uniforms of blue and gold
    a peeks ae pec ae vale “has cinema was badly roe bombers and fighters had Lewis said Communist propa- with antique muskets.
    a acts involved except] damaged. as

    those which cannot be released
    for reasons of security about the
    clash in policies advocated by
    President Truman and Mac
    Arthur in Asia.

    The Europeans were attacked

    before police could disperse the

    crowd.

    The strike began last month

    when the Anglo-Iranian Company

    Ghost Ship
    Will Come

    at great Communist con.
    voys to prevent a further buildup
    against advancing ground troops.
    Pilots claimed 130 vehicles des-
    troyed.—Reuter,

    THE CORONATION STONE
    GOES BACK TO LONDON








    After inspecting the Guard,
    Princess Elizabeth was led into
    colourful procession which accom-
    panied her to the Pope's apart--
    ment.

    ganda first appeared on the water-
    front three years ago and had be-
    come stronger, Talking about the
    effect on workers, Lewis said

    i * ee Ben ae the} Prince Philip followed behind
    ‘ ‘ r alk aSlé rear , io a tee 4 z oa

    MacArthur is expected in the}cut certain special bonuses to I d " alk is Russia. You cant hear eT accompanied by another prelate

    United States early next week.| workers. The trouble followed oO n 1es AFTER THREE MONTHS waves for Russia, Lewis als

    He has indicated through an aide | the assassination of Persian Prime

    his willingness to appear before

    ; ‘ lenders working on the waterfront As 300 British and Canadian
    LONDON, April 13 GLASGOW, April 13 Pr s yho are in fe , itions im , ee
    i the Persian decision to nation- ‘ ” : ‘ @ 5 ie L4 r ne ’ ae m who are in favoured pos joné of fF priests and students in Roman
    be aang ag gy Ser- Sie the company’s oil. adntt et Cae oie tay _ The stolen Coronation Stone, the 336-pound slab ot| 0 Ship the B.G, Labour Union Execu-f colleges watched in silence, chiefs
    vices Committee made it certain] The Persian Government has! sential lighting, state rooms and sandstcne upon which Kings of England have been crowr.: (From Our Own Cortespondent) tive, of the Vatican ceremonial greeted |
    that the General would: have at '

    least a limited Congressiona’
    forum for his views.

    Republican Leaders in Con-
    gress have been insisting that the
    General should be askéd to

    address a joint Senate-House of) sein Ala who announced last night |york—West Indies “millionaires”

    Minister General Asmara Razmara

    blamed Communists for agitation ),yblic rooms deserted, and no pas-
    leading to the spreading strike and nae. . P

    the Abadan rioting.

    The Company’s representative | ¢ 2,500,000 Ocean Monarch (13,600
    in Teheran was today in touch|tons) latest bid by British ship-

    with Persian Prime Minister Hus-











    She is the Furness Withys

    owners to earn dollars on the New






    Woman Missing

    ed for centuries left here on Friday in police convoy for
    London. After two days of secrecy a large black cer crep!
    out of Glasgow police headauarters at dawn.

    Nee A oe Hi ead In front were three other cars,
    | 3 |
    _ IN OUR TOWN

    GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 13, ;
    Mrs, Harold Martin-Sperry |
    wife of the Netherlands Consul in
    British Guiana is reported lost at
    sea between Barbados and Trini-

    one on its own carrying plaip| gaq on Thursday morning while

    clothes detectives was apparently






















    of the court and behind him were

















    said there is a clique of money-§ yembers of the Royal Suite.

    the Royal visitors, These then
    joined the Royal procession, The
    Princess and the Duke were, intro-
    duced together into the library
    where the Pope in white silk
    robes sat silent with armchairs

    Avalanches Destroy
    Timber And Huts





    returning from a U.K, holiday BELGRADE, April! 13 placed ready for visitors,
    | Om a decoy . F Rem ne During th lienc »
    n, hat the situation was under con. 5 e ial with her husband aboard the During the audience the Pope ,
    Representatives session, ie: : a pleasure run, one of the most ; 4 @ These... elaborate .-precautions| } yg. Colombie. Arrivin 8 | Giant avalanches are pyrthing chee aahbecvigitar.ageiek tnndal. 4
    rol. ‘ lucrative in ‘the world. | You can even dig up’ the were’ taken because Scottish - & dewn the higher »motifitains 0 ehar'h GOctainuter GanvernA..
    3 Days Before Dispatch of troop reinforce-} “Eventually she goes also to St.|| road in Barbados for a six- Nationalists had threatened an} Geersetown to-day by plane her| Slovenia causing “enormous dam- tion, members of the Royal Suite
    ments to Abadan was reported last};awrence and New Foundland|| pence. Yesterday on Tudor en war if the stone was taken | 2usSband said he spent a pleasant | age", Belgrade Press reported to-{ (Ol mein itl vine ee
    ‘ ight ; : | Pp A open N evening aboard tt Col bi were presented to the Pope.
    Authoritative sources — stated/ "ght. . : ‘ and will assist the larger Queen| | Street a sixpence dropped back to London. Nationalists \ ening aboard the Colombie on | day. On thelt way, Gaek from: tha
    here today that Truman had , The Shah and his Cabinet acted | 9¢ Bermuda (22,000 tons) in New|} from one of the passengers admitted having organized its|Wednesday evening when he last} They had destroyed timber and] oi e.ce still in procession, the
    decided to dismiss General Bac )iastieasy to-day. They dismiss-|yor;-——Bermuda trade during the]! on one of the ‘buses of the || pemoval from beneath the Corona. |S&W her on retiring to her cabin }]mountain huts in Troiglav Julian} 200000" sha the Duke a oe
    Arthur five days before he issued! ed the Governor General of Khuz-! more popular seasons, when thou. National Motor Bus Com- || tien Chair in Westminster Abkcy |i% the night-time. On awaking on} where most damage was done. | ar with aay ris € where
    ®je actual order. istan province which includes the | sands of Americans like to spend|| pany. as BRAY Thursday his wife was missing.:No casualties are so far reported, | reeled with = ceatening cheers
    : Truman made up his mind|riot-torn oil town, Abadan, and | their holidays in the sunny Carib-|| It rolled a short distance ‘They claim the Stone belongs|The former Mary Dixon, her —Reuter. a edhe an and students
    when he read a_ statement by aevenal other Fatman St officials | bean. and then disappeared to Scotland and should stay there. | mother’s first cousin, was Charles hommes ee Reuter.
    Republican Leader Joseph W./and high naval and military off-| Below decks, the Ocean Mon.|| through one of the many’ | )Miss Wendy Wood, tartan kilted | Kingsley and also distant cousin Weaetree 9 PE eit etek ethtoets,
    Leet ce Apel D that Mex Arthur | 0888. eae yD . arch is like a series of elaborate | manholes that line the side || Witionalist’. Leader is going to|of Thomas Hardy, TRYGVE LIE SEES TIN PRICES DROP
    had written him on March 20,| The Cabinet's decision was tak-|fimsets. Her architects have cen-| | Of this strect.— London this week-end to campatgn 2 eet
    backing Martin’s demand that en at a special meeting as Persian |treq their plans on the spacious} | Inimediately about twelve for yunport a eee { MARSHAL TITO SINGAPORE, April 13.
    5 : ne sed armoured cars patroiled the {coun deck overlooking the swim-| | people went into action to riaerantioa \nneal dnicaied A . ; 7 i Tin prices reacting to General
    Chiang Kai Shek’s troops be u } ‘ recover the sixpence and in After police looked in va A oe Tr k BELGRADE, April 13 ,
    against Chinese Communists streets. ; _.) {ming pool. There is a handsomely) | oe ceo, Sa ahere there three months the stone appeared Poe ntina Lakes Trygve Lie, General Secretary |MacArthur’s dismissal, dropped
    gi : s : i. They also decided that Genet al “Coral Cafe’ which will be used a few seconds w nere there a erate P Fatt nied ah yev ab re) 3 el Marly here again tosday
    Martin told the House of Revle-| cy anbaki who has the reputation | 46°. «pj ht club”. In all public| | had been three | inanholes mysteriously on Wednesd Ov . of the United Nations today |Sharply 8 a
    sentatives that he had asked Mac} + «strong man” should leave Be nie ee ‘ ich pile a car.| | there were only “holes” in aro eo om ved to | et ie tat Dy er Cruisers poranied an, Marshal Tite at - —Reuter.
    Arthur’s views on the use of Teheran for Abadan to enforce s are 4 | the road. ationalists drove up with it to private villa in a Belgrade suburb, ates wine 2
    ; ‘ : : s antly upholstered arm. ; : | rot Abbe where he :
    Chinese Nationalist troops now 1"| ;,artial law regulations which are Dee, eS oitiat wail decova. | ‘The sixpence was finally pore Ae Soot Py ah a PAL siti 45 _ He met the Marshal for the first ATE
    Formosa. still in force in southern Persia | tiong ng manmifestit ' grand recovered and. taken to a eclaration of “ ap, naane n i fp ae April . time. TELL THE ADVOC |
    ~ : Seana | © . * ‘ She S. . . . i })} ence was signed in e rgentina 1as aken over n ‘ : 4 ‘
    Men Aaitiae, Sad” regites ‘ith though lifted in the capital. lounge extends from side to side eee ee a || They carried it to the High| United States li ght Cities Boise This morning Lie was received THE NEWS
    views and recommendations wit —Reuter 4 1 must have joined other coins & by M. Vlah th, wh jeputis DAY OR NIGHT
    i ‘tuati , ’ fof the ship. Here are two sculp- f sibl eater detiom- Altar, covered it with the blue|and Phoenix, famous ships in:the} 2”: Y ahovich, who is cleputis-
    pospptt, the eis ee cee tured figures of Prospero and Mir-| | fi one ited in celebrating | {cross flag of Scotland's Patron|last war. They were taken from Ke for Woretgn binister Roverd DIAL 3113
    R na’s entry into the anda from Shakespeare’s “Temp- ree int St. fad foe om Wa tic) Ft vadal ge : : ardelj on sick leave in Slovenia.
    i ; 7 F 8 the event. Saint, St. Andrewsanc left it with! the reserve fleet and were the fifth
    against us in Korea, have been est” first performed in 1611 and : psi £19; Re aemnty aati i —Reuter, @
    ‘ the ; ¢ : a “keep off” warning to the Eng-|and sixth to be sold to South a
    submited to | Amglo-Egypt Talks: |sugzeste by Six Gearse Somers, | ——-—————— lish. Pep) American countries.
    “1 SHIPWTh 9 oer be ae t 3razil bought Philadelphia oS
    “Generally these views are well 2 : x B ital C and Lonle and Chile the Brett ;
    : E 4 ; yn
    now aod any undarned | May Be A Failure | ATE | vritain Cuts | CZECH MISSION |i Xtsivite
    they ar ap ee Sk” one CAIRO, April 13. | INVESTIG. S E _ iy Argentina took over the 10,000
    of m A “ ae ‘i m 13-year sruisers in a brie
    maximum counter force as wel | The independent Caira ewe: | SMUGGLING teel Exports | LIQUIDATED _ jj 8 yer os crusers in a anes
    have never failed to do in the past.” paper sirmeantie 2 Anglo- : q Philadelphia naval base
    ‘ : 2 to) a “serious development” in Anglo ; re VIENNA, April 13. ua witdk ded '
    “Your view with Peers. eat Egyptian talks, BONN, April 13. es ae ,_ LONDON, April 18, The Czechoslovak military mis- lhe price was not disclosed, but
    utilisation of Chinese force: h As a result it said, talks were} Smuggling between East and Britain is to reduce exports of} i “Vienna has been liquida-|® Navy spokesman said it was
    Formosa is in conflict with aan no longer likely to be successful. West Germany estimated by steel, Supply Minister George)) 4 according to reports in the | ®bout 10 per cent of the $24,000,000
    logic nor tradition. “Here we fi ‘I It gave no details of the de-|Some experts to be four times Strauss announced today. Slitenna presa to-day. they cost to build.—Reuter,
    Europe’s war with arms, while ; .| the vaiue of legal trade, is being He told the Commons that sup- 9 en Fa taht ie
    diplomats there still fight it with velopment, but quoted a eR investigated by the All-German | plies to the domestic market would The Czechoslovak Legation here
    Pp .| sible Egyptian source as saying: pean > : ‘i . P declared it was not competent to " *
    words. If we lost the war ee “The tepuan side insists on|Affairs Committee of the Bun-|also be restricted because of the} -omment on these reports. I rench Will Close ;
    munlém in Asia, ate st it abrogation of the 1945 treaty or | destag viene cee PEFEROS BE OSCEIEENS, Newspaper stories said that ‘ i
    is inevitable and Se would| the evacuation of British troops} Committee Chairman, Herbert| Licensing control would be ex-|Colonel Odrich Krystof who wa: Czech Consulate REACH EV ERYWHERE I
    mare) Oy | “ye freedom , rom, Egypt. It will not shift on@] Wrener, Social Democrat who| tended to exports of semi-finished) head of the mission was recently dh
    avoid a war and preserv aie inch.” _ | lived in Russia for several years, 'steel and alloys of steel from next|recalled to Prague and arrested : PARIS, April 13,
    a rm ‘| British and Egyptian official)toiq a news conference ‘toaay Monday and all other types of steeljas he crossed the frontier into The French Government an
    R GETS circles would not comment OM|that North African, Dutch! from May 14, he added. British | Czechoslovakia, During the war | nounced _today that the Czecho
    MACARTHU the report. Swedish and Belgian firms were| steel production was likely to fall’ Colonel Krystof fought in Yugo-| slovak Consulate in Algiers an
    A NEW JOB —Reuter. involved in illegal interzonal| this year because of the difficulty ;slavia among partisans and before| the Masaryk Institute in Paris i
    FLORIDA, April 13, trade ef getting raw materials, he said. | the breach between Yugoslavia| would be closed as reprisal foi
    MIAMI, ay will. 4Ot sees S mal 5 7 and the Cominform, was a close|similar measures taken by th .
    1 Mac Arthur will join Reuter. —Reuter. i
    a f the typewriter firm left in 7 [friend of Marshal Tito. Czech Government against the
    ae Doan. aaa a assume an| Only 2 days to get Aa ea > a a _ a nn + —Reuter French Consulate in Bratislava,
    in i irs within 99 oca o .e7? 7 and the French Institute ir
    oo Re i stan dames Rand | the Advocate Year Book Civilian Wanted May Postpone | Prague,
    Gaye: seed here to-day —Reuter: | DOCTORS CONCERNED | Masaryk Institute is a cultural
    ennggne’ WASHINGTON, April 13. ott association mainly for Czechs in
    ng New York, Times suggested to- etirement OVER VANDENBERG || paris. r
    day that following the dismissal : The Czech Embassy in Paris re- 4
    M s d W men But of General MacArthur a — Ai aes NEW ee e GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan, mains open ag usual.—Reuter,
    rrie O High Commissioner should ap- erican press reports fro’ April 13 ey
    a pointed to the task of “continu-|Washington today said General






    Doctors said today



    “hh nf they felt
    ing Jap reconstruction”. Among | Omar Bradley, Chairman of the “inereasing concern” over Seriator | ¢s 3
    e ® the reasons for success of Mac-|Joint Chiefs of Staff, aged 58, dtchiae “Vanden ern, 66, who has ENEMIES OF PEACE
    Still S insters Arthur in Japan had been his | mig oot waked t0 Postpone His) meen seriously ill’ at his home BUDAPEST, April 13
    knowledge of the Orient and his| retire’ , y @ : nie 7 oad art
    Pp ability to devote all his attention |, He had planned to retire when ee —"S ublican Party’s iceer anaes hee ttae siieaaa
    and energy to Japanese recon-|his two-year period of office ex- | e is t va ar Expert EBACE oa am ae ae. entes
    1 : *) 46 struction between World War | Pires on August 16, but President leading Foreign a ae : = “es ee “9 sie Sets seg ai
    BONN, April 13. Two and the Korean war Truman is said to desire that he| He had a relapse recently after a}Roman Catholic Bishops )
    Y Hae i hy . nN ; continues for another term series of major operations, fused to sign a Communist peti-
    married women will ues a , ‘ f
    More than 4,000 West, Sarma All —Reuter, —Reuter. —Reuter. tion. —Reuter,
    soon be made spinsters again by a streke of the pen. se Ba anal ee aa ah a . a ue et ateT ac aa
    were “married” during the war to soldiers who had already n
    been killed in action. : ‘ tart, I C D C
    The Government has decided that these rere iwmana emen umoure n e e e
    c i “steel helmet marriages” are to be
    worth a at ns eee: Tamer tty = tee ped that “it would be for him a matter
    null and void. x (From Our Own Correspondent) ° ffi ce l ° of enduring regret — a Gace \y
    Under Nazi war _ legislation, Pretisa Argentine LONDON, April 13. Senior O 11a uits cessor Lord Reith heard | ese ‘
    women could “marry” dead et Mr. R. V. Cabel, senior Colonial charges in abs é é

    diers if they could prove that they
    were engaged to them or that the
    soldiers had intended to marry
    applicants.

    The women are to be allowed fo
    keep the names of their “hus-

    1

    |} pendent daily La Prensa accord-

    BUENOS AIRES, April 43,

    A new newspaper to be knowh
    as Prensa Argentine wil! soon be
    rolling off the press of the inde-

    ing to the English language Thr
    Standerd to-day. Commenting o1




    Development Corporation official,
    has resigned. He was Operations
    Controller for the Caribbean.
    Announcing this today, the
    C.D.C, spokesman said Cabel re-
    signed for health reasons. He
    jenied his resignation had any





    lowed them to go unanswered,”

    Cabel's resignation leaves an
    important gap in the Corporation's
    activities in the West Indies. He
    recently returned from a visit to
    the Caribbean and one of his chief
    concerns is understood to be the

    heard of these rumours, “but ‘as
    far as I know,” he went on, “they
    have no foundation”.

    Certain members of the Board
    of C.D.C. are said to be thinking
    of getting out because they con-

    next Wednesday, “Tf he will make
    a statement on resignations that
    are about to take place from the
    Board of C.D,C.”

    tumours were strengthened this
    week when Lord Trefgarne made









    , onnection with strong rumours Sider there is a good deal of mis- 4 personal statement in the House improvement in shipping services
    hands” but they will be deprived | La Prensa’s appropriation by tn’ | iat are circulating in London to management at the top. of Lords denying that he had between the United Kingdom and
    of all claims to widows’ pensions | Government, The Standard said he effect that a number of resig- An attempt to get to the bottom “acted in an arbitrary and high- the Southern Caribbean.
    or other aid, Children from such | “Our readers will _understanc ations from the Board of the of the rumours is to be made by handed manner” while he was He joined C.D.C, in November |
    marriages will receive al] benefits |when we say we come to bury oration are about to take Mr. F. Erroll, Conservative M.P. an of the Corporation 1949. Before that he was Financia! | |
    accorded to children of the war | La PreMsa, not to praise it for Altringham who is to ask the > ggestions that had riser to several Argentine Rail- cars ie ea i Soe ie ste :
    dead, —Reuter. } —Reuter. spokesrnan said he had Secretary of State for the Colonies been made to this effect and added Companies ha ANE IC A ARREST a SN AIRES ERS NS PERE REY EN EATER EO TEES OE ES






    ?





    <
    o

    M?; VICTOR CUNARD, Sir
    Edward's brother is off on
    a visit to Martinique to-day by
    B.W.1.A. via St. Lucia.

    En route

    EV. JOHN W. CLEMENT-
    SON is on his wav back to
    Montserrat from British Guiana.
    He will spend a week in Barbados
    staying at Codrington College
    before going on to Montserrat
    where he is stationed at the St.
    George’s Rectory. He is a Church

    of England minister.

    Continuing W.I. Holiday
    R. JOE SELLIER’S | sister,
    Jeanne, who had been spend-
    ing a short holiday in Barbados
    staying at the Hotel Royal checked
    Gui yesterday by B.W.I.A. for
    trinidad to continue her holiday
    in the West Indies. Miss Sellier
    lives in the U.S.; she is a nurse
    at the Roosevelt Hospital in New
    York.
    Back to Trinidad
    R. and MRS. FRANCIS CARY
    who have been in Barbados
    since April 4th, were among the
    passengers by BAW.1.A. for Trini-
    dad yesterday afternoon. They
    were staying at the Ocean View

    Hotel. . on the same plane
    went Mr. John Campbell,
    1.C.T.A. lecturer who had been

    here on a short visit.

    Nelson and the Navy
    AILORS from the Canadian
    shigs added a touch of colour
    to Bridgetown yesterday as they
    simply “swarmed” ashore. Each
    one had a camera. Most popular
    subjects they chose to photograph
    were the statue of Nelson and the

    Fountain Gardens.

    Avensa’s Traffic Manager
    R and Mrs. Rene Van den
    Branden and their youngest

    daughter Nicole have come over

    from Caracas for a brief stay,

    Their other two daughters Car-

    mencita and her sister used to go

    to school at the Ursuline Con+
    vent here. Mr. Van den Branden

    is Traffic Manager of Avensa
    Airlines in Caracas, They are
    guests at the Paradise Beach
    Club. vod

    The Churchili Trust
    ERE is news of a Scottish land
    deal. I quote from the
    Weekly Scotsman:

    “Acting on behalf of the Win-
    ston ChurchiJl Literary Trust, a
    London firm of estate agents are
    negotiating the purchase of more
    than two.thirds of the 7,000-acre
    Biel estate, East Lothian.

    “The estate is being sold to meet
    death duties, stated Vice-Admiral
    Basil C. B. Brooke, managing di-
    rector of the Biel and Dirleton
    Estates, Ltd.

    “*People are interested because
    they think that Winston Churchill
    has bought himself a house here.
    I do not think he is personally con.
    nected. No houses are involved;
    it is simply a block of farms.’ ”



    ADVENTURES



    BY THE

    AMARA wabad mul, mul Jimo.

    lak. So runs the Afghan prov-
    erb, the meaning of which eludes
    me. “The thud of her fall,” says a
    description of ballet, “seems to
    stop the music.”

    And well it might. When the
    Tavistock Tiger throws the Bill-
    erieay Butcher, does not the
    cot tee pits agp | 2 the bar
    stop playing “In onaster.
    Garden”? .

    The brimless bowler

    FTER a breakfast of dried

    Peruvian egg, Mr. Vincent
    Fumbling adjusted the brimless
    bowler in which he is to go to bed
    at 11.43 (Greenwich time) this
    morning. The judges examined
    the hat, and certified that there
    was no trace of a brim. There
    was a scuffle when a party of:
    young women carrying a banner
    bearing the words “Down With
    Vaccination!” tried to force their
    way into the yard where the test
    is to take place. Police took the
    names and telephone numbers of
    the two prettiest girls.

    Hoofbeat corner

    T F the Stewards of the Jockey
    Club (“Steward! A basin! A
    basin! Flashaway is feeling ill”)
    compel owners. of racehorses to
    tattoo their nags. I understand
    that romantic marks will be dis-
    couraged. A horse will not be
    allowed to have a heart pierced
    by an arrow tattooed on its chest,
    with the legend underneath: “I
    Love Gipsy Queen.” Ever since
    unlucky Simon turned out to be a
    camouflaged cow, and lost the
    Penzance Plate by 1,389 yards, the
    Stewards have had their eyes on
    a widow in Bruton-street, who
    does her “ringing” through a group
    of sailors living above an iron-
    monger’s shop in Suffolk-street.



