Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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Wal

ESTABLISHED 1895







Britain, Franee, U.S.
Caution Israel, Syria

A bout Border Dispute

Avoid The
Danger Of
A Flare Up

LONDON, April 9,
RITAIN has” cautioned
beth Israel and Syria to
use restraint in their border
dispute, a British Foreigr
Office spokesman said to-day.

This advice had been passec
on through diplomatic repre-
sentatives at Tel-A-Viv and
Damascus, he said.

A Washington report states that
the United States have protested
vigorously to Israel against the
recent bombing of Syrian posi-
tions by the Israeli Air Force.

Syria has also been told of the
“serious view” taken by _ the
United States of border incidents
between the two countries.

In Paris, it was reported that
France will follow the example of
Britain and the United States in
asking both Israel and Syria to
use restraint in their border dis-

pute.

A French Foreign Office spokes-
mian said today that French dip-
lomatic representatives at Tel-a-
Viv and Damascus will ask the
Syrian and Israeli Government to}
ease the tension by dropping ‘their
conflict and avoiding the dangers
of a “flare up”. —Reuter.

Students Protesi

Jaw Violations

DAMASCUS, April 9.
Thousands of students from the
Syrian University and Religious

Rebels Take
Third Village
HANOI, Indo-China, April 9.
Partisans returning to the
French lines allege that Chinese
irregulars and Vietnamh rebels
have occupied a third village in-
side Indo-China, French sources

caid to-day.

Partisans said the force whicn
was reported to have crossed
China’s Yunan border into north
west [ndo-Chira on April 1, ha
occupied Thinso 25 miles north
of Lai Chau.



institutes demonstrated here :

today against “Jewish truce A French army communique

violations.” They..asserted their yesterday saiq French reinforce-
: y ments flown to the area, had

readiness to fight. with the Syrian
Army. Syria has asked the
Security Council to meet soon to
consider their protest against
Israeli violations in frontier
zones. —Reuter,

15,000 Strike

BOMBAY, April 9.

Nearly 15,000 civilian employees
of defence establishments at
Kirkee near Poona, (Headquarters
of the Indian southern command)
came out on strike to-day in
protest against the Government's
“retrenchment” policy.

The strike was organised
the Socialist-led trade unions.

It was not known how many of
the 15,000 employees would be
affected by the proposed retrench-
ment programme.—Reuter

failed to establish contact with
“invaders” who were reported
earlier to have taken the border
towns of Bannamcoum and Phong
Tho 50 miles west of Lao Kay,
French sources said they
| thought irregulars belonged to
bands always active in this aree
| during the opium season,
—Reuter.





Basie Threat To
World Is Fear

NEW YORK, April 9.

Jawaharlal Nehru, Indian Prime
Minister, told a United States
editor he favoured firmness
with friendliness as ¢
basis for approaches to settle
international disputes. But there
should be no appeasement of evil,

His views were given in a con
versation with Norman Cousines,
Editor of the Saturday Review ©
iiterature during the latter’s visi!
to New Delhi, \

Nehru said the basic threat in
the world to-day was fear. He
believed spiritual effectiveness 01
the United Nations was decreas
ing.

“If it becomes an instrument for
war then it does not function a
a United Nations”, Nehru said

by

tempered



Iron Ore Short

GENEVA, April 9.

Europe faces a_ 10,000,000-ton
iron ore shortage by 1953, or about
16 per cent of the total require-
ments for European countries, ex-
cluding the Soviet Union, to reach
the 1953 pig iron production target
of 5,000,000 tons, the United Na-
tions Economic Commission for
Europe said here to-day.—Reuter,







| vie _you cannot deal wiih :
Onl Py country within the forum of the
ly 6 detys left to get in | United Nations, then the only

ocat | alternative is to deal with it out
the Adv le Year Book ' s'de, ultimately by force of arms”,

| he said.—Reuter,

Larger Deficit On C.N.S.
Line To West Indies

OTTAWA, April

An increased deficit was shown in the
of the Canadian Naticnal (West Indies) Steamships Line
tabled in Parliament this week.

Rising costs and increased handling charges at Wes
Indies ports were blamed for a deficit of $1, 028,767 in 1950,
The Tigure compares with a 1949 deficit of $460,498.

The report showed operating
revenues of $5,124,200 compared
with $6,595,008 the previous year
und operating expenses of $5,725.-
632 compared with $6,582,608. The
operating deficit thus was $601,-
432, which was increased by pay-





Held For Dope
Smuggling



ROME, April 9 ment of interest on bonds and

Italian police to-day held a ma0| government advances.
described as an American customs} Signed ty Donald Gerdon, pre
officer for inquiries into a eens | sident of the Canadian Nationa

smuggling ring.

The man, Frank Callaci 30, of
New York, was held when pol'ce
at Rome airport claimed to have!
found heroin worth $100,000 in his

system, the report said operating
costs were adversely affected “by
substantially increased handling
charges at West Indies” ports for
the company’s 10 vessels, and by
tuggage. Callaci was trav elling | increased prices of ships’ supplies.
from Milan to Pelerme. , The Company however was

He saiu ne nad no idea of the} loo:.ing forward to a better year
contents of the three packets con ho 1951 “particularly because of
taining heroin. People he ha aa | the relaxation of collar import re-






met casually in a Milan restaurant strictions centemplated unde: the
had asked him to hand the pack-| ‘trade liberalization plan’ which
et to a man he would meet in| Was effective last Jan, 1

Palermo he said.—Freuter. It said an extensive siudy is
under way on the subject of

trade relations between Canada









NO RICE | and the British West Indies,

with particular attention to the

LONDON | financial position of the C.N
Three British soldiers, released! cesmnn oe tes ;
after being held as prisoners by| Passenger Service Up



Chinese Communists in Korea Passenger revenues shov
seid they never want to see rict| slight increase over 1949 des
again. They said they were march-:educcd fa t re

ed 26 miles a day, strafed from th« Ibe tition
air and were fed—rice, rice, rice.| decreased 26 pe

(CP) ji @ On page 7







—

bados «

TUESDAY,

APRIL





OPENING NEW
SHOP

MADAME EVA PERON, wite
of the Argentine President, in-

augurates the first Government
shop in Buenos Aires, the

Argentine capital. ‘fhe shop is
the first of a series to be opened
by the Government for the pur-
pose of selling provisions direct
to the public at a cheaper price.

—Express

Period of ‘Tension
Ahead—Not War
Says George Marshall

Secretary of Defence, George Marshall said to-day the

sion rather than an all out war.

Mar, shall said *

ten years’ tension, but tension has relaxed here in SiX}c@ommar

weeks.”

Anglo-U.S. Oil

\! WM yy,
ON KZ






Advocate |

PRICE: FIVE CENTS





1, 1951

‘U.N. Forces Meet Stiff’
Resistance Seven Miles

\North Of 38th Parallel

eta ae (REDS TRY TO
“STOP IT”
MAN 4 WILL QUIZ GOVT. | FLOOD OUT

TELLS MAC ON SUGAR DEAL |U-N. TROOPS

TOKYO, April 9,
Pexy O, Apr ul 9, oy e we ‘
caw! ‘Why Desert Jamaica Now ?’

CHINESE COMMUNISTS
Gasieeai Douglas Mac Ai tr |

|

|



opened ood :
was to-day given “stern but tact- pe the & gates of

ful” instruction from Prosident x % the massive Hwachon Reser-
Truman to abstain from further From Our Own Correspondent voir dam in Central Korea on
politieal pronouncements — on LONDON, April 9 Monday and sent thousands

pISsa’ TISFACTION at Britain’s proposed trade pact with
Cuba will be expressed by Mr, H. Alan Walker, Man-
‘ing Director of the West Indies Sugar Company to-mor-

of tons of water rushing down
on Allied-held ground, but the
Pukhan River rose no more

night. The instruction was passed

cu to him to-day by

Korea, it was reported here | 1
Frank Pace |

|

|

|

|

Mac Arthur with recall but he i:
reported to have warned the Gen- |
eral that the latter's position hz :

American Secretary of the Army

who arrived in Tokyo to-day row (Tuesday) in an interview with James Griffiths, Sec-| than 41% feet, By Monday
President Truman is understcod retary of State for the Colonies. night the water level was re-
not to have threatened Genet Mr. Alan Walker hag just returned to this country] ceding and there was no dan-

from a three-month business visit to the West Indies xer to United Nations forces.

The Hwachon _ reservoir,
about seven miles north of
the 38th parallel, is the main
point of stoutest Red resist-

Keep Out Of
Affairs In ince in North Korea in sever-
al weeks,
Morocco the reservois th Meter: hia
France Tells E,

He has been asked by the Sugar
Manufacturers’ Association of Ja
maica to find out what truth lies
behind the report that Britain will
shortly enter into © three-yea
eontract with Cuba for one and a
half million tons of sugar.

Growing concern a‘ the lack of
\ steepation on the subject of the
Anglo-Cuban trade talks is reflect.
ed in the increasing number of,
questions listed for answer in Par-

become precarious as a result of
his statement two weeks ago pro-
posing full-scale war against Com-
munist China unless she agreed to
a Korean settlement.

As a result



the President

aA message delivered orally by |
Pace told General Mac Arthur,
that Presidential support for him{
cannot be maintained if he con-
tinues to be an international storm:

slowed or stopped Allied ad-
vances at several points.

gypi



gentre at the present critica) |!iament this week. s The dam is 1,000 feet high and

juncture in the world situation JAMAICAN TOBACCO French etal Persien tinier tone hd ae cag aha oc

Embarrassing Wing Commander Bullus and] Pierre Schneiter today informed flood. ie a ee a ee

According to informed sources |Mr. Remnant set the ball rolling|the Egyptian ambassador in First to cut the Chunchon

President Truman pointed out} @d they have now been joined by} Paris that France could — not{rwachon highway — a wi

that more than once in the past | their Commons colleagues Mr, H.|%llow foreign states to intervene] atiieq supply artery——and s one.

e hag reprimanded Generai sient’ oe D. Gammans, Mr = concerning Morocco < pave A ee i coontne.

Mae Arthur for entering ; ge isher and Mr. Norman ‘rench Government spokes " iy % rc

WASHINGTON, April 9, political sphere but that the Gen. |Dodds. All these have put down [man stated tonight that, he} offensive down the Chunchon-

eral has seen fit to continue | Wuestions to be answered by the] Egyptian ambassador had handed ‘Although wii ghtit a ar the

best the United States could hope for was a period of ten- issuing public statements not en- oars - oe President Mr ine te is woe Metta: a Naat eevee these

3 = ¢ son, ' to i ;

: oe ag <> my his cealm as United it's Canale tad probable that he Somat i er idtina Voien was no indieation that the Reds

‘what we are thinking about is possibly fons Commander 3 will take their questions collec. Minister to-day Ded singteg 8 lashes Grive, Un

Pace ae eet Mating tively and make a statement, | A spokesman said; “Schneiter| ‘OOPS Of four nations, ara

Marshall criticised what be | eould no hide tvatiobe we’ t- Closely connected with ques-|did not fail to point out to his rreca. vremeate ain ie

called a “letdown” in public SUP} ttude in thie Ee aoe i , tions is another from Mr, Dodds| Visitor that in so far as thig note t fe cue s might be

‘port of the Defence Programme } jc, aipect eh ~danerd ca! alli ~ °' who on Wednesday is due to ask constituted intrusion into the vie fie cut off by the rising

in the face of a worsening world |” “pruman made it clear tt ie “Gen. | Mv. James Griffiths, Secretary of French internal policy, the water gh water may extend as

situation. He added that he could ai yee pes it c “, rat 7€N- | State for the Colonies, what steps|French Government could not far down thePukhan River as

see no hope for any early re-|))° “mh rthur’s role had been | he is taking to further his declared|take a note of this nature into] Seoul, some 58/air miles southwest.

laxation in the Rearmament. Pro- |®" mbarrassment to the Admin- | policy of giving every possible en.| consideration.” The spokesman (cP)
istration in its dealings with

Talks Begin

WASHINGTON, April 9.

British and United States oil
experts were opening crucial talks
to.day aimed at maintaining the
low of Persian oil to the free
vCrid, despite Persia’s nationali-
ration plan, British Ambassador
sir Oliver Franks and American
Assistant Secretary of State for
Middle Eastern Affairs George
McGee were formally opening the
conference between oil experts an¢l
officials of the two countries in

search of a common line of action buy $12,000,000 worth of standard} tary strategy,

in response to the Persian Govern-'

ment’s decision to nationalise the

chiefly British-owned oil industry,
—Reuter.



Plane Crashes
On Hong Kong

HONG KONG, April 9.

A Thailand aireraft ‘inward
bound from Bangkok crashed on
Hong Kong island to-night in a
thick fog.

There was a crew of five, and
11 passengers on the plane. Their

fate was not immediately known
Eye-witnesses regarded thai

the aircraft blew up as it dived

into the sea off the eastern end

of Hong Kong island. Officials

feared all aboard were lost.
—Reuter.



MacGowan Dies

NORTHERN IRELAND, April, 9
The death of Sir John Hall Mac
Gowan 57, former British Ambas-
sador to Venezuela, was announcec

on Saturday.
During World War II, Sir

Joh

annual report] served as Minister and Commerica

Adviser to the British Ambassador
to the United States.

He was appointed to the Caraca:
post in 1948. Last year he was
named Ambassador to Thailand.

—(CP)

Rocket Expert Dies

CAMBERLEY, Surrey, April 9.

Leading British rocket expert,
William G. A. Perring, died sud
denly at his home here to-day
aged 52.

Perring, Director of the Royal
Aircraft establishment at Far
borougin Hampshire, helped to un-
ravel the secret of German rockets
in World War II.—Reuter





GUERILLAS KILL SIX
SINGAPORE, April 9.

Communist guerillas killed six

Malay soldiers and wounded =

British officer and nine Malays,
when they ambushed a heavily
in Negri Sembilan
it was announced to-

ermed convoy
yesterday,
fay Reuter



Swim For Petrol

MELBOURNE, April 9
faptain P, G. Tay lor and crew
t ioneering flying boat Fri-
te Bira Il now returning from
Stralia, he
garva Gambie
for petrol,





to ao





gramme,

Even if the West and the Soviet "he" nations, particularly Britain. {

“we would
relax our

Union came to terms
be perfect fools to
military strength until we had
evidence of good faith’, he said
—Reuter.

U.S. May Buy Army
Supplies In Europe

HEIDELBERG, April 9.
United States army may



The

items of army supplies
European manufacturers, Euro-
pean Headquarters announced to-
nieht.

from) our



couragement to tobacco growing

did not reveal the detailed con
and. tag cigar-manfeacturing indus-

tents. of the Egyptian note.

BRITAIN. APPROVES





—~Reuter try in Jamaica, Reuter,

: aes HUNGER AND POVERTY VY CHIEF
Sack Acheson Meanwhile, in to-duy's Daily BELGIAN’ COAL eitais" a anetly cepeoer
Not MacArthvr [trometer calcd BW, W20iy.| MINAS STRIKE — ine, sppeiniment™ ot “Admita
asking for support against the BRUSSELS, April 9 be R Fee hteler of the United States
WASHINGTON, April 9, | Government, moog of a trade Charleroi “ode ane sduthorn Atlantic Navy, and: his” wel
pgp ety tae bring Belgium struck work to-day to|]ment is expected to be announced
Arthur controversy by asserting | bunger, bitterness and poverty to ‘nforce the demand for wage; here to-day according to usually

increases
The strike is not backed by the
he Social Christian (Catholic)

the West Indies
“Ll belong there,
ror

that continual interfer:
diplomats in Washington,
end Lake Success, on

reliable London sources,
~—Reuter.

ence by
London
sound mill-



I knew the ter-
s.ckness and distress



and pain,

“- & Miners’ Union, which ealled for
“places a burden on |@s the people of London know the : 116 TE TH TE
responsib!> Commanders wound of a bomb” says Hardy.[" general stoppage on April 10 is j ” lon cnt
which is unfair and intolerable.” |“Jamaica helped Britain then. support af a Ave) per cents: wage) THE NEWS
In a statement issued last night,|Why in peace is Britain deserting boost DIAL 3113

Senator Knowland said that State | Jamaica ? Employers have offered an,













2 5a Ay it g so DAY OR NIGHT
These supplies for which pay- Department policies ‘greatly con- Hardy parallels Britain’s action ¢¢°°'®*8* of 2.5 per cent. |
ment would be made in dollars] ‘tibuted to Communist domination |in considering an agreement with Reuter.
would supplement deliveries eae nad hias ao C cuba 18 a man supporting another | );a@===eeeee ee ai
from American firms, and meet]|,, *@ .added that now was the | man’s wife and le saving his own in
the increasing worldwide re- Ene, to remove Acheson (Dean | hunger, \
quirements of the United States aot rae y of State) and He says Cuba can sell to Ameri-
larmy it was added. eowiatid. cate: s if she cannot sell to Britain.
—Reuter. “It isin longer tolerable ‘to ex- ut Jamaica has onl, the British



Discuss Financial
Aid To Yugoslavia

LONDON, April 9.

Anglo-American talks on finan-
cial aid to Yugoslavia began in
London this morning, it was au-
thoritatively disclosed.

British and American official
are discussing the Yugoslav appeal
for assistance in the purchase .
raw materials amounting
520,000,000 from the United Sate,

ond £4,000,000 from Britain.

Britain last autumn grantec
Yugoslav two loans for the pur
chase of raw materials and con
sumer goods of £2,000,000.

The British delegation is led by
John Beecham, head of the Britis}
Foreign Office, Southern Depart-
ment, America is represented by
J. Campbell, head of the Balkan:
Department of the State Depart-
ment ,.—Reuter,

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER



“What staggers me about
this horse-switching racket is
the length of time it took for
| the Jockey Club to wake up
| to what was going on.”
|

ARTEUL







i
| yo bringing baby carriages to football games in this York- |
j shire village found a new dodge

s-|

on the edge of the field the

babie
“ing the linesmen run up and dow

pect our men to fight and die market.

while the aggressor is allowed to
remain in his own lair.”
—Reuter,



| GILBEYS



Danish Paper Wants
MacArthur Dismissed
COPENHAGEN, April 9
The Independent Danish paper
Information to-day urged the
MacArthur,

dismissal of General
under the headline: MacArthur














House of Representatives, said at
a Press Conference to-day that
the Soviet Union is building up
troops’ concentrations “in
places” He added
terrible danger.”

Sam Gayease Sueaier of the
} Maintain the

lots 0)
“we are in

same High
' Standard of
) Quality as
) shipped to
the

i West Indies
» for the

past fifty

Senator William Knowland, Re- | Pact with
publican, has joined in the Mac- | Eastbourne,

Moscow's Secret Weapon

—Reuter,



RN

D “BUILDUP” =a Spanish Wines

Income Tax May |
Go Up In Britain |

LONDON, April 9,

The Cabinet to-day gave its final approval to this year’s
budget which will be laid before the House of Commons ‘
to-morrow and which may lead to new and bitter clashe:
between Government and Opposition.

Hugh Gaitskell, Chancellor of
the Exchequer, celebrated his 45tt
birthday this morning by telling
the Cabinet how he proposes ti

e
SS

More Changes hii

Slav Cabinet make it

raise the extra £250,000,00¢
which he needs to square actounts BELGRADE, April 9
this year. More Government changes in|{Q
He is at least £150,000,000] Yugoslavia were announcec 3
Short of the £4,500,000,000 re-] to-day General Colonel Tan;
guired for 1951/1952 and he may} Gesnjak hitherto ‘assistant Min
also need to offset anotherf{ister of Nat'onal Defence wa
£100,000,000 lost by yroviding} @ppointed Deputy Minister of
reliefs to poor sections of the} Naticnal Defence. Tanjug Yugo
community. Slav News Agency :

PORT

and
SHERRY |

GARDINER AUSTIN & Cn., Ltd.

Agents,

Budget prophets suggest that he
may do this:

1. Increase the higher rates of
income tax by about 2% per cent
which would give him an extra
£ 75,000,000,

2. Increase the petrol tax by
about 50 per cent per gallon.

3. Please the Socialists by a
heavier tax on distributed profits
in industry —Reuter.

MOTHERS

WOMBELL,

National Assembly in connection

with wholesale Cabinet reorgani

sation announced on April 6.
Reuter.



Red Paper Picks Winners

LONDON, April, 9
Back in 1949 when the Commun.
ist Daily Worker was
London paper
| of the

the only
inner
people
horse’s

to pick the w
Grand National
| thought it was a joke, th«
Russian Hero.

England ij name was

Worker wa
thi year’

(CP)

Saturday the only

winner

When the carriages dre ¢
kept happy
(CP)

arked
ch-| paper to tip

i Nickel Coin



ana

s bre

announcement | }}
said all of to-day’s changes were
made by the Presidium of the
i |
n the field

juiet





PAGE TWO

Canib Calling ey

‘HE Marquess and Marchioness

of Normanby are in Barbados

on a short holiday, Touching down

at Seawell on Sunday afternoon by

B.W.1.A., they are staying at

Porter's Housé, St. James, the
home of the Hon. M. Guinness,

Hon. M, Guinness is a brother

of Lady Normanby.
Lady Normanby live

Lor@ an
ip Fata 1 uy Mulgrave Castle in
itby, Yorks.

Comings and Goings
OHN IN, B.O.A.C., offi-
cial im New York is in Bar.

bados for a = of weeks’ holi-
Binje ‘Broetor and Giibert Yvonet
are frém the Union Park race
meeting in Trinidad... . . Mrs.
Winston Marshall. the former
Phyllis 11 and her two chil.
dren have e to the U.S.A. to
jo’ kare. md a working
in OOM, 6. 7" 455 01 -
ing her were Miss winder have.
rock and Mrs. V. Leverock who
had been in Barbados on a holi-
day. Their home is in Richmond
Hill, Long Island. Mrs. V. Leve-
ock is a sister of the late Capt.
avid Hassell. Miss Leverock is
a niece of Mrs. David Hassell,
To Assist

R. WILFRED WOODHOUSE,
Building Development Ad-

viser to C.D. and W. during h
week’s visit to Antigua, will assist
in advising on re-housing propos-

als that have been drawn up in ©” Saturday at St. Mary’s Chureh Phelan wet,

that colony following the damage
from the two hurricanes of last
autumn.

Mr. Woodhouse, we} a passenger
.o Antigua yesterday by B.W.I.A.

On Way Home

RS. M. A. RODGERS who

Rad been visiting her sister
Mrs. Smith in St. Vincent since
January 29th, is on her way back
to her home in Worth Bucks, Eng-
land. Coming in by B.G, Air-
ways yesterday morning, she will
stay at the amore Hotel until
Thursday when she leaves for the
U.K. by the Golfito,

The flight over from St, Vincent
was the first time she had ever
flown . . . “It was” she said, “a
lovely flight,” “I never felt when
we touched down.”

Canadian A
GILBERT A, MATTE,

member of the Statistical
Office of the United Nations is a
Canadian. Since March 2nd he
has been holidaying at the Hotel
Hastings. He will be among the
passengers on B.W.1.A,’s_Trini-
dad flight to-night. He will be in
Trinidad for five days before con-
neeting with the El Presidente
Line for New York. Dr. Matte
is an economist and statistician,

intransit
NTRANSIT through Barbados
to Teinldad fren Yemmaa, “by
oO. a r amaica by
B.W.LA. were Mi and Mre
Kenny Trestrail. They were mar-
ried a few days ago in Jamaica,

Representing Barbados
E&€ TA who is now in
Trinidad will represent Bar-
bados in the compppign for the
Brandon Trophy (W.I. Davis Cup),
Other Barbadians sélected to take
part are Ralph Legall and Ralph
Ca both of whom are at
present living in Trinidad.

Who’s Who
L* nobody knows Who's Who
in Barbados, the fault will
be yours, You have just six days
left to return the form,

Members of the House and
Council, this means you. i









"ee Royal Statistical Society,
of which I was Chairman
from 1937 to 1938, has its eye on
queues. A paper read recently to
the Research Section, of which I
was Director in 1929, discusses
“Borel’s theory of busy hours in
terms of the Galton-Watson
branching process of stochastic
population.” It also speaks of “The
ergodic properties of traffic inten-
sity measured in erlangs,” and
“Input of the Poisson type.” We
learn that “the stochastie process
is not (in general) Markovian,”
and “Yuel’s autogressive schemes”
are touched on. It may seem au-
dacious to criticise such a grom-
onological concept, but I cannot
help feeling that the author of the
paper confused Wybright’s para-
cessional influxes with Matachi’s
involuntary retrogressive
(measured in spodicules).

More Horseplay

ESTERDAY, during a trial

run at Grimsby, Greased
Lightning went so fast that the
owner and trainer, who were
watching, could not believe their
eyes. “Her feet,” said Major
“Noddy” Talltrouser, “barely
seemed to touch the ground.” No

Danipilabiavaniaiocaaameeeee te ee ee
BEEBE BEB BBB RBBB BBB e es Bi
Men's ‘AERTEX’ Vests

36-46

Interlock in

DIAL 4606



byput °



STRIPE PYJAMAS

POLO SHIRTS 1:38

Cream, White. Grey, Fawn

EVANS & WHITFIELDS



‘then

owly tram was
de. syed at Datlinigeon, Have
ties mussea Queen Victoria’s

obening ceremony ?”’

Just Married
M* STELLOW RAWLINS of
Roebuck Street was married

to Miss Cleotilde
Some of Mr
allender of Dayrells R
Michael y oad, St.
© ceremony was perform
Rev. Fr. K. Hinds. a

Callender,

The bride was given in marriage Canada with his wife, to report jest,

by her father while Mr. Victor
Worrell was the bestman.

Five Years

Canin born R. E. Urton

has been living in Venezuela
for five years. Accompanied by
his wife, (they are both from
Saskatchewan) they have come
over to Barbados for two weeks’
holiday and have brought along
their two children. Mr. Urton is a
geologist engineer with Shell
Caribbean Petroleum Corpn.

Four for Four

T Four Winds for four days

is Jeanne Fisher who drop+
ped in over the week-end from
Antigua to obtain her American
visa . ... From Greenwich Con-
necticut arriving by the same plane
was Mr. Benedict Quinn. A Law-
yer by profession, his three weeks’
holiday will be spent on the coast,
He is staying at Old Trees, St.
James,

The St. James Coast
iS tear St. James coast will be the
‘ setting for a novel to be pub-
lished soon by Sidney Cunliffe
Owen who used to live at Little
Battalays, St, Peter and was, at
ad time, Private Secretary to

. Baldwin When he was Gov~
ernoi Abtigua.

Mr, Cunliffe Owen's articles on
the Mmevitd islands were read
with great enjoyment by readers
of the Ady . y .

Copies of his latest book ought
to be as thick as manchineel leaves,

Family Gathering
WELLS has_ her
brother-in-law and _ sister
Mr. and Mrs. John Otway staying
with her, They came in yesterday
from Grenada for two weeks’ holi-
day. Theit four children accom
panied them. They live at Anhan<

,

-and Mrs, Cecil :-:

Air View
RS. LOUIS BISCOITO has
been to Barbados before but
this is her husband’s and_ their
daughter’s (Jocelyn) first visit. Mr.
Biscoito, who is a grocery manager
in Port-of—Spain, thinks that from
what he has seen of Barbados from
the air, he is going to enjoy his
month’s holiday at Acera Guest
House. . . . ace nying them
were two Singer girls Sheila de
Cruz and Claire Vieira who work
in the Singet Sewing Machine
Company in Port-of-Spain ..., .
and speaking of Singer girls. . .
Janice Gill is back from her holi-
day in St. Vincent.
Quick Change

APT. DARRAGH PHELAN

finds Barbados mighty hot
after two weeks in Churchill on
the Hudson Bay. From the pre-
vailing arctic conditions up there
to come down to sunny Barbados
ig quite a change!

Four weeks ago he had to go
to Canada on a_ business trip.
Formerly of the Canadian Irish
Regiment he served six years in
the last war. While in Canada
he offered his sefvices to the army
once more and he was promp*‘ly
accepted,

Before he knew it, he was on
army manoeuvres. Part of
training called fot a battalion
parachute jump, complete wit}
jeeps and equipment. Capt
with the rest o:
ht of 16,000 feet
first parachut

them at a
..it was his
jump ever,

Back from his extended trip,;

he plans to spend a short vaca-~
tion here, before returning

for duty on May 7th at Camp
Petawawa, North Ontario.

Carib understands that he will
be going to Germany with the
Occupation Force. is wife will
accompany him.

Meee *
RS. LILIAN BRANDFORD-
"HINDS of Barbados who has
not seen her relatives in the U.S.
tor twenty-eight ts will soon
be seeing them. She is en route
to the U.S. on a three-month visit

If It Was Meat...
[* SCOTLAND to-day, more

than three months since the
Stone of Scone was whisked out of
Westminster Abbey, thére are
rumblings that political action
may be taken if the thieves are
brought to court.

What do the English feel
about it? Six people named Eng-
lish were asked this question:

“Should the people who stole

the Stone be punished?” Here
are their views:
Mrs. Brenda English, of

Twickenham: Yes, because they
gave the police so much trouble.
But on patriotic grounds I have
no feelings ont it,

Mrs. F. R. M. English, of Ken-
sington: 1 don't really mind
about the Stone—I have never
seen it, It’s alla lot of fuss about

nothing.
Mrs. R. English,
Park: I haven't given

thought.

Mrs. Henry English, of Ilford;
wife of a butcher: I am _ not
interested in a stone. If it had
been a bullock, it would have
been a serious matter,

Incidental Intelligence

IRST funeral parlour for

women only, operated by all
female personnel, will open in
New York shortly. It will cater

of Canons
it much

BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1951



"Rion | Junior Short Story Competition

10, 1951 The Evenixg Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for

d 19. its Junior Short Story Competition. The best story will be published
: F Shonen 7 am. |¢Very Monday n The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive

Tn eres Raves A saiysis; 2.18] Prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery, The stories

am. From the Editorials; 7.25 am.|can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 300

Lrogramme Parade: 7.0 a.m, Generally | words in length, and must reach The 's Editor, The Advocate

oa be y ae atekaien. 8.15 aan. Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesdavw every week.

Music from the Ballet; 830 a.m. Think NOTE: Stories must not be copied.

on these Things; 845 a.m. Letter from Send this coupon with your story.

Introducing

SOPHIE—
ie cage

GOLDEN-VOICED febot called Sephie* arrived in
London from Switzerland yesterday with the reputa-

TUESDAY, APRIL

6.30 a.m. 1215 p.m. ... oo M.



A






n ica; a.m, ews; 9.10 a.m,
tion of being the perfgct secretary. Home News feon Britain: 818 a.m, Clove Hamed UNIO® SHORT STORY COMPETITION
She answers the telephone while her boss is out, taking 11:30 am Commianizm. in Asta as i VEG + Nia oes eons teveks ine rne the Sheree ts Shae ‘
messages in any lanigua and never getting them wrong. 2%". oT “ aoe asa ier a3.i8 eedeesebdeecsdbet dese ebdebevesces te ecnee ones
Hér wheels, wires, d fash lights are immune to flu, bie Rory A eng Ant - si BE gi tate uence cokes shee aruethaceeevced ¥es
romance, and other hazards which teset the white-collar *27—**¢P™ an WO eek cael Kec R ec kes saben Ash nh Cae Geren ‘

girl.
Sophie is so di
matters oly | wit

embarrassing
she "Sates can
erased from her
magnetic memory for
ever.

She is so discern-

ing that, When her
Boss rings f an
dutside phone, shé

will tell him all the
messages which have
been left, but will
repeat them to no-
body else.

Test

Though she is
beautiful in a trim
streamlined way, she
will never distract a
‘ian or make his
wife jealous. Sha@will
work a 168-hour
week without a
from the

> Could there be a-
teatch in all this? I
decided to give
Sophie a thorough

First of all, in the
laboratory where So-
phie is being tried
out, I came to a
secret arrangement
with her, whereby
she could recognise my voice from
all others.

Locked Memory
By pressing two buttons on the
robot’s plastic dial I fixed the
mechanism so that it would tell

me all it knew when I said
“Hullo, hullo,” in a special way.
Then f£ locked up_ Sophie's

memory so nobody could tap it,
pocketed the key and went to my
club for a drink.

While I was on the way my
human sécretary rang the robot
up and asked for me. Sophie
politely said that I was out, but
that she would record the mes-
sage. I dialled Sophie from the
club bar and after saying “Hullo,
hullo,” in the pre-arranged way,
she repeated my secretary's mes—
sage perfectly.

Friends who tried to coax the
information out of her got nothing
but “Your message will now be
recorded.”

The Sna
When I got back to the labora-
tory I unlocked Sophie’s memory,



eet that she will diseuss confidential
r boss. By pressing a button every

SOPHIE will keep all your secrets

picked up her receiver, pressed a
button and heard the message
again. Then I said “Cancel can-
cel,” and automatically Sophie's
memory became a blank.

It all sounded perfect until I
got back to the office, when 1
wanted io ask the scientist who
had been testing the robot a
further question,

I rang him up. All I got was
Sophie telling me my message
would be recorded. But I wanted
a quick answer to a simple ques-
tion.

Five times I rang and five
times I got Sophie. I ended
slamming the phone down after
saying rude things which went on
Sophie’s record.

I began to wonder what will
happen when lots of Sophies get
loose in Britain as they will soon,
after a factory starts making them
and hiring them out.

Sophie offers lots of advantages
= my secretary is safe in her
job.

*Short for “ipsophone.”
—L

Slim By Day
By VICKI SILVA-WHITE «

EW YORK spring and sum-
mer shews have the same
fashion aecents as Paris—the
ultra-slim silhouette for day wear,
the superfull for afternoon and
evening.

Two colours to every costume,
unusual contrasts of fabrics are
featured, as in Paris. Boned

;

dale Estate in Grenada, The situs for women who do not want to bodices, poufed overskirts, num-

ation in Grenada they describe as

L being quiet at present.

ADVENTURES OF PIPA

BY THE WAY
By Beachcomber

wonder. A wideawake stable-lad
discovered that the two men in-
side had rig up a motor. The

unusual sound of the engine had
been attributed to faulty breathing
by this much-fancied yearling.
Later that day, Paddy Wockwell
stopped a high-stepping three~
year-old and shouted, “Come out,
you two, the game’s up.” The
horse, which was a real horse this
time, breathed in his face and
passed on.

Why Not

MAN called Sobobble, who
changed his name to Stri¢k-

aldring-Horp——

Prodnose; This is too absurd!

Myself; No, no. It is plausible
enough. By statute and deed-
poll. H. Wk, 64/79, dom. circ. 63
ultra vires. mh. boo. ba. 64. Vic.
63 Cap. 91, Op. IV. Hum 296 ca.
e. fn. p. et sey. As was laid down
in Bollinger v. carter. the Rev.
Edward Tuckaway intervening,
when Sirius is in the dheandant,
and nettle-rash is common in
stone-tracers and verdigris-



Cellular in

$6.08

‘AERTEX’

Cellular in

YOUR SHOE STORE





$2.98



be touched by a man even when
dead. {

Copyr'ght «PS 4 Vaz Dias Int Amoterdem





graters and newts lie by the wall,
anyone wishing to change his or
her name, for reasons of snuddery
or curfoil, must first go wham-
acky-whomacky in tredilio, like
any snuff-choked nuzzler of chalk.
Thus let us all cry amon to
the grocers’ doxy, and no green-
gage mumbler a halfpenny the
better for it,
Snibbo for Smoothness
F a singer, a critic wrote yes-
terday, “She will no doubt
become smoother in time.” I will
bet that already that singer has
had a call from Snibbo Ltd., with
an offer to make her as smooth as
an air-cooled egg by daily appli-
cations of the new_ preparation,
the Snibbo Cream, Rubiton. “A
month ago,” writes Mrs. D., “my
face was as rough as a won of
rusty tin and iron. Today it is like
a butter-slide.
Marginal Note
F all sad words of tongue or
pen, the saddest are “I have
only got one pair of official trou-
sers,”
official has complained: “It is diffi-
cult to maintain a smart appear-

ance with only one pair of official i

trousers.” I can asure him that it
is even more difficult with only
one pair of unofficial trousers.

