Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
PAGE THREE





Weyyy,

aL. ICE: FIVE CaNTS

MacArthur Is AVLIES MAKE LIMITED GAINS:
eee Communist elements fight back stubbornly
|















ESTABLISHED 1895





3

acne eee ceeseee a —-

MUSIC FESTIVAL

U.S. Congressmen Say
TOKYO, April 6 Battle Must RED GUNS POUND
Go On—\ie | YANK POSITIONS

‘TWO American Congressmen back from the
Korean war-front told correspondents here to-
imeaieats dae ete tetas TOKYO, April 6

day they would submit a “startling report” to Con-
gress in the middle of April,
rop-gzeony Geoares declared tien COMMUNIST defenders fought back stubbornly
wt as there was no sign of any





























They urged that General Douglas MacArthur,
United Nations Commander, should be freed from
the “terrific handicap’’ of not being allowed to

send war planes beyond the Yalu River.
A joint statement by E. K.!'—— Sa
Armstrong (Republican, Mis-

souri) and W. J. Bryan-Dorn B . Lik
(Democrat, South Carolina) said ritons 1 e
Communists. had a_ sanctuary

behind the Yalu River. C ib ; Ar
“We feel that this is an intol- aril bean t



Communist peace move in Korea to-day against United Nations forces who had
United Nations had no alternative} made deep penetrations into North Korea along the

but to continue the battle.

|
j He was speaking at a New central front.
|



Conference here before leaving {0 Details of fighting were sketchy, as Allied troops
the, Middle ya. Lie wth nOBe continued making gains in the west and centre of
the ULC e a cease €

| soon, but added “it is not a pr the Korean line. The Eighth Army's evening com-



eisih akan ak Ry tre os ae munique said heavy resistance was being encoun-
‘ . » and we tail t | » refused to comment on rece: 5
see how the war can be ocean LONDON, April 6, | statements by General Macarthu tered on the central front north and northwest of
the statement said. The exhibition of paintings including his offer to negotiate Chunchon.

“Our forees cannot carry the {from Haiti closes today, Sponsor-

cease-fire directly through Field

iction to the enemy territory. We | commanders,

feel General MacArthur and his
Commanders and forces should
not be restricted in any military

ed by the institute of contem-
porary arts, and housed in Dover
Street off Piccadilly, it has caused
some interest among artistic






On the western front, resist
. ance was less but there was i
Lie said that the United. Nation TT j j rati far Tnited
| ’ itec atior o indication how far Unitec
| maintained its primary objective Red Troops N t Nations units advanced during
jin Korea to repel aggression anc



















/ ° the day in some areas, com-
action which they consider to be |Londoners, restore peace and security and t In Vanchuria manders dispatched smal! but
necessary”, One note of regret has been: ;@stablish q united, free an > z fast moving patrols far out in

The Yalu River marks the|What a pity the exhibition could | democratic Korea 3 LONDON, April 6 lie. fréast Ot: tamaceaeeaes 1 at
frontier between North Korea |2°t have shown us Caribbean.ari 4 Atta shout the danger of’ was Tass the Soviet official new eft th find, steeaie nears
ay ee. wu the” i - Lie said “I still think the dimcul ‘gency declared tonight that uo elements

Armstrong thought the United} But the paintings, about 50 in ‘ ict h

Soviet troops were massing in
number, are all the work of un-
trained negro painters in Haiti
and apparently all due to en-
couragement given by an Ameri-
can who set up an art centre on
the island in 1943, The pictures
have been shown in Paris, Brussels
and Amsterdam. They came from
a Dutch city and are going back
there.

Nations should take the “calcu.
lated risk” of bringing Russia into
the war and “see if we can’t put
the Communists off balance in the
whole Far East”.

In any case, Moscow should be
branded as agitators since she is
furnishing much material for

oo and North Koreans he
said,

ve message reaching London a
: ' "ORK +i ARIS, April 6, | NC*sas ne
“ : : What Londoners like about NEW YORK, April 6. eo Aare ci >, AL * | number of American newspaper
tank Meher eee rae them are their unsophisticated A 29-year-old American ex- ied ro A s Communist Deputy published a statement to the effect
have to wait for the = ted charm. The way they break com-|Sergeant David Greenglass was oe _Pourtalet todey said that} that Mr Rayburn had in mind
Communist "sealed i@euaine etn pletely from stylish African negag} Sentenced here to-day to 15 years pine ran h Government ha | that in Manchuria Soviet troops
these handicaps” © ete said, |att; their strange compelling mix-|imprisonment for atom spying. j8ranted United States the use © | ore being concentrated.
arse wr Ranice, ‘|ture of Christian and Pagan ey of Greenglass formed “4 * * e a mat oh oo Bette sy “Tass is authorised to refute
“beliefs; ll, their great] the bulwark of the case against his I ign l A res ¥ | ourtalet asked in the Nationa’ | these reports as invent and
eaehike “Of ffs ‘that nés Seen sister Ethel and her husband Julius oO op S87 ae t 83 SStON | Assembly why the bases had bee! ee oe Ana ine Sevine troaas
hidden away for centuries and] Rosenberg, sentenced to death ceded without consulting th'| are in Manchuria,"
now looks like being brought out} yesterday. United States Attorney CAIRO, April 6. acting ean u ;
; ; ypol recommended 15 years ie. F cting Foreign Minister Pierr: Sener red slowly. ovt
with al} Its ‘Hower, ree ‘ay oedema Egypt today asked Britain, the United States and France to i imeiter redalied that’ by th Greek units moved slowly ov

OVER 90 children waiting for the start from Captain C. BE. Raison to render “Hannibal” at the Comber- | ties will be settled, but it will tak Afeaphiita
mere School yesterday. (Story oa page 5] | time —Reuter

The Tass statement referred to



the statement on Wednesday by



An American tank force last
placed nine miles inside North
Lh: pe ; P } 4 a heavy rifle and machine-gun five
as ~ . e S l ‘ Mr. Sam Rayburn Speaker of the from Chinese defenders There

J . tates a »prese . .
15 Years For , u tan Gave United States House of Repre igh was no report what advance ft
tatives that non Chinese trogps any, the column made since thi

Aft S ' ire being concentrated in

m ae , a) alate In the only important area
0 Py Subsequently Yass said in a where United Nations troops
parallel, they were hit by
heavy mortar fire northeast of

Korea is reported to have met
A] : morning
} vs uthority Manchuria % _
oo
were still fighting below the
Hangye on the eastern front

Hangye is about 10 miles south
of the border





The advance in the -central
sector was hampered by fog, late:
reports trom the front said to
night. American troops who with

Civil Servants
Plan To Strike

PARIS, April 6.
Paris’ Civil Servants of non-
Communist unions have decided
to stop work this afternoon prob-
ably for two hours for a protest

meeting over the 15 per cent Go On Strike To-day

wage increase for jupige officials TURIN, April 6.

—Reuter



—Reuter.

Italian Teachers

° : . ee : " . i law lying ground were often able
Greenglass said he stole atom stop “Israeli aggression” against Syria following yesterday ‘ ae or io of 1912 the Sulta I reuch Laurich Ita see only a fow yards ahead
bomb secrets at the Government flare up in the demilitarised zan@ between the two countries. oe morocco BARANa over to Fane Chinese pounded American
experimental station at Los Ala~ Egypt called for action under the three Big Powers’ declar- |)" atta ae re 5 aaa Drive On Rebels positions at several points in the:
mos, New Mexico and turned them 5 " r . ; lL 3 Ey : 5 eal ad , pe a. the erritory , ae i biggest heavy artillery strafe fo:
over to the Rosenbergs for trans- ation last May that in the event of frontier violations, joint | maintenance of order and polices Ds weeks... Allied officers said guns
mission to Russia. —Reuter. steps would be taken “both within and without the frame-|faction on Morocean soil and ii HANOI, Tongking, April 6 Lwere page dt ‘tke. Cataate eiatats
: ‘ Co) ¥ Moroccan waters.’ —Reuter. Strong French forces launched a cee : ent ri
work of the United Nations” . powerful avive in the mountainous) #¥& concentrations which have
hich th * TUR! Pa i a — egret ~eca® “Yowrttgn Under-Secretary Abdi t aie Indo-Chinese territory about 90 been forming th the central sects:
Ww Paris Civit 3 oe Te acten ‘ ga hundred bate at seman BOAC Head Coming Rahman Hakpasha announced that ay vet wales be tere teklny. “| north of the parallel.
. north wes' 3 ny = 7 . 3 > , ‘oo / ’ bi s 8 ! eh
ing inereases totalling about 60,-|learned with delight todas that Robert Adams Egypt and the Arab states would) Gandhi Starts Fast | carge forces of Vietminh rebel: Reuter
000 million francs per year in-| thoj 7 ae LONDON, April 6. take action unless acts of aggre: wre believed to be established in
stead of 48,000 already granted their teachers will strike to-} Sir Miles Thomas, Chairman of sion against Syria were stopped Ps :

J ! a ; 1a are ate after~!
Seater morrow. the British Overseas Airways Cor- Baeks Down Gi niadlately.: Re. interventita’ ot DURBAN, April 6 the area, but up to late this after M.P. TABLES MOTION
4 poration, left London airport to-

The 24-hour strike by teachers Manilal Gandhi, 58-year-old son| noon the French reported no
night for a tour of airports on the |

in intermediate schools for children the Big Three of the late Mahatma Gandhi, to-| opposition AGAINST MCARTHUR









































Egyptian Prime Minister Nafias) jay pegan a 14 lay { ton The French 21 Neiall Bs
between the ages of 10 and 15|Corporation’s routes in South (From Our Own Correspondent) ie anes Sty , | day began a 14-day fast in_protes ne ench said officially tha LONDON, April 6
Carcase Meat will take place in the province of Amicive and the Caribbean. “I GEORGETOWN, April 6. Sat teteell “Geadaaion’’ Costaet ee a ee African Govern thee pe Be aged ane pi a Will Nally, British t Virkoiis
Fe A We k avat Teal’ in det Sh TP deot at alae Leet anes Hamner He Brit onvalanay teany Stoukeer Syria was a threat to peace in the ae acd Stabe Lae ih SUCK Was DONE MAGS On
or ee r Italy nex . said. , .

aa M fe Stal ; : Se Regt Member of Parliament, today
Pri Gandhi declared tha | the northern side of Holy _Bavi| tabled a motion in the House ot
after he had endl his fast, he | Mountain just outside the triangu } Commons regretting that the
would “in the name of God” defy | lar French delta bridgehead in House “no longer Ete onfider ce
the Government's aparthied (racial! Tongking. Heavy air and artillers ir cn oral Mi ar th 7 ; ei pee :
segregation) policy by deliberate-] pounding last Tuesday was be renere) MaCAT hur as SUpPEM¢

Middle East.

His statement added; “The
Egyptian Government and people
support Syria in all efforts being

the teachers’ demands are not met
by April 18, there will be a total





He will visit Buenos Aires and/an application for a summon:

the Caribbean during next week} against the Attorney General, the
Food Minister Maurice Webb] strike throughout Italy—Reuter. [to see improved landings and pas-}Legal Draughtsman and the De-
announced today that the whole senger handling facilities. tective Superintendent After

LONDON, April 6.







. . sat cao i? . Commander of United Nations
talber : 7 ; : ade to stop this aggression ly creating a breach of it lieved to have sent the bel:
f Brit: S chk i asda rris arles heard} ™ § ’ ! t ga brea i levec vaV en 1 reb aie engage . Abeon. é :
a a ae eeeney meray Tonan 2 Reuter. Magistrate. ere on Be a : An Israeli source near the He announced his decision t' | deeper into Holy Bavi.—Reuter, forces engaged in Korean opera
would be supplied in carcase meat riots ant _ further evidence, he reserved hi: ai ee Arar he tions
for the week beginning Sunday YP border, who said the situation | fast last Tuesday, four days afte = ’ Nally’s motion is intended for
7 et the coming into force of the Sout! oe i. ie Sais
: 7 African Government's Group CUT EXPENDITURE de bate, but it is uncertain wh ether
} ‘ D’Abreau and Sub-Inspector Bel troops and artillery had been seen | Areas Act, designed to set asid Government will give time to dis-
ir far included canned corned ATHENS, April 6. WASHINGTON, April 6. ms fon. cuutiontt + the) im the demilitarised zone and the} separate areas for different racia WASHINGTON, April 6 cuss it.—Reuter
‘ Archbishop"Makarios of Cyprus Several American newspapers Before the application fo hi

Maurice Webb, the Food Minis-
ter, said increasing supplies of

howe ned cattle made this pos- no other solution” Argentine newspaper La Prensa.! as accused persons on a charge o\
sible. ,

| zonal town of El Hamma whictt] groups in the Union.—Reuter The House of Appropriations
“We might be able to extend it"{. “The granting ‘of permanent Flags over their buildings will be| obstructing the course of justice
a oxte) it, | P



said here today that Cypriots|amd radio stations are observing|summonses was heard, Adams Egyptians said had been occupied Committee called on the United

ee States Government to-day to cut



wanted union with Greece “and|today as a day of mourning for! Gravesande and Hunte appeares



by Syrian troops. Z 5 rr tesa c
Smoke was still rising toda: its spending. “One way for Rus

Dove a sia to accomplish her objectives
Princess Born

| THE NEWS
without spending a rouble is to |

DIAL 3113
DAY OR NIGHT

ff6m’ positions near the town
bombed by the Israeli air fore
last night reports from the borde:

bases to Britain could not be| flown at half mast in tribute to the} When Adams took his place at
eeceptable,” he told a press con- Buenos Aires paper closed by|the bar table, the Magistrate re-
ference. President Peron’s Government.| minded him that he was the ac-

The Greek Government, he said, ete an spunchod. by, ie cused and called upon him to take
~ i seals teks eae, Whe nove the Organisation of Washington Jour-

CUXHAVEN, April 6. issue on a friendly basis with lists-—-Reuter.

German fishermen reported here] Britain. ngiisee Puser,
today that 70 “squatters” had{ “Otherwise, the issue will be} remained beside he cock and on
again oecupied the North Sea] brought before the United Nations’ \ ne Sb * re Magistrate invited him to go the
Island of Heligoland. forthcoming General Assembly Buildirg Airfields the bar table but he replied “I ar

ze _ Reuter. | session,” he declared.—Reuter. BERLIN, April 6 afraid I may feel strange

he added.

~ * » j|low us to Spend ourselves poor”
J i
—Reuter. LAUSANNE, April ¢



said, Queen Sirikit of Siam, wife of| e Committee TO ies

| TELL THE ADVOCATE

Bombing was in retaliation for | ing Phumiphon gave birth to het
the shooting dead of seven Israeli | "st child, a baby girl today, The
police 22-year-old king is studying law

Israeli sources claimed Syria’s |°! Lausanne University, He mar-
objective was to interfere with the |e4 Princess Sirikit now 18 in
big drainage scheme in the Hule Bangkok last April shortly before
Valley, which Israel hoped would nus -SOFOnAtLOn Reuter.
yield many acres of fertile land
and provide a besis for a powerful

settlement in the northern pari of A Red Warning

the demilitdrised zone —Reuter



70 SQUATTERS

his stand beside the dock, Late:
when the application for th
summonses was considered, Adam:







A West German News Agency Adams made an unsuccessfu

Stet ,_| application for two weeks’ post-
‘ slaimed to-day that Soviet occupa~| app i ,
Sch uman I lan Is tion authorities were speeding up|Pomement stating that it woul

, ; ve hi i secure nen
installation of new airfields about] sive him time to secure an emine



BUDAPEST, April 6.
Szabad Nep Hungarian worker

Jap Treaty Draft a voce party newspaper

warned Yugoslavia that

10 miles northwest of Berlin. ' King’s Counsel from abroad, bu

2 + Eyewitnesses from the Agency) Gilbert Farnum, Legal Draughts
ari tel Oo nit said that last week a group oj/ man who is appearing for the
Soviet soldiers and officers orderec} Police said that he had an import

a number of families from thei:} ant witness who is leaving th



a Hungary would find means of
Changes Likely getting “suitable satisfaction"’ for



}
+ decision in an application for : inating’. tent Hadad
April 15. s . sta “5 . @ vis against Superintendent | ere remained tense, allege
TOne-fifth of the weekly ration Union With Greece Newspapers Mourn ummons against Superintendent} wurther concentrations” of Syrian





: ; farm houses immediately. colony shortly and would like th: } F the alleged assault on the Hun-
ry : " : ; —Reuter, evidence taken early. od WASHINGTON, April 6 garian Charge D’Affaires Istvan
ays wMumac ter The Magistrate granted the post The State Department said to-|Hrabec in a Belgrade street last
ponement until next week Bar- .day that it had decided to recom-| Saturday — Reuter.
BONN, April 6 ARGENTINA WILL rister A. E. Eastmond is thi [mend some changes in the draft wee
’ *





today that three other barrister: |cUlated to other interested Gov

Dr. Kurt Schumacher, West Gérman Social Democrat leadér,| SELL MEAT TO U.K.) | counsel tor Adams. | It was state: Japanese peace treaty recently cit World ‘Tithe Fight
5 ’ © ’ ~ wi
said here today he did not. believe the West German Parlia- BUENOS AIRES, April 6. | will be associated with Eastmond /@fmments, A State Department





ais ee : ' CHICAGO, April 6
ment would approve West Germany’s signing of the Schu-| An agreement to resume meat Spokesman said the first draft did x0, Ap



cad y flee > fing Ezzard Charles r AVY -
man Plan, shipments to Britain was reached Hot neces ily reflect the final zzard Charles, World Heavy









: ther Teas a = : [sa ; American view. weight Champion and Joe Maxim, |
Social democrats thought it a barrier to European unity. It | fi)" OE pai etherept in, Bag Visas Denied Paul He said he did not know if| the World Light-Heavyweight title |
placed material and politi i tn ag Hist ; ; " : changes had yet been communi-|hoider, today signed for their long
I . I island al an + pO itical burdens on the German people. eta gaa henhe.” t0 Robeson, Red Dean cated to the 16 interested Govern-{[ expected heavyweight title bout.!
Si A Schumacher said in al! important £ Ss. ‘ BOMBAY, April 6 ments.—Reuter. ‘lentative date for the contest in|
wn greement points not “the poor German f . >: ga Chicago stadium is May 30}
eo ” ‘i The Indian Government has re- ba i : Sig Charles will receive a west 4
Cee ean cit ee meenen and} ~WOOL STILL DOWN | frused ‘visas to Paul’ Robeson,| 7ITO SACKS ELEVEN {Charles will receive 40 pex cent, ‘
| On Monday : Yon High Commissioners had LONDON, April 6. | American negro singer, Professor a Haid ie (ha conidia saab
: the final say. Wool sold here this week has} Joliot-Curie, French atomic scien- BELGRADE, April 6 | Per cent.—Reuter,
(From Our Own Correspondent) The great bulk of German | made prices generally up to one/tist, and Dr. Hewlett Johnson,| Yugoslav press office tonight

workers, he declared, were opposed | shilling cheaper than at February | Dean of Canterbury, who plan to | announced the dismissal of eleven
GRENADA, April 6. {to the Schuman Plan, and if by} sales. This is the result of the] attend the

Communist-sonsorec | Ministers fr Marshal Tito’s} OPERALION VAGABOND
The formal signing by the|??Y chance it received a majority} withdrawal of United States buy-| ‘Peace Conference” in India this Federal aterametlt No reasons we ? ic
Agricultural ‘Asisclation “cant in Parliament, Social Democrats|ers from the international wool] month












































t a were given.—Reuter, NEW YORK, April 6
q would unleash a big political cam- | markets. Some observers here The Bombay ‘Peace Commit The United States Government
Agricultural Employers — Mental paign against it in the country, think the prices will fall further|tee’ which is organising the Con- | intends to mount a_ powerful
and Manual Workers’ Union Wage| The Social Democratic Party|when selling is resumed next fepency aed the mh Ministry | STRIKE FAILS medium-wave xedic.etation on.)
i Pact presently only initialled, may rouse continue to press for fresh | Thursday.—Reuter. are. volley eee) Shown ta fast ocean going freighter for it
z : s or 5 te rer 5 . i i a ashington despatch to the New
agreement remains in force for|the Government to go to the coun-| PASS COPPER BILL rile refused peonipiges ¢ haa | | Coreen opment Se York Times. ‘The project to be
d B. year. ane uy Opposition would try tc Th Va arch 8 Sourerarehe ect lobe, on Uruguay today was almost al known a ‘Operation Vagabond.”
Tonignt Gairy addresses what|diseredit Adenauer'’s regime so ESM Er OF, Seema cotw a —Reutes | total failure.—Reuter. —Reuter.
is expected to be a mammoth|Much that it would lose support| today passed a bill to suspend im- Ss ee 7 Ri aes
' bah amoyg the people “nd respect| port duties on copper until Feb- :
Market Square meeting in cele-|\,; . Y 1952 It will to the e e ® e
Beatl es aie ree with the Allied Government, ruary, 1952 ’ gO Oi: t
ration of the strike ogotation Miewier, |Semte Tn tented ever! India Rejects Frene indings
victory. age imporis of copper for defence
On Wednesday an reday | purposes. The bill safeguards the ‘. ‘ ‘ ‘ .
12 . oh aa . ee tae os | Aeabricen copper mining industry _ NEW DELHI, April 6 by the French Government, and Court of Justice. —
= OMS Wisheseps Were HeGES Ft Peace Awards lif the price of copper should fall}, Indian Prime Minister Nehru im the circumstances, the Indiai The Indian Government, he
a coroner’s inquiry at: the St | belo ; 24 cents a pound —Reuter |tO-day told Parliament that the Government did not regard them-]added, had also asked that there
David’s Magistrate’s Court into LONDON, April 6. | vt] palaplandngrapia ai 3. | Zreech ipa s had ace ; rye, Deane 70 ‘aecept any ‘of should be at lea it ere eae. Ge
the Latante shooting incident in-| Professor Joliot Curie, Com- | “NO PROGRESS j 7 et ANE pat dle Bay "Net 4 “dedied that the Indic servers to correspond h th
volving the Trinidad Police, this munist-French expert in atomic PARIS, April 6 aged ny re 4 ruene vt i da eehty Os 1 os 1a tee ne ‘7 yng fe fh Raropes, Me sae
is now adjourned sine die pending or the eine ante jist oF winners | A western spokesman reported | iiattan conditions ite rt uit ible | arrangements regarding their Nehru dec bated, as repe atedly 3
the arrival of Trinidad witnesses. |°f the Stalin International Peace | « rogress” after a four-hour) ¢or ; oT scide their sit. He said th idian Gover e ented to the French Gov * ~cyi
"Hon. A, P. 'T. James, a Trinidad|Awards announced today. Moscow |meetine of Foreign Ministers| political tusure “°° Eiht hed nereeh teen ear tepregented to the French Gow. {T'S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS
legisl ing here gives ajradio reported. Dr, Hewlett John- | Deput today, their 24th. He] ~ dum on French possessions in| take place unless political prisor
dinner tonigt hotel for Gairy;son, “the Red Dean” of C | added ) new proposals were; ‘The Indian Government's repre- India should be supervised by ‘ in French settlements in India
and the and Mentaijwas another of the prize | submitte for the Foreign Minis- ations in regard fo these ob- team of observer appointed ‘| been released.” aw 1
Wavieown’ ty] ebeaia the report said.—Reuter rand owes neler sara are nok arconted [ihe Pre nt of the Internation ewse Ache iets ab tna Sa









Carub Calling

ON, MRS, EVELYN BERTIN
acegsmpanied by Mrs, Hilda
Melville ‘arrived from B.G. yes-

terday afternoon by B,W.I.A.
Here for about a month’s holiday
they ave. staying with Mrs.

Clarice Gomes at “Glenroy” St.
Lawrence,

Mrs, Bertin is the daughter .of
the late Lord Mowbray. She met
Mrs. Melville several years ago
in France. Mrs, Bertin’s husband
who served in the Royal Navy
was killed in the last war.

Mrs. Bertin’s home is at pres-
ent in Bermuda, but for the past
two yeats she has been travelling
around. «the world, When she
leaves Rarbados she will return to
B.G. before going to Europe.

With Demerara Bauxite
RRIVING from B.G. yester-
AXday by B.W.I.A. were Mr.
and Mrs. F. Kreller and their two
children Bobby and Judy. Mr
Kreller is with the Demerara
Bauxite Co., in MacKenzie.
Here for two weeks, they
staying at the St
Hotel. ..

BW.1.A. Director
ON. 8. A. CUKE who attend-
ed & meeting of the Directors
of B.W.1,A. in Trinidad, return-
ed yesterday afternoon by
B.W.I1.A.
General Manager
R, AND MRS. WILLIAM W.
GARDINER arrived from
Trinidad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.I.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday, staying at the Casuarina
Club. Accompanying them over
were Mrs. Grace Mansfield and
her son Stephen.

Mr. Gardiner is General Man-
ager of Trinidad Bakeries Ltd.,
Port-of-Spain.

Retired Building Contractoi
R. AND MRS. GEORGE
WINKLER arrived from
Trinidad .yesterday afternoon by

are
Lawrence

B.W.I.A. to spend a holiday in
Barbados. They live in Los
Angeles, California, Mr, Winkler

is a retired building contractor.

During their stay in Barbados
they will be the guests of Mr.
Larry Van Dusen at “Little Barn”,
Pine Hill,

Barbados Holiday

RS. PIERRE QUESNEL and

three children arrived from
Trinidad.yesterday by B.W.I.A,
accompanied by Mrs. Quesnel’s
mother, Mrs. Lucille Dear. The
Quesnels are here for a holiday
and are staying with Miss Spencer
of “Dunloe” Collymore Rock,

Mr. Quesnel who is with For-

rest Park Estate, which is near
Pointe a Pierre. was unable to
come over for the holiday as the
estate is in the middle of crop.

HE man chosen by the Dorset

Coast Erosion and General
Purposes Committee to carry out
sleeping tests in a brimless bowler
is level-headed, dynamic, thick-
cheeked “Vincent Fumbling, of
Clayshott Farm, Hengstone-Ham-
berley.

Mr, Fumbling, aged thirty-nine
two years.ago next February, said:
“I expect they chose me because
I used torsleep in a bowler hat
out of sheer devilry. But it had a
brim all right,” he added, laugh-
ingly. In order to get used to the
brimless bowler, Mr. Fumbling is
wearing it at meals for a few days.
His sister, Mrs. Rout, said yester-
“He forgets himself, and
raises his hat when visitors come
into the room. And he has sprained
his ‘thumb trying to get his hand
under the crown to raise the hat.
There’s no doubt it’s easier to have
a brim to catch hold of. But that
would be cheating.”

The Party System

HE first plank in the Tory

policy being to keep the
Socialists in the House until they
sre loo sleepy to know what is
suing on, the counter-plan to the
Socialist attempt to close the bar
at 10 p.m, will be to block all the
exits with hats, overcoats and other
oddments. The Socialists will then
disguise themselves as Tories, and
slip out unobserved through gaps
in the clothing. The Tories will
then disguise themselves as Social-
ists, pretend to be asleep, and sud-
denly leap up to vote on the Tory
side, Democracy is all the rage.

The Orfl Plan

N connection with the Orfl Traffic

Scheme a Pedestrians’ Univer.
sity is to be opened in Clerken-
well. There the student will be
told, with the aid of diagrams and
graphs, how to cross a street. A
recording cf motor-horns and roar-
ing vehicles will be played, lichts



ee ee

ADVENTURES










“ Yes, it’s still pouring—
looks as if I'll never get
out of here.”



Indefinite Holiday
R. ALFRED HUBERT
STONE, retired B.G. Planter
arrived by B.W.1.A.’s B.G., flight
yesterday afternoon to spend an
indefinite holiday in Barbados.
He is staying with Mr. J. C

Roberts of Government Hill.

Joirs Family
R, J. D. H. PHILLIPS who

is with “Bath” Estate in
Berbice B.G., arrived from B.G.,
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.

to join his wife and two daughters
who are already in Barbados.
They have been here — since
March 16.

Back From B.G.
RS. J. BERNSTEIN who had
been in B.G., on a visit re-
turned yesterday afternoon | by
B.W.I.A.

Short Visit
R. INGHAM GORING who
was in B.G., on a_ week’s
visit returned yesterday by
B.W.LA.

Long Leave

R. BEN KING who is with

Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., in
Pointe-a-Pierre returned to Trini-
dad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1LA., after spending his long
leave in Barbados staying with
Mr, and Mrs. R. M. Croney of
Fontabelle. He had been here
since January.

Special Representative
M*. HAROLD BISHOP, Spev-
ial Representative of the
yulf Oil Corpn., arrived from the
U.S. on Thursday via Puerto
Rico by B.W.1.A. He is a guest
at the Ocean View Hotel.

Grenada Merchant
R, AND MRS ROBERT
PROUDFOOT and their four
daughters, Kathlene, Jeanette,
Henena and Valerie arrived from
Grenada on Thursday by B.W.LA.
to spend one month’s holiday in
Barbados, They are staying with
the Atkinsons at “Sea Queen”
Hastings. Mr, Proudfoot is a
merchant in Grenada,
They haye three other children,
all boys who are at present in
Grenada,

Aftended Brother’s

Wedding

R. HAROLD MARSHALL
M returned yesterday afternoon
by B.W.1.A., from Trinidad. He
was on two weeks’ holiday. Dur-
ing his stay in Trinidad, he
attended his brother’s (Cuthbert)
wedding.

Chemical Engineer
M* AND Mrs, J. R. Taylor came

in on B.W.1.A’s Trinidad

flight yesterday afternoon. Here
for a short holiday they are stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel. Mr,
Taylor is a Chemical Engineer
with Stuart Bros., in Montreal.

T.C.A. Flights

EDNESDAY, APRIL 11, wil!

be the last T.C.A, mid-
week schedule, This schedule was
in operation during the peak of
the tourist season, Their regular
Saturday flight will continue to
operate until May 5. Starting, May
10, T.C.A’s weekly flight wil!
operate through Barbados every
Thursday instead of Saturday, and,
also starting May 10, flight 600, the
southbound trip will arrive at Sea
well at 5.10 a.m., leaving for Trini-
dad at 5.40 a.m., and flight 601
will arrive at Seawell from Trini-
dad at 9.45 a.m., leaving for
Canada via Bermuda at 10.30
a.m,

Dentist

D*® WILLIAM STANLEY
LYON, Venezuelan born den-
tist who lives in Trinidad arrived
yesterday afternoon by B.W.I1.A.,
from Trinidad to spend three
weeks’ holiday in Barbados, He is
staying at Ashton-on-Sea, Max~
wells.
Trinidad Arrivals

ISS PAM McLEAN_ was
~ among the passengers arriv—
ing from ‘Trinidad yesterday
afternoon by B.W.I.A. She plans
to spend a little over two weeks’
holiday here, staying at Sea Gays,
Maxwells,

Arriving by the same plane was
Mrs, Stella A, Fernandez who has
ccme over to spend an indefinite
holiday with Mrs. Miller at “Win-
chester”, Hastings.



BY THE WAY...

will flash, brakes will grind, and
each student will be given ten
seconds to run from one _island-
ramp to the next. Before crossing
a street the pedestrian will have
to convince the Crossing Warden
that he has a good reason for not
staying where he is, that his
crossing-record ig a good one, that
there have been no accidents in
his family, that he will not attempt
to re-cross on the same day, and
that he will not take with him to
the other side of the street any
vnauthorised pedestrian, or one
‘who has not passed the tests and

been awarded his diploma,
False Start

ROFESSOR GRAHAM STUD-
MOLE, writing in the Hatters’
Argus, says: “Anybody can lay his
head, encased in a brimless bowler,



On a very cold morning in mide
winter Rupert notices that one of
the windows is covered with frost
patterns. After gazing at them for
a while he fetches his pencil and
sketchbook and begins trying to
draw them. ‘How strange they
are,"" he murmurs. ‘ That big one

By BEACHCOMBER

ona pillow. The test comes when.
during sleep, the head is moved.
A hat with a brim would either
fall off, or wake the wearer by
tilting over his eyes, or sticking
into his cheek, What will happen
to a brimless bowler depends on a
number of things,” What did
happen we now. know. Mr.
Fumbling got into bed yesterday
at 11.43. He placed his head
gently on the pillow. The hat, in-
securely donned, slipped for-
ward, and a jagged edge, where
the brim had been removed too

carelessly, cut his nose. The ex-
periment was postponed while
first-aid was applied by Dr.

Reculver, of Linlithgow, The last
ragged edges of brim were skil-

fully removed by the electric
scissors of the foreman hat-
moulder of Messrs. Towell and
Darkleigh,

upert and the Ice

-flower—1

U

is just like a sort of ice-flower. [
wonder how Jack Frost thinks of

such lovely designs."’ Just as he
moves to the table to do his draw-
ing more carefully Mrs, Bear opens
the door. ‘Will you do some

shopping for me, please, Rupert ?"”
she says.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ?; :

OF







PIPA



Coorraht P 2. Var Dias tat Amsterdam



BREBRBEHBEEBEERERESBSBEBHE ES DB

for Young Men

GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS

Double-Seated. Free Repair patch

mg !ROPICAL SUITINGS
Including Pin-Stripes

a
99 343 4.39
2 > 3 > 4 ?

DIAL 4606

4:90, 4.99. ya.

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOF STORE

& Youths ONLY g

PER PAIR

6.18"

WAIST 27%” to 30” @

i
|
|
|
|

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DIAL 4220

|
|

i

|

The attached picture by John French,
ed as three of this year’s topline fashion models in London.

BARBADOS

TOP LEFT: JOAN BURGESS, BELOW ; PATRICIA GODDARD.

Shorts From Everywhere

TRANSPARENT shoes of plastic
which make onlookers believe the
lady is not wearing any are Fifth-
avenue’s newest vanity for Easter.

notices greet

SHOW BUSI



SS:
“Gramercy



Glowing
Ghost”

and its star, but they are from
provincial critics, The play and its

leading lady Sarah Churchill must



2. What two elghts turn
8. Sleeved

1
3.
eer et, 4.
5.
6.

y
1
2. Now this doesn’t exist.
5
6.
8

CROSSWORD .

Across
out to
(7)

robe of

Sieeve a bishop and
you can see him tn if. (6)

. Clue number. (4)

. Island bale. (4) .
. Some may be maidens, a
4)

. In all burning buildings. (3)

. Military headgear, (5)

. Common, pungent smeiing

herb. (6)

. Memorial initials, (3)
+ Dawn. (6)
3. Forcible extractions, (9)

Down

. Good plan to read over a menu.
(8) B 2. Decidedly shaky. (7)

. Diana embraces nim, (3)
Lexicon. (9) "

. Often biown to flames, (5)

. Almost the word you want. (6)

. You won't solve this unless you
have. (5)

. This ts of the brain. (8)

shutter and it won't

be taken. (4) s
. Such a pod is a crustacean, (0)
1. Rase in different shape, (4)
. Heart of a swoon. (3)
. The twin of 15 Across, (3)

utio: yesterday's puanle,—Across:
Solution of teerrow: 9, Sit; 10, Orion

Noon, 16 Notary:
fa; 22

7.
8.
3. Close the
4
7
9.
0

12, Shah: 14
pd: @0, Ewer:
Down:
nger: 3. Orison: 4
e, 6, Digamy

4, Node: 15 and 2
& Ark: 19 Odd

GLOBE



TODAY 5 & 8.30 & Continuing

ce

t

) OFAG

Lei



HE HELD A LOADED






REAT CITY!

Brought Thrillingly
To Life By The

starring RICHARD BASEHART
SCOTT “CANON CITY” BRADY
with Roy Roberts * Whit Bissell * James Cardwell
Jack Webb * Produced by Robert T. Kane
Directed by
C. Biggins and
by Horry E

Crone Wilbur * Additional dielogue
ex Origine! story by Crone, Wilbur
A Bryen Foy Production

An EAGLE LION FILMS Presentation



|

| GUN AT THE HEART /

Alfred Werker* Screenplay by John



| fore retiring to the 18 berths.

ADVOCATE

SATURDAY, APRIL 7,







iP aad

RIGHT : AUDREY WHITE,

the famous photographer, shows three girls who have been select-
—London Express Service.

|B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY, APniL 7, 1951.

still pass the scrutiny of Broad-
way’s austere and often morose
critics.

BRITANNIA rules the video



fe 6.30 a.m.—12.15 9.m, 19.60 M.
waves with Bea and Rex says a aloe siphhieinees incur Snionsoetnechresialaih
headline in the newspaper 6.30 am. Forces Favourite; 7 a.m

pap Worle The News; 7.10 a.m. News Analysis;

Telegram. It refers to a review of
a TV appearance by Beatrice Lillie
and Rex Harrison,

But the rent control chief an-
nounces that if a renter applies for
an H aerial on the roof to bring
in Bea and Rex, the landlord can
raise the rent two dollars (14s.) a
month,

“THE LOST WEEK-END,” you

7.15 a.m. From The Editorials; 7.25 a.m,
Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m. From the
Third Programme; 8 a.m, Montmartre
Players; 8.15 a.m. Composers of the
Week; 8.30 a.m. Elton Hayes; 8,45 a.m,
Colonial Questions 9 a.m. The News;
9.10 am Home News from Britain; 9.15
a.m. Close Down; 11 a.m. The Grand
Nation l; 11.30 a.m, Programme Parade;
11.40 a.m. Interlude; 11.45 a.m. Band!
Stand; 12 noon The News; 12.10 News
Analysis; 12.15 C.pse Oown.

4.15—6.00 p.m. 19.76 M.





remember, was a film of an alco-|~ 415 p.m. Listeners Choice; oem
holic’s »s -e ode The Grand National; 5.15 p.m. B.B.C.
Se Were ene. Today Scottish Variety Orchestra; 6 p.m.

Charles Jackson, author of “The
Lost Week-end”, was fined £26 in
Vermont District Court. Charge—
drunken driving.

DREAMLAND Ez:PRESSES start
flying to London next month. Until
now, airliners have had berths plus

Music for Dancing.
6,007.15 p.m.

25.64; 31.32; 48.43 M.







6.45 p.m, Programme Parade; 7 pms
The News; 7.10 p.m. News Ana ysis;
7.15 p.m. Behind The News,
7.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 M.

7.45 p.m,

& 48.43 M,



e Gra National; 8 p.m.
8.15 pm. Royal En-



seats. Passengers on the extra- reer See 8,20 p.m. Invitation to a}
fare all-sleeper plane will have a : 9.45 p.m, Songs by Dupare; 10
dinner with free cock- The New 1010 p.m. From ie

gourmet ,
tails, champagne and liqueurs, be- |






pm. Take it from Here;

Editorials; 10.1 Il pm. |

10 45 p.m. Yours Faithfully;
Southern Serenade Orchestra.

“CHINA DOLL” Mathill Street.

SHRIMPS ON THE MENU
Dial 4730 for Reservations



— oo

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE; TODAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT to SUNDAY NIGHT at 8.30
LORETTA YOUNG, CELESTE HOLM

in “COME TO THE STABLE”

with HUGH MARLOWE, BAS LANCHRSTER, THOMAS GOMEZ
r
ais Suake 7 a ‘Story by the well-known



A Heart-warming Picture based upon
Author; Clare Boothe Luce







—














To-night

visit



MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food




Music, Dancing
Entertainment



throughout the night

Dial 4000 for reservations





BEING RECEIVED



NOW

PORTLAND CEMENT





‘



IN 94 1b. PAPER BAGS.

‘ OBTAIN. YOUR REQUIREMENTS FROM
OUR PLANTATION SUPPLIES

DEPARTMENT
TEL. NO. 4657



THE KRARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LTD. |
ESRD




















“WHERE DANGER LIVES” with Faith Domergue






Robert Mitchum in

Coming Soon:—



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

4.45 & 8.30 p.m. and Contiruing till MONDAY 4.45 & 8. p.m

TODAY
Film Classics Inc. Presents—

“The PIRATES of CAPRI”





with Louis HAYWARD, Binnie BARNES, Mariella LOTTI, “Alan CURTIS
EXTRA: THE RHUMBA SHORT TROPICAL TOPICS
TODAY 9.30 am. & 1.30 p.m. (Two New Pictures

Boris KAPLOFF (as Mr. WONG) in WONG IN CHINATOWN
- (A New Chinese Detective Mystery)
— and —

The CISCO KID in

PLAZA) DIAL
OISTIN 8404

TODAY & TOMORROW 5 and
8.30 p.m. (Warner)

JAMES CAGNEY in

“ST. LOUIS KID"
with
Patricia ELLIS, Alen JINKENS

MIDNITE TONITE (RKO)
TIM HOLT in (Both)

“UNDER THE TONTO RIM” and
GUN SMUGGLERS



EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30. .
& Continuing

J. Arthur Rank presents . .
Fredric MARCH in

“ CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS.”

Color by Technicolor
Co-starring

Florence ELDRIDGE
Francis L. SULLIVAN &
Linden TRAVERS

ROXY

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30. .
& Continuing

J. Arthur Rank presents. .
Fredric MARCH in

** CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS ”

Color by Technicolor



Co-starring

Florence ELDRIDGE
Francis L. SULLIVAN &
Linden TRAVERS





PLAZ

Watch For:—‘NOT WANTED” It's a

BARBADOS

RIDING THE CALIFORNIA TRAIL
with GILBERT ROLAND





TO-DAY -
and Continuing to Monday at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

LOUIS HAYWARD ARINMHVE BARNES ALAM CORTE - mal. ASOT - eNQOUPY STD

ATA eat C Preecnen Pete ty TOR PRBLD Sn. ty CDGM HLM cae Tn cst Pate sneer FICK CLAS STES, INE,

Extra Special: ihe Short “TROPICAL Tories’

and latest “WORLD NEWS”



‘Se RINEYS Of cocet

eacoucee » wraserte at
a

1951


























GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James

TCDAY & TOMORROW 8.30 p.m.
Mat. Sun, 5 p.m
Paramount Presents . . .
“THE LAWLESS"
with
McDonald CAREY—Gail RUSSELL
John SAND and other,
——S
MIDNITE TONITE (RKO)
“CODE OF THE WEST"
with Robert MITCHUM and
WILD HORSE MESA
with TIM HOLT



ROYAL

TO-DAY to SUNDAY
4.30 and 8.30

Universal Double .
John HALL &
Maria MONTEZ

in
“WINTE SAVAGE”
AND
“THE WICKED
LADY”
with

James MASON &
Margaret LOCKWOOD

‘OLYMPIC
LAST TWO SHOWS

TO-DAY 4,30 and 8.15

ist Inst. Republic Serial .
Richard WEBB &
Aline TOWNE
in
“THE INVISIBLE
MONSTER ”

Along with the picture...
“Whispering Footsteps’

Starring

John HUBBARD &
Rita QUIGLEY

4.45 & 8.30 P.M.




















in torn



v








habet WALCO

erstisn 6408 mevease

I’TOWN DIAL 2310
THE MOST POPULAR CINEMA
IN TOWN!

is ia cient cestiaineciaiie:

Big syjoUy—suleYy WA rd “eo BEMOL SLINM FHL

uovg end samog

Thriller!

OWN PICTURE

Under the Distinguished Patronage of .His Excellency
the Governor and Lady Savage

YOU'VE. BEEN










| P PAA
% COLOR
os anaes ve
Paar






By



Directed by DA

J ARTHUR RANK presents

FREDRIC MARCH
ouuMBn.

vw J -.-He lived the Greatest ff
j Adventure of them all! (



WAITING FOR...






ee ae, L.
ELDRIDGE - SULLIVAN
Linden Kathleen
TRAVERS - RYAN
and DEREK BON D with
p> James Robertson JUSTICE

=

Felix AYLMER

VID MACDONALD + Produced b RANK BUN
aA Sydney Box Production for Gainsborough + Released bo He RANE SUNDY

Released by Universal-International

You Saw them Film Scenes for Christopher Columbus Here /

Now

NOW

EMPIRE

See

the

SHOWING

Completed Picture.

AT BOTH

& ROXY

THEATRES.







SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1951

Ch. Ch. Nurses International Trade To
Strengthen The Free World

The United States and the democratic

Need Bigger
Quarters

Quarters are inadequate for the
number of Nurses in Christ Chureh
aceording to the report of the
Churchwarden.

The building needs washing and
painting, “I strongly recommend”,
says the Churchwarden, “that the
Nurses be given a small outside
kitehen which could be erected at
no great cost. At present the
Nurses do their cooking in their
rooms. This is neither safe nor
hygienic.

.D. Clinie—No funds were
granted for this building. but 4
small sum was diverted from the
Almshouse grant to do minor re-
pairs and lime washing.

Vestry er grant .
cated for this building was Ls *

quate, but again I diverted funds
— = Almshouse to distemper

e walls and paint the ceiling.
hoods, etc.

Matron’s Quarters —There was
no grant for this and nething was
spent. To have done any repairs
of a small nature would have been
a waste of money. The time has
come when some decision should
be arrived at as to what is to be
done with this building. At present
its condition beggars description,

Parish Church—This is in
condition and should be kept so.
The walls are in deplorable condi-
tion and money should be granted
to put them in order. With the con-
sent of the Commissioners of High-
ways, the Yard and Road be
the Church and School were ré-
conditioned and colassed, e
dangerous corner caused by thi
Church wall was “rounded off”
These improvements were done
from Highway funds.

Rectory.—Little was done to this.

It is sadly in need of renovation
and unless steps are taken to do
this at once I fear that the cost
will be excessive, I recommend
that a loan be raised for this pur-
pose.
_ St. David's Chureh,—Washed
inside and outside with lime wash,
Painted, and minor repairs done.
The Church is im good order,

St. David's Vicarage—A few
repairs were done, but repairs are
urgently needed, and painting is a
necessity to save the building.

St. Bartholomew's Church —
Only minor repairs were done to
the roof. It is imperative that this
galvanised roof be painted and
kept painted as it is subject to the
effects of the salt air. It may yet
be saved for some years if speedy
measures are taken,

St. Matthias Vicarage—aA grant
of £100 was given the Churen
Committee and this was spent on
washing and paint, the difference

in cost being paid by the Church-

Committee itself.

“IT want to express my thanks”
concludes the Churchwarden, “to
the entire Parochial Staff for their
help and co-operation throughout
the Parochial year, The Matron,
erees pas ees Law Inspector
have render their services. un=
sparingly, and I want to place on
record my appreciation of their
co-operation. The Storekeeper has
always been of inestimable value
by turning his hand to aid in any
task. The Medical Officers huve
been thorough in their work and
have given freely of their time,
to the service of the poor of the
parish,

Representations have been made
by the Nursing Staff for an in-
crease in their salaries, I recom-
mend that an incremental basts be
adopted, as is done in Gavernment.



CANE FIRE

A quarter of an acre of ripe
first crop canes the property of
Louis Boyce of St, Blizabeth
Village, St. Joseph, was burnt
about 2 p.m, yesterday. Neigh
bours helped to put out the fire

and prevented Boyce’s house from
catching afire.

are more
tenan

countries of Europe are constantly seek

iuternational trade as an economic bulwark against hostile ideologies.

By F. PRESTON FORHES

THE health of the international
Soeteoa thal ee at ae a the
tates prime impor-
tance to our national security. As
we and the other nations of the
free world mobjlize our military
strong and gear economies
for e potential defense of the
democratic way of life, it is essen-
tial that the els of trade be
utilised to their maximum capa-
ee = the supply S =
neede milit: production .
fo do 99 would We to Waste
a valuable asset ef the American
productive system.

It is equally true, moreover,
ot maintenance of high levels
of multilateral trade contributes
so directly to the economic stabil-
ity of all the nations of the free
world that any substantial falling
off in this commeree would weak
en one of the psychological foun-
dations of our security. One of
the strongest forces supporting
the democratic philosophy is the
material demonstration that peo-
ples living by it are physically

good more comfortable and are re-

warded more fully for their
labours than is possible under
other political economic systems.

International trade is not only
the way in which wane people =
ion earn their living—il

ie ine way in gg the os
ef mest peo e
worth the earning. merican
goods sold to customers in other

parts of the were not only aoe
cerned wages for na 's
labour and profits for its business-
men, but they also have supplied
the needs and raised the material
prosperity of the people to whom
they were sent, At the same time
the purchase by the United States
of goods and services from other
nations has increased their pros-
perity of and has s' ed Ameri-
ean economy with many of the
essentials for its productive sys-

Faced as the nations of the free
world now are with the necessity
of placing greater emphasis on
the military aspects of their eco-
nomic activity, it is fortunate that
there exist ‘well-functioning in-
ternational trading channels to
supply the expanded needs for
the specialized goods required in
this type of production.

Imported goods are an impor-
tant ingredient of prosperity for
severd? reasons. Taking European
countries as an example, the sales
volume which American indus-
tries enjoy in the European mar-
kets is of — sagen sence © —

fitable functioning of the ec

ESinle ale of the United States,
The effects of lower unit costs
significant for the main—

ee of business volume in the
United States than can be mea-
sured directly in terms of the
dollars earned from sales to Euro-
pean costumers. But the benefits

of. contin

those users ean continue to earn
the dollars to pay for their pur-
chases by selling their wares to

United States in return. From
ihe standpoint, therefore, the
United States strengthens its
national prosperity when it buys
from European customers the
goods which they offer.

The progress of the United
States in balancing its interna-
tional accounts has been due in
part to the lessening of its export
volume. The sales decline was to
be expected ue increasingly
effective habilita on of Europe
reduced the extraordinary de-
mands for both consumer goods
and capital e nent which had
been created wartime destruc-
tion and dislocation. Since indus-

ial economies traditionally have
teen the best “customers, it is
reasonable to expect that Europe’s
normal demand for American
products may increase as its eco-
nomic health improves.

A MORE

GLAMOROUS

Society's most

YOU!

beautiful women

From Foreign Commerce Weekly




ARTIE'S HEAOLIN

Hes





“Can’t | have tate night
sittings just like M.P.s?”

European sales to the United
States have increased steadily.
Productive capacity has been
more effectively utilized, permit-
ting European goods to be offered
in world markets in greater
variety and volume. While Euro-—
pean producers have had more
and better things to sell, this
favourable position alone would
not have forged the gains which
have been made. Marketing chan-
vels have been strengthened and
diversified. Wider and more
effective contact has been made
between European sellers and
American businessmen who now,
in increasing numbers, are hand-
ling the European goods de—
manded by the American market.

This progress has been particu-
larly encouraging because it is
almost entirely the achievement
of private enterprise. On both
sides of the Atlantic, individual
producers and traders have sought
business energetically and have
been increasingly successful in
meeting the needs of the market.
The role of the U.S. Government,
both abroad and at home, has
been to foster trade by supplying
traders with information; to en-
courage commerce by removing
obstacles in the path of trade, and
generally to perform those ser-
viees which the trading commun-
ity can best render to itself
through a public agency. This
role for government is a charac-
teristic of a free society, and its
effectiveness even in troubled
times is a demonstration of the
virility of the democratic com-
mercial system.

The first step forward was the
widening awareness among the
American people that hospitality
to imported goods was in their
own. self-interest, This develop-
ment in thinking came, not from
altruism, but rather because the
economic facts of 1950 have been
persuasive to the conclusion that
national prosperity and economic
strength are intimately bound to
the prosperity and strength of the
trading world. The facts of 1950
are continuing every day to con-
vince citizens of the United States
that the strength of private com-—
merce and the standard of living
which it creates are dependent
upon a progressive expansion of
production and trade, The con-
cept of business volume as a
limited amount of activity in
which one man’s share is obtained
only at the expense of another
man’s loss has been demonstrated
to be false. .

But this change in thinking, ax
well as the greater availability of
goods, merely provided the cli-
mate. The growth in trade has
been realized through the efforts

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ene
Citizens Replan

ry 7 ‘ve

heir City
PHILADELPHIA
than 2,000,000 resi-
gents of this third largest city of
The United States — even school
children—are having opportunity
to. voice opinions on city planning
end replanning.
So successful have been the
orts of the Citizens’ Council on

Planning and allied groups in

oving the metropolitan area
om the term “Philadelphia ap-

ch” has come to have a definite
meaning to all city planners

The Citizens’ Council, which re-

eeives support from Community
Chest funds as a nonprofit, non-
partisan organization, faces with
realism q major problem that
troubles many cities. Philadelphiz
has in the last 25 years grown sc
rapidly and its citizens have been
So occupied with commercial and
industrial expansion that general
etvic development has been
neglected.

Now the Citizens’ Council, repre-
Senting 140 labour, business,
church, welfare and civic organ-

The

more

ing better means to foster and strengthen

J ii
of the individual trader, and has

developed from a multitude of
transactions, some of them quite
small, which in total are a signi-
ficant contribution to the national
economy. European and other
imported goods were offered for
sale in places throughout the
United States in 1950 where they
had been unknown before, and in
established import markets, the
variety and quantity cf imported
foods increased,

The importance of all of this acti-
vity is enhan¢éed by the considera-
tions which have persuaded the
United States and the rest of the
free world to direct their econo
mics along the lines of democratic’

defense, A firmer commercia} inte. izations, is sparking individual
gration of the trading world is a imerest and channeling public
vital component of its military and support of the City Planning Com-
moral defense. The more effe.. mission, the Re-Developmeni

tively private business both in the
United States and in other natioas
provides efficient channels for the
interchange of goods and services
the more real will be economic and
military security for all. The in-
dustrial might of the United States
supplemented — by the specia-
lised knowledge and skills of
Europe and the other industrializ-
ed nations of the world, can and
will produce a military potential
even superior to the prodigious
achievement of World War II.
Perhaps equally important, the
strengthening of commercial ties
among democratic peoples on the
consequent raising of ving
standards and improvement in
material well-being will be an Whole community,”
important bulwark against the Parents caught the enthusiasm
moral attacks of ideologies hostile Of their children and began to
to the concepts of a free world, realize that something could be
, ; done about undesirable conditions
Europe’s role in the economic that for too long had been ac-
strengthening of the free world— cepted as permanent,

Athority, and the Philadelphic
Housing Association in projects
ranging from backyard gardening
w highways extensions.

With the co-operation of the
schools, these organizations took
neighbourhood problems int
classrooms, There, with maps anc
models, pupils studied ways to
make their blocks more attractive
and to provide the air and space
needed to make life pleasanter.

After struggling with the prob-
lems of dirty alleys, rubble heaps
dangerous traffic, and run-down
homes, one youngster exclaimed

“You know, I don’t think the
average citizen ever really sees hi:

both in the supply of Not only were they asked to fac
military material and in the i y i , “
coke na Geiation oe the financial problems involved

but they were invited to participat,
personally in neigbourhood im
provement planning, All were
urged to voice opinions, study the
master plan for the city, and be-
come familiar with proposals for
bond issues so that they might
vote as informed citizens

So encouraging was the response
of citizens that the goal for 195!
has been supplemented with a plar
calling for the expenditure of
$537,298,000 during the next six
years,

From far and near person:
interested in city planning come
to look at the “Philadelphia ap-
proach.” Within the last year, lf
persons from Germany viewec
projects undertaken or completec
and studied future plans, Visitor:
also came from Australia, Switzer-
Jand, Sweden, Turkey, India, New
Zealand, England, Japan and the
Philippines.

Democracy, the visitors learned
is the keystone of the “Philadelphi;
approach”, For they noted thes«
statements of belief by the Citizens
Council:

“We believe the citizens wan
Philadelphia to have a planned
growth rather than a haphazard,
piecemeal growth.

“We believe that all Philadel-
phians should have the opportunity
to take part in planning for that
future, a right to know the cost
and a right to say how the money
shall be raised, and how it shall

civilian goods—will be that of the
specialist, simce the character of
that continent’s productive capac-
ity and of its social structure fits
it for this type of activity. As
part of their services in support
of the sound expansion of private-
ly operated trade, the governments
of Western European nations con-
tinue to work in co-operation
with the government of tho
United States through such
channels as the technical assis-
tance programmes, under which
groups of European businessmen
are enabled to visit the United
States to improve their knowl-
edge of the structure of its indus-
try and trade and, more particu-
larly, to discuss with American
potential buyers the ways in
which European commodities can
best serve the needs of their own
economy,

The goals of expanded multi-
lateral trade and ¢o-operative.
strengthening of the economy of
the free world are not easy of
attainment. They can be reached
however, by continuous and
energetic effort on the part of
producers, traders, shipping in-
terests, bankers, and other seg-
ments of the business public
assisted and supported by govern-
mental services and by co-opera-
tive action by business groups.
The way of achievement will be
a steady progress made up of
many individual efforts, The com-
bined effect may well be pro-



foundly significant in the course be spent.”
of the world’s history for
seneeioom. Rates of Exchange

This article appeared in the Novemoer APREL 6, 1961

Oo
£0, 1950, issue of Foreign Commerce Week- Pa gil
ly, a trade magazine published by the gg 8/10% pr. Bankers de Gaten ‘ne

1.$. Department of Commerce. The

* Demand Drafts 61.75% pr.
writer is Deputy Director of the Inteii- ind Drafts % DI

Sight Drafts 61 6/10% pr.

gence and Services Division, Office of 93 8/10% pr. Cable
International Trade, U.S. Department of 632 3/10% pr. Currency 60 4/10% pr.
Commerce. Coupons 59 7/10% pr





Your money buys more
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4


























PAGE THREE



Recommends Arms
Factories In W.I.

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LO.



i NDON, April 5,

The immediate provision of
small arms factories in the
olonies to help Britain's Re-
armament Programme and pro-
vide jobs for surplus overseas
labour was recommended today
by Mr, Halford W. | Reddish
Chairman of the Rugby Portlanc
Cement Company

He told directors at the Com-

IMPERIAL LEATHER ° LINDEN BLOSSOM *

pany’s annual meeting in Rugby
“If world planning has any prac-
tical meaning outside Bloomsbury
now at this time of rearmament
is when the Government shoul
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Empire as a whole. We in thir
country will need to switch ove:
1alf a million men and women te

BLUE HYACINTH



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ve : " . ing | hess, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles, *,
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oll de A 3 the Sian 2 Help Kidneys tor's Qy 4 | you, so buy your treatment today =
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BUENOS AIRES, April 5.

American airline Panagra turn-
“i Dr. Victor Paz Estenhoro
*resident.al candidate in next
nonth's General Elections in
3olivia off the plane in which he
1oped to fly to Lapaz from
3uenos Aires this morning,

Paz, the leader of the Bolivian
nationalist revolutionary move
ment had been exiled from his
country since the Lapaz populace
in 1946 hanged the then President
Villaroel from a lamp-post.

—Reuter,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield. Sch, Gloria Henrietta
Sch. Adalina, Sch Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Yacht Caribbee,
Sch. Laudalpha, Sch. Gardenia W., Sch
D'Ortae; Sch. Emeline, Sch. Lydia Adina
8 Seh. Wonderful Counsellor, Yacht
Buckaroo, M.V. T. B. Radar, M.V. Biue
Star, M.V Lady Joy, Sch Harriet
Whittaker Sch Enterprise S., Sch
Sunshine R., Seh. Turtle Dove, M.V
Caribbee



ARRIVALS

Sehooner Cyril EB. Smith, 56 tons net,
Capt. Jones, from St. Vincent

Schooner Laudalpha, 60 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, from St. Lucia,

S.S. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 tons
net, Capt, Wallace, from British Guiana
via Trinidad

DEPARTURES

Schooner Blue Nose Mac, 82 tons net,
Capt. McFarlane, for British Guiana

Schooner Mary B. Caroline, 54 tons
net, Capt. Joseph, for Dominica

$.S. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 tons
net, Capt. Wallace, for Canada

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable anc Wireless (West Indies) Lid
‘dvise that they can now eommunicate
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& for St, .N.B,, vbee and $
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DUNIOPILLO

Parcel Mail at 9 a.m
Ordinary Mails at 10 am
April 1951,

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PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS sb ADVOCATE

Printed ty the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown.



Saturday, April 7, 1951



CLEANLINESS

THOSE people who use the streets of
Bridgetown daily are the best judges of the
cleanliness of the City. This is what “one
of the cleanest cities in the West Indies”
looked like between 9.15 a.m. and 9.20 a.m.
yesterday morning. Opposite Plantations
Building on the other side of the road was
a galvanised stuff bin, containing half-a-
grapefruit rind and discarded paper over-
flowing on the pavement. A few feet away
on the same pavement two empty water
coconuts highlighted a pile of rubbish. An
open push cart labelled “Commissioners of
health” was drawn up alongside Lower
Broad Street and a man was emptying
some of the contents of a cardboard box
into the cart while bits and pieces of paper
blew back into the road. Close to the cart
was a drain pipe under which was firmly
embedded an old shoe, half an empty
orange and six inches of paper. In the
road neer the Corner of Baxters Road and
Lower Broad Street a standpipe remains
a relie of an age dead, but not buried.
Across the road the gutters between the
Singer Sewing Machine Co., and the new
De Lima Store were full of litter, and the
gutter outside J. N. Goddard and Sons, was
strewn with pieces of paper.

From gutters in Baxters Road a current
of water was driving down the gutters
which lead along Me Gregor Street to the
sea. There were clusters of flowers, leaves,
and paper being swept down with the
water and a slight smell from matter which
had begun to decompose. One side of Mc
Gregor Street was blocked by vehicles,
including a new refuse collector which
was then being filled. A man was spitting
in the road. Higher up where Mc Gregor
Street reaches the Advertising Department
of the Advocate, two men were playing a
game of warri in the road itself, while an
outdoor barber was setting up his shop in
the same road opposite the Advertising
Department of the Advocate but closer to
Parry Street.

It was a typical morning in Bridgetown
on one of its cleaner days. None of the
refuse in the streets or gutters described
above had anything whatever to do with
hucksters, although in the short distance
between St. Mary’s Chureh and opposite
Charles McEnearney and Co., the pavé-
ments and roads were generously lit-
tered with leaves, mould and other dirt-
makers commonly associated with the
trade of huckstering. It is a grave mistake
for the Commissioners of Health to sup-
pose that the Advocate has any other pur-
pose than the preservation of the good
name of the City of Bridgetown and the
cleanliness of the Island of Barbados
when it gives publicity to what thousands
of Barbadians and visitors to the island
daily see for themselves.

The letter from a Canadian published
in yesterday’s paper complaining of dead
animals and refuse on bathing beaches, is
only one of hundreds of complaints which
this paper receives about Barbadian
beaches. In fact the very day that the
Commissioners of Health were reported as
saying that Bridgetown was one of the
cleanest cities in the West Indies, the
stench from the Paynes Bay Beach caused
by the rotting carcasses and entrails of
sharks was detracting from the solid value
of the St. James coast as a tourist resort.

And the reporter had hardly finished with ~

his report of the meeting of the Commis-
sioners of Health on Thursday, before the
telephone was ringing in this office and a
resident of Hindsbury Road complaining of
the stench caused near his home by smoke
and dead animals.

The public is not ignorant of the difficul-
ties which the island of Barbados must
face in keeping itself clean and preserving
its good name as a tourist resort (which
it is now in real danger of losing if smug-
ness and satisfaction get a foothold here.)
But it insists that those difficulties be tack-
led, not shelved. And this newspaper, true
to its policy of reflecting public opinion on
all matters affecting the good name of this
island will continue to draw attention to
the unnecessary filth and refuse daily to be
seen around Bridgetown and on every
bathing beach of the island which is at all
accessible. Everyone knows the high value
that this newspaper places on tourism as
a major industry, second only to sugar in
its importance to our island economy, and
the cleanliness of Bridgetown and of
the whole island is at the heart of the
matter.

_No one who has travelled at all would
suggest that Bridgetown was as well man-
aged and as clean as the neighbouring capi-
tal of Grenada, St. Georgés, while to speak
of Port-of-Spain and Georgetown in com-
parison with Bridgetown is to display-an
unusual ignorance as to the very use of
the words “clean city.”

“Here is the most convincing explanation of what happens at Communist treason Monday—There is one club in Barbados
trials... believe it to be the true one.”

the trial of the British engineers
from the Metropolitan-Vickers
works, who had been accused o!
sabotaging the Five Year Plan.
After several months in detention
they had appeared in court and
some of them, at least, had made
astonishing confessions.

I remember being taken past the
gtim-looking Lubianka prison, or
rather hurried past it, as my guide
obviously thought it was not 4
plage to linger near. I wondered,
as I gazed at its grey walls, what
processes went on behind them to
obtain such abject admissions of
guilt.

Other trials took place on a
larger scale after I left Russa.

Liquidated

These trials followed an identi-
cal pattern. The defendants vied
with each other in their offor's at
self accusation. Men who had fill-
ed high ‘and prominent positioag
in the State confessed to the most
heinous teachery against the
Soviet fatherland. In spite of their
pleas for Mercy they were con-
victed and subsequently “liquida-
ted.”

Western observers were bewil-
dered by these extraordinary con-
fessions and sought in vain to ex-
plain them. My,,parliamentary col-
league, Brigadier Fitzroy Mac-
}lean, who was present at the trial
}of Bukharin and others, supposed
that torture had been employed.
By some it was believed that drugs
had been used, But the prisoners
always seemed in good health; and
although in many instances they
repeated their stories like actors
playing their parts, on the whole
they appeared self-possessed, How
could one account for it?

In 1940 Mr. Arthur Koestler
published his famous book, Dark~
ness At Noon, which contained a
brilliant but hypothetical expla-
nation. His view qwas that a Com-
munist on trialâ„¢-would confess
to any crime against the State be-
cause he would realise that his
confession even though substan-
tially false, was the only way left
to him in which he could advance
the cause of Communism,

In other words, to abandon be-
lief in Communism after a life-
time as a revolutionary was psy-
chologically impossible. Thus with
the broken men of the opposition
recantation had become a kind of
ritual habit and accepted routine.

Guilty Pleas

But this explanation seems to
be but partially true.

It cannot have applied to the

Between the two wars I paid a
visit to Moscow. It was just after

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Why Do They Confess?

Metropolitan - Vickers engineers
nor to other non-Communists, such
as Cardinal Mindszenty or the 16
Polish leaders who were carried
oif to Moscow in 1945 and charged
with sabotaging the Soviet war ef-
fort in Poland.

Fifteen of these Poles pleaded
guilty at their trial. The sixteenth,
Mr. Z, Stypulkowski,* unlike his
companions, refused to confess in
prison. On the contrary, he in-
sisted on pleading Not Guilty in
court. What is even more surpris-
ing he has survived to tell the re-
markable tale of his experiences
in the Lubianka prison.

He is almost the only living wit-
ness who, although publicly ac-
cased before the Supreme Court
of the U.S.S.R., has been able to
put on record the truth about the
Soviet methods of breaking down
their victims both physically and
morally.

A barrister and former officer
in the Polish army Mr. Stypul-
kowsky was taken prisoner in 1939,
first by the Reds and later by the
Germans. He later found his way
back to Warsaw where he started
underground activities and became
one of the leaders of the Resis-
tence movement, and in 1944 took
part in the abortive Warsaw rising.

Kidnapped

Early in the following year,
together with 15 other Polish
underground leaders, he was
invited to Moscow to meet Mar—
shal Zhukov, Commander-in-
Chief of the Soviet Forces, to
discuss outstanding problems
concerning Soviet occupied Polish
territory. Instead of being
received as a delegate, he was
kidnapped and thrown into the
Lubianka.

There the NKVD, the dreaded
secret police, did their best to
make him confess to having
plotted against the Soviet Union.

He was not subjected to torture,
but he was the victim of the most
intensive third-degree methods, in
which it -was sought to wear down
his resistance by regulated dis-
comfort. He was dragged from
bed on 70 nights out of 71, and
suffered 141 protracted interroga—
tions.

By sheer force of willpower he
dominated his interrogator, His
harrowing experiences enabled
him to explain the submission of
his 15 colleagues, who were in
reality equally guiltless.

The Price

The prisoner is confined in a
cell under constant surveillance
of a guard, under the harsh glare
of a strong electric light, the prey
of ceaseless anxiety and fears, In

By Montgomery Hyde. M.P.

these surroundings and after
nights of repeated questioning his
sense of values comes blurred
and he is inclin to accept the
idea put into his mind by the
interrogator. This is that his par
amount duty is to recover his
freedom. The price does not seem
unduly high—just his s gnature
on a deposition acknowledging
his traitorous acts against the
Soviet.

Meanwhile his faculties have
become diminished and his reas-
oning powers. corrupted. He,
confuses the true facts with those
suggested to him by his interro-
gator.

Finally, in his determination to
confess everything, he talks about
things which have never hap-
pened. He tries to remember
something he never did, he tries
to remember some action he
never committed just to prove
conclusively that he does not
intend to conceal anything.

After the fortieth interrogation
or so the prisoner’s deposition
usually beginsg ‘Yes, I didn’t
state the truth until now. Now
I will tell everything openly. . .”

A Wreck

By this time the prisoner is a
nervous wreck, Having stated
what is required of him he is
then put on a better diet and
deliberately fattened up for the
public trial. Any attempt on his
part to deviate from his story in
court is countered by the prose--
eutor reminding him sharp!v of
the details of his confession.

Mr. Stypulkowsky was lucky
True he was convicted, but he
received the extremely _ light
sentence of four months, most of
which he had already spent in
jail, so that he was
almost immediately. While the
Soviet authorities were anxious
to discredit the Polish Resistance
movement at that time, they also
desired to keep up the appear-—
ance of harmony with the West
With fifteen pleas of “Guilty”
they could afford a few acquittals
to please their allies.

The story which Mr. Stypul-
kowski has to tell makes fascina—
ting . reading. It is the most
convincing account of Communist
technique in treason trials which
I have read. The reason for this
is_clear. It affords the most
likely explanation of just why
political prisoners under the
Soviet confess to crimes they have
never committed. I believe it to
be the true one.

World Copyright Reserved
.E.S.

released



News From Britain

: LONDON,

The struggle in British politics
seems to have taken yet another
turn, Now it is even less likely
that there will be immediate
elections, or that a government
of Mr. Churchill will replace the
government of Mr, Attlee. Just
after Christmas, as I recorded at

.| the time, the morale of the Gov-

ernment was at a low ebb, Its
supporters talked of defeat. And
the Conservative party was over-
joyed at the prospect of power,
The Conservatives could have
done two things. They could
have waited timidly for the Gov-
ernment to make mistakes, Or
they could attack the Govern-
ment verbally, as much as
possible with the aim of getting
to power quickly. There were
risks in the second course. High
political temperatures cannot be
maintained for very long. If the
Conservatives failed to win their
battle, then they might have
sacrificed the chance of power
this year, On the other hand,
to play a timid political game
does not pay — and it is the
business of an opposition to be
vigorous. So with Mr. Churchill's
leadership and the active “oe
of many new backbench M’Ps,
burning to do battle, the Conser-
vatives decided on an all-out
campaign to bring down the
Government, Latterly the tactics
were to keep the Goverhment up
all night and wear its nerves to
hysteria.

At the moment of writing, the
first round of the battle is over,
and the segond round is about
to begin, Undoubtedly, Labour,
has won the first round on points,
The morale of the government
party has improved. It has been
discovered that the tricks Conger-
vatives think of for maintaining
debates late in the night can be

} countered by other tricks, For
instance, Conservative motions
put down purely for debating
purposes, are supported in a
formal sense by Labour M.P'’s
adding their names to the motions
on the Order Paper, -The Labour
M.P’s then suddenly withdraw
the motion in the middle of the
debate, Or Labour M.P’s desert
the House of Commons; or they
move an adjournment suddenly
when there is “rerreral: uproar.
The..motion is almost unheard
but it passes, and the Sergeant-
at-Arms walks» out with the
Mace. this Parliamentary
fooling is not, helping the Con-
servative Party and would cer-

discredit to the

tainly bring



By David, Templa Roberts

Cpposition if it were carried on
for too long,

But the second round is now
beginning which will be rather
more perilous for the Govern-
ment. The one fixed point in
the Parliamentary year is the
“Budget.” The debates that
follow it approve the Budget
Resolutions and embody them in
the Finance Bill, On most ques-
tions, Mr. Attlee’s Government
has to be defeated twice before
it will fall. The Prime Minister,
even if defeated on a major
question, is quite able to come
back the following day to the
House, and ask for a motion of
confidence in his policies which
would reserve a defeat the fol-
lowing day, But on some stages
of the Finance Bill, this could
not be done and the Government
is in some peril from a_ single
vote. Nevertheless, Mr. Attlee
enters the second round with
some advantage carried over
from the first round, The Con-
servative performance in the
first round lost them the support
of half a dozen fickle Liberals,
When these facts are weighed, I
venture to predict that a Labour
Government’ will come through
the second round and survive the
skirmishes of the summer. It
may not be wise enough, in its
own or the national interest, to
choose a General Election in the
Autumn, It is doubtful whether
the Conservatives’ bid for power
since Christmas has. done them
anything but harm.

Behind this political scene is
a new menace of the Public
Opinion Poll. The Conservatives
would never have attempted an
onslaught on the Government if
there had been no polls to tell

them that inion was running
their way. ow the latest polls
show the pendulum = swinging
back to Labour, It is quite

possible that the whole of the
Conservative lead will disappear
within the next two or ree
months. Will the publication of
these polls cause as much cfass
political stupidity on the Labour
side as it has on the Conserva-
tive? The parties are almost
evenly divided in the House of
Commons, The proper basis for
a-government in such a circum-
stance is a_ kind of_ sceptical
political uncertainty, Until tne
public opinion pollsters came
along, the political leaders could

OUR READERS SAY:

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I should like to. make a

few observations on Mr. John
Shannon’s letter of Thursday
April 5, in which he ‘states :—

“The highlight of the Secre-
tary’s report is that he states the
1950 season was-the best financial

one since 1910, but fails to
mention the fact that both the
1949 and 1950 seasons the
|B.A.F.A, had nothing to do

with the running of the game
other than to make fixtures and
receive 40% of the gate money.
All the donkey work attached to
a football season, being done by
Pickwick Cricket Club under the
terms of the then , exfsting ar-
rangement. Is it any wonder

Football

that the B.A.F.A. doesn’t need
an Auditor for their financial
report. As Mr. Ward aptly puts
it, the simplicity of the figures
could be appretiated.”

If this had come from anyone
else I would have allowed it to
pass for ignoranee of the situation
but from a former Secretary of a
B.A.F.A,. I cannot allow it to go
unchallenged. Can Mr. Shannon
deny the fact that the B.A.F.A.
have never been offered terms
under which they can undertake
this magnificent administration
at Kensington or even rent the
grounds and emulate the excel-
lence of the present machinery.

On the other hand what is the
donkey work there is so much
braying about? Does Mr, Shannon



not estimate how they were doing
from week to» week. They had
to think of policies and their
results — not solely of their own
popularity, Now they have
sort of check on themselves like
the Box Office returns on a film
star’s appeal. I quite expect, by
the middle of Summer, Labour
politicians will be so cock-a-hoop
they will be talking of capital
levies to finance rearmament.

There is of course another view
of the public opinion — polls.
Rightly it can be said that they
cannot be suppressed, and the
politicians must get used to them.
That may be true. But if the
politicians are to get used to them
they will have to cultivate much
calmer heads than they have at
the moment. Mr. Attlee himself
is as much a, politician as the
rest. There is every evidence that
he thinks and plans in terms of
remaining in power, at least for
his own lifetime! Noticeably, he
has remodelled. his government
not with the aim of an election,
but with the aim of carrying on.
The Prime Minister knows an
administrative blunder when he
sees one, and some steps are being
taken to prevent any more of the
sort of blunders on coal and meat
that so nearly defeated the Gov--
ernment in the middle of the
Winter. For once the coal situa-
tion is being examined at the easy
end of the year when the weather
is getting warmer rather than at
the difficult end of the year when
stocks are due to fall and the
weather is getting colder. At last
the Government has decided that
it is better to pay more for some-
thing to eat than exceedingly
little for next to nothing to eat,
The result will certainly be
increased food prices. But the
British farmer is at last being
encouraged to rear more beef and
the generally raised prices will
eventually mean that our over-
seas buyers of will be able
to offer a little above the bargain-
counter prices ‘they have been
trying to find recently. So the
food situation ought to improve
by the end of the year. There Will
probably also be a few changes
in Government posts in order tc
strengthen the appointments tc
the defence services—the ‘Amer-
ican Admiral” blunder ought not
to have happened: But once those
changes are made, I expect the
Government will fasten its seat-
belts and prepare to survive »
rough passage,







i
consider that collecting pennies and
sixpences at a gate or being in
hand to lock people into cages
or let them out.is beyond the intel-
ligence of ordinary human beings
like myself? We are not allowed
but this does not say that we
cannot, With regard to the sim-
plicity of my account for which
I was congratulated by Mr.
D. L. Ward and what Mr
Shannon inferred was hardly
necessary, Mr. Shannon can
easily recall that at some unfor-
gotten periods in the hjstory af
the B.A.F.A., there were not
so simple accounts and in some
ether occasions there were ne
accounts at all.

QO, S, COPPIN,

a! Thursday—I heard a tale which reminded of

Friday—A letter from Grenada confirms what

7, 1951







SATURDAY, APRIL









PENCILS FOR EVERYONE

“NOBODY'S DIARY" |

where ceremony counts for nothing. The
game’s the thing. And the game ranges
from dominoes up to cards. It is played
when there is no rain in the open under the
manchiheel trees and the seats are the sand
or asmall box. Last Saturday there were
more than two dozen men hard at it when
I passed. Nearby there were pig stys, and
empty cans, broken bottles and what have
yous fouled the clean white sand near the
boats but the players were not upset. After
all it’s the game that cotnts.



Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS

STATIONERY STORE











ADVOCATE

EASY ON THE EYE
A BEAUTIFUL SELECTION OF

LAMP SHADES

IN BLUE, ROSE, AMBER, APRICOT, PINK
PEACH, GREEN

Yesterday saw two houses being moved,
both on hand carts. What exactly is the
reason for houses on wheels? And how
often do people move this way in a lifetime,
every year or whenever the rent comes
due?

* * *

Tuesday—Found two bare-necked hens sit-
ting on one another instead of laying eggs.
When I bought a set of expensive Leghorn
eggs 30 cents apiece, the other day, one of
these same bare-necked hens had the
cheek to pretend to be setting and ended
by burying eight eggs, breaking and eating
two and laying one herself just to show
how much she cared. Bare-necked noth-
ing, barefaced brazen hussies I call them,
and if they don’t start laying soon I'll show
them a Parson’s nose or two.

* *

Wednesday
“The *potamus can never reach
The mango on the mango tree.”
Thus T. S. Eliot, but I wonder what sort
of mango tree he had in mind. My little
one year old son can reach the mangoes on
my mango tree and he’s no ’potamus.




of various designs to suit reading and standard Lamps.
They will provide both beauty and comfort in your

Home.
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Successors to

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in the following colours —

*







I find my hatred of blackbirds increasing.
They are such useless birds. They pick holes
in my guavas; they puncture my pawpaws;
they shove their horrid yellow beaks in my
tomatoes; they bite the heads off my seas-
oning; they eat up my young ducks’ start-
ena; they eat the hens’ food and to cap it
all they sit around and chatter chatter their
song which only a black bird could invent:




Red, Blue, Green, Brown, Lt.
Brown, Navy, Fawn and White

“Miss Betsy Y—the guinea corn ripe
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet!”

I hate them.

*









e
Get your requirements from——

* *

the old Latin saying Quis custodiet eustodes ?
In these days of progressive education I
can’t expect anybody to know what this
means, so for the sake of the Philistines I
will translate: Who is going to save the goal
when the goalkeeper’s missing? The story
as I heard it concerned a certain gentleman
whose profession is to educate the old.
That is how I translate the very cumber-
some title which he supports. But the
point of the story is that this would-be
educator seems to need a few lessons in
practical geography. He got lost and had
to spend the night under the stars some-
where near where the Government spent
$16,000 to build a road which ends in a
cul de sac,

DA COSTA & CO.. LID.



BENDIX

WASHING MACHINES
FULLY AUTOMATIC

WASHES NINE POUNDS CLOTHES.

Through Six Complete Stages in

45 minutes (without any manual

labour) the final stage the Clothes

are just damp, suitable for ironing,

ONLY A FEW MACHINES LEFT
UNSOLD.

@
DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.

ELECTRICAL DEPT.

oo

OOF: D SPIO SFOO 4,
SOGSSSS

Talking of stars reminds me I can still
see that man in the Evening Star. If this
keeps. up I’m going to see a doctor or lay
off my only vice—one stiff rum and not so
stiff soda before dinner.

* * *

POCO PLE LL ALS PS OOS

I had long suspected. The West Indians
use the word Socialism out of its context.
Writes the correspondent “I have been
nurtured in a Socialist atmosphere ... .
but Labour is in power here with a ven-
geance. I cry out. The Governor and
Barltrop have made every concession to
Gairy and his horde, each making them
more positive ih the belief that they are
running Grenada?” It’s a pity that the
conversion from Socialism should be so
painful, but what can one expect from West
Indian socialism which is no more no less
than the preaching of class hatred. One man
shows the way: the other follows suit, They

GOOSSSOSSSSGOSSSSFS HISTO TSO










For Your
Enjoyment

FISH IN TINS.

Norwegian Sardines.
Canadian Sardines

should call it Bridge Socialism, but they Red Salmon
never do. Hysh no politics. This column is aoe



meant to make you laugh.
* | * *

Pilchards.

| Norwegian Kirpers

Saturday—Will journalists never tearn?|
‘|

Chivers Vegetables
Carrots.

Beet Root

Mixed Vegetables.
Celery Hearts.

. String Beans.



LIQUOR DEPT.

Here is an account of a wedding sent m
by a dear lady in Port-of-Spain.

“The full skirt ended in a train,” The.
Simplon or the Orient Express, or perhaps |

(how .romantic) the last train to San
Fernando. |\\) Gold Braid Rum
|

MEAT DEPT.
Fresh FISH

Fresh Snappers
Fresh Salmon
Smoked Kippers
Smoked Haddock.
Calves Liver
Fresh Sausages

SPECIALS



Top Notch Rum
Burnett's Gin.
Gordon's Gin.
Vielle Cure.
Prunier Brandy

“The bride cut a lovely figure” with her
penknife I suppose, and what did the!
bridegroom say. Was he jealous? And then,
this request “Would you like picture of





wedding?” Would I indeed! Would you?, Sliced Ham .. 1.50 per Ib. Cooks Paste, 6 cents per tin.
You're welcome. How polite we're becom-|})) PHONE GODDARDS — WE DELIVER
ing. It’s this wedding atmosphere I suppose. ! ;









SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1951

—

Acquitted Of Threatening
Letter Charge

HUNDREDS yelled in the Courtyard yesterday as David Introduced
Van Puttin bowed to the Court and walked out of the dock,

‘acquitted of the charge the Police had brought against him To the Bar

—uttering a threatening letter to Aubrey Birch of Dayrells | MR. SAMUEL GRAHAM, a
Road, demanding money. The case was’ going on for five Trinidad born Barrister-at-Law



who

days at the Court of Grand Sessions before
Justice, His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylo:.



Parking
With Touts

"yrs who hang around the
_ various places of entertain-
ment always pretend that they are
capable of taking care of peoples’
cars, but the Commissioner of
Police said yesterday, “these touts
are not even capable of taking
care of themselves,”

Police Constables are now on
the look out for such touts and
already two have been arrested,

The Commissioner said that he
would like the public to know
that, anyone who visits a place of
entertainment can guarantee that
the Police will take care of his
vehicle.

He said that when a_ person
gives one of these touts money to
take charge of the vehicle, that
person, instead of assisting the
Police, is encouraging lawlessness
and this increases the work of the
Police who.are trying to rid
Bridgetown of touts,

One motorist said that he once
gave a tout consent to sit in his
car and take charge of it. He
went to the theatre and when the
show was over he discovered that
the tout, as well as two of his
car wheels had disappeared,

HE ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING of the Barbados
Friendly Football Association was
held at’ the Fortress Club on
Wednesday when Mr, C. E.
Jemmott was appointed President.
The Financial Report and that
of the Secretary were read and
adopted. The Association approv-
ed of a team from the B.F.F.A.
entering the Knock Out Competi-
tion of the B.A.F.A,

On Thursday the B.F.F.A.
season will begin. Mr. Jemmott
was also elected to represent the
B.F.F.A. on the general body of
the B.A.F.A. Members of the
Association spoke highly of the
kindnesses rendered by Carlton,
Shell and Empire for the use of
their grounds and Fortress, for
the use of the Club house.

Other appointments were as
follows: L. Slocombe, Vice-Presi-
dent, J. T. Archer, Treasurer,
C. B. Seott, Secretary, C. E.
Reece, Assistant Secretary and
two trustees, Messrs, J. T.
Archer and T. Estwick.

FIRE at Church Village, St.
\ Philip, on Thursday burnt
500 holes of first crop ripe canes,
belonging to H. B. Greaves, 81
holes of third crop. young, the
property of Miriam ‘Alleyne, three
quarters of an acre of second
ercp ripe, the property of Hilton
Francis, 50 holes of third crop
ripe, the property of Aletha
Hinds and 100 tholes of second
crop young canes the property of
Joyce Moseley. None of the
canes were insured,

ICYCLE M 1400 was exten-
sively damaged when an
accident occurred at Kew Gap,
St. Michael, yesterday evening.
Also involved was a ‘bus owned
by the Leeward "Bus Company.
The rider of the cycle was slightly
injured,

N THURSDAY night an acci-

dent occurred at Boarded
Hall Road, St. George, between
motor car M 2462, driven by
Clyde Jackman of Carrington’s
Village, St. Michael,,and Louis
Blenman,. who was_ standing be-
side his bicycle, Blenman was
slightly injured.

". ELECTORS ASSOCIA-
TION held a political meeting
in the St. Simons district of St.
Andrew in support of their can-
didate Mr, J. A. Haynes.

Mr. E. V. Rock acted as
chairman and the large crowd
who attended were entertained to
Steel Band music. r

HE ST. SAVIOUR’S Church

Lads Brigade gave a Concert
at the Belleplaine Playing Field
on Wednesday night, A play,
“Old King Cole”, was the most
interesting item on the pro-
gramme.

ISHING BOATS which went
out on Thursday were return-
ing during the evening with large
eatches of flying fish and dolphin
to the Speightstown Fish Market.
The majority of the boats had
gone to the fishing bank since
Wednesday night.

Large quantities of the catches
were taken to Eagle Hali and the
City by lorries and vans, The
market was kept busy until late
during the night. Residents were
unable to buy up all the catches.



Petition Granted

In the Court of Common Pleas,
His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor
granted a petition on. behalf of
the Company of Plantations Ltd.
that the alteration of the Com-
pany’s Objects proposed to be
effected be confirmed by the
Court pursuant to sec, 11 of the
Companies Act 1910,

Mr, J. S. B. Dear instructed
by Cottle Catford & Co., appeared
for the Company.



Wills Admitted

In the Court of Crdinary yes-
terday His Honour the Acting
Chief Judge Mr. G, L. Taylor,
granted the petition of Louise
Malvina Gamble of River, St
Philip, Widow, to the estate of
her husband Joseph Ezekiel
Gamble, deceased.

Mr. D. H. L, Ward instructed by
Mr. D, Lee Sarjeant appeared for
the petitioner.

The wills to the following per-
sons were admitted to probate:—

Margaret Ella Collymore, St.
Michael; Elizabeth Acourt Craw
ford, St. Philip.

. : lived most of fiis life in
the Acting Chief Rorbados and who practises at

the Bar in Grenada, was intro-
duced and admitted to practise
at the local bar: yesterday. He
was introduced by the Solicitor
General, Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
whi'e His Honour the Acting
Chief Justice Mr. G. L. Taylor
presided at the Court before the
Van Puttin case continued,

Mr. Reece said that Mr. Graham
was called to the Bar by the Hon-
ourable Seciety of Gray’s Inn in
1949 though it was in 1947 that he
passe his finals,

He acted as assistant Attorney
General and then as Magistrate in
Grenada, He. was since doing
private practice,

Though the members of the
local bar welcomed him, they
would still be pleased to hear that
Mr. Graham had no intention of
practising in Barbados, but would
be returning to Grenada where
fees were attractive.

The Acting Chief Justice wel-
comed Mr. Graham and added
that it gave him great pleasure to
do so.

Mr, Graham __ thanked the
Solicitor General and the Acting
Chief Justice and said that in
Grenada and other West Indian
colonies, he noticed that the Bar
and Bench in Barbados were
referred to with great respect.
He would uphold the tradition ot
the Bar of such a place,

Police Dogs Are
Taught Tracking

Peggy and Rip, the Police dogs,
are at present being taught track-
ing and one of them gave an excel-
lent performance yesterday when
it followed a trail for half a mile
until it came on its quarry.

They are being trained at Wind-
over, St, Peter, by Dr. Sumner-
Moore and have already passed
obedience tests,

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com-
missioner of Police, visited Wind-
over yesterday morning. On his
return to the Central Police
Station he told the Advocate that
he was very pleased with their

Yesterday after listening to the
three-hour address of the Solicitor
General, Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
for the prosecution and an hour’s
summing up by the Acting Chiet
Justice, the izZ-man jury delib-
erated for an hour and 4u minutes
before they returned. their not
guilty verdict. They had heard a
two-hour address by Defence
Counsel, Mr. E. W. Barrow on the
previous day,

Puttin was charged by the
Police with having demanded
$6,000 from Aubrey wirch, threat-
ening Birch’s and his children’s’
lives if the money was not placed-
at a certain spot.

The Defence Counsel, Mr. Bar-
row, had made strong objections
in the early stages of the case to
certain statements Puttin was
alleged to have given the police,
being used as evidence against
him, Mr. Barrow argued that the
Statements had been got out of
Puttin after he had been enticed
and threatened and befuddled by
beer given him by the police,

Statements Admissible
After the Chief Justice ruled

that the statements’ were ad-
missible, Mr. Barrow cross-ex-
amined the witnesses closely and
brought out discrepancies, partly
on fhe strength of which he held
that Puttin should be acquitted.

Mr. Barrow argued that there
would only be evidence in case
of an admission that he, Puttin,
wrote the letters, but nothing as
to his having sent them. The
writing of them alone would not
entitle them to convict him.

Another strong point of Mr.
Barrow’s was that the menaces
to Birch were not sufficient to
overcome his free and voluntary
actions, not sufficient therefore,
for the law.

One of the witnesses for the
prosecution, Mr. Barrow told
the jury, was Toppin, who was
supposed to have been listed by
Puttin to pick up the money,

He, however, admitted that a
Superintendent of Police had
told him that things would have



: : progress.
been made easy ‘for him if he “6 said that they are being
gave evidence against Puttin. taken around the streets of

As the trial began yesterday,
Mr. Reece continued his address
to the jury. He said that the case
Mr. Barrow had quoted, holding
that mere admission of the writing
of a threatening letter was not
enough for a conviction, did not
apply im the case before them.

In that case admission was all
the evidence, but in the Puttin
case there was more évidence,

Menaces

He said _that. the persen who
placed’ the letter in the envelope
was guilty of uttering. A threat
to a man’s children would con-
stitute menaces since a man was
necessarily touchy on that score.

It was evident from the facts,
he argued, that Puttin was a young
man with the mind of a master
criminal. He was making sure the
crop would come off and at the
same time securing himself by
sending Toppin for the parcel.

The circumstantial evidence, he
held, was damning, What he said
to Inspector Franklyn, admitting
the Inspector to be a master after
he illustrated the similarity in the
different writing, was sufficient
evidence alone to merit a con-
viction. Besides he had spoken
to the Inspector before he was
given the glass of beer,

Did they think that Puttin would
share the money with Toppin, a
young man he searcely knew?
That in itself, he said, put aside
the idea of Toppin’s being an ac-
complice. ‘

Summing Up

Summing up the case, the Chief
Justice said that the case which
Defence Counsel had cited to
prove that merely admitting that
one wrote a threatening letter did
not mean that that person sent it,
did not bear on the case then be-
fore them,

The only evidence against the
defendant in the case which the
Defence Counsel had cited was the
statement that he had written the
letter, In the case before them
there was more evidence.

They knew from the evidence of
Winfield Toppin, a witness whom
Puttin had sent to collect the par-
cel, and from Sgt, Phillips, that
Puttin was on Dayrells. Road in
pursuance of what he had written
in the confession and the letter to
Birch.

The prosecution was asking
them to conclude from that that
Puttin did utter the letter. If
Puttin had written the letters and
put them in his room, they would
never have got to Birch,

It was not likely that anybody
would have seen Puttin put the
letters in the letter box.

There was nothing in demand-
ing money. That people demand-
ed money from others was a daily
happening, The difficulty only
arose when the demands were ac-

Speightstown that they may be-
come accustomed to traffic and
people.

Constables Maitland and Brath-
waite, who are in charge of the
dogs, are called Dog Masters. The
Commissioner said that both Con-
stables are showing great keen-
ness in this new department of
Police work.

“It is hoped that within a few
months the dogs will be available
for use in the detection of crime”,
Cojionel Michelin said. —

Remanded On
Larceny Charge

HIS WORSHIP Mr. H. A.
Talma, Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” yesterday remanded
without bail George Downes, a
labourer of Thomas Gap, . until
April 11 when he was charged by
the Police with the larceny of
cloth valued at £2. 5s. 7d., the
property of Mohomed Kola on
April 6.

Viola Thorne said that she was
on Hopes Alley on April 6 selling
coconuts when the defendant
came to her and asked her to
keep a quantity of flying fish for
him: The defendant returned later
to her’ with a brown parcel which
he placed into her box. He then
took the. parcel out of her box
and the fish also and left.

George Downes in his defence
said that on April 6 he never
took a parcel from Mohomed
Kola. About some time in the
morning he saw Thorne selling at
Hopes Alley and asked her to
keep some fish which he was
carrying.

When he had returned to
Thorne he saw Kola with two
parcels on his bicycle. One of the
parcels dropped off the bicycle
and a man picked up the parcel
and ran away. Later he was told
at the C.1.D. that he would be
charged in connection with the
parcel.

At this stage Downes, asked by
Mr. Talma if he had any witnesses
he would like to call, said that he
had witnesses but they were not
present at the Court.

Drove With
Faulty Brakes

LEVI FORDE of Bank Hall, St
Michael, was yesterday found
guilty of driving the motor car
A-113 with inefficient brakes on
February 28.

His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” before whom the case
was heard ordered Forde to pay
a fine of £2 and 2/- costs or one
month’s imprisonment. Before
imposing the fine Mr. Walwyn
said “It is a dangerous thing to
drive with faulty brakes. This





ee with threats and Gfrence is very serious and_ the

manaces. oa people. must be protected from
No Convicitions reckless drivers.”

Defence Counsel, Mr. Barrow, This case was brought by the

was saying that the threats and
menaces were not of such as to
induce Birch to part with any of
his property, He was holding that
the menaces would have to be
such as would make Birch part
with something. But that was not
the law. There would never be
any convictions, in \that case, un-
less a threatened. Demon. yielded.
They, the jury, ‘heard the
of the threats, threats to
Birch himself and his children,
and it was for them, to decide
whether a normal man would
pay any attention to them. If
they felt that Birch was a man
who would treat such threats as
a matter for laughter, then
Puttin would not be guilty.
Defence Counsel had argued
that Puttin did not know Birch,
nor Birch Puttin and Puttin
would therefore have no reason
for writing to him, But one
could write such a threatening
@ On Page 8.

Police as a result of an accident
between the motor bus M-727 and
the motor car A-113. After the
accident the brakes of the motor
car A-113 were tested and it was
found that they were not working
properly. The front fender which
was damaged could not prevent
the brakes from working proper-
ly said the Transport Inspector.

Another case of driving without
due care and consideration against
Forde has been adjourned until
April 11.



In the Court for Divorce and
Matrimonial Causes the Acting
Chief Judge Mr. G. L. Taylor
pronounced decree absolute in the
suit of N. S. Sainsbury, petitioner,
and E. A. Sainsbury, respondent.

Mr, J. S. B, Dear instructed
by Mr. E. D. Rogers of the firm of
G. L. W. Clarke & Co., appeared
for the petitioner.

COURT FOR DIVORCE |g

BARBADOS



PARKING POLES

ADVOCATE

“‘Combermere’s Wall Will



In oraer tnat tne mowre | .VOE Obstrwet Flood Water”’

PUBLIC Wall Kaow wulem arc
we restricted warcets wari
parking is forbaden, a num
ber of Poies ok tan e Stree...
carry white, red and biack
bancs. These streets can
now be easily distinguished

“Whenever you see a pole
painted im these colours you
will know that you cannot
park your motor vehicle in
that street,” Colonel Miche-
lin told the “Advocate” ye:-

y

He said that this step was
especially taken to av‘iist
motorists who are visiters to
the island and are not ac-
quainted with the local

parking regulations,

“In nearly all countries
this method
he said.

is employed,”



MUSIC
FESTIVAL
FINISHES

Lady Savage Presents
Prizes

The Schools’ Music Festival
of 1951 came to a glorious end
yesterday when some 300
children staged a two-hour
concert at the Combermere
School Hall.

It was the second biennial
schools’ music festival, the
first of which was successfully
staged in 1949,

The Governor, Sir Aifred Sav-
age, and Lady Savage attended
the function, Lady Savage made
the presentation of prizes and
certificates to the winners of the
competitions. Before making we
presentation she was pres¢ nted
with a bouquet.

The festival started some wecks
ago with over 5,000 pupils from
87 Elementary schools and four
Secondary schools entering the
competition, After an elimination
process, the winners gave a finale
to round off the festival.

Perhaps, some of the children
will have the opportunity of hear-
ing their voices as their audience
heard it yesterday. A recording
instrument was at work while thi

concert was taking beautiful
stride.

Nothing was lacking in audienc:
Parents, friends, and _ official

packed the hall while the gallery
could have provided space for only
a few more.

Accompaniment

The Police Band under the
leadership of Captain C. E. Raison,
occasionally accompanied the
choral groups while a part of this
job was undertaken by Mr, Gerald,
Hudson on the pianoforte.

The programme was begun at
three o'clock with the Police Band
rendering Eric Coates’ “March of
the Youth of the Empire”.

This was followed by Martin
Shaw’s “Song of the Music Mak-
ers” which was chosen as the
Festival song and rendered by 9
powerful and sweet sounding
voices selected from the winners.

The programme included five
choral groups, five. vocal solos and
one pianoforte solo, all of which
drew hearty applause from the
audience, The audience seemed
particularly pleased with Shaw’s
“Hannibal” sung by St. Bartholo-
mew’s Girls’ School-—quick rhythm
indeed—the solo “Drink to Me
Only With Thine Eyes” sung by
B. M. Taitt of Combermere School,
Sullivan's “Gaily. Tripping” ana
Shaw’s “Cargoes’ sung by Queen's
College and the spiritual ee
Down Moses” rendered by Bay

One of the prize winners, 1)-

Street Boys’ School,
year-old Winston Brathwaite, got
second prize for playing a piano-
forte solo. He received his pryec
from the hands of Lady Savage
amidst the loud cheers from the
audience who were amused and
yet surprised to know that a boy
of his size could have managed the
comparatively massive pianoforte,
Mr. C, E. Theobalds, Acting
Director of Education, gave a vote
of thanks.



THE WALL now going up on the eastern side of Comber-
mere School, is being erected because of the continuous
annoyance caused by the encroachment of animals, some
of which have at times entered the classrooms, Mr. C. A.
Coppin told the Advocate yesterday.

Mr. Coppin said that he has been authorised by the Gov-
Qrive Body of the School to supervise the erection of the

vall,





Sheep, goats, pigs, mules,
donkeys and the like entered the
school premises from that side and
roamed about at will, Mr. Coppin
said. The impounding of these
inimals was tried, but this was
found to be useless. Barbed-wire
fences were put up but two of
these were carried away,

The Governing Body were ac-
cordingly advised that a wall con-
structed in such a manner that it
could not be inundated by flood
water, would remedy the situation
more effectively than any measure
that had been previously adopted,

Tenders were invited and the
successful tender Mr, A. B,
Franklin was commissioned to
execute the contract.

“The Governing Body have been
advised that in case of serious
flood waters, only a panel of this
wall at most, could collapse if a
heavy obstacle charged into it.
Flood water pressures have been
equalised on both sides of the wall.

Wall-Parallel

“The designers have guaranteed
that unlike Park walls of the past,
ete., it would be impossible for
the entire structure of this wall
to collapse. A guarantee has been
given to the Governing Body to

this effect. It must also be noted
that this wall runs parallel with
the current and does not oppose it

at any of its stages,

“The cost of the construction of
the 800 feet of wall is approx-
imately $3,000. In view of normal
building cost for normal wall con-
Struction this is a very reasonable
figure to achieve the purpose
which the Governing Body desire.

“The construction was delayed
until the necessary deeds vesting
the property in ‘the Governing
Body, had been completed. The
wall has been set back’ from the
canal to permit of any future ex-
pansion or development in dealing
with flood waters in this area.

Plantations Ltd.
Appoitited Agents
Canadian Stock

Brokers

‘ Mr, Hugh V. Shaw of Gairdner
& Company Ltd,, Toronto, Cana.
da, arrived in Barbados last Sat-
urday and was met by Mr. Geo,
P. Watt, a director of the com-
pany, vie has been in Barbados
or sometime. They are sta
it the Windsor Hotel. " 7“
Mr, Shaw, in an interview with

the Advocate, said that his com.
pany had made an agreement
with Plantations Ltd. to represent
them in the island.

Of interest to most investor:
with Canadian or Americal
securities, he said, would be’ the
fact that although some othe
Canadian investment firms were
known in Barbados already, thi:

newly formed association betwee:
the Ganadian Company and Plan
tations Ltd, would provide
another source of information an
service to Barbadians,

The company are dealers in al!
types of securities in Canada, New

York and London and hope ;te
place particular emphasis on pro-
viding up-to-date report on speci:
fic investments. Further, to pro-
vide a system of supervising lists

of securities presently held in the
island to ensure their continuity
and maintenance of earning
power,

Mr, Shaw said that his com-
pany had grown very consider-
ably in Canada over the past 20
years in no small measure due tc
the service which had been afford-
ed to clients and that they were
hopeful now of being no less suc-
cessful by the same measure in
the British West Indies,

Both Mr. Shaw and Mr. Watt
will remain in Barbados for a few
weeks and they have planned to
meet and talk with as many inter-
ested investors as possible.

Mr. Shaw, being here for the
first time, stated that the only
thing that could be blamed foi

his failure to accomplish this ob-
jective would be the unbounded
hospitality which he had _ been
shown since arrival.





: e
BRUSH.®. UP...” YOUR... SMILE...



Wisdom’ s straight-line head nahes —————-—

awkward corners easily.

Wisdom's angle in the
handle is the secret of
its comfortable control.




Wisdom’ s widely-spaced
tufts *comb’ between teeth
clean where decay begins.

Wisdom

ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD, MAKEAS

BAVAILABLE !!

PURINA

BPOULTRY CHOWS

Sui. JASON JONES & CO, LTD.—Distribators.
SRE SUES TEER esesee

OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

|

“The Governing Body is not
aware that any Order exists pro-
hibiting the erection of a wali on
its property. At no point is ii
considered that this wall will offer
obstruction to flood water.”

H.E. Will Address

Civil Service Ass‘1i

THE Governor Sir Alfred Sav-
age will address members of the
Barbados Civil Service Associa-
tion at their Annual General
Meeting which takes place at
Harrison College this afternoon
at 1.30 o'clock.

The Auditors’ Report for the
year 1950-51 will be considered
after which the Association will
elect officers for the current year,





“CAN. CONSTRUCTOR”’
LOADS SUGAR

The C.N.S. Canadian Con-
structor, 3,936 tons net is here
loading about 1,600 tons of sugar
and the equivalent of 900 pun.
cheons of molasses for Canadian
ports :

The Constructor arrived here on
Thursday evening. “She is ex-
pected to leave port early next
week’ for Canada, Her local
agents are Messrs,. Gardiner
Austin & Co,, Ltd.



Fresh Arrivals

WEATHERHEAD'S

Buckleys Cough Mixture
Buckleys White Rub
Palmers Soap

Palmers Ointment
Palmers Bleach Cream
Palmers Hair Success
Ferrozone Tablets
Hamiltons Pills
Caterrhzone

Nervelene ;

Black Magic Choe; (3 sizes)

Pascall’s Marshmallows } lb,
tin

Pascall’s Marshmallows %4
i pk.

Pascall’s Orchid Fruits

Pascall’s Mixed Fruit Drops

Pasrai"'s Glucose Barley
Sugar } lb,

Pascall’s Glucose Barley
Sugar 1 lb.

Royal Scotch Shortbread
Jacobs Cream Crackers
Ivory Soap

Camay Soap

Torch Batteries

Irradol A,

Erthymol Tooth Paste
Ellimans Embrocation

“My Sin” Perfume
“Scandal Perfume”

Bandbox Shampoo
Calmasmine (For Asthma)

BRUCE

WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED

Head of Broad Street

Made in Canada, La Parisett

are idead for toddlers, We !

blue, black, sizes 2 to 4.

|| CAVE
|| SHEPHERD
| & Co,, Ltd.

a 10-13 Broad St.



50 YEARS
|

E OOO MOU
——————



Stepping stones to success



La Parisette Shoes

have them in white, pink,

Per pair

$1.91 ond $2.12





PAGE FIVE









OOOO





oF





YES!! THEY'RE HERE



FLEXCO—Double
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Lens 3.5, will take any

WIRGIN—620 Camera, 4.5 Lens, Double View
finder .

PUCKY—-Reflex Box Camera
Only a Limited Supply



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Childrens’ Slippers



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Pair $2.25 & $3.18









a

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en cmmet

PAGE

HENRY


















HE MUST THINK IM CRA2V+« |
DROPPING FROM PLANES TO TRAINS,

PHEW THE SMOKE IN THAT TUNNEL} [1 DIDN'T TELL HIM WHY. THANKS FoR

WELL« THATS THE PILOT WHO 7 SU THE LIFTS

BROUGHT ME HERE!



SIX

DAGWOOD, CALL
MR. BARGLE
DISTANCE AND EXPLAIN

NEW >p

THE STREAM THAT RUNS BENEATH
THIS ROOM! 4

N ASS awl

I HAD BETTER GIT
BUSY AN! PAINT TH’
GARAGE - I TOLD
MAGGIE I'D DO IT
> A WEEK AGO!

{
pe
{

He's A
|) KILLER!

- CS

iTS CURTAINS! BE

it

P

yt






/ LUMI WONDER

[ss

EVER="THINKING OF

ators

IF HE'S AG. BUSY AS

ETTIN' A JOB

=
SS





(en ree ema

- AZT THOU COMING OR Y
SORRY, GODDESS! ) %: ~~.



—

you SAY

YOu'VE BEEN
QUT OF
TOWN ?

3

WHEW« HE MADE ITS
IF HE DOES IT FORA



SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1951

1, Heart Troubl
1 Caused by High
| Blood Pressure

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON



ene na















“Canada's Wonder Remedy 15
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ECZEMA, BURNS, SORES, PIMPLES

There’s nothing like Buckley’s White Rub for breaking up a
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(Reading Room

( iST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)
| « Hours: 10 a.m.—3 p.m.







Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Fridays.
( 10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays.





Selense and Heaits with Key to
the Scriotures by MARY BARER
may %e read, bonow.d,

or purchased.
g Visitors Are Welcome §
swwwwwweo
















IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

| SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only













USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Heinz Mulligatawny Soup Heinz Spaghetti in Tom.
Bae ee Peer se 30 26 Seed WN ee ks 28 «235
Bacon (Sliced per |b} 120 106 Orange & Grapefruit
Juice tins _29 26
Kardomah Tea 2% lb. 39 35 Jetirey's Beer bottles ad 26 20














WELL--



WHAT
HAPPENED?



'M SORRY--T |)

THOUGHT THEY ( LISTEN IN

WUZ GONNA GIT |\ TOMORROW
[Pe HERD OVER / AT THIS

TH’ BORDER f SAME TIME-

Let us supply





For the HOUSEWIFE ee
eee ae Bit.
Enamelware, Chairs, Brooms, etc.
For the CARPENTER and MASON
rein Hainer ete.

\ For the PAINTER and JOINER

Ready-mixed Paints, Enamels,
Oils and Pigments Brushes,
Varnishes Brassfoundry, etc.

) For the FISHERMAN

Hooks,
Wire for Pots,

Lines,
Ropes and Blocks,
Copper Paint

Canvas, etc., etc.

For the AGRICULTURIST and
HORTICULTURIST
Sickles, Cane Bills,

Hoes, etc., etc.

ae

G

Pitch Pine, Donglas Fir,
White Pine Spruce,

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Window @

Our QUALITIES are GOOD,
I|| PRICES — REASONABLE
TERMS EASY

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C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Phone 4413, 4657, 4472

|PITCHER’S

\
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~~ OREN

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BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
WONDE

LIVING:

for ECONOMY. VALUE
and SATISFACTION. |

= lO OO
ean ee eS







a



a





SATURDAY, APRIL 7,



CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Births, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices i*
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays

or Engagement
arib Calling the
is $3.00 for ahy number of words
50 and 6 cents per word for each
cash, Frone 2508

between 8.30 and 2 pete 3113 for Death | A-1 condition

ee
MAUGHAN—The Maughan family begs
most respectfully to thank all who

attended the funeral and showed

sympathy in other ways in our recent] dition.
bereavement occasioned by the death] Street, St. John.

of our husband and father.
William Maughan, Mrs.
Maughan and children.
7451—1n.

IN | MEMORIAM

CADOGAN—In ever loving memory of
our dear aunt Emily Cadogan, who
depa, this life on Good-Friday,
Aprif 7th 1950.

A year ago she left us

Sad memories to recall

But she’s gone to be with Jesus

Forever with the Lord.

Ever to be remembered by —
The Maloney Family.

Gertrude



7.4.51—in.

KNIGHTS—In loving memory of our

dear sister Olga Knights, who passed | Andrews

away on April 7th 1950.
Gone but not forgotten
Ever to be remembered by her sisters
Doris and Elise, mother: Anite meee
74.51—Iin.

“GOVERNMENT — NOTICES
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

VACANCIES IN THE ELEMEN-
TARY TEACHING SERVICE

Applications are invited from
teachers (women) with at least
10 years’ teaching experience for
the Headships of the following
schools: —

St. Catherine’s Mixed School,
St. Philip; Ebenezer Girls’ School,
St. Philip.

The minimum professional
qualification required is the Certi-
ficate ‘A’ of the Department of
exemption therefrom.

Salary will be in accordance
with the Government Scale for
Head Teachers in Grade I Elemen-
tary. Schools.

Candidates who have already
submitted application forms in re-
spect of previous vacancies (now



filled) may apply by letter,
accompanied by a recent testi-
monial, All other candidates

should make application on the
appropriate form which may bel
obtained from the Department of
Education. All applications must
be enclosed in envelopes marked
“Appointments Board” in the to
left hand corner and m-st reac
the Department of Education by
Saturday 14th April, 1951.
6.4.51—2n

ed
Oooo

ADVERTISE
IN THE ©
WEEKLY ADVOCATE

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANDS wv













(ueaner City CAMPAIGN

Translation old Eastern proverb:
“For cleaner city let each man
clean his own doorstep”

Obvious moral ....-.ss+e0s
It’s each person's job to make a
clean city.

pocvocccccccnnsecsacantanananonsan

i The M.V. CARIBBEE will accept
Ca.g) and Passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and
St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 20th inst,

The M.V. DAERWOOD will
occept Cargo and Passengers for
Psramaribo. Sailing Wednesday
11th inst,

B,W.I. SCHOONER
OWNERS ASSOC, INC.
Tele, 4047.



S999 9O PP SSOPO POSTE,

NOTICE

This serves to inform the
General Public that my wife
Leotta Waithe (née Reid),
formerly of Paynes Bay, St.
James, has deserted me since
1941 and I have not heard of
her whereabouts. It is my
.% intention to re-marry in the
‘* near future.

S$ BERESFORD WAITHE.

-

$5956 99M

3 Paynes Bay,
y St. James.
3$$65655656666666666008




FURNISH TO-DAY
The Popular Way

NICE New Renewed
Mahogany, Cedar and other
Vanaties, Stools, Wardrobes,
Drerser-Robes, Bedsteads, Beds,
Springs, Cradles, Laths.

DINING, Kitchen, Cocktail
Radio, Sewing and other fancy
Yables — China, Bedroom and
Kitchen Cabinets, Sideboards,
Waggons, Larders, Tea Trolleys.

DRAWING ROOM HITS in
Morris, Tub, Bergere, Rush and

and

Upholstered 3 and 5-piece Suites
and separate pieces — Couches,
itees with low and high backs—
MORRIS CUSHIONS, $4.50 up
DESKS, with Fiat or Sloping
ton, and Folding leaf with pigeon
holes, $9.00 up-—-Bookcases, Book-
sacks, Strong Office Chairs.

pe BUY NOW AT MONEY-
SAVING PRICES,



L.S. WILSON
SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069





of words up to 50, and| 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

1951 BARBADOS

a ee





ADVOCATE



Contract For Public Printing



FOR SALE

: OTICE is hereby given that Sealed Tenders will be received by
Minimum charge week 72 cents and

the Clerk of the General Assembly up to the 15th day of June,
1951, for performing the fellowing printing work and services for
the Government and Legislature of this Island, and other printing

work hereinafter mentioned, / such. other printing work as may be

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a





AUTOMOTIVE required by the Printing C ttee, for the period commencing the
lst day of July, 1951 to the 30th day of June, 1954.
AUTOCYCLE: One Norman Autocycl. 1. Printing and publishing at so much per page the OFFICIAL

Owner buying larger Bike.
Only 2,000 miles. Apply: J G. Qutram,
Laneaster, St. James. 7451—2a

AUTOMOBILE; Vauxhall 14/6. E-151
Perfect running order excellent mileage
$1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Phone-4616,

4.4.51—T FN.
Im perfect con-
E. D. Hinkson, Massish
6.4.51-—3n,

GAZETTE every Monday and Thursday in every week, or on such
other days as may be ordered by the Printing Committee—250 copies
to be printed at each issue. The GAZETTE is to be printed on paper
of foolscap size, and shall follow as closely as practicable the speci-
men copy furnished, and is to contain: —

(a) All proclamations, public documents, government notices,
minutes, documents, and Bills and Resolutions of the Legislature
ordered to be printed, and all Acts of the Island; (b) All notices,



CAR: 10239 Mercury.

Apply:

CAR—One (i) 1947 Plymouth Delux | advertisements and documents from the Chief Officer or Chief Clerk
in ample working order, Pil. S420, or Secretary of any of the departments of the Government Service

a8 \whether the said departments shall be now in existence or shall
‘ar Dar see Standard 12 eae ree hereafter be brought into existence, or from the Clerk of the Gen-

i : ~~" Jeral Assembly of this Island; (c) All notices or returns required
by any Statute, rule or order of Court or Government regulation to







CAR—Hillman Sports, engine recently



rhauled. Pr .00, i S
ovemnaiegs Price $400.00. Pil gsLin, |be published in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE and any private adver-
ae? Wks adie deainent tae tisements which the Printing Committee may permit or authorise tc

(Green) Mileage 15,600 very good condi- |be published therein; (d) All minutes of meetings and notices of the

tion. |, New Batteny. Apply: S. FP. | Directors of the Barbados General Hospital, all notices and other
ghill, Telephone 4266. c/o R. & G. . . *
Challenor. 6.4.51-an | Matters relating to elections, and all returns, regulations, bye-laws,



“TORRIES—Two (@) Chevrolet 1999 and notices &c. from any public Board or parochial authority; (e) Any
1940 models. Recently working at |other paper or document ordered by the Printing Committee to be
Factory. Can be seen |at
Fisherpond Plantation, St. Thomas, and published.
will be offered for sale on Wednesday Any notices and advertisements for the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
SET Pet ANE, AY 2 Ps 54.5189. | coming under class (c) abovementioned which are not by law requir-
ed to be paid for from the Public Treasury are to be deducted from
the OFFICIAL GAZETTE in the measurement thereof but in the
tender for the printing of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE the charge per
inch with the width, which will be made, for such notices and adver-
tisements, is to be stated not exceeding however 3/4 per inch of
space. All printing in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE for the General
REFRIGERATOR—One (1) Westing. | Hospital or for any Public Board or parochial authority coming
fon apes s uae eee under class (d) shall also be deducted from the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
Brittons Hill, *whonp Yond. n Malcot’ “in the measurement thereof, and the public printer shall collect the
6.4.51—2n. | amount due for such space from the parties requiring the publication
REFRIGERATOR—Quiet running $80.| at the same rate per page as the OFFICIAL GAZETTE is paid for
G. Hudson, Pendle, Pine Hill. i by the Government.
re The Printing Committee reserve to themselves the right to in-
clude or exclude at any time any particular class of private or other
notices or advertisements or special or particular notice or advertise—



ELECTRICAL

ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts,
30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps and
spares, A. Barnes & Co. Ltd,

14,8.51—t.f.n.

















FURNITURE

FURNITURE: Large stock of good
Secondhand furniture, Also rush bot- | ment.
Saks Gua’ gin eccaie babe ek ae All matter required to be printed in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
Ralph Beard’s Show Room: Hardwood | must be inserted therein within one week after delivery to the con-
Aley Phone—-4683. q . 2 : :

4.4.51—2n. | tractor or his agent. Provided always that it shall be in the discretion

sameeren scepiian,

CHAIRS Two 1a) Invalid Whee |of the Printing Committee to extend such time. The number of sheets
Chairs, can be seen at Fogarty’s. One|of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE is not limited, and all reports, return,

chair can be expanded to a_ reclining A :
position. 7.3.51-3n.;documents, &c., must be published in full in one OFFICIAL

GAZETTE,
All original documents, draft minutes, draft Bills and Resolutions,
al if rreturns, &c., to either branch of the Legislature shall immediately
PUPPIES—Pure Bred Alsatian Pups.|after the publication thereof in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE be returned
oan en caa ae Peak ae to the Clerk who delivered the same to the contractor.
Every Bill, Resolution, or other paper delivered to the contractor
MECHANICAL __ | to be printed, ‘shall be printed and circulated within five days after
CARRIER BIKES and Bicycles by | the delivery thereof, Provided always that it shall be in the discretion
Hercules, Silver King. A BARNES & ten a: itt to extend such time.
co., LTD. S1—t.tn, | Of the Printing Committee
= ere Every paper, document, &c., delivered by the Clerk of the Gen-
MISCELLANEOUS eral Assembly or by the Colonial Secretary or the Chief Clerk of his
ar Mie duaudy tte Oiuanes f ication in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
BEAUCAIRE—The Superb Dry Cl office to the contractor for publicat
removes grease, oll, ey atakée "tom or to be printed, shall be confidential and the contractor will be
‘eh Sdaiite eee Peeve bound in a substantial penalty to be fixed by the Printing Committee
DESPAIR JUST USE BEAUCAIRE.” | against the publication in any newspaper other than the OFFICIAL
44.514. | GAZETTE or against the disclosure to any person whomsoever of
WeATHS mp Roreelain Znamel, in| the contents of the said paper or document whereby the sams shall
units to complete colour suites. Top | become generally known,
rede. A, HARES) & Os1ht shall not be spaced more than is absolutely necessary and the Printing





LIVESTOCK



















26,1.51—t.£.
Sen einmen a Committee shall be the sole judges as to whether the matter has been
and Small, 3. E, Field, Advameg Stove,| Spaced more than is necessary.
James Street. 7.4,51—In 2. Printing 20 copies on paper of foolscap size of each Order

CURTAIN FITTINGS For smart win.|of the Day of the Legislative Council, and 62 copies of each Order
dow styling, light control, Valances ano | of the Day of the House of Assembly, for each inch of 24 inches wide.

draperies. By Kirsch, D! ; Mp ‘
BARNES & CO., LTD. eat eest 3. Printing at so much per page of 12 inches by 44 inches the
— following, namely :—
ESCHALOT— Quality — Eschalot $ : aa) z ;
25 Ib, lot at 30c.aper tb... nation ahane (1) 60 copies of every Bill introduced in either branch of the
PROVERBS ‘8° co Lr, High Street, | Legislature
s . LTD., High Street. Mu “ ss . ‘
"145120. (2) 200 copies (if required) with marginal notes in small type,



FOLDING TABLECWil any anima{of every Act of the Legislature on paper to be approved of by the
lover give or sell cheaply a folding | Colonial Secretary, half pages and quarter pages in proportion,

Rae taie aeae ae Special attention is called to the Publication (Statutes) Act 1854.



7.4.51—In 4. Printing at so much per page in Book form 500 copies with

MEGASSE at Lower Estate Factory | Marginal abstracts in small type of every Act of this Island 7 inches

at $3.00 per ton. 6.4.51—6n.] by 44 inches, each of the Acts passed during a Legislative Session,

NATIONAL CASH REGISTER—in|to be bound up together at the end of such session to form a book.
excellent condition at Ralph Beard's| Such books to be sewn and not stabbed.

4683 : 4.4.51—3n. 5. Printing at so much per page (and proportionately for parts

ROLLLUP DAYLITE MOVIE Scher {of @ page) 50 copies of each set of the Minutes and Documents of
tn ease, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy. | the Legislative Council and the House of Assembly in foolscap fort.
on 1£851-t£.0. | ai) Bills, Orders of the Day, Minutes, Resolutions, and other Docu-

SKILLED SHIRT MAKERS—Reliance} ments to be circulated to members of the Legislative Council and
oat Daas: Ealmaro. Hseety the House of Assembly to be endorsed as at present and the price
per page tendered is to include and cover such endorsement.

Printing not more than 250 copies (if required) of the Blue



7,4.51—Sn. |



Two PLATE Glass Display Cases. $120.09
, Ltd, Broad 6.

7451—t.f0.) Book at so much per page.



The matter in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE|.. .

your requirements at T, Geddes Grant
Ltd. 7 451—Tn



VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
a}l metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
Dial

13.2.51—t.f.n.

sizes delivery 3 weeks. 4476.

A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

a

WOODWORKING MACHINERY: Swed-
ish Quality Made, Band and Circular
Saws, Planers, Jointers cte. Shipment
1—3 months after order—Your inquiries
solicited. Dial 4722, ANGLO-SWEDISH
AGENCIES, Marhill Street. 5.4,51—In

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, WILHELMINA
HARROW (nee Gooding), as do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me.
Signed DONALD BARROW,
Rices, St. Philip. |
6.4.51—2n.

WANTED

Minimum charge week 172 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.











HELP

—_ ae + Oe wenn
FEMALE HELP WANTED
Three (3) Reliable Ladies to contact
American familits for general House
work in U.S.A. must be well recom-
mended, passage furnished. Write sor
particulars. Mr. H. Smith, 30 Fufton
Street, Canning Town, London, E. 16.
6.4,51.2n

MISCELLANEOUS
IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-












lery, old China, silver Plate.

Phone 4429 or call a , ade

joining Royal Yacht. Ch 4
TFN.



IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, goid nuggets, coins, miniatures jade,
Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES
Antique Shop. Dial 4429,













LEGHORN HENS and Cocks A pair
of Rabbits, two pairs of Doves. Call 8521
7451—1n
HUMBER CYCLE COMPETITION:
| Brand New Humber Cycle now on
| display at Harrison's Store.
jsale 1/- each. Get your lucky number)
|} now since ¢ompetition is closing at the |
lend of this month. YÂ¥ may win
| Gent's or Lady's cycle for Whit-Sun
7451—1n

\

Tickets for | forms,

al

Printing and furnishing 50 copies of the monthly return of

use and of a quality to be approved by the Printing Committee,

8. Printing cards such as those used for hackney cab licenses,
tickets of admission to the opening of the session of the Legislature,
&c., and any other cards required by the Printing Committee at sol
much per 50.

9. Printing placards and posters per square foot for each 100.

10. Printing, ruling, and furnishing as under all blank forms and
circulars, &c., required for the use of all departments of the Govern-
ment service now in existence or which may hereafter be brought
into existence, at so much per 100, one-half the charge for 50, and
one quarter the charge for 25 copies supplied of each size respectively.
Where forms or other paper, &c., require ruling it shall be included
in the charge for the forms of other papers.

Forms of one sheet foolscap printed on both sides,

Forms of one sheet foolscap printed. and lined with cloth down
the centre.

Forms

Forms

Forms

Forms of

Forms of

Circulars

Circulars

leach Stansfeld ‘Scott & Co
St.
TYPEWRITER RIBBONS & CARBON %,
PAPER, Fresh stock ‘ust receivéd, get} yeyenue and expenditure on paper of similar size to that now in
>

of
of
of

one sheet foolscap printed on one side,
half-sheet foolscap printed on both sides.
half-sheet foolscap printed on one side.
quarter sheet foolscap printed on both sides,
quarter sheet foolscap printed on one side.
or forms of one page of note paper.

or forms of two pages of note paper.

Circulars or forms of three pages of note paper.

Circulars or forms of four pages of note paper.

Forms of larger size than foolscap will be paid for proportionately
with forms of foolscap size,

Blank forms*are to be understood as meaning not only forms in
columns ruled with headings, but also all forms laid down in Acts,
&c., which may only require the insertion of words in certain places.

Any public boards, parochial authorities, or person who may be
allowed by the Printing Committee to insert notices in the OFFICIAL
GAZETTE under classes (c) and (d) beforementioned, who may be
required by any Law of this Island to furnish to the Legislature returns
or staternents requiring blank forms, shall be entitled to have them
printed by the public printer at Government contract rates, The
Bishop of Barbados shall be entitled to have his official printing done |

by the contractor at Government contract prices,

11. The contractor may be required at any time to furnish any,
copies of Bills, Resolutions, returns, documents and other papers,

.| &c., beyond the number herein specified. The person tendering must

therefore state at what price pro rata with the other copies respectively
he will supply those additional copies in numbers of 25, 50 and 100
or more respectively.

12. Except as hereinbefore mentioned the contractor is to furnish
and provide all paper of approved size and quality to the satisfaction
of the Printing Committee and no extra charge can be allowed for
supplying a better quality of paper which may be required for some

Three copies of every Bill, Resolution, and address, &c., on paper
of the best quality are to be sent to the Clerk of the House of Assem—
bly for the signature of the Speaker.

Every Act is to be published in the Official Gazette in such a
manner as to be detachable from the Gazette without affecting the
paging thereof, and shall not be mixed up with the other matter of
the Gazette.

13. The contractor is to address and post or otherwise forward
{as from time to time may be required by the Printing Committee) to
the Clerk of the House of Assembly, the Clerk of the Legislative
WCouncil, or to such other persons as the Printing Committee may
from time to time determine, all copies of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
and all other books, Acts, and papers and documents and shall also
when forwarding the OFFICIAL GAZETTE supply to 2ach person,
corporation or body entitled to receive the Acts, a copy of each Act of
the Island printed as required by this notice.

The Official Gazette, Acts, Bills, and other papers and documents
must be circulated separately, that is, not enclosed one within the
pages of another.

14. The type to be used in the printing is to be similar in size
to that now used in printing the Official Gazette and public docu-
ments or of such other size and nature as the Printing Committee
shall permit or require,

15. Binding the Official Gazette, the Debates, the Laws of the
Legislative Sessions, the Minutes and Documents, each volume:

16. Colonial Secretary’s Office

Furnishing 2 Divisional Registers annually 20 in. x 12) in.

Printing and binding Departmental Reports 13 x 8 in.

Printing Colonial Estimates, as settled by the Executive Com-
mittee, as laid before the House of Assembly, and as passed by the
House: of Assembly, per page.

Printing Debates of the Genera] Assembly and of the Legislative
Council.

Binding sessional laws } bound cloth and paper per volume of
100 stitched.

Printing and ruling pay sheets per 50.

Ruling where feint lines are required per 100 sheets,

17. Colonial Treasury’s Office,

8 licenses and receipt books.

31 descriptions and paper of different quality.

1 Ledger

1 Cash Book

1 Miscellaneous Journal

1 Abstract Ledger

18. Auditor General’s Office. ‘

Furnishing about 1,000 loose Jeaves for Departmental Vote Books.

19. Post Office,

About 100 White Foreign Receipt Books 54 x 16 in. in 1,000

leaves with duplicates.

About 100 Green Local Receipt Books for out-districts 5) x 15 in.

of 100 receipts with duplicates.

About 100 Green Local Receipt Books 5} x 15 in. of 100 receipts

‘with duplicates. .

About 100 Green Foreign Receipt Books 54 x 15 in, of 100 receipts

with duplicates,

50 Books of Gummed Nos,

Parcel Post Receipt Books 19 x 614 in. 500 leaves with duplicates,

Mail Despatch Books for registered letters 15 x 9 in, of 200 leaves,

C.O.D. Register 15% x 10 in,

20. Registrar’s Office.

Report on vital statistics-—annually—on extra strong paper,—
“Battleship Quality.”

Register of Births—forms 24 x 14% in,

Register of Deaths—forms 24% x 164% in,

21. Legal Department,

Furnishing about 300 receipt books for use in Police Magistrates’

Courts, Assistant Court of Appeal, and Petty Debt Courts, each book
containing 100 receipts 6 x 9 in,

General Cash Book 15 x 10 in, of 100 leaves.
Ledgers and Record Books—different sizes,
Suitors Receipt Book 15 x 10 in, of 150 leaves.
Suitors Cash Book 15 x 9% in, of 300 leaves,
Compensation Book 13 x 8% in, of 120 leaves,
22, Department of Science and Agriculture.
‘Hints for guidance of exhibitors 5% x 8% in.
Annual Reports 13 x 8 in. .

Receipt Books,

Polarization certificates,

Plant Invoice Books 17 x 8% in.

~ Acknowledgment Books 114% x 13 in,

Meteorological Books 16 x 12 in,

Rainfall Books 14% x 9 in,

Fumigation labels,

Sugar cane reading books 8 x 6'2 in,

File covers 1344 x 8% in.

Forms for recording monthly meteorological data 14 x 8% in,

22. Police Department,

Police diaries 15% x 9% in. of 150 leaves,

Prisoners Charge Book 174% x 11% in. of 200 leaves.

Police Report Books 174% x 11% in. of 200 leaves,

Criminal Summons Book 16'% x 11% in, of 200 leaves,

Criminal Warrant Book 18 x 10% in, of 200 leaves,

P.D. Summons Book 15% x 9% in, of 150 leaves,

P.D. Civil Warrant Book 17% x 10% in. of 150 leaves with 36
leaves for index.

Occurrence Book 131% x 8 in. of 96 leaves,

Prisoners Property Book 13% x 8 in. of 96 leaves,

Report Summons Books 16 x 10 in, of 150 leaves,

Criminal Register 19% x 13 in. of 800 leaves,

Harbour Police Arrival Book 8% x 14 in, of 250 leaves.

Harbour Police Departure Book 8'% x 14 in, of 250 leaves.

Permit Book 9% x 10% in, of 100 leaves,

Police Duty Book 17% x 11 in, of 366 leaves,

24. The contractor shall be responsible for the correctness of
every Act, Bill, Resolution, Document, Return, Form, Statement or
other paper or any book sent him to be printed or for publication,
according to the copy thereof delivered to him,

25. In case of the non-performance of any item in the contract
or in case of any delay in printing or binding according to the terms
of this Contract the Printing Committee may have such printing or
binding done by any other person and may deduct from the amount
due to the contractor the amount paid by them for such printing or
binding.

26. The contractor will be required to keep a telephone on the
premises where the printing office is carried on,

27, The contractor will be required to have and keep the
premises where the Printery is carried on a sufficient number of up
to date complete Linotype or Monotype machines with all necessary
metal and other accessories and appliances for the proper operation
thereof, and also to have a full stock of other proper type necessary
for the prompt carrying out of his contract.

28. If the contractor shall fail to print and or circulate any
document, return, or other paper, form or statement required to be
printed, and or circulated within the time required by his contract
or such further time as may be allowed by the Printing Committee
he shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding ten shillings per day
for each document or other paper until the same is peraee and or
circulated to be deducted from any ampunt due or to become due
to the contractor.

29. The person tendering will be required to send a letter signed
by two persons possessed of sufficient property engaging to become
bound with him in the sum of 42500 or to give the security of an
approved Guarantee Society conditioned for the due fulfilment of
the contract,

Persons desirous of tendering may obtain any further particulars
from the Clerk of the General Assembly, The Printing Committee
do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.

It must be clearly understood that the Printing Committee reserve
to themselves the right of determining what documents or papers
shall be published or printed. Persons tendering are particularly
requested to note this reservation,

D. LEE SARJEANT,
Clerk to the General Assembly.

a

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Wilbert Leslie, The application of Alonza B, Hind
bolder of Liquor License No. 453 of 1951,| of Kensington New Road, St. Michael,
granted to him in respect of a board and| for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
shingle shop attached to residence «t| Liquors, &c., at a board and shingle
Fairficid Cross Road, St. Michael, fcr | shop attached to residence at Kensing-
permission to use said Liquor License &c.,|} ton New Road, St. Michael,
at a board arid shingle shop at Villa





Road, Brittons Hill, St. Michael. Dated this 5th day of April, 1951.
Dated this Sth day of April, 1951. To E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,
Tc E. A. McLEOD, Eaq., Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A Signed A, B. HINDS,
Signed WELBERT LESLIE Applicant
Applica
N.B.—This application will be N.B.—This application will be con
| sidered at a Licensing Court to be } sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’ on Monday | at Police Court, District “A’’ on Mond. y
| the 16th day of April, 1951, at 11 o'clock, | the 16th day of April, 195], at 11 o’clocix,
a.m, a.m
£. A. McLEOp, E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A Police Magistrate, Dist. “A"
T4A51i—in.! 4.51

PUBLIC NOTICES

Téa cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTICE

BYE ELECTION — PARISH
OF 8ST. ANDREW
BARBADOS.

I HEREBY give notice to all per-
sons entitled to vote at the Election
of Members of the General Assembly for
the Parish of St. Andrew that the Elec-
tion will commence between the hours
of 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning on
Monday the 9th day of April 1951 at The
Community Hall Belleplaine in the
Parish of St. Andrew.
all 80

summon persons
entitled to vote to meet at the time and
plece aforesaid then and there to make
choice of one qualified, able, sufficient
and discreet person to advise and con-
sent to the making of such laws as shal!
be meet and convenient for the good
Government of this place and people and
preservation of their estates unless a
Poll be required for the determination
thereof in which case such Poll will be
taken ot the place or places appointed
for that purpose, on Monday tte 16th
day of April 1951 commencing between
the hours of 7 and 8





morning.
Given under my hand this 30th day
of March 1961.
Dated this 30th day of March 1951.
F. A. INGRAHM, J.P.,
Sheriff & Returning Officer.
31.3. S1—2n



NOTICE

BYE ELECTION — PARISH
OF ST. ANDREW
BARBADOS.

TI HEREBY give notice to all persons

ualified to vote at the Election of

of the General Assembly for
the ish of St. Andrew that I have
appointed The Community Hall at

Delleplaine as the place where all such
persons may meet on Monday the 9th
day of April 1961 to elect one Member
to serve for the Parish of St. Andrew
in the General Assembly of this Island.

And I hereby further give notice that
in the event of a Poll being required for
the determination of the said Election, I
have appointed for the said purpose the
places hereinafter specified, that is to
say:—

Polling Station No, (1) :—

The Alleyne School Belleplaine THE
NORTH WING For the use of all per-
sons whose surnames begin with the
letters A to J inclusive,

Polling Station No, (2):—

The Alleyne Sehool Belleplaine THE
SOUTH WING For the use of all persons
whose surnames begin with the letters
K_to Z inclusive,

Dated this 30th day of Ma 1951.

Cc, A. 8K .
Parochial Treasurer St, Andrew.
31.3.51—Tn

PUHLIC SALES

Ten

taintantom "onege 61,60 on” wesh-tees
@ $1.50 on wee

and $1.80 on Sundays ”

REAL ESTATE

BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 =z|
rooms, every convenience including
garden, water supply. As new, £3,000,
Phone 4476, 16.3.51—t.f.n,

LAND—At Bush Hall Cross Road,
opposite Allen's Park. This land con-
tains several pieces, Now, you can buy
for cash, or you can credit same tf
wanted, Please get in touch with Mr.
Brown at Hutchinson & Banfield's Offige.

3.4.51—5n,

LAND—1124 sq, ft. of land at Bed-
ford Lane, Bridgetown, together with
dwelling house thereon,

Inspection on application to Miss FE, M.
Downie at Corner of Roebuck Street
end Bedford Lane,

The above will be offered for sale by
pie competition at our office, James
2













— on Friday 13th April 1961 at
ea Hutchinson & Banfield,
$1.3.51—12n,

BUILDING LOTS at Dover, Christ
o ee vole Maxwell Mein Rena’ Roatr,
Mrs, "L-Ae Herbert, Dover. Phone. 34

6.4.51—5n,

or 8385.

AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By recommendations of Lloyds Agents
we will sell on TUESDAY, the 10th at
our Mart, High Street. F

7 Cartons Corn Flakes, 48 pkgs. Quaker
Oats, 20 Tins Paint, 28 Coalpots, 10 Danish
Pots, 30 Negro Pots, 34 Sheet Asbestos,
16 Thermos Flasks, 4 Suit Cases, 1 fot
Plate Glass. "

Sale 12,30 o'clock. Terms cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers.
TADL—2n,



——_—————
BY instructions received from the Com-
missioner of Police I will sell at Central
Station on Monday Next the 9th, begin-
ning at 2 pm. the following items; —
One (1) Humber bieyele frame, one 1)
Fountain Pen; one (1) Gold tie pin, sew-
eral dozen tins of Polish, and several
other iter: of interest
D'ARCY A, SCOTT,
Govt, Auctioneer.
74 51—2n



o'clock, in the |

PAGE SEVEN
roR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents G
word Sundays.





HOUSES

BOULOGNE--St
furnished, Vacant
Dial 8459

Lawrence Gap, fully
from April 165th.
64.51—2n
BUNGALOW: Furnished Bungalow and
Flat at Coral.Sands, Worthing, - Silver
and Linen. Further particulars, Diab 8134.
Alma Lashley. TAD AL.

~ oe

BUNGALOW~—Modern Bungatow sit-
uated at Brighton, Black Rock, all cari-
veniences, Dial 2338. §.451—tin.







En casa particular con su_ ay
grandes jardines habitacion — grande
doble con bsno y tambien dos simples.

Buena comida y servicio esmerado, Se
habla Espanol. Telefono 8372,

Large double room with bath also
two singles in comfortable private
home on sea. Spacious grounds, good

excellent meals. Tel.

bething beach,
8372. 4.4.51—Sn.

DRY GOODS STORE-—Are You’ in-
terested in a Dry Goods Store with Stock
in Trade Furniture etc. In Swan Street?





Veny good spot, available immediately.
Write for particulars to Swpn Street
Store. C/o. Advocate,

6.4.51—34,



EVANTON, Situated at Top Rock;
Having 3 bedrooms; 2 toilets and
Showers. Dining-room. Lounge. All

modern conveniences, available immed-
lately, unfurnished. Apply -—- Ralph
Beard, Phone-4683. or 8569

4.4.51—3n.

HIGH WINDS—Cattlewash, Bathsheba.



For May, July, September, October,
November and December. Dial 2650.
5.4.51—t.f.n,



“MYOSOPIS, 3rd Avenue, Belleville,
Appointments to view.
Phone

from May Ist
Dial 2120. Further
8107. H. W. Hinds.

particulars



PREMISES—No. 6 Swan
stairs premises, very spacious ¢
fuitable for Factory, Agents O! .
Dentists, Solicitors, or Society. Apply;
Thani Bros, or Dial M66.



SEAFORTIL— Worthing,
dezvous Gap, on the
rooms, drawing and
electricity and gas. All
venience, vacant from ist May.
2074, for further particulars.

opposite Ren-
sea-side, 3 bet
dining room,

modern | ¢on-
Phone

6.4.5)—2n.





VICTORIA, On the seaside, fujly furn-

ished from 15th April, with Tblepfidne,
Frig. and Radio, $10) per month. Dial
8150, T4AS1—tin.

————
WAVERLEY—From May Ist, St, Law-
rence Gap on sea, furnished. 3 bedrooms,
running water, Refrigerator, Gas, Garage.
Inspection by appointment. Phone 827%,
6.4.51—10,

NOTICE

CASUARINA CLUB

Members and friends of the a
Club are advised that cttective- Tare hte
ist 1961, the Club is moving frompits-pres-
ent location in St, Lawrence to te prem-
ises known as ILFRACOMBE,, Maxwell
Coast,

This being a strictly residential district,
certain modifications to the existing
regulations of the club will be necessary
Such modifications will be announced
shortly, Meanwhile, business continues
as usual at the Club's present location
in St. Lawrenee, 2.4.51—In.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOHN

As, from the 9th to the 2tst April,
the office of the Paroehi.l Treasurer,
St. John, will be open on Saturday,
14th and 2st April only.

R. 8S. PRASER,

Parochial Treasurer,

a St. John. ,

Lat | 7A4.51—3i



CLOSING NOTICE.
FERGUSSON'S DRUG STORE
We beg to notify our friends,
customers and the general public that
our business will be closed from Wedner
day 11th April to Monday 29rd" April
inclusive, (ASL ¥

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)

M.S, “TONGARIRO” galled Brisbane

en 24th, Arriving at Barbagos Nay,
st. .



Cargo accepted on beet? ills of
Lading with transhipment a rinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands, *

For further particulars apply:—

FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., and
Da COSTA & CO. LTD.,

Bridgetown,
Trinidad, Barbados,
B.W.1. BW.

SHIPPING NOTICES



NEW YORK SERVICE
SS. “Geiruly" sails 23rd March — arrives Barbados Sth April
A Steamer sails 6th April, — arrives Barbados 20th April.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
S.S. “Alcoa Polaris” sails 2ist March — arrives Barbados 4th April.
8.5. “Alcoa Roamer” sails 4th April — Arrives Barbados 17th April

CANADIAN SERVICE

SAILS HALIFAX ARWIVES an
March 27th yt rh bth















SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship
28. “ALCOA PENNANT” ,,





5.8. “ALCOA PARTNER” besa ARE ae April 19th
NORTHBOUND
58. “ALLOA PEGASUS" due April Sth Sails for St. Law-
s rence River + Ports.
28. “ALLOA PIONEER” ee o due April 12th Sails for St. John,
and St. Lawrence
River Ports: »-
ee
These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

LINE





HARRISON

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM







Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
S.S. “TACOMA STAR” .. Liverpool 22nd Mar, ‘th April
S.S. “HERDSMAN” .. London 10th Apr. 23rd April
S.S. “DEFENDER” .. London llth Apr. 26th: April
S.S. “ASTRONOMER” Liverpool 10th April 23rd April
S.S. “PLANTER” London 20th April 3rd May
S.S. “DALESMAN” Glasgow via
Liverpool 15th April 8th May
bie Sc a | me
; *4OMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “STATESMAN” .. London End of April



For further information apply te -- -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

eee

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

( Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia., for sail-
'

‘| tng to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

|
|



|
‘





eee





j







PAGE EIGHT





B.A.F.A. Council Send

New Terms To Piekwick |

The

1951 Football sea



terday evening p
the Pickwick Clu
this season.

Mr. F. St. Cc
preposed the motion ured the
Council that Pickwick would be
quite willing to accept the new
proposals.

This motion w carried by a
10 to 5 majority. The Chairman,
Major A. R. Foster. Mr. O. S&S.
Coppin and Mr. L. F. Harris ab

stained from voting.

Hutchinson who









The motion was to the effect
that of the gross receipts taken,
10% be subtracted for Pick
Club on account cf administration
and expenses. Of the remaining





44° would go to the



90% gros





B.A.F.A. : the other 56% to the
Pickwick Club

The motion also set out that
Pickwick Club and the B A.
shai settle their own financial
arrangements.

Propesing the motion, Mr.
Hutchinson said that he had
approached the Pickwick Club

and from the figures which he
had set out in his motion, learned
that Pickwick was quite willing
to accept them. He thought that
if the members of the Council
could get together and come to a
compromise they would be able
to play at Kensington The Asso

ciation he said had nothing to
lose and many members had i:

timated to him that they prefe

red to play at Kensington instead
of the Park

Mr. E. A. V. Williams said th
the proposals were put to hia
before the meeting started ard
he promised to give the matt

his support. In 1949, the Associ.
tion wisely or unwisely included
something for the B.C.A. and he
would not be a party to any
motion which would exclude the
B.C.A. from getting a fixed per-
centage.

Mr. L. L. Gittens expressed the
view that they were wasting their

time as far as the motion was
concerned as the last letter the
Association received from the

Pickwick Club was a strong one
stating that they could not deviate
from the original terms as set out
by them tor the stagimg of foot-
ball at Kensington for this season.

Mr. E.- Branch said that as
representatives of the various
Clubs, they must air the views of
their members and many of the
players said that they would like
to play at Kensington.

Mr. V. T. McComie said that he
had heard it from _ responsible
members of Pickwick Club that
the Association was taking an
easy way out. All they had vo ao
was to draw up fixtures, while
they (Pickwick) had to see after
the administration. He resented
very strongly any remarks made
against the Association

With regard to the motion, the
matter was already threshed out
by the Association and they had
rejected the proposals by Pick-
wick and he could not be a party
to any such motion,

Mr. D. H.,L. Ward said that
he could not support the motion
now, as the terms suggested were
proposed to Pickwick already
although in different amounts.

When the original terms by the
Association were submitted to the
Pickwick Club, he made a motion
that 20% should be allotted to the
B.C.A. because he felt that a
substantial portion should be
given to that body as they had the
stands there.

He felt that the Council would
be failing in their duty if they
were to agree to this motion,

Mr. F. L. Walcott said he knew
Mr, Hutchinson was interested in
football and was enthusiastic to
see that the game was played at
Kensington, but in view of the
correspondence the Association
had had with the Pickwick Club
he could not now support the mo-
“tion,

He said that they would be
childish and would be more ignor-
ant than Pickwick if they were to
accept the motion, They would
not make a concession to a man

when he» never intended to give
way. Now that they had Pick-
wick cornered, they must remain
there,

If they were to agree to this
motion now, they did not know
what Pickwick would do nex
year.

Mr. N. Medford felt that the

terms proposed by Mr. Hutehin-







VPraffie Don't

No. 20
e

Do not leave your vehicle
where it obscures a Trafic
Sign or Pedestrian Crossing

e
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring



‘They'll Do It Every Time

TO HEAR HIM TELL IT (BUT LOUD),
| THE HEAD CHEESE EXPECTS MISS

POTHOOKS TO THINK FOR HERSELF =~

GOOD GRIEF! WHERE'S
YOUR INITIATIVE
YOU'VE BEEN HERE
LONG ENOUGH TO

ANSWER RUN-OF -THE-
MILL CORRESPONDENCE,
HAVEN'T YOU 4IM TOO
BUSY FOR TRIVIA!
BLAH-BLAH-BLAH »

























MR. BIGDOME,
WHAT DO YOU

WANT TO SAY
IN REPLY TO
MR. ESCROWS
LETTER?

on may be }
Council of the B.A.F.A., at a meeting at the
sed a motion setting

pb under W



layed at Kensington. TI
Y.M.C\A
out fresh tetms to



ves-

rhich the game will be plaved



Empire Quits
Soccer Game

At their annual general
meeting held hact night at
their club recm, Bank Hall,
ihe Empire Club decided to
withdraw from the First Di-
vision Football competition
due to the unsatisfactory
arrangements between the
BAF.A. and the Pickwick
Cricket Club.



son in his motion would do the
Association no harm and it would
be a good thing for football if they
were to accept the motion,

Mr. O. S. Coppin said that Mr.
Hutchinson had spoken to him
about the motion and he told him
that he would have nothing to do

with any more verbal arrange-
nents with Pickwick.
He also said that he would

have nothing to do with the mo-
on. If the Council decided that
they would play at Kensington, he
would carry on as Secretary until
some one else could take over
The Chairman said that he did
not look at the matter as a com-
promise. Mr Hutchinson had
hrought the matter before them
d it was for the Council to de-
cide, but personally, he did not
like the idea of any suggestions to
Pickwick as coming from the
Association as they had already
put up their terms which were
turned down by Pickwick
After other members had ex-
pressed their views, the motion
was put to the vote and carried
Voting for the motion were
Messrs, F. St, C. Hutchinson,
N. Medford, C. A, Smith, F. E
Hinds, A. F. Ishmael, G. Moore,
E. Branch, S. O'C. Gittens, G

Roachford and W. F. Hoyos
Voting against were Messrs
D. H. L. Ward, V. T. Mc Comie,

E, A. V. Williams, F. L. Walcott
and L. L. Gittens,



SAVANNAH CLUB
TENNIS RESULTS

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
MEN'S DOUBLES (Finals)
Dr. C. G. Manning and E. P. Taylor
beat G. H. Manning and P. McG. Pat
terson 6—1, 6-3, 6—4

TODAY'S FIXTURES
_ LADIES’ DOUBLES (Finals)
Miss D. Wood and Mrs. R. 8S. Bancroft
vs. Miss G. Pilgrim and Miss I. Lenagan
MIXED DOUBLES (Handicap)
Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Barnes vs
J, Wood and J. DD Trimingham
Two Courts will be available for Club

A DRAW

LONDON, April 4
Mikhail Botvinik and David
Bronstein today agreed to regard
as a draw the ninth game in the
World Chess Championship at
Moscow, the Soviet news agency
Tass reported today

Miss



The game was adjourned last
night in an intricate position, but
the players decided today that

neither could win.

Botvinik proposed a drawn game
and this Was agreed to without
resumption of play.

‘ Botvinik is now leading in the
series by five points to four. The
tenth game will be played on Apri!
6. Both players are Russians.

—Reuter,



By M. HARRISON-GRAY

rl S often wise t think
vice <



e before me y udd
If. for inste

@ ts nea:









e. your
& the 3000





sone card Or
have meided



a

your
‘your
goes out, you will
enough unmelded cards

purtner
have
Lo subtract from your score;

while if he

is Unable to go
will

out, be able to do so

yourself on the next turn if tt
seems desirable,





Tradae Benrase Saratoe

Aoginered US Potent Oftes


















Jf WHo's R
Y UNNIN
ATHIS OFFICEZ wis Ce
YOU THINK You ARE? }{
WHO EVER GAVE You /\\
AUTHORITY TO QUOTE
PRICES To ESCROW ?WHEN
IM READY TO TURN THE
FIRM OVER TO You
ILL LET you KNow

{





DR bacon FRABAY, tac President of India, sunces uauus

bers at the ceremony which marked the opening of the First Asian Games in New Delhi recently.
The countries represented in the Games were:

Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Tha

High Living Cost
Causing Slump In
Soccer Pools

LONDON,
The Old Country football pools

which for years have dangled
bulging pots of gold before mil-
lions dreaming of sudden riches,

are reported to be undergoing a
slump.

Fortunes are still being won
every week by lucky speculators,
but latest surveys disclose a sharp
The rise

decline in pool receipts.
in cost-of-living and_ restricted
spending power of the average

British wage-earner are blamed

During the easy-going, post-—
war era about 500 competing
pools were *handling annual in-
vestments, reaching a peak of
more than £100,000,000 in 1946.

To-day, less than 150 ‘get-rich-
quick” outfits are operating with
only about a dozen or so of any

nsequence. Even the surviving
giants admit they are feeling the
pinch



“take’ et present is
have dropped to
approximately £45,000,000, This
fair—size “kitty” however, returns
only 50 per cent of the total pool
to the investors in prizes. Of the
remainder, 30 per cent goes to
the government in taxes and 20
per cent to operating costs

The drop in turnover is attrib-
uted to a decline in the average
weekly stake rather than a de-
crease in the number marking
coupons. The experts estimate
that some 7,750,000 of Britain’s
adult population send in their
forms each week during the pool
This figure has remained
fairly constant during the last two
years but the average weekly

The yearly
estiinated to







stake has slumped from around
seven shillings per person in
1946 to around three shillings
this year.

Fortunes In Prizes
Despite the investment decline,

the country’s largest pool organi-
zation not so long ago w Day
ing out fabulous fortunes for a
paltry outlay of a few shillings
The peak prize this year was
around £110,000 and there have
been several in excess of £80,000
The average major prize, how-
ever, has been closer to £10,000

Strangely enough, a_ recent

eanvass disclosed that five out of
six major pool winners had failed
to find happiness from their
newly-acquired wealth,

A couple of former factory
girls, Agnes Turner and Margaret
MacMahon, of Leyland, Lanes.,
who between them shared a jack-
pot of about £50,000 confessed
that fortune had created unex
pected’ worries

Agnes, a 28-year-old brune

said the money had made her los« |





the joy of living “T was much
happier with the lads and lassie

at the factory,” she said,



Margaret, 33, admitted” the
money had ended any fears of
insecurity, but she too has lost
her old sense of values and re
gards new-found “friends” with

suspicion.——(CP)



Soccer Matches



LONDON, April 4
Results of Soccer matche piayed i
the United Kingdom on Wednesda
follows
ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION I
West Bromwich Albion 1, Blackpool
INeweastic United 0, Aston Villa 1
DIVISION Il

Manchester Cit

Queen Park Ra

DIVISION IL, SOUTHERN
Exeter City 0, Torquay United 0, (Tie)
Bristol City 1, Aldershot 1, (Tie)

DIVISION III, NORTHERN
Crewe Alexandra 1, Southport 0.
New Brighton 6, Gateshead 1,
Chester 3, Stockport County 0.
Rexham ©, Oldham Athletic 2

INTER LEAGUE MATCH
League of Treland @, Football Li





















S





GAMES GREETINGS

the Directors
sidered

their





Afganistan,
iland and India.

Burma,

Local Netball
Season Opened



Ceylon,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



|

cae ke, sath ed

Wibit LMG s25sAil Wed 2 LmMre wees seewaeâ„¢





Indonesia, Japan,
—Express

Tran,



Rugby Results

April 4.
Matches

LONDON,
Rugby League



Results of

played in the United Kingdom on Wed

On Saturday the first match ip
the Barbados Netball League
Tournament was played between
Queen’s College Old Girls and
Olympia Club. Lady Savage
made the first pass and Mrs.
Challenor, President of the
League, opened the season with
an address in which she express-
ed hér good wishes for the League,

For the first ten minutes of the
game Olympia played a fast gam«
with almost accurate passing and
shooting. However, the game did
not maintain the standara
“expected. Although Old Girls
gave a reasonable account of
themselves at team work in the
outfield, their inaccurate shoot-
ing caused Olympia to finish the
first half With 5 goals to 1 for
Old Girls.

T. Barker, as Shoot, I. Quintine
and P, Best were most outstand-
ng players for Olympia.

During the second half, Old
Girls combined as a team far

better than Olympia who seemed
to lack team spirit Old Girls
outplayed Olympia near the close
of the game and scored 4 quick
goals, At the end of play, the
seore was Olympia 7 and Old
Girls 5 goals.

The results of the Match which
took place on ‘Thursday, 5ta
April, at Erdiston Training
College between Erdiston Training

Cellege and St. Michael’s Old
Girls’ Association are as fol-
lows

E.T.C. 10 goals; St. Michael’s

Old Girls Assn. 24 goals,



TOTTENHAMHOTSPURS
STILL SAY “NO”
LONDON, April 5.
After considering the fresh pro-
pesals from the Argentine Foot-
ball Federation the Tottenham
Hotspurs football club directors,
announced today that they would
adhere to their previous decision
not to undertake a close of season
tour of the Argentine this summer.
An official afterwards said that
had carefully con-
the new proposals, but
felt that the reasons contained in
original statement of last
week still applied.—Reuter.







:

nesday are as





follow:

Featherstone Rovers 13, York 6.
Huddersfield 18, Hunslet 8.

Salford 20, Rochda@ Hornets 7
Swinty 14. Widnes 2.

Saint Helens 22, Leeds 14,

-—-C.P

What’s on Today

Shooting by Barbados Rifle
Association—1 p.m.

General Meeting of the Bar-
bados Civil Service Asso-
ciation—1,30 p.m.

Netball at Queen’s College.
Queen's College vs Queen's
College Old Girls—5 p.m.

Table Tennis at Y.M.C.A.

> —6 p.m.

Basketball at Y.M.C.A. Har-
vison College vs Y.M.C.A.
and Harrison College Old
Boys vs. Fortress at
¥Y.M_ P.C.—7.45 p.m.

CINEMAS

Giobe: “He walked By Night.”

Plaza (Bridgetown); “Pirates of
Capri.”

Otympic: “Invisible Monster” and
“Whispering Footsteps”.

Roxy: “Christopher Columbus”

Empire: “Christopher Columbus,”
Aquatic; “Come to the Stabie.”







The Weather

TODAY

Sun Rises; 5.56 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
re (First Quarter) April

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 3.41 am., 4.26
P.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: .67 ins,
Temperature (Max.) 86.5°F
Temperature (Min.) 71.0°F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.S_E. *
Wind Velocity: 6 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.999,
(3 p.m.) 29.991



CLEARS STUFFY NOS*~Q2,2¢ gs @Greage,
d 2"

Sev tVng
Comfort

iN YOUR POCKET!

SO HANDY —Carry it with you in
pocket or handbag—neat, feather-
weight Vicks Inhaler. It's tiny, but
loaded full of soothing, nose-clear-
ing medication,

pen to be, as often as you need it,
Just unscrew the cap and put the




“

tip of Vicks Inhaler right into each
stuffy nostril in turn,
in, and—quick as a breath!—your
nose feels delightfully cool “and
clear, So pleasant. So convenient.
EASY TO USE—Wherever youhap- 4

f-e-a-t-h-e

ry it today!

Use as often as needed






GERM LUBRIC

ii DON'T ONLY OIL
} CENTRAL Fou
Gasolene Static



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NOW! Dental Science Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE; EFFECTIVE WAY TO

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Trafalgar St.



SESSIO!

«

@ From Page 5



letter to another whom he had | States of America will be

uever seen.
It had been argued that Toppin



| April to Friday 18th April, 1951, and women who have

SATURDAY,
GOVERN MENT

Completion of tl

APRIL 7, 1951

NOTICE





1e@ registration carg
lready registered their names for possible er



continued during the week—Mo



lay 9th
yet called



«tiuew a lot more than he was ad-|4"d completed their cards can report and do so between the hours

mitting; that Toppin was an ac-
complice,
inat he was an accomplice, his

reporated, They had seen Toppin

varry out such a job.

Defence Counsel asked why})|
Puttin did not get Phillips,.a wit-
ness who saw Puttin pick up Top-|1
pin on the bicycle, and whom
Puttin had known for five years.
They, the jury, had seen Phillips
and could assume that Puttin
might have thought Phillips above
Such an action or that he might
call for q fifty-fifty deal.

After he had heard Defence
Counsel and the Solicitor Generai
for the prosecuuon as to the ad-
missibility as evidence of state-
ments given by Puttin to the
Police, he had ruied that the state-
ments were admissible.
advise them that they should ac-
cept those statements. It was for
them, of course, to attach the
weight they felt due to them,

If they felt that the Police who
took the statements threatenea
him or enticed him to give them,
they should ignore them entirely

The statements had to be
voluntary, though not voluntary in
the sense that Puttin would
be willing to give them, Puttin

would never have been anxious
to do so.

Further Investigation

It was likely that the reason
for Puttin’s long detention was
the circumstance of Cpl. Devonis!,
having to go out to make furthe:
investigations.

There was direct evidence from
Cpl. Byer who said he recognised
Puttin as the man who rode with
Toppin on the bicycle bar on the
night of Toppin’s arrest.

Mr. Reece, for the prosecution,
he ‘safd, had told them how he
himself was sometimes forgetful
of little things and it was quite
reasonable that the Police could
forget trivia] things said at the
Magistrate’s Court and that there
would be discrepancies.

THANI |
BROS.

<>

HARVEST
SALE

Is THE TALK
OF THE TOWN





YOU CAN'T AFFORD
10 MISS IT

<>

Thousands are

taking real ad-
vantage of gen-

uine Reductions |
in

Ladies Dress
Goods, Gents
Wear and
Woollens and

other

Departments

EVERYDAY

What about
you 7



Just Received

Horlicks Malted Milk 3 sizes
Rinso

Lux Flakes

Palmers Soap
Ointment

Puckleys White Rub
* Mixture

Todex Soi ae

Cuticura Soap
” Ointment

Canadian Healing Oil
PVelatol Comp
Honey 1lb, jars.



C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail Draggist
— Dial 2819

S and §

Truly the Finest of RUM

So Mellow in a highball

So Smooth in a Cocktail

It is simply Superb.

Try it and you will be
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STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for

BEST RUM

ee /

|

= Ss fo

of 9 a.m
If they were satisfied | Women whose surnames begin with the
letters A, BangeC .. ie ; oh
evidence would have to be cor-| Women whose Surpames begin with the
letters D, E, F amd G ‘ 2 ;
as witness and he seemed the | Women whose surnames begin with the
teal person for one to pick on to | letters H, I, J, K and L z ala
Women whose surnames begin with the

Women whose surnames begin

He would |(



|

and 2 p.m. according to the following time table:

Monday, 9th April
Tuesday, 10th April
Wednesday,

llth April

etters M, N, O, P, Q@ and R Thursday, 12th April

with ti







etters S, T, V, W and Y . Friday, 13th Apri

New registrations will be started again from Monday, 10th April,
1951, and will continue. Those interested who have not registered
can do so between the hours of 9 a,m. to 3 p.m. any day between

Monday and Friday at Queen’s Park House.

lS





CRYPTOQUOTE No 2?

. te | AEMT BIZGZBAVG | FY | |
A Grand Danec FPKVLVPKVPA = LS | BFGBED
| YAZPBVY BIP KESA FY
) PA YTZC,
MAD HIGGINSON pags Saye

will be given by
1th hath
Shakespear
On SATURDAY 'NIGI | J. A. CORBIN & SONS.

Tih April 1951
SAVOY CLUB
Hall Street

a quiet



MISS



At ¢t
Masor



$6655.46 On
alata atala PELE LEE OF OOO

ADMISSION —a: R/- Ne my

Musie by Mr. Percy Grean’s a 1 e
Orchestra %S MR. : Rk BROWNE x
~ . 1 9

Refreshments on Sale

,
Please Invite Your Friends, ie (Dance Band Leader) x
+
















SSS "0 Bevs to remind all Dance %

S Lovers, Customers & Friends °

x that his %

( J . ¥

A Grand Dance DANCE 3
> give: . > : >

will be given by is being held at ,

MISS IRENE

At &T CATHERINE’S SOCIAL
CLUB HALL, Wiltshire, St. Philip
Kindly lent by the Management)

On MONDAY NIGHT

>
MASON QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE x
Constitution Road %
ON MONDAY NIGHT %
x

April 9th, 1951

PEEPS PPPOE OD

Sth April, 1951. | Orchestra eae
Admission: ( The Count and his Band ¥
GENTS 2/- ca: LADIES 16. ADMISSION iz: 50c. &
Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra i = ‘KR ‘
Attala wos rchestra: 3 A WELL STOCKED BAR %
‘ N.B.—This Invitation is ex- &
Refreshments on Sale tended to all (Dress ¥
Please Jnvite Your Priends naeq to all. = 6
optional) ss

—————SSSSSB!





Â¥
§9OSOCCOS OOOO OIE

oe

a







———



we

Style! 2





in these
Vedonis
House Coats

made of brushed Rayon with








-wrap fronts, Shawl collar
with Zip Fronts,
Collar with Zip Fronts, In
Blue,
Starry Blue,

or Eton



shades of Hacienda
Green Vista,

Spindle Berry and Carnation

Red.
£

Cave Sh






epherd & Co., Ltd.

12 & 13 Broad Street. |

















See Our Up-to-the-Minute

STYLINGS

jor
Spring
195"

LADIES,



$5.50

MEN’S AND CHILDREN’S SOCKS
ALSO

CLEANERS, POLISHES AND BRUSHES



RED HAND PAINTS

FOR ALL PURPOSES
“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT

in Cream, Green and White.
For interior decoration of Walls,
Ceilings and Woodwork.
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White and C:eam,
HARD GLOSS TULIP GREEN
PAINT
HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT
For exterior or interior use.
“SPECIAL” HOUSE PAINTS
In Tropical White, Oak Brown,
Barbados Light and Dark Stone,
Grey and Dark Grey,
For exterior or interior use
CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
In Grey and Mid Green.




The Sign of
Quality

Phone one vane REMOVER hone
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.
AGENTS,





Full Text
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SATURDAY. APRIL 7. 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SI.VEN CLASSIFIED ADS. TCLKPMONI ISO* Th* charfa to* %  nth* MtfiUfH, Msananla. and In V I'M on a.*ek-da>i %  ml ti.au *n Sunder< lot an* number of wards u M M. ana 1 cento par word on waafc-dava ami • canto per word on Sundays lor each additional word. Tor Birtaa. Marriage or Infiimifi announr*m*nb In Carlo Ciltirj \"r rhata* H HBO lor any numb*r of word, up lo M and %  canta par word lor a-** edeUttor.el word. Tar mi ra.h. fto^WI HIS l„r DraMt THANKS MAI CtBAN—Th* Maughan I mo-1 re-pectluin to Baas ..Handed the funeial ai v nip. thy In olhar wa*i in bereavement ociUini bi of our nuaband and lalhci William Maughan. Mr. Mauchan jnd children Ih* death IN MEMORIAM I l)0*N In ever Ion our dear aunt Emily Cadogan. car ago ah* Mt ua SaU T-i.rv.trir. t'l .r .'I Bui ahc %  >Pti( to be with Jeaui KMOHTa in loving memory of our dear Mater Olga Knighu. who |..>w.l away on April 1th IStO Gone bul nol forgotten Kvar lo br remendtored ct' h*r U-t*r> Dorla and ElM* mother An.te Knlghle 7451 In GOVERNMENT NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VACANCIES IN THE ELEMENTARY TEACHING SERVICE Applications are invited from teachers (women) with at leas'. 10 years' teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools: — St. Catherine's Mixed School, St Philip; Ebenezer Girls' School, St. Phili].. The minimum professional qualification required is the Certificate 'A' of the Department of exemption therefrom. Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head Teachers in Grade I Elementary. Schools. Candidates who have already submitted application forms in respect of previous vacancies (now tilled) may apply by letter, accompanied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make application on the appropriate form which may bet obtained from the Department of Education. All applications DMltf be enclosed in envelopes marked "Appointments Board" in the loo left hand corner and m st reach the Department of Education by Saturday 14th April, 1951 64 M—2n ADVERTISE m THE WEBKLY ADVOCATE I'Olt SALE Mi-imxn eha-p* tS (nil Suadayi t' uora, ) n •roe* Samdapa. AUToarorrvF. IX Oiif Noraun Autornla Owner buUif largen>r Only 7 aOB rrllee Atp|i J G Cuti-m .vn.a I* fl aVlll r.e*U*nt mUradr raft* %  > % %  m a AUTOMOBILE va Perfect running order tIJOO 00 Counaa* a Street. '-I J >hri > In perfect t llinkioti. M M •4.SIContract For Public Printing v i he Clerk of the General Assembly up to the ISth day ol Juiv : performing the fallow! re printing work and service* for :nmfnl and I-eglslalure of this Island, and other printing work hereinafter mentioned, and such other printing work as may be required by the Printing Cosamittee, for the period commencing the 1st day of July, 1951 to the 0th day of June. 1954. I'l III.11 MMIIIS Fas rente paaooia Una on reek-dope >-d II conli per ao.Hr !•* on Semdapa. •" %  %  •c**rge 11 M on <**ek-d*pa %  •d |l m ** S>4a*a. I and publishing al so much per page the OFFICIAL [Council, or to wek olher pagaagaj a GAZETTE every Monday and Thursday in every week, or on such [from time to time determine, all copi Ever> At' hi to be published In the Offki.il Gazette In such a inannei as OmUa w iihmit jfTrvliiia the paging thereof, and shall not be mixed up with the other matter of ttfete13. The contractor is to address and post or otherwise forward Phi— 4W I" I 4 M ?nAllis -Tare Invalid w .i ma pandod lo %  refill LI\i:ST o djcneiai Public that my wUa ; V Leotta Waithe (raff! \\< ,* formerly of Paynes Hay. St O James, has deserted me since N 1941 and 1 have not heard of > O her whereabouts. H |i mj J S intention to re-marry In the ft near future. ; 9 I'-KIiESFORD WAITHE O Paynes Bay. J jj St. James. FURNISH TO-DAY lie Popular Way NR78 New and Ren. ed Mrhosanv. Cedar and otlvr Vanatke*. Atool*. Wandrobo*. I>r • ei -Roben. Brilafeail< |led>. Rprir.a Cradle. U/m%*\ 11N1NG. Kitchrn. Co.kUil Radio. Sewing and other Um. tablet China. Bedroom and Kllchon Cabinet*. Sideboard!. \'.HII. Lordrrm. Tea Trolleyi llli AW INO ROOM HITS In U.r-n. Tub. Borgrre. Ituan aiul UphokMorod 3 awd S-plaa-e tulle. and separate pleer. Coucfea*. So.trea wiUi low and high hack. MORRIS Ct'SHlONS M V up i'tSKS with Fiat or Slooln* 1 .1 fokllns leaf v. llh p'aexn l..ln SB 00 upFU->Xc] Co. Ltd Ian %  %  4J1 !•> CURTAIN FTTTtNflS—For i to alrllns. lishl control, v. drapano* Uy Klrach. Dial KNF-S A CO. LTD. I T I'ltmntiis Quality Ea.-hi.lot Hi HAPOtJ) %  %  r .i DDM ,ver Slvo luble for taj ci.ni..-.• ai Barbadr. f anlm.il %  (oldlnfl a.P.C.A. Laval F.'i'ii' c < kM %  NATIONAL CA8II BECJISilH M icellent eondlthtn al Ralph Brard %  low Hi-inn; Hardwood Allev Phon' 1 4611 4.4.81—Sn. HOI.L-UP DAVLITE h'oVIE SCREEN < C.H. good older, Fill. CH' PHm l:.Ji tin. SKnXED SlltRT MAKERM-H..!-.* Ihlrl Factory. Palmetto Surol. TYPEWRITER IIUIUONS A CAHUON •AffJBl >""^h 't'^k 'II-I recelvad. get .... %  %  II 'I: |. (, i 4 ii 4n VENETIAN BLINDS. Kll.'h ••m-alf ill metal UeLuxo Venrlian bl.ndi, to >onii.-. d. iverr ) work*. Dl-I 44TH \ BARNES A Co, Ltd. II J 91-t.l r WOODWORKING MAC ih Quallt. Made. Ban. aw*. Plar*i. Jolntera Aoancjan uari inrgjn gwwd l-StrHHgfll IMUSOWI T!>^ p.. I ..,.,. WILHEUl %  %  _..lng creil .IARBOW in i .repon.lblr I. one rUr contracllni any debt or debta In mv name UBJSSl D) I afrg Signed DONALD BARROW. Rlca. Rl Phlhp. S4.JI an WANTED Minimum cho'o* u-rh TS ernl* oad PS cent! Sa%day§ 14 owrdf — oirr 1J icrO S emu a loord lorrk—4 raau u-ord Sundoyi IIKLP IIIII "it i' * \'ri i Three Ui B.Mi-b.e I—on t i American famih'i foi get. work In USA muat bo v. %  ... v. . partitlil.rMr H Aenllh. 30 rutlon a. 'I—2n MIMI.I.Li.MOIS IMMEDiATE CASH for diamond l.weilary. old China, .Hvar and Kheflekl Plate. PboM 44 or rail at r.nBHINCFS. adloimu Royal Yacbl Club %  IUM-TF.N IMMEDIATE CA11I for bfnkon Jawelli-ry, aoid nugget., coin*, oil mature, )ade OH B W I SUmpa OORRlN<,r.s AntlT-e Shop, blal 443a. %  Ill-tin OOATOne %  !• \* %  I RabblU. two pair* of Do. 7,-l I. i HUMBPH CYCl-B COMPETrTIO-.r now .m Ticket* lor rvow ilnce rompetlllon I* cloalng M the LaOv olher day* .is may be ordasrad U) the I'rmtitig Committee—250 copleto be printed at each hwud Th. OMETl'l Is to be printed on papei of foolscap sue. and shall follow a closely AS practicable the speciOpy furnishrxi. and is lo com.in; — la) All prtxl.H | ttofuments. Rovernment nut id minutes, documents, and Bills an>: Re^nlutlons of the Legislature ordered lo be printed, and all Ac'* of the Island; (bl All notice.*, advertisements and documents L. M Offlcer or Chief Clerk nr Si'i-rolary ul any ol the departments of tht Government Service Iwlieihcr the said d('p.iir" tN noaa in existence or shall hereafter be brought Into existence, or iroag the Clerk of the General Assembly of Ihis Island; (ri All notices or returns required by any Statute, rule or order of Court or Government regulation lo be published in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE and any private advertisements which the Printing Committee may permit or authorise t* be published therein; (d) Ail minutes of meetings and notices of th. Directors of the Barbados General Hospital, all notices and other matters relating to elections, and all returns, regulations, bye-law-. milHC fee, from any public Board or parochial authority; (e) Any Other paper or document ordered by the Printing Committee to be published. Any notices and advertisements for the OFFICIAL, GAZETTE coming under class (c) abovemenlloned which are not by law required to be paid for from the Public Treasury are to be deducted from the OFFICIAL GAZETTE in the measurement thereof but in the u-mlti for the printing of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE the charge per inrh wiih the width, which will be made, for such notices and advertisements. Is to be stated not exceeding however 3 4 per inch of space. All printing in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE for the General i ur for any Public Board or parochial authority coming IS* (d) shali also be deducted from the OFFICIAL GAZETTE in the measurement ther*or. and the public printer shall OOUMI tin amount due for such space from the parties requiring the publication .it DM BUM rata pei pajg .is the OFFICIAL GAZETTE Is paid for bv tin(inv.inment. The Printing Committee reserve to themselves the right to include or exclude al any lime any particular class of private or other notices or %  llmllMlimill or special or particular notice or advertisement. All D Md to be punted m the OFFICIAL GAZETTE ust be inserted therein within one week after delivery to the con tractor or his agent. Provided always that it shall be in the discretion Ol the Prtnttguj Committee io extend such time. The number of sheet* of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE is not limited, and all reports, returns^ documents. &c, must be published in full In one OFFICIAL GAZETTE. All oriuimil documents, drgfl minutes, draft Bills and Resolutions, turns, Ac, to either brunch of the legislature shall immediately after the publication thereof in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE be returned the Clerk who delivered the same lo the contractor. Bill. Resolution, or other paper delivered to the contractor to be printed, shall be printed and circulaled within five days after .( [>i ,v,y Ihr House of Assembly, per page. Printing Debates of the General Assembly and of the Legislative Council. Binding sessional laws J bound cloth and paper per volume of 100 stitched. Printing and ruling pay sheets prr 50. Ruling where feint lines are required per 100 sheets. 17. Colonial Treasary's Office. 8 licenses and receipt books. 31 descriptions and paper of different quality 1 Llli get I Cash Book I Miscellaneous Journal 1 Abstract Ledger IB. Auditor General'* Offlir. Furnishing about 1,000 loose leaves for Departmental Vole Books. 19. Psal Office. About 100 White Foreign Receipt Books 5J X 16 in. in 1,000 )e.i\.n uh duplicates. About 100 Green Local Receipt Books for nut-districts 51 x 15 in of 100 receipts with duplicates. About 100 Green Loci Receipt lUioks 5J X 15 in. of 100 receipts with duplicates. pi Books 5J x 15 in. of 100 receipts NOTICE BITS BI.Bt TION PARISH Or ST. IMI.IVRBAHOS I HKIUUIY glva nolico to all per. % %  vota a. o iho Oeneial Aaaembl) foi W Pariah of Bt Androw that the Kle. on will commence I-etwee,, UM hour ( a and > o-cWK In th* moral* f 01 londay Uto eta day of April IS5I al Thi •mmunlt* Kail Balliglaun to th, %  run of bt Andrew And I ban entitled t* *„t. | ___ ~Maea aforoaaMI then and there to mak> aotco of on* eunlilWd able, anftViem nd diat-roet perann lo adrtaa and con%  ul to ih* mating of aurh lawa a, anj'l b* meet and convenient for Iho good %  rnmenl ol thia ular* and people an I trrvatlon of Iholr eatatoa unlooi %  roil be required fur the d. %  iharoof In which raar auch Poll will be taken al th* place or pUcn appointed lor thai purpoao. on Monday the lath day of April ISM commencing between hnuri of 1 and a o'clock, in inn | rt*uU.-i D BUNOALOW Modern BuraHlBBt .l| lalcri .1 Brighton. Black B~*l ma En rasa particular con eu BtST' a v grand** )ardin*a ham I an.. dor>N> eon bano y tamhien doa annplc*. Buena comidi y arrvlcio e*tm-rado a* h.Ma BBBBBBl Telclono STtt Larg* double room with path alao two untie* In ramfartahl* prlvut* ham* an tea Spactoua groondi, good belhlnc beach. e.r.llei.l maoli. TN. BST1 SI—Si.. .... raaag Ulven i ( March mdar i hand thi. tila SOIh .lav of March IBM r. A INGrlAHM. J P.. Sheriff A Ket.irnlng Officer •1-1 M-Sn NOTICE BTB Kl ICTION — ivi.i-ii BARBADOS I Hiagutv glvo lattice to all pon qualUlrcl lo vole .t the Elect Vcridaeii of Ih* (Jcnaral Aaarmblt II* Pariah of M Andrew thai I I appointed Th* C'nnununlt* Rail — U*ll*plaine a* th* plar* where all auch peraona re.ay meet on Monday IH* elu dav of April IBS! lo elect on* Meirdkrr io arrve for the ParUh of St. Andrew in ih* (l*n*ral A.-mbl> of Ihli laiand And I here*.* luilher give not!,* that in th* event of a Poll being requited lor Ih* determination, ol the aald IJ'ctlon. 1 have appointed fnr Ih* raid purpoa* Ih* place. Hereinafter •perilled, thai n lo aay Polling Station No I > Tlw Allrvn* School Hrllrplalnr THE MOUTH WINCI For Ih* UBr ol all peraana whoar Mirnamaa begin .. mi th • htleri A to J inclualve Pnllltig Hlalln No lg|I The Allevne Sklu-il Belleplalne TUB SOUTH WINO Por rhe uar of all peraona whnar aurnamea liegui with ih* letters K lo E Inclualve Dated ihia 30th dav of March 1SS1 C. A SKINNK1I. rarochlat Tr*aaur*r St Andr*w SI SSI Tn ram About 100 Green Foio.nn R* with dtiptrOataa, N DoOaal of GuinnuHl NoParcel Post Receipt Botiks 19 N BI in. 500 leaves with duplicates Mail Despatch Bt i k^ tor regi '• -i-M letters 15 x 1in. or 200 leavi-i.. C.O.D. Register lS4ft x 10 in. 20 Kf-glstrarV Oflite. RgpoH on vital statistics -annually—on extra strong paper — Baltiaangp Qimbty Register of Births—forim 24 I \*'J in. Register of 1HM R 11*1 in. 21. Lri-I nepartmrnl. Furnishing •boul UQ teenpt bot-ks for use in Police Magistrates' Courta, Assistant Court of Appeal, and Petty DatH Courts, each book staining 100 receipts 6 x 0 In. General Cah Book 15 x 10 in. of 100 leaves. Lallan and Record Books—difli rvnl %  dfCI SuitorItei-eipt Book 15 x 10 tn of 150 leaves. Suitors Cash Book 15 x 9'? In. of .100 leaves. i-onsation Book 13 x H in ,.i LM leaves. 22. n.-i-.i in., in uT Srienrr and Airiculture llintb for guidantf of exhibitor* 5Vj x &\t In. Annual Reports 13 x 8 in. Receipt Books. IMariwttion certificates. Plant Invoice Books 17 x Mt Acknowhttmnont BookUVi v LI In, Meleonih>iiical Botiks l x IL' in. Rainfall BookM L4V. x 0 in. FuiniK-'lion I % % %  Sugar cane reading books 8 x 6'a In. Kih' covers 13'; x %V rmin for n-rortiing inontldy mctiinoloiiu .1 data 14 x 8 1 In. Jt. Polite IrrparlmeBl Poliea diaries 15"4 x 04 In. of 150 leaves. Prisoners Charge Book 174 x UK in. of 200 leaves. Police Report Books 17W x ll4 UL of 200 leaves. Criinin.il Summons look 1'< x 11% in. of 200 leaves. Criminal Warrant Book 18 %  ; 10=, In ;>f -'<) leaves. I'.I) Summons Book !.'•'. l,r i in ol 1M leaven. P.I> Civil Warrant Book 17% x 10* In. of 150 leaves with 3fl leaves for index. Occurrence Book 13' 3 x 8 in. of 6 leaves. Prisoners Property Book IIV. x 8 In. of 96 leaves. Report Summons Books 16 x 10 in. of 150 leaves. Criminal Register 18'* x 13 in of 81IO leaves Harbour Police Arrival Book 84 x 14 in. of 250 leave*. Harbour Police DeyeatlaTC Book 8'j x 14 in. of 250 leaves. Permit Book 94 x 10*. in of 100 leaves. Police Duty Book 17 x II in. of 366 leaves. 24. The contractor shall be responsible frr tho correctness of every Act, Bill. Rcolution. Dovigmant, Return, Form. Statement or other paper or any book sent him to bo printer! or for publication according lo the copy thereof B> hvered to him. 25. In etaa of the non-performance of any ilem in the contract or in case of any delay In printing or binding according to the term' of this Contract the Printing Committee may have such printing or binding done by any other person and may deduct from the amount due to the contractor the amount paid by them for such printbrg or binding. 26. The contractor will l>c required to krci, g telephone on the premises where the printiiiK office i* carried 00. 27. The contractor will ! %  required to have and keep the premises where the Printery J* carried on a sufficient number of up to date complete Linotype oi Monotype machines with all necessuo metal and other accessories and appliances for the proper operation thereof :,n for the |jnm|)t tarryinn nut .f hn contract. 28. If the ci.titrat tor 'li.ill fail to print and or circulate any document, return, or other paper, form or statement required to l" printed, and or circulated within the time required by his contract or such further Ua I ma> '•<• allowed by the Printing Committee he shall he liable to I penalt) not exceeding ten shililngs per day for each document Of OOM i>iper until thr same is printed and or circulated to le deducted from any amount due or tn become due lo the contractor. 29. The person tendering will be required lo send a letter signed by two persons possessed of sufficient property engaging to become bound with him in the sum of tftOO or to give the security of an approved Guarantee Society conditioned for the due fulfilment of the contract. Persons desirous of tendering may obtain any further particular' from the Clerk of the General Assembly. The Printing Committee do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any tender. It mud lie lieaill i.iidnstood that the Printing Committee reserve tn themselves the rigid of determining what documents or paper.shall be published or printed. Persons tendering are particularly requested to note this reservation. D I.EE SARJEANT. Clerk to the General Assembly. ITHIK Ton crnfr par agate p*e ii.'uH . from Hay lit Appoint men ta lo n*w Dial I ISO Full her particular! Phono %  lT II W Hliida 4*11 t.f.n. PM an SB* Li> rulfafeaa lor VacioVy, AgI %  MM ttrnllidi Snlicltora, nr Sun-in-. Aupl>: Thanl Broa or Dial Ma. a i ll-4ka. %  raRAPfMiTii VBTOBIA. O.. the ...ulf. n lahed front liih Apill. IM. T&*aBBne. ITig and Radio. •101 p*r mevlS. Dul giso. REAL ESTATE UAV;IM .I i... i May US, St 1> r*nc* Gap on ••*. 1 rnlih*d. h, %  [rrolor. c; i ilnwnt Phone KT* S4S1 — In UUNOAI.OW Navy U ardent. 1 bad • Including ii* w. C1S0D. IS 1 11 I I n l-\NI> Al mh Hall onpoalt* All,.,, r-artr Th %  i-evetal plecrm Now. lor faaat, or you ran m II — I -n hau i...i LAND lit* aq. ft of land lord l-ne. Il.l,luet..i.ii. |.rai.U, asas. MM 11 AUCTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER B| recommendation. .f l.lo.di Agenli we will .ell on TUESDAY. Ih* loth a1 our Mart. High Street 1 t int..11. Coin riahea. 48 pkgt CJiakrt CK.U, M Tina Paint. SB Coul|K)t., 10 Dantifl l-UL Ncgi.i l>ta. M BMtM t.l. Bolt Sato HRANKKR. TROTMAN 4% CO. An. I t .i-. T4.SI— tn BY litaliu. n I-Inn.. Ol Sl.,1 l,.'l„, U i.l Crnlral Mh begin.NOTICE cr I.e. k Ciwl Thi. HlMAL'itMIIK. Mi.X*.ll being r.i.lli -.1.1 mdii. %  <•gutallt.li. ol ttir rliih will bl Horn ntlAcatmi will be annoiincil ihortlv Meanwhile, toaeineaa continue II u>udt al Mr Clullm preaent IwaUon n St. I-.NOTICE ''M-ll Ol ST. JOIIS I from the flh lo Ih* BjBt orlWe nl the .",. .i I T -. Jolui. will be open on Sal 14th and % %  April II S FltASrtH. CI.OSIN<; NOTICE IINI.I .-t\ liHI t. .111111 *r I"' I" P SI ii .i UM saresraJ pub %  t l.n.ine^ will I.1... i front W*dJ lllh April to Monday J'rd A at 1 pn Dn Hi Humuer bnv.ie name, as* I|I rmmtaln Pen; on* Ui (inld II* pin. *rVrial dn>r„ Una of Poll.h. jn.l gaVOtSl i.ttwi nea eJ mlereat UABCV A. SCOTT. Oovt. Auctioneer TAa V aa SHIPPING M"Mi;i \l. AI'STRAMA, NEW ZEALAND LINE, i IMIII n IDA N.X LINE) MS TONCAIIIICO' a.,11,.1 II, I ,i March StUi. Arriving at H..ih9SS*i Hfij Cargo acrept"d on Utrousll I {.tiding nith lr..ii-lui..r..„l ..: for Billt.li Oularut, i: and Lreward laiand*. Tor furlher partlcuUia apply: %  UlUHESS. WIT1IY % CO. LTD.. and NEW iBrd ApriL NOTICES 9nc. SEHVIC1 i>Mlv*i Barbailoi Mh Apill arrive* %  arbadoa Kith April. NEW ORLEANS SERVICE aalli lift Mmiii .rrivea Barbad i aalU 4lh April AsMvg TANADIAN KERVK E "" MimiiMi NaaM at Ship s "AldTflA rmSAMT" .. s --Ali'ilA PAnTNKH.t>..ll |. WIU I. %  iiniiiiini M. I s 'ALCOA PTT.ASUS%  "ALCOA MONrJaX'' Apill Mh satti lea fct. i — %  i April 13th Saila for ft and ST Bi\er PortrROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND Gl'I.F SERVICE APPLY:—DA COSTA CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE ^HARRISON LINE r OUTWARD FROM THZ UNITED KINGDOM Due Vessel Frem I'L'... I'.I-I.UI. %  1 "TACOMA STAR" ., Liverpool 2tnd Mar. -^•i "HERDSMAN" .. I .iirl< >n %  ss "DEFENDER" I %  -i ui' HI i ith A| r MUi April ss "ASTRONOMER" Liverpool 10th April Urd April ss PLANTER" 20th Apill 3rd Mav -.s. "DALESMAN" .. Glasgow via LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE I Ki... f aTJfltorl U Licenr* Mo 4-Si of 1S9I i r*ep**t %  >! a l-..rd and tched Hoad. Kt MMhael, |. .%  .....t i la Uesatog %  > % %  id ehlngle Oiip at Villa Md. Brillon* Hill. Ml MKhaol. Dated thi. Stn „..> of April. IMI ,-, K A McLBOD, Faq. PbllC* Magletr.te. Ill | I ,i i wuiriir Lgsi n A^-llcar* idervl at .. %  lt iaih day ol April. IMI, al | E A UcLCOD. T4SI l LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Alon>a B III I %  "* Niw Bond, SI Mich-e Lit iiennlMxi lo aril Bplrlta. M'll l.iSuor-. *c. *| hoard and mural.tr-op attached lo reatdei.re al Ker-I'iy Ion New Rood. St Ma-heel Dated Uili Mb day of April. ISS1. To E A MrlXOD. Eaq narrate. Dm A Bbjnaa A B N M ThM applKStli %  Merad at a LaMW thISO. day of April. ISS1 -ill 1.1th April Bth Mav %  iOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM Vessel Far Closes In Barbados SS STATESMAN" ..London End of For further information apply to DA COSTA A CO.. LTD.—AfonU PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products, Limited. Roseau. Dominie,, for sailtag to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or Rotterdam Single fere £70; usual reductions tor children. A



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SATURDAY. APRn. 7, 1H1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACK TIIRF.K Ch. Ch. Nurses Need Bigger Quarters Quarters are inadequate for thr number o* Nurses in Christ t'hurc.i according to the report of th. Churchwarden. The building needs .vnshinf anH painting. "I strongly nc inadequate, but again 1 diverted fund* from the Almshouse to distemper the walls btsidii ate International Trade To Strengthen The Free World .T^y t: '' %  **"" '*"* ,IM *'*•' •"* •" th * (:i(i/. iiKi'|ii.ui Their City l'llll.ADiUJ'llIA : .'A'OO.UOU Or* r ts of this third Urge • U ."uitM MM -chool By f. I'lll S I ll\ I 'OH HI S THE health of the international immfti-*il relationships of the United States is of prime impi lance to our national security A-. we and the other nations of the free weald mob*IU our nulitary strength and gear our eooaomies for the potential defense of Undemocratic way of life. It Is essen.. tial that the channels of trade be Ulp utilised to their maximum cspap *" bl lilies for the supply of goods needed in mlittajy production No* to do so would be to waste a valuable asset ef the American productive system. It Is equally true, moreover. nd paint the celling, that maintenance of high level* of multilateral trade contribute Matron* Quartern,—There was so directly to the economic stabilIUI grant for this and ni'lhing was v ol ,he nations of the free spent To have done any repairs world that •"* substantial falling of a small nature would have been in lh s A !" "! gg*l -SJ" a waste of monev The time has •* * <* *• ""^^^"U !" r i** ** %  nou.d ff-sis rsxp-niS&i the. ciemocrauc philosophy ARTIES HtaOLINE rVstC"Can't 1 ha..fate night iliil".'! nix like M.P.t '" ihe individual trader. oloped from a multitude e i.uren—are having oppoitumtv voice opiniun* on city planning .ad rt'planning So successful have been the etorts of the CttaV Cllv Planning and al.v. iiSiproviiig the oietrOBust imttm Phila-lelphia approach'" has come to have. 7 n •* '"*"< %  i peoeoh has roro* to have a de „t;iT""X*h r;^ "" m st? !" *> %  3* KSiT itrtkaatton t„ the Ration*] J£ !" f, S^" c ";^'; wniomv Eun-M. w mkai % %  *•" *"PPrt from 1 omm European and other Imported goods were offered for *tie in places ih.oughoui th' Unittil States in 150 where they had i-een unknown before, and h reunify %  .inonprofit, nonpsUlisan organi/almn. faces willi real i mi „ major problem that troubles many cities Philadelphia •Stal :>*hed import markets, the h ** '" lhl u,! s y** n P 0 *" •* %  ad QUanUt* %  • imported "*pWy and its citizens have bean goods increased. ao occupied with commercial and ind irial expansion that venerol The importance of all of this actit>)vle development has been vil> is i-nhaneed by the eonsKleraneglected turn, which have persuaded the M _, United States and ihe rest r.f the Now'.heCUuens Council, tepie. froeworld to direct their econo •*'"-; 1*0 labour. buMMO, iRthe lines of democratic cnurcti, welfare and civic organdefense. A firmer commercial inte. Nations, is sparking in,tivi.ii..i. grotlon of ihe trading world is a Ink-rest and channeling publu vital component of Its military and support of th e City planning Cornmoral defense. The more effe> %  mission, the Re-Developmeu. lively private business both In tl.r A'thurity, and the Philadalphu United States and In other natlo i5 Igusing Association In projecu provides efflctant channels for '.'••• ranging from backyard gardenniK interchange of oods and .•crvicaa ; highways extensions the more real will be economic and With the co-operation i military security for all. The inschools, these orgjumalioiw look United dustrial might of the United State. M ghbourhood problems int. teadlly Mippleniented by the vpeciaclassrooms Thenwith been || i knowladge and -kglp.if modnta. pup.ls auntssd make their block: conditioned and col assed. n .|„. w ,, r id .an jii" Jn greater wi „ p*^ a mlllla ry' ^tential „^ *"* ....... be arrived at as to what is to be tT* *iS u 8 > ulldm At p !" nt n^teVrai'^emonstraUon' that peoits cmdltion beggars description. ple u vln g b y it are physically Pariah Church—This is m good more comfortable and are recondition and should be kept so. warded more fully for their The walls are In deplorable eondilabours than is possible undi tion and money should be granted other political economic systems, to put them in order. With the con, , sentoftheCornmisaionersofHiihInternational trade iinjon .,T.I P~Pl %  !" mor. p,n prodih-er. h a v %  • %  <• "•* arhlcvrmont of World wj II „*""'!'"''"',',""*'""'?''.'""" ,„ * !" worth tM irnln. American and belter lhln w sell. IkU Herh.p, muallv Imporunt. fi, {! %  "" <""> '.' rounded offK0Q d 5 sold to cuBlomers In other favourable position alone would str enBtromr.c of ommcri'Uii i.e. dimgeruus trafni. and run-dowr rhes..mprovements were clone MrU o[ ,he world not only have not have forged the noin. which • ,._,.,2: r ,,. r ,„„,i,. ,T v i i„. homes, on,, jrounj-ter nclalmed from Highway funds. J^„ M w ,g„ (or tp, nation, tave ten ra.de Markcllng chanco^u^T^ifnlT \? Uvtal Y !" %  "• "'"' '" U" Bectorj.—Utlle was done to Ihia labour and proflta lor lla bualneaaTC ls have been ulrengthened and ...riJSS. a „ d ..rorovci^nt m av.r.ig. cltucn ever r.-.11 II Is sadly in need of renovation men. but the, also have supplied d.verslned Wider and more i„| "EJ"' ,7 whole community.inalde and ouulde with Urn. wMh. JJ"^'^,"" "„i,h'many of the This progress has been partieuboth In the supply of fcu ,Iy wmo the, ed to fau minor repairs *ne. jw^gior ii productive s. S larly encourngln, br.-aua.it . military mate. -Inl and in th. lh anm .,„i p rol ,, c „„ „„,„,„ In good order. S, almoat entirely the achwvcrnciil m..king and distribution if l. al Ihe, were ii.viu.l t., ,,.„i„,, 'Ulan goods—will be that of the since the character Hi tomiii. nil Arms Factories hi W.I. • he unmv-iiate pro\ •mall .1 r m s factories in the tin's RePrc-granune and profor surplus %  dad ;oda* b> Mi Halfoid W 1 Heddisn. %  %  If world planning has any pracIcal meannu oUtlKle Hloomi-bur> l .itmamenl best i HI Ihe it MHII %  % %  %  Lllion men jnd omc;i ti %  owering : -of lifo. '.. %  I .ii .1., rrimd.Kl and u nge ngcmgntwil IKHII "1 s an IndMsl confident thai iaite In these imull arm*, bouts and ahoes ant the |Mg t-inipln.di-t qiuiinit iecided In kill lh .l-m.iiean cigai iKhaitl 1 londitn S ask for o& 0* 1. 1 \l \w I SOAPS u i i Mill a Kidney Trouble Causes Backache, Getting Up Nights if ••-. No lenafit —No Pa* Jeasafeo.1 '-.f'^" ,*'"' %  I'.inted. The Church St II.-.„I Vlei ,—A fev. of the frco of private entorpri' On both vt.iiuin pw.s—wm ue u.. ... .ic peraon.llv li dth the necessity lldM of Ihe Atlantic, individual specuiust since the charade, ,,l J^.,,,,^, „|, nn |„, A1 „ rr emphasis on producers and traders have sought that continent-, prclucllve ,-apac' ,„'',, '',„,, ,.,,d. m %  energetlcallv nnd have liv and of its social structure fits u "" a to voie. oplnloni, study tut tern Faced .-is the nations repairs were done, but repairs areworlt | „„. urgently needed-, and painting is a ,7f placing greater necessity to save the building the military aspects of their ecobusiness rnergrn,-.,,, „„., „-.. .,, !" o. ... .. ...uv.u.e .,„ ^^ ,, . rl.rtholomeW, rhureh „omic activity. Itiis fortunate that been Increasingly successful in ,t for thui type of activity. As r PJJ" •' <" %  llnlv minor repairs were done to lire exist VelHunctloning inmeeUn. the needs of the market part of their services In .upuorl •"" !" !" "i'h., ihe! „iM l h. roof li 1, iC.r .Vi,.J ^.KTT.^, i„ n .ii,„VS trading channels to The role of the U S Government. „f the sound cxp.'n'i.m of privatebo'" UUfa •'".•; the. might gaTvamscd roor'bV named L, d .upp" The ".panned need, for both abroad -J, M home ha, „ ow „ u .d trade, the government, "> %  "t'onn^l eitbm. kei,i ua,rl,..i -„ i. S^hwV.„ihi Si iDCsUrnd leads required in been to foster trad, by supplying „[ Western European nations eon-S-encouraging was th. -2!, If ot X ; all ..^fm. 2 v., "/iv^ of>"3c''" •'*•"" i,h l lmM "" ; " !" lint"' < " "' co-oper.lion • cilUaw. that Ihe goal for Its: ......I,.. _. "may yet mDO V, t d ioods are an Imporcourage commcro by removing wl ,„ ,„,. goiernment of tho ha. l.en supplemeiil.d willi a plai -ved for some years if speedy '"^J^ijnt „f prosperity for obM.cles In the path of lr.de. anJ VmlM slillo Uirough such calling for the expenditure M scveritrreasons. Taking European generally to perform thoseser(hi) i, nc i s 1K 1n c lechnical aslisIfi37.29fl.o00 during Ihe next example, the sales vUl stWI^Ibfl y""^"",; lane pronrammes, under which years groups of European businessmen From far and near person. Commute* and "this was spent o.. & •WJSLPtSSSTJ'X: eSTC ZJSZZvrXTti >T&^W_to_ !" wf U n ". r d ft*"** ln rll y_!•'!".'" wathing and paint, the differencelcetJ bn; mea< i are takei St. M-iuiii.n, Viraraie.— A gram countries a* ,s St-S^OK Ses i ^^^he t 'Europe.„^a,: >&£ .^bsTiSna,. i of great importance to the role (or government Is a c harac. urotitnble functlonirig of ths ecoteristic ol a free society, in cost being paid by the Church System of the Onlis* States efTectiveness The effecU of lower unit costs urncs is a d virility of the democratic commercial system. State* to improve their knowlto look at the ,: l*ti!ladrlpl" „, edge of the structure of Its Induspri..,.-., Within the I. .lJ7ITatiaslnii nf ths r y and trade ;ind. more uarticuper**.* from Cermnny vtewsjl h larly. to discuss with American gojactl undttrtaken or complete, potential buyers the wayg In nrt .tudlsjd future plaru which European commodltieg CSSB also ,ant frosn Australia, Switsers the best serve the needs of their oesa. lanrf Swclen. Turkey, India. New *^ nom >"' Edaland, England. Japan and OV The goals of expanded multiPWIippmsst ,, ^y %h ,. tfl n M W„ tl rl of the ••Phiiitdelpri orld are not eaay of approach". Tor they noted th attainment. They can be reached statements of belief In UwaUMBI tiuitinuous and Council: by turning hla hand toaid'inTrTv "" "SStfflT Therefore "ihe Slton^'nt^iiierTw^^^n^ energMic eftort on the part of 'We believe the citisens wan t*k The Medical Officers hTvo '^^"gS" strains l ."trength KK b^nStn producers, traders, shipping in,-hil.deJpbj, lo have been thorough ir, their work and 23g£| p rotper |ty when it buy, lhr prospartty and strength ol the •£, bankers, and^ otherjjjgrowth ratl have given freely of their time, from Europian customers the trading world. The facts of 1950 menu of the business pubUe p ICC emeal growth Ihe service of the poor of the goo dj which thev offer. arc continuing every day to con%  a ?fp vince ciluens of the United SUtes ~" Commit tee itself "I want to express my thanks" 1£ m oVc*sT|nUlcant for the mainconcludes the Church warden, "to tenance of buainaaa volume in thine entire Parochial Staff for their United SUtes than can be meahelp and co-operation throughout sured directly in terms of the the Parochial year The Matron, dollars earned from sales to EuroNume and Poor Law Inspector 1 pean costumers. But the bcnet.U havn rendered lhair sarviccs unol continuing tialcs to Eun .sparingly, and I want to place on buyers can be assured record my appreciation „, their IS^^i^^.v^foiXir'pu'r" .'.t^il.ru. •buTVa.he;-c.uke"Se H..^l selling their wares to economic facts of 1950 hnv been If %  to "earn The first step forward widening awareness among tin American people that ho*pilaht. to imported goods was in thel own MEd norted aiods was in thel The S 031 of ***"'*•* lu "'V^^ZL .w in imnKing ' wartime destruc^itahn been demonstrate! t^-^jP^jwgMbyJ •p canes the property of lion and dislocation. Since Industo be false. j lr-• %  raided, and how it shall bined enact may wen we y*<*ta „%  ,, roundly signilicant in the course "^ "^ i T r Louis fcoyco of St. •^u> ( ~. Village. St. Joseph, wa> burnt bten the best customers, it about 2 p.m. yesterday. Neigh reasonable to expect that Europe i hours helped to put out the Are normal demand for Amerieni and prevented Qoyce/s house from products may increase an ls ecocatching afire. nomic health improves. W.fkh, lhr Kales of Exchange I'ANAbA Ch|uni on n-iikri. SI %  ,.•". ,.• DMnBiut Draft* SI : %  i-i Sakat maft< fll nvv i>r A MOKE GLAMOROUS YOU! SMMI'I maM beauUflU ]• %  the world .rer Istly on turn*'* Iset l*ow'der to enhance Uunr Uvellnao. Follou their lead and see v.lu>t a difference the rtgttt siugst ol face powdM e.n make la> yaaar e*n>lexlon: how wonderfaiUy loll •nd clear It MB k>M. Sifted Oirangh the finest illk. Pond's Face Powder la a. finely H gtured a. sstwder can be So It joe. on with ntra-apeeM .rnorth. nean and eHng. for hours. P.mil\ Fare Powder ka deiicAlelr perfumed and rM In a. aMiflrable Dre.mi.ower Bo. V..H *d iat aU Hi. beat bculy i .wase r. Your •iumv-1 buys more in a tlOltltIS . ^aV POI\ T D*S FACE POWDER AY fj I.OVEL\ smuts "->,r '""*" 'mo,— "*yi„"Wen, ifajvf P"W W ^ '""""-".co.,. EE in: MM CAR AT dp* Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay MV efmbsanoKl fW h ('.In. A'UliOdi. Brh i".i •' %  M. I > \l . . \ k-h Ijudalpha. SV-n (lardrt. I \. Hi nottdM. m > %  %  %  --it I ...i. Mia .. I. M ..,. %  karoo, M v r n a-d-., M V Blu atv i i it..*-t ieli Inteipitsa *l H *t*h TtirlW !>•-' M V AKHIVALS tan %  Caroline. utt. (. L i JsSfll iia In Touch With Barbados Coastn. Station Caasi sad gnsalsss w*i ii>a>. a M. •rllfe Hit Ibi lush thl ...... a I %  *htl I-... ... %  %  lasts*:: a l-uit*.. Loi r Stat>. fUtAif K. ntayaSUK 0/u*>*i ol BNIHHIU. S pkaula Monica. H. ktatoo. H.U..... Uonaae ftfnainat.un. Gainil. Aili l-tlnr, Alc^i fa. i*iTM>d. Rio DC ii-int.. Artaaa <> Mulkban ssta. MAIL NOTICES .em I PJ* I omn I.U* Apnl. .1 John. N '.It M i, ,... I.. < ....... %  hr (l-*i*I %  lal HW, KidMT. 0l.'i W., • M) ii. i .i.l i Cyst ex for [ I D N V i It ADD |t to. .i ...r... %  ...s. KHIUMATISW HEALTH BENEFITS • FREE FROM HARSH IMPURITIES • NO INJURIOUS AFTER-EFFECTS • SAFE IN ACTION CASTOR OIL %  ••• *| tllll I lillllll III.. 10*00* "$ood Tlewi goA (Mhmatici... A Now Guarnnlood Romody lor lh ilollcl ol ASTHMA Dr. JOHN'S ASTHMA REMEDY This akilllully blandod piapuiation. aaauios you ol immediate lolief in liils raoat diatreasincj diaoaso and is tho reault ol yeoia ol intonaive study in Asihmailc coudiitons. Kp a Bottle handy and relieve yourself ol the constant threats ot Asthmatic altucks. RetaU Price:—12/Pe. fiottla Obtainable at . BOOKERS (Barbados; DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. HoMlna. DunlopiUu, the uriginal LJICX foam matlteit, li ideal lor all ilimuiei. The tuet'i. naivcmentt cause air lo circulate thniuRh millions of liny intcrionncctcd cclln, keeping the temperature down to %  comlortalilc degree. This hygienic mattress ia uniRcctcd by damp heat, and is completely odcagtajli it ic.isu veiiniii and pcit. an.l doesn't make dust, -. ~ — the Inside secret of modern comfort iTHItuVllll Illli5^\ BrSMIil llllTmi FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor. Phon* 4504 l. \I(IH \ IIOSK— %  .." a:




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I'AC.F. THBFF SATl'RnAV. A '• ' "II w, ^ac^r/w/s ALLIES M\KE LIMITED GAINS rffiiSSSfy Communist elements fight back stubbornly Congressmen Say ^„ Prt TOKYO, April ti I WO American Congressmen back from the Korean war front told correspondents here to day they would submit a "startling report" to Con gress in the middle of April. They urged that General Douglas MacArthur, United Nations Commander, should be freed from the "terrific handicap" of not being allowed to send war planes beyond the Yalu River. by E K Britons Like Caribbean Art %  itate Armstrong < Rcpi" < %  • %  ourl) .ind W. J. Bryan-Dorn :Ocmocr.it, South Carolina) said Communists had a sanctuary oehm.t the Yalli I -Wc feel that this is an intolerable sftiution. JIKI we fall to V HI be Hie '-tatcment said. "Our fofftea canni.i carry tha iction to tha enam territory We fwl General MaeArthm aril hia Commanders and forces should not bo restricted in any militarv action which they consider to be necessary". The Yalu River marks the frontier between North Korea Tid Manchuria, Armstrong thought the United Nations should lake the "calculated risk" of bringing Russia into 'he war and "see if we can't put tha Communists off balance in the -vhole Far East". In an* case. Moscow should be branded as agitators since she is furnishing much material for Chinese and North Koreans he %  aid. "It does not make sense that United Nations forces in Korea have to wait for the expected Communist spring offensive with the<;c handicaps" Armstrong said. —Reuter. Civil Servants Plan To Strike PARIS. April 6. Paris" Civil Servants of nonCornmunJat unions have decided to stop work this afternoon probably for two hours for a protest meeting over tha 15 per cent wa> increua for junidr officials hicli Hiey say is inadequate. Paris Civil Servants are claiming increases totalling about Sfl.000 million francs per year Inlead Of 4H.OU0 alrendj granted. —Renter Carcase Meat Far A Week LONDON, April 6. Food Minister Mauri.. %  WeW i.'-ii -i.i today that the who* uf Britain's lonponny meat ration would be supplied in carcase meat for the week beginning Sundnv. April 15. One lifth uf the weekly ration had no far included canned corned meat. Maurice Webb, the Food Minister, said increasing am home-killed cattle made this possible. We might be able to extend it." h* added. —Rrutrr MIMt HKVTIVU LONDON. April 6. The exhibition of paintings from Haiti eloaag today. Sponsorby the institute of contemporary an*, and housed In Dovei street oil Piccadilly. It Hi nome interest among artfipi Londoners. One note of rcfirei has been* what a pity the exhibition could not IKIVP shown us Caribbean ar: i a whole. Hut the paintings, about 50 in imber. ore all the work of untrained negro painters in II;ut and apparently all due to encouragement given by an American who set up on art centre OP the island in IMS. Tin* pirtuter have been shown in Pans, Brussels and Amsterdam. They came from I Dutch city and are goln£ back there Wh.it Londoners like about them are their unsophisticated harm. The way they break completely from stylish Atrioan nem*# art; their strange compelling mlxt of Christian and Pagan baUab; and above all, their great promise of an art that has been hidden away tor centuries and now looks like being brought out ith all its power. —ReuU-r Italian Teachers Go Oir Strike To-day TURIN, April S. Two hundred thousand children in Italy's northwestern province* learned with delight today that thenteathara will itrifce to morrow The 24-hour strike by teachers in intermediate schools for childri between the ages of 10 and will lake place in the province of Piedmont It will he repeated all over Italy in the next 10 days. If the teachers' demand* are not me by April 18. there will be a total 'Irike throughout Italy.—Reuter 70 SQUATTERS CUXHAVEN. April 6 German fishermen reported hero today that 70 "squatter" had North sea again occupied the Island of Heligoland. Renter Cypriots Want Union With Greeer ATHENS. April 6. Arch bishop Ma k a rios of Cypm said hara today ihat Cypriote wanted union with (irccce "and uu othei solution". •'Tho granting of permanent bases to Britain luuld not icceptable," he told a press < Terence. The Greek Government, he satd, should take steps to solve tho Issue on a friendly basis with Britain. "Otherwise, the Issue will bo brought before the United Nation;' forthcoming Grncr.il Assembly session," he declared —Reuter !R 1*0 children waiting for the *Urt from Captain C T, Ralaen to rsndr maniUbal" *t the Comber I School yesterday IV ri, on pmI Battle Must Go ()n—\.\v I .\KV si n uss April a %  i Hint as UM ,411 of an) a In K> rat but (0 continue ihe i Ha ww %  i %  iJrJnj n Na* %  %  h U Eaat i.„ thai thara an uld I,soon, but added ItcUon Ml, .: keArtn InCUKUng lilt Offd ..• riei.oti.U, i ugh Field C %  Bland) %  "' %  "' | irj IccUw to ici-'i Bjgri • 113 and t %  %  I. L I %  %  1 1 still think 1 1 will tattled 1.11I it will iaK. 1 time — KssHer IS Years For Atom Spy NEW YORK, April fi A 29-year-oid Ainencan ex Sergeant David Greenglsss was sentenced hara to-day to 1 in 1 risooment (or atom .pying. Testimony of Green*!.the bulwark of the case against, his vister Ethel and her husband Julius Rosenberg, sentenced to death rVttofn*? Savpol recommended 1?> yaan sentence tor Greenglns^. QranngiaM taid Da tola a* 1 bomb secrets at the Government Bntal station at Los Alamo';. New Mexico and turned thcr.i over to the Rosenbergs for transmission to Russia. —Reuter. BOAC Head Coming LONDON April 6 Sir Miles Thomas. Chairman of the British Overseas Airways Cor* poration, left 1-ondon airport tonight for a tour of airports on the Corporation's routes in South America and 'he Caribbean 'I am trying to get more business" he .. d He will visit Hucnos Aires and the Caribbean during next week to see improved landings and passenger handling facilme'. — Rent*.-. Newspapers Mourn WASHINGTON, April Seveial Amci nan newspapers IM radio stations are observing today ns a day of mourning for Argentine newspaper La Prensa. FIBES over their buildings will he flown at half mast in tribute to the Buenos Aires paper closed by President Peron's Government Observance waj launched by the Governors ol National Press Club Organisation of Washington JouinalisbJ.—RruUr Egypt Asks Big Three For Help To Slop Israeli Aggression CAIRO. April 6. Egypt today asked Britain, the i meed StatM and France to slop "Israeli angreMion" aji'itns' Syria following yesterday's Hare up in the demilnai ised /onebetui-en the two cbuntri, Egypt called for action under th* three Big Powers' declaration last May that, in the event of frontier violations, joint steps would be taken "both wi'hui ..in! without the Iramowork ol the United Nations" Robert Adams Backs Dow 11 Schuman Plan Is Barrier To Unity Says Schumacher BONN. April 6. Dr. Kurt Schumacher. West Orman fcocial Democrat leader, said here today he did notbelieve the West German Parliament would approve West Germany's signing nf the Schuman Plau. Social democrats thought it a barrier lo European unity. II In i material and political burdens on the German people. Schumacher nald In nil Importaie r.nililii u Airfields BERLIN. April It A W. •. i.i nil.. Nawi Aaeiie l.iimcd to-day thnl Soviet occupation authontu-s wen installation or new lurllelds aboul 10 miles northwest „t Berlin. Eytwitnr-seIrom lh< laid thai la't week a Kruup o. • i offlcera nut' ic a niiltlb'i aof*fiit> GRENADA. April 6. The formal signing by the A pi icultural Association and Agriculturnl Employers — Mental and Manual Workers' Union Wage Pact presently only Initialled, may take place on Monday. The agreement remains in force 'r a ye:ir. Tonignt Gairy address* what i* expected to be a mammoth Market Square meeting in celebration of the strike negotiatio; On Wednesday and Thursda] 12 more henrd a! a coroner's inquiry at the S; David's Magistrate's Court into the Latante shooting incident involving the Trinidad Police, this is now adjourned sine die pending Hi no; "the poor German people"* but the French and American High Commissioners had the final say. The great bulk of German nrkers. he declared, were opposed lo the Schuman Flan, and if by any chance it received a majorit> Parliament, Social Democrats would unleash a big political campaign against It in the country The Social Democratic Partv ould continue to press for fresh elections Although the-, %  onstitiitionnl legal means to force the Government lo r.n to the country, 'he Opposition would try tt discredit Adenauer's regime so much that it would lose auppor) amoifg ihe people and respect with the Allied Government. —efaler. ARGENTINA WILL SELL MEAT TO U.K. BUENOS AIHES. April 6 An uraameni to i**ume meat htpraanta to Britain was reached at ;iu e irlj id Argentina ncgoUatoa here today, accoraing lo ArfV'Mine source*—Reuter WOOL STILL DOWN LONDON, April tf Wool sold here this week I made pric au to one shilling (i.eaper than at February sale* Tins is the n*-ult of the al of United Stales buy ers from the international wool market*. isoine obscrvera here think the prkas will fall further ilmg \* resumed n^xi Thunda] Hi-ater GEORGETOWN. April 6. Robert Adams and hki dark Eric (;ravesande today withdrew an apph>-ation i<>i g nuTasnoni against the Attorney General, the Legal Ur^uKhtMiian and the Detective Superintendent Allci Magistrate Morris Charles heard furtbai iv.iii'i.t I-. II i %  i %  decision in an application for a .summons .i.;. Insl Sup* D'Abreau and But*-lMB ton. Before the application fu • th< %  ummonscr was heard. Adam*. Gravcsande and Hunte appeared d person* on u charge „\ obstructing the course of Justice When Adams took hi the bar table, the Magistrate reminded him that he was the accused and called upon him to taki his stand beside the dock LaW when the application r<>i tm summonses was considered. Adanv remained beside the dock and Uu Uagistrab invHad him to •> the the bur table but he replied I an afraid I may feel Adams made an un %  ppUcatlon for uu w %  1 i I staling that it wouli give Mini tune ti secure an eininen King's Counsel from abroad, bu Gilbert Parnum. Legal Druuuht* man who ii .ippearin K (or thi POIIca MM that he ha peace In IV,• Middle !-;.> %  t I I litviTiinivnt and pt'Ople .upp"M Syi ki HI all • %  i made to stop this aggression". An l-raeli source neai the border, who said the tuatlon there rei alleged il SM Ian %  irtlllarj had bgan aaan zonal town of El llamma whlr?t 1 %  occupied by Syrian troops. Smoke wag Hill n-ing toda Mn [> un HI near the luw hombed bv the Israeli air fore: i icports from :i .... %  .'i n lalutaoa mf HI Israel ptiliee. Ii.ieh aourCM lanei| Syria's objective Wgg to llltelleie VIUI the big dramaga letiaaM In UM ii"ic Valley, which Israel hoped would % %  rtila lai %  and provide „ < %  %  %  the demQItgriaad Kruu-i Sultan Gave Vuthoritv PARIS. April ii. i Commurda) Deputy today said tha rntnenl h* trantad i nltad Btatm i in Morocco Pi urtalel tuiki i In H I Assembly why the ha.es nad •-•< : 'eadad without consulting It) Morocc Actln Foroign Mil lad lhal t>\ th Fi -f IBI2 the Suit,. i powpi i..'i.riiiiit, irdlllai i of Ihe %  Intananea ol ofdai mid poQei M ni ami %  Monteean waters —Rrulrr (.;n'(llii Slarls Fusl rjURH Maml.i! i 1,1 ..i I the lab ndht, ii %  i galoal i'" '... i | i M Qandni dacJared tha rtet tic i i . %  i *ould "in lha nan i i Ood" tb i heOovet unent'a a; irtl I gregatioi. i i Igl berab %  i nf ii 1 ntued hht da uaaday, foui d i Into foi the Bouti African Government''OrOUp %  i dllhiant i groupa m tha Union %  Rewtrr Peace Awards PASS COPPER BILL WASHINGTON. April 6 The Hi today pasted a bill to suspend i port duties on topper until February. 193 II will go to the %  XI a in %  ifagaardi m LONDON. April 6 Professor Joliot Curfc munlst-French expert In atomic %  the arrival or Ti Btalht, International Peace Hon A. P T. James, a TnnidadjAwards announced todai legislator holidaying here gives a.radio reported. Dr Hewlett John. I .IT -i {son. the Had Dean" of Canterbury and the Mnr Iwa i 'the report said —Reuter. rurp topper mining industry %  %  r.clow 24 cents a pound R-ut*r \ isas Denied Paul iitilif-tin. WfiA Dean BOMBAY. April 8 The Indian, Govemmc. fused visas to Paul Robeson American negro singer. Professoi Joliot Ci.nc, Ranch atomic scientist, and Dr. Hewlett Johnson. Dean ol Canterbury, who plan to attend 'he Communist Pagca Conference" In India this TTionth The Dosnbai tee' wbich is organising; ference anl the Home Ministry refused on the ground that Indi..' peace pom known to the world The Indian Government hau earlier refused permission for HIP Conferenre to mee' in Delhi —Reut*.Jap Treaty Draft Changos Likch WASHINGTON. April hnanl sawi u>. ay that il had tJi %  i i i Japanese peace treaty recently circulated drnmenlr A State I %  | %  Mkaari an ak) Im An I drafl 11 not necessarily reflect i II. aid he did not knov changes had yet been cumin eutcd to th" 111 inter* l< tnents—Reulrr TITO .sia> ArXaTfl \ BELGRADE, Apid I Yugoslav press office loni| announced the dismissal ol eleven Ministers from Mai ha] Tit I n Wed Raybum Bpeakei il %  Raprai en mtad" ii 1 km i. HI I.I %  quanUy" Taaa %  eachlng LondJotl iHimher i>( Amu %  -i i itatament to the effac that Mr. Rayburn na-t lh it in Manohui m batnf ooacantistedL "Taaa is auUiorlsed ihaaa raporti j'Invtatad and i.Hui. Miti tinea no sov let troop %  %  — Rraler French Uuuifrli Drlw Oir Rebels Princess Horn I.AI'SANNE. Apnl C, Ouoen Sir ikiOf Slnm, •'!( %  Ol i . fu t child, a bab* glrj todaj UM -King law He marin-I I'm,reSinkit IIOW 111 ll Bangkok |ja*l Apl I Itlon Itculer HANOI. Tongklng, April U Strong v ....in. hed Dowarbri ivc in the mountainous • • % %  • %  terrltor) about 3" %  of hare today Virtmuih rebali it>. beli<< ad I i %  %  I ihhahed in in %  >mi up tn lata th noon the Eiem Ii r\ Borh i n BJ poaHJon The nangC) .said Official!) 111.i' tt i". h.ill lakfn i IHI|i: i -iini'i An .itt.Kk wraa balng da on the northern side nf link ll.iv Ida lha Iruofu ; f omm !" i.i KMball ,1 nililler. 1,1ml ding laal P %  have vent lha rabCi l . I Itruln On the waatan fronl %  %  %  indication him raj ... %  %  !!* id\ anced ihe day an atMM i a nil but ,i (.ut hi tinfronl etTurt to dad itsahte t An Amcricjiii :. i k placad nine nidi Kurd is reported to M :iin tii' 1 %  was no import whut iiiu in the Lilly knpori where United Nations troop* wan till fight ng balo* lh<" parallel. Ihg) %  on ^ • i tarn fronl Hangyc is about m ntiK nf the %  | %  -ector w,i| i %  icports irom UM night. Amariean tnmpr i I .... | low lying i %  ihood \ • i oaltlons at avei diggesl In... weeks Allif.1 off %  were part of lha CMnaaa dofon •iv concopt r at Ions which have bean (orming Mi tt* norUi "i lha parallel Rrulrr M.P. TABLES MOTION AGAINST MCARTHUR CUT EXPENDITURE \v tSHtNOTOM AptU R Thi Houaa ol Appi called on lha Uiulel ivarnmanl lo-d %  to < lii(iMi(i llnr wiiv tor Rus%  11 i hai i. ..... B I %  I I I I : .-V us In spend ouraelvci i tinCon miiiei eommanb d —Keute i.i'M >N April 1 Will Null?, Ilrttish Member of { %  arI lament. i motion in UM Ha i regretting that the House "no lunger has i II General MacA I %  forcean| %  tions" N.iiK' adad foi %  %  % %  i i i %  i i wl ethei G< w mmanl Hill |tvo hnv HISS it — Itrulrr TILL THE ABTOCATI TIIF. NFWS I>IAL 3113 Ml OR Mr.Ill A Red W Jiniing l.CUAI'KST April 0 Sfub^ri Ncp II i %  to-day DUM nd means <•' %  Ihe ullegerl BJmutl OR lha Hun IHI Charga D'Affalna Islvan bee in K< U —aeutrr. World Title Fight cmcAoo, A i weight Champion and Joe Maxim. < %  '• Wi rWL %  Hi %  >v.i-ighi mu notda*. toda Mavywatghi i %  Chicago • i Charles will receive 40 DM of the net receipt pc r cent—Reuter t>PU(\IIO\ I If, \IHI\I) NEW YORK. A|>nl I Th.Uniud Btatea Oovarnatani powerful madtum-wava ra a ti H"iiig freighter (oi f campaign of imU Washington despatch to the New York Un*-* Tha projaet lo b" ... Vagabond —Reuter India Rejects French Findings %  \/ MtOCItESS" PARIS. Apnl A > it) "no progress" after i maetirir of Foreign 24th. He added that no new proposaU were! *r (l ,. | n %  —Prater J erv<:rs, r (KV DELHI. April fi Indian Prune Ministi *<< 11 Pvllamanl French C'.overninent I. %  •unllaterallv" In sending | U ers tO French po sessions in India to |*a| ndition* were icferendum to %  %  %  I I Covr-rnmeni did not rej ialvea bound lo Nehru denied that the Indian ada any ng their I I >. possessions ir ' %  Court nf 1 The Indian Covernmcn'. he ihould be at I %  two from I % %  %  %  %  in India l 1 HI.,IT'S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS



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PACK SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATfRDAV, ANUL l5l BY CARL ANDERSON Canada's Wonder Remedy Is Here Again-To Slay! Hurt Trouble Caused by High Blood Pressure .: roo r.... JM MNI ta >>••" .••Moat, •*•**** %  !>• %  > % %  • < P .nd tMkWkM4u4iM •>• %  aaaaer, kunii ta< iU\l WUlW fr*n •"? M ibaaa wi" lam, raw 111* BUM eaaaageraa i • HMrt Trouble or a p*ri>tlo etr>>ke • l4 r*u thou 14 *rt traaimMt %  .nee. Tht rar flnl 4OM 0/ N.n (fon — rt> Uwn w HJfim' a. nan n*JIO*J dhKvtr>, rajducaa Higk Blood Iftwi and rr.akea ou M reeri ^;ni|r In ft !(• df.)a %  '••• Nl(l rra Tour phamUl t> liirln pheM cold "v,-r nickt, ot bukskin th.. .tabbing, loftanag 1x1,11 ..I II.. uru.ir i-i.i. urlliritis. ii.illll 1. n.urallKia. "" I" 1 "'' musel--*. r Hi. misery .,r lired ukiaf feet JOB rub n Into ih,. .,.,,. apou the congested .-i-~t ..r lebng, tired muscles, aii.l fooj 111.(."in ami sur.hi-ss WBstt m a mutter of miiiiit.Huc-kliv's wi.ii.. Huh is %  Mtmttte pnantetl onUintag • aim.iuNdioBta. eenlatty leleetej for th.-ir prove, were%  mtie valuiII sliii.ulnl.s .ir.-ulation. breaks HI I nn.l r.-li-i.--. |iiiin H-als .ml HiH.th.-, sor.-, mmpl.-, ai.,1 l.r-l biiriiiiiu. sialy PERT Wi(UtntM MORE r.-li.r ni LESS time " %  .!%  n Ui j JOHNSONS STATIONERY and HARDWARE BUCKLEYS OTJBBrMm WHITE III II J Christian Science 1 Heading Koom f IST nooi, town SON* Hour* : 10 am—3 p.m. Tueadava. Wexlaeadaya, >*rtdaye. 10 a.m.—13 o'clock Saturdaya. %  irtrrillniM %  ( KAII PA.II t lBBt oar W re.il. banrati. M P in le--l | Visitors Are Welcome | IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEQAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW Heinz Mulligatawny Soup tins .__ 30 2 Bacon (Sliced per lb] 1.20 lOtt Kardomah Tea } lb. 39 tS USUALLY NOW Heinz Spaghetti in Tom. Sauce tins 28 23 Orange & Grapefruit Juice tins 29 M Jeffreys Beer bottles 26 91 V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street liet us supply uti your Awd.% . Fir tar HOUSEWIFE OU"-f,r Cutlery, Stoves, 'iWr'A*'" Ohluftr*. Lump-. Saucepan."-. E nit mat wax*, Chain, Broom i, alt. For Ihf CARPENTER and MASON Saw*, Hammer*, Trowels, etc.. etc. For the PAINTER and JOINER Ready mixed Paint".. Enamels. OU and Plcmenta Brushes, Varnishes BrassfoiindrT, etc For thr FISHERMAN Books. Wire for Pota, Copper Faint Ropes and Block*. Cuva,, ate. etc. Far tkr AUIHILHRISI and HOKIiaiTlRISI B1IK ate., rtc. Far tar IlllaER Plica Pine. Walaa *. SalnslM. Window Olau. D.v^.. Fir. Hi nice*. Our QUALITIES are GOOD. PRICES REASONABLE TERMS EASY Skop at Wilkinson & II......-. Co.. Lid.. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phoo 4413. 4657. 4472 &f PITCHER'S for ECONOMY. V AM ami SATISFACTION. 3SS3ES3 \



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PAC.I P.VBBAIMtS AI1V(K \ll SATIKUAV. MUM B.A.K. A. Council Send New Terms To Pickwick Tlic HOI Football v K.A ;il a in Ihr PI ... %  (...til S MCI rriM.s %  %  line I" accept lhe m-w10 lo 3 majoriij Th. Hi r. g C The ni %  10* bo (obtruded foi %  li A FA and id the B.I A I ,n. Mr. lluirhm.. he had %  and fa n he had set w m hii'i spokan that Pickwick told fin .Hi anj ITII.I Empire (Jults Soccer (iamc At I In-1 (I II n,liL Jl UH II i luii room glgasa li-: uif IIM ire < lub decided lo H illiLi i .i vv Inn | ,.r I ; vi'lo> Foa-.b-ll eomFelllion AM in the unv.-iti.rj lory II | MB| I mi-nl* (M-lMff-n Ih. It \ I \ Mi the rick wick n.,k,i ( tub %  %  i i.i if Ihey pgan M|d that Mr. b*rat tho The lOimui**. •sioeor of India, w.*.atu*m •> . A.;... "iiniTn* — ;— %  ramony wtaUn marked tka opening of the Flrirt Asian Out. in New Delhi recently, represented in the Oamet were: AfgUanlntan. Burma, %  •flea, Irit. Indonesia. Japan. NIU.I. I'll ill p pi net Singapore. Thailand aud India. if tin' n lllll gOt I woukl I*able 1 ...Thing I" %  '" Mmjbil ,!: bjry until tii i th.u ho would thins lo iLl k %  %  %  h proml ihc mart one "ui! %  %  < %  i ould ; I %  Thr Chairman aaW thai he >ii ". '"' '; ''"'" %  '' <<> *. illy, litdid Dot I... i,, B.C % %  Hitidi-a of any suKi.e would nni boa part) lo an) i ri from ihe motion which would < Il.C.A. from getting •> I Up tattr tumwhich wore (-outage LurnedT down bj Piekwkk Mr. 1 1 % %  % %  >' %  '' ottatf members had oxview thai lime as I put %  '" %  • %  I MTlod <<>nccrncd us tho last letttr the Voting fOl the rnptjos) were %  ived from Hi Messrs. F. Si. I IVkwkk Club was a strong one N Medfor.l. (' A Smith I ) stating that thev could not deviate ii.ml*. A y bhvnhtt, C Moorv. from tho original terms a? solmil E n, ;imll s oc ,;,„,.„ ( I %  • %  • ''*, Uonchford and W K WtTC Meant Eton for this M, I i %  that w ..f the various flubs, they must air the views of Ihaif momben anil many of the players said that Hu> wnuld HKC %  i. ington. Mi V. T McComie lid Hi d ru had \\< ai i ii members of Pickw l.k Club lhat Ihe Association was lakltiK an easy way out. All Ihe was to draw up fixture*, while kwirki h.iil 10 the admlnlitration. H .rks made against the Arociallnn H I. Ward. V T MrComio. E A V Williams. V 1 and L. L. Gitlons. SAVANNAH CLUB TENNIS RESULTS With reearci lo Ihe motion, the matter was already thiwhed out by the Association and they had rejected the proposals by PickTp wick and ha could not be a party to any such n, Mr. D. II .!. ward said that he could not Npport Uu tnoUon now, as tho ttrroi proposed to Pickwick alreaOy although in different amounts. When Hie ori^inul in Association were submitted to the Pickwick Club, he mad* %  motion should be allotted tu the B.C.A because he fell thai substantial portion should VrSIKKIIAVS RIISCLTS MISS nni ni i % i mi). C u ,,1,1 I' M C (, pat %  J S 4 r(nt\i | n\n m i.AOir-. not mis im^ui Mi" D Wood anl MrH H 'i. i Ml O Pllsilm and Mm. | l^n^aii WIXEII OOt nil-Han*lr*> M. and Mr. V \1 BariM """I ani J K TrimlMlum ill bt a.allaMA DRAW LONDON. April 4 Mikhail tsotvfnlh and Davl^ i t<> regard n i.ih game in the World Chess Championship at Moscow, the Soviet new s agency Taaa reported today The name WHS adjourned last *. m an intricate position, but i to that body as they had Ihe [| playCTl decided today liwt stands then-. IIMl that i"" Council would (jo failing in their duty il they ,,,, „ ua ^ ; m .,. (| ,,, Villl; ,, u rialthor oouU artn Botvinik proposed a dj to this motion. Mr. r ' he knew Mr Hutchlnson was interested in football and was mUiualaalh lo ace thai the game araa played ai ,; K.i;Mimlon. DUt in vic .1 : correspondence Ihe Association with the Pickwick Club ho could no: now support the motion. He said that lhe> would be childish and unt than Plckwlckl II thi %  not makJ 10 I man when ho nevei Intended to Rive way. Now thai th* wlca < orntred, ihe) mu there; If tbei were to ajpi %  to U I ,,h.d Pi. kwtek would do naac year. Mr. N It ilia! llu rlutchln* plion of play 1 ''. h adlng m thi five points in four. The tenth game will he plnved nn April I layers are Ru —Router UNMELDEO CARD3 a, M HARHISON cue" Traffir lluiVl No. 20 where il .J.MIM. I I Sln .it I'rde-iri.in ( n. aco made available I CANADA lRv lor Safer Motortua ; If fur II %  %  I I %  I %  I v n f)u. i i i 1 I %  -li.HII.I 1... ; .., J : re In |h raw rOUl High Living Qoti Ct*ti9illg Slump In Soccer l*tmls LONDON, me "i %  dl pOOaf dnnglrd bulging i Ure reported to •> idi i slump. t.ng won %  ., ll.lt..I decline In J I %  ei are blamed nmuil inE I00JM0 %  '< -iiiick" outfits are operating wilh only eboul I dozen or so of any %  giants admit in* piiK-h %  %  i r, (MHMWMi This fail i kiti trover, returns %  Of thi remainder. 30 t • %  KM and 20 per end to operating coats. %  I %  uted lo a decline in thi weekly slake rather than a decrease in the coupons. The i that some 7,750.000 of Britain' %  quit population send %  % %  their %  %  season. Tl years huf Ihe average weeMy Bd from around %  luii; i" around three shillings Oil Fortunes In Price* %  tin Ing out i %  rot %  S I %  around I IlO.OOll nnd ti %  The average n aior pi I i: lo.iHio %  %  canvass disclosed thai fivi I to find happiness In newly-icqulred wwalth, A couple <.( formal [acton ciris. Agnes Turnei and %  who iH'f %  cd a jack: that (ortui Agues. th< is rnu.-li 1 I i M irel %  .,!:,. I • toi has h g her "in • %  % %  ol value* ind i I Local "SetbulI Season Openeil On Baturdaj dw Beat aaateb in iBaruAdo N Ibal] League %  %  1 I Old Olrts and %  of in" a, opened the 1 %  %  Li %  first ten mini %  %  fast gam. with -• I %  %  thi Although Old Qtrli %  ,i .1, '"iir. Of v. in |hr i uineld, their Inaccurate shootI Oil la to ilrst hall with % %  > goals to i I ri old Girls. T Marker, as Shoot. I. QuJnUne and P. Best were most outstandng players for Olympta. During the second half. Old •oined as a learn fu* belter th.m Olympu wl to lack learn spud Ol Gil 'he oloso of the ganie and scored 4 i> the tli'ltrd Ktm.lai( PH IS. Y'-rl HUd4*tWlekl IS. II,iwx B *,!..1.1 > ti WMnee 2. • l.-*U 14. What's on Today s| dotini k)J li..ii..,d. linti\>.SIIC i.iliun—1 p tn Collo|p i\i;urrn Colloie Did Girls—5 m Table tvaaala at V M c A —ii p.m. it.iskclball at V M.C A Harrlaon il. ;.. vi V.M.C.A and n :-..-. ( ..ii-.., Old Rays vs Fortrwsa al V M P C—1.41 pm CINEMAS < .pit I....Mr H.n.l'l ."I Hhltexini loaUlram K... I %  ,,.!.,..,, I'tllBbn" I >.>itirr ( bn.lapbfi (almbst, V.u.l,. ( ,„.,. I. |fc, -I.I... SESSIONS g, I mm Iwgai i Irilrr u. ggSBSBsaf whein ho had %  aaeW seen. It had been argued that Topp.ii ivw a lot more than he was addling; that Toppin was an accomplice If they were satisfied nal he was an %  oi.lti have lo be corThey had seen Toppm H and he seemed the .ri lor one to pick on to ; such a job. Counsel asked why i not get Phillips, a wilho saw Puttin pick up Top%  had known fee BT| They, the lury, bad seep Phillips could assun • %  %  Puttin might have thought Pnillips abovr sucn an action or that he mij,h: call for ., lifly-flfly deal After he had ncard Defencf id the Solicitor Genera, Misvcution as to Ukl adibliny as evidence ot siatents given by Puttin lo in. Pi lie*, M had ru'icd mat ihe sl-ti iaible !t would advise them Uiat they Msould 00 cept those statements, l |M rn, ,it course, to ettai h Lbs weigh! ihey felt due to th If they felt that the Polios took the stalements thlwatO him or ciUiced linn to give men they -hould ignore them cntirel; Thu sUlemii.i had to I voluntary, though not voluntary i the sense thai Putt be willing to glVO them. Pulli* would never have been anxious to do so. Further Investigation It was likely that the reason for Puttin's lonn deten fhe circumstance of Cpl. lX*vonishaving to go oul to make further investigations. There was direct evideruv from Cpl liycr who said be Pf Puttin u s the man who rode with Toppin on the bicycle bar on the night of Toppln's arrest. Mr. Heecc, for the prosecution, he said, had told them 1 nmsolf was sometimes iorgetful f little things and It UMI quite casonuble that lh e Police ould forget trivial things said al the Magistrate's Court a nd that there Id be discrepancies. MaVIIIVvll VI MUM I TOTTENHAM HOTSPURS STILL SAY "NO" LONDON, April 5. nsidering the fresh propom the Argasnt ii olball club directors. %  odhere to thenprevkms decision not to undertake a close of season tour of 1 ff : .i I summer An official tftarwards said thai i I carefully considered lhe new proposals, bill fell lhat the reejona contained In their original statement of last •h still applied.—Renter. Soccer Maldirs ; A.-, i i %  I '.LI i n i i M. i : % %  i %  \ %  i inv IftlQM li i iii, aotTia UM iTM-i %  They'll Do It Every Time 1^ HEAR Hi* TELL IT (B^OU^ -TWE WEA^ CWEdSE EXPECTS M;SS POTMOOi ., m ) E. 29.Ml CUARS STUFFY N OSiIdj^ aS *&*,#, wrry /as/**?. Com/or/ J IN YOUR POCKET! dV .r..*w. ...Ill !, H„ ).! II ixickrt oi handbag :,.,ti„ %  i %  i mg rncdlcapan lASYTOUSt \%h R i l ton need K, ,' 1 | i i ths pci ia I nedlti ree int .ip an' %  uflj iwstru in lurn.^r-c-a-l-h-s in, and-euk-fe ai a fmttk.'—>twr nosg feels drlighitully coal and clear. So pleasant. So convenient. Use os often os nfd*d .Wars Inhaler \r 'JPUJVWS I laaoowt 1 r BUT WWEN SHE Doii...! APOPLECTIC PU RP. E ,TOBCEXCT) !" S OFFICE? WHO CO ( >W THIN* VOU ARE? WHO EVER fiVE YOU AJ T H0RIT>'-^O QUOTE va IM REAoy ,r> TJR.H TH£ 1 1'_ fRM OVER TO you V,(Vf ILLLET>OU


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PACK FOUR BAKBAOOS ADVOCATC SATURDAY, APRIL J. I5I PrlnUd by th* AdvorU Co.. UA Broad Si. Bridgetown. Saturday. April 7. ISM Why Do Tliey Confess? "Here is the most convincing explanation of what happens at Communist (reason trials../ believe it to be the true one." &y Montgomery Hyde. M-P CLEANLINESS THOSE people who use the streets of Bridgetown daily are the best judges of the cleanliness of the City. This is what "one oi the cleanest cities in the West Indies" looked like between 9.15 a.m. and 920 a.m. yesterday morning. Opposite Plantations Building on the other side of the road was a galvanised stuff bin, containing half-agrapefruit rind and discarded paper overflowing on the pavement. A few feet away on the same pavement two empty water coconuts highlighted a pile of rubbish. An open push cart labelled '-'Commissioners of health" was drawn up alongside Lower Broad Street and a man was emptying some of the contents of a cardboard box into the cert while bits and pieces of paper blew back into the road. Close to the cart was a drain pipe under which was firmly embedded an old shoe, half an empty orange and six inches of paper. In the road nepr the Corner of Baxters Road and Lower Broad Street a standpipe remains a relic of an age dead, but not buried. Across the road OM gutters between the Singer Sewing Machine Co.. and the new De Lima Store were full of litter, and the gutter outside J. N. Goddard and Sons, was strewn with pieces of paper. From gutters in Baxters Road a current of water was driving down the gutter* which lead along Mc Gregor Street to the sea. There were clusters of flowers, leaves, and paper being swept down with the water and a slight smell from matter which had begun to decompose. One side of Mc Gregor Street was blocked by vehicles. including a new refuse collector which was then being tilled. A man was spittini; in the road. Higher up where Mc Gregor Street reaches the Advertising Department of the Advocate, two men were playing a game of warri in the road itself, while an outdoor barber was setting up his shop in the same road opposite the Advertising Department of the Advocate but closer to Parry Street. It was a typical morning in Bridgetown on one of its cleaner days. None of the refuse in the streets or gutters described above had anything whatever to do with hucksters, although in the short distance between St. Mary's Church and opposite Charles McEnearney and Co. the pavements and roads were generously littered with leaves, mould and other dirtmakers commonly associated with the trade of huckstering. It is a grave mistake for the Commissioners of Health to suppose that the Advocate has any other purpose than the preservation of the good name of the City of Bridgetown and the cleanliness of the Island of Barbados when it gives publicity to what thousands of Barbadians and visitors to the island daily see fur themselves. The letter from a Canadian published in yesterday's paper complaining of dead animals and refuse on bathing beaches, is only one of hundreds of complaints which this paper receives about Barbadian beaches. In fact the very day that the Commissioners of Health were reported as saying that Bridgetown was one of the cleanest cities in the West Indies, the stench from the Paynes Bay Bench caused by the rotting carcasses and entrails of sharks was detracting from the solid value of the St. James coast as a tourist resort. And the reporter had hardly finished with his report of the meeting of the Commissioners of Health on Thursday, before the telephone was ringing in this office and I resident of Hindshury Rond complaining of the stench caused near his home by smoke and dead animals. The public is not ignorant of the difficulties which the island of Barbados must face in keeping itself clean and preserving its good name as a tourist retort (which it is now in real danger of losing if smugness and satisfaction get a foothold here.) But it insists that those difficulties be tackled, not shelved. And this newspaper, true to its policy of reflecting public opinion on all matters affecting the good name of this island will continue to draw attention to the unnecessary filth and refuse daily to be seen around Bridgetown and on every bathing beuch of the island which is at all accessible. Everyone knows the high value that this newspaper places on tourism as a major industry, second only to sugar in its importance to our island economy, and the cleanliness of Bridgetown and of the whole island is at the heart of the matter. No one who has travelled at all would suggest that Bridgetown was as well managed and as clean as the neighbouring capital of Grenada, St. Georgft.. while to speak of Port-of-Spain and Georgetown in comparison with Bridgetown is to display an unusual ignorance as to the very use of (be words "clean city Mic iwo wars 1 paid ; M \xm after i <>l the British engineer. from the Metropolitan-Vlrker.. tio had been accused c: sabct-iing the rive Year Plan naTBl month* in detention ttMS had appeared in court and Metropolitan VWnn angUMUl < than surroundings and artel to other non-Communists, such nights of ropeaird .iue*tioning h:* u Cardinal Mlndszcnty or the IS sense ot values becomes blurreo Ptslish leaders who were earned *.nd he is intlintd to accept the uit to Moscow in 1945 and i-harged idea put Into his mind by tht with sabotaging the Soviet war efinterrogator This U that hu par fort in Poland. amount duly I* to recover h. Fifteen of these Poses pleaded freedom. The price does not seem som<' tif them, at least, had madi guilty at their trial The sixteenth, unduly high—Just his s gnatur.tig confessions Mr Z. Stypulkowski.* unlike his on a deposition acknowledging I remember being taken past thr companions, refused to confess in his traitorous Sets against b ,„, roK By some It waj bellmed that druB dllcuM ouutandln! problem, color remindin, him .harplv „1 had been uaed But the PJon „,„,.„„„,, Soviol occupied Pol Ml thdetail, of his confession 1 T ,, T? n """' !" 1 h, '' n ; Z"'; u-irilory Instead of l-in Mr. stypulkowsky was lucy althougk ill many Imttnew y> received a n delegate, he was True he was convicted, but he kidnapped and thrown into '.he received the extremely llxht sentence of four months, most < %  drendeil whioh he had already spent in ] repented their stone, like actors ___ playing their pnrtj. on the whom j u^ianka l>poamd selfpossesaed How Thcr< , n| NKV o, the uld one account for it? In 1940 Mr Arthur Koestler mak( poUc him did their nfe best to Jail, so that hav ; na almost Immediately. ele, While "NOBODY'S DIARY" Monday—There \t one club in Barbados? wrsere ceremony counts for nothing The game's tho thinq. And the name ranges from dominoes up to cards. It i played when there is no rain in the open under the manchineel trees ana the seats are the sand or a small box. Last Saturday there were more than two duzen men hard at it when I passed. Nearby there were pig stys. and empty cans, broken bottles and what have yous fouled the clean while sand near the boats but tin players were not upset After all it's the game that counts. Yesterday saw two houses being moved, both on hand carta. What exactly is the reason for houses on wheels? And how often do people move this way in a lifetime, BVVn year or whenever the rent comes due? PENCILS FOR EVERYONE %  ID — BLt: 15 Also PENCILS WO* MARKING GLASS ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE %  Tuesday—Found two bare-necked hens sitting on one another instead of laying eggs. When I bought a set of expensive Leghorn eggs 30 cents apiece, the other day. one of these same bare-necked hens had the cluck to pretend to be setting and ended by burying eight eggs, breaking and eating two and laying one herself just to show how much she cared. Bare-necked nothing, barefaced brazen hussies I call them, and if they don't start laying soon I'll show them a Parson's nose or two. published his famous book. DarkpioUed a'cainst the Soviet Union" Soviet nuthonli. wenuixJotM Al Noon, winch contained a He WMS not 3U hjected to torture, to discredit the IMlsh Resistance l rtlllaot but hypothetical exulajj Ut no was( he victim of the most movement nt Bat lime, they al*> Hon. His view was that a Comintensive third-degree methods, in desired to keep up the appear-miimst on trial*' would confess which It was sought to wear down anee of harmony with the West to any crime HK'iin't Th* State behis resistanceby regulated disWilh lifteen pleas of "Uullly cause he would realise that bis comfort. He was dragged from they could afford n few acquittals confession even though subtrtani^ „„ 70 n i a hU out of 71, and to please their alliea. lially false, was the only way left uiflered HI protracted intcrroaoThe story whkh Mr. Stypulto him in which he could advance UMU. kowski has to tell makes fascina%  M of Communism. By sheer force of willpower he ting reading. It is the most In other words, to abandon bedominated his interrogator. Hu convincing account of Communls*. Uaf in Communism after a lifeharrowing experiences enabled technique in treason trials which ubmlssion lime us a revolulinnary was payhim to expl chologically impossible. Thus with his IS colleagues, the broken men of the opposition reality equally guiltless raeantaUon had become a kind of The Price ritual habit and accepted routine. The prisoner Is confined Guilty Pleas cell under constant But this explanation seems to of a guard, under lb be but partially true. of a strong electric light, the prey It cannot have applied to the of ceaseless anxiety and tears J have read. The reason for this is,_clear. It affords the moat likely explanation of )usl wh political prisoners under the Soviet confess to .rimes they have rveillanc-' never committed. I believe It to harsh glarebe the true one World Copyrtijhl Resertvd —L.E S News From IIrilain EASY ON THE EYE A BEAUTIFUL SELECTION OF LAMP SHADES DN BLUE, ROSE, AMBER, APRICOT. PINK PEACH, GREEN of various designs to suit reading and standard Lamps. They will provide both beauty and comfort in your Home. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. %  PHONES : 41T :. MS7, U51, tin. LONDON, The struggle In Hrltlsh politics nvriK to have taken yel aaofbaf turn. Now It is even lests likely Ihat there will be Immediate elections, or that a government of Mr Churchill will replace the government of Mr. Attlee. Just after Christina*, as I recorded at the time, the morale of (he Government was at a low ebb. Ita .supporters talked of defeat. And the Cnservatlve party was overI bond %  '' the prospect of power. The Conservative* could have done MrO things They could have waited timidly for the Government to make mistakes. Or they could attack the Governt verbally, as much as possible wilh the aim of getting to power quickly. There were t In the second course. High political temperatures cannot bo maintained for very loruf. If the Conservatives failed to win their battle, then they might hnve sacrificed the chance of power %  On the other hand to play a timid political gamerices not pay — and It is the business of an opposition to be vigorous. So with Mr. Church ill's leadership and the active support of many new backbench M'PJ., I-uniing to do baitle. the Conservatives decided on mi Ml-out rampaign to bring down the Government. Latterly ihe taclics were lo kaep the Government up IIIKM and wear its nerves to hysteria At the moment of writing, the first round of the battle is over, and the second round Is about to begin. Undoubtedly. Labour, has won the first round on points. The morale of the government party has improved. It has been discovered that the tricks Conservatives think of for maintaining debates Inle in the night can bfl countered by olher tricks. For instance. Conservative motions put down purely for dabaflngj purposesare supported in a formnl Sense by Labour M.P's adding their name* to the motionn on the Order Paper. The Lab-nic M.P's then suddenly withdraw Uie motion In the middle of the debate. Or Uibour M.P's desert the Hon— of Commons: or they move an adjournment sudden!v whim there Is %  s ne T .ernl unreal' The lltOUOII is almost unheard but it pave*, and the Sergeantat-Arms walks out with lhe Mace. All this Parliamentary fooling is not helping the Conservative Party and would certainly bring discredit to the p„ rt-..;J T. nn l. D,L.,t, n l estimate how they were doing By David T*mpla Roberts f „, m w ^ k to ,J££ Thty h „5 to think of policies and their Opposition if it were carried on result* — not solely of their own for too long. popularity. Now they have a But the second round is now sort of cheek mi themselves like iK-ginning which will be rather the Box Office returns on a film more perilous for the Governstar's appeal. 1 quite expect, by ment The one (Ixed point in the middle of Summer Labour the Parliamentary year Is the politicians will be so cock-a-hoop "Budget." The debates that they will be talking of capital follow it approve the Budget levies to finance rearmament. Resolutions and embody them In the Finance Bill. On most quesThere Is of course another view tiona. Mr. Attlee's Government of the public opinion potls. has to be defeated twice before Rightly it can be said that the> it will fall. The Prime Minister, cannot lie suppressed, and the even if defeated on a major politicians must get used lo thorn, question, Is quite able to come That may be true. But if the back the following day to tha politicians are to get used to them House, and ask fur a motion of they will have to cultivate much confidence in his policies which culmer heads than they have at would reserve a defeat the folthe moment. Mr. Attlee himself lowing day. But on some stages ^ as muo h a politician as the of the Finance Bill, this could ,,-rt There Is every evidence that not be done and the Government he thinks and plans in terms of alnlng In power, at least for Is in some peril from a vote. Nevertheless. Mr. Attlee ] .ingle „.. lifetime^ Noticeably, h enters the second round with ius remoao ||cd his government some advantage carried over not wltn thc alm of a n eteetlot from the first round. The Conbu wllh the aim of carrying on (icrvutlve performance in the Tht pr\nx v Minister knows a first round lost them the support administrative blunder when r of half a dozen fickle Liberals. svvs on(1( ;,,„( Vlll)r steps are batnsj When these facts are weighed. ( nKrn lo p'r.vent any more of the venture to predict that a Labour ^^ I)f bluiulcr5 „„ coa l and meat Government will come through hal w> nctrl de(ea ted the Gov the second round and survive the p,^,,,,.^ m he mi ddle of th ikirmishes of the summer. It Winter. Foi once the coal sitmi xamlned at the ea* may not be wise enough, in its (| \xine own or the national interest to ^ f th h thc wCol her noose a Central Bee l0 n In the %  ^^ lV;irmpr ra(hpr lhan al %  acting; the difficult end of the year when due to fall and the weather Is getting colder. At last the Government has decided that it is better to pay more for some thing to eat than exceedingly Utlk (Of next to nothing The result will certainly Autumn. It Is doubtful whether the Conservatives' bid for power TL*si since Christmas has done them anything but harm. Behind this political scene is n new menace of the Public Opinion Poll. The Conservatives SSaughTon tho\kr?ornnwm "5 l n ^ reoB J Iwni ?'"'** Du l ) h there had been no polls to tell n"*h '" !" er_ls at last bcine them that opinion was running encouraged to rear more Deet — their way. Now the latest polls tf Thursday April 5. in which he states: 'Th,highlight of the Secretary's report Is that he states tho mSO season wag thc best financial one since 1910. but fails to mention tiie fart that both the 1949 and IBM seasons the IIA FA had nothing to do with the running of the game other than to make fixtures and receive 401ot the gate money. All |ha donkey work attached to a football season, being done by Pickwick Cucket Club under the terms of the then .extsUng arrangement. Is it any Ihat the R.A.F A. doesn't need an Auditor for their financial report. As Mr. Ward aptly puts it. the simplicity of thc ugurecould be appreciated" If this had come from anyone else I would have allowed it to pass for ignorance of the Mtuatin but from a former Secretary of a B A K A. I cannot allow it to go unchallenged. Can Mr. Shannon deny the fact that the B.A.F.A. hnve never been offered term i under which they can undertjko this magnificent administration (ten mn rent the grounds and emulate Hit excellence of the present n On the olher hand whal Is the donkey work there hi *o much braying about? Doej Mr Shannon -onsider that collect!uc pennies am' sixpences at a gate or being In hand to lock people into cages or let them out U beyond the intelligence of ordinary human beings like myself'.' Wc are not allowed but this does -ibt say that we cannot. With r.gard to the simplicity of my account for which I was congratulated by Mr D. H. L Ward and what Mr Shannon Inferred was hardly necessary. Mr Shannon can easily recall that at some unforgctten penods in thc lustory af UM B.A.FA.. there were not .-,1 simple accounts and in some ither occasions there were nc accounts at all. O. S. COPPIN. BENDIX WASHING MACHINES FULLY AUTOMATIC WASHES NINE POUNDS CLOTHES. Through Six Complete Stages in 45 minutes (without any manual labour) the final stage the Clothes arc just damp, suitable for ironing. ONLY A FEW MACMSES LEFT UNSOLD. • DaCOSTA & CO.* LTD. ELECTRICAL DEPT. Saturday—Will journalists never learn? Here is an account of a wedding, sent me by a dear lady in Port-of-Spain. Tlufull skirt ended in a train." The Simplon ur the Orient Express, or perhaps (how romantic) the last train to San Fernando. "The bride cut a lovely figure" with her iH'nknife 1 suppose, and what did the bridegroom say. Was he jealous? And then this request "Would you like picture of wedding?" Would I indeed! Would you? TOUTl wrlciim. 1 How polite ui're becoming. It's this wedding atmosphere I suppose For Your Enjoyment FISH IN TINS Norwegian Kardlncv •Tanadiao Sardines Red Salman J'lnk Salmon Mackerel Pilchard* Norwegian Klrpcrc LIQUOR DEPT. %  "Id Braid Rum Tap Nol-h Rum Burnett's Gin <..•rrt.ii>. Uln Vielle Care. Pmnter Brandv 4'hivers Vecettblc. Carrots Bi-el Root Mixed Vegetables. CHerj Hearts Shins; Beans MEAT DEPT. Fresh FISH Irrsh Snappers I r ,h Salmon Smoard Kipper* Smoked Haddock. Calrea Llver Fresh SaMsaa-es SPECI ALS Sliced Ham 1 58 per lb Cooks Paste. 8 renta per U* PHONE *.OW/>l/.//S — 11/ DELIVER


PAGE THREE





Weyyy,

aL. ICE: FIVE CaNTS

MacArthur Is AVLIES MAKE LIMITED GAINS:
eee Communist elements fight back stubbornly
|















ESTABLISHED 1895





3

acne eee ceeseee a —-

MUSIC FESTIVAL

U.S. Congressmen Say
TOKYO, April 6 Battle Must RED GUNS POUND
Go On—\ie | YANK POSITIONS

‘TWO American Congressmen back from the
Korean war-front told correspondents here to-
imeaieats dae ete tetas TOKYO, April 6

day they would submit a “startling report” to Con-
gress in the middle of April,
rop-gzeony Geoares declared tien COMMUNIST defenders fought back stubbornly
wt as there was no sign of any





























They urged that General Douglas MacArthur,
United Nations Commander, should be freed from
the “terrific handicap’’ of not being allowed to

send war planes beyond the Yalu River.
A joint statement by E. K.!'—— Sa
Armstrong (Republican, Mis-

souri) and W. J. Bryan-Dorn B . Lik
(Democrat, South Carolina) said ritons 1 e
Communists. had a_ sanctuary

behind the Yalu River. C ib ; Ar
“We feel that this is an intol- aril bean t



Communist peace move in Korea to-day against United Nations forces who had
United Nations had no alternative} made deep penetrations into North Korea along the

but to continue the battle.

|
j He was speaking at a New central front.
|



Conference here before leaving {0 Details of fighting were sketchy, as Allied troops
the, Middle ya. Lie wth nOBe continued making gains in the west and centre of
the ULC e a cease €

| soon, but added “it is not a pr the Korean line. The Eighth Army's evening com-



eisih akan ak Ry tre os ae munique said heavy resistance was being encoun-
‘ . » and we tail t | » refused to comment on rece: 5
see how the war can be ocean LONDON, April 6, | statements by General Macarthu tered on the central front north and northwest of
the statement said. The exhibition of paintings including his offer to negotiate Chunchon.

“Our forees cannot carry the {from Haiti closes today, Sponsor-

cease-fire directly through Field

iction to the enemy territory. We | commanders,

feel General MacArthur and his
Commanders and forces should
not be restricted in any military

ed by the institute of contem-
porary arts, and housed in Dover
Street off Piccadilly, it has caused
some interest among artistic






On the western front, resist
. ance was less but there was i
Lie said that the United. Nation TT j j rati far Tnited
| ’ itec atior o indication how far Unitec
| maintained its primary objective Red Troops N t Nations units advanced during
jin Korea to repel aggression anc



















/ ° the day in some areas, com-
action which they consider to be |Londoners, restore peace and security and t In Vanchuria manders dispatched smal! but
necessary”, One note of regret has been: ;@stablish q united, free an > z fast moving patrols far out in

The Yalu River marks the|What a pity the exhibition could | democratic Korea 3 LONDON, April 6 lie. fréast Ot: tamaceaeeaes 1 at
frontier between North Korea |2°t have shown us Caribbean.ari 4 Atta shout the danger of’ was Tass the Soviet official new eft th find, steeaie nears
ay ee. wu the” i - Lie said “I still think the dimcul ‘gency declared tonight that uo elements

Armstrong thought the United} But the paintings, about 50 in ‘ ict h

Soviet troops were massing in
number, are all the work of un-
trained negro painters in Haiti
and apparently all due to en-
couragement given by an Ameri-
can who set up an art centre on
the island in 1943, The pictures
have been shown in Paris, Brussels
and Amsterdam. They came from
a Dutch city and are going back
there.

Nations should take the “calcu.
lated risk” of bringing Russia into
the war and “see if we can’t put
the Communists off balance in the
whole Far East”.

In any case, Moscow should be
branded as agitators since she is
furnishing much material for

oo and North Koreans he
said,

ve message reaching London a
: ' "ORK +i ARIS, April 6, | NC*sas ne
“ : : What Londoners like about NEW YORK, April 6. eo Aare ci >, AL * | number of American newspaper
tank Meher eee rae them are their unsophisticated A 29-year-old American ex- ied ro A s Communist Deputy published a statement to the effect
have to wait for the = ted charm. The way they break com-|Sergeant David Greenglass was oe _Pourtalet todey said that} that Mr Rayburn had in mind
Communist "sealed i@euaine etn pletely from stylish African negag} Sentenced here to-day to 15 years pine ran h Government ha | that in Manchuria Soviet troops
these handicaps” © ete said, |att; their strange compelling mix-|imprisonment for atom spying. j8ranted United States the use © | ore being concentrated.
arse wr Ranice, ‘|ture of Christian and Pagan ey of Greenglass formed “4 * * e a mat oh oo Bette sy “Tass is authorised to refute
“beliefs; ll, their great] the bulwark of the case against his I ign l A res ¥ | ourtalet asked in the Nationa’ | these reports as invent and
eaehike “Of ffs ‘that nés Seen sister Ethel and her husband Julius oO op S87 ae t 83 SStON | Assembly why the bases had bee! ee oe Ana ine Sevine troaas
hidden away for centuries and] Rosenberg, sentenced to death ceded without consulting th'| are in Manchuria,"
now looks like being brought out} yesterday. United States Attorney CAIRO, April 6. acting ean u ;
; ; ypol recommended 15 years ie. F cting Foreign Minister Pierr: Sener red slowly. ovt
with al} Its ‘Hower, ree ‘ay oedema Egypt today asked Britain, the United States and France to i imeiter redalied that’ by th Greek units moved slowly ov

OVER 90 children waiting for the start from Captain C. BE. Raison to render “Hannibal” at the Comber- | ties will be settled, but it will tak Afeaphiita
mere School yesterday. (Story oa page 5] | time —Reuter

The Tass statement referred to



the statement on Wednesday by



An American tank force last
placed nine miles inside North
Lh: pe ; P } 4 a heavy rifle and machine-gun five
as ~ . e S l ‘ Mr. Sam Rayburn Speaker of the from Chinese defenders There

J . tates a »prese . .
15 Years For , u tan Gave United States House of Repre igh was no report what advance ft
tatives that non Chinese trogps any, the column made since thi

Aft S ' ire being concentrated in

m ae , a) alate In the only important area
0 Py Subsequently Yass said in a where United Nations troops
parallel, they were hit by
heavy mortar fire northeast of

Korea is reported to have met
A] : morning
} vs uthority Manchuria % _
oo
were still fighting below the
Hangye on the eastern front

Hangye is about 10 miles south
of the border





The advance in the -central
sector was hampered by fog, late:
reports trom the front said to
night. American troops who with

Civil Servants
Plan To Strike

PARIS, April 6.
Paris’ Civil Servants of non-
Communist unions have decided
to stop work this afternoon prob-
ably for two hours for a protest

meeting over the 15 per cent Go On Strike To-day

wage increase for jupige officials TURIN, April 6.

—Reuter



—Reuter.

Italian Teachers

° : . ee : " . i law lying ground were often able
Greenglass said he stole atom stop “Israeli aggression” against Syria following yesterday ‘ ae or io of 1912 the Sulta I reuch Laurich Ita see only a fow yards ahead
bomb secrets at the Government flare up in the demilitarised zan@ between the two countries. oe morocco BARANa over to Fane Chinese pounded American
experimental station at Los Ala~ Egypt called for action under the three Big Powers’ declar- |)" atta ae re 5 aaa Drive On Rebels positions at several points in the:
mos, New Mexico and turned them 5 " r . ; lL 3 Ey : 5 eal ad , pe a. the erritory , ae i biggest heavy artillery strafe fo:
over to the Rosenbergs for trans- ation last May that in the event of frontier violations, joint | maintenance of order and polices Ds weeks... Allied officers said guns
mission to Russia. —Reuter. steps would be taken “both within and without the frame-|faction on Morocean soil and ii HANOI, Tongking, April 6 Lwere page dt ‘tke. Cataate eiatats
: ‘ Co) ¥ Moroccan waters.’ —Reuter. Strong French forces launched a cee : ent ri
work of the United Nations” . powerful avive in the mountainous) #¥& concentrations which have
hich th * TUR! Pa i a — egret ~eca® “Yowrttgn Under-Secretary Abdi t aie Indo-Chinese territory about 90 been forming th the central sects:
Ww Paris Civit 3 oe Te acten ‘ ga hundred bate at seman BOAC Head Coming Rahman Hakpasha announced that ay vet wales be tere teklny. “| north of the parallel.
. north wes' 3 ny = 7 . 3 > , ‘oo / ’ bi s 8 ! eh
ing inereases totalling about 60,-|learned with delight todas that Robert Adams Egypt and the Arab states would) Gandhi Starts Fast | carge forces of Vietminh rebel: Reuter
000 million francs per year in-| thoj 7 ae LONDON, April 6. take action unless acts of aggre: wre believed to be established in
stead of 48,000 already granted their teachers will strike to-} Sir Miles Thomas, Chairman of sion against Syria were stopped Ps :

J ! a ; 1a are ate after~!
Seater morrow. the British Overseas Airways Cor- Baeks Down Gi niadlately.: Re. interventita’ ot DURBAN, April 6 the area, but up to late this after M.P. TABLES MOTION
4 poration, left London airport to-

The 24-hour strike by teachers Manilal Gandhi, 58-year-old son| noon the French reported no
night for a tour of airports on the |

in intermediate schools for children the Big Three of the late Mahatma Gandhi, to-| opposition AGAINST MCARTHUR









































Egyptian Prime Minister Nafias) jay pegan a 14 lay { ton The French 21 Neiall Bs
between the ages of 10 and 15|Corporation’s routes in South (From Our Own Correspondent) ie anes Sty , | day began a 14-day fast in_protes ne ench said officially tha LONDON, April 6
Carcase Meat will take place in the province of Amicive and the Caribbean. “I GEORGETOWN, April 6. Sat teteell “Geadaaion’’ Costaet ee a ee African Govern thee pe Be aged ane pi a Will Nally, British t Virkoiis
Fe A We k avat Teal’ in det Sh TP deot at alae Leet anes Hamner He Brit onvalanay teany Stoukeer Syria was a threat to peace in the ae acd Stabe Lae ih SUCK Was DONE MAGS On
or ee r Italy nex . said. , .

aa M fe Stal ; : Se Regt Member of Parliament, today
Pri Gandhi declared tha | the northern side of Holy _Bavi| tabled a motion in the House ot
after he had endl his fast, he | Mountain just outside the triangu } Commons regretting that the
would “in the name of God” defy | lar French delta bridgehead in House “no longer Ete onfider ce
the Government's aparthied (racial! Tongking. Heavy air and artillers ir cn oral Mi ar th 7 ; ei pee :
segregation) policy by deliberate-] pounding last Tuesday was be renere) MaCAT hur as SUpPEM¢

Middle East.

His statement added; “The
Egyptian Government and people
support Syria in all efforts being

the teachers’ demands are not met
by April 18, there will be a total





He will visit Buenos Aires and/an application for a summon:

the Caribbean during next week} against the Attorney General, the
Food Minister Maurice Webb] strike throughout Italy—Reuter. [to see improved landings and pas-}Legal Draughtsman and the De-
announced today that the whole senger handling facilities. tective Superintendent After

LONDON, April 6.







. . sat cao i? . Commander of United Nations
talber : 7 ; : ade to stop this aggression ly creating a breach of it lieved to have sent the bel:
f Brit: S chk i asda rris arles heard} ™ § ’ ! t ga brea i levec vaV en 1 reb aie engage . Abeon. é :
a a ae eeeney meray Tonan 2 Reuter. Magistrate. ere on Be a : An Israeli source near the He announced his decision t' | deeper into Holy Bavi.—Reuter, forces engaged in Korean opera
would be supplied in carcase meat riots ant _ further evidence, he reserved hi: ai ee Arar he tions
for the week beginning Sunday YP border, who said the situation | fast last Tuesday, four days afte = ’ Nally’s motion is intended for
7 et the coming into force of the Sout! oe i. ie Sais
: 7 African Government's Group CUT EXPENDITURE de bate, but it is uncertain wh ether
} ‘ D’Abreau and Sub-Inspector Bel troops and artillery had been seen | Areas Act, designed to set asid Government will give time to dis-
ir far included canned corned ATHENS, April 6. WASHINGTON, April 6. ms fon. cuutiontt + the) im the demilitarised zone and the} separate areas for different racia WASHINGTON, April 6 cuss it.—Reuter
‘ Archbishop"Makarios of Cyprus Several American newspapers Before the application fo hi

Maurice Webb, the Food Minis-
ter, said increasing supplies of

howe ned cattle made this pos- no other solution” Argentine newspaper La Prensa.! as accused persons on a charge o\
sible. ,

| zonal town of El Hamma whictt] groups in the Union.—Reuter The House of Appropriations
“We might be able to extend it"{. “The granting ‘of permanent Flags over their buildings will be| obstructing the course of justice
a oxte) it, | P



said here today that Cypriots|amd radio stations are observing|summonses was heard, Adams Egyptians said had been occupied Committee called on the United

ee States Government to-day to cut



wanted union with Greece “and|today as a day of mourning for! Gravesande and Hunte appeares



by Syrian troops. Z 5 rr tesa c
Smoke was still rising toda: its spending. “One way for Rus

Dove a sia to accomplish her objectives
Princess Born

| THE NEWS
without spending a rouble is to |

DIAL 3113
DAY OR NIGHT

ff6m’ positions near the town
bombed by the Israeli air fore
last night reports from the borde:

bases to Britain could not be| flown at half mast in tribute to the} When Adams took his place at
eeceptable,” he told a press con- Buenos Aires paper closed by|the bar table, the Magistrate re-
ference. President Peron’s Government.| minded him that he was the ac-

The Greek Government, he said, ete an spunchod. by, ie cused and called upon him to take
~ i seals teks eae, Whe nove the Organisation of Washington Jour-

CUXHAVEN, April 6. issue on a friendly basis with lists-—-Reuter.

German fishermen reported here] Britain. ngiisee Puser,
today that 70 “squatters” had{ “Otherwise, the issue will be} remained beside he cock and on
again oecupied the North Sea] brought before the United Nations’ \ ne Sb * re Magistrate invited him to go the
Island of Heligoland. forthcoming General Assembly Buildirg Airfields the bar table but he replied “I ar

ze _ Reuter. | session,” he declared.—Reuter. BERLIN, April 6 afraid I may feel strange

he added.

~ * » j|low us to Spend ourselves poor”
J i
—Reuter. LAUSANNE, April ¢



said, Queen Sirikit of Siam, wife of| e Committee TO ies

| TELL THE ADVOCATE

Bombing was in retaliation for | ing Phumiphon gave birth to het
the shooting dead of seven Israeli | "st child, a baby girl today, The
police 22-year-old king is studying law

Israeli sources claimed Syria’s |°! Lausanne University, He mar-
objective was to interfere with the |e4 Princess Sirikit now 18 in
big drainage scheme in the Hule Bangkok last April shortly before
Valley, which Israel hoped would nus -SOFOnAtLOn Reuter.
yield many acres of fertile land
and provide a besis for a powerful

settlement in the northern pari of A Red Warning

the demilitdrised zone —Reuter



70 SQUATTERS

his stand beside the dock, Late:
when the application for th
summonses was considered, Adam:







A West German News Agency Adams made an unsuccessfu

Stet ,_| application for two weeks’ post-
‘ slaimed to-day that Soviet occupa~| app i ,
Sch uman I lan Is tion authorities were speeding up|Pomement stating that it woul

, ; ve hi i secure nen
installation of new airfields about] sive him time to secure an emine



BUDAPEST, April 6.
Szabad Nep Hungarian worker

Jap Treaty Draft a voce party newspaper

warned Yugoslavia that

10 miles northwest of Berlin. ' King’s Counsel from abroad, bu

2 + Eyewitnesses from the Agency) Gilbert Farnum, Legal Draughts
ari tel Oo nit said that last week a group oj/ man who is appearing for the
Soviet soldiers and officers orderec} Police said that he had an import

a number of families from thei:} ant witness who is leaving th



a Hungary would find means of
Changes Likely getting “suitable satisfaction"’ for



}
+ decision in an application for : inating’. tent Hadad
April 15. s . sta “5 . @ vis against Superintendent | ere remained tense, allege
TOne-fifth of the weekly ration Union With Greece Newspapers Mourn ummons against Superintendent} wurther concentrations” of Syrian





: ; farm houses immediately. colony shortly and would like th: } F the alleged assault on the Hun-
ry : " : ; —Reuter, evidence taken early. od WASHINGTON, April 6 garian Charge D’Affaires Istvan
ays wMumac ter The Magistrate granted the post The State Department said to-|Hrabec in a Belgrade street last
ponement until next week Bar- .day that it had decided to recom-| Saturday — Reuter.
BONN, April 6 ARGENTINA WILL rister A. E. Eastmond is thi [mend some changes in the draft wee
’ *





today that three other barrister: |cUlated to other interested Gov

Dr. Kurt Schumacher, West Gérman Social Democrat leadér,| SELL MEAT TO U.K.) | counsel tor Adams. | It was state: Japanese peace treaty recently cit World ‘Tithe Fight
5 ’ © ’ ~ wi
said here today he did not. believe the West German Parlia- BUENOS AIRES, April 6. | will be associated with Eastmond /@fmments, A State Department





ais ee : ' CHICAGO, April 6
ment would approve West Germany’s signing of the Schu-| An agreement to resume meat Spokesman said the first draft did x0, Ap



cad y flee > fing Ezzard Charles r AVY -
man Plan, shipments to Britain was reached Hot neces ily reflect the final zzard Charles, World Heavy









: ther Teas a = : [sa ; American view. weight Champion and Joe Maxim, |
Social democrats thought it a barrier to European unity. It | fi)" OE pai etherept in, Bag Visas Denied Paul He said he did not know if| the World Light-Heavyweight title |
placed material and politi i tn ag Hist ; ; " : changes had yet been communi-|hoider, today signed for their long
I . I island al an + pO itical burdens on the German people. eta gaa henhe.” t0 Robeson, Red Dean cated to the 16 interested Govern-{[ expected heavyweight title bout.!
Si A Schumacher said in al! important £ Ss. ‘ BOMBAY, April 6 ments.—Reuter. ‘lentative date for the contest in|
wn greement points not “the poor German f . >: ga Chicago stadium is May 30}
eo ” ‘i The Indian Government has re- ba i : Sig Charles will receive a west 4
Cee ean cit ee meenen and} ~WOOL STILL DOWN | frused ‘visas to Paul’ Robeson,| 7ITO SACKS ELEVEN {Charles will receive 40 pex cent, ‘
| On Monday : Yon High Commissioners had LONDON, April 6. | American negro singer, Professor a Haid ie (ha conidia saab
: the final say. Wool sold here this week has} Joliot-Curie, French atomic scien- BELGRADE, April 6 | Per cent.—Reuter,
(From Our Own Correspondent) The great bulk of German | made prices generally up to one/tist, and Dr. Hewlett Johnson,| Yugoslav press office tonight

workers, he declared, were opposed | shilling cheaper than at February | Dean of Canterbury, who plan to | announced the dismissal of eleven
GRENADA, April 6. {to the Schuman Plan, and if by} sales. This is the result of the] attend the

Communist-sonsorec | Ministers fr Marshal Tito’s} OPERALION VAGABOND
The formal signing by the|??Y chance it received a majority} withdrawal of United States buy-| ‘Peace Conference” in India this Federal aterametlt No reasons we ? ic
Agricultural ‘Asisclation “cant in Parliament, Social Democrats|ers from the international wool] month












































t a were given.—Reuter, NEW YORK, April 6
q would unleash a big political cam- | markets. Some observers here The Bombay ‘Peace Commit The United States Government
Agricultural Employers — Mental paign against it in the country, think the prices will fall further|tee’ which is organising the Con- | intends to mount a_ powerful
and Manual Workers’ Union Wage| The Social Democratic Party|when selling is resumed next fepency aed the mh Ministry | STRIKE FAILS medium-wave xedic.etation on.)
i Pact presently only initialled, may rouse continue to press for fresh | Thursday.—Reuter. are. volley eee) Shown ta fast ocean going freighter for it
z : s or 5 te rer 5 . i i a ashington despatch to the New
agreement remains in force for|the Government to go to the coun-| PASS COPPER BILL rile refused peonipiges ¢ haa | | Coreen opment Se York Times. ‘The project to be
d B. year. ane uy Opposition would try tc Th Va arch 8 Sourerarehe ect lobe, on Uruguay today was almost al known a ‘Operation Vagabond.”
Tonignt Gairy addresses what|diseredit Adenauer'’s regime so ESM Er OF, Seema cotw a —Reutes | total failure.—Reuter. —Reuter.
is expected to be a mammoth|Much that it would lose support| today passed a bill to suspend im- Ss ee 7 Ri aes
' bah amoyg the people “nd respect| port duties on copper until Feb- :
Market Square meeting in cele-|\,; . Y 1952 It will to the e e ® e
Beatl es aie ree with the Allied Government, ruary, 1952 ’ gO Oi: t
ration of the strike ogotation Miewier, |Semte Tn tented ever! India Rejects Frene indings
victory. age imporis of copper for defence
On Wednesday an reday | purposes. The bill safeguards the ‘. ‘ ‘ ‘ .
12 . oh aa . ee tae os | Aeabricen copper mining industry _ NEW DELHI, April 6 by the French Government, and Court of Justice. —
= OMS Wisheseps Were HeGES Ft Peace Awards lif the price of copper should fall}, Indian Prime Minister Nehru im the circumstances, the Indiai The Indian Government, he
a coroner’s inquiry at: the St | belo ; 24 cents a pound —Reuter |tO-day told Parliament that the Government did not regard them-]added, had also asked that there
David’s Magistrate’s Court into LONDON, April 6. | vt] palaplandngrapia ai 3. | Zreech ipa s had ace ; rye, Deane 70 ‘aecept any ‘of should be at lea it ere eae. Ge
the Latante shooting incident in-| Professor Joliot Curie, Com- | “NO PROGRESS j 7 et ANE pat dle Bay "Net 4 “dedied that the Indic servers to correspond h th
volving the Trinidad Police, this munist-French expert in atomic PARIS, April 6 aged ny re 4 ruene vt i da eehty Os 1 os 1a tee ne ‘7 yng fe fh Raropes, Me sae
is now adjourned sine die pending or the eine ante jist oF winners | A western spokesman reported | iiattan conditions ite rt uit ible | arrangements regarding their Nehru dec bated, as repe atedly 3
the arrival of Trinidad witnesses. |°f the Stalin International Peace | « rogress” after a four-hour) ¢or ; oT scide their sit. He said th idian Gover e ented to the French Gov * ~cyi
"Hon. A, P. 'T. James, a Trinidad|Awards announced today. Moscow |meetine of Foreign Ministers| political tusure “°° Eiht hed nereeh teen ear tepregented to the French Gow. {T'S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS
legisl ing here gives ajradio reported. Dr, Hewlett John- | Deput today, their 24th. He] ~ dum on French possessions in| take place unless political prisor
dinner tonigt hotel for Gairy;son, “the Red Dean” of C | added ) new proposals were; ‘The Indian Government's repre- India should be supervised by ‘ in French settlements in India
and the and Mentaijwas another of the prize | submitte for the Foreign Minis- ations in regard fo these ob- team of observer appointed ‘| been released.” aw 1
Wavieown’ ty] ebeaia the report said.—Reuter rand owes neler sara are nok arconted [ihe Pre nt of the Internation ewse Ache iets ab tna Sa






Carub Calling

ON, MRS, EVELYN BERTIN
acegsmpanied by Mrs, Hilda
Melville ‘arrived from B.G. yes-

terday afternoon by B,W.I.A.
Here for about a month’s holiday
they ave. staying with Mrs.

Clarice Gomes at “Glenroy” St.
Lawrence,

Mrs, Bertin is the daughter .of
the late Lord Mowbray. She met
Mrs. Melville several years ago
in France. Mrs, Bertin’s husband
who served in the Royal Navy
was killed in the last war.

Mrs. Bertin’s home is at pres-
ent in Bermuda, but for the past
two yeats she has been travelling
around. «the world, When she
leaves Rarbados she will return to
B.G. before going to Europe.

With Demerara Bauxite
RRIVING from B.G. yester-
AXday by B.W.I.A. were Mr.
and Mrs. F. Kreller and their two
children Bobby and Judy. Mr
Kreller is with the Demerara
Bauxite Co., in MacKenzie.
Here for two weeks, they
staying at the St
Hotel. ..

BW.1.A. Director
ON. 8. A. CUKE who attend-
ed & meeting of the Directors
of B.W.1,A. in Trinidad, return-
ed yesterday afternoon by
B.W.I1.A.
General Manager
R, AND MRS. WILLIAM W.
GARDINER arrived from
Trinidad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.I.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday, staying at the Casuarina
Club. Accompanying them over
were Mrs. Grace Mansfield and
her son Stephen.

Mr. Gardiner is General Man-
ager of Trinidad Bakeries Ltd.,
Port-of-Spain.

Retired Building Contractoi
R. AND MRS. GEORGE
WINKLER arrived from
Trinidad .yesterday afternoon by

are
Lawrence

B.W.I.A. to spend a holiday in
Barbados. They live in Los
Angeles, California, Mr, Winkler

is a retired building contractor.

During their stay in Barbados
they will be the guests of Mr.
Larry Van Dusen at “Little Barn”,
Pine Hill,

Barbados Holiday

RS. PIERRE QUESNEL and

three children arrived from
Trinidad.yesterday by B.W.I.A,
accompanied by Mrs. Quesnel’s
mother, Mrs. Lucille Dear. The
Quesnels are here for a holiday
and are staying with Miss Spencer
of “Dunloe” Collymore Rock,

Mr. Quesnel who is with For-

rest Park Estate, which is near
Pointe a Pierre. was unable to
come over for the holiday as the
estate is in the middle of crop.

HE man chosen by the Dorset

Coast Erosion and General
Purposes Committee to carry out
sleeping tests in a brimless bowler
is level-headed, dynamic, thick-
cheeked “Vincent Fumbling, of
Clayshott Farm, Hengstone-Ham-
berley.

Mr, Fumbling, aged thirty-nine
two years.ago next February, said:
“I expect they chose me because
I used torsleep in a bowler hat
out of sheer devilry. But it had a
brim all right,” he added, laugh-
ingly. In order to get used to the
brimless bowler, Mr. Fumbling is
wearing it at meals for a few days.
His sister, Mrs. Rout, said yester-
“He forgets himself, and
raises his hat when visitors come
into the room. And he has sprained
his ‘thumb trying to get his hand
under the crown to raise the hat.
There’s no doubt it’s easier to have
a brim to catch hold of. But that
would be cheating.”

The Party System

HE first plank in the Tory

policy being to keep the
Socialists in the House until they
sre loo sleepy to know what is
suing on, the counter-plan to the
Socialist attempt to close the bar
at 10 p.m, will be to block all the
exits with hats, overcoats and other
oddments. The Socialists will then
disguise themselves as Tories, and
slip out unobserved through gaps
in the clothing. The Tories will
then disguise themselves as Social-
ists, pretend to be asleep, and sud-
denly leap up to vote on the Tory
side, Democracy is all the rage.

The Orfl Plan

N connection with the Orfl Traffic

Scheme a Pedestrians’ Univer.
sity is to be opened in Clerken-
well. There the student will be
told, with the aid of diagrams and
graphs, how to cross a street. A
recording cf motor-horns and roar-
ing vehicles will be played, lichts



ee ee

ADVENTURES










“ Yes, it’s still pouring—
looks as if I'll never get
out of here.”



Indefinite Holiday
R. ALFRED HUBERT
STONE, retired B.G. Planter
arrived by B.W.1.A.’s B.G., flight
yesterday afternoon to spend an
indefinite holiday in Barbados.
He is staying with Mr. J. C

Roberts of Government Hill.

Joirs Family
R, J. D. H. PHILLIPS who

is with “Bath” Estate in
Berbice B.G., arrived from B.G.,
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.

to join his wife and two daughters
who are already in Barbados.
They have been here — since
March 16.

Back From B.G.
RS. J. BERNSTEIN who had
been in B.G., on a visit re-
turned yesterday afternoon | by
B.W.I.A.

Short Visit
R. INGHAM GORING who
was in B.G., on a_ week’s
visit returned yesterday by
B.W.LA.

Long Leave

R. BEN KING who is with

Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., in
Pointe-a-Pierre returned to Trini-
dad yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1LA., after spending his long
leave in Barbados staying with
Mr, and Mrs. R. M. Croney of
Fontabelle. He had been here
since January.

Special Representative
M*. HAROLD BISHOP, Spev-
ial Representative of the
yulf Oil Corpn., arrived from the
U.S. on Thursday via Puerto
Rico by B.W.1.A. He is a guest
at the Ocean View Hotel.

Grenada Merchant
R, AND MRS ROBERT
PROUDFOOT and their four
daughters, Kathlene, Jeanette,
Henena and Valerie arrived from
Grenada on Thursday by B.W.LA.
to spend one month’s holiday in
Barbados, They are staying with
the Atkinsons at “Sea Queen”
Hastings. Mr, Proudfoot is a
merchant in Grenada,
They haye three other children,
all boys who are at present in
Grenada,

Aftended Brother’s

Wedding

R. HAROLD MARSHALL
M returned yesterday afternoon
by B.W.1.A., from Trinidad. He
was on two weeks’ holiday. Dur-
ing his stay in Trinidad, he
attended his brother’s (Cuthbert)
wedding.

Chemical Engineer
M* AND Mrs, J. R. Taylor came

in on B.W.1.A’s Trinidad

flight yesterday afternoon. Here
for a short holiday they are stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel. Mr,
Taylor is a Chemical Engineer
with Stuart Bros., in Montreal.

T.C.A. Flights

EDNESDAY, APRIL 11, wil!

be the last T.C.A, mid-
week schedule, This schedule was
in operation during the peak of
the tourist season, Their regular
Saturday flight will continue to
operate until May 5. Starting, May
10, T.C.A’s weekly flight wil!
operate through Barbados every
Thursday instead of Saturday, and,
also starting May 10, flight 600, the
southbound trip will arrive at Sea
well at 5.10 a.m., leaving for Trini-
dad at 5.40 a.m., and flight 601
will arrive at Seawell from Trini-
dad at 9.45 a.m., leaving for
Canada via Bermuda at 10.30
a.m,

Dentist

D*® WILLIAM STANLEY
LYON, Venezuelan born den-
tist who lives in Trinidad arrived
yesterday afternoon by B.W.I1.A.,
from Trinidad to spend three
weeks’ holiday in Barbados, He is
staying at Ashton-on-Sea, Max~
wells.
Trinidad Arrivals

ISS PAM McLEAN_ was
~ among the passengers arriv—
ing from ‘Trinidad yesterday
afternoon by B.W.I.A. She plans
to spend a little over two weeks’
holiday here, staying at Sea Gays,
Maxwells,

Arriving by the same plane was
Mrs, Stella A, Fernandez who has
ccme over to spend an indefinite
holiday with Mrs. Miller at “Win-
chester”, Hastings.



BY THE WAY...

will flash, brakes will grind, and
each student will be given ten
seconds to run from one _island-
ramp to the next. Before crossing
a street the pedestrian will have
to convince the Crossing Warden
that he has a good reason for not
staying where he is, that his
crossing-record ig a good one, that
there have been no accidents in
his family, that he will not attempt
to re-cross on the same day, and
that he will not take with him to
the other side of the street any
vnauthorised pedestrian, or one
‘who has not passed the tests and

been awarded his diploma,
False Start

ROFESSOR GRAHAM STUD-
MOLE, writing in the Hatters’
Argus, says: “Anybody can lay his
head, encased in a brimless bowler,



On a very cold morning in mide
winter Rupert notices that one of
the windows is covered with frost
patterns. After gazing at them for
a while he fetches his pencil and
sketchbook and begins trying to
draw them. ‘How strange they
are,"" he murmurs. ‘ That big one

By BEACHCOMBER

ona pillow. The test comes when.
during sleep, the head is moved.
A hat with a brim would either
fall off, or wake the wearer by
tilting over his eyes, or sticking
into his cheek, What will happen
to a brimless bowler depends on a
number of things,” What did
happen we now. know. Mr.
Fumbling got into bed yesterday
at 11.43. He placed his head
gently on the pillow. The hat, in-
securely donned, slipped for-
ward, and a jagged edge, where
the brim had been removed too

carelessly, cut his nose. The ex-
periment was postponed while
first-aid was applied by Dr.

Reculver, of Linlithgow, The last
ragged edges of brim were skil-

fully removed by the electric
scissors of the foreman hat-
moulder of Messrs. Towell and
Darkleigh,

upert and the Ice

-flower—1

U

is just like a sort of ice-flower. [
wonder how Jack Frost thinks of

such lovely designs."’ Just as he
moves to the table to do his draw-
ing more carefully Mrs, Bear opens
the door. ‘Will you do some

shopping for me, please, Rupert ?"”
she says.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ?; :

OF







PIPA



Coorraht P 2. Var Dias tat Amsterdam



BREBRBEHBEEBEERERESBSBEBHE ES DB

for Young Men

GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS

Double-Seated. Free Repair patch

mg !ROPICAL SUITINGS
Including Pin-Stripes

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YOUR SHOF STORE

& Youths ONLY g

PER PAIR

6.18"

WAIST 27%” to 30” @

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The attached picture by John French,
ed as three of this year’s topline fashion models in London.

BARBADOS

TOP LEFT: JOAN BURGESS, BELOW ; PATRICIA GODDARD.

Shorts From Everywhere

TRANSPARENT shoes of plastic
which make onlookers believe the
lady is not wearing any are Fifth-
avenue’s newest vanity for Easter.

notices greet

SHOW BUSI



SS:
“Gramercy



Glowing
Ghost”

and its star, but they are from
provincial critics, The play and its

leading lady Sarah Churchill must



2. What two elghts turn
8. Sleeved

1
3.
eer et, 4.
5.
6.

y
1
2. Now this doesn’t exist.
5
6.
8

CROSSWORD .

Across
out to
(7)

robe of

Sieeve a bishop and
you can see him tn if. (6)

. Clue number. (4)

. Island bale. (4) .
. Some may be maidens, a
4)

. In all burning buildings. (3)

. Military headgear, (5)

. Common, pungent smeiing

herb. (6)

. Memorial initials, (3)
+ Dawn. (6)
3. Forcible extractions, (9)

Down

. Good plan to read over a menu.
(8) B 2. Decidedly shaky. (7)

. Diana embraces nim, (3)
Lexicon. (9) "

. Often biown to flames, (5)

. Almost the word you want. (6)

. You won't solve this unless you
have. (5)

. This ts of the brain. (8)

shutter and it won't

be taken. (4) s
. Such a pod is a crustacean, (0)
1. Rase in different shape, (4)
. Heart of a swoon. (3)
. The twin of 15 Across, (3)

utio: yesterday's puanle,—Across:
Solution of teerrow: 9, Sit; 10, Orion

Noon, 16 Notary:
fa; 22

7.
8.
3. Close the
4
7
9.
0

12, Shah: 14
pd: @0, Ewer:
Down:
nger: 3. Orison: 4
e, 6, Digamy

4, Node: 15 and 2
& Ark: 19 Odd

GLOBE



TODAY 5 & 8.30 & Continuing

ce

t

) OFAG

Lei



HE HELD A LOADED






REAT CITY!

Brought Thrillingly
To Life By The

starring RICHARD BASEHART
SCOTT “CANON CITY” BRADY
with Roy Roberts * Whit Bissell * James Cardwell
Jack Webb * Produced by Robert T. Kane
Directed by
C. Biggins and
by Horry E

Crone Wilbur * Additional dielogue
ex Origine! story by Crone, Wilbur
A Bryen Foy Production

An EAGLE LION FILMS Presentation



|

| GUN AT THE HEART /

Alfred Werker* Screenplay by John



| fore retiring to the 18 berths.

ADVOCATE

SATURDAY, APRIL 7,







iP aad

RIGHT : AUDREY WHITE,

the famous photographer, shows three girls who have been select-
—London Express Service.

|B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY, APniL 7, 1951.

still pass the scrutiny of Broad-
way’s austere and often morose
critics.

BRITANNIA rules the video



fe 6.30 a.m.—12.15 9.m, 19.60 M.
waves with Bea and Rex says a aloe siphhieinees incur Snionsoetnechresialaih
headline in the newspaper 6.30 am. Forces Favourite; 7 a.m

pap Worle The News; 7.10 a.m. News Analysis;

Telegram. It refers to a review of
a TV appearance by Beatrice Lillie
and Rex Harrison,

But the rent control chief an-
nounces that if a renter applies for
an H aerial on the roof to bring
in Bea and Rex, the landlord can
raise the rent two dollars (14s.) a
month,

“THE LOST WEEK-END,” you

7.15 a.m. From The Editorials; 7.25 a.m,
Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m. From the
Third Programme; 8 a.m, Montmartre
Players; 8.15 a.m. Composers of the
Week; 8.30 a.m. Elton Hayes; 8,45 a.m,
Colonial Questions 9 a.m. The News;
9.10 am Home News from Britain; 9.15
a.m. Close Down; 11 a.m. The Grand
Nation l; 11.30 a.m, Programme Parade;
11.40 a.m. Interlude; 11.45 a.m. Band!
Stand; 12 noon The News; 12.10 News
Analysis; 12.15 C.pse Oown.

4.15—6.00 p.m. 19.76 M.





remember, was a film of an alco-|~ 415 p.m. Listeners Choice; oem
holic’s »s -e ode The Grand National; 5.15 p.m. B.B.C.
Se Were ene. Today Scottish Variety Orchestra; 6 p.m.

Charles Jackson, author of “The
Lost Week-end”, was fined £26 in
Vermont District Court. Charge—
drunken driving.

DREAMLAND Ez:PRESSES start
flying to London next month. Until
now, airliners have had berths plus

Music for Dancing.
6,007.15 p.m.

25.64; 31.32; 48.43 M.







6.45 p.m, Programme Parade; 7 pms
The News; 7.10 p.m. News Ana ysis;
7.15 p.m. Behind The News,
7.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 M.

7.45 p.m,

& 48.43 M,



e Gra National; 8 p.m.
8.15 pm. Royal En-



seats. Passengers on the extra- reer See 8,20 p.m. Invitation to a}
fare all-sleeper plane will have a : 9.45 p.m, Songs by Dupare; 10
dinner with free cock- The New 1010 p.m. From ie

gourmet ,
tails, champagne and liqueurs, be- |






pm. Take it from Here;

Editorials; 10.1 Il pm. |

10 45 p.m. Yours Faithfully;
Southern Serenade Orchestra.

“CHINA DOLL” Mathill Street.

SHRIMPS ON THE MENU
Dial 4730 for Reservations



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“WHERE DANGER LIVES” with Faith Domergue






Robert Mitchum in

Coming Soon:—



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

4.45 & 8.30 p.m. and Contiruing till MONDAY 4.45 & 8. p.m

TODAY
Film Classics Inc. Presents—

“The PIRATES of CAPRI”





with Louis HAYWARD, Binnie BARNES, Mariella LOTTI, “Alan CURTIS
EXTRA: THE RHUMBA SHORT TROPICAL TOPICS
TODAY 9.30 am. & 1.30 p.m. (Two New Pictures

Boris KAPLOFF (as Mr. WONG) in WONG IN CHINATOWN
- (A New Chinese Detective Mystery)
— and —

The CISCO KID in

PLAZA) DIAL
OISTIN 8404

TODAY & TOMORROW 5 and
8.30 p.m. (Warner)

JAMES CAGNEY in

“ST. LOUIS KID"
with
Patricia ELLIS, Alen JINKENS

MIDNITE TONITE (RKO)
TIM HOLT in (Both)

“UNDER THE TONTO RIM” and
GUN SMUGGLERS



EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30. .
& Continuing

J. Arthur Rank presents . .
Fredric MARCH in

“ CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS.”

Color by Technicolor
Co-starring

Florence ELDRIDGE
Francis L. SULLIVAN &
Linden TRAVERS

ROXY

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30. .
& Continuing

J. Arthur Rank presents. .
Fredric MARCH in

** CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS ”

Color by Technicolor



Co-starring

Florence ELDRIDGE
Francis L. SULLIVAN &
Linden TRAVERS





PLAZ

Watch For:—‘NOT WANTED” It's a

BARBADOS

RIDING THE CALIFORNIA TRAIL
with GILBERT ROLAND





TO-DAY -
and Continuing to Monday at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

LOUIS HAYWARD ARINMHVE BARNES ALAM CORTE - mal. ASOT - eNQOUPY STD

ATA eat C Preecnen Pete ty TOR PRBLD Sn. ty CDGM HLM cae Tn cst Pate sneer FICK CLAS STES, INE,

Extra Special: ihe Short “TROPICAL Tories’

and latest “WORLD NEWS”



‘Se RINEYS Of cocet

eacoucee » wraserte at
a

1951


























GAIETY

(THE GARDEN) St. James

TCDAY & TOMORROW 8.30 p.m.
Mat. Sun, 5 p.m
Paramount Presents . . .
“THE LAWLESS"
with
McDonald CAREY—Gail RUSSELL
John SAND and other,
——S
MIDNITE TONITE (RKO)
“CODE OF THE WEST"
with Robert MITCHUM and
WILD HORSE MESA
with TIM HOLT



ROYAL

TO-DAY to SUNDAY
4.30 and 8.30

Universal Double .
John HALL &
Maria MONTEZ

in
“WINTE SAVAGE”
AND
“THE WICKED
LADY”
with

James MASON &
Margaret LOCKWOOD

‘OLYMPIC
LAST TWO SHOWS

TO-DAY 4,30 and 8.15

ist Inst. Republic Serial .
Richard WEBB &
Aline TOWNE
in
“THE INVISIBLE
MONSTER ”

Along with the picture...
“Whispering Footsteps’

Starring

John HUBBARD &
Rita QUIGLEY

4.45 & 8.30 P.M.




















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Directed by DA

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WAITING FOR...






ee ae, L.
ELDRIDGE - SULLIVAN
Linden Kathleen
TRAVERS - RYAN
and DEREK BON D with
p> James Robertson JUSTICE

=

Felix AYLMER

VID MACDONALD + Produced b RANK BUN
aA Sydney Box Production for Gainsborough + Released bo He RANE SUNDY

Released by Universal-International

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SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1951

Ch. Ch. Nurses International Trade To
Strengthen The Free World

The United States and the democratic

Need Bigger
Quarters

Quarters are inadequate for the
number of Nurses in Christ Chureh
aceording to the report of the
Churchwarden.

The building needs washing and
painting, “I strongly recommend”,
says the Churchwarden, “that the
Nurses be given a small outside
kitehen which could be erected at
no great cost. At present the
Nurses do their cooking in their
rooms. This is neither safe nor
hygienic.

.D. Clinie—No funds were
granted for this building. but 4
small sum was diverted from the
Almshouse grant to do minor re-
pairs and lime washing.

Vestry er grant .
cated for this building was Ls *

quate, but again I diverted funds
— = Almshouse to distemper

e walls and paint the ceiling.
hoods, etc.

Matron’s Quarters —There was
no grant for this and nething was
spent. To have done any repairs
of a small nature would have been
a waste of money. The time has
come when some decision should
be arrived at as to what is to be
done with this building. At present
its condition beggars description,

Parish Church—This is in
condition and should be kept so.
The walls are in deplorable condi-
tion and money should be granted
to put them in order. With the con-
sent of the Commissioners of High-
ways, the Yard and Road be
the Church and School were ré-
conditioned and colassed, e
dangerous corner caused by thi
Church wall was “rounded off”
These improvements were done
from Highway funds.

Rectory.—Little was done to this.

It is sadly in need of renovation
and unless steps are taken to do
this at once I fear that the cost
will be excessive, I recommend
that a loan be raised for this pur-
pose.
_ St. David's Chureh,—Washed
inside and outside with lime wash,
Painted, and minor repairs done.
The Church is im good order,

St. David's Vicarage—A few
repairs were done, but repairs are
urgently needed, and painting is a
necessity to save the building.

St. Bartholomew's Church —
Only minor repairs were done to
the roof. It is imperative that this
galvanised roof be painted and
kept painted as it is subject to the
effects of the salt air. It may yet
be saved for some years if speedy
measures are taken,

St. Matthias Vicarage—aA grant
of £100 was given the Churen
Committee and this was spent on
washing and paint, the difference

in cost being paid by the Church-

Committee itself.

“IT want to express my thanks”
concludes the Churchwarden, “to
the entire Parochial Staff for their
help and co-operation throughout
the Parochial year, The Matron,
erees pas ees Law Inspector
have render their services. un=
sparingly, and I want to place on
record my appreciation of their
co-operation. The Storekeeper has
always been of inestimable value
by turning his hand to aid in any
task. The Medical Officers huve
been thorough in their work and
have given freely of their time,
to the service of the poor of the
parish,

Representations have been made
by the Nursing Staff for an in-
crease in their salaries, I recom-
mend that an incremental basts be
adopted, as is done in Gavernment.



CANE FIRE

A quarter of an acre of ripe
first crop canes the property of
Louis Boyce of St, Blizabeth
Village, St. Joseph, was burnt
about 2 p.m, yesterday. Neigh
bours helped to put out the fire

and prevented Boyce’s house from
catching afire.

are more
tenan

countries of Europe are constantly seek

iuternational trade as an economic bulwark against hostile ideologies.

By F. PRESTON FORHES

THE health of the international
Soeteoa thal ee at ae a the
tates prime impor-
tance to our national security. As
we and the other nations of the
free world mobjlize our military
strong and gear economies
for e potential defense of the
democratic way of life, it is essen-
tial that the els of trade be
utilised to their maximum capa-
ee = the supply S =
neede milit: production .
fo do 99 would We to Waste
a valuable asset ef the American
productive system.

It is equally true, moreover,
ot maintenance of high levels
of multilateral trade contributes
so directly to the economic stabil-
ity of all the nations of the free
world that any substantial falling
off in this commeree would weak
en one of the psychological foun-
dations of our security. One of
the strongest forces supporting
the democratic philosophy is the
material demonstration that peo-
ples living by it are physically

good more comfortable and are re-

warded more fully for their
labours than is possible under
other political economic systems.

International trade is not only
the way in which wane people =
ion earn their living—il

ie ine way in gg the os
ef mest peo e
worth the earning. merican
goods sold to customers in other

parts of the were not only aoe
cerned wages for na 's
labour and profits for its business-
men, but they also have supplied
the needs and raised the material
prosperity of the people to whom
they were sent, At the same time
the purchase by the United States
of goods and services from other
nations has increased their pros-
perity of and has s' ed Ameri-
ean economy with many of the
essentials for its productive sys-

Faced as the nations of the free
world now are with the necessity
of placing greater emphasis on
the military aspects of their eco-
nomic activity, it is fortunate that
there exist ‘well-functioning in-
ternational trading channels to
supply the expanded needs for
the specialized goods required in
this type of production.

Imported goods are an impor-
tant ingredient of prosperity for
severd? reasons. Taking European
countries as an example, the sales
volume which American indus-
tries enjoy in the European mar-
kets is of — sagen sence © —

fitable functioning of the ec

ESinle ale of the United States,
The effects of lower unit costs
significant for the main—

ee of business volume in the
United States than can be mea-
sured directly in terms of the
dollars earned from sales to Euro-
pean costumers. But the benefits

of. contin

those users ean continue to earn
the dollars to pay for their pur-
chases by selling their wares to

United States in return. From
ihe standpoint, therefore, the
United States strengthens its
national prosperity when it buys
from European customers the
goods which they offer.

The progress of the United
States in balancing its interna-
tional accounts has been due in
part to the lessening of its export
volume. The sales decline was to
be expected ue increasingly
effective habilita on of Europe
reduced the extraordinary de-
mands for both consumer goods
and capital e nent which had
been created wartime destruc-
tion and dislocation. Since indus-

ial economies traditionally have
teen the best “customers, it is
reasonable to expect that Europe’s
normal demand for American
products may increase as its eco-
nomic health improves.

A MORE

GLAMOROUS

Society's most

YOU!

beautiful women

From Foreign Commerce Weekly




ARTIE'S HEAOLIN

Hes





“Can’t | have tate night
sittings just like M.P.s?”

European sales to the United
States have increased steadily.
Productive capacity has been
more effectively utilized, permit-
ting European goods to be offered
in world markets in greater
variety and volume. While Euro-—
pean producers have had more
and better things to sell, this
favourable position alone would
not have forged the gains which
have been made. Marketing chan-
vels have been strengthened and
diversified. Wider and more
effective contact has been made
between European sellers and
American businessmen who now,
in increasing numbers, are hand-
ling the European goods de—
manded by the American market.

This progress has been particu-
larly encouraging because it is
almost entirely the achievement
of private enterprise. On both
sides of the Atlantic, individual
producers and traders have sought
business energetically and have
been increasingly successful in
meeting the needs of the market.
The role of the U.S. Government,
both abroad and at home, has
been to foster trade by supplying
traders with information; to en-
courage commerce by removing
obstacles in the path of trade, and
generally to perform those ser-
viees which the trading commun-
ity can best render to itself
through a public agency. This
role for government is a charac-
teristic of a free society, and its
effectiveness even in troubled
times is a demonstration of the
virility of the democratic com-
mercial system.

The first step forward was the
widening awareness among the
American people that hospitality
to imported goods was in their
own. self-interest, This develop-
ment in thinking came, not from
altruism, but rather because the
economic facts of 1950 have been
persuasive to the conclusion that
national prosperity and economic
strength are intimately bound to
the prosperity and strength of the
trading world. The facts of 1950
are continuing every day to con-
vince citizens of the United States
that the strength of private com-—
merce and the standard of living
which it creates are dependent
upon a progressive expansion of
production and trade, The con-
cept of business volume as a
limited amount of activity in
which one man’s share is obtained
only at the expense of another
man’s loss has been demonstrated
to be false. .

But this change in thinking, ax
well as the greater availability of
goods, merely provided the cli-
mate. The growth in trade has
been realized through the efforts

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ene
Citizens Replan

ry 7 ‘ve

heir City
PHILADELPHIA
than 2,000,000 resi-
gents of this third largest city of
The United States — even school
children—are having opportunity
to. voice opinions on city planning
end replanning.
So successful have been the
orts of the Citizens’ Council on

Planning and allied groups in

oving the metropolitan area
om the term “Philadelphia ap-

ch” has come to have a definite
meaning to all city planners

The Citizens’ Council, which re-

eeives support from Community
Chest funds as a nonprofit, non-
partisan organization, faces with
realism q major problem that
troubles many cities. Philadelphiz
has in the last 25 years grown sc
rapidly and its citizens have been
So occupied with commercial and
industrial expansion that general
etvic development has been
neglected.

Now the Citizens’ Council, repre-
Senting 140 labour, business,
church, welfare and civic organ-

The

more

ing better means to foster and strengthen

J ii
of the individual trader, and has

developed from a multitude of
transactions, some of them quite
small, which in total are a signi-
ficant contribution to the national
economy. European and other
imported goods were offered for
sale in places throughout the
United States in 1950 where they
had been unknown before, and in
established import markets, the
variety and quantity cf imported
foods increased,

The importance of all of this acti-
vity is enhan¢éed by the considera-
tions which have persuaded the
United States and the rest of the
free world to direct their econo
mics along the lines of democratic’

defense, A firmer commercia} inte. izations, is sparking individual
gration of the trading world is a imerest and channeling public
vital component of its military and support of the City Planning Com-
moral defense. The more effe.. mission, the Re-Developmeni

tively private business both in the
United States and in other natioas
provides efficient channels for the
interchange of goods and services
the more real will be economic and
military security for all. The in-
dustrial might of the United States
supplemented — by the specia-
lised knowledge and skills of
Europe and the other industrializ-
ed nations of the world, can and
will produce a military potential
even superior to the prodigious
achievement of World War II.
Perhaps equally important, the
strengthening of commercial ties
among democratic peoples on the
consequent raising of ving
standards and improvement in
material well-being will be an Whole community,”
important bulwark against the Parents caught the enthusiasm
moral attacks of ideologies hostile Of their children and began to
to the concepts of a free world, realize that something could be
, ; done about undesirable conditions
Europe’s role in the economic that for too long had been ac-
strengthening of the free world— cepted as permanent,

Athority, and the Philadelphic
Housing Association in projects
ranging from backyard gardening
w highways extensions.

With the co-operation of the
schools, these organizations took
neighbourhood problems int
classrooms, There, with maps anc
models, pupils studied ways to
make their blocks more attractive
and to provide the air and space
needed to make life pleasanter.

After struggling with the prob-
lems of dirty alleys, rubble heaps
dangerous traffic, and run-down
homes, one youngster exclaimed

“You know, I don’t think the
average citizen ever really sees hi:

both in the supply of Not only were they asked to fac
military material and in the i y i , “
coke na Geiation oe the financial problems involved

but they were invited to participat,
personally in neigbourhood im
provement planning, All were
urged to voice opinions, study the
master plan for the city, and be-
come familiar with proposals for
bond issues so that they might
vote as informed citizens

So encouraging was the response
of citizens that the goal for 195!
has been supplemented with a plar
calling for the expenditure of
$537,298,000 during the next six
years,

From far and near person:
interested in city planning come
to look at the “Philadelphia ap-
proach.” Within the last year, lf
persons from Germany viewec
projects undertaken or completec
and studied future plans, Visitor:
also came from Australia, Switzer-
Jand, Sweden, Turkey, India, New
Zealand, England, Japan and the
Philippines.

Democracy, the visitors learned
is the keystone of the “Philadelphi;
approach”, For they noted thes«
statements of belief by the Citizens
Council:

“We believe the citizens wan
Philadelphia to have a planned
growth rather than a haphazard,
piecemeal growth.

“We believe that all Philadel-
phians should have the opportunity
to take part in planning for that
future, a right to know the cost
and a right to say how the money
shall be raised, and how it shall

civilian goods—will be that of the
specialist, simce the character of
that continent’s productive capac-
ity and of its social structure fits
it for this type of activity. As
part of their services in support
of the sound expansion of private-
ly operated trade, the governments
of Western European nations con-
tinue to work in co-operation
with the government of tho
United States through such
channels as the technical assis-
tance programmes, under which
groups of European businessmen
are enabled to visit the United
States to improve their knowl-
edge of the structure of its indus-
try and trade and, more particu-
larly, to discuss with American
potential buyers the ways in
which European commodities can
best serve the needs of their own
economy,

The goals of expanded multi-
lateral trade and ¢o-operative.
strengthening of the economy of
the free world are not easy of
attainment. They can be reached
however, by continuous and
energetic effort on the part of
producers, traders, shipping in-
terests, bankers, and other seg-
ments of the business public
assisted and supported by govern-
mental services and by co-opera-
tive action by business groups.
The way of achievement will be
a steady progress made up of
many individual efforts, The com-
bined effect may well be pro-



foundly significant in the course be spent.”
of the world’s history for
seneeioom. Rates of Exchange

This article appeared in the Novemoer APREL 6, 1961

Oo
£0, 1950, issue of Foreign Commerce Week- Pa gil
ly, a trade magazine published by the gg 8/10% pr. Bankers de Gaten ‘ne

1.$. Department of Commerce. The

* Demand Drafts 61.75% pr.
writer is Deputy Director of the Inteii- ind Drafts % DI

Sight Drafts 61 6/10% pr.

gence and Services Division, Office of 93 8/10% pr. Cable
International Trade, U.S. Department of 632 3/10% pr. Currency 60 4/10% pr.
Commerce. Coupons 59 7/10% pr





Your money buys more
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4


























PAGE THREE



Recommends Arms
Factories In W.I.

F Or yw





LO.



i NDON, April 5,

The immediate provision of
small arms factories in the
olonies to help Britain's Re-
armament Programme and pro-
vide jobs for surplus overseas
labour was recommended today
by Mr, Halford W. | Reddish
Chairman of the Rugby Portlanc
Cement Company

He told directors at the Com-

IMPERIAL LEATHER ° LINDEN BLOSSOM *

pany’s annual meeting in Rugby
“If world planning has any prac-
tical meaning outside Bloomsbury
now at this time of rearmament
is when the Government shoul
try to plan the resources of the
Empire as a whole. We in thir
country will need to switch ove:
1alf a million men and women te

BLUE HYACINTH



Kidney Trouble Causes
Backache, Getting Up Nighis





















armaments with consequent It
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ve : " . ing | hess, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles, *,
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. r eed nsieaiat b and place a heavy strain on your kidneys en ey ou to try It under a money
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oll de A 3 the Sian 2 Help Kidneys tor's Qy 4 | you, so buy your treatment today =
a , , : ‘©. | Many doctors have discovered by scien for
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PLANE TRIP DENIED

BUENOS AIRES, April 5.

American airline Panagra turn-
“i Dr. Victor Paz Estenhoro
*resident.al candidate in next
nonth's General Elections in
3olivia off the plane in which he
1oped to fly to Lapaz from
3uenos Aires this morning,

Paz, the leader of the Bolivian
nationalist revolutionary move
ment had been exiled from his
country since the Lapaz populace
in 1946 hanged the then President
Villaroel from a lamp-post.

—Reuter,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield. Sch, Gloria Henrietta
Sch. Adalina, Sch Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Yacht Caribbee,
Sch. Laudalpha, Sch. Gardenia W., Sch
D'Ortae; Sch. Emeline, Sch. Lydia Adina
8 Seh. Wonderful Counsellor, Yacht
Buckaroo, M.V. T. B. Radar, M.V. Biue
Star, M.V Lady Joy, Sch Harriet
Whittaker Sch Enterprise S., Sch
Sunshine R., Seh. Turtle Dove, M.V
Caribbee



ARRIVALS

Sehooner Cyril EB. Smith, 56 tons net,
Capt. Jones, from St. Vincent

Schooner Laudalpha, 60 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, from St. Lucia,

S.S. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 tons
net, Capt, Wallace, from British Guiana
via Trinidad

DEPARTURES

Schooner Blue Nose Mac, 82 tons net,
Capt. McFarlane, for British Guiana

Schooner Mary B. Caroline, 54 tons
net, Capt. Joseph, for Dominica

$.S. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 tons
net, Capt. Wallace, for Canada

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable anc Wireless (West Indies) Lid
‘dvise that they can now eommunicate
with the following ships through their
Zarbados Coast Station





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and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings

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PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS sb ADVOCATE

Printed ty the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St.. Bridgetown.



Saturday, April 7, 1951



CLEANLINESS

THOSE people who use the streets of
Bridgetown daily are the best judges of the
cleanliness of the City. This is what “one
of the cleanest cities in the West Indies”
looked like between 9.15 a.m. and 9.20 a.m.
yesterday morning. Opposite Plantations
Building on the other side of the road was
a galvanised stuff bin, containing half-a-
grapefruit rind and discarded paper over-
flowing on the pavement. A few feet away
on the same pavement two empty water
coconuts highlighted a pile of rubbish. An
open push cart labelled “Commissioners of
health” was drawn up alongside Lower
Broad Street and a man was emptying
some of the contents of a cardboard box
into the cart while bits and pieces of paper
blew back into the road. Close to the cart
was a drain pipe under which was firmly
embedded an old shoe, half an empty
orange and six inches of paper. In the
road neer the Corner of Baxters Road and
Lower Broad Street a standpipe remains
a relie of an age dead, but not buried.
Across the road the gutters between the
Singer Sewing Machine Co., and the new
De Lima Store were full of litter, and the
gutter outside J. N. Goddard and Sons, was
strewn with pieces of paper.

From gutters in Baxters Road a current
of water was driving down the gutters
which lead along Me Gregor Street to the
sea. There were clusters of flowers, leaves,
and paper being swept down with the
water and a slight smell from matter which
had begun to decompose. One side of Mc
Gregor Street was blocked by vehicles,
including a new refuse collector which
was then being filled. A man was spitting
in the road. Higher up where Mc Gregor
Street reaches the Advertising Department
of the Advocate, two men were playing a
game of warri in the road itself, while an
outdoor barber was setting up his shop in
the same road opposite the Advertising
Department of the Advocate but closer to
Parry Street.

It was a typical morning in Bridgetown
on one of its cleaner days. None of the
refuse in the streets or gutters described
above had anything whatever to do with
hucksters, although in the short distance
between St. Mary’s Chureh and opposite
Charles McEnearney and Co., the pavé-
ments and roads were generously lit-
tered with leaves, mould and other dirt-
makers commonly associated with the
trade of huckstering. It is a grave mistake
for the Commissioners of Health to sup-
pose that the Advocate has any other pur-
pose than the preservation of the good
name of the City of Bridgetown and the
cleanliness of the Island of Barbados
when it gives publicity to what thousands
of Barbadians and visitors to the island
daily see for themselves.

The letter from a Canadian published
in yesterday’s paper complaining of dead
animals and refuse on bathing beaches, is
only one of hundreds of complaints which
this paper receives about Barbadian
beaches. In fact the very day that the
Commissioners of Health were reported as
saying that Bridgetown was one of the
cleanest cities in the West Indies, the
stench from the Paynes Bay Beach caused
by the rotting carcasses and entrails of
sharks was detracting from the solid value
of the St. James coast as a tourist resort.

And the reporter had hardly finished with ~

his report of the meeting of the Commis-
sioners of Health on Thursday, before the
telephone was ringing in this office and a
resident of Hindsbury Road complaining of
the stench caused near his home by smoke
and dead animals.

The public is not ignorant of the difficul-
ties which the island of Barbados must
face in keeping itself clean and preserving
its good name as a tourist resort (which
it is now in real danger of losing if smug-
ness and satisfaction get a foothold here.)
But it insists that those difficulties be tack-
led, not shelved. And this newspaper, true
to its policy of reflecting public opinion on
all matters affecting the good name of this
island will continue to draw attention to
the unnecessary filth and refuse daily to be
seen around Bridgetown and on every
bathing beach of the island which is at all
accessible. Everyone knows the high value
that this newspaper places on tourism as
a major industry, second only to sugar in
its importance to our island economy, and
the cleanliness of Bridgetown and of
the whole island is at the heart of the
matter.

_No one who has travelled at all would
suggest that Bridgetown was as well man-
aged and as clean as the neighbouring capi-
tal of Grenada, St. Georgés, while to speak
of Port-of-Spain and Georgetown in com-
parison with Bridgetown is to display-an
unusual ignorance as to the very use of
the words “clean city.”

“Here is the most convincing explanation of what happens at Communist treason Monday—There is one club in Barbados
trials... believe it to be the true one.”

the trial of the British engineers
from the Metropolitan-Vickers
works, who had been accused o!
sabotaging the Five Year Plan.
After several months in detention
they had appeared in court and
some of them, at least, had made
astonishing confessions.

I remember being taken past the
gtim-looking Lubianka prison, or
rather hurried past it, as my guide
obviously thought it was not 4
plage to linger near. I wondered,
as I gazed at its grey walls, what
processes went on behind them to
obtain such abject admissions of
guilt.

Other trials took place on a
larger scale after I left Russa.

Liquidated

These trials followed an identi-
cal pattern. The defendants vied
with each other in their offor's at
self accusation. Men who had fill-
ed high ‘and prominent positioag
in the State confessed to the most
heinous teachery against the
Soviet fatherland. In spite of their
pleas for Mercy they were con-
victed and subsequently “liquida-
ted.”

Western observers were bewil-
dered by these extraordinary con-
fessions and sought in vain to ex-
plain them. My,,parliamentary col-
league, Brigadier Fitzroy Mac-
}lean, who was present at the trial
}of Bukharin and others, supposed
that torture had been employed.
By some it was believed that drugs
had been used, But the prisoners
always seemed in good health; and
although in many instances they
repeated their stories like actors
playing their parts, on the whole
they appeared self-possessed, How
could one account for it?

In 1940 Mr. Arthur Koestler
published his famous book, Dark~
ness At Noon, which contained a
brilliant but hypothetical expla-
nation. His view qwas that a Com-
munist on trialâ„¢-would confess
to any crime against the State be-
cause he would realise that his
confession even though substan-
tially false, was the only way left
to him in which he could advance
the cause of Communism,

In other words, to abandon be-
lief in Communism after a life-
time as a revolutionary was psy-
chologically impossible. Thus with
the broken men of the opposition
recantation had become a kind of
ritual habit and accepted routine.

Guilty Pleas

But this explanation seems to
be but partially true.

It cannot have applied to the

Between the two wars I paid a
visit to Moscow. It was just after

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Why Do They Confess?

Metropolitan - Vickers engineers
nor to other non-Communists, such
as Cardinal Mindszenty or the 16
Polish leaders who were carried
oif to Moscow in 1945 and charged
with sabotaging the Soviet war ef-
fort in Poland.

Fifteen of these Poles pleaded
guilty at their trial. The sixteenth,
Mr. Z, Stypulkowski,* unlike his
companions, refused to confess in
prison. On the contrary, he in-
sisted on pleading Not Guilty in
court. What is even more surpris-
ing he has survived to tell the re-
markable tale of his experiences
in the Lubianka prison.

He is almost the only living wit-
ness who, although publicly ac-
cased before the Supreme Court
of the U.S.S.R., has been able to
put on record the truth about the
Soviet methods of breaking down
their victims both physically and
morally.

A barrister and former officer
in the Polish army Mr. Stypul-
kowsky was taken prisoner in 1939,
first by the Reds and later by the
Germans. He later found his way
back to Warsaw where he started
underground activities and became
one of the leaders of the Resis-
tence movement, and in 1944 took
part in the abortive Warsaw rising.

Kidnapped

Early in the following year,
together with 15 other Polish
underground leaders, he was
invited to Moscow to meet Mar—
shal Zhukov, Commander-in-
Chief of the Soviet Forces, to
discuss outstanding problems
concerning Soviet occupied Polish
territory. Instead of being
received as a delegate, he was
kidnapped and thrown into the
Lubianka.

There the NKVD, the dreaded
secret police, did their best to
make him confess to having
plotted against the Soviet Union.

He was not subjected to torture,
but he was the victim of the most
intensive third-degree methods, in
which it -was sought to wear down
his resistance by regulated dis-
comfort. He was dragged from
bed on 70 nights out of 71, and
suffered 141 protracted interroga—
tions.

By sheer force of willpower he
dominated his interrogator, His
harrowing experiences enabled
him to explain the submission of
his 15 colleagues, who were in
reality equally guiltless.

The Price

The prisoner is confined in a
cell under constant surveillance
of a guard, under the harsh glare
of a strong electric light, the prey
of ceaseless anxiety and fears, In

By Montgomery Hyde. M.P.

these surroundings and after
nights of repeated questioning his
sense of values comes blurred
and he is inclin to accept the
idea put into his mind by the
interrogator. This is that his par
amount duty is to recover his
freedom. The price does not seem
unduly high—just his s gnature
on a deposition acknowledging
his traitorous acts against the
Soviet.

Meanwhile his faculties have
become diminished and his reas-
oning powers. corrupted. He,
confuses the true facts with those
suggested to him by his interro-
gator.

Finally, in his determination to
confess everything, he talks about
things which have never hap-
pened. He tries to remember
something he never did, he tries
to remember some action he
never committed just to prove
conclusively that he does not
intend to conceal anything.

After the fortieth interrogation
or so the prisoner’s deposition
usually beginsg ‘Yes, I didn’t
state the truth until now. Now
I will tell everything openly. . .”

A Wreck

By this time the prisoner is a
nervous wreck, Having stated
what is required of him he is
then put on a better diet and
deliberately fattened up for the
public trial. Any attempt on his
part to deviate from his story in
court is countered by the prose--
eutor reminding him sharp!v of
the details of his confession.

Mr. Stypulkowsky was lucky
True he was convicted, but he
received the extremely _ light
sentence of four months, most of
which he had already spent in
jail, so that he was
almost immediately. While the
Soviet authorities were anxious
to discredit the Polish Resistance
movement at that time, they also
desired to keep up the appear-—
ance of harmony with the West
With fifteen pleas of “Guilty”
they could afford a few acquittals
to please their allies.

The story which Mr. Stypul-
kowski has to tell makes fascina—
ting . reading. It is the most
convincing account of Communist
technique in treason trials which
I have read. The reason for this
is_clear. It affords the most
likely explanation of just why
political prisoners under the
Soviet confess to crimes they have
never committed. I believe it to
be the true one.

World Copyright Reserved
.E.S.

released



News From Britain

: LONDON,

The struggle in British politics
seems to have taken yet another
turn, Now it is even less likely
that there will be immediate
elections, or that a government
of Mr. Churchill will replace the
government of Mr, Attlee. Just
after Christmas, as I recorded at

.| the time, the morale of the Gov-

ernment was at a low ebb, Its
supporters talked of defeat. And
the Conservative party was over-
joyed at the prospect of power,
The Conservatives could have
done two things. They could
have waited timidly for the Gov-
ernment to make mistakes, Or
they could attack the Govern-
ment verbally, as much as
possible with the aim of getting
to power quickly. There were
risks in the second course. High
political temperatures cannot be
maintained for very long. If the
Conservatives failed to win their
battle, then they might have
sacrificed the chance of power
this year, On the other hand,
to play a timid political game
does not pay — and it is the
business of an opposition to be
vigorous. So with Mr. Churchill's
leadership and the active “oe
of many new backbench M’Ps,
burning to do battle, the Conser-
vatives decided on an all-out
campaign to bring down the
Government, Latterly the tactics
were to keep the Goverhment up
all night and wear its nerves to
hysteria.

At the moment of writing, the
first round of the battle is over,
and the segond round is about
to begin, Undoubtedly, Labour,
has won the first round on points,
The morale of the government
party has improved. It has been
discovered that the tricks Conger-
vatives think of for maintaining
debates late in the night can be

} countered by other tricks, For
instance, Conservative motions
put down purely for debating
purposes, are supported in a
formal sense by Labour M.P'’s
adding their names to the motions
on the Order Paper, -The Labour
M.P’s then suddenly withdraw
the motion in the middle of the
debate, Or Labour M.P’s desert
the House of Commons; or they
move an adjournment suddenly
when there is “rerreral: uproar.
The..motion is almost unheard
but it passes, and the Sergeant-
at-Arms walks» out with the
Mace. this Parliamentary
fooling is not, helping the Con-
servative Party and would cer-

discredit to the

tainly bring



By David, Templa Roberts

Cpposition if it were carried on
for too long,

But the second round is now
beginning which will be rather
more perilous for the Govern-
ment. The one fixed point in
the Parliamentary year is the
“Budget.” The debates that
follow it approve the Budget
Resolutions and embody them in
the Finance Bill, On most ques-
tions, Mr. Attlee’s Government
has to be defeated twice before
it will fall. The Prime Minister,
even if defeated on a major
question, is quite able to come
back the following day to the
House, and ask for a motion of
confidence in his policies which
would reserve a defeat the fol-
lowing day, But on some stages
of the Finance Bill, this could
not be done and the Government
is in some peril from a_ single
vote. Nevertheless, Mr. Attlee
enters the second round with
some advantage carried over
from the first round, The Con-
servative performance in the
first round lost them the support
of half a dozen fickle Liberals,
When these facts are weighed, I
venture to predict that a Labour
Government’ will come through
the second round and survive the
skirmishes of the summer. It
may not be wise enough, in its
own or the national interest, to
choose a General Election in the
Autumn, It is doubtful whether
the Conservatives’ bid for power
since Christmas has. done them
anything but harm.

Behind this political scene is
a new menace of the Public
Opinion Poll. The Conservatives
would never have attempted an
onslaught on the Government if
there had been no polls to tell

them that inion was running
their way. ow the latest polls
show the pendulum = swinging
back to Labour, It is quite

possible that the whole of the
Conservative lead will disappear
within the next two or ree
months. Will the publication of
these polls cause as much cfass
political stupidity on the Labour
side as it has on the Conserva-
tive? The parties are almost
evenly divided in the House of
Commons, The proper basis for
a-government in such a circum-
stance is a_ kind of_ sceptical
political uncertainty, Until tne
public opinion pollsters came
along, the political leaders could

OUR READERS SAY:

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I should like to. make a

few observations on Mr. John
Shannon’s letter of Thursday
April 5, in which he ‘states :—

“The highlight of the Secre-
tary’s report is that he states the
1950 season was-the best financial

one since 1910, but fails to
mention the fact that both the
1949 and 1950 seasons the
|B.A.F.A, had nothing to do

with the running of the game
other than to make fixtures and
receive 40% of the gate money.
All the donkey work attached to
a football season, being done by
Pickwick Cricket Club under the
terms of the then , exfsting ar-
rangement. Is it any wonder

Football

that the B.A.F.A. doesn’t need
an Auditor for their financial
report. As Mr. Ward aptly puts
it, the simplicity of the figures
could be appretiated.”

If this had come from anyone
else I would have allowed it to
pass for ignoranee of the situation
but from a former Secretary of a
B.A.F.A,. I cannot allow it to go
unchallenged. Can Mr. Shannon
deny the fact that the B.A.F.A.
have never been offered terms
under which they can undertake
this magnificent administration
at Kensington or even rent the
grounds and emulate the excel-
lence of the present machinery.

On the other hand what is the
donkey work there is so much
braying about? Does Mr, Shannon



not estimate how they were doing
from week to» week. They had
to think of policies and their
results — not solely of their own
popularity, Now they have
sort of check on themselves like
the Box Office returns on a film
star’s appeal. I quite expect, by
the middle of Summer, Labour
politicians will be so cock-a-hoop
they will be talking of capital
levies to finance rearmament.

There is of course another view
of the public opinion — polls.
Rightly it can be said that they
cannot be suppressed, and the
politicians must get used to them.
That may be true. But if the
politicians are to get used to them
they will have to cultivate much
calmer heads than they have at
the moment. Mr. Attlee himself
is as much a, politician as the
rest. There is every evidence that
he thinks and plans in terms of
remaining in power, at least for
his own lifetime! Noticeably, he
has remodelled. his government
not with the aim of an election,
but with the aim of carrying on.
The Prime Minister knows an
administrative blunder when he
sees one, and some steps are being
taken to prevent any more of the
sort of blunders on coal and meat
that so nearly defeated the Gov--
ernment in the middle of the
Winter. For once the coal situa-
tion is being examined at the easy
end of the year when the weather
is getting warmer rather than at
the difficult end of the year when
stocks are due to fall and the
weather is getting colder. At last
the Government has decided that
it is better to pay more for some-
thing to eat than exceedingly
little for next to nothing to eat,
The result will certainly be
increased food prices. But the
British farmer is at last being
encouraged to rear more beef and
the generally raised prices will
eventually mean that our over-
seas buyers of will be able
to offer a little above the bargain-
counter prices ‘they have been
trying to find recently. So the
food situation ought to improve
by the end of the year. There Will
probably also be a few changes
in Government posts in order tc
strengthen the appointments tc
the defence services—the ‘Amer-
ican Admiral” blunder ought not
to have happened: But once those
changes are made, I expect the
Government will fasten its seat-
belts and prepare to survive »
rough passage,







i
consider that collecting pennies and
sixpences at a gate or being in
hand to lock people into cages
or let them out.is beyond the intel-
ligence of ordinary human beings
like myself? We are not allowed
but this does not say that we
cannot, With regard to the sim-
plicity of my account for which
I was congratulated by Mr.
D. L. Ward and what Mr
Shannon inferred was hardly
necessary, Mr. Shannon can
easily recall that at some unfor-
gotten periods in the hjstory af
the B.A.F.A., there were not
so simple accounts and in some
ether occasions there were ne
accounts at all.

QO, S, COPPIN,

a! Thursday—I heard a tale which reminded of

Friday—A letter from Grenada confirms what

7, 1951







SATURDAY, APRIL









PENCILS FOR EVERYONE

“NOBODY'S DIARY" |

where ceremony counts for nothing. The
game’s the thing. And the game ranges
from dominoes up to cards. It is played
when there is no rain in the open under the
manchiheel trees and the seats are the sand
or asmall box. Last Saturday there were
more than two dozen men hard at it when
I passed. Nearby there were pig stys, and
empty cans, broken bottles and what have
yous fouled the clean white sand near the
boats but the players were not upset. After
all it’s the game that cotnts.



Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS

STATIONERY STORE











ADVOCATE

EASY ON THE EYE
A BEAUTIFUL SELECTION OF

LAMP SHADES

IN BLUE, ROSE, AMBER, APRICOT, PINK
PEACH, GREEN

Yesterday saw two houses being moved,
both on hand carts. What exactly is the
reason for houses on wheels? And how
often do people move this way in a lifetime,
every year or whenever the rent comes
due?

* * *

Tuesday—Found two bare-necked hens sit-
ting on one another instead of laying eggs.
When I bought a set of expensive Leghorn
eggs 30 cents apiece, the other day, one of
these same bare-necked hens had the
cheek to pretend to be setting and ended
by burying eight eggs, breaking and eating
two and laying one herself just to show
how much she cared. Bare-necked noth-
ing, barefaced brazen hussies I call them,
and if they don’t start laying soon I'll show
them a Parson’s nose or two.

* *

Wednesday
“The *potamus can never reach
The mango on the mango tree.”
Thus T. S. Eliot, but I wonder what sort
of mango tree he had in mind. My little
one year old son can reach the mangoes on
my mango tree and he’s no ’potamus.




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in the following colours —

*







I find my hatred of blackbirds increasing.
They are such useless birds. They pick holes
in my guavas; they puncture my pawpaws;
they shove their horrid yellow beaks in my
tomatoes; they bite the heads off my seas-
oning; they eat up my young ducks’ start-
ena; they eat the hens’ food and to cap it
all they sit around and chatter chatter their
song which only a black bird could invent:




Red, Blue, Green, Brown, Lt.
Brown, Navy, Fawn and White

“Miss Betsy Y—the guinea corn ripe
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet!”

I hate them.

*









e
Get your requirements from——

* *

the old Latin saying Quis custodiet eustodes ?
In these days of progressive education I
can’t expect anybody to know what this
means, so for the sake of the Philistines I
will translate: Who is going to save the goal
when the goalkeeper’s missing? The story
as I heard it concerned a certain gentleman
whose profession is to educate the old.
That is how I translate the very cumber-
some title which he supports. But the
point of the story is that this would-be
educator seems to need a few lessons in
practical geography. He got lost and had
to spend the night under the stars some-
where near where the Government spent
$16,000 to build a road which ends in a
cul de sac,

DA COSTA & CO.. LID.



BENDIX

WASHING MACHINES
FULLY AUTOMATIC

WASHES NINE POUNDS CLOTHES.

Through Six Complete Stages in

45 minutes (without any manual

labour) the final stage the Clothes

are just damp, suitable for ironing,

ONLY A FEW MACHINES LEFT
UNSOLD.

@
DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.

ELECTRICAL DEPT.

oo

OOF: D SPIO SFOO 4,
SOGSSSS

Talking of stars reminds me I can still
see that man in the Evening Star. If this
keeps. up I’m going to see a doctor or lay
off my only vice—one stiff rum and not so
stiff soda before dinner.

* * *

POCO PLE LL ALS PS OOS

I had long suspected. The West Indians
use the word Socialism out of its context.
Writes the correspondent “I have been
nurtured in a Socialist atmosphere ... .
but Labour is in power here with a ven-
geance. I cry out. The Governor and
Barltrop have made every concession to
Gairy and his horde, each making them
more positive ih the belief that they are
running Grenada?” It’s a pity that the
conversion from Socialism should be so
painful, but what can one expect from West
Indian socialism which is no more no less
than the preaching of class hatred. One man
shows the way: the other follows suit, They

GOOSSSOSSSSGOSSSSFS HISTO TSO










For Your
Enjoyment

FISH IN TINS.

Norwegian Sardines.
Canadian Sardines

should call it Bridge Socialism, but they Red Salmon
never do. Hysh no politics. This column is aoe



meant to make you laugh.
* | * *

Pilchards.

| Norwegian Kirpers

Saturday—Will journalists never tearn?|
‘|

Chivers Vegetables
Carrots.

Beet Root

Mixed Vegetables.
Celery Hearts.

. String Beans.



LIQUOR DEPT.

Here is an account of a wedding sent m
by a dear lady in Port-of-Spain.

“The full skirt ended in a train,” The.
Simplon or the Orient Express, or perhaps |

(how .romantic) the last train to San
Fernando. |\\) Gold Braid Rum
|

MEAT DEPT.
Fresh FISH

Fresh Snappers
Fresh Salmon
Smoked Kippers
Smoked Haddock.
Calves Liver
Fresh Sausages

SPECIALS



Top Notch Rum
Burnett's Gin.
Gordon's Gin.
Vielle Cure.
Prunier Brandy

“The bride cut a lovely figure” with her
penknife I suppose, and what did the!
bridegroom say. Was he jealous? And then,
this request “Would you like picture of





wedding?” Would I indeed! Would you?, Sliced Ham .. 1.50 per Ib. Cooks Paste, 6 cents per tin.
You're welcome. How polite we're becom-|})) PHONE GODDARDS — WE DELIVER
ing. It’s this wedding atmosphere I suppose. ! ;






SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1951

—

Acquitted Of Threatening
Letter Charge

HUNDREDS yelled in the Courtyard yesterday as David Introduced
Van Puttin bowed to the Court and walked out of the dock,

‘acquitted of the charge the Police had brought against him To the Bar

—uttering a threatening letter to Aubrey Birch of Dayrells | MR. SAMUEL GRAHAM, a
Road, demanding money. The case was’ going on for five Trinidad born Barrister-at-Law



who

days at the Court of Grand Sessions before
Justice, His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylo:.



Parking
With Touts

"yrs who hang around the
_ various places of entertain-
ment always pretend that they are
capable of taking care of peoples’
cars, but the Commissioner of
Police said yesterday, “these touts
are not even capable of taking
care of themselves,”

Police Constables are now on
the look out for such touts and
already two have been arrested,

The Commissioner said that he
would like the public to know
that, anyone who visits a place of
entertainment can guarantee that
the Police will take care of his
vehicle.

He said that when a_ person
gives one of these touts money to
take charge of the vehicle, that
person, instead of assisting the
Police, is encouraging lawlessness
and this increases the work of the
Police who.are trying to rid
Bridgetown of touts,

One motorist said that he once
gave a tout consent to sit in his
car and take charge of it. He
went to the theatre and when the
show was over he discovered that
the tout, as well as two of his
car wheels had disappeared,

HE ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING of the Barbados
Friendly Football Association was
held at’ the Fortress Club on
Wednesday when Mr, C. E.
Jemmott was appointed President.
The Financial Report and that
of the Secretary were read and
adopted. The Association approv-
ed of a team from the B.F.F.A.
entering the Knock Out Competi-
tion of the B.A.F.A,

On Thursday the B.F.F.A.
season will begin. Mr. Jemmott
was also elected to represent the
B.F.F.A. on the general body of
the B.A.F.A. Members of the
Association spoke highly of the
kindnesses rendered by Carlton,
Shell and Empire for the use of
their grounds and Fortress, for
the use of the Club house.

Other appointments were as
follows: L. Slocombe, Vice-Presi-
dent, J. T. Archer, Treasurer,
C. B. Seott, Secretary, C. E.
Reece, Assistant Secretary and
two trustees, Messrs, J. T.
Archer and T. Estwick.

FIRE at Church Village, St.
\ Philip, on Thursday burnt
500 holes of first crop ripe canes,
belonging to H. B. Greaves, 81
holes of third crop. young, the
property of Miriam ‘Alleyne, three
quarters of an acre of second
ercp ripe, the property of Hilton
Francis, 50 holes of third crop
ripe, the property of Aletha
Hinds and 100 tholes of second
crop young canes the property of
Joyce Moseley. None of the
canes were insured,

ICYCLE M 1400 was exten-
sively damaged when an
accident occurred at Kew Gap,
St. Michael, yesterday evening.
Also involved was a ‘bus owned
by the Leeward "Bus Company.
The rider of the cycle was slightly
injured,

N THURSDAY night an acci-

dent occurred at Boarded
Hall Road, St. George, between
motor car M 2462, driven by
Clyde Jackman of Carrington’s
Village, St. Michael,,and Louis
Blenman,. who was_ standing be-
side his bicycle, Blenman was
slightly injured.

". ELECTORS ASSOCIA-
TION held a political meeting
in the St. Simons district of St.
Andrew in support of their can-
didate Mr, J. A. Haynes.

Mr. E. V. Rock acted as
chairman and the large crowd
who attended were entertained to
Steel Band music. r

HE ST. SAVIOUR’S Church

Lads Brigade gave a Concert
at the Belleplaine Playing Field
on Wednesday night, A play,
“Old King Cole”, was the most
interesting item on the pro-
gramme.

ISHING BOATS which went
out on Thursday were return-
ing during the evening with large
eatches of flying fish and dolphin
to the Speightstown Fish Market.
The majority of the boats had
gone to the fishing bank since
Wednesday night.

Large quantities of the catches
were taken to Eagle Hali and the
City by lorries and vans, The
market was kept busy until late
during the night. Residents were
unable to buy up all the catches.



Petition Granted

In the Court of Common Pleas,
His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor
granted a petition on. behalf of
the Company of Plantations Ltd.
that the alteration of the Com-
pany’s Objects proposed to be
effected be confirmed by the
Court pursuant to sec, 11 of the
Companies Act 1910,

Mr, J. S. B. Dear instructed
by Cottle Catford & Co., appeared
for the Company.



Wills Admitted

In the Court of Crdinary yes-
terday His Honour the Acting
Chief Judge Mr. G, L. Taylor,
granted the petition of Louise
Malvina Gamble of River, St
Philip, Widow, to the estate of
her husband Joseph Ezekiel
Gamble, deceased.

Mr. D. H. L, Ward instructed by
Mr. D, Lee Sarjeant appeared for
the petitioner.

The wills to the following per-
sons were admitted to probate:—

Margaret Ella Collymore, St.
Michael; Elizabeth Acourt Craw
ford, St. Philip.

. : lived most of fiis life in
the Acting Chief Rorbados and who practises at

the Bar in Grenada, was intro-
duced and admitted to practise
at the local bar: yesterday. He
was introduced by the Solicitor
General, Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
whi'e His Honour the Acting
Chief Justice Mr. G. L. Taylor
presided at the Court before the
Van Puttin case continued,

Mr. Reece said that Mr. Graham
was called to the Bar by the Hon-
ourable Seciety of Gray’s Inn in
1949 though it was in 1947 that he
passe his finals,

He acted as assistant Attorney
General and then as Magistrate in
Grenada, He. was since doing
private practice,

Though the members of the
local bar welcomed him, they
would still be pleased to hear that
Mr. Graham had no intention of
practising in Barbados, but would
be returning to Grenada where
fees were attractive.

The Acting Chief Justice wel-
comed Mr. Graham and added
that it gave him great pleasure to
do so.

Mr, Graham __ thanked the
Solicitor General and the Acting
Chief Justice and said that in
Grenada and other West Indian
colonies, he noticed that the Bar
and Bench in Barbados were
referred to with great respect.
He would uphold the tradition ot
the Bar of such a place,

Police Dogs Are
Taught Tracking

Peggy and Rip, the Police dogs,
are at present being taught track-
ing and one of them gave an excel-
lent performance yesterday when
it followed a trail for half a mile
until it came on its quarry.

They are being trained at Wind-
over, St, Peter, by Dr. Sumner-
Moore and have already passed
obedience tests,

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com-
missioner of Police, visited Wind-
over yesterday morning. On his
return to the Central Police
Station he told the Advocate that
he was very pleased with their

Yesterday after listening to the
three-hour address of the Solicitor
General, Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
for the prosecution and an hour’s
summing up by the Acting Chiet
Justice, the izZ-man jury delib-
erated for an hour and 4u minutes
before they returned. their not
guilty verdict. They had heard a
two-hour address by Defence
Counsel, Mr. E. W. Barrow on the
previous day,

Puttin was charged by the
Police with having demanded
$6,000 from Aubrey wirch, threat-
ening Birch’s and his children’s’
lives if the money was not placed-
at a certain spot.

The Defence Counsel, Mr. Bar-
row, had made strong objections
in the early stages of the case to
certain statements Puttin was
alleged to have given the police,
being used as evidence against
him, Mr. Barrow argued that the
Statements had been got out of
Puttin after he had been enticed
and threatened and befuddled by
beer given him by the police,

Statements Admissible
After the Chief Justice ruled

that the statements’ were ad-
missible, Mr. Barrow cross-ex-
amined the witnesses closely and
brought out discrepancies, partly
on fhe strength of which he held
that Puttin should be acquitted.

Mr. Barrow argued that there
would only be evidence in case
of an admission that he, Puttin,
wrote the letters, but nothing as
to his having sent them. The
writing of them alone would not
entitle them to convict him.

Another strong point of Mr.
Barrow’s was that the menaces
to Birch were not sufficient to
overcome his free and voluntary
actions, not sufficient therefore,
for the law.

One of the witnesses for the
prosecution, Mr. Barrow told
the jury, was Toppin, who was
supposed to have been listed by
Puttin to pick up the money,

He, however, admitted that a
Superintendent of Police had
told him that things would have



: : progress.
been made easy ‘for him if he “6 said that they are being
gave evidence against Puttin. taken around the streets of

As the trial began yesterday,
Mr. Reece continued his address
to the jury. He said that the case
Mr. Barrow had quoted, holding
that mere admission of the writing
of a threatening letter was not
enough for a conviction, did not
apply im the case before them.

In that case admission was all
the evidence, but in the Puttin
case there was more évidence,

Menaces

He said _that. the persen who
placed’ the letter in the envelope
was guilty of uttering. A threat
to a man’s children would con-
stitute menaces since a man was
necessarily touchy on that score.

It was evident from the facts,
he argued, that Puttin was a young
man with the mind of a master
criminal. He was making sure the
crop would come off and at the
same time securing himself by
sending Toppin for the parcel.

The circumstantial evidence, he
held, was damning, What he said
to Inspector Franklyn, admitting
the Inspector to be a master after
he illustrated the similarity in the
different writing, was sufficient
evidence alone to merit a con-
viction. Besides he had spoken
to the Inspector before he was
given the glass of beer,

Did they think that Puttin would
share the money with Toppin, a
young man he searcely knew?
That in itself, he said, put aside
the idea of Toppin’s being an ac-
complice. ‘

Summing Up

Summing up the case, the Chief
Justice said that the case which
Defence Counsel had cited to
prove that merely admitting that
one wrote a threatening letter did
not mean that that person sent it,
did not bear on the case then be-
fore them,

The only evidence against the
defendant in the case which the
Defence Counsel had cited was the
statement that he had written the
letter, In the case before them
there was more evidence.

They knew from the evidence of
Winfield Toppin, a witness whom
Puttin had sent to collect the par-
cel, and from Sgt, Phillips, that
Puttin was on Dayrells. Road in
pursuance of what he had written
in the confession and the letter to
Birch.

The prosecution was asking
them to conclude from that that
Puttin did utter the letter. If
Puttin had written the letters and
put them in his room, they would
never have got to Birch,

It was not likely that anybody
would have seen Puttin put the
letters in the letter box.

There was nothing in demand-
ing money. That people demand-
ed money from others was a daily
happening, The difficulty only
arose when the demands were ac-

Speightstown that they may be-
come accustomed to traffic and
people.

Constables Maitland and Brath-
waite, who are in charge of the
dogs, are called Dog Masters. The
Commissioner said that both Con-
stables are showing great keen-
ness in this new department of
Police work.

“It is hoped that within a few
months the dogs will be available
for use in the detection of crime”,
Cojionel Michelin said. —

Remanded On
Larceny Charge

HIS WORSHIP Mr. H. A.
Talma, Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” yesterday remanded
without bail George Downes, a
labourer of Thomas Gap, . until
April 11 when he was charged by
the Police with the larceny of
cloth valued at £2. 5s. 7d., the
property of Mohomed Kola on
April 6.

Viola Thorne said that she was
on Hopes Alley on April 6 selling
coconuts when the defendant
came to her and asked her to
keep a quantity of flying fish for
him: The defendant returned later
to her’ with a brown parcel which
he placed into her box. He then
took the. parcel out of her box
and the fish also and left.

George Downes in his defence
said that on April 6 he never
took a parcel from Mohomed
Kola. About some time in the
morning he saw Thorne selling at
Hopes Alley and asked her to
keep some fish which he was
carrying.

When he had returned to
Thorne he saw Kola with two
parcels on his bicycle. One of the
parcels dropped off the bicycle
and a man picked up the parcel
and ran away. Later he was told
at the C.1.D. that he would be
charged in connection with the
parcel.

At this stage Downes, asked by
Mr. Talma if he had any witnesses
he would like to call, said that he
had witnesses but they were not
present at the Court.

Drove With
Faulty Brakes

LEVI FORDE of Bank Hall, St
Michael, was yesterday found
guilty of driving the motor car
A-113 with inefficient brakes on
February 28.

His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” before whom the case
was heard ordered Forde to pay
a fine of £2 and 2/- costs or one
month’s imprisonment. Before
imposing the fine Mr. Walwyn
said “It is a dangerous thing to
drive with faulty brakes. This





ee with threats and Gfrence is very serious and_ the

manaces. oa people. must be protected from
No Convicitions reckless drivers.”

Defence Counsel, Mr. Barrow, This case was brought by the

was saying that the threats and
menaces were not of such as to
induce Birch to part with any of
his property, He was holding that
the menaces would have to be
such as would make Birch part
with something. But that was not
the law. There would never be
any convictions, in \that case, un-
less a threatened. Demon. yielded.
They, the jury, ‘heard the
of the threats, threats to
Birch himself and his children,
and it was for them, to decide
whether a normal man would
pay any attention to them. If
they felt that Birch was a man
who would treat such threats as
a matter for laughter, then
Puttin would not be guilty.
Defence Counsel had argued
that Puttin did not know Birch,
nor Birch Puttin and Puttin
would therefore have no reason
for writing to him, But one
could write such a threatening
@ On Page 8.

Police as a result of an accident
between the motor bus M-727 and
the motor car A-113. After the
accident the brakes of the motor
car A-113 were tested and it was
found that they were not working
properly. The front fender which
was damaged could not prevent
the brakes from working proper-
ly said the Transport Inspector.

Another case of driving without
due care and consideration against
Forde has been adjourned until
April 11.



In the Court for Divorce and
Matrimonial Causes the Acting
Chief Judge Mr. G. L. Taylor
pronounced decree absolute in the
suit of N. S. Sainsbury, petitioner,
and E. A. Sainsbury, respondent.

Mr, J. S. B, Dear instructed
by Mr. E. D. Rogers of the firm of
G. L. W. Clarke & Co., appeared
for the petitioner.

COURT FOR DIVORCE |g

BARBADOS



PARKING POLES

ADVOCATE

“‘Combermere’s Wall Will



In oraer tnat tne mowre | .VOE Obstrwet Flood Water”’

PUBLIC Wall Kaow wulem arc
we restricted warcets wari
parking is forbaden, a num
ber of Poies ok tan e Stree...
carry white, red and biack
bancs. These streets can
now be easily distinguished

“Whenever you see a pole
painted im these colours you
will know that you cannot
park your motor vehicle in
that street,” Colonel Miche-
lin told the “Advocate” ye:-

y

He said that this step was
especially taken to av‘iist
motorists who are visiters to
the island and are not ac-
quainted with the local

parking regulations,

“In nearly all countries
this method
he said.

is employed,”



MUSIC
FESTIVAL
FINISHES

Lady Savage Presents
Prizes

The Schools’ Music Festival
of 1951 came to a glorious end
yesterday when some 300
children staged a two-hour
concert at the Combermere
School Hall.

It was the second biennial
schools’ music festival, the
first of which was successfully
staged in 1949,

The Governor, Sir Aifred Sav-
age, and Lady Savage attended
the function, Lady Savage made
the presentation of prizes and
certificates to the winners of the
competitions. Before making we
presentation she was pres¢ nted
with a bouquet.

The festival started some wecks
ago with over 5,000 pupils from
87 Elementary schools and four
Secondary schools entering the
competition, After an elimination
process, the winners gave a finale
to round off the festival.

Perhaps, some of the children
will have the opportunity of hear-
ing their voices as their audience
heard it yesterday. A recording
instrument was at work while thi

concert was taking beautiful
stride.

Nothing was lacking in audienc:
Parents, friends, and _ official

packed the hall while the gallery
could have provided space for only
a few more.

Accompaniment

The Police Band under the
leadership of Captain C. E. Raison,
occasionally accompanied the
choral groups while a part of this
job was undertaken by Mr, Gerald,
Hudson on the pianoforte.

The programme was begun at
three o'clock with the Police Band
rendering Eric Coates’ “March of
the Youth of the Empire”.

This was followed by Martin
Shaw’s “Song of the Music Mak-
ers” which was chosen as the
Festival song and rendered by 9
powerful and sweet sounding
voices selected from the winners.

The programme included five
choral groups, five. vocal solos and
one pianoforte solo, all of which
drew hearty applause from the
audience, The audience seemed
particularly pleased with Shaw’s
“Hannibal” sung by St. Bartholo-
mew’s Girls’ School-—quick rhythm
indeed—the solo “Drink to Me
Only With Thine Eyes” sung by
B. M. Taitt of Combermere School,
Sullivan's “Gaily. Tripping” ana
Shaw’s “Cargoes’ sung by Queen's
College and the spiritual ee
Down Moses” rendered by Bay

One of the prize winners, 1)-

Street Boys’ School,
year-old Winston Brathwaite, got
second prize for playing a piano-
forte solo. He received his pryec
from the hands of Lady Savage
amidst the loud cheers from the
audience who were amused and
yet surprised to know that a boy
of his size could have managed the
comparatively massive pianoforte,
Mr. C, E. Theobalds, Acting
Director of Education, gave a vote
of thanks.



THE WALL now going up on the eastern side of Comber-
mere School, is being erected because of the continuous
annoyance caused by the encroachment of animals, some
of which have at times entered the classrooms, Mr. C. A.
Coppin told the Advocate yesterday.

Mr. Coppin said that he has been authorised by the Gov-
Qrive Body of the School to supervise the erection of the

vall,





Sheep, goats, pigs, mules,
donkeys and the like entered the
school premises from that side and
roamed about at will, Mr. Coppin
said. The impounding of these
inimals was tried, but this was
found to be useless. Barbed-wire
fences were put up but two of
these were carried away,

The Governing Body were ac-
cordingly advised that a wall con-
structed in such a manner that it
could not be inundated by flood
water, would remedy the situation
more effectively than any measure
that had been previously adopted,

Tenders were invited and the
successful tender Mr, A. B,
Franklin was commissioned to
execute the contract.

“The Governing Body have been
advised that in case of serious
flood waters, only a panel of this
wall at most, could collapse if a
heavy obstacle charged into it.
Flood water pressures have been
equalised on both sides of the wall.

Wall-Parallel

“The designers have guaranteed
that unlike Park walls of the past,
ete., it would be impossible for
the entire structure of this wall
to collapse. A guarantee has been
given to the Governing Body to

this effect. It must also be noted
that this wall runs parallel with
the current and does not oppose it

at any of its stages,

“The cost of the construction of
the 800 feet of wall is approx-
imately $3,000. In view of normal
building cost for normal wall con-
Struction this is a very reasonable
figure to achieve the purpose
which the Governing Body desire.

“The construction was delayed
until the necessary deeds vesting
the property in ‘the Governing
Body, had been completed. The
wall has been set back’ from the
canal to permit of any future ex-
pansion or development in dealing
with flood waters in this area.

Plantations Ltd.
Appoitited Agents
Canadian Stock

Brokers

‘ Mr, Hugh V. Shaw of Gairdner
& Company Ltd,, Toronto, Cana.
da, arrived in Barbados last Sat-
urday and was met by Mr. Geo,
P. Watt, a director of the com-
pany, vie has been in Barbados
or sometime. They are sta
it the Windsor Hotel. " 7“
Mr, Shaw, in an interview with

the Advocate, said that his com.
pany had made an agreement
with Plantations Ltd. to represent
them in the island.

Of interest to most investor:
with Canadian or Americal
securities, he said, would be’ the
fact that although some othe
Canadian investment firms were
known in Barbados already, thi:

newly formed association betwee:
the Ganadian Company and Plan
tations Ltd, would provide
another source of information an
service to Barbadians,

The company are dealers in al!
types of securities in Canada, New

York and London and hope ;te
place particular emphasis on pro-
viding up-to-date report on speci:
fic investments. Further, to pro-
vide a system of supervising lists

of securities presently held in the
island to ensure their continuity
and maintenance of earning
power,

Mr, Shaw said that his com-
pany had grown very consider-
ably in Canada over the past 20
years in no small measure due tc
the service which had been afford-
ed to clients and that they were
hopeful now of being no less suc-
cessful by the same measure in
the British West Indies,

Both Mr. Shaw and Mr. Watt
will remain in Barbados for a few
weeks and they have planned to
meet and talk with as many inter-
ested investors as possible.

Mr. Shaw, being here for the
first time, stated that the only
thing that could be blamed foi

his failure to accomplish this ob-
jective would be the unbounded
hospitality which he had _ been
shown since arrival.





: e
BRUSH.®. UP...” YOUR... SMILE...



Wisdom’ s straight-line head nahes —————-—

awkward corners easily.

Wisdom's angle in the
handle is the secret of
its comfortable control.




Wisdom’ s widely-spaced
tufts *comb’ between teeth
clean where decay begins.

Wisdom

ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD, MAKEAS

BAVAILABLE !!

PURINA

BPOULTRY CHOWS

Sui. JASON JONES & CO, LTD.—Distribators.
SRE SUES TEER esesee

OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

|

“The Governing Body is not
aware that any Order exists pro-
hibiting the erection of a wali on
its property. At no point is ii
considered that this wall will offer
obstruction to flood water.”

H.E. Will Address

Civil Service Ass‘1i

THE Governor Sir Alfred Sav-
age will address members of the
Barbados Civil Service Associa-
tion at their Annual General
Meeting which takes place at
Harrison College this afternoon
at 1.30 o'clock.

The Auditors’ Report for the
year 1950-51 will be considered
after which the Association will
elect officers for the current year,





“CAN. CONSTRUCTOR”’
LOADS SUGAR

The C.N.S. Canadian Con-
structor, 3,936 tons net is here
loading about 1,600 tons of sugar
and the equivalent of 900 pun.
cheons of molasses for Canadian
ports :

The Constructor arrived here on
Thursday evening. “She is ex-
pected to leave port early next
week’ for Canada, Her local
agents are Messrs,. Gardiner
Austin & Co,, Ltd.



Fresh Arrivals

WEATHERHEAD'S

Buckleys Cough Mixture
Buckleys White Rub
Palmers Soap

Palmers Ointment
Palmers Bleach Cream
Palmers Hair Success
Ferrozone Tablets
Hamiltons Pills
Caterrhzone

Nervelene ;

Black Magic Choe; (3 sizes)

Pascall’s Marshmallows } lb,
tin

Pascall’s Marshmallows %4
i pk.

Pascall’s Orchid Fruits

Pascall’s Mixed Fruit Drops

Pasrai"'s Glucose Barley
Sugar } lb,

Pascall’s Glucose Barley
Sugar 1 lb.

Royal Scotch Shortbread
Jacobs Cream Crackers
Ivory Soap

Camay Soap

Torch Batteries

Irradol A,

Erthymol Tooth Paste
Ellimans Embrocation

“My Sin” Perfume
“Scandal Perfume”

Bandbox Shampoo
Calmasmine (For Asthma)

BRUCE

WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED

Head of Broad Street

Made in Canada, La Parisett

are idead for toddlers, We !

blue, black, sizes 2 to 4.

|| CAVE
|| SHEPHERD
| & Co,, Ltd.

a 10-13 Broad St.



50 YEARS
|

E OOO MOU
——————



Stepping stones to success



La Parisette Shoes

have them in white, pink,

Per pair

$1.91 ond $2.12





PAGE FIVE









OOOO





oF





YES!! THEY'RE HERE



FLEXCO—Double
Pictures

Lens 3.5, will take any

WIRGIN—620 Camera, 4.5 Lens, Double View
finder .

PUCKY—-Reflex Box Camera
Only a Limited Supply



KNIGHT'S LIMITED

PA =







GHORGE PAYNE

IS

GOOD COCOA

|
|
|

nf.
}

eI NETH
vera

We Oe ales
r oD Sa 22

at -Y-teJe

|



PURE —



HARRISON'S sioso st



BITUMINOUS
RooFING FELT

36 inches wide
Mineral Surfaced — Green and Red















TIME, WEATHER and

WATER PROOF
e

A HIGH GRADE
THAT HAS BEEN IN
UNIVERSAL USE FOR

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
e

Only $11.10 Per Roll
of 12 yards

HARRISON'S

SS



BROAD ST.
TEL. 2364





e Infants’ Stepping Shoes

Childrens’ Slippers



A small quantity of these
pretty slippers designed in
shapes of chickens and
ducklings

Pair $2.25 & $3.18









a

oa” tice.
en cmmet

PAGE

HENRY


















HE MUST THINK IM CRA2V+« |
DROPPING FROM PLANES TO TRAINS,

PHEW THE SMOKE IN THAT TUNNEL} [1 DIDN'T TELL HIM WHY. THANKS FoR

WELL« THATS THE PILOT WHO 7 SU THE LIFTS

BROUGHT ME HERE!



SIX

DAGWOOD, CALL
MR. BARGLE
DISTANCE AND EXPLAIN

NEW >p

THE STREAM THAT RUNS BENEATH
THIS ROOM! 4

N ASS awl

I HAD BETTER GIT
BUSY AN! PAINT TH’
GARAGE - I TOLD
MAGGIE I'D DO IT
> A WEEK AGO!

{
pe
{

He's A
|) KILLER!

- CS

iTS CURTAINS! BE

it

P

yt






/ LUMI WONDER

[ss

EVER="THINKING OF

ators

IF HE'S AG. BUSY AS

ETTIN' A JOB

=
SS





(en ree ema

- AZT THOU COMING OR Y
SORRY, GODDESS! ) %: ~~.



—

you SAY

YOu'VE BEEN
QUT OF
TOWN ?

3

WHEW« HE MADE ITS
IF HE DOES IT FORA



SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1951

1, Heart Troubl
1 Caused by High
| Blood Pressure

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON



ene na















“Canada's Wonder Remedy 15
Here Again-To Stay:







you
coms, your life may be endangered

Heart Trouble or a paralytic stroke

4 you should atart trea t a!

@ very of Noxce

oo ox). aoe

very, reduces High Blood

Pressure and makes you feel years

ounger In a few days. Get

our chemist it is pere

te make

today. I
feel "1
ci enoney beck sa reture @
pa. sce






















For CHEST COLDS, RHEUMATISM.
NEURALGIA, ARTHRITIS NEURITIS
ECZEMA, BURNS, SORES, PIMPLES

There’s nothing like Buckley’s White Rub for breaking up a
tight chest cold over night, or banishing the stabbing, torturmg



‘TODAY'S NEWS FLASH |
Beautiful
Lamp Shades

IN BLUE; GREEN; PINK






i : d i iti puriti e igi tiff sore 10/-, Each
pain of rheumatism, arthritis, neuritis, neuraligia, stiff s - Pe
museles, or the misery of tired aching feet. Just rub it into BT, QUALI SAPORE STAIN
the sore spots—the congested chest or aching, tired muscles, JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

and feel the pain and soreness vanish in a matter of minutes. and HARDWARE

9 active ingredients, carefully seleeted for their proven thera-
peutic value. It stimulates cireulation, breaks up congestion
and relieves pain. Heals and soothes sores, pimples and tired
burning, scaly FEET. We guarantee MORE relief in LESS
time or your money back.

BUCKLEYS

STAINLESS

WHITE RUB

{
ere io cd }
Buckley’s White Rub is a scientific prescription containing | |
\
| oo wy
\

q Christian Science
(Reading Room

( iST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)
| « Hours: 10 a.m.—3 p.m.







Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Fridays.
( 10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays.





Selense and Heaits with Key to
the Scriotures by MARY BARER
may %e read, bonow.d,

or purchased.
g Visitors Are Welcome §
swwwwwweo
















IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

| SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only













USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Heinz Mulligatawny Soup Heinz Spaghetti in Tom.
Bae ee Peer se 30 26 Seed WN ee ks 28 «235
Bacon (Sliced per |b} 120 106 Orange & Grapefruit
Juice tins _29 26
Kardomah Tea 2% lb. 39 35 Jetirey's Beer bottles ad 26 20














WELL--



WHAT
HAPPENED?



'M SORRY--T |)

THOUGHT THEY ( LISTEN IN

WUZ GONNA GIT |\ TOMORROW
[Pe HERD OVER / AT THIS

TH’ BORDER f SAME TIME-

Let us supply





For the HOUSEWIFE ee
eee ae Bit.
Enamelware, Chairs, Brooms, etc.
For the CARPENTER and MASON
rein Hainer ete.

\ For the PAINTER and JOINER

Ready-mixed Paints, Enamels,
Oils and Pigments Brushes,
Varnishes Brassfoundry, etc.

) For the FISHERMAN

Hooks,
Wire for Pots,

Lines,
Ropes and Blocks,
Copper Paint

Canvas, etc., etc.

For the AGRICULTURIST and
HORTICULTURIST
Sickles, Cane Bills,

Hoes, etc., etc.

ae

G

Pitch Pine, Donglas Fir,
White Pine Spruce,

i Shingles, Hinges. i
Window @

Our QUALITIES are GOOD,
I|| PRICES — REASONABLE
TERMS EASY

Shop at - - -

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.,
Suecessors to

C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Phone 4413, 4657, 4472

|PITCHER’S

\
| Sees

eS

~~ OREN

é ~ aa
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
WONDE

LIVING:

for ECONOMY. VALUE
and SATISFACTION. |

= lO OO
ean ee eS




a



a





SATURDAY, APRIL 7,



CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Births, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices i*
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays

or Engagement
arib Calling the
is $3.00 for ahy number of words
50 and 6 cents per word for each
cash, Frone 2508

between 8.30 and 2 pete 3113 for Death | A-1 condition

ee
MAUGHAN—The Maughan family begs
most respectfully to thank all who

attended the funeral and showed

sympathy in other ways in our recent] dition.
bereavement occasioned by the death] Street, St. John.

of our husband and father.
William Maughan, Mrs.
Maughan and children.
7451—1n.

IN | MEMORIAM

CADOGAN—In ever loving memory of
our dear aunt Emily Cadogan, who
depa, this life on Good-Friday,
Aprif 7th 1950.

A year ago she left us

Sad memories to recall

But she’s gone to be with Jesus

Forever with the Lord.

Ever to be remembered by —
The Maloney Family.

Gertrude



7.4.51—in.

KNIGHTS—In loving memory of our

dear sister Olga Knights, who passed | Andrews

away on April 7th 1950.
Gone but not forgotten
Ever to be remembered by her sisters
Doris and Elise, mother: Anite meee
74.51—Iin.

“GOVERNMENT — NOTICES
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

VACANCIES IN THE ELEMEN-
TARY TEACHING SERVICE

Applications are invited from
teachers (women) with at least
10 years’ teaching experience for
the Headships of the following
schools: —

St. Catherine’s Mixed School,
St. Philip; Ebenezer Girls’ School,
St. Philip.

The minimum professional
qualification required is the Certi-
ficate ‘A’ of the Department of
exemption therefrom.

Salary will be in accordance
with the Government Scale for
Head Teachers in Grade I Elemen-
tary. Schools.

Candidates who have already
submitted application forms in re-
spect of previous vacancies (now



filled) may apply by letter,
accompanied by a recent testi-
monial, All other candidates

should make application on the
appropriate form which may bel
obtained from the Department of
Education. All applications must
be enclosed in envelopes marked
“Appointments Board” in the to
left hand corner and m-st reac
the Department of Education by
Saturday 14th April, 1951.
6.4.51—2n

ed
Oooo

ADVERTISE
IN THE ©
WEEKLY ADVOCATE

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANDS wv













(ueaner City CAMPAIGN

Translation old Eastern proverb:
“For cleaner city let each man
clean his own doorstep”

Obvious moral ....-.ss+e0s
It’s each person's job to make a
clean city.

pocvocccccccnnsecsacantanananonsan

i The M.V. CARIBBEE will accept
Ca.g) and Passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and
St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 20th inst,

The M.V. DAERWOOD will
occept Cargo and Passengers for
Psramaribo. Sailing Wednesday
11th inst,

B,W.I. SCHOONER
OWNERS ASSOC, INC.
Tele, 4047.



S999 9O PP SSOPO POSTE,

NOTICE

This serves to inform the
General Public that my wife
Leotta Waithe (née Reid),
formerly of Paynes Bay, St.
James, has deserted me since
1941 and I have not heard of
her whereabouts. It is my
.% intention to re-marry in the
‘* near future.

S$ BERESFORD WAITHE.

-

$5956 99M

3 Paynes Bay,
y St. James.
3$$65655656666666666008




FURNISH TO-DAY
The Popular Way

NICE New Renewed
Mahogany, Cedar and other
Vanaties, Stools, Wardrobes,
Drerser-Robes, Bedsteads, Beds,
Springs, Cradles, Laths.

DINING, Kitchen, Cocktail
Radio, Sewing and other fancy
Yables — China, Bedroom and
Kitchen Cabinets, Sideboards,
Waggons, Larders, Tea Trolleys.

DRAWING ROOM HITS in
Morris, Tub, Bergere, Rush and

and

Upholstered 3 and 5-piece Suites
and separate pieces — Couches,
itees with low and high backs—
MORRIS CUSHIONS, $4.50 up
DESKS, with Fiat or Sloping
ton, and Folding leaf with pigeon
holes, $9.00 up-—-Bookcases, Book-
sacks, Strong Office Chairs.

pe BUY NOW AT MONEY-
SAVING PRICES,



L.S. WILSON
SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069





of words up to 50, and| 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

1951 BARBADOS

a ee





ADVOCATE



Contract For Public Printing



FOR SALE

: OTICE is hereby given that Sealed Tenders will be received by
Minimum charge week 72 cents and

the Clerk of the General Assembly up to the 15th day of June,
1951, for performing the fellowing printing work and services for
the Government and Legislature of this Island, and other printing

work hereinafter mentioned, / such. other printing work as may be

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a





AUTOMOTIVE required by the Printing C ttee, for the period commencing the
lst day of July, 1951 to the 30th day of June, 1954.
AUTOCYCLE: One Norman Autocycl. 1. Printing and publishing at so much per page the OFFICIAL

Owner buying larger Bike.
Only 2,000 miles. Apply: J G. Qutram,
Laneaster, St. James. 7451—2a

AUTOMOBILE; Vauxhall 14/6. E-151
Perfect running order excellent mileage
$1,300.00 Courtesy Garage Phone-4616,

4.4.51—T FN.
Im perfect con-
E. D. Hinkson, Massish
6.4.51-—3n,

GAZETTE every Monday and Thursday in every week, or on such
other days as may be ordered by the Printing Committee—250 copies
to be printed at each issue. The GAZETTE is to be printed on paper
of foolscap size, and shall follow as closely as practicable the speci-
men copy furnished, and is to contain: —

(a) All proclamations, public documents, government notices,
minutes, documents, and Bills and Resolutions of the Legislature
ordered to be printed, and all Acts of the Island; (b) All notices,



CAR: 10239 Mercury.

Apply:

CAR—One (i) 1947 Plymouth Delux | advertisements and documents from the Chief Officer or Chief Clerk
in ample working order, Pil. S420, or Secretary of any of the departments of the Government Service

a8 \whether the said departments shall be now in existence or shall
‘ar Dar see Standard 12 eae ree hereafter be brought into existence, or from the Clerk of the Gen-

i : ~~" Jeral Assembly of this Island; (c) All notices or returns required
by any Statute, rule or order of Court or Government regulation to







CAR—Hillman Sports, engine recently



rhauled. Pr .00, i S
ovemnaiegs Price $400.00. Pil gsLin, |be published in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE and any private adver-
ae? Wks adie deainent tae tisements which the Printing Committee may permit or authorise tc

(Green) Mileage 15,600 very good condi- |be published therein; (d) All minutes of meetings and notices of the

tion. |, New Batteny. Apply: S. FP. | Directors of the Barbados General Hospital, all notices and other
ghill, Telephone 4266. c/o R. & G. . . *
Challenor. 6.4.51-an | Matters relating to elections, and all returns, regulations, bye-laws,



“TORRIES—Two (@) Chevrolet 1999 and notices &c. from any public Board or parochial authority; (e) Any
1940 models. Recently working at |other paper or document ordered by the Printing Committee to be
Factory. Can be seen |at
Fisherpond Plantation, St. Thomas, and published.
will be offered for sale on Wednesday Any notices and advertisements for the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
SET Pet ANE, AY 2 Ps 54.5189. | coming under class (c) abovementioned which are not by law requir-
ed to be paid for from the Public Treasury are to be deducted from
the OFFICIAL GAZETTE in the measurement thereof but in the
tender for the printing of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE the charge per
inch with the width, which will be made, for such notices and adver-
tisements, is to be stated not exceeding however 3/4 per inch of
space. All printing in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE for the General
REFRIGERATOR—One (1) Westing. | Hospital or for any Public Board or parochial authority coming
fon apes s uae eee under class (d) shall also be deducted from the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
Brittons Hill, *whonp Yond. n Malcot’ “in the measurement thereof, and the public printer shall collect the
6.4.51—2n. | amount due for such space from the parties requiring the publication
REFRIGERATOR—Quiet running $80.| at the same rate per page as the OFFICIAL GAZETTE is paid for
G. Hudson, Pendle, Pine Hill. i by the Government.
re The Printing Committee reserve to themselves the right to in-
clude or exclude at any time any particular class of private or other
notices or advertisements or special or particular notice or advertise—



ELECTRICAL

ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts,
30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps and
spares, A. Barnes & Co. Ltd,

14,8.51—t.f.n.

















FURNITURE

FURNITURE: Large stock of good
Secondhand furniture, Also rush bot- | ment.
Saks Gua’ gin eccaie babe ek ae All matter required to be printed in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
Ralph Beard’s Show Room: Hardwood | must be inserted therein within one week after delivery to the con-
Aley Phone—-4683. q . 2 : :

4.4.51—2n. | tractor or his agent. Provided always that it shall be in the discretion

sameeren scepiian,

CHAIRS Two 1a) Invalid Whee |of the Printing Committee to extend such time. The number of sheets
Chairs, can be seen at Fogarty’s. One|of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE is not limited, and all reports, return,

chair can be expanded to a_ reclining A :
position. 7.3.51-3n.;documents, &c., must be published in full in one OFFICIAL

GAZETTE,
All original documents, draft minutes, draft Bills and Resolutions,
al if rreturns, &c., to either branch of the Legislature shall immediately
PUPPIES—Pure Bred Alsatian Pups.|after the publication thereof in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE be returned
oan en caa ae Peak ae to the Clerk who delivered the same to the contractor.
Every Bill, Resolution, or other paper delivered to the contractor
MECHANICAL __ | to be printed, ‘shall be printed and circulated within five days after
CARRIER BIKES and Bicycles by | the delivery thereof, Provided always that it shall be in the discretion
Hercules, Silver King. A BARNES & ten a: itt to extend such time.
co., LTD. S1—t.tn, | Of the Printing Committee
= ere Every paper, document, &c., delivered by the Clerk of the Gen-
MISCELLANEOUS eral Assembly or by the Colonial Secretary or the Chief Clerk of his
ar Mie duaudy tte Oiuanes f ication in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
BEAUCAIRE—The Superb Dry Cl office to the contractor for publicat
removes grease, oll, ey atakée "tom or to be printed, shall be confidential and the contractor will be
‘eh Sdaiite eee Peeve bound in a substantial penalty to be fixed by the Printing Committee
DESPAIR JUST USE BEAUCAIRE.” | against the publication in any newspaper other than the OFFICIAL
44.514. | GAZETTE or against the disclosure to any person whomsoever of
WeATHS mp Roreelain Znamel, in| the contents of the said paper or document whereby the sams shall
units to complete colour suites. Top | become generally known,
rede. A, HARES) & Os1ht shall not be spaced more than is absolutely necessary and the Printing





LIVESTOCK



















26,1.51—t.£.
Sen einmen a Committee shall be the sole judges as to whether the matter has been
and Small, 3. E, Field, Advameg Stove,| Spaced more than is necessary.
James Street. 7.4,51—In 2. Printing 20 copies on paper of foolscap size of each Order

CURTAIN FITTINGS For smart win.|of the Day of the Legislative Council, and 62 copies of each Order
dow styling, light control, Valances ano | of the Day of the House of Assembly, for each inch of 24 inches wide.

draperies. By Kirsch, D! ; Mp ‘
BARNES & CO., LTD. eat eest 3. Printing at so much per page of 12 inches by 44 inches the
— following, namely :—
ESCHALOT— Quality — Eschalot $ : aa) z ;
25 Ib, lot at 30c.aper tb... nation ahane (1) 60 copies of every Bill introduced in either branch of the
PROVERBS ‘8° co Lr, High Street, | Legislature
s . LTD., High Street. Mu “ ss . ‘
"145120. (2) 200 copies (if required) with marginal notes in small type,



FOLDING TABLECWil any anima{of every Act of the Legislature on paper to be approved of by the
lover give or sell cheaply a folding | Colonial Secretary, half pages and quarter pages in proportion,

Rae taie aeae ae Special attention is called to the Publication (Statutes) Act 1854.



7.4.51—In 4. Printing at so much per page in Book form 500 copies with

MEGASSE at Lower Estate Factory | Marginal abstracts in small type of every Act of this Island 7 inches

at $3.00 per ton. 6.4.51—6n.] by 44 inches, each of the Acts passed during a Legislative Session,

NATIONAL CASH REGISTER—in|to be bound up together at the end of such session to form a book.
excellent condition at Ralph Beard's| Such books to be sewn and not stabbed.

4683 : 4.4.51—3n. 5. Printing at so much per page (and proportionately for parts

ROLLLUP DAYLITE MOVIE Scher {of @ page) 50 copies of each set of the Minutes and Documents of
tn ease, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy. | the Legislative Council and the House of Assembly in foolscap fort.
on 1£851-t£.0. | ai) Bills, Orders of the Day, Minutes, Resolutions, and other Docu-

SKILLED SHIRT MAKERS—Reliance} ments to be circulated to members of the Legislative Council and
oat Daas: Ealmaro. Hseety the House of Assembly to be endorsed as at present and the price
per page tendered is to include and cover such endorsement.

Printing not more than 250 copies (if required) of the Blue



7,4.51—Sn. |



Two PLATE Glass Display Cases. $120.09
, Ltd, Broad 6.

7451—t.f0.) Book at so much per page.



The matter in the OFFICIAL GAZETTE|.. .

your requirements at T, Geddes Grant
Ltd. 7 451—Tn



VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
a}l metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
Dial

13.2.51—t.f.n.

sizes delivery 3 weeks. 4476.

A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

a

WOODWORKING MACHINERY: Swed-
ish Quality Made, Band and Circular
Saws, Planers, Jointers cte. Shipment
1—3 months after order—Your inquiries
solicited. Dial 4722, ANGLO-SWEDISH
AGENCIES, Marhill Street. 5.4,51—In

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, WILHELMINA
HARROW (nee Gooding), as do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me.
Signed DONALD BARROW,
Rices, St. Philip. |
6.4.51—2n.

WANTED

Minimum charge week 172 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.











HELP

—_ ae + Oe wenn
FEMALE HELP WANTED
Three (3) Reliable Ladies to contact
American familits for general House
work in U.S.A. must be well recom-
mended, passage furnished. Write sor
particulars. Mr. H. Smith, 30 Fufton
Street, Canning Town, London, E. 16.
6.4,51.2n

MISCELLANEOUS
IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-












lery, old China, silver Plate.

Phone 4429 or call a , ade

joining Royal Yacht. Ch 4
TFN.



IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, goid nuggets, coins, miniatures jade,
Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES
Antique Shop. Dial 4429,













LEGHORN HENS and Cocks A pair
of Rabbits, two pairs of Doves. Call 8521
7451—1n
HUMBER CYCLE COMPETITION:
| Brand New Humber Cycle now on
| display at Harrison's Store.
jsale 1/- each. Get your lucky number)
|} now since ¢ompetition is closing at the |
lend of this month. YÂ¥ may win
| Gent's or Lady's cycle for Whit-Sun
7451—1n

\

Tickets for | forms,

al

Printing and furnishing 50 copies of the monthly return of

use and of a quality to be approved by the Printing Committee,

8. Printing cards such as those used for hackney cab licenses,
tickets of admission to the opening of the session of the Legislature,
&c., and any other cards required by the Printing Committee at sol
much per 50.

9. Printing placards and posters per square foot for each 100.

10. Printing, ruling, and furnishing as under all blank forms and
circulars, &c., required for the use of all departments of the Govern-
ment service now in existence or which may hereafter be brought
into existence, at so much per 100, one-half the charge for 50, and
one quarter the charge for 25 copies supplied of each size respectively.
Where forms or other paper, &c., require ruling it shall be included
in the charge for the forms of other papers.

Forms of one sheet foolscap printed on both sides,

Forms of one sheet foolscap printed. and lined with cloth down
the centre.

Forms

Forms

Forms

Forms of

Forms of

Circulars

Circulars

leach Stansfeld ‘Scott & Co
St.
TYPEWRITER RIBBONS & CARBON %,
PAPER, Fresh stock ‘ust receivéd, get} yeyenue and expenditure on paper of similar size to that now in
>

of
of
of

one sheet foolscap printed on one side,
half-sheet foolscap printed on both sides.
half-sheet foolscap printed on one side.
quarter sheet foolscap printed on both sides,
quarter sheet foolscap printed on one side.
or forms of one page of note paper.

or forms of two pages of note paper.

Circulars or forms of three pages of note paper.

Circulars or forms of four pages of note paper.

Forms of larger size than foolscap will be paid for proportionately
with forms of foolscap size,

Blank forms*are to be understood as meaning not only forms in
columns ruled with headings, but also all forms laid down in Acts,
&c., which may only require the insertion of words in certain places.

Any public boards, parochial authorities, or person who may be
allowed by the Printing Committee to insert notices in the OFFICIAL
GAZETTE under classes (c) and (d) beforementioned, who may be
required by any Law of this Island to furnish to the Legislature returns
or staternents requiring blank forms, shall be entitled to have them
printed by the public printer at Government contract rates, The
Bishop of Barbados shall be entitled to have his official printing done |

by the contractor at Government contract prices,

11. The contractor may be required at any time to furnish any,
copies of Bills, Resolutions, returns, documents and other papers,

.| &c., beyond the number herein specified. The person tendering must

therefore state at what price pro rata with the other copies respectively
he will supply those additional copies in numbers of 25, 50 and 100
or more respectively.

12. Except as hereinbefore mentioned the contractor is to furnish
and provide all paper of approved size and quality to the satisfaction
of the Printing Committee and no extra charge can be allowed for
supplying a better quality of paper which may be required for some

Three copies of every Bill, Resolution, and address, &c., on paper
of the best quality are to be sent to the Clerk of the House of Assem—
bly for the signature of the Speaker.

Every Act is to be published in the Official Gazette in such a
manner as to be detachable from the Gazette without affecting the
paging thereof, and shall not be mixed up with the other matter of
the Gazette.

13. The contractor is to address and post or otherwise forward
{as from time to time may be required by the Printing Committee) to
the Clerk of the House of Assembly, the Clerk of the Legislative
WCouncil, or to such other persons as the Printing Committee may
from time to time determine, all copies of the OFFICIAL GAZETTE
and all other books, Acts, and papers and documents and shall also
when forwarding the OFFICIAL GAZETTE supply to 2ach person,
corporation or body entitled to receive the Acts, a copy of each Act of
the Island printed as required by this notice.

The Official Gazette, Acts, Bills, and other papers and documents
must be circulated separately, that is, not enclosed one within the
pages of another.

14. The type to be used in the printing is to be similar in size
to that now used in printing the Official Gazette and public docu-
ments or of such other size and nature as the Printing Committee
shall permit or require,

15. Binding the Official Gazette, the Debates, the Laws of the
Legislative Sessions, the Minutes and Documents, each volume:

16. Colonial Secretary’s Office

Furnishing 2 Divisional Registers annually 20 in. x 12) in.

Printing and binding Departmental Reports 13 x 8 in.

Printing Colonial Estimates, as settled by the Executive Com-
mittee, as laid before the House of Assembly, and as passed by the
House: of Assembly, per page.

Printing Debates of the Genera] Assembly and of the Legislative
Council.

Binding sessional laws } bound cloth and paper per volume of
100 stitched.

Printing and ruling pay sheets per 50.

Ruling where feint lines are required per 100 sheets,

17. Colonial Treasury’s Office,

8 licenses and receipt books.

31 descriptions and paper of different quality.

1 Ledger

1 Cash Book

1 Miscellaneous Journal

1 Abstract Ledger

18. Auditor General’s Office. ‘

Furnishing about 1,000 loose Jeaves for Departmental Vote Books.

19. Post Office,

About 100 White Foreign Receipt Books 54 x 16 in. in 1,000

leaves with duplicates.

About 100 Green Local Receipt Books for out-districts 5) x 15 in.

of 100 receipts with duplicates.

About 100 Green Local Receipt Books 5} x 15 in. of 100 receipts

‘with duplicates. .

About 100 Green Foreign Receipt Books 54 x 15 in, of 100 receipts

with duplicates,

50 Books of Gummed Nos,

Parcel Post Receipt Books 19 x 614 in. 500 leaves with duplicates,

Mail Despatch Books for registered letters 15 x 9 in, of 200 leaves,

C.O.D. Register 15% x 10 in,

20. Registrar’s Office.

Report on vital statistics-—annually—on extra strong paper,—
“Battleship Quality.”

Register of Births—forms 24 x 14% in,

Register of Deaths—forms 24% x 164% in,

21. Legal Department,

Furnishing about 300 receipt books for use in Police Magistrates’

Courts, Assistant Court of Appeal, and Petty Debt Courts, each book
containing 100 receipts 6 x 9 in,

General Cash Book 15 x 10 in, of 100 leaves.
Ledgers and Record Books—different sizes,
Suitors Receipt Book 15 x 10 in, of 150 leaves.
Suitors Cash Book 15 x 9% in, of 300 leaves,
Compensation Book 13 x 8% in, of 120 leaves,
22, Department of Science and Agriculture.
‘Hints for guidance of exhibitors 5% x 8% in.
Annual Reports 13 x 8 in. .

Receipt Books,

Polarization certificates,

Plant Invoice Books 17 x 8% in.

~ Acknowledgment Books 114% x 13 in,

Meteorological Books 16 x 12 in,

Rainfall Books 14% x 9 in,

Fumigation labels,

Sugar cane reading books 8 x 6'2 in,

File covers 1344 x 8% in.

Forms for recording monthly meteorological data 14 x 8% in,

22. Police Department,

Police diaries 15% x 9% in. of 150 leaves,

Prisoners Charge Book 174% x 11% in. of 200 leaves.

Police Report Books 174% x 11% in. of 200 leaves,

Criminal Summons Book 16'% x 11% in, of 200 leaves,

Criminal Warrant Book 18 x 10% in, of 200 leaves,

P.D. Summons Book 15% x 9% in, of 150 leaves,

P.D. Civil Warrant Book 17% x 10% in. of 150 leaves with 36
leaves for index.

Occurrence Book 131% x 8 in. of 96 leaves,

Prisoners Property Book 13% x 8 in. of 96 leaves,

Report Summons Books 16 x 10 in, of 150 leaves,

Criminal Register 19% x 13 in. of 800 leaves,

Harbour Police Arrival Book 8% x 14 in, of 250 leaves.

Harbour Police Departure Book 8'% x 14 in, of 250 leaves.

Permit Book 9% x 10% in, of 100 leaves,

Police Duty Book 17% x 11 in, of 366 leaves,

24. The contractor shall be responsible for the correctness of
every Act, Bill, Resolution, Document, Return, Form, Statement or
other paper or any book sent him to be printed or for publication,
according to the copy thereof delivered to him,

25. In case of the non-performance of any item in the contract
or in case of any delay in printing or binding according to the terms
of this Contract the Printing Committee may have such printing or
binding done by any other person and may deduct from the amount
due to the contractor the amount paid by them for such printing or
binding.

26. The contractor will be required to keep a telephone on the
premises where the printing office is carried on,

27, The contractor will be required to have and keep the
premises where the Printery is carried on a sufficient number of up
to date complete Linotype or Monotype machines with all necessary
metal and other accessories and appliances for the proper operation
thereof, and also to have a full stock of other proper type necessary
for the prompt carrying out of his contract.

28. If the contractor shall fail to print and or circulate any
document, return, or other paper, form or statement required to be
printed, and or circulated within the time required by his contract
or such further time as may be allowed by the Printing Committee
he shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding ten shillings per day
for each document or other paper until the same is peraee and or
circulated to be deducted from any ampunt due or to become due
to the contractor.

29. The person tendering will be required to send a letter signed
by two persons possessed of sufficient property engaging to become
bound with him in the sum of 42500 or to give the security of an
approved Guarantee Society conditioned for the due fulfilment of
the contract,

Persons desirous of tendering may obtain any further particulars
from the Clerk of the General Assembly, The Printing Committee
do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.

It must be clearly understood that the Printing Committee reserve
to themselves the right of determining what documents or papers
shall be published or printed. Persons tendering are particularly
requested to note this reservation,

D. LEE SARJEANT,
Clerk to the General Assembly.

a

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Wilbert Leslie, The application of Alonza B, Hind
bolder of Liquor License No. 453 of 1951,| of Kensington New Road, St. Michael,
granted to him in respect of a board and| for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
shingle shop attached to residence «t| Liquors, &c., at a board and shingle
Fairficid Cross Road, St. Michael, fcr | shop attached to residence at Kensing-
permission to use said Liquor License &c.,|} ton New Road, St. Michael,
at a board arid shingle shop at Villa





Road, Brittons Hill, St. Michael. Dated this 5th day of April, 1951.
Dated this Sth day of April, 1951. To E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,
Tc E. A. McLEOD, Eaq., Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A Signed A, B. HINDS,
Signed WELBERT LESLIE Applicant
Applica
N.B.—This application will be N.B.—This application will be con
| sidered at a Licensing Court to be } sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’ on Monday | at Police Court, District “A’’ on Mond. y
| the 16th day of April, 1951, at 11 o'clock, | the 16th day of April, 195], at 11 o’clocix,
a.m, a.m
£. A. McLEOp, E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A Police Magistrate, Dist. “A"
T4A51i—in.! 4.51

PUBLIC NOTICES

Téa cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTICE

BYE ELECTION — PARISH
OF 8ST. ANDREW
BARBADOS.

I HEREBY give notice to all per-
sons entitled to vote at the Election
of Members of the General Assembly for
the Parish of St. Andrew that the Elec-
tion will commence between the hours
of 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning on
Monday the 9th day of April 1951 at The
Community Hall Belleplaine in the
Parish of St. Andrew.
all 80

summon persons
entitled to vote to meet at the time and
plece aforesaid then and there to make
choice of one qualified, able, sufficient
and discreet person to advise and con-
sent to the making of such laws as shal!
be meet and convenient for the good
Government of this place and people and
preservation of their estates unless a
Poll be required for the determination
thereof in which case such Poll will be
taken ot the place or places appointed
for that purpose, on Monday tte 16th
day of April 1951 commencing between
the hours of 7 and 8





morning.
Given under my hand this 30th day
of March 1961.
Dated this 30th day of March 1951.
F. A. INGRAHM, J.P.,
Sheriff & Returning Officer.
31.3. S1—2n



NOTICE

BYE ELECTION — PARISH
OF ST. ANDREW
BARBADOS.

TI HEREBY give notice to all persons

ualified to vote at the Election of

of the General Assembly for
the ish of St. Andrew that I have
appointed The Community Hall at

Delleplaine as the place where all such
persons may meet on Monday the 9th
day of April 1961 to elect one Member
to serve for the Parish of St. Andrew
in the General Assembly of this Island.

And I hereby further give notice that
in the event of a Poll being required for
the determination of the said Election, I
have appointed for the said purpose the
places hereinafter specified, that is to
say:—

Polling Station No, (1) :—

The Alleyne School Belleplaine THE
NORTH WING For the use of all per-
sons whose surnames begin with the
letters A to J inclusive,

Polling Station No, (2):—

The Alleyne Sehool Belleplaine THE
SOUTH WING For the use of all persons
whose surnames begin with the letters
K_to Z inclusive,

Dated this 30th day of Ma 1951.

Cc, A. 8K .
Parochial Treasurer St, Andrew.
31.3.51—Tn

PUHLIC SALES

Ten

taintantom "onege 61,60 on” wesh-tees
@ $1.50 on wee

and $1.80 on Sundays ”

REAL ESTATE

BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 =z|
rooms, every convenience including
garden, water supply. As new, £3,000,
Phone 4476, 16.3.51—t.f.n,

LAND—At Bush Hall Cross Road,
opposite Allen's Park. This land con-
tains several pieces, Now, you can buy
for cash, or you can credit same tf
wanted, Please get in touch with Mr.
Brown at Hutchinson & Banfield's Offige.

3.4.51—5n,

LAND—1124 sq, ft. of land at Bed-
ford Lane, Bridgetown, together with
dwelling house thereon,

Inspection on application to Miss FE, M.
Downie at Corner of Roebuck Street
end Bedford Lane,

The above will be offered for sale by
pie competition at our office, James
2













— on Friday 13th April 1961 at
ea Hutchinson & Banfield,
$1.3.51—12n,

BUILDING LOTS at Dover, Christ
o ee vole Maxwell Mein Rena’ Roatr,
Mrs, "L-Ae Herbert, Dover. Phone. 34

6.4.51—5n,

or 8385.

AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By recommendations of Lloyds Agents
we will sell on TUESDAY, the 10th at
our Mart, High Street. F

7 Cartons Corn Flakes, 48 pkgs. Quaker
Oats, 20 Tins Paint, 28 Coalpots, 10 Danish
Pots, 30 Negro Pots, 34 Sheet Asbestos,
16 Thermos Flasks, 4 Suit Cases, 1 fot
Plate Glass. "

Sale 12,30 o'clock. Terms cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers.
TADL—2n,



——_—————
BY instructions received from the Com-
missioner of Police I will sell at Central
Station on Monday Next the 9th, begin-
ning at 2 pm. the following items; —
One (1) Humber bieyele frame, one 1)
Fountain Pen; one (1) Gold tie pin, sew-
eral dozen tins of Polish, and several
other iter: of interest
D'ARCY A, SCOTT,
Govt, Auctioneer.
74 51—2n



o'clock, in the |

PAGE SEVEN
roR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents G
word Sundays.





HOUSES

BOULOGNE--St
furnished, Vacant
Dial 8459

Lawrence Gap, fully
from April 165th.
64.51—2n
BUNGALOW: Furnished Bungalow and
Flat at Coral.Sands, Worthing, - Silver
and Linen. Further particulars, Diab 8134.
Alma Lashley. TAD AL.

~ oe

BUNGALOW~—Modern Bungatow sit-
uated at Brighton, Black Rock, all cari-
veniences, Dial 2338. §.451—tin.







En casa particular con su_ ay
grandes jardines habitacion — grande
doble con bsno y tambien dos simples.

Buena comida y servicio esmerado, Se
habla Espanol. Telefono 8372,

Large double room with bath also
two singles in comfortable private
home on sea. Spacious grounds, good

excellent meals. Tel.

bething beach,
8372. 4.4.51—Sn.

DRY GOODS STORE-—Are You’ in-
terested in a Dry Goods Store with Stock
in Trade Furniture etc. In Swan Street?





Veny good spot, available immediately.
Write for particulars to Swpn Street
Store. C/o. Advocate,

6.4.51—34,



EVANTON, Situated at Top Rock;
Having 3 bedrooms; 2 toilets and
Showers. Dining-room. Lounge. All

modern conveniences, available immed-
lately, unfurnished. Apply -—- Ralph
Beard, Phone-4683. or 8569

4.4.51—3n.

HIGH WINDS—Cattlewash, Bathsheba.



For May, July, September, October,
November and December. Dial 2650.
5.4.51—t.f.n,



“MYOSOPIS, 3rd Avenue, Belleville,
Appointments to view.
Phone

from May Ist
Dial 2120. Further
8107. H. W. Hinds.

particulars



PREMISES—No. 6 Swan
stairs premises, very spacious ¢
fuitable for Factory, Agents O! .
Dentists, Solicitors, or Society. Apply;
Thani Bros, or Dial M66.



SEAFORTIL— Worthing,
dezvous Gap, on the
rooms, drawing and
electricity and gas. All
venience, vacant from ist May.
2074, for further particulars.

opposite Ren-
sea-side, 3 bet
dining room,

modern | ¢on-
Phone

6.4.5)—2n.





VICTORIA, On the seaside, fujly furn-

ished from 15th April, with Tblepfidne,
Frig. and Radio, $10) per month. Dial
8150, T4AS1—tin.

————
WAVERLEY—From May Ist, St, Law-
rence Gap on sea, furnished. 3 bedrooms,
running water, Refrigerator, Gas, Garage.
Inspection by appointment. Phone 827%,
6.4.51—10,

NOTICE

CASUARINA CLUB

Members and friends of the a
Club are advised that cttective- Tare hte
ist 1961, the Club is moving frompits-pres-
ent location in St, Lawrence to te prem-
ises known as ILFRACOMBE,, Maxwell
Coast,

This being a strictly residential district,
certain modifications to the existing
regulations of the club will be necessary
Such modifications will be announced
shortly, Meanwhile, business continues
as usual at the Club's present location
in St. Lawrenee, 2.4.51—In.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOHN

As, from the 9th to the 2tst April,
the office of the Paroehi.l Treasurer,
St. John, will be open on Saturday,
14th and 2st April only.

R. 8S. PRASER,

Parochial Treasurer,

a St. John. ,

Lat | 7A4.51—3i



CLOSING NOTICE.
FERGUSSON'S DRUG STORE
We beg to notify our friends,
customers and the general public that
our business will be closed from Wedner
day 11th April to Monday 29rd" April
inclusive, (ASL ¥

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)

M.S, “TONGARIRO” galled Brisbane

en 24th, Arriving at Barbagos Nay,
st. .



Cargo accepted on beet? ills of
Lading with transhipment a rinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands, *

For further particulars apply:—

FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., and
Da COSTA & CO. LTD.,

Bridgetown,
Trinidad, Barbados,
B.W.1. BW.

SHIPPING NOTICES



NEW YORK SERVICE
SS. “Geiruly" sails 23rd March — arrives Barbados Sth April
A Steamer sails 6th April, — arrives Barbados 20th April.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
S.S. “Alcoa Polaris” sails 2ist March — arrives Barbados 4th April.
8.5. “Alcoa Roamer” sails 4th April — Arrives Barbados 17th April

CANADIAN SERVICE

SAILS HALIFAX ARWIVES an
March 27th yt rh bth















SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship
28. “ALCOA PENNANT” ,,





5.8. “ALCOA PARTNER” besa ARE ae April 19th
NORTHBOUND
58. “ALLOA PEGASUS" due April Sth Sails for St. Law-
s rence River + Ports.
28. “ALLOA PIONEER” ee o due April 12th Sails for St. John,
and St. Lawrence
River Ports: »-
ee
These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

LINE





HARRISON

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM







Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
S.S. “TACOMA STAR” .. Liverpool 22nd Mar, ‘th April
S.S. “HERDSMAN” .. London 10th Apr. 23rd April
S.S. “DEFENDER” .. London llth Apr. 26th: April
S.S. “ASTRONOMER” Liverpool 10th April 23rd April
S.S. “PLANTER” London 20th April 3rd May
S.S. “DALESMAN” Glasgow via
Liverpool 15th April 8th May
bie Sc a | me
; *4OMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “STATESMAN” .. London End of April



For further information apply te -- -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

eee

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

( Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia., for sail-
'

‘| tng to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

|
|



|
‘





eee


j







PAGE EIGHT





B.A.F.A. Council Send

New Terms To Piekwick |

The

1951 Football sea



terday evening p
the Pickwick Clu
this season.

Mr. F. St. Cc
preposed the motion ured the
Council that Pickwick would be
quite willing to accept the new
proposals.

This motion w carried by a
10 to 5 majority. The Chairman,
Major A. R. Foster. Mr. O. S&S.
Coppin and Mr. L. F. Harris ab

stained from voting.

Hutchinson who









The motion was to the effect
that of the gross receipts taken,
10% be subtracted for Pick
Club on account cf administration
and expenses. Of the remaining





44° would go to the



90% gros





B.A.F.A. : the other 56% to the
Pickwick Club

The motion also set out that
Pickwick Club and the B A.
shai settle their own financial
arrangements.

Propesing the motion, Mr.
Hutchinson said that he had
approached the Pickwick Club

and from the figures which he
had set out in his motion, learned
that Pickwick was quite willing
to accept them. He thought that
if the members of the Council
could get together and come to a
compromise they would be able
to play at Kensington The Asso

ciation he said had nothing to
lose and many members had i:

timated to him that they prefe

red to play at Kensington instead
of the Park

Mr. E. A. V. Williams said th
the proposals were put to hia
before the meeting started ard
he promised to give the matt

his support. In 1949, the Associ.
tion wisely or unwisely included
something for the B.C.A. and he
would not be a party to any
motion which would exclude the
B.C.A. from getting a fixed per-
centage.

Mr. L. L. Gittens expressed the
view that they were wasting their

time as far as the motion was
concerned as the last letter the
Association received from the

Pickwick Club was a strong one
stating that they could not deviate
from the original terms as set out
by them tor the stagimg of foot-
ball at Kensington for this season.

Mr. E.- Branch said that as
representatives of the various
Clubs, they must air the views of
their members and many of the
players said that they would like
to play at Kensington.

Mr. V. T. McComie said that he
had heard it from _ responsible
members of Pickwick Club that
the Association was taking an
easy way out. All they had vo ao
was to draw up fixtures, while
they (Pickwick) had to see after
the administration. He resented
very strongly any remarks made
against the Association

With regard to the motion, the
matter was already threshed out
by the Association and they had
rejected the proposals by Pick-
wick and he could not be a party
to any such motion,

Mr. D. H.,L. Ward said that
he could not support the motion
now, as the terms suggested were
proposed to Pickwick already
although in different amounts.

When the original terms by the
Association were submitted to the
Pickwick Club, he made a motion
that 20% should be allotted to the
B.C.A. because he felt that a
substantial portion should be
given to that body as they had the
stands there.

He felt that the Council would
be failing in their duty if they
were to agree to this motion,

Mr. F. L. Walcott said he knew
Mr, Hutchinson was interested in
football and was enthusiastic to
see that the game was played at
Kensington, but in view of the
correspondence the Association
had had with the Pickwick Club
he could not now support the mo-
“tion,

He said that they would be
childish and would be more ignor-
ant than Pickwick if they were to
accept the motion, They would
not make a concession to a man

when he» never intended to give
way. Now that they had Pick-
wick cornered, they must remain
there,

If they were to agree to this
motion now, they did not know
what Pickwick would do nex
year.

Mr. N. Medford felt that the

terms proposed by Mr. Hutehin-







VPraffie Don't

No. 20
e

Do not leave your vehicle
where it obscures a Trafic
Sign or Pedestrian Crossing

e
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring



‘They'll Do It Every Time

TO HEAR HIM TELL IT (BUT LOUD),
| THE HEAD CHEESE EXPECTS MISS

POTHOOKS TO THINK FOR HERSELF =~

GOOD GRIEF! WHERE'S
YOUR INITIATIVE
YOU'VE BEEN HERE
LONG ENOUGH TO

ANSWER RUN-OF -THE-
MILL CORRESPONDENCE,
HAVEN'T YOU 4IM TOO
BUSY FOR TRIVIA!
BLAH-BLAH-BLAH »

























MR. BIGDOME,
WHAT DO YOU

WANT TO SAY
IN REPLY TO
MR. ESCROWS
LETTER?

on may be }
Council of the B.A.F.A., at a meeting at the
sed a motion setting

pb under W



layed at Kensington. TI
Y.M.C\A
out fresh tetms to



ves-

rhich the game will be plaved



Empire Quits
Soccer Game

At their annual general
meeting held hact night at
their club recm, Bank Hall,
ihe Empire Club decided to
withdraw from the First Di-
vision Football competition
due to the unsatisfactory
arrangements between the
BAF.A. and the Pickwick
Cricket Club.



son in his motion would do the
Association no harm and it would
be a good thing for football if they
were to accept the motion,

Mr. O. S. Coppin said that Mr.
Hutchinson had spoken to him
about the motion and he told him
that he would have nothing to do

with any more verbal arrange-
nents with Pickwick.
He also said that he would

have nothing to do with the mo-
on. If the Council decided that
they would play at Kensington, he
would carry on as Secretary until
some one else could take over
The Chairman said that he did
not look at the matter as a com-
promise. Mr Hutchinson had
hrought the matter before them
d it was for the Council to de-
cide, but personally, he did not
like the idea of any suggestions to
Pickwick as coming from the
Association as they had already
put up their terms which were
turned down by Pickwick
After other members had ex-
pressed their views, the motion
was put to the vote and carried
Voting for the motion were
Messrs, F. St, C. Hutchinson,
N. Medford, C. A, Smith, F. E
Hinds, A. F. Ishmael, G. Moore,
E. Branch, S. O'C. Gittens, G

Roachford and W. F. Hoyos
Voting against were Messrs
D. H. L. Ward, V. T. Mc Comie,

E, A. V. Williams, F. L. Walcott
and L. L. Gittens,



SAVANNAH CLUB
TENNIS RESULTS

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
MEN'S DOUBLES (Finals)
Dr. C. G. Manning and E. P. Taylor
beat G. H. Manning and P. McG. Pat
terson 6—1, 6-3, 6—4

TODAY'S FIXTURES
_ LADIES’ DOUBLES (Finals)
Miss D. Wood and Mrs. R. 8S. Bancroft
vs. Miss G. Pilgrim and Miss I. Lenagan
MIXED DOUBLES (Handicap)
Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Barnes vs
J, Wood and J. DD Trimingham
Two Courts will be available for Club

A DRAW

LONDON, April 4
Mikhail Botvinik and David
Bronstein today agreed to regard
as a draw the ninth game in the
World Chess Championship at
Moscow, the Soviet news agency
Tass reported today

Miss



The game was adjourned last
night in an intricate position, but
the players decided today that

neither could win.

Botvinik proposed a drawn game
and this Was agreed to without
resumption of play.

‘ Botvinik is now leading in the
series by five points to four. The
tenth game will be played on Apri!
6. Both players are Russians.

—Reuter,



By M. HARRISON-GRAY

rl S often wise t think
vice <



e before me y udd
If. for inste

@ ts nea:









e. your
& the 3000





sone card Or
have meided



a

your
‘your
goes out, you will
enough unmelded cards

purtner
have
Lo subtract from your score;

while if he

is Unable to go
will

out, be able to do so

yourself on the next turn if tt
seems desirable,





Tradae Benrase Saratoe

Aoginered US Potent Oftes


















Jf WHo's R
Y UNNIN
ATHIS OFFICEZ wis Ce
YOU THINK You ARE? }{
WHO EVER GAVE You /\\
AUTHORITY TO QUOTE
PRICES To ESCROW ?WHEN
IM READY TO TURN THE
FIRM OVER TO You
ILL LET you KNow

{





DR bacon FRABAY, tac President of India, sunces uauus

bers at the ceremony which marked the opening of the First Asian Games in New Delhi recently.
The countries represented in the Games were:

Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Tha

High Living Cost
Causing Slump In
Soccer Pools

LONDON,
The Old Country football pools

which for years have dangled
bulging pots of gold before mil-
lions dreaming of sudden riches,

are reported to be undergoing a
slump.

Fortunes are still being won
every week by lucky speculators,
but latest surveys disclose a sharp
The rise

decline in pool receipts.
in cost-of-living and_ restricted
spending power of the average

British wage-earner are blamed

During the easy-going, post-—
war era about 500 competing
pools were *handling annual in-
vestments, reaching a peak of
more than £100,000,000 in 1946.

To-day, less than 150 ‘get-rich-
quick” outfits are operating with
only about a dozen or so of any

nsequence. Even the surviving
giants admit they are feeling the
pinch



“take’ et present is
have dropped to
approximately £45,000,000, This
fair—size “kitty” however, returns
only 50 per cent of the total pool
to the investors in prizes. Of the
remainder, 30 per cent goes to
the government in taxes and 20
per cent to operating costs

The drop in turnover is attrib-
uted to a decline in the average
weekly stake rather than a de-
crease in the number marking
coupons. The experts estimate
that some 7,750,000 of Britain’s
adult population send in their
forms each week during the pool
This figure has remained
fairly constant during the last two
years but the average weekly

The yearly
estiinated to







stake has slumped from around
seven shillings per person in
1946 to around three shillings
this year.

Fortunes In Prizes
Despite the investment decline,

the country’s largest pool organi-
zation not so long ago w Day
ing out fabulous fortunes for a
paltry outlay of a few shillings
The peak prize this year was
around £110,000 and there have
been several in excess of £80,000
The average major prize, how-
ever, has been closer to £10,000

Strangely enough, a_ recent

eanvass disclosed that five out of
six major pool winners had failed
to find happiness from their
newly-acquired wealth,

A couple of former factory
girls, Agnes Turner and Margaret
MacMahon, of Leyland, Lanes.,
who between them shared a jack-
pot of about £50,000 confessed
that fortune had created unex
pected’ worries

Agnes, a 28-year-old brune

said the money had made her los« |





the joy of living “T was much
happier with the lads and lassie

at the factory,” she said,



Margaret, 33, admitted” the
money had ended any fears of
insecurity, but she too has lost
her old sense of values and re
gards new-found “friends” with

suspicion.——(CP)



Soccer Matches



LONDON, April 4
Results of Soccer matche piayed i
the United Kingdom on Wednesda
follows
ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION I
West Bromwich Albion 1, Blackpool
INeweastic United 0, Aston Villa 1
DIVISION Il

Manchester Cit

Queen Park Ra

DIVISION IL, SOUTHERN
Exeter City 0, Torquay United 0, (Tie)
Bristol City 1, Aldershot 1, (Tie)

DIVISION III, NORTHERN
Crewe Alexandra 1, Southport 0.
New Brighton 6, Gateshead 1,
Chester 3, Stockport County 0.
Rexham ©, Oldham Athletic 2

INTER LEAGUE MATCH
League of Treland @, Football Li





















S





GAMES GREETINGS

the Directors
sidered

their





Afganistan,
iland and India.

Burma,

Local Netball
Season Opened



Ceylon,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



|

cae ke, sath ed

Wibit LMG s25sAil Wed 2 LmMre wees seewaeâ„¢





Indonesia, Japan,
—Express

Tran,



Rugby Results

April 4.
Matches

LONDON,
Rugby League



Results of

played in the United Kingdom on Wed

On Saturday the first match ip
the Barbados Netball League
Tournament was played between
Queen’s College Old Girls and
Olympia Club. Lady Savage
made the first pass and Mrs.
Challenor, President of the
League, opened the season with
an address in which she express-
ed hér good wishes for the League,

For the first ten minutes of the
game Olympia played a fast gam«
with almost accurate passing and
shooting. However, the game did
not maintain the standara
“expected. Although Old Girls
gave a reasonable account of
themselves at team work in the
outfield, their inaccurate shoot-
ing caused Olympia to finish the
first half With 5 goals to 1 for
Old Girls.

T. Barker, as Shoot, I. Quintine
and P, Best were most outstand-
ng players for Olympia.

During the second half, Old
Girls combined as a team far

better than Olympia who seemed
to lack team spirit Old Girls
outplayed Olympia near the close
of the game and scored 4 quick
goals, At the end of play, the
seore was Olympia 7 and Old
Girls 5 goals.

The results of the Match which
took place on ‘Thursday, 5ta
April, at Erdiston Training
College between Erdiston Training

Cellege and St. Michael’s Old
Girls’ Association are as fol-
lows

E.T.C. 10 goals; St. Michael’s

Old Girls Assn. 24 goals,



TOTTENHAMHOTSPURS
STILL SAY “NO”
LONDON, April 5.
After considering the fresh pro-
pesals from the Argentine Foot-
ball Federation the Tottenham
Hotspurs football club directors,
announced today that they would
adhere to their previous decision
not to undertake a close of season
tour of the Argentine this summer.
An official afterwards said that
had carefully con-
the new proposals, but
felt that the reasons contained in
original statement of last
week still applied.—Reuter.







:

nesday are as





follow:

Featherstone Rovers 13, York 6.
Huddersfield 18, Hunslet 8.

Salford 20, Rochda@ Hornets 7
Swinty 14. Widnes 2.

Saint Helens 22, Leeds 14,

-—-C.P

What’s on Today

Shooting by Barbados Rifle
Association—1 p.m.

General Meeting of the Bar-
bados Civil Service Asso-
ciation—1,30 p.m.

Netball at Queen’s College.
Queen's College vs Queen's
College Old Girls—5 p.m.

Table Tennis at Y.M.C.A.

> —6 p.m.

Basketball at Y.M.C.A. Har-
vison College vs Y.M.C.A.
and Harrison College Old
Boys vs. Fortress at
¥Y.M_ P.C.—7.45 p.m.

CINEMAS

Giobe: “He walked By Night.”

Plaza (Bridgetown); “Pirates of
Capri.”

Otympic: “Invisible Monster” and
“Whispering Footsteps”.

Roxy: “Christopher Columbus”

Empire: “Christopher Columbus,”
Aquatic; “Come to the Stabie.”







The Weather

TODAY

Sun Rises; 5.56 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
re (First Quarter) April

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 3.41 am., 4.26
P.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: .67 ins,
Temperature (Max.) 86.5°F
Temperature (Min.) 71.0°F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.S_E. *
Wind Velocity: 6 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.999,
(3 p.m.) 29.991



CLEARS STUFFY NOS*~Q2,2¢ gs @Greage,
d 2"

Sev tVng
Comfort

iN YOUR POCKET!

SO HANDY —Carry it with you in
pocket or handbag—neat, feather-
weight Vicks Inhaler. It's tiny, but
loaded full of soothing, nose-clear-
ing medication,

pen to be, as often as you need it,
Just unscrew the cap and put the




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tip of Vicks Inhaler right into each
stuffy nostril in turn,
in, and—quick as a breath!—your
nose feels delightfully cool “and
clear, So pleasant. So convenient.
EASY TO USE—Wherever youhap- 4

f-e-a-t-h-e

ry it today!

Use as often as needed






GERM LUBRIC

ii DON'T ONLY OIL
} CENTRAL Fou
Gasolene Static



a

NOW! Dental Science Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE; EFFECTIVE WAY TO

‘ATING OILS

ARE BEST B







mer ae

co a 8

Peer Te EL aaa



Y TEST

IT—GERM IT
NDRY LTD.
Trafalgar St.



SESSIO!

«

@ From Page 5



letter to another whom he had | States of America will be

uever seen.
It had been argued that Toppin



| April to Friday 18th April, 1951, and women who have

SATURDAY,
GOVERN MENT

Completion of tl

APRIL 7, 1951

NOTICE





1e@ registration carg
lready registered their names for possible er



continued during the week—Mo



lay 9th
yet called



«tiuew a lot more than he was ad-|4"d completed their cards can report and do so between the hours

mitting; that Toppin was an ac-
complice,
inat he was an accomplice, his

reporated, They had seen Toppin

varry out such a job.

Defence Counsel asked why})|
Puttin did not get Phillips,.a wit-
ness who saw Puttin pick up Top-|1
pin on the bicycle, and whom
Puttin had known for five years.
They, the jury, had seen Phillips
and could assume that Puttin
might have thought Phillips above
Such an action or that he might
call for q fifty-fifty deal.

After he had heard Defence
Counsel and the Solicitor Generai
for the prosecuuon as to the ad-
missibility as evidence of state-
ments given by Puttin to the
Police, he had ruied that the state-
ments were admissible.
advise them that they should ac-
cept those statements. It was for
them, of course, to attach the
weight they felt due to them,

If they felt that the Police who
took the statements threatenea
him or enticed him to give them,
they should ignore them entirely

The statements had to be
voluntary, though not voluntary in
the sense that Puttin would
be willing to give them, Puttin

would never have been anxious
to do so.

Further Investigation

It was likely that the reason
for Puttin’s long detention was
the circumstance of Cpl. Devonis!,
having to go out to make furthe:
investigations.

There was direct evidence from
Cpl. Byer who said he recognised
Puttin as the man who rode with
Toppin on the bicycle bar on the
night of Toppin’s arrest.

Mr. Reece, for the prosecution,
he ‘safd, had told them how he
himself was sometimes forgetful
of little things and it was quite
reasonable that the Police could
forget trivia] things said at the
Magistrate’s Court and that there
would be discrepancies.

THANI |
BROS.

<>

HARVEST
SALE

Is THE TALK
OF THE TOWN





YOU CAN'T AFFORD
10 MISS IT

<>

Thousands are

taking real ad-
vantage of gen-

uine Reductions |
in

Ladies Dress
Goods, Gents
Wear and
Woollens and

other

Departments

EVERYDAY

What about
you 7



Just Received

Horlicks Malted Milk 3 sizes
Rinso

Lux Flakes

Palmers Soap
Ointment

Puckleys White Rub
* Mixture

Todex Soi ae

Cuticura Soap
” Ointment

Canadian Healing Oil
PVelatol Comp
Honey 1lb, jars.



C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail Draggist
— Dial 2819

S and §

Truly the Finest of RUM

So Mellow in a highball

So Smooth in a Cocktail

It is simply Superb.

Try it and you will be
convinced.

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for

BEST RUM

ee /

|

= Ss fo

of 9 a.m
If they were satisfied | Women whose surnames begin with the
letters A, BangeC .. ie ; oh
evidence would have to be cor-| Women whose Surpames begin with the
letters D, E, F amd G ‘ 2 ;
as witness and he seemed the | Women whose surnames begin with the
teal person for one to pick on to | letters H, I, J, K and L z ala
Women whose surnames begin with the

Women whose surnames begin

He would |(



|

and 2 p.m. according to the following time table:

Monday, 9th April
Tuesday, 10th April
Wednesday,

llth April

etters M, N, O, P, Q@ and R Thursday, 12th April

with ti







etters S, T, V, W and Y . Friday, 13th Apri

New registrations will be started again from Monday, 10th April,
1951, and will continue. Those interested who have not registered
can do so between the hours of 9 a,m. to 3 p.m. any day between

Monday and Friday at Queen’s Park House.

lS





CRYPTOQUOTE No 2?

. te | AEMT BIZGZBAVG | FY | |
A Grand Danec FPKVLVPKVPA = LS | BFGBED
| YAZPBVY BIP KESA FY
) PA YTZC,
MAD HIGGINSON pags Saye

will be given by
1th hath
Shakespear
On SATURDAY 'NIGI | J. A. CORBIN & SONS.

Tih April 1951
SAVOY CLUB
Hall Street

a quiet



MISS



At ¢t
Masor



$6655.46 On
alata atala PELE LEE OF OOO

ADMISSION —a: R/- Ne my

Musie by Mr. Percy Grean’s a 1 e
Orchestra %S MR. : Rk BROWNE x
~ . 1 9

Refreshments on Sale

,
Please Invite Your Friends, ie (Dance Band Leader) x
+
















SSS "0 Bevs to remind all Dance %

S Lovers, Customers & Friends °

x that his %

( J . ¥

A Grand Dance DANCE 3
> give: . > : >

will be given by is being held at ,

MISS IRENE

At &T CATHERINE’S SOCIAL
CLUB HALL, Wiltshire, St. Philip
Kindly lent by the Management)

On MONDAY NIGHT

>
MASON QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE x
Constitution Road %
ON MONDAY NIGHT %
x

April 9th, 1951

PEEPS PPPOE OD

Sth April, 1951. | Orchestra eae
Admission: ( The Count and his Band ¥
GENTS 2/- ca: LADIES 16. ADMISSION iz: 50c. &
Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra i = ‘KR ‘
Attala wos rchestra: 3 A WELL STOCKED BAR %
‘ N.B.—This Invitation is ex- &
Refreshments on Sale tended to all (Dress ¥
Please Jnvite Your Priends naeq to all. = 6
optional) ss

—————SSSSSB!





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oe

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we

Style! 2





in these
Vedonis
House Coats

made of brushed Rayon with








-wrap fronts, Shawl collar
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Collar with Zip Fronts, In
Blue,
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or Eton



shades of Hacienda
Green Vista,

Spindle Berry and Carnation

Red.
£

Cave Sh






epherd & Co., Ltd.

12 & 13 Broad Street. |

















See Our Up-to-the-Minute

STYLINGS

jor
Spring
195"

LADIES,



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ALSO

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in Cream, Green and White.
For interior decoration of Walls,
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“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White and C:eam,
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HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
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For exterior or interior use.
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In Tropical White, Oak Brown,
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In Grey and Mid Green.




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Phone one vane REMOVER hone
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.
AGENTS,






PAGE 1

BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 15I Cahib Qcdiinq H ON MRS gVELYN BWtTW alclwlla arrived Irom B.G. *•an b> n.w i A Mic i'.T uboui a month's holklay the: • Ravine with Mi-. CUrtcC Qomes at "Olenroy" S: 1. Irelic* %  > i tin is tho daughter 3f the laic Lord Mou-bray. She met Mrs Melville %  av*Yal years ago In France Mi> BartnVa husband whu served in the Royal Navy was killed In the last war. i ome Is at present in BaTUHMam, but fur the pa*t two vest? she ha* been travelling (he woi hi. When sho Barbados she will return lo H V, baton doing !• Europe. With Demerari. Bauxite A MilVING Irom B.G. vesterI B W I A. were Mr. and Mr* r\ Krellcr and their two Hobby anil Judy. Mr k with the Demerara In ".!.-. K %  !. %  Hare for two weeks, they are %  tajrlng l the St Lawrence it.W ,!.A. Director H ON fl A CL'KE who attendmatting of the Directors Of B.W.I.A. in Trmliiad. return-. %  lerdny afternoon by (l W I.A. General Manager M R. AND MRS WILLIAM W GARDINER arrived from Trinidad > csterday afternoon by U.W.I.A. tD spend two weeks' holiday, staying at the casuarina Club Accompanying them over %  tare Mrs. Grace Mansfield and ItOT SOU Stephen Mr. Gardiner is General Manager of Trinidad Bakeries Ltd., Porl-of-Spain. Retired Building Contractoi M H AND MRS. GEORGE WINKLER arrived from Trinidad yesterdav afternoon bv H.W.I.A. lo spend a holiday in Barbados. Thev live in Lo* ('.,],f...-imi. Mr. Winklcr is a retired building contractor. During then stay in Unrhndo* they will lie the guests of Mr. Lurry Van Dusen at "Little Barn". Pine Hill. Barbados Holiday M RS. IMFItRE yUESNEL and three ihiUtrcn arrived from Trinidad yesterday by it W.I.A. accompanied by Mrs. Quesnel's Mther. Mrs. Lucille Dear. The QuesneU are here for a holiday and are staying with Miss Spencer nl -liijiiloe" Cotlymore Rock. Mi UucMiel who is with Forrest park Estate, which is near PotnU u Plan* was unable to COBM over for the holiday as the in Ihe middle of crop. Yes. its still pouring— looks as if III never get out Of here." Indefinite Holiday M R. A1JRED HUBERT STONE, retired 111! PUUIUJT arrived by HWIA's B.O., flighi yevti-Miiv aftei BQ •" to Indefinite holiday Ln Barbados. He is staying with Mr. J C lU-liert:. %  %  Mill Joint Famil) M B. J. D. H. PHILLIPS who Is with "Barn" Estate in Berbice B.G.. arrived from 11G., yesterday afternoon by 11.W I A to )oin his arlfa and two daughters vrho ere elre d) In Barbedoi They h;iv. been here sine" March 16. Ba'k From B.G. M RS. J. BERNSTEIN who had baon in B.O., on visit noturned yesterday afternoon by B.W.I A Short Visit M R. INGHAM GORING who was. in it Q, on %  week'i visit relume*! yesterday by B.W.I.A. Lonf Leave M il. HEN KINO w s with Trinidad leaseholds Ltd.. In Potnte-i JPIerre returned to Trinidad yesterday afternoon by BW1A, after spending his long leave in Barbados staying with Mr ami Mrs. It. M. Cionev ot rontebelle. He had been here since January. Special Represzntntive M H HAROLD BISHOP, Special Itepreeentetlve •>( the Gulf Oil Corpn.. urrived from the US on Thursday via Puerto Rico by II W I A He is a Kuest at the Ocean View Hotel. Grenada Merchant M R, AND MRS ROBERT PROUDFOOT and their (out daughters. Kn'hi. Ilenena and Valerie arrived hrogo Grenada on Thursday by B.W LA MM month's holiday in Barbados. They are staying with tin* Atkinsons at "Sea Qnssjn" Hastings. Mr Proud foot is a merchant in Grenada. They have three other children all boys who are at present In Grenada. • Attended Brother's Wedding M R. HAROLD MARSHALL returned yesterdav aft< b] B.W.I.A from Trinidad He. •wax ou two weeks' holiday. During his stay in Trinidad, he attended his brother's (Cuthbert) wedding. Chemical Engineer M R AND Mrs. J R Taylor came in on B W 1 A's T flight yesterday afternwm II. i for a short holiday they are staying at the Ocean View Hotel. Mr. ,i Chemical Engineer with Stuart Bros. In Montreal. T.C.A. Flights W EDNESDAY. APRIL 11. wffl be the last T C.A. midweek schedule. This schedule wain operation during the peak ot I season Their regular Saturday flight will continue to operate until May 5. Starting. May 10. T.C.A'* weekly flight wilt uper.ite through Barbados every Thursday instead of Saturday, and. also starting May 10. flight 800. tin south bound trip will arrive at Sea well at 5.10 a in., leaving for Trinidad at S.40 am. and flight GDI %  I Seawell bom Triniilad at 9.43 am, leaving fni Canada via Bermuda at 10 3d a.m. Dentist D R. WILLIAM STANLEV LYON. Venezuelan born dentist who lives in Trinidad arrived yesterday afternoon by B. W I A from Trinidad to spend three weeks' holiday In Barlmdo*. He i< staying at Ashton-on-Sea. Max wells. Trinidad Arrivals M ISS PAM Mr LEAN WU among the passengers arriving from Trinidad yesterda* et tetnoon by B.W.I A She plans to spend a little over two weeks' holiday here, staying at Sea Gays. Maxwells. Arriving by the same 'plane snu Mrs. Stella A Fernandez who has time over to spend an Indeiknitc holiday with Mrs. Miller at "Winchester". Hastings. PLAZA Th*mtr*-Bridgttown (D'AL 23I0J TODAY let* • p- MiOm-i'i m vtoemAY m ssspm. rilm CUani Ine Pttt.nU. "Thm I'lllllis ol CAP HI TODAY am 4 1 l ~ ~."N> PietaMf. Born KAP3X.FV IM Mr WOHOi If K.isi. IS I HI* A TOWN l vanity U-t Easter. SHOW HI SINESS: (.lowing notices greet "Gramercy Ghost" and its star, but they are from provlncJal erlUca The play and it* leadil | lads s n ih Chunhlll must CROSSWORD BY THE WAY... 'T*HE man chosen by the Dorset X Coast Erosion and General l"urpoowlor : headed, dynamic, thickeheoked Vincent Fumbling, of ClaysnOtt Farm. Il.ngsimie-Mi.rn berlp} Mr rumbling, ..iied ihirty nine : %  *"I expect iiiey cboet me beeauae 1 used te. glaep m •< bowlfi bal ..in i.f r.hwr devilry But it had n brim all right." be addetl, l.mgh(>rder to get used to the bowler, Mr. Pumblin>< Ll %  ji rneali for o few days, %  He rorgeti bin i %  itors eome into thi room. And he has sprained his thumb trying to gel | band under the ciuwn to raise the hut. There's no douht it's easier to huve I brim to eetcb hold <>f But that would l>e cheating." Tl— Parly fl/ gae npHE oral plank ba the Tory I. policy being to been ^^" Soclalirts in the House until they lire lo,sleepy lo snow trnal Ml OH DM e-iunter-pl.in In (he Social. M .iltempt tn clos.-thr bar at in p.m. win be to block all the , %  i %  r, oats and oilier oddmeTiiTneBoelalbm srfJltben tn maelvei es Tories, und gTJp IUII unobaerved through gaps In Un clothing The Tones will thee disguise! Ivei u socialists, pretend to be asleep, and sudi i ii .i tip la VOtl %  !! the Tory Democracy hi all ihe rage. Ttf Orfl Plan I N connection with the Orfl Traffic Scheme a Pedestrians* llruver aity is lo be opened in Clerkenwell. There the student will be told, with the aid of diagrams and graphs, how to cross a street. A ; nil cf motor-horns and roarjhg vehlck; will be pla>cH. H;Ml will flash, brakes will grind, ^nd each %  tuoanl will hi given leu second* lo run fxom %  lamp to the MM. llefiire crossing n sini'i tin pedeatrlan will have to convince the Craaalng warden td.ti ha baa .1 good ie.iy.ni r 12. Now Uii* iluon'i r*im. Mi IS. in nil burning huiinu %  i. M 18 i nimuii p u ii itc it i a tet j la) Inilisu. II) 5-j. Unwii. ifli tS. rorrtbW rstraciiona. tvl Paenj 1. Good pimi t- riwd on no 2. uetidrdiv hay. a. Diana eniorrces mm, i8 4. Loxieua n*i Q Olten 0-'iti lo flimrs. I5I 5. Almost U>* •I'i'O vou want, is 1. Ycu %  i %  unle* i !... %  i %  n i -i U of tnr Drain, IBI 13. Clow the hiiMer and u %  be laKcn. MI l*. aueli 'i P !" l I* i rruHocean. 17. H^'e in uinnent shape. Ml t ul a swoon. (Ji I a ol 111 Acroaa. (1) P Don li-"" i alill pass the scrutiny of Broadway's austere and often morose critics. BRITANNIA rules the video waves with Bra and Rex says a headline in the newspaper World Telegram. It refers to n review of a TV appearance by Beatrice Lillio and Itex Harrison. But the rant control chief anncunces that if a renter applies for an H aerial on the roof to bring in Bon and Rex. the landlord can raise the rent two dollars (14s \ a month. "THE LOST WEEK-END." you remember, was a lllm of an alcoloal week-end. Today Charles Jackson, author of "The I>l Wnk-end". was lined £26 in Wi-mont District Court. Charge— Irunken driving. DREAMLAND EXPRESSES slaif •lying to London next month. Until now, airliners have had berths plus .eats. Passengers on the extrafare all-sleeper plane will have a gourmet dinner with free cocktails, chnmnagne and liqueurs, before retiring to the 18 berths. B.B.C. Radio Programme S SO II m Poire* Favourite, 1 a M The J*ew.. 7.10 a m. New* AnalyiU. 7 IS a m From The EaiiorUU, T.SS a m. PioKi*mmr Parade: 7 30 am From the Thud Programme, lam MontmartiPlayer*, a IS a m Compoeera ot the Week. %  30 a m Uton Haye.. BS am. Colonial Qunlloi.i Bam The Nrwi SI0 am Home New* Irom Britain. S IS a m Clo*e Down. It am The Orarnl Naltoml: H 30 am Programnte Paraoe. II *0 ii.ro Interlude. 1145 am Hand -.'.a II noon Thr New.. II 10 Hews Analvi: II. IB C Sw OOwn i ia-e •• f-m'• • I >iriiti TODAY 4 45 and I M . a> •eillnuini J. Arthur Rank presents . Frcdric MARCH in CHRISTOPHER COIVMBVS Color by Technicolor Co-starring Florence ELDRIDGC Francis L. SULLIVAN St Linden TRAVERS HOYY TO DAY 45 and 111 . A I onllnuni. J. Arthur Rank presents . Fredric MARCH in CHRISTOPHER COLVMBVS Color by Technicolor Co-starring Florence ELDRIDGE Francis L SULLIVAN & Linden TRAVERS HOYAL TO-DAV lo SUNDAY I.N iadi Univir.nl Double . John HALL & Maria MONTT.Z In %  n iun: SAVAGE" AND • 193 KXeUD LADY" wllh James MASON & Margaret 1XXTKWOOD OLYMPIC LAST TUO SlliiWs TODAY 4.30 and 8 15 lit Inst. Republic Serial Richard WEBB & AlbM TOWNE In %  THE IWISIBU: MO\STER Along with the picture . Whispering Foolsfeps' Starriog John HUBBARD A Rita QUICLEY 4 is p i LHIrne'f Choice; S p m d MaUonal. S IS pa. BBC iin Variety Orcheatra; p m. r lor Doneins -7.1ft •.!*.. I1.M; 11 at; MU M *'pm Ptogramm* Parade. 1 p m ttmwt. 7 15 pm News Anafy" -Brt,,nd ^jVa?. a L4S M. 7 IS p m Beliln : i-II '-• S* 1 *S p tn. The Grind National: %  Pj*Rana. i l a ii a m li l is P". "," I ,"' irlnecr.Rally. 130 pm invltat-m to a Voyaa• 43 pm Son*, by Dup.>rc. 10 pm The Ne.; lo l P'" Fr.-n th.' Edllouala: 10 IS vm TaVe n Iron, Hri in 45 II m Y.n. Failhlulry; ll P ">. Orehe*t'a TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. and Continuing lo Monday al 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. 161 I "CHINA DOLL" % *•* %  sitt. S1U11MPS ON THE MENU Dial 4730 (or Rewrvations AQUATIC' C'l.UB II> i:.MA :M.mb.r. Only) MATINEE: TODAY at S pm TO-NIOHT to SI NI>AV NKillT -I %  LORCTTA VOUHO. CEt^STE HOI-M in "COME TO THE STABLE" ith HUGH MARLOWE, EUSA t.ANCHESTEH. THOMAS GOMEZ An KKO Radio Pletuie _,, A Heart•warmina Picture baaed upon the Story by UW well-known Author; Clare flnothe |*.te ^mtes of Capri -fe^L L(WIS NAYWARD ksaMuiais urtaawi Bam am NkliELLi uni ..rsacsirmer r 1>1J.1:' ffaV* On a very cold morning ,n mid. winter Rupert notitei thai one ol %  he window* ii covered w.th (ro pitiern. Aher ganng it ihcrn lor • while he fetchei hit pencil and •ketchbook inH begun |ryni| to driw them. "Mow tir^nge ihty • rr," he murmtiri. Thji big one _. ire'tlowcr. I rider how | a( k Fran thinks of uch i.ivf. dcsigni." |uu at he novet to the ubTe ,., do hn drj. %  it more cjrelully Mr*. Br; open* he door. Will you do aotnc Sopping foe me. plcsic. Rupert > AIL %  at %  fj Krstuvso tiniMiiiis or %  % % %  % ft rS *^ ;/ A \KJ v L o ii i: TOI1AY ."> A ;-. \ ( .iiitiiiuiiu HE HELD A LOADED GUN AT THE HEART OF A GREAT CITY! %  Vovghl Th...i:r.oly til* i, I-.* *•! Ol CANON CITT" for Young Men & Youths ONLY GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS "" '"" Oouble Stand Free Repair patch O.IO WAISt 27|" lo 30" 0 TROPICAL SUITINGS Including PitvStripes 2", 3 A3 4 3 9 4-9, 4", Yd. EVAMS ri WHITriELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SH0F STORE / To-night visit CLUB MORGAN The trinrt Boautlful Niflht Club from Miami to Rio trirh a u'orld-u-lde rrpuialton for good food Music, Dancing Entertainment throughout the night Dial 4000 tot rtisrvationi Kxirs SperUI: Thr Kh<.-1 IHDI'U.AL MrnV and latest "WORLD NEWS" TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY (On)*) i i". jnd 8 39 p m. ... rm "TOWS DIAL 2310 rUAl\MjI\ T "t MOST POPULAR CINEMA %  '" %  !" M T0WN I Watch for: -"NOT HANT1D" It %  a Thil f..;.. tiCHAro ESFHH won "CAgtw tut MADT a.'k It. laW.ti-W.t I.lull -Ja-Mi (ateMII *ai. *i> • rrein'l it l..ri I, leai aiwM I. %  ' %  (.'•. An EAGLE IKW FILMS rTttantsJaN NOW BEING RECEIVED PORTLAND CEMENT IN 941b. PAPER BAGS. OBTAIN YOUR REQUIREMENTS FROM OUR PLANTATION SUPPLIES DEPARTMENT TEL. NO. 4657 Tin: it MIII \IION (o-(i'i:iiiiivi lOITIA FACTORY LTD. BARBADOS OWN PICTURE Under thi> Dialinguithed Pulrunagr of ///. Exi-rllrnrv Ihe Governor and Lady Sarnge YOU'VE BEEN WAITING FOR... J APTriUft RANK presents FREDRIC MAKCH iisropife. .^./ % %  •"• llvd Ifi* Grtaleil Advenlure of them all! Fksrenca Prancil L ELDRIDGE* SULLIVAN -IMa Kalhlern TRAVERS-RYAN iDEREK BOND-.H Jatm SottrUoi JISTKt Frh AVLan You Saw thtr. Film Utntt for Chnttophtr Cola r>bu% Htrt Now Sa fha Completed Picfura. NOW SHOWING AT BOTH EMPIRE & ROXY THEATRES. I



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SATURDAY', APRIL 7. 1HI BAKU UHIS AliVOt Ml PAGE FIVE Acquitted Of Threatening Letter Charge Introduced To the Bar HL'NDRKDS yelled in Ihe Courtyard ye^tcrdav as David Van Puttin bowed to the Court and .valked out of the dock, M quitted of the charge the Police had brought against him —uttering a threatening letter to Aubrey Birch uf Dayrells Road, demanding money The case was going ||u Honoui Ihe Acttat] Jiui.ee, Uie UHOftn jury del.bChief Justice Mr G. I. Taylor erated for an hour ana 4o minutes presided at the Court before the before tney returned their no! Van Pultin case continued guilty verdict. They had heard a Mr R**cc said lhal Mr Graham %  . iwo-hour address by Defence VVi s called 10 the Bar by the lionwho han, around the Cmmel Mr E w r^J !" ^ oiraM. MM ot Gr^, inn in i. |l.,,-,.,, r ,-III,-,I3„, ,„,.,,„„ C|J IB4> Ihouili II w In 1947 thai he in. i lalwajl u eu-nd lhal they are ,^.,,„ ,. h ,,_„,. .„, ,,,,. paue I hi. Bn.U S,^' Se'ToSn.lwnoK?'?; *"*" hivhiT den-no^ ,, r'KV ••" < !" Aubrey Slrch. threT S" !" ?'* nd '^ "' "" ' .^nSt tf uS f'" Birch', .nd hi, children.^^ "• "' %  **K care of thcmielvn." I've. It the money n not placed p Ti?*.? .L. ...„ Police Con.UI.lM are now on • certain ,po, toSTEr wtlcSrM L £ Ihe lia* out for such lout, and The Defence Couiual. Mr Bar'~ ,. S?. r i^^^, "'£.,. S* already two have been arrested, row. had made MlJWHI J, "SI K ,n,en?.on of but would ~ -rcnadii where _...'ged to have given the police, fee* were -attractive ;he'Urr.mT;Ke ,u ^ m ?f h"J s ,n UM !" ,6 !" • *a7*t£PS3 i-*. —. I.-*. !" '" Wl '" k c "* "' " him. Mr Barrow ariued lhal ihcorned Mr Gntam and added Btatcmcnt. had been got out or that it gave him great pleasure lo Parking With Touts 'THHTS varlo already two have been arrested, row. had made strong objections Mr fir.rnm hart ",? i The Commissioner said that he In the early stages of the case to utl c\Mn* m Barbados would like the public to know ceruin staWments Puttin was £ ,eirning to Grer. that anyone who visits a place of alleged to have g.ven the notice, f~. ~Z .? J^v* PARKING POLES In wdrr thai ItM inu. sj pbWK W,ll a —11 ithVH -.1. .oe rtmdni ..r-n. *, parkins (.. biotlm | BJBJ g*Jf .1 imr. -,. i.. -. carry while red These vlreeta • an i.ov be easllj dfaUliigukahed "Whrnevrr you we A pol< painted in lhe*e tMo*r* aw will know that >ou radii** park yotar motor vehicle in thai street,' (ului'l Mirhr hu laid the Advcrata" yr > tgfdjaf Hr said that this tcp was esperlally Ukei. t J in. i. r.-! who are visitor, u the .aland aud are not **. qaalnted with the lerd l>arkms resulallo i. "In nearly all eoinuri< iin. m-thi.il la rmplo>ed he said. MUSIC FESTIVAL FINISHES 'Combermvfe's Wall Will \ot Obstruct Flood Water" WALL DOW |Obu| up 'i the eastern sul: cf Cii..ber.•reiied because of tha continuous annoyance caused b) 'he ciicroachnient ol animals, some "1 wm I times entered the classrooms. Mr. (' A Coppln toUl the Advocate yesterday. Mr Coppin said that he has been authorised by tha Oovffcrnitm Ht.lv .( the School to supervise the erection o( the Tvall mules, 'The Governing Body IK not and the like entered the aware that any Order exist* j rosehool premises from iht fide and hlblting tha erection of a wall on roamed about &\ will. Mr. Coppin -'* property. At no point i i >itd Tha iniponridiiis of these considered that this wall will ofTct %  ininals nM triad, but this w.s obstruction to flood water." to be useless. Barbed-win______^_ (ten put up but iwo of are earned away. The Governing Body were ac%  dviaed that a wall conI such i> manner that it Ci nl I nut hv ininui.ited by flood 1 tlvslj than ( nv %  IhSl ha.| t>e,-n (ii.w.iu.l, adoplil invited and the successful tender Mr. A. li YES!! THEYRL HERE GERMAN /jaj CAMERAS H.E. U ill Addn m Civil Service ASS'II Lady Savage Present* Prizes Hivehicle lie said that when a person aTIT'" ,. ifives one of these touts mohey to Pu "'" art *' r he ha <* been enticed do so. i rge of the vehicle that f nd threatened a nd befuddled by Mr. rerson, instead of assisting the beer given him by the police. Solldl Police. Is encouraging lawlessness Statements Admissible Chief Justice and and this increases the work of th<* After the Chief Justice ruled Grenada and otherPolice who are trying to rid that the statements were adBrtdgetown of touts. missiblc, Mr. Barrow cross-ex One motorist Miid that he once amimvi the witnesses closely and %  avi i tout consent to sit in his brought out discrepancies, partly car and take charge of it. He „„ me htreI11(lh ot which luheld 25! !gth *.**g^*-g^..*^"Jg that Puttin should be acquitted. Mr. Barrow argued th.it then would only be evidence in care of an admission that he. Puttin, wrote the letters, but nothing as to his having sent them. The writing of them alone would not entitle them to convict him. Another strong point of Mi heavy obstacle charged into it Flood water pressures have been The Schools' Mu.s-u-.-V.,, ,1 M.dis^ igih.lde.of the wrtl. Of 1951 came lo a gaorlCNM n d Th( ,,,„„.,„., ,,., w ^^^ Graham thankej thyesterday when some -iUO that unlike park walla of tba> past, Gcneial and the Acting fjhU^faQ staK*^a tWO-hoUT lU '. it would be impossible loi concert at Ihe Combennera '.'"' •**" -' %  taw W ibi WJ|I THE Governor Sir Alfred S-ivW "111 address memi>ei<>l the Ilarbados Civil Service Awociation at their Annual General Meeting which takes place at fr*runiti. %  -.... Harrison t'nlleKe this .(lienv-tii *52S?,>J? aM con : m '"' on *d to at i SO o'clock The Auditors' Report for the 1 he Governing, body have been year 1950-91 will be consider.-! I Hat In case of serious nfter which the Asso-iation will flood waters, only a panel ... ihiolcet oaneetl for th* current year ill at most, could collapse It a I'll \ct—Double Lens S.S, takg u] WlKt.IN — i : %  .{> %  nbla View i'ox Camera Only %  L b id that West Indian %  lonies, he ncsttead thai Ihe Bar School Hall. ,ud Bench in Barbados were referred to with great respect. It was tin in collapse, A alii %  i to il QM tecood biaaniaJ g| '""' U > ;uarantee has been a "d the equ Ing Bcagy la •CAN. CONSTRUCTOR LOADS SUGAR The C.NS Canadian Bsjh fttrurtor. 3.93d ton* net is hero hmding about 1,600 tons 01 W|U 'alMlt of SOU puB. n l ai wi pail ('.,. ,,I ( .,I, i %  > -,i Ul uphold Hie traditinn i of such a place. %  how was over he discovered tha' the tout, as well as two of his car wheels had disappeared. T NI INNTAI. GENERAL MEETING of the Barbados Friendly Football Association wag held at the Fortress Club on Wednesday when Mr. C. E. Jemmolt Wag nppointel President. The Financial Report Bnd that i r ;li. Beentary were read ana adopted. The Association approved of a teom from the B.F.F.A. entering the Knock Out Competition of the B.A.F.A. On Thursday the B.F.F.A. season will begin Mr Jemmolt was als.i elected to represent the H.FF.A. on the general body of the B.A.F.A. Members of th.' Association spoke highly of the kindnesses rendered by Carlton. Shell nnd Empire for the use of their grounds and Fortress, for Ihe use of the Club house. Other appointment* were as follows: L, Slocombe. Vice-Presi IJ.ifc )>viiii 414 .ill th;il Iho mrnarr, w "< ,P"' It tollowpd I Police Dogs Are Taught Tracking Peirgv and Rip. the Police dogs. %  n u pn ml baini tuunht tim-k M of them gM\e an excel•liouls' mu^t>festival. th4 first of whicl: was successfully lf any of it^ stages sia-i^; in 1949. -i of the constnwtlon ol The Gnvernor Sir Alfnd 8 "' %  < %  >" CSet ol I age. ajid Lady Savage attended imntel> 13,000 In view of normal the function. 1. sH i> nocma] wall conthe presentation of prizes and atruetion this is a very reasonable certiticates to the Winners of thfigure lo achieve, the purpose Jao be noted P*' rt ,i ihai tin,v:iii rung parallel with Iha> paatathaMtai arrivad hew as eot and doea not oofieaa II Thtaradaj avanins She b as* port earl; pecle.1 to lei week leg i agents are Mc*sr AuKtln ft CO Ltd Met local rdlner Barrow's lo Birch were not sufficient to overcome his free and voluntary un *i ,l am t S 5 TZ r> actions, not sufficient therefore. Th'.v "• being trained a for the law. over 9l One of the witnesses for the prosecution, Mr. Barrow told the Jury, was Toppin, who was supposed to hove been listed by Puttin to pick up the money. He, however, admitted that a Superintendent of Police had told him that things would have been made easy for him If he gave evidence against Puttin ipatlUon piesenlation she wa;" .wlh %  Iniii.uei The faath al tun ago with over 5.1HH) pupil? being trained at Wind87 Elementary Khaolf and k-Ul Peter, by Dr. SumnerSecondary schools cntermK Moore and have already passed competition. After an ehc obedience tests. process, Ihe winners gavI Colonel It T Michelin, Comto round off the festival. missioner of Police, visited Windover yesterday morning. On his Perhaps, some or the Thildir return to the Central Police '•'! hav ' lh opportunity of hear Station he told Ihe Advetate thai "18 'heir voices as their audiem he wi< very pleased with their hwd it yesterday A re progress. He said that they taken around the streets of strld lakinfl in' which the Oovernlni Biti praaented -The construction n;,. until lha necessary deed" i estiu*: U a property („ ,(.,. Qoverrnta| .i u u ""' ,v h d ,Hn n '""U'l-KNi Toe I Lark from the canal lo permit of any futur> cx%  (WVatopnianl in dealing wall flood water* ui this area. instrument w. being concert was taking ,hile th beautlli streets As the trial began yesterday. Spelghlstown that they may beNothing was lacking HI amlicn. Mr Reeee continued his address r(imr accustomed to traffic and Parents, friends, and official to the Jury. He said tljat the case people pocked the hall while the galler dent, JT. Archer. Treasurer. Mr. Barrow had quoted, holding Constables Maitland and Brothcould have provided space for onl C It Scott Secretary, C. E. that mere admission of the writing waitc, who are in charge of the a few more. Reecc Assistant Secretary and 0 f a threatening letter was not dogs, are called Dog Masters. The two trustees, Messrs. J T. enough for a conviction, did not Commissioner said that both Conapply In the case before them, "tables are showing great keenIn that case admission the evidence, but in the pultin there was more evident c Menaces Plantations Ltd. Appointed Agent* Canadiui! Stock Brokers KMI.III S VWW.' %  -.*-',ii*-v.-.',LIMITEB GEORGE PAYNES is GOOD COCOA lOtf* ,/#/"" Archer and T*. Estwkk. A FIRE at Church Village. St. Philip, on Thursday burnt 500 hole* of first crop ripe canes, belonging to H. B. Gr> Accompaniment the this new department of Police work. "It Is hoped that within a few months the dogs will be available for use in the detection of crime". He said .that the person who Coionel Michelin said. in Ihe i DTOporty of **MII -inrn"Alieyne. threw placed the letter In the envelope nu.-irters of an acre of second was guilty of uttering A threat Srop rip*". U" 16 properly of Hilton [ 0 a man's children would conFrancis. 50 holes of tnlrd ., c r? p atilute menaces since a man was ripe, the propfrty of Aletw; necetMr | !y l0U chy on that score Hinds and 100 holes of second J( wM evldtnt Irom the fact5 M he argued, th.t Puttin was a young Joyce lioaeky. None canes were Insured. The rldav of the cycle was slightly lne inspecto injured. Remanded On Larceny Charge Mr Hugh V Shaw of Gmrdnri ( panj Ltd.. Toronta Cana 'a. arrived in Barbailos last Sal%  inlay and was met by M. Ceo P. Wall, a director of the coml>."'.v. who has been in Barbados <'ime. Thev are staying Ihe Windsor Hotel. Mr Shaw. In an Interview with the Advocate. nU thai i Ihe bland. The Police Band ui leadership of Captain C. E. Raiso eccasioni'lly accompanied Ih choral groups while a pnrt of tl iob Hudson on Ihe pianoforte. The programme was begun a,t e present ot Urao-ClnckUilll llP..II.-.. II.Kl „„„ ,•;,„.„„„, ,„ .(„,,,„ irndrrint Enc Coalo. Mairli ol .,cunflo. he uul. v. I bihi tho Youth of Ihe Empire'. i that although .DM 0UH .^ „ -.. Canadian Invcatmoot llrma wcr Tim was followed by Martin Known In Barbado. alcaady Ihi HIS WORSHIP Mr H. A. Shaw's "SOIIB ot Hie Mume M....„.,,;, ,..,„,„, 1 ^ K .|„|„„ bM W n man with th. mind ot a matter Talma, Police Magistrate ol Diner." which . rhnvn aa DM the Uanadlan Company and Vim criminal. He was making sure the trlct "A" yesterday remanded Festival song and leiidci..! I M i tions Mil would provide B K'YCXK M 144M was extencrop would come on and at Ihe without bail George Downes, a powerful and sweet soumliiig anolhn gourca ol Inforn it] sivcly damogeil when an game time securing himself by labourer of Thomas Gap. until voice* selected from the v. It . I; accident occurred al Kew Gap. sending Toppin for the parcel. April II when he was charged by . 111.-..,, n, i nde.lei in ul St Muliael %csleidav evening The circumstantial evidence, he thePolice with the larceny of The progranimc iiicliuied live lypag of aacurluaa uit'iiuida New Also involved was bun owned held, was damning. What he said cloth valued at 1.1. St. 7d.. the choral groups, five vocal sol. ...i y. k ,, |.. m ,toi, and t...,.. i, bv the Leeward 'Bus Company. 1O injpector Franklyn, admitting ? ro JP'"* "' "ohomed Kola on „„,. pianoforte solo, all of wl.i.-h I „,, |„,j. "" the Inspector to be a master after "H?.',"' TW A .K„ -I.. ..,.. dre hearty applause f. tlH vldUM up-to-date rei-irt u n aiiccT 0 TH,-SOAY nigh, an J JJ-Jwjitrng -^jajj, £ > *£*g& "--' S -Z'SlVZ P-*? viction. B^ide. he h.d spoken gAj^fijftg SSSS'SS^SS'S% ^"SISS given the (lass of beer. to her with a brown parcel which Only Will Thine Evesnog ( „ ul Did the, think that,Pln -ld he p,.c Into^bo,^ He then B Jj^TaK, ^>!"!" ;?' % %  ;_;; ,. 'dent occurred al Boarded are M SnJgrs Clyde Jnekman of Carrington'sVillsRe. St Michael, and Blentnan. who aide his bicycle. Blenman slightly iniured. ktanding beanar *' ,no money Wlth Toppin. a took M Taitt of Combermere School. Mr Shaw 'aid thai his com> considerIhe past 2C George Downes in his defence College and the spiritual "go fgrfJ^.^SM! 1 .?J*J"* *2*Jf Id that on April 6 he never Down Moses" rcndeied by ity JJ*^f^JSJ !" :*\^^1^2; o. n,,,..-• suswui to client* nnd that they were and the fish also aud lift Shaw'<. %  Cargoes' sung by (juo*n':i was young man he scarcely kne Thnt In itself, he said, put add T mil taanna. lh LlSit f Toppin ,1 b in,t a "*" t^ok a" parcel from Mohomed Street Boys' School Ifc ELECTORS AHSOCIAeompllce KoU A £, ut Jtome Ijm( in ,,„, TION haU a POUttoal imalmB Summing l.p morninK he saw Thorne celling at One of the i.ri/ in the St. Simons district of K. Summing up the case, the Chief Hopes Alley and asked her lo year-old Wimton Drain wuitc. n >' Andrew in support of their canj us tic sanl that the case which Keep some fish which he was dldate Mr. J A. Hsynes. Defence Counsel had cited to carrying. Mr. F. V. Rock acted as piove t hnt merely admitting that When he had returned to chairman and the large crowd one wro i,> .. threatening letter did Thorne he saw Kola with Iwo who attended were entertained to nol rne.,n tliat that person sent it, parcels on his bicycle. One of the Steel Band music. did not bear on the c*se then beparcels dropped off the bicycle _. fore them and a man picked up the parcel T HE ST SAVIOl R'S Church The on j y evidcnc against the and ran away. Later he was told I .ads Brigade gave a Concert defendant in the case which the at the C.I D thnt he would be at the Bclleplaine Playing Field jx-fencc Counsel had c*d was the charged in connection with the Wednesday night. A play. aUlemtnl that he had written the parcel "Old King Cole", interesting item gramme. was the most on the proletter. In the case before them „ Al hi 8l f? e p wn '" kcd b > there was more evidence Mr Talma if he had an> witness,.. Thev knew from the evidence of he wou d like to atUjnM that he %  horn h d wtnesses but they *>•" they now uf being no less ii''. ii %  uiie measure In the BrlUah West In.i.i : forte Solo lie ,oce,yd Inprye w p|.„„„| |r. from the hands of Lady S..v.g. „„.,., |k >. „ amidst the loud cheers Horn Ih. „„,, nTOllor „ poMU,' audience who wenairoiasM and Mr shn ,^ ,,,„„, „,„ ,,„ lhl yet surprised to know that a buy || r t ,i m ,. t „„, rt -rde to pay Petition Granted % !" *-u^£F:f?S$Z S>g£ Hpfig ,n the Court of Common Pie,, .'^ wn , SbJSSEmZ ^^t &J£k ffiffg is Honour Mr 0, L Toylor ^*3 , 1 d '' * %  faull >"rakes. This %  anted a petition onbehalf ol ^f 1 '^ oflen cf '* \**>' ,0^1ou, •?"."* from I |i d a petition VIImu . _,•,•>.#• the Company of Plantations Ltd. """ %  %  , i^ople niust be protected that the alteration of the Com„ "' ton^Kiiions reckless drivers ram's objects proposed to be Defence Counsel. Mr. Barrow. This case wag brought by the effected be confirmed by Ihe was saying that the threats and Police as a result of an accident Court pursuant lo sec. II of the menace, were nol of such as to between the motor bus M-727 and Companies Act 1910. induce Birch to part with any of the motor car A-113. After the Mr. j. S B. Dear instrucfd his property. Ha was holding that accident the brakes of the motor bv Cottle Catford & Co.. appeared the menaces would have to be car A-113 were tested and it for the Company. such as would make Bn with something. But that Wills Admitted the law. There would never be any convictions, in that case, unless a threatened peBK>n yielded. Thar, irr )vir. had heard the h part found that they were nol working fas not properly. The front fender which In the Court of Ordinary yesterday His Honour the Acting Chief Judge Mr G. L. Taylor granted the petition of Louise Malvina Gamble of River. St Philip. Widow, to the estate of her husband Joseph Eiekiel Oamble. deceased. H L. Ward Instructed by Mr. D. Lee Sarjeant appeared for the petitioner. The wills to the following person* were admitted to probate: — I Dig Collymore. St. Michael; Elizabeth Acourt Cr.w %  lord, St. Philip. as damaged could nol prevent the brakes from working properly said th* Transport Inspector. ,,„ .., Another case of driving without nature '.f Ike threat.. threaU U, l !" !"!" !?!?**: !"!" \J* mt X nirrh hl-m-lf and his rhlldrrn. £ nm > h ***" "Uoumen ..J %  • aaataa — ah.— ._ <..u. .'.,H.. IICOURT FOR DIVORCE and It KM 'or them, to deride wbrlher a normal man would %  ay any attention to them. If they felt that Blrrh was a man who woil. treat toeh threats aa [„ t he Court for Divorce and a mailer for laughter, then Matrimonial Causes the Acting Puttin would not be guilty. chief Judge Mr. C. L. Taylor Defence Counsel had ariued pronounced decree absolute In the that Puttin did not know Blrrh uit of N S Sainsbury. petitioner, nar Blrrh Pultin and Pultin and E A Sainsbury, respondent would therefore have no reason Mr J S H Dear instructed far wrlllni to him. Bat one by Mr. E. D. Rogers of the firm of rould write anch a threatening <"", u w Clarke Ac Co appeared a> On Page S. lor the petitioner. BRUSH.'. KILLS PAIN J .:.' %  %  i.""it,i'f'i Jt,-*>V'.'V'*V>''>V'V*VV>V'.'.*.V^ I • %  • % %  •Ii I in' rills !> — AT — WEATHERHEADS Mui-klevs Cough Mixture Buckleys White Rub Palmers Soap P.ilrmiOintment Palmers Btaach Cream Palmer* Hair Sucre"* Ftrrozone Tablets Hamllloiis Pills Caterrhzone Ncivclene Ulack Mauie Choc (3 sixes) Pu>c.iirs Marshninllows 1 lb. tin Pascall's Marsbinallows ' lb pk Pascall-s Orchid Fruits Pascall'< Mixed Fruit Drops PasenP's Glucose Barley Sugar lb. Paacull'. Glucose Barley Sugar I lb. Royal Scotch Shortbread Jacob. Cream Crackers Ivory Soap C.iin.iy Sii.i|> Torch Batteries Irradol A. Fjthymol Tooth Paste Ellinians Embrocallon "My Sin" Perfume Scandal I*erfume" I land box Shampoo Calniasminc (For A'thma) BRUCE WEATIIEKIIEAI) LIMITED Street FINE — PURESOLUBLE. HARRISON'S BROAD ST. 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