    ARTIE’S HEADLINE

    “1 keep finding Communist
    leaflets in MY jar.’



    Welcome

    HE Y.M.C.A. have extended

    a welcome to the personnel of
    both the Canadian naval ships at
    present in Carlisle Bay offering
    them all of their facilities at their
    headquarters in Pinfold Street.
    Facilities include reading room,
    writing room, billiards, table ten-
    nis, draughts, dominoes etc., and
    sleeping accommodation up to 50
    men can be provided. They have
    also offered to give all information
    in connection with the islands
    many beauty spots.

    Flying Visit

    P from B.G. for a few days
    is Mrs. Lena Raleigh, She
    is staying with Mr. and Mrs.
    Jack Marson until Tuesday. Mrs,
    Marson is her niece. She told
    Carib that her brother and sister-
    in-law Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
    Psaila expev. to leave for England

    later this month on a holiday.
    On Tuesday Mrs. Raleigh will
    fly down to Trinidad to visit

    other relatives.

    U.K. Bound
    P bases pnd WILLS of Georgetown,
    B.G. is on her way to the
    U.K. But first she is spending
    two weeks in Barbados en route,
    staying at Dulce Domin, Fonta-

    belle.
    B.G. Boys
    AYMOND SHANKS and
    George Manly, two B.G.

    boys are in the Royal Canadian
    Navy. Raymond is stationed on
    board the H.M.C.S. Magnificent
    and George is with H.M.C.S.
    Miemac. They were granted
    special leave to visit their relatives
    in B.G. and yesterday they were
    on B.W.1.A’s B.G. flight as they
    come over to rejoin their ships
    George's parents Maj. and Mrs.
    PE anly were in Barbados
    a few months ago on holiday.

    WAY...

    Plastic Eggs
    Y appetite was whetted by a
    cutting sent to me which an-
    nounced Inflated Plastic Eggs. For
    a moment, I thought it was a quo-
    tation from this column, but I
    read on and discovered that they

    are already on sale in America.

    It is true that they are onl
    Easter eggs. However, the publi-
    city says that they are “pre-inflat-
    ed and electronically welded,”
    which is good news for progres-
    sive children. They are sold in
    paper bags, “with acetate win-
    dows.” The eggs are made of
    “Heavy gauge vinyl film.” Eng-
    land is still a long way behind

    America in these matters.

    An passing
    HE incident at the Shah’s
    wedding, when the train-

    bearers were almost unable to



    Carb Calling

    Mind the Doors!

    ONDONERS who believe it
    impossible for a tube train to
    move until all the automatic doors
    are shut are confounded by the
    experience of the man who was
    dragged into the tunnel at Charing
    Cross the other night with his foot
    caught in the sliding doors.

    Truth is ,a train can move even
    if every door is open. There is no
    automatic device to prevent it.
    It depends on the guard.

    When all the doors close, an
    eleetric contact is made and a
    light flashes in the guard’s com-
    partm “nt. He rings the bell, the
    driver starts the train.

    London Transport think the
    man at Charing Cross had a thin
    instep. Thus, although the doers
    were open at the bettom, they
    could be closed at the top, and the
    guard would have received the
    “all elear.”

    Nobody in the train used the
    ved-handled emergency stop.
    There is ome in every carriage.
    London Transport say no one has
    pulled it for more than a year.

    Project Put Off

    N Essex vicar, the Rev. Hugh
    Cuthbertson, was going to
    turn his home into a guest house

    this summer. He planned to put s

    people up at Tilty Vicarage, near
    Dunmow, for £5. 5s. a week.

    Now, his wife says, she and
    the vicar haye changed their
    minds, “We were going to. make
    structural alterations,’ she says,
    “but with labour difficulties, we
    decided to put it off this year.”

    The Cuthbertsons had ‘sent out
    a leaflet advertising their project.
    Their publicity was a little ahead
    of their achievement, it seems.
    _ If the plan ever does material-
    ise, they will need to print a new
    leaflet. The present one is headed:
    “Your Holiday 1951,” And it
    warns:

    Accommodation will be short
    during the Festival of Britain,

    R.A.F. Visitor



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Athletic Stimulus

    eter - WEST AFRICAN

    REVIEW this month, refer-
    ring to the visit to the Gold Coast

    of the two West Indian athl

    Arthur

    O” LEAVE in London last
    week was R.A.F. Sergeant

    Keith Blake of St, Mary’s Parish,
    Jamaica, He is attached to the
    R.A.F. Camp at Grimsby, Lin-
    colnshire. He joined the service
    in 1944 and says he hopes to be
    demobilised next year, Once
    back in “civvy street” he intends

    to become a sanitary inspector

    and has already started a corres-
    pondence course with a view to
    obtaining the Associa’ diploma
    of the Royal Sanitary Institute.

    Incidental Intelligence

    ore people sleep in the tops
    of their pyjamas, some in
    the bottoms. With taxes going up
    as they are they’ll soon be sleep -
    ink in the strings.”—U.S.
    TV comedian Arthur Godfrey.
    —L.E,S8.



    OF PIPA

    Copyright - P10 - Vas Dias int. Amiterdgam

    By Beachcombe~

    support the weight of the bride’s
    fabulous dress, recalls the corona-
    tion of Napoleon as Emperor.
    Josephine’s dress was so heavy
    that she could hardly walk. Her
    sisters-in-law, Elisa Caroline, and
    Pauline, loathed her. So, at a
    critical moment in Notre-Dame
    (aceording to Mme. de Rémusat,
    who was there), they brought
    Josephine to a full-stop by their
    deliberate clumsiness. Napoleon
    spoke to them sharply, and Jos-
    ephine was able to move again.
    Another account says that the
    amiable ladies dropped the train
    and that Josephine nearly fell
    backwards.
    Tail-piece

    The loss of 23 stone in one day
    by a Mrs, Ntnge is not so startling
    when one realises that it was

    potatoes.
    (Ministry of Diet).

    Junior Short Story Competition

    The Evening Advocate invites

    its Junior Short Story Competition.
    every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner w

    a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. ‘1
    can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more

    all children under 12 to en’
    The best story will be

    for
    dished
    ,eceive
    Stories
    an 306

    words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
    Co, Ltd., City not later than Wednesdaw every week.

    NOTE:

    Stories must not be copied,

    Send this coupon with your story.
    JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

    Stee teen eee er fee

    a Cotten Prints 36’
    a

    m Shirtings

    M@ wuite & coLtours

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    Wint and Me
    Bailey, says that their appear-
    ance will do much to stimulate
    the ambitious plans of the logal
    Sports Council for a stadium
    worthy of the rapidly
    interest, Mac and Arthur, who
    will be in West Africa by the
    time you read this,

    ago. has followed

    emergence of a first-class team in
    the inter-Colonial Championships.
    at Achimota, and the
    ful tour of
    last year by Gold Coast athletes,

    Sybil Atteck

    SYBIL ATTECK, whose exhi-
    bition of paintings opens at the
    Museum to-day (Saturday), is a
    member of a well known Port-
    of-Spain family, and a founder
    of the Trinidad Art Society. This,
    however is her first one-man ex-
    hibition here and her work is
    full of interest.

    In 1935, the artist spent a year
    in London studying sculpture a
    painting at t Steg

    chool of Art of t Gt



    Lon

    Polytechnic, In 1942, she visited
    Peru, where she studied painting
    under the South American painter
    Julia Cordicido and sculpture un-
    der professor Pro, at the Escuela
    de Belles Artes. Anxious to gain a
    fuller knowledge of the meaning
    and technique of art, Sybil Atteck
    gave up her post with the Agri-
    cultural Department, St. Clair, and
    went to Washington University.
    Here she studied for three years
    under the Canadian symbolist
    painter Philip Guston and the
    expressionist painter Max Beck-
    man, and obtained the degree of
    Bachelor of Fine Arts. An exhi-
    bition of her paintings was held
    at the Public , St. Louis,
    Missouri in 1947.

    Last year, Sybil Atteck spent
    three mc iths in England studying
    art on a British Council scholar-
    ship, and during her visit had
    one of her paintings exhibited at
    the Royal Institute of Painters in
    Oils, Piccadilly. She has also to
    her credit a large mural depict-
    ing the history of rum which was
    commissioned by the Fernandes
    arenes Trinidad, for its new

    ices.

    B.B.C. Radio
    Programme

    SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1951.
    6.30 am—t215 pom. .......... 19.60 M.

    —_—_— eee

    6.30 a.m, Forces Favourites, 7 aum. The
    News, 7.10 a.m, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.
    From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme
    Perade, 7.30 am. From the Third Pro-
    gramme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude, 8 a.m.
    Montmartre Players, 8.15 a.m, Composer
    of the Week, 8.30 a.m. Elton Hayes,
    8.45 a.m. Colonial Questions, 9 a.m, The
    News, 9.10 a.m. Home News from Britain,
    £.15. a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m, Pro-
    gramme Parade, 11.25 a.m. England vs,
    Scotland, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m.
    News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down.
    4156.00 Pom. 6. - 19.96 M.
    4.15 p.m, Listeners’ Choice, 5 p.m.
    Composer of the Week, 5,15 p.m. BBC
    Seottish Variety Orchestra, 6 p.m. Music
    .or Dancing.
    007.15 p.m.



    25.64 M. 31.32 M. 48.45 M



    6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m
    The News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15
    p.m, Behina the News.
    145—11,00 pom. .. 2.2...

    745 p.m, Sandy MacPherson at the
    Theatre Organ, 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
    8.15 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.30
    p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p.m. The News,
    10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15
    pm. Take it from Here, 10,45 pm. Yours
    Faithfully, 11 p.m. Southern Serenade
    Orchestra.

    ©.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

    SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1951.
    1010.15 p.m. News and Canadians.

    3L.32 M. 48.43 M.



    10.15—10,30 p.m. Neighbourky News.
    11,76 Me 25.51 M.
    CROSSWORD

    eo



    1 Grain goes cre

    0 Or @ change, (9
    0. Fuel, 8 ff Nothing? (3) rt
    2. Used by angler: ur footbatiers 16:
    3 st about foo (5)
    ; e (6)
    ¥
    0
    2

    A symbol of stubbeurnness (4)
    Is tt a blue river? (4)

    You
    (7)
    Containers

    may be trans;

    (a)

    rted oy it,
    Dilfter ? (5)

    Whatever msden moo
    f
    You will have bdo this artar *
    bww out of 22 Across
    yen Bg as ae 16)
    e se w
    > de otficers

    untidy (4)
    ure, ¢ ‘ indian soldier, (4)
    Take this measure trom leve:

    jand only. (4)

    Phe year doetor 1s buring

    Thess Ups to the mudisc.
    res caugh

    “eturming tide (3) he

    Not so wet. surely (5)

    Hang backwards (3)

    ; -. Of yesterday s purate

    (6)
    (6)
    the

    =~ Oe @O9 #6 Kr

    eo ee

    Across
    9. North 65 Anthem. +. Co
    ar tchggrins 3 st
    en; 16 Sees ‘is “pales id: Orme



    oon: 21 Warsi fa, tithe
    Eneores: 3, Atire. 4 Soa 45 ‘ant

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    (1938) LTD.

    onsen








    Britain undertaken

    SATURDAY, APRIL 14,



    chief, giving news to-day

    By JAMES STUART

    The man who taught the King
    to fly stubbed his cigarette-end
    into the on his desk. He
    pointed to the bookcase, where
    there were half a dozen ashtrays
    all surmounted by modern
    types of airplanes. “We have
    deposited them in the bookcase
    as being out of date,” he
    chuckled,

    For, rising vertically from the
    centre of the one now in use was,
    in beautifully turned bronze, a

    1 of a rocket projectile.

    It wag a symbol of his office
    Air Chief Marshal Sir Alec
    Coryton, DFC, is Chief Execu-
    tive, Guided Weapons, at the
    Ministry of Supp'y.

    In his room seven floors up
    above the river at Millbank
    today, he told me of some of the
    work that is going on 12,000 miles
    away in the South Australian
    scrub country that will make any
    new Battle of Britain a very dif-
    ferent affair from the summer

    days of 1940,
    1,200 Miles Range
    Coryton just
    & visit to oy an rocket testing

    north of Adelaide, where, tar
    away from prying eyes the work

    of testing both defensive and
    offensive rocket projectiles _ is
    progressing.

    “There is room there for ex-
    pansion,” he said, “There is a
    range of about 1200 miles over-
    land, and that is plenty to start
    with. j

    “Out there the rainfall is only
    about 5jin. or 6 in. a year, There
    is good weather for 360 days of
    the year, so there is no fear of
    the experimental work _ being
    held up through weather.”

    Woomera—named after the
    Aborigines’ word for launching
    a boomerang—has been built
    into a substantial village with








    his way home very sadly and care-
    fully and puts his purchases on the
    table. Mrs. Bear looks grave when
    she sees the broken eggs. ** It war

    all my fault."’ says the little bear.
    “Tf [ hadn’t turned to laugh at

    TO-DAY R.K.O,

    4.45 ard 8.30 p.m,

    and Continuing
    Daily

    LEON ERROL in

    Also:
    SPECIAL TO-DAY 9.30 a.m,
    The CISCO KID in

    “SOUTH OF THE RIO GRANDE”
    with DUNCAN RENALDO











    PLAZA DIAL
    OISTIN rrow 5 and

    8.20 p.m, R.K.O's
    “BLOOD ON THE MOON"
    Robert MITCHUM and
    Barbara Bel GEDDES
    IT’S ACTION ALL-THE-WAY!
    ——
    Midnite TONITE (Monogram)
    Boris KARLOFF as Mr. Wong in
    “MR. WONG IN CHINATOWN”
    and CISCO KID in
    RIDING the CALIFORNIA

    TRAIL
    with GILBERT ROLAND

    The most Beautiful Night

    Nozzles

    Rupert and the Ice-flower—5

    PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

    RADIO'S SUSPENSE THRILLER!
    Robert
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    ‘““WHERE DANGER LIVES”

    and 1,30 p.m,




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    THE ROCKET MAN
    Scraps His Ash-trays

    Reason? They’re out of date, said the Guided Missiles

    of the developments that

    are providing Britain with new weapons.

    prefab. houses, church, hospital,
    shops, school and two airfields.

    Eighteen miles away from the
    village is a radar station for
    tracking the guided weapons as
    they are tested,

    More than three hundred
    miles away in a former muni-
    tions factory, is the base where
    the Australians are building up
    all the supperting acfivities—
    electronics, rocket propulsion
    and aerodynamics, This base is
    headed by Mr. H. C. Pritchard
    40-year-old Oxford Double Blue

    What are the prospects for
    British industry?

    “There are various schemes
    afoot, One British aircraft firm
    have already started out there.”
    Sir Alec said. aad

    How are we doing on rockets?
    Sir Alec was careful to give no
    secrets away. “In relation to the
    total effort that has been put into
    guided weapons, progress » has
    been satisfactory,” he said.

    Fifty-six years old Coryton,
    tall and slim, with hair that is
    going white, usually prefers to
    wear a lounge suit with a white
    stiff collar

    His ‘Old Crock’

    An old Etonian, he joined the
    Rifle Brigade after leaving Cam-
    bridge during the 1914-18 war
    transferring to the Royal Flying
    Corps in 1917. Two years after

    he became an airman he was the
    King’s flying instructor at
    Cranwell,

    What does the man who is in
    charge of all Britain’s supersonic
    “rocketry” do in bis spare time?
    He loves engineering, and has his
    own pfrfvate workshop, Another
    of his joys is an “old crock” car.
    “IT did 160 miles in it the other
    day at an average of 24 m.p.h.”
    he said.

    WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
    —L.ES.










    SARS Te
    SS ROS A |
    RSIS

    He ey WA ||








    n Cy), ei
    A itt a

    tr Algy | saouldn’t have tum-
    Pied.” ** Well, 1? oe you've
    blamed yourself and 1 else,”
    sighs his mother, ‘* and

    scold you, but the roads are too
    slippery for your boots, You'd
    better stay in,"’ So Rupert watches
    the weather from another window.





    Faith
    UM DOMERGUE

    Claude
    RAINS in

    “WEDTIME STORIES”

    (Monogram Double)
    Ro!

    land WINTERS as
    Charlie Chan in
    “THE GOLDEN EYE”

    GAIETY
    (THE GARDEN) St. James

    To-day to Sunday 8.30 p.m.
    Mat. Sunday 5 p.m.

    James CAGNEY in (Warner's)
    “ST. LOUIS KID” and

    Humphrey BOGART in
    “CHAIN LIGHTNING”
    Midnite TONITE (R.K.0,)
    Tim HOLT in (Both)

    “GUN SMUGGLERS” &
    “UNDER PHE TONTO RIM”

    eae eee nate







    &







    To-night

    visit

    Club from Miami to Rio

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    Joan CAULFIELD with
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    ROXY

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    4.30 and 8.15

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    ==










    :
    }
    i
    '
    :
    ~

    SATURDAY, APRIL 14,

    1951





    ccc 4 tenement eee

    Knowledge Of Land
    Grows By Exchange

    By Dr. DOUGLAS ENSMINGER

    ‘Americans are exchanging visits by , in greatly expanded
    the thousand with people of other lands | 4gricultural improvement
    From FOREIGN AGEICULTI KY

    programme of

    THE exchange of agricultural knowledge through the
    exchange of people is growing. From July 1950 until July
    1951, more than 3,000 agricultural leaders from 77 friendly
    countries will have visited the United States to learn about
    American agriculture. Conversely, American farm leaders,
    farmers, and agricultural scientists and students by the

    thousands are seeking to bro

    visiting other lands.

    This first-hand
    the ways of life in other ecoun-
    trigs on such a large scale is
    something new to history, It
    reflects educational policies that
    should contribute substantially to
    greater cooperation and trust
    among the participating nations.

    Recently the U.S. Department
    ef Agriculture received a letter of
    thanks from a German forester
    who had been studying the fores-
    try methods of the United States.
    It is typical of the many that are
    reeeived from _ visitors from
    other lands. It said, in part: “1
    started this year my trip with a
    little suspicion. After a lost war
    and all the bad things made by
    the Nazi regime, I could under-
    stand if your people would be a
    little ma@ on the German visi-
    tors. But it happened only
    contrary. All the American peo-
    ple I met were very kindly, and
    I felt myself never an foreign
    guest. Sometimes it happened I
    met old soldiers—we fought
    against each other in the last war;
    today we made nice parties,
    Only a crazy politick started this
    war. You have a real freedom
    here and I hope all the other
    world may get it too.”

    U.S. Leadership

    The vast populations of
    world are pressing today
    improved living conditions,
    enly ‘proper that the United
    States should aid their agricul-
    tural leaders in their quest for
    ways and means of making their

    observing of

    the
    for
    It is

    agricultural resources’ provide the world-wide exchange of Hospital but died shortly after en-
    higher and more secure levels of prurighes 3 and to give guid- . the gate and before being
    living. The way to early and ®nce to it. : . 4, admitted to the ward. The truck
    lasting unproestient must of ,Other international activities was Jaden with sugar being con-
    necessity come through an im. 2!so are adding to the exchange. veyed from Montpelier Factory
    yrovement of their agricultural The U.S. Economie Cooperation to’ st, John’s, Steel band “Red
    ‘echniques. Administration, for example. Army” from Greenbay played in
    during 1951 is sponsoring the ~bbott's funeral procession
    The United states is in a visit to the United States. of
    fortunate position to give some 1,400 agricultural leaders

    leadership to this venture. It
    is a progressive nation whose
    very foundation stones were
    laid through an exchange of
    Knowledge. When the Pilgrim
    Fathers landed on this new
    continent, they had _ brought
    with them some seeds, a few
    implements, and the farming
    knowledge of the Old World.
    In order to survive they had to
    add to their competence by
    adopting the crops and many of

    means of applying these answers.
    high
    American standard of living and
    American
    marketing
    methods are the products of this

    In no smali measure the

    the advancement in
    preduction and

    joint federal-state activity.

    Public Law 535

    The broadening of the domes-
    agriculture in-
    world proportions
    accompaniment of
    re-

    tie exchange of
    formation to
    is a natural

    the expanding international
    sponsibilities of the

    States. The activity has
    rapidly in the decade

    US. Congress passed the
    legislation to facilitate
    Initially, the legislation was

    concerned with
    ideas with Central
    America,

    and

    aden their knowledge by

    South 5!
    The first law called for tion Me
    the 8® exchange of information and School, Trinidad, where she stud-
    students with the other American ied
    republics, and later was expand- 8Â¥ and physics, she entered Lon-



    POCKET CARTOON |
    by OSBERT LANCASTER



    (Ie that the Director of
    Recruiting, Admiralty? A
    rather interesting point has
    just arisen—”’

    Gets M.D.

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    ST. GEORGE'S April 11.

    Mrs. Hilda Gibbs Bynoe, daugh-
    United tet of Mr. Joseph Gibbs, retired
    grown Head. Teacher of the Crochu R.
    since -
    cae oo Gibbs, has qualified in Medicine
    it, at London University.
    ; A former pupil of the St. Jos-
    interchanging @Ph’s Convent High School where
    Matricula-
    High

    School and the late Mrs.

    she took her London

    and later Bishop's

    ed when money was appropriated ¢on University on a C.D. & W.
    to the U.S. Department of State Scholarship in 1945.

    for awarding training grants to
    American

    Central and South

    In 1948 she was married to Mr.
    Peter Bynoe, a Trinidad student

    technicians and leaders for study Of architecture in England.

    in the United States.

    Legislation making
    change
    was passed in
    increasing number of
    from other areas visited the
    United States to study many
    phases of agriculture. Then in
    June 1950 Public Law 535, an
    “Act for International Deyelop-
    ment,” was passed. Under this
    new romt Four
    is possible to further

    1948,

    expand

    from the Marshall Plan countries

    To direct this world exchange,
    the American land-grant colleges
    and universities and the s.
    Department of Agriculture have
    created a Joint Committee of
    Technical Services to Foreign
    Areas. One of the Committee's
    important decisions is that the
    state institutions and the Depart-
    ment of Agriculture must accept
    the leadership in this exchange
    of agricultural knowledge as a

    the methods of the American major and highly important pro-

    Indians. Thereby they set in

    motion an exchange of agricul- The

    tural abilities between the Old
    World and the New that
    through the decades has .con-

    gramme for the next generation.
    sincere feeling has been
    expressed that through _this
    accelerated exchange of agricul-
    tural. knowledge the free people

    i and zathered of the world may gain new hope,
    Denuantiy ‘ improve their level of living, and
    For many years. the U.S. more actively engage in the
    Department of Agriculture and business of helping demoeracy to
    the land-grant colleges and spread to other lands throughout




    universities have been Americé
    principal storehouses .and distri-

    § the world.



    the ex-
    programme world-wide
    and an
    people

    programme it



    Death From “Hop”

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    ANTIGUA.
    In attempting to hop on toa
    truck last Monday Carton Abbott,
    a labourer of Greenbay, was fa-
    tally wounded when he fell from
    the moving vehicle and the
    wheels ran over his body. He
    Was rushed off to the Holberton



    Factories Change To Syrup

    Some of the local tactories have
    stopped making sugar for the
    time being and are making syrup.
    Because of this many labourérs
    are out of work.

