Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


:

,
;
|
|



PHarbad0os





ESTABLISHED 1895

Stop Negotiations |
With Cuba On Sugar |
Commonwealth Asks U.K.





LONDON, March 21.
COMMONWEALTH SUGAR PRODUCING COUNTRIES
asked the British Government today to abandon negoti-
atiens with Cuba for 4 bilateral sugar agreement.

The request was made in a Resolution passed by a
meeting here of representatives of Australia, South Africa,
British West Indies, Mauritius and Fiji.

The Resolution reinforced earlier protests made by
Australian Resident Minister Eric Harrison and Queensland
Agent General Leonard Pike against a propesed 2egreement
that would provide Cuba with a guaranteed market in
Britain for a minimum supply of 1,500,000 tons sugar for
three years in return for tariff concessions.

+ It

was
to-day
Minister
made representations to
Minister Clement Attlee
The Commonwealth countries’
Resolution also asked Britain to
| join with Dominion Governments
making

stated authoritatively
that Australian Prime
Robert Menzies had also
Prime

Mass Rally
To Be Staged

Against Reduction | oe



representations to

Canada “in the hope that that

Of Preferences maintain the full

Dominion will for £1,000,000... Anthony Brooke used to be Crown

Kiarry Roy, the dance band ieader: another married Bob
the daughters of Sir Charles Vyner Brooke, whose family had rv
years.

of British Commonwealth

(From Our Own Correspond*nt)

under present preferential

entry

sugar
LONDON, March 21 system without commitment for
An attack designed to cauntes purchase of foreign sugar under
proposals for reducing Empire

¢ re) a bilateral agreement.”
preference is to be launched in

Celia 6.—Express.





Torquay, the current home of The Resolution was sent to four
trade and tariff talks on March| British Gepagtments concerned— .
30. Organisers are the Empire| Board of Trade, Ministry of El b th M
Aaiates Association and Phe Food, Colonial Office and the Za el ay
British Empire League who last mse Relations Office. a's
+ ‘ : Sugar pro- t state that any agreement V Th Pp F
gear assisted colonial sug Dr°-|wherety Britain “would avooro| VIGIL Lhe rope
new contracts with the British definite quotas of sugar was LONDON, March 21
Government j“contrary, to the provisions of ee aes wy Pal ak ‘Koes
‘ the Commonwealth Sugar Agree- fold oie te ih aan ee es
A ; rall as been plz sq | ment.” man told euter to-day it was
mass rally has been plannec likely but not definite that



The Resolution added that the PRESIDENT TRUMAN
interests of sugar producing domin-
ions and colonies under the Com-
monwealth Sugar Agreement
would be “seriously endangered” | call
if these negotiations were con-

and a Resolution denouncing any
attempt to reduce Empire prefer-
ences as an attack on the Empire's
economy will be put forward by
Lord Balfour of Inchrye. He is
the newly elected Chairman ol

Princess Elizabeth would visit the
Pope, during her visit to Rome
next month

Such a visit would be a courtesy
and an informal one, the
spokesman added, Princess Mar-

sion of Korea to resist “stil
_against other free nations.”





believe the best way of progres:
for all of us lies along the lines





high places”. An American soldier was killed

THURSDAY, \ MARCH. 22,



1951.



CROWN PRINCE RETURNS



Mr. Anthony Brooke, exiled nephew of the last White Rajah of Sarawak, returns to London, after
giving up his five-year fight to regain the kingdom which his uncle transferred to British rule in 1946

Prince of Sarawak. One of his cousins married
regory,
Sarawak for more than a hundred

the wrestier. They were

Phato shows Mr. Anthony Brooke at Victoria with his wife wa two daughters, Angela 9 and

U.S. DOUBLE
ARMED. FORCES

KEY WEST Florida March 21.



disclosed today that the

United States has doubled its armed forces since the inva-

1 further Communist attacks

An exchange of telegrams be-

the Empire Industries Associa-| tirmed. garet was criticised by the Free tween the President and Secre-
tion. “Any bilateral agreement be-| Church of Scotland in Edinburgh ¢. I. Killed In tary for Defence George Mar-
Mr. Alan Lennox—Boyd, Chair-| Cuba such as has been suggested} holiday in Italy two years ago. States uniformed forces now
man of the Conservative Party] would seriously prejudice nego- Rev. Donald Mackenzie said: “I Tok oO Brawl stand at more than 2,900,000,
imperial Affairs Committee, is} (jations for a new International} think I speak for you all when 1 y About 250,000 of the 2,900,000
another who will be speaking on} Sugar Agreement” it said. say we deprecate and deplore men are engaged in the Korean
behalf of Empire producers 1 —Reuter. visits to the Vatican by those in TOKYO, March 21. |war the greater part of them rep-

resenting army strength,

< : 9 A a * * King George VI was asked to-|&d two wounded in a brawl in} In Europe there are about 127-
of Empire development » he told Wages Council Bill day to prevent the proposed court-|Tokyo’s International _ Theatre}000 men of which 97,000 are
za ae dete wees Te Hay + - | esy visit of his daughter Elizabeth | ¢4rly to-day. army about 20,000 air force and
place to express t his point o For Further Study to the Pope, and thus avoid an af-| Two hundred Japanese police|the remainder crews aboard
view was Torquay where trade ‘ bow front to national sentiment.” called out to quell the disturbance,

and tariff conferences have been

taki Tata" made 82 orrests.
aking place”.

Princess Elizabeth, at present in
Malta, is to visit Rome with her

From Our Own Correspondent

GRENADA, March 21.

The Empire Industries Associa-|_, After an hour and a half sit-| husband the Duke of Edinburgh see eect pe
tion are hopeful that delegates to ting the Legislature to-day re-| from April 11 to April 24. A let- Koreans in o dark street. while A

ferred the Wages Councif Bill to

ter to the King from the Secretary
a Select Committee following the

Batt. will. Aitend Meir Pal ang of the Protestant Alliance said

they were looking for a place t
listen. to their call for .sttong . i al

spend the night.











i i second reading of the debate on] that news of the visit of the next . : .Jaboard ships at sea.
Pe principles, The committee of in succession to the “Protestant dedier of nasal eee ee by While exact figures may not be
seven under the chairmanship of|throne of this realm”, Would be and beer voting ¢ | edie ny used, it may be said the army is
Mr. C. F, Henville, Attorney] flashed around the world as “Papal with eigen om ORC Une we beginning to approach the 1,400,-
PLOTTERS FOR TRIAL |General, includes F. B. Paterson,! propaganda of the greatest value.” ’ mt 000 strength figure mentioned by
J. B. Renwick, R. O. Williams,{ Millions of Britons would be filled| Japanese police officials said |General Omar Bradley, Chairman
KARACHI, March 21. |R.C. P. Moore, T, E. Noble- Smith} wih “surprise, perplexity, and they believed North Koreans pro- {of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the
Prime Minister \Liaquat Aliland Captain E, FE. Hughes who] profound sorrow” at the thought| yoked the incident “from political [Congressional Committee _ testi
Khan told Parliament to-day he|meet to-morrow afternoon to re- lot such a visit, he said—Reuter. | motives”, but General Mac}™Mony last month,
would bring to trial Major Gen-|port at the full session of the Arthur’s headquarters said it was At the time he spoke, the army
eral Akbar Khan, Chief of his|Council on Wednesday next , not definitely established whether | total was about 1,200,000, navy
General Staff, and other alleged| week. Egypt Plans the attackers were Koreans, Many |20d air force strength was about
plotters despite public and army| Work on the estates continue Koreans live in the area where the }820,000 each the Marine corps
demands that they should have!normal with only isolated in- Red Sea ‘Defence’ attack occurred,—Reuter, about 170,000.
been shot without trial. —Reuter. (stances of minor trouble. | oe On Page 3. |
CAIRO, March 21, | —



The Egyptian Army Command-
er-in-Chief, General Hussein
Farid Bey, has left for the Gulf
of Aquada at the northern end of
the Ked Sea to organise “military

Convent Wall Kills

Canada Is Democratic 19: Sehkool-tlite

—GEORGE HUNTE

MR. GEORGE HUNTE, Assistant Editor of the
Advocate returned yesterday by T.C.A. after a ten-day
stay in Canada as a guest of Trans Canada Airlines.

Shortly after his arrival at Scawell, Mr. Hunte said
“My trip to Canada was only one of the many examples
of Canada’s good relations with the Press.

defence” in this area, according to MILAN, March 21.
the pro-Government newspaper Thirteen school girls crouching
Al Misry, under a wall of a convent here to

The newspaper said this move
followed reports that Israel had
established air and land communi-| toppled on to them.
cations with the port of Elat on| Eleven other girls were badly
the gulf. Reports said Israel had| injured.
built a road 125 miles long across 1 . 7
the Negev desert and had also al Seven of the school girls, pupils

shelter from violent gusts of wind,
werg killed to-day when the wall







bean,
men are in the United States or

United States navy ships, in Eu-

shore instal-

lations,

Brace for a few thousand in
ska, Hawaii and the Carib-

remaining 2,000,000

ropeun waters or at



Radio Bomb
Dropped

TOKYO, March 21,
A six-ton radio-controlica bomb

was dropped on a rail bridge to-
day as American superforts made
a massive
communications on the
Manchuria
Communist
Superforts also raided three Com—
munist supply

the main
road from
North Korean
Pyongyang.

assault on

to the
capital

centres nearer to



Canadians whether bli tablished a regular airline to Elat,|@t the Institute of the Sister of : ) re i an
private enterprise Rg a ne igake nein i be planning| Jesus, were killed outright by tons the battle line Aa en a
for the Press to inform the pub- to build up Elat into a centre for|0f Stone which crashed on to them communique claimed. —Reuter
lic, fishing, mining and tourism. The others died in hospital soon

They do not leave the Press to ; Reuter. | afterwards. ye .. A
pick up information from offi- Seitnes dik Gk tenesital where Finnish Govt.
oa Pree, Magen in. the ITALY TO STEP UP | the injured girls were taken, said Resigns
Trai Pt on al Pee ae SULPHUR OUTPUT {some were in a serious condition pe ‘
dian democracy. And without ROME. March 21 Reuter. HELSINKI, March 21.
Canadian democracy the world of ; ‘ —. Finnish Prime Minister, Urho



Italy plans to expand her sul-
phur output in view of the strong

demand on the world merket, anal Britain Closing

the resultant favourable prospects . ..
se 3 *
Six Consulates

for this Italian industry.
The Ministry of Industry said it
LONDON, March 21,
Britain is to close six of her

was planned to step up production
‘onsulates in China, Foreign

in the sulphur mines of Sicily
where. Italy's principal deposits

Secretary Herbert Morrison told
Commons to-day. The closed posts

1951 would be in a worse plight
than it is.

It does not need ten days in
Canada, It needs only half an
hour in Ottawa to hear the pulse
beat of a great, virile and pro-
gressive nation,

My personal gratitude to Trans
Canada Airlines for making my
visit to Canada possible is all the
greater because of the opportuni-

are docated —Reuter.



. 7 r at Ch king, Kumning,
ty it ‘gave me to breathe if only ATTLEE GOES FOR Gankow Nanking Psingtao pe
for ten days the same air as a MEDICAL CHECK-UP Amoy, - r

people standing at the threshold

It is noted that to-day’s decision
of a great future.

arch 2
etgpeo rs March 2i « leaves only four British consulates

British Prime Minister, Clement

Three-Hour Flight Attlee went into a London hospital} hee eee
to-day for a general medical SMhich is also the seat of the
Winnipeg is 1,000 miles from checkup embassy.
Montreal and from. Victoria to He was treated for Duodenal] 4 Foreign Office spokesman
Halifax is something like 4,000 ulcer three years ago and has re-}saiq to-day that there are fewer
miles. It took me nearly three cently been suffering some discom-}than 2,000 British subjects in
hours to fly from Montreal to fort after meals. China of whom some 700 are in}
Toronto, some 300 miles. To. talk He will spend a short period in|] Shanghai. |

of seeing Canada in
nonsense.

But even ten days in Canada
is better than no days in Canada,

10 days is | hospital during the Parliamentary

| Easter recess.—Reuter.

FORMER PRESIDENT

—Reuter.





the guest of Trans, Canada OF ECUADOR DIES Earth Tremor

NEW YORK, March 21
The death was announced to-| UDINE, North Italy, March 21. |
lay of Dr. Alfredo Basquerizo A strong earth tremor lasting
| Moreno, former President of Ecua-|several seconds shock the Alpine
— |dor. He died in a New York hos-jregion of Tolmezzo, 25 miles north
pital on Monday night aged 91 of Udine early yesterday, delayed
Dr. Moreno came here a fort-|reports said to-day,
night ago for medical treatment, No victims or damage

Airline is probably equivalent to
30 days as an ordinary visitor.
Ten days is time enough too to
form an impression of the vast-
ness of Canada and to appreciate
the fact that there is a Canadian
way of life. Canada does not



Mr. GEORGE HUNTE

NO AGREEMENT

BUENOS AIRES, March 21



were re-













talk about democracy, Canada is} With Britain’s special “meat
democratic mission” to Ar gentina preparin Reuter. ported.—Reuter.
The Senator for Peterburgh|to leave next week, no agreemen
goes into a cafeteria and sit on 2| was yet in sight to-day according
stool next to the butcher bo) |to circles in cl te
The Canadian House of Parli2-| negotiations which |!
ment is almost an open house ine on daily here ft e ast
And the Press in Canada is re-|two and a half wee Reuter
garded as an essential part of} —- + TORONTO, March 21 approval to the bill setting u
Canadian democracy REJE ype MAND The work of the Government! a new Milk Control Boar
Public Relations in Canada is! ae TON, Mat 1 V peeded up on Wednesday) Lieutenant Governor Ray Law
based on a study of public! The United States State Depart- avert the strike whieh would; sén would be on hand to give}
opinion and government policies, ment d today that R ! off milk supplies to more’ the Bill Royal assent, minutes |}
and commercial and trade vo ed can de nd f 1,000,000 people in greate: later, and the Board would then}
cies ure made to fit in with pre the 670 hold its first meeting with
vailin pul opir Onte e 7 » Milk Price Associat
by the public rel ( i le Reuter . xpecte iste final A stril f 1,700



Keykonen to-day handed his Coa
lition Government's resignation to
President Paasikivi, but agreed at
the President's request to delay
making it effective until after
Easter

Earlier to-day Social Democrats
had withdrawn their six Ministers
from the 16-seat Coalition Cabinet
because Parliament refused yester-
day tc pass a
postponing from April 1 to August
l,a 43 per cent. increase in rents

They maintained that an imme-
diate rise in rents would help Com-
munists in the Trades Union elec
tions next month, and in the July
general elections. —Reuter.



Defend Middle East

Senator Urges

WASHINGTON, March 2)

Democrat Senator Edwin John-
gon, urged to-day that instead of
Europe, the United States shoula
concentrate on defending the
Middle East with its great oil
reserves because the Third World
War might begin in that area
In a speech prepared for delivery
he told the Senate, the “eastern
Mediterranean is not only a feve:

spot, but it is the foremost
strategic spot in the world
Reuter

ers had been scheduled to start



this morning, but an appeal by
Major Hiram McCallum won a
24-hour postponernent! While
the postponement was being
arranged Toronto w setting }





nething of a preview of what

Reta







Government Bill}

}
'





) eration
‘total 48



“Canada Faces Milk Shortage

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



, U.N. Troops Take

Over Chunce
rN earing Par

(By JULIAN BATES).

TOKYO, March 21

AMERICAN TROOPS to-day captured Chun-

chon, last major Communist base south of the

38th parallel without firing a shot. On the east coast,

South Koreans were believed to have reached north
of the frontier itself.

Chinese had abandoned Chunchon shortly be-

fore rapidly advancing Allied patrols and tanks
probed into the city.



Deputies Still |

Deadlocked
Over Big 4 Agenda

PARIS, March 21
“Big Four” Foreign Ministers
deputies failed again today to go
forward with their efforts to draft
an agenda for a Foreign Minis- i
ters’ Conference,

There was no progress at to-
day’s fiftieth meeting nor were any
new proposals or amendment
tabled, the British spokesman said. |

Andrei Gromyko, Russian depu- |

Eighth Army troops had last
been reported in holding positiong
| five miles south of the city this

“Cautious | morning. The last official report
| of South Koreans on the East Coast

said they were nine miles from
ty, set a new Conference record by A y roach” the parallel, after a quick advance
speaking for twe hours and ” from Kangnung, but observers
ee including translation believed they had reached the
ime. }

Gromyko challenged Western!
cantention that the acceptance of
the Soviet proposals on German
demilitarisation and the reduction
of armaments would mean taking
decisions on the substance of these

Diplomats of sev
ae teobine’ in Kor mm) ae es! given after the 14 houfs ban on
ps i ree the location of the

ae aa petthacee lifted Communist
United Nations pv were being
ing the narrow

troops had
rear.
back
territory

been
guards
into a

pressed
policy on

strip of

cross

38th parallel in

trength



questions. Representatives of a doze: 95 mils Jong by roughly 10 miles

Such suggestions were being|countries, fighting in the om deep @ along the central and
used simply to mislead public paign met United States A eastern fronts. Harried by a for-
opinion, he said,—Reuter unt Secretary of State Sai inj Ward curtain of jets and fighter

bombers, rearguards
scattered resistance
Stiffest resistance on the war
front developed north of the South
Korean capital, Seoul
munist groups fought
all attempts to dig
high ground

The

put up only

Rusk at the State

Department
fen hour long

conference yester



News despatches widely
lished " throughout the Uniter
States quoted informants ag sayin
that the 38th parallel problem wi
being broken do

March 21 As

Auriol Leaves

For New York

PLYMOUTH,

ul
eo Here, Com
stubbornly

them out of
vn into twe part

Communists were reported

r ; : 1 far as immediate mitita trengthened by elements of the
, rene 1 President neh Vincent operations were concerned, it third Chinese Field Army in the
uriol, his wife and Foreign Min- generally recognised that to mountainou region, 25 mileg



ister Robert Schuman, were we!-
comed by representatives of King
George V1, when they arrived here
this moning en route to the United
States in the He De France

Three British destroyers which
had awaited the liner since dawn

northwest of
te and

Seoul. On the east

central front, early morning

9 boundary by to-night
NEW YORK, March 21 News of the Allied advance was

tical purposes, United
forces must cross the pars allel
keep harassing retreatin; port iid Amoeriean infantry,
munists, and to find out what they |@dvancing behind a powerful air
were doing nd artillery bombardment swept

This was particularly impor-]| merth to occupy a strategic hill
tant because of the probability of} pes Communists resisted on

Nation

Com-! re

ihion



a few n.iles off the Devon coast,j: major Chinese Communist’vidges and hill crests for some

escorted the He De France into|counterattack in the next few/tours but petrol jelly bombs

Plymouth, weeks it was suggested oreed them to quit their foxholes
As. the liner approached the Other Washington reports snidjend flee northward.—Reuter.

harbour, guns thundered a wel-{the United States and its allies

come from the seventeenth cen-jhad agreed on crossing — the

tury royal citadel which had once parallel and forming a line

“MSS Publisher Of “La Prenea”’





defended the port against the|the waist of Korea without try-}
French. au , ing to reach the Manchurian Barred From Plane
After 200 passengers from Lon-|border, These same reports s aid{ 4
don had boarded the liner, the Britain and other countries h id BUENOS AIRES, March 21.
Ile De France lay to, until she was snow accepted the view expressed Dr. Alberto Gainza Paz, 50-year-
‘ tt ublicly by President Truman] old publisher of the independent

ready to leave for New York thi
afternoon, She will then be given
a salute of 21 guns

Auriol is ona State visit to
the United § States. —Reuter

chat crossing the
military
Arthur

La Prensa, which was
seized by the Argentine Govern
ment last night was prevented
from boarding a plane for Monte

matter for General Ma
to decide

Reuter





parallel wag | newspaper
|





intel video to.day,-R ;
21 ARRESTED oe eee
. . ,ye .
Britain Will Give HONG KONG, March 21
‘ ~e Peking Radio said to-day that TELL THE ADVOCATE
Antigua £300,000 an American directed underground THE NEWS
espionage organisation in Tient-, DIAL 3113
age sin had been discovered and 21
For Storm Dam 8 spies of various nationalities ar- DAY OR NIGHT
(From Our Own Correspondent) rested, —~—Reuter. 1

ANTIGUA, March 21,
Britain is prepared to make a
grant of up to £300,000 for repair



and reconstruction of houses
struck by last September's hurri 9
cane when two storms within ten
days hit the Leeward Islands
chain.
Making this announcement

Governor Kenneth Blackburne
said the amount would include a
large sum announced earlier,

It would also include a grant
of £6,857, for preliminary work
in London,

The grant would be conditional
on owners making a contribution
in labour.

Special grants in sterling would
be made available for hurricane
damage in the northerly island of
Anguilla where a few houses were {
left intact and for rebuilding the
Secretariat in Antigua

Spanish. nes
) Maintain the
same High
Standard of
Quality as
) shipped to

e
i West Indies
) forthe
past rea












)
)
}
}
j
{
|
{

The hurricane was the’ worst
for 80 years. Antigua was shaken
in January by an earthquake



Welsh Fusiliers

Arrive In Jea

KINGSTON, March 20

Trooper Dilwara arrived thi
morning and Janded an advan
| party of 200 of the First Battalion
| of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers who |
are relieving the First Battalion |
| Roy: al Inniskilling Fusiliers of}
| garrison duty in Jamaica, |
|

|

}

|
|
|

The vessel sailed this afternoo:
for Belize, British Honduras
where it will land another part
for garrison duty on the border
of Guatemala and British Hondu

EASTER

ras |

The Dilwara is due to return
to Kingston on March 26 when ‘e
the remainder of+the battalion make at

will bé landed

RAIL STRIKE CALLED

PARIS, March 21 |

—(CP)



The fir
French general

t major step towards >
strike came to
night, when the powerful non
Cemmunist Trade Union Confed
Force Ouvriere ordered a
hours rail strike for
and Friday .—Reuter,

GILBEY’S

Thursday

\
Geo
WP
ones
ene
~~
~~
mt

residents flocked t
milk supplie

canned

evening as
get extra
resh and

A
Both)

groce! re

ported enough powdered ind | GARDINER AU STIN& Co., Lid.
canned milk to last only a short}
Ane | Agents.



ERR



PAGE

TWO





Caub Calling

PEGG, Overseas
Fredk

who had been





ix
ta.,
a

M* B. CECII
a Representative of
Sage



n Barb on hort visit, re
rned Trinidad yesterday
afternoon 1} B.W.LA He was

Windsor Hotel
is stationed in Trini

taying at t
Pe



Vi
dad
First Out of Sixty

R. DAVID ELIOT, son of the
late E. C. Eliot former Ad-
ministrator of Dominica and Mrs.

g

Eliot (now Mrs. Bradshaw) a
Barbadian who left here at the
age of ten has just joined the

Royal Navy, He came first out of
sixty entrants in the sixteen—year-
old entry examination for the
Royal Navy. Only twenty-four of
the candidates qualified.

David was educated first at the
Ursuline Convent and then at
Lodge School before he went to
England. There he_ spent three
years at Boarzell, Hurst Green
where his two young brothers,
Mark and Henry are doing ex-
tremely well. He then went to
Uppingham until last year when
he decided to make the Royal
Navy his career.

David's great grandfather was
the first Archdeacon of Barbados
and his grandfather was bern in
Barbados.

Twenty Years

) BE shown before the sche-

duled film at the Aquatic
Club Cinema to-morrow is a two-
reel featurette “Twenty Years of
Academy Awards” produced by
the Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences

It tells the story of the “Holly-
wood Oscars” and to whom. they
were awarded between 1927” and
1947. Brief shots from the films
which won awards and some of
the stars are seen. A few of the
old timers who are seen are
Warner Baxter, Charles Laughton,
Norma_ Shearer, George Arliss,
Janet Gaynor, Marie Dressler and
several others

Will See B.LF.
M® and Mrs. Ted Benjamin
a? atcompanied by their daugh-
t Gill were ‘among the passen-
£ for England last
ht by the Willemstad. Mr.
Benjamin will be in England foc

the British Industries Fair.

First Clients Return

s leaving

E* ROUTE to British Guiana by

he S.S. Gascogne are Nurs-
ica

onous, Callender and
> in England they
ying at the Royal
Nursing and observing










College

modern

d nursing techniques. at
various London Hospitals, They
vere the first British Council
lients last year when the

Council took over from the Col-
onial Office responsibility for the
welfare and accommodation of
Colonials in England.

Married in U.S.

ISS DAISY RILEY, LS.M.,

formerly Charge Nurse of
the Eye Department of the Bar-
bados General Hospital was mar—
ried in New York on March 14
to Mr. Edgar Freeman an Express
Businessman of Long Island.

BY THE

HE less food there is, and the

more repulsive it becomes,
louder grows the cry of the
‘expert’, bidding us not to
s9 much,

From an article I take the fol-
lowing shining words, in the hope
that they may help others as they
have helped me: ~—

Weight for weight, a mouse
needs far more food than an
elephant, because its relative sur-
Jace area is much greater,

If that does not encourage Fatty
to give her processed halibut to
Tiny, then there is no decency
left in this grabbing world. i

The Octopus
C NE of the features of Pro-

fessor Orfl’s two-way round-
about is the Octopus. This con-
sists of a maze of twisting streets,
thrown out like tentacles to catch
traffic appreaching or leaving the
roundabout and 59 spread the
volume of vehicles over a wide
area. The ramps and parkodromes
closest to a roundabout would be



the

eat

inside these twisting streets, so
that all traffic proceeding away
from the roundabout would be

diverted at key—points to the back
entrance of a parkodrome, while
traffic approaching the roundabout
by alternate ramps would use the
front entrance of the parkodrome,
Each tentacle-street would bear a
number, according to the day of
the week, and this number would
correspond to another number
issued to each driver at the parko-
drome before or after leat ing or
arriving. 5

Madness in the Air

T HAVE always saic

f 1 that flying
is the dullest and

silliest way

cf wasting time. The airlines
apparently agree with me. To
induce people to fly they *have
lo Wage a war of propaganda If
one line offers each woman a
ae of orchids, its rival
counters with free chs

A Gwelve-course an raat

dinner served in

bed by one firm brovokes another

Se See eee eee eee
st New Millinery LADIES’ AND CHILDREN’S
a

STRAWS

In WHITE and Many Latest SHADES
51 Gauge “ARISTOC”

ti

‘ Nylons

@i----------- +e.

aw MEMS HATS
fine new assortment
a Latest Shades

m ONLY 2.40
a

Dial 4606






POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“What 1 want ts a straight
answer to my question—is the
National Commander, Western
Regton, under the control of
the Supreme Commander
British Railways, or is he
not?”






After 33 Years
RS. DAISY BURNETT
+ companied by her daughter

ac-

Miss Dorothy Burnett who had
been spending three months’ holi-
day in Barbados left on Tuesday
afternoon for the U.S. via Trini-
dad by B.W.I1.A,

Mrs. Burnett who is a Barba-
lian had been paying her first
visit to her home in thirty-three
years, This was her daughter's
first visit to the island.

While in Barbados she was the
guest of her sister Mrs. Cyrus of
“Lascelles” Pin., St. James. Mrs.
Burnett is also a_ sister of Mr.
J. M. Crick former headmaster of
St. Thomas Boys’ School and St.
Silas Boys’ School.

West Indian Studies Local
Government

OR the third consecutive year
the Lambeth (London) Bor~
ough Council arranged at the re~
quest of the Student Welfare De=
partment of the British Council a
special comprehensive course on
Local Government for overseas
students. The course, which fin-
ished last week, included a study
of the Council's housing depart-
ment, a visit to Lambeth Palace,
where the Archbishop of Canter-
bury lives, meetings with local
government officers as well as
lectures and discussion groups.
The West Indian representative
was Mr, O. D. Marsh, of Jamaica,
who_has recently been called to
the Bar.

* .

Anniversary Celebrations

HE LEAGUE of Coloured

_ Peoples, in celebration of
their 20th anniversary, held a
dance in London last week. The
dance was only a small part of
the celebrations; there are educa—
tional and other social events to
follow. The climax will be the
Annual General Meeting in April.



Barbados Holiday

EAVING ENGLAND on the
Golfito to-day for his first
holiday in Barbados since the war
is Dr. C. B. ‘Bertie’ Clarke, form-—
er West Indies Test cricketer. He
will be accompanied by his wife

whose first visit to the Wést Indies
this will be. A few days ago Mrs.
Clarke, who is herself an aftist,
judged a lecal Art Exhibition held
in connection with the Festival of

Britain. When they arrive here
Bertie hopes he will not be too
late to get a couple of Zames of
cricket and possibly re-appear for
his old club, Spartan.

Off to U.S.

EAVING by B.W.1.A. on
Monday for Puerto Rito on
her way to the United States to
weside, was Mrs, Lloyd wife of
Mr. Lionel Lioyd of the Barbados
Police Force.
Mrs. Lloyd will be staying with
her brother in the United States.

Area Engineer

R. BOB GREENE, Area En-
gineer, I.A.L, left for An-
tigua on Monday by B.W.LA, af-
ter spending three days in Bar-

bados.
T.C.A. Pilot

R. AND MRS. JOHN VAL-

LANCE arrived by T.C.A.
yesterday to spend ten days’ holi-
day in Barbados. Mr, Vallance is
a pilot with T.C.A.

For Easter

R. NEVILLE CONNELL.

Director of the Barbados
Museum, left yesterday afternoon
by B.W.1.A. for Trinidad. He has
gone over for the Easter week-end
and expects to return on Easter
Monday.

Canadian Surgeon

R. AND MRS. G. M. SPOON-

ER accompanied by their son

Charles, arrived from Canada yes-

terday by T.C.A. to spend

eighteen days’ holiday in Barba-

des. They are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Dr. Spooner is a Urological Sur-
geon in Toronto.

With T.C.A., Bermuda

RRIVING from Bérmuda by

& T.C.A. was Mr, Walter

Jones who is with T.C.A’s Traffic

Department in Bermuda, Here for

a short holiday he is staying at the
Aquatic Club.

Arriving on the same plane was
Miss June Clark’s friend, Miss
Jean Lovie who is an gir steward-
ess with T.C.A. Her home is in
Toronto. Miss Clark, who is also
a T.C.A. air stewardess arrived
from Canada on Saturday. They
plan to stay here for about ten
days.



WAY...

to offer free scent, cosmetics,
manicure outfits, and tea—services.
Which will be the first line with
compulsory TV?

Overall Overalis

(HARLIE SUET has issued this
directive: —

Owing to the increased overall
price of utility overalls, utility
overalls sold under the new over-
all prices will be referred to as
overall utility overalls, not, as
hitherto, as utility overall over-



DINE

By Beachcomber

alls, in order to avoid the confu-
sion between the overall and the
overall price schedulisation, except
in cases where the word
overall refers to one or the other,
in which case or cases the second
overall should be used to distin—
guish the overall price from the
article referred to as an overall,
having regard to the use of the
word overall in both cases, and
not with reference to an overall
overall without the word utility
being inserted between overall
and overall,



7

and DANCE

at the

Crane

Hotel

EASTER MONDAY 26th MARCH

19351
SPECIAL DINNER WILL BE SERVED

from 7—9 p.m,

DANCING 9 P.M. — 2 A.M.

Music by Riche Goodridge and his Orchestra

DINNER & DANCE
Admission to DANCE only

Please make your TABLE

$3.00
$1.00
RESERVATIONS EARLY

Phone 2220

iN

“CHARNOS”
“MASCOT”

“MASCOT” Chiffon
“MASCOT” Rayon
In Latest Fashionable Shades

* ELITE”

Sports Shirts .......... $5.93
All Popular Shades

SPORT SHIRTS
Boys & Youths Sizes only (White) .... $1.88

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

CELLULAR

YOUR SHOE

{

STORES





2.12

. $1.70
All Sizes

Tle.

Dial 4220

BARBADOS

Woman Of The

ADVOCATE



Week

TALLULAH

@ At 49 she is America’s best-loved radio star . .

but he» star

appearance this week was before a committee of Congress, when
she asked the Government to support a voluntary National Heaith

Committee.

From Fredé¢rick Cook

NEW YORK,

WHO SAID “ME? I’m as pure as the driven slush?”
WHO stopped Dr. Kinsey dead in his tracks by agree-
ing to answer all of his questions if he would answer hers ?
WHO staggered a fashionable Park Avenue dinner
party by retorting loudly when someone said how habit-

forming cocaine was :
for years.”

