Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
— DHavbado

ee

ESTABLISHED 1895



Satisfactory Sugar
Agreement Expected

22% s i et.
Observers Believe
By SYDNEY GAMPELL
LONDON, March 22.
A BOARD OF TRADE spokesman said today that Britain's
talks with Cuba on sugar and other trade matters are

still continuing “when questioned about a rumour that they
had broken down.”
Nevertheless leading unofficial sugar experts believed thai
the negotiations were more or less in abeyance. They
doubted whether there would be bilateral Cuban sugar
agreements on the lines so far mooted with either Britain

Secale expected a much — . r bh, He .
U.K. Will Give
Undertaking

looser arrangement far more satis-
Bi-lateral trade discussions are

factory to the Commonwealth
taking place between representa-

sugar producers.

to denounce and might last much tives of the United Kingdom and

1. The negotiations had never} Purchases of sugar from Cuba

insuperable obstacles. Britain’s} assure Commonwealth sugar pro

Cuban market it might be difficult] Cuban sugar in 1953 they are will-

too far for Britain to ignore. / Commonwealth Sugar Agreement
Britain has frequently oy

Hitherto they said the British
negotiations in Cuba had tenia-
lively contemplated 500,000 tons
a year for three years. In practice
such an Agreement was not easy
longer Ne mado Cuba. They are taking place at
: Torquay although outside the for-
Experts gave Several reasons | mal scope of talks under the gen-
for their belief that this idea is eral agreement on tariffs and
out. trade.
been so definite as was commonly | by the United Kingdom during the
supposed. Quite apart from the; years 1951-1953, inclusive, are
protests from the Commonwealth | part of the subject matter of these
sugar producing countries, Britain] discussions.
and Cuba themseives might find Nevertheless, in order to re-
idea in a bilateral agreemeni| ducers, H.M. Government an-
would be to obtain reciprocal] nounce that if an agreement is
advantages for her own exports tof made with Cuba which includes
Cuba, With the United States,en undertaking on the part of
goods so deeply entrenched in the} H.M. Government to purchase
for Cuba to grant as much recipro-| ing to give an undertaking to find
city as Britain would expect. ir, that year a market for export-
2. Even supposing that the) able surplus of sugar for Common-
Commonwealth protest arose from} wealth countries concerned up to
a misunderstanding, they had gone} the full limit laid down in the
3. A bilateral agreement with| They will be very ready to dis-
Cuba would cut across the de-| cuss with representatives of Com-
clared sugar policy of the British! mcnwealth producers the most
Government itself. acceptable method of giving effect
Assurance to this undertaking,
her policy of leaving a part of her
market competitively open to
dollar and other raw sugars for the
sake of Britain’s important re-
export trade in refined sugar and



Deputies Cancel
16th Meeting |

‘

to preserve the International PARIS, March 22
ae Agreement on 2 multilateral! Four power Foreign Ministers'|

Deputies cancelled their sixteenth)
meeting called for to-day and
arranged to meet in private ses-
sion at 3 p.m, to-morrow.
Three western deputies were!
meeting at the Freuch Foreign
Ministry tonight to co-ordinate
their tactics, Decision not to meet
to-day was taken in “informal
discussion” after luncheon for the]
four deputies held at the British
Embassy aimed at breaking the
deadlock. Ernest Davies British
deputy was host. |
—Reutey,

NO HALF MEASURES

TOKYO, March 22.
The South Korean Minister in
Tokyo, Kim Joo, today urged the |
United Nations to allow their}
troops in Korea to drive to the
Manchurian border. |
He appealed to them not to stop
at the 38th parallel because Korea ,
“cannot live half free’’.—Reuter.

French Troops, Police
Ordered To Stand By |
In Strike-Bound Paris |

The Commonwealth sugar pref-
erence is designed to give Com-
monwealth sugar producers -some-
thing more than a_ co titive
world price over a period though
it does not do so at present.

But experts could not see how a
bilateral preferential agreement
‘with Cuba could be reconciled
with the principal of multilateral
competition. They expected that
the outcome of the negotiations
with Cuba would refer to an as-
surance that part of the British
market would be left open for
Cuban sugar in fair competition
with other suppliers.—Reuter.





UNEMPLOYMENT IN U.K.

LONDON, March 22.
Britain aims at not allowing un-
employment in Britain to rise
above three per cent at the season-
al peak, the House of Commons
was. told today,.—Reuter,



PARIS, March 22.

The Government to-day cancelled all Easter leave for}
police and troops to ensure public order during the railway |
strike.

All soldiers on leave will be ordered to report to their
nearest military garrison. The last time such order was.
made was during the nationwide strike of 1948.

ee Seren Hundreds of thousands of French {
workers, striking for higher}
wages, have turned Paris, tradi-}
tional Easter playground for for-|
eign tourists, into Europe's gloom- |
jest capital.

PERSIANS BEGIN NEW
YEAR CELEBRATIONS

TEHERAN, March 22.

The Persian oil and financial} A_ skeleton train’ service
crisis receded to-day as people ap~ buses, few underground and no
parently little affected by Tues-, suburban trains, little gas, and
day’s martial law proclamation, threats of light and power cuts,
began their six-day New Year contributed to give Parisians their

celebrations. rs ‘dullest Easter since the war.
Rumours that assassinations of
A general

Government leaders in Azerbaia- railway strike was}
jan, northern province bordering called for to-day and to-morrow }
Russia had followed the shooting by Communist and non-Commun-!
of Prime Minister, General Raz- ist Unions after they had failed to’
mara, and former Minister of agree with Premier Henri
Education, Dr. Zanganeh, are now Queuille yesterday on immediate
known to be untrue.—Reuter. , wage increase.

The Unions refused to grant the
government's request to hold
UNWORTHY their strike crder until the Com-

jmission for Revision of Salaries
HONGKONG March 22. met to-day and published its re-

An authoritative American port tomorrow.
source in Hongkong declared to- Government replied
day that he did not think Com- following measures:



no;



with the

| Wall Builders
Under Arrest

Fourteen Die

MILAN, March 22,

An Italian Public prosecutor to-
day ordered the arrest of four men
concerned with building the play -
ground wall which collapsed here
tyesterday morning, killing 14
school girls.

Arrest warrants were issued for
the architect of the wall, its con-
structing engineer and two work-
men engaged in building it last
January.

Tons of debris buried about 40
girls between five and 13 years
old Many are sti!! lying grave-
ly injured in hospital.

The fatal casualty list rose to
14 to-day with the death in hos-
pital of a nine-year-old girl.

The girls at a Convent school,
were sheltering under the wall as
a high wind swept the city, when
it crashed down on them. Work-
ers belonging to Communist and
non-Comrmunist trade umions to-
day united in calling a five minutes
stoppage of work in Milan as a



Poison: Arrested

NUREMBERG, March 22.

Peter Martin Bleibtreu, a 29-
year-old journalist who claimed
that he had given Herman Goer-
ing the poison with which he com-
mitted suicide, was arrested in
Nuremberg yesterday DPA, East
German News Agency reported
to-day.

Bleibtreu, an Austrian, had
come from Switzerland and in-
tended to stay in Nuremberg only
a few days. But policemen recog-
nised and arrested him,

Last’ October, West German
magistrate Quick said Bleibtreu
had confessed on oath to slipping
Herman Goering, a poison phial
with which he committed suicide

jin Nuremberg gaol.—Reuter,

—



Democracy at Work

NEW ORLEANS, March 22,
A Jewish judge here dismissed
a suit brought by Protestants for
the removal of ‘the statue of a

Roman Catholic saint, Mother
Cabrini from a public square,
The Judge L. J. Yarrut giv-

ing his decision said: “When there
is a legal contest prosecuted by
some of the Protestant faith to
remove a public statue dedicated
to one of Catholic Faith trie@ in
a court of law presided over by
a Judge of Jewish Faith, we may
well know that Democracy is
still hard at work.”’—Reuter.

DEATH SENTENCE

WASHINGTON, March 22.

Oscar Collazo, “Puerto Rican
Nationalist, will be sentenced to
death on April 6, for his part in
the shooting in front of President
Truman’s Blair House residence
last November,

District Judge -Goldsborough
to-day dismissed a plea for a new
trial. —Reuter.

NOT ACCEPTED

PARIS, March 22.
Vice Premier Rene Pleven told
the French National Assembly to-
night that the Government had in-
formed the United States that
they could not accept the principle
of the Mediterranean defence
under the Atlantic Pact being
divided into two parts and that
they would not consider them-
selves tied by any agreement at
which they were not represented.

—Reuter.







29 KILLED IN CRASH

BOGOTA, March 22.
Twenty-nine people were killed
when a Colombian DC3 Dakota
transport crashed in northern
Colombia on Wednesday, civil
aviation authorities reported —(CP)



BOMBS EXPLODED

UDINE, Italy, March 22.

A small bomb exploded outside
the building housing the local
offices of two Italian non-Com-
munist Socialist parties—the Unit-
tary (P S U) and the workers
(PSL) parties.

Police said damage was “insig-
nificant” .—Reuter.



| Truman Ends Holiday
KEY WEST Florida Mareh, 22.

'
sign of mourning.—Reuter,
Slipped Goering



F Y, MARCH 23, 1951
NG WIT A PURPOSE

te ,
'



TRAIN









FLIPPY, a porpoise which is b
Florida, in an effort to determi:
three feet out of the water through
from Mr, Frohn, his trainer,
retrieves balls and does back

trained by Marine Studios in

hi# species’ intelligence, jumps
a hoop on a word of command
Flippy also rings a bell at dinner time,
flips.—-Express

FRENCH APPROVE NEW’
ELECTORAL SYSTEM

PARIS, March 22.

_ The French National Assembly, after a stormy all-
night session, to-day approved the new voting system
whereby any party getting 50 per cent of the votes in a de-
partment, gets all the seats there.

The number of seats in departments varies from two
to 11. Under the new voting system, opposition parties
getting 49 per cent of the votes are counted as theoretically
to be without a single seat in Parliament, 5

The debate on the reform bill is to be continued late
to-night.



U.K. Lift Ban On
German Barges

’ BERLIN, March, 22.
British authorities announced
te-day that they had removed re-
swictions on East German barges
held up in West Berlin locks,

After an exchange of letters be-
tween Major General G. K.
Bourne, British Commandant in
Berlin and Sergei A. Dengin, Ber-
lin representative of the Soviet
Control Commission, immediate
difficulties on the waterways have
been overcome”, a statement said.

Beona rule under the new
systém, fs that if no party gets
St p8F Cent, then seats are allo-
cated as at present.

But as none of the Government
parties has any chance of getting
50 per cent on its own in any de-
partment, the “alliance” rule—a
new feature of the system—has
been brought in

The “alliance” rule enables a
group of parties, after votes have
been counted, to add them. to-
gether for purposes of obtaining
50 percent of the votes needed to
get all the seats. Only a declara-
tion to the voting authorities is
needed to constitute an alliance,
Thus, for example four “allied”





parties, getting each 13% of the

—Reuter. votes, may obtain all the seats,

while a fifth party, that avt the

remaining 48 percent of the votes

. = would be unrepresented in the
Protest Anti U.S. new Parliament.—Reuter,

is *
Demonstrations —

FRANKFURT, March 22,

°
Major - General, George P Inquire Into
Hays, Deputy American High v9
Commissioner protested to Th
Russian authorities today over a ree at 8

Anti-American demonstrations by
East Germans against passengers|
on an American military train to
Berlin.



(From Our



Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, March 22,



In a letter delivered today to|.,4 Coroner's inquiry — started
the Deputy Chairman of the So-|4S morning into the cireum-
viet Control Commission General|*t@0ces surrounding the deaths
Hays said: “During the period of two men and one woman whe
March 1, to March 14, 1951, there} Were killed as a result of the
ave been instances in which «| ‘tke in St. David's Magistrate
military train of the American|Cou't. His Worship Mr. E, A,
occupation forces, passing through| eyligger presided,

Soviet occupied territory to or 7
from Berlin. was futoatel to as wets John Radix District
tacks by German Nationals re-|M¢dical Officer who’ performed

the post mortem and Cecil Gun-
Munro Resident Medical Officer
of the Colony Hospital gave ew
dence before the sine die adjourn-

siding in the Soviet zone,

“At 10 p.m. on Mareh 1, 1951,
a United States passenger train
number 610, during a scheduled

: , , ment, Station Sergeant Chamber-
oe es em ois oon lain Joseph conducted the ex-
proached by a group o er! aminations. Holbourne Radix
man children and 2 German

Barrister-at-Law appeared in the

Adults, - singing Anti-American]; Th is. erathn hes
songs, and throwing propaganda rate, @ the relatives of the

leaflets aboard the train.



Hon'ble Mitra Sinanan Trini-

—Reuter. dad Barrister watched the pro-

: fa ee eariier in the day

, s e $6 with Manual and
Exemption Bill Mental Workers’ Union Execu-

|jtives in the capital. This morn-
ing Mr. E, Baritrop accompanied
by Labour Officer Dabreo went
On a tour of the estates in the
country observing the conditions.

Passed In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN March 22.
The Legislative Council passed
a bill promoting the establish-|_ This morning the Chamber of
ment and development of certainjCommerce, Agricultura] Associa-
industries by permitting certain|tion, Tourist Board and Em-
items of equipment to be import-|ployers' Society held another
ed free of customs import duties|meeting but they did not disclose

and taxes, a reply to Mr. Barltrop’s formula
Exemptions will be granted to|concerning the re-instatement of

machinery and appliances,| workers,

launches, docks, barges and Appreciation of the services of

building materials for the erec-|Colonel Donald was expressed at

1
7

$e

New Zealand

Will Not Yield
To Dockers

WELLINGTON, March 22,

Prime Minister Sidney Holland
in a nationwide broadcast to-day
said the New Zealand Government
would not capitulate to dockers,
on strike for more than a month
for wage increases and changes
in working conditions.

The Prime Minister said dock-
ers had lost £485,000 in wages in

the last two years. through the
stoppage
The present month-old strike

had cost them £300,000,
“The Government is not going tc

shrink from its plan of duty” he
declared
“It has taken up the Commu

nists’ challenge and we are going
to stick it out until Demovracy
succeeds” Holland said.

In this battle with Communism,
there will be no retreat, no ap-
peasement nor surrender.”

He believed an overwhelming
majority of dockers were as fed
up with stoppages as the public.

Most of them would like to get
back to work.

“Outside your own ranks and «
few extremists in other indus-
tries,” he told dockers, “you have
scarcely a friend in New Zealand
to-day.”

—Reuter.



Police Seize Radio
Transmitters

BRUSSELS, Mareh 22.
Belgian police, after a_ series
of raids last night, confiscated
three clandestine radio transmit-
ters in Limbourg province.

One of the stations instalied in
a farmhouse, was in full opera-
tion when police arrived,

The operator caimly told his
Mtsteners: “If am sorry, but IT must
sign off now, The Police are
here,”

—Reuter.

French’ Deputy
_Slaps Another

PARIS, March 22,

French National Assembly offi-
cials rushed in to stop a fight when
one Deputy slapped another De-
puty during a debate early to-
day. After arguments over elec-
toral reform, Mohamed Ben Taib,
Moslem Deputy tor Algeria, grab-
bed another Algerian member
Francois Quilici by the coat and
slapped him so hard that he stag-
gered,



The Assembly will consider the
proposal by its bureau that Taib,
member of the Popular Republi-
can Party should be censured and
have his salary cut by half for the
month,

The National Assembly later
to-day accepted an apology. irom
Mohamed Ben Taib,—Reuter,



q
U.S. Announce New
yy , ; .
Irade Policy
WASHINGTON, March 22,

The United States Commerce
Department to-day announced ;
new trade policy under which i
reserved the right to limit ex-
ports to “normal requirements’
for all importing countries,

The policy, already in effect for
such destinations as Hong Kong
and Macao, is now being extended
by the Office for Internationa]
Trade “for such commodities and
such other destinations as
be necessary to protect domestic
upply and national security.”

—Keuter



MR. ATTLEE HAS
DUODENAL ULCER

LONDON, March, 22

Prime Minister, Clement Attlee

is suffering from duodenal ulcer

aha will require medical attention

in hospital for two or three weeks

it was officially announced here

to-day. —Reuter.



15 “PICTURE BRIDES”
TOKYO, March 22.

Fifteen Japanese girls sailed for |

Argentina to-day to marry men}
they have never seen.
The 15 “picture brides”, so call-



ed because their

marriages have

Reds Prepar
Last Ditch



PRICE: FIVE CENTS



BOUT €,000 Communist troops were reported
today dug in ready to stand and fight along
the mountainous defence line virtually straddling
the 38th parallel in Central Korea. They had fallen
back from Chunchon, the last major Communist
base seven to eight miles below the parallel.
These reports followed frontline despatches that
an American tank column had yesterday advanced
to within four miles of the parallel after crossing
the Soyang River, north of Chunchon. The column
withdrew later to the south of the river.

Shaw’s Will Is
Complicated

LONDON, March 22,

It was officially announced to
day that the will of the late
Bernard Shaw left a gross estate
of £267,233 and is the most com
plicated will of the century

The literary genius, drew up a
most extraordinary 14—page docu
ment, which only a lawyer could
understand

One of the main points, was
the establishment of a 40-letter
alphabet instead of the present 26
When this and other bequeaths
had been met the remainder was
to be divided inte three One
third would) be for the British
Museum, another for the British
National Gallery, and a third to

the Royal Academy of Dramatic
Art.
Shaw’s whole estate was

£301,586, but out of it £180,571
was to go to the British Govern
ment in death duties. The Public
Trustee—a state official respon
sible for handling funds in trust
was appointed by Shaw as his
sole executor.

£500 For Secretary

last November were these:

1, Money from the copyrights
performing rights, filing rights,
television rights of his works to
be regarded as
estate,

2. All diaries,
and other

income of his
account books

documents of similar

American jet planes in massed
flights over ‘the area to-day
atlacked bridges leading towards
Hwachon, key read junction for
retreating Communists, eight miles
north of the parallel United
Nations air strikes were intended
to trap Communists below the
parallel and force them to fight.
Yesterday's two-pronged advance
northeast and northwest of
Chunchon was the closest any
American unit had got to the par-
allel since they fell back before
the big northern counter offensive

in December, The northwest
ern drive actually was the far-
thest north but returned after
a skirmish with a Communist
platoon Each prong’ brought

back one Communist prisoner.
New Chinese concentrations

were observed to-day northwest
~ Chunchon United Nations
warplanes sent up to disperse

them scattered one party of 500

who were accompanied by horses.

Extending

Northeast of Seoul Communist
Wwoops were reported to be man-
ning freshly dug entrenchments
extending from a point about 20
miles northeast of the capital to
the 38th parallel.

Southeast of Chunchon Ameri-
were still meeting stubborn
I ance to their advance east
of Hangye where Communists are
in on hill crests and





closing
ridges.
Small Communist “blocking”
forces most of them believed to
be members of the North Korean
47th Division continued to stab
at United Nations patrols north
and northwest of Seoul, Larger
Communist groups moved south

kind to be offered to the British }'9 eceupy bill positions northwest

Library, of Political Science.

3. ‘Letters and documents
worth preserving in a public col-
lection, to the British Museum.

4. His trustee to take all steps
fo preserve his copyrights in the
United States
siderable value,’

5. Mrs. Stella Mervyn Beech,
the famous

Campbell,
to print
between

“which are of con

actress
to be
publish
and

daughter of
Mrs. Patrick
authorised
letters
mother,
G6. An annuity of £500 to his
secretary Miss Blanche Pattch
who worked for him for 30 years
Among several bequests to em-
ployees, he left a year’s wages to
every one of seven years’ service,
and still with him
and small
servants,

and

Shaw her

at his death,

annuities to retired

—Reuter,

of the Chungjyong: Reservoir.
Reuter.

RESTRICT REDS

WASHINGTON, March 22.
The Staté Department has
advised Congress that entry of
Soviet officials in America would







be restricted whenever It was
evident that such action was in
overall interest of the United
States.
~— Reuter,
TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
DIAL 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



Among provisions made by the
94-year-vld playwright who died



|

|
{

'



munist charges of American spying 1. Individual requisition of _ President Truman left here for|tion of mills, and factories, The|the meeting and his dismissal was] been arranged by an exchange of |
























i i ilway w rs Vashing oda aboard the exemption would be for a period) viewed with dissatisfaction.! photographs, are among 83 Jap-
in China “deserve the dignity of railway workers. eerottn aideedenascar after a not exceeding 10 years and in the} Townsfolk turned out this morn-|anese emigrants who sailed i |
denial.” : ; Suspension of all Easter leave shies ‘weeks! holiday in Florida. ‘case of mining undertakings five}ing to find the streets well chalked! Yokohama in a Dutch ship,
Peking Radio made charges yes- for the army and police force. —Reuter. | years. up. ‘ —Reuter.
terday when reporting that an 3. Private and military lorry | ae
“American directed underground ; services from Paris to all im- } . 66 39
espionage organisation” in Tientsin portant towns within 100 , H d O t d M
had been discovered and 21 spies mile radius. | in eorge an Ss u aun y oney |
of various nationalities arrested. 4. Maintenance at all costs of)
—Reuter. train services to all major, LONDON, March 22 |cipients, King George handed} King Edward the Third began| Queen Elizabeth and Princess
cities in the country such S| jing George Sixth making his|three Tudor-style purses. In the| the custom of distributing “Roval Ma‘geret went with the King to|
Marseilles, Bordeat anc first public appearance since his/ first, a green purse, there was| Maundy”. For hundreds of years| today’s ceremony
SLAVS WANT $30m Lyons ‘recent illness today handed out| money to buy clothes. In the} afterwards 3ritish Kings gave |
Representative Communist and “Maundy money” to three dozen'second was money to buy food | food, money and clothes to as Though 56 men and 56 women}!
BELGRADE, March 22 nen-Communist Unions were ex='s,en and women in Westminster’ And in the third which was white,;; many poor men as they were| were given “Maundy Money | os _ ~ P ” :
Yugoslavia has asked the United pected to form a united front de-! appey Iwo thousand people} specially minted silver pennie years in age only about a third of them could, 24 tg OTe AZ ee ihe ag ‘
States for $30,000,000 worth of in- manding a pay increase of 14 ver cnded the Cathedral to see the| two pences, threepences and four- | receive it in person, Others could | Zs ee Pig ACEO g 6 GOLA A oe
dustrial raw materials, Mr. George cent for all wage earners before )509_yez id ceremony |pences adding up to 56 pence Since 1754 ilver coins hav not come because they had toc
Allen, United States Ambassador ,the Salaries Commission to-da }one for each year of the King’s been specially minted for the! far to travel or because the ere}
here said to-night.—Reuter. Reuter To each of the poor, aged re-' life ceremony ill. —Reuter. ' ° a —_-









TWO

Be eS

avib Calling

From Iste of Man

M* F H MANIFOLD
yse husband is a retired

‘ountant the Isle of Man,
arrived from England yesterday
I e Gascogne for a holiday and
the St. Lawrence

n
in



ing at

Manifold was accompanied



daughter Miss Sonia
M vho is doing Domestic
ence at Penrhos College in
North Wales This is Miss
Talone’s first visit to Barbados.
She is a niece of Rev. W. M.
Malone of Navy Gardens, Christ
Church

Old Harrisoniar
M R. REGINALD HARRIS, an

old Harrisonian who left
Barbados in 1928 and went up to
the U.S.A., returned yesterday
morning by the Fort Amherst on
his first visit since then. He has
come over for three months’ holi-
day which he will spend with his

relatives at Hill Road, Bank
Hall

Mr. Harris who is employed
with the Refrigeration Mainten
ance Co. in the U.S.A. is a
brother of Mr. Oliver Harris of

the General Post Office

Back From Police Course

NSPECTORS G. SPRINGER
- and C. Bourne of the Bar
bados Police Force, returned from
England yesterday morning by
the Gascogne after attending a
six-month course in modern
Police methods at Hendon Col

lege.

M* and MRS AUSTIN

+ WOOD and family arrived

fre lrinidad yesterday by
W.I1.A. spend the Easter
lay here. They are staying

vith the Simpsons at Woodland,

George

Wood is with Hardware

in Port—of-Spain

Fire Officer
RRIVING in Barbados yester-
morning from England
Gascogne was Mr. R.
who has come out on a
contract as fire officer

From Trinidad

to



Liectric

A

y the
4 ¥<

Gay



i

r ig
three-year
]

Mr. Craggs who was District
)flicer in the London Fire
as with the service for
During the war, he was
of Cannon Street Fire

(
Brigade, w
30 year

in charge

Station in the shadow of St,
Paul’s. Later he went to North-
iptonshire to cover all. fires

eccurring in the county and part
of Leicestershire which included
15 air operational aerodromes, a
number of which were American.
He first visited Barbados in 1919
ust before he joined the London



ire Brigade. At that time, he
was Yeoman of Signals in the
Royal Navy on H.M.S. Dart-

mouth,

With Cable & Wireless
ME R. J. CHOULER of Cable
& Wireless, England, arrived
re yesterday’ morning by the
sengne to take up an appoint-
ment as one of the engineers here
and will be stationed at St.)
Lawrence.
Mr. Chouler is relieving Mr.
“Bud” Kerley who will shortly
be going to England on leave.

he





CROSSWORD



Across
1. James Hilton's was fost, (7%)
6. His must be » narrow neck of |
land. (7)
Â¥. Does this ridging plough give an
antiseptic alsu? (6)
Science of atmospheres or Royal
ego? (8) |

Brings war back again, (3)
John Gay's was beggarly. (5)
Horsehair. (4)
Back goes the tide. (3)

ut the Frencb tn the can, (5)

FRANCES HARMAN, g
. n—law of Mr. Haynes
Cc nd her friend Mi
Butler vho are guests at the
Ocean View Hotel, plan to return
to Toronte, Canada on April 4th



1g
4
aa
iy
a Heaveniy retresnment, (5)
23

Coloar of the fortified dungeon.
(3) |
Part of a building you can see to |
pelt. (7)

‘ Down |
1. This is very merry. (9) |
2. Rosie in the basket. (5) |
3. End of a favour.

4. fh er? (4)
5







2 it seems. (9)
7. Thea er could be a lemon, (5)
8 Wise sort of shrub (4)
10 The supporters’ path ? (3)
12. What any ambier may do. (6)
15 A broken pane. (4)
16 That which ts agreed on. (4)



1 from Cape Horn, (3)

One time the curtain {s lowered,
(3)




red by a cartographer, (3) |
pert the filbert.” (3)



6, Rain-gauge; 10,
12 Estrange;
Deem; 19. Oval;
Grenadine, Down:
da: 5, Rite: 4, Baus
Grogram;, 9,
18. Moa,



a
a New Millinery LADIES’ AND CHILDREN'S Wl)

Nylons

me a tm Ft te at et

MEN'S HATS

fine new assortment

Latest Shades

ONLY 2.40

â„¢ Dial 4606

(3) ts
‘rab can provide the con- |

| by popular vote.
Ay's puggle.—Across: | corner may 1
14,; Queen for Beauty Week, to open !



salient aihieiiaeieremaaicaeiiii
BEB SEEHEHRHRERHRB BBB

EVANS & WHITFIELDS



Husband Arriving Monday

ARTIE’S HEADLINE RS, JOSEPH A, KING accom-




- 5 panied by her son Mr
AW - Peter King arrived from Trinidad
= % yesterday by B.W.I.A, Mr. King

who is with Messrs. William Fog-
arty Ltd., in Port-of-Spain is ex-
pected to arrive on Monday, Mr.
King was for many years stationed
at their Branch here, Mrs. King
is staying at the Aquatic Gardens
Guest House.

For Easter Week-end
ISS BETTY GASKIN a nurse
at one of the oil company’s
hospitals jn Caripito, arrived from
Venezuela yesterday via Trinidad
by B.W.LA, Here foy the Easter
week-end she is staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Arriving by the same _ plane
was Mr, Robert Nye an Engineer
of Creole Petroleum Corpn. in
Caripito.

Military Airport Chief
AJ, JULIO CARENO, Mili-

ALue-
“Shot them nothing, Colonel,
I’ve EATEN. them!”



quetia arrived by Avensa
lines Special on Wednesday and
HOWARD his wife arrived a few hours later

Were Staying at Canefield
M* AND MRS
BROWN
their son Howland who had been short holiday, they are staying at

holidaying in Barbados for the Paradise Beach Club.

past two weeks, left yesterday by

B.W.LA. for Puerto Rico.
They are en route to the

Trinidad Businessman
R. AND MRS, HERBERT
where Mr, Brown is a lawyer in WATERMAN and family
New York, During their stay in arrived by B.W.I.A. yesterday
Barbados they were the guests morning to spend a holiday in
of Mr, Charles Merrill owner of Barbados, Mr, Waterman is the
Canefield House, St. Thomas, proprietor of Waterman’s Store |
Mr, Merrill, they told Carib, on Frederick Street, Port-of-
was probably in Miami. He left Spain. They are staying at Fon-|
Barbados a couple of weeks ago. tamara Maxwells. |

Trinidad Medico W.I. Holiday

R. ELTON RICHARDSON,

Eye, Ear and Nose Specialist :
of Port-of-Spain was among the R. AND MRS. FREDERICK
passengers arriving from Trini- P. REYNOLDS, Jnr., are
dad yesterday by B.W.I.A, He is ®t present holidaying in Barba-
here for about five days, staying 40s. From White Plains, New
at Indramer Guest House, Worth- York, where Mr, Reynolds is Vice

US.

ing President of Geyer, Newell and
’ Ganger, an advertising agency.
Here For Ten Days Leaving the U.S. in the middle
R. AND MRS. LEONARD ® January they flew to St.
M y et uy Thomas, where they chartered a
ki PaeeOe. | strived YW TA. 46 ft. schooner and visited all the
a ate Stasi” Sa Pablo Hotei WI. islands with the exception of

St. Martin, St. Barths and Mont-
serrat, They arrived here on Sun-
day from Tobago by B.W.I.A, and
plan to remain here ennpees
sae week, before leaving for Trinidad
From eg ieacO via Tobago. From Trinidad they
M* HAYD uO : *~ will return home via Los Angeles
_ FORD of the firm of A. C. California. They afte staying at
Sniliingiord and Co., General Im- guper Mare Guest House, Worth-
porters and Exporters and Com- ing.
mission Agents of Dominica, ar- Mrs, Reynolds’ father is Gen.
rived yesterday by the Gascogne. w fy Rose now retired from the |
Here tor three weeks’ hoiiday, he U.S. Engineer Corp, while Mr.

Royal. Mr, Taylor is a Director of
Julien and Co., in St, Georges,
They are here for about ten days,

tary Airport Chief at Mai- |
Air- |

accompanied by by B.W.I.A. Special, Here for a }



1 staying at the Savoy, bay Reynolds’ father Gen, F. P. Rey-

street nolds is retired from the U.S.
After 41 Years Medical Corp,

ETURNING home yesterday They have two children, a

i G * 5 : y aduating from
morning by the Fort Amherst daughter now gra
from the U.S.A. was Mr, Jim Prep School and a son at West

Smith who left here 41 years ago. Point. Le
He has conie over to see his rela- .
tives who Ilve in New Orleans. Enjoying Stay
Intransit R, R. J, LIDDIARD who has
NTRANSIT the G . been here since March
on the Sascogne 15th is enjoying his stay in Bar-
yesterday from England to bados, He is at present on a tour
Grenada was Mr, Cosmo St. of the West Indies and will be
Bernard, barrister-at-law who

: ‘ leaving here about March 29th.

qualified at Grays Inn and was Mr, Liddiard

called to the bar in January, of the firm of F. W. Berk and Co..
Retired Merchant Ltd. of London, Heavy Chemical
R. and MRS. G. H. JOHN- manufacturers and exporters of
SON of New York, left yes- fertilisers. He is a guest at the

terday morning by the Gascogne Ocean View Hotel.

for Trinidad where they expect

is a representative

to take another ship for the Accountant

U.S.A. It was their first visit RRIVING from Venezuela on

to the island and they told Carib Wednesday by B.W.LA.

that they spent a very enjoyable Special Flight was Mr. Rupert

four months’ holiday here as Stone, who is an accountant at

guests at the Marine Hotel Schlumbergers in Caracas. Here
Mr. Johnson is a retired mer- for the Easter week-end, he is

chant of New York,

staying at Accra Guesi House,

BY THE WAY By Beachcomber

NOTE with a shout of purest dents, who remember her appear-
joy that the statisticians are ance in Blaenavon wearing a red
already preparing their abracada- dogsnatcher hat to boost Ladies’
braical tables in connection witn Utility Overalls. Pontypool
the new plan to deal with London ‘where Cecil Rhodes was born, has
traffic. its own Eisteddfod every year.
The plan will save 107,384 “ve- and it was Nere that a Mrs. Myrd-
hiele-hours” per day per acre of din, disguised as a druid, struck
street. How many man-hours go Councillor Llewellyn with her
to make a “vehicle-hour” and/or harp because he disqualified her.
vice, as it were, versa? Then We “This,” said the councillor, flick-
must consider pedestrian-hours, ing her leg with his wand of office,
and roller-skate hours per boy. ‘will have repercussions.” None
At the end of the whole business of which gets us anywhere.
we shall probably find that You May Hum
1,078,495,819 “vehicle hours” have DOCTOR who said that hum-
been saved in six months But ming was good for people is
exactly what that will prove is reported to have “tossed a bomb-
enother and a sillier story shell into neighbouring consulting
Tinned Consul rooms.” What the meaning of this
Case of Grilled Consul excited language is, I ie
; no cover, But this I do know: a Hun-
oad eee ston pith by garian bophomologist found last
my ppecia’ correspondent in voar, that it is humming that
keeps bees fit Since nowadays
nobody would dream of doing any-
thing until he was told it had been



Hertfordshire, are trying to sell
io our Government several cases
of tinned Consul to “supplement
the ration,’ proved good for animals and in-
Pontypool News sects, it is well to have medical |

HE nine Pontypool urban area science in support of private hum- |
wards, which are the oldest ming |

and thickest in Monmouthshire, Yqil-piece |
are to choose 45 Festival Queens HEY are saying, at least I am, |
sun ae Guest that if Mr. Errol Flynn is to}
: he : ay Nelson in a film Enigland is
the new swimming pool in Aber. bound to win the battle of Trafal-|
sychan-road. But there is consid- 8&r, even though that result is his-
erable opposition from the resi- torically correct. |

be

STRAWS 5

In WHITE and Many Latest SHADES

51 Gauge “ARISTOC” .............. . 242
“CHARNGS” Woes aes ie $1.95, $2.21, $2.33
“MASCOT” ... GR:

“MASCOT” Chiffor*..... |. . 93e.
“MASCOT” Rayon ......... Tle, All Sizes
In Latest Fashionable Shades

* ELITE”





Sports Shirts .......... $5.93
All Popular Shades

CELLULAR SPORT SHIRTS
Boys & Youths Sizes only (White) .... $1.38

YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 {

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BRONNET

ir







f



“BROODY” is the apt name given to this creation, chosen as an
Easter Bonnet by screen star Annette Simmonds (Viscountess Dan-
gan) and styled by Rose Bertin. The hen is couchat on its nest
swathed in tulle on a raffia straw crown. Ears of corn add to the
general effect.—Express



B.C. Radio



Programmes



















FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951 SATURDAY, MARCH 2%, 1951
6.50 a.m—12.15 pom. ..........., 19.60 M
6.30 a.m.—12.15 p.m. 19.60 M
ae Take it from Here: 7 a.m.
ie ews; 7.10 a.m. Ni i
7.15 p.m. Eiberinces 7.35 a 6.30 a.m. Football Results; 6.45 a.m.

Parade; 7.30 a.m. The Colonial Reformers;

7.50 a.m. Interlude; 8 2.m. Lis + a.m, News Ana} sis; i
Choice; 8.45 a.m. Humour; 9 aan Editorials; 7.25 a.m. Programme Parade,
News; 910 am. Home News from 720 am. From the Third Programme

55 p.m. Interlude; 8 e.m. BBC Symphony
Orchestra; 8.45 a.m. Monia Liter are
ews

Britain; 9.15 a.m. Clase Down; 11.15 a.m,
Programme Parade; 11,30 a.m, Good
Friday Service;

{ + 2WS; Home
12 (oon) The News: » 4m. The News; 9,10 a.m e s
12.10 p.m, News Analysis; 12.15 pin. {0m Britain; 9.18 a.m. Close Down; 11.15
Close Down, 7 om. Programme Parade 11.20 a.m
4156.00 pom. . 3 Interlude; 11,30 a.m. New Zealand vs
: 19:76 M. egland: 11,40 a.m. Bury vs. South-
415 p.m. BBC Scottish Orchestra; “mpton; 12 (noon) The News; 12.10 p.m
5 p.m. Composer of the Week; 5.15 pm News Analysis; 12.15 p.m. Close Down

Let's make Music; 6 p.m. Merchant Navy
Newsletter,
6.00—7.15 p.m. .....

1150.00 p.m... . 19.76 M.
aD

4.15 p.m. Strike up the Music;,<5 p.m
New Zealand vs. England; 5.10 p.m.
interlude; 5.15 p.m, BBC Opera Orches-
tra; 6 p.m. Music for Dancing.

25.04, 31.32, 48.43 M

—
6.15 p.m. The Colonial Reformers; 6,35
p.m. Interlude; 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade; 7 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. New
Analysis; 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary
7456—11.00 pom. , SLM. & 48.48 M
——————
7.37 p.m. Interlude; 7.45 p.m. Think o1
these Things; 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
8.15 p.m, Good Friday Service; 8.45 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 9 p.m. World
Affairs; 9.15 p.m. Let’s make Music;
10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m, From. the
Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Recent Trends j;
Societ Agriculture; 10,30 p.m. Melody or
Strings; 10.45 p.m. The Debate Continues;
11 p.m. Ring up the Curtain. ;

==—S—= Se

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE: TOMORROW and TUESDAY at 5 p.m.

6.17.15 p.m, 25.64 M, 31.32 M
—— LT

6.45 p.m. Programme Parade; 7 p.m.
The News; 7.10 p.m, News Analysis; 7.15
pan. Behind the News; 7.45 p.m. Sandy
MacPherson at the Theatre Organ; 8 p.m
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m Oxford vs
Cembridge Boat Race; 8.30 p.m Eden
End; 10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From
the Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Anything ‘*«
Declare; 10.45 p.m. Yours
‘1 p.m. Messiah



ae —_ =












fe Was all S000 Lanocent..
and ye sooo inbanrassing!.

Robert Young
Shirley Temple
John Agat «

ADORE SCHARY Presentation | | f
Produced by Richard H. Borger + Directed by Richard Wallace # Screonp!cy by Lione) Houser




Also the 2-reel Featurette:—
“20 YEARS OF ACADEMY AWARDS”

Produced by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences, showing numerous S‘ars with actual parts of the
Films which won Academy Awards.







———-——



To-night




visit







CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations










NOTICE
We shall NOT be OPENING

to business on
SATURDAY, 24th MARCH

ill our friends and customers
their
shopping and orders accordingly.

Please note and arrange



THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Forces Favourites; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10
7.15 a.m. From the

& 48.48

Faithfully;



DIET TIPS

NEW YORK.

DIETING is as much a fad in
the United States these days as in| ¢
Britain. But a _ best-seiler book |
which proclaims the way to live|
longer by eating less has been im—
pounded by the authorities in
Buffalo, New York 5

The book, “Look Younger, Live
Longer,” by Gayelord Hauser, was
seized along with a load of black-
strap molasses, which is unrefined
treacle. For the health authorities
did not like all that was in the
book .

The food and drug administrator
charged in Buffalo that the book
falsely suggested that molasses
would increase life by five years.

The jars of molasses were labell-
ed “Recommended and endorsed
by Gayelord Hauser.”

‘Misbranded’

The Government said they were
misbranded because of statements
in Hauser’s book suggesting that
molasses was an excellent vitamin
B source and was effective in pre-
vention and treatment of vitamin
B deficiency, poor digestion, tired— {





ASTOR

COLUMBIA PRESENTS—

“WHEN

FRANKEY
LANE

=<@) T
A

FRIDAY MIDNITE MAT. “WOMAN WHO CAME BACK”

A REPUBLIC SENSATIONAL DOUBLE
DAUGHTER of the
and “SOUTH of Rio”





THE ISLE OF SAMOROâ„¢

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951



THEATRE
WISHES

A HAPPY EASTER.

FRIDAY 4 & 8.30 P.M. ONLY

YOURE SMILING”

Starring :

THE MILLS THE # BOB
BROTHERS MODERNAIRS CROSBY
AND



and “VAMPIRE’S GHOST”
SATURDAY 4.30 & 8.30

JUNGLE

“HARBOUR OF MISSING MEN”

SATURDAY MIDNITE “FLAME OF BARBARY COAST” «& = &
3





ALL’ 3
%

HAPPY EASTER AND INVITE ALL OF
JOU TO ENJOY THE BEST IN MOTION PICTURE CARE-
FULLY SELECTED SO THAT YOU CAN BE TOGETHER FOR

S555 29S SSSI Nt
RROD SRO OTITIS



ness, heart trouble, neuritis, helped wa we , vet.

to induce sleep, correct neryous- OSE ESTER: a
ness, restore grey hair to normal] wosseee ars Koper
colour, and correct See ale x
ae ES oe oes GLOBE : « 8.30 e™
“ 3.” L.z.8. . 3
ey ) OPENING TO-DAY (Good Friday)
; and through the Weekend %
GRAND EASTER FIESTA a, ” i
AND DANCE HAYWARD ie PRESTON %

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members
Only)

on
SATURDAY, MARCH 24th,
9 p.m.

PROGRAMME
SONGS AND SKETCHES
by Local Artistes. \
SPOT DANCE, WALTZ and





JITTERBUG:
—— PRIZES will be given for
these.
DOOR PRIZE:

A GIANT EASTER EGG
(weighing 25 lbs.), packed
with Novelties to suit all, to
the lucky ticket holder,

DANCING until 3 a.m.

Music by Two Orchestras:
One playing the latest hits
and the other Spanish Music.



Bienvenido Los Turistas
VENEZOLANOS
al AQUATIC CLUB

El Sébado 24 de Marzo
a-las 9 p.m.

GRAN FIESTA y BAILE

“Almallanera” y otras
piezas

Upicas Venezolanas
Admission: —48c¢,





JULIUS SYMMONDS
AR THEIR: MEMOR Ee iiss Siois cies ls ene.
TT TAREE Fiona atin cas
JOE (Shoeshine) CLARKE .
ALVA ARTHUR
CHESTER HOLDER

You'll Meet...

CHEROKEE LANSING
Half Angel . . . Half Wildcat

All WOMAN Sh

ernie 2B RP e

SOAR ON



oe

COLOR A
TECHNICOLOR

TONITE

PLUS LOCAL TALENT Z
......+.“Embraceable You”

....“Dreamers Holiday”
“Dear Hearts Gentle People”
1c te tO “Bop! Goes My Heart”
RP eROGICT Ths acd a see ee “IT Wanna Be Lover”

AT Set pat eerie ss “Wildest Gal In Town”
GUEST STAR — PERCY WELCH

iPt 16—House 30—Balcony 40—Box 54

2310

TODAY

(ONLY)
Starting Times:—

(GOOD FRIDAY)

2.30 — 4.30 — 6.30 — 8.30 ana 10.30 p.m.

The lst. ALL-TALKING



WELCOME
TO ALLS!

ENJOYABLE
EASTER ::

ENTERTAINMENT
FoR yvou!! g



ee So

PLAZA THEATRES

BRIDGETOWN DIAL

y DIAL
OISTEN DIAL
TODAY (GOOD FRIDAY)

(ONLY}

Starting Times:—
2.00; — 4.00; — 6.00; and 8.00 p.m.

PICTURE TO COME



TO BARBADOS OF ....

The LEFE and PASSION »o CHRIST

MATINEES: SATURDAY 24TH
9.30 a.m. and 1.30 p.m.
R.K,O. Double - -

“WILD HORSE MESA”
TIM HOLT
— one

“CODE OF THE WEST”

JAMES WARREN

SATURDAY and SUNDAY
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
MONDAY (Bank) 9.30 a..m; 1.30; 4.45
and 8.30 p.m.
TUESDAY to THURSDAY
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Warner’s Spectacular Action - -

) The FLAME the ARROW

. (Colour by Technicoior)
Burt LANCASTER — Virginia MAYO
and a cast of thousands

MIDNITE SAT. 24 (2 new Monogram
Pictures)
John CALVERT as the FALCON in - -
“AP POINTMENT FOR MURDER”
— and —
Tom KEENE in - -
“THE DRIFTING KID”

MIDNITE SAT, 24TH (RKO Double)

WEST of the PECOS

with Robert MITCHUM

& MASKED RAIDERS

With Tim HOLT

SATURDAY to TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m
Big Easter Action from W.B.

Errol FLYNN - -

The Adventures of DON JUAN

Colour by Technicolor





Special Matinee MONDAY (Bank) 1.30 pm.
(2 new Monogram Pictures)

MAN FROM HEADQUARTERS

with Frank Albertson and
Leon ERROL in...

JOE PALOOKA, CHAMP

LS NEE eS
James
TODAY (Good FRIDAY) STARTING TIMES 4.30-6.00-7.30- 9.00 P.M.

The’ LIFE and PASSION of CHRIST

GABETY (The GARDEN) S¢.

(RKO Action Double)
Randolph Scott—George (Gabby) Hayes

TRAIL STREET and

Tim HOLT and Cliff EDWARDS

aaa
SATURDAY 24TH SUN. 25th & MON, 26th
and Continuing Daily

WOMEN 5 p.m. — MEN 8.30 p.m.
(Age Limit: 16 years and over)
Social Guidance Enterprises presents:

THE STORY OF BOB & SALLY

Positively NO CHILDREN.

TUESDAY 27th (Only) “DYNAMATIC CANYON Tom Keene & “RAIDERS OF THE
SOUTH” Johnny Mack Brown

MIDNITE SATURDAY 24TH
|

THE AVENGING RIDER
|
































Seer to. ae









FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE


















































GOLLL ILL LG LAG OL OSA DILL DILL LI Dolnt LIAM ICIS LISS LM SV LLL LLL Lobel LIES, ~
lye * + , > . “is . ns cnn POIROT ILO OD LNG OTC LG LEO EGE E TE AARC
Abolition of Rice E.C.A. Expert Joins ¥2° ,.2°°" Police Motor Cycle Bermuda Will Ship U.K. Concerned \% 1 !

Ui . - ~ pe f - police motor cy 1° y - 4 ee ahs o . 13 The CHINA DOI | RESTAU R ANT p24

Marketing Board C.D.C. Rice Mission cles fitted with i itted W ath Radio Over 100,000 ons ° % : 3

re . a two-way radi < = Over Persia 8 MARHILL STREET %

Will Be Sought In British Guiana ¢8¢'27¢% _ Serap Metal To N.Y. (ine ke %

B (From Qur Own c : used by Metro ee ‘ ow bs BERMUDA. March 21 Conservative Member .of Par-| 3 CLOSED TO-DAY (GOOD FRIDAY) 3

y B.G. Legislator GEORGETOWN. Mar . 30 politan” Police a Pe 1 ics mA, Maren <<: liament Somerset de Chair sug 5. i at: 5 - : 3

Chita? Of the. Overseas &, a patrols were de- j Over 100,000 tons of machinery sosted in Commons to-day that OPEN TO-MORROW, SUNDAY, MONDAY %

So ~ tural. Sect ee a ae monstrated tees . ; and scrap metal will be shipped jn yiew of the strategic import- | 3

GEORGETOWN, March 20, {tal Se a Administration Gen Sir. Harold pe = =4 to New York within the next few ance of Persian oil supplies, | Dine where the BEST Eat the BEST %

k Hon. Daniel P. Debidin, Mein- Lyle J. Hayd ; “ot the Paris’ ) oer Scott, Commis— ; ¥ ; months from Bermuda's dockyard, Britain should offer a military | SOCIETY'S RENDEZVOU %

oer of the Legislative Council has ~~?“ +; *8ycen. of the Paris Office Sa ma 7 & which closes down on March 31. guarantee to Persia as a deterrent soc ry’s EI} WA S $

given notice that he wil! move 0! BCA. is now in British Gui- Metro} ittan Po. ‘Se There were many bids for the to any potential aggressor | 2

at the next meeting of Coun- riecion cp pe ith the Rice fice, * tated that material which was advertised by Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor DIAL 4730 For Reservations §

cil a motion asking Council to MUSsion of Colonial Development it is hoped ‘to 1 the British Admiralty throughout vison replied that British policy | 2

recommend yovernme ,,, Corporation. Mr, Hayden is serv- (°° P { J was to encourage an independent, | 4enene SOOO OS SONG O GSO NOTE
recommend to Government the ; r whe have between 30 the world. y 4 s i pen +]
immediate repeal of the Rice 728 2" an advisory capacity par- and 35 motor Tenders of the Halifax scrap stable and prosperous Persia, He |










Marketing Ordinance, 1946, and necpariy, in the fleld of farm ma- eycles fitted with
all amendments thereto, and the ‘ 7 PBs which he specialises. two-way wire-
abolition of the Rice Marketing ,.“0Y E-C-.A. activity in ove less telephony to

metal firm of Joseph Simon, were
accepted and they have since sold



reaffirmed Ernest Bevin's state~ j|
nent on May 19 that the British |
sovernment was vitally concern

LEAVE YOUR TRAVEL PROBLEMS WITH



F " orig : oiaa ew York C 1

mea territories under the Mar. ; oe material to a buyer in New Yor ed in the independence, integrity

Board. a st the police The Halifs Pedi ch . , .

‘Mr. Debidin's motion further Aid Plan in the field of agricul- a ; reeuleting The Halifax firm also Bis for and security of Persia and were HOLIDAY TRAVEL

asks that the Council recommend re, has to be done through the traffic on both large floating dock, but the Ad- determined to continue their pol :
ae: Gt nain wen ined ae ~ 4. Overseas Agricultural Section 4 miralty decided to send it to icy to Persia and to other coun- WE OFFER THESE y ; “ye |
that Government take immediate ae pia . oanks of the England. tries striving th ' ilitary - | t \

steps to organise and place the Mr. Hayden is not a member of River Thames nglar ries striving through military SERVICES AT ‘ ud

industry on a truly co-operative the C.D.C, mission, but through during the Fes- Simon who has been in Bermuda and economic measures to safe-

basis in the direct interest of the his connection with E.C.A., who tival of Britain. several months, expects to make a guard their independence and








territoris , 1. Confirm all Airline Reservations

fia hapa satiedean Wa. cece ee is very interested in increasing Later the whole large profit. —(CP) territorial integrity
rice producers of the C . , § Later © Pp . » nin at s

In he areanians ie Nee ae food supplies throughout the motor cycle Reuter. 2. Secure Hotel Reservations any re
Mr Debidin asserts that the world, the E.C.A. was in a posi- squad of 200 % r 3. Deliver Your Tickets to your Office or Home
present price of padi is uneco- #0? 7 help when the British Gui- Se nae Indonesian [Troops ss 4 4. Arrange Motor and Sight-seeing Tour

sae Seika, tia , » similarly fitt- ' ?

nomie for the ority of rice 224 “rove rnment indicated that be similarly » » 5. Advise you on any Travel Problem
farmers, and that the cost of sie they were anxious to expand rice ed. Each has a 5 Combat Java Lord lre fgarne s e y

duction and other circumstances production in the Colony, This ft. aerial attach





r eg s ¥ - ? * y y .
duction “and other circumstances gave him the opportunity to join @d_ to the rear : Position with C.D.C. HOLIDAY TRAVEI CONSULTANTS
not less than $5.00 per bag of 149 the mission, = when «cr Fanaties Ay ) \ j i

po slr rao a “so a s put out from we pee oreo old
nae rhe ability to pay this Mr. Hayden told a Press Con- Scotland Yard, DJAKARTA, March 19 at ae ee | of CANADA. LTD
purchase rice e main is : ; 7 7 - - ange light Twenty SATE battalions of ondon nis wee as t F | sealed ae ++

a se t *\ ference at Georgetown that he is 22 orange Hs) enty seven atta ions “ tartan }

= ug CRETE as the .. Board ‘aisious. to give the mission the #ickers on a dial . Indonesian troops have been of not Lord Trefgarne, LORFRGT | Main Floor Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd, Telephones 4920 & 4949
securing immediately for the un- }.. efit of his knowledge of farm attached to the , i thrown into action against the Chairman of the Colonia} ee ONE CALL DOES IT AI
expired period of the contracts yachinery i ae a aa handlebars and a \ » f Darul Islam organisation ment Corporation has in fact} a vine - ss
between the Board and the Con- machinery in rice production, &

. . : zzer sounds.
and to learn the possibilities that ge then

the B.G. Government officials communicates
jeel are available for increasing gipect with Scct-

a. severed his connections with the |
teen of them went over to Corporation, At the moment Lord
seale offensive in west Java, refgarne is in the Bahamas and

tracting Colonies in the West In-
dies at least the minimum world
market prices for the rice ex-






































ice pr Y , ‘ donesian Defence Ministry the Financial Times states that “on | hy fee bes if;
ported to these Colonies, and he rice production. ; ‘ _ land Yard by a “ i hers had broken sd authority” it understands | 2 DAYS OF STARTLING REVELATIONS ne
MS ak ay 6 Resoluti During his stay in the Colony, telephone fitted said to-day. _Ot hers hac ,o0d §=aut ) Xi
draw B attention to a Reso ution Mr. Hayden will confer with Mr. to “he motor i eo _, organised resistance in the central that he has been discharging some
carried in the Legislature in No- Mo Chitie Gio ls dus ‘to -attive .3 eyele he mets meee” — Fava district of Brebes of the Corporation's responsibili- GLOBE THE A TRE Presents Xi
the RM B, oe ‘ at meee shortly, and make recommenda- “~~ , r A spokesman claimed the army ties for the project on Sleuthera . : n
e R.M.B, to approach the Gov- 4:05 fr increasi Peat ante je had captured some 10,000 ter- Jgland A CDC spokesman later tt
oe saint es on increasing live: - CT ad captured s¢ , Island A CDC spokesman la
ernments of the Caribbean colo- ya ae Kay ae lise 2 bp" oeee ae oe Corkle is being loaned ‘to the B.G. BROUGHT AGAINST Darul Islam claims that it 1S gaiq that Lord Trefgarne was not Dr HIMSEI KF »)
‘ srease e price Of Te Gover n . Techni + seeking a rely Islamic state bags) i e aS ee a (
aot at n'y ign log hl Government through the Techni- . seeking 2 purely discharging any responsibility for ‘$
ad sri ides Sia eas eet cal Assistance Division af E.C.A For Agricultural B.G. NEWSPAPER Terrorism has flared up lately iD ine pleuthera project but that his | y)
reve average WOric arke —— ‘ S s vdnew’ oe“ is ‘ \
ine, neti ; , : om Our Own Correspondent) its usual optrating grounc advice was always available to the
prices, and the failure of the comin GEOR ETOWN March ‘ —Reuter 7 ont}
Board to take action accordingly. : Progress In World cs FEC ee ese — pa Corporation ase | @ €
On this argument, Mr. Debian ») tila 7 PL Aare Aga cco ar claims that the funetioning of the be Kuk d 6 Hurt SIR HUBERT RANCE Thea West . Raa, m me ee) p re {
Board is to be regarded as “high- + 7 . has filed an action against the New Weapons BODYGUARD Mystery Played i
i . + (From Our Own Correspondent) Daily Chronicle laiming $5,000 a ’ 3 ayed in
ly unsatisfactory and inimical AD otor Cech ent SPAIN, March 19. aily rronicle, claiming $5,006 oe wteNe MARCH 91 BRUSSELS |
to the interest of rice producers PORT-OF arch as damages for alleged libel A ; WASHINGTON, March 2 The chief cashier of a leading | Mind dodey. Deasic
in the Colony.” (From Our Own Correspondent) The role of the imperia 128 writ settings out the claim has been New and deadly types of tox Antwerp store asked for a body a s
. PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 19. of Tropical Agriculture . filed ig the Dee Registry by his pedoes for anti-submarine War guard to escort him to the bank Reading dential Palace
Two men were instantly killed gustine, Trinidad, in + the colicitor, Miss Evelyn Luckhoo. fare and a new launcher [6% Oy the steps of the bank the .
end six other people injured when lead for agricultural progr s in The action is a sequel toa mur- rockets with improved range and }odyguard, an employee of thc Hypnotism * in the
BRADSHAW LECTURES 2 truck and a motor car travelling tropical regions, not only in the ger trial in wh Sewchand was Underwater performance — re frm, snatched the brief -case, 1
UNION MEMBERS in opposite directions collided on British Commonwealth but for the one of the acc being added to the United States Gontained over £5,000 | Spiritism Aidt
the El Mame Road, Waller Field, world, was stressed when His |! —EE——E navy’s armament j ‘
. 3 Tr a » cellency Sir bert Rance, ith TREASURE HUNT Rear-Admiral Malcolm Franci 2 ;
(Prom Our Owm Correspondent) Trinidad, It is reported that the cellency Sir Hu tE/ gE U leo) ait. re arees Wobinand
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 19 oecupants of the car, Mr. and Mrs. distinguished guests attended the ROME Ss hoeffeil, C hief of the pares UNUSUAL ACE | a
The Hon, 'T, Bradshaw of St. Seemungal, were travelling into College’s Charter Silver Jubtlec In the mountains of the Italian ©£ Ordinance, announced to-ca; its! ea ler aectaiint | Hours Performance
Kitts, told about 200 members of Port-of-Spain after a visit to their Celebrations. The occasion, high- South Tyrol, people are hunting that the Navy was pend nj In Durban a spectacular accic¢ en
the Seamen and Waterfront Work- €state when the accident occurred, lighted by the opening of the bio- for 1,000,600 worth of jewels About $500,000,000 of its funds for happened when a railway euck of the Buckingham
Trade Union in Trinidad: “You Following the collision both vehi- logical laboratories by Sir Allan bel ing oO 2othsehild this year on guns, shells missile: in passing a row of parked cars
must maintain your democratic cles ran off the road. The truck Burns and of the sugar laborator- fay . jewels were seized by 224 other weapons including new struck the end one, picked it uy other Palace
principle within. the admiration ; driven by the owner, Dassarat ies by the Governor, drew €m!- the in Paris, but towards #2") submarine devices. -Revter and hauled = it along the line |
of your Union.” Mr. Bradshaw Persad. The two men killed wero nent visitors from Britain rd the the the war were taken MAY BE NOMINATED wiping she secistors, peedtae | World, (1916)
lectured to the gathering for forty- travelling in the tray of the truck. neighbouring Caribbean Colonies. to the South Tyrol and hidden BONN, March 19, ind windscreens from 17 large cars |
|

ive inutes i ss hey . Twenty members of the College t} a ihe atvece.aid eae damaging them beyond repair
Phin og 4a eg ns Bin ¢ pe Fritz Oellers 47-year-olc The cars were left in a jumbled






rategic industry staff received long service medal —



longed to a v@ leader of the Free Democrat (Lib

































¢ The : . » lowly ploug 7 , 7 heap
and it was their duty to always ° The list included the lowly plougt LADIES ONLY eral) party in Schleswig Holstein -_ |
keep on the alert and see to it that B.G. Scholarship Awards eet ee nee creas ALEXANDRIA is up for nomination as West i} Professor WU- LI- WONG
disrupters did not penetrate their 1949-50 Cost $365,000 tific rains, all of whom shared Next summer Alexandria is to German Consul in Buenos Aires, LEPROSY | s .
venice, equally in the applause which fol- have a beach for ladies only. This it was learned authoritatively MOMBASA | Chinese Doctor Of Magic
(From Our Own Correspondent) Icwed the presentation, Messages was decided by the Municipal here to-day The death sentence was pass sed | : .
GEORGETOWN, March 20. were received from Mr, Griffiths, Commission, because ladies bath Dr. Oellers, who is also a mem- yecently at the Supreme Court on WEDNESDAY, March 28th, 8.30
TRIPLETS Total value of scholarships Secretary of State for the Colonies. ing object to men “eyeing” them per of the Bonn Parliament, used g mother who three times. asked | ’ oe
awarded between 1944 and 1950 Besides Jaggai, who lives on a and cracking jokes to be a prominent Berlin lawyer. a man to kill her son who was a THURSDAY, March 29th, 5 & 8.30
(From Our Own Correspondent) amounted in round figures to peasant holding near the Colle ———_$_ His nomination still had to be leper. The murderer, who shot his ’ ’ "
OR TC )F-SPAIN, March 19. $365,000. Of this, $159,000 was pro- and Simon Pierre the Tractor dr negic Professor of Economics, and approved by the Cabinet and by victim with. a bow and_ arrow, TICKETS sold in advance every day from
Mrs. Ena Serias of Tunapuna, vided by local funds, $173,00@ from er, who mounted the galvanise Professor Frederick Hardy, C.B.E., President Theodore Heuss. It was also sentenced to death. It is 3 :
age 40, gave birth to triplets. Mrs. Colonial Development and Wel- roof platform, were alongside M.A., Pri or of Soil Science would probably still be several the custom of the accused man’s | TO-DAY—GLOBE
Serias is the mother of seven fare Funds, and $33,000 from other Professor Cecil Yazley Shephard, end Chemistry who received months before he would leave tribe — the Wadizs — to kill off |
children. sources. C.B.E., Vice-Principal and Car- medals from Sir Burns tor, South America..-Reuter lepers. \ SSF







aa FROM

~2"2 1 ROODAL
“| THEATRES

CARIBBEAN







selina pla
Mims Se





EMPIRE ROYAL ROXY i

TO-MORROW—4.45 & 8.15 and Continuing
WAGE i OR RRR ee Tt ian |













TO-MORROW TO THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 Daily ; 2
The true, savage story «=SATORDAY



f of BILLY THE KID ! cadena }
5 AND New Adventures *










with The Son ®

of Robin Hood! TO ALL OUR

PATRONS

SUNDAY
f PARADISE UNTAMED

..in all its wonder
and fury!

LOVE UNASHAMED

...in all its innocence
and romance!

7” ADVENTURE
-f — s+A8 NEVER BEFORE!

1.30 & 6.30



He had a talent for
trouble...
a greedy
gun...
*. anda
taste for

Â¥ GOOD FRIDAY
" SPECIAL

THE PASSION PLAY

EMPIRE — 4.3$—6.45—8.45
ROXY — 5—7—9

OLYMPIC — 4.30—6,.45—8.45
ROYAL — 5—8.15

COMIN G TO EMPIRE

starring

John DEREK - Diana LYNN

wih George MAGREADY + Alan HALE

Screen Play by George Bruce + Directed by GORDON DOUGLAS + Produced by FRED M. PACKARD
©



EXTRA 2 REEL SHORT WITH THREE STOOGES

OLYMPIC

TO-MORROW & SUNDAY 4.45—8.15
Ist Instalment Columbia Serial SUPERMAN vs. ATOM MAN
2nd Instalment—MONDAY— TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.15



—--

J. ARTHUR RANK presents
DONALD

JEAN SIMMONS - HOUSTON

me BL

JAMES HAYTER





sete DAVIS - ow BAXTER
Georze SANDERS - Celeste HOLM



a. starring
AUDIE LE ~» MARTA TOREN
MURPRY:S ‘ST ORM ~ JEFF CHANDLER

ven ME ny |
a Men Uw = SHEPPERD STRUCK | yicy CLAUDE DAUPHIN MARINA BERTI







ALL ABOUT EVE | |

PP AO Kit WG ANCREAIN YETI BODINE Oe» soepe ce

* CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS”

“GIRL OF THE YEAR’
“THE THIRD MAN”
“THE MUDLARK”



i
SPECIAL!
MIDNIGHT SHOW TO-MORROW
The Republic Whole Serial
«JAMES BROTHERS OF MISSOURI”

Starring: Keith Richards—Ray Bowery




Screenplay by FRANK LAUNDER
JOHN BAINES « MICHAEL HOGAN
Directed by FRANK LAUNDER
AN INDIVIDUAL PICTURE
Released by
UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL



“ATOM MAN ws. SUPERMAN”
With KIRK ALYN — LYLE TABBOT





PAGE FOUR





Harrold Clarke Connell

By TONY VANTERPOOL





It t surprising tha
hibit of Paintings | H
Cc, Connell a E
Museum is a s
is a r
experien
Harrold C. Connell, a nbe



of an old Wes
Irish extr

damental




boyhood his mair







aftists. During
attraction was fr i g is
career began A €
left Harrison College

He went Eng was
admitte the Grosver Ss o}
of Ar London hose Principal
was lain MacNab

Occasionally Connell’

ights

still wander back to the days of
his training and the building
which housed the Grosvenor Art
School. This building was orig-
inally built by the Duke of
Bedford as a Town House bu
Subsequently became the quarters
of the Italian Embassy
It was in this same building
that Bram Stoker wrote his hair-
raising work “Dracula.” The his-
tory of this _ building. was
especially suitable for the artists’
imaginations,
Four Years '

Connell spent four years at the
Grosvenor School and during that
period he also took the opportun-
ity to study interior decorating
and furnishing with Messrs.
Osborne & Co, Ltd., Grafton
Street, London

After leaving he opened his
own Art Gallery — The Albany
Gallery — at i7 Sackville-Street



on March 18th, 1931. This Gal-
lery was opened with a very
successful Exhibition of Lino-

Cuts by Claude Flight, one of the
chief British exponents of lino-
cutting who also wrote books on
the subject

Between 19231—34 a great num-
ber of exhibitions were held at
the Albany Gallery. Among the

artists exhibiting their works
from time to time were Duncan
Grant, S. J. Peploe, R. D. Dun-

lop, Iain MacNab and Olive Snell

At one exhibition Clare Leigh-
ton (Mrs, Brailsford) showed her
portrait of the Mahatma Gandhi
— the only portrait of the Mahat-

ma to be done by an English
woman.
Gandhi

A Press Release to the British
newspapers stated; “If Mr
Gandhi will not leave a_ great
impression behind among our
Statesmen, he has at any rate,

been a boom to his personal ac-
quaintances who were writers
and artists.

“I visited the Albany Gallery
this afternoon where Mrs. Brails-
ford is showing a large oil paint-
ing of the Mahatma, which she
was able to do through her
acquaintance with him.

“He refuses to give sittings to
artists but he allowed Mrs.
Brailsford, who accompany him
on his business, attend interviews,
and even stay with him on days
of silence so that she could get
sketches of him. She did not like
the days of silence as he kept his
head bent down except when
occasionally he looked up _ to
crack some dumb show joke with
her.

“She has pictures of him in
every position, even dozing, but
the finished portrait is of Gandhi
as a public speaker in the middle
of an oration,”

Mrs. Brailsford was best known
for her beautiful wood engrav-

ings. Her husband is the well
known author.

Another great Albany attrac-
tion was an Exhibition of Car-
toons by “Rem”, the cartoonist,
Peter Baxendale’s (Mrs. Basil
Baxendale) Exhibition of Circus
Drawings and Portraits and an-
other by Agnes Lambert.

Highlights
Perhaps the highlights at the

Albany were two Exhibitions of
Pavement Artists. Eleven artists
took part in these and they rep-
resented sixty-one works. These
exhibitions were called the
“Pavement Artists Academy.”

It was while Connell was on
the hunt for pavement artists
that he came across some of the
most interesting characters of his
career. He gathered this type of
artist from all quarters,

“Rem’s” past was the most in-
teresting. When he was discov-













ALL-OVER (elit
kw

i of
- Play safe...
1oey

DREAM
counters throughout the island.

~ HARROLD C.

ered he was doing his work on
stone e'abs in Trafalgar Square
outsidt St. Martins-m-the-Field

Rem was actually taught by
John Paul Lawrence, the famous
French artist and confessed that
he was painting under an alias
His works at the Exhibition were
found quite interesting

Connell

also induced wo
friends from Waterloo Place to
take part. They were both

striking on pastels and were will-

ing to exhibit their work but said

that they could not afford to buy
boards to work on
Proud

They brightened up consider-

ably when Conneil proviced ine
material. One was proud to teil
after that his work had bee
noticed by the Queen of Spain
Announcing tne Pavement Ar-
tists Academy the Star wrote: “An
artist whose work Connell con-
siders will attract the most atten-
tion is the out-of-work miner, who

specialises in landscapes in
ink and wash in such a manner as
to have all the appearances of
etchings.”

The most advanced designer at

the Pavement Artists Academy
was Conway Martin of Bond
Street, a miner, who by trade
showed constructive designs in

black and white of the kind shown
in art schools,

The Times stated; “A word is
due to the ‘good taste with which
the exhibition has been arranged,
with no emphasis upon circum-
stantial interest, but as if pave-
n.ent art had its own dignity.”

Other leading pavement artists
taking part were Rex Villiers and
James Hulbert of Oxford Street,
C.E. McLean of Hyde Park
Corner, H. Bumpus and W. J.
Stubbs of Waterloo Place, Richard
Johnson and F, Perrin of Trafal-
gar Square



Good

Another leading neWspaper
Stated that the Exhibition was ex-
tremely good, interesting and often
amusing and you could buy a work
of art foi as little as seven shill-
ings and sixpence,

An Exhibition of Politcial Car-
toons was also very interesting
For this the Prince of Wales lent
Connell his world famous “Prime
Ministers I have Known” by Max
Beerbohm which was kept at York
House

There were nearly fifty cartoons
on show at this exhibition and
among the cartoonists taking part
were Stubbs, Sir Bernard Patridge,

Grimes, J. L Carstairs, Will
Dyson, Cumberbatch and Matt.
Beerbohm’s cartoon ranges from

Disraeli to Baldwin and MacDon-
ald

Of this
wrote:

Chronicle
by the

the News
“This exhibition

BE SURE OF“

—with the faithful |

use of DREAM

the Beautiful
for your romantic
TOILET SOAP,
faithfully in your
shower and at the
basin for a
elear skin. radiant
loveliness.
is available

use

with

at toilet

The Soap |

be prepared,
moment,
Get a few cakes of DREAM
it
bath,
wash
soft-smooti-
natural

goods



CONNELL,

country’s “funny-men” who can
be very serious at times, is well
worth seeing for its topical inter-

est and skill; and, to many people, -;
have what the cartoon looks like |

before it is compressed for the

newspaper.”

Other exhibitions were “Paint-
ings of the West Indies” by Lt
Col, Vaspilieff—159 paintings
from all parts of the West Indie
Exhibition of Oi] and Water Col-
our Paintings by Margaret L. C
Beale and Tong Paintings of His-
toric London by R. A. Wilson an’
others too numerous to mention.

The exhibitions at the Albany

attracted the attention of leading

connoisseurs, including Per Majes-

y the Queen Mary, and they all
were especially enthusiastic about
Connell’s furnishings

Originality

Of Connell’s furnishings and the
Albany, Peter Harland, yrriting in
the Monthly Pictorial at the end of
1931 stated; “a visit to the gallery
reveals the originality of his fur-
niture, but it is in his complete
schemes that his genius is best
revealed, for in this, one obtains a
sense of expression of the theme
and the spirit of the twentieth cen-
tury. From time to time, exhibi-
tions of works of art in various
media are held here, for Connell
is a believer in the universal kin-
ship of the arts; a recent event was
an exhibition by the Four and
Four Group.

“The Albany Gallery is indeed,

one dedicated to the cause of con-
temporary expression in contem-
porary media and idiom; its work
is stimulating, suggestive and sig-
nificant.”

Connell closed the Gallery in
1934 when Great Britain went off
the gold standard and the majority
of luxury businesses were forced
to close. He joined the staff of
Messrs. Heal & Sons Ltd., interior
decorators of Tottenham Court
Road, London.

Senior





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Doctors’ Disease Sets
Docters Arguing [iT Kiwe0)

By A Medical Officer Of Health



the serious diseases
ecome More commen
MY, cerenary throm.
form, of heart attack) is
which . most interests
they themselves die of
oftem than any other
the comumunity









expected rate of death.
capse. caleulated for
| male population, is taken
100, the rate for doctors has
rked out as 368, for judges
embers of the legal profes.
for coal miners 40, for
agricultural workers 32.

Nearly 50,000 men and women
die of coronary disease each yar.

Why the disease now attacks
more people—and particularly
why it seems to strike with greater
venom those whose work entails
mental rather than physical strain
are points which are being hotly
debated in The Lancet.

Coronary thrombosis is caused
by a narrowing of the diameter
of the main blood vessels
(coronary arteries) of the heart.
Eventualiy the blood cannot pass
elong the narrowed channel and
forms a clot (thrombus) in’ the
artery. The result is that the
neart muscle—a large part of it
in a severe attack or only a small
part in a slighter attack—is cut
off from the essential supply of
blood on which the efficiency







sion

of the pumping mechanism
depends.

CORONARY
THROMBOSIS

1
@ It kills 50,900 people a ||
| year. . . It strikes hardest |
. at the successful - But
| its CAUSE may lie in a fear

of failure. |
{

Smoking ? Harmless

Just why the diameter of the
arteries ot the heart should be
specially susceptible to this nar-
rowing process is not known.

It is believed to have something
io do with the breaking down of
fat in the chemical factory inside
the human body, though this is
not to say that coronary thrombo-
ris has any connection whatever
with diet or obesity. But its oc-
currence in many cases certainly
does seem to depend on heredity.

The late Sir Maurice Cassidy,
the King’s physician, found a
family history of the disease in
half his patients,

Incidentaliy smoking, which
was at one time tiiought to pre
cipitate the clotting of blood in
the arteries of the heart, is now
regarded as relatively harmless.

Coronary thrombosis is a
serious condition: abcut one in
ten of first attacks are immediate-
ly fatal, But there is a brighter
side . Modern methods of diag-
nosis and treatment have helped
many sufferers even those wh)
have been most desperately ill,
to return to useful life for many
years.

A doctor called to a _ patien?
with a suspected “heart attack”
will recognise coronary throm-
bosis from the severe and dis-
tressing pain in the chest of



a

Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girts
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

tition.

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must reach the Short Story Editor,

Advocate Co., Ltd..

City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

- Age



resilience

unnecessary.

Wear it out,

Seats

hot climates.



D

ECKSTEIN BROS.



“OBTA

| Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
| Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth |
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism !
and Heart Trouble
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
jand quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
Guarantee. Amosan must make
|mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack.
age. Get &mosan from your chemis

Amosan

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

| Why not be More comfortable ?

The Dunlopillo latex foam mattress is just about the
most comfortable thing one can imagine.

Natural

aided by porosity, prevents loss of shape and
sagging in the middle, making turning and beating
Dunlopillo is dust-free, germ-resisting,
and completely odourless,

and what’s more there are

no springs or stuffing to come through the cover or

Dunlopillo latex foam cushioning is also ideal for
armchairs and settees and for bus, cinema and theatre
in fact wherever supreme comfort is required.
Owing to its porosity it is particularly suitable for



UNLOPILLO

The original Latex Foam Mattress

4ABLE AT

Bay St.—-Distributors.









NOVELLO
i .

which the patient complains and!
the signs of collapse or shock
Often there have been warning
symptons dt g the previous few
offers

'



hours



Yhe preliminary treatment ,is
te ensure absolute rest and quiet-
Mess and to ease distress with
injections of nain--'lling drugs,

When the patie: recovers
from tee immedigte ill-effects of
sudden Gamage td the heart
musele ke niay be considered a!
suitable case for treatment with|

heparin or dicoumoral, the
so-called anticoagulant drugs. CV- 240
These are given to prevent

further clotting of the blood in|
the arteries of the heart and
other organs.

SERVICE

Only a few years ago opera-
tions were being devised to
mprove the blood supply of
hearts damaged by coronary
thrombosis, but progress in this
direction appear to have ceased
for the time being. !

between

SAN JUAN
ST. THOMAS
ST. CROIX
GUADELOUPE
MARTINIQUE
ST. JOHNS

The tragedy cf coronary throm-
bosis is that it often strikes down
successful men at the peak of
their career,

is five times
men than in

In middle-age it
more common in
women.

Shortly before his death last
year, Professor John Ryle of
Oxford, himself a victim of coron-!
ary thrombosis, pointed out in the
British Heart Journal how rapidly
this disease appeared to be on the
increase. In seeking the reason}
for this he emphasised the impor- |
tance of social and occupational |

ST. LUCIA
changes; in forty per cent of the! PORT OF SPAIN
patients under his care he had

noted heavy mental or emotional} *
strain,

Jt may be of course that the
professional classes are more
usceptible to this disease than}
manual workers, not because they
overtax their brains, but because
their occupations are sedentary

Whip of Ambition

The Clipper CV-240 is
acknowledged to be the

most advanced type airplane
of its kind. Its extra large
picture windows, wide aisles

and its 40 roomy, recline-to-
Nevertheless there is perhaps
something in the theory of an
American psychiatrist who be-
lieves that susceptibility te
coronary thrombosis is related tc
fear of failure, with a consequent
perpetual straining to catch up
with ambitions which may be
only half realised even in these
at the very top of their particular
tree, : ‘ f

your-comfort seats, assure
passengers the utmost in

comfort and luxury in flight

By providing this most mod-
ern, fast, dependable Clipper

on this route, PAA is con-

.Possibly the body has to rebel
in some way against the almost
intolerable mental efforts of
those who are constrained, per- |
haps by their hereditary make-up, |
to ride ever forward on the surg- |
ing wave cf success to some
unattainable shore. iq?

tributing to the advancement
of the rapidly growing tourist
area in the islands between
Puerto Rico and Trinidad.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED For full information and

|

|

LES | reservations, consult your
—L.ES,



travel agent or

& "TM. Reg

PAN AMERICAN
Worip AlRWAYS

PASSENGERS + MAIL + CLIPPER CARGO

DaCOSTA & Co., Ltd,

BRIEF AP?@ARANCE |
}

JOHANNESBURG.

A new island, abort 100 yards
long and with precipitous sides
appeared above the sea off Walvis!
Bay, South West Africa, recently, |
It only stayed about an hour, then |
disappeared under the watei
before anyone could examine it. |






aA
|
NEW STYLE MURDER

NEW YORK
Murder—new style—was alleged
against three asylum attendants
in a town in Georgia recently |
They were accused of killing an
insane patient by forcing him to|
swallow a handkerchief.

Broad St.



'
Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose ; |

SADDLES (New)
Clearing off at $48.00
| Ideal for



Plantations,






Amosan stops sath |

@
MAHOGANY VARNISH
| STAIN—Just opened.

\ e

your




today, The guar-
antee protects
you. \





] and HARDWARE

ee











JUST RECEIVED

KING PIN SETS.

FOR THE FOLLOW ING:=-

AUSTIN.7 H.P., 8 H.P., 10 H.P., 12 H.P.
FIAT 500

FORD 8 H.P. & 10 HP.

FORD V 8 CARS

FORD V 8 TRUCKS

FORD V8 THAMES TRUCK
HILLMAN 10 HLP.

MORRIS 8 H.P. & 10 HP.

SINGER 9 H.P. & 10 H.P.
STANDARD 8 HLP., 9 H.P., 14 H.P.
VAUXHALL 10 H.P., 12 H.P., 14 HP.
BEDFORD TRUCKS

Also
GENERATOR ARMATURES
FOR POPULAR MODELS.

BROTHERS

4269

ECKSTEIN

Bay Street Dial





CLIPPER:

a

/
|? ,



Phone 2385

| Pisas 2122 (after hours 2303)

Gums Bleed? |

OCS SES OS OO 5 99GB 9990 000664666909





| BRITISH ARMY RIDING

net, |

$9S9SS

| JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD.

OOOO"

OCPOREOO

<

se

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951

hae.) 5 ©
BiG
HEALTH BENEFITS

* CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D
IN A DELICIOUS FORM

% INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS

* ENSURES STRONG LIMBS
AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN







Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL



Made by ALLEN &@ HANBURYS LTO., LONDON

$$ ES ER NN wn +











100 BLP, SIX CYLINDER
OVERHXAD VALVE ENGINE
e
CAR COMPORT SAFETY CAB

“STRENGTH RESERVE”






Everything YOU and
your DRIVERS want
in a truck






Progressive springing: extra springs
come into action as freight weight is in-
creased. Tough chassis designed to
carry rated load with wide margin of
safety. Rear axle has a “strength re-
serve " to operate with vehicle fully laden
over rough ground, Car-style driving
cab insulated ageinst heat and cold.
‘The greatest truck value of the century!

The New 5 ton

MORRIS-COMMERCIAL

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Sole Distributors Phone 45&04

PROPOSE POEL EEA POPP POOP PO PPPS P FPO”

TAILORS and CLOTHIERS

Worthily upholding the traditions

of

FINE
, TAILORING

“Service to Our

Customers before
all else’

is our Maxim.



Select your Suit from
among the Finest °
- range of

Tweeds, Tropicals,
Worsteds, Doe-Skin
Flannels,

Harris and Sports Tweeds.





6.664,¢
errrr wvwrrer Oe ee ee a rere POOF OOO SSOSSOSS





FRIDAY,

MARCH

PAGE FIVE





















THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BEN

Yes! — Yeast-Vite quickly
soothes away headaches, neu-
ralgia, nerve and rheumatic
pains — but it does something
else too ! Because of its valuable
tonic propertics Yeast - Vite
helps you to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more casily and
enjoy more ene! Neat time
you want pain relief take Yeast-
Vite and get tomic benefit too!

Heart Trouble =,
Caused by High =“
assure



EFIT



i -




1 a
very sia
(ft known ip
tpodignl Manavery, pA Blood ié

you feel 2 |



YV/50j2



“Take a letter.



Wicksteed’s
Festival Is On!

BEGIN TO-DAY this week-by-week conducted

tour of the British
-++-- AD. 1951

in their native habitat
HOLYWELL, Hunts.

a OFFICIAL hand-outs of That Other Festival say :
Visitors will be encouraged to meet the men and women

of Britain in their own surroundings. .

and the people will be open

Do you get the idea? We are
going to be put on show like the
quaint little furry creatures that
scuttle about in a zoo.

Maybe it’s a good idea, but why
spend eleven and a half million
pounds on it when I can be your
guide for nothing? rs

So let’s have our own Festival.
Let's | start our inspection of
Britain and her native types by
going to some fishing pub by a
water-hole and watching ‘the
anglers come in to drink,

The pub I suggest is called Ye
Olde Ferry Boat Inn at Holywell,
near St. Ives, Hunts, It’s historic
and olde. Herewargd the Wake
popped in for a quick one when
he was fleeing from William the
a:

e tracks of the British Angler
(Piscater Britannicus) and the
Hardy Fenland Wildfowler have
leq there for centuries, They
still do though nowadays a lot of
the tracks are made by motor-
coaches,

There, among the olde oake
beams and the stuffed fish, you
can watch the goings-on in
comfort,

In fact the landlord, Jack Rodd,
who used to be a grocer at Gos-
port, has put in g TV set to enter—
tain visitors while waiting for the
exhibits to appear.

He has also ground-baited the
place with 1,400 bottles behind
the bar to help lure the innocent
anglers along.

In Luck
So we'll take up our position by
the stuffed bream — (5Ib. 2ozs.)

caught by a Mr. A, W. McLean
in 1910—and wait developments.

The latch clicks. Not a word.
Some exotic British

species is

coming in to drink.
Aha! We're in luck, It’s a fine
young specimen of the male

angler in the prime of life. Look,
he’s ordering a pint of bitter.

' The suspense is terrific, Let’s
creep nearer and see if we can
speak to him without frightening
him away,

He proves to be quite tame and
ready to talk. His name is Tom
Metcalfe Arnold, but he calls him-
self simply Tom Metcalfe.

This is because there has been
a Tom Metcalfe at Holywell,
Hunts, since 1063, and he doesn’t
wish to break the continuity,

Tom is 28, and when he isn’t
fishing, shooting, or playing darts
for pints of beer, he is cutting
rushes on the river bank as his
ancestors have always done,

Tom’s Rushes

In the old days rushes were
used on the floor instead of car-
pets, or in oil lamps for wicks.
Now they go to breweries, jam
makers and women’s institutes.

Half the women’s institutes in
Britain use Tom’s rushes. They
make mats with them and baskets.
Brewers and jam makers buy.
rushes for caulking barrels,

Two armfuls of wet rushes make
one bunch or bolt, and when dried
and matured, a bolt sells for 10s.
6d, The skill comes in the drying.

Rushes are like hay. You can’t
explain when they are ready for
storing. You just have to know.

A quick calculation shows that
Tom must have been in the war.

What was he doing this scion
of the 900-year-old rush-cutting
family of Metcalfe? He was a

. . The country

to view.”

navigator in a Lancaster bomber.
Good Catch

The latch clicks again. Here’s
another angler come in to drink.
He’s a bit older and orders whisky.

A detailed examination reveals
that he is no less a catch than
the chairman of the St, Ives and
District Fish Preservation and
Angling Society,

We collectors of British types
scribble in our notebooks that his
name is Mr, Geoff Kiddle, He’s
in an old family business, too—
furnishing and removals at St.
Ives.

He is also a borough councillor
and he’s come for a drink after
a meeting of the Housing Commit-
tee.

Fishing on the Ouse isn’t what
it was he says. Too much pollu-
tion. Why, when he was a boy
he could swim with his face in
the water and see the fish on the
bottom. Couldn’t do that now.

Geoff was in the R.A.F., too,
He was a sergeant in the radio
section.

‘Chick Evans, the next one to
look in was a squadron leader
engineer. Now he keeps a toy-
shop in St. Ives and acts as
secretary to the Angling Society.

Funny, isn’t it? When you come
to examine these inhabitants of





PERON’S PRIVATE ENEMY No. 1



NEW YORK

UP on the top floor of the

six-storey building
housing South America’s
most respected newspaper,
La Prense of Buenos Aires,
is a little soundproof room
with polished mahogany
floor. They call it the
Salle d’Armes.

There in the old days angry
readers who imagined them-
selves slighted in its columns
could demand satisfaction, not
by a libel suit, bus by a duel
with the editor or by arrange-
ment even with the offending

re er,

' The Satle d’Armes has not been
used lately—though the care-
fully polished swords are still
there. But La Prensa’s editor.
Dr, Alberto Gainza Paz, has on
his hands the biggest duel of
his life. His opponent who so
far has won every move but sti?!
has not found the opening for
a fatal thrust. is Argentina’s
dictator. Peron.

- THE WRECKER

T stake for Gainza Paz is not
the existence of his

newspa but the principle
of Press treedom throughout
Argentina. Peron’s one-sided

t with Pag is being closely
watched here in the United
States—nowhere more so.
*\Ever sinc: Peron took office
five years ago he has shown a
mark disii« for newspaper
‘men who refused to be yes-men.
Particular object of his dis-
favour has m La Prensa
agains which a whole series of
sometimes novel wrecking tactics
has been brought to bear.

At one time Peron took away
its newsprint and distributed it
among papers who showed

readier appreciation of the
benefits of Beronisin.
+ Two months ago the Peron-

backed newsvendors’ union
demanded one-fifth of all La
Prensa’s classified advertising

revenue.
‘* Ofcourse, this was refused,

Dear Mr. Stalin, we will be very much obliged if you don’t start anything for two



Dr.



PAZ

by Frederick Cook
COPPELL PPLE EEE



when suddenly gang hoodlums
opened fire, killing one worker.
Then they set fire to the paper's
delivery trucks. while armed
Police stood by and laughed

Police occupied the office that
night to “protect” it, and Dr.
Paz. the man against Peron. was
formally charged with violating
national security law.

eae telephone inquiry
from New York to-day, he said
guardedly that he knew nothing
about charges against him
beyond what had been pub-
lished in Argentina and overseas.
As he rang off he added signi-
ficantly, however: “But thank
you for your interest in the
matter.”

HE SIMPLY COULDN'T
STOP TALKING

Says Hitler’s Interpreter

itai j Then the union would not
Seesan; you find they $e gue handle the paper. A handsome, scholarly man of
ordinary people... like you and Threatened by the news fifty, Alberto Gainza Paz, a
me. vendors, the printers went “on eo Po eenate with a ears ae
: strike. avile WwW suits, nob only edits
ake tte thi ane, Moanyak But last Monday 1300 workers but owns La Prensa (The Press).
safari into the wilds of darkes yor to resume publication. Paz's doctorate is in law
Britain by Bernard Wicksteed. Seven hundred of them were on though he has never practised.
—LE.S. their way to work on Tuesday. — It is more than likely that if nus
CHURCH SERVICES
i)
AN BELMONT—l1 a.m, Rev. M, A. E
SERVICES FOR aan vhiDay AND ent 7 p.m, Passion Play, ‘He died
EASTER , ‘or us.”
ST. LEONARD'S SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m. Rev. B.
GOOD FRIDAY—7.30 a.m. Mating and Crosby.
Ante Communion. 9.30 a.m. Matins and PROVIDENCE—1! a.m. Mr. J. Clarke
Sermon, 12—3 p.m, Devotions of the VAUXHALL—11 a.m. Mr. C. Jones

Cross. 7.30 p.m. Stainers Crucifixion.

EASTER DAY—5 a.m. Choral Eucharist
end Address. 8 a.m. Holy Communion.
% am. Choral Eucharist and Addréss.
11 am, Matins and Sermon. 3 p.m,
Children’s Service, 7 p.m. Evensong,
Sermon and Procession.

ST. STEPHEN'S
EASTER DAY—Low Mass 5 a.m. Pro-
cession and Solemn Mass 9 a.m, Children’s
Service at 3.30 p.m, Solemn Evensong,
Sermon and Procession at 7 p.m.
Easter Day. Lazaretto: Sung Mass
8 am, Friends invited.



MORAVIAN

ROEBUCK STREET—6 a.m. Mr. C.
Hewitt. 11 am, Rev. D. C. Moore. 7 p.m.
Rev. D. C. Moore (Musical Service)

GRACE HILL-—11 a.m. Mr. O, Lewis.
7 p.m. Mr, L. Oxley.

FULNECK—l1 a.m. Mr, S. Weekes.
7 p.m. Mr. G. Francis.

MONTGOMERY—7 p.m, Mr. D. Cul-
pepper.

SHOP HILL—7 p.m. Mr. U. Reid.

DUNSCOMBE—l1 am. Mr. D. Cul-
pepper.

COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH

FASTER DAY—5 a.m.* Holy Com-
ynunion Service. 3.30 p.m. Sacred Cantata.
7.15 p.m. Evangelistic Service. A cordial
invitation is extended to all, Minister:
Rev. E. A. Gilkes.





CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown. Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 a.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.
SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 1951
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: MATTER.
Golden Text: Psalms 81: 9, 10. There
shall no strange god be in thee; neither
shalt thou worship any strange god. J
am the Lord thy God, which brought
thee out of the land of Egypt. .

METHODIST
GOOD FRIDAY

BETHEL—i1 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby.
DALKEITH—9 a.m, Rev. M. A. E.
Thomas.

NOTICE

We beg to inform our Customers
that Our Hardware Stores will be
Closed on SATURDAY, 24th March

|
| The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltda.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST, MICHAEL

| DIAL 4528





EASTER SUNDAY
BETHEL—5. a.m, Easter Communion
11 am, Rev. B, Crosby. 7 p.m. Rev
M. A, B. Thomas. Holy Communion after

. B. Crosby.
Holy Communion. 7 p.m. Mr. J. Clarke
BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr. G. Harper.
7 p.m. Rey. B. Crosby. Holy Communion
SOUTH DISTRICT—9 am. Mr. A.
St. Hill. 3 pam. Rev. M. A. E. Thomas
Holy Communion.
PROVIDENCE—1! a.m. Rev. M. A. E.

Thomas. Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr.
D. F. Griffith.

VAUXHALL—9 a.m. Rev. M. A. E
Thomas. Hoty Communion. 7 p.m. Mr
G. Jones,

ST. THERESA
United Episcopal Orthodox Churen,

Good Friday Services—7 a.m, Holy Com-
munion. 12—3 p.m. Devotions of the
Cross. Preacher: Rev. C, R. Morgan
7 p.m. Parts recording Stainers Cruci-
fixion. “

8T. JOHN'S LUTHERAN CHURCH

Good Friday, Fairfield Road, Black
Rock—6 a.m, A Strange Procession; The
Rev. W. F. O'Donohue Speaker. Subjegt
“The life of Christ’. 11 a.m, Song and
Sermon by the Local Representative.

HOLY SUNDAY

Fairfield Road, Black Rock--11 a.m.
Song and Sermon, The Rev. W. F
O'Donohue. Speaker, Subject: Away with
Him; 7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon by
the Rev, Wm. F. O’Donohue,

THE SALVATION ARMY
EASTER SERVICES

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL—ll a.m,
Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Y.P, Programme
7 p.m. Altar Service and Sound Movie



Show on Crucifixion. Conducted by
Major A. E. Moffett, (Divisional Corm-
mander)

WELLINGTON STREET—11 a.m, Holi-
ness Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting.
7 p.m. Altar Service. Preacher; Major

OISTIN—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting;
8 p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Altar
Service; Preacher: Lieutenant Gibbons

@ GLASSWARE

Broad Street





By HENRY AWBRY

THE thing about Hitler was not.
so much what he said or how he
said it. It was the way, once he
started talking, he went on
on.

Dr. Paul Schmidt noticed it the
first time he met him.

his ensuing nine years of trans-;

lating Hitler’s garrulity to foreign

haustively confirmed.

potentates the impression was “q

No Notes the course of negotiations—at
Otherwise, Dr. Schmidt now${ any rate, Mr. Chamberlain, so |
reports (in Hitler's Interpreter, long as you remain on German |
published by Heinemann, 15s.),,, Soil.
the Feuhrer’s talk was not sensa- That was one aspect of the para-
tional. “dox of Hitler’s personality,
“His phraseology was hinting He could be composed, yet he
conventional. He expressed could be frenzied. Logical, yet
himself clearly and adroitly,.. unaccountable. Courteous, yet
He had no notes,” «churlish. What he never seems
But even at that first meeting§to have been is relaxed
—with Mr. Anthony Eden and Sir ; sa?
John Simon in 1935—Hitler ex- Impressec La
hibited his mercurial temper. The only foreign statesman ever
There was never any carpet- on comfortable terms with him,
chewing, but: — according to Schmidt, was Ru-
“Almost without transition he gaania’s Marshal Antonescu.
would suddenly fly into a rage; | Before their first meeting “it was
his voice would become hoarse, drummed into him that he must
he would roll his r’s and clench not say a word against the award
his fists, while his eyes blazed.” fof Rumania’s Transylvania to
A remark of Mr. Eden’s caused Hungary]. He spoke for ret
that particular outburst. But then hours about nothing else |
Mr, Eden had the provoking habit “"That always impress¢ d me,’ |}
of asking straight questions. Hitler frequently said, ir" i
So, Dr. Schmidt notes, had Mussolini was never Mo
Molotov and Belgium’s King Leo-, teemed. Hitler always out-ta ced
pold, Neither were favourites him, overwhelmed him. with the
with Hitler. military statistics his mind stored

One of his disarming tricks was
that of stidden and unexpected
restraint. Schmidt saw it done





Remember —
HUTCHINSONS

The Most Central Shopping Place For :—

and CROCKERY

@ ALL TYPES KITCHEN WARE
@ BEST BRANDS PAINTS and ENAMELS
@ STOVES and PARTS

@ BEDSTEADS, SPRINGS and MATTRESSES

@ GLASS and MIRRORS.

and many other BARGAIN ITEMS.







ands came

And in® spoke quietly.



ee

Years...”

London Express Service



case ever comes to trial he with
conduct his own defence

Apart from his paper he has}
only .one absorbing interest
clagsical miusic. He owns one ot
the. world’s finest. gramophones
built especially for him and
thousands of albums of per-
formances by the world’s best
orchestras. He lives in a
modernistic 12-year-old three-
floor house a tew minutes from
his office and the Presidentiai
Palace which are virtually
neighbours. The house, brick
built and painted a gleaming
white, is lavishly furnished in
the style of an English country
place

MORNING SWIM

EFORE Peron’s ban Paz used
to drive in his American car |
to his office for a short statt

conference, where the work of
the leader writers was debatea }







He left at eight. drove nome. and
took 4 swim. An office messenger
would be waiting with page
proofs as he stepped from his
pool Nothing went into La
Prensa's editorial page without
bis personal approval

In his news columns Paz
dernands oniy two things
impartiality and accuracy. For
h readers he buys Britain's
Reuter service and America’s
United Press, maintaining onlv
two overseas bureaux of his own
—ore in Montevideo, Uruguay

just across the river Plate. one in
Geneva
Paz 1s tall. grey-haired and dis-




tinguished. He has eight
children. five cf them sons and
fourteen grand-children He |
inherited La Prensa from his if
tather. who had founded it in i
1869. He ser his apprentice
ship tn ¢ tments. and for |
some year: a junior in the

leader-writing rooms

MISSING: 6 MEN

HE sort of thing La Prensa is

up against is illustrated by

the story of its brand-new
press. This was bought in the
United States in 1947. Jt reached
Buenos Aires in safety. To-day
iG still stands uncrated in the
paper's garage.

“Shortage of labour” has so far
prevented Peron from granting
th? required Government permit
to have it installed About six
men would be needed for a week
So delicate is Argentina's man-
pewer situation that they just
cannot be found.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

London Express Service

during the Munich crisis of 1938. |
Hitler and Chamberfain were
in delicate negotiation, Peace and |
war were in the balance.
the dreaded news that the
‘Czechs had mobilised. |
i In the horrified silence Hitler
Schmidt translated |
Zinto English:
4 “Despite this
vocation, I shall, of. course,
keep my promise not to proceed
against Czeehoglovakia during

easily.

sO



Henry Awbry.
L. E; S.

IIS

Roebuck Street

G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD. 1
'



KIDNEY-LIVER PILLS |



Then F

unheard of pro- |;



CITY GARAGE TRADING CO, LTD.



Get Nexce








Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with the liver, must filler out im-
purities from the bloodstream.

So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
achy-—-with the nagging pain of an
aching back-—look to both your kid-
neys and liver, That's why Cana-
dians have been relying on Dr.
Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills for over
half a century.

Give your system a chance to
work properly. Try Dr. Chase's
idnes-Léver Pills today, The name |
“Dr. Chase’’ ig your assurance. 3 |

> Dr. Chase's -



Her old undies look new —
because they are always

washed in LUX

You too can keep your pretty clothes looking
like new—just wash them regularly in
Lux. For Lux gives longer life to dainty
clothes, keeps colours gay and lovely.
Yes, gentle Lux flakes wash perfectly,

So make sure your clothes last longer, keep
new-looking — wash them regularly in Lux.

Keeps all dainty clothes like NEW

4 LEVER vaopvcr

iBATTERY



HAM G67 81



My cyes often used to smart and
ache after 4 day's work. Sometimes
leven had to stay late to get finished

At the Club Jim said: “You're
probably suffering from a touch of
eye strain, Why not try Optrex?”








You speed up innumer-
able farming jobs...cut
farm machine operation
costs... when you use
EXIDE Batteries in your . 7 - :
ad ifie So I took Jim's advice. Every day ‘No eye strain now!" I said to Jim
farm tractors and other I used Optrex-—washed away dirt later. “Thanks to you—and Optrex!
mechanical equipment and germs, toned up eye muscles. I'll never be without it again.”
EXIDE Batteries give
rae pe PROTECT YOUR EYES wzth
steady, uniform, eco- a
s nomical performance ; oe
year,in and year out +
‘Oy
THE
’ LONG LIFE 9 ~ OPTREX »
a) ,
bod GATTERY! | se EYE LOTION KGS
A a Dependable Batteries ; }









for 61 Years!



MAKE THIS TEST
‘The rim of the eye and inner
should be healthy flesh
FREE! in each
a scientifically

packet
designed eyebutl. @






















THE FAMILY CAR

This luxuriously upholstered Car offers complete comfort in seating for six
passengers.
It is economical to buy and economical to maintain,

VANGUARD FOR VALUE

and let us demonstrate it for you

Visit our new Showrooms in Pinfold Street
every day

Our Gasolene and Oils Dept. is now open from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m,
including Sundays.

It is to be remembered that
fasolene and oil,

GOOD as important to your car as

ervicing 1

LET US THOROUGHLY SERVICE YOUR CAR
It will pay you to visit... «....

CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LIMITED

Pinfold Street, Bridgetown.





PAGE SIX



BARBADOS Ga ADVOGATE

taaee eS fase

Printed by the Advocate Co.,

Friday, March 23, 1951

ACT NOW

IT is impossible to understand Canada’s
position with regard to Cuban sugar unless
Canada’s trade position with the West
Indies is first understood.

In 1950 Canada bought $414,000 worth of
sugar from Cuba. In the same year Cana-
da bought $7.2 million worth of sugar from
Barbados, and total imports from Barbados
into Canada for the year ending 1950 were
10 million dollars. This was an increase
of 3 million dollars on the value of imports
into Canada during 1949,

But in 1950 Barbados imported, from
Canada products valued at only 2.9 million
dollars, a considerable falling off on 1949
when Barbados imported 5 million dollars
of Canadian goods.

Nor is Barbados’ trade with Canada an
isolated instance of the unbalance between
Canadian and West Indian trade, In 1950
Canada imported from British Guiana
sugar valued at 13.6 million dollars:
Jamaica supplied 16.3 million dollars worth
of sugar to Canada the same year: and
Trinidad sold Canada $7.6 million of sugar.

Other British Empire countries in 1950
were responsible for the vast majority of
Canadian imports of sugar into Canada.
Australia sold Canada $10.9 million and
Fiji $10.1 million.

Of the vast total of $76,000,000 of sugar
imported into Canada in 1950, only $414,000
of sugar from Cuba, and $413,000 of sugar
from San Domingo were from non-British
Empire countries.

It only aggravated the Canadian cod fish
exporter when Trinidad chose the year
1950 to cancel its traditional buying of
codfish from the Canadian province of

Newfoundland and to purchase a year’s
supply of codfish from a Scottish co-opera-
tive. \
Nor has Cuba been slow to recognise
Canada’s disadvantage with regard to
West Indian trade. Cuba has been offering
at Torquay where international trade
agreements are presently being hammered
out to buy codfish from Newfoundland
provided that Canada in return will buy
sugar from Cuba. It is this fear that is
agitating British Empire sugar producing
countries. But no blame can be attached
to Canada, if the United Kingdom deliber-
ately controls the movement of trade be-
tween the British West Indies and Canada,
in favour of the United Kingdom,

How unfair that control of trade is, can
be seen by the 1950 twelve-month figures
of Canadian trade with the British West
Indies. These figures show that Canada
bought 67 and a half million dollars of
B.W.I. products in 1950, (a record over $62
million of imports in 1949). But in the
very year.of 1950 when Canadian dollars
for B.W.I. sugar and other goods reached
this all-time record figure, there was a
drop of no less than 30 per cent. in the
dollar value of Canadian sales in the Brit-
ish West Indies.

Exports from Canada to the British West
Indies in 1950 dropped to $30,600,000.

This compares with $43,000,000 in 1949.

And in dollar total this is the smallest
volume of trade which Canada has enjoyed
with the colonies since 1940.

The British West Indies must speak with
one voice and must make that voice heard
now, if our traditional trade with Canada
is not to be shipwrecked for the sake of
saving dollars for Britain and the sterling
area,







BOAT RACE

OVER a million people will line a four
and a half stretch of the River Thames to-
morrow for the greatest free sporting
spectacle in the world—the annual Oxford
and Cambridge boat race.

For the sixteen oarsmen who have un-
dergone three months of rigorous training
preparing for the race, there will be no
cups or prizes. They will be awarded a
Blue, the hallmark of achievement in sport
at the Universities.

The race itself seldom produces a thrill-
ing finish, though in 1877 there was a
dead-heat, and in 1949 Cambridge got up
at the post after having been led most of
the way.

The boat race was started in 1829, but
was not an annual event at first. In 1846
boats with outriggers were used, and the
first race in the present style of boats with-
out keels was. rowed in 1875. Now, with
ninetysix races rowed, the score stands at
Cambridge 52, Oxford 43.

The odd thing about the boat race is that
everybody — including leader writers —
takes sides, usually for no apparent reason.
Another odd thing about the race is that
although Oxford are usually favourites —
they are this year — Cambridge usually

wins. Since the end of the war Cam-
bridge has won four times to Oxford’s
once.

Unfortunately, unless something is done
soon it will be impossible to continue hold-
ing the boat race on the tideway, and
since the rivers at Oxford and Cambridge
are too narrow it would have to be rowed
at Henley. It is estimated ihat the race
eosts each University Club about £1,800,
and College funds are running low.

It has been suggested that the people

who benefit from the boat race — the
owners of hotels, pubs and clubs along the
course — should contribute towards the
cost of the race. This seems a fair pro-
posal, and it is hoped that it will be put
into effect and so help to preserve London's

. great sporting event,

Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.

































































|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

AGRICULTURAL NOTES

By C. C. SKEETE, Director of Agriculture

RAINFALL for the month of
February 1951 was greatly in
excess of the amount recorded in
any month of February during
the last 108 years for which
records are available. According
to rainfall returns received from
39 stations situated in the various
rainfall categories of the Island,
the average total rainfall for the
month was 13.42 inches. The
average total for February, ).950
was 2.08 inches; the average for
February for the past 100 years
was 2.09 inches.

The highest total fall for Feb-
ruary, 1951, at any of these
stations was 21.93 inches, recorded
at a station situated in the high-
lands of St. Thomas, and the
lowest was 6.77 inches measured
at a station on the coastal area
of the parish of Christ Church.

Sugar Cane. The harvesting of
the old crop was continued during
the month; some factories sus-
pended grinding operations for a
few days as it was impossible to
obtain sufficient cane on account
of the very heavy rains which
fell between the 12th to the 17th
of the month. Field yields have
remained above the estimate, but
juice quality has been below
average due to the immature con-
dition of the cane.

Food Crops, Tne marketing of
the main yam crop was permitted
during the month. Several fields
of sweet potatoes were harvested

Cotton, The reaping of the
first bearing of the cotton crop
was nearly completed, but the
weather conditions experienced
during the month have practically
made this reaping a total loss.
These rains .also hampered the
development of the second bear-
ing causing quite a number of
new flower buds and bolls to be
shed. Owners and occupiers of
several plots in St. Philip and
St. Lucy have commenced to
clean up their plots and not wait
for a second bearing, the land
being planted in some food crop.
No pink bollworm has_ been
observed either ir. the field or at
the ginnery.

Cotton Variety Trials. The
reaping of these trials was c¢n-
tinued during the month and will
be completed early in March.

The cotton and okra _ close
seasons were proclaimed during
the month. This season extends
from the Ist May, 1951 to. 30th
June, 1951.

Peasant Agriculture

Food Crops. Exceptionally
heavy and persistent rains during
the month proved a setback to
the cultivation of green vege-
tables, Cultivators experienced
some severe losses, and were
forced to replant a number of
their crops. As a result, green
vegetables are not expected to be
as plentiful as they normally are
at this time of the year. The
reaping of yams and eddoes was
continued, and these were in good
supply in the market,

Sugar Cane. Small farmers
continue to report good yields of
both plant and ratoon canes,
Reaping of this crop was slowed
down in many areas owing to the
heavy rains which fell about the
middle of the month, Supplying
of the young plant canes was con-
tinued.

Cotton, The picking and drying
of cotton were greatly hampered
by the rains. It is anticipated
that, as a result, the crop will
fall short of expectations, By the
end of the month many growers
had begun to destroy their cot-
ton plants,

Brittania still rules the waves
on the oceans which carry the
world’s merchant trade, And that
is truer today than at any time
in recent years. For in British
yards there are 2,000,000 tons of
new shipping on the stocks and
orders for as much again,

Fresh contracts are being sign-
ed daily. Yesterday orders for
five cargo ships were disclosed.
The P & O Line intends to add
two big passenger liners to its
fleet. And so it goes on.

Since January 120 new ships,
totalling 1,500,000 tons, have been
ordered at a cost of nearly £106,-
000,000.

War Losses Replaced

Thanks to a gigantic shipbuild-
ing programme, Britain now boasts
a Merchant Navy larger than in
1989—and we have far more
ships plying the seas than any
other nation, including the Uni-
ted States.

In five years British shipyards
have built 1,800 new merchan*
ships—bigger and faster than be-
fore—valued at about £500 mil-
lion.

The 4,000,000 tons of orders in
hand and on the books represent
another £300 million in hard cash.







Tree Crops. Coconuts, papaws
and limes were in reasonably
good supply during the month.
Mango and avocado pear trees
are beginning to bloom

Pests and Diseases, Except for

slugs, which were encouraged by
the damp weather, no serious
pests or diseases were reported.

Peasant Livestock. Balanced

animal feed as well as succulent
fodder was in free _ supply
throughout the month.

Extension Work. (i) The

Peasant Agricultural Instructors
paid visits to 581 peasant hold-
ings and ‘18 schgol gardens in
February, Twenty-one mango
trees were top-worked.

(ii) With a view to determin-
ing the initial reaction of
peasant dairy cattle own-
ers to the proposed Cen-
tral Milk Depot, and ar-
riving at some estimate of
the support likely to be
given the scheme from this
source, the peasant agri-
cultural extension _ staff
conducted a quick survey
during the month among
small-scale dairymen. The
results, on the whole, were
very encouraging.

Irrigation, The Colonial Devel-

opment and Welfare Scheme for
assisting individual peasants to
install irrigation units continues
to make satisfactory progress,

Crop Husbandry, Apart from

* routine cultural an@ other opera-

tions, the principal activities at
all Stations during the month
were those in connection with
the reaping of sugar cane and
yams, Both crops are giving fair-
ly satisfactory results,

Livestock. (i) The total number
of livestock at the six stations at
the end of February was 128.
These included stud animals, cat-
tle, goats, sheep, pigs and equines.
Thirteen head of stock were sold
and 550 gallons of milk produced

Gi) Stud services paid for at
the stations were as follows :—
pulls 136, bucks 37, rams 29 and
boars 50, making a total of 252 for
the month,

Botanical

Economic Tree rvropagation and
Distribution

Ninety lime, 50 Sbhaddock and

12 citron trees were budded du-

ring the month. Fruit trees de-

livered from Codrington were as



follows: —
Orange .....seeereeeee - 30
Grapefruit ws eee te 12
Pomelo «.....-.seeereee 2
Breadfruit .....sssesee 2
Golden apple 3
LAO. cievee ec vd ll
Mandarin ee 2
PROP. ist 4 5c 9
GUAGE «05 cts aes eee 2
FTAP] cee seve eeeeeee . 1
TOE) (oo le cece ee nviens 74
Coconuts © ......see2++++ 759
Distribution of Ornamental

Plants. One hundred and thirty-
six ornamental plants of different
species were distributed.

Afforestation. In addition to the
above, fifty-four casuarina trees
were distributed.

Entomological

Control of Moth Borer, | Field
work was carried out on D. sac-
charalis moth egg deposition in
fields, and on extent of parasitism
by Trichogramma. Very few dead
hearts or D. saccharalis eggs are
as yet apparent, .

The normal mass breeding of
Trichogramma has been _ inter-
fered with this year by large scale
invasion of ants from unexpected

By GERALD SCHEFF

State board can claim any credi*
for such enterprise.

Twenty-seven other countries
have looked to Britain for their
merchant ships. One third of the
tonnage building is for foreign
owners. Norway has. ordered
1,000,000 tons of shipping frem us
since 1945,

British shipowners, with war
losses replaced, are proceeding
with plans te rejuvenate the ilcet
with the most seaworthy, econom-
ical and comfortable ships ever
built,

Among the merchantmen on
order are 27 vessels of more than
20,000 tons each.

Oil-tanker Rush

Greatest demand is for tankers.
An oil-hungry world is clamour-
ing for them.

One north-east coast yard is
building 24 tankers which on
average will be 6,000 tons larger
than the petrol-carriers of the
thirties,

A 32,000-ton tanker is likely to
be the largest ship launched in
Britain this year.

Finishing touches are being put

Neither the Government nor any to two new liners scheduled for

OUR READERS SAY
Closing down of City Dairies

though probably Dr. Carter, in the
Chair, approved of the vote of his

sources. This has been corrected |
and distribution of parasites to!
planters will start at the middle!
of Marca.

Factory counts of bored canes
were held up for one week by
rain, but results so far to hand
show a satisfactory low percentage
of drainage by moth borer.

During the previotis year ad-
vantage was taken of prevailing
wet conditions to re-introduce and
mass breed in the laboratory the
larval parasite Lixephaga diatraea,
Altogether 7,120 of these parasites
were liberated under favourable
conditions in cane fieldsy of which
total 3,635 were mated females
and the remainder were surplus
males.

A survey of the young plant
crop will be carried out later pn
when reaping is more advanced,
to ascertain whether the above
larval parasites can be recovered
in the field. y

Food Crops. Routine observa—
tions for incidence of insect pests

were carried out,

Introduced Parasites and Pre-
dators. A third field generation
of the cabbage worm parasite
Apanteles was found at Groves

Agricultural Station. That source
et supply has now gone and no
other area is known in whieh the
parasite could establish itself and
show. such successful field ye
coveries,

The parasite AgYa_ trinitatus
which controls Aspidiotus scale on
coconut trees has been recoveyea
in numbers and it is undoubtedly
established here. Another very
Jarge coccinellid predator was also
found in numbers; this predator
was not found hefore 1950 and
may well be one of the introdyec-
tions made from Trinidad. =

No recoveries were made of
white fly parasites or other in-
troduced parasites or predators:

Root Borer, Laboratory experi-
ments with new “poisons, which,
if properiy distributed throughout
the soil are known to kill root
borer and brown hard back grubs
before serious damage can be
inflicted by them on growing cane,
has shown that under local condi-
tions these materials do not
inhibit or in any way damage the
growth of cane setts planted in
12 inch pots. in ‘sterilized soil.
Also pulverized coral ‘stone mixed
with the soil at the rate of 600
pounds to the atte has so far
caused no ill effects, On the
other hand, dipping cane setts in
a mud slurry containing con-
centrated’ poisons. which could
not economically be distributed
throughout the soil has completely
inhibited growth in all of the 20
pots so treated, The setts dug up
for examination after 2 months
—ere not dead and the eyes ap-
peared normal. The variety used,
however, namely B.41211 has
given similar examples in two or
three of the control pots, one sett
springing 2 months after being
planted,

Control of Woed Ants, Four
Government buildings and four
private buildings were examined
during the month; also one ship-

in the packing cases. ;
Mosaic.

Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane
Owners and occupiers of land are
reminded.that the first inspection
of the young cane crop for this
disease should take place during
the month of March, _ The neces-
sary return forms ¢an be obtained
from the Department of Agricul.
ture, t



Britain’s Ships Lead The World

More Vessels At Sea Than AtiyoneeEven America

maiden voyages in April and

May.
One, Furness
cruises. The other the £3,500,900
liner Oronsay is ‘for the Aus-
tralian run. paw J
She will have’ more tourist
space, with fares as low as £59,
a ‘dining-room and playdeck for
“children only,” and a mast con-
taining a radar-scanner on the
bridge.

Fewer Coal-fired

New liners-are to fit anti-sea-
sickness _stabilisers—hull __pro-
jecting fins which reduce ships’
roll in heavy weather.
device will convert sea
into drinking water. y

Oil-burning motorships — will
form 80 per cent of the new
ships. Fewer coal-fired steamers
are being built tham ever.

But there will be no “jet” ships
Such engines were tried out and
discarded at sea before airplanes
were invented.

Most of Britain’s newest snips
will cost £1,000,000 each. And
ships of the future will have only
ene funnel. Bow figure-heads of
ancient days are returning to add
grace and beauty,

new
water

—L.E.S.

een een ee tA TT

such ‘conditions
cases, and

- Bozorgmehr,

exist. in. other
would of course be



The Murdered Prime Minister

‘| AM AFRAID OF NO ONE’

By JOHN GODLEY

FOR ten days I stayed in Resht on the
Caspian Sea as the guest of General Haji Ali
Razmara (assassinated in Teheran a few days
ago) at the time of his unexpected nomina-
tion as Premier of Persia.

I asked him if he feared assassination. He
replied: “Never. If you are afraid all the
time you cannot work. I am afraid of no
one.”

Even then it was whispered in Teheran
that his life was in danger. He had many
enemies, who feared his power. :

Britain has lost a good and powerful frien
by his death, After his nomination as
Premier he was attacked by the minority
Opposition as the “stooge of Britain and
America,”

NO STOOGE

He was a friend of the West and opposed
to Communism, but he was nobody’s stooge.

His interest was only in Persia. He knew
he could not afford to oppose. Russia openly.
Russian troops were concentrated along the
frontier, and there were no British forces
within 2,000 miles, But he determined to
maintain the independence of Persia against
constant Soviet pressure.

Under the Treaty of Friendship signed be-
tween Russia and Persia in 1921, Russia was
entitled under certain circumstances .to
occupy Persia. This shadow was always be-
hind Razmara.

Occupation of Persia would give Russia a
common frontier with Pakistan, Iraq, Tur-
key, and Afghanistan. It would also cut
Britain off from the Persian Gulf oilfields.

A BULWARK
Razmara was the chief bulwark against the
Red tide.
Razmara, when I met him, was no politi-
cian, but Chief of the Imperial General Staff.
I was introduced to him through Esfandiar

was murdered.

I learned that he might soon be nominated
Prime Minister and I cabled the information
to the Sunday Express.

My cable was read, of course, by the Per-
sian censors, and next day all the papers
in Teheran carried a denial that there were
“any possibilities” of a change in Govern-
ment, Eight days later the Shah sent for Raz-
mara.

Razmara worked a 14-hour day. He was

on the move all the time.
Every Thursday he visited his father, who
is 110.

FOR UNITY t

He received me in the office of his summer
residence at Tajrish, in the hills outside

Teheran.

One could sense the strong personality of

the man.

I asked him if he was encountering oppo-
sition, and he replied: “There is always oppo-
sition to anyone, but I do not think it is seri-

ous. I hope I can unite the country.
“I know those in authority all over the

country, and I believe they have confidence

in me.

“Our foreign policy is very clear. Persia is
: small country, despite her strategic and

Withy “Ocean economic importance. She wants to keep her;
Monarch, is designed for =

He told me that the combined army and
gendarmerie totalled only 150,000. “It is
only sufficient for the security and integrity
of the country,” he added.

ON COMMUNISTS

“It is hard to estimate the strength of the

Communist Fifth Column here. The number

of real Communists is very small indeed —

probably not more than a thousand.
_ “But there are many people who are out of
work and many who are very poor. For this
reason they have sympathy for the Commun-
ists.

“Tf, as we hope, we can find work for every-
one, the number of Communist sympathisers
will at once dwindle rapidly.”

Thus spoke the friend of Britain who was
buried on Thursday. The Shah will not easily
replace him.

Without Razmara Persia may slip back
into weakness and vacillation.

\ ! —L.ES.

the big dairy van from a distance
would not, could not, do.



assistant director of propa-
ganda, who was by Razmara’s side when he

Last July I wrote: “Razmara has
energy and vitality enough to reach just as

ment of tea and one of shoes; preat an age.”
examined for Indian wood : 8

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951



PENCILS FOR EVERYONE

Y



Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE







Will Our Customers please Note
that We will not be open for Bus-
iness on SATURDAY, 24th March
1951, and arrange their Shopping
accordingly.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES: 4472, 4687, 4251, 4413.

INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD.

THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS
PAINTING REQUIREMENTS

INSIDE and OUT.



For the protection and beautification of

your _ property, we offer

can you

the following

WALL PAINTS

“PROPELLER” DRY DISTEMPER (for exterior walls).
Supplied in powder form to be mixed with fresh water
— $6.10 per 4 cwt. drum.

“LAGOMATT” FLAT OIL PAINT (for interior walls)
Supplied ready mixed; can be repeatedly washed — $7.12
per Imperial gallon.

-_—

Fae best poral the following instructions should be carefully

Exterior Walls,

1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least

2 an before painting.’ Then apply 2 coats of “PROPEL-

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with a mixture of plaster-
of- Paris and “PROPELLER,” afterwards treating these
patches with 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL” CEMENT
aaee PRIMER, Then apply 2 coats of “PRO-

Interior Walls.

1. For new work, allow the surface to dry out for at least
ose before painting, Then apply 2 coats of “LAGO-

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with plaster-of-Paris, after-
wards treating these patches with 1 coat of “INTERNA-
TIONAL” CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, Then
apply 1 coat of “LAGOMATT” if the surface was previ-
ously of the same shade; or 2 coats of “LAGOMATT” if
of a different shade. :

TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED,



DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acents




JUST A FEW
HOURS .... THEN
EASTER





To Tne Editor, The Advocate—

- SIR,—Will you permit some-
thing more to be said, even yet,
on this very controversial and
long-drawn-out subject, although
it was decided at the Board of
Health meeting last week to en-
force the 1948 Regulations and
remove all dairies from Bridge-
town’s “Extended limits’’-—even
though in some places there is
room to spare,

I think there are a good many
people, in addition to the dairy
owners, who regret that the re-
commendation of the Committee
appointed to investigate and advise
on the matter was rejected, namely
“that the situation should be re-
viewed in the light of additional
facts and because of substantial
opposing circumstances,” and they
very much wish that a compro-
mise should still be reached,

May I try to sum up the pros
and cons for the point of view of
those who ere not so much con-
cerned for logic and consistency
as for practical issues and com-
munity benefits.

1, The decision was reached by
a vote of 3 to 2, not a very con-
vincing or decisive conclusion,

brother medicos; who constituted
two thirds of the small majority.
But thus the’ Board’ turhed back
from its attitude in appointing the
Committee, and _ rejecting its
advice.

2. Mr. Kidney and Mr. Goddard
presented substantial reasons for
review, and presumably for the
provisions of a licensing system,
like that operating for pig-keep-
ing.

They pointed out that the eleven
dairies, large and small, still car-
rying on, furnish milk-hungry
people, many of them children,
with upwards of 400 pints daily,
And it may be added that there is
not readily apparent -eany~ source
from which that logs could be
made good.

Now that is a matter of very
considerable importance. The com-
munity is already suffering from
a great shortage of this vital com-
modity, and we do not .want, T
judge, to import more powdered
substitute.

The two Committee members
also pointed out, naming especially
Mr. Hill’s Holborn Dairy, that all
possible hygienic and sanitary re-
quirements were provided, But

strictly enforced if a licensing sys-
tem were ‘arranged, Moreover,
closing down means ruin in some
cases, }

3. On thé'other hand, the Hon.
V. C. Gale, ‘the other lay member
of the Committee, spoke strongly
about the injustice to the large
number of proprietors who gave
heed to the regulations and moved
out their dairies in good time. To
make exceptions or compromise
now would be very unfair to them,
said he,

Now we all know that “fair play
is a very precious jewel.” But it
is possible for very special cir-
cumstances to justify compromise
in the publje interest, And “two
wrongs do not make a right.”

4. It has been urged on my
attention by one of the smaller
proprietors ‘that, being conveni-
ently situated and equipped, he is
able to act as a retailer to poor
people who eannot afford a regular
supply of milk. Through his dis-
tributor he sells them a gill or a
half pint when they have the
necessary pence, and so helps
them to make palatable and more
nourishing the morning or night
“sweet water,” “This, I suppose,

Finally, Mr, Editor, there were
two points in your leading article
last Friday which were, I submit,
mistaken and should be corrected.

, Here is the first; “It is impossi-
ble for either the dairy keeper or

-Sanitary authority to direct the

flight of a fly, and so there can
be no protection for food or health
when the breeding ground is in the
midst of a residential area.”

I have had considerable experi-
ence of stock keeping, and it is
quite possible to keep cow-pens
and yards as clean and sanitary as
any other premises. “That is up to
the sanitary Inspector.

Here is the second: “Pigs can-
not be kept on the West side of
Culloden Road’’—or, in other
words, within the extended limits
of the city. ‘That is a slip up. By
the very wise licensing plan in-
stituted on “second thoughts”
when eviction was proposed, and
ven passed by the Legislature,
pig-keeping therein was approved,
and there were, according to Mr.
Merritt’s last Annual Report, be-
tween 1,600 and 1,700 parties so
licensed! That. works quite well.

INTERESTED ONLOOKER.
Other letters on page 8.~

”



eta
and

Wein ty

Gold Braid Rum
Top Notch Rum



Dry Sack Sherry
Pale Nutty Sherry
Partner's Port
Cliquot Champagne

Prunier Brandy |

Phone GODDARDS

‘
Lord Culvert Whiskey
Scotch Whiskey

Schenley’s Whiskey ,

Segram’s Whiskey
Tubory Beer %

Guinness Stout

WE DELIVER

> yo >





FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951 : ea



Larceny As A Bailee

1 a
VERNON CARMICHAEL (25) of Whitehall, St. Mi- MR. AND. MRS. Carl F. Tauch and Mr. and Mrs. whether they are bound to prose- | Mr. Mottley successful baking eee
chael, was sentenced to 9 months’ imprisonment at the Joseph H. Boyd who arrived here on Wednesday in Se ee ee oe aan eae fed Sees ger Bg
Court of Grand Sessions yesterday when an Assize Jury engined Beachcraft left yesterday for Martinique. ae eo _——" oe ae? ie Ry Fp aerlpg ————
found him guilty of larceny as a bailee. : ' The Beachcraft which carries a crew of two and three sodnieaies oars oe "being that Sabon " revinus eemulation
_. His Honour, Sir Allan Collymore, Chief Justice. pre- passengers is the property of the U.S. Civil Aeronautics either may prosecute. had allowed a dairy owner t
sided, are oe 7 Reece, K.C., Attorney General, Administration The Commissioners came to that keep cows if the per . were
rosecuted on behalf of the Crown. i ; ae . decision on the motion of Mr. certain distance from the neares
Sspoueaned Carmichael} wee er 8 ss Mr. Tauch is an Aviation Safety Agent and is Super- A. R. Toppin at their meeting residence. The present regula
Carmichael was charged on vising Agent of the U.S. Civil Aeronautics Administration. yesterday. Mr. E. D. Mottley tions made no sych allowance

three alternate counts and was

convicted on the first cont of lar-



Shopkeeper

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Will Serve 9 Months For W.1. Will Have Chance To Get
U.S. Aviation Certificates





His headquarters are in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mr. Boyd

is Chief of Communications

Operations of the same organ-





COMMISSIONER
MAY PROSECUTE

THE Commissioners of Health

will seek legal advice to find out

had previously made a motion that
as they had gone into the Bridge-

OF HEALTH

omens

the number had beer é

That dairies shoild be a specified
distance from the nearest resi

i P tion from every dence was, to his mind, a fair wa
ceny as a bailee of 50 bags of isation. ———— a » town dairy ques’ r .
eo iat t of view, they of going about it
balanced animal feed to the value The party left San Juan on s practical point | » the) g Hi :

2 rf ~s . could not see their way to bring Mr Toppin said _ that
Sethecee "Goten’ Venere Lae Gets 3 Months aaa wrist wee ad Price Control cases against dairy owners who appeared to him from the lav
having tedcdeedly Meee tok agi ganda he Wednesday ‘Toy Re rt R - t d still operated. ny = = that the ree have t
same to his own use. Sentence of three months’ im- left Barbados yesterday afternoon po ejyec e ever, gave the right to the Board remove. Could they then ru

The offence was committed on

October 16, 1950 in the parish of
St. Michael.

prisonment was yesterday passed
on Elizabeth King, a shopkeeper
of Tudor Street, by His Honour

for Martinjque and Guadeloupe,
and will arrive in Puerto Rico

THE Report of the Price Con-
irol Committee has been examined

of Health to prosecute, they could
prosecute if they wished .
Mr. Toppin questioned whether

over the existing law?
If they did not issue
and a dairy owner continued t

licence

; : , to-morrow after a brief stop at in the light of the present and they as commissioners could sell milk, he would be committin

Summing Up the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Col- St, Martin potential world situation te w 3 ’ "They seek leg:

i x as re- ally f t rosecute whep a breach. They should seek leg:

The Chief Justice, in summing lymore for receiving stolen goods They told the Advocate that See hedk a eee : t ehteenee aio

up to the jury, said that if they

plie Wh the C ‘ o ‘i PM tag he thought
\ y a 7 plies , ereas e ‘ommittee The ommissioners reachec Mr. Motiley decided to postpon
intended convicting the accused; Soeacttenanien yon: s the that many West Indians through- nad reasonably assumed that as this temporary decision when (his motion and allow the bommis 8 Tury
they would have had to convict Mr. G. H. Ada sg erday. out the Caribbean were strongly time advanced, there would be they were discussing what action |sioners to seek legal cdvice. STRep FOop PR A D
him on one of three counts. The eq of lehear ae Who appear- desirous of having a U.S. aero- likely to be some recession both should be taken in connection p = SIRMine ees pene
counts were (1) larceny as a bailee His Honour to exe Sees Saeed nautical certificate, whether it im prices and in supplies, inter- with the decision of the Board ot SOSSOOOSOO POOF FOPOOSD eee
(2) fraudulent conversion (3) lar- He said that she a ee be pilots, mechanics, control National —_ developments have Health in respect to the remova) c
ceny. sets E vas not the most tower operators, despatchers, par- resulted in increasing price of dairies from the city limits. GET YOUR Sra.

a guilty in this affair and consider- : 4

He said that the accused had

addressed them stating that the
50 bags of feed were delivered to
the Barbados Cotton Factory. If
they believed that that was true,
he said, the accused was not guilty.
Similarly, if they had a reason-
able doubt about the witness and
if they felt that the case was not

some time between September 30

ation should be given as she is the
mother of young children.

His Honour before passing sen-
tence told King that the jury had
found her guilty of receiving
Stolen property and the quantity
of goods was large. He said that
it grieved him to see her in that
position. It was a bad case and



their office in San Juan was aware

achute packers, ete, Their visit
through the islands was a famil-
jiarisation tour and provided local
response was good enough they
would probably be returning
through this area in about three
months’ time, when licences would
be issued after an examination,
Applications stating qualifications

gards commodity prices and sup-

trends. It is obvious also that a
restriction in the production of
commodities for civilian purposes
will be maintained until there is
some sustained improvement in
world affairs and in supplies.

In these circumstances, Govern-
ment considers it would be
inappropriate to implement the

they had the power to do so,

Motion Postponed
Mr Mottley postponed his |
motion which will be considered!
again when the Commissioners
get advice as to whether they are!

bound to prosecute or not
The Chairman, Mr. J. M. Kid-
ney, reviewing the decisions which
Had been reached when the |

EASTER EGGS

At WEATHERHEAD'S

Nestle’s Chocolate Egg im




~





Pastry and bicmts
rn








CENTURY Baking Powder
makes you

For lighter, more

PAGE SEVEN















Casket 11/- each '
recom ations a a a sa Nestle’s Chocolate Eggs @ f

proved to their satisfaction, he it was the duty of the Court not CUld be forwarded to local Civil Raat Tus, ~~ a Board of Health and the Commis- ’ 27e., 50c., $1.20, $2.00 ea. sure of success:
was not guilty. only to see that justice was done “V¥iation authorities who in turn that the proposal for distributors SOPeTs of Health disc ee a Fry's Chocolates in Plastic .

He outlined the case for the in every case, but to see people Would send thei to their head- to levy a service charge for retail, T°TOV"l, of Ses Tron ore 12 Ege @ $1.22 & $2.00 ea
prosecution, stressing the point were protected and also shop- Tarters in Puerto Rico, which deliveries has been implemented tein "had fl wally ye ied. that S Fry’s Marzipan & Choe, Exe
that it was significant that the keepers, was Civil Aeronautics Adminis- by some retailers as from the 1st ae ‘he ~ Ane y ducted ; na x in.thes. Cun-d00. ea.
accused on that particular day was ins tration P.O. Box 4764, San Juan, of March, 1951. ets th once cadets oy Am

He also drew to the jury’s at-

ernment is not prepared to increase

should be made and it then meant

Fry’s Marzipan & Choc, Egg

ery for .



+ of r Ser re) \999999969069999956999999959665" OPPS POPS OOOSTOSS
earning his living by driving a Will S Th Puerto Rico. = The Equalisation Account will eae ae ee ek a 30c. ea. x re ee ee ee ne 3
lorry, and was paid by the trip. F, Hous aa Years hi Expensive poutine — within its available 4. make recommendations and it Duck Carriage with Choe. % ‘ s
30 Bags Extra or House-Break r. Tauch’ said that | West balances — 19 make minor price was"tventuslly, sugsesten to the|® ERE 4/6 ¢4 * HARRISON'S
Yet he (the accused) was in- MacDonald Bishop, a Brie Indians found it very expensive adjustments but until further in- Board of Health Tent amenities Also Easter Eggs @ 20c,, & % BROAD ST.

sistent on placing an extra 50 of Government Hill, St. Michael, t© C0me to Puerto Rico to obtain formation regarding the present should be made to the existing 36e. ea x ¥
bags of feed on the top of 120 bags Was yesterday sentenced to three * licence, so in order to help -— rom: gy financial condition of regulations. The Board, however, : Also :- / Sena

to make one trip rather than years’ imprisonmept by His Hon- them, _his. organisation would Commission agents, wholesalers had decided that no amendment Fresh Delicious Confection- x %
making two trips, our the Chief Justice Sir Allan 8°24 him down to give them the 8nd shopkeepers is available, Gov— s

tention the fact that never before
had feed been sent from the
mixing depot at Da Costa & Co.,

«
a aa tat or nea, che meeting was to decide * sst. Ch @ $1.12 x 938 & >. ;
Ltd. to the Barbados Cotton Fac- tober 1 and 4 broke into the house Teturned from attending a joint following Vtseact SOME ASCs whether they as Commissioners,|® FTES Mor Chee. G $s $1.93 $2.18 only $2.48 pair
aes e oa of William Atki 3i at Durricane conference in Miami {0loWing increases in world 4). the Board of Health should , x each r
tory by any truck which had other ‘Atkinson situated at 5 n fam! prices. + gal Cadbury's Asst. Choe. @ %
=: Rockley, Christ Church, and stole Which opened on March 7th. : . prosecute. j .
deliveries of feed to make at that ; , stole : es : Government will give further : 5/- & 9/- box p
aame tine articles to the value of $141:12, Ccmmunications for the coming consideration to the conan Mr. Mottley said that the Large Boxes of Fry's Choc > COU NTER
There ‘wate dinerepaticted a fac Fitzgerald Lovell, who was al- hurricane season were being representations: of Pathe ere - question of removal had been ba. bi cn ’ x
as the evidence of the delivery of ed to be associated with Bishop checked. He recalled the services the first instance it is proposed Drought forcibly to him when he Meltis Favourite Candies @ } | %
as o nea, Pleaded guilty of receiving stolen the different governments in this to examine the comparative per- 22° been acting Chairman for $1.02 & $1.85 box F % JACOB'S PATTERN—with Solid Brass Pan, Tare Bar and
we esi wet dart ae goods and was sentenced to 18 area were able to give their or- centage of profits as Parades tHe Mr. Kidney. Discussing it from : :

The evidence was as follows.

Tickets Issued
George Roach, a clerk of the

Collymore at the Court of Grand
Sessions for house-breaking and
larceny.

Bishop sometime between Oc-

months’ imprisonment with hard
eer Both of them had nothing
Oo say.

opportunity. This was a recip-
rocal agreement beiween the U.S.
and British Governments.

Mr. Boyd said that he had just

ganisation last year, due to close
co-operation and working agree-
ment which had been established.
Everyone knew how important

the margin of profits, resulting in
a further increase in the price of
food and other supplies which is

commission “agents, the whole.
salers and the shopkeepers.



that either the Board or the
Commissioners, as the Act stated,
could prosecute.

every practical point of view, the
Board came to the conclusion that
a joint committee of the Board and
the Commissioners should be

BASTER

Black Magic Choc. $4.06 box

Nestle’s Choc, @

Meltis Coffee Choc.
Creams @ $1.23 box

Fry's Princess Choc. @

$1.19 box
Mint

Ode,

CHAMOIS LEATHERS

Selected Qualities

Weights

GARDEN SHEARS

8” Notched STEEL BLADES

Poise, Stamped ready for immediate use and complete with

—<— << . f 8

Barbados Cotton Factory said that Labourer Received communications were to hur- ST. LUCY ASSESSOR ep pointe to make recommenda- jae teen dione ee % "

on October 16 at about 1.30 p.m. Stolen Property ricane reconnaissance. Mr. Boyd TO BE APPOINTED ar ny box ; Soe x $28.14 each
he received 120 bags of balanced visited Barbados last June, and Dairies Visited

animal feed from one of M. L.
Harrison’s trucks. He issued tick
ets to the feed depot and the depot
in turn sent back theirs. He never
received 50 bags of feed on Oc-
tober 16, There were two loads

‘ ; . ade, Cadbury's Roses @ 3/9 & > ARIEL AND TIGER MODELS
of 120 bags each, brought in that sions of receiving stolen goods ee all the gays — hope Soins Mit ey, wee gee F The regulations allowed any $1.48 tin $ Each i el «
day. some time on December 21 and 31. re eturn soon for a _ Jonger Tike 1 dite er Ateme don. ihe peredd. to keep any wimbe of] % Cadbury's Red Rose @ 980 % cach in two sizes—12 and 14 inch
He did not see the accused on _ His Honour the Chief Justice *'8Y- Agenda. When the Vestry do meet cattle in any part of Bridgetown] ¥ & $1.80 box x PRICES RANGE FROM... .
October 16. . a pe Sent ony they will consider a suggestion by $0 long as that person did not] } aa oe 64c. tin ‘. x %
Clifford Carter said that he was S€n im to months’ im- © Fairfield & Mount Gay Ltd, in sell milk. One could keep cows|# Jacob's ream Crackers % | 9} °
a clerk at the mixing depot of prisonment to run concurrently in Travelling Bank connection with wa. Recthry: and give away milk, keep one or x $1.64 tin % ¥ $38.19 to $46.18 each
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. On October €ach case and consecutively with . someone will be elected to the two cows and sell milk; but|% Meltis Royal Princess Asst. $)% : J 3
16 about 9 a.m. the accused came & Sentence of 12 months which he Does Good Business office of assessor; there will be a could not keep more than two % $1.85 box » x Complete with GRASS BOX
in the depot driving a truck. He iS now serving for ani offence for discussion on ownership tax in cOws and sell milk. } Fancy Biscuits in Cello Peks. &
Jeft the depot and came back with eon he was convicted in the The Travelling Office of the view of Sir John Maude’s Report; There were 11 dairies and 15] 10c. pk. %
a ticket for 50 bags of feed. The /ower court. Government Savings Bank has and consideration of advertising people who kept cows but did not § Fancy Biscusts in Airtight s >
accused also produced a ticket for SESSIONS just completed its fourth week for tenders for supplying grocer- come under the title of dairies, x Pks. 2/- pk $1 % CAST IRON p
120 bags of feed and he asked him ON visiting the _various sugar fac- ies, vegetables, fruit, fresh meat, The question then was reduced % Butler Scotch 2le. pk. & x -
why he was carrying 170 bags of WEDNESDAY NEXT tories in the island. Business done milk, ete., and the making of to whether the regulations were | ¢ 45e. tin SRAM): ic) CORA neon, Meat. us ie Se ethene tees ts ales
feed on the truck. The next sitting of the Court of during the week showed that clothing, and nurses’ uniforms for for hygienic purposes. In that x Mougat 34c. pk. & 7c. tin
The accused said that he was Grand Sessions will be on Wednes. there were 10 new accounts, 46 the Almshouse. case no cow owner should be % Royal Scotch Shortbread $
being paid for it. day, March 28. deposits and the amount of The Vestry will also consider allowed to keep cows in the city. | $ $1.36 tin %
George Agard, a labourer em- Sir Allan Collymore, Chief Jus- â„¢Oney received was $1,011,30. the advisability of asking the St. The committee, after reviewing

ployed by M. L. Harrison as 2
hand on one of his trucks, said
that the accused used to drive a
truck. On October 16, the accused
drove a truck to the feed depot for
feed,

Milton Miller, a labourer of My
Lord’s Hill, pleaded guilty yester-
day of receiving stolen property
valued at $70.25 on December 23
at the Court of Grand Sessions.
He was also found guilty previ-
ously at the Court of Grand Ses-

tice, when he adjourned the Court
yesterday said that early that day
he had released the waiting jurors
until Tuesday, March 27.

He, however, will be leaving the

, island on Tuesday, March 27, to

may visit Trinidad in May or June
to attend a hurricane conference,
sponsored by the Caribbean Com-
mission.

Both Mrs. Tauch and Mrs, Boyd
thought Barbados was the pret-



A comparison of the business
done during the past four weeks
this year as compared with that
of the two previous years is as
follows: —

New Deposits Amount

THE St. Lucy Vestry meeting,
which was fixed to be held at the
Vestry Rooms yesterday afternoon,
was postponed until a later date.

The meeting was called by Mr,
C. H. Yearwood, Churchwarden,

Peter’s Vestry to concur in the
remodelling of the hospital known
as Farres and making the same
suitable for use as a joint Isola-
tion Hospital for the two parishes,

They will also consider giving

They realised that the enforce
ment of the law would create a
hardship. After several meetings, |
visits to the dairies and accepting’
of the advice of the Chief Inspec. (
tor, their recommendations they

the whole situation suggested to
the Board of Health that some
effort should be made to amend
the Act, not only with the view
of helping the people who still
had their dairies in Bridgetown,



Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc. 2/-,
* 3/9 & $1.79 box

x Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc. @
% 8/- tin

§ Cadbury’s Milk Tray @ 3/9
% & $1.48 tin

Mars Bes 14, ea >
Crest Bars 16¢. ea. %
For the Best of |. . %
“EASTER EGGS”
& “Confectionery”

PRD sid

OA AA
At AA hgh ALIA LILLIA FIFI FP FOL L LLL ECPI LLL AAAAALA
4,

RANSOMES’ LAWN MOWERS



ENAMELLED BATHS

RECTANGULAR SHAPE—5S’ 6”

OVERALL

Complete with TAPS, OVERFLOW and WASTE FITTINGS

’ +50 : Accounts assistance to the sexton to combat but with a view to making the
Pay a Read Car Seni ator it ae cot aan ms = ie ea ashes from the factory during the law more reasonable, That, at the only $109.91 each
of fe rom ¢ a @ : ? ae ’ .80 3 i revi se ime y o 2
at the feed depot. While on the ve nen fe start a case on.that day, j95) "56 198 4'639.20 canines with revenue same time, would prevent the
1e . '.

way the accused left 50 bags of
feed at the old Y.M.C.A. and
carried in 120 bags to the Factory.
He gave the order to one Parris,

x
Jerk of the Cotton Factory NO FILM SHOWS What is the sealcott t beet first got out, there were 68 dairy Head of Broad St. . . TEL. 2364
ac - To-night, being Good Friday Over 20,000 paper f Port- ° eal price o: -ef owners in Bridgetown, but since PRCA eee *t = Z
Returned For Feed night, there will be no film show lend Gamnent ts neh. end may well be asked by anyone who then until the present ‘time, there EE LLLP LLLP ALLA ALAA A MD

Adter. the accused left the Cot-
ton Factory, he returned for the
50 bags of feed at the Y.M.C.A.
and he helped him to load the feed
on to the lorry. He drove from
there and went to the corner of
Pine Road where he talked to a
lady in a shop. He shortly came
out of the shop and carried ten
bags into the same shop.

They left there and went to
Cole’s Garage where they bought
some gas, before driving off to
Spooners Hill. He left 20 bags at

He adjourned the court
until Wednesday.



at the British Council, ‘Wake-
field,” for adults. The Advocate
was also informed that the usual
Saturday morning show for chil-
dren will not take place to-mor-
row morning.

ON EDUCATION BOARD

The Advocate learnt yesterday
that Rev. A. E. Armstrong has
been invited to become a member
of the Education Board and that
he has accepted.







Cement Comes

yesterday from England by the
Harrison liner S.S. Statesman.

The Statesman began discharg-
ing her cargo shortly after her
arrival and is expected to spend
a few days in Barbados.

Supplies of sausages, shredded
wheat, confectionery, ground oat-
meal, milk powder, table jelly,
ovaltine, wine, gin, canned goods
and biscuits were also brought by
her to the island,

The Statesman is consigned to
Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd.





What Price, Beef?

enters the Public Market to get a
supply.

It was stated a short while ago
‘that the price had risen from 36
to 38 cents per pound, Some
butchers are now charging 40
cents and the surprised housewife
more often than not buys. Many
ask, however: “Is this the latest
price or are we being overcharg-
ed?”



"Gascogne” Brings 18
From ULK.

Board from being laughed at,

Formerly 68 Dairies
The Hon. V. C. Gale said that
when the Dairy Regulations were

were only 11 in the prohibited
area. Faced with the provisions
of the law, the majority took the
trouble to remove their dairies
Were they then to condone those
who had refused to comply with
the law and give them prefer
ential treatment?

To argue that those who obeyed
the law had to be penalised ana
those who flouted it should be
taken into their bosoms was one
sided and unfair argument if
such were maintained, they would

Eighteen passengers arrived S009 come to a fine state of

a shop there. The accused then : here yesterday by the French liner ®{Tairs.
drove to Green Hill and left the Qperpriced Fish S.S. Gaseogne, which sailed for The General Board of Health
rest of the feed there. NO FISH the West Indies from Le Havre via Were the Health authorities of
Police Constable Arthur Jes- Fifty - two - year - old Edith i! dees elie. ether ables Sadar England. Barbados and they, rightly or

samy said that on October 21 at
about 10.40 a.m., he went to the
residence of the accused in Green
Hill and talked with him. He told
the accused that he was suspected
of receiving 50 bags of feed from
the feed mixing depot on October
16, and failing to deliver the
same, The accused made a vol-
untary statement which he took
down in writing. On October 26
he arrested the atcused on a war-
rant which was issued to him at
the Central Police Station.

Millar of Dalkeith Hill, St. Mi-
chael was yesterday fined 30/- in
14 days with an alternative of
one month’s imprisonment when
she was found guilty by Mr. C, L,
Walwyn, City Police Magistrate,
of selling fish at a greater price
than scheduled.

Millar sold C. D. Harristhree
and a half pounds of dolphin for
$1.05, when the scheduled price
of this fish is twenty-six cents a
pound. The incident occurred on
Wednesday evening,

opeâ„¢ CAP

THE WHOLE FAMILY

® LEAVES BODY FRESH,

SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN

@ MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR



day several housewives were in
the Public Fish Market peering
eagerly out to sea for any fishing
boat that might be on its way to
the shore. There was none in sight
but they continued to wait. Pecu-
liarly enough, a few yards away
was a vendor of shark and dolphin
who spared no pains in making
his presence known. He attracted
little attention. Presumably the
housewives nearby—or their hus-
bands—had no liking for such
fish.






HELP

- NOW! Dental Science Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO

The Gascogne also had on board
11 intransit passengers, She left
port some hours after her arrival
for Trinidad. Her agents are
Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.

Engineer Appointed

His Excellency the Governor has
been notified that the Secretary oi
State for the Colonies has approv-
ed of the appointment of Mr. J.
C. Kellman, 2nd Assistant to the
Colonial Engineer to be Assistant
Colonial Engineer.





STOP

wrongly made certain regulations.
They as the Commissioners could
not fly in the face of the regula-
tions made by the Board.

In any case if these owners did
not get licences they could be
prosecuted and it would be their
duty as commissioners to prose-
cute,

Mr.
some

Toppin said that he saw
wisdom in the arguments

|of Mr. Mottley as to whether the

regulations were for the purpose
of hygiene. As it was, there were

'68 dairies and since that time,



| Will be CLOSED for
STOCK-TAKING

;
OUR DRUG STORE
3

WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED

EEG OOOO OOS PAE

2
BRUCE

Same styles

|
Black Patent |





LIRR e

SSSI BODO Op ne

SPOS OPIS PPPS SPSS FOP

o

aad Toes,
Sizes 7 to 10.

Lave 5





SOARES

HARRISON’







Platform Soles,

» 2hto-l







HARDWARE DEPT.



Very Smart Styles with Closed and Open Backs

si sWiidhs tities tre alk V4 wid $6.83 & $6.13
bhia sk eh y hes 4b saned $6.67 & $7.37

hepherd & Co., Ltd.

1, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

ORDER
THESE
TO-DAY







|

e

TOOTH

: Cece cate eeeees
SEBS




DECAY



PPLE ID DDR Rp
POR
ODD D ID pe
PELL PLL




LPPLL LALA PDD OOF >
LOOSE LE LL



GORGONZOLA CHEE yer Ib. ., . . $1.08
a n on Wednesday March 2th PORT SULUT CHEESE- jae ib aes
AVAILABLE !! w LUNCHEON CHEESE—per Ball $1.2
oa s ! | The DISPENSING Department {)} coups curese new $1.08
PU Er re re) || Wibe OPENED co umal || acer oe. nies
. > : . 3 3 DANNISH TINNED HAMS 214, ibs., 44 Ibs., & lbs 12 lbs
|S See tee Pee GCF Pregbtiptions 716. 5c.0 nau ative nacon RAcAsel wondapEcen
sPOULTRY CHOWS=s g of Prescriptions | | ch" abi no
a s : be ae
pi. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors. 2 , KNIGHTS LT). —PHOENIX PHARMACY i i STANSFELD. SCOTT & Co. Lid. ‘
Seeauagg = =) @ @ s = e e id » Wiiccisseeccint SOLOS EEO Vrorenmneennnerinnt ntti bbb tt ett ttt ttt tttettt tlt tet tener ey

















BARBADOS



PAGE EIGHT
OUR READ » SAY:
Fosrv ADERS SAY:
Ts Rait The cate— -
SIt we ain in connection Criticism Of S.P.C.A. has to ask why the regulation
n E ites reference has To Thée Editor, The Advocate were not made to apply t
et ct SIR,—My attention has been whole of the populated a
‘ e A imes drawn to the adverse criticism of te_Island
18 me t B ados the S.P.C.A. made in the House «f (5) HW the regulation aol
"5 Assembly recently made for the purpose otf controll
May I inform the public that 8 the fiy nuisance and the dang
; The wil g up of reserves b> our Chief Inspector - gives cl¢se of the causing of disease, ther
limited ility ‘companies haS attention to the condition of qe say the regulations should be e
been. refe d to as sagacious and animals swaiting slaughter at tn forced and should be mete to
snatogous aaa catiet ond wathave avai PBN to til Dairies rected with
May I venture to suggest that for and obtained from Col and the regulations should be ex
this Government policy is based Michelin extra police patrols on 1} 7 ied to cover the keeping of all
on a fundamental mistake and, Fridays and Saturdays. The snimals including Race Horse
despite some .similarities, the structurai shortcomings of the {% 2

analogy is clearly false.

The mistake lies in looking on
Government as something apart
from the Community, as if it
stood on its own financial feet
separate from the economic life
of Barbados, and had _ interests
differing from and perhaps ad-
verse. to- those of the community.
In reality Government is just a
part, exercising many necessary
functions, and perhaps some that
are less essential, all of which are
paid for with money drawn from
the cOmmunity by taxation, If
reserves are to be built up more
money must be drawn from the
community than is needed to pay
for government.

Does the taking of this addi-
tional amount from the commu-
nity in fact strengthen the finan-
cial position if hard times come?
I don’t think so on the contrary,

it is not even just a matter of
transferring money from the
pocket to another, which, if it
did no good, might not do any
particular harm, The mischief
lies in taking money from there

it can be put to work and placing

it in the Government's hands
where, .at best, it will lie more
or less sterile. The Parable of

the Talents still carries a lesson
that it would be well to keep in
mind. This idea of taking away
and locking up substantial sums
of money. seems particularly
hurtful, wheh, owing to increased
costs and expenses, business
needs so much more money to
finance it.

There are other objections. For
instance, the greater the amount
20 set aside, the greater is apt to
be the cost of looking after it.
The talent is not only buried; but
watchmen have to be paid to
guard it. Also, the existence of
any considerable fund, not tight-
ly tied to a specific purpose, will
be a standing temptation to ex-
travagance. Further, now-a-days
when the purchasing power of
money, that is, its real value, is
steadily dwindling, and when the
danger of inflation still causes
concern, it seems doubtful wis-
dom to plan to keep iarge sums
unemployed indetinitely

May I add a comment on the
analogy? It is undoubtedly sound
policy for a company to build up
reserves, and to do so does in-
crease that company’s financial
strength and its ability to weath-
er hard times. For that company,
if it should need money, can
look only to its own resources and
credit, it cannot make a levy on
its shareholders, Government's
position is very different; if it
needs money the community is
taxed to provide it, Therefore
while the company can rely only
on itself, Government can draw
on the taxable capacity of the
community. This is the reserve
that Government should seek to
build up. Much can be done to
encourage sound and_ careful
business principles, to foster
thrift and to stimulate suitable
enterprizes. Government also
might set a useful example by
care to eliminate waste, which is
not only harmful at the time but
does greater and lasting injury
by being habit-forming.

A sound, seaworthy ship, well
vared for and well navigated,
should be able to face bad
weather with reasonable confi-
dence,

x

Colleton,
St, Peter,

E, SHEPHERD.

een











AFRICAN MIXT

Colours the Hait instantly.

Available in 4 handy sizes
Obtainable from

DRUG








—for
longer
life

LASTING SAFETY

~ DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING

COMPANY

(ECKSTEIN

NO MORE GREY HAI

{t Is absolutely what Is professed of it:
A GENUINE HAIR COLOURING

BOOKER’S (Barbados

STORES LTD.
BROAD STREET, BRIDGETOWN
Manufactured by E. FLOUTIER LTD., Stanmore, Middlesex, Eng. Estd. 1889

DUNLOP rorrt

CAR TYRES



At present some of these stables
both in the Garrison and else
where are within twenty-five to
thirty feet of built up areas, the
fnanure pens of such horses pro-
vide a greater breeding place for
flies than do the Cow pens.

In conclusion the enforcemen*
of these regulations will work a
great hardship on those poor per-
sons living within the Dairy areas
and further strain the hard cur-
rency which is needed to purchase
the expensive Milk powders.

Trusting that the Authorities
will take cognizance of these farts
and act fair by all.

Yours faithfully,

rlaughter-house have been inves-
tigated by Canon Moore, Mzgor
Foster and myself and represen-
tations have been made to the
Colonial Secretary on the matter

The overloading of draught
animals causes us great concern
and I would point out to our
critics that no statutory regula-
tions exist. in this island for de-
termining maximum loads. Many
members of our Society, as well
as our Inspectors, are constantly
stopping and advising cart-men
not only regarding this offence,
but also concerning defective
harness, badly balanced loads and
ill-fitting wheels.









In order to augment the POOR MAN.
ety sees ss Se canes Public Health Conference

readily acceded to our request to
award a prize annually to the
member of the force with the best
record for Animal Welfare, work,

There is no need for me to en-
croach further on your space ex-
cept to say that we welcome
CONSTRUCTIVE criticism, es-
pecially if it will lead to the en-
actment of legislation framed to
protect and increase the relatively
few privileges enjoyed by animals
in Barbados,

Yours truly,
CECILE WALCOTT,
Hon. Secretary, (Actg.),
Barbados S.P.C.A.
Dairies
To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—After reading what the
Board of Health said about the
Dairy Regulation and what Mr.
Hill has written to-day, one has to
ask oneself why the Dairy Regu-
lations were passed,

(1) Were they made for
purpose of improving
sanitation of the City.
Has any epidemic occurred
in the City, if so, has it
been caused by the keeping
of Cattle by Dairymen.
Have any of the Dairy-
keepers in the City been
prosecuted for breaches of
the Sanitary regulations.

Is it due to the over popu-
lation of the City.
Were the regulations made
for the purpose of the fiy
nuisance and danger of the
fly causing disease.

(1) They could not have been
made for the purpose of improving
the sanitation or the nuisance to
those persons who are called to
live in the vitinity of Cow Pens,
as if this were the case, one would
have expected that the keeping
of Cattle in all built up Areas
would have been completely pro-
hibited. But what do these Regu-
lations do, they prohibit Mr, BE. C.
Hill who has the most modern
dairy in the Island, standing on
a seven acre plot, at a distance
of over 160 feet from any other
building from keeping his dairy
but allows any person who desires
to keep a cow, for as they term
it their own use, to keep it in as

To che Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The Conference of Public
Health Officers recent'y held at
Queen’s Park House was an un-
bounded success. The Conference
opened on a high note and ended
with a unanimous echo of har-
monious sounds,

The Director of Medical services
Dr. O'Mahony and Mr. Dougias
Smith, Resident Tutor of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies,
are to be complimented on arrang-
ing this conference which for the
first time in the history of this
colony, all persons working in
Public Health in this island met
tagether in solemn conclave to
diseuss the common problems with
which they are confronted in the
performance of their duties. Was
it a dream? No, it was a fact

The conference found comfor
in the stirring and inspiring ad
dress delivered by His Excellency
the Governor in opening the con-
ference. Public Health workers
have an arduous task and it has
often been observed that it has
turned out to be « thankless job
to those who labour in the field of
Public Health as well as to the
Administrators of Public Health

His Excellency’s address showed
that recognition and appreciation
was at last being given to this
important sphere of labour.

The high standard of the lec-
tures given by each respective
lecturer was indeed a credit to the
community. Without appearing in
vidious I think that the second
day of the conference will long be
remembered by those who attend-
ted and those who failed to attend
missed the opportunity of their
lives. It is well known that our
Senior Medical Officer Dr. F, N
Grannum has the gift of lecturing
on matters of Public Health and
to him a large number of our
qualified sanitary Inspectors and
Nurses owe gratitude for the
success they achieved in obtain-
ing diplomas in Sanitation. It is
the unanimous opinion of the con-
ference that the address on “Infant
Mortality” delivered by Dr, Gran-
num at the opening of the morning
session of the second day of the
conference was numbered among

the
the

(2)

(4)
(5)













booklet f i icte
t ted th igh isl
I le I la r
t pa
« al ric ! ild be
: Sanitar Inspecto and
‘ ! d the Associa
on I of its air t
pread of public healt;
throt gth and breadth
ti I think this an
»~ppor to do so,

Ye ave long been advocat
in newspaper improved
Sanitation and Public Health Ser-
vice nd full education on health

matters for the peopie of this is
land and you earn the gratitude
t all for the publication you gave
the proceedings of the confer-
ence

It is to be hoped that the four
important points made by the
Director the conference will
ever remain forever in the memory
of those who heard them. “The
attitudes, “The Personal Re-
sponsibility,” “Mother Craft,” and
“The Common Objective.”

EGBERT McCLEAN.



|



Age Grouping

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—On reading the
sions of the Members of the
House of Assembly in Friday’s
Advocate re Age Grouping, Il
have discovered that the chief
cause of the worry and bother in
the Elementary Schools has not
yet been made known to them.

Age Grouping may be trouble-
some, but in my opinion the prin-
cipal trouble is the lack of proper
staffing and the little interest
which the young teachers take in
their work.

One teacher generally has forty,
fifty, or sixty children to teach.
Will the abolition of Age Group-
ing lessen the number of children
in a class or will the large class
still remain ? Will the teacher be
able to examine forty exercise
books in less time? I say leave
Age Grouping alone, and staff the
echools adequately, so that the
bright children can be pushed on
and the slow ones receive more
attention. Try thig out, Honour
able members, then Tt

qauscus-



and awalt
results

s The next bother S the young} wy
teacher whose only interest is his
Salar

uneertain terms that he is not}
paid for hig ability to teach or|
for the amount of work he does, |
but for his qualifications, so he

qualifi
the
we

and qualifies to receive
ary for qualifications, The
of the child is no concern









ot his, he must learn as he can.
Thanking “you,
THINKER,
19.3.51.
Public Health
To The Editor, The Aavocate—
SIR,—Public Health is right-
fully very much to the fore to-
day. May I remind the Govern-

ment Authorities responsible that
payment for such important ser-
vices as Notification of Infectious

Diseases, Post-mortems, Lunacy
Boards, V.D. Clinics and Vac-
cinations remains the same as it



was over fifty years ago,
In view of the present high cost
of living is this fair or wise?
Incidentally the salaries
many P.M.O.s, Dispensers and
Nurses are considerably overdue
for an increase by their Vestries
WELFARE WORKERS

Fresh Bread
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR

of

rea -i have heard so many peo
close proximity to their neigh- the most brilliant addresses ever pje complain of their difficulty in
bour's house us they like. On the heard from the lips of any lec- keeping bread fresh during holi
face of this one must admit that turer in this island on Publie qay periods, that it is possible
these regulations are unjust and Health. In this fine address many your readers may care to know
work a nardship not only on Mr. important things in infant life my own method of doing so.
Hill but on his clientele who live were strikingly revealed, The bread should be wrapped
in the City. Then came the Director of Med- in a good-sized piece of plastic
(2) There has not been .an ical services on the subject of material and placed on the low-
epidemic in this Island since the Tuberculosis which is engaging*est shelf of the

Small Pox of over forty yearg
ago, so one cannot say that the

the attention of sciantists and
public health workers throughout

Dairies have been in anyway Te- the world. With calmness and
sponsible for what has not simplicity the Director kept the
occurred, conference spell bound on this

(3) As far as I know there nave
not been any prosecutions against
Dairykeepers in the city. 2

(4) If it is due to the over
population of the City then one

©

burning subject.

As a member of the Executive
Committee of the Barbados
Sanitary Inspectors Association I
am going to suggest that these

























URE



Also try
FLEUROIL
BRILLIANTINE

Makes the hair
soft and glossy
Sold in 2 Sizes

ROBI









_THE BEST AT T



Domestic
Refrigerators

a .

Unit which carries a

Pie :
ee re

PRESTCOLD

There is a PRESTCOLD MODEL to suit
Every Home — Every Pocket
Capacity 4.4 cu.ft. and 7.7 cu.ft.

Incorporating. the Exclusive “PRESTADOR”
inner door for exfra food storage.

Made by the largest Manufacturers of Automatic
Refrigerators in Britain.

Powered by the Hermetically Sealed Presmetic

Ww. FOGARTY LTD.

refrigerator;
brought out for use and returned
afterwards.

It will keep well for over
week and though it may become
a little dry it is still edible and
makes good toast.

(Mrs.) E. GARTSIDE-TIPPINGE.
Whitehaven,
Navy Gardens,
March, 19, 1951.

SON'S

Sli2
<2)



‘PATENT’ BARLEY

makes milk more digestible for baby

‘PATENT’ GROATS
makes weaning a happy time for baby—
and mother

)
y

SCC PE POPS FVOOFEE,

oe

HE LOWEST COST

LEO ELLOS

ota



five year Guarantee.

s
LIMITED ;
+ e . , .
% Representative for the West Indies.
‘ ‘
BROS ) PSSSSSSCOS 959 B9 9999999 FOSS OOO BOSS SOS OSSE SGOOOSS SX

ADVOCATE





He makes it known in no Rheumatism, Burning Passages, Excess

LLLP PLP POD

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951







Thanks
Editor, The Advocate—





























Sim On behalf of the girls of RAEN and WOMEN
the De itive Icing Class of the an
Girl dustrial Union, [ would
like to thank the Advocate Co., a
Lid. and Messrs. Cave, Shepherd | & v 5 *
& Co., Ltd. especially, for thei>|
* assistance with the cake raffle Be ’
ro here's how you can
The amount reaised was i
$101.95, and the winning ticket
was No. D—20 held by Mrs. O. be strong and active

Jonson of Brittons Cross Road.

Our thanks are also due to the
helpers and to the public for their
generous support.

Yours faithfully,
RUBY CHASE.

If you feel run down, are not
as full of life as you should be,
and colds hang on, you may
need more A&D Vitamins.
Try scientific, good-tasting
Scott’s Emulsion. Take it
regularly all year round.
Vitamins and energy-building oil.
It helps build resistance, stamina
and energy.

More than just a tonie—
it's POWERFUL NOURISHMENT



£ me



ey



“Dita













rgiCHPAND
WEEN

ic SHINY)

jt
1

: This sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of flavout
\ which will claim your allegiance from the first sip.

HIGHLAND
QUEEN

SCOTCH WHISKY

Sole !mporters :—
W.S. MONROE & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

ACDONALD & MUIR LTO * DISTILLERS © LEITH " SCOTLAND

Rheumatism, Ankles Puffy,
Backache, Kidneys Strained?

If you're feeiing out o-sorts, Get Up
ights, or suffer from Dizziness, Nervous-
ness, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles,

€





mM

called Cystex. Hundreds and hundreds 0}
Doctors’ records prove this.

exe No Benefit—No Pay

The very first dose of Cystex goes right
to work helping your Kidneys remove ex
cess acids. Quickly, this makes you feel
like new again. And so certain are the
makers that Cystex will satisfy you com-
pletely they ask you to try it under a money
back guarantee. You be the judge. If not
entirely satisfied just return the empty
package and get your money back,

Cystex (Siss-tex) costs little at chemists
and the money back guarantee protests
you, so buy your treatment today

Acidity, or Loss of Energy and feel old be-
fore your time, Kidney Trouble is the true
cause

Wreng foods and driaks, worry, colds or
overwork may create an excess of acids
and place a heavy strain on your kidneys
80 that they function poorly and need help
to properly purify your blood and maintain
health and energy.

LOR ey,
DHelp Kidneys Doctor's Way ®

Teeth as white

MAKESTHIS PEPSODENT

MIRROR TE
Many doctors have discovered by scien- ~~ for â„¢ os / %
tifle clinical tests and in actual practice KIDNEYS as ers?
that a quick and sure way to help the kid- BLADD
neys clean out excess poisons and acids is D ER

with a sctentifically prepared prescription | The GUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM |





LOOK YOUR BEST

Let your mirror show you your frue
smile — the smile that comes with
teeth that are Pepsodent white!
Pepsodent, you see, contains Irium,
wonderful ingredient which dis-
solves the ugiy stains that hide
whiteness, steal brightness from
your stile.

TONIGHT — Smile into your”
mirror—take a good look at
your teeth

NEXT—Clean your teeth with
Pepsodent. Do this, morning
and evening, for a week,



Your hair will be
handsomer by far
when you treat it te

“aseline’ Hair Tonic.| THEN—Smile

into your
mirror again
. you’ll see fy
how a week
of Pepsodent
makes your
whiter,yoursmile
simply dazzling!

Just use a few drops
a day... then see
the difference!

Buy a botile today!

Vaseline:

TRADE MARK

VASELUNE in the registered trade mark
tt the Vianchenaeh Mfe ¢ ’ 7

WITH IRIUM*

% Irium 1s the registered trade mark of
Pepsodent Ltd., for a special soluble in-
gredient that gives greater cleansing power.





X-PO 19-302-50

PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND
.















Loveliness

for you -

oO

FREIGHT
SERVICES
to and from

RS

Regular Services
Save Time

From B’dos to
BERMUDA




Goocre WITHERS
(J. Arthur Rank Organisation)




| LISBON ai — to “ou:
| LONDON ‘It's thrilling che way Lux
Toilet Soap leaves skin



You can have film-star loveli-
ness, too! The fragrant lather of
pure white Lux Toilet Soap
enhances the natural beauty of
your skin, leaves it clear and soft,
Just wash in warm water with the
creamy lather, then rinse in cold,
Famous film stars use Lux Toilet

Soap—it can be your beauty
soap too!

LUX °

TOILET SOAP

softer, smoother. I always
deperd on its gentle
daily care.”







ITS’ FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD,
Book through ir local

1 B.O.A.C. Forwarding Agent
who makes no charg

| advice, information or x pn
\@ ings by “Speedbird” to all LY- B0:A-
| six continents.

7 =





BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED
Airways House, Brudigetown



ee THE FRAGRANT WHITE SOAP OF THE FILM STARS
Phone 4585



A*LTS 732-302-850



a LEVER propvucr
‘











FRIDAY, MARCH 23,



By 0. 8S.

THE three main features in the
Jamaica-B.G. series of Tests
should, in my opinion, be rated in
the following order of importance.

(1) The fact that the players on
both sides did not allow the pre-
sence of the West Indies Selectors
to influence their play to the ex-
tent of making it dull, colourless
or devoid of the entertainment
one usually associates with first
class cricket.

(2) The promising form pro-
duced by quite a few young

cricketers on both sides that
augurs well for future Intercol-
onial as well as West Indies
cricket.

(3) The excellent standard of
the umpiring and the commenda-
ble impartiality of the large
crowds that attended the games. A
boundary, a fine bit of stumping
a fielding, a good catch or a clever
ball was cheered to the echo
whether the principal being
cheered was a Jamaican or Brit—
ish Guianese,

I shall deal with the tour under
their three main heads. In the first
place I think that British Guiana
was unlucky to_ have been twice
beaten and I say this without pre-
judice to Jamaica’s fine achieve-
ment in winning both Tests.

On the other hand, for instance
in the first Test after Berkeley
Gaskin, chiefly by his individual
bowling skill and clever. cap-

«



B. McG. GASKIN

taincy, had placed Jamaica in the

embarrassing position of losing
eight wickets for 153 runs. Jamai-—
ca was able to add 120 runs for
the other two wickets. It will be
admitted that there is a_ great
difference between 153 runs as a
first innings score in an_ Inter-
colonial engagement.

Having scored 162 runs in reply,
it is logica} that Jamaica went on



to win the game.
Similarly in the second Test
in the face of a 510 runs first

innings score by Jamaica, British
Guiana started most promisingly
scoring 149 before they lost the
first wicket but they collapsed
suddenly and added 137 for the
nine remaining wickets.

It might have been a different
story if Bayley had not become
reckless at 94 and lose his wicket
by hitting across an innocent and
harmless ordinarily pitched ball
from Valentine.

And so from this, British Gui-
ana went on to their second de-
feat.

Buc tne fact that there were
decisions in both games, and the
fact that many runs were scored
and many wickets taken ahd
since both games finished with a
day to spare, constitute ample
evidence that there was no “sit-
ting on the splice” or delaying tac—
tics adopted.

Now for my second point. What
prospective talent has the tour
unearthed? It has, in my opinion
produced seven young players
who should hold their places in
Intercolonial teams for some
years a who showed promise
of developing at a pace that
should make them candidates for
West Indies honours.

For British Guiana there are
Brian Patoir (17), Leslie Wight
(21) and Peter Wight (20), for
Jamaica, Stan Goodridge (22),
Roy Miller (20), Alfie Binns (21)
and L, E. Saundérs (19).

Brian Patoir bowls leg breaks, Jamaica, Robert Christiani (30) for making their stay such a
googlies, top spinners and the and Lennie Thomas of British happy and interesting one and
straight wrong: ‘un. He is about Guiana proved themselves to be added that they could not have de-
5 feet 11 inches and has a good first class batsmen at various sired better treatment on and off
trajectory. times during the tour. the field
Se PROPS SS PPS SSP PPPOE POOP OIL ALS

5

* N
s %
> e
: NOTICE :
|

'

eee eal

OUR

1951

B.G.-Jamaica Tests Was 8
Interesting Series ..««:

OUR OFFICE AND WORKSHOP
WILL BE CLOSED ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 24th





A

It is true that the degree of the
excellence of their individual per
formances varied during the tour
but it is generally accepted that
all of them established their right
to be called first class batsmen

Old Stagers Shine

Peter Bayley, Berkeley Gaskin
and John Trim
old stagers all,

Members of the Council of t

COPPIN

As a batsman he moves his feet
to the ball well, and to quote his
captain Berkeley Gaskin “he has-



re ; . F noon
ee a En Mr S. O’'C. Gittens, Vice-
tiani, | Lennie President of the B.A.F.A., pre-
Thomas and sided
Peter Wight The Council on motion of Mr.
were the only O. S. Coppin seconded by Mr.
British Guian- Lionel Gittens unanimously
ese batsmen passed the following which will be
who played sent to the Pickwick Cricket Club
strokes to Val- The Council of the B.A.F.A, do
Sent wie ae not agree with the terms of your
conia ny hit letter dated the 14th March, 195!
when he bowl- with regards to the terms and con-
ed half volleys ditions under which football is to
ww pitched the be played at Kensington for the
ball short of a 1991 season.
length The Council point out that they
Bayley, in are satisfied with the terms under
my opinion, P. BAYLEY which the 1949 ahd 1950 football
did this best of all. In addition to reasons were played at Kensing-
this, each time he opened the ton and agree to the 1951 season
batting he took the early sting being played under the same
out of the Jamaican pace bowling terms
attack ont ok ;
The Council also inform you

Berkeley Gaskin, a reservoir of
energy and optimism, has bowled
his way into the team, in my
opinion. The selectors can have
nothing against him. The bogey of
being “too old” he has exploded
and so too has John Trim ex-—
pleded it by being the only pace

that they are in no way concern-
ed with any financial arrangements
you may wish to make with the
Barbados Cricket Association,
Following are the terms which
were set out in the letter from the
Secretary of the Pickwick Cricket



rd.

LESLIE WIGHT

Leslie Wight has a straight bat, bowler in the series to maintain a Club to the Secretary of the
a good eye and all the patience in hostile pace for his entire spells, B.A.F.A
the world, He therefore has most I think his

was the number
selection in this department.

The umpiring was excellent
Tom Ewart and Burke should be
given full credit for having held
the respect and admiration of the
crowd in a welter of many diffi-
cult decisions they were called

one All the stands and pavilions will

be available except that . of the
Pickwick Club which will be re#
served for the sole use of their
members

At the conclusion of each month
of the season, the nett profits will

of the characteristics of a class
opening batsman and should be
able to develop the few which he
now lacks.

Peter Wight I am backing to
make a fine batsman. His timing
is so near perfection that he gets
tremendous power into his strokes

upon to give. be divided after the undermen-
for one of such a small size. The Jamaican cricket authori- tioned expenses have been de-

His follow through has_ the
smoothness of a professional and
he is not afraid to_play his own
forcing game against all types of
bowling.

ties must be complimented for the
excellent arrangement they made
for the press to record the games
in complete comfort and their
100% co-operation in supplying on
the spot much needed statistics

ducted as follows:

(a) 10% of the gross takings to
Pickwick Cricket Club for admin-
istration and gate—keeper;

(b) Marking and preparation of
ground; (c) balls for match play,
(competing teams must provide
their own practice balls);

(d) wages including constables;
(e) cleaning pavilions and stands;
(f) repairs to damage of pavilions,
Stands or enclosure; (g) advertis-
ing or printing of signs; (h) water

Stan Goodridge of Jamaica has
shown such improvement on his
Trinidad form of last year that it
would be a pity if he does not
gain selection on the W.I. team
and now I cannot find any room
tor him.

He has shown



Grenada Footballers
Return Home

better physical

development and has acquired ELEVEN members of the 14- rates: (i) Lighting; (j) Telephone;
considerable additional spéed and ™an Grenada football team re- «) Police. . a ; ¥
powers of direction. turned home yesterday morning () Police,

After the above expenses have
been deducted from the gross: re-
ceipts the nett profits will be
divided as follows:

1/3 to Barbados Football Asso-

by the Gascogne after playing a
number of games here.

Those leaving were Robin Ren-
wick (Capt.); Roland» Callender,
Rudolph Knight, Denis Knight,

Roy Miller is a fast medium
paced bowler of the calibre of our
own Carlton Rogers. He: made a
great impression on his first ap-

pearance in Intercolonial cricket Cuthbert Cummings, Colin Hus- ciation; 1/3 to Pickwick Cricket
and he also batted and fielded bands, Phil Edwards, Leonard Club and 1/3 to the Barbados
well. Berkeley, Lawrence Fletcher, Cricket Association,

Alfie Binns has had experience ees, Mosten and George Wil- mn) ae aaa fe
of Intercolonial cricket before this “‘,,.”: ; bg Mr. D vas ard said tha
tour. He has however not only ana. toes ieee ati it struck him that the Pickwick
improved i is r hind the © va ar : ‘ seeme: i hat the
improved in his role behind the for a holiday while Wilfred Mc Club seemed to think that they

wicket but is a 100 per cent better ae N

batsman than he proved to be a Leod is staying on to work with

year ago in Trinidad. the Sanitary Laundry.

; Shortly before leaving yesterday
I would not be surprised if he Morning, Skipper Renwick told

were entitled to the greater share
of the profits to be collected out of
the business but they were not
running football for the benefit of

gets the job of second string the Advocate that they had avery the Pickwick Club, they é HE

wicket-keeper on the 1951 W.I. enjoyable tour. Although the doing it for the benefit o the

team to Australia. ' ground was hard and fast and Association and the general
Saunders shows signs of becom— handicapped the players to some public

ing a good all rounder. He played extent, yet he believed every man
a good innings for his first ap- pulled his weight.
pearance and he was more than He had a bunch of young play-
ordinarily useful as a bowler with ers who were always trying to give
his medium paced off breaks. of their best and they, no doubt,
had benefited from the experience
gained, on this tour.

With regard to the local play-

All that the Pickwick Club was
enfitled to was the rental value
of the grounds and the stands,

Excerpts from Stainer’s Cruci-

ers he said that Grant in the fixion will highlight the Police
defence and “Brickie’ Lucas in Band's Good Friday performance
the front line were outstand- at Hastings Rocks tonight begin-
ing for Barbados while Ivan ning at 8 o'clock. Capt, C. E.

Smith in goal was always a hard
nut to overcome. Wilkes another
forward, although not in his best
form, showed that he knew his
stuff.
Sterling Performances

Although every member pulled
his weight, yet he must make
special mention of Callender and
Phil Edwards in the defence and
forward line respectively who
played sterling games throughout |
the tournament. |

Asked which was his hardest |
game he replied “the one against |
Spartan, although we beat them | 21224

Raison will conduct the Band.
PROGRAMME

Excerpts from the MESSIAH:— Overture
Pastoral Symphony; He shall feed hi
flock; Behold the Lamb of God; He was
despised and rejected of men,

Symphony No. 9 in B flat Minor
Unfinished)

Organ Transcription

(The
Franz Schubert
Solemn Melods

+s . Sir Walford Davie

Jesus Joy of Man's Desir

J $ Bach

There ip a

Gounod

Chorale
ing ;

Two Sacred Songs Judex;
Green Hill Far Away Charles

Excerpts from The Crucifixion
John Stainer.

Synopsis:—Processional

to Calvary:

Humiliation; Anther

POON NGES
by three goals to one”. | 33
With regard to the last colony
fame he said that it was a bit]

strenuous on his boys as they were
a bit worn out and therefore were |
not capable of giving of their best. |

He thanked the members of the |
Carlton Club, as well as those of
the B.A.F.A. and other members
of the various clubs, Capt. H. H.
Williams, and the general public



KEN RICKARDS

¢

Of the slightly older players,
Ken Rickards (28), J. K. Holt
Jr. (28), Neville Bonitto (27) of



oe,

ee ene me

os

GASOLENE STATION

EEO LEPC SS





-F.A. Reject
Of Pickwick Club

Hymn, Mystery of Divi a

A etttt bb tttb bib tebtobte tttetvttetetwt-t-tlntteteletnlrtndnte tet tet tte
ORO EAL TT



BRASSIERES = 857 to $1.11



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ee

erms

he Barbados Amateur Football

Association strongly criticised a letter from the Pickwick
Cricket Club setting out the terms under which football
should be played at Kensington for the 1951 season. This
took place at an extraordinary meeting which was held at
the Y.M.C.A, headquarters, Pinfold Street yesterday after-

Scandalous

Mr. V. T. McComie said that
the 10% for administration put in
by the Pickwick Club struck him
as being scandalous. He was not
satisfied with the explanation
given him in that connection and
he regretted that no representative
of the Pickwick Club was there
to let them know something about
it. If they accepted that it was
for the expenses of the gate-
keeper, that did strike him as an
unusual procedure

He said that the time had come
when the Association should take
a stand on principle. The Pick-
wick Club was trying to blackmail
them. If the Association gave
them the slightest encouragement,
as years rolled by, the present
terms which they were demanding
would obviously increase

If the necessity arose and they
had to play football here under
conditions which would make it
difficult for them to make a profit,
he would undertake to lend all the
support he could every evening
as the game was played.

The Association should make it
quite clear to the Pickwick Club
that they were not willing to ac-
cept any less than they got on the
two previous occasions

Mr. O. S. Coppin said that the
word scandalous used by Mr, Mc-
Comie was too mild. It was well
known that they made $5,000 last
season of which the B.A.F.A,. got
approximately $2,000 If they
were to make another $5,000 this

season, then according to the
present agreement made by the
Pickwick Club they would only

get something like $1.100

He pointed out that under the
old terms, the Pickwick Club got
60% and the Association got 40%
of the gross takings. They were
quite satisfied with that and did
not want any change Pickwick
had their 60% and they could do
whatever they liked with it,

it was also stated in the old
terms that the Pickwick Clul
would have full control of the

grounds and gates and would pro
vide cashiers and staff for the
purpose. From their 60% share
they were to provide and prepar

the playing field and be responsib]:
for the preparation of such

They were also to provide staf?
balls for match use only as com-
peting clubs were required to have
their own balls for practice prior
to the match.

After other members had spoken
criticising the action taken by the
Pickwick Club as set out in their
letftF, Mr. Coppin then moved his
motion.

The Council approved the
principle of a letter accepting the
visit from the Kingston Cricket
Club of Jamvica to engage in foot.
ball here during the last two weeks
in-May.



** Crucifixion’? At Rocks To-night

“God so loved the World”;

Hymns, The mystery of

Intercession and The |

Adoration of the Cruci-

fied; Finale, For the love

of Jesus.

Gralsritter-Marsch March of the Holy

Grail from ‘Parsifal” Wagner. Writ
ten at Bayreuth 1876-77 completed at
Palermo 1882.

Synopsis:—This splendid work opens
with the basses giving
forth a peculiar unison
bell-like motive which
continues until the reed
with a_ discord relieves
them, The remainder is
of a_ pleasing smooth
character, until the brass
enter with the famou
“Dresden Amen". Wag
ner uses this in man:
way ind finally pounds
it forth to make a glori
ous finale

GOD SAVE THE KING









6¢

$1.30
$1.63 $1.86

per pair



NIGHTIES = 83.50 to $5.95

A Large Range

wS

b



PANTIES



: American Style Briefs
%
te WILL BE OPENED TO BUSINESS S Bz

on $
> I: > ‘ >a , y r et
% be AS USUAL. 3/f CHILDREN'S RAYON PANTIES
% 3 3 for S$L19
* <
g a Sf LADIES’ and GENTS’ VESTS
x : 2 for $1.00
x COU RTESY G AR AGE | | HORDERED SPUNS
- %
> 9 |
% 5 %| ities ‘
. ROBERT THOM. LTD. <; THE BARGAIN HOUSE
S WHITEPARK ROAD. S| 90, Swan Street —_—_S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
z 31% PHONE 2702 rd

} } !



one of the cane workers

PAGE NINE



~ TOURIST
INVASION

AN invasion of Barbados is on
in full force. But it is an agree-
able one, for it is being carried out
by nearly 300 Venezuelan Tour-
ists armed with thousands of dol-
lars to spend, and they are spend-
ing it.

Hotels are chock full, and some
people have put rooms in private
houses at the disposal of the tour
ists, thus cashing in on some of
the benefits of the trade, The
tourists have come to spend the
Easter Holidays not only because
of the sea bathing and the peace
and quietness, but because, as they
readily admit, their American
dollars and Venezuelan Bolivares
go much further in Bridgetown
than they would in Caracas

The Easter Invasion started last
Saturday with a special flight by
Avensa Airlines, followed by
special flights by B.W.I.A. Ii
continued up to Wednesday night
and yesterday when B.W.I.A
brought in more tourists,

Since their arrival from Vene
zuela the tourists have been sight
seeing, dancing and feting, and
also taking advantage of the com-
parative peace and quiet of Bar-
bados to relax tired nerves, They
are forming part too of the busy
throng of Easter shoppers, the
women brightening the = streets
with gaily coloured dresses, and
both men and women threading
their way along the pavements of
Broad Street chatting volubly in
rapid fire Spanish. In some cases
they are accompanied by Barba-
dians filling the role of Interpret-
ers,

Some of the tourists are not for-
getting the spirituel side of life
now that they are on holiday, and
they are taking opportunity to at-
tend the religious ceremonies of
Holy Week at St. Patrick's Roman
Catholic Church Some were at
Mass yesterday morning -Maundy
Thursday—and they will no doubt
attend the Good Friday rites this
morning .

Club Morgan, the Aquatic Club!
and the Marine Hotel are among
the places who have planned Eas-
eer festivities for the tourists, and
more and more advertisements in
Spanish are finding their way into
the Press, and in show windows of
city stores.

The tourists will start returning
home from about Monday

Mixed Cargo Comes
On “Fort Amherst”

Messrs, Furness Withy’s Fort
Amberst landed at Barbados yes-
lerday 410 casks of salted tish ana
supplies of chocolate syrup, flav-
Oullig extracts, ground cottee,
tru and other general cargo

The salted fish was consigned to
Messrs. W. S. Monroe & Co.,
Ltd., while the fruit—chiefly
grapefruit and oranges—came
various fruit vendors of the city

The Fort Amherst brought witn
her 93 passengers, five of whom
got off here,

She arrived from Halifax via
Trinidad and Grenada and left
port during the evening for St
Vincent and Martinique.

Her agents are Messrs
& Co., Ltd.

CANE FIRE

HORTLY AFTER 9 o'clock last
night fire destroyed a large
quantity of canes at the Belle
Plantation, The amount of damage
has not yet been estimated but
in the





DaCosta

district described at as, big

Instant





!

ANYTIME, ANYWHERE







We beg
and ‘the

head,
will be

SATURDAY, MARCH 24th

remain

and





Ha

pettnttntvlnbebtrbvbebebelvtnt-o-tettettel-ttntetvtetntete
SRO EPPO EEO LE

Store and Electrical Dept. pier

and the

The Produce Department will

shipping of Sugar

molasses.

MANNING & CO., LTD.

DON'T

smear RAZOL pomade on
HAIR. Take it on the comt

—_———

Sand §





2 tan te ff] Ermby the Finest of RUM
po Mises {ak Be ge So Mellow in a highball
first, then backward, until = 7 ktail
miost of it comes back out. So Smooth in a Cockta

Soft paper cun then be used
to wipe away surplus and
to dress the hair to a firish.
The above course, will give
very desirable results.

It is simply Superb.
Try it and you will be
convinced,

STUART & SAMPSON

RAZDE POMADE phame (1938) LTD.
a Headquarters for
ni tebe hacas {__BIst RUM
in as ke











J

SEE
OUR
NEW

EASTER STYLINGS

==

roar



1951

LADIES,

$5.50

AND CHILDREN'S
ALSO
CLEANERS, POLISHES

MEN'S SOCKS

AND BRUSHES





Agradable
Delicioso

)

aU
PASCUA

se
Rico

PARA QUE SE ALEGREN SUS NINOS DEBE
DARLES UN HUEVO DE CHOCOLATE DE PASCUA
LLENO CON MARZAPAN-—
EMVUELTO EN PAPEL

EN HUEVERA DE PLASTICO

Y TAMBIEN
EN HUEVOS DE PLASTICO

EVOS DE



LLENOS DE ALMENDRAS TOSTADAS,



TAMBIEN PROVEEMOS UNA SELECCION COM-
"TA DE

CONFITES EN CAJAS LUJOSAS

GALLETAS DE COCKTAIL

GALLETAS DULCES EN LATAS LUJOSAS
ETCETERA ETCETERA EN LA..

ker's 0s) Drug Stores Ltd.

BROAD STREET and ALPHA PHARMACY (IIASTINGS)















Sees

wer
9G 9DGGOG

19S



Soe
PIP >



NOTICE



to inform our Customers

general public that our

Corner Store

closed on

open for the receiving

and

SLO LLL OD DLO DES
CODEINE I

twtr tte tutttwtrdntetntetne.
DLOPLISIT TTT

ae



PAGE TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY: MARCH 23, 1951

| F Pash for


















CLARKE’S “BLOOD MIXTURE” |








BY CARL ANDERSON




Cleanse the system from blood
impurities ; many sufferers from
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimptes, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great ..
benefit from this well-known medicine.

tn LIQUID or TABLET FORM





pho AAA, Kili those throbbing pains in
your muscles at once! Apply

| FOR LASTING. =e
QUALITY & SHADES pA ee!
|

|





ae :

You don’t rub in “Sloan's you dab it
INSIST ON on the aifected nl ont" Sona’ “Sloan's”
does the rest! Good for

aches and pains and stiff
joints too !

ay






REGISTEREE



READY MIXED

PAINTS

AN I. C. lL PRODUCT
A. §. BRYDEN & SONS (00s) Lip.
















that builds! Save ’em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

NOW, LOPEZ YOU SEE WE AINT FOOLIN! WE DONT HESITATE TO KILL, SO
TELL US WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW! : ;





\F THE LAW HAD GOT-
7}| TEN HIM, HE'D HAVE
1 BEEN HANGED. FOR
MURDER !



Ktlloggs
CORN FLAKES
today!

| or PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
| [SPECIAL offers to all Cash an SPECIAL offers to all Cash and d Credit customers customers for Thursday to Saturday only |
















(WE WANT THE SPANISH GOLD). BRING LOPEZ TO THE OLO <4] Pts poor IS OPEN, TONTO. COME] USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
YOUR Bre: tee HID - CASTLE, TO SAY! DUNGEON, JAKE. THEN WE CAN Ww F
LOPEZ! VG) KNOW WHERE: px) Eye << | [MAKE HIM “TALK! J) | Wnuk’ GOES ON IN THe DUNGEON! i Bottles CORONATION WINE Bottles JEFFREY’S BEER 26 .20
. ) j Ty (Qts) 1.44 1.32

Lie sat bb tt hk a tt tt

Tins TABLE BUTTER








Tins P.F. MARTINI
CRACKERS....__.175 30 FB) caesar eneernen Os
Tins SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE Bottles MATURED RUM I
OOS Ee sce an ci 39 —s«iws (3 Gill Bots)... .._._- _48 42

» aie €
my SEWERS §
Seo













WELL- HE AcxeD FoR )

T-LL FILL HIM
FULL OF LEAD -IT'Lt. )I
TAKE TEN MEN | _/
TO LIFT HM 7









6UFFERIN'
coyotes !/
( HERE Cc Lee,
H' SHERIF

BETTER BY FAR.. coe

BISCUITS »y CARR’S

©

























Just In Time For Your

EASTER ENJOYMENT



HE WON'T BE ABOARD
LONG! CURTAINS DRAG



TOUGHER. NOW
SINCE KIRBY WISED
HIM UP! You IDIOT!



/ REALLY WORK.
ON HIM NOW,
MR, SEVEN 2

¢

BE WISE...








a ir

N KI
; WAS RIGHT! MY LIFE IS “ay
ay SAFE ONLY AS. LONG AS eS
I KEEP MY Ki

y Z D> -SECRET! J 3







YEAH, | LEFT THE ENGINE
ON. WERE OFF LET ANY-
BODY TRY TO FIND US g
NOW! .




Usacrted
ON SALE AT BISCUITS | usin iin

YOUR GROCER





FRIDAY, MARCH 23,



1951



The charge for announcements of
Births, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to ‘50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash, Fhone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.



THANKS

_—_————
ATKINS—We acknowledge with thanks
the cards, wreaths and other tokens
of sympathy sent us on the occasion
of the death of Hubert Atkins tlate
master tailor) of Henry’s Lane, Colly-
more Rock. 5
The Atkins’ Family.

—_—_——
FIELDS—The Fields family beg through
this medium to return thanks to all
those kind friends who sent wreaths,
letters of condolence or in any way
expressed their sympathy in our recent
bereavement. 23,3.51—1n
GITTENS—Through this medium we beg
to return thanks to all thore kind
friends who sent wreaths, letters of
condolence or in any way express their
sympathy in our recent bereavement
caused by the death of Joseph
Emanuel Gittens late of Mayers Road,
My Lord's Hill.
Veola Howard, Goulbourne Howard.
23.3.51—2n





IN| MEMORIAM

_—_—_———————
ALLENBY-—In tender and sacred memo-
Ty of my dear husband (George Henry
Allenby) who was called away March
23rd 1948.
To-day is a day of remembrance
And many sad regrets
A day 1 shall always remember you
When the rest of the world forgets
Evelyn (wife) U.S.A.

23.3.51—In





ASHBY—In loving memory of our dear
beloved wife and mother Leotta Ashby
who died on March 23rd 1950.

To-day has brought us sad memories,
Of cne year ago

We loved you darling

But Jesus loved pou best

So he took you home to rest

Ever to be remembered by Clyde Ashby

thusband), Obrica

Ashby, Cynthia
Burton (daughters). 23.3.51—1n.
NAYNES—in loving memory of my
adopted mother Catherine Haynes

who passed away on March 24th 1940.
On that Easter day
The ane I Loved was called away
God knew best
And took her to eternal rest.
Ever will be remembered by Mrs. Enid
Vanderpool





PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever in my name as I do not hold
myself responsible for anyone contracting
any debt or debts in my name unless
by a written order signed by me.

SEON WORRELL,
Fairfield,
Black Rock.,
22.3.51—2n





The public are hereby warned against
giving Paredit to my wife, MILLENCE
SMALL (nee GOLLOPP) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

ned by me.
* GUSTAVUS SMALL

Bentley Tenantry
! 23.3.5!—2n,
St. Philip.
23.3.51—2n.

seca, aa ratataterstitie
ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANT’S 2"








Trinidad Guardian

Notice
An effort is to be made to
institute a more _ satisfactory
methed of distributing the
Gvcrdian,

All subscribers, or those wishing
to become subscribers, any part
of the Island, are asked to heip
in the plan by phoning 3543 or
calling at the Trafalgar Store,
Trafalgar Street, and giving their
names and addresses.

‘the success of the plan will
depend entirely on the response
to this call.

y,

NOOR PISS DSSS SOS OF OFFS

NOTICE

Closing for Annual
Easter Holiday-

m4
%
We beg to inform our Customers
and Friends that we shail be
closed to business as from:
THURSDAY at 3.30 p.m. 22nd
POSSESSED”








inst, re-opening SATURDAY 3st
inst.



NEWSAM & CO.



EASTER
FARE |

COOKING BUTTER per lb.
or 5 lb, tin









PRUNES ........+. Sic. Ibe
RAISINS °........ 46c. Ib,
CURRANTS ...... 38¢. Ib,




AUSTRALIAN CHEESE
72c. lb.

GLACE CHERRIES 89ec, |b,
POLAR ICING




SUGAR ........ 36e. pk.
BRIDAL ICING

SUGAR ...... .. 35¢e. pk.
SWEET CORN .... 46c. tin
ANCHOR TABLE

BUTTER ...... 88c. pkg.

- SPECIALS -

BICO ICE CREAM,
POLAR ICE CREAM,
POLAR ICICLES,
EASTER EGGS.

MOIRS CHOCOLATE BARS
PEANUTS in Tins.

HAM in Tins.

CASAREEP in Bottles.

GRIFFITH'S
ROCKLEY
Dial 4514





FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

| word Sundays,

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—One 1948 Model
10 K.P.
Morris
St.

Prefect Ford
Done 22,000 Miles. Apply B. C.
daily, Dunscombe Piantation
Thomas. 23.3.41-——3n.
kus 23.8.51—3n

——— ee
(X 22) Dial 8225.
23.3.51—2n.



CAR—Ford V-8

\eoseticletetltndy led in mtinreneensinsnmiseniasionn Meee
CAR—One Standard Vanguard in good , Spooner’s Hill,

condition 15,300 miles.
Sayers — Phone 3632.

CAR—1951 Hillman Saloon.

Apply Denton
22.3.51—3n

Registered





under three months, low mileage—Phone | Claims duly attested to the undersigne.i

8569. or 4683, 22.3.51—-3n

—————
CAR—One 1938 Dodge Car, $600.00, Can | Said Blanche
be seen at Courtesy Garage, Whitepark | Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors,

Rad. 22.3.51—8n

21.3,.5i—t.fm, | Parties entitled thereto having rega





FORD — MODEL “B’ SEDAN iM 3)
Excellent condition. H. ARRINDELL. | assets of
ELECTRICAL





REFRIGERATOR — Canadian Genevyal
Electric 6 Cub. feet, Perfect
order. Can be seen at K. R. Hunte &
Co, Ltd., Lower Broad Street, Dial 4011.

22.3. 51—6n

ee

ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts,
30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps and
spares. A. Barnes & Co, Ltd.

LIVESTOCK

———
ONE SAANEN GOAT—heavy in kid,
second litter, har six teeth, no reasonal
offer refused. Apply to Dudley Gibbs,
Hindsbury Road, St. Michael.
23.3.51-—1n,

MECHANICAL

———————

BICYCLES—With and without three-
speeds for Ladies, Gents and children.
Secure yours now, Courtesy Garage,
Whitepark Rd. Dial 4391. 22.3.51—6in

BICYCLE A
Saddles, Connections,
wheels etc.
Whitepark Rd.

-— Pumps,
Patching Kits,
Apply Courtesy Garage

Dial 4381. 22.3.51—6n

CARRIER BIKES and Bicycles by
Herevies. Silver King. A BARNES &
co., LTD. 20.3.51—t.f.n.

TYPEWRITER
Royal Typewriter.







One new portable
E. S. Gibbs, Dial 4375.
22,3.51—2n

.

MISCELLANEOUS
AERATED WATERS PLANT — One
Barnett-Foster Filling and Capping Head.
Three Carbonators, (German). Electric
Motor. Shafts Pulleys, Spare Parts, Gas







Tubes etc. All in good order and excel-
lent performers. Apphy to M. Abbadi,
Dial 2297. 17.3.51—3n,



ANTIQUES—A good assortment of An-
tiques including old clocks, Candles,
Shades, China, Pottery, Silver, Ivory and
Furniture, In Ralph Beard’s Show Room,
Hardwood Alley. Open 8 a.m.—4 p.m,
21.3.51—4n,

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.

ne

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances ana
draperies, By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A,
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n

DIAMOND RINGS—Two Gents’ single
stone rings. Claw. settings. Attractive
prices, See them. Wm. D. Richards &
Son, Mc Gregor Street. Phone 2080,

22.3.51—3n

MIRRORS—Just received, Triple Ward-
robe and Bathroom Mirrors. Polished and
Bevelled Edges. G. W. HUTCHINSON &
co,, LTD. 22.3.51—3n
eee

PESQUI URANATED WINE—At long
last we are in a position to offer you







this wine for the treatment of Diabetes, {| French chef in Aruba and in U.S.A

1¢/6 per bot, 3 bottles for 30/-.
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD,
24.3.51—-3n,

ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN
i» case, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy.







15.3,61—t.f.n,

SWEDISH STAIN!.ESS STE! CUT-
LERY lasting a_ lifetime won't
scratch, tarnish, stain or rust — needs

no polishing —- will harmonize with any
table setting for any occasion lending
charm and beauty to your home

Knives: Table 69c, Dessert G4c.
Forks : Table S4e. Dessert 49c,
Spoons: Table S4e. Dessert 49c.

Tea 36c. Coffee 26c, Eaeg 36c.
Jam 36c.
More than fifty different pieces in two
beautiful models —- See Them and Buy
Them. at
CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.
18.3.51—6n

ee
TEA SETS—Exceptional” Value. 23%
piece Flowered Tea Set all for $7.99, See
these Today at G. W. HUTCHIN: ;
co., LTD. 22.3.51—-3n

VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

13.2.51—t.f.n,

Sore Mouth

ing Gums, Sore Mouth
Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sere melad





and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron cli

guarantee. Amosan must make Z°

mouth well and save your teeth or

money back on urn of empty pack-

age. Get Amosan from gem chemist
today.

je guar-
Armosan

antee protects
ou.
For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

HAPPY RELIEF
FROMBACKACHE

Neighbour said ‘Take Doan’s Pills”
Wwrr PUT UP with needless
discomfort from backache,
rheumatic pains, lumbago, stiff,
aching muscles and joints or the
common urinary disorders due to
sluggish kidney action when you
might get happy relief.
Many thousands of healthy
ple bless the day they took
Boan's Backache Ridn ey Pills.
This well known diuretic and
urinary antiseptic helps sluggish
kidneys to carry out their function
of ridding the blood of excess uric
acid and other mpareies harmful
to health. Grate le, every-
where, recommend Boan's Pills to
their friends and neighbours.

ic. DOAN'S

Wealer fer



1/3,
2/9,
Si.

A. M. WEBB

STOCKBROKER



Barbados Bonds and Shares
Oversea Investments
Bought and Sold.



Dial: 4796 Hours 9—3

33 Broad St.
(Over Phoenix).
i



—

rr er

CLASSIFIED ADS.|

working | have had notice.



PUMLIC NOTICES |

Tea cents per agate line on week-drys |
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, |
minimum charge $1.50 on week-doys |
and $1.80 on Sundays.



NOTICE



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD

This office will be closed to business
on Saturday March 24th with the exci a-
tion of The Airways

& Steamship
Department.

22.3.51-—-2n



NOTICE

Re Estate of }
BLANCHE SKEETE
deceased.
hereby given that «li
any debt “or clai.n |
affecting the estate o/
Skeete deceased, late o/ |
in_the parish of Saji»: |
Michael in this Island Spinster who
cied in the parish of Saint Michael «
28th day of January, 1951 are ro
Quested to send in particulars of the :

NOTICE is
Persons having
against or
Blanche

EMMANUEL FITZPATRICK JOHNSO\
Qualified Executor of the will of
Skeete deceased, c¢
No. 12
High Street, Bridgetown, on or bef:
the 15th day of April, 1951 after whi}
date we shall proceed to distribute t-<
the deceased, among t

1
only to such claims of which we sho!
then have had notice and we will » t
be liable for the assets or any po t
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not th:

And all persons indebted to the said}
estate are requested to settle ther |
indebtedness without delay. }
ones this 9th day £ February, 1951

A NURI, PATRICK JOHNSON
Qualifie ecutor of the Will of
Blane Skeete, deceased.
10.2.51—4n.

a
r



NOTICE

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
AcT ih0
and
IN THE MATTER OF WARD TRU
COMPANY LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant
to section 176 of the Companies Act 1919
i meeting of the creditors of the above
named company will be held at the
cffice of Messrs, Bovell & Skeete, Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, Barbados, on
Wednesday the 4th day of April 1951,
at 2 o'clock in the afternoon.

Dated the 22nd‘ day of March, 1951
DEIGHTON HARCOURT LISLE WARD
HENRY RAYMOND LEACH,

Liquidators
23.3.51-—3n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Elise Phillips of
Cheapside, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c at
bottom floor of a 2 storey wall building} |
in Cheapside, City.

Dated this 22nd day of March 1951
To:—H._A. TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.
ELISE PHILLIPS,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-| ¢
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A on Monday
the 2nd day of April, 1951, at 11 o'clock,
am ,



H. A, TALMA,
Magistrate, Dist A’

Police 2
23.3.51—1n



WANTED

Mtnimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents c
word Sundays.

'
!



HELP



THERE is a good job offered in Trinidad
for the rignt man, His ability and experi-
ence must enable him to take charge
of the Photographic Department of a we'll
known Store, Salary and commission in
keeping with his value. Dial 4727.

22,2.51—2n

POSITION WANTED
COOK: Wants position; trained by
will accept engagement in the island
or abroad; reference given. Contact
Joseph Rochester, Speightstown or phone ;
91-12 23.3.51-—3n.



MISCELLANEOUS

IMMEDIATE CASH for
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGES, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club

20.2.51.—T.F.N.









IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniature: jade, |
|

Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES,
Antique Shop. Dial 4429,

20.2.51.—t.f.n.

To buy or borrow for h short while,

Volume one and two of Bishop Burnett’
“History of my own kind”, Dial 3458.
. 23.3.51—In

PERMANENT or
with accommodation.

Transient Guest,

Dial 4837.
23.3.51—2n

POLICE NOTICE

INSPECTION OF
PUBLIC SERVICE VEHICLES
AND
RENEWAL OF LICENSES.

Regulation 16 (6) of the Regula-







nd Loose | tions made under Section 7 of tne

Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic
Act, 1937—16, requires that own-
ers intending to renew their
licenses in respect of
service vehicles, goods vehicies or





Mintmum charge week % cents end Ten cents per agate tine on week-days



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FOR RENT

% cents Sundays 24 words — aver 24

pords 3 cents @ word week—4@ Cents a

word Sundays,



Main



or coup



Chir



Modern Bu
Black Rock all conveniences. Apply

HOUSES

ee
c sit RACEsTS FURNISHED FLAT—
td

Bath with Heater

Mastings, facing Sea. English
Suitable one person
Telephone 2949.

2.3.51-4.1.



le



MARSHV!LLE—Bank Hall Mai Road.
Enclosed gallery, drawing and %
room, 3 bedrooms, breakfast room, toflet

and bath, water, and light.

Apply W. L.
23.3.920

ton,

on

Baxter's Road.
alow situated at



premises to Mr, Vere Lewis,

15.3.5—T.F.N



MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow

3 bedroo:

ms with running water, built in

Wardrobes and all modern conveniences.

man, Ho
_NEW
Christ





jE

9

3.

The estimated fortnightly deliveries are 400—650 cartons of bis-
and 110—265 containers of Skimmed Milk
Powder of 56 lbs. each. Supplies must be taken from central depots
in Bridgetown.

Supplies must be delivered every two weeks according to the
requirements of the individual schools, and all deliveries must be
completed within three days.

Tenders must cover all requirements of the schools during the
periods mentioned above, and must reach the Colonial Secretary’s
Office not later than 12 o'clock noon on Saturday, the 24th March,
Tenders must be marked “Tender for transport of Biscuits and
Milk to the Public Elementary Schools.

The person whose tender is aceepted must be prepared to furnish
sureties for the due performance of the contract.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any

cuits of 24 Ibs, each,

951,

ender.

Tenders are invited for the supply of fresh cow's milk to the
Public Elementary Schools throughout the Island during the follow-
ing school terms :—
7th May to 3rd August, 1951.
10th September to 7th December, 1951.
7th January to 4th April, 1952,

Particulars of the conditions and requirements of supplying the’
milk are embodied in the contract, (Copies of which are evailable
for reference at the Colonial Secretary’s Office.) |

Persons tendering must be prepared to furnish two sureties for
the due performances of the contract. ; land

The tenders marked “Tender for the Supply of Fresh Co's Milk’ |
to the Publie Elementary Schools; must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o’clock neon on Saturday, the 24th March,

Be

9

3.

1961.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lawest or
any tender.
9th March, 1951,

TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF SUGAR TO THE PUBLIC
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Tenders are invited for the supply of Clear Straw Sugar to the
Public Elementary Schools of the Island during the following school

terms :
1
9

3.

Publie

The person whose tender is aceepted must be prepared to furnish
sureties for the due performance of the contract.

Church.
Furnished, Fridge, Electricity a:

| Long lease preferred. Apply Mrs. Pricd-

tel Royal. 13.3.51--t.f.n,

BUNGALOW--Enterprisa |Rea0.
Availabie immediately,
water.









Apply Frederica FitzPatrick Telephone
3835, 21.3.51—8n
MECHANICAL
BICYCLES — Daily, Weekly and
on Monihiy terms, Apply Crescent |
\| Bicycle Dept. Store, 30 Tudor Street
| Dial 3361 21.3.51—5n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ZENDERS FOR TRANSPORT OF BISCUITS & MILK TO THE
PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Tenders are invited for the transport of cartons of biscuits and
containers of Skimmed Milk Powder to the Public Elementary Schools
ST] of the Island during the following school terms :—
7th May to 3rd August, 1951.
10th September to 7th December, 1951.

7th January to 4th April,

$th March, 1951,



TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF FRESH COW'S MILK TO THE
PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. |



7th May to 3rd August, 1951.
10th September to 7th December, 1951,
7th January to 4th April, 1962.

The estimated fortnightly requirements are 4,500 to 10,000 pounds
cf sugar. Persons tendering must quote the price per pound plus de-
livery charge and are required to submit a sample of sugar.

Supplies must be delivered to the schools every two weeks ac-
cording to the requirements of the individual schools, and all deliv-
eries must be completed within three days.

Tenders must cover all requipements of the schools during thé
periods mentioned above, and must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o'clock noon on Saturday, the 24th March, 1951.
Tenders must be marked “Tenders for the

Elementary Schools.”

The Government does not bind

tender.
Sth Ma

INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS, REVOCATION DEPARTMENT,
ST. LUCIA

Applications are invited for
public| 2ducation Department, St. Lucia.

The applicant (who should possess
ivailers shall before the 30th day| erably) should be

rch, 1951,



of April, make application to the] ence of work in Primary Schools,

Commissioner of Police who shal
eppoint a time and place for the
examination of the same.

mitted before the 28th day
April, 1951.
3. Forms will be supplied on

of

and Transport; but will not be
sent through the post. [

4. Inspection of these yehicles
will commence on Monday, 16th
April, 1951.

5. Owners of vehicles are here-
by reminded that vehicles which
are not passed as road-worthy by
the 30th June, 1961, will not be

permitted to operate after that|*€@ch not later than 81st March,

date.
(Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.
Polite Headquarters,
Bridgetown,
12th March, 1951.
23.4.51—3n





The post is pensionable and carries emolurments in the scale of
$1,920 to $2,400 per annum by annual increments of $96 plus a Cost
$: Apelibelion would bs sub- of Living Bonus at the rate of $192 per

Travelling and Subsistence allowances will be paid in accordance
with the rates prescribed by local regulations.

The duties of the post will be
application to the Transport Sec-] tion Officer,
tion of Department of Highways| and such ot

Th
Officer

Free passages for the Officer and his family wil) i
accordance with the Colonial Regulations (i . Cert
Applications setting out full details of qualifications and experi—
not less than two testimonials and
eres te, ST. LUCIA, to
1,

ence s'
should

her local orders as

should the necessity arise.

hould be accompanied by
be addressed to THE



In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietia:

fury D. Wallace; Yacht Caribbee; Sch.

¢ An Gl, Mi, A, Me, a “ + a Adalina: Sch. Marea Henrietta; Sch.

«Christian Science
Reading Room

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)

Houre: 10 a.m.—3 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fridays.
10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays.

the Science text-book,
Sefence and Healta witn Kry to
th« Sertotures by MARY BAL&£R
SDDX may ve reed, borrow,

or puryhased

|
} Visitors Are Welcome

(.. this Room tae Bivle
5



ee

=f

Burma

D.; Sch. Laudalpha; Seh. May

Olive; Sch. Gardenia W.; Sch. D’Ortac
Sch. Emeline; Sch, Lydia Adina S.; £2,
Franklyn D. P.; Sch, Wonderful Caun-
sellor; Yoeht Buckaroo; Sch. Easte:a
Eel; Sch. Lucilie M. Smith: Sch, Man-
‘ dala I1.; Sch. Blue Nose Mac,
ARRIVALS
‘ S.S. Fort Armiherst, 1,946 tons net
Capt. Musson, from: Halifax via Grenada
S.S. Gascogne, 2,661 tons net, Capt
Prigent, from Le Harve,
M.V Daerwood, 94 tons net, Cant
DeCoteau, from St. Lucia
£.S, Statesman, 4429 tons net, Capt
Richardson, from London
i DEPARTURES
| Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt
| King, for St. Vincent
SS. Gascogne, 2,681 tons net, Capt
b } Prigent, f Trinidad
¢ ret, |



Fort An

rerst
Kean, for St

st fy

1949 to
rent







the post of Inspector of Schools,

a trained Teacher and should have

Such as are assigned by the Educa-—
and the holder will be subject to the Colonial Regulations
aré in force.

e Inspector of Schools will be required to act as Education

| Harbour Log





Happy Easter



PUHLIC SALES

and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
mimimum cnarge $1.50 on week-days|
Sundays



and $1.89 on
®
eae ciecanic senate aiksalk thie
REAL ESTATE G reetings





BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 And all the



bed. |
sane. every convenience —including| S$ eason’s best wishes
garden, water supply. As new, £3,000
Phone 4476. 15.3.51--t.f.n From___G. A. SERVICE
LIGHT SMALL PROPERTIES For) !-————



SALE, FOR CASH OR ON TERMS

One at Country Road; One at Codring-
ton Hill; One at King's Street; One at
Mason Hall Street; One at Brilton's x
Road; Qne at Deacon's Road, One at
School Road, Carrington's Village, One
at Sober’s Lane. One-third of the cost
can be paid and the balance month):

For particulars apply to D'Arey A
Scott, Magazine Lane. 21.3.51—2n

SS
WALL BULDING—On 4.362 sq. ft., at
69 Roebuck Street, Downstairs, Spacious
Store, Store Rooms and Garage. Upstairs’
Fovr Bedrooms, Drawing and Dining
Rocms, ete, Suitable for Business,
Dwelling or Industry, Frontage: 43 ft.
Depth 100 ft. Concreted right through
Apply to M. Abbadi. Dial 2297,
17.3,51—4n

REAL ESTATE |

JOHN
M4.

BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A,

SSS
ADVERTISE

iT
PAYS

Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“TOBRUK”, Cattlewash, St. Jos-
eph. A picturesque holiday home
situated right on the beach posi-
tiened on approx. % acre of land
The contruction is of timber raised
on stone pillars with shingle roof-
ing is of sound condition through-
out. There are 3 bedrooms (with
basins), lounge, wide roofed gal-
lery overlooking the ocean,
kitchen, servant's rooms, outside
bathing cubicles and garage space.
Offers invited

“DAGATELLE HOUSE”, St

homas A spacious two-storey
ecuntry house with approx. 5 acres
-plus additional 3% acres if re
quired. There are 5 bedrooms, 2
lounges, dining room, 2 enclosed
gelleries, 3 bathrooms, kitchen
pantry, servant's rooms, 2 garage:
ard various outside buildings
This property is well elevated
and commands excellent views of
ithe St. James coastline

1952.

“NLA DENDRA" Pine Hill Estate
Peeently built coral stone bunga-
low in select residential area. Well
cesigned and constructed by &

reputsble firm of Contractors. 3
bedrooms (built-in wardrobes)
lounge, dining room, tiled kitehen
tiled bathroom and toilet, garage,
laundry and = servant’s qvarters

Ecc.

“MEDMENHAM™ Pine
very fine 2-storey pre
antly situated in approx, 1's ac
near Government House Th
is spacious and” well proportioned
accommodation comprising 3 es

eeption dining and = breakfast
rooms, 4 bedrooms, (t with large
dressing room) butier’s pantry,
kitchen, servant's rooms, garage,
fernery, poultry houses ete, There
is a two wa? entiance arive and
the grounds are well laid out wita
lawns, flowering shrubs and flower
gardens The whole property
has a pleasant character t+pigal
of some of the older established
homes in this exclusive area

Hill A
rity pitas.







14.3.51.—2n.





const
Well
state of
deteaing

COUNTRY HOUSE near
some 12 miles from town
constructed and in flag
repair 4 bedrooms, 2
rooms, large and airy reception
rooms, verandshs ete. Stone out-
buildings and double garage
Barns, cowpens and milking shed
Lavge courtyard. Over 17 acres of
with several fertile act
excellent for ground provision |
cultivation Property very suit-
able for mixed farming

“INCH MARLOW"'— On approx
2 acres coastland near ;
Sands A solidly = constr
sione house with shingle roof gnd
pine flooring 4 reception, 3 bed-
rooms, verandah; 2 bathrooms
and toilets; 2 kitehens; 2 servant's
rooms, 2 garages Now in @
apaytments but to reegn-
vert







14.3.51.—2n,

east

RENTALS

“Windy
St, James

Willows"— =Prospect
Unfurnished house
on const, with 3 bedroom
Jounge, verandah over looking

In Chaneety" on Coast at Silver

@ sea ete. Immediate — possession
Sands, Furnished, Now avail+
able i

Unfurnishea
POBSER:

“Plores',

Kont
Inurediate



“Cachalet", Si, * Lawrence,
Pleasant furnished house with
3 bedrooms, lounge, screengd
yallery, garage ete Available
April—July inclusive

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
’Phone 4640

Supply of Sugar to the

itself to accept the lowest or any |
et

14.3.51—2n,

graduate qualifications, pref-
wide experi-

annum, We have been instructed by the

owner, Mr. R, G. §. Kerley, to
sell by Auction the following
Household effeets at ‘Fearn’ «6th
Avenue, Belleville
Round Tables, Redio Table, Ocea-
sional Tables, Cabinet (all Mahdg-
ony), Marble Top Table, Crab-
wood Table, Octagonal Folding
Table, (23 Diameter), Invalid
Tray, Wicker Chairs, Folding Gal
lery Chairs; Cream Painted Ward-
eg Table, Folding
, Hair Mattresses;
Redio; Electric Table
Lamps; Oil Lamps, (Table Models)
Pitch Pine Table (20" x 20”)
Lomp Shades, Fawn Floor Rugs:
33° x 60”), Electric Toaster, 2
Burner Westinghouse Hot Plate
Coffee Percolator, Electric tron
jalmost new) Table Model Valor
Stove; Wine Glasses, Cocktail
Glasses, Lemonade Set Jug %
@inesea), Ioe Cream Glasses, Glace
Coasters, Flowered Dinner Ser-
viee, Dinner Plates Bread é& But
ter Plater, Dessert Plates, Stuin-
less Steel & Plated Cutlery, Cori
Dinner Mats, Silver Solt Cellars,
Coffee Cups & Saucers, Bytter



. a maximum of 5).

17.3.57—2n

MAIL NOTICES

Mails ior 8. Lucia, Martinique,
Antigua, Guadeloupe, United Kingdom
and France by the 8.8. Gascogne will
be closed at the General Post Office as



undey: — Dishes, Pyrex Ware, Pastry
‘Parcel Moil at 4 p.m. on the 29th Poards, Mixing & Pudding Bowls.
March, 1951, Registered Biail at 11 a.m. Meneuring Cups, Enamel Frying

Pans, Enamel Saucevans and
Kettle, Lroning Bowrd, Seli-Heater
Coal Tron, Lady's Bicycle, Child
Bieyele, Concrete Flower Pots
Lawn Mower, Watering Can,
Buckets, Garden Tools, Scale &

and Ordinary Mall at 12.15 p.m, on the
20th March, 1951.



Mails for St. Lucia by the M.V. Ladys
Joy will be closed at the Genera! Post
Office as under:—





Parcel Mail, Registered Mail and Weights, Ice Cream Vreezer (4
Ordinary Mail at 9 am. on the 2th Pint!. Suiteases; Chicken Pon
March, 1961. Leghorn Hens and Cocktrelis

Cash on fall of the Hammer

RATES OF EXCHANGE | wap oeme Pied

VANADA John M. Biadon
MARCH #2, 1961
64 8/10% pr. Cheques on AFS. F.V.A
ipekers 62 6/10 pr
mia red ,
Drafts 62.85° pr Phone 4640
Sight Drafts 62 5/107 7
#4 910% pr. Cable : = PLANTATIONS BUILDING
| 63 3/10" *urrencs 61 3/10% pr
Coupons 60 6/10% pr
Silver








PAGE ELEVEN

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS | =

- STEAMSHIP CO, FRENCH LINE

/





SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM
M.S. “Hersilia”—22nd Mareh 1951
S.S. “Cottica—¢th April 1951. | Cie Gle Transatlantique
M.S. “Willemstad” —12th April 1931, |
SAILING TO AMSTERDAM «& | n
‘kis coed PLYMOUTH ' ae
§ “Willemstad” 22nd March 1951
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, SAILINGS TO

PARAMARIBO, GEORGETOWN

ENGLAND & FRANCE










M.S. “Bonaire 27th March 1951. |
S.S. “Justiniar 27th. March 1951 t ‘
M8 amal sth April, 2961 GASCOGNE: April Ist
S'S. “Cottica’ 23rd. April 1951. i via St. Lucia, Martinique,
SAILING “TO LA SUA SAC AG Guadeloupe and Antigua
M.S. “Oranjestad™ 28th, March 1951 } 0
M.S. “Willemstad” 25th, April 1951 | wd
8S, P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Lid SOUTHBOUND
Axstents,
OES Se GASCOGNE: March 23rd
|| Grenada, Trinidad, British
The M/V “CARIBBEE” will and French Guiana
accept Cargo and Passengers for '
Dominica Antiqua, Montserrat | we
Nevis and St Kitts, Sailing | i
Wednesday 21st inst
Accepting Passengers,
me - , “DABRWOOD" an Mail and Deck Passengers
cee argo an Passengers fo ini
St. Lucia, Grenada, oa aeube to Grenada, Trinidad, St.
and. Passengers only for St | Lucia and Martinique.
Vingent. Date of Departure to eee
be notified, oat
)
B.W.L SCHOONER OWNERS R. M. JONES & Co., Lid.
ASSOCIATION (INC)
AGENTS
Consignee. Tele. No, 4047 Phone ::: 3814
i
aS
a
8 HARRISON LINE
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
: Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
SS, “SUCCESSOR” Liverpoo! 10th Mar 25th Mar.
5.8. “STUDENT” Glasgow &
South Wales 18th Mar 2nd Apr.
SS. “SPECIALIST” London 21st Mar. 5th Apr.
S.S. “TACOMA STAR” Liverpool 22nd Mar, 3rd Apr.
SS. “HERDSMAN” London 28th Mar. 15th Apr.
S.S. “DEFENDER” London 3ist Mar. 1§th Apr.
S.S, “SCHOLAR” Liverpool Ist Apr. 14th Apr.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel For Closes in Barbados
SS. “MULBERRY HILL” London 27th Mar,
S.S. “PROSPECTOR” Greenock 30th Mar.
S.S. “CRAFTSMAN” Liverpool 3ist Mar,

For further information apply to - - .
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents

Ye Alcoa, Stam

NEW YORK SERVICE

8.8. “Myken" sails 28rc February, arrive? Barbados 6th March,

S.S. ‘Seabreeze’ sails 16th Mareh. arrives Barbados 27th March,
eee tee tt tees ne eee ane 6

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

8.8. “Rur \" sails 15th February. arrives Barbados Ist March,

SS. “Alcoa Patriot’ sails 7th March arrives Barbados 23rd Maren
—_—__—







CANADIAN SERVICE



SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship SAILS HALIFAX ARAIVES B'DOS

SS. “ALCOA PARTNER" oe ‘ February 23rd Mareh 6th
8.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” .. March $th March 20th
<5, “ALCOA PENNANT" . Mareh 23rd Apri) 3rd



NORTHBOUND
“ALCOA PENNANT” .,
“ALCOA PARTNER"

8.8. Due March 5th

"ue Mareh 20th

Sails for St. John &

Halifax,
Salle for St, Joh
é& Halifax 2





These vessels have limited passenge? sccommodation. a

ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE



—
—

| PASSAGES TO EUROPE
|
\











Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia, for sail

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £170; usual reductions for children.

—--



a —- =
JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs over NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad Street
BEAUTIFUL AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL

and EVENING GOWNS
Open SATURDAY MORNING until 11.30, Tel. 2684

—
WEE SE
{ GERM LUBRICATING OILS
ARE BEST BY TEST
DON'T ONLY OIL. IT—GERM IT





. }
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. y
Gasolene Station-—Trafalgar St.





NOTICE

We beg to inform our Customers and the General
Public that our Stores will be closed on SATUR-
DAY 24th March and will re-open to business on
Tuesday 27th March.





Phone 1 Phone

aoe. IERBERT Ltd. “exer

1 & 11 Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.





ROB IGROS

SPLOT

NOTICE

COPIES
%,
Seon.

ca

SOS

Our Customers and Friends are asked to note
that our Picr Head Branch (Workshop, Dock, Ship
Chandlery & Sugar Factory Supplies and General
Office) will not be open for business on Saturday
next 24th inst.

SOOO

The Central Emporium, Broad St. and Gasolene
Station, Trafalgar St., will be open as usual.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

4 44°
LPL OOOO:

\

8
x
x
-
é
+
%
$
A
%,
9

LELLEPLLPPPLLPPPPPLLPCCEPP?PPP@APP PPD LE LALAK_G

$6,6,.56664
PFO PSSOOY







PAGE TWELVE





Varsity Boat Race To-morrow

18 Men Row

(fy A Special. Correspondent

LONDON.

A sporting event which can
probably claim to be the best
supported in the world will take
place in London tomorrow
E.ghteen young men will race
thrcugh the heart of the capita)

fo the accompaniment of cheers
from over 250,000 spectators,
Traffic jams’? No need to worry
about anything like. that The
event takes piace on the river
Thames and the crowds are
stretched along the four and a
half miles of bank from Putney
to Morllake

Yes, you are right. It is the

Oxford and Cambridge boat race
When the two crews meet on
March 24th it will be
encounter between the rival var—
sities. Cambridge, winners last
year, have been successful on 5?
eceasions and Oxford on 43, with
one dead heat.

Since the war, Cambridge have
added tour times to their list of
triumphs and apart from the first
post-war race in 1946 Oxford
have been unsuccessful. Last year
they were unfortunate to lose
their stroke Davidge = shortly
before the race and the year
before that they were beaten by
oniy a quarter of a length after

one of the most thrilling race
ever
This Year
This year, with Davidge back

in the Oxford boat, although not
in his former position, and Jen
nens, his rival of the 1949 race,
again available to stroke Cam-—
bridge, there are indications
another great struggle Both
créws are now on the Thames
practising for the big day but they
are not giving much away in then
training. As in previous post
war years Cambridge have tended
to hold back their crew whereas

Oxford have pressed on more
quickly. The dark blues have a
slight weight advantage whicl

may prove beneficial especially as
the early date of the race provides
a possibility of rough conditions.

Incidentally, this year Oxford
will be coxed by American,
G. A. Carver of Yale. But that
does not mean that there will be
the traditional antics which
American coxes at Henley have
made usual—such as banging the

sides of the boat for rhythm.
Carver has adopted the English
manner. He does not wear eccen-

tric kit or even a jockey cap. He
sits motionless in the manner of
a first class pilot

When the crews finally take the
water at Putney on March 24th
they will be cheered on by the
largest sporting crowd to gather

in London for any one event
during the year. And yet, peculi-
arly enough, the majority of

spectators will have no personal
tie-up with either of the Univcr-
sities or the towns in which they
stand.

Explanation Hard

Indeed, the explanation of the
terrific attraction of the boat race
is hard to find. Certainly an
important consideration is that it
provides free entertainment. The
whole of the tow-path from Put-.
ney to Mortlake is public property
and so the crowds who gather on
the banks to get a “grand-stand”’
view of the race do so without
payment. Neither must it be for-
gotten that the race takes place
right on London’s doorstep and
that it is one of the few events
which takes itself to the public
rather than having the public
come to it. And of course another
telling factor is the amount of
publicity both before and during
the race which is afforded by
newspapers and the wireless. It
is a combination of these things
which has helped to make the
boat race an institution.

And yet in its earliest days the
event was not considered of
sufficient importance to make it
even an annual affair. The first
race was in 1829 when Oxford,
no doubt inspired by the fact that
one of their crew was named
“Toogood”, were the winners.
But not until 1856—20 years after
the first race was rowed on the
tidal waters of the Thames—did
the event become an = annual
affair. Another important date in





+ Traffie Don’t
No. 10
®

Do not stop in the middle
of the road to take up some-
one.



Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.








Ano JUST THEN
THE PROFESSOR
OF ENGLISH AND
THE DEAN OF
CLASSICAL
LANGUAGES
COME ALONG»








THANX TO i
ROBT 2 HEISER, N\
(38 KO PROSPECT AVE, 1

STATE COLLEGE, MA.



2-28

the 97th, #

of &

OXFORD
4



PRACTICE

First time on the Thames—Oxford’s probable boat race crew for



spell.—Ewpress.

those far off days was the year
1846 when the first outriggec
boats, forerunaers of the present

Ff lay shells, were used.

Most Memorable

Which was the most memorable
of all boat—race years? There are
many different claimants. There
was the magnificent race of two
years ago when Oxford after
leading all the way were beaten,
literally on the post, by Cam--
bridge. The margin was so close
that even those on a level with
the finishing post had to wait
until the judges had delivered
their verdict.

And then there was the mem-
orable year in 1912 when both
boats sunk and the race had to
be re-run. But probably the most
famous of all boat-races was the
one in 1877 when the crews dead-
heated.

Oxford on that occasion had a
slight jiead when their bow,
Cowles, damaged his oar so badly
that he could do no more rowing.
In spite of the handicap of having
to carry a “passenger” and in
spite of the fact that they had
only seven oars to eight, the
remaining members of the crew
stuck to their task so gamely that
although Cambridge were able to
pull up slowly, the finishing line
was reached with no discernible
margin between the two boats.

Latest weights and order of
row ng.
CAMBRIDGE *
H. H. Almond (Shrewsbury and Lady
Margaret!, 10st. 6%lb.; D. D. Macklin

'Felsted and Lady Margaret), 11st. 111b.;
J. G. PB. Crowden (Pedford and Pem-
broke}, 128i, 10lb: P. EF. A. Sharples
‘Shrewsbury and Lady Margaret), Ist.
élb, E. J. Worlidge (Mariborough and
Lady Margaret), 1l?st, 13%; C. B. M,
I.loyd (Shore, N.S.W.. and Lady Mar-
garet), 12st. 12%lb.; W. A, D. Windham
Pedford and Christs’s), 13st.; D. M.
Jennens (Oundle and Clare), 12st, 91b..
(stroke); J, F. K, Hinde (Malvern and
Pembroke), Sst. 41b. (cox). Average,
12st, 7b,
OXFORD

J, F. E. Smith (Eton and New College’,

list. 11lb.; A. J, Smith (Me\bourne G.S.
and Merton), last. lllb.; H. J. Renton
{Fton and Magdalen), 13st. 1i%lb.;

u. A. F. Stokes (Winchester and New
College}, list. 3lb.; M. J. Hawkes (Bed-

ford and New College), 2st, 11%41b.;
G, C, Turner (Winchester and New
College), 4st. 6lb.; D, N. Callender

(Eton and Trinity), 12st, 64lb.; C, G. V.

Davidge (Eton and Trinity), Ist. T4ilb,
(strokei; G. Carver (Yale University and
Belliol), 8st, 7lb, (cox), Average, 12st.
13441b,



Wilkes Has Eyes
On World Title

From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 19,
Rodney Wilkes, the only gold

medal winner at the recent Pan-
American Games told pressmen
when he arrived at Piarco that,
“IT have my eyes not only on the
World Olympics, but on the world
lifting championships to be held
in Italy in October this year. I
do hope the Olympic Games Com-
mittee will make it possible for
Trinidad to send a team of lifters.
After my lifts in the ‘Pan-Am’
Games, I can win the world title
in my division”, It was a confident
Wilkes who spoke.



y li Do It Every Time
XT] Se

| The Iota A Pot Og By Jimmy Hatlo |
yy

the Varsity Boat Race against Cambridge to-morrow make a fine
picture as they shoot past Hammersmith Bridge during a practice

Re-elected Water
Polo President

At the Annual General Meeting
of the Barbados Amateur Water
Polo and Swimming Association,
Maj. A. R. Foster was re-elected
President of the Association and
Mr. Peter Patterson was re-elect-
ed Vice-President. Mr, Tim Year-
wood was elected Secretary and
Mr.-Evan Rogers Treasurer.

At the beginning of the meeting
the Secretary on behalf of the As-
eociation congratulated their
President, Maj. Foster, on his be-
ing awarded the M.B.E. in the
King’s New Year honours list.



Cricket On Monday

A FRIENDLY cricket match will
be played on Easter Bank Holiday
26.3.51 at Belmont grounds Six
Roads, St. Philip, between
ane XI” and “Chamberlain

Play starts at 11.30 a.m.

TEAMS

Chamberlain C.C. C. Leacock
(Capt,), St. C. Sobers, R. Thomp-
son, I. Seales, F. King, C. Tull,
V. Burke, V. Branker, C. Mas-
siah, B. Austin M. Kellman, K.
Kidney .

Clarke’s XI. G. Clarke (Capt.)

G. Kirton, H. McCarthy B.
Springer, O. Carter, V. Holder,
C. Clarke. P. Roach, H. Jones,’
J. Jordan, S. Miller.

Umpires: J. Ramsay O. Sandi-
ford.



Lindsay Gordon |

WinsB.G. RoadRace

From Our Own Correspondent
GEORGETOWN, March 20.

Lindsay Gordon, B.G, champion
cyclist won the 17-mile road race
from Belfield to the Sea Wall
bandstand on Sunday morning,
covering the distance in 38 min-
utes ahead of a field of 36 starters,
Mario Mendinca was a close sec-
ond, and Dennis Rix, third.

The race was marred by a mis-
hap involving Roy Gordon who
fell and suffered injury to his left
hand when he rode into a cow
shortly after the start of the race,
He was rushed to the Georgetown
Hospital and admitted.



Assize Diary

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28

No, % Rex vs. Cecil Scantie-
bury,
No. 7. Rex vs. Kenneth Hurdle,

THURSDAY, MARCH 29

No, %. Rex vs. De Coursey Grif-
fith,
No. 21, Rex vs. Randolph Chand-
ler and Kenneth Hurdle,
FRIDAY, MARCH 30
No, 4. Rex vs. \Gardiner Gittens.



INSTEAD OF THAT SILLY
“Sone OF THE CULTURE.
YOU'RE SUPPOSED TO

BARBADOS





ADVOCATE

World Middleweights
Run From Turpin

By GEORGE WHITING
THE MIDDLE-WEIGHTS and the cruiser-weights of

the world are running away
who shall blame them?
Finding opponents for

from Randolph Turpin — and

Britain’s rumbustious young

middle-weight champion has never been easy, even when
“Licker” was a fledgling pro just out of the Navy.

Now, after nis 48 sec. destruc-
tion of the luckless Lue Van Dam
at Harringay recently, the match-
ing of Randolph has become box-
ing’s biggest heedache.

Proudly, promoter Jack Solo-
mons has told the world that Tur-
pin will be fighting at the Gardner-
Weidin show at Earls Court on
March 27—eight days after his
return clash at Leicester with
Frenchman Jean Stock,

Whom will he fight? Solomons,
earnestly seeking g box office
answer to that question, has his
scouts flourishing cheque books
half way round the world — but
their preliminary reports are not
encouraging. Randolph seems as
popular as the plague with the
fighting men of America and
Europe.

One Volunteer

Up till now, the only offer to
accommodaté Turpin on the 12-
Stone mark has come _ from
America’s Mel Brown, who will be
back in England within the next
few days—but whose claims to this
kind of billing would have looked
a good deal brighter had he not
been outpointed last year by
South Africa’s George Angelo.

Which of the world’s middle-

‘ weights could be expected to give
| Turpin any kind of test before he

gets down to his Empire title
argument with Australia’s Dave
Sands this summer?

Combing America

Obviously, the pick ot the bunch
would have been American Jake
LaMotta and Frenchman Laurent
Dauthuille—heroes of a 15-rounds
slam in Detroit last September for
the world title that LaMotta sub.
sequent'y ceded to Ray Robinson,

But this top-line pair are out.
Dauthuille has qg date with Claude
Ritter in Paris a few days before
the Earls Court show. LaMotta, is
still recovering from the hammer-
ing he took from Robinson, and is
certainly in no state to risk his
chin coming in contact with Tur-
pin’s right hand.

It seems inevitable that Ran-
dolph’s next London opponent



The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.02 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Full) March 23
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 4.30 a.m., 4.28



m
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil
Total for month to yesterday:
22 in,
Temperature (Max.) 85.0° F.
Temperature (Min.) 73.5° F.
Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
E.N.E, (3 p.m.) ENE,
Wind Velocity 14 miles per
hour
Barometer (

a.m.) 29.944

(3 n.m.) 29.868





BROS

Show you these and more
for Ladies!
Anglaise Embroidered $3.04

up.
Checked Taffeta

$1.37
a yd.
Spun Silks
in varieties ...... 87c. up
Crepe-de-Chine
in varieties .... $1.14 up

Sandal Shoes in Big varie-
ties

Felt and Straw Hats

Underwears

Costumes Jewellery

‘Wrist-Watches

Pocket Books Etc, Ete.

GENTLEMEN!

Sports Shirts in Plain and
Flowered for holidays
Striped and Plain Woollens
‘Inderwears

Ties
Socks etc.
Shop at

THANI
BROS

Pr. Wm. Hry St.



WAITING FOR
YOU

A Fine Range of...

EXCLUSIVE TWEEDS, WORSTEDS
and TROPICAL SUITINGS
When TAILORED by US will give you
that look of PERFECTION.

gee See the Patterns now on Show!







P. C. §. MAFFEL & C0., LTD.
“TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING”

will be a eruiser-veight, and it is
with the object of finding one
brave specimen of this class that
Lew Burston, Solomon’s New
York agent now combing
America,

is

“Bough Task

_ You have only to examine Tur-
pin’s record against Americans to
appreciate how tough is the task
iburston has been set. As an ama-
teur Randolph knocked out Harold
Anspach, g tough marine in less
than a round. As a_ professional
he compelled Pete Mead to retire
with his ribs smashed after four
rounds, and hammered all real re-
sistance out of Tommy Yarosz in
eight rounds.

All of which raises once again
the question that scores of people
have asked me since the Van Dam
explosion: What chance would
Turpin have with world champion
Ray Robinson? At this early stage
I venture only one forecast.

Robinson, from what I saw of
him in Paris, is the greatest all-
round fighter in the world—but
neither he nor anybody else would
stay upright under the kind of

right hand killer punch that Tur-
pin hung on the chin of Lue Van
Dam.





SATURDAY, 24TH

‘ r Dance Band un
The Police vi supply the

i lida
sca de Baile Sup
Mpolicia el Sabado, Marzo











MARCH, 9 P.M.

der Cxpt. Raison
Music

por la Ba
24, 9 pam

ENTRANCE: ous



\. Zealand M P Calls
lor New Approach
To Test Cricket

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,
March 22.
An appeal for a different ap-
proach to Test cricket was made
to-day by Mr. Walter Nash, New
Zealand, leader of the Opposition
when the England and New Zea-
land Test teams were entertained
in the Cabinet room here.

Mr. Nash said he saw a good
deal of the final day’s play in the
first Test at Christ Church and
was disappointed in the perform-
ance generally. During the four-
day drawn match, 1,013 runs were
scored, and only 21 wickets fell,

“If we are to have the type of
game you men are capable of put-
ting on, you must get a transfor-
mation .from the Test match
mind,” Mr, Nash declared.

“If we can get back to the old
style of cricket, followers of the
game would love it. We want from
you English team the same lesson
in cricket as we received from the
British Isles rugby teams,

—Reuter.

Peruvian Will

Swim Channel

LONDON, March 21.

Channel swimmer Daniel Car-
pion of Peru, at present resident
at Caona, Buenos Aires, has
officially entered the Daily Mail
Cross Channel Swimming Race
1951.

In 1947 Carpion now 39, became
the first South American to swim
the English Channel. He left Cape



nda de la



: Ali Tourists are Welcome _ :
—: All Venezuelan Friends :—

SPECIAL DANCES !!
SPECIAL PRIZES !!

Bienvenido a Todos las Turistas
y Amigos Venezolanos

Bailes Especiales

y Premios

$1.00

DINE and DANCE

at

the

Crane, Hotel

EASTER MONDAY 26th MARCH
1951

SPECIAL DINNER WILL BE SERVED

| from 7—9 p.m.

DANCING 9 P.M. — 2 A.M.

Music by Riche Goodridge and his Orchestra

DINNER & DANCE
Admission to DANCE only

$3.00
$1.00

Please make your TABLE RESERVATIONS EARLY

Phone 2220













| Gris at 10-a.m.,

_

a

FRIDAY,

on September 4
and landed at Folkstone 14 hours,
46 minutes later, Carpion’s entry
was the fortyfifth to be received
since the race -was announced.
—Reuter.

TIN TALKS GO ON
WASHINGTON, March 22
A diplomatic source here to-day

categorically denied the report in
Washington that tin discussions
between the United States, Bri-
tain, Holland and Belgium broke
down. Talks are continuing, he
said.



—Reuter.






TWINE

Skein

Esta Noche







MARCH 23,

1951



which makes %
“GOD'S WAY OF :
SALVATION 3

COS

PLAIN”

Plecse write fer one to
Samuel Reberis, Gospel
Book end Tract Service,
30, Central Avenue, Ban-

gor N. Ireland.”

os

LECCCBSSSSSSSSSSCOSSSOSSSS

Visite

CLUB MORGAN

para

un entretenimiento

de cenar

. y baile

PAPER Per quire of one colour 36¢
heh 2¢

Per ball = 27e. 28e. & 47c.
(Cero e

Beda ais Ree Ok



CAVE

SHEPHERD

& Co, Ltd.
10-13 Broad St.

SHIRTS

STIFF FRONT

AUSTIN REED

DRESS

SEMI-STIFF DRESS
SEPARATE COLLAR STRIPED

By

VAN HEUSEN

COLLAR ATTACHED STRIPED

_ By
AERTEX

SHORT SLEEVE SPORT

AT

C. B. RICE







Phone 4267 for

&CO.





SWEDISH 6-PANEL DOORS
Vx 3 x 14” thick
Tx 2’8" x 1%” thick

These are well made Wooden Doors at

low prices.

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

48” thick, 4

x 6’, 8’, 10’ long

3/16” thick, 4’ x 8’ long

SURINAM PLYWOOD, best quality
14” thick, 4’ x 8’ long
14" thick, 3’ x 7’ long

RED CEDAR SHINGLES
DOUGLAS FIR JOISTS & PLANKS



Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €9., LTD.

*











arene



Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY. MARCH 21 1S51 IIAKIIMMIS \l>Mi( Ml PA01 MM B. G. -Jama tea Tes ts Interesting Series Was If* O. s. Mri'i\ THE three main fcature-i in Ihe As a batsman he mov. Jamalca-B.G series of Test* lo the ball well, and to quote hie hould. in my opinion, be rated in captain B*rkele\ < %  no nerves" the following order of importance < 11 The fact that the players on Ixith fielding, a good ball was cheered to I i %  , %  whether the principal 'wing cheered was %  Jamaican <.i nrit itti GutM I Shall deal with the lour under their three main hoods. In the lirst llllllk that British Guiana was unlucky to have been twice beaten and I say this without prejudice to Jamaica's One. evament m winning both Tests. On the other hand, for instance In the first Tost after lleikcl. v Gaskin, chiefly by his individual the world. H therefore has DMM bowling skill ami clever capof the characteristics of a class 4 opening batsman and should bo able to develop the few which ho now I ti Peter Wight I am backing to make a fine batsman. His timing is so near perfection n il tremendous power into his strokes ( of such a amal but it is generally accepted that ..II of them esiiii II i-d first class %  old Blafan BMM Peter Bay ley, I | I John Trim %  %  tola lb %  Lennie Thorn ;is and Wight the onto %  who lo Val online and •howed that ho BOUM be hit when ho bowl ci half vollan Md the length Bavlcy. „, Hi v opinion. did th:> %  en time be t,>,k out of the JamahB.A.F.A. Reject Terms Of Pickwick Club TOURIST INVASION AN invasion of Barbados is in full force But it is an agreeilball ab '* on *' or '' '" *ing can ict out noon. 0"C Glttens. i the h A F A. VlcepraI* BATU1 litton ti> hi ni%  Council ofthi Barbadog AmaU*. ettar iron, th* Piekwlcfc Eg-*!TO _ ry "! i ? n ?._. ch fcrtb.ll KiJ^^liTft^ sdnniid bo played at Kcttsin^trxi (or the 1951 season This hM >< t.H.k place at an extraordiui v mee-Una which was held at " tcl ? arr chock ,uU nd """^ 'LA Hlldqunll—, Pinfold SHI I) after££* It* , ists, thus cashing In on some of MMaMI the benefits of the trade. The Mr. V MI said that tourists have come to spend th> thg II I itMn uut in Easter Holidays not only because by the Pickwick Club struck him f the ** bathing and the peace a Urn. inimlal^nii Ha araj not *nd quietness, bul because, as the> aaUafled with the explanation readily admit, their American : (Ivtn hun 111 U and dollars and Venezuelan Bohvarek Onset Club he regTCtled th lativ* ,ml,h '""her in Bridgetown rick Chill im mere *** *&_** ** ,n Caracas lo M IhtmkBosi tccnethlna about a 7". EaMrr lnvi ,lon 1 ••• >"t I If thev accepted that It w *a ^T^ 1*S *"£& fl, *. M ^ i„ith„ — %  ----_* ,,. !" RV.ib.i Airlines. foil." which the 194H and 19S0 tooiball incil on motion of V.r Oppbl seconded by Mr Lionel Gillen* un •ant to the Pickwi The Council of the B A r \ ,1. not agree ,,uh the lent letter dated mo 14th March, iff-' •itli regai jnd (-otiLl.SLIi: WIGHT In being hen the Association thOUld tak.' Since thou arrival from Ven* Th,. Pick ,„rh. ,hriTiri". h"vJC ,,J,-irk club wm tryiiix to bUekmall mint, daadu n,i wm. nm ,h ',„. "" %  '" ""' A '""'-'""" 'V,• !.. lakinf nilvanl f c o( th,. com Mi,. ^,,1,-„!„, sa,r"pi55 "„'",r r u •? ,ne '"* c %  c ~ ^ ~* p* !" v • %  nu.quw t B> in paco bowling um,. rmerv.nr -I ll orm you wouU %  bvi„„l, UleneW IbMBi M Ka,i.-i ibm Ihe IMI\ I smear RAZOL 1 HAIR. Take M and work through the IIAIK f,r..n l iirst. thou baal art ui HI nit oi ti to wipe to dress the hair t. The above course, will give • irable results If your dealer hasn't KA/OI. ItlMAllF, phortf mm BAY RIM (0. S and S b Truly the Finest of Kl M So Mellow in a highball *> % %  Smooth in a Cocktail ll Lsimply Superb. Try il and you will he < <>n\ iuced. Ml Mil & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. Ilradquarlcrs for BEST RUM i[i\— raaani bttdca to relax tired "nerves. Th. terms which Hi, .i, dkwnandln| •'" %  loinunK pait ton Dl HM hi Berkeley Oukln are* ' n~1v increase throng of Easter shopper*, •nergy and opUmtsm, hni bowled /' H "* •"* aroaa and thaj woman bright. Into the team In mj adwltnai Maiigemenis had to play football here undai w "*h gaily coloured dresses, ano pinion T naka arllll the dominions which would make it bo,h '"•" nd women thioa.lin :t.n.ittainM Mm The bogey o( Barbados Crtcfcal Association .hfllcult for them to make d uroflt. Ih ,,r ' %  >' ttlon S ,he PVements of Id" he ha-i_explodod Pillowing afC^tna terma which he would undertake to lend all the liIW *d Street chatting volubl Wight has a straight bid. 1 g.n-t gnrg and all the patw I. Ui and so too has John Trim o\ >•"• el out tn the loiter from the I v batng the %  B* retarj 1 the Pi, kwb bowler in the series to maintain a Club to the Secretary of the ppnrl ho eOUld tMTj ns the game was played. The Association should make II BUfla clear to the |>i.kthat they were not willing to acoapt any less than they got on thi :-' [.li'llii. %  .,I-.-IMr. O s OopcdJI -aid thai thf word scandalous used by v At the conclusion of each month Comle was too mild li thov were called of ,,u reason, the netl profits will known that Miey made J.'.-OIKi |WI %  vld ed after lh r ondormonseason of which the A KA ,;.. %  riu.iv.l.o tuiil thev wtTl %  Crtchel nuthorlnoned expenses have been doapproximately $2,000. If thev B A F A All th< avilione k Club which will be 1 %  %  %  nbers I think his WM the nil) In this depart! The umpiring wai Tom Ewarl and Hurke should be Kivcn full credit for having held n of the crowd In a welter of mi cull decisions The .lain.ii, His follow through has the Ues must be complimented for the ducted as "follows: smoothness of a professional and excellent arrangement thn m|g ( %  ) 10% of the gross '.,1. !_ta no? afraid to.play his own lor the press to record the (arm adminapid fire Spanish In some cases they are accompanied by Barbadians filling the role of Interprelers Some of the tourists are nol for%  •tttng the spirilurl side of life now that they are on holiday, and %  \ no i.ikins opportunity to atlend the religious icrtmomes of Holy Week at SI Patrick's Roman Catholic 1 irara it Mass yesterday morning—Maundy doubt attend the Good Friday rites this %  fnrcinc (a %  lK>wling tor th. against all type-! of in complete comfort and 100*", co-operntinn In lUppbrlniJ spot much tieedi latisl 1 has McC fi\~hl\ taincv. had placed Jamaica in (lie embarrassing position of losing i-ighl wieketi for 1T>3 runs. Jai Stall ell (.rcnatfa Footbullcrs Ui hun Home 14I I KVEN members 0/ the man Grenada football team %  slerda b] the Uaaeogne after number of g.inies here. ThoM uMving were Itobin RasaI I'.olull.lrl. Hudolph Knight. IX* nil. Knight, UtrmUon and gab „ auh hc wouId ___ lb) Marking and preparation 01 gtt -unetlung like SI 100 ground; (0) balls for match play. M ,. pointed OUl that under the (compel 1 ; 1 • provide ,.],, terms, tlv Pickwick Club got their own practice balls 1; ,., \ ^ i a tlon got 401 td) wages Including constat ,^ takings. The. war (c) rleaning pavilions „nd stand-, qulI< ., a „ 5 ,|e,l with that and did : P" l HOI want anv change Pickwlcl: stands or encloeure. ,g) advertl*had their (10", and thai could d n s or printing of signs, (hi waiciwhatevei they liked with it II was also staled in the ol morning Police tarmt nnl fhr pickwtck Clni pUTlni a Arter the M navt „,.„1| hava full control of llu been deducte.1 from the 1 ,,. I WOttld OTO %  ill be 1( |,. eashiers and lUff h 1 Uli nnrixise From then tm-; ihari rara lo maki aiiothc, M4M0 thb "mmtng season, then neoordlU to th. Club Nloigan. the Aipialic Club im 'in igrcement made by th) "u rt 'he Marine Hotel are among the places who M.ive planned Baathe pU ;r fes itlvitie* for the tourists, and more and more advertisements 111 Spanish are finding their way into the Press, and in show windows ol eity stores Th iMiin.f will |Url leturnuiM home from about Monday Mixed i'.urgo Comes I On "Fort AIIIIHTSI" I Ion \ SEE Ol it x*;nEASIEK STYUN6S S.....O HUNS ANI> CIIH.I>RRNS SOCKS ALSO CLEANERS. I'OLISIitS AMI MM SHI s Meztw I 9 lo BtrbadOl Football Asso,, 1 mekat Cuthbert Cummmga, Colin Huelation; 1 3 10 Pickwick i Bet 1 (letOM bands. Phil Edwards, U-onard Oub and I 3 to the Harbodoa r* pnr|>ose The Allio BinU has had .X|i.inine ,a ma 1,1,1. 10 ndd 12" run foi ,j tatotpnlal cricket before thl the other two wickeU. It will be %  '' >'; admitted thai there is a great Improved in his role behind the 5"? difference U-twe-en 133 runs as a wu-kct but is a 100 per cent better ATal InnlPgl -ore in an Inter bataman than he proved to be a colonial engagement. Having 'cured 182 runs in reply, ., M I would not be surpi lloikolev. I^iwrence Hoaten and (" Fletcher, nge Wllwara I iirepar playing field and be reeponsib] reparation of such II Is logical thai .1 lo wii the game Similailv In the went on ither niac n haaa John Stael Ranwlck are ramalntng holiday while Will, Laod ii sia.Mfu; on t" wort with the Sanitary Ijiundry Shortly before leaving yesterday drill. Skipper Renwick gets the job of second string Ihe Advocate that thea had a very HCODd Tosl wtakal keeper on the l51 Wl. enjoyable tour. Although the dottg %  ,„„„„ wa sir.npf In comhandicapped the .. publl Guiana rtarteeT moat promisingly Ing a gdod all rounder He played scoring 149 befor.the i I lh. %  !""' 1 ungs for his ilrst apfirst wicket but Ihcy collapsed poi'raiice and he was more than suddenly and added 137 for the ordinarily useful as a bowler with fall medium paced off breaks. Crlchm Aaaoctation, Tnrv vv ,.,,. ,,,., ,,, provide itafi t.eneral I'lihlie (or n„ III D H i. Ward aald thai natlncdubawaretaqubasftomtve \ ti ii tha en kwick ihcli own baUi foe prad aafnad to think that lhay to ihe match. %  rare entlUed In Ihe graatai share Aftar other luembara had apokan of the prollls tob> the action taken by t'" the business but they were not Pickwick i told : '"" ''"' l """* ,il of iMfrT. Mr COpphl then mOVCd hh Pickwick Club, they wan, motion, for the iwncfH of the The Council approved letter acceptlm ::I-OUIHI md fast and Association and tl a principle nine remaining wickets. It might have been a dUTarenl dory if Bayley had no*, become reckless at 94 and loae by hitting across an innocent and harmless ordinarily pitched ball from Valentine. And so from this. Biilish Guiana went on to their second defeat Bio uw lact thai thou aiara decisions in both gamus. and the fact thai many ram were scored and many wickets taken and since both games finished with a day to spare, constitute ample evidence that there was no "sitting on Ihe splice" or delaying laclies adopted. Now for my second point. What prospective talent has tinlaw unearthed? It has. in my opinion produced seven young players who should hold their places in lnlercolom.il teams for some years and who showed promise I Toping at a pace that should make Ebam 'andldatcs for West Indies honours. For British Guiana there arc Brian Patoir (17), Leslie Wiu;M (21) and Peter Wight (201, for Jamaica. Stan Coodrio Rov Miller (20), Aide Bums (21) and T. E. Saunders (19). Brian Patoir bowls leg breaks, googlies. top spinners straight uiongun Hi S feet 11 trajectory BMaayaajaw I mansard Asked which was his hardest name he replied "Ihe one against Bparlan. although we beat them by three goals to one". With regard to the last colony game he said that It was a bit a on his boyg as they %  UI worn OUl and therefore war. ., not capable of giving of their I-• I 8 ... ..,, n -..He thanked the members of the:;} Carlton Club, as well as those of |g Of tha slightly older plavers. the B A F.A and other members Ken RJckardf (28), J, K. Holt of Ihe various clubs. Cnpt II II Jr. (28), Neville Bonitto (27> of Williams, and the general public Jamaica. Robert Christian! (30* for making their stay such a nd the and Lanala Tbomaa <>f British happy and lataraatuig one and about Guiana proved themselves to be added that they could not havo denii. Kingatoa lent, yet he believed even man All thai the Pickwick Club woa Club of Jamaica lo angaga pulled his weight. entitled to wai Ihe rental valm | |n| the last Iw He had a bunch of young pinynf Ihe grounds and the stands. in~May Oil who were always Irving lo give %  of their boat and they, no doubt, .. *-, eaa • .....* %  r*< • %  • had ix-neiiie.1 from the experience C rtlClUXlOll AI RtieKH 7 fWI ItZll I ii i. :n this lour. With regard to the local playiKcaipta from Stnuier's Cruciers he said thai Oraol la the fUdon will highlight the Police defence and 'Brickie" Lucas lb Band's Ooi ilormaiur the front line were outstnndat Hastings Idx-ks tonight begining for Barbados while Ivan ning at 8 o'clock. Capt C I Smith m goal was always a nurd liaison will conduct the Band. nut to overcome Wilkes another PaooaAHMl forward, although not in his IM-M ^TSSBtftZSSSW* •22K form, showed that he knew hi. ^ImJSPS^tJ^JtoU^SS^ stllfr "i and raixiM Slcrliii*; Performances Although every memlw-r pulled Ois*n TianvMpuun his weight, yet he must make r , *" w %  '.' special mention of Callendcr and mi "'"^ ^ h Phil Edwards in the defence and 1 %  *" s "" Bsnai Ju.ir. i forward line respectively who gS^T, 1 'J 111 r "' A "" " Playad riartlng games thrnughout i j.a.,, StFurness Withy'i A miters l lanoad i UuiuaUi U rnaj *in ...K.s ol talnd nah ana %  uspiiaa of diosoiala yrup. itavounog i \;iaels, ground colter. it un and other general cargo .n<"d iish was eonalgnad i* Messrs. W. S Munro, g Ltd., while the hjuit chlaflj graprtiuit and or-i.ges -came li various fiull vendors of tincity I' %  lorl Amhenrt brought witn I of S3 passengers, live of whom got off here She arrived from Halifax via Tr in idad and Urenadu and left it dining the evening for St tn ,. Vincent and Martinique lh i agi-nt uiMr i li.r I Ii Co.. Ltd bat 1 foot1 %  I'.I In term* toil and Tin* A'l.>inO<>n f BM < I %  AM; K-iir r.ON tovs ,•1 Jr.... 0>aMItM M*r*cll Mh nl Hw H"l> Onll lr..n. "Parmlfal" WMH.I WMI un at Ihiyrrulh 1ST" TI cnniplrtu JI l'j|t>rm IBft Thl> *plrnrtid wora open' CANE FIRE S HORTLY AWKK o'clock hist night tire destroyed a large luuntity of canes at the Hello Plantation. The amount of damage has not yet been estimated bul of Ihe enno workers In the .. %  in. • d.-. I at I big Instant Breathing Comfort Agradable Delicioso Rico HUEVOS DE PASCUA I'AKA QUE SE ALXQREN si's N1N0S UKUK DAK1.KS UN HI'KVO l)K CIKX'OLATE DF. PASCUA LLENO ION MAIIZAI'AN KMVCKI.TO KN PAPKI. EN IIUEVKKA DE I'l.ASTICO V TAMIIIKN EN IIIEVOS DEPI.ASTKO I.1.ISIIS DE AI.MKNDKAS TOSTADAS TAMB1XN PROVEEMOB UNA 3ILECCI0N COMI'l.KTA lit: CONl'ITES EN ( AJAS I.UJOSAS liAI.I.ETAS DE CIK'KTAII. GALLEIAS DtflXES EN I.ATAS LUJOSAB KTCETKKA ETCCTERA EN l.A. Drug Stores Ltd. inchea and has a good first laai duru beta g the tour, 'f****f****S0**s*'s&*ffs*i?**ss&s&s**sssst' t ffsj's s* *'f'. NOTICE OUR OFFICE AND WORKSHOP WILL BE CLOSED ON SATURDAY, MARCH 24th OUR GASOLENE STATION WILL BE OPENED TO BUSINESS AS USUAL. I,-,,, COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM. LTD. WHITEPARK ROAD. ,V *.-.',',','.',','. KWWWWWWWWtWWWWW^WWSWrrWSWSW' '.:'.'..: % % %  '. %  .'.-. %  .Y.V.'.'.'.^'. .' % % %  '.V^'.V-'.'.'.:'^, 1



PAGE 1

I M \HCH 23. 1*51 BAUB VIM1S WiVOCATt: p\t. r THRU: Abolition of Rice Marketing Rminl II #7/ 0a Sought By B.C. Legislator II I : ht BfthMAon, but through • rflOfl with E.C.A.. who interested in %  ad Nipphe* throughon: i h %  world, the E.C.A. was in a position to help when the British nf indicated that • • i land rice ih> c %  m Thi'. th# opportune on. Mr Hayden tokl I Press ConUiat he i%  < %  rivr in* mission the his knowl.'di. i and to learn the possibilities that the BO Government officials .iV.i.l.ildc fa nuir.iM . rlca production. During his stay in the Colony. ,i it will confer IUl Mi la who is dumake '"mmendaI • %  ineri uloi livestock pcothr Colony. Mr. Mr Coikle is being loaned to the B.C. Government through thi At S Yard %  police CS> cVcs ntt. I equipment are to be uaed by Metropal i tan Police patroli. were demoiiMiated. Sir Harold %  loner 'an Pi> ted that It is hoped to havi bati and 35 cycles lined with two-way ertre less telephony to assist the police In, regulatirm traffic on both oanKs of the River Thame during the Fetlval of Britain Later the whole motor cycle squad of 200 machines would ily litt ed. Each has a 3 ft. aerial attach ed to '.I is put Din fn %  Scotland Yard %  i orani %  I %  etaefced to il** handlebars and a buzzer sounds The oft... eommunlcnti* direct with Scot land Yard by a telephone fitted to the motor cycle I'ulinMotor Cvrlr Fitted With Bmilm ftvriiiuriu \\ ill Ship <\.r 100,000 lon> S*rap Metal ToNA. UEKV.i Over 100.000 tons ol m-olum-ry and arrap metal wtO fork within Uw from Bermuda'^• %  h closes down on March SI I aere were many bt>i which wiu jKiwHueo b) i repliM and they have since sold %  ..." N • Hallfaj %  ting dock, but \ to send it to K:i..l.|ll | Simon who ha%  v. T ,.i moirtht. i cpaci to make a large profit. Id that the British mm Iaaila' was vitally concern ed in the %  Integrity ieterminiHi Iit; lectured to 1 i T : for fort> rive mif. they ii> ..: d H %  • %  their duty ii> alwayi %  i in it thai %  ranks. In Motor Accident >Fiaa\ Out Oo CotTMpoiwlrnt. U SPAIN. March iv Two men were Instantly killed rnd lix other peoi [Id a motor ear travellir. %  ite direcUona collided on thi CJ Maine Road. Waller Field It is reported that the • ir. Mr and Mrs. ^remungal, were travelling into -i iin aflat a visit to their estate when the accident occurred. i the col %  road. The truck %  %  Pennd The two men killed were tni) "f the truck. TRIPLETS PORT OF SPAIN, March 10. Mrs. ive birth to trip Iher of seven children. B.G. Scholarship Awards 1949-50 Cost $365,000 iFrem Our 0*n ItwrrSpondcnl > liKOIKJKTOWN, March L'" Total value of scholarships awarded between I04t and m.^u amounted % %  > round llgures to S365.000. Of this. $159,000 was proloial funds, S173.0U* from %  .'. and 131 DOO (i 'ir other PORT-Of-SPAJlff, March 19. <.f Tropical Asrtculturo at St. Auguatlne, Trinidad, in %  ell Mbd lor agncuiui tropical i< Ki ..HI ( o.i ceUenej Sir Hn I I %  I CollegVi ( %  %  ; lighted i. %  %  !es by thi i iieighlmui.i P frtalT reci %  I CO medal. %  %  man of the ui-imittnn t.. : p title brains, all ol equally bl I hlctl fo were received from Mi I H o c ro t ary of Bhria I Jafgai. who ll> peasant holdbuj near the i and Simon Pierre the Tt cr. who %  galvanise. roof platform, were alongside . C.B E Vi.v-ptii.i ipal $5,000 LIBEL ACTION BROUGHT AGAINST B.G. NEWSPAPER i % % %  ^'f Anna A i oast, Demerarr, i.i,is t aroaaah i lali ting ts.uou lieged libel K i %  I i .ikhoo. -equel to a murhand wn %  .ised. i them went ^_ scale olfenat> Oat idioms ,,. Defence Ministry TO to-day Otlu-i.s Java distu.i of Brabt A ; kfi MI. 11 rl.i. %  %  : Mi. 1 had captured %  onw III.OIHI ter.l.n.i and Madura. I >,i .1 lahUB l.iiiii5 that It is % % % %  hig i I i i %  • %  itlng groundi iter Lord Trefgarne*i %  i>sititni uillH .IM been raised In nit w eek as to whether t r not Lord Trelgarne. former i olouiai Develop %  ,.ii ha* in (act s.vcrert hiconnections with the i corporation. At the momi :*uij(arne la in the Hahanuu and IIN Financial Thne* tU*m that On i;Ood authority" it understand^ that he has been dttcharg ol the Coi lies ror the project on UHMJ A CDC ipt • %  miao uttei laannl ..' the myttat \ wllao DC MM th.it Lord Trefgarf. tbutty rot I i that his .„i\ lea was %  !* hy aeallabi CorponUon -i r. s LEAVE YOUR TRAVFL PROBLEMS WITH HOLIDAY TRAVEL "M:\IIIS AT 1 Confirm all Airlm. !: 2 Secure Hotel Reseivau. 3 Deliver Your Ticket:, fout Ot 4 Arrange Motor anil Si 5 Advise >ou on any Travel Pn I HOLIDAY TRAVU ((INSlHANTS of CAHADA, LTD Mnln F1..T Cvn Stu-(.h. r.l ft Co. I I '' ONK f.M.l. ! .V'. I r '•' I ; Btn <>K STARTI.INd REVELATIONS GLOBE THEATRE Presents Dr. SATAN BUM SEL I TREASURE HUrtl ROME %  %  % %  lOUth %  hunt ., %  1 I i rare taken nd bidden LADIES ONLY ALEX KHD %  immer Alaxan li lad! i> Thw i the Municipal %  %  %  %  %  i • nemlee, ud C.B I M.A I'n .' %  Mr of S ... OJ1 ... Ilia I New Wtapom w UrffiNUTCm, Mid New and deadlj tjrfei : . .. in UM wai : ., ii1 %  %  %  .. mameni %  i Francis %  f Ordinnnee, announc* I \.,, k sra inend ng ubout |80l tunas fo r on Kuns, hells jdlruj nev Reetei MAY BE NOMINATED !.( JAfM Di I" %  %  | rat (Lib in 8 hies* kg is up fOl nomination as West Oarman Cot anei Aires. It was MMraod %  uthorttatlvalj hare I Dr. Oeiiii ho alao %  mow In of tin I. P oent. usrd I promuv %  I Barlta lawyoi id.nomination ^tii 1 I be I < and l>v Theodora lleuss. u ii ibabb still bt .id hwva II Vteulrr r.i.nw.i M:I> BBUflB %  iin chief cashier ol Ke.1 for a body him (0 the bank Of the Iwink th. araphrraa < %  ( tea %  ',, %  % % %  i %  UNt'Sl'AL ACCIDENT i fcFTTOWN In Dui bat larao [dan happened whan . tailwaj truck In paaaUuji %  row •>' parl truck the and %  ii". perked il ui iled it niong the Una wlpini thi >* idllghU . | froB 1 •' large carRnd damaging them beyond ropa'" (umWed I.UPKOM MOMBASA The death sentence was passed, recently at the ffcjprtaM COUrl "i .1 mother who three times asketl a man U. kill her son who was a %  ;,. ri..' p urderer, who shot his vlctbn wiUi .. bow and arrow. was .il.i> se7itence.l to f >liii. 1 eiUHBUIAT, M;irrh 2Klh. 8.30 TIII.'HSDAV, KUtk 2lllh. I & H.:l(. 'I'lCKKTS siUI In adx.ince every day from w ToitfiT nioat 1 -7igsr i: 311 i is i: TO-MORKOW TO THCRSDAY 4.15 A 8.311 [>nily FROM ROODAL THEATRES CARIBBEAiN II O 1 A L II O V 1 m PARADISE UNTAME& ...in oil its wonder and fury! LOVE UNASHAMED ...in oil ils innocence and romance! ADVENTURE / ...At NEVER BEFORE! J AKTHIT RANK prennl. JEAN SIMMONS HOUSTON r**££4/£ JAMES WYTER rO ...M;I;..V% 1 I -. I and (flitllnuliiK Hew MmtV'is —r^^_ of Robin Hood! John DEREK Disaa LYNN, ... ( %  %  !. sKK/ur • AH. mu Wh.HMfl.1 MN k| warn BCUBA1 iMlllf % % %  " 1 l.\llt\ KIH. SIIOIll \MIII IIIK1.I. hT(HM.r:s O I %  >1 l I i TO-MOKROU A SI'NDAV 4.45—>. IS 1st Instalment tolumbU Belial SII'liRMAN v. ATOM MAN 2nd lii*Ulment—MOMlAV Tt'l-SIIAY 4.45 A HI 5 MART* TOREN JEFF CHANDLER -ami m'm-mm inn SPECIAL MllJNKiMT SHOW TO-MOHKOW The Republic Whole Serial •JAMS BMOfBOS Of \fl>soi§tl" Starring : Keith Richarrts—Ray Bo'.vi ff^l.aii %  Flly ^-^ %  H ^^^\ i fll MA %  ,-ilVjil 21 f / /. la i ^-J ^Lw MJ jRJL TO ALL OUR PATRONS!! ATOM MAN VM. SUPERMAN' I f.fMHP lltlltW SPECIAL a THE PASSION PLAY KMPIKK — l.:i$—.I5—M5 ROXV — 5—7—9 OLYMPIC — 4.3K-C.4S— H.I5 ROVAI. — 5 8.15 COMING TO EMPIRE -"•MfIS --BAXTER I b-PlMRtJ-M CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS" "GIRL OF THE YEAR" THE THIRD MAN" THE MUDLARK"



PAGE 1

ISarkrita ESTABLISHED 1895 Satisfactory Sugar Agreement Expected Observers Believe I RIUAY. MARCH 23, 1(*M PKICE : FIVE CENTS By SYDNEY <; wm.i. LONDON. Miirch 12. A BOARD OF TRADE spokesman said today that Britain**, talk* with Cuba on sugar anil other trade in tier* in still continuinu "when questioned ahout a rumour iliut the\ had broken down." Nevertheless leading unofTuiul sufiar experts heli.\eil ilin> the negotiation* were more or less in abeyance. i'lic* doubted whether there would be bilateral CuU.ui MIK.II agreements on the line* so far mooted with either Britain or Canada. Instead they expected u mutt, looser arrangement far mure satisfactory lo the Commonwealth ;ugar producers. Hitherto the;. said the British negotiations In Culm had tcnialivaly contemplated 500,000 Ion* ii year for three year* In prfffitlrfTi such an Acivcine.nl win not eas> to denounce and might last much longer than three years. Not Definite Experts gave several reason* lor iheir belief that this idea is out. 1. The negotiations had never been so definite as was commonly Mipposed. Quite apart from the protests from the Commonwealth Migar producing countries. Britain and Cuba themselves might ilnd insuperable obstacles. Britain's idea In a bilateral ogreemem would be to obtain reciprocal advantages for her own exports to Cuba. With the United Slates goods so deeply entrenched In the Cuban market it might be difficult for Cuba to grant as much reciprocity as Britain would expect 2. Even supposing that the Commonwealth protest arose from a misunderstanding, they had gone too far for Britain to Ignore. 3 A bilateral agreement with Cuba would cut across the declared sugar policy of th P British Government Itself. Assurance Britain has frequently stated her policy of leaving a part of net market competitively open to dollar and other raw sugars for the sake of Britain's important reexport trade in refined sugar and lo preserve the International Sugar Agreement on :; multilateral basis. The Commonwealth sugar preference Is designed to give Commonwealth sugar producers something more than competitive world price over a period though it does not do so at present. Rut experts could not see how a bilateral preferential Agreement with Cuba could be reconciled with the principal of multilateral competition. They expected that the outcome of the negotiations with Cuba would refer to an assurance that part of the British market would be left open for Cuban sugar in fair competition with other suppliers —Heater. UNEMPLOYMENT IN U.K. LONDON, March 22. Britain aims at not allowing unemployment in Britain to rise above three per cent at the seasonL.K. Will Give LI ndei 4 taking Bi-lateru! trade discussions an inking place b etwee n reprcsentat.ves of the United Kingdom and Cuba. They are taking place at Torquay although outside the forrral scope of talks under UM general agreement oq -., trade Purchases of sugar from Cuba by ibe United Kingdom during the years 195! -1953. inrhiM\.. an part of the subject matter of these discussions Nevertheless, m order to reassure Commonwealth sujor pro ducers, H.M. Government announce that ir an agreement i>> made with Cuba which includes an undertaking on the part of H.M. Government to purchase Cuban sugar in 1953 the. ing to give an undertaking to And U. that year a market for exporthie surplus of sugar for Commonwealth countries concerned up to the full limit laid down in the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement They will be very ready to discuss with representative.-; of Commen wealth producers the most % %  ixeptable method of giving; effect to this undertaking Deputies Cancel 16th Meeting Wall Builders Under Arrest Fourteen Die MILAN. March 22 An Italian Public prosecutor today ordered the arrest of four men ith building the playPW wall which collapsed her* yesterday morning, killinc 14 school girls Arrest warrants were issued for DM archltad of the wall, its constructing engineer and two workUjed in building it last deb is buried about 40 girls between live and 13 years Bid Manj BN still b/lnj gravely injured m hospital. The Jatal casual'y list rose to with the death in hospital of a nine-yenr-old girl. The girls at a Oonvani school, %  m neiterinif under the wall as a high wind swept the city, when crashed down on them. Work* I behmeing to Commur.ist and m-Corrnuinist trade unions today muted m calling a five minutes stoppage of work in Milan as a MHII of mouinniR -Renter. Slipped Goering Poison: Arrested NUREMBERG. March 22. Peter Martin Blcibtreu, a 28year-old Journalist who claimed that he had given Herman Goering the poison with which he committed suicide, was arrested in "Juremborg yesterday DPA. East German News Agency reported to-day. Bleibtreu. nn Austrian, had rome from Switzerland and intended to stay in Nuremberg only a few days But policemen recognised and arrested him. Last October. West German magistrate Quick said Bleibtreu had confessed on oath to slipping Ifr.man Ooering. %  poison phial with which he committed suicide in Nuremberg gaol — Reuter. Reds Prepar Last Ditch Democracy at Work PARIS, March 22 Four power Foreign Mmiste Deputies cancelled their sixtecr meeting called for to-d arranged to meet in private .%  %  ion at 3 )> m. to-morrow NEW ORIGANS March 22 Three western deputies were A Jewish Judge here dismis~sed meeting at the Frr..ch Foreign a suit brought b v Protestants fur Ministry tonight to co-ordinate the removal of the statue of their tactics. Decision not to meet Roman Catholic saint Mother to-day was taken fn "informal Cnbrini from a publ.c square discussion' after lunchojii for the The Judge L I Yarn.i „.,. deputies bid ,uBritish ,„, hii S&t'mli J% !" *£ fou Embassy aimed at breaking the remove a public statue dedicated to one of Catholic Faith tried in a court of law presided i^cr bv a Judge of Jewish Faith, we may well know that Democracy b -till hard ;,t work." Reuter NO HALF MEASURES TOKYO. March 23 The South Korean MJnlBtai i Tokyo. Kim Joo. today urged UW United Nations to allow then troops in Korea to drtva to QM Manchurian border. Me appealed to them not to stop al peak, the House of Commons at the 38th parallel because Korc WBS told today —Reuter. "cannot live half free" Heater French Troops* Police Ordered To Stand By In Strike-Bound Paris DEATH SENTENCE WASHINGTON. March 22. Oscar Collazo. Puerto Ricaii Nationalist, will be sentenced to death on April Ii. for his part In the shooting in front of President Truman's lilair House residence last November. District Judge Goldsborough to-day dismissed a plea for a new trial —Reuter NOT ACCEPTED PAULS. March 22 • mici (Una picven told the French National Assembly toi night that the Government had InI A ?, 1 ^' Marc h 22 formed the United States that The Government to-day cancelled all Easter leave for they could not accept the pnnclpl police and troops to ensure public order during the railway of theMediterranean defenc Strike. I under the Atlantic I'nct being All soldiers on leave will be ordered to report to their ,uvinV <' in, <> two parts und that nearest military garrison. The last time such order was ( T V w ( "ld not consider tbemmade was during the nationwide strike of 1048. Hundreds of thousands of French workers. striking for higher j wages, have turned Paris, tradi-'. tional Easter playground for for-' eign tourists, tnto Europe's gloomJ test capital. A skeleton train ser buses, few underground PERSIANS BEGIN NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS TEHERAN. March 22. The Persian oil and financial t receded to-day as people apwhich they were not represented Rrtilr. 2e without a single seal in Parliament. The debate on the reform bill ii to be continued late to-nigh t. If Wf f .•/. O—_ n v s'lrn, ts thai If no u.rty a*\U.K. Lift /fan On ';*'"?': _!lr^.""" •" "" German /targes New Zealund W ill No! Yield To Dockers WBJ INOTON. March 22. Prims Minlsloi Sidnaj Hfiiland in a nationwide broadcast la daj Mid the Ni -\ 7.IVOUU MM ...pit id ale to dockers. on tmkt rm mora than -> niontli for wage Increases and changes II: wiirkmg conditions. The Prime Minister said riorkI'PS had lost i:4S.'..004) in wages In M last hn raan thn.ugh the stoppage Tinpreaanl nomb-oM itrifca ism 1300,000. The QovarnmSfH is not goitia It ink from illplan f " lie "it has taken up the Conuini r.lsta* challenge and we i. Ki'inn i I.I i eni.iit rim soirendei He btlleved an ovarwhatmlni majtuin grt back to work "Outside VOHt BWH ranks and t fOW extieimsLs In other industries." Intold dockers. ">ansiiiill*rs I1RUSSELS. March 22 llelgian police, after a seriei r raids lust night, conusculed i ... n %  i-. in Limbourg ptuvtncs One of the stations installed in farmhouse, was HI full Opanhon when police arrived. Tha operator calmly M>U %  '.!• < I am sorry, but I must sign off now. The Police are here." -Keatr. nut J at present none of the Government as any chance of getting BERLIN. March. 22 ? 1 U ,,. P ^l.tT m ..? ,l 1 ,V\?wn '' Hritish authorities ..nnounced ,',\\! 'T','...,' lr „ r a ,''' an f, U-day that they had remove, MKin Kght . rict.ons onlEast German barges Tl „. ^n,,,,,.,... ru e c m Tta Up In West Berlin locks. ; ,. lollo ol pi ^ 1(1(i .,,„' ££T. After an exchange of letter, |,e. been counte!. o add Ihcm 1otwrrn Major General {; K getl.e. fo, , .. n Bouno, British Commandant in 50 p,„,m -,. ,h, M,„, ll( ( P Berlin and Sergei A Dcngin. Her( get all the seals o n |v a dcclarjtin representative of the Soviet, lion to the voiing authorities ii< Control Commission, immediate I needed to constitute an nllJanc* rule .i stem—has difficulties on the waterways hi been overcome", a statement said —Reuter Profott Anti-U.S. Demonstrations Thus, for Mtample four "allied parties, getting ti oh II | th votes, m*V oblam gj the seals •vnui i fitih party, thai rf i the remaining 48 parcmi <>i the votes, would be un rep resen tr-o" in the new Parliament —Renter BOGOTA, March 22 rj] Twenty-nine people were killed „ ..o'when a Colombian DCS Dakota paiently little affected by Tues-, suburban trains. hltl gas, and transport crashed in northern I day's martial law proclamation, threats of light and power ruts. Colombia on Wednesday, civil, began their six-day New Year contributed to give Parisians their aviation authorities reported —

] celebrations ,'dullest Easter since the war I Rumours that assassinations of, Government leaders m Azerbaia-1 A general railway strike was BOMBS EXPLODED Jan. northern province bordering called for to-day and to-morrow ( imiM Russia had followed the shooting bv Communist and non-Commun-' tpiNE. naly March 22. of Prime Minister. General Raz1st Unions after thev had failed to' A %  ma bom |' "Plo 0 ^ outsidi mara. and former Minister of agree with Premier Henri building housir Education. Dr. Zanganeh, are now Qucuille yesterday on Immad wage increase The Unions refused to grant the government's request to hold their strike crdcr until the Commission fcr Revision of Salaries met to-day and published t t> re port tomorrowGovernment replied with the FRANKFURT. March 22. Major General. George P Hays, Deputy American iligl. Commissioner protested to Russian authorities today over Anti-American demonstrations b> Kaat Qermani against passenger) on nn American military ti.iin to Berlin In .i leiier delivered today to ffte Deputy Chairman of the Sovii-t Control Commission Qanaral Hays said "During the period March 1, to March 14. 1951. there hava been instances in which i military train of the American occupation forces, passing through' ,IPV,, Kgw presided Soviet occupied territory to or from Berlin, was subjected to attacks by German Nationals residing in the Soviet /one. •At 10 p.m. on March I. 1951. i United State* passenger tram number 610, during a scheduled stop at Magdelburg. was approached by a group of IS German children and 2 German Adults, singing Anti-American songs, and throwing propaganda leaflets aboard the train —Bants* Inquire Into Three Deaths GRENADA. Man h 22 A i oretMl Inquiry slartco Nl i n ..nun,, into UM clrS itances surrounding UM dtathi or two men and one woman were killed as u result of -tnke in St Ii, v %  ,, Ills Worship Mi I A known to be untrue.—Reuter UNWORTHY the buildi two Italian non-Com%  laiist parties—the UnitS U) and the workers 1'S! i parties. Police said damage was "insignificant —Reater. Truman Endt Holiday HONGKONG March 22 An authoritative Amerkc source in Hongkong declared today that he did not think Comfollowing measures: KaW WEST Florida March. 22 munlst charges of American spying 1 lrdlviou.il requisition of President Truman left here for tion of mills, and factories. The. the meetim: and h d. > %  %  %  -.! *.. in China "deserve the dignity of railway workers Washinnlon today aboard the exemption would be for a perloa viewed with dissatisfaction denial2. Suspension 0 ( all Bsttl %  Independence" after a not exceeding 10 years and In the Townsfolk turned out this mornPeking Radio made charges yes.' for the army and p. %  •*•** holiday in Florida. case of mini) terday when reporting that an 3. Private and military lorry Exemption Bill Passed In b\G. I'Wneh DeputySlaps Another PARIS. Mann 22 Franca National Assembly offi ials lushed 111 to stop a light whei lie Deputy slnpiied aimthei Dt init> during a debate early today. Aftei inumanta 0*01 aMc* toral reform. Mohamed Ben Talb, Moslsni Deputy tor Algeria, grabbed another Algeiian member ijiiihri 1 %  > UM coat and ilappad him so hard that he stag%  arad The Assemoly will consider th' proposal by its bureau lli.it Taib. •nlier of the Popular ItepubliParty should be censured and e his salaiy bosn Mohamed Iten Talb. Renter. TOMMVMBdi 22. ^BOUT 1,000 Communist troops were reported today dug in ready to stand and fight along the mountainous defence line virtually straddling the 38th parallel in Central Korea. They had fallen back from Chunchon, the las' major Communist b.ist* seven to eight miles below the parallel. These reports followed frontline despatches that an American tank column had yesterday advanced to within four miles of the parallel after crossing the Soyang River, north of Chunchon. The column withdrew later to the south of the river. Shaw's Will Is Complicated U1N1H1N It was 'itti.iaiK announcad to d.n that the *ill of the lute Bernard Shaw left a gross estate of £267,233 and is the n plicated arill ol tha eantur] The liler.il> KCIIIIIS. die A up moat aatraorolnao n pa9 I 1 "i U it] -1 lav *< r >'"'.ii %  uruiei stand One Ol the main points, wag %  'I ill at ol .1 40 lelti 1 glphabal inataad ol DM pan ani It iiut othar ba> hud INCH met the remainder tru o lw dividetl Lntt tliree On. UM sraukl LM ( Hi. Museum, another for the British National Gallery, and 1 third to the Itinal \< iden trf Mi an itli Art. |na holt *-.late was 1.' :il>l.r>8ti. Iiut out of it 4! 180.571 was In go to the British Qovt rn ment In death duties. The Public rmstev .1 -tale oAdal responsible for li.nidlnw: funds in trust appc4i tad b] K 1 %  M MI %  OM excuitor IIM Kor Secretary Among provisions made by the M-year-old playwright who die.) hint November were these: Money from the copyrights performing rights, hhng rights levision rights of his works lo be regaided as income of hji estate. 2. All diaries, account books Md other horses I xlcmling nt Seoul Communist ie reported to be manotna rroahb ova s*trttMlunanti Irom a point about 20 the capital to ihe 3th parallel 1 1 of I'hunchon Ameri111 ha rnamban of the North Korean 17th Division continued to stab nl United Nations patrols north and northwest of Seoul. Larger Communist groups moved south mil positions northwest .f the fI'ungitong Jteservoir. Rsuter I'niled S'.il. Inch 1 of c llll I ,-l 5. Mrs Stella Mervyn Beech. daughter of the (amoui astfi Mrs. Patink Campball, to be %  Uth I to print and publish letters between Shaw am) hei mother. t; An innuity of CMO to hfa Mcratary MlM Blanche I'.itt, 1 wlui worked for turn fin K fWt Aoiniii' •. vei.il beq u a st g u< am ployaag. ha lafl %  yaar*i wages to .'vei v one of Mvan raai i* trviei and 'till with him at his death and gnsll ..niiniiiev N. retired %  1 vanti —Healer RESTRICT REDS W \SMINtlTON. March 22 The Si •nt has dvtsed ConCreM that entry of Soviet ollielals in America would it was evident that such action was in ovtrall inlaraai of the Unltad States. Iteuter TEIJ, TIIK ADVOCATE THE NEWS DIAL 3113 lAY OR Mi.Ill iPran Our Own Corr'ipordxm C;EORGETOWN March 22 The Legislative Council passeci a bill promoting the establish ment and development of certair industries by permitting certau items of equipment to be import' ed free of customs import dutie and taxes Exemption) will be granted to machinery and appliances launches, docks. barges and building materials for the erection of mills, and factories. The Doctors John Radix District Mediral Officer who |M-rf..rmeri (he past Mrlrm .,i,d c Munro Restdeni Medical Offlcai of the Colony Hospital gave donee before (he mine die ment Station Sergeant ChamberIain Joseph conducted t'n ,xaminations. Holbourne Radix Barrister-nt-Law appeared in Ihe mterest or the raUtlvas of the deceased. Hon'bic Bfltra Slnanan Trinldatl Banister watched the proci-edings and earner m the day held talks with Manual and Mental Workers' Union Executives in the capital. This morning Mr. E. Barltrop accompanied by t.ahour Officer Dabrco went On a tour of the estates in country oliservinic the tonditi L.S. Aiintnincf Nivt Trade Pollc) WASHINGTON. Kuan 22 The United States Commcrci Daportmaat to-day announced new ti.nle policy umler whk'h 1 reserved the right to hum • %  • |Mris to "normal requirements' 'or all importing countries. The policy, already in effect foi *ueh destinations as Hong Kun. and M.ie.to. is now being extended by the Office for ImefnaUooal Trado "for such commc-i %  UCfa other destlnatimis as may I -'in e -'-il ', to plolr. I domeMl. Ol) .oid IMtlon .1 e, um giailer This morning the Chi Commeire, Agricultural Association. Tourist Board and Employers' Society held another meeting but they did not disclose a reply to Mr Barmop\ formula Pfjti concerning the re-instatement of Argent they i Appreciation of tl ol TinColonel Donald was expressed at ad bat I the meeting and h MR. ATTLEE HAS DUODENAL ULCER LONDON, March 22 Prune Miiustei. Clement Attic. nj from duodenal ulcai ahd will require medical attention In hospital for two or three weeks It was officially announced hen to-day. — Rmler RetJter 1 yean 15 'PICTURE BRIDES' TOKYO, March 22 n Japanese girls sailed for nn to-day to marry men %  a new 1 *MB !i "picture brides", so calliuse their marriages have been arranged by an exchange of photi i;i .ii)hs, are among 8.1 Japint 1 'migrants who MUMd hron Yokohama tn a Dutch ship -Reuter %  American directed underground espionage organisation" in Tientsin %  iad been discovered and 21 spies of various nationalities arrested. —Reuter SLAVS WANT $30m BELGRADE, March 22 Yugoslavia has asked the United 1 S30.000.000 worth nf in1 aw materials. Mr. George Allen, United States Ambassadoi %  fht.—Renter. services from Paris to all portant towns within 100 mile radius 4 Maintenance at all train MWicea to all major in the roonti;. M 1: %  Lynns Rcpreseniativ. 1 pen-Communist Unionwere expected to form a unite I ma nd inc. %  cent for nil wage earnei UM BalarM Con n I sion 1 -da iter King George Hands Out "Maundy Money" I-ONDON. March 22 King George Sixth making his ,1.1-' public appearance since his today 1 n %  %  to three dozen Wl — ap in Westminster Abbey Two thousand people %  %  %  %  To 1 ich of the poor, aged recipients, King George hande. thr" %  first, a green purse, there WS money to buy clothes. In th %  reeond was money to buy food And in the third which was whit'. %  paciaUy minted silver pennies, two pence*, threepence s and fourpenccs adding up tn M one for each year of the Kinp life. King Edward Hie Thid the custom of distributing Maundy" r*or hundreds of afterward* British Kings fi*.d money ; ., 1 many poor men as they years in age 1 1 been specially mint! ceremony. began lfo.ll years gave Queen Elizabeth anil 1'rmce.K went with the King to today's ceremony Though M men and 5 women are given "Maundy MOCMJ I third of the n person Others could dad too -to travel or t. ill—


— DHavbado

ee

ESTABLISHED 1895



Satisfactory Sugar
Agreement Expected

22% s i et.
Observers Believe
By SYDNEY GAMPELL
LONDON, March 22.
A BOARD OF TRADE spokesman said today that Britain's
talks with Cuba on sugar and other trade matters are

still continuing “when questioned about a rumour that they
had broken down.”
Nevertheless leading unofficial sugar experts believed thai
the negotiations were more or less in abeyance. They
doubted whether there would be bilateral Cuban sugar
agreements on the lines so far mooted with either Britain

Secale expected a much — . r bh, He .
U.K. Will Give
Undertaking

looser arrangement far more satis-
Bi-lateral trade discussions are

factory to the Commonwealth
taking place between representa-

sugar producers.

to denounce and might last much tives of the United Kingdom and

1. The negotiations had never} Purchases of sugar from Cuba

insuperable obstacles. Britain’s} assure Commonwealth sugar pro

Cuban market it might be difficult] Cuban sugar in 1953 they are will-

too far for Britain to ignore. / Commonwealth Sugar Agreement
Britain has frequently oy

Hitherto they said the British
negotiations in Cuba had tenia-
lively contemplated 500,000 tons
a year for three years. In practice
such an Agreement was not easy
longer Ne mado Cuba. They are taking place at
: Torquay although outside the for-
Experts gave Several reasons | mal scope of talks under the gen-
for their belief that this idea is eral agreement on tariffs and
out. trade.
been so definite as was commonly | by the United Kingdom during the
supposed. Quite apart from the; years 1951-1953, inclusive, are
protests from the Commonwealth | part of the subject matter of these
sugar producing countries, Britain] discussions.
and Cuba themseives might find Nevertheless, in order to re-
idea in a bilateral agreemeni| ducers, H.M. Government an-
would be to obtain reciprocal] nounce that if an agreement is
advantages for her own exports tof made with Cuba which includes
Cuba, With the United States,en undertaking on the part of
goods so deeply entrenched in the} H.M. Government to purchase
for Cuba to grant as much recipro-| ing to give an undertaking to find
city as Britain would expect. ir, that year a market for export-
2. Even supposing that the) able surplus of sugar for Common-
Commonwealth protest arose from} wealth countries concerned up to
a misunderstanding, they had gone} the full limit laid down in the
3. A bilateral agreement with| They will be very ready to dis-
Cuba would cut across the de-| cuss with representatives of Com-
clared sugar policy of the British! mcnwealth producers the most
Government itself. acceptable method of giving effect
Assurance to this undertaking,
her policy of leaving a part of her
market competitively open to
dollar and other raw sugars for the
sake of Britain’s important re-
export trade in refined sugar and



Deputies Cancel
16th Meeting |

‘

to preserve the International PARIS, March 22
ae Agreement on 2 multilateral! Four power Foreign Ministers'|

Deputies cancelled their sixteenth)
meeting called for to-day and
arranged to meet in private ses-
sion at 3 p.m, to-morrow.
Three western deputies were!
meeting at the Freuch Foreign
Ministry tonight to co-ordinate
their tactics, Decision not to meet
to-day was taken in “informal
discussion” after luncheon for the]
four deputies held at the British
Embassy aimed at breaking the
deadlock. Ernest Davies British
deputy was host. |
—Reutey,

NO HALF MEASURES

TOKYO, March 22.
The South Korean Minister in
Tokyo, Kim Joo, today urged the |
United Nations to allow their}
troops in Korea to drive to the
Manchurian border. |
He appealed to them not to stop
at the 38th parallel because Korea ,
“cannot live half free’’.—Reuter.

French Troops, Police
Ordered To Stand By |
In Strike-Bound Paris |

The Commonwealth sugar pref-
erence is designed to give Com-
monwealth sugar producers -some-
thing more than a_ co titive
world price over a period though
it does not do so at present.

But experts could not see how a
bilateral preferential agreement
‘with Cuba could be reconciled
with the principal of multilateral
competition. They expected that
the outcome of the negotiations
with Cuba would refer to an as-
surance that part of the British
market would be left open for
Cuban sugar in fair competition
with other suppliers.—Reuter.





UNEMPLOYMENT IN U.K.

LONDON, March 22.
Britain aims at not allowing un-
employment in Britain to rise
above three per cent at the season-
al peak, the House of Commons
was. told today,.—Reuter,



PARIS, March 22.

The Government to-day cancelled all Easter leave for}
police and troops to ensure public order during the railway |
strike.

All soldiers on leave will be ordered to report to their
nearest military garrison. The last time such order was.
made was during the nationwide strike of 1948.

ee Seren Hundreds of thousands of French {
workers, striking for higher}
wages, have turned Paris, tradi-}
tional Easter playground for for-|
eign tourists, into Europe's gloom- |
jest capital.

PERSIANS BEGIN NEW
YEAR CELEBRATIONS

TEHERAN, March 22.

The Persian oil and financial} A_ skeleton train’ service
crisis receded to-day as people ap~ buses, few underground and no
parently little affected by Tues-, suburban trains, little gas, and
day’s martial law proclamation, threats of light and power cuts,
began their six-day New Year contributed to give Parisians their

celebrations. rs ‘dullest Easter since the war.
Rumours that assassinations of
A general

Government leaders in Azerbaia- railway strike was}
jan, northern province bordering called for to-day and to-morrow }
Russia had followed the shooting by Communist and non-Commun-!
of Prime Minister, General Raz- ist Unions after they had failed to’
mara, and former Minister of agree with Premier Henri
Education, Dr. Zanganeh, are now Queuille yesterday on immediate
known to be untrue.—Reuter. , wage increase.

The Unions refused to grant the
government's request to hold
UNWORTHY their strike crder until the Com-

jmission for Revision of Salaries
HONGKONG March 22. met to-day and published its re-

An authoritative American port tomorrow.
source in Hongkong declared to- Government replied
day that he did not think Com- following measures:



no;



with the

| Wall Builders
Under Arrest

Fourteen Die

MILAN, March 22,

An Italian Public prosecutor to-
day ordered the arrest of four men
concerned with building the play -
ground wall which collapsed here
tyesterday morning, killing 14
school girls.

Arrest warrants were issued for
the architect of the wall, its con-
structing engineer and two work-
men engaged in building it last
January.

Tons of debris buried about 40
girls between five and 13 years
old Many are sti!! lying grave-
ly injured in hospital.

The fatal casualty list rose to
14 to-day with the death in hos-
pital of a nine-year-old girl.

The girls at a Convent school,
were sheltering under the wall as
a high wind swept the city, when
it crashed down on them. Work-
ers belonging to Communist and
non-Comrmunist trade umions to-
day united in calling a five minutes
stoppage of work in Milan as a



Poison: Arrested

NUREMBERG, March 22.

Peter Martin Bleibtreu, a 29-
year-old journalist who claimed
that he had given Herman Goer-
ing the poison with which he com-
mitted suicide, was arrested in
Nuremberg yesterday DPA, East
German News Agency reported
to-day.

Bleibtreu, an Austrian, had
come from Switzerland and in-
tended to stay in Nuremberg only
a few days. But policemen recog-
nised and arrested him,

Last’ October, West German
magistrate Quick said Bleibtreu
had confessed on oath to slipping
Herman Goering, a poison phial
with which he committed suicide

jin Nuremberg gaol.—Reuter,

—



Democracy at Work

NEW ORLEANS, March 22,
A Jewish judge here dismissed
a suit brought by Protestants for
the removal of ‘the statue of a

Roman Catholic saint, Mother
Cabrini from a public square,
The Judge L. J. Yarrut giv-

ing his decision said: “When there
is a legal contest prosecuted by
some of the Protestant faith to
remove a public statue dedicated
to one of Catholic Faith trie@ in
a court of law presided over by
a Judge of Jewish Faith, we may
well know that Democracy is
still hard at work.”’—Reuter.

DEATH SENTENCE

WASHINGTON, March 22.

Oscar Collazo, “Puerto Rican
Nationalist, will be sentenced to
death on April 6, for his part in
the shooting in front of President
Truman’s Blair House residence
last November,

District Judge -Goldsborough
to-day dismissed a plea for a new
trial. —Reuter.

NOT ACCEPTED

PARIS, March 22.
Vice Premier Rene Pleven told
the French National Assembly to-
night that the Government had in-
formed the United States that
they could not accept the principle
of the Mediterranean defence
under the Atlantic Pact being
divided into two parts and that
they would not consider them-
selves tied by any agreement at
which they were not represented.

—Reuter.







29 KILLED IN CRASH

BOGOTA, March 22.
Twenty-nine people were killed
when a Colombian DC3 Dakota
transport crashed in northern
Colombia on Wednesday, civil
aviation authorities reported —(CP)



BOMBS EXPLODED

UDINE, Italy, March 22.

A small bomb exploded outside
the building housing the local
offices of two Italian non-Com-
munist Socialist parties—the Unit-
tary (P S U) and the workers
(PSL) parties.

Police said damage was “insig-
nificant” .—Reuter.



| Truman Ends Holiday
KEY WEST Florida Mareh, 22.

'
sign of mourning.—Reuter,
Slipped Goering



F Y, MARCH 23, 1951
NG WIT A PURPOSE

te ,
'



TRAIN









FLIPPY, a porpoise which is b
Florida, in an effort to determi:
three feet out of the water through
from Mr, Frohn, his trainer,
retrieves balls and does back

trained by Marine Studios in

hi# species’ intelligence, jumps
a hoop on a word of command
Flippy also rings a bell at dinner time,
flips.—-Express

FRENCH APPROVE NEW’
ELECTORAL SYSTEM

PARIS, March 22.

_ The French National Assembly, after a stormy all-
night session, to-day approved the new voting system
whereby any party getting 50 per cent of the votes in a de-
partment, gets all the seats there.

The number of seats in departments varies from two
to 11. Under the new voting system, opposition parties
getting 49 per cent of the votes are counted as theoretically
to be without a single seat in Parliament, 5

The debate on the reform bill is to be continued late
to-night.



U.K. Lift Ban On
German Barges

’ BERLIN, March, 22.
British authorities announced
te-day that they had removed re-
swictions on East German barges
held up in West Berlin locks,

After an exchange of letters be-
tween Major General G. K.
Bourne, British Commandant in
Berlin and Sergei A. Dengin, Ber-
lin representative of the Soviet
Control Commission, immediate
difficulties on the waterways have
been overcome”, a statement said.

Beona rule under the new
systém, fs that if no party gets
St p8F Cent, then seats are allo-
cated as at present.

But as none of the Government
parties has any chance of getting
50 per cent on its own in any de-
partment, the “alliance” rule—a
new feature of the system—has
been brought in

The “alliance” rule enables a
group of parties, after votes have
been counted, to add them. to-
gether for purposes of obtaining
50 percent of the votes needed to
get all the seats. Only a declara-
tion to the voting authorities is
needed to constitute an alliance,
Thus, for example four “allied”





parties, getting each 13% of the

—Reuter. votes, may obtain all the seats,

while a fifth party, that avt the

remaining 48 percent of the votes

. = would be unrepresented in the
Protest Anti U.S. new Parliament.—Reuter,

is *
Demonstrations —

FRANKFURT, March 22,

°
Major - General, George P Inquire Into
Hays, Deputy American High v9
Commissioner protested to Th
Russian authorities today over a ree at 8

Anti-American demonstrations by
East Germans against passengers|
on an American military train to
Berlin.



(From Our



Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, March 22,



In a letter delivered today to|.,4 Coroner's inquiry — started
the Deputy Chairman of the So-|4S morning into the cireum-
viet Control Commission General|*t@0ces surrounding the deaths
Hays said: “During the period of two men and one woman whe
March 1, to March 14, 1951, there} Were killed as a result of the
ave been instances in which «| ‘tke in St. David's Magistrate
military train of the American|Cou't. His Worship Mr. E, A,
occupation forces, passing through| eyligger presided,

Soviet occupied territory to or 7
from Berlin. was futoatel to as wets John Radix District
tacks by German Nationals re-|M¢dical Officer who’ performed

the post mortem and Cecil Gun-
Munro Resident Medical Officer
of the Colony Hospital gave ew
dence before the sine die adjourn-

siding in the Soviet zone,

“At 10 p.m. on Mareh 1, 1951,
a United States passenger train
number 610, during a scheduled

: , , ment, Station Sergeant Chamber-
oe es em ois oon lain Joseph conducted the ex-
proached by a group o er! aminations. Holbourne Radix
man children and 2 German

Barrister-at-Law appeared in the

Adults, - singing Anti-American]; Th is. erathn hes
songs, and throwing propaganda rate, @ the relatives of the

leaflets aboard the train.



Hon'ble Mitra Sinanan Trini-

—Reuter. dad Barrister watched the pro-

: fa ee eariier in the day

, s e $6 with Manual and
Exemption Bill Mental Workers’ Union Execu-

|jtives in the capital. This morn-
ing Mr. E, Baritrop accompanied
by Labour Officer Dabreo went
On a tour of the estates in the
country observing the conditions.

Passed In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN March 22.
The Legislative Council passed
a bill promoting the establish-|_ This morning the Chamber of
ment and development of certainjCommerce, Agricultura] Associa-
industries by permitting certain|tion, Tourist Board and Em-
items of equipment to be import-|ployers' Society held another
ed free of customs import duties|meeting but they did not disclose

and taxes, a reply to Mr. Barltrop’s formula
Exemptions will be granted to|concerning the re-instatement of

machinery and appliances,| workers,

launches, docks, barges and Appreciation of the services of

building materials for the erec-|Colonel Donald was expressed at

1
7

$e

New Zealand

Will Not Yield
To Dockers

WELLINGTON, March 22,

Prime Minister Sidney Holland
in a nationwide broadcast to-day
said the New Zealand Government
would not capitulate to dockers,
on strike for more than a month
for wage increases and changes
in working conditions.

The Prime Minister said dock-
ers had lost £485,000 in wages in

the last two years. through the
stoppage
The present month-old strike

had cost them £300,000,
“The Government is not going tc

shrink from its plan of duty” he
declared
“It has taken up the Commu

nists’ challenge and we are going
to stick it out until Demovracy
succeeds” Holland said.

In this battle with Communism,
there will be no retreat, no ap-
peasement nor surrender.”

He believed an overwhelming
majority of dockers were as fed
up with stoppages as the public.

Most of them would like to get
back to work.

“Outside your own ranks and «
few extremists in other indus-
tries,” he told dockers, “you have
scarcely a friend in New Zealand
to-day.”

—Reuter.



Police Seize Radio
Transmitters

BRUSSELS, Mareh 22.
Belgian police, after a_ series
of raids last night, confiscated
three clandestine radio transmit-
ters in Limbourg province.

One of the stations instalied in
a farmhouse, was in full opera-
tion when police arrived,

The operator caimly told his
Mtsteners: “If am sorry, but IT must
sign off now, The Police are
here,”

—Reuter.

French’ Deputy
_Slaps Another

PARIS, March 22,

French National Assembly offi-
cials rushed in to stop a fight when
one Deputy slapped another De-
puty during a debate early to-
day. After arguments over elec-
toral reform, Mohamed Ben Taib,
Moslem Deputy tor Algeria, grab-
bed another Algerian member
Francois Quilici by the coat and
slapped him so hard that he stag-
gered,



The Assembly will consider the
proposal by its bureau that Taib,
member of the Popular Republi-
can Party should be censured and
have his salary cut by half for the
month,

The National Assembly later
to-day accepted an apology. irom
Mohamed Ben Taib,—Reuter,



q
U.S. Announce New
yy , ; .
Irade Policy
WASHINGTON, March 22,

The United States Commerce
Department to-day announced ;
new trade policy under which i
reserved the right to limit ex-
ports to “normal requirements’
for all importing countries,

The policy, already in effect for
such destinations as Hong Kong
and Macao, is now being extended
by the Office for Internationa]
Trade “for such commodities and
such other destinations as
be necessary to protect domestic
upply and national security.”

—Keuter



MR. ATTLEE HAS
DUODENAL ULCER

LONDON, March, 22

Prime Minister, Clement Attlee

is suffering from duodenal ulcer

aha will require medical attention

in hospital for two or three weeks

it was officially announced here

to-day. —Reuter.



15 “PICTURE BRIDES”
TOKYO, March 22.

Fifteen Japanese girls sailed for |

Argentina to-day to marry men}
they have never seen.
The 15 “picture brides”, so call-



ed because their

marriages have

Reds Prepar
Last Ditch



PRICE: FIVE CENTS



BOUT €,000 Communist troops were reported
today dug in ready to stand and fight along
the mountainous defence line virtually straddling
the 38th parallel in Central Korea. They had fallen
back from Chunchon, the last major Communist
base seven to eight miles below the parallel.
These reports followed frontline despatches that
an American tank column had yesterday advanced
to within four miles of the parallel after crossing
the Soyang River, north of Chunchon. The column
withdrew later to the south of the river.

Shaw’s Will Is
Complicated

LONDON, March 22,

It was officially announced to
day that the will of the late
Bernard Shaw left a gross estate
of £267,233 and is the most com
plicated will of the century

The literary genius, drew up a
most extraordinary 14—page docu
ment, which only a lawyer could
understand

One of the main points, was
the establishment of a 40-letter
alphabet instead of the present 26
When this and other bequeaths
had been met the remainder was
to be divided inte three One
third would) be for the British
Museum, another for the British
National Gallery, and a third to

the Royal Academy of Dramatic
Art.
Shaw’s whole estate was

£301,586, but out of it £180,571
was to go to the British Govern
ment in death duties. The Public
Trustee—a state official respon
sible for handling funds in trust
was appointed by Shaw as his
sole executor.

£500 For Secretary

last November were these:

1, Money from the copyrights
performing rights, filing rights,
television rights of his works to
be regarded as
estate,

2. All diaries,
and other

income of his
account books

documents of similar

American jet planes in massed
flights over ‘the area to-day
atlacked bridges leading towards
Hwachon, key read junction for
retreating Communists, eight miles
north of the parallel United
Nations air strikes were intended
to trap Communists below the
parallel and force them to fight.
Yesterday's two-pronged advance
northeast and northwest of
Chunchon was the closest any
American unit had got to the par-
allel since they fell back before
the big northern counter offensive

in December, The northwest
ern drive actually was the far-
thest north but returned after
a skirmish with a Communist
platoon Each prong’ brought

back one Communist prisoner.
New Chinese concentrations

were observed to-day northwest
~ Chunchon United Nations
warplanes sent up to disperse

them scattered one party of 500

who were accompanied by horses.

Extending

Northeast of Seoul Communist
Wwoops were reported to be man-
ning freshly dug entrenchments
extending from a point about 20
miles northeast of the capital to
the 38th parallel.

Southeast of Chunchon Ameri-
were still meeting stubborn
I ance to their advance east
of Hangye where Communists are
in on hill crests and





closing
ridges.
Small Communist “blocking”
forces most of them believed to
be members of the North Korean
47th Division continued to stab
at United Nations patrols north
and northwest of Seoul, Larger
Communist groups moved south

kind to be offered to the British }'9 eceupy bill positions northwest

Library, of Political Science.

3. ‘Letters and documents
worth preserving in a public col-
lection, to the British Museum.

4. His trustee to take all steps
fo preserve his copyrights in the
United States
siderable value,’

5. Mrs. Stella Mervyn Beech,
the famous

Campbell,
to print
between

“which are of con

actress
to be
publish
and

daughter of
Mrs. Patrick
authorised
letters
mother,
G6. An annuity of £500 to his
secretary Miss Blanche Pattch
who worked for him for 30 years
Among several bequests to em-
ployees, he left a year’s wages to
every one of seven years’ service,
and still with him
and small
servants,

and

Shaw her

at his death,

annuities to retired

—Reuter,

of the Chungjyong: Reservoir.
Reuter.

RESTRICT REDS

WASHINGTON, March 22.
The Staté Department has
advised Congress that entry of
Soviet officials in America would







be restricted whenever It was
evident that such action was in
overall interest of the United
States.
~— Reuter,
TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
DIAL 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



Among provisions made by the
94-year-vld playwright who died



|

|
{

'



munist charges of American spying 1. Individual requisition of _ President Truman left here for|tion of mills, and factories, The|the meeting and his dismissal was] been arranged by an exchange of |
























i i ilway w rs Vashing oda aboard the exemption would be for a period) viewed with dissatisfaction.! photographs, are among 83 Jap-
in China “deserve the dignity of railway workers. eerottn aideedenascar after a not exceeding 10 years and in the} Townsfolk turned out this morn-|anese emigrants who sailed i |
denial.” : ; Suspension of all Easter leave shies ‘weeks! holiday in Florida. ‘case of mining undertakings five}ing to find the streets well chalked! Yokohama in a Dutch ship,
Peking Radio made charges yes- for the army and police force. —Reuter. | years. up. ‘ —Reuter.
terday when reporting that an 3. Private and military lorry | ae
“American directed underground ; services from Paris to all im- } . 66 39
espionage organisation” in Tientsin portant towns within 100 , H d O t d M
had been discovered and 21 spies mile radius. | in eorge an Ss u aun y oney |
of various nationalities arrested. 4. Maintenance at all costs of)
—Reuter. train services to all major, LONDON, March 22 |cipients, King George handed} King Edward the Third began| Queen Elizabeth and Princess
cities in the country such S| jing George Sixth making his|three Tudor-style purses. In the| the custom of distributing “Roval Ma‘geret went with the King to|
Marseilles, Bordeat anc first public appearance since his/ first, a green purse, there was| Maundy”. For hundreds of years| today’s ceremony
SLAVS WANT $30m Lyons ‘recent illness today handed out| money to buy clothes. In the} afterwards 3ritish Kings gave |
Representative Communist and “Maundy money” to three dozen'second was money to buy food | food, money and clothes to as Though 56 men and 56 women}!
BELGRADE, March 22 nen-Communist Unions were ex='s,en and women in Westminster’ And in the third which was white,;; many poor men as they were| were given “Maundy Money | os _ ~ P ” :
Yugoslavia has asked the United pected to form a united front de-! appey Iwo thousand people} specially minted silver pennie years in age only about a third of them could, 24 tg OTe AZ ee ihe ag ‘
States for $30,000,000 worth of in- manding a pay increase of 14 ver cnded the Cathedral to see the| two pences, threepences and four- | receive it in person, Others could | Zs ee Pig ACEO g 6 GOLA A oe
dustrial raw materials, Mr. George cent for all wage earners before )509_yez id ceremony |pences adding up to 56 pence Since 1754 ilver coins hav not come because they had toc
Allen, United States Ambassador ,the Salaries Commission to-da }one for each year of the King’s been specially minted for the! far to travel or because the ere}
here said to-night.—Reuter. Reuter To each of the poor, aged re-' life ceremony ill. —Reuter. ' ° a —_-






TWO

Be eS

avib Calling

From Iste of Man

M* F H MANIFOLD
yse husband is a retired

‘ountant the Isle of Man,
arrived from England yesterday
I e Gascogne for a holiday and
the St. Lawrence

n
in



ing at

Manifold was accompanied



daughter Miss Sonia
M vho is doing Domestic
ence at Penrhos College in
North Wales This is Miss
Talone’s first visit to Barbados.
She is a niece of Rev. W. M.
Malone of Navy Gardens, Christ
Church

Old Harrisoniar
M R. REGINALD HARRIS, an

old Harrisonian who left
Barbados in 1928 and went up to
the U.S.A., returned yesterday
morning by the Fort Amherst on
his first visit since then. He has
come over for three months’ holi-
day which he will spend with his

relatives at Hill Road, Bank
Hall

Mr. Harris who is employed
with the Refrigeration Mainten
ance Co. in the U.S.A. is a
brother of Mr. Oliver Harris of

the General Post Office

Back From Police Course

NSPECTORS G. SPRINGER
- and C. Bourne of the Bar
bados Police Force, returned from
England yesterday morning by
the Gascogne after attending a
six-month course in modern
Police methods at Hendon Col

lege.

M* and MRS AUSTIN

+ WOOD and family arrived

fre lrinidad yesterday by
W.I1.A. spend the Easter
lay here. They are staying

vith the Simpsons at Woodland,

George

Wood is with Hardware

in Port—of-Spain

Fire Officer
RRIVING in Barbados yester-
morning from England
Gascogne was Mr. R.
who has come out on a
contract as fire officer

From Trinidad

to



Liectric

A

y the
4 ¥<

Gay



i

r ig
three-year
]

Mr. Craggs who was District
)flicer in the London Fire
as with the service for
During the war, he was
of Cannon Street Fire

(
Brigade, w
30 year

in charge

Station in the shadow of St,
Paul’s. Later he went to North-
iptonshire to cover all. fires

eccurring in the county and part
of Leicestershire which included
15 air operational aerodromes, a
number of which were American.
He first visited Barbados in 1919
ust before he joined the London



ire Brigade. At that time, he
was Yeoman of Signals in the
Royal Navy on H.M.S. Dart-

mouth,

With Cable & Wireless
ME R. J. CHOULER of Cable
& Wireless, England, arrived
re yesterday’ morning by the
sengne to take up an appoint-
ment as one of the engineers here
and will be stationed at St.)
Lawrence.
Mr. Chouler is relieving Mr.
“Bud” Kerley who will shortly
be going to England on leave.

he





CROSSWORD



Across
1. James Hilton's was fost, (7%)
6. His must be » narrow neck of |
land. (7)
Â¥. Does this ridging plough give an
antiseptic alsu? (6)
Science of atmospheres or Royal
ego? (8) |

Brings war back again, (3)
John Gay's was beggarly. (5)
Horsehair. (4)
Back goes the tide. (3)

ut the Frencb tn the can, (5)

FRANCES HARMAN, g
. n—law of Mr. Haynes
Cc nd her friend Mi
Butler vho are guests at the
Ocean View Hotel, plan to return
to Toronte, Canada on April 4th



1g
4
aa
iy
a Heaveniy retresnment, (5)
23

Coloar of the fortified dungeon.
(3) |
Part of a building you can see to |
pelt. (7)

‘ Down |
1. This is very merry. (9) |
2. Rosie in the basket. (5) |
3. End of a favour.

4. fh er? (4)
5







2 it seems. (9)
7. Thea er could be a lemon, (5)
8 Wise sort of shrub (4)
10 The supporters’ path ? (3)
12. What any ambier may do. (6)
15 A broken pane. (4)
16 That which ts agreed on. (4)



1 from Cape Horn, (3)

One time the curtain {s lowered,
(3)




red by a cartographer, (3) |
pert the filbert.” (3)



6, Rain-gauge; 10,
12 Estrange;
Deem; 19. Oval;
Grenadine, Down:
da: 5, Rite: 4, Baus
Grogram;, 9,
18. Moa,



a
a New Millinery LADIES’ AND CHILDREN'S Wl)

Nylons

me a tm Ft te at et

MEN'S HATS

fine new assortment

Latest Shades

ONLY 2.40

â„¢ Dial 4606

(3) ts
‘rab can provide the con- |

| by popular vote.
Ay's puggle.—Across: | corner may 1
14,; Queen for Beauty Week, to open !



salient aihieiiaeieremaaicaeiiii
BEB SEEHEHRHRERHRB BBB

EVANS & WHITFIELDS



Husband Arriving Monday

ARTIE’S HEADLINE RS, JOSEPH A, KING accom-




- 5 panied by her son Mr
AW - Peter King arrived from Trinidad
= % yesterday by B.W.I.A, Mr. King

who is with Messrs. William Fog-
arty Ltd., in Port-of-Spain is ex-
pected to arrive on Monday, Mr.
King was for many years stationed
at their Branch here, Mrs. King
is staying at the Aquatic Gardens
Guest House.

For Easter Week-end
ISS BETTY GASKIN a nurse
at one of the oil company’s
hospitals jn Caripito, arrived from
Venezuela yesterday via Trinidad
by B.W.LA, Here foy the Easter
week-end she is staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Arriving by the same _ plane
was Mr, Robert Nye an Engineer
of Creole Petroleum Corpn. in
Caripito.

Military Airport Chief
AJ, JULIO CARENO, Mili-

ALue-
“Shot them nothing, Colonel,
I’ve EATEN. them!”



quetia arrived by Avensa
lines Special on Wednesday and
HOWARD his wife arrived a few hours later

Were Staying at Canefield
M* AND MRS
BROWN
their son Howland who had been short holiday, they are staying at

holidaying in Barbados for the Paradise Beach Club.

past two weeks, left yesterday by

B.W.LA. for Puerto Rico.
They are en route to the

Trinidad Businessman
R. AND MRS, HERBERT
where Mr, Brown is a lawyer in WATERMAN and family
New York, During their stay in arrived by B.W.I.A. yesterday
Barbados they were the guests morning to spend a holiday in
of Mr, Charles Merrill owner of Barbados, Mr, Waterman is the
Canefield House, St. Thomas, proprietor of Waterman’s Store |
Mr, Merrill, they told Carib, on Frederick Street, Port-of-
was probably in Miami. He left Spain. They are staying at Fon-|
Barbados a couple of weeks ago. tamara Maxwells. |

Trinidad Medico W.I. Holiday

R. ELTON RICHARDSON,

Eye, Ear and Nose Specialist :
of Port-of-Spain was among the R. AND MRS. FREDERICK
passengers arriving from Trini- P. REYNOLDS, Jnr., are
dad yesterday by B.W.I.A, He is ®t present holidaying in Barba-
here for about five days, staying 40s. From White Plains, New
at Indramer Guest House, Worth- York, where Mr, Reynolds is Vice

US.

ing President of Geyer, Newell and
’ Ganger, an advertising agency.
Here For Ten Days Leaving the U.S. in the middle
R. AND MRS. LEONARD ® January they flew to St.
M y et uy Thomas, where they chartered a
ki PaeeOe. | strived YW TA. 46 ft. schooner and visited all the
a ate Stasi” Sa Pablo Hotei WI. islands with the exception of

St. Martin, St. Barths and Mont-
serrat, They arrived here on Sun-
day from Tobago by B.W.I.A, and
plan to remain here ennpees
sae week, before leaving for Trinidad
From eg ieacO via Tobago. From Trinidad they
M* HAYD uO : *~ will return home via Los Angeles
_ FORD of the firm of A. C. California. They afte staying at
Sniliingiord and Co., General Im- guper Mare Guest House, Worth-
porters and Exporters and Com- ing.
mission Agents of Dominica, ar- Mrs, Reynolds’ father is Gen.
rived yesterday by the Gascogne. w fy Rose now retired from the |
Here tor three weeks’ hoiiday, he U.S. Engineer Corp, while Mr.

Royal. Mr, Taylor is a Director of
Julien and Co., in St, Georges,
They are here for about ten days,

tary Airport Chief at Mai- |
Air- |

accompanied by by B.W.I.A. Special, Here for a }



1 staying at the Savoy, bay Reynolds’ father Gen, F. P. Rey-

street nolds is retired from the U.S.
After 41 Years Medical Corp,

ETURNING home yesterday They have two children, a

i G * 5 : y aduating from
morning by the Fort Amherst daughter now gra
from the U.S.A. was Mr, Jim Prep School and a son at West

Smith who left here 41 years ago. Point. Le
He has conie over to see his rela- .
tives who Ilve in New Orleans. Enjoying Stay
Intransit R, R. J, LIDDIARD who has
NTRANSIT the G . been here since March
on the Sascogne 15th is enjoying his stay in Bar-
yesterday from England to bados, He is at present on a tour
Grenada was Mr, Cosmo St. of the West Indies and will be
Bernard, barrister-at-law who

: ‘ leaving here about March 29th.

qualified at Grays Inn and was Mr, Liddiard

called to the bar in January, of the firm of F. W. Berk and Co..
Retired Merchant Ltd. of London, Heavy Chemical
R. and MRS. G. H. JOHN- manufacturers and exporters of
SON of New York, left yes- fertilisers. He is a guest at the

terday morning by the Gascogne Ocean View Hotel.

for Trinidad where they expect

is a representative

to take another ship for the Accountant

U.S.A. It was their first visit RRIVING from Venezuela on

to the island and they told Carib Wednesday by B.W.LA.

that they spent a very enjoyable Special Flight was Mr. Rupert

four months’ holiday here as Stone, who is an accountant at

guests at the Marine Hotel Schlumbergers in Caracas. Here
Mr. Johnson is a retired mer- for the Easter week-end, he is

chant of New York,

staying at Accra Guesi House,

BY THE WAY By Beachcomber

NOTE with a shout of purest dents, who remember her appear-
joy that the statisticians are ance in Blaenavon wearing a red
already preparing their abracada- dogsnatcher hat to boost Ladies’
braical tables in connection witn Utility Overalls. Pontypool
the new plan to deal with London ‘where Cecil Rhodes was born, has
traffic. its own Eisteddfod every year.
The plan will save 107,384 “ve- and it was Nere that a Mrs. Myrd-
hiele-hours” per day per acre of din, disguised as a druid, struck
street. How many man-hours go Councillor Llewellyn with her
to make a “vehicle-hour” and/or harp because he disqualified her.
vice, as it were, versa? Then We “This,” said the councillor, flick-
must consider pedestrian-hours, ing her leg with his wand of office,
and roller-skate hours per boy. ‘will have repercussions.” None
At the end of the whole business of which gets us anywhere.
we shall probably find that You May Hum
1,078,495,819 “vehicle hours” have DOCTOR who said that hum-
been saved in six months But ming was good for people is
exactly what that will prove is reported to have “tossed a bomb-
enother and a sillier story shell into neighbouring consulting
Tinned Consul rooms.” What the meaning of this
Case of Grilled Consul excited language is, I ie
; no cover, But this I do know: a Hun-
oad eee ston pith by garian bophomologist found last
my ppecia’ correspondent in voar, that it is humming that
keeps bees fit Since nowadays
nobody would dream of doing any-
thing until he was told it had been



Hertfordshire, are trying to sell
io our Government several cases
of tinned Consul to “supplement
the ration,’ proved good for animals and in-
Pontypool News sects, it is well to have medical |

HE nine Pontypool urban area science in support of private hum- |
wards, which are the oldest ming |

and thickest in Monmouthshire, Yqil-piece |
are to choose 45 Festival Queens HEY are saying, at least I am, |
sun ae Guest that if Mr. Errol Flynn is to}
: he : ay Nelson in a film Enigland is
the new swimming pool in Aber. bound to win the battle of Trafal-|
sychan-road. But there is consid- 8&r, even though that result is his-
erable opposition from the resi- torically correct. |

be

STRAWS 5

In WHITE and Many Latest SHADES

51 Gauge “ARISTOC” .............. . 242
“CHARNGS” Woes aes ie $1.95, $2.21, $2.33
“MASCOT” ... GR:

“MASCOT” Chiffor*..... |. . 93e.
“MASCOT” Rayon ......... Tle, All Sizes
In Latest Fashionable Shades

* ELITE”





Sports Shirts .......... $5.93
All Popular Shades

CELLULAR SPORT SHIRTS
Boys & Youths Sizes only (White) .... $1.38

YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 {

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BRONNET

ir







f



“BROODY” is the apt name given to this creation, chosen as an
Easter Bonnet by screen star Annette Simmonds (Viscountess Dan-
gan) and styled by Rose Bertin. The hen is couchat on its nest
swathed in tulle on a raffia straw crown. Ears of corn add to the
general effect.—Express



B.C. Radio



Programmes



















FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951 SATURDAY, MARCH 2%, 1951
6.50 a.m—12.15 pom. ..........., 19.60 M
6.30 a.m.—12.15 p.m. 19.60 M
ae Take it from Here: 7 a.m.
ie ews; 7.10 a.m. Ni i
7.15 p.m. Eiberinces 7.35 a 6.30 a.m. Football Results; 6.45 a.m.

Parade; 7.30 a.m. The Colonial Reformers;

7.50 a.m. Interlude; 8 2.m. Lis + a.m, News Ana} sis; i
Choice; 8.45 a.m. Humour; 9 aan Editorials; 7.25 a.m. Programme Parade,
News; 910 am. Home News from 720 am. From the Third Programme

55 p.m. Interlude; 8 e.m. BBC Symphony
Orchestra; 8.45 a.m. Monia Liter are
ews

Britain; 9.15 a.m. Clase Down; 11.15 a.m,
Programme Parade; 11,30 a.m, Good
Friday Service;

{ + 2WS; Home
12 (oon) The News: » 4m. The News; 9,10 a.m e s
12.10 p.m, News Analysis; 12.15 pin. {0m Britain; 9.18 a.m. Close Down; 11.15
Close Down, 7 om. Programme Parade 11.20 a.m
4156.00 pom. . 3 Interlude; 11,30 a.m. New Zealand vs
: 19:76 M. egland: 11,40 a.m. Bury vs. South-
415 p.m. BBC Scottish Orchestra; “mpton; 12 (noon) The News; 12.10 p.m
5 p.m. Composer of the Week; 5.15 pm News Analysis; 12.15 p.m. Close Down

Let's make Music; 6 p.m. Merchant Navy
Newsletter,
6.00—7.15 p.m. .....

1150.00 p.m... . 19.76 M.
aD

4.15 p.m. Strike up the Music;,<5 p.m
New Zealand vs. England; 5.10 p.m.
interlude; 5.15 p.m, BBC Opera Orches-
tra; 6 p.m. Music for Dancing.

25.04, 31.32, 48.43 M

—
6.15 p.m. The Colonial Reformers; 6,35
p.m. Interlude; 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade; 7 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. New
Analysis; 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary
7456—11.00 pom. , SLM. & 48.48 M
——————
7.37 p.m. Interlude; 7.45 p.m. Think o1
these Things; 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
8.15 p.m, Good Friday Service; 8.45 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 9 p.m. World
Affairs; 9.15 p.m. Let’s make Music;
10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m, From. the
Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Recent Trends j;
Societ Agriculture; 10,30 p.m. Melody or
Strings; 10.45 p.m. The Debate Continues;
11 p.m. Ring up the Curtain. ;

==—S—= Se

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE: TOMORROW and TUESDAY at 5 p.m.

6.17.15 p.m, 25.64 M, 31.32 M
—— LT

6.45 p.m. Programme Parade; 7 p.m.
The News; 7.10 p.m, News Analysis; 7.15
pan. Behind the News; 7.45 p.m. Sandy
MacPherson at the Theatre Organ; 8 p.m
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m Oxford vs
Cembridge Boat Race; 8.30 p.m Eden
End; 10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From
the Editorials; 10.15 p.m. Anything ‘*«
Declare; 10.45 p.m. Yours
‘1 p.m. Messiah



ae —_ =












fe Was all S000 Lanocent..
and ye sooo inbanrassing!.

Robert Young
Shirley Temple
John Agat «

ADORE SCHARY Presentation | | f
Produced by Richard H. Borger + Directed by Richard Wallace # Screonp!cy by Lione) Houser




Also the 2-reel Featurette:—
“20 YEARS OF ACADEMY AWARDS”

Produced by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences, showing numerous S‘ars with actual parts of the
Films which won Academy Awards.







———-——



To-night




visit







CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations










NOTICE
We shall NOT be OPENING

to business on
SATURDAY, 24th MARCH

ill our friends and customers
their
shopping and orders accordingly.

Please note and arrange



THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Forces Favourites; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10
7.15 a.m. From the

& 48.48

Faithfully;



DIET TIPS

NEW YORK.

DIETING is as much a fad in
the United States these days as in| ¢
Britain. But a _ best-seiler book |
which proclaims the way to live|
longer by eating less has been im—
pounded by the authorities in
Buffalo, New York 5

The book, “Look Younger, Live
Longer,” by Gayelord Hauser, was
seized along with a load of black-
strap molasses, which is unrefined
treacle. For the health authorities
did not like all that was in the
book .

The food and drug administrator
charged in Buffalo that the book
falsely suggested that molasses
would increase life by five years.

The jars of molasses were labell-
ed “Recommended and endorsed
by Gayelord Hauser.”

‘Misbranded’

The Government said they were
misbranded because of statements
in Hauser’s book suggesting that
molasses was an excellent vitamin
B source and was effective in pre-
vention and treatment of vitamin
B deficiency, poor digestion, tired— {





ASTOR

COLUMBIA PRESENTS—

“WHEN

FRANKEY
LANE

=<@) T
A

FRIDAY MIDNITE MAT. “WOMAN WHO CAME BACK”

A REPUBLIC SENSATIONAL DOUBLE
DAUGHTER of the
and “SOUTH of Rio”





THE ISLE OF SAMOROâ„¢

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951



THEATRE
WISHES

A HAPPY EASTER.

FRIDAY 4 & 8.30 P.M. ONLY

YOURE SMILING”

Starring :

THE MILLS THE # BOB
BROTHERS MODERNAIRS CROSBY
AND



and “VAMPIRE’S GHOST”
SATURDAY 4.30 & 8.30

JUNGLE

“HARBOUR OF MISSING MEN”

SATURDAY MIDNITE “FLAME OF BARBARY COAST” «& = &
3





ALL’ 3
%

HAPPY EASTER AND INVITE ALL OF
JOU TO ENJOY THE BEST IN MOTION PICTURE CARE-
FULLY SELECTED SO THAT YOU CAN BE TOGETHER FOR

S555 29S SSSI Nt
RROD SRO OTITIS



ness, heart trouble, neuritis, helped wa we , vet.

to induce sleep, correct neryous- OSE ESTER: a
ness, restore grey hair to normal] wosseee ars Koper
colour, and correct See ale x
ae ES oe oes GLOBE : « 8.30 e™
“ 3.” L.z.8. . 3
ey ) OPENING TO-DAY (Good Friday)
; and through the Weekend %
GRAND EASTER FIESTA a, ” i
AND DANCE HAYWARD ie PRESTON %

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members
Only)

on
SATURDAY, MARCH 24th,
9 p.m.

PROGRAMME
SONGS AND SKETCHES
by Local Artistes. \
SPOT DANCE, WALTZ and





JITTERBUG:
—— PRIZES will be given for
these.
DOOR PRIZE:

A GIANT EASTER EGG
(weighing 25 lbs.), packed
with Novelties to suit all, to
the lucky ticket holder,

DANCING until 3 a.m.

Music by Two Orchestras:
One playing the latest hits
and the other Spanish Music.



Bienvenido Los Turistas
VENEZOLANOS
al AQUATIC CLUB

El Sébado 24 de Marzo
a-las 9 p.m.

GRAN FIESTA y BAILE

“Almallanera” y otras
piezas

Upicas Venezolanas
Admission: —48c¢,





JULIUS SYMMONDS
AR THEIR: MEMOR Ee iiss Siois cies ls ene.
TT TAREE Fiona atin cas
JOE (Shoeshine) CLARKE .
ALVA ARTHUR
CHESTER HOLDER

You'll Meet...

CHEROKEE LANSING
Half Angel . . . Half Wildcat

All WOMAN Sh

ernie 2B RP e

SOAR ON



oe

COLOR A
TECHNICOLOR

TONITE

PLUS LOCAL TALENT Z
......+.“Embraceable You”

....“Dreamers Holiday”
“Dear Hearts Gentle People”
1c te tO “Bop! Goes My Heart”
RP eROGICT Ths acd a see ee “IT Wanna Be Lover”

AT Set pat eerie ss “Wildest Gal In Town”
GUEST STAR — PERCY WELCH

iPt 16—House 30—Balcony 40—Box 54

2310

TODAY

(ONLY)
Starting Times:—

(GOOD FRIDAY)

2.30 — 4.30 — 6.30 — 8.30 ana 10.30 p.m.

The lst. ALL-TALKING



WELCOME
TO ALLS!

ENJOYABLE
EASTER ::

ENTERTAINMENT
FoR yvou!! g



ee So

PLAZA THEATRES

BRIDGETOWN DIAL

y DIAL
OISTEN DIAL
TODAY (GOOD FRIDAY)

(ONLY}

Starting Times:—
2.00; — 4.00; — 6.00; and 8.00 p.m.

PICTURE TO COME



TO BARBADOS OF ....

The LEFE and PASSION »o CHRIST

MATINEES: SATURDAY 24TH
9.30 a.m. and 1.30 p.m.
R.K,O. Double - -

“WILD HORSE MESA”
TIM HOLT
— one

“CODE OF THE WEST”

JAMES WARREN

SATURDAY and SUNDAY
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
MONDAY (Bank) 9.30 a..m; 1.30; 4.45
and 8.30 p.m.
TUESDAY to THURSDAY
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Warner’s Spectacular Action - -

) The FLAME the ARROW

. (Colour by Technicoior)
Burt LANCASTER — Virginia MAYO
and a cast of thousands

MIDNITE SAT. 24 (2 new Monogram
Pictures)
John CALVERT as the FALCON in - -
“AP POINTMENT FOR MURDER”
— and —
Tom KEENE in - -
“THE DRIFTING KID”

MIDNITE SAT, 24TH (RKO Double)

WEST of the PECOS

with Robert MITCHUM

& MASKED RAIDERS

With Tim HOLT

SATURDAY to TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m
Big Easter Action from W.B.

Errol FLYNN - -

The Adventures of DON JUAN

Colour by Technicolor





Special Matinee MONDAY (Bank) 1.30 pm.
(2 new Monogram Pictures)

MAN FROM HEADQUARTERS

with Frank Albertson and
Leon ERROL in...

JOE PALOOKA, CHAMP

LS NEE eS
James
TODAY (Good FRIDAY) STARTING TIMES 4.30-6.00-7.30- 9.00 P.M.

The’ LIFE and PASSION of CHRIST

GABETY (The GARDEN) S¢.

(RKO Action Double)
Randolph Scott—George (Gabby) Hayes

TRAIL STREET and

Tim HOLT and Cliff EDWARDS

aaa
SATURDAY 24TH SUN. 25th & MON, 26th
and Continuing Daily

WOMEN 5 p.m. — MEN 8.30 p.m.
(Age Limit: 16 years and over)
Social Guidance Enterprises presents:

THE STORY OF BOB & SALLY

Positively NO CHILDREN.

TUESDAY 27th (Only) “DYNAMATIC CANYON Tom Keene & “RAIDERS OF THE
SOUTH” Johnny Mack Brown

MIDNITE SATURDAY 24TH
|

THE AVENGING RIDER
|
































Seer to. ae






FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE


















































GOLLL ILL LG LAG OL OSA DILL DILL LI Dolnt LIAM ICIS LISS LM SV LLL LLL Lobel LIES, ~
lye * + , > . “is . ns cnn POIROT ILO OD LNG OTC LG LEO EGE E TE AARC
Abolition of Rice E.C.A. Expert Joins ¥2° ,.2°°" Police Motor Cycle Bermuda Will Ship U.K. Concerned \% 1 !

Ui . - ~ pe f - police motor cy 1° y - 4 ee ahs o . 13 The CHINA DOI | RESTAU R ANT p24

Marketing Board C.D.C. Rice Mission cles fitted with i itted W ath Radio Over 100,000 ons ° % : 3

re . a two-way radi < = Over Persia 8 MARHILL STREET %

Will Be Sought In British Guiana ¢8¢'27¢% _ Serap Metal To N.Y. (ine ke %

B (From Qur Own c : used by Metro ee ‘ ow bs BERMUDA. March 21 Conservative Member .of Par-| 3 CLOSED TO-DAY (GOOD FRIDAY) 3

y B.G. Legislator GEORGETOWN. Mar . 30 politan” Police a Pe 1 ics mA, Maren <<: liament Somerset de Chair sug 5. i at: 5 - : 3

Chita? Of the. Overseas &, a patrols were de- j Over 100,000 tons of machinery sosted in Commons to-day that OPEN TO-MORROW, SUNDAY, MONDAY %

So ~ tural. Sect ee a ae monstrated tees . ; and scrap metal will be shipped jn yiew of the strategic import- | 3

GEORGETOWN, March 20, {tal Se a Administration Gen Sir. Harold pe = =4 to New York within the next few ance of Persian oil supplies, | Dine where the BEST Eat the BEST %

k Hon. Daniel P. Debidin, Mein- Lyle J. Hayd ; “ot the Paris’ ) oer Scott, Commis— ; ¥ ; months from Bermuda's dockyard, Britain should offer a military | SOCIETY'S RENDEZVOU %

oer of the Legislative Council has ~~?“ +; *8ycen. of the Paris Office Sa ma 7 & which closes down on March 31. guarantee to Persia as a deterrent soc ry’s EI} WA S $

given notice that he wil! move 0! BCA. is now in British Gui- Metro} ittan Po. ‘Se There were many bids for the to any potential aggressor | 2

at the next meeting of Coun- riecion cp pe ith the Rice fice, * tated that material which was advertised by Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor DIAL 4730 For Reservations §

cil a motion asking Council to MUSsion of Colonial Development it is hoped ‘to 1 the British Admiralty throughout vison replied that British policy | 2

recommend yovernme ,,, Corporation. Mr, Hayden is serv- (°° P { J was to encourage an independent, | 4enene SOOO OS SONG O GSO NOTE
recommend to Government the ; r whe have between 30 the world. y 4 s i pen +]
immediate repeal of the Rice 728 2" an advisory capacity par- and 35 motor Tenders of the Halifax scrap stable and prosperous Persia, He |










Marketing Ordinance, 1946, and necpariy, in the fleld of farm ma- eycles fitted with
all amendments thereto, and the ‘ 7 PBs which he specialises. two-way wire-
abolition of the Rice Marketing ,.“0Y E-C-.A. activity in ove less telephony to

metal firm of Joseph Simon, were
accepted and they have since sold



reaffirmed Ernest Bevin's state~ j|
nent on May 19 that the British |
sovernment was vitally concern

LEAVE YOUR TRAVEL PROBLEMS WITH



F " orig : oiaa ew York C 1

mea territories under the Mar. ; oe material to a buyer in New Yor ed in the independence, integrity

Board. a st the police The Halifs Pedi ch . , .

‘Mr. Debidin's motion further Aid Plan in the field of agricul- a ; reeuleting The Halifax firm also Bis for and security of Persia and were HOLIDAY TRAVEL

asks that the Council recommend re, has to be done through the traffic on both large floating dock, but the Ad- determined to continue their pol :
ae: Gt nain wen ined ae ~ 4. Overseas Agricultural Section 4 miralty decided to send it to icy to Persia and to other coun- WE OFFER THESE y ; “ye |
that Government take immediate ae pia . oanks of the England. tries striving th ' ilitary - | t \

steps to organise and place the Mr. Hayden is not a member of River Thames nglar ries striving through military SERVICES AT ‘ ud

industry on a truly co-operative the C.D.C, mission, but through during the Fes- Simon who has been in Bermuda and economic measures to safe-

basis in the direct interest of the his connection with E.C.A., who tival of Britain. several months, expects to make a guard their independence and








territoris , 1. Confirm all Airline Reservations

fia hapa satiedean Wa. cece ee is very interested in increasing Later the whole large profit. —(CP) territorial integrity
rice producers of the C . , § Later © Pp . » nin at s

In he areanians ie Nee ae food supplies throughout the motor cycle Reuter. 2. Secure Hotel Reservations any re
Mr Debidin asserts that the world, the E.C.A. was in a posi- squad of 200 % r 3. Deliver Your Tickets to your Office or Home
present price of padi is uneco- #0? 7 help when the British Gui- Se nae Indonesian [Troops ss 4 4. Arrange Motor and Sight-seeing Tour

sae Seika, tia , » similarly fitt- ' ?

nomie for the ority of rice 224 “rove rnment indicated that be similarly » » 5. Advise you on any Travel Problem
farmers, and that the cost of sie they were anxious to expand rice ed. Each has a 5 Combat Java Lord lre fgarne s e y

duction and other circumstances production in the Colony, This ft. aerial attach





r eg s ¥ - ? * y y .
duction “and other circumstances gave him the opportunity to join @d_ to the rear : Position with C.D.C. HOLIDAY TRAVEI CONSULTANTS
not less than $5.00 per bag of 149 the mission, = when «cr Fanaties Ay ) \ j i

po slr rao a “so a s put out from we pee oreo old
nae rhe ability to pay this Mr. Hayden told a Press Con- Scotland Yard, DJAKARTA, March 19 at ae ee | of CANADA. LTD
purchase rice e main is : ; 7 7 - - ange light Twenty SATE battalions of ondon nis wee as t F | sealed ae ++

a se t *\ ference at Georgetown that he is 22 orange Hs) enty seven atta ions “ tartan }

= ug CRETE as the .. Board ‘aisious. to give the mission the #ickers on a dial . Indonesian troops have been of not Lord Trefgarne, LORFRGT | Main Floor Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd, Telephones 4920 & 4949
securing immediately for the un- }.. efit of his knowledge of farm attached to the , i thrown into action against the Chairman of the Colonia} ee ONE CALL DOES IT AI
expired period of the contracts yachinery i ae a aa handlebars and a \ » f Darul Islam organisation ment Corporation has in fact} a vine - ss
between the Board and the Con- machinery in rice production, &

. . : zzer sounds.
and to learn the possibilities that ge then

the B.G. Government officials communicates
jeel are available for increasing gipect with Scct-

a. severed his connections with the |
teen of them went over to Corporation, At the moment Lord
seale offensive in west Java, refgarne is in the Bahamas and

tracting Colonies in the West In-
dies at least the minimum world
market prices for the rice ex-






































ice pr Y , ‘ donesian Defence Ministry the Financial Times states that “on | hy fee bes if;
ported to these Colonies, and he rice production. ; ‘ _ land Yard by a “ i hers had broken sd authority” it understands | 2 DAYS OF STARTLING REVELATIONS ne
MS ak ay 6 Resoluti During his stay in the Colony, telephone fitted said to-day. _Ot hers hac ,o0d §=aut ) Xi
draw B attention to a Reso ution Mr. Hayden will confer with Mr. to “he motor i eo _, organised resistance in the central that he has been discharging some
carried in the Legislature in No- Mo Chitie Gio ls dus ‘to -attive .3 eyele he mets meee” — Fava district of Brebes of the Corporation's responsibili- GLOBE THE A TRE Presents Xi
the RM B, oe ‘ at meee shortly, and make recommenda- “~~ , r A spokesman claimed the army ties for the project on Sleuthera . : n
e R.M.B, to approach the Gov- 4:05 fr increasi Peat ante je had captured some 10,000 ter- Jgland A CDC spokesman later tt
oe saint es on increasing live: - CT ad captured s¢ , Island A CDC spokesman la
ernments of the Caribbean colo- ya ae Kay ae lise 2 bp" oeee ae oe Corkle is being loaned ‘to the B.G. BROUGHT AGAINST Darul Islam claims that it 1S gaiq that Lord Trefgarne was not Dr HIMSEI KF »)
‘ srease e price Of Te Gover n . Techni + seeking a rely Islamic state bags) i e aS ee a (
aot at n'y ign log hl Government through the Techni- . seeking 2 purely discharging any responsibility for ‘$
ad sri ides Sia eas eet cal Assistance Division af E.C.A For Agricultural B.G. NEWSPAPER Terrorism has flared up lately iD ine pleuthera project but that his | y)
reve average WOric arke —— ‘ S s vdnew’ oe“ is ‘ \
ine, neti ; , : om Our Own Correspondent) its usual optrating grounc advice was always available to the
prices, and the failure of the comin GEOR ETOWN March ‘ —Reuter 7 ont}
Board to take action accordingly. : Progress In World cs FEC ee ese — pa Corporation ase | @ €
On this argument, Mr. Debian ») tila 7 PL Aare Aga cco ar claims that the funetioning of the be Kuk d 6 Hurt SIR HUBERT RANCE Thea West . Raa, m me ee) p re {
Board is to be regarded as “high- + 7 . has filed an action against the New Weapons BODYGUARD Mystery Played i
i . + (From Our Own Correspondent) Daily Chronicle laiming $5,000 a ’ 3 ayed in
ly unsatisfactory and inimical AD otor Cech ent SPAIN, March 19. aily rronicle, claiming $5,006 oe wteNe MARCH 91 BRUSSELS |
to the interest of rice producers PORT-OF arch as damages for alleged libel A ; WASHINGTON, March 2 The chief cashier of a leading | Mind dodey. Deasic
in the Colony.” (From Our Own Correspondent) The role of the imperia 128 writ settings out the claim has been New and deadly types of tox Antwerp store asked for a body a s
. PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 19. of Tropical Agriculture . filed ig the Dee Registry by his pedoes for anti-submarine War guard to escort him to the bank Reading dential Palace
Two men were instantly killed gustine, Trinidad, in + the colicitor, Miss Evelyn Luckhoo. fare and a new launcher [6% Oy the steps of the bank the .
end six other people injured when lead for agricultural progr s in The action is a sequel toa mur- rockets with improved range and }odyguard, an employee of thc Hypnotism * in the
BRADSHAW LECTURES 2 truck and a motor car travelling tropical regions, not only in the ger trial in wh Sewchand was Underwater performance — re frm, snatched the brief -case, 1
UNION MEMBERS in opposite directions collided on British Commonwealth but for the one of the acc being added to the United States Gontained over £5,000 | Spiritism Aidt
the El Mame Road, Waller Field, world, was stressed when His |! —EE——E navy’s armament j ‘
. 3 Tr a » cellency Sir bert Rance, ith TREASURE HUNT Rear-Admiral Malcolm Franci 2 ;
(Prom Our Owm Correspondent) Trinidad, It is reported that the cellency Sir Hu tE/ gE U leo) ait. re arees Wobinand
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 19 oecupants of the car, Mr. and Mrs. distinguished guests attended the ROME Ss hoeffeil, C hief of the pares UNUSUAL ACE | a
The Hon, 'T, Bradshaw of St. Seemungal, were travelling into College’s Charter Silver Jubtlec In the mountains of the Italian ©£ Ordinance, announced to-ca; its! ea ler aectaiint | Hours Performance
Kitts, told about 200 members of Port-of-Spain after a visit to their Celebrations. The occasion, high- South Tyrol, people are hunting that the Navy was pend nj In Durban a spectacular accic¢ en
the Seamen and Waterfront Work- €state when the accident occurred, lighted by the opening of the bio- for 1,000,600 worth of jewels About $500,000,000 of its funds for happened when a railway euck of the Buckingham
Trade Union in Trinidad: “You Following the collision both vehi- logical laboratories by Sir Allan bel ing oO 2othsehild this year on guns, shells missile: in passing a row of parked cars
must maintain your democratic cles ran off the road. The truck Burns and of the sugar laborator- fay . jewels were seized by 224 other weapons including new struck the end one, picked it uy other Palace
principle within. the admiration ; driven by the owner, Dassarat ies by the Governor, drew €m!- the in Paris, but towards #2") submarine devices. -Revter and hauled = it along the line |
of your Union.” Mr. Bradshaw Persad. The two men killed wero nent visitors from Britain rd the the the war were taken MAY BE NOMINATED wiping she secistors, peedtae | World, (1916)
lectured to the gathering for forty- travelling in the tray of the truck. neighbouring Caribbean Colonies. to the South Tyrol and hidden BONN, March 19, ind windscreens from 17 large cars |
|

ive inutes i ss hey . Twenty members of the College t} a ihe atvece.aid eae damaging them beyond repair
Phin og 4a eg ns Bin ¢ pe Fritz Oellers 47-year-olc The cars were left in a jumbled






rategic industry staff received long service medal —



longed to a v@ leader of the Free Democrat (Lib

































¢ The : . » lowly ploug 7 , 7 heap
and it was their duty to always ° The list included the lowly plougt LADIES ONLY eral) party in Schleswig Holstein -_ |
keep on the alert and see to it that B.G. Scholarship Awards eet ee nee creas ALEXANDRIA is up for nomination as West i} Professor WU- LI- WONG
disrupters did not penetrate their 1949-50 Cost $365,000 tific rains, all of whom shared Next summer Alexandria is to German Consul in Buenos Aires, LEPROSY | s .
venice, equally in the applause which fol- have a beach for ladies only. This it was learned authoritatively MOMBASA | Chinese Doctor Of Magic
(From Our Own Correspondent) Icwed the presentation, Messages was decided by the Municipal here to-day The death sentence was pass sed | : .
GEORGETOWN, March 20. were received from Mr, Griffiths, Commission, because ladies bath Dr. Oellers, who is also a mem- yecently at the Supreme Court on WEDNESDAY, March 28th, 8.30
TRIPLETS Total value of scholarships Secretary of State for the Colonies. ing object to men “eyeing” them per of the Bonn Parliament, used g mother who three times. asked | ’ oe
awarded between 1944 and 1950 Besides Jaggai, who lives on a and cracking jokes to be a prominent Berlin lawyer. a man to kill her son who was a THURSDAY, March 29th, 5 & 8.30
(From Our Own Correspondent) amounted in round figures to peasant holding near the Colle ———_$_ His nomination still had to be leper. The murderer, who shot his ’ ’ "
OR TC )F-SPAIN, March 19. $365,000. Of this, $159,000 was pro- and Simon Pierre the Tractor dr negic Professor of Economics, and approved by the Cabinet and by victim with. a bow and_ arrow, TICKETS sold in advance every day from
Mrs. Ena Serias of Tunapuna, vided by local funds, $173,00@ from er, who mounted the galvanise Professor Frederick Hardy, C.B.E., President Theodore Heuss. It was also sentenced to death. It is 3 :
age 40, gave birth to triplets. Mrs. Colonial Development and Wel- roof platform, were alongside M.A., Pri or of Soil Science would probably still be several the custom of the accused man’s | TO-DAY—GLOBE
Serias is the mother of seven fare Funds, and $33,000 from other Professor Cecil Yazley Shephard, end Chemistry who received months before he would leave tribe — the Wadizs — to kill off |
children. sources. C.B.E., Vice-Principal and Car- medals from Sir Burns tor, South America..-Reuter lepers. \ SSF







aa FROM

~2"2 1 ROODAL
“| THEATRES

CARIBBEAN







selina pla
Mims Se





EMPIRE ROYAL ROXY i

TO-MORROW—4.45 & 8.15 and Continuing
WAGE i OR RRR ee Tt ian |













TO-MORROW TO THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 Daily ; 2
The true, savage story «=SATORDAY



f of BILLY THE KID ! cadena }
5 AND New Adventures *










with The Son ®

of Robin Hood! TO ALL OUR

PATRONS

SUNDAY
f PARADISE UNTAMED

..in all its wonder
and fury!

LOVE UNASHAMED

...in all its innocence
and romance!

7” ADVENTURE
-f — s+A8 NEVER BEFORE!

1.30 & 6.30



He had a talent for
trouble...
a greedy
gun...
*. anda
taste for

Â¥ GOOD FRIDAY
" SPECIAL

THE PASSION PLAY

EMPIRE — 4.3$—6.45—8.45
ROXY — 5—7—9

OLYMPIC — 4.30—6,.45—8.45
ROYAL — 5—8.15

COMIN G TO EMPIRE

starring

John DEREK - Diana LYNN

wih George MAGREADY + Alan HALE

Screen Play by George Bruce + Directed by GORDON DOUGLAS + Produced by FRED M. PACKARD
©



EXTRA 2 REEL SHORT WITH THREE STOOGES

OLYMPIC

TO-MORROW & SUNDAY 4.45—8.15
Ist Instalment Columbia Serial SUPERMAN vs. ATOM MAN
2nd Instalment—MONDAY— TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.15



—--

J. ARTHUR RANK presents
DONALD

JEAN SIMMONS - HOUSTON

me BL

JAMES HAYTER





sete DAVIS - ow BAXTER
Georze SANDERS - Celeste HOLM



a. starring
AUDIE LE ~» MARTA TOREN
MURPRY:S ‘ST ORM ~ JEFF CHANDLER

ven ME ny |
a Men Uw = SHEPPERD STRUCK | yicy CLAUDE DAUPHIN MARINA BERTI







ALL ABOUT EVE | |

PP AO Kit WG ANCREAIN YETI BODINE Oe» soepe ce

* CHRISTOPHER
COLUMBUS”

“GIRL OF THE YEAR’
“THE THIRD MAN”
“THE MUDLARK”



i
SPECIAL!
MIDNIGHT SHOW TO-MORROW
The Republic Whole Serial
«JAMES BROTHERS OF MISSOURI”

Starring: Keith Richards—Ray Bowery




Screenplay by FRANK LAUNDER
JOHN BAINES « MICHAEL HOGAN
Directed by FRANK LAUNDER
AN INDIVIDUAL PICTURE
Released by
UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL



“ATOM MAN ws. SUPERMAN”
With KIRK ALYN — LYLE TABBOT


PAGE FOUR





Harrold Clarke Connell

By TONY VANTERPOOL





It t surprising tha
hibit of Paintings | H
Cc, Connell a E
Museum is a s
is a r
experien
Harrold C. Connell, a nbe



of an old Wes
Irish extr

damental




boyhood his mair







aftists. During
attraction was fr i g is
career began A €
left Harrison College

He went Eng was
admitte the Grosver Ss o}
of Ar London hose Principal
was lain MacNab

Occasionally Connell’

ights

still wander back to the days of
his training and the building
which housed the Grosvenor Art
School. This building was orig-
inally built by the Duke of
Bedford as a Town House bu
Subsequently became the quarters
of the Italian Embassy
It was in this same building
that Bram Stoker wrote his hair-
raising work “Dracula.” The his-
tory of this _ building. was
especially suitable for the artists’
imaginations,
Four Years '

Connell spent four years at the
Grosvenor School and during that
period he also took the opportun-
ity to study interior decorating
and furnishing with Messrs.
Osborne & Co, Ltd., Grafton
Street, London

After leaving he opened his
own Art Gallery — The Albany
Gallery — at i7 Sackville-Street



on March 18th, 1931. This Gal-
lery was opened with a very
successful Exhibition of Lino-

Cuts by Claude Flight, one of the
chief British exponents of lino-
cutting who also wrote books on
the subject

Between 19231—34 a great num-
ber of exhibitions were held at
the Albany Gallery. Among the

artists exhibiting their works
from time to time were Duncan
Grant, S. J. Peploe, R. D. Dun-

lop, Iain MacNab and Olive Snell

At one exhibition Clare Leigh-
ton (Mrs, Brailsford) showed her
portrait of the Mahatma Gandhi
— the only portrait of the Mahat-

ma to be done by an English
woman.
Gandhi

A Press Release to the British
newspapers stated; “If Mr
Gandhi will not leave a_ great
impression behind among our
Statesmen, he has at any rate,

been a boom to his personal ac-
quaintances who were writers
and artists.

“I visited the Albany Gallery
this afternoon where Mrs. Brails-
ford is showing a large oil paint-
ing of the Mahatma, which she
was able to do through her
acquaintance with him.

“He refuses to give sittings to
artists but he allowed Mrs.
Brailsford, who accompany him
on his business, attend interviews,
and even stay with him on days
of silence so that she could get
sketches of him. She did not like
the days of silence as he kept his
head bent down except when
occasionally he looked up _ to
crack some dumb show joke with
her.

“She has pictures of him in
every position, even dozing, but
the finished portrait is of Gandhi
as a public speaker in the middle
of an oration,”

Mrs. Brailsford was best known
for her beautiful wood engrav-

ings. Her husband is the well
known author.

Another great Albany attrac-
tion was an Exhibition of Car-
toons by “Rem”, the cartoonist,
Peter Baxendale’s (Mrs. Basil
Baxendale) Exhibition of Circus
Drawings and Portraits and an-
other by Agnes Lambert.

Highlights
Perhaps the highlights at the

Albany were two Exhibitions of
Pavement Artists. Eleven artists
took part in these and they rep-
resented sixty-one works. These
exhibitions were called the
“Pavement Artists Academy.”

It was while Connell was on
the hunt for pavement artists
that he came across some of the
most interesting characters of his
career. He gathered this type of
artist from all quarters,

“Rem’s” past was the most in-
teresting. When he was discov-













ALL-OVER (elit
kw

i of
- Play safe...
1oey

DREAM
counters throughout the island.

~ HARROLD C.

ered he was doing his work on
stone e'abs in Trafalgar Square
outsidt St. Martins-m-the-Field

Rem was actually taught by
John Paul Lawrence, the famous
French artist and confessed that
he was painting under an alias
His works at the Exhibition were
found quite interesting

Connell

also induced wo
friends from Waterloo Place to
take part. They were both

striking on pastels and were will-

ing to exhibit their work but said

that they could not afford to buy
boards to work on
Proud

They brightened up consider-

ably when Conneil proviced ine
material. One was proud to teil
after that his work had bee
noticed by the Queen of Spain
Announcing tne Pavement Ar-
tists Academy the Star wrote: “An
artist whose work Connell con-
siders will attract the most atten-
tion is the out-of-work miner, who

specialises in landscapes in
ink and wash in such a manner as
to have all the appearances of
etchings.”

The most advanced designer at

the Pavement Artists Academy
was Conway Martin of Bond
Street, a miner, who by trade
showed constructive designs in

black and white of the kind shown
in art schools,

The Times stated; “A word is
due to the ‘good taste with which
the exhibition has been arranged,
with no emphasis upon circum-
stantial interest, but as if pave-
n.ent art had its own dignity.”

Other leading pavement artists
taking part were Rex Villiers and
James Hulbert of Oxford Street,
C.E. McLean of Hyde Park
Corner, H. Bumpus and W. J.
Stubbs of Waterloo Place, Richard
Johnson and F, Perrin of Trafal-
gar Square



Good

Another leading neWspaper
Stated that the Exhibition was ex-
tremely good, interesting and often
amusing and you could buy a work
of art foi as little as seven shill-
ings and sixpence,

An Exhibition of Politcial Car-
toons was also very interesting
For this the Prince of Wales lent
Connell his world famous “Prime
Ministers I have Known” by Max
Beerbohm which was kept at York
House

There were nearly fifty cartoons
on show at this exhibition and
among the cartoonists taking part
were Stubbs, Sir Bernard Patridge,

Grimes, J. L Carstairs, Will
Dyson, Cumberbatch and Matt.
Beerbohm’s cartoon ranges from

Disraeli to Baldwin and MacDon-
ald

Of this
wrote:

Chronicle
by the

the News
“This exhibition

BE SURE OF“

—with the faithful |

use of DREAM

the Beautiful
for your romantic
TOILET SOAP,
faithfully in your
shower and at the
basin for a
elear skin. radiant
loveliness.
is available

use

with

at toilet

The Soap |

be prepared,
moment,
Get a few cakes of DREAM
it
bath,
wash
soft-smooti-
natural

goods



CONNELL,

country’s “funny-men” who can
be very serious at times, is well
worth seeing for its topical inter-

est and skill; and, to many people, -;
have what the cartoon looks like |

before it is compressed for the

newspaper.”

Other exhibitions were “Paint-
ings of the West Indies” by Lt
Col, Vaspilieff—159 paintings
from all parts of the West Indie
Exhibition of Oi] and Water Col-
our Paintings by Margaret L. C
Beale and Tong Paintings of His-
toric London by R. A. Wilson an’
others too numerous to mention.

The exhibitions at the Albany

attracted the attention of leading

connoisseurs, including Per Majes-

y the Queen Mary, and they all
were especially enthusiastic about
Connell’s furnishings

Originality

Of Connell’s furnishings and the
Albany, Peter Harland, yrriting in
the Monthly Pictorial at the end of
1931 stated; “a visit to the gallery
reveals the originality of his fur-
niture, but it is in his complete
schemes that his genius is best
revealed, for in this, one obtains a
sense of expression of the theme
and the spirit of the twentieth cen-
tury. From time to time, exhibi-
tions of works of art in various
media are held here, for Connell
is a believer in the universal kin-
ship of the arts; a recent event was
an exhibition by the Four and
Four Group.

“The Albany Gallery is indeed,

one dedicated to the cause of con-
temporary expression in contem-
porary media and idiom; its work
is stimulating, suggestive and sig-
nificant.”

Connell closed the Gallery in
1934 when Great Britain went off
the gold standard and the majority
of luxury businesses were forced
to close. He joined the staff of
Messrs. Heal & Sons Ltd., interior
decorators of Tottenham Court
Road, London.

Senior





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Doctors’ Disease Sets
Docters Arguing [iT Kiwe0)

By A Medical Officer Of Health



the serious diseases
ecome More commen
MY, cerenary throm.
form, of heart attack) is
which . most interests
they themselves die of
oftem than any other
the comumunity









expected rate of death.
capse. caleulated for
| male population, is taken
100, the rate for doctors has
rked out as 368, for judges
embers of the legal profes.
for coal miners 40, for
agricultural workers 32.

Nearly 50,000 men and women
die of coronary disease each yar.

Why the disease now attacks
more people—and particularly
why it seems to strike with greater
venom those whose work entails
mental rather than physical strain
are points which are being hotly
debated in The Lancet.

Coronary thrombosis is caused
by a narrowing of the diameter
of the main blood vessels
(coronary arteries) of the heart.
Eventualiy the blood cannot pass
elong the narrowed channel and
forms a clot (thrombus) in’ the
artery. The result is that the
neart muscle—a large part of it
in a severe attack or only a small
part in a slighter attack—is cut
off from the essential supply of
blood on which the efficiency







sion

of the pumping mechanism
depends.

CORONARY
THROMBOSIS

1
@ It kills 50,900 people a ||
| year. . . It strikes hardest |
. at the successful - But
| its CAUSE may lie in a fear

of failure. |
{

Smoking ? Harmless

Just why the diameter of the
arteries ot the heart should be
specially susceptible to this nar-
rowing process is not known.

It is believed to have something
io do with the breaking down of
fat in the chemical factory inside
the human body, though this is
not to say that coronary thrombo-
ris has any connection whatever
with diet or obesity. But its oc-
currence in many cases certainly
does seem to depend on heredity.

The late Sir Maurice Cassidy,
the King’s physician, found a
family history of the disease in
half his patients,

Incidentaliy smoking, which
was at one time tiiought to pre
cipitate the clotting of blood in
the arteries of the heart, is now
regarded as relatively harmless.

Coronary thrombosis is a
serious condition: abcut one in
ten of first attacks are immediate-
ly fatal, But there is a brighter
side . Modern methods of diag-
nosis and treatment have helped
many sufferers even those wh)
have been most desperately ill,
to return to useful life for many
years.

A doctor called to a _ patien?
with a suspected “heart attack”
will recognise coronary throm-
bosis from the severe and dis-
tressing pain in the chest of



a

Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girts
between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

tition.

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must reach the Short Story Editor,

Advocate Co., Ltd..

City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner will re-
ceive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

- Age



resilience

unnecessary.

Wear it out,

Seats

hot climates.



D

ECKSTEIN BROS.



“OBTA

| Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
| Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth |
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism !
and Heart Trouble
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
jand quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
Guarantee. Amosan must make
|mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack.
age. Get &mosan from your chemis

Amosan

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

| Why not be More comfortable ?

The Dunlopillo latex foam mattress is just about the
most comfortable thing one can imagine.

Natural

aided by porosity, prevents loss of shape and
sagging in the middle, making turning and beating
Dunlopillo is dust-free, germ-resisting,
and completely odourless,

and what’s more there are

no springs or stuffing to come through the cover or

Dunlopillo latex foam cushioning is also ideal for
armchairs and settees and for bus, cinema and theatre
in fact wherever supreme comfort is required.
Owing to its porosity it is particularly suitable for



UNLOPILLO

The original Latex Foam Mattress

4ABLE AT

Bay St.—-Distributors.









NOVELLO
i .

which the patient complains and!
the signs of collapse or shock
Often there have been warning
symptons dt g the previous few
offers

'



hours



Yhe preliminary treatment ,is
te ensure absolute rest and quiet-
Mess and to ease distress with
injections of nain--'lling drugs,

When the patie: recovers
from tee immedigte ill-effects of
sudden Gamage td the heart
musele ke niay be considered a!
suitable case for treatment with|

heparin or dicoumoral, the
so-called anticoagulant drugs. CV- 240
These are given to prevent

further clotting of the blood in|
the arteries of the heart and
other organs.

SERVICE

Only a few years ago opera-
tions were being devised to
mprove the blood supply of
hearts damaged by coronary
thrombosis, but progress in this
direction appear to have ceased
for the time being. !

between

SAN JUAN
ST. THOMAS
ST. CROIX
GUADELOUPE
MARTINIQUE
ST. JOHNS

The tragedy cf coronary throm-
bosis is that it often strikes down
successful men at the peak of
their career,

is five times
men than in

In middle-age it
more common in
women.

Shortly before his death last
year, Professor John Ryle of
Oxford, himself a victim of coron-!
ary thrombosis, pointed out in the
British Heart Journal how rapidly
this disease appeared to be on the
increase. In seeking the reason}
for this he emphasised the impor- |
tance of social and occupational |

ST. LUCIA
changes; in forty per cent of the! PORT OF SPAIN
patients under his care he had

noted heavy mental or emotional} *
strain,

Jt may be of course that the
professional classes are more
usceptible to this disease than}
manual workers, not because they
overtax their brains, but because
their occupations are sedentary

Whip of Ambition

The Clipper CV-240 is
acknowledged to be the

most advanced type airplane
of its kind. Its extra large
picture windows, wide aisles

and its 40 roomy, recline-to-
Nevertheless there is perhaps
something in the theory of an
American psychiatrist who be-
lieves that susceptibility te
coronary thrombosis is related tc
fear of failure, with a consequent
perpetual straining to catch up
with ambitions which may be
only half realised even in these
at the very top of their particular
tree, : ‘ f

your-comfort seats, assure
passengers the utmost in

comfort and luxury in flight

By providing this most mod-
ern, fast, dependable Clipper

on this route, PAA is con-

.Possibly the body has to rebel
in some way against the almost
intolerable mental efforts of
those who are constrained, per- |
haps by their hereditary make-up, |
to ride ever forward on the surg- |
ing wave cf success to some
unattainable shore. iq?

tributing to the advancement
of the rapidly growing tourist
area in the islands between
Puerto Rico and Trinidad.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED For full information and

|

|

LES | reservations, consult your
—L.ES,



travel agent or

& "TM. Reg

PAN AMERICAN
Worip AlRWAYS

PASSENGERS + MAIL + CLIPPER CARGO

DaCOSTA & Co., Ltd,

BRIEF AP?@ARANCE |
}

JOHANNESBURG.

A new island, abort 100 yards
long and with precipitous sides
appeared above the sea off Walvis!
Bay, South West Africa, recently, |
It only stayed about an hour, then |
disappeared under the watei
before anyone could examine it. |






aA
|
NEW STYLE MURDER

NEW YORK
Murder—new style—was alleged
against three asylum attendants
in a town in Georgia recently |
They were accused of killing an
insane patient by forcing him to|
swallow a handkerchief.

Broad St.



'
Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose ; |

SADDLES (New)
Clearing off at $48.00
| Ideal for



Plantations,






Amosan stops sath |

@
MAHOGANY VARNISH
| STAIN—Just opened.

\ e

your




today, The guar-
antee protects
you. \





] and HARDWARE

ee











JUST RECEIVED

KING PIN SETS.

FOR THE FOLLOW ING:=-

AUSTIN.7 H.P., 8 H.P., 10 H.P., 12 H.P.
FIAT 500

FORD 8 H.P. & 10 HP.

FORD V 8 CARS

FORD V 8 TRUCKS

FORD V8 THAMES TRUCK
HILLMAN 10 HLP.

MORRIS 8 H.P. & 10 HP.

SINGER 9 H.P. & 10 H.P.
STANDARD 8 HLP., 9 H.P., 14 H.P.
VAUXHALL 10 H.P., 12 H.P., 14 HP.
BEDFORD TRUCKS

Also
GENERATOR ARMATURES
FOR POPULAR MODELS.

BROTHERS

4269

ECKSTEIN

Bay Street Dial





CLIPPER:

a

/
|? ,



Phone 2385

| Pisas 2122 (after hours 2303)

Gums Bleed? |

OCS SES OS OO 5 99GB 9990 000664666909





| BRITISH ARMY RIDING

net, |

$9S9SS

| JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD.

OOOO"

OCPOREOO

<

se

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951

hae.) 5 ©
BiG
HEALTH BENEFITS

* CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D
IN A DELICIOUS FORM

% INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS

* ENSURES STRONG LIMBS
AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN







Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL



Made by ALLEN &@ HANBURYS LTO., LONDON

$$ ES ER NN wn +











100 BLP, SIX CYLINDER
OVERHXAD VALVE ENGINE
e
CAR COMPORT SAFETY CAB

“STRENGTH RESERVE”






Everything YOU and
your DRIVERS want
in a truck






Progressive springing: extra springs
come into action as freight weight is in-
creased. Tough chassis designed to
carry rated load with wide margin of
safety. Rear axle has a “strength re-
serve " to operate with vehicle fully laden
over rough ground, Car-style driving
cab insulated ageinst heat and cold.
‘The greatest truck value of the century!

The New 5 ton

MORRIS-COMMERCIAL

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Sole Distributors Phone 45&04

PROPOSE POEL EEA POPP POOP PO PPPS P FPO”

TAILORS and CLOTHIERS

Worthily upholding the traditions

of

FINE
, TAILORING

“Service to Our

Customers before
all else’

is our Maxim.



Select your Suit from
among the Finest °
- range of

Tweeds, Tropicals,
Worsteds, Doe-Skin
Flannels,

Harris and Sports Tweeds.





6.664,¢
errrr wvwrrer Oe ee ee a rere POOF OOO SSOSSOSS


FRIDAY,

MARCH

PAGE FIVE





















THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BEN

Yes! — Yeast-Vite quickly
soothes away headaches, neu-
ralgia, nerve and rheumatic
pains — but it does something
else too ! Because of its valuable
tonic propertics Yeast - Vite
helps you to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more casily and
enjoy more ene! Neat time
you want pain relief take Yeast-
Vite and get tomic benefit too!

Heart Trouble =,
Caused by High =“
assure



EFIT



i -




1 a
very sia
(ft known ip
tpodignl Manavery, pA Blood ié

you feel 2 |



YV/50j2



“Take a letter.



Wicksteed’s
Festival Is On!

BEGIN TO-DAY this week-by-week conducted

tour of the British
-++-- AD. 1951

in their native habitat
HOLYWELL, Hunts.

a OFFICIAL hand-outs of That Other Festival say :
Visitors will be encouraged to meet the men and women

of Britain in their own surroundings. .

and the people will be open

Do you get the idea? We are
going to be put on show like the
quaint little furry creatures that
scuttle about in a zoo.

Maybe it’s a good idea, but why
spend eleven and a half million
pounds on it when I can be your
guide for nothing? rs

So let’s have our own Festival.
Let's | start our inspection of
Britain and her native types by
going to some fishing pub by a
water-hole and watching ‘the
anglers come in to drink,

The pub I suggest is called Ye
Olde Ferry Boat Inn at Holywell,
near St. Ives, Hunts, It’s historic
and olde. Herewargd the Wake
popped in for a quick one when
he was fleeing from William the
a:

e tracks of the British Angler
(Piscater Britannicus) and the
Hardy Fenland Wildfowler have
leq there for centuries, They
still do though nowadays a lot of
the tracks are made by motor-
coaches,

There, among the olde oake
beams and the stuffed fish, you
can watch the goings-on in
comfort,

In fact the landlord, Jack Rodd,
who used to be a grocer at Gos-
port, has put in g TV set to enter—
tain visitors while waiting for the
exhibits to appear.

He has also ground-baited the
place with 1,400 bottles behind
the bar to help lure the innocent
anglers along.

In Luck
So we'll take up our position by
the stuffed bream — (5Ib. 2ozs.)

caught by a Mr. A, W. McLean
in 1910—and wait developments.

The latch clicks. Not a word.
Some exotic British

species is

coming in to drink.
Aha! We're in luck, It’s a fine
young specimen of the male

angler in the prime of life. Look,
he’s ordering a pint of bitter.

' The suspense is terrific, Let’s
creep nearer and see if we can
speak to him without frightening
him away,

He proves to be quite tame and
ready to talk. His name is Tom
Metcalfe Arnold, but he calls him-
self simply Tom Metcalfe.

This is because there has been
a Tom Metcalfe at Holywell,
Hunts, since 1063, and he doesn’t
wish to break the continuity,

Tom is 28, and when he isn’t
fishing, shooting, or playing darts
for pints of beer, he is cutting
rushes on the river bank as his
ancestors have always done,

Tom’s Rushes

In the old days rushes were
used on the floor instead of car-
pets, or in oil lamps for wicks.
Now they go to breweries, jam
makers and women’s institutes.

Half the women’s institutes in
Britain use Tom’s rushes. They
make mats with them and baskets.
Brewers and jam makers buy.
rushes for caulking barrels,

Two armfuls of wet rushes make
one bunch or bolt, and when dried
and matured, a bolt sells for 10s.
6d, The skill comes in the drying.

Rushes are like hay. You can’t
explain when they are ready for
storing. You just have to know.

A quick calculation shows that
Tom must have been in the war.

What was he doing this scion
of the 900-year-old rush-cutting
family of Metcalfe? He was a

. . The country

to view.”

navigator in a Lancaster bomber.
Good Catch

The latch clicks again. Here’s
another angler come in to drink.
He’s a bit older and orders whisky.

A detailed examination reveals
that he is no less a catch than
the chairman of the St, Ives and
District Fish Preservation and
Angling Society,

We collectors of British types
scribble in our notebooks that his
name is Mr, Geoff Kiddle, He’s
in an old family business, too—
furnishing and removals at St.
Ives.

He is also a borough councillor
and he’s come for a drink after
a meeting of the Housing Commit-
tee.

Fishing on the Ouse isn’t what
it was he says. Too much pollu-
tion. Why, when he was a boy
he could swim with his face in
the water and see the fish on the
bottom. Couldn’t do that now.

Geoff was in the R.A.F., too,
He was a sergeant in the radio
section.

‘Chick Evans, the next one to
look in was a squadron leader
engineer. Now he keeps a toy-
shop in St. Ives and acts as
secretary to the Angling Society.

Funny, isn’t it? When you come
to examine these inhabitants of





PERON’S PRIVATE ENEMY No. 1



NEW YORK

UP on the top floor of the

six-storey building
housing South America’s
most respected newspaper,
La Prense of Buenos Aires,
is a little soundproof room
with polished mahogany
floor. They call it the
Salle d’Armes.

There in the old days angry
readers who imagined them-
selves slighted in its columns
could demand satisfaction, not
by a libel suit, bus by a duel
with the editor or by arrange-
ment even with the offending

re er,

' The Satle d’Armes has not been
used lately—though the care-
fully polished swords are still
there. But La Prensa’s editor.
Dr, Alberto Gainza Paz, has on
his hands the biggest duel of
his life. His opponent who so
far has won every move but sti?!
has not found the opening for
a fatal thrust. is Argentina’s
dictator. Peron.

- THE WRECKER

T stake for Gainza Paz is not
the existence of his

newspa but the principle
of Press treedom throughout
Argentina. Peron’s one-sided

t with Pag is being closely
watched here in the United
States—nowhere more so.
*\Ever sinc: Peron took office
five years ago he has shown a
mark disii« for newspaper
‘men who refused to be yes-men.
Particular object of his dis-
favour has m La Prensa
agains which a whole series of
sometimes novel wrecking tactics
has been brought to bear.

At one time Peron took away
its newsprint and distributed it
among papers who showed

readier appreciation of the
benefits of Beronisin.
+ Two months ago the Peron-

backed newsvendors’ union
demanded one-fifth of all La
Prensa’s classified advertising

revenue.
‘* Ofcourse, this was refused,

Dear Mr. Stalin, we will be very much obliged if you don’t start anything for two



Dr.



PAZ

by Frederick Cook
COPPELL PPLE EEE



when suddenly gang hoodlums
opened fire, killing one worker.
Then they set fire to the paper's
delivery trucks. while armed
Police stood by and laughed

Police occupied the office that
night to “protect” it, and Dr.
Paz. the man against Peron. was
formally charged with violating
national security law.

eae telephone inquiry
from New York to-day, he said
guardedly that he knew nothing
about charges against him
beyond what had been pub-
lished in Argentina and overseas.
As he rang off he added signi-
ficantly, however: “But thank
you for your interest in the
matter.”

HE SIMPLY COULDN'T
STOP TALKING

Says Hitler’s Interpreter

itai j Then the union would not
Seesan; you find they $e gue handle the paper. A handsome, scholarly man of
ordinary people... like you and Threatened by the news fifty, Alberto Gainza Paz, a
me. vendors, the printers went “on eo Po eenate with a ears ae
: strike. avile WwW suits, nob only edits
ake tte thi ane, Moanyak But last Monday 1300 workers but owns La Prensa (The Press).
safari into the wilds of darkes yor to resume publication. Paz's doctorate is in law
Britain by Bernard Wicksteed. Seven hundred of them were on though he has never practised.
—LE.S. their way to work on Tuesday. — It is more than likely that if nus
CHURCH SERVICES
i)
AN BELMONT—l1 a.m, Rev. M, A. E
SERVICES FOR aan vhiDay AND ent 7 p.m, Passion Play, ‘He died
EASTER , ‘or us.”
ST. LEONARD'S SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m. Rev. B.
GOOD FRIDAY—7.30 a.m. Mating and Crosby.
Ante Communion. 9.30 a.m. Matins and PROVIDENCE—1! a.m. Mr. J. Clarke
Sermon, 12—3 p.m, Devotions of the VAUXHALL—11 a.m. Mr. C. Jones

Cross. 7.30 p.m. Stainers Crucifixion.

EASTER DAY—5 a.m. Choral Eucharist
end Address. 8 a.m. Holy Communion.
% am. Choral Eucharist and Addréss.
11 am, Matins and Sermon. 3 p.m,
Children’s Service, 7 p.m. Evensong,
Sermon and Procession.

ST. STEPHEN'S
EASTER DAY—Low Mass 5 a.m. Pro-
cession and Solemn Mass 9 a.m, Children’s
Service at 3.30 p.m, Solemn Evensong,
Sermon and Procession at 7 p.m.
Easter Day. Lazaretto: Sung Mass
8 am, Friends invited.



MORAVIAN

ROEBUCK STREET—6 a.m. Mr. C.
Hewitt. 11 am, Rev. D. C. Moore. 7 p.m.
Rev. D. C. Moore (Musical Service)

GRACE HILL-—11 a.m. Mr. O, Lewis.
7 p.m. Mr, L. Oxley.

FULNECK—l1 a.m. Mr, S. Weekes.
7 p.m. Mr. G. Francis.

MONTGOMERY—7 p.m, Mr. D. Cul-
pepper.

SHOP HILL—7 p.m. Mr. U. Reid.

DUNSCOMBE—l1 am. Mr. D. Cul-
pepper.

COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH

FASTER DAY—5 a.m.* Holy Com-
ynunion Service. 3.30 p.m. Sacred Cantata.
7.15 p.m. Evangelistic Service. A cordial
invitation is extended to all, Minister:
Rev. E. A. Gilkes.





CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown. Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 a.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.
SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 1951
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: MATTER.
Golden Text: Psalms 81: 9, 10. There
shall no strange god be in thee; neither
shalt thou worship any strange god. J
am the Lord thy God, which brought
thee out of the land of Egypt. .

METHODIST
GOOD FRIDAY

BETHEL—i1 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby.
DALKEITH—9 a.m, Rev. M. A. E.
Thomas.

NOTICE

We beg to inform our Customers
that Our Hardware Stores will be
Closed on SATURDAY, 24th March

|
| The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltda.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST, MICHAEL

| DIAL 4528





EASTER SUNDAY
BETHEL—5. a.m, Easter Communion
11 am, Rev. B, Crosby. 7 p.m. Rev
M. A, B. Thomas. Holy Communion after

. B. Crosby.
Holy Communion. 7 p.m. Mr. J. Clarke
BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr. G. Harper.
7 p.m. Rey. B. Crosby. Holy Communion
SOUTH DISTRICT—9 am. Mr. A.
St. Hill. 3 pam. Rev. M. A. E. Thomas
Holy Communion.
PROVIDENCE—1! a.m. Rev. M. A. E.

Thomas. Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr.
D. F. Griffith.

VAUXHALL—9 a.m. Rev. M. A. E
Thomas. Hoty Communion. 7 p.m. Mr
G. Jones,

ST. THERESA
United Episcopal Orthodox Churen,

Good Friday Services—7 a.m, Holy Com-
munion. 12—3 p.m. Devotions of the
Cross. Preacher: Rev. C, R. Morgan
7 p.m. Parts recording Stainers Cruci-
fixion. “

8T. JOHN'S LUTHERAN CHURCH

Good Friday, Fairfield Road, Black
Rock—6 a.m, A Strange Procession; The
Rev. W. F. O'Donohue Speaker. Subjegt
“The life of Christ’. 11 a.m, Song and
Sermon by the Local Representative.

HOLY SUNDAY

Fairfield Road, Black Rock--11 a.m.
Song and Sermon, The Rev. W. F
O'Donohue. Speaker, Subject: Away with
Him; 7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon by
the Rev, Wm. F. O’Donohue,

THE SALVATION ARMY
EASTER SERVICES

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL—ll a.m,
Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Y.P, Programme
7 p.m. Altar Service and Sound Movie



Show on Crucifixion. Conducted by
Major A. E. Moffett, (Divisional Corm-
mander)

WELLINGTON STREET—11 a.m, Holi-
ness Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting.
7 p.m. Altar Service. Preacher; Major

OISTIN—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting;
8 p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Altar
Service; Preacher: Lieutenant Gibbons

@ GLASSWARE

Broad Street





By HENRY AWBRY

THE thing about Hitler was not.
so much what he said or how he
said it. It was the way, once he
started talking, he went on
on.

Dr. Paul Schmidt noticed it the
first time he met him.

his ensuing nine years of trans-;

lating Hitler’s garrulity to foreign

haustively confirmed.

potentates the impression was “q

No Notes the course of negotiations—at
Otherwise, Dr. Schmidt now${ any rate, Mr. Chamberlain, so |
reports (in Hitler's Interpreter, long as you remain on German |
published by Heinemann, 15s.),,, Soil.
the Feuhrer’s talk was not sensa- That was one aspect of the para-
tional. “dox of Hitler’s personality,
“His phraseology was hinting He could be composed, yet he
conventional. He expressed could be frenzied. Logical, yet
himself clearly and adroitly,.. unaccountable. Courteous, yet
He had no notes,” «churlish. What he never seems
But even at that first meeting§to have been is relaxed
—with Mr. Anthony Eden and Sir ; sa?
John Simon in 1935—Hitler ex- Impressec La
hibited his mercurial temper. The only foreign statesman ever
There was never any carpet- on comfortable terms with him,
chewing, but: — according to Schmidt, was Ru-
“Almost without transition he gaania’s Marshal Antonescu.
would suddenly fly into a rage; | Before their first meeting “it was
his voice would become hoarse, drummed into him that he must
he would roll his r’s and clench not say a word against the award
his fists, while his eyes blazed.” fof Rumania’s Transylvania to
A remark of Mr. Eden’s caused Hungary]. He spoke for ret
that particular outburst. But then hours about nothing else |
Mr, Eden had the provoking habit “"That always impress¢ d me,’ |}
of asking straight questions. Hitler frequently said, ir" i
So, Dr. Schmidt notes, had Mussolini was never Mo
Molotov and Belgium’s King Leo-, teemed. Hitler always out-ta ced
pold, Neither were favourites him, overwhelmed him. with the
with Hitler. military statistics his mind stored

One of his disarming tricks was
that of stidden and unexpected
restraint. Schmidt saw it done





Remember —
HUTCHINSONS

The Most Central Shopping Place For :—

and CROCKERY

@ ALL TYPES KITCHEN WARE
@ BEST BRANDS PAINTS and ENAMELS
@ STOVES and PARTS

@ BEDSTEADS, SPRINGS and MATTRESSES

@ GLASS and MIRRORS.

and many other BARGAIN ITEMS.







ands came

And in® spoke quietly.



ee

Years...”

London Express Service



case ever comes to trial he with
conduct his own defence

Apart from his paper he has}
only .one absorbing interest
clagsical miusic. He owns one ot
the. world’s finest. gramophones
built especially for him and
thousands of albums of per-
formances by the world’s best
orchestras. He lives in a
modernistic 12-year-old three-
floor house a tew minutes from
his office and the Presidentiai
Palace which are virtually
neighbours. The house, brick
built and painted a gleaming
white, is lavishly furnished in
the style of an English country
place

MORNING SWIM

EFORE Peron’s ban Paz used
to drive in his American car |
to his office for a short statt

conference, where the work of
the leader writers was debatea }







He left at eight. drove nome. and
took 4 swim. An office messenger
would be waiting with page
proofs as he stepped from his
pool Nothing went into La
Prensa's editorial page without
bis personal approval

In his news columns Paz
dernands oniy two things
impartiality and accuracy. For
h readers he buys Britain's
Reuter service and America’s
United Press, maintaining onlv
two overseas bureaux of his own
—ore in Montevideo, Uruguay

just across the river Plate. one in
Geneva
Paz 1s tall. grey-haired and dis-




tinguished. He has eight
children. five cf them sons and
fourteen grand-children He |
inherited La Prensa from his if
tather. who had founded it in i
1869. He ser his apprentice
ship tn ¢ tments. and for |
some year: a junior in the

leader-writing rooms

MISSING: 6 MEN

HE sort of thing La Prensa is

up against is illustrated by

the story of its brand-new
press. This was bought in the
United States in 1947. Jt reached
Buenos Aires in safety. To-day
iG still stands uncrated in the
paper's garage.

“Shortage of labour” has so far
prevented Peron from granting
th? required Government permit
to have it installed About six
men would be needed for a week
So delicate is Argentina's man-
pewer situation that they just
cannot be found.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

London Express Service

during the Munich crisis of 1938. |
Hitler and Chamberfain were
in delicate negotiation, Peace and |
war were in the balance.
the dreaded news that the
‘Czechs had mobilised. |
i In the horrified silence Hitler
Schmidt translated |
Zinto English:
4 “Despite this
vocation, I shall, of. course,
keep my promise not to proceed
against Czeehoglovakia during

easily.

sO



Henry Awbry.
L. E; S.

IIS

Roebuck Street

G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD. 1
'



KIDNEY-LIVER PILLS |



Then F

unheard of pro- |;



CITY GARAGE TRADING CO, LTD.



Get Nexce








Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with the liver, must filler out im-
purities from the bloodstream.

So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
achy-—-with the nagging pain of an
aching back-—look to both your kid-
neys and liver, That's why Cana-
dians have been relying on Dr.
Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills for over
half a century.

Give your system a chance to
work properly. Try Dr. Chase's
idnes-Léver Pills today, The name |
“Dr. Chase’’ ig your assurance. 3 |

> Dr. Chase's -



Her old undies look new —
because they are always

washed in LUX

You too can keep your pretty clothes looking
like new—just wash them regularly in
Lux. For Lux gives longer life to dainty
clothes, keeps colours gay and lovely.
Yes, gentle Lux flakes wash perfectly,

So make sure your clothes last longer, keep
new-looking — wash them regularly in Lux.

Keeps all dainty clothes like NEW

4 LEVER vaopvcr

iBATTERY



HAM G67 81



My cyes often used to smart and
ache after 4 day's work. Sometimes
leven had to stay late to get finished

At the Club Jim said: “You're
probably suffering from a touch of
eye strain, Why not try Optrex?”








You speed up innumer-
able farming jobs...cut
farm machine operation
costs... when you use
EXIDE Batteries in your . 7 - :
ad ifie So I took Jim's advice. Every day ‘No eye strain now!" I said to Jim
farm tractors and other I used Optrex-—washed away dirt later. “Thanks to you—and Optrex!
mechanical equipment and germs, toned up eye muscles. I'll never be without it again.”
EXIDE Batteries give
rae pe PROTECT YOUR EYES wzth
steady, uniform, eco- a
s nomical performance ; oe
year,in and year out +
‘Oy
THE
’ LONG LIFE 9 ~ OPTREX »
a) ,
bod GATTERY! | se EYE LOTION KGS
A a Dependable Batteries ; }









for 61 Years!



MAKE THIS TEST
‘The rim of the eye and inner
should be healthy flesh
FREE! in each
a scientifically

packet
designed eyebutl. @






















THE FAMILY CAR

This luxuriously upholstered Car offers complete comfort in seating for six
passengers.
It is economical to buy and economical to maintain,

VANGUARD FOR VALUE

and let us demonstrate it for you

Visit our new Showrooms in Pinfold Street
every day

Our Gasolene and Oils Dept. is now open from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m,
including Sundays.

It is to be remembered that
fasolene and oil,

GOOD as important to your car as

ervicing 1

LET US THOROUGHLY SERVICE YOUR CAR
It will pay you to visit... «....

CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LIMITED

Pinfold Street, Bridgetown.


PAGE SIX



BARBADOS Ga ADVOGATE

taaee eS fase

Printed by the Advocate Co.,

Friday, March 23, 1951

ACT NOW

IT is impossible to understand Canada’s
position with regard to Cuban sugar unless
Canada’s trade position with the West
Indies is first understood.

In 1950 Canada bought $414,000 worth of
sugar from Cuba. In the same year Cana-
da bought $7.2 million worth of sugar from
Barbados, and total imports from Barbados
into Canada for the year ending 1950 were
10 million dollars. This was an increase
of 3 million dollars on the value of imports
into Canada during 1949,

But in 1950 Barbados imported, from
Canada products valued at only 2.9 million
dollars, a considerable falling off on 1949
when Barbados imported 5 million dollars
of Canadian goods.

Nor is Barbados’ trade with Canada an
isolated instance of the unbalance between
Canadian and West Indian trade, In 1950
Canada imported from British Guiana
sugar valued at 13.6 million dollars:
Jamaica supplied 16.3 million dollars worth
of sugar to Canada the same year: and
Trinidad sold Canada $7.6 million of sugar.

Other British Empire countries in 1950
were responsible for the vast majority of
Canadian imports of sugar into Canada.
Australia sold Canada $10.9 million and
Fiji $10.1 million.

Of the vast total of $76,000,000 of sugar
imported into Canada in 1950, only $414,000
of sugar from Cuba, and $413,000 of sugar
from San Domingo were from non-British
Empire countries.

It only aggravated the Canadian cod fish
exporter when Trinidad chose the year
1950 to cancel its traditional buying of
codfish from the Canadian province of

Newfoundland and to purchase a year’s
supply of codfish from a Scottish co-opera-
tive. \
Nor has Cuba been slow to recognise
Canada’s disadvantage with regard to
West Indian trade. Cuba has been offering
at Torquay where international trade
agreements are presently being hammered
out to buy codfish from Newfoundland
provided that Canada in return will buy
sugar from Cuba. It is this fear that is
agitating British Empire sugar producing
countries. But no blame can be attached
to Canada, if the United Kingdom deliber-
ately controls the movement of trade be-
tween the British West Indies and Canada,
in favour of the United Kingdom,

How unfair that control of trade is, can
be seen by the 1950 twelve-month figures
of Canadian trade with the British West
Indies. These figures show that Canada
bought 67 and a half million dollars of
B.W.I. products in 1950, (a record over $62
million of imports in 1949). But in the
very year.of 1950 when Canadian dollars
for B.W.I. sugar and other goods reached
this all-time record figure, there was a
drop of no less than 30 per cent. in the
dollar value of Canadian sales in the Brit-
ish West Indies.

Exports from Canada to the British West
Indies in 1950 dropped to $30,600,000.

This compares with $43,000,000 in 1949.

And in dollar total this is the smallest
volume of trade which Canada has enjoyed
with the colonies since 1940.

The British West Indies must speak with
one voice and must make that voice heard
now, if our traditional trade with Canada
is not to be shipwrecked for the sake of
saving dollars for Britain and the sterling
area,







BOAT RACE

OVER a million people will line a four
and a half stretch of the River Thames to-
morrow for the greatest free sporting
spectacle in the world—the annual Oxford
and Cambridge boat race.

For the sixteen oarsmen who have un-
dergone three months of rigorous training
preparing for the race, there will be no
cups or prizes. They will be awarded a
Blue, the hallmark of achievement in sport
at the Universities.

The race itself seldom produces a thrill-
ing finish, though in 1877 there was a
dead-heat, and in 1949 Cambridge got up
at the post after having been led most of
the way.

The boat race was started in 1829, but
was not an annual event at first. In 1846
boats with outriggers were used, and the
first race in the present style of boats with-
out keels was. rowed in 1875. Now, with
ninetysix races rowed, the score stands at
Cambridge 52, Oxford 43.

The odd thing about the boat race is that
everybody — including leader writers —
takes sides, usually for no apparent reason.
Another odd thing about the race is that
although Oxford are usually favourites —
they are this year — Cambridge usually

wins. Since the end of the war Cam-
bridge has won four times to Oxford’s
once.

Unfortunately, unless something is done
soon it will be impossible to continue hold-
ing the boat race on the tideway, and
since the rivers at Oxford and Cambridge
are too narrow it would have to be rowed
at Henley. It is estimated ihat the race
eosts each University Club about £1,800,
and College funds are running low.

It has been suggested that the people

who benefit from the boat race — the
owners of hotels, pubs and clubs along the
course — should contribute towards the
cost of the race. This seems a fair pro-
posal, and it is hoped that it will be put
into effect and so help to preserve London's

. great sporting event,

Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.

































































|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

AGRICULTURAL NOTES

By C. C. SKEETE, Director of Agriculture

RAINFALL for the month of
February 1951 was greatly in
excess of the amount recorded in
any month of February during
the last 108 years for which
records are available. According
to rainfall returns received from
39 stations situated in the various
rainfall categories of the Island,
the average total rainfall for the
month was 13.42 inches. The
average total for February, ).950
was 2.08 inches; the average for
February for the past 100 years
was 2.09 inches.

The highest total fall for Feb-
ruary, 1951, at any of these
stations was 21.93 inches, recorded
at a station situated in the high-
lands of St. Thomas, and the
lowest was 6.77 inches measured
at a station on the coastal area
of the parish of Christ Church.

Sugar Cane. The harvesting of
the old crop was continued during
the month; some factories sus-
pended grinding operations for a
few days as it was impossible to
obtain sufficient cane on account
of the very heavy rains which
fell between the 12th to the 17th
of the month. Field yields have
remained above the estimate, but
juice quality has been below
average due to the immature con-
dition of the cane.

Food Crops, Tne marketing of
the main yam crop was permitted
during the month. Several fields
of sweet potatoes were harvested

Cotton, The reaping of the
first bearing of the cotton crop
was nearly completed, but the
weather conditions experienced
during the month have practically
made this reaping a total loss.
These rains .also hampered the
development of the second bear-
ing causing quite a number of
new flower buds and bolls to be
shed. Owners and occupiers of
several plots in St. Philip and
St. Lucy have commenced to
clean up their plots and not wait
for a second bearing, the land
being planted in some food crop.
No pink bollworm has_ been
observed either ir. the field or at
the ginnery.

Cotton Variety Trials. The
reaping of these trials was c¢n-
tinued during the month and will
be completed early in March.

The cotton and okra _ close
seasons were proclaimed during
the month. This season extends
from the Ist May, 1951 to. 30th
June, 1951.

Peasant Agriculture

Food Crops. Exceptionally
heavy and persistent rains during
the month proved a setback to
the cultivation of green vege-
tables, Cultivators experienced
some severe losses, and were
forced to replant a number of
their crops. As a result, green
vegetables are not expected to be
as plentiful as they normally are
at this time of the year. The
reaping of yams and eddoes was
continued, and these were in good
supply in the market,

Sugar Cane. Small farmers
continue to report good yields of
both plant and ratoon canes,
Reaping of this crop was slowed
down in many areas owing to the
heavy rains which fell about the
middle of the month, Supplying
of the young plant canes was con-
tinued.

Cotton, The picking and drying
of cotton were greatly hampered
by the rains. It is anticipated
that, as a result, the crop will
fall short of expectations, By the
end of the month many growers
had begun to destroy their cot-
ton plants,

Brittania still rules the waves
on the oceans which carry the
world’s merchant trade, And that
is truer today than at any time
in recent years. For in British
yards there are 2,000,000 tons of
new shipping on the stocks and
orders for as much again,

Fresh contracts are being sign-
ed daily. Yesterday orders for
five cargo ships were disclosed.
The P & O Line intends to add
two big passenger liners to its
fleet. And so it goes on.

Since January 120 new ships,
totalling 1,500,000 tons, have been
ordered at a cost of nearly £106,-
000,000.

War Losses Replaced

Thanks to a gigantic shipbuild-
ing programme, Britain now boasts
a Merchant Navy larger than in
1989—and we have far more
ships plying the seas than any
other nation, including the Uni-
ted States.

In five years British shipyards
have built 1,800 new merchan*
ships—bigger and faster than be-
fore—valued at about £500 mil-
lion.

The 4,000,000 tons of orders in
hand and on the books represent
another £300 million in hard cash.







Tree Crops. Coconuts, papaws
and limes were in reasonably
good supply during the month.
Mango and avocado pear trees
are beginning to bloom

Pests and Diseases, Except for

slugs, which were encouraged by
the damp weather, no serious
pests or diseases were reported.

Peasant Livestock. Balanced

animal feed as well as succulent
fodder was in free _ supply
throughout the month.

Extension Work. (i) The

Peasant Agricultural Instructors
paid visits to 581 peasant hold-
ings and ‘18 schgol gardens in
February, Twenty-one mango
trees were top-worked.

(ii) With a view to determin-
ing the initial reaction of
peasant dairy cattle own-
ers to the proposed Cen-
tral Milk Depot, and ar-
riving at some estimate of
the support likely to be
given the scheme from this
source, the peasant agri-
cultural extension _ staff
conducted a quick survey
during the month among
small-scale dairymen. The
results, on the whole, were
very encouraging.

Irrigation, The Colonial Devel-

opment and Welfare Scheme for
assisting individual peasants to
install irrigation units continues
to make satisfactory progress,

Crop Husbandry, Apart from

* routine cultural an@ other opera-

tions, the principal activities at
all Stations during the month
were those in connection with
the reaping of sugar cane and
yams, Both crops are giving fair-
ly satisfactory results,

Livestock. (i) The total number
of livestock at the six stations at
the end of February was 128.
These included stud animals, cat-
tle, goats, sheep, pigs and equines.
Thirteen head of stock were sold
and 550 gallons of milk produced

Gi) Stud services paid for at
the stations were as follows :—
pulls 136, bucks 37, rams 29 and
boars 50, making a total of 252 for
the month,

Botanical

Economic Tree rvropagation and
Distribution

Ninety lime, 50 Sbhaddock and

12 citron trees were budded du-

ring the month. Fruit trees de-

livered from Codrington were as



follows: —
Orange .....seeereeeee - 30
Grapefruit ws eee te 12
Pomelo «.....-.seeereee 2
Breadfruit .....sssesee 2
Golden apple 3
LAO. cievee ec vd ll
Mandarin ee 2
PROP. ist 4 5c 9
GUAGE «05 cts aes eee 2
FTAP] cee seve eeeeeee . 1
TOE) (oo le cece ee nviens 74
Coconuts © ......see2++++ 759
Distribution of Ornamental

Plants. One hundred and thirty-
six ornamental plants of different
species were distributed.

Afforestation. In addition to the
above, fifty-four casuarina trees
were distributed.

Entomological

Control of Moth Borer, | Field
work was carried out on D. sac-
charalis moth egg deposition in
fields, and on extent of parasitism
by Trichogramma. Very few dead
hearts or D. saccharalis eggs are
as yet apparent, .

The normal mass breeding of
Trichogramma has been _ inter-
fered with this year by large scale
invasion of ants from unexpected

By GERALD SCHEFF

State board can claim any credi*
for such enterprise.

Twenty-seven other countries
have looked to Britain for their
merchant ships. One third of the
tonnage building is for foreign
owners. Norway has. ordered
1,000,000 tons of shipping frem us
since 1945,

British shipowners, with war
losses replaced, are proceeding
with plans te rejuvenate the ilcet
with the most seaworthy, econom-
ical and comfortable ships ever
built,

Among the merchantmen on
order are 27 vessels of more than
20,000 tons each.

Oil-tanker Rush

Greatest demand is for tankers.
An oil-hungry world is clamour-
ing for them.

One north-east coast yard is
building 24 tankers which on
average will be 6,000 tons larger
than the petrol-carriers of the
thirties,

A 32,000-ton tanker is likely to
be the largest ship launched in
Britain this year.

Finishing touches are being put

Neither the Government nor any to two new liners scheduled for

OUR READERS SAY
Closing down of City Dairies

though probably Dr. Carter, in the
Chair, approved of the vote of his

sources. This has been corrected |
and distribution of parasites to!
planters will start at the middle!
of Marca.

Factory counts of bored canes
were held up for one week by
rain, but results so far to hand
show a satisfactory low percentage
of drainage by moth borer.

During the previotis year ad-
vantage was taken of prevailing
wet conditions to re-introduce and
mass breed in the laboratory the
larval parasite Lixephaga diatraea,
Altogether 7,120 of these parasites
were liberated under favourable
conditions in cane fieldsy of which
total 3,635 were mated females
and the remainder were surplus
males.

A survey of the young plant
crop will be carried out later pn
when reaping is more advanced,
to ascertain whether the above
larval parasites can be recovered
in the field. y

Food Crops. Routine observa—
tions for incidence of insect pests

were carried out,

Introduced Parasites and Pre-
dators. A third field generation
of the cabbage worm parasite
Apanteles was found at Groves

Agricultural Station. That source
et supply has now gone and no
other area is known in whieh the
parasite could establish itself and
show. such successful field ye
coveries,

The parasite AgYa_ trinitatus
which controls Aspidiotus scale on
coconut trees has been recoveyea
in numbers and it is undoubtedly
established here. Another very
Jarge coccinellid predator was also
found in numbers; this predator
was not found hefore 1950 and
may well be one of the introdyec-
tions made from Trinidad. =

No recoveries were made of
white fly parasites or other in-
troduced parasites or predators:

Root Borer, Laboratory experi-
ments with new “poisons, which,
if properiy distributed throughout
the soil are known to kill root
borer and brown hard back grubs
before serious damage can be
inflicted by them on growing cane,
has shown that under local condi-
tions these materials do not
inhibit or in any way damage the
growth of cane setts planted in
12 inch pots. in ‘sterilized soil.
Also pulverized coral ‘stone mixed
with the soil at the rate of 600
pounds to the atte has so far
caused no ill effects, On the
other hand, dipping cane setts in
a mud slurry containing con-
centrated’ poisons. which could
not economically be distributed
throughout the soil has completely
inhibited growth in all of the 20
pots so treated, The setts dug up
for examination after 2 months
—ere not dead and the eyes ap-
peared normal. The variety used,
however, namely B.41211 has
given similar examples in two or
three of the control pots, one sett
springing 2 months after being
planted,

Control of Woed Ants, Four
Government buildings and four
private buildings were examined
during the month; also one ship-

in the packing cases. ;
Mosaic.

Mosaic Disease of Sugar Cane
Owners and occupiers of land are
reminded.that the first inspection
of the young cane crop for this
disease should take place during
the month of March, _ The neces-
sary return forms ¢an be obtained
from the Department of Agricul.
ture, t



Britain’s Ships Lead The World

More Vessels At Sea Than AtiyoneeEven America

maiden voyages in April and

May.
One, Furness
cruises. The other the £3,500,900
liner Oronsay is ‘for the Aus-
tralian run. paw J
She will have’ more tourist
space, with fares as low as £59,
a ‘dining-room and playdeck for
“children only,” and a mast con-
taining a radar-scanner on the
bridge.

Fewer Coal-fired

New liners-are to fit anti-sea-
sickness _stabilisers—hull __pro-
jecting fins which reduce ships’
roll in heavy weather.
device will convert sea
into drinking water. y

Oil-burning motorships — will
form 80 per cent of the new
ships. Fewer coal-fired steamers
are being built tham ever.

But there will be no “jet” ships
Such engines were tried out and
discarded at sea before airplanes
were invented.

Most of Britain’s newest snips
will cost £1,000,000 each. And
ships of the future will have only
ene funnel. Bow figure-heads of
ancient days are returning to add
grace and beauty,

new
water

—L.E.S.

een een ee tA TT

such ‘conditions
cases, and

- Bozorgmehr,

exist. in. other
would of course be



The Murdered Prime Minister

‘| AM AFRAID OF NO ONE’

By JOHN GODLEY

FOR ten days I stayed in Resht on the
Caspian Sea as the guest of General Haji Ali
Razmara (assassinated in Teheran a few days
ago) at the time of his unexpected nomina-
tion as Premier of Persia.

I asked him if he feared assassination. He
replied: “Never. If you are afraid all the
time you cannot work. I am afraid of no
one.”

Even then it was whispered in Teheran
that his life was in danger. He had many
enemies, who feared his power. :

Britain has lost a good and powerful frien
by his death, After his nomination as
Premier he was attacked by the minority
Opposition as the “stooge of Britain and
America,”

NO STOOGE

He was a friend of the West and opposed
to Communism, but he was nobody’s stooge.

His interest was only in Persia. He knew
he could not afford to oppose. Russia openly.
Russian troops were concentrated along the
frontier, and there were no British forces
within 2,000 miles, But he determined to
maintain the independence of Persia against
constant Soviet pressure.

Under the Treaty of Friendship signed be-
tween Russia and Persia in 1921, Russia was
entitled under certain circumstances .to
occupy Persia. This shadow was always be-
hind Razmara.

Occupation of Persia would give Russia a
common frontier with Pakistan, Iraq, Tur-
key, and Afghanistan. It would also cut
Britain off from the Persian Gulf oilfields.

A BULWARK
Razmara was the chief bulwark against the
Red tide.
Razmara, when I met him, was no politi-
cian, but Chief of the Imperial General Staff.
I was introduced to him through Esfandiar

was murdered.

I learned that he might soon be nominated
Prime Minister and I cabled the information
to the Sunday Express.

My cable was read, of course, by the Per-
sian censors, and next day all the papers
in Teheran carried a denial that there were
“any possibilities” of a change in Govern-
ment, Eight days later the Shah sent for Raz-
mara.

Razmara worked a 14-hour day. He was

on the move all the time.
Every Thursday he visited his father, who
is 110.

FOR UNITY t

He received me in the office of his summer
residence at Tajrish, in the hills outside

Teheran.

One could sense the strong personality of

the man.

I asked him if he was encountering oppo-
sition, and he replied: “There is always oppo-
sition to anyone, but I do not think it is seri-

ous. I hope I can unite the country.
“I know those in authority all over the

country, and I believe they have confidence

in me.

“Our foreign policy is very clear. Persia is
: small country, despite her strategic and

Withy “Ocean economic importance. She wants to keep her;
Monarch, is designed for =

He told me that the combined army and
gendarmerie totalled only 150,000. “It is
only sufficient for the security and integrity
of the country,” he added.

ON COMMUNISTS

“It is hard to estimate the strength of the

Communist Fifth Column here. The number

of real Communists is very small indeed —

probably not more than a thousand.
_ “But there are many people who are out of
work and many who are very poor. For this
reason they have sympathy for the Commun-
ists.

“Tf, as we hope, we can find work for every-
one, the number of Communist sympathisers
will at once dwindle rapidly.”

Thus spoke the friend of Britain who was
buried on Thursday. The Shah will not easily
replace him.

Without Razmara Persia may slip back
into weakness and vacillation.

\ ! —L.ES.

the big dairy van from a distance
would not, could not, do.



assistant director of propa-
ganda, who was by Razmara’s side when he

Last July I wrote: “Razmara has
energy and vitality enough to reach just as

ment of tea and one of shoes; preat an age.”
examined for Indian wood : 8

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951



PENCILS FOR EVERYONE

Y



Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE







Will Our Customers please Note
that We will not be open for Bus-
iness on SATURDAY, 24th March
1951, and arrange their Shopping
accordingly.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES: 4472, 4687, 4251, 4413.

INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD.

THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS
PAINTING REQUIREMENTS

INSIDE and OUT.



For the protection and beautification of

your _ property, we offer

can you

the following

WALL PAINTS

“PROPELLER” DRY DISTEMPER (for exterior walls).
Supplied in powder form to be mixed with fresh water
— $6.10 per 4 cwt. drum.

“LAGOMATT” FLAT OIL PAINT (for interior walls)
Supplied ready mixed; can be repeatedly washed — $7.12
per Imperial gallon.

-_—

Fae best poral the following instructions should be carefully

Exterior Walls,

1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least

2 an before painting.’ Then apply 2 coats of “PROPEL-

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with a mixture of plaster-
of- Paris and “PROPELLER,” afterwards treating these
patches with 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL” CEMENT
aaee PRIMER, Then apply 2 coats of “PRO-

Interior Walls.

1. For new work, allow the surface to dry out for at least
ose before painting, Then apply 2 coats of “LAGO-

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with plaster-of-Paris, after-
wards treating these patches with 1 coat of “INTERNA-
TIONAL” CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, Then
apply 1 coat of “LAGOMATT” if the surface was previ-
ously of the same shade; or 2 coats of “LAGOMATT” if
of a different shade. :

TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED,



DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acents




JUST A FEW
HOURS .... THEN
EASTER





To Tne Editor, The Advocate—

- SIR,—Will you permit some-
thing more to be said, even yet,
on this very controversial and
long-drawn-out subject, although
it was decided at the Board of
Health meeting last week to en-
force the 1948 Regulations and
remove all dairies from Bridge-
town’s “Extended limits’’-—even
though in some places there is
room to spare,

I think there are a good many
people, in addition to the dairy
owners, who regret that the re-
commendation of the Committee
appointed to investigate and advise
on the matter was rejected, namely
“that the situation should be re-
viewed in the light of additional
facts and because of substantial
opposing circumstances,” and they
very much wish that a compro-
mise should still be reached,

May I try to sum up the pros
and cons for the point of view of
those who ere not so much con-
cerned for logic and consistency
as for practical issues and com-
munity benefits.

1, The decision was reached by
a vote of 3 to 2, not a very con-
vincing or decisive conclusion,

brother medicos; who constituted
two thirds of the small majority.
But thus the’ Board’ turhed back
from its attitude in appointing the
Committee, and _ rejecting its
advice.

2. Mr. Kidney and Mr. Goddard
presented substantial reasons for
review, and presumably for the
provisions of a licensing system,
like that operating for pig-keep-
ing.

They pointed out that the eleven
dairies, large and small, still car-
rying on, furnish milk-hungry
people, many of them children,
with upwards of 400 pints daily,
And it may be added that there is
not readily apparent -eany~ source
from which that logs could be
made good.

Now that is a matter of very
considerable importance. The com-
munity is already suffering from
a great shortage of this vital com-
modity, and we do not .want, T
judge, to import more powdered
substitute.

The two Committee members
also pointed out, naming especially
Mr. Hill’s Holborn Dairy, that all
possible hygienic and sanitary re-
quirements were provided, But

strictly enforced if a licensing sys-
tem were ‘arranged, Moreover,
closing down means ruin in some
cases, }

3. On thé'other hand, the Hon.
V. C. Gale, ‘the other lay member
of the Committee, spoke strongly
about the injustice to the large
number of proprietors who gave
heed to the regulations and moved
out their dairies in good time. To
make exceptions or compromise
now would be very unfair to them,
said he,

Now we all know that “fair play
is a very precious jewel.” But it
is possible for very special cir-
cumstances to justify compromise
in the publje interest, And “two
wrongs do not make a right.”

4. It has been urged on my
attention by one of the smaller
proprietors ‘that, being conveni-
ently situated and equipped, he is
able to act as a retailer to poor
people who eannot afford a regular
supply of milk. Through his dis-
tributor he sells them a gill or a
half pint when they have the
necessary pence, and so helps
them to make palatable and more
nourishing the morning or night
“sweet water,” “This, I suppose,

Finally, Mr, Editor, there were
two points in your leading article
last Friday which were, I submit,
mistaken and should be corrected.

, Here is the first; “It is impossi-
ble for either the dairy keeper or

-Sanitary authority to direct the

flight of a fly, and so there can
be no protection for food or health
when the breeding ground is in the
midst of a residential area.”

I have had considerable experi-
ence of stock keeping, and it is
quite possible to keep cow-pens
and yards as clean and sanitary as
any other premises. “That is up to
the sanitary Inspector.

Here is the second: “Pigs can-
not be kept on the West side of
Culloden Road’’—or, in other
words, within the extended limits
of the city. ‘That is a slip up. By
the very wise licensing plan in-
stituted on “second thoughts”
when eviction was proposed, and
ven passed by the Legislature,
pig-keeping therein was approved,
and there were, according to Mr.
Merritt’s last Annual Report, be-
tween 1,600 and 1,700 parties so
licensed! That. works quite well.

INTERESTED ONLOOKER.
Other letters on page 8.~

”



eta
and

Wein ty

Gold Braid Rum
Top Notch Rum



Dry Sack Sherry
Pale Nutty Sherry
Partner's Port
Cliquot Champagne

Prunier Brandy |

Phone GODDARDS

‘
Lord Culvert Whiskey
Scotch Whiskey

Schenley’s Whiskey ,

Segram’s Whiskey
Tubory Beer %

Guinness Stout

WE DELIVER

> yo >


FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951 : ea



Larceny As A Bailee

1 a
VERNON CARMICHAEL (25) of Whitehall, St. Mi- MR. AND. MRS. Carl F. Tauch and Mr. and Mrs. whether they are bound to prose- | Mr. Mottley successful baking eee
chael, was sentenced to 9 months’ imprisonment at the Joseph H. Boyd who arrived here on Wednesday in Se ee ee oe aan eae fed Sees ger Bg
Court of Grand Sessions yesterday when an Assize Jury engined Beachcraft left yesterday for Martinique. ae eo _——" oe ae? ie Ry Fp aerlpg ————
found him guilty of larceny as a bailee. : ' The Beachcraft which carries a crew of two and three sodnieaies oars oe "being that Sabon " revinus eemulation
_. His Honour, Sir Allan Collymore, Chief Justice. pre- passengers is the property of the U.S. Civil Aeronautics either may prosecute. had allowed a dairy owner t
sided, are oe 7 Reece, K.C., Attorney General, Administration The Commissioners came to that keep cows if the per . were
rosecuted on behalf of the Crown. i ; ae . decision on the motion of Mr. certain distance from the neares
Sspoueaned Carmichael} wee er 8 ss Mr. Tauch is an Aviation Safety Agent and is Super- A. R. Toppin at their meeting residence. The present regula
Carmichael was charged on vising Agent of the U.S. Civil Aeronautics Administration. yesterday. Mr. E. D. Mottley tions made no sych allowance

three alternate counts and was

convicted on the first cont of lar-



Shopkeeper

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Will Serve 9 Months For W.1. Will Have Chance To Get
U.S. Aviation Certificates





His headquarters are in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mr. Boyd

is Chief of Communications

Operations of the same organ-





COMMISSIONER
MAY PROSECUTE

THE Commissioners of Health

will seek legal advice to find out

had previously made a motion that
as they had gone into the Bridge-

OF HEALTH

omens

the number had beer é

That dairies shoild be a specified
distance from the nearest resi

i P tion from every dence was, to his mind, a fair wa
ceny as a bailee of 50 bags of isation. ———— a » town dairy ques’ r .
eo iat t of view, they of going about it
balanced animal feed to the value The party left San Juan on s practical point | » the) g Hi :

2 rf ~s . could not see their way to bring Mr Toppin said _ that
Sethecee "Goten’ Venere Lae Gets 3 Months aaa wrist wee ad Price Control cases against dairy owners who appeared to him from the lav
having tedcdeedly Meee tok agi ganda he Wednesday ‘Toy Re rt R - t d still operated. ny = = that the ree have t
same to his own use. Sentence of three months’ im- left Barbados yesterday afternoon po ejyec e ever, gave the right to the Board remove. Could they then ru

The offence was committed on

October 16, 1950 in the parish of
St. Michael.

prisonment was yesterday passed
on Elizabeth King, a shopkeeper
of Tudor Street, by His Honour

for Martinjque and Guadeloupe,
and will arrive in Puerto Rico

THE Report of the Price Con-
irol Committee has been examined

of Health to prosecute, they could
prosecute if they wished .
Mr. Toppin questioned whether

over the existing law?
If they did not issue
and a dairy owner continued t

licence

; : , to-morrow after a brief stop at in the light of the present and they as commissioners could sell milk, he would be committin

Summing Up the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Col- St, Martin potential world situation te w 3 ’ "They seek leg:

i x as re- ally f t rosecute whep a breach. They should seek leg:

The Chief Justice, in summing lymore for receiving stolen goods They told the Advocate that See hedk a eee : t ehteenee aio

up to the jury, said that if they

plie Wh the C ‘ o ‘i PM tag he thought
\ y a 7 plies , ereas e ‘ommittee The ommissioners reachec Mr. Motiley decided to postpon
intended convicting the accused; Soeacttenanien yon: s the that many West Indians through- nad reasonably assumed that as this temporary decision when (his motion and allow the bommis 8 Tury
they would have had to convict Mr. G. H. Ada sg erday. out the Caribbean were strongly time advanced, there would be they were discussing what action |sioners to seek legal cdvice. STRep FOop PR A D
him on one of three counts. The eq of lehear ae Who appear- desirous of having a U.S. aero- likely to be some recession both should be taken in connection p = SIRMine ees pene
counts were (1) larceny as a bailee His Honour to exe Sees Saeed nautical certificate, whether it im prices and in supplies, inter- with the decision of the Board ot SOSSOOOSOO POOF FOPOOSD eee
(2) fraudulent conversion (3) lar- He said that she a ee be pilots, mechanics, control National —_ developments have Health in respect to the remova) c
ceny. sets E vas not the most tower operators, despatchers, par- resulted in increasing price of dairies from the city limits. GET YOUR Sra.

a guilty in this affair and consider- : 4

He said that the accused had

addressed them stating that the
50 bags of feed were delivered to
the Barbados Cotton Factory. If
they believed that that was true,
he said, the accused was not guilty.
Similarly, if they had a reason-
able doubt about the witness and
if they felt that the case was not

some time between September 30

ation should be given as she is the
mother of young children.

His Honour before passing sen-
tence told King that the jury had
found her guilty of receiving
Stolen property and the quantity
of goods was large. He said that
it grieved him to see her in that
position. It was a bad case and



their office in San Juan was aware

achute packers, ete, Their visit
through the islands was a famil-
jiarisation tour and provided local
response was good enough they
would probably be returning
through this area in about three
months’ time, when licences would
be issued after an examination,
Applications stating qualifications

gards commodity prices and sup-

trends. It is obvious also that a
restriction in the production of
commodities for civilian purposes
will be maintained until there is
some sustained improvement in
world affairs and in supplies.

In these circumstances, Govern-
ment considers it would be
inappropriate to implement the

they had the power to do so,

Motion Postponed
Mr Mottley postponed his |
motion which will be considered!
again when the Commissioners
get advice as to whether they are!

bound to prosecute or not
The Chairman, Mr. J. M. Kid-
ney, reviewing the decisions which
Had been reached when the |

EASTER EGGS

At WEATHERHEAD'S

Nestle’s Chocolate Egg im




~





Pastry and bicmts
rn








CENTURY Baking Powder
makes you

For lighter, more

PAGE SEVEN















Casket 11/- each '
recom ations a a a sa Nestle’s Chocolate Eggs @ f

proved to their satisfaction, he it was the duty of the Court not CUld be forwarded to local Civil Raat Tus, ~~ a Board of Health and the Commis- ’ 27e., 50c., $1.20, $2.00 ea. sure of success:
was not guilty. only to see that justice was done “V¥iation authorities who in turn that the proposal for distributors SOPeTs of Health disc ee a Fry's Chocolates in Plastic .

He outlined the case for the in every case, but to see people Would send thei to their head- to levy a service charge for retail, T°TOV"l, of Ses Tron ore 12 Ege @ $1.22 & $2.00 ea
prosecution, stressing the point were protected and also shop- Tarters in Puerto Rico, which deliveries has been implemented tein "had fl wally ye ied. that S Fry’s Marzipan & Choe, Exe
that it was significant that the keepers, was Civil Aeronautics Adminis- by some retailers as from the 1st ae ‘he ~ Ane y ducted ; na x in.thes. Cun-d00. ea.
accused on that particular day was ins tration P.O. Box 4764, San Juan, of March, 1951. ets th once cadets oy Am

He also drew to the jury’s at-

ernment is not prepared to increase

should be made and it then meant

Fry’s Marzipan & Choc, Egg

ery for .



+ of r Ser re) \999999969069999956999999959665" OPPS POPS OOOSTOSS
earning his living by driving a Will S Th Puerto Rico. = The Equalisation Account will eae ae ee ek a 30c. ea. x re ee ee ee ne 3
lorry, and was paid by the trip. F, Hous aa Years hi Expensive poutine — within its available 4. make recommendations and it Duck Carriage with Choe. % ‘ s
30 Bags Extra or House-Break r. Tauch’ said that | West balances — 19 make minor price was"tventuslly, sugsesten to the|® ERE 4/6 ¢4 * HARRISON'S
Yet he (the accused) was in- MacDonald Bishop, a Brie Indians found it very expensive adjustments but until further in- Board of Health Tent amenities Also Easter Eggs @ 20c,, & % BROAD ST.

sistent on placing an extra 50 of Government Hill, St. Michael, t© C0me to Puerto Rico to obtain formation regarding the present should be made to the existing 36e. ea x ¥
bags of feed on the top of 120 bags Was yesterday sentenced to three * licence, so in order to help -— rom: gy financial condition of regulations. The Board, however, : Also :- / Sena

to make one trip rather than years’ imprisonmept by His Hon- them, _his. organisation would Commission agents, wholesalers had decided that no amendment Fresh Delicious Confection- x %
making two trips, our the Chief Justice Sir Allan 8°24 him down to give them the 8nd shopkeepers is available, Gov— s

tention the fact that never before
had feed been sent from the
mixing depot at Da Costa & Co.,

«
a aa tat or nea, che meeting was to decide * sst. Ch @ $1.12 x 938 & >. ;
Ltd. to the Barbados Cotton Fac- tober 1 and 4 broke into the house Teturned from attending a joint following Vtseact SOME ASCs whether they as Commissioners,|® FTES Mor Chee. G $s $1.93 $2.18 only $2.48 pair
aes e oa of William Atki 3i at Durricane conference in Miami {0loWing increases in world 4). the Board of Health should , x each r
tory by any truck which had other ‘Atkinson situated at 5 n fam! prices. + gal Cadbury's Asst. Choe. @ %
=: Rockley, Christ Church, and stole Which opened on March 7th. : . prosecute. j .
deliveries of feed to make at that ; , stole : es : Government will give further : 5/- & 9/- box p
aame tine articles to the value of $141:12, Ccmmunications for the coming consideration to the conan Mr. Mottley said that the Large Boxes of Fry's Choc > COU NTER
There ‘wate dinerepaticted a fac Fitzgerald Lovell, who was al- hurricane season were being representations: of Pathe ere - question of removal had been ba. bi cn ’ x
as the evidence of the delivery of ed to be associated with Bishop checked. He recalled the services the first instance it is proposed Drought forcibly to him when he Meltis Favourite Candies @ } | %
as o nea, Pleaded guilty of receiving stolen the different governments in this to examine the comparative per- 22° been acting Chairman for $1.02 & $1.85 box F % JACOB'S PATTERN—with Solid Brass Pan, Tare Bar and
we esi wet dart ae goods and was sentenced to 18 area were able to give their or- centage of profits as Parades tHe Mr. Kidney. Discussing it from : :

The evidence was as follows.

Tickets Issued
George Roach, a clerk of the

Collymore at the Court of Grand
Sessions for house-breaking and
larceny.

Bishop sometime between Oc-

months’ imprisonment with hard
eer Both of them had nothing
Oo say.

opportunity. This was a recip-
rocal agreement beiween the U.S.
and British Governments.

Mr. Boyd said that he had just

ganisation last year, due to close
co-operation and working agree-
ment which had been established.
Everyone knew how important

the margin of profits, resulting in
a further increase in the price of
food and other supplies which is

commission “agents, the whole.
salers and the shopkeepers.



that either the Board or the
Commissioners, as the Act stated,
could prosecute.

every practical point of view, the
Board came to the conclusion that
a joint committee of the Board and
the Commissioners should be

BASTER

Black Magic Choc. $4.06 box

Nestle’s Choc, @

Meltis Coffee Choc.
Creams @ $1.23 box

Fry's Princess Choc. @

$1.19 box
Mint

Ode,

CHAMOIS LEATHERS

Selected Qualities

Weights

GARDEN SHEARS

8” Notched STEEL BLADES

Poise, Stamped ready for immediate use and complete with

—<— << . f 8

Barbados Cotton Factory said that Labourer Received communications were to hur- ST. LUCY ASSESSOR ep pointe to make recommenda- jae teen dione ee % "

on October 16 at about 1.30 p.m. Stolen Property ricane reconnaissance. Mr. Boyd TO BE APPOINTED ar ny box ; Soe x $28.14 each
he received 120 bags of balanced visited Barbados last June, and Dairies Visited

animal feed from one of M. L.
Harrison’s trucks. He issued tick
ets to the feed depot and the depot
in turn sent back theirs. He never
received 50 bags of feed on Oc-
tober 16, There were two loads

‘ ; . ade, Cadbury's Roses @ 3/9 & > ARIEL AND TIGER MODELS
of 120 bags each, brought in that sions of receiving stolen goods ee all the gays — hope Soins Mit ey, wee gee F The regulations allowed any $1.48 tin $ Each i el «
day. some time on December 21 and 31. re eturn soon for a _ Jonger Tike 1 dite er Ateme don. ihe peredd. to keep any wimbe of] % Cadbury's Red Rose @ 980 % cach in two sizes—12 and 14 inch
He did not see the accused on _ His Honour the Chief Justice *'8Y- Agenda. When the Vestry do meet cattle in any part of Bridgetown] ¥ & $1.80 box x PRICES RANGE FROM... .
October 16. . a pe Sent ony they will consider a suggestion by $0 long as that person did not] } aa oe 64c. tin ‘. x %
Clifford Carter said that he was S€n im to months’ im- © Fairfield & Mount Gay Ltd, in sell milk. One could keep cows|# Jacob's ream Crackers % | 9} °
a clerk at the mixing depot of prisonment to run concurrently in Travelling Bank connection with wa. Recthry: and give away milk, keep one or x $1.64 tin % ¥ $38.19 to $46.18 each
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. On October €ach case and consecutively with . someone will be elected to the two cows and sell milk; but|% Meltis Royal Princess Asst. $)% : J 3
16 about 9 a.m. the accused came & Sentence of 12 months which he Does Good Business office of assessor; there will be a could not keep more than two % $1.85 box » x Complete with GRASS BOX
in the depot driving a truck. He iS now serving for ani offence for discussion on ownership tax in cOws and sell milk. } Fancy Biscuits in Cello Peks. &
Jeft the depot and came back with eon he was convicted in the The Travelling Office of the view of Sir John Maude’s Report; There were 11 dairies and 15] 10c. pk. %
a ticket for 50 bags of feed. The /ower court. Government Savings Bank has and consideration of advertising people who kept cows but did not § Fancy Biscusts in Airtight s >
accused also produced a ticket for SESSIONS just completed its fourth week for tenders for supplying grocer- come under the title of dairies, x Pks. 2/- pk $1 % CAST IRON p
120 bags of feed and he asked him ON visiting the _various sugar fac- ies, vegetables, fruit, fresh meat, The question then was reduced % Butler Scotch 2le. pk. & x -
why he was carrying 170 bags of WEDNESDAY NEXT tories in the island. Business done milk, ete., and the making of to whether the regulations were | ¢ 45e. tin SRAM): ic) CORA neon, Meat. us ie Se ethene tees ts ales
feed on the truck. The next sitting of the Court of during the week showed that clothing, and nurses’ uniforms for for hygienic purposes. In that x Mougat 34c. pk. & 7c. tin
The accused said that he was Grand Sessions will be on Wednes. there were 10 new accounts, 46 the Almshouse. case no cow owner should be % Royal Scotch Shortbread $
being paid for it. day, March 28. deposits and the amount of The Vestry will also consider allowed to keep cows in the city. | $ $1.36 tin %
George Agard, a labourer em- Sir Allan Collymore, Chief Jus- â„¢Oney received was $1,011,30. the advisability of asking the St. The committee, after reviewing

ployed by M. L. Harrison as 2
hand on one of his trucks, said
that the accused used to drive a
truck. On October 16, the accused
drove a truck to the feed depot for
feed,

Milton Miller, a labourer of My
Lord’s Hill, pleaded guilty yester-
day of receiving stolen property
valued at $70.25 on December 23
at the Court of Grand Sessions.
He was also found guilty previ-
ously at the Court of Grand Ses-

tice, when he adjourned the Court
yesterday said that early that day
he had released the waiting jurors
until Tuesday, March 27.

He, however, will be leaving the

, island on Tuesday, March 27, to

may visit Trinidad in May or June
to attend a hurricane conference,
sponsored by the Caribbean Com-
mission.

Both Mrs. Tauch and Mrs, Boyd
thought Barbados was the pret-



A comparison of the business
done during the past four weeks
this year as compared with that
of the two previous years is as
follows: —

New Deposits Amount

THE St. Lucy Vestry meeting,
which was fixed to be held at the
Vestry Rooms yesterday afternoon,
was postponed until a later date.

The meeting was called by Mr,
C. H. Yearwood, Churchwarden,

Peter’s Vestry to concur in the
remodelling of the hospital known
as Farres and making the same
suitable for use as a joint Isola-
tion Hospital for the two parishes,

They will also consider giving

They realised that the enforce
ment of the law would create a
hardship. After several meetings, |
visits to the dairies and accepting’
of the advice of the Chief Inspec. (
tor, their recommendations they

the whole situation suggested to
the Board of Health that some
effort should be made to amend
the Act, not only with the view
of helping the people who still
had their dairies in Bridgetown,



Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc. 2/-,
* 3/9 & $1.79 box

x Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc. @
% 8/- tin

§ Cadbury’s Milk Tray @ 3/9
% & $1.48 tin

Mars Bes 14, ea >
Crest Bars 16¢. ea. %
For the Best of |. . %
“EASTER EGGS”
& “Confectionery”

PRD sid

OA AA
At AA hgh ALIA LILLIA FIFI FP FOL L LLL ECPI LLL AAAAALA
4,

RANSOMES’ LAWN MOWERS



ENAMELLED BATHS

RECTANGULAR SHAPE—5S’ 6”

OVERALL

Complete with TAPS, OVERFLOW and WASTE FITTINGS

’ +50 : Accounts assistance to the sexton to combat but with a view to making the
Pay a Read Car Seni ator it ae cot aan ms = ie ea ashes from the factory during the law more reasonable, That, at the only $109.91 each
of fe rom ¢ a @ : ? ae ’ .80 3 i revi se ime y o 2
at the feed depot. While on the ve nen fe start a case on.that day, j95) "56 198 4'639.20 canines with revenue same time, would prevent the
1e . '.

way the accused left 50 bags of
feed at the old Y.M.C.A. and
carried in 120 bags to the Factory.
He gave the order to one Parris,

x
Jerk of the Cotton Factory NO FILM SHOWS What is the sealcott t beet first got out, there were 68 dairy Head of Broad St. . . TEL. 2364
ac - To-night, being Good Friday Over 20,000 paper f Port- ° eal price o: -ef owners in Bridgetown, but since PRCA eee *t = Z
Returned For Feed night, there will be no film show lend Gamnent ts neh. end may well be asked by anyone who then until the present ‘time, there EE LLLP LLLP ALLA ALAA A MD

Adter. the accused left the Cot-
ton Factory, he returned for the
50 bags of feed at the Y.M.C.A.
and he helped him to load the feed
on to the lorry. He drove from
there and went to the corner of
Pine Road where he talked to a
lady in a shop. He shortly came
out of the shop and carried ten
bags into the same shop.

They left there and went to
Cole’s Garage where they bought
some gas, before driving off to
Spooners Hill. He left 20 bags at

He adjourned the court
until Wednesday.



at the British Council, ‘Wake-
field,” for adults. The Advocate
was also informed that the usual
Saturday morning show for chil-
dren will not take place to-mor-
row morning.

ON EDUCATION BOARD

The Advocate learnt yesterday
that Rev. A. E. Armstrong has
been invited to become a member
of the Education Board and that
he has accepted.







Cement Comes

yesterday from England by the
Harrison liner S.S. Statesman.

The Statesman began discharg-
ing her cargo shortly after her
arrival and is expected to spend
a few days in Barbados.

Supplies of sausages, shredded
wheat, confectionery, ground oat-
meal, milk powder, table jelly,
ovaltine, wine, gin, canned goods
and biscuits were also brought by
her to the island,

The Statesman is consigned to
Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd.





What Price, Beef?

enters the Public Market to get a
supply.

It was stated a short while ago
‘that the price had risen from 36
to 38 cents per pound, Some
butchers are now charging 40
cents and the surprised housewife
more often than not buys. Many
ask, however: “Is this the latest
price or are we being overcharg-
ed?”



"Gascogne” Brings 18
From ULK.

Board from being laughed at,

Formerly 68 Dairies
The Hon. V. C. Gale said that
when the Dairy Regulations were

were only 11 in the prohibited
area. Faced with the provisions
of the law, the majority took the
trouble to remove their dairies
Were they then to condone those
who had refused to comply with
the law and give them prefer
ential treatment?

To argue that those who obeyed
the law had to be penalised ana
those who flouted it should be
taken into their bosoms was one
sided and unfair argument if
such were maintained, they would

Eighteen passengers arrived S009 come to a fine state of

a shop there. The accused then : here yesterday by the French liner ®{Tairs.
drove to Green Hill and left the Qperpriced Fish S.S. Gaseogne, which sailed for The General Board of Health
rest of the feed there. NO FISH the West Indies from Le Havre via Were the Health authorities of
Police Constable Arthur Jes- Fifty - two - year - old Edith i! dees elie. ether ables Sadar England. Barbados and they, rightly or

samy said that on October 21 at
about 10.40 a.m., he went to the
residence of the accused in Green
Hill and talked with him. He told
the accused that he was suspected
of receiving 50 bags of feed from
the feed mixing depot on October
16, and failing to deliver the
same, The accused made a vol-
untary statement which he took
down in writing. On October 26
he arrested the atcused on a war-
rant which was issued to him at
the Central Police Station.

Millar of Dalkeith Hill, St. Mi-
chael was yesterday fined 30/- in
14 days with an alternative of
one month’s imprisonment when
she was found guilty by Mr. C, L,
Walwyn, City Police Magistrate,
of selling fish at a greater price
than scheduled.

Millar sold C. D. Harristhree
and a half pounds of dolphin for
$1.05, when the scheduled price
of this fish is twenty-six cents a
pound. The incident occurred on
Wednesday evening,

opeâ„¢ CAP

THE WHOLE FAMILY

® LEAVES BODY FRESH,

SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN

@ MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR



day several housewives were in
the Public Fish Market peering
eagerly out to sea for any fishing
boat that might be on its way to
the shore. There was none in sight
but they continued to wait. Pecu-
liarly enough, a few yards away
was a vendor of shark and dolphin
who spared no pains in making
his presence known. He attracted
little attention. Presumably the
housewives nearby—or their hus-
bands—had no liking for such
fish.






HELP

- NOW! Dental Science Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO

The Gascogne also had on board
11 intransit passengers, She left
port some hours after her arrival
for Trinidad. Her agents are
Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.

Engineer Appointed

His Excellency the Governor has
been notified that the Secretary oi
State for the Colonies has approv-
ed of the appointment of Mr. J.
C. Kellman, 2nd Assistant to the
Colonial Engineer to be Assistant
Colonial Engineer.





STOP

wrongly made certain regulations.
They as the Commissioners could
not fly in the face of the regula-
tions made by the Board.

In any case if these owners did
not get licences they could be
prosecuted and it would be their
duty as commissioners to prose-
cute,

Mr.
some

Toppin said that he saw
wisdom in the arguments

|of Mr. Mottley as to whether the

regulations were for the purpose
of hygiene. As it was, there were

'68 dairies and since that time,



| Will be CLOSED for
STOCK-TAKING

;
OUR DRUG STORE
3

WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED

EEG OOOO OOS PAE

2
BRUCE

Same styles

|
Black Patent |





LIRR e

SSSI BODO Op ne

SPOS OPIS PPPS SPSS FOP

o

aad Toes,
Sizes 7 to 10.

Lave 5





SOARES

HARRISON’







Platform Soles,

» 2hto-l







HARDWARE DEPT.



Very Smart Styles with Closed and Open Backs

si sWiidhs tities tre alk V4 wid $6.83 & $6.13
bhia sk eh y hes 4b saned $6.67 & $7.37

hepherd & Co., Ltd.

1, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

ORDER
THESE
TO-DAY







|

e

TOOTH

: Cece cate eeeees
SEBS




DECAY



PPLE ID DDR Rp
POR
ODD D ID pe
PELL PLL




LPPLL LALA PDD OOF >
LOOSE LE LL



GORGONZOLA CHEE yer Ib. ., . . $1.08
a n on Wednesday March 2th PORT SULUT CHEESE- jae ib aes
AVAILABLE !! w LUNCHEON CHEESE—per Ball $1.2
oa s ! | The DISPENSING Department {)} coups curese new $1.08
PU Er re re) || Wibe OPENED co umal || acer oe. nies
. > : . 3 3 DANNISH TINNED HAMS 214, ibs., 44 Ibs., & lbs 12 lbs
|S See tee Pee GCF Pregbtiptions 716. 5c.0 nau ative nacon RAcAsel wondapEcen
sPOULTRY CHOWS=s g of Prescriptions | | ch" abi no
a s : be ae
pi. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors. 2 , KNIGHTS LT). —PHOENIX PHARMACY i i STANSFELD. SCOTT & Co. Lid. ‘
Seeauagg = =) @ @ s = e e id » Wiiccisseeccint SOLOS EEO Vrorenmneennnerinnt ntti bbb tt ett ttt ttt tttettt tlt tet tener ey














BARBADOS



PAGE EIGHT
OUR READ » SAY:
Fosrv ADERS SAY:
Ts Rait The cate— -
SIt we ain in connection Criticism Of S.P.C.A. has to ask why the regulation
n E ites reference has To Thée Editor, The Advocate were not made to apply t
et ct SIR,—My attention has been whole of the populated a
‘ e A imes drawn to the adverse criticism of te_Island
18 me t B ados the S.P.C.A. made in the House «f (5) HW the regulation aol
"5 Assembly recently made for the purpose otf controll
May I inform the public that 8 the fiy nuisance and the dang
; The wil g up of reserves b> our Chief Inspector - gives cl¢se of the causing of disease, ther
limited ility ‘companies haS attention to the condition of qe say the regulations should be e
been. refe d to as sagacious and animals swaiting slaughter at tn forced and should be mete to
snatogous aaa catiet ond wathave avai PBN to til Dairies rected with
May I venture to suggest that for and obtained from Col and the regulations should be ex
this Government policy is based Michelin extra police patrols on 1} 7 ied to cover the keeping of all
on a fundamental mistake and, Fridays and Saturdays. The snimals including Race Horse
despite some .similarities, the structurai shortcomings of the {% 2

analogy is clearly false.

The mistake lies in looking on
Government as something apart
from the Community, as if it
stood on its own financial feet
separate from the economic life
of Barbados, and had _ interests
differing from and perhaps ad-
verse. to- those of the community.
In reality Government is just a
part, exercising many necessary
functions, and perhaps some that
are less essential, all of which are
paid for with money drawn from
the cOmmunity by taxation, If
reserves are to be built up more
money must be drawn from the
community than is needed to pay
for government.

Does the taking of this addi-
tional amount from the commu-
nity in fact strengthen the finan-
cial position if hard times come?
I don’t think so on the contrary,

it is not even just a matter of
transferring money from the
pocket to another, which, if it
did no good, might not do any
particular harm, The mischief
lies in taking money from there

it can be put to work and placing

it in the Government's hands
where, .at best, it will lie more
or less sterile. The Parable of

the Talents still carries a lesson
that it would be well to keep in
mind. This idea of taking away
and locking up substantial sums
of money. seems particularly
hurtful, wheh, owing to increased
costs and expenses, business
needs so much more money to
finance it.

There are other objections. For
instance, the greater the amount
20 set aside, the greater is apt to
be the cost of looking after it.
The talent is not only buried; but
watchmen have to be paid to
guard it. Also, the existence of
any considerable fund, not tight-
ly tied to a specific purpose, will
be a standing temptation to ex-
travagance. Further, now-a-days
when the purchasing power of
money, that is, its real value, is
steadily dwindling, and when the
danger of inflation still causes
concern, it seems doubtful wis-
dom to plan to keep iarge sums
unemployed indetinitely

May I add a comment on the
analogy? It is undoubtedly sound
policy for a company to build up
reserves, and to do so does in-
crease that company’s financial
strength and its ability to weath-
er hard times. For that company,
if it should need money, can
look only to its own resources and
credit, it cannot make a levy on
its shareholders, Government's
position is very different; if it
needs money the community is
taxed to provide it, Therefore
while the company can rely only
on itself, Government can draw
on the taxable capacity of the
community. This is the reserve
that Government should seek to
build up. Much can be done to
encourage sound and_ careful
business principles, to foster
thrift and to stimulate suitable
enterprizes. Government also
might set a useful example by
care to eliminate waste, which is
not only harmful at the time but
does greater and lasting injury
by being habit-forming.

A sound, seaworthy ship, well
vared for and well navigated,
should be able to face bad
weather with reasonable confi-
dence,

x

Colleton,
St, Peter,

E, SHEPHERD.

een











AFRICAN MIXT

Colours the Hait instantly.

Available in 4 handy sizes
Obtainable from

DRUG








—for
longer
life

LASTING SAFETY

~ DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING

COMPANY

(ECKSTEIN

NO MORE GREY HAI

{t Is absolutely what Is professed of it:
A GENUINE HAIR COLOURING

BOOKER’S (Barbados

STORES LTD.
BROAD STREET, BRIDGETOWN
Manufactured by E. FLOUTIER LTD., Stanmore, Middlesex, Eng. Estd. 1889

DUNLOP rorrt

CAR TYRES



At present some of these stables
both in the Garrison and else
where are within twenty-five to
thirty feet of built up areas, the
fnanure pens of such horses pro-
vide a greater breeding place for
flies than do the Cow pens.

In conclusion the enforcemen*
of these regulations will work a
great hardship on those poor per-
sons living within the Dairy areas
and further strain the hard cur-
rency which is needed to purchase
the expensive Milk powders.

Trusting that the Authorities
will take cognizance of these farts
and act fair by all.

Yours faithfully,

rlaughter-house have been inves-
tigated by Canon Moore, Mzgor
Foster and myself and represen-
tations have been made to the
Colonial Secretary on the matter

The overloading of draught
animals causes us great concern
and I would point out to our
critics that no statutory regula-
tions exist. in this island for de-
termining maximum loads. Many
members of our Society, as well
as our Inspectors, are constantly
stopping and advising cart-men
not only regarding this offence,
but also concerning defective
harness, badly balanced loads and
ill-fitting wheels.









In order to augment the POOR MAN.
ety sees ss Se canes Public Health Conference

readily acceded to our request to
award a prize annually to the
member of the force with the best
record for Animal Welfare, work,

There is no need for me to en-
croach further on your space ex-
cept to say that we welcome
CONSTRUCTIVE criticism, es-
pecially if it will lead to the en-
actment of legislation framed to
protect and increase the relatively
few privileges enjoyed by animals
in Barbados,

Yours truly,
CECILE WALCOTT,
Hon. Secretary, (Actg.),
Barbados S.P.C.A.
Dairies
To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—After reading what the
Board of Health said about the
Dairy Regulation and what Mr.
Hill has written to-day, one has to
ask oneself why the Dairy Regu-
lations were passed,

(1) Were they made for
purpose of improving
sanitation of the City.
Has any epidemic occurred
in the City, if so, has it
been caused by the keeping
of Cattle by Dairymen.
Have any of the Dairy-
keepers in the City been
prosecuted for breaches of
the Sanitary regulations.

Is it due to the over popu-
lation of the City.
Were the regulations made
for the purpose of the fiy
nuisance and danger of the
fly causing disease.

(1) They could not have been
made for the purpose of improving
the sanitation or the nuisance to
those persons who are called to
live in the vitinity of Cow Pens,
as if this were the case, one would
have expected that the keeping
of Cattle in all built up Areas
would have been completely pro-
hibited. But what do these Regu-
lations do, they prohibit Mr, BE. C.
Hill who has the most modern
dairy in the Island, standing on
a seven acre plot, at a distance
of over 160 feet from any other
building from keeping his dairy
but allows any person who desires
to keep a cow, for as they term
it their own use, to keep it in as

To che Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The Conference of Public
Health Officers recent'y held at
Queen’s Park House was an un-
bounded success. The Conference
opened on a high note and ended
with a unanimous echo of har-
monious sounds,

The Director of Medical services
Dr. O'Mahony and Mr. Dougias
Smith, Resident Tutor of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies,
are to be complimented on arrang-
ing this conference which for the
first time in the history of this
colony, all persons working in
Public Health in this island met
tagether in solemn conclave to
diseuss the common problems with
which they are confronted in the
performance of their duties. Was
it a dream? No, it was a fact

The conference found comfor
in the stirring and inspiring ad
dress delivered by His Excellency
the Governor in opening the con-
ference. Public Health workers
have an arduous task and it has
often been observed that it has
turned out to be « thankless job
to those who labour in the field of
Public Health as well as to the
Administrators of Public Health

His Excellency’s address showed
that recognition and appreciation
was at last being given to this
important sphere of labour.

The high standard of the lec-
tures given by each respective
lecturer was indeed a credit to the
community. Without appearing in
vidious I think that the second
day of the conference will long be
remembered by those who attend-
ted and those who failed to attend
missed the opportunity of their
lives. It is well known that our
Senior Medical Officer Dr. F, N
Grannum has the gift of lecturing
on matters of Public Health and
to him a large number of our
qualified sanitary Inspectors and
Nurses owe gratitude for the
success they achieved in obtain-
ing diplomas in Sanitation. It is
the unanimous opinion of the con-
ference that the address on “Infant
Mortality” delivered by Dr, Gran-
num at the opening of the morning
session of the second day of the
conference was numbered among

the
the

(2)

(4)
(5)













booklet f i icte
t ted th igh isl
I le I la r
t pa
« al ric ! ild be
: Sanitar Inspecto and
‘ ! d the Associa
on I of its air t
pread of public healt;
throt gth and breadth
ti I think this an
»~ppor to do so,

Ye ave long been advocat
in newspaper improved
Sanitation and Public Health Ser-
vice nd full education on health

matters for the peopie of this is
land and you earn the gratitude
t all for the publication you gave
the proceedings of the confer-
ence

It is to be hoped that the four
important points made by the
Director the conference will
ever remain forever in the memory
of those who heard them. “The
attitudes, “The Personal Re-
sponsibility,” “Mother Craft,” and
“The Common Objective.”

EGBERT McCLEAN.



|



Age Grouping

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—On reading the
sions of the Members of the
House of Assembly in Friday’s
Advocate re Age Grouping, Il
have discovered that the chief
cause of the worry and bother in
the Elementary Schools has not
yet been made known to them.

Age Grouping may be trouble-
some, but in my opinion the prin-
cipal trouble is the lack of proper
staffing and the little interest
which the young teachers take in
their work.

One teacher generally has forty,
fifty, or sixty children to teach.
Will the abolition of Age Group-
ing lessen the number of children
in a class or will the large class
still remain ? Will the teacher be
able to examine forty exercise
books in less time? I say leave
Age Grouping alone, and staff the
echools adequately, so that the
bright children can be pushed on
and the slow ones receive more
attention. Try thig out, Honour
able members, then Tt

qauscus-



and awalt
results

s The next bother S the young} wy
teacher whose only interest is his
Salar

uneertain terms that he is not}
paid for hig ability to teach or|
for the amount of work he does, |
but for his qualifications, so he

qualifi
the
we

and qualifies to receive
ary for qualifications, The
of the child is no concern









ot his, he must learn as he can.
Thanking “you,
THINKER,
19.3.51.
Public Health
To The Editor, The Aavocate—
SIR,—Public Health is right-
fully very much to the fore to-
day. May I remind the Govern-

ment Authorities responsible that
payment for such important ser-
vices as Notification of Infectious

Diseases, Post-mortems, Lunacy
Boards, V.D. Clinics and Vac-
cinations remains the same as it



was over fifty years ago,
In view of the present high cost
of living is this fair or wise?
Incidentally the salaries
many P.M.O.s, Dispensers and
Nurses are considerably overdue
for an increase by their Vestries
WELFARE WORKERS

Fresh Bread
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR

of

rea -i have heard so many peo
close proximity to their neigh- the most brilliant addresses ever pje complain of their difficulty in
bour's house us they like. On the heard from the lips of any lec- keeping bread fresh during holi
face of this one must admit that turer in this island on Publie qay periods, that it is possible
these regulations are unjust and Health. In this fine address many your readers may care to know
work a nardship not only on Mr. important things in infant life my own method of doing so.
Hill but on his clientele who live were strikingly revealed, The bread should be wrapped
in the City. Then came the Director of Med- in a good-sized piece of plastic
(2) There has not been .an ical services on the subject of material and placed on the low-
epidemic in this Island since the Tuberculosis which is engaging*est shelf of the

Small Pox of over forty yearg
ago, so one cannot say that the

the attention of sciantists and
public health workers throughout

Dairies have been in anyway Te- the world. With calmness and
sponsible for what has not simplicity the Director kept the
occurred, conference spell bound on this

(3) As far as I know there nave
not been any prosecutions against
Dairykeepers in the city. 2

(4) If it is due to the over
population of the City then one

©

burning subject.

As a member of the Executive
Committee of the Barbados
Sanitary Inspectors Association I
am going to suggest that these

























URE



Also try
FLEUROIL
BRILLIANTINE

Makes the hair
soft and glossy
Sold in 2 Sizes

ROBI









_THE BEST AT T



Domestic
Refrigerators

a .

Unit which carries a

Pie :
ee re

PRESTCOLD

There is a PRESTCOLD MODEL to suit
Every Home — Every Pocket
Capacity 4.4 cu.ft. and 7.7 cu.ft.

Incorporating. the Exclusive “PRESTADOR”
inner door for exfra food storage.

Made by the largest Manufacturers of Automatic
Refrigerators in Britain.

Powered by the Hermetically Sealed Presmetic

Ww. FOGARTY LTD.

refrigerator;
brought out for use and returned
afterwards.

It will keep well for over
week and though it may become
a little dry it is still edible and
makes good toast.

(Mrs.) E. GARTSIDE-TIPPINGE.
Whitehaven,
Navy Gardens,
March, 19, 1951.

SON'S

Sli2
<2)



‘PATENT’ BARLEY

makes milk more digestible for baby

‘PATENT’ GROATS
makes weaning a happy time for baby—
and mother

)
y

SCC PE POPS FVOOFEE,

oe

HE LOWEST COST

LEO ELLOS

ota



five year Guarantee.

s
LIMITED ;
+ e . , .
% Representative for the West Indies.
‘ ‘
BROS ) PSSSSSSCOS 959 B9 9999999 FOSS OOO BOSS SOS OSSE SGOOOSS SX

ADVOCATE





He makes it known in no Rheumatism, Burning Passages, Excess

LLLP PLP POD

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951







Thanks
Editor, The Advocate—





























Sim On behalf of the girls of RAEN and WOMEN
the De itive Icing Class of the an
Girl dustrial Union, [ would
like to thank the Advocate Co., a
Lid. and Messrs. Cave, Shepherd | & v 5 *
& Co., Ltd. especially, for thei>|
* assistance with the cake raffle Be ’
ro here's how you can
The amount reaised was i
$101.95, and the winning ticket
was No. D—20 held by Mrs. O. be strong and active

Jonson of Brittons Cross Road.

Our thanks are also due to the
helpers and to the public for their
generous support.

Yours faithfully,
RUBY CHASE.

If you feel run down, are not
as full of life as you should be,
and colds hang on, you may
need more A&D Vitamins.
Try scientific, good-tasting
Scott’s Emulsion. Take it
regularly all year round.
Vitamins and energy-building oil.
It helps build resistance, stamina
and energy.

More than just a tonie—
it's POWERFUL NOURISHMENT



£ me



ey



“Dita













rgiCHPAND
WEEN

ic SHINY)

jt
1

: This sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of flavout
\ which will claim your allegiance from the first sip.

HIGHLAND
QUEEN

SCOTCH WHISKY

Sole !mporters :—
W.S. MONROE & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

ACDONALD & MUIR LTO * DISTILLERS © LEITH " SCOTLAND

Rheumatism, Ankles Puffy,
Backache, Kidneys Strained?

If you're feeiing out o-sorts, Get Up
ights, or suffer from Dizziness, Nervous-
ness, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles,

€





mM

called Cystex. Hundreds and hundreds 0}
Doctors’ records prove this.

exe No Benefit—No Pay

The very first dose of Cystex goes right
to work helping your Kidneys remove ex
cess acids. Quickly, this makes you feel
like new again. And so certain are the
makers that Cystex will satisfy you com-
pletely they ask you to try it under a money
back guarantee. You be the judge. If not
entirely satisfied just return the empty
package and get your money back,

Cystex (Siss-tex) costs little at chemists
and the money back guarantee protests
you, so buy your treatment today

Acidity, or Loss of Energy and feel old be-
fore your time, Kidney Trouble is the true
cause

Wreng foods and driaks, worry, colds or
overwork may create an excess of acids
and place a heavy strain on your kidneys
80 that they function poorly and need help
to properly purify your blood and maintain
health and energy.

LOR ey,
DHelp Kidneys Doctor's Way ®

Teeth as white

MAKESTHIS PEPSODENT

MIRROR TE
Many doctors have discovered by scien- ~~ for â„¢ os / %
tifle clinical tests and in actual practice KIDNEYS as ers?
that a quick and sure way to help the kid- BLADD
neys clean out excess poisons and acids is D ER

with a sctentifically prepared prescription | The GUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM |





LOOK YOUR BEST

Let your mirror show you your frue
smile — the smile that comes with
teeth that are Pepsodent white!
Pepsodent, you see, contains Irium,
wonderful ingredient which dis-
solves the ugiy stains that hide
whiteness, steal brightness from
your stile.

TONIGHT — Smile into your”
mirror—take a good look at
your teeth

NEXT—Clean your teeth with
Pepsodent. Do this, morning
and evening, for a week,



Your hair will be
handsomer by far
when you treat it te

“aseline’ Hair Tonic.| THEN—Smile

into your
mirror again
. you’ll see fy
how a week
of Pepsodent
makes your
whiter,yoursmile
simply dazzling!

Just use a few drops
a day... then see
the difference!

Buy a botile today!

Vaseline:

TRADE MARK

VASELUNE in the registered trade mark
tt the Vianchenaeh Mfe ¢ ’ 7

WITH IRIUM*

% Irium 1s the registered trade mark of
Pepsodent Ltd., for a special soluble in-
gredient that gives greater cleansing power.





X-PO 19-302-50

PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND
.















Loveliness

for you -

oO

FREIGHT
SERVICES
to and from

RS

Regular Services
Save Time

From B’dos to
BERMUDA




Goocre WITHERS
(J. Arthur Rank Organisation)




| LISBON ai — to “ou:
| LONDON ‘It's thrilling che way Lux
Toilet Soap leaves skin



You can have film-star loveli-
ness, too! The fragrant lather of
pure white Lux Toilet Soap
enhances the natural beauty of
your skin, leaves it clear and soft,
Just wash in warm water with the
creamy lather, then rinse in cold,
Famous film stars use Lux Toilet

Soap—it can be your beauty
soap too!

LUX °

TOILET SOAP

softer, smoother. I always
deperd on its gentle
daily care.”







ITS’ FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD,
Book through ir local

1 B.O.A.C. Forwarding Agent
who makes no charg

| advice, information or x pn
\@ ings by “Speedbird” to all LY- B0:A-
| six continents.

7 =





BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED
Airways House, Brudigetown



ee THE FRAGRANT WHITE SOAP OF THE FILM STARS
Phone 4585



A*LTS 732-302-850



a LEVER propvucr
‘








FRIDAY, MARCH 23,



By 0. 8S.

THE three main features in the
Jamaica-B.G. series of Tests
should, in my opinion, be rated in
the following order of importance.

(1) The fact that the players on
both sides did not allow the pre-
sence of the West Indies Selectors
to influence their play to the ex-
tent of making it dull, colourless
or devoid of the entertainment
one usually associates with first
class cricket.

(2) The promising form pro-
duced by quite a few young

cricketers on both sides that
augurs well for future Intercol-
onial as well as West Indies
cricket.

(3) The excellent standard of
the umpiring and the commenda-
ble impartiality of the large
crowds that attended the games. A
boundary, a fine bit of stumping
a fielding, a good catch or a clever
ball was cheered to the echo
whether the principal being
cheered was a Jamaican or Brit—
ish Guianese,

I shall deal with the tour under
their three main heads. In the first
place I think that British Guiana
was unlucky to_ have been twice
beaten and I say this without pre-
judice to Jamaica’s fine achieve-
ment in winning both Tests.

On the other hand, for instance
in the first Test after Berkeley
Gaskin, chiefly by his individual
bowling skill and clever. cap-

«



B. McG. GASKIN

taincy, had placed Jamaica in the

embarrassing position of losing
eight wickets for 153 runs. Jamai-—
ca was able to add 120 runs for
the other two wickets. It will be
admitted that there is a_ great
difference between 153 runs as a
first innings score in an_ Inter-
colonial engagement.

Having scored 162 runs in reply,
it is logica} that Jamaica went on



to win the game.
Similarly in the second Test
in the face of a 510 runs first

innings score by Jamaica, British
Guiana started most promisingly
scoring 149 before they lost the
first wicket but they collapsed
suddenly and added 137 for the
nine remaining wickets.

It might have been a different
story if Bayley had not become
reckless at 94 and lose his wicket
by hitting across an innocent and
harmless ordinarily pitched ball
from Valentine.

And so from this, British Gui-
ana went on to their second de-
feat.

Buc tne fact that there were
decisions in both games, and the
fact that many runs were scored
and many wickets taken ahd
since both games finished with a
day to spare, constitute ample
evidence that there was no “sit-
ting on the splice” or delaying tac—
tics adopted.

Now for my second point. What
prospective talent has the tour
unearthed? It has, in my opinion
produced seven young players
who should hold their places in
Intercolonial teams for some
years a who showed promise
of developing at a pace that
should make them candidates for
West Indies honours.

For British Guiana there are
Brian Patoir (17), Leslie Wight
(21) and Peter Wight (20), for
Jamaica, Stan Goodridge (22),
Roy Miller (20), Alfie Binns (21)
and L, E. Saundérs (19).

Brian Patoir bowls leg breaks, Jamaica, Robert Christiani (30) for making their stay such a
googlies, top spinners and the and Lennie Thomas of British happy and interesting one and
straight wrong: ‘un. He is about Guiana proved themselves to be added that they could not have de-
5 feet 11 inches and has a good first class batsmen at various sired better treatment on and off
trajectory. times during the tour. the field
Se PROPS SS PPS SSP PPPOE POOP OIL ALS

5

* N
s %
> e
: NOTICE :
|

'

eee eal

OUR

1951

B.G.-Jamaica Tests Was 8
Interesting Series ..««:

OUR OFFICE AND WORKSHOP
WILL BE CLOSED ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 24th





A

It is true that the degree of the
excellence of their individual per
formances varied during the tour
but it is generally accepted that
all of them established their right
to be called first class batsmen

Old Stagers Shine

Peter Bayley, Berkeley Gaskin
and John Trim
old stagers all,

Members of the Council of t

COPPIN

As a batsman he moves his feet
to the ball well, and to quote his
captain Berkeley Gaskin “he has-



re ; . F noon
ee a En Mr S. O’'C. Gittens, Vice-
tiani, | Lennie President of the B.A.F.A., pre-
Thomas and sided
Peter Wight The Council on motion of Mr.
were the only O. S. Coppin seconded by Mr.
British Guian- Lionel Gittens unanimously
ese batsmen passed the following which will be
who played sent to the Pickwick Cricket Club
strokes to Val- The Council of the B.A.F.A, do
Sent wie ae not agree with the terms of your
conia ny hit letter dated the 14th March, 195!
when he bowl- with regards to the terms and con-
ed half volleys ditions under which football is to
ww pitched the be played at Kensington for the
ball short of a 1991 season.
length The Council point out that they
Bayley, in are satisfied with the terms under
my opinion, P. BAYLEY which the 1949 ahd 1950 football
did this best of all. In addition to reasons were played at Kensing-
this, each time he opened the ton and agree to the 1951 season
batting he took the early sting being played under the same
out of the Jamaican pace bowling terms
attack ont ok ;
The Council also inform you

Berkeley Gaskin, a reservoir of
energy and optimism, has bowled
his way into the team, in my
opinion. The selectors can have
nothing against him. The bogey of
being “too old” he has exploded
and so too has John Trim ex-—
pleded it by being the only pace

that they are in no way concern-
ed with any financial arrangements
you may wish to make with the
Barbados Cricket Association,
Following are the terms which
were set out in the letter from the
Secretary of the Pickwick Cricket



rd.

LESLIE WIGHT

Leslie Wight has a straight bat, bowler in the series to maintain a Club to the Secretary of the
a good eye and all the patience in hostile pace for his entire spells, B.A.F.A
the world, He therefore has most I think his

was the number
selection in this department.

The umpiring was excellent
Tom Ewart and Burke should be
given full credit for having held
the respect and admiration of the
crowd in a welter of many diffi-
cult decisions they were called

one All the stands and pavilions will

be available except that . of the
Pickwick Club which will be re#
served for the sole use of their
members

At the conclusion of each month
of the season, the nett profits will

of the characteristics of a class
opening batsman and should be
able to develop the few which he
now lacks.

Peter Wight I am backing to
make a fine batsman. His timing
is so near perfection that he gets
tremendous power into his strokes

upon to give. be divided after the undermen-
for one of such a small size. The Jamaican cricket authori- tioned expenses have been de-

His follow through has_ the
smoothness of a professional and
he is not afraid to_play his own
forcing game against all types of
bowling.

ties must be complimented for the
excellent arrangement they made
for the press to record the games
in complete comfort and their
100% co-operation in supplying on
the spot much needed statistics

ducted as follows:

(a) 10% of the gross takings to
Pickwick Cricket Club for admin-
istration and gate—keeper;

(b) Marking and preparation of
ground; (c) balls for match play,
(competing teams must provide
their own practice balls);

(d) wages including constables;
(e) cleaning pavilions and stands;
(f) repairs to damage of pavilions,
Stands or enclosure; (g) advertis-
ing or printing of signs; (h) water

Stan Goodridge of Jamaica has
shown such improvement on his
Trinidad form of last year that it
would be a pity if he does not
gain selection on the W.I. team
and now I cannot find any room
tor him.

He has shown



Grenada Footballers
Return Home

better physical

development and has acquired ELEVEN members of the 14- rates: (i) Lighting; (j) Telephone;
considerable additional spéed and ™an Grenada football team re- «) Police. . a ; ¥
powers of direction. turned home yesterday morning () Police,

After the above expenses have
been deducted from the gross: re-
ceipts the nett profits will be
divided as follows:

1/3 to Barbados Football Asso-

by the Gascogne after playing a
number of games here.

Those leaving were Robin Ren-
wick (Capt.); Roland» Callender,
Rudolph Knight, Denis Knight,

Roy Miller is a fast medium
paced bowler of the calibre of our
own Carlton Rogers. He: made a
great impression on his first ap-

pearance in Intercolonial cricket Cuthbert Cummings, Colin Hus- ciation; 1/3 to Pickwick Cricket
and he also batted and fielded bands, Phil Edwards, Leonard Club and 1/3 to the Barbados
well. Berkeley, Lawrence Fletcher, Cricket Association,

Alfie Binns has had experience ees, Mosten and George Wil- mn) ae aaa fe
of Intercolonial cricket before this “‘,,.”: ; bg Mr. D vas ard said tha
tour. He has however not only ana. toes ieee ati it struck him that the Pickwick
improved i is r hind the © va ar : ‘ seeme: i hat the
improved in his role behind the for a holiday while Wilfred Mc Club seemed to think that they

wicket but is a 100 per cent better ae N

batsman than he proved to be a Leod is staying on to work with

year ago in Trinidad. the Sanitary Laundry.

; Shortly before leaving yesterday
I would not be surprised if he Morning, Skipper Renwick told

were entitled to the greater share
of the profits to be collected out of
the business but they were not
running football for the benefit of

gets the job of second string the Advocate that they had avery the Pickwick Club, they é HE

wicket-keeper on the 1951 W.I. enjoyable tour. Although the doing it for the benefit o the

team to Australia. ' ground was hard and fast and Association and the general
Saunders shows signs of becom— handicapped the players to some public

ing a good all rounder. He played extent, yet he believed every man
a good innings for his first ap- pulled his weight.
pearance and he was more than He had a bunch of young play-
ordinarily useful as a bowler with ers who were always trying to give
his medium paced off breaks. of their best and they, no doubt,
had benefited from the experience
gained, on this tour.

With regard to the local play-

All that the Pickwick Club was
enfitled to was the rental value
of the grounds and the stands,

Excerpts from Stainer’s Cruci-

ers he said that Grant in the fixion will highlight the Police
defence and “Brickie’ Lucas in Band's Good Friday performance
the front line were outstand- at Hastings Rocks tonight begin-
ing for Barbados while Ivan ning at 8 o'clock. Capt, C. E.

Smith in goal was always a hard
nut to overcome. Wilkes another
forward, although not in his best
form, showed that he knew his
stuff.
Sterling Performances

Although every member pulled
his weight, yet he must make
special mention of Callender and
Phil Edwards in the defence and
forward line respectively who
played sterling games throughout |
the tournament. |

Asked which was his hardest |
game he replied “the one against |
Spartan, although we beat them | 21224

Raison will conduct the Band.
PROGRAMME

Excerpts from the MESSIAH:— Overture
Pastoral Symphony; He shall feed hi
flock; Behold the Lamb of God; He was
despised and rejected of men,

Symphony No. 9 in B flat Minor
Unfinished)

Organ Transcription

(The
Franz Schubert
Solemn Melods

+s . Sir Walford Davie

Jesus Joy of Man's Desir

J $ Bach

There ip a

Gounod

Chorale
ing ;

Two Sacred Songs Judex;
Green Hill Far Away Charles

Excerpts from The Crucifixion
John Stainer.

Synopsis:—Processional

to Calvary:

Humiliation; Anther

POON NGES
by three goals to one”. | 33
With regard to the last colony
fame he said that it was a bit]

strenuous on his boys as they were
a bit worn out and therefore were |
not capable of giving of their best. |

He thanked the members of the |
Carlton Club, as well as those of
the B.A.F.A. and other members
of the various clubs, Capt. H. H.
Williams, and the general public



KEN RICKARDS

¢

Of the slightly older players,
Ken Rickards (28), J. K. Holt
Jr. (28), Neville Bonitto (27) of



oe,

ee ene me

os

GASOLENE STATION

EEO LEPC SS





-F.A. Reject
Of Pickwick Club

Hymn, Mystery of Divi a

A etttt bb tttb bib tebtobte tttetvttetetwt-t-tlntteteletnlrtndnte tet tet tte
ORO EAL TT



BRASSIERES = 857 to $1.11



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ee

erms

he Barbados Amateur Football

Association strongly criticised a letter from the Pickwick
Cricket Club setting out the terms under which football
should be played at Kensington for the 1951 season. This
took place at an extraordinary meeting which was held at
the Y.M.C.A, headquarters, Pinfold Street yesterday after-

Scandalous

Mr. V. T. McComie said that
the 10% for administration put in
by the Pickwick Club struck him
as being scandalous. He was not
satisfied with the explanation
given him in that connection and
he regretted that no representative
of the Pickwick Club was there
to let them know something about
it. If they accepted that it was
for the expenses of the gate-
keeper, that did strike him as an
unusual procedure

He said that the time had come
when the Association should take
a stand on principle. The Pick-
wick Club was trying to blackmail
them. If the Association gave
them the slightest encouragement,
as years rolled by, the present
terms which they were demanding
would obviously increase

If the necessity arose and they
had to play football here under
conditions which would make it
difficult for them to make a profit,
he would undertake to lend all the
support he could every evening
as the game was played.

The Association should make it
quite clear to the Pickwick Club
that they were not willing to ac-
cept any less than they got on the
two previous occasions

Mr. O. S. Coppin said that the
word scandalous used by Mr, Mc-
Comie was too mild. It was well
known that they made $5,000 last
season of which the B.A.F.A,. got
approximately $2,000 If they
were to make another $5,000 this

season, then according to the
present agreement made by the
Pickwick Club they would only

get something like $1.100

He pointed out that under the
old terms, the Pickwick Club got
60% and the Association got 40%
of the gross takings. They were
quite satisfied with that and did
not want any change Pickwick
had their 60% and they could do
whatever they liked with it,

it was also stated in the old
terms that the Pickwick Clul
would have full control of the

grounds and gates and would pro
vide cashiers and staff for the
purpose. From their 60% share
they were to provide and prepar

the playing field and be responsib]:
for the preparation of such

They were also to provide staf?
balls for match use only as com-
peting clubs were required to have
their own balls for practice prior
to the match.

After other members had spoken
criticising the action taken by the
Pickwick Club as set out in their
letftF, Mr. Coppin then moved his
motion.

The Council approved the
principle of a letter accepting the
visit from the Kingston Cricket
Club of Jamvica to engage in foot.
ball here during the last two weeks
in-May.



** Crucifixion’? At Rocks To-night

“God so loved the World”;

Hymns, The mystery of

Intercession and The |

Adoration of the Cruci-

fied; Finale, For the love

of Jesus.

Gralsritter-Marsch March of the Holy

Grail from ‘Parsifal” Wagner. Writ
ten at Bayreuth 1876-77 completed at
Palermo 1882.

Synopsis:—This splendid work opens
with the basses giving
forth a peculiar unison
bell-like motive which
continues until the reed
with a_ discord relieves
them, The remainder is
of a_ pleasing smooth
character, until the brass
enter with the famou
“Dresden Amen". Wag
ner uses this in man:
way ind finally pounds
it forth to make a glori
ous finale

GOD SAVE THE KING









6¢

$1.30
$1.63 $1.86

per pair



NIGHTIES = 83.50 to $5.95

A Large Range

wS

b



PANTIES



: American Style Briefs
%
te WILL BE OPENED TO BUSINESS S Bz

on $
> I: > ‘ >a , y r et
% be AS USUAL. 3/f CHILDREN'S RAYON PANTIES
% 3 3 for S$L19
* <
g a Sf LADIES’ and GENTS’ VESTS
x : 2 for $1.00
x COU RTESY G AR AGE | | HORDERED SPUNS
- %
> 9 |
% 5 %| ities ‘
. ROBERT THOM. LTD. <; THE BARGAIN HOUSE
S WHITEPARK ROAD. S| 90, Swan Street —_—_S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
z 31% PHONE 2702 rd

} } !



one of the cane workers

PAGE NINE



~ TOURIST
INVASION

AN invasion of Barbados is on
in full force. But it is an agree-
able one, for it is being carried out
by nearly 300 Venezuelan Tour-
ists armed with thousands of dol-
lars to spend, and they are spend-
ing it.

Hotels are chock full, and some
people have put rooms in private
houses at the disposal of the tour
ists, thus cashing in on some of
the benefits of the trade, The
tourists have come to spend the
Easter Holidays not only because
of the sea bathing and the peace
and quietness, but because, as they
readily admit, their American
dollars and Venezuelan Bolivares
go much further in Bridgetown
than they would in Caracas

The Easter Invasion started last
Saturday with a special flight by
Avensa Airlines, followed by
special flights by B.W.I.A. Ii
continued up to Wednesday night
and yesterday when B.W.I.A
brought in more tourists,

Since their arrival from Vene
zuela the tourists have been sight
seeing, dancing and feting, and
also taking advantage of the com-
parative peace and quiet of Bar-
bados to relax tired nerves, They
are forming part too of the busy
throng of Easter shoppers, the
women brightening the = streets
with gaily coloured dresses, and
both men and women threading
their way along the pavements of
Broad Street chatting volubly in
rapid fire Spanish. In some cases
they are accompanied by Barba-
dians filling the role of Interpret-
ers,

Some of the tourists are not for-
getting the spirituel side of life
now that they are on holiday, and
they are taking opportunity to at-
tend the religious ceremonies of
Holy Week at St. Patrick's Roman
Catholic Church Some were at
Mass yesterday morning -Maundy
Thursday—and they will no doubt
attend the Good Friday rites this
morning .

Club Morgan, the Aquatic Club!
and the Marine Hotel are among
the places who have planned Eas-
eer festivities for the tourists, and
more and more advertisements in
Spanish are finding their way into
the Press, and in show windows of
city stores.

The tourists will start returning
home from about Monday

Mixed Cargo Comes
On “Fort Amherst”

Messrs, Furness Withy’s Fort
Amberst landed at Barbados yes-
lerday 410 casks of salted tish ana
supplies of chocolate syrup, flav-
Oullig extracts, ground cottee,
tru and other general cargo

The salted fish was consigned to
Messrs. W. S. Monroe & Co.,
Ltd., while the fruit—chiefly
grapefruit and oranges—came
various fruit vendors of the city

The Fort Amherst brought witn
her 93 passengers, five of whom
got off here,

She arrived from Halifax via
Trinidad and Grenada and left
port during the evening for St
Vincent and Martinique.

Her agents are Messrs
& Co., Ltd.

CANE FIRE

HORTLY AFTER 9 o'clock last
night fire destroyed a large
quantity of canes at the Belle
Plantation, The amount of damage
has not yet been estimated but
in the





DaCosta

district described at as, big

Instant





!

ANYTIME, ANYWHERE







We beg
and ‘the

head,
will be

SATURDAY, MARCH 24th

remain

and





Ha

pettnttntvlnbebtrbvbebebelvtnt-o-tettettel-ttntetvtetntete
SRO EPPO EEO LE

Store and Electrical Dept. pier

and the

The Produce Department will

shipping of Sugar

molasses.

MANNING & CO., LTD.

DON'T

smear RAZOL pomade on
HAIR. Take it on the comt

—_———

Sand §





2 tan te ff] Ermby the Finest of RUM
po Mises {ak Be ge So Mellow in a highball
first, then backward, until = 7 ktail
miost of it comes back out. So Smooth in a Cockta

Soft paper cun then be used
to wipe away surplus and
to dress the hair to a firish.
The above course, will give
very desirable results.

It is simply Superb.
Try it and you will be
convinced,

STUART & SAMPSON

RAZDE POMADE phame (1938) LTD.
a Headquarters for
ni tebe hacas {__BIst RUM
in as ke











J

SEE
OUR
NEW

EASTER STYLINGS

==

roar



1951

LADIES,

$5.50

AND CHILDREN'S
ALSO
CLEANERS, POLISHES

MEN'S SOCKS

AND BRUSHES





Agradable
Delicioso

)

aU
PASCUA

se
Rico

PARA QUE SE ALEGREN SUS NINOS DEBE
DARLES UN HUEVO DE CHOCOLATE DE PASCUA
LLENO CON MARZAPAN-—
EMVUELTO EN PAPEL

EN HUEVERA DE PLASTICO

Y TAMBIEN
EN HUEVOS DE PLASTICO

EVOS DE



LLENOS DE ALMENDRAS TOSTADAS,



TAMBIEN PROVEEMOS UNA SELECCION COM-
"TA DE

CONFITES EN CAJAS LUJOSAS

GALLETAS DE COCKTAIL

GALLETAS DULCES EN LATAS LUJOSAS
ETCETERA ETCETERA EN LA..

ker's 0s) Drug Stores Ltd.

BROAD STREET and ALPHA PHARMACY (IIASTINGS)















Sees

wer
9G 9DGGOG

19S



Soe
PIP >



NOTICE



to inform our Customers

general public that our

Corner Store

closed on

open for the receiving

and

SLO LLL OD DLO DES
CODEINE I

twtr tte tutttwtrdntetntetne.
DLOPLISIT TTT

ae
PAGE TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY: MARCH 23, 1951

| F Pash for


















CLARKE’S “BLOOD MIXTURE” |








BY CARL ANDERSON




Cleanse the system from blood
impurities ; many sufferers from
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimptes, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great ..
benefit from this well-known medicine.

tn LIQUID or TABLET FORM





pho AAA, Kili those throbbing pains in
your muscles at once! Apply

| FOR LASTING. =e
QUALITY & SHADES pA ee!
|

|





ae :

You don’t rub in “Sloan's you dab it
INSIST ON on the aifected nl ont" Sona’ “Sloan's”
does the rest! Good for

aches and pains and stiff
joints too !

ay






REGISTEREE



READY MIXED

PAINTS

AN I. C. lL PRODUCT
A. §. BRYDEN & SONS (00s) Lip.
















that builds! Save ’em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

NOW, LOPEZ YOU SEE WE AINT FOOLIN! WE DONT HESITATE TO KILL, SO
TELL US WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW! : ;





\F THE LAW HAD GOT-
7}| TEN HIM, HE'D HAVE
1 BEEN HANGED. FOR
MURDER !



Ktlloggs
CORN FLAKES
today!

| or PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
| [SPECIAL offers to all Cash an SPECIAL offers to all Cash and d Credit customers customers for Thursday to Saturday only |
















(WE WANT THE SPANISH GOLD). BRING LOPEZ TO THE OLO <4] Pts poor IS OPEN, TONTO. COME] USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
YOUR Bre: tee HID - CASTLE, TO SAY! DUNGEON, JAKE. THEN WE CAN Ww F
LOPEZ! VG) KNOW WHERE: px) Eye << | [MAKE HIM “TALK! J) | Wnuk’ GOES ON IN THe DUNGEON! i Bottles CORONATION WINE Bottles JEFFREY’S BEER 26 .20
. ) j Ty (Qts) 1.44 1.32

Lie sat bb tt hk a tt tt

Tins TABLE BUTTER








Tins P.F. MARTINI
CRACKERS....__.175 30 FB) caesar eneernen Os
Tins SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE Bottles MATURED RUM I
OOS Ee sce an ci 39 —s«iws (3 Gill Bots)... .._._- _48 42

» aie €
my SEWERS §
Seo













WELL- HE AcxeD FoR )

T-LL FILL HIM
FULL OF LEAD -IT'Lt. )I
TAKE TEN MEN | _/
TO LIFT HM 7









6UFFERIN'
coyotes !/
( HERE Cc Lee,
H' SHERIF

BETTER BY FAR.. coe

BISCUITS »y CARR’S

©

























Just In Time For Your

EASTER ENJOYMENT



HE WON'T BE ABOARD
LONG! CURTAINS DRAG



TOUGHER. NOW
SINCE KIRBY WISED
HIM UP! You IDIOT!



/ REALLY WORK.
ON HIM NOW,
MR, SEVEN 2

¢

BE WISE...








a ir

N KI
; WAS RIGHT! MY LIFE IS “ay
ay SAFE ONLY AS. LONG AS eS
I KEEP MY Ki

y Z D> -SECRET! J 3







YEAH, | LEFT THE ENGINE
ON. WERE OFF LET ANY-
BODY TRY TO FIND US g
NOW! .




Usacrted
ON SALE AT BISCUITS | usin iin

YOUR GROCER


FRIDAY, MARCH 23,



1951



The charge for announcements of
Births, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to ‘50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash, Fhone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.



THANKS

_—_————
ATKINS—We acknowledge with thanks
the cards, wreaths and other tokens
of sympathy sent us on the occasion
of the death of Hubert Atkins tlate
master tailor) of Henry’s Lane, Colly-
more Rock. 5
The Atkins’ Family.

—_—_——
FIELDS—The Fields family beg through
this medium to return thanks to all
those kind friends who sent wreaths,
letters of condolence or in any way
expressed their sympathy in our recent
bereavement. 23,3.51—1n
GITTENS—Through this medium we beg
to return thanks to all thore kind
friends who sent wreaths, letters of
condolence or in any way express their
sympathy in our recent bereavement
caused by the death of Joseph
Emanuel Gittens late of Mayers Road,
My Lord's Hill.
Veola Howard, Goulbourne Howard.
23.3.51—2n





IN| MEMORIAM

_—_—_———————
ALLENBY-—In tender and sacred memo-
Ty of my dear husband (George Henry
Allenby) who was called away March
23rd 1948.
To-day is a day of remembrance
And many sad regrets
A day 1 shall always remember you
When the rest of the world forgets
Evelyn (wife) U.S.A.

23.3.51—In





ASHBY—In loving memory of our dear
beloved wife and mother Leotta Ashby
who died on March 23rd 1950.

To-day has brought us sad memories,
Of cne year ago

We loved you darling

But Jesus loved pou best

So he took you home to rest

Ever to be remembered by Clyde Ashby

thusband), Obrica

Ashby, Cynthia
Burton (daughters). 23.3.51—1n.
NAYNES—in loving memory of my
adopted mother Catherine Haynes

who passed away on March 24th 1940.
On that Easter day
The ane I Loved was called away
God knew best
And took her to eternal rest.
Ever will be remembered by Mrs. Enid
Vanderpool





PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever in my name as I do not hold
myself responsible for anyone contracting
any debt or debts in my name unless
by a written order signed by me.

SEON WORRELL,
Fairfield,
Black Rock.,
22.3.51—2n





The public are hereby warned against
giving Paredit to my wife, MILLENCE
SMALL (nee GOLLOPP) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

ned by me.
* GUSTAVUS SMALL

Bentley Tenantry
! 23.3.5!—2n,
St. Philip.
23.3.51—2n.

seca, aa ratataterstitie
ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANT’S 2"








Trinidad Guardian

Notice
An effort is to be made to
institute a more _ satisfactory
methed of distributing the
Gvcrdian,

All subscribers, or those wishing
to become subscribers, any part
of the Island, are asked to heip
in the plan by phoning 3543 or
calling at the Trafalgar Store,
Trafalgar Street, and giving their
names and addresses.

‘the success of the plan will
depend entirely on the response
to this call.

y,

NOOR PISS DSSS SOS OF OFFS

NOTICE

Closing for Annual
Easter Holiday-

m4
%
We beg to inform our Customers
and Friends that we shail be
closed to business as from:
THURSDAY at 3.30 p.m. 22nd
POSSESSED”








inst, re-opening SATURDAY 3st
inst.



NEWSAM & CO.



EASTER
FARE |

COOKING BUTTER per lb.
or 5 lb, tin









PRUNES ........+. Sic. Ibe
RAISINS °........ 46c. Ib,
CURRANTS ...... 38¢. Ib,




AUSTRALIAN CHEESE
72c. lb.

GLACE CHERRIES 89ec, |b,
POLAR ICING




SUGAR ........ 36e. pk.
BRIDAL ICING

SUGAR ...... .. 35¢e. pk.
SWEET CORN .... 46c. tin
ANCHOR TABLE

BUTTER ...... 88c. pkg.

- SPECIALS -

BICO ICE CREAM,
POLAR ICE CREAM,
POLAR ICICLES,
EASTER EGGS.

MOIRS CHOCOLATE BARS
PEANUTS in Tins.

HAM in Tins.

CASAREEP in Bottles.

GRIFFITH'S
ROCKLEY
Dial 4514





FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

| word Sundays,

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—One 1948 Model
10 K.P.
Morris
St.

Prefect Ford
Done 22,000 Miles. Apply B. C.
daily, Dunscombe Piantation
Thomas. 23.3.41-——3n.
kus 23.8.51—3n

——— ee
(X 22) Dial 8225.
23.3.51—2n.



CAR—Ford V-8

\eoseticletetltndy led in mtinreneensinsnmiseniasionn Meee
CAR—One Standard Vanguard in good , Spooner’s Hill,

condition 15,300 miles.
Sayers — Phone 3632.

CAR—1951 Hillman Saloon.

Apply Denton
22.3.51—3n

Registered





under three months, low mileage—Phone | Claims duly attested to the undersigne.i

8569. or 4683, 22.3.51—-3n

—————
CAR—One 1938 Dodge Car, $600.00, Can | Said Blanche
be seen at Courtesy Garage, Whitepark | Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors,

Rad. 22.3.51—8n

21.3,.5i—t.fm, | Parties entitled thereto having rega





FORD — MODEL “B’ SEDAN iM 3)
Excellent condition. H. ARRINDELL. | assets of
ELECTRICAL





REFRIGERATOR — Canadian Genevyal
Electric 6 Cub. feet, Perfect
order. Can be seen at K. R. Hunte &
Co, Ltd., Lower Broad Street, Dial 4011.

22.3. 51—6n

ee

ONAN—Lighting Plant, 12-15 volts,
30 amps, 400 watts, with lamps and
spares. A. Barnes & Co, Ltd.

LIVESTOCK

———
ONE SAANEN GOAT—heavy in kid,
second litter, har six teeth, no reasonal
offer refused. Apply to Dudley Gibbs,
Hindsbury Road, St. Michael.
23.3.51-—1n,

MECHANICAL

———————

BICYCLES—With and without three-
speeds for Ladies, Gents and children.
Secure yours now, Courtesy Garage,
Whitepark Rd. Dial 4391. 22.3.51—6in

BICYCLE A
Saddles, Connections,
wheels etc.
Whitepark Rd.

-— Pumps,
Patching Kits,
Apply Courtesy Garage

Dial 4381. 22.3.51—6n

CARRIER BIKES and Bicycles by
Herevies. Silver King. A BARNES &
co., LTD. 20.3.51—t.f.n.

TYPEWRITER
Royal Typewriter.







One new portable
E. S. Gibbs, Dial 4375.
22,3.51—2n

.

MISCELLANEOUS
AERATED WATERS PLANT — One
Barnett-Foster Filling and Capping Head.
Three Carbonators, (German). Electric
Motor. Shafts Pulleys, Spare Parts, Gas







Tubes etc. All in good order and excel-
lent performers. Apphy to M. Abbadi,
Dial 2297. 17.3.51—3n,



ANTIQUES—A good assortment of An-
tiques including old clocks, Candles,
Shades, China, Pottery, Silver, Ivory and
Furniture, In Ralph Beard’s Show Room,
Hardwood Alley. Open 8 a.m.—4 p.m,
21.3.51—4n,

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.

ne

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances ana
draperies, By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A,
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n

DIAMOND RINGS—Two Gents’ single
stone rings. Claw. settings. Attractive
prices, See them. Wm. D. Richards &
Son, Mc Gregor Street. Phone 2080,

22.3.51—3n

MIRRORS—Just received, Triple Ward-
robe and Bathroom Mirrors. Polished and
Bevelled Edges. G. W. HUTCHINSON &
co,, LTD. 22.3.51—3n
eee

PESQUI URANATED WINE—At long
last we are in a position to offer you







this wine for the treatment of Diabetes, {| French chef in Aruba and in U.S.A

1¢/6 per bot, 3 bottles for 30/-.
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD,
24.3.51—-3n,

ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN
i» case, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy.







15.3,61—t.f.n,

SWEDISH STAIN!.ESS STE! CUT-
LERY lasting a_ lifetime won't
scratch, tarnish, stain or rust — needs

no polishing —- will harmonize with any
table setting for any occasion lending
charm and beauty to your home

Knives: Table 69c, Dessert G4c.
Forks : Table S4e. Dessert 49c,
Spoons: Table S4e. Dessert 49c.

Tea 36c. Coffee 26c, Eaeg 36c.
Jam 36c.
More than fifty different pieces in two
beautiful models —- See Them and Buy
Them. at
CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.
18.3.51—6n

ee
TEA SETS—Exceptional” Value. 23%
piece Flowered Tea Set all for $7.99, See
these Today at G. W. HUTCHIN: ;
co., LTD. 22.3.51—-3n

VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your
sizes delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

13.2.51—t.f.n,

Sore Mouth

ing Gums, Sore Mouth
Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sere melad





and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron cli

guarantee. Amosan must make Z°

mouth well and save your teeth or

money back on urn of empty pack-

age. Get Amosan from gem chemist
today.

je guar-
Armosan

antee protects
ou.
For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

HAPPY RELIEF
FROMBACKACHE

Neighbour said ‘Take Doan’s Pills”
Wwrr PUT UP with needless
discomfort from backache,
rheumatic pains, lumbago, stiff,
aching muscles and joints or the
common urinary disorders due to
sluggish kidney action when you
might get happy relief.
Many thousands of healthy
ple bless the day they took
Boan's Backache Ridn ey Pills.
This well known diuretic and
urinary antiseptic helps sluggish
kidneys to carry out their function
of ridding the blood of excess uric
acid and other mpareies harmful
to health. Grate le, every-
where, recommend Boan's Pills to
their friends and neighbours.

ic. DOAN'S

Wealer fer



1/3,
2/9,
Si.

A. M. WEBB

STOCKBROKER



Barbados Bonds and Shares
Oversea Investments
Bought and Sold.



Dial: 4796 Hours 9—3

33 Broad St.
(Over Phoenix).
i



—

rr er

CLASSIFIED ADS.|

working | have had notice.



PUMLIC NOTICES |

Tea cents per agate line on week-drys |
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, |
minimum charge $1.50 on week-doys |
and $1.80 on Sundays.



NOTICE



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD

This office will be closed to business
on Saturday March 24th with the exci a-
tion of The Airways

& Steamship
Department.

22.3.51-—-2n



NOTICE

Re Estate of }
BLANCHE SKEETE
deceased.
hereby given that «li
any debt “or clai.n |
affecting the estate o/
Skeete deceased, late o/ |
in_the parish of Saji»: |
Michael in this Island Spinster who
cied in the parish of Saint Michael «
28th day of January, 1951 are ro
Quested to send in particulars of the :

NOTICE is
Persons having
against or
Blanche

EMMANUEL FITZPATRICK JOHNSO\
Qualified Executor of the will of
Skeete deceased, c¢
No. 12
High Street, Bridgetown, on or bef:
the 15th day of April, 1951 after whi}
date we shall proceed to distribute t-<
the deceased, among t

1
only to such claims of which we sho!
then have had notice and we will » t
be liable for the assets or any po t
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not th:

And all persons indebted to the said}
estate are requested to settle ther |
indebtedness without delay. }
ones this 9th day £ February, 1951

A NURI, PATRICK JOHNSON
Qualifie ecutor of the Will of
Blane Skeete, deceased.
10.2.51—4n.

a
r



NOTICE

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
AcT ih0
and
IN THE MATTER OF WARD TRU
COMPANY LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant
to section 176 of the Companies Act 1919
i meeting of the creditors of the above
named company will be held at the
cffice of Messrs, Bovell & Skeete, Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, Barbados, on
Wednesday the 4th day of April 1951,
at 2 o'clock in the afternoon.

Dated the 22nd‘ day of March, 1951
DEIGHTON HARCOURT LISLE WARD
HENRY RAYMOND LEACH,

Liquidators
23.3.51-—3n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Elise Phillips of
Cheapside, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c at
bottom floor of a 2 storey wall building} |
in Cheapside, City.

Dated this 22nd day of March 1951
To:—H._A. TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.
ELISE PHILLIPS,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-| ¢
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A on Monday
the 2nd day of April, 1951, at 11 o'clock,
am ,



H. A, TALMA,
Magistrate, Dist A’

Police 2
23.3.51—1n



WANTED

Mtnimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents c
word Sundays.

'
!



HELP



THERE is a good job offered in Trinidad
for the rignt man, His ability and experi-
ence must enable him to take charge
of the Photographic Department of a we'll
known Store, Salary and commission in
keeping with his value. Dial 4727.

22,2.51—2n

POSITION WANTED
COOK: Wants position; trained by
will accept engagement in the island
or abroad; reference given. Contact
Joseph Rochester, Speightstown or phone ;
91-12 23.3.51-—3n.



MISCELLANEOUS

IMMEDIATE CASH for
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGES, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club

20.2.51.—T.F.N.









IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniature: jade, |
|

Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES,
Antique Shop. Dial 4429,

20.2.51.—t.f.n.

To buy or borrow for h short while,

Volume one and two of Bishop Burnett’
“History of my own kind”, Dial 3458.
. 23.3.51—In

PERMANENT or
with accommodation.

Transient Guest,

Dial 4837.
23.3.51—2n

POLICE NOTICE

INSPECTION OF
PUBLIC SERVICE VEHICLES
AND
RENEWAL OF LICENSES.

Regulation 16 (6) of the Regula-







nd Loose | tions made under Section 7 of tne

Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic
Act, 1937—16, requires that own-
ers intending to renew their
licenses in respect of
service vehicles, goods vehicies or





Mintmum charge week % cents end Ten cents per agate tine on week-days



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FOR RENT

% cents Sundays 24 words — aver 24

pords 3 cents @ word week—4@ Cents a

word Sundays,



Main



or coup



Chir



Modern Bu
Black Rock all conveniences. Apply

HOUSES

ee
c sit RACEsTS FURNISHED FLAT—
td

Bath with Heater

Mastings, facing Sea. English
Suitable one person
Telephone 2949.

2.3.51-4.1.



le



MARSHV!LLE—Bank Hall Mai Road.
Enclosed gallery, drawing and %
room, 3 bedrooms, breakfast room, toflet

and bath, water, and light.

Apply W. L.
23.3.920

ton,

on

Baxter's Road.
alow situated at



premises to Mr, Vere Lewis,

15.3.5—T.F.N



MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow

3 bedroo:

ms with running water, built in

Wardrobes and all modern conveniences.

man, Ho
_NEW
Christ





jE

9

3.

The estimated fortnightly deliveries are 400—650 cartons of bis-
and 110—265 containers of Skimmed Milk
Powder of 56 lbs. each. Supplies must be taken from central depots
in Bridgetown.

Supplies must be delivered every two weeks according to the
requirements of the individual schools, and all deliveries must be
completed within three days.

Tenders must cover all requirements of the schools during the
periods mentioned above, and must reach the Colonial Secretary’s
Office not later than 12 o'clock noon on Saturday, the 24th March,
Tenders must be marked “Tender for transport of Biscuits and
Milk to the Public Elementary Schools.

The person whose tender is aceepted must be prepared to furnish
sureties for the due performance of the contract.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any

cuits of 24 Ibs, each,

951,

ender.

Tenders are invited for the supply of fresh cow's milk to the
Public Elementary Schools throughout the Island during the follow-
ing school terms :—
7th May to 3rd August, 1951.
10th September to 7th December, 1951.
7th January to 4th April, 1952,

Particulars of the conditions and requirements of supplying the’
milk are embodied in the contract, (Copies of which are evailable
for reference at the Colonial Secretary’s Office.) |

Persons tendering must be prepared to furnish two sureties for
the due performances of the contract. ; land

The tenders marked “Tender for the Supply of Fresh Co's Milk’ |
to the Publie Elementary Schools; must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o’clock neon on Saturday, the 24th March,

Be

9

3.

1961.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lawest or
any tender.
9th March, 1951,

TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF SUGAR TO THE PUBLIC
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Tenders are invited for the supply of Clear Straw Sugar to the
Public Elementary Schools of the Island during the following school

terms :
1
9

3.

Publie

The person whose tender is aceepted must be prepared to furnish
sureties for the due performance of the contract.

Church.
Furnished, Fridge, Electricity a:

| Long lease preferred. Apply Mrs. Pricd-

tel Royal. 13.3.51--t.f.n,

BUNGALOW--Enterprisa |Rea0.
Availabie immediately,
water.









Apply Frederica FitzPatrick Telephone
3835, 21.3.51—8n
MECHANICAL
BICYCLES — Daily, Weekly and
on Monihiy terms, Apply Crescent |
\| Bicycle Dept. Store, 30 Tudor Street
| Dial 3361 21.3.51—5n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ZENDERS FOR TRANSPORT OF BISCUITS & MILK TO THE
PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Tenders are invited for the transport of cartons of biscuits and
containers of Skimmed Milk Powder to the Public Elementary Schools
ST] of the Island during the following school terms :—
7th May to 3rd August, 1951.
10th September to 7th December, 1951.

7th January to 4th April,

$th March, 1951,



TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF FRESH COW'S MILK TO THE
PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. |



7th May to 3rd August, 1951.
10th September to 7th December, 1951,
7th January to 4th April, 1962.

The estimated fortnightly requirements are 4,500 to 10,000 pounds
cf sugar. Persons tendering must quote the price per pound plus de-
livery charge and are required to submit a sample of sugar.

Supplies must be delivered to the schools every two weeks ac-
cording to the requirements of the individual schools, and all deliv-
eries must be completed within three days.

Tenders must cover all requipements of the schools during thé
periods mentioned above, and must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o'clock noon on Saturday, the 24th March, 1951.
Tenders must be marked “Tenders for the

Elementary Schools.”

The Government does not bind

tender.
Sth Ma

INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS, REVOCATION DEPARTMENT,
ST. LUCIA

Applications are invited for
public| 2ducation Department, St. Lucia.

The applicant (who should possess
ivailers shall before the 30th day| erably) should be

rch, 1951,



of April, make application to the] ence of work in Primary Schools,

Commissioner of Police who shal
eppoint a time and place for the
examination of the same.

mitted before the 28th day
April, 1951.
3. Forms will be supplied on

of

and Transport; but will not be
sent through the post. [

4. Inspection of these yehicles
will commence on Monday, 16th
April, 1951.

5. Owners of vehicles are here-
by reminded that vehicles which
are not passed as road-worthy by
the 30th June, 1961, will not be

permitted to operate after that|*€@ch not later than 81st March,

date.
(Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.
Polite Headquarters,
Bridgetown,
12th March, 1951.
23.4.51—3n





The post is pensionable and carries emolurments in the scale of
$1,920 to $2,400 per annum by annual increments of $96 plus a Cost
$: Apelibelion would bs sub- of Living Bonus at the rate of $192 per

Travelling and Subsistence allowances will be paid in accordance
with the rates prescribed by local regulations.

The duties of the post will be
application to the Transport Sec-] tion Officer,
tion of Department of Highways| and such ot

Th
Officer

Free passages for the Officer and his family wil) i
accordance with the Colonial Regulations (i . Cert
Applications setting out full details of qualifications and experi—
not less than two testimonials and
eres te, ST. LUCIA, to
1,

ence s'
should

her local orders as

should the necessity arise.

hould be accompanied by
be addressed to THE



In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietia:

fury D. Wallace; Yacht Caribbee; Sch.

¢ An Gl, Mi, A, Me, a “ + a Adalina: Sch. Marea Henrietta; Sch.

«Christian Science
Reading Room

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)

Houre: 10 a.m.—3 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fridays.
10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays.

the Science text-book,
Sefence and Healta witn Kry to
th« Sertotures by MARY BAL&£R
SDDX may ve reed, borrow,

or puryhased

|
} Visitors Are Welcome

(.. this Room tae Bivle
5



ee

=f

Burma

D.; Sch. Laudalpha; Seh. May

Olive; Sch. Gardenia W.; Sch. D’Ortac
Sch. Emeline; Sch, Lydia Adina S.; £2,
Franklyn D. P.; Sch, Wonderful Caun-
sellor; Yoeht Buckaroo; Sch. Easte:a
Eel; Sch. Lucilie M. Smith: Sch, Man-
‘ dala I1.; Sch. Blue Nose Mac,
ARRIVALS
‘ S.S. Fort Armiherst, 1,946 tons net
Capt. Musson, from: Halifax via Grenada
S.S. Gascogne, 2,661 tons net, Capt
Prigent, from Le Harve,
M.V Daerwood, 94 tons net, Cant
DeCoteau, from St. Lucia
£.S, Statesman, 4429 tons net, Capt
Richardson, from London
i DEPARTURES
| Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt
| King, for St. Vincent
SS. Gascogne, 2,681 tons net, Capt
b } Prigent, f Trinidad
¢ ret, |



Fort An

rerst
Kean, for St

st fy

1949 to
rent







the post of Inspector of Schools,

a trained Teacher and should have

Such as are assigned by the Educa-—
and the holder will be subject to the Colonial Regulations
aré in force.

e Inspector of Schools will be required to act as Education

| Harbour Log





Happy Easter



PUHLIC SALES

and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
mimimum cnarge $1.50 on week-days|
Sundays



and $1.89 on
®
eae ciecanic senate aiksalk thie
REAL ESTATE G reetings





BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 And all the



bed. |
sane. every convenience —including| S$ eason’s best wishes
garden, water supply. As new, £3,000
Phone 4476. 15.3.51--t.f.n From___G. A. SERVICE
LIGHT SMALL PROPERTIES For) !-————



SALE, FOR CASH OR ON TERMS

One at Country Road; One at Codring-
ton Hill; One at King's Street; One at
Mason Hall Street; One at Brilton's x
Road; Qne at Deacon's Road, One at
School Road, Carrington's Village, One
at Sober’s Lane. One-third of the cost
can be paid and the balance month):

For particulars apply to D'Arey A
Scott, Magazine Lane. 21.3.51—2n

SS
WALL BULDING—On 4.362 sq. ft., at
69 Roebuck Street, Downstairs, Spacious
Store, Store Rooms and Garage. Upstairs’
Fovr Bedrooms, Drawing and Dining
Rocms, ete, Suitable for Business,
Dwelling or Industry, Frontage: 43 ft.
Depth 100 ft. Concreted right through
Apply to M. Abbadi. Dial 2297,
17.3,51—4n

REAL ESTATE |

JOHN
M4.

BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A,

SSS
ADVERTISE

iT
PAYS

Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“TOBRUK”, Cattlewash, St. Jos-
eph. A picturesque holiday home
situated right on the beach posi-
tiened on approx. % acre of land
The contruction is of timber raised
on stone pillars with shingle roof-
ing is of sound condition through-
out. There are 3 bedrooms (with
basins), lounge, wide roofed gal-
lery overlooking the ocean,
kitchen, servant's rooms, outside
bathing cubicles and garage space.
Offers invited

“DAGATELLE HOUSE”, St

homas A spacious two-storey
ecuntry house with approx. 5 acres
-plus additional 3% acres if re
quired. There are 5 bedrooms, 2
lounges, dining room, 2 enclosed
gelleries, 3 bathrooms, kitchen
pantry, servant's rooms, 2 garage:
ard various outside buildings
This property is well elevated
and commands excellent views of
ithe St. James coastline

1952.

“NLA DENDRA" Pine Hill Estate
Peeently built coral stone bunga-
low in select residential area. Well
cesigned and constructed by &

reputsble firm of Contractors. 3
bedrooms (built-in wardrobes)
lounge, dining room, tiled kitehen
tiled bathroom and toilet, garage,
laundry and = servant’s qvarters

Ecc.

“MEDMENHAM™ Pine
very fine 2-storey pre
antly situated in approx, 1's ac
near Government House Th
is spacious and” well proportioned
accommodation comprising 3 es

eeption dining and = breakfast
rooms, 4 bedrooms, (t with large
dressing room) butier’s pantry,
kitchen, servant's rooms, garage,
fernery, poultry houses ete, There
is a two wa? entiance arive and
the grounds are well laid out wita
lawns, flowering shrubs and flower
gardens The whole property
has a pleasant character t+pigal
of some of the older established
homes in this exclusive area

Hill A
rity pitas.







14.3.51.—2n.





const
Well
state of
deteaing

COUNTRY HOUSE near
some 12 miles from town
constructed and in flag
repair 4 bedrooms, 2
rooms, large and airy reception
rooms, verandshs ete. Stone out-
buildings and double garage
Barns, cowpens and milking shed
Lavge courtyard. Over 17 acres of
with several fertile act
excellent for ground provision |
cultivation Property very suit-
able for mixed farming

“INCH MARLOW"'— On approx
2 acres coastland near ;
Sands A solidly = constr
sione house with shingle roof gnd
pine flooring 4 reception, 3 bed-
rooms, verandah; 2 bathrooms
and toilets; 2 kitehens; 2 servant's
rooms, 2 garages Now in @
apaytments but to reegn-
vert







14.3.51.—2n,

east

RENTALS

“Windy
St, James

Willows"— =Prospect
Unfurnished house
on const, with 3 bedroom
Jounge, verandah over looking

In Chaneety" on Coast at Silver

@ sea ete. Immediate — possession
Sands, Furnished, Now avail+
able i

Unfurnishea
POBSER:

“Plores',

Kont
Inurediate



“Cachalet", Si, * Lawrence,
Pleasant furnished house with
3 bedrooms, lounge, screengd
yallery, garage ete Available
April—July inclusive

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
’Phone 4640

Supply of Sugar to the

itself to accept the lowest or any |
et

14.3.51—2n,

graduate qualifications, pref-
wide experi-

annum, We have been instructed by the

owner, Mr. R, G. §. Kerley, to
sell by Auction the following
Household effeets at ‘Fearn’ «6th
Avenue, Belleville
Round Tables, Redio Table, Ocea-
sional Tables, Cabinet (all Mahdg-
ony), Marble Top Table, Crab-
wood Table, Octagonal Folding
Table, (23 Diameter), Invalid
Tray, Wicker Chairs, Folding Gal
lery Chairs; Cream Painted Ward-
eg Table, Folding
, Hair Mattresses;
Redio; Electric Table
Lamps; Oil Lamps, (Table Models)
Pitch Pine Table (20" x 20”)
Lomp Shades, Fawn Floor Rugs:
33° x 60”), Electric Toaster, 2
Burner Westinghouse Hot Plate
Coffee Percolator, Electric tron
jalmost new) Table Model Valor
Stove; Wine Glasses, Cocktail
Glasses, Lemonade Set Jug %
@inesea), Ioe Cream Glasses, Glace
Coasters, Flowered Dinner Ser-
viee, Dinner Plates Bread é& But
ter Plater, Dessert Plates, Stuin-
less Steel & Plated Cutlery, Cori
Dinner Mats, Silver Solt Cellars,
Coffee Cups & Saucers, Bytter



. a maximum of 5).

17.3.57—2n

MAIL NOTICES

Mails ior 8. Lucia, Martinique,
Antigua, Guadeloupe, United Kingdom
and France by the 8.8. Gascogne will
be closed at the General Post Office as



undey: — Dishes, Pyrex Ware, Pastry
‘Parcel Moil at 4 p.m. on the 29th Poards, Mixing & Pudding Bowls.
March, 1951, Registered Biail at 11 a.m. Meneuring Cups, Enamel Frying

Pans, Enamel Saucevans and
Kettle, Lroning Bowrd, Seli-Heater
Coal Tron, Lady's Bicycle, Child
Bieyele, Concrete Flower Pots
Lawn Mower, Watering Can,
Buckets, Garden Tools, Scale &

and Ordinary Mall at 12.15 p.m, on the
20th March, 1951.



Mails for St. Lucia by the M.V. Ladys
Joy will be closed at the Genera! Post
Office as under:—





Parcel Mail, Registered Mail and Weights, Ice Cream Vreezer (4
Ordinary Mail at 9 am. on the 2th Pint!. Suiteases; Chicken Pon
March, 1961. Leghorn Hens and Cocktrelis

Cash on fall of the Hammer

RATES OF EXCHANGE | wap oeme Pied

VANADA John M. Biadon
MARCH #2, 1961
64 8/10% pr. Cheques on AFS. F.V.A
ipekers 62 6/10 pr
mia red ,
Drafts 62.85° pr Phone 4640
Sight Drafts 62 5/107 7
#4 910% pr. Cable : = PLANTATIONS BUILDING
| 63 3/10" *urrencs 61 3/10% pr
Coupons 60 6/10% pr
Silver








PAGE ELEVEN

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS | =

- STEAMSHIP CO, FRENCH LINE

/





SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM
M.S. “Hersilia”—22nd Mareh 1951
S.S. “Cottica—¢th April 1951. | Cie Gle Transatlantique
M.S. “Willemstad” —12th April 1931, |
SAILING TO AMSTERDAM «& | n
‘kis coed PLYMOUTH ' ae
§ “Willemstad” 22nd March 1951
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, SAILINGS TO

PARAMARIBO, GEORGETOWN

ENGLAND & FRANCE










M.S. “Bonaire 27th March 1951. |
S.S. “Justiniar 27th. March 1951 t ‘
M8 amal sth April, 2961 GASCOGNE: April Ist
S'S. “Cottica’ 23rd. April 1951. i via St. Lucia, Martinique,
SAILING “TO LA SUA SAC AG Guadeloupe and Antigua
M.S. “Oranjestad™ 28th, March 1951 } 0
M.S. “Willemstad” 25th, April 1951 | wd
8S, P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Lid SOUTHBOUND
Axstents,
OES Se GASCOGNE: March 23rd
|| Grenada, Trinidad, British
The M/V “CARIBBEE” will and French Guiana
accept Cargo and Passengers for '
Dominica Antiqua, Montserrat | we
Nevis and St Kitts, Sailing | i
Wednesday 21st inst
Accepting Passengers,
me - , “DABRWOOD" an Mail and Deck Passengers
cee argo an Passengers fo ini
St. Lucia, Grenada, oa aeube to Grenada, Trinidad, St.
and. Passengers only for St | Lucia and Martinique.
Vingent. Date of Departure to eee
be notified, oat
)
B.W.L SCHOONER OWNERS R. M. JONES & Co., Lid.
ASSOCIATION (INC)
AGENTS
Consignee. Tele. No, 4047 Phone ::: 3814
i
aS
a
8 HARRISON LINE
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
: Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
SS, “SUCCESSOR” Liverpoo! 10th Mar 25th Mar.
5.8. “STUDENT” Glasgow &
South Wales 18th Mar 2nd Apr.
SS. “SPECIALIST” London 21st Mar. 5th Apr.
S.S. “TACOMA STAR” Liverpool 22nd Mar, 3rd Apr.
SS. “HERDSMAN” London 28th Mar. 15th Apr.
S.S. “DEFENDER” London 3ist Mar. 1§th Apr.
S.S, “SCHOLAR” Liverpool Ist Apr. 14th Apr.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel For Closes in Barbados
SS. “MULBERRY HILL” London 27th Mar,
S.S. “PROSPECTOR” Greenock 30th Mar.
S.S. “CRAFTSMAN” Liverpool 3ist Mar,

For further information apply to - - .
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents

Ye Alcoa, Stam

NEW YORK SERVICE

8.8. “Myken" sails 28rc February, arrive? Barbados 6th March,

S.S. ‘Seabreeze’ sails 16th Mareh. arrives Barbados 27th March,
eee tee tt tees ne eee ane 6

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

8.8. “Rur \" sails 15th February. arrives Barbados Ist March,

SS. “Alcoa Patriot’ sails 7th March arrives Barbados 23rd Maren
—_—__—







CANADIAN SERVICE



SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship SAILS HALIFAX ARAIVES B'DOS

SS. “ALCOA PARTNER" oe ‘ February 23rd Mareh 6th
8.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” .. March $th March 20th
<5, “ALCOA PENNANT" . Mareh 23rd Apri) 3rd



NORTHBOUND
“ALCOA PENNANT” .,
“ALCOA PARTNER"

8.8. Due March 5th

"ue Mareh 20th

Sails for St. John &

Halifax,
Salle for St, Joh
é& Halifax 2





These vessels have limited passenge? sccommodation. a

ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE



—
—

| PASSAGES TO EUROPE
|
\











Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia, for sail

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £170; usual reductions for children.

—--



a —- =
JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs over NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad Street
BEAUTIFUL AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL

and EVENING GOWNS
Open SATURDAY MORNING until 11.30, Tel. 2684

—
WEE SE
{ GERM LUBRICATING OILS
ARE BEST BY TEST
DON'T ONLY OIL. IT—GERM IT





. }
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. y
Gasolene Station-—Trafalgar St.





NOTICE

We beg to inform our Customers and the General
Public that our Stores will be closed on SATUR-
DAY 24th March and will re-open to business on
Tuesday 27th March.





Phone 1 Phone

aoe. IERBERT Ltd. “exer

1 & 11 Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.





ROB IGROS

SPLOT

NOTICE

COPIES
%,
Seon.

ca

SOS

Our Customers and Friends are asked to note
that our Picr Head Branch (Workshop, Dock, Ship
Chandlery & Sugar Factory Supplies and General
Office) will not be open for business on Saturday
next 24th inst.

SOOO

The Central Emporium, Broad St. and Gasolene
Station, Trafalgar St., will be open as usual.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

4 44°
LPL OOOO:

\

8
x
x
-
é
+
%
$
A
%,
9

LELLEPLLPPPLLPPPPPLLPCCEPP?PPP@APP PPD LE LALAK_G

$6,6,.56664
PFO PSSOOY




PAGE TWELVE





Varsity Boat Race To-morrow

18 Men Row

(fy A Special. Correspondent

LONDON.

A sporting event which can
probably claim to be the best
supported in the world will take
place in London tomorrow
E.ghteen young men will race
thrcugh the heart of the capita)

fo the accompaniment of cheers
from over 250,000 spectators,
Traffic jams’? No need to worry
about anything like. that The
event takes piace on the river
Thames and the crowds are
stretched along the four and a
half miles of bank from Putney
to Morllake

Yes, you are right. It is the

Oxford and Cambridge boat race
When the two crews meet on
March 24th it will be
encounter between the rival var—
sities. Cambridge, winners last
year, have been successful on 5?
eceasions and Oxford on 43, with
one dead heat.

Since the war, Cambridge have
added tour times to their list of
triumphs and apart from the first
post-war race in 1946 Oxford
have been unsuccessful. Last year
they were unfortunate to lose
their stroke Davidge = shortly
before the race and the year
before that they were beaten by
oniy a quarter of a length after

one of the most thrilling race
ever
This Year
This year, with Davidge back

in the Oxford boat, although not
in his former position, and Jen
nens, his rival of the 1949 race,
again available to stroke Cam-—
bridge, there are indications
another great struggle Both
créws are now on the Thames
practising for the big day but they
are not giving much away in then
training. As in previous post
war years Cambridge have tended
to hold back their crew whereas

Oxford have pressed on more
quickly. The dark blues have a
slight weight advantage whicl

may prove beneficial especially as
the early date of the race provides
a possibility of rough conditions.

Incidentally, this year Oxford
will be coxed by American,
G. A. Carver of Yale. But that
does not mean that there will be
the traditional antics which
American coxes at Henley have
made usual—such as banging the

sides of the boat for rhythm.
Carver has adopted the English
manner. He does not wear eccen-

tric kit or even a jockey cap. He
sits motionless in the manner of
a first class pilot

When the crews finally take the
water at Putney on March 24th
they will be cheered on by the
largest sporting crowd to gather

in London for any one event
during the year. And yet, peculi-
arly enough, the majority of

spectators will have no personal
tie-up with either of the Univcr-
sities or the towns in which they
stand.

Explanation Hard

Indeed, the explanation of the
terrific attraction of the boat race
is hard to find. Certainly an
important consideration is that it
provides free entertainment. The
whole of the tow-path from Put-.
ney to Mortlake is public property
and so the crowds who gather on
the banks to get a “grand-stand”’
view of the race do so without
payment. Neither must it be for-
gotten that the race takes place
right on London’s doorstep and
that it is one of the few events
which takes itself to the public
rather than having the public
come to it. And of course another
telling factor is the amount of
publicity both before and during
the race which is afforded by
newspapers and the wireless. It
is a combination of these things
which has helped to make the
boat race an institution.

And yet in its earliest days the
event was not considered of
sufficient importance to make it
even an annual affair. The first
race was in 1829 when Oxford,
no doubt inspired by the fact that
one of their crew was named
“Toogood”, were the winners.
But not until 1856—20 years after
the first race was rowed on the
tidal waters of the Thames—did
the event become an = annual
affair. Another important date in





+ Traffie Don’t
No. 10
®

Do not stop in the middle
of the road to take up some-
one.



Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.








Ano JUST THEN
THE PROFESSOR
OF ENGLISH AND
THE DEAN OF
CLASSICAL
LANGUAGES
COME ALONG»








THANX TO i
ROBT 2 HEISER, N\
(38 KO PROSPECT AVE, 1

STATE COLLEGE, MA.



2-28

the 97th, #

of &

OXFORD
4



PRACTICE

First time on the Thames—Oxford’s probable boat race crew for



spell.—Ewpress.

those far off days was the year
1846 when the first outriggec
boats, forerunaers of the present

Ff lay shells, were used.

Most Memorable

Which was the most memorable
of all boat—race years? There are
many different claimants. There
was the magnificent race of two
years ago when Oxford after
leading all the way were beaten,
literally on the post, by Cam--
bridge. The margin was so close
that even those on a level with
the finishing post had to wait
until the judges had delivered
their verdict.

And then there was the mem-
orable year in 1912 when both
boats sunk and the race had to
be re-run. But probably the most
famous of all boat-races was the
one in 1877 when the crews dead-
heated.

Oxford on that occasion had a
slight jiead when their bow,
Cowles, damaged his oar so badly
that he could do no more rowing.
In spite of the handicap of having
to carry a “passenger” and in
spite of the fact that they had
only seven oars to eight, the
remaining members of the crew
stuck to their task so gamely that
although Cambridge were able to
pull up slowly, the finishing line
was reached with no discernible
margin between the two boats.

Latest weights and order of
row ng.
CAMBRIDGE *
H. H. Almond (Shrewsbury and Lady
Margaret!, 10st. 6%lb.; D. D. Macklin

'Felsted and Lady Margaret), 11st. 111b.;
J. G. PB. Crowden (Pedford and Pem-
broke}, 128i, 10lb: P. EF. A. Sharples
‘Shrewsbury and Lady Margaret), Ist.
élb, E. J. Worlidge (Mariborough and
Lady Margaret), 1l?st, 13%; C. B. M,
I.loyd (Shore, N.S.W.. and Lady Mar-
garet), 12st. 12%lb.; W. A, D. Windham
Pedford and Christs’s), 13st.; D. M.
Jennens (Oundle and Clare), 12st, 91b..
(stroke); J, F. K, Hinde (Malvern and
Pembroke), Sst. 41b. (cox). Average,
12st, 7b,
OXFORD

J, F. E. Smith (Eton and New College’,

list. 11lb.; A. J, Smith (Me\bourne G.S.
and Merton), last. lllb.; H. J. Renton
{Fton and Magdalen), 13st. 1i%lb.;

u. A. F. Stokes (Winchester and New
College}, list. 3lb.; M. J. Hawkes (Bed-

ford and New College), 2st, 11%41b.;
G, C, Turner (Winchester and New
College), 4st. 6lb.; D, N. Callender

(Eton and Trinity), 12st, 64lb.; C, G. V.

Davidge (Eton and Trinity), Ist. T4ilb,
(strokei; G. Carver (Yale University and
Belliol), 8st, 7lb, (cox), Average, 12st.
13441b,



Wilkes Has Eyes
On World Title

From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 19,
Rodney Wilkes, the only gold

medal winner at the recent Pan-
American Games told pressmen
when he arrived at Piarco that,
“IT have my eyes not only on the
World Olympics, but on the world
lifting championships to be held
in Italy in October this year. I
do hope the Olympic Games Com-
mittee will make it possible for
Trinidad to send a team of lifters.
After my lifts in the ‘Pan-Am’
Games, I can win the world title
in my division”, It was a confident
Wilkes who spoke.



y li Do It Every Time
XT] Se

| The Iota A Pot Og By Jimmy Hatlo |
yy

the Varsity Boat Race against Cambridge to-morrow make a fine
picture as they shoot past Hammersmith Bridge during a practice

Re-elected Water
Polo President

At the Annual General Meeting
of the Barbados Amateur Water
Polo and Swimming Association,
Maj. A. R. Foster was re-elected
President of the Association and
Mr. Peter Patterson was re-elect-
ed Vice-President. Mr, Tim Year-
wood was elected Secretary and
Mr.-Evan Rogers Treasurer.

At the beginning of the meeting
the Secretary on behalf of the As-
eociation congratulated their
President, Maj. Foster, on his be-
ing awarded the M.B.E. in the
King’s New Year honours list.



Cricket On Monday

A FRIENDLY cricket match will
be played on Easter Bank Holiday
26.3.51 at Belmont grounds Six
Roads, St. Philip, between
ane XI” and “Chamberlain

Play starts at 11.30 a.m.

TEAMS

Chamberlain C.C. C. Leacock
(Capt,), St. C. Sobers, R. Thomp-
son, I. Seales, F. King, C. Tull,
V. Burke, V. Branker, C. Mas-
siah, B. Austin M. Kellman, K.
Kidney .

Clarke’s XI. G. Clarke (Capt.)

G. Kirton, H. McCarthy B.
Springer, O. Carter, V. Holder,
C. Clarke. P. Roach, H. Jones,’
J. Jordan, S. Miller.

Umpires: J. Ramsay O. Sandi-
ford.



Lindsay Gordon |

WinsB.G. RoadRace

From Our Own Correspondent
GEORGETOWN, March 20.

Lindsay Gordon, B.G, champion
cyclist won the 17-mile road race
from Belfield to the Sea Wall
bandstand on Sunday morning,
covering the distance in 38 min-
utes ahead of a field of 36 starters,
Mario Mendinca was a close sec-
ond, and Dennis Rix, third.

The race was marred by a mis-
hap involving Roy Gordon who
fell and suffered injury to his left
hand when he rode into a cow
shortly after the start of the race,
He was rushed to the Georgetown
Hospital and admitted.



Assize Diary

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28

No, % Rex vs. Cecil Scantie-
bury,
No. 7. Rex vs. Kenneth Hurdle,

THURSDAY, MARCH 29

No, %. Rex vs. De Coursey Grif-
fith,
No. 21, Rex vs. Randolph Chand-
ler and Kenneth Hurdle,
FRIDAY, MARCH 30
No, 4. Rex vs. \Gardiner Gittens.



INSTEAD OF THAT SILLY
“Sone OF THE CULTURE.
YOU'RE SUPPOSED TO

BARBADOS





ADVOCATE

World Middleweights
Run From Turpin

By GEORGE WHITING
THE MIDDLE-WEIGHTS and the cruiser-weights of

the world are running away
who shall blame them?
Finding opponents for

from Randolph Turpin — and

Britain’s rumbustious young

middle-weight champion has never been easy, even when
“Licker” was a fledgling pro just out of the Navy.

Now, after nis 48 sec. destruc-
tion of the luckless Lue Van Dam
at Harringay recently, the match-
ing of Randolph has become box-
ing’s biggest heedache.

Proudly, promoter Jack Solo-
mons has told the world that Tur-
pin will be fighting at the Gardner-
Weidin show at Earls Court on
March 27—eight days after his
return clash at Leicester with
Frenchman Jean Stock,

Whom will he fight? Solomons,
earnestly seeking g box office
answer to that question, has his
scouts flourishing cheque books
half way round the world — but
their preliminary reports are not
encouraging. Randolph seems as
popular as the plague with the
fighting men of America and
Europe.

One Volunteer

Up till now, the only offer to
accommodaté Turpin on the 12-
Stone mark has come _ from
America’s Mel Brown, who will be
back in England within the next
few days—but whose claims to this
kind of billing would have looked
a good deal brighter had he not
been outpointed last year by
South Africa’s George Angelo.

Which of the world’s middle-

‘ weights could be expected to give
| Turpin any kind of test before he

gets down to his Empire title
argument with Australia’s Dave
Sands this summer?

Combing America

Obviously, the pick ot the bunch
would have been American Jake
LaMotta and Frenchman Laurent
Dauthuille—heroes of a 15-rounds
slam in Detroit last September for
the world title that LaMotta sub.
sequent'y ceded to Ray Robinson,

But this top-line pair are out.
Dauthuille has qg date with Claude
Ritter in Paris a few days before
the Earls Court show. LaMotta, is
still recovering from the hammer-
ing he took from Robinson, and is
certainly in no state to risk his
chin coming in contact with Tur-
pin’s right hand.

It seems inevitable that Ran-
dolph’s next London opponent



The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.02 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Full) March 23
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 4.30 a.m., 4.28



m
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil
Total for month to yesterday:
22 in,
Temperature (Max.) 85.0° F.
Temperature (Min.) 73.5° F.
Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
E.N.E, (3 p.m.) ENE,
Wind Velocity 14 miles per
hour
Barometer (

a.m.) 29.944

(3 n.m.) 29.868





BROS

Show you these and more
for Ladies!
Anglaise Embroidered $3.04

up.
Checked Taffeta

$1.37
a yd.
Spun Silks
in varieties ...... 87c. up
Crepe-de-Chine
in varieties .... $1.14 up

Sandal Shoes in Big varie-
ties

Felt and Straw Hats

Underwears

Costumes Jewellery

‘Wrist-Watches

Pocket Books Etc, Ete.

GENTLEMEN!

Sports Shirts in Plain and
Flowered for holidays
Striped and Plain Woollens
‘Inderwears

Ties
Socks etc.
Shop at

THANI
BROS

Pr. Wm. Hry St.



WAITING FOR
YOU

A Fine Range of...

EXCLUSIVE TWEEDS, WORSTEDS
and TROPICAL SUITINGS
When TAILORED by US will give you
that look of PERFECTION.

gee See the Patterns now on Show!







P. C. §. MAFFEL & C0., LTD.
“TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING”

will be a eruiser-veight, and it is
with the object of finding one
brave specimen of this class that
Lew Burston, Solomon’s New
York agent now combing
America,

is

“Bough Task

_ You have only to examine Tur-
pin’s record against Americans to
appreciate how tough is the task
iburston has been set. As an ama-
teur Randolph knocked out Harold
Anspach, g tough marine in less
than a round. As a_ professional
he compelled Pete Mead to retire
with his ribs smashed after four
rounds, and hammered all real re-
sistance out of Tommy Yarosz in
eight rounds.

All of which raises once again
the question that scores of people
have asked me since the Van Dam
explosion: What chance would
Turpin have with world champion
Ray Robinson? At this early stage
I venture only one forecast.

Robinson, from what I saw of
him in Paris, is the greatest all-
round fighter in the world—but
neither he nor anybody else would
stay upright under the kind of

right hand killer punch that Tur-
pin hung on the chin of Lue Van
Dam.





SATURDAY, 24TH

‘ r Dance Band un
The Police vi supply the

i lida
sca de Baile Sup
Mpolicia el Sabado, Marzo











MARCH, 9 P.M.

der Cxpt. Raison
Music

por la Ba
24, 9 pam

ENTRANCE: ous



\. Zealand M P Calls
lor New Approach
To Test Cricket

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,
March 22.
An appeal for a different ap-
proach to Test cricket was made
to-day by Mr. Walter Nash, New
Zealand, leader of the Opposition
when the England and New Zea-
land Test teams were entertained
in the Cabinet room here.

Mr. Nash said he saw a good
deal of the final day’s play in the
first Test at Christ Church and
was disappointed in the perform-
ance generally. During the four-
day drawn match, 1,013 runs were
scored, and only 21 wickets fell,

“If we are to have the type of
game you men are capable of put-
ting on, you must get a transfor-
mation .from the Test match
mind,” Mr, Nash declared.

“If we can get back to the old
style of cricket, followers of the
game would love it. We want from
you English team the same lesson
in cricket as we received from the
British Isles rugby teams,

—Reuter.

Peruvian Will

Swim Channel

LONDON, March 21.

Channel swimmer Daniel Car-
pion of Peru, at present resident
at Caona, Buenos Aires, has
officially entered the Daily Mail
Cross Channel Swimming Race
1951.

In 1947 Carpion now 39, became
the first South American to swim
the English Channel. He left Cape



nda de la



: Ali Tourists are Welcome _ :
—: All Venezuelan Friends :—

SPECIAL DANCES !!
SPECIAL PRIZES !!

Bienvenido a Todos las Turistas
y Amigos Venezolanos

Bailes Especiales

y Premios

$1.00

DINE and DANCE

at

the

Crane, Hotel

EASTER MONDAY 26th MARCH
1951

SPECIAL DINNER WILL BE SERVED

| from 7—9 p.m.

DANCING 9 P.M. — 2 A.M.

Music by Riche Goodridge and his Orchestra

DINNER & DANCE
Admission to DANCE only

$3.00
$1.00

Please make your TABLE RESERVATIONS EARLY

Phone 2220













| Gris at 10-a.m.,

_

a

FRIDAY,

on September 4
and landed at Folkstone 14 hours,
46 minutes later, Carpion’s entry
was the fortyfifth to be received
since the race -was announced.
—Reuter.

TIN TALKS GO ON
WASHINGTON, March 22
A diplomatic source here to-day

categorically denied the report in
Washington that tin discussions
between the United States, Bri-
tain, Holland and Belgium broke
down. Talks are continuing, he
said.



—Reuter.






TWINE

Skein

Esta Noche







MARCH 23,

1951



which makes %
“GOD'S WAY OF :
SALVATION 3

COS

PLAIN”

Plecse write fer one to
Samuel Reberis, Gospel
Book end Tract Service,
30, Central Avenue, Ban-

gor N. Ireland.”

os

LECCCBSSSSSSSSSSCOSSSOSSSS

Visite

CLUB MORGAN

para

un entretenimiento

de cenar

. y baile

PAPER Per quire of one colour 36¢
heh 2¢

Per ball = 27e. 28e. & 47c.
(Cero e

Beda ais Ree Ok



CAVE

SHEPHERD

& Co, Ltd.
10-13 Broad St.

SHIRTS

STIFF FRONT

AUSTIN REED

DRESS

SEMI-STIFF DRESS
SEPARATE COLLAR STRIPED

By

VAN HEUSEN

COLLAR ATTACHED STRIPED

_ By
AERTEX

SHORT SLEEVE SPORT

AT

C. B. RICE







Phone 4267 for

&CO.





SWEDISH 6-PANEL DOORS
Vx 3 x 14” thick
Tx 2’8" x 1%” thick

These are well made Wooden Doors at

low prices.

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

48” thick, 4

x 6’, 8’, 10’ long

3/16” thick, 4’ x 8’ long

SURINAM PLYWOOD, best quality
14” thick, 4’ x 8’ long
14" thick, 3’ x 7’ long

RED CEDAR SHINGLES
DOUGLAS FIR JOISTS & PLANKS



Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €9., LTD.

*











arene




PAGE 1

PAOI I..I I BARBADOS ADVOCATr IKH>.\\ M\i:( II B. IS1 Harrold Clarke Connell By TOhlY VANTIRPOOL Una* h\ Harn-H TUrbado* %  IUCCCf is a k%  MrilHI Harmln C CoDfkrU, %  of an c: :*mJi at Irish axti .. n* h*^ dea %  During boyhexv .: but Ma r.reer bei*n b :i*on College:>d was Tdmitled to UM I of Art. London, whose l*nn.ipal was Iain MN thoughts dor buck U. t; %  his train) nK and ttic build inn which boused School Thi* ItuilflinF I inolly built l>v (he I as a Town H My became %  %  i>t the Italian Embassy II WH In thif. lame buil'in e his haii Tha hi>kldtnaj ni eop eci a l L? suftabk fa • Imasinatlona. Kour Yean Connell spent four years at Hie ol and during thai period inaa> ti %  %  and furnishing with Messrs. A CV, Ltd. Grafted Street, i. After leaving he opened bin none ^aba in Trafalgai own Art OalUry — The Albany %  %  Gallery — at i7 Sockville-Street on Match IKtli. 931. This GalItem mi actually taught b lory was opened with a very John Paul | I ., .,: • Cuts by Claude Might, one of the he was painting undei rhier Brttttn exponents of linoHis works M the Kxh.: tutting who ulso wrote books on found quite interesting. 34 a great numConnell also ber of exhibitions. wer c held at 'nends from Waterloo Wi Ihe Albany GalW-rv Among the %  %  P a They wore artists exhibiting their works striking on pastels and wen from time to time were Duncan '"a* u > exhibit their work but Grant. S J. Peploe, R D. Dun'hat tfatj could not afford i lop. Iain Ma, Sab and OUve Snell boards to work At one exhibition Clare Leigh„ *i< Brallsfordi showed her rrmid ""STLw ^LH^iT^ S"^ 1 Tne brighteneu up — te ** donc by nn En l h material. One was prouu woman afu r lna| ftw Gandhi A Press Release to I pen stated; If Mr Gandhi will not leave a great Impression behind among our •talesmen, he has at any rate, been a boom to his personal acquaintances who wn. and artists. I visited the Albany 0*11 this afternoon where Mrs. Hrallaford i* showing a large oil paintThe mo t advanced Doctors* Disease Sets Doctors Arguing f" • KILLED] NOVELLO 1 % Mrelir.il Offirrr Of II. ..I.I. the t become more cerraaaa M*ft aiucfci B An any etisee be eoaamunity •'iKh the patient comi ; OAoa ihere have been warning sjrafatoru during the prei days. M ensure absolutiasss and to eaae distress with •-tpected rawof deals* Ulartsoa >< oam Ring drugs. • caysc calculated for *(um the paHei>: recovers %  '-k. .mmedintr Ul I udden dnnsage M the heart "uscle 1-r Ta> be considered a .• utabLp case for tfi "fpinn or dicouaaoral. the o called anticoagulant dstats. ITiese -re given To prevent .-inner clotting of the blood In •rie arteries of the heart and >lher organs. a—i —a* p n aai latsort. is lahan %  • *** aW nss lar doctor s has %  -%  ifc.the legal proteew coal mineu 40. for osttural wer he ri it •aetr MCOO men and women >f coronary disease each r*ar i red be was doi BABKOLD 0. CONM i i country's "funny-men" who can • Tinus at times. Is well i leal Interest and skill; and, to many people. nave what the cartoon looks like •fore i compressed Tor the }.:iper" Other exhlbluons were "Palntinits of thf West Indies' by Lt Col, Va.llieff—159 painlingt from all parts of the Wast Indies Kxhibition of Oil and Water Colour I';iintings by Margari" I. C : Toiio Palnllngs of Historic London by R. A Wilson and others too numerous to mention. Why the disease now attacks more people—and particularly *ny it seems to strike with greater venom those whose work entails rthOr than physical strain -are points which are being hotly debated in The Lancet. Coronary thrombosis is caused by a narrowing of the diameter of the main blood ve s se l s (coronary arteries) of the heart Eventually the blood cannot para : long the narrowed channel and forms a clot (thrombus) In the ortery. The result is that the neart muscle—a large part of iin a seveie attack or only a small pan in g slighter attack—Is cut oft from the essential supply of Hood on which the efficiency of the pumping mechanism %  i %  i. iCORONARY THROMBOSIS 0) It kills Mi urn people a year It strikes hardest at Ihe successful Hut Its OssMaT may lie In a fear of failure. few peats ago operations were being devised to mprove the blood supply of .imaged by coronary :hrombosis, but progress in this llreeUon appear to have teased ;or the time being. The tr-igedy resslon of the theme half his patients. KsJ of the Mahatma7 which she ln '" I'uvement Ait: ind the -pint of the twentieth do through her Wai Cogflpajp Martin of Bond tury. From time to time, exhibispecialues in landscapes Ink and wash in such %  have all the enj ^. It Is believed to have sonietl.mj to do with the breaking dnwn of lat in the chemical factory inside the human body, though this II the '"" '" Jiy tnat coronar y thronibo•' has any connection whatever th diet or obesity. But its occurrence in many cases certainly to depend on heredity. acquaintance with dim Street, .. miner, win "He leluM-s u, g|fe Mtt.nns to showed cOBBtrucUve designs artists but ho allowed Mrs. Wick and white of th* kind shown is a bellev BnUgferd, who ssscotsparr* him ta art schoola, on his business. tws, __ _, ,_ and even slay wiili inn. %  -irht Tu atatad; "A word Incidentally smoking, whnn 'as at one time thought to pre ipitate ihe clotting of blood In In Us* universal kinthe arteues of the heart, is now "-"ly hnrmless. lions of works of 1( rt in various icdia arc held here, for Connell l days ship of the nrlsin recent event was regarded as relatl %  n i xhibitlon by the Four and Four Group. of illenea so tii.it *he couJd gat *'"*' l """ t,00rt tnst '* w r wtm "The Albany Oallerj Is mdce<). sketchafl of htm. She did not Ijkc* %  axhlbiUon has been arrange ,„„. dedioated to Ihe cause of conthe days of silence as he Kept till Wlln " ""PhaslS U|KMi CUVpmtemp(rary expression In eontem'? lJl ". head bent down except when *ntial intereet, but a if pave idly he looked up to ."> art had its own d. crack some dumb show loke with Other leading pavem her. Villlers an-She has plotting of him m '•• %  Hulhert or Oxford St every position, even do/.ing. but C E Mrl/.-n of Hydl the iiimiii'd portrait is of Oaadhl Corner, n Humpus porarj rnedli and idiom, its work is stimulating, suggestive and significant." Connell closed the Gallery in lyji when Gre.it Britain went Ott i public rpeaket In U., BtsOfl Mrs. Drailsford was best It&OWn for her beautiful wood engraving?.. Her husband is the well %  ulhor. Another meat Albany attracan Kxhibition of Cartoons by "Rcm". the i Stubbs of Waterloo Plao I ark 0lv gold jdondard and the majortty of luxury businesses were toreed to close. He joined the slnfT of Coronal y thrombosis is u serious condition: ab'.il one in ten of flr-t attacks are immediate^ But there is a brighter side Modern methods of diagnosis and treatment have helped many sufferers even those wh> have been most desperately ill. to return to useful life for many years. women. shortly before his aV year. Professor John Ityle of t>xfi>rd. himself a victim of coron-' ary thrombosis, pointed uut in the British Heart Journal how rapidly this disease appeared to be on th Increase. In seeking the roa for this he emphasised the impor-1 lance of social and occup<>tu rial changes; in forty per cent of inpatients under his care he bad noted heavy mental or emotional! strain. It may be of course that the professional classes are geore usceptlblc to this dlai I manual workers, not beca U eir braint, i the St 1" upet Whip of Ambition perhaps' of en psychiatrist IkW that susceptibility t< coronary thrombosis is related w tear of failure, with a consequent peipelual straining to calch Up with ambitions which m i\be only half reali-cd even in "thr*e j Bt the very top of their pal I i ular tree, •! .Poeafbl* the body has t> rebel m some way against tt I il tfforta uf these tvho arc cot trail haps by their hereditary I tO rfde ever forward On I ing wave ,1 gut eeai to some; unattainable shore. wosio corYHK.m i i -.imi BR1KF ArVfUBANCE Johnson and F. Perm. I .,. ,., s,n S Ltd.. interior gar Square decorators of Tnttenhs (HH.d Anotbei laarling It the KxhiDition was extremely g*>od. Interestlni and often A doctor called with a ruspeclcd "heart aitac,k' will recognise coronary thrombosis from the severe and distressing itain >n the chest of JOHANNKSIlflu; A new island, ebb) I 100 rardi long and with precipitous • M *i*.,•PP* ar ad above the se 1 .? }',,.!^' * %  > %  South West AJI It only stayed about an houi disappeared under the wate; | before anyone could examine Peter Isaxendale's (Mn niatit %  %  * % %  l uld bu; Baxendulej Exhibition F CU s little as seven shulllrawings and Portraits and aninKS '"" ioriblnci ''"' ' AKn !" La""*"AJ, Exhibition of PoU] Hi lili lii toons was aUo very Intel I For this th. %  Perhaps the highlights at the Connell his world famon Albany w re twi Bxnll rwrernenl AiiitDevon artists Beerbohm which \> i took part m these and Iheg repHouse ly artoong exhlbtUoni wei,. called i h <; on show at this • i 'Tertment Artists Aoadarrq among the car too n ists taking part while Conaiell > the hunt for pavcn.ent erthU Orttnl I is. Will that he came across some of Ihe Hyson. Ciimbcrhatch and Matt most interesting i .,, %  career. He galhereri ihls lype of Disraeli to Daldwtt artist from :ill qu B % %  most mf> \rvts ( hronlclr h w e et l n sj. When he wax discovwrote ri'i exhibition by the Senior Short Story Competition The livening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-gim •he ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Snort Story (mpetition, stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words length and must reach the Short Story Editor. Advocate Co. Ltd • later than Wednesday every week The best story each week will '->e published ln the Evening Advocate and the winner will rcFlve a prize of books or Stationery to the value of lj/ff. Send this coupon with your story. H MOR SHORT STORV COMPETITION Home Address NEW STOLE Ml KI>rK NEW YORK Murder—new style— H against three asylum ..' IB I taam m Georgia retenth They were accused of killing an Insane patient by forcing him to swallow a handkerchief Gums Bleed! IIU*4lnC Hyni So.Muoih .nil !-*-. T.ih >*an thai you have f f arrl>**. Tr.i.i I. M,>uth or parkapa %  < %  !M*** ihat will aoon.r or l.i-r nalUn> am H*an Trouble A maun atM K<" kl*.'.T-I lough c h Mi n dnla-ard M OtfI| %  •>'• 1 I !" i -Hi wida natglii at '•ii. Kriask SM a "luraanb f*. ' xpciait -,ih vahkk (ull lada %  OSga si'Hiiul. ( %  r-atjla dnruig Ir^uUTcd aplui haai and coll (tratnt iruE SURE OF* Why not he More comfortable ? i' e Duni'tpiUo latex foun rnattt c w u |u^t %  boui the moai comrortaUe thing one cen inuginc Natunl resilience aided 1>\ |><>nt*m, pranrenti ls %  ! shape nod middle) naurng turning aod beating try. DunlopiQo Is duM-frec, a^nrt-reaittirjg, and completelv odouriesi, and what*! more tberc arc i>" springi >-t gtuffing in come thnui^h the covet ••t • >ui. Dunlopillo Latex rbam cuahicairnfl i alao Ldeal for ind fbi bus, cinerna and theatre %  %  icrevei lupicjnc comfort is Kcniired. in in its porosit] it is particularlv suitable fbf i Imatcs. e>w* -with ihe faithful naj \M i o'. Ihe Beautiful. l r. gats ... be prepare!. rarnanUc momc it. twi .i |e oakas ol mtt:.\ ii iii i BOAP. fi.itl,fully in >


PAGE 1

PAGE I H.IIT I1AI1II Vims AllVOCAIt I111UAV. MARCH 23, IMI AVSTIV 01 it HI:AIM H% %\\ i .onnecU>i %  rone* ha I %  %  < rtticitm Of S.P.C.A. SIR. -Mj attention has been drawn to the advertr crtUclim of •hr S.P.C A. mad* .n th.House %  Assembly r.iently May I Inform the public that iP of rMrrvos b, ^ Q,^, inspector KlV * c l % companies n.i* Bl WBtka to the rondrboA of .ie been relenfd to n. *ac.arious and onm,^ bW>; tUi slouohtor at tnpublic market and we haveji*\M M*> 1 Mn to fuueat that '' * obtainrt fron. I This £„.,,= s^T*bS jsa-? ssjcsssr"-^ 5~ UM r< |l %  %  ... (3) 11 mad* fin" the purpose ol controlling the f!v immttcu and the danger of the mntau pi say the reiculattonit shrt. forced and should be made (.< %  npfily lo all Dairies erected wttfctn 0 thousand yards of any howr. Wad the reguLitions should oe %  %  daspite .-.roil o*r v ital mistake and. %  %  %  • a, rle.-irlv faiso. tho ahonenminn of Uic a |l,n ta including Hare H ., M||1 „ le ral Ihumkm To r*e tdiior. The Adt-ocal*— f of the girls of aaa i-l the 1 would %  Bbcpham ...vullv. for thfir "" %  ""*"" rooaJood was nh :im an |I01 W .md the winning ticketl do so. was No D—20 held by Mrs. O. ( Hrittom Cross Road. *.are al*o due to the loodttl Se' helpers -and to the public for thetr on healtli genereus support ltd Friday, structural shortcomings of th' .'laughter-hour* have been investigated by Canon Moore. M The mistake lies in looking on IWnr ,md myself and represm icnt ns something apart tntlom liave been madr to the frosn Uie t't.inmuii.iv. as if it Colonial Secretary on the matter Mood on its own Hnancial feet Th.' overloading of draught separate from the economic life animals causes us treat concarn I :.dos, and had interests and 1 would point out lo our diffet-mp iron, .md perhaps adcritic that no statutory r*guJ. those ol Ihe r.s ,-xist in this island for detiiimcnt is Just a termining maximum loads. Many ing many necessary members of our Society, as wVU %  oaa that as our Inspectors, ore constantly TT nry v *Jl^ are less essential, nil of which are stopping and advising cart men in paid fur with money drawn from not only regarding this offence. !he community by taxation il but also concerning defectlv reserves are to be built up more harness, badly balanced loads and money must be drawn from the ill-nttlng wheels L'cmmunity than is needed to pay In order to augment the DaT p uv O JJliU Hlt Society's efforts in this direction The Commissioner of Police .nimals At present some of thee stable* botb i" the Carrlson and elsewhere are within twrn* thirty feet of built up areas, the %  nanure pens of such horses proTide %  greater breeding place W .lies than do the Cow m. In conclusion the OBtotttHMn ( .j. i(TV wh „ h(J| of these regulations will work .( great hardship on those poor per rons living within the Dairy areai and further strain the hnrd cur you eat it the gratitude Uoo you gave tf the proceed) nas of Oh important points made i>> .hi*, • i no* orfO i. forever in the memory d them. "The The Personal Remft," and "The Cor i %  faithfully. RUBY CHASE .expensive Milk powders. Trusting that the Authorities will take cognisance of these fa;t end act fair by all. Your* faithfulh. POOR MAN. Afm (iruupiitfi To The laatfir. JT0 AoaMM* MMOn reading the discusPuhlir ll-ilih t'.unfTenw Does the taking of this addlreadily acceded lo our request lo Ed Th Ad ,, oca tionul amount from the commuawa rd a priae annually to the r ._ _. : _^^. the Member* ol l! House of Assembly in Friday's have discovered that U cause of ilie proil . thI ii hools has no*, nity in foct strengthen the flnanmem ber of the force with the best SIR.—The Conference ofPu cial position if hard times come' record for Animal Welfare work Health omcccs recent y neld at A>e Grouping may be trouble1 don't think so on the contrary. There Is no need for me to enQueen's Park House WU an unsornet but in my opinion tho pnnit is not even just a matter ol n-oach further on your space exbounded success. The Conference Il; .,| tn,,!,,!,. ,, | roonoy from t h e ppp, ^ !" m si W e welcom.op*-nd on a high note and ended .stoning and the liMIe interest pocket to another, which, if it CONSTRUCTIVE criticism, eswith a unanimous echo of harw *nch tho young teachers lake in did no ,-ood. miglil not do any peclslly tf it will lead to the enmonious sounds. work. particular harm. The mischief ac tment of legislation framed to The Director of Medical service. one te.,cher i;enerally has forty, king money from there protect and increase the relatively Dr. 0*Mahony and Mr Doug's? f : fty i or sixty children lo teach, be put lo work and placing fcw p nv ,leges enjoyed by animals Smith. Resident Tutor uf the UniWill tiie abolition of Age Cir'jup ****** in Barbados. MEN and WOMEN 40, 50 AND OLDER.' here's how you can be strong and active If you fed raa dowa, are not %  • full of life you thoukJ be. and colds bsag oc, you assy need nor* AD Vlisadni. Iry •cieoiiiic, good tasting 1 Scon's Eoiuliioa. Take H regularly all year rouad. Vnamiai and eaergy-building oilIt helps build nubias**, suucdu sooc tod AJ. Yours truly, CtCILE WALCOTT. Hon. Secretary, (Actg.), Barbados S P.C A llun „ %  the Ooveininent's H will lie more or less sterile The Parable of lite Talents still carries a looaon ihat It would bO WOU to keep in nund. This idea o( takmK awn> and loektng up substantl.il sums of money seems particularly hurtful w'-en owing to increased To the Editor. The Adrocafi es, busuicss „ R '".—A'' ct /.csolnf *"-needs so much more money to B"d of Hoolth sa.d about the finance it Dairy Regulation and what Mr. Hill has v.ritlan to-day. one has to There are other ebjeciiorut. For ask oneself why the Dairy Hegugiootor the amount liitioiu were passed. w gieater a apt to I i. .. , i.' purpose sonHatlon of the Ciiv (-') Has any epidemic occurred in the City, if so, has it been caused by the keeping ot Cattle by Dairymen. (3) Have any of the Dairy ke-pers in the City been prosecuted for breaches of the Sanitary regulations. (4) Is It due to the over population of the City. (•>! Wer tho regulations made for the purpose of the fly nuisance and danger of Uio fly causing disease (1) They could not have bee: versily College of the West Indies, ing lessen IhO number of children aro lo be complimented on arrang|a & clu-s or will the large class ing this conference which for tbo atlU rcsnain 1 Will the teacher be first time In the history of this nble to examine fuity Oa M tc to g colony, all persons working In btoks in 1< I My leave I'ublic Health in this Island met Age Gn-uping alone, and staff the ut*thcr in solemn conclave lo echo 1>. so that the discuss the common problem', with imght cnildron ran be pushed on width they are confronted in In* •od Ibo alow onto reoolvo moro rfcrmanee of their duties. Was attention. Try |hia out. Honour^ It 0 dream? No, it was a fan > Ofld Baan awai. The conference fuun-i cot) in the stirring and Inspiring ad"Th* next bother II the young dress delivci.-d |, v H.s Kxe.1!-.. h the Governor in opening the COT, % %  !*' BOWB in SJ toronoo Publk Htsilth worksn unejn r^," a nave an arduous task ond often been observed 0M1 II k "' turned out to N> -. thankless |ob but • %  at ions, to Ihoa* who labour in thHeld of 3llftoo and qualifies lo receive Public He-ilth as U-.-1I M 10 the Administratois of PUbUc Health His Exccllencv's address showed thai leeognltion and appreciation was at lasl being given to this important oplsrTO <>f labour. The high standard of th* lot lures given by each respeetive lecturer Bfafl in.icommunity. Without appearing invidious I think that th< day of the conference will lon^ be neieign Whnky ponetiei ihit dinincUoa of flavour • huh *ill cljim our jlksisnce from the (Inl up. HIGHLAND QUEEN SCOTCH WHISKY Sole Importers :— W.S.MONROE 0 CO IID §IDC(70WH. BSSiADO'. Rheumatism, Ankles Puffy, Backache, Kidneys Strained! Nifhi-. oi iullirTtSm Dl.lii."Nvou.' MM li'k.th' I..* I'llA-SwdlLn An*1*, KIIMJ IIIMITI. Iluinlna lun|rgr ana f**l old W3 'i*il tr. a r-l OMSOJ* %  Kldn. i Tiou %  does. lusilflcaUoni. Tin welfare no conccrti ol his. ho must learn as ho rsu. Thanking \ou. Tl'lNKFU 19 3 51. Puhlir Ihullh """• %  .' ll ^ nd ^ ubt .* d l?:..^ u ^ made for the purpoae"of\mpVv"ing t*mcmb-.Ted by ihose v orf or the nuisance to *d snd those who failed to a' and >i'r harnvy %  •o that ih>y reneUM to prT*tlv purili hith and aoirsa OHelp Kidney" Doi,J % %  U. |i %  vO'iiintaitf prapjirid [la-crlpoor, .]ll Cyalaa. H|ir>ilrrda and hundrl ix-ir>iraoteas r">'* tM .—. No %  onotlf—No Poy Thr *tty lir-t -I— ol Cratss f>" 'H lit —k h.lpln B "mr Kl.tu. >. r. in. cawi .ld. Quk-kiv, Il.l. in.ihryn U r Ilk* ft" asxln And mo MHl m.wr. ihai Cyan will aaiiify you r. pl-i-lih*v aoW >ou to Iry n undrr a n ha.h nunrant.-*. Trni I— iaJii.ln* II i •ntir*l/ Mtian.d )uat raiurn tin •ml pmrm.tr „.,.! g.t > nui num-y ba< k. Cyai. (Si— %  (.-.> easts Hut. at fh-ml aod %  • ni..rv n.* prol? Cystex:-'; N I YS i DO I a ... *isn... >.-,.d, RHIUMATISM To The Editor, The rtovnrare— I fully very inu.li lo UM fOffl M day. May I re'. .Me that lor a comp.ny to build up ,„, ,„„;„,'„ H,, mi |„ nc ,„ l-a .nd lho. who t>lM lo.tW .wrvei. tnd to do >o doe. In(hM( prnlo „, who „ rc r lu d lo mined Ihe opportunity of Ihtlr vlccJ •.,, %  .,,.,.,.„,„ of Intectlou. i. 1M S m ^i'f". """""i'.f live In the vIMnlty of. Cow Pens. live". It I. well known th.it our ,. ; „,,, v .t.enthnd IUi.bl lily to wenth„„ lh | s were the ca-. one would Senior Medical Ollleer Dr. F n hHr.l timer.. For that eompuny. navo cx|Wclrd ,,, tne keeplm Cnuiiiuni has the ft of lertutinx c Uutou renuuM the IU.IT. If It snould need money ci. Ciu ,,, m ,„ bul „ Ar< „ on m ,t„.rs of Public Heulth and n „ vcr „„,. v ,. ars .,„. look on >to its own rorourco. and „ ould nlvf bcm ^mp,,,.,, pr „. to him %  large number of our ,„ v |, w o( lhQ pr .„.„, h i k h .., credit. It cannot make. j. levy on hlbllcd But what do tb RCKUqulUfled aaniUry ln.peet.its and „, |, vln „ ,.. 11: : ,„ (l .rijof 111 abaieholdeu. Oove.nn.ei.ti Ull0ns dQ ,„ prohllMl Mr F c Nunea owe gratitude for the | nc WentUy the aalarles position .. very diflerrm it n ml| whi> hm ^ mM| moll „ n !" cee they ach.e\ed ... ..litmn. m any P.MO <, Dlapelun need, money the •" %  %  %  %  "VJ! dairy In the laland. andln on Ing diploma. In Sanitation 11 ..• %  „, overdue taxed to provide It. Tneretore ^ 1€V|n arrw ^ >t m ,,!,,„„,.,. the unanimous opinion of the eon. ,... nflklaf the cprnpaliy can rely only lfi() rwl from ul ((a er fcrenee that the IKI<1I.'N< .... "Infant WELFAHK W'mKF.RS on Itself. Covernmeiit can draw bu „ d| rm „ H , pln hls dairy Morlalll." delivered by Dr. Oran011 the taxable %  capacity of| lU11 ||| lw W |„ l n.| B1 Hhlm i.Lm at the opening of mo morning fmh llmitl ST. m H1!.L .1. JL*S 1Z£ 10 " kop P ""•• ,nr aa tnoy term aetaion ol the second day of Iho T „ T/ „. pd„„ r The jldeonifr— overnmenl should seek lo j; lhpli own ^ |0 kcep „ a conference ^ns numbyred imol 1.UIKI up Much cm lanolle to rloM Brcstall y |o their neighthe moM btilllant addresses evet ,,,1,, |„ Hid and car. IUI bour -, house as they like. On the heard from Ihe I an. I. h nunn. hollI'''""' 1 !'''" %  ..''\,'•'.,,; tare ol '.his one inuat admit that turcr in this Island on Pol i.aalble if**r.id. "" %  MfiaaWaiai M tmlmt and Healm. In tl • k.,..v ', '. „„..!. I, ork a Hardship not only on Mr important things In Infant Ufa „ ,,,„ ., athod i I doing so. . 1 ;Ej.i "1 but on his clientele who live, were atrikingly revealed care I,, elii.linnte waste h.th a m y^ a nrn ,...„„. llr 1)ir ,. c t„, „f M ed. i„ a „,.; ,,t plastic not only harmlul lit tne -ime out 2 Th




PAGE 1

PACK TWI 1 VI BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MARCH W. 1931 Varsib Boal Race To-morrow 18 Men Row OM OHII I'll \i I II I Bph ...,!.. LOM %  probably claim to b.' the best I A III mar Aili race %  •-ompan:rncnt from over 2.SO.000 | \. uwi la %  retfl %  BOUl aiiyihiiiK ||k that The H > tin UM TIVCT %  M retched .done the (our and H hall "Mi. fro !" Putney V, you arc rieht Ii li the iidac boat race Win ii iN meet oti ith ii will be the 97th. %  itetwecn the i iv.ii \ ii CambrNRv leanoeti law I till on 5? Word on 43. with hfert i.'ii list ol" am the first in IM6 oxford unsuccessful. Last year no unlortunatc to Ion their itroke Dwldce shortly before the race and the year before thai the] weri beaten by • length oft*. mftsi ihnll'T \> r This Year earnestly necking' u box ortlce Anspach. a tough marine m Ii wer to that question, has his !" u %  round. As a professional ___uts flourishing cheque hooka n *" """pellcd Pete Mead tu retire half way round the world -uul Wllh hls r,b smashed after four theipreliminary reports are not rounds, and hammered all real reencGurajdnn. Randolph seems M "Is^nce out of Tommy Yarosz in popular as the plaxue with the • t hl rounds. Ultlnf men of America and A ' which raises once again Eurp.-. tfll question that scores of people have asked me since the Van Dam One Volunteer a* plosion: What chance would Turpin have with world champion Up till now. the only offer to Bay Robinson? At this early stag.:commodate Turpui i.n the 12l venture only one forecast. %  lone mark has come from Itobinson, from what 1 saw of America's Mel Brown, who will ?* him In Paris, is the greatest nllback in England within the next round tighter in the with Davtdfi back in thai Oxford boat, although DM i--iu-.il. and Jan nens. his rival of the 1MB race. Mike Cambridge, then ire Indl .iMi.lli.i great struggle Both mi the Thames prneti-ini{ for tinMg dag bul Ihea ivlrai mucb awa] in U i >n previous post bridge have tended to bold back 'hen craw ethereai Oxford hav pressed on nioi The dark bluea have allajhl ivadahl advantage whacl P la) hathi .... date of the race rinvi.it. Musi Memorable; liiv of rough ...millions winch was the most memorable Incidentally, this rear Oxford (l| Al \ b.<.!t-race years? TlM-re BTC will be publk piopeitv Q the crowds Who gather on rnw nR I lie banks to net a grand-stand K at. i vtaii HI tha net do ao without Haraerati payment. Ne.tlni imis: ii !>, %  foi i. ti.i gottati thai the raoa uutai plaea ,'. '/ right on London'l doorstep and iffhrewebuTy %  nd D> i^g that it is one of the (aw events u c .p WMeh lakes itself to the public "***> %  " %  " }*Jl rather than having the publi.'!;;; J-ft-Jf^ come to It And of course another rtaipid mg t'"i-t n-!lni>: I tor is the amount of publicity both baton and durliuj ihe race which is afforded bi naa/gpap r and the wireless. It is a combination of Ii. which hlU helped to boat race an Institute to carry n "passenger" and in Hoads. St. spile of the fact that they had "Clarke's XI" only seven oars to e'ght, the C.C remaining members of the crew Plav starts at ll.SO a.m stuck to their task so gamely that TEAMS although Cambridge were able to Chamberlain C C. C Lei pull up slowly, the finishing lire (Capt.),St C Sobers. R Thump, was reached with no discernible son, I. Scales, F King, C. Tull margin between the two boats. V. Burke. V. Branker, C Mas Lateel weights and order n' R | n h. BAustin M. Kellman K Kidney Philip. between and "Chamberlain ock t-tHnainnr n on i ilhtewebvr* ie.1 'MI, ii r id i-.a> IUi [towrtrn ir#* gS bigg-st heed ache. York Proudly, promoter Jack SoloAmrn the obJ< Burstun, agent Solomon's Nrw ibm has told the world that TurI be fighting at the Gardner. Weidin show at Earls Court on 27—eight days after hlh return clash at Leicester with Frenchman Jean Stock. Whom will he light? Solomom T-ue.li Tatk You hawi only to examine TurplnS record against Americans to appreciate how tough is ihe task burs ton has been set. A .. i aaj I tetir Randolph knocked oui Harold day drawn match. 1,013 scored, and only 21 wickets fell. "If we an to have the type of game you men are caprble of putting on, you must get a transformation frum the Test match mind." Mr Nash declared. "If we can get back to the old style of cricket, followers of the game would love it. We want from you English team the same lesson cricket as we received from the rugby teams. —R ruler. Peruvian Will Stvim Channel LONDON. March 21 Channel swimmer Daniel Con of Peru, at present resident .. Caona. Buenos Aires, has %  • „ol,he r „"o,o„ y bi, y "Se'U;u gST&ESFaSSuS!? "'" kind of billing would have looked .m, upr „hi „„rter the kind ol \M? tn '" ,l "•""""•nil I a Bood deal brlh.er had he not ,„, nn nd killer puml. thai Tur'| n 1917 Carulnn nnu, la i mB „ b„. ou.poln.ed la... ye,r b, p |„ hul „ on hr 5hta o. I-c V.n ,„eVm Sou.h An,eHc„n''.o ,tZ South Africa's George Angelo. Which of the world's middlcI'ighU could be expcctett>it iut if 01 tu rvnur htiih' The Weather TODAY Sun Rb.es; A 9t am Sun SeU: 6 It p.m. Moon (Full) M.'.r.li 22 %  .ighllng: 6 11 p.m. High Water: 4 30 am, 4.28 YESTERDAY Rainfall iCodrtngton) Nil Total fur month to yesterday: 22 In. Temperature (Max.) 85.0 F. Temperature (Mln.l 73.5' F Wind Direction )9 ami E N E Dp m ) E.NE. W'lr.d Velocity 14 miles per hour Raiometer < am 1 '19 S44 (S •> m 1 -.9 868 w A n win IW: II r r andui i I lllb: 1 Mnt. And vet in it %  the CaDaea avant wag not considered ot *?**_• • nt importance to make it aval an annual afT.ni race wai In ISSfl whan Oxford, no doubt inspired t>> the fact that one of their crew was np ned "Toogo""!". were Ihe inmi. Hut not until i8;Si> -n y> rowed on the Udgl I '• i i %  the Thames—did tinevent become an annual affair. Another Important data In o I St I P K llnulr iM.IVrm .tid l'cm4iri.kc< l KO ico. Av8S*. ISM 31b Xl'llll n Cettm | .%  .. (; | J Itonton IM P.Hi V Slokri .WliKhMlci and New l>t lib M J IU-H.ItmHe Cfeaai, tan. n i m 'WuwhMSSi and Ct>llegri. ) %  (. Sib. D. N Call. II %  .i TriMiyi UM 1MB) 0 %  V Davfaga n i Tn. m i.i.i T\H> I si %  nn iV-k" ITnli Btlllnli. S-i lib ICDXI Avcrasr. u> take up same• Space ii.'in available by t \N.\i:.\ 11RY for Safer >iolorlng. • Cw -,-....i, %  Liiidgay Gordon Wins B.G. Road Raee GEORGETOWN. March 20. Lindsay Gordon, B.G. champion cyclist won the 17-mlle ruad race N.w from Bclfield to the Sea Wall nan bandstand on Sunday morning. iV > v ritiK the distance in 3fl min%  d utcs ahead of n field of 36 starters. Mario Mendinca was a close second, and Dennla Rix. third. The race was maned by a mishap imcilving Roy Gordon who fell ami suffere.1 injury to his left hand when he rode into a cow shortly after the start of the race Me was rushed to the Georgetown Hospital and admitted. PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 19. Rodney Wilkes, the only gold medal Winner at the recent PanAmerican Games told pressmen when he arrived at Piarco that. "I have my eyes not only on the World Olympics, but on the world lifting championships to be held in Italy in October this year. I do hope the Olympic Games Comrnlttee "ill make it possible for Trinidad to send a team of lifters. After my lifts in the 'Pan-Am' Games. I can win the world title in my division". It was a confident Wilkes who spoke. Assize Diary They'll Do It Every Time .—.By Jimmy Haclo ** V / *X 1 gtUAl ICU2 r-ikVT vrl THANI BROS Ehow you these and mor? for LadkWl Anglatse Embroidered $3.04 up Cheeked Taffeta .... %\Xl a yd. Spun Silks in varieties 8 7c. up Cri |,e lieChnii' II vartaUaa ,... SL14 up Sandal Slio^s in BIK varietlCN Felt and Straw IIn<* Under wears v.'nstumes Jewellers'Vrlst Wal.h... docket Bonks Etc. Etc. GENTLEMEN! Sports Shirts in Plain and Flowered f>r holidays Stuped and Plain Woollens Underwear* Ties Socks etc. Shop a' THANI BROS Pr. Wm. Hry St. aaaaasfaasK^ KITE PAPER & TWINE PAPER Per quire of one colour 36^ j „ sheel_ 2tf TWINE Per ball 27c. 28c. & 47c. Skein 63r CAVE SHEPHERD &. Co., Ltd. 10-13 Broad St. in ihi> Chcufw diobd *^ ON EASIER MONDAY 2filh MARCH #0.57 SPECIAL DINNER WILL DE SERVED from 7—9 p.m. DANCING 9 I'M. — 2 A.M. Musi, by Kiche Gnmlriilt-i* anil his Orrhrslru DINNER & DANCI. &I.IMI Admission In DANCK only SI.IMI Please make your TABLE RESERVATIONS EARLY Phone 22211 WAITING FOR YOU A Fine Range ol. . EXCLUSIVE TWEEDS. WORSTEDS and TROPICAL SUITINGS When TAILORED bv US will give you lhal look of PERFECTION. JW See Ihe Pallcrns now on Show • P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO.. LTD. "TOP SCORERS IN INURING" SHIRTS By AUSTIN HEED STIFF FRONT DRESS SEMI-STIFF DRESS SEPARATE COLLAR STRIPED By VAN HEITSEN COLLAR ATTACHED STRIPED By AERTEX SHORT SLEEVE SPORT AT C. B. RICE & CO. Phone 4267 for SWEDISH 6-PANEL DOORS T x 3' x IV thick T x t" x l'" Ihick These are well made Wooden Doors at low prices. STANDARD IIARDBOARD SHEETS '." thick. 4' x 6', 8'. 10' long 3/lk" thick. 4' x K' I..H.. SURINAM PLYWOOD, best quality ik" thick. 4' x R' lonf 'i" thick. 3' x 7' lone RED CEDAR SHINGLES DOUGLAS FIR JOISTS & PLANKS Phone 4267. WILKINSON & HAM CO., LTD.



PAGE 1

KKIDAV. MARCH 2X 1151 11AKB4DOS \n\'OCATi: CLASSIFIED ADSJ~fJ!T~ .1^ !" *... TiLtraoNi ISO* The charge for ennooneenimi. % %  *••. Mama***. Death*. Ac know%  regiaaaila, MM In HtnorUH m w a W on %  aiow Jaya and |l n on Sunday. tor any niiBMr of war* up to u. n a 1 cent* DOT word on week-day* and • c*nt* par word on Buivdar* lot "(" additional word. For Rirtht. Minima or Enaagmen HMUNMrnti In Carlb CeIUrig th. mare* U Sloe for any number of word lip to SO and • ftnU per word lor r. iddltlonal wo'd. Trrmi ca>h Ibo-r V*l brtwern a and 4 p.m Jill In, nraU. MeUtea only alirr 4 am AlklN* -Wo ark in* card*, wre* of aympetny *ri Of the H*i of Hubert Atkm. rapath> In our recent HrMV*H4HI BJJ M Ip Tin friend, -h. rondolrnre avmpathv igh tnn m.-; nk to ail ml wreath* bHtari at Erramiel (iitlrm My Lord Hill VroU Howard. Goulbo %  I M..>t I ll..w.,r FOII SALE "' %  *"" • %  '' work f| mil .id M .rnii Xandapi It u urda o r 14 w">rd, j mil a. uord tee**:—4 rrwU %  leord Sundapf. MJTOW*mVW (AR—0. 1V4B Model prrtrvi Kor lo M P Done M Mil— Apply M C Mom. dailv Dunarenior St Tbo...a*. BSaal In CAJt—Ford V-l X a< Dial d II readi'i*. -"i— %  <— rka-pa SI sa *ed II * on luadj.r Nona • .4Rt>lvrR 41 Ml\ a ,„ | tll T.i ceRe* wiU b* rln**d !• buafn-aa on Saturday Marvh f-tth BrrtR I Lint of Th* Atrwav. llanndnv Department Monci CAR-On* *liandard V-,n guard In load "~ IHlM 15 300 mileAppl\ llenien %  TfTl gfj Sayavi Phone J5M. CAR IB-,] u..—mi %  i . .. i %  KI-KCTKICAl, %  ...-! IV. ..,' *en at K. H. %  n %  MM %  I.., 3f IN MEMORIAM AluMr-i„ t TV of my d*ar Allenbv' who iUr.1 To-day li a day ol r*ir* And man' v.il irfirlA do* I .hall alway. re Wh*n Ih* net of the oi I'.i'iv, iwlfei V ft A %  * -In loving mrmory of ou, beloved -if* ai>d mother Lrotta *h dknl -m March Hid 1*M To-day haa brought it. urf iran Of %  I K.-.1 W* tovrd ; But J<.. luvi So h* took y Ev*r to b* rtinrmbrfM bv Cl>d* A*> huabandi. Ob* Ira Aihb>. Ctnt lurlon idangr.trr... JS3.H II tINIL In ili i'* 1 i %  < I lti-1 F. Lirth 341b II Btflad mm C.!•* I.s WrtttOT order Ug"*d l>^ M %  SON WOIIBEI.L. r.nfi.-id. "lark P-.ck %  U Mil, I. ;,:.-\\giilng rted SMALL it* linoby warned ^galml _.. lo my wtf*. Mll.LKNCF. "** GOLLOPPi aa 1 do not If le-pnnatbl* for her or aiv-,nlr. .ting any debt or d*bl me unlaaa by a wlltlrn nnler UU9TAVU8 ST.IAIJ. Dentlry Tenantry r.t i ' m St Philip .3l-tn ;: NEWSAM & CO. Jc'e*-'e*e'V e*e'-*e*e*,*,',*,'e',',',-,',*e',** EASTER FARE COOKING BUTTER per lb. or 5 lb. tin t AltHIKIt BIKCK and Blrrl*a b •m.lehitter King A ft A ft N134 j CO LTD. 7t 3 51-t f %  TYPEWKITKR One new porubl MIS( KIXANFOUS AFRATFTl WATRHS PlJUfT — On H..rnH1 IV-Irr llllli.g ind Capping Heul Thr*— Carbonatori. lOavMai | I Molor Kli.ilH Pulley*. Bpal* Parta. On TUbra etc. All f\ good old.: lent prrforinari Apvkf to M Alib'di Dial an ANTIQUES— A good tiiliie. i. eluding o:d clock*, Cih. alnln or rust nerdi ni poll .u TIH will hnmtaiilB* with an.' laMo aettii g for tny oc*akn lrndii .(.ma and iM-autv — you* hom* knlvoo: TibUt fate. Oeaaart Mr. Fork* TnbhM*. Deuert 41". Sponri T.ble 54r De^nt 4C. Tea 3Br. Coffee 2Gc. Ed* Xc Re Srtat* f BI^NntE SKUTE deceaard NOTICE iriecrbv Bva th-4 ill partnn. uvinar v debt or b, p aff*rling II* ,.|.te Blanehe Skeete d*c*awd. late .. atpooner* Mill .„ the ,. ..Id. nl .! %  Mha*l in uua Land ip.n.i.r wta cied in Hi* p^rnh ol Ipanl Michael • ttueataat M aend in partKuUra of th". clam., duly aiteHed lo the ii.aMaMbi i RMMANUE1 FIT7.PATRICK J.MINm Q...llfled Ev.cut.i. 0l •, u.ll .i i aald Blanrh* Skeric decraaed. i HA\nr4 A (IrHBlh. %  oak Rat H*i Strrot. Bridgetown, on o. bef< i Ihe ISth day of April, u'll fdW| tu date wr >hall piocerd lo Hi oaaoU of th* deceased, among f p~rli ...titled iherrin having reg. oJy to *urh rlalnu of which w* ah then Have had notice and e oill i be (Ub> for th* aaart* nr any it iteraof %  •• gatoMatdgd n. mv prraon .1 whoae debt or claim we ahall nut Hi km had notice. And all poraoin mdrbi^l to the I ertato aro i*qu*-ted m ^tlle th, i Indebtodneaa without d*Up. fXiard tbn >th di F.N'M*NUL EtTCPATKlTK JOHNSON t,ualin*d teeu\or of th* Will ..( Il^i.cl.e S-eet.. d. %  <•... -.1 10 111 -*n NOTICE IN THE MATTER or HARK IRIS roaCPANr IIMUM. NOTR7B m hereby given that purati.. li aectiai IM of th* Cotnp.M I %  mMMIng uf Ih* cirditoi. of the ,,Un. .-aned comfMny ,ll be held ..I ih rOU* of M*an> Bo>r.. .'. s-.-i. SI reel. Bridget....., Rarliadoa. O Wrdneaday th*4th oay of April ltd al 2 ..dock in Ihe afUTnoon Dated the 31ml day ol March. IBM DKIGHTON HARCOURT I.ISIX WAMI HENRY RAYMOND LEACH. Liquidator' (honM w*b tl •-i> Snnd*ya It word* — It 3 cjat, vor* WOoR &f • HOl'SRS .'.II! UNIFIED FLAT MAIUaHVILir Rank Hall Mam -.. rr.rl.wl gaikwy. drawing and dag*... HKMO, 1 herir.w,,.. breokfaal room. 1*t*' and bath, water, and Uafti. Apply W I atot-i w.*i -i • T P I MARINE GARDENS— H'tr Rima ] bed,,.,,,,. ,.,,,, .unnin, ,|,. bAd). „ Wardiobe* and all rr-idem convent**!.< Lonf lea** p.efrrre.1 Apply Mn m... %  nan. Hotel Rn\ai. u | m -i | n .i % .. % %  ich Fuiin-hed i I u .,t, Applv FVrd.r.c. F.lrPal'irk TclrpJVnT 3M9 ill SI %  Bnterprtaj' P* IM HI H Sotua REAI, ESTATK %  UNOAlilW Nav* Garden*. 1 bed I i H in -mi i mm. >TUM 'in iQR (* %  ou UN ti "Irv Rnad. On* al C |..M 11.11 o. ... K. Maaon Hall Stre.1 Onr at Bid Road On* al Deacon Heed. ehttol Rn*d. Camngloni YlUaa at Sobri'i I an* One-third ol i can be Mid and Ih* balonr* i> F"r p^nuitUf* mm • %  roll Masmne Lane n ; W AJJ. MUUJIING unl30N R I ". Roebuck Slieet Downilali Stere. Stole Room. Fo i Bedroom*. Drawana and Itimn rlc Suitable foff HuRncO :... Intau, MKCHAMCAL Da %  Vv.ek.ly *n.i ***.. Apply Cr**rr-' Sinrr. 10 Tudor Stn*' ABVMmWMB iT M ffS <.o\i II\>II \r \OIIMS LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICi: Th* .] %  !.. ( Haaa phiiup. Che-p-de. Sl Michael M to aril Spoil. M boitom floor el a 3 itorn wall buiidt. in Cheapatd*, CHy. Dalrd Ihia CRul day of Maid. 1*91 r.. II A TA1JIIA. Eaq Poll** Maglatfatr Di.l "A ELlftE PHILLIPS. Applicant SB Tin, appllrallon -ill be ronaM eied al a Lirmaing Cmirt lo be held a Police Court. Dtitrirt A on Monda th. Ind d*. of April. ll. al II "'clock WANTED trB f a .Suaj um Simdni %  • irrrk 13 ..• ffl i 14 tcorda OPOf M i .... HELP THERE It a good ]nb nffe.r.l In Tciiild .1 nr th* rlgnl man. Ilia abllit% and e*poi•itcm inuat enable hlir to lake rh*rg> it the Pholographkc Drpaiiment of wrll mown Store, ftalary and roinmlaton nlerplng With Ida value Dill 4117. COOK. French ehet in Aruba nnd in v s /> Will accept eiig.igenii.t in Ih* Ulan or abroad: relnrnte given. Confat T it.. '. % % %  >.< %  • •1-12 11 1 l—li MISCELLANEOUS IMMEDIATE CASH far dlomnnd l*w*llery. old China, *llv*< and Sheffl-lil Plate iPltor44N or call at GOHHIM.lv a '-'-'ni Royal Yarht Club >.fil -T.P.N Jan Me More than fitly different pl'rr. In l< l-rau1il.il nod*!— See Thaan and B> Them at CAVE. etKEPHBRD A CO.. LTD IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewelry, gold -inggeti. coin*, miniature Jade Old B W I Stamp* GOFIIIINGES. Antique Shop. Dial 44M. TEA SETS F->reptionar Value 23 n|*r* Flnwrred Tei Set all foa~a*. Re* th*** Today al O. W HUTCHINSON 1 CO.. LTD. 13381—* VENETIAN BLINDS. Klrarh Bun-alr* all metal Del.uae Venetian blind*, to >oir alfe* delivery 3 werki Dial 44M A 11A1INES A Co., Lid. 13 f Bl-l I B. Sore Mouth Loose Bloody; Tooth m..-qi..g Uinna. Borr klouth ami %  -.-. Terlh man that you havr Pyorrhra. Trench M.iulh or perri-i* aome bad dl*-A>* lo fall oil! and may alao iau*e Itheumatmni i 1'i-dlng the flral day. end* 00*0 mouth and quickly lighten the teeth. Iron eta*) guarantee, t-iiin mu.t make tour m.irny l.a.i no return of otnply packafr U*t AIKIMI from your rhrmlat A.aaa.a*i*a "*?' Th 5 y '." r*r Pyorreiea—Trench Mouth PRUNES Jlc lb. RAISINS 46c lb. CURFANTS 3c. lb. AUSTRALIAN CHEESE 72c lb. GLACE CHERRIES 89c lb. POI^R ICING SI"CiAII 3c. Pk. BRIDAL ICINC SUGAR 35c pk SWEET CORN . 4c lin ANCHOR TABLE BUTTER 88c *4 -.*'#*;* %  %  if. .*, m BICCI ICF: CRKAM. FOLAR l< F (REAM I'OI.Alt If. ICLKS. -STKR EGGS MOIRS t 110(01.ATE BARS PI WITS In Tlt HAM In Tins TASAREEP In li-.ttl. HAPPY RELIEF FROM BACKACHE H:>whbattr mid "TeAo Doon' %  Pilli" WHY PI I VP wiih nccJk*i v% ui..otB(ofT frocn backjKlie. thrumath.paint, lumbaao. aulf, a Jung mukclet and KMnti or ihe cummjo urinary tliMMdm due tc tluggith kidney action when you mighi gel bappy icuef Many tiym*andt of health* pe-iorc hleyt the day they look fhQ'i BaAache Kulncv Pilh. Thit well kmnin diufclic and urinary anilseptic helpi •lupii'h r i carry out ihcif furwimn of ridding ihe blood of execs* unc a-,a and other tmpuriliet rurmiul IP heallh. Giaieiul people, everywhere, recommend Doan't PtUi 10 their Inendand neighbour*. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IENDERS MM: TRANSPORT OF lll.Mllis A Mil h TO THE 'imii linilMim SCHOOLS Tenders are invited for the transport of cartons of biscuits and containers of Skimmed Milk Ponder to the Public Elemental) School* Ol ihe Island during the following ichool term* :— 1. 7th May to 3rd August. 1951. 2. 10th September to 7th December. 1051. :< 7th Jaiiunry to 4jlh April, 1953. n htl> drhveriei are 400—6fi0 eartons of bn.itii'. uf 2\ lba. each, and 110—265 containers of Skimmed Milk Powder of 56 11K. i-arh Suppli-: must be taken from central depots in Bridtfclcwn Supplies must !*• delivered every two weeks according to Ihe requirements of the Individual schools, and all deliveries must be completed within three days. Tenders mint cover all requirements of the school*, duung the l.eriods mentioned above, and must reach the Colonial S**cretar>' A later than 12 o'clock noon on Saturday, the 24th M.i.h i .rid.is ituisi Umarked Tender for transport of Biscuits and Milk to the Public Elementary Sikoula. The person whose tender is rcepted must be prepare.! to furnish gurtWag fur the due performance at the contract The Government Hoes not bJo| itself to accept the lowest %  Stta March, 1651. ,m> 51.2n. TENIIERS FOR THE Sl'PPLY OF FRESH COW'S Mil H TO THE PIBMC FLFMtNTARV SCHOOLS. Tender! Bre invited for the supply of fresh cow's milk tn the YmenUry Schools throughout the Island during the fnilowins school terms :— 1 7th May tc 3rd Aufust, 1851 2 10th September to 7th Dectmber. 1951 :i ?ti' January to 4th April, 1952. Particulars of the conditions and icnuircments of supplying the milk ara embodied in the contract, (Copies of which are pvallable lor nfenooa at the Colonial Sccrttary's Office.) Persons te.idering must be prepared to furnish two sureties for Url due performancats of the contract The tenders marked "Tender for ihe Supply of Fresh Coe's Milk" ti. Ihe Public Klementary Schools: must rooch the Colonial S-wrelary's (lITlce noi later than 12 o'clock neon on Saturdnv, the 24th Mtnh 1951. The Government does not hind ilself to accept ihe lowest or any tender. 9th March. 1951. 14 3 5| _2„ r borrow lor n dwn -hll*. c and |*vo -f BUI.. I my %  >... kind". DI..I M*t 3*1 Sl -In POLICE NOTICE INSPECTION OF ITKLIC SERVICE VIIIKI.Is AND RENEWAL OF LICENSES Regulation 16 (6) ol UM Kegu...uiis inane UDfMl B> I • %  lotor Vehicles and Hoad 1 rait'c id, 1937—16. isjrjulpag that own rs intcnainit to rara licenses m respect of public service vehicles, goons v... ..ill Lefore Ihe 3Uth daj uf April, make application to the |.net Of I'l-li. g % %  %  eppolnt a time and pla< %  xan mat mn ol tne .unc 2. Application should be submitted before the 28th da> of April. 1951. 3. Forms will be supplied on 1 ii to the Transport Stilton of Depnrtrm'u; ..T tUghwayi and Transport; but will not ba *ent through the post. 4 Inspection of those vet telM will rommnii' on April. 1951. 5 Owners of vehicles arc here by reminded that vrhiclcf which are not passH as rood-worthy by llu3ii1ii June. 1951. will not be permuted lo operate after that .!..'. %  (Sad.) B T MICI1F.I.1N. Commissioner vl Police. Police Headquarters, I'.ridgetown. li'il March. 1951. 23.4 51—3 IIMtERS FOR Till: Hl'PPL. OF HI'GAk TO THE Pl'BI.lC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS an arc Invited for the * gubject lo the Colonial RrsulalHins and such other local orders as ..re in force nm Th i 1 ""^^' r Sch0 ' i U U ** '>"• %  U. act as Education Officer should the necessity arise. I ""^'.W^ 0mc ,nd nis ,amil >' w111 ^ Provided In WO S r ; i l,h 'he Colonial H.gulatlon, (,.e. a maximum of 5, ,,,„ h P U k B< tmi Ul f M **•'""" of "flUonand ex^n Ihn?.M K ^ %  "ompenied bv not less than two testimonials and should be addressed lo THE ADMINISTRATOR, ST LUCIA reach nnt !at>* •!.. *.... %  iu. reach not later than 31st March 1951 to 17 3.57—2n GRIFFITH'S %  MM Kl.fr:v llial 4511 I Christian SetattE r 1 lifatlinji lliimii ST FLOOR. BOWBM A BOISl) TToun : 10 am.—3 p.rn. TutRsdajs. Wednesdayg, Fridaya 10 a.m.—12 o'clockSaturdara rni-Mii.e-.il BBSBSBBBBBSB -, and Sold. I 1 *g 41 Ihla ftooai taa Rlala and •* i— M U4* ChHitian a***ooa leai-rwek. g, I Hours 9—3 2 IT* %  •"Hor** , atar n4i.au "; Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay M.V e**aa*aoRL Vn flk.ru Hnilr1u: %  ... %  """' P erh. Uudalph* Sch Hal Olive H,h ard*rua W. Bd B*li Bm*li *.,-., i V diAgios S. s-Y Frankly,, D p. Hrn Wvi-drrl i| rat' • M-llor V.rni Hurkaroo; •I Mar. ABBfVAli SB Petl AmhrrM. I Ml tons r*t Capt MUM.II. freer H.III,. via Oreru>0a %  I aaer*-grie. /HI Ui. Harv* M V D arrwood, M ii D^Toieau. fr.-n . : ( %  DBS air ee feed. bnn>*x k ae fMKaaeed f | Viaitora Are Wrtcome | C ,pnsr*.ari ru Heleuaen. 44 tori %  BRRSBl i aai ton. MAIL NOTICES 'XBr. Ihe tt'h Malls for ft! I ue tvilf. appios I orro fMehSS There are J bedr^ .m.. I ; li.Kt.ge* dining i.Him. 1 emloa*. I I iMihroonu. kitchen pantry aervani Idgenl I gar igr Ihi. iHoneiii i. .-en iii'saied ang roranu..^. earellrnl *Hrra ol 0 •• %  lamoa taM %  Ml \ Bg*fBB BUM HHI %  taaas 1 ..mm In.ill vi-r.il N I m in Klni rrdentia1 are.. W.-.l 11 t*.i h a ..I ('~.lnr|..,. %  HI liklt.MI U Pine HHI I.IV in.* |-ak*i rowi '' i' %  %  i .II ag*prp a i i Mr* .. atae Thai. ti gpai aner well propi ill p..uiiTv aMB*es ate Th*..... •* i .xnda an %  nVumuv i % %  Thr WBd nn aaoro ee l el ih* elde. .. j-, i t in' vim Rut |g %  —i %  raaav u muss %  *< "11 (..mil in ted a...I I. %  i.tair I Bfnl BM .' i %  imsi large >i>d oirj rwos-Ua blilklliid* and d • |. ,.... i, afBdita ".it n i %  e.rellent fat ground provi.inn (.iHlvatton PI %  faa f... fftlBfal i-i.i'i.i" IM H atuos 1 o.i reayM t *rr* ruaalland • •< SB r..„dA ndi> itfutnod i. jir ho..e altli thmgl I J." .,..., ... i IS .eraiulah 1 b..lhroom and loiwu. i kilohano. se*sBl RENTALS i.-i, ... %  i Nest .'ni . nriil'hed Iwui .Jill Mi pollen a REAL KKTATK fUMMf AfCTlONKKR PLANTATIONS UIILUINO •Phone 4640 S4SBM Ml II (i I BV •ell by Auction Hie folio-mg KoiMkold rBecti al ream" •eth %  Ii-llevlll* Hi d'l Table. R-i.ii. T.til. Dei I %  tonal Tabl... Cabtn*t tall Mahdg ) Marble Top Table. Clab• "i. Table rhtag.ii.nl Fording Tat,i. UaV* D.amete.i Iranltl Trav. Wicker Chair I lery Chalra. r.eam l-.iu.Ud Waul roll* and DraaUnd TM< '< I..... Re.nt.-ad.. Ileir M-llre-ee. C. KC Radio KlMi'i. T-'.l. I Mill*. Oil I-., p. I tl Pitih Pii^ T-bl* i*. >". I -I I 1' . SB* Sfr-i. EleiUle Toaeter. I W*.licgh..uaHot J'-l. ile* F-. Win IfrtfM 1 .IH .. | Model Valor Slot Rl.M** lemonadi' B*t iJus ,\ %  luae.i Md n**n. Ql fo.'ln. Pht*r*J DUtBOf H*r HfM Dlnnrr Platen Bread R.,' lir rial**. Deaaril Plau*. hlai i l*-t Siret ft Piatril II ier MatSilver Sell Cr'larr Co"ee ('up* U Saucer.. B. IBR> fli.h.r Pre" \< F 1-a.i. B....o. Mi.ing a Pudding Bowl* Meriinng. Cup*, Ri.amel rTjlng Pan. fCiamel Baurrnan. and I a B....FU B*ll-ll*~tr Ccl Iron. Lad) • in BKkrle I.--. %  V .1 Gardr-i Ai .ml. i Tint. Sudratr* l*iii. \l I MUM I IJoataaa ,%f. IH-4*-.. Ape i v A l-hi.n,4640 PLANTATTONfl HI II.DIM. SHIPPING NOTICED ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. \UII Ml. , Oth April lareh •lad -4IIIM. i.. t...' TH % %  -o..lad m.d Marrn 1M1 BA11IMI TO TRlNtli "ARAMAR1BO. OtORul.i MR "BkMvOtr*-' -etth Mai. I %  S -juitlniai." gtl v IS5I BB -CoMKa" rd April 1B0I IAILINO TO LA GLAUIA • Meieh ifdi r~ j M V DAr.BWOOn and P.. irenada i i-. HO MB %  1 IIWNKKS FRENCH LINE ( lr r.le Tranr.aUaniiQ.ie HA1L1NG8 TO LNHLAND m FBAM t GASCOGNf: April 1st via St. Lucia. M;irtir.ique. Guadeloupe ami Antigua % %  I I IlKt.l ••! %  lASl <--NE: March 23rd OreftaVdaTrinidad. British ind French Guiana Accept Inn Passengers, Mail and Deck Passengers to Grenada. Trinidad. Sl Lucia and Martinique. I!. M..HIUUI... I Hi. AGENTS Phone IB 3814 HARRISON LINE O0TWARD rFOM THE DHITXD SIKOD0II Dn. •-. SI'CI-ESSIHI Ifl MI'I.I \-r M SPBCIAI IST I'M'OMA STA1! ss "HERDSMAN" ~s LH-'tNIIERss SCHOLAR H0MBWASD TOR THE UNITED K1M0D0M VM *' Id fl^e. In Rjrh.ilo 1 .V %  1 (HaafKra 1 s.nnh Valai lBth Mar -ml ASH 1.I-H.I..II 21sl Mai. 5th Apr Uvatpool !2n 1 M.u 3rd Apr. London 28th Mar ISth Apr Hal afai lMh Api Uvernool 1st Apr 14th Apr. LBEHRV HILL" London -s raoaracToa G no* s CIIArrSMANI „,,,.,„! :7ih Hv :<<• %  !. Mm 3lt Mar Tor (in l|.tr inform.Uon .pply to . ^^^^ DA COSTA A CO.. LTD.—AfenU 9nt. NEW VOItK SERVICE SS "M>k*n" aai I. Sard rebruari ,..i ( v.. Hurt.B.S Reobirose" .all* laih Marrfi airl.e. n.rb* NEW (IRLEANS SLRVIfT ISih Fen. .. H tlool Baibado* I kaaaili tut Uarrh .....v.. luihado. ? %  CANADIAN I i'\li I -•I 1.11 Ml Naes* a' Bhlg RLCOA PAHTNPKA PKCiARUH 'S • Ala-OA PRll|NAt*T•' i3rd Al ,.. Kit KOBTeUBOl Mi "I "ALCOA PENNANT" .. P % %  M.rrh RB SUM for SI J..hn •. llallfai Sail* for St. Jo),.. a Hallfaa • Ainu PARTNKR" tm Moreh SSlh mitcd passssgasr •*< itOIU.KT TIIOM LTD. — NEW VORK AND GI'IF SF.RVICF AI'PI.V:—DA COSTA St CO. LTD—CANADIAN SERVIl h PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products. Umr.ed, Roseau, Domlnis,, DM sailing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin. London, or Rotterdam. Single fire £70. usual reductions for cluldim. JANWTWA UMK.S.S siiun I HUln nvrr NKUSAM'S l.nMrr Hro.il Blntl BKAUTIFi:l. AKTKKNOON. COCKTAIL nnd EVKNINC ('.OWNS laTOBDAT MIIRMV. until II..10. Tel 2o8l f I.I nu I.I UUH \ri\u OILS AIIK. BMT I1Y TEST DONT ONLY OIL IT lillll IT i iMini im Mini mi '...s ,|.-.i. Sl..-...,.. TralalKar 6* aasBBi \ OTin We ben li. Inlurm our Cviltom*n Ind Ih* G-n*r*l Public ihai our Btor** will b* eloatd on SATURDAY 24th Barak and will re-open lo battaMai on Tuesday 27lll March. I'hnn. i;.... T. IIFRRERT Ltd. Ill & II K,..-l.i:,l. St., & Maxaiinr l.:.nr. Phono 4M7 V*VV>W'.V.VA'/.*.'AVA'.V^.V.-.V,*.V.V/AV///.V.'. '-•""'• %  *• NOTICE Our Cuttomen and Krionds aro askci in not* that our Pto. Head Blanch (Workahop Dock, Ship Chandlery &• Sugar factory Supplies and Getirral Oflice) will noi hr '.pen far busineai on Saturday I Ith li TlM Central Emfanriuni, Broad St. and *. Station, Traial [ar St., will be open as usual. CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. '.''-V//.'.V///rV/.'. ,',•-'-'-'---*-*-•.'-*,-.*-*,'-•,*,'. *,-.-.



PAGE 1

VRIDAY. M Mil II 23. ItSI HAKKA1MIS MiMKATI PACK rivr. Htirt Trouble Caused by High mm %  a \tKJK." j <, Hw lira urM MSfm4 l Haut Trouble or MnlrUt iiroa. SEAsrvrre i Mur< and makae jou faal rw*rt roDHCM u raw av. Uoa4 inifcka jou real wen"*aftt 3**% it a THERE'S PAIN RELIEF AND TONIC B ENEF IT Yeel Yeast-Vis* *.K.U' wiothes awav headaches, r r.Ufia, nerve and in pains bul doi elic ia 1 Brouv c proprrih and rhcunwttc H does someihing I mr erf %  <• vtluaNc 1 **, -ar-> rriui Yeav.-Vue TV/>. ^ V u'iii he rei-v much obliged if you don't siurt i Wicksteed's Festival Is On! BEGIN TO-DAY this Mill if % %  conducted tour ul the British in their native habitat A.D. 1951 HOLYWELL, Hunts. OFFICIAL hand-outs ol That Other Festival say : "Visitors will be encouraged to meet the men and women ol Britain in their own surroundings. . The country and the people will be open to view." PERON'S PRIVATE ENEMY No. Do you net the idee? We are going to bo put on show Ilk? the quaint little furry creatures thai ;>cuttle about in a xoo. Maybe it's a good idea, but why spend eleven and a half million pounds on it when I can be your guide for nothing: So left havo our own Festival. * l s st rt our inspection of Britain and her native types by lioing to some fishing pub by a water-hole and watching the anglers come in to drink. The pub I suggest is called Ye Oldo Ferry Boat Inn u l Holy well, near St. Ivcs, Hunts. It's historic olde. Hcreward the Wake vi gator in a Lancaster bomber. Good Catch The latch clicks again. Here's another angler come in to drink. He's a bit older and orders whisky. A detailed examination reveals that he is no less a catch than the chairman of the St, Ives and District Fish Preservation and Angling; Society. We collectors of British types scribble In our notebooks that his nomo is Mr. Geoff Kiddle. He's in tin old family business, too— furnishing and removals at St. Ivcs. He is also a borough councillor and he's come for a drink after a meeting of the Housing Commiti"pped in for a quick one when lee. he was fleeing from William the Fishing on the Ouse isn't what "nqueror. it was he iays. Too much pollurh tracks of the British Angler tion. Why, when he was a boy (ffcwator Brltannkufc) anii the he could swim with his face in .lardy Fenland Wildfowier have the water and see the fish on the led there for centuries. Tbey bottom. Couldn't do that now. -till do though nowadays a lot of Geoff was in the B.A.F.. too. IMP tracks u re made by motorHe was a sergeant in the radio 1 %  % %  %  Hi section. There, among th e olde oakc "Chick Evans, the next one to beams and the stuffed llsh. you look In was a squadron leader can watch the goings-on in engineer. Now he keeps a toycomfort. Bhop ln s, j ves aIu j acts a* In f.iet,the landlord. Jack Rodd, secretary to the Angling Society, who used to be a grocer at GosFunny isnt it? When you come port, has put in „ TV set to enterto examine these inhabitant* of lain visitors while waiting for the Britain, vou find they are just exhibits to appear. ordinary people... like you and He has also ground-United the me. placg with 1,400 bottles behind Nl xl Week: Another Festival the bar to help lure the Innocent arnr i nlo lhe w))ds of dnrRr5 anglers along. Britain by Bernard Wlcksteed. In Lurk —L.E.S. NEW YORK U P on the top floor of tinsix storey building housing South America's most respected newspaper. La Prenar ol Buenos Aires. is a little soundproof room with polished mshofrarv floor. They call it the sa.ic d'Annes. There tn the old days anfry reader* who imagined thniv aclvea slighted in its co'.umii* could demand satisfaction, not by a libel suit, bu; by a duel wlUi the editor or 0* arrangement even with the ofl*ndnti report or. Trie Salle dArmtshaanot Men used laielv—though lhe carefully poii'hed word* are Mitl there. But. La Premn's editor i life. His opponent who 1 tar ha* won every move but •••111 ha. not found the noenina tor a fatal ibrust is Argentina*, dictator Peron. THE WRECKER A T stake for Oamsa Pea is not only Uie existence of his newspaper but die principle of Press freedom rhrountiout. Argentina Peron one-sided fight with Pas is beina rlose'v watched here in the United Slat**—Downer a more so. Ever atnci Peron took offlce five year* ago he ha-, -hown a marked dial 1 -* lor newspaper men who refined to be vn*-mrn Particubir object of his disjavour has been La Pn-nsn agains' whinh a whole tertts of aonietimea novel wrecking tact it.* has been brought to bear. %  • %  At an* time Peron Took away )ta newsprint and distributed it among papers who showed readier appreciation ol the benefit* of Peron m %  Two month* ago Die Poroni tat Kid newsvendoiv union deaunded one-tifth of all La PreM'i classified advertising revenue. ** Of course, this waa refund. Then Uie union would no', handle th" paper. Threatened Bv the newsvendors. Uie primers want 'on ..irlke." Hut last Mondav laoo worse !" voted to resume publication. Seven hundred ol iheiii weiton their wav to worK ou Tue-duvla-e ever comes to trtat tie air %  on cieten.'e Aaari trom tua paper he na> eiiiy oe VmKDtrm mwret— .Hfiiai i:iui' He owns one oi ineesand* of albums or per. lumiaiic-a by iha world* ban in a ne 1'2-vear-oid laresxni a lew mmiiie* Iroin l and the Pre i I i Pelarr whieti are vtriimny iur The uoustI I i You cunt sec the difference.., f OLD I iij II oi/ uyl 4 %  r-i.:-. MORNING SWIM E %  PAZ by Frvdvrivk (Soak when suddenlv tcsmr hoodlumi iipcned nre. Killinn one Tlien ihey i tlrr io the panel delivery trueKv while armed police stood bv and luuihed POIKC occupied the office U.nt nluhl to "uroteei" IL and Or Piu. the man agami i Pen %¡ eas torinally cliarxed uiih vi naitoual •jeeoniy law. An-werlnK a Ulrphone iDQUirT from New York to-day. he Ntid Kuardrdiy that he Knew no*, hi nit ubout cluirt(es agnmst him beyond what had been pulisluil in Artienlin.i and ovir->a~ As he nuiK oil he added KHIneantiy. however: "But ihank you for your interest In the matter." A handaome, scholarly man of Hfty, Alberto Qalnai Pa/., mulit-nnihonuire wlUi a laMe for Savile lUiw MIUi not only edits bu' own. La I'renti ITI i I Paz doctorate Is in law though lie hanever a It Is morthan hkelv 'hm it nw Ui* work ai ihleader writers wu rt-Mteu ti • %  nuiidrove n-mir anil fU... . %  M'lll I pact proott n' he -.tepped li bo Ftw Ina o I i uaae aiihoui %  In t> Maa oottaM I OOUr t* . Hrllaui Hi I %  service and Ameti' a i on:. %  —twe in raauav %  roe> lhe river Plaie. one in n.va Pa/ la tail gre\ haired and div Unk-ur-iied He haewtht children five ol tl fouiieen uriind-ehildti-ii He : i a Proa %  from i • lather -n i had lound* l igci He lerved i 1 %  appi hhip 'n all departmenu. and lor some team was i leader-inituc room* MtSSI.W: li MEN T HE sort of thing la I'rensa II up urn nil u> ilius'inted by 'instory of it*, brand-new or.-.. ...en III luu It reacheil Buemm AID .% In saletv To-dav u. si'.il Stand*, uncrated In the paper i garage •'t'.iMrwge of labour nas so fai !) %  I Peron from i ill* rctuircd (ioverniiit '. i ll installed AI iii-n would he iieaded for a week Hi delicate n Ariieniina'i ainn"itustian ihat U i"-iMJ \V IULU i-ii'YI.H im l.'.^HHVUi Many WIIUMMI ara HIKHS i lit weak. -ciiiiif tMtk. tlftaa lh<> kkrinrya HIW to hliitiw. fur your knlnevB. ituiig with iho hver. mual htier oat im poritir* from lhe bU"i-irr:iin s.. if v-Hi t—l iiifl. want <>oi, hadBchl mb ili naKSiiiit i"tim <>f nn nclting hack look la -^^ -Ml WiH iri-\aed iivn i h.ii wag < %  "> %  %  l..,i \ %\, I.. Il l.K lit .'II I %  l.i ... Kxhx-v lil r 1-..1I BVWl half ii cantor>. Giva your avatani a chioitv Io w*itk prtiperly. Trv l)r I'liaaea hxlnev Liv.t PI1UOHI.IV TWwaBM "Hr Ommr ia your M-II 1 • Dr.Chases • KIDNEY-LIVER PILL? ANGLICAN SKHVIcr-S FVH GOOD FRIDAY A-MD KA-STXR DAY ST i.iivK"i C(K>0 FWDAY-TSS a.m. Malin. aiui Arn.Can un art Int. SM a.m Malmand Smnon. 13—3 p.m DwvMktni of th O'lm. TStl p.m St.ilnrr* Crtirlltvloii BAarfawl DAY 3 am Choral Eucturut • nil Add'faa. %  m Holy Canuinuilaii V a in Choral Kucha, {tl and Addrf So we'll take up our position by the stuffed bream — (5 lb. Im.) tauKht by a Mr. A. W. McLean in 1010—and wait developments. The latch clicks. Not a word. Some exotic British species i* tumuli; in to drink. Aha! We're in luck. It's a fine young specimen of the male angler In the prime of life. Look, he's orderlns a pint of Utter %  The suspense is territk' lM*$ creep nearer and see If we can '.peak to him without frightening him away. He proves to l>e quite tame and ready to talk. His name Is Tom Metealfe Arnold, but he calls him%  elf simply Tom Metealfe. This is because there has been avnouo and pTut*Mon a Tom Metealfe at Hulywcll, p -" ,pr '*"; '-" %  T" 0 Hunts, since 1063. and he doesn't • %  %  "*•" %  • in ^l !" wish to break the continuity. MOBAVIAN Tom is 28. and when he Isn't .HOEBUCK STREarr PshinB. shooting, or playing darts for pints of beer, he i s rutting: rushes on the river bank as his ancestors have always done CHURCH SERVICES Her old undies look new because they are always washed in LUX You loo can keep your preuv do*lies looking like new — )ui wash ihcm regularly in lux. For Lux gives longer life i" dainty clothes, keep* colours gay ami Lewei) Vet, pHMk Lux Hake* wa*h pcrleclly. So make Ml wur .loihc. Uki longer, koeo new-looUnf — %  •* 'hem regularly in I Keeps ill I dainty chtbts like NEW 1 bl IN eauui CMWrml Srwvim uchi|M . %  .. .ivd Sn-rmoi %  vet ~l -II I'M! S KA-STER DAY Low Maa* Sam. Pi>ir 4Miii and Sulrmn Mm • a.m. Chlldrmi r>n'i.' at 1.10 p.m. Solurm Evp Thorn,... 1pm. P-aakriv JU-. ll>iM MXrni DlSTRHTT-t am H. v U Crea*y pieiVIDRNCft—11 a.m. Mr. J. Claifce VAlTOfALI^Il a.m. Mr. D J" I EASTER ailKOAV QETHKl^-1 am Batter Cominu'ilon 11 ii.tn. Rev BCroaby T p m Krv M A. %  Thomaa. tiolv Conwr.unlun attei "nAIJIBrrii—0 am. Rev B Craaby. ii<>ly CV H.ity Communlnit SOUTH IlUiTRHT a a m. Mr. A 81. Mill. 1 pm. Ran M. A. %  Thuoui. H"ly Communion I'KOVUwiNCE11 awItov. MAE. HE SIMPLY COULDN'T YOU GIT STOP TALKING EXTRA POWER Sayx Hitler's tnlerprator 1 Ol Hoi i.iP Tom's Rushes Bcv. 0C. Moore .Muatral Servi.*. GRACi: HIU. Il a.m. Mr. O. LtWU. 7 m. Me L. 01 m ,_ ,-UL.NEc-K-n a.m. Mr. S Week*-*. 7 prr. Mr. O PTancU. MOMTOOMEHY-7 p.m. Me. D. Colin the old days rushes were used on the_ floor instead of car,< %  '-. or ui oil lamps for wick*. Now they go to breweries, jam makers and women's institutes. Half the women's institutes in ln> Britain use Tom's rushes. They v.make mats with them and baskets. Bmrwi and Jam makers buy rushes for caulking barrels. Two armfuls of wet rushes make MM hunch or bolt, and when dried %  nd matured, a bolt sells for 10s. ltd. The skill cornea in the drying. Rushes are like hay. You can't explain when they are storing. You Just have A quick calculation shows that Tom must have been in the war. What was he doing this scion t'f lhe MO-year-old ni MA Tlvamai. llo.' Communion 7 p.m M 0, la..r I. IHBUaA United Eplttooal OrUuidoi. Ch..r. (;lct a* L-oann-aermiui MATTI ; K MM Tr.l: P-lm. Bl: . It. Thar,. ST IOHM S III % % %  %  < in liN Ooud Knday, rairfltid Road. BL... Rork am A Blrans* Prore—U.n Tin K.V W F O'Dniioliur Sp*jrr tautO-;: Tho Uie ol Chrlal". II an Sons ti* Sornvii by the [.oral Rrpr*anlaliva. II. .1 1 M M.M ralrllr.d Road. Black Rork 11 a m Bana and Harmon, Thr Rrv VV I' <> nvtuiBi* Hpnikar SwbB-rt Away Win Httn, 1 pm. Evpnaong and Harmon b: irady for -i|i ~ o ^f; h '^^. ^52 Sod *! to know. ^" tn ?i!Jd 7h* P Ood. wtuch broulBI ol Eflvpl. MtTHOULST GOOD rSUDAl nmna^n IlAlJvElTH • Re-r BRinr.rrrowN nEXTMAi^-n Hulinro WMlBlf 3 pm Y P lloffi p.m. Altar SarvM-a and Bound Shuw m l"ruclnion Conduct Mantr A E. Moflell. I).VI.M..I laapjsri WEia-IMOTOM BTiirr.T % %  mm MOaiu.a 1 pm Cumpai 7 pm Allar Rervica Praai-i OIBTtN II M II..in— I p m Company M**tn 1 p a Service; Preacher: Lieutenant ti R> III:NRV AWmtV dUHH| DM Munich crisis t.f 1938 THE thine ubout Hiller was not. Httln and Chanabetfani wen; so much what he said or how he in ueluaUneguliaucm. Peace Wd said it. it wai thf way, one* he mt wtjri in IM bejence. wn Started talking, he went on andacami led news that uie Ol, 't'ei-eh* had moDtliscd. Dr. Paul Schmidt iwUcwd it the • In Uw i %  ,, !' r flrsf Ume he met him. And i %  Schmidt translated his ensuing nine years of trans-i' '"> Eiigli>h: Utlng Hitler'* gariulit^ to f..reij-ii Dl rd Ofpropotentatea the im[>resRlon was ex-.i v^ewtten, I -hail, of course, hautivelv conflrqwd. %  ^P *iy pumiue not t. |.r.eed [ agalntl CzeMaitoaUa during No Notes iici:oiiation: .it OUaprwlae, Dr. Bebmldt DOWJ BIO rate, Mi Chamberlain, so reporta (in Hillcrs lrile.,^r,r-4 10 published by Heincmann, 15s. > I Tl llonol a • "' Hl 1 ' I %  "" %  ,l,t >'• %  Hi* phraseology vu ,*.lectl> B* eauld be ^ornpoMj conveniional He express! ""/ ". lur **'"* But even at that first meeting •" '' with Mr Anthony Eden and Sir ...%  .-.. %  r John Simon in 1835 Hitler exlinprtsMliibitcd his mercurial tempei. The onl; mm^ ever There was never any carpetM coinfonahle terrn* ; chewing, but: according to !-hmldt. was BU"Almott without traiiMtiou he (nania t Marshal Antonescu would suddenly lly into a rage; Before UM ft Wl his voic.would become hoar.-e, drun.iiied into him_ that In be would mil inrtod eiemh i.nt ma %  word against me i hH flat*, while his eves hiaxtd." I"i KUwia "va•" %  l A remark of Mr. Eden'* cau %  -i HU "' '"" k '' '"' IWo that particular outburst But then houii. about nothing else. Mr. Eden had lhe pi ovokmg habit 'That alwavi. impressed me, of aikmu .traifl sa il cr „, ... ~ SStlllS. inlllU. Ui* hi. mind ,to.i One of his disarming tricks wai sc, that of sudden and unnipMl restraint. Schmidt saw ll dono T&T3M ia Club bin iJ "Yee'st iil> uitki.uf lion a loocii of *hv aot irr uptrcr' ai I Henri/ Atobry. Voti *fe.l up %  bit tarm.og J..U *antt m.Jinito| when yt IXIIII ll.i l.rm UaCtOM moodier mechanical aouipmcni IXHH Ltattgrtti gi* you eura power nesdr, uniform, ecoI... IM .1 peiformsnce year, in and year UUL THI LONG LIFI • bATIfHY! OaaentaWe tatt-.i. fM 11 Vaant So I look June adc. I . nat "No *ve Mrain nowl" I laid io i.m I uwal Oplira wathed away dm Uiei *'11 .. .'.iou ifJUM'"" and geinu. (onad up r>r muolt. I tl net... 1 •kilUoui il again.'' PROTECT YOUR EYES ,itA U A %  € r M I J The nni of ttw eye *n4 nuiar g iliou]*i be huMtiv ..-'I. r. Ilthayaieredor a* mew oeuir wbtlei b l ooii h oL mf I' In each packet 1 eyeb. ff NOTICE We Ix'g to inform our Customers' I hat Our Hardware Stores will be Closed on SATURDAY. 24th March /*.• It l lOS / Ol YIHIV I. Id. MB PARK ROAD. 8X. aUCHARL DIAL UM Remember — HUTCHINSONS The Most Central Shopping Place For-• CI.ASSWARK and C ROCKERY • ALL TYPES KITCHEN WARE • BEST BRANDS PAINTS and ENAMELS • STOVES and PARTS • BEDSTEADS. SPRINGS and MATTRESSES O (-LASS ami MIRRORS. and many i.lher BARGAIN ITI.Ms G. W. HUTCH INSON & CO. LTD. Broad Slrrrt Rorhmk Slrrrt 'Sv. .j^.\^tit THE FAMILY CAR upholstered Car ptTwrs loniplele comfort in seatim: • buy and econonut.il to maintain. VANGUARD FOR VALUE Vuit our nrv. ,,„! I. I u. ilomonslnili-11 tor v. Our Oamlrnr and (• CM* I • %  • OORtl ban ~. I m unlll 10 pm. •# %  "'"luftotaMiienibMed thai 0OOD .,.,;.. ll at imporlonl to ma Thi* luxuriouil ii ii I %  ,! ;\ ii |] ind oil. It will pa I.JT is rHOKOffOHLY SERVICE V00B CAB It Will |WV ^lil 1 THH ...... CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LIMITED Pinlold Slrrrl. Ilridgatawn.



PAGE 1

r\c.r TWO BARIIADOS ADVOCATI FRIDAY, MARCH 0, 1951 CcudJ) galling I:\STI: it no\ M.r M ES IIMJMAN. are guests at thr %  Froir. IV. e of Man %  Md is .. reined ..i %  %  %  %  i pad from bajlai 1<> :hr (.assscne (Of •> hn.i.lny and toying ( the Si. Lavriviio%  %  %  Mia. I Don %  %  Wales This Is Mis* ;.dOS %  nice* of Rev W. M % % %  -if Navy Garden*, Chris" I Old HarrUonlar. M R REGINALD HAMUS, M rbi nlan who Ml Barbados In II up to %  : % %  i s A raturaad yei a %  • %  it \mhcr-i rtnea then Ha has ronw over for throe months' holih he will -prnil *th Ills al Hill Road. Bank Mr Harril who is employer! Malnteri unco Co in the USA iv OUres Harris of ..i Port omep Back From Police Course 1 NSPBCTOR8 G SPRTNOn and c. Bow '11 nod from niikinfi i>. tha (iMrncw after attending %  MX-month rourse in modern Polire methods at llendon Col lege. From Trinidad M .liiJ, AUSTIN ID and family arrived %  '. ui;iv l.v E.W.I.A. to spend the Easter here They are staying WixKiland. %  AMI' Hardware Port r Spain Fire Officer A . %  ng (in.ii rtnglundOaaiparflM an*s Mr. R, %  >ul on a I i (I . %  .. In tha Loi I %  .-.' ,.i..i I)urn in charxr of Cannon Bl I Station Ll idow of h*. Paul's. I ir. Northhire i.> covar ill Bra In the county and part • which Included of which were American. Ho first visited Barbados In 1919 tha Utndon Bad*. At thut tmif. ha in l ftf-ali in iba > on II M S. Dartr.aulh. With Cable & Wireless M R. R. J. CU k Win ii %  | ardaj caorniJUj by the • an appnlntMent as our "f tho enjriri"ban and will be stationed g| SI I.ru'icnce. I hi relieving Mr. "Bud" Karlay who will shoriiv' lo angflaod on leave ARTIE'S HEADLINE bhat ihent nothing. Colo Vvt I.WIA : CROSSWORD %  i %  .1 r r r %  i' .— L a i ^_ "| i 1 1 Werr Staying at Caneficld M R AND Mils HOWARD BROWN a the bar In Janoary. Retired Merchant M R. and MRS. G II JOHN SON of New York, lafl terday morning by the s guvsts at tha Marine Hotel Mr Johnson chant -.1 New York Husband Arriving Monday M RS JOSEPH A. KIN* I panted by her son Mr Paler King arrived from Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A. Mr King vho IN with Messrs William Fogaity Ltd.. in P..ii-ot-Spin is expected to arrln on Monday. Mr. King was for many years stationed %  t ihen Braajfa here. Mrs. King | .i' lh Aqualu Cardan* it'iuir. For Enster Week-end M ISS BETTY GASKIN a nurse at one of the oil company'.' in:-pit ala In Car i pi to, arrived from ..i vesleroay via Tritwd.Hi i II W I A. Hera for ihe Jaslet week-end she is staying at the %  Hotel. Arriving by the same plane was Mr Robert Nye an Engineer ol Creole Petroleum Corpn. in C.mpire Military Airport Chief M AJ JULIO CARENO, Military Airport Chief at MaiU nved by Averuui Ani. • Baooial on Wednesday and his wife arrived a few hours later by B.WI.A. Special. Here (or a short holiday, they are staying at Paradise Beach Club. Trinidhd Businessman M R AND MRS HERBERT WATERMAN and family arr i ve d by W.IA yesterday morning to spend a holiday in Barbados. Mr. Waterman Is the proprietor of Waterman's Store on Frederick Street. Port-ofSpain. They are staying at Fontamnra Maxwells. W.l. Holiday M R. AND MRS FHEDERICK P REYNOLDS. Jnr., are at present holidaying m Barbados. From White Plains. New York, where Mr. Reynolds is Vice President of Oeyer, Newell and Ganger, an advertising agencv. Leaving the US in the middle Of January they flew to St. Thomas, where they chartered a 46 ft. schooner and visited all the W.I. islands with the exception of St. Martin, St. Barth* and Montaarrat, They arrived here on Sunday from Tobago by B W.l A. and plan to remain here another week, before leaving for Trinidad Via Tobago. From Trinidad they will return home via Log Angeles California. They are staying at Super Mare Guest House, Worthing. Mr*. Reynolds' father is Gen. W H. Rose now retired from the US Engineer Corp, while Mr. Raynoldr father Gen. F P Reynold* is retired from the U.S. Medical Corp. They have two children, n daughter, now graduating from IMP School and a son at West Point. 'BROODY" ii the apt name gmi, to tin. crssUon, chosan as an Esstar Bonnot by screen star Anr.-tts Slmmand* .d w.i-lTei live in preiciitiori and treatment of vluunin B deficiency, poor digestion, tirodi, heart trouble, neuritis, helped nduce sleep, correct nervous(, restore grey hair lo normal colour, and correct baldness Said the Government Blackstrap molasse* will not ds Usage thwjnj %  L.E.S *" 'i ffr' i n 'n' 'r A 'Yi tt tt Vi f tt VtG Vfi'. ir '-•: ASTOR THEATRE WISHES ALL OF ITS PATRONS A HArPY BA8TU AND INVITE AI.L OF ?Ol' TO D.JO? THKKEST IN MOT.ON PICTURE CARF.Fl-LI.Y SFI.ECTED SO THAT YOU CAN BE TOGETHER FOR A HAPPY EASTER FRIDAY 4 > M P.M. ONLY COLUMDIA PRESENTS— %  n i iE.x t-f'••* %  : sMii.i.Mi" THE • BOB MOIlEltNAIIIS CROSBY THE MIU.S HRriTHERS ANI1 "OX llll ISI I #' VI.MOffW" FRIIIAY MID.MTE MAT •WOMAN WHO < AME BACK" %  < VAMPIRE H i;HOST SATIRDAY 430 i. .J0 \ REI'l'Pl If SENSATIONAL DOl'BI.E II 11 I. II11 It at lh, antl SOI III ,,( .11 M.I.I: HIO" SATIRDAY MIONITE "FLAME OF RAHHARY COAST" A "HARBOI'R OF MISSING MEN" GLOBE 5 8 3 p M OPENING TO-DAY (Good Friday) nd through the Weekend ROBERT PRESTON B.B.C. Radio ISIDAV MARl M U. IUI You'll Mccl . CHEROKEE LANSING Hall Angl . Half Wildcat AU WOMAN ft Th I." Tlw II l.on, H.r I .m 1 10 %  ,. Nr. Analiil* letiud^ 1)S .tn Pn.,1,,,,,!,.. in Tlw Colonial HUotn.m nlarludr. %  11. UntMn' caeajtl %  A .m ii un ur t mm, Th# Nw ; S IS am. Home NnT. f rim I'IH-III. tli j„. CHMT Uon. 11 IS n.r, l-.ograiT.me ParaSSri II V I Frldav Sawvenp; IS inooni Tha N tM ~ Nrw. Ai>al>|>. HIS .-, On I.IS-SM w-m.M M it pm nnc s .k US t>i n '*"""'•• rnhmk, e am tear* • %  -..1 : • IS H Enjoyinf May M R. R J. ].ll)l)I.\Kl> who has been here since March 15th is enjoying his stay In Barbados. Ha Is at present on a tour of the West Indies and will be leaving here about March 29th. Mr Liddiard Is a representative of the firm of F. W Berk and Co Ltd. of London. Heavy Chemical manufacturers and exporters of fertilisers. He is u guest at the Oreaa View Hotel. Accountant A RRIVING from Venezuela on Wednesday by B.WI.A. Special Plight was Mr. Rupert ITlnSsa. who is an accountant at .vhlumbcrgers in Ca r acaa. Here ioi the asmaff week-end, he Is stayUuj al Am.i Cues; House. • 11 p.m The Caloikial Rr'.amer*; ,V P> inlerluSe. 6 *s y n froBramrtv "aiad. T pm Tha Nm. 1 to pm N> Analyui. 1|S p ,,, Wr.t Ir.n ;|; %  %  *i.as M. a t s.is M IJVpSI tnlrtlud*. 7 p .1 TLn.k ,. Ihcaa Thuu... 1 p m Hidio Nrw-n-. %  IS pm flood rrld-> SrTV>r. 11 p.m •'**>"i ol ihWM*. • pi. World ARalr.. SlJ JMfc L*V !" , Mu* ie %  > % %  nHawai 1010 p.m. i, oll (n BdlleaU. I0IS p.m. Kvcenl Trand. IiOMirt A(r,iulUirt. 10JD pm M(lud> 01 Miiim. 1045 nm Thr Di-txijU. c-ini m ..:iII P.HT Kinc op tha CurUln BY THE WAY Uy Beachcomber bfSS U • loat. (Tl Ilia must be ii a 1 row oecK of iana 17) i*o 'nie ridsiue pioagn glee so .:iti-ri>Ur IBHl B •pbcree or r.orsl Hitrernair. iti I Fart ,1 a. ouiidlng *ou CAD see to ran merrj. ioi Hie oesStt. |S| %  meoui HI i IP marker ? ii %  >n provide the CODleyaac* it teems. <9i i be lemon. > It ansfe, versa? Then vra must consider pad and roller skate hours per !->> A: the end of the v hi !e m. ncM> >4 shall probably and that 11178,405.814 v. t i %  i • en i ivad In six montti Ehsj UrJastlj arhal Ui-i will prove is nother and s slUlet stoi % %  /'innnl 1'onsul CIIHV ft/ i.i i!l< tl Ciinxtil C ANNIBAL. I am informed by my special ceerespondeni la Rertfordahlre, are trytn 4i our Government several cases of tinned Consul to "SUPDlanMSjl tha latlon." PonlypiHtl Vsjgn T HE nine Puntypool urban aro wards, anakta are the oldest and thickest in Monmouthshire. %  TO U) choose 45 Festival Queen. %  y popular vnte Mie ooraar maj be '.ueen (or Beauty Week. i.. open tha BOW swimming pool in Alx'ij hychan-road But ihcre i* consldirable oppositimi from tha real ilenK. who remember her appearance in Blaenavon weauiiK a red ooHMialcher hat to boost Ladles' Utility? Overalls ftgfl tyj aaol v here Cecil Rhodes was born, has its own Elstcddfoil every year. and It was here that a Mrs Myrddln, disguised as a riruid. llrtiesl CouncUkst Llewellyn with her harp beeauaa ha disqualified her "This." said the councillor, fluking* her leg with his wand of olllce. "will have raaasncuailoBM None of which gets man>where. >n Way Hum A DOCTOR who said that hum 111111,: was good for p^-uple Is 11ported tu have "tossed a bombs>tt| into iH-ighiMiuiii x constdtini ii'' What the meaning of this ixelted lanauags is. I cannot disi. '.n H\it this I do know a Hun ..iiioe boplior:u>loitisi found List year, thai M is humming that keeps bi"e* fit Since nowadays notwdj would dream oi %  thing] Until hS was told it had been i i .:^-)(l for animals and |n%  >> well to have medical science in support of private hum mln| liiil-iiivvi' T HEY are nay lug. at least I am. that If Mr Errol Fly-in i 10 pla) P f a l aan in a fllm Eisiland Is bound i" win the battle of Trafal ui-r. even though that result Is historically | AlJTATir ri t II % |.\i:MA (MembenOnly) TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIG1I1 at H.30 MATINEE: TOMORHOU> and TUESDAY at 5 p.m. It v&SM mo Innocen t. Robert Young .Shirley Temple 1 John Ago' 4|N the 2-recl Fenturclte.— -2t YEARS OF At ADF.MY AWARDSProduced by the Academy of Motion Pictuie Arl Sc lancaa, show ing Films which won At.aleni^ "Emhraceable You" "Dreamers HoUday 11 "Dear Hearts Gentle People" • Bop! Goes My Heart" "I Wanna Be Lover" CHESTER HOLDER "Wildest Gnl In Town" GUEST STAR PERCY WELCH IPt It—House 30—Balcony 40—Rss 54 Adventure in Baltimore WELCOME TO ALL!! i:\.HtY\iti.i: EASTEH F.XTFMT. 1 1 V/*.\ VT Foit vmcll ; S'.irs with actual part* of the PLAZA THEATRES To-night visit CLUB MORGAN The moif Beautiful Nlalii Club from Miami ta Rio u>lih a uwtd-wide reputation for good food Music, Dancing En It r tain ment throughout the night Dial 4000 /or reservation! HltllM.I IOW \ DIAL 2310 TODAY (GOOD FRIDAY) (ONLY) Slarlnu Time.:— I 30 — 6 30 — 8 30 and 10 30 p.m. 1st. The niiiM OlSTIX DIAL 8404 SUl-Unx 1 ini. .— 2 00: — I in' \I.I.-TAI.KI.\4.. I'KTIHK TO BARBADOS OF . (GOOD FRIDAY) (ONLY) and 8.00 p.m. TO I OMI The LIFE and PAS3IOi\ ofCHBIST M4TIVHV t I.I ..... TTTTT: ^ MATINF.FS: SATI BUAI MTII 30 > m and 1 30 p m. R h o Double • "WILD IIOaSE MESA" Tl M HOLT — and — %  CODF. OF TIIF. WESTJAMES WARBEN New Millinery LADIES' AHD CHILDREN'S STRAWS Nylons SflERTS BuYfll line new assortment Kales! Shades OXI.V -2AO In Will i I ami Mun\ l.alrsl SHADES .".I Caugr "ARISTOt IIIAKVOS .MASCOT" "MASCOf" i 1..IT..1 .. MASCOT" Kayan tM $1.K, *Z.ZI. S2..-I.1 11.70 7I C All Sizes In Laical I'.i-liii.iinlilfShadrn -Ki.iTi-:" Spin(, Shins S.93 All Papular Shades i I.I.I %  i AII siMiiii sunns Roys Ii Vaulhs Sires only (While) .... si.:1s EV/.IV.S M WHITFIFinS Dial 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 NOTICE We shall NOT be OPENING to business on SATURDAY. 24th MARCH J^ill our friends and customers please note and arrange their shopping and orders accordingly. THE H VllllADOS ll-IICI It \ I l\ I IIIIKIX i \i nun i in SATIKIIAV 4nd SIMI.lv I I.". 4iid s in p. m MONDAY ll.,,., 93,. „. „. „ %  „'l 1.30 |i MI Tl ESDAY lo THI RSDAV 4 4S and 8 10 ,, „, w-irner's SperUeular Arllon The FLAME .H? ARROW i "linn by Terhnlroieri Burl LANCASTER Vlrjina MAYO MIIIMTI: SAT. J4 a new „,,,„ l'i. l.i.rsi J„hn CALVEDT Hie FALCON in \P POINTMENT FOR Ml IDER" — and — T in KF.ENE in THE MlillilM. RID" MIDNITE SAT. 24T11 iKKII llouhlel WEST of ,he PEC0S 'Hh Robert MITCIH.M & MASKED RAIDERS With Tim HOLT SATIRDAY to Tl r.SllAY 5 and *.3a p m Bi Ijister Action from tV.B. Errol FLYNN The Advenlures of DON JUAN Colour by Technicolor Special Mallnee MONDAY iBank) 1.3e pm. <2 new Monocrsm Plrlarml MAN FROM HEADQUARTERS with Frank Alocrlson and Leon ERROL In JOE PALOOKA. CHAMP I.All Tl (Tha GARDEN) St. Jinn HUiAV (Good FRIDAY) STARTING TIMES 4.30-6.00.7.309.00 P.M. The LIFE and l\SSIO\ Q [ S llinsi MIDNITE SATURDAY ?4TII (RKO Artlon Douhlr) (j Randolph Scott—George (Gabby) Haves TRAIL STREET and THE AVENGING RIDER SATURDAY 24TH SI N 251h MON 26lh *nd ronlinulns Dally WOMKN 5pm — MtN 30 p tn (Ae Limit: 16 years and over) Social Guidance Knterprises |i THE STORY OF BOB & SALLY Tim HOLT and Cliff EDWARDS Piwlilvely NO CTIILDRFN. It ISHAV not (Only) "DYNAMATIC CANYON Tarn Keenr & "RAIDERS OF THE SOITH" Johnny Mark Brown



PAGE 1

FUMY, MAKCII 13, 1*31 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAf.l V| S Will Serve 9 Months For Larceny As A Bailee VERNON CARMICHAEL ,25) of Whitehall, St MiWtt sentenced to 9 months' imprisonment at the Court o! Grand Sessions yesterday when an A—I— j ur found him guilty oi larceny as a bailee. His Honour. Sir Allan Collymore. Chief Justice nr*sided. while Mr W. W Reece. K.C.. Attorney General. prosecuted on behalf of the Crown. Carmichael arm not represented. Carmichael was charged on ——————^—-^-^_^^___ alternate counts and was I n the first co'mt of lar1 bailee of SO bags of balanced annual feed to the value of $214 SO. the property of the H.irt>.idos Cotton Factory Ltd.. havlnji fraudulentlv converted the same to his own use. The offence was committed on t October 16, 1950 in the parish of St. Michael. tltc Chief Ju: I ymore for WJ. Will Have Chance To Gel U.S. Aviation Certificates MR_ AND. MRS Cirl F. Tauch and Mr. and Mi Joseph H. Boyd who arrived her.' on WednM cngined Bvachcraft left yesterday for Martinique The Beachcraft which carries a crew of two and threr pasaenners is the property of the U S Civil Aeronautics Administration Mr. Tauch is an Aviation Safety Agent and is Supervising Agent of the US Civil Aeronautics Administration. His headquarters are in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mr Boyd is Chief of Communications Operations of the same organ, isaliun. — Price Control Report Rejected COM.WSSIO.XER OF HEALTH MA V PROSECl TE Shopkeeper Gets 3 Months Sentence of three months' im. rJSJL"t*,J'*""? I" !" 11 %  "• Martinique and Guadeloupe The parl> left San Jiian on MOMU fw St. Lucia. N, * %  Piarco. Trinidad, from where they arrived on Wednesday. They left Barbados yesterday aftcrno THE Report of the Mt I trol Committee has been examined AllanTT sVTiTT.n b ef t%0p al in thC ,ht * ,he ""*•< %  s x&zrz&f* &^£&?.z Biassas mended eonvletlnj the actual: c„ u ,! of Grand SSleJfte.ird!.. """ ?*"> W **' lndl !" >hrouhnl rnsonab* numed that hey would have had to convict Mr ( ll !" ni i?'' s ,m >' 5 '*" ut the Caribbean were UxSS, !" e advanced, there would bo him on one of three count. The ,„ !" ._,..,?, _??? m ^ n ? %  pp T^; desirou, of bavin, a US .,?o. hkely to be some reeewon both nauticj] ccrtillcute, whether il ln prices and in supplies, interbe pilots, mechanics, control n *honal development* have **"auiltv In this arTi.ii %  ..(,..VnJS """'' "Orators, despalclier... p.n """"ed in inrrautn* price lie saKl that the accused had Stion should be ve^ a Xr.,' H*"* ""**•• •"' T "-< '" %  %  "**"'* %  " obv """ 1 "'• "> a • addressed them stating that the n-.olhcr of vouiw t+ilrlreiV through the ulands %  as ., i. ltl ulrestriction in the production of 50 bans of feed were delivered to Hi Honour before nassmo ~. iarisatlon tour and provider! local c mmodiUts for civilian |I.|||IIMH the Barbados Cotton Factory If tence told Km., ih'.. ikT i.!.., h response was good cileuah they wl ^ maintained until there is they believed that that was true, "ouna %  guilty „| ricJiviS SE* 1 P~babfc br "E.u, „,n SJ. "££', ln.pro.em.,,, „ %  'aid,the accused wa.no, .u.lty. „„,„, pro^rly .nd J,e !" o,„,,^ *! <*>• <"?• about ihr," "%£"! "'"' '" ••" %  *'"" coun-were M, SS^ JC &%&£ "' ~S=£E* ,2, fraudulen, conversmn ,3, ,.„ff aSHS. ItfKKS.'K'JXi !l n;. I.r.lf. i;,,V.M! Similarly, If they had a reasonof'goodVwM large"" He uld'uwt mon0u Hme ne "fences would m able doubt about the witness and .. Kr iV ed him i?„,"Lr SI. *>• ""d aft#r an examination !! cons,d,,r,i ul(l be (f they fell thai the cn W wa, no. lotion u'was^^aS'-aJe and ^PPUcafons .tS quaUnca.Ions ^3u.' t„ '" SSSTT S proffMl to th.. taUM ttl, IM .1 WM the dui, of the Court not "W_be for*-aro>d lo local Civil c"mmmo! shop!o?BPSR £?3SS; sS 1 ^ 1 ir ^" Puerto Rieo TJ)t Eqiialisation Account will kxpeiuiive continue — within Its available Mr. Tauch said that West balanees — to make minor price Indians found it very expensive adjustments but until further in•i come to Puerto Rico |o obtain formation rcKardintt the present licence, so In order to help and potential financial condition of ii'ganWuttion would l m miss inn agents, wholesalers making two trips "ur the Chief Justice' Sir 1 Allan %  ** 1 n him down ' x,v ,n *' m ,,lv and s,n l ,ket 'P 1 I s >* -'vail.tble. (loi He alM drew to the jury's tCoUvmore at the Court of Grand PPr, unity. This waj „ ,,,,,,. jnunent Is not prepared to IneiMM tention the fact thai never before Sessions for house-breaking and rocal affrwment beiween the U S tn '^ ^J"* 1 "' P" ,fl,s ronilUlll in had feed bMB MBt from the ar ff n >' a,ld British Governments mixing depot at Da Costa A Co.. Bishop sometime between OcMr Bo >' d Mld ihat he hud jus". Ltd. lo the Barbados Cotton Fac, be L.! M and 4 broke ""<• the house felurncd from attending a loint torv by any truck which had other !" JV l,lan ?. Atkimon situated at hurricane conference in Miami deliveries of feed to make at that "*??,* y th ri8t Church, and stole which opened on March 7th i not'guilty. only lo see that justice He outlined UM ,;,<..> lo, the In every case, but to s* prosecution, stressing the point "*ere protected and all that it was significant that the keepers accused on that particular day was earning his living bv driving a u/'i7 C TL w lorry, and was paid by the tn P w "' ierve ifiree Years 50 Bags Extra For House-Breaking Yet he (the accused) was inMacDonald Bishop, a UHWUM slstent on placing an extra 50 of Government Hill. St bags of feed on the top of 120 bags w '* yesterday to make ooa trip rather than yea Alia yesterday sentenced to three d c *' n f p > In s' imprisonmept bv Hi B Honlh em. his oig. the Chief Justice Sir Allan "' ,in n m down ] t>ame ti There were discrepancies as fur %  I 8M evidence of the delivery of the 50 bags of feed was concerned. *'"*^J" further increase in the Dlici ol food and other supplies which Is already inevitable in some cases following increases in world prices. Government will give further Fitzgerald Lovell. who•waValhurricane "season "were "be"ing* ^SSS^SP^-^-' he --? rf Sl ^ leged to be associated with Bishop checked He recalled the servicepleaded guilty of receiving stolen the different fcovemments in th Ucles to the value of $141:12. Communications for the coming lie said, but they were not erloi The evidence was as follow* Tickets Issued George Roach, a clerk of the Barbados Cotton Factory said that on October 16 at about 1 30 p.m he received 120 bags of balanced animal feed from one of M 1. Harrison's trucks ets to the feed depot and the depot valued at $70.25 in turn sent bock theirs. He never nt the Court of G turns of retailor: UM first Instance li is propos.ii and was sentenced to" "li . were able to K .ve thenor^n^Tp^i^^''^'' ^ months imprisonment with hard ganisation last year, due lo close commission Both of them had nothing co-operation and working agreena|i to say. Labourer Received Stolen Properly Milton Miller, a labourer of My Lord's Hill, pleaded guilty yesterincnt which had been established. Kveryonc knew how important communications werto hurricane reconnaissance. Mr. Boyl visited Barbados last June, and -islt Trinidad in May or June i as between the agents, the whole. i and the shopkeepers. ST. LUCY ASSESSOR TO BE APPOINTED St. Lucy Vestry meeting, issued tick day of rcccn'iiTB ^ole'n'nm^r.v ' 1,,,ond n hurricane conference, which was Axed to be held at the lahZTtt sponsored by the Caribbean O the numb* :i .(..n% owaaii had I to tola i inmi hnd i and UM H-KUI.; enforce*! I'M t had aBow' -\ -i daii % on IMI ..( UM pat certain distance fntn the nearei tonmade M That dairies hou1d be I dence w .is. to his niniH, a fair 'i ol going about it li COM* npp— r ad lo Un from that the II daui.-VOU pwaovfl Could UMJ then re over the exlaung law %  If thev and a dan% owiMi contlnuad t Mil milk, he would be committin a breach. TlH) ihould iinformatiou. he thought Mr. hlttilev deii S l (Mkct 11 each 1 N> in .' *i M A $? ' n J FT] Marslpjn A (hoc. Fix In Fn t up *0r ea Fry'a ManliMii A ( h iiu.k Qarrtafa uiih KM 4 I ea Also Caster t.sts | 36. ea Also l.i-ii I). In i.-iis (imliilii.il rr\ for I ti i h %  v EASTKR .ved 50 bags of feed on OcHe was also found guilty urcvi L W "' .. ,il ? ,n ano Mn il ,tl ,"4T v ^ ,£""T "' l T r p 10. There were two loads ously at the Court of Grand Ses ,nou h I Barbados was the pret{v %  Yp J Br *2?-, Churchwarden. !0 bans each, brought in thot sions of receiving stolen goods ,e 1 , f al1 lnp islfl nd, -nd hope "f. F Webster and Mr. J. i December 23 —and Sessions received 50 bags of feed on OcHe was also found guilty previ tober 16. There were two loads ously at the Court of 120 bags each, brought in thot sions of receiving stolen goodi day. *ome time on December 21 ond 31 He did not see the accused on His Honour the Chief Justice October 16. Sir Allan Collymore yesterday Clifford Carter said that he was sentenced him to 12 months' ima clerk at the mixing depot of prisonment to run concurrently in Da Costa & Co.. Ltd On October p rh case and consecutively with Vestry Rooms yesterday afternoon ai postponed until n later date. Tauch and Mrs. Boyd „ Th c meeting was called by Mr. loiiner *"""" %  There i sentence of 12 month* is now serving for an' offenc which he was convicted ii lower court for about 9am the accused came in the depot driving a truck He left thu depot and came back with %  ticket for 50 hags of feed The accused also produced a ticket for crccinwc r\\i 120 bags of feed and he osked him 5taaiUIH5 ON Why IM was carrying 170 bags of WEDNESDAY NEXT feed on the truck. The next sitting of the Court of dunn The accused said that he was Grand Sessions will be on Wedncs">" %  were 10 new accounts. 46 the Almshouse. |>eing paid for It day. March 28. deposits and the amount of The Vestry will also consider 0ora Aaard. a labourer cmSir Allan Collymore, Chief Jusmo "y received was $1,011.30. the advisability of asking the St ploved by M. L Harris-n as a tice. when he adjourned the Court return soon foi There are six items on the Agenda. When the Vestry do meet they will consider a suggestion by Fairfleld A Mount Gay Ltd in connection with the Rectory; someone will be elected to the oftice of assessor; there will be a T „. „„ diacussion on ownership tax In The Travelling Office of the view of Sir John Maude s Report t-ovcrnment Savings Bank has and consideration of advertising i i COT *P ,,ted ll8 fourth week for tenders for supplying grocervisiting the various sugar facies. vegetables, fruit, fresh meal. tories in the island. Business done milk. etc. and the making of showed thnt clothing, and nurses' uniforms for Travelling Bank h he Does Good Business hand on one of his trucks, said yesterday said that early that day that the accused used to drive a he had released the waiting jurors truck On October 16. the accused until Tuesday. March 27 drove :i truck to the feed depot for He. however, will be leaving the feed. Island on Tuesday, March 27, to The accused received 170 bags *it on the West Indian Court of of feed from a man called Carter Appeal. Therefore, it would not ut the feed depot While on the be Desl lo start a case on that day. WU the accused left 50 bags of he said. He adjourned the court feed at tlM old Y.M.C A. and until Wed neiday. earrled In 120 bags to the Fnctorv A comparison of the business Peter's Vestry to eoncu.In the done during the past four weeks remodelling of the hospital known this year as compared with that as Farres and making the same of the two previous years is as suitable for use as a joint Isolafollows:— non Hospital foi th* two parishes New Deposits Amount They will also consider giving .... Ac !" nls „. .„„„ assistance to the sexton to combat 1949 103 210 $2,988 19 ashes from the factory during the Sf? J" 3."8.W crop season and deal with r -venue 1951 56 198 4.639 20 and expenditure. He nayo the order to one Parris, a clerk of the Cotton Factory. Returned For Feed After the accused left the Cotton Factory, he returned for the 50 bags of feed at the Y.M.C A nnd ho helped him to li on to the lorry. He drove from there and went to the corner of Pine Road where he talked to %  lady m a shop. He shortly come unt of the shop and carried ten bags into the same shop. They left there and went I i, NO FILM SHOWS To -night, being Good Friday light, there will be no film show the British Council, "Wak> Cement Comes What Price > B !" f? Over 20.000 paper bags of Portland Cement arrived in the Island yesterday from England by tho cld. for .dulu The A*..u K— '„—s FBSLS, id the feed Saturday morning sho dren will not take pi; informed that the usi for chilThe Statesman began discharging her cargo shortly pelted lo P*"d l(U cheis What is the real price of beef may well be asked by anyone who enters the Public Market to get a supply. It was stated a short while ago that the price had risen from 36 38 wnts per pound. Some ON EDUCATION BOARD i Barbados. -uusages, shredded now charging 40 cents and the surprised housewife The Advocate learnt y that Rev A. E. Armsli , been invited to become a age where they bought of the E,,,^,.,,,, lillLtll) Home gas, before driving off t' Spooneis Hill. He left 20 bags nt a shop there. The accused then drove to Green Hill and left the net of the feed there. Police Constable Arthur Jeshe has accepted %  MAM) %  ii* DM member nd |hBl val and few day* lIV" Itlne, and biscuits were her to the island The Statesman Meam, DaCosto ,anned good io brought by are we being ovcrchumOverpriced Fish NO FISH Gascogne" Brings 18 From UX. Kight.''ii passengers arrived U 'day by the French liner -S S naseoinr. which sailed for the West Indie, fi-om lx> Ham vi | In the early afternoon yester • "Kl'id. day several housewives were in The Gaarocne also had on hoard the Public Fish Market peering ">' mlransit passengers She left eagerly out to sea for any fishing I rl tom k hours after her arrival boat that might be on its way to f receiving 50 bags of feed from Walwyn, City Police Magistrate — the fee,! mixing depot on October of selling fish at a greater price tlthey continued to wait PecuEngineer Appointed 16. and failing iV deliver the ^n scheduled. ''X Vh. .'•* y* •*"> same. The accused made a volMillar sold C. D. Harnj threa untary statement which he took and a half pound* of dolphin m down" in writing. On October 26 $1.05. when the scheduled price he arrested the accused on a warof this fish is twenty-six i ml %  rant which was issued to him at pound. The incident occurred on the Central Police Station Wednesday evening. vendor of shark and dolphin His Exci'llcnry the Governor has ho spared no pains in making been nolil.ed that ihe Secretary ol his presence known. He attracted Slate for the Colonies has approvlittle attention Presumably the ed of UM oppoudineut of Mr. J nousewlves nearby—or their husC. Kellman. 2nd Assistant to the bands—had no liking for surh Colonial Engineer to be Assistant (lsh. Colonial Engineer II III.IIH.I: .'.' PURINA [POULTRY CHOWS !H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Di.tributor.. NOW! Dental Science Reveals PROOF THAT MUSHING KITH RIGHT APTEP EATINO IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAT TO HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY with Colgate Dental Cream 25c 45c 75c THE I i Health will seek legal advice to And out wnether they are bound •BO break ihe Oaix] regulations or whether the Board < i Health alone may prosecute, the law being that cither may prosecute inillMUlllOfl c.irne to that decision on Ihe motion of Mr A. K Toppin at then yvaU'tday Mr ED. Mottley had previously made a aaottOO IkM as they had gone into the Bridge town dairy question from every practical point of vie. thev could not see their way to bring cases against dairy owners who still operated As the law. however, gave the right to the Hoard of Health to prosecute, taat prosecute if tiie> artahtd Mr Toppin questioned Whtttlll they as commissioners could legally fail to prosecute when they had the power to do so. Trie Commissioners reached • Hus temporary division when) Ibag • da iiaMni hi .should be taken in connection with the decision of the Board ol Health in reepect In UM noiovaJ of dairies from the city limits Motion l*o**tponed Mi atotta** poatponad Idi v inch will be considered aga.n when the CnmmisM get advice as to whethei UB] at) bo>uid io prosecute oc not The Chairman. Mr. J M Kid ney. reviewing the ditis,ons which Mad ban reached when thHoard rf Health and the Commls OIUI .i to thfl IliKird of Health that ;imendment-. should be made to the exlsttfuj regulations. The Board, hoi-vcr. 11. J %  i deeiderst got out, there were AH dalrj owners in Bridgetown, but since then until the present time, ther* were only 11 in the prohibited area. Faced with the provision* of the IPW. the majority took the trouble to remove their dairies Were they then to condone those who hud refused to comply with the law and give lhem prefer cnlial treatment* To argue that those who obeyed the law had to bo penalised and thocc who flouted It %  heuM b* Taken into their I i •idesl and unfair argument If Mich ware maintained, thaj would MMHI come to a DIM f .'ifTairv The General Bonnl <>1 H-alth were the Health authorities of Barbados and they, tightly wrongly made certain refjul itl< They as Ihe Commissioners could not fly in the face of the r*full lions made by the Hoard In any case if these owners did not get licences they could be prosecuted and it would be their 1 ; • %  Ol-rll %  1 %  t. %  I %  'i. cute [ Mr. Toppin said that he saw ome wiHtlom in the al of Mr Mottley as to whether the | regulations were for the purpose [of h%iii.ne. As it was. there were Ii8 dairies and since that time. OUR DRUG STORE Will be CLOSED for STOCK-TAKING on Wednesday Murcli 21llh The DISPENSING Department Will be OPENED as usual for the Filling of Prescriptions > KNIGHTS LTD.— PHOENIX PIIAKMAIV For lighter, more successful baking... Black Magic Choc. 1 M Ml lr> 'm Awl. Choc •< >l I | U -'1 box Cddbur^'a Awl. Choc a S/A 9 box Large Buxr* of I'M* thu. V t* M ea. M. InI .iM.„n; ( OMHUM I S1.0-! & SI K.S box Nestle'* lh. | SI HI box Mrllii toiler CIKHMini ( rrjm. n >l ; IM.V Fry's I'rincetts t'liiN' 'H< SI '•'' box Pry's CJssM .AlniomU box ftrt llasel Nl OsMC 3, a A si :H aai Frj's lUirl Nul ( IMH 8, tin ~ Milk I T .! % A SI 4K Un ( i. II. in %  i; 4< :i !> A SI.48 tin l'4dhur> I:..I Kn>. | $%t A $1 •• box Stilled I'r.inuU S4c tin Jacob's crrsm Oraaaaia SI.64 tin Mem!: % % %  J Mama Aaal SI 85 box I I .in.* BIMUIU in QaBa *'rk iae ph I Fancy Rl*cu!t* in AlrlUht Pks •; pk lliiller Scotch ?lc. pk A 43e tin Moucat .tic pk A M tin Royal Srulch Shnrlhrr^d SI SB tin Mars ttt.-* He. ea Onaf Hsrs i... ea For Hi. Hal l KAMIR l.l.i,-, %  ( nnfecth.nrr) • VMt lllllll Wl Allll'lllll \H !' I IMI I IH II' nl Of Un. ,,l SI CENTURY Baking Powder makes you sure of success! kooa | HARRISONS BROAD ST CHAMOIS LEATHERS GARDEN SHEARS BssssssVi SjjBgsassBS Sl.JM A SJ.ttt H Si.l.hrd MFII. RLADEH ..nl* S'J. Ill it.in COUNTER SCALES MOOsTC I'AITIHN ,-ith BaW Bfaal Pa*. Tare Bsr and ntaa BaMaaMal mail lat asUaafssMa BM aaal complete uiib WclshN S 211.1 I ...rl. RANS0MES LAWN MOWERS ARIIt. AMI IK.lit MOI1FLS FJCII in twa BtaM -l-' ami 14 Inch / 1'RICIs RAffQI FRCIM .... i3f*.19 . Ml.l .-..rl. < innidrlc Uh QRAJJsl BOX CAST-IRON PORCELAIN ENAMELLED BATHS in i\\..i i. \n SIIAI'I:— sti" OVBLUX r.mpiriium, IIIIIVIKI I.IH iiuini.ii iiriisds I SHI!I.!I| ,arl. W/AW: i! HARRISON'S I y'.v.v////,v,v.v.v.v.v..,v,v/.v...v/ A ....., VAVfVjVj tV HARDWARE DIPT TEL 2364 s MIV***Same styles i— \'ITV Sinurl BlylM will. < IIIM-I uri.l Opi'ii Kutki il Ts. |.|i.lf„ rm MM. Stan 7 in in SS.K3 & $s.n •• II lo I 86.07 & S7..17 Black Patent Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II, 12 & 13 Brood Street. -.'.'. %  %  %  ::::::'r.'.;:'..:•<:'.-'.::' '.' IBOOffEOLA niKl-,1 ;.. i II,. 51 03 PORT sn.rr CHnsi SI 05 i I'NCMi SI.21 SI 08 M Bul.s ( KSS1 %  BRANDY %  CM I IKMARI m 1 I i.lbs. botH. i* p %  VIWMI.III. SCO I I A ... I.I.I. \Vi%'.'.%%'.:'.'.'.:'A'. '.•.'.•.'„:•,',• '*'.'.'.;:


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E2CXMNRE3_JJ5Z69 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:15:09Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02540
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

r \f.l Tl N BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MARCH 23. 1951 hTNRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY ^ ^*P1 BLONDIF BY CHIC YOUNG ( c#es ME > WANT ? v THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER WE KNO* LCSifi-JAW LACEY' AND •AM WHO I IF THE LAW HAD GOTC-fcT SHOT'ij TfN HIM, HE'D HAVE 666N HANGED FOB MUROLK N0W.LOPEZ.\OU SEE WE WNT FOOLIN'I V£ OOT HESITATE TO H TEU. US WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW' J~ WE WANT THE SPANISH GOLD ) YOUR ANCESTORS HID IN THIS CASTLE, T TC ^ fl HAVE! NOTHING ) SAY.'i BRING LOPEZ TOTME OLD %  DUNGEON, JAKE THEN WE CAN MA KE HIM TALK j m \ BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS 'RIP KIRBY L. HUH-THAT GUY •' %  %  *j THf V '.-Mi m MAN I, ask for. o&* o—"Stoanji" don the rw Good for at he* and pains and Uiff inn loo I tOO KM1M -/ picum 01 D UOAW OS tM PKHIT ma. PAINTS AN I. C. I. PRODUCT A. S. BRTDEN & SONS (BDOS) LTD. AGENTS HM • ra.kf.il thai buildil Sava 'am anal Swap) 'am ... 40 C.rd in Iht Scrici. CORNFLAKES MM IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE j j SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW Bottles CORONATION WINE IQls! 1.44 L3S lins P. F. MARTINI CRACKERS 1.75 LM Tins SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE JUICE 39 .:n USUALLY NOW Bottles JEFFREYS BEER 26 Jt Tins TABLE BUTTER ..lib: 92 . Bottles MATURED RUM 13 Gill Bolsl _48 .12 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street BETTER BY FAR ... BISCUITS BY CARITS Just In Time For Your EASTER ENJOYMENT &f BE WISE . Buy )> ^ CAHRS ^1; ON SALE AT YOUR GROCER BISCUITS HADf %  > OIK ( CD LIU CMUSK %  IK1IID



PAGE 1

PACE SIX IIAHII.ADOS ADVWATK I KIIIAV. MARCH 2.1. 1SI BARBADOS AWtXtfTE t. 1 1—. : -i Fridu>. March 23. 1551 AIT XOU' IT is impossible to understand Canada's position with regard to Cuban sugar unless Canada's trade position with the West Indies is tirst understood. In 1950 Canada bought $414,000 worth of II from Cuba. In the same year Canada nought $7.2 million worth of sugar from Barbados, and total imports from Barbados into Canada for the year ending 1950 were 10 million dollars. This was an increase of 3 million dollars on the value of imports into Canada during 1949. But In 1950 Barbados imported from i la products valued at only 29 million dollars, a considerable falling off on 1949 when BarbadfM imported 5 million dollars ol Canadian goods. Nor is Barbados' trade with Canada an isolated Instance of the unbalance between Canadian and West Indian trade. In 1950 Canada imported from British Guiana sugar valued at 13.6 million dollars: Jamaica supplied 16.3 million dollars worth of sugar to Canada the same year: and Trinidad sold Canada $7.6 million of sugar. Other British Empire countries in 1950 were responsible for the vast majority of Canadian imports o! sugar Into Canada. Australia sold Canada $10.9 million and Fiji $10.1 million. Of the vast total of $76,000,000 of sugar imported into Canada in 1950, only $414,000 of sugar from Cuba, and $413,000 of sugar from San Domingo were from non-British Kmpire countries. It only aggravated the Canadian cod fish exporter when Trinidad chose the year 1950 to cancel its traditional buying of COftflal) from the Canadian province of \ewfoundIand and to purchase a year's supply of codflfb from a Scottish co-operative. \ Nor has Cuba been slow to recognise Canada's disadvantage with regard to West Indian trade. Cuba has been otfering at Torquay where international trade agreements arc presently being hammered out tu buy codlish from Newfoundland provided that Canada in return will buy sugar from Cuba. It is this fear that is agitating British Empire sugar producing countries. But no blame can be attached to Canada, if the United Kingdom deliberately controls the movement of trade between the British West Indies and Canada, in favour of the United Kingdom. How unfair that control of trade is, can be seen by the 1950 twelve-month figures of Canadian trade with the British West Indies. These iigures show that Canada bought 67 and a half million dollars of B.W.I, products in 1950, (a record over $62 million of imports in 1949). But in the very year of 1950 when Canadian dollars for B.W.I, sugar and other goods reached this all-time record ligure, there was a drop of no less than 30 per cent, in the dollar value of Canadian sales in the British West Indies. Exports from Canada to the British West Indies in 1950 dropped to $30,600,000. This compares with $43,000,000 in 1949. And in dollar total this is the smallest volume of trade which Canada has enjoyed with the colonies since 1940. The British West Indies must speak with one voice and must make that voice heard now, if our traditional trade with Canada is not to be shipwrecked for the sake of saving dollars for Britain and the slerling area. AGRICULTURAL \OI IS By C. C. SKEE7E. Director of Agriculture RAINFALL for the month of Trrr Oops. Coconut*, papawi February 1951 was greatly In ami limes were in reasonably of the amount recorded in good supply during the month, any month of February during Mango .md avocado pi the last 108 years for which are beginning to bloom records are available. According Plata] and I>iM-a*.i b I to rainfall returns received fiom slugs, which were encouraged by 39 stations situated in the various the damp weather, M rainfall categories of the Islind. pests or diseases were reported, the average total rainfall for the Peasant Livestock. Balnnced month was 13 42 inches. rhe smimal feed as well as succulent average tola) for February, 950 fodder was In fret supply was 2.OS .nrhes. the average fothroughout the month. February for the past 100 years Extrusion Work u) Tinus 2.09 inches. Peasant Agricultural In %  The highest total fall for l'ebpaid visits to SSI peasnnt hol<'lary, 1951, at any of trwsc mg* and IS scfeool gardens in stations was 21.93 inches, recorded February. Twenty-one mango station situated in the hightrees were top-worked lands of St Thomas, and the (n) With a view to dele lowest was 6.77 Inches measured a station on the coastal area the parish of Christ Church upar CSM The harvesting of the old nop was continued during the month; some factories suspended grinding operations for a few days as it was Impossible to obtain sufficient cane on accoun* the very heavy rains which fell between the 12th to the 17th or the month. Field yields have remained afaasM the estimMe, but juice quality has been below average due to the immature condition of the cane. of Thirteen head of stock were sold nd 550 gallons of milk produced di) Stud services paid for nt the stations were us follows — several plots in St Phi St. Lucy have commenced clean up their plot* and not wait for a second beailng, the land being planted in wme food crop. „ bocks 37i rums 29 „nd No pink bollworm has been a |oU of 252 for observed cither n the held or at JETU-U. the ginnery. Coaton Variety Trials. The reaping of these trials Wag DfJB tinned during the month and will bo completed early fn March. Tho cotton and okru close seasons were Botanical rononuc Trei Propagation and Distribution Ninety lime, 50 Shaddock and nmeialmtd rt.lrS5 12 ltron tn * WCf budded dU % %  IMV proclaimed during _„_•, BVi.it tun-* rtethe month. This season extends r ln ?J ho monlh from tho 1st Ma; Juno, 1951. g the initial react peasant daw era to the proposed Central Milk Depot, and arriving at some estimate of the support Ittsn given the scheme from tbli source, the peasant agricultural extension staff conducted a quick survey during the month among small-scale dairymen TJM results, on the whole, gnu* very encouraging. Irrioflflon. The Colonial Development and Welfare Scheme fur „, assisting Individual peasants to .i?,M..i install irrigation unit* continues the main yam crop was iierimtted .-tisfartory utogress. during the month Several Held. *^filgSSZZ *Ap5rt from of sweet potatoes were harvested. rouU mrulturnl and other ooeraThe reapln, of the £" th( nncipal .ctlVitS at first bearing of the cotton crop J staiu>ns during the mouth was nearly completed but the "" UiQU {n conne ,tion with weather coraSlUom experienced re upmg of sugi.r cans and during the month h^e.n.^.illy ^ OT g v ,ng fairmade this reaping a total los^f satisfactory results so hampered tho ,JL, lorfc( jj) The total number development of the s-cond bearlivestock at the six stations at ins causing quite a number of o( FcDruary was 128 new flower buds one' boll* to be uwluded Hud animals, catted. Owners and occupiers of ^ |g5 nnd „„[„. Philip anil _,w .^ _* -t.u-w were sold Food Crops. Tne i Thia has bs-r*i corrected ireettea to planters will start at the middle I Hart.-. Factory counts of i orvd canes were held up for agg week by i dn. but results so far to hand show a satisfactory low ; %  < of drainage by moth Duilng the previous vantage was tikef. ni I % %  mass breed in U* I larval paiasile Liswhfi diairaea. AltoKelhi r 7.120 <>l ihi so parasite.: wrrr Uba I .vournble in cana Da] i. of uludi total 3,635 were mated female-* and the remainder wan males. A survey of the j oiing plant crop will be carried out later on when reaping is more advanced, m gsoSffaafl whethet the above larval parasites can i-e reeovored In the field Food crop* R lions for Incidence of inaed were carried out. /nfroduced raratii< • and Peg datorf A third Held gvneration ,.f v.„ .1 i Apaiiu4r-*> n f"ui .it Oroy* 1 Agricultural Station That source rf ruppl> has now gong -HHI no other area is known in which Ihe parasite could efltabliii ilself and show such MMtegfnl ">'d re The par*it. which controls Asa* loconut trees teat I* numbers aim it i AsV* inmutus fftdmiMs ;., ,il.' on m %  undoobtcdl> I'I-.I mi Agriculture Food Crops. Exceptionally heavy and persistent rains during the month pioved a setback to the cultivation of green vegetable. Cultivators experienced severe losses, nnd were forced to replant a number of their crops. As a result, green vegetables arc not expected to inplentiful us they normally anal this time of the year. The eaping of yams and eddoes was ontlnued, nnd these were In good upply in the market. Sugar Cane. Small farmers continue to report good yields of both plant and rutoon canes. follows: — Orange Grapefruit Pomelo U read fruit Golden apple Lime Mandarin Pear Guava Grape Total 74 Coconuts 5 Distribution of Cmianif-iioi Plants. One hundred and thirlyrix ornamental plants of different species were distributed. A/Torrstarion. in addition to the established here. Another very large coccinellid predator was also found In numbers; '.Ills predator was not found btf. i. r.iMi and may well be one ol the intrody; tions made from Ti nidad No recoveries were made of white fly parasites or other in traduced parasites or predator* ftoot Borer. Laboratory experiments with new poisons, which. if properly distributed throughout the soil are known to kill root borer and brown hard back grubs before serious damage can br inliictcd by them on growing cane. has shown that und-r local conditions these materials do not inhibit or m any */ %  • %  damage Uu growth of cane set'at planted in 12 inch pots in sterlli/cd soil. Also pulverixed coral stone.ml\ed with the soil at the rate of 600 pounds to the awe has so far caused no ill effects. On the other hand, dipping cane setts in a mud slurry containing concentrated poisons which could not economically be distributed throughout the soil has completely .nhiblted growth, in all of the 20 pots so treated. The setts dug UP lor examination %  Ite* 2 montni —re not dead and the eyes ap pcared normal. The variety used. however, namely 11.41211 has given similar examples In two or three of the control pots, one sett springing 2 months alter being planted. Conlrof of f/ooi! Ants. Four Government buildings and four %  ere examined The Murdered Prime Minister •I AM AFRAID OF NO ONE" By JOHN ( (-HI I \ FOR ten days I stayed in Resht on the Caspian Sea as the Ruest of General Haji All Kazmara (assassinated in Teheran a few days ago) at the time of his unexpected nomination as Premier of Persia. I asked him if he feared assassination. He replied : "Never If you are afraid all the time you cannot work. I am afraid of no one." Kven then it was whispered in Teheran that his life was in danger. He had many enemies, who feared his power. Britain has lost a good and powerful friend by his death. After his nomination as Premier he was attacked by the minority Oppsisilion as the "stooge of Britain and America." NO STOOGE He was a friend of the West and opposed to Communism, but he was nobody's stooge. His interest was only in Persia. He knew he could not afford to oppose Russia openly Russian troops woro concentrated along the frontier, and ihere were no British forces within 2.000 miles. But he determined to maintain the independence of Persia against constant Soviet pressure. Under the Treaty of Friendship signed between Russia and Persia in 1921, Russia was entitled under certain circumstances occupy Persia. This shadow was always behind Razmara. Occupation of Persia would give Russia a common frontier with Pakistan, Iraq, Turkey, and Afghanistan. It would also cut Britain off from the Persian Gulf oilfields. A BULWARK Razmara was the chief bulwark against the Red tide. Razmara, when 1 met him, was no politician, but Chief of the Imperial General Staff. I was introduced to him through Esfandiar Bozorgmehr, assistant director of propaganda, who was by Razmara's side when he was murdered. 1 learned that he might soon be nominated Prime Minister and 1 cabled the information to the Sunday Express. My cable was read, of course, by the Persian censors, and next day all the papers in Teheran carried a denial that there were "any possibilities" of a change in Government. Eight days later the Shah sent for Razmara. Razmara worked a 14-hour day. He was on the move all the time. Every Thursday he visited his father, who is 110. Last July I wrote: "Razmara has Reaping" of" this crop wag slowed above. fift-our casuarlna trees down In many areas owing to the **" tc distributed. heavy rains which fell about the I'.ntoiiloliHilcal middle of the month. Supplying Control ol Moth Borer. Field of the young plant canes was conwork was carried out on D. sactinued. ehaxalla moth egg deposition In Cotton. The picking and drying fields, and on extent of parasitism of cotton were greatly hampered by Trtchof nmmi Very few dead by the rains. It is anticipated hearts or D. aacehanUk* eggs :;re that, as a result, the crop will as yet apparent, fall short of expectations. By the The normal mass breeding of end of the month many growers Trlcbegraauna has been iulcrhad begun to destroy their cotfcred with this year by large scale ton plants, invasion of ants from unexpected examined for Indian wood borer in the packing caaes. Mosaic, Mosaic Discos* of Sugar Cane Owners ,, ^^ can cUlm any „ ru ,-. Is truer today than at uny time ,„ luc|l c „, crpr i K In recent years For In British T . c „„.„ vc „ ot i,, r countries yard, there are 2.000,000 ton. ol tave lmkrd ,„ „,,„,,„ |or .„„ new shipping on the stocks — orders for as much again. In April BOAT It U I OYK.l. ,i million people will line % %  four end n null sliclcli of tm River Thames tomorrow for the greatest tree iporting pectocle In the world—the annual Oxford and Cambridge boat race. For the sixteen oarsuea who huve undergone three months of rigorous training preparing for the race* there will be no cups or prises. They Will be awarded a Blue, lhe hallmark of achievement in sport at the Universities, 1 i e race itself seldom produces a thrilling finish, though in 1877 there was a dead-heat, and in 1949 Cambridge got up St the post after having been led most ot the way. The boat race was staited in 1829. but was not an annual event at first. In 1846 boats with outriggers were used, and the first race in the p re s en t style of boats without keels was rowed in 1875. Now, with I %  %  %  Ix races rowed, the score .stands at Cambridge :.2. Oxford 4:t. Th odd thing about the boat race is that everybody — including leader writers — Ukes sides, usually for no epparent reason. Another odd thing about the race is that h Oxford are usually Uvourttes Ihey are this year -Cambridge usually wins. Since the end of the war Canibridge has won four times to Oxford's once. Unfortunately, unless something is done soon it will be impossible to continue holding the boat race on the tideway, and sine the iiM'rs at Oxford and Cambridge are too narrow it would have to In* rowed at Henley U is estimated t'hiii the race Ity Club about £1,800. and College funds are running low. It has been SUggei who benefit from the boat race tne of hotels, pubs aid clubs alung the — should contribute tow coat of the a fair proposal, and it is hoped that it will ho put Into effect and so help to pn > w 1. great BJ*9rting event. DIMI maiden voyages One, Furness Withy Oe*an Monarch, is designed for luxury erulsos The other the 13,500.0.10 linrr Oronaay is 'for the Australian run. She will have more t< hant ships One third of th five cargo ships were disclosed. )nM 1M The I' & (1 Line intends to add big passenger line) fleet. And so it goes on. Sime January 120 new ships, totalling 1,500,000 tons, have '>," %  vi.v will Thanks to a gigantic shipbuild20,000 tons each Into drinking ing programme, Britain now bo-jsls -. — %  „„. Oil-burning I Merchant Navy larger than In Oil-tanker Rush Iorm 80 per 1K3W—nnd we have for more Greatest demand is for tankers, ships, f British shipowners, with war losses replaced, are proceeding with plans to rejuvenate the licet with the most sv.iworthy, economical and comfortable ships cvrr huilt. Among the merchantmen on •rder nre 27 vessHi of moie .. dining room and playdeck -children only." and a mn*t tnlnlng a radar-.^tinner on th bridge. Fewer Coal-tired New liners aie to At imli•iaknaBI .stabiliser*—hull 1>'* Jecting 11ns which reduce shlpi weather. A new unvert sea water ater. motorships cant Of the n coal-fired steam will jhlps plvlng the was than any An oil-hungry other nation, Including the Urn. ing for them, ted States. One north-east coast yard In live years British shipyai 1? building 24 tankeifl which orld is clamourare being built than ever But there will be no "Jet" ships Such engines were tried out Slid discarded nt sea before aliplines have built 1,800 m-v nieivh.ir verage will be 6,000 Ions lar/er were invented. Mofrt of Britain'-; newest sn ]* cost £1,000,000 each. And ships—bigger and faster than I*than the petrol-carriers of tne fore—valued at about £500 mil'thirties. --. *.—-..-] lon A 32,000-ton tanker is likely to ships of the future will hnv' ni1 The 4 000 000 tiim of order.* in be the largest ship launched in one funnel. Bow figure-heads of hand gnd on the books rSpnsanl Britain this year. ancient days are re-urnlne. to add another £100 million in hard cash. Finishing touches are being put grace and beauty. Neither the Government nor any to two new liners scheduled t^c L % %  orivate buildings were examined) during the month, also one ship) energy and vitality enough to reach just as inent of tea and one of shoes great an age." FOR UNITY He received me in the office of his summer residence at Tajrish, in the hills outside Teheran. One could sense the strong personality of the man. 1 asked him if he was encountering opposition, and he replied: "There is always opposition to anyone, but I do not think it is serious. I hope I can unite the country. "I know those in authority all over the country, and I believe they have confidence In me. "Our foreign policy is very clear. Persia is a small country, despite her strategic and economic importance. She wants to keep her independence." He told me that the combined army and gendarmerie totalled only 150,000. "It is only sufficient for the security and integrity of the country," he added. ON COMMUNISTS "It is hard to estimate the strength of Ihe Communist Fifth Column here. The number of real Communists is very small indeed — probably not more than a thousand. "But there are many people who are out of work and many who are very poor. For this reason they have sympathy for the Communists. "If, as we hope, we can Ilnd work for everyone, the number of Communist sympathisers will at once dwindle rapidly," Thus spoke the friend of Britain who was buried on Thursday. The Shah will not easily replace him. Without Razmara Persia may slip back into weakness and vacillation. —L.E.S. Ol II HI: VIMHS SAY Closing down of City Dairir* To Tne Editor, The Advocate— S1H,—Will you permit something more to be said, even yet, on this very controversial and lung-diawn-out ub]cct. ulthouitii i, was decided at the Board of Health meeting last week to enfore* the 1H48 Regulations and remove all dairies from Bridgetown'* "Extended limits"—even though in some places there i* loom to spare. I think there are .1 good manv people, in addition to the dairy owners, who regret that the recommendation of the Committee appotftaad to investigate and advise on the matter was rejected, namely 'that the situation should be reviewed In the light of additional facts and because of substantial opposing circumstances," and they very much wish that a compromise should still be reached. May I try to sum up the pros and cons for the point of view el those who are not so much con tog logic and consistency Bi fur practical tues and communlty benefits. 1. The decision was reached by I 3 to 2. not a van convincing OT decisive conclusion, though probably Dr. Cnrter. in the Chair, approved of the vole of his brother medicos, who constituted two third* of the small majorit>. But thus the Board turned back frOCQ ill altitude In appointing the Committee, and reject in u Us .1 K toe 2. Mr. Kidney and Mr Qoddafd presented substantial reasons for review, and presumably for tinprovisions of a licensing system. like that operating for plg-kecplng. They pointed out that the eleven dairies, large and small, still car%  >ing on, furnish milk-hungry people, many of them children, with upwards of 400 pints daily. And it may be added that there is 1 ot readily apparent any source, from which that loss could bo made good. Now that is u matter of very considerable importance. The community is already suffering from a great shortage of this vital commodity, and wc do not want, I lUdfS, to imjMM-1 more pSW substitute. Tin* two Commitlee members %  l-.ii pointed out. naming especinllv Mr. Hill's lfolborn Dairy, that all jMmible hygienic and sanitary requirements were provided. But such conditions exist in other ..i-cs. ..MI would of course be Strictly enforced if a licensing syht.ni were arranged. Moreover, closing down means ruin in f0QM vases. 3 On the other hand, the Hon. V. C. Gale.'the other lay member t .f the Comrnlttee. spoke strongl> i.bout the Injustice lo tht large i.umber of proprietors who gave lo ine regulations and moved out their dairies In good time. To make t-xoeptiuiu or compromise now would be very unfair to them, •aid he. Now we a4l know that fair play i : %  very pyaCMUl jewel" But It U passible for very special circumstances to Justify compci In the public interest. And "two wrongs do not make a right.'* 4. It h.ts been urged on my RttenUon bf one of the smaller proprietors that, being COaVCnl tntly situated nnd equipped, he is able to act as a retailer to poor lieople who cannot afford a r-nuUi %  ypply i.f milk. Through his distributor he sells them a gill or I half pint when they nave the neesind SO help*; them to niiUCO palatable ami nourishing the morning or night "sweet water." This, I suppose, the big dairy van frcm a distance would not. could not, do. Finally. Mr. Editor, there were two points in your leading arltcle Ibft rrlda) which were, 1 ubn li 11 "islaken and should be corrected llerr i. the first; "ll is impossible for either the dairy' keeper or suluaTg authority lo duect the 'tiight of a fly, and 80 there can be no protection for food or health when the breeding ground is in the midst of a residential nrra 1 have had considerable experience of stock keeping, and it is quite possible to keep cow-pens and yards as clean arid sanitary as any other premises. That Is up to the sanitary Inspector Her* Is the second: "Pigs cannol be kept on the West side of Culloden Hoad"—or, in Other words. Within the extended IbnlM of the city. That is a slip up. By •.> %  •' very wise licensing plan instituted on "second thoughts" When eva-tiiri was proposed, and even passed by the Legislature. 1-lg-kecping therein win approved. %  rare; according to Mr Merrttt's last Annual 1'eport, between 1.600 and 1.100 parties sn llectuedl TThtt worka quite well. INTERESTED ONLOOKEB. Other letten on psge *. PEXtirs KOII I:VI:IIV.M: BED — BLLE — Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS AD VOCATE STATIONERY STORE u.uuueoeaooopooft NOTICE Will Our Customers please Note that We will not be open for Business on SATURDAY, 24tli March 1951, and arrange their Shopping accordingly. WILKINSON & II AY MS Co., Ltd. Sure*uon To C.S. PITCHER & CO PHONES : 4472. 4687, 4851, 4413 INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD. THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS PAINTING REQUIREMENTS INSIDE and OUT. For the protection and beautification of your property, we can offer you the following WALL PAIXTS "PROPELLER" DRY DISTEMPER (for exterior walls). Supplied in powder form to lie mixed with fresh water — $6.10 per I cwl. drum. 'LAGOMATT" FLAT OIL PAINT (for interior walls) Supplied ready mixed: can be repeatedly washed — $7.12 per Imperial gallon. For best resull*. the following lnstruelioni. should bo carefully followed:— Exterior WalU. 1. For new work, allow the surface lo weather for nt least a year before paintinC Then apply 2 COatl of "PROPELLER". 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean; and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with a mixture of plaster** ofParis and "PROPELLER." afterwards treating these patches with 1 coat of "INTERNATIONAL" CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER. Then npply 2 coats of "PROPELLER." Interior Walls. 1. For new work, allow the surface to dry out for at least a year before painting, Then apply 2 coats of "LAGOMATT.'' 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean; and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with plaster-of-1'ari*. afterwards treating these patches with 1 coat of "INTERNATIONAL" CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER. Then apply 1 coal of "LAGOMATT" if the surface was previously of the same shade; or 2 coats of "LAGOMATT" if of o different shade. TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL PAINTS. LTD.. AND BE CONVINCED. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. AGENTS JUST A FEW HOURS T HEN EASTER winES C(/KCl tarnLIQUORS SAUlernes Chablb Burgundy Dry Sack Sherry Pale Nultj Shrrrv Partner's Port Cliquot Champaitne VIHIe Cure Prunirr Brandt <>ulil Braid Kum Top Notch Rum "• Lord Culvert HhUke? >' %  >! n Whisker S.henlr>\ Whiskey Sri ram's Whiskey Taborv Beer V (.ulnnfMi Stsut Phone GODDARDS WE DELIVER '***'*',',;',',:',*,;*,;',',