    A planter told the Advocate
    yesterday that the factories have
    turned over to making syrup to
    fulfil orders from Canada.

    So far this month 9,042 tons of
    erystal sugar were shipped to
    the U.K., 3,100 tons to Canada
    and 52 to Dominica.

    White Crystal Sugar shipped
    to the U.K. this year amounted to
    1,050 tons while 70 tons were
    sent to Dominica.

    Faney molasses shipped is as
    follows: 302,384 gallons to
    Canada, 3,896 gallons to the
    U.S.A., and 102 gallons to Mont-
    serrat. Vacuum Pan Molasses:
    236,926 gallons to the U.K.









    preliminary chemistry, biolo-

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE





    $250,000 For
    Red Regime

    BERLIN,
    Germany's former Imperial
    family has donated, indirectly,
    nearly a‘ quarter million dollars
    to the Soviet Zone Communist
    regime.
    The puppet government § an.
    nouneed that salvage in the
    recently demolished Kaiser's
    palace in East Berlin yielded

    4,500,000 East marks ($225,000) in
    “historic and artistic treasures,”
    Ihcluded in this trove were 900
    pounds of 18th century silver-
    ware found in one of the base-

    ment vaults, the government
    reported,
    The palace, one of Berlin's

    most famous landmarks, has been
    torn down to clear space for a
    vast Communist “Red Square”
    for official demonstrations and
    parades.—I.N.S.



    Club Makes London
    Less Lonely

    LONDON, April 12.

    At the All-Nations Social Club,
    2.000 members meet every night to
    shatter the loneliness of people
    stranded in London. But as some
    of the loneliest people in London
    are Londoners, scores of local
    young men and women turn up
    alter shop, office and store hours
    to greet visitors from all parts of
    the world.

    Viscount Stansgate, remarking
    oa the extraordinary mixture of
    races there last night in honour of
    Indonesian Ambassador Dr, Su-
    bandrio, said: “This is a model of
    what the world could be and ought
    to be, if only people were intelli.
    gent,”

    Leslie Blanckenhee, who found-
    ed the club just over three years
    ago, is a manufacturing jeweller
    by trade. The club, which meets
    in the huge basement of the An-
    glican Church in Marble Arch, ‘is
    his almost full time hobby.

    More than 100 West Indians go
    there for games and table tennis;
    Membership costs about two pence
    a night.

    “I started this club” Blancken.
    hee told Reuter, ‘because I was al-
    ways coming up against the prob-
    lem of loneliness, and wanted to
    do something about it. The
    trouble in London for strangers
    is that they cannot join a club
    until they have found someone to
    propose them. As very often they
    cannot do this, they cannot join
    and don’t star{ meeting people as
    they should.—Reuter,



    Senior Short Story Competition

    The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school~girts
    between the ages of 12-19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-
    Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
    n length and must reach the Short Story Editor,
    Jity not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
    will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
    eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6,

    Send this coupon with your story.

    SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

    tition.

    NAGE... esaccaens





    HOME -

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    Labour Notes







    The International Confedera
    bi of Fre: Trade Unions i
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    in Asia. ICFTU has been joined by
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    India, Malaya, Hong Kong, For-
    mosa, Korea, and Japan. According
    to ICPTU officials, these unions
    have an aggregate membership
    about three times greater than that
    of Communist controlled labour
    gvoups in Asia, ¢

    A.F.L. DISPLAY

    A series of displays depicting
    the formation and growth of the
    American Federation of Labour
    (AFL) will highlight the AFL
    Union Industries Show in Chicago
    in May. Officials of the AFL say
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    FABRICS

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    vices to the American people. ” / professional perfection to every-



    PAGE THREE

    Blood Pressure
    Kills Men & Women

    Twice as many women as men suf-
    fer from High Bieod Pressure, which
    is a mysterious disease that starts
    about the time of Change of Life and
    is the real cause of much trouble
    and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
    mon symptoms of High Blood Pres-
    sure are: Nervousness, headaches at
    top and back of head and above eyes,
    aressure in head, dizziness, short

    reath, paing in heart, patpitation,
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    delay treatment a single day, because
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    thing you make, Day-dresses, °“

    LABOUR LEADERS HELP Niece, Givtdag ieee, nd DOBIE'S

    American labour leaders are ee it will be th mesa ahs .
    helping to advise President Tru- ee s vag - all wi the FOUR SQUARE
    man on U.S. foreign eeonomic envy of your friends. ie . ade
    policy. Jacob S$ Potofaky, vice oy YELLOW & PURPLE
    President of the Congress of In- TOBACCO
    dustrial Organizations; Lewis G.
    Himes, special representative of the em . 202 & 402 Tins
    American Federation of Labour g¥ yre
    and three other union officials est co” ee
    were included on the 17-man In- e
    ternational Development Advisory e ce | is C. CARLTON BROWNE
    Board appointed by the President ce

    to study U.S. economic aid to
    underdeveloped countries.

    ADDRESSES
    JAP WORKERS

    Mrs, Gladys Dickason, vice Pres-
    ident of the Amalgamated Cloth-
    ing Workers of America, recently
    addressed the opening session of
    the general council of Japanese
    labour unions in Tokyo, The group,
    which represents 3,200,000 work-
    ers, indorsed the action taken by
    the United Nations against the
    communist aggressors in Korea,

    FORTUNATE NINE
    The United States was one of
    nine countries in which unemploy-
    nrent was lower at the end of 1950
    than at the close of 1949, accord-
    ing to statistics gathered by the
    International Labour Office. Other
    countries showing a decrease in
    unemployment in this period were
    Canada, Hawaii, the United King-
    dom, Ireland, Finland, Switzer-

    land, Tsrael and South Africa.







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    butors of agricultural knowledge.
    Traditionally, farm families have
    taken their problems in farming
    and homemaking to them for
    solution. The Department olf
    Agriculture and the state institu-
    tions in turn have sought the
    answer to these problems in their a
    research laboratories, in field tribesmen involved in an inter-
    testing plots, and through 4 tribal feud to three years hard
    continuous examination and sift- jabour and six strokes of the lasn
    ing of experience throughout the each, Twenty-three people were
    world. Meanwhile the coopera- killed in the rioting.

    tive agricultural extension work- The 27 were among 190 charged
    ers have been active in taking after a tribal battle last, October.
    the answers so found back to A fight arose from a_ 100-year-
    American farm families and in olq feud over the chieftainship.
    helping to work out ways and —(C.P.)

    27 Sent To Gaol
    After Tribal Feud

    UMTATSA, April 13.
    judge sentenced 27 African




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    are definitely effecting large savings by attending this CLEARANCE
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    TENNIS DRESSES. SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS

    A fine assortment in sizes and colours, Most of these items were regularly
    Sale Price _ $4.98

    sold up to $8.50 dene ieee
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    LADIES’ ART SILK STOCKINGS
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    LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS
    2 of these fine Towels with a Glass Tumbler
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    LADIES’ BETTER DRESSES

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    LADIES’ PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK

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    LADIES’ SKIRTS AND BLOUSES ,

    Jersey material Blouses, Printed Cotton Skirts Specially reduced for qf
    this Sale $0 co daccsa oA

    IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS
    For ladies and children in white and many other useful colours. Many {] i
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    MEN’S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS
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    °


    ~

    PAGE FOUR â„¢

    [ee ees |

    Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.



    Saturday, April 14, 1951



    TRAINING

    THE sending of two members of the
    Civil Service attached to the Government
    Savings Bank for training in British Guiana
    where there is a system of mechanical
    accounting is a step which will be wel-
    comed not merely by members of the Ser-
    vice but by the general public.

    Nor is this the first instance of local offi-
    cers being given training in other colonies.
    There is at present an officer studying
    modern statistical methods in Kingston.

    The system of training members of the
    Civil Service outside Barbados has long
    been recommended and the advice given
    is apparently now being taken.

    At its last meeting the Civil Service
    Association made it plain to His Excellency
    the Governor that there was dissatisfac-
    tion because of lack of opportunity given to
    local candidates for higher grade posts;
    and this newspaper has on more than one
    occasion pointed out that the only remedy
    was to utilise the $25,000 voted by the Leg-
    islature in. giving officers of various de-
    partments opportunities for training out-
    side the island.

    His Excellency gave the Association an
    undertaking that something would be done
    to have the scheme working and it is pre¢?
    sumably due to his interest in the matter
    that there has been no delay. It is bound
    to be of great benefit to the Civil Service
    and the public generally.

    BYE-ELECTION

    THE St. Andrew bye-election caused by
    the death of Mr. D. A. Foster of the Bar-
    bados Labour Party will be concluded with
    the polling on Monday.

    The keenest interest is being taken in the
    contest between the two candidates repre-
    senting the only two political parties com-
    peting.

    Mr. Haynes is the candidate of the Elec-
    tors’ Association and Mr. Worrell is the
    candidate of the Barbados Labour Party.

    The election will be based on the old
    electoral roll with its low income qualifica-
    tion of £20 per annum. On the same vot-
    ing qualification in 1948 a candidate of the
    Labour Party was elected. Ifa greater
    number of votes in favour of the candidate
    of the Electors’ Association is obtained it
    will conclusively prove that the voters of
    St. Andrew are no longer’ supporting
    Labour,

    The loss of the seat by the Labour Party
    will reduce their numbers to the low level
    of 11 in a House of 24, A gain by the Elec-
    tors’ Association will increase their num-
    bers from 9 to 10. In either event “party”
    government by majority is hardly possible.



    WAY OF LIFE

    WHAT has America‘to offer the world?
    Is there an American Way of Life ? Russell
    Davenport, writing in Life recently sums
    up likes this :

    “It is wrong, at the present stage of the
    U.S.’s evolution to expect some great ‘cul-
    tural’ development in America, equivalent
    to the culture of Europe that extends back
    for twenty or twenty-five creative cen-
    turies. The intellectuals who castigate
    Americans on this score miss the point.
    In the first place, they overlook the fact
    that there is a great activity in the creative
    arts throughout the country, especially at
    the community level; and second they too
    easily forget that American culture is of
    necessity a popular culture, and hence in-
    herently different from that which we
    inherit from Europe. Yet even after these
    modifications have been made, the fact
    remains that high culture is not what
    Americans have primarily to give. The
    big American contribution to Western
    civilization has to do, rather, with certain
    qualities of the heart deriving from demo-
    cratic ideals.”

    “Everything in America,’ Mr, Daven-
    port claims, “be it national, regional, sub-
    regional or local, comes back somehow to
    the individual. And the American can
    live his life on two planes at once in such
    a strenuous way precisely because he
    recognizes that the human individual may
    have — must have — ideals. That is the
    inner secret of the Amer‘can way of life.
    It is a way of life to permit and encourage
    the development of the human individual,
    by his own free will, toward his own
    ideals.”

    It is the U.S. ideal of equality, however,
    which “next to their belief in the ‘natural
    rights of the individual, is the most valu-
    able contribution that Americans have to
    offer the world.”







































    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    &) nour Overseas Visitors And

    Siudenits In Britain
    ....And He Dreams On

    LONDON.

    You would not imagine after a
    first look at Addiscombe Grove
    (Croydon, near London) that it
    was the birthplace of an experi-
    ment of world significance, one
    which in eleven years has proved
    that men of all races, given a
    chance, CAN live together as
    brothers.

    Addiscombe Grove has no out-
    standing town-planning devices
    or architectural wonders about
    it. It looks like any other resi-
    dential street in an old-estab-
    lished saiellite town. Yellow—
    bricked, grey-—slated, mid—Victo—
    rian villas, whose bay windows
    are discreetly draped with Not-
    tingham lace and chintz, stand
    on parade each side of it.

    But 416 of the 28 villas in the
    Grove house represent a pro-
    gressive ideal. They form part
    of the International Club — a
    home from home — for overseas
    students and visitors of 50 nations
    who live there as friends and
    equals.

    With them live 200 British —
    mostly professional and business
    men With their. wives and chil-
    dren. Basic aim of the Club is
    that overseas residents shall live
    in an atmosphere as close as pos-
    sible to that of a normal English
    home.

    Opened in one house with eight
    European students, the Club has
    expanded in thirteen years to 38
    houses — all of them situated
    within a few yards of the Head-
    quarters in the Grove. Five
    hundred students live there now.
    More than 12,000 who passed
    under its old-fashioned wooden
    porticos have returned to India,
    Burma, Africa, China, the West
    Indies and a dozen other places.

    Some have gone back to be-
    come leading figures in ado
    lescent democracies. From what
    present overseas students at the
    Club tell me, if is clear that prac—
    tically all return well-disposed
    towards Britain and grateful for
    being given a home and a warm
    welcome.

    Unhappily, it had not always
    been like that. Before this Club
    came into being the most that
    many coloured students could
    expect was to be segregated like
    animals in a gloomy hostel.
    They returned home disillusioned

    Anyone so ill-advised as to
    write about. women is bound,
    sooner or later, to find himself
    faced with having to write. about
    men. ‘The reason for this is be.
    cause it is only fair that the read~
    ing public should be given the
    low-down about men also, And
    because, unless they were, many
    men might be misled into getting
    an entirely wrong impression
    about the relative virtues of the
    two sexes,

    I mention men only as being
    likely to be: misled, because it
    would be a pretty dumb woman
    who does not already know more
    about men than any article by a
    man could tell her, The truth is
    that men like to be known as the
    sterner sex. They therefore hide
    the weakness of their velvet hands
    in iron gloves and get away with
    it, The reason they get away with
    it is because, as women do not
    like to be considered the sterner
    sex, they hide their dear little iron
    hands under the softest of velvet
    gloves, thus helping to keep up the
    illusion, And what is more im-

    | portant they do in a way that

    leaves a man in the happy belief
    that his achievement of this
    masterly distinction is entirely
    due to his own masculine efforts.

    The average man is far too
    modest to write about himself.
    The reason for this is that if he
    did write what he honestly be-
    lieves to be the truth about him-
    self, it would be extremely diffi-
    cult for him to avoid creating the
    impression of being a_ braggart.
    Another reason is that it is diffi-
    cult for any average man to be-
    lieve that he is merely an average
    man,

    Few men can, however, resist
    reading anything written’ about
    themselves. And the reason they
    can’t is because if it is complimen-
    tary, he has the satisfaction of
    knowing that the writer has only
    erred on the side of understate-
    ment, On the other hand, if it is
    uncomplimentary, it gives him a

    Emigration

    To The Editor, The Advocate—

    SIR—It is the established
    practice of the Barbados Tabour
    Party to claim responsibility for
    certain beneficial results to the
    Community, that neither its ac-
    tivities nor policy did anything
    to bring about.

    We have heard them claim that
    their party is wholly responsible
    for the economic improvement in
    the Island during the last ten
    years. They never mention that
    the cane harvest is three times the
    tonnage that it was in former
    decades; that sugar is six times
    the price. They claim responsi-
    bility for development and welfare
    projects. They never mention
    that Colonial Development and
    Welfare Act was passed by a
    Conservative Parliament before
    the Barbados Labour Party was
    born, They claim their leaders
    got the latest increase in Sugar
    prices, when in truth and fact
    they came into the picture only
    after every other Labour Party in
    the British Caribbean had sup-
    ported from the beginning their
    respective Sugar producers’ dele-
    gation to London. They claim that
    their efforts brought emigration to
    the U.S. in 1944, when the reading
    public knows their leader spoke
    against it, They claim to have
    made Barbados the most progres-
    sive Colony in the British Empire.
    Only they know how this miracle
    was accomplished in the last ten
    years. We know that if it is true
    that Barbados is the most progres-
    sive Colony in the Empire, it is
    on unconscious-.tribute..to . the

    4

    By £.B. TIMOTHY

    and, often,
    embittered .

    Terence John Driscoll, an
    English engineer, born at West-
    minster 39 years ago, began the
    Club in-1938. He then bought
    the first house after receiving a
    legacy of £1,000.

    Today the Club is valued at
    £150,000, with an annual turnover
    at £60,000.

    The house he bought originally
    is one of four which now com-
    prise what is called the Club
    centre. It has 16 dining and
    common rooms, and here the
    students — some of whom stay
    for three. years — eat together,
    talk, attend lectures and discuss-
    iens, play games, dance; listen to
    the radio, watch ‘television (which
    is very popular), or just relax
    and read. Studying is done in
    the solitude of the living quar-
    ters. Every resident has his own
    room the charge for which, with
    meals, is £3 a week.

    politically hostile and

    Every week, visits are arranged
    to cultural centres, such as Strat-
    ford-on-Avon (the birthplace of
    Shakespeare); to factories, coal-
    mines, theatres and other cen-
    tres which depict various aspects
    of the British way of life.

    At the International Club no
    one bothers to lock his door, The
    Club has no crime record; nor
    has there ever been a_ serious
    quarrel between residents, On
    the other hand, there have been

    93 marriages, of which only one
    was “mixed,”

    Driscoll, in stature, is in inverse
    ratio to his ideals and aims, He
    is short, stocky, _ prematurely
    bald, has a square, jutting chin.
    The lines of his face are softened
    by a slight plumpness — and a
    small smile. He wears his ties
    gay and his carefully manicured
    fingernails long.

    His success, the overseas resi-
    dents say, is ‘due to a rare com-
    bination — ideals and the ability
    to put them into practice. He

    works 14 hours a day, most of
    the time in his shirt sleeves. He

    knows everyone of the 500 resi-
    dents by their first names and
    they call him “Terry

    The idea of the Club first came
    to him when, as a traveller for
    an engineering firm he became



    appalled at the mistrust between
    nations.

    A few days‘ after being left
    the legacy, he was_ strolling
    through the Grove with a Chinese
    officer when he ‘saw a “For Sale”
    notice. Three days later, he had
    bought the Club’s first house and
    abandoned his engineering career.

    Almost every day, “Terry” is
    called upon to perform some
    minor miracle in the way of find-
    ing accommodation for overseas
    visitors and students. He was
    nonplussed one day, however,
    when the Colonial Office asked
    him if he could find rooms for
    750 Maltese.

    On one occasion a batch of 120
    students from India and Pakistan
    arrived at short notice and there
    was nothing to do but put them
    in a marquee on the back lawn.
    An Indian official who visited
    the Club late that night leoked
    into the ma ec in wonder—
    ment. “Amazing,” he said to
    Terence Driscoll. “At home
    they wouldn’t even live in the
    same town, and here you've got
    them ‘sléeping im the same tent.”

    “That was nothing extraordin—
    ary,” Terry told me when I vis-
    ited the Club recently. “Come
    upstairs and look into the billiard
    room.”

    ~*~.

    We did so and saw five youths
    happily playing snooker. “One
    from Tanganyika, one from In-
    dia, one from Pakistan, one from
    Trinidad and one from Switzer—
    land,” said Terry. The youths
    smiled, said ‘Hallo, Chief,” and
    went on with their game.

    Terry looked at me again, then
    turned to me. “Two Christians,
    one Jew, one Hindu and one
    Moslem,” he said, “and yet they
    say the world Gan’t live at peace.
    Here, at the International -Lan-
    guage Club, we know that peace
    is possible.”

    The old spirit dies hard and one
    battle won by Terry in his strug—
    gle to establish the centre has
    been over a few local diehards
    who couldn’t.tolexgte the idea-of
    white men and coloured men liv—
    ing in the same quarters.

    “Terry” has further dreams.
    He hopes some day to be able to
    build a great Empire Students’
    Centre, which will cost anything
    up to £2,000,000.

    Sea eames maanetenatinatn as



    MEN

    By ¢. G.
    heaven-sent excuse to call atten.
    tion to those merits the writer
    failed to mention. Oddly enough,
    although women have nothing to
    learn from articles written about
    men, they too cannot resist read-
    ing them, Their reason for doing
    so is because it is gratifying to
    have their opinion of the trans.
    parent simplicity of the male con-
    firmed,

    The real difference between the
    male and the female of the spe-
    cies is that the male believes he
    is being subtle when he pretends
    to be simple while the female
    knows perfectly well the more
    subtle he tries to be, the easier
    it is for the feminine mind to
    realise how very simple he real-
    ly is. These diametrically op—
    posed points of view are the real
    reason why articles like this one
    get written. The tired bread
    winner wearily wending his way
    home in his motor car after toil
    ing during the only hours his
    trade union allows him to work,
    is much too simple to understand
    why he should have to be both-
    ered with finicky domestic de~
    tails about how his wife can be
    expected to provide a £10 stand-
    ard of living on £5 a week's
    housekeeping money. He is far
    too simple to comprehend why
    she seems incapable of under—
    standing that a man who has just
    received his income tax assess-
    ment anda _ notice that next
    month the rent will be increased,
    is not in the best frame of mind
    to be confronted with the knowl-
    edge that the cook has walked
    out on them, or that young Billy
    has had another of his front
    teeth knocked out and his new
    trousers torn in a free for all with
    the boy next door. He can’t help
    wondering why women are so
    unreasonable. After all, she has
    nothing to do all day long except



    tr

    OUR READERS SAY:

    Conservative Governments that

    have preceded this Bushe Labour
    Experiment,

    Well now, they tell’ the St.
    Andrew Electorate in this bye-
    clection that their leaders are re-
    sponsible for the prospective
    Emigration to the U.S., and that
    in particular it is one of their
    Jeaders who made the suggestion
    regarding the possibile emigration
    of women, The people of Barba-
    dos shouid be made to understand
    that it was the Bustamante Gov-
    ernment of Jamaica which took
    the leading action get B.W.I1.
    workers to the.UlS., this year.
    Mr, Bustamante was so concerned
    over the matter and so anxious
    for its complete success that he
    did not entrust it into the hands
    cf any incapable junior. He per-
    sonally led the delegation.

    It was the woman member of
    the Jamaica House of Represen-
    tatives Mrs. Rose Leon, one of
    the Jamaica delegation to Wash-
    ington, who, along with Mr.
    Bustamante made strenuous ef-
    forts to secure mass employment
    of Jamaica domestic help by
    American families. Mrs, Leon
    stayed over in Washington after
    the delegation had left, further
    to discuss the question. On her
    return to Jamaica she said that
    she had not been as successful
    as she would have wished. She
    added that the lodging difficulties,
    in addition to immigration re—
    strictions, has made any mass re—
    cruitment of Jamaica female la—
    bour for America impossible at
    the present time.

    TRUTH
    April

    13, 1951.

    provide the family with suitable
    meals, see that their clothes are
    washed and mended, the house
    kept spick and span, his socks
    darned, the cocktail shaker filled
    and ready at appropriate mo-
    ments, the children kept out of
    mischief, and to make herself
    attractive and look cheerful
    against his coming home with an
    unexpected and thirsty guest.

    Why, oh why, is it that we
    poor men are never given credit
    for what we are? Why should our
    being too modest to press agent
    ourselves result in women being
    too blind to see the fine fellow
    that lies beneath the veneer of
    humility we wear. Why should
    they expect us to put up with
    having no flying fish for dinner
    merely because the fishermen
    have caught none; or because
    they’ve sold whatever they caught
    to the hotels

    Just because the Foreign Secre—
    taries of the Great Powers have
    been unable after 27 meetings to
    decide what they want to talk
    about, and because women can
    talk about anything, agenda or
    no agenda, is that any reason why
    they should jump to the absurd
    conclusion that they are our in-
    tellectual equals?

    With a war going on in Korea,
    and a cold war everywhere else,
    what is a wretched man to do if,
    when you come home, you are
    either irritated by trivial domestic
    details, or infuriated by being
    met with a too cheerful smile and
    an overdone care-free manner as
    if there was nothing to worry
    about in this sad world? You
    don’t know? Well, with apologies
    to Kipling, Ill tell you:

    The cure for this ill is not to
    sit still

    And grumble and grouse in
    your ire;

    ee a very big calomel
    Pi

    And next morning the salts,
    you require.



    Mark-Ups

    ' SIR,—I have read with interest
    tthe Debate in the Chamber of
    Commerce on the question of
    controlled price park upe but it
    seems to me mat the real “bone
    of contention” between the Gov-
    ernor and the merchants was not
    emphasized. The General Public
    will remain indifferent unless it
    is able to understand what it is
    all about and I am wondering if
    the following example would not
    Bimplify the issue:—

    If an article in 1940 costs a
    merchant $3 and he was allowed
    a 15% mark-up, then he was
    making a gross profit of 45c. If
    today that same article costs the
    merchant $4.50 or more probably
    $6, he is now making a gross
    Profit of from 67c. to 90c. In
    other“words the higher the cost
    of the article the greater the
    gross profit and in these days of
    inflation it is likely that the gross
    profit of the merchant will be
    upward @wather than downwards.
    Now everybody will admit that
    the merchant’s overhead expenses
    have also been steadily rising
    since 1940 due to.inereased values
    of stock, staff salaries, rent etc.
    ete., and I presume that, it is
    Government’s cotitention that the
    increase in profits takes care of
    the increase in expenses, If this
    is not so and it can be proved
    that any particular trade is not
    making its normal percentage of
    profit as in 1940 when controls
    were instigated, then surely it
    would be a simple matter for the
    experts to arrive at a formula
    which would take care of any
    discrepancy between Profits and
    Overhead expenses.

    W. L, ALSTON.
    St. Thomas.
    1951,

    Landscane
    April 13,

    SATURDAY,

    APRIL 14, 1951



    NOBODY'S DIARY

    Monday — The agave is in bloom outside my
    window. I had always called it a may-
    pole but today I learned its true name,
    the Agave. It is a beautiful thing. It is
    yellow and shaped like my lady’s powder
    puff. But it is huge. The yellow breasts
    love it and so do the humming birds. Its
    beauty, to quote my encyclopedia, is re-
    markable. More remarkable certainly
    than my ignorance of the Agave, And
    that is remarkable indeed. No mean
    scholar myself, fed on Tibullus and
    fashioned by Lucan, licked into shape
    by Demosthenes, one who has. read
    Hardy and been aware of the Joyces,
    Lawrences, Day Lewis, Huxleys and the
    Picasso, Matisse, Ibsen firmament, I am
    the veriest fool when it comes to Agave.
    I can plagiarise Hamlet and cry “What’s
    Agave?” And my precious little ency-
    clopedia cheap at £12. 0s. 0d. replies
    “Agave, a genus of plants belonging to
    the order Amaryllidaceae found mostly
    in Mexico. It somewhat resembles the
    aloe, and on that account is often com-
    pared with it. Its beauty is remark-
    able.”

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    BLUE HYACINTH

    There's a bit too about the roots being
    used for soap, but I’m afraid of infringing
    the copyright. Buy an encyclopedia and

    read it for yourself. That’s enough Successors to
    knowledge for 5 cents. ¢. S. PITCHER & co.
    * * * ’Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413

    Tuesday—lI am iooking out of a window. The

    Wednesday — Today I saw a man _ with

    Thursday — Glorious news tonight.






    Friday — It’s been a day of horns.

    Saturday — Suppose you stop blowing your

    fields are under snow and the trees are
    graceful outlines, flickering as it were
    with the promise of spring leaves, naked
    against the white background, finely cut.
    A picture far more beautiful than a
    painting. Is the revolt against scenic
    painting a revolt against beauty? Is the
    smug laughter against the week-end
    “bird” school of poets, the witless chuckle |
    of those who carinot enjoy naturé? I}g,
    shouldn’t be surprised,

    * *

    You can once again
    BAKE with a SMILE...

    YES! It’s Here Again




















































    *

    threadbare trousers, close and tightfit-| $
    ting. He was carrying a bunch of flowers | $
    in one hand. I followed him and saw him
    turn down an alley noted for its dirt
    and watched him toil up a winding stair-
    case and deposit them lovingly in a bowl.
    Later in the evening I touched him on his

    cap and whispered “Mister why do you
    do it ?”



    THE FLOUR WITH GOOD RETURNS

    OBTAINABLE AT YOUR WHOLESALER.
    He replied with a thin cracked voice :
    “It’s my contribution to a cleaner city.”

    I was so touched that I dug up all my

    tuberoses and put them out to dry. You

    will know me next time you see tube-
    roses in Nelson Street.

    * *

    LOUNGE
    SUITS
    ready
    to
    wear

    Choose from a wide

    *
    I can
    double my whisky and soda before
    dinner. Did I say whisky and soda ? How
    careless of me. Women only drink gin
    and lime. But whatever diet I am on,
    I can double it because there is a man in
    the Evening Star. I proved it tonight.
    The moon came up and I looked her over
    and over with my naked eye. There
    was no man in the moon, but sure
    enough, there he was as big as the hero
    in King Solomon’s Mines bending ‘his
    gigantic arms across thé Evening Star. range of fitting, single or
    Husband pour me a stiff rum and soda.

    double breasted.
    Iam annoyed. After a morning shop- :

    ping in all the big Broad Street stores,
    I had to return home without my pattern.
    The girls did their best. They offered’ me
    some English patterns. I looked at them
    but they are not for me. I can imagine
    some people liking English patterns here
    but now that I’ve qualified at the Singer
    sewing course, I think I’ll make my own
    patterns, until they let the Canadian
    patterns back.

    *

    Style Grade
    WORSTEDS and GAB-
    ERDINES.

    in fine

    A big assortment to

    select from - - -

    DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.

    * * Dry Goods Dept.

    There
    was the one that makes a noise like a
    peasant in distress. It is the one that
    goes ha-di-hah. That’s meant to be
    musical.

    Then there is the hornblower. Some
    drivers tap their horns and a muffled
    whisper comes out. These seem to say
    “I wonder if you would mind moving
    over just a little to let me pass.” An-
    other driver will put his whole weight
    on his horn, I interpret this to mean “if
    you reverse any further you'll smash
    into me and I'll fix you....” Then there
    is the driver who waits till he is passing
    you out and hails you. His horn says;
    Sorry to do this. But I am ina hurry.

    ENERGY FOODS
    KELLOGG’S ALL BRAN
    KELLOGG’S CORN

    FLAKES

    PUFFED WHEAT
    CHOCOLATE LUNCH
    BISCUITS

    BARLEY SUGAR STICKS

    CALVES LIVER

    DANISH BACON

    DANISH LUNCH
    TONGUES

    J & R ENRICHED BREAD




    FRESH VEGETABLES

    CARROTS
    Must. pass you.” SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL BEET ROOT
    ee CANADIAN, APPLES STRING BEANS
    Then there is my horn. ‘It either sticks ine RokE: CHOCOLATE ‘CHRISTOPHENES
    and blows when I don’t want it to blow, CANADIAN CHOCOLATE
    or it doesn’t blow at all. This seems to BARS



    |
    ‘

    be the best horn of all, and I really find

    it possible to do without it.
    " |

    * *

    FISH
    SMOKED HADDOCK
    SMOKED KIPPERS
    RED SALMON
    RED SNAPPER

    ae Wee

    horn and tell us who you are. How are
    you looking at snow through a train
    window one day, and buying patterns
    from Bridgetown the next. What sex
    are you anyhow ? Peace, restless soul,
    I’m nobody, nobody at all and were it
    not for my friend in the Evening Star,
    the Editor would never receive my copy
    in time for -you to read it in bed every
    Saturday. Pip, Pip.

    order early from

    CODDARDS

    RIASS

    SOOO OOOO LAO OOO OD
    PIPELIE SII E OTF ETE EE TEE Et PATI
    SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1

    951

    Trade Commissioner Reviews

    Local Supply Situation Appeat court

    MR. A. R. STARCK, O.B.E., United Kingdom Trade
    Commissioner in the British West Indies with headquar-
    ters in Trinidad, told the Advocate yesterday that he would
    do his best through the Board of Trade in London to ensure
    that traders in Barbados are getting supplied with goods

    from the United Kingdom w

    ithin the limits of the essential

    requirements of the island from the resources of the Mother

    Country.

    Many Care Little
    For Adult Suffrage’

    Now that every Barbadian over
    21 can vote when the .General
    Election comes off, the estimated
    number who are qualified to vote
    is 107,000.

    Mr. L. A. Chase, who is con-
    nected with the registration of
    voters, told the Advocate yester-
    day that the progress in the work
    of registering voters is good.

    Formerly a voter had to go to
    a Justice of the Peace and get
    him vouch for the legitimacy of
    his qualifications, The voter then
    had to go and register himself.
    Now a voter does not have to go
    to a Justice of the Peace nor to go
    and get himself registered, An
    officer comes around to each home
    and registers those who can vote.

    There are many, however, who
    do not care a straw about voting.
    Besides the hundreds who are too
    old and who tell you they
    think it is too much for them to
    hobble down to a centre to vote
    for anyone, there are many who
    would not even get registered,
    furthermore think of voting
    when it is election time.

    Some people are giving some
    funny arguments to strengthen
    their decisions not to vote..

    One woman who could not have
    voted under the old system but
    who can now vote, asked what
    Government had done for her.
    She did not think much of the
    suggestion that.she would be able
    to decide who would do something
    for her.

    Mr. Chase said that there
    should be a few people paid to
    go around and tell the people at
    meetings what is behind register-
    ing and voting.

    Out of the 107,000 estimated
    qualified voters. 7,000 are in
    Bridgetown, 38,000 in St. Michael,
    13,000 in Christ Church, 7900 in
    St. Philip, 7,000 in St. George,
    3,000 in St. Andrew, 4,000 in St.
    Lucy. 5,000 in St. John. 4,000 jn



    St. Thomas, 4.000 in St. Peter,
    6.000 in St. James and 3,000 in
    St. Joseph.

    —_—- = |

    Can. Challenger
    Brings Flour, Eggs

    THE motor vessel Ganadian
    Challenger landed a cargo of 900
    bags of flour, 70 cases of eggs, 140,
    barrels of potatoes and quantities
    of peanuts and pickled meat from
    Halifax during her 15-hour stay
    at Barbados yesterday.

    She also landed cabbages, car—
    rots, provisions and fruit from the
    British Northern Islands.

    The Challenger left port last
    night for British Guiana via St.
    Vincent,’ Grenada and Trinidad.
    She is consitned to Messrs. Gar-
    diner Austin & Co,, Ltd.

    ——



    FOWL TYPHOID

    Isolated outbreaks of Fowl Ty-
    phoid still occur in the island,
    and at least two of these were
    confirmed by the Government
    Veterinary Officer during the last
    month. ;

    Poultry keepers, he said, must
    sti therefore be aware of the
    presence of the disease and con-
    tinue to take the precautionary
    measures previously outlined,
    chief cf which is to avoid the
    purchase of adult poultry for
    addition to their flocks_ unless
    they are known to come from a
    clean source.»

    Mr. Starck is now on one of his
    regular tours through his terri-
    tory. He arrived here on Thursday
    evening by B.W.I.A. from An-
    tigua after visiting the Leeward
    Islands. From’ Barbados he goes
    to Dominica on Thursday. He is
    staying at the Windsor Hotel.

    Asked about conditions in the
    nerthern islands, Mr. Starck said
    that the earth tremors in St.
    Kitts and Nevis appeared to have
    died down and the people are
    quickly recovering from a most
    terrifying experience.

    The sugar crop is very good
    and is being gathered according
    to schedule and it is anticipated
    that a record tonnage of sugar
    will be produced.

    In Antigua there, are still many
    signs of the ‘terrible damage
    caused by the hurricane, but the
    Government have taken vigor-
    ous action to house the people
    and conditions will gradually be-
    come normal, it is hoped, towards
    the end of the year.

    The Government seems to have
    done a most commendable job;
    for it was faced with the problem
    of replacing some 1,400 houses.

    There is a very good sugar crop
    in Antigua, but there is some
    doubt as to whether it would all
    be gathered, as unfortunately,
    there was'a stoppage of about
    four weeks which is now happily
    settled. If the labourers continue
    to give a full day’s work, there is
    every hope of the full crop being
    taken off the fields.

    Estates’ Flood

    Mr. Starck said that when he
    was here in February, there were
    terrific rains and some fear was
    expressed as to whether the Bar-
    bados sugar crop would come up
    to expectations, as he had himself
    seen the serious flood which had
    taken place on the estates and in
    the country generally.

    He is delighted to see that the
    rains have ceased and that we have
    had plenty of good sunshine here
    with every prospect of getting an
    all time high in sugar production.

    Speaking on the question of

    supplies of goods from the
    United Kingdom, Mr. Starck
    said that certain items includ-
    ing most metal goods and any-
    thing in connection with paper
    or card board were very diffi-
    cult to be obtained owing to the
    necessity of carrying out a vig-
    orous and determined rearma-
    ment programme,

    Production in the United King-
    dom is increasing on demands, and
    the resources of the country are
    also rising and, unfortunately,
    supplies are becoming _ scarcer.
    However it is to be hoped that
    the international situation may
    eventually be eased and that the
    necessity for rapid expansion of
    armaments will gradually dimin-
    ish and that manufacturers gen-
    erally will be able to turn their
    attention to the needs of a peace-
    ful world.

    On Cali At C.C.

    Mr. Starck said that owing to
    the Intercolonial Cricket games in
    February, he wag unable to see
    all the traders he would have
    liked and this is his reason for
    spending another week here.

    He is using the offices of the
    Chamber of Commerce as _ his
    headquarters and although he
    proposes to call on as many firms
    as possible, anyone wishing to
    see him on any particular matter
    can telephone the Chamber of
    Commerce where arrangements
    will be made for him to call on
    them.



    Canadian

    Warships

    Visiting Barbados

    SHIPS of the Canadian Navy are at anchor in Carlisle
    Bay for the second time since the war. Since Thursday,
    Barbadians have been seeing the 18,000-ton aircraft carrier

    H.M.C.S. Magnificent sole ai

    reraft carrier of the Canadian

    Navy, and the 2,300-ton destroyer Miemac from shore, and
    to-day hundreds of guests will see them at close quarters.

    On Sunday between 2 p.m.

    open to all visitors.

    The Magnificent, which is the
    senior ship, is under the command
    of Commodore K, F. Adams,
    R.C.N., and has a complement of
    1,000 including 160 officers. The
    Micmac is under Lieutenant-Com-
    mander F. C. Frewer, R.C.N.,
    and has«a complement of 230
    including 12 officers.

    The Micmac was here in 1947,
    but this is the Magnificent’s first
    voyage to Barbados.

    Three Trinidadians are sailors
    on the ships. Two are with the
    Micmac and one with the Magnifi-
    cent, All other personnel are Can-
    adians .@

    Both ships came in from Trini.
    dad on Thursday. They started
    their cruise from Halifax early
    this month and made their first
    call at Trinidad where they spent
    three days.

    They will.spend four days here
    before leaving for Boston,

    Except for the sweltering heat
    and the tiring effects of their daily
    routine of keeping their ship clean
    and going through the various
    exercises, the cadets are enjoying
    their cruise.

    They met fine weather through- |
    out the trip and were very pleased
    with their first glimpses of the
    West Indies, Barbados in particu-

    lar.
    Rescued “Gilbert Junior”

    On the way down from Halifax,

    when about 190 miles off =|

    the Micmac rescued the passenger |

    ship Gilbert Junior with a crew of
    16, 12 passengers and two horses
    on board. Eight of the passengers \
    were women. i

    The Gilbert Junior had run out}
    of fuel and had been adrift for!
    over 40 hours. The Micmac escort. '
    ed by the Magnificent, towed the ;
    passenger ship into Curacao. As
    soon as the passenger ship was |
    safe, the Micmac and the Magnifi-



    and 4 p.m. the ships will be

    cent steamed out of Curacao at 20
    knots for Trinidad.

    The Magnificent carries 27 air-
    craft and was built in Belfast in
    1946 at a cost of approximately
    seven million dollars. It costs 20
    million dollars a year to operate.

    The Micmac, the ‘plane guard
    to the Magnificent, is one of the
    first warships built in Canada.
    She was launched from the Hali-
    fax dock yard sometime in 1942.

    '. In February 1947 the Micmac
    was accompanied by the Nootka
    also of the Canadian Navy.

    \

    SSC O NOSIS

    Your Deli.
    Facourite Here
    Again!

    '

    CHOCOLATE
    BARS

    Liquid Cherry
    Nut Roll




    NEILSON'S



    Tasty Crisp
    Malted Milk
    Rosebuds

    Macaron

    THE CHILDREN WILL ENJOY THESE

    KNIGHT'S LIED. -- Ali

    DSOROGOD EC EEE EE TELE





    Judges Uphold
    Earlier Decision

    ; The Assistant Court of Appeal
    judges, Mr. W. B. Chenery
    and Mr. H. A. Vaughan yester-
    day agreed with a decision of
    Petty Debt Court Judge .
    J. H. Hanschell who ordered
    Reginald Knight of Bush Hall to
    pay Edwin Lovell, undertaker of
    Spooners Hill £7. 18s. 4d.

    In the Lower Court, Lovell
    brought the case against both
    R. Knight and Edith Collymore
    who Knight told the court used
    “to do” for him.

    On June 29 last year Knight
    went to Lovell and told him that
    he wanted him to bury Rudolph
    Collymore, Edith’s son who was
    dead. Lovell said that he asked
    Knight who wouid be responsi-
    ble for paying the bill and Knight
    told him that it would be a cash
    deal as he would pay him on the
    following Friday.

    Knight kept him waiting for
    the money, saying that he was
    about to collect a meeting turn.
    In December Knight came to him
    and told him that Edith and
    himself were no longer friendly
    and suggested that he go and
    ask Edith whether she would be
    willing to pay part of the money.
    Edith paid $2 before he brought
    the case and $5 after he did so.

    Knight tried to prove to the
    court that he only went to Lovell
    because Edith Collymore had
    asked him to do so, but the
    arrangements as to who would
    pay were all between Collymore
    and Lovell. Lovell, however,
    said that all the talk concerning
    the burial were between Knight

    and himself. Judgment was
    therefore given against Knight
    only.



    Appeal Judges
    Impose 25/- Fine

    Their Honours Mr. J. W. B.
    Chenery and Mr. H. A. Vaughan,
    Judges of the Assistant Court of
    Appeal yesterday varied a
    decision of Kis Worship Mr. C
    L. Walwyn, Acting Police Magis-
    trate of District “A”.

    Mr. Walwyn had fined Harold
    Bishop of Kew Road, St. Michael
    40/- and 1/— costs to be paid in
    28 days or in default two months’
    imprisonment for wounding
    Kenneth Goodridge on February
    11, 1951 with a drill.

    Their Honours after reviewing
    the evidence imposed a fine of
    25/— to be paid in 14 days or in
    default two months’ imprison-
    ment.

    .

    £5 For Speeding

    Sherlock Jordan of Eckstein
    Village, St. Michael was ordered
    to pay a fine of £5 to be paid by
    monthly instalments by is
    Worship Mr. E, A. McLeod,
    Police Magistrate of District “A”
    yesterday.

    Jordan was found guilty of
    exceeding the speed limit while
    driving a motor van on Black
    Rock Road on March 7, The van
    was reported by the Police to be
    driven at over 48 miles per hour
    and the speed limit on that road
    is 20 miles per hour. Sst. Forde
    prosecuted for the Police.



    BYE-ELECTION
    OFFICERS

    THE Governor-in-Executive
    Committee has, on the recom-
    mendation of the Returning
    Officer, appointed two Officers to
    preside at the bye-election of a
    member to serve in the Genera!
    Assembly for the parish of St.
    Andrew for the remainder of the
    Legislative Session 1948-51. They
    re:
    F Mr. Darnley C Cumberbatch,
    and Mr. Daniel F. Best.

    This is in accordance with the
    provisions of Rule 8 (1) as con-
    tained in Section 3 of tl\< ballot
    (Amendment) Act, 1944.

    a ania
    7) SUDDENLY

    Fifty-six—-year-ola Joseph Ben-
    tain ta eben of Padmore Village,
    St. Philip, died suddenly at his
    residence on Thursday night.

    The body was removed to
    mortuary at the Almhouse where
    a post mortem examination was
    performed yesterday by Dr. E. A.
    Kinch. He attributed death toa
    natural causes.

    the®

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    sant

    —

    AIRCRAFT TRAINING

    THE PILOT fixes his harness in the “Dilbert Dunker”’, used by



    Wyn
    ‘pM
    yt

    } ee

    abet
    pen
    pee

    eprnl pase
    ie "

    yam

    M peeteey
    i =

    pilots of the United States Air Force and Navy training at the Naval

    Air Station at Pensacola, Florida.
    slipway into the water, just as an

    . The machine rushes down the
    aircraft would crash into the sea.

    The pilots learn to release themselves from the harness before they

    are dragged under the water by the suction.

    American Labour



    And The World
    Struggle For Freedom

    By MATTH

    Vice President, Americar

    IN RECENT YEARS, the area of human freedom has
    been shrinking rapidly. Totalitarianism, in one form or
    another, has been sweeping over the world. To-day it is
    holding one out of every three human beings in subjection.
    In such a state of affairs, the ideals of freedom, of human
    dignity, are challenged as never before.

    EW WOLL

    Federation of Labour

    desperate conflict with the forces of despotism.

    Contrary to the belief of some,
    the present world crisis is not
    to be attributed to any conflict
    between different forms of prop—
    erty ownership or of economic
    systems. Nor is it due to a conflict
    over boundaries or territories
    between two nations or bloes of
    nations. It is utterly false to say
    that the present world crisis is
    one between the forces insisting
    on the status quo and other forces
    seeking constructive social
    changes.

    If there is any country in the
    world that is the classic example
    of status quo that country is
    Russia, It is in Russia where no
    one dare whisper a desire for
    change, It is in Russia where it is
    politically and physically danger-
    ous to organize for or in any way
    further any change whatsoever,

    CONTRAST

    In refreshing contrzst America
    is the land where there has oeen
    the highest rate of economic and
    social change, change for the bet—
    ter, truly progressive change. This
    country, with its economy based
    on private enterprise and personal
    adventure, represents an economy
    with a growing sense of social
    responsibility and a growing re-
    cognition of labour’s rights and
    responsibilities in the life of the
    Nation. This is the economic ana
    philosophic pasis of America’s
    free society.