“Nonsense! I’ve been living on it

WHO—after loving a good punchy cocktail all her
life—“went on the wagon” the day of Pearl Harbour and
refused to touch a drop until Hitler and Tojo were licked—

and kept her word?

Frank .. . .. ribald

ALONG Broadway, they would
have no difficulty in identifying
her, It’s the woman they wrote
the song about, “You call every-
body darling,” the girl who out-
Hollywooded Hollywood more
than 20 years ago and turned he&X
back on it, the one and only
hoarsely crodaking, outrageously
frank, florid and unpredictable
Tallulah Bankhead, “bejtter
known, darling, if you don’t
mind, as The Wham from
Alabam’, a study in perpetual
motion,”

To-day Tallulah, at undis-
closed thousands a week, is un-
challenged mistress of the Amer-
ican airwaves. Always ribald,
often risque, her triumph has
surprised many who thought she
would prove too strong meat for
the unseen audience, This sug-
gestion she takes with mock
indignation.

At 49, Tallulah has lost no
scrap of her scorpion wit. Cer-
tainly there is some justification
for her own claim. “I’ve created
more gossip than any woman
since Catherine the Great.”

Tallulah might, had she chosen,
have won fame in a quite different
field—as the Lady Astor of the
American, Congress.

Her father was an M.P.
Speaker of the Lower House.

Her uncle was the famous
Senator Bankhead, who died in
1946.

No name has stood higher in
the American Deep South since
the Civil War than the one she
rescued from Washington, planted

and

firmly in lights on Broadway
and spread across page one of
every scandal sheet tabloid in
America.

To meet Tallulah, one needs
all one’s mental armour on
and then to be prepared for barbs
that will speed wunerringly to
whatever chinks may a.

In a New York night club
Tallulah once heard two dow-
agers discussing her in a none
too flattering way, “Waiter!”
she said in her most formal tones,
“please go into the kitchen, pro-
cure two saucers of cream—make
it sour cream— and place them
before those two aged cats over
there.”

The waiter looked despairingly
for help to the head waiter and

wa rashing around the moun-
1, ’
jtain

She opened the window and
found an iron object banging
against the glass. She could not
get it loose: it seemed to be
attached by a string. She pulled
the string as far as it would
come, tucked the iron object
under her pillow, and went of

to sleep.

“Lordy, Lordy, Mam,” said the
horrified Negro porter in the
morning. “You’se been a-sleepin’
all night on the end of the light-
ning conductor.”

The rest of Tallulah’s party
were not in the least surprised.

“Even forked lightning,” they
said, “knows better than to
tangle with Tallulah.”

World Reserved

—LES.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

Copyright



got no help from that quarter.
He carried out the order. The THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951.
dowagers left in a huff. 690 am—12.15 p.m. . ..s.. 19.60 M.
“Tht 9 6.30 a.m, Football Fixtures; 6.45 a.m.
It ad real ' Sporting Record; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10
‘ . . ;am. News Analysis; 7.15 a.m. From the
THIS sort ot incident lends 348 sin. Preatanuie Parade;
rich flavour to the atmosphere

of wild derision and utter confus-
ion in which Tallulah (“The girl
with the sleeping-car name”)
comes to full bloom. She likes

Listeners’ Choice; 8 a.m. Land and Live-
stock; 6.30 a.m. Mary Munn; 8,45 a.m
Plain English; 9 a.m, The News; 9.10 a.m
from Britain; 9.15 a.m, Close
11,15

Home News

Down; Programme Parade;

Editorials:
7.30 a.m. Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m.
a.m,



ao 11.25 a.m, Listeners’ Choice; 11.45 a.m.
nothing better than to be called, | coecial Dispatch; 12 (noon) ‘The News
as she has been, “the only voleano | j219 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m.
in the world dressed by Main- | Close Down. ‘
bocher.” | 4.15--6.00 p.m. 19.76 M.

" “Vales 4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 5 p.m. Com-
Tallulah is, to put it mildly, |... of the Week; 8.15 p.m. Scottish
overpowering. Howard Dietz | Magazine; 5.45 p.m. Melocy on Strir

ence said of her with an exhaus-
ted sigh, “A day away from her
is like a month in the country—
so restful, and yet so boring.”

The most improbable thing
about her is her name, and the
fact that it is her real one.





How to Travel; 6.33 p.m, Interlude
25.64 M. 31.32 M, 48.43 M

6 p.n
6.00—7.15 p.m.



. Programme Parade; 7 p.m

rs; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15



The ;
p.m, We see Britain; 7.45 p.m. Generally
Speaking

7.45—11.00 pom,

31.32 M. & 48.43 M

8 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m, Sir
‘I love it myself, daaarling,” | John Mipeil's | jake Journey: at aati:
she says, “for nobody knows what Dione: ei8 ‘ti Sing with adh: Bas
it is all about. It would be per-|),m. Do you Remember; 10 p.m. The
fect for a barbecue Sauce. It] News; 10.10 p.m. Interlude; 10 15, ote
ce ¢ FA ~all +| Toke it from Here; 10.45 p.m. Life ip
pounds ike: Mueer ne cay Britain; 11 p.m. The Music of Sid Phillips
prayer. But it’s real, daaarling,| 34a nis Band
it’s real!”
Chain-smoker CROSSWORD

TALLULAH is a chain-smoker,
But
and

chain-drinker, chain-talker.
under the hyperbolic wit

rapier repartee lurk furious affec-
tions and instant loyalties that
make her—to a select few—a

dependable, unshakable friend o:
whose word life itself could safely
be staked.

She regards Roosevelt as the
greatest American who ever
lived, rates Truman. not far
behind. At a 1948 rally (when
she worked like a_ cyclone for
Truman at a time when most of
his friends had written him off)



j

Th
adic ‘



Across





MARCH 22, 1951

NS

THURSDAY,

RATS !

y "i 1 3 g the next best thing

MANILA, Feb. 21. Club is doing i eee ;
They have g need fora Piedad The club is offering a 5 cent re-
Piper in rat-infésted Ozamis City ward for every rat, dead or alive,









ilippines turned over to the city Health
in southern Philippines. raiees any the of oe Sey
Lacking one, the local Lion's —LN:S.
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
Upstairs over NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad Street
BEAUTIFUL AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL
ppd ENE ING GOWNS
Open SATURDAY MORNING until 11.30, Tel. 2684





—_——

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
TO-NIGHT at 8.30
CARY GRANT . MYRNA LOY . SHIRLEY TEMPLE
in “THE BACHELOR AND THE BOBBY-SOXER”

Commencing FRIDAY 23rd at 8.30
RKO’s New Picture
“ADVENTURE IN BALTIMORE”
Starring :
ROBERT YOUNG SHIRLEY TEMPLE
JOHN AGAR
NO MATINEE ON GOOD FRIDAY.









,S” Please Note:















—

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TODAY (2 SHOWS) 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M
‘EXCEPT GOOD FRIDAY)
MONDAY (4 Shows) 1.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.tr

TUESDAY TO THURSDAY — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M,
Two Hours of Solid Action!

THE FLAME ano tee ARROW

Color by Technicolor
Burt LANCASTER Virginia MAYO — Others







SAT. & SUN,
9.90 a.m.,,

445 & 830 PM

Good Friday (only) (5 Shows) Starting Times 2.30—4.30—6,30—8,30 and
10.30 p.m, The Life and Passion of Christ

PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

TODAY (Only) 5 & 8.30 P.M Double)
Johnny Mack BROWN in (Both) - - -

CODE oF tHe SADDLE & RAIDERS oF THE BORDER

(Monogram Action

Goop FRIDAY (only) Starting Times; 2.00 — 4.00, — 6.00, — 8.00 pm
The First All-Talking Picture of

“THE LIFE AND PASSION OF CHRIST”

SAT. MIDNITE 24TH (RKO Radio Double) _
“WEST of the PECOS” Robert Mitchum & MASKED RAIDERS” Tim Holt

GATET WY—rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE: 8.30 — (Monofram Double)
LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT & RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL

evra ttennriateraheipsiestneeditinanst =e RET van tecencems tra iia Neat te i.
GOOD FRIDAY (Only) Starting Times: 4.30 — 6.00 — 7.30 — 9.40 pm
“THE LIFE AND PASSION OF CHRIST”
Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Two Shows Daily
“THE STORY OF BOB AND SALLY”
Women 5 p.m.—Men 8.30 p.m.
POSITIVELY NO CHILDREN
Age Limit: 16 Years & Over

EMPIRE |

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.45 & 8.30

20th Century Fox Presents





Midnite Sat. 21th (RKO)
“TRAIL STREET”
Randolph SCOTT &
“THE AVENGING RIDER”
Tim HOLT.







ROYAL

TO-DAY only 4.45 & 8.30
M-G-M Double —

Wallace Beery in



; ‘ . St art tence, (6
she wept openly when introduced Bt BRRRET PEL ROTE.OE A Mebtrence,, (6) Burt LANCASTER, Dorothy : ‘i
to him. Still sobbing, she bobbed _ gale. (3) . : i ' « VIVA VILLA
in a near curtsy, seized his hand} ,6: Sity*, Sin (ola change. (4.9) | McGUIRE, Edmund GWENN ;
impulsively and covered it with (7) 11. Mountain range. (U0 é and
kisses, Mr, Truman blushed | !2- Alienate. (8) as ie)
scarlet ie 4 ipken ey, "a 6 RIO RITA ”
3 . . iat & frost it is. ¢ 99

ey Gongiber (4) 4.6 batty ta «* MISTER 880
_* . sricket groun ut not . ) i

Storm-proof 20. Container, (3) | with Starring
21. A Roy, but not Derek. (3)
TRAVELLING by train last] 22. Grade nine matertal. (9) Bud Abbott & Lou Costello
sala 7 Millard MITCHELL and
autumn between California and Down ‘ ‘
New York, Tallulah could not] 1}. Bee eS att prop: (7) stat Minor WATSON
sleep. one hight for something] “ “py “9 *C* © ® SPantah estate ia ra nae 3 eS
rattling against her window-pane. 3 A& solemn observance (4) i
A heavy desert thunderstorm| § }Ya'er of bea pace Tay ROXY
7 No, the R.N.R. for a change.. (8)
8. Coarse fabric made up of drin!



THE FAMILY SOAP
@ Gets skin really clean

© Banishes perspiration odor

© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that is
mild and gentle. for face, hands and daily
baths. Odex is ideal for family use.








para

We shall NOT

to business on
SATURDAY, 24th MARCH

Will our friends

please note and arrange

y baile

NOTICE

un entretenimiocnto

de cenar

be OPENING

and customers
their

shopping and orders accordingly.



THE BARBADOS
COTTON





CO-OPERATIVE

FACTORY LTD.





i}

and sheep. (7)
9. You find them In the winter of






life. (8)
13 It’s ali part of the act. (5)
16. Greeting. (3)
18. The dinornis. (8)
Solution of yesterday's puzzle.—Across
5. Scan. 9 Cinnamon, 10
ie) 1S, Waul. 14, Valid 15, Goety
18 UWusien, 22 Lair: 25
vender, Down: 1. Scow!
Enough, 4 Enclosure
8. Need; 11 Eyen; 12
Ri nd 17. Hill: 20 Son: 21

ay Le
(AB) Ode

2 BREATHLESS HOURS
OF EXCITING ACTION
EVER WITHIN THIS

THEATRE’S WALLS!

>



MPAHES TRHONTITD



TODAY 2.30; 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
SAT. & SUN. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
} MON. 9.380 a.m.; 1.30; 4.45
| and 8.30 p.m
| TUES. and Continuing 4.45
| and 8.30 p.m



PELAZA Btewn

(DIAL 2310)

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15

M.G.M. Double.

M-G-M Double
Hedy Lamarr, John Hodiak

Nelson Eddy in . =
« BALALAIKA"* “A LADY WITHOUT
and PASSPORT ”
“ACT OF and
VIOLENCE” “ CONGOLAISE ”
wih

The Forgotten World of the
Savage.



OLYMPIC

Van Heflin and Robert Ryan.

GLOBE

OPENING TO-MORROW & CONTINUING







SUSAN HAYWARD...

Tempestuously Magnificent
As Cherokee Lansing...








...who ruled
men

with the
soft touch
of her

lips!!

WALTER WANGER

Presents



i
COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR!

starring

SUSAN HAYWARD « ROBERT PRESTON

Pedro ARMENDARIZ - chit witis-tioyd Googh- Edward Begley ~






Produced by WALTER WANGER + Directed by STUART HEISLER + Associate Producer i}
EOWARD LASKER + Screenplay by FRANK NUGENT and CURTIS KENYON
Suggested by a Story By RICHARD WORMSER «+ An EACLE LION FILMS Release
PLUS
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
JULIUS SIMMONDS ............ “Embraceable You”
WEY Pee PITT ch vs cuca e peat “T Wanna Be Loved”
ARTEL MOORE 0 isc. caved “Dreamers Holiday”
CHESTER HOLDER .......... “Wildest Gal In Town”
OTHA TAYLOR ....“Dear Hearts And Gentle People”
JOE (Chatanooga) CLARK ....‘Bop! Goes My Heart”
GUEST STAR—PERCY WELCH
Pit 16 — House 30 — Balcony 40 — Box 54
TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 Last Showing }
“THE DOCTOR AND THE GIRL” }
GLEN FORD — JANET LEIGH \
NS pa nen a!)





THURSDAY, MARCH 22,

1951



| STR







1
| 1. Probtem spots in the |
| eatkans and Middle East |
1
| 2. Yugesiavis's owtist to

the Mediterranean

3. Russia's outlet to the
! Mediterranean from her
| Black Sea ports

4. Oilfields and areas of vita



qe Strategy in
si Mediterranean is cone

trated on keeping open vital
safe-

shipping lanes and

ALGERIA

importance to Britain and U.S.A.







1 OA

the
en- Middle East.

Alon,

Gritish cir bases © Communist countries Au
i American air bases i) Naval bases

guarding the oilfields of the

the North African coast
lie a chain of sea and air bases

y





25 = 7 =
5 oe ee
a a até ae er aikie
SS ate @Fienaica ee
ee, i 1 ¥
Y A t eg

belonging to the Western Powers.
Malta and Gibraltar are still key
points of defence.

Soviet satellite States border



BARBADOS

ATEGY IN THE ‘MED’: WHAT IT MEANS
aN ae Co | I §
} ! il ; :

Af SSF

vep

Greece and Yugoslavia.
outlet to the Mediterranean from
her Black Sea ports is through
the Dardanelles,

Russia's

oe OG thy) 7. SAY

ADVOCATE mi
























i) ee

tat tt fh ae



/

ae
Uh

London Express Service





Fishing Industry

In Barbados

By C.C. Skeete Director
Of Agriculture

During the month the sum of
$705.21 was repaid on loans; this
makes a total of $53,699.24 repaid
over al! loans to date. An amount
of $6.31 interest was also receiv-
ed making a total of $660.80 in-
terest paid to date.

A sum of $237.00 was issued in
loans during the month making a
total of $98,576.29 issued in loans.

One meeting of the Fisheries
Advisory Committee was held
during the month at which four
applications for loans _ totalling
$2,054.00 were granted

At this meeting it was decided
that in future an amount of 40 per
cent. of the cost of the boat or
$400.00, whichever is less, should
be loaned towards the building of
a new boat.

Fishing operations suffered on
account of the ever changing
weatner conditions which _pre-
vailed during the month of Feb-
ruary. Firstly, fast moving south-
easterly tides kept the flying fish
far off the south-east of the Island.
and a few boats were able to make
the difficult trip. Then three days
of very heavy winds which caused
considerable damage to the sails of
about fifty boats had the fisher-
men on the alert. This unusual
keavy wind was followed by three
te four days of flat calm, a week
of rain and a further south-easter-
ly tide

It should be noted, however,
that during the period of heavy
winds, some boats brought very
good catches of flying fish, but
the risk was too great for the fish-
ermen to take. Dolphin catches
for the month were above average
for this time of the year.



Owing to bad weather condi-
tions, Investigator found it neces-
sary to tow back fifteen fishing
boats during the month. Investi-
gator also carried out fishing op-
erations on the south-eastern
banks off the Island to determine
the possible duration of the king
fish season. King fish were pres-
ent on both Middle and London
Shallows.

Flying fish catches were better
on the eastern coast than on any
other section.

It is encouraging to record that
about thirty to forty flying fish
boats are using gill‘nets for flying
fish capture with favourable
results .



SAUDI ARABIAN OIL

CAIRO, March 19.
Prince Faisal, Foreign Minister
of Saudi Arabia, said here to-day,

nationalisation of Persian oil
“will not affect the future of
Saudi Arabian oilfields in the
least”.





a

American Column:

Flashback To A Night
In 1931...

From R. M, MacCOLL
NEW YORK.

The course of world history
hung in the balance on a night
fin December 1931.

Then Winston Churchill, jump-
ing out of the wrong side of his
New York taxi, was knocked down
by another car.

He was On his way to dine with
an old friend, American elder
statesman Bernard Baruch, But
he had to go to hospita] instead.

Now America is a little worried
over Churchill's friend,

For Baruch, 80, hurt a leg while
getting off his horse in South
Carolina, and was rushed back to
New York by, plane.

The counsel of Baruch is still
regarded as invaluable by Presi-
dents and common men alike.
When he speaks the nation listens.
And with all his great gifts he is
not aloof but warm and friendly,

A NEW STIRRING among the
prospectors of northern California
has. sent hardened veterans off
again on the endless search among
lonely hills and deserts. Gold?
No—they are after tungsten now.

It is a basic war material, for
hardening steel, and Franco's Spain
has jumped up the price of her
wolfram (from which tungsten is
made) from 2,300 dollars (£821) a
ton last year to 4,970 dollars
(£1,774) a ton, And even at that
exorbitant price Spain insists on
payment in scarce copper, nickel,
or tin.

WHILE Barbara Hutton is busy
down Mexico way, trying to
divorce Prince Igor Troubetskoy,
Porfirio Rubirosa, Dominican Re-
public diplomat and former hus-
band of tobacco hieress Doris
Duke, turned up.in New York to
spend a week on Doris’s New
Jersey farm, “We are better
friends than ever,” said Porfirio.

THE MOST REVEREND Richard
Cushing, Roman Catholic Arch-
bishop of Boston, is against letting
18-year-olds join the army. He
says they would emerge “immoral,
dishonest, irreligious, heavy drink-
ers, gamblers, and just plain no
good,”

MAYBE you thought cattle
rustling a thing of the past?
Alabama has just had the worst
year in its history, with 100,000
dollars (£35,714) worth of cattle
stolen. And things will get worse
—meat prices are still rising.

SAMUEL GROVE stole some
suits from q Bronx flat, Then he
went over to Harlem, walked into
a pool-room and tried to interest
one of the players in buying
them. He was arrested. The pool
player was the man who owned the
suits. “A small world,” said
Samue!l sadly.

PLENTY of people were already
keen to find new uranium deposits.
Now they will be even keener. The
Atomic Energy Commission is

eS









JUST RECEIVED

KING PIN SETS

For THE FOLLOWING:-

AUSTIN 7 ELP.,
FIAT 500
FORD 8 HP. &

8 H.P., 10 H.P., 12 H.P.

10° H.P.

.

FORD V 8 CARS
FORD V 8 TRUCKS













SINGER 9 H.P.

ECKSTEIN

Bay Street

FORD V8 THAMES TRUCK
HILLMAN 10 H.P.
MORRIS 8 H.P.

& 10 HP.
& 10 H.P.

STANDARD 8 HLP., 9 H.P., 14 H.P,
VAUXHALL 10 H-P., 12 H.P., 14 H.P.
BEDFORD TRUCKS

Also
GENERATOR ARMATURES
FOR POPULAR MODELS,

BROTHERS,



offering bonuses of up to 35,000
dollars (£12,495) for new ore dis-
coveries.

AMERICANS thought they had
heard all the reasons for divorce.
Not'so. Giving evidence in a case
where his wife, Arlynne Mac-
fadden, alleges cruelty, husband
Berwyn (son of 82-year-old
physical culture authority Bernarr
Macfadden) admitted he threw a
plate of her salad against the
dining-room wall,

“T told her five separate times
not to put green peppers in my
salad,” he said. “But when it
happened again, I threw the plate
That’s all”.

SERGEANT Glenn Garrison is
home from the wars, to Columbus,
Georgia. He is allergic to wool.
And his skin just cannot stand the
G.I. winter undies,

THE FIRE BRIGADE at Buell-
ton, California, is worn out. A
farm blaze lasted more than ten
hours, because every time they got
one shed of hay under control
flaming rats dashed into the next
shed and touched that off

THE MAN who played the sar-
donic barman in “Lost Weekend,”
Howard da Silya, is in trouble.
Together with Oscar-winning
actress Gale Sondegaard, he has
been ordered to appear before the
Congress Un-American Activities
Committee, Says Howard; “They
want to silence me.”

Mr. Louis Law
Visits St. Vincent

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, March 18.

MR, LOUIS LAW, Executive
Secretary of the Caribbean In-
terim,Tourism Committee arrived
in St. Vincent by British Guiana
Airways on Tuesday 13 and was a
guest at the Blue Caribbean Hotel.

Mr. Law was taken around by
Mr. C. G, Huggins—Secretary of
the St. Vincent Tourist Board—to
see many places of interest includ-
ing Touer Hotel, Harbour Club
the Aquatic Club at Villa and In-
dian Bay as well as several other
beauty spots.

Mr. Law attended a meeting of
the local Tourist Board and told
members that St. Vincent had all
the natural attraction for tourists
and that at the moment there was
adequate hotel accommodation for
them. The important problems at
the moment, he said, were, first,
to let people outside, particularly
in America, know about St. Vin-





cent, and secondly to provide
proper transport for people
to get to St. Vincent. With

regard to the first, Mr. Law prom-
ised to give St. Vincent its share
of publicity in Travel Trade as
well as in other American maga-
zines. The transport problem, he
felt, would best be solved by pro-
viding a 15 to 20 passenger amphi-

.

luse LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP

You'll feel so fresh and full

you’ve washed with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap.
Lifebuoy’s deep-cleansing lather makes you

fresh and keeps you fresh.

whole day through.



New Industrial
Order Is Here

Governor of St. Thomas
And St. John Says

In his inaugural address to the
meeting of the eighth Municipal
Council of St, Thomas and St,
John last month, Governor Morris
de Castro said.

“We have been fortunate to
attract at least two new industries
here through our tax exemption
laws Arrangements are now
being made for the establishment
of these industries in our com-
munity,

Besides, there have been serious
enquiries from other industries
which are now giving considera-
tion to coming to these islands.

The advent of this industrial
order, | believe, might make it
necessary for us to re-examine
our labour policies, for the pro-
tection of both the industries and
our working people.

At the time our wages and
hours act was adopted, no thought
was given to the type of indus-
trialisation which is now coming
to the islands,

Because of this fact, I feel that

our wages and hours act may
have to be revised.
Within the framework of our

laws, we should consider, as the
federal government and many
states have done, the enactment
of a provision in our wage laws
which will create special indus-
try committees to make determin-
ations for minimum wages in each

industry.
No Economic Serfdom
Of course, we will have to

continue the protection of a single
floor for all wages, and a ceiling
for hours of work.

I would like to reiterate my
policy of being in favour of the
best working conditions including
huurs and wages, which we can
get for our working people.

We have not had, nor will we
permit, economic serfdom of any
kind. We recognise the partner-
ship of Labour and Capital in a
democratised, socially sensitive
and just industrial order.

We shall expect Labour to give
an honest day's work for a full
day’s pay, and we shall expec
Capital to be fair and just in its
dealings with Labour,

In the light of this policy, 1
shall recommend such revision of
our wages and hours act as may
become necessary as a result of
negotiation with prospective in-
dustrialists and discussions with
labour leaders.”

(A Caribbean Commission Release)



Dian plane. We also advised the
Tourist Board on a method of ar-
riving at a more accurate estimate
of the value of the tourist trade to
the Colony.

Mr. Law returned to Trinidad
on Friday morning by the Lady
Rodney, full of enthusiasm about
tourism in St. Vincent.

of energy when

So use Lifebuoy



Toilet Soap regularly, and keep fresh the pS
ey

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

WLBT Of 4-11 0-86








U.S. DOUBLE
ARM FORCES

@ From Page 1.

Truman's announcement was a
new warning to Soviet Russia that
the United States “in company
with other free nations” is deter-
mined “to. establish and maintain
world peace”.

He emphasised the speed with
which the United States is re-
building its defences by disclosing
Marshall's telegram which gave
the size of the country’s armed
forces as double what it was on
June 25,

“This doubling of our strength
has been accomplished in less than
nine months after Communist ag-
gression against the Republic of
ae General Marshall wired.

“For

your information the
strength we have already at-
tained —a total strength in ex-

cess of 2,900,00—was not attained
in World War II until more
than 21 months after our buildup
Started in June 1940,° following
the fall of France, and more than
three months after Pearl Harbour.

The President took unusual
steps to seek a world wide dis-
closure of the progress of Ameri-
can defences, and the exchange
of telegrams was radioed around
the world by the State Depart-
ments’ Voice of America,

The _ President telegraphed
Marshall, “I wish to commend
you and all your associates in
the Army, Navy and Air force
for the strenuous efforts which
have made such growth possible,

“This tremendous gain in our
strength has been made necessary
by the Jawless aggression of
Communist forces in Korea and
by the menace of still further
Communist attacks against other
free nations,

Preservation Of Freedom

The armed forces we _ are
building, and the supplies for
them which our factories, farms
ana mines are turning out, are
for the proteetion and preserva-
tion of our freedom,

The speed with which we have
been able to strengthen our de-
fences should be a source of in-
spiration and encouragement to
men everywhere who love free-
dom, It is evidence of our deter-
mination in company with other

free nations, to establish and
maintain the world’s peace.
“T am confident that under

your wise leadership you will be
wfully supported by the American
people.”

The Defence Department gave
this country’s Pre Korean armed
force strength at 1,458,000 men.

Truman has announced a goal
of 3,400,000 men as soon as possi-
ble after June 30, His leaders in
Congress are making a last ditch
stand against some attempts to
place the ceiling at 4,000,000 men
on uninformed personnel

Truman’s statement to-day was
generally considered an_ invita-
tion to the Allies of the United
States to speed up rebuilding
their armaments and their armed
forces,

—Reuter.

/ keep fresh all day...!



no ee

a
ee

‘

PPL PP PELE LALA EPPS LPS PES CCS ESSSSE OSSOS



a LEVER raopvge

PAGE THREE

ee

Industriés
On Increase

| General On Trial For





War Crimes

| PARIS, March 19 mander, Rameke was living under
| German ex-General Hermann observation in Paris sut until
| Ramcke, appeared to-day before a February when he left without

|
i
| French court charged with having
organised or tolerated atrocities
According to the 1949 Annual|committed by German forces
Report on Jamaica, industrial de- under his command in the Brest
= has taken an appreci-| “pocket” in 1944.

IN JAMAICA

warning for Germany

ing against the “slow

able stride in that island. The re- The 71-year-old airborne Com- again arrested —Reuter,
port says that arrangements have
been made for the construction of
the cement factory, which is
expected to go into production in
1952,

Both the textile factory and the
plant for the manufacture of ania!
concentrates are expected to go
into production this year. The
substantial incentives provided by
the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Law have also proved
very attractive to other manufac-
turers,



Pioneer concessions have been

granted for the manufacture of

bypocrete—a new building mate- Sele tev :
rial—and for building materials WS, MONROE &CO typ
made of gypsum; for wire-bound Bridgetown, desta
boxes for exporting island pro-| Barbades,

duce; for cocoa powder and cocoa
butter; for laundry blue, and for
wooden handles for carpenters’ and
cultivators’ tools

There are a number of other
proposals, some of considerable ‘aise
5 » : > Distillers
importance, which are now under ‘
consideration, the Report states, Leith, Scotland

These industries, when established,
will do something towards reliev>|
ing unemployment.

Some of them will earn dollars,
and others will assist in making
the island independent of import-
ed supplies of essential materials.

Good Factories Needed

As an additional gid to indus-
trialisation, the government of
Jamaica is developing an Indus-
trial Estate in Western Kingston
on which tactories may be sited at
moderate rentals,

Attempts are being made to se-
cure the services of an industrial
scientist of high qualifications to
act as Scientific Secretary to the
Industrial Development Commit-
see,

Thus, concludes the Report, the
government has already achieved
substantial results on its policy of
encouraging industrialisation, a ;
policy which it intends to pursue TNT Tells qo
with the utmost vigour. you what Ono tS
* TONO "' is not only a delicious drink but
also a food of high nutritive and caloric value.
It contains all the health-giving and restorative
elements of pure rich milk—fine chocolate—
sucrose, and malted grain—with a definite
addition of Vitamin D.

It will be recalled that Profes-
sg Arthur Lewis referred to this
Jamaica Government scheme in
his study on The Industrialisation
of the British West Indies,

Professor Lewis felt that the Take it cold or hot asa morning drink or a
trading estate is a very useful in- bedtime nightcap. Children lao te No added
vention But he eypressed milk is required,

the opinion that simply scheduling

an area for industrial develop-
ment is not enough. He felt
that an Industrial Develop-

ment Corporation should be set up
to erect factory buildings. “What

“Tono'’ is a complete food beverage.
the industrialist is looking for is a
factory building, well planned,

with public utility services laid hy,

CHOCOLATE MALT & MILK BEVERAGE
Fe . “

on’. r= ~
Mr, Lewis said “He (the indus- Saree

trialist) is not impressed by an

empty piece of ground ” e
More recent news from Jamai-

ca indicates that such a Corpora~

tion is likely to become a reality

in that island in the near future

{A Caribbean Commission Release)











PE

(PP





Remember —
HUTCHINSONS

The Most Central Shopping Place For :—

@ GLASSWARE and CROCKERY
@ ALL TYPES KITCHEN WARE
@ BEST BRANDS PAINTS and
@ STOVES and PARTS
@ BEDSTEADS, SPRINGS and MATTRESSES
@ GLASS and MIRRORS,
and many other BARGAIN ITEMS.

ENAMELS



G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD.

Broad Street

—

Roebuck Street







EEL LLLP LPL K

PROSLSE ECP SEPP POCO

445%;

OS

NOTICE

OUR OFFICE AND WORKSHOP
WILL BE CLOSED ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 24th

OUR GASOLENE STATION

WILL BE OPENED TO BUSINESS
AS USUAL.

PVOOODOPSSS

COURTESY GARAGE

ROBERT THOM. LTD.
WHITEPARK ROAD.

*
-

After
ing Press conferences and protest-
course :
French justice” he returned by his
own free will on March 9 and w



/ MACDONALD
y & MUIR LTD




POPPE AAP

£5 oes ‘hOsOsbs SbESO% 1S
SLSR GELS P ECCS SSPE SLLEL PSE LEEPER PFPADLL PPP ANPP LP LPC VEE

hold-

of

13










434,6,454,4,¢,6,0, 0
OGG FFE P SS FEED

SS

Â¥,

ao

POOLE SGLEL SAL IDPISOPPE SE LLP LAS OS SO$

-
i sa i ia eta i ith a a It a ik ee



PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

Thursday, March 22, 1951



HARRISON COLLEGE

DURING the last century the name of
Harrison College has stood out high in the
list of public schools in the British Empire.
It was not merely the name of the school but
the calibre of her alumni found in almost
every part of the v,orld occupying posi-
tions of eminence. It would be impossible
to reproduce the impressive list but among
tHose of the past have been Abel Green-
idge and the late H. B. Gooding while
among those of the present is a Perman-
ent Under Secretary of State in the Brit-
ish Home Office. Sir Frank Newsam.

But it is not on her past laurels that
Harrison College hopes to maintain her
prestige in the world of scholarship.
Throughout the years she has continued
to produce scholars who have done re-
markably well at the universitits and in
every branch of study. Today it is her
proud boast that she is still among the
best public schools in the British Common-
wealth and Empire. Examination results
are not the only indices by which a school
or any other institution can be judged, but
they serve to indicate a standard of work
done,

Recounting the successes of the School
at Speech Day last week, Mr: Hammond
supplied the information that “outside the
United Kingdom Harrison College headed
the list of examination results of all schools
in the British Commonwealth including
the Dominions.” The examiners themselves
wrote in their report: “It was gratifying
to note that the standard in Greek was as
high as in Latin. .... The standard in Set
Book papers was higher than that obtained
by schools in England. .... The general
average of the work in Classical History
was high and compared favourably with
the average of most English Schools.” It
was with pardonable pride that the Head-
master said, “I know of no overseas school
in the whole Commonwealth that can sur-
pass the academic record of Harrison Col-
lege.”

