Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
ESTABLISHED 1895

le

hhavbados



THURSDAY, A



7



>»





12, 1951

i

» Advocate







Fresident Truman relieves

MACARTHUR

TRUMAN



Gen. MacArthur of commands

WAR

‘

United Nations forces
udvance against



Herb. Morrison say: Britain
ready to negotiate cease-fire

’ .
KOREA

CANADA



Ridgway takes

SACKS

over com

m







PRICHy FIVE

New budget shows taxes
jump sixteen per cent

MACARTHUR

ss) aa

CELEBRATES INDEPENDENCE DAY TAX ES JUMP

A GREAT wilitary parade was held in Athens recently in celebration
of Greek Independence Day, at which King Paul took the salute from

THE GENERAL DISOBEYED, How the |U-K

PRESIDENTIAL ORDERS

WASHINGTON, April 11.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN early to-day relieved

General Douglas MacArthur from all his
commands.

The President said he concluded that General!
MacArthur was “unable to give his wholehearted
oo. to United States and United Nations
policies.

President Truman named as MacArthur’s suc-
cessor Lieutenant General Matthew B. Ridgway,
at present Commander of the United States Eighth
Army in Korea.

' General MacArthur was appointed Command-
er-in-Chief, United Nations Forces in Korea, in
July, 1950, when the Security Council authorised

the United States to establish a unified command

there.

Announcing MacArthur's dis-’
missal at a press conference at,
the White House today, President
Truman said “military Com-
manders must be governed by
policies.and_ directives ~of the}
Government. In times of crisis
this consideration is particularly
compelling.”

He designated Ridgway as his
successor, as Supreme Command-
er Allied powers, Commander in
Chief United Nations Command,
Commander in Chief in the Far
East and Commanding General
of the’ United States army in the
Far East.

The President appointed Lieu-
tenant General James A. Van
Fleet to succeed General Ridgway,
in command of the Eighth Army.

President Truman made his
announcement of the dismissal of
MacArthur at a_ special press
conference to which correspond-
ents were summoned early, _

The time was fixed to coincide
as nearly as possible with deliv-
ery to General MacArthur at}
Tokyo of the order relieving him
of his command “effective: at
once.” *

The White House released with
the President’s statement a memo-~
randum purporting to show dift-
erences’ between MacArthur's
statements and actions and Presi-
dential policy.



The President’s order, tele-
graphed to MacArthur over Army
Communications network was

brief and pointed.

4 deeply regret that it becomes
my duty as President and Com-
mander-in-Chief of the United
States Military forces to replace
you as_ Supreme Commander
Allied Powers, Commander-in-
Chief, United Nations Command,
Commander-in-Chief Far East and
Commanding General of the
United States Army in the Far

East.

“You will turn
over your Com-
mands _ effective
at once to Lieu-
tenant General

Matthew B.
Ridgway, You
are authorised to
have issued such
orders as are ne-
cessary to com-
plete desire d

travel to such
places as you
select.

“My reasons
for.your replace-
ment will be

made public co-
ineident with the
delivery to you of

the foregoing

order and = are :

contained in the next following,

message” (this referred to the

President's statement). |
The President’s statement as-

serted that General MacArthur's |
place in history “as one of our}
greatest commanders” was fully
established. :

“The nation owes him a debt of
gratitude for distinguished and ex-
ceptional service which he has
rendered his country in posts of
great responsibility,” Truman
said. ;

“For that reason, I repeat my
regret at the necessity for the
action I have been. compelled to
take in his case.” i

The President made public a
series of previously secret direc-
tives. tending to show how Gen-
eral MacArthur had failed to fol-
low the Administration’s foreign

nlicy
ae included one from the
Joint Chiefs of Staff to General
MacArthur, and other Command-



PETAIN IMPROVES

ILE DYEU (Off Atlantic
Coast), April 11.

Ex-Marshal Philipe Petains
health has “markedly improved

since yesterday, h's doctor said |

to-day.

“Such a recovery would have
been impossible without his extra-
ordinary physical resistance”, the
doctor added,

«He pointed out however that
the “crisis has not yet been over-
come”.

—Reuter.

i ceaiieeenneaterioneipesociicimnitinistai
Only 4 days left to get in
the Advocate Year Book







national crisis.




Gen, MacArthur





; ;
' | Goes To Nassau

ers last September, embracing the
Presidential order that “no speech,
press release or other public
statement concerning activities
must be released

General Mac Arthur’s dismissal
was the climax of a long series
of differences with President
Truman over Far Eastern policy.

Some observers said the action
raised prospects that General Mac
Arthur might return to the U.S. te
deliver a series of attacks against
the administration, probably
under the auspices of Republican
supporters in general.

MacArthur, caught off-balance
by Truman’s dramatic announce-
ment, was understood this after-
noon to be preparing a_ state-
ment in his own defence. It was
not immediately known here ex-
actly how the surprise change-
over would be effected but it
seemed likely that Mac Arthur
would be called home as quick-
ly as possible.

He has not been back to the

United, States for 15 years. Du-
ring that time he frequently re-
fused invitations to make a visit.

General Ridgway’s. appointment
was universally welcomed here.
Observers regarded it as the com-
pletion of the breaking up ‘of
“Mac Arthur’s Empire.”

Reuter’s Correspondent Paul
Scott Rankine writing from Wash-
ington says that President Truman
in the boldest act of his career
to-day used his full constitutional
powers as Commander-in-Chief
of the United States armed forces
to dismiss one of the country’s
greatest military heroes at the
peak of his popularity.

The audacious removal from all
his commands of General Douglas
Mac Arthur staggered Washington
and was bound to split the coun-
try from top to bottom in a bitter
controversy at the time of inter-

Extremes of
pro - MacArthur
forces might even
call for the im-
peachment of
Truman though
they stand little
or no chance of
obtaining the.re-
quired support in
Congress to make
this a_ practical
proposition,

On the surface,
opportunities
given to the pro-
MacArthur Re-
publican faction
to exploit the |
situation for po-
litical publicity
purposes were
immense and
’ breath-taking.
Points in Truman's favour were
however rooted in the tradition of
the American people which go to
the depth ‘to which partisan
politics and publicity however
glaring could seldom reach.

There was every indication in
first reactions to Mac Arthur’s
dismissal that Truman would have
a majority of people and prob-
ably a majority of Congress behind
him.

Truman anchored his decision
firmly upon sections of the United
States Constitution, sacred to
every American and drafted by
founders cf the Republic with the
specific objective of preventing
victorious generals from challeng-
ing the authority of elected repre-
sentatives of the people. Even the
most belligerent anti-White Housc
congressman would hesitate be-
fore, standing as a champion for
military. versus civilian power,
—Reuter

Billy Butlin

LONDON, April 11.
“Billy” Butlin left London by
air last night for the Bahamas for
talks in| Nassau with American
| businessmen interested in the
| ovtion to buy his “vacation vill-
} age’.
He said: “If the option is not
taken up, Butlin’s (Bahamas)
Ltd.. will go into Jiquidation,.”

| REVAN WILL REMAIN

LONDON, April 11,



| British Minister of Labour
Aneurin Bevan has made it clear |
that he wi!l remain a member of
the Government.

‘ —Reutcr,

world
reacts

LONDON, April 11,
In Western Europe, reaction to
to-day’s dismissal of General
Douglas Mac Arthur has been al-
most without exception. But ihe
General found Champions in Aus-
tralia and among the Japanese

people,

Reuter telegrams from _ the
world capitals reported:

Lake Success, United Nations

circles were generally relieved.
General Mac Arthur had been
a source of consiaerable con-
fusion in the United Nations for
some time.

‘fokyo: Immediate Japanese re-
action was sorrowful and there
was every indication that the
sorrow was real, Newspaper
editors commented that Japan-
ese had real sentiment for Mac
Arthur.

Australia: Dr. Herbert Evatt:
former President of the United
Nations Assembly and Labour
Party leader said at an election
meeting in Sydney “whatever
the outcome of this dispute, I
again pay tribute to Mac Arthur
who did so much for Australia
during the days when we were
in deadly peril from the Japan-
ese,

France: Socialist Deputies greet-
ed the news with relief, Former
Premier Paul Reynaud said the
President’s action solved an
inter-Allied issue, and a French
Foreign Office spokesman ex-
pressed “satisfaction”,

Great Britain: Diplomatic quar-
ters in London felt that reper-
cussions from the move went
far beyond the immediate
issues in Korea. It was consid-
ered that a change in leadership
simplified efforts to make a new
and determined effort to_end
the war,

Soviet Russia: No official reaction
was available. Tass the Soviet
News Agency reported” the
change without comment. But
many observers regarded the
dismissal as possibly the open-
ing of a new approach for a
solution in Korea,

Germany: In Berlin all East
German newspapers gave pron:-
inence to the news and two eve-
ning papers said the mass of
protests of peace loving people
had forced the issue.

Denmark: Independent Aften-
bladent said “Europeans will re-
ceive the news of the General’s
dismissal with dry eyes. No
official comment was available,

Belgium: Prime Minister Jos-
ephe Pholien just back from
America said General Mac
Arthur took upon himself too
much authority,

Holland: The Netherlands Gov-
ernment fully supports Presi-
cent Truman’s removal of the
General, it was officially an-
nounced here. The Dutch Gov-

ernment had brought to the
attention of the American
Government _ its “increasing |
concern” about General Mac
Arthur’s actions during the last 4
few days,
India: Official circles were sur-

prised and guarded in comment
waiting to see’ if President
Truman's decision meant a
change in United States foreign
policy. Bombay stock exchange
reacted with a sudden drop in
silver and gold prices and
“barometer” stocks fell sharply.
New York: An estimated $1,000,-
000,000 was sliced off stcck
market values in early trading
in Wall Street today following
the news. Sales of so-called
“war issues” were heavy,
Observers felt that General
Mac Arthur’s removal might
serve to open the way for talks
on the Korean peace settlement.
—Reuter.

Syria May Withdraw
Deniand To U.N.O.

DAMASCUS, April 11.
Khaled Azim, Syrian Premier,
said today that Syria was willing
o withdraw her demand to the
security Council to consider the
sorder dispute with Israel if the



For Talks

On Cease Fire

LONDON, April 11.

Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor-
rison making a statement’ on
Korea ir. the Commons today said:
“our aims are unchangea, We
stand for resistance to aggression,
a free independent and unifieu
Korea and no extension of the
conflict”.

“The question of crossing the
38th parallel cannot be treatea
apart irem other matters concern-
ing Korea. “We were ready a iew
months ago to negotiate a cease-
fire and we are ready now. But it
takes two to agree on a cease—fire
and so far the other side have!
shown no desire to stop hostilities
in Korea, ;

“IT would not have the House
think that crossing the 38th paral.
lel is the main issue in Kere

“The real issue is whether No
Koreans and Chinese are willin
to negotiate a settlement. If the:
are, the question of the Para
will soon cease to have an
political importance and I would
hope. that the aims for which so
many nations including the Sovi
Union have been pledged for ‘s0
long—free, unified and independ-
ent Korea—could be achieved by
negotiation. S

Giving a summary of the direc-
tives issued to General MacArthur,
Morrison said “The Commander of
the United Notas forces in Korea
was instructed that the political

@ On page 7









Coronation Stone
In Arbroath Abbey

LONDON, April 11.
The Coronation Stone stolen
from Westminster Abbey last year,
was handed to the custodian of
unknow:





Ar Abbey by a

people ay.

Arbroath Abbey is in Forfar- |
shire, Scotland. The stone, crown-
ing seat of the ancient Scottish
Kings, has been placed on the
high altar of the Abbey. It was
with two unsigned letters, one ad- {
dressed to King George VI, and
the other to the General Assembly
of the Church of Scotland.

—Reuter.

Elizabeth And Philip

Arrive In Rome |

ROME, April 11
Princess Elizabeth and the Duke ;
of Edinburgh arrived in Rome to- |
day by air from Malta for a fort-!
night’s private holiday. ‘



—Reuter. |



Inniskillings
Reach England

SOUTHAMPTON, April 11,
Six hundred and fifty officers
and men of the First Battalion
Royal Inniskilings Fusilliers ar-
rived here from the West Indies
to-day in the 11,000-ton transport
Dilwala.
! ~-Reuter,



Lord Nelson Leaves |atec enemy strength there to
; 695,000

LONDON, April 11.

: Ready}

ean force

ands

_

“ALLIES MAKE FRESH GAINS:

REDS TRY TO STOP

TOKYO, April 11,

Communist “hold or die” rearguard groups went into
action at several points along the front line to-day in a bid
to stem the slow but relentless United Nations advance into
North Korea,

On the western front southwest of Imje, American
troops who crossed Soyang River yesterday ran into what
was Officially described as “determined enemy resistance.”

In the same area other Ameri- ;
thitiy-minute attace || Four Faint As
Visitors
Crowd Ship

East of Yonechon a small Ameri- |
(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

was counter-attacked
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 9.



and Turkish troops came under
sporadic mortar and artillery fire,
Ning Opposition was en-

£ Americans ad-

_vaneing south of the reservoir

a ante . WHEN H.M.C.S. Magnifi-
iota erintied tb teats tree cent threw open its doors to
a Fen a the publie over the week-
ee ene ved ee end, four persons fainted
et only light resistance. South and one was badly injured
Korean troops who advanced F

as over 4,000 visitors crowd-
ed the ship. The Magnificent
arrives in Barbados on Fri-
day.

“Lady Nelson”
Collides .
With Barge

with the 29th Brigade to.day re-

ported the area free of Com

munists.

The British Brigade spearhead-
ed a force of Turkish, American
and South Korean troops which
was to have occtipied entire Com-
munist fortifications and to have
captured some equipment,

The town of Chorwon, the sup-
ply hub objective of two main
Allied forees converging from
east and west was reported prob-
ably levelled by United Nations



fighter bombers, Yi ‘_ FP ep Fy,
There was no fresh news to-| ,¢ ae at Aine et
day from northwest of Yongpyong tans Nea ‘ one 1 t Sard ta
where Communists have been Pp “2 of S en; , limped — rac inte
launching determined attacks | /0?-°!-Spain harbour this morn

ing with her bow ripped open nea)
the water mark as the result of a
collision with an oil barge or
Monday night in the Gulf of Paria

| The accident occurred while the

against adyaneing United Nations
forces.—Reuter,

18 New Red Chinese

Divisions In Korea

WASHINGTON, April 11,
The Pentagon reported to-day
that 18 new Chinese Communis.
divisions have been identified in
Korea bringing the total estim-



Lady Nelson was leaving on ;
return trip to Halifax to open i
new spring cruise of the Caribbean
Aboard were 96 passengers who
embarked at Trinidad for Canada
New York and Caribbean ports
and 63 Caribbean
returning home.
According to reports, the Lady
Nelsen ran into the barge valuec
. $100,000 (B.W.1.) carrying
The spokesman said 97,000 ad-| $17,000 worth of diesel oil con-

roundtrippers

Lord Nelson, direct descendant | ditional Chinese troops had been} signed to an Alcoa terminal station

of Britain’s great naval hero,
sailed from England for the last
time last night, driven, he said, by
taxation and cancellation of the
£5,000 per year state pension, to
start life all over again at 60.
—Reuter,

e
No Conflict
LONDON, April 11,
Emanuel Shinwell, Minister for
Defence declared in a_ speech
near London to-day: ‘We have no
desire to enter into conflict with
Communist China. All I can hope
is that the Communist Govyern-
ment of China have no desire to

enter into conflict with us.”
—Reuter,

THE HAGIT'E, April 11,
Dr. Willem Drees, Netherlands
Prime Minister was taken ill in

situation on the frontier returns | t@day while replying to speakers

o normal,
—Reuter.

the first chamber of ce |

The meeting was adjourned,
- —Reuter.

identified since last Friday The barge sank with the whole
Eighteen divisions, if at full} of the cargo, while one of the
strength, would total 180,000 men,| crewmen aboard the tug Ane
the army said.—Reuter, Matilda belonging to the creolc
Petroleum Company of Venezuela
was taken to hospital with both
legs broken and a cut on the eye,
suffered while trying to cast off the
tow rope.

It is understood that temporary
\repairs to be done to the Lady
| Ne‘sen here, will enable her te

make the return trip to Halifay
lehers full repairs will be made
| A local inquiry into the acciden
lis to be held.—(CP)
|
|

BOMB EXPLODES

NICE, April 11.
| Windows of neighbouring build-
| ngs were smashed and a front
joor blown in by a time bomb
which exploded early today out-
side the Communist Party office in
the harbour district of Nice
No casualties were reported
—Reuter.-





POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT. LANCASTER



“And what the devil's wrong
with our good English water,
i should like to know--whty, |

I've shaved in it for yerrst” |
— oe





Schuman Plan ‘Js Greatest Hope

PARIS, April 11.
The West German Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer arrived at
Orly Airfield today for signing
of the six-nation Schuman Plan.

He is the first German
Premier to visit Paris since
1931.

Members the
mission in Paris
Adenauér at the Airfield

The Chancellor was

German
greeted

of

cet,

accom '

panied by Andre Francois Pon-|
French High Commissioner |

in Germany.

Tight security measures were
enforced, Several hundred
uniformed police took up posi-
tions at regular intervals along
the route to Paris. About 50
plain clothes men mingled with

| police at Orly.

The Chancellor read a state
ment to a radio microphone: “I
set foot on the soil of France

cbservers,

“It ig with joyful
full hope, I today
neighbours.”



t
with emotion, This is a moment)



# { even among the most sceptical]
é : i
Says Adenauer | heart. ‘nd

salute my

the tomb of the Unknown Warrior. Express

‘ee

ADVANCE

| Gammans Wants

Empire Council

LONDON, April 11.
A Council of the Empire on th
lines of the, Council of Europe
was advocated in the Times today
by David Gammans, Conserva
tive member of Parliament,

Such a Council he — argues
would be a purely consultative
body, which wotld meet in Lon-
don at regular fixed mtervals,

“Surely te =most pressing
Imperial problem today is how tc
hold the Colonial mpire to-
gether, The chief disintegrating
force ig the impact of Colonia)
nationalism which we have de
iberately fostered as part of our
olitical and educational policy

The United States hag not
hesitated to hold on to the
Panama Canal, and its bases in
the Pacific, on the understandable
plea that these are essential tc
the interests of American

security,

“When we consider how much
more vulnerable is the British)
Commonwealth, why should we

hesitate te explain to the Colonies

nd to! ‘orld the vital needs
of Impeial ~ categy?
“We must convince suspicious

ind sensitive nationalist leader:
‘hat British connection is neither
amporary nor a status of inferi-
rity.”

—Reuter.

16 PER CENT
IN CANADA

OTTAWA, Ont. April 11.

General “across the board
jump” in Federal taxes aver-
aging in the neighbourhood of

16 per cent. emerged on Wednes-
dav as the headline feature ot
Finance Minister Abbott's 1951—52
“Preparedness Budget”. Main
provisions are, boost in general
sales tax to 10 per cent. from
eight per cent. and an over all
20 per cent. hoist in the rate of
personal income taxes. The result
is that commodity taxes are going
up immediately on everything
the average Canadian buys except
food, fuel, building materials and
machinery for farms, fishing and
industry .

Beginning July 1, the man who
earns enough to pay income taxes
is going to see his payroll deduc-
tions go up by 20 per cent or by
one-fifth, through the defence
surcharge on. basic tax rates, and
exemptions will remain un-
changed .

Big business gete even tougher
treatment. It too will pay a
defence surcharge on top of the
present corporation taxes, but
this will be retro-active to Jan-
uary 1

Little businesses
that earn a
£10,000 a

of the kind
profit of less than
‘ year are not affected
Cigarette smokers will find
euffing a little more expensive.
Direct tax on the Tailor Mades
was lifted three cents for a pack
of 20. This plus the boost in sales

tax may put cigarettes up four
rents a package.
The man who rolis his own

night get a better break. While
the tax on tobacco went up tha
levy on cigarette papers and tubes
was repealed. Cigar taxes are
unchanged, —«€P)



Statement Causes
Stir In Egypt

“i CAIRO, April 11.
‘The, publication in the independent
Al Ahram the “authoritative”
Egyptian statement that “joint
defence is imperative in time of
war or threat of war", caused a
stir in Egyptian official cifcles
to-day, The statement was attri-
buted by the newspaper to an
“authoritative spokesman of the
Egyptian Foreign Ministry” but
was known to have been made by
Foreign Minister Salah El Din
recently, It said “joint defence
was provided for in the 1926
(Anglo-Egyptian) treaty and will
be one of the conditions of any
any similar agreement between
the two allies,

: —Reuter,

TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
DAY OR NIGHT

DIAL 3113

ae












WM.

of great significance for me, I} a zHose eee nos — a
want to prove that I believe that evant M aaa or ents uc ss
Franco-Germar relations are the ie. ei can lah age SE:
Sar solution in) Walter Hallstein, leader of the
, | German delegation to the
The imminent conclusion of! Schuman Plan talks, Hausen-~
the Schuman plan--an idea of stein, German Consul in Paris,
genius conceived by two great! and a_ representative of the
Frenchmen and Europeans- French Foreign Office
gives birth to the greatest hope Reuter

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PAGE TWO







Parib Calli

HIRTY-TWO passengers from

Barbados are making the
Caribbean cruise on the Colembic
Among them are, the “Tibi”
Wainwrights, better known as the
Wandering Wainwrights. .. . Col.
and Mrs. Leonard W. Lucas who
after the cruise are continuing on
to the U.K. ... Mr. and Mrs. C. E.
Shepherd of Colleton House, St.
Peter. . . . The Misses Enid and
Daisy Fergusson of Ravens Court,
Fontabelle. . . . Miss Mabel Arm-
strong, Mr. and Mrs. Harold =
verbs and their son Roy... .
David Read of the Canadian Bank
of Commerce. During his stay in
Jamaica David will see his brother



Geoffrey who is with the Reyal
Bank of Canada in Kingston. Wt. .
Mr. Geoffrey Skinner, Mr. Tom
Armstrong, who is in charge ge

Bookers Alpha Pharmacy. ;
and Mrs. E, C. Jackman. Mr.
Jackman is a retired Court of
Appeal Judge.

No Exception

LICE BAND concerts, at the

Hastings Rocks always draw
a large crowd and the one tonight
promises to be no_ exception.
Police concerts at the Rocks are
generally held on Fridays; the one
tonight is in wa of a deserving
cause, > a. fa

Hot Tip!

ARIB got a hot tip, yesterday.

Film-star John Wayne is due
to leave California this week in
his private plane . . . local girls
pulses are already quickening, for,
his destination is the Caribbean
islands. Speculation is rife among
the teen-agers as to whether he
will make Seawell.

. The B.O.C. Cup

HE Barbados Orchid Circle
has offered a Challenge Cup
to be competed for at The bar-
bados Horticultural Society Ex-
hibition to be held at Queen’s
Park on 2ist April, 1951. At a
Meeting of thé Members of the
B.O.C. it was decided that the
Cup should. be-awarded only to
members whose subscription was
not in arrears, to be competed
for annually, and must be won
three (3) times in sugcegsion or
four (4) times in all, before be-
coming the property ‘of the win-
ner. It shall be awarded for the
best and most outstanding speci-
men whether on Plant or Cut
Flower, Any year that the Bar-
bados Horticultural Society does
not hold'a show, it shall be com-
peted for at the Barbados. Axgri-
cultural Society show at the end
of that year. No competitor shail
act as a Judge for the Cup.

Engaged

HE ENGAGEMENT. has _ been
announced between Mr.
Tom Reece of the Income Tax
Department and Miss Grace
Bishop daughter of Mr. F.
Bishop, Controller of Supplies and
Mrs, Bishop of “Bingen” Howells
Cross Road.



ADVENTURES OF

BAL.
Masque

BY THE

EVERAL hundred million
people have written to ask
me—

Prodnose: Why do you tell such
obvious lies?

Myself: What do you suppose
would happen if I wrote, “Four
people have written,” ete? You
would be the first to go about
saying, “He gets no fan mail,”
for that’s the barbarous language
you talk—‘“He gets no fan mail,
therefore, he is no good.”

ose: Well, couldn’t
say “hundreds” or even
ands” have written?

Myself: No. Everybody says
that. Anyhow, I have forgotten
what I was going to write about..

you
“thous-

Special seesaw trains

ISTER BEACHCOMBER, the
pore hittendants at hour
show in Bedford larst week is of
becos the orrible ousewifes was
not hov saving enuff kole so that
especial tranes could be of being
run to take peeple to hour show.
Sport is the Englishmens Karsul
says yore prooverbs, so hunless
these selfish wimmen stop using
kole seesaw will be of being hon
its larst leg, and with milliands
of torewrists owling for kulturd
desplais hov virteosos hand tor-
defawces, ho yes. Bi gosh ow can
you iwpek the workers to plase
their baks into it, hif the pore

beests carnt five seesaw tranes?

We hare, ho yes,
Kazbulah, Ashura and Riza-
mughan, pleeze

About Parkodromes

ACA my traffic plan

did not make it clear enough
that the ramps are not the old sort,
with curved edges. The edges are
straight, to save space, as in the
excellent blue-prints of the three-
way street to be seen at ‘the

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Now remember—if We get
this Lady Godiva job, I’m
relying on you to explain to
the Press that we only
applied for it because we're
so fond of Coventry.”



Simon’s Father

RIGADIER Michael Wardell

whose son Simon owns a
house on the St. Peter coast, has
bought the Gleaner, the only
evening paper published in
Fredericton, capital city of New
Brunswick, Canada,

Two years ago, Brig. Wardell
sold his nolding in Sporting Re-
cord to Mr. H. CC. (Harley)
Drayton, the City financier. He
had taken over this small weekly
paper in 1946 and hac built up a
circulation of more than 400,000,

The Gleaner is a paper which

carries great weight in New
Brunswick, Under the direction
of Brigadier Wardell it can be
expected to expand in prestige

and influence,
Travel Agent

.C.A, brought down Mrs.

Gladys Gel) yesterday on a
two-day visit. A representative
of Tom Travel and Ticket Agency
in Peterborough, Ontario, she has
already visfted Bermuda. Next
stop is Trinidad. ... Mrs. Elsie
Watson came down on the same
plane. She is from Hamilton,
Ontario. Here for six weeks’ holi-
day she is a guest at the Marine
Hotel, . Mrs. George Somers
was at Seawell vesterday to meet
her husband who had been up
north on a short visit.

U.K. and Dominica

OL. J..H.. WHITEHOUSE, now

retired from the British Indian
Army came in on the Colombic
yesterday from the U.K, to spend
a month's holiday at the Ocean
View Hotel. .. Mr, A. A. Halacsy,
who got on board in Dominica is
C.D.C’s resident engineer in that
colony. His wife accompanied
him. They are here for two or
three days staying at the Marine
Hotel before leaving for St, Lucia.
..» Miss Irene Davis and her sister
Marie also. came in from Dominica
by the Colombie.

WAY...

Ministry ~f Transport Museum in
Cuffestreet.
Where the east-west traffic

crosses a three-way street it does
so in a west-east direction on one
of the two-day roundabouts,
coming back to the point of re-
entry just where the straight edge
of the ramp borders the parko-
drome, This enables a car leaving
the parkodrome to be caught up
in the main stream of stationary
traffic at either end of the ramp,
and avoids the diversion necessary
for cars coming the other way.
Down Harmony-lane
T is claimed that an electronic
computer:
Prodnose : What is that?
Myself: If you don’t know, you
inust be mixing” with very queer



I

School



Home Address ....

Advanced Information
HORTLY after ten o’clock yes-
terday morning, a Grum-
man Avenger fighter touched
down at Seawell from HM.CS.
Magnificent, light fleet carrier
which accompanied by H.M.CS.
Miemac, Tribal class destroyer
are on their way to Barbados on a
tour-day visit. The ships are duc
to arrive in Carlisle Bay this af-
ternoon at 4 o'clock and will be re-

maining here unti) Monday.
The Grumman Avenger had a

crew of four on board. Lt.
(T.A4.8.) PC. BM. Cooke,
R.C.N. Donald H. Cheney,
Assistant Canadian Government

Trade Commissioner in Trinidad,
Lt. (P) Robt,, Hughes, pilot and
Lt. (O) J. Anderson, navigator.
The plane left Seawell three hours
later to return to the ship leaving
Lt. Cooke and Mr. Cheney be-
hind to make advance arrange-
ments and get advance details for
the sport and entertainment ar-
rangements for the ships’ com-
pany.

Lt. Cooke has been in the navy
for ten years and served in the
North Atlantic during the war. He
specialises in torpedo anti-submar-
ine work, He is Operations Officer
on board the MagNificent.

Donald Cheney has been in Trini-
dad for nearly two years and has
visited Barbados many times, He
is due back in Trinidad on Satur-
day.

Magnificent and Micmac left
Halifax March 19th on training
exercises in the Caribbean, They
have already visited Bermuda
and Trinidad. Their destination
when they leave Barbados is
Halifax via Boston.

On board the Magnificent are
two fighter squadrons, Grumman
Avenger anti-submarine fighters
and Hawker-Sea Fury fighters.

Jamaica and Trinidad
RS. F. K. N. MASCOLL and
her two children Phillip and
Sandra are on their way to
Jamaica by the Colombie after
spending a_ holiday with Mrs.
Mascoll’s relatives. Her husband
Capt. Neville Mascoll is ——
Adjutant at Palisadoes.
on board the Colombie but geting
off in Trinidad are Mr. and Mrs.
Carlos Lyon and their two child-
ren Sheila Ann and Jo-Ann, Mr.
Lyon is Shipping Superintendent
of U.B.O. in Port-of-Spain.
They had heen here since March
14th,

eiinihs Story

TOWAWAY who has become a
commercial success within
four years of his arrival in Britain
is Harry Samuel who comes from
Belize, British Honduras. On a
business trip to Manchester last
week, a London friend met him at
Moss-side, and was shown around
his property—four large boarding—
houses with European and Colonial
tenants, A tailor by trade, Samuel
hopes to establish a_ tailoring
business in London this summer.



PIPA



By Beachcomber

company, 4
It is claimed that this thing,
which computes electronically,

“can execute a series of instruc-
tions if a given situation exists.”
Aha! But what happens if a given
situation does not exist, and refuses
to exist? Riddle me that, my
Trinity scholar,
Good Riddance
ERE is an excellent example
of how to get rid of late
guests who debate on weighty
matters
At 2 a.m, Ninon de Lenclos was
being bored by two dreary visitors
to her salon, They were discuss-
ing the costume of the ancient
Greeks. “Gentlemen,” she said
“I wonder what time the Lace-
daemonians wer went to bed.”



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for
its Junior Short Story Competition.
every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The storie:
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30!
words in length, and must reach The
Co, Ltd., City not later than Wednesdaw every week.

NOTE: Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story,

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

The best story will be publishec

Children’s Editor, The Advocats

Penne e ete ween eee eee eens
etree tree eaceseteseer?®

peewee ewan ee eeeeeeen eee ee

cache enernhtneaieetanesieeiineietianiaatindltalesipettcieeiletitiandia co serananionsotoqerscaanctensiononsoai-shecininheieainoeasetedinensiccaganeas aan
ales al ce edly Metal

s ‘Phoenix’

“IS CLEAR’
“ Casseroles

Entree Dishes - 1.89

Gravy Boat & Platter

DIAL 4606

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORE

Oven Glass

and STAYS CLEAR’
Deep & Shallow, 2 Shapes

Chicken Casserole
Roasters -

Cc

$1.26-2.39
2.52
3.15

— —

1.26

DIAL 4220

BARBADOS



VICTORIAN MISS . ,, . up-swept
hair, soft front curls.

ICHELLE GAY STEINER,
daughter of the hair stylist
was asked what she would like
for her seeond birthday. She
said; A coiffure like Mummy.’
So, with artificial hair [to avoid
Michelle sitting under the drier}
these three hair styles were
created by father for her birth—

day A

Michelle has long, straight “lanky”
hair which, in the normal way,
is worn tied with a bow on top,



ADVOCATE

YOUTHFUL BEAUTY

MADAME BUTTERFLY ...
false hair and flowers.

the hair hanging down her back.

This straight hair—problem hair
while she is young—will be
perfect, and easy to dress in
attractive styles when Michelle
grows up

On the care of children’s hair Mr.
Steiner says: Cleanliness is all
impertant. Washing the hair up
to three times a week is good
2nd won't make it dry.

Brush children’s hair back off the
hairline. This is important.

SENORITA ...
twist of hair.

encircling thick

A fringe in childhood spoils the)
hairline when the child grows




up. The hair must be kept off
the forehead |
WISDOM FOR

WOMEN

“Feminine vanity; that di-
vine gift which makes
women charming.”’—Disraeli

B.B.C. Radia Rupert and the Tee-flower—4

Programme

THURSDAY, APRIL 12%, 1951.
6.390 &m—12.15 pm. ..... -. 19.00 M.

rin rertesmeneendaptenegeeseenentntignelieete—
7 am, The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; , 7.15 a.m, From the Editorials:
7.25 a.m. Programme "Parade; °7.30 a.m,
Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m, Land and
Livestock; 8.15 a.m. Listeners’ Choice
8.30 a.m. Recital; 845 a.m, Spare Part
for Human Bodies: 9 a.m. The News:
9,10 am, Home News from Britain:
9.15 a.m, Close Down; 11,15 a.m, Pro-
gramme Parade; 11.256 a.m, Listeners
Choice; 11.45 am. Special Dispatch
The News; 12,10 pm, News

12.15 p.m. Close. Down,
ee na Ww M.
“Gis p.m, Top noes 5 p.m. Composer
of the Week; 5.15 p.m, Scottish Maga-
tine; 5.45 p.m. Music from the Films
6,00—7.15 Pom. .4,. 25.04, 31,92, 48.48 M.
Oe eee

Sean ES OREEEREEENEEEREEEEee
6 pm. BBC Scottish Orchestra;

6.45
p.m. Programme Parade; 7 p.m. The
News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15

p.m. We see Britain,

7.45-—11.00 p.m. 31.32 M. 48.43 M

145 p.m. Generally Speaking; 8 p.m.
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. The Adven-
tures of P.C. 49; 8.45 p.m. Composer of
the Week; 9 p.m. Special Dispatch; 9.15

.m, Sing with Joe; 9.5 p.m. "De you

member; 10 pm. The News; 10.19

.m, From the Editorials; 1015 p.m.

ight Music; 10.45 p.m. Life in Britain;
11 p.m. Announcer’s Choice.



NEW COTTON FIBRE
NEW DELHI,
A new cotton fibre longer than
the Egyptian and American long
o' vayiety has been crossed
successfully grown in Suart,
Western India, An experimental
crop produced a fibre 1 1/4 inches
leng, or 15 per cent longer than
the present variety.—(CP)

PLAN SPEEDY ’COPTERS
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya.
British helicopters are taking
an active part in the campaign
against Communist guerrillas in
Malaya, New models with speeds
of more than 100 miles per hoer
are to be put into service, —(CP)

BOOKS FOR WOUNDED
LONDON.

More than 2,000 books, plus
magazines, have been sent to a
service hospital in Kure, Japan, by
the British Red Cross and St. John
Hospital Library department for
use Of British servicemen wound-

ed in Korea, —(CP)
POLICE LECTURED
SYDNEY, N.S.

The police here are to be lec-
tured by members of the Bar
Society. The programme of lec-
tures on law procedure was au-
thorized by the police commission
following success ef a similar
programme at Glace Bay, —(CP)



Be hornet deeb




Lat impe
‘te, must ‘ eke rfect? (9)
To make a 2 Gein. (9)

valual
. Jointly,
Such play is reciprocal. (5)
Noticed in education. (3)

Ransile.
At least a —aanee of tales, (5)
necessarily wi ail tailored,

ine 16):
Wine caske, (a) ‘*

‘ac Down
rm or manuf:
@ pest, (8)

- In @ way you're bo
(4) #, Lit and (7)
pow tha reet lit. (7)

I don’t eat this way. (8)

a to sea? (3)
be e. (4)

sri

ed It can be!

)

bes the longest i!ver. (6)
yore you wif! find the laity. ‘ (9)
As sie e to cause a rising. (5)
ia the nort! re ect ‘nothing

ub of town. (
of wo leone 8 pussie eee

ra ae ens

basest ellent: 2
Srseties 8,
aoe, ‘Shins: . hs hero! eg Egat

2." Yen? Se Boies: e Pe sareg

STevasse: = Luxor! 4 ‘ nati, 3:
Trenches: 12, Snow a
inner; 17, Sixty: 20, Paw,

ee ¢
@
Ss





Cash: 18



GLOBE

Last Shows To-day 5 & 830 p.m,






W.

personally
brings his greatness
to the screen!

Yt
2am ~
= ==
y

ih

With 40 FAMOUS PLAYERS!

443. ARTHUR RANK Presentation
An EAGLE LION Films Release





Poor Rupert soon finds that #
doesn't pay to laugh at other people
when on icy toads, In turning
round he has become careless, and
when he starts forward again his

feet slip away and he goes down
with a aaebie bump. _ Picking

himself w pa shakily he hears
chuckles him. “ Yes,
serves os right.” he Le
“If | hadn't turned to laugh a

Algy | shouldn’t have fallen. And,
oh Gea, here’s Mummy's bag of
eggs. believe every, one is
broken I What shall 1 do?”

ciehamennchermtinccuectemunaamen sate

——







AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
TYRONE POWER—GENE TTIRRNEY—JOHN. PAYNE—ANNE BAXTER
in W. Somerset Maugham’s

THE RAZOR'S EDGE

A 20th Century-Fox Picture



Commencing Friday 13th.
FARRAR-—-GUYNIS JOHNS

DAVID



and the New Swedish Star

MAT





Last Two Shows To-day

THE
“THE MISSING LADY"
with KANE RICHMOND and
“GENTLEMAN JOB PALOOKA”
with LEON ERROL

Friday and Continuing
5 and 830 p.m.
“BLOOD ON THE MOON"
Robert MITCHUM
Barbara Bel GEDDES

PLAZA DIAL
OISTIN 8404

TO-DAY

ZETTERLING in










PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

fonly) Women, 4.45 p.m,

“FRIEDA”





GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James

Last Show Tonite 8.30

“JAMES WARREN in
“CODE OF THE WEST”

TIM HOLT in
“WILD HORSE MESA"
——_
Friday to Sunday 8.30 p.m.
Mat, Sunday 5 p.m.
JAMES CAGNEY in
“ST LOUIS KID”

and



Men 8.30 p.m,

AGE LIMIT 16 years and over!

“THE STORY OF

Positively no Children allowed.
leaves for Trinidad for
Matinee To-day 1.30 p.m. (R.K.O,)
JAMES WARREN in

CODE OF THE WEST and
TIM HOLT in

WILD HORSE MESA



wisisids all

EMPIRE
To-day 4.45 and 8.30
‘To-morrow 2.30 Only

J. Arthur Rank Presents
FREDRIC MARCH in

CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS

Color By Technicolor

Co.Starring .
Florence ELDRIDGE

— with —

Francis L. SULLIVAN and
Linden TRAVERS



eS Sas
=.
S|
a
nA

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.15
Universal Big Double
George RAFT and
Pat O’BRIEN in

BROADWAY
t and

EYES of the
UNDERWORLD

with
Lon CHANEY and
Richard DIX

} FAITH DOMERGUE. in



BOB AND SALLY”

This is the Last Showing as this Film

its engagements there.

Cae Friday (3 Shows) ,
2,304.45 and 8.30

ROBERT MITCHUM

WHERE DANGER LIVES

—

ROYAL

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Big Double
Teresa WRIGHT and
Joseph COTTON in

SHADOW of a
DOUBT

and

RIDERS of
SANTA FE

Starring...
Rod CAMERON and
Fuzzy KNIGHT

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
Republic Smashing Double
Lynne ROBERTS and
Charles DRAKE in

WINTER
WONDERLAND
and
GOLDEN
STALLION

Starring ..,
Roy ROGERS and
Dale EVANS
















BEDSTEADS

MAHOGANY COLOUR—From $27.72 each

COIL SPRINGS .....
MATTRESSES. ..

COTTON

oO

....+. from $12.99 each

gw CHECK Our Prices on These!



THE RARBADOS co-oPpERATIVE |
FACTORY LTD.

— SSS SSS



. from $13.40 each ;







T

HURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1951







OPENING TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30

GLOBE

Presents

ITS ist PARAMOUNT FILM

THE BRAND OF
GREATNESS
1S ON...

The Richest Ranch-
lands in the West!

aHAL WALLIS

PRODUCTION
oa ng

WENDELL

fsmANiK: Covey

WALTER

HUSTON

JUDITH ANDERSON
GHBERT ROLAND - THOMAS GOMEZ

BEULAH BONO!
Directed by ANTHONY MANN

A Paramount Picture

By the author of
“Duel In The Sun”

Screenplay by Charles Schnee
From a novel by Niven Busch



Plus

The ALL-STAR
falent Contest

featuring :

KEITH SEALEY
“Count Every Star”



JOE (Shine) CLARK
“Route 66”
SAM GORDON
“Nite And Day”

COUNT DEVONISH
“A Little Bird Told Me”

ERROL BARNETT
“My Foolish Heart”

OTHA TAYLOR
“Laughing On The
Outside”

HOLMAN RAYSIDE
“Our Very Own”

Seton habitants nie edehioeiee eu h Es



7 LOCAL STARS COM-
PETING FOR THE
SILVER CUP



Pit 20, House 36
Bal. 48, Box 60c.



Positively Your Best
WEEKEND.





Starting FRIDAY, 2.30, 4.45 &

AT YOUR

FAITH DOME

\) CADDN
AMMA Meets aaacelt

“ WHITE

(RKO-RADIO

THE SUPERB

Dainty Materials, Carpets,

IL



IRVING CUMMINGS in. ond IRWIN ALLEN present

CLAUDE RAINS

for cleaning --

Felt Hats, Frocks: and Gowns, Crepe de Chines

Lamp Shades, Glassware, Wind Screens, Ornaments, Silver-
ware, Sparking Plugs, Chrominum Fittings, Typewriters,
Upholstery.

In bottles of two sizes

60c. and 34c. per bottle S



PLANTATIONS LTD.

BRIDGETOWN SPEIGHTSTOWN





8.30 and continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30

RKO-RADIO SMASHING THRU

AGAIN WITH ANOTHER COLOSSAL
POPULAR SHOW-HOUSE

PLAZA

HIT

BRIDGETOWN
(DIAL 2310)







RGUE |

Hat
TOU SUR CL a A eae



PLUS: The NEW SHORT:
LEON ERROL in = WED-TIME STORIES”
and Latest “WORLD NEWS” (Warner Pathe)
Coming :— GLEN FORD—VALLI

TOWER”



CLAUDE RAINS. l
{

NEVER
DESPAIR

Sust. use $

BEAUCAIRE

DRY CLEANSER

, Voile, Ninons,
Rugs, Curtains, Jewellery, Gloves,

.
OPE OOOO

OOO IELS a
SES ORIOLES





PS





THURSDAY, APRIL 12



1951

a te em Ree



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





“Surely you wouldn’t hand over power to that burned-out old ‘has-been’ Churchill?”

American People
Asked To Grow
Liberty Gardens

WASHINGTON, D.C.
The American people are being
asked to grow home gardens to
improve their diets and health,
as well as to contribute to
national defense. Similar to the

New

veloped by



New Uses Found For
Meat By-Products

CHICAGO,
uses of the by-products
of meat animals are being de-

Institute Foundation. The pro- of
ducts derived from livestock are of

contributing to improved health, make up the population of this

——

Fish For
BOSTON.

the many nationalities



Many Tastes
More than 50 varieties of fish

that





U.S. Find New

Vegetable Wastes

Su gar Cane Make Good Feed







PAGE THREE



U.S. Almost Free
From Malaria

producing sugar cane



. .

I or Livestock Malaria in the United States
WASHINGTON, D.¢ : 3@ has been reduced almost to the
About 70 new varieties of grair Philadetphia ‘Leafy parts ana, ¥anishing point, the United States
fruits, vegetables, and other plants stems of such vegetables as peas, Public Health Service reports.
are now being grown by Amer lima-beans, broccoli, spinach, and D-D.T., a powerful insecticide,
can farmers as a result of research beets are being made into high. as been the most effective weap.
carried on by the U.S. Depart- Quality, well-balanced livestock on in fighting the mosquito-
ment of Agriculture. Aniong the feeds on American farms. borne disease. It is sprayed on
new varietie: © an élm trée that the interior of buildings where ma-
is resistant to the Duten’ ein __Ne longer do truck farmers and jaria cases ate present or have
disease, six new blueberries, three vegetable processors have to been reported Former malaria

new cianberries. and a ~ throw away the vines, leaves

control methods, such as
mosquitoes in their larval

killing

and stems of their vegetable crops. stage

By putting these plant wastes





The Department cites in its through a rotary drier, they cz and draining swamps and pools,
: . 3 ‘ y can »
annual report the need for sus- be converted into a satisfactory, “#V® wou found "les Caen
tained research that will make meal to feed farm animals, the%#nd have practically been aban-
London Express Service possible necessary shifts to bring U.S. Department of Agriculturag#oned.
nctilnnpeectnintnectonensonarppemeetstihns ils diate, Aa nieces about more efficient farm produc- reports
tion.
. : °

American Farms ' (¢,.D.C. Dispute tt ie the judement of raanv “, Stulies show that the leaf, TEA DRINKERS
: : eee ee ~ vay. Parts of many vegetables are ricr r '
os “9 scientists,” the report says, “tha . ; ; : 7 The United States is the world’s
Grow Conicrete Settled if beeetlivid resenteh were to & tn carers. (orevtenin AS a Bhargest importer of tea. More than
CHICAGO, Il discontinued, within a decade gredients of well-balanced live-â„¢ 0%, Million pounds, chiefly of

A

boxes, and posts, says the Port
Cement Association.

certain parts of the United States

tourist motoring through

and , ‘
former's store on a site at Msusu, “&

most of the varieties of crops now
LONDON. sr

Agriculture

. - lack tea, were imported in the
stock feeds, . > a a,
own would succumb to diseases 5 76 t ai - cabin of teed sane year ending July 1950, an increase





; ; . The dispute between London ang 4nd the result might be starva= from these i aj. © Of 17 per cent over the preceding
: , s “ ” a : ; ; se ingredients equals, .
the American Meat are imported from many parts sili ai or Wut "adiin Blantyre Supply Company and ¥en for millions of people and in some cases exceeds, thcgY®?!
the world to satisfy the tastes } os 4 * CDC over the continuance of the The disease-resistant elm tre® normal guaranteed minimums tor



veloped by the Department of

commercial alfalfa meals.
will be available as

: : |
‘ ; hed inaeas i . Nyasaland, on which the CDC is . J
Victory Garden Programme dur- industrial progress, id better tenth largest city i The proprietors of these farms er . 4. planting stock within three years Converting plant wastes inic KEEP
ing World War II, the new pro- living in the United States. ates. Pans lain "edema care little about the fertility of ae ot aoe A new sugar cane, producing from feed involves chopping the fresh-
ject—called the Liberty Garden Medicines and glandular ex- from Portugal, snails from the soil, but they watch with Su tas h teal os h 13 to 45 percent. more sugar per ly gathered wastes and then sub-}
Programme — emphasizes home tracts from meat are used to cor- Morocco, frogs’ legs from Japan, keen interest oe their crops Gaal ow. i Te onee Ges. acre also has been discovered, jJecting them to direct heat in an
gardening and home food preser- rect bodily deficiencies and pro- and dried cod from Norway, develop. Thousands of engineers wn, ler. Ww. Mm. Robson, Direc Another sugar variety that rotary drier of the type used for,
vation.

U.S. Secretary sf Agriculture
Charles F. Brannan says, “The
value of home garden production
in improving the diets and health

vide relief from illness. Two of Persons
the latest wonder drags—ACTH, Italian,
made from

French; Greek,

tisone, made from the adrenal Make up_ the

of Seandinavian,

the anterior lobe of Chinese descent are included in
a hog’s pituitary gland, and Cor- the more than 790,000 people that
population

and research scientists from the tor of Campbell Booker Carter
United States and Canada are also Limited, of which the Nyasaland
interested in the development of company is a subsidiary, in giving
the concrete crop, which is tested this news to your correspondent
periodically for durability, today, said he had received intim-

and

of

produces from
(190 to
per
during the year

285

acre was

50 to 75
liters)
also

drying alfalfa, Drying time and
temperature are regulated so
that the tender parts of the leaves
dry thoroughly and become brit-
ule, while the stems remain fair-

gallons
more syrup
introduced




Seat

a... Keep your weight dows








si iora— ati i y relo i “O) hybridiz: ly ow t

of our people, especially these gland of cattle—are among the Boston. Here the Salem Street oe and posible .ameriora seater’ ees ee no iat erie gots Mla bi Seat hee ae ee the healthy way. Do what millions
families with limited food bud- most important recent discoveries, Market has been satisfying its “The concrete farms are part of Nyasaland last week-end. shows promise resisting the . As the material is carried eee the world are doing —take
gets, is important under present These are used in the treatment multitude of customers for 43 4 research project on the watgorde “Expressing appreciation of the ravages of the European corn through the fans in the drier, the pace in ere tons Sip Gortens
conditions. ef arthritis and other ailments. Years. : ance of cement under varying full cooperation received from the borer. Important progress is brittle leaf-blade portions aie |, ae —

The new programme was re- Insulin, made from animal en- Every. edible fish that.is caught conditions of ' climate soil, and Government of Nyasaland and reported in the nitrogen fertiliza. crumbled from the stems, Blade ano ently s
commended to the Secretary by docrine glands, is used by diabetic 2nywhere in the world’s lakes, jnoisture. The “harvest” is the CDC there, Mr, Robson said the tion of pastures to boost yields @Md stem fractions are later sep- maaan init come. insented
an advisory committee made up sufferers. New techniques to de- Streams, and oceans can be found cojiection of information that will satisfactory ending to the dispute Of grasses. A method of producing @ated by screening. The dried weieht Tile Beane
of State agricultural leaders, gar- velop the vitamin B12 content of ®t the market sometime during make possible more durable and did not affect the Company’s the seed for the type of onion leaf-blade material, wae Fa tho Veep. 960: Fell ta,
dening editors of magazines and meat and meat products are also the year, the Boston Post reports. stronger concrete mixes for use views on the question of whether st@wn in Bermuda Will help free most nutritious part of the rr Wimle: o Qenay
newspapers, garden’ club offi- being disecvered, Studies reveal The fish are brought in by plane, in homes, industrial buildings, it was right for CDC to start U-S. growers from dependencs ge ee pee a ag sried and — attractively
cials, educators, commercial vege- that cattle livers ahd Kidneys are boat, train, and ck. roads, airports, and other struc- shopkeeping with British taxpay. ©M seed stock grown in other the feed. e partially driec dim. - hast aaa
table growers, canners, and seed excellent séurdes of this vitami For persons of Norwegian, tures shopneer ng itish taxpay coniiitrien stems may be accumulated and Pa eg
companies. It will be supervised ; umes vitamin. swedish, and Danish descent the : ; sit , . ers’ money. There was a funda Pek seh cae ean 6 dried more thoroughly at the

i By-produets used in foods come f ; Farms in Georgia and Illinois mental principle involved Under study are machines and ong of each day's operations

by the US. Department of Agri- from various parts of animals. market imports dried Norwegian gre growing concrete to test the Mr. Robson. who spent ten attachments that will reduce ee me Cpe
culture’s Co-operative Extension Fats are used in candies and cod fish. This is soaked and effects of extreme winter and ala oe production costs by cultivating

Service, which already has active

programmes under way in home

gardening and food preservation.
Home Gardening

fertilizer z
Many schools throughout the at:

chewing gum. The residue from
cooking fats used to produce soap
—called tankage — makes good
also can be con-

made into a dish of quivering
white jelly-like flakes known as
lutefisk. Scandinavians also like
herring which is imported from
Norway, Iceland, and Newfound-

summer weather pressures on the
material.

1,000

weeks in Nyasaland, said CDC had
four stores on their property there
Lendon and Blantyre Supply

fey
Each farm
specimens of

has about

concrete ‘ i
exposed to the elements, Company will continue trading on

one operation.

tilizing, and spraying fields i:



country are also teaching child-
ren the fundamentals of home
gardening. For example, in
Detroit. Michigan, gardening is
being used as a therapy treatment
for some 400 handicapped young-
sters. The students not only
carry out gardening projects at
home, but they also help land-
scape the school’s courtyard.
Before attempting practical gar-
den work, the youngsters get
classroom instruction in plant
structure, propagation, indentifi-
cation, sprays, and _ fertilizers.
They also are taught what soils
are best for various plants.

In March the youngsters will
start growing boxes of tomatoes,
cabbages, carrots, radishes, and
annual flowers at school, When
the plants are ready to be moved
outdoors, they will be taken home
and replanted in the ground.
Climax of the garden work is in

September when the children
exhibit their products,
During the Victory Garden

period of World War II, thous-
ands of amateur gardeners turn-
ed their lawns into food-growing
areas. In some parts of the
United States private industrial
firms turned over small garden
plots to any employee that want-
ed to grow his own vegetables
and flowers.

T’dad Cane Has Less



verted into hog and poultry feed. jand
From hog grease has come a :
new chemical used in
rubber, Lard is used in making Live eels are caught in
facial ointments and creams.
Hair from the ears of cattle is
made into artists’ brushes and pig
bristles are used in teoth brushes.
Hair from the tails of cattle is
used as an air filter in tractors,

No Profit

along the Atlantic Coast in

marinated. Italians also eat

cuttlefish, salmonetti, and

From the skeletons of animals urchins which come from Mes- sent to be tested in a laboratory

Sicily, and Palermo,

Octopus In Oil

The octopus,

come buckles, chessmen, crochet *!"4+
needles, hairpins, and umbrella
handles, India ink is made from
charred bones, violin strings from
sheep intestines, and clothing from d
hides and wool,
The Foundation is
organization,
than 500 meat packing companies i
in the United States. Affiliated Daneman”
with the University of Chicago, it Live carp is

a non-protit Teg a ng

French,

the request

employs about 40 highly trained those with the tastes of Poles,
middle-

research scientists,

f other
Its laboratories include a pilot

Germans, and
European peoples.

plant, where production and sta~ and served in “Polish sauce,”



7 Eels are a traditional Christmas
synthetic qish for those of Italian tastes.

rivers icy conditions. This type of con—

United States and in Canada.
‘They are brought to the market gir bubbles Which prevent dis~
in specially constructed barges.

Eels are served either fried or under ice conditions.

from the ocean engineers in all parts of the —
epths off Portugal, is probably ty. r en
requested,
: : this many-armed
Supported by more gh js a favourite dish for those

Carp, cooked | cents or 21 cents per day according lings are finalized, and it will be

Along one stretch of highwa CDC property.
in New York State a study is The firms concerned form part
being made of the performance Of the well-known Booker Broth-

of air-entrained concrete under ¢TS group. —E.F.S.

the crete is a new development

eontaining billions of microscopic

GIANT PLANE MAY

FLY AROUND WORLD
LONDON, "et

rupting pressures on concrete

the Samples, of the concrete “grow-

Tahiti May Become
Airways Centre
PAPEETE, Society Islands,
Tahiti might be the

in the central South Pacitic for a
South

work of

Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder
+++ 80 Velvety smooth

April 9, «++ delicately perfumed

focal point «++ Clings softly for hours

Pacifie air

and hours, giving you

sea ing” on farms and in water are Tentative plans are being dis Toutes between Australia and
x ain cussed ssainai pans the Ministry of Seuth and Central America, ac- that natural vivid look.

set up by the cement industry Supply and@ the Bristol Aviation ®ording to Captain P. G. Taylor

near Chicago. The data collected Company for a round-the-world @!, the pioneering flying boat

by the laboratory is analyzed and flight of the giant 100-ton Braba-
passed along to builders and zon plane.

The Brabazon makes its first
flight outside Britain in June when
it will be on show at the Paris Air

SOCIETY DOGS Exhibition. The plane will no

LONDON. jand but will give a number o!

The London Daily Express re- demonstration flights over L«
ot ported the following announcement Bourget field.
in a Devonshire hotel brochure:
“Guests’ dogs are charged

is ¢
fron
to



and

+
%,
Many technical details have t ¥
*
<

GRIPES

is a} ta size and social standing.” late

summer before the





14 be settled before any world-gird
ate plane |

bility of products under controlled favourite of these people. —I.N.S. could leave on its trip.—IN.S. %
conditions are studied, and a fat

extraction room, A special project —Red snapper, caught in the e i" ts e,e Ie
laboratory is used to study the Gulf of Mexico, is used by Senior Short Stor Com etition 1S
nutritive values in bone and meat Americans of Japanese and is
scrap, tankage, and other meat Chinese origin. They also like i
packing by-products. A fully pike and porgies. Greeks favour The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girt: %
equipped home economies kitchen striped bass, The French enjoy] between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe- ' g
provides facilities for research in snails which are a shellfish and] tition. Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words! §
connection with cooked products, are imported from Morocco.} in length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd..| $

They also demand frogs’ legs

OUTDOOR CINEMA













brought in from Cuba and Japan
Shrimp, liked by almost every-



City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week |}
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re- ‘y

























: ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6
An estimated 2,000 “drive-in body, comes from a number of ; S ve }
Sugar Content Than theatres” in the United States ac- places. The species jusnbo King Send this coupon with your story. :
. commodate 5,000,000 persons and is imported from Mexico. er q
Barbados Cane 600,000 automobiles each day. The types come from the southern SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION 3
theatres are built so that whole waters of the United States. THAD: coin de cvareinsdenssen Be ttlnsos be Dap Te ae Rips ada’ x
(From Our Own Correspondent) families may view motion-picture %
PORT-OF-SPAIN, oe 6 performances from their automo- BR ic ec ce tecv eden esr ss bbdadsreteeterdtenccpebe $
pril 9. niles, which they park before a ;
“The sugar content of Trinidad jarge outdoor screen. TOO MANY CATS NE THe ec vicke boss Kediees cdc eablaahbdeda sees %
cane is lower than that of the Bar- form &
bados cane, and therefore, cannot ._ VANCOUVER. He SHS RSE ESE URED RSME TES ESAT ER EES sh $
command such a high price,” the DRIVE ANYWHERE A total of 4,825 cats were des- i lia ish mn uth enugatievedats : $
Hon. Victor Bryan, Minister of A company in the United States troyed by the Humane Society} = = ““™™ “um ss*"* ‘ :
Agriculture said to a press repre- has developed an automobile tire here last year but the Society’s' |... bpd ed cake bina) done Gi WEE ths gi cide cereus %
sentative, in answer to a corres- that is safe from blowouts on greatest problem is still stray cats. yu
pondence writing in the Gazette punctures. No rubber inner tube An official told the annual meeting z
under the nom-de-plume “De- js required. If a puncture does of the S.P.C.A. that the Water-| BRP 4AlL "Y AND PROTECTION 2
pressed Farmer.” who wanted to occur, a soft pliable rubber inside front and downtown areas are %
know why Barbados cane farmers the tire surrounds the leak ang “full” of them ¢s
were being paid $10.50 per ton prevents the loss of air :
for their canes, a price higher than ~ : st
that paid to Trinidad farmers, ent CHANGE z
why the price paid by the estate make a ton of sugar. He pointed TES x
owners to their labourers were out that another important factor RA OF EX %
much more favourable than that was that in Barbados the cane was APRIL 11, 1951. %
paid in Trinidad. Mr. Bryan ad- being delivered by the farmer to ’ pause gor ;
mitted that the price paid for Bar- the factory door, and as such the ® 3/10% pr. Cheques on oo og
bados canes was around the fig- farmer had to stand the cost of Demand :
ures mentioned but pointed out transportation, whereas in Trini- Drafts 61.15% pr.
that ‘* — only cl tons of dad, the sugar manufacturer was eer wea ee
a make a ton of sugar in paying the cost of transporting th 2 os 4 pr.
‘ados, while in Trinidad it cane from the farmer's eeale, Seer Oe ee Somes Be 1/10% pF.
toox nearly 10 tons of cane to a long way from the factory. Silver g
%&
SSS ass == :
3 $
WHOLESALE DEALERS PLEASE :
5
%

NOTE



THE FOLLOWING

“

Frigate Bird I, The aircraft lana-
ed here today from Mangareva. It
back
after

ym its way
n Chile

find suitable

PORES 9CIEUES

5

Day

ALL

TENNIS DRESSES.

a survey
airbases in the
South Pacific for a regular Aus- [
iralian-Chile air service.—Reuter l

OO OVOVS

to Australie
flight

FOR THAT NATURAL VIVID LOOK



MONDAY - TUESDAY





{TEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED

FOR QUICK CLEARANCE

You are definitely effecting large savings by attending this CLEARANCE

SALE. Here are some of the many reductions.

A fine assortment in sizes and colours, Most of these items were regularly

sold up to $8.50

LADIES’ BETTER DRESSES

Many Styles and Colours,

LADIES’
Regular Sizes and Modern Shades
Also a variety in Ladies Ankle Socks

Sale Price

All sizes, Reduced from $24 to

ART SILK STOCKINGS

LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS

2 of these fine Towels with a Glass Tumbler

To-day's Value 65c. per towel,

LADIES’ PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK

Lace tiinumed Panties in tea rose, cream also black, Small, Medium, Large.

Regular priced $1.92

Sale Price



OPPO

MODERN DRESS SHOPPE-troad St.

SALE

THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY

SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS *

Special Sale Price. All 3 in a pkg. cor § | 00

“am tae G1 00

a8) SUD s |

6S

Â¥

ae |
eh] PM §

Sale Price a prs. for $I. i

“4,

CSOCOOOS SS

OF

hOSSS955S59S9F

ESSO



FLIT SPRAYERS
FLIT POWDER 4







BROWN 3 * re
PARAFFIN OIL IN 52 GALLON DRUMS
PARAFFIN OIL IN 5 GALLON PAILS
NUJOL IN PINT BOTTLES

OR DIAL 3814,

PRODUCTS JUST RECEIVED

FLIT IN TINS :—GALLONS, QUARTS, PINTS, HALF PINTS
WHITE PETROLEUM JELLY IN 400 LB. DRUMS

MISTOL IN }-0z. BOTTLES WITH & WITHOUT EPHEDRINE
MISTOL IN’ 2-0z. BOTTLES WITHOUT EPHEDRINE.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY TO —
R. M. JONES & COMPANY, LTD.









”

delieate colours for
| outside,
} MADE BY
BERGER PAINTS

[ALL HARDWARE STORES

Agents:—GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Léd.

With Bergertex, chere’s new beauty and protection for walls of
concrete, plaster, brick or stone
Bergertex cannot crack or peel off. for in drying it beeomes an integral
part of the wall on which it is painted. Its crisp, matt finish stays

«-»-WITH BERGERTEX

. F454
a at of a a

-

Waterproof and weather resisting,

fresh and smart almost indefinitely. |

4

Bergertex is available in many

use inside or



GEESE EPEC FS

CPPS O SSPE

Stocked by

. yee
PROPEL ELPEPRPPPBDPDLDPBPLAPEPPAPLLALLLPPPLAPLDPPPLLADL!LLLLLLLLLP PII NIN

LADIES’ SKIRTS AND BLOUSES

Jersey material Blouses, Printed Cotton Skirts Specially reduced for gf %
this Sale Only sisi csidl 7 x
+

IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS x

For ladies and children in white and many other useful colours. Many fl ij ¥%
Styles, Many regular prices were up to $4.80 To Clear ®

MEN’S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS %
Men’s Polo Shirts in White only with Zip fasteners. Shirts that were oo .
regular $2.40. Reduced for this Sale ee es S

54” WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL 3
That will make Skirts or Coats for travelling and can make many other | ] 3
useful things. Reduced from $6.00 to Per yd. $3: ¥

et et

LADIES’ COATS, WOOLLEN PULLOVERS, CARDIGANS y
Reduced to |} Price §

CORSETS, CORSELETTES, TURBANS, INFANT CHRISTENING
DRESSES to | Price *



THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE ;

PRSF



PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.

The issue of Canada.West
Indies Trade is being kept alive
in Canada as well as in the West
Indies, The Toronto Globe And
Mail of April 5, 1951 calls for
“immediate negotiations for a
new B.W.I. trade treaty to re-
place the moribund and now one-
sided pact of 1925." Under cur-
rent conditions, argues the Globe
and Mail, the B.W.I. area is not
itself benefiting by the $11 million
subsidy which Canadian consum-
ers pay annually for their sugar
requirements. “We are not bene-
fiting by free access to B.W.I.
markets for our exports, Britain
alone benefits, as she skims off
B.W.1I. dollar earnings from us
for concentration in her central
dollar reserve. We need a new
treaty based on a new principle.
We would benefit by freeing our-
selves from purchases in the
United States. The Colonies
would benefit by greatly expanded
activity in production, processing
and marketing. And Great Britain
would benefit by the transfer of
our present dollar purchases from
the United States to the Colonies.”

Twenty-two years ago at the
First West Indies Conference Mr.
J. P. Hand of Bermuda was say-
ing something not quite the same
but tending in the same direction.
“There are,” he said, “outstanding
businessmen of the West Indies
who believe that Bermuda and the
West Indies can do a greater vol.
ume of trade with Canada than
with Great Britain. That does not
mean that we should not continue
our trade with the Mother Coun-
try, It means that if by virtue of
that agreement (the Canada-West
Indies agreement) our Colonies
can be made more prosperous we
shall be in a better position to buy
more from the Mother Country.”

Trade between Canada and the
West Indies is the outstanding
topic of conversation throughout
the West Indies and in Canada
to-day, and in London tongues are
wagging, It is therefore well worth
recounting what is known of
those trade relations and showing
how the Canada-West Indies
Trade agreement came into being.
The story is best told, as far as I
have been able to trace it, in F, V.
Meyer’s ‘“Britain’s Colonies and
World Trade,” published by
Geoffrey Cumberlege (Oxford
University Press) in 1948.

As early as 1890 the Canadian
Minister of Finance visited the
West Indies to diseuss proposals
for mutual preferences, At that
time the West Indies were nego.
tiating with the United States for
most favoured nation treatment
under the McKinley Tariff Act
and were afraid that preferences
given to Canada would penalise
the export of West Indian sugar
to the United States. In 1898
when the Colonies were in distress,
Canada, out of a feeling of im-
perial responsibility towards H.M.
Government in the United King-
dom, put raw sugar on the duti-
able list and thereby extended the
preferential tariff treatment to the
West Indian Colonies, Canada
neither asked nor received any-
thing in return, Two years later
sent a delegation to



Thursday, April 12, 1951



UNTAXED PEDLARS

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
passed an address relating to. the activities
of pedlars and asked that a Committee be
appointed to consider what should be done
to remedy the situation.

At last Government’s attention has been
focussed on a matter which has given cause
to much concern and grave dissatisfaction
in this island. The influx of these itiner-
ant vendors has gone on at a rate which
alarmed small business houses without any
official attention being paid to it or its
concomitant dangers.

During the debate in the House it was
pointed out that these pedlars who sell
cloth. and other merchandise escape the
payment of taxation which they would
have to pay if they had been established
in business houses.

The average businessman now con-
tributes by way of income tax and paro-
chial tax approximately 50% of his profits.
The upkeep of his establishment and
wages for his staff are other demands on
his business.

The itinerant vendor moves around in
his car and besides the upkeep of the
vehicle and his chauffeur has no other ex-
pense of consequence. It has been argued
in his favour that he carries to the country
worker goods which would not be other-
wise available to him and on terms of pay-
ment which would not be afforded him by
business houses in the City, The difference
in price, however, is sufficient to give the
worker twice the amount of goods.



































The itinerant vendor is only one of a
growing class of itinerant trader whose
growing prices are tending to aggravate
inflation and raise the cost of living.

The Government must show a greater
awareness of the way in which the price
control list is openly flouted in this island.
It must also take action against all sellers
of foodstuffs who put up the cost of living
to themselves and the public by selling at
scarcity prices, The tendency in this
island has been to attack the big man of
whom there are relatively few and who
keeps proper accounts, and to ignore the
great many who keep no books and whose
profits are out of all proportion. There
must be no discrimination, and action
against itinerant vendors must be extend-
ed to all those who exploit the community
in search of a quick road to prosperity.

LONDON,

Britain is to spend £1,300 million
on rearmament during the coming
financial year. This is only the
first stage of a defence programme
which is to cost £4,700 million in
the next three years.

The sum to be spent this year
is divided into three main cate-
gories (as illustrated in the ac-
companying chart). Pay and al-
lowanees for the armed forces will
amount to £270 million, and an-
other £330 is needed for miscel-
laneous purposes such as food,
petrol, oil, transport of personnel
and stores, etc.

The lion’s share of this year’s
rearmament expenditure—
amounting to £700 million—is to
go to the production of tanks,
guns, ‘planes and other military
equipment, and to research, de-
velopment and other work con-
nected with the defence pro-
gramme.

The overriding problem for the
nation is how to carry this tre-
mendous burden without reverting
to a war economy or, lowering its
standard of living more than is
justified by the urgency of the
task and the need to restrict in-
flation at home to the minimum.

The Government have now de-
cided that the main burden will
fall on home consumption. There

—————— |



NO PARKING

IN an effort to assist motorists who ex-
perience great difficulty in- finding ade-
quate parking space in the City and who
unwittingly park in restricted areas, the
Commissioner of Police, in co-operation
with the Transport Authority has clearly
marked “No Parking” areas.

Poles have been painted red in addition
to black and white.

Once the significance of the red band
has been understood, there can be no diffi-
culty for the motorist, who may still find
it impossible to find parking space, but who
will not suffer from any nervous fear that
they have broken the law. Never park
where there is a.red band. |







OUR READERS SAY:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By George Hunte

The next ten years saw a change
in the West Indian attitude to-
wards Canada, The annexation ef
Puerto Rico by the United States
and the preferential treatment
granted by the United States to
Cuba and the Philippines led to
a virtual cessation of the demand
for West Indian sugar. At the
same time Canadian imports of
sugar rose from 104,000 long tons
in 1899 to 185,000 long tons in
1909. The Barbados House of
Assembly was quick off the mark.
In 1908 a Bill was passed increas.
ing by 20 per cent, the duties on
certain specific articles when not
imported from Canada or any
other British country.

In these early years the West
Indies seemed to benefit by selling
at a preference to Canadian re-
finers and on a more favourable
basis to British refiners, In Can-
ada, meanwhile, a movement was
developing which claimed that the
grant of Canadian preferences
should be conditional upon the re-
ceipt of return advantages, In
1907 the Boards of Trade of Tor-
onto, Halifax and St, John sent a
commission to the West Indies to
investigate trade relations, As a
result, Barbados in 1908 was the
meeting place of a general con-
ference at which Canada and most
of the British West Indian colo.
nies were represented by official
delegates, Resolutions in favour
of reciprocal preference and of
improved means of communica-
tion and transportation between
Canada and the West Indies were
adopted. The next step was a
Royal Commission, which was
appointed in 1908 and reported in
1910 (Cd 5369),

This Commission pointed out
that “the geographical position ‘of
the West Indian colonies must al-
ways tend to throw them under
the influence of the fiscal system
either of the United States or of
the Dominion of Canada. Attempts
have been made from time to time
to obtain for these colonies special
advantages in the markets of the
United States, whose proximity
renders them of special import-
ance to the West Indies, The
Colonial policy of the United
States has now finally stopped ad-
vance in that direction; it would
be unwise, except for the gravest
reasons, now to oppose the natural
desire of the West Indian colonies
for close connection with the
Northern Dominion,”

In 1912 the West Indies sent re-
presentatives to Canada. Their
main concern was an {adequate
preference on sugar and the as-
surance of its continuation for a
long enough peried to give
promise of stability to the cane
sugar industry. An _ agreement
came into operation in 1913 and
remained in force until superseded
by the agreement of 1920. Canada
did more than she was required
by the agreement. She granted a
preference of 24 per cent instead
of 15 per cent per 100 Ib, on sugar
of 96°. 7

The 1914 war upset everything.
The United Kingdom’s place as
the largest supplier of imports into



will be fewer goods in the shops
and the price of those that remain
will be higher. This fact, by itself.
will restrict spending power and
thus help to check internal infla-
tion, Controls—and, possibly, new
taxes—will do the rest.

But this alone will not solve the
problem, Britain’s economy de-
pends on a steady flow of imports
—of food and raw materials—
which must be paid for with ex-
ports. We will need even more
imports in the coming year to sus-
tain the arms programme, and the
Government estimate that they
will cost us over £3,200 million,
or £850 million more than last
year. On account of price increases
alone, Britain may have to face
an increase jon import costs of
£700 million.

If we can get the raw materials,
and if production is raised to four
per cent above the 1950 level
(which is no greater than it was
at the end of last year) we may
just manage to export enough to
strike a balance in our overseas
trading account. This means that
last year’s overall surplus of
£229 million on our external
trading account will have to go—
together with about £100 of our
gold reserves, the amount needed

Before And After 1925 (oli Airls Wages Guide

A Review Of Canadaw¥W.L Trade

the West Indies in 1912 had been
taken by the United States in
1920. Exports to Canada relative~

ly declined during the same
period, while the ion of ex-
ports to the Uni Kingdom in-

creased, These chanves were due
to a rise in prices resulting from
the war. A new eerment nego-
tiated in 1920, taking effect
912. Tt w. a te all the
of 1912. ya
West Indian steer asa Bermu-
da. All the West Indian colonies
brought it into foree but not Ber-
muda. The preference granted
was much bigger nin 1912, The
all-round ta differential grant-
ed in 1920 was of far greater im-
portance to the British manufac-
turers than the extension of the
1912 agreement.

Another conference took place
at Ottawa in 1925, The agree-
ment came into effect in 1927.
In 1938 the Dominion gave notice
of its denunciation as from 31 De-
cember 1939 onwards, but the war
intervened and it is still in force,
although the whole weight of
Canadian public opinion appears
to be against it to-day and a re-
vision, is expected this year, and
will probably be requested when
the conference to discuss the 1951
Trade Liberalization Plan meets
this summer in Ottawa.

In 1932 imperial preference be-
came part of an Empire-wide
scheme and Canadian-West Indian
relations changed. Previously the
West Indians bargained directly
with the Canadians. At Ottawa
in 1932 and after the Secretary of
State for the Colonies not only
had the last word, but also the
first. He conducted the negotiations
at Ottawa, without eny colonial
delegates being present. “The Co-
lonial Schedules” to quote Dr.
Meyer “became an integral part
of the United Kingdom agree-
ments. Then the colonies were
invited to put them into effect. For
the Colonial Emovire it was Hob-
son’s choice,”

Before Vttawa sometning else
happened to affect the normal
course of West Indian Trade,
something remarkably like what
happened in 1949. Sterling was
depreciated relatively to the dol-
lar from 1931 to 1938. This made
(and the fact readg like 1949 all
over again) Canadian and United
States goods very expensive and
imports from the United Kingdom
rose while imports from Canada
and the United States declined.
After 1933 the dollar also was de-
preciated and by 1938 Canadian
Trade at least in Jamaica and
Barbados had recovered to an ap-
preciable extent.

During the war of course Can-
ada’s trade with the West Indies
saved the West Indies. What hap-
pened when Great Britain depre-
ciated sterling in 1949 and clamp-
ed down on dollar allocations to
buy Canadian goods is too well
known to need recapitulation.
But it cannot be repeated too
often that unless Canada gets bet-
ter treatment with relation to her
trade with the. West Indies than
the United Kingdom allows her to-
day, then nothing can save the
West Indies from another great
depression, unless the United
Kingdom is prepared to subsidize
the West Indies indefinitely.

What Rearmament Will Cost

to finance stock-piling of vital
foods and raw materials.

Nevertheless, it is hoped thab
by increasing the price of our
exports we will be able to cover
the greater part of the rise in
the cost of our imports, But if
we do this recklessly, we stand
to lose valuable export markets—
a thing which we cannot afford
to do, especially now that Ger-
man and Japanese industry is
begining to recover.

We must, therefore, aim at an
increase in the volume of our
exports. This must be done des-
pite the fact that many of the
metal-using and engineering firms
which normally produce the bulk
of our exports will be engaged in
the production of arms. The gap
must be filled with textiles, cloth-

ing. and other consumer goods.| are British) at almost any time by ringing

These are the things that are like-
ly to disappear from the shops at
home.

The Commonwealth and dollar
markets will continue to have the
highest priority in this new ex-
port drive.

The prospect for the people of
Britain is, as the Economic Survey
for 1951 admits, “in many ways
Warsh and unpleqsant’, but, on
the whole, no worse than we had
expected.
















Barbados Tennis
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—"I am writing this letter
with the intention of, exposing the
most unsatisfactory way in which
the business of the Barbados Ama-
teur Lawn Tennis Association is
conducted,

I would like to quote the fol-
lowing paragraph which appeared
in last Thursday’s Advocate—
“The Council of the Lawn Tennis
Association who are selectors as
well did not consider the local
players nominated up to a stand-
ard that would do credit to Bar-
bados in the games.”

I would appreciate if the sele¢-

tors would advise the public just
how they arrived at this decision
in view of the fact that no prac-
tice matenes were arranged or
held. Can it be possible that they
judged players by their form last
September? Are they not aware
that tennis is a game that requires
a lot of practice and if given the
necessary practice a great im-
provement can take place in a
player within a few weeks.
Eh would suggest that instead of
jumping to conclusions they make
a point of watching some of the
local tournaments instead of being
guided by results in the daily
newspaper.

Why were six players asked to
hold themselves in readiness for
the forthcoming tour to Trinidad
af it had been previously decided
that only two of them should go
and in event of one of the two not
going, other arrangements be
made? The above statement is
substantiated by the fact that no
practices were held.

I would further like to ask the
selectors who communicates in-
formation regarding players to
the Press? Surely this shouldbe

one of the duties of the Secretary
of the Association. How then
could information be given the
Trinidad Guardian to the effect
that I would be unable to make
the trip to Trinidad if selected,
when the Seeretary has in his
possession a letter of 2nd instant
Mrom me to the contrary,

It.is Righ time that open tourna.
ments: were held previous. to. the
selection of players to ta/ie@. part
in the Brandon Trophy, IP Clubs
affiliated to the Association are
unwilling to stage such tourna-
ments on their grounds I would
like to suggest that the President
of the Association approach His
Excellency with a view to staging
such tournaments annually at
Government House,

Can some members of the
Council select players to repre-
sent Barbados without holding an
official meeting? I understand
from reliable sources that no
meeting was held. However, if
a meeting was held how is it that
two members (maybe more) were
never notified of such a meeting.

I understand that Council mem-
bers were phoned and notified
that the decision of the “few’’ had
already been forwarded to Tring
dad.

How is it that the President has
allowed the business of the Asso-
ciation to be conducted in such a
manner, I look forward to some
action being taken by members of
the Clubs affiliated to the Associa.
tion as the ‘future of Lawn Ten-
nis in Barbados now rests in a
precarious position.

How do members of the Coun-
cil, who have created the prece-
dent of inviting Carter and Legall
to play for Barbados, ever- hope

to regain the confidence of mem-
bers of the Association.

Is itin accordance with the rules
of the Association to invite non-
members when there has been no
opportunity for members to prove
that they are “up to standard.”

DENNIS E. WORME,
The Cot,

Rockley, ' 4 Jb
Christ Church,
April 10, 1951.

Age-grouping

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Quite recently from de-
bates in the House of Assembly,
I noticed where certain critic-
isms were levelled against the
Government as regards the in-
troduction and extension of age-
grouping in this island, A few
days having elapsed, I have now
read in your Journal of 8th
April, re: the debate about this
age-grouping at a meeting of the
Teachers’ Association, In _ fair-
ness to myself and the general
public, it would appear as though
the teachers as a majority and
not the Government have under-
taken to use themselves as an
umbrella to shield this system
which can do no good to our
clementary schools in this island,

I heartily agree with Mr. Cum-
berbatch’s suggestion and can
further him by saying that T
have always agreed with those
Educational Reformers who sug
gest to grade the child from the
known to the unknown — hence
I conclude by saying — away
with age-grouping. Tell the Gov-
ernment that teachers practically
find it retrograde and not pro
gressive as Mr. Cumberbatcb has
admitted. And I can assure you
that-the Government will do its

best in the interest of our elemen-
tary schools, teachers, and the
general public:
ONE INTERESTED.

April 9, 1951. ,

Good Fellowship

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I will be glad if you will
be so kind as to publish the fol-

lowing in your “Our Readers
Say” column.
I was deeply moved and

touched this morning when I ar-
rived at my Office and read the
Newspaper article about the Din-
ner given in Honour of the Hon:
J. H, Wilkinson by the Speaker
of the House of Assembly:

It was a_ great pleasure to
read what an, amicable course the
proceedings took among the var-
jous speakers, Everyone present
seemed to be in the very best of
spirits and the laudable terms in
which the speakers spcke pf Mr
Wilkinson were indeed deserving.
What struck me more forcibly
however, was the spirit of “good
feelings” that existed between
all parties, i.e. Labour and Con-
servatives. I think both sides
spoke well of each other and that
is as it should always be, not
only among politicians but among
all persons in the Island. I hope
that all who read the article will
take it as an example of how we

can all live and work for one
another, Words fail me to say
much more than what I have

said.
Thanking you for space,
I Remain, Sir,
Yours Faithfully,
M. V,. TAYLOR.
Stratham,
Worthing Ch. Ch:
April 6, 1951,

THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1951





SSeS

PENCILS FOR EVERYONE








In Oil Town

By KENNETH MACAULAY
whose despatches toretold the Abadan crisis



Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE

AS the plane drives through a sky almost
bleached of its blue there is a glint far away
of silver.

In a few moments the glint spreads out and
becomes a shimmering city. The traveller is
arriving at Abadan. ,

Every part of the great oil refinery, with
its farms of enormous steel storage tanks,
is painted in glistening, unstained aluminium
to throw off the sun’s heat.: .

Here on this flat mud island created from
the prehistoric silt of the Tigris and the
Euphrates is the oil capital of the world.

DO YOU WANT A

G00D-TEMPERED BREAKFAST FAMILY?

Serve their early morning tea or coffee in our

MINTON PLAIN or GOLD-EDGED Man-Sized

BREAKFAST CUPS & SAUCERS





The soil is Persian, but every stick and
stone there, every nut, bolt, and pipe, is the
property of the British-owned Anglo-Iranian
Oil Company.

Two thousand Europeans and their families
live in this town of wide asphalted roads,
good houses or bungalow flats with every
amenity that the paternalism of the oil com-
pany can provide.

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

4687 & 4472.

BENDIX

WASHING MACHINES
FULLY AUTOMATIC

WASHES NINE POUNDS CLOTHES.

Through Six Complete Stages in
45 minutes (without any manual
labour) the final stage the Clothes
are just damp, suitable for ironing.
ONLY A FEW MACHINES LEFT
UNSOLD.
@

For the oil company is Abadan, Almost
every soul here, Persian or European, is in
the company’s service.

LIFE IS BEARABLE

The management has spent some of its
millions trying to make life bearable for the
people it has recruited to supply, refine, sell,
and ship oil and its products from this blis-
tered place.



Phones:



6.





















SCOOPS SFOS

Outside Abadan there is nothing, nowhere
to go, nothing to see.

From the guard on the refinery gate who
makes sure that the visitor gives up his
matches or lighter to the top executive, chief
engineer or chemist, every man-jack finds
that every facet of his life becomes inevit-
ably the concern of the company and in some
degree under its control.

POP GOOS OSS

Oo

His house is company-owned. Only the
company could get grass to grow on his
lawns and afford to keep it watered for 24

|



hours a day in the hot weather. 3
Abadan is the only place in Persia where ELECTRICAL DEPT.
one dare drink the water that comes out of SECC SOO EOEOOEOECCEEB LE ESS OBEY

the tap. It is company’s water.

Laid on, like the water, are the house ser-
vants and a laundry service, shops, swim-
ming pools, libraries, schools, and a farm, all
company-owned and run.



LOUNGE
SUITS
‘ready
to
wear

Who imports the English beer and cigar-
ettes for the community’s social centre, the
Gymkhana Club? The company,

Who keeps the prices from soaring to 10s.
a bottle or 7s. 6d. a packet ? The oil company.

They built the town’s two cinemas, outdoor
for summer and indoor for winter, and im-
port the films for them. There is a daily
newspaper (run by the company).

AIR-COOLED

Social distinctions there are, of course, but

they are out of this world of Mayfair and
Suburbia.

It is not a matter of high-powered, flashy
American cars, for the company owns almost
all the cars in Abadan, large and small,
maintains them and supplies petrol and

| chauffeurs too. Anyone can have a car (they




range of fitting, single or



double breasted.

Style in fine Grade
WORSTEDS and GAB-
ERDINES.



up the transport pool.

_There is never any occasion for mink and
diamond tiaras, and the company would not

stand for the snobbery of private swimming
pools,

A big assortment to



select from - - -

DA COSTA & CO..
Dry Goods Dept.

So in a town where everyone has servants
and a nanny, if necessary, the only social dis-
tinction left is air-conditioning. The oil man’s
wife who can boast she gets so many tons
of air cooled to such a temperature every 24

hours has got somewhere in Abadan’s social
hierarchy.



Lesser folk have to put up with fewer tons
of conditioned air—a cooled living room and
bedroom perhaps.

The lowest stratum of social life—the
“first contract man” who is almost invariably
single and serving his first term with the
company—has to do the best he can with an
electric fan in a bungalow flat.

ENERGY FOODS
KELLOGG’S ALL BRAN
KELLOGG’S CORN

FLAKES
PRUFF WHEAT
PUFFED WHEAT
CHOCOLATE LUNCH
BISCUITS

BARLEY SUGAR STICKS

CALVES LIVER

DANISH BACON

DANISH LUNCH
TONGUES

J & R ENRICHED BREAD



COVETED
Tight, compact and organised 1s the com-
munity of
y Abadan, where the penalty for FRESH VEGETABLES
moral or gross professional delinquency is CARROTS
a ticket on the first plane back to the United|% SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL BEET ROOT
inal: CANADIAN APPLES CABBAGE
CANADIAN CHOCOLATE STRING BEANS '
a : NUT ROLL CHRISTOPHENES
is is the city the Persians covet as much :
a : : ’ CANADIAN CHOCOLATE
as the oil that flows silently into it from the BARS :
wells 130 miles away. ;
Men have given a lifetime to making the

mud flats of the oil capital habitable.

And no finer example of the British organ-
ising genius is to be found anywhere in the
world.

The Communists who organised the appear-
ance of their manifesto in every letter box
in Abadan a few months ago are waiting for
their chance.

FISH
SMOKED HADDOCK
SMOKED KIPPERS
RED SALMON
RED SNAPPER

(SB. GRADE ‘A MEATS



order early from

i
|
; GODDARDS

They want to take the world’s oil capital
over-—-and they reckon that everything|
would go on as smoothly as before.
—L.ES."



OF



Myint bv penh totttote lvl te betn ttre ttt Arle bbb dr
3 RRR IERIE

‘





THURSDAY, APRIL

—

12,

1951



C.C. Dissatisfied
With Profits

Resolution

Will Go To

Government

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE are dissatisfied with

Government’s decision not
on goods, and at a meeting

to increase margins of profits
yesterday they decided to ap-

proach Government again on the matter. The meeting was
called to consider the repert of the Price Control Commit-
tee. The view was expressed that there seemed no justi-
fication for Government's decision not to implement the
recommendations of the Committee.

The Council of the Chamber, it was decided, will now
hold a meeting at which representatives of the various
branches of trades will be invited. At this meeting it is

proposed to draft a suitable

resolution to be forwarded to

Government stating the views of the Chamber.

The President, Mr. D, G. Lea-
cock, was the first to address the
meeting yesterday. He said:

This Meeting has been sum-
moned for the special purpose of
considering the report of the
Price Control Committee. There
are many members here who will
speak on this report with special
reference to the various classes of
business with which they are most
familiar, but I intend to make a
few general remarks first.

Unsatisfactory Point
“The first point which appears

to me most unsatisfactory is that
this report which was dated July
5th, 1950, was only laid on the
table of the House of Assembly
during last month, a delay of some
8 months. One cannot help feel-
ing that if this Report had recom-
mended a reduction in the allow-
able profits of merchants, whole-
salers, and the larger retailers,
rather than the removing of con-
trols and the increasing of some
margins of gross profit, it would
have been dealt with far more ex-
peditiously.

“It appears to me most unfair
to the business community, who
have frequently been accused of
making excessive profits and
thereby causing unnecessary
increases in the cost of living,
that this Report, which entirely
refutes these _ accusations,
should not have been released
many months earlier.

“The general public does not

perhaps realise that the smooth

working of local price controls
during the last ten years is very
largely due to the full whole-
hearted co-operation of the
business community with the

Controller of Supplies through-

out this period, The latter’s

task would have been very
much more difficult without this
co-operation. Such a difficulty
is far more likely to arise, if
traders feel that they are being
subjected to unfair and unrea-
sonable controls.”

Supply Position

Since this Report had been
written, the supply position as a
whole had most definitely deteri-
orated. He thought, therefore,
that it would be unwise for the
Chamber to press at the present
time for the measures of decon-
trol which were suggested in the
report, without in any way reced-
ing from the position they had
taken. That was, that as soon as
any articles were in free supply,
they should be decontrolled and
competition would ensure that
their prices would be kept as low
as possible,

But admitting there were rea-
sonable grounds for continuing
price controls at the present time,
did not mean that they were satis-
fied with the present mark-ups
allowed. He would like to draw
their attention to paragraph 7 of
the report, which stated that with
the possible exception of hard-
ware the net profits which had
accrued to traders over the last
three years were less than ade-
quate.

“With the large increases in first
cost of goods since the report was
written, this satement is even
more true today than when it was
written as the capital required to
maintain stocks is now consider-
ably higher.

There is therefore every ground
for pressing on the Government
our view that many of the per-
mitted profit margins should be
increased, Paragraph 11 recalls
that when wholesale and retail
foodstuffs prices were controlled,

it was intended to permit
a weighed average gross profit
of 10% to wholesalers and
15% to retrilers. It would
surely not be unreasonable for
us to suggest that margins of

these concerns, which are now
probably in the neighbourhood of
6 per cent and 10 per cent should
be increased, by steps if necess-
ary, to percentages at least close
to those originally allowed.
Not Represented
“While the small shopkeepers in
the country are not represented in
this Chamber, I am _ sure that
members here would not wish to
see them driven out of business or
reduced to bankruptcy by totally
inadequate controlled profits, as
they comprise a most essential
section of the community. We
must therefore see that their case
is given consideration. I could say
a good deal more, but I know
there are many others who want
to speak on this subject, I will end
by suggesting that our correct
course at the end of this Meeting
will be to send a resolution to
His Excellency the Governor-in-
Executive Committee setting out
our views on this matter, after
members have discussed it fully.
Mr, D. V. Scott of the Colon-
nade Stores said that when the
matter of controls were start-
ed, a circular was sent around
to the various business houses
asking them to give some idea
of the prevailing margins of
profit, Owing to some confusion
amorg them, however, the mar-
gins were then fixed lower
than it had been the case be-
fore, During the following five
or six years there was a very
definite increase in cost prices,
! and one could therefore only
conclude that the Government
had taken that into considera-
tion. They seemed to have
reasoned that the trade was get-~
ting a greater profit. Either
the Government were right or
they were, for it was the trade's
contention that there was prac-
tically no fluctation im doing
business regardless of whether
an item cost $1 or $1.50. As the
Price Control Committee had
found out. figures remained al-
most identical for long periods.

Now the Government had said
that they were not prepared to
implement these recommenda-
tions. It was somewhat nebulous
reading Mr. Adams’ speech in the
House of Assembly, to find out
why. The price of goods had gone
up in the last few months but
their position remained as it: was
before, “Are we going to wait an-
other three years for it to. be
found out by another committee
that our mark-ups are not ade-
quate?” Mr. Scott questioned,

He thought that if Government
were prepared to control this mat-
ter, it was morally right for them
to see that profits were such that
a reasonable living wage could be
offered employees, that share-
holders get a reasonable return
on their money and the like.
Surely one side of the picture
alone could not be taken into

consideration and the other dis-
regarded.

Mr. J. O. Tudor, wholesale
provision dealer, of Roebuck

Street said that their branch of
trade had been the hardest hit
throughout all the controls, 1
1941 or '42, Dr. Saint decided to
give them a specific mark up, 10
per cent gross on a fixed thing.
As the years went by the price
of items went up but the mark-
up. remained the same 40 cents
that it had been before. They were
not as fortunate as others with
mark-ups on a percentage basis.

They went to the Controller and
drew to his attention that the
fixed mark-up was causing them
hardship, His answer had always
been that it was government’s
policy; that Dr. Saint had laid
down that the prices of foodstuffs
had to be kept as cheap as possi-
ble and he could not interfere
with the mark-up as laid down.

Good Mark-ups

They continued to press and
worry him. The Government
however felt that the mark-ups
were so good that they appointed
a committee to go into the system
with the result that when this
committee reported in July, 1950,
Government were so astonished
that they had nothing left ‘to do
but to pigeon-hole the report as
long as they could.

The trade again got hold of the
Controller and told him that as
matters were, they could not con-
tinue for long, The position cf
their profits was that instead of
there being a 10 per cent gross,
there was an average of 5 per cent.

When the Leader cf the House
made his statement which in-
formed them of Government's
policy they had no alternative
than to write to the Colonial
Secretary to ask him to write to
His Excellency asking him to give
them an interview. They had not
yet got a reply.

Mr, J. C. Carter of Messrs.
T. R. Evans, said that there was
the problem of stock replacement
Even with goods in free supply
there was difficulty. He would
contend that it was a matter of
great regret that the views of
the Select Committee on Price
Control were disregarded. He
would like to commend them in
the exactness of their report,

Mr. J. K. C. Grannum, dry
goods merchant of Swan Street,
said that he felt the dry goods
trade did not have very much to
grouse about. He thought they
should be content with the mark-
ups allowed at present.

Hardware Affected

Mr. H. F. Alkins of the Bar-
bados Cotton Factory, spoke on
the Report as it affected the Hard—
ware trade, He said that the first
reference to the trade in the Re-
port was in paragraph 7 where
the Committee stated, that as a
result of their investigations they
had come to the conclusion that
with the possible exception of
dealers in Hardware, the net pro-
fits of trade generally over the
past three years had been less
than adequate. He drew atten-
tion to the carefully worded
phrase used by the Committee,
and said that it could be assumed

@ on page 7



Mechanical Counting

For Savings Bank

Messrs. E. D. Carrington and
W. A. Gittens of the Government
Savings Bank will be going to
British Guiana on Friday, 13th
April on a six weeks’ training
course at the Post Office Savings
Bank there.

It is proposed shortly to intro-
duce a system of Mechanical: Ac-
counting in the Barbados Savings
Bank and the course in British
Guiana is intended to provide
them with practical experience in
the use of the National Cash Re-
gister Posting Machine and with
a knowledge of the unit system
for saving accounts which has
been successfully used in British
Guiana for the past three years.

RETRIAL TO-DAY

_ THE case in which a 12-man
jury failed to agree after a de-
liberation of two hours and five
minutes as to whether or not
Herbert Hutson, Angus Hunte and
Winfield Layne were guilty of the
larceny of a quantity of goods
valued at $161.70 the property of
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd., on
October 24 will be retried to-day
at the Court of Grand Sessions.
On the first occasion Mr.
J. E. T. Brancker appeared on be-
half of Layne while Mr. W. W.
Reece K.C. Solicitor General
prosecuted for the Crown,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WANTED

Nee dah ee ates)
pe a es.
ot :





BRIDGETOWN NEEDS FOUR OF THESE-—-This one off the Garrison was erected by the Turf Club,
and shows what a public lavatory should look like.



es the Department of

Highways & Transport has
removed many ‘Bus Stops which
were at curves and near corners,
but there are still a few more to
be removed.

Some of the incidents that
cause traffic blocks are not in all
cases the fault of wrongly placed
stops. In some cases traffic blocks
take place when ‘buses stop for
inspectors to board them in order

to check passengers for the own-
ers.

ees peasants suffered loss-
es when a cane fire occurred
at Archers Plantation, St. Lucy.
It extended to Harrison’s Tenan-
try where the peasants had their
canes planted. The fire started at
about 1.40 p.m. on Tuesday.

FIRE at Ealing Grove Planta-
tion, Christ Church on Tues-
day night burnt eleven and a half
acres of second crop ripe canes.
This fire extended to Gibbons
Plantation and burnt four acres of
second crop ripe canes. In both,
instances the canes were insured.
They are the property of S. T.
Gooding.



Sailors’ Rest Will
Be Furniture Shop

The Admiral Grant Sailors’
Rest on Lower Bay Street, for
many years a rest house for sea-
men, will shortly be turned into a
furniture store.

The old three-storeyed wood and
wall building was bought by
Mr. Ralph A. Beard, a city busi-
nessman, from Mr, Leslie Pitt, a
Commission Agent and is now
being reconstructed,

It was purchased in 1901 by
the late Mr. E. H. Weekes, a
Barbadian for the British Society
in England. After the retire
ment of Mr. Weekes at the end
of the second world war, Mr.
Russel was sent out by the
Society in Engand to take charge.

Two years later, the building
was sold and was used as a liquor
business, It is expected to be
finished by the middle of June.

BOAC Chairman
Will Tour
Caribbean

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, April 10.

Sir Miles Thomas, B.O.A.C
Chairman, is shortly to make a
tour of inspection of his Com-
pany’'s workings in the Caribbean
area including the Bahamas and
Bermuda. He will leave London
airport on Saturday.

To-day, four days before his
departure it is revealed in ua
quarterly review put out by the
Corporation’s Financial Comp-
troller that B.O.A.C. expect to
show a reduction of £3,000,000
in the annual deficit when
accounts for the financial year
to March 31 are published later
this year.

In 1949—50 the B.O.A.C.
deficit amounted to nearly
£8,000,000.

The review which is referred to
in the Financial Times‘ also
reveals that for the first 11 months
of the financial year 1950—51
nearly half of the B.O.A.C’s total
overall deficit was incurred on
South American routes. More than
one quarter was on account of the
route through the Caribbean
down the west coast,

Sir Miles’ visit to the Caribbean
is understood to be concerned to
a large extent with cutting down
such losses in future.

One way in which B.O.A.C.
hope to make Caribbean opera.
tions a better financial proposition

is by. offering regular services
between New York and _ thore
islands which are particularly

favoured by American tourists as
holiday resorts.

Latest Airliners

In an interview reported in
to-day’s Daily Telegraph Sir
Miles reveals that the De Havil-
land Comet jet, Britain's latest
and best airliner, may be used in
the not-too-distant future on ser-
vices between New York and the
West Indies.

This summer B.O.A.C’s Strato.
cruisers will be busily engaged on

Trans Atlantic routes, but a
Telegraph report states that
B.O.A.C. is planning to set

up a new Constellation service
from New York to Bermuda, the
Bahamas and Jamaica

This service may entail some
reduction of the B.O.A.C’s South
American services.

SS

P appointment of Miss Muriel






an, B.A. Honours, Lendon, I
Diploma, Specialist Degree, as He
mistress of the Alexandra Girls’ S ol

by the Governing Body, will have wb be
confirmed by the Governor

.to

BAKER



NOT GUILTY OF

MALICIOUS INJURY

SYDNEY WALTERS, a 40-year-old baker of Oistin,

Christ Church, was dischar;

sed by His Honour the Acting

Chief Judge when a jury found him not guilty of malicious
injury to property valued at $84.61 belonging to Eudora
Daniel at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday

Mr. D. H. L. Ward appé

sared on behalf of Walters and

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C. prosecuted for the Crown.





A fowl owned by Mrs.
St. Clair of Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael, laid three eggs
cf this shape during the last
two weeks. The egg is the
same size as the normal egg,
except for the “cashew seed
shape.”



Labourers
Imprisoned

Three labourers were sentenced
to terms of imprisonment by His
Honour the Acting Chief Judge
Mr. G. L, Taylor at the Court of
Grand Sessions yesterday. They
were Oliver Griffith, a 35-year-old
well digger of Bush Hall, St, Mi-
chael, who was sentenced to five
years’ pena! servitude for mali-
cicusly damaging a house with
gun powder and endangering the
lite of Enid Griffith. The offence
was committed on October 14
Kenneth Hurdle was sentenced

18 months’ imprisonment for
breaking into the house of Alitta
Hinds and stealing a quantity of
goods, He was also sentenced to
three years’ penal servitude for
the larceny from the dwelling
house of Mohommed Kola, These
terms of imprisonment are to run
concurrently.

Sentence of 18 months’ impris-
onment with hard labour was also
passed on Randolph Chandler for
larceny of goods from the dwell-
ing house of Mohommed Kola





Lumber Limite

Over 203,000 feet of pine lumber
errived in Barbados yesterday by
the 364-ton motor vessel Precise
The shipment arrived trom Pine
Ridge, Bahamas, for Messrs. T
Geddes Grant, Ltd.

The Precise began discharging
the lumber shortly after her ar
rival. She remained in the Bay
while lighters attended her to
bring the lumber to the wate:
front of the inner basin of the
Careenage.

She is expected to spend quite a
few days here before she is rid of
her cargo. Her local agents are
Messrs. T. Geddes Grant Ltd







Governor Foot Speaks
On Local Government

KINGSTON, Jamaica,
Replying to the civic welcome at Ward



Walters was charged yesterday
with the malicious damage of
property owned by Eudora Daniel
and which she valued at $84.6!
while he was at her house at
Garden Land on June 18,

Eudora Daniel of the Garden
Land said that she used to live
with the accused for about two
years. About 11.30 a.m. on June
18 she heard a noise coming
from her front door. She got out
of her bed and saw the accused
entering her house. He took up
a water bucket and stabbed her
twice with a knife, He also took
up a machine and threw it on the
ground thus breaking it. She ran
away from the house and when
she returned to it she found that
everything was _ broken. The
machine is valued at $18,

Saw Breakage

Rupert Jones who also lives at
the Garden Land, St. Michael,
said he was at home which is
quite close to Daniel's. He heard

a noise and went to Eudora
Daniel’s house and saw the ac-
cused breaking up the things in

the house. Some of the things in-
cluded glasses, a coal box and a
goblet, ete, He remained at the
house and watched the accused
breaking up the things,

Violet Knight told the Court
that on June 18 at about 11.30
a.m. she went over to Daniel's
house and saw the accused run-
ning alter Daniel, Daniel got
away from him and he returned

to the house and started to break
some of the things in the house.

Sydney Walters said that he
knew Daniel as they had been
friendly for some time. He had
some articles in Daniel’s house
which was in the Garden Land
and on June 18 between 11 and
12 o’alock in the day he went to
Daniel’s house to get the articles,

While trying to get his articles
Deniel struck him on the head
with a stick and threw out his
tnings. He had a serge suit in the

house which he had brought from
the United States. He never
threw a machine out of the house

A Probability
In addressing the jury Mr,
Ward told them that the people

the accused and compluinant—
hed just separated. Nothing was
more likely than that she the
complainant having fought with

him-on the Saturday night before
the alleged offence, would go to
all ends to get him convicted

Mr. Ward submitted that some
of the witnesses had lied about
the breaking. It is clear that the
evidence of the complainant
would have to be accepted with
the greatest caution and scrutiny,
Both of them fought for a con-
siderable time in the house and
the machine which was on a table
fell to the ground and was dam-

aged. Mr. Ward also told the jury
that when they came to go
through the evidence as to how
the machine was damaged, they
would see that it was very con-
flicting. Mr. Ward further sub-
mitted that on all the evidenc<
the ease had not been proved. Mr
W. W. Reece did not address the
jury.

— 10.

heatre on

Monday evening Governar Foot highly praised Mayor Seiv-

right.

He said “if I had to name one man who seems to me

to have combined all the best qualities of the Jamaican
people, it would be your name which would first come to

my mind.”

Speaking on local government,
the Governor believed a truly
democratic system was not the
concentration of power and re-
sponsibility among a few, but
rather the diffusion of power and
responsibility amongst many
Local Government was a field of
public service of vital consequence

Speaking about the federation
of the West Indies, he said : “I gaid
on Saturday that I hoped Jamaica
would play a leading part in
building a free federation of the
British West Indies so that they
may take their rightful and hon.
ourable part in the Cormraonwealth



and would undertake the, task
which secrns to me to be of in-
creasing urgency



Single Voice

It surely becomes every -year
more urgent that the Britisi West
Indies should be able to speak
with one voice — with a voice

which will be heard and respected

particularly in the field of econo.
mic and trade affairs where the
heed becomes every month more
apparent
It seems to me that the choice
becomes increasingly clear. A
choice between federation and
frustration I look forward to
the day when we here shall have
four loyalties, aot conflicting,
but complementary; and each in
it equally important :—
to the city of Kingston,
y to Jamaica, loyelty to the
fed ted West Indies«and loy-
alty to the British Common-
weaith
The Governor
important to the
future that the Cis
first-rate, efficient, impartial and
incorruptibly free from political
prejudices and political interfer.
ence
That there is need for new agri-

@ on page 7




Oyal

loy

tressed that it is
island and its
il Serviee be






|

New Business
Ilouses Go Up

MANY new buildings are being
erected in Bridgetown and its pre-
cincts and at present a few of the
old buildings are being demolish-
ed

At Lower Broad Street, opposite
the new Plantations Ltd., building,
a modern and attractive _two
storey building which will house
the general offices of Messrs. Gar-
diner Austin & Co., Ltd,, is now
being erected. This building will
be the first of its type in the is.
land,

On the ground floor will be the
Traffic Department of Trans Can-
ada Airlines and Canadian Na-
tionat Steamships. The General
Offices, such as sales, insurance
and Directors, wili be on the sec.
ond floor.

Several improvements have
been made to a two storey build-
ing, also the property of Messrs.
Gardiner Austin, which is situated
besides the new building. When
this building is completed, that
area of Broad Street will be the
most modern part of the City

At Bay Street, opposite the
Aquatic Club Gap, a beautiful two
storey building is now being com-
pleted. This will house the Ju.c
beverage firm.

On the ground floor will be the
beverage plant, Lorries of the
firm will be able to enter the
building with ease to load drinks
and, as with the one way traffic
system, they will pull out for their
various routes without having to
reverse .

Employment

Many Barbadians will be em-
ployed in this new local enterprise
of which the Managing Director is
Mr. Charles Ray

Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd. a
new company that was formed last
year, has opened their new Gas
and Service Station at Pinfold
Street in the building which form.
erly housed the Y.M.C.A. This
building was renovated and mod-
ernised

The high wall that surrounded
the Y.M.C.A., was demolished
and the blind corner in that vicin.
ity removed

In the main buildine on the
ground floor are the parts depart-
ment, bicycle, sales, paints, gas
and oil departments as well as the
new cars showroom and the work.
shop.

The Garage also has a large
parking area which has greatly
relieved the parking situation in
Bridgetown but this is at present
filled

On the second floor the general
offices are situated and the back
rooms are used fo~ stores.

Messrs. General Traders Ltd.,
have renovated their building at
the corner of Magazine Lane and
Roebuck Stree‘, This building
now looks extremely attractive in
its colours of green and cream.
Because of the renovations pedes-
trians now have at their disposal
a wider side-walk in front of this
building.

Further along Roebuck Street is
a new two storey building that was
erected by Mr. James A. Tudor,
This building has also afforded
pedestrians a side-walk.

Tiled Stores

The majority of Swan
merchants have placed tiles in
front of their stores. These tiles
are in many attractive colours to
eatch the eye of purchasers.

Some of the old buildings that
were built many years ago are
now being demolished and new
ones will take their place. At
Prince William Henry Street the
building that formerly housed the
Manhattan Club, and at Bay Street
the Sailors Rest building, are
being taken down,

A visitor to the island told the
Advocate yesterday that Bridge.
town may soon look like Puerto
Rico “with its snow white minia
ture skyscrapers”, In his opinion
all the new buildings should be
painted in cream or white to eit
the climate. In this way the ¢ ity
would have a lighter appearance

Street



Turkeys

Turkey growers in the United
States are planning to raise a re
cord number of turkeys this year
the U.S. Department of Agricul
ture reports, It is estimated that
about 44,773,000 turkeys will be
raised during 1951,

TT

Are you proud of your
INDUSTRY? Well tell the
World about it,

Send in your details to-
day. You have 4 days left
only to get in the YEAR
BOOK,





'
i
'




f. PAGE FIVE



Barge Floats

cablegram arriving a the

A

Harbour and §



1ipE : Department
yesterday was warning all ip
of a floating barge outside
Bocas de Huevos, which wa i€
scribed as being dan
navigation



rerou

The barge was 19 collision with
a ship in the Gulf of Paria. She
was sighted by the Captain of the
Alcoa Clipper in latitude 10.43
North, longitude 61.42 West.

Two of the steamships lying in
port yesterday were notified



Fuel Arrives

Supplies of kerosene oil and gas
oline arrived here from Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by the 1,856
ton oil tanker Rufina

The Rufina anchored in Carlisle
Bay for a short while before going
on to Spring Gardens, Black Rock
where she usually discharges her
fuel through pipe lines running out
into the sea

The Rufina’s agents are Messrs
Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

DUTCH POTATOES

ce

I rather small supply of
Dutch

white potatoes now in the
island was increased by a meagre
300 crates yesterday when the
motor vessel Hersilia called here




from Holland ports

Other foodstuffs among her
cargo for Barbados were 1,050
crates of onions, 325 bags of

groundnuts,
tated milk,

1,735 cases of evapo-
135 cartons of pow-

dered milk, 700 cartons of beer
and a small quantity of cheese.
This cargo came fror: Amster-

dam

The Hefsilia also brought 1,400
bundles of staves and 280 bundles
of bottoms from Hamburg and
other general cargo from Amster-
dam. She is consigned to Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd



Attorney General
Of Nyasaland

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 9

Mr. J B. Hobson, K.C., a-
Trinidadian, who recently took
silk, and was formerly Solicitor
General of Kenya, hag been ap
pointed Attorney General of Ny-
salend

LAYENA

gil. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.



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AG : BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1951
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THURSDAY, APRIL 12



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Marriages, Desths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
~p to 50 and 6 cents per word for each



DEANE—In lo



memory of our be-

ving condition; good
loved Mutilda Degne.. Who deparjed| Telephone 3174,

this life on 12th April 1948.
Saviour, breathe giveness O’er us,
All our weakness Thou dost know

Thou did’st tread this earth hefore | Apply

us,
Thou did’st feel its keenest woe;
Love and dreary, faint and weary,
Through the desert thou’ did'st go.
E. L. Deane (Husband), and Family.
12.4,51—in.



HOLDER—Iin loving memory of our
beloved Beatrice who departed this
world on 12th April 1943.

Some think you are forgotten,
Though on earth you are no moré,
But ir memory you are still with us,
As \you ever were before.



FOR SALE

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CAR—Morris Minor 1948; very good
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12.4.51—4n
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From page 1

aims of the United Nations called _

for resistance to aggression in
Korea”. He- was. told that opera-
tions should not be undertaken
which extended the conflict be-
yond Korean territory and that it
was the intention of the United
Nations to localise hostilities in
Korea and therefore that it was
not their intention to become in-
volved in general hostilities with
China,

“And he was told that the
powers of the Commander of the
United Nations Forces to conduct
operations on behalf of the United
Nations were limited to Korea and
were to be executed within the
framework of the declared United
Nations pclicy.”

Morrison took this opportunity to
essociate British Government fully
with these instructions which
represented the policy of Britain
and other countries with forces in
Korea:

On the way in which General
Mac Arthur had carried out his
instructions, Morrison said: “in
view of the change in command
this episode is now closed and 1
do not desire to say more than to
draw the attention of the House
to the traditional British _ inter.
pretation of relationship between
the military commander in the
field and the government to whom
he is responsible.”

On this matter successive
British Governments have always
consistently stood for subordina-
tion of the military to the political.

“It is clear from = Sotmeers
issued this morning by
dent of the United States that
under American Constitution and
practice the same interpretation
is placed on this relationship as
indeed it must in any democratic
country where the views of people
expressed by their freely elected
governments must be paraniount.

1




Morrison paid tribute to Genera

Mac Arthur saying “he was_ 4! Weatherhead Ltd.

great servant of the Allies during
the war in the Pacific and he has
proved himself a brilliant soldier:

he highest order in his conduct
o the a paaire: in Japan. These
are achievements which will be
yemembered long after the im-
mediate controversy has
forgotten.”

Winston Churchill then sj
briefly saying the Conserva’ .
agreed on the traditional view that
constitutional and civil authorities
should control
nilitary commanders: He endorsed
what the Foreign Secretary had
said about Mae Arthur's brillian‘
service throughout the war and

poke

in the direction of affairs in Japan. |inat Kiddies and Grown-ups alike will

—Reuter,

{ERRODRIIRNIRARE RRR I IEE
FOR SALE

CRUSHED STONE AND
FINES. IDEAL FOR CON-
CRETE, AND MAKING
ROADS AND PATHS.

Apply - -
J. N. HARRIMAN & CO.
LTD., SEAWELL.,

Phone 8444, Extension 8.

12.4.51.—6n.

}

REAL ESTATE
JOHN

v4.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.

GERALD WOOD

FOR SALE

There has come on the tnarket
| 7 seres Approx. of Beach Proper-
ty at Bachelor Hall, St. James.
This land has a wide Beach
Frowitage, one of the best entrance
crives in the Island, A hand-

“He has displayed qualities of] BARNES & CO., LTD.

been with every purch

tives] tisons, showroom Ist Floor.

the actions of] at $3.00 per ton,

| Mona, Lisa and Sam's Song.”
















300 miles. Price
Apply: B’dos Agencies Ltd.

10.5.51—4n.

CARS-—Citroen 15 H.P. cars, just) ar-
rived. Apply R'dos Agencies Ltd. Ring
10:4.51—4n

CAR—ONE HUDSON CAR, Apply
Bob Haynes. Dial—4886_ or

108 51<3n.

ere

FORD PICKUP—in good condition and
4 new tyres, City Garage Trading Co.
Ltd. 11,4,.51—t.f.n,

ELECTRICAL





ONAN—Lighting Plant,
30 amps,
spares,

12-15 volts,
400 watts, with lamps anr
A. Barnes & Co, Ltd.

143.51—t.£.9,

net ee pce Sees

ONE (1) five H.P. three phase totally
enclosed induction motor. One (1)
Switch board fully fitted. One 2%
inch delivery (Lee Howell) centrifugal
pump. Ail in condition “as good as
new.” Price two thirds (2/3) Ruling
market price. Reply Box Zz e/o
Advocate. 8.4.51—3n.

REFRIGERATOR — Crosley Shelvador
Refrigerator 3.3 cubic ft. in good work-
ing order, Just been completely over-
hauled. What offers? For particulars
Phone 3770. 12.4.51—2n.





LIVESTOCK

COW—One Guernsey Cow giving 23
pts milk, (First calf). Apply E. D.
Davis, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch.

10.4.51—3n:

MILCH GOAT, “Sally Laurator”, Reg.
Apply S, C. Skinner, “Laura-







tor”, Rockley Terrace or Da Costa & Co,,
Ltd. Phone 8280 or 2122.
10.4 51,--t f.n
MECHANICAL
BIKES—on terms, Hercules Silver

King, All models in stock.
A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
11.4,51.—T.F.N,

MISCELLANEOUS ....

“BATHS — In Porcelain
cae, sotendane colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n,
CROQUET SETS.—Boxed and fully
equipped at Harrisons Sports Dept. Ist

Floor 12.4 51—3n. |

CALF’S FOOT JELLY.—Fresh stock
of Calf's Foot Jelly. Orange flavour. A
10 oz. jar for 60c, Get it at Bruce
12.4.51—3n,

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart wine
dow styling, light control, Valances ana
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.!
13.2.51—t.£.n 1









FREE GIFTS—FREE for your asking
on ‘Thursday 12th., Friday 13th. and
Saturday dN rae set eo ao col-
ourful Measur' ns giv
; Rbape ce One Dollar or
over, C. W, HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd.
Broad Street. F 10.4.51—3n

INVALID CHAIRS—2 only at Ha
12.4,.51—3n.
Estate Factory





‘
‘

MEGASSE at Lower

6.4.51—6n,

eect peninlrenneneciee ar
ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN
City Pharmacy.

iy case, good order, Fitt, nr ae



-_

The son



RECORDS—‘Here at last!
RED-NO!

love RUDOLPH SE
REINDEER at Harrison's Music Dept
,

Other favoyrites include Mambo. Jam

12.4.51.—-2n
| TABLE TENNIS TABLF-—Solid Pine
Top. Phone 8137. §.4.51—t. Ba,

TYPEWRITER RIBBONS & CARBON
PAPER. Fresh stock 2 peoetved,.
at T.
Pd requirements baa -w ‘sin

—_—————$—$—$—.
Two PLATE Glass Display Cases, $120.00
each Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, Broad
St. 74.51—t.£n,

———_—_—_—$———_—$

VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
sizes delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476,

» Ltd.
Me & Co Md. 5 a.s1—t.f.n.



Recruiting Board
For West Indies

From Own Correspondent) .
(Prom Out ONDON, April. 11,
A Conservative M.P. has put
up a suggestion for a Travelling
Recruiting Board to visit the

colonies,

was told by Defence Minister,
Emmanuel aie that he ~~
looking into t yn

conjunction with of the

the idea” said Mr. Shinwell and
the prospect of recruiting men
from the
M.P.

are 10,000 men in d




one of the draw!

ee

in [

Air Commodore Harvey, M.P., |!

three services, “I am. attracted by |

colonies,, A Labour
that

Colonial Empire, tapable of check-
ing qualifications of recruits and
their medical fitness. presen
backs of recruit-

£

ndays,
days

i





Applications are invited for the post
of Secretary of the Barbados Dairy ard
Stock Associatio:

$00.00 per month and
applicant would be required to take \9
on the 16th day of April, 1951, *

3. Applications should be addressed

to A. G. F. Seale, Esq., Livestock Officer,

Livestock Station, St. Micha |.

and should be submitted by 4.00 p.m.
on Friday, the 13th instant,

10.4.51—0n



TI would like
thank all who
sponse to an
for my office,
is now filled

through this medium «>
application in re-

it for a Junior

and to state that the Po t

FRANCIS H. PILE.
12.4. 51—2r



|
|

;

‘
members in the a+
cae = — for ae ~— of St
dee aed, place o » A. Foste:
ereby notify my intention cf
taking a poll for the determination «:|
the sald election on Monday next the}
16th. day of April 1951 at the Alleyr. » |
School, Belleplaine beginning betwee |
the hours of seven and eight o'clock i:
the morning.
Polling Station No.1.— The Alleyn>:
- ie cna woah” = = persons
whose surnames with the letter
A, to J. inclusive.
Station No. 2. — The Alleyne
School — the South wixg for all per- '
sons whose Surnames begin with the
letter K. to Z, ees,
F. A. INGRAM,
Sheriff and
Returning Officer.
10.4.51—6n



“HE BARBADOS MUTUAL BENEFIT
BAP OCI.

NOTICE

IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 14th.
Annual General Meeting of the above
Society will be held on Monday, 23rd.
April 1951, at 4.30 p.m. at the Regis-
tered Office, 48 Swan Street, for the
purpose of (a) Receiving the Report of
the Committee of Management and
Treasurer's Account for the past year,



ae and
| mane

| Gnd $1.80 on Sundays
\

ne
2. The Salary attached t> the post tel
the successt | |



; Our office No,



PURLIC SALES

Ten centa per agate tine on week-days |
12 cew® per agate line on Sundays, |

mum charge $1.5C om week-days

REAL ESTATE





— every convenience in
@ en, water supply. As new, £3
Phone 4476. 16.3.51—

LAND—1124 sq. ft. of land ar
ford Lane, Bridgetown, together
dwelling house thereon.

a ys = ae Le > M.
whie at Corner uck Street
Bediord

end
The above will offered for sale by
iblic competition at our office, James
On Friday 13th 1951 at

2 p.m. —-

Hutchinson & Banfieid.
31.3.51—12n.

PROPERTY — Containin
house with three bedrooms (
standing on one rood,
jand situated at Forde’
Hin. Apply
Hutchinson

< dwelling
Partly wail),
14% perches of
's Gap, Britton’s
to: C. M_ Greenidge or
& Banfield, James Street
8.451—6n

Se
On Friday the 13th inst. at 2 pm. at
17 High Street:
Shares, Barbados’ Fire Insurance
Company;
22 Shares, Barbados
Limited;
£350 31/2% Barbados Government
bentures.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
Solicit:
10.4.51

20

Tee Company

De
‘os





AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By recommendations of Lloyds Agents
we whl sell on THURSDAY the 12th
at General Traders Ltd. Roebuck Street

101 Bays D.C. Sugar.

Sale 12.30 o'clock, Terms Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO
Auctioneers





10,4.51

n



‘Blind’ Corners

Removed

tb) Electing Officers and a Committee For the last four years thc
of Management for the current year, | Department of Highways <
ans lo) meat with any other matters/?Transport has widened man.
‘01 e Meeting. . ‘ pag
By Order of the Committee, roads throughout the island anc

©. ¥ REEVES, also ree bends, There

cts. retary. jwere eight such instances in

11.4.51.—2n. 11947—48, a similar amount ir

1948—49, eleven in 1949—50 anc

OTICE

N
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

three so far in 1950—51,

In 1947—48 a portion of ‘the

‘ae Lenderee, (Marked on the |Government House wall was sett
pe “Tender for ........ " will be /back mak say 90%
received by me at my office up to 4.00 | ‘eet wie = bi roadway 2:
P.m. on Tuesday, 17th April, 1951 fo. ]° > wa Was demol

the supply of the following commodities
to be delivered at the Christ Church
Almshouse in such quantities and at
such time@s as the Board of Guardians
shall from time to time divect:—
(a) PRESH MILK
The amount of milk required is
approximately 3,000 pints per pint
and the Board reserves the right
to accept the tender of more than
one person for the supply of this







ished at Country Road
open swale left, The wall at St. |
Barnabas, junction with Highway
5, was set back, A wall to the
wroperty of Sea View on High
way 1 was also set back.

and an

The corner at Codrington was |

ore and walls, one near the | ‘
ce

Factory, Highway 7, Bay |



BARBADOS ADVOCATI

> r >
WANTED
Mtnimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4@ Cents «!
word Sundays.





















FOR

Minter

RENT
week 72 cents and

vs 24 words — over 24/
a word week—4 Cents a/



words 3















HELP HOUSES
| “CLOMK.—at the Warbados ice Cc | . FLATS mpletely new de te
pita. ally for Sales elivery | ft flats at A st. |
of Ice Cream Facto further | war >|
} particulars, apply to the rv . iidineg = w
11.4. 51—5r flats tt i nt
: Apply Mr 1
RELIEF MESS MANAGERESS ver 10.4.81—5
at een Gravteun” San —e NO CLIFION TERRACE —Mo ler
catering for Restaurents or He oy | Bunsalow ic Upper Bay Street. Tele
similar experience is desirable prone ID4.01—2r
Applications should be submitted a ~—e
| writing giving details of previous ex n
ice and enclosing copies of tes | J F
timonials and a recent pessport six oV error oot
photograph, and should be addressec
to Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd., P.U Ss k
| Box 103, Brows” 10.4.51,.—6n pea Ss |
| MISCELLANEOUS @ From Page 5





MAGAZINES—True

Romance and True Story |
STANWAY STORE, Lucas Street
Dial--4910 11,4.51--2n



|

TURKEYS 6-10 Ibs. FOWLS & DUCKS |
Apply GREEN DRAGON RESTAURANT
Broad Street, Dial 3896,



cultural development, new meth-
ods and new thinking, also great.
er collaboration between the units



| of the British West Indies in order

that their

joint interest can te
served Everyone would agree
with him that Jamaicans mus*

10.4,.51,—t-f n | recognise that they must work out
| their own salvation and be re-
| solved to build the island’s future

Chamber
Dissatisfied

@ From page 5
that the Committee's finding
were that profits in the Hardwar
trade had been just about
quate.

While the trade could eviti
cise the mark-ups granted on
specific items they ugreed that
by and large the mark-ups
allowed were not unreason-
able. This did not mean they
were complacent over the
state of the trade, In recent
months prices of most hard-
ware items had soared con-
siderably and stocks of many
items were now being sold at
prices far below replacement
value. A serious fall in ihe
volume of turnover was bound
to take place and overheads
were continually rising. The
eesult was that a rate of profit
which might be adequate at
present would, before long,
prove inadequate.
The | Committee had

mended that items in free supply
should be removed from pric:
control and, referring specifically
to the hardware trade, the Report

ade

recom-

included a schedule of items re-
commended for de-control, This
schedule covered practically the |
whole range of goods sold by the }
trade. The supply position had
altered so radically since July

1950 when the Report was signed
that he considered, in the inter-
ests of the community generally,
the Government's decision not to
de-control at the present time wa:







| Said
| the

rie
C

on the sure foundation of free in-
stitutions and that the achieve.
ment of a stable and successful
democracy in Jamaica depends
ulmost wholly on an overriding
patriotism and a common devotion
to the highest needs of Jamaica

——(CP)

Magistrate Turtis
Down Applications |

_(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., April i
Magistrate Maurice Charles to-

day in a_ written decision de-
clined to issue summonses applied
for by Robert Adams and hi

clerk Eric Gravesande against the
Assistant Superintendent, now act
ng Criminal Investigation Chief
Frank De Abreu and Sub-Inspec-
or Vigilant Belfon, charging them
with conspiring to defeat the
‘ourse Of justice and also for at-
empting to d ude a witness by
hreat or bribe from giving evi-
‘ence in a criminal matter,

Che magistrate in his decision
he was not impressed with
way in which Gravesande
eave his evidence during the
hearing of the application for
summonses, when answering ques-
tions or with his demeanour in
the witness box. “I consider his
evidence untrustworthy and in-
sufficient,” said the ‘magistrate.





Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

Sedgefield, Sehooner Gloria Hen
Schooner Marea Henrietta, Yacht
»bee, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner

M.V

























PAGE SEVEN
PERSONAL





Lo

}



& FOUND

— _ a ~ The public are hereby warnéd agalnst

giving credit to my wife GEIRRISLA

LOST HEADLEY ‘nee Headley) a8 I do no:

| hold myself responsible for her oF any-

+= — lene else centracting an’ debt ar debt

in my name unless by a written ofder

BAG--On Monday Sth Apvil between | signed by me.
Fogarty snd Modern Dress Shop. Ono DENNIS HEADLEY,

Plastic Bag White) containing a bunch Rock Dunedo,
of Keys Reward offered Cit St. James

Pharmacy 10.4.51--2n 12.4.51,—2n.





French Paratroops Contact
‘Rebel Irregulars”’

HANOI, Apri] 11.
French paratroops, seeking S0C
Chinese reported to have crossed

Paratroops were rushed to the
northern frontier after Chinese

\ were reported to have occupied
s1to northern Indo-China, have three villages inside Indo-China.
made their first contact with Paratroops found no proof that
“rebel irregulars,” French army

Chinese had been in Tsinho, about
10 miles south of Phongtso, one of
the towns reported to have been
occupied by Chinese.

headquarters said here today,
But it was not known whether
any Chinese were included in this

foree

Contact was made when irregu- Rebels left no dead on the
lars made a small attack to ground after the attack on Tsimho.
day about 25 miles north of Lai- American built French bomb-
hau ers yesterday dropped high. ex-

plosives in Binhlu about 40 miles
northwee* of Laichau.

The «rench army reported that
strong guerilla activity was con-
tinuing in the northern part of
the Thaibinh area about 50 miles
southeast of Hanoi,—Reuter,

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Unconfirmed reports last night
said that Indo-China’s Communist
led Vietnamh rebels had linked up
with 800 Chinese who crossed the
berder on April 1 The link up
was about 30 miles northwest ot
Laichau





Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1951, No. 9 which will be published in the: Official
Gazette of Thursday 12th April, 1951.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Cornmeal”, “Margarine—(c) Mello-Kreem Brand’ -and
“Cement” are as follows: —

~ ARTICLE

— Sige al
RETAIL PRICE
(not more than)

| WHOLESALE PRICE | MI
(not more than)



--
Cornmeal $10.58 per bag of

98 Ibs 12e. per Ib.
Margarine:

(ec) Mello-Kreem $2.55 per 5 Ib. tin 56c. per lb. or less
Brand than % Ib. 44gec.

per oz.
53c. per Ib. tin 58. per lb. or less
|; than % Ih. 4%e.

per 02.
Cement a “tb _ | $2.08 per bag of

| 94 Ibs.



12.4,51—2n.

SHIPPING NOTICES

i

The MV. “Daerwood’ | will
accept Cargo and Passengers for

>

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)















item. Tenders must be accom-} Street, and another by the Cot- | 4 wise one. Gardenia W., Schooner Emeline, Schooner| M.S, “TONG Do lak Paramaribo, Sailing Thursday 13th
ported pcan ee ton Fea Highway. 1 White. | Govt’s Views Not Clear Bourke Rey ne ae Wonderful Maren natn, Amivne at Barbados Ngee nen r
a eter! inary ctitioner |. r 7 2 a 4 r 7 ior, J 5 adar, Schoone . 7 . >. ”
that the cattle from which the} 4tk, were both set back. Mr. Alkins recommended that | Harriet Whittaker, Schooner Turtle Dove, | aan 7 ere ya omer
milk is supplied are free o9f During the 1948-49 period! the Chamber should approach the sanponer Giri » Schooner Rain- Cargo accepted on through Bille of aica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
Tuberculosis, walls were set back at the Brit. | Government pointing out that ihe | °°” ™* %* § MV, Willemstad. | Lading with transhipment at Trinidad and ‘St. Kitts, Sailing Monday
(b) FRESH BREAD t Hill. sels tome 3 - s t ARRIVALS for Britieh Qui B. 4 e 16th instant,
(c) FRESH MEAT ons Hill—Deightons Road junc | Government's view on the Re Schooner C. M, W, Ipana, 49 tons net, | and Leeward Island arbados, Windward ;
(d) PROVISIONS tion, at the corner of Barrack poft as published in the Press Capt. Compton, from Dominica vin 3 este aphaes Poet a a Pecan i
— i i shies ratte oP ie uel nm ‘assongers for
eee Unit to be tendered for ae iy eens and r | Were not sufficiently clear, They | “Ditch $.8. Hersilia, 2218 tons net,| FOr Mtther particulars apply:— Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
D at the corner of were unlikely to obtain a more | Capt. Oldenburgen, trom’ Amsterdar Nevin and St. Kitts, Sailing 45
Biscuits per carton WURNESS, WITHY
Rice (State grade) per bag ot |Deighton and Brittons Hill. 4 | disinterested or abler Committee |, M-V. Precise, 464 tons net, Capt, Ritch > & CO. LTD, and Friday 20th instant,
180 Ibs. footpath was constructed or! than the one which had already | @Qâ„¢, Trinidad via Pine Pidge Da COSTA & CO. LTD, TELE. 4047
Flour per half bag of 98 tbs. |land at Magazine Lane anc | considered the matter and all | Kenan met F888 tone “net, Capt Sridastawh, BW,b SCHOONER OWRRE
Cornmeal per half bag of 98 lbs Highway 1, below the Menta Perens, ve = ‘ ma saatnnl ne Kerharo, from Le Havre vin Fort ae Trinidad, Barbados, ASSOG, INC,
9 - ac nformation avails : ag eee Wi
oe fheor= Grade) per bag 3% ' Asylum was. improved. - Ire eae a aren om ko EWN. eatin: 5 Gal tiie’ shudis EL mew SOSOSOS GEES.
pn Blue mottled per box already been examined by this De Coteau, from St, Luci = r . hea ‘hie, ‘ : 8 :
Bont aes eeerters at 06 SGA In 1949—50. property was pur | Committee. , ‘ }., MV. Rufina, 1,856 tons net, Capt
Salt Pork per Ib. chased at Orange Street They should ask Government | Bin, from Trinidad via Grewada, .
Salt Fish per Qntl, | “\to make a clear statement of | «, «QUE AR TERRE: 0.
Coffffee per Ib |Speightstown for a car park. Wigs cP Ne ; Schooner Sunshine R., 2 tons net 5
Oat Flakes per Ib ‘The curve at the junction of | i A nee that the Report | Cupt. Barnes, for fishing banks,
e , oO e Committee would be ie M.V. Hersilia, 2,238 tons net, Capt
oanen > Ib | Chance _Hall and Rountl Rock plemented as and when aiedan ” | Oldenburuen, for ‘Trinidad. Qnc.
'P Dr (on Roads Were improved. Curves " 7 een M- | 8.8, Gowmbie, 7,954 tone net, Capt
Tollene Freoweea. bor ton |were widened at Balis Corne: | S{ances permitted. He suggested | kerharo, ior" Trinidad NEW YORK SERVICE
> ie . i | that if such a statement of policy | 8.8. Tacoma Star, 4,975 tons net $.8. “Geirulv’ — gall . . nevies ‘
Each aoe eraanne must wnitenit | Wachee wutcneta a ee | were published it could then be , Capt. Frank Lesiie, ior Trinidad A Steamer ‘salle a on ve os ‘iodives "Berhecee Dat nia
Peciarit Cosalined: Toecwona: from Wo | Roads were improved, | left to the Controller of Supplie: Pan Nan aoe ~NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
become bond with the successful ten-| So far in 195051 the curve | to adjust margins of profit as re- SS. “Ale “ etat’ teen? fal
derer for the due performance of the|has been widened at Ivy Road, Commended by the Committee, o1 In Touch with Barbados 89. “Alooa einer tact th nee, “Avtived invades Phe hel
contract. | , j| to de-control various items ac- a enteeeemenentemtenmneteenenned . jaurebanecinadaistanetsbaonasta ge antiine. ; ;
The Board of Guardians do not bind |near St. Giles Boys’ School and | ; :
themselves to accept the lowest or any |the Flint Hall Road widened by | ©ording as the opportunity srose Coastal Station CANADIAN SERVICE
tender. approximately four feet, Mr, B. A, Weatherhead of the . : SOUTHBOUND
E. FE. ASHBY, | | firm of Weatherhead’s (druggists) Cable and Wireless (W.1) Ltd, advi Name of Ship SAILS HALIFAX ARRIVES BY
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians, | said the hile { : that they can now communicate with) eg “ALCOA PENNANT” B'DOs
Christ Chureh, | sai hat w nile it might be agreed | the following ships through their Bar- hi, "ALGOA PARTHER” Mareh 27th April Sth
10.4.51—3n. | ? | that some items should be Gor= | bados Coast Station ae TNER April 9th, April 19th
| ock > trolled, he saw 1 reas r. tisbiae | s Uruguay, ss, Argentina/Wmds,
——e — | St k Exchange luxury een ais na y , ens why ' S, Pauls, 8.0, Aleoa Corsair, 8.8, Colombie, NOBFREOUND
, | B wreath ekiaicrecl yar 2e, a as. §, Socia, 4% Magnilanes/Eanhi, 5.3. “ALCOA PEGASUS" tue April Sth Sails for St. Dae
2 | ; were a fed to be paid for, a | Ardea, Gertrud Sehliewen, ,y aye ; a ails for St, Baw-
Jamaica Urges uoyant Dingo wuaely of the cheaper sl viaeene a8 ine of eRe Ne ABBY 3.8. "ALCOA PIONEER” due April. 12th "Oetle ona bone
j oe | *j | icles For poor persons couid then |g. Tribesman, 4.5. Mactra. a8, C, G and St. Lawrence
Trade Commission wis, pif QXPON Aen Me be obtained. This, sac, indochinon, as. Raligeton iver Forts
| Ss ‘als ie aah are ; - ss Hille, Clarkes Wharf, ss. Polifemo, | C02 nen ne ene See Annette:
less severe than expected, many He complained about price- an? ihoumehends. ae Fort Seugein These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
Service In U.K. sections ot the London Stock | Utting, and said that when the | {5 "tera Me” gered Wane se ROBER “NeW YORK AND GUL VICE.
\txchange were buoyant today.,| Price € ontroller took up a news- | Chiwawa, 5.5, Pokyt 4.8. Conace T THOM LTD. — N YORK A GULF SER ;
(From Our Own Correspondent) (Sharp advances in home issues P’Per and saw that one busines Lake Charles, ss Seow » 8, Ultraman APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.-CANADIAN SERVICE
_ Kl TON, April 11. | were however unaccompanied by | hOUSe Was selling an article for | iva ‘Frontenac acon, |) eee = a —
Jamaica’s mauey eee | any marked increase in the| ear 15 om Jess than another, | a. Tegelus Pr ite Dutra, M/S | |
tives unanimous adopte vr.) ‘ ; 1e naturally reasoned, why could | Vortiand, Orlea ’. Helicon,
N. W Manley’s “resolution today ae inn at’ an) tof not others do the ane thing. It E. 8. BLUM, nadian Chailonge: | PASSAGES TO EUROPE
. . s pre ee . ‘
calling upon the Government 10) gividend limitati Sela ti was one of the things for whict
A 7 mitation legislation & ich | —_
take a lead immediately in the Soy °¢ne amano el wains | they had themselves to blame, | Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia., for satl-
establishment of a British Carib- | tas, Those companies whose|.. More money was wanted’ in MAIL NOTICES Ing to Europe. The usual poris of call are Dublin, London, or
bean Trade Commissioner Se ‘\ordinary dividends are not welj| the drug business. They had to | Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.
vice with the United Kingdom covered by earnings however,|employ responsible people be- Maile: for Dominien, Antigua, Mant i
Si. . . serrat, evia 6 St itte by the } ! —_
and Canada and other steps | inclined lower and some brewery | cause they had to be very par- | Moneka will be clowed at the Genova,

towards federation of the British

West Indies with a responsible |
government, |
The decision was taken during)

a special meeting of the House!
called by. Manley to discuss the)
trade situation in relation with
the United Kingdom-Cuban pact)
and both Manley and Bustamante |
were unanimous in __ indicting
Britain for neglect of her Carib-
bean interests.

Bustamante said “If we are
held in captivity we shall seek
a way te escape that captivity.”
Mai said that it was time the
‘West Indies decided whether they
would remain disunited colonies
own feet. :

Both parties agreed that if any
other colony is reluctant to join
jn the move for the Trade Com-

















forward on her own

“The Minister of Social Welfare.

The

‘Mi



with service . The }included provision
scheme would be for a board of | mates towards such a pervice:
examining officers to tour the|}Such a fund was gerd for

this year’s budget for
pu o en colonies part
neld up er

larly dos and Bri
Guiana.

-

itish

shares eased when expectations
of tax relief were not fulfilled,
Overseas stocks enjoyed a
good demand which produced
rising prices. Those domiciled
abroad were particularly wanted
including South African indus-
trials, oils, tins, rubbers and
seiected minings.

The MacArthur news was re- |
| ceived quietly and produced lit- |

tle reaction in markets
occupied with budget details,

In the foreign section Japanese
bonds were marked one point
higher.

South African gold producers | were studying a

pre |

ticular. Due to the rising cost of
living he wag certain that these
employees should be in receipt of
better wages. Conditions wer
such, however, that they could
not afford it at present, Because
of this, among other



Post Office as under

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m. Registered Mall







reasons ne
| would like to see a general re-
| vision of mark-ups.
. oye .
Mobilisation

CAIRO, April 11
Cairo newspaper Al Aham said
that Egyptian authorities
scheme for gen-

| today

recorded useful gains and a firm eral mobilisation in the event of

vrarret existed in diamonds andj|an emergency,
coppe*s. Government funds how-

ever were fractionally lower.
—Reuter.



RSS SS SARS
IS



GARDEN HOSE FITTI
GARDEN SHEARS
TRUCK JACKS

VYOU°LL NEED
GARDEN HOSE—14” and %”

GREEN CANVAS—69”

The newspaper
}added that a special law dealing
| with general mobilisation would
' be issued.—Reuter,



LOOK

LICENCE
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Patt tartan neg atiatiatat in iterate i inate aoe
TR |

THESE

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end Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m. on the
13th April 1061

Mails for St. Vincent and Trinidad |
the Sch. Gardenia W. will be closed at
the General Post Office as under

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail nd

Ordinary Mail at 1 a.m, on the 1é6t
April 1951

{ Mails for British Guiana by the Sch
Marion Belle Wolfe ¥ be clostd
‘the General Post Office as under:-

Parcel Mail, Regis d Mail r
| Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m. TO-DAY ite
| April 1961

Mails for St.-Lucia by the Sch, La
| dalpha will be closed at the General
| Post Office as under;

Parcel Mail Registered Mai) and
| Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m, TO-DAY 12th
{an 1961

Mails for Paramaribo by the M.V

Daerwood will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail and
| Ordinary Mail st 2.20 p.m. TO-DAY 12th
| April 1951



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Also AFTERNOON DRESSES in Larger Sizes
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»-HOURS—Mondays to Fiidays 8.30 to 3.30
Saturday Morning 8.30 to 11.30

NOTE :—We do not Olose for LUNCH.

SS ——



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Savannah Clab
Tennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
oe DOUBLES (Handicap Fins!)
Miss Eileen Bowen and J. W. McKinstry
: a4 Mrs. F. D, Barnes







Sport

Worrell Denies Mak ing £1,400 Demands

Jamaican Footballers ~~
Due Here On May 18
BY O. S. COPPIN

FRANKIE WORRELL, West Indies and Bafbados all-
rounder is‘incensed over what he describes as fals2 rumours,
I was authentically informed in a Jettor from Ulundi Street,
Radcliffe, Nr. Manchester, yesterday.

The letter states that at a patty at which there was. a
touch of homeliness, because Clyde Walcott hed thougrit-
fully brought a bottle of Sugar Cane Braudy for Frankie
from Barbados, a sudden gloom was cast over the party.

One cf Frankie’s friends pro-
exorbitant amount. He is very

Report

MIXED DOUBLES Rape T oan:
Miss GC. Pilgrim and G. ame
fost to Miss D. ek and Ao >

Manning 5—1.
TOo- DAYS. FIXTURES

eS eras ae

Mrs. R. S. Bancroft
terson vs. Miss D, We and

waning.
Prsontetion of Cups.by Lady Savage

’ Water Polo
At Aq -atic

THERE wiil be a water polo
practice match this aftefrioon , at
the.Barbades Aqua... Club. To-
morrow and Saturday there-will be
matches between teams from the
Barbados Water Polo Association
and teams from H.M.C.S.. Mag-
nificent and H.M:C.S. Miemac.



>t SP PL RTs

. rig
c+

duced a clipping from the Daily

ing. time. are’ as follows:
conpeepelbcnitecactateanleaiaglomenatmenptee

Dispatch. This article was written

by Jack Fingleton of Australia

and it read as follows:—

Worrell Wants £1,400 to Tour
From JACK FINCLETON,

“Daily Dispatch Special Corre-
spondent.”
CANBERRA, Friday.

“The West Indies cricket tour

planned for Australia in the com-

ing summer is believed to be
jecpardised by the claim of
Frankie Worrell, who plays for
Radcliffe (Central Lancashire
League) for £1,400 to make the
tour.

“Phe Secretary of the Australian
Board of Control says the matte
is being considered, Recent
M.C.C. cricketers receiver £800
plus allowances.

“More requests for extra pav

ment are feared from Ramadhin
of Crompton (Central Lancashire
League), and Weekes of Bacup
(Lancashire League) and the de-
mands might make the tour im-
possible.

“Australia lost financially on the
West Indies tour in 1930.”

Worreii Denies
When tackled on the question
Frankie Worrell said that he is
not so crazy as to ask for such an



keen on going to Austrana. ant

has asked the West inaies Cricace +

Board of Control for the same
terms as in 1950 English tour, but
has not heard a word from tacm,

He is surprised at the article
and fears that unfounded rumours
are getting around,

“Ram” Said Yes

With regard to Ramadhin, it
was stated that he wrote from
Madras early this year accepting
the invitation to tour Australia,

An announcement in the Daily
Gleaner of Jamaica states that the
personnel of the West Indies team
to tour Australia will be announced
this week and the authenticity of
the statement has been attributed
to Mr. Donald Lacy the Secretary
of the West Indies Cricket Board
of Control.

Australia Responsible

The Gleaner went on to state
that the Australian Cricket Board
of Control was the party respon-
sible for delaying the announce-
ment of the team.

This should give the lie to many
rumours that have been circulated
throughout the West Indies that
are unfavourable to a _ great
cricketer like Worrell.

Two sources are responsible for
the spread of these rumours—



Empire Asked Withdraw

Decision

THE Council of the B.A.F.A. at their meeting yester-
day evening at the Y.M.C.A. headquarters, considered the
situation with regard to the withdrawal of the Empire First
Division team from the competition this season.

After a lengthy discussion, it was decided to await a
further reply from the Empire Club asking them to recon-

sider their decision.

This step was taken after Mr.
J. M. Kidney had suggested that
Mr. E. A. V. Williams, the Em-
pire representative on the Coun.
cil should report back to his club
asking them to withdraw their let-
ter in the interest of the game.
The matter was adjourned until
this evening.

After the Secretary had read the
letteg stating that the Empire Club
was withdrawing from the first
division competition this season,
Mr. G. Rocheford said that the
rules of the Association pointed
out that the six strongest clubs
must play first division football.

Empire he said was one of the
six strongest teams and he did not
think that it would be right to
allow them to withdraw from the
first division and play in the sec-
ond and third divisions. ,He felt
that if they did not withdraw their
letter, they would not be able to
play in the competition this year.

Mr, A. F. Ishmael said that ac-
cording to Rule 5 of the Associa-
tion, any club withdrawing from
the Association during the play-
ing season was liable to a fine of
10/.,. He also said that the Bar-
bados League consisted of three
divisions and that Empire would
not be able to play in the second
and@ third divisions if they were
withdrawing from the firs* divi-
sion.

Hoyos appealed *6 the

Empire representative to with-
draw their letter. It was felt by
many persons in public life that
the step taken by the Empire Club
was a hasty one. He knew that it
would take a big man to withdraw
anything and he believed that Mr.
Williams was big enough to do
that,

* Mr, O. S. Coppin said that he
had spoken with some of the mem.
>

Traffic Don’t
No. 23

DO NOT vokonr TO DIP
YOUR HEADLIGHTS
WHEN MEETING OTHER
VEHICLES AT NIGHT.
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring,



They'll Do

Sauarweit ==

WAS SCARED By
HIS DOC INTO
BO POUNDS wa |
RS. HE ALSO
TOOK OFF To
THE TAILOR’S +.



It Every Time

bers of the Empire Club and he
did not think they were going to
withdraw. That was the impres-
sion he got and he believed that
the Council were placing Mr.
Williams in a very invidious posi-
tion, He would however like Mr.
Williams to tell them on what
grounds his club was withdrawing
from the first division competition
and on what grounds his Commit.
tee took that stand.

Mr. Williams pointed out to the
Council that he had no authority
to withdraw the letter. He said
that the decision was arrived at at
their Annual General Meeting
owing to the terms which were
made by Pickwick C.C. Those
terms he reminded the Council,
were termed by some of their
members as outrageous.

Some of the members of his club
said that they played football for
the sake of the game and with the
hope that the. Association might
make some money which might
come in useful at some future date,
for the purpose of sending a team
abroad and that they might be in-
cluded in that team.

Mr. F. St. C. Hutchinson felt
that the Council was grossly in-
sulted by the stand which the Em.
pire Club had taken because they
had made their letter known to the
public through the Press and in
doing so, were asking the public
to support them in a decision
against the Council.

Mr. Val MeComie said he was
sorry that Mr. Hutchinson had
waited until that late stage to

learn a little about ethics and mor-
ality and that that new attack
should be launched at the Empire
Club.

He reminded Mr. Hutchinson
that he was the introducer of a
motion which succeeded in re-
scinding a previous decision of the
Council and he himself was guilty
of insulting the Council which had
made that first decision.

He counselled Mr. Hutchinson
not to wax so warm on the matter
and said that he was happy to sup.
port very strongly, the stand taken
by the Empire Club because he felt
that it had a very salutary effect
insofar as the Association was
concerned, It made the Associa-
tion the laughing stock of the com.
munity and/the responsibility was
entirely Mr. Hutchinson's, hence
the majority of the blame should
acerue to him,

Registered U.S Parent OMe

PS LOOK«I’M ON™



TAILORING [{ {50
FIT Cee TENTS ses

A DIET! TOOK oFF
POUNDS“GOT Six
SUITS HERE THAT, b.



FRANK WORRELL

firstly journalists who must pro-
vide sensational copy without first
getting facts and secondly the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con—
trol who supply absolutely no in-
formation on a most important
subject and allow the public to
guess or accept whatever irre-
sponsibilities are handed to them
from sources to whom the word
ethics convey nothing.
Need for Review

I consider that the whole ques-
tion of conducting West Indian
Cricket affairs needs review in the
light that the West Indian cricket
public are being kept too little in-
formed of the entire progress of
West Indies cricket, its plans, fin-
ances and its policy.

There should be some system of
liaison with the Press fron, a high
level and let the thinking Press
be in a position to kill rumours at
their birth rather than players
like Worrell, to whom the West





Mr.J. M. Kidney said that he
was a keen advocate of sport and
in view of the fact that they would
have to select a*team for the first
time to play against one from
Jamaica, they must get their
strongest team. He did not think
Barbados could do so without the
assistance of the Empire Club.

He hoped that Mr. Williams
would carry back to his Club all
that he had said so that they might

be able to reconsider their de-
cision,
He felt that the Empire Club

was sufficiently sporting and good
enough at heart to withdraw that
Jetter and come back into the com-
petition.

Mr. Williams said that his Club
was having a meeting that very
night and he would tell them all
that was said.

Mr, D. H. L. Ward said that as
far.assthe rules of the Association
were concerned, the Empire Club,
having decided to write the Asso-
ciation a letter of withdrawal from
the first division, they would have
to withdraw from the other divi
sions»as well,

With regard to Mr. Hutchinson's
remarks saying that the Empire
Club had insulted the Association,
he would say that if he was the
Spartan representative and had
unything to do with the Spartan
Committee he would also see that |
Spartan withdrew from the aie
tire competition. Unlike Empire
he would have seen that they had
raat affiliated for the season
rst.

cision of the Council said that they
had made themselves the laughing
stock of the community.

He was reliably informed that
other clubs were most anxious to
withdraw, perhaps, for reasons
better known to themselves.

After further discussion, the
Council decided to await the reply
from the Empire Club.

The Council agreed to terms by
the Finance Committee with the
Pickwick C.C, for receiving a
Kingston C.C. football team here
to play a series of games next
month, subject to confirmation
from Jamaica. The team is due
to arrive in Barbados on May 18
and will play games as follows
Monday May 21 vs. Colts, Wee- |
nesday May 23 vs, a Club team, |
Thursday May 24 First Colony
Game, Saturday, May 26, 2nd
Colony Game, Monday, May 28
vs. a Club team, Tuesday, May 29
3rd Colony Game.

The team is expected to leave on
May 30,

Mr, A, F. Ishmael was appoint
ed to act as a member of the Se-
lection Committee during the ab.
sence of Mr. S. O'C. Gittens whc
is in Trinidad.

The Council approved a motion
that Mr. G. Wilkes be appointed
to coach 24 players in preparation
for the Jamaica tournament,

By Jimmy Hatlo









Wy
LOOK! it’s NOTHING To \—]
= LIKE BEING IN A LET OUT. SEE WE He
HE'S PUT BACK SAME MIDGET'S GIRDLE! 1 CUT EVERYTHING
ALL THE TONNAGE TAL Ore WHAT DO I DO A=] OFF LAST TIMEâ„¢s
PLUS I5 POUNDS als Buy NEW ZOOTS



BESIDES~30-0-0, |
WHERE DO WE GO
FROM HERE =




1S AL Af ae

Every person who had spoken to
him with regard to the last de.

)
|
|

“SONNY” RAMADHIN

Indies owe so much, be subjected

abuse,
Nunes Unmindful

I was in Jamaica and from what
I have seen of Mr. Numes the
President and what I have been
able to learn of him, he seems to
consider himself, beyond the »cen-
sure of the West Indies Cricket
public and the actions of the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control,
of which he is the head, are kept
as Kremlin secrets.

If Mr. Nunes thinks so, I aim
willing to lead a campaign to bring
home to him the error of such
thought,

What has become of the £30,000
prefit from the 1950 West Indies’
tour? Is Barbados’ £2,000 poor
relation pittance still being with-
held from them in reproof for
having asked about the legality
of the disposal of the funds? What
has become of the rest? Has it!
been invested?

What is being planned by the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
trol for the benefit of future West
Indies Cricket now that they have
more funds than they ever had?

All these are questions that the
West Indies Cricket public want
to know and which any other
parent body would have told their
member bodies ever since.

Jamaica Footballers Coming

The Kingston Cricket Club
football team from Jamaica, is
due to arrive here on May 18
I shall give readers of this column
the personnel of the team in a few
days when final word comes from
Jamaica,

The provisional fixture allows
for six games—three colony games,
one Colt’s match and two club
fixtures.

The Council of the Barbados
Amateur Football Association
have accepted with thanks an
offer from Mr. Wilkes of the Lodge
School to supervise the training of
twenty-four players from whom
the colony teams will be selected.

The Selection Committee of the
B,A.F.A. will select these
twenty-four players in another
few days and will commence
training at once.



i

The teams selected to play this

afternoon are: —
: A. Weatherhead;
Patterson, |
oO
Jordan and G. Fos-

“A” Team.
G. MacLean;
(Capt.); M.
Johnson; G.
ter

B.
FitzGerald;

“B” Team. P. Foster; B, Brooks;

T. Yearwood; H.

Weatherhead;

to such personal pain and general 7. Orne D.’ Bannister. and. M.

It may be possible to arrange
for. a Harrison College team to
play a match against the naval

men,

hat’ ‘
What’s on Today
Court of Grand Sessior:—
10.00 a.m,
Police Courts—10.00 a.m.
Meeting of the St. Peter's
Vestry—1.30 p.m



ondary School vs, James
Street Boy Scouts — at
Harrison College—5 p.m.
Police Band gives open air
concert at Parry School,
St. Lucy—7.45 p.m.
CINEMAS

“Quartet”
“Christopher Columbus"
jhadow of Doubt'’

r
Th * Underworld”

Globe :



Piggy (Bridgetown): “Code of The
ext”
Aquatic; “The Razor's Edge”

ASSIZE DIARY
‘Rex vs Clarence Barker.
‘Rex vs Herbert Hutson, An-
+ gus Hunte and
Winfield Layne,



‘The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.55 a.m
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) April
14.

Lighting: 6.30 p
High- Water; 6. 16 2 am. > 42.31
p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil.
Total for Month to yesterday

.73 in,
Temperature (Max). 87.5 °F
Temperature (Min). 74.0 °F
Wind Direction . a.m.) E.
(3. p.m. E.N.E
Wind Velocity 14 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m:) 30.017
(3 p.m.) 29,943











Regatta On
Saturday

The sixth, regatta of the 195]
season will be sailed over on
Saturday in Carlisle Bay under

the auspices of the Ro al Barbados
Â¥acht Chub, Handicaps and start-































; ———
Class “No! “Wieht Start at Flag
B 4 Hi-Ho 2,30 Red '
/D» 8 Peter Pan 2.31 Yellow
"
B+ 10 Witara 2.32 Red
D 4 ore 2.33 Yellow
‘
B 13 Ranger
Dd 1 Van Thorndy ¥ 244 Red
D. 12 Rainbow
"
B 6. Flirt
D 1 Buccaneer 2.35 Yellow
B 481 Fantasy 2.36 Red
B 3 War Cloud ;
B 8 Rascal 2.37 Yellow
— 1,
B 9 Okapi 2.28 Ped
D z Imp ‘
dD ® Olive Blossom 2.39 Yellow
B 7 Moyra Blair, 240 Red —
——rs
Dd 7 Sinbad 241 Yellow
B_ 5 Mischief 243 Red -
B 1 Gipsy 244 Yellow
c 1 Miss Behave .
K 34 Comet 2.45 Red
0
I 6 Eagle
I 7 Mohawk 2.46 Yellow
— .
c 9 Folly ; y
I 2 Invader 247 Red
Tt 9 Dauntless
%
c 8 Peggy Nan
G 11 Magwin 2.48 Yellow
K 35. Edril a:
'
c 2 Scamp 2.49 Red
K 29 Cyclone 2.51 Yellow
K 4 Vamoose :
I ll Reen 252 Red,
I 12 Dawn ;
I 1 Gnat 2.53 Yellow
I 4 Coronetia
T 18 Clytie 2.54 Red
——
c 7 Rogue
c 10 Gannet 2.55 Yellow



amen 8;
N.B. The following date has been fixed
for gattas:—
7th Regatta, Saturday, 28th April.
H, BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter.

Brion, Gardner Fight
Should Not Be Called Off

NEW YORK, April 11.
Hymie Wallman, Americar
manager of Argentine heavy-
weight Caesar Brion, said here it
would be “a lousy thing” to cal
off the proposed fight in London
between Brion and Jock Gardner
British and European champion
It was reported in London yes-

terday that the fight schedulec
for May 22 might not be held
It had already been reportec
postponed from April 24 becausc
Gardner injured a thumb is
training.

Waliman. — said: “We only

accepted the match in the hope o

getting a shot at Lee Savold ir
England, Otherwise it woula
not have been worth while

financially, But we expected tc
lick Gardner and then get the
match with Savold.”

—Reuter.

THE B'DOS FRIENDLY
FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
To-day’s fixture:—

Westerners “B’’ vs. Penrode a
St. Leonard’s.
Referee: Mr. O, Graham.





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THE ENERGY-
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\
Toni

Were

sognenponeens st
SOIREE IIS

THURSDAY,

T'dad Prepares For
Summer Race Meet

s
APRib 48, 1951

Griffiths, Gomes
Off To Good Start

‘From OUF Own Correspondent) KINGSTON, J’ca., April 7
Hubert Griffiths and Ralph
wate ee! SPAIN, April 9. Gomes Trinidad’s table’ tennjs
a aeces. have scarctly aces got off to a big start last night
ended when race fans are alread Sg a big ste

concentratin, th are already when each easily beat good
Turf Club ees necting which Jamaican players in exhibition
s te 4 Aen Sephel = s

wa beg on June 28 and 20, 2#mes, preliminary to the inter

colonial championship starting
ele i: of 28 maces tonight . so ;
and erumine in tubes and neitee. Flavia Davis, visiting lady |




champion was beaten two sets to

This? teers cor the aera one by Eldores Kapp, Jamaica
‘Twa champion .
at in, remeieny Cham- “"Over 700 people witnessed the

, Bion * ; horse, whipped
Foote on a oceasions he met

im,
Ocean: Pearl, ruler of the Trini-

dad turf. There is a lot of én-
couragement. for top-grade ani-

mals on the programme—five “A”
class events—three “B”,

and probably the return of



. four “C”

and the “C” class maiden—so we
should see the champions out in
full force witli a~strong invasion

—CP)

games.



ween





from Barbados, i

CRYPTOQUOTE NO. 5. |
One JRQFBMRP IER PLRRD,
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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE TWO IIARHADOS AllVtX Ml III! II-.IIW \IMill. 12 IMI Ccuiib galling T HIRTY-TWO pas*. iu kdoa aro makmR -t Caribbean cmtMoa tin ColotntiiAmong Ihem are. thr Tibi Wainwrights, belli T known at the WndTTtn wainwdfhts. . Col and Mrs. Leonard w. Ijicas who after the cruise are continuins on 10 the li K Mr and Mrs. C. K. Sbrpherd of Collrton House. St. ivicr. The MIUM Enid and Daisy Fergusaon of Rnveiu Court, Fontabello Mlsa Mabel Armstrong. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Proverbs and their son Roy ... Mr David Read of the Canadian Rank "f Cominern Duilnf his il J.imaic. David uill aee his brotfci'i r.cofTrev who i with the Rsty.il Bank of Canada in Kingston 9. Mr, Geoffrey Skinner. Mr Tm Armstrong, who U> in chart) Hook': Mt and Mrs. E. C Jack man. Mr .lackman is | iciiini C'Kirt of Appeal Judae No Exception DOUCE BAND conocrti.at the MT Ha.stlug* Rocks always draw a large crowd and the one lonittht primuses to be no exception Police concerts* at the Rocks on? generally held on Fridays; the one tonight is in aid of a deserving cause. I POCKET CARTOON fe OSBERT LANCASTER "Now rrmemhrr — ,f *v* get th(a Lady Qodiva fob, Vm relying on JPU to explain 10 in, Pre*, ihnr M only apitiled for ic htcau-e we're to fond of C iHii n. Hot Tip'. C ARIB got a hoi tip. yesterday. Film--t..i John WajK hi .Unto irnve California this week in hi* private plane local girl.". pulses are already quickening, for. his destination is the Ci*ibb*an islandi Speculation is rife among the teen-ager* as to whether he will make SeawcU. The B.O.C. Cup rpHE Barbados Orchid CaTClo 1 has offered a Challenge Cup to be competed for at The Barbados Horticultural Society Exhibition to be hold at Queen'.. Park on 21sl April. 1951. At a Meeting of the Itspmbers of the B.O.C it was decided that the Cup should be awarded only to members whose 'ubscription wa not in arrears, to be competed for ..nnunlly. and must be won three (3) tune* in succession >r four (4) times in all," before becoming the property ol the winMr It shall be awarded for the best and most outstanding specimen whether on Plant or Cul Flower. Any year that the Barbados Horticultural fcocieiy docs not hold a show, U shall be competed for at the Barbs** _Agricultural Society show al the end of that yoar No competitor Khali act as a Judge for the Cup Fnfafcd T HE ENGAGEMENT has been announced between Mi Tom Reecc of the Income Tax Department and Miss Grace Bishop daughter of Mr. F. A Bishop. Controller of Supplies and Mrs. Bishop ol "Bingcn" Howells Cross Road. Simon's Father B RKMsDIBl gfMM son Simon owns. %  l m use on the St Peter coast, has bought the Gteasatr the only evening paper published in Kredericton. capital city of Nc .. %  Hi unswick. Canada. Two years ago. Brig. Warded .-old his nolding in Sassrllne Ketord to Mr 11. C, (Harlcvi Dray ton. the City financier He Kg | fcCkao over this rmall weekly paper in 194b and had built up n iirculatton of more Ihan 400,000. Tin Gleaner Is a paper which carries great weight m Nam Brunswick. Under the direction of Brigadier Wardell it can be expected to expand In prestlgv i.nd influence. Travel Agent T C.A. brought down Mrs. Gladys Cell yesterday on a Uvo-day visit. A representative of Tom Travel and Tick' I in Peterborough. Ontario. \hc has already vlsfted Bermuda. Next stop II Trinidad Mrs Elsie Watson rame down on the same S lane. She is from Hamilton, ntarlo. Here for six weeks' holiday she is a guest at the Marine Hotel, . Mrs. George Somers was al Seowell vrterday lo meet her husoaiiu who had been up north on a short vial U.K. and Dominica C OL. J..H..WHITEHOUSB, now retired from the Rntisn Indian Army came in oil the CotemhU yesterday from the UK. to spend a month's holiday al the Ocean View Hotel. Mr A A. Halacay, ,vho got on board in Dominica is C.D.C's resident engineer In that colony. His wife accompanied him. They are here for two or three days staying al the Marine Hotel before leaving for St Lucia Miss Irene Davis and her sister Marie also came in from Dominica by the Colamble. Advanced Information S HORTLY after ten o'clock yesterday morning, a Grumman Avenger lighter touched down at Seowell from II.MCS MactiiHr***. light fleet carrier wlmJi ncvompanled by IIMCS Mleaaae, Tribal das, destroyer are on their way to Barbadoson a f. ur-day visit The ships are du_to arrive in Carlisle Bay this afternoon at 4 o'clock and will bo Pi i',dining here until Monday. Tha Grusnman Avenger hada crew of four on board. Lt (TAS) P C. H. Cooke. Il C *.' Donald H Cheney Auotant Canadian Governmer.t i < -mrnissioncr in Trinidad, .' Root Hughe*, pdot Mad 1 I <>) J Anderson, navigator The plane left Seawell three hours later to return to the ship leaving Lt. Cooke and Mr. Cheney behind U> make advance arrangements 'ind get advance details for the sport and entertainment ga> ragtgjggogggaj for the ships' comLt Cooke has been in tho navy f',r ten years and served in llw North Atlantic during the war. He %  teciallscs In torpedo anti-submarine work. He is Operations Officer on board the Magnificent. Donald Cheney has been >n Trmi dad for nearly two yearn and has visited Barbados many times. He is due back in Trinidad on Satuidn Mainiflcenl and Mleime left Halifax March ISth on training < xcrcises in the Caribbean. They have already visited Bermuda and Trinidad. Their destination when they leave Barbados Halifax via Boston. On board the Magnificent arc Iwo fighter squadron*, Grumman Avenger anti-submarine lighters and Hawker-Sea Fury fighters. Jamaica and Trinidad M RS F K. N. MASCOLL and her two children Phillip and Sandra are on their way Jamaica by the Colombia after spending a holiday with Mrs. Mascoll's relatives. Her husband Capt Neville Maacoll is Garrison Adjutant at Palisadoe*. Also on board tho Colombia but getting off m Trinidad are Mr and Mrs. Carlos Lyon and their two children Sheila Ann and Jo-Ann. Mr. Lvofl i* Shipping Superintendent of U.B.O.T in Port-of-Spa in They had been here since March 14th. Succen Story S TOWAWAY who hus become a commercial success within four years of his arrival in Britain is Harry Samuel who comes from Belize, British Honduras. On a business trip to Manchester last week, a London friend met him at Moss-side, and was shown around his property-iour lame boardinghouses with European and Colonial tenants. A tailor by trade. Samuel hopes to establish a tailoring business In Ixmdon this summer. .Olllllll III \l r\ VICTORIAN MlSat . up-u--pf hair, toft front curls M ICHELLE tiAY STFINEK diDihter ml the hair atxIrM was asked what abe weald like for her seeood blrthasvy She %  aid: A colour, like Afu-nni, *e. with artlHelal hair [l aveM Ml.hrllisltUni under thr drier) these three hair f tries were created by father far hei birth day party. Michelle hu long, airaichl "lank) hair which, in the noraaaj waj la worn tied with a bow as. top MADAME BUTTERFLY false has 1 the hair hanging down her back. This slr-.ithi Iwii problem half whale she it young—will be perfect, and easy lo dre* In attractive styles when Michelle crows up On the ear r of ofcildrena hair Mr. Kleiner says: < le^nl usaaa la all impcrianl Waahins Die hair up to three limes a wrek is tood %  asfl won't make It dry. I'nash children's hair back off thr hairline This i. Important. OPENING TO-MOKKOW 1 A *;; GLOBE Presents ITS lsl PARAMO! NT FILM .IEN0RITA rnrtrrlmo thick taffU of hair A fringe In childhood spoil, the halrllce wham the child grows %  p The hair 'iu'be kept off the forehead WISDOM FOR WOMEN "Feminine vanity; that d*rasg gift which makes women charminF "—Disraeli B.B.C. Radiq Programme T o.m. The New.; 7.10 < m. Nr<.. AnlWs, 7 11 %  m. Tram Ui* B0.io.i.,u T.a a TOProsHm,,^,. p.,*. JO ,, I-*-nefall bpeaklns: 7.U a.m. Land an-i LlvaaUick SIS am. LHOJIHII ChOlc* SJS ,.m. ReelUI, S4S am SHrs %  >' 'or Huniu Bodiea: S a.m The Ne*1 10 a terrchoH*. us aaa spwui iMioat... 1 -TWM.r.. The tfewa, 1110 p m. Nr.. Analy**. II IS p.m. Clow Down. L11-W m H.M M 4.IS pin Top So>*. i pm Cwr-pox-r of .> Sat—1 IS am ,. SSS4, SI.M. W.4S M S a.m. BBC BaoOlah Orcherba. Ml p m Prucramen* Parade. p.m. Tw Newe. T.IS pm. Nov.* Analyau. 7.11 p m. We aee Britain. l.**-| | M , .. im M. M .U M 7.4S pm <;." -i .II-Hpaakiiii. %  ( > n iNlu Nrwareol; S IS p m. The Adv.',: lure* of PC V Stt pm Coinpoacr Ihe Week. pm Special [>i-palch. >l n>m Slr *lin J Beachcomber JFVERAI, hundred mtllioB people hnve writlen to ask Prodnoae: Why do you tell such ObvV I! I If Myself Whnt do you suppose wmilit happen If I wrote, 'Tour people have written." etc? You would he the rlrst to go about saying*. "He gets no fan mail." for that's th# barbarous language you talk—"He g<:-: no fan mail, therefore, he is nn good." rrodnoae Well, couldn't you say "hundreds" or even "thousands" have written? Myself No. Everybody says that. Anyhow. I have forgotten what 1 was going to write about SpfTiul Meat*** Iniinn M ISTER BEACHCOMBER.. Hi. pore hirtrnddnts at hour shouj In Bedford lant uvcefc Is of heros the orriblc uusewifrB u>ai not hov wr i Tip cnufj kale to that rspecial (raxes could be of brlno run to lake pceple to hour shou< BpOTi ts t*e Enaltthmrni Karsul taut pore proovvrbs, tt> hwilftt these tetfith trim men slop tiling kole ttetaw will be of bet up han itt lartt ley. and with triiMiaud* 0J I'lrcirrUts ouiltnp for kulturd ilrsplais hov ftrteosos hand torde/oxcers, ho pet. Bi posh ow can liou ixpei, the u straight, to save space, as in Ihe excellent blue-prints of Ihe three way street to be seen at thel Ministry f Transport Museum 111 Cuffcstrect. Whctv the cist-west traffic crosses a three-way street it does so in a west-cast direction on one of Ihe two-day roundabouts, coming back to UM point of "•entry just where the straight tdgl of the ramp borders the parkodrome. This geiabltg a I the parkodrome to be caught up in the main stream of Btsmonary traffic at cilher end of the ramp, and avoids the diversion necessary for cars coming the other way. limrii llnrmunylunv I T is claimed that an electronic computer Prodnoae : What is Ihot* Myself: If you don't know, you must be mixing with very qucr* ninpany. It is claimed lhat tmthing, which computes ssssysTOnleall). %  can execute a series of instructions if a given situation exists." Aha! But what happens if a given situation does not exist, and refuses to exist* Riddle me that, my Trinity scholar. i, <><>./ ttiifttanro H EHE i* an excellent example of how to gel rid of late guests who debate on weight: matters Al 2 a.m. Ninon dc Lenclos was being bored by two dreary visit to her salon. They were discu: ing the costume of the ancient Greeks. "Gentlemen," she said "I wonder what time the Lacedaemonians went to bed." Junior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate Invites all children under 12 to enter 10' Its Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be pubhf.!ie< every Monday n The Evening; Advocate, and tho winner will receivi a prise to the value of 7 6 In cither books or stationery. The storir can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than SO 1 words In length, ard must reach The Childrw's Editor, Tha Advaeaf C. Lid.. Chy not later than Wednesdaeverr week. NOTE : Stories must not be copied. Send this coupon with your story. laSSa SIIOET STOEY COMPETITION Naaae A* .. SekMl Farm Ileanr Address "IS CLCAR a nd STAYS CLBAK' CaSSeroleS Deep & Shallow, 2 Shapes $1.26-2.39 Chicken Casserole 2.52 Entree Dishes 1.89 Roasters 3.15 Gravy Boat & Plalter — 1.26 EVANS & WHITriEI.DS DIAL 4606 YOUR SH0F STORE NEW COTTON FIBRE NEW DELHI. A now cotton fibre longer thar the Egyptian and American long staple vasjety has been crossed and successfully grown In Suart, Western India. An experimental rop produced a fibre I 1/4 mchrleng. or 15 per cent longer thai the present variety.—(CW PLAN SPEEDY COPTERS KUALA LUMPUR. Malay. British helicopters are taking i active part in the campaig; against Communist guerrillas In Malaya. New models with speeds of more than 100 mile, per hotr are to be put into service. —K.f) BOOKS FOR WOUNDED LONDON More than 2.000 hooks, plus magazines, have been tssn t" %  'ice hospital in Kuie. Japan, by the British Red Cross and St John Hospital Library department for use of British servicemen wounded in Korea. — CROSSWORD 1 • i 1 7 | 1 r r .'i J 1 r • r '' rJ \a i 1 l' Arrow 1. I-sU, must I n..sH imperdxt/ n> 10. To mssa s atiut 1 tore |sln. |WI it. A uiis nur aa> • spy, <4i 12. htrpiMd. 141 13. IC lis a Brrt is aui DMUH vaiudibls. Hi 1^. Jointly. Hi IS. 3ui'h u:v i rcclprocsJ. (S| to. Nnilrrd in good aduosUon 13) 11. iitpUle. (41 O. At insrt s chsass ,.r (sin. (S) ft. Moi nros>MrU> well uulorad. (•) g. tta an erf*orr. ( 4i 6, Wina casks. u>> OOWR i. Bora or uMDuiaeturM it eaa as a pest. (•} ft. IM on. %  .( a. in s way rou'rs fcouniTto ai. t4) *. Lit sod IT. a now tha rest in. (Ii I don't st iii.i wav. IB) I. Liquid Uiu'sora lo ars t 111 a School ol tioV (4) i> iiimquilly. %  > i* Oicrlbea Ui* rongSBt Itf'r. (il is. Wbis you will nod the J. u w. A *! %  • to CSU hit leet alip jway and he toei down with a lerribk bump. Picking himtell up raibcr ahiloly he bean thiKklss from behind him. Ye., K serves mc right," he muiien. "If I hjdn-i turned to laugh u AI B y 1 ahouldn'i have lallen. And. oh dear, here'* Mummy** bag of eggs1 do be) eve every or-.e \% broken I Whii iMI I a*>" AMMTH M.I II CINEMA MembenOnl V ) TYRONT. POWtMt OgNI TIEKNKY—JOHN PAYNB—AHNE BAXTEH THE RAZOR'S EDGE A 1Mb Caattury-Foa Pletura itAvio rArtAn__c,i.YNis JOHNH and Ihe New Sv.adlah Star MAI ZgTTgfU-WG Hi millM PLAZA DIAL OIVI l.\ 8404 THr SHADOW IN *ll*mlN I.AI1V >iu> KA It HK.1IMOMD and HIMUMAN JOI: .limn %  IJXIN nmni. FrKI.. %  nd Caerunulnd HI.OOI OS III MOON" MITCIU'M "••<• ii. ..i tmpi I.AII;TY I THE GARDEN) St. JSAHM Iil SHOW Tonllr S r> X.Q. JAMCg WAHI1F.N In I > pm KKil JAMI-s WAHMEN in c trill (II llll VV| I KOnKHT MtTTMUM BkMPIME To-day Ml and a.M lo-morrow ?.30 Only J. Arlhur Rank Presrnl* FREDR1C MARCH In COLUMBUS Color By Technicolor Co.Starring .... Florence ELDHIDGE — with — Francis L. SULLIVAN -ind Linden THAVERS HOW La.^1 Two Shows To-day 4.3S and 8.15 Universal Big Double George RAFT .nut Pat O'BRIEN in BROADWAY and EYES of the UNDERWORLD with Lon CHANEY and Richard D1X ROYAL Last Two Show* To-day 4.31 and 8.3* Republic Big Double Teresa WRIGHT and Joseph COTTON In SHADOW of a DOUBT RIDERS'" of SANTA FE Starring . Rod CAMERON and Fuzzy KNIGHT OLYMPIC To-day Only i ID anal 1.15 Kopubllc Smashing Double Lynnc ROBERTS and Charles DRAKE In WINTER WONDERLAND and GOLDEN STALLION Rov ROGERS ai Dale EVANS SLEEP l.\ THE BRAND OF GREATNESS IS ON... A sold Terrifying Sfory The Richest Ranch* landIn the Wastl .HAL WllLIS •nautrgsi STANWYCK COREY WAlTtt HUSTON \ JUDITH ANDERSON BWBM-BSVBBI KiMNian I OaKl by AKtHOIIY M*H A •o'Clr-O,-' Pi \jr iy ihe author of "Duol In Th* Sun" %  -g—P-l' .. CM.IM StfBf* -f Him i -x-il %  • r*r-• ftno The ALL-STAR fiileiit Contest fealurini;: KKITII SEALRY "Count Bvanp Star" JOE (Shine) CLARK "Route 66" SAM "GORDON "Nit2 And Day" COUNT DEVONISH "A Little Bird Told He" ERROL BARNETT "My Foolish Heart" OTHA TAYLOR "LauuhinK On Tho Outsidt-" HOLMAN RAYSIDE "Our Very Own" 7 LOCAL STARS COMPETING FOR THE SaVER CUP Pit 20. House 36 Bui. 48. Box 60c. Positively Your Best WEEKEND. SiaMmq FRIDAY. 2 30. 4 45 & 8 30 aod conl.nurng daily 4 45 & 8 30 iiho-n xnio aauksou/vm rum AGAIN WITH ANOTHER COLOSSAL HIT AT TOUR POPULAR SHOW HOUSE P | ". V A BRIDGETOWN %  M Xsl asa XSi (DIAL 2310) mot twanes. M M U1N „ ROBERT MITCHUM FAITH DOMERGUE CLAUDE RAINS *%m* .^UmiWiMuiuaru' PLUS : The NEW SHORT : LEON ERROL in • WEDTIMt STORIES" and Litest "WORLD NEWS" (Wjnur Talhe) C.mlns :— .. U'HITl TIIU L1) III.EN FOSI) -VAIJ iRKo.RAiiio nnllL lUni.li > LAUDE RAINS. %  H BEDSTEADS MAHOGANY COLOUR—From 27.72 each COIL SPRINGS from S12J9 each MATTRESSES from $13.40 each CHECK Our Prices on Thee I aaMfMaan .lusl live BEAUCAIRE THE ll\llll VIMIS I O-Ol'l IIAl IVI 4'OTTO.S* FACTORY LTD. THi: SI I'I llll ItBY ti.EWSF.B lor rlfimiiiif m PHI Hats. Froclotand Gown.. Crepe >le Cbtaaa, Vollt, Ninons. Dainty Materials. Carpets. Rugs. Curtains. Jewellery. Uloves. Lamp Shades. Glassware. Wintl Serrens. Ornaments. Silverware. Sparking Plugs. Chrominum Fittings, Typewriters, Upholstery In bottles of two sizes 60V. and 34c. per bottle PLANTATIONS LTD. BRIDGETOWN SPEIGHTSTOWN I


ESTABLISHED 1895

le

hhavbados



THURSDAY, A



7



>»





12, 1951

i

» Advocate







Fresident Truman relieves

MACARTHUR

TRUMAN



Gen. MacArthur of commands

WAR

‘

United Nations forces
udvance against



Herb. Morrison say: Britain
ready to negotiate cease-fire

’ .
KOREA

CANADA



Ridgway takes

SACKS

over com

m







PRICHy FIVE

New budget shows taxes
jump sixteen per cent

MACARTHUR

ss) aa

CELEBRATES INDEPENDENCE DAY TAX ES JUMP

A GREAT wilitary parade was held in Athens recently in celebration
of Greek Independence Day, at which King Paul took the salute from

THE GENERAL DISOBEYED, How the |U-K

PRESIDENTIAL ORDERS

WASHINGTON, April 11.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN early to-day relieved

General Douglas MacArthur from all his
commands.

The President said he concluded that General!
MacArthur was “unable to give his wholehearted
oo. to United States and United Nations
policies.

President Truman named as MacArthur’s suc-
cessor Lieutenant General Matthew B. Ridgway,
at present Commander of the United States Eighth
Army in Korea.

' General MacArthur was appointed Command-
er-in-Chief, United Nations Forces in Korea, in
July, 1950, when the Security Council authorised

the United States to establish a unified command

there.

Announcing MacArthur's dis-’
missal at a press conference at,
the White House today, President
Truman said “military Com-
manders must be governed by
policies.and_ directives ~of the}
Government. In times of crisis
this consideration is particularly
compelling.”

He designated Ridgway as his
successor, as Supreme Command-
er Allied powers, Commander in
Chief United Nations Command,
Commander in Chief in the Far
East and Commanding General
of the’ United States army in the
Far East.

The President appointed Lieu-
tenant General James A. Van
Fleet to succeed General Ridgway,
in command of the Eighth Army.

President Truman made his
announcement of the dismissal of
MacArthur at a_ special press
conference to which correspond-
ents were summoned early, _

The time was fixed to coincide
as nearly as possible with deliv-
ery to General MacArthur at}
Tokyo of the order relieving him
of his command “effective: at
once.” *

The White House released with
the President’s statement a memo-~
randum purporting to show dift-
erences’ between MacArthur's
statements and actions and Presi-
dential policy.



The President’s order, tele-
graphed to MacArthur over Army
Communications network was

brief and pointed.

4 deeply regret that it becomes
my duty as President and Com-
mander-in-Chief of the United
States Military forces to replace
you as_ Supreme Commander
Allied Powers, Commander-in-
Chief, United Nations Command,
Commander-in-Chief Far East and
Commanding General of the
United States Army in the Far

East.

“You will turn
over your Com-
mands _ effective
at once to Lieu-
tenant General

Matthew B.
Ridgway, You
are authorised to
have issued such
orders as are ne-
cessary to com-
plete desire d

travel to such
places as you
select.

“My reasons
for.your replace-
ment will be

made public co-
ineident with the
delivery to you of

the foregoing

order and = are :

contained in the next following,

message” (this referred to the

President's statement). |
The President’s statement as-

serted that General MacArthur's |
place in history “as one of our}
greatest commanders” was fully
established. :

“The nation owes him a debt of
gratitude for distinguished and ex-
ceptional service which he has
rendered his country in posts of
great responsibility,” Truman
said. ;

“For that reason, I repeat my
regret at the necessity for the
action I have been. compelled to
take in his case.” i

The President made public a
series of previously secret direc-
tives. tending to show how Gen-
eral MacArthur had failed to fol-
low the Administration’s foreign

nlicy
ae included one from the
Joint Chiefs of Staff to General
MacArthur, and other Command-



PETAIN IMPROVES

ILE DYEU (Off Atlantic
Coast), April 11.

Ex-Marshal Philipe Petains
health has “markedly improved

since yesterday, h's doctor said |

to-day.

“Such a recovery would have
been impossible without his extra-
ordinary physical resistance”, the
doctor added,

«He pointed out however that
the “crisis has not yet been over-
come”.

—Reuter.

i ceaiieeenneaterioneipesociicimnitinistai
Only 4 days left to get in
the Advocate Year Book







national crisis.




Gen, MacArthur





; ;
' | Goes To Nassau

ers last September, embracing the
Presidential order that “no speech,
press release or other public
statement concerning activities
must be released

General Mac Arthur’s dismissal
was the climax of a long series
of differences with President
Truman over Far Eastern policy.

Some observers said the action
raised prospects that General Mac
Arthur might return to the U.S. te
deliver a series of attacks against
the administration, probably
under the auspices of Republican
supporters in general.

MacArthur, caught off-balance
by Truman’s dramatic announce-
ment, was understood this after-
noon to be preparing a_ state-
ment in his own defence. It was
not immediately known here ex-
actly how the surprise change-
over would be effected but it
seemed likely that Mac Arthur
would be called home as quick-
ly as possible.

He has not been back to the

United, States for 15 years. Du-
ring that time he frequently re-
fused invitations to make a visit.

General Ridgway’s. appointment
was universally welcomed here.
Observers regarded it as the com-
pletion of the breaking up ‘of
“Mac Arthur’s Empire.”

Reuter’s Correspondent Paul
Scott Rankine writing from Wash-
ington says that President Truman
in the boldest act of his career
to-day used his full constitutional
powers as Commander-in-Chief
of the United States armed forces
to dismiss one of the country’s
greatest military heroes at the
peak of his popularity.

The audacious removal from all
his commands of General Douglas
Mac Arthur staggered Washington
and was bound to split the coun-
try from top to bottom in a bitter
controversy at the time of inter-

Extremes of
pro - MacArthur
forces might even
call for the im-
peachment of
Truman though
they stand little
or no chance of
obtaining the.re-
quired support in
Congress to make
this a_ practical
proposition,

On the surface,
opportunities
given to the pro-
MacArthur Re-
publican faction
to exploit the |
situation for po-
litical publicity
purposes were
immense and
’ breath-taking.
Points in Truman's favour were
however rooted in the tradition of
the American people which go to
the depth ‘to which partisan
politics and publicity however
glaring could seldom reach.

There was every indication in
first reactions to Mac Arthur’s
dismissal that Truman would have
a majority of people and prob-
ably a majority of Congress behind
him.

Truman anchored his decision
firmly upon sections of the United
States Constitution, sacred to
every American and drafted by
founders cf the Republic with the
specific objective of preventing
victorious generals from challeng-
ing the authority of elected repre-
sentatives of the people. Even the
most belligerent anti-White Housc
congressman would hesitate be-
fore, standing as a champion for
military. versus civilian power,
—Reuter

Billy Butlin

LONDON, April 11.
“Billy” Butlin left London by
air last night for the Bahamas for
talks in| Nassau with American
| businessmen interested in the
| ovtion to buy his “vacation vill-
} age’.
He said: “If the option is not
taken up, Butlin’s (Bahamas)
Ltd.. will go into Jiquidation,.”

| REVAN WILL REMAIN

LONDON, April 11,



| British Minister of Labour
Aneurin Bevan has made it clear |
that he wi!l remain a member of
the Government.

‘ —Reutcr,

world
reacts

LONDON, April 11,
In Western Europe, reaction to
to-day’s dismissal of General
Douglas Mac Arthur has been al-
most without exception. But ihe
General found Champions in Aus-
tralia and among the Japanese

people,

Reuter telegrams from _ the
world capitals reported:

Lake Success, United Nations

circles were generally relieved.
General Mac Arthur had been
a source of consiaerable con-
fusion in the United Nations for
some time.

‘fokyo: Immediate Japanese re-
action was sorrowful and there
was every indication that the
sorrow was real, Newspaper
editors commented that Japan-
ese had real sentiment for Mac
Arthur.

Australia: Dr. Herbert Evatt:
former President of the United
Nations Assembly and Labour
Party leader said at an election
meeting in Sydney “whatever
the outcome of this dispute, I
again pay tribute to Mac Arthur
who did so much for Australia
during the days when we were
in deadly peril from the Japan-
ese,

France: Socialist Deputies greet-
ed the news with relief, Former
Premier Paul Reynaud said the
President’s action solved an
inter-Allied issue, and a French
Foreign Office spokesman ex-
pressed “satisfaction”,

Great Britain: Diplomatic quar-
ters in London felt that reper-
cussions from the move went
far beyond the immediate
issues in Korea. It was consid-
ered that a change in leadership
simplified efforts to make a new
and determined effort to_end
the war,

Soviet Russia: No official reaction
was available. Tass the Soviet
News Agency reported” the
change without comment. But
many observers regarded the
dismissal as possibly the open-
ing of a new approach for a
solution in Korea,

Germany: In Berlin all East
German newspapers gave pron:-
inence to the news and two eve-
ning papers said the mass of
protests of peace loving people
had forced the issue.

Denmark: Independent Aften-
bladent said “Europeans will re-
ceive the news of the General’s
dismissal with dry eyes. No
official comment was available,

Belgium: Prime Minister Jos-
ephe Pholien just back from
America said General Mac
Arthur took upon himself too
much authority,

Holland: The Netherlands Gov-
ernment fully supports Presi-
cent Truman’s removal of the
General, it was officially an-
nounced here. The Dutch Gov-

ernment had brought to the
attention of the American
Government _ its “increasing |
concern” about General Mac
Arthur’s actions during the last 4
few days,
India: Official circles were sur-

prised and guarded in comment
waiting to see’ if President
Truman's decision meant a
change in United States foreign
policy. Bombay stock exchange
reacted with a sudden drop in
silver and gold prices and
“barometer” stocks fell sharply.
New York: An estimated $1,000,-
000,000 was sliced off stcck
market values in early trading
in Wall Street today following
the news. Sales of so-called
“war issues” were heavy,
Observers felt that General
Mac Arthur’s removal might
serve to open the way for talks
on the Korean peace settlement.
—Reuter.

Syria May Withdraw
Deniand To U.N.O.

DAMASCUS, April 11.
Khaled Azim, Syrian Premier,
said today that Syria was willing
o withdraw her demand to the
security Council to consider the
sorder dispute with Israel if the



For Talks

On Cease Fire

LONDON, April 11.

Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor-
rison making a statement’ on
Korea ir. the Commons today said:
“our aims are unchangea, We
stand for resistance to aggression,
a free independent and unifieu
Korea and no extension of the
conflict”.

“The question of crossing the
38th parallel cannot be treatea
apart irem other matters concern-
ing Korea. “We were ready a iew
months ago to negotiate a cease-
fire and we are ready now. But it
takes two to agree on a cease—fire
and so far the other side have!
shown no desire to stop hostilities
in Korea, ;

“IT would not have the House
think that crossing the 38th paral.
lel is the main issue in Kere

“The real issue is whether No
Koreans and Chinese are willin
to negotiate a settlement. If the:
are, the question of the Para
will soon cease to have an
political importance and I would
hope. that the aims for which so
many nations including the Sovi
Union have been pledged for ‘s0
long—free, unified and independ-
ent Korea—could be achieved by
negotiation. S

Giving a summary of the direc-
tives issued to General MacArthur,
Morrison said “The Commander of
the United Notas forces in Korea
was instructed that the political

@ On page 7









Coronation Stone
In Arbroath Abbey

LONDON, April 11.
The Coronation Stone stolen
from Westminster Abbey last year,
was handed to the custodian of
unknow:





Ar Abbey by a

people ay.

Arbroath Abbey is in Forfar- |
shire, Scotland. The stone, crown-
ing seat of the ancient Scottish
Kings, has been placed on the
high altar of the Abbey. It was
with two unsigned letters, one ad- {
dressed to King George VI, and
the other to the General Assembly
of the Church of Scotland.

—Reuter.

Elizabeth And Philip

Arrive In Rome |

ROME, April 11
Princess Elizabeth and the Duke ;
of Edinburgh arrived in Rome to- |
day by air from Malta for a fort-!
night’s private holiday. ‘



—Reuter. |



Inniskillings
Reach England

SOUTHAMPTON, April 11,
Six hundred and fifty officers
and men of the First Battalion
Royal Inniskilings Fusilliers ar-
rived here from the West Indies
to-day in the 11,000-ton transport
Dilwala.
! ~-Reuter,



Lord Nelson Leaves |atec enemy strength there to
; 695,000

LONDON, April 11.

: Ready}

ean force

ands

_

“ALLIES MAKE FRESH GAINS:

REDS TRY TO STOP

TOKYO, April 11,

Communist “hold or die” rearguard groups went into
action at several points along the front line to-day in a bid
to stem the slow but relentless United Nations advance into
North Korea,

On the western front southwest of Imje, American
troops who crossed Soyang River yesterday ran into what
was Officially described as “determined enemy resistance.”

In the same area other Ameri- ;
thitiy-minute attace || Four Faint As
Visitors
Crowd Ship

East of Yonechon a small Ameri- |
(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

was counter-attacked
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 9.



and Turkish troops came under
sporadic mortar and artillery fire,
Ning Opposition was en-

£ Americans ad-

_vaneing south of the reservoir

a ante . WHEN H.M.C.S. Magnifi-
iota erintied tb teats tree cent threw open its doors to
a Fen a the publie over the week-
ee ene ved ee end, four persons fainted
et only light resistance. South and one was badly injured
Korean troops who advanced F

as over 4,000 visitors crowd-
ed the ship. The Magnificent
arrives in Barbados on Fri-
day.

“Lady Nelson”
Collides .
With Barge

with the 29th Brigade to.day re-

ported the area free of Com

munists.

The British Brigade spearhead-
ed a force of Turkish, American
and South Korean troops which
was to have occtipied entire Com-
munist fortifications and to have
captured some equipment,

The town of Chorwon, the sup-
ply hub objective of two main
Allied forees converging from
east and west was reported prob-
ably levelled by United Nations



fighter bombers, Yi ‘_ FP ep Fy,
There was no fresh news to-| ,¢ ae at Aine et
day from northwest of Yongpyong tans Nea ‘ one 1 t Sard ta
where Communists have been Pp “2 of S en; , limped — rac inte
launching determined attacks | /0?-°!-Spain harbour this morn

ing with her bow ripped open nea)
the water mark as the result of a
collision with an oil barge or
Monday night in the Gulf of Paria

| The accident occurred while the

against adyaneing United Nations
forces.—Reuter,

18 New Red Chinese

Divisions In Korea

WASHINGTON, April 11,
The Pentagon reported to-day
that 18 new Chinese Communis.
divisions have been identified in
Korea bringing the total estim-



Lady Nelson was leaving on ;
return trip to Halifax to open i
new spring cruise of the Caribbean
Aboard were 96 passengers who
embarked at Trinidad for Canada
New York and Caribbean ports
and 63 Caribbean
returning home.
According to reports, the Lady
Nelsen ran into the barge valuec
. $100,000 (B.W.1.) carrying
The spokesman said 97,000 ad-| $17,000 worth of diesel oil con-

roundtrippers

Lord Nelson, direct descendant | ditional Chinese troops had been} signed to an Alcoa terminal station

of Britain’s great naval hero,
sailed from England for the last
time last night, driven, he said, by
taxation and cancellation of the
£5,000 per year state pension, to
start life all over again at 60.
—Reuter,

e
No Conflict
LONDON, April 11,
Emanuel Shinwell, Minister for
Defence declared in a_ speech
near London to-day: ‘We have no
desire to enter into conflict with
Communist China. All I can hope
is that the Communist Govyern-
ment of China have no desire to

enter into conflict with us.”
—Reuter,

THE HAGIT'E, April 11,
Dr. Willem Drees, Netherlands
Prime Minister was taken ill in

situation on the frontier returns | t@day while replying to speakers

o normal,
—Reuter.

the first chamber of ce |

The meeting was adjourned,
- —Reuter.

identified since last Friday The barge sank with the whole
Eighteen divisions, if at full} of the cargo, while one of the
strength, would total 180,000 men,| crewmen aboard the tug Ane
the army said.—Reuter, Matilda belonging to the creolc
Petroleum Company of Venezuela
was taken to hospital with both
legs broken and a cut on the eye,
suffered while trying to cast off the
tow rope.

It is understood that temporary
\repairs to be done to the Lady
| Ne‘sen here, will enable her te

make the return trip to Halifay
lehers full repairs will be made
| A local inquiry into the acciden
lis to be held.—(CP)
|
|

BOMB EXPLODES

NICE, April 11.
| Windows of neighbouring build-
| ngs were smashed and a front
joor blown in by a time bomb
which exploded early today out-
side the Communist Party office in
the harbour district of Nice
No casualties were reported
—Reuter.-





POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT. LANCASTER



“And what the devil's wrong
with our good English water,
i should like to know--whty, |

I've shaved in it for yerrst” |
— oe





Schuman Plan ‘Js Greatest Hope

PARIS, April 11.
The West German Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer arrived at
Orly Airfield today for signing
of the six-nation Schuman Plan.

He is the first German
Premier to visit Paris since
1931.

Members the
mission in Paris
Adenauér at the Airfield

The Chancellor was

German
greeted

of

cet,

accom '

panied by Andre Francois Pon-|
French High Commissioner |

in Germany.

Tight security measures were
enforced, Several hundred
uniformed police took up posi-
tions at regular intervals along
the route to Paris. About 50
plain clothes men mingled with

| police at Orly.

The Chancellor read a state
ment to a radio microphone: “I
set foot on the soil of France

cbservers,

“It ig with joyful
full hope, I today
neighbours.”



t
with emotion, This is a moment)



# { even among the most sceptical]
é : i
Says Adenauer | heart. ‘nd

salute my

the tomb of the Unknown Warrior. Express

‘ee

ADVANCE

| Gammans Wants

Empire Council

LONDON, April 11.
A Council of the Empire on th
lines of the, Council of Europe
was advocated in the Times today
by David Gammans, Conserva
tive member of Parliament,

Such a Council he — argues
would be a purely consultative
body, which wotld meet in Lon-
don at regular fixed mtervals,

“Surely te =most pressing
Imperial problem today is how tc
hold the Colonial mpire to-
gether, The chief disintegrating
force ig the impact of Colonia)
nationalism which we have de
iberately fostered as part of our
olitical and educational policy

The United States hag not
hesitated to hold on to the
Panama Canal, and its bases in
the Pacific, on the understandable
plea that these are essential tc
the interests of American

security,

“When we consider how much
more vulnerable is the British)
Commonwealth, why should we

hesitate te explain to the Colonies

nd to! ‘orld the vital needs
of Impeial ~ categy?
“We must convince suspicious

ind sensitive nationalist leader:
‘hat British connection is neither
amporary nor a status of inferi-
rity.”

—Reuter.

16 PER CENT
IN CANADA

OTTAWA, Ont. April 11.

General “across the board
jump” in Federal taxes aver-
aging in the neighbourhood of

16 per cent. emerged on Wednes-
dav as the headline feature ot
Finance Minister Abbott's 1951—52
“Preparedness Budget”. Main
provisions are, boost in general
sales tax to 10 per cent. from
eight per cent. and an over all
20 per cent. hoist in the rate of
personal income taxes. The result
is that commodity taxes are going
up immediately on everything
the average Canadian buys except
food, fuel, building materials and
machinery for farms, fishing and
industry .

Beginning July 1, the man who
earns enough to pay income taxes
is going to see his payroll deduc-
tions go up by 20 per cent or by
one-fifth, through the defence
surcharge on. basic tax rates, and
exemptions will remain un-
changed .

Big business gete even tougher
treatment. It too will pay a
defence surcharge on top of the
present corporation taxes, but
this will be retro-active to Jan-
uary 1

Little businesses
that earn a
£10,000 a

of the kind
profit of less than
‘ year are not affected
Cigarette smokers will find
euffing a little more expensive.
Direct tax on the Tailor Mades
was lifted three cents for a pack
of 20. This plus the boost in sales

tax may put cigarettes up four
rents a package.
The man who rolis his own

night get a better break. While
the tax on tobacco went up tha
levy on cigarette papers and tubes
was repealed. Cigar taxes are
unchanged, —«€P)



Statement Causes
Stir In Egypt

“i CAIRO, April 11.
‘The, publication in the independent
Al Ahram the “authoritative”
Egyptian statement that “joint
defence is imperative in time of
war or threat of war", caused a
stir in Egyptian official cifcles
to-day, The statement was attri-
buted by the newspaper to an
“authoritative spokesman of the
Egyptian Foreign Ministry” but
was known to have been made by
Foreign Minister Salah El Din
recently, It said “joint defence
was provided for in the 1926
(Anglo-Egyptian) treaty and will
be one of the conditions of any
any similar agreement between
the two allies,

: —Reuter,

TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
DAY OR NIGHT

DIAL 3113

ae












WM.

of great significance for me, I} a zHose eee nos — a
want to prove that I believe that evant M aaa or ents uc ss
Franco-Germar relations are the ie. ei can lah age SE:
Sar solution in) Walter Hallstein, leader of the
, | German delegation to the
The imminent conclusion of! Schuman Plan talks, Hausen-~
the Schuman plan--an idea of stein, German Consul in Paris,
genius conceived by two great! and a_ representative of the
Frenchmen and Europeans- French Foreign Office
gives birth to the greatest hope Reuter

Available from

LTD.

GIVE YOURSELF A

god
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‘MAXPLY?’
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AND THE

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~~

PAGE TWO







Parib Calli

HIRTY-TWO passengers from

Barbados are making the
Caribbean cruise on the Colembic
Among them are, the “Tibi”
Wainwrights, better known as the
Wandering Wainwrights. .. . Col.
and Mrs. Leonard W. Lucas who
after the cruise are continuing on
to the U.K. ... Mr. and Mrs. C. E.
Shepherd of Colleton House, St.
Peter. . . . The Misses Enid and
Daisy Fergusson of Ravens Court,
Fontabelle. . . . Miss Mabel Arm-
strong, Mr. and Mrs. Harold =
verbs and their son Roy... .
David Read of the Canadian Bank
of Commerce. During his stay in
Jamaica David will see his brother



Geoffrey who is with the Reyal
Bank of Canada in Kingston. Wt. .
Mr. Geoffrey Skinner, Mr. Tom
Armstrong, who is in charge ge

Bookers Alpha Pharmacy. ;
and Mrs. E, C. Jackman. Mr.
Jackman is a retired Court of
Appeal Judge.

No Exception

LICE BAND concerts, at the

Hastings Rocks always draw
a large crowd and the one tonight
promises to be no_ exception.
Police concerts at the Rocks are
generally held on Fridays; the one
tonight is in wa of a deserving
cause, > a. fa

Hot Tip!

ARIB got a hot tip, yesterday.

Film-star John Wayne is due
to leave California this week in
his private plane . . . local girls
pulses are already quickening, for,
his destination is the Caribbean
islands. Speculation is rife among
the teen-agers as to whether he
will make Seawell.

. The B.O.C. Cup

HE Barbados Orchid Circle
has offered a Challenge Cup
to be competed for at The bar-
bados Horticultural Society Ex-
hibition to be held at Queen’s
Park on 2ist April, 1951. At a
Meeting of thé Members of the
B.O.C. it was decided that the
Cup should. be-awarded only to
members whose subscription was
not in arrears, to be competed
for annually, and must be won
three (3) times in sugcegsion or
four (4) times in all, before be-
coming the property ‘of the win-
ner. It shall be awarded for the
best and most outstanding speci-
men whether on Plant or Cut
Flower, Any year that the Bar-
bados Horticultural Society does
not hold'a show, it shall be com-
peted for at the Barbados. Axgri-
cultural Society show at the end
of that year. No competitor shail
act as a Judge for the Cup.

Engaged

HE ENGAGEMENT. has _ been
announced between Mr.
Tom Reece of the Income Tax
Department and Miss Grace
Bishop daughter of Mr. F.
Bishop, Controller of Supplies and
Mrs, Bishop of “Bingen” Howells
Cross Road.



ADVENTURES OF

BAL.
Masque

BY THE

EVERAL hundred million
people have written to ask
me—

Prodnose: Why do you tell such
obvious lies?

Myself: What do you suppose
would happen if I wrote, “Four
people have written,” ete? You
would be the first to go about
saying, “He gets no fan mail,”
for that’s the barbarous language
you talk—‘“He gets no fan mail,
therefore, he is no good.”

ose: Well, couldn’t
say “hundreds” or even
ands” have written?

Myself: No. Everybody says
that. Anyhow, I have forgotten
what I was going to write about..

you
“thous-

Special seesaw trains

ISTER BEACHCOMBER, the
pore hittendants at hour
show in Bedford larst week is of
becos the orrible ousewifes was
not hov saving enuff kole so that
especial tranes could be of being
run to take peeple to hour show.
Sport is the Englishmens Karsul
says yore prooverbs, so hunless
these selfish wimmen stop using
kole seesaw will be of being hon
its larst leg, and with milliands
of torewrists owling for kulturd
desplais hov virteosos hand tor-
defawces, ho yes. Bi gosh ow can
you iwpek the workers to plase
their baks into it, hif the pore

beests carnt five seesaw tranes?

We hare, ho yes,
Kazbulah, Ashura and Riza-
mughan, pleeze

About Parkodromes

ACA my traffic plan

did not make it clear enough
that the ramps are not the old sort,
with curved edges. The edges are
straight, to save space, as in the
excellent blue-prints of the three-
way street to be seen at ‘the

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Now remember—if We get
this Lady Godiva job, I’m
relying on you to explain to
the Press that we only
applied for it because we're
so fond of Coventry.”



Simon’s Father

RIGADIER Michael Wardell

whose son Simon owns a
house on the St. Peter coast, has
bought the Gleaner, the only
evening paper published in
Fredericton, capital city of New
Brunswick, Canada,

Two years ago, Brig. Wardell
sold his nolding in Sporting Re-
cord to Mr. H. CC. (Harley)
Drayton, the City financier. He
had taken over this small weekly
paper in 1946 and hac built up a
circulation of more than 400,000,

The Gleaner is a paper which

carries great weight in New
Brunswick, Under the direction
of Brigadier Wardell it can be
expected to expand in prestige

and influence,
Travel Agent

.C.A, brought down Mrs.

Gladys Gel) yesterday on a
two-day visit. A representative
of Tom Travel and Ticket Agency
in Peterborough, Ontario, she has
already visfted Bermuda. Next
stop is Trinidad. ... Mrs. Elsie
Watson came down on the same
plane. She is from Hamilton,
Ontario. Here for six weeks’ holi-
day she is a guest at the Marine
Hotel, . Mrs. George Somers
was at Seawell vesterday to meet
her husband who had been up
north on a short visit.

U.K. and Dominica

OL. J..H.. WHITEHOUSE, now

retired from the British Indian
Army came in on the Colombic
yesterday from the U.K, to spend
a month's holiday at the Ocean
View Hotel. .. Mr, A. A. Halacsy,
who got on board in Dominica is
C.D.C’s resident engineer in that
colony. His wife accompanied
him. They are here for two or
three days staying at the Marine
Hotel before leaving for St, Lucia.
..» Miss Irene Davis and her sister
Marie also. came in from Dominica
by the Colombie.

WAY...

Ministry ~f Transport Museum in
Cuffestreet.
Where the east-west traffic

crosses a three-way street it does
so in a west-east direction on one
of the two-day roundabouts,
coming back to the point of re-
entry just where the straight edge
of the ramp borders the parko-
drome, This enables a car leaving
the parkodrome to be caught up
in the main stream of stationary
traffic at either end of the ramp,
and avoids the diversion necessary
for cars coming the other way.
Down Harmony-lane
T is claimed that an electronic
computer:
Prodnose : What is that?
Myself: If you don’t know, you
inust be mixing” with very queer



I

School



Home Address ....

Advanced Information
HORTLY after ten o’clock yes-
terday morning, a Grum-
man Avenger fighter touched
down at Seawell from HM.CS.
Magnificent, light fleet carrier
which accompanied by H.M.CS.
Miemac, Tribal class destroyer
are on their way to Barbados on a
tour-day visit. The ships are duc
to arrive in Carlisle Bay this af-
ternoon at 4 o'clock and will be re-

maining here unti) Monday.
The Grumman Avenger had a

crew of four on board. Lt.
(T.A4.8.) PC. BM. Cooke,
R.C.N. Donald H. Cheney,
Assistant Canadian Government

Trade Commissioner in Trinidad,
Lt. (P) Robt,, Hughes, pilot and
Lt. (O) J. Anderson, navigator.
The plane left Seawell three hours
later to return to the ship leaving
Lt. Cooke and Mr. Cheney be-
hind to make advance arrange-
ments and get advance details for
the sport and entertainment ar-
rangements for the ships’ com-
pany.

Lt. Cooke has been in the navy
for ten years and served in the
North Atlantic during the war. He
specialises in torpedo anti-submar-
ine work, He is Operations Officer
on board the MagNificent.

Donald Cheney has been in Trini-
dad for nearly two years and has
visited Barbados many times, He
is due back in Trinidad on Satur-
day.

Magnificent and Micmac left
Halifax March 19th on training
exercises in the Caribbean, They
have already visited Bermuda
and Trinidad. Their destination
when they leave Barbados is
Halifax via Boston.

On board the Magnificent are
two fighter squadrons, Grumman
Avenger anti-submarine fighters
and Hawker-Sea Fury fighters.

Jamaica and Trinidad
RS. F. K. N. MASCOLL and
her two children Phillip and
Sandra are on their way to
Jamaica by the Colombie after
spending a_ holiday with Mrs.
Mascoll’s relatives. Her husband
Capt. Neville Mascoll is ——
Adjutant at Palisadoes.
on board the Colombie but geting
off in Trinidad are Mr. and Mrs.
Carlos Lyon and their two child-
ren Sheila Ann and Jo-Ann, Mr.
Lyon is Shipping Superintendent
of U.B.O. in Port-of-Spain.
They had heen here since March
14th,

eiinihs Story

TOWAWAY who has become a
commercial success within
four years of his arrival in Britain
is Harry Samuel who comes from
Belize, British Honduras. On a
business trip to Manchester last
week, a London friend met him at
Moss-side, and was shown around
his property—four large boarding—
houses with European and Colonial
tenants, A tailor by trade, Samuel
hopes to establish a_ tailoring
business in London this summer.



PIPA



By Beachcomber

company, 4
It is claimed that this thing,
which computes electronically,

“can execute a series of instruc-
tions if a given situation exists.”
Aha! But what happens if a given
situation does not exist, and refuses
to exist? Riddle me that, my
Trinity scholar,
Good Riddance
ERE is an excellent example
of how to get rid of late
guests who debate on weighty
matters
At 2 a.m, Ninon de Lenclos was
being bored by two dreary visitors
to her salon, They were discuss-
ing the costume of the ancient
Greeks. “Gentlemen,” she said
“I wonder what time the Lace-
daemonians wer went to bed.”



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for
its Junior Short Story Competition.
every Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The storie:
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 30!
words in length, and must reach The
Co, Ltd., City not later than Wednesdaw every week.

NOTE: Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story,

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

The best story will be publishec

Children’s Editor, The Advocats

Penne e ete ween eee eee eens
etree tree eaceseteseer?®

peewee ewan ee eeeeeeen eee ee

cache enernhtneaieetanesieeiineietianiaatindltalesipettcieeiletitiandia co serananionsotoqerscaanctensiononsoai-shecininheieainoeasetedinensiccaganeas aan
ales al ce edly Metal

s ‘Phoenix’

“IS CLEAR’
“ Casseroles

Entree Dishes - 1.89

Gravy Boat & Platter

DIAL 4606

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORE

Oven Glass

and STAYS CLEAR’
Deep & Shallow, 2 Shapes

Chicken Casserole
Roasters -

Cc

$1.26-2.39
2.52
3.15

— —

1.26

DIAL 4220

BARBADOS



VICTORIAN MISS . ,, . up-swept
hair, soft front curls.

ICHELLE GAY STEINER,
daughter of the hair stylist
was asked what she would like
for her seeond birthday. She
said; A coiffure like Mummy.’
So, with artificial hair [to avoid
Michelle sitting under the drier}
these three hair styles were
created by father for her birth—

day A

Michelle has long, straight “lanky”
hair which, in the normal way,
is worn tied with a bow on top,



ADVOCATE

YOUTHFUL BEAUTY

MADAME BUTTERFLY ...
false hair and flowers.

the hair hanging down her back.

This straight hair—problem hair
while she is young—will be
perfect, and easy to dress in
attractive styles when Michelle
grows up

On the care of children’s hair Mr.
Steiner says: Cleanliness is all
impertant. Washing the hair up
to three times a week is good
2nd won't make it dry.

Brush children’s hair back off the
hairline. This is important.

SENORITA ...
twist of hair.

encircling thick

A fringe in childhood spoils the)
hairline when the child grows




up. The hair must be kept off
the forehead |
WISDOM FOR

WOMEN

“Feminine vanity; that di-
vine gift which makes
women charming.”’—Disraeli

B.B.C. Radia Rupert and the Tee-flower—4

Programme

THURSDAY, APRIL 12%, 1951.
6.390 &m—12.15 pm. ..... -. 19.00 M.

rin rertesmeneendaptenegeeseenentntignelieete—
7 am, The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; , 7.15 a.m, From the Editorials:
7.25 a.m. Programme "Parade; °7.30 a.m,
Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m, Land and
Livestock; 8.15 a.m. Listeners’ Choice
8.30 a.m. Recital; 845 a.m, Spare Part
for Human Bodies: 9 a.m. The News:
9,10 am, Home News from Britain:
9.15 a.m, Close Down; 11,15 a.m, Pro-
gramme Parade; 11.256 a.m, Listeners
Choice; 11.45 am. Special Dispatch
The News; 12,10 pm, News

12.15 p.m. Close. Down,
ee na Ww M.
“Gis p.m, Top noes 5 p.m. Composer
of the Week; 5.15 p.m, Scottish Maga-
tine; 5.45 p.m. Music from the Films
6,00—7.15 Pom. .4,. 25.04, 31,92, 48.48 M.
Oe eee

Sean ES OREEEREEENEEEREEEEee
6 pm. BBC Scottish Orchestra;

6.45
p.m. Programme Parade; 7 p.m. The
News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15

p.m. We see Britain,

7.45-—11.00 p.m. 31.32 M. 48.43 M

145 p.m. Generally Speaking; 8 p.m.
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. The Adven-
tures of P.C. 49; 8.45 p.m. Composer of
the Week; 9 p.m. Special Dispatch; 9.15

.m, Sing with Joe; 9.5 p.m. "De you

member; 10 pm. The News; 10.19

.m, From the Editorials; 1015 p.m.

ight Music; 10.45 p.m. Life in Britain;
11 p.m. Announcer’s Choice.



NEW COTTON FIBRE
NEW DELHI,
A new cotton fibre longer than
the Egyptian and American long
o' vayiety has been crossed
successfully grown in Suart,
Western India, An experimental
crop produced a fibre 1 1/4 inches
leng, or 15 per cent longer than
the present variety.—(CP)

PLAN SPEEDY ’COPTERS
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya.
British helicopters are taking
an active part in the campaign
against Communist guerrillas in
Malaya, New models with speeds
of more than 100 miles per hoer
are to be put into service, —(CP)

BOOKS FOR WOUNDED
LONDON.

More than 2,000 books, plus
magazines, have been sent to a
service hospital in Kure, Japan, by
the British Red Cross and St. John
Hospital Library department for
use Of British servicemen wound-

ed in Korea, —(CP)
POLICE LECTURED
SYDNEY, N.S.

The police here are to be lec-
tured by members of the Bar
Society. The programme of lec-
tures on law procedure was au-
thorized by the police commission
following success ef a similar
programme at Glace Bay, —(CP)



Be hornet deeb




Lat impe
‘te, must ‘ eke rfect? (9)
To make a 2 Gein. (9)

valual
. Jointly,
Such play is reciprocal. (5)
Noticed in education. (3)

Ransile.
At least a —aanee of tales, (5)
necessarily wi ail tailored,

ine 16):
Wine caske, (a) ‘*

‘ac Down
rm or manuf:
@ pest, (8)

- In @ way you're bo
(4) #, Lit and (7)
pow tha reet lit. (7)

I don’t eat this way. (8)

a to sea? (3)
be e. (4)

sri

ed It can be!

)

bes the longest i!ver. (6)
yore you wif! find the laity. ‘ (9)
As sie e to cause a rising. (5)
ia the nort! re ect ‘nothing

ub of town. (
of wo leone 8 pussie eee

ra ae ens

basest ellent: 2
Srseties 8,
aoe, ‘Shins: . hs hero! eg Egat

2." Yen? Se Boies: e Pe sareg

STevasse: = Luxor! 4 ‘ nati, 3:
Trenches: 12, Snow a
inner; 17, Sixty: 20, Paw,

ee ¢
@
Ss





Cash: 18



GLOBE

Last Shows To-day 5 & 830 p.m,






W.

personally
brings his greatness
to the screen!

Yt
2am ~
= ==
y

ih

With 40 FAMOUS PLAYERS!

443. ARTHUR RANK Presentation
An EAGLE LION Films Release





Poor Rupert soon finds that #
doesn't pay to laugh at other people
when on icy toads, In turning
round he has become careless, and
when he starts forward again his

feet slip away and he goes down
with a aaebie bump. _ Picking

himself w pa shakily he hears
chuckles him. “ Yes,
serves os right.” he Le
“If | hadn't turned to laugh a

Algy | shouldn’t have fallen. And,
oh Gea, here’s Mummy's bag of
eggs. believe every, one is
broken I What shall 1 do?”

ciehamennchermtinccuectemunaamen sate

——







AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
TYRONE POWER—GENE TTIRRNEY—JOHN. PAYNE—ANNE BAXTER
in W. Somerset Maugham’s

THE RAZOR'S EDGE

A 20th Century-Fox Picture



Commencing Friday 13th.
FARRAR-—-GUYNIS JOHNS

DAVID



and the New Swedish Star

MAT





Last Two Shows To-day

THE
“THE MISSING LADY"
with KANE RICHMOND and
“GENTLEMAN JOB PALOOKA”
with LEON ERROL

Friday and Continuing
5 and 830 p.m.
“BLOOD ON THE MOON"
Robert MITCHUM
Barbara Bel GEDDES

PLAZA DIAL
OISTIN 8404

TO-DAY

ZETTERLING in










PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

fonly) Women, 4.45 p.m,

“FRIEDA”





GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James

Last Show Tonite 8.30

“JAMES WARREN in
“CODE OF THE WEST”

TIM HOLT in
“WILD HORSE MESA"
——_
Friday to Sunday 8.30 p.m.
Mat, Sunday 5 p.m.
JAMES CAGNEY in
“ST LOUIS KID”

and



Men 8.30 p.m,

AGE LIMIT 16 years and over!

“THE STORY OF

Positively no Children allowed.
leaves for Trinidad for
Matinee To-day 1.30 p.m. (R.K.O,)
JAMES WARREN in

CODE OF THE WEST and
TIM HOLT in

WILD HORSE MESA



wisisids all

EMPIRE
To-day 4.45 and 8.30
‘To-morrow 2.30 Only

J. Arthur Rank Presents
FREDRIC MARCH in

CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS

Color By Technicolor

Co.Starring .
Florence ELDRIDGE

— with —

Francis L. SULLIVAN and
Linden TRAVERS



eS Sas
=.
S|
a
nA

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.15
Universal Big Double
George RAFT and
Pat O’BRIEN in

BROADWAY
t and

EYES of the
UNDERWORLD

with
Lon CHANEY and
Richard DIX

} FAITH DOMERGUE. in



BOB AND SALLY”

This is the Last Showing as this Film

its engagements there.

Cae Friday (3 Shows) ,
2,304.45 and 8.30

ROBERT MITCHUM

WHERE DANGER LIVES

—

ROYAL

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Big Double
Teresa WRIGHT and
Joseph COTTON in

SHADOW of a
DOUBT

and

RIDERS of
SANTA FE

Starring...
Rod CAMERON and
Fuzzy KNIGHT

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.15
Republic Smashing Double
Lynne ROBERTS and
Charles DRAKE in

WINTER
WONDERLAND
and
GOLDEN
STALLION

Starring ..,
Roy ROGERS and
Dale EVANS
















BEDSTEADS

MAHOGANY COLOUR—From $27.72 each

COIL SPRINGS .....
MATTRESSES. ..

COTTON

oO

....+. from $12.99 each

gw CHECK Our Prices on These!



THE RARBADOS co-oPpERATIVE |
FACTORY LTD.

— SSS SSS



. from $13.40 each ;







T

HURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1951







OPENING TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30

GLOBE

Presents

ITS ist PARAMOUNT FILM

THE BRAND OF
GREATNESS
1S ON...

The Richest Ranch-
lands in the West!

aHAL WALLIS

PRODUCTION
oa ng

WENDELL

fsmANiK: Covey

WALTER

HUSTON

JUDITH ANDERSON
GHBERT ROLAND - THOMAS GOMEZ

BEULAH BONO!
Directed by ANTHONY MANN

A Paramount Picture

By the author of
“Duel In The Sun”

Screenplay by Charles Schnee
From a novel by Niven Busch



Plus

The ALL-STAR
falent Contest

featuring :

KEITH SEALEY
“Count Every Star”



JOE (Shine) CLARK
“Route 66”
SAM GORDON
“Nite And Day”

COUNT DEVONISH
“A Little Bird Told Me”

ERROL BARNETT
“My Foolish Heart”

OTHA TAYLOR
“Laughing On The
Outside”

HOLMAN RAYSIDE
“Our Very Own”

Seton habitants nie edehioeiee eu h Es



7 LOCAL STARS COM-
PETING FOR THE
SILVER CUP



Pit 20, House 36
Bal. 48, Box 60c.



Positively Your Best
WEEKEND.





Starting FRIDAY, 2.30, 4.45 &

AT YOUR

FAITH DOME

\) CADDN
AMMA Meets aaacelt

“ WHITE

(RKO-RADIO

THE SUPERB

Dainty Materials, Carpets,

IL



IRVING CUMMINGS in. ond IRWIN ALLEN present

CLAUDE RAINS

for cleaning --

Felt Hats, Frocks: and Gowns, Crepe de Chines

Lamp Shades, Glassware, Wind Screens, Ornaments, Silver-
ware, Sparking Plugs, Chrominum Fittings, Typewriters,
Upholstery.

In bottles of two sizes

60c. and 34c. per bottle S



PLANTATIONS LTD.

BRIDGETOWN SPEIGHTSTOWN





8.30 and continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30

RKO-RADIO SMASHING THRU

AGAIN WITH ANOTHER COLOSSAL
POPULAR SHOW-HOUSE

PLAZA

HIT

BRIDGETOWN
(DIAL 2310)







RGUE |

Hat
TOU SUR CL a A eae



PLUS: The NEW SHORT:
LEON ERROL in = WED-TIME STORIES”
and Latest “WORLD NEWS” (Warner Pathe)
Coming :— GLEN FORD—VALLI

TOWER”



CLAUDE RAINS. l
{

NEVER
DESPAIR

Sust. use $

BEAUCAIRE

DRY CLEANSER

, Voile, Ninons,
Rugs, Curtains, Jewellery, Gloves,

.
OPE OOOO

OOO IELS a
SES ORIOLES





PS


THURSDAY, APRIL 12



1951

a te em Ree



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





“Surely you wouldn’t hand over power to that burned-out old ‘has-been’ Churchill?”

American People
Asked To Grow
Liberty Gardens

WASHINGTON, D.C.
The American people are being
asked to grow home gardens to
improve their diets and health,
as well as to contribute to
national defense. Similar to the

New

veloped by



New Uses Found For
Meat By-Products

CHICAGO,
uses of the by-products
of meat animals are being de-

Institute Foundation. The pro- of
ducts derived from livestock are of

contributing to improved health, make up the population of this

——

Fish For
BOSTON.

the many nationalities



Many Tastes
More than 50 varieties of fish

that





U.S. Find New

Vegetable Wastes

Su gar Cane Make Good Feed







PAGE THREE



U.S. Almost Free
From Malaria

producing sugar cane



. .

I or Livestock Malaria in the United States
WASHINGTON, D.¢ : 3@ has been reduced almost to the
About 70 new varieties of grair Philadetphia ‘Leafy parts ana, ¥anishing point, the United States
fruits, vegetables, and other plants stems of such vegetables as peas, Public Health Service reports.
are now being grown by Amer lima-beans, broccoli, spinach, and D-D.T., a powerful insecticide,
can farmers as a result of research beets are being made into high. as been the most effective weap.
carried on by the U.S. Depart- Quality, well-balanced livestock on in fighting the mosquito-
ment of Agriculture. Aniong the feeds on American farms. borne disease. It is sprayed on
new varietie: © an élm trée that the interior of buildings where ma-
is resistant to the Duten’ ein __Ne longer do truck farmers and jaria cases ate present or have
disease, six new blueberries, three vegetable processors have to been reported Former malaria

new cianberries. and a ~ throw away the vines, leaves

control methods, such as
mosquitoes in their larval

killing

and stems of their vegetable crops. stage

By putting these plant wastes





The Department cites in its through a rotary drier, they cz and draining swamps and pools,
: . 3 ‘ y can »
annual report the need for sus- be converted into a satisfactory, “#V® wou found "les Caen
tained research that will make meal to feed farm animals, the%#nd have practically been aban-
London Express Service possible necessary shifts to bring U.S. Department of Agriculturag#oned.
nctilnnpeectnintnectonensonarppemeetstihns ils diate, Aa nieces about more efficient farm produc- reports
tion.
. : °

American Farms ' (¢,.D.C. Dispute tt ie the judement of raanv “, Stulies show that the leaf, TEA DRINKERS
: : eee ee ~ vay. Parts of many vegetables are ricr r '
os “9 scientists,” the report says, “tha . ; ; : 7 The United States is the world’s
Grow Conicrete Settled if beeetlivid resenteh were to & tn carers. (orevtenin AS a Bhargest importer of tea. More than
CHICAGO, Il discontinued, within a decade gredients of well-balanced live-â„¢ 0%, Million pounds, chiefly of

A

boxes, and posts, says the Port
Cement Association.

certain parts of the United States

tourist motoring through

and , ‘
former's store on a site at Msusu, “&

most of the varieties of crops now
LONDON. sr

Agriculture

. - lack tea, were imported in the
stock feeds, . > a a,
own would succumb to diseases 5 76 t ai - cabin of teed sane year ending July 1950, an increase





; ; . The dispute between London ang 4nd the result might be starva= from these i aj. © Of 17 per cent over the preceding
: , s “ ” a : ; ; se ingredients equals, .
the American Meat are imported from many parts sili ai or Wut "adiin Blantyre Supply Company and ¥en for millions of people and in some cases exceeds, thcgY®?!
the world to satisfy the tastes } os 4 * CDC over the continuance of the The disease-resistant elm tre® normal guaranteed minimums tor



veloped by the Department of

commercial alfalfa meals.
will be available as

: : |
‘ ; hed inaeas i . Nyasaland, on which the CDC is . J
Victory Garden Programme dur- industrial progress, id better tenth largest city i The proprietors of these farms er . 4. planting stock within three years Converting plant wastes inic KEEP
ing World War II, the new pro- living in the United States. ates. Pans lain "edema care little about the fertility of ae ot aoe A new sugar cane, producing from feed involves chopping the fresh-
ject—called the Liberty Garden Medicines and glandular ex- from Portugal, snails from the soil, but they watch with Su tas h teal os h 13 to 45 percent. more sugar per ly gathered wastes and then sub-}
Programme — emphasizes home tracts from meat are used to cor- Morocco, frogs’ legs from Japan, keen interest oe their crops Gaal ow. i Te onee Ges. acre also has been discovered, jJecting them to direct heat in an
gardening and home food preser- rect bodily deficiencies and pro- and dried cod from Norway, develop. Thousands of engineers wn, ler. Ww. Mm. Robson, Direc Another sugar variety that rotary drier of the type used for,
vation.

U.S. Secretary sf Agriculture
Charles F. Brannan says, “The
value of home garden production
in improving the diets and health

vide relief from illness. Two of Persons
the latest wonder drags—ACTH, Italian,
made from

French; Greek,

tisone, made from the adrenal Make up_ the

of Seandinavian,

the anterior lobe of Chinese descent are included in
a hog’s pituitary gland, and Cor- the more than 790,000 people that
population

and research scientists from the tor of Campbell Booker Carter
United States and Canada are also Limited, of which the Nyasaland
interested in the development of company is a subsidiary, in giving
the concrete crop, which is tested this news to your correspondent
periodically for durability, today, said he had received intim-

and

of

produces from
(190 to
per
during the year

285

acre was

50 to 75
liters)
also

drying alfalfa, Drying time and
temperature are regulated so
that the tender parts of the leaves
dry thoroughly and become brit-
ule, while the stems remain fair-

gallons
more syrup
introduced




Seat

a... Keep your weight dows








si iora— ati i y relo i “O) hybridiz: ly ow t

of our people, especially these gland of cattle—are among the Boston. Here the Salem Street oe and posible .ameriora seater’ ees ee no iat erie gots Mla bi Seat hee ae ee the healthy way. Do what millions
families with limited food bud- most important recent discoveries, Market has been satisfying its “The concrete farms are part of Nyasaland last week-end. shows promise resisting the . As the material is carried eee the world are doing —take
gets, is important under present These are used in the treatment multitude of customers for 43 4 research project on the watgorde “Expressing appreciation of the ravages of the European corn through the fans in the drier, the pace in ere tons Sip Gortens
conditions. ef arthritis and other ailments. Years. : ance of cement under varying full cooperation received from the borer. Important progress is brittle leaf-blade portions aie |, ae —

The new programme was re- Insulin, made from animal en- Every. edible fish that.is caught conditions of ' climate soil, and Government of Nyasaland and reported in the nitrogen fertiliza. crumbled from the stems, Blade ano ently s
commended to the Secretary by docrine glands, is used by diabetic 2nywhere in the world’s lakes, jnoisture. The “harvest” is the CDC there, Mr, Robson said the tion of pastures to boost yields @Md stem fractions are later sep- maaan init come. insented
an advisory committee made up sufferers. New techniques to de- Streams, and oceans can be found cojiection of information that will satisfactory ending to the dispute Of grasses. A method of producing @ated by screening. The dried weieht Tile Beane
of State agricultural leaders, gar- velop the vitamin B12 content of ®t the market sometime during make possible more durable and did not affect the Company’s the seed for the type of onion leaf-blade material, wae Fa tho Veep. 960: Fell ta,
dening editors of magazines and meat and meat products are also the year, the Boston Post reports. stronger concrete mixes for use views on the question of whether st@wn in Bermuda Will help free most nutritious part of the rr Wimle: o Qenay
newspapers, garden’ club offi- being disecvered, Studies reveal The fish are brought in by plane, in homes, industrial buildings, it was right for CDC to start U-S. growers from dependencs ge ee pee a ag sried and — attractively
cials, educators, commercial vege- that cattle livers ahd Kidneys are boat, train, and ck. roads, airports, and other struc- shopkeeping with British taxpay. ©M seed stock grown in other the feed. e partially driec dim. - hast aaa
table growers, canners, and seed excellent séurdes of this vitami For persons of Norwegian, tures shopneer ng itish taxpay coniiitrien stems may be accumulated and Pa eg
companies. It will be supervised ; umes vitamin. swedish, and Danish descent the : ; sit , . ers’ money. There was a funda Pek seh cae ean 6 dried more thoroughly at the

i By-produets used in foods come f ; Farms in Georgia and Illinois mental principle involved Under study are machines and ong of each day's operations

by the US. Department of Agri- from various parts of animals. market imports dried Norwegian gre growing concrete to test the Mr. Robson. who spent ten attachments that will reduce ee me Cpe
culture’s Co-operative Extension Fats are used in candies and cod fish. This is soaked and effects of extreme winter and ala oe production costs by cultivating

Service, which already has active

programmes under way in home

gardening and food preservation.
Home Gardening

fertilizer z
Many schools throughout the at:

chewing gum. The residue from
cooking fats used to produce soap
—called tankage — makes good
also can be con-

made into a dish of quivering
white jelly-like flakes known as
lutefisk. Scandinavians also like
herring which is imported from
Norway, Iceland, and Newfound-

summer weather pressures on the
material.

1,000

weeks in Nyasaland, said CDC had
four stores on their property there
Lendon and Blantyre Supply

fey
Each farm
specimens of

has about

concrete ‘ i
exposed to the elements, Company will continue trading on

one operation.

tilizing, and spraying fields i:



country are also teaching child-
ren the fundamentals of home
gardening. For example, in
Detroit. Michigan, gardening is
being used as a therapy treatment
for some 400 handicapped young-
sters. The students not only
carry out gardening projects at
home, but they also help land-
scape the school’s courtyard.
Before attempting practical gar-
den work, the youngsters get
classroom instruction in plant
structure, propagation, indentifi-
cation, sprays, and _ fertilizers.
They also are taught what soils
are best for various plants.

In March the youngsters will
start growing boxes of tomatoes,
cabbages, carrots, radishes, and
annual flowers at school, When
the plants are ready to be moved
outdoors, they will be taken home
and replanted in the ground.
Climax of the garden work is in

September when the children
exhibit their products,
During the Victory Garden

period of World War II, thous-
ands of amateur gardeners turn-
ed their lawns into food-growing
areas. In some parts of the
United States private industrial
firms turned over small garden
plots to any employee that want-
ed to grow his own vegetables
and flowers.

T’dad Cane Has Less



verted into hog and poultry feed. jand
From hog grease has come a :
new chemical used in
rubber, Lard is used in making Live eels are caught in
facial ointments and creams.
Hair from the ears of cattle is
made into artists’ brushes and pig
bristles are used in teoth brushes.
Hair from the tails of cattle is
used as an air filter in tractors,

No Profit

along the Atlantic Coast in

marinated. Italians also eat

cuttlefish, salmonetti, and

From the skeletons of animals urchins which come from Mes- sent to be tested in a laboratory

Sicily, and Palermo,

Octopus In Oil

The octopus,

come buckles, chessmen, crochet *!"4+
needles, hairpins, and umbrella
handles, India ink is made from
charred bones, violin strings from
sheep intestines, and clothing from d
hides and wool,
The Foundation is
organization,
than 500 meat packing companies i
in the United States. Affiliated Daneman”
with the University of Chicago, it Live carp is

a non-protit Teg a ng

French,

the request

employs about 40 highly trained those with the tastes of Poles,
middle-

research scientists,

f other
Its laboratories include a pilot

Germans, and
European peoples.

plant, where production and sta~ and served in “Polish sauce,”



7 Eels are a traditional Christmas
synthetic qish for those of Italian tastes.

rivers icy conditions. This type of con—

United States and in Canada.
‘They are brought to the market gir bubbles Which prevent dis~
in specially constructed barges.

Eels are served either fried or under ice conditions.

from the ocean engineers in all parts of the —
epths off Portugal, is probably ty. r en
requested,
: : this many-armed
Supported by more gh js a favourite dish for those

Carp, cooked | cents or 21 cents per day according lings are finalized, and it will be

Along one stretch of highwa CDC property.
in New York State a study is The firms concerned form part
being made of the performance Of the well-known Booker Broth-

of air-entrained concrete under ¢TS group. —E.F.S.

the crete is a new development

eontaining billions of microscopic

GIANT PLANE MAY

FLY AROUND WORLD
LONDON, "et

rupting pressures on concrete

the Samples, of the concrete “grow-

Tahiti May Become
Airways Centre
PAPEETE, Society Islands,
Tahiti might be the

in the central South Pacitic for a
South

work of

Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder
+++ 80 Velvety smooth

April 9, «++ delicately perfumed

focal point «++ Clings softly for hours

Pacifie air

and hours, giving you

sea ing” on farms and in water are Tentative plans are being dis Toutes between Australia and
x ain cussed ssainai pans the Ministry of Seuth and Central America, ac- that natural vivid look.

set up by the cement industry Supply and@ the Bristol Aviation ®ording to Captain P. G. Taylor

near Chicago. The data collected Company for a round-the-world @!, the pioneering flying boat

by the laboratory is analyzed and flight of the giant 100-ton Braba-
passed along to builders and zon plane.

The Brabazon makes its first
flight outside Britain in June when
it will be on show at the Paris Air

SOCIETY DOGS Exhibition. The plane will no

LONDON. jand but will give a number o!

The London Daily Express re- demonstration flights over L«
ot ported the following announcement Bourget field.
in a Devonshire hotel brochure:
“Guests’ dogs are charged

is ¢
fron
to



and

+
%,
Many technical details have t ¥
*
<

GRIPES

is a} ta size and social standing.” late

summer before the





14 be settled before any world-gird
ate plane |

bility of products under controlled favourite of these people. —I.N.S. could leave on its trip.—IN.S. %
conditions are studied, and a fat

extraction room, A special project —Red snapper, caught in the e i" ts e,e Ie
laboratory is used to study the Gulf of Mexico, is used by Senior Short Stor Com etition 1S
nutritive values in bone and meat Americans of Japanese and is
scrap, tankage, and other meat Chinese origin. They also like i
packing by-products. A fully pike and porgies. Greeks favour The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girt: %
equipped home economies kitchen striped bass, The French enjoy] between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe- ' g
provides facilities for research in snails which are a shellfish and] tition. Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words! §
connection with cooked products, are imported from Morocco.} in length and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd..| $

They also demand frogs’ legs

OUTDOOR CINEMA













brought in from Cuba and Japan
Shrimp, liked by almost every-



City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week |}
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re- ‘y

























: ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6
An estimated 2,000 “drive-in body, comes from a number of ; S ve }
Sugar Content Than theatres” in the United States ac- places. The species jusnbo King Send this coupon with your story. :
. commodate 5,000,000 persons and is imported from Mexico. er q
Barbados Cane 600,000 automobiles each day. The types come from the southern SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION 3
theatres are built so that whole waters of the United States. THAD: coin de cvareinsdenssen Be ttlnsos be Dap Te ae Rips ada’ x
(From Our Own Correspondent) families may view motion-picture %
PORT-OF-SPAIN, oe 6 performances from their automo- BR ic ec ce tecv eden esr ss bbdadsreteeterdtenccpebe $
pril 9. niles, which they park before a ;
“The sugar content of Trinidad jarge outdoor screen. TOO MANY CATS NE THe ec vicke boss Kediees cdc eablaahbdeda sees %
cane is lower than that of the Bar- form &
bados cane, and therefore, cannot ._ VANCOUVER. He SHS RSE ESE URED RSME TES ESAT ER EES sh $
command such a high price,” the DRIVE ANYWHERE A total of 4,825 cats were des- i lia ish mn uth enugatievedats : $
Hon. Victor Bryan, Minister of A company in the United States troyed by the Humane Society} = = ““™™ “um ss*"* ‘ :
Agriculture said to a press repre- has developed an automobile tire here last year but the Society’s' |... bpd ed cake bina) done Gi WEE ths gi cide cereus %
sentative, in answer to a corres- that is safe from blowouts on greatest problem is still stray cats. yu
pondence writing in the Gazette punctures. No rubber inner tube An official told the annual meeting z
under the nom-de-plume “De- js required. If a puncture does of the S.P.C.A. that the Water-| BRP 4AlL "Y AND PROTECTION 2
pressed Farmer.” who wanted to occur, a soft pliable rubber inside front and downtown areas are %
know why Barbados cane farmers the tire surrounds the leak ang “full” of them ¢s
were being paid $10.50 per ton prevents the loss of air :
for their canes, a price higher than ~ : st
that paid to Trinidad farmers, ent CHANGE z
why the price paid by the estate make a ton of sugar. He pointed TES x
owners to their labourers were out that another important factor RA OF EX %
much more favourable than that was that in Barbados the cane was APRIL 11, 1951. %
paid in Trinidad. Mr. Bryan ad- being delivered by the farmer to ’ pause gor ;
mitted that the price paid for Bar- the factory door, and as such the ® 3/10% pr. Cheques on oo og
bados canes was around the fig- farmer had to stand the cost of Demand :
ures mentioned but pointed out transportation, whereas in Trini- Drafts 61.15% pr.
that ‘* — only cl tons of dad, the sugar manufacturer was eer wea ee
a make a ton of sugar in paying the cost of transporting th 2 os 4 pr.
‘ados, while in Trinidad it cane from the farmer's eeale, Seer Oe ee Somes Be 1/10% pF.
toox nearly 10 tons of cane to a long way from the factory. Silver g
%&
SSS ass == :
3 $
WHOLESALE DEALERS PLEASE :
5
%

NOTE



THE FOLLOWING

“

Frigate Bird I, The aircraft lana-
ed here today from Mangareva. It
back
after

ym its way
n Chile

find suitable

PORES 9CIEUES

5

Day

ALL

TENNIS DRESSES.

a survey
airbases in the
South Pacific for a regular Aus- [
iralian-Chile air service.—Reuter l

OO OVOVS

to Australie
flight

FOR THAT NATURAL VIVID LOOK



MONDAY - TUESDAY





{TEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED

FOR QUICK CLEARANCE

You are definitely effecting large savings by attending this CLEARANCE

SALE. Here are some of the many reductions.

A fine assortment in sizes and colours, Most of these items were regularly

sold up to $8.50

LADIES’ BETTER DRESSES

Many Styles and Colours,

LADIES’
Regular Sizes and Modern Shades
Also a variety in Ladies Ankle Socks

Sale Price

All sizes, Reduced from $24 to

ART SILK STOCKINGS

LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS

2 of these fine Towels with a Glass Tumbler

To-day's Value 65c. per towel,

LADIES’ PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK

Lace tiinumed Panties in tea rose, cream also black, Small, Medium, Large.

Regular priced $1.92

Sale Price



OPPO

MODERN DRESS SHOPPE-troad St.

SALE

THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY

SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS *

Special Sale Price. All 3 in a pkg. cor § | 00

“am tae G1 00

a8) SUD s |

6S

Â¥

ae |
eh] PM §

Sale Price a prs. for $I. i

“4,

CSOCOOOS SS

OF

hOSSS955S59S9F

ESSO



FLIT SPRAYERS
FLIT POWDER 4







BROWN 3 * re
PARAFFIN OIL IN 52 GALLON DRUMS
PARAFFIN OIL IN 5 GALLON PAILS
NUJOL IN PINT BOTTLES

OR DIAL 3814,

PRODUCTS JUST RECEIVED

FLIT IN TINS :—GALLONS, QUARTS, PINTS, HALF PINTS
WHITE PETROLEUM JELLY IN 400 LB. DRUMS

MISTOL IN }-0z. BOTTLES WITH & WITHOUT EPHEDRINE
MISTOL IN’ 2-0z. BOTTLES WITHOUT EPHEDRINE.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY TO —
R. M. JONES & COMPANY, LTD.









”

delieate colours for
| outside,
} MADE BY
BERGER PAINTS

[ALL HARDWARE STORES

Agents:—GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Léd.

With Bergertex, chere’s new beauty and protection for walls of
concrete, plaster, brick or stone
Bergertex cannot crack or peel off. for in drying it beeomes an integral
part of the wall on which it is painted. Its crisp, matt finish stays

«-»-WITH BERGERTEX

. F454
a at of a a

-

Waterproof and weather resisting,

fresh and smart almost indefinitely. |

4

Bergertex is available in many

use inside or



GEESE EPEC FS

CPPS O SSPE

Stocked by

. yee
PROPEL ELPEPRPPPBDPDLDPBPLAPEPPAPLLALLLPPPLAPLDPPPLLADL!LLLLLLLLLP PII NIN

LADIES’ SKIRTS AND BLOUSES

Jersey material Blouses, Printed Cotton Skirts Specially reduced for gf %
this Sale Only sisi csidl 7 x
+

IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS x

For ladies and children in white and many other useful colours. Many fl ij ¥%
Styles, Many regular prices were up to $4.80 To Clear ®

MEN’S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS %
Men’s Polo Shirts in White only with Zip fasteners. Shirts that were oo .
regular $2.40. Reduced for this Sale ee es S

54” WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL 3
That will make Skirts or Coats for travelling and can make many other | ] 3
useful things. Reduced from $6.00 to Per yd. $3: ¥

et et

LADIES’ COATS, WOOLLEN PULLOVERS, CARDIGANS y
Reduced to |} Price §

CORSETS, CORSELETTES, TURBANS, INFANT CHRISTENING
DRESSES to | Price *



THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE ;

PRSF
PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.

The issue of Canada.West
Indies Trade is being kept alive
in Canada as well as in the West
Indies, The Toronto Globe And
Mail of April 5, 1951 calls for
“immediate negotiations for a
new B.W.I. trade treaty to re-
place the moribund and now one-
sided pact of 1925." Under cur-
rent conditions, argues the Globe
and Mail, the B.W.I. area is not
itself benefiting by the $11 million
subsidy which Canadian consum-
ers pay annually for their sugar
requirements. “We are not bene-
fiting by free access to B.W.I.
markets for our exports, Britain
alone benefits, as she skims off
B.W.1I. dollar earnings from us
for concentration in her central
dollar reserve. We need a new
treaty based on a new principle.
We would benefit by freeing our-
selves from purchases in the
United States. The Colonies
would benefit by greatly expanded
activity in production, processing
and marketing. And Great Britain
would benefit by the transfer of
our present dollar purchases from
the United States to the Colonies.”

Twenty-two years ago at the
First West Indies Conference Mr.
J. P. Hand of Bermuda was say-
ing something not quite the same
but tending in the same direction.
“There are,” he said, “outstanding
businessmen of the West Indies
who believe that Bermuda and the
West Indies can do a greater vol.
ume of trade with Canada than
with Great Britain. That does not
mean that we should not continue
our trade with the Mother Coun-
try, It means that if by virtue of
that agreement (the Canada-West
Indies agreement) our Colonies
can be made more prosperous we
shall be in a better position to buy
more from the Mother Country.”

Trade between Canada and the
West Indies is the outstanding
topic of conversation throughout
the West Indies and in Canada
to-day, and in London tongues are
wagging, It is therefore well worth
recounting what is known of
those trade relations and showing
how the Canada-West Indies
Trade agreement came into being.
The story is best told, as far as I
have been able to trace it, in F, V.
Meyer’s ‘“Britain’s Colonies and
World Trade,” published by
Geoffrey Cumberlege (Oxford
University Press) in 1948.

As early as 1890 the Canadian
Minister of Finance visited the
West Indies to diseuss proposals
for mutual preferences, At that
time the West Indies were nego.
tiating with the United States for
most favoured nation treatment
under the McKinley Tariff Act
and were afraid that preferences
given to Canada would penalise
the export of West Indian sugar
to the United States. In 1898
when the Colonies were in distress,
Canada, out of a feeling of im-
perial responsibility towards H.M.
Government in the United King-
dom, put raw sugar on the duti-
able list and thereby extended the
preferential tariff treatment to the
West Indian Colonies, Canada
neither asked nor received any-
thing in return, Two years later
sent a delegation to



Thursday, April 12, 1951



UNTAXED PEDLARS

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
passed an address relating to. the activities
of pedlars and asked that a Committee be
appointed to consider what should be done
to remedy the situation.

At last Government’s attention has been
focussed on a matter which has given cause
to much concern and grave dissatisfaction
in this island. The influx of these itiner-
ant vendors has gone on at a rate which
alarmed small business houses without any
official attention being paid to it or its
concomitant dangers.

During the debate in the House it was
pointed out that these pedlars who sell
cloth. and other merchandise escape the
payment of taxation which they would
have to pay if they had been established
in business houses.

The average businessman now con-
tributes by way of income tax and paro-
chial tax approximately 50% of his profits.
The upkeep of his establishment and
wages for his staff are other demands on
his business.

The itinerant vendor moves around in
his car and besides the upkeep of the
vehicle and his chauffeur has no other ex-
pense of consequence. It has been argued
in his favour that he carries to the country
worker goods which would not be other-
wise available to him and on terms of pay-
ment which would not be afforded him by
business houses in the City, The difference
in price, however, is sufficient to give the
worker twice the amount of goods.



































The itinerant vendor is only one of a
growing class of itinerant trader whose
growing prices are tending to aggravate
inflation and raise the cost of living.

The Government must show a greater
awareness of the way in which the price
control list is openly flouted in this island.
It must also take action against all sellers
of foodstuffs who put up the cost of living
to themselves and the public by selling at
scarcity prices, The tendency in this
island has been to attack the big man of
whom there are relatively few and who
keeps proper accounts, and to ignore the
great many who keep no books and whose
profits are out of all proportion. There
must be no discrimination, and action
against itinerant vendors must be extend-
ed to all those who exploit the community
in search of a quick road to prosperity.

LONDON,

Britain is to spend £1,300 million
on rearmament during the coming
financial year. This is only the
first stage of a defence programme
which is to cost £4,700 million in
the next three years.

The sum to be spent this year
is divided into three main cate-
gories (as illustrated in the ac-
companying chart). Pay and al-
lowanees for the armed forces will
amount to £270 million, and an-
other £330 is needed for miscel-
laneous purposes such as food,
petrol, oil, transport of personnel
and stores, etc.

The lion’s share of this year’s
rearmament expenditure—
amounting to £700 million—is to
go to the production of tanks,
guns, ‘planes and other military
equipment, and to research, de-
velopment and other work con-
nected with the defence pro-
gramme.

The overriding problem for the
nation is how to carry this tre-
mendous burden without reverting
to a war economy or, lowering its
standard of living more than is
justified by the urgency of the
task and the need to restrict in-
flation at home to the minimum.

The Government have now de-
cided that the main burden will
fall on home consumption. There

—————— |



NO PARKING

IN an effort to assist motorists who ex-
perience great difficulty in- finding ade-
quate parking space in the City and who
unwittingly park in restricted areas, the
Commissioner of Police, in co-operation
with the Transport Authority has clearly
marked “No Parking” areas.

Poles have been painted red in addition
to black and white.

Once the significance of the red band
has been understood, there can be no diffi-
culty for the motorist, who may still find
it impossible to find parking space, but who
will not suffer from any nervous fear that
they have broken the law. Never park
where there is a.red band. |







OUR READERS SAY:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By George Hunte

The next ten years saw a change
in the West Indian attitude to-
wards Canada, The annexation ef
Puerto Rico by the United States
and the preferential treatment
granted by the United States to
Cuba and the Philippines led to
a virtual cessation of the demand
for West Indian sugar. At the
same time Canadian imports of
sugar rose from 104,000 long tons
in 1899 to 185,000 long tons in
1909. The Barbados House of
Assembly was quick off the mark.
In 1908 a Bill was passed increas.
ing by 20 per cent, the duties on
certain specific articles when not
imported from Canada or any
other British country.

In these early years the West
Indies seemed to benefit by selling
at a preference to Canadian re-
finers and on a more favourable
basis to British refiners, In Can-
ada, meanwhile, a movement was
developing which claimed that the
grant of Canadian preferences
should be conditional upon the re-
ceipt of return advantages, In
1907 the Boards of Trade of Tor-
onto, Halifax and St, John sent a
commission to the West Indies to
investigate trade relations, As a
result, Barbados in 1908 was the
meeting place of a general con-
ference at which Canada and most
of the British West Indian colo.
nies were represented by official
delegates, Resolutions in favour
of reciprocal preference and of
improved means of communica-
tion and transportation between
Canada and the West Indies were
adopted. The next step was a
Royal Commission, which was
appointed in 1908 and reported in
1910 (Cd 5369),

This Commission pointed out
that “the geographical position ‘of
the West Indian colonies must al-
ways tend to throw them under
the influence of the fiscal system
either of the United States or of
the Dominion of Canada. Attempts
have been made from time to time
to obtain for these colonies special
advantages in the markets of the
United States, whose proximity
renders them of special import-
ance to the West Indies, The
Colonial policy of the United
States has now finally stopped ad-
vance in that direction; it would
be unwise, except for the gravest
reasons, now to oppose the natural
desire of the West Indian colonies
for close connection with the
Northern Dominion,”

In 1912 the West Indies sent re-
presentatives to Canada. Their
main concern was an {adequate
preference on sugar and the as-
surance of its continuation for a
long enough peried to give
promise of stability to the cane
sugar industry. An _ agreement
came into operation in 1913 and
remained in force until superseded
by the agreement of 1920. Canada
did more than she was required
by the agreement. She granted a
preference of 24 per cent instead
of 15 per cent per 100 Ib, on sugar
of 96°. 7

The 1914 war upset everything.
The United Kingdom’s place as
the largest supplier of imports into



will be fewer goods in the shops
and the price of those that remain
will be higher. This fact, by itself.
will restrict spending power and
thus help to check internal infla-
tion, Controls—and, possibly, new
taxes—will do the rest.

But this alone will not solve the
problem, Britain’s economy de-
pends on a steady flow of imports
—of food and raw materials—
which must be paid for with ex-
ports. We will need even more
imports in the coming year to sus-
tain the arms programme, and the
Government estimate that they
will cost us over £3,200 million,
or £850 million more than last
year. On account of price increases
alone, Britain may have to face
an increase jon import costs of
£700 million.

If we can get the raw materials,
and if production is raised to four
per cent above the 1950 level
(which is no greater than it was
at the end of last year) we may
just manage to export enough to
strike a balance in our overseas
trading account. This means that
last year’s overall surplus of
£229 million on our external
trading account will have to go—
together with about £100 of our
gold reserves, the amount needed

Before And After 1925 (oli Airls Wages Guide

A Review Of Canadaw¥W.L Trade

the West Indies in 1912 had been
taken by the United States in
1920. Exports to Canada relative~

ly declined during the same
period, while the ion of ex-
ports to the Uni Kingdom in-

creased, These chanves were due
to a rise in prices resulting from
the war. A new eerment nego-
tiated in 1920, taking effect
912. Tt w. a te all the
of 1912. ya
West Indian steer asa Bermu-
da. All the West Indian colonies
brought it into foree but not Ber-
muda. The preference granted
was much bigger nin 1912, The
all-round ta differential grant-
ed in 1920 was of far greater im-
portance to the British manufac-
turers than the extension of the
1912 agreement.

Another conference took place
at Ottawa in 1925, The agree-
ment came into effect in 1927.
In 1938 the Dominion gave notice
of its denunciation as from 31 De-
cember 1939 onwards, but the war
intervened and it is still in force,
although the whole weight of
Canadian public opinion appears
to be against it to-day and a re-
vision, is expected this year, and
will probably be requested when
the conference to discuss the 1951
Trade Liberalization Plan meets
this summer in Ottawa.

In 1932 imperial preference be-
came part of an Empire-wide
scheme and Canadian-West Indian
relations changed. Previously the
West Indians bargained directly
with the Canadians. At Ottawa
in 1932 and after the Secretary of
State for the Colonies not only
had the last word, but also the
first. He conducted the negotiations
at Ottawa, without eny colonial
delegates being present. “The Co-
lonial Schedules” to quote Dr.
Meyer “became an integral part
of the United Kingdom agree-
ments. Then the colonies were
invited to put them into effect. For
the Colonial Emovire it was Hob-
son’s choice,”

Before Vttawa sometning else
happened to affect the normal
course of West Indian Trade,
something remarkably like what
happened in 1949. Sterling was
depreciated relatively to the dol-
lar from 1931 to 1938. This made
(and the fact readg like 1949 all
over again) Canadian and United
States goods very expensive and
imports from the United Kingdom
rose while imports from Canada
and the United States declined.
After 1933 the dollar also was de-
preciated and by 1938 Canadian
Trade at least in Jamaica and
Barbados had recovered to an ap-
preciable extent.

During the war of course Can-
ada’s trade with the West Indies
saved the West Indies. What hap-
pened when Great Britain depre-
ciated sterling in 1949 and clamp-
ed down on dollar allocations to
buy Canadian goods is too well
known to need recapitulation.
But it cannot be repeated too
often that unless Canada gets bet-
ter treatment with relation to her
trade with the. West Indies than
the United Kingdom allows her to-
day, then nothing can save the
West Indies from another great
depression, unless the United
Kingdom is prepared to subsidize
the West Indies indefinitely.

What Rearmament Will Cost

to finance stock-piling of vital
foods and raw materials.

Nevertheless, it is hoped thab
by increasing the price of our
exports we will be able to cover
the greater part of the rise in
the cost of our imports, But if
we do this recklessly, we stand
to lose valuable export markets—
a thing which we cannot afford
to do, especially now that Ger-
man and Japanese industry is
begining to recover.

We must, therefore, aim at an
increase in the volume of our
exports. This must be done des-
pite the fact that many of the
metal-using and engineering firms
which normally produce the bulk
of our exports will be engaged in
the production of arms. The gap
must be filled with textiles, cloth-

ing. and other consumer goods.| are British) at almost any time by ringing

These are the things that are like-
ly to disappear from the shops at
home.

The Commonwealth and dollar
markets will continue to have the
highest priority in this new ex-
port drive.

The prospect for the people of
Britain is, as the Economic Survey
for 1951 admits, “in many ways
Warsh and unpleqsant’, but, on
the whole, no worse than we had
expected.
















Barbados Tennis
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—"I am writing this letter
with the intention of, exposing the
most unsatisfactory way in which
the business of the Barbados Ama-
teur Lawn Tennis Association is
conducted,

I would like to quote the fol-
lowing paragraph which appeared
in last Thursday’s Advocate—
“The Council of the Lawn Tennis
Association who are selectors as
well did not consider the local
players nominated up to a stand-
ard that would do credit to Bar-
bados in the games.”

I would appreciate if the sele¢-

tors would advise the public just
how they arrived at this decision
in view of the fact that no prac-
tice matenes were arranged or
held. Can it be possible that they
judged players by their form last
September? Are they not aware
that tennis is a game that requires
a lot of practice and if given the
necessary practice a great im-
provement can take place in a
player within a few weeks.
Eh would suggest that instead of
jumping to conclusions they make
a point of watching some of the
local tournaments instead of being
guided by results in the daily
newspaper.

Why were six players asked to
hold themselves in readiness for
the forthcoming tour to Trinidad
af it had been previously decided
that only two of them should go
and in event of one of the two not
going, other arrangements be
made? The above statement is
substantiated by the fact that no
practices were held.

I would further like to ask the
selectors who communicates in-
formation regarding players to
the Press? Surely this shouldbe

one of the duties of the Secretary
of the Association. How then
could information be given the
Trinidad Guardian to the effect
that I would be unable to make
the trip to Trinidad if selected,
when the Seeretary has in his
possession a letter of 2nd instant
Mrom me to the contrary,

It.is Righ time that open tourna.
ments: were held previous. to. the
selection of players to ta/ie@. part
in the Brandon Trophy, IP Clubs
affiliated to the Association are
unwilling to stage such tourna-
ments on their grounds I would
like to suggest that the President
of the Association approach His
Excellency with a view to staging
such tournaments annually at
Government House,

Can some members of the
Council select players to repre-
sent Barbados without holding an
official meeting? I understand
from reliable sources that no
meeting was held. However, if
a meeting was held how is it that
two members (maybe more) were
never notified of such a meeting.

I understand that Council mem-
bers were phoned and notified
that the decision of the “few’’ had
already been forwarded to Tring
dad.

How is it that the President has
allowed the business of the Asso-
ciation to be conducted in such a
manner, I look forward to some
action being taken by members of
the Clubs affiliated to the Associa.
tion as the ‘future of Lawn Ten-
nis in Barbados now rests in a
precarious position.

How do members of the Coun-
cil, who have created the prece-
dent of inviting Carter and Legall
to play for Barbados, ever- hope

to regain the confidence of mem-
bers of the Association.

Is itin accordance with the rules
of the Association to invite non-
members when there has been no
opportunity for members to prove
that they are “up to standard.”

DENNIS E. WORME,
The Cot,

Rockley, ' 4 Jb
Christ Church,
April 10, 1951.

Age-grouping

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Quite recently from de-
bates in the House of Assembly,
I noticed where certain critic-
isms were levelled against the
Government as regards the in-
troduction and extension of age-
grouping in this island, A few
days having elapsed, I have now
read in your Journal of 8th
April, re: the debate about this
age-grouping at a meeting of the
Teachers’ Association, In _ fair-
ness to myself and the general
public, it would appear as though
the teachers as a majority and
not the Government have under-
taken to use themselves as an
umbrella to shield this system
which can do no good to our
clementary schools in this island,

I heartily agree with Mr. Cum-
berbatch’s suggestion and can
further him by saying that T
have always agreed with those
Educational Reformers who sug
gest to grade the child from the
known to the unknown — hence
I conclude by saying — away
with age-grouping. Tell the Gov-
ernment that teachers practically
find it retrograde and not pro
gressive as Mr. Cumberbatcb has
admitted. And I can assure you
that-the Government will do its

best in the interest of our elemen-
tary schools, teachers, and the
general public:
ONE INTERESTED.

April 9, 1951. ,

Good Fellowship

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I will be glad if you will
be so kind as to publish the fol-

lowing in your “Our Readers
Say” column.
I was deeply moved and

touched this morning when I ar-
rived at my Office and read the
Newspaper article about the Din-
ner given in Honour of the Hon:
J. H, Wilkinson by the Speaker
of the House of Assembly:

It was a_ great pleasure to
read what an, amicable course the
proceedings took among the var-
jous speakers, Everyone present
seemed to be in the very best of
spirits and the laudable terms in
which the speakers spcke pf Mr
Wilkinson were indeed deserving.
What struck me more forcibly
however, was the spirit of “good
feelings” that existed between
all parties, i.e. Labour and Con-
servatives. I think both sides
spoke well of each other and that
is as it should always be, not
only among politicians but among
all persons in the Island. I hope
that all who read the article will
take it as an example of how we

can all live and work for one
another, Words fail me to say
much more than what I have

said.
Thanking you for space,
I Remain, Sir,
Yours Faithfully,
M. V,. TAYLOR.
Stratham,
Worthing Ch. Ch:
April 6, 1951,

THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1951





SSeS

PENCILS FOR EVERYONE








In Oil Town

By KENNETH MACAULAY
whose despatches toretold the Abadan crisis



Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE

AS the plane drives through a sky almost
bleached of its blue there is a glint far away
of silver.

In a few moments the glint spreads out and
becomes a shimmering city. The traveller is
arriving at Abadan. ,

Every part of the great oil refinery, with
its farms of enormous steel storage tanks,
is painted in glistening, unstained aluminium
to throw off the sun’s heat.: .

Here on this flat mud island created from
the prehistoric silt of the Tigris and the
Euphrates is the oil capital of the world.

DO YOU WANT A

G00D-TEMPERED BREAKFAST FAMILY?

Serve their early morning tea or coffee in our

MINTON PLAIN or GOLD-EDGED Man-Sized

BREAKFAST CUPS & SAUCERS





The soil is Persian, but every stick and
stone there, every nut, bolt, and pipe, is the
property of the British-owned Anglo-Iranian
Oil Company.

Two thousand Europeans and their families
live in this town of wide asphalted roads,
good houses or bungalow flats with every
amenity that the paternalism of the oil com-
pany can provide.

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

4687 & 4472.

BENDIX

WASHING MACHINES
FULLY AUTOMATIC

WASHES NINE POUNDS CLOTHES.

Through Six Complete Stages in
45 minutes (without any manual
labour) the final stage the Clothes
are just damp, suitable for ironing.
ONLY A FEW MACHINES LEFT
UNSOLD.
@

For the oil company is Abadan, Almost
every soul here, Persian or European, is in
the company’s service.

LIFE IS BEARABLE

The management has spent some of its
millions trying to make life bearable for the
people it has recruited to supply, refine, sell,
and ship oil and its products from this blis-
tered place.



Phones:



6.





















SCOOPS SFOS

Outside Abadan there is nothing, nowhere
to go, nothing to see.

From the guard on the refinery gate who
makes sure that the visitor gives up his
matches or lighter to the top executive, chief
engineer or chemist, every man-jack finds
that every facet of his life becomes inevit-
ably the concern of the company and in some
degree under its control.

POP GOOS OSS

Oo

His house is company-owned. Only the
company could get grass to grow on his
lawns and afford to keep it watered for 24

|



hours a day in the hot weather. 3
Abadan is the only place in Persia where ELECTRICAL DEPT.
one dare drink the water that comes out of SECC SOO EOEOOEOECCEEB LE ESS OBEY

the tap. It is company’s water.

Laid on, like the water, are the house ser-
vants and a laundry service, shops, swim-
ming pools, libraries, schools, and a farm, all
company-owned and run.



LOUNGE
SUITS
‘ready
to
wear

Who imports the English beer and cigar-
ettes for the community’s social centre, the
Gymkhana Club? The company,

Who keeps the prices from soaring to 10s.
a bottle or 7s. 6d. a packet ? The oil company.

They built the town’s two cinemas, outdoor
for summer and indoor for winter, and im-
port the films for them. There is a daily
newspaper (run by the company).

AIR-COOLED

Social distinctions there are, of course, but

they are out of this world of Mayfair and
Suburbia.

It is not a matter of high-powered, flashy
American cars, for the company owns almost
all the cars in Abadan, large and small,
maintains them and supplies petrol and

| chauffeurs too. Anyone can have a car (they




range of fitting, single or



double breasted.

Style in fine Grade
WORSTEDS and GAB-
ERDINES.



up the transport pool.

_There is never any occasion for mink and
diamond tiaras, and the company would not

stand for the snobbery of private swimming
pools,

A big assortment to



select from - - -

DA COSTA & CO..
Dry Goods Dept.

So in a town where everyone has servants
and a nanny, if necessary, the only social dis-
tinction left is air-conditioning. The oil man’s
wife who can boast she gets so many tons
of air cooled to such a temperature every 24

hours has got somewhere in Abadan’s social
hierarchy.



Lesser folk have to put up with fewer tons
of conditioned air—a cooled living room and
bedroom perhaps.

The lowest stratum of social life—the
“first contract man” who is almost invariably
single and serving his first term with the
company—has to do the best he can with an
electric fan in a bungalow flat.

ENERGY FOODS
KELLOGG’S ALL BRAN
KELLOGG’S CORN

FLAKES
PRUFF WHEAT
PUFFED WHEAT
CHOCOLATE LUNCH
BISCUITS

BARLEY SUGAR STICKS

CALVES LIVER

DANISH BACON

DANISH LUNCH
TONGUES

J & R ENRICHED BREAD



COVETED
Tight, compact and organised 1s the com-
munity of
y Abadan, where the penalty for FRESH VEGETABLES
moral or gross professional delinquency is CARROTS
a ticket on the first plane back to the United|% SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL BEET ROOT
inal: CANADIAN APPLES CABBAGE
CANADIAN CHOCOLATE STRING BEANS '
a : NUT ROLL CHRISTOPHENES
is is the city the Persians covet as much :
a : : ’ CANADIAN CHOCOLATE
as the oil that flows silently into it from the BARS :
wells 130 miles away. ;
Men have given a lifetime to making the

mud flats of the oil capital habitable.

And no finer example of the British organ-
ising genius is to be found anywhere in the
world.

The Communists who organised the appear-
ance of their manifesto in every letter box
in Abadan a few months ago are waiting for
their chance.

FISH
SMOKED HADDOCK
SMOKED KIPPERS
RED SALMON
RED SNAPPER

(SB. GRADE ‘A MEATS



order early from

i
|
; GODDARDS

They want to take the world’s oil capital
over-—-and they reckon that everything|
would go on as smoothly as before.
—L.ES."



OF



Myint bv penh totttote lvl te betn ttre ttt Arle bbb dr
3 RRR IERIE

‘


THURSDAY, APRIL

—

12,

1951



C.C. Dissatisfied
With Profits

Resolution

Will Go To

Government

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE are dissatisfied with

Government’s decision not
on goods, and at a meeting

to increase margins of profits
yesterday they decided to ap-

proach Government again on the matter. The meeting was
called to consider the repert of the Price Control Commit-
tee. The view was expressed that there seemed no justi-
fication for Government's decision not to implement the
recommendations of the Committee.

The Council of the Chamber, it was decided, will now
hold a meeting at which representatives of the various
branches of trades will be invited. At this meeting it is

proposed to draft a suitable

resolution to be forwarded to

Government stating the views of the Chamber.

The President, Mr. D, G. Lea-
cock, was the first to address the
meeting yesterday. He said:

This Meeting has been sum-
moned for the special purpose of
considering the report of the
Price Control Committee. There
are many members here who will
speak on this report with special
reference to the various classes of
business with which they are most
familiar, but I intend to make a
few general remarks first.

Unsatisfactory Point
“The first point which appears

to me most unsatisfactory is that
this report which was dated July
5th, 1950, was only laid on the
table of the House of Assembly
during last month, a delay of some
8 months. One cannot help feel-
ing that if this Report had recom-
mended a reduction in the allow-
able profits of merchants, whole-
salers, and the larger retailers,
rather than the removing of con-
trols and the increasing of some
margins of gross profit, it would
have been dealt with far more ex-
peditiously.

“It appears to me most unfair
to the business community, who
have frequently been accused of
making excessive profits and
thereby causing unnecessary
increases in the cost of living,
that this Report, which entirely
refutes these _ accusations,
should not have been released
many months earlier.

“The general public does not

perhaps realise that the smooth

working of local price controls
during the last ten years is very
largely due to the full whole-
hearted co-operation of the
business community with the

Controller of Supplies through-

out this period, The latter’s

task would have been very
much more difficult without this
co-operation. Such a difficulty
is far more likely to arise, if
traders feel that they are being
subjected to unfair and unrea-
sonable controls.”

Supply Position

Since this Report had been
written, the supply position as a
whole had most definitely deteri-
orated. He thought, therefore,
that it would be unwise for the
Chamber to press at the present
time for the measures of decon-
trol which were suggested in the
report, without in any way reced-
ing from the position they had
taken. That was, that as soon as
any articles were in free supply,
they should be decontrolled and
competition would ensure that
their prices would be kept as low
as possible,

But admitting there were rea-
sonable grounds for continuing
price controls at the present time,
did not mean that they were satis-
fied with the present mark-ups
allowed. He would like to draw
their attention to paragraph 7 of
the report, which stated that with
the possible exception of hard-
ware the net profits which had
accrued to traders over the last
three years were less than ade-
quate.

“With the large increases in first
cost of goods since the report was
written, this satement is even
more true today than when it was
written as the capital required to
maintain stocks is now consider-
ably higher.

There is therefore every ground
for pressing on the Government
our view that many of the per-
mitted profit margins should be
increased, Paragraph 11 recalls
that when wholesale and retail
foodstuffs prices were controlled,

it was intended to permit
a weighed average gross profit
of 10% to wholesalers and
15% to retrilers. It would
surely not be unreasonable for
us to suggest that margins of

these concerns, which are now
probably in the neighbourhood of
6 per cent and 10 per cent should
be increased, by steps if necess-
ary, to percentages at least close
to those originally allowed.
Not Represented
“While the small shopkeepers in
the country are not represented in
this Chamber, I am _ sure that
members here would not wish to
see them driven out of business or
reduced to bankruptcy by totally
inadequate controlled profits, as
they comprise a most essential
section of the community. We
must therefore see that their case
is given consideration. I could say
a good deal more, but I know
there are many others who want
to speak on this subject, I will end
by suggesting that our correct
course at the end of this Meeting
will be to send a resolution to
His Excellency the Governor-in-
Executive Committee setting out
our views on this matter, after
members have discussed it fully.
Mr, D. V. Scott of the Colon-
nade Stores said that when the
matter of controls were start-
ed, a circular was sent around
to the various business houses
asking them to give some idea
of the prevailing margins of
profit, Owing to some confusion
amorg them, however, the mar-
gins were then fixed lower
than it had been the case be-
fore, During the following five
or six years there was a very
definite increase in cost prices,
! and one could therefore only
conclude that the Government
had taken that into considera-
tion. They seemed to have
reasoned that the trade was get-~
ting a greater profit. Either
the Government were right or
they were, for it was the trade's
contention that there was prac-
tically no fluctation im doing
business regardless of whether
an item cost $1 or $1.50. As the
Price Control Committee had
found out. figures remained al-
most identical for long periods.

Now the Government had said
that they were not prepared to
implement these recommenda-
tions. It was somewhat nebulous
reading Mr. Adams’ speech in the
House of Assembly, to find out
why. The price of goods had gone
up in the last few months but
their position remained as it: was
before, “Are we going to wait an-
other three years for it to. be
found out by another committee
that our mark-ups are not ade-
quate?” Mr. Scott questioned,

He thought that if Government
were prepared to control this mat-
ter, it was morally right for them
to see that profits were such that
a reasonable living wage could be
offered employees, that share-
holders get a reasonable return
on their money and the like.
Surely one side of the picture
alone could not be taken into

consideration and the other dis-
regarded.

Mr. J. O. Tudor, wholesale
provision dealer, of Roebuck

Street said that their branch of
trade had been the hardest hit
throughout all the controls, 1
1941 or '42, Dr. Saint decided to
give them a specific mark up, 10
per cent gross on a fixed thing.
As the years went by the price
of items went up but the mark-
up. remained the same 40 cents
that it had been before. They were
not as fortunate as others with
mark-ups on a percentage basis.

They went to the Controller and
drew to his attention that the
fixed mark-up was causing them
hardship, His answer had always
been that it was government’s
policy; that Dr. Saint had laid
down that the prices of foodstuffs
had to be kept as cheap as possi-
ble and he could not interfere
with the mark-up as laid down.

Good Mark-ups

They continued to press and
worry him. The Government
however felt that the mark-ups
were so good that they appointed
a committee to go into the system
with the result that when this
committee reported in July, 1950,
Government were so astonished
that they had nothing left ‘to do
but to pigeon-hole the report as
long as they could.

The trade again got hold of the
Controller and told him that as
matters were, they could not con-
tinue for long, The position cf
their profits was that instead of
there being a 10 per cent gross,
there was an average of 5 per cent.

When the Leader cf the House
made his statement which in-
formed them of Government's
policy they had no alternative
than to write to the Colonial
Secretary to ask him to write to
His Excellency asking him to give
them an interview. They had not
yet got a reply.

Mr, J. C. Carter of Messrs.
T. R. Evans, said that there was
the problem of stock replacement
Even with goods in free supply
there was difficulty. He would
contend that it was a matter of
great regret that the views of
the Select Committee on Price
Control were disregarded. He
would like to commend them in
the exactness of their report,

Mr. J. K. C. Grannum, dry
goods merchant of Swan Street,
said that he felt the dry goods
trade did not have very much to
grouse about. He thought they
should be content with the mark-
ups allowed at present.

Hardware Affected

Mr. H. F. Alkins of the Bar-
bados Cotton Factory, spoke on
the Report as it affected the Hard—
ware trade, He said that the first
reference to the trade in the Re-
port was in paragraph 7 where
the Committee stated, that as a
result of their investigations they
had come to the conclusion that
with the possible exception of
dealers in Hardware, the net pro-
fits of trade generally over the
past three years had been less
than adequate. He drew atten-
tion to the carefully worded
phrase used by the Committee,
and said that it could be assumed

@ on page 7



Mechanical Counting

For Savings Bank

Messrs. E. D. Carrington and
W. A. Gittens of the Government
Savings Bank will be going to
British Guiana on Friday, 13th
April on a six weeks’ training
course at the Post Office Savings
Bank there.

It is proposed shortly to intro-
duce a system of Mechanical: Ac-
counting in the Barbados Savings
Bank and the course in British
Guiana is intended to provide
them with practical experience in
the use of the National Cash Re-
gister Posting Machine and with
a knowledge of the unit system
for saving accounts which has
been successfully used in British
Guiana for the past three years.

RETRIAL TO-DAY

_ THE case in which a 12-man
jury failed to agree after a de-
liberation of two hours and five
minutes as to whether or not
Herbert Hutson, Angus Hunte and
Winfield Layne were guilty of the
larceny of a quantity of goods
valued at $161.70 the property of
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd., on
October 24 will be retried to-day
at the Court of Grand Sessions.
On the first occasion Mr.
J. E. T. Brancker appeared on be-
half of Layne while Mr. W. W.
Reece K.C. Solicitor General
prosecuted for the Crown,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WANTED

Nee dah ee ates)
pe a es.
ot :





BRIDGETOWN NEEDS FOUR OF THESE-—-This one off the Garrison was erected by the Turf Club,
and shows what a public lavatory should look like.



es the Department of

Highways & Transport has
removed many ‘Bus Stops which
were at curves and near corners,
but there are still a few more to
be removed.

Some of the incidents that
cause traffic blocks are not in all
cases the fault of wrongly placed
stops. In some cases traffic blocks
take place when ‘buses stop for
inspectors to board them in order

to check passengers for the own-
ers.

ees peasants suffered loss-
es when a cane fire occurred
at Archers Plantation, St. Lucy.
It extended to Harrison’s Tenan-
try where the peasants had their
canes planted. The fire started at
about 1.40 p.m. on Tuesday.

FIRE at Ealing Grove Planta-
tion, Christ Church on Tues-
day night burnt eleven and a half
acres of second crop ripe canes.
This fire extended to Gibbons
Plantation and burnt four acres of
second crop ripe canes. In both,
instances the canes were insured.
They are the property of S. T.
Gooding.



Sailors’ Rest Will
Be Furniture Shop

The Admiral Grant Sailors’
Rest on Lower Bay Street, for
many years a rest house for sea-
men, will shortly be turned into a
furniture store.

The old three-storeyed wood and
wall building was bought by
Mr. Ralph A. Beard, a city busi-
nessman, from Mr, Leslie Pitt, a
Commission Agent and is now
being reconstructed,

It was purchased in 1901 by
the late Mr. E. H. Weekes, a
Barbadian for the British Society
in England. After the retire
ment of Mr. Weekes at the end
of the second world war, Mr.
Russel was sent out by the
Society in Engand to take charge.

Two years later, the building
was sold and was used as a liquor
business, It is expected to be
finished by the middle of June.

BOAC Chairman
Will Tour
Caribbean

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, April 10.

Sir Miles Thomas, B.O.A.C
Chairman, is shortly to make a
tour of inspection of his Com-
pany’'s workings in the Caribbean
area including the Bahamas and
Bermuda. He will leave London
airport on Saturday.

To-day, four days before his
departure it is revealed in ua
quarterly review put out by the
Corporation’s Financial Comp-
troller that B.O.A.C. expect to
show a reduction of £3,000,000
in the annual deficit when
accounts for the financial year
to March 31 are published later
this year.

In 1949—50 the B.O.A.C.
deficit amounted to nearly
£8,000,000.

The review which is referred to
in the Financial Times‘ also
reveals that for the first 11 months
of the financial year 1950—51
nearly half of the B.O.A.C’s total
overall deficit was incurred on
South American routes. More than
one quarter was on account of the
route through the Caribbean
down the west coast,

Sir Miles’ visit to the Caribbean
is understood to be concerned to
a large extent with cutting down
such losses in future.

One way in which B.O.A.C.
hope to make Caribbean opera.
tions a better financial proposition

is by. offering regular services
between New York and _ thore
islands which are particularly

favoured by American tourists as
holiday resorts.

Latest Airliners

In an interview reported in
to-day’s Daily Telegraph Sir
Miles reveals that the De Havil-
land Comet jet, Britain's latest
and best airliner, may be used in
the not-too-distant future on ser-
vices between New York and the
West Indies.

This summer B.O.A.C’s Strato.
cruisers will be busily engaged on

Trans Atlantic routes, but a
Telegraph report states that
B.O.A.C. is planning to set

up a new Constellation service
from New York to Bermuda, the
Bahamas and Jamaica

This service may entail some
reduction of the B.O.A.C’s South
American services.

SS

P appointment of Miss Muriel






an, B.A. Honours, Lendon, I
Diploma, Specialist Degree, as He
mistress of the Alexandra Girls’ S ol

by the Governing Body, will have wb be
confirmed by the Governor

.to

BAKER



NOT GUILTY OF

MALICIOUS INJURY

SYDNEY WALTERS, a 40-year-old baker of Oistin,

Christ Church, was dischar;

sed by His Honour the Acting

Chief Judge when a jury found him not guilty of malicious
injury to property valued at $84.61 belonging to Eudora
Daniel at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday

Mr. D. H. L. Ward appé

sared on behalf of Walters and

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C. prosecuted for the Crown.





A fowl owned by Mrs.
St. Clair of Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael, laid three eggs
cf this shape during the last
two weeks. The egg is the
same size as the normal egg,
except for the “cashew seed
shape.”



Labourers
Imprisoned

Three labourers were sentenced
to terms of imprisonment by His
Honour the Acting Chief Judge
Mr. G. L, Taylor at the Court of
Grand Sessions yesterday. They
were Oliver Griffith, a 35-year-old
well digger of Bush Hall, St, Mi-
chael, who was sentenced to five
years’ pena! servitude for mali-
cicusly damaging a house with
gun powder and endangering the
lite of Enid Griffith. The offence
was committed on October 14
Kenneth Hurdle was sentenced

18 months’ imprisonment for
breaking into the house of Alitta
Hinds and stealing a quantity of
goods, He was also sentenced to
three years’ penal servitude for
the larceny from the dwelling
house of Mohommed Kola, These
terms of imprisonment are to run
concurrently.

Sentence of 18 months’ impris-
onment with hard labour was also
passed on Randolph Chandler for
larceny of goods from the dwell-
ing house of Mohommed Kola





Lumber Limite

Over 203,000 feet of pine lumber
errived in Barbados yesterday by
the 364-ton motor vessel Precise
The shipment arrived trom Pine
Ridge, Bahamas, for Messrs. T
Geddes Grant, Ltd.

The Precise began discharging
the lumber shortly after her ar
rival. She remained in the Bay
while lighters attended her to
bring the lumber to the wate:
front of the inner basin of the
Careenage.

She is expected to spend quite a
few days here before she is rid of
her cargo. Her local agents are
Messrs. T. Geddes Grant Ltd







Governor Foot Speaks
On Local Government

KINGSTON, Jamaica,
Replying to the civic welcome at Ward



Walters was charged yesterday
with the malicious damage of
property owned by Eudora Daniel
and which she valued at $84.6!
while he was at her house at
Garden Land on June 18,

Eudora Daniel of the Garden
Land said that she used to live
with the accused for about two
years. About 11.30 a.m. on June
18 she heard a noise coming
from her front door. She got out
of her bed and saw the accused
entering her house. He took up
a water bucket and stabbed her
twice with a knife, He also took
up a machine and threw it on the
ground thus breaking it. She ran
away from the house and when
she returned to it she found that
everything was _ broken. The
machine is valued at $18,

Saw Breakage

Rupert Jones who also lives at
the Garden Land, St. Michael,
said he was at home which is
quite close to Daniel's. He heard

a noise and went to Eudora
Daniel’s house and saw the ac-
cused breaking up the things in

the house. Some of the things in-
cluded glasses, a coal box and a
goblet, ete, He remained at the
house and watched the accused
breaking up the things,

Violet Knight told the Court
that on June 18 at about 11.30
a.m. she went over to Daniel's
house and saw the accused run-
ning alter Daniel, Daniel got
away from him and he returned

to the house and started to break
some of the things in the house.

Sydney Walters said that he
knew Daniel as they had been
friendly for some time. He had
some articles in Daniel’s house
which was in the Garden Land
and on June 18 between 11 and
12 o’alock in the day he went to
Daniel’s house to get the articles,

While trying to get his articles
Deniel struck him on the head
with a stick and threw out his
tnings. He had a serge suit in the

house which he had brought from
the United States. He never
threw a machine out of the house

A Probability
In addressing the jury Mr,
Ward told them that the people

the accused and compluinant—
hed just separated. Nothing was
more likely than that she the
complainant having fought with

him-on the Saturday night before
the alleged offence, would go to
all ends to get him convicted

Mr. Ward submitted that some
of the witnesses had lied about
the breaking. It is clear that the
evidence of the complainant
would have to be accepted with
the greatest caution and scrutiny,
Both of them fought for a con-
siderable time in the house and
the machine which was on a table
fell to the ground and was dam-

aged. Mr. Ward also told the jury
that when they came to go
through the evidence as to how
the machine was damaged, they
would see that it was very con-
flicting. Mr. Ward further sub-
mitted that on all the evidenc<
the ease had not been proved. Mr
W. W. Reece did not address the
jury.

— 10.

heatre on

Monday evening Governar Foot highly praised Mayor Seiv-

right.

He said “if I had to name one man who seems to me

to have combined all the best qualities of the Jamaican
people, it would be your name which would first come to

my mind.”

Speaking on local government,
the Governor believed a truly
democratic system was not the
concentration of power and re-
sponsibility among a few, but
rather the diffusion of power and
responsibility amongst many
Local Government was a field of
public service of vital consequence

Speaking about the federation
of the West Indies, he said : “I gaid
on Saturday that I hoped Jamaica
would play a leading part in
building a free federation of the
British West Indies so that they
may take their rightful and hon.
ourable part in the Cormraonwealth



and would undertake the, task
which secrns to me to be of in-
creasing urgency



Single Voice

It surely becomes every -year
more urgent that the Britisi West
Indies should be able to speak
with one voice — with a voice

which will be heard and respected

particularly in the field of econo.
mic and trade affairs where the
heed becomes every month more
apparent
It seems to me that the choice
becomes increasingly clear. A
choice between federation and
frustration I look forward to
the day when we here shall have
four loyalties, aot conflicting,
but complementary; and each in
it equally important :—
to the city of Kingston,
y to Jamaica, loyelty to the
fed ted West Indies«and loy-
alty to the British Common-
weaith
The Governor
important to the
future that the Cis
first-rate, efficient, impartial and
incorruptibly free from political
prejudices and political interfer.
ence
That there is need for new agri-

@ on page 7




Oyal

loy

tressed that it is
island and its
il Serviee be






|

New Business
Ilouses Go Up

MANY new buildings are being
erected in Bridgetown and its pre-
cincts and at present a few of the
old buildings are being demolish-
ed

At Lower Broad Street, opposite
the new Plantations Ltd., building,
a modern and attractive _two
storey building which will house
the general offices of Messrs. Gar-
diner Austin & Co., Ltd,, is now
being erected. This building will
be the first of its type in the is.
land,

On the ground floor will be the
Traffic Department of Trans Can-
ada Airlines and Canadian Na-
tionat Steamships. The General
Offices, such as sales, insurance
and Directors, wili be on the sec.
ond floor.

Several improvements have
been made to a two storey build-
ing, also the property of Messrs.
Gardiner Austin, which is situated
besides the new building. When
this building is completed, that
area of Broad Street will be the
most modern part of the City

At Bay Street, opposite the
Aquatic Club Gap, a beautiful two
storey building is now being com-
pleted. This will house the Ju.c
beverage firm.

On the ground floor will be the
beverage plant, Lorries of the
firm will be able to enter the
building with ease to load drinks
and, as with the one way traffic
system, they will pull out for their
various routes without having to
reverse .

Employment

Many Barbadians will be em-
ployed in this new local enterprise
of which the Managing Director is
Mr. Charles Ray

Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd. a
new company that was formed last
year, has opened their new Gas
and Service Station at Pinfold
Street in the building which form.
erly housed the Y.M.C.A. This
building was renovated and mod-
ernised

The high wall that surrounded
the Y.M.C.A., was demolished
and the blind corner in that vicin.
ity removed

In the main buildine on the
ground floor are the parts depart-
ment, bicycle, sales, paints, gas
and oil departments as well as the
new cars showroom and the work.
shop.

The Garage also has a large
parking area which has greatly
relieved the parking situation in
Bridgetown but this is at present
filled

On the second floor the general
offices are situated and the back
rooms are used fo~ stores.

Messrs. General Traders Ltd.,
have renovated their building at
the corner of Magazine Lane and
Roebuck Stree‘, This building
now looks extremely attractive in
its colours of green and cream.
Because of the renovations pedes-
trians now have at their disposal
a wider side-walk in front of this
building.

Further along Roebuck Street is
a new two storey building that was
erected by Mr. James A. Tudor,
This building has also afforded
pedestrians a side-walk.

Tiled Stores

The majority of Swan
merchants have placed tiles in
front of their stores. These tiles
are in many attractive colours to
eatch the eye of purchasers.

Some of the old buildings that
were built many years ago are
now being demolished and new
ones will take their place. At
Prince William Henry Street the
building that formerly housed the
Manhattan Club, and at Bay Street
the Sailors Rest building, are
being taken down,

A visitor to the island told the
Advocate yesterday that Bridge.
town may soon look like Puerto
Rico “with its snow white minia
ture skyscrapers”, In his opinion
all the new buildings should be
painted in cream or white to eit
the climate. In this way the ¢ ity
would have a lighter appearance

Street



Turkeys

Turkey growers in the United
States are planning to raise a re
cord number of turkeys this year
the U.S. Department of Agricul
ture reports, It is estimated that
about 44,773,000 turkeys will be
raised during 1951,

TT

Are you proud of your
INDUSTRY? Well tell the
World about it,

Send in your details to-
day. You have 4 days left
only to get in the YEAR
BOOK,





'
i
'




f. PAGE FIVE



Barge Floats

cablegram arriving a the

A

Harbour and §



1ipE : Department
yesterday was warning all ip
of a floating barge outside
Bocas de Huevos, which wa i€
scribed as being dan
navigation



rerou

The barge was 19 collision with
a ship in the Gulf of Paria. She
was sighted by the Captain of the
Alcoa Clipper in latitude 10.43
North, longitude 61.42 West.

Two of the steamships lying in
port yesterday were notified



Fuel Arrives

Supplies of kerosene oil and gas
oline arrived here from Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by the 1,856
ton oil tanker Rufina

The Rufina anchored in Carlisle
Bay for a short while before going
on to Spring Gardens, Black Rock
where she usually discharges her
fuel through pipe lines running out
into the sea

The Rufina’s agents are Messrs
Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

DUTCH POTATOES

ce

I rather small supply of
Dutch

white potatoes now in the
island was increased by a meagre
300 crates yesterday when the
motor vessel Hersilia called here




from Holland ports

Other foodstuffs among her
cargo for Barbados were 1,050
crates of onions, 325 bags of

groundnuts,
tated milk,

1,735 cases of evapo-
135 cartons of pow-

dered milk, 700 cartons of beer
and a small quantity of cheese.
This cargo came fror: Amster-

dam

The Hefsilia also brought 1,400
bundles of staves and 280 bundles
of bottoms from Hamburg and
other general cargo from Amster-
dam. She is consigned to Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd



Attorney General
Of Nyasaland

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 9

Mr. J B. Hobson, K.C., a-
Trinidadian, who recently took
silk, and was formerly Solicitor
General of Kenya, hag been ap
pointed Attorney General of Ny-
salend

LAYENA

gil. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.



a"






Favourite Here

Again!

NEILSON’S

CHOCOLATE
BARS

Liquid Cherry
Nut Roll
Tasty Crisp
Malted Milk
Rosebuds
Macaron
THE







FOR
WOOD



Your Delight#ul

CHILDREN WILL ENJOY

KNIGHT'S LTD. — ALL BRANCHES

mas







Jersey Nut
Milk
» Toffee Milk

Cherry Creme





Burnt Almond



Peppermint
THESE

LINOLEUM
FLOORS

AND FURNITURE

HYGIENIC WAX

POLIS

FOR BRIGHT AND

ale



Really smart

coloured grounds.

wide.



Cave Shepherd

10, 1112 &







designs against
Suitable
evening dresses or any special occasion, 36”
Prices

per yd.

$2.78, $2.92, $3.02, $3.19 $3.66

HOMES





A new beautiful set of

Hloral Crepe-de-Chune

white and

for cocktail or



13. BROAD STREET





|
& Co, Ltd. |
|
{








an ctialiaer win: OF
E b Alto, B b Tenor,

© Melody
CLARINET REEDS
Bb, E b.

GOOD SECOND HAND
SHOT GUNS



JOHNSON’S STATIONERY |
and HARDWARE |



AG : BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1951
HE BY CARL ANDERSON | oF Z rege
| De | f°) TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
: \ io i SAXOPHONE REEDS



WE SPECIALISE

IN HIGHCLASS
PRINTING





ADVOCATE
FT HIEIR good looks tell you they're just righ. | PRINTING

= oO You know, too, when you look at the price. eas
a4 ‘i rT tag, that you can’t get finer value. Ilustrated

NAL 268g is a Tan Punched Oxford. Tied to every pair S d S
"ave 7 AS is the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign alt
BY CHIC YOUNG lr 0 \G Cine? which means ‘just right’! Look for it tm Is
ENT may Ret HY leading stares in Barbados. Truly the Finest of RUM
be o / ane m—~| | ' ia in
murey|| a. CivSRermcer, Si fesewsen, wa Sorel ft) | ag Croan ware made by So Smooth in a Cocktail
ast NATION Seer Pas ww T Lucy (Bu | 11 || S28 PincH my EAR . It is simply Superb.
|

%\— SO TIGHT,

pans ae
Â¥ * Tm Ww
Se SAVE suse 5
OF .

1) OOF
, Ss) oe
-
\

, wed ty
OHN WHITE || =:
~ 4\ ; (1938) LTD.

means made justiright \ : wir EWM

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE











WE'VE CAPTURED YOUR INDIAN

FRIEND, THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE
SAVE YOUR LIVES, AND HIS, BY

TELLING WHERE THE GOLD IS HIDDEN.)



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only







USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW

TINS
Bot. JEFFREYS BEER 26 18 RIND MARMALADE 36 32

‘ . AQ PKes.
ne ter 0 ORG OVALTINE BISCUITS 48 42

PKGS.

BRIDAL ICING . "MOIRS CHOCOLATES 10
SUGAR 36 32 2



AMBOLS
I@N'T IT LOVELY TO BE Y—~

BACK AGAIN FLAT RACING ?

ae

pks. 15























JUST THE GAME OLO LINCOLN
Tu JOVIAL MAKERS
AND JOLLY CROWD —

Se

THiS PLACE NEVER CHANCES

AFTER Tile LAST RACE,,,.. i
—1TS ALL JUST THe GAME 3

THIS COURSE HAG GONE ALL
Hio pieces LACT YERa
BACKED A WINNER















D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street















POPPE OLED PPPOE OPP POPS POPP FPP SPSS PPP PPP OPS OD

SCHOOL
NEW BOOKS ere a

POPSD9SS IO VSS OOS SSS

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ELEPHANT BILL by Lt.-Col. J. H. Williams 3
ROYAL READERS %
: VENUS THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskine “ee :
’ ?
8 SHAW by Desmond McCarthy ROYAL SCHOOL
%
x sin inet s es ek PRIMER
BRINGING UP FATHER % § DS OF THE SUN by Rosita Forbes
WN atin nics sid ciitih desea
wn ee x THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELBRECHT WES INDIAN
a : = $ by Maurice Richardson READER
we | HERS Asano CL aes 1 caspiididenini
Pie hear to a x CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHTING
23 he | RaRHEADS AL wave: Crue ene SB $
| 2 bop) IN HERE IN HIS tl 5 wed (i ake % ;
8&9] USUAL COMA! ) La> VP (ne: | ] Ihe x \ f T T T j :
r - i * 2) x
ed Areca x
ic ON sill 3
¢ ns a i a my gee aria i LOO OOOO OOOO OOOO LPLPPLLPLPPLPPLLPPLS PEEP I PLPLPLPE VPP PPLE LLCS POSES
A mA ; | ee on :

Fey re ser
t PA ee if : /
SA BF rr |
~ a bie on ;








—_. BY ALEX RAYMOND aN
CouBLe-ceoss! . - el (ie >
hs y

if T HANDLE
THIS RIGHT,
THEY'LL PLAY
STRAIGHT

LUXURY
“TOILET SOAPS INSPECTION TIME NEED

IMPERIAL LEATHER ao LINDEN BLOSSOM e BLUE HYACINTH NOT BE WORRYING
se sasamsicaniapmieamnaetnn amasddalada : TIME

SEE US FOR-

DUNLOPILLO BUS SEATS











LIONIDE LEATHERETTE GREY PAINT for Flooring
CARPET MATERIAL SIGNAL RED for Body
RUBBER MATS HEAT RESISTING BLACK
. ° REAR VIEW MIRRORS WHITE LEAD & ZINC
ee c — Mah Meeetins |e BOUT To gives you 6 & 12 Volt BUZZERS MUFFLERS & PIPES
HEVAWHAT) { UH GORRV+ LOST MY Ke : ROOF LAMP BULBS & KING PIN SETS
TE (ieee TRAINS ec ade pe caged igipna 5 SOCKETS DECARBONIZING SETS
BS i) ST UUOGGING* (~+~74 | UKE AHANDS po ‘“ li } ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX BRAKE LINING SETS ’
el y | * BATTERY FRONT SPRINGS for Ford
1 the extra vita ity RCCRASORY aviytcsts & Chevrolet
Flat GALVANISED SHEETS FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
[}} "Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT AND LOTS OF OTHER
j for Interior ESSENTIALS
|

to resist





[INFLUENZA |) S&XSTHN Bromiens,


THURSDAY, APRIL 12



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Marriages, Desths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
~p to 50 and 6 cents per word for each



DEANE—In lo



memory of our be-

ving condition; good
loved Mutilda Degne.. Who deparjed| Telephone 3174,

this life on 12th April 1948.
Saviour, breathe giveness O’er us,
All our weakness Thou dost know

Thou did’st tread this earth hefore | Apply

us,
Thou did’st feel its keenest woe;
Love and dreary, faint and weary,
Through the desert thou’ did'st go.
E. L. Deane (Husband), and Family.
12.4,51—in.



HOLDER—Iin loving memory of our
beloved Beatrice who departed this
world on 12th April 1943.

Some think you are forgotten,
Though on earth you are no moré,
But ir memory you are still with us,
As \you ever were before.



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and

96 cents Sundays 24 .words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.



i:

AUTOM :
UTOMOBILE: Vauxnall ‘14/6. E-151
$1,300. 00 Courtesy “Garage, Bhone-seie,
T.F N.
So
CAR—Morris Minor 1948; very good
gas mileage. $900.00.
12.4.51—3n.
CAR—(1) one Standard 8 HP. 1949

model; in very good order. Mileage 19,900
to C. A. Proverbs C/o. Jame



A. Lynch & Co, Ltd. Phone

12.4.51—4n
eee
CAR—MORRIS OXFORD SALOON—

(9.000 miles only) 1950 000.
Martin Griffith. =.

(91-40) .
CAR—Hillman, 10 Car, 1939. Perfect
Owner leaving island.

running order.
Ring—2593 12.4.51—3n.
—_—_—_—__

CAR—Morris Minor Saloon 1949 (Green:
Mileage 15,600, very good condition. New

Elaine Skeete (U.S.A.) (daughter), Mrs./ Battery, Apply: S. P. Edghill. Telephone

Ira Merritt (U.S.A.) (sister).

12.4.51—In,



4266, C/o R. & G, Challenor.
12.4.51—4n.

CAR—Chevrolet Master 6. (J-132)
good order. Price $400.00. Dial 95-218.
10.4.51—8n.

HYP. in perfect

U.K. READY |e" 2325 Ross

FOR TALKS |"

From page 1

aims of the United Nations called _

for resistance to aggression in
Korea”. He- was. told that opera-
tions should not be undertaken
which extended the conflict be-
yond Korean territory and that it
was the intention of the United
Nations to localise hostilities in
Korea and therefore that it was
not their intention to become in-
volved in general hostilities with
China,

“And he was told that the
powers of the Commander of the
United Nations Forces to conduct
operations on behalf of the United
Nations were limited to Korea and
were to be executed within the
framework of the declared United
Nations pclicy.”

Morrison took this opportunity to
essociate British Government fully
with these instructions which
represented the policy of Britain
and other countries with forces in
Korea:

On the way in which General
Mac Arthur had carried out his
instructions, Morrison said: “in
view of the change in command
this episode is now closed and 1
do not desire to say more than to
draw the attention of the House
to the traditional British _ inter.
pretation of relationship between
the military commander in the
field and the government to whom
he is responsible.”

On this matter successive
British Governments have always
consistently stood for subordina-
tion of the military to the political.

“It is clear from = Sotmeers
issued this morning by
dent of the United States that
under American Constitution and
practice the same interpretation
is placed on this relationship as
indeed it must in any democratic
country where the views of people
expressed by their freely elected
governments must be paraniount.

1




Morrison paid tribute to Genera

Mac Arthur saying “he was_ 4! Weatherhead Ltd.

great servant of the Allies during
the war in the Pacific and he has
proved himself a brilliant soldier:

he highest order in his conduct
o the a paaire: in Japan. These
are achievements which will be
yemembered long after the im-
mediate controversy has
forgotten.”

Winston Churchill then sj
briefly saying the Conserva’ .
agreed on the traditional view that
constitutional and civil authorities
should control
nilitary commanders: He endorsed
what the Foreign Secretary had
said about Mae Arthur's brillian‘
service throughout the war and

poke

in the direction of affairs in Japan. |inat Kiddies and Grown-ups alike will

—Reuter,

{ERRODRIIRNIRARE RRR I IEE
FOR SALE

CRUSHED STONE AND
FINES. IDEAL FOR CON-
CRETE, AND MAKING
ROADS AND PATHS.

Apply - -
J. N. HARRIMAN & CO.
LTD., SEAWELL.,

Phone 8444, Extension 8.

12.4.51.—6n.

}

REAL ESTATE
JOHN

v4.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.

GERALD WOOD

FOR SALE

There has come on the tnarket
| 7 seres Approx. of Beach Proper-
ty at Bachelor Hall, St. James.
This land has a wide Beach
Frowitage, one of the best entrance
crives in the Island, A hand-

“He has displayed qualities of] BARNES & CO., LTD.

been with every purch

tives] tisons, showroom Ist Floor.

the actions of] at $3.00 per ton,

| Mona, Lisa and Sam's Song.”
















300 miles. Price
Apply: B’dos Agencies Ltd.

10.5.51—4n.

CARS-—Citroen 15 H.P. cars, just) ar-
rived. Apply R'dos Agencies Ltd. Ring
10:4.51—4n

CAR—ONE HUDSON CAR, Apply
Bob Haynes. Dial—4886_ or

108 51<3n.

ere

FORD PICKUP—in good condition and
4 new tyres, City Garage Trading Co.
Ltd. 11,4,.51—t.f.n,

ELECTRICAL





ONAN—Lighting Plant,
30 amps,
spares,

12-15 volts,
400 watts, with lamps anr
A. Barnes & Co, Ltd.

143.51—t.£.9,

net ee pce Sees

ONE (1) five H.P. three phase totally
enclosed induction motor. One (1)
Switch board fully fitted. One 2%
inch delivery (Lee Howell) centrifugal
pump. Ail in condition “as good as
new.” Price two thirds (2/3) Ruling
market price. Reply Box Zz e/o
Advocate. 8.4.51—3n.

REFRIGERATOR — Crosley Shelvador
Refrigerator 3.3 cubic ft. in good work-
ing order, Just been completely over-
hauled. What offers? For particulars
Phone 3770. 12.4.51—2n.





LIVESTOCK

COW—One Guernsey Cow giving 23
pts milk, (First calf). Apply E. D.
Davis, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch.

10.4.51—3n:

MILCH GOAT, “Sally Laurator”, Reg.
Apply S, C. Skinner, “Laura-







tor”, Rockley Terrace or Da Costa & Co,,
Ltd. Phone 8280 or 2122.
10.4 51,--t f.n
MECHANICAL
BIKES—on terms, Hercules Silver

King, All models in stock.
A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
11.4,51.—T.F.N,

MISCELLANEOUS ....

“BATHS — In Porcelain
cae, sotendane colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n,
CROQUET SETS.—Boxed and fully
equipped at Harrisons Sports Dept. Ist

Floor 12.4 51—3n. |

CALF’S FOOT JELLY.—Fresh stock
of Calf's Foot Jelly. Orange flavour. A
10 oz. jar for 60c, Get it at Bruce
12.4.51—3n,

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart wine
dow styling, light control, Valances ana
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.!
13.2.51—t.£.n 1









FREE GIFTS—FREE for your asking
on ‘Thursday 12th., Friday 13th. and
Saturday dN rae set eo ao col-
ourful Measur' ns giv
; Rbape ce One Dollar or
over, C. W, HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd.
Broad Street. F 10.4.51—3n

INVALID CHAIRS—2 only at Ha
12.4,.51—3n.
Estate Factory





‘
‘

MEGASSE at Lower

6.4.51—6n,

eect peninlrenneneciee ar
ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN
City Pharmacy.

iy case, good order, Fitt, nr ae



-_

The son



RECORDS—‘Here at last!
RED-NO!

love RUDOLPH SE
REINDEER at Harrison's Music Dept
,

Other favoyrites include Mambo. Jam

12.4.51.—-2n
| TABLE TENNIS TABLF-—Solid Pine
Top. Phone 8137. §.4.51—t. Ba,

TYPEWRITER RIBBONS & CARBON
PAPER. Fresh stock 2 peoetved,.
at T.
Pd requirements baa -w ‘sin

—_—————$—$—$—.
Two PLATE Glass Display Cases, $120.00
each Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, Broad
St. 74.51—t.£n,

———_—_—_—$———_—$

VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
sizes delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476,

» Ltd.
Me & Co Md. 5 a.s1—t.f.n.



Recruiting Board
For West Indies

From Own Correspondent) .
(Prom Out ONDON, April. 11,
A Conservative M.P. has put
up a suggestion for a Travelling
Recruiting Board to visit the

colonies,

was told by Defence Minister,
Emmanuel aie that he ~~
looking into t yn

conjunction with of the

the idea” said Mr. Shinwell and
the prospect of recruiting men
from the
M.P.

are 10,000 men in d




one of the draw!

ee

in [

Air Commodore Harvey, M.P., |!

three services, “I am. attracted by |

colonies,, A Labour
that

Colonial Empire, tapable of check-
ing qualifications of recruits and
their medical fitness. presen
backs of recruit-

£

ndays,
days

i





Applications are invited for the post
of Secretary of the Barbados Dairy ard
Stock Associatio:

$00.00 per month and
applicant would be required to take \9
on the 16th day of April, 1951, *

3. Applications should be addressed

to A. G. F. Seale, Esq., Livestock Officer,

Livestock Station, St. Micha |.

and should be submitted by 4.00 p.m.
on Friday, the 13th instant,

10.4.51—0n



TI would like
thank all who
sponse to an
for my office,
is now filled

through this medium «>
application in re-

it for a Junior

and to state that the Po t

FRANCIS H. PILE.
12.4. 51—2r



|
|

;

‘
members in the a+
cae = — for ae ~— of St
dee aed, place o » A. Foste:
ereby notify my intention cf
taking a poll for the determination «:|
the sald election on Monday next the}
16th. day of April 1951 at the Alleyr. » |
School, Belleplaine beginning betwee |
the hours of seven and eight o'clock i:
the morning.
Polling Station No.1.— The Alleyn>:
- ie cna woah” = = persons
whose surnames with the letter
A, to J. inclusive.
Station No. 2. — The Alleyne
School — the South wixg for all per- '
sons whose Surnames begin with the
letter K. to Z, ees,
F. A. INGRAM,
Sheriff and
Returning Officer.
10.4.51—6n



“HE BARBADOS MUTUAL BENEFIT
BAP OCI.

NOTICE

IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 14th.
Annual General Meeting of the above
Society will be held on Monday, 23rd.
April 1951, at 4.30 p.m. at the Regis-
tered Office, 48 Swan Street, for the
purpose of (a) Receiving the Report of
the Committee of Management and
Treasurer's Account for the past year,



ae and
| mane

| Gnd $1.80 on Sundays
\

ne
2. The Salary attached t> the post tel
the successt | |



; Our office No,



PURLIC SALES

Ten centa per agate tine on week-days |
12 cew® per agate line on Sundays, |

mum charge $1.5C om week-days

REAL ESTATE





— every convenience in
@ en, water supply. As new, £3
Phone 4476. 16.3.51—

LAND—1124 sq. ft. of land ar
ford Lane, Bridgetown, together
dwelling house thereon.

a ys = ae Le > M.
whie at Corner uck Street
Bediord

end
The above will offered for sale by
iblic competition at our office, James
On Friday 13th 1951 at

2 p.m. —-

Hutchinson & Banfieid.
31.3.51—12n.

PROPERTY — Containin
house with three bedrooms (
standing on one rood,
jand situated at Forde’
Hin. Apply
Hutchinson

< dwelling
Partly wail),
14% perches of
's Gap, Britton’s
to: C. M_ Greenidge or
& Banfield, James Street
8.451—6n

Se
On Friday the 13th inst. at 2 pm. at
17 High Street:
Shares, Barbados’ Fire Insurance
Company;
22 Shares, Barbados
Limited;
£350 31/2% Barbados Government
bentures.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
Solicit:
10.4.51

20

Tee Company

De
‘os





AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By recommendations of Lloyds Agents
we whl sell on THURSDAY the 12th
at General Traders Ltd. Roebuck Street

101 Bays D.C. Sugar.

Sale 12.30 o'clock, Terms Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO
Auctioneers





10,4.51

n



‘Blind’ Corners

Removed

tb) Electing Officers and a Committee For the last four years thc
of Management for the current year, | Department of Highways <
ans lo) meat with any other matters/?Transport has widened man.
‘01 e Meeting. . ‘ pag
By Order of the Committee, roads throughout the island anc

©. ¥ REEVES, also ree bends, There

cts. retary. jwere eight such instances in

11.4.51.—2n. 11947—48, a similar amount ir

1948—49, eleven in 1949—50 anc

OTICE

N
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

three so far in 1950—51,

In 1947—48 a portion of ‘the

‘ae Lenderee, (Marked on the |Government House wall was sett
pe “Tender for ........ " will be /back mak say 90%
received by me at my office up to 4.00 | ‘eet wie = bi roadway 2:
P.m. on Tuesday, 17th April, 1951 fo. ]° > wa Was demol

the supply of the following commodities
to be delivered at the Christ Church
Almshouse in such quantities and at
such time@s as the Board of Guardians
shall from time to time divect:—
(a) PRESH MILK
The amount of milk required is
approximately 3,000 pints per pint
and the Board reserves the right
to accept the tender of more than
one person for the supply of this







ished at Country Road
open swale left, The wall at St. |
Barnabas, junction with Highway
5, was set back, A wall to the
wroperty of Sea View on High
way 1 was also set back.

and an

The corner at Codrington was |

ore and walls, one near the | ‘
ce

Factory, Highway 7, Bay |



BARBADOS ADVOCATI

> r >
WANTED
Mtnimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4@ Cents «!
word Sundays.





















FOR

Minter

RENT
week 72 cents and

vs 24 words — over 24/
a word week—4 Cents a/



words 3















HELP HOUSES
| “CLOMK.—at the Warbados ice Cc | . FLATS mpletely new de te
pita. ally for Sales elivery | ft flats at A st. |
of Ice Cream Facto further | war >|
} particulars, apply to the rv . iidineg = w
11.4. 51—5r flats tt i nt
: Apply Mr 1
RELIEF MESS MANAGERESS ver 10.4.81—5
at een Gravteun” San —e NO CLIFION TERRACE —Mo ler
catering for Restaurents or He oy | Bunsalow ic Upper Bay Street. Tele
similar experience is desirable prone ID4.01—2r
Applications should be submitted a ~—e
| writing giving details of previous ex n
ice and enclosing copies of tes | J F
timonials and a recent pessport six oV error oot
photograph, and should be addressec
to Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd., P.U Ss k
| Box 103, Brows” 10.4.51,.—6n pea Ss |
| MISCELLANEOUS @ From Page 5





MAGAZINES—True

Romance and True Story |
STANWAY STORE, Lucas Street
Dial--4910 11,4.51--2n



|

TURKEYS 6-10 Ibs. FOWLS & DUCKS |
Apply GREEN DRAGON RESTAURANT
Broad Street, Dial 3896,



cultural development, new meth-
ods and new thinking, also great.
er collaboration between the units



| of the British West Indies in order

that their

joint interest can te
served Everyone would agree
with him that Jamaicans mus*

10.4,.51,—t-f n | recognise that they must work out
| their own salvation and be re-
| solved to build the island’s future

Chamber
Dissatisfied

@ From page 5
that the Committee's finding
were that profits in the Hardwar
trade had been just about
quate.

While the trade could eviti
cise the mark-ups granted on
specific items they ugreed that
by and large the mark-ups
allowed were not unreason-
able. This did not mean they
were complacent over the
state of the trade, In recent
months prices of most hard-
ware items had soared con-
siderably and stocks of many
items were now being sold at
prices far below replacement
value. A serious fall in ihe
volume of turnover was bound
to take place and overheads
were continually rising. The
eesult was that a rate of profit
which might be adequate at
present would, before long,
prove inadequate.
The | Committee had

mended that items in free supply
should be removed from pric:
control and, referring specifically
to the hardware trade, the Report

ade

recom-

included a schedule of items re-
commended for de-control, This
schedule covered practically the |
whole range of goods sold by the }
trade. The supply position had
altered so radically since July

1950 when the Report was signed
that he considered, in the inter-
ests of the community generally,
the Government's decision not to
de-control at the present time wa:







| Said
| the

rie
C

on the sure foundation of free in-
stitutions and that the achieve.
ment of a stable and successful
democracy in Jamaica depends
ulmost wholly on an overriding
patriotism and a common devotion
to the highest needs of Jamaica

——(CP)

Magistrate Turtis
Down Applications |

_(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., April i
Magistrate Maurice Charles to-

day in a_ written decision de-
clined to issue summonses applied
for by Robert Adams and hi

clerk Eric Gravesande against the
Assistant Superintendent, now act
ng Criminal Investigation Chief
Frank De Abreu and Sub-Inspec-
or Vigilant Belfon, charging them
with conspiring to defeat the
‘ourse Of justice and also for at-
empting to d ude a witness by
hreat or bribe from giving evi-
‘ence in a criminal matter,

Che magistrate in his decision
he was not impressed with
way in which Gravesande
eave his evidence during the
hearing of the application for
summonses, when answering ques-
tions or with his demeanour in
the witness box. “I consider his
evidence untrustworthy and in-
sufficient,” said the ‘magistrate.





Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

Sedgefield, Sehooner Gloria Hen
Schooner Marea Henrietta, Yacht
»bee, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner

M.V

























PAGE SEVEN
PERSONAL





Lo

}



& FOUND

— _ a ~ The public are hereby warnéd agalnst

giving credit to my wife GEIRRISLA

LOST HEADLEY ‘nee Headley) a8 I do no:

| hold myself responsible for her oF any-

+= — lene else centracting an’ debt ar debt

in my name unless by a written ofder

BAG--On Monday Sth Apvil between | signed by me.
Fogarty snd Modern Dress Shop. Ono DENNIS HEADLEY,

Plastic Bag White) containing a bunch Rock Dunedo,
of Keys Reward offered Cit St. James

Pharmacy 10.4.51--2n 12.4.51,—2n.





French Paratroops Contact
‘Rebel Irregulars”’

HANOI, Apri] 11.
French paratroops, seeking S0C
Chinese reported to have crossed

Paratroops were rushed to the
northern frontier after Chinese

\ were reported to have occupied
s1to northern Indo-China, have three villages inside Indo-China.
made their first contact with Paratroops found no proof that
“rebel irregulars,” French army

Chinese had been in Tsinho, about
10 miles south of Phongtso, one of
the towns reported to have been
occupied by Chinese.

headquarters said here today,
But it was not known whether
any Chinese were included in this

foree

Contact was made when irregu- Rebels left no dead on the
lars made a small attack to ground after the attack on Tsimho.
day about 25 miles north of Lai- American built French bomb-
hau ers yesterday dropped high. ex-

plosives in Binhlu about 40 miles
northwee* of Laichau.

The «rench army reported that
strong guerilla activity was con-
tinuing in the northern part of
the Thaibinh area about 50 miles
southeast of Hanoi,—Reuter,

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Unconfirmed reports last night
said that Indo-China’s Communist
led Vietnamh rebels had linked up
with 800 Chinese who crossed the
berder on April 1 The link up
was about 30 miles northwest ot
Laichau





Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1951, No. 9 which will be published in the: Official
Gazette of Thursday 12th April, 1951.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Cornmeal”, “Margarine—(c) Mello-Kreem Brand’ -and
“Cement” are as follows: —

~ ARTICLE

— Sige al
RETAIL PRICE
(not more than)

| WHOLESALE PRICE | MI
(not more than)



--
Cornmeal $10.58 per bag of

98 Ibs 12e. per Ib.
Margarine:

(ec) Mello-Kreem $2.55 per 5 Ib. tin 56c. per lb. or less
Brand than % Ib. 44gec.

per oz.
53c. per Ib. tin 58. per lb. or less
|; than % Ih. 4%e.

per 02.
Cement a “tb _ | $2.08 per bag of

| 94 Ibs.



12.4,51—2n.

SHIPPING NOTICES

i

The MV. “Daerwood’ | will
accept Cargo and Passengers for

>

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)















item. Tenders must be accom-} Street, and another by the Cot- | 4 wise one. Gardenia W., Schooner Emeline, Schooner| M.S, “TONG Do lak Paramaribo, Sailing Thursday 13th
ported pcan ee ton Fea Highway. 1 White. | Govt’s Views Not Clear Bourke Rey ne ae Wonderful Maren natn, Amivne at Barbados Ngee nen r
a eter! inary ctitioner |. r 7 2 a 4 r 7 ior, J 5 adar, Schoone . 7 . >. ”
that the cattle from which the} 4tk, were both set back. Mr. Alkins recommended that | Harriet Whittaker, Schooner Turtle Dove, | aan 7 ere ya omer
milk is supplied are free o9f During the 1948-49 period! the Chamber should approach the sanponer Giri » Schooner Rain- Cargo accepted on through Bille of aica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
Tuberculosis, walls were set back at the Brit. | Government pointing out that ihe | °°” ™* %* § MV, Willemstad. | Lading with transhipment at Trinidad and ‘St. Kitts, Sailing Monday
(b) FRESH BREAD t Hill. sels tome 3 - s t ARRIVALS for Britieh Qui B. 4 e 16th instant,
(c) FRESH MEAT ons Hill—Deightons Road junc | Government's view on the Re Schooner C. M, W, Ipana, 49 tons net, | and Leeward Island arbados, Windward ;
(d) PROVISIONS tion, at the corner of Barrack poft as published in the Press Capt. Compton, from Dominica vin 3 este aphaes Poet a a Pecan i
— i i shies ratte oP ie uel nm ‘assongers for
eee Unit to be tendered for ae iy eens and r | Were not sufficiently clear, They | “Ditch $.8. Hersilia, 2218 tons net,| FOr Mtther particulars apply:— Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
D at the corner of were unlikely to obtain a more | Capt. Oldenburgen, trom’ Amsterdar Nevin and St. Kitts, Sailing 45
Biscuits per carton WURNESS, WITHY
Rice (State grade) per bag ot |Deighton and Brittons Hill. 4 | disinterested or abler Committee |, M-V. Precise, 464 tons net, Capt, Ritch > & CO. LTD, and Friday 20th instant,
180 Ibs. footpath was constructed or! than the one which had already | @Qâ„¢, Trinidad via Pine Pidge Da COSTA & CO. LTD, TELE. 4047
Flour per half bag of 98 tbs. |land at Magazine Lane anc | considered the matter and all | Kenan met F888 tone “net, Capt Sridastawh, BW,b SCHOONER OWRRE
Cornmeal per half bag of 98 lbs Highway 1, below the Menta Perens, ve = ‘ ma saatnnl ne Kerharo, from Le Havre vin Fort ae Trinidad, Barbados, ASSOG, INC,
9 - ac nformation avails : ag eee Wi
oe fheor= Grade) per bag 3% ' Asylum was. improved. - Ire eae a aren om ko EWN. eatin: 5 Gal tiie’ shudis EL mew SOSOSOS GEES.
pn Blue mottled per box already been examined by this De Coteau, from St, Luci = r . hea ‘hie, ‘ : 8 :
Bont aes eeerters at 06 SGA In 1949—50. property was pur | Committee. , ‘ }., MV. Rufina, 1,856 tons net, Capt
Salt Pork per Ib. chased at Orange Street They should ask Government | Bin, from Trinidad via Grewada, .
Salt Fish per Qntl, | “\to make a clear statement of | «, «QUE AR TERRE: 0.
Coffffee per Ib |Speightstown for a car park. Wigs cP Ne ; Schooner Sunshine R., 2 tons net 5
Oat Flakes per Ib ‘The curve at the junction of | i A nee that the Report | Cupt. Barnes, for fishing banks,
e , oO e Committee would be ie M.V. Hersilia, 2,238 tons net, Capt
oanen > Ib | Chance _Hall and Rountl Rock plemented as and when aiedan ” | Oldenburuen, for ‘Trinidad. Qnc.
'P Dr (on Roads Were improved. Curves " 7 een M- | 8.8, Gowmbie, 7,954 tone net, Capt
Tollene Freoweea. bor ton |were widened at Balis Corne: | S{ances permitted. He suggested | kerharo, ior" Trinidad NEW YORK SERVICE
> ie . i | that if such a statement of policy | 8.8. Tacoma Star, 4,975 tons net $.8. “Geirulv’ — gall . . nevies ‘
Each aoe eraanne must wnitenit | Wachee wutcneta a ee | were published it could then be , Capt. Frank Lesiie, ior Trinidad A Steamer ‘salle a on ve os ‘iodives "Berhecee Dat nia
Peciarit Cosalined: Toecwona: from Wo | Roads were improved, | left to the Controller of Supplie: Pan Nan aoe ~NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
become bond with the successful ten-| So far in 195051 the curve | to adjust margins of profit as re- SS. “Ale “ etat’ teen? fal
derer for the due performance of the|has been widened at Ivy Road, Commended by the Committee, o1 In Touch with Barbados 89. “Alooa einer tact th nee, “Avtived invades Phe hel
contract. | , j| to de-control various items ac- a enteeeemenentemtenmneteenenned . jaurebanecinadaistanetsbaonasta ge antiine. ; ;
The Board of Guardians do not bind |near St. Giles Boys’ School and | ; :
themselves to accept the lowest or any |the Flint Hall Road widened by | ©ording as the opportunity srose Coastal Station CANADIAN SERVICE
tender. approximately four feet, Mr, B. A, Weatherhead of the . : SOUTHBOUND
E. FE. ASHBY, | | firm of Weatherhead’s (druggists) Cable and Wireless (W.1) Ltd, advi Name of Ship SAILS HALIFAX ARRIVES BY
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians, | said the hile { : that they can now communicate with) eg “ALCOA PENNANT” B'DOs
Christ Chureh, | sai hat w nile it might be agreed | the following ships through their Bar- hi, "ALGOA PARTHER” Mareh 27th April Sth
10.4.51—3n. | ? | that some items should be Gor= | bados Coast Station ae TNER April 9th, April 19th
| ock > trolled, he saw 1 reas r. tisbiae | s Uruguay, ss, Argentina/Wmds,
——e — | St k Exchange luxury een ais na y , ens why ' S, Pauls, 8.0, Aleoa Corsair, 8.8, Colombie, NOBFREOUND
, | B wreath ekiaicrecl yar 2e, a as. §, Socia, 4% Magnilanes/Eanhi, 5.3. “ALCOA PEGASUS" tue April Sth Sails for St. Dae
2 | ; were a fed to be paid for, a | Ardea, Gertrud Sehliewen, ,y aye ; a ails for St, Baw-
Jamaica Urges uoyant Dingo wuaely of the cheaper sl viaeene a8 ine of eRe Ne ABBY 3.8. "ALCOA PIONEER” due April. 12th "Oetle ona bone
j oe | *j | icles For poor persons couid then |g. Tribesman, 4.5. Mactra. a8, C, G and St. Lawrence
Trade Commission wis, pif QXPON Aen Me be obtained. This, sac, indochinon, as. Raligeton iver Forts
| Ss ‘als ie aah are ; - ss Hille, Clarkes Wharf, ss. Polifemo, | C02 nen ne ene See Annette:
less severe than expected, many He complained about price- an? ihoumehends. ae Fort Seugein These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
Service In U.K. sections ot the London Stock | Utting, and said that when the | {5 "tera Me” gered Wane se ROBER “NeW YORK AND GUL VICE.
\txchange were buoyant today.,| Price € ontroller took up a news- | Chiwawa, 5.5, Pokyt 4.8. Conace T THOM LTD. — N YORK A GULF SER ;
(From Our Own Correspondent) (Sharp advances in home issues P’Per and saw that one busines Lake Charles, ss Seow » 8, Ultraman APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.-CANADIAN SERVICE
_ Kl TON, April 11. | were however unaccompanied by | hOUSe Was selling an article for | iva ‘Frontenac acon, |) eee = a —
Jamaica’s mauey eee | any marked increase in the| ear 15 om Jess than another, | a. Tegelus Pr ite Dutra, M/S | |
tives unanimous adopte vr.) ‘ ; 1e naturally reasoned, why could | Vortiand, Orlea ’. Helicon,
N. W Manley’s “resolution today ae inn at’ an) tof not others do the ane thing. It E. 8. BLUM, nadian Chailonge: | PASSAGES TO EUROPE
. . s pre ee . ‘
calling upon the Government 10) gividend limitati Sela ti was one of the things for whict
A 7 mitation legislation & ich | —_
take a lead immediately in the Soy °¢ne amano el wains | they had themselves to blame, | Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia., for satl-
establishment of a British Carib- | tas, Those companies whose|.. More money was wanted’ in MAIL NOTICES Ing to Europe. The usual poris of call are Dublin, London, or
bean Trade Commissioner Se ‘\ordinary dividends are not welj| the drug business. They had to | Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.
vice with the United Kingdom covered by earnings however,|employ responsible people be- Maile: for Dominien, Antigua, Mant i
Si. . . serrat, evia 6 St itte by the } ! —_
and Canada and other steps | inclined lower and some brewery | cause they had to be very par- | Moneka will be clowed at the Genova,

towards federation of the British

West Indies with a responsible |
government, |
The decision was taken during)

a special meeting of the House!
called by. Manley to discuss the)
trade situation in relation with
the United Kingdom-Cuban pact)
and both Manley and Bustamante |
were unanimous in __ indicting
Britain for neglect of her Carib-
bean interests.

Bustamante said “If we are
held in captivity we shall seek
a way te escape that captivity.”
Mai said that it was time the
‘West Indies decided whether they
would remain disunited colonies
own feet. :

Both parties agreed that if any
other colony is reluctant to join
jn the move for the Trade Com-

















forward on her own

“The Minister of Social Welfare.

The

‘Mi



with service . The }included provision
scheme would be for a board of | mates towards such a pervice:
examining officers to tour the|}Such a fund was gerd for

this year’s budget for
pu o en colonies part
neld up er

larly dos and Bri
Guiana.

-

itish

shares eased when expectations
of tax relief were not fulfilled,
Overseas stocks enjoyed a
good demand which produced
rising prices. Those domiciled
abroad were particularly wanted
including South African indus-
trials, oils, tins, rubbers and
seiected minings.

The MacArthur news was re- |
| ceived quietly and produced lit- |

tle reaction in markets
occupied with budget details,

In the foreign section Japanese
bonds were marked one point
higher.

South African gold producers | were studying a

pre |

ticular. Due to the rising cost of
living he wag certain that these
employees should be in receipt of
better wages. Conditions wer
such, however, that they could
not afford it at present, Because
of this, among other



Post Office as under

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m. Registered Mall







reasons ne
| would like to see a general re-
| vision of mark-ups.
. oye .
Mobilisation

CAIRO, April 11
Cairo newspaper Al Aham said
that Egyptian authorities
scheme for gen-

| today

recorded useful gains and a firm eral mobilisation in the event of

vrarret existed in diamonds andj|an emergency,
coppe*s. Government funds how-

ever were fractionally lower.
—Reuter.



RSS SS SARS
IS



GARDEN HOSE FITTI
GARDEN SHEARS
TRUCK JACKS

VYOU°LL NEED
GARDEN HOSE—14” and %”

GREEN CANVAS—69”

The newspaper
}added that a special law dealing
| with general mobilisation would
' be issued.—Reuter,



LOOK

LICENCE
NGS

COOL CU



Patt tartan neg atiatiatat in iterate i inate aoe
TR |

THESE

RUBBER MATTING
REAR VIEW MIRRORS,
WINDSCREEN WIPERS (Vacuum)



end Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m. on the
13th April 1061

Mails for St. Vincent and Trinidad |
the Sch. Gardenia W. will be closed at
the General Post Office as under

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail nd

Ordinary Mail at 1 a.m, on the 1é6t
April 1951

{ Mails for British Guiana by the Sch
Marion Belle Wolfe ¥ be clostd
‘the General Post Office as under:-

Parcel Mail, Regis d Mail r
| Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m. TO-DAY ite
| April 1961

Mails for St.-Lucia by the Sch, La
| dalpha will be closed at the General
| Post Office as under;

Parcel Mail Registered Mai) and
| Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m, TO-DAY 12th
{an 1961

Mails for Paramaribo by the M.V

Daerwood will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail and
| Ordinary Mail st 2.20 p.m. TO-DAY 12th
| April 1951



HOLDERS

SHION





RM LUBRICATING

ARE BEST BY TEST
DON’T ONLY OIL IT—GERM IT

NTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Gasolene Station—Trafalgar St.





JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs Over NEWSAM — Lower Broad Street—Tel. 2684

New Arrivals

INEXPENSIVE COTTONS FOR BEACH WEAR
AFTERNOON DRESSES

Also AFTERNOON DRESSES in Larger Sizes
Beautiful COCKTAIL HANDBAGS

»-HOURS—Mondays to Fiidays 8.30 to 3.30
Saturday Morning 8.30 to 11.30

NOTE :—We do not Olose for LUNCH.

SS ——



“Good News" for Aathmatics...

A New Guaranteed Remedy for the Relief of ASTHMA

Dr. JOHN'S ASTHMA REMEDY

This skillfully blended preparation, assures you of
immediate relief in this most distressing disease and
is the result of years of intensive study in Asthmatic



—

GAS TANK LOCKS (English and

American Cars)

ing is that a man has to present
himself in Britain and then stands
the risk of being rejected for
lack of education or medical

FRICTION TAPE
PLASTIC LEATHER CLOTH













some avenue of Casurinas, Is. well
plented with ornamental and fruit
beering trees. Exeellent buy for
| a Private Residence or Develop-

conditions.

UNBREAKABLE POTS ! Keep a Bottle handy and relieve yourself of the














REAL ESTATE AGENT ORIENTAL some ee ae TUBE VALVES—Truck and Car | CHROME CLEANER Obtainable at... 8}
ADOTSONEER souv CURIOS, CARNATIONS | ptieies y ‘ - BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES
PLANTATIONS. BUILDING New Shipment opened , Sr taep aeh aah 26 COURTESY GA RAG E Ltd.—Broad Street
Phone 4640 ‘THANT’S ee Dohke, oau it ROBERT THOM. LTD. -- White Park Rd. _ Dial 4391 and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings
FSS = LLY en pee














PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Savannah Clab
Tennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
oe DOUBLES (Handicap Fins!)
Miss Eileen Bowen and J. W. McKinstry
: a4 Mrs. F. D, Barnes







Sport

Worrell Denies Mak ing £1,400 Demands

Jamaican Footballers ~~
Due Here On May 18
BY O. S. COPPIN

FRANKIE WORRELL, West Indies and Bafbados all-
rounder is‘incensed over what he describes as fals2 rumours,
I was authentically informed in a Jettor from Ulundi Street,
Radcliffe, Nr. Manchester, yesterday.

The letter states that at a patty at which there was. a
touch of homeliness, because Clyde Walcott hed thougrit-
fully brought a bottle of Sugar Cane Braudy for Frankie
from Barbados, a sudden gloom was cast over the party.

One cf Frankie’s friends pro-
exorbitant amount. He is very

Report

MIXED DOUBLES Rape T oan:
Miss GC. Pilgrim and G. ame
fost to Miss D. ek and Ao >

Manning 5—1.
TOo- DAYS. FIXTURES

eS eras ae

Mrs. R. S. Bancroft
terson vs. Miss D, We and

waning.
Prsontetion of Cups.by Lady Savage

’ Water Polo
At Aq -atic

THERE wiil be a water polo
practice match this aftefrioon , at
the.Barbades Aqua... Club. To-
morrow and Saturday there-will be
matches between teams from the
Barbados Water Polo Association
and teams from H.M.C.S.. Mag-
nificent and H.M:C.S. Miemac.



>t SP PL RTs

. rig
c+

duced a clipping from the Daily

ing. time. are’ as follows:
conpeepelbcnitecactateanleaiaglomenatmenptee

Dispatch. This article was written

by Jack Fingleton of Australia

and it read as follows:—

Worrell Wants £1,400 to Tour
From JACK FINCLETON,

“Daily Dispatch Special Corre-
spondent.”
CANBERRA, Friday.

“The West Indies cricket tour

planned for Australia in the com-

ing summer is believed to be
jecpardised by the claim of
Frankie Worrell, who plays for
Radcliffe (Central Lancashire
League) for £1,400 to make the
tour.

“Phe Secretary of the Australian
Board of Control says the matte
is being considered, Recent
M.C.C. cricketers receiver £800
plus allowances.

“More requests for extra pav

ment are feared from Ramadhin
of Crompton (Central Lancashire
League), and Weekes of Bacup
(Lancashire League) and the de-
mands might make the tour im-
possible.

“Australia lost financially on the
West Indies tour in 1930.”

Worreii Denies
When tackled on the question
Frankie Worrell said that he is
not so crazy as to ask for such an



keen on going to Austrana. ant

has asked the West inaies Cricace +

Board of Control for the same
terms as in 1950 English tour, but
has not heard a word from tacm,

He is surprised at the article
and fears that unfounded rumours
are getting around,

“Ram” Said Yes

With regard to Ramadhin, it
was stated that he wrote from
Madras early this year accepting
the invitation to tour Australia,

An announcement in the Daily
Gleaner of Jamaica states that the
personnel of the West Indies team
to tour Australia will be announced
this week and the authenticity of
the statement has been attributed
to Mr. Donald Lacy the Secretary
of the West Indies Cricket Board
of Control.

Australia Responsible

The Gleaner went on to state
that the Australian Cricket Board
of Control was the party respon-
sible for delaying the announce-
ment of the team.

This should give the lie to many
rumours that have been circulated
throughout the West Indies that
are unfavourable to a _ great
cricketer like Worrell.

Two sources are responsible for
the spread of these rumours—



Empire Asked Withdraw

Decision

THE Council of the B.A.F.A. at their meeting yester-
day evening at the Y.M.C.A. headquarters, considered the
situation with regard to the withdrawal of the Empire First
Division team from the competition this season.

After a lengthy discussion, it was decided to await a
further reply from the Empire Club asking them to recon-

sider their decision.

This step was taken after Mr.
J. M. Kidney had suggested that
Mr. E. A. V. Williams, the Em-
pire representative on the Coun.
cil should report back to his club
asking them to withdraw their let-
ter in the interest of the game.
The matter was adjourned until
this evening.

After the Secretary had read the
letteg stating that the Empire Club
was withdrawing from the first
division competition this season,
Mr. G. Rocheford said that the
rules of the Association pointed
out that the six strongest clubs
must play first division football.

Empire he said was one of the
six strongest teams and he did not
think that it would be right to
allow them to withdraw from the
first division and play in the sec-
ond and third divisions. ,He felt
that if they did not withdraw their
letter, they would not be able to
play in the competition this year.

Mr, A. F. Ishmael said that ac-
cording to Rule 5 of the Associa-
tion, any club withdrawing from
the Association during the play-
ing season was liable to a fine of
10/.,. He also said that the Bar-
bados League consisted of three
divisions and that Empire would
not be able to play in the second
and@ third divisions if they were
withdrawing from the firs* divi-
sion.

Hoyos appealed *6 the

Empire representative to with-
draw their letter. It was felt by
many persons in public life that
the step taken by the Empire Club
was a hasty one. He knew that it
would take a big man to withdraw
anything and he believed that Mr.
Williams was big enough to do
that,

* Mr, O. S. Coppin said that he
had spoken with some of the mem.
>

Traffic Don’t
No. 23

DO NOT vokonr TO DIP
YOUR HEADLIGHTS
WHEN MEETING OTHER
VEHICLES AT NIGHT.
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring,



They'll Do

Sauarweit ==

WAS SCARED By
HIS DOC INTO
BO POUNDS wa |
RS. HE ALSO
TOOK OFF To
THE TAILOR’S +.



It Every Time

bers of the Empire Club and he
did not think they were going to
withdraw. That was the impres-
sion he got and he believed that
the Council were placing Mr.
Williams in a very invidious posi-
tion, He would however like Mr.
Williams to tell them on what
grounds his club was withdrawing
from the first division competition
and on what grounds his Commit.
tee took that stand.

Mr. Williams pointed out to the
Council that he had no authority
to withdraw the letter. He said
that the decision was arrived at at
their Annual General Meeting
owing to the terms which were
made by Pickwick C.C. Those
terms he reminded the Council,
were termed by some of their
members as outrageous.

Some of the members of his club
said that they played football for
the sake of the game and with the
hope that the. Association might
make some money which might
come in useful at some future date,
for the purpose of sending a team
abroad and that they might be in-
cluded in that team.

Mr. F. St. C. Hutchinson felt
that the Council was grossly in-
sulted by the stand which the Em.
pire Club had taken because they
had made their letter known to the
public through the Press and in
doing so, were asking the public
to support them in a decision
against the Council.

Mr. Val MeComie said he was
sorry that Mr. Hutchinson had
waited until that late stage to

learn a little about ethics and mor-
ality and that that new attack
should be launched at the Empire
Club.

He reminded Mr. Hutchinson
that he was the introducer of a
motion which succeeded in re-
scinding a previous decision of the
Council and he himself was guilty
of insulting the Council which had
made that first decision.

He counselled Mr. Hutchinson
not to wax so warm on the matter
and said that he was happy to sup.
port very strongly, the stand taken
by the Empire Club because he felt
that it had a very salutary effect
insofar as the Association was
concerned, It made the Associa-
tion the laughing stock of the com.
munity and/the responsibility was
entirely Mr. Hutchinson's, hence
the majority of the blame should
acerue to him,

Registered U.S Parent OMe

PS LOOK«I’M ON™



TAILORING [{ {50
FIT Cee TENTS ses

A DIET! TOOK oFF
POUNDS“GOT Six
SUITS HERE THAT, b.



FRANK WORRELL

firstly journalists who must pro-
vide sensational copy without first
getting facts and secondly the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con—
trol who supply absolutely no in-
formation on a most important
subject and allow the public to
guess or accept whatever irre-
sponsibilities are handed to them
from sources to whom the word
ethics convey nothing.
Need for Review

I consider that the whole ques-
tion of conducting West Indian
Cricket affairs needs review in the
light that the West Indian cricket
public are being kept too little in-
formed of the entire progress of
West Indies cricket, its plans, fin-
ances and its policy.

There should be some system of
liaison with the Press fron, a high
level and let the thinking Press
be in a position to kill rumours at
their birth rather than players
like Worrell, to whom the West





Mr.J. M. Kidney said that he
was a keen advocate of sport and
in view of the fact that they would
have to select a*team for the first
time to play against one from
Jamaica, they must get their
strongest team. He did not think
Barbados could do so without the
assistance of the Empire Club.

He hoped that Mr. Williams
would carry back to his Club all
that he had said so that they might

be able to reconsider their de-
cision,
He felt that the Empire Club

was sufficiently sporting and good
enough at heart to withdraw that
Jetter and come back into the com-
petition.

Mr. Williams said that his Club
was having a meeting that very
night and he would tell them all
that was said.

Mr, D. H. L. Ward said that as
far.assthe rules of the Association
were concerned, the Empire Club,
having decided to write the Asso-
ciation a letter of withdrawal from
the first division, they would have
to withdraw from the other divi
sions»as well,

With regard to Mr. Hutchinson's
remarks saying that the Empire
Club had insulted the Association,
he would say that if he was the
Spartan representative and had
unything to do with the Spartan
Committee he would also see that |
Spartan withdrew from the aie
tire competition. Unlike Empire
he would have seen that they had
raat affiliated for the season
rst.

cision of the Council said that they
had made themselves the laughing
stock of the community.

He was reliably informed that
other clubs were most anxious to
withdraw, perhaps, for reasons
better known to themselves.

After further discussion, the
Council decided to await the reply
from the Empire Club.

The Council agreed to terms by
the Finance Committee with the
Pickwick C.C, for receiving a
Kingston C.C. football team here
to play a series of games next
month, subject to confirmation
from Jamaica. The team is due
to arrive in Barbados on May 18
and will play games as follows
Monday May 21 vs. Colts, Wee- |
nesday May 23 vs, a Club team, |
Thursday May 24 First Colony
Game, Saturday, May 26, 2nd
Colony Game, Monday, May 28
vs. a Club team, Tuesday, May 29
3rd Colony Game.

The team is expected to leave on
May 30,

Mr, A, F. Ishmael was appoint
ed to act as a member of the Se-
lection Committee during the ab.
sence of Mr. S. O'C. Gittens whc
is in Trinidad.

The Council approved a motion
that Mr. G. Wilkes be appointed
to coach 24 players in preparation
for the Jamaica tournament,

By Jimmy Hatlo









Wy
LOOK! it’s NOTHING To \—]
= LIKE BEING IN A LET OUT. SEE WE He
HE'S PUT BACK SAME MIDGET'S GIRDLE! 1 CUT EVERYTHING
ALL THE TONNAGE TAL Ore WHAT DO I DO A=] OFF LAST TIMEâ„¢s
PLUS I5 POUNDS als Buy NEW ZOOTS



BESIDES~30-0-0, |
WHERE DO WE GO
FROM HERE =




1S AL Af ae

Every person who had spoken to
him with regard to the last de.

)
|
|

“SONNY” RAMADHIN

Indies owe so much, be subjected

abuse,
Nunes Unmindful

I was in Jamaica and from what
I have seen of Mr. Numes the
President and what I have been
able to learn of him, he seems to
consider himself, beyond the »cen-
sure of the West Indies Cricket
public and the actions of the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control,
of which he is the head, are kept
as Kremlin secrets.

If Mr. Nunes thinks so, I aim
willing to lead a campaign to bring
home to him the error of such
thought,

What has become of the £30,000
prefit from the 1950 West Indies’
tour? Is Barbados’ £2,000 poor
relation pittance still being with-
held from them in reproof for
having asked about the legality
of the disposal of the funds? What
has become of the rest? Has it!
been invested?

What is being planned by the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
trol for the benefit of future West
Indies Cricket now that they have
more funds than they ever had?

All these are questions that the
West Indies Cricket public want
to know and which any other
parent body would have told their
member bodies ever since.

Jamaica Footballers Coming

The Kingston Cricket Club
football team from Jamaica, is
due to arrive here on May 18
I shall give readers of this column
the personnel of the team in a few
days when final word comes from
Jamaica,

The provisional fixture allows
for six games—three colony games,
one Colt’s match and two club
fixtures.

The Council of the Barbados
Amateur Football Association
have accepted with thanks an
offer from Mr. Wilkes of the Lodge
School to supervise the training of
twenty-four players from whom
the colony teams will be selected.

The Selection Committee of the
B,A.F.A. will select these
twenty-four players in another
few days and will commence
training at once.



i

The teams selected to play this

afternoon are: —
: A. Weatherhead;
Patterson, |
oO
Jordan and G. Fos-

“A” Team.
G. MacLean;
(Capt.); M.
Johnson; G.
ter

B.
FitzGerald;

“B” Team. P. Foster; B, Brooks;

T. Yearwood; H.

Weatherhead;

to such personal pain and general 7. Orne D.’ Bannister. and. M.

It may be possible to arrange
for. a Harrison College team to
play a match against the naval

men,

hat’ ‘
What’s on Today
Court of Grand Sessior:—
10.00 a.m,
Police Courts—10.00 a.m.
Meeting of the St. Peter's
Vestry—1.30 p.m



ondary School vs, James
Street Boy Scouts — at
Harrison College—5 p.m.
Police Band gives open air
concert at Parry School,
St. Lucy—7.45 p.m.
CINEMAS

“Quartet”
“Christopher Columbus"
jhadow of Doubt'’

r
Th * Underworld”

Globe :



Piggy (Bridgetown): “Code of The
ext”
Aquatic; “The Razor's Edge”

ASSIZE DIARY
‘Rex vs Clarence Barker.
‘Rex vs Herbert Hutson, An-
+ gus Hunte and
Winfield Layne,



‘The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.55 a.m
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) April
14.

Lighting: 6.30 p
High- Water; 6. 16 2 am. > 42.31
p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil.
Total for Month to yesterday

.73 in,
Temperature (Max). 87.5 °F
Temperature (Min). 74.0 °F
Wind Direction . a.m.) E.
(3. p.m. E.N.E
Wind Velocity 14 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m:) 30.017
(3 p.m.) 29,943











Regatta On
Saturday

The sixth, regatta of the 195]
season will be sailed over on
Saturday in Carlisle Bay under

the auspices of the Ro al Barbados
Â¥acht Chub, Handicaps and start-































; ———
Class “No! “Wieht Start at Flag
B 4 Hi-Ho 2,30 Red '
/D» 8 Peter Pan 2.31 Yellow
"
B+ 10 Witara 2.32 Red
D 4 ore 2.33 Yellow
‘
B 13 Ranger
Dd 1 Van Thorndy ¥ 244 Red
D. 12 Rainbow
"
B 6. Flirt
D 1 Buccaneer 2.35 Yellow
B 481 Fantasy 2.36 Red
B 3 War Cloud ;
B 8 Rascal 2.37 Yellow
— 1,
B 9 Okapi 2.28 Ped
D z Imp ‘
dD ® Olive Blossom 2.39 Yellow
B 7 Moyra Blair, 240 Red —
——rs
Dd 7 Sinbad 241 Yellow
B_ 5 Mischief 243 Red -
B 1 Gipsy 244 Yellow
c 1 Miss Behave .
K 34 Comet 2.45 Red
0
I 6 Eagle
I 7 Mohawk 2.46 Yellow
— .
c 9 Folly ; y
I 2 Invader 247 Red
Tt 9 Dauntless
%
c 8 Peggy Nan
G 11 Magwin 2.48 Yellow
K 35. Edril a:
'
c 2 Scamp 2.49 Red
K 29 Cyclone 2.51 Yellow
K 4 Vamoose :
I ll Reen 252 Red,
I 12 Dawn ;
I 1 Gnat 2.53 Yellow
I 4 Coronetia
T 18 Clytie 2.54 Red
——
c 7 Rogue
c 10 Gannet 2.55 Yellow



amen 8;
N.B. The following date has been fixed
for gattas:—
7th Regatta, Saturday, 28th April.
H, BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter.

Brion, Gardner Fight
Should Not Be Called Off

NEW YORK, April 11.
Hymie Wallman, Americar
manager of Argentine heavy-
weight Caesar Brion, said here it
would be “a lousy thing” to cal
off the proposed fight in London
between Brion and Jock Gardner
British and European champion
It was reported in London yes-

terday that the fight schedulec
for May 22 might not be held
It had already been reportec
postponed from April 24 becausc
Gardner injured a thumb is
training.

Waliman. — said: “We only

accepted the match in the hope o

getting a shot at Lee Savold ir
England, Otherwise it woula
not have been worth while

financially, But we expected tc
lick Gardner and then get the
match with Savold.”

—Reuter.

THE B'DOS FRIENDLY
FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
To-day’s fixture:—

Westerners “B’’ vs. Penrode a
St. Leonard’s.
Referee: Mr. O, Graham.





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‘ij « R EnrIcHED

BREAD

THE ENERGY-
FOOD

HUILDING
FOR THE

FOOT-BALLER
anp ATHLETE

DY re

SOLIS ODPL ENCED ith”
PID ROS GEO ONE o


























\
Toni

Were

sognenponeens st
SOIREE IIS

THURSDAY,

T'dad Prepares For
Summer Race Meet

s
APRib 48, 1951

Griffiths, Gomes
Off To Good Start

‘From OUF Own Correspondent) KINGSTON, J’ca., April 7
Hubert Griffiths and Ralph
wate ee! SPAIN, April 9. Gomes Trinidad’s table’ tennjs
a aeces. have scarctly aces got off to a big start last night
ended when race fans are alread Sg a big ste

concentratin, th are already when each easily beat good
Turf Club ees necting which Jamaican players in exhibition
s te 4 Aen Sephel = s

wa beg on June 28 and 20, 2#mes, preliminary to the inter

colonial championship starting
ele i: of 28 maces tonight . so ;
and erumine in tubes and neitee. Flavia Davis, visiting lady |




champion was beaten two sets to

This? teers cor the aera one by Eldores Kapp, Jamaica
‘Twa champion .
at in, remeieny Cham- “"Over 700 people witnessed the

, Bion * ; horse, whipped
Foote on a oceasions he met

im,
Ocean: Pearl, ruler of the Trini-

dad turf. There is a lot of én-
couragement. for top-grade ani-

mals on the programme—five “A”
class events—three “B”,

and probably the return of



. four “C”

and the “C” class maiden—so we
should see the champions out in
full force witli a~strong invasion

—CP)

games.



ween





from Barbados, i

CRYPTOQUOTE NO. 5. |
One JRQFBMRP IER PLRRD,
GD DNFPR GSNRIEB TER
PLRRD:

—YRIDP.
Last Cript: The first and in-
dispensable requisite of hap-
piness is a clear Sane

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.

FOUR WINDS
CLUB



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PAGE 1

THURSDAY. APRIL 12. I9SI ItARHAlHiN \[.\l im .u animals are being developed by the American Meat 1 nst 11 u te Foundat: duel* derive.1 from livestock are „ c ntr.hu nog lo improved health, make up the population of thu industrial progress. r/d better tenth largest city in the Uniteo living in the United States States. These include octopuses ino* ond glandular exfrom Portugal, snails from tract* from meat are used lo corMorocco, frogs' legs from Japan, reel bodily deficiencies and proand dried cod from Norway, vide relief from illness. Two of Parsons of Seondtnov.oi the latest wonder drugs—ACTH. Italian, French; Greek, and in the anterior lobe of Chinese descent are Included In n hog's pituitary gland, and Corthe more than 790.000 people th.il tlao n a. made from the adrenal make up the population at gland of cattle—are among the Boston. Here the Salem Street irtant recent discoveries, Market has been satisfying it These are used in the treatment multitude of customers for 43 if atthriii, and other aliments years. Insulin, made from animal enEvery edible ilsh that is caught doerinc glands, is used by diabetic anywhere in the world's lakes sufferers. New techniques to de%  * %  . ar >d ocean* can be found velop the vitamin B12 content of * ,he market sometime during meal and meat products are also **? ***". rhe %  *5" ?"-** l %  icing discovered Studies reveal "• fl f*> %  %  brought in by plane. that cattle livers and kidnevs are bo £ t u t,n nd "}" ck -.. .w.,l*.,. unMM # ,iT.J.Y.U_ \, '*r persons of Norwegian, t. sceueni sources oi this vitamin C i-^i.h •,* n,.i,h _, ,,,„ chewing gum. The residue from -king fats used lo produce made into a dish of quivering hite jelly-like flakes known as lutenek. Scandinavians also like raited tankage — makes good h* rr i, lg whic h Is imported from M and also can bo conMorway Iceland, and Newfoundverted into nog and poultry feed, iitnd Prom hog grease has come a s>ls are a traditional Christmas ncx. chemical used In synthetic m Bn for those of Italian tastes rubber. Lard is used in making Uvc eels are caught fan rlfatl ktmenU and creams. aloeai the Atlantic Coast in the Kin from the ears of cattle is United States and In Canada. iitistsbrushes ;HKI puj fhev are brought lo the market %  used in tooth brmhe.. i n specially constructed barges. 09 the tails of cattle is Eels are served either fried or i. '-l .i an air filter m tractors. marinated. Italians also eat (he N,, I'tnlii cuttlefish, salmonetti, and Mt From the skeletons of animals urchins which come from Me. com,, buckles, chessmen, crochet • iri aciltf and P*' 0 !" 0 balrploa, and umbrella ~ *.,. handles. India ink is made from Octopus In Oil sSrT ilJ!2^!!s. V S! m wL1*! 1 '/ ,,m The octopus, from the ocean ; ,nes and clothing from dfpths 1>rT P PfirtuoI „ probably niow anu V.UU1. [( oddest Specie, requested The^Foundation .s a nen-prortt Cook#d ln 0 a. thb. many-armed ?k* a "! !" tlCn ; u W' r,pd bv morp flfh is a favourite dish for those Uian ..on moat packing eumpaniev of Greek. Italian, French, and ... the (Totted States. Affiliated Spflnlaif Farms "Grow" Conerete CHICAGO. Ill A tourist motoring througl. certain parts of tin United Btatl will find farms "growing strange irop of concrele slabs, boxes, and posls. am) the Perilaaw Cement ASSOCMI The prtspneton of these farm? care little about ihe fertility of the soil, but the} watch iti keen interest as thin cffOfg develop. Thousands of engineer and research scientists from tho United States and Canada are also interested in ihe development of the concrete crop, which periodic .diy tar durability, strength, and possible deterioration. The concrete farms are^part of a research project on the perform ancc cf cement under varying conditions of climate, soil, and moistiue ['he harvest*' is the collection of information that will make possible more durable and stronger concrete mixes for use In homes, mdustnsl builnmgs. rood*, airports, and other structures Farms in Georgia and Illinois are growing concrete in test ihe effects of extreme winter and summer weather pressures on the material. Ei.eh fam i % %  < %  .i.<>ut 1,000 specimens of concrete exposed to the elements. Along one slreUh Of highway In New York Stale a being made of the performance of air-niiraiiied concrete under ley conditions. This tvpe of concrete is a new •kvelopnient containing billions of "microscopic air bubbles which prevent MIV nipt I ng pressures on conarf*J| ui dee ice conditions. Samples, i.f ihe concicle "growing" on fanns and in water are sent to be tested in a laboratory set up by the cement industry near Chicago. The dala collected by the laboratory is analyzed and passed along to builricri nd engine-is m all puts af the counl>eople caught in o. is used Japanese They also blUty of products under controlled favourite of th %  %  %  %  !udn"i. anil .i fat extraction room. A special project Bed snapper, laboratory is used to studv Ihe C>ulf of Mexi nutritive values in bone and meal Americans of nrtage. and other meat Chinese origin. by-product* A fully puce and porgles. Greeks favo i home econoinlcs kitchen striped bass. The French enji facilities for research In snails which are a shellfish ai ci [lncitiiiii with cooked products %  "* imported from Moron — ^. They also demand frogs' legs rvi t-rrxr-rvn. awaemaei brought m from Cuba and Japan OUTEXJOR CINEMA Shrimp, liked by almost every An estimated 2.000 "drive-in body, comes from a number of theatres" in the United States acplaces. The special Jumbo kind ccmmodaie 5.000.001) persons and *e Imported from Mexico. Othei i]*s each day The types come from the southern %  re hull; -d that whole waters of the United Stale* n ..v view motion.picture nances from their automobile*, which they park before a large outdoor screen. SOCIETY DOCS LONDON. The I.oiidon Daily Exare<* re ported the following announcement In a Devonshire hotel II.AIHUO "Guests' dogs are charged 1* cents or 21 cents per day according to size and social standing." —INK TOO MANY CATS VANCOUVER. DRIVE ANYWHERE A total of 4.W5 cats were desA company in the United Slates troyed by the Humane Society loped an automobile tire here last year but the Society s thai is safe Irom blnwouis or greatest problem is still stray cat*. puncturea. No rubber inner tube An official told the annual meeting is required |f a punclure does * IheS.P C.A. that fr* !" *occur. %  soft pliable rubber inside front and downtown areas_are the tire surrounds the leak and "ru"" of them prevents the loss of air. ___^^^ C.D.C. Dispuh Settled IXtNDON The dispute between London and JUanlyre Supply Company and CDC over the continuance of the former'* store on a sile al Msuso. Nyasaland. on which the CDC now operalin,!. has been amicably settled. Notice of eviction to the Supply Company has Men srltt drawn. Mr. W. M. Robson. Dim UM af Campbell Hooker Cartel Limited, of which the Nyasalan company u a substdtary. m gfevtal to your corresponder! %  %  i he had r'.vei\'ed intin.ation of the withdrawal of the eviction notice before he left Nyasaland last week-end Expressing appreciation of the full cooperation n %  %  Government of Nyasaland and l .K there. Mr Itobson said tfcc satisfactory ending to the dispute •fid not affect the Company*' views on the question of whctliei it was right for CDC to stari ••hopkeeping with Britain taxpaj ers" money Ther..* menial principle Involved. Mr. Rohson. who spent ten weeks in Nyasaland. said CDC had four stores on their property there London and lllantyre Supply Company will continue tradiiiH Ml CDC property Thp firms concerned form part of the well-known Booker Brothers group -I F S CUNT PLANE MAY FLY AROUND WORLD LONDON Tentative plans are being dts < ussed between Ihe Ministry of Supply and the Hrislol AvlatlM i irnpanv for a IOUIHI the world flight of the giant 100-ton lir.m.i /on plane. The llrabaion makes its nr-it (light outside Britain in June wher Will be on show at the l'an> An F-xhibition. The plane will no land but will give a number 0 demonstration flights over L> Hourget field. Many technical detaiU have t be settled before any world-sird lings are nnalired. and It will ' late summer before the piam i .iulil leave ,.n Hi UlD t N S I .S. Find Net* Sugar Cane %  of grains. are now being •MBt of \fn. i. : IT4 Among the is resistant to Ihe %  %  produvins iifiai cgCM The Department cues In its annual re. search ihal will make %  about fnoi %  %  if breediMii rase discontinued, w 'bin aaat %  11 *ult mtgh; b The li %  elm tret* b> tinnei>nrtmeiii of Aurii nlluic Wflll I alantlng %  ea j ean Kdnf from acre also has > Another .sugar cane variety thnt produces Irom 5n to i ifto ii 2tS Utera) n %  %  luring thi Development in coru Uon has prod u ce d a arteay th it aho*a*ji picaiUat "i m I borsj Import preajosa is rrporied In the nltroejei Uon of poet '< '•< i of grasses. A mcthud Of prod %  for th. type Uda ill help frev U.S croun. frorn dependence on sce-l tuck groani in otntar miintii.attachmenta thai %  III I field |i one operation. \ t l **'lahl' >X Mlefl Mak-fl Good Peed U.S. Almost Free From Malaria For Uteetoek ia 1'hiUdrlf.his iblea as pess Hma %  beaii.H. broc, e heing nude into high fi-eds Malaria in Ihe United States ha* been reduced almost to the ad Stales Public Health Service reports. DTD.T a powerful insecticide, ha* been the most effective wrap. %  rall-DBla on in fighting the mosquitoAmerican farms. borne disease ll is sprayed on M .ii med Iive%  tock feeds. The can %  %  content of feed mad| from 0MM Ingradianai aqua %  normal guaranteed minimum" 1>-i •Rial alfalfa meals. (onverting plant wastes m lead involves chopping Hi, li.->' )y leathered waste; and then MibtecUng them to direct heat tn s-J rotary drier of the type used foij, drying alf.dfu Diying tune .-i"' tiinperature are regulated "• Ihal UM tender parts of the leav > iiry thoroughly and beeorna brii He. while the stems remain fair ,m.i laagca As the material is carried no fans in the drier, llui bum,, leaf-blade jH-rtlons i" crumblad tram the stems. Blade i i i.-in fractions are la' a rated by screeniiin. Th. inc., material which is 0M •i lUOUg part oi the Ic.ivc-. || then ground and mixed UhO Uuj raad. The partially dried may be accumulated and dried nn>re Uwroughlj al the TEA DRINKERS The I'niwd Stat<* Is the world's largest importer of tea More than [104 million pounds, chiefly of llarJl tea, were Imported tn the 'ear ending July IB50. an Increase f II pet cent oVr the precedinc KEEP 2P+ Tahiti May HiN'omr Airnuvn Cfiilro I %  \ I' I | Apul it. Tahiti might be th in tin eaatraJ Bouth Par U network of South p routes be t araan Australia and Souiii and Central Amei cordinu to Captain I' G Ta> li of the pioiii*eriug flytni i*>at rrlgate B'rd II rhe alrcmfl lano. j l..'1.i. i u |. gray l.nK to AiMlralb frorn Chile afar .. mrvey night io nnd lultabla ntrtoapi In rht Si Ulli Pa. Illi N.| .1 raSUUI All'Irallan-Chlle mi ervlce —Reaier (aiibmera BoiMutr Face Powder ^F V. / • Bouqucr Far* Powder ... so vslitly •esooi .trll.si.lY p*rfum*J . . I.r-i...in. i. houn aee* hours. (I*lng you that aatural *llt leek. i ACI rowNt Fftl THAT NATUHAt VIVTO lOOK Senior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate Invites all school-boys nnd school-girl' between the ages of 12—19 lo enter for il* Men lor Short Story fompeHtlen. Stories can bo on any subject, but should not exceed 500 word' n length and must reach the Short Story Editor. Advocate Co, Ltd "ily not later than Wednesday every week. The best story c, will be published In the Evening Advocate and the winner will re icivu a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12'( Send thu coupon with your slory. I MODERN DRESS SH0PPE-B>.d St j make a Ion of sugar. Ho point, d RATES OF EXCHANGE out that another Important factor v-.i'hat in Itarbado* the cane was being delivered by the farmer lo the factory door, and as such Ihe farmer had to stand the cost of transportation, whereas In Trinidad, the sugar manufacturer was paying the cost of transporting the cane from the farmer's i>cale. often a IOUK way from ihe factory. I J 10'. i j/wt pi. WHOLESALE DEALERS PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING ESSO PRODUCTS JUST RECEIVED FLIT IN TINS:—GALLONS. QUARTS, PINTS, HALF PINTS FLIT SPRAYERS FLIT POWDER WHITE PETROLHM JELLY IN 400 LB. DRUMS BROWN „ „ „ „ PARAFFIN OIL IN 52 GALLON DRUMS PARAFFIN OIL IN 5 GALLON PAILS NUJOI. IN PINT BOTTLES MISTOI. IN l-o. BOTTLES WITH A WITHOUT EPHEDRINE MISTOL IN 2-oz. BOTTLES WITHOUT EPHEDRINE. I Oil I I llllll II IM OMM VI ION APPLY TO R. M. JONES &. COMPANY, LTD. OR DIAL 3814. THIHSDAV IUIIKXY SATLHUAY ItOXIHY TUESDAY ALL ITEMS ADVERTISED HERE ARE GREATLY REDUCED FOR QUICK CLEARANCE You arc definitely efiectinf large aavingt by attending thit CLEARANCE SALE. Here are tome of the many reductions. TENNIS DRESSES SEERSUCKER OR COTTON HOUSECOATS A line .lOMirtmi-iit In •.Ire* and colour*. Me*t of these llcm* Mere regularly aolU Up la '8.M Sale I APRIL 11. Ml. CAJtADA ChM|UM on Dinlini fl .'* pr pr.fu ei.tsn pr. Slgtit THiU* %  .. "*• f4* SB saw*. _$12n LADIES' ART SILK STOCKINGS RriuUr Ht/^ jud Haim ShdM tfl 1 .. .. Aba a vulrlT In 1 ..... ^ Anklr %  .,..!.. Hall I'rl. r 'I ftS. \tT •? I LINEN FINISHED GLASS TOWELS | of llirsr line l.iUfU H Itll a (MtJi Tumlilrr To-dat't V.-.lii!:.>. per lowrl. Snerlal Sale Prlre All 3 In a pkg ,or _jfl I '"" Meat... Large. ^| „ „ LADIES' SKIRTS AND BLOUSES Jersey material Rloue*. Printed CvtMn Shirts Specially re is fed far ihiSalr Onlj LADIES' PANTIES WOVEN ART SILK I..ne liiiMPi'd rjiitin lii leu rose eream also Mark. Small. Medium. Large. Resular prlred .*! "t le Prke M .OR Wnh Baxaattex, (here's, new beaaay aiitl pr.iteriion for wall* of I ennrrete. pla^Lr, brick or Hasje Waterproof sod weather rei*ting, Bergerif-T ranrn't etaekat ajgal oi tot Nejgai M aMaajfeJ pan of the wall "ii v f irh it in | ejajassl It• ri-p, rruttt fmi-h -de rfaj| ami mart ah' llergerlei in available in manr • lelirale ssjtMri for use inside of \t i I>F. it y BERGER PAINTS Stocked by IMITATION LEATHER HANDBAGS I'or ladles and children In white and m*n other useful rolauro. Many gj -| .. .. Styles. Many reiuUr prlers were up to M.ae To Clear „„ ,, JS J " MEN'S CANADIAN POLO SHIRTS Men's Polo shirts in White only with Zip faeteaers. Hharts that were resular fj.40 Kdu/ed for this "ale 54 WOOLLEN CHECKED MATERIAL Thai will make Sklrta or foots for travolling aadl ean useful flUatJ". Kedurrd from S.at tw LADIES' COATS. WOOLLEN PULLOVERS. CARDIGANS Reducad lo | Prico CORSETS. CORSELETTES. TURBANS. INFANT CHRISTENING DRESSES lo I Prlc :.i ean auke rnsoy other A S-W nn P>r J a*.. •3.1 ALL HARDWARE STORES Agenti:—GARDINER AUSTIN & Co.. Ltd. THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE %  WMV/WWW.'


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PACE roi R BARBADOS ADVOCATI: TIURSDAV APRIL 12. ljl R\HBADOS^|AlM)(srrE r. 1 Lta mroMd 11. Brld.ton llni.-.i.i. April 12. 1951 ixrwm i*i in AIIS THE House of Assembly on Tuesday passed an address relating to the activities of pedlars and asked that a Committee be appointed lo consider what should be done to remedy the situation At last Government's attention has been focussed on a matter which has given cause to much concern and grave dissatisfaction in this island. The influx of these itinerant vendors has gone on at a rate which alarmed small business houses without any official attention being paid to it or its concomitant dangers. During the debate in the House it was pointed out that these pedlars who sell cloth and other merchandise escape the payment of taxation which they would have to pay if they had been established in business houses. The average businessman now contributes by way of income tax and parochial tax approximately 50' %  of his profits. The upkeep of his establishment and wages for his staff are other demands on his business. The itinerant vendor mows ai.iiiiul m his car and besides the upkeep of the vehicle and his chauffeur has no other expense of consequence. It has been argued in his favour that he carries to the country worker goods which would not be otherwiseavailable to him and on terms of payment which would not be afforded him by business houses in the City. The difference in price, however, is sufficient lo give the worker twice the amount of goods. The itinerant vendor is only one of a growing class of itinerant trader whose growing prices are tending to aggravate inflation and raise the cost of living. The Government must show a greater awareness of the way in which the price control list is openly flouted in this island. It must also take action against all sellers of foodstuffs who put up the cost of living to themselves and the public by selling at scarcity prices. The tendency in this island has been to attack the big man of whom there are relatively few and who keeps proper accounts, and to ignore the great many who keep no books and whose profits are out of all proportion. There must be no discrimination, and action against itinerant vendors must be extended to all those who exploit the community in search of a quick road to prosperity. NO P \IIKI.\4. IN an effort to assist motorists who experience great difficulty in finding adequate parking space in the City and who unwittingly park in restricted areas, the Commissioner of Police, in co-operation with the Transport Authority has clearly marked "No Parking" areas. Poles have been painted red in addition !o black and while. Once the significance of the red band has been understood, there can be no difficulty for the motorist, who may still find it impossible to find parking space, but who will not suffer from any nervous fear that they have broken the law. Never park where there is a red band. Before And After 1925 <-* Air Is Wafts Guide In Oil Town tk_ U'..> l_^41_ 1_ lull W_J hu>n Hy 4.i-• !•<••• II ii 111 The issue of Canada-West Indie* Trade U being kept "live in Canada as well as in the WMI Indies The Toronto OUhe Awl the West Indies in 1 M2 had been taken by the Unit-o Slate* in 1920. export* to Canada rtiattva. .hange '>' declined during the same Mall ot April 5. 1951 calls for in n€ W esl Indian attitude toperiod, while the preportior, ..( xmmediate ncaotiattnni for a w = raa Canada The annexation of P 01 "** lo th p United Kingdom inB.WI. trade treaty to rep^,, Rko bv he United States creased. These ehar.ee*were due ibund and now oneand lh , (IC Wntial treatment ln a %  ln prices .mult.n The next ten ] sided pa ce the mor.bund and now oneand he preferential treatment ? a %  in El^iZ^ni £ ed pact of 1925." Undfrtur. vantfd by ^ Uni (ed States to hf ?£\g*£C£i SSrt t coodlUons, argues the Glebe (•„,„, „ ni , he Philippine, led to ""£? '" .JJJ^SnS .SrasXJS I Hall, the B.W.I, area is not v|rtual ^,,,0,, £ % hc demand £ | 'T^tGa ^TITirMlbenefiting by the SM million or West Indian sugar A. the %  *L'SaU^JTsSLX! tself luosidy which Canadian ers pay annually for their sugar ,,, m Indian sugar. At the w^?^,.; ^orS^nd 1 CarurfWnimporta of dA „ ^ Weilt |nd|>|n e6ltin i et reouiremen.s. We are no, bene£TtlTi.'EW? Zg'Ton.^n' *$** ^""JS... lllmg by free access to B W.I. im ThP Barbados Hou of w m UC h Sa?r^ markets for our exports. Britain Assembly was quirk off the mark ..il-r.Hm.l tariff alone benefits, as she skims off ln 19 0B a BUI wa* passed increas. g ,,. uowas of far greater immst l 20 per cent the duue* on portance to the British manufaccertain specific articles when not t urcrB than the extension of the an* 1912 agreement ich bigger then in 1912. The rtiftVtrntial granlB W I. dollar earnings from for concentration in her central dollar reserve. We need a new imi x, r ted'from Canada treaty based on a new principle. othpr British country. Wc would bencfl* by treeing our. from purchases in the United States. The Coh.ni*> ild benefit by greatly expanded activity In production, processing early years the West A g %* f In th Indies seemed to benefit by selling at a preference to Canadian refiners and on a more favourable In Caninfercrve took place 1 1939 The agreement came into effect in 1927. In IBM the Dominion nave notice of Its denunciation ai from 31 December 1939 onwards, hut the war would benefit by the transfer of ou. meanwniie a movement was m cr vened and It Is " •" B,..,.h ,e,ln.r.. In I would benefit b, th* .ranker of d. m !" nwrul. %  m ovement but IcnriiriK %  nd %  h.n rthilM nrt'ciuitt the*Him %  "<• %  "< %  "" St. John tent a the"conference lo KIIH the 1951 in. inlhl £ di.ectlon "" %  . to the We.t Indie, to Trade I.,l-,.,l„atlon Plan meets "There are he said "ouM.ndlrm mvestiitate trade relations. As a this summer in (hliiwa. blSm^mV. of The vSest tSS '""" %  '•<"*> > P '"• [ '" EljyrW l"^'' !" ^ %  filS: ^'S' r m U r^,-. n r d v „ h ,' '.e^nee-.rXh'can.^'and SS ISSN'S, C!n.$JSZT^ti !" ,f ir'ile wfth C*lS ' '"""" West Indian eolo. relation, changed. Previously the ?h •,', H,i, ,„ Th.,d-.no, nie. were represented by oBlcial West Indians h.rainc< Ktl) mean th.t Sld"'t'eoTlnue "eieate. Resolutions in I.vour with the Canadian. At OIUwl F91SHH.E u oi r: P r3^.r?r"^ Indies agreement) our colonies .^ ^ _. _._ waK a t Ottawa, without tny colonial can be made more prosperous we Sni Cimits?on whichT wa* delegates being pre-ent The Coshall be in a belter pos.lion to buy ^ ,T7r n : nil ^2,.,, S loni.l Schedules" to quote Or. more from the Mother Country" P^'^Jf J !" !" and r W i *>* m M eyer "became an Integra] parl Tradc between Canada and the "u ltd MM,). >f |h(i Unl|rd |fjngdofi We( invited lo out the in int.. i-tfe. t K..i the West Indies imd in Canada l(ie ts/,, a i i na lin colonlN must sithe Colonial Ei'mi. it M to-day, and in I-indon tongues are W|1VS tPn(l lo hr lW lnrm un ,icr son's choice wagging. It is therefore well worth tn ,. influence of the fiscal iJlUlll recounting whal is known of either of the United States or o" those trade relalionsand showing the Dominion of Cannda. Attempt: how the Canada-West Indies have been made from time to time S 0 iL r ?S, Before Oltnwn somei.nl ng else happened to affect the normal Trade agreement came into being, to obtain for these colo • special of imcthing is best told, as *TJ*J ?dyantag In the markets of the 5eJ r ia?ed relat West Indian Trade remarkably like whi 1949. Sterling have been able lo trace it. In F. V. United States, whose proximity Meyer's "Britain's Colonies and renders them of upecial importWorld Trade," published by ance to the West Indies The Geoffrey Cumberlege (Oxford Colonial policy of the University Press) in 1948. States has now finally stopped advance in that direction; it would As early as 1890 the Canadian be unwise, except for the gravest Minister of Finance visited the reasons, now West Indies lo discuss proposals desire of the for mutual preferences At that for close connection with time the West Indies were nego. Northern Dominion Hating with the United Stales for ,,._ ,. ,„ J Sr ''he"'^Ki^T CTAC! Pi-n!.?,^ TFo*£-V"fc* rle^Z^r€"=ii Sr— ^ w h Gr when the Colonies were In distress. J" or indu lry An agreement Canada, out of a feeling of ime inl „ opvtilUan ln )B |3 an( | known to need recapitulation penal responsibility towards H.M. rr millim iri forcr untl i ..uperseded Bui if cannot 6repealed fo< Government in the United Kinghv he agreement o( 1920. Canada often Ihuf unless Conada oels beflar from 1031 lo I0U. This made (and the fact reaf> like 1949 nil tinainH ver Bin) CanaJan and United lcd States goods very expensive and imports from the United Kingdi rose while imports from Canada .,, and the United Slates declined w" 1 ,u T, niAfter 1933 the dollar also was dele West Indian colonies prPC)at e d ind b y 1B38 Canadian Trade at least in Jamaica and Barbados had recovered to an appreciable extent During the war of course Canada's trade with the West Indies ciated sterling In 1949 and clamppromise ofstabilry lo Ibe cane *d down on dollar allocations to buy Canadian good* is loo well By UHMaUII MACAl'LAY whose despalches loretold Uie Abadan crisis AS the plane drives through a sky almost bleached of its blue there is a glint far away of silver. In a few moments the glint spreads out and becomes a shimmering city. The traveller H arriving at Abadan. Kvtiy part of the great oil relinery, with farms of enormous steel storage tanks. is painted in glistening, unstained aluminium to throw off the sun's heat. Here on this flat mud island created from the prehistoric silt of the Tigris and the Euphrates is the oil capital of the world. The soil Is Persian, but every stick and stone there, every nut, bolt, and pipe, is the property of the British-owned Anglo-Iranian Oil Company. Two thousand Europeans and their families live in this town of wide asphalted roads, g-K.d houses or bungalow flats with every amenity that the paternalism of the oil company can provide. For the oil company Is Abadan. Almost every soul here. Persian or European, is in the company's service. LIFE IS BEARABLE The management has spent some of its millions trying to make life bearable for the people it has recruited to supply, refine, sell, and ship nil an.l its products fnmi this blistered place. Outside Abadan there is nothing, nowhere to go, nothing to see. From the guard on the relinery gate who makes sure that the visitor gives up his matches or lighter to the top executive, chief engineer or chemist, every man-jack finds that every facet of his life becomes inevitably the concern of the company and in some degree under its control. His house is company-owned. Only the company could get grass to grow on his lawns and afford to keep it watered for 24 hours n day in the hot weather. L BCD — BLVt -Tl AIM PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE DO YOU WANT A dom. put raw 5ugar on the duti. i 1 -1 than she was required ter treatment u'ilh relation to her able list and thereby cxlended the by tht agreement She granted a trade with the Wot Indies fhan preferential laulT treatment lo the preference of 24 per cent instead the United Kingdom allows her toWest Indian Colonies. Canada „i 15 pei ,ent per 100 lb on sugar day. thru nothing can save UM neither asked nor received any„f gt, Wrst Indiej from another orral thing In return. Two years later The 1BH war upset everything depression, unless the United Trinidad sent a delegation to The United Kingdom's place as Klnodom is prepared to subiidiia Ottawa. the largest supplier of imports into the W.'*t indies tdefliiUel|/. What Rearmament Will Cost LONDON. will he fewer goods in the shops lo finance stock-pillns: of vita Britain Is to spend £1,300 million ,md the price of those that remain fnods and raw materials on rearmament during the coming will be higher. This fact, by itself. Nevertheless, it is hoped ma Inancta) yeai Thi-ionly the will reitii.-t -pending: powtf UM by bn< ** M W | DM pntM H 040 iiist sinuf .1 defence praaanuni thui help to cMek in'cnmi inflatxpecti vn •fill H iOM to cover which Is to cost £4.700 million in lion. Controls—and, possibly, new the greater part of the rise in the next three years. taxes—will do the rest the coat of our imports. But If The sum to be spent this year we do this recklessly, we stand divided into three main catcBui this alone will not solve the lo IQSO valuable export markets — gories (as Illustrated in the acproblem. Britain's economy de., thing which we cannot afford .-ompanyiiiK chart). Pay and alpends on a steady now of imports to j 0i especially now ihnl 0 lowances for the armed forces will —of food nnd raw materials— man an( | j.-ipa'ncse industry amount to £270 million, and anwhich must be paid for with exiw-gining to recover other £S30 is needed for miscelports. We will need even more laneous purposes such ax food, Imports in the coming year to sunetrol. oil. transport of personnel tain the arms programme, and the md stores, etc The lion's share of this year's rearmament expenditure %  amounting lo £700 million—Is tn go to the production of tanks, guns, 'plane* and other military iquipmenl. nnd to research, development and other work connected with the defence proALL LAID ON Abadan is the only place in Persia where one dare drink the water that comes out of the tap. It is company's water. Laid on, like the water, are the house servants and a laundry service, shops, swimming pools, libraries, schools, and a farm, all company-owned and run. Who imports the English beet and cigarettes for the community's social centre, the Gymkhana Club ? The company. Who keeps the prices from soaring to 10s. a bottle or 7s. 6d. a packet ? The oil company. They built the town's two cinemas, outdoor for summer and indoor for winter, and import the films for them. There is a daily newspaper (run by the company). AIR-COOLED Social distinctions there are, of course, but they are out of this world of Mayfair and! Suburbia. GOOD-TEMPERED BREAKFAST FAMILY? Serve their early morning lea or cotfee in our MINTON PLAIN or 00UMBXWD M:m-Si/ed BREAKFAST CUPS & SAUCERS Wilkinson & llaynes Co.. Ltd. Successors In C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phones: 4687 & 4472, BENDIX 1 WASHING MACHINES FULLY AUTOMATIC WASHES NINE POUNDS CLOTHES. •! S Through Six Complete Stages in 45 minutes (without any manual ;i labour) the linal stage the Clothes are just damp, suitable lor ironinn. ONLY A FEW MAC.M\F.S LEFT UNSOLD. DaCOSTA & CO., LTD. | ELECTRICAL DEPT. LOUNGE SUITS ready to wear Wc must, therciore. aim at ai £25? TKi'. h !" .rl!i ,, l SL U is ni a ma "0' high-powered, flashy ('•iivi-tnmnnl I'Xtlmalr Ihat thev exports. This murt Dc done itc?.. "• r j win c !" !.s !" £3.200 million. iio iht tart ih.l many of the American cars, for the company owns almost or £850 million more than last metal-usinn atnl !" mcH-niii: firm, a || t | le cnrs | n Abadan. larce and small v...r On ..i-cnunt of nrlri'irnTfO*l"1 Which normallv pnidUCP IhC bulKf -^^... •* Jj *• u, -, war eeonomv or lowering Its i"st manage to export enough to highest prlorlu m this new txSaidari of King more ban Is strike a balamt In our oversea, port drive. o.v .1155? In uri ncv of II e tradin 8 accounl. This means that The prospert lol the people of B aid h. need to rSlr"ct "last .rear's overall surplus of Britain Is, a. the Economic Sum nati„S.homct.the minimum £22 million on our external for 1951 admits -In mw The CSovernment have now detrading account will have lo gotersh and unplev.nl but. c elded lhat the main burden will together with about 4.100 of our the whole, no worse than we had fall on home consumption There gold rccive., Hie iiinounl necdeil expivlcd wide out in AIM: us SAYi Hiir/.iiiln11 mw To The Edifer. Th,Ailr^.iu, SIR.— "I am writint! this letter with the intention nt rxposing the most unsatiuf'ictory way in which the business ot the Barbados Amateur lawn Tennis Association In conducted. I would like to auote the following; p..r;.nrj|)li which appeared HI um Thursday's Advoealr— •The Council of the Lawn Tennis Association who are selectors as well did not consider the local players nomtnnted up to :i standard that would do iredit to Barbados iu the Kami's "' I would apnreciutr if the selectors would advise Ihe public just how they arrived at tills decision in view of the fact that no practice maU-iies were %  Ifinf d M lield. Can it IK> possible thai they Judged plawtri by their form last September"' Are Ihcy not aware that tennis is a same that requin | a lot of practice and if given the necessary practice a great improvement can t;ike place In a player within a few weeks. I would suggest that instead of jumping to conclusions they make a point of watching some of the local tournaments instead of being guided by results in the daily newspaper. Why wire six playtn asked to hold themselves in readiness for the forthcoming tour to Trinidad it it had been previously deoded that only twa of them should go and in event of one of the two MM going, other arrangements be made? Thr above staleim substantiated bv the fact that no practices were held. 1 would further like to ask the selectors who communicate.* information regarding plajl Ihe Pre*' Surely this should be one of the duties of the Secretary of the Association. How then could information be given the %  mud.!., (iuardlan to the effect that I would be unable to make the trip to Trinidad if selected, when the Secretary has in his possession a letter of 2nd instant lrnm me lo the contrary. It is high time that open tournaments were held previous to the selection of players to la p port in the Itiandon Trophy, IFClubs iifflllated to the Association are unwilling to stage such tournaments on their grounds I would like to suggest that the President of the Association approach His Excellency with ,i view to staging such tournaments annually at C.overnment House. Can some members of the Council select players to represent Barbados without holding an official meeting 7 I understand from reliable sources that no meeting was held. Howcer. it a meeting was held how is it that two members (maybe more) were never notified of such a meeting. I understand that Council members were phoned and notified thai the decision of the "few" had already been forwarded to TriraV dad. ^ How is It that the President has allowed the business ot the Association lo be conducted in *uch u manner I look forward to some action being taken by members ot the Clubs affiliated to the Association as the future of Lawn Tennis in Barbados now rests in a precarious positmn How do meinljcis „( :]-,,. CoUDh ell, who have created the precedent of inviting Carter and Legall to play for Barbados, ever hope to regain the confidence of members of the Association. Is it in accordance with tinrules of the Association to invite nonniemlieis wheu there has been no o,>,M>iUinit> for members to prove th:il thev ure "up to standard'"' IiV.NNIS F. WORMS. The Cot, Hockley. II li Christ Church, April 10, 1BS1. Agv-grnuping 7a The Etlifor. The Adrocatr— Silt.—Quite recently from AtD*tM in the House ot Assembly. I noticed where certain critici-ins were levelled agilnst Ihe (.•ovemment as regards the introduction and extension of agegrouping in this island. A few ttayi diving elapsed. I bftVSj DO* ivjd m your Journil ol B''i April, re: the debate about this .ige-grouping ;t ;i milUllJf of th 1 .' Teachers' Association. In fairness to myself ,nn the general public, it would appear as though the teachers as a majority and not the Government have uudei taken to use themselves as an umbrella to khleld tin which can do no good to our eisint nt ny schools in this island I heartily agree with Mr Cum herbatch's suggestion and can lurthcr him by saying that f t iva always agreed with thOM Bducatlonaj Iteformers who sug iiest to g-adc the child from the ! world. The Communists who organised the appearance of their manifesto in every letter box in Abadan a few months ago are waiting for their chance. They want to take the world's oil capita over—and they reckon that everything would go on as smoothly as before. MTU Choose from range of fitting, single or double breasted. Style in fine tirade WORSTEDS and GABERDINES. A big assortment to select from • DA COST A A <.. LTD. Drv l.oini-. lli|>i. TASTY BAKERY GOODS BfflhQl FOODS KELLOGG'S ALL BRAN KELLOGG'S CORN FLAKES PKUFF WHEAT PUFFED WHEAT CHOCOLATE LUNCH BISCUITS BARLEY SUGAR STICKS CALVES LIVER DANISH BACON DANISH LUNCH TONGUES .1 .V II ENRICHED IIIIEAI) SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL CANADIAN APPLES CANADIAN ( IIOCOI.ATi; NIT ROLL CANADIAN < IHHOLMI BARS FRESH VEGETABLES CARROTS ItEET ROOT < tBBAGI STRING BEANS CHRISTOPHINVS irder early from FISH SMOKED HADDOCK SMOKED KIPPERS RED SALMON RED SNAPPER GRADE A MEATS



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PACE IK.III BABBADOS ADVOCATF. TIIL'RSnAV. APRIL l-i-.l Sp.arl II. |M.L I Worrell Denies Mak ing £1,400 Demands Jamaican Footballers Due Here On May 18 BY O. S. COPPIN FRANKIE WORRELL, West Indies and Bat I rounder is incensed over what he describes as falsa nnnoui 1 n .. authentically informed in a letter from Ulundi Si reft RjcfeHIYe. Ni Manchester, yesterdayThe letter state? that at a party at which then %  > much ni homeliness, because Clyde VValcott hud thouKrtt fully brought a bottle of Sugar Cane Brandy for Frankn from Barbados, a sudden gloom was cast over the p*Vt) One <( Ft.uifcieV. friends prodlppliu Mom Ihr Dally csxrbitent amount He b vei, ninrtili. This -rude wm written *<*" • %  %  •* %  to *"*""• •"' ,. Fmglcton of Australia %  a*N f WMUBHIP. t rtri audit,, ** %  ** ef Control for Ih, .mr tWrrll Wants 11 4.M. in Tour •""'" Sf F f J'? IT. !" From JACK HNCI ETON h ,wt hMrd B *'* ? ro,n ""T; Dally IHocsteh Special Carre"• !" l^V L , . voiHl'-nl i,n fcars l "*' unrounded nunom CANBERRA. Fndav -re gelt.* around Th. A iiukct jour Kani s ,f J, **. tor Australia in the com With regard to Hamadhtn. it in E summer s believed to be was stated that he wrote from iccpardised by the claim of Madras early Um year accept ma West Indies Cricket [* %  Savannah Club Tennis Tournament ) i -mini %  u MJX>l> IM-UBIXS Kaotflraa tlnt-li Boni4J W UtK.r.u. ', urat Mr and Mr> V D Iljrn*. I • 1 ljiXJ.lt DOCHaSI • %  •mUrm-la Pllarta. and u .1 't < %  > M n w.4 -.d Mam..** ST. S-* TO OAK MIXHJ iK^uauai .rini> Mi 11 S Bancroft >nd *• M.i. tamn vi Mil Wood and l 1 Bfch ProfotjUon at CUB* by LU> a*' Regatta On Saturday T'dad Prepares For Summer Race Meet Griffiths, Gomes (iff To Good Start Th %  isili will Saturday in Oarliali (atta of l<.;alHa. ! S .....,„„„ „„ ..... Tnnlda.l jT !" \c.r^l.£5 u, ^h.1,,1 ", c b v.chl Club. Handicaps and MailTurf Club aummrr .„....,,• _....*. J,m liandlcip* i ufm bag time are as follows: i-.i Water Polo At Aq Mtic Vuiikic Worrell. who play fi Rndcliffc (Central Lancashiri lor £1.400 to make Uv tour. the invitation to tour Austral TtlEHE will be a water pot" practice match this afternoon • %  < th* Barbados Aqua... Club TO nioifow and Saturday Ihero will be mati he* iwlween teams fr whom the West *" public and the actions of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control. t>f which he is the head, are kept os Kremlin secrets. If Mr. Nunes thinks so. I a.n willing to lead a campaign to bring home to him the error of such thought What has become of the £30.000 profit from the 1950 West Indies' tour? Is Barbados' £2.000 poor relation pittance still being withheld from them in reproof for bout the legality of the disposal of the funds? What 1 the rest" Has it 1 been Invested dre Askeid Withdraw Decision To Quit What is being planned bv the West Indies Cricket Board ofConwy • 4 I 'J IF/^JI. i u .. Mr„J. M Kidney said that he trol for the beneflt of future West LtinDire J\SKe4l WltfltiraW was keen advocate of sport and Indies Cricket now thai they hav ^M in view of the fact that they would more funds than they ever had? have to select a team for the first All these are questions that the time to play against one from West Indies Cricket public want Jamaica, they must get then to know and which nnv .>ih mi hl !" c 1 K""""" 1 <-';cket club further reply fromthe Empire Club askinR them to recon*£* '—* %  "* •*" 2' „'-" !" i"~& He felt that the Empire Club I shall give readers of this column s step was taken after Mr. bers of the Empue Club and he was sufficiently sporting and good the personnel of the team in a few wncn linn! word comes from sider their decision. bers J M. Kuiney had suggested that did not think they were going to enough at heart to withdraw that Mr. F A. V Williams, the Emwithdraw That was the impresletter and rome back into the com pirs representative on the Coun. sion he gut and he believed that petition til should report back to his club the Council were placing Mr Mr. Williams said that his Club asking them to withdraw then letWilliams in a very invidious posiwas having a meeting that verv ter in the interest of the game lion. He would however like Mr. night and he would tell them ail The matter was adjourned until Williams to tell them on what that was said. this evening. grounds his club was withdrawing Mr. D II. L Ward said that aAfter the Secretary had read the from Ihe first division competition far as the rules of the Association lette* slating that the Empire Club and on what grounds his Commit, were concerned, the Empire Club. was withdrawing from the first tee took that stand. having decided to division competition this season. Mr Williams pointed out to the elation a letl< Jamaica. The provisional fixture allows for six games—three colony games, one Colt's match and two club fixtures. The Council of the Barbados Amateur Football Association have accepted with thanks an rite "the AssoorTpr f,ul Mr Wllkcs of the Lodge ,lhdrawal from School to supervise the trainln B ol The Selection Committee U th R.A.F.A. will select these twenly-four players in another few days and will commence trMning at once Mr. G. Rocheford said that the Council that he had no authority the first division, they would have twenty-four players from whon rules of the Association pointed to withdraw the letter. He said IO withdraw from the other divs. the colony teams will be selected out that the six strongest clubs that the decision was arrived at al rums as well must play first division football their Annual General Meeting With regard to Mr Hutchinson's Empire he said was one of the owing to the terms which were remarks saying that the Empire six strongest team*: and he did not made by Pickwick C C. Those Club had insulted the Association think that it would he right to terms he reminded the Council, he would say that if he was th. allow thorn to withdraw from the were termed by some of their Spartan representative and had first division and play in the seemembers us outrageous. i. n > Ihing to do with the Sparta i ond nnd third divisions. He felt Some of the members of his club Committee he would also see that that if they did not withdraw their said that they played football for Spartan withdrew from the eni.tV], they would not be able to the sake of Ihe game and with the tire competition. Unlike Empire play in the competition this year hope that the Association might he would have seen that thev had Mr. A F Ishmael said that acmake some money which might become affiliated for the season cording to Rule 5 of the Associacome in useful at some future date, first lion, any club withdrawing from for the purpose of sending a team Every person who had spoken lo the Association during the playabroad and that they might be inhim with regard to the last do. ing season was liable to a fine of eluded in that team. cision of the Council said that they 10/-.. He also said that the BarMr F. St. C Hutchinson felt had made themselves the laughing bodos league consisted of three that the Council was grossly Instock of the community, divisions and that Empire would suited by the stand which the Em. He was reliably Informed that not be able to ploy in Ihe second puc Club had taken because they other clubs were most anxious to iind third divisions if they were had made their letter known to the withdraw, perhaps, for reasons withdrawing from Ihe firs' divipublic through the Press and in better known to themselves. non doing so, were asking (he public After further discussion, the Mr. Hoyos appealed *6 the to support them tn a decision Council decided to await the replv Empire representative to withagainst the Council. from the Empire Club. draw their letter. It was felt by Mr Val McComie said he was The Council agreed to terms bymany persons in oublic life lhat sorry that Mr Hutchinson had the Finance Committee with lh the step taken hy the Empire Club waited until that late stage to Pickwick C.C for receiving was a hasty one. He knew thai it lenrn a little about ethics and morKingston C.C football team here would take a bi,i man to withdraw alily and that that new attack to play a series of games near! anything and he believed that Mr. Williams was big enough to do Vi hat a 8 on Today "'oun of Grand Seseler.-.— It an a.m. Police Courts— 1* Him Meeting af Ihe SI Peters Vr.itry—I 3* p m Spelghtatown Boys' School Sport* 1 10 p m Basketball — Lyneh>. Sec ondsry School vs. Jamr* Street Boy Scents — at Harrison College—5 p in Police Band gives open air eoneert al Parrj Sehoil. si i u. v 45 a nv CINEMAS I maiir ( hrlalas-htf t'alambai H.S. i i %  *...•• af Doakl" '•>*, %  <.> .n4 !... al Tfc. rnaar-tarM" Cleu oXMiaUoa): •*'•• al Ta Waal" v....... "Tka llMli Hf -f ASSIZE DIARY Btex vs Clarence Barker. Rex vs Herbert llulaon, Angus Muma nd VMni.ri.i Layne. The Weather TODAY Sun Rises: a.ftS a.m Sun Seta: i, in p m Moon (First quarter) April II Lighting: i. ::u p n High Water: 6.18 a.m 7 31 p.m. YESTFRDAY RalaJall (Codrlngten) Nil. Total for Month to yesterday .73 In. Temperature (Max). 87.5 F Teanaperature iMini 74.t *F Wind Direction (9 a.m 1 f. 13 p m E N E Wind Velocity 14 mile* per boor Barometer (I a m ) 3.017 (3 p m ) 2* 943 Ostss v.. * %  < %  > M.< n HI HO sss RrH D 1 PSler Par731 Yellow a Wid ia sue >• • %  esane in Yalhtw n D O U %  filler '.',... T* 4 %  Pt-inU.1*4 n+4 D i nut Iltsrcnrir 1SS V.llo. -. tstuswi 1 t. it-%  n n ; w.. i:„ i H_.. .1 in Vrllow n 1 ... IS rd r n %  OSFM geai..,. 13S YtRe • n 1 Mow hl.,,1 ie> H..I D 1 S.l.l.-l S41 VPIIO* n Ml1 -t 1*1 Had '. 1*4 V*llo* c K :• Ui11.. .... I'lmifl l*i Had I 1 J % -.I. M.,h,wK its Yalloa,' c I %  3 ru> ii....j-1 Dountlau sn llpd r c K 11 3i p-mo Kse M.. v -i-, Cdnl its Yalkr* c Scamp its Rod K I OfehMM ui YclloK I Vainooar Kran Daa 1.SS M. 1 Onal 193 Yellow I : %  <"rulill.i • •lwi.144 Ii. J Q C Rogut Gnnl lee Yaltow NI Tltr follow inc dn lot RcfatUts: "Ui hafjlla, Auturdav ii HI Air %  has tract, fWl SMh April BANNISTirP. the Trinidad !" '"" %  ""= "I** .mvs. p,eim,„,a,. U Ihe InM colonial championship sterling held un June 28 and '() will i and f July 5 and 7 The pro„ LSi^itr^.K.-Js !" !? ^KiDavU. visiting lady champion was beaten two sets to .. H Eldores Kapp. Jamaica cruiniploti Over 700 people witnessed the games.

Aral and indip.niv>bl*> irauUlle ol Happlrxwa la a claai ronacionca GIBBON I A COSBBJBJI a SONS. i oi ii \vi\s € I I IS CLOSED lor the Summer Season There's a SISCO Pamt jot evetu put pose . SISSONS BROTHERS I. COMPANY. LTD SIM rAINfa Sioikfd by T tarbarl Ud Plai'tMloni I.ld Carln h Co lUrbudu* lUopriiln. Coltou racUry. N. B HowaU. O W. IfntrhlnOn Co. Lid. T J Srl>. Canlrjl rpiinciry lid WiUini Co.. Manning b OBUd.. C f* Pncfia. ST CO.. Ltd. ir-d u.r Boo. H.rdwaia C IUI 8ACKA6AM/ i^ ...AND SO #^> THE BIM>S FRIENDLY FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION To-day's fixture:— Westerners "B" vs. Penrode i St Leonard's. Referee Mr. O. Graham that. Mr. O. S. Coppin had spoken with som said that ht p of the mem. Traffic lion*. No. 23 • DO NOT FORGET TO DIP YOt'R IIFADI.If.il is WHEN MEETING OTHER VFHK I.FS AT NIGHT. • Space made available by CANADA DRY for Safer Motoring. should be launched at the Empire month, subject to confirmation c,u b from Jamaica The team is due He reminded Mr Hutchinson to arrive in Barbados on Mav 18 was the introducer of a and will play games as follows which succeeded in reMonday May 21 vs Colts. Wednesday May 23 vs. a Club team. Thursday May 24 First Colony that h motion scinding a previous decision of thi Council and he himself was guilty of insulting the Council which had Game, Saturday, May 28 2nd made that first decision. Colony Game. Monday, May 28 He counselled Mr. Hutchinson vs a Club team, Tuesday, Mav 29 not to wax so warm on the matter 3rd Colony Game and said that he was happy to sup. The team is expected lo leave on port very strongly the stand taken Mav 30. jn the Empire Club because he felt Mr. A F. Ishmael was appoint that it had a very salutary effect ed to act us a member of the Scinsofar as the Association was lection Committee dining the ebcoiu'crned It made the Associasence of Mr. S. O'C Glltens whr lion the laughing stock of the com. is in Trinidad iniinifv anitrthe responsibility was The Council approved a motion entirely Mi Hutchinson's. hence that Mr. G Wilkes be appointed lority of the blame should to coach 24 players in preparation for the Jamaica tournament DM I to him. JThcv 11 Do It Every Time OQUATWELL WAS SCARED By MIS DOC INTO TAtfNG OFF 30 POUMDS-" P.g ME ALSO TOOK OFF TO THE TAILOR'S^ ^aW-S -~ By Jimmy Hado .PuTey MOW HE'S PUT 8AC< ALL THE TONNAGE PLUS 15 POUNDS BESOES-SOO-O. WHERE DO WE GO PROM HERe? ...AND SO WELCOME foil relief for stuffed up note.' YIJ ONCI A0A:N Vici.s V.i iro in I is avail.ihlr at cost shops? CIOV* TOU CAN MtVCNT the dcvtlc^. i.K-nt ol many colds hy u* ng '. :cks VarinMHl at tlc (nit wullleor loeise. NOW TOU CAN Clli.3 Co!J'Clsgged :..— j. sc--onds itli a lew drops of VKXS Va-tio-nol up each nostril. V/KIN SrarrV NOII s,..is *I t, Vai-o-nol Ins you I %  sathe — and slatrl "Jv%l a few o'rops up ct.S nostril" Wvi f!9CKf


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UllKslMY M-HII 12. 1951 I! \RII\IMIN \II\IM \ II I'Ac.l CLASSIFIED ADS. TCLCFMOM* 1IM IMIM. TIM Cfcarga for Banns. Marriage*, WpM and In tlflO en week-da yi and tl SO lor *n. o.unMtol wi 3 feflT* par WOTO 4 rin :r. l Marriage or Engage. li m Ciim Calling iht enaige la (3 OS for any number of word. r lo (0 and 8 cents per word lor %  —Mo—I %  ** T*m> c.-r. Fk-M Mt MtwNl lin* t p.m S11J lor D-alB IN Tho,i dld'-l Deene Who dr parted Ih AM" IF* in* Infi^rnrM Orr %  • I>T. 111.'.! %  • %  — rrea-1 ihiearth hefere TW'i ilM'J l—l Ukf ami dreeiy. falnl arid HMD Through lite ill—it Ihou' aid* Bo. 1 Drar.r Husband., and Family iicii—an In loving memory ol on idi ho departed Ihi I l!ih April IMS. mink you are forgntii-it A. fou r\n wore before Klelne Sgeele tins oo court*,. .IIX.MI1 M4 E-IU •ui-i r x CAB-Moms Minor rondiiror. gnod %  -. Telephone ,174. mileage tauen CAB_,I, „,_, maftmti a Rp lt , odel. In very food order Mileagr 1BOQU Apply to C A. Proverba C a, J*n.a A UN 4 Co. Lid Phone MBS 12 • 51 An CAR—MOBBJS, OXFORD SALOON 'BOPO miles only. ItSO mode) —SI BOO Martin QtiaiUv Gibb* pnrn Dut'M-40'. 1J.JI In PIBLir \l l I V I'lRiii HULKS U AMI II rm-s^sjv-—= : I've list sa .'%  -I.,. %  %  tdoy*. -dd.f III III M Ml* I A MM Ml NOTICE Aoei--,i:uri. are invited tor the ( %  >%  ol Setreia,, at the aareBga.. n Mr „ a MeSj IKNH. S.s-.tatUi. I The S-Urr allnched I. m. lei *' ner mor.c. and (he •uceeeal u apoiicmt would be reau'red lo take *',.'*" J" 1 H h •* %  •* AD "' '•> %  V Appjestt-BB aho„le be add re-, d F *>esle. last. UvoMorH oak*-. Livestock Suuon. St U H n<. • b. 4 p.. REAL tSTATE %  UNHALOWMaw Oarden.. ronfoe. war, envenien •ponae tnn advert taerr,,.., fo t j,.,. >e to •toithai the V< LAND-lie* fd I*r>e. Shiderlown. t,,-ih dwaHinc heuee iboreon. B BBbi E t m, on i B p H niaaa) to MM B Duwnie al Corner • %  was: in. public competition a '"net. on rridn, Itk AprU &f Hutctiinaon A ftanAr XI I.M M\ -MAh \-i "te.l*.. liar eapenence M uexiahle ADulicaiiotn aliould be aubniitlrd H < %  -.. aerMrre and encloalim i-f aae br imonisla and a recent %  aaapart a uhotxsreph and ihould be aAa'eaae> lo Meean Da Coata A Co Lid P •/ Box 1 Brldset wn Iti Hlied rHAMCM II %  UePflRIV baaaM in. thn •tandine or, o Cont*ii.,r.c MlACcXLANFOrS CAJt-MiUman. 10 Car. runnins order Owner ft Km* 13P3 CAR-Mor.i, Mlror Saloon 1 Ml leas, 1SOB0. ve,, mml BBM %  CV. Appl %  S P Fafhill C o R A G. ChallMKK CAR-Ch.vrulet Maner 4 iJ-IJJ. in K^Od order Price btOBOB DL.1 BS-IIB. 10 4.31—in '-AA-One Citroen IS HJ" rendition done onlv ]SBB K ABB 0B. Apply, ttde. H i IBJ 1 e TIIIPrire Aaancapa Lid NOTICE BYE niCTlOM V .. Pariah of St A.NDRFW -* panon baeiBdl b.. at Ihe election of pt I rnembam in ihe (Je-.%  • noi, tot the Paiith o( 1" Andrew in ihe place at D. A Pmi dereaaed. I Itnreby notify my Inlrnllon I Ublns a poll for the delerrmnat.on I Ihe saM election on Monday neii n lath day of April Itfll al Ihe Alie>-i School. Bellep'ame beginning; b vat It. with lam pi an. •pares, A. Damn A Co. Lid. "iTTI1a*-| ONI Hi Ova H P three phaae lo|aJK encloaed induction motor One 111 Flwltch board fully Sited One >S inch delivery Lee HoweU> cenlnfugal pump A.I In condition "aa good a" nowPrice two Ihirdi il 3i Kullng marhet price Reply Bo XVI B/a Advocate | 4 M-*n. Oi idav the ) % %  „ nu at 1 p *" "*"* %  N It h p ?o .Snare,. rUrbado* Firo In %  IS Share*. Bnrbodni |aa B Lot nodi CM 31 J-; Rarbadoa Q, .. Romanc. I tTAfTWAt WI %  Dialaan> IIOI Mx Tt'HKXVS B -in ll> Appl. ORIPN DRAflON RI1TAVRA.VT Rioa.1 Street. Dial 3tM. l'* SI If l Chamber Dissatisfied AUCTION T7 1SORAM. SneeifT jnd irnin* oft"., .-i 10 4 51 --t, UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER NOTICE leu is lrEHcnv r.rviN ihai nAnnual Ooneral Mrellng of Ihe wins .HI be held on Monday. rd April IBBI. a' 4 SB p m nl Ihe Ren • terad OfAce. S *.,„ street, for ih (at Receiving the Report -v tee of Man age men! aiu Account for Ihe p.l rreaa... %  lectlng OnVerM-nage. ihe CUmnillle and before Ihe Meeting By Order of the Commute. C W RaWVgSL ItF.rRKiCRATOR Cro.ley Rhelvadoi Refrigerator 13 cubic ft. in good worM log order. Jiial beei completely nver< l-inied What orTert" Ppr pertHxlar' Phone3TI0 II4BI n LIVESTOCK COW—One Ouernaey Cow giving 33 pie milk. .Pirrt calf). Apply I. l> li, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch. lB.4.51-3n ~a < -5 OTM55ftW ^,55J5SW'-'-i j FOR SALE CRUSHED STONE AND FINES. IDEAL FOR CONCRETE. AND MAKING ROADS AND PATHS ASBB|| J N. HARRIMAN 8. CO. LTD., SEAWELL. MILCH OOAT. "Sally Louralor". Ree lo AM Apply S 0 Shinner. "Uu.a>i". Rock lev Terrace or Da Coita A Co., id Phone UBO or lltf If 4 91.-1 f n MECHANICAL MISCELLANEOUS Tea BATHS — In Porcelain Bru While. Oreon. Prtmroee with grade. A. BARJ4IS A Co.. Lid Ml.flt-tf n. CROQUET sc.Tn.,.,,1 and couipped al Harrlaoni Sports Drpt Ploor IB *>ai—: NOTICE PARI4H OF CHRIST HI m it Sealed Tenden iMarked on ihe envelope "Tender for ." will ne received by me at m %  office up to 4 OH pm. on Tiieeday. ITth April, IB1I lo.Ihe aupplv of ihe following commodillev lo be delivered al Ihe Chriit Church Almehoiiee in .uch quantities and a> •uch lunoa aa Ihe Hoaid of Guardian* hall from lime lo lima dUtCt — IA1 I1M MILK The amount ol milk requiied k approximately .1.0BB pint, per pint and the Board reaorvei Ule riShl to accept ihe tender of more tt.a one person for ihe lupply of |ku Hem Tenders mutt be accon, panle>l by a rortlBi •igned bv Proclllione. i which Ihne free d SI quiillued that the can la it milk Is supplied Tuborculosit. i IRISH "in M> FRSgH Ml AT PROVISIONS %  nciiMunr— Unit to be tendered (or Biaculta per carton r...iBtale grade* per bag <> %  ISO lb* Dour per hall bag ol OS lbs Cornmoal per half bag of %  lb. Sugar iRlate trradei per bag M Soap, n Split Pean per li .|f Rail Pork per lb. Salt Fish per Qntl. CofflTee per lb. Oat riakea per lb. Riigo per lb. Tapioca per lb Oh Boa h 101 Rjt< D s-le U . c BKAVKril Blind'Corners Removed For Ihe last four years tht D'M'-'i'lniMit of Highways Transport hu s widenci i %  cads throuftiout the island ani also improved Ixiids Then wrT* eifthi s Ucll mst.uK-r. b IH7—48. a similar Bmounl u I4tl—49. oleveni in 194-1 SO illhl three so far In 1930—51. In 1947—48 ;. nortion i( Ih, Government House wall oeck to make the rvejdwat fH-l ide A WmB wa. demol Bber] ill Country Road and .in >pen swale left The wall at St liarnabos. Junction with Highwaj 5. was set back. A wall to the %  ro|>erIv of Sej View on Hiuh wav 1 wan also .et back. The cornet ,u Cark. were both set back. During the 194Rin w.illwere set back at thai Hi r. testa Hill—Deighlona Road }uiW '.inn. at the corner ol Bairncl Road with Hiahway 2 and thi road improved at the comer or Deighton and Bnilon k Hill footpath was constructed t>' land al Magazine Lane atw Highway I, below the Merit.. Asylum was Improved. Hi..From parr i it in.. .il'.--. CURTAIN FITTINas—For smart winlow atyllng, light control, Valances ana irapenes. By Klrscb. Dial 44T4 A iiARMSA A CO.. LTD. I1.I.SI—4X FREF. aiFTA ntlX for your Mkaag on Thursday vril. Friday I3ih. .m Saturday 14th. A An* art of (our colourful Keosurlng Spoons given FTtCB with every % %  .irchasr t>( One Dollar or over, C. W. ilUTCHTNSOf* Co.. LBS. Ilroad Street. W 4 SI—to. properly qualified peoons Killing ib. In 1949—50 property was put chased at Orange Street Speightstown for a ear IJI; The curve nt the lundlon o! I Chance Hall and Round Rock Rnudf.' were Improved. Curvewere widened at Balls Cornet and Spring Hall. Junctions al a*JJ* Watches, Fairlield am' Itoadh were 1 m proved. So far in 1950—91 the i irvr peilormance ol Ihr h fc |>pf!n wldcnPd al I !" | (oa(J near St. Giles Bovs' School and '" da-control Firewood per I E ASHBY. Poor law Ouarduiii*. Chu.1 Church. I0.4S1—Sn. the) Flint Hull Road approximately loo that pruOtb in UM H trade had Iwcu | While ihe trade .uuld c.iii ri%e ihe nuik u|i, rr.iuled on %  |M-i ill, i H nis (he.. ...n.-tl lli.il by and large the mark unallowed ur.-e not unreajMiii able. Tlila did mil mejii lhr were 'ontiilj'-iil ini-r the stale of Ihe trade. In month, pfMea ol ajagafl lurtl ware Urni* had soaretl >IIIIsiderahl> .ml %  eSMkl '•> man ilrini WCN now hrmr ,,.IU al price* lar below re|ilar'nn>iil value A Berlou* fall in the vr.lunir nl lu ffggj . M liouml lo lake place and .... n>< | I Bnaei iiinliiiu..ll% n-m; It,...-nil was Hi.i a ralr ol prohl which mithl he atlruo.u, ..( Bswawajfj would before lung, prove in ...i-in.u, The lonillHMo mended Ihai itfsni should be lenioven fin pm control and. referring tinfiarda ire h included .. •"..muriended fee h %  chedMaa whole range of | trade. Th. Hion hat] altered BO leXUeali) lulj lySl) when th,I:, i that he considered. |n csu of tineonmuniu ;he Government' di—contiol |1 tit,. %  a I one. Cut's Views \..i ('tear Mi Alk na i, 1 Oovtnunaai pointing ew thai il i (.ovetmneiit'. .. ; IH publtshad in ware not ul leai Thev wan imlikal) I %  than ttta on ... i otislfiarad the mattei % %  i ., %  %  %  ... t J %  < Commilto They ahould Iti make n clear ftatemeni %  pottcy Indicating that the itep,, • of thiCtwunlttta would be In I' > %  urnpermiMed Hi thai ii lucri .i itab rneni >l pol wcr. publlihed it M I.I.I thai led to the Cmtroatei <>i Bupp %  to adjU5t rnarfji rnoeended by Hi,, i .,.,,., i Gov-STfluc Foot a> I'rum rage | %  %  the unl lee m ordi loinl inttresi can I I I PrW juu g would agree with inn, thai Jamaicans BUT • MJ3 muit work out n ii n and (>e p md'i fmu ire foundation i and that the achieve%  %  %  " Jamaica depend patriotism and a common devotion Igfreet needs of Jamaica — %  %  i %  i ,i . .ode a witness by %  >< nig avl* %  rlmlnal ttai i iti •Id hr In which Gi %  < %  mi' during the icanng of ihe application for umnvaaaaa. whan answering quok i • inou, nen box. "I consider his mt i ijstworuai and lit nifllclenl" said tl %  Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay M V 1„ I,, ,. M roe llei i urtbboe. arhnoner ludalpia. Schooner t.ydla Adlna H. Bchooitet W..„i.n M v T H Radai M.nnel W.ilHah,-, Schooner T.irtle r>... M V Wll a. • | I 'omtnlca Capi Cot 1 Oulc h f-'i" 'Mdi ii 1 M V l>i*.-oe. MM tOM i %  Kled Ma FlM ""'. TBB4 lor. LtU t.„.. ETv %  %  BQLUjr DAYUTX MOVIT. SCHElJf %  cue. good order. F1U. Crtr rTtannasj. KVX'URtM Here al '..•< The aBIUl Ihat Klddlrand Grown-upnhliiwill hrve BUDOVPH TH RXD-SOR* HFINDEER al Harrison'. MuUDept Other (avounle. Include Mambo J^mbo, klona Lsaa and Sam's Song Extension ft 12.4.51 .—tin. REAL ESTATE JOHN M. Ill ADON A F •.. r.v A. Ftepreaentatlvr: r.rit \i i> WOOD TYtwrB/RrrtJl RIBBONS A CARBON APER Frr-r\ •loch 'uil received, get VXNXTIAN BLD4D9. Kltafh I all maUl UeUuie Vaneiun bl.nda. -icdalivarr %  wat A UAlOiCb A Co. i-W Dial 1J.1.S1— FOR SALE here has pome on the BBaFBBJt of Reot-h Ft.*erat Bachslor Hall. St Jams* i. lard has a wide Be.rn iitago, one of Ihe beat entrance vee in Ihe Inland. A >ane .iveeue ol Caeuiinaa. la well nted with ntt* Realdet F.fooee Mlnistar. Emmanuel Shinv/ell that he was looking into the suggestion in .njiinctton with head* of the three nervicea. "1 am attracted b> the idea" ^aid Mr. ShinwelL and prospect of recruiting men from the colooles. A tabour M P rfnunded him that ther* in,000 men In Jamaica alone with service exaerieoce. The scheme would be for a board of examining officers to tour thr Colonlal Empire. Capable of chocking iruallncalions of recruits an*, iheir medical fitness. A* preen: oiu of the drewbacha of recruiting u that a man has to present himself in Britain and then nand* the risk of being rejected for lack of education or med qualifications. Jamaica Urges Trade Commission Service In U.K. titoin Our Own Correspondenti KINGSTON. AprU 11". Jamaica's House of Representative* unanimously adopted Mr N. W. Manley's resolution today railing upon the Gove'nmenl loj lake a lead immediately In the establishment of a British Cartb bean Trade Commissioner Bet vice with the United Klngdoo mid Canada and other step' 'owards federation of the BritUh West Indies with a responsible government. The decision was taken during i special meeting of the House | ailed by Manley to discuss the trade situation in relation with ihe United Kingdom-Cuban pact and both Manley and Bustamante were unanimous ui indicting Britain for neglect of her Cant* bean interesU. Bustamante said "If we are held in captivity we shall seek a way to escape that captivity." Manley said that It was time the West Indies decided whether they .-ould remain dlgunlled co'or.tes r go forward to and on the r wn feet Both partieg agreed that If any other colony is reluctant to |oln In the move for the Trade Commissioner Service, at the confer rnce to be held in Barbados in May in connection with the Hogional Economic Committee Jamaica should seek the cooperaon of any willing colonies and it rmne. go forward on her own The Minister of Social Welfare Mr Donald Songster speaking lor ihe Government informed ihe House that Jamaica all along look ihe lead in this matter and was the first colony who lam yeai included provision in the esU mates towards such ( *ervicc Such a fund was provided for ir this vear-s budgr*, lothe unc mirpose but the maat-r has been neld up in other colonies pari.ctilarly Barbados and Guiana. rldanc i I >% irdlng B the opp ..,. Mi n ,\ aTcathfirm i WeatiV rhi thai ioina Itemi ihould I trolled) ha luXUT) items BhOClld bfl pnara alkiwad tc I bigger supply .,f the chi i • be nblained. i-mplaii %  an i .. i %  %  %  %  -.::.I %  % %  ess bin relief %  *• nBturall) reaeoned, i | tha pn "''it '"' oln r > ''" %  %  '* was one ti' tha things for which 'he> had Ihamaali More money the drug biuintm employ responsilil, hrewr> • C8U ** th^y ha have been m Chinese were included In ihi^^pi^ bv chine-*. force Contact was made when irreun KebeU left no dead on the tan made a wnall attack louround after the attach on Tssnlii) i ?^ RuaBI north of LssV American bulll Trench bomb hiu >esterday dropied high ex,:rned report? last ni,ht ploaives in Binhlu about 40 mile. %  • %  >f iJiichau %  rnh rabaai bad Imhad rtsaeh armji reported that 1 I'hinesv who crossed Ihe itTOBg Kucrilla activity wag conutei on April I The bnk up litiuing In the northern part ol % %  about 30 miles northwest oi the Thaibmh dica aliout 30 mileLitesBBPJ i sat of Hanoi — Rrswr. M>\MI>mM MUill. u.n i drawn to ihe f .n i Pricat (Defeoce) lAmendMl, No. which will be pubhshe.1 in the Official I Thursday I2lh April. 1931. iti-ter this Order ihe maximum wholesale and retail selllr : Cornn.cal". M >) Me||o-Kreem Brand" and Cement" ore as follows: — ARTTCLE (c) Mell.-K(, Hrand WMDI.I (nol more than) TO ',1! ae lbs 12.33 per 5 lb tin 53c. per lb lin I.ETAII. rmcF. (nol more thin* 58e. per Ib or less than h lb. 4 Vac per or lee. per lb. or legthan u lb. 44c. Dcr ot. i12 08 per has of M lbSHIPPING NOTICES MONThFAL. AUSTRALIA NKW ZRALAND LIN1. i r.iui n tM ANZ LINE. Cargn -. m ||,||, n :•"": •*'" lr"r.lrn,e.,t '". n-iiieh oinana. Fi.inn.i MM leeward lalniids Tot f.nlhrr p.ntl,. i Bsssti VUIUNBIHSS, WITHY CO. LTD. u, Da COSTA V 0O l H, IM I %  ( .. T, u n wr ftwt* %  M V -HoBMhaVwill vieeen" >"•' Ittaaen^et. lot D. A'ill|ii> Mi.nl.en i aejlng Mnndax IBtn in.lint The MV C.,ribhee' .ill aceepl Cargo and P.^aet.p.%  %  A HI. %  Mo„1 BBttl *' Kit*. a*tUpg 11 "i ^ pn, %  %  TUX. *MT a w i Nr.K owmRt ASSOC INC NEW %  "Chiruh %  s.ila ssnl Slaejner sail. no. April. KKHVH'R i undo. Itn Apill jtn\BswsskaM mn April. Alt I NKW ORLEANS SERVICE mivBB B...lkHlo4ii. April %  "• *"> Apill AfflVN Bailietloitih April CANADIAN s'li'iNam so Naaia al *M, '1 "ALCOA PVNNANT*' B. ALCUA PARTNKR" AR..IVPB April I %  >i nil-in • "AIAKM taJOASBgf/i AICOA PIONCBSB' April llh Sail, lor Si. April no. Bail Ports PM BV Join. M Lowreuve RflHKRT THOM LTD. — NKW YORK AND OCLF SERVICE \rriA D\ COSTA .t co, LTD—CANADIAN -IIIVI.K trials. Sis, tins, rubl aclectcd minings The MacArthur new* wan received quietlv inul pt'iduced little reaction in mark. I ncupltsl with budget tlel.tilln the lorelan section J-P:ie*e bonds were marked one point hitch. would like %  iiuon of ark-up Mobilisation ORIENTAL SOUV ENIR. CV RIOS. JKWaXS New Shipment opened THANI'S CAIHO, April II Cairo newt D4 pi i \i \ii..m today that Kgyptun BUthoiiUei South Afnei.n gold producerwere studying a set* rstcorded useful gains and firm eral mobillsatltin in thi ar;-et existed In diamond, ana an cmergenev The newspaper ppe-s Government fund* howadded Ih;:". ;i ipedal law %  cr *>f Iractinniill;. lowei with Kencr.il rnobtlleatlon would —Keuter r. Keuter. MAIL NOTICES n Qaraanla w -m i. seal Pri.t Olnte as under I i Mail M I Ordinary M.11 .-.i |n ,„. on the Itt I Ai-il IBBI %  %  will oe i-loot J . • 1. . ; ,1 il iS pn TO-DAY i Ai.iii ikoi %  1 oalpha will be cluaed at .-i.. %  .•. mam Mail an.' SMI -I i.apit. T"-DAY HI" April 'KM Mails lor Par.mafibo u. t>~ M V Daerwood will bo closed al Ihe General Post Office aa ,,-ln Partel Mai. Ilr.i.1. r !" t Mall an' 1 It> IIAV ITIPASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products, Limited. Roseau. Dominie., for sailing to Europe. The uual por of call are Dublin. London. 01 Rotterdam. Single fare £70, usual reductions for children. tVBBIABUBta *•*• o. car. i.l1 •* a lew o e%Bess1 LOOK YfH'l.l. .*#:#;#* Till SI. i. \KIII \ B08B—>4" and y," > .Ainu s IIOSF. riTTisr.s (.ARDEN SHEARS TRCCK JACKS GREEN CANVAS—" FRICTION TAPE PLASTIC LEATHER CLOTH NUMBER PLATES & DIGITS TOM VALVES—Tier* nnd Car LICENCE lltll.DERS Kl Mint MATTING III IB VII W MIRRORS WIMISI 111 IN WIPKRS (ViKii.iiii) COOL ( I'SIMON c.\s TANK LOCKS (Iniili.l, and Ami'rican Car>) HAM) SOAP CHBOME CLKAN'ER I.I II M 11 llllll \ll\l. OILS AIIE MM ||V TEST DONT ONLY Oil. IT -OEIIM IT




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PACI n WJIIUH.S itHM>l Ul llll KMl\Y M'llll. It 1M1 iiENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY BY CHIC YOUNG ( I CAM'T WT£ £41* y* WHEN NOJ |ral PINCH MY CAR * P ^ SO TIGMT, „ 1 1 r3^ jisSPP* •'. (Ml f^Tad s li iij^ ^vr made by rpllEIK good look* tell you they're juaj right. Yon kaow, loo, when you look at the price lag. ihdt \ou can't gel finer value. Illustrated ia Tan Pnnrhed Oxford. Tied to every pair iiti. Mm White Guarantee Shield—the tiga which means 'jutt right'! Look for it hi lending -Lufin Barbadot. JOHN WHITE means madejustmght\ TH-IAV S MWS FIASI SAXOPHONE IflDt E b Allo. B b Tcn C MeM> CLARINET HEI.DS lk,Eb GOOD 9EIOND HAND SHOT GIN* JOHNSON'S STATIONERY and HARDWARE '-* irpiit.iT^.!-ijL WE SPECIALISE /> HICI/CLASS MSRIMB S ADVOCATE PRINTING S and S Truly the Finest of BUM So Mellow in a highball So Smooth in a Cocktail It is simply Superb. Try It and you will be convinced. ST! Mil & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. Ilfadquarlers IK BEST RUM IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEGAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY Boi. JEFFREYS BEER 26 PRUNES Pc I lb pkg 48 NOW USUALLY NOW %  U TINS TRIN'D MARMALADE 36 St 12 OVAL-TINE BISCUITS 48 12 BRIDAL ICING SUGAR 36 MOIRS CHOCOLATES 10 XI 2 pks. i.l D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street SCHOOL BOOKS NEW BOOKS ELEPHANT BILL by Lt.-Col. J. H. Williams VENUS THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskine SHAW by Desmond McCarthy ISLANDS OP THE SUN by Rosita Forbes THE EXPLOITS OF ENGELHKECIIT by Maurice Richardson CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHTING ROYAL READERS 3. , ROYAL SCHOOL PRIMER WEST INDIAN READER I 2 ADVOCATE STATIONERY T ''** \ U'XURY #1IJ T SOAPS IMPERIAL lAATHLH • I WW M BOVRIL gives you Ihe extra vitality to i-i-sisl INFLUENZA ixsi'Knox n\n XEED XOT BE WOHHYiSG I IMF, Tin ~ BUS un Chevrolet FIRE EXTINCUISHERS AND LOTS OF OTHER F.SSC1T1ALS ECKSTEIN BROTHERS Par 8tmt DM u1



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tl W Alt I III It President Truman relieve! Cen. MacArthur of commands mm* || United Naliom forces !" % %  .av.nce acaimt oppoaiUeji ar j||||; m Herb. Morrison lay Britain m\WWr,.* rcidy to ne 0 |i all ceaie-fire CANADA Nc-w budget ihows taxes juniD sixteen per cent TRUMAN SACKS GEN. MACARTHUR Ridgway takes over commands THE GENERAL DISOBEYKD. / foil? the U -K. Ready 4 I UlkUAliS IMMPKMMMl A GREAT idihljry parade wi> held of Orsek ImUpud.'PCP Day . wliti tin* tomb oi the Unknown Warno, B Atlim, receetly \t Kins 1'JUI took lha celahrstlon %  *h.i.> from PRESIDENTIAL ORDERS WASHINGTON. April 11 PRESIDENT TRUMAN early to-day relieved General Douglas MacArthur from all his commands The President said he concluded that General MacArthur was "unable to give his wholehearted support" to United States and United Nations policies President Truman named as MacArthur's sue cessor Lieutenant General Matthew B Ridgway at present Commander of the United States Eighth Army in Korea General MacArthur was appointed Command er in Chief, United Nations Forces in Korea, in July, 1960, when the Security Council authorised the United States to establish a unified command there. Announcing MacArthur's dla laat September, embracing the missal at a press conference .it I'icMuciilial ,„ regret at the necessity far the action 1 have been cornp. I toke >n his case." The President made public a •rrles of previously atcrct directivi b tending lo sliow how General MacArthur had failed to follow the Administration s foreign P TSe included one from the Joint Chiefs of Staff to General Mat-Arthur, and oth er Command PETAIN IMPROVES fused invitation* to make i Islt. General Ridgway appointment was universally welcomed here. Observers regarded it as the completion of the breaking up -of "Mac Arthur's Empire." Heuter's Correspondent Paulj Scott Rankine writing from Washington says that President Truman it ih< ieldest act of his career to-day used his full constitutional powers as Commander-in-Chlef of the United States armed forces to dismiss one of the country's (reettMt military heroes at the petk of his popularity, The audacious removal from all his commands of General Douglas Mac Arthur staggered Washington and was bound to split the country from top to bottom in a bitter 4 : Itgg Gen. Mar Arthur next follow Extremes of pro MacArthur fortes might even call for the impeachment of Truman though they stand little or no chance of obtaining the required support in Congress to makfl this a practical proposition. On the surface. opportunities • given to the pro MacArthur Republican faction exploit the tion for poll publicity purposes and fT 1 llilc s< pur; hi i I n tm tullj breath-taking. Truman's favour were sn -.' %  %  rooted in the tradition ol the Americitn people which go to the depth tn which partisan politics and publicity however glaring could seldom reach. There was every indication in first reactions to Mac Arthur's di'nnssal thai Truman would have m.i)oi iiy of people and prob%  majority of Cougre*.-behind %  bl him Truman anchored hidecision firmly upon sections of the United States Constitution, sacred to every Amtiu-an and drafted by founders indacaboa that th %  sorrow was real. Newspaper editors commented that Japanese had real sentiment !<>i MaiArthur Australia: Dr Herl ert r'.\..' termer President of the United Nations Assembly and Labour Party leader said a' an election meeting in Sydney "whatever the outcome of this dispute, I again pay tribute to Mac Arthur who did so much for Australia during the days when we were in deadly peril from Hie Japanese. France: Socialist Deputies greeted ihc news with relief. Former Premier Paul Reynuud said the President's action solved an inter-Allied issue, and a French Foreign Office spokesman expressed "satisfaction". Great Britain %  Diplomatic quarters in London felt that rrperfrom the move went far beyond the immediate i in %  in K'.rcn ll was consid< .ol that a change in leadership Simplified efforts to makr a new and IM -ter inlned effort lo end the war. Soviet Rmala: No official reaction was available Tas the Sovle 1 News Agency reported th. chunge without comment. But bHrren regarded the dismissal as possibly the opening of n new approach for a Miiution m Korea, (in mam: In Merlin all Eaf. German newspapers gave prominence to the news and two evening papers said the mass of protests of peace loving people had forced the issue Denmark: Independent AftenhUdmt said "Europeans will receive the news of the General'* dismissal with dry eves. No (.flicial comment was available. Brlslum: Prime Minister JosI pba Pholien Just back from America said General Mac Arthur took upon himself too much authority. Holland: Tnc Netherlands Government fully supports President Truman's removal of the General, it was officially announced here The Dutch Gov. it bad brought to the attention of the American Government its "increasing concern" about General Muc Arthur's actions duiing the last lew days, India: Official circles were iupri-ed and guarded in comment wailing to sic if President Truman's decision meant a change in United States foreign policy. Bombay stock exchanv reacted with a sudden drop n* silver and gold prices and %  barometer" stocks fell sharp! New Ye.-k: An estimated 41.000.000,000 was sliced off Htck market value* in e-riy trading in Wall Street todav following the newa, Sales of so-called -wnr issues" were heavy. Observers felt lhat fierier •) ac Arthur's removal migl't eve to open the way for talks on the Korean peace settlement —Heater. For Talks On Cease Fire LONDON, April II, Foreign Secretary Herbcn Hoi rison making a statement on Korea ii. the Commons tode> said: r alms are unclmngeo. We stand for resistance to aggression, free independent and unities Kirea and no extension of the conflict" "The question of crossing the 3ith parallel cannot be [nataa apart irem other matters conc^nig Korea 'We were ready a .ew months ago to negotiate a ceasefire and we are ready now. Bui it lakes two to agree on a cease-fire' and so far the other side have shown no desire to stop hostilities in Korea "I would not heve the House think that crossing the Mth paral is the main Issue In Kear. was handed to the custodinn of Arbroath Abbey l-y unkruwa people today. Arbroath Abbey is In Forfnr.liu.-, gooUand The sua>e, crown.ng seat of the ancient Scottish Kings, has been placed on the high altar of the Abbev It was A'lth two UIHlgned letter'.. nAfl nldressed to King George VI, and fhe other to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland —Renter ALLIES MAKE FRESH GAINS: REDS TRY TO STOP ADVANCE 1LE DYEU (Off Atlantic Coast), April 11 Ex-Marshal Phtlipc Petalnhealth has "marked!v iioproved suce vesterday. h's doctor said to -day "Such a recovery would have been Impossible without his extraordinary phvsical resistance Hv doctor added. •. He pointe*! out hOWOVOT Kn Ihe "cilsls ha not yet been over c*mc". —Realer Elizabeth And Philip Arrive In Rome HOME. April II Princess Ellrabeth and the Di. of E! sevornl potntl along the Ironl line to-daj In bitl ii atom the slow but relentless I'niied Nations advance Info North Keren. On the western front southwest of Imj.\ Ann-ucm troops who crossed Sn> in ; hiver yesterday ran Into whnj was offlcially describe*"! as "determined enemy lesistance." In the same area other Amerlcilh BhfOde I aorted tutarea free of ComiCNUUltl ['r. Milt! ., %  ed a force oi Tuiklaii, American end Si i Hi Kon .. munlst tortlneatli captured SOTM tCjiupmeflt The town • %  < d i nee u the upply hub objective of t %  m ,.,, AHu'l ftmc: t..t % %  .••I 1 ;II>I! from it and west was rcpoil'd prob* _, .II from Malta for ghts private holiday. —ReuteInniskillings Reach England SOUTHAMPTON. April II. Six hundred and fifty officers and men of the First Battalion Royal Innisklllngs Fusillters arrived here from the West Indies to d.iv in the 11.000-ton transport Ollwala. --Rrgler lighter bomber* There was no fresh news today from northwest ol Vtmgpyont: where Conununi launching determined olta< k again*! advancing United Nutio'-.! K.uttr IB New Red Chiilent Divisions In Koreu Four fiaint As Visitors Crowd Ship Ii'HT-OF-SPAIN. April B. WHEN HM.C.fl Magnlflrf-ni ihn open lb dooro to Ihe pubUo over the w tkend, four persons fainted and One WSJ badjl innired, %  over 4.""" vtetton rrowdI 'I llM Ship I l.< Maillllirrlll II Barbadog on Friday. WASHINOTON, Apnl 11. Tn-1'i-r.t,gem reported to-day that 18 new Chine-.Conununi divisions have been II. uti'ii .1 II Korea bnniling the total cslimLora INelson Leaves |ated eraami strmgti. Hilly liutlin Goes To Nassau LONDON. April 11. BvQrn lefi London bj air last nieht fur the Bahamas for talks In Nassau with American businessmen interested in th< bin H-"varatinn villSyria May Withdraw Deiiiaitd To U.N.O. DAMASCUS. April II Khaled AirJm. Syrian Premier, Mid today Out Syria was willing 0 Withdraw her demand to the iecurlt) Council to consider the i. i ii-i dlspuU wi'h Ihrjel if the dtuatlon on Ihe frontier returns —Reater IXJNBON. April 11 Lord Nelson, direct descendant ol Britain's great naval hero, sailed from England for the last time last night, driven, he said, by taxation and cancellation of the 13.000 per year state pension, to start life all over again at SO — Reuter. No Conflict LONDON, April II. Emanuel Shin well, Minister for Defence declared in a speech near London to-day: "We have no desire U enter Into conflict with Communist China. All I can hope ta that the Communist Govern ment of China have no desire to enter into conflict with us." -neater. DREES TAKEN ILL TIIF. HAOI'C, April 11. Dr Willem Drees. Netherland' Prime Minister was taken ill u the firs', chamber it Parliament U-day while replying to speakers The meeting was adtoorned. Kr tit! %  r Th; vpokvsman said 97.000 ditlot'at Chinese troops had 1(^:1 Itlentllled suite List Fnd.iv F.iRhteen divisions, if at full strength, would total 180.000 men, tne army said— ReuUijPOCKET CARTOON h> OSBf-nr LANCASTER "Lady Nelson' Collides With Barge PORT OV SPAIN. April 10. 1 inn National | i 4 season, Itanpod bach takhi Ipain harbour tnis morning with her bow ripped open neai = ' NPUIIII ,<: %  leartng on reitui II trip ui Rallfag to open %  new spring cruise of the Caribbean Aboard were SO passengers who %  Ti Intdad for Canada %  ltd Caribbean ports ,ind 83 Caribbean loundd ip|H-r returning home. AeeOrttblg to reports, the lads Nelson ran into the barge value* $100,000 tBW 1 ) carrylni *I7.000 wcrth "1 UeSal oil con signed to ''ii Ali-u ternnn.il | IMsOri Tha barge sank with the whol if OH cargo, while one oi thi %  board the tug AH Matilda belonging lo the creoli Petroleum Company <>i %  was taken to hospital with botl %  ,i rut on Hi'eye I hile trying to east off the tow rope. r ,,.'-1 % %  ad ihjt temporar> tha i*d Ma'M %  %  re, wUJ inable her u % %  return trip to Ila1lfa hare full reiwilrs will be made A local in<|uirv into th) U inbald Cummans Wants Empire Council IX>NDON. April II. A Council of Ihe Kmpire on th lines uf the. t:ouncil of Eurufx as advocated in the Tunes tuda> David Garaman-, Conserve re member nf Parliament. Such a Council he argues mild be a purely consultativi iiody. which would meet In i^'" don at reaulnr lined intervals. "Sineiv iiw moat preeaini bnpartaJ problem today in ho* hold the Colonial Empire gelher The chief disintegrating force Is the impact of Coaonia 'iation.ilism which we have detberatelv fosterail as part of out end i dot itj nal |K>hc> The United State* has no' entated to hold on to the Panama Canal, and Its bases I: ho PunUr •* going lo MM hi. payroll dntoe nous go up by 30 per cent or by one iilin through the defence surcharge' on bairnlex rates, and exemption* will remain un f 20 This plus the boe*t in sale* tax may put cigarettes up four •en l* 1 I'.H age Th* iii.ii Mho rolls his M q nigl.l act a better hre ik While he t x on tobacco went up UlQ % %  vv i n cm. rrtte paiM-rs %  nd infta vu • i %  autd Clani i\-. are inchi wed. — Statement Causes SUr lit Egypt CAIRO, April II. Tea publication in the independent Al Ahram the -'authoritative" Egyptian statement that "joinl i imperotiva in time of war or threat .if war", cnuswd a stir In Egyptian official circle* to-day. The statement was attributed by the newspap-i to un 'authoritative spokesman of tinEgyptian Poiei,..n Ministry" bul v-.i-. known lo have lievii matle hv PorOttn Mlniiter Salati El D:n %  -^1111% It said '"Joint defence v as provided for in the lfl2, i.'d. win r BuOtn'i %  i % %  Only 4 daya left to get in the Advocate Year Book BEVAN WILL. REMAIN I I NDON. April II. | M [gtti i>r LoboBj Anrurio 11-vin bus made il dm 'that he will remain a member of the Government. -neou.-. Schuman Plan Is Greatest Hope Says Adenauer PARIS. April II The West German Chancellor Konrnd Adenauer arrived a' Orly Airfield today for signing of the six-nation Schuman Pi m Ha If the first Gcman Premier tn visit Pans since 1931 Members of the German mission In Parti greeted Adenauer at the Airfield The Chancellor was accom nanled by Andre Francois Poicet, Frcicb, High Commiestonci in Germany. Tieht security measures were enforced. Several hundred uniformed police took up poai • Inns at re-iular intervals alonu Ihe rout? to Paris. About 50 plain clothe, men mingled with po'iee at Orty. The Chancellor read a statement to a radio microphone "I •et foot on the soil of France u th .n.'.tio. Tin. is a moment • for me. 1 want :,) prove itu.' %  %  } %  %  1 rn aret essential hub for solution in Europe. apttea. heart und salute my The immir.ent conclusion of" the Schuman plan an idea of renltis conceived by two great | Frenchmen and Europeans— gives birth to the greatest hop-the most r bservcrs. %  it is with Joyful hjU bop*, 1 today iieie^bours.'' Those present to meet the German Chance'lor included Jean Monnet, autnor tiie Schuman Plan, Professor Walter Hallstein, leader of the German delegation to the Sehuman Plan talks, llausen. nan Consul in Paris, and g representative of the French Foreign Office Reelei



PAGE 1

THURSDAY. APRIL 11. 1SSI BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE C.C. Dissatisfied With Profits Resolution Will Go To Government THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE are dissatisfied with Government's decision not to increase margins ol proAts on goods, and al a meeting yesterday they decided to approach Government again on the matter. The meeting was rulled to consider the report of the Price Control Committee. The view was expressed that there secnied no justification for Government's decision not i.. implement the recommendations of the Committee. The Council of the Chamber it was decided. WlU Don hold a meeting at which representatives of the various branches of trades will be invited. At this meeting ii is prup Government stating the views of the Chamber. The PraaMaat, Mr. D. G LeaNow the Governmeot had said cock, was the first to address the that they were not prepared tt meeting yesterday. He laid. implement these recommendaThis Meeting has been sumnone. H was somewhat nebulous moncd lot the special purpose of ic-ading Mr. Adams' speech in the considering the report of the House of Assembly. u> And out Price Control Committee. There why. The price of goods had gone are many members here who will up in the last few months but speak on this report with special their position remained as it was reference to the various classes of before. "Are we going to wait anw AMI n "7f F jJPut' 1 M K ^* aa Be Jm BBfcs.-"iMB*BB if** C?1 pi • %  -SeSWPk \ FR11X1LTOWN NEEDft POUR OF lllisi This and -howwhat a public lavatory should look like %  cted by the Turf Club. business with which they are most familiar, but 1 intend to make a lc i.iiK'ul laafuirns tlrsl. Unsatisfactory Point 'The llrsl point which appears to me most unsatisfactory is that this report which was dated July oilier three years for it to be found out by another committee that our mark-ups are not adequate?" Mr. Scott questioned He thought that if Cover-mem were prepared to control this mailer, It was morally right for them Bus Stops Removed LREADV the Department of Highways & Transport has Mb, 1950. >.ll|l I.1111 Ill, IIIC table of the House of Assembly during last month, a delay of some 8 months. One cannot help feeling that If this Report had recommended a reduction in the allowable profits of merchants, wholesalers, and the larger retailers, rather than the removing of controll and lb* Incraa mg of some margin* of gross profit, it would liave lieen dealt with far more Mpcditiously. j reasonable living wage could be offered employees, that sharebut the BAKER NOT GlULTi OF MALICIOUS INJURE SYDNEY WALTERS, i 40-year-old baker of Oistin. reverse Church, was dischnr :oH by His Honour the Acting Chief Judge when a jury found him not guilty ol ouUkloua New Business Houses Go Up \l\\Y rasa buiidmgs are being erected in Bridgetown and its prcCUCtB and at present i. few of the Old buildings are being dcmolish...I Street, opposite I*I tww Plantations Ltd., building. • modern and altrarUva two toraj building which will house hi aassaral offices of Messrs GaidlBsM Austin & Co.. Ltd., is DO* being erected This building will be the first of its type in the island. Gn the ground floor will be the Traffic Department of TrMM CM ada Airlines and Canadian National Steamships The General Offices, such as sales. insurance i Ion, will be on the second floor. %  •trara] impingements have l wen m;ide to a two stores buud* mg. also the property of Messrs Gardiner Austin, which is situate! besides the new building When this building is complete.!, thai area of Broad Street will be the most modern part of the City At llav Street, opposite the Aquatic Club Gap, a beautiful two storey building is now balna, i m* pleted. This will house ihJu.r %  leverage firm. On ihe ground floor will be the beverage plant. tarries ot the firm Mill IH> able lo enter the building with ease to load drinks and. as with Ihe one way traffic tl %  %  > will pull out foi their unou* routes without having t Itargv Float* OVTCH POTATOES A tablrgram arriving It the 1 was warning all ships of a float inn bat Bocas da Huevo*. which was de aorlbad as being dangerous :> navigation The Qarge was in COl nBfc sa wild %  aUp in the Quit >>! Parla Bhe wa ighted by ihe Caplam 04 tl I Aleaa (llmser North, longitude Bl WeM Two of ihe steamships lying m port yesterday were noiilied Fuel Arrives Supplies of kerosene oil and gas nline arrived here flom I tha I.8.MJ ton oil tanker KuHna TinRaHaa anchored ihorl while before lotni on to spring Garden-. Black Rock arhara aba uaaan) fuel through pipe llMB running oUl into the sea The RaMnas agents are Maasrs Da Costa & Co Ltd ..ill supply of Dutch wh.*. a) In the i-land was incraased by a meagre MM crate* yesterday when tha %  al HcraMa called here i :iand ports. Other foodstuff! among bar Barbados were 1.030 I onions. 325 bags of l, 1.735 cases of evapoDg of powderad milk. 700 cartons of beer a;id a imall quantity of cheese. This carjo came frori Amsterdam. %  araDas .,i., bought MOO bundles of stave, and 280 bundle* tirg and : i from Amster%  Attorney General Of Nyasaland PORT-OF-SPADf, April !> Mi J n Hot Ms, K ( .iTnnidadlan. who recently took I rmarly Solicitor i. has been ap i>f N. holders get" a reasonable return be removed en their money and the like Som ,' '"* incidents that Surelv one side of the picture rau e ra ") c blocks arc no '" aU alone could not be taken into r f** lh '"" of wrongly placed consideration and the other dlsf 10 "* 8 ,"' "o !" "** ^"nlc blocks ifgarde.) l3j,e P lac when buses stop for Mr .1 O Tudor, wholcsjilo inspectors to board them in order provision dealer, of Hnebuck lo ^*>^k passengers for the ownStreet said that their branch of CTS trade had been the hardest hit re still a few more to injury to property valuvd .it $84.61 belonging lo Budorji ',( w| mn "It abpear, to roe most unfair &U£* ^"" Ite conUof,'. '. T^fw^Tc'.lne fl^rSaiS .-, the business community, who ,„., .... .. %  > nr o,:.., H-TIHI^I t„ , wnen -? tan n <*Turred havi ertqutntb baan accuiad of ',,*' 1*'; ,LS IS a? 10 f.' A ? he !" P>ntation. St. Lucy. iaklng excessive proAts and f'\ e ""' m J '"^ ^ T/A m 'n? l cx,ended L to '""Hsons Tenon. — cent gross on a fixed thin^ try w h c re the peasanls had their Daniel at the Court ol Crand s rday Mi it n l. Ward appeared on baWf ol Walttra and Mr. W. \V. Reece. K C. prosecuted (or the Crown —^ %  — —^—^^—^— ,\'.il:ii wttb Itac i ii mm ol %  I ind wWeh iha valued at Mm: whila hr waa al bar house ii | '; ii i.-ii Land on J ployed m thi th Kmployinenl BarbadU t local enterprise Managing Directoi is thereby 'cessary the cost of living. As the years went by the price markcanes planted, about I 40 p. The lire started at Tuesday that this Heix.rt. which entirely * iu>m we ?> UD hul *• refutes Ihf'r nccusations. "P remained the same 4ii should not have M. i (hat it had been before. They were A FIRE at Ruling Grove Plantamany months earlier. '*>t as fortunate as others with %  tion. Christ Church on Tues%  The general public does not mark-ups on a percentage basl'. day night buml eleven and a half perhaps realise that the smooth They went to the Controller find acr s of second crop ripe canes working of local price controls drew lo his attention that the This fire extended to Gibbons during the last ten years is very fixed mark-up was causing them • lantation and burnt four acres of largely due to the full wholehardship His answer had always econ( cro P r,De f BM 1" bothi hearted co-operation of the I**.,, that it was government's instances the canes were Insured business community with the policy; that Dr. Saint had laid Controller of Supplies through(jown lha lnc price, of foodstuffs this period. The (alters nBd lo ^ krp afl cn0Bp u po,,,. r hie and he could not interfere with the mark-up as laid down. Good Mark-tips They continued to press and worry him. The Government however felt that the mark-up'^ were so good that they appointed I committee to go into the system with Ihe result thai when this committee reported in July, 1950. | u therefore. Government were so asionlshed for the that they had nothing left to do port -s out task WOUld have I. much more difficult without this co-operation. Such a difficulty is far more likely to arise, if feel that they are being subjected to unfair and unreason able controls." Supply Position Since this Report had been written, the supply position as n whole had most delinitely deteriorated. He thought. that it would IK They are the property of S. T Gooding. Sailors'Rest Will lie Furniture Shop The Admiral Grant Sailors' Rest on Lower Bay Street, for many years a rest house for aaamcn. will shortly be turned into a iture store. The Mr Charles Hay M Garage (1B50) Ltd. a na*j company thai was formed last year, has opened their new Gas "i Barvfcl Station at Pinfold Street in the build:ng which form, eily housed the Y M C A This waa innovated and mod* HiUaad J^CA"!' S "SS3S 10 llVt .„„, hl b i II)( ( oim ., ,ln V| WlU) the accused lor about two |ty removed • out W a.Bi on June in the mam build""on tha IH she heard I BOIn *-n ng „,ound floor are the parts dtparlrrocn bar rratu doa she goi out moat, bsByek*, sales, paints gas rf her bed BOd "' UM OCeuaad and oil departments as well as i'h. antenna bar house. H t.-.k up new curr. showroom and the work. 1 i. kel and ttabbad her shop. rwka With .< knife \l,u-o <.>.,k The Garage also has a large <!-" llVl Rl ihe Oaroaa Land, st MichaaL nld he was at home which is now quite close to Daniel's. He haai %  noise and went |o RudOrB Bao %  i house .mil Qfnces are situated and the back -ooms are used fostores Kaagrl OaaaraJ Traders Lid., have ivnovated then building al lha .. rnar "f Haga-Jna Lane utd Roebuck Strec". This building IMW looks extremely attractive in olours of green and cream use of the renovations pedesnow have at their disposal breaking: up (ha things ,i i arldai iMa-aralk m front <>f ih t UW thing-, inbUlkUM. i.oal box and a *'"' I'"' along Roebuck Street Is ill.t gtc Hi lemamed at thi %  ** two storey building that wai house and watched the accused l r ec,cd b Mr James A Tudor. aking up the things. any articles were In free supply. nr „ni the. Ihould be decontrolled and hc r PW competition would ensure that ''"" thdr prices would be kept as low ,n as possible Bui admitting there were reamade as that Instead of being i 10 per cent gross. "_*_ as an average of 5 per cent. When the Leader of the House his statement which It was pur late chased 11)01 bv Mr E. R, Weekes. .. barbadian for the British Society Ennland. After the reth hie grounds for continuing formed them of Government's S ice controls at the present time, policy they had no %  IttniaUve il not mean thai they were satisthan to write to the Colonial fled with the present mark-ups Secretary to ask him to write to allowed. He would like to draw His Exrcllencv asking him to give their attention to paragraph 7 of them an interview. They had not the report, which stated that with yel go t a reply. mem of Mi. Weekes at the i rwl Mr. G. L. Taylor at the Court of of the second world war. Mr. Grand Sessions yesterday Tin v if saag] "... M.„, But bv D. ,. pa ouvi Qi ittth, ., 19 raai I I b bad baan IIH Ddl) I HMW tune He lia. some articles in Daniel's houi %  if digger ofBuah BalL'St. Mlwhich was In the Garden Land i %  aalj Who was %  antartcad to five Bnd on June 18 bttaraan ll and Ihe Sailors He terms of imprisonment by His HOftOUr lha Acting Chief Judgo This building has also afforded pedestrians a side-walk Tiled Stores The majority of Swan si,, merchant! have placed ll lores. These til, %  re in many attractive colours %  > puieiiasers. Some of the old building* thai "'' '""It Mianv viNirs nun now being demolished and 'ne>: will lake then place. At Prince William llenr> Street the building that form-rly housed the be the possible except ware the net profits accrued to traders o 1 three years were les quate. "With the large increases in first cost of goods since the report was written, this satemenl Is even more true today than when it was Mr J. C Carter of Messrs. rnsen na T R Evans# Mld lnat xhvit ,,,„ r the last lh( prob |e n i of stock replacement than adeEven with goods in free >uppl> there waa difficulty. He would contend that it was a matter of great regret that the views of the Select Committee on Price written as thVeapftal requinVd'to Control were disregarded He maintain stocks is now considerwould like to commend them in ably higher. the exactness of their repcrt. There is therefore every ground Mr. J. K. C Grannum. dry for pressing on Ihe Government goods merchani of Swan Street. our view that many ot Ihe persaid lhat hc felt the dry goods mined profit^ margins should be trade did not have very much I grouse HO AC Chairman Will Tour Oaribbean ("Ol Sentence of IB months' Imprl ith hard labour was al>o passed on Randolph Chandler for mei en-d Paragraph 11 recalls grouse about. He thought the;. that when wholesale and retail -hnuld be content with the markfowlstuITi prices were controlled, II was intended to permit a weighed nverage gross profit Of 10% to wholesalers and 15% to ret.—lers It would surely not us to suggest lhat margins oi Ihese concerns, which arc now probably in the neighbourhood of i, pi i cant and 10 per cent should be increased, by steps if necessOur own iV-rrni-iFidi%  LONDON, April 10 Sir Miles Thomas, BOA C Chairman, is shortly to make i tour of inspection of his Com pany's workings in the Caribbeai area including the Bahamas and larceny of goods from th...-. Bermuda, lie arfU lam London '>B house of Mohommed Kol, .aiprescn. *g£ £?%. bafOC bis ~ ~ ^ „ r l W "aT.. r departuie It is revealed in LUmbW Lutlds Mr. H F Alkins of the Barquarterly review put out by the bados Cotton Factory, spoke on Corporation's Financial CompOver 209,000 feat ol pine 1 years' penal servitude tot Rial '" <>'ol"ck in the day he went lo being taken down Clcuah; damaging a house with Daniel's house to get the articleA v|*IUu lo Hie island tolil f KUII powder and endangering Ihu Whila Imnn to Ret hi artlckM Advaeale yesterday that Bridu lite of Enid Griffith. The Ofloni • Daniel iuu-k 'u < Hie head n n may soon look like Puei was committed on Oetobar 14 with a stick and threw out Ms "ico "with its snow while min Kenneth Hurdle was senten.ed I"-' 1 ":' He bad I serge suit In the <<'* skyjerapers". In hi | to 18 months' imprisonment (OV noire whlcb he had brought flom "" tne new building* should be breaking into the hcuse of AUtU l '" I Itad st..;. He never Hinds and stealing a quantity ol threw a machine out of the housi goods. He was also sentenced to ,... three years' penal servitude for A Probability Ihe larceny from Ihe dwcllin.i i„ addressing tin jury Mr house of Mohommed Kola. These Ward tl ,, d nom lna thr .^.p^. lerme ot imprisonment are to run lhe accused end i lalnani hrd just separatoi e likely than that she th plainant having fought will him on tha Saturday night before the alb %  -%  • %  IIIXA" %  5 LAYENA -. %  %  %  *• %  JH JASON JONES & CO.. LTD-D].„;b„,o r .. J BIIIBIBIIBIiaMnll I Your It. I..,l.ii,.1 ^TvX lriiii(i' HIT* .1 ffm in! NEILSON'S CHOCOLATE BARS t.iiiuiii Gekstfi Nut Roll Tasty Crisp Malted Milk K„ rl.H.I %  Msraron .J in t tiii.iiiti \ mi i i NIOV THisi: \K.IIIS l/ril. AU BRANCHFS FOH LINOLEUM WOOD FLOORS AND FURNITURE palntad in eream or %  I the cltmaU In this ra* the ( ity H hgl.tei RI would Turkeys %  i ubmitted i %  %  bat Rsm of flic witiu-Nses bud Ued ibOUl iii4 tun motor vessel rrrclse reference to tho trade in the ReIn Ihe annual defied when Tha iBlpnMnl arrived from PlM port was in paragraph 7 where accounts for the financial year Pidge, Bahamas, for Messrs. T the Committee slated, that as .i to March 31 are published (atai Gaddea Grant result of their investigations thev this year. The Precise began discharging lell to thi •o nsTeMUkaasTat kwiTeloai hart conw "> the conclusion that I" 1M8—50 Ihe B.O.A.C. Ihe lumber shortly after her ai Iffed Mi Ward ..IM. told Ihe lury frMhr*. nnain-illv dlowed wlth ln '' JM—tble otceplloii -f deficit amounted t^> nearly rival She remained in the Ba.that v.Ion they came to go io inwi ""* A dealers in Hardware, the net pro£8.000.000. while lighters attende-l her to through the evidence as to how •ui^L_~7r.in fcT.r — in ts of trade generally over the The review which is referre-' to tring Uie lumber lo the watei the machine was damaged, they . *^^"S !" ?ffSgnl ff 1^' *rea vears haa been lesi ,n ^ "Tnanelal Tleaes also front Q f the inner basin ot the would see thai 11 thr. eoiintr> ..re not represented in --J adcqu; ; lc |e dww % .. fn reveaU thai for the first 11 months Caraaniga flirting Mr Ward furtlthe Carefully worded nf lhc ,,n ancial year 1950—M she is expected to spend quit that on BU the u.i M i^. k .-n a ,"-.-.. oaaa had itot heaei isroved M this Chamber. m.V,,,iir-: here would not wish to "on to the carefully worded m ,..,.. J„ ... a \ She i-expected to apen enSSchVven*" of SsmeS or phrase used by the Commits. *^*H&^**&!** tow days hara bajora aha Mi in "—-•—• ,,,„i,. nnd ..i ihm n mniH h. 0 -.,, mil M overall deficit was incurred on h „_ ..„.. Her oral ai raduead lo bankruptcy by totally an "' '• "' i'"l' B.O.A.C. toiir-e "\ lluend of this UMiiil T"'.! h r ""'" -" Friday. t3th hope lo moke Caribbean opera, will be to -nd a resolution to £"' " %  " J"TSi. tralnin, tion, belter llnanei.l proposition Hi Exrellen.v the Governor inn.-iT.iTii Savi.im i> bv odenrs rejular aervlee. F.seculive t'ommlltec MMtliiK out B *. n .'""* . Jt between New York and Iho.our views on this matter, after ," ' P r f <<1 "hor lly to Introbland, which are pan rulni I. member! have di.cuj.ed It fully """ \?!?!. ""I}' "' ,**" '"votircd by Amernan Mil I Mr D V Seolt of the Colon'''• '". in '" 'JJ* 2"rbado. Savin,! h oli,li,y re.rt!. P II. I |i ..: a;;. %  I ml v '.V le Store* ^.id lhat v.hen the [V ^.f^ th C 0 W.' British -.f eonUol, were start2 !" ^Jf ''"*' nd "l to provide !" with practical experience in of the National Cash Rent altei ._ ed. a circular was sent around to the various builne** hou*r oaklnx them to five some Idea of the prevalllne margin* ol profit Owing tn s mr onfunion .um.i \: them, however, the margins were then lived lower than It had been the case before Um HI; the following five r sis years there waa a very definite increase In coM price-.. the i gister Posting Machi a knowledge of the unit tyst for saving accounts which has essfully used in British Oulana for the past three years. Latest Airliners HI interview reported to -day's Daily Tele->raph In and with Miles'reveals thai the l„ H.,vi|' democratic systei Governor Foot Speak* On Local Government KINGSTON. Jamaica. April 10 Replying to the civic Wvlcorna at Ward Traatrt) Monday aveiUnfl QovarnQi Fm.i highly praised May West Indies Local Government was a iu-i i al T "' ""mer B O AC'S Strato. >" aerv.ee of v.tal cr,nse,,H.n* %  Speaking about the federiitnr f the We I id : *"l &id Saturday that I hope9 frould play n Iradng part building a free federation of tie British West Indies so tl may take their rightful and hon. ourable part in thi Corni and would unirrtake t^of miraaae-f Single Voice %  '<'• aaad becornee evi p month apparani ll seems to me thai the ehOSOB I -ingly clear. A choke between federation and frustration I look forward to the day when ere heie •hall have four I... nnictinii. but complementary: and each in its way equal):, important : in the cily of Kingston, man %  ("fait* to tha federated WeM Indies -and loy. Commonwealth The Governor stiessed that it is important to the BO i || future Baal Service be nist-rate. efficient, u. partial and incorruptibly free from political erfer. more urgent thst the British West PJudleaB and political Indies should be able • with one voice — with a voice Tn,t ,h "* ls n€ d Ior Mw Wwhieh will be heard and respected on page 7 A new beautiful set of J>lDfoal Qh&p&-d&~Qhinsi RfBfilj Mi..;'* i,[gm ;i; iin-t while and coloured grounds. Suitable for cocktail or evening dresses or any special occasion. 36" wide. Prices per yd. $2.78. $2.12, $:t.02. 13.11 $iM (ave aShrphenl ii Co.. Ltd. 10, 11 12 & 13 BROAD STREET