    Here in the United States, al-
    leged by the Soviets to symbolize
    capitalism in extreme form and
    control, organized labour enjoys
    far more and greater rights in
    factories and workshops, yes, even
    in relation to production policies,
    than anywhere else in the world.
    Despite all references to “Wall
    Street” and alleged great capital-

    ists past and present, American
    workers have a far greater and
    more effective voice in industry,
    in mining, and in transportation



    From Student Nurse To Sister

    Mi Enid M. Skinner has been appointed Sister at the
    General Hospital with effect from 31st March, 1951.
    Miss Skinner entered the General Hospital on ist June, 1944,

    as a Student Nurse,

    and was selected in July, 1945, under the

    Colonial Development and Welfare Scheme for the London County

    Council training course for

    nurses,

    She completed her training as a General Nurse at Whittington

    Hospital in
    at the same

    November, 1948, and then took a course in Midwifery
    Hospital and afterwards at Epsom Hospital.

    She held

    an appointment as Staff Midwiie at St. James’ Hospital from
    Septernber, 1950, to February, 1





    951.





    and so too would you







    than those of any other land.
    That is why American
    prizes collective bargaining

    Nation’s economy.

    RUSSIAN RIGHTS

    When we compare the “rights”
    of labour in Russia with the rights
    enjoyed by labour in America, we
    find, first and foremost, no real
    in
    its satellite countries
    The Russian worker has nothing
    to say about choice or change of
    jobs. The Russian worker is sub
    in

    trade or labour unions exist
    Russia or

    ject constantly to the most

    __ Carib Service |

    Democracy is in

    labour
    so
    highly. It provides the vital spirit
    and the most powerful vehicle for
    the extension of democracy in the

    tensive exploitation and speed-up

    system. He is severely punished for

    the slightest infraction of factory

    rule or discipline



    term.
    @ on page 7
    Are you proud of your
    INDUSTRY? Well tell the

    World about it.

    Send in your details to-
    day. You have 2 days left
    only to get in the YEAR
    BOOK,

    t
    ;

    with one. of these Canadian

    BLACK RAIN COATS

    An excellent coat for Seamen of all ranks as well as
    Watchmen, Porters or anyone who has to work out-



    Lateness of
    work may be punished by a prison






    At your grocer’s in convenient size packages
    also in improved filter tea balls

    REFRESHING





    He laughs at the weather



    Jason Jones & Co, Ltd.

    PAGE FIVE



    B.O.A.C. Will |

    Expand Inier |











    Sir Edward
    Frankland

    was among the first to develop
    the theory of valency, which
    explains how the atoms twit
    constitute all matter are held

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    LONDON.

    The B.O.A.C. are to expand j
    inter Caribbean services. :
    Parallel with this, improve-
    ments are to be made in ser- |
    vices between the North
    American mainland, the
    Bahamas and Jamaica. As a
    result, cuts may be made in
    the B.O.A.C.’s west coast
    South American service.

    This was revealed to-day by
    Sir Miles Thomas, B.O.A.C
    Chairman, who leaves _ to-
    morrow morning for a busi-_ tae existence of helium in the sun,

    ness visit to South America! = dic nati bacteri
    : ; tem for the periodic examination of water for bacteria
    and the Caribbean. He will “““" supply, and instituted a system fo ar f
    visit Trinidad, Jamaica and which brought him widespread renown.
    Stacee ahamas among other Bor in Churchtown, Lancashire, in 1825, Frankland was apprenticed to a druggist
    Sir Miles in an exclusive in- | in Lancaster until he went to London at the age of twenty to study chemistry. In 185%

    terview explained that contrary . ‘
    to rumours which had been cir- he was appointed professor of chemistry at Owens College, Manchester. Returning to
    culated, it was the B.O.A.C’s , : itati
    intention By ce the eckivibies London in 1857, he held appointments at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, The Royal Institution
    3. wit =. palbean teat oes and The Royal School of Mines. He was President of the Chemical

    Society from 1871-3, and of the Institute of Chemistry from 1877-80.

    The Royal Society awarded him its highest honour—the Copley Medal—

    in 1894. Frankland was knighted in 1897, five years before his death,

    Trade Mark of Imperial Chemica: :ndustries Ltd., London, England.

    together. This theory played an
    important part in the subsequent
    growth of chemistry. With Sir
    Norman Lockyer, British

    = astronomer, Frankland discovered

    In addition, he was one of the leading authorities on

    vices must be consolidated and }
    expanded. They must be adequate

    to meet the traffic demands of the

    West Indies area now and in the

    future,” he said.

    Sir Miles pointec out that when
    he became B.O.A.C. Chairman
    in 1949, he set out to do three
    things. Firstly he pruned the in-
    ternal organisation of the B.O.A.C.
    from 24,000 to just over 15,500,
    Secondly he sought and obtained |
    a new aireraft and thirdly he
    aimed to make the Company into
    a sound commercial proposition,
    This task hgs been successfully
    undertaken in North America,
    Australia, India and Africa and
    now was to be approched in the
    Caribbean and South American
    areas,



    SONI NOO GS “3

    HARRISON'S saroap sr.



    ttt PPLE LLL bw

    “JONES” FAMILY
    HAND SEWING
    MACHINES

    on wood base and complete with cover

    Financial Loss
    _He revealed that or the finan-
    cial year ended March 31, the
    B.O.A.C, sustained the loss of
    four and three quarter million
    pounas. This was a reduction of
    nearly three million in the previous

    year, A big loss had been sus- . s ‘

    tained on the. west NOeEE Manes A Compact Lightweight Machine and a

    American service Wonderfully Efficient Worker capable of
    He explained that the B.O.A.C turning out the most Beautiful Effects on

    wanted to play its part and share
    in the commercial expansion of
    eastern South America, but he
    added “I shall have a critical loots
    at the Jamaica-Panama-Santiago
    route”,

    He told me that the B.O.A.C.
    would shortly introduce Constel-
    lation operated services between
    New York and Jamaica and New
    York and Bermuda. These de-
    cisions might result in reduced
    activities south of the Caribbean,

    He went on to explain that the

    .O.A.C. were satisfied that the
    present services through Bermuda
    and Nassau with a junction at
    Kingston were adequate to meet
    the demands of the West Indies.
    An attempt to bring in additional
    services would disturb the bal-
    ance between local operators and
    trunk lines,

    This did not however mean such
    places as Trinidad or Barbados or
    any other West Indian territories
    in the Southern Caribbean would
    not be able to attract and enter-
    tain American tourists, The saleg
    effort of the B.O.A.C’s New
    York office was applied to all
    West Indian ‘territories and tickets
    would be direct for any of them

    Sir Miles will be away for ape
    proximately four weeks returning
    via New York about May 5,

    almost every imaginable type of job.

    SRF RA TS

    THE PERFECT
    HAND SEWING MACHINE

    Simple, Silent and Easy Running

    Sews Backwards and Forwards as Reguired.
    Special Cash Price

    $93.74
    Credit terms on application

    The “JONES” Electric Motor

    with Needle Point Light
    Can be fitted quickly and easily to any type
    of “JONES” DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINE

    The running c(sts are negligible and the
    operator has both hands free to guide the

    work,

    OEE TTA TET OTA OOO

    OUR PRICE— ONLY $46.37 EACH

    HARRISON'S LOCAL AGENTS

    TEL. 2364

    "Athelbrook” Takes
    Molasses To Trinidad

    THE molasses tanker Athelbrook
    left Barbados for Trinidad yester-
    day evening with a full losd of
    vacuum pan molasses, She «rrived
    at daybreak for her load,

    She is consigned to Messrs. H





    oof

    9965S









    LAVOR







    doors in all weathers .........0000000. 000000 $16.59 y SERGE BE ESU EB REEEe
    SOUWESTER HATS a “PURINA” a
    To match — Each ......... 66. 0e sees sense $ 3.79 a €
    a 4 = LAYENA §
    rw ama | Cave Shepherd & Co.,Ltd. : .
    Peppermint | 2 see e
    BrancHes fh Ce ae gil. JASON JONES & CO,, LTD.—Distributore.

    sosseeed:

    SRS




    PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, APRIL HM, 1951





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    t










    ATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1951

    CLASSIFIED ADS.

    TELEPHONE 2506

    announcements of FOR SALE



    Sejepenenpenens
    charge for

    Deaths, Acknow-
    ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
    $1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
    for any number of words up to 50, and

    3 cents per word on week-days and! %
    4 cents per word on Sundays for each! “ 3 cents a word week—4 cents «
    additional word. word Sundays.





















    DIED

    CRAWFORD—On April 13th, 195%, at her
    residence Bird Hill, Haggatt -
    Michael, Edith Udora Crawford. Her
    funeral leaves the above residence at
    430 pm to-day for St. Barnabas
    Church.

    Issabel Callendar, Sjtira Alleyne,

    Mary Lovell (U.S.A.), Geraldine

    Alleyoe, Rita Barker (sisters), Edith

    and Ulrick Jordan, Maria and

    McGregor Allevne inephews and

    Nieces). 14.4.51—1n.

    AUTOMOTIVE

    ALMOST NEW 12 H.-P. Bedford Van.
    Guarantee if required. Extra Masonite
    Flooring. Licensed and Insured. Upset
    Price $1,850. New one Cost $2,125 pre-
    sently. Apply Courtesy Garaz

    e.
    a one Standard
    â„¢ : in very order. ie 19,
    Appiy to Cc. "Wee cee sake
    A. Lynch & Co. Ltd. Phone 3643
    12.4.51—4n



    8 HP. 1949



    IN ' MEMORIAM
    TAYLOR—In loving memory of our dear
    beloved mother Florence Taylor who
    fell asleep on the 12th April,
    Some think you are forgotten
    Though on earth you are no more,
    But in memony you are still with us
    As you ever were before.





    SL

    CAR—Hillman 10 Car, 1939, Perfect
    running order. Owner leaving island.
    Ring—2583 12.4.51—8n.
    _—

    CAR—Morris Minor Saloon 1949 (Green)
    Mileage 15,600, very good condition. New

    1950.

    Battery. Apply: S. P. Edghill. Teleph
    Children—Mrs. Allsopp, Alma, Joseph . . Telephone
    Taylor (Trinidad) ison), | (Grana- | #86, C/o R. & G. Challenor,
    children). Lorna, Joyce. (Son-in-law) 12.4.51—4n,
    Thomas Allsopp. 14.4.51—I1n

    a RSeseeeeremeneee

    FORD PICKUP—in good condition and
    4 new tyres, City Garage Trading Co,
    Ltd. 11.4.51—t fn.

    Rae

    ?ICKUP—Austin A. 70. Pickup. Almost
    new. Dial 4725, General Engineering
    Co., Spry Street, 14.451--20

    ELECTRICAL

    relbaiteenintcibh eatin casein ia

    ONAN—Lighting Plant, voits,
    30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps ane
    spares. A. Barnes & Co. Ltd.



    GOVERNMENT NOTICES
    MAIL NOTICE

    AIR MAILS
    Effective immediately and until
    end of April, the following changes
    affecting air mails to the under
    mentioned places are notified.
    Schedules should be amended ac-
    cordingly :—



    12-15





    Bermuda—11.45 a.m, Tuesdays} —_. Nee nls Sey
    do — 2.00 p.m. Fridays
    *Canada—11.45 a.m, Mondays LIVESTOCK
    an — 2.00 p.m, Fridays
    U.S.A.—11.45 a.m, Tuesdays aries
    do — 2.00 p.m, Fridays secopa tian De a 1agi 38

    *By Monday’s opportunity to’
    Canada the higher rate of postage,

    namely 30 cents per 4 oz., will be tor", Rockley Terrace or Da Costa & Co,
    charged. 13.4,51—2n,. | Ltd. Phone 8280 or 2122.
    10.4 51—tfn

    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION|
    MECHANICAL

    Registration of Relief Teachers,
    PibsDrtnpianaechmctesirineytaiamamsadinedk
    Allen Motor Driven GRASS CUTTER—

    —
    MILCH GOAT, “Sally Laurator", Reg
    No, 656. Apply S. C. Skinner, “Laura-

    1951-52

    Applications are invited from

    . Recently overhauled. Ca se it

    suitably qualified persons for re-| Jason Jones Garaae a 13.4518.
    istration as Relief Teachers,

    ference will be given to per- BIKES—on terms, Hercules Silver

    King, All models in stock.
    A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
    114,51.—T.F.N.

    SEWING MACHINE—One Singer Sew-
    ing Machine, Cost $116.00. As good ‘as
    new going for $90.00. Phone’ 3201.

    14.4.51—1n

    sons holding the School Certificate
    or other equivalent qualifications.

    Applications, to be submitted on
    Form E/7 M (Men) or Form E/7
    W (Women) obtainable from the
    Department of Education, should
    reach the Director of Education









    ee er Saturday, the 21st MISCELLANEOUS
    oO pril, 1951.
    Registered Relief Teachers, who | .BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

    White, Green, Primrose with matching

    units to complete colour suites. Top

    grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
    26.1.51—t.f.n.

    BULBS (Blectric) 100 only at 25e.
    230V. 40W. Bargain at Whitfields Hard-
    ware Dept. 4.51—2n.

    CALF’S FOOT JELLY.—Fresh stock
    of Calf's Foot Jelly. Orange flavour. A
    10 oz. jar for 60c. Get it at Bruce
    Weatherhead Ltd. 12.4,51—3n.

    CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
    dow styling, light control, Valances and

    wish to have their names retained
    on the Revised List, MUST in-
    form the Department by letter not
    later than Saturday, the 21st of
    April, 1951.
    Department of Education,
    5th April, 1951.
    10.4.51—2n.

    It is notified for general in~
    formation that the 14th Interna—
    tional Bookeeping Congress will
    be held at Leamington Spa in the





    United Kingdom from September | BARNES a Go. cao DM TO A
    3rd to 8th, 1951. Further particu- siediempeipininads

    For Boulders, Concrete Stone, Grit

    lars regarding the Congress can}. Q°huct Contact WILLIAM HINKSON,



    be had from Miss eae cee Sealy Hail, St. John. 13.4.51—3n.
    Honorary Organising ecretary,
    : : LAMP JURNERS, holesale nd
    The Vicarage, Wragby, Lincoln, Retail. This offer canine be repeated
    England. as next shipment will cost 15% more.
    14,4,51.—In. Chandler’s Hardware and Bicycle Store,
    ue inpaiienbandinaednns Reed & Tudor Streets,
    OFFICE ACCOMMODATION 14.4.51—1n



    Temporary office accommoda— One Galvanised Iron Tank 400 Gallons

    tion (approximately 18,000 square} capacity, 4’x4’x4 with 18”.Manhole and
    feet), within one half mile radius wtapply to M Sndibas Se iecica Tick

    of the Public Buildings, is
    required, immediately, to house a
    Government Organisation.

    Offers in writing should be
    submitted to the Financial Secre—
    tary, Publie Buildings, not later
    than the 18th ere .

    ATHLONE GUEST
    HOUSE

    13.4,51—2n.

    POULTRY PEN—Newly Constructed
    Double Decker. Containing 8 by 3 feet
    square compartments. New half-inch
    mesh throughout. Suitable as Brooder,
    Rearing Pen or Cockerel Pen,

    ARCHIE CLARKE. Phone 4530 from
    8 am, to 4 p.m. 14.4.51—2n





    51—1In.





    ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN
    in case, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy.
    46.3.51—t.f.n,

    SPANNERS; (Cycle) “Universal” 3-
    way nut, Peg & Cone 40 doz. to clear
    at 12c. each, Whitficlds Hardware Dept,

    14,4,51—2n.









    FONTABELLE 1; TYPEWRITER ae aoe & re
    YAPER. Fresh st “us eived, ge’
    PERMANENT = your seguiecmamate at 1. ‘Geddes Grant
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    TRANSIE

    Two PLATE Glass Display Cases. $120.00
    each Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, Broad
    St. 7.4,51—t.f.n.

    VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-atre
    all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
    sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4478.
    A. BARNES & Co., Ltd,

    13.2.51—t.4.n.

    “VAN HOUTENS drinking chocolate

    Add a dessertspoonful to a glass of
    milk to obtain a refreshing beverage of
    exquisite flavour, Only 38 cents for ‘s
    lb tin. Compare the price with com-
    petitors’. 11.4,.51—3n.

    EDUCATIONAL

    COMBERMERE SCHOOL

    ENTRANCE EXAMINATION TO MAIN
    SCHOOL

    1. As previously notified in the Press,
    admissions to the School will take place
    in September next.

    2. The Entrance Examination will be
    eran Oe Oe ee ees held in the School Hall on Friday, June
    or 8th at 9 am,

    i 3. Candidates will be accepted for

    ’ 7 "| examination who were not over 12 years

    10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH of age on Ist January last, or who will

    I not be under 11 wears on Ist September

    | next. This concession is applicable to
    the current year only.

    4. Parents/Guardians must notify the

    Headmaster in writing not later than

    BOARD AND LODGING

    FOR RESERVATION .
    DIAL 4837

    14.4.51.—2n.



    FOR SALE

    CRUSHED STONE AND -

    FINES. IDEAL FOR CON-
    CRETE, AND MAKING
    ROADS AND PATHS.

    Apply - -
    J. N. HARRIMAN & CO.
    LTD., SEAWELL, -

    Phone 8444, Extension 8.
    12,4.51.—6n,

























    SOOO OOO



    SAXOPHONE REEDS
    E b Alto, B b Tenor,



    C Melody Monday, 3th April if they wish aS
    cons/wards to sit the examination. ue

    ea apaoe application must state the boy's date cf

    2 birth supported /e7, ei Pe ee bes a

    tificate. It shall ai e 00)

    GOOD SECOND HAND he is now attending and must be accom-

    SHOT GUNS panied by a brief Testimonial from the

    } Headmaster of that School.

    , 5, Candidates are expected to provide
    JOHNSON’S STATIONERY net own pencil te), pen & Tuler et
    tefreshments Ww! on le 9
    and HARDWARE School canteen.
    re 6. Will Vestries and all other Scholar-
    ship-awarding authorities please submit
    their lists of candidates in accordance
    with the foregoing conditions.

    PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT
    1. A limited number of vacancies will
    occur in September, 1951, im the Prep-
    aratory Department of the above School.

    ,

    CHOICE

    CHINA CABINETS





    Applications mar be submitted to the
    Headmaster, by parents/guerdians on
    CHOOSE NOW a Charm of behalf of boys w. be not less

    than eight and @ half years of age, nor
    more than ten and a half years of age,
    cn ist September, 1951, fists te

    2. Closing date for
    Monda April, .

    3. An examination will be conducted
    at the School on Saturday, June $th at
    9 wm.

    4. Candidates should arrive equipped
    with 2 (two) pencils and a ruler.

    M. PINDER,

    a CHINA CABINET, New or
    renewed, in Mahogany or
    mahoganized, Birch or Fir—
    $39 to $120.

    SMART STYLES on cab-
    riole legs or bases show up
    your ware and glass every
    time you pass.

    BF Some of these cabinets

    are on the simpler graceful
    lines equally suitable as your

    BOOK CASES

    L. §, WILSON

    SPRY ST.

    DIAL 4069

    Secretary.
    Governing Body of Combermere
    School.
    14.4,51—4n

    e



    UNBREAKABLE POTS!

    You can still get a few of the
    Medium and Small Sizes of
    OLD IRON METER CASES

    Some people have used them for :

    VIOLETS
    CARNATIONS
    PINKS

    {
    GERANIUNS ete.

    Price only 1/% and 2/6
    See Them at Your —

    GAS WOPKS, BAY sT.





    \

    PUBLIC SALES

    Tee cents per agate tine on week-days

    mimmum cnarpe $1.5 on week

    -days
    and $1.80 om Sundays



    REAL ESTATE





    BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 bed-
    rooms, every convenience including
    oo water supply. As new, £3,000

    4476. 15.3.51—t.f.n.

    PROPERTY —

    Containing dwelling
    house with three bedrooms (Partly wall)
    standing on one rooa, id‘ perches of
    land situated at Forde’s Gap, Britton's
    Hin. Apply to: Cc. M Gréenidge or
    Hutchinson & Banfield, James Street

    8.4.51—6n |

    HOUSE—One (1) Board and Shingled
    House 22 x 1) x 9. Shedroof and Kiichen,
    Situated Brereton’s Village, St. Philip
    Apply to Mrs. Joseph Bartiett, Breretons
    Village. 14.4.51—1n
    ——

    By instructions received I will sell b
    P v

    day next the 19th at 2 p.m. Two houses
    17 x 8 and 18 x 10 with ched at Ist
    Avenue, Bush Hall,
    D'ARCY A. SCOTT.
    Auctioneer.
    14.4.51—4n.



    eileen recannmanennnartitiglinssttactetinats ad

    Offers will be received up to the 20th
    day of April 1951 by the undersigned
    for that substantially built stone
    bungalow called Allenby _ situate ut
    Welches, Christ Church on the sea where
    there is excellent bathing. It consists
    of Open Verandah, Drawing and Dining
    Rooms, Three spacious Bedrooms, Lava-
    tory and Bath, Kitchenette, Double
    servants’ room, and a Garage; and stands
    on 6,664 sq. ft. of land.

    Inspection by appointment.

    DARCY A. scorTt,
    Real Estate Agent,
    Magazine Lane.

    Dial 3743. 13.4.51--49



    We will offer for sale to public com-
    petition at our office on Friday 27th.
    April at 2 p.m. oi

    (1) LABOCSR BLEST a
    Dwelling house and
    Martins St. Philip,
    acres, 2 roods of land. Dwelling
    house comprises Drawing and
    Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kiteh-
    en, Toflet and Bath. Government
    water installed.

    Three other parcels of land con-
    taining respectively 2 = roods,

    roods, and 1 acre 2 roods belong-
    ing to and near to above property
    will also be offered for sale either

    Stone wall
    shop at St

    standing on 2

    (2)

    together with above property of

    separately.

    For inspection apply on the prem-
    ises to the owner Mr. Everton

    Greenidge.

    For further particulars and conditions
    of sale apply to :—
    HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD
    11.4,51.—6n

    AUCTION .

    By instructions received I will sell at
    Central Police Station om Monday next
    the 16h April, 1951 at 2 p.m., the fol-
    jowing items: 25 cartons Biscuits, 10
    Tins Condensed Milk, 13 packages Tea,
    528 Tins Beef. 90 Mess Tins, 11 Pairs
    Boots, Foot and Fuel Pumps, 2 Hy-
    draulie Jacks, 4 Blow Lamps, 3 Shifting
    Wrenches, Fiat, Round and Half-round
    Files, Tyres, 1 Clutch Plate

    D'Arcy. A. Scott,
    Gov't Auctioneer
    11,4. 51-—4n, -

    a prices etahtainangagtinas arcane

    I have been instructed by the Gov-
    ernor-in-Executive Committee to sell
    by publie auction at Seawell Air Port
    on Wednesday next *e 18th April at
    2 o'clock. One tractor drawn Lawn
    Mower. It is a collection of Six Mowers
    and is the right thing for a Cricket or
    Tennis Club. It can be seen at Seawel!











    any day except Sunday between the
    hours of 9 a.m, to $2 R
    DARCY A. SCOTT.
    Govt. Auctioneer
    13.4.51—4n



    American Labour
    And The World

    © From page 5

    In Russia, as in her satellites,
    we see the most reckless destruc-
    tion of the critical spirit, the
    most systematic and thorough
    abuse and annihilation of all
    human rights. Russia of to-day
    is the model of twentieth-century
    slavery, Forced labour has be-
    come an integral part and
    organic phase of the entire Soviet
    economy, Indeed, the old Marxist
    battleery: “Workers of the world
    unite, you have nothing to lose
    but your chains” holds true in
    ‘Russia far more than in any other
    country,

    Clearly, the roots of the present |
    crisis are deeply imbedded in the,
    challenge ‘of Soviet slavery to|
    human freedom, The struggle for
    human freedom has taken on a
    new meaning. To-day, it is not
    merely a struggle to extend and
    expand freedom. It is a desperate
    struggle to preserve and protect
    freedom. .

    TOTALITARIANISM

    In this struggle to preserve,
    protect, and promote human free-
    dom American labour has done
    its part and will continue to do
    much more than its part. We of
    labour recognize that we have
    more to lose than any other group
    im society, if democracy is re-
    tarded or destroyed. Experience
    has clearly demonstrated that
    there can be no free labour with-
    out democracy, We sincerely hope
    and trust that all other social
    groups understand that there
    can be no democracy without a
    healthy and powerful free labour
    movement. If Communist totalit-|
    arianism should ever triumph,
    labour can “win” only one thing
    —the most brutal and brutalizing
    form of slavery,

    _ It is this realization that has
    impelled us in the labour move-
    ment to be in the forefront of |
    the fight for freedom. Labour is
    best equipped to be the spearhead
    in the fight against every brand
    of totalitarian tyranny.

    _ American labour will intensify
    its activities to help strengthen}
    the ranks of free labour and of
    other democratic forces abroad,
    We welcome the recent setbacks
    to communism in Italy, India,
    Germany, and in other countries.
    We will continue every possible
    effort to advance still further
    this disintegration of the forces
    of communism now taking place
    in those areas and elsewhere,

    American labour is determined
    to hold itself in readiness at all
    times to help make available
    American techniques in health,
    industry, and self-government on
    a world. scale to economically
    underdeveloped regions and to
    render every service possible to
    humankind.

    It is our firm conviction that
    with world labour rallying vig-
    orously. on the side of democracy,
    neither the Communist nor any
    other brand of totalitarianism or
    slave statism can ever win, or







    ition on the spot on Thurs. |

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE
    | PUBLIC NOTICES |





    Tea cents per agate line on week-days |
    and 12 cent per agate line on Sundays. | "4 12 cents per agete Hine on Sundays,

    minimum charge
    | and $1.80 on Sundays.

    NOTICE
    | BYE - ELECTION
    | Parish of
    cre . ~*
    1 non:inates
    | sons to serve ». members in the
    } eras Assembly for the Parish of
    Andrew in the place of D.
    deceased,

    I hereby notify my intention
    taking a poll for the determination
    the said election on Mond. next
    16th. day of April 1951 at the



    St. ANDREW
    person having















    Harbour Log
    In Carlisle Bay

    M.V. Sedgefield, Schooner Gloria He
    rietta,
    Ca
    Adina S., Schooner
    MV

    Lydia
    Counsellor,

    net, Capt. Clarke, for St. Vineent,



    be«
    the election of p





    Schooner Marea Henrietta, Yacht
    bbee, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner
    Gardenia W., Schooner Emeline, Schoon
    Woaderful
    T. B. Radar, Schooner
    harriet Whittaker, Schooner Turtle Dove,
    Schooner Cyril E. Smith, Schooner Rain-

    $1.50 on week-days |

    ri]



    e

    A. Foster

    of
    of
    the

    Alleyne



    n

    bow M., M.V, Willemstad. Sehooner
    Cc. M. W. Ipana, M.V. Daerwood.
    ARRIVALS
    M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
    | yet, Capt. Clarke, for Halifax via St
    Lucia.
    M.V. Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt
    Cook, from Trinidad.
    DEPARTURES
    M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons

    M.V. Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt

    Cook, for Trinidad,

    In Touch with Barbados

    Coastal Station





    Cable and Wireless advise that they
    can now communicate with the following |
    hips through their Barbados Coast
    Station

    s,s, Golfito, ss, Bonaire, 8.8, Edison
    Skipper, ss. Ravnanger, 8.5. Polifemo,
    ss. Cavina, 8.8. Colombie, s.s. Brazil,
    s.s. Fort Amherst, 5.8. Helena, s.s. Alcoa
    Pennant, s.s. Mormacreed, 8.8. Alcoa
    Polaris, § Canadian Challenger,
    Mails for St. Licia, Dominica, Mont
    serrat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda,
    Boston, Halifax and Montreal by the
    5.8, Lady Nelson will be closed at the
    General Post Office as under;—

    Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Regis\ered
    Mail at 1.30 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at
    2.20 p.m, on the 16th April, 195!

    RATES OF EXCHANGE

    APRIL. 13, 1951
    CANADA
    Cheques on
    Bankers
    Demand
    Drafts
    Sight Drafts
    Cable
    Currency
    Coupons
    Silver

    63 2/10% pr.

    G1 2/10"
    61.05 pr
    @ 9 10%.
    63 2/10%
    1 7/10%

    rT.

    59° pr

    pr

    pr

    pr

    SS,





    SECOND ANNUAL
    BENEFITSHOW & DANCE

    DRILL HALL (GARRISON)
    On

    FRIDAY MAY 4TH,
    at 8.20 p.m.
    In ald of the Christ Church Baby
    Welfare League Clinic

    1951

    MADAME IFILL Presents
    THE “STAR BUDS" of 1951
    Patrons:

    Honourable V. C. Gale, M.LC.,
    Mr, E. D. Mottley, M.C.P,
    By kind permission of Colonel

    Michelin and under the Direction
    of Captain C. E, Raison, A.R.C.M.,
    M.B.E, the Police Band will supply

    the music.
    ADMISSION: :—: $1.00
    Dancing after show. Bar and
    Refreshments

    Evening Dress Optional









    Christian Science
    livading Room

    Nourt: 10 am-—2 p.m.
    Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

    10 agit o'clock.
    Saturdays.

    i> 4, >. i, a. 4D

    Tiristian Science $



    GERM LUBRICATING

    OILS

    ARE BEST BY TEST
    DON’T ONLY OIL IT—GERM IT

    Gasolene Station—Trafalgar St.

    |
    | CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.



    PAGE SEVEN

    NOTICE

    FOR RENT

    Minimum charge week 72 cents and
    86 cents Sundays 34 words



    —_——
    )
    |
    |





    WANTED

    charge week

    GOVERN ME!



    Mfnimur



    72 cents and

















    nda m — over 24)
    warts cane - gaa a ‘cane | words 3 cents a word week—4 Centa o
    word Sundays. ae a ents © | word Sundays. Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
    ;}menty) Order, 1951, No. 9 Which will be published in the Official
    neLY HOUSES eve . aa '
    } Gazette of Thursday 12th April, 1951
    | “CUERK.—at the Barbados Ice Co. |, ee me _ peceeee a nee 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
    Lt, pineioalty ie Sales atid Delivers o lean Apply Winston Johneor, | Prices of “Cornmeal”, “Margarine--(c) Mello-Kreem Brand” and
    : am at Factor r further | Phone 82 ; poe ’ ; "
    particilars, apply to the Secretary.” | PDOne 4921 or a2 14.4.51—2n | “Cement” are as follows:-—
    i 4 —_—_—_——
    11 .4.51--Sn BEWDLEY "-~Nawy Gardens. h upatomrsicnanrer onsciagenn frien Spepnereneene-cgpomnn animate aaaa ae

    Ch. €

    ARTICLE |



    “Sa nad We ed, Gr unfurnished, for ; WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE
    ! 3 — fro y to 15th Se

    A vacancy exinte for @ Re let Mees PR wig ie che dor 1S Sateen (not more than) (not more than)
    Manageress Previous experience in * ‘ 14.4.83-_2s as mortatulaniiat = > oe

    catering for Restaurants or Hotels 0: Ome —tp





    similar experience is desirable

    a






















































    i
    |
    School, Belleplaine beginning between} Applications should be submitted in | ¢hUATS: Two completely new de Luxe | Cornmeal . | $10.58. per bag of |
    the hours of seven and eight o’clock in| Writing giving details of previous ex- | [UY furnished flats at Four Aces, St } 98 Ibs }12 Ib
    the morning perience and enclosing copies of tes Lawrence Gap. From June onwards ‘oe t ‘ | 5 ven | t | _ Polling Station No.1.— The Alleyne a and a ent passport six ee aes — serine war | Margarine: } ;
    ) Sehool—the North wing for all persons | photograph, and should be addressed ans us ‘© house flats. It is not oe 9 nap & :
    whose surnames beni” with the letter /to Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd., P.O. | ® Teconverted residence. Apply Mrs. L (c) Mello-Kreem $2.55 per 5 Ib. tim 56c. per lb. or le&s
    Ja to J. inclusive : Box 103, Bridgetown.” 10.4.51.—Gn | Hassell, phone 4003. 10.4.51—5n Brand than % Ib. 4¥%r.
    | Polling Station No. 2. — The Alleyne | eee an —— ctieidigtan } =
    | School — the South wing for all pe | . a INGRID—Marine Gardens. The house per oz.
    ; sons whose Surnames begin with th: MISCELLANEOUS contains living rooms, Three (3) Bed- ‘
    pre ny ee POSITION WANTED as maid or ng | end Elec arielty throughout. "Fer ens ve gee TH On We. per lb. ae
    a Ae t rsing J - - 1 at. or turther 1 :
    ©. A. INGRAM. fa sick, Willing to live Write Mrs. | particulars apply Messrs. Yearwood -& | than % Ib, 4%.
    Sheriff and = {Constance McConney Beckles Hill, St. | Boyce, Solicitors, James Stree: }
    : Returning Officer | Michael 14.4.51—1n 14,4.51—2 ;, oe
    —6:
    4.5 Sonnniinshitesatlinneeincsircei —_—__oo
    ae ac ees ae ear eee ARCH wantea: Apply to BROS | LARGE HOUSE & FLAT—The Camp.| Cement 5s cs _ |$2.09 per bag éf
    © BARBADOS MUTUAL BENEFIT! xniTTING & SPINNING co. Wp. | 5t. Lawrence Gap. On-the-Sea. Puliy ' } 94 lbs :
    NOTICE } Coleridge Street, 10.4.51—4n paraished et 8357. Miss , Hunt ’ 7 :
    pl Maxwe'! ‘coast 31.3.51—t.t.n. | ——_— ~ ;
    1S HEREBY GIVEN that the 44 12.4.51—2n.
    Annual General Meeting of the abo “| Fee gga = ello Beachmont, Bathahebs an
    ciety will be held on Monday, 28rd re , = from ; 7 enema nip npn ene peetnengeeneinnsetife
    . : apa ety se, 3 double bedrooms with sing)
    April oe * = pine ot Mane ; it The ed it way Re Simmons bedsteads, children’s room WN
    mee < aon mae a the ‘Wepaut tl to lief from. x dining .room and lounge. Refrigerato
    eres © 2 : . mee garage, servant's room, Apply: Howe gua :
    th Committee of Management and | ee ‘ 5 s RS ke Ring 3626 —
    : . , 13.1,.51—t.f.1
    Treasurer's Account for the past year, AC IN 1ON- ; & y
    » Electing Officers and a Committe 5 ’ 1D. ‘ DIGEST , ‘ * ‘Vic TeaAte. ts manatee | cae LONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, ees
    of Management for the current year. | ©syyq 7 Worthings Post Office. Ideal locaiity;| ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED | Th yo . i
    fand ‘c) Dealing with any other matters; Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste fully furnished with telephone refrig- (M.A.N.Z. LINE) 2 dale Pesrmossy nr
    before the Meeting ‘rator, Radio, Electric; running water accept Cargo and Passengers for
    By Order of the Committee, and sparkling effervesce! nce in badeouings Baniedie tei wa Ba, . MS. “TONG L Paramaribo, Satling Thursday 33th
    E ssures gentle efficiency. Special = % OM a garag § ARLRO” sailed Brisbane instant
    ‘i “A 1g. Selrelary Drop oth or teu tatlets into Dial B15 “Or eet V ion ee 9 ag Mth, “Astiving at Barbados Noy The MLV. “Monek i
    c § etary a 50 or ictoria s ve y. “Mo: a’ will accept :
    11.4,52.—2n a of water, watch it fizz, i44.5i—teon |” Cargo and Pawnee Haeat
    _ - b
    H then drink it. Keep a —e ~ fw oes Cargo accepted on through Bills of nica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
    NOTICE | BA) suppty handy always! |wsee Gan Purnmied: Bedroom, | Bian Guten ert weeseeg gt isin inant” SNE Monday
    yi ¥ , z
    PARISH OF ST. PRILIP | i fae ‘ing water waets Retrigavater, ” ae for Bvitish Guiana, Barbados, Windward instant. :
    Sealed Tenders — marked on envelope. | Padio, Telept Ne . * he ind Leeward Islands, The MLV. “Caribbee" will :
    ' Tender for Residence’’ — are Inyited for p nd a : oD pints ae 5 "Pho oa paver ae Cargo and Passengers for
    the purehase of the Head Teacher Alka Seltzer > ppointmen one—8278 Seas For further particulars apply:-- te Mnica, Antigua, Montserrat,
    House at the St. Philip's Boys’ Schoo! ree Nevis and. St Kitts. Salling -
    The House is of board and shingle and) — ae Be RRS AUIS eo eS Oe pee *URNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD, and Priday 20th instant
    can be inspected on application to Mr a fees Da COSTA & CO. LTD. ae TELE. 4037.
    Alleyne the present occupant. } ne Ne ‘= Bridgetown, VI. SCHOONER OWNE! “tv
    All Tenders will be received by thc'| GOVERNMENT NOTICE Sehaiies ee ASSOC. INC -
    undersigned not later than the id4th Apri! : : Bw . Borhos 08, ;
    1951. oF ‘ Fadi oa Attention is drawn to the Price of Goods (Defence) (Amend- | 2 < ore
    S 88: urchaser must be p' pc z ' ; ‘ ; ; cbiyenirrane ——— aan
    PI ctieapiy oy from the spot in two/ ment) Order, 1951, No. 3 which will be published in the Official -
    weeks’ time after sale. eis | Gazette of Thursday, 12th April, 1951 i HARRISO .
    The Vestry doe t bind itse ao sell} © : e ‘ +
    to ‘the Sigeeni oe ane tenet { 2. In this Order the percentage of mark-up on “Canvas” is as
    P. 8. W. SCOTT, follows: —
    Clerk, to the Vestry, | Sa —_ er
    St. Philip. | P mn R
    33.81—1r | ; ap. Can: OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
    NOTICE Canvas: — ‘
    PARISH OF ST, PETER | (a) All kinds including duck and materials used for Due
    As from April 16th to May 16 th: 7 BS EF SRES ara __Vessel From Leaves Barbados
    Parochial Treasurer will not bé at hi covering motor vehicles inside and out 25 3S. “TACOMA STAR” Liverpool 22nd Mar 7th April
    OOS See Se Mey heer 10 ae (b) The retail price of any canvas when sold to 38. “HERDSMAN” London 10th Apr. 28rd Aprit
    Saturds hil 21s rom ar 3 7G ¢ s
    beet a | persons producing a certificate signed by or on oe! pera s London lith Apr. 26th Aprib
    Saturday April 28th from 10 a.m behalf of the Fishery Officer authorising that per- 3s. “PLANTER sAverneol 10th April 23rd April
    : 2 : > Ly . ‘ .
    tiny aes bh teem 10m son to purchase the amount of canvas named in S.S. “DALESMAN” Glacntn vi 20th April 3rd May ©
    noon at certificate » us s ij : ¥ 8 a :
    co eee seam ieibaiceiaaeste van. | that certificate to be used in connection with the Liverpool 15th April 8th May
    eee repairs, construction or refitting of fishing boats HOM ——— ot ST _ ssmumrarinessnbasnnD sipnitie~ensienneninmnniieni eens
    G. 3. CORBIN. shall be the landed cost excluding Customs duty EWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGD
    Parochial Treasurer, i on kk EB ,
    St, Peter plus 25% mark-up Vessel F ° :
    $.51—6 . . ; or Closes in ‘bados ©
    toe 14.4,51—I1n. S.S. “STATESMAN” .. London =

    End of April





    Por further information apply te - -
    DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

    \me, ALcoa

    NEW YORK SERVICE
    S.S. MYKEN” sails 6th April arrives Barbados 19th April.
    A Steamer satly 27th April arrives Barbados 9th May,
    pacer ene peeriegipisinrtimeteshindiiiesion er



    Make sure you ask for Sloan’s Liniment
    apply it to your rheumatism—then—











    NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
    S.8. “ALCOA ROAMER” eailx 4th April arrives Barbados 20th April.
    8.8, “ALCOA PATRIOT” snile 18th April arrives Barbados 4th May
    (ee



    You cannot get anything better
    for your muscular pains than
    Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it
    lightly — don’t rub — and relief is
    quick and certain,

    LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET.



    CANADIAN SERVICE



    SOUTHBOUND









    Name of Ship Sails Montreal Satis Hatifax Arrives dow
    83. "ALCOA PARTNER" April 9th April 19th
    a 5.3, “ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May %th
    d SS. “ALCOA PIONEER Ma, ith May 14th May Mth @
    a —
    \s. NORTHBOUND z
    —— : -
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    PAGE EIGHT



    ISLAND BEAT. NAVY 3—1 TUE GAMBOI.< 8
    IN FOOTBALL GAME

    , AN Island side defeated a team’ from H.M.C.

    \
    : * 4 7 The Vi a as . 2» > ormé ty was
    Magnificent and Micmac three—one in their foothall match , a ae - Bie may peggy f between 8 and 9 o'clock to-night exehenes for German, unity — we U r
    at the Garri esterday ; ISG ee See woe First information was that it}4% iusion and | > i
    atthe Garrison. yesterday evening. 500 cc NSU machine on a_ six cent. of the German people,

    Ships

    The goals for the island were scored by Desmond
    Johnson, Reynold Hutchinson and Arthur Wilkes. Johnnie

    . : Dorval at 8.30 a.m. to-day.
    . oba class. bi Dr. Adenauer was answering R A D I @ sS
    prcoct. at centre half for the Navy,sepred the lone goal es me. Saeeer Pek as ie questions after addressing report-
    or his team. 500 cc machine with sidebar y 2 ers at a lunch giv by the asso-
    dhe Barbados teok the .touch .off over a measurei mile in 28.774 Y.M.C.A. Wins ciation of fren Diplomatic We. ha
    with the Navy defending the seconds, an average speed of 126 I the Seidler imran “ae Journalists. ‘ " ; ; ve a complete range
    northern 1 A few seconds miles per hour. > e L nen ‘ . MCA Dr. Adenauer ‘said: “I have ef models including the
    S orts later Drayton, on the right. wing The old record established by ¥-M.C.A. L. Gill o HMCS been asked whether I and the latest EBS15. This can be
    Pp * for the island, received the bail Henne, was 115 miles per hour, Won from Sairbrun of H.M.CS.|German people would accept adapted to work off vevious
    . and centred. Johnson collected —Reuter, Magnificent 46—44. S. Smith also] neutralisation of Germany if the voltages from 220 to 110.
    Window it, ane shot well out of the as . per ek aga beat E. Browne ao somes Se re-estab- $118.00
    : reaches of Brown, the -Navy eS ‘{ is! . a ree elections were ‘
    The 1951 football season custodian. BRONSTEIN RESIGNS eta ate Raat Cc. guaranteed. — : :
    opens this afterncon at Ken- The Navy after got their arding an a ute! sen lobes This question is very theoreti -
    sington with a First. Divi- equaliser when Johnnie Hancock. CHESS GAME from Coryell and Hawkins cal; but I will reply frankly. Also other models with and

    sior fixture between Carlton
    and Notre Dame.

    Carlton is one of the most
    vopular of the First Division
    veams while Notre Dame
    are making their bow to
    senior football, They won
    the Third Division competi-
    tion and promotion to the



    in the geal -area, received a
    through pass. He shot hard and
    low to beat Marshall, the island's
    goalie. /

    The island made attacks on
    their opponents’ goal but»the full
    backs for the visitors, Johnson
    and Dickinson, were always in
    position, Johnson especially used



    Good Shooling
    This Week

    Major J. E. Griffith and- Mr.
    M. G. Tucker with scores of 98
    out of a possible 100 were the best
    marksmen in this week’s shooting

    Motor Cycle Speed

    Record Broken
    MUNICH,

    April 12. Gardiner Austin Co, Ltd. PARIS, April 138
    Wilhelm Herz today broke the [T C.A. agents, have been in- German Chancellor Dr. Konrad
    world motor cycle speed record formed that the T.C_A. aircraft|Adenauer to-day said in Paris

    with 180 miles per hour

    miles stretch.
    Two other records were estab-

    LONDON, April 11.
    David Bronstein to-day resigned
    the 42th game without renewing
    play in the World Chess Cham-
    pionship in Moscow, aceording to
    a Tass Soviet News Agency mes-
    sage received in London. When



    T.C.A. Plane
    Coming To-night

    is expected to arrive at Seswell

    would arrive this morning. It is
    now, however, scheduled to leave



    60. L. Fields, Y.M.P.C. beat
    Bairbrun 100—32.

    BARBADOS WINS
    AT WATER POLO

    Barbados’ defeated H.M.C.S.
    Magnificent seven — nil in the

    | Germany Belongs



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    SATURDAY,

    APRIL 14, 1951



    To The West

    that to buy German neutrality in

    including those in the Soviet east
    zone, shared his opinion.

    Germany belongs to the West: and
    does not want to be separated
    from the West. That is a decisive
    point... Anybody who thinks
    neutralisation is possible in the

    face of pressure from develop-
    ments in Asia misconstrues the
    —Reuter.

    facts.













    e without the famous Teleflic

    Device. Prices from
    $80.00 to $168.00

    CAVE



    4 Sout ad > the game was adjourned yester-
    Second Division two years his head to good advantage and Practice of the Small Bere Rifle day, Wael cumapita Michail water polo game played at the GRYPTOQUOTE NO. 6.
    ago and last year they car- | at one time saved what looked Club. ; ._ Botvinick held a material Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon. || pyogq gcpl xAG ENOG NOQ
    ried ‘off the championship | like a certain goal. ‘TO, CUS pest. scores a Bs advantage. Aa Barheses, Lary aa gees SCKP 0ZQ ICZ?
    ‘ . eth. 6.5 points to 5.5 Owen Johnson and Billy Manning —DCSGFZ. SHEPHERD

    = guy = ih gm ed ry Soon after goalie Brown was 100 pale croee Je C2 * Pavers each scored two goals, while Tim Last Crypt: Heard melodies are
    to the First Divisi this called upon to save two good Major J. E. Griffith ........ 98 —Reuter, | Yearwood scored the seventh for sweet, but those unheard are
    Renan’ : on shots. One he snatched out of the Mr. M. G. Tucker .,...... 98 team. sweeter, ‘

    mt. air while he dived and gathered ,, B. W. Clarke .... 96 ¢ \ KEATS. & Co Ltd

    rhe: felewins seams win | Other of the groan’) | wg: Bk Mas «= Saecer Results ~~ RCRA & BONS i Led.

    nein MEG d's XT | centred and Wilkes headed goal- ..°\T. A. L. Robert ...... 92 Lonvon, april 13. Britain Threatens 10-13 Broad St
    Basketball at YMPO a wards, Brown reached the bali ,, H.U G. Webster .. 92 Results of soccer matches ek ‘ E 156565655 POOSPEPEEAD .
    night: Edghill L, Greenidge. and managed to push it out. Mrs. H. W. Webster . 88 played in the United Kingdom on Action In Persia POOP

    r Sy : was

    W. Greenidge and Hunte
    (Y.M.P.C.), Forde and Git-
    tens (Pirates) Weatherhead
    and Symmonds, (H.C.0.B.),



    Archer (Â¥.M.C.A,), Stanford Both teams fought hard to . Division III (Northern) Bar- British lives and her giant oil con- ra _
    (Fortress) . , ee eetiine hin we wie, Polo AtThe Garrison ee va . a q cession in Iran, following riots i, Sa Sener s
    : accompli is when 8 er match:—Brighton an hich 12 ted
    received the ball and beat Brown DURING the past few weeks)Hove, Albion 4, Saint Johnstone filled. eee ener eee COTTON DRESS DANCE
    with a beautiful shot along the no serious Polo has been played| 1,—(CP)

    Island Beat Navy
    At Table Tennis

    ALL the



    Reynold Hutchinson, who
    boring through, made no mistake,
    beating Brown with a well placed
    shot.

    ground,

    Half time soon after found the
    island two goals in the lead.

    In the second, the island missed
    many opportunities and again
    Johnson at full back was respen-



    There will be another practice
    shoot of the Rifle Club to-day at
    2 p.m.



    owing to cracks in the field and
    general hard condition of the soil
    resulting from lack of rain, but
    it is hoped that the few showers
    during the last two days will so
    improve the surface that mem-



    Thursday :—

    English League Division I1:—
    (Southern):—Leyton Orient 0;
    Newport County 3.



    RUGBY RESULTS

    LONDON, April 13.
    Results of Rugby matches



    LONDON, April 13.
    Britain threatened on Friday to
    take action of her own to protect

    In response to a question by
    Deputy Conservative Leader,
    Anthony Eden, as to whether Brit-
    ish naval vessels are available and
    whether others are proceeding to
    the neighbourhood, Herbert Mor-







    a :— TO-NITE

    At Queen’s Park

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    14.4.51

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    raN
    i he car that
    C.VPresses you!

    island players won sible for warding off the majoriiy bers will be able to get a game : ; i rison, Foreign Secretary, said that
    their games against the players of, attacks, shits ‘atiarfoon. if there pas i itane sane gg “re the matter is being considered,
    of the team from the H.M.C.S. The teams were as follows: Polo players among the men of Union: Northam Aon eunie: “er {fit is true that a man expresses himself in
    Magnificent at table tennis a: the = Navy: Brown, Johnson; Dickin- H.M.C. Ships in harbour, they] 45, 13: Bridge fb r and Albi
    Y.M.C.A. yesterday afternoon. son, Shirley, Fox, Gregory, will be welcome at the Club.]g path o aerate we . fon DENIED PLOT ¥ u mi a § m the clothes he wears, how much more
    Owing to some difficulty only Stewart, Cuttral, Hancock, Arn- Should it be impossible to play, Berta 0 (HED) Ae wpeRt: ' : evident is the taste he exhibits in the car
    three players of. the Magnificent old, and Bell Irvine. They were some of the members will no|° Ruane Te : 2 ar BOMBAY, April 13. Setces Wolseley “ ak
    turned up to play. Three gamés accompanied by Mr. Carey doubt be exercising their horses.| ,. ey Hull 20, Batley....Former Premier of Kashmir, he drives. The Wolseley “ Four-titt
    were played in each set and the Coach. a 5; Widnes 2, St. Helens 5; Work. Pandit Kak today denied that he ‘ac re is for the man who demands the highest
    sailors tried their best but perhaps ~ [slamd: Medford, Ishmael COLLEGE DEFEAT Eee a Barrow 0; Hudders- had been organising q plot against mechanical achievements of the auto-
    they were still suffering from their prayton, Cadogan, Gittens OLYMPIA 9 teld 2, Wakefield Trinity 16; Liv- Kashmir in collaboration with ; ;
    “sea legs”. Grant, Marshall, Wilkes, Hutchin 11— “pot 5, Bradford North- pakistan, rae bead n ee mobile age, expressed in coachwork of
    ern — 4 ssivai ei
    The results were :— son, ae L. F. Harris, QUEEN’S COLLEGE defeated} —————— ea) Flush Kidneys With Cystex and You'll Feel Fi. superb comfort, with the restrained exterior
    Magnificent vs. Islana Referee; Mr. Olympia 11—9 in ‘their netball ends all tro prescription of a famous doctor styling that stamps his good judgment.
    S. J. Fairbairn vs. R. Spéncer game -at Queen's College grounds e Soutle sae hg dl fe sayy. ianay Retin |b
    18—21, 10—21 e B yesterday evening. For Queen’s Bare. heats. Neuritis, Lumbogo, Backacho, Luxuriously Roomy Interior, Five sit comfortably
    E. Brown ee V. Chase 16—21 Jamaica eal Collége Jean Vaughan and ° ¢ beh wy be as, © eziness, i Foor tr on genuine hide seats, cushioned in soft, resilient
    > anata ‘ A ‘ , foam rubber. Car heater and id Jemist
    he Barbad SE gy Mangehcpan 28 Sa ater Pat ae Pe, | it Sega
    18—81. ii SOQ aly an aa r 06 their shooting weak. ae ahd be At’end ‘well next week, yo ON? Fee ene seinen ene core oe
    E. Beawa ae EB McLeod 21 16, (From. Our Own Correspondent) Cc Hel N Way: feet for switcases, golf equipment, etc. Separate
    ac ae PORT-OF- SPAIN, April 13, an atex ps ature 3 Ss compartment for spare wheel saves disturbing
    aa. Fairbeii J a Doubles players Donald tDecialy compounded 1 to sont vy ents took i
    airbairn vs. J. Hoad 19— amaica Do - ’ Se SAG Sins Adjustable Front Seats and Telescopic Steering
    nit atone Hone ag: | What’s on Today Sipiiieetimierecr gs | Sei ie Mee oe
    ‘ is ars! rivers are not ¢ same height. all or
    Exhibition Game Carter 6~8,!6—4, 6-3, 6—1 as | police ‘Courts ...... 10,00 theseld wavy tovend Your troublen =~ works ia | hott, you drive in absolute fatique-free comfort
    the Brandorr Trophy tennis series Athletic Meet, Notrs Dame (1) Starts killing the germs which are attack. with perfect control.
    20°” oo lost to R. Leslie, 22— entered the second day at Tran- Sports Club — ‘Bay tem in two hours; yet is absolutely habmizss
    —21 and 19—21, Both of J a 1 - ; Tt
    S a quility. this afternoon. Jamaic Grounds ........ 2 pm, to human tissue.
    these boys play for the Y.M.C-A. now "lead 31, fhe eee Fogtball—Cariton ve Notre S k he Sees sais nae whist yous. aystans ‘as
    so play pressively y > e vision) a mMmokers a nen.
    sy oOrrow sin- Kens! ton .... 5.00 _m. 4 ) Srstene tee and reinvigorates the kidneys,
    S i Cl] ges See. are. “Rerepahatson Feotwall" Inter-ship match @ Bivack c on the’ delicate filter organism, ‘ond
    avaniiah Club (Jamaica) vs. Legall, ,(B’dos), —Gurison .... 5.00 p.m stimulates the entire system.
    Te “ni T Sturdy © (Jamaica) vs. . Tayloi I tee nae of experience 9, Weeks in Hosp Hat-ntiow Well
    énnis Tourriament (pros). = G_ aulee ‘. pent : Bladder trouble, also Rhewmatic pains ond Stuf
    ol “= — Joints. | was not able to raise my arms and
    THURSDAY'S RESULTS FORTRESS DEFEAT Sea WY ant Weuals Staal om 5.00 p.m. spent nine weeks in hospital, They said I would

    MIXED DOUBLES (Final)
    Mrs. R. S, Bancroft and P. McG. Pat-

    Y.M.P.C. 13—7
    FORTRESS defeated ¥.MP.C.

    Basketball

    H.M.C, Ships vs Is‘and,

    choose —_.-”




    not be able to work, but after ae I ee years
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    1 Health Improv
    terson beat Miss D. Wood and Dr. C, G. College vs Pickwick “I had not felt reall ally eved in 2 Daye
    Manning $10. 6—3, 6—3 ; 13—7 in a game of Basket ball YMPC. .... 7.45 p.m. Sou ieneiy: from Dackaches and headaches. |
    after. te mmatoh 1 a afer last night at the Y¥.M.P.C)! Billiards— lasting relic) Finally 1 decided to give Cystes ¢
    President. in the unavoidable absence of Y.M,P.C's usual surprise attack H.M.C, Ships vs Y.M.C.A fein one wish T hed tried it long ago and saved ;
    Lady Savage. could not penetrate the Fortress —Y¥M.CA. .. 7.30 p.m. my health more in two of three days thar other
    The following are the winners of the Jines, G, Rocheford scored 8 for Dance for men of H.M.C tings have done for months.’—Mrs. B.
    several. events:— . "]
    Ladies’ Singles—Miss G. Pilgrim Fortress. \ Ships Aquatic Club 8.30

    Men's Singles—Dr, C. G,.

    Ladies’ Doubles—Miss G
    Miss 1. Lenagan.

    Men's Doubles—Dr, C. G, Manning and
    ¥. P, Taylor,

    Manning.
    Pilgrim and

    The teams. were ;—

    Fertress: G. Stanford, J’ Archer,
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    G. Rocheford and C. Parris.

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    cKinstry.



    Navy Beat Island

    The H.M.C.S. Magnificent and
    Micmae combined team defeated
    the Island 38-21 in a basketball
    game at Y.M.P.C, last night. This
    win for the ships’ team followed
    an earlier win when they beat
    Y.M.P.C. 12-6.





    Traffie Don’t

    No. 25 duction was being still further Rainfall (Codrington) 21
    e stepped up.—Reuter. in. Sole Importers:
    Sree Total for Month to Yestcr- W.S. MONROE &CO, LTD.
    DO NOT FORGET TO BUSTA ACQUITTED day: .97 in. Bridgetown,
    RESPECT PEDESTRIAN KINGSTON, April 12. Temperature (Max,) 86.5 °F dos,

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    U.K. EXPORTED 1473
    RADIO ACTIVE
    ISOTOPES

    LONDON, April 13,

    Britain’s atomic energy plant is
    supplying radio active isotopes for
    medical and other research to 25
    foreign countries, the Ministry of
    Supply announeed to-day,

    Out of the past year’s total of
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    The total was nearly double
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    Bustamante was today acquit-
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    the police at the end of the third

    Moon”"—5.00 & 8.50 p.m.

    Astor—‘‘South of the Rio Grande”
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    & 1.30 p.m.





    The Weather

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    Sun Rises: 5.54 a.m.
    Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
    Moon (First Quarter) April
    4

    14
    Lighting: 6.30 p.in.
    High Water: 8.22 a.m.,

    p.m.
    YESTERDAY

    11.11

    Temperature (Min.) 72.5 °F

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    PAGE 1

    SATVHDAV, APRIL H, IH.-.I BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Trade Commissioner Reviews Local Supply Situation YIIH IIAI I IIIVIMNt. MR A. R. STARCK, O.B.E., United Kingdom Trade C'lmmis-siuncr in the British West Indies with headquarnis bl Trinidad, told the Advocate yesterday that he would do his best through the Board of Trade in London to ensure Appeal Court Judges Uphold Earlier Decision that traders in Barbados are getting supplied with goods j u d#es. The Assistant Court of Appeal Mam Care Little For Adult Suffrage from the United Kingdom within the limits of the essential and Mr H. A. Vaughan ye* tor requirements of the island from the resources of the Mother $*y agreed with a decision ot Country IVtly Debt c urt Judae Mr. A. Mr Starck is now on on* of hi* R # i „M H i^f l *„. ,, ^d ,^ ^ ? ngulv tours through hi. tern^7'^.*",^,? Jnd!JJSr 5 ...r> H,. arrived here on Thursday b^JSVfl.ll ^7 Ifc 4d evenum by B.W.I. A. from An^."eU-wcr Court Lnvell t.gua after v,s,ln ( h. Inward „ „, .^f/^ Co £ ln t ^ l,lamli From Itarbad< hr |.*. H Knight and Edith Collymore Now thai every Barbadian over '" Oorninua on Thursday Hi; i* wn „ Kmght told the OOU SI CM vow artMD the General >tayin at the Windsor Hotel to do" for him. FU.lion tomes off. the estimated Ask "*' %  ,bni conditions in theOn June 29 last year Knight who are qualified to vote "tithern islands. Mi Starck said went to LoveU and told him thnt Is 107.000. In the Bnn tremors in St. he wanted him to bury Rudolph Mr L A Chase, who is conKll, nd Nevis appeared to have Collymore, Edith's son who was nectcd with the registration of dled down • nd ,hc PW>Pl<' !" dead. LoveU said that he asked voters, told the Advacate vesterquickly recovering from a most Knight who would be responsida] that the progress in the work terrifying experience ble for paying the bill gad Knight or registering voters Is good The sugar crop is very good told him that it would be a cash Formerly a voter had to go to and ls being gathered according deal as he would pay him on the a Justice of the Peace and get to schedule and it U anticipated following Friday. him vouch for the legitimacy ol thai a record tonnage of sugar Knight kept him waiting for his qualifications The voter then will be produced. the monev, saying that he was had to go and register hirmelf about to collect a meeting turn Now a voter doc* not have to go ,n Ant.gua then^are mil many in December Knight came to him i Justice of the Peace nor to ito s,En of tfw terrible .Un.af< and told him that Edith and friendly •voukt be the terrible dasnaa} _. and get himself registered. An c m,jaed ** the hurncang. but too himself were no long* officer comes around to each home Government have taken vigorand auggested that he and register, those who can vote ou fl ,on o house the people ai k Edith whether she There are many, however, who n conditions will gradually bewiilina to pay part of truBBHB**J. do not car* a straw about voting. comv normal, it .s h.-ped. towards Edith paid 2 before he brought Besides the hundreds who are too the end of the year the case and $5 after he did so old and who tell you they ^" Government seems to have Knight tried to prove to the Ihlnk It is too much for them to done a most commendable job: court that he only went to Lovell hobble down to a centre to vote f r w faced with the problem because Edith Colly; for anyone, there are many who of replacing some 1,400 houses would not even get registered, There is a very good sugar crop furthermore think of voting m Antigua, but there is some when it ts election time. doubt as to whether it would all Some people arc giving some be gathered, as unfortunate! funny arguments to strengthen there was a stoppage of about their decisions not to vote.. four weeks which Is now happilv One woman who could not have settled. If the labourers continue voted under the old system but to give a full day's work, there is nly who can now vole, asked what every hope of the full crop being Government had done for her. taken off the fields. She did not think much of Ihe suggestion that, she would be ahla Estates' Flood to decide who would do something Mr Starck said that when hi f W her was here in February, there were Mr. Chase said lhat there terrific rains and some fear was limiM l>e :i few iieople paid to expressed as lo whether the BarTheir Honours Mr. J. W. It go around and tell the people at bndos sugar crop would come up Chenery and Mr. H. A. Vaughan meetings what Is behind registerto expectations as he had himself Judges, of Ihe Assistant Court of ing and voting JWI1 hc se rloui flood which hed Appeal yMterday varied Out of the 107.000 estimated uken place m ^ estates .id .n Vision of His Worship Mr. C qualified voters 7.000 are In nc e^try generally. ? n i£r t An .-, 3 ?'? 0 ?.i n L ?os^'H w d elighted to tee that Iho 13.000 In Christ Church. 7 000 in rams have ceased and that we havo had plenty of good sunsh asked him to do so, but Ihe arrangements as to who would pav were all between Collymore and LoveU. Lovell. however, said that all the talk concerning the burial were between Knight ind himself. Judgment was therefore given against Knlghl B.O.A.C. Will I \paml Inter Carih Service i Appeal Judges Impose 25'Fine L. Walwyn, Acting Police Mag trate of District *'A". Mr. Walwyn had fined Harold I here Bishop of Kew Road, SI. Michael A ,"„ n r"j.,Hn^.^;„ T<£&F£?£SSS& S'iJSVfe ssiir.£ sag • uEr„ rJL *££-£ zzsrsuds.'* TSSSS supplies of gooos rrom Ihe ,, ,„., ,,_ .,. Un 'l Ktaiftom. Mr. Starck "^ HonoJrf after reviewing said that certain items includw evidence imposed a fine of ing most metal goods and anyM/ g gj d in u days or in thing in connection with paper dcfauU tW( f months' Imprison or card board were very dimmen cult lo be obtained owing to the necessity of carrying out a vigorous and determined rearma-*. %  • ment programme. £5 |T0f SMNllIg St PhUlD, 7.000 in St. Oeorge, 3.000 in Si. Andrew. 4.000 in St lAicy S.i St. Thorn 6.000 in St. James and 3.O0O i St. Joseph. Can. Chalk ngt-r Brings Flour, Eggs THE motor vessel Canadian Challenger landed a cargo of BOO bags of flour. 70 cases of eggs, 140. Production in the United King barrels of potatoes and quantities dom ,, | ncrM sing on demands, and Sherlock Jordan of Eckstein B y 5lem ,i N or (s ( d i of peanuts and pickled meat from ih c resourcer of the country are Village, St. Michael was ordered over boundaries or territoric Halifax during her 15 hour stay a j, 0 rising and. unfortunately, to pay a fine of £5 to be paid by bet wren ( WO nations or blocs <-r at Barbados yesterday. supplies arc becoming scarcer, monthly instalments by His na t(ons li is utterly false to sav She al> landed cabbages, earHowever It Is to be hoped lhat Worship Mr. E. A. M^* 0 ^;, that the present world crisis i rols. provisions and fruit from the (he international situation may Poilco Magistrate of District "A mi| tw lwl ^, tl lnp f oree insisting British Northern WBglrl l eventually be eased and that the yesterday. (|1 lh ,. raIt(V „„ 0 and other forceThe Challenger left port last necessity for rapid expansion of Jordan was found guJlly ot c€k)n(( constructive rtaai OBI ui LONDON, i The B.O.A.C are to expand %  intei Caribt>ean • Parallel with this, improvements are to be made n. Ms> vices between the North American mainland, the Bahamas and Jamaica. As n result, cuts may be made in the B O A f l uis! ...it South American s**rvice This w..s rWMltd t\ Sir Miles Thomas, lit) At Chairman, who leaves tomorrow morning for a busia* ness visit to South Amvru and the Caribbean. He will visit Trinidud, Jamaica and the Bahamas among other places. Sir Miles in an m. terview explaineo thst contrar. lo rumours which had been en culated. It was not the B.O.A.C" I intention to .uitail tinactlvAti of Ihe B.W.I.A. My approach fa B W I A problems is thai set vice* must be eonsolldated aim expanded. They muV. Ix;nli-ni.i:bj meet the traffic demands of the West Indies area now and in the future." he said. Sir Miles pointet out that when he became B.O.A.C Chairman in 1949, he set out to do three things. Firstly he pruned the internal organisation of the B.OA.C". I MM to just over IS.500. Secondly he sought and obtained a new aircraft and thai iK aimed to make the Company into a sound commercial proposition. This task has been successfully undertaken In North Amerlen. Australia. India and Africa and now was to be auproched in lbs Caribbean ami South Aimru.ui HI .1-. I in.,n, i.,1 I ,., Ilm ^ crc i a l ' 1l P*"""" been shrinking rapidly. Totalitarianism, in one form or another, has been sweeping over the world. To-day it is holding one out of every three human beings in subjection In such a state of affairs, the ideals of freedom, of human dignity, are challenged as never before. Democracy is in desperate conflict with the forces of despotism. Contrary to the belief of some, the present world crisis ll Hot thaii those of any other land lo be attributed to any conflict That •" why American labour between different Forms of propP""s collective bargaining so erty ownership or of economic highly It provide, the vital Spirit to a conflict *" 11 "w m0*1 powerful vehicle • %  • the extension of democracy ii Nation 1 THE PILOT fixes hi* h*rn*a in the "Dilbert Duuker", usad by pilots of the United State* Air Force *ud Nnvy training at the Naval Air Btatlea at Psnsacols, Florida. The machine rushes down the slipway into the wstei. just as an aircraft would crash into the sea. The pilotlearn to roloase themselves from the harness before they are dragged under the wator t>y the *ucUou. American Labour And The World Struggle For Freedom By MATTHEW WOU. • Prnldmit. Ame*lei the KtSSIW RiOIITS night for British Guian u via St. Vincent, Circr.da and Trinidad. She Is consi"ned lo Messrs. Gardiner Ausli'i & Co. Ltd. changes. If there i* III On Call At C.C. tha r Starck said that owing lo nroseC uled for the Police. Intercolonial Cricket games in haveWhen we compare the "right*' Df labour in Ku*-ia with tha right* enjoyed by labour in Amri V %, M any country in the 1"d, first and foremost, no real i' -TVrVhdV Pollee'to' bk world that I. the classic example trade or labour unions exwl in • r nTt at?4S miS?Sr SoSr • S guo thai country is Husalor lt satellite countries thai road Rums. It is in Russia where no Thi UB Forde -e^dare whisp^^a desire for t^ ^ ^^ ^ politically and phyfically dannor jei't connlantly la Iho % %  to organize lor or In any **• M p|oiu,(lon and .peed u p further an, chanae whatroeve. Jordan wu found gljdtty ol J^g armaments will gradua'lly dlminexeeedlryr the speed limit while Jsh and that manufacturers gendriving a motor van on BlacK erally will be ablo lo lum their Rock Road on March J. Tl attention to the needs of a peacewas reported by t" tul world. driven at over 48 miles per and the ..peed limit onU. at^ !" STT^" iHl^^V*** lor to say_.bout rowL 7) niliin Isolated outbreaks of Fowl Tylihold still occur In the island. ,nd at least two ol thev were February, he wa, unable to confirmed by Ihe Government all the traders he would Veterinary Officer during the last liked and Ibis ,s hi. reason lor n onth spending another week here. Poultry keepers, he said, must He is using the offices ol the •ill l.erefore be aware ol the Chamber ol Commerce as his THK ""'"--.L-:^,. i, hc ) a nd where there has „een lcr„. presence ol the disease and con. headquarters and although h^ Committee has. on Ihe r ""\ '„.,, „ r „.',„„„ ,„„ lake the precautlona. v propo^ to c.H on ^ mjujy nrrn. m.nd.tlon of the^ "^J !" ^.TcrTnge. change lor Ihe bet at the bye-eleclion of a ter. truly progressive char, i purchase of adult poultry for can telephone the Chamber of member to serve"in ^Genorat country, with its economy based to their flocks_ unless Commerce where arrangemenui Assembly for the parish or at. BYE-ELECTION OFFICERS Governor-in-Executive he recomthe Reluming th In COsVTKAHT elreshing COntfl M Aua-rica system He is severely punished for the slightest infraction of factory rule or discipline Lateness cf work may be punished hy a prison astern South A: added "I shall ha< at the Jamaica-) route" He told me 11i.it Hie II O A (' would shortly introduce Constcl, niit-t DM ossDMadg %  >! the Went Indlc An am-nipt to bung in addlUon services would disturb tin(M .'nice liotween local operators ai trunk lines. This did not however moan such places as Trinidad or Barbados or ant other Wi->t Indian t err lionet. in the Southern Canhl-eun would has nothing nol ^ aD | e lo 0 ttract and i>ntei hange or %  „,„ American tourist*. The Miles r is sul effort of the It o A C's New nost in York office was applied lo all West Indian ti-rntoii' and Licfcol would be direct for anv or thorn Miles will bo away for apfour weeks returning k about May 5. of factory uroximilU .| v "* via Nr • on page 1 urcs previously outlined, as possible, anyone wishing *.o Officer, appointed two_ Offjf* 1 ?. l hief mo Vie m examination was w On Sunday between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. the ships will be performed yesterday by Dr E. A. .,„ open to all Visitors. Klnch He attributed death la j n The Magnificent, which is the rent steamed out of Curacao at 29 senior ship, is under Ihe command knots for Trinidad. of Commodore K. F. Adams. The Magnificent H C N and has a complement of craft and was built in Belfast in 1.000 including 160 officers The 1946 at a cost of approximately Mlrmar is under Lieulonant-Comseven million dollars. It costs 20 mander F. C Frewer. K C.N., million dollars a year to operate, and has a complement of 230 including 12 officers. The Mkmac. the pla The Miemac was here in 1B47. to the Mag/nhVent ,. oi bill this is the Magnlficent's first O" 1 warships bi voyage to Barbados. Three Trintdadians on the chips. Two are with the Mlrmar and one wilh the Magnificent. All olhcr personnel are CanI adian<; Both ships came in from Tnni. dad on Thursday They started their cruise from Halifax early ihis month and made their first call at Trinidad where they spent three days. They will spend four days here ) before leaving for Boston. Except for the sweltering heat and the liring effects of their daily routine of keeping their ship clean and going through the various exercises, the cadets are enjoying their cruise i They met fine weather throughout the trip and were very pleased with their first glimpses of the West Indies. Barbados in particular. Rescued "Gilbert Junior On the way down from Halifax, when about 190 miles off Curacao, The Mlrmae rescued the passenger ship Gilbert Jankse with a crew of 16, 12 passengers and two horses on board Eight of the passengers were women. The Gilbert Junior had run out of fuel and had been adrift for over 40 bouri. The Mtesnae escorted by the Magnificent, towed the passenger ship into Curacao As soon as the passenger ship was safe, the Mleaaae and the Magalfiie guard le of the Canada. She was launched from the Hali. sailors fat dock yard sometime in 1942 February 1947 the Mlrmar accompanied by the Noalka of Ihe Canadian Navy. th a grow'ing sense of social responsibility and a growing rei cognition of labour's rights and I responsibilities in the life of the] Nation. This Is the economic JW philosophic birds of America's j free society. Hn In the United States. aV-' leged by the Soviets to symbollne capitalism in extreme form and control, organized labour enjoys far more and greater rights in factories and workshops yt ven in relation to production policies, than anywhere else in the world lie .pile all references to 'Wall •moved to the Street" and alleged great capitalmo'rVuarTat ihe' Almhouse where uu past and present. workers have a far greater and more effective voice in induitry mining, and In transportation atural causes From Student Nurse To Sister Miss Fnid M Skinner has been appointed Sister ^ the CPn SWnner STk^SSSf Kual'on',,. June. %  ,, ., a sSdent Nurse, and - .elected In July. 1945 under the "olonial Development and Welfare S.home lor Ihe 1-ondnn Countjt C ~&aJ^TtMJl% nciicra, Morse aWhiltin.tnn Itosultal in November. 1948. and then took a course In Midwifery al the same HO M JIU1 Ud afterwards at Epsoi an appointment as Staff Miriwiie at St JJ September. 1950. to February. 1951. Are you proud of your INDUSTRY? Well fell the World about it. .Send in your details today. You hartI dai left only lo vet in Ihe YEAR BOOK. "AtMbroofr Takr-% Mo/asses To Trinidad THE mo1aM.es tmk. i Athelbrnok left Barbados for Trinidad yesterday evening with ., full load of vacuum pan ninlu at daybreak for her load She is consigned to Messrs H Jason Jones A Co Ltd. RICH FLAVOR i Hospital. She held Hospital fr REFRESHING He laughs at the weather and %o too would you wilh ne of these Canadian in A K IIAI.X rovis An excellent coat (or Seamen of all ranks as well ai Watchmen. Porter*, or anyone who has to work outdoors in all weathers $16.59 SOI 1VISII H HATS To matt h — Each J-?* Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11. It, & 13, llllci Mi STREET — THE HAND SEWING PERFECT — MACHINE Simple, Silenl .ind K;i\v KunniiiK Sews Backwards mid KorwartK us Keuuireil Special Cash Price $93.74 CretlH lermi on applicallnn The "JONES" Electric Motor with Needle I'nint I lulu Can IHlitied quickly und easily to any Ivpe f "JONES" DOMBSTK SEWING MACHINE mill luml. free to riml.' till 1 (HJR PRICEONLY iSl..7 EACH HARRISON'S LOCAL AGENIS TEL 2364 .:v,:v.v.:v,v.:%::v diai& jfoA fWBMj OCCOAWtl on sola ai the faaduuf AioMA 'PURINA* %  LA\ENA wee ,H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.-Di.tribuior..



    PAGE 1

    ,1 IIIKU__ /^ All Persian oil workers Riot: A\ e gf VIL Seamen killed, other, wounded 5 '"Allied troops move forward deyond the 38th parallel >l\4 MITIII Senate invites the General to address Armed Services Group I II I' Rumours say mismanagement * W *^ in running the Corporation TWELVE KILLED IN PERSIAN RIOTS Martial law regulations to be enforced in Abadan TWO BRITONS DEAD: EIGHT INJURED TEHERAN, April 13. TWELVE PEOPLE were killed and nineteen injured in last night's rioting at Abadan, the Persian oil town Two British seamen and an Ital ian were battered to death by oilfleld apprentices shouting "Kill the British!" The injured included two British children Persian security forces stop ped the rioters just before they reached the Anglo Iranian Oil Company's great oil refinery l>M'H IS 4.1 \(i: MacArthur Will Address Senate Group WASHINGTON, April 13. The Senate Armed Service! Committee decided today t) invite General Douglas Mac Arthur to appear before the committee to discuss the United State* policy in the Fur East. Announcing the Invitation liie Chairman Democrat Sena toi Hichard Russell said "The Amen can people are entitled to know all the facts involved except those which cannot be release for reasons of security about 'he clash in policies advocated by President Truman and Mac Arthur In Asia. MacArthur is expected in the United States early next week He has Indicated through an aide his willingness to appear belore the Congressional group. The move by the Armed Services Committee made it certain that the General would have least a limited Congiesslo forum for his views. Republican Leaders in Congress have been insisting that the General should be asked to address a joint Senate-House of Representatives session. 5 Days Before Authoritative sources suited here today that Truman had decided to dismiss General Mac a !" *} iCa ">'J££*A *£? *ZaW ^ ri.v. before he issued 'ed the Governor General Arthur live day; •.ie actual order. • Truman made up his mind when he read a statement by Republican Leader Joseph W. Martin on April 5 thnt Mac Arthui had written him on March 20. backing Martin's demand that Chiang Kai Shek's troops be used against Chinese Communist". Martin told the House of Rente .•tentative* that he had asked Mac Arthur's views on the use of Chinese Nationalist troops now m Formosa. Mac Arthur had replied "iny views and recommendations with respect to the situation created by Red China's entry into the woi against us in Korea, have been submitted to Washington in most complete detail. "Generally these views are wen known and clearly understood they follow the conventional y terr of meeting force with the maximum counter force as w have never failed to do in the past. "Your view with respect to utilisation of Chinese forces in Formosa is in conflict with neither lottic nor tradition. "Here we fight Europe's war with arms, while diplomats there still fight it with words. H we lost the war to Communism in Asia, the fall of Euro!* is inevitable and if we win Eurow most probably would MAM a war and preserve freedom —Rent-. MACARTHUfTcETS A NEW JOB MIAMI. FLORIDA. AprilI 13._ General Mac Arthur will Ota the Board of the typewriter Urn Remington Rand ami a .me active part in its affair. Within davit, its President .lame* Rai'd announced here to-day — Reuter. gathering again to-day and the situation was re. Ilolp ll'IIV f orcemeats: with armoured cars called out by the Government last night, to-day reached the city Press reports thnt British troops were in the area were categorically denied here. The noting began when striking apprentices shouting "kill Ihc British" led a crowd from the nniir area in a mnrch towards the residential quarter. Persian security forces stopped one section of the marchers before they reached the Abadan Oil Reflnerv, one of the biggest in the world. Another section \va3 diverted to a big cinema on the town's outskirts. The cinema was badly damaged The Europeans were attacked before police could disperse the crowd. The strike began last month when the Anglo-Iranian Compon> cut certain special bonuses to workers. The trouble followed the assassination of Persian Prime Minister General Asmara Razmara and the Persian decision to nationalise the company's oil. The Persian Government has blamed Communists for agitation leading to the spreading strike and the Abadan rioting. The Company's representative in Teheran was today in toucl. with Persian Prime Minister Hus sein Ala who announced last night that the situation was under control. Dispatch of troop reinforcements to Abadan was reported last night. The Shah and hi:: Cabinel acted dlsnUjav of KhuzIstan province which includes the riot-lorn oil town. Abadan. and several other Persian Gulf official: and high naval and military ofn. cers. The Cabinet's decision was taken at a special meeting as Pi armoured cars patrolled the at reels. Thev also decided that General Shahbaki who has the reputation Of "Strong man" should leave Teheran for Abadan to enforce martial law regulations which are still in force in southern Persia though lifted in the capital. —Reuter HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor Sir Alfred %  age Inspecting U*)0m*rd tf Honour aboard H.M C8 "Maguinceut" ye*terdy. Anglo-Egypt Talks May Be A Failure CAIRO, April .?. The independent Cairo new!.; paper Al Ahraji to-day reported j a "serious development" in Angloj Egyptian talks. As %  result it said, talks ware no longer likely to be successful It ga\c no details of the development, but quoted a responsible Egyptian source as saying: "The Egyptian side insists on abrogation of the 1945 treaty or the evacuation of British troops from Egypt. It will not shift one Inch British and Egyptian official elKlefl would not comment on the report. —Reuter Ghost Ship Will Come To W Indies LONDON, April 13 A "ghost" ship flits across the Atlantic next week with only essential lighting, state rooms and public rooms deserted, and no paswan, She is the Furness Withys £2.500,000 Ocean Monarch (13.600 tons), latest bid by British shipowners to earn dollars on the Nev York—West Indies "millionaires' pleasure run, one of the most lucrative in the world. |hnv.nally she goes also to St. Lawrence and New Foundlond and will assist the larger Queen of Bermuda (•22,000 tons) in New York—Bermuda trade during the more popular seasons, when thousands of Americans like to spend their holidays in the sunny Caribbean Below decks, the Ocean Mom arch is like a series of elaborate Her architects have centred their plans on the spacious sun deck overlooking the swimming pool. There Is a handsomely %  •Coral Cafe" which will be used as a "night club". In all public rooms there are a rich pile of carpets, elegantly upholstered arm. chairs and beautiful wall decora, tions. The magnificent grand lounge extends from side to side of Uie ship. Here are two sculp, lured figures of Prospcro and Mirand H from Shakespeare's "Temp, tit" find performed in 1611 and suggested by Sir George Somers. %  lupwright of Bermuda.—Renter. INVESTIGATE SMUGGLING THE CORONATION STONE GOES BACK TO LONDON AFTER THREE MONTHS GLASGOW. April 13. The stolen Coronation Stone, the M6-pound slab ol iandl*( UP upon which Kings of Knuland have been crowi. ed i">r centuries left here on Friday in police convoy for L'j.ndnn. After two davs of secrecy a large black CPI ere 1 IUSROW police headouarlers at dawn. front were three other ears, on Its own Carrying plain i BONN, Aprd 13 SmugRlin; between East and i.. i oanj eel matad bj oecflc experti lo be (our tunas the value of legal iraoe. Is being nvaaUfated by the All-German Affairs Committee of the Bundestag (Lower House). Committee Chairman, Herbert Whener, Social Democrat who lived in Russia foi evi ial y< :i told a news conlerenc that North A f Only 2 daya laft lo gal in the Advocate Year Boole IN OUR TOWN You can even dig up IHC road in Barbados for a sixpence. Yesterday on Tudor Street ;i sixpence dropiied from one of the passengers on DM of the 'buses of the National Motor Civ Company. It rolled a short CliStai I and then disappeared through one of the many manholes that line the side of tin. street. Immediately about twelve peopii went into action to i i .'I the sixpence and In a few Mviiinl' Whore there had been three manholes there were only "notes* 1 In Hie mad. The sixpence was finally recovered and taken to a I nearby rumshop where it 1 must have joined otht'i CoirH of possibly greater denom; inntions used In celebrating the event. U.N. Troops Beat Off Red Counter-attack TOKYO, April 13 J N 1TV.11 NATIONS troops in rapidly warming weather advanced further north to day beyond Yongchon, key road and rail centre 10 miles north of the thirty eighth parallel For yet another day major Communist resist ance failed to materialise, though a counterattack was thrown against United Nations troops about 20 miles southeast of Yongchon ^^^^^ Communists Active InB.G.? i %  ..I Matthew Hldgwa> s man threw it Iwck after a two hours tight and advanced again, j Patrols on the western front probfld Into Communist-held inn. bn '"'Uli of the lmjm Rival On m from a slow advance n\uned. Earlier reports told <.l ,ight when Edward Lewi*. .aterfroni worker for 22 years ..mi . tormoi Union nop itewa ut evidence -aid thai pottttcal iigent.s and Coton acuva on the waterfront Lawn said Conununtsl propaganda Bui appeered on the water front Ihree .ears ago and had beeOOM itrondec Talking abolil thi eftcct on wnrkei I% % % %  %  •" 'they read the papers and all the talk is Itiissin Yon cent ben tin ravm for Russia." Lewis aUu said there is a rllquo of mone) lenders working on the w.iicifnin who anin favoured p.. the ii Q Labour Union Baeeu live GEORGETOWN. B.C.. April 13. Mrs. Harold Martin-Spei rj wife of the Netherlands Consul In British Guiana is reported lost v M bitwten Barhado and Turndad on Thursday morning while returning from a II K nOsldej .•mi hafl husband aboard the 1 K MR CotomMr. Arriving n < %  am to-day by plane hi r ,n aboard the Coiomhir on Wedneaday evening when he la^t %  aw her on retiring to her cabin in the nlfhi tuna on an nj Ttiursday hla wife was IHI'MUU The former Mary Dixon, her lhar*i Diet cousin, was Charles l. :.nd also distant cousin of Thomas Hardy. Britain Cuts Sleel Exports LONDON. April 13 Britain is to reduce rM^'ru of Iteel, Supply Minister (Jeorge Slraiiss announced today i He told the Commons that supplies to the domestic market would also be restricted because of the programme. Licensing control would lie exf-nded to exports of semi-llnished steel and alloys of steel from next uy Monday and all other types of steel Dutch from May 14. he added. British Swedish and Belgian firms were steel production was Ikety to fall clothes delec'iv a decoy fThw r-uuoraU' precaution! were tah< n becau U had thra it> open k'.n if the ftono %  back to fxuidon. Nattonallal admitted having orgai.i.nl || removnl from beneath the Corona tion Chali on Chrlati .. Dej Tbaj claim the Btona i* Ihere | i rtan kilted National! gmng to London 1 I rnpahji for SUPPOl t. %  i" After police lo three month Ui n-vslcrlou I '. Wed %  . %  ; Arhroath Dei laietlon %  B ittlafa Indepond ence was signed In 1320 %  i hoy i riad I I Altar, covt red II with I nd's Patron Saint. St. Andrew* and lafl i 1 with j the reaarvo ftoet and I %  kn p off" warnmc to the Engand sixth lo be ihh. — ten \ Mihmclirs l-lrov Tiinhrr And Huts HELXIHADE. Apid 13 OUnl Hvalnm-he* me hurtling down the higher mountains klovenm causing "enormous damage". Helgrnd*Press reported t day. They hud destroyed timber and mountain huts in Troiglav Jtiliai Where most damage was done No casualties are so far reported —Keatei Ar^t'iiliua Takrn Over Croieerf CZECH MISSION LIQUIDATED Tli MOM lid, involved trade. illegal interzonal 1 this year because of th* difficulty rJl ef getting raw materials, he % %  tear. VIENNA. April 13. ih military mlabeen llquKla%  cording lo reports in the V %  • i /rchoBlovak Legation here dot land It w... i %  i i o.i these ro|.oiU. Newspaper stories said thai Colonel Odrieh Krystof who wa head arlisans and befon lha bra & tween Yugoslavia and the Comlnform. was a close friend of Marshal Tito. Krutrr PHILAhKLPIIlA, Pani .ivaiiia. April 13 \ i'r'it T. i haa btken ovet lha United states light crulaara naUr and I'hornlx. famous ships In the last war. Thev were taken from %  era the fifth ild lo South American countries. BraaU bought phiiadriphi.. %  nd l-.uh and Chile tinRrokl>n id NaMhvllle Argentina took over tin10)000 n il \t;n ohi endavn In • tarlel hut impreSMve ceremony at the I'hiladeliihla naval base The pure was no! disclosed, but Navy siMikesmnn said it was i.hui.t 10 |M-> i-ent of the24.'HH),0Oi they cost lo build .—Beater. Princess Elizabeth Sees Pope VATICAN CITY, April 13. DO! E PIUS XII 75-year-old pontiff of the Roman CatholicChurch to-day re>' I r ii/abeth and Prince Philip in audience in InVatican pulacc. Tli.-re wus staged a ceremony of solemn urandcur for the sivUi vitit m f>0 years of members of (he British Royal family. The Tope chatted toe 20 mio UUM in hiprtvala llbranr with. .ho Prlnceaa and the Duke Pnnceas BUxabeth wore a black tress reaching to the ground with i black >• il of Spanish lace hangrut loosely from her head over her shoulders to her knees. fOt n willery she wore a dlanond necklace and a diamond iracelet. Prince Philip was In lavel unlfomj, Pops Ptua Uked after the Royal oupL'\ children and sent hi* I King Oeorge VI and fcjaen aUlaabaUi After the BUdlence, the |*rinrrSK mil the Duka wen lei bj Couf Prelate* anrund the most famnu* j--tion'i of thr Vatican nalao i'i %  room i ulded to the palace by the Bor %  das. and llnally the : Slstlne Chapel with in Walfa and <00f entirely covered by thr last i i. of Michael Angelo. i.-i.nd ol Honour The Royal riatton eew ireeted kid Of lion Sil of tin Pl>e' Palatine gumds Corp* o? Rocnan volunletn In nineteenth century uniforms of blue and gold with antique muskets After inspecting the Guard. Princess Elizabeth was led into colourful procession which accomi i to the Pope's apart ment Prince Philip followed behind iccompanied by another prelate if tincourt and In-hind him WITI or the Royal Suite. As 300 Brtttah and Canndiai Ul tents to Homan oUegl • watclied in silence, chief•M the Vatican ceremonial greeted the Royal visitors These then joined the Hoval procession. Tho l %  nd the Duke an luced logethcr into the library Popa m white silk rolws d siltnt with ar.nchalrs placed read) '"i rianore. During the audience the Popei Have each vlalUar a wold — medal. After 30-mnuitcs oonven • lion, member* of lha Royal Suite ." %  il' pre sent >d to the pope. On 'h.-ir way back fr-m UV inidtence. -dill In procession, the princess and Lha DUkl wen Aiih deafening cheer* from Hiiti-h priests and student. :n Cl n'liia Hall. -Beuter TMYGVB UB 8ES8 aUaMULnU TITO BKLORADI, April 13 Trygve Lie, General Secretary of tinUnited Nations todaj lunched with Marshal Tito al hl ptivale villa in a llelgradc suburb He met Ih. M.n h.,\ loi the Hist time Tin* morning Lie was received by M Vlahovich. who is depulising for Foreign Minister Cdvard K.iiiiclj on stek leave tit Slovenia —Beuter. TIN PRICES DROP UNQAPORBi April 13. %  i in prkM w rt l m lo fioi.i'i..' MwArlhur'n 1ll5mls.nl. droppoil thnti.ly hcie unain to-day. —Infer. TELL Till ADVOCATE THE NEWS DAY Ol NIOnT DIAL 3113 Married Women But Still Spinsters BONN. April 13. More than 4.000 West German married women will soon be made spinsters again by a sin ke of the per. All were "married" during the war lo soldiers who had a)read> been killed in action. The Government has decided that these murnaGes known in Germany as "steel he tftge* are lo M ill and void. Preilsu Argeiltiiu* Civiiian Wanted WASHINGTON, April 13. New York Times suggested to1 day that following the dismissal of General MacArthur a civilian High Commissioner should Inappointed to the task of continuing J:io reconstruction". Among am for success of MacArthur in Japan had been hla M -i Orli Dl and his %  .ill his attention ,y to Japanese roconatrueUoa between world War %  the Korean war. —Reuter Way Postpone Retirement DOCTORS CONCERNED OVER VANDENBERG GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan, April 13 Doctors said today they lei M lnereealn| vonetm N over Senator t?l Arthur Van.ienurrg. 58. who has I been seriously ill at Ml home here for months. He is the Republican I'art> 's lea/.'<'h Consulate PARIS, April 13. The French Ooveroment an iiouiicifl today that the Czecho unsulate in Algiers BH the Ma*aryk Instilut,. in Par I* >. closed aa reprisal hu similar measures taken by th %  /< <; tnof all claims to widows' pension Oo^aniinent, The Standard said' or other aid. Children from such "Our readers will ui marriages will receive all benefit* when we ray we come to bury accorded to children of the wax I La Prenaa. not to praise a. dead. -Beuter. -Keuler. Mismanagement Rumoured In C.D.C. Senior Official Quits LONDON. April 13. Mr. R. V. Cabel, aanlOf Colonial Development Corporation official, has resigned He was Operations Controller for the Caribbean. Announcing this todav. the CDC. spokesman said Cabel reloi health reasons He had any %  onneetion witn strong rumours 'hat are circulating in London to 'hat a numlM'i latlons from Corporation heard of these rumour far as 1 know." he went on. "they have no foundation" Certain members of the Board Of C DC are said to he thinking of getting out because thev consider there is a good deal of milmanagement at the lop. An attempt to ret to the bottom ,[. i ind althem to go unai next W. %  Will maka Cabal'l resignation leaves an a statement on resianation^ 'hat irnp-irt.ni' gap in the Corporation s • to take plaet from : n 'he West li. %  HI Board of c D.C ad from a vliil to Rumours were strengthened \hi Caribbean and one of his chief %  be the a personal stater. m >t In 'hlpnlng p—" of Lords denying that he had between the United Kmgd "acted in an arbitrary and highthe Southern Caril vices. tod D.C in November . %  The spoken id of the of the rumours is to be made by handed manner" while he • ; ,. Mi v %  rraV C ma* n %  %  %  v P Chain m who is to ask the had Adviser to several Argentine Railnan said he had Secretary of State for ihc Colonies been DM ' and added way Companies.



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