Barbadians in every walk of life will
pride themselves in the fact that among
the educational institutions of the Empire
the leading school of this island is classified
among the best. But that justifiable pride
becomes empty if nothing is done by those
who have benefited from their associations
with her to help her to maintain that posi-
tion of eminence to which she has attained.
The former Headmaster Mr. H. N. Haskell
was never tired in his appeal to Old Har-
risonians to support education in a tang-
ible way by contributing those necessary
adjuncts which contribute to the enjoy-
ment of the corporate life of the school.
The most recent contribution is that of
equipment for the teaching of Biology to
enable pupils who aim at becoming medi-
cal students to gain exemption from the
first M.B. examination while still at school.
The ever increasing numbers on the school
roll expresses more eloquently than any-
thing else, the demand for education at
Harrison College but there is the underly-
ing danger pointed out by the Headmaster:
“There is a third dilemma which pressure
of numbers produces; the loss of a feeling
of entity which is an almost inescapable
result of growth in size.”

PUBLIC SERVICE

FOR some time complaints have been
made of the inconvenience suffered by
people whose business takes them to the
Treasury. There is no opportunity to pur-
chase stamps which must be affixed to
vouchers.

In the event of anyone going to the
Treasury without the necessary stamp
to be affixed he must first go to the Post
Office and purchase the stamp before he
can be paid.

The same state of things has arisen at the
Parcel Post Department now removed to
the Wharf. ‘

It should not be difficult for the Govern-
ment to make stamps available at these
two departments not for general purposes
but merely to facilitate the business con-
ducted there.

The Government sells stamps and the
departments exist for the purpose of cater-
ing to the general public who go there for
business with the Government.

OUR READERS SAY



ARBADOS Gp ADVOCATE



British industry has made fine
strides since the war; but I give
this warning: —

We haven’t done enough. We
have to wake up, we must inten-
sify our efforts to improve pro-

ductivity, otherwise we. shall
starve.
Our population of 50,000,000

can live only by selling its manu-—
factures abroad in exchange for
food and raw materials.

In France, 33 out of every 100
adult workers produce food. In
America 18 out of every 100, In
Britain fewer than five in 100.

No country is so dependent on
imports as ours.

And increasing population and
industrialisation in overseas coun—
tries are reducing the quantities
of food, etc., that these countries
can sell to us, and forcing up the
prices.

TO PRODUCE
AND REARM

The problem facing us is:—

Can we continue to sell
enough of our goods on favour-
able enough terms to get the
raw materials to keep our fac-
tories working and the food to
keep our stomachs full?

Can we produce enough to
do this and at the same time
to rearm?



The answer is, only if we work
more efficiently .

We are facing a new world. In
order to survive as a great nation
we must evolve an entirely new
outlook on relations between
worker and employer.

We can succeed only if instead
of the two fighting each other
they can create a_ partnership
leading to the highest productiv-

ity.
GET RID OF
THIS FEAR .-

|
| Can we do that? I think we



can. We have travelled some way
along the road already.

Workers must get rid of the
fear that if they work better
they will work themselves out
of a job.

Our curse is that they have
good memories for bad things—
especially for the years of unem-
ployment and wage cuts.

If the full employment of today
can continue for ten years, there
is a hope that the fear of the
sack—the old basis for discipline
in industry—will die, and a new
basis of reason be firmly estab-

lished .
DUTY OF THE

EMPLOYERS

Trade union leaders now realise
that they can no longer just fight
to get the most out of someone
else’s pocket, but that the only
way to improve their members’
lot is to increase their productiv-
ity.

Their difficulty is to get this
across to the rank and file.

As for employers’ associa-
tions, they must give thought
to something more than merely
protecting their own interests.

They have to consider how
private enterprise can work
best in the public interest.



By SIR GEORGE SCHUSTER
(industrialist, banker, and chairman
of the Government panel on Human
Factors Affecting Productivity).

In the nationalised industries
the Socialists should give a lead
in creating good human rela-
tions. They have certainly not
done that yet.

Many firms in private industry
are far ahead of the nationalised
industries in progressive policies
for handling human relations.

I believe that by employer
and employee agreeing to see
how they can operate together
more expertly, and getting rid

of all restrictive practices,
there could be an immediate
30 per cent. increase in Bri-

tain’s productivity without any
necessity for longer working
hours,

UNIONS AND
EFFICIENCY



Lever Brothers have been able
to put up productivity by 30 per
cent. just by improving work
methods.

Tube Investments have report-
ed an even bigger advance. There
have been many other cases, too.

Nothing is more important than
that trades unions should co-op-
erate in this efficiency drive.

They should have their own
efficiency experts, as they do in
America, and themselves force
laggard firms into line.

Hitherto the attitude of the
British unions has been rather
to protect the weaker brother and
see that he does not get left be-
hind.

But the day for this concentra-
tion on minimum standards has
gone. We must encourage the
man to make as much as he can.

We need a new race of fore—
men—the N.C.O.s of industry.
They must be trained in
handling people. They must be
leaders who can take real re—
sponsibility.

A recent survey of a large sam-—
ple group of British industries
showed that only two-fifths of
foremen had undergone any sort
of training for their job, and only
11 per cent. had received more
than a primary school education.

30% bO
JOB WELL

I do not believe in long hours
of work. I think 40 hours of hard
manual work is enough for or-
dinary people. Nevertheless in
times of crisis like the present it
may be necessary to toil longer.



BUT before we try to persuade
people to do this, management
and workers should see what can
be done to improve efficiency so
that every working hour becomes
as productive as possible.

At least 80 per cent. of Britons
are working well. Most men like
to do a job well,

Why, then, do we have strikes?

Tt is not enough to put them
all down to Communist agitation.
Communists only get a hold if
there is a genuine grievance.

In general, men become dis-
contented if they think they are
not getting a fair deal compared
with other people.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

If they seek a remedy by strike,
it is almost always because the
machinery for handling human
relations and settling wage ques
tions is too cumbersome. For this
the trade union organisations are
often as much to blame as the
employers’ side.

Dockers have been particu-
larly strikeprone just because it
is difficult to establish real
human relations in dock work,
since the men are always shift-
ing from one employer to an-
other.

But we hear too much about
strikes. Taking a broad view, our
workers have been extra-ordinar-
ily reasonable during the past
five years. We have been 16 times
freer from strikes than during
the five years following the 1918
war.

IT MAY BE
PROSPERITY

Nevertheless, I agree that we
are now approaching a very dif-
ficult time.

We are in for a period of rising
prices and rising wages. I am
not so frightened of this as some
people are.

Provided it does not go too fast,
a period of rising prices is a peri-
od of prosperity.

It makes people believe in the
future, and be enterprising,



Judged by pro§ts, British in-
dustry is prosperous today. But
I think there is still a substantial
margin for really earning bigger
pay packets if everybody on the
job pulls together. What we can
not afford is bigger pay packet
not really earned by better pro-
duction,

I believe that the current talk
about workers being hindered by
lack of incentives is exaggerat
ed; but I am worried about the
smaliness of the meat ration.

Those doing hard physical la—
bour will feel the iil effects of
the meat shortage if it goes on
much longer.

ANSWER TO
COMMUNISM



Let us hope we can get over
that. The really big task ahead is
to create the spirit of partnership.

This requires an entirely new
outlook on human relations in
industry, so that all concerned—
employers, union leaders, and
rank and file workers—come to
regard themselves as constructive
partners in an all-out effort tu
increase industrial efficiency.

We have a long way to go be-
fore that is the general spirit
of industry; but the experience
of a few progressive firms makes
me believe that it is possible to
achieve.

I believe this is’ something
which British industry can do
better than any other,

If we can succeed in creating
such a spirit then we can make
industrial employment the basis
of a good life.

And we shall have found the
answer to Communism. Once
again we shall take the leader
ship of the world.

London Express Service



Exit The Typists Who Went “Red”
To Keep Their Jobs

despatch from KURT NEIDHARDT, who escaped vecently

from the Soviet zone, where

he was an editor of the East

German Communist News Agency :—

A million German Communists
are being “screened” by party
tribunals in session all over the
Soviet zone.

There is one basic test: could
the comrade be completely trust-
ed to fight for the Kremlin, if the
call came?

Inquiry into the comrades’ fit-
ness to continue in membershiv
is not the only aim'‘to the purge
Its wider purpose is to condition
party members to regard Stalin’s
plans of imperialist conquest as
sacred and inevitable.

The new Communist parties are
to be thoroughly indoctrinated
with the idea that Stalin is the
sun and centre of the universe,
not only the greatest living
thinker and . scientist, but the
greatest in history.

If he is all these, it follows that
he is also the greatest general
not only of the next war but the
last war and all the wars preced-
ing it.

It is, in fact, Lenin who ts being
purged,

Two Moves

Walter Ulbricht, the trim-beard-
ed top Communist of the Soviet
zone—the little Lenin of fas:
Germany — brought the purge
directive back to Berlin when he





returned from his latest of many
visits to the Kremlin,

The same hour that a Russian
plane set him down at a Red
Army airfield on the outskirts of
Berlin, Ulbricht ordered a cor-
ference of party officials.

Ulbricht talked for two hours
about his newest directive, Stalin
is known to have told Ulbrich:
that two moves must be made in
Germany:—

1. To rid the party ranks of the
Government typists, girl secreta-
ries, and shopkeepers who flocked
to join in order to keep their jobs
or make life easier for themselves;

2. To build up a party of true
revolutionaries imbued with Stal-
inist ideas.

Ulbricht gave orders for the
“sereening.” The party member-
ship card became—officially—‘“the
most treasured possession of any
German”; more to be cherished,
apparently, than ration cards,

‘Earn It’

Now the membership card has
to be earned. Those who are
being purged have the theoretical
chance of winning it back through
long and diligent apprenticeship
in the “mass organisations” — the

omer | testers



German-Soviet Friendship League
is one.

The league will give full op-
portunity for its members to show
complete acceptance of Stalin and
all his works. It will give instruc-
tions, too, on the latest party lines.

Those left in the party musi
also serve an apprenticeship, The
training course for them is more
advanced, more strenuous, too.

Local committees of the party
—made up of those who have
won status as teachers—will mark
the progress of each apprentice in
a booklet which will record the
number of lectures attended in the
week. Absence from two succes-
sive lectures will require to be
explained.

The Genius

The teaching will represent
Lenin as a revolutionary, as the
founder of the Soviet State, and
as a man who achieved much.
But it will show him as a pigmy
beside Stalin, whose genius
changed one-sixth of the earth,
not to mention the post-war gains,
into the Socialist Sixth,

It is

_ 4s an extension of the
Stalinist attempt to charige
history—-so that the disciplined

historian of the future will permit
himself no doubt Whatever that
Stalin was not Lenin’s pupil, but
that Lenin was Stalin’s pupil.’

—L.ES,





and when ever I goes before Mr,
Masiah or Mr. Seon, I ent going



Prison *‘Westlynne,” tongue. I am_ sorry to see
Land’s End, you here so soon’ again —
To the Editor, The Advocate, March 16, 1951, and then he does appear so sorry,
The Story from THE BEE -fol- end he acks more like a nice old
SIR,—While reading the criti- lows:

cism in the House of Assembly re
the Prison and the treatment of
prisoners in today’s Advocate,
Friday, March 16, 1951, I remem-
bered reading only yesterday in
an old newspaper The Bee of
Friday, September 30th, 1887, pub-
lished by Messrs G. Anciaux and
S..W. Poyer, copies of which you
no doubt also have, this same prob-
Jem with criticism faced the House

of Assembly 64 years ago, and en
closed is a copy taken from
“Buzzings” of the comic side to
the question.

In this same paper there is also

criticism of the method of sanita
tion and the scavengers’ carts, ut
after 64 years we have at last
‘cuvered wagons’, something to be
proud of, for as the article reads
-“Dust we are, but unto us doth

cust return,” for many years.

Yours truly, :

M, BAYLEY

OUTSIDE THE WALLS OF THE
“ROYAL HOTEL” IN ANCIENT
TIMES CALLED “GLENDAIRY”
Stone-walls do not always a prison
make, nor iron bars a cage.”

Becky, who has just completed
her term of one month in, for
erticles of the peace; has started
on her way to the city.

Friend, meeting her: Hi! Becks

darling, you out once more?

Becky: Yes child, but I only
wishes I had to go back next Mon—
day morning,—Oh! Glanderry is
the most beautifullest place in the
whole world, and Mr. Gubenor
Price is a most blessed old gentle-
man, his manners is as soft as
lard, he does speak so kind,—~and
says child your last lesson had no
effect, why don’t gOvV
ern your dirty abusive



you

and

well behaved white woman,—than
a Gubner,—TI likes to go to “Glan-
derry, deed I does,”—In the morn-
ings you get the nice fresh air
strong enough to blow the teeths
down your throat, den punctual at
8 o'clock you has your bath and
by dat time, tea and breakfast
comes together, my cousin Johnnie
(we calls him “three foot goat”
for a nickname,) used to bring me
up regular good vittels, and at 2
o'clock again he was waiting with
dinner, you doesn’t have the least
thing to do, only at 6 o’clock you
has to get the lock turned upon
you, dats de only wotless ting in



the whbdle of it—of course only
females is allowed to talk to
females, but my dear Titty’ a set
of courting goes on, but you has
to be as sly as a cat without claws,
however, I is out—but ess I don’t
put Catherine in gaol before 6
months goes over dis head, you can

cut off my hair for rat poison

take no false oath, but I is going
to do the business for her upon a
“saliva oath.”

Friend inquires "with a deal of
interest: What kind ofa ting a
eS oath is?

cky: Child you isent been in
de world long enough yet, de fust
hody ever show me how to take
one of doze oaths was a policeman,
--you puts your thumb upon de
prayer book and kisses dat, not de
book, den you spits and wipes your
mout, so dat you isn’t swear at
all but den de Magistrate don’t
know dat.

And beyond all question of
doubt, as long as “Glendairy”
makes such good terms, and af-
fords such accommodation for law-
less peace-breakers and other dis-
turbances, so long will it remain
PNed with such vagabonds, give
them work to do, and see how
soon the number of peace-breakers
will diminish,

“Cepied

Friday

from “The Bee” of
September 30th, 1887.’

The Cure For Strikes

And The Only Way Te High Wages



The Guinness Millions Dispute Throws
Up Again The Problem

What Happens To Your
Money When You Die?

By BERNARD HARRIS

ONE of the 18 counsel engaged in trying
to unravel the tangle of the Guinness mil-
lions has suggested that it is better to die
in the poorhouse than to die rich.

Certainly, if we all ended our days own-
ing less than £2,000 (at which death duties
start) we should save a lot of trouble for
the folk we leave behind.

For difficulties over wills are becoming
more frequent.

Of course it is the millionaire estates, bur-
dened with duties of 16s. in every pound,
that give rise to the most spectacular prob-
lems.

WIDOW’S WILL

The problem with the estate of Mr. Arthur
Guinness is that it is between £300,000 and
£ 400,000 short of the amount needed to carry
out his wishes — even though he left
£ 2,000,000 after death duties. ;

There has been a deficiency, too, with the
estate of Mrs. Lavinia Clarissa Keene, 85-
year-old widow who died nearly two years
ago.

eThis charitable old lady left £1,347,000, of
which death duties took £937,663. More than
£ 1,000,000 of her wealth was represented by
50,000 Pearl Assurance shares, valued when
she died at £20, 5s. each.

Soon after her death the Socialists came
out with their plan to “mutualise” industrial
life assurance.

Down went Pearl shares to £17, And
down also went Mrs. Keene’s holdings of
War Loan and industrial shares.

The estate was so reduced that it seemed
there would be nothing left for anybody. So
it was decided to “nurse” the Pearl shares
in the hope that the price would recover.

Luckily for the beneficiaries it has done
so.

SACRIFICES

Another estate which has given rise to
problems is that of Lord Portal, head of the
banknote paper firm. He left £2,112,000, of
which £1,569,000 went in duties.

On paper his widow would appear to be
still a wealthy woman. But apparently Lord
Portal left instructions which could be
carried out only by heavy sacrifice on her
part.

If you have any money to leave it is useful
to look ahead and see what happens to it
when you die.

If you work out roughly what the State
grabbers will take you will make things
easier for those who come after you.

Hardly anything escapes the State net.

Your executor’s first business is to take
charge of everything of any value you
possessed. If there is odd cash in your trouser
pocket he is supposed to include even that.

VALUE ALL

He will instruct your bank manager to rule
off your account. He will value all your furni-
ture and house fittings.

If the amount is small, his valuation will
probably be accepted; if it is large, a valuer
will have to agree the figure.

The local district valuer will check the
price put on your house. Stocks and shares
will be taken at the market value on the day
of your death,

The rule is “a quarter up”—which means
that if a share is quoted at 20s.—22s., the
value will be taken at 20s. 6d.

Shares in companies with no market
quotation will have to be valued by the
secretary or auditor. The figure will later be
checked by the Estate Duty Office, who may
call for the last three years’ accounts,

When your executor has put a figure on
everything an Inland Revenue affidavit will
be prepared and checked. Then probate is
obtained and your executor can go ahead
and carry out all your wishes—provided you
have not been too generous.

TO COURT?

If you have underestimated the duties pay-
able your executors may have to go to the
High Court for advice on how to deal with
your legacies,

In the case of small estates this difficulty
can sometimes be got round by the benefici-
aries agreeing to take a cut,

By this time one or two details of your
will may have appeared in the local news-
paper,

Almost certainly there will be friends of
yours who will say: “I had no idea old So-
and-So was worth all that.” Or, “I thought
he would have left more than that.”

In either case they will be jumping to con-
clusions. For \published figures are often
little guide to a man’s real wealth.

You may be shown as having left £20,000
gross. But there may be £15,000 of debts to
come off this.

: YOUR | GIFTS

“Net personality” may be equally mislead-
ing for it doesn’t include the real, estate—
freehold houses or land—you may have
owned. Assets owned abroad may also result
in your wealth being understated.

Another point which may puzzle your
friends is that duties appear unduly high in
comparison with the amount paid on another
estate of similar size.

This could be due to your having made
expensive gifts to your wife or friends with-
in five years of your death. Duty will have
to be paid on them though they do not figure
in your estate.

! —L.E.S.



THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951

Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE





NOTICE

Will Our Customers please Note
that We will not be open for Bus-
iness on SATURDAY, 24th March
1951, and arrange their Shopping
accordingly.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

PHONES: 4472, 4687, 4251, 4413.

INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD.
THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS
PAINTING REQUIREMENTS

INSIDE and OUT.



For the protection and beautification of

your

property, we can. offer you

the following

WALL PAINTS

“PROPELLER” DRY DISTEMPER (for exterior walls).
Supplied in powder form to be mixed with fresh water
— $6.10 per 4 cwt. drum.

“LAGOMATT” FLAT OIL PAINT (for interior walls)
Supplied ready mixed; ¢an be repeatedly washed — $7.12
per Imperial gallon.

For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
followed :—

Exterior Walls,

For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least

ora before painting. Then apply 2 coats of “PROPEL-
LER”,

For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with a mixture of plaster-
of- Paris and “PROPELLER,” afterwards treating these
patches with 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL” CEMENT

AND PLASTER PRIMER. Then apply 2 coats of “PRO-
PELLER.”

2

Interior Walls.

1. For new work, allow the surface to dry out for at least
a year before painting, Then apply 2 coats of “LAGO-
MATT.”

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with plaster-of-Paris, after-
wards treating these patches with 1 coat of “INTERNA-
TIONAL” CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, Then
apply 1 coat of “LAGOMATT” if the surface was previ-

ously of the same shade; or 2 coats of “LAGOMATT” if
of a different shade.

TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED,

_—-—

DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acenrts



DAYS BEFORE
EASTER
HOLIDAYS!!

®



FOR YOUR PARTY

SPECIALS

Oat Flakes .17 per lb.
Cook's Paste .06 per tin

Ice Cream Powder 65 per tin
Pineapple Crush .48 per tin

â„¢ HOT
K ces] CROSS

Sandwich Bread & Cakes

,

| joeSooeeossosess:



Milk Fed Ducks

Canadian Salmon

Smoked Haddocks, Anchovies
Carr’s Cream Crackers

Carr's Cocktail Biscuits
_Grape Fruit Hearts

ONLY 1:
SHOPPING

‘

Dutch Cheese

Danish Cheese

Fruit Cake in tins

Barley Sugar

FINE LIQUORS

Gold Braid Rum
Sandeman’s Wines
Gilbey’s Gin

Gilbey’s Wines
Humbert’s Dry Sack
Sparkling Burgundy
Prunier Brandy

Phone GODDARDS To-day

SSPE SCESESS SSSOOSSS MOOS SO SOSSSSS

s



LHURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951

em



Four Named
Justices Of
The Peace

‘WO PARISHIONERS of St.
Andrew and two of St. Jo-
Seph were yesterday made Justices
of the Peace by the Governor at
Government House about 10 a.m.
The two of St. Andrew are Mr.
E. L. Bannister and Mr. Fred A.
Ingram. The other two are Mr
Lloyd Smith, M.C.P., and. Mr.
“Prince” Walker.
EVEN more cane fires have
been reported and the quanti-
ty of canes burnt was over 40
acres. In nearly all cases labour-
ers assisted in saving further dam-
age to crops.

At Hothersal Plantation, St.
John, 154 acres of second crop
ripe canes were burnt over the
week-end. They are the property
of E. M. Taylor and were insured.

Another week-end fire at Staple
Grove Plantation, Christ Church,
burnt an acre of second crop ripe
canes belonging to Messrs. General
Traders Ltd. They were also in-

sured. This brings the number of
cane fires over the week-end to
nine.

On Monday at about 8.30 p.m.
900 holes of third crop ripe canes
were burnt at Strong Hope Plant-
ation. They are the property of
W. T. Gooding and are insured.

A fire on the same day at Easy
Hall Plantation, St. Joseph burnt
five acres of first crop ripe and
seven and a half acres of second
crop ripe canes, The canes belong
to Messrs. R. &. G. Challenor
and were insured.

Five and three quarter acres of
first crop ripe canes, also insured,
the property of the Ridge Planta-
tion, Christ Church, were burnt
on Monday night.

On Tuesday night a fire at Small
Ridge Plantation, Christ Church,
burnt eight and a quarter acres
of second crop ripe canes belong-
ing to G. S. Evelyn. They were
also insured.

Six acres of second crop ripe
canes were burnt when a fire
broke out at Edghill Plantation,
St. Thomas, on Tuesday night.
The canes, which were insured,
are the property of Messrs. Gen-
eral Traders Ltd.

The Police are again asking
motorists, car and ’bus passengers
to be extremely careful when they
throw away their lighted cigarette
ends.

T ITS MONTHLY meeting on

March 17, the Executive Com-
mittee of the S.P.C.A. decided to
provide canvas slings for the un-
loading of donkeys and small
mules from vessels. The present
system of tying rope round the
animals causes unnecessary suffer-
ing. They were very gratified to
hear that 80 Elementary Schools
had decided to form Bands of
Mercy and to enrol 2,360 children,
It was felt that children from the
age of 9 years should be eligible
for membership and any Head
Teachers with applications from
this age group should include
them in the Band. Membership
ecards are being printed and
badges made and details concern-
ing activities that can be under-
taken will be sent out as soon as
possible after the Easter holidays.



Grenada Canie Yield
Due To Good
Rainfall
DONALD MASON

Mr. Donald Mason, Produce
Inspector of the Department of
Agriculture in Grenada, told the
Advocate that the cultural opera-
tions of cane cultivation in Bar-
bados were not only beautiful,
but were superior to those in
Grenada,

In Grenada, he said that they
however got the same yield and
that was due principally to the
better rainfall’ they got which
helped them quite a lot.

In the worst cane belts in the
colony, he said that they got as
high as about 80 inches of rain
per year,

Mr, Mason who spent past of
his long vacation here, has now
gone to St. Vincent to spend the
Easter Holidays with his rela-
tives. He was accompanied by
his wife,

He said that he was very glad
to hear that the strike situation
in Grenada was quite controlled
and he believed that there was
going to be quite a reasonabie
compromise with regard to the
demands for wages

Labour conditions in: Barbados
were not only better than those
in Grenada, but they were better
controlled and he thought that
they could do with some of the
experience in the general labour
operations here.



Assize Jury
Fail To Agree

After about an hour’s delibera-
tion, an Assize Jury failed to agree
on a verdict in connection with a
charge of buggery brought against
St. Clair Foster of Green Fields,
St. Michael, at yesterday’s sitting
of the Court of Grand Sessions.

His Honour Sir Allan Colly-
more, Chief Justice, presided. Mr.
WwW. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
General, prosecuted on_ behalf of
the Crown. St. Clair Foster was
represented by Mr. J. aS;
Brancker.

The foreman of the jury, when
asked if the jury had agreed on
a verdict, informed the Court
that there was no likelihood of
that jury reaching a verdict.

Bail was granted the defendant
fn ‘the sum of £100 with one
surety.

LANDING LIGHTS
AT SEAWELL

The landing lights at Seawell
which were used for the first time
earlier this week were used again
last night when a B.W.I.A.
Special Flight bringing Venezue-
lans here for Easter arrived at
Seawell shortly before 8 o'clock.

B.W.I.A. have obtained special
permission from the Government



to use lights during the Easter
reriod The lights are not yet
officially in use, but it is expected
f4hat they will be shortly

‘

-* PRESENT ~



House Of

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Assembly —

Pass Voters Resolution

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed a
Resolution approving the Order by the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee made on March 3, 1951, under the provis-
ions of section 4 of the Special Registration of Voters
(General Assembly) Act, 1951.

The proposals in the Resolution make provision for

66 districts for voters in St.

Michael, 27 in Christ Church,

15 in St. Philip, 18 in St. George, 9 each in St. Andrew, St
Lucy and St. Joseph, 13 in St. John, 11 in St. Thomas. 10
in St. Peter and 12 in St. James. Bridgetown has 14.

Mr. G. H. Adams (L) moving
the passing of the Resolution, said
that some members might feel
that the division of the island, as
done in the Resolution, was not
as good as it might have been.

It seemed to him, however,
that the principle on which Gov—
ernment had acted was sound.
“As members knew, Government
had obtained the service of Mr,
L. A. Chase who had been re
sponsible for the taking of the
last census. With the experience
which Mr. Chase had acquired
both from taking the census and
as Social Welfare Officer, it
would be seen that Mr. Chase was
the Government’s best choice.

Anomalies

There would be complaints of
anomalies in the Resolution. He
thought that was inevitable in
such a Resolution, but he would
invite members to draw to Gov-
ernment’s attention any very seri-
ous anomalies.

Mr. Adams _ recalled that the
island had been so divided as to
approximate in each district a
number of 450 voters. There had
been complaints that that number
was too small. The small sub-
committee that had gone through
the matter—Mr. Chase, the At-
torney General and himself—had
been told that the number was too
small, But they had decided to
stick to that number following
further advice, and taking into
account experiences obtained
from the Trinidad Elections.

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) moved
that the House go into Committee
on the Resolution. There could be
no objection, he thought, because
the Resolution had to be studied
carefully. Hon. members had been
engaged in the consideration of
the Estimates for the past few
days and might not have been
able to pay the attention to the
Resolution it deserved,

Speaking for himself he had
scanned it and he also was aware
of the various districts in St.
Michael and some other parishes.
Being a Commissioner of Health;
he considered it his duty to have
this knowledge.

Trinidad Elections

He had listened very carefully
to the hon. member when ‘he
spoke about the 450 voters and
what had happened in Trinidad
during their elections. He too had
read about the Trinidad elections
but in Barbados they had the
highest standard of literacy in the
West Indies.

With all due respect to Mr.
Chase or anyone else who helped
in making the proposals , he
would tell hon. members that he
remembered in 1929 when 1,000
people had to attend the polls
there was a_ rush, because in
those days there was one presid—
ing officer, that was not the case
to-day. He had seen in _ St.
Michael that by 10.30 a.m. with-
out any rush at all, 450 people
had polled.

66 Polling Booths

He observed, according to the
proposals, that there would now
be 66 polling booths. He felt that
this would entail great expense
and difficulty.

Mr. Mottley said that as regards
the polling at the booths he
thought that 800 people could poll
quite easily at any th from 7
a.m. to 4 p.m. It was hardly likely
that what had happened in Trini-
dad would happen here because of
the comparatively high degree of
literacy obtaining in this island.

Mr, J. H. Wilkinson (E) second-
ing Mr. Mottley’s motion said he
thoroughly agreed with the argu-
ment that in Barbados 450 voters
to a booth was too small. He
realised that from his experience
of voting in St. Michael and St.
James,

They did not want an unneces-
sary number of booths and officers
and hence unnecessary expense.
They wanted to see everyone reg—
jster and vote in reasonable com—
fort. But he still felt that Barba-
dians were intelligent enough
that 800 voters could go to one
booth, and quickly grasp what
they had to do, even though many
of them would be voting for the
first time.

Mr. L. E. Smith (L) criticised
the wording of the Resolution
where it mentioned “Highway
2a, Highway 3a” etc. He himself
did not understand these high-
ways, and he thought it would
confuse voters as well

He thought it would have been
better to stick to the names of the
roads.

He did not agree either with
the way the division into districts
had been done. He thought they
would find that in some cases, a
voter living on one side of a road,

would have to vote at a booth in
another district, while a voter
Ilving on the other side of the
road voted at a booth near home.

The question that the House go
into Committee on the Resolution

was put and decided in the
affirmative. ’

“City Of Bridgetown”

Dealing with the Head “City of
Bridgetown”—District 1, Mr. Mil-
ler (L) suggested that considera-
tion of that Head and all others
should be postponed as there
seemed to be some mistake, He
felt they would be approving
something of which they knew
nothing, He referred to an in-
stance where he pointed out that
one district ran into another.

Mr. G. H. Adams said that any
person who had carefully exam-
ined the proposals and would re-
examine his own arguments,
could for one moment object to
‘the proposals,

He pointed out that there \/as
no legal declaration of a road be-
ing called by a particular name,

and in some cases it was not
specifically known where a road
by a certain name began and

where it ended, As regards any-
one being concerned over where
his particular district was, he
need not be because all this
would be pointed out to him by
the Registering Officer,

The Delay
Over and above’ everything
said Mr, Adams, there were
numerous people in the island

who thought that the Govern-
ment was deliberately holding up
the passimg of the proposals.
Only last week he had been in-

formed by an official connected
with this thing, that right and
left he had been told in some

parishes that the Labour Govern-
ment did not really intend to in-
stitute the districts or get the
matter dealt with before the end
of the year. He was not prepared
to accept any blame whatsoever
for any delay. It did appear that
some members were playing into
the hands of their’ enemies.

Mr. Mottley said that he did
agree there was no law say-
ing that Baxters Road was Bax-
ters Road, or that Government
Hill was Government Hill, and
the like, but there was equally no
law saying that Highway 3a was
Highway 3a. etc.

He thought it would be better
to describe a road by name.

Mr. Adams replied that where
instances occurred in the Reso-
lution where the defining of a
road was really confusing he
would accept an amendment.
Members would find as they read
further, that les; familiar high-
ways were defined by name.

Districts 1—7 inclusive were
passed,

“Boundary Line”
Dealing with District 8, Mr.

Mottley said that the “Bridge-
town Boundary Line’ was de-
fined differently by various Acts.

Mr. Adams replied that there
was only one “Bridgetown
Boundary Line” as defined by
the Bridgetown, Holetown and
Speightstown Consolidated Act.
For the purposes, say, of public
Health, Bush Hall might be con-
sidered as within the Bridgetown
area; but that did not make
Bush Hall a part of Bridgetown.

Mr. Mottley said that if an
enumerator incorrectly defined
the Bridgetown Boundary Line,
it would be easy to upset an
election.

Mr. Adams replied that all the
enumerators and other officers
concerned would be given gen-
eral as well as specific instruc-
tions to the proper carrying out
of their work,

District 8 was passed, and so
were all the remaining districts
in Bridgetown, St. Michael and
the other parishes were passed



Approve Erdiston

Extension

THE House of Assembly yes-
terday passed an Address to the
Governor saying they approved
of the extension of Erdiston
Training College. A _ similar
address was passed by the Legis-

The House

lative Council last Tuesday.
com-|

appointed a





mittee to prepare a reply to the}
Governor’s Message relating to|
the establishment of a Central
Milk Depot and Creamery. |
The House adjourned
Thursday, March 29 at 3 p.m

PRISONS



= Propose D~

co
(Hes
co

6 Months For
Larceny

ELIEZOR BISHOP (36) was
yesterday sentenced to six months’
imprisonment by His Honour the
Chief Justice, Sir Allan Colly-
more after he pleaded guilty of
larceny as a bailee as the Court
of Grand Sessions resumed sitting
yesterday.

Bishop, a_ tailor, was given
cloth to make a serge suit for a
customer on June last year. The
value of the cloth was $15 and
he was also given $6.20 towards
the cost of making the suit.
Since that time, Bishop could not
be found to give either the suit
or the money.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C. told
the court that the case had a bad
aspect about it. Another prisoner
who had been charged with a
similar offence at a _ previous
period, tried to get in contact
with Bishop through a. letter
while he was held prisoner, ask
ing him to come to give false
evidence. The letter was inter
cepted, but afterwards Bishop
still went and gave the same
evidence, ’



Guilty of Wounding
Eudeen Gibson (19) who had

pleaded guilty of wounding was
put on probation for 18 months

She was represented by Mr.
Barrow. She had no previous
convictions. The Chief Justice

said that it was probable that the
woman whom Gibson wounded
could have been the aggressor.
He warned her that if she got into
such trouble again she might be
sent to prison.



Put on Probation

Forty-four—year-oid Stanley
Stanton of Reed Street who was
found guilty of having effected a
public mischief was put on 12
months’ probation. Stanton re
ported to the Police early on the
morning of December 31 last
year that he had been robbed of
money by two men at the point
of a gun. Investigations proved
that that statement was not true.

Mr. Edwards, custqdian. of the
Salvation Army hostel, gave
Stanton a good character. Stan-
ton used to sleep at the hostel.
A condition of the probation is
that Stanton must continue to
sleep at the hostel and not go out
after it is shut for the night.

ON £10 BOND FOR
HOUSE BREAKING

Ruby Benn was put on a bond
for 18 months in the sum of £10.
She pleaded guilty earlier in the



sessions to house breaking and
larceny,

Investigations made by thé
probation officer showed that

Benn used to work at the woman
whose house“she had broken and
entered, but never used to be
remunerated.

The Chief Justice told her that
he took into account that it was
her first offence but she could not
go breaking into people’s house



Obituary :
PC Cumberbatch

The death of Police Constable
Clifton Cumberbatch took place at
the General Hospital earlier this
week. “Hoytie,” as he was known
throughout the Barbados Police
Force, was always of a very cool
and quiet temperament, and was
a friend to all with whom he came
in. contact

He was one of the leading
marksmen in the Police Force for
the past few years, and was also
a member of the Barbados Rifte
Association. He was laid to rest
ir. the St. James Cemetery with
military honours in the presence
of a large gathering



TOILET

LINDEN BLOSSOM e

IMPERIAL LEATHER °

PAGE FIVE



Radio—Telephone
Sets Being ‘Tested

THE Police are at present test-
ing very high frequency Radio-
Telephone communication
throughout the island. So far the
tests have surpassed expectations
and absolutely reliable two-way
communication has been obtained
from the Station with the Police
vans throughout St. Michael, the
greater part of Christ Church,
the whole of St. George and most
of St. Thomas, parts of St. Joseph,
St. Philip, St. James and St. Peter.

When these tests are completed
® report will be submitted to
Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, by Capt. W. H,
R. Armstrong, who is in charge
of the experiments. Following
this the Commissioner will in turn
submit a report to Government
concerning the introduction of
this modern and extremely useful
system. :
was loaned to the Police by a
Jeading British manufacturer o
V.H.F, sets. The tests will las
for about eight weeks. This
equipment is similar to that which
has been installed in over twenty |
per cent of the leading English ;
Police Forces and a very large
percentage of the Police Forces dH

'
'

, the British Cotonies.

The tests began on March 14
when equipment was installed at
the Headquarters of Area No, 2,
District “A. In addition, mobile
equipment was installed in a
Police van, Tests took place both
day and night and the equipment
was actually put to a test in the
investigation of crime a_ few
days ago in Spooner’s Hill. It
saved a considerable amount of
Police energy which normally
would have been spent in sending
men from the scene of the crime
to the nearest telephone and tele-
phoning.

Within the next few days the
equipment will be removed from
District “A” to Area No, 3 at Dis-

trict “B” and subsequently to
District “D", headquarters of
Area No. 4. After that it will be

carried to the. Police Stations at
Districts “F”’, “E” and “C” for
the purpose of ascertaining the

radio coverage in each area.

Finally tests will be carried out
to locate a suitable site somewhere
for the erection of the main trans-
mitting and receiving Station.
This site will most likely be at
Castle Grant or Chimborazo, St.
Joseph if the final scheme is ap-
proved by Government. This loca—
tion is chosen in order to get the
maximum radio coverage of the
island and the Station will be un-
attended but will be controlled by
radio link from Police Headquar-

ters at Bridgetown where the
Control Room for the entire
Police radio network will be lo-

cated and from which all patrol
cars can be directed to the scenes

of crimes,

The V.H.F. Radio-Teiephone
equipment will be installed at
each of the area headquarters
also to permit the vehicles at- !
tached to each of them and to’
those stations fitted with two-|
way radio-telephone system, to

contact direct the area headquar-
ters to which they are attached,
without relaying their
through the Police Control Sta
tion, These area headquarters will |
therefore become Sub-control
Stations for their particular areas,

wial — “99

At the Controf Station in
Bridgetown, and _ provided the
facility can be made available by
the Barbados Telephone Co. for
operation in conjunction with
their automatic exchange, there
will be provided, for the use ot
the general public, the emergency
telephone system known as 999,

With the 999 system a member
of the public, who may require
the services of the Police,, Fire
Brigade or an ambulance, will be
able to get any of these by simply
dialling nine three times and
being connected immediately to
the Police telephone operator, The
operator will answer by saying
“Police, Fire or Ambulance” anc
in turn the person -will tell the
operator which service is required
and any other necessary informa
tion.

The operator will then, if the
service required is Police, imme
diately ascertain where the near-
est radio equipped patrol vehicle
is located and will, by the means
of V.H.F., dispatch instructions to
the vehicle which will proceed to
the scene of the 999 call and in-
vestigate the report.

“I feel sure that the general
public will appreciate the useful
ness of such a service in the pre-
vention and detection of crime,’
Capt. Armstrong told the Advo-
cate.

He said that this service, to-
gether with a very extensive sys
tem of radio-telephone has _ re
cently been completed in Trinidad
and the general public have fully
appreciated: these adequate facil-
ities and are using them to the
best advantage.

“Many cases, of what could
have been serious assaults, were
pievented by radio patrol cars in

answer to the 999 call. In one
particular instance the 999 call
was received during the nigh’

from a resident of Port-of-Spain
to the effect that suspicious look
ing people were in a house next

LUXURY

SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH

“eee
eiiee eats tates CR oncaeid cet
SERB RSE ER ERT ARBREEES

SAvVAMABLE !!

* PUR

POULTRY CHOWS

| git. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pistributors.
“ SESE UBER RBSERERBSES

INA

For these tests the ety aor





messages

door, The owner of the house was
away on vacation. The call was
received in the “Police Operating
Room” and immediately relayed
by radio to two patrol cars a few
miles away. Within a matter of
minutes the Police crews of these
ears were on the scene and had
apprehended three men who had

broken into the house and were |
preparing to steal the owners’
property. These men naturally

had no idea that their movements
had been reported and had it not
been for the emergency system,
together with the radio equipped
vehicles, they may never have
been detected,” he said

When the Advocate visited Dis
trict “A” yesterday a Police Con
stable at the Station’s Headquar
ters was in contact with a Police
van in Bank Hall and then Cod
The reception was ex
remely clear, without the slight
‘st interference.

ott —CPLSOS PLP S PF OPES

GET YOUR ....

Nestle’s Chocolate Egg in
Casket 11/- each

Nestle’s Chocolate Eggs @
27e., 50c., $1.20, $2.00 ea,

% Fry's Chocolates in Plastic
Egg @ $1.22 & $2.00 ea.

Fry’s Marzipan & Choc. Egg
in Egg Cup 40c, ea.

Fry's Marzipan & Choe, Egg
30¢.

ea.
Duck Carriage with Choc.
Egg 4/6 ea.
%

.
8
‘ At. WEATHERHEAD’S

Also Easter Eggs @ 20c., &
36c. ea.
—: Also :—
Fresh Delicious Confection-
ery for .

BASTER

Meltis Coffee Choc, Mint ¥%
Creams @ $1.23 box °
Fry's Princess Choc, @ 94c. 3
& $1.69 box

s +
> Fry's Choc. Almonds 2/- %
s * ‘s
s box %
* Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc. 2/-, 3
2 3/9 & $1.79 box x
® Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc, @

2 8/- tin x
Cadbury’s Milk Tray @ 3/9 ¥
& $1.48 tin %

Black Magic Choc. $4.06 box |

Fry's Asst, Choc. @ $1.12
& $2.21 box 3
Sadbury’s Asst. Choc, @ x
5/- & 9/- box g
Large Boxes of Fry's Choc. x
@ $4.55 ea. x
Meltis Favourite Candies @ y |
$1.02 & $1.85 box %
Nestle’s Choc, @ $1.19 box





% Cadbury's Roses @ 3/9 & &
g $1.48 tin %
% Cadbury’s Red Rose @ 98e.
%$ — & $1.80 box 8
% Salted Peanuts 64c. tin x
*s Jacob’s Cream Crackers \
$1.64 tin %
% Meltis Royal Princess Asst. %
% $1.85 box %
% Faney Biscuits in Cello Peks.
(s — 10e. pk. %
% Fancy Biscuits in Airtight $
% — -Pks. 2/- pk. %
s$ Butler Scotch 2le. pk. &
% 450. tin %
% Mougat 34c. pk. & 70c. tin ¥&
& Royal Scotch Shortbread &
% $1.36 tin %
Mars Bars 14e, ea. ¥
8 Crest Bars 16c. ea. %
R For the Best of . . . »
% “EASTER EGGS” x
¢ & “Confectionery” Sy
eS Vint S'S aa %
% ’ >
S BRUCE §
5, i rs]
§ :
S WEATHERHEAD
*. %
% LIMITED %
% Head of Broad St. x
>

" . . ‘
LPC LLL

4

BOVRIL




MARALYN

( muk PLUS ) iy 802. ond {6 02. TINS

A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT

9

introduces

Maralyn





10W.



FRY'S CHOCOLATES

Plastic Eggs @ $1.22, $2.22 each

FRY'S CHOC

Also NOVELTY

FASTER EGGS
EASTER CONFECTIONERY

BLACK MAGIC CHOC,
$1.15, $2.02, $4.08
HAZEL NUTS

Ple., $1.97
FRY’S PEPPERMINT CHOC.

Pure, creamy, country milk. . . enriched
... flavoured .
that’s Maralyn Milk Plus! Itis a satisfying,
nourishing milk drink. It tastes delicious
. . and the kiddies love it, too!

. and already sugared —

a

ne md gat)








aS



7
)

— =
if





y AND ATTRACTIVE

EASTER EGGS

NESTLES CHOCOLATE EGGS
@ 26c., 50c., $1.20 & $2.00 each



FRY’S CHOCOLATES Large Boxes
MELTIS TWIN-PACK, FAVOURITE CANDIES & NEWBURY

CRYSTALLIZED FRUIT

SH



q

Da a

| FECUAR d

FRUITS
ARP’'S TOFFEE

$2.40 & $2.72 Box
vse) 1/8, S/8,- 476

KNIGHT'S LTD.— au srancues

—

the greatest protection
devised by













At last! you too can have “ Lifeguard "
the wonderful scientific discovery thar
has caused such a sensation, “ Lifeguard”
is a most powerful germicide yet itis so
safe that all can use it, Iris vitally necessary
in any home, You need it to prevent cuts
and bites going septic and as a safeguard
against all forms ot infection. “ Lifeguard
is pleasantly fragrant, non-staining, non-
corrosive,

Key danger attag with

LIFEGUARD.

THE

SUPREME

GERMICIDE AND ANTISEPTIC



A. 8, BRYDEN & SONS (b'D08) LTD.—Agents







Same styles |
in

Black Patent



This luxuriously
passengers.

It is economical to buy

Visit our new Showrooms in Pinfold Street and let us demonstrate it for you
Our Gasolene and Oils

including Sundays



and Toes.

ce

Dept









on veerto 4



Pe

THE FAMILY CAR

upholstered Car

offers

and economical to maintain

is now open from 7 a.m

It is to be remembered that GOOD servicing 1

gasolene and oil

LET US THOROUGHLY SERVICE YOUR CAR
visit

It will pay you to

VANGUARD FOR VALUE |

Platform Soles.
Sizes 7 to 10

complete

comfort in

as important



Ae i $6.83 & $6.13

pha ceded eaeee $6.67 & $7.37

hepherd & Co, Ltd.

1, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



seating for six

until 10 p.m. every day

to your car as

CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LIMITED (

Pinfold Street, Bridgetown. {







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951
Sara cian niaibieigntiiianiaesiad deans cceLieninsneliaciasundaeta ee a I

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON }} ———— ,

Additional Issue

Lt $1,500,000
Nova Scotia Light and Power Company, Limited

4:% Cumulative Redeemable Preference Shares
(Par Value $100 per Share)









These Preference Shares will rank pari passu with the outstanding 6%, 442% and 4% Cumulative Redeem-—
ble Preference Shares. The rights, preferences, priorities, restrictions, conditions and limitations attaching
| therto are more fully set out in the offering cireular.
j “
i puivapeladaaniieaticeiich
j : i .
} In the opinion of counsel these Preference Shares will be investments in which companies registered
| under The Canadian and British Insuranee Companies Act, 1932, as amended, may invest their funds
—— — -
MICKEY MOUSE | CAPITALIZATION
ee eee ae (After giving effect to the financing referred to in the offering circular)
he First Mortgage Bonds. . 7 : od ga one’ 4 © oh cheba ee iehanilge—enaretate $14,630,000
Cumulative Redeemable Preference Shares, $100 par value............ $8,187,200 8,187,200*
CORES DR Oree. Wb Ne WATE. ok oo eins oa 5s hod ee th ee ee los 300,000 shares 290,948 shares

$2,430,000 6%, $2,000,000 4% and $2,257,200 442% now outstanding and this issue of $1,500,000 44%2%.

erat

(Price: $100 per Share)

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS @arsapos) LTD.

CORRESPONDENTS FOR
| Royal Securities Corporation Limited

j Montreal Toronto Halifax Saint John Quebec Ottawa Hamilton
Winnipeg Calgary Edmonton Vancouver Charlottetown St. John’s, Nfid.









LONDIE





-———_—_—_-- - — —— See EE nEEAE EEE EERE

——— ee SS — : —

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE ©

USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Bottles CORONATION WINE Bottles JEFFREY'S BEER 26 .20

PN seas 144 L.32
Tins TABLE BUTTER

Tins P.F. MARTINI
CRACKERS 175 150

SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE Bottles MATURED RUM
BA (a Ce soe _48









SERTHATS THE THIRD EL
GAME RUNNING YouNe
BEATEN ME - GEORGE FH
<= ERIM GLAD | MARRIED Ir
RALA MAN WITH BRAINS















‘ GOING TO CHURCH THIS
EASTER? ,



THE LONE RANGER

S,
x

-- avert R 3

ne ANYONE WHO LEARNS OUR SOMEONE WAS SHOT . % s

SECRET HAS TO DIE. USE YOUR i BEYOND THAT DOOR. R %
GUN, JAKE! g - MAYBE WE CAN SEE x
= _ . THROUGH %



YOULL NEED
A& M

‘HYMN & PRAYER
BOOKS

We hare a limited Supply

SOOO SOOO SSSSOCH

65

4,

BRINGING UP FATHER

i eee

eae, soe ava
{evs
|

GSOOOOS9OS FOOSS9SG99S9C GGG 9G9F OS

SOSSSSS SOO P SLOSS SSO




364

TELE







H TELEVIGION SET?
= IT DOESN'T WORK/

6)

FRON

46

>
S
<
©
%
J
=
ne
>
o
°
z
=
~~
nA

xs

SSOP LOSSLESS PEELS OSES PP PFOOS

4



i THAT WAS JUSTA LOVE-] STOP, CUTTLE! DON'T ‘i
TAR CUTTLE! Come YOU REALIZE THAT YOU'RE | | BLABBER-
Ot, WHERE'S THE Vat A DEAD PIGEON IF YOU MOUTH,
_ ) TELLTHEM? THEYLL KILL| | CURTAINS ! os
7 44M YOU THE MOMENT THEY ,
DON'T! DON'T ‘ ~ GET THE MONEY!
HIT ME AGAIN!

TOL TELL!
a ee,







Frequent servieos
by British West tn dian






; Airways enable you to enjoy short vacation
'n neighbeuring Caribbean Islands over the

Eoster holidays. y Make your choice and
BOOK Now.

\ A Wi A 5) NOW READY at
(2) | BRITISH WEST INDIAN Airways =| 2 & B BAKE RIES

Phome 4567
B.W.LA., Bridgetown

SO THATS WHY

YOU LEFT THE
CAR ON THE






~
*"
e
j
SE













THURSDAY, MARCH




















99

CLASSIFIED

TELEPHONE 2508

1951

S..





A D Tea cents per agate line on week-days | nnd a
ahd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, s

| ommer r











































PUBLIC NOTICES | PUHRLIC SALES











BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| WANTED

rye .
v6 cents Sunde











FOR RENT

‘ents per agate tine en 108?)
cons? per agate line of Si



charg



T2 cents 9 cénts Sutidays 24 words —- over



















































































PAG VEN



i
{
Minimum charge wéeek 72 cents ond; SHIPPING NOTI











































; | . ‘
t ‘crn ye $1.50 o week-da . ee words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a/|
sininvem oor on tweek-dovs | and $1.80 on Sundays * o7 wortls 3 cents a word week—& Cents ¢| word Sundays. , Lay % (
. } word Sundays } ¢>
The churge for announcements of FOR SALE Tee ae HOUSES hoe! tela DISTRESS
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- « NOTIC - —_ oy ee OU re ore tied ] i y y
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is ; E REAL ESTATE ATTRACTIVE PURNIS
$1.50 on week-days and $1.89 on Sundays Minimum charge week 72 cents aad | FOCKLEY GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUS SS ee HELP Mn ‘ CONE FUR etee, maT —— . 7
for any number of words up to 50, and| 96 cents Sundays 24 words — éver 24| THE Office snd Bar will be closed Fath, Rd. Westings, facing Ses. Engtish | Alka-Saittet i
3 cents per word on week-days and/{ rds 3 cents a word week—4 cents a| on Friday 23rd QMarch ‘Good Frida) ————- Rath with Heater, Suitable one persor ika-Seitzer is so @asy to take... 4 as ; —
Pp y . ‘ it ; oe cereenaeiatictenmeres ———-_—— | ur couple. Telephone 2949 ccepting Cargo and Pas-
4 cents per word on Sundays for each! word Sundays. Members wishing to play on this d iudia ont d containing 41.7% LADTOPt quusial Giice Wark with uv 29 eiidens 5 plegfant-tasting. Just drop one . plin argo ¢ as
additional word. ae core with the Caddy Mas St "Michael sHusted st Britten Hil.| , owledge of @enogtaphy ahd. Typing pr =~ ia See or two tablets into a glass of water, engers for St, Lucia, sailing
For Births, Marriage or Engagement for Clubs and Caddies or the proces The above will be set up for sale at| APY. In writing to P.O. Box 233] GUMCOURT—Britions X Rd. Drawing,| watch it fizz, then drink it. Not a , s :
announcements in Carib Calling the ursday public competit a © | Bridgetown. 16.3.51—6n.] dining rooms, two bedroom nant | 5 ’ 7 _ » Ch hie Ss iad G
charge is $3.00 for any number of words AUTOMOTIVE Seas A + ition at our office in Lucas Re aire tail ap tinenntela T Behen | Sollet and bath, el ot ars t | laxative, not habit-forming, you can Saturday, 24th March, 1951.
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each day of Seeaka aati on Eritay, Se 30th | “LADY CUTTER—A lady cutter for our water. “Apply: Misa ¢ eeumnlice r Britto \.| take it any time. Let Alka-Seltzer .
edditional word. Terms cash, Fhone 2508 ~ CARRINGTON & teat dress-making Department. Proper salary} x Rd pair “4 vuitata ‘sane aalel. indlasatiod Apply HANSCHELL, LAR-
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for DeatB/ GAR-—One Standard Vanguard in good 2 . el ; ‘et haticiacal | Se-ie tight pereen, A.B TAYLOR Sor your ac igestion,
Notices only after 4 p.m. condition 15,300 miles. Apply Denton St. Saviour's Teen Age Clad, "16.3.81—n. | ETH.. Coleridge Street 22.3,51—3n | “Modern Bungalow situated at Brighton, | /44¥¢ 4 supply handy. SEN & Co., Ltd., Agents,
a Sayers — Phone 3632. 22.3.51—In 7 a “NURSE-MAID — Good refere nies Fe: er Rock S Se Apply on ‘
—-- The Drawing which showtd take plac > BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 bed ne he iene ‘ * “| premises to Mr. Vere Lewis,
BIRTH CAR—1951 Hillman Saloon. Registered | at the St. Saviour’s Boys’ School c| TOMS. every convenience including | Wired. Apply to Mrs. Brian Robinson, yas. N.| Eo beAs a
under three months, low mileage—Phone | Saturday 2th inst. has been postpone || £arden, water supply. As new, £3,000. |) *MUnlay. _ sit. se anbe Worthing, —- ee - "
CADOGAN—Mrs. Florence Vant i Peecseiaet ccna fag” ge A ase’ | eats ISS.IAt1n. | ha 130 pm. B1.381—Bn| § bedroomne with runnine wet roan |
/ N—Mrs. Florence Vanterpool, | — ee il all persons who have sold out the » | — inte ———— | 2 ; ‘ hisipiaiea \ Dia ail hod caetieeieeee:
better known as “Sugar” would like to| CAR—Ope 1938 Dodge Car. $600.00, Can | Books kindly return ther Sata | | By public competition at our office Wardrobes and all modern conveniences. NT |
ceneuabe dich camitake Ab. Se coed aaa at Seale Sate Wioat wt ee ee fhe by, Satins James’ Street on Thursday, ‘the ‘ong |, THERE is a good job offered in Trinidad] Long lease preferred. Apply Mrs. Fried- MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW | peer = ee; —
Grand - daughter, born to her grand-| Rd. 22.3.51—2n |Chureh Rotise, Bridgetown Mareh 1951, at 2 p.m for the rignt man, His ability and experi- | man, Hotel Royal. 13.3.$1—t.f.n ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED |
daught Mr Hyacinth Cadogan, ¢ s . wig | 9145 perch fl ‘ ence must enable him to take charge —— —— = => - ° The M/V “CARIBRBEER”’ i
aughter 8. Hyacin lOGAN, ON | The Secty., | p22 perches of land at 4th Avenue.| oi ine Phot hic D ell] NEW BUNGALOW-—Ent fee Road (M.A.N.Z. LINE) . wilh
Tuesday 20th March, 1951. messin 2 oe. “B" SEDAN .«(M. 3) ++ St. Saviour's, | oa Read, Bush Hall, St, Michael Susee Store. Salary “ta copa tn Christ Chucch. Available inimediately pot LiES Op Bonar - ane Pees for
calle " t t . F ; s . Salary and ¢ ? t t al e : ominica ttigua, Mon
condition, H. enh St. aw. | toe with the stonewall bungalow | osing with fis value. Dial 4%? Furnished, Fridge, Electricity and water MS. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to Ne and st icitts, Sailing
DIED a | Inspection on application to th ’ 22.3.51—2n | Apply Frederica FitePatrick Telephone | Mi! Melbourne February 20th, Sydne Wednesday 2ist inst
ale tore ion to e owner least 2833. 21.3.51—an | Februany 28th, Brisbane March jth, A
ELECTRICAL , Mr. Joseph Moore between the hours of aa aS | : | riving at Barbados early A a ,
inimcn—on, Sach Aide, tubs, at nl 4 Bedi NOTICE 9 am. and 5 pm, except Sundays MISCELLANEOUS CHANICAY This Vetsel hay ample apace ‘tor ts The M/V “DAERWOOD” will
dence, Gilford, Surrey, England, Dr.| ONAN—Lighting Plant, 215 volte . ,For further particulars and conditions i ho eee Dag oe MECHANICAL | Frozen and General ‘ate or. Hard accept Cargo and Passengets for
Willis ‘Somerset Birch, late Supedtas| 30° sete, ee setts atts, 12-18 volts: | GARDINER AUSTIN & Co. LTD. | of sale appli to — IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel- | ——————---—~— . —- | Cargo accepted on through Bill ané. Peers te at ae
tendent of the Barbados Mental Hos- | spares. A. Bathes & Go. Lta This office will be closed to busine HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD. __ | lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.| BICYCLES Dally, Weekly and | tading with transhipment at. Tetnidad | {{ vincent toate of we oar te
eee pier tee | ON, SAUCY March Beth with the exer 16.31—en,| Phone. 4439 or call at GORRINGES, ad: [on Monthly terms Apply Crescent | facips itt, tanshipment “at Teiniaad | [| Vincent” Date of "Departure 49
REFRIGERATOR — Canadian Genetal| ponan. Airways & Steamshi) | joining Royal Yacht Club Bicycle Dept. Store, 30 Tudor Street. | and Leeward Islands - ry oe
IN ' MEMORIAM Electric 6 Cub. feet, Pertect working | D°Partment maa | AUCTION Peas | re at re |] Bw. scHooweR owNeRs f
order. Can be seen at K, R. Hunte & Sore : eetnnienrienernor tf IMMED: | For further particulars app) Rt ia 7
Co, Ltd., Lower Broad Stre@t, Dial 4611 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC!: lery, Gold fusabta, coins, rainietenas fete oe ee | YURNESS, WITHY a eo. a ' ASSOCIATION (INC)
JORDAN—In loving memory of our dear 22.3 51—8n (TRANSFER AND. REMOVAL) UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGESs, | )}/; ~~ allan ‘+. One
mother Etheline Jordan who died on The application of Etheline Lewis Sly. shateusts boik x OE sca Antique Shop. Dial 4429. ‘ia m aia Da COSTA & CO. LTD, | Consignee. Tele. No. 4047
22nd March 1950. IVESTOC rthur § 2 6 yy. instrue: received, wi sel .2.51.—t.f.n. rinidad, |
Sad and sudden was the call u K (or Eee roms Sete sr et a oa Thursday 22nd at the office of the Grand Easter Bw nw
Of that dear one loved by all. 3 2 P= , 1.46 Gleor leve : . eer General Motor Bus Co., Nelson Street WE PAY CASH FOR STAMPS > —= —
Boothe of tartnt no ards ean ten | Ge Saceatice®: oo Sindy Tempra: | testes nae eee [one Atatin ATO, iowa" doge) ed att Mint slaty of erik Parade je
a Of the lost one we loved so well named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Geckeriabk next door to C. F. Harrison & Co,, Lid jee Gents ee miles amore a are Tet males mivane Space on — | a centr
: an (s . . : aS eee oa ce a Nn accide ale at 2 yam. Terns] Covers, Sheets, § s, Surcharge
Racca Vereen: Mate race ete re Princess Stella). Apply: J. R = tagger el aid License to a stone wall} a Stamps. 1 2 a i. gran ee awards. Telephone 2520, ia pi rpes = posence at Arthut } VINCENT GRIFFITH, CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY,
Wh Ps 71.2.51—t.f-h, | ost ta acbae Auctioneer No. 10 Swan Street Faster Monday March 26th |
bM lemei eanach Ran si ag se 17.3.51— 18.3 51—4n
—_——- ————_—-—— | PUPPIES—Pure Bred Alsitian Puppy.| Dated this 19th day of March, 1951 , : 3-6 pm |
— 4 Dogs — 3 Bitches. Phone 4144 “Mts GEORGE LEWIS, \ ald of Sunday School Missionary
For cd ane oo, mee are s Ma Sure 5 TORS, "Hakeiwood”, Barbarees for Applicant | “ ei “oN c titi a it | 4
f other who left us March } Hill 21.3.51—4n | To:—A. W. HARPER Esq., 1 , 7 i y -_ ee eee me eer N
Freee the rond.wgas:yateiig. hare Ag. Police Magistrate GoV ERN MENT NOTIC E Refreshment SS EW YORK SERVICE
a 2 uard

The hills were hard to climb,
He gently closed her sleepy eyes,

And whispered: “peace be thive.”
David Autiléy Downes, Wilbert C.
Jordin (Pantma); Elaine Yearwood

(daughter-in-law), 22.3.51--1n



PERSONAL



The public are hereby warned
giving credit to ahy person or pe





sons





whomsoever in my name as I do not hold
myself responsible for anjrone contracting
any debt or debts in my name unless
by a written order signed by me
SEON WORRELL.
Fairfieid,

Black Rock..
22.3.51—2n

2X PSG SSSSESSSSSS9OSOY,

COMPLEXION

That school-days

plexion can be retained, if

2O4

com-

you will give the skin this

simple treatment. Dampen
the skin with water, sprin-
kle plain Limolene on, then
Do

just before retiring.

give a gentle massage.
this
Very beneficial for those
who shave ,..

LIMOLENE 24c. to 72¢. a
bottle at your dealer



{ WHO, WHAT,
| WHY?





Who's Who of Trinidad peo-
ple, Business Concerns, Re-
view of Spert and Public
life.

The greatest
publication about
Trinidad
On Sale

at

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

34
Broad Street

L5G GSSGS SOS OVSS SOS OSES

EASTER
FARE

COOKING BUTTER per Ib.
or 5 Ib. tin









PRUNES .........- 51c. Ib.
RAISINS ........- 46c. Ib.
CURRANTS 38c. lb,
AUSTRALIAN CHEESE

72e. Ib.
GLACE CHERRIES 89c. lb.
POLAR ICING

BRIDAL ICING , os Dee :
SUGAR ........ 3c. pk. {}}% at Money-Saving Prices selection and
SWEET CORN .... 46c. tin SET IND | Vaiiittes and
Stools, " s, Wardrobes :
ANCHOR TABLE ind. Dresertdbes, “Cheval ant blending.
BUTTER. «4%; . 88c. pkg. 4 smaller. Mirrors—Mahogany anc
Â¥ % hyd bhp oe eee oe
- SPECIALS = iter
DR. i ¥
BICO ICE CREAM, mont, Seraere, Tub ond mosh
POLAR ICE CREAM, 0S eee, a2 Be eie, and
. : Sate aa
artete aaha $50 ane olding asycnairs
MOIRS CHOCOLATE BARS divine, Cocktail, Kadi end
PEANUTS in Tins. Fancy — China, Bedroom and
HAM in Tins. nee: gcompet “4 ro.
aracers—tLronin: an washing
CASAREEP in Bottles, beards, Tubs, vane many other
things.



GRIFFITH S

ROCKLEY
Dial 4514



District “D"’.
N.B.—This application will be consid- |
ered at a Licensing Court to be held on
the 2nd April 1951 at 11 o’clock a.m
i

MECHANICAL

BICYCLES—With and without three-
speeds for Ladies, Gents and children.
Secure yours now. Courtesy Garage,
Whitepark Rd. Dial 4391, 22.3.51—6n

CARRIER BIKBS and Bicycles by

at Police Court, Dist. “D"
A. W. HARPER,
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “Db”

22.3.51—it





Seawell











Hercules, Silver King. A RARNES. & Tor
CO., LTD. 20.3.51-t..n. | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
. awh r = The application of Learnetta Brath
Royal Typewriter a 4 chal aie waite of Sargeant’s Village, Christ} €xperie
' : . aan ‘3, | Church, for permission to sell Spirits. | era) jen
=.68'~=" | Malt Liquors, &c., at a board and shivgle
shop with shedroof attached at Sar
MISCELLANEOUS geant's Village, Christ Church; within
eee «| Histrict “A’’.
ANTIQUES—A good assortment of Ah- Dated this 2ist day of March 1951

-E. A. MeLEOD Esq.,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.

tiques including o'd clocks, Candles, | To
Shades, China, Pottery, Silver, Ivory and
Furniture. In Ralph Beard’s Show Room,

x 96—



Hardwood Alley. Open 8 a.m.—4 p.m, JOS GRAHAM accomp:
21.3.51—4n for Application & dat
--—— N.B.—This Application Will be consid. | Secreta
BICYCLE ACCESSORIES — Pumps, fred at a acerca Ccurt to be heid at}
Saddles, Connections, Patching Kits,| Police Court, District “A’ on Monday |
wheels etc, Apply Courtesy Garage] the 2nd day of April, 1951 at 11 o'clock !
Whitepark Rd, Dial 4391. 22.3.51—6n | a.m,

E. A, McLEOD, |
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”,
22.3.51—In

BATHS — In Porcelain
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A, BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1,51—t.f.n
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-

Enamel, in

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE |

The application of Wharton
solder of Liquor License No. 684 of 195)

Louise







Son, Mc Gregor Street, Phone 2080,

To:—E. A. McLEOD Esq rh, East





1951

22.3.51—3n ‘Police Magistrate, Sch. Mar

MIRRORS—Just received. Triple Ward- rapes mee :

. AMES WHARTON,
robe and Bathroom Mirrors. Polished and y a for ‘Appileation ss. Ss
Bevelled Edges. G. W. HUTCHINSON & |' yp -This application will be consid-| cotiie, |

22.3,51—3n a at a Licensing Court to be held 4

lice Court, District “A’’ on Friday
PESQUI URANATED WINE—At long |. ; ; t 11 e’clock
last we are in a position to offer you aha Ber Pe amene ee te

this wine for the treatment of Diabetes, on
1¢/6 per bot. 3 bottles for 30/-.
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD.

24.3.51—-3n.

ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN | -——————————— “N
i» case, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

15.3.51--t.f.n. The application of Phylis Atkinson, of

Schoon

FE. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
22:3.5%—-N}

M.V.
Gumbs,
Schoon
Capt, Ol




















— | foletown, St. James, for permission to

RASINS & CURRANTS—Rasins 40c. per } gei) Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at i|
Ib, Currants 40 ¢. per 'b. CC. Herbert, | poarded and galvanized shop attached Cable 2
55 Tudor Street, Dial 3666. fo residence situated at Trents Cornet | acice th
21.3.51—2n T gt, James sf er with the
— - - ate: s 20th day of irch ) Jarbados
SILVEP Westmoreland, Sterling pp D*e4 {Ps Aire Kea. gk ig
Silver Cutlery, 50 pieces. George and Police Magistrate, S.S. Tect
Martha pattern, Can be seen at Y. ‘de District of . Holetown york, S

Lima & Co, Ltd., 20. Broad Strect.

JOHNSON,
21,3.51—3n HOLFORD

Selilo, S,
for Applicant. 3

S.S. Aur

—












APPOINTMENT OF AN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL OFFICER

Applications are invited foi

cal fitness and one year’s probation



Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

dow styling, light control, Valances and} granted to Clarence Als in respect of 4 see eas
r a t 8) Ser ‘

draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 board and shingle shop at Villa Rdy| neue 45
RNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.£.n | Brittons Hill St. Michael for permission | Bayne I
> Oo id Liquor License &c, at | olive, Se
DIAMOND RINGS—Two Génts' single | {¢,,°5, fale Elion wes
stone rings. Claw settings. | Attractive Ra. Seine Pee ane = ian
prices. See them. Wm. D. Richards &}] pated this 20th day of Mcrch roy

or, Yacht

Tannis, for



ADULTS 6d. CHILDREN 3d



An enjoyable time for all

SBAWELL AIRPORT







appointment as Control Officer





|
|
«| onsite =

Airport.

Applicants should be not less than 21 years of age and should
have previous experience of Flying Control, preferably with Air Crew

nee as Pilot or Navigator
owledge of Civil Aviation

Additional assets would be a gen-

Legislation and Practice, and of

Radio Aids to Navigation.
The appointment is permanent and pensionable, subject to medi-

FOR

Salary scale $1,200 x 72—1,776
,160 per annum.

Applications statirg age, education, qualifications and experience,

anied by testimonials should be sent to The Colonial Secretary,
riat, Bridgetown on or before 24th March, 1951

ESCHALOT

————————— e

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

15.3.51—2n



THE FORTRESS
CLUB



























The Annual General Meeting ot
dgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietta the above Club will be held on
lina, Seh. Marea Henrietta, Sch Thursday 2th instant at 8 p.m

We » Yacht Caribbe: Sch 22.3.51—1n
», Laudalpha, Sch. May Se,
h. Gardenia W Sch. D'Ortac
line, Sch, Lidia Adina 8., Sch

D. R.; Sch. Wonderful Coyn-



Buckaroo,
ern Eel, Sch



). Belquecn,
ille M. Smith,









vdalay I, Sch. Blue Nose Mac
ARRIVALS
ubedar, 3,244 tons net, Capt
from Caleutta a. Capetown,
rom cu , a apetown SPOTLIGHT Is
DEPARLURES Hata
“ Zenith, 70 t t, a y
i British Guiana. ae ey ON YOUR
"Hi . ons pt, Capt
a9 lorama » T1 tons pf,
iiviere, from St. Vincent. HOLIDAY TIME

In Touch with Barbados | : ~ : °

Coastal Station

and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
iat they can now communicate
following ships through their
Coast Station
illemstad, S.S. Baron Murray,
us, S.S, Hyreania, 8.8. Mor!
Polifemo, S.S. Subadar
S.S. Thelma IV, S.S. Gasex
S.S. Mauretania, SS











: z TERI —This application will be consid- | Amherst, Nieuw Amsterdam
tity nthe Side = peed 3 een a Licensing Court to be held at | Nueva poems on on Ki
e $ mee OS z i Sour’ strict “FE Holetown, ati |Changchow, 8.8, Loch Ryan, S-
crate ah ai — nee Police Court, District “E" I , . ; Poe
ai Dot hthie ca reat dummon tes wiey elie Tuesday, the Brad day of April, 19%6, at Memphis, 88. 8. Rosa, $8.8. Cecilia
table seting for any" ocension tending |! O'I%K. gy. sung, [Alcon Corals, SS. Alcan Chiper: 5.5
ane 3 . stained “BR” Holetown, PO ” al Sa ee el
Knives: Table 69c. Dessert 64c. _ Police Magistrate, Dist. “E oe a. te | Haven, Heler SS. Hermod
Yorks : Table S4c. Dessert 49c. _— Laurentian Forest, § Siiver Ocean
Spoons: Table S4e, Dessert 49c. eee Clarkes Wharf, 5.5. Esso New H
Tea 36c, Coffee 26c. Fag 36c¢ Umatilla, S.S 8.c.T. PLOr

ee
T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

—_

Jam_ 36e,
More than fifty different pieces in two
beautiful models — See Them and Buy
Them. at
CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

ss




son,
s.s
M/S Car
tan, S.S
Gallo



18.3.51—61t









TEA SETS—Exceptional’ Value. 23
piece Flowered Tea Set all for $7.99. See |
these Today at G. W. HUTCHINSON, & /
co., LTD, 22.3.51—3n

CANE SUGAR HANDBOOK
By GUILFORD L SPENCER, D.Sc.
and
GEORGE P, MEADE, BS., ChE.
Revised Edition $20.90 |
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY.

cuenta sears
MAHOGANY VARNISH STAIN
at | | 64 9/10

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE | Ee 4/108

———
VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch oat bad Aoe
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your

sizes delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476.

A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.



13.2.51—t f.n.



YACHT — Yawl ‘“Frapeda"” approx.
37% ft. long, with gray marine engine.
Recently painted and in good condition,
Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4569
or 3026, 27,.2.51—t.f.n.

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANIS

50% pr.




















DIAL
3466

NEW NATURAL GAS

installed at your Gas Co, Bay St.
The above Plant will now
ensure our Customers with
regular supplies of

Pure Distilled Water

_ oe

DISTILLING _PLANT



of two centuries

FURNITU RE experience in

Ask for

‘1. 8. WILSON

§

s \j 7 al

% SPRY S

2 SIPRY ST.

*

%

% DIAL 4069

o

y

2 OCPO OPCS SF OBO CSOOD





Successor,

RATES OF EXCHANGE

ase
DE FEED EDL

Famous the world over
for that perfect bouquet

and flavour — the result















Rusa; |



an, S.S
Atlantic Producer

ibbee, S.S. Statesman, S.S. Lari

Triton, S.S. Kurdistan, SS. El

Morma



nr

Je sure
Yvorthy of notice
“sy way, with
will be thrille

that your appearance is
Dress your hair the
A.K, POMADE. You

with the result

A.K. POMADE



CANADA

MARCH 21, i951

pr. Cheques or
Bankers 62 9/1
Demand
Drafts @2.15% p
Sight Drafts 62 6/10
pr. Cable
pr. Curréney 61 4
Coupons 60 7/10°
Silver 20% pr







— AT ITS BEST

randy — /

WHEN IT IS HENNESSYS.

Both Bottles
and Flasks

available in a

THREE STAR
V.S.O.P = over

X.O.
at all Grocers, Hotels and Clubs

— Over









“Myken" sails g3ra

February
eabreeze”

sails 16th March



arrives Barbados 6th March,
arrives Barbados 27th March.





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE









S.S. “Runa” satls 15th F y %
SS. “Alcoa Patriot” sale tn March. arcives arboen aan Marek,
iineaiedielaaiy OT I Aa
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship
S. “ALCOA PARTNER”
S. “ALCOA PEGASUS"
S. “ALCOA PENNANT”

SAILS HALIFAX ARAIVES
February 23rd March 6th
March {th March 20th
Mareh 2ard April 3rd

B’DOS

NORTHBOUND
8.3." "
ALCOA PENNANT” ., j *» Due March Sth Sails for St. John &
; i , ¥ Halifax
8. “ALCOA PARTNER ue March 20th Sails for St. John
& Halifax

SL iene states.»

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

NN Nn om

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Domini, for sail-

ing to Europe, The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

a





= oo +
—









SSS LOMO TE
%,
A.M. WEBB {i)$ sarsados museum
x











STOCKBROKER x eee
% '
% EXHIBITION OF
Barbados Bonds and Shares s
Oversea Investments ¥ PAINTIN ‘s
Bought and Sold, *
x IN OILS, x
Dial: 4796 Hours 9—3 * BY x
ial: 479 s 9—é i a
‘i ied % HAROLD ©. CONNELL. 3
33 Broad St. % Open Daily. Sundays. \
(Over Phoenix), x 10—6. 2—6 x
‘ tt total yt otet tte tee”

)

\ You will be glad to learn that you can get

VHITE TALLOW
ad ABA

at

FOUNDRY LTD.

Pier Head.



\
| CENTRA









% PEP EAE EEE EE LEE A PEA ETE



t $
ys %
ys S
.

% q 8
e ~
: ri %
-

>

$

Our Customers and Friends are asked to note
that our Pier Head Branch (Workshop, Dock, Ship
Chandlery & Sugar Factory Supplies and General

CREASE

Office) will not be open for business on Saturday x
next 24th inst. x
S 2 ‘ .
% The Central Emporium, Broad St. and Gasolene
%,
x Station, Trafalgar St., will be open as usual.
> 4
¢ a
2 x
@ .
8 B
io *
om
% >
ad at at, Et 5G 5%, 4, 0% 4,



by ty POPOL LEE #549
OD reporooonnnoeeno ooo eno Cm:

NOTICE



Offices, Hardware and Lumber yards. will be

closed on

We beg to inform our Customers that our
:

SATURDAY 24th Inst.

Kindly arrange your shopping accordingly. «

The Warehouses will remain

:
x
usual.
|

Sugar open as

PLANTATIONS LTD.
BRIDGETOWN
and
SPEIGHTSTOWN

%,
DOOOOSSCSSCSESLES
SLOPES SCS CSS OPOOOO SOOO OCOD SGOOOOO SS SOSS A]

ao



PAGE EIGHT



Barbados D
VISITORS FIGHT HARD —

TO SCORE THIRD GOAL

THE COLONY XI de

feated Grenada in their final

football fixture at Kensington yesterday evening. by: three
goals to two in a tame game, '

At half time the score was 2—-1

in favour of the Colony.

Blades playing at inside right
for the colony opened the scoring
for the Colony The other two
goals were scored by Wilkes

For Grenada, Berkeley and
Tony Renwick scored,

The Game

Grenada defended the goal from
the northern end and within five
minutes of play, the Colony scored
when goal—keeper Steele missed u
tame shot by Blades the Colony’s
inside right.

Shortly afterwards, the Colony
attacked and Lucas made a good
first time effort from outside the
area, but the ball missed the cross
bar by inches,

The Grenada front line then got
going but Tony Renwick on the
right wing after receiving, kicked
wide

Grenada made another attack
on their opponents’ goal and
from a pass by Phil Edwards, Ren-
wick sent in a hard shot from the
right wing wich goal-keepe
Smith was forced to deflect ove,
the bar. Nothing however resulte:!
from the corner

Frenada soon found themselves
two down when Williams centred
from the left wing and Wilke:
McLeod the visitors outside lef
scored,

Later Gibbons miskicked but
McLeod, the visitors’ outside left,
after getting possession, kicked
wide. The colony missed a good
opportunity to put themselves
further in the lead when Lucius
kicked out a good pass from
Wilkes.

Grenada opened their scoring
when McLeod at outside left ran
down the field, beat full back
Gibbons and centred for centre
half Berkeley to beat Smith with
a good shot from close up.

Soon afterwards Grenada
launched another attack, Phil Ed-
wards after beating the Colony’s
half backs, passed to McLeod on
the left wing who centred, Berke-
ley- who was on the run headed
goalwards, but the ball grazed the
cross bar. The interval was taken
with the score 2—1 in favour of
the colony.

Second Half

On resumption the Colony were
first on the offensive but Blades
their inside right kicked over
from inside the area,

It was not long after this that
Wilkes got possession and beat
Steele with a hard shot from with-
lin the area to make the Colony 3.

Grenada got their second goal
when full back Gibbons kicked
across for goal—keeper Smith to
clear but the latter was not there
and. Tony Renwick pounced on
the ball and crashed it into the
nets.

The game at this stage grew
more interesting as Grenada on
the one hand tried to equalize
and the Colony on the other tried
to put themselves further in the
van.

On one occasion, McLeod the
visitors’ outside left sent in a good
effort but goal-keeper Smith was
well in position and had no diffi-
culty in saving.

Play was now transferred to the
visitors goal area and their defence
was kept busy for some time as
the Colony’s front men tried to
score,

The ball was however sent mid

field and Tony Renwick = got
possession and raced down the
field. He sent in a good one

which Smith saved.

In spite of some good efforts
by both teams to score, the game
ended with the Colony winners
by three goals to two

The referee was Mr. L. F
Harris.
The teams were as follows:—

Island: Smith; Gibbons; Grant;
F, Hutchinson; Cadogan: Gittens;
Chase; Biades; Wilkes; Lucas and
Will ams

Grenada: Steele; R. Renwick;
Husbands; Knight; Berkelev: Hus
bands; A. Renwick; Edwards,
Cummings; Fletcher and McLeod







Traffie Don't
No. 10
e

Do not stop in the middle
of the road to take up some-
one

Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.



They'll Do It Every Time

No MATTER WHAT THE BEAUTY op
SAYS, CITRONELLA WANTS HER HAIR
DONE THE WAY SHE WANTS IT ++









/. BUT, RUDOLF:
/

I SAW IT ON Ty:--










Vanterpool Victor
Ludorum

Robert Vanterpool of Set D was
declared Victor Ludorum when the
annual athletie sports at the Boys’
Foundation School, Christ Church
ended yesterday.

Rather big and tall for his age
Vanterpool also headed his
division — Division 5 — with . 28
points. The champion Set was C.
with 150 points followed by Set
D, 1044, A-70 and B-67% points.

The day was fine and the track
was firm. There were 31 events
14 of which were. completed on
Tuesday.

Perhaps the most thrilling and
exciting race was the 100 yards—
in Class I which E. Browne ot
Set E won. In this race. there
were tw. false starts but even-
tually all the boys got off to a
good start. Browne was a bit
Jate and about half the distance
Thomas showed signs that he
would win but when about two
yards from the tape Browne with
a big effort breasted the tape
before him. Thomas took seeqpjd
place.

The time for that race was ten
and four-fifths seconds. In the
150 yards Division 5, Robert Van-
terpool aithough getting off to a
late start won easily breasting the
tape well ahead of L. Silver who
trotted in second.

Another race which was thrill-
img was the Old Boys’ Race which
D, Sealy won. Ten boys entered
for the race but only four finished

After the sports Mr. E. Theo-
belds, Assistant Director of Educa-
tion, presented the prizes to the
winners. The Judges were Mrs
I, J. King, Messrs, K. G. Alleyne
and L. E. Jones,

Following are the results of the
events:—
1, THROWING THE CRICKET BALL
(CLASS 2)
92 yds. 2 ft. Ist—M. King,
King, 3rd Grosvenor.
2. RELAY—(Under 14)
lst—Set A, 2nd Set C, 3rd Set B.
5S. THROWING THE CRICKET BALL
(CLASS 1)

118 yds. 2 ft. 1#t—D, Jones, 2nd E
Graham, 3rd Eversley and Burke
4. LONG JUMP—(Class 4)

12 ft. 5 ins. Ist—H. King, 2nd Moseley,
Srd J, Clarke.
5. LONG JUMP—(Class 4)

14 ft 9 ins. Ist—Waithe, 2nd R. Clarke,
3rd D, Jones.
6. LONG JUMP—(Class %)

47 ft. 2 ins, Ist—C, King, 2nd R
Grosvenor, 3rd Murrell,
7. LONG JUMP--(Class 5)

11 ft, 4% ins. Ist Vanterpool, 2nd
Silver, 3rd Waterman,
8. HIGH JUMP--(Class 4)

4 ft. 2 ins. Ist-—-H, King, 2nd Pilgrim
and Moseley.
2. HIGH JUMP—(Class 4)

4 ft. 3ins. 1st—Simpson, 2nd D, Jones,
3rd Waithe and Eversley.
10, HIGH JUMP—(Class 2%)

5 ft. 0 ins. Ist—M, King, 2nd Thorpe,
3rd Walrond.

it, HIGH JUMP

and. c,



(Class 5)



3 ft. 6 ins. let--Vanterpool, 2nd Wate
man, rd L. Weekes.
12, 220 YARDS—(Class %)

Ist~R. Clarke, 2nd D, Jones, 14
Waithe.

1% 220 VARDS—(Class 4)

Ist—J, Clarke, 2nd Gooding, 3rd A.
Pilgrim.

ii, THREE-LEGGED RACE—(Over 4)
lst—Thomas and Browne, 2nd Evervley

ond Burke, 3rd Brome and Jones,

1. 100 YARDS—(Class 3%),

Ist. L, Clarke, 2nd, L. Simpson, 3rd
J. Waithe, Time 11 4/5 secs
Fi 100 YARDS-—(Class 4).

Ist R. Gooding; 2nd H. Pilgrim; 3rd
A, Pilgrim, Time 1% 2/5 secs,

16. 1009 YARDS—(Class 1).

ist E. Browne; 2nd Thomas; 3rd R
Price Time 10 4/5 sees.

19, 100 YARDS—(Class 2).

Ist N. Walrond; 2nd C, King; 3rd C
Murrell, Time 11 2/5 secs.

20, 80 YARDS—(Class 5).

Ist R. Vanterpool; 2nd W. Waterman,
3rd L, Silver. Time 11 1/5 sees,

2. LONG JUMP—(Class

Ist O, Thomas; 2nd B.
Graham, 18 ft. 10 ins.
22. 220 YARDS—(Class 2)

Ist Walrond; 2nd King
Time 25 4/5 secs.

28. 150 YARDS—(Class 5)

Ist R. Vanterpool; 2nd L.
Waterman. Time 24 2/5 secs
oo 220 YARDS—(Class 1),

ist Browne; 2nd Moseley; 3rd Gay
“. THREE-LEGGED RACE— (Under 14)

Ist Lloyd and Morgan, 2nd Waithe and
Clarke, 3rd Blackman and Forde.

6, HIGH JUMP (Class 1),

Ist O. Thomas; 2nd, Carttr; trd Layne
Height 5. ft. 1) in, .
23. 440 YARDS—(Class 2),

Ist Wa’rond; 2nd M, King; 3rd C. King.
28 VISITORS’ RACE.—(Girls)

ist M. Lioyd; 2nd_ G, Browne.

29. 440 YARDS—(Class 1)

Ist D. Lioyd, 2nd A, Price 3rd, 3rd E
Moseley.

“0. OLD BOYS’ RACE

Ist D. Sealy, 2nd C. Morrison, 3rd ©
Rollins
31, 880 YARDS—(Open)

ist D. Lloyd; 2nd E. Mose





ayne, 3rd R.
ard Clarke,

Si'ver; 3rd





by, 3rd Weekes



EXTEND CONSCRIPTION

BRUSSELS, March 21.
The Belgian Senate Upper
House to-day passed a Bill ex-
tending the period of military
service for Belgian conscripts
from twelve months to two years.
The Bill, already approved by the

Lower House, becomes law.

—Reuter.

Registered US Patent Ofles












BUT THE

"Then HOME SHE GOES AND SPENDS”
HOURS DOING IT OVER THE WAY RUDY
SUGGESTED IN THE FIRST PLACE

GOOD GRIEF



GERMAN

BARBADOS



coe...



ADVOCATE



efeai Grenada In Final Game 3-2

vs BRITISH



Hans Bierman, first German to enter a British ring since before the war, seems to be getting the worst

of his bout against J. Tomlinson of the Cains Club,
man against his British opponent.

against the Cains Club by three bouts to two.
The Germans will also meet the Lyle Boxing Club before returning to Germany.—Express.



England-N. Zealand
Test Drawn
Bailey 134 Not Out
CHRIST CHURCH,

NEW ZEALAND, March 21.
The first of the two Test matches

between England and New Zealand
on the present M.C.C. tour ended

in a draw here to-day. in reply
to New Zealand’s first innings
score of 417 for 8 wickets declared,
England scored 550, and New
Zealand lost 3 second innings

wickets for 46 runs before the
match eaded,

A feature of the England in-
nings was a not out century—134
—by. Trevor Bailey, the England
fast bowler, who scored with
delightful freedom after taking
four and a half hours to reach 50.
NEW ZEALAND—lst Innings (for

8 wickets declared) 417
ENGLAND Ist INNINGS
Hutton b Moir . 28
Washbrook ¢ Mooney b Hayés 58
Simpson c Wallace b Moir 81
Compton b Burtt 79
Bailey not out .,. 134
Brown ¢ Scott b Cresswell 62
Evans ¢ Hayes b Moir 19
Bedser.¢ Hayes b Moir ‘ 5
Tattersall b Moir ‘ 2
Wright ¢ MacGibbon b Cresswell 45
Statham b Moir 9
Extras (imves: 22, legs: 6) 23
Total 550

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. MM R Ww

Hayes 43° «11 89 1
MaeGibbou 28 6 “4 «6
Burtt . 49 23 99 1
Cresswell ... ° 3300 15 2
Moir ’ . 56.316 156 6
Reid 10 1 29 0
Scott ‘ 2 0 5 0
NEW ZEALAND 2nd INNINGS

MacGibbon ¢ Evans b Simpson 8
Hayes l.b.w. b Washbrook 19
Cresswell ¢ Evans b Simpson 2
Moir not out . ° ere 0
Scott not out ... i
Extras a
Total ifor 3 wickets) 40
—Reuter,

Ladies Will Enter
Water Polo Contest

THE Barbados Water Polo and
Swimming Association held their
Annual Meeting at the Aquatic
Club yesterday evening when it
was unanimously decided that
three Ladies teams will be formec
to enter the 1951 League,

Over 26 girls have expressed
their wish to form teams and six

others are not yet definite, The
ladies will practise for several
weeks before they form their

individual teams.

With reference to new teams fo:
the League, Lodge School were
very keen on entering the League
but due to lack of funds for trans-
portation they were unable to
enter a team.

Harrison College also expressed
the wish to enter qa team but as
several members of the various
clubs in the Association are pupils
of Harrison College they would
only agree to enter g team if these
players were allowed to represent
the College with the understanding
that when they left school they
could rejoin the clubs they used to
play for.

They however stressed the fact
that they left the matter éntirely
in the hands of the captains of the
teams involved and would abide by
their decision. This matter was
also referred to the council,

The tentative

fixed for the first week in June
that is, after the Footbal] season.





















date for the
beginning of the 1951 season was

Holkar Wins
Ranji Trophy
For Third Time.

INDORE, March 21.

Holkar won the Ranji trophy for
the cricket championship of India
for the third time when they beat
Gujerat by 189 runs with 40 min-
utes to: spare here to-day. Holkar
Scored 429 and 443 and Gujerat
replied with 327 and 356.

Indian Test player Mushtaq Ali
scored a grand 187 in Holkar’s first
innings and A. K, M, Rangekar
hit 97. Gujerat replied gamely
after losing Test allrounder Vinoo
Mankad for 11, but a sparkling 234
by C. Sarawate helped Holkar to
set their opponents the task of
getting 546 for victory in their last
innings.

Gujerat lost five wickets for 123
by lunch to-day but in a fighting
finish they added another 233 be-
fore their second innings ended in
defeat soon after tea.

Allrounder
a dashing 152
hours.—Reuter.

Jass Patel scored
in just over two





The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.03 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Full) March 23.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 3.54 a4.m., 4.11
a.m,

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil,
Total for Month to Yester-

day : .22 in,
Tempevature (Max). 84.5 °F
Tempco ature (Min.) 71.5 °C
Wind direction (9 a.m).
N.N.E. (3 p.m.) N.N.E
Wind velocity 15 miles per
hour,
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.967
(3 p.m.) 29.889







DD SS
1



but the final result was a win on points for the Ger-
The German team came from Frankfurt and won their match

Savannah Club

Tennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
LADIES’ SINGLES

Miss Pilgrim beat Mrs, M. Legge 6—0,

o—1

MIXED DOUBLES
ilis Excellency the Governor and Lady
Savage lost to Mr, and Mrs, F. D. Barnes
1-6, 2—6,

Mrs, R. S. Bancroft and P. McG. Pat-
terson beat Miss Ena Bowen and G. O'N.
Skinner 6—1, 6—2.

Miss Ramsay and A, F, Jemmott lost to
Mr. and Mrs, R. Challenor 75, 6—8,
6—4

MEN'S SINGLES

J. D. Trimingham beat J. S

0—6, 6—3, 6—1
MEN'S DOUBLES

U.N. Roach and P, K
R. S. Nicholls and T, A, Gittens 6—4
4—6, 3—6.

TO-DAY’'S FIXTURE
LADIES’ DOUBLES

Patterson

Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and Miss D. Wood
vs, Mrs, C. S. Lee and Mrs, C. I, Skinner.

What’s on Today

Court of Grand_ Sessions
—10 a.m,

Police Courts and Court of
Original Jurisdiction
—10 a.m:

Meeting of the Sanitary
Commissioners of St, Mi-
chael—10 a.m.

Sale, at the office of the
General Motor ’Bus Co.,
one Austin, 1950 Model,
A-70 (damaged in acci-
dent) —2 p.m,

Sale—Furniture at ‘“Wast-

., field, Pine Hill—2 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives a show
at Checker Hall Pin.,
Yard, St. Lucy—7 p.m.

CINEMAS :

Olympic—'Destination Big House”
& “South of Rio”’—4.30, 8.15 p.m.

Aquatic Club—"The Bachelor and
he Bobby-Soxer"—%.30 p.m.

Ylaza (Bridgetown)—"The Flame
and The Arrow’ 2.30, 4.45,

& 8.30 p.m.

Plata (Oistin)—‘Code of the
Saddle” & “Raiders of the
Border"—5 & 830 p.m.

Gaiety (St. James)—“Law Comes
to Gunsight" & “Riding Down
The Trail—8.30 p.m.

Empire—“Mister 880°—4.45 & 8.80

Roxy_-“Balataika’ & “Act of Vio~
Jence—4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Royal —“Night at the Opera” and
“The Search" —1.30 & 8.30 p.m.











PRICED TO SELL

ALLEYNE ARTHURS
SPECIAL

RUM



¢>

‘Tottenha m Hotspurs

May Tour Argeritina

LONDON, March 21.

Mr. Arthur Rowe, Manager of
the Football League First Division
Club, Tottenham Hotspurs, said
u-day that plans to tour Argen-
tuna during the close of the season
were still far from definite.

Tottenham have accepted an
offer from the Argentine Footbal)
Association to play six matches at
a guarantee of £2,000 for each,
but have not yet been able to
complete negotiations.

“We are as anxious as anybody
to get things’ settled,’ Mr. Rowe
said, “but they have not told us
yet where the games will be play-
ed, or more important, what ar-
rangements will be made to enable
us to have them over in this
country. I hope we shall hear
something definite soon.”

ERNIES—

UNION PARK EASTER
MEETING





Friends are kindly asked to
attend at 5.30 sharp.

On Thur, March 22nd
for the Call Over on the
Ist Day only run on the

24th March.

Pari Mutuel Commissions
executed on any race at the
meeting

Usual Cold Buffet
hors d’oeuvre



Roach lost te

Turkey and Ham
J. N. G. & Sons’ Special

| Home Made Sausages

Special Purity French
Patties and Mince Pies
Peach Melba.

Etceteraa, Etceteraa





THANI

BROS

Show you these and more
for Ladies!
Anglaise Embroidered $3.04

up.
Checked Taffeta
a yd.
Spun Silks
in varieties ...... 87c. up

$1.37

Sports Shirts in Plain and
Flowered for holidays
Striped and Plain Woollens
Underwears

Ties
Socks etc.

Shop at

THANI
BROS

Pr. Wm. Hry St.





OSE

PLEX

22

PESCOLIE,






COUGHING

== IS DANGEROUS













Phone 4267 for

SWEDISH 6-PANEL DOORS

Crepe-de-Chine

in varieties .... $1.14 up
Sandal Shoes: in Big varie-

ties
Felt and Straw Hats
OUnderwears
Costumes Jewellery
‘Nrist-Watches
Pocket Books Etc. Etc.

°

GENTLEMEN!

THURSDAY, MARCH. 22, - 1951



PAPER
&
TWINE

PAPER Per quire of one colour 36 ¢

Ga II sie 2¢

TWINE

Per ball = 27c. 28c. & 47c.
Porte 3. oe eis

ON eT” S



CAVE
{SHEPHERD

& Co., Ltd.
10-13 Broad St.





The Barbados Mutual Life Assurance

Society.

“Will Policyholders and all others concerned please
note that the office of this Society will not be opened
on SATURDAY, 24th March.

Cc. K. BROWNE,
Secretary.





Vx 3 x 1%" thick
TV x 2’8" x 1%” thick

These are well made Wooden Doors at

low prices.

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

14” thick, 4’ x 6’, 8’, 10’ long
3/16” thick, 4’ x 8’ long

SURINAM PLYWOOD, best quality

4" thick, 4’ x 8’ long
%," thick, 3’ x 7’ long

RED CEDAR SHINGLES
DOUGLAS. FIR JOISTS & PLANKS



Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €O., LID.









a












A HALF POMPADOUR, UPSWEEP ;+:
AND THEN THE BACK SHE ARE NOT funy vive ,
COMES UPAND OVER BEING WORN : Bu
IN SORT OF A TODAY ++ LIKE THE: Way 4
THEY FIXED: I(T
AT THE BEAUTY




PARLOR «+



EMVUELTO EN net
EN HUEVERA DE PLASTICO
Y TAMBIEN
EN HUEVOS DE PLASTICO
LLENOS DE ALMENDRAS TOSTADAS.

for EASTER

‘3 from

ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co. tid.

“YOUR GROCERS"



TAMBIEN PROVEEMOS UNA SELECCION COM-
PLETA DE

CONFITES EN CAJAS LUJOSAS

GALLETAS “DE COCKTAIL

GALLETAS DULCES EN LATAS LUJOSAS

Ro alll .



ETCETERA ETCETERA EN LA.

| i,
: \| Booker's «00s Drug Stores Ltd.
WASHINGTON a ic; o3 | EROAD STREET and ALPHA PHARMACY (HASTINGS)



PARA QUE SE ALEGREN SUS, NINOS DEBE
DARLES UN HUEVO DE CHOCOLATE DE PASCUA
LLENO CON MARZAPAN—

COR i St STAYED
) " CLR OOKLES LA ELE POE
{ Ne enh he IID ele noe









‘
— — ————







Full Text

PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 THURSDAY, '. UtCH PRICK: I'VE CENTS Stop Negotiations With Cuba On Sugar Commonwealth Asks U.K. LONDON. March 21. f~*OMM0NWBALTfl BUGAfl PBODVCD4G COONRUEfl asked the Brilisi(internment todtiy to abandon net;nlintions with Cliha for :> bilateral Mi<-ar agreement. Tile request ua. nude in .1 Kcolulion parsed h\ m meeting here of representatives of Australia, Sott'h Africa. British West Indies. Mauritius ;md Fiji. The Resolution rciulorccd e;.rlur protest-, made by Australian Resident Minister I'.ric Harrison and QMCnilaMfJ Agenl General Leonard Pike agajjajt a plfjOMCd ;recnu'iit that would provide Cuba with u guaranteed nutrkel in Britain for a minim: ni supply of l.aim.lMM) tons suuar for three vc-rs in return for tariff concession.. %  I T MIOtt\ PIIINTI: RHIHXS Mass Rally To Be. Stageil Against Reduction Of Preference* ilium Our Own Correspond* in I LONDON. March 21 An attack designed to counter proposals for reducing Empire preference 11 to t>e launched in Torquay, the current home ol trade and tariff talks on March 30 Organisers are the bnntra Industries Association and the British Empire League who last year assisted colonial sugar pro duean m llatir attempts to aocurc new contracts with the British Government A mass rally has been planned and a Resolutuu-. |< attempt to reduce Em pin' prefer encaa as an attack on the Empire's economy will he put forward by Lord Balfour of Inchiv.He is the newly elected Chairman ol the Empire Industries tlon. Mr. Alan I-cnnox-Boyd. Chairman of the Conservnt. Imperial Affairs CommitU*e. la "another who will be speak mi 01 behalf of Empire producers "I believe tha bgat way <>f proaxes for all of us ins along the Unas 0/ Empire development", he told me to-day "We decide! the boa! place to express this p>nnt :• view was Torquay e/tsare trade and tarlfT conference' have beer taking pUM The Empire Industrie-; A>M*-I.I tion are hopeful that delegates t> Gatl will attend their rally and listen to their call for strong Empire ties. PLOTTERS FOR TRIAL KARACHI. March 21 Pi 11 iv Minister Liaquat Al Khan told Parliament today he wouid bring to tnai Hajoi Gen eral Akbar Khan, chief of hW General Staff, and other alleged plotters daaptte public and army demands that they should hav< lieen shct without trial.—Renter ;.. d.iy that A MIL let had al %  l a u wea n totaOni la Pri M Minister Clement Alt lee tha < %  i ountrtea 1 asked Britain to join with DoiBunon Governments 1 1 esentatlons to m thi hope that that %  aril] maintain the full I %  sugar under pn 1 ential gyeten) without commitment (or purchase of foreign sugar under a bilateral agreement The Resolution was ami t<> four British departments concerned Board of Trade. Ministry of Food. Colonial Oltlce .in lulntrral agreement between the United Kingdom and %  would seriously prejudice ncgodationa fnr %  new Int* %  I Sugai Agreement" it said. —Reuor \\ ages Council Hill For Further Stud] GHKNADA, March 21. A flic .HI hOW and a half Sitting the legislature tn-ditv Icrred the Wages Crranrir Bill 10 a Select Committee following the second reading Of the "i he %  -iniiniti a of seven under the ihatrmanshlp of Mr C F llenvillr. Attorney Genei'm. Ilk IlKkM t. B I .1 H Renwlck, R. o Williams, R, C P Moore, T v: He and Captain B I Hughes who nieei tnn 00 1 in report al Ihc full sesMon of the Council on Wednesday next week Work on the estates continue nornnl with only laofc stances of minor I Canada Is Democratic -GEORGE HUNTE MR. GEORGE HUNTE, Assistant Editor of the Advocate returned yesterday by T.C.A. after a ten-day stay in Canada as a guest of Trans Canada An linej Shortly after his arrival at Scawell, Mr. Hunle said "My trip to Canada Wag only one of the many examples of Canada's jjoixl relations with the Press. Canadians whether in public or private enterprise make it easy for the Press to inform the pubThey do not leave the Press to pick up information liom nflicials or private persons in the know. Without the Canadian Press there would be no Canadian democracy. And without Canadian democracy the world of 1951 would be in %  worst plight than it is. It dues not need ten days in Canada. It needs only lialf an hour In Ottawa tn hear the pulse beat <>r a great, virile and progressive nation My personal gratitude to Trans Canada Airlines for making my visit to Canada possible is all the greater because of the opportunity it gave me to breathe if only for ten days the name air as a people standing at the of a great future. Three-Hour Flight Winnipeg is 1.000 i Montreal imd from Victoria to Halifax is something like l.oou in.Us It took ma nearly three hours to fly from Montreal to Toronto, some 300 mile*. To talk of seeing Canada in 10 day* BJ nonsense. But even ten days b i* better than no day.' in Canada, and ten days In Canada as the guest of Trans C a n ada Airline is probably equivalent to 30 days as an ordinary' visitor Ten days is time enough too to form an impression of the vastness of Canada and to appreciate the fact that there is a Canadiar way of life Canada docs not lalfc about democracy. Canada ii democratic The Senator for Peter t.urgh U.N. Troops Take Over Chund Nearing Pa Mr. Anthony Brooks, exiled nephew of the !•' tthif lUjah of Sarawak, i-tiiriis la London. ftr ( giving up bin are-year fight to regain the kingdom which hi-, uaole transferred U> Bnu-h rule In 191b for £ 1,000,000. Anthony Brooke used to be Crown Prince of Harawak One of his cousins married Hairy Boy. the dance band le*d>i. another inarnid Bob Oregory. the wrestler They were tha daughter* of Btr Charles Vynei B:ook.\ whose family h.d ndsp Barawak for more than a haitered years. Phati shows Mr Anthony Brooke at Victoria with Bti wife sag two daughters. Angela 9 and Cella C. Bi Elizabeth May Visit The Pope LONDON. March 21. A Buckingham Palace spokesman told Beater to-day it was "likely but not definite" that Princess Elizabeth would VuB the Pope, during her visit to Borne next month Such a VIMI would be a courtesy call and an intormal one. tho spokesman added. Princess Margaret was criticised by the Free Church of Scotland in Edinburgh Ling the Pope during her holiday in Italy two years ago Bev Donald Mackenzie said: "I think I speak for you all when 1 taj we deprecate and deplore visits to the Vatican bv those in high places". King George VI was asked today to prevent the proposed courten) visit i,f hidaughter Elizabeth to the Pope, and thus avoid an affront to national sentiment." rrlaoBM Elizabeth, at present In afalta, is to visit Borne with her husband the Duke of Edinburgh from April 11 to April 24. A latter lo the King from the Secretary of the Protestant Alliance said that news of the visit of the next in succession to the "Pre* I me of this realm". Would be flashed around the world as "Papal propaganda of the CKMII-M value 1 Britona would be filled Ii "surprise, perplexity, and profound sorrow" al the thought ; -. ibit, he said,—Kcuter. Egypt Plans Rod Sva 'Defence' CA1HO. March 21. i rptlan Army Cominandei-m-Chief. General Hussein Farid Bey. has left for the Gulf of Aquada at the northern end of the lted Sea to organise "military defence" in this area, according to the pro-Govern mont newspaper AI Mlsry. The nawipoper said this move followed reports that tared had led air and land communi•attoni with the port of Elat on the gulf. Reportr. said Israel had built a road 125 miles long across the Negev desert and had also established a regular airline to Elat van said t<> i>c pla n ni n g to build up Elat into a centre foi ilshing. mining and tourism. R cuter U.S. DOUBLE ARMED FORCES KEY WEST Florida March 21. PRESIDENT TRUMAN disclosed todaj that the United States has doubled its armed forces since the invasion of Korea to ivsi.st "tttl! further Communlfd fl'tackg agaiBgl other f-eo nations." txehanaa of hTlegnuai beihe President ,.n 1 Been Deputies Still Deadlocks. Owr Itig / Agent/a PABJS BTarca II "big Foui" Koieitn Mini-uid aput l ai tailed again todav to go forward with then efforts. ''<> draft an agenda (01 .1 Fu-Un MlnU %  1 i^ hi far %  few thousand in and the Caribbean, Ihe reirmining 2,000.000 the United Stales or aboard ships at sea. While exact figures may not be %  rd. t in.1'. l>.' said the army Is 'ginning to approach the 1.400.000 strength figure mentioned by Lieniia] Omar Bradley. Chaiiitian of the J( Inl '"In. f ol Stiff in the 11.ll Clllllllllt!' I . month. At the 1 %  '"i". navy and .>u torn-tiength was about 820.000 l 1 rtM corps ibout I70.trtlfj. c or Pass ITALY TO STEP UP SULPHUR OUTPUT ROME. March 21. Italy plans lo expand her sulphur output in view of thi D| iemand on the. world market, anu the resultant favourable prospects (or this Italian Induatry The Ministry of Industry said it was planned to step up production HI the suinhui mini of Sicily where Italy's principal deposits are iocatcd.—Renter. Convent Wull Kills 13 School Girl* MILAN. March 21 Thirteen school girls crouching under a wall of a convent here to shelter fiom violent gusts of wind, werji,killed to-dny when the wall toppled on to them. Eleven other girls were badly injured Seven of the school girls, pupils at the Institute of the Sister ol Je.suv. were killed outright by Ions of titone which crashed on to them The others died in hospital soon after warda. Doctors at the hospital whenthe injured girls were taken, said some were in a serious conditioti leader. ATTLEE GOES FOR MEDICAL CHECK-UP LONDON. March 21 EriiiMi Prune Minister, Clement etil into n London hospital to-day for a general medical checkup Me *as treated for Duodenal %  ilcer three year* ago and has re %  i Ing some discom %  %  He will pi hrspital during the Parliament:) Reuter goes into a cafeteria and alt on stool next to the butch) The Canadian House of Parli ment is almost an open hous And the Press in Canada is regarded as an essenli.' Canadian demo, Public Relations in I baaed on a study of public l arui eorni %  SI m with prevailing 1 by ihe NO AGREEMENT BUI March 21 With I ri 1 "'mea I Argentina 1 %  FORMER PRESIDENT OF ECUADOR DIES NEW YORK. March 21 The death was announced l PC Alfredo Rasqi %  imei President ol fceuaVork h l night aged 31 Dr. Moreno came here a fort%  light ago for medical treatment R eater. lirilain ( lo-niv Six Conriulatt's LONDON, March 21, Britain is to close six of her %  onsulates in China, Foreign 3ecretary Herbcit Morrison told Commons to-day. The closed poaii %  re at Chungking. Kumning Nankow. Nanking. Tsmgtao and Ainu.. ll is noted that to-day's decision leaves only four British consulate* In China, those in Shangha. Tentsin. Canton and Peklm: which is also the scat of th. nbaea) A Foreign Office spokesman laid to-day thnt there are fawer than 2.000 British subjects in China of whom some 700 are u Shanghai. —Renter laMons Kxcepl for a I A Oak a. Hawaii Auriol Leaves For New York PLYMOUTH, March ^1 French President Vuu.-nt Auriol, his nifa Ud Foreign Mlnrt Bchuman, 1 n preoentatlve 1 tieorge VI. when they arrived tier tins rnontng en route i llnUnited Stales in the lie l* France Three I %  II^LI ^waited the liner since dawn I Ien lies ef| UsB l>escoited tha He le trance bate Plymoutli. As the liner ap|>roucl>ed \iw harbour, guns thundered a welcome from the seventeenth century royal citadel which hail once defended the poii RBJ Frenih After 200 passenger* from LoB don had boarded the liner, the He lie France lav to, IRltll I"Sri ) eoi H the Unitad States — Reuter (By JULIAN BATES) TOKYO Marrh 9.1 \MKR1CAN TROOPS to day captured Chun chon, last major Communist base south of the 38th parallel without firing a shot. On the east coast, South Koreans were believed to have reached north of the frontier itself Chinese had abandoned Chunchon shortly be fore rapidly advancing Allied patrols and tanks probed into the city M Cautious Approach" IRK H with Iron %  .'atIng a ''caanv United Naltaiis poliv Ing lln3fith (l .n countries, flghtln i w palgn met Unite I \ il State Dean ftuik .,t tha State Depi las Ni %  .' patel es widely pub> Hshed throughout the Unite. Lates quoti thai the .intii p % %  • A %  i %  t < .il |"ii DOS* keep i.." and to find nut ^> era doing This .I'II .lilliU o! majoi Chin oaki i| .\.,. ujuB N .1 Other >aahanBb | Wg ; nlvd I hi Radio bomb Urapped TOKYO. March 21. A six-u.i. was dropped on a rail bridge tolaj i \meriean SUperfOrts made nassive assault on Ihe main ununications on the road from Manchuria lo the North Korean CommuiiKt capital Pyongyang. Superforts also raided three Communist supiih untilniarei lo the battle line '-.ilh rt Communique claimed —Kmter Kiimisli Govt Resigui HELSINKI. March 21 Finnish Prime Minister Urthg 1. I nra I handed his C iitmn Qovernment'i raatanatlon to 1 %  %  J'aasikivi. Iiut %  Jaj rraking it effective until jltei Easter K.nii'1 to %  !.! %  S' i.ii i). 11.' %  1.ithad withdrawn Ihi from the Id-seat Coalition Cabinet ParHan ant reluied yesterday 1 pass a Government Hill postponing from April 1 to August 1, a 4J per cent, increase in rents Thev maintained thai diate ris" in rents would helu Com munitts in the Trades Union elec MOni next month, and in the Jul< • %  lection* —Renter Karth Tremor t'DINE, North Italv. March 21 A stiong earth tremor laslmt %  aireral seconds shock the Alpine region of Tolmezzo, 25 miles north of Udine early yeeterday. dela>ri reports said to-day. No victims or damage vcere reported —Renter. Britain Will Give Antigua £300,000 For Storm Damugc <>iii n>n <*<>rri->pondefiii ANTIGUA, March 21. Britain 1 .0 to £100,000 for repair and rswoaatruetlon of bouses atfuca i>\ 1.1st napternber'i hum cane M/hen twe itorrni within ten days hit the leeward Island* chain Making this iuiiK 1 Qavernni Kenn th Hiackhu MO' 1 the amount would Include .1 large sum announced earlier. It wool.I Iteo Include %  grant of £0,857, tot pre) min 11 trorl ui London Tl %  grant would bs c on owners making a conlnhution In labour. iirants In sterling would lie made available foi Inn 111 am damage in the norlhcrl. Angiill.i Where %  few houses were left Intact and rot rebuilding lh %  %  ThMl.inane WM Ihe uorst for 811 vears Antigua |o .1 m ..1 bj Y\ ebb Fusiliers' Arrive In JVa ch L'MUCAI M id aaaaad an i.diei and rormm ..1 Kore K to reaiii Ihi liorder, 1 %  Int. 1111 .md Othei OW HCI || %  ... hat crossing lh< parallel x io d* Id Eighth Anny troops had las: 1 led in holding city mi' morning The last official report of South Koreani on lha 1 1 said thaa snare nine aulai u m Tn,parallel. ,H* r .1 quick advam % %  fum Kangnung, but InO] had tea 1 Might. Nen of the Allied advance was I the 14 hours ban on 14 m of the troops had I een lifted Communist rearbeing pressed back jitnp of territorj by roughU III mili" ntral ami Hai' %  ward curtain of lets and flghtei %  %  Hie BUM %  loped north Ol the South : 1 Seoul Hera, Cam rauntsl u pa foughi iful>bornle all ittempti to dig Ihem out of Mah itioiiini The Con 1 reported %  1 I Id Amu in lha tsdon M mllag %  1 • pa earful an %  I nt swept north io occupy l strategic lull lesiiion Communists resisted on %  'ours Init patrol irllv bomb* lii .iuit their foahotel lh VBTd Reutrr %  I Rrui^r 21 ARBB8TBD %  111) thai %  %  plottage In Tlenl ,in had 1 11 toted — Reatrr Publisher Of "La ftaasM*' Barred From Plane llUHNOfi AIMF£, March 21 %  'to Gainra Par, 30-year the %  IJ rrrnsa. which WM auced by tha A ri 1 eveeii rj from tMmidfng a plane for Munle KruUT TELL TillADVOCATE TUB NKWH DIAL 3113 HAY OR NIGHT GILBEYS ;h Wanes Defend Middle East Senator Urges WASHINGTON. Ma I twin John•00, uiKLd to-day that instead of the United States shoulo concentrate on defending the Boat with its gieat oil rewrvr* because Use Thii" World War might oogin 10 In a speech prepared for delivery he tolo the Senate. lli> Mediterranean is not only a fever tnot %  I U 4 in the woili) Raater KINGSTON. M Trooper marara morning and la n ded an advam %  too ol the Fli I I ..1 the Boyal "Feish Fusiliers who i Ing the Ftrsl I %  Inniaktlllng Fusiik garrison duty in Jaman .1 1 %  1 voaeel 1 a Had Ihil fo, Ballaa, aVNlah Honduraa whenit will land another part for ,..010.01 -int. on the border of (. itai 1 and Brtnah Honttu The Dllwara If due to ret to rUnaStOn OH March tho remainder of the buHJad <* RAIL STRIKE CALLED PARIS. March 21 %  %  Van b em nlghl. on Wednesday to mrrrt the strike which would • ui off n bo more than l.OOO.OOO people in greatei The Ontgno [j-gi'la* approval to the bill setting u, I ricv. Milk Control Boom LaSUtaassnt Governor Ray La* son would be on hand to giv the hill Royal av.cn' later, and the Board an) hold its Tirst meeting with thi oclat on A strike of 1,700 dan ... %  thi.* morning, but an appeal by Major Hiram aaaCallun 2* bOUf poatponetn'i t While the postponement was being 1 getting ng of a preview of what %  Retail stores were sold out by .: m reiidentfi flocked gel extra milk fresh and canned ftl ported enough poa h only a sh time. Hospital*. were mak mat patients. — K'l



PAGE 1

PACK FOl/R RARBAIIOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAKCII it. ItSl HAKIi^DO_S^Al)\0(^TE Thur>da>. March 22. 1951 11 MllllSOV < OI.I.M.I. DVRIN lury the RUM <>t Harrison Collage lias stood oul hi^h in the list of public schools in the British Eniuiit-. Jl WM noi merely the name of the school but the calibre of her alumni found in almost •very part of the v.orld occupying positions of eminence. It would be impossible to reproduce the impressive list but among those of the past have been Abel Greenidge and the late H. B. Uooding while among those of the present is a Permanent Under Secretary of State in the British Home Office. Sir Frank Newsam. But it is not on her past laurels that Harrison College hopes to maintain her prestige m the world of scholarship. Throughout the years she has continued to produce scholars who have dune remarkably well at the universities and in every branch ol study. Today it is her proud boast that she is still among the best public schools It) the British Commonwealth and Empire. Examination results are not the only Indices by which a school or any other institution can be judged, but they serve to indicate a standard of work done. Recounting the successes of the School at Speech Day last week, Mr. Hammond supplied the information that "outside the United Kingdom Harrison College headed the list of examination results of all schools in the British Commonwealth including the Dominions." The examiners themselves wrote in their report: "It was gratifying to note that the standard in Greek was u high as in Latin T he standard in Set Book papers was higher than that obtained by schools in England T he general average of the work in Classical History was high and compared favourably with the average of most English Schools." It was with pardonable pride that the Headmaster said. "I know of no overseas school in the whole Commonwealth that can surpass the academic record of Harrison College." Barbadians in every walk of life will pride themselves in the fact that among the educational institutions of the Empire the leading school of this island is classified among the best. But that justifiable pride becomes empty if nothing is done by those who have benetited from their associations with her to help her to maintain that position of eminence to which she has attained. The former Headmaster Mr. H. N. Haskell was never tired In his appeal to Old llarrisonians to support education in a tangible way by contributing those necessary adjuncts which contribute to the enjoyment of the corporate life of the school. The most recent contribution is that of equipment for the teaching of Biology lo enable pupils who aim at becoming medical students to gain exemption from the first M.B. examination while still at school. The ever increasing numbers on the school roll expresses more eloquently than anything else, the demand for education at Harrison College but there is the underlying danger pointed out by the Headmaster: "There is a third dilemma which pressure of numbers produces; the loss of a feeling of entity which is an almost inescapable result of growth In IT K 1.1r SERVICE FOR some time complaints have been made of the inconvenience suffered by people whose business takes them to the Treasury. There is no opportunity to purchase stamps which must be affixed to vouchers. In the event of anyone going to the Treasury without the necessary stamp to be affixed he must lirst go to the Post Office and purchase the stamp before he can be paid. The same state of things has arisen at the Parcel Post Department now removed to the Wharf It shot: 1 not be difficult for the Government to make stamps available at these two departments not for general purposes but merely to facilitate the business conducted there The Government sells stamps and the departments exist for the purpose of catering to the general public who go there for business with the Ciovernment. The Cure For Strikes Auel TinOnl* WM* l Iliul. Wutft-% mad* n !" stride* sime the war; hl I ' v < ln| — wt i mean done too M haw to wake up, wt m efforts in Improve pro dueUvtty, otherwise we shall starve. our population of so.ooo.ono ...n live cil, I,-. ' I %  d--i aad raw material! In France, 33 out of %  adult workers produce f<--l In America 18 out ol c vc | IM Ifl Britain fewer than nVe 111 100 no eouatrj % %  so dependent on Imports ns our* And increasing population and Induat ri a lliat Jon In overseas countries are reducing the of food, etc that these countries ran sell to us and forcing up the %  TO I'HOIM i i AMI III \ini The problem fatrinj a b Can wi eontfiitM to acO enough of our goods on favour. %  hla enough term* to gel the law material;; to keep our tm lories working and the food to keep our stomachs full? Can we produce enough to do this and .it the same time lo rearm? By SIR GEORGE SCHUSTER rMaatrtsaal -**•• %  •<• sMnaea %  I iiir aaeanaasM %  •( • %  % %  %  i ..i... Wssakki PflsaasaMa) In the nationalised Industrie* list* should give a lead in creating good human re I a lions They have rerta'nly not done that yet. Many firms In private industry are far ahead of the nationalised Iva policies % %  ; a lions. I bailev* Gtai by employer %  ho ihey run operate together more expertly, and pjrtUni rH of all restntUn. practices, thencould be an immediate 30 per cent increase In Bri..rnductivity without any necessity for longer working hourI MOW \Ml EmCIENCV If they seek n renut it is almost always twause the machinery for handing human relation* and settling wage quai lions is loo cumberaor.e. Tor this the trade union orgat i-^ilion* are often as much to W .me as the Dockan have been part cu larly stnkrpi"' %  bi ilnTicult to establish real human relations in dock work. rinea UM men en slwayi shift ing from one empl<-%  < %  other But we hear too much about strikes Taking a broad view, our worker* have been ex'i ily reasonable during the pas) five years. We have been IB time* freer from strikes than during the five years following the 1918 IT MAY III ritosn IIIITI The answer IS, only if we work nor* efficiently We are facing a new world In order to survive as a great nation we must evolve an entirety new outlook on relations betweer. worker and employer We can succeed only if instead of the two fighting each other they can create a i>;n:m> i leading to the highest productivity. GET mo or %  HIS ggAg Can we do that? I think we mi. We hove travelled some way long the road already Workers must net rid of the fear that If they work batter they will work themselves out ill | jllll. Our curse in that they have good memories for bad things— pccially for the years of unem ploymont and wage cuts. If UM full employment Of todfJJ can continue Cor len vein i hope that the few "f the sack—the old l>asis for discipline. In Industry-will die, sod %  new basis of reason lie flnni. llshecl. in TY or mi iHriOVIKS Trade union li-arlersnow rcillv thai they can no longer |UT4 Aghl to get ihe moat OUt of someone else's pocket, but thai lh,.!., %  way lo ttsujsreve their members' lot is to Increase their proriuclJvily Their tthVulty Is lo get this across lo the rank and tile As for employers' associations, they must give thought to something more than merely protecting their own Interests They hove to consider how I rlvate anterpi is,, i u work best in the public Interest. Lover llrothfrs have been able lo put up productivity by 30 per cant, just by improving work methods Tube Investments have reported an even bigger advance There D many other cases, too Nothing is more important than % %  •"* unions should co-operate in this efficiency drive. They should have Iheir own efficiency experts, as they do in America, and themselves force laggard linns into line Hitherto UII attitude of the British unions has been rather lo protect the weaker brother and see that he does not get left beh nd Hut Ihe day for this MM ti tion on minimum standards has gone We must oncounuji the %  nan U) m ilM U much as he can. We need a new race of foremen—the N.C.O.s of industry. The) mutt ! %  trained n> ii indhng peopleThe b-adei-s who ran take real re— sp*msiblhty. A recent survey of a large sample group of British Industrie* showed thai only two-fifths of foreman had undergone any sort of training for their job, and only 1i pei carrl had re eived more than a primary school education. no IN ion win Nevertheless. 1 agree that w< are now approaching a very difficult lime We are in for a period of rising prices and rising wages I am not so frightened of this as some people are. Provided It does not go too fast. a period of rising prues is a pen od of prosperity It makes people believe in th< future, and be enterprising Judged by proQts. British industry is prosperous today. But 1 think there Is still a substantial margin for really rarninu bigget pay packets if even-body on thi Job pulls together What m -an no! afford is bigger pay packet. noi really earned by better pro duct ion. I believe that the run cut will about workers being hindered b) lock of incentives if exaggerat ed; but I am worrml about Ihe smullness of the meat ration Those doing hard pay hour will feel the til effects, of the meat shortage if it goes on much longer. VNSWIII TO <0>l>ll MSM I do not hallgve In long >.. %  .: of work, I think 40 hours of hard manual work is enough far of dinary people. Nevertheless in limes of crisis like the pn lenl II ni.iv i„. necessary lo toil longer BUT before wo toy bo persuade IMHtpie to do this, managemen' and worfeen should see what can l>e Hone %  iinprrive eflli-iem v :., thai every working hour becomes i ducttvo a^ pnaslhls AT leatt o per cent of Prlton are WOrkln| WeO MOM men Uke IO dO .i fob Welt. Why. than, do We have strike-ill is not enough to put them all down to Communist agitation. Communists only get a hold if 'heir is a genuine grievance. In general, men become discontented if they think thev are n| I fair deal compared with other people. Lei us hope we that. The really big This requires an outlook on human industry, so tb.it all employers. union rani and flu? work. regard thcmielvo* a partnen In an ail, Increase industrial i get ovci '.ask ahead II partnanhlp intlrely new rehttJ m ii concerned— seders, tfl—come to construct ..,! effort %  We have a kttg %  f to go be. fore that is Ihe general spirit of industry; but Ihe experieno Ol %  few progressive linns make mo baneve that it po i aehleee I believe Ihls U something hnh Britten Industry an ii" battei than any OUMH II wi can Mo a ai d In %  mel as such a spirit then we can make industrial employment the bash of a good life. And we shall hove found the answer lo Communism Once again we shall take Uh ship of the world. London Express Servict Exii The I siiisls Whm Went -Red" To Keep Their Jobs mm escaped ,-rcrnllv n editor of Ihe East despatch from KI'RT VHDIItRlir from Ihe Soviet xone. where he was < .• t nun Communist Nrws Agency : A million German Communists returned from his latest of manv ££.£&*. screened 'r Prty visit, lo the Kremim y tribunals in session all OAor Ihe Soviet rone. The same hour that There is one basic test, could plane %  hun down at ., Red Ihe comrade lx> completely trust Army alrflold on the outskirts of ed to fight for the Kremlin, if the Berlin. Ulbricht ordenvi call came? ference of parly officials. Inquiry into the comrades' fitUlbricht talked for two hocrs ness to continue in memlHrshi,. PD OUl his newest directive. Stalin is not th,only aim'to the purwc known '" btve told Ulbn.-h: Its wider purpose is to condition ,nal ,wo rr,ov w must be made in rty members to regard Stalin''. 1 ""m/.plans of imperialist connuesl a sacred and inevitable. n i new Communist parties ai( 1. To rid the party ranks of the Government typists, girl secretj. rtes. and shopkeepers who flocked to be thoroughly indoctni'uled to Join In order to keep their jobs With the idea that Stalin i-. tho or make life easier for themselvessun and centre of the uiUvefBe, 2. To build up a party of true not only the grrnte*i bvnig revolutionaries imbued • thinker and scientist, but the iniat ideas. gnnrtaal m histor>'. If he li all these. It follows that t-'lbricht gave orders for the M ll ..Iso the greater neneral '.screening." The party membernot only of the next war but the -hip eM became— ofliciaIly —"the Usl war and all the wan preced* i'o*t treasured possession of any lol • I lei man" j more to be cherished. It is. In tart, I.enm wn. Is being apparently, than ra1 purged. „_ l-jirn It' Two Moves Now th* irehlp i srd bas Walter Ulbricht, Ihe Inm-beardto be earned. Those who arced top Communist of Ihe Sovirl being purged have ihe theoretical /one— the little Lanln Of I Chance of winning It back through Germany — brought the pumc long and dibiient anMOAtlceahlp %  ireotlVI beck |0 Berlin when he in the "mass organisations" — the German Soviet Friendship League The league will give full opportunity for it* members to show complete acceptance of Stalin ana all his wcrks. it wUl give Instructions, loo. on Ihe latest party lines Those left in the party mus'. also serve an apprenticeship The training course for them is more advanced, more strenuous, too. Local committees of the party —made up of those who have won status as teachers— will mar* the progress of each apprentice in l booklet which will record the number of lectures attended i n the week. Absence from two successive lectures will require to be The Genius The teaching will represent i-enin as a revolutionary, as the founder of the Soviet Slate, and as a man who achieved much. Hut it will show him as a pigmv beside Stalin, whose genius changed one-sixth of Ihe earth, rot to mention the post-war gaip, into the Socialist Sixth the ll q -in extension of Stalinist attempt to cb-,-rhistory so that the disciplined historian of the future will permit himself no doi.Siailn was not Ix-:iln's pupil, but that Lenin was Slalin's pupil LES. Ol II III AIM HS SAY fVaWn To I lie aVUfOT, Tintdeocflfe, BIB HI lie readina the crUl in Ihe House • >r Ai trnbty re the J*risnn and the treatment of prisoners in today's Advocate .Friday. March 16. 1951, j ri bared reading only yesterday in an old newspaper The Bee of ry, September 30lh, 1887. pubi by Messrs G Anciaux and K. V.' !, vini no doubt also have, thli same probliclsm f.n"i thi or Aaaambl) (ii yeai .. closed i from "BuMinu-" of the eomU the ojt* In the 'ritu i %  i % %  ;,v. ll untrj a return." f>>r i Yours truly, I YLEY "Wesllynne." land's Knd, Man-h 10. 1951. The si,i-y from TIIF M i ill ISHiF THE WALLS OF TME "RUVAL HOTEL" IS ANCIENT TIMES CALLED "GLENOAIRV" tHM walls do not always a prison nuke, nor iron bars a r4ge." Bielrjr, who has Jus! completed hi .1 BI of one month in. for Of the pence; has started on bar %  .t. to On city. Friend meeting her: HI* Heck* ou out onci x*i eiuld. but 1 only id logo back neM Kan daj nsoenlng, 0 the most beautifullesi place In the %  arid, and Mr Cubenor %  man, his manners is i lard, )"• ii i effect, a D OU go\' %  leng ue 1 am sorr)' lo tee you here n IOOII Ud 'hen he does appear So sorry, %  nd he aeja more like i nki oU Mil behaved while woman,—than a Gubner.—I likes lo go to Clane'erry, deed 1 does."—In the momfit the nice In strong enough to blow the teeths UT throat, den pnnctuil ll 8 o'clock you has your bath and by dat time. te. I OHM I lOMtl H my COUlfaa Johnnie (We Calls him "thte.f,*rt U ,;if* for | nicknamc.l uaad to bring me up regular good vittels, and at 2 o'clock again he was waiting with limner, you dOOn*! havl the least thing in do, i.nU ;it 6 oVItu k fOU has to gel the lock turned upon you, dats de only wotless ting in the Whole of il—of course onlv allowed t %  '< main i ntty* .i sc* it you hai %  '.it claws, -but ess I ilon't pin Cathi rl %  %  ^ni'jkvs men coed tarma, and afh accommodation for lawother disturbances. Sg lonfl will it remain J lied with such vagaUmds. glvi see how goon Ihe nun bar of pe i s-hrealteri Ihe Bee" of rth, 1887" The Guinness Millions Dispute Throws Up Again The Problem What Happens To Your Money When You Die? By BKRNARI) HARKIS ONE of Ihe 18 counsel engaged In trying to unravel the tangle of the Guinness milions has suggested that it is better to die in the poorhouse than to die rich. Certainly, if we all ended our days owning less than £2.000 (at which death duties start) we should save a lot of trouble for the folk we leave behind. For difficulties over wills are becoming more frequent. Of course it is the millionaire estates, burdened with duties of 16s. in every pound, that give rise to the most spectacular problems. WIDOWS WILL The problem with the estate of Mr. Arthur Guinness is that it is between £300,000 and £ 400,000 short oi the amount needed to carry out his wishes — even though he left £ 2,000,000 after death duties. There has been a deficiency, too, with the estate of Mrs, Lavinia Clarissa Kcene, 85year-old widow who died nearly two years ago. This charitable old lady left £1.347.000. of which death duties took £937,663. More than £ 1,000,000 of her wealth was represented by 50.000 Pearl Assurance shares, valued when she died at £20. 5s. each. Soon after her death the Socialists came out with their plan to "mutualise" industrial life assurance. Down went Pearl shares to £17. And down also went Mrs. Keene's holdings of War Loan and industrial shares. The estate was so reduced that it seemed there would be nothing left for anybody. So it was decided lo "nurse" the Pearl shares in the hope that the price would recover. Luckily for the beneliciaries it has done so. SACRIFICES Another estate which has given rise to problems is that of Lord Portal, head of the banknote paper firm. He left £2.112.000. of which £ 1.569.000 went in duties. On paper his widow would appear to be still a wealthy woman. But apparently Lord Portal left instructions which could be carried out only by heavy sacrifice on her part. If you have any money to leave it is useful to look ahead and sec what happens to it when you die. If you work out roughly what the State grabbers will take you will make things easier for those who come after you. Hardly anything escapes the State net. Your executor's first business is to take charge of everything of any value you possessed. If there is odd cash in your trouser pocket he is supposed to include even that. VALUE ALL He will instruct your bank manager to rule ofT your account. He will value all your furniture and house fittings. If the amount is small, his valuation will probably be accepted; if it is large, a valuer will have to agree the figure The local district valuer will check the price put on your house. Stocks and shares will be taken at the market value on the day of your death. The rule is "a quarter up"—which means that if a share is quoted at 20s—22s, the value will be taken at 20s. 6d. Shares in companies with no market quotation will have to be valued by the ncnttry or auditor. The figure will later be checked by the Estate Duty Office, who may call for the last three years' accounts. When your executor has put a (igure on everything an Inland Revenue affidavit will be prepared and checked. Then probate is obtained and your executor can go ahead and carry out all your wishes—provided you have not been too generous. TO COURT? If you have underestimated the duties payable your executors may have to go to the High Court for advice on how to deal w'th your legacies. In the case of small estates this difficulty can sometimes be got round by the beneliciaries agreeing to take a cut. Bjr this time one or two details of your will may have appeared in the local newspaper. Almost certainly there will be friends of yours who will say : "I had no idea old Soand-So was worth all that." Or. "I thought he would have left more than that." In either case they will be jumping to conclusions. For published figures are often little guide to a man's real wealth. You may be shown as having left £20.000 gross. But there may be £ 15,000 of debts to come off this. YOUR GIFTS "Net personality" may be equally misleading for it doesn't include the real estate— freehold houses or land—you may have owned Assets owned abroad may also result in your wealth being understated. Another point which may puzzle your friends is that duties appear unduly high In comparison with the amount paid on another estate of similar size. This could be due to your having made %  gilts to your wife or friends within live years of your death. Duty will haw d OB them though they do not figure m your estate. —1.1 ~ KlfCtTS ran KVI:IIVOM: RED — BI.l'E —1 AIM PENCILS FUR MARKIMi CLASS ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE N OTIC E Will Our CutODMM please Note that We will noi lie open for Business on SATUKDAY.24tliMareh 1951,and arrange their Shopping aecordingly. WILKINSON ft HAY NFS Co, Ltd. Sueeeiaon To C.S. PITCHER & CO. PHONES : 4472. 4687, 4251, 4413. INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD. THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS PAINTING REQUIREMENTS INSIDE and OUT. For the protection and beautificat.on of your property, we can offer you the following WALL PAINTS "I'ROPELLER" 1>RY DISTEMPER (for exterior walls). Supplied in ixiwder form to be mixed with fresh water — M.10 per 1 cwt. drum. "LAC.OMATT" FLAT OIL PAINT (for interior walls) Supplied roudv mixed-, run be iepeatedl> washed — $7.12 per Imperial gallon. For best results, the following instructions should be carefully followed :— Exterior WalU. 1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a year before painting, Then apply 2 coats of "PROPF.L2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean; and (HI all holes, cracks, etc., with a mixture of plasterofParis and "PROPELLER." afterwards treating these patches with 1 coat of "INTERNATIONAL" CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER. Then apply 2 coats of "PROPELLER." Interior Wall*. 1. For new work, allow the surface to dry out for at least a year before painting. Then apply 2 coats of "LAGOMATT." 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean; and till all holes, cracks, etc.. with plaster-of-Paris, afterwards treatinu these patches with 1 coal of "INTERNATIONAL" CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER. Then apply 1 coat of "LAGOMATT" if the surface was previously of Ihe same shade; or 2 coots of "LAGOMATT" if of a different shade. TRY THESE FINE PRODI I TS OF INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD,. AND BE CONVINCED. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. AGENTS %  ->* %  *•**>',•&•>•* %  *****'. SPECIALS Oat Fluke* 17 per lb. Cook'H Punic M Btr tin lee Cream Powdec 00. per tin rineapjiio Oreaa i* per tin Carrol24 per lb. HOT (^J CROSS BUNS nd J & R Sandwich Bread & Cakes ONLY U SHOPPING BAYS BEFORE EASTER ROLFOAYSSI • FOR YOUR PARTY Milk Fed Ducks Canadian Salmon Hmokod Haddocks, AnchoriM Can's Craam Crackers Carr %  Cocktail Bisculta Orape Fruit Hearts Sliced Mangoes Dutch Cheese Dan! tfi encase Fruit Cake in tins Barley Sugar FINE LIQUORS Oold Braid Rum Saudemau's WlDM Ollbey' Gin Oilbey's Wines Humberts Dry Back Sparkling Burgundy Priinirr Brandy Phone GODDARDS To-day i



PAGE 1

illlKSDAY. MARCH 22, IftSl HXRftAiMiS AliVtK \ll PAGC FIVi: Four Named Justices Of The Peace Two rARisimiMHs 0 r si Andrew and two .1 N J| seph were yesterday minkJtaitaM ot the Peace by the i;< Government House about 10 a.m The two of St. Andrew are Mr E. L. Bannister and Mr Fred A Ingram. Thr other two are Mr Uoyd Smith, M.C.P., and. Mr Prince" Walker. S EVEN more cane (Ires have been reporled and the quantity of canes burnt wafl aataa In nearly all cases labourera assisted in savin* further damage to crop At Hothersal Plantation. St John. 15) acres of second crop ripe MDM were burnt over the weekend They are Ufc of E M Taylor and were insured. Anotht-r week rnd tiro at Staple Grove Plantation. Christ Chun-h. burnt an acrv of second crop ripe '•ii' In-longing to Messrs. General Traders Ltd. They were also insured This brings the number of COM lm over n nine Do Monday ( ; about 830 pin 900 holes of third crop ripe canes were burnt at Strong Hope Plantation They arc the property vl W. T Gooding and are insured A tire on the same day at Easy Hall Plantation. St. Joseph burnt live acres of first crop ripe and seven and a half acres of second crop ripe canes. The canes belong to Messrs. R. &. G. Challenor and were insured. Five and three quarter acres of first crop ripe canes, also insured, the property of the Ridge Plantation, Christ Church, were burnt on Monday night On Tuesday night a lire at Small Ridge Plantation, Christ Church. burnt eight and a quarter acres of second crop ripe canes belonging to G. S Evelyn. They were also insured. Pius £ N T ~ — PROPOSE DRaclio—Telephone Sets Being Tested THE Police are at present testdoor The %  Hutu-. Radioaway communication rocelved In tha i'oii-t W M. \ chiiU .. th< % n ri Armstrong, who is in chine PoUowbuj ._.. ilonei will in tiun When the Adverair VISII.M pi I icport to OoraiWnent *"et "A yesterday a folieil n coneeming (he mtrodi. •'' ""' Station^ Hcul this nKHieir, and extremal] aaatui ,,,,s WBS m contact with VHI In Hank Hall and (hen Cod | Fat thoM lean the soulpmonli rtnflon The reception was ex-1 was loaned to the Police b) afc remel> clear. wltnOUl Un -Li^rit i odlni British manufa* lun i o %  >' uitarft %  V.H F sels The tests will las." for about eight weeks. This %  qUipEBM 'hat which llc.i in .AII ti ^ eenl of the lending Kngli>h|C 4 n .-„ ru !_* %  •> 9 BOVRIL introduces Maralyn THE MILK DRINK THAT OifJJ. EVERYONE ENJOYS. I'urr. BRBBSVi tnuniiy milk . enriched lUwured and iilrcsdy viif,eJ~ \NUtshnMilkPlu*' In**%  hshing milk Junk li aMM dclKhtui ,m I ilir kiJJicv l*c it, (>'! idqiuu i Police MtU** 1 la*fe BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT (36) EUEZOR IIISHOP yasaarda) sentenced to imnrlmnmanl bj Hli Honour i Chief JuaUca, Si. Allan Colly ; ItllKj o! larceny as a bailee a> the Court mi, under the pmvisuf Gt-Ild Sessions resumed silttiu, ions of section 4 of the Special Registration of Voters yesterday THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesleulay passed Resolution approving the Order by the Governor-in-Executive Commitlee made on March '.i. (General Assembly) Act. 1951 The proposals in the Resolution make provision for 66 districts for voters in St. Michael, 27 In Christ Church. 15 in St. Philip, 18 in St. George, 9 each in St Andrew. St Lucy and St. Joseph, 13 In St. John, 11 in St. Thomas. 10 in St. Peter and 12 in St. James. Bridgetown has 14. Mr. O. H. Adams 20 low.ird iihuiium making the suit Within the nexi (e da 0ET YOUR ... i( Butbop, ,i tailor, cloth to make a serge customer on June last value <•' the cloth was S15 and he an ak cost into L'ommtttee < was put and anuMm "Cily Of BridKetown" again motorists, car and 'bus passengers to be extremely careful when thev L ,., "f 1 ^i 10 ... "^'l '? Dealing with the Head City of ~>, A T ITS MONTHLY meeting March 17, the Executive Com :teeof •*-' ivide c oadine nules"fn hich Mr Since that time. Bishop could not equipment will be removed from be found to give cilher the sui. ihslrict "A" t<> Area No 3 at Dis01 the money "B" and subsequent^ to Mr w w if...... K.C told nisirici i> haadqusurtti the COUTl (hat the ease had a ba d 27r 50c SI 20. tZ W Ost, V Fry'a Chocolates In Plastic o taa l< fl tt a. ri ou at X K)' Martipan A Choc tsil 5 In Ega Cup ••>. ea l'r*' Marsipan A Chr. (K 30c ea Dark Carriage with ChoEga ea AIM. Easter Ens % %  20c & 1*e ea AJ IV-eih li.-hiMnis (.-nii.il>.,, evidence. (.uilh of \\ oundinu auin^vini! • ler (L) suggeskd thai consideraboth from taking the census a^ Slid t" "T 1 n *" \^ ,S n Social Welfare OffWr ct snould '"' postix.nod as there milteeof the S.PC.A decided to LffL £r M -. cS\. I "£** ' •* ^ mC v provide canvas slings for the unlllc (; 0V erntnenls best choice rc ,nf v would 1 approving loadnyj of donkeys and small something of which they knew Lsudaao QlbMO (ll who had vessels. The present Anouialie'. nothing. l(p referred lo an inpleaded guilty of wound:ng was system of tying rope round the There would IromnUinU of s,anC€ where he pointed oul that Pl on probation fc^ IH months, animals causes unnecessary suffer.„,„„,.,,,, .„ ,,,. u..„.i,.i ,„ n„ u '"' '1'^'nct run into another. She was represented b) Mi nig Tlu> ue.e ve.v ci^t.iied to ^.h, Uit S* SSSP S Mr. G H A4un said that any Barrow She had no pn hear lhat 80 Elementary Schools !" h*" R^dutiot! but he would ,€ rs n who hnd carendly examr-nvictions. The Chief Justice had decided to form Bands of ,,,,,!,. I,„..,LIHTS to draw to Gov"""^ ,no P'"P*UIR "nd would ro,il111 ,N1 lt wllN prOhaWa II %  < tinMercy and to enrol 2.3fi0 children, irninant'b attention any vorv scrl•"xamine his own arguments, woman whom (Hbapn wounded it was felt that children from the „ us iWiniill could for one inonMCri ODjact ( %  • COUld have been the aggressor age of y yoara %  houhl ba eligible Mr. Adorns recalled that the 1tl e proposals. He ararned hai that II ihe nembership and any Head island had been so divided as to He pointed out that tbfjre .. n brouhla axxu she might *•< each for Pul on IVobutioii Teachers with applications from approximate In "each district' "a '*" legal declaration ol I ro.nl h*. M group should include numbtr >f 450 volers There had ing called by a particular Dan them in the Band. Membership bean complaints that that number and in some eases it was not cards are being printed and was too small. The small suhspecifically known where n roao badges made and details concerncommittee that had gone through by a certain name began and port* fOUI VOBI < %  1 S %  a n le ivhere it ended. As "I st",',. Y,'„.' being cottcernad oven whoYe foimllv „, MVm| ,„,,„.,, %  ';' tl h '' public mischief was put .* KI— wS Hionlha' proboUon Stanton further advice, and taUnrj account experiences obtained from the Trinidad Elections. Joseph if the dual scheme is apQoveanaMOt This location is chosen in order to get the m.ixiniuni radio coverage of tin island and the Station will be UO adended but will be controlled b> radio link from Police lleadquari;rnlgelown where the Control ftoom for the entire Police radio natWOCfc will lie located and from which all patrol cars can ba directed to the scenes ot crimes Th.V H r Hadio Te.eph.im equipment Mill he inslalhd ;• i .in., hoadquarteri 1 for EASIER inn aillvilK-s lhat CM b* uncU-r|ha FTI.IU.'I MI Chaw. IhiAltofcHI will Ixsent mil as soon as lorni-v (ivnetal and hlniMlf li.ul possihlr aflpr thr Ra*1rr Imlidayn Grenadu Gams ^ ield Due To Good Rainfall DONALD MASON been laM that the numbei was too his particular dl trlci MIL ill Hut the, had decided to n0 cd nol be horatast .Lick to that number following wouUI ^ r ,i nle< | ou| to him b' "<" the Registering Ofleer. Tl.el.elai Mr E D. Melller lhon wcn <.n the Resolution There could be numerous people in the island no objection, he thought, because who thought that the GovernSalvation the Resolution had to be studied m ent was deliberately holding un Slant. Mi. Inspector Maso the Departn ad Agriculture In Grenada, told Un %  arefully. Hon. members had been the passing of the proposals ton used to sleep at the host ce engaged In the consideration of o,j y | ast week ho n ld ttCfn m A condition of the probation of the Estimates for the past few i orme d by an official connected 'hat Stanton must conttn< 10 permit the vehieli tached to each "f them and t I %  idled with two %  ystem, t i.ii ttu area boadqu a i i.i s io which they jr. attaohai without rel.iMii tiitough tha Police Control st„ l* Hon. Tbe-.. %  rea headquarb n "' therefors t. %  %  ported to the PoUca eorlj on the gut* irtlculei ai morning of December :il last M .ii ib-ii ha bad been robbed of wiai — -^9 money by two men al the polnl of a gun. Investigations proved At that that statement was not true Hiidgctuwii, and provided Mr. Edwards, custodian of tha ';" '''V ,'"'. '"'T'I '. all l f ,lP Army hostel. gave >"' Barbados Telephone Co good character. Stan.operation :I. %  the davs and might not have been with this thing, that right and %  *•* >* lc hOfteJ and not go 'lei il ik shut for the in.JU Advocate lhat the cultural operaable to pay the attenUon to the ell hp nad liecn ul( m sunH tioius of cane cultivation in BarMe ^J"V" ll "^rved parishes that the Labour Oovarnbados were nol only beautiful. ?^^ n ,* J2, wJ^?i ->•• " mpnl dW no r lly '^v"' 1 U> m but W superior to those in *-nned £f^>^" "1" s.itute the districts or ge, th. Grenada. In Grenada, hi said that they Mtl harI an<: omo olhpr pnrlrin matter dealt with before the and [ of the year. He was not prepared to accept any blame whatsoever Ruby llrnn put i for any" delay. It did apiwar that for 18 months in the sum of £1(1 some member* were playing Into -She pleaded guilty earlier in (hi better rainfall they got which ,ms knowledge helped them quile a lot. T,.;J,.J %  %  'he hand, of their enemies. sessions lo house breaking f"' ""•" %  J * ;po.'e h0 .i!S, n .ST8f\35T.£ SVr^^M !" ''"p "'" a ,, ii ..,.,. ,n^. !" n f w hal had happened In Trinidad tcrs "'"id, or thai Government Mr. """",'''" ,;.'"', n, .'l t ' during Ihelr elecl,on< He loo had Hill .., Covernmenl Hill, and hi,i lonit %  ion lure. Mm now ^^ ^ M ^ TlMlU|n|| | „,. ll ,„ ls ,„, lkr llul lherc was oqullll no u?"-Iw .K^. k. . QB mn olad Wilh a due respect to Mr. to describe a road by name. He said that he was verj glad rh anvone else who helped Mr Aiema reulicd that whci. coniiiromi!*. Wttb rega-d lo Ihc hl re was a u ,h. because III Memhern would tinti -IK Ihev ,.demands for w,g ,hose days Ihere was one presid"' r h „" lhal L lam.l, ,r hishTin OMUl ol I'.lue Coiutabl. Labour eondlllon. In Barbados Ing ollleer lhal was not the ease w '"7 wcr ,? a ao ,( ,„, ^SS CBIUlo CuniWrbaKh look place rJ,ft&iSjr-''JS n,s,rie„ ,_, inclusive ~ f^B5>ff ££* "Boundar> Line" throughout the Barbados Polu ihe Barbad conjunction with their automatic exchange, then will be provided, for the use ol the general public, UM emergeno telephono lystem known as PW. With the 999 system a inonbtl of the public, who may require %  arvlcai ol tha Police., fin : an ambulance, will IH gbla to gel iiny of these by simpl.v di.dllng nine three times anr. imiiiedlutely tr the Pollcf lolopnona operator. Thi pi i ratot "in an wai by saytm "I'olice, Kire ot And, ini iii turn the porter, will loll Un -ator which seiv.ee is re<|uireu made to Mutt nacaaaary informa showed that Hon Henn used to work at the woman I 'HI Uian, If ihe whose house she had broken and ii-ivice lequired is Police, imme entered, but nOVOl ItWd 10 dlatelj K-m where the near remunerated. ' '"'" %  "i"'I'l'"' 1 patrol vehnli ON £10 BOND FOR HOUSE BREAKING he could m breaking Into paople'i houai PC Cuntherbatcfa were not only better man in use to-day. He had seei in (;renada. but they were better Michael lhat bv 10.30 a.m. wlthcontrolled and he thought that out any rush at all, 450 people P* they could do with tome of the had polled experience In the general labour operations here Assize Jury Fail To Agree After about an hour': lion, on Assize Jury failed to agree or. a verdict in ConMCtlOfl artttl .i charge of buggery brought against St flair Foster of Green Field*. J"; Dealing with Dletttet 66 rolling Booths Mottley said that the He observed, according to the town Boundary Line" proposals, that there would now fined differently by various Acts. be 66 polling booths He felt that Mr Adams replied that there this would entail great expense was only one "Bridgetown and difficulty Boundary Line' M dofl n ad b> Mr. Mottley said thai ax regards ,)ie Bridgetown, Holetown and thi polling at the l*ooths he speighutown Consolidated Act thought that 800 people could poll Fur „„. ,,ur]>o*cs. M y .,j publh delibcraquite easily at any booth from Health. Bush Hall might be conam. to 4 pm It was hardly likely Bid( ied a wllhin thf Bridgetown that what had happened in Trln. ; a but lhill dld Ml)t make ,d would happen here because of Bush |(fl|| g ^ of lill6l[l UlWII S t M^hael^esterd^slVung "tgcj ^ffjjjfj^f^jgj^. JSnJS^J^ff" •' f^fusrvpKU& s^^gas "aft— -tr a represented by Mr. J K T j Bmes eral as well as specific instrucBrancker They did not want an unneces'""• lo the proper can The foreman of the jury, when Sflry numDCr D f booths and officers of iheir work. tsked If the jury had aareed on ant f henc# unnecessary expense District B was parsed, and u a verdict, informed the Court They wan ied lo see everyone regwere all the remaining district thai there was no likelihood of ister and vote in reasonable comin Bridgetown St. Michael and that lury reaching a verdict fort. But he still felt that BarbaUie other parishes were passed Bail was granted the defendant dians were intelligent enough ^^^_^^^^ In Ihe sum of £100 with one that 800 voters could go to ited and will, by th* • %  „ cently been compkted In 1 If a verv em>\ ,nd ,he ** nc,nl P"''lic have rulh n.~.. adequate f.nl ng them to the a u torce was alwuvs of a verv cx.l %  "" "T **V.," *' ..erid^V^rT^rv : %  md to all with whom he cam.|(( „, t))lv-nl()tir ... 'Many cases, of what could He was one of the leading ni vp lM .,. n „..„„„, jwault an marksmen In the loli,.force f"r ...,. r ,.„, l)V ,.„,,,, patrol cars in tha pi I ran %  •i and m I %  M mm ,,, "the w call, in one member of the Barbados Bit' %  particular instance the 990 call n. rety LANDING LIGHTS AT SEAWELL booth, and quickly grasp what they had to do. even though many Of them would be voting for the drit time. Mr L. E. Smith (Ll criticised the wording of the Resolution where It mentioned Highway 2a. Highway la" etc He himself Approve Erditftmi Extension THE House of Assembly terday passed an Address to the (;o\emor saying they approved Erdistor. .t passed by (he LegisThe landing lights at Sea* which were used for Ihe first l earlier this week war* used again dld not UIM>rflind hfw high2? the nteniion of last night when a B W.I A waySi on(| he lhoug nt it would Training Coilaaje A Special Flight bringing Vcneiue,.,,. | wc u. address was passed by t lans here for Easter arrived at n e thought it would have been -"^ v ^ Council last Tuesday S< i ..ell shortly before 8 o'clock better to slick to the names of the The House appo H W f A have obtained special roa ds. permission from the Govemmen' He did nol agree either with Governor's Message relating tto use lighst during the E Central re not yet had been done. He thought the> Milk cpected would find that in ome cases, a The House adjourned until be shortly. voter living on one tide of a road, Thursday. March 29 at 3 p m. RIP Association He was Laid to t i 'v. ,. received during the nigh ,i ih,. si .lame-, Cemetery w I i i, m. ., reainanl ol rod of span military horsoura In lha praaa %  I %  afrad that suspicious look of a large gathering irg people were in a hOuaa Mod BUek Magic (hoc. 4 Oli box Fry'a Aunt, rhee • >i 13 A St 21 box i .011.111 % Aasl. %  fj 3 X 9 bsx Lane Hoxm of Fr> (hue I S4 54 ea. Meltls Favourtlr Canriko %  > li.iz si as box Nestle'* (hoc. <> l li box Mrllli Coffee Choc Mini ( reams '• fl 2Z box I. 1 ~ I'rlnresa Choc f Mr. All 69 box Fry's Choc Almonds t box Fry's llatel Nut Char Z -, ID I tl.1t box l>r>\ llarrl Nut Char 8 tin Csdliuo's Milk Tray Q |/i A tl 1Un (adbur>\ Hoses § 3 9 tl.48 tin Cadburt's lied Kose %  < ""He & $1 80 l.ov Sdlleri l-.iiuir file tin Jscoh'D Crrsm Oa.kfis 11.61 Un Mi-Ills Kovsl I'rln.cii Al SI KS box Fancy Itlscults in Cello Prks. Ite |)k Fanry Hlftruils in Alrlishl Pkx I/pk Hutlrr Scfll.li |1| pk A 4.1c Un Mnugat 34c pk A 70c Un Kuyal Nrolch Shorlbrrad SI 38 tin Mum Bars 14c. ea Great Bars h ra Fur the Best ef • EASIFK F.tHiN" A"Confeelie.ner> Visit liiiiu; WEATHERHEAD in 111101 s |.\## ATTMACnVE EASTER EGGS NFSTI.KS CHOCOLATI BOOS I L'^< aOc SI 20 & S2 00 each KRVS CHOCOI ITU Plastic Eggs a tl 22. s: Also NOVELTY EASTER EGGS EAS1F.H (ONHXilltNIRl BLACK MAOIC CHOC tl.15. $2 02. S4 08 TR\ CHOC I tile, 91.01 FHYS PEPPERMINT CHOC FltY'S C1H ICOLATES Large Boxes MK1TIS TWIN PACK. KAVOt'HITK CANDIFS K NEWBURY ntuirs CRYSTALLIZED PRUIT $2 40 & S2 72 Hox SHARP'S rOPFXI 1/1 aVfl l/t KlNKJIITS U\l-ALL BRANCHES I Al Ian yiiu iixi >sn h kend *.i ha* nutnl >u> h %  HHHIII 1.1 ri.11 as >'< ii 1 •Hfe iliai SB csn UN n, Inwiullya 10 any iVxiit Vod BCfd it ID p" tug MptM ami %  a ufcgtMnl atatBsf allli>rni'i>l uilri>~>n l.ilcauard 11 plcaumlv hiKmni. LIFEGUARD 11 H I C I D f AND ANTISEPTIC 11 Ml I III ll01 o( Ilmad Si l\. S. BRYDEN & SONS (Biios) LTD.—Agents 11 in 1 in 1 a PURINA I POULTRY CHOWS a JH. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Di.tribmor.. Black Patent Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. THE FAMILY CAR Tiuluxuioualy upha %  comfort lassenaers. Il Is economlcnl In hnv an-i > %  VANGUARD FO* VALUE VWI '<> naii E Oui Q it is now open irom 1 inrludinjt Bund II is lo lie remembered that K •* UORQUOHLV SERVH It ulll pay v 1 Ik until 10 p.m every day mpYirlant I CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LIMITED Pinf.ili! Strati, BIMIIIIIWII. I



PAGE 1

I'U.l EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY M.MM II 22. IMI Barbados Defeat Grenada In Final Game 3-2'lZ'^^2 VISITORS FIGHT HARD TO SCORE THIRD GOAL THE COLONY XI ck-fealed Grenada in their final football Axture at Kensington ytaterday cveiling by three %  to two in a tame garr*. At hall tune the *eore i .i imw vm Hiiinsii in favoui of %  ". I Blades playing at ini for the colon) opened | fr the Colony The other tw<> jBI were seen Tor Grenada. Berkeley and Tony IN The r.:ime Yantcrpool Victor I. in Jorum Robert Vanterpool of So: D wan declared Victor UI.IOI.INI Mien lh annual .ithletie sport.s ai itB J frooi Foundation School. Christ Church %  rn end and within five ended yesterday. mfftUte* %  play, the, Colony scored Rather big and tall tor his ?' Keeper Stede mbued M Vanterpool also headed his • uvision Division 5 — with 28 iMlde l oint-. The champion Set was C. Slioitly afterwards, the Colony with 150 points followed l.v Set attacked and laicas made a ROO.1 D. 104|. A7O and B-flJ^ points. effort ironi outside th. The d..y was fine ind itutrad. but the ball missed %  * There weie 31 events e cot n pie Its* bar by inche5 The Grenada front line then no". 14 nf which hMadaj the most thrilling and wide Grenada made another attack in Class I which E. Browne ot Set K won In this race there wei'e tw > false starts hut even their opponents goal a nr from the Argentine Football \*MKUtiun to play six matches at a guarantee of £2,000 for each, • L.nave not yet been able to complete negotiations. Wi are as anxious as anybody tc get things settled." Mr Rowe said, "but they have not told us yet where the games will be played, or more important, what arrangements will be made to enable u< to have them over in this tountry I hope we hall hear i.ii i n .in; definite soon —Heater of his bom again %  > Frankfurt and won their match aisiMMt Uie Cams Club by thro* boutto two. The Oermans will also awet th* Lvte Boxing Club before returning to Cli-many — Expren. Englail(l-.Y /calami Test Drawn Bailey 134 Not Out CHRIST CHURCH. NEW ZF.A1.AND. March 21. The Best of the two Test mutches Holkar Wins Ranji Trophy For Third Time A ,:i. for the race but only four finished Grenada opened their seorinu Ar,PT 'he sports Mr E Thenwhen Mrl-et*l at outside left iu,i ••"* %  Assistant Director of Educa down n. beit full back on prewn^o the prizes to the Gibbons and centre:! t i anlr ".""ICV The Judges wri1, Ml hall Berkeley lo bent Smith with %  J %  '"*• %  ••••. K. G Allryno a good shot from closo up. '''' ,l L E Jonw Soon afterwardi Orcn*da Following are the results of th. launched another attack. Phil Edevents:— waras after beatliiR the Colony'** half backs, paaaed to McLeod on ih left whig who eantra I, Borkcley who was on the run headed i,oalw..rds. but the ball fl Thp interval was tjkeri I'.'I I -core 2—1 in favour of :lie colony. Second llitlf present MX. in a araw here to-day. in reply to New Zealand's t'rst innings score ol 417 for 8 wicket* declared England seored &M). and New Zealand loM J second innings wlCaWtg for 40 runs before the* mulch i-idt d A featuc Ol th • England lnnuagl was a not out century— IJ4 seored a grand 187 In Holknr's lint THROW IN u me IIUKIT gUUX -by Truvor Baile>'. the England innings and A K. M Rangekar ^ %  t^V*^. 1 ' %  '* %  howler, who scored with hit 97. Gu|erat replied gamely delightful freedom after taking after losing Test allrounder V: Savannah Club IVnnit* T< > II r 11:11 nr 111 VESTERDAY'S RESULTS lADir* IISUUI Mis* Pllerlnt b* B | Mr. M Unr O O MIVl li lli>l III I Fjrrlirni'i |he Ooverntu and Ljidv and Mr. V D. Esmn INDORE, March 21 Holkar won the Ranji trophy for a x .* K 'he cricket championship of India M „ R B B-IM ., 0 „ for the third time when they beat ir, bi MIU, Ea i Gujerat by 186 runs with 40 mln'*""" utes to spare hero to-day. Holkar u scored 428 and 443 and Gujerat o-4 replied with 327 and 356. MV.H-* SINOIXS ERNIESUNION PARK EASTER MEnTNG Fi lends ar attend kindly nsked to t 5 JO sharp. On Thur. March 22nd ii the Call Over on the I Daj onlj inn on tho 24th M.iich Pari Mutael Commissions executed on any race at th.; meeting Usual Cold Buffet hors d'oeuvre Turkey and Ham f N. G. a Sons' Special Home Made Sausages Special Purity French Patties and Mince Pies Peach Melon. Etceteraa, Eteeteraa COUGHING fe ^$ IS DANGEROUS Stop rota tvuah t> BMUM l aw I awasttmaai Tt world -faaMoa naaady tswiaaig eaif. W MTOWM, % %  jftf id protein the lufigi. 'AMflTftlMCOr fV coixun • cot*, -aaeboiiT juiaasa %  UIMMUI mi. JKIGHI CWf— KITE UGH MIXTURE PAPER & TWINE D Trim • bent J s I'.f Indian Test player Mushtuq All On resumption the Colony we.*e first on the offensive but Blades their Inside right kicked over from inside Uie %  I BRU*y—ItfBdM in l*t—a>i A. md 8*1 C, 3rd Srt n ini' nilM. THR i li" hi 1 IVI I icuAaa ii III >'dl a ft. 1*1D Jonn. Ind T. r;r.hjim. 3rd Ev*rtl*r and Suiki i i.osf. iinr (CBMB II II (l II.. 1.1 II Km*. Ii.il Mo .;. %  Ird J Claik*. I I .>S'. 'I Ml' |(bU >l 14 (I • InIM-Wallhr. 3nd It Cl.-iikr. ltd D Jo>**. I.OMJ ii Mr ifiMi ti Orenadu got their second goal n. I aav in H. King. Ind PUgrfen when full back Ulbbons kickea f0 goal kaapat smith u> clear but the latter wai mil ihere ?rd WatOM ami gwartMQ and Tony Hcnwlck pounced on '• %  %  !" >**-£* ine ball a nd crashed it into thr ^ waiiw net*. % %  aina Jtue i. s. Tho game at this stage grew 3 %  !"', !'• \Vsmu-iponi. ind Wi more imerestmc as Crennda on ",*%iTYiauj£tUM s> the one hand tried lo equalize I*-*. Ctariw, tad n j< !" e*. and she Coli ny on the other tried Waiihe .1 Ml, |, LI 1 D. Jon**, '.'• %  V 1SII1-K l..i H lil J. flnik*. ?nd Go-tdiFip. ptlariaj ,. MIDI I IJf.UIII KM I --"IiItlThou..i. Aim Bn %  .1 Hi* VAl OH IIUII 31. md. I -i I** V4IDH-KU* It. Itl It (iiiidlntf. Slid II lllffilniL 3rd Piumm. Timt M 13 i*c. in Taaa— (CIM* n. 1.1 F mown*; Tnd Thomai. Ini H ricv Tim* 10 4.S %  **• • IMI VAHOS—iriu* i: I.i N Walrond. Ind C Ktna; 3rd C t> put them'dve. tinther in the van. II' .-, M I % % %  I f viMt.'i-' outside left sent in a i;oo.l (Tort iiin goal-keeper Bmltli wai .veil III position and had no difllculty in saving. Play wag how traniferred to the visitors goal area and then defence was kept busy for some time as tho Colony's front men tried to OQfl The hall ;., how.ver .em mil Ton) Renwick cot possession and raced down the Held. He sent m a good one which Smith saved, In *ptte of Rome good effortr by both teams to score the pin (iided with the Colonv winm-i • i v mree goals to two The referee was Mi I t The learns were as follows: — Iiland Smith; Gibbon On it; F Nut .it. (iittens; Chase, B' Ml LUCBI and Clark*, no HUIIMH mid Fnrd* Willnrrs Oreaada Steeic. R Renwick Husband* Kmcht: Uerk'lov Hul bands; A Renwick; Edwards. Cumming-.. Fletcher and McLeod %  p' (our and a half hours NF.W 7.KAIAND-U1 lnnln> H< nki drcUrrd FNU1JV.NI> l>1 INNi.HC.ft Hullun b M..11 Wagharoi I i Uaanffi | M % % % %  aaageafl < Wallw* b Moir i\.nij.i..ii h Hut l: nallry no! out Brawn c Kcoll b frr-.-.H Evan. •• lUvrn b Moir l"fd-*r c rUFM b Mr.it T-ltriMll Ii M..I. Urlghl .• M.M-C1IM>.>II b i % % %  -i-i. -i >tl b MMr rsu (aVM , lr II Total noWMNC ANAI VMS O. U R ll.vr. 41 11 %  SUcOIBtoo.. M • 7. Bum *• a S.OU 1 0 KEW 7F-AIANH %  %  MacaiUbxt. %  gvani i' ll-y* lbl> W...l.bfook C-*a*rlt iRv.i • It m D*nn Moir mil awl £roti not ui T '.I iftt 3 wirkMo 40 % %  asalM Udiea Will Enter Water Polo Contest Mankad for 11, but a sparkling 234 by C Sarawale helped Holkar to set their opponents the task of getting MS for victory in their last innings. Gujerat lost live wickeu for 123 by lunch to-day but in | lighting linlsli they added another 233 before their second innings ended ha defeat soon after tea. Allrtundcr a dashing 152 hours.—Krutrr, i Patel scored i )utt over two THE Barbados Wider polo and Swimming Association held U*BU Annual Meeting at the Aquatic • %  "'am'i'AKiia' "i\' \T' Club yesterday evening when it I.I BV*M*.U ""< %  'w irmmiii *' %  unanimously decided thai jrd U siiv*r Tun* it i .1 -*tthree Ijidies teams will IK> formed Vr%SSTl!?S '.'., " | ** .'^.' ^?"r.n.,l Orakaai. is n 10 in. 0ver za K |ris hav ti. eia mDH-n.11 t their wish lo form teams and six i.t w...... ad 1 i.d aaarta others are not yet definite. The %  rial VABDali('! % % %  j) ladiea will practise for several .1 n vaniMpooi: ind i. Si v*. Sri weeka before they form then The Weather TO-DAY Mun ![]-, %  1, in 4 111 Sun Srli: ti 10 9 m Moon (Full k March 23. Lighting: 630 p m High Water: : >l m 4 II YKSTKRIIAY Rainfall tCodrlnglon) Nil Total for Month to Yesterday : .22 In. Trmpe.-alure N N.E (Ipm)NNi: Wind velocity 15 Baikal ptr hour. Baromrtrr (9 x.m ) 29.861 (3 p m ) 29 K89 I n a Ml \ ~ OOI III t t< N. H.....I. and P K Bnn.h lo1 in II A Nlcholland T. A CJillnn -4 TODAY'S nXTl'RK i Aim 1101 BI.. Has B. S Banrrnfi and Ml D. W.iod v. Mra. C. B Lev and Mr. C. I. 5lkliin*r What's on Today irt of Court of flrand Sessions —10 a.m. I'ollce Court* and Original Jurisdiction —10 a.m: Mretbig of the Sanitary Commissioner* or Ht, Michael—10 a-m. Sale, at the office of thr Ovneral Motor Bu Co.. one Austin, 1950 Model, A-10 (damaged in arc! dent) — Z p.m. Sale— Furniture .1 "Waat. field. Pine 11111—2 p.m. Mobile Cinema gives a show at rheeker Hall Pin.. Yard, St. Lucy—7 p.m CINEMAS * %  A "h*Ui ..( Kl" — *.:. nil p.m ' %  ' o not slop in t f Che nud lo like IP middle up some ipj.c mane available by CANADA I>RY for Safer Rnotorlng. IV.lnm. fl. fl* I v l: 1 %  ||. 1.1 Brown*; Ind Mowlrv; 3rd (iiv M. nan uiiiiin BA< a— ii aa. IJovd and Moi(iaii Ii.d Waith *, 3rd Blaeknui" and NII.M II Mr HUaa 1.1 O Thiuv 1ml can %  "' I %  -• llnirhl S u I m. IV IN TABOR— ICteM II. hi Wa'rona. Ind M Klin. Ini C Ki.x • M'lroaaBAt-r.-ioirbi in M l.b>vd. Ind O Brown* ' II* VABII-— %  {' %  •*. Ii 1-1 H 1 I..MI 2nd A Pile* 3rd ml I* individual teams. With reference to new teams lo I the League, l-odgc School wen I very keen on entering the E*aagiH but due to lack of fund* for transportation they wenunable t<-1 enter a team Harrison College also expressed j the wish to enter a **arr but ai 1 several members of the varlou* I clubs In the Association are pupilof Harrison College they ari u) 11 only agree to enler j team ii these players were allowed to represent j Vi %  — M*II. dp,,,. the College with the iindentandlni I 11 D Ltovd Hid ( UM.I.1. jrd w**k*. that when Ihcv left school lhc\ ^—— could rejoin the clube they ned U EXTEND CONSCRIPTION p ,a y '. They however stressed the faci BRUSSELS. March 21. that they left the matter entlreK The Belgian Senate Upper in the hands ol the captains of IfU Ik use to-day passed a Bill exteam* Involved and would abide b> ttiiding the period of military their decision. This matter eral serviei ror Belgian conscrlpis also relerred to the council. fiom twelve months to two years The tentative date for the | The Bill, already approved by thrbeginning of the 1951 nenson wl Lower House.'.becomes law. fixed for the first week In Jun —Renter. ,hai in. after the Football season They'll Do It Every Time No MATTER WHAT THE BCAUTy OP SAYS, OTRONELLA WANTS HER HAlR DONE THE WAy SHE rVANTS IT •• --By Jimmy Hado BUTfRJOOLPI SAA IT Or3 TVA MALF fOMPACOO^, AND THEN THE 8AC< COMES UP AUD OVE"? IN SORT O* A SEMI-9UNrim I-:II ALLEYNE ARTHURS SPECIAL RUM In. I lilWill Policyholders and all others concerned please note that the office of this Society will not be opened on SATURDAY, 24th March. C. K. BROWNE. Secretary. Phone 4267 for SWKD1SH 6-PANK1. DOORS I'xlv W thick 7' x I'll" x l'l" thick These are well made Wooden Doors at low prices. STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS Mi" thick, V x 6', 8', 10' long 3/16" thick. fxK long SURINAM PLVWOOD. best quality Mi" thick. 4' x 8' long Vt" thick. J' x 7' long RED CEDAR SHINGLES DOUGLAS FIR JOISTS & PLANKS Phone 4267. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. Agradable Deiicioso Rico HUEVOS DE M PASCUA lh PARA QUS SE ALEGREN SUS NIN'OS DEBE DARLES UN HUEVO DE CHOCOLATE DE PASCUA LLENO CON MARZAPAN— EMVUELTO EN PAPEL EN HUEVKRA DE PLASTICO V TAMBIEN EN HUEVOS DE PLAST1CO LLENOS DE ALMENDRAS TOSTAOAS TAMBIEN PROVEEMOS UNA SELECCION COMPI.ETA DE CONF1TES EN CAJAS LUJOSAS GALLETAS DE COCKTAIL GALLETAS DULCES EN LATAS LUJOSAS ETCETERA ETCETERA EN LA. Booker's <'' D0S > Drug Stores Ltd. E.ROAD STREET asul ALPHA PHARMACY (HABTINOR) WHHHHHBHHHP r? i = s Tr X! 'Wf l f9Htl^m9Ktm' Ki---1*



PAGE 1

nil RSDAY, M \li( II 21, 1851 IIAKilAUos ADVOCATE I'M. I IIIKII STRATEGY IS T HE M ED : WHAT IT MEANS FRANCE >~'\/~r ITALY! ? %  *%. 7 / SPAIN /-* to -jrt S. \ /z* OL imtH i< M.:re Em 1 tap* i'i M"M u ft* MtJ4.rawM ISRAf L,V% ""I I 1lM -j' > ^ygi~? ?&& Industries General OB Trial For War Crines On Increase \ 1 I.IKD strategy in the guarding I lie oilfield<.f ihe MMN ItJI* WHttfll tawfl Mediterranean b cancanMiddle But HAIU a,,fl yyW* arc •" ac Irited ull keeping open ViUI \luiig ihr Norlta %frlrn roast ""* %  ' drfi-nrc. %hippiiif, l.mr and \.t\* lie a iti.nn of sea and air bases Soviet aiellii. MatM I'm.Iei -I kagealavai RiV. %  -.Hi- i" lbs irAMnMHU from her Hl.vk "-ra p4 00 were grunted. At tins meeting it v.. that m future an amount of 40 per tent, of the coat of the boat or $400 00. whichever 1* Mat, should be loaned towards the bulldJni of a new boat Fishing operations Wfl recount of the aver changing weatner conditions which prevailed during tha month of Febroarj 1 ring pniut* Hying Ban far off 11 %  and a fi la to maka the difficult trip Then UlNO dfi> of vary beavj wlndi a b considerable damage to the sails of iv boat* hud tl men on Inn alert This unusual : i was tallowed by thraa U four days of gat calm, a week of rain and %  fui It should unotad %  1 %  me boats broil good catch%  of flyll •: %  crmen m talM Dalphln catches onth were at>. I lur this time of tic J %  Owing to bad weather condiBnaaataaaaar (eun %  try to taw book ftftw DOall during the mODth. Investlgater also earned 011; era t ions on the aoul banks ofl .1 itkm of iiuking Han un i on King Bab wara praaent on both Middle and London Shallows. 1 betti U in on any %¡ thai It is rninurngine to record that about tlHying fish boats arc using gill-nets for tlying Jlsh capture with favourable IHMTICUH Column: Flashback To A Night In 1931 . SAUDI ARABIAN OIL C URO, March 19. Princa 1 of Saudi Arabia, dd Kara to-day. nntkninUaatlon o( I'erkian ml "will not affeet the Saudi Arabian oilfields in the least-. Pram R. M HiofiOlI NEW YORK The course of world tUBUiy hung in the balance on a night In December 1931 Then Winston Churchill, jumping out of the wrong side of his New York taxi, was knocked down by amh' 1 llo was on his way to dine with an old friend, American cldt-r statesman liernard Baruch. But he had to go to hospit..| Now America Is a little worried over Churchill's friend For Baruch, 80, hurt a leg white fi his horse in South Carolina, and was rushed back to New York by.plane. The counsel of Baruch is slill regarded as invaluable by PraalDd common men |UjM Whiti he n>eak.s the nation listen*. And with all his great gifts he is no! aloof but warm and A NEW STWMNG among the Oil of northern Califonui h;is sent hardened veterans off n.. ( a ton. And even al that •exorbitant price Spain insists on D scarce copper, nickel, or tin WHILE Barbara Hutlun is buy down Mexico way. trying '.o divorce Prince Igor Tioubetskoy. porflrio Rublrosa, Dominlran Republic diplomat and former husband of tobacco hieress Doris Duke, turned up, in New York to pi od % %  week on Doris's New Jm < %  farm. "We are belter 11 lends than ever." said Porflrio. Till MOST REVEREND Richard Cushing, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston, is against letting Ms join the army. He would emerge "immoral, I .ireligious. heavy drinkers, gamblers, and just plain no M*YBF you thought cattle rustling I thine of the past" Alabama has just had the worst year in Us history, with lOO.UOO A llm (C35.7141 worth of cattle stolen And things will get worse 1 rieaa ara *tiii rising BAnTOaX GROVE stole some mm from n Bronx flat. Then he H to Harlem, walked into a pool-room and tried to interest one of the players In buyim; them. He wns arrested The pool playar wai Uieman who owned the Hills. "A small world." said SamueT sadly. PLENTY of people were already Veen to find new uranium depoiit' Now they will be even keener The Atomic Energy Commission 1" offoruig bonuses of up to 3.">.0ni) dollars (£12,495 ( for now cover irs AMERICANS : heard all the raasOM lor divorce. Not'so. Giving evidcni-,. In .1 DIM where his wife. Aftynna nwcfuddei.. allege' inU>. husband Berwyn (son of fl^ physical cultura authority Macfadden) ndmitte-1 he UUW* a plato ot her .salad against tho dining-room u.dl "I" told her flve separate times not to put ureon peppers in my salad." he said. "But whan it happened again. 1 threw That's all". SERGEANT Onn <,.. home from the wars, to Columbus. Georgia. He is auargk to wool And his skin just cannot stand the G I. winter undies. THE EIRE BRIGADE Ion. California, is worn out A farm blaze lasted more than ten hours, becini'.' ?vu | Uma the) sol one shed of hay under control flaming mU dashed bsta tdieil ami touched that off THE MAN wno played clonic barman in "LOn W< Howard da Silv. Together with Oacar-winning actress Gale Sondeganrd. h v has been ordered lo appear bafort tb< Convrass Un-American Activities Committee. Says Howard They want lo silence me Mr. Louis Lav* Visits St. Vintfiit KINGSTON. M MR. LOUIS LAW. 1 Secretary of the Caribbean Interim.Tourism Committee arrived 111 St Vincent b> llnlih (luian.i Airways on Tuesday 13 and was a guest at the Blue Caribbean Hotel Mr. Law wus taken around by Mi C u. Huggins^—Secretary of the si. Vlncanl Tourbri Board—to see many places of interest including Touer Hotel, Hail" the Aquatic Club at Villa and Indiun Bay as well as several other beauty spots. Mr Law attended a meeting of the local Tourist Hoard and told members that St. Vincent had all the natural nttraclinn for tourists and that at the moment khan W N adequate hotel accommodation for them. The important problems al the moment, he said, were, tlrst, to let people outside, particularly 111 America, know about St. Vinteni. und secondly bo pfOVMa prona 1 trananoi 1 fSoa lr get lo St Vincent. With regard to Ihe first. Mr. l^aw promised to give SI. Vincent It* share Ol publicity In Travel Trade 1 well as in other American magazines. The transport problem, he felt, would best lie solved by providing a 15 to 20 passenger amphiNew Indus! rial Order Is Here Governor 0/ St. Thomas And St. John Says ... Sl fi and St nor Morris %  -.mi •M tortunata to %  exemption .. %  .' .1 %  %  r the esi iblUimani %  1 from othei Industrial 1 n 1.1%  1^ island* I Ol U11industrial i.niei 1 baUava, night maka 11 fa U t" ie-e\.iNilnv -. %  ihc ptoluMrias and our working paoplO Al the time oui Vnigl ami 10 iliought %  1 to Ho typa if indus%  %  f III.I.n 1 act may irtaedL Wiihm the framewor k of our laws. .•* %  should lonsidei. as ill • A.MIIIU'IH and many states have done, the enactmenl of a piovision in our v. which will create special mdusmiOtO dilerinin %  N Kcoimmic Serfdom Of COUI I] have to ci ntunw the protactiOfi 1 I ..II sngaa, and %  ealllni %  1 I would like lo reiterate my iieuvt in favour nf IM bi'st working conditionv. iir M •ur working people. We have not had, nor will we n rmlti 1 < %  kkMn of any kind. W ( rocognl %  %  %  cd. soelall) We shall exp' i %  1 i'i agBtai Capita] lo bo fi • dealings with Labour. In ihe light of this pollex 1 ltd sueli revision of tt as may 1 %  11 with proap* : discussions with labour lenders." D I l'l~H|l ino. We also advued tha on l nieihiKl of arriving at a more accurate estimate duo of ihe lourtst tradu to the Colony. Mr Law returned to Trinidad on Friday morning by the Lady itodiiD. : .11 1 I anthu laam about tourism in St Vincent. U.S. DOUBLE ARM FORCES 0) From Pair t Truman's announcement was a new warning to Soviet Russia lhat Ihe United States "in mmpan) with other free nations" lab nttnad "to aataMlah and maintain orlii pi lie imphaslsad the ?.peed with which the United States u rebuilding its defences by disclosing Marshall's telegram which gave the si/e of the country's armed fonts as double what H .1 on June 25. "This doubling ol oui sliength has been accompli:iheed with which we hjivibaan ahla to stronglheu our defences should be a source or Inspiration and I'IH'HII sgwoanl t> where who love freedom It is evidence of oui determination In company with other frea nations, to aataUtab and maintain the world'-, peace "i am eoafl i nt ngl imdoi %  1 • %  •. lead %  1 QU "-ill IHfully nipiKwtrn 1.. me Ainerican The Defence Depntment gave iii.. eouDtfy's i'i-' Koraan armed nk-th at 1.458.000 men. Truman hns announcrd a goal of 3.400,000 men as soon as posslUa gftl 1 June 30 His lender* In Congress are making a l.i-t ditch stand against BOOM itti placa the ceiling al 4.1100,000 un umnforme-1 personnel Truman's statement In-day was generally considered on invitation to the Allies of the United Suites to speed up i .-building their armaments and their armed) f,>im — Keutcr. IN JAMAICA un to Ihe 1949 Annual Report on Jamaica, industrial development ha* taken an appi enable sUrldo m that island Tin 1 port says that arrangements have been made for the con-': the cement factory, which 1cxpccled to go into production 1052. Both un •he manufacture of cm is comenlrales are expected to no into production this year. The substantial incentives provided by %  i'i. 1.. i %  (Bneatn agemenn Idrw baef all very attractive lo other manufac%  r concessions have been lot ilumanufacture of a new bulMlng material and for buildinc ni.de of B paun 1 boxes tor exporting island produo-, 'or socoo powdei and ataos butler; for laumiiv nluc, and for •roodon handVai I .ullivators' tools There are a number of aff*ai proposals, some of ioiiMdeil>. %  1*. whuh are now UIHICI lUOO, the Report stales i ban seta b t srh od, will do something towards relieving unemployment Some of Uicni will aai and others will assist In inaklng the island independent M -d supplies of essential materlalQajaaJ Facloric^ Neisler! As an additional a id to industrialisation, the government Jamaica is developing an lnui.. irial Estate In Western Kingston On which factories may V Bdjj 1 %  rentals. Attempts are bolng nvadg %  cure the services of an Indus scientist of high qualillcations to act as Scientific Bacretajj lo 'la Industrial Development Commit lee. Thus, concludes Ino lloport, lha ^'.M'liiiiient I1.1 .dicady ...nievcl substantial results on n pOUO] i^t ing industrialisation, a 1 leh it intondi with the utmost I It will u* rawellag thai Profai %  or Arthur kWwls referred to this Jamaica Ciovernment .chernc Ml his study on Tho Industrialisation .. KJ n 1 iDdiai .1 Lewfcl felt that the trading estate is a very useful mv.nlion Hul hO I pinion thai simpl) schodulini in area for industrial developmenl Is not enough K| fen that an Industrial Develop inent Corporation should he -ol up h> ere, l laclory imildings 'What Ihe industrialist is looking fm "' %  a (actorv building well planned, with publii otih' IS, March IP Ramcke. appeared to-da> astV n t charged ,\-i having organised or tolerated atrocities commuted by %  •pocket" in 1944 The "I year old mrl1 tag under February when he left without i %  ng Press vonfercnecs am*. FienehJUS I g ruler Mr u-wi* said "Ha (the Indu tnaiii 1 is not Im p rpaa t d by an .. B ol L-M-und Mori' recent uewj lioni Jamaica indicates that such a 1 1 lion is likely to become a reality ,n thai Island in the near future .\ ru.bbetn Caswatssbm Hk. JUST WUBCEIVMBB KING PIN SETS /• THK FOLI.OWIXa:AUSTIN 7 HP.. 8 H.P.. 10 HP.. 12 H.P. FIAT 500 FORD 8 HP. & 10 H.P. FORD V 8 CARS FORD V 8 TRUCKS FORD V 8 THAMES TRUCK 1HLLMAN 10 H.P. MORRIS 8 H.P. & 10 IIP. SINGER 9 H.P. & 10 H.P. STANDARD 8 IIP, 9 HP, 14 H.P. YAUXHALL 10 HP, 12 HP., 14 H.P. BEDFORD TRUCKS Aba (a:\KII.\TOK ARMATURES FOR POPULAR MODELS. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS I use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP You'll feel so frevh and full of energy when you've washed with Lifebuoy Tl Utl Soap. Lifebuoy's decp-c leans ing lather make* you frcih and keeps you fresh. So use Lifebuoy Toilet Soap regularly, and keep frc*h the jf whole day through. FOR /7.7fM/\ (/. //,'/.W/\l— l/.M tYS Rvmemhvr — IIUTCmNSONS The Moil Central Shopping Place For• (il.ASSWAIIi: and C'llOCKKRV # Al.l. TVPHS KITt'lllN WARE • IIKST BRANDS PAINTS iin.l IN \MI01.S • STOVES mill PARTS • HEDSTEAOS. spiii.M.s ;n.ii M\rrmssi:s a (il.ASS und MIRRORS. and iniiiiv olhrr IIAHI-AIN ITEMS. G. W. HLTCIIINSON & CO., LTD. Ilru.ul Street ItlM-hlllk Si l X*V////////*'*W//V'//V/.'. -#'/'-**-* ////W// NOTICE OUR OFFICE AND WORKSHOP WILL BE CLOSED ON SATURDAY, MARCH 24th OUR GASOLENE STATION WILL BE OPENED TO BUSINESS AS USUAL. COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM. LTD. WHITEPARK ROAD. •Vw>v,v'. V*SSSSS.::::-S/::::VMSSAAIV-'-IVSS.:'S-:: '.'///bUU(M'/'VV. v-v



PAGE 1

PAOJ SIX RAKUADOS ADVOCATE TIILBsD VV, M Ma ll HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE ; -H SCO! „/ CAluTUi 0=T? rws fTTfS ft CON"\"2tB WAS.— -O 1 *? ~"v 3Y WALT DISNEY -*N£?S...\ K*. BLONDIE J ; BY CHIC YOUNG n <, -BY BARRY APPLEBY THAT'S I-r n&RP*fl *APrtSQUWIN* VOv*W ifATfrN Mfr &SOtf&fr IM GLAD i WAaOktOC *_ WAN JITU &gftiNJ^J V~ *r E IT OVfrfl GAYfr-f-l Kic v,•.;. *OU TO HAVt A> ftiT MOtffr .tfWCrVfrPiW Xil'liliimiil I$1,500,000 Nova Scotia Light and Power Company, Limited 4*'Cumulative Redeemable Preference Shares (Pr Value $100 per Share) The" I IBM will rank \>art txutu with the OUtataadbUJ O"-. 4 l it and 4% Cumulative Redeemable Frcfi-i trice Shares. The rights, preferences, prior Hies, restrictions, conditions and limitations attaching M ha] etrariar in the ( %  %  %  . Shares will ba investments in which companies registered undai Tlir Canadian I irance Companies Act. 1932. as amended, may invest their funds CAPITALIZATION (After glvlllfl %  Danetna; referred to in the offering circular) koBdj 114.630.000 Cumulativi Kcdecmat shares. $100 par value $8,187,200 8.187.200* ,% no* oKafndlng and this Issue of $1,500,000 1*1 (Price: $100 per Share) A. S. BRYDEN &. SONS (BARBADOS, LTD. CORRESPONDENTS FOR Royal Securities Corporation Limited Montreal Toronto Tlli(x Saint John Quebec Ottawa Hamilton *s ,;,. c. *...% CdaaMM faaa|9M ttaaMMaasj st John.. IM THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW Bottles CORONATION WINE (Qts!._ 1.44 I..I2 Tins P. F. MARTINI CRACKERS 1.75 LM Tins SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE JUICE 39 .94 USUALLY NOW Bottles JEFFREYS BEER 26 .20 Tins TABLE BUTTER 111b) .92 Bottles MATURED RUM (3 Gill Bolsl _48 nil .12 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street r//////////>'v////////.v//.v,-v/A^v////-v/////^/////.*/,M GOING TO CHURCH THIS EASTER? M \ BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS T WU.T TO %  %  vCa/Ee-f **BJL_ I'LLQrr *v %  %  TUN* lrrxiwr rone? j %  ; M6-'M BUSVCC6CWJCB* I HOW BCtf* iTCAKE-'. %  % %  %  %  %  M .." aa ij RIP KIRBY STEP, CUTTLE DONY A >S fxzi i -.i TF1.L THEM ? TVCYIL K1U. BY ALEX RAYMOND %  w,'s,',;'s.'sss.'sss,*,','*ss*'. YOU'LL Mil* A A 3t HYMN & PRAYER BOOKS II '<* Imif a limiliil SIIJI/III/ ADVOCATE STATIONERY THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY M00RES 4 !r^K '< *• I<


PAGE 1

THI itsuu Htm ii K, I-,I IIARiniM.^ mini \u I'M.I I CLASSIFIED ADS. !" !" jm?r !" ""^"^ WA !" SJSE SHIPPING NOTICES lELfFHORI 2 SO* TIM ch.i(r for ipnounmnrali of Barthe. Mamaf... Deat-i>. Arkno* IfMaWaU, and In Mcmorum n BOTH H |I.5C an wMt;4t)< and Sl.aO on Sunday" for any number of word* up lo 90. and S ran* par word an week-day. and 4 cent* par word on *iinda>> lor each addition word. Tor Tallin. Chaii* la 13 00 lor any nan.bar of word, up la 90 and A cant* par word lor each I OH Sill %  >*( %  'ha-vr ireek TJ ran i< Sa-deu* H woraa — f\ ) reali a i.-orit Nailer, only attar 4 )n HUM II ( tDOUAN—Mr* Florence Van ter pool belleki.n* i. at "Sugar'* would like lo benouara tha arrival cl hat Gra* Clrand daughter, born lo lie* |i.na Mi. H-achiUi C*dogM>. M Tuesday SRh Maich. IfAt. DIED BIB* R-Vn Mar n am. ir blfl real; don Surrey. III! %  ad, Ur ,: H ., • %  .,u Of 11. Birbadu* lal II ... pltal. IN MEMOKIAM JORDAN—l n lotmu n rmi.rv of our den . and March IMP ''art -ind Hidden wa* the call l>f thai da., one loved b-r :,|| %  %  Of the lo.t „nr we loved *> .rli Violet. ||r* %  >d.children un-ta kOWKli-Aibmn.. in luvimt mem-.rt of our dear mother who Ian M Hats ll.l. i >. —Mr road wai fc .-ilin| „ -i II* hill, weir haid lo Ha rently cloned her ile.; And "hi.parra peat David Audit*. Downc*. '.tnberi t" Jordan ipaiirma Elaine Vaarwoofl .dau*hier.,r..|aw-. M 3 51I. i"i:n\o\ it. giving credit ran IfON WORRX14. r'niitVid. ii. 'CM Rock :.ill— J C Ltd KITIlHiEltATo't Oub. loot Part* %  n General LIVESTOCK no Saadav fraak-el.T NOTICE ii" KIII i mi M s | TUT Off.-a > %  *! Bat .ill M '. J d nida> ATan hii .1 i hovM arran* for Ciul and CaaM i Thurad*' % %  kffab Mlli o'-" Si.'odo.w Mi AI ESTATE SI. Savkir's Tffi ||| (lu A paroal '.1 land i. nt| ,|, t; TS•quar* raai -n ..tad -,t ri Too abova MB ka> w l >.,. for a .. ;>(lrwi at o^r of* Wroai. aVldajrln-n o„ ptld-. Lav of M*rrn 1WI. ( \KR!V(.iTON ft SCALY. %  oik it n ts.jj!—n T*r Diaulng whicl rVfcM •hould take pla. mart •..->: I kWOl *r "X* 1 SaliirdBaa, h lo a latar rtaia Will all per-..,, ,no kvo aold out Ihr Book" kindly rolurn Uiam b> -"aluid^ h to Mr [a.11* .Crtureh rto< %  .. SI. Si at And.r. II J SI nUNOALOW-N.i. r.ardan.. %  oomt SWtfan. waWr aoppjy. a^ n •< %  NOTICE t.ARDIMB \lHN a Tl, oftVa will bo (lowd *
  • public '"i"'i Hrat %  l atd Fl im. al I p.rr n*o p<-ichao of Innd at •• Avr T..rkBrad. Buah Hall. M Mk .. 1 tofothar with ihr alon-wall bunp M Inapoclioc on anpllcalion to tha *flraoj Vr. Joaoph Monro Wl.rin tha hour. ,.( I am and S p m. o>ccpt S or lurllLf. |>.>tirula>. and coaidlli M HORSES-1 ^ Q^ldmt "lodyawaB • Jim Garkarlark ax Suaar ldyl unpamad J y o. m-dm . Slalta. ApplJ. R Eowordfc Telephone Hw. flJil—if n lo inulri.i : -II %  a? MECHANICAL DllVrl ts With aid •paoda for Ladm. On. i now i' Whitctiark Rd Dial 'JB CABRir,H~niKB ai rrt"l SIKcr Kln| CO. LTD. Mill (in LICENSE NOTICI itMNMiit AM mxnvtn Tlw -p|>ii %  | Arahw SHI. S Thon>a> UM ol Liquor Ucenar No 4a o' ISfll. arai Id to Grorre Clrvclan.l I. -all huuai %  IP T lo ifmc-r uid tacanuIn a %  oat. Si Thnraai. I..rt daorfiueri MBtaea Dalpd thilath day ..I March. 19SI. t^oiuii: lwis. for A; %  . To:—A. W HARPBR r*,, Al Police llaajM DagVtol I> NP-Thii application .ul ba •rod at a LKenalnc COUII lo i Ih* 3nd April IMI al II (i'c!ck a it at PHIICP Cn.i'i i)t>i |t A W HARPER, A| Police Mamtr.tr Iti.t It Uicvclc. by RARVn A •fS.Jl—Ifn. One nev. ix>rtablv r s r.ibb. i.iai ijj-i ffUl—fen MISCELLANEOUS Shane.. Cl. r'l.'mture Hard\>i>d iding od clock*. Cinikm. