Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Havbados

ESTABLISHED 1895



U.N. DOWN 22 RED P



FRIDAY, APRIL



» 18, 1962





(ANES

Wild dog-fights rage over Yalu river

80 Fighters Attack 40

American Superforts

TOKYO, April 12.

‘THE BIGGEST AIR BATTLES of the Korean
War were fought to-day and 22 Communist
planes ]
d. In two encounters near the Manchurian
border United States pilots claimed the destruction
of 5 M.1.Gs II, probably destroyed and 15 dam-

aged. Two American Superforts were damaged.
The first of the day’s battles was itself the war's biggest
with about 200 planes in it. About 80 M.I.Gs dashed across
the Yalu River into North Korea to attack between 30 and
40 American Superforts which were bombing a concrete |

railway bridge spanning the river at Antung.

Sep eorrrmnnpemn ee str " 4 An American fighter escort 72
Thunder jets and a Sabre jet
‘counter-attacked while Superforts
kept dropping bombs on thei!

U.N. Army ‘In

7



e @ | iargets. F 7 :
Fine Sha e2 h In a series of wild dogfights
/p Americans destroyed two Com-
miunist jets, probably destroyed

TOKYO, April 12. iwo more and damaged 13.

Army Secretary Frank Pace But some M-1.G’s managed to
who has been touring the Korean| penetrate the American fighter
front, arrived by air in Japan to-| screen and attacked bombers. In-|



day with General Ridgway, New
United Nations Supreme Com-|!
mander, just over 24 hours after}
the dismissal of General Mac-
Arthur.

Pace said the army in Korea
was “in fine shape.”

His arrival was quiet. Ridgway
had spent the night at forward
headquarters in Korea, while
sleet and rain temporarily ground-|
ed his plane.

He was wearing a battle stained
uniform with hand grenades
strapped to his chest. |

He said he had sent MacArthur
a message, that he was coming to
Tokyo immediately, and would see
him at MacArthur’s pleasure.

—Reuter.

complete reports from Superforts |
gunners showed they downed one |
M.1.G- and damaged at least one
other.

American jet fighter pilots re- |
ported, no damage to their own)
planes: the second battle was
fought late in the afternoon
the famous “M-I.G, valley”.

Twelve Sabre jets clashed with
15 Communist jets in a 15-minute
battle fought between an altitude
of 10,000 and 13,000 yards,

American pilots claimed .to
have shot down one M.1.G. and
damaged another with no
damage to themselves: On the
ground United Nations trogps

edged slowly forward on 170

miles front in Central Korea

against steadily stiffening fe-
sistance, On the eastern flank

South Koreans were still ad-

vancing against little resistance.

It was disclosed to-day that on
Tuesday one of their patro!s

TEL-A-VIV, April 12. entered the town of Kangsong 26

An Israeli soldier was killed and|imiles north of the 38th parallel
three wounded in a clash with patois ini meeting a single Com-
Arabs near Jordan lines at | munist. .
Beithjibrin, fi was said here today, |. British, Turkish, Apericnt and

The clash was with 100 Arab} South Koreans a eee
shepherds last night south-west of ; Fart in the centra er 3 ar
Jerusalem, an official spokesman | 7a" into increasing resistance 7
said, ; the mountains a few tomas nese

Both sides had casualties in the | °f the parallel = /
“exchange” he added.

Arab casualties were believed to
be higher than Israeli losses.

Seven Israeli police’ were killed
in the clash on the Israeli soil last
week, and Israeli planes bombed |
Syrian positions as a reprisal.

Both sides took the dispute over
the demilitarised border area, to
the Security Council.

This frontier was reported quiet
here today.—Reuter |

in

\



Israeli Police
Clash With Arabs

Schuman Plan Will
Be Signed Tuesday

PARIS, April 12.

French Foreign Minister
Robert Schuman today said “he
did not expect the Schuman
Pool treaty to be signed before
next Tuesday. Schuman said:
“There igs no question of the
treaty being signed on a Satur-
cay as certain reports have said,

“Tt may be signed on Tuesday
or later during the course of the
next week.”

Commenting on today’s French

Big Three Will Hold
TalksIn Washington int inisterial conference he

WASHINGTON, April 12. |said; “We have reviewed our
France, the United States and|position on all points which will
Britain will ho!d tripartite con-)be discussed by the six Ministers’
sultations in Washington t0| Conference.”
discuss Yugoslavia’s request for
arms, a Foreiga Office spokesman
said today. : :
Yugoslavia’s request, which is
separate from the current Lon-
don negotiations fcr economic

—Reuter.

KING RECEIVES
AMBASSADOR
LONDON, April 12.



aid from the West, was made; |, ‘ sao
; uke Primo De Rivera, nea
Wie Pees” oa Spanish Ambassador to _ Britain,
re , |drove through London in_ state
night —Reuter foday to present his credentials

to King Gecrge VI.

Three black and gold landaus
were sent from the Royal stable
to take the Ambassador and his
jstaff to Buckingham Palace. The
| Ambassador was received for 2¢
ore

Only 3 days left to get in
the Advocate Year Book





“V" FORMATION

were reported to have been destroyed or! Mona

















THIS IS
‘HOW IT

HAPPENED | OV€YF-

WASHINGTON, Anril 12.

Truman’s final decisien to dis-
miss MacArthur was made on
ay. two days before it was
announced to the world, accord-
ing to Government sources,

Last week he read a news
agency report of e letter from
MacArthur to Joseph Marttin,
Republican leader in the Housé
of Representatives.

This took issue with Truman's
policy on two vital problems—-the
use of Nationalist troops, and the
relative importance of the Far
East situation.

Truman had preliminary talks,
first with his two main cenfidants
General Marshall, Secretary for
Defence, and Dean Acheson,
Secretary of State, and with other
Cabinet members: He also en-
listed the opinion of, the Joint

Chiefs of Staff, headed by Gen-
eral Bradley.

This is how the _ situation
developed after that,
Friday: There was a Cabinet
meeting devoted to briefing by

General Bradley about the Com-
munist buildup for an offensive
in Korea.

When it ended, General Bradley
and General Marshall stayed
behind und talked with the
President: for 45 minutes:
Saturday: They had another
private talk with Truman, dis-
cussing the removal of Generai
MacArthur, the choosing of a
uccessor, the timing of action,
and what the announcement
should say.

Sunday: The Joint Chiefs of
Staff, were summoned by General
Bradley.

Monday: Truman talked _ the
situation over with Congressional
leaders, Later the ‘MacArthur
problem” was discussed at a
Cabinet Meeting. The President
had then finally decided to act,
but he did not indicate this to
everybody he consulted.

Tuesday: Documents connected
with the case had been collected
and Truman called in General
Bradley and Dean. Rusk, , Assis-
tant Secretary of State and
Director of Far Eastern Affairs,
and conferred by telephone with
Acheson.

Then orders went out through
military channels to MacArthur,
Lieutenant General Matthew
Ridgway and Lieutenant General
James Von Fleet, the three men
directly involved in the changes.

—Reuter-.



Red Victory?

TAIPEH, Formosa, April 12.

Nationalist sources said today
the dismissal of General Mac
Arthur was due to French and

British pressure. They consid-
ered it a great victory for
Communism. They believe that

if the dismissal does not lead to
peace talks over Korea, America
will shape her Far East cam-
paign without consulting Britain.
—Reuter,

AMMUNITION DUMP
KILLS THREE

NAPLES, April 12.

A secret ammunition dump hid-
den in a sewer at Sant Antimo
near here, exploded last .night
killing three workmen and gravely
injuring a child.

Police said they believed the
three workmen accidentally set off
the ammunition while clearing a
sewer. The child, playing in 2
nearby garden was hit by a
splinter.—Reuter.





OUR CAMERAMAN caught these planes from the H.M.C.8. “Magnificent” while they were flying over
Bridgetown yesterday afternoon in “V” formation. It was the first time that many Barbadians ever saw
so many planes and they were all very interested.















ridé

Mac says he

did not

Truman

TOKYO, April 12.

GENERAL DOUGLAS MAC ARTHUR to-day rejected

any suggestion that he }

ad over-ridden President Tru-

man’s orders to abstain frory making political pronounce:

ments,

Through Major-General
political adviser, the General
his own defence, the first sit
by point that he had been
official supremacy.

Truman Has
The Evidence

NEW YORK, April 12,

President Truman had plenty
secret evidence to support his
case against General MacArthur,
if it should become a national
issue, said James Reston, New
York Times diplomatic corre—
spondent in to—day’s issue.

“Truman ordered two or thfee
ed Up this morning? estan aad.

up this rn. ;
“These provided not ay oh “
nition for the President's cha
that MacArthur was not follow-

ing orders, but also asserted that
while MacArthur had beet blam-

ing the Administration for failing
to rearm South Koreans, he him-
self had opposed precisely such a
proposal by the Joint Chiefs of
Staff.

The voluminous Mac Arthur
file is now in the process of being
carefully examined. It will not
made public unless the General's
dismissal degenerates to a political}
row, for the very disclosure that |
MacArthur really did want a!
large. scale. war.with China. fits
precisely into
propaganda line,

“If, however, the General wishes
to ehallenge the authority ard









strategy of the Administration the
intention here is to let the record
—Reuter

speak for itself.”

MacArthur ,
Japan—YOSHIDA

TOKYO, April 12.

Japanese Premier Shigero Yo-
shida said today that Washington
had assured his government that
the dismissal of General Mac-
Arthur cid ‘not imply any change
in American policy in Japan and
the Far East, nor did it affect the
American determination to press
for an early conclusion of a peace
treaty.

Yoshida said MacArthur
“salvaged the nation and steered
the country to recovery”. He had
also “firmly planted democracy in
the nation and had paved the way
for a peace settlement.”

“All Japanese looked to Gen-
eral MacArthur with the most
profound * veneration,” Yoshida
continued,

“I have no words to convey ‘the
regret of our nation. His memory
will live forever in the hearts of
the Japanese.”

The Japanese Government has






had

stay in Tokyo and ordered those
away to return immediately.
—Reuter.



“Triumphal Entry”
Planned For Mac

TOKYO, April 12.
Adherents of General Mac-—
Arthur have invited him to make
a “triumphal entry” through Los
Angeles, Chicago and New York
as a signal for massive public
demonstrations in his support, it

to-day.

The general is studying the
proposal and informed quarters
believed he is likely to accept.

There was as yet no official
announcement on when Mac~
Arthur would leave Japan, nor
was it officially known where he,
his wife and young ‘son
going.

ares

—Reuter.

Confusion In The
Camp Says Moscow

MOSCOW, Apri! 12,
First Soviet comment on _ the
; dismissal appeared in a literary
gazette which declared: “The
change in command of American
forces in the Far East is convinc-
ing evidence of confusion in the
camp of the warmongers. How-
ever regardless of who conducts
the war—Mac Arthur or. his- suc-
cesscr Ridgway—a policy of ag-
gression can only end in a dis-
graceful failure.”—Reuter.





DUBLIN, Eire, April 12.
Eire’s proposed free health
} scheme for mothers and childen up

to 16 years of age was rejected by
| the Government last night, and
| Minister



for Health, Dr. Noel|
Browne, resigned his post. Prime}
| Minister John Costello, has taken |
j over the health .department him-
self, as a temporary measure

The plan which has been the

ordered all Cabinet Ministers

was learned authoritatively z

. meeting of the Senate and

| Eire rejects

Courtney Whitney, his chiet
issued a strong statement in

hiis dismissal, denying point
guilty of disobedience to his

Mac Arthur made it clear that
he does not intend dropping con
froversy with Truman and the
United Nations oan Far Bastern
policies.

The text of Major General
Whitney’s staternent read: “Io
clarification of news despatches
from the United States making

+



The H.M.C.8. MAGNIFICENT which is at present anchored in Carlisle Bay.





Postpone
_ Inquiry

YFrom Our Own Correspondent)

GBORGETOWN, B.G., April 12,

The inquiry into the indictable

chatge of obstructing the course

reference to the President's direc- | Of justice against Robert Adams,

tive of December 6
against the issuance of
statements on foreign policy with-
out reference to the State Depart-
ment for clearance, Major Gen-

Mac Arthur’s staff to-day pointed
out the following:

my, Directive of December
Mac Arthur personally but way
directed to all executive agencie:
of the Government.

2 General MacArthur
ted a proposed communique to the
Joint Chiefs of Staff who informed
him among other things that it
was not necessary to submit com-
muniques with reference to mil-

enjoining | Dis clerk
public | €X-policeman Grafton Hunte, be-
gan
Charles,
city
eral Courtney Whitney of General | 8°?
t
arrange for Counsel from the U.K

; °| December
was not directed to Genera! ¢
and
issued
Deygoo and Frank Gomes, form-
Immediately after its receipt,| er mianager of the Premier Pawn-
submit | t

Eric Gravesande and
before Magistrate
and after one witness
Magistrate A, R. F. Dick-
had testified, was adjourned
o May 2 to allow the accused to

Maurice

Dickson told the court that on
19 last, Adams = and
iravesande entered his chambers
requested tha, warrants be
against Police Inspector

orokery,
Endorsement
Dickson added that Adams told

him he had discussed the matter
with Justice Ward who suggested

c he should apply for warrants

itary operations, Dickson endorsed the information

“3. The President in a_ press with statements that warrants
conference on January

define General Mac = Arthur’s
was any curb on hig authority ‘tc

speak freely on the Korean war.”
“4. Furthermore the directive of

Frenchmen
Premier Pawnbrokery was in pro-
gress. While he was not influenced

12| should be issued, Subsequently he | ‘hat “the colonies could in fact

appealed to this headquarters to} ecensidered the matter and gave | olay a considerably larger part in
instructions

the Communist authority, specifically, that’ there issued instead.

that summonses be

That trial of

robbery

the
for

day four

of the

December 6 by its terms angi], what Adams said, Mr. Justice

spirit was interpreted at this
headquarters as applying solely
be public statements anc

sto: communiques, correspond-
éncé or pérsonal — coriversation:
with others,

* The General feels that he

has complied with all direc-
tives he has received, not only

Ward told
lieved what Adams said, because
Adams was a member of the Bar,

on
Postponement

May 2 next, as Adams informec
the

him he however be-

Dickson
May

is leaving
on

the colony
vacation leave
was granted tc

3

Court he was
ecure the services



arranging t
of a leadin:

recently but throughout his entire | Counsel from overseas

military service
“" The General has interpreted
both his statement af March
24 and his letter to Congressman
Martin dispatched from here four
cays prior thereto as dealing ex-
clusively with the military situa-
tion.” “The one bore not the
slightest relationship to the other

“7. Reference to arms for re

1951 while the Army’s retrograd
movement frem Secul was
process ana conditions
the possibility of further
drawals into a more
area or even the possibility
evacuation .”.—Reuter,

with-



Mac May Address
U.S. Congress

WASHINGTON, April 12.
The House Republican Leader
Joseph Martin said today
is a possibility’ that



Douglas Mac Arthur .might . fly
back to the United States

week and would be available to
address Congress,

Martin made the announcement |
to reporters after an _ early}
morning session of the House
Republican Policy Committee

Original plans, Martin said
were for Mac Arthur to return)

from Japan by ship, Republicans
are angry at President, Truman!
for dismissing the General, and
are sponsoring a Resolution!
inviting Mac Arthur to address a

House.
—-Reuter,



Truman ‘Hanged’ |

CALIFORNIA, April 12.
An effigy of President Trumun
was hanged here in California
to-day, in protest against his dis
missal of MacArthur. ~

The dummy was found dang-
ling from a flagpole in front of
the San Gabriel College of
medical technicians. A card
attached to the dummy labelled
it “Harry S. Truman,”

Police cut the dummy down
after it had swung for about two
hours,

—Reuter.

controversy between Dr. Browne}
and the Irish Medical Association |
was withdrawn following the dis
closure of opposition to it by the
Roman Catholic church and the|
Cabinet.

The scheme would have cost the
state £2,000,000 per annum }
Dr. Noel Christopher Browne
34 years of age, was not only the

House of Commons

serve elements of the Repub-|wasg aware of the dissatisfaction
lic of Korea was taken from a top Jof
secret message of early January |Labour Union at the appointment
of only one representative of the
in|jpecpie on the Executive Council
indicated |one representative
and Settlement Board,

free health scheme

| subject of a nine months’ bitter! youngest

Brifish M.P’s
Discuss Antigua

LONDON, April 12.
Henry Hynd (Labour) askea
the Colonial Secretary in the

whether he

the Antigua Trades and

on the Lane

and one

restricted jon the Electric Light Board, He

of jalso asked whether he woulc
increase this representation,

Secretary of State for th

Colonies, James Griffiths replied,
The Union have made representa
tions about
the Executive Council, but I sec
no need for change in advance ¢
the wider, constitutional
which
“there which is now being worked ou
in
Comme’ that the Unions may make to th«
next Governor or through him to me
‘would of course be careful y con-
|sidered.

the composition o

reforn

hag been accepted § an

detail Any representation

—Reuter.
R.A. Transport
Plane Missing

KHARTOUM, April 12.

Royal Air Foree planes wer
today searching for the R.A.F
Valetta transport aircraft which
disappeared on flight to Khartoum
on Tuesday night,

It was believed that the missin;
plane carried six people.

Distress signals picked up here
on Tuesday, said the plane was i
trouble over the wild, desolate
3,000 yards high Marra Mountain
region, about 360 miles west of
Khartoum and had fuel for only
20 minutes flying.

—Reuter.

(BUSIVE SPEECH
PARIS, April 12

Deputies of Big Four Foreign
Ministers to-day heard an ‘‘abusive
speech” from Soviet delegate An
drei Gromyko lasting two hours
and twenty minutes, a western
spokesman said.

It was the deputies 29th mecting
in an effort to find an agenda for a
full scale Foreign Ministers’ Con-
ference.—Reuter,



minister in Ccstello’
Government, but he had the dis
tinction of being the first man te

}assume office on the first day of
his entry into the Dail (Parlia
ment) and also the distinction of
being elected mernber of Parlia
ment, a fortnight after makins
his first political speech

Reuter.

U.N. Chief Satisfied
Over Israel Talks

TEL-A-VIV, April 12,
United Nations Acting Chief of Staff, Belgian Colonel
Bennet Deridder held a “satisfactory” two-hour meeting
with Israeli officials to-day for a settlement of Israeli’s dis-
pute with Syria. He was then flying on to the Syrian
capital, Damascus to hear the other side. \
eaten The flare up betwéen the two

|
|



aoe | countries began last week when
Munitions j Israeli planes bombed the zonal
; Village El Hamma after several
|} Israeli policemen had been shot

Could Be ! by Syrian troops.
" \ (From Damascus today a big
* fire was reported to have been
Made In W. I. seen during the night at Krad
7 } ee Guamameh, an Arab village on the
Israeli side of the demilitarised
(From Our Own Correspondent) frontier area, A Syrian military
spokesman said it meant that
LONDON, April 12. Israelis had evacuated the in-

|

habitants and then burned down
the village).

Colonel Deridder today saw the
Director General of the Israeli
Foreign Office, Dr. Walter Eyetan.
He said after the meeting, “F am
satisfied with the oufcome of the
talks and I am now going to Da-
mascus to discuss with Syrians the
possibility of reconveningya mixed
Armistice Commission.”

A United Nations spokesman
here today said that the return of
650 Arab villagers evacuated from
demilitarised zones north and
south of Galilee should be ar-
ranged by the Chairman of the
Commission,

He added that»United Nations
headauarters in Palestine did not
consider the demilitarised zone as
part either of Israel or Syria.

—Reuter.

YUGOSLAV RADIO
OPERATOR SEIZED

Peter Smithers, M.P., Chairman
of the West Indies Sub Committee
of the Conservative Party, sug-
gests in a letter in to-day’s Times













the defence effort und also benefit
themselves if secondary industries
were further encouraged.”

This belief, he admits, wat
strengthened by what he saw in
the Gold Coast during his recent
visit there.

In support of his suggestion,
Peter Smithers refers to the letter
trom R. L. M. Kirkwood of Ja-
maica, published last month, in
which he suggested “that West In-
lian colonies might with advan-
(age be encouraged to play a part
n manufacturing articles required
inder the rearmament pro-
sramme,"”

He also refers to the Commons







debate on colonial manpower BELGRADE, April 12.
when Mr. L, D, Gammons, Con. Belgrade news paper Politika
servative M.P., suggested ; “In the}said today “kidnappers” had
British West Indies and other colo- } broken into the Yugoslav
nies where there ir surplus la-|]Embassy in Prague and_ seized
bour, it might be possible to man-| Anton Novak radio operator,
ufac*uce such items as munitions —Reuter.
and army boots.” aes “a ay
Replying to that in debate, Mr, @ 6
Sivuchey, Minivter for War said,} |} TELL THE ADVOCATE
“Colonial manpover should be THE NEWS
used mainly for the production of DAY OR NIGHT
raw, materials,” |
No official encouragement was DIAL 3113

day’s Tiraes letter.

;
|
|

|



|
\
given, adds Peter Smithers in to- @



—"



—





... yes, it’s
always the
Unexpected that happens

That YOU should ever iose your home or







————=:“—_, buUSiNess—or both—because of an accident or ...
someone’s carelessness, is unthinkable . . . or,
to say the least of it, ‘the last thing you want to

think about’.

Wouldn’t it be much wiser to remove the fear
| of this possibility AND the unpleasant conse-
| quences, by making it ‘the first thing you thins
about’? There were 131 fires in the Island in

| 1949, not including cane fires.

Why not arrange an appointment with a repre-
Co. Ltd.
NOW ? An easy mind and complete protection

sentative of Guardian Assurance

are both very quickiy secured.

Local Agents:

S.P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Lia.

BROAD STREET P.O. Box 227, Phone 4465



a



af Sk





PAGE TWO





Carib

ON. F.C. HUTSON is

from a four-day visit t
Grenada Sugar Factory
Other arrivals from Grenada
yesterday were Mrs, Elsie Court-
ney who was here q few weeks
ago and Mrs. Phillipa Stewart

. Mrs. Doreen Ross and her
son Lynn have come over to stay
,»at Chandos in St. James . and
Briggs La Mothe, Grenada busi-
nessman is here to spend a couple
of weeks with N, E. Wilson

Short Visit

R.. AND MRS. JOE AN-

DRIEUX flew down to St.
Lucia yesterday on a short visit.
Mrs. A, has not been too well. .
Their niece who was in Barbados
for a week’s holiday accompanied
them.

back
the

Grandson
DDY CHAMBERS came up
from Trinidad yesterday to
spend a short holiday with his

grandparents, who were at Sea-
well to meet him.
Ten Davs
OUG ,MOORE, engineer of

S. K. Watson and Co., is on
a ten-day visit, staying at the
Enmore Hotel. . Rev. Seth
White, Seventh Day Adventist
missionary went off to St. Lucia
yesterday.

U.S., U.K. and France

RS. FRANK MORGAN is on

her way to New York, Her
final destination is England where
she will stay with Harry and
Dorothy Ormiston. She will spend
one week in New York. During
her stay in England she hopes to
take a little time out to go across
to Paris. She will be away three
months .... Frank’s mother Heady
and Mrs, Polly Roberts, yearly
visitors to Barbados for the winter
are on their way home to Pine

Orchard Connecticut. They are
passengers on board the Fort
Townshend .... Winston Marson

is on a six-week visit to the U.K
via the U.S. and will visit the
B.I.F.

Half and Half

R. DONALD LITTLEPAGE of
Trinidad will spend the first
part of his Barbados holiday with
the Walsh’s at Rest-a-while, St.
Peter and the last week with his
sister at Leaton—on-sea .... Rdgar
Norris and his wife had been liv-

ing in Sao Paulo, Brazil until
October last year, when they
moved to Trinidad. On Monday

they plan to visit Antigua. Mean-
while they are guests at the Ocean
View Hotel. Mr. Norris is resident
representative for General Electriz
Co., (England) for the West Indies,
Venezuela and Brazil. An English-
man, he has lived away from Eng-
land for over twenty-five years.

ADVENTURES



BY THE WAY... 2 Beachcomber

HE substitution of two men
for a racehorse, an unustal
form of “ringing,” is to be inquir-

ed into. Foul play was suspected
when, in the Dungeness Cup, a
pair of braces fell to the ground,
and the front part of the favour-
ite began to waddle.

It was discovered that the
“horse” had been doped and the
front part, a longshorernan on
leave, had got the dope. While
struggling to free himself from the
“horse” he lost his braces, and his
breeches, falling over his feet,
impeded him. The rear part, in
trying to retrieve the situation, got
his foot in the breeches, and the
whole horse collapsed halfway
down the course, Officials were
quickly on the spot, and the
“horse” was disqua fied.

Preliminary Inquiry

T the preliminary inquiry the
4 Xdoped man was too dazed to
say anything. His confederate
told a long story about a gang
which offered a sum of money and
put the two of them inside a pan-
tomime horse. But on the way to
the course a rival gang got into
the horse-box and did the dop-
ing. The man in front got it all,
and it was when he began to feel
sleepy that he burst his braces.
The second man complained that
before being doped his friend had
got a lot of hay in his mouth when
a boy forced the “horse’” to eat.
Asked what had become of the
tail, the second man said that he
had cut it off as a souvenir for a
girl he had met at Bognor. When
the first man came to, he thought
he was still supposed to be a horse,
and he lashed out angrily with his
right foot, and caught a steward a
crack on the mazzard.

‘Borax’ Explains
“WORAX,” famous. for his mili-

tary writings during the last
war, says: —

Nobody can understand the
fighting in Korea unless he realises





COMMANDER K. F. ADAMS
—Commanding Officer H.M.C.S.
Magnificent.—N.D.P.

Preview For Dollar Ship
EFORE. beginning her maiden

- voyage to Bermuda and
Nassau ‘on May 3rd, the new
Furness Withy ‘dollar’ = ship,
Ocean Monarch will be open

for a Press viewing at Tilbury on
the river Thames, The = ship,
has been designed and _ built
almost exclusively fer cruising
out of the port of New York to
the West Indies and to the ports
of the St. Lawrence and New-
foundland. She has a gross reg-
istered tonnage ef 13,658, and her
two double reduction geared
turbines give a cruising speed of
18 knots. -



LIEUT.-CDR. F. C. FREWER
—Commanding Officer H.M.C.S,
Mimac,.—N.D.P,

that where there are no roads,
mechanical transport becomes a
major problem. The speed of con-
voys depends, to a certain extent,
on the degree of mobility possible
in the circumstances, That is to
say that, other things being equal,
good, dry roads are an asset. No
roads, or impassable roads, are,
conversely a disadvantage cumu-
lative in its effect. The use of the
air for supply is conditioned by
distance weather, and the nature
of the terrain. These are lessons
which must be learned. A bad
road is better than no road, but
a good road is best of the three,

Up. the Moles!
Y eye was caught yesterday
by a highly significant item
of news, five words that might be
what is called . epoch-making:
Moles have closed a Danish air-
field. Bravo, Moles! Atta, Moles!

NOTE:
Name ....

Home Address ....



DIAL 4606

Entree Dishes - 1.89

Gravy Boat & Platter



“IS CLEAR seem and STAYS CLEAR”
Casseroles _ Deep & Shallow, 2 Shapes $1.26-2.39
Chicken Casserole — - 9252

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORE

OF PIPA

Junior Short Story Competition
The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for

{ts Junior Short Story Competition,

every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive

a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery, The stories

can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 300

words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate

Co, Ltd., City not later than Wednesdaw every week.

Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story,

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

ene
CMa eee teeta eee weet eeaeneee

eee eee eee eee ee eee oe eee ee eee aT

‘Phoenix’ Oven Glass

Roasters - — 3.15

Calling

So many...

OUNDING up the Golfite pas-
sengers was quite a job.
They were so many en route to
England. Mr. and Mrs, R. B.
McKenzie are on four months’
holiday which will be spent in
England . . Jack Carter,
Manager of T. R. Evans, his wife
Iris and their young daughter
Christine are en route to England
to their home in Surrey, This is
their first visit back to England
since August 1949. While in Eng-
land they will visit their son who
is at a public school near Oxford-
shire, and other relatives... .
Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Gordon of
“Cachalot” St. Lawrence are. also
on four months’ holiday. Mr. Gor-
don is a construction engineer . .
Mrs. R. D. O’Neale of Cliff Plan-
tation St. John has gone on six
months’ holiday to gland ac-
companied 4 her daughter
Peggy who will be going to school

at Torlington Park in Sussex.

..and still more

ILL STEPHENS has been in
Barbados for three and a
half years. Accompanied by Mrs,
Stephens, this is their first visit
home since then, They were pas-
sengers by the Golfito. Bill is an
engineer with Cable and Wireless
Ltd., and is also a keen radio
amateur....., Resident Partner
of Fitzpatrick Graham and Co,,
Mr, P. O, McDermott and his wife
are en route to England accoms
panied
beth, Also on their programme is
a motoring tour on the Continert
.. . . . Diana Smart, Mr. ana
Mrs. E, A. Way’s nieee is on her
way back to England after three
months’ spent with them at Ine
dian Pond, St. Joseph, Diana
seemed sorry to be leaving . . .
Mr. E. C. Parfitt, Assistant Gen-
eral Manager of the Water Works
and his wife are on six months’
holiday.

England and the
Continent

R. and Mrs, A. M, LEE_from

B.G. who spent two weeks’
holiday at Accra Guest House are
continuing their vacation with a
trip to England by the Golfite,
In England and the continent
they plan to spend three months,
Mr. Lee is Secretary of Bookers
wee Transport and Wharves
ata,

Stop off

RS. ELEANOR BOYD, wife cf

Lt, Col. Clay Boyd stopped
off in Barbados on her way to the
U.S. from Venezuela on Monday,
Yesterday she continued her
journey via Puerto Rico, Lt. Col.
Boyd was formerly in command of
the U.S. Marine Corp ir Vene-
zuela. He has just’ ‘been re-
drafted to the U.S. Mrs. Boyd is
following him. She is en route to
California. ;



Var Dias It Amaterdem

This may be the first step in a
really effective “peace-drive.” If
the moles close all airfields, and
some method is found ny which
all oilfields can be obliterated, and
existing stocks destroyed, and all
scientists locked up, we may en-
joy a few quiet years,

For Motorists

VT F you want a new Thanatos

Sports Model delivered to you
in 1956, all you need do is fill in
a form for your dealer, giving your
weight in 1938, your grand-
mother’s religioén, your father’s
size in collars, the tide variations
at London Bridge during March
1931. You must also say whether
you keep doves, what area of your
property (if any) was under beet-
root in 1948, and when your chim-
neys were last swept. It’s as easy
as falling off a motionless tricycle.

The best story will be published

eee ee eee eee ee eee ery
eee eee eee eee eee eee)

eee ee eee eee eee eee

eee eee eee cece eee eee eres

1.26

DIAL 4220 ji

by their daughter Eliza- I

























—_—_—




BARBADOS ADVOCATE

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1961
6.38 a.m.—2.15 p.m. . . 19.40 M.
-—-ooor
6.30 am. Take it from Here; 7 a.m.
The News; 7.10 a.m, News Analysis; 7.15
am. Prem the Editorials; 7.25 a.m.
gramme Parade; 7.30 a.m. In Lenaon;
8 a.m. Southern Serenade Orchestra:
4.30 a.m. Semprini at the Piano: 6.45 am.
How the Writer Does It; 9 a.m,
News; 910 am. Home News
Britain; 9.15 om. Close Down; 11.15 a.m,
Programme Parade; 11.25 a.m. Listeners
Choice; 11.45 a.m. World Affairs; 12 neon
The News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis;
12.15 p.m. Close Down,
4156.40 pom. Sus CU hen




19.76

4.15 p.m, Listeners’ Choice; 5 pm.
Composer of the Week; 5.15 p.m. ae
Scottish Variety Orchestra; 6 p.m. Musie
for Dancing.

600—7.15 p.m. %5.64 M. 31.22 M. 4.45 M





nei

645 p.m. Programme Parade; 7 p.m.
The News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15
p.m. West Indian Diary; 7.45 p.m. Think
on these Things.
545—11.00 p.m. .... 31.92 M. 48.43 M.

8 pm, Radio Newsreel; 815 p.m.
English Magazine; 8.45 p.m. Composer of
the Week; 9 p.m. World Affairs; 9.15
f.m. Joe Loss and his Orchestra; 10 p.m.
The News; 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials;
10.15 p.m, Communism in Asia; 10.30
p.m. Rendezvous Players; 10.45 p.m. The
Debate Continues; 11 p.m. Concerto.

C.B.C, RADIO PROGRAMME

10—10.15 p.m. News and Commentary.
10.15—10.30 p.m, Canadian Chronicle,
11.76 Mes 25.51 M.



Aboard ‘ Magnificent "
co of H.mM.C.S. Mag-
J nificent are asked to be at
the Baggage Warehouse from 6.15
p.m, onwards on Saturday when
launches will take them on boar.

Three days
F you want to be in Who's
Who you've got three days
left. Send in your forms to-day,

Festival Poetry Prize

O ENTRANTS from British

Guiana and two from Jamai-
ca are included in the Arts Coun-
cil [Poetry Competition for the
Festival of Britain, Entries were
invited from citizens of the
British Commonwealth and Irish
Republic for two categories of
poetry in English: (1) A single
poem of not less than 300 lines
and (2) a collection of between
six and ‘twelve short ms, no
single poem to exceed 50 lines in
length, The nse has been

f respo
world-wide and the Judges, who]

are hoping to announce the

awards before the Festival openg
next month,

are bus:
make their choice
entries.

CROSSWORD

trying to
rom 2,030

Ny Way of (4

i

ae aizoa wita gin she shows
joyance,
1, Nothing more than five before ¥

2. Hold ps (8) 4, 13. Bharp. (4)
: m

Land lies, (4)
A letter from Angora upsets the
rest. (5)
Put on both ways.
The set word may
you'll Gnd. (7)

Down
us with grub, (5)
them request items.
‘or @ change. (6)
She may ov e ere
Eaten or drunk? (5)
fuss sae bell, you'll Gnd nim
nm. (
Not on the level. (8)
Not this. one 16 Across,
Common anima} herb, (7)
Marked on a log in more senses
than one. (4)

ite close. (4)

fece of turf. (4)

appear to be last down.

Provides
Let's a (7)
Tear it f

oPenH

See =

—_— oe
se

(3)

Solution of Saturday 4 puazie.— Across:

iL and © Down poortiah ea pipes 7,
Cereals; & 10 Down. Bnglish history;
if ‘Tarn; 15, Limp; 14 Erpe; 15, Task,
17 and 18 wa. Welsh harp; 19, Stop,
20, Tota: 21, Hope: 22, Inform; 25, Rate
er. Down; 1, Scene, 2 re: 3
Taint, 5, elm: Slash:

Wan-iolt: 4 Tas .
'@. Rest 16 Bevie: 17. Weir

MATTRESSES ...

COTTON



t children after glamorous * Holly—



)
t of @ broken thorn. (5)
sing! “insect on
Siete »
0

{8 mater |
e material

To-night

CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
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Music, Dancing
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BEDSTEADS

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THE HARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1951

_—
























AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEES: TO-DAY & TOMORROW at 5 }
TO-NIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT at 6.30

DAVID FARRAR — GLYNIS JOHNS FLORA ROBSON
and the New Swediceh Star MAI ZETTERLING











Be Careful About
Your Baby’s Name

NORTHAMPTON, Eng names,” he told International in “FRIEDA”
News Service. A Universal Release
A ‘Northampton vicar recently “I have no objection to names .
criticised parents for naming jjxe Shirley (Temple); Clark





(Gable) or_James (Stewart).

“When Shirley Temple was the
rage and captivating film audi-
ences, baby girls were inevitably

named Shirley.

“But this pragtice becomes)
absurd when such names 4s
Tallulah, Ginger and Hedy are
saddled on the children.

“Of course, I have no objection
to these beautiful, talented stars.
Their names are attractive enough
for screen purposes. But I like
euphonius names—simple melodi-
ous names.” oe

Prospects of the parish being
invaded by irate film stars left
the vicar unabashed.

woed stars and said “Tallulah”
(as in Bankhead) is “absolutely
terrible” .

The Reverend James Daniel
Berry, vicar of St. Paul's,
Northampton, told his 6,000 par-
ishioners in his parish magazine
that he hoped they would get
back to the good old English
aaa like Roger, Mary, John and

nm. :



EMPIRE

To-day 2,30 Only
J.. Arthur Rank Presents

FREDRIC MARCH in
“ CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS ”

To-night at 8.30 and
Continuing

ROYAL

To-day To Sunday
4,30 and 8.30

Universal Big Double

Yvonne DeCARLO
Brian DONLEVY

“SONG OF
SCHEHERAZADE ”’

“TI cannot refuse to baptize any

and
baby whose mother wanted to

in

give it the awful name of Tallu-
lah”, said the vicar. “But I think
it’s absolutely terrible.

“As for Ginger (Rogers) and
























Hedy Sa ee are not “Gracious, I hope not” said Columbia Pictures Presents
names at all.” the Reverend Berry. “But if they and
“Fortunately, I see signs of the come—I shall be glad to meet||] “THE GIRL OF THE
waning popularity of film star them.” —(I.N.S.) YEAR ” «THE WEB”
—— energies $$ —_—_—— Starring... . Edmond O’BRIEN and
Robert CUMMINGS Ella RAINES
Joan GAULFIELD with a belles sagen
Elsa LANCHESTER
PLAZA DIAL GAIETY ee ~©6d(|sdC OLYMPIC
OISTEN 8404 (THE GARDEN) St. James ROXY
To-day ard Continuing Daily Tolday to Sunday 0.90 p.m ee eee
BLO eg Pm 7 (Warner's Double) To-day To Monday 4.30 and 8,15
“ D ON THE ” i
Robert ‘MITCHUM Mauss a Touts kw" & AD SAA: 8.8 Warner Bros. Smashing
Barbora Bel GEDDES Humphrey BOGART in Rengbile Smashing Double Double
fi “ 7 ; i BRE a
Boris KARLOGD ner cw Lynn Bari in st - Billy HALOP and
WONG Midnite SAT. 14th

in CHINA TOWN
id

A Bobby JORDAN in

n

RIDING the CALIFORNIA
iL.

“KID FROM

Tim Holt in (Both)






“GUN SMUGGLERS" & TANT) 9? “HELL'S KITCHEN”
GILBRRT ROLAND “UNDER the TONTO RIM” CLEVELAND
a el and and
—— is
: «SINGING GUNS” ‘6 r hLINDA®

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) oe JOHNNY BELINDA”
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ROBERT MITCHUM — FATTH DOMERGUE In Ella RAINES Lew AYRES

95 WHERE DANGER LIVES” eee

MAT. SATURDAY 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m
DUNCAN RENALDO (as the Cisco Kid) in
SOUTH OF THE RIO GRANDE
and
ROLAND WINTERS (as Charlie Chan)

in
THE GOLDEN EYE

Starting TO-DAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 and continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30

RKO-RADIO SMASHING THRU






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1STOR T EATRE AGAIN WITH ANOTHER COLOSSAL HIT

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Are you interested in seeing how your island was discovered 9 % BRIDGETOWN
Well here’s your chance ! ! ! y lA
J. ARTHUR RANK PRESENTS FREDERICK MARCH in ’

(DIAL 2310)
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS

PART OF THIS FILM WAS MADE IN BARBADOS

See the ships from Moletown Dock, St. James, Maycock's Bay where se
the landing was filmed, and many other places in Barbados.
PIT 18 — HOUSE 36 — BOX 48 — SCHOOL CHILDREN 18¢.









SATURDAY — 12 p.m. — A REPUBLIC SMASHING DOUBLE
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JOE (Shoeshine) CLARK
KEITH SEALEY ..
SAM GORDON vs
COUNT DEVONISH
ERROL BARNET

“Sunny Side Street”

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FRIDAY, APRIL 13,

1931



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

WHAT FOREIGN SECRETARIES EVER HAD SUCH QUALITIES?

HASTEN









Trese soit ansy His wineino ways with His persuasive manner His capacity to soothe
tarneth away u the Press with the wayward t fearjul.
American Column Canada To Give City Bars
20 Men World New Tips. Danger Liner
Look Out In 1951 Census From NEWELL ROGERS
When Canada 1 rie ae A haunted ier semed out sf
P ; un!
Fi or Dang er ee’ mae Soar ane: wi bp New York on April 4 for England

From R. M, MacCOLL
NEW YORK.

Isolationist Congressmen often
capture the headlines, but there are
plenty of patriotic Americans who
see things differently—and are
prepared to do something about
at.

Twenty such men formed the

“Committee on the Present
Danger” recently.
Its members include former

Secretary of War Robert Patter-
son; James Conant, Harvard Uni-
versity’s chief; and Dr. Vannevar
Bush, who during the last war
headed the 30,000 American
scientists who helped produce the
atom bomb. p

They have put up a consider—
able sum of their, own money to
press sueh politically unpalatable
things as putting the 18—year-olds
into uniform and sending large
numbers of American infantry to
Europe quickly .

Much of the committee’s money
goes in expensive broadcasting
time. “Europe is the next great
prize Russia seeks. Europe must
not fall.” That is the message they
keep repeating.

FRANK PERKINS fired at 4
crow near the little village of
Pearl River in New York State.
An explosion followed. Frank’s
bullets had touched off a fireworks
factory concealed by trees.

Ten fire brigades were alerted
Many people thought it was an
atomic explosion. Frank himself
was knocked backwards into a
river. Nobody was hurt; not even
the crow.

THE college basketball bribes
seandal still rumbles on, Column-
ist Robert Ruark gives this reason
for the sudden tremendous popu-—

rity of ski-ing this winter:
‘They have all realised that you
can’t ‘fix’ a mountain.”

ARE American G.I’s overloaded
with equipment? An inquiry into
last war conditions says yes.
Many soldiers are alleged to have
been sent “to certain death”
simply because they had too much
on their backs.

AMERiAN business is pricking
up its ears over mueeti
Ja eager for new inves _
sana ding bright lures. Not only
can Americans take their profits
out. in dollars, but, if once Japan
decides on nationalisation, the
Government promises to “pay oft”
in dollars.

IRVING (“The Weeper”) Gold-
stein, a figure straight out of a
Runyonesque underworld, was
ealled to give evidence in the case
of a New York policeman accused
ef corruption. The judge got
angry with The Weeper because
he wept so much nobody could
hear what he was saying.



Atom Lessons In
Industry

The first course to help indus-
trialists in the use of isotopes—
radio-active elements—was open-
ed at the Atomic Energy Re-
search Establishment at Harwell
on April 2,

Industrialists will pay £40 for
the course. The sct.ool has been
set up, state the Ministry of Sup-
ply, because of the rapid increase
in the use of isotopes and the need
to understand their application in
testing metals and other processes,

The school will also give
students a broad outline of the
principles of nuclear physics, elec-
tronic circuits and the hazards of
radioactive materials,

The experiments carried out in
these Harwell courses will give
industrialists ample experience of
the methods of radiochemistry,

Dr. J. E. Johnston, of Harwell’s
isotope division, will conduct the
first course, Three later four-
week courses have been ee Uh



&
e

Re
MS
e/
Your hair will be
handsomer by far
when you treat it te
“Vaseline’ Hair Tonic.
Just use a few drops
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Buy a bottle teday!

TRADE MARK
WASELINE ie the cecistered trae
ed the Chreclwoazh Mig. Lo. |

mark

oma

KK YOUR

striving to maintain a world amd ports east — perhaps never
leadership in census-taking she to return.
captured almost 300 years ago. . She is the Polish liner Batory:
In 1666, an obscure little French in | which Communist Gerhart
colony hacking her way out of Eisler fled from America to be-
the wilderness, Canada lay claim Come East German propaganda
to the title of the first country to Chief. |
take a name-by-name census in , It is Eisler’s memory which
modern. times. haunts the Batery, Because Po-
How she got that title is a story land is under Communist domina-
that goes back centuries before, tion the city of New York re-
when grapevine whispering that fused to give the Batery a place
a census was coming brought to dock. She had been using the
fear lest kings were on the French Line’s pier near Cunard’s
march again searching for new Pier, 90, But now the French Line
tax sources and ‘vealth, = the space for its own
The official reason for re-
fusing pier space to the Batory
was that she might be carry-
ing atom bombs which could

Nowadays, of course, this rear
is dispelled by the fact that au
information, gi’en to the census—
taker is secret. It can be used
for no other purpose than for blow up New York.
the compilation of national and Each time the ship docks, Cus-
regional statistical facts. No man toms inspectors take geiger
can be sued; no man can be taxed counters aboard and over her
cn the information he gives. He from stem to stern. She is under
can, however, be hauled into close guard by the police, and the
court if he refuses to give it. crew do not get shore leave.

But for centuries before, fear But just as big a problem for
always walked with the census. Security officials is the fact that
In ancient times, the census pro- the is so venient for
vided the source by which kings the comings and goings of Red
increase their wealth and raised ®8¢Mts and propagandists, Eisler
conscripted armies. Babylon took Proved that.

census in 3,800 B.C.; China had
a census in 3,600 B.C.; Rome had Te PIES? as boat steeple-
} chase in Florida saw the boats
census-takers in 600 B.C. leaping 20 feet into the air off a
But it took William the Con- wooden ramp In an 11-mile
queror of England to almost put course they had to slide across
an end to them. His survey, in g Jana spit under their own
1086, known as the “Doomsday momentum and cross a finishing
Book”, was for the express Pur line &0 feet up on the grass from
pose of finding — bor gy te the water, Three of six entrants
every estate in England an © sta 3
oS. cole. ia toe bevel Treas ae the course, One shot into
ury. HENRY FORD i
In the New World, censuses going to give 70 ial tatieeman
began springing up in the 16th ters of Ford Motor Company em-
century. But they were not on a ployees four-year college schol-







name—by-name basis until Canada, arships, They must be in the u
then called New France, stepped third of their aenteat rath
into the picture. pee to qualify. And even if

3 ather gets sacked while they are

First Modern Census in school, the scholarship will go

“The census of 1666,” says cen- on,
sus officials, “was the first modern AMERICA’S HANSARD asks
census on a name-by—name basis,..Congressmen to list “salient facts”
taken for a fixed date by a per- in their careers for brief biogra-
sonal canvass, showing age, sex, phies. High points listed by rep-
place of residence, occupation and resentative Chester McMullen, of
conjugal condition of eagh per- Florida, in his life story: “Made
son,”? . a hole in one twice.”

Incidentally, the population COST of running a car per
then showed a total of 3,215 year for the average motorist is
inhabitants: compared. with Can- now £307. In Appleton, Wis-
ada’s present-day 14,000,000. consin, the Chamber of Commerce

In 1951, Canada expects to has taken down its hoarding
open up new techniques for other urging motorists to drive safely.
countries. Around the world this Police said it was a traffic hazard.
year many neyo ee edes —_——
what Canada is ig ¥ 7
their people and their possessions. Shadow Works
Canada, however, is using newly- és
designed: electronic machines for Start Again
tabulations.

If the machines are a success, By Air Reporter JAMES STUART
other nations likely will adopt Shadow factories will build
them, and once again Canada British and American aero engines.
will have leaped to census leader- The aircraft industry will do the
ship. —(CP) job in Britain, the motor industry

——— will do it in the U.S.A.
: peg Pie anes ine Har-
and, . V. Roe will produce

Cotton For Cars the Canberra jet bomber yn well

About 400,000 bales of cotton - aeeae Electric Company,
were used in 1950 to finish the in- "The Bristol Aeroplane Company
teriors of American-made autom0- are to assist in building the De
biles. Other materials used were Havilland Venom while a number
wool and foam rubber, A recent of other firms are helping in the
survey by the U.S. Department production of De Havilland Vam-
of Agriculture of 6,648,238 closed pire fighters.
cars and 234,121 convertibles has Production of Gloster Meteor
revealed that most of the cotton fighters is split between five diff-
was used in making headlinings, erent aircraft manufacturers with
seat padding, and car sheeting. factories as far apart as South-
Wool was the leading fibre — a anpron a6 ee aie

i walls, while sections are taken to e

upholstery ‘and side Gloster works at Gloucester for
assembly.

‘“¢ ® In the U.S.A., Ford, Chrysler,

Talking Point General Motors, Studebaker and

a ae omnny the or ame

“So often the man who treats Which are roduce jet engines.
life as a comedy is more useful as The Buick Division of the Gen-
a member of the community, { ¢Tal Motors Corporation have re-
als < ++ 3, ceived a big contract for the pro-
think, than the one who sees it in a :

: ¢ duction of Curtiss-Wright J-65
terms of tragedy. A sense Of engine, which in \eality is the
humour, you see, helps us to pre- British’ Armstrong-Siddeley Sap-
serve a balanced view of things; phire jet. motor.
and it is when that balance is “ The Sapphire is one of the
upset, that the trouble starts. The world’s most powerful aircraft
kind of trouble the world is facing engines. American reports indi-
to-day,” eate that it may be used for a new

(Sewell Stokes speaking in a fighter being built for the United

BBC programme). States Navy —L.E.S.

HAIR

... With ingredients of Vicks VapoRub



ee”









































—.




“— “a
we

paci or explainin WHY, the Russians will soon be
=o Thiaes Sieas! eating out of his hand.
trinting little mistakes 5

London Express Service



New York Busiest Hashcur
In The World

NEW YORK CITY. terminal and loading _ facilities

The Port of New York is the are necessary. Some 2,500 tug
largest and busiest harbour in boats, barges, lighters, and other
the world. Comprising an area @uxiliary boats are maintained
of 1,500 square miles, the Port Approximately 25,000,000 squar
handles an average year about fect of warehouse space are pro
120 million tons of freight. vided for cargo that cannot be

In 1949 more than 10,500 immediately distributed, Huge
vessels sailed from New York, cranes mounted on fixed founda
In the same period, some 8,500 tions, on trucks, and on barges
ships cleared the Port of London, supplement. the hoists on_ the
the werld’s second major har. ships, enabling the easy liftiny
bour, .. of oe machine tools or 60-tor

Establish : y , Bteel girders,
between my et eae lag F Countless tractors, lumbe:
and New Jersey, the Port of New C®!riers, and small power-drive:
York includes, besides New York litt trucks shuttle like ants
City, the New Jersey port cities Petween the ships and the pie)
ot "Newark, Elizabeth, Jersey Warehouses, transferring | { h¢
City, Hogoken, Perth Amboy, and â„¢#ssive quantities of freight,
other smaller towns. a ae 1949 omens oo ali a

Consisti of eigh of imports and exports, valued a
and the meus t Rey Boag nearly | $7,000,000,000, or 40 per-
Raritan, Passaic, and Hackensack cent of the monetary volume o
Rivers, the New York harbour America’s foreign trade, were
has a frontage of approximately
520 miles. Two hundred d
water piers, all at least 450 feet
long, service overseas traffic. were handled. i“

Most of the large passenger _ The task of operating New
liners, including the Queen Eliza- York's complex harbour machin
beth and Queen Mary, together ery means jobs for many thous-
with a few cargo ships, dock at @48 of persons.
the west side of Manhattan
Island, only a few minutes’ ride
from the heart of New York
City. Other shipping ties up at
points along the New York State

York. At the same time, abou
97,000,000 tons of domestic carg:



P-O-S MAY GET MAIN
AIR CARGO BOND

(From Our Own Correspordent)

and New Jersey State sides of PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 10.
the narpour. Establishment of a main air car-
Millions of tons of foofs, raw go bond in Port-of-Spain for al’

materials, and finished produciy operating airlines is now under
are imported each year through consideration. In this main air
the Port of New York, from ¢argo bond, it is reported that air
which thousands of railroad cars cargo will be stored by Customs
and motor trucks pick up the for all operating airlines, A similar
goods and distribute them one for Piareo is also suggested.

throughout the United States, A "
Venezuelan Journalists

vast tonnage of exports in’ great
variety likewise flows outward Visiting Trinidad
(From Our Own Correspondent)

through New York to all parts of
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 10.



the world, Twelve railroad lines

and hundreds of trucking com- Ten Venezuelan journalists wil!
panies converge on the harbour, spend 12 days in Trinidad as the

carrying the two-way flow of guests of the Trinidad and Tobago

cargo, Tourist Board. They will spend
To handle such enormous six days in Trinidad and ‘six in
amounts of freight, extensive Tobago,





Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school~boys and school-girts
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

titien, Stories can be on any mick, but should not exceed 500 words
in length arid must reach the Story Editor, Advocate Co., Lid.

will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-



Look at your smile in
the mirror ¢ ¢.

Are your teeth as
white as hers?

Your smile can’t be truly bright,

unless your teeth are really

white! Pepsodent will uncover

the natural brilliance of your

smile, make your teeth sparkle!
Pepsodent, you see, contains
Irium, wonderful ingredient
which floats away dull film and
ugly stains leaving teeth whiter
than ever before !

THE TOOTHPASTE
WITH IRIUM*



















MAKE THIS PEPSODENT
“YMIRROR TEST
oe .



TONIGHT — Smile into your
mirror — take a good look
at your teeth,

ay
NEXT—Clean your teeth with
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ing and evening, for a week.



THEN—Sgnile into your mir-
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rium is the registered trade mark of Pepsodent
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PEPSODEST Ure i D

shipped through the Port of New} genieg



Saturday
Decides
Butlin’s Fate



(From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, April 1!

we E. MacColl writes from Ne

ork: If the Nassau court gives

nae : ee . To help children develop strong t ad
assent to ; a A > -~ . t ng bonesand
sits on Situedey ee + } teeth and good muscles, co give them energy
the ailly Butlin’ vecet eu >| and stamina for school or play, and to assure

¢ j acation village all-round good health—there is no finer milk
will be taken over by n Ameri- than KLIM. KLIM gives youngsters a gener-
can syndicate headed by Lionel ous supply of the essestial Body building
Marks. elements found in fresh cow's milk.

Mr, Sydney Krause, Broadway |

attorney acting for Marks, arc
who flies to Nassau tonight to a

PAGE THREE





1 ;

{

j 7 KLIM is pure, safe. milk
i 2 KLIM keeps without refrigeration
3 KLIM quality is always uniform













i





tend the court hearing on Satur- 3 KLIM adds nourish ient to cooked dishes
definitely not” te ao Hudtaan 6 KLIM is recommenced for infant feeding
hot starting ee thee el a nee wz KLIM is safe in tho specially-packed tin

rit must emphasise that”, hr @ KIM is produced vider strictest control
en sahaee tor ogee sevaaen ok
gery en the, atarks nyndlets Ce Kile? MILK
Gar hn eats FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

Krause said that Marks, who is
now in Nassau

conferring witt
Butlin’s attorney, ha had the
option on the vacation village for
some time
He and his associates who will,
it is believed, be named in cour
on Saturday, plan to spend $7,000,
000 in “expansion and improve-
ment.”

A race track and “club house’
will be among improvements

Britain Denies
Note On Jap Treaty

LONDON, April 11

British Foreign Ottice today
Press reports that a not
had been presented to the Ameri-
can Government urging Chinest
Communist participation in the
Japanese peace treaty, and hand
ing over Formosa to Communists

Foreign Office spokesman ‘said
a communique issued last Decem
ber after conversations between
Prime Minister Attlee and Presi
dent Truman, said Britain and the
United States had agreed to differ
on the subject on which the Gov
ernment was entitled to represent
China.

“The British and Washington
Governments” the spokesman
added, “are agreed that all States



The

which played a major part in the
feat of Japan should participate
in drafting the Japanese peace
Treaty

“As a consequence, His Majes



ty’s Government have recorded
their view that the Central Peo-
ple’s Government should be given
the opportunity to take part in
current negotiations

“This question will have to be
considered further by both Gov
ernments before a solution can be
found” he added:—Reuter.
x SUD DO99SGSGOS9 PPPOE POTTS
.
%

8



x S
g

City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week |} x
. *

ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6, %
Send this coupon with your story. % %
SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION 8 %

PERGND gc sire sae tsbhe 04 sd vtsinnscneodersgbdbcrivante % x

%&

. . * . 4

* MODERN DRESS SHOPPE=Broad st. |
















SE SURE OF
ALLL OVER fel

use of DREAM rhe ip
of the Beautiful,

Play safe be prepared,
for your Yomantic moment.
Get a few cakes of DREAM

TOILET SOAP, use it
faithfully in your bath,
shower and at the wash
basin for a_ soft-smo
sar skin, radiant with notural
loveliness.
DREAM is available at toilet goods

counters throughout the island.









LPL LLL LLL LLL LLL
.

Â¥





> THURSDAY - FRIDAY = SATURDAY 3:
: MONDAY - TUESDAY x
: ALL ITEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED x
8 FOR QUICK CLEARANCE 3
% You are definitely effecting large savings by attending this CLEARANCE x
i SALE. Here are some of the many reductions. x
& %
% TENNIS DRESSES. SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS %
& A fine assortment in sizes and colours, Most of these items were regularly a { x
sold up to $8.50 Sale Price msihioinnat eae 48 %
% x
% LADIES’ BETTER DRESSES s

Many Styles and Colours, All sizes, Reduced from $24 to ‘celal 1 c s tl ii $

LADIES’ ART SI

epee seein

Also a variety in Ladies

To-day's Value 65e. per

LADIES’ PANTI

Lace tiimmmed Panties in
Regular priced $1.92

LADIES’ SKIRTS

& Jersey
“& this Sale

SOPPPOF TS SOS SFO OSS OIFF

big For ladies and children

Regular Sizes and Modern Shades

LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS

2 of these fine Towels with a Glass Tumbler

material Blouses,

Ny IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS
in white and many other useful colours, Many {]
Styles, Many regular prices were up to $4.80 To Clear Ce ] 8 i}

Is MEN’S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS 8

LK STOCKINGS 3
Je
Sale Price om prs. for » 1 . t! i

for a l] ® fi il
ES WOVEN ART SILK

tea rose, cream also black, Small, Medium, Large.
Sale Price

AND BLOUSES
Printed Cotton Skirts Specially reduced for
m0 y juce "$1.98

°

Ankle Socks

towel, Special Sale Price, All 3 in a pkg

“4
SOE OOOOSS

| 00

ts

et haat fa a

SOESESSSSO BOSS SOSO

>
% Men's Polo Shirts in White only with Zip fasteners. Shirts that were (7 il il h
$$ regular $2.40. Reduced for this Sale cy ake °



% 54° WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL



e That will make Skirts or Coats for travelling and can make many other 7 fl fl 3
x useful things. Reduced from $6.00 to Per yd. icc “ %
i LADIES’ COATS, WOOLLEN PULLOVERS, CARDIGANS s
i Reduced to | Price %
Ix CORSETS, CORSELETTZS, TURBANS, INFANT CHRISTENING .
RK DRESSES to } Price 3
s X
lor LLL PPP LLLP LLP APPPPPAPLELP PPP LPS :





PAGE FOUR :



BARBADOS GG) ADVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co.,



Friday, April 13, 1951



YOU MUST REGISTER

WITH the passing of the Adult Suffrage
Bill giving the right to vote to every per-
son who had reached the age of 21 years,
the old register of voters comprising the
electoral roll became obsolete and it was
necessary to prepare a new register of
voters.

To this end the Government appointed
213 Assistant Rezistering Officers and these
with 22 supervisors are now.issuing forms
for registration throughout the island. The
work was begun on April 2 and must be
finished by June in order that new regis-
ters can be compiled,

The Assistant Registering Officers are
already experiencing great difficulties be-
cause of obstruction on the part of thous-
ands of people. In some instances it has
been claimed that there is no necessity to
register again, in others that the registra-
tion of women would make them serve as
jurors at the Court of Grand Sessions,
while others feel that they should be paid
to register.

Thousands refuse to register on religious
grounds.

The public must realise that the new Act
wiped out the old registers except for a
bye election during the year. In the case
of women it is not true that every woman
who registers will be called upon to serve
as a juror because the jury list will be
prepared separately from the list of voters.

It has been claimed that the fact that
every adult had to be registered afresh
was not sufficiently advertised so that the
public could be acquainted with the cir-
cumstances'and the need for re-registering.

This criticism overlooks the fact that the
coming into operation of the new system
was advertised by means of a public notice
published several days in the Press. But
even if this had not been done, it is clear
that the appointment of 213 Assistant Reg-
istering Officers and 22 Supervisors whose
duty it is not merely to issue forms for reg-
istration but to explain to people who are
potentially qualified .voters why it is
necessary to register is evidence of the
awareness of the Government of the ob-
stacles. Under the old system of income
qualification it was necessary for those
who held that qualification and who want-
ed to exercise their right as voters to go to
a Justice of the Peace, swear to their quali-
fication and then hand them to a Register-
ing Officer. .

The necessity for registering must be
clear to all those who give the matter the
slightest consideration. With the introduc-
tion of party government in this island, it
was not enough to leave it to the members
of the various parties to register such
people as might be of their political view
or who might be sympathetic towards their
policies. It was plainly the duty of the
Government to set up machinery for the
registration of all those who might be en-
titled to vote so that all the people might
take part in the establishment of govern-
ment.

The reason for registering is to exercise
a civic right by taking part in the selection
of the personnel of government.

If there is no registration, there can be
no voters’ list, no election, no House of
Assembly and'so no proper form of Gov-.
ernment. ‘Registration is then the first
step in the formation of a government and
it is the duty of every citizen aged 21, to
fill in the forms delivered to them, The
earlier it is done the more time will be
available for the preparation of the regis-
ters and the electoral roll.

PICNIC BLOCKS

IT IS an excellent thing for people to
spend a day in the country on a picnic. It
is an excellent thing and deserves con-
gratulation of those responsible for organ-
ising picnics. But it is essential that the
organisers of picnics should realise that
their excursion is for a relatively small
“number of people. The thousands of work-
ers who are not going to the picnic are still
entitled to the use of the island’s highways.
This right to use the island’s highways was
severely restricted yesterday morning by
the thoughtless action of six ‘bus drivers
on the St. James coast road; Instead of
collecting their “picnic” passengers off the
road, and then spacing their departures in
accordance with the flow of traffic travel-
ling on the road at that time, these ‘bus
drivers lined up their buses in close forma-
tion and delayed the passage of four times
the number of other vehicles wanting to
use the‘road at that particular point.

Quite apart from the thoughtlessness of
this action, the practice, common in Barba-
dos of parking vehicles immediately be-
hind preceding vehicles, is anti-social.
Whenever vehicles have to park in the
main roads for whatever reason, it is quite
possible for traffic to continue, providing
that vehicles take good care to allow a
space of 20 feet between vehicles. No one
capable of entering a vehicle is incapable
of walking an extra 20 feet. But the 20
feet makes all the difference between the
passage and the jamming of traffic.

Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown.




























BARBADOS ADVOCATE

U.S. Senator Paul H. Douglas propeoses-=

A Programme For
Resisting Aggression

I belong to the school of thought
which believes that the United
States must strive to help put
down aggression wherever we
can. We would do this provided,
first, that other nations will ade-
quately join us in the attempt;
and secohd, that the places in
which the aggression occurs, or
threatens to occur, are accessible
to our forces,

I favour this because I believe
that peace is indivisible, and be-
cause I believe that if aggression,
particularly the concerted Com.
munist type, is allowed to succeed,
it will build up the strength of the
aggressors and encourage them to
further aggression.

I do not believe in this pelicy in
order to be aggressive, i believe
in it because I want the reign of
law to triumph I want all men
and nations to be able to live
relatively free from attack, and
hence able to enjoy freedom and
justice and to cultivate the arts
of peace. I would like to have the
United States, as the strongest
nation in the world, continue to
lead in these efforts, although I
have no desire to dictate to any-
one, even in these worthwhile
pursuits. I believe that the ulti-
mate safety of the United States
lies in having a secure world, and
that our own safety, like that of
other nations, is involved in the
maintenance of peacé everywhere,

The United States. cannot resist
Communist aggression all over the
world by itself. Other non-Com-
munist countries should share the
burden. If we can encourage
such help by our own willingness
to resist aggression, it would be
far better than letting the Com.
munists take over the whole
world, even excepting the West-
ern Hemisphere. I would rather
have allies with us if we have to
fight Russia than to face Russia
alone.

At this late day it can hardly be
true that we must debate what
power appears to be the main in-
stigator of war if it should come
upon us

After World War II the United
States reduced its. armed forces
from 13,000,000 men to 1,500,000
and had only a scant 12 divisions
prior to the Communist aggression
in Korea, Russia did not cut its
total force by more than one-half,
and now has 175 divisions, prob-
ably the ser rnent of 135 to 140
American divisions

IN MID-AIR BETWEEN
PERSIA AND IRAQ.

The wheels of our Viking have
hardly shaken the dust of Teheran
airpert from their still-revolving
tryes,

An American Embassy courier
leans across the gangway between
us. “There has been another
attempt to assassinate the Prem-
ier,” he says to me, “They told
me just as I was leaving.”

Yes, there is literally no get-
away’ from it: Tehehan,
its terror rule of muraer
rumours, pursues us into the
sky.

For the past fortnight I have
been checking up three or four
zssassination reports like this
per day. Most of them are false
Whether they are spontaneously
generated or deliberately planted
by the Communist underground,
as some say, I do not know,

But they are just as effective as
the real thing in cowing all those
who have doubts about @e
feasibility of the terrorist (and
Communist) sponsered nationali-
sation of the oil industry.

The Mob Boos

MOST telling episode yet was
the funeral of Dr. Zanghaneh,
the Education Minister in the
Razmara Government, who died
of his injuries after being shot
by a theological student. The
Government was reported to
have ordered him a state funeral.

But it was a most modest
affair, Cabinet Ministers were
“too busy” to attend, The party
of mourners was not more than
80 to 40 strong. Whén they
arrived for the ceremony, they
found themselves faced by
hostile crowd. The jnob, led by
an organised. terror gang, boeed
and jeered at the mourners and
upbraided them for honouring “a
traitor.”

The United States offered to
share the secret of atomic energy
with the whole world, including
Russia, provided only that there
should be an adequate interna-
tional inspection to which we
would be subject to prevent any
country from making atomic
bombs. We also offered to dena-
ture our atomie bombs under the
same conditions, Russia refused
to agree to this international in.
spection.

We sought, imvough the United
Nations, to create a pooled force
to resist aggression, Russia failed
to co-operate, Russia has ham-
strung the United Nations by
using the veto no less than 44
times, evet. prior to tne Korean
crisis.

We have helped to organize in.
ternational agencies to enhance
the arts of peace. Russia has
refused to co-operate with them.

We have stripped ourselves of
our colonial empire by freeing the
Philippines and giving up rights to
intervene in Cu

Under the Marshall Plan we
offered economic assistance to all
of Europe, including Russia and
her satellites, Russia not only re-
fused to come in herself, but also
prevented her European satellites
from coming in,

That totalitarian power most of
us have long believed is commit-
ted by its very nature to a garri-
son state that threatens to expand,
In the past, acting through the
United Nations, we prevented
Russian aggression in Iran, in the
Dardanelles, and in Greece, Act-
ing with our Brftish and French
allies, we prevented Russian seiz.
ure of Berlin,

Wherever we showed strength
to resist Communist aggression,
the Russians backed down,

Last June 24, however, the
forces of world Communism,
solidly backed by Russia, commit-
ted military aggression across the
whole of a national frontier. Now,
Russia has committed its largest
satellite, China, to the risk of gen-
eral war,

If war comes, it will be insti-
gated by Russia, not by us,

The danger confronting us is a
totalitarian Communist danger
The record of Soviet gains gives
conclusive proof that it is the
weak and not the strong who are
in danger. If there is any hope
for peace with Russia, we will
find it in strength,





Will The Terror
Spread to Bagdad? |

Hy Sefton Delmer

It worked perfectly, Many ot
the dead man’s friends were so
frightened that they dropped .the
wreaths and flowers they carried
slunk away from the processipn
and tried to melt into the crowd
of bystanders-

Contrast

BAGDAD. What a_ contrast!
Here, too, as throughout thy East,
men want to grab the fruits of
Western thrift, initative, and
technical capacity. Nationalisation
looks to them the simplest and
auickest method of achieving it.

Eighteen deputies of the
Nationalist opposition have put
down a motion in the Iraqi Par.
liament demanding nationalisa-
tion of the partly British-owned
Iraq Petroleum Company and its
subsidiaries in Basra and Mosul.

The Government itself has let
it be ‘qnown—unofficially—that
failing redress of its grievances
by the companies it is consider-
ing nationalisation as a means of
ending the ‘most unsatisfactory”
Basra and Mosul concessions.

But there is no stampede as in
Teheran, “Wait and see how
things go in Persia,” is the watch-
word, Critics—even Nationalists
like deputy Salman Shaik Daoud
—speak up against nationalisation
without fear of being assassinated
as traitors the following day.

“Reason” says Daoud “not emo-
tion, must guide our decision,
What evidence is there that na-
tionalisation is likely to increase
the revenue from oil?”

It is the kind of question which
the Teheran oil commission
should. have, debated at length
but never did.

“It’s the RAF... .”

Make no mistake, though, dis-
pite all this healthy realism, oil
nationalisation is a live issue here
in Bagdad, and it is likely to be-
come livelier still. The opposition

OUR READERS SAY:

Widow’s Fund
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—For the last two days I
have been at Bathsheba making
a collection in aid*of the widow
and. seven children of Herbert
Goodman, who was drowned at
sea, when fishing, on. Monday
morning.

I am enclosing a list of sub-
scriptiéns up to date, and I would
be very grateful if you would be
kind enough to publish this, and
any further amounts that your
readers may be kind enough to
contribute. This is a very de-
serving case as the last child is
only eleven months old, and there
are three others under nine years
of age. I have given the widow
a sum to carry her over the next
few days, and am opening a
Savings. Account -with the re-
mainder

Any — subscriptions
sent either to me at the under-
mentioned address or to Miss
Peet h ea yy c/o the Advocate, and
be acknowledged.

could be

Remainder of a sum collected by Mi
H.O.. Emtage and Mrs. Howe on
& previous occasion........ 25.00

The St Leonard's Church
outing to Bathsheba 6.52

Fishermen & their families at

Pent. Bay... bedi ss cone ysens 7
Mrs. Bayley and Mrs. Barrow 1
Mrs. Carter, 2

Edgewater......
Servants at Edgewater........
Mrs. Greenhalgh
Mrs. Stanton’.

Mr. Gill ..
“A friend"
Mr, Durant ; ke
Mr. Winfield, Walker

Mr. A. Cumberbateh
Mr, Hart ...

A friend ......
Mr. Noel and family ..
Mr, and Mrs, L, Williams .
Anonymous ... oleae







BSESEQnSesnessssse









Dr. Johnson 1
Mr, Branch ,...
Mr. Evelyn pawesnayecd seeds 24
Mr, & Mrs. Elliot Williams .. 2.36
Mr. Scantlebuny ........+ 12
D’Arey Hinkson 06
Cecil Holder 12
John Eastman ... 12
Mr, & Mrs. C. M. Howe 10,00
Mr, Chrichlow 4
Mr. A. T. King 50
Mr. H. Shepherd .. 12
Mrs. Maud Holder ........-- 12
Mr. St. John. ..,..-. 48
Anonymous subseriptions
Bathsheba o....6s555- sarees 1.01
$65.48
Paid into Savings Account in the
Bank of Canada.
Yours, ete
T. HOWE.
Whitehall,
Codrington Hill.
April 12, 1951

CARROTS
, Busted whether he be player, em | were paying far too high a price for the sort|% SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL BEET ROOT
ployer, or just enthusiast like my- a s Pp - ABBA
self. of concessions now being allowed us by CANADIAN APPLES 3 g

FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1951

semen

All Not Sweet On Sugar
Deal; Battle Brewing”

(Toronte) of March 24, 1951

OTTAWA (Staff).

Canada is in a bitter fight over sugar at
Torquay. Possible repercussions on the
Empire preferential tariff structure and |
especially on Canada’s relations with British
West Indies are considerable.

The fight centres on efforts by Cuba to|
get a share of the big Canadian sugar market, |
worth $76 million last year and given almost
wholly to Commonwealth sources of supply. |

One presently unanswered question is:)
what is Cuba willing to pay in concessions on
Canadian manufactured goods as a quid. pro}
quo? ‘

Australia and other Commonwealth
spokesmen meanwhile are fighting to retain |
this lush business within the preference
framework.

Legally, Canada is bound by her preferen-
tial sugar rates negotiated under treaty with
B.W.I. in 1925. We can’t break this agree-
ment. But we could nullify its effect by |
buying sugar at the full general tariff rate |
either under subsidy or by direct govern-|
ment purchase.

$11 MILLION SUBSIDY

Unknown to most Canadians in all this is
the fact that as consumers, they paid a cash
subsidy of about $11 million last year to give
their sugar business to Commonwealth coun-














| 66

Ko Ny” Sa
ee FOR P

THE WHOLE FAMILY

@ LEAVES BODY FRESH,
SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN

© MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR

The “FINANCIAL POST”

The United States must main-
tain a foreign policy of resisting
Russian aggression everywhere
we can, We must maintain this
policy for our own security as well
as for that of the other free and
independent na’ of the world.
I should like to”emphasize, how-
ever, that we are fot the only ones
who should take this stand. Every
nation with a stake in freedom
and independence should do the
same, Unless we help, the Com.
munists could now sweep over all
of Europe, Asia, the Middle East,
and Africa. Since this might be
done, we must build up our com-
bined strength to meet this chal-
lenge,

Let us determine that our civil-
ization is not to fall and that the
ice-cap of the police state shall not
descend upon us, If that were to
happen then the liberties which
we take for granted, as the air we
breathe, would disappear, It
would be hundreds of years, per-
haps many centuries, before that
ice-cap would melt.











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Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413
































Arnold ae in his recent
great work on story, says that
civilizations fall because of “in-
sufficient response” to “stimulus.”
And the gloomy German, Speng-
ler, had the same version, that
civilizations fall because the inner
faith of a civilization wears itself

























out. The Communists believe that| tries. This means close to a cent a pound on ‘ee
this is what wi s, ‘ * . * = Mi tnt tnttettrtvttnttvtntlntrtntttnttrtottvtrtltntntetetetvtelntrdndetnlo tried dn dele nl tell 7
They think the Sioenar Seaaee ai wager whtes: Cenadtana ‘tapers. SSS SOPIP LISS SPP SSESPPPP SLAP L PSPS SPS SP SSPE

All but about 1% of our sugar imports came
from Commonwealth sources in 1950,

Of total imports, $16.4 million came from
Jamaica; $13.6 million from British Guiana;
$11 million from Australia; $10 million from
Fiji; $7.3 million from Barbados; $7.6 million
from Trinidad. Only $414,000 came from
Cuba and a like amount from Dominican
Republic.

The present British. preference arrange-
ments date back to the B.W.I. agreement of
1925. At that time Canada granted the B.W.I.
a protective preferential concession of $1 per
100 lb. The preferential rate in the 1920
treaty with B.W.I. had been 83.2 cents per
100 lb. Between 1912 and 1920 it had been
15 cents.

Since the present tariff against Cuban
but it/sugar is $1.28, this means that theoretically,
Empire sugars can charge anything up to the
world price plus $1.28 and still retain the
business,

In practice, the rate of Empire sugars is
set a little below what the traffic will bear.
Instead of $1.28, the present Empire rate is
about $1.13. This means that the effective

Empire preference is about 85 cents per
100 lb.

flows with them,

It lies within our power to
prove them right or wrong, If we
have faith in the essence of our
society, namely, respect for the
individual and a deep desire to
improve human life, and if we
translate such a faith into acts,
we will survive. If we do not,
we are likely to fall,

The non-Communist world, if it
will only unite, still holds the pre.
ponderance of power. It has
more than twice the population of
the Communist world, It has
many times the industrial strength
of the Communists. For the mo-
ment it is weak in military
strength at its very centre. But
we can repair this,

Freedom can .rin if all free
peoples are united. Such deter-
mined unity can perhaps. still
deter ,the aggressors from going
further and can give us peace, It
is confessedly a slim hope,
is the only hope for peace.

MR. BAKER!!

SOPOSSO

a
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W.L. Cricket Team

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Allow me to add my
quota of disgust to the growing
pile stacked up in connection with
the manner in which the West In.
dies Cricket Board of Control is
handling the 1951 West Indies Tour
to Australia. They seem to know
nothing about what is really hap-
pening, care less about keeping
the public informed, and have nc
regard whatever about who is dis-





es

a
OILFIELDS aA
@ MILES 200
bows STEAMSHIP SUBSIDY
iy i Twenty-five years ago, this protective
oe a he ee important | preferential protective concession by Canada,
y tical campaign, j i
Don't forget either, nat Petal when added to our annual subsidy to build,
farrouiet agades, She pioalen priest} Operate and maintain the Lady Boats in the
: 1, has a large and devoted : , : :
following in font voted’) B.W.I. service, was Canada’s contribution
a aor Bellew pots bitterly to maintenance of traditional trade relation-
- ern eputies whom I : .
met at an Iraqi Friends house it| Ships between this country and the B.W.L.
Hee od = peeeenre, = Britain's In the ’30’s, this preference cost Canada
ALF. a raq’s abani air “Ws :
base that has Deaected "things several millions annually as compared with
here going the way of Persia be-|the price she could have bought the sugar
Said one of them, with general | 0M world markets. The steamship subsidy
ie tia eee ae ee was cumulative. Until the war it had cost
1 ne alr “aye . :
base and within 24 hours the pres-| 2b0ut $2 million annually, inclusive of
ent gang of thieves and robbers} interest on capital investmeni
ruling and exploiting us will be ee
either dead or abroad.” When the treaty was signed, there was
ane fe recta a an important quid pro quo by way of prefer-
s 3 one lot o , -
Americans lined up» as co-| @ntial treatment for Canadian manufac-
operators, tured goods in the B.W.I. market. At one
ad ey tis | time, upward of 2,000 individual Canadian
n was in Bagdad three i i i .
weeks ago, t faund’thare « arta! exporters were doing business in B.W.I. For
contieting of ea-Sehator Tydings,) Many, this was their initial introduction into
partner in one of the United i ;
States’ richest and most infiuen- export business,
oa Ermis af sorporssion lawyers, But since inconvertibility and the dollar
Xas oll magnate Ra, an, ‘
aigelate ut (he ‘aamieanaeamine shortage, Canadian manufacturers
nan Hunt one expert} been having a rough time in B.W.1.
; rman, an e British oil .
financier F.’ W. Rickett, ‘ Last year, total Canadian sales there
ont a pects Ty peepee slumped one third. On a volume basis our
Al y made a tour o > .
the 87,000-square-mile Basra con-| €Xports last year were 5% less than in 1938.
Or Hyer te the Ministee They were less than one quarter our volume
Dia Jaffa, at the end of the trip:| Of trade in the peak years following the
waite years 1 would sink 200) war,
wells here, 3
Now all this talk of nationali- _ Just recently a new trade liberalization
sation and negotiations with the j : Sea a
Asnaribatads Tint ier mae nerve plan has been introduced. This gives Can-
war, But like all war it is danger- adians a hunting license in their old stamp-
ous—especially in an inflammable] ; ; as
Situation like that of the Middle| #28 grounds. The maximum trade they can
East today, i. obtain is 50‘% of postwar sales in some lines;
—LES. | 334% in others.
This is the background into which the
Cubans have hurled their demand for some
share of Canada’s sugar business.
SEEK TREATZ REVISION
Long before the Cubans raised this issue
at Torquay, Canada had indicated inform-
ally that she wanted to revise the 1925
treaty. For the past two years there has
been a strong feeling in Ottawa that we

FRESH VEGETABLES

STRING BEANS

CANADIAN
CHOCOLATE CHRISTOPHENES

olan
AN CHOCOLATE
BARS en

I sympathise with Frank Wor-
rell, and all the other chaps whc
are awaiting the decisions of thi:
august body whid seems in ne
way anxious to @xpedite matter:
one way or the other. Perhaps thc
President, Mr. Nuthes, may not be
the Mussolini-like figure your ver
satile Sports Editor conjures him
up to be, and there may be some
g00d reason for not telling us wha
is really «going on. But for goodness
sake do tell us something. Don’
let us imagine things, becaus¢
every pound of rumour contains
at least 2 ounces of fact.

Tell us what you have, do, anc
who, if anybody at all, is really te
blame for the delay.

Please remember we are anxiou
about sending our best team te
Australia, and would even sub
scribe to pay extra if it were ne
ecessary to do so

Yours,

U.K. authorities in this traditional Canadian
market.

One important feature of this preference
is that the B.W.L. gets no direct benefit from
the fact that they have become big dollar
earners because of these heavy Canadian
purchases.

Last year,

Poe PPL LP LLLP LI PP DD
PLEDGE POD IIO OPIE DEE EET TEE PE

tr

t
FISH
our purchases from B.W.I.

reached a new record figure of $67 million. |
But the $37 million balance of trade in|
favour of B.W.I. goes direct into the dollar|
pool in Britain. And the complaint is fre- |
quently voiced in B.W.I. that since the bal-|
ance of trade turned so strongly in their |
favour, there has been no commensurate |
relaxation in import
Canadian goods.

SMOKED HADDOCK
SMOKED KIPPERS
RED SALMON

RED SNAPPER

order early from

CODDARDS



restrictions against!

|
| ed ptt ttn tnt tt PEA ALL LLL Bott bile me trl tlm tle rn: hls tot
i eid LAr re -

butt tule bint te bb bef PLD peers
tube. AAA

VOTE ST TE IT TTS

EXPERIENCE

4



FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1951

ees,

St. Lucey Churchwarden
Asks For “No Friction”

MR. E. L: WARD, M.C.P., was appointed Church-
warden of St. Lucy for the ensuing term 1951-52, when the
St. re Vestry met yesterday.

@ nomination was made by Mr. I. C. S r
seconded by Mr. D. E. Webster. ~ eo





PLOUGHING

Labourer Fined
£3 tor Wounding
FINE of £3 in 28 days with

A an alternative of two months’
imprisonment was imposed on
Athelbert Ashby, alias Bradshaw
or Pal Brown, a 35-year-old
labourer of Percy’s Gap, Martin-—
dales, by City Police magistrate
Mr. C. L. Walwyn yesterday.

Ashby was found guilty or un—
lawfully and maliciously wound—
ing Geraldine Hinkson in her fore—
head with a pine joist. The inci-
dent occurred along Lukes Alley,
City.

CANE FIRE at Mangrove

Plantation, St. Philip, on
Wednesday night burnt three and
a half acres of second crop ripe
canes. They are the property of
Carrington Estates Ltd. and were
insured,

Another fire on Wednesday at
Walkers Plantation, St. George,
burnt five and a half acres of first
and sécond crop ripe canes, the

property of C. L. Davis. They
were also insured.
ISTRICT Welfare Officers,

Mr. Weekes and Miss Black-
man, are going through many
districts in Belleplaine in search
of people to start classes in em-—
broidery etc., at the Belleplaine
Playing Field.

A general meeting is expected to
be held next Wednesday night to
give these classes a start.

During Miss Blackman’s search
she met some of the old students
of Mrs. H. A. Vaughan who are
willing to help. She had an inter-
view with some of them. During
the evening ag netball game was
played at Belleplaine under the
supervision of Miss Blackman.

YTINETEEN-YEAR-OLD James
4 Tavlor. a labourer of Castle
Grant. St. Joseph, was taken to
the General Hospital yesterday
morning suffering from head in-
juries and detained. He was in-
volved in an accident with a load-
ed mule-drawn cart.

Flower, Fruit Show

Ferns, ornamental plants
flowering plants in baskets,
grafted plants in addition to
vegetables and fruit will be
among the exhibits at the six-
teenth Annual Exhibition of the
Horticultural Society which opens
at Queen’s [Park on Saturday
April 21 from 1—6 p.m,

There will also be a luncheon
table decoration and those
desirous of entering are asked to
communicate with Mrs. T. H.
H. Wilkinson,

Plants in pots would be receiv—
ed the day before the exhibition
from 9—5 p.m. and cut flowers,
vegetable and fruit on the same
morning of the show between 7
and 8.30.

The Committee are hoping not





only to have a good attendance
but a good many exhibits as
well.

A cup will be offered by the
Orchid Circle to their members
only for the best exhibit at the
show, .There wiil be three other
cups offered to members cf the
Horticultural Society for the
greatest number of points for cut
flowers, plants and ferss as well
as a prize of $5.00 to be given
for the best collection of vegeta-
bles exhibited by a school.



NO EXCITEMENT
AT SUGAR AUCTION

THERE is not the excitement
nor the number of buyers at a
damaged sugar sale as there is at
a furniture or some similar sale.
On Wednesday in less than 10
minutes, DaCosta & Co, Ltd.,
Pierhead Lane, sold 74 bags of
damaged sugar to four city mer-
chants. The sugar was sold in
lots of 10 bags.

The usual auctioneer’s bell was
not rung nor was the auctioneer
doing much shouting. In a quiet
way the auctioneer just said to the
half dozen men around him, “This
lot—$6.50 (meaning $6.50 a bag)?
One merchant nodded his head to
indicate that he favoured that
price. No one else took a bid and
when the auctioneer said “One—
Two—Three,” that lot was sold.

When the sugar is sold in such
lots, a man of limited cash cannot
buy any. Among the half a dozen
men at the sale yesterday, there
was such a man who said to him-
self, “Cheap—gocd bargain, they
should be selling each bag separ-
ately.

Nothing so was going on, how-
ever, and he could only watch the
four merchants, without any com-
petition, buy the 74 bags. The
merchants left the warehouse and
shortly afterwards their lorries
came to take away the sugar.

SSPPSISS

S ENJOY





TO Yorn...

CHUM SALMON—Large

with

STUFFED OLIVES—per jar
PLAIN OLIVES—per jar

SOUPS |

SATISFACTION

SOUTH AFRICAN LOBSTER 9a. Hh

CAMPBELLS SOUPS :—CHICKEN NOODLE, CHICKEN
RICE, CONSOMME, BOULLION, BEEF,

CREAM OF MUSHROOM—per Tin
NEILSONS CHOCOLATES—per bar
Nut Rol!, Rosebuds, Jersey Nut,-Jersey Milk, Macaroon, Burnt
g Almond, Crispy Crunch, Cherry Cream, Liquid Cherry.

CARRS CHEESE CRISPS—per tin

PEAK FREANS CHEESELETS—per tin
PEAK FREANS MARTINI CRACKERS—per tin
HEINZ PICKLED ONIONS—per jar

STANSFELD, SCOTT

SOCCCSO SOOO SOOO SP POOSOSSOOSOS SF OPOOOOOSS

Mr. Ward said that as the lot
fell on him, he was prepared to
do his best for the parish,

_He would live up to expecta-
tions of the parishioners and
carry on the good work started
by his predecessors.

He was hoping that during his
term of office there would be no
friction, but rather cooperation
among the boards and Vestry on
the whole.

Hearsay, he said, was respon-
sible for lots of friction. He was
asking the Vestry to deal with
ard facts rather than hearsay.

He realized that the responsi-
bility of a churchwarden was a
great one and that he had a big
reputation to live up to.

Officers Elected
The Vestry then proceeded to
elect other officers and com-
mittees. They are as follows:—

Senior Guardian: Mr. F.. A.
Greaves,

Junior Guardian: Mr. C. H,.
Yearwood.

Sanitary Commissioners: Dr. A.
C, Kirton, Mr. W. L. Greaves, Mr.
K. C. O'Neal, Mr. J. Alleyne and
Mr. N. Slocombe.

Building Committee: Mr. J
Alleyne, Mr. W. IL. Greaves, Mr.
E. L. Ward, .Mt. C. H. Year-
wood and Mr. F. A. Greaves.

Organ Tuner and Repairer: Mr.
E. J. Bouvier.

Delegates: Mr. D. E, Webster
(Vestry); Mr. Collin Ward and
Mr. J. E. Marville (Congregation
and Parish Church); Mr. C. Birch
(St. Clement’s- congregation) ;
Mr. J. J. Broome (St.
Swithan’s). 4

Present at the meeting were:—Rev,
F. E. Pestaina, Chairman, Mr. E. L.
Ward, (Churchwarden}, Mr. D. Ex
Webster, Mr. I. C. Sobers, Mr. G c.
O'Neal, Mr. W. L. Greaves, Mr. C. H,
Y wood, Mr, J, Alleyne, Mr. F. A,
Greaves and Mr. N, Slocombe.



RUSSIAN WIT
LONDON.

Moscow radio reported
that a trio of cartoonists
known as Kukrynsky were
awarded a Stalin prize of
$18,830 for a series of car-
toons. depicting President
Truman, Prime Minister
Attlee, General MacArthur,
Dean Acheson and Foster
Dulles as warmongers.

The broadcast, monitored
in London, also stated that
the Soviet Council of Min-
isters awarded a Stalin prize
of $25,200 to the directors,
actors and cameramen of the
film “Secret Mission.”

This Russian film portrays
Winston Churchill seeking to
make a separate peace with
Hitler.—LN.S.



Sixteen Planes
From “Magnificent”
Fly Over Barbados

SIXTEEN planes from the
H.M.C.S. Magnificent flew over
Barbados between 1.30 and 2.30
p.m. yesterday in a variety of
formations.

Many people rushed from their
houses into the streets while
others climbed on to Toof tops to
get a glimpse of the planes.
Others stood in the centre of the
road and looked into the sky.
One man who was paying no
attention to traffic was struck on
his leg by a bicycle,

The planes, on their first flight
in three

over, were arranged ;
groups of four each while the
other four, flanked the main

formation in pairs.

They flew east and after cover~
ing the area of the island those
at the side banked, turned and
formed a group of four to lead
the others on their return run.

This time three groups of four
formed a “V” formation while
the other group remained well
in the rear. The last group then
flew under the others and went
jnto the lead while the leading
group fell back to the rear.

Following this the planes flew
in many directions. At times
individual planes could be seen
performing stunts either above
or below the main formation.

One woman, who was looking
on, told the ‘Advocate that she
had never seen so many planes
in her life. :

Another woman said that she
saw a large number of planes
over Barbados in 1939.

The H.M.C.S. Magnificent and
Micmac sailed’ into Carliste Bay
yesterday evening at about 4.30
"o'clock and anchored.

Many members of their crew
could be seen strolling around the
City last night.

gs frm.

Scewial ang Ge bated ba 39c,

a A 0s hve tye MWe se 8 12c,
2

Ber Masa ae Oe te $1.13
ye pe a $1.24 >
8

SOSSOOS




BARBADOS ADVOCATE
THROUGH



ee

\ PAGE FIVE





e
YOUR... SMILE...

Guilty of

Larceny

Placed On Probation

After a deliberation ot about 46



minutes, a 12-man jury yesterday

Specs

PICTURED here is H.M.C.S. Micmac as it ploughed its way into Carlisle Bay yesterday. As soon as the
vessel came into the Harboursmany members of the crew crowded the deck to get a glimpse of the island.

“St. Peter's —
Land Tax
Goes Up

St. Peter land owners will have
to pay $1.00 more per acre as
land tax this year than the $3.29
per acre they had to pay last year.
Tax on trade has also been raised.
The three cents in the dollar in-
crease makes this tax 29% cents
in’ the dollar. The St. Peter Ves-~
try decided to make this increase
yesterday to meet the increased
Capital Expenditure.

Last year’s Capital Expenditure
was $44,000. This year the Ves-
try plans making extensions at
the almshouse for children quar-
ters and more suitable nurses
quarters. The organ tuner’s sal-
ary will be increased and provis-
ion is also made for an increase
in the wages of the sanitary em-
ployees. Two street lamps will be
placed on Farm’s Road and these
new items along with the over-
spent amount of $1,654 from last
year has carried the Capital Ex-
penditure to $57,000.

Vestry members said that con-
ditions at the almshouse were bad
and there was need for many
changes. :

The Vestry decided to erect the
two street lamps after a number
of taxpayers had written to ask
that two lamps be put up.

Mr. T. S. Chandler, last year’s
Churchwarden, was unanimously
re - appointed Churchwarden.
Members of the Vestry praised Mr.
Chandler for his “energy in carry-
ing out the affairs of the parish.”

Mr. Chandler gave a short re-
port on his work as Church-
warden last year, speaking
chiefly of repairs to churches,

Mr, G. Gill and Mr, A, A, Gill
were appointed as the two Poor
Law Guardians. Mr. G. Gill, the
Senior Guardian was a Guardian
last year while Mr. A. A. Gil)
takes over from Mr, T. E. Corbin.

Other appointments werc:
Health Commissioners, Messrs
T. S. Chandler, T. FE. Corbin, G. C
Parris, ©. L. Bannister and A. Gill

Highway Commissioners: Messrs
T. S. Chandler, A. A. Gill and G.
Gill.

The Building Committee will be
the same as the Poor Law Guar-
dians.

The Tax Relief Committee are:
Messrs. T. S. Chandler, G. Gill,
A. Gill, T. E. Corbin and C, A.
Thornton.

Mr. Chandler brought to the
Vestry’s attention the water short-
age at Boscobel and suggested
that a lorry or two should be sent
with water through that area, No
decision was reached, however, on
the matter.



Miss Harbin Dies
In Grenada

(From Our’ Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 12.

Miss Louie Harbin, Assistant
Librarian at the Publiie Library,
Grenada, and fourth daughter of
the late John Harbin, Inspector
of Schools and Mrs, Harbin, died
at the Colony Hospital shortly
after noon to-day.

She was taken to the hospital
yesterday after a short illness and

underwent an operation this
morning.
A large crowd attended the

funeral which was held this after-

noon at St. George’s Anglican
Church, Archdeacon Pigott offi-
ciated,

TWC R.A.F. JETS LOST
YORKSHIRE, ‘April 12.
Two of four Royal Air Force

Meteor jet planes were lost on a
formation flight from here today.

A search was’ immediately
started.
Each plane carried only the

pilot.—Reuter.













TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

SAXOPHONE REEDS
E b Alto, B b Tenor,
C Melody
CLARINET REEDS
Bb, Eb.

nd
GOOD SECOND HAND
SHOT GUNS



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| JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
| and HARDWARE

) : M ) ith
Loose Bloody Teeth
Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism

and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth



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OPED 79¢. guarantee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save your teeth or

CSF 04 TF ee F $1.08 money back on return of empty pack-

age. Get Amosan from your chemist

today. The guar-
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&

you

oe Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth






From Rest House
To Furniture Shop

THE Admiral Grant Sailors Rest, one of the oldest
buildings on lower Bay Street, is now being reconstructed

to be used as a furniture shop.

It is the property of Mr.

Ralph A. Beard, a city businessman,

About 50 years ago, the late
Mr. E. Hamlet Weekes pur-
chased the building which was

then a small dilapidated one, for
the British Sailors Society in
England to be used as a rest
house for seamen. This was done
through the instrumentality of
Admiral Grant who came out here
in 1895 and saw the need for such
a hostel. It was eventually opened
by Bishop Swabey in 1901,

The purpose of this hostel was
to house sailors who visited here
in the days when shipping was

mostly done by sailing vessels
which used to remain in port for
several days. Nowadays, sailors

coming. here on steamers hardly
remained longer than a day or
two, and so preferred to sleep on
the ship.

In the early years of the Sailors
Rest, Mr. Weekes and Mr. Grant
Pile used to go out on Sundays
to visit ships in Carlisle Bay to
hold services for the men. Ser-
vices were also held at the hostel
and _were conducted either by
Mr. Weekes, a Wesleyan Minister,
or the Chaplain of any visiting
warship which was in port at
the time.

During the following years up
to 1929, there were several addi-
tions and enlargements to the
hostel, First, a strip of land was
purchased. This made possible, a
small front yard, a more adequate
kitchen over which was a wing
of two rooms for the Superintend—

ent and increased space at the
back.
Spacious orm.
Next came the addition of a

spacious two storey dormitory at
the back of the original premises.
For this, a laying of corner stones
by Lady O’Brien and her two
daughters was arranged in con-
nection with the unveiling by
Governor Sir Charles O’Brien of
the Memorial Tablet to Admiral
Grant in 1920.

This tablet was inscribed to the
memory of men of the Mercantile
Marine who gave their lives in
the 1914—18 War.

The hostel had
accommodation for 50 men for
whom there were such amuse-
ments as billiards, darts and card
games. Newspapers and periodi-
cals were also provided for them.

During the second World War,
the hostels came in very useful
as it had to accommodate at times
no less than 50 men a day who
were torpedoed, picked up and
brought here. This continued for

registered

several months, but with the
cessation of hostilities and the
retirement of Mr. Weekes, The
British Sailors Society sent out

Mr. James Russell to carry on as
Superintendent and Port Mission-
ary.

After Mr
about two years, the Society in
England were impressed that there
was not much to be done here
and as it was costing a lot of
money to provide lodging and
salary for a Superintendent, it
was decided to sell the building
as the Society was not prepared
to finance it.

There was an idea of getting
another place more suitable for
the hostel as it was felt that the
present site had become too noisy
and there was no accommodation
for open air life, nor direct
access to the sea for bathing pur
poses That idea, however, never
came to fruition.

The building was eventgally
sold to a Commission Agent and
it was then turned into a restau-
rant for a couple of years before
being purchased by its present
owner.



=

!




A DELIGHTFUL

FOUNTAIN TREAT

KNIGHTS

Soda

Fountain

Phoenix

|

a Doppee
SOOO OOOO OOS

\
Russell was here for





Whyatt Selected
To Be Attorriey
General Of Kenya

Mr. J. Whyatt, Attorney Gen-
eral, Barbados has been selected
for appointment to the post of
Attorney General, Kenya.

Mr. Whyatt, who was born in
1905, is a Bachelor of Arts of Ox-
ford University and was called to
the Bar of the Inner Temple in
1927. The following year he be-



Mr. J. WaAYATT

came a member of Mr. Willinck’s

chambers and thereafter prac.
tised in the Commercial Court and
on the Western Circuit until he
joined the Colonial Legal Service
in 1937 as Crown Counsel, Hong
Kong. From 1941 to 1946 he was
seconded for administrative work
as Secretary of the Eastern Group
Supply Council in India and sub-
sequently as Supply Liaison Offi-
cer in Australia and New Zealand.
He returned to Hong Kong in 1946
and acted as Custodian of Enemy
Property until his appointment
two years later as Attorney Gen-
eral in this Colony. During his
service in Barbados he was ap
pointed a King’s Counsel

Mr. Whyatt, accompanied by
his wife, is expected to leave Eng-
land on the 2ist of April in order
to take up his new appointment,



Are you proud
INDUSTRY? Well
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Send in your details to-
day. You have 3 days left
only to get in the YEAR
BOOK.

of your
tell the



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HEN CHOW

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ttettet




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see

gil. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.
SEB UEEE PVE SSEees

10und Angus Hunte guilty of the
1arceny of goods vaiued at $161.iu
tne property of S. P. Musson &
Co., Litd., on October 25 at tm
Court of Grand Sessions yester
day.

«fis Honour the Acting Chiet
Justice placed him on probation fv.
18 months. Winfield Layne am
Merpert Hutson who were als«
charged with Hunte were dis
charged,

_ before placing Hunte on: prob:
tion, His Honour told the jury tha
he could not understand their
verdict; he could only say th:
they had found the boy guilty an
nad not found the two ring-lead-
ers guilty.

This case was a retrial as 0)
the first occasion a jury could not
agree on a verdict whether or not i a
the three defendants—Angus | ‘
Hunte, Herbert Hutson and Win-

field Layne—were guilty of th :
i
:
f
i
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WITH THE CORRECT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH

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Wisdom s angle in the
handle is the secret of
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REGO.

Wisdoni

ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD. MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

% Wisdom’ s widely-spaced
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clean where decay begins.



tated tet bod tet bebe belle bette bbb ttt tte
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HARRISON'S aszroan st.

o



at

+

~

larceny of goods valued at $161.76
the property of S. P. Musson é
Co., Ltd., on October 25.

In the case yesterday were Mr
J. E. T. Brancker for Layne an
Mr. W_ W. Reece K.C. for the
Crown,

In his address Brancker submitted that owner
ship had not been proved by the
prosecution. They should have in
their minds that the prosecution
was there to prove their case with
out a reasonable doubt. Owner
ship must be established in a lar
ceny case. He ended by submit
ting that they, the jury, should be
very careful how they accepted th«
evidence of Harbour Police Con
stable Gill and Harbour Police
Constable Wilkinson who were
witnesses for the prosecution. M
W. W. Reece, Solicitor General,
did not address the jury



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Discharged
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His Honour the Acting Chief |
Judge Mr, G. L. Taylor yesterday
discharged Clarence Barker, »
butcher of Emmerton Lane, St,
Michael, when he was found not
guilty of the fraudulent’ conver-
sion of money to the amount of
£40 belonging to James King at
the Court of Grana Sessions yes-
terday, ,

Counsel in the case were Mr,
E, B. Barrow for the accused and
Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C. for the
Crown.

James King said that he seni
$40 made up of two $20 notes by
a lad to Barker so that he could
buy a calf for him on October 25
Later in the same day the accuse:
told him that he had lost the
n.oney which he had placed in his
hip pocket, but promised to pas
it back soon to him,

He gave the accused ample time
to repay him, but on December 21

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’
he could not do anything else but HARRIS O N 4
report the matter to the Police. oe ~_—
Before Mr. Barrow had finished

. ala peninncntnnetrilnonte beets peanpdutntrcbtetretn tn bce b betel bn le
ea Samm ml a APS RIP aP IPS o PPE PP Paani a a a a a a a Ee a a a a a aa

cross-examining King. Mr, Reece
submitted that from the evidence
there was no case to take to the
jury. A verdict of not guilty was
then returned by the foreman of
the jury.



Lobb tebe btbbd bobobetmtehobe
DIEGO SET P TTC TGY





|



Bound Over

The March sitting of the Cour
of Grand Sessions ended yesterday
with the retrial of a larceny case
Only one case was held over for
the next assizes—which was onc
of Rex vs St. Clair Foster, 4
labourer of St. Joseph in which :
jury could not agree on e verdici
after it was put to them,

In that case Mr. J. E. T
Brancker appeared on behalf of the
accused. Foster is bound over for
the next assizes.

“RIPPINGILLES”
BLUE - FLAME



———

NO CONFERENCE

WASHINGTON, April 12.
President Truman will not ,hold
his weekly news conference to-
day, the White House announced.
No explanation was given.
—Reuter,



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COOKING |

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10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET

















PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1951

Se ee eet nema










BY CARL ANDERSON



HURRY! THOU }
MUST ESCAPE.








the pllassat woy stein s

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which checks cavity formation these 3 important ways.

1. LISTERINE Tooth Paste helps remove destructive CORN FLAKES
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3. LISTERINE Tooth Paste even helps to remove
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Brushing with ListERINE Tooth Paste after every meal helps ia Business
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Especially important for children!



a ee

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HA

yas

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(rag ey . ~~~
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aie > IN er 2 | | HURRY, DEAR ) PLEASE, DADDY|




























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“Ohi--- SANwr: ety 4 OBAR os
E, —7






PRINTING

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Se WE HAVE ONE CHANCE TO GET OUT, SENOR
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CERNE STORED LATED SONS PORLEES LES OOS TT
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SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only











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——



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SDITS F ROSS TO KNOW HOW IT WOLILD BE WORTH ANY ; a a EES
THE STREET aes MUCH YOU'RE \\| PRICE 70 GET YOU PEOPLE 1
COMING TO PAY LiG A ASKING FOR THE Hl OLIT OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD -

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IF SOMETHING DOESN'T

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THEY KILLED KIRBY!
THEY'LL KILL ME!
THAT WOMAN
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AS THEY HIT THE WATER THE
PHANTOM DIVES AFTER THEM.



Pa iatictae
THE TRAINS SLOWIN' 19
SLOPE. WERE JUMPIN’ OFF NOWs~-
INTO THE LAKES =f

Tt ( - 3
{ , Tne!) a Say



POSSOSSOO SPOS SSOO GS FOSS SS ESSE SSSOSS PEOPTSSE LCV OPS FOG ”

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ELEPHANT BILL by Lt.-Col. J. H. Williams
VENUS THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskine
SHAW by Desmond McCarthy

ROYAL SCHOOL

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THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELBRECHT WEST INDIAN
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ADVOCATE STATIONERY

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* NILHISHIRSLSOASLOWHAIPOOTS CIE ST ID I.HEP SOATEST QP OOG DIDIER CIPO AOI IEC OE OOIIOL EO IDOE,
eg Shey PRS SRS ee ve See XS 2 ES ete: ¢



Spence

*
x
é
~
;
%
s
%
%







FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.







AUTOMOTIVE

ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van.
Guarantee if required. Extra Masonite
Flooring. Licensed and Insured.

Price $1,850. New one Cost $2,125
sently. Apply Courtesy Garage.

“$i
12.4.51—4n







Ries Be Sree een ee A. Lynch & Co. Ltd.
Bryan (Wife); (Son) ; 1
an eae 3 eu SSanee’ Vatm| osgb maton ents aeae
ere hy
Powlett (Cousins); Brnest Pow- Griffith. Gibbs Bin:
we lett: (Brother-in-law) . (91-40) 12.4.51-2n.
13l




—_—_—.

WRAYTON—On 12th April, at his late
residence Carlton, St. James. Joseph
Drayton, His funeral leaves the above
residence at 4.30 p.m. to-day for the
Adventist Church and thenee to the
St. James Cemetery.





very good condition. New
Battery. Apply: 8. P. Edghill. Telephone





Elrie Drayton (wife!, Willington }| 4266, C/o R. & G. Challenor,
(son), — ar _ ? oe 12.4.51—4n.
Irene rayton (daughter-in-law). | -—————————————————____
13.4.51—1n. | CAR—-One Citroen 15 HP. in perfect
“ condition done only 3,300 miles. Price
THANKS $2,600.00. Apply: B’dos Agencies Ltd.

LYNCH—The Lynch family beg through Tog 4008.

this médium to thank all those who
sent us wreaths, cards and letters, or
in any way expressed their sympathy
with us in our recent bereavement
caused by the death of Dorothy Lynch,
St. Matthias Road, Christ Church.

George Lyneh (son), Wife and children,

10.5.51—4n,

CARS--Citroen 15 H.P. cars, just ar-
rived, Apply R’dos Agencies Ltd. Ring
4908, 10.4.51—4n

FORD PICKUP--in good condition and

















4 new tyres, City Garage Trading Co. purpose of (a) Receiving the Report of/ sonal wants and pleas, charity ap- “Mummy end Daddy and I
Aubrin Lynch (son, Curacao) wife and Offers received 1 ; : yi ;
ee aren CRT beeen anne Lue IS RAEn. | OMS WE be reccived up ee Tye, Coma ot a es yuna | peals, sales and services retains its} have lived in one furnished ag ANG FROM AMSTERDAM
Trinidad) and childrem Clyde and for that tially built stone | (ny Electing Officers and a Committes | OWN peculiar flavour. room since I was born, I don't Se ET USA—1VER April 1861 Cie Gle Transatlantique
Beril (grand children). 8.4.51—In ELECTRICAL bung Allenby situate at of Management for the current year.| Faithful readers delve into it| mind for myself, but Mummy RSW rTon aeieeo ns AND
4 ; cS mess Christ cael on ne ee ee ae oS ne any other matters} day by day; rewarded regularly by| and Daddy are growing up now] Ms “ORANIEBTAD th April 1951 a8
GOVERNMENT NOTICES Allon Molar Eien GR of Gges Verandaty, Draws and’ Dining 7 \iby Gada ot the, Caricattes, such nuggets as : ; and need much more space.| satina 10 TRINIDAD, PARAMARTRO SAILIN!
n ge Theva Seis gua Rooms, Three ;spacious Bedrooms, Lava- ae Cc. W. REEVES. ‘Quict country home required Joth are charming, intelligent AND GEORGETOWN a6. TO
‘MAIL NOTICE ~ Jin Sande eee aS Ser se! Late find x, Bath Kighenette;.: Soble Actg. “Secretary. | for’ refined elderly gentleman. | persons, who speak only when|/-MS- “HERSILLIA"—1ith April 1951 ENGLAND & FRANCE
MA ONAN: on 608 sa. it, of lands ne ans 11-4.51-—20) | Periodic dipsomaniac .” | Spoken to and pay their rent] _ 5:5 “COTTICA’—23rd. April 1951
AIR di aah tin! 30 eae ak nea hes — stad Inspection by intment. Readers acquainted with region-| promptly. Won't some kind fairy} 84™%ING tare ee en ,COLOMBIR” April 22nd.
- Effective immediately and until 3), ,0mP% “00. Watts, with lamp: DA A. SCOTT, f the al Americania were jolted by this} landlord find them a flat with al ss. «Ganeuagas aT Acai ian Via Martinique and Guade-
tect ais. matte to te weteer eer tt ronatas., | Latest Quarry of the jon ee win & es, =“
s Gaia oe eg a eee ee - “First-class English : The restless postwar i , S. P, MUSSON, “
mentioned places are notified. '|_ REFRIGERATOR — Crosley Sheivador | Dial 9743. 13.4.51~-4n, tai” Th = shot-gun{ ‘The restless postwar period is tin oe 2
—— Rone _ * Refrigerator 33 cubic ft in woot wae | —— i Roy. avy s— @ } wanted. e address of the ad- | reflected _ in the never-ending SOUTHBOUND
contents ould be amended ac- ing order. Just been completely over- AUCTION ’ Wervinet wae Fassodo, Feieicls, stream of ex-service officers who OSS NILI?,
. wis hai t offers? For particulars pid) ‘ . ° ’ Continuous advertisements |are “willing to go anywhere and * e i
Bermuda—11.45 a.m, Tuesdays , Phone $770. 12.4.51—2n.| By § received I will sell at Elusive Pimpernel sometimes weave a thread of mys.|do anything.” ees —_ ie
do — 2.00 p.m. Fridays Central Station on Monday next The M.V. “Daerwood" — will pe Bow Bidens :

*Canada—11.45 a.m, Mondays



CAR—Hiliman 10 r —. LS SS EEN
Turning, order. a iectiey sland, On Friday the isth inst at

12°4,51—3n_} OF office No. 17 High Street:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PUBLIC SALES | PUBLIC NOTICES |

Ten cents per agate tine on week-duys
and 2 A. cone per oome eee on er
min enarge on wee a
and $1.90 on Sundays .

REAL ESTATE

—

Tea cents per agate line on week-days

and 12 cents per agate fine on Sundays,

wintmum charge §1.50 on week-daya
Svunadeys.

aa





al NOTICE
wou like threugh this medi

thank all who made application a
sponse to an advertisement fo
for my oMffee, and to state th

is now filled
PRANCIS H

‘o
re-
a Junior
' the Post



PILE

BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 be-
“76. 15.3.51—t.£.n. 12.4. 51—2n

Tooms, every convenience incliding
=. water supply. As new, £3,000.

LAND—1124 sq. ft. of land at Bed- OTI
Sore, tate, together with wie ait:

More than one person hav: bee:
duly nominated at the election of 3
sons‘to serve as members in the =
erat Assembly for the Parish ¥ St.
Andrew in the place of D. A. Foster

I notify my intention of
taking a for the determination ot
the said jon on Monday next the
of April 1951 at the
laine beginning

sale hy
y es

1961 at

Banfeid.
31.3.51—120. 2
16th. Alleyne

— Containing dwelling | sche between
three bedrooms (Partly wall), | the hours of seven and eight o'clock in

i On One rood, 144» perches «i
tend ataana at Forde’s Gap, Britton:s |

Polling, Btition Mo.1.—"
ion l.— The Alleyne
C. M= Greenidge cr) School—the North wing for ail person:
» James Strect | whose surnames begin with the ietter
84.51—<1]} A. to J. inclusive.
Polling Station No.
Sehool — the South witg for all per
sons whose Surnames begin with the

|

i
°

2 p.m. jt

|

20 Shares, Barbados Fire Insurance| letter K. to Z. inclusive,
Company;
22 Shares, Barbados Ice Company A. INGRAM,
Limited; a Sheriff and
Fue Sian Barbados Government D>» Returning Officer
0.4. 51—6r.

tures,
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors
10.4.51—<

$$ —___
THE RHONDA. Large dwelling hou:

on the Sea near Cacrabank, Worthin~ NOTICE

The above will be. set up for gale 4t

our in Lucas Street on Friday IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 44th

the 20th day of April 1951 at 2 p.m.] Annual General Meeting of the above

inspection from 4 to 6 p.m. every day | Society will be held on Monday, 23rd

from April 16th. or on application to} April 1951, at 4.30 p.m. at the Rezgis-

Carrington & Sealy, 10.4.51—Tn | tered Office, 48 Swan Street, for the

“4 BARBADOS MUTUAL BENEFIT













the 16h April, 1951 at 2 p.m., the foi



- The Alleyne Broad Street, Dial

squeezed none of the charm out of |
the London Times |
umn. }

tery or intrigue through the col- |

























. + v »
WANTED rOR RENT PERSONAL | EDUCATIONAL
Mtnimum charge week 72 cents and iets ce Beaten un eae a ree ae |
* o 2. cen 2 words _ Dm 1 ry ; » hereh« war m net .
eee aa a J worde 3 conte @ ward week—4 cents a! aoe Pin Se peta warned exalts | Accountancy, Cost Accountitig, Com
Mime ‘ 4 cents ©) word Sundays | HEAD vietition) “iat a s } pany Secretaryship, Book-Keepin
. = nee ———— hele oad r ede ™ for her os aauwe | Course (Recognised for award “y Diplo-
HELP HOUSES | na else oretvacting. ancy edt ck debts | SH $5, Atemoiaae oF Cees aaa?
ip aniiamtasiniomnstemesen athens SOULOGNe & _ . er | oe ee ee written order | you for higher statue by spare-time
“CLERK,—at the Barbados Ice Cx eee a paerenee Gap. Fully] dened & | postal study, For details, write now
Ltd.. principaliy for ‘Sales and Delis en April 15th. Dial 849 DENNIS HRADLEY, The Principal, LONDON SCHOOL oF
@f lee Cream at Factory. Por furt 11.4.6i—1n. | Rock Dundo ACCOUNTANCY, 12, Duke Street: ©:
particulars, apply to the Seeretary aon a, ; St. James James's, London, SW 1. Engiand
ee. FLATS: Two completely new de Luxe estan. | a5
" . jn ly furnikhec flats at Pour Aces, St = ee ee 13.4,51—30
RELIEF MESS MANAGERESS i! ywrence Cap From June onwards *o hr: RRC, IE a
A vacancy exists for a Re lef Mesa | “PPLOved ienants, This Building was
Manageress . Previous experience in | *Peetally beitt to house flats. Lt is not
catering for Restaurants or Hotels or | * Sar ee ee Apoly Mrs, L.
similar experience is desirable | sell, e 3 i oo
Applications should be submitted in ea > oes
writing giving details of previous ex- | FLAT—Or ) furpished fat at e »
perience and enclosing copies of tes ; Dundee St. Lawrence Gap, Suitable for e
timoniais and a recent passport sir tw ® only. Available 15th April, onwerd a a Iona eams Ss
photograph, and should be addressed | No children, no Pets. Apphy Mrs. EF. c }
to Messrs, Da Costa & Co, Litd., P.v.| Boyce on premises. Phone—6a40 SOUTHBOUND
Box 103, Bridgetown.” 10.4. 51.—€n 11.4.51.—3n Saile ie Satle Arrives
Som a “WINSLOW — Cattlewash — For the] CAN. CHALLENGER .. e Taser ver ic Apr. 14 Apr
MISCELLANEOUS months of May, June, October, Novern- | LADY RODNEY ea 16 Apr. 18 Apr 27 Apr. 27 Apr.
ber, December. Apply Mrs. W. 'T. Good- TARY NELSON 7 May 10 May =: 12 May 21 May 23 May
STARCH wantea: Apply to B'DOS | ing. Strong Hope, St. Thomas -ADY RODNEY 5 June 6 June 11 June 20 June 21 June
KNITTING & SPINNING CO. LID. | 1,4.51,—%n | bADY NELSON 20 June duly 5 duly M4 July 18 July
Coleridge Street 104.5145 | | LADY RODNEY 30 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug 14 Aue
orienta Vine
9 " pom ‘ y . rc LT cer rte tities eesti tt eesmesheneamninetnine:
AURIEYS 8--10 Ibs. POWLS & DUCKS |RATES OF EXCHANGE inten
pp! DRAGON RESTAURANT wouranoun
‘tae ee APPIL, 12. 1981 ' parbados Qainee Boston stun | Aitives Arrives
$i.—tt y . 4 . > t.
bs CANADA LADY RODNEY ..10 May 12 May 91 May or 22’ Mey . has
192 1/20% pr. Cheques on LADY NELSON .. 3 June 5 June 14 June ae 16 dure i dune
| Bankers 61 i/10% pr,}| LADY RODNEY .. 3duly 5 July 14 July a 16 July. ¥eduly
{ harm In he or pe eoeen «27 Juky 29 July TAu 9 hug. 12 Aug
| rafts 60.955. p ODNEY ..26 Aug, 28 Au 6s t Sen
“ . Sight Draits 60 8/10 pr ss ua r csi 8 Sept, 1 i
‘eé - E i” } 1% pr. Cable Subject to change without notice. All vessets fitted witn cold sto
A 151 6/10 pr, Currenc 59 wd" pr bers. Passenger Fares and freigut ra storage cham-
gon y Coupons 58 9/10 ps Mut rates on application to:—
S'-ver
my
By JOHN E. CARLOVA
; — _ - —~-
LONDON. | : GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD. — Agents.
Britain's newsprint shortage has; Echoes of Britain's housing ie y Sh

shortage are often heard through
the column
Probably
per. |came from

“agony” cole

the most

This famous collection of



Occasionally the weaker sex ap-

. jowing items: 25 cartons Biscuits. 10 oO The Sea umn for weeks on end pears among these adventurers,
do — 2.00 p.m, Fridays LIVESTOCK Tins ondensed Milk, 13 ckages . f There was a “Mrs, S, S.” who|usually as secretaries or c on
$28 Tins Beef, 90 Mess Tins fl Pains : 5 or compan.
U.S.A.—11.45 a.m, Tuesdays EAI ge ng Fat pss = LONDON, April 2. | repeatedly called on “the talllions “yearning for a change”.
do — 2.00 p.m, Fridays draulic Jacks, 4 Blow Lamps, 3 Shitti The Navy's latest survey ship,] blond American who arrived at} Column fans are sometimes

“By Monday’s opportunity to
Canada the higher rate of postage,
namely 30 cents per } 0z., will be
charged, 13.4.51.—2n.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
VACANCIES IN THE ELEMEN-
TARY TEACHING SERVICE
Aeneas are invited from
teachers (women) with at least
10 years’ teaching experience for

ee———S—_-
MILCH T, “Sally Laurater’’, Re:
jo. Sooty. Skinner, “Laura:
tor", Rockley ce or Da Costa & Co.,
Phone 8280 or 2122,

10.4 51.—tin

MECHANICAL

BIKES—on terms, Hercules Sil
King, All models in stock, y or
vEN.

A. BARNES & CO. L’
(1) Royal Type-

N
Ltd.

11.4.51,—

TYPEWRITER—One
writer Standard

by public suction at Seawell Air Port 4
on Wednesday next the 18th April at} answer as to why fishing grounds

Mower. It is a collection of Six Mowers,
and is the right thing for a Cricket or



oa H.M.S. Cook — commissioned av
Plymouth at the end of March—
has an important first assignment.
She is to scour the Atlantic for an
underwater valley, a_ gigantic
crack in the sea~bed, that scien-
tists feel may be the indirect

Wrenches, Flat, Round and Half:

Files, Tyres, 1 Clutch Plate.
D’Arey. A. Scott,

Gov't Auctioneer.

“rou

11.4, 51--4n,
I have been instructed by the Gov-
ernor-in-Exeeutive Committee to sel)

2 o'clock. One tractor drawn Lawn] off Britain’s coasts have become

twenty years.



” Tennis Club. It can be seen at Seawell ian
the Headships of the following! 9 am. ee ee bie day ‘except, Sunday between the} Experts believe that these “ishing
schools: — nent eee | BOUFS Of 9 ae ear aad grounds have been deserted by

St. Catherine’s Mixed School, MISCELLANEOUS Govt. Auctioneer. | their “plankton’’—minute sea or-
St. Philip; Ebenezer Girls’ School 13.4.51—4n. | ganisms forming the food of such
St. Philip. ‘ "| qBATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in fish as mackerel or herring. Plank-

: P. : White, Green, i 2

itauon require © ihe Cont | Side 2. Say SE sae | UNDER THE SILVER | ira, itttes contained sen

a uired is the Certi- ° & Co., e
fleate SA’ of the Department of Si.81—t40. r water. But the particular reach

ion ~— nn | ON Tuesday 17th by order of Mrs. {of water richest in such chemicals
exemption therefrom, CROQUET SETS.—Boxed and fuly|E. M. Watson we will sel her Furni- ot nuendo the

Salary will be in accordance} equipped at Harrisons Sports ist | ture at ‘The Canteen” Garrison. (Near | Seems to have va
with the Government Scale for } Floor 12.4 51—3n. Married Womens’ Quarters). Which |Atlantic. The suggestion is that
Head Teachers in Grade I Elemen-| ——>3> >> aes Extension Dining i it may have sunk to fill a ms

CALF _ . juare " . nm ‘al . i ‘avi 5
tary. Schools. of Calf's Foot Jelly "Ore sas anu | Sideboatda’ Haistond,”” Bookshelves; | suomarine ravine some 200 miles

Candidates who have already] 10 oz. jar for 60c. Get it at Bruce



p Desk; Tea Trol south of the Irish coast,

i we , Settees, Upright and Corner Chairs; H.M.S. Cook and her comple
submitted application forms in re-} Weatherhead Ltd 12.4.51—3n. = ee | prigh ~ Ls eee Anas |eneni of navel Daten of
spect of previous vacancies (now P : < Gandia. iubles “an vob it i ti
filled) may apply by _letter,)dow styling, light control, Valances ano | in ; Silvertone Radio, Gias | CTS) whose job it is Side will

; "By Kirsch. 1 x 5 contours of the ocean-bed, w
eat AE other candidates BARNES’ & CO., LTD. Dil ae ais Serviees;. 1a Shine Manan, ners probe oe nae of the sea a at
’ 2 tion on thel >. a... Lugine i are spot where the precious”

should make application on Peg. Pediders, Casumvebe Grit} Entree, Vegetable and Sweet dishes! thought to have hidden itself. If
appropriate form which may and Dust. Contact WILLIAM Hil ON, | Candlesticks, meee ee Tore. and Sut it ie loeated, itain’s fishing
obtained from the Department Sealy Hall, St, John. 13.451—sa. Cong Ce apt trae Te oe 8 i Ctinirs; ss. fleets may be guided to valuable
Education, All applications must “One Galvahiaed fron Tonk 400 ) Gallons * Dress ogee ingte M or o Bedstead. new fishing grounds and our sup-
be enclosed in envelopes marked] capacity, 4x4#x4 with 18” Manhole and Deep Steep tress; Very nice old spies of sea-food substantially in-
“Appointments Board” in the top | Brass Sock J tebies * uses Vardrey Dressing cneaube.
left hand corner and must rea re: 5 eeeere: Eat eee Sad . M.T. Washstand; Single Iron] Plankton, despite their micro-
Boturdee tath A il a ™ INVALID CHA. Ganves Cot! Mreaktect, Table” Chairs, | coically: small size, are f wed .of
Saturday 14th April, 1951. IRS—2 only at Har-} : ~ , »| tremendous importance for an-

6.4.51—2n | Tone showroom st Floor.” | 4. 3. Jae" ah painted Greene Biers 9'bekies other reason than as. fish-fo04.



MEGASSE a
at $3.00 per ton.
ROLL-UP DA

6.4.51—Gn.







FOR SALE





ders itt Giey Bhovrmacy.
CRUSHED STONE AND - 3| ' cae, good order, lenses |
FINES, IDEAL FOR CON- $|——-_—_—__ C
CRETE, AND MAKING | wnat adie ot haat atic “wl
ROADS AND PATHS. love | RUD ¥ Sene
Apply - - a oma Mambo. Jambo,
tnd, SAMHEBEAN © 0 anes
* TYPEWRITER & ‘
Phone 8444, Extension 0, 4] ¥APeL. Prom sway sw teaet et
12.4.51.—6n, 3] 224" . Pasian |
Two ATE Gl. Cases. $120.06
each Stansield Seat a Go. Foes ‘Broea
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE oF || ** re ta
THE WEST INDIES amet Bebuae plana nr a
ive le b
EXTRA-MURAL OF Set ot ae




DEPARTMENT
A COURSE OF TEN

13.2.51—t.f.n.
a
VAN HOUTENS drinking chocolate









LECTURES aR S en veces cee

AN INTRODUCTION TO || in“tin “Compare the price ‘with, com:
CHEMISTRY Petitors’. 12.4.51—3n.

by
F. N, A. FIELDS, B.Sc.
Harrison Caltege Laboratory Barbados Fancy Molasses
waltians Production and Export

at 1.30 5m, Acts 1937 and 1939




Fee fer course: $1.00
Members of Ex,-Mu.
Assoc: 84c,
Single Lectures: 12c.




. Under the above Acts, the Fancy
Molasses Control and Marketing
Board: has allocated the following
amounts of Fancy Molasses to be
manufactured for the purpose of

























export by the plantations and
é factories named. alloca-
FOR Ss ALE tions are subject to approval by
the Governor.in-Executive Com-
’ ” mittee at the ‘ation of seven
td MEDMENH AM ' ae from the date of this publica-
on :——
Name of Plantation Wine
PINE HILL or Factory Gallons
. OME sds Hau ces gc keer re 400,000
A “very. fine ‘twoontorey Colleton (St, John) .. 287,500
property pleasantly situated Teere Silasies Me hee ‘oe
in approx. 134 acres near Gibbens rere 525,000
Government House, There Goodland ae 29,000
is spacious and well pro- Harrow .. 400,000
portioned — accommodation || Kendal ||| 586,957
comprising 3 reception, din- Moncrieffe 250,240
ing and breakfast rooms, 4 |M|Newton ............. 651,700
bedrooms (1 with large Bi hcds pics n tics ¥ 253,260
dressing room), butler’s V.P. Factories,
pantry, kitchen, servants’ Andrews ............ 650,656
rooms, garage, fernery, poul- Bruce Vale .......... 530,000
try houses, etc. There is a Pool ........ acess 650,000
two-way entrance drive and Sandy Lane ......... 1,030,000
the grounds are well laid
out with lawns, flowering Total ......... 7,675,313
shrubs and flower gardens.
The whole property has a 13.4.51.—In.
pleasant character typical of
some of the older establish-
ed homes in this exclusive
area. 1 oe
: lager. ‘For au
| John ¥4. Braden Seliatttbe Sata
| as A
| A.F.S., F.V.A. cas ign er on ee
Phone 4640 DR: CHASE’S
Plantations Building
| Antiseptic OINTMENT

farrot Cage, Roller, 7
Poles, Quorts; Preserving Pan, Westing-|milliard of plankton then swim-

Moffat Stove (very good) Electric. Hot | Scientists say that these infinitesi-
t Lewer Estate Factory | Plates, Steamers, 2 Burner Valor Oil{mal organisms were also the raw

ve. (Practically new), Primus Stove;

Separator, Churns, Freezer, } Material from which crude oil has

Utensil A ium, | been formed. Perhaps as long as
Fee” al Rane’ nfet nee 400 million years ago, countless

house Refrigerator
onder,
Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers

in g00d working |ming in long-since evaporated

oceans died and sank to the bot-
tom, where they were engulfed
by mud before they could decom-

pose, Anaerobes—bacteria whice
13.4.51—2n. | can work without air—acted upon

them and there rey ipo have
i n
Wool Prices Will Keen some chemical teactio
Stay “Firm”



the salts in the water and mud.
As the weight of the water and
successive layers of mud convert-















ed the underlying ue om, rewst

terial of crude oi

MELBOURNE, April 12. | S° the source ma ‘ ’

i ‘ finally entombed. There it
Financial circles forecast here carnage a Glaparesh’ throviebout

to-day that current wool prices,
down by as much as 30 per cent
since Easter, will stay “firm”
throughout this season.
Observers here wonder if Amer-
ican withdrawal explains the price
drop, or whether the “bogey” of
American stockpiling had been] ing, was squeezed out and filtered
exaggerated. : its way into the pores of surround-
sources predict that Perth] ing coarser rocks, percolating inch
sales opening early in May would] py inch upward toward the earth's
see the same pattern of price drops} surface, sometimes actually reach-

“er: ing it but more often finding its ;
e@ market rose sharply by

ssage eventually halted by a,
jumps of up to 20 cent in Jan-} barrier of impervious rock. Here, |
uary, reaching the peak about] jt waited throughout countless
mid.March.

centuries; until men gained a bet-
West European buyers,

who} ter understanding of Nature's mys-
have been unable to confirm{teries, and until the oil men’s
the steady stream of reports of} drills, guided by geo-physicists
American stockpiling, are said to}and geologists, bored -a way
have bought solidly

the shale, until the convulsions of
the young world, then shaping its
mountains and valleys and turn-
ing sea into dry land, gradually
compressed the shale into harder
types of rock. The crude oil,
which had been gradually form-

in belief that through the crude oil’s rock prison
American stimulus would force up| and commercial oil production be-

prices.—Reuter, an. Thus, plankton similar to
; - those upon which the fish sre now

feeding formed the origin of the



72. 1 which today drives the
£1 2,500 Viola! owe fleets. to thet favourite
MADRID. | srounds.

Pe egy tg i arene
longing panish cou
and which disappeared from the} 1p Touch with Barbados
Royal Palace here in 1813 during Coastal Station



Southampton on the Queen Eliza-
beth” on a certain date to “please
keep your promise and contact me
as arranged.”

peared at regular intervals to re-
;mind “Herry" that “Sam would |
like to see you.”

steadily less prolific during the last —



It was reported that a price of





Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Lid., adyire
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station

Marie Hoim, 6.5.

5.4






3.8, tor, 5.8.

12,500 pounds sterling was paid on «Hid,
by the Spanish government to the eee Tag ‘ oren ; Gertrud
man who had it in his possession] Schliewen, 8.5. Nordindle, 5». Prospera-
—said to have been an English—]} tive. s*. Alcoa Polaris, ».s. Canadian

Challe 8. Ms a . Carmen,
man whose identity was not dis- a4. Ganymedes. én to Cordillera, ss
closed. —(I.N.S.) Poseidon, 5.8. Politemo, s,s. Isle 9%

P as. Geirulv, s.s. Tiberius, %.s.
gunwatt, #9. Baso Cambridge, +.8, Brazil,
ss. Sanmateo, 5.8. SaXonstar, «8, Indo-
chinois, 9s. Uruguay, s*. Argentina,
s.. Fort Townshend. s.s. Tacoma Star.
Alcow Pilgrim, ss. Liberville, 6.4
Laeo London, 5.8, Olympic Thunder,
§. Helena, #.8. Bonito, s.s. Del Alba,
. Alcoa Pennant, 58. Egda, 8 Zeus,
San Lorenzo, 4.8, Stanvac Brisbene,
Lordon, ss, Vogtiand, «+. Hersilia

GOVT. STOCKS DOWN

LONDON. Aprii 12.
Post budget enthusiam in the
London stock exchange evapor-
ated to-day. '
British oe ee stocks or
clined by 1/16 to % on persisten nee, s.s. Odvvar 2,
small wales, and irregularity was eens ag “Dolores
recorded by industrials. ‘
Oils were patchy but rubber SS ————
and tin shares received small sup- UNBREAKABLE POTS!
port and were firm.—Reuter. . You can. still get a few of the

|

and Small Sizes of
me

im
OLD IRON METER CASES
0 IENTAL Some people have used them for :
oe

vio
CA NS (P 4
New Shipment opened

GERANIUNS etc
THANI’S

Prive only 1/2 and °/6
See Them st Your —

GAS WORKS. BAY ST







stumped by code advertisements.
One read simply:
“123456789. Call to-mor.
row.”

But anyone who ever spent time
in the doghouse recognised the old:
“Come home. All is forgiven.”

—(I.N.S.))

And there was “Anna” who ap.

EES Seep Sse

THE “843% TIMES

Review of
The British Colonies

Never has the process of change in the British colonial territories
been more rapid than it is to-day, And never has full and informed
discussion of the problems of colonial development and administration
been more necessary,

THe Times — by common consent the foremost newspaper in the
world — issued last year three special Surveys of the British Colonies,
which were widely appreciated. It has now been decided to establish
THE TIMES REVIEW OF THE BRITISH COLONIES as a regular quarterly
publication, appearing in March, June, September and December.

Each issue of THE TIMES REVIEW OF
THE BRITISH COLONIES will survey the
progress of events during the pre-

articles on West African railways ;
the position in Hongkong ; British
West Indies housing ; pest control

vious quarterly period in all parts in colonial agriculture ; plantation
of the colonial empire and will dis- conditions in Malaya ; development
cuss a wide range of colonial subjects in western Uganda; secondary

political, social, financial,
economic, administrative, cultural
‘The first issue in March will contain

industries in Southern Rhodesia :
African technical education; and
big game.

Illustrated

Annual Postal Subscription Rate 2s. 6d.

24 pages

Orders to the Subscription Manager, The Times, London, E.C.A





6771/1.



WITH THE

A

SMAXPLY?
TENNIS RACKET

AND THE

Available from

WM. FOGARTY
LTD.

GEDDES GPANT LTD



T







Agents



608/01



GERM LUBRICATING OILS

ARE BEST BY TEST
DON’T ONLY OIL IT—GERM IT

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Gasolene Station—Trafalgar St.


































PAGE SEVEN





)













ROYAL NETHERLANDS |\7
STEAMSHIP CO,

plaintive
“Tot of 4" and read

FRENCH LINE





















accept Cargo and Passengers for
Paramaribo. Sailing Thursday 13th
instant,

The M.V. “Moneka” will accept
Cargo and” Passengers for Domi-
nica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts, Sailing Monday
léth instant,

The M.V, ‘Caribbee” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Fridey 20th instant,

TELE. 4047
SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOC. INC




cao, Cartagena and Jamaica










Accepting Passengers.
and Mail.




, Cargo





R. M. JONES & Co,, Lid.

AGENTS
Phone 3814








BW.




ts
nt





PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominie., for sail.

Ing to Europe. The usual poris of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.







ATTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining youx requirements
IN





GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from “4” upwards

MILD STEEL

Flatg, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS-—-All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.

COCO TS

:

S



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lad.

White Park Road, St, Michael
DIAL 4528

shal

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.

APRIL EXCITEMENT
°

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that hit the high notes of Beauty
You'll rub your eyes... twice...












then look again at the



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that will identify you with Fashion
°
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FOGARTY’S



PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Harrison College Bat Well
Against Q.R.C.

Barbadian
Boys Lose Out
At Athletics

(Brom Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 11
The Harrison College Boys re-
eéived their first defeat from the
Royalians by 45 points to 23 when
they competed for inter-college
supremacy on the College grounds
in Port-of-Spain yesterday. Only
one record for the ground was
broken by Austin Clarke of Harri-

son College when he did the 440 s

yards flat in 52.7 seconds.
former record for the ground was
52.8 sees
Bob Donawa of Q.R.C.. and
Clarke were the most outstanding
athletes for the respective colleges,
Q.R.C. won five of the eight
events while Harrison College won
three. Clarke won the 440 and
880 yards flat. This youngster is
19 years old; ‘and is strongly built,
and has made a good impression
in Trinidad.
Displays by
both colleges
plause .
Results are a3 follow:—
THROWING THE BALL
W. Donawa, Q.R.C.--9 yards,
F. Sealy, Q.R.C
3. Morrison, H.C,
100 YARDS FLAT
W. Donawa, Q.R.C.—10 4 sees
P. Inniss, Q.R.C.
L. Waithe, H.C.
40 YARDS FLAT
A. Clatke, H.C.—62.7 secs
C. Charles, Q.R.C
J. Ince, Q.R.C
LONG JUMP

representatives of
earned .warm ap-

D. Price,

Q.R.C.—19 ft. 3 ins
E. Sealy, Q.R.C
K. Griffith, H.C

220 YARDS FLAT RACE

W. Donawa, Q.R.C —24 6 secs
P. Inniss, Q.R.C
L. A. Waithe. H.C

HIGH JUMP
J. Williams, H.C.—5 ft, 6 ins
Â¥.. Williams, Q.R.C
Jd. Morrison, H.C.

a0) YARDS
A.-Glarke, H.C,--2 mins.
P. Heath, Q. RC
©. Charles, Q.R.C.
Points: Harrison 29;

8.2 secs.

Q.R. Collexe 45.



Legall Wins
By Default

(Erom Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAILN, April 12
Ralph Legall, representing Bar—

bados, won his game against Ron
Sturdy (Jamaica) when the open-
ing matches of the British Carib-
bean Brandon Trophy Tennis
Tournament took place to-day.
He won by default. Sturdy had
an attack of migraine and was
forced to discontinue, Legall was
however leading 11-9 and 38—0.
In’ the other game Jim Far
uharson (Jamaica) defeated Eric

The ; ’

From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April
The touring Harrison College
team, thanks to fine individual
batting performances by Cammuic
Smith (72), N. Harrison. (59 not
out); James Williams (54) ana
Emman Hope (27) kept Queen's
Royal College in the field all day
to score 225 for 5 when the first
cricket match opened here yest?)
day.
Scores:—
HARRISON COLLEGE
C. Smith lb.w, Awai
E. Hope c Hislop; b Awai
C. Blackman stpd. Jones b Awai 0
i. Harrison not out 59
FE, Roach b Gamaldo .. 5
Williams c Awai b Sealy -
R. Dash not out ’
kK. Griffith, M. Simmons, G. Foster
and J...Corbin to bat



Ist INNING
2





Extras 9

Total ifor 5 wkts.) oan
BOWLING ANALYSIS

0 M R Ww

F. Gamaldo 23 6 a7 1

R. Crouch . 17 7 on %

U. Awai 2 6 v7 3

LL. Bdwards 15 2 42 0

EF. Sealy 3 0 i2 1



Whitsuntide
~ Athletic Meet
At Kensington

(Ey A Correspondent)

The Amateur Athletic Associa-
tion of Barbados will hold their
Annual Sports meeting at Ken-
sington on May 14th, Whit Mon-
day and also for two more days
con May 17th and 19th. This is
the first time that a three-day
Athletic Sports meeting will be
held jocally, and from latest de-
velopments there is great promise
that it will be a success,

The fact is that due to the early
arrival of Easter this year, and
one thing and another, no Inter-
colonial Athletic Sports meetings
have been held either in Trinidad
or B.G. up to now, This circum-
stance therefore makes the ath-
letes of these two colonies very
interested in partaking in the Bar-
badog Sports and already in-
quiries have been received from
ceveral Trinidad Cycling Clubs.

These Clubs include a number
of prominent cyclists in the Carib-
bean and it is hoped that as many
of these as possible will be mak-
ing the trip. Among the Clubs
interested are All Stars, Saddle
Boys, Barbican Wheelers and
S.A.C.C. All Stars numbers
among its members Phelps and
the Lewis brothers who recently
rede at the Pan American Games
for Trinidad, while Compton
Gensalves, who rode here year

aylor (Barbados) 6—2; 6~-3; before last, is a member of Sad-
6—4,. dle Boys.’ The A.A.A.B. also
——— plan to extend invitations to



STANDARD BR

By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer: South 5



B.G. cyclists chief of whom will
be Lindsay Gordon, whom we
also know in Barbados,

Among the athletes in tne fleld
and track events it is hoped that

East-West game.’ ‘fa number of the Police from
| 543 : Trinidad will make the trip as
| 3 ass 76 : their sports meeting will be
1 @8542 : coming shortly before and _ this

ai t should find them in fine trim. In
ve Ka 102 i this pereentiots athletes in Bar-

* : bados should be in a_ serious

i $ Rae! $o3 x $ training by now as repeatedly in
9 9 1075 & the past the local boys have been
$5332 4Q
8. § beaten, not so much by better
ase : natural athletes, as by better
z 5e. Q? 3 trained men. It is hoped there-
: fore that the local gentlemen will
Pe. Se eitias Five | tum out-fitter than ever.
Diamonds via the same $ aa
i route on this hand from a } The Ladies
; rowent Sold Pup: mated : Among the ladies Barbados will
uth open e ; 3 also have to find athletes of some
: Bosh eee Heat. cae : class to take on the opposition
: Diamonds. jumping to game 3 from outside as this will include
= on the next round after a 3 Bileen King of Trinidad, if this
= single een poreh Sntt ; ~=Jady accepts the invitation offered
3 est Je f : She is at present the leading
i pA was Dl rah ewer byt lady athlete ‘in the British Carib-
3 5 3 pean having victori Pear}
a Club ruff in 35 “ . g victories over Pea
i £ kts South came back } Gcoding who also visited us year
i with *outh and areas + before last.
second Club. he ; The A.A.A.B. will be hold-
Ge, PS te cashed, #4 ing meetings in the near future
i @ K provided the eleventh to decide what the exact pro-

the mistake of playing low
in Dummy on the opening
lead, East
trump _ return
upset South's
could no
fifth Club

and his
completely
timing. He
longer make_ his
s wel 9 K

won.




‘

trick. :
The other decldrer made }
;

;

z

Traffic Don’t

No, 24
e

gramme of events will be on the
three days. Terms for renting the
Kensington grounds have already
ae arranged with the Pickwick



island Football X1

THE following have been
selected to represent the island at
football this afternoon at the
Garrison against a team repre
senting the H.M.C.S. Magnificent
and Micmac:—

S. I. Smith (Empire), Grant
(Empire), Bowen (Spartan), Git

1 you tens (Spartan), Cadogan (Spar
Fn si u tan), Ishmael (Barbados Regi
$ CONDITION ment) Capt., Chase (Spartan),

" - Drayton (Empire), Wilkes

Space made available by
CANADA DRY

(Lodge), Lucas (Carlton), and R.
St. C. Hutchinson (Carlton).
Players unable to take part wil!
notify the Honorary Secretary of





for Safer Motoring, the B.A.F.A., Mr. O. S. Coppin,
: at once, , a
They'll Do It Every Time

4,
VL,

When GARGOYLE










WHAT YOU LIKE THE AND HIS APPETITE —_
COULDNT EVEN Look { MOSTESTâ„¢CHICKEN *| | ARE UPAND ~~
OF 4. vitAuinl TETRAZZIN| AND A AROUND AGAIN»
GREEN GODDESS SO WHAT DOES THE.
TABLET, PRALINE [ SALAD-~AW,C/MONâ„¢| | MISSUS DISH UP
DID HER BEST YOU GOT TO FORCE NIGHT AFTER
TO WHET HIS YOURSELF +++ JUST NIGHT s-2
APPETITE +++» \AvTTLE BITE *+s5 x




ae |



LOOK, DEAR %





G
r

Old
won the ovér 18 Old Boys’ race.

sented
were well attended.

Wei» Gargoyie

Denny. Victor
Ludorum

AT SPEIGHTSTOWN
BOYS’ SPORTS

JOHN DENNY, 13,
Ludorum of the Speightstown
Boys’ School athletic sports held at
the Coleridge School grounds yves-
terday afternoon.

Denny ended with 16 points
having won the high. . jump,
hurdles, and taken second place in
the 220 yards and 100 yards. *

K, Rock, athlete of the 10—12
division, was Denny's Keénest
rival for the championship. He

took 15 points to become champion
of his division. C. Rowe was the
8-10 division champion with 4%
points .

The events were keenly contest-
ed. House “Millar’’ topped with
68 points, closely followed by
“Greaves” which piloted 54 points.
“Mottley” ran third with 36 points,

All the Elementary Schools of
St. Peter were roped into the pro

gramme
Best Form
Schocls showed best form in the
inter-school events, Yet it must
be remembered that the Speights-
town Boys’ were hard pressed,
having to take part in every event.

In a 220 yards for Elementary
Schools in St. Peter—Girls under
11—All Saints Girls got all three
places and in a similar race for
Boys under 11, All Saints Boys
won.

Both schools repeated this feat
in the over 11 division.

Waterman came first the
Coleridge School 100 yards flat;
Corbin was second; Thompson ran
a good third.

T. Headley won the under

in

18
Boys’ race while C. Walker

Justice J. W, B. Chenery pre-
the prizes. The sports



W hat’s‘on Today

Pc fee Courts and Court of
Grand Sessions—10,00 a.m,
Water Polo—
H.M,.C.S. Magnificent and
Miemac vs. Island 5.00

p.m.
Football—
H.M.C.S. Magnificent and
Micmac vs. Island — 5.00
p.m,
Table Tennis—
H.M.C.S. Magnificent and
Micmac vs. Island — 5.00
p.m.
Hockey—
H.M.C.S. Magnificent and
Micmac vs. Island — 5.00
p.m. RB &
"Basket Ball—
H.M.C.S. Magnificent ann
Micmac vs. Istand — 7.30
p.m.
Billiards—
H.M.C.S, Magnificent anéd
Miemac vs. Island — 7.30

p.m.

A Dance will be given at the
Aquatic Club by the Royai
& Merchant Navy Welfar~
League for ©.P.0s. P Ms
and men of the H M.C.S
Magnificent and Micmac—
8.00 p.m. :

CINEMAS

Aquatic: “Frieda"—5.00 and 8.0

“Mm,
Globe | “phe Furies and All Star
Talent Show—8.50 p.m.

Bridgetown Pla “Where Dan-




wer Lives’—2.50, 4.45 and 8.30
p.m,

Empire: “Christopher Columbus
—2.40 p.m.

Empire : “The Girl of the Year’—
8.30 p.m,

Olympic: “Hell's Kitchen and
Johnny Belinda’—1.30 and
8.15 p.m.

Oistins Plaza:—"Blood On The

Moon" —5.00 and 8.30 p.m,





The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.55 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) April
14
Lighting: 6.30 p.in.
‘High Water: 7,04 a.m., 8.56

p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .03
in.
Total for Month to Yester-
day: .76 in,

Temperature (Max.) 84.0 °F
Temperature (Min,) 71.5 °F |!
Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
E.S.E, (3 p.m.) E.S.E.
Wind Velocity:
hour, }
Brrometer: (9 a.m.)
(3 pm.) 29,906.

9 miles per

29.995,

was Victor







FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1951



What A Joy To See Our Money Used |

tur inas ee Full use is being made cf sur- |
SHRIVENHAM, Wilts. 2S ; plus war ‘stores and captured

I wish I had hada - Russian oO ise Ve foreign.equipment
observer with me here today. Foi Many intricate iatinen euch |
what I have seen at the Military me |

College of Science adds up to a

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

most stimulating and heartening :

d aboratory attle_
report in what is so often the ae DF rong “Seen
gloomy story of Britain's defences. 7

A Russian making notes at my

shown the principles of guided-

sa supersonic wind_tunnel, have
been built in the college work
shops.

Some of the country’s finest
brains are on the spot to train

sb : ree sina, rocket mechanisms. Others. were the Army scientists. — ;

are see sane ha ger a Eh getting the background to the Sir Reginald Strading, Britain's
Toute ani Keema ne Brtain’s atomic bomb by experimenting No. 1 wartime expert on Civil
determination to” tfiumph. in g With’ radium. Defence, is in charge of the

scientific war.

More, the bustling activity. the
Army has to show in.th’s one
centre would convince any M.P
at tomorrow’s debate that
£293,000 vote for the college this
year is well deserved—and wil! be
well spent.

Scores of regimental officers aré
being schooled here by front—rank
professors to provide the atomic-
age Army with a super-trained
cadre of soldier— scientists.

After two or three years of
intensive ‘study most of the
scientists-in-uniform: will be post_
éd to field units, Others will work
with civilian “boffins” in Govern-
ment defence laboratories.

The Atom...

Their job will, be to see that
what the fighting man needs is
made known to the scientists who
design intricate weapons like atom
bombs and guided missiles. They
will ensure that the finalised
weapons are properly des gned
for use in action.

, Fron: NEWELL ROGERS
~ NEW YORK,

A cut-away model of qa farm
tractor stands in a ninth—floor
room.of New York’s Law Courts.
It is there to hel» Judge Gregory
Noonan settle a dispute between
two titans of industry over a
£122,142,800 handshake,

British inventor Harry Fergu-
son is suing the Ford company for
this sum on the ground that Ford
infringed his tractor patents.

The handshake was between
Ferguscn and Henry Ford the
First. It started them in business
together. Ferguson alleges that
the Ford company made his trac-
tors until 1946, and then broke
the handshake pact by continuing
to turn out the tractors while
paying him nothing.

For Henry Ford jun., attorney
Whitney North Seymour says
Ferguson makes “an extravagant
claim that cannot be substanti-
ated.” He argues that the Ford-
son tractor was the basis for
the Ferguson.

The case is expected ic last from
three to six months. Before it is
over, Judge Noonan may be an
expert on every part of a tractor.
For the mode] is there to prove the



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equals one compressed yeast cake
in any recipe, If you bake at home

Keen 2 supply on hand - bake af 2 moments notice



ow

I Can

Cade

drole


















the







Next door three Canadian offi—
cers were operating a split.
second camera to photograph a
bullet in flight.

In, the biggest and best_equipped
electrical—-engineering laboratory
I have ever seen, a dozen men
,wereé experimenting with dynamos
and motors.

Young officers fresh from
Sandhtrst were operating th:
latest types of plane_spottin;

equipment in the radar depart-
ment... ‘

Worth Millions

Every. kind of tank and lorry
engine was being studied in the
mechanical—engineering shops.

Nearby, in a _ huge hangar,
other officers were investigating
the design of foreign tanks, guns,
and pocket launchers.

The whole array of equ’pment
must be worth millions. But it
has been built up, at the smallest
possible cost.

scientific staff. Famous men like
radar—pioneer Professor Holt
Smith, and aerodynamics expert
Professor ©. G. Sutton, work
under him.

v

Double D.S.O,

The mihtary stuaies are direct—
€d, not by an academic man, but
by one of the most widely ex-
perienced combat soldiers in the
Army—53-year-old Major-Gen—
eral William Eldridge, a double
D’s.O.

He never lets tne officer-scien—
tists forget that they are primarily
fighting men.

What I have seen here con-
vinees me that the Colonel Blimp
mentality is playing no part in
the technical reorganisation oi
the Army,

I report with pleasure that my
view is strengthened that Britairt
is already much better prepared
jor deferice than most people
believe.



- HANDCLASP PACT |
LEADS TO LAWSUIT

























difference between a Fordson and
a Ferguson. z

CRITICS are divided over Anna
Neagle's Odette. Says the Herald-
Tribune: “Acted with sincerity and
conviction;” The Timey; “A pretty
punk secret agent—more like a
lady tourist from Little Twicket-
on-Thrums. The only wonder is
that the Nazi gumshoes don’t grab
her earlier.”

SONGS, not words, should be
used to reach the hearts of the
Russian people, says psychiatrist
Ira Altschuler. “Russian. leaders
fear the songs of free men more
than any other propaganda,” he
argues.

TV°SET is installed in the floor
of a new car delivered to a New
York businessman. Controls are
in an arm rest, the screen is at
a 45-degree angle; cost—£350.
Hollywood folk are having sets
fitted into the footboards of beds
and in bedroom ceilings.

ROSY PROMISE by defence
production bss Charles Wilson:
“By 1953 we will, if necessary, be
able to fight an all-out war from
ithe production lines and, at the

same time, supply goods for the
civilian economy.”

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For Your Health's Sake — try
Fieischmann's Dry Yeast dissolved
in fruit juice, milk or water. Like
old-time foil yeast—it helps tone
up your system.

See... :
It’s so easy
to see those
extra fine |
points in a
well tgiler- ¢
ed suit that
you should
always
contact the
Top Scorers

in Tailoring



Water Polo Team |

THE Barbados team to play a
Water Polo match against the
Canadian Navy this aftetnoon at
the Barbados Aquatic Club is as
follows:—

Maurice Foster, Tim Yearwood,
Boo Patterson (Capt.), Harold
Weatherhead, Delbert Bannister,
Billy Manning and Owen John-
son.

Play begins at 5.00 p.m.

RECORD FLIGHT
MADRID.
» Mrs. Rosa Munoz, of La Gomera
in the Canary Islands, believes
she established some kind of a
record when, at the claimed age
of 120 years, she recently took an
aeroplane trip.

Left, a widow when her hus—
band died twenty years ago, Mrs.
Munoz has seores of descendants
ineluding a 50-year—old grandson
and five great grandchildren.
—(I.N.S.)

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—YRIDP.
Last Cript: The first and in-
dispensable requisite of hap-
piness is a clear conscience.

: GIBBON,

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.











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Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY. APRIL 13, 1951 BAKBAOOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE St. Lucy Churchwarden Asks For "No Friction" MR. K. L. WARD. M.C.P., was appointed Churchwarden of St. Lucy for the ensuing term .9!. 1-52. when the St. Lucy's Vestry met yesterday. The nomination was made by Mr I C. Sobers and was MCOOdvd by Mr D. E. Webster I MM .l|| \<. I II MOM. H Mr. Wart said that as the lot! foil on him, he was prepared to do his best for the parish. He would live up to expectations of the parishioner* and carry on the good uork started by his predecessors. Idwas hoping that during his term of office there would be no friction, but rather cooperation among the boards and Vestry on the whole. Hearsay, he said, was responublv for lot<> of friction. He was Biking the Vestry to deal with lawfully and maliciously wouix:hard facts rather than hearsay. ingCeraldineHlnkson in her foreHe realized that the response head with a pine joist. The incibillty of a churchwarden was a dent occurred along Lukes Alley, great one and that he had a big Labourer Fineti £3 lor Wounding A FINE of £3 In 28 days wiin an alternative of two imprisonment wa* imposed on Athelbert Aahby. alias Hraatha* or cal Brown, a 35-year-old labourer of Percy's Gap, Martin dales, by City Police Magistrate Mr. c. L*. Walwyn yesteraay Alhby was found guilty 01 cay A CANE FIRE at Mangrov Plantation. St. Philip, a Wednesday night burnt th n half arrel/icy are the property of Carnngton Estates Ltd. and were insured. Another lire on Wednesday at Walkers Plantation. St. George. burnt five and a half acres of first and second crop ripe earn property of C. L. Davis were also insured D ISTRICT Welfare Mr. Weekee and M 11->ut.it inn to live up to H. Officers Elected ght burnt three and Th e Vestry then proceeded of second cop upe ^T 01 * n offlc0 %  it c mittees. They are H toUom .Senior Guardian: Mr. F. Greaves. Junior Guardian; Mr. C. Yearwood. Sanitary Commissioners Dr. A. C. Kirton. Mr W. I. Greaves, Mr > thc K. C. O'Neal. Mr. J Alleyne and Thoy Mr. N. Slocombe Building Committee Mr J Officers. Allevne Mr. W. L Greavc*. Mr Bl*d> I L. Ward. .Ml C. H. YearPICTURED here i> H.M C.8. Hlcmac ait ploughed It* • *•. %  >**! came Into the Harbour-many member*, of the crew 'ay into CarlisleBay ymUrdsy. As soon as th* crowded thu deck to get a glimpse of the Island. man, are going through inanv wood and Mr. F. A. Greaves. IUM in St. Peter's I .ami Tax Goee Lj> nd Repairer: St Peter land owners will have n pay $i.oo mora pM m r% u land tax tills year than the $3.28 (*•% Mr CoU>„_W.rd_r.d S^SKJ^S districts in Belleplaine In search Organ Time of people to start classes in emE J. Bonvlcr. broidery etc at the nelleplaine Delegates: Mr. D. E. WebsU Playing Fiekl. (Vestry); Mr. Collin V A general meeting is expected to Mr. J. E. Marvllle <9? n *I e *2j t -r be held next Wednesday night to and Parish Church); Mr. C. Birch SZ^^Sl£wi 29'', cenis give these classe, (St. Clement's • ,I J> = K dollar The S* Prter VDuring Miss Hlackman's warch Mr. J J Broome tat. rv dwldc( lo makc lhL increase she met some of the old students Swithans). %  yesterday lo meet the increased TT"pUiS !" TaSSSm. u7ilU Capital Expenditure. Id. iCI.vharl*n.. Mr n *• featir, Mr 1 C. Sob. !" Mr (J t. SaaL Mr W I. Grrtvcu. Mr C II. urn-nod. Mr. J. AIUvn. M.. F. A of Mrs. If. A. Vaughan who i willing to help. She had an Interview with some of them. During the evening a netball game wa played at Belleplaine under the supervision of Miss Rlackninn N INfcTFEN YEAR OLD Jam-; Tavlor a Inhourer <.f Cattle Grant Sl Josenh. ws taken t>^ the General Hospital yesterday morning sulTerlne. from head injuries and detained. He was Involved in an accident with a loaded mule-drawn rart. From Rest House To Furniture Shop THE Admiral Grant Sattori EUat, ona of tba buildings on lower Bay Streat, is now being reconatructad lo be used as a furniture shop. It is tha prOfM tty of Ml Ralph A. Beard, a city businessman. About SO years ago. the late \\ hvaii SeleeMd To Be Attorney < .rn<-nil Of Kenva Flower, Fruit Show RUSSIAN WIT LONDON. Moscow radio reported that a trio of cartoonists known as Kukiynsky were awarded n Stalin prire of SI8,830 for n ,series of earloons depicting President Truman, Prime Minister Attlee. General Mat-Arthur Dean Achcson and Foster Dulles as warmongers. The broadcast, monitored in London, also stated that ihc Soviet Council of Ministers awarded n Stalin prize of $25,200 to the directors, actors and cameramen of the film "Secret Mission." This Russian film portrays Winston Churchill seeking to make a separate peace with Hitler .—Ul 8. E. Hamlet V chased the building which ''J than i small dilapidated on*, '"> tfat Brlttab aV lion BooMa in England lo be used as a resl mmn, This wu done throuah *he InttnunantaUtj <>i : i Grant who eanw out hi ni ihe need for such Mr J. Whvntt. Attorney Gen. .. |„ : -I It ...... eventually opened ,., ;l i iu „ |, ll( | 0 hag hern selected by BtlhOP Bwabey III IBOl, r„r appoinlineui to the poM .t The purpose of this hostel was Attorney General. Kenya. Last year's Capital Expenditure was .B.O00. This year the Vestry plans making extensions at Ihc almsliouse for children (4u.11tcrs and more suitable nurses quartets The organ tuner's salai. nil] W In H ie a e iJ and provision is also made EM an increase lo house sailors who visual he •n Ihc wages of the sanitary emm the days when shipping was Mr Whyati. who was born 1 plovees. Two street lamps will be mostly done by sailing vessels 1905. 15 a Bachelor of Arts of Ox plated on Farm's Road and these which used to remain in port for ford University and was called t new Iteaaa along with Ihe overseveral days Nowadays. sailors the^Ilar^of the loner Tcmpli Guilty of Larceny \ Placed Qn Probation Aftet a deliberation 01 about 4fc minute*, a It nun jury yesterdto UMMd Anglic Hunte guilty of thr %  i a00— valued ai $iol iheir minds that the prosecution as there lo prove their ease erlth out a reasonable douht t)wnei %  hip must be cstablinhcd m a laf ceny case. He ended by subinil ting Ihat Ihey. the (ury. ihouid b very careful how they accepted ihi eviden.-e of Harbour Police Con stable Gill and Harbour PoUd Constable Wilkinson who eraffi witnesses for the prosecution W W Reeee, Solicitor Q*n did not addrtal the hlr) BRUSH... WITH THE CORRECT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH &f llWo-Wii.UKnUit u Urn tnrtl "I id rom/or(aM> eM/rW. tlluiM'i ,,Mr-if*nd tliam a hni dritt tfiar. Wisdom ADOll LTD. Of MEKTfORO. M"in Of rMi I '.'.VAV.::-'.'.%VA'.V. % %  .',:'.',*.',;•.'.; • *; Ferns. ornamental plants flowerinir plants in baskets, grafted plants in addiUon to vegetables and fruit will be among Ihe exhibits ..t the IB* tcenth Annual Exhibition of Ihc Hortleanural society which opens at QtMen'S Park on Satutday April 21 from I—6 p.m. There will also bo a luncheon table decora t ion and those desirous of entering are .isked to communicate with Mrs. T. HH Wilkinson. Plants in pots would be race h ed Ihe day before the exhibition from 9 5 p.m. and cut flowers, vegetable and fruit on the same morrinii of the show betweei and B30 The Committee are hoping not only to have a good attendance but l K<*i many exhibits as W A'cuu will be offered by the SIXTEEN planes from th. Orthid'crrcle t theI, memberH M C S Mnlee„t flew over only lor the best exhibit al the Barbados betwc show. There will be three other p.m. yesterday cups offered to members of the formations. Horticultural Society for the greatest number of points for cut spent amount of $1,654 from last coming here on fteamers hardly raeu DM earriad the Capital Exremained longi-r than a da> or penditure to $57,000. two and so preferred to sleep on Vestry members said that eonthe ship. ditions at the nlmshouse wre bad In the tally years of ihe Sailors and there wan netd for many nest. M. Weekea ana Mr. Grant ch times Pile iu*d to go out on Si.: The Vestry decided to erect the to Irliit ships in Carlisle Bay to two street lamps after a number hold services for the men Berlaxpayers hod written to ask vices were also held It the ft) lei 1917 Tha 6 -i rlna he bt that iwo lamps he put up. Mr. T. S. Chandler, last year's Churchwarden, was unanimously re appointed Churchwarden Members of the V.-M. piaised Mr Chandler (Of his eiu. D in carrying out the affairs of the parish." Mr. Chandler Rave a short report on his work as Church. a rd en last Sixteen Planes From "Magnificent" Fly Over Barbados 1.30 and 2.30 variety Many people rushed from theii prlSof $5 00 to for the best collect blcs exhibited by a f tiool to roof tops to cgetnKet a glimpse of the PfcjM*Others hlood In the centre of the road and looked into the sky chleflv of repairs to churches. Mr. G. Gill and Mr. A. A. Gill were appointed as the two Poor Law Guardians. Mr. O. Gill, the Senior Guardian was %  Guardian la* raw while Mr. A. A. GiP takes over from Mr. T. E. Corbln. Other appointments w e r < Health Commissioners, Messrs T. S. Chandle-. T K Cmbin. G. O Parris. E. L. Bannister and A. Gilt Highway Commissioners: Messn T. S. Chandler. A. A. Gill and G Gill. The Building Committee will be p,.-i 1. 1,-.. 11 %  diaru. The Tax RelUf Committee ..re Messrs. T. S. Chandler, G. GUI. A. GUI, T. E Corbin and C. A. Thornton and were ciinducted either by Ui Weekea .< Weslevan Ulni n or the Chaplain ">f any vlsttine. warship which was in port at the time. During, the following years up to 1929. then ware several additions and enlargements to the hostel. First, %  strip of land was WW\ speaking purc hased. This made possible, a ill front yard, a more adequate ow which was a wing of iwo rooms for the Superintendent and increased space at the back. Spacious :>orm. Next came the addition of a gpss lOUJ two storey dormitory at „ the back of the original premises. .„... For ihb.. a laying of corner stones by Lady O'Brien and her two daughters was arranged in COO nectton with Ihc unveihrg >>' r Governor Sir Charles O'Brien of 1 the Memorial Tablet to Admiral f Grant in IB20 W.IYATT r of Mr. Willinck': Butcher Discharged Hie Honour the Acting dual %  iiKii.i Mi 1; 1. Tayloi ya a terdaj llll IIAMI KKHIXi; >IAtlll\i:S on uiurr wa „ no paw ,„ |llk< t)( |h This tablet was inscribed 10 the m i M7 M Crown Counsel. Hong ,nP UI meinorv of men of the Men amile Kong Fron l94l to l946 he w ,„ Marine who gave their lues in rpcon( |el for administrative work Mr Chandler brought to the the ltfl4—18 War ; Seciei.n., of the Eastern Group ,"trv> auention the water shortThe hostel had restated s„ PP l> Council In India and subOnc man who was paying no al B .mcobel and suggested accommodation for M """ J** lequantly a.s Supply Liaison Ofll%  ittention to traffic was struck on h , orrv nr i wo should 1* sent whom there were such amusecer in Australia and New Zealand il leg b a bicycle. with water through that LW No ments as billiards, darts and card „,. lHmMl .,, ,„ lon Kwg in ,„, — games. Newspapers and jxMiodi .„„, atlod 1(S cuslodmn of Enemy 1 were -lw provided rortlicm. i> rowrlv %  hiring the second World War. two fan laJei ^ Attorney Oen' %  11 %  %  % %  %  > nr u '-I ,.,.., „. ,,,. r .,|,, ri pyTtg tll as it had to accommodate at times 9trwlt9 in Rj(rbad0s h(1 was „,, ""1 *3 Ti,i^ ^ P oin,wl %  King's Counsel were torpedoed, picked up and brought here This continn.il lor Mr Whyati, accompanied h> several months, but with tl.. n of hostilities and UM |„ ri ,| ., decision was reached. The planes, on their tlrst (light hc ma ne r over, were arranged in three groups of four each while ihe other four, flanked formation in pairs. Bound Over The March sitting oi of Grand Sessions eAded >' with the retrial of a larceny case Miaa o. r-nemy Q h( ., u ove ^ fo| S as2S£ t Sr' the'nexf ass.zes-which was om the naln They fie ing Ihe east and after OOVel of the island thin' Mis$ Harbin Dies In Grenada retlrenv rrt 0! Mi Weel %  d'r .in Our (>wi> Correiponlrtii' GRENADA. April U Miss Louie Harbin, Assistant BrtUatl Sallon Boeh Librarian at the Public Library, Mr. Jnmes Huseell to carry while Grenada, and fourth daughter of Superintendent and Port Mil Th 7 to take up b out of Rex v St. Clalr Foste labourer of St. Joseph In which jury could not ugree on e verdict after it was put to them. In that case Mr J. E. T ife. is expected to leave EngBrain ker appeared on behalf of th* the 21^t of April in ordei .neuse.1 Poster Is bound over for appointment he exl 19 ires. The usual auctioneer's bell was Iorme d a "V formation while Grenada, and fourlh da. ghu Kit rung nor was the auctioneer lhe other group remained well the late John HarbH lnspe.to o ng much shouling In a qmcl ,„ ,he .eai The lust gioup then of School; and Mrs. Hfrt^V 0 *" ^ ^.T „.....nner Rut said lo the flU uiuier the others and went at the Colony Hospital shortl. %  ry. wavlhe auctioneer Just said to the View unner the others half dozen men around him. 'Tins inll the lead while the leadinr. Jot—$6 M (meaning MM a bag)? group fell back to the rea One merchant irndded his head lo Following this Ihe %  Indicate that he favoured that ( n many directions. price. No one else took a bid and individual planes when the auctioneer said "One— performing stunts f'thei Two—Three," that lot was sold. nr below the main formats When the sugar Is sold in such lot*, a man of limited cash cannot c, !" u o 11 iL buy any. Among the half a dozen on told th. men at the sale yesterday, there had^er iaid that shi RuaaeU ine s.. %  After M'%  the Colony Hospital shortly gbaut two fter noon to-day. Kngh.inl were ImpriMld thai 'here She was token to the hospital Wil .. ,,.,! nUR -h to be do planes flc* yesterday after a short illness and ant f ga It was costing %  lot M t times underwent an operation this m , ... i for open air Hie i 1 itiuna pur pones That idea, however, never eame to fruition. The building was eventually -old to Commission Agent EX JOY irrierl only the „ Wllfl ,| lcn turned into \ Irani for a couple of yi I l.-f.wn purchased by iiSOUPS TO MU It . SATISFA1TiO SOUTH AFRICAN LOBSTER—per U (.HUM SALMON—Large 6e. (-\MFPF.LLS SOUPS:—CHICKEN NOODLE CHICKEN with RICE, CONSOMME. BOULLION. BEEF. CREAM OF MUSHROOM—per Tin NEILSONS CHOCOLATES—per bar I2c. Nut Bolt. Roseb'ids. Jersey Nut. Jerse> Mi*. Macaroon, Burnt Almond, Crisp) Cr unch, Cherry Cream. Liquid Cherry. <|{!tS CHEESE CRISPS—per tin $1.13 PEAK FPEANS CHEZSELETSpar im $1.24 PEAK FREAKS MARTINI CRACKERS—per tin $1 (H HEINZ PICKLED ONIONS—per jar 79c. STUFFED OLIVES—par Jar $I08 PLAIN OLIVES pei jar $1.80 ST.WSFELD. SCOTT A TO.. i.TIK TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH SAXOPHONE REEDS 1 b Alto. B b I '""i C Melod) CLARINirr RFEBS B b. E b. Are you proud of pour INDUSTHV Well tell Die World about If. Send In pour details today. You have 3 day* Uft only to uet in I'IC YEAR BOOK. A Compart l.i".iilur.e.lit Machine mid n Wnndrrfullv Klucient Worker capable if turning out the ninst Iteauliful F.ITeeli on .ili.i-.-1 every iniiiKinable t>us' of job. — THfc PERFECT — HAND SEWING MACHINE Simple, Silent iiml Batty Knnnine, Sews Barkwiird*. and Forwards us Kennired. Special Cash Price $93.74 The "JONES" Electric Motor with Needle Paint l.isht Can I"filled quickly and easily lo any type of "JONES'" DOMESTIC SI WINC. MACHINE Thr running MMBI are nrsligiblr mil the ..i.fi.ii..t has bath hand* free to ulde the OUR PRICEONLY $16.17 EACH HARRISONS LOCAL AGENTS TEL 2364 v,'.:'.:'.',','.',::'.'.:'.',: •--,'-•-',-,•,•,*.'-•.---.-,*..'.'-•-',---,',','*. al NO CONFOtBNCE WASHINGTON, April 12 •resident Truman will nol ,hold weekly newMmfi-iein e t"ihe While House announced. lo explanalion wus given —Reuter < •IMIHX.V | HEN CHOW | | (SCRATCH GRAIN) | > mm !H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.-D,.tribu.or.. USE A RIPPINGILLES BLUE-FLAME STOVE FOR EASY & CLEAN COOKING A.S.BRYDEN& SONS (BMS) LTD. AGENTS. WXT&'.'.'.'.'S. '." Small ,;::;:::;;:;:::-^'.:-.:: ------'// %  //<'////.•.-.-. -----GOOD KKCONII HAND SHOT GI'NS JOHNSONS STATIONERY and HARDWARE Sore Mouth Loose Bloody Tooth lll.r-tflTB Um Hoi. Mou'h >n* T.lh me.n lhal ou have p.orrr..-. Tr-iv-h Mouth * P*rtiapa % -• •*. •'•'^ ihi will Mionrr n* tai" %  •* )'^<" *-'" •u '.II '..,1 and may alao illiv lUl-^mall-r,, aoa llrf TTOIIW *mar. opa su Mateai M* "rt dy •> %  aor laowt nixl MUKWIX tlshi.n. ihr i—th Iroa €>la (i-.i—,)4ik Ml ralurn of rmplr %  %  i-0ia Irom our I^••mlll Amosan Tr.. H.aia PRUNE CREAMS fi I Tr Prorrh.i i m.i.H.mn / mi vi i/\ TX£iT KNK;IITS I'L II f ii ix SIHIH I lilllllilili He laughs at the weather and W too would von u nh ni" of tl,i--iCanadian III At Ii IIAI.\ 'OAT!SI An excellent coat for Seamen of all riinki as well u*< Watchmen. Porters or anyone who has to work outdoors in all weathers $16.39 soi WISH II HATS To match — Each S 3.79 Cave ShepherdS Co., Ltd. 10. 11. 12. & 13. BROAD STUI I T -.-.-,'.-.--v--;--;;;:;;:;-.-.-.-. %  A.



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SIX BARBADOS .IDVOCATK 1 RI1JAY. APRIL li lil HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON H.IP PREVENT**,* DECAY •*w*tf tooth dmcoyl Vie refrwhinj umtlNI Touch Hnw wWh chkt cavti> fornuiwi ihrvr .1 important way*. 1. IIMIIIM It-nh Patuhrlrn Mm detiructi** bacteria. 1 uimmi Tooth Paor attacki dull falm hkh holdi bacterial -* %  •, (ooth surfacia3. URUM Tooth I'.-u rvm help. i u remove mouth acid*. BtvMmg with Umm Tooth Put otlrf every "—' ha* reduc* u—h d,-,*,. poLuhe* your leeth whiter, brighter thaa CVT. t UllUlaN lovi in IUMI. MI MY H_A\... TV. .r..W..t Ih.t build.I $.. '.m and Swap 'cm ... 40 Cirdi in th Sriti. CORNFLAKES totbyf ItfMKually imrwrtaat for th.ldr.al Mude by the maker-, ol famous LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC WE SPECIALISE IN HICHCLASS MIM1W ADVOCATE PRINTING IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEGAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY Bot. JEFFREYS BEER 26 PRUNES Per 1 lb. pig 48 PKGS BRIDAL ICING SUGAR 36 NOW USUALLY NOW '* TRIND MARMALADE 36 It Vi mm, OVALTINE BISCUITS 48 a MOIRS CHOCOLATES 10 ^ D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street CEREALS VIGRO—Toaslrd Wheat Flakes POST HIIIMIH I % % %  Flake. 1(1 Mil .It — "VIi.lt. ,1 Com Flakes QUAKER OATS—Quick (Lareemu! Small) QUAKER—Puffed Wheat K I I l.l >( ;i.s All Bran CRAPE: NUTS—Breakiast Food WF.I.C.AR Shredded Whenl CREAM OF V. Ill \ l --i I li... and Small) FOR HEARTY BREAKFASTS EXTRA DELICIOUS CANADIAN APPLES NEW SHIPMENT Lvura GMNH SVIIIP 1 lb. % %  • — 2 1. 2 Ik. lit. |.-,,. ALLEYXE ARTHUR A Co. Lid. "YOI'R 4.IMM I IIS HAMS I'irnii1.02 prr lb. • CHEESE 73? per lb. i; ,w/ ^^^a^/^/>yrfv*wv>y///^,vv^/i'AvwM'x* •.'.•S.'SS-'*'''''''''''''** NEW BOOKS ELEPHANT BILL by Lt -Col. J. H. Williams VENUS THE LONELY C.ODDESS by John Enkine SHAW by Desmond McCarthy ISLANDS OF THE SUN by Rosi'a Forbes THE EXPLOITS OF I M.l l.lllll 1 II i by Maurice Richardson CHAMPIONSHIP I it .11 I l\l. SCHOOL BOOKS ROYAL READERS X 4. 6 ROYAL SCHOOL PRIMER WEST INDIAN READER i : ADVOCATE STATIONERY



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PAGE FOl'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. APRIL 13. 1951 BARBADOS ADVOfflTE I'-lrlrd br lh AdvocaW Co. L*.. Broad St. BrtdMlown Friday. April 13. 1951 MM >ll SI III 4.ISI I II WITH ihe passing of the Adult Suffrage Bill giving the right lo vote to every person who had reached the age of 21 years, the old register of voters comprising the electoral roll became obsolete and it was necessary to prepare a new register of voters. To this end the Government appointed 213 Assistant Rt -lsU'ruig Officers and these with 122 supcrvis >rs are now.issuing forms for registration throughout the island. The work was begun on April 2 and must be limshed by June in order that new registers can be compiled. The Assistant Registering Officers are already experiencing great difficulties because of obstruction on the part of thousands of people. In some instances it has been claimed that there is no necessity to register again, in others that the registration of women would make them serve as jurors at the Court of Grand Sessions, while others feel that they should be paid to register. Thousand : rtfltM t<> rBgJlttr Oil rvligious grounds. The public must realise that the new Act wiped out the old registers except for a bye election during the year. In the case of women it is not true that every woman who registers will be called upon to serve as a juror because the jury list will be prepared separately from the list of voters. It has been claimed that the fact that every adult had to be registered afresh was not MI (lieu-nth advertised so that the public could be acquainted with the circumstances and the need for re-registering. This criticism overlooks the fact that the coming into operation of the new system was advertised by means of a public notice published several days in the Press. But even if this had not been done, it is clear that the appointment of 213 Assistant Registering Officers and 22 Supervisors whose duty it is not merely to issue forms for registration but to explain to people who are potentially qualified voters why it is necessary to register is evidence of the awareness of the Government of the obstacles. Under the old system of income qualification it was necessary for those who held that qualification and who wanted to exercise their right as voters to go to a Justice of the Peace, swear to their qualification and then hand them to a Registering Officer. The necessity for registering must be clear to all those who give the matter the slightest consideration. With the introduction of party government in this island, it was not enough to leave it to the members of the various parties to register such people as might be of their political view or who might be sympathetic towards their policies. It was plainly the duty of the Government to set up machinery for the registration of all those who might be entitled to vote so that all the people might take part in the establishment of government. The reason for registering is to exercise a civic right by taking part in the selection of the personnel of government. If there is no registration, there can be no voters' list, no election, no House of Assembly and so no proper form of Government. Registration is then the first step in the formation of a government and it is the duty of every citizen aged 21, to till in the forms delivered to them. The earlier it is done the more time will be available for the preparation of the registers and the electoral roll. i -S. Senufor Paul II. Iloiitflii*. propo%e%- A I'I-O2I *aiiiiiM k lor Resisting Aggression I belong to the school ot thought The United States offered to The United States must main, ••hich taUtvW lh;.t ihe United share the secret of atomic energy tain %  foreign polirv of ratUUni State* must strive to help put with the whole world, including Russian BKKieuton everywhere down nggrcsMon wherever wc RlMBla, provided only that there we can. We mut maintain this can. We would do this provided, should be an adequate internapolicy for our own security as well first, that other nations will adctional Inspection to which we as for that of the other free and quately join us in the attempt; would be subject to prevent any independent naUam of the world. and second, that l 'ie places in country from making atomic I should like to emphasize, howwhlch the aggression occurs, or bombs. We also offered to denaever, that we are am the only ones threatens to occur, are acces'thlc ture our atomic bombs under the who should take this Hand %  * to mil forces. same conditions. Kusiia refused nation with a stoke In freedom I favour this because I believe to agree to this international inand independence %  hould nn the thai peace is indtvtBable, and bespcction same. Unices we help, the Com. cause I believe that if aggression. We sought, HUVXHtl the United munlsU could now sweep over all particularly the concerted Com. Nations, to create a pooled force of Europe, Asia, the Middle East. niuiiist type, is allowed to succeed, to resist aggression. Russia failed and Africa. Since this might be it will build up the strength of the to co-operate Russia has hamdone, we must build up our corriiggressors and encourage them to strung the United Nations by bined strength to meet this chalfurther aggression using the veto no less than 44 lenge. t d not believe in "his tclicy in times, evei prior to tne Koreas i^t us determine that our civil-' Older to be aggressive, i believe crisis. utatlon is not to fall and that the in it because I want lha reign of We have helped l organize inice-cap of the police state shall not law to triumph I want all men tetnational agencies to enhance descend upon us. If that were to and nations to be able to live the arts of peace. Russia has happen then the liberties which relatively free from attack, and refused to co-operate with them. we t aK>1 f or granted. ;s the air we hence able to enjoy freedom and We have stripped ourselves of breathe. would illiappeei It justice and tn cultivate the arts our colonial empire by freeing the would be hundreds of years, perof peace. I would like to have the Philippines and giving up rights to haps many centuries, before that United States, as the strongest intervene In Cuba ice-cap .vould roeh. nation in the world, continue to Under the Marshall Plan wc lead in these efforts, although 1 offered economic assistance to all Arnold Toynbajr, in his recent have no desire to dictate to anyof Europe, including Russia and great work on history, says that one, even In these worthwhile her satellites. Russia not only recivilizations fall because of "inpursuits. 1 believe that the ulti. fused to come in herself, but also sufficient response" t ;„, vcry nature to a garri. oul *"*' t-onimunists IwlK The Umt.-d States CSflUlot r*gM son stale that threatens to expand. > h s > a hat *'" happen to us Communist aggression oil over the i n lhc piul| acting through the T" e y ,hmk .. ,he stream of history world by itself. Other_ non-CornUnited Nations, we prevented rtunlst countries should share the Russian aggression i Ir. i the It lies within our power to burden. If we can encourage Dardanelles, and in Greece Actprove them right or wrong, such help by our own willingness nK w nh 0 ur British and French nve faith in the essence of our to resist aggression, it would be allies, we prevented Russian sciz. ?****• namely, respect for the far better than letting the Com. uie of Berlin. individual and a deep desire to tnunists take over the whole Wherever we showed strength > m Prov* human life and if we world, even excepting the West. 1O resist Communist aggression, translate such a faith Into acts. ern Hemisphere. I would rather the Russians hacked down we w ,,? u r" ve J* wc do not have allies with us if we have to Last June 24, however, the w *' rc ,lKe 'y lo ail light Russia than to face Russia forces of world Communism. !" non-Commun.st wor d. if it alone. solid)v backed hv Russia, commitW|U nlv unite, still holds the pre. At this late day it can hardly be ted military aggression across the Ponderonce of power. I, has true that we must debate what whole of a national frontier. Now. more than twice the population of power appears to be the main InRussia has committed its largest ""' L ommil E l ". world It has stlgator of war If it should come satellite. China, lo the risk of genman y umei ,n industrial strength llfMB in era! war, of the Communists. For the moAfter World War II the United If war comes, it will be instiment It is weak in inllltar> States reduced its armed forces gated by Russia, not by us. strength at Its very centre. Bui from 13,000,000 men to 1.500,000 The danger confronting us Is a we can repair this and had only a scant 12 divisions totalitarian Communist danger. Freedom can -in If all free i prior to the Communist aggression The record of Soviet gains gives peoples arc united Such deter| in Korea. Russia did not cut its conclusive proof that it is the mined unity can perhaps still total force by more than one-half, weak and not the strong who are deter .the aggressor: from going has 175 divisions, probin danger. If there is any hope further and can give us peace. It ably the equivalent of 135 to 140 for peace with Russia, we will is confessedly a slim hope, but it American divisions find it in strength. is the only hope for pe, Will The Terror Spread to Bagdad? £X Y-V" K&*AsiA JL Kv s. n..ii n. im. i 'All Not Sweet On Sugar Deal; Bailie Brewing HASH IMPOi PICNIC BLOCK* IT IS an excellent thing for people to spend a day in the country on a picnic. It is an excellent thing and deserves congratulation of those responsible (or organising picnics But it is essential that the organisers of picnics should realise that their excursion is for a relatively small number ol people. The thousands of workers who are not going lo the picnic are still entitled to the use of the island's highways. This right to use the island's highways was severely restricted yesterday morning by the thoughtless action of six 'bus drivers on the St. James coasl road. Instead of collecting their "picnic" passengers off the road, and then spacing their departures in accordance with the flow of traffic travelling on the road at that time, these 'bus drivers lined up their 'buses in close formation and delayed the passage of four times the number of other vehicles wanting to use the road at that particular point. Quite apart from the thoughtlessness of this action, the practice, common in Barbados of parking vehicle! immediately behind preceding vehicles, li antisocial Whenever vehicles have to park in the main roads for whatever reason, it is quit* possible for traffic to continue, providing that vehicles take good care to allow a space of 20 feet between vehicles No one capable of entering a vehicle is incapable of walking an extra 20 feet. But the 20 feet makes all the difference between the passage and the jamming of traffic. IN MID-AIR BETWEEN It worked perfectly. Many of is making it the most important PERSIA AND IRAQ, the dead nun's friends were so plank In its political campaign The wheels of our VikitiK have iriuhteneri that they dropped .ttta Don't forget either, that Persii hardly shaken the dust of Teher.m wreaths snd (lowers they carried terrorist leader, the Moslem priest bjrport from their stiU-rcvoIvimt j.| U nk away rrom the procession Kashani. has a large and devoted !i>'-end tried to melt into the crowd following In Iraq. An American Embassy courier D f bystanders It I may believe some bitterly leans across the gangway between anti-Western deputies whom I us. "There has been anolher Contrast met at an Iraqi friend's house |i attempt to assassinate the PremBAGDAD What a contrast is only Uie presence of Britain': icr." he says to me. "They told Here, too. as throughout ttv East. R-A.F. at Iraq's Habaniya air me just as I was leivlng." men want to grab the fruits ol ba se that has prevented thing? Yes, there is literally no getWestern thrift. Initatkve, and here going the way of Persia beting away from it Tehehan. technical capacity Nationalisation toT this. viih its terror rule ot murder looks to them the simplest and Sold one of them, with general umnurs. pursues us into the quickest method of achieving it. approval: -Let the British wiuiiky, Kighteen deputies of the draw their garrison from Uie ulr For the past fortnight I have Nationalist opposition have put b w an an 8 of thieves and ro&bon KSsnsslnation reports like this n a ment demanding nationalisarultn K a "o exploiting ua will be per day. Most ot them are false tion of the partly British-owned •'"her dead or abre Whether they are siKmlani-ously i, m Petroleum Company and its Rut ,hp companies gel out ated or deliberately planted u l>sldlarles In Bara and Mosul. raa nas already Sl one lot of by the Communist \inrlci ground. The Government itself has lei American-! Lined up as coas some say. I do not know. it be tflnown—unofllciHUy—h operators. But they aie just U effective u.i failing redress of its grievances Nerve War the real thing in cowing all those by ihe companies it is consideru/K-r, ..... ,_ t. J ... who have doubts about ^ie ing natlonalisaUon as a means of u "w ".,, 1 il, ^ '" idu,t irc \ feasibility of the terrorist (and ending the -'most unsatisfactory!" ZS,*V\i ."£.* £ rmm Communist) sponsercd national.Basra and Mosul concessions. """!*'*"* of „< *s *'><<; Tydings. But there ,s no stampede as In *£?*&?*"„£! £$S£ Tchei.in. %  'Wait and see how tiul firms of corporation lawyers, things go in Persia." is the watchthe Texas oil magnate Rav Kyan! MOST telling episode yet was word. Critic*—even Nationalist'! associate of the 110-and-camlni the funeral of Dr. Zanghnneh. like deputy Salman Shaik Daoud Sherman Hunt COnCOrn, oil expert the Education Minister In the —speak up against nationalisation W. Gorman, and the British oil Razmara Government, who died without fear of being assassinated financier F W. Itu-kett. of his injuries after being shot ns traitors the following day. At the Invitation of Premier by a theological student. Tho "Reason" says Daoud "not cmoNuri. the parly made a tour of Government was reported to tion. must guide our decision, the 87.000t So much nerve host ilu crowd. The ;nob. led by Make no mistake, though, diswar. But like nil war it Is d-.n^.itn organised terror gang, boned pinall this healthy realism, oil !: % %  ri d .it t^< mourners and nationalisation is a live uma now upbraided them for honouring "• in Bagdad, and it is likely to beF.;ist MOOX, traitor." come livelier still. The opposition The Mofc Boos specially in an inflammable ituntion like that of the Middle —1..E SOI'R KEADEHS SAY: W iiluu* Fund To The Editor. The Adrocole— I lbs t'lihrrnmi "wii 1 Trul Bay • u i'.iii | lad Hi BSSffS* \ii. Carter, Ed*w*tr< i ijj--.ii" the lost two days I It Bathshehn ntakta • In aid of the widow children of Herbert ,ho was drowned at ftthlpsj on Monday SIR—For liave been n collection and seven Goodman. %  sea. when morninn. I am enclosing n list of subscriptions up to date, and I would i. vn irataral if you would i>e kind enough to publish this, and any further amounts that your reader* may be kind enough to ontribute. This Is a TOT) d*J erving case as the last child is only eleven months old. and tln'ic are throe othei> am lei nine >...i. of age. I have given the widow a sum to carry her over the next few days, and urn opening I Savings Account with the remainder Any subscriptions could he sent either to me at Hie mule address or to Mis< the Aslveciiie and i taovrledgod Bi-maliiJ,! ol a .urn toOtftSl b;, Ml HO. Rmlas* und Mr*, llowr < %  IS on Th . LeonardChurch utittnf lo RaOxhrtoa C 81 \h On >alS* Mr. -111111100 a IS 60 ITInrWd Wallm: Mr A. Cumbcrbatc l\ Mr Kail A ( I.. William* 1 00 3* 1 OS Mr Br*(. 11 Mr. % %  eg* M Mr. A Mil. Kltiot Wllllami %  J ~> It D'Arcy llinkton rwil lloiaer 11 11 Mr A Mr* C M. Howe 10 Mr. Chrichlow M> Mr A. T. Ki.-.B Sa.Mr i< TUtrpht-id lt Mr*. Maud Holder 11 Mr W John W Anotivmeui aubiciipUon* Bathtfteba 1 SI ssst* Paid BSta Savins. Acem al in th Bank Pi c IfOttl %  %  T. HOWE Whitehall. Cadrtagtao HID April 12. 10S1. H./. Cricket Ttmm To tlic tdilor. The Adrocorr— sin Allow me to add m> c.uota of disgu.-t to thiuinwini pile stacked up In connection with the manner In which thiWM h. uies Cricket Board Ol Control is t;andlmg the I9S1 West Indies Tout to Australia. They seem to know nothing about what is really hap pening. care less about keeping the public informed, and have nt regard whatever about who is disgusted whether h§ be player, cm ployer. or Just enthusiast like mv MB I sympathise with Frank Worrell, and al] the other chaps whi i^re awaiting the decisions o£ ihi august body whiah Mvm> In tn Way anxious to expedite matter one way or the other. Perhaps th. President. Mr Nufies, may not b* the Mussolini-like ilgure your ver %  fiaflaj Spoils Editor ninjures hirr up to be. and there may be som< good reason for not telling us wha is really igoing on But for goodness sake do tell US -omething Don' let us imagine things, becaust 11 und of rumour contain.' at least 2 ounces of fact. Tell us what you hav. do, am who. if anytKi.lv at all. is really t< blame for UM delay. Please reinoinbcr we u %  ndlng our best team tr Australia, and would even suti pay Mtra if I cessarv to do so. Yours. KXPER1ENCE. OTTAWA (Staff). Canada is in a bitter fight over supar at Torquay Poavtbk) reporcusslona on the Empire preferential tariff structure and especially on Canada's relations with British West Indies are considerable. The litfht centres on efforts by Cuba lo Ret a share of the big Canadian sugar market, worth $76 million last year and given almost wholly to Commonwealth sources of supplv. One presently unanswered question is: what is Cuba willing to pay in concessions on Canadian manufactured woods as a quid pro quo? j Australia and other Commonwealth spokesmen meanwhile are fighting to retain | this lush business within the preference framework. Legally, Canada is bound by her preferen-, tial siujiir rates negotiated under treaty with B.W.I, in li2:>. WV Can't break this agree-1 ment. But we could nullify its effect by I buying sugar at the full general tariff rate either under subsidy or by direct government purchase. $11 MILLION SUBSIDY Unknown to most Canadians in all this is the fact that as consumers, they paid a cash subsidy of about Sll million last year to give their sugar business to Commonwealth countries. This means clOM to a cent a pound on all sugar which Canadians import. AH but about 1'. of our sugar imports came from Commonwealth sources in 1950. Of total imports, $16.4 million came from Jamaica; $13.6 million from British Guiana; $11 million from Australia; $10 million from Fiji; S7.3 million from Barbados; $7.6 million from Trinidad. Only $414,000 come from Cuba and a like amount from Dominican Republic. The present British preference arrangements date back to the B.W.I, agreement of 1925. At that time Canada granted the B.W.I. a protective preferential concession of $1 per 100 lb The preferential rale in the 1920 treaty with B.W.I. had been 83.2 cents per 100 lb. Between 1912 and 1920 it had been 15 cents. Since the present tariff against Cuban sugar is $1.28, this means that theoretically, Empire sugars can charge anything up to the world price plus $1.28 and still retain the business. In practice, the rate of Empire sugars is sol a litile below what the traffic will bear. Instead of $1.28. the present Empire rate is about $1.13. This means that the effective Empire preference is about 85 cents per 100 lb. STEAMSHIP SUBSIDY Twenty-live years ago, this protective preferential protective concession by Canada, when added to our annual subsidy lo build. operate and maintain the Lady Boats in the B.W.T. service, was Canada's contribution !<> mniiitcnance of traditional trade relationships between this country and the B.W.I. In the '30's. this preference cost Canada several millions annually as compared with the price she could have bought the sugar on world markets. The steamship subsidy was cumulative. Until the war it had cost about $2 million annually, inclusive of interest on capital investment. When the treaty was tigntd, there was an important quid pro quo by way of ptwfiaTential treatment for Canadian manufactured goods in the B.W.I, market. At one time, upward of 2,000 individual Canadian exporters were doing business in B.W.I. For many, this was their initial introduction into export business. But since inconvertibility and Ihe dolla ihortagO, Canadian manufacture! s have been having a rough time in B.W.I. Last year, total Canadian sales thero slumped one third. On a volume bMfcl GUI exports last year were 5;< less than in 1938. They were less than one quarter our volume of trade in the peak years following the war. Just recently a new trade liberalization plan has been introduced. This gives Canadians a hunting license in their old stamping tiounds. The maximum trade they car obtain is 50' of postwar sales in some lines; 33J '.< in others. This is the background into which the Cubans have hurled their demand for some shore of Canada's sugar business. THE WHOLE PAMILY C0NG0LE11 With FELT BASE Braulilul PulUrns Cut to Your Requirements SILVER STAR CONG0LEUM SQUARES with Fell Base -3X2! yds. and 3 > 3 yds. j^ Just the Floor Covering you have been waiting for WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER rim. II: 4472. 487, 4413 & CO. MR. BAKER I! I li MM MM aawN iA>;.ri//i a BULK... )t:s: /('.< flbra .tjafa GOLDEN ARROW FLOUR FLOUR WITH GOOD RETURNS OUTAINABLE YOUR WMOlSSALfR .'.','.'.'.'.•'.'.'.','.','•,'.'-*.'.-. -.'.'.'.-.-.'.-.'.-.'.'.','.'.'.'.'.*.'.',','.-,-.'. -.-.-. <^L Choose from a wide range of fitting, single or double breasted. Style in fine Grade WORSTEDS and GABERDINES. A big assortment to select from • DA COSTA A .. LTD. i ***-* * ^* * * *+ J +>+* TASTY BAKERY GOODS SEEK TREAT* REVISION Long before the Cubans raised this issue at Torquay. Canada had indicated informally that she wanted to revise the 192.5 treaty. For the past two years there has been a strong feeling in Ottawa that we were paying far too high a price for the sort of concessions now being allowed us by U.K. authorities in this traditional Canadian market. One important feature of this preference is that the B.W.I, gets no direct benefit from the fact that they have become big dollar I it earners because of these heavy Canadian 18 purchases. Last year, our purchases from B.W.I.! reached a new record figure of $67 million But the $37 million balance of trade in favour of B.W.I, goes direct into the dollar pool iti Britain. And the complaint is frequently voiced in B.W.I, that since the balance of trade turned so itiongly In ihrn favour, there has been no commensurate relaxation in import restriction Canadian goods. %  NBBQT FOODS KELLOGO'S ALL HRAN KF.LLOGG'S CORN FLAKES PRUFF WHEAT PUFFED WHEAT CHOCOI.ATE LUNCH BISCUITS H Alt LEY SUGAR STICKS CALVES LIVED DANISH BACON DANISH LUNCH TONGUES JAR ENRICHED BREAD 8 c & VEGETABLES SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL CANADIAN APPLES CANADIAN CHOCOLATE NIT ROLL CANADIAN (HOCOLATE BARS ERESII VEGETABLES CARROTS ROOT l VBBAGK STRING I1F.ANS CHR1STOPHENES ordrr earl> from (JODDARDS FISH SMOKED HADDOCK SMOKED KIPPERS RBD SALMON RCD SNAPPER GRADE A MEATS 5C5^K;K^Kc;;;-.c:'.:';'.-'^vC5r=-.





PAGE 1

FRIDAY. APRIL 13. 1*51 CLASSIFIED ADS. BARBADOS \DV<< Mi. PACI. SCVKN T1UFHOK1 ItM IV char** for MWHMM %  Mir. a. Marriafrs, Deaths, Acai ^l"i'"U, and In Memoriam not* %  J M or. w-k-( and 11 K on Sunday* loi" an* > %  > ol word* i*> te a*. J aerate per >M an tM-4>n 4 'irn M word art Suaaiaf/i lor %  ililffMTwpt IMMMMMI W Cart* OlUnj eharge I* UM lor any mimfcii o( w up lo SO H< • t*im par word tor eeb %  •Mil *"rd Trrm. ra.h I ha*,* UM oat-Mo M and 4 p.m 1111 for B" n m wi only Bftor p-an. DUD RYAN: On April It. 1MI. at hi. dan** radepare Village. 91 PI JOeUTnt B4ENJAUIN SAYAN nan the aaov. i rtowtott Sister U.i MM raid. Jee*, llunte. Vrr. '.-Sen iCeueanai. kDNI rwW.Brether-in-l.,*, |.|*tfOV..Oii IHh April a( hi. Ul* rmdenre Cultor. tt Jama*. Jaaepei KM fwkml leave* the above r %  %  dtP. M at 4 3D p.m la-day lor tk Advaeitlat Chuiet. and ihene* to Iha St James Omelets Ckrar Dt*lMi mill tt'i.hna-ton .earn. Mna Ada ma tatep aasighteri. liana Diayton > Una n.dium lo thank, all thoaa wno aant ua wreaths. caraJa and toltria, sr in any BM ripmaew Iheii umpatllv rau/ed b* Iha death ol Dorothy L'ixh. SI Malthla* ftoad. (firm Chufs-r, ( %  rorfr lonrh i*aii Wila and rtulOirc. Autorin Lyncn 'eon. Ciuaraai wW and Trintdadi and child iria, civile Had llrill ia.rjr.it children' MM' I. I OH SALE AlTOMcrTIVE ALMOST NTw it HP Hadfcrd Van. Qiaaranwa if. rrajuirad gatta Uaaonft* RK"S.. ,J TZS ~ SSTSimtt aently. Apply Court a* y QSfSM. CAB —Hi ona KinaiM | HP IS* noaei. in \er, food oadar a4iwi> ttaotf W 5 &£ •*-v.H C • Janie. t Lvnrtt a c Ud Phan* ssaa II 4 -.-, CAR—MoRWi OXPORO •1AJ 0ON I MO mil** only, 1M0 rbodal -.!• Jarlin OiifTt-, Qibba p K h DialCAK—till.ma, running o'dar 14) Car. ItJS Pnf-e: Owner leaving|.l PI Ml It WALES PI'ttl.H Minus Tea real* par aa!i tin* %  >**** 4. (< •vd II east** par aaota Uaa on Iaadc b Me.aa.aaj, r*4ra* Bl V on taaa-da,i REAL KSTATfc BUNGALOW-Nas-> Cardan., t pa i •MMA every t eas-eawaiiaw WI.JIM UUll-t ILAN&-1U4 aq ft. o( land i Itadlord Lanai. awldMown. lofrinar w.iiiptt li i g Jae-aaa tfcaraaai Inapactioa on •ppUcatx.n to MBM r H Dowrual Car.,, of RaaOuak nra.i *nd %  ad J aaal [_an Tha abova wUi ba ottarad for M* >V pbj PrtoPCMTV C-a.tiU.lnB d.alUrj -t.ndli,, o n . r^,. „, ^ and aiiiiaaad at roroV. Cap BrU^r L ApplT W: C M liaarlda* *r.8ald Juaoa *u*. %  '" r ^ u P" — l a aiM ea a ntl awap *?." **•' P" dwa'a U"a o* 'paaMpa NOTICE "• inrai.h arua r— j,. trr i M I'lLJ M... abfli MUaa** llaM. varv ood r—dlti*n Na Ballary Appl S P rdghlll Talaph, Alt on* CiUaan i> j ,„ Mtiaci tondltb... Son* oalv J.Mo mllr. Pn %  • Appry a*V Aeanclaa Ud \ On PtKla. ina l*>h ln*t • .• r ."r rlB,. No II Hifh Snaac S*iara. Birbadoa fira Inauran. Compaii> TI "Jnara. Barbadoa Ira Com., Umllad. fWO J l 1-, ii.joa.io, navrrnmant O COTTLat CATTOPID A CO., SolKllO" 104SI • I A(,mn. 1.1,1 ttirl£ ELECTRICAL flWFBnam NOTICES MAIL NOTICE AIR MAILS Effective Immediately and until * end of April, tho followins changes iiffecUng air muils to the under mentioned places are notified. Schedules should be amended acc-nrdingly *— Bermuda—11.45 a.m. Tuesdays do — 2.00 p.m. Fridays •Cnnada—11.45 am Mondays do — 2.00 p.m. Fridays USA—11 45 a.m. Tuaadayi do — 2.00 p.m. rrtdaya "By Monday's opportonily to Canada the higher rate of postage, namely 30 cents per 1 of., will be chanted 13 4 51.—In. IlFPAKTMRNT OF EDUCATION VACANCIES IN THE ELDONTARV TEACHINO SERVICE Applications are invited from teachers (women) with at least 10 years' teaching experience for the Headships of the following trhooli: — St. Catherine's Mixed School. St. Philip; Ebenezer Girl';' School, St. Philip. The minimum professional qualification required is the Certiflcate 'A' of the Department of exemption therefrom. Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head Teacher; in Grade I Elementary. Schools. Candidates who have already submitted application forms in ra>spect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by latter, accompanied by a recent testimonial. All other candidaUw should make application on the appropriate form which may btl obtained from the Department of Education. All applications mut be enclosed 'n envelopes marked "Appmnrmpnfs Board" In the top led hand comer and must reach the Department of Education by Saturday 14th April, 1951. 0.4.51—2n UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES EXTRA -MURAL DEPARTMENT A COURSE OF TEN LECTURES on AN INTRODUCTION TO CHEMIRTRV by F. N. A. FIELDS, D.Sc at the Harrison College Laba>ratrv TueadAyi at 7.3w P m. Fee far course: 91.00 Members or Ex,-Mil. A-sftor: 84c. Single Lectures: I % %  FOR SALE "MEDMENHAir PINE HILL A very fine two-storey property pleasantly situated In approx 1*4 acres near Government House. There is spacious iru* well proportiuntvl accommodation comprising 3 reception, dining and breakfast rooms. 4 bedrooms (1 with large .(treating room), butler*^ pantry, kitchen, servants' looms, garage, fernery, poultry houses, etc There is a two-way entrance drive and the grounds are well laid out with lawn', flowering shrubs and flower garden). |g properiy has a pleasant character typical of some of the older established homes in this exclusive area. |a.lb M 'V..Kldbald.P. A F S. F V A Phosir t*4a rlaraUUatn* Buildiiu KtirRIOCnATOR Croalry Hhr-Kador Rrfrifa— U.r J.J cAtHn. Scbool. BeUrplaina barinnlni !-,„ j PJ *"""' "' ** 1 1 •"• •'a*' -lot* .i PWlinj *tMmn Ma | *Th. Al( Srhoolthe North win* lor t paraon A to J Inrluaftf PoIlJiI SIU.M No J Tl %  Sartool — tha South wtif fo•on* ahoae Surname, be|m latter K lo I ineluatv* W AMI H IOR KK.\T l k I.IIM.MI. %  ** r I leaaai war 14 111 I f IHll NFS i td prinaipacv fo 4 laa Cream at r— %  !..Ih D>a. MM \v M iatlor Rr.1 SffR alKj %  S iin-.*.lah and pholoa-iaph and P1-A.TS T> i •aanpartol* ara da lot al Pnui *.,. a, 1 %  • b •iMIna w *M Hat* %  naaaavao.a raaaaanra Apf>l. M... aaaorat wtj i (xraWhad flat r..,nct*a 84 lj.-TTr.ra Oast, atntabir fo racaw' paaapo't cut ('*• aSaU Avatl.bla 15th April. onisPid %  bouM ba aoalraaaeti a ehiialren. no Pati Appl M.< r premiaaa Phi THE RHONDA Uaif* dwalUna hail r am bba Saa naar Caaiabank. WorthnTha above will be aat up (or **K our OSS,* an Luto Slreri .-, IrMai tha SSth dar al April l*l at J a ... Iiiapnttan liunt 4 lo %  pro. *vi %  r|av from Apul lath or on -raiaTlMl lo CarrinatoTi A Sealy. IB4SI In or. will be — *..rd aMakMI lOi Ibal hsabsataai Welch*,. Crarstj church ..,, the era wh. inare u aaeaUerrt bathing It nmn f Open Verandah. Dr.iwiog "id Dim %  ima, Thrrrpaciou. Redroomi L*vIT and> Bath. Kiune^atie On.*! r*nU loom, aid a Oarage and itand SM4 m. fl of I-.-1 lnapr<||i>ii b ^pptunlnriil IVAFlfJV A aCOTT H-..I E,Ulr >,.' Masauna Lane Allev. amtoCELLA .N'EOUS I eTARC rl -.r.ec App BOo | KNTTTtMa HPi.'.NINn CO I IV | Celp H dg* e-lrr-l l"4M • Tt'RKivs m it. rowi.i nrcu* I Al.plGREVN HHi Hrn*d Stteat n.al 1PM int'i If i Irfr nrr-miei Calllawaah .I..I*. Oeuib*. \ . W T C."d "I ThofnoIIIM.VIIIIMI paarr Saarataryahip naob K eepti. Courna ilbMoanlaad for awafw at D.y ma al Aaaw iota ar Pellow. Ideth.. IIADIFV poatal tidy detail'. 'jsr.' I Jaaam-i Land an < W I SHIPPING NOTICES Canadian National Steamships %  orTIMOrf*> in TS..I (Jhatm In "Agony" NOTICE HEREBY OIVK.N thai .., .1 Oenaral Mr*li ..I h. .1.., I> will be baadj on Uandav. sard IPkl II ( %  p i. at iha H* Ornre. U Swan ftteaet for I'I > %  ol .J. RereiMiia UM UM pa.i VKI I a Camntiita it teat AUCTION MILCH GOAT -aajly l* U rala>r' K.f "" "? J*P1 c %  "•**. -Laora%  ii Rorhlry Trnare or Da Coata A Cm .id Phona SIM or tin IS 4 11.—t f a MECHANICAL Ry inatruriiaaia raeaavad i will aeU *i omial Poliev Si ^ I ion on Monde) iini Mr 14h April. IS}] at : p m IV lii. .owina itema t eartvna Ilia. u in. HI Tina Co.-le>wed MUK. 1J parkagra Tan, Ua Tint Beat, to Uaaa TinII Pa.rBoola. Pool and Purl Pvimp. t IU drauhc Jaaka. 4 Bio. laaia) 1 Shilling Wrench**. Plat. Round and Half-round Pile*. T>r I Clutch Plate D'Arc> A fatott. Ga.l Au.tion**r 11 4 51—4n. aiKr.l nn lerma. llrtculea SUri tins. All modal* In ... A BAIINgS . CO. 1.TB. II4A1.—T ft B aHrr MISi KLLANFOL'S BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel. |n White. Green, Prlmroea with .ruHcklnt jnibi lo comalata eotour aultas. Tap •race A. BAAtfg. Co, Ltd ^ X 1 SI Ifn CROQUET SETS -Baaed quipped al Harr.aoni Sportt pei %  **• it a*r lull. CALP-S POOT JgJXY Tieai, .lot I Calf's Foot Jelly Orange flavour f o at jar for •* Oat n at Bnic raatBathaad ua IE4A1-Ia CUBTAD4 rn-rDCO— POT am.rt window rlyllng. light control. Valansm tta) drapenee. By Klrech. Dial 44JN A. BAIWES A CO.. LTD. 1S.S.91 U4> %  ouldeta. Coatcrala Storta. On! ual Omlacl WILUA>. HINKSON. Hall. St. John 114SI-1B hatra ernor-in-gaeeutiv* Commit' my p.dUc iucUon at Seawall Air Potl on Wedneaday neai Ihe IRh April at 3 a'r lock One tractoi drawn Lawn and M Ihe rifM Ihing for a Cnrhrt r Tcimi. Club II ran be aeen al Saawwll any day eacepl Sumli hour* of t a m la 4 p SCOTT to 4 p m. >ACY A It 4 SIin UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER IS. fttaaia] I Wataon wc at ••Tha Can1 ad Wot i Heal.. Son Sulrb.,.,,,!. Dumb Wane M Chair rilaon qaasaj ana Tabt^ Si ire Tip-Top un HalMand. Book-ahaK-r-a Ptai Top Deak. Tea Tro) Upright and Corner Cha.ra. J with Cuwlion. Aniiuuc Uphola Otloman Or.iamrnl Table, all in Mahoaany. auvartune Radio. c..-id China. Dinner, Tea and Coffee Servicea. Old China Dliii.ac Hnv Ira LaaeU* CaSfaa Pal. Plalad Were ir atnlraa. Vaaraaabl* ard Sweet daahea. Candlnticki Spoana Porha and Cut l-i>. aVIdga Table and 4 Chalia Pbiaa Conlolauru. Plcturaa. Vnandal. Chalia Diaaa PUS. Stna'iMahOf; Baaatead Daep Reap M-lir—. Very nlca old btahog 1 Wlna-rd Ward.owa Droaslng Tablaa. agutlaiy Wa-hatamt Chaval aland Sine I* Ira* d Oreen. Mana L4aa arid] I t-nl'i. Kitchen Cabnnet Tea Wagjfon *r ail Palnled lire*,. Electric I nun .i %  AOffal SUnr ivai, good' Kirciric Hot Plate. Steamer., t Burner Valor OH SkMrve l'-.ol-*all nvwi, Prlmua %  *tn\ r Oaeat Sa p a n atar. t'huina r>aat*r. Kltrhan UianaHa Aamarluan, Lra> rarrol Cas*. Roller tenni* Net and Pale*. Quorw. Preiervlng Pan. WeaUiiClaiuae Rrfnaetalor in (oou wor*.U>-> oadar. Role II.M o'clock. Teraa* caah. BRANKER. TROTMAN •% CO AartieMieen 111 51. In J'YI'EWIll I-RR l-APEK PraaSt your raqulremsaaaf • T. JadaSaa Orani Ltd. T .SI-,tn Two PLATE Olaaa OaapaSy Caaaa IISOO'. i ich Stanafeld Scott A Co.. Ltd. Broad . T4J1-II.: VENETIAN BLDCDS. Klrach P,n-*lr,11 melal DeLuaa VanoSlan bl.nda, to yo-ir IPM dallvary S araakj Dial 44W 1. BARNES A Ca., Ud. U.I Bl—I t.n. VAN HOITENS drlnkinf chocolate Add a deaarrt^oatnful lo a glass il "S'" flavour. Onlis canta lor 'i lb iiii Compare ihe price with cam* eatflora' II 4 I-3n Barbados Fury Motors Priidiidion and Export Arts 1137 ud 1939 Under the above Acts, the Fancy Molasses Control and Marketing Board has allocated the following amounts of Fancy Molasses to be manufactured for the purpose of export by the plantation-* and factorio* named. These allocations are subject to approval by the Governor.in-Executive Committee at the expiration of seven days rrom the date of this publication :— Wool Prices Will Stay "Firm" MELBOURNE, April 12 Financial circles forecast hei to.day that current wool prices, down by as much as 30 per cent since Easter, will stay "firm" throughout this season. Observers here wonder If American withdrawal explains the price drop, or whether the "bogey" of American stockpiling had been exaggerat isI Trade sources predict that Perth sales opening early in May would see the same pattern of price drops repaated The market rose sharply by Janabout Hectiii*. Offlre! M...,afei.nl t.< I lei •%,,!„ .. ore lhM %  •Okti R> J1HIN V t ARLOVA %  | iNDt >1i lllltaill'y laaWaUKrtnl aaaOrtagg hi squeezed none of the cfeeil UM l.nsh>n Times H a v ony' 1 ". uann Th 'RATES OF EXCHANCF. %  gashoea |. thicolumn famous collection of per.'cat-. jumps of up to 20 per cent i uary. reaching Vim* of nuUlkn Wine "•an Oiikrai Mto B09.000 nm 400.000 rolleton (Si. John) 287SOO fair View 402,000 rrer* Pilgrim ... 180.000 %¡ ibbons S2S.0K %  OOJ I..IK1 29.000 Itanow 400,000 Kandil 8H.W7 Vlonf nefTf 2S0J4O Nvwtoa asi.fas 3>— mi 2S3.2SO V.r ruterlM. Andrews 8S0,M Bruce Vale 5io.oao Pool oso.oao Sandy Lue Teul 1 1.030.0*0 7.675.313 14>l —In PILES the peak mid .March. West European buyers, who have been unable to confirm the steady stream of reports of American stockpiling, are said to have bought solidly in belief that American stimulus would force up prices.—Rmlar. £12,500 Viola! MADRID Stradivari us viola formerly U-longirur to the Spsuiish court and which dl*appeared from the Hoyal Palace here In 1813 during the War of Independence-, fiar* been recovered by the Spanish ute Il war. reporupd that 12,500 pounds sterling was paid by the Spanish government to th. man who had it In his possession —said to have been an Fnglish man whose identity was not disclosed. — (1 N S i GOVT. STOCKS DOWN [AWDON April 11. Post budget enthuBiam in tru> I on don stock exchange evaporaled to-day. British Government stocks declined far/ 1. 16 to '* on persistent small .Ales, and irregularity recorded by industrials Oils were patchy but rubber and tin shares received small i port and were firm -Renter Latest Quarry of the Royal Navy Is—The 'Elusive Pimpernel' Of The Sea LONDON. April 2 The Navy's latest survi i H.MSCsok — commissioned Bl Plymouth at the end of March has an important first assignment She Is to scour the Atlantic for an underwater valley, a ::iganti> k In the sea-bed. thai scientists feel msy be the ndlrot er as lo why fishing gmunds off Britain's coasts have become ileadily less prolific during the last wenty years. Experts believe that these ii