Sizes 36-44

Ankle-length DRAWERS
sizes 32-44 $9.69

DIAL 4220

erous petticoats, crinolines, hoops,
and bustles in the best Edwardian
tradition are all part of the eve-
ning scene. Even short, party
dresses have crindlined skirts.

For day wear, necklines have
risen discreetly. Day frocks, aré
cut daringly low at the back—dll
are daringly low by night.

Hats are feminine and atter-
ing and nearly all do double duty.
Veils double as boas, or hug t)'e



After buying all the chings ou
Mrs. Bear's list Rupery has to be
more cautious than ever, for he has
ro catry a full basket in one hand
and 4 bag of eggs in the other. On
his way Back he meets Bill Badger
and Algy Puig. Algy calls out
cheerily arid waves, Bor at that



the ice-flower—3



Bustles At Night

head; gossamer veils give a head-
in-the-clouds look, and all can be
worn independently of the hats
they accompany.

The Far Eastern influence is a

sure summer bet. It shows in
materials—cotton Indian prints,
Oriental stoles, Indian - saris.

Indian print cotton frocks feature
base tops and pocketed stoles
stoles inspired by saris. Linen
coclie jackets with velyeteen
trimmings are worn with con-
trasting linen skirts.

Beach suits with tapered, calf-
Jength trousers, are made up in
red and blue saileloth. The loose
jackets have embroidered fronts,

wide elbow-length sleeves, and
turn-back cuffs,
WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.E.S.





EE warn r



he down,

n, bump.
** Ok, bad luck, Algy,"’ cries Rupert
as he turns his head to laugh at his

him and goes

al. ‘* What does the ice feel like ?
've been all the way to the P
and back to here and I haven't
tumbled once."

ALL RIGHTS SPSERVED ie te hay ad

JANETTA DRESS SHOP
U over NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad Street
BEAUTIFUL AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL

N
and EVENING
Open SATURDAY MORNING un’

11,30,



To Tottenham Council an}

COIL SPRINGS
MATTRESSES

BEDSTEADS

MAHOGANY COLOUR—From $27.72 each

from $12.99 each
from $13.40 each

SS CHECK Our Prices on These!

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.



a
Records; 6 p.m. Music
6007.15 pm. .

6.15 p.m. Welsh Magazine;
Progr! e Parade; 7 p.m, The
7.10 p.m, News. Analysis; 7.15 pan. West
Indian Guest Night; 7.45 p.m. Genera

91.82, 48.43 M.

8 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Meet
the Commonwralth; 845 p.m. Composer
of the Week; 9 p.m. Report from Britain;

BBC Scottish Variety Orches-



Speaking.
711.00 Pom. oo. eee

11 p.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra.

J'CA PLANS TO DEVELOP
PINEAPPLE INDUSTRY

\FPror: Our Own Correspoudent)
KINGSTON. Ja. April 3

A programme for the develop-
ment of the pineapple industry in
Jamaica has been drawn up by
Government in collaboration with
the growers’ organisation and it
is expected that work on this
programme will begin this year.

Arrangements are now being
made for the importation from
Florida of 20,000 suckers of the
Natal variety for propagation un-
der the direction and control of the
Department of Agriculture, Based
on the result obtained from the
planting of these suckers and the
advice of a pineapple expert to be
obtained under the United Nations’
programme of Technical Assist-
ance, a further 30,000 suckers is

likely to be obtained.

UTIL AD RD
OEE gh AE sa 2
re tekst ee
TA ae teed
ee we
Pee |
heh det BR
Pod OG a RK
Pedy poesia Rc teil -3)













See 5 Across. (9)
Queen of 1 Across who wore @

1 coat. (9)
it to score it, (3)
Top marking. (9
\< Refreshing Rinse. (5)
This can rise to poison. (7)
. Has the head of a woman and
the body of a lioness, (6)
a} pager.
22. cre. St SY OF & ee, CC)
pra or the hay. (3)
25; Cali that f# heard either way. (3)
Down

Japanese coin. (3)

Slope for a change, (5)

Lists mean differently. (4-5)
4 giacier cleft. (8
Known to 1 Across. (5)

Friend from the palace. (3)

{rf you've got the flu vou do (3)
Encronches, (

Endowa in another way. (6)
Ready money. (4) :
Cirele Known to Londoners. (5)
Ten short of the allotted span.
fy 0 A sort of foot (3)

GLOBE
Opening Friday

IDF CSraspop

tee



THE BRAND OF
GREATNESS
jis ON...

The Richest Ranch-
lands in the West!

aHAL WALLIS
PRODUCTION

starring.

WALTER
HUSTON
JUDITH ANDERSON
GHBERT ROLAND THOMAS GOMEZ
BEULAN BONDI

Directed by ANTHONY MANN

By the author of
“Duel In The Sun”

Screenplay by Charles Senne.
From Tiel Niven Busch




PLUS ALL STAR
TALENT CONTEST






a ASSP PH EEE tease eese serene

ROBERT

Sete ee emer teen tee saeens te

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE; TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
YOUNG—MAW. oO

8
WEBB



TO-NIGHT_at
RA—CLIFTON

“ G PRE CTY"
with RICHARD HAYDN—LO

A Mth Century-Fox Picture.



TINEE: WEDN
WEDNESDAY & T' 8,50
TERNEY—JOHN PAYNE—ANNE BAXTER

TYRONE Pore T

AY at 445 p,m.
RSDAY NIGHT at

n W. Somerset Maugham's

PLAZA DIAL
OISTIN 8404

To-day Last Two Shows
5 8.30 p.m,
“GOING PLACES”
with DICK POWELL and
“D. PASSAGE"
with HU ‘EY BOGART

Wednesday and Thursday 5 and
8,30 p.m, (Monogram)
“THE MISSING LADY”

with KANE RICHMOND -nd

“GENTLEMAN JOE PALOOKA”™
with LEON BRROL |

“THE RAZOR'S EDGE"



|






GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James

To-day 830 p.m
“MY OWN TRUE LOVE”
with PHYLLIS CALVERT and
“CHICAGO DEADLINE”
with ALAN LADD

Wed, & Thurs. 8.30 (R.K.O.)
JAMES WARREN in
“CODE OF THE WEST"
TIM HOLT in
“WILD HORSE MESA"











|
|

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

HERBERT WILCOX Presents
ANN.

A_NEAGLE—MICHAEL WILDING in

“THE
with GLADYS

COURTNEYS OF

CURZON STREET”

YOUNG and others
THURSDAY 1.90 p.m.

)R.K.O,)

JAMES W. in “CODE OF THE WEST" and
TIM HOLT in “WILD HORSE MESA"
THURSDAY (Only) By Numerous (Request
“THE STORY OF BOR AND SALLY”
w 4.45 p.m. MEN 8.30

Age Limit 16 Years and Over

AJ. ARTHUR RANK

JOE CLEMENDORE

EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.30
and Continuing

J. Arthur Rank Presents
FREDRIC MARCH in

CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS

Color By Tectinicolor
Co-Starring. ...

Florence ELDRIDGE
Francis L. SULLIVAN and

Linden TRAVERS

ROXY
Last Two Shows To-day
4.45 and 8.30

J. Artur Rank Presents
FREDRIC MARCH in

CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS

Color By Technicolor

Co-Starring ....
Florence ELDRIDGE

Francis L. SULLIVAN and
Linden TRAVERS



ware, Sparking Plugs,
Upholstery.

In bottles
60c.

BRIDGETOWN

_ Positively the Last Showings before going on to Trinidad.

TO-DAY LAST SHOWS 5 & 8.30

“HE WALKED BY NIGHT”
SCOTT (CANON) BRADY—RICHARD BASEHEART
TO.MORROW & THURSDAY 5 & 8.30




Presentation
An EAGLE LION Films Release



of
and 34c.



PLANTATIONS LTD.









by ila

Boas. et

Pane co.

W.SOMERSET MAUGHAM | The

personally
brings his greatness
‘0 nm!

UARIST

With 40 FAMOUS PLAYERS!

ALL GIRLS
ALL STAR
TALENT SHOW

LADIES NITE

1/- House—30c. Bal.

GUEST STAR

Famous Contortionist



ROYAL

To-day Last Two Shows
4.30 and 8.30
Universal Smashing Double
WARREN HULL in

THE WEREWOLF
OF LONDON

and

THE HOUSE
OF DRACULA

with
Lon CHANEY and
John CARADINE

OLYMPIC

To-day and To-morcow
4.30 and 8.15
Republic Smashing Double
Rod CAMERON and
Ferrest TUCKER in

The PLUNDERERS

DEATH VALLEY
GUNFIGHTER

Starring
Alan (Rocky) LANE and
His Stallion Black Jack



NEVER
DESPAIR

Just use :

BEAUCAIRE

THE SUPERB DRY CLEANSER

for cleaning --

Felt Hats, Frocks and Gowns, Crepe de Chines, Voile, Ninons,
Dainty Materials, Carpets, Rugs, Curtains, Jewellery, Gloves,
Lamp Shades, Glassware, Wind Screens, Ornaments, Silver-
Chrominum Fittings, Typewriters,

two sizes
per bottle

POON

SPEIGHTSTOWN

°
wenn petite tetris
SOO IIL



§



TUESDAY, APRIL
a i RS OE rn cn TTT

10,

IP A ANEZ
‘BACK

But Allies
will watch |:
the Pacific|

APAN now takes a top place
oJ in the deliberations or the big
has
circulated a draft peace treaty
which she hopes will be signed

Powers. For America

by midsummer,

In this map, Daily Express artist
these
proposals by Washington :—
(}) American trusteeship over the
Sere Ane verten islands—with

apanese territorial sovereignty
ricted horw
minor neighbouring

John Bodle spotlights

r to the four
islands and
isles.

Japan to renounce all claims

(2) Formosa and the Peseadores;
South
Sakhalin and the Kurile Islands
awarded to Russia at Potsdam
America wants Japan to be able
to apply for membership of the

(3) Korea; and (4)



Sir Charles Woolley

Going To U.K.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 8
Governor Sir Charles Woolley,

left British Guiana by air to-day
for Trinidad where he will join
the Golfito to proceed t England.

During his scheduled three-
month busman’s holiday in the
United Kingdom, His Excellency
hopes to find ways and means of
getting more money to enab'e this
eountry to get ahead with devel-
opment at a brisker pace.

Colonial Secretary, Honourable
John Gutch, O.B.E., acts as offi.
cer administering the Government
for the period of Sir Charles’ ab-
sencce,—(CP)

U.S. MINING COMBINE
WANTS LICENCES
TO PROSPECT IN J’CA

(From Our Own Correspondent)

_ KINGSTON, J’CA, April 3.
An American combine has
made application to the Jamaica
Government for licences to pros-
pect in the Constitution Hill
area of the island in a mining
project. Lead, copper and zinc
are the main metals to be devel-
oped and the move follows recent



Prospecting by a pair of US.
mining engineers, Copper has
been mined sporadically in the

island for over two centuries
‘while zinc and lead deposits have
been found in several places

The copper mining combine,
which has applied for these li-
eences, will commence operations
eae as the Government per-
mits,



J'CA RECRUITS
WORKERS FOR U.S.A.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
_ KINGSTON, J’ea., April 3
- With former employers of Ja-
maican farm labourers applying to
e U.S. Immigration authorities
for the importation of 5,000 work-
ers this season, the local Labour
Department has made arrange.
ments for the recruiting of 1,000
men during this month, 500 in May
and 2,000 in June ang the airlines
have arranged facilities for air
travel.
Recruitment started this week.



TRINIDAD NOTES
(From Qur Own Correspondent)
ORT-OF-SPAIN, April 7
The legal circulation of notes in
Trinidad at the end of 1949 was
$18,399,234, and the sum of $1,750
was received as commission for
issue of notes. Also, $734.24 was
received from the Board of Trade
being interest on $4,881.68 at the
rate of 2% per cent per annum
in settlement of a claim for Cur-
rency notes and currency notes
peer from date of damage to
ate of the payable order.
oetieemeneene

College Patois

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN April 6.
Possibility of research work on
Patois as part of the studies to be
pursued at the University College
of the West Indies, is being con-
sidered. This was stated by Pro-
fessor M. Sandmann, Professor in
Languages on the staff of the
University College, who is now in
Trinidad with Professor P. M.
Sherlock, vice Principal, and
Professor Eric Cruickshank, Dean
of the Faculty of Medicine,

Moving
Problems



ROBERTS

TRUCKS, TROLLEYS & WHEELS

A TRUCK and TROLLEY



1951

PO 1H

a





fl
e — Sangkok
Hie

to Se PHILIPPINES (US) __

United Nations and to carry
world trade
after the peace treaty is sign
she should still keep forces ii
Japan to protect her.

J’ca Taxes Raised
From April 1

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’CA, April 3.

April 1, the beginning of
new financial year,
added taxation to the
Jamaica,

Motor car drivers’
were increased 100% from 10/-
to 20/- a year; trade and busi-
ness licenees moved up from
£25 to £50 a year and the rates
in excess of £500 value from
7/6d to £1 2s. 6d, in the £10; with
the maximum rate payable being
increased from £100 to £300;
auctioneers and commission
agents licences went up from
£7. 10/- to £15; Retailers
licences went up from a mini-
mum of 10/- to £1, with an
increase of rates from 7/6d to
£1.2.6. in the £10, and the maxi-
mum payable from £75 to £225.

a
broughi
people o

licences

Entertainment admission fees
were also increased, The tax on
entertainment tickets went up
from 25% to 33 1/3% on all
tickets, the cost of whieh exceed-
ed 1/6d.



Jamaica Prepares
To Fight Typhoid

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON J’ca, April 3.
The medical department has
geared itself to fight a threatened
lyphoid epidemic in the siland.
Thirty-six thousand c.e. of T.U.B.
vaccine have been sent to medi-
eal centres throughout the island
during the past 8 weeks to build
up existing stores into quantities
sufficient to inoculate the com-

rrunities.

Meanwhile, as the island swel-
ters in the grip of drought which
has tainted water supplies in the
rutal districts and which is direct-
ly believed to be the cause of the
outbreak, the Health Office has
issued a warning to boil all drink.
ing water in rural areas before
use.

The laboratory where the
T.U.B. vaccine is manufactured,
is working at peak to sustain sup-
plies of the drug and there is no
immediate fear of shortage.



CHRISTIAN APEROACH
TO GRENADA'S LABOUR
PROBLEMS URGED

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, April 6.
An appeal to laymen and
women to play their part in pro-
moting better community rela-
tions, with Christian principles as
their guide, was made __ last
Wednesday night by Miss Megan
Phillips, speaking at the St,

Georges’ R.C, Boys’ School.

Miss Phillips, a former pupil
of the St. Joseph’s Convent High
School and now reading for a
Doctorate in Sociology, spoke on
the Lay Apostolate, defining this
as the whole company of Christ-
ians applying the principles
laid down in the Gospel in their
everyday living, and moving
among the fellow members of
their community and endeav-
ouring to create better social and
economic conditions. She urged
this approach to Grenada’s
present labour problems.

She suggests ud



‘the group term





















BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Also is a_ collective
security eme in the Pacific

ua revival of
Rosane ahiehe,
Britain favours the proposals

IE 8

Attlee’s
Disease

ELL over half a million men
in England and Wales have
shared or are sharing with Mr.
Attlee she unwelcome experience
of suffering from a duodenal ulcer.
The treatment of this common
disease and the closely related
gastric ulcer (“peptic ulcer” is the
‘or both) is a
heavy charge on the National
Health Service, and the economic
loss is equally great. In a group
of one hundred men it may be
capped that 33 working days
will be lost each year due to this
disability.

Duodenal ulcer, like coronary
thrombosis, is a disease which has
become much more common in
the last twenty or thirty years.
During the nineteenth century it
occurred most often in young
women: now it mainly affects
men, the age of greatest incidence
being 45-55. During the last war
the rate of discharge from the
Army on account of peptic ulcer
was 300 times what it was in the
1914-18 war.

The cause of duodenal and gas-
tric uleer is unknown. The duo-
denum consists of the first few
inches of the small intestine, and
it receives from the stomach the
food which has been partially
diges in that organ. It is not
clear whether the amount of hy-
drochloric acid formed in the
stomach has anything to do with
the origin of an ulcer, but quite
certainly the acid delays healing
when an ulcer is present.

Hunger Pains

One of the main objects of
treatment is to en the acid
in the stomach from perpetually
irritating the ulcer, hence the ad-
vice to eat little and often, for in
this way the acid will be neu-
tralised.

Patients with duodenal ulcer
often complain of hunger pains
when their stomach is empty, and
it is a characteristic of the disease
that food relieves the pain. Besides
distary, teatime, simple drugs to
neutralise the acidity are also in-
dicated, aluminium hydroxide and
nenenus trisilicate being two
modern variations of them.

While the pain of duodenal ulcer
is usually nagging rather than in-
tense, there can be serious compli-
cations. X-rays will give valuable
information about the type of
ulcer present, and in some cases,
surgical treatment may be neces-
sary. ‘

There has been much specula~
tion about the reasons for the
rapid increase in the numbers of
patients with peptic ulcer. Two
well-known London physicians
have recently tried to find out
whether particular kinds of work
tend to cause ulcers. They were
unable to confirm the commonly
held views that bus drivers and
conductors are particularly prone
to this disease and that irregu-
larity of meals and shift work are
predisposing factors.

Anxiety at Work

On the other hand, foremen and
others holding responsible posi-
tions in industry were found to be
specially susceptible, These doc-
tors concluded — aoe wnt
work oppo: worries a
Bae personality factors
leading to anxiety at work, are
unduly common !n subjects with
duodenal ulcer.”

It is common knowledge that
the stomach is closely linked with
the emotions; anticipation of
something unpleasant leads to “a
sinking feeling,” which are often
the very words an ulcer sufferer
uses to ‘describe his ores toms,

e@ highly strung ndividua is
particularly susceptible ner-
vous indigestion, but whether or
not he develops a duodenal ulcer

‘| will depend on both his constitu-

tion and environment.

For their ulcers to heal, patients
nrg mental as well as physical
rest.

Not so long ago patients dis-
charged from hospital after treat-
ment were exhorted to keep
strictly to an uninspiring diet and
an unexciting life, but, as the

recently said, “It is
reasonable to expect a restless,
eager, and ambitious man, such as
many ulcer patients are, to lead a
frustrated vegetable ence.”

With knowledge limited as it is,
the only safe way to recuperation
is by diet and rest, but the time

hen some glandular
i Ye used to prevent the
dispepsia which so commonly re-
flects the stomach’s reaction to
overtaut nerves. —LES.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED.



GRENADA GETS NEW
DEPUTY POLICE CHIEF

(From Our Own Correspondent)
is rd GEORGE'S April 6.
r. .

Police.

tendent Jenkins had

un-

Jenkins, former Chief
Constable, Falkland Islands, is the
new Deputy Superintendent of

irty-nine years old, Superin-
revious

generally, but has told Washing-
en she would like a limit on

Jayprrse shipbeiifing.
Russia has broken off talks on

Japan, But she will not be











| Spies Got |
| Skyship
Secrets

From NEWELL ROGERS
NEW YORK.
A Russian espionage ring got
| information about an American
space ship, said a confessed atom
| spy in court.

David Greenglass entered the
witness-box to testify against his
sister, Mrs. Ethel Rosenberg, agec
35, and his brother-in-law, 33-
year-old Julius Rosenberg,

The charge of conspiring to spy
for Russia in wartime carries ¢
possible death penalty

OcEAN
a if

ne

Greenglass said Rosenberg told
him he got data on a “sky plat-



allowed to veto the pact, And form project from one of the
fhe eS x ts that she shall boys”—identity not disclosed,

He said Rosenberg explained|
that it involves the suspension of |
a large vessel in space between the
gravity pull of the earth and the!

in possession of
South Sakhalin and the Kurile
Islands only if she signs it.

London Express Service



Washington Was
An Experimental

Farmer

“I KNOW of no pursuit in
which more real and important
services can be rendered to any
country, than by improvin;
agriculture, its breed of useful
animals, and other branches of a
husbandman’s cares,” observed
George ashington more than
150 years ago.

ashi m, the first President
of the United States, was also the
Nation’s first experimental farmer.
He was a farsighted citizen who
realized the importance of agri-
culture to the future of the United
States. He Sonia experimenting
on several thousand acres (hee
tares) of land he owned in Mount
Vernon, in the State of Virginia.

Throughout his life he sought
to broaden his agricultural
knowledge by corresponding with
farm experts in many other coun-
tries. m France and England
he learned the latest techniques
of planting alfalfa and potatoes.
He discovered new ways to cope
with blights and better methods
of plowing. Before long he was
recéiving plants, birds, and ani-
mals from France, Arabia, China,
Spain, and Malta-——all sent by
friends who wanted to help him
build up agriculture in the new
world.

His farm practices were not like
those of other farmers in America.
Because land was then plentiful
and inexpensive, most farmers
would move to another area as
soon as their soil became deplet-
ed. This was not Washington's
method, When his soil appeared
worn out, he experimented in
treating it with new fertilizers.
He rotated his crops and planted
new varieties of seed. He was a
protector of the soil, practising
the best conservation measures he
could learn.

Wheat was one of Washington's
best crops. He has filled his
diaries with records of his many
experiments. Eventually he rais-
ed so fine a crop that by 1763 his
wheat was selling for 91 cents a
bushel; and by 1769 he was able
to keep his own three mills busy
grinding flour that was so uni-
formly fine in quality that it never
lacked for purehasers. It was
exported to the West Indies in
home-made barrels, simply mark-
ed “George Washington — Mount
Vernon.”

Washington was also a pioneer
in horticulture and his orchards
became famous, By extensive
grafting processes and wise plant-
ing he succeeded in produeing
fine varieties of plums, grapes,
pears, peaches, apples, and cher-
ries.

His great concern for his crops
is recorded in his diaries. n
April 18, 1798, after a severe frost,
Washington wrote: “Peaches not
killed and hoped other fruit not

hurt. Points of the new moon
upwards . Began to plant
corn.”

Later on, writing about August
weather, he said: “On the 28th
there was a very refreshing rain
but not sufft. (sufficient) to go to
the roots of Indian corn which
was suffering very much for want

it.

That he believed in the preser-
vation of trees is noted from a
letter he wrote his farm manager
in 1795: “It is always in one’s
power to cut a tree down, _ but
time only can place them where
one would have them, after the
gerd. (ground) is stripped of
them.” Whenever one of his
fields was to be cleared he insist-
ed that a few trees or clumps be
left_ standing.

Washington was also noted as a
successful breeder of good animal
stock, and raised many fine horses,
sheep, cattle, and hogs.

Summing up his observations
on farming to Arthur Young, edi-
tor of the Annals of Agriculture
and the outstanding farmer in
Great Britain in the early part of
the eighteenth century, Washington
wrote: “The more I am acquaint-
ed with agricultural affairs, the
better I am pleased with them
. . . how much more delightful
to an undebauched mind is the
task of making improvements on
the earth than all the vain glory
which can be acquired from rav
aging it, by the most uninterrupt-
ed career of conquests.”

en

China Got 19,407

Tons Malayart
Rubber
SINGAPORE, April 7.

Communist China got 19,407
tons of Malayan rubber during
the first three months of this year,
according to official figures re-
leased here today.

This amount compared with
the 38,568 tons received by China
during the whole of 1940.

Direct shipments to Russia were
none in March but totalled 8,101

in January and February. This
compared with 68,058 tons during

and Cortificate of the Royal Life “The high percenta .

ge of rubber
Saving Society and the Medal of exported to Hong Kong is known
the S*, John’s Ambulance Associa- to be re-exported to China.

tion. Exports of Malayan rubber to
He served under Colonel E. M. Hdng Kong, China, Russia and

moon.
Scientists speculate that a
nation able to launch atom bombs
from such a platform could rule
the earth The U.S. Army ha
admitted conducting research int
an “earth satellite vehicle pro-
gramme.”
“% ria el a aes ete a Greenglass also told the jury that
on Saturday, Apil 7, by Member }® month after the atom bomb was
Countries of the World Health}@?opped on Hiroshima he gave
Organization, a Specialized Agency Rosenberg a description of a
of the United Nations. “ Jnewer-type bomb,
aieerieot x mp Sn, Oe te MEAT for another man is ina
WHO's Constitution became et- film, to be called “One Man's
fective in 1948, followed the pat-] Poison.” Actor Gary Merrill is
tern of last year when various] 8°!%8 to Britain to appear in it,
Member States called attention to 5@ys Mrs. Merrill, better known
health through exhibits, recep- }45 Bette Davis, ‘It offers a fine roie
tions, plays, processions, sports|for Gary, and mine is excellent,
events, baby contests, clean-up}too, I have always wanted to play
campaigns, and the showing oifin a suspense melodrama done it
lantern slides, the quiet, effective British way.”
WEATHER is to be investigatec
by a Senate committee to see
whether it can be controlled to
conserve water resources

HOVERPLANE pilots are
have a special army training schovl
of their own. They will be organ-
ised in companies to carry troops
and supplies to front lines—one
company of 28 aircraft to each
army division,

LEAP YEAR, 1952, will cost the
United States Government a lot
of money. The Civil Service has
to be paid extra for February 29

BRITISH manufacturers are
selling so many fast two-seater
sports cars that American com-
panies are being tempted to plunge
into the market. Defence pro-
duction may prevent their offer-
ing too much competition,

SCREEN STAR Mary








Children’s
Day

As the one-day observance of
World Health Day is held in
Member Countries, year-round
efforts of the World Health Or-
ganization to improve child
health will be continued by WHO
personnel at headquarters and in
the field — for example, by
malaria spraying teams in Pak-
istan and Thailand, at tuberculo-
sis centres in India and Turkey,
in a campaign against eye in-
fections among Palestine refugees,
in large-scale attacks on yaws in
Haiti and Indonesia, and in ma-
ternal and child health services
on many continents.

The significance of the theme
“Health for Your Child and the
World’s Children” has been un-
derlined in a statement by Dr.
Brock Chisholm, Director-General
S the World Health Organiza-
lon

What needs to be stressed, he Astor

“ete joined the glamorous’ grand-
said, “is the very intimate rela-{'OMe & : BP Shak’ 8
tionship which exists between the Hy men eee - ee Porn
health of the child—when defined J het , 19-year-old daughter, Mrs

as total health—ana the gsolu-) Marilyn Thorpe Roh,
tion of the great crisis which
confronts humanity to-day, The
world will be what our children
and the children of the next gen-
eration make it.



Quebec Will Spend
$1,500,000,000

On Resources

“If,...we sueceed not only in
making our children physically
healthy but also in freeing them
of our taboos, our anxieties, and
destructive impulses; if we teach
‘them to feel and to act in accord
with a sense of responsibility for
the welfare of their fellow hu-
man beings—not just locally, not
just nationally, but for the whole
human race; if, in other words,
we help them toward real ma-
turity, then we need not worry
about our future and theirs: i
cannot but be secure, peaceful
and truly rich in the values that
make life worthwhile.”

QUEBEC, April 7.

Development of Quebec’s vast
nining and hydro-electric resour-
‘es will be stepped up to the
tune of $1,500.000.000 in the
iext two years, Premier Duples-
tis said on Friday.

The Premier told his weekly
oress conference that the amount
neludes Government expenditure
@ the hydro-electric development




















ss aa “ and private enterprise, and in-
tol Ce ie She ie wanes vestment in both mining and
Children” is considered of high- nydro-electric promotions.
on importance by the Organiza- Among new mining _develop-
tion Since beginning its work ments Premier Duplessis _ listed

considerable quantities of ferrous
sands on the St. Lawrence River
1orth shore.—(CP)

officials have pointed out, WHO
has sought to help governments
develop services and facilities
that would assure adequate ma-
ternity care, the best possible
chance of survival to infants, and
opportunity for all children to
grow up in a healthful environ-
niént, free from preventable
disease,

One yardstick for judging the
health of a country, WHO has
stated, is its infant mortality rate:
how many infants out of 1,000
will die, on the average, before
reaching their first birthday.



Jca Selects 3 For
Festival Of Britain

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, April 3
The Legislative Council of Ja-
maica has selected the Hon, Doug
las Judah to be one of the island's
representatives to the Festival of
Britain this year
Two other representatives pre-
viously selected by the House of
Representatives are the Hon. Sir
Harold Allan, Kt., O.B.E., J.P
Minister for Finance and General
Purposes and Leader of the House,
and Mr. L. L. Simmonds, M,H.R
Chairman of the House Committec

This rate varies from less than
30 per thousand in some coun-
tries to 200 per thousand in
others, WHO records show. In
large areas, statistics do not even
exist but surveys indicate that
one out of every three children
dies in infancy,

Only a hundred years ago,}on Finance and President of the
WHC has stated in a report pre-} Elected Members’ Asscciation
pared for World Health ay,

Mr. Judah represented Jamaica
on the Closer Association Commit
tee and at the Montego Bay Con-
ference. Sir Harold once repre
sented the B.W.1. at International
Trade talks in London, Geneva and
Havana, and Mr. Simmonds pre

“such a situation existed almost
everywhere in the world.” Since
then, particularly during the past
several decades “improvement
has been very rapid in Burope,
North America and Australia, and
in some places on other conti-

nents.” Within a century the} viously represented Jamaica at the
has dropped in Germany,} West Indies Conference

for example, from 300 to 50} It is anticipated that Mr. Judah

Western Germany) since 1900 in- | who is Chairman of the Legislative

‘ant mortality has declined in Bel-} Council’s Select Committee on

gium from 172 to 63, in Australia] Constitutional Advance for Jamai-

from 104 to 28.

“A low infant mortality rate
is no longer considered to be the
privilege of countries with a
favourable climate,” the report
continues, “Children born in the
hot humidity of a tropical forest
or in the darkness of an Arctic
winter can enjoy good health..
provided the necessary public
health measures are taken by the
community and understood and
followed by the public,”

ea, will discuss this matter unoffi



Hongkong Shipping Was Not

Seized For Evacuation

HONG KONG, April 7.
A Government spokesman today
denied that the Hong Kong auth-
orities had put emergency regula-
tions into force yesterday to enable

GARDEN SHEARS
TRUCK JACKS
GREEN CANVAS—69”
FRICTION TAPE

year-old regulations which allow
the authorities to requisition “any
vehicle or animal, and any launch,
lighter, boat or other small craft,
and ,any ship, vessel or aircraft.)






cially with Colonial Office officials,;
'

GARDEN HOSE—14” and 3”
GARDEN HOSE FITTINGS

TUBE VALVES—Truck and Car

PAGE THREE



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impurities ; sufferers from
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neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
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system
many

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CARPET MATERIAL
RUBBER MATS
REAR VIEW MIRRORS
6 & 12 Volt BUZZERS
ROOF LAMP BULBS &
SOCKETS ‘
ELECTRIC WIRE & FLEX
BATTERY CABLES
ACCESSORY SWITCHES
Flat GALVANISED SHEETS
Hard Gloss WHITE PAINT
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GREY PAINT for Flooring
SIGNAL RED for Body
HEAT RESISTING BLACK
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ROOM:
seats ©



cong, ©
* was, od ith OP
tr

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone | 4504
/ ”






HOLDERS

RUBBER MATTING

REAR VIEW MIRRORS.
WINDSCREEN WIPERS (Vacuum)
COOL CUSHION

GAS TANK LOCKS (English and

LICENCE

~~

. them to seize shipping for a pos is ‘ ‘ i
police experience in England be- the, lat zone, the peggy Séded. itis everustion.”- ‘ PLASTIC LEATHER CLOTH American Cars)
ore klands. i ar- a > =
Delivery for every BONN irs Ceidkr “ct te rttice Mace: MsI87=" rubber ducing this quar- "| But he gave po reason for the NUMBER PLATES & DIGITS HAND SOAP

CHROME CLEANER

8. P. MUSSON SON & CO., LTD,-Agents COURTESY GARAGE















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tendent, St. Lucia, whe has been trolled from Apri! 9 under new wag connected with Hong Kong’s ROBERT THOM. LTD. _ White Park Rd. oa Dial 4391
% %| appointed to act temporarily as licensing regulations announced relationship with Communist
l SCSSCSSOS SOO 9S OO POOF O9 FSO PPO OV OF OOV9 90 0F0F5 709007 Superintendent. on Thursday, , —Reuter, China | NSS SESS SS SE



PAGE FOUR :





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown



Tuesday, April 10, 1951

STALE FISH

THE danger of having severe and lasting
damage done_to the health of the general
public through the indiscriminate sale and
consumption of “stale” fish about the City
is becoming more and more apparent. This
newspaper has on more than one occasion
called attention to the necessity for
amending the present Act so that the Sani-
tary Authorities could deal with the situa-
tion.



There is, however, a new and more
satisfactory method of removing thé im-
mediate danger. There have been in recent
months large catches of fish at various
points but especially at Bridgetown and
Oistins. Owing to the late hour at which
these fish reach shore; sales are limited and
the surplus is left to the hawkers who put
them on ice and hawk them around the
street next day. The fish has already been
exposed to sun and air for several hours
before reaching shore and this further ex-
posure after a few hours on ice causes
deterioration.

The Sanitary Authorities can only stop
the sale of these fish when it can be proved
that they have been exposed for some par-
ticular period. Even at this stage applica-
tion must first be made to a Police Magis-
trate who can then issue an order that the
fish be brought before him and if deemed
unfit for human consumption, declared as
unfit for sale and to be dumped.

This long and tedious process has been
the cause of the flourishing trade which
now threatens to endanger public health.

The solution.to the problem seems to
be proper means of distribution and mark-
eting, but these must be accompanied by
adequate cold storage facilities. The sur-
plus fish which are not purchased during
the evening could be gutted and stored.
This would be under Government super-
vision. They would not be available for
retail by hawkers or fishmongers but for
hotels, restaurants and housewives who
would make their purchases direct from
the cold storage. This method would re-
move the possibility of having fish distri-
buted early in the day by wheel-barrows
and trays after they had been exposed in
fishing boats and ashore for several hours.

The first necessary step in the overall
change, however, is the improvement of
distribution. It has happened that a single
day’s taking by the fleet brought 40,000
flying fish to the Public Market; @ it were
possible either by means of private enter-
prise or by government to have the means
of distributing such large numbers out-
side Bridgetown it would be possible for
people who now seldom get fish for the
dinner table because they live off the ’bus
xoutes, to purchase some of them, At pres-
ent the reverse is true. Fish from Oistins
and Holetown and Speightstown are now
loaded on to motor lorries and come to the
City for sale.

Barbados ought to examine seriously the
question of exporting surplus fish. It is
possible for Barbados to build up an ex-
port trade if the fish are put on ice at the
time of catching. This means that certain
boats would have to be fitted with ice
chambers perhaps on the scale of one
boat in every group of twenty.

These boats would be able to take the
fish back to shore soon after they had been
caught. Those in excess of normal re-
quirements could be exported by air.
There is today a demand for flying fish in
Montreal and this demand can be fulfilled
by Barbados providing the fish and Trans
Canada Airlines providing the transport.

The difficulties which the fish industry is
now experiencing have been the subject
of close and careful investigation. Even
now the Government is trying to find solu-
dions but the absence of proper and
adequate cold storage facilities still pre-
sents the greatest obstacle. In the mean-
time refrigeration on boats and better dis-
tribution seem to solve the problem of
stala fish.



OUR READERS SAY:



Lamy Life With Father The Two Men I'd Call Back

THE MARX BROTHERS. By Kyle
Crichton. Heimemann. 12s. 6d.
326 pages.

The young Marxes were not a
family. They were a social men-
ace, Society had the duty either
to round them up or stamp them
out. Society failed in both those
tasks. It was not for want of try-
ing.

So much becomes evident in
this vivacious, all-in record of
family life on the run, on the make
and on the set, The Evening
Standard Book of the Month, if
not literature, is unblushing, di-
verting, 4vith some of the demonic
energy of a Doctgem car.

In the person of Mr. Hummel,
rent collector on Ninety-third
Street, Society drew its first blank.
Gentle Mr. Hummel was no match
for so devoted a clan of rent-
dodgers: as the Marxes. Little
Augie Harzfeld, the police lieu-
tenant’s son, made some headway
in a one-man pogrom up to the
moment Chico dropped on _ his
Lead a paper bag filled with water.
This was later written off as one
of the unsolved mysteries of crime,

Papa Marx's disillusioned cus-
tomers for made-to-measure suits
might have settled the Marx prob-
lem, But the Marxes survived their
first encounters with a cruel world
—police poverty, even the cruel
Irish on Ninety-second Street
Papa sometimes won at the races.
And Mama, in the darkest days,
kept a penny game of ante going
in the kitchen.

Here is the Marx order of battle:
Leonard (Chico), mathematical
genius; Adolf (Harpo), believed
to be the most brilliant illiterate
in history; Julius (Groucho), stu-
dent of letters; Milton (Gummo),
who got bored with the alphabet
half-way through and never fin-
ished it; Herbert (Zeppo), who
later took refuge from his family
in business,

Business! It was. a temptation
which most of the Marxes resisted
grimly. Chico’s experiences had
made them wary. Three times a
gust of wind biew the weekly pay
envelope out of that poor lad’s
hand as he was bringing it home
to his mother.

But what was to become of
them? What becomes of most
juvenile delinquents ? Looking
about her, Mrs, Marx discerned
the figure of Uncle Al Shean, who
had become prosperous in vaude-
ville. There, surely, was an ex-
ample for her little ones to follow!

Chico learned to play the piano
but, as his teacher put it, “He
doesn’t want to practise. He wants
to play the notes.” Harpo, an un-
discovered musical genius, was
terrified by the mere idea of notes.
Groucho, at one dollar per service,
threw in his soprano to reinforce



BARBADOS - ADVOCATE

Marx

By GEORGE MALCOLM
THOMPSON.



Elegance on 93rd Street .
HARPO MARX

the episcopal church
Madison Avenue.

This was the raw material in
which Minnie Marx, with a
mother’s instinct, discerned a
future vaudeville act. Success did
not come at once nor easily.
Gummo had a spell (that is, one
night) with his Unele Heinie, the
ventriloquist. By a refinement on
the usual practice, Gummo was to
act as the dummy, Uncle Heinie
having every qualification for his
ert save the ability to “throw”
his voice,

But at last The Nightingales, as
they were called, dressed in white
suits and supported by a_tone-
deaf girl named Janie O'Riley,
were launched in the Howard
Theatre, Boston, This home of
the drama had, from its patrons’
point of view, a singular advan-
tege. A gallery ran round three
sides of the auditorium, enabling
a well-placed ticket-holder to spit
tobacco juice on the performers,

This unpromising prelude was
followed by a raid into the Deep
South, a two-pronied attack in
which Papa and Uncle Julius
Schickler (who, having a beard,
was called “the General”) peddled
cloth, while the younger genera-
tion appealed to the artistic sensi-
bilities of the former plantation-
owners,

The appeal was rejected. In
reckless despair after one fiasco,
the family began to improvise
lines insulting to the audience—

choir on



and so the real Marx Brothers act
was born.

Gradually it grew in subtlety,
pacé and belligerence. Harpo
came upon an old harp and
thumbed his way towards an un-
derstanding of it. He still plays it
on, the wrong shoulder. His famous
silence was achieved by accident:
Uncle Al quite forgot the boy’s
existence while writing a script
for the troupe.

The Marxes emerged ‘rom the
lanes of the Confederacy strength-
ened by suffering and with a clear-
er idea of what kind of performers
they meant to be. The door to
success waS opening, although
grudgingly. Success! Groucho at
least has never quite believed
in. it. Even when his name spar-

jed over Broadway, he had a
oment of panic when he spent
50,000 dollars on an annuity.

And was he not right? When
the little Marx boys were rich at
last, came the great slump of 1929
end knocked them down like five
ninepins. When fortune smiled in
New York, it glowered in Chicago.
When Mrs, Marx put the family
savings into a chicken farm, the
chickens lost the race for survival,

And if all else succeeded, Papa
could be relied on to fail. He
counts as one of the most consist-
ent incompetents in history, a

‘man incapable of entering a train

without having to send his wife a
wire: “Where am I going? I lost
that little piece of paper.”

But maybe—the thought keeps
recurring through this saga of five
hard lives—Papa brought some of
his own innocent philosophy to the
most amazing brood of zanies in
all theatrical history.

THE GREAT ESCAPE, By Paul

Brickhill, Faber and Faber.

10s, 6d. 263 pages.

‘

Goes on the shelf next to The
Wooden Horse and ranks with
that magnificent story. Camp is
the same—Stalag Luft Ill. Differ-
ence is that this is a mass escape,
the most ambitious attempt of the
war: 600 officers, dig three tunnels
30 feet deep, 350 feet long; forge
400 passes; make 250 compasses, |
print 4,000 maps, fake German ;
uniforms “civvies”.

seventy-six men -break out.
Five million Germans take part in
the hunt, Three of the run-aways
escape to Britain. Hitler has 50
shot. A tragie end, and one of the
blackest Nazi crimes.

But not quite the end. Final
chapter tells how Wing Command-
er Bowes hunted down the
killers, Thirteen were hanged.

A war story that must not be
missed,

World Copyright Reserved,





A General Looks At The Call-Up And Declares:

We Can Do Better Without
Conscription

It is now generally accepted that
the army in Europe must consist
of 40 or 50 divisions, of which half
must be armoured divisions, and
all of these forces will have to be
standing by in Germany and main-
tained at full strength,

It is also being accepted that
the larger proportion of the ar.
moured divisions must be provided
by the U.S.A. and ourselves,

It is not possible to produce
first-class armoured divisions with
all their technicians and skilled
men from a National Service army
with enlistment for two years.
The German Panzer forces which
won such great victories in 1939-
41 were trained for four years.

The U.S.A. seems to be able to
obtain volunteers for at any rate
three years’ service and we are
now doing much better in the en-
listment of regulars, The French.
and Belgians have a good conscript
system which provides sufficient
training to produce the essential
infantry divisidns. Ty

Great Machine

We must now examine our own
problem of producing as many
divisions as possible for Europe in
addition to the provision of our
overseas garrisons,

The first point to realise is that
cur present large scale conscrip-
tion policy has forced us to pro-
duce large establishments of many
different types, none of which
would be needed if we had not
adopted conscription.

There are colleges for training
national servicé ‘officers, estab-
lishments for receiving and dis-
patching the men overseas, and, of
course, very large training estab-
lishments for the national service
men,

A great machine is needed,
when at least half the Army con-
sists of men who must be turned
over every two years due to our
conscription policy, As an_ in-
stance, almost a quarter of the
conscripts who are sent to our
more distant overseas garrisons
are permanently on the sea either
going or returning from their
stations,

The figures work out in this
way. A division requires just
under 20,000 men, But to produce



the establishment of a second
grade school for boys, a first grade,
school for girls was established





—

| by Lieut-Gen. Sir |
GIFFARD
MARTEL

Commai.der of the Royal

Armoured Corps, 1940; Head

of the British Military Mis-
sion to Moscow, 1943,



ten intaniy divisions we need an
army of 415,000 men, which is
more than; double the numerical
strength of ten divisions, Part of
this increase is due to the necessity
to provide for non-divisional
troops, but a great part is due to
the inevitable inefliciency of a
two-year conscript service,

What would be the position if
we could return to the use of a
regular army in peace-time and
effect these great savings? We
would need 10,000 men for over-
seas garrisons and 180,000 for the
Europe and Home service, ie, a
total of 250,000 for the British
Army. This would give us six
divisions at full strength for use
in Europe instead of the present
five half-trained divisions.

Quite clearly we could not
possibly shut down our conscrip-
tion policy on the assumption that
the regulars would be forthcoming,
What chance would there be of
raising these numbers?

The rate of recruiting for regu-
lars is rising rapidly, The monthly
average has more than doubled as
a result of the new pay code. We
are now offering other attractive
features,

At present we have
200,000 regulars in the Army.
Surely there would be every
chance of raising this figure to
the 250,000 which we need,

The cost of raisimg six divisions
in this way would be no higher
than our present bill; it might
even be less. The whole efficiency
of the Army would rise, Forma-
tions would be immediately ready
for war; they would not contain
a large proportion of half-trained
men.

nearly

Stay in Army
How could we put such plans
into effect? We ‘vould have to



Lord Combermere seems to have
taken an interest in the historic,
and so when he was made a baron

start by declaring that as a tem-
porary measure, to meet the emer-
gency everyone who was in the
Army would have to remain where
he was, A limit of retention up
to three years might be fixed,

A very large reduction would
‘then be made to the intake for
the Army, with a great saving in
consequence in the man-power
which is used to run the “Con-
script Machine.”

This would result in a flow of
regulars to rejoin their units and
a conversion of training units into
fighting formations. Simultane-
ously a real drive would be made
to obtain regulars,

As this progressed further
reductions would be made in the
numbers of national service men,
Those who had been retained be-
yond two years would all be
released but the whole situation
would be in hand. In the unlikely
event of a cessation of the present
flow of regulars the process could
be arrested.

Plenty of Reserves

It must be realised that this
European army may be required
for a considerable time. War may
be a long way off and we hope
that it will never take place.
Conscription would, of course, be
needed in war, but we have seen
the almost overwhelming advan-
tage of using regulars in this
preparatory stage which may be
very prolonged,

It may be argued that this policy
will not raisea large reserve, but
present conditions demand a strong
army which is ready at once.

We have plenty of reserves to
keep this army up to strength
until the war-time conscripts be-
come available and the Territorial
Army takes the field. As this
policy would greatly increase our
strength, there can be no question
of the abolition of conscription
causing any loss of morale, thoush
this has often been suggested by
those who wish to retain conscrip-
tion.

Surely we ought to take advan-
tage of this method of increasing
the strength of our standing army
without delay,

World Copyright Reserved,
—L.E.S

twenty years ago



in-every-way buses

Lizzies” compared

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1951 ~





To Pep Up The Z Army

Hy ROHERT JESSEL

MILITARY COMMENTATOR



THERE are two inen in Korea whose
proper place today is the West. If Mr.
Strachey wants to show that he understands
the importance of the new Russian Army
he talked about, he will bring these men
home.

The two men are Brigadier Basil Coad and
Brigadier Tom Brodie, who command the
British 27th and 29th Brigades in Korea. Each
has won glory in a tough campaign of ups
and downs, writing the names of their brig-
ades in the annals of British military history.

They happen to be the two senior officers
in the British Army with the latest, most
complete front-line experience of fighting
Communist soldiers.

I say that it is high time we brought them
home. Not to be dined and wined and feted,
though they richly deserve it. But to teach
the conservative-minded generals in London
and Rhine Army everything that they know
about the new kind of war our men are
fighting in the Far East.

Don’t believe the people who tell you that
there is nothing “new” in war, and that well
trained troops can tackle any type of fighting]
to which they put their hands. 1g

THEY PAID

British and French armies went to war in|?
1939 prepared to fight a 1914-18 kind of war] ¥,
—and paid the price. I have a nasty feeling] ¥
that outside Korea both the British and the] §
American armies are training to fight Ger-
mans and Italians, maybe British and Ameri-
can “enemies” on exercises—anything but
the massed Communist armies with their
spearheads of trained battalions.

It ought to be Coad’s job and Brodie’s to
put that right. It ought to be Mr. Strachey’s
main objective to see that their successors
aren’t the men at the top of the seniority
list, nor the men most easily accessible out
East.

They must be young senior officers with
a great future before them, who in turn will
come home in six months’ time to pass on
to Western divisions the lessons which hard
experience has taught them.

And when these Korean veterans do come} %
home, the one thing Mr. Strachey must not
do is to stick them into office jobs writing
reports which nobody will read, or to send
them round Britain under the C.O.I. lectur-
ing on life around the 38th Parallel.

OUR NEED

If Coad is good enough to win the un-
stinted praise of MacArthur’s senior generals
he is good enough to command a division in
Rhine Army.

This is no time to think about questions
of seniority. His arrival in Germany or his
assumption of command of a Territorial
division would set in motion a lot of new
ideas which are badly needed.

The Chinese, North Korean, or Soviet way
of war is very different from Hitler’s Mr.
Strachey. The Red soldier is not a superman
but our troops will not be trained to meet
him unless their commanders themselves
have trained in the hardest most up-to-date
school. :

Mr. Strachey is now engaged in planning
the shape of the British Army in 1952. Field-
marshal Slim is his chief military adviser
but it would involve no breach of etiquette
if the Minister had the benefit of a long
personal, first-hand discussion on the organ-
isation of an infantry division with a man
with Brigadier Brodie’s experience.

QUERY... QUERY...
Have we too many trucks in Arniy units
today when it comes to fighting in guerilla-
infested country? Have we too many men
clerking in company offices, too many educa-
tional instructors teaching current affairs,
too few men actually manning an automatic
weapon in the forward areas?

Will the average Territorial battalion,
now 120 strong, be capable within a few
weeks of mobilisation of withstanding
attacks by Red suicide squads?

Are we underrating the Communist}.
potential enemy?

Have the United States’ troops any par-
ticular weapons in Korea which our{%~
soldiers covet?

Are there any special lessons which the
Army ought to ram home with the Z men
this summer at Territorial camps?

—LES.












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“Fairy Cattle’ which inhabit the
island of CORVO in the Azores,
these cattle are only approxim-

The Effect Of A Place Name

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The name “Combermere”
is an interesting example of the
effect of a place name.

Some years after the death of
Stapleton, Ist Lord Combermere
in 1865, as a result of an Act of
1878 a second grade school was
established, and in honour of Lord
Combermere was called Comber-
mere. But there was a reason

. Why the new name of Combermere

should have been chosen, Over half
& century before in 1819, Lord
Combermere had collected funds
for a new school building, and had
himself laid the foundation stone
of that particular building. This
sehool was known as the Central
School, and included both boys
and girls throughout Lord Com-
bermere’s administration which
lasted from 1817 to 1822, as the
Parish School had done, It was in
the Central School that Lord
Combermere is said to have taken
a great interest. In 1822 an act
was passed with respect to the

Central School in which regula-
tions were laid down for both boys
and girls, 4

A few vears after Lord Comber-
mere left the Island, the girl
Were given a separate building on
another part of. the School
grounds, 1nd instead of the Central
School there were two schools,
the Boys’ Central School and the
Girls’ Central School. -

The boys continued in the
School building whose foundation
Lord Combermere had laid when
the Parish School was reorganised
(vide Vestry Minutes). In 1944
the boys were moved to excellent
new buildings at Weymouth, but
with which Lord Combermere had
nothing to do. The name “Com-
bermere” has not however been
changed, and is a reminder that
“Combermerians” had their home
as a second grade school in the
building of which Lord Comber-
mere had laid the foundation
stone more than half a century
before the school received the
name of Combermere. Scon after

ia

to which the name of Queen’s
College has been given. :

In 1944 the girls were given
back the building in which Lord
Combermere had known the gi7ls
of the Central School to be, and
where they had attended through-
out his administration as Governor
of Barbados. One has only to read
through the Act of 1822 concern-
ing the Central School to realise
this fact. This Act ‘was at the
Barbados Museum and I presume
is still there among a copy of the
laws of that period. But the fact
that Lord Combermere in laying
the foundation stone was as great
a benefactor to the girls as to the
boys has strangely been over-
looked such is the effect
of a place name,

But to pursue the matter of a
place name further Lord Comber-
mere’s surname was Cotton. He
had an ancestor, Sir George
Cotton, who in the reign of Henry
VIII had seated himself at Com-
bermere in Cheshire, formerly an
abbey of Benedictine monks
founded in 1133.

for distinguished military service
he took the title of Combermere—
thus the name “Combermere” may
be traced to an ancient abbey in
Cheshire

Yours truly, H. G..H.



No letter to the Editor can
be published unless the
writer reveals his or her
identity to the Editor.
Names are published unless
the writer particularly re-
quests the use of a “Nom-
de-plume.”



Can Be Improved
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I have just returned from
another pleasant stay in dear, de-
lightful Barbados.

There are many matters which
could be improved and to add to
the comfort of the people and of
visitors. I shall mention only
two:—

1. Your buses are primitive,
they are the same uncomfortable-

fortable buses running in Port-of-
Spain. There are not enough
buses at rush hours and on holi-
days.

2. I stayed at Hastings
visitors congregate. To transact
postal business, I had either to
take a bus to Worthing where
there is an efficiently run Post
Office or go to the G.P.O., again
by bus, and endure long waits—
néarly two hours once for three
transactions .

Why not a Post Office at Has-
tings in the heart of this large
residential and Hotel area?

I am,

where

etc,
FREQUENT VISITOR.

Fairy Cattle

To The Editor, The Advocute.

SI In view of the early
establishment of “The Govern—
ment Creamery” scheme, may I
suggest to Mr. Crawford who is
the Sponsor that he request The
Livestock Station to collaborate
with The Peasants’ Bank = in
obtaining several specimens of

* your

ately 353 inches high, Cafe au lait
in colour, with milk giving qual-
ities of the Jersey type; this
should overcome the limited
pasturage disclosed in the debate
on the address and should be a
great addition to the present
peasant owners.
With thanks for space.
Yours truly,

MILKSHAKE.
6.4.51.

Thanks

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly allow me throug’.
valuable columns, just 10
thank the Honourable members,
who supported my nomination as
Chaplain to . the House _ of
Assembly, on Tuesday last, The

names are as_ follows:—Messrs.
G. H. Adams, F. L. Walcott,
R. G. Mapp, D. D, Garner, O
Allder.
Rev, L. BRUCE CLARKE,
Tudor Bridge,

St. Michael,

Barbados §.4’51

@ Other Letters on page 8.







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TUESDAY, APRIL 10,

—

1951

St. Andrew Seat
In House of Assembly

MR. J. A. HAYNES and Mr. Seibert Worrell, candidates

for the Barbados House of

Assembly, invited about 150

parishioners at the Belleplaine Community Hall yesterday
to vote for them next Monday. The two candidates are con-
testing the seat left vacant by the late Mr. D. A. Foster.

Mr, “Josh” aynes is the
Electors’ cena candidate.
Mr. Worrell is the choice of the
Barbados Progressive League.

Mr. Haynes stressed the rising
cost of living. He said: “The
present Labour Government ‘in
power in this island has con-
tinued the policy of controls
with, to my mind, dismal failure,
and it will be my intention ii
elected to vote against any
measure that will not give free-
dom to trade and ecmmerce.”
He was sure, he ‘said, that as
long as business was trammelled
by restrictions, the cost of living
was bound to keep up.

Mr. Haynes said that he had
been approached by a large num-
ber of the electors of the parish
to offer his services. As they
already knew, he had served the
parish for seven years in the
House and during that period no
elector had ever found any fault
with his representation. He had
tried during that time to stick to
his policy of progress regardless
of class, creed or colour. In him
they had a trained man already
accustomed to taking part in the
cebates of the House—one who
was fearless in trying to get their
interest advanced in every way.

Wages Increased

“You are told by Mr. Adams
and his party since he has led
the Government that your wages
have been increased. This is
true in one respect, but Mr.
Adams does not tell you why,
nor does he tell you that with
this increase there ensues a
greater increase of the cost of all
the necessities of life, which
negatives most of the, advantages
of the bigger pay envelopes that
you are now receiving. I defy
him to tell you about increases in
pay, had there been a drop in the
price of our staple commodity—
sugar. He has been lucky in that
world prices of this article have
risen, How else could increased
wages have been paid by the
small or large landowner?”

Mr. Haynes said that he had
been told that the Road Board
employees were debarred from
the Labour Welfare Fund to
effect repairs to their houses. He
felt that this money should be
given and not lent to those whose
houses needed repairs, and as the
sugar industry could not be car-
ried on without roads, he could
not see why road workers should
net benefit from the Fund, If
he were returned, he would do
his best to have this anomaly
rectified.

Mr. Haynes then spoke about
the roads of the parish, with
special referenc2 to the East
Coast Road. He had fought hard
during his political career to get
this road put in working order,
he said, but he had read to his
amazement in the debate that the
whole matter had beea shelved.
Not only would people of the
parish get employment by the
construction of this read, but it
would assure them of a_ certain
outlet to town in heavy weather.
Even the small cane rowers
would be able to send their canes
to Three Houses Factory as they
had done in the days of the rail-
way. If he were returned he
would certainly push this mat-
ter as he had done in the past.

Lighting

He hed always felt the elec-
tric lighting would tend to
brighten and bring more of the
amenities of life to them. and if
he were given the opportunity
he would get this real grievance
remedied as soon as possible. Mr.
Haynes questioned: “What has
your late Labour representative
done in this matter? He could
have carried on my work during
my absence from the House. It
also shows that the Labour Party
has no true intentions of improv-
ing eenditions in the parish and do
not keep their promises.”

He had advocated when in the
House, the erection of a new
echool at Chalky Mount and an
enlarged school for the Hillaby
district in place of the infant
school at Gregg Farm. This was
most essential as the children in
the Hillaby district had to walk
jong distances to get their educa-
tion. He had also advovated thd
purchase of buildings constructed
curing the war at Seawell and
which were available at that
time for this purpose, Instead,
the Labour Party had allowed a
Mr. Crowe to waste all the money
on the Chalky Mount School and
none was left for the Hillaby
School, Mr, Haynes counselled.
“Let me warn you that unless
you put in the House men of
‘vision and intugrity, your condi-
tions in time will be worsened

rather than bettered.”

He had come to them under the
banner of the Electors’ Associa-
tion, not because he thought Party




SELECT THESE
FINE

Government would ever suit Bar-
bados, but because in the nature
of things today, all independence
and individualism were stifled.
He believed, therefore, that he
would be better able to serve
their.interest if he had an organi-
sation behind him, than if he
fought alone.

As to the qualifications of his

opponent, he left that to their
consideration, Mr. Haynes said
that they had always returned

him to the Vestry with an over-
whelming majority for many years
and had also done so when he had
served in the House. Do not let
the mistake they had made in 1948
in dropping him from the House,
be repeated this time.
Improvement

Mr. Seibert Worrell said that
tor many years he had been sup-

rting the candidates of the Bar-

ados Labour Party because he
was satisfied that it was the only
body which fought, and quite
successfully, for and on behalf of
the down-trodden masses. When
he looked around and saw the
vast improvement of conditions
and the advancement of his people
during the last ten years as a re-
sult of the existence of this party,
he praised God for the day that
birth was given to it; more par-
ticularly its leader, Mr. G. H.
Adams,

It was unnecessary for him to
enumerate the things he would
like to see done immediately, He
would like to mention, however,
the East Coast Road which he
wanted to see constructed soon.
He was satisfied that the Gov-
ernment was sympathetic toward:
the project and would do its best
to sce that a start was made at
an early date. He wanted to see
the Alleyne School extended in
order to accommodate more
children. He wanted to see water
in every village so that people
could get supplies with less incon-
venience, and that those desirous
of installating water might do so
at less expense.

He thought it was high time
that electricity should be all over
the parish and if he were returned
he would see that it reached them
soon. No individual alone, how-
ever could go into the House and
do anything for them, but with
the good fellowship and ¢o-
operation of his comrades every-
thing that weuld help to improve
conditions would be achieved.

“I promise you to support all
matters brought to the House ot
Assembly by our Government
which is in truth and in fact, the
saviour of the masses, who were
oppressed and kept in bondage,
misery and ignorance by the rich,
for over three hundred years.”

Mr. J. A. Haynes is a 56—year-
old planter. He went to school at
Ledge, then at Codrington Col-
lege. After he had graduated at
Codrington College, he was a
master at his old school for a
year.

He was a member of the
B.W.I. Regiment and fought in
the 1914—18 World War from
1916, returning to Barbados in
1919.

Mr. Haynes was a member of
the House of Assembly for seven
years. a member of the St.
Andrew Vestry for 27, and the
St. Joseph for nine, He was a
Board of Health member for 15
years and a member of the Gov -
erning Body of the Alleyne
School for the same period. He
was also a member of the Fancy
Molasses Control Board.

As a member of the House of
Assembly, he had two Addresses
on the Order Paper, one to get
an economic survey of the island
and another to nationalise Public
Utilities.

Mr. Seibert Worrell, 48-year-
old shopkeeper and planter, has
now been a Vestryman for six
years.

a)
*“Sunavis’’ Calls
The Saguenay Terminals’ steam-
ship Sunavis, 4,290 tons, arrived
here yesterday with 1,000 tons of
sulphate of ammonia from Ant-
werp and general cargo including
motor cars—from Rotterdam and
London,

She is expected to be here until

Wednesday when she’ will sai) for
Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, to dis-



charge other cargo.

The Sunavis operates on the
‘Continental—U.K. run. Her local
agents are Messrs.
Ltd.

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Are vou proud of your
INDUSTRY? Well tell the
World about it.

Send in your details to-
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HUNTLEY & PA

LMERS Asst.

SOUTH AFRI



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COCKADE

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PEAK FREAN’S Playbox Biscuits—-per Tin
Chocolate Biscuits (Balmoral) per Tin $1

CRAWFORDS Club Cheese Straws—per Tin
Ufillit Biscuits—per Tin
‘ CAN LOBSTER—per Tin
y FRENCH ASPARAGUS—per Tin

# MUSHROOMS—per Tin
WALLS PORK SAUSAGES—per Tin
WALLS OXFORD SAUSAGES—per Tin
% ESCOFFIER FRENCH MUSTARD—per Bottle
’ SLICED BACON, SLICED HAM, SLICED MORTADELLA

DUTCH LUNCHEON CHEESES—per Ball
JACOBS CREAM CRACKERS—per Tin

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.

CODSOOO

$1.20
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Biscuits—per Tin .... $1
Biscuits—per Tin—

$1.59, $1.60, $1.80

oat ie $1.12

FINE RUM

ALO OOSSOS SSS

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PPLE SS SOLS SS.

COCSS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



2 Nominated For Four Years For House &:. JamesVestry tay Labour M.P.

Breaking And Larceny Rates For New Year

HIS HONOUR the Acting Chief Justice, Mr. G. L. Taylor
sentenced McDonald Bishop, a labourer, to four years’ penal
servitude when he was found guilty of house breaking and
lareeny at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Sol-
icitor General, prosecuted for the
Crown.

Bishop appeared before the
court on two counts. On the first
eount on which he was found
guilty — he was charged with
breaking and entering the house
of Denis Worme situated at Rock-
ley, Christ Church and stealing
articles to the value of $64.24
sometime between September 7
and October 4, 1950.

On the second count he was
charged with receiving stolen
goods valued at $64.24 on October
4, the property of Denis Worme.

Before passing sentence on
Bishop, His Honour told him that
his trouble was that he would not
leave other people's property
alone. He told him that he was a
menace to the community. Police
Constable Howard—keeper of the
criminal records—told the court
that Bishop had two previous
convictions, one for shop breaking
and the other for house breaking.
On November 11, 1948, he was
sentenced to two years’ impris-
onment for the shop breaking and
on March 2 this year to three
years’ imprisonment for house
breaking.

First Witness

First witness called for the
prosecution yesterday was Denis
Worme who lives at Rockley,
Christ Church. He said that on
September 7 at about 1 p.m. he
closed his house and gave the
keys to his mother who lives at
Hill Crest, Christ Church. He left
for Demerara and returned to his
house on October 19 and received
some information,

Mrs. Edith Worme said that her
son—Denis Worme—left for B.G.
on September 7 and gave her the
keys of his house. On October 5 a

policeman came to her place and ‘

told her something. She then
went to her son’s flat. She opened
the front door with the key and
noticed that everything in the
house was disarrahged. In the
bedroom the drawers of the
presses were pulled out and the
contents scattered all over the
floor. Three jackets and a pair of
pants belonging to her son were
cut as if with a knife or razor. In
the kitchen some wares were miss-
ing and she noticed that the win-
dow had been broken.

Clothes Scattered

Sgt. A. Belgrave told the court
that on October 5 he received
certain information about 1.10
p.m, About 3.30 p.m. he went to
the house of Denis Worme at
Rockley, Christ Church. In one
of the bedrooms a clothes press
was open and clothing scattered
on the floor. Three jackets and a
pair of pants were cut. In the
kitchen the wire screen to one of
the windows was damaged and
the window opened, Match sticks
and brown paper were on the
floor and some wares were miss-
ing. He made investigations into
the matter and held an identifica-
tion parade on October 18 at the
Worthing Police Station after the
accused was arrested.

Charles Taylor, a watchman at
Blue Waters Terrace, said that on
October 4 about 5 p.m. he saw
the accused in the company o:
another man who was carrying a
suit case which appeared to be
heavy. He got suspicious and
Started to follow them, but event-
ually lost sight of them. He re-
ported the matter to the Police
the next day.

Cpl. Devonish said he saw the
accused at the Bridge Police Sta-
tion on October 17 and from there
he took him to the C.I.D. At the
C.1.D. Bishop made a voluntary
statement which he tcok down in
writing and read over to him.

On October 18 an identification
parade was held at Worthing
Police Station and the accused
was picked out by two people.
The accused then made another
Statement after which he was
formally charged,

Recognised Accomplice

Another watchman. at Blue
Waters Terrace—Newton Fred-
erick said he saw the agcused with
another man on October 4 going
in the direction of Skeete Hill.
The other man was carrying a
valise and he recognised that man
as Fitzgerald Lovell.

Police Constable Beresford
Grovesnor told the court that on
October 5 about 9 a.m. accord-
ing to information he went to na
certain cane-field near Rockley
with two men and found in the
field a black valise containing a
quantity of articles.

He took the valise to the Worth-
ing Police Station and@ handed it
over to Sgt. Belgrave.

The accused called on two wit-
nesses to give evidence in favour
of him, but both of them denied
knowing anything about the case
and the whereabouts of the ac-
cused on the day the offence



CREAM



was said to have taken placé
2 Years

Fitzgerald Lovell a labourer of
St, Matthias Gap, Christ Church,
was sentenced to two years’ im-

risonment with hard labour by
His Honour the Acting Chief
Judge Mr. G. L, Taylor at the
Court of Grand Sessions yester-
day.

Lovell pleaded guilty of receiv-
ing stolen goods, the property of
Denis Worme of Rockley, Christ
Church on October 4.



BOAT SINKS:
MAN DROWNS

Herbert Goodman of Tent
Bay, Bathsheba, was drown-
ed on Sunday evening when
the fishing boat Ranger,
0-27, in which he sailed,
sank off Cluffs, St. Lucy.

Goodman was accompany-

ing Cristin Meyers, the
owner of the boat, to the
fishing banks. When_ they

had done about six hours
sailing, a squall struck the
Ranger, turned her around
and she eventually sank.

Both Goodman and Mey-
ers started to swim. They
were on the water for about
four hours when Goodman
got into difficulties and was
drowned,

Meyers did not give up,
but continued to swim until
he reached shore at Bath-
sheba. He was weak when
he reached shore and was
helped out of the water by
one Oswald Seales.



Canes Burnt

T SUNBURY PLANTATION,

St. Philip, on Sunday night,

16 acres of second crop ripe canes

were burnt. They were insured

and belonged to the trustees of the
estate of A. Cameron,

Another fire at French’s Planta-
tion, St. George, on Saturday night,
burnt thirteen and three quarter
acres of second crop ripe canes
belonging to Edgecumbe Ltd
These canes were also insured.

Seven acres of first crop ripe
canes were burnt in fires at Ben-
netts and Bagatelle Plantations
on Sunday night.

A fire at Coverly Plantation,
Christ Church, on Sunday night,
burnt five acres of first crop ripe
canes which were insured, They
are the property of the trustees of
the estate of A. Clarke.

A small cane fire at Frizer’s
‘Tenantry, St. Joseph, burnt 500
holes of canes belonging to Del-
cina Forde, Joseph Franklin and
Ottie Devonish, all of the same
tenantry. About 400 holes of the
canes were already cut

THIEF broke and entered

the house of Ursilla Taitt at
the Garden, St. James between
12.30 a.m., and 2.30 a.m., on
Sinday and stole a bicycle and
other articles, total value $85.16.
The Police are making investiga~
tions

Obituary

James E. Seale

The death of
Seale, garage proprietor of
“Lyneville”, Baxters Road,
occurred at his home on Sunday
morning, and he was laid to rest
in the Westbury Cemetery the
same evening in the presence of
a large gathering. A service at
the Brethren Room, Chapman
Street, preceded the burial,

James Seale was 73 years of
age, and started life in the
parish of St. Thomas where he
was born as proprietor of a small
dry goods business, Later he
journeyed to the United States
of America where he lived for
many years. He also visited
many West Indian islands, but
finally returned home to settle
down and establish himself in the
real estate business.

He was a member of the
Brethren, and a strict application
of christian principles charac
terised all his dealings, He won
an euvierle rep. wil ir ’
wide circle and the community
fg the poorer by his passing, As
husband, father, and .riend he
will be missed,

He leaves to mourn his loss
hig widow, son Winston, four
daughters, Mrs. Gwen Barrow,
Mrs. Vida Beckles, Eslyn and
Eunice and several grand children
children.

DIED SUDDENLY

Myrtle Blackman, a domestic of
Carrington Village, St. Michael,
died suddenly at her home yester-
day afternoon about 4.45 o'clock.

Her body was later removed to
the Public Mortuary where a post
mortem examination will be per.
formed to-day.



James Edward



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CREE

The St. James Vestry at their
meeting yesterday laid their rates
for the ensuing year at $3.72 per
acre on land and $1.19 in the £
on trade and rents. The previous
rates laid were at $2.88 per acre
on land and 90 cents in the £ on
trade and rents. Land in the
parish is valued at $16.20 per acre.

Mr. A. L. Jordan was appointed
Churchwarden in succession to
Mr. A. G. Johnson.

Other appointments are as fol-
low: —

Board of Guardians: Mr. R. S.
Bancroft (senior) and Mr. S, A.
Walcott (junior).

Highway Commissioners: Mr.
C. G. Massiah, Mr. S. A. Walcott
and Mr, Outram,

Sanitary Commissioners: Mr.
R. L. Hutson, Mr. A, L. Jordan,
Mr. S. A. Walcott, Mr. R. S, Ban-
croft and Mr. C. G. Massiah.

Builling Committee: The Rec-
tor, Mr. S. A, Walcott, Mr, A. L.
Jordan, Mr, J. H. Wilkinson, Mr.
C. G, Massiah, Mr. E. Holder and
Mr. J. M. Crick.

Members of the Board for ap-
pointing Rectors and Curates:
Parish Church—Mr. A, L, Jordan,
Mr. C. G. Massiah, Mr. Mande-
ville, Mr. Kellman; St. Alban's
and St. Silas—Mr. A. L. Jordan
and Mr, J, M. Crick; St. John the
Baptist—-Mr. C. Moore and Mr,
A. G. Mose.

Mr. J. %&. E.. Mayers was ap-
pointed druggist. This is the first
time that a druggist has been ap-
-0inted in the Parish.

Before the appointment of the
Churchwarden was made, Mr.
f G, Johnson, the outgoing
Churehwarden gave a resumé of
his work for the past year. He
said that when he took up office,
conditions at the Almshouse were
not pleasant. He had to paint the
wards, put pipes in the isolation
ward and the V.D. Clinic, erect a
bath in the ward for the patients
and build a sink in the kitchen
as the maids used to do their
washing on the ground.

No Proper Quarters

He said that the nurses did not
have proper quarters and one of
them was actually living with her
door near to the T.B. ward. He
however removed the T.B. ward
to a room which was formerly
used as a mortuary and since then
four people had died and there
was one case there at presen}.

The Matron’s quarters were
badly in need of repair and he
suggested that a toilet and bath
should be erected adjoining the
quarters, and thus prevent her
from having to cross the yard as
was the case at present.

He thanked the Chairman for
the valuable assistance he had
given him with regard to the
spending of the small amount of
money, $50, he had at his disposal
for repairs to the Parish Church.

He said that he had carried ot
minor repairs to the toilet atsSa,
Alban’s Vicarage in addition to
repairs of the roof which was
leaking very, badly, but regretted
that he had not done everything
to the roof owing to lack of funds.
The roof of St. John the Baptist
Church was in a similar condi-
tion and again he could not do
much as funds were not available

He said that they had increas-
ed money for outside patienty and
had also engaged the, servic s of
a porter for the Almshouse

Medical Relief

Under 1 sor Relief he said that
if the 621 people who applied for
't, 613 received, and added that
329 got medical relief, 13 were
visited at their homes, 221 were
treated at the Almshouse and 2
vere sent to the Hospital.

The number of people receiv-
ing money were 305 in addition
to the 300 pensioners,

He hoped that when the new
churchwarden took up office he
would see that the matron and
nurses were given better quar-
ters. He then proposed Mr, A, I
Jorden, senior Guardian as
Chur nwarden, and this was
agreed tâ„¢,



Mr. Jordan after thanking Mr
Johnson for proposing him and
the Vestry for supporting the
proposal said that he agreed with
what Mr. Johnson had said alout
the Matron’s and Nurses’ quar
ters and assured the Vestry tha
it was a question which wa:
always in his mind and that he
would do his best to see that the
situation was remedied,

He then proposed Mr. R. S
Bancroft as senior guardian an:
Mr. S. A. Walcott as junior,

Mr, Johnson thought that in as
much ag Mr, Walcott was Church-
warden the year before him and
knew about the workings of th«
parish that a younger mat
should” be appointed on the
Board of Guardians in order that
he might be acquainted with the
poor and also get an idea as t
how things were working in the
parish, He _ therefore proposec
Mr, E. Holder to be junio:
Guardian

Mr, J. M. Crick seconded Mr
Johnson’s proposal and said that
it did seem strange that certain
people should be in office all the
time, While he had nothing
against the proposal of any can-
didate, yet he did think that new
blood should be brought to the
boards from time to time.

Mr. Johnson’s proposal
however lost, four



was
members

Will Ask About
C.0.L. Bonus

For Antigua Civil Servants

LONDON, April 9.




Labour Member of Parliament
Henry Hynd is to ask in the
House of Commons this week

when the cost of living bonus wi!l
be paid to civil servants in Anti-
gua,

In a question which is tabled for
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies, James Griffiths, to answer
Hynd points out that it is now
ever two years since civil ser-
vants of the island stated their
need for financial relief, and
well over six months since a
commission of inquiry into the
cost of living was appointed.

In another question, Hynd will
ask Griffiths who are the mem-
bers of the Salaries and Adjust-
ment Committee of the Civil Ser.
vice in Antigua.

A third question asks the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies
if he is aware of the dissatisfac
tion of the Antigua Trades and
Labour Union at the appointment
of only one representative of the
people on the Executive Coun-
cil, one representative on the
Land and Settlement Board, and
one on the Electric Light Board,
and whether he will increase
this representation.

The fourth question inquires
whether it is the intention of the
Government of Antigua “to re-
turn lands of all the Christian
Valley area to peasants whe
formerly cultivated the — estate
now that water is available for
developments.”

Hynd told Reuter today that his
questions were based on what
he had read in newspapers sen:
to him from the Caribbean, He
mentioned the Workers Voic
official organ of the Antigu:
Trades and Labour Union,

Hynd explained that he wa
checking up on what he har
read, He did not accept every
thing as necessarily correct. Ques
tions to the Minister were de
signed to find out,

The Antigua Government ha
announced that the cost of livin
bonuses will be 50% on the firs
$480 of salary; 30% on the sec-
ond $480 7 br 20% on the

i salary.
third $480 o y a



Grapes, Candles Come

OVER 1,600 crates of potatoe:
were landed here yesterday bj
the 4,557-ton Nourse Liner Mutlal
which called from Calcutta vit
Capetown.

The Mutlah also brought sup-
plies of peanut butter, grapes
canned goods, wine, vermouth anc
candles, and from Colombo, 7
cases of tea consigned to Messrs
J. A. Marson & Son, Ltd, She it
consigned to Messrs. Da Costa &
Co., Ltd.



voting in favour of Mr. Walcott
and three for Mr. Holder,
Mr, Bancroft and Mr. Walcott

were therefore appointed Senior
and Junior Guardians respec-
tively.

The Vestry agreed to under-

take the repair of the roof of the
chancel of the parish church and
decided to raise a loan for the

purpose.

“SUPERSEED"

THE SEEDS THAT SUCCEED

Fresh Fiower
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Cosmos, Dahlia,

Allyrum,
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Canterbury Bell, Nigella, &
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PAGE FIVE



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PAGE SIX















err
MAY
TAKE

SOME }
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COME! IF IM
GOING TO SAVE

>A SORRY! aa 70

SON | HEE FROM
2 DONT ) a8 x. Wy
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WITH A CHARMING ee A MISTAKE BHE CALLED TO _ y t HA
VOICE CALLED REMIND YOu
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TOMORROW

THE WAY THIS WATER
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FOR THIS DUNGEON TO FILL!

i“?

MUAY Cuaie oe Tie wan béeo TO PLAY _ with o.oo} HOUGF AND FINIGH Veet
STARTED OUR SPRING-CLEANI Nibiick ~~ ae wate

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VOU REMEMSER WHEN | GEENEXT VeaR WE'LL START ON THE

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ee eee

we eal AS

RIP KIRBY

(_ LEAVE EVERYTHING 10 Ne.” asa
és TLL BE BACK FOR YOU & AyStaR
















BY ALEX RAYMOND








WHAT'S WITH YOU AN THE )TM NO SCHOCLECY
WIDOW, JOE SEVEN ? YOU,/— WHITEY ! 1 KNOW

AIN'T GOIN’ SWEET ON AQ’



) LISTEN...I GOT PLANS BUT
THE WIDOW AIN’T IN ‘EM!
CUTTLES DOUGH IS GONNA BE

SPLIT JUST THREE WAYS!
ME.,.AN’ YOU...AN’ CURTAINS!







1S CLEAR! p>

pp ew OE
Ay“ PLEASE, PLEASE
FAP | BE CAREFUL! IF JOE *
SEVEN CATCHES
ON, HELL KILL
US BOTH! 4

i IM GETTINGOFF+NOW WHILE HES NOT

| WATCHING ME. NO USE | MAY BE KILLED «OR,
AS JEEF STUDIES HIS MAP~ BADLY HURT IF
|S FEW MORE MINUTES AND WE OUGHTA 1 JUMP

| BE GETTIN OFF += _ SS VS
| LEMME SEE, J ! {Se aay



BARBADOS ADVOCATE


















SPECIAL offers to all Cash and bred





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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1951

Gums Bleed!

eding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
rote mean that you have pares.
Kaan auth of Seat cosh yal eet
to Sth i} also cause matism
a Amosan ae

the first day, ends sore

a 7 ly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee.

A n Mugt make your
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ake "ate m reee son



















today.
antee protects





<=
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iy
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il
al

seroma sor



oe

il
i
‘tT

| fi-- a ( VF mn

j
:
i

:
z
f
i

era

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Is
Truly the Finest of RUM
So Mellow in a nt
So Smooth in a tail
It is simply Superb.

Try it and you will be
convinced.

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LID.

Headquarters for
BEST RUM

2
“
(P55





IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE





it customers for Monday to Wednesday only
———SSSSS
USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW

Royal Baking Table Butter, 1b. tins—92 86

Powder, 1 |b. tins—_.62 56
16. 2 tins for 28 Dried Plums, 2b. pkgs. 76 60

Sardines, | tins





Shredded Wheat, pkgs. 40 15



36 Rinso, pkgs. (small)



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3, 4, 6

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SHAW by Desmond McCarthy ROYAL SCHOOL
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ra
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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

aR PAGE SEVEN

CLASSIFIED ADS. LOST & FOUND | WANTED | FOR RENT | PUBLIC NOTICES | GOVERNMENT . NOTICE
TELEPHONE 2508 CL, ARG 8S: A lamas tt

Mineman weéle 72 cents and| Minimum charge week 73 cents and
1
‘





harg
96 cents Sdéndays 94 words — over 24| % cents Sundays: 24 words — over % Téa _cents per agate line on week
iene
Sabres 3 cfhts a Word weeked sents | Words F conte 8 word wech—d Conte @| and 12 cents per snete tine we Senden ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence)






















































LOST word Sundays. | word Sundays. minimum charge $1.00 On week-days | (AMendment) Order, 1951, No. 8 which will be published in the
Sis: Gadi Die ‘aeeienimei i - and $1.80 on Sundays | Official Gazette of Monday, 2nd Apri 5
. FO Se es SES — : iiioiaeedhtinpheiiniloan 1 ‘ ay, 2nd April, 1951,
ledhrewhte, bos, Aen. am SALE pEkG—On Monday un “Apri wot HELP sii i ! 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
thee on weak-deve and on Sundays| 4.Minimum charge, otek 12 conte Plastic Bog (White) containing «bunch GREAED GUN WMG OSG. ccs | roundines ar “Chasiotiente ; CLOSING NOTICE co of “Salmon Tinned”, “Flour” and “Pork-Salted” aré a§ fol-
$ cents per word on weak-days’ and| W°rde 3 cents & icord week—4 cent of Keve Reward offered, Cits| Shirt Factory. Palmétts Steat. | Rock. Appl: within. fr pai: snndiee tk ows: =
6 eae Fe oe on Sundays for each} Word Sundays. * S)Phatmacy. 10.4.51—2n : : 1.4.5i—3n,| 6 Paro ; i We be i pete? a Bricks VRTIOLE WHOLESALE ;
. " ~, - oe —-- customers 4 the i‘ 1 “ at | AN . ; .
- WATCH—Man’s stainless see. wrist RALIFF MESS MANAGERESS | BUNGALOW: Fu | Gué businges wll be closed Sem Wednes ALE PRICE RETAIL PRICE
AUTOMOTIVE z with bracelet. Rockley Reach A vacancy existd for a Rewef \.esq| Flat at Coral Sands, 2 riday ith April te Monday 2%rd April (not more thah) (not more than)
* Saturday. Frampton, Navy Gardens. Manageress. Previous experience ic, | 284 Linen. Purther particulars, Dial $134. ' melusive 44.51—3n |
MARRIAGE ao wart .10.251—2~} catering for Restaurants or Hotel (or! Alma Lashley, 74.81--t.£n {| Sato ‘Vinned: ' :
———SS } similar rience is desirabl —— — — .
ASHE JEMMOTT._On 23rd De Po hd pent ye Vauxhall 14/6, E-15) ; wiApolicstinns should be subraitted ain 5 PLATS: Two Completers new de Luxe dianinsd teat tothe (a) Red - ¥ | $45.86 per case of 48
cember. Allan K. Payne of Cleveland. : ning order excellent mileage URLIC writing givi of wious €x-| fully furnished flats at Four Aces, St | : ae 3 SE i ;
Onlo took as his brids Elaine Jemmoit, | $1300.00 Courtesy Garage Phone-a6i6. P SALES perlence or encibeing copies te | Lawrence “ab, From June odwards ‘c ng ares an Ome. has | 1-Ib. tins or $11.59 $1.00 per tin.
ondee | Seana of Mr. C. EB. Jemmoti 4451—T.FN.} gen per _ogate pe a timonials and 8 — er a Siproved nant mS bufiding Was | oetine Bathsheba until further | per 12 1-Ib. tins
ings, Barbados. y m photograph, shoul 7] 8] pts. not ¥
: —- sos Eo c. Apply end 7a! cone” per tpate ne on Sundays, | bo ‘Meme, ‘Da Costa & Co. H3,. 0. Pitsiedia cauaene ctw te Signed A. T. KING, jee per case of 96
DIED ls “4 a and $1.80 om SC on week-days Box 103, " ce _10.4.51.—@m | Hassell, phone 4003. 10.4.51—Sn | Parochial a. | %-lb. tins or $6.28 4c. 5 oy
FOLKES—On April 9, 1991, at her resi- ; aide ae OS: | Sapereiereepremeesteerctaeeneniniaiiecneat a Riese Spratt. | ag pee | per 12 Ib, tins ,
dence 1 Gap, Paynes Bay. Helen 6. in iiniid (b) Chum



Florette Folkes. Her funeral leaves

the above residence at 3.45 p.m. to-day

for the Holders Hijl Brethren

and thence to the Westbury i
Etheline Blackman (sistér-in law),
Cuthbert Blackman (Cuiracao! ;



Gaitilishh I hone Sn ees | ee Room, Garage ete. Apply Mrs. Gooding | ROYAL SANITARY INSTITUTES per 12 1-tb. tins -
J at Sousee 0-9 Nery good BUNGALOW=Navy Gardens, 3 bel. EXAMINATION

ition. Telephone 1. Warner. ue every convenience ineludin _ —— ee eect 0 allah Bo Se ay $32.62 per case of 96
ee oe eee geen ‘we supply. As new, 23,000 STARCH warted: Apply to B’DO< LARGE HOUSE & FLAT—The Camp.



An approved course of lectures for



|
a ‘ 3 candidates ertering for th ns 14-1b, tims or $4.14) ;
ee rE ei ta 18.361—tf-n,| KNITTING & SPINNING CO. LTD..| st. Lawrence Gap. On-the-Sea. Fully | for. the Certifeate for Se erica | f 12 %4b. tins me
.51——In. GAR—One rs Xe Fluid drive in Coleridge Street. 10.4.51- ei furnished Dial 8357. Miss K. Hunt. | tors, Royal Sanitary Mstitute, will start (c) Pint pe . J
PH : On April 9, at her ca} Derfeet condition. Apply Chueh LOTQ, at Daver; Christ | ——— +. Maxwell Coast. 31,3.51—t.f.n. ]on Saturday, 17th April, 1981, at 10.00 . oe -» | $36.46 per case of 48
Mars: On sprit ra nae 8 ne en Corit Stoyte cone Lots near the sea, and kt: WANTED TO RENT fi . , 146. tin 24
iad Sea ALLETHA Her tafierat Kine » tanean pe on. eS Main Road. Apply:| SMALL UNFURNISHED COTTAGE .r! VICTORIA, On the seaside, fully furn-| Sanitary Inspectors who desire to at- , s or $9. 80c. » »
Teaver tho abane’ laddcbes of 08 = ‘ie le » Dover, Phone 8131] BUNGALOW in the country, WANTE ished from 15th April, with Telephone. | tend this course of lectures should enter per 12 1-lb. tins
p.m. for the St. Paul's Church. | CAR—One Citféen 13 HP In tl ¥ 64.51—5..| by English cauple. Essential requirs-) Frig. and Radio. $10) per month. Din! | their names at the offce of the Director $40.30 96
Olanda Ellis (Nurse, USA), Mrs,| Conditién done only 3,906 “pifles? Brine im ak tan A tes. Fgh eg ore ee sy a 8150, 1451-100 = ere Services on or before the 16th % lb case a 10
= : ce hace . he d-} san: mm, liv Ue rit, 1953 v2-lb. :
eur Aone is ab 2 | iwi Ao “Baoan Uh | ava abs! Bi | atk nde ae aan ee Ae.

Depart of M vices.
nent of Medical Service Bs per 12 %-lb. tins !
nihinsiidiniiiacedaipi lahat mes Flour ee ‘ -» [$7.60 per cotton bag

NOTICE of 100 Ibs. .. -+ Be. per Ib.

house garage,
thereon moderate rent for long lease. Repl

10.4,51. 10.5.51—4n | _ Inspection on applicatic A} |
= | pow a Conner ‘of Rosbuck gine: = N° Aawowte Coss Clean Up Campaign
: |

sore ieetiaclepesiansstmneysinetline soe eetenpenesresfipnieng=e
sT, JOHN—On April 9th 1951, at hee
residence No, 37 Housing Scheme,

a enn nes
CAR—Vauxhall 18, almost new done | ood Bedford



only 6.000 niles. Apply. Cyril Stoute 4569} The above will be offered for sale by | wee A Clean Kitehen is as important

Deacon’s Poad, Muriel Elsie St. John, | 9° S. H. Kinch 2861 Pork—Salted:

re the estate of







—Chevtolet Master (3-132) " 8 HOUSE — Comfortable unfurnished | $09. 74
good order. Price $400.00. Dial 93-218, REAL ESTATE | house conveniently situated in Palm - | ‘ re | -74 per case of 48) iat
: T Ti FS & DUCKS | Beach Gap, Hastings. Four bedrooms NOTICE I 7 5 ”
= 304.0)—98 goply GREEN BRA RESTAURANT Dining and Drawing Rooms, game . | lb. tins or $7.56 66c. ,, oe
ad Street. 3896.

































































8 4.51—3n, | Public competition at our office, Jame: : ' i ,

age 40, Funeral will leave the above reet, on Friday 13th April 1961. at PERSONAL gp A OSD OCR Ae ae | HUGH CLARENCE CLARKE (a) Neck Bones, Neck .
residence at 4.30 p.m. to-day for the} CARS—Citroen 15 HP. cars, just,ar- | 2 P.M. ts, . (deceased) Ribs. Finn Bones $49.00 per tre. of 350
Westbury Cemetery, ~~ | tived. Apply B'dos Agencies Ltd. Ring Hutchinson & Banfield. a tan A Clean City NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that ali s, Finn Boues.. lbs, of $27.45 per

Aubrey C. St. John (husband), | 498. 10:4.51—4n 31.3.51—12n, Pi = Ping: poe wares, seame ere ee persons having any debt or claims brl. of 200 lbs. or lle

Edward, Nancy, Bontord, Rose, | 79 pone | ERGREREY OL GUNRIN ITH (nee Richatds) as 1 do not It is easy to have a clear sqeinh che. Eotate of Hugh Clarence * i ae

Cuthbert (childsen) ; 10.4.51-1n } g350 one a) Standard’ 12 Fest ake | house with tered boaters feet anne myself responsible her or ansidne ieitehyn when you have Gag for the parish of Christ Church in this Inland 15e. per Ib, in lots

nae » | sta on ene rood, 14\%¢ hes of | oO contracting any t or debts in My besa ositaad who died on the 5th day of October of not less than 25
THANKS ie’ i 18) Chevrolet jose | ne’ i Peede'y. Ge a Teetteokstacd ares wont, BY, @Welpees order Slgned Ty 1, aaa ae +] 1950; Intestate, are requested to send xt ‘eae ‘ lbs,

—— - ntly wor at | Hill, App! : o Gteeni este at articulars eir claims duly attested ») Feet, Ears, § -

CuARKE—The Clarke fairily desire | Andrews er tr eo tat Hutchinson. & Bonfitid. James went Rock Bunaet?” BRIC GRIFFITH, Pert Oke cohen we ae gems) et, Rars, Stom~ | 955 50 per tre. of 350
through this medium to thank all those| Fisherpond FP mn, St. Thomas, and | 2. * : $.4.51—6n | St. James. 10.4 $1.—2n Larger Deficit C/o Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors, No achs lbs. or $91.15 per
who attended the funeral, sent wreaths * will be le on Wednesday | ™ — aiemssanphbdinink as 12 High Street, Bridgetown, on or bo-
and letters os aouniby 10, sis Senet llth April 1951, at 1 pum, 5.4.51—6n. gahio bie x ei Boarded and O N S in fore the Sth day of May, 1951, afte brl. of 200 lbs. or 18
hereaviinént- Oceania ¢ the death o i : Root . sly to Manager | ; i n Cc | ine which date I shall proceed to distributs ' 17e, per Ib in lots Ce ee
Mtss ‘Clarke’ on 30th‘ March, 1951. = ELECTR ao ee) | Henley: Plantatipn, St: John. 7 ie Stock- Excha FOS ONS the assets of tt 4 ‘ 4 :
Perey Clarke and family, 8.4.51—I1n. 4 ‘TRICAL me &4.51—-3n ’ nge , eee 4 partige “enthlea thereto’ hating wedont of: notless than 26
â„¢ SS SS e @ From Page only to such claims of which I shall then lbs
MURRELL—We acknowledge with thanks oe bs HP. three phase totally{ On Friday the 13th inst. at 2 pm. Qui N have h ; . $ pa
pathy sent, us on the, copaaioe, of the Switeh ly atte ‘One 2 “Mo Shares," Barbedee Fire ie On et ole “due to substautial rate reduction tor “thes ests Or thy pact “thereat "e ad Tevet me ‘+ | $68.50 per tre. of 350
death ‘of Frederica Augusta Murrell, | ch delivary | (Lee fy cenepgel| °° Comeenye eee Pie thsurance LONDON, April 9. | 0n_ sugar and flour which constr- | distuniiod to fay person ar, Suose debt ihe. 90. See One
Titan, "Rana (chilaean); Morar Wothe new Price tee thirds nr) ‘Ming 22 Shares, Barbados Ice Company} Ahead of Britain’s budget day— | tute the principal cargoes, and to} notice, eth brl. of 200 Ibs. or

. na tc 3 y . . . : 7 ¥ at} 5 6 - ae ‘
eee eee pein eorow, South, wacked Prud. Reply Box XY¥Z c/o] paso Shae’ Barbados Government pe. |t-Morrew, April 10 — London} reduction of aa tons * iS eel Bi Peteons Indebted to, the sai | 2te. per Ib. in lots te. gia
Janice, (grandchildren) ce 8.4.51 | Oe ees, ent De- Stock Exchange operators were | Per cent, in the volume of traffic | tite are sequesled to settle thelr said of not Tess than 25

‘Safe in the arms of Jesus”. ON. ting Plant, 19-15 4 E COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., cautious and unwilling to exten ee ats f $856,976 in Dated this 27th day of February, ‘p51 i . Ibs. }

WILLTAMS—Through thie mediam we tua’ tladiam we 2 ai 400 ete th Janipe and Sovieftors. commitments in domestic stocks 4 reduc Eo Sn Te ~ Py 3 r. HEADLEY, (d) Short Ribs, Riblets, 79.9
Sanh Sar deat ee een Tae ® Yss.51—at a ne detec ack ant Garam Tet Qualified Administrator of the Estate Spare Ribs, Finns | 979-90 ver tre. of 350
friends who pent wreaths, letters of Si—Ain.| “Tie RHONDA. Latws dueling hoon lower freight tonnage handled and e mninietretor of the Rotate 1 Ibs. of $45.15 per
condolence or in any way expressed "FURNITURE on the Sea near Cacrabank, Worthing |. Price changes were_mainly to} reduction in the number of voy- gh Clarence Clarke, brl. of 200 1b: 27¢
rant CORES WY the vied ane NITURE The above will be set up for sale at|lower levels and shoWed British | ages, from 65 in 1949 to 63 last een 1.61—0 se ie. @ oe
He Api a A BB so, gprumemrcenenry guar | our Office in Licas Street on Friday |Government stocks occasionally | year. —— 25c. per lb. in lots

Martha (wife), Verona (daughter), Mrs. | Chairs, €an be seen at Fogarty's. e inmates aie eee a ae nen one - sixteenth off. Apart from| The report showed a balance in NOTICE of not less than 25

I, Worrell (friend), Miss ©. Garner | chair ean be expanded to a reclining | from April 16th. or on’ application’ to | Oreweries, firm on hopes that the] the vessel replacement fund at the], The Annual General Meeting of th: (e) Tails, Snout lbs.

(friend); Miss Ruby Jordan (friend), | Position 7.3.51—8n. | Carrington & Sealy. 10,4.51—7n | budget will be favourable to the!end of 1950 of $4,313,638 and! Fortress Club was held at their Ctuo , o . Sapam

10.4.51—1 01, | tt I inlet ieee industrial | Fl alled ) Room, Lightsfoot | Lane, on Thursday Jowls, Headskins, | $86.25 per tre. or 350
LIVESTOCK brewery industry, most industrial’ the self-insurance fund totalled) March 28th. The following were elected ’ 1b
IN ' MEMORIAM AUCTION groups record losses of a few! $1,772,458. officers for the year 1981-82 Scalps, Boneless S. or $48.40 per :

a nee eens ae “Sawa t é . pence. The Canadian National Rail Mr ¥ ns ae toe Head, Bean Pork, i. of se or 29e ; ets
LLEYNE—In loving memory of our ni uernsey Cow giving 23 . way system as whole reported| ; oe Dene ‘ Lips €. r lb. in lots Sao
dear mother Ouida Alleyne who was] Pts milk. (First calf). Apply E. D. UNDER THE SILVER Speculative selling resulted in a deficit of $3 261,000 ‘whieh le the Mi 6 “ROcHErORD woe B A ; of fet’ tens th 25
called to rest on April 9th 1950. Davis, Small Ridge Plantation, Ch. Ch. H losses of one to two points in)* Mit wait et ouiin is einan 1 Ges Mace. A HEWITT kG. BO , 7 een a

ote 2 smiling, always content 10.4.51—3n A Japanese bonds, but foreign | best ee ia eae e esee esi, re ganar ices ioe Ce Bee LLARI lbs
Wed and respected. wheiever she. | Smee mmeytagtlipeteeeemennnemntemenshinhen ecord gross revenue of $553,831,- . ative Members . . ‘
wank spec! MILCH GOAT, “Sally Laurator”, Ree By instructions received we will sel! utilities were quiet . 000 ee due to a combination of a - FEOF. Cpt. Basket Ball, (c) Clear, Belly Pork, | $55.80 per bri. of 200
To a beautiful life, came a noble end | No. 656. Apply S. C. Skinner, “Lauta-|on WEDNESDAY the 1ith as follows: Eastern buying gave strength . — " . ee Cpt. Cricket Mess Pork, Fat lbs 31 b
; nd | tor’, Rockley ace or Da Costa & " 7 : -¢| higher freight rates and greater| Mr. CC. PARRIS, Cpt. Table Tennis Ss. or 3le. per Ib. 33¢.
She died as she lived everybody's , 1a Cos' On pS .C, Sugar S, P. Musson Son|to jute shares, but oils, rubbers back Pork of
Meee. SS | Ltd.” Phone 6280 or 2122, 0 & Co, fuse, Bridge Wed. 1290 land tine were’ heaitant freight traffic. ia 10.4,51—10 ck Pork, Bone- | in lots of not less
Dorothy and Thelma (daughters), Wini- 10.4 51.—t f.n. | o'clock. : .| This may be the C.N.R’s last }~-—~~~— iene re less Belly, Butts than 25 Ibs s
7 e aa Elsewhere gold and copper : ’ NOTICE ; |.
fred, Hyacinth, Viola (sisters). —_ ; BC. Stigar DaCosta's tron! . . deficit report, because the govern-
10.4.51—1n. POULTRY Bu érhead = 12.45 o'clock. jee were occasionally asta ment is taking steps to reorganize (indus “the Boubadee Oaury. ana 2nd April, 1951 3.4.51--2:
| ee ee s —Reuter. - & . ~~ | of Seeretary of the Barbados Dai t «%, n
GABNER~Secred ta the | memory of Guna tans Bred | Crosses Kabki- R, TROTMAN & 60., ! its capital structure, Under the] stock Broeders Aman tt
vinia ica Garner who fell asleep in. Flock of nine, Five Auctioneers, a . d 2. The Salary attached to th 4
#h April, 1949. ducks, 4 drakes, Archie Clarke, Beach. 8451-2 | new set-up recdmmended by Ais eon per wionth Rnd inp meakemtin §
May she rest in peace.” court Avenue, Hastings. 8.4.51—$n, HANGE Royal Commission on transportae yi piicant would be required to take uo
The Garner family. ell | RATES OF EXC A G tion, it was estimated the C.N.R. } duties on the 16th day of April, 1981. * éiaiabes us }
Rosedale, St. Philip. 10.4 1051. MECHANICAL UNDER THE SILVER 6 iss would have shown a surplus of], % Applications should be addressed MONTREAL AUSTRALIA, NEW | seeeeeesencesevescennosonesenveonns
' cine atcha estates APRIL 9, (GF & a i. GSS SIONS ‘ ,

QESRELS. Giite ERD URE aaa | eee iets ‘ HA CANADA more than $14,000,000 for the past| Cuitial Livestock att eee ome: | ome ; y
pisihe ae cite ae who paserrt ixiie ROR Oe ae "ES MMER 63 6/10% pr. Cheques on een year.—(CP) and should be subraitica’ by 4.00 pie ray = LIMITED he M.V. CAR’
awa pr! 3 ‘ 3639 after 9 /10% pr. |” ; 4 ' .N.Z, LINE) The . CARIBBER

But the Lord doth nought amma | 9 am, oar 10.4.51—3n, By recommendations of Lloyds Agents |] ........ ‘ peme on Friday, the 19th instant aN seca » Aceh una dime a ae

And since He hath order'd this | GaRRiBR “AGS end waa | No elk om IRSDAY the 12th. Drafts 61.45% pr. ee ay _ eS) MLS. “TONGARIRO” sailed Brisbane , Pore 7e R
We have nought to do but stilt sercules BIKES and Bicyeles by at General Tradets Lid. Roebuck Street. | _....,.. Sight . 3 ~~ | March 24th, Arriving at Barbados May lea, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and
Rest in silence at His will 1 Sarees, Silver King. A {01 Bags D.C. Sugar, Drafts 61,9/10% pr. Big Arms Dump NOTICE Let, St, Kitts, Sailing Friday 20th inst,

Ever to be remembered by Elton, Gwen, - 20.3.81—ti.n, le 12.30 o'clock, Terms Cash. 8 hy pr. Cane etl ‘ ree oF cess CHURCH “ iad , .

Daphne (children), Margot, Beverly, JONES SEWING MA 4.51.2. % pr. urrency % pr. 7 . Sealec enders (Marked on the argo accepted on through Bills of the M.V. DAERWOOD will
lorette, Ronald and-c , Mi \CHINE—Tre: b esata aid Coupons 4/10% pr. envelope “Tender for ’ with ne | Lading with transhipment at Trinitlad
iene aunty, ee oh or Mie in splendid condition, Phone 2762. 30% pr. Silver % pre 4 Found In Milan received by me at my office up, to 40)] for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward SeggpL Cardo and, Easengers

. . , 10.4.51~2n, RN NT NOTICES a pm, on Tuesday, 17th April, 1951 fo | and Leeward Islands, Piraméribo Sailing Wedne
cb inithiinttcgeiitctadaninnlimitiagtsats MILAN, April 9 the supply of the following commoditie I'th inat,

| MISCELLANEO! ahetinmmeptanioad , nough explosives “to blow up|to be delivered at the Christ Church| For further particulars apply:—
(OVERNMENT NOTICE | Harbour Log a pad og | night found in Almshouse in guch quantities and at ,
BEAUCAIRE—The Superb Dry Cleaner | Dietitian — Medical Department, the Pirelli tyre factory here. Sell gee tthe te Mae ee eee oes oe

B.W.I, SCHOONER











¥ ee : 4 ‘i fre time to » direct :
Woollens; Topindity Cota tet ee British Honduras. In Carlisle Bay Italian police were continuing | (a) rResad Mink Oo Da COSTA Sao” OWNERS ASSOC, INC. ;
EXPORT OF LIVESTOCK Deere cats, fabrics, “NevER| Applications are invited for the | .v. sedgensid, Schooner Gloria Hen-{ their search of the country’s big- Fite i kM Pi ag hg A Trinidad, Barbados, Tele, 4047 f
Consideration will be given to JUST USE BEAUCAIRE.” |post of Dietitian, Medical Depart- | ,ictta, Schooner Marea Henrietta, Yecht gest industrial plants for secret and the, Moa reaneyee (oe sight BWI." BW ; §

Sosa fo. ment, British Honduras, Salary | Caribbee, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner yarms dumps.



to accept the tender ‘of more tnan



the issuing of export licences for BATHS — in






























































































oe Gardenia W., Seh Emeline, Schooner Yor ; epared i steel ne: pers ” . , 4
a limited number of breeding} white, Green, Prismoe wt ching £902 X 12 — £270 x 15 — £800) Cydia Adina 8. Schooner Wonderful tubes “apparentig made "in. the Thine Deusen wilt. be’. wean
cattle and swine. units to complete colour suites. Top with cost of living allowance GP- | Cxtnsation, 35. V. T. B. Bacay, Schoonss factory : the explosives weighing panied by a certificate signed by
2. Application for licences] ade, A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd. proximately £27 per annum, Spestiet Whittaker, Stnooues Sunshine wil about half. a top, were found in qualified Veterinary —Practitione
which should be submitted in|. 26.1.51—t.f.n. Condidabes, who must hold a $hgontr Turtle Dove, “lan arms dump weighing a | ie ae eaatiad oka ee
writing to the Director of Agri-| CURTAIN FITTINGS_For wnat Qin. |7eCognised diploma or qualification | "ARRIVALS fi 3 Wecauitight te tse ota :
. . art together five tons. Tuberculos a cae omen an ce Ooo
culture will be considered strietly} dow styling, light control, Valances ‘ana | i? Heretics, should forward their | 99. Sunavie, 420 tons inet. Capt | The dump was hidden in an un-| (>) FRESH BREAD { re
in rptation. Grapsrics: By, Kirsch. ‘Dial 4476 A. applications stating full particulars | °° Sritian, “4587 tons net, Capt. |derground gallery beneath a sec-| (© PRESY MEAT CANADIAN SERVICE
3.4.51—2n, - vd base Seat a4 eine 2 “_ testimo- | stazara, «rom Calcutta vis Capetown, tion of the factory in ghich 100 |”) oludindie . From Halifax, N.S., St, John, N.B,
slit i REE GIFTS—FREE nia Oo rector M.V. Willemstad, ne nes, cap en work and inecludec ree Thit to be tendered td ;
> i an wATPEr fo Sotastae tar 1 phy i, ae Services, British mea Margelipe, SO ro tartg net, Capt wonit field guns, a mortar and a Biscuits Suet Tee er Tk. ____To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.
ORIENTAL ourful Measuring Spoons: gives. FREE 1,4.51—2n. | prank Leslie, from Liverpool , [large number of other weapons, ay eer ene Pam RAR OF LOADING DATES at
SOUVENIRS, CURIOS, pad ~ Purchase of, One Doll DEPAREMMNT “OF EDUCATION oa ee, M36 tow net. | according to police officials, Flour per half bag of 98 lbs | ws Expected Arrival
Satoh er. .. Eta. apt, Fi te al he ! ee les : Cornmeal per half bag of 9 Ibe Alalifax ot. Joho Montreal ¢ Dates iedentows,
New Ship t Broad ‘Street pasha ; Registration of Relief Teachers, capt, Siena, aan ‘Seattle vid Puerta Yesterday Italy's Iron : oes Sugar (State Grade) per bag Of} . «> wgunptaz: ee Bar!
ipment opened MEGASSE at Lower Estate Factory Estate Factory 1961-62 Cabello. Minister, Mario Scelba, accusec 224 Ibs. a. “POLY! c 31 Mar. | (23 Mai 2 16 Apr.
THANI’S at $3.00 per ton. 6.4.51—8n, eee a invited from] ‘ss, Specialist, 4,445 tons net, Cabt.}the 2,600,000 Communist party of a Situ Ri sige bat oh rr: naar a? ae ~ a 28 Ang.
—— - sui ali is “i ys London. si r hi jreds of : See DOe Fae OP ea ie 4 re |e ce a 25 Apr. 16 Ma
noi Ge PARTS, Pa come | gration” ‘hale "Resins, [Te bbekae, | ate “i tmp ound] SRB sain Te] =| NG]
- iu ’ on S - t Pin r
~ paw 18351 the en a Me ay 3 beh wn Gee Beals. for itis Guiana northern and central Italy in the Coftftee per Ib ‘ UNI Fa he ences ©
olding the ertifica Schooner Bnterprise S., 66 tons net,} past few months, , Oat Flakes per Ib .K,
Two PLATE Glass Display Cases, 180, r othe i A St. Lucia : kad ay Sago per Ib,
oe Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd, ‘read ? Aphinehcgs toe Chait capt ine Sak. 190 tons net, Capt. aoe ie rate ipa te __ Tapioca por Ib. From Glasgow, Liverpool, Newport, i
é 7.4.51—tA.n. . B ‘otton seed of} per gin
TABLE N 1S T _ We Won, > ieee bl eo tH FEY Genadian Conetructor, 3,996 tons} plosives from the Pirelli factory Waitaba Firewood per ton Glassow Liverpool; Newport | Dai ge
TENNIS TABLE—Solia e omen) obtainable from | net, Capt. Wallace, for Canada during the night said they consti-} Matches per carton <, cakiemiiie pe wna
; caenmeinees $4.51—tEs. | Department of Education, should tuted the biggest secret explosive | iyo Mutter of £50, euch from. twa | ©: “SUNVALLEY” 1 Maren] 14 April | a April “iMag
TYPEWRI RIBBONS & CAR reach the Director of Education In Touch with Barbados {dump yet found. properly qualified persons willing to} |
PAPER, stock “1st received, get | Mot later than Saturday, the 21st losi red to have| become bond with the successful ten pitti a a en
i our fi nén Grant |of April, 1951 f tal Station Explosives appeared to nave | ee Yor the due performance of inc| From Rotterdam, Antwerp, London Expected Ari
e 7 ts at T. pects Oe t Remastered Relief Teach ho as been hidden about two years, | [Ory Rotterdam s> Antwerp tendon faten” bit Sake
+ 5 chers, Ww ; ; dai » Hoard of Gu nat bine e
SS advise | Police officials said. The Hoard of Guardians do an. LONDON
o> VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sancaipe | WisTt to i ee Baas enemas eee ane, Miree’ Sommunicsie with} ‘They said both explosives and | themselves to accept the loweliar an OOF gs 10s BA Awe ee aden st wed
‘aes aaa ete De 3, form the Department by letter fiat the followifg ships through their B HA R VEST A. BARNES & Co, Dt. later than Saturday, the ist of |>a%o* Const Station ay | preservation, as Clerk, Poor Law Guardian, Agents: PLAREATIONS LIMITED.
s 13.2.51—t.t.m.) April, 1951, . : Samana, $.6 Colombie, 5.8. Megara, 5:5. —Reuter, e WOR) Pate ob one 4703
« _ ye as ‘Atlantic Sabihcicesinsad? dik sokluikacichdatiely F —3n,
, WINDOWS and DOORS precision built | Department of Education, Lady Nelson, 4.8, Sue Lykes 4 cgenting — of cured lumber by machinery. aay 5th April, 1951. Ocean, 5.8. Del Mar/Kivz, s re . Tn ee
8, S. Paula, s.s, Cristobal, s.%, George )
SALE payin 30 cea ang time, wae a 10.4,51—2n. ionea, ae. Santarem, rin Brasil W sbw, MIXED CARGO: LOYAL — OF 7.
instr ‘uction le ee jcoa . s.s. oc . enlt
Phone 2791, L. &, H. Miller, Reed St CE es .§. Itaifmbe, 5.8. Chudad A shipment of 1,230 bags of salt THE STA
Is THE TALK oy. sie . ay OTICE » jueen of Bermuda, 5.8. was among the varied cargo ar-
NOTICE Parish of St. ANDREW Magallanes/Eshi, 8%, gt riving at Barbados from Liver- Neediest Cases Fund Ine.
OF THE TOWN PARISH OF ST. JOBN duly ‘péiettoned et iy A hee One, Clarkes” Wharf, ss. | pool y ow, > ona mere The 1" ; ‘i
As from the 9th to the 2ist il, | sons to serv bers ii } Oranjestad, ‘$s. Canadian Challenger./]iner S.S. acoma Star. TAT , NEW YORK SEKVICE
the pace ote Parothial aren “ ora Astemibytor the. Parish oad . | as Rufine, | a geroly, Pe a eiad, Tacoma Star called to Messrs [ { | af “Geirulv" sails 23rd = Mareh — arrives Barbados 5th April
YOU CAN'T AFFORD sak ore open on urday, rew in the place of D. A, Foster | Lmtj, 5.5, lcoa Pal » &8. &, ‘| Robert Thom, Ltd. Steamer sails 6th April, arrives Barbados 20th April.
April only. deceased, 3. Querety. ‘ si ee 7a Re Saediadgoeacg dain»
K. 8S. FRASER, — I heteby notify my intention of cheapie iia Relative to Carnival and Fair to NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
10 MISS IT Parochial Treasurer, taking poll for the determination —_— Spee ennn ert ar ith and 9th June af} $8. “Aicoa Polari rn "
St. John, the said el on Monday next the ICE be held on 7 an -S. “Alcoa Polaris” sails 2ist March — arrives Barbados 4th April, —
7.451 | 16th. day of April 1951 at the Alléyne OFFICIAL NOT Queen's Park, the undersigned will 8.8. “Alcoa Roamer” sails 4th April — Arrives Barbados 17th April
. School, "Wellegiinne weataning us : y. ‘ol ing:— ee ID
o> ne Te erwin IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY. | receive entries for the following
N the iors Tatas eee Were of the Chancery Act, 1906, 1 do nereby give notice to all persons (a) Costume Bands ldriehueriies CANADIAN SERVICE
Estate of 0 i6.1,— The Alleyne , right interest or any Hien or ineumbranc: y Bands. “
Thousands are aU Tv THORPE School-—t North wing for all persons CE eee ee eee eee aty’ bareinatier mentigned. (the roperty of the Defendant) vp be caecatne Bands | Name of Ship SAILS MALIFA Dos
acid whose su begin with the letter! bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and © v & , $.8. “ALCOA PENNANT”... ..... March 217th ~
takin real ad- NOTICE 1s GIVEN that al| A. to J. inclusive. vouchers to be examined by me, on any Tuesday or Friday between the t ae (d) Historical Bands SS. “ALCOA PARTNER” ae a April 9th, April 19th
g persons having any debt of claims| _ Polling Station (No. 2. — The Alleyne] o1 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Build” | 1, Qiaoe to raise the standard of | ——________ ‘
i a or 2 the estate of Hubert School — the South wing for all per-| ings, Bridgetown before eleventh day of May, 1951 in order a’ : r . ittee | NORTHBOUND
e and priority | Carnival, the Steering Comm
anta e of en- Of Chelsea Road, | "0% Whose Surnames begin with the | such claims may on and ranked ing to the nature @ ' nt a »
vi g be in the parish of Sa ichael i g| letter K. to Z. inclusive. thereof respectiv auch persons will be precluded fram the benefits) weytd appreciate the co-cperation| <5 «arcoa PEGASUS" .. a du 1 Sails for St. Lew:
tetana wi Mi iene Signed of any dectee and f all claims OM of against the sald property vim Clube and Ladisideat $ dive Abell th Sails tow Sti Law
uine Reductions December 1980, juestec SA: Beet and PLAINTIFE, | JAS ARTO ehy BC ebLE being a8 original as possible. 2.8, “ALCOA PIONRER" - as due Apri 12th Sails for St, Jon,
: ee ARNOLD Rae ores PER TY MUL SHAT certain piece of paréel of land situate at Welehman Haii| No entrance fee will be charged aera Tent ee
in ed Beeetiior of the| 10.4 Shr. | PRO “in 1 of Saint Thomas and Island aforesaid containing by ad- A Carnival Band of thirty will
wit ths. said bert Thor LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE measurement 3 roods 17 perches or thereabouts (of which area 4) y. visiting Rarbades to take part) These vessels have limited passenger sceommodation.
c/o Haynes & ‘ fo. 14| LIQ ; Ni a perches are in the public road hereinafter mentioned) abutting and} - 1 1 iodo
Ladies Dress Street st day| The application ef Sylvester Maxwell bounding on lands formerly ef McD, Chandler but now of Joe Cave | in D ROBERT THOM LTD Nw YORE NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE
ae of May 1961, ie I shali} holder of Liquer License No. 636 of on lands of the Estaie of William Small, deceased on lands now of JED. ‘
proceed to ribs of the| 1951 granted to him in respect of a late of one Mayers on lands of Highland Plantation and on the Pub. Closing date, 19th May APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
Gecensed “the entitled | ‘¥°!l building known as Retreat at lic Road or however else the same may abut and bound TOGETHE oD tern he alpen at itor room pe Bc oh OD
Goods, Gents thereto havi 45 Lower Black Rock, St. Michael, for per- with the mesetage, oF dwellinghouse ‘and ail and singular other the More particulars late: — = ?
claims of wi have mission to use said Liguor License at 4 buildings and erections thereon. i. WILLIAMS
IL builds t top Dayrell’s Road, Ch. etetsin Che ; SE CKLES
Wear and Soy ibe eesetd ! aie nD ted this oth. a of ‘Aprit 1951. pm shill zatiiaey, 1608 Registrar-in-Chancery ‘te eile Dusee ame, PASSAGES TO EUROPE
k distributed "0 an debt | T° - MAROD, Bly Lee de
or claim 1 have ‘hag! Potice Magistrate Dist. “Av een eee re - ieaen eee | Contact Antilles Products, Linited, Roseau, Dominia , tor sail-
y pO OOO COSC ODIO IIIT, | ere RSS |
Woollens and And ail persons to the sald] ys: this application Sh econ: RS | § v 4 \'| mg to Europe. The usual poris of call are Dublin, London, of
ieqeneanees w settle thei] sidered at a Gourt to, be FREE HOOK % | LONE, GUEST | Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.
Dated this ¢ held at Police Court, District “A” on TODAY'S NEWS FLA % it, t iN hy
other a , 195). Thuraday | the 19th. day of April 1951 i which makes || i OUSE =
Qualified Executor of the will of | 1) oclock: @ meg a a ,
D ube Hubert Thorpe, deceased. uae + Police, Magistrate, bites Heanatitul i * GOD’S WAY OF % * 4 r Ss
epartine cue 7 SALVATION 3), sONTABELLE GERM LUBRICATING OIL
} ‘ Lamp Shades % PERMANENT |
EVERYDA Y tr BLA Gilda: sti PLAIN”’ % OR i} ARE BEST BY TEST
‘ , m 2ANSIENT |
Required young. tent Engineer for S Factory 10/+ Rach | ; CAT es ODGING DON’T ONLY OIL IT—GERM IT
What bout Pn » competent Engineer for Sugar Factory . onan: (© | @ Pleuse write for one to BOARD A FING
at a 10,000 tons, with experience in West Indies preferred. BEST QUALITY VARNISH STAIN Samuel Roberts, Gospel % | : ao h ad. ‘ UNDRY LTD
J Apply Ralsteun Grant, Managing Director; Hampden Estate ae Book and Tract’ Service, $|})) FOR RESERVATION CENTRAL FO 5
you ? and |Post Office, Jarhaica B.W.I, JOHNSON’S STATIONERY § | $0, Central Avenue, Ban- 3 I DIAL 4837 Gasolene Station—Trafalgar St.
és 10.4.51—1n: and HARDWARE if gor NW, Ireland.” s i 4.4.51-—8n, 1k $
"PRS "oes
SCL VOSCFSOOT LOCOCO) || LS SSS







PAGE EIGHT

WEST INDI
If Full Side Goes

Says Freddie Brown

MELBOURNE April 9,

Freddie Brown who captained Englagd in the tour of
Australia recently, thinks the West Indies can beat Austra-
lia.

Before boarding a plane for West Australia where he
will pick up the liner Orontes at Freemantle to-morrow,
Brown said that England's Test future is distinctly bright.

Referring to the coming West;
Indies tour of Australia, he said
he expected it to be a most in-!
teresting tour and “if they sead



5



CAI

ES

;



their full side, the West Indies
cculd beat Australia.” J |
Brown considered. Bert Sut-

cliffe who made a century against
England in New Zealand as the
best left-hand batsman of the
present day.



Reuter. |



Friendly Football |
Opens On Thursday |

THERE are only five Soh
entered in this season’s Competi-
tion of the above Association,
which commences Thursday April

12. Following are this week’s

fixtures:- |

April 12, Penrode vs Western-|

’ ers at St. Leonard's :
FREDDIE BROWN Referee: Mr, O. Graham

a * at 5h April 13, Rangers vs Harclitte |

at St. Leonard’s
Referee: Mr. J.. Archer :
The kick off in all matches will
be 5.00 p.m

Rare Happenings
Give Atmosphere
To British Turt

By ALAN HARVEY
LONDON

One of the things that gives
British racing a piquant flavour 1s
its Curious carnival: spirit. Any
«bing can happen, and often does

So racegoers didn’t bat an eye
lash at recent episodes



Savannah Club
Tennis Tournament

ZESTERDAY’S RESULTS

ciaaaoern

Mixed Doubles

G. Pilgrim and G. 4. Mannins

Miss S

heat Mrs, P. McG. Patterson and R



















































ee : . eee -

WEIDEN of Austria, his left eye badly damaged, flinches as Jack
Gardner of Great Britain brings across a right to the jaw, in their
heavyweight contest at Earls Court, London.
game cpponcnt on points over 15 rounds, Jack Gardner of Great
Britain becomes the European Heavyweight Champion.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





‘

$ ee
= na AO

In defeating his very

—Evxpress.

Our Readers Discuss:

‘Why Empire Football Club withdrew from the Compe.

Association—

At Sandown — — - Ban uft 6—1; 86
London, a horse with a big leac
da Doubl Handicap
swerved suddenly “about five yise iteen Bowen and 3. W. McK n-
yards from the winning post, stry—1, 30 beat Miss H. Challenor and
aeons. oe or ae = R. Chaltenor pits’ 15 7-—5; 6—3 Giish Picktlek Chih and. the’ Foathall
e@ judge’s stand and losing ne TO-DAY'S FIXTURES : ; “3 Wis ae
race. Mixed Doubles — Semi-Finals Barbados Tennis Team for Trinidad.

McG. Pat-
Trim-

R 8. Bancroft and P
Miss J. Wood and J. D

Mrs
terson vs
ingham.

At Cheltenham, Gloucestersh re
a placid police horse watching »

Football

hurdle race shook off his rider, — Miss G. Pilgrim and G, H, Manning vs aii rm - :
Jumped fh barrier and. joined 4 Miss D, Wood and Dr, C. G Manning To The Editor, The Advocate—
ad 19 four hurdles On Wednesday there will be the usual SIR,—Our attention has been
« fie of . runners ¥ 7 Club Tennis and on Thursday, after the drawn to a paragraph appearing
from home. The favourite and finals of the Mixed Doubles, Lady Sav- tdcdatia: Tinie eo
the second choice (guilty con- age has kindly consented to prevent the 1! to-day’s Issue of your paper
sciences maybe”) ‘shied away Cups to the winners of the several events. under the caption “Empire Quits

from the police horse and lost so Soccer Game”. As the paragraph



*they finished out 4 States, we decided to withdraw
ae — we W hat’s on Today from the First Division football,
At Hurst Park, near famed . but will continue to play in the
Hampton Court Palace, a six- Court of Grand Sessions Second and Third Divisions
year-old mare, La Verite, carried —10 a.m. Our decision was arrived at
five shoes—and won her race. Police Courts—10 a.m. after careful consideration and
(The fifth shoe was a small House of Assembly meets prolonged deliberations at our Alt-
model of the real thing which at—3 p.m. nual General Meeting, The mem-
jockey Jimmy Rowden wore Mr. J. E. T. Brancker is bers strongly deprecated the decis-
around his neck to change his to meve the passing of an ion taken at the B.A.F.A,. Coun-
Juck. ) Address to His Excellency | oj] Meeting of the 6th April, 1951,
The Sandown Park incident the Governor relating to the ,

and were uncompromising in their

payment of an annual opposition

rred during the running of
pet i Christmas bonus to all Gov.

further
the Select Hurdle, a £1,000 race. urther

proach by the Council to the Pick-

to any ap-

A French-bred horse | named ernment employees. wick Cricke lub cecordi ;
Blanc Pain swerved at the last Pelice Band gives coacert at | the iets Gaol Saaoehe
hurdle, impeding Wenceslaus, but St. Thomas’ Almshouse the stand taken at the Council
straightened out and came down —4.45 p.m. Meeting by the Club’s Representa-
the stretcn with a clear lead, As Basket-Ball at Y.M.P.C. = rey:

tive Mr. E. A. V. Williams
We look forward to our adm'r-
ers for their moral support in the
stand we have taken due to the
very unsatisfactory and unreaso 1-
able conditions under which foot-
ball is being played.
Thanking you,
we remain,
C. A, BRATHWAITE, J.P

the favourite backers began
counting their winnings, Blane
Pain swerved again and stopped
suddenly just before the winning

when YÂ¥.M.P.C. will en.
gage Pirates in a first divi-
sion match, Pickwick
will also meet Carlton
at the same ground.
Play begins at—7.45 p.m.
Table Tennis at Y.M.C.A
Barna vs. Y.M.C.A
—7 p.m.
Sale of Household articles at

t.

His jockey, Andy Jarvis, raced
into space and landed past the
post, Blanc Pain turned and gal-
lopped back the way he had come
as Wenceslaus plodded on to win

the event. High Street —Auctioneers President

“J can’t understand it,” said Branker Trotman & Co., L. WILTSHIRE,
trainer Jack Gosden after the —12.30 p.m. Honorary Secretary.
race. “He’s never done anything CINEMAS Empire Club,

like. that before.”

Blanc Pain may have been reg-
istering a protest at his name, The
French usually say “Pain Blanc”
putting the noun before the
adjective. The phrase means
white bread

Blanc Pain isn’t the only horse
with a French name that looks
peculiar to the natives, One of
the favourites for the derby, to
be held May 30, is Fraise du Bois

Globe—"He wataed By Night".

&Bmypire— Christopher Columbus"

hoyal—''House of Dracula’

Koxy—"Christopner Columbus”

Flaza (Bridgetown)—‘The Pirates
ut Capri".

Aquate—"Sitting Pretty”

Bank Hall,
7th April, 1951.



Pickwick and B.A.F.A.

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—The Committee of Man-
agement of this Club cannot aliow
the letter written by Mr. O
Coppin, Hon. Secretary, B.A.F.A.,
which appeared in your issue of



The Weather





11, already touted by the Aga TODAY Tuesday 3rd April, 1951, to be
Khan as a likely winner. The Sun Rises: 5. 56 a.m read by the public, without mak-
expression means wild straw- ing certain comments,

Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.

Moon (First Quarter)
April 14.

Lignting: 6.30 p.m.

lligh Water: 5.05 a.m., 6.06

berry, but the French usually say
Fraise Des Bois. —(CP).

-

Traffic Don’t

The letter written by this Club
appearing in your issye of Sun-
day last (April Ist) was not writ-
tem with the object of making out
a @ase, but simply correcting state-





p.m 7 ft
re ments made by Mr. Coppin in an
No. 22 R: YESTERDAY article which appeared on the pr>-
tainfall (Codrington) .06 in. vious Sunday.
e vo Pa to Yester The Committee of this Club is
VEHICLE ON A ROAD AT Temperature (Min). 72.5 °F hee Rep ees

letter,

NIGHT WITHOUT Wind Direction (9 a.m.) Mr. Cecil Goddard is a memt
> a cen . > . 70 a S é embd?
PARKING LIGHTS Wal caedue ca of the Management Committee o!
r . this Club but he was at no t me
Space made available by eee Sse authorised to make any bindin;
CANADA DRY rometer (9 9.m.) 29-976 | agreement with the B.A.F.A

for Safer Motoring (3 p.m.) 29,903

When, he was approached by Mr
Coppin re the playing of football







| ty hey'll Do it Every Time

.

ee =

FY nasintered U$ Patent Omen

~ __ By Jimmy Hatlo |

Maori. ene Aways KNEW HER PRINCE
WOULD COME ALONG«\\\ iF NOT ON A
WHITE HOSSE AT LEAST ON A LUXURY

CRUISER ON A MOONLIT TROPICAL SEA «

CAPRIewSTROMBOLI RIO! )

THE WHOLE WORLD SHALL /

BE OUR HONEYMOON ++. 25

7 ONLY SAY THAT ee
RY ME}/ /

Au, ROMANCE BUT 2S, HESE'S
HOW IT HAPPENED WHEN IT DID ssss
4 Say, KiDQO“YOU MUST BE
/ AS TRED AS I AM EATING IN,
TUESE BEANERIESAT.M MAKIN
65 CLAMS A WEEK AND YOU
MUST MAKE S5°\WHATTYA
SAY WE GET HOCKED FRIDAY
AFTER WORK AND SLIP OVER
TO PICNIC BEACH FOR THE
WEEK END2 WE'LL GE BACK
IN TIME FOR WORK “
MONDAY ss»

\s












SS




—






a

}
hi
|











.

pe
whe

= Rae
=

wee)
My













“YESS-S-
lH CONRAD,
YESS-s



X \

\

|
|

at Kensington, many points were
disctissed, such as expenses, pro-
vision of balls, admission fees, ete.
Mr. Goddard also discussed the
division of gate receipts and inti-
mated to Mr. Coppin that he
noped it would be possible to
make some provision for the
B.C.A. to share, however, he told
Mr Coppin that he would place
the matter before his Committee
tor final approval.

This Committee 1eit :vhen the

matter was discussed that they
would make no definite figure
with regard to B.C.A. as they

were entirely ignorant as to the
outcome of the 1949 season, being
the first occasion when footbali
was piayed at Kensington, burt
should the venture prove to be a
success the B.C.A. would benefit
by a donation,

A letter therefore was written
to the B.A.F.A,. on the 25th Feb-
ruary, 1949, outlining the term:
for the football season, The
B.A.F.A. had a Council Meeting
very early in March, 1949, but this
letter was never read, Instead,
Mr. Coppin informed the Ccuncil
that Mr. Goddard and himself had
come to an arrangement whereby
B.A F.A. would receive 40% of
the gross, P.C.C. 40% and B.C.A
20%; this letter was referred tc
for the first time at a Council
Meeting early in 1951, when this
Club replied to a letter from tae
B.A.F.A. concerning 20% due the
BGA, of which agreement
naturally they knew nothing.

When figures as to costs, etc.
were gone into, even Mr. Goddard
agreed that it would be impossi-
ble for this Club to make such an
arrangement.

The above can easily be demon-
strated by taking last year’s hg-
ures, ie, a gross gate receipt of
$5,000 00. It the aivision of gross
was to be 40% each to B.A.F.A.
and P.C.C., and 20% B.C.A.,, it
would mean that B.A.F.A, would
receive $2,000.00; Pec.c.
$2,000.00 and B.C.A. $1,000.00
Imposing figures admittedly, but
the P.C.cC, had to pay all expenses
which amounted to approximately
$1,200.00, leaving them with a nett
of $800.00. Could anyone possibly
visualise this Club under these
circumstances working’ their
members for three months free of
charge, three and sometimes four
afternoons a week, contrclling
everything, cash receipts, grounds,
staff, gate, ete., and after all that
receiving much less than anyone
else concerned who were con-
tributing nothing in the way of
labour or help, and this especial-
ly epplies to the B.A.F.A.

The letter of 25th* February,
1949 referred to by Mr. Coppin
was admittedly badly expressed in

pears



Phone







jon a 60% P.C.C

ML Te

JAR



BEAT AUSTRALIA

{ene first paragraph, but Mr. Cop-
'pin does not make any reference

however to the second paragraph
Of this letter which clearly stated

the term referred to. Further, can

ome imagine that the explanation
given, by the writer to the Council
would not have
nm accepted without going into
legal phraseology. If this Club
hadsjntended to give the B.C.A
the which it is alleged they
d-agreed to do, would it not be
quite obvious that the B.C.A,.
would have been advised accord-
ingly and would have in the course
of time asked for such payment?
Does Mr. Coppin want to accuse
the Management Committee of the
P.C.C. of deliberately receiving
money under false pretences?

We would refer Mr. Coppin to
his letter to’this Club dated 24th
March, 1951, in which he states
that the B.A.F.A. are not in any
way concerned ¥ith any finan-
cial arrangement this Club might
make with the B.C.A, This state~
ment, obviously, has always been
the view of the B.A.F_A.
Therefore, if Mr.
wishes this matter to be on a
legal basis, the B.A.F.A. played
the 1949 season at Kensington,
thereby accepting the terms from
this Club set out in the letter of
25th February, in which there
was no mention of any percentage
for the B.C.A., and if tne
B.A.F.A. were under a different
impression, they should have
stated so in a letter to this Club.
But the letter referred to was
never read when it should have
been, nor »was it confirmed.
Further,, Mr. Coppin must
admit that when the time came
for the 1950 season he wrote to
this Club a letter which turned
out to be an exact copy of our
letter of 25th February, 1949. The
first condition mentioned {s the
division of the gross gate receipts,
., 40% B.A.F.A

Coppin

basis. Surely 5 :
were under any other impression,

as they claim, with regard to the,

B.C.A., mention would have
been made of the terms.

Finally it must be stated to the
public that the final terms offered
the B.A.F.A.. for the 1951
season were these: —

10% of the gross receipts to

’ be deducted to partly defray the
expenses of this Club.

From the remaining gross
figure—40% to B.A.F.A., 40%
P.C.C. and 20% B.C.A.

The P.C.C. would pay all
expenses over and above those
offset by the 10% from their
40%.

This really meant that on the
basis of a $5,000.00 gate season
the B.A.F.A. would receive
$1,800.00, the B.C.A. $900.00
and P.C.C. $1,100.00 after
deducting expenses. A fair divi-
sion. Mr. Coppin is evident)
under the impression that there
are not expenses to be deductec
from the P.C.C. share. No, Mr
Coppin, this Club has _ respectec
men of the community running i
and you must bring much stronge
legal information if you want t
implicate us in what you accust¢
us of. Admit to the public tha
your Coundil turned down thr
above terms because it meant the
B.A.P.A. giving up 4% to helr
the B.C.A.

Yours faithtully,
H. D. KIDNEY.



Tennis
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I read in to-day’s Advo-
cate with complete an.azement the
personnel of the team to represent
Barbados in the Brandon Trophy
matches in Trinidad next week.
I would like to point out a few
facts for the perusal of the tennis
follower and it will be evident as
to the extent of the blunder made
by the Selection Committee,

The Council of the Lawn Tennis
Association made the statement
that there are no players at pre-
sent, with the exception of Eric
Taylor and Dr. C. G. Manning, up
to the standard which would do
Barbados credit. This statement
is very misleading for we all re-
member that these very players
were miserably defeated in B.G.
last year by the same team we
now have to meet, Jamaica. These
two players were unable to get a
single set in three men’s singles

@
matches and a men’s doubles Oatmeal Sp wa
match, Pkg. Vita Wheat Biscuits we g

Last year we sent to B.G. along Pkg. Weetabix Biscuits

With the above-mentioned player:
Dennis Worme, a talented young

player who showed much promise }
In the one sin-!

of improvement.
gles match he was allowed to play
in, he showed that he was on a pa
with his team mates, winning as
many games as they did, and per-
forming very creditably indeed
There is also another young player

in Louis St, Hill, who representec !

Barbados against Tranquility las(
‘year here, and who showed himself
to be capable of great natural
tennis ability,

With regard to the other two
players selected, Barbadians resi-
dent in Trinidad, it is to be re-
membered that while both of
them were asked to practise fo {







BAKERIES





| Island.

if the B.A.F.A. | 5th April, '51.

a

LY LLL |

at 1567

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1951

a

MODERN HIGH WINS

A





f





team of the High
24 goals
to 13 in a.basket-ball game which
was played at Y.M.P.C., Beckles

Road, yesterday afternoon

Modern
Sehool defeated Y.M.P.C

Pianoforte Lecture
RECITAL
MR. HENRY WILSON

Professor of the Royal
College of Music, London,
will give a Pianoforte
Lecture-Recital



the Trinidad team, neither of them
gained selection, While this state-
ment is not conclusive, it is gener-
ally accepted that this team will

GAME DRAWN

|

Olympia and St. Michael's Girls |
played to a 9—9 draw in a net- |
ball game which was played at St.
Michael's Girls’: School yesterday
afternoon. |
|

1956 Olympic Games Will |
Be Held In Melbourne |

.







not win even one match against at
the superior Jamaicans. This being THE BRITISH COUNCIL
the case, would it not be better Wakefield,” White Park
for tennis in Barbados if two of On Monday April 9th
the three players be vesident in at 8.30 p.m.
the Island at present, so that the The Programme will
experience gained could be dis- include:
tributed to the younger players Three 16th Century Lute
afterwards? Pieces—RESPIGHI

This error by the Council of the Three 18th Century Pieces
Lawn Tennis Association has de- Chromatic Fantasia and

Fugue—J. S. BACH
Sonata in D Major— Op. 10
No, 3—BEETHOVEN
La Soiree Dans Grenade,
Jardins Sous La Pluie

—DEBUSSY

All seats reserved. Tickets

($1.00 and 60c.) obtainable

in advance from the British
Council.

cucted from the low store of our
tennis ability and has given Trini-
dad a chance to improve their al-
ready superior standard of play.
The future cf our Tennis rests on
the shoulders of the young players
and when they are deprived of
such a golden opportunity, it, is
evident that the standard of tennis
will continue to decline in the fu-
ture years. If this is an example
of the Lawn Tennis Association’s
idea for the betterment of tennis
in Barbados, then we can be ex-
pected to slip quietly out of tennis
competition in the West Indies.
We have young players, who
with experience gained in Tourna-
ments such as this, would reach the
standard of Eric Taylor himself.
If the funds of. the. Association
will only permit two players to be
sent, then let us send two players
who we know will improve our
standard of play. If we cannot re-
eruit players who will teach our
players when they return from
these Tournaments, then still let

MELBOURNE, April 9.
Australian Olympic Games offi-
cials want every country in the
world to know that the 1956 |
Olympic games will be held inj
Melbourne as scheduled. |
The Organising Committees’ |
secretary, E. Tanner, made this}
comment to-day and said the
Statement was intended to
international uncertainty.”
Reuter.



“end }
|

en













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» Per Yard

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In Blue, Pink, Peach,
Lemon. 30” wide 77c.
White only 7c.

TENNIS FAN.



Brazil Picks Football Tea:

THE HAGUE, April 9,
The Brazilian football team to
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pic Stadium in Amsterdam was
chosen to-day.—Reuter,



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Full Text

PAGE 1

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PAGE 1

II I SDAY. APRIL 10. 1MI I1ARB.UM.S ADVOCATE l\(.l. IIIKII 'BACK TO THE FOLD' PLAN FOR JAPAN But Allies will watch the Pacific re itftuUli d drill H" Hiltr*li •iklth *hr hopr. mil I*. ripM in mul-ummi r III Ihiimp liiil. i \p. irliJohn HodUMU prapoaal* u u.-hnui <>n .— Hi \in< %  %  HI % %  .,-:%  ntrr Ihr Kwkui 4Hd llouln it.ind *II i J-iBiuitr trrtllwr.jl taer*UDl< M-ttriclrg to llir foat 'i i.law.1. and ininr nri^l .sir. T.,..n MI fii.iuii.. ..II rl.iim> t.'l 1 ..-niL.sJ .nil Ihr I" iai Kami; and di soatta %  i.'viiin III d ihr Kuril' l land -..in!, j in Reeds i Peisds %  imertae amnta Jan*" t' br ,iWr In >|>pW (iw ni-mVr.M|i of Ihr haa lohl Uaihinaaltovrd , vrl* Ihr pad. Ihf I S u .i-u thai -h..kail L>II lirnil i III itII i.iiin HI i Sakhalin and the Hunk IilaniN <*nl< n ihr -;iu II. l.iill.l.M t^-.,. S. .-:.Sir Charles ^oolley Going To U.K. JVu Taxes Raised From April 1 GEORGETOWN, I1G, April B Governor Sir Charlas Woollr-y, left British Guiana by rt.r to-day bv r,.r he "i ilTrtl. Otir Ov>> C'lrmpoidrali KINGSTON. J'CA. April 3 Apnl 1, the beginning of a \r financial year, brought \\ A ttlee 9 s Wa hi go w An Experimental Farmer Disease Children 9 s Day "1 KNOW of no pursuit In which more real and important service* can be rendered to any country, than by improving. It* agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a WASHINGTON World Health Day was observed on Salurd.tv. Ap-il 7, Ly Meinbii Cotintries of the World Health Oriranlia'iOi., a Specialised Agency of the United Nations. <_v.servure Ol thp ri.iv t! TELL over half a million men •z ^t pr^r sasa sri"^'-'-^ ^fiSSSSE jglisSS II — !" H'-sS 5 s;Six^ Un.tod Kingdom, Hi, Exrrllrncy ,„ 30.. a ytar; tradr and bulldisean. and the cloatly reUtad husbandman's cam,'observed niVt hope: I, lliid ways and means of „„ licence. moved up Irom um c ulcer (-peptic ulcer" It Ihe Oeore Washmjton mor than SKS** 1 ^' fcttlnt more money to cnabV this t 2S t„ £ 50 year M lre „. f h „ lcrm lor „„, % ,, 1, 150 years uo country to get ahead with develtn excess of £500 value from heavy charge on the National Wushinflon, the first President opment at a bnsger pace. 7/jd t 0 £1 j,. 6d. In the £10; with Health Service, and the economic of the United States, was also Ihe Colonial Secretary. Honourable the maximum rate payable being loss is equally graat. In a group Nation's first experimental farnitr. n £100 to £300; of ona hundred men It may ba Ha was 11 farsightcd cilizcii who and commission expected that 13 working days realized the importance of agri%  s want up from will be lost each year due to this culture to the future of the United £U, Rctuilcr. diablty. Slates. He began cxperimeiitlng up from a mini Duodenal ulcer, like coronary on several thousand acres (nee Hi £1. with an thrombosis, is a disease which haa tares) of land ho_owned in Mount Spies Got Sky ship Secrets Frwn NFWKU. %  route I A Russian espionage ring got I information about an Ani'm.". 'pace ship, said a confessed atom tspj in court. David GreciiKlaw entered the witness-box to siiter. Mrs Ethel Roenbei g. age. 3$, and his brother-in-law. Myear-old Julml!iM-tiU-rg. The charge of .ompimiR to *p. for Russia In wartime carries pocalble death penalty (.reenglass said Rosrnbeig toW him he got ii.ii.i OB .1 -i\ plMform proJc\-l trom imtoi thi bVMrWB ">> i gr.vlt> pull and the moon Si itimhh .1 pi.ilfi'ini nilld rule the earth Tlv t' s \nm ha .K.mitto,i un "carl' 1 U pfa mumim%  Greenglass also told thi month artcr the gtotn bOltlb w ' dropped on Hiroshima he gavi Rosenberg a M -type bomb John Gulch, O.B E., acts as offi. Increased frorr cer administering the Government auotlorMcrs for the period of f' twice.—tCP) f Sir Chiirles' abJI gents g U.S. MINING COMBINE WANTS LICENCES TO PROSPECT IN J'CA KINGSTONTVCA. April 3. An American combine has made application to tinJamaica Government for hcenn 10 went of 10 WHO's Constitution became rtctive m 1MB. followed the pattern of last year when various Member States called attention to health through exhibits, reception*, plays, procession*, sports events, baby contests, clean-up campaigns, and tho sSowini; m lantern .slides. pect in the Constitution ''HIU ^ ,8d se of rates from 7'6d to become much more common in Veriion. in the State of Virginia U-26 m the £10, and the max.the last twenty or thirty years Thrwhoul m '"' I"LXr mum payable from £75 to t;225 During the nineteenth century It to j"*di h **MV with occurred most often in young knowledge by corresponding with u.inment admission fees women: now It mainly affects fsrm expert-i in many other toun_ were also increaaed. The tax on men. the age of greatest incidence tncs From France and England cmei uinmcnt tickets went up being 45-M During the last war he learned the atest techniques from 25',; to 33 1/3% on all the rste of discharge from the of planui... wlfnlti lickeU. the cost of which exceedArmy on account of peptic ulcer He discover* and potato ways to cope 1 rea of the Island in %  iniuuiH project Lead, copper and zinc %  re the main metals to bo ,L-VPI oped nnd the move follows recent prospecting by a pair of US mining engineers. Copper hn keen mined sporadically in ih. island for iwer tw 1( centuries tx>en found in several pUces Th '" med, *' al department has Stomach has anything to do with and Inexpeni The copper mining combine • %  • %  red '-, ' 14*1 a threatened the origin of an ulcer, but quite would mov.> v-hich has applied for Ukss* 1U U H>"I cpi the one-day observance 04 World Health Day is held in Member Countries, year-round off..Ms of the World Health Organization U> improve child health will be continued by WHO personnel at headquarters and In the Held — for example, by malaria spraying teams in I'ak . 300 ume. what ,, was in ,h. weight. „t^ method, JT-S^mMW Xltall.3IISll oulid up agrtcul.ure In the new .;! and1 child health ser. clear whether the amount of hythose of olher farmer, in America • %  !_•> 9""er Pains One of the main objects of m-lo^uanmie. 'n^Lf cX £,u^, ^'?S^^" this way the acid will be neuMcanwhile, as the island swrlirallsed. tcrs In the grip of drought which Patients with duodenal ulcer __ has tainted water supplies hi the often complain of hunger pain maican farm labourers'applvmg t.i nita) districts and which Is directwhen their stomach "WptyjiiH. rxD .. r m ,. lvl s Ihe U.S. Immigration iuti.or.l.es ly believed to be Ihe cause of the • f^^^^^fSSSl eSTo for the importatior, of 5.000 workoutbreak, the Health Office ha. 22*£?* 1 ffia*tEff-^S?2 wheat !: %  ->d This was not Washington't method. When his soil appeared What needs to be stressed, h worn out, he experimented in >i'l "is the very Intimate relatreating It with new fertilizers, tlomhlp which exist* Iwtween the He rotated his crops and planted health of the child when define,! as a as total health -and the solu protector of the soil, prailislng tlon of the great crisis which the best conservation mcisures he confronts humanity to-day. Th* could learn. world will be what our children Wheat was one of Washington's and the children of the next genbest crops. He has lllled his araUbn make it. their stomach is empi^nd *JjJjjLSlSJ 'fcSui^tTS! " %  • •*• " c ea n l ">* characteristic of the aisease "tperirnenls. Ev. ually !>| jaljouf ^ M physically ,att.xxi relieves the pain. .Besides "La^t.'JBSg hi % CaStarl Wealthy but also in freeing thi MEAT t.'i UWtbai man is in film, to he tailed "One Man' Poison" Actor Gary Merrill going to Britain, to appeal In i Baya Mm Merrill, bauai known Btttg i 1 %  AM rate %  Gary, and ml too. I have always wanlcn M pi I I suspense mclodian the i.ulet. elfarth WEATiiVR ii in be Investigate by a Senate committee to see whether it can be roiunllcii tg • mMTTg w.'i-i -i IIOVr.ltri.AM pHota are u have a special army training scbo. t of their own. They will be organ. Ised in companies to carry troop; nnd supplies to fioni h •ompany of 23 aircraft In e;n!i ..i BU livlsion. LEAP YEAR, |gU, wlU cost the United State* Oawertunent %  lot of money. The Civil Barvio I to be paid extra fur Pebruai %  N nRUlsil niaiiuf at turers are scTTIng so many fabt twu-seatei sports ran th.it Aflwrll panics are being tanpted to plungl into the market Dei. i duct ion may prci'iit !lniDnW ing too much panpetition, SCREEN STAR Mary A then w ne>ad not worry bout our future and theirs, [i Bv extensive cannot but be secure, peaceful nd wise plant and truly rich in the value* that make life worthwhile." This year's theme of "Health (or Your Child and the World'( iiildi'ci," i| considered of highest importance hy the Organization. Since beginning Its work officials have pointed out, WHO bag sought to help governments develop services and facilities that would assure adequate maternity care, the t>e>t possiblechance of survival to infants, and opportunity for all children to aid: "On the 88th grow up in a healthful environ eryjefrcshlug rain n Nil. free from preventable mcern for his crops n his diaries. On K rll 18. 17B8, after a severe frost, shlngton wtotc: "Peaches not killed and hoped other fruit not hurt. Points of the new moon upwards . Begun to plant corn Later on, wrltlnc about August weather, he said: "On ihe 28th K 0 w then w a very refreshing rain m*-iil Wednesday night by Mis. Megan j lnMln| f, f t„ r ,. Phillips, .pi-aklng ."IJJJJ S"Anxlaty at f.cnrges Q n (nc oln r hand, nunncn n.. ou t not sunt. isumcienn to go to disease. Miss Phillips a former pupil others holding responsible posltnt rooU o( Indian corn which One yardstick for judging Die iFtwn Our Own <-..„, M ,^„ ,, n{ ^y c t Joseph's Convent High tlons In industry were found to be wtg suffering very much for want Health of a country. WHO has PORT-OF-SPAIN April I! school and now rending for a specially susceptible These docof ,,,.. sUted, is its infant mortality rate Possibility of research work 00 Ooetorata in Sociology, spoke on tori concluded that anxiety over Tn „, h believed In the prescrhow m> „ y infanU out of 1 000 .•atoll • %  part of the studies to be tie Lay Apor ** %  >> aalQldM ^ill S|M'iid neSOOiOfnooo On KcsfHintNH QUEUE<'. Apnl | !> %  '.i lopoteni oi ijin i nlning and hydro-eleetrlc reaoures will be %  -j %  i*i mi in uie SI.~.(ltM",u,nni m .exl tw, years I'n'tnicr KuplesMI'.| ments Pit %  %  lisle* considerable qu -. %  un. mi tin* si Levrreoee lUvi nirth sliore.—

of the West Indies. aldered. This was stated by Prolaid down fessor M. Sandmann, Professor In everyday living, and movii Languages on the ^.ilT of the nmong the fellow members of University College, who is now In tneir community and endcavTrinidsd with 1-rofessor P. M. ouring to create better social and Sherlock, viie Primlpsl. and economic conditions. Sbe ,ir !" Professor Eric Crmckshank, Desn this approach lo i.renaaa of the Faculty of Medicine. present labour problems. i ill die. on the average, before eachmg their first birthday duodenal ulcer." time only can place them wherr It Is common knowledge that one would have them, after the the stomach Is closely linked with gra< (ground) is stripped of the emotions; anticipation of ih Pm ." Whenever one of Ml %  thing unpleasant leads to "a fields was to be cleared he Insist sinking feeling." which are often eo mat a few trees or clumps be the very words an ulcer sufferer orl B i, n ding. uses to "deacribe his symptoms Washington was also noted as I The highly-strung individual is suect M f u i breeder of good animal "-ularly susceptible to ner^tocg, a nd raised manv fine horses. indigestion, but whether ot ,heep, rattle, and hogs, not he develops a duodenal ulcer Summing up his observations will depend on both his ronsululltl f iirrn ing to Arthur Young, edl tion and environment. tor „f the Annals ef Agriculture For their ulcers to heal, patients and nc ou i B tandlng farmer need mental as well as physical Grcal Britain in Ihe rest. the eighteenth century. Waihingti Not so long ago patients diswroU: "The more I am acquaintchi-rged from hospital after treat^ |h BtTlcu ii ura i affairs, the " letter I am pleased with them partk This rale varies Irom less than 30 per thousand in some countries to 200 per thousand in others. WHO records show. In large areas, statistics do not even exist but surveys Indicate that one out of every three children dies In Infancy. Only a hundred years ago, WHO hastated in a report prepared for World Health Dav, "such a situation existed almost everywhere in Ihe world" Sinew then, particularly during the past %  I decades "improvement Moving Problems ROBERTS TRUCKS, TROLLEYS & WHEELS e A TRUCK and TROLLEY Delivery for every trade S. P. MUSSON SON & CO.,LTD,-Agfnts incut were exhorted to keep strictly to an uninspiring diet nnd tn unexciting life, but, as the Lancet recently said, "It la unreasonable to expect ft restless, eager, and ambitious man, such as many ulcer patients are, to lead : %  frustrated vegetable existence." With knowledge limited as It is. the onlv safe way to recuperation Is by diet and rest, but the time may come when eome glandular extract will be used to prevent the diipepsia which so commonly reflects the stomach's reaction to %  ertaui nervea. -LE wmiD rorvRicHT arsnvBD. — TT~ : \ MIU tins uuitiaiimiii .••...• %  •• %  has been very rapid % %  • % %  • % %  ••)>•••• ell as physical Grcal Britain in Ihe early part of North America and Australia, and in some places on olher eetfUnent Within n century the gate has dropped in Germany, for example, from 100 lo 50 (Western Germany since IHOO Infant mortality has declined m Bel glum from 172 to 63. in Australia from 104 to 28 "A low infant mortality rate is no longer considered tn 1-UM privilege of countries with a favourable climate," the report continues •Children born In the hot humidity of a tropical forest or In the darkness of an Arctic winter can enjoy good health uovided the necessary public health measures are taken by th fommunitv and understood an' bry the public" GRENADA GETS NEW DEPUTY POLICE CHIEF how much more delightful to an undebauehed mind Is the task of making improvements on the earth than all the vain glory which can be acquired from rav aging it. by the mosl uninterrupted career of conquests." China Got 19,407 Tons Malayan Rubber SINGAPORE, April 7 Communist Chins got IB.40", tons of Malavan lubber during the first three months of this year. according to official figures released here today. This amount compared with the 38.5*.8 tonreceived by Chin* whole of 1940 JVa Selectt) . Tor IVsiival Of Britain KINGS'lON. i\ The LegWativi i otu n ,,i ja man-a has *eb cted ihe Hon l>" ' lea Judah to be on repreeentatlvee i<> in'I Brij I i i % %  viously selected b. tin BepresentatiM are Ihe Hon Sn Harold All.ui. K' O I'. K J I* i .i.im.n ind !%  %  • r of tl nnd Mi 1. 1-. Bui I M H R ..t tinHOUM < Ofnmlttes HI Fiti.iii. %  nd ol Ihr lembei cd ition Mr. Jwl Jamaice .in the i 'i i A sn Harold %  %  anted UM K W I Inti 1 %  %  Havana, god Mi Sim ids pre Viously 1* pTI West Indies Conff %  It la entl ted Ju lab Couneil' Beb el I mi Constitutional Ai. ea, will discuss this ma;' %  %  • rr*M Oar Oan (.ir'iM-4'" ST. GEORGE'S April 8 Mr. A H. Jenkins, former Chief during tin Constable, ^'"i^'"^? *"" Direct shipments lo Russia were new Deputy Superintendent of non(1 Jn M ^ (|1 bul x lXuU ^ tAlll Po l*F'\ .j in January and Fcbruar. Thirty.mne. yeewold. SupennOT( ££3 with. 88.058 tons du; CLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE Cleanse the system from blood Impurities ; many sufferers from rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago, neuritis, pimples, boi's, sores and minor skin ailments, can derive great benefit from this well-known medicine. le LIQUIO er TAii £ r POMM TRUCK OWA'ERS #v#r:rr#o.Y TIME XEED XOT HE nOHHYIW TIME EORIirNl-OIMl.l" HI'S SEATS LIONIUE l.tATHERETTF. CARPET MATEII1M. UlMlllER MATS HEAR VIEW MIRRORS 12 Volt BUZStKS ROOF UMP BULBS '. SOCKETS ELECTRIC WIRE h ELEX UATTBRY CABl.BS ACiESSORY SWITCHES FlatOAI.VANlSKli BHECTS ll.t.I Gloss WHITE TAINT for Inlrrlor C.REV I'AINT lor Flooring SIGNAL RED for Body HEAT RESISTING BLACK WHITE LEAD ZINC MUFFLERS i PIPES KING PIN SETS DECARBONIZING SETS BRAKE LINING SETS FRONT SPRINGS for Ford & Clicvp'li-l FIRE EXTINGUISHERS AND LOTS OF OTHEK I N-f VTMI.S ECKSTEIN BROTHERS Its not it all ways! ^/Check the new 5-ton 100 HOJUC roWLF MORMS-COHHERClAi against everything you mnd your drivers want in a truck! Man w, 1*1... Mwm i.,.. ins hiai.-. ...o.J n 1-jiV ului t><>|,ird I., IfHI -b" l l t l I I lid %  T. %  h. M*MM n4"n*diof di HtH >o>nl/>. IOU MI iinpbfi i.i 0 a %  i.. h. FORT Phone 2385 ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Sole Distributor* Phone 4504 (In irt added tr-ndent Jenkins had previau* [hfi j^,, poliee experience in F.ngfand be„ on|[ K(I „ K tr-lk 2 5.973 tons of fore going to the Fslklands He Malayan rubber during this qu.iria a holder of the Bronze Medal ,,,, _ind Certificate of the Royal Life f hp hllh percentage of rubber Saving Society and the Medal of sported to Hong Kons i Itnowi Ihe S*. John's Ambulanc Associato be re-exported lo Chin, lion. Exports of Malayan rubber to _.„ He served under Colonel E. M Hdhg Kong, China. Ruwla and and,any hlp. vessel V. James, former Police Superlnome other countries will be conWrit Informed so, tctident. St. Lucia, who has been trolled from Aprl! 0 vinder new was connected with Hng Kong' appointed to act temporarily u licensing regulations announced relaUonship with Commun %  Supertatrndent. on ThiirsdejT. — Heater China Hongkong Shipping Was Not Seized For Evacuation HONO KONG, April 7 A Government spokesman tod %  lenied that the Hong Kong auihl-! put emergency regulaiimiinto force yenterdav to enable tbem to wize shipping lor %  p %  moo. But he gave no reason for the midden re-iiitnKluction of the twoveor-old regulations which allow the authoritie>. lo reojuMt vehh I-or animal, and eny launch, lighter, boat or other small craft. ifrcraft ft ,id ii KM I.MtDI \ IIOSi;— %  and %" (iAKDKN IIMSE FITTINGS OABOKN SMKARS TRUCK JACKS (illl.l.N CANVAS—69" FRICTION TAPK I'l.ASTK l,l\TIIKR CLOTH NCMBKK FLATM & DIGITS TUBF VALVES—Truck and Car COtJRTESl ROBERT THOM. LTD. — UCMCS IIOI.DBRS 111 llltl K MATT1NC! KKAR VIRW MfRKOKS. WINDSCREEN WIPERS (Vtuum) COOL CUSHION GAS TANK LOCKS < Knulisli and American Can) HAND SOAP CHROME CLEANER GARAGE White Park Rd. — Dial 4391



PAGE 1

TITSOAY. APRIL in, 1951 RARRADOS UlVOOATF i'\cr. FIVI 2 Nominated For Four Years For House stjrsa*vstryt^ c>. A 0 Breaking And Larceny itst> F NewYear ot. Andrew Seat In House of Assembly HIS HONOUR the ActinK Chief Justice. Mr. (J L. Tttror The si. Jamei Vralry ai ilwir sentenced McDonald Bishop, labourer, to four vrV pc-,,1 SSlSSSZSVa^TSi servitude when he was lound guilty of house breaking and larceny at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday. Labour M.P. Will Ask Aboul C.O.L. Bonus for thp ensuing year at S3 72 prr -__ Mr W. W. Reece, K C SlMR. J. A. HAYNEfc and Mr Selberl Worrell, candidates icltor General, prosecuted f for the Barbados House of Assembly. Invited about 1M C roym partshiontri ; ( i the Bellcp.ainc Community Hall vrsterJay i" vote for thi-m next Monday. Th.two candidate* are contesting the seat left vacant by the late Mr. D A Fost.r BNft taken pate 2 Yean Mr. • %  Josh" Haynes l Ihe Government woulil ever suit BarElectors' Ascorlatton cnndldalr. bados. bin 1-ecaunin ihe nature Mr. Worrrll is the choice of the %  ' thing* today, all independence Barbados Progressive League nd individualism were stifled. Mr. Haynes stressed the cost of living, He present Labour Government power in Ihil inland ootart on i*u eeagsts, on the first count on which hi M taaad guilty — he was charged witn breaking and entering U of Denis Worme situated at Rockley. Christ Church and stealing arUcles to the value of $61 24 Fitwrald Lovel! a labourer af Churchwarden In St. Matthux QaB, Quiet Chun*, Mr. A 0 Johnson, was sentenced to tare Odw ..ppoinlment* are . %  fnlpiisonment with hard hioour oy fourteen on land snd 51 11 in the i f-r Antinun %  < **--SWa' on trade and rents The prat ' Antl W<* CWsTServants rates laid were at $2 KB peg gen on land and 90 cents in Q 1.0NDON. April It trade and renis. Land in the Labour Member of I'., parish is valued at $I6.:M ...... % %  Hcmy Hynd is to ask in th Mr A L. Jordan was iipi-iir;>ti "ru* ,.f Commons this be sesftcj el asssrol v.ith. to my mind, dismal laUure, end it "ill be my intention n -cled to vote against His Honour the Acting Ch ef Judge Mr. O. L Taylor at Court of Grand Sessions yesU-r day. Lovell pleaded guilty i.f rec* %  'he *"uia ix oeiier ioir to serve •* *-.-.** , i>w. n g v toln goods, the property t interest if he had an organiOn the second count h v was Denis Worme of Rockley. CnfH tatiu liehind him. than If he charged with receiving -.loU n church on October 4 He believed,, therefore, that he sometime between September 7 ,..m to trade and c mmerce %  A h r.m.n outfoHl* IW I v | I'e HSJl he returned i aval whelming majority for many years *""*• inal ., a and had also done so when he had hi ^r^riSSSr.tJr M PSftS? isnred In the House Do not let ny miiicthau. the co*t of living t |e mtstake they tiad made in 1948 M bound to keep up. in nrop pt ni[ h | m rrom lhc House. Mr. Haynes said that he hod oe repeated this lime Improvement Seibert Worrell said that fought alone goods valued at $64 24 on October As to the qualification* of hi* 4. the property of Denis Worme. It he left that 10 their Before passing sentence on considerauon Mr. llaynes said Bishop. His Honour told him that his trouble was thai he would not leave other people's ptaastt) nlone He told him that he was a menace to the community. Police Constable Howard—kccpci of the criminal records—told the court that Bishop had two previou j .'nivutiiin*. one lor gaoa and the other for house breaking. W-r of the clecters of th? parish w SraidrVSl CTS? £7E fcr^nT^n, tafiad bran w^JS^*-"' ,M8 h H 721* new hc had ^".ed the porti,,thi candidates of the Bar"enlenced to two years' impnspartsn for *even years In the ^a^ Labour Party because he onment for the shop breaking and Mouse and during that period no wa -.atislied that It was the only on March 2 this year to three elector had ever found any fault body which fought, and quite years' Imprisonment for house with his representation. He had successfully, for and on behalf of hreakinif. tried during that time to stick to the down-trodden masses When DM I*>IK-V of pnsjrea regardteag H looked %  rajgad and is* the of class, creed or colour. In him vast improvement of conditions they had a trained man already and the advancement of his people accustomed to taking port in the during the last ten years as a re. debates of the House*—one who suit of the existence of this party, Worme who lives was fearless in trying t„ get their he praised God for the day that Christ Church. Hc iiitenst advanced In every way. birth was given to it; more parWaj.cs Increased licularly Its leader. Mr G. H. "You are told by M*—• !" Ada and his party since hi Adams has led th-Government that your wages have been increased. Thi true m one respect, but Mr. Adams does no! tell you why, that with unnecessary fi enumerate the things he %  fOUM like to see done immediately He ,* would like to mention, however. the East Coast Road which he wanted to see constructed First Witness I %  %  PitDSta called for the prosecution yesterday was Denis t RocUay, id that on September 7 at about 1 p.m. he closed his house and guv,the keys to his mother who lives at ""}.?? Hill Crest. Christ Church He left for Demerara and returned to his house on October 19 and received some information. BOAT SINKS: MAN DROWNS Herbert Goodman of Tent Bay. Bathshcba. was drowned OS) Sundav evening when -hing boat Ramrr. 0-27. tn which he sailed, sank off Cluffs. St. Lucy Goodman was accompanying Cri.-lin Iffayen, the owner of the boat, t" UM Ashing banks. When they had done about six hours; sailing, a squall -truck the Kajsser. turned her around and she eventualU sank llnth Goodman and Mey* ,, %  ,.,i;.,i to lartm. The> .in oa the water for about row hours whan Qoooman got into difficulties and was ilriiu ned Higyen did not give op, hut contlaued to swim until he reached shore at Bathsheba. Hi gfSJ eresk when he rcnrheil sssOte and wai helped out of the water by one Oswald %  eeles, Hixir.1 of Gtaordiarw Mr. H. S. Bancroft (senior) and Mr S, A Waleott (junior). ififlhti'su CommtjnoHers: Mr. i; M isstaa, ha %  A VJ iwolt and Mr Outram. Samtarv Coin ni issioiicr j: Mr It 1. Hutaoo, Mr. A. L. Jordan, Mr S A Waleott, Mr. R. S. Bancroft and Mr. C. C. Masstah HuiNfo Conimiifer Th.He.lor. Mr S A Waleott, Mr A, L. Jordan. Mr J H. WilKinson, Mr C, M.,-M.,h MT K llol.trt ..rn* Mr. J. M. Crick Member* of the Board for appointing Rectors and Curates: he %  th.cost of living bonuL be paid to civil servants In Antigua. In a question which is tabled lor Secretary of State for the ColoM Griffiths, to answer Hynd points out that it is now < VST two years since civil servants of the Island stated their need for financial relief, and well over six months since a tun mission of inquiry into t^e cost of living was appointed In another question. Hynd \ ll ask firiffUhs who are th. i bars of the Salaries and Adjust ment Committee of the Civil Service in Antigua. A third question asks the Secretary of State for the Colonies if he is aware of the dleealllfl . -^,. —;_ : it lie is nnic >>i im* ciiksuij Parish Church-Mr. A i. L .Jordan. loll of th# Antigua Trades Mr 1 It MnLih Sir WaruL>. %  _m .. .. ._, I K C. U. Massiuh. Mr. Mand< Kellman; St. Alban's and St. Silas—Mr. A 1. Jordan and Mr. J M. Crick: St John tna Baptist-Mr. C Moore and Mr. A li M.. .-. Mr. J. S. B. Mayers was appointed druggist. This is the llrst time that a druggist has been ap tinted In the Parish and labour Union at the appointmeit of only one representative of the people on the Executive Council, one representative on the Land and Settlement Board, one on the Electric Light Board i-.d whether he "ill IncreaM this representation. New Loveliness For You "" PALMOUYE SOAP PbffDNr tkh Simphlit,,,,: .-.It, I..s,I, I.Hi %  flu. It,|. v Ihlu^nti^n,,, ",:' %  % % % % %  %  • % % % % %  B jajsj i< III! K VIAK Tl > A S %  iH. JASON JONES & CO.. LTP.-ot.ua— %  II, atished that the Go ". ernment was sympatiietic "• %  •' IKi, iirn. No individual alone, howin f onti she noticed that the er could go into the House and w had been broken. anything for them, but with good fellowship and c"cf the bigger pay envelopes that you are now receiving. I defy him to tell you about increases in pay. had there been %  drop in the pric? of our staple commodity— sugar. He has bean lucky In thai world prices of this article have risen. How else could increased wages hove been paid by the small or large landowner?" Mr Haynes said that he had been told that the Road Board employees were debarred from the Labour Welfare Fund to effect repairs to their houses. He felt that this money should bo Mrs. Edith Worme said that her son—Denis Wortm*—left fur B.G 00 September 7 and gave her the of his house. On October 5 a policeman came to her place and told her something She then went to her son's fiat. She opened the front door with the key and noticed that everything In the house was disarranged In the bedroom the drawers of the presses were pulled out and the burn tents scattered all over trie acres Canes Burnt AT Sl'NBI'RT PLANTATION. *V St Philip, on Sunday night, however removed the T.B liefin the appointment of the Churchwarden was made. Mr A. G. Johnson, the outfoins Cnnrchwarden gave a resiim* of -ink for the past year. He said that when he took' up office, conditions nt the A Inn house were not pleasant He had to paint the ward and the VII Chru hath in the ward for the patient' and build a sink in the kitchen as the maids used to do thci washing on (he ground. No Proper t Ju.iHi'i He said that the nurses .lid i ,.t have proper quarters and Ml of them was actually living with her dOOf near to the T.B. ward. He floor. Three Jackets and a pair of belonging to Edgecumbe Lt pants belonging to her son were These canes were also insured given and not lent to those whose ol>cra tj t tiitiiana i^vli>it nMi:iir -ITIH 11 Ihe %  if with a knife or razor, lit Clothes Scattered houses needed repairs, and as the sugar industry could not be carried on without roads, he could not ; why road workers should net benefit Irom the Fund. If Assembly he were returned, hc would do his best to have this ancmaly rectified. Mr. Haynes then spoke about th? roods of the parish, with •racial reference to the East of his nrades everySgt I hat A Belgravi October told the court 5 he thing that wculd help to imprnv nditions would be achieved. "I promise you to support all ^'iVJ"'? 1 !" 1110 .!! a ?' uX } l0 the estate of A Clarke. Hers brought to the House ot by our Government which is in truth and in fact, the saviour of the masses, who oppressed and kept in bondage. misery and ignorance by the rich for over three hundred years Mr J. A. Haynes is a 56-yearCoasl Road He had fought hard old planlcr He went to school at the windows was damaged during his political career to get Ledge, trieri al Codrington Colthe window opened. Match stick.this road put in working order. ff((c Aftfr ^ j^d graduated at and brown paper were on the he said, but he had read to hi:i codrington College, he was a floor and some ware* were mtssamazement in the debate thai the murt er at his old school for a ing. He made investlgalions into *ndav and slol whole matter had beet shelved. year (he maUor and hcM nn ldentl k a other articles, total About 3.3U p.m. he went to the house of Denis Worme o: Rockley, Christ Church. In one of the bedrooms A'as opei >n the floor. Three jackets and a pair of pants were cut. In the kitchen the wire screen to The fourth question inquires whether it is the intention of tic Government of Antigua "to return lands of all the Qirlatiai Valley area to peasants In formerly cultivated the estate that water is available lor developments Hynd told Renter t.-iav il...t InHiaWllong were based on Srnal he had read m newspapers to him Irom the Caribbean, lb mentioned the Workers Vole. official organ of the Anttgu Trades anil laliotu 1*111011 Hynd explsmed that he wa checking up on what he bu< ,. %  ||,' did not accept %  vei % %  thing as necessarily correct Quel Iha Minist.-i .vre si %  .mi it to And out. ere, ot .eeond crop ripe unc. ii V room whldl "iV"formV.I. T1 "A, )".;'" SfTSTnrtl burnt. They were Imured ujed n mortuary .nd Mm-e then annouiu-ed t ht Ihe i oM oil urn SS orci%"lh d ere d '" p'reaer.""'" S& !" 5 %  ""^ >"* £ ig^r^T^xcrin. •j.'ffl.'of ".fa's 2 0% on badly lO need of repair and he third WM of salary MiRgestetl that a toilet and bath should be erected adjoining the ___— quarters, and thus previ ni from having to cross the ym was the case at present. Hc thanked the Chairman for r)VFR SOU crates ol potato** the valuable assistance he had .y," \„, ,..,,. veMerdav P given him with regard to u.e %  • %  p .ll n f d '"'_ %  >'" 'TK5 of Ihe small amount ..f me 4 557-ton Nourse lanu Mullai money, ISO. he had at his disposal which called from taituua TH for repairs to the Parish Church Capetown He said thai he had carried e,.i The Mullah al inor repairs to the toilet at at. piles ot peanut rage in addition tQ p. HIS of the rool which was leaking very badly, but regretted and belonged to the trustees of th estate of A. Cameron. Another Are ot French's Plan'ation, St. George, on Saturday ni^nV thirteen and three quartei of second crop ripe cam Heater Seven acres of first crop rip* canes were burnt in fires ot Bei netts and Bagatelle Plantation' on Sunday night. A lire at Coverly Plantain Christ Church, on Sunday nighburnt five acres of first crop rip canes which were insured. Thr\ the property of the trustees of Alban'i Grapes, Candies Come A small cone Ire at Frizcr' Tenantry. St. Joseph, burnt MO '." %  ?. "• "* \.**_*** P ve T-^ hil > holes of canes belonging lo Delo brought sup butter, grape* wined goods, wine, vermouth am ndles. and from Colombo. 7. of tea consigned to Mr-'t' A Mnrson & Son. Ltd. She || consigned to Messrs Pa Costa A| CO Ltd. to the roof owing to lack of fun omx a clothes press "£Z* ^Jn'Y^h"&*Zwi n ".nd Tlu roof of Sl Jonn ""' B •• >,15l d clothing scattered f' na F ,/ dc J S* eph 1 ,.t n Chureh was in a similar condl%£ !" ; :L !" ?" !" .. Ottle Devonish. all of the sumo tum ftna lgilln hc cool(i not „, tenantry. About 400 holes of the mU(rn „, | undf were not ava ,iable canes -..re already mt He said that they had Inc-easvoting in favour of Mr Wolcotil broke and entered ,.,| money for outatde patient'' and ttl d three for Mr. Holder. I house of Ursilla T-ltl at had also engag.il the BarvR I or Mr. Bancroft and Mr Wolc<>li| A Tt *V in, the I at the ftei th" Not only would pcopl • Of : Hp „, a member of the lion parade on Octoboi parish get 1 l*;?* ,mcnl b '' n e U W.I. Regiment and fought in Worthing Police Station construction of tnis r nd, but it lnp u4_ie World War from accused was arrested woull assure them o: B certain 9lfl returning to Barbados in Charles Tavlor a watchman SSL? 'the^maH o,7 ^ '"tt „ Blue wSer.^'. !" *^ S Even the small cane growers Mr Haynes was a member o( October X alv.ur •> n m K U would be able to send their canes he House of Assembly for seven }£. a^ulcd in the P comnaL to Three Houses Factcry as they ve ^, l The Vestry agree I to "n* 1 ""! t..k.' Hag icpair of Uie roor of tliel chancel of the parish church and| decided 10 %  '* ,0Hn OuardlaB and this < the Police niomine iind he was laid to rest In th"V?burv CaSiry *. Jfjjsa th|ilfjl trie lighting would tend to Molasses Control Board *£Li 0 Uh 0 ,d ** !" w lh ""nr evening in the presence of {K^^BL brighten and bring more of the As a member of the House of ?""*<* £, lh f Bridge Police Sta. lar^e gathermg. A service at i^"*"'^' Ol life to them, and if Asscmhlv. he had two Addresses f nn '^""X'r I. and from thenthe Brethren Room. Chapman "a* !" he •rare given the opportunity o,, the Order Paper, one lo ge „ ,2* """ 1O ,ne F D At ,n Street, preceded the burial. Mr JoMfln nUor thanking M he would get this real grievance an economic survey of the island V. "isnop mode a voluntory James Seo'e was 73 years of j ohnson for p ro|Kirig him remedied as soon as possible. Mr. nnil ano thi Haynes que'tioneri: "What has utiltii your late I-abour representative done >n ihis matter? He could have carried on my work during my absence from the House. It rlso shows that the Labour Party has no true intentions of improving condition* in the parish and do not keep their promises." He had advocated when in the House, the erection of a new and started life to nationalise Public sta ? p m< n which he t< ok down writing and read over to him Mr. Seibert Worrell. 48-year n Ortober 18 an identification was bom as proprietor of Id shopkeeper and planter, hor S.i? dC ~*P 1< neld a J Worthing drv goods business. Later tOW been a Vestryman for the Vestry for supporting lift pirlsh of St. Thomns where ha "^^ ^, d tnat ,„; aBnN d wl „ ><•;':* "Summit" Calls The Sagucnay Terminals' stean Police Station and the accused journeyed to the United States was picked nut by two people of America where he lived f< The accused Ihcn made another many years. He also v. tatement after which he wa-. many West Indian islands. fnrmall charged. Recognised Accomplice reboot al Chalky Mount and an &[„ Soaavla, 4,290 tons, arrived enlarged school for the ililluby ncre yeslerdav with 1,000 tons of district in place of the Infant Blllnhal( Af ar school at Gregg Form. This most %  s-.enlial as the childr; the Hillaby districl had_ to She i what Mr. Johnson had said atom the Matron's ond Nurses' quai lets and assured the Va i was a question which waIways in himind and that hi would do oil beat lo gee that tin situation was remedW'd. He then propose I Mr It S Bancroft as senior guardian a" member of the Mr. S. A. Waleott as Junior. strict application Mr Johnson thought thai MI %  plea charac much as Mr. Wnlcott was Church ited but : flnuliy returned home to settle down ond establish himself in th* real estate business He was i Brethren, and of Christian Another watchman ot niui Waters Terrace—Newton free 1 sulphate of ammonia from Anlrr c k said he saw the ;.fciise*l witn lerlaed aU hla dealhuts. Ho won warden"the year Irf-fnre h werp and general cargo including Hn •Bd the whereabouts of ihe ac mortem examination i.ili be iK>r. Mr. Jonnaon a prop., (•used on the duy the offence formed to-day. however lost, lour -SliPKIiSEEir ti'l SffDS THAI SUCCftD Fresh Flower SEEDS at WEATHERHEAD'S ZINNIA fGlant Dahtil flo cred Mixed) Snapdragon (3 kinds). Marigold. Portulae, Petunia. Indian Pink, ChryII 'i. mum, Phlox, l-nrkspur, Sweet William, CarCoreopsis, Verbena, J Candytuft, Naeturtluni. MigBOnetb ralllnnall. Balsam, HJter, c.uillurdla. Cornflower. HollyhiK'k, Agendum. Cegenes, Aliyrum. Dahlia, Foiet-ni,.-Not. OodStlg Canterbury Hell, Nigella. a IWHT PEAS (II kinds). Get your supplij fo-rfau from UM v. i \i HI mil \n I f D—Hfod o/ fifoaa' Scsff SOIF AOKNTSt MESSRS. A. S. BRVPhN *. .SONS U:\Hll.\MCS. LTD^ P.O. BOX 401. HRIPGKTOTN. 3ARBAOOS HARRISON'S BROAD ST. BITUMINOUS ROOFING FELT H> %  ii. li is H idr Mineral Surfaced — Green and Red •Mill.. Ml 1)111 II and U \ I I I! I'llIMM' A HIGH GRADE THAT HAS BEEN IN UNIVERSAL USE FOR 50 YEARS SATISFACTION GUARANTEED Only $11.10 Per Roll of 12 yards HARRISON'S BROAD ST. TEL 2364 .;-.-.-.-.-.-,-.S SMSLECT THKSK KIXK TOODS DEUCI0USAND THRIFTY PEAK PREAVS Pla-almx KisctiitK per Tin $120 Chocolate Biscuits (Balmoral! per Tin $1.60 Afternoon Tea Biscuits—per Tin $1 44 HUNTUEV & P-.LMERS AM. Biwuits—per Tin SI 59. $150. $180 CRAWFORDS Club Cheese Straws— per Tin $1.12 lit Biscuit?-per Tin $1 21 SOI'TII AFRICAN IX>HSTER—per Tin 6ft-. FRENCH ASPARAGUS—per Tin $1.56 MUSHROOMS per Tin aflc. w \l.l.s I't >RK SAUSAGES per Tin 75c. WALLS OXFORD SAUSAGES—per Tin (He. F.SCOFFIER FRENCH MUSTARD—per Botlle JOc SLICED BACON. SLICED HAM. SLICED MORTADELLA SALAMI DUTCH LUNCHEON CHEESES-per Ball $1.21 B CREAM CRACKERS—per Tin $1.64 COCKADE FINE RUM STWSKKI.U. StOTT A 10.. KTU. S Wi MEPiCINE CHEST FRESH SUPPL.ES •aw THESE ARE in ( HI.I I ("H.ii MIXHItl B1CKI.FVS .MIIII RIB PALMER'S SKIN STJOGBU SOAP OINTMFM niFACHISf. (REAM mUtOZONI TABLETS II \Mll ION -. PILLK CAT\RRHZON'E LAS POI.SON'K GREEN CO! Gil SVRt'P NERVILENE VAPE.A KNIGHTS DRKi STORLS-^/sQn c*, (ientleiuen Remember! Prices are low now CONKILATE Sparta Shirt*, short sleeves White onI\. IBM 14', to 17. SEA ISLAND COTTOV VESTS. Cellular a. sjgavi less. Also trunk* wilh elastic waist. SOCKS in AM Silk .in-1 Lish(anej %  • %  ]'• I Me io to SILK HANDKERCHIEFS white and tnaroon. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street AERTEX VESTS. Cellular Quality No. S31. Short %  MrVeSi *lres 40 to 44. %  Each $S •• MM KS %  >, length Kh.iki wool with turn over top*. Si/e. Id'/ to U' ; BOYS WOOL iivnm rRI'NKs maroon Sue, 26 to 30. ;



PAGE 1

Britain, France, U.S. Caution Israel, Syria About Border Dispute Avoid The Danger Of A Flare Up LONDON. April 9. DKITAIN ha* ;viitinm-ii both Israel rind Syria lo use restraint in ti.eir border dispute, a British 1'Weiu Office spokesman said to-day. This advice had baam ptaW on through diplomatic representative* at Tel-A-Viv and Damascus, he said. A Washington report states Ihnt the United Stale haw prot-:-ti>it vigorously lo Israel against th* recent bombkng of Syrian po-itions by the Israeli Air Force Syria has also been told of the "serious view" taken bv the United Stales of border incidents between the two countries. In l'aris. It was reported thai France will fellow the example of Britain and the United Stab asking both Israel and Syria to use restraint in their border dispute. A French Foreign Office rpokesnvan said today that French diplomatic representatives at Tel-.iVlv and Damascus will ask the Syrian and Israeli Government lo case the tension by dropping tin IT conflict and avoiding the dangers of a 'flare up". —Reuter OPENING NEW SHOP MADAME EVA PERON, wit* of Uiv Argentine President in angorat** the In) Oorernmeni li>ng buy $12.000.000 worth of standard items of army supplies from European manufacturers. Kino pean Headquarters announced t0> akehl. These supplier for whieh payment would be made in dollar! would supplement deliverii from American firms and meet the increailng worldwide requirement* of the United States army it was added. Reuter. Larger Deficit On C.N.S. Line To West Indies OTTAWA An increased doflclt wu thown in UM ot the Canadian National (Weal Indie i Btcuuhlpi Line labled In Parliament thji week. Rising coals and increased handling clinrgts at A es: Indies porls were blamed for a d.licit of S1.02B il Thellgure compares wuh a 1949 deficit of S4B0.498. The repon Bhi>wet .. %  venues of $5,124,200 < Held For Dope Smuggling ROME. April ! Italian police to-day held a m.m :e>.T,bed as an AmcrU.it i (of inquiries into a dope Mnugglir.f ring. The man. Frank fallael 30. of New York, was held when por.ee at Rome aimort claimed to have lound heroin worth $100,000 in hi' t-ggagc. Callaci was travelllnit irom Milan to Pflennc. Bl | BU ne had nc I contents of the three packets co 1 taining heroin. People he hao met casually In a Milan I had asked him to haml I ot to a man he would meet in Palermo he said.—Renter NO RICE LONDON Three British soldiers. releas*d altar L.'ing held as pi i Chinese Communist* in Knrct %  agjin They said they were march W ad 26* mile.s a day. strafed from the %  ll and were f**d—rice. rice, riec —CM A-lth $8 595 008 t: and <>p rating exiw-nscs of .V"25 I .-I arKI) $6.52,fl0H 'Hi. oparatlng dafleii tiiu.s was sr.in,. % %  •I b> payment of interest on bondk anti g.ivprnment advances. ... %  i %  %  %  i I the eon.i Bl tit, and by i nipany howe^-r was %  in IMI "particularly becaute %  i — itrmplii*--! undci the 'trade lib *hieh was ,'ffectivr laai J It said an asttaniive under way on the %  trad-r relations betwoai and the British Wist Indies. with particu'ar attention to the financial posit%  Paw.iiier Service I p Passenk' -hoved a light increase over IMS %  d 26 per cent *.o *n A On paie 1 UacGotvan Dies NORTHERN IRELAND. April, It The death of Sir John Tlall Mar owan 5?, former ltritish Arnbaasador to Venezuela. WM announce, .! (.IV. During World War II. BU Johl aarvad tall Adviser lo the British A:: to the United Slate' He was appointed to the Cariua U.II in (1*48 Lasi jiaai innraf lOT lo Thailand — i •%  ...;• .imouiitmg t< : ZO.OOn.iHW from the United State. ; tut £4.000.000 from Britain. Britain last autumn grantee Yugoslav two loan, for thr pug c-haae of raw materials and con turner goods of £2.000.000 Hi.Ilntisn del.KHtin:, John Beecham. he.id of the llntisi Foreign Office, Southern Deumt ment. America is represented bi J Campbell, head of thiBalfean Dapartmanl of ihe Vtata Depart. ipetH _Reuter. "STOP IT" TRUMAM TELLS MAC > 1 %  i K V OtaMral %  to-day given slu: ,..!' %  tnatrui lion 1 'uman lo absuin fi %  %  I oliKcuI pitsnouncamenta on i was reporti d hi tla aiKnt ThiInahruetKMi was passed ui to him Uxlaj t Frank Pan I %  : •vbu %  rrtved in Tokyo to-day l Truman i ur i' t lo bavi til I If* Arthur with recnll I ... rtad to hava warned r-.l that th.' latter's position |i;ni me pracartoug at a result nl hi. statement tu.. o.-|. poBina lull aaalo %  • DIUttaH China unlens site .itoevd lo a Korean settlement A* a result the President i JL rnesaage delivered oraiiv i Pare told t;eneral Mac Aithm hat PresidentlaJ lupport for him ann %  \ II iiTit.m.i-.i ,f he con. • %  rnatlonal Morn 1 ' %  %  i Mil i i it it .il nature in the world situation Ktnharrassinc According to infoim. i rVataaani Truman pointed out 1 I moaa than an i in UM past hihas reprimanded Gonerai Arthui for entering ihr i tieal p h ara but II at nas Oar R| has seen nt to contlnu % %  UlliK! public -.( ,|, ,. < ly within his realrn %  • 'II"" I'll. 'Ililllltcl Pure told the Uniterrespiindenl LONDON. April 4 rjlSSATlSTACTlON at Biitaln'i propoaaid trade pact with *"^ t'uba will be expresst--! i>> Mi H Al.m Walkr, ManDtrojotor of UM Wgaii IndiM Sugar Company to-mori w (Tni'sdav) in an mill view with Jatneg OrifRtl retary of Stanii.r tha Qoapnlat Mr. Alan Walker tia.t |uai roturnod to this country from a three-month business visit to tin* West liulu*. UlHI.il '.I.oil). ...If r POCKET CARTOON by OSBERT LANCASTER i.i I i,-ii I \Kill UI SINt.AItHtE. April 9. Communist guerillas killed at Malay soldiers and wounded British officer and rjioi when they anioushed a heavil .-rmed convoy In Negri Semhila yesterday, *t was announced t< Rawer What Jldfgrn nt aOCbl (Im hoi ifiuilliimi iiJ.dil II (he Unxth l lias* H took for !** loeliey Cluh ro nalir "f* la (thuf HOI oig o." lie has been asked by Ihe Siinat Manufacturi i A actaUon of J-< 10 find out what truth IMM the report that Britain will enter into ihrea reai i iih Cuba for one and a iHum tons or euaai Orowlng ooneern a' the lark of i n oil the Mihjii't of III.AiiKlo-t-'iiban tr.niitalks is nMlret. od in iii. increain(i number of. Iistc.1 foi unswi'i in PHI liament 'his work MMAH n TOBACCO Wiiu Cornaianiiei luiiiu. .m.i Mi i;. ii,M, UM srt ihe ball roiling M i thaj BOVa now I>een joined r.v ihii: Centtnuu i oUeeguei Mr. II Hyiid. Mi I. 11 (.mtunans. Mi Nliel Fiiher and Ml Norman Dodds All the., have put down lueettont lo << an e wered by the i TI M PreaMeni i Mai old Wilson It'* consult red |iri>babl thai hi will t..k.thi-ii i|i estions rollec. iivelv and make a statement. Closely connected With MOI tions is another from Mr. Dodds who on Wednesday is due to ask Ml James Griffiths. SetiH.n. oi it.iti foi the Coloiue v li.it Mep: he i* taking to fw I policy of giving every possible en. %  nt f. tobacco RrowniK and tov_t'i* m*|*eUir.ng indus: .1 1 Danish Paper Wants MacArthur DiimUeed COPENHAGEN, April B The Indi peno> nl Dei inft.rmjti. to-daj urged lh M.icArthui under the hriaclHiMi MacArthui laoeeow'i Be r* w.-apon. /// \GSK 1 \l> POVKKTl Ueei while, in to-oWi Dally r.nprrwi is a inis.iionale appe.il rrOBB %  leader e.lled D W Hardv. ppO lUlal UM 1 POVOI nmanl ugnlng of %  trad* P* I IUl Cuba, Wntin[ t.on. %  '-. lie sayi ,,MII bring hungiT, l." , %  %  '.', %  %  rig there. I knet ihatai i or nml pain, i ekneaa and dUtrear ... the |>eo,,],. ,,| l^uutoll know lh. wound of ,i iMimb" says Hardy helped Britain then vi.iv II: paaee U Britain i H-itil> parallels Britain's <-ln,ii ui eonsidertng an agreement With %  man sui>p>rliii|| .molher man' g Lf and lenvlnr I hunger. Cuba ean sell to Amenca i -ineannot Mil in Britain Hut Jamaica liav on|. th* lititi h market, RED "BUILD UP" WASHINGTON, Aunt 9 Sam Hayburn, Bnewtei .f |hl i Repreeantatleg 1 inference ti-day th.-t the Soviet Union Is building up incentraUoru "m lots ra i Lai | id."iiir-.i *we are Ii terrible ilanger -Kruter Income Tax May Go Up In Britain LONDON. April 9. The Cabinet to-day gava U Anal tpproval to this yaar' budjiet which will be laid helote lha Houaa <1 Commm to-murruw and which may |aad ti> new and hitler glaabi betwoi'ti Oovanunant and opposition. Hugh Oaitskell. Chancellor ol ttie Exchequer, celebrated his 45H rlOn* (^nUlUfl'tt III birthday tinrnornlng b telling the Cabinet hoa he pro) Slut { iliiiinl raise the exlrC33 00. '"'" which be needa to s-ainn this year. M| ,0.0(10.000 short of Ihe n H>U.UII %  i. 'iiirc.i lor 1951 1952 ami lie ma) also need to otr-et £ lOO.OOO.COO lost by -i oviding reliefs to pool wctlone of the community Hudget prophet! suggest that he may do this: I Increase the higher rale* of income lax by about 2'i per ratal "aid give him fc76.000.fn in 2. Increase the petrol tax by l-oUl 50 per cent per gallon 3. Pleaae the Socialists by a heavier ta* on dlatrlbutl tn industry.—Reeter Keep Out Of Affairs In Morocco Fmnce Tells Egypi i'.MtlS April 9 %  Yea ii acting IN reign Mlniste (•leu,. Sihneit.'i i.idny informed the Egyptian anitwi-sador in I'aiis that France could not %  How foreign *late l.i interven.* hi matters concerning Morocc'i A Kren.h OoveriUTH pan elated banlghl A .Egyptian amhaMaiim had handed a note from hiliovernrnenl relating to the situation in Molni. o to tile .ii Uflg I Muu-ler to-day. A spokesman aaid "Schnelter did not fall to ixiint out to his visitor that in so far as thla note oonotttutod iiiirusion Into the Kitnih inti nial polley, tha rraawn (invernment could not take .i note Of this nature bite consideration." The s|ikesman lint mil reveal the daaallQi] OBn lentnl the ErvplUii i Reiiler Mil BKLGIA\ COAL \II\HKS STHIkt: BRUSSELS ....in ' iara In eight ptti In t M "n.nle I Belgium Htruek work to day to ml uie demand iii •• The strike is nig hacked bl the ha B i Cl leUa (Cathola > MJnen Un on, whu b caUed foi i general rtoppage on A| t sUp(ioit of ,i live per eeni Wage REDS TRY TO FLOOD OUT U.N. TROOPS TOKYO. April 9. ^III.NKSK (IIMMl'MSTS upened Ihe flraidgales of (Ii.massive Hwariioii Keservoir tl.in, in Centr.il Korea on Monday and sent Ihoiiiaiid-. nf ton.", of wuler rushing down on Allied-held ground, but the I'likhuii Ki\er rose no more than 4' t feet. By Monday night the waler level wa* rereding .mil there was im danger tn I mi. d Nations i Tho Hwacluin raaarvoir. nlKiut seven miles north of UM S80l pjnalli'l. is ihe main point of atoutCal Hod rosmtinco in North Koraa in eavag*'i Weeett, in huier HghUraj touth of tinrgaarvolrori Monday, Rtdg glOWed or stoppeHl Alliitl a0> vances al Mvaral pointa, high and %  tb may hav had I i losing their man-made flood I to CUt the t r Hwachon highway — !h) |ipl> artel %  .oi.l S.HMIUI. to pave the wa) tot %  countet %  % %  Mown UM ChunrhorH Wonju highway Although ilghtihg near the reatrva i hei bean %  vvtit', iharo was no indication that the Redj had stalled I inasa drive. UN troops of four nations ar deployed around chunchon. Some forward elements might be temporarily cut off bv the rising water High waler may extend as far down th Pukhan River as Seoul, some SB air miles outhweM BRITAIN APPROVES U.S. NAVY CHIEF LONDON. A i r.l 9. Britain has Anally the appointment of Admlnu R F.I hteJer of the United Rtatea .Su|in-ine Commander of th*Atlantic Navy, and his appointment i H expected to be announced here to day according to usually reliable Umdon sources. Renter TELL Tlir ADVOCATE TIIF NEWS DIAL 3113 DAT OE NIGHT GILBEYS Sit im For Petrol MFXBOUHNE. April 9 % %  p '; Taylor anJ crew ng living boat Frleale flint II now rr'arninn from 1 i'i Australia, had to swim ; Mangarva O.imbier Is. | on the ede of the field th. lands lor petrol. ARTFUL MOTHERS v.. llF.l.tilSAIHApnl etavli %  t changes in wen announrx'i %  .cuernl 1 |ak 1 %  *' %  %  % %  '.' ; %  II IM f rat'onal IH-put V %  N na| DefetmTaaJatt Vuito 1 News %  %  %  Id all ol to—day i, gun %  11 Tl.l %  l,y \. .'1 mlik %  irltl %  ale ( abinet tei n -tn %  A n ann ,unecd o i April 6 Reut*r. M OTHERS bringing baby car shire vdlaae found a new d.-drc on the ede of the field thr rjebW-a I Ing the linesmen run up and down the ncld--> WOMRF.Ll. England ges lo football ggg When the carriages are parked habirs lire kept happy Red Paper Picks Winners LONDON. April, 9 Bark in 1M9 when lh. I I't Dally Marker w... the only l-mdon paper to pick Ihe 'vlnner of the Grand National people UlOugtll it was .i name v.. gisatea gtere the only v v.-inner Werker Up thi> Makai i ..in CPI Mainiain (he same High Standard of Quality as shipped to ihe ^•Xkst Indies for the past fifty B years iitiiln> it GILBEY'S PORT and SHERRY &f liUIIIIUII/USilYK.Mi.l.lil. Aqenti. *.


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r\(.i MI. in nVHRADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. APRIL IU. 1SI WEST INDIES CAN BEAT AUSTRALIA if Full Side Goes Sam Frwddte Brown MELBOURNE A| e Brown Who captained England Australia racai tW, ihlnta ihe Weal Indteemn bra rtgtiim h—a illng •' plant rtrajta whei. hi in lb* im.M Oronleal Fuvnuuttle I-.-morrow. Brown uld ihat England's To-r fuiui.is dwtlncUy bn.fr i. Referring (,, |lw rominp West HI i : Autr..liJ. fie Mid he expected it to be a •our and "II Lift then full tMa, to* \Vv<> Inciuc> uliI beat Austrjliii lered %  Tl Suiciinv who mad* a eanturj again*' Ennlan.l in New Zealand u lhe Of the day. Br foin hurdler ourMa no .-mm. I 1:1 DMI BROUN KunBappenblgB give \lmoflphere To British Turi Bv A!.AN HARVEY LOM %  OIKirt "> a B* vf British racing a piquant Baroui is : \,!i spirit An> irlnv ran happen, and "Urn dor toei dJdni bat an eye %  %  At Sundown Park. Landon. .i horse with a lt* lead nrarved suddenly about Ave jard from the winning peat "dapoalUuR hU MK-U-v the )uds> race ., At Chi ttcnb im, Glou %  police nor."* welching • Hurdle raec shook nil Jump*'! • flelri ol in i from ho.— ^hr second rholec 'RulU) science*, i i.^i" "' 1 1 •' iron. !hc ,-ollce horse und l Mn 8 Itan ..II und I' M'-l 1 %  ,Mia PilmiMi.. II Wn-Kl ii O* *ll HNUtl ib Tinnn "in 1 -1,. M IVB. kiiMllv Vihat'nonTodav Court of Orana Sewions —It B m 1'ollre Courts—II a m House of Assembly mreU at—3 p m Mr J ft. T, Brancker is to BU.V4 the passing of an Adarcss In His Excellency Hi. Governor relating, to the payment of an annual Christmas bonus to all Gov. ( crnment employees I'cllce Rand given eorceri at Ht Thonuut' Almshous* —4.41 P m li.Nh. 1 K..II at V M P C when V M F C will en. gage Pliaten In a find, dlvl• ii.ii matrh. Pickwick will also men Carlton i the same g r a u n d Play beglna at—7 45 p m Table Tennis at V M.C A HTM, vs V M V A —7 p m Sale of Household articles at High Street —Auctioneers Branker Trotman 4: Co.. —12 30 p m W is I.I..I.. I 1 Sum Trnflir on'l No. 22 ro NOT I.KAVT: VIIIR M HUM. ON A KltAII \1 MGIU wiiiiori I'ARKINC: I IIIIITH • Spur nudr ivilabl by CANADA DRV lor sfrr MoUrlni MODERN HIGH WINS A tear: School defe ted V M PC 24 goals lo 13 in a basket-ball game which was played at YM.PC, licklrv Road, yesterday afternoon GAME DRAW^ In [the first paragraph, but Mr. Copthe Trinidad teem, neilli•pin doaa not make any ra*agaa>c < g,nned selection While this tiie however to the secona paragraph mcni is not coiwlusivc, it is gener of thh letter which .learly stated all, accepted that this team will 0 and S( M|cha# Jhe term referred to Further, car. not win even .me match againsi pUy#d to ^ ^^g ^ Mw oate imaguie that the explanation the superior Jamaicans. This being ^ pmp whicn wat ,_ given by the writer to Ihc (oumii the i.*s*. would U not be oeuei Michael's Ok a Ihe iiAF A would not have for tenn;s In Barbados if two ol a ft crnoon n accepted without going urn. the three players be w hJet In legal phraseology 1( this Club the Island at present. So that the had .mended U, five 'he B C A experience gained could be disthe it>% which it is alleged they tubuled to the younger players had aareed to do. would it nol be afterward*? This error by the Council of Ihe Lawn Tennis Association has de c uctad from the low store of our UanaJa ability and has given Tnnidaii %  chance to improve their alidy superior •Unrtard of play. if our TennU rests ihe shoulders of the youn Girls neted at St. Mb. .(.,quite obvious that the B C A Would have been advised Becordngly and would have in the course of time asked for such payment' 1 Does Mr. Coppin want to accuse the Management Committee of tin !2 !" y !" P.C C of deliberately receiving money under false pretence*' We" would refer Mr Coppin to bd when they arc deprived of such %  golaen opportunity, it 1956 Olympic Games Will Be Held In Melbourne MELBOURNE. April . Australian Olympic Games officials want every country In the world to know that the IBM Olympic fames will be held m players Melbourne as scheduled. The Organising Committees' v ,h (lM ,Un ,rd of "T commen to-day and said the STLRI'FA Intfilinj will continue to decline in the fust t ement was Intended to end 5L5JLS ith r, flnan,ure yr n thi U *" ex,m P' e international uncertainty." way concerned 1 1th any nnannf lhe Uw|| jennu Association's Heater lai arrangement this Club might make with the B.C A This state. ment. obviously, has always been the view of the B A FA Therefore. if Mr. Coppin 'ishes this matter to be luea for the betterment of ter In Barbados, then we can be expected to slip quietly out of tennH competition in the West Indi' PianUrlf Lwtirr %  w % %  n MR HENRY WILSON Professor of ihe Royal College of Music. London, will give a Pianoforte Lecture-Recital at Tilt: ItUITlSH COUNCIL Wakeheld !" WTiitc Park On Monday April 9th ft 8 30 p.m. The l"rogrammc will include: Three 16th Century Lute Pieces—RESPIGHI Three 18th Century Pieces Chromatic Fantasia and Fuicue J. S. HACII Sonata in D Major— Op. 10 No. J—BEFTHOVEN La Soiree Dans Grenade. Jardins Sous La Pluie —DEBUSSY All 'eats reserved. Ticket* (SLOP and 60c.) obtainable In advance from the British Council. WEIDEK of Austria, his left cy badly damaged, flinches as Jack Uardnar o.' Ureat Britat-i bring* ncros* s right to the Jaw. In their boavywolBht contest at Earls Court. Iindon In defeating bts very gin( ppoi'.c*.t on polntn over lf> rounds. Jack Oardner of Great Britain becomes th? [Inropran Hrsvywcight Champion. —Express. Our Readers Discuss: Why I mini 1 Konlbull Club withdrew from the C'om|ie tition—Pickwick CluS and the Footbnll AMorinlion— ll.ii h.-ihi-N Tennis Tenm for Trinidad. We have young players, n..h experience gained in Tournalegal baaU. the B.A FA playeci nwnts surn M th,,, wou id reach ihe the 1949 season at Kensington, standard of Eric Taylor himself thereby accepting the terms from Jf the funda of [ba Associalli this Club set out in the letter of W|11 ( n ppnmt t wo players to he 25th February, in which ihcrr ^^ lnwi lM ^ 8Cnd lwo pUycrs was no mention of any perceniag' who we kncm wi n improve our for 'he B.C.A., and if ,n ^ ilnu dard of play If we cannot reB.A.F A were under %  d ifferent pn|i| pIavpr who wl „ tCach „,,. imprenuNi. Ihey should nav|ayCTJI wl)tn lhey return from sUted so in a leiier to thU Club 1hMp Tournaments, then still let Bui the letter referred to was us nQ( fMon tf> outsidp never read when it should adv* he)p ^^ thc pretext lhat been, nor waa it confirmed tncw players are Barba vc v nn | c lor the name Barbados. Ml ClUb a letter which turned Wp ((| c our e l V es when we letter of 25th February 1949^ The tenn|g ^ first condition mentioned !s the . division or the grow gate receipts, | on a 60* P C.C 40% B A F A basis. Surely If the B.A.F A. were under any other impression, as they claim, with regard to the B C A., mention would have been made of the terms Finally it must be staled to the public that the final terms offered the B A.FA. for the 19*1 season were these: — 10% 'tut* were dRrussed, such as expenses, provision of balls, admission fees, etc. Mr. Goddard also dun division of gate receipts and intimated to Mr (oppm that he iu. put 11 would be possible to n.ake some prOViUOO B.C A. to share, however, he told Mr Coppin lhat he would place '£ IEKP.EKL ,5 T &aa~-i~B This Committee leir -'.en the matter was discussed that they would make no definite llgure with regard to B C.A as they Coppin, this" Club has reepectewere entirely ignorant as lo the m en of the community running 1 outcome of lhe 1949 season, bemn and you must bring much stronge the first occasion when football legal Information If you wBnt t ,1 was played at Kensington, bu' Implicate us in what you accusi proarh by the Council to the p;.'; h ""kl the venture prove ... >>. a us of Admit to the public iha wick Cricket Club naeordln u Mltws ,nc .l C.A. would aft ireur Coundil turned down UV the General Assembly endured by a donation. '.^^"M^ BU 'i !" *?" V ^* A letter therefore was written B.A FA. giving up 4% lo hel[ to ihe B A F A. on the 25th Febthe B.C.A. luaty. 1949. outlining Uh V"" !" ralUilullv. for the football season. T.ie jnjgrtaj/l ro rhf BdlfOP, The Adrocnie— SIR.—Oui %  ttantlon I drawn tn a paragraph appearing in to-day's Issue of youi papar under the caption "Empin QulU Soccer Game". As lhe paragraph %  decided to withdraw from the Pint Dtvfctlon football, but will (ontinue to pi Second and Third DtlrWoni Our decision was arrived .1! after careful c l l %  I 1 prolonged deliberations at our Annual oanara] laaauna, The mamban strongly daprac a tad tha dael Ion tuken al th<11 A F A Council Meeting of the 6th April, 19M. and w re uncompromt*lug in their opposition tO any ruii .. of the groas receipt" to be deducted lo partly defray the expense* of this Club From the remaining fro*.figure—40% to B.A.F.A.. 40S P C-C and 20% B C.A. The P C.C. would pay all expenses over and above those offset by the 10% from then 40% This really meant that on the 1h basis of a $5,000 00 gate season the B A.FA. would rOChfi SI.BOO.00. the B.C.A. $900 Of lid P.C C. $1,100.00 after fair dlvi Mr Coppin is cvidentl under the imprceslon that then are not expenses to be deduct* from the PC C. share No. Mr TENNIS FAN I 51 h Apr il. 'SI. Brazil Picks Football Team THE HAGUE. April 9. The Brazilian football team to play a Dutch B team al the Oh pic Stadium in Amsterdam %  %  hosen today Rruter. the stand taken at lhe ui Meeting hv the Cll 1 live Mr E A V Williams. We look forward to our ndi H I> KIDNEY pl Th. Ltrt 1. mShepherd, inrrefor* dUU 1-. k nolhlmi l--.li. j. A. 1 ""ins a SONers for ihelr moral support In 1 •< %  li A F A hat [, a Sf'BS M, '' ,;i : %  tana -• turn I fa '.' c tl y in Mt (n ."• %  hut thli very unsatisfactory ami ibla MDdJUoni under which fOeing played Thanking you. we remain, C A BHA T HWAITE. J n President L WILTSHIRE. Honorarv Bl F.nuuie Club. Rank Hall. 7th April. 1951 lettei Mr. was never read. Instead, faMltll I The t'ditor. The Adrocate— The Wealhor TODAY San Rlaea: 5. 56 a.m Sun SeU; 6 10 p.m Moon 'Hi-l Oaartri > April 14. l.lgnilnf; •< 30 p.m High Water; 5.5 a r %  6 Oh Yi;STERI)A> Rainfall (Codrlnglon 1 ,H In. ToUl for Month to Venter day 13 In. lemperalure I Max) %  .S %  ' Temperature (Mini. 72 5 F Wind Direction 19 %  %  l E.S.E (3pm) h Bl S Wind i10 m Irs ei hour Barometer {9 em) •9 % %  :.. ilpm I •*. MS Coppin informed lhe Council SIR.-I read in today's Advo ' %  '' ^' : Gi-ld.ird ..nd I. mse I %  -. (jlr .. ,... .„„,],...,. H im IW nl .1 com to an arrangement whereby personnel of lhe team to represent HA FA would receive 40% ol Barbados in the Brandon Trophy the gross. P C C 40% and B C A matc hes in Trinidad next week 20%. this letter was referred U 1 wou ld like to point oul a few for the first time at a Counnl facls for the perusal of the tennisMeeting early in 1951, when th; • follower and it will be evident am Club replied to a letter frorMe lo U ie extent of lhe blunder madB.A.F A concerning 20% due th.by lite Selection Committee. B.C.A.. of which agreement The Council of the L-.wn Tennis naturally they knew nothing. Association made the statement When figures as tn costs, etc that there are no players at prewere gone into, even Mr. Goddard wnt with the exception of Eric agreed that it would be impostTaylor and Dr. C. G. Manning, up ble for this Club to make such an to the standard which would do arrangement. Barbados credit. This statement -,. Is very misleading for we all reThe above can eas.. y be demonm embe. that these very player, slrtcd by taking last years tigmn miserably defeated in B.O. ures i.e. a gross gate receipt ,.1 lBt t year by lhe same learn we Sa.uuo.uu. II the Division of gro's now n ve lo meot Jamaica. These Wa i I, 0 ,^ 40 each lo B Ar A two players were unable to get n -t im,SB^r B ^;,ii sasr i n ,hw m appearing in youi issue of Soureceive $2.000.00; P.C.C m atch d* %  *? W !" ,s,> *• %  n .* writ : S2.O0O.W) and B C.A. $1,000 00 Pivkiiirk mill II. i.F. I To TJie Editor. The Adioear. SIR,—The Committn %  gement of this Club cannot UOi tha leu.r nrritsan b] Mr. <> S Coppin, Hon Baeratary, 11 A K.-. which appeared in your Issue o Tuesday 3rd April, 1951, lo b read by the public, without mil; Ing certain comments and double with lhe object ol making a ease, but simply correcting %  tnteruenis made by ^li Coppin In an article which appeared on the pr>vlous Sunday. The Committee ol thai r again forced to oorrad Ml on several pointappeuring in hi letter. Mi 1 ;• ii ooddard i nf ihe Manaaarnanl Committal this ClUb I'liI Mi1 r %  agreement with the It A K h When he was appi reel d 03 Coppm re the pi %  • %  %  I jThcvll !)<; h Ivory Time JJAnBii rne ALWAYS e nn [ s u/oime, a talented ymim %  louiitett to approximate!) p j aV er who showed much promise $1,200.00. leaving them with a DOtt 0 f improvement. In the one sinof $"00 00 Could anyone possibly gfc, mjU h lie WM a u uwe d to pla> %  tins Club under these in. he showed thai tw was on a pai circumstances working then w ,th his team mates, winning ar members foi three moniha Jree 01 many games as thev did, and pcr. harge. three and sometimes foui formmi; very ureditably indeed .1 week, eontr^lling There is also another young playei everything, cash receipts. gtQUBds, in Louis St. Hill, who i-epresentoc' staff, gate. etc. and after all that Barbados against Trai quility UUI leceiving much less than anyone year here, and who-howe.1 hlmn-lt arnad who were conto be capable of great natural IrlbutlBg nothing m the way Ol tennis ability hiliour or help, and this especial With regard to the other twr applies to the B.A.F.A. players selected, Barbadians real. The letter of 25th' February dent in Trinidad, it b lo be re-'I 11949 referred lo by Mr. Coppin membered that while both o was admittedly badly expressed in them were asked lo practise fo A BAND CONCERT by kind consent of Commissioner of Police and Captain Raisou will bo held at HASTINGS ROCKS APRIL : %  % % %  1 ft '4 lb. tin C. & E. Morion Oatmeal PkR. Vita Wheat Biscuits Pkg. Wcetublx Biscuits Hots. Heinz Sandwuh Spread Bois. Heinz Salad Cream Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad in Mayonnaise Bots. C. & E. Morion Pickle Tins Lamb Tongues Tins Breakfast Rolls 2 lb bots. C. & P. Table Sail Bats. Cocktail Cherries I lb. tin Asetd. Sweet Biscuits i liNCE & Co., Ltd. t. >. I 9 Kurl.H.k SlrKl Olftl 22Sfl '. -N--STSOVBOL' TJE WHOLE WOR. 31 OCR KONEWOCS' — OhLV SOY "T"H/T r VOulL M^S 1 ?/ VIE-/ I -4 7 S4y K,0OO->O-' "S r BS T„£5E 3Si--EES-T' %  -s t= CUVI5 WBE t A\7 IOJ • M^AMi3S-W>WtT. I SAV MB OET "OCKTE: W W ro P1CN1C 8ZAC~ fo*. -je \ V/SE< ES5? WB U. 3t RjC< I IS T-ME TO 1 ? AO?< /\ % %  %  ( %  ~V_ MONBAyJ & R ^W/vmdL Make your own styles with these... RAYDN SATIN In Peach, Pink. Grey. Saxe. Skv. Uold, Red, While. Black. r*36" wide. • Per Yard 7Gc. SEEHSUrHEHS In Blue. Pink. Peach. I.emnn. HO" wide 77c. While only 74c. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd. 10-13 Broad Si. "Sood TISWA go A CUUwudki... A Naw Guaranlocd Ramedy lor Ihe Rtlial ol ASTHMA Dr. JOHN'S ASTHMA REMEDY This skillfully blended preparation, assures you ol immediate relief in this moat distressing disease and is the reault ol years ol intensive study in Asthmalic conditione. Keep a BotUe handy and relieve yoursell of lhe constant threats ol Asthmatic attacks. Betall Price:—12/Per Bottle Obtainable at . BOOKER'S (Barbados^ DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY, Haallnga See OUT Up-to-the-Minute STYLiiXGS /•r Spring s....o MAKE THIS YOUR DAILY BREAD Mas** ./%/• H IA mus at t.1H7 LADIES, MEK'S ANI> CHII.BRFN'S SOCKS CLFANKKS, POLISHES ANI BRI'SHFS IIA\I lAIMS %  OR Al.l l lll'OSI'S MS "MATINTO" FLAT PAINT in Croan., I.'II-I. :>n


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Tl'ESDAV. APRIL 14, 1951 UAHBAIMis mini MI CLASSIFIED ADS. mmou iaoa Tha charge lor But'... MMrUtM ledgment.. and In Merrwilaa* notices II W — -Nl- real, aadl i. *-•*!*.J* ""-• o.*.T! real. %  turg wk—4 .'Alt 41 MAUOAOE P4YNE JEMMOTT-On n.d D* ..-ruber Allan K Payne of Ch>v*4nd Ohio MOB ** hia bride EUl ir Jfmimli • daughter of Mr c E Jnmwi ol Hai M# DIED rOLKM-On APT,! I. iui. H h T |. der.r* OWl Oop. Payn*< Ba. He>., rioratt* Folks* Her funeral leavei IN* itavr i-ndfi^f at xtl pro io-a.1' for In* Holde*. Hill Brethren Roo-t ...J ihenr* lo IM W eat bury Cm-alter .-. nVetme BlviMman %  •H1f*-ln Mil. Cunit—t Blickmir, iCuucw Alfred BlBCkman .Trinidad'. 4-51—In iHl'ili%  tlheLille\ Upper BecSle. Road Mr. MAHIA AUJTIIA tin fancr* leaves In* above re^denc* it 4'A p m lorlMK. PaulChurch Calhta i. Ml* John O-n 10 4 M. St, JOHNOn Aptll Mh M41. al he.' iraidtnee No. 31 Houalni Scheme Deacon'* Pood. Muriel El Be St J-hn. apt of. Funeral will Ir.ir ,h. ih... r**jdanca al 430 p-m to-day (or (he e*tb„r> Ca*SMBI Aubrey C Hi John .iiubeid'. Ettwatd. Nancy. Bontord Boar. Cuihbert children I84M— in AUTOSJOTTVS *i .ran r.rrllaa. SKEa £?*.' CAR-Morn. | Tour** K—Ml Very .j condl.k-iTrt.ph,*,. Wl W^ h** Bat*** Tmiw after 4 pm l*!l|-n I9ST A tOI * PACE SfiVEN WAIVTKB LOST •"• %  .4a.. H aw.4. I OH III M PI III l< VOllltS VKt MlWraas-. rtarff area* 11 e*-I iM "Jj^t ^ d *" *• %  *•* oa-aM T< cat* penpai, ti* OR *....-*„, ,T, Q !•"* %  • J c a s aa a we'd affaaB 4 'MU a and ll c*,la par a-jtOR* -. Taiiaiaaa I %  % %  — %  "J II II MO PtMl | H_, 04 K>V. Ptiirma. i d' UK AM,. I*tr • od** n Dr"a Ibioii OT> !" %  c-.'l-ii,ir.| T.., ; %  wwd aKW. C Ii4.llin WAT.TI PI HI.M SALES ran nnu pa> apata MM m ir.-J .. .id il tawa* par apala M>a on ianda^i LttAt KSTATF. •W0*XOW-!IVT Oardrrva, 1 b —A.ni !" InciuJi ( now, *J.r ^v—<*!* rod f n.i„ P nu3 *i>i rortact rondiiMm. Appl. ,\.(i H, or S H Khvh Ml ISJSl 1 HELP • %  J-'D "wrirt M*K**AHa hlfl arioc PMmaitp tt*M ,fid lor K*^a.ir. nil M H'V ... •ifnllar ronrO la d>la Applirilirina ihaukl M> •ubmil*.! In %  rrrtiiuj divnij drtalta o* tarviou* 4p Mlonta and onrtatinf iopli or *" •i %  %  "* a ior— I pa>apit ai-. %  Routd k* addrrMr __ a Co Lid V (T , 101 BrWjHo— 10 I_ll An | HM^u, .hon. plKflottaph. n.AT^ T"o i>w..iil*triN mi l..ll> (utniahrd *l. I U.r-nff ,| t apprviod l*,nnt* 1 •Dorlau> h-nii to ho'iv A < roconvoirM loaadonr* App l"4.li. MISCELLANEOUS Ti'BKKVI -10 la* fOWLA A Iy> K' Id 4 Jl - HOl': Comfort. Brai h Ciap. HaalinC< '.. n i %  i.. .lit %  • %  Apptv '.I londlt**! d-no only ..in „,(!, p, Ke S^voim Bl> "*''" Manew* Lid THANKS -Tlia Clarko farrlKd!tidh tininMltim lo lhank n'i Ihm* ..tlrndrd tn* (iiiiot*! papl .rcail lotwta ol aympalhy in our r**m %  lha doaih of oan 11 HP. cam. mat rDdoa Agancln Ud Rin WltUMKO LOTS at Dom. Cl.i Church Lot. naor tho m*. MM! hi 2L""S"y M "*'" Main Road. A Pr i MrT. A Krrbarl. Dovor. Phot* :.,. * | W M AI~f LAKD~im aq f|. ol fend M -M" t^S5%rt —• %  %  iv ^' ,,W S" •PP"*" h> Mia. K. n SWLjt.'S "— rhc .boy. wm M orlorcd for V i l-.olic ^oniprtitton *l vur orAcr Ji,n %  *•• rrld- ilu, Apia itdl w 1TA HOI KNITTINC A SPIKN' %  Vlaiidda ^irol as : ^ I 4il I WAS'TIP TO BINT OACAIX L'N'FTrr>NI*Hrn COTTAOI I m-NOALOW m In* counl'v. WANTi t>> Ciiitii-ii oiiuolr Raanitial ra*)v inrnta aro two pood bodiooin*. "*' %  aniUIH>-<. liy|n and dining ,o.> %  arafa aarrtrlc lifht. taarphwn*. inodaialr rml lor lonf Ira-.B'l pox No • %  AtfviKata Co PI.HSO\ VI dan .' LAMM "o<*v %  Si laanmOap fumiOioo Dial BM M..,ril OMM FLAT Th* Mix K C;-|. %  VB-POBIA. On Iho 1 nhod from IHh Aoril PrlA ond Bodxv llo< %  i % %  it, I. -, I %  | A P llulchinaon A CAR OBI %  MO Di, ruk $t iiidard i: II.P prit. alHILl *> ochnowh-d B r witn lhank. tha wraalhand ulhrr lokont of BJ>B>palhy arnt ua on liir occaalon of Ihr drolh of Prodrrtra Auu>ta Murrcll, who diad on 3rd April. -Ropaii. Harold, Lilian. Edna ichlldroni. Noima. Hulh. Joan, Victor, ljlian, Wln.ten. HPPoM. Janlro. d "Saf* In Iba aim. nf Jaaua" *ll.ll\ll Thrnnch Ull IrtOM I h*. lallar. Ihair *vmpaihv In our rwnit bairav. mont rauard tar Ih* daoih of my dr. haiovnl hu.boiid Wllbart Wllllama Mjiiiia 'Wlfn, Verona ilanaliKi i, Mra I Wonrll ifrirrdi. Mi.. O Gamn i(ilrnd>. Mlaa Ruhr Jordan )lrl*ndt. 104 M--It, IN MEMOKIAM M I II SI door molti railed to i on April tin |BM. luppv ii, amiluid. alwari cot loved anil iraported wheteyri To a beaiiltfiil lite, ramr a noble rnr Shv died aj an* lived evarybod< Iriend. Dorotlty aid Ttw-lrrui >dau.i>l<-T-<. Win trad, llvorinth. Viola >"V">M 1U an. %  MO rnodMl B#cenUy orklr| | A'drr" i>rtor>. Can ba ar*n al Flaherpond PiantalMn. SI Thorn*i ana -III be gaTorad far mate on WrdnaAdaj nth April IPJI. al I p.m )i.5| -4n aXEfTaiCAL I phaM :ota.lv One Switch b4kWd fully fitted One a I, ixn Qpllvdrv •'. Rorkley Tanace or Id Phono RW or JIM 10 4 il -I f LaufaI A Co. POULTRY Dt:CK--P u ,e Bred Cro-e. Kahk, ampbell Pekm piock of nlna. |v, itcki, 4 drakoa Archie CWrkr. Beach. nun Avenue, m-tii,*. a4Sl-n. AUCTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER By InatrnFtHtr.. received - will a*U on WVDNBaOAl Ihe nth a. follow. H naa. DC Suaar S. P. M.iaion Spn *-kark W *** h o ,, e %  •"' %  O Srel || II baa D.C Sufar DoCoitat Iro,. BBAVattt TIOTMAN CO.. Tha public ara hereby r %  Kind credil *• my wife. El FITH ore Ri.hard. aa I mya.ll re.pon.ible for he. tlae contraetlna any dabt or dab" b> \3b ERIC GHIPPITII Clrau Up Campaign A Clean City NOTICE i\ai-ii in .i Boon removed to Rjlhahaba uMII ItirtVi umoti A T itmo. Parochial TTOddMacr, W Jo-epr ia %  a* *.0\l H\WI \l MMMI ATTENTION II drawn :o the Control .f PrtcaH (L>fence, (AmerKlmenit Order. 1951. No 8 which .I1 bd publi-hed in the Official OaaBMta of Mondnv. 2nd April, 19il 2 l'nd Ul d r ^ a il teUinf pHaaH of Salmon Tinned". "Flour' and Ptat SalttMl" ^ie M follow* — • Tiri.f NOTICE < % %  -ei M( |nr the at ISMM km o.mla|. In to-morrow, April 10 — l-.ni. 1 . Stack Exchange operatntH w< .'autlous and unwilling lo aatti commltmenti In domeili. si<, to-day. rice changes were mainly U er levels and showed Br't. %  ; %  Oovemment stocks nccaalonaMv • Mxteenth off Apart fPBin breweries, t\rm on hopes that the budget will be favourable lo ihi if/ery lnduEtr>', most groups record losses pence. Larger IVficil On C.N.S. Line a> I %  .. %  Page 1 {"due to substantial rate re'lticiion "on sugar and floui .UH. I lute the |ii in< 11... 1 '-.in." it reduction of M.6M2 tit per icnl in tha volume o,* traffic inn lad The reduction of $MM76 In operating expenes was ajug t I lower freight tonnage hal reduction in the number .-f nay. ages, from 65 in 1049 i I year. The report ihowad II balance in the vessel lepiucement fund ut Ihe of 1Mb of M.:II:M!3H .md re i %  %  %  IOTB % %  ineitrnv IIIVKN u.,t all aona bavins as) drill or claim. ilnat the atalaU ol Hugh Clarencrue. drc*oaed late of Hurt'. Oop, 'n pariah of Churl Church In thu Itlan I o died on the Mh dav of Oat a . Inta.tal*. are requested to arnd Ul tlriiUra of Ihelr claim* duly atmtrj the uiuleraurrod Tut PublkTrn.ie> o llavne. g, (IrrfBlh. SolicitorN II Hlgli Street. Brldpetown. on or t> hard Ihr l IMI, J(l -hlch d.ile I aho'l ptocred %  the aaarta of UM dereaard anumi Hi ie.1 tberelo havlni rogai only lo ouch < lalma of which I at .11 Uu have had notfera and I will not inI...I. Inr the aaMla or any pan thereof %  I h ana perapn of whoa* d*li or claim I ehali not then hove It.-* aaSBM And all perwina indented In Ihe •.. i.lobiedi.e wllhc Died IM. Jllh i I v > i iixiix of iba Batal Hugh Clato-ice CkanM. dereaaed •491. MECHANICAL Royal r T">%  l MSB after 10.4.11an. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Blcrtlaa hy BARNES 4 %  iM-teaa MISCELLANEOUS jr delicate labrlea 'NEVIB OPSPAtB J1TST USX RFAtlCAIRE 4 4 51—dn MS£?*! ~ fa P""* 1 "" Paaaaat. % %  While. Oraan, Prlmroae with malchtni """ %  '"eotour ..iliea. Tap CVBTAIN riTTDfOS—For am art wtBotow alyllnf. licht control, Valancea and drapene. By atlrarh. Dial 4411 A. BARNES A CO.. LTD. 11 1 SI tf.n TREE OIPTS—PBEg for your klne JI Thura.Lv iaih. Friday' 13th and Saturdny lam. A fine an of four flnlourful Kraaurlns >*,.*-,„. -iv n ntBE with every purchaM of One Dollar at %  wer C, W HfTf.-HIS.SCN IG.IW 4 r.i-TC. Factorv oad Ssreet MEGANRF Lowei F.i J ROLL-L'P DAVLTTB MOVIE BCItflaaM I CBM. rood ardor. Fltt. Clf phirmaev 13-asi-ttn. TABLE TErtNIB TABIE-Solid ,',"; TYPE WRITER RlimONS A CARBON APCR Ficrh alork %  -'" received, ga 1 reoulrementi at T Gadde. Grab I 4 ll-ti I.I.I VENETIAN BUNDS. KIrach S-m-alra all metal DeLtisa Vonellan bhnda. to yon •liei deliver./ 1 Sfaaka. Dial eft* A C*. Ltd. 81—I. (i BARNgg A Co., Ltd. WINDOWS and DOORS prerlalan built sf cured lumbar bv machinery Oroal •avlna. in coat and time, when you kH ua solve vour ronMrurllon pmlilamp Phone jrai i. A. II. Miller Bead at Ciiy ,i -str By recommend-I I., n. of Lloyd. Aaarii re will Mil oo THURSDAY in* mi, i General Trader. Ltd Roebuck Stfooi 101 Ba<* D C Sugar. Sale la JO o'clock. Terma Caah 10 4 91 an fiOVEINNENT MITICES Dietitian Mrdieal Deaarlmenl BrllWi Handaraa Application* are invited 'or the post of Dietitian. Medical Deparlit, British Honduras. Salary £222 x 12 — £270 X IS £t00 with cost of living allowance approximately £27 per annum. Candidates, who muM hold a recognised diploma or qualification n Dietetic*, ahould forward their pplicatfons slating full particular, and accompanied by two testimonials lo thpajpireetor of Medical Services. BrlfTsh Honduras 1 4.SI—2n. ndusti-lal'the selff* |1.7T.4aa | The Canadian Nation il K.nl Speeu,.t,ve MI„, !" [M J-JJj, .Jjbest financial rttowlni linca 194* Record gross revenue of $553 831.000 were due lo a combinat higher freight rates and gieatvr freight traffic This may be the (' >. deficit report, because llW ment is taking steps to i^orfWIlH its capital structure Ul new set-up recommeiulcl bj ihe Royal Commission on transpotta. noii. ii wag e1lmatei' th,. i • N IE would have shown n surplus of on than $14.000000 for the pM year —*CPl )< i-s nf one to two point Japanese bonds, hm fnrei utilities were quiet Eastern buying gave strciujU to Jute shares, but oils, rubbt-i and tins were hesitani Elsewhere gold and coppe s*uot were occasionally lower Beater ",RATES OF EXCHANGF APRIL 0. 1M1 CANABA Chaauea on Baaker. m t>|pi p. Demand 11..ti 81 •>'. P. siahi Dtaft. Sia'10' Pf CaMa CUrrenc. I'101 in Harbour Log In Crl.$.e Bay MV S*dajcfleld Srb %  QlOtl I Ut.! Srheonar M-re llrniirli %  .libber. Schooner l.indalpii., Brhoi ardnu.i W. Srhooner 1 ..In Adir.i S. ftcluton.i '•' rmiaatHirr M v. T B Radar. SCHii.ni.i wi.in..).--. %  sthoonr. Sclioon.t Turtle Dove, schooner I g fmli %  %  %  net < a PL rawt rwm. DEPARTiniKT OF EDUCATION Regi-lratlon of Rallef Teichers. 1961 M Applications are Invited from suitably qualified persons for registration as Relief Teachers Preference will be given lo persons holding the Schoct Certificate or other equivalent qualifications. Applications, to be submitted ait Form E 7 M (Men) or Form E'7 W (Women) obtainable from the Department nf Education, should reach Ihe Director of Education not later lhan Saturday, the 21ft of April. 1951 Refftsiered Relief Teachera. who Utah to hone ihetr names retained on .he Revised Lisl. MUST IJ/orm the Deparfmenf h„ letter not later than .S'afiirdat/. the ?I*e of Aprtl. 1951. Department of Education, 5th April. 1961 10 4 51—Jn 4.T03 ARRIVAI.4 u *.aao tor. Cole. Irani Rotterdam Via SS Mullah. •*.! lonl.iard Irom Carrulta vi, M V Willeanstad. B*8 ton Marcaima, from A..iba via Si TAcoina War 4JTS loi rrr..l**lle. from I iveipc fkhmwai Rainbow M. Tapl Mark., from *l Trader Capt Carlaon. f-'-n Sr.me via iSS *pn-ial>t. 4,44^ tana net, I UTtman Irom lndim in r-i -ii %  i %  Hohnoner Philip H Davida".i ti rt. Capt Raalv. for Britlah OuiVrhoonei Bntetpti-e S.. M Ion. apt Greag. lor Bl Lurla MV Blue ttar. 1 ion. net. >rau*s.|.. lor Trinidad MV Canadian Con.truclor. J.W> al. CaM Wallact lor Canada. In Touch -Vain Barbados Coaatal Station YOU C/a.VT AFFORD TO MISS IT Thousands are taking real advantage of genuine Reductions in Ladies Dress Goods, Gents Wear and Wootlens and other Departments EVERYDAY Whin 4iht.nl U49M J NOTICE PABISB OF gT. JOHN AS from Ihe 8lh to Ihe ll.t April the office of Ihe J>arneh<'.l Treaurrer. John, will ba open on Saturday, nnd 11 .t April oi.lv a FRAAXH. Parochial Treasurer, R4. John. T.lgiadJtl NOTICE Bt BIBT TBOBPE Daaeapad NOTICBI la HXSBBV NOTICE BVE • EIXCTION Parlh of SI ANDREW store than one paraon havlnf beer duly nominated at the election of pei •oriB lo nrv. aa member, in the dTaci rral Aaaembly for lha Pariah of Bl Faatar my intention of the Ol will r H.yne Hlft! *ri -,f Ua, ii rroreed tcieceaaed thereto hrtalma of had nstic. OIVBN thai .,' debt or rlalmi -rTacimp lha eatate of Huker' • aaed. late of ChaUkta laa.rt i lah ol Salnl Michael In thl > died on lha Brth d.. %  at laao. ..re raapaasa d ln aand i * of aaabt alaim. d>.l< ndertitned APNOlI) .s. Or mth. anlicrtort. No. II oft a* be*os HM Si-t d.v .I. after whlrh data I own .mtribvria lha aaarta o ma :",ond lha aartlea entitled "I retard only ti aurn -Skfk I abaH lhar. hr.va • nd I ehali not bo iiahia *tae any part iBoreof to 10 any ae.au, ar who-.e debt I nail not then have h .a 'he aakd election on Monday lath, day Of April HM al Ihe Alteon, School. He I lap Ian ii> Mrnirmi hrtweei tha houra of aeven and el|bi o rtortt U lha %  '. %  Nad Pollina SHatlon No I. Tha AIM) oi School—the North wing (or all person • hOM aurnaanea ne*in with thleMeAmi mchaslye Polllns Station Wo I The Alleyr.. School — ihe South wing for all DO' -on whose Surnarne* beain with Ihr letter K to Z lnclu..v Rifled H A INI.RAM Sheriff and Refjrnlnf Officer 10 4 11—dr LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application sf Sylveeier Maxwell holder of Lkquda* Lieanae No OM of IWI nanted lo him in respect of rail i.uildin' known aa Retreat lower Btocb Roc pBJBfa | ti,..i i R (W Ii Lid they can the following ahlpa through Iheir M rbadoa Coaal Sutionnr.idei.t Theodora TWaier. M V i.. .a. CnlombW. %  Megaia. ' Lady Nrlaon. a. Bua Lyke*. a. An.." ear M Dal Mar/Klv.. .a AlgBMlnA B. Paula. • %  Criatobal. a a. CJaora> hea. an Araenlifie Wind*. da SOMlM. aa | Slagalian" Eabi. Alton "olarl.. • t ii Ubavlll* • O-arifaated. a a • i HuHna. • Lmll, ... Alcoa . (Ju.-ri%  AJaMaeOg 'Reeling tha proper' .ring hffora me an I'outhS-r* lo be esai Alcoa Ptone'r %  %  a llslfnbe. •*. aA. .. of Barmuda. %  I t-a. BaaBraax. (,ttK j • Oeolog.. clarkea Wharf. • • Canadian Chatlan*tog da %  • Mcnat.i; "•alfiol %  i % I'baUli l>ii Arms l>iini|> I t.uii.l In Mil.in MILAN. April 9 Enough explosives "to Mow ip i eWy' ware ages night found m the Pirelli lm rator* here. ii,iii. HI poatca awre eoatlnulni refi of the eoonl trial ptafrii ft anna dawnpi Carefully prepared In alcel tubes, apparently nude in the f.ntoiv. the explosive about half .i lOO, WaW found in an arms dump weighing allogether i.' The .lump arae Mdden in an unleigrouii't gAllen batMwlh n secUon of the f.u-loiv in whi. Ii 100 women work anil iMllW I %  mall IteM aunf. a iMtrw larga iiuinher of other weapon^. according to police officials. q M.iK' lr.ni M..ii Mini-t.'i. MataO I the 2,600,000 Communist parly of being responsible for hun

  • unprotnumi P !" l" Five mllikm German, lake parl in aboul her, Mr. Marx dUccrnen tallowed by a raid Into '^ D,

    , ihs, m„ „„ be terrTnedby the mere idea of note, reckles, despair after one OMCO. mWed. Orauebo, al one dollar per service, Ihe family began threw in his soprano to reinforce line improvise lltin| to the audience— Werla t'epyrl.ht Reserved. —I..I S. X General l.ooko At Tht IM|i And llr.-lui-i-s: We Can IKi Better Without Conscriptioii Its l.it-ii (-(.a-ii. Kir 1,111 VIII) RiAaTnttj oinni ., ii. i uf the Ko.val Armoured Corps, IV**; Head of the brltish Mll.Ury Mis slon lo .Moseuw. i %  i.;. It is now generally accepted that the army in Kviropt* must consist of 40 or 50 divisions, of Wbieb hall ntuM ba irntourtd cUv 1 1 all of these forcen will have to be standing by in f .rrmnny and main turned .it full slrength. It Is also being accepted that the linger proportion of the armoured divisions must be provided b] tho I'SA. iind ourselves. It Is not possible to produce lirsl-class armoured divisions with "" """'•'> m vision* we need _.. all th.-,r bohnlcUnS and skilled '""' v of *i>.W0 men. which afl ,c uU "J,/*?," h ?' Sffi in.-,, ii,>m a National Service army more than double the numerical a conversion of training unit with eniUlm.-nl tor two years ttrength of ten ilivisums. I'.irt of lighting fonnations. .-.imiill.un ?he G.Sn i'L!" taees which .„,..„.„ 0djtly.WOUldb.P-d. won such trri-iit victories In 1939lo provide for non-divisional to obtain regular* 41 weritriTi^.for fouT ve.r"-'I-, bul a ,r.-.l pail is due to As this pronresscl The USA Km lo I,'nble to *• "lenlabl, melheiency ol u reduction, woulrl he made In IM ohtain volunl^-r. Inr at onv rate two.year conscript service i umbers or national serv toiT".! !" ; What would be the p.„,, ( Those who had bNOPPtalnM benow dans much bPtMr in the en. J could return to the use of a >ond Iwo years would a I be lU.mcn.or re,„lars. The Fren. + ^1".^"".^.^' !" !^ •£* ^St,Vt£HSS,'SlSSS start by declaring that as a temporary measure, to meet the emergancj avtryona who was in the Army would have lo remain wr he was. A limit of retention lo three years might be llxed. A very large reduction would then be made to the intake fur the Army, with a great saving consequence in the man-power which is used to run Ihe "Con(.crlpt Machine." rould result In %  flow of yond two year The French tegular army in peace lime and released but th. U nd Belgians have a good conscript "' 1 -*>• >-' !" x B ri " BT Wc would be l "" !" |-w svstem which provides Mifllcienl would im-d '.n.000 nu-n for overevent of I O^Uon of ll.e present irain.i.r: to pVcSuca tht l m %  uu ..I %  '• %  -'. %  '" -001 %  'M0 for the flow of reftulars Ihe process coul, Lurope and lloinc service, i.e., a nc arrestco total of IMMIOO for the Elrllish Plenty of Reserves Anny. This would give us six ( nu>l ^ roa |i Ml) tn..t thi divisions at full strength for use European urmy may he required Europe instead of IM present fi , t iv War mn fiv* half trained divisions. ^ u long way 0 (f and we hop Quite clearly we could not nBt ,. wW nCVrr udH pilot that -* 1Si,tbIv snul rtow our conscripconscription would, of course, be faulty i!,\ : i Qml Machine We mint now examine r problem of producing .is many divisions as posnible for Europe in addition to the provision of ou>' overseas garriMins. The Urst point to realis CUT pnasal lU|i scale conscripUOD policy has forced us to protion policy on the assumption that |, \,-,y preionged. adopted consrlption. ! s rising rapidly. The monthly u ma y be argued thr! V There are colleges for training overage has more than doubled aj will nol raise a Ian. national service officers, eslab" result of the new pay code. We present eond it ion < demand a strong Ushmcnls for receiving and di are now offering other attractive army wniih is ready at once. patcblngthO men overseas, ami. of features. We have plenty Of men course, very large training eMahAt picsini we have nearly keep this army up lo al lishments for ihe national service 200.000 regulars in Ihe Army. un til Ihe war-time conscrlptl M m en Surely there would be every come available and the Territonnl A great machine i needed, chance of raising this figure to Army takes the field. As this when .it least h-ilf the Annv eont'"" 2*0.000 which we need. policy would greatly Increase 0UI sisH of men who must be turned The cost of raising six divisions strength, there can be no question nor every two vcars due to our '" this way would be no higher G f the abolition of conscription conscription policv A* an inthan our present hill; It might causing anv loss of morale, ihouwh stance almost a quarter of the tvon bo less. The whole efficiency ihls has often been suggested by conscripts who arc sent to our ol ihe Army would rise. Formathose who w lf"h lo retain conscripmoie distant overseas garrisons 'ions would be immediately ready lxm are permanently on the sea either tnr win; they would not contain Surely we ought to take advnngoing or returning from theit %  lira* pmporltnn of half trained i Jge 0 f thin method of incrcesinR stations. 'nen. the strength of our standing jrmv The figures work out in this Stay in Army without delay. way. A division requires Just How could we put such plans Werld renyrlght BUNfilf under 20.000 men. Bul to produc* into effect? We -vould have to —L.E.8 nen in Korea wbOM is the? Weil. If Mr. Rtrachey wants to show that he understands the tmportance of the new Russian Army h. i.lke.1 about, he will brinj; these men home. The two men are BriRadier Basil Coad and Tom Brodie. who command the tli Itbfa '-^7th and 29th BriRades in Korea. Each has won glory in a lough campaign of u and downs, writing the names of their brigades in the annals of British military history. They happen to be the two senior officers n the British Army with the latest, most complete front-line experience of lighting Communist soldiers. I say that it is high time we brought them home. Not to be dined and wined and feted though they richly deserve it. But to teach the conservative-minded generals in London and Rhine Army everything that they know about the new kind of war our men are fighting In Ihe Far East. Don't believe the people who tell you that there is nothing "new" in war, and that well trained troops can tackle any type of lighting to which they put their hands THEY PAID British ;ind French armies went to war in 1939 prepared to fight a 1914-18 kind of war —and paid the price. I have a nasty feeling that outside Korea both the British and the American armies are trainin b to fight Germans and Italians, maybe British and American "enemies" on exercises—anything but the massed Communist armies with their spearheads of trained battalions. It ought to be Coad's job and Brodie's to put that right. It ought to be Mr. Strachey's main objective to see that their successors aren't the men at the top of the seniority list, nor the men most easily accessible out Baal They mint be young senior officers with a great future before them, who in turn will come home in six months' time to pass on to Western divisions the lessons which hard experience has taught them. And when these Korean veterans do come home, the one thing Mr. Strachey must not do is to stick them into office jobs writing reports which nobody will read, or to send them round Britain under the •'.<)!. leclurng on life around the 38th Parallel. OUR NEED If Coad is good enough to win the unstinted praise of MacArthur's senior generals he is good enough to command a division Rhine Army. Thi.i is no time to think about questions nl s.nimity. His arrival in Germany or his assumption of command of a Territorial division would set in motion a lot of new ideas which are badly needed. The Chinese, North Korean, or Soviet way of war is very different from Hitler's Mr. Strachey. The Red soldier is not a superman but our troops will not be trained to meet him unless their commanders themselves have trained tn the hardest most up-to-date school. Mr. Strachey is now engaged in planning the shape of the British Army in 1952. Fieldmarshal Slim is his chief military adviser but it would involve no breach of etiquette if Ihe Minister had the benelit of u long personal, first-hand discussion on the organisation of an infantry division with a man wilh Brigadier Brodie's experience. QUERY .. QUERY ... Have we too many trucks in Army units today when it comes to lighting in guerillainfested country? Have we too many men clerking in company offices, too many educational instructors teaching current affairs. too few men actually manning an automatic weapon in the forward areas? Will the average Territorial battalion, now 120 strong, be capable within a few weeks of mobilisation of withstanding attacks by Red suicide squads? Are we underrating the Communist potential enemy? Have the United States' troops any particular weapons in Korea which our soldiers covet? Are there any special lessons which the Army ought to ram home with the Z men this summer at Territorial camps? —L.E.S. YOU WANT GOOD-TEMPERED BREAKFAST FAMILY? Serve their early morning leu or coffee in our MINTON PLAIN or GOLD-EIM1EI) Man-Sixed. BREAKFAST CUPS & SAUCERS Wilkinson & Hi.Ni.es Co.. ltd. Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phones: 46H7 & 4472. l -.-,-,'-'.-,V*-0',V,'*','-',->',V,*y',-XV-. ,•.'**•*'*','*',','*'*'*'.-*'*'' %  BENDIX WASHING MACHINES FULLY AUTOMATIC WASHES NINE POUNDS CLOTHES. Through Six Complete Stages in 45 minutes (without any manual labour) the final stage the Clothes are just damp, suitable for ironing. OAX1 A FEW MACIII\KS LEFT UNSOLD. • DaC'OSTA & CO.. LTD. ELECTRICAL OEPT. Ol'II III AIM US SAY: Th4-L/f r ctOfAPIac>-.\am c '"'*' t Sc *""'. in •fiftJPtS: Colloi^h.."^'",^-! Hon. were taut down for both boy. ,,. ,1. the estobli.hmenl ot %  seeon.' t.oreem. to hnee m-very-wa)r busei which tan "Fairy Cattlewhich inhabit lb Grade school for boys, a flwt Krade taken an interest in the histo'i ic, twenty years ago and arc 'Tin islam! or CORVO in the Azores school for gitls was estabhsfied and so when he was made a baron Lizslts*' compared lo the comthese cattle are unly approxiir. h the mime of Queen': for distinguished military service fortable buses running in Port-ofately 35| inches high. Cafe au lait he took the title of Combermen* Spain. There are not enough 'n colour, with milk giving qualanri girls. A few nun u-ft %  ere gi. In 1944 the girls lack thbuilding In To The Editor. The /tdi-ocole— SIR.—The name "Combermere" Is an inlcrotlng example of tin .,„,, krt lfir |,i„„d. ihe girl effect ol %  place name. „„ Q ivrn „ „.„;„„,, building 0: Some years ifter the death of „„„!„„ „„ t ot lhc Schi Stapleton. 1st Lord Combemier.groun d,. ,nd inslead of the Cent... in 1B05. as a result of an Act o! School Ihere were two schools .I.*.". 00 f ra ^ t !rho0 % '. DM Bar* Central School and th. •rtablUhcd. and in honour of I-ord Glr | s Central School. Combermorc was called Comber^ mere. But lhe,.was a reason The boys continued in lbs why the new name of Combermcr.' School building whose foundatioi should hive been chosen Over half Lord Combermere had laid wher. .. 1 century before in 1819, I., r-i the I'an.h Seheol was reorganised H 1 ". .V om bermere In laying Combermere had collected fund, (vide Vestry Minutes). In 1941 ,h T foundation stone was a_. great for a new school building, and had the boy. were moved to e.cellenv VJ* n *J*.. [._.fiS." i'JL* '.* looked £•% ^ ri .Jff n 5!r" Combermere had known lhe gvU < \ of the Central School to lie. and where Unv bad attended through*J out his administration as Governor of Barbados. OnehasonUt through the Aet of 1822 concerning Ihe Central School lo realise this fact. This Art was at the Barbados Museum and I presume i? still there among a ropy of tho laws of that period. But the fact thus Ihe name "Combermere" i be traced to an ancient abbeyNo I'"'-. In the I dii.ir CM lie publUhed m>i. •• (lie writer reveal* hU or her Identity to Ihe l.dltor. Names are publtohed unlc* Ihe writer particularly retin..is the u*e of a 'Nornde-plune." buses at rush houn, and on hoti'V**,. 0 ,he Jcrso > 'M*': "'^ days should overcome the rmiiei •i i „ „J u...i„,,.,„, pasturage disclosed tn the debal 2 1 **at Hast.ngs where „ he addmM an(| s!v>ul „ |)p visitors congregate To transact „„-,. ncWl lon lo thc „,,, postal business, l bad MUWC to <*>.sar,t owners take a bus to Worthing where With thanks for ,„_ there is an etricimtly run Post Yours truly, Office or go to the C.IVO., again MILKSHAKE by bus. and endure long waits— 8.4.51. nearly two hours once for three / transactions Thilitkt Why not a Post Office at HasTo The Editor. The A&vocate— LOUNGE SUITS ready to wear Choose from a wide range of fittim-. single or double breasted. Style in Hne Grade WORSTEDS and CABKRIUNES. A big; assortment to select from DA COSTA A llry ISIIIMI* COLTD. 7:v.-:;-v.;. : % %  -. -M: •?.:-.: ••-.-. -. -,-. •-.-.-.-.-.-,. •.KM'.I-.CKIKIIKEKJKKIKI-. Th* 1 lilits HIS1I ITS tinl /lit' tin* itmtr m li SMi>S Can B*> Imprmfil such is the effec; To The Editor. The Adi'orole— SIR.—I have just returned (Kun But to pursue the matter ot a ? no,her Pleawnt stay in dear, datings In thc heart of this large residential and Hotel area? I am, ate, FREQUENT VISITOR itrangely been over, of that particular building. Thi> with which Lord Combei ichool was known as the Central nothing to do. The name "Com r P ,acp name. SIR.—l have just returned frem Fairv Cattlr School, and included both boys bermere" has not however befn But to pursue the matter ot a ? n ,he f P'*ant stay in dear, deTo Thf £d,, 0f j^ Adr^.-'r and girl? throughout Lord Comchanged, and is a reminder that, place name further Lord Comber"ghtful Barbados. gip.. .^ ^.j^. ll( xtli ,,,]. barmere'i administration which %  Combcrmenans" had their hcirumere's surname was Cotton. He There are many matters whit h establishment of The lasted from 1817 to 1822. as the aa second grade school in t'lie I.ad an ancestor. Sir George could be improved and to add lo lm .. %  MnOl had done. J: w,is in building of wlilch Lord ComberCotton, who In the reian of Honr> the comfort of the people and til Sh tral School thi! Ix>rd mere had l-iid the foundation V11I had scaled himself al I I shall mention only the Sponsor that he rCCmaM The Ctombenncre Is said to have taken ..tone more than half a century bermere in Cheshire, formerly an two-— Ltvaatock S In 1822 an act before tho school received the abbey of Benedictine monkI. Your buses are primitive. w lth The Peasants* Bank in taaed with respect to th name of Combermere. Scon after founded In 1133. r* the same uncomfortableobtaining several spo SIR.—Kindly allow me throu your valuable columns, just i:> thank the Honourable member.-, who supported rny nomination al Chaplain to lhe House ol Assembly, on Tuesday last. The %  Q H. Adams, F. L. Walcott. R C; Mapp, D D earner. O Alkk'i RM, 1. BRVd C1ARKE. Tudor Bi St Michael. Barbados 5.4'51 Other letters i l page 8 Cream Crackers PK. Assorted pkg. Afternoon Tes—Pkg. Nil Mil* Marls Onhorne Thin Arrowroot Almond Crisps .. Cheese Crisps In tinn Tush Vsgstahlo(KcnUngton Orowa) Consonnn" Oresm or Chicken Chicken Noodle Chicken ft Rice Pepper Pot Vasrei .Mg Beef Cream ot Mushroom — excellent with — JH BREAD L ROLLS SPECIALS BABLOVA" _. -The Power BulWet" Blend of Milt Milk ft En* Chocolste Flavour II %  Large Blse **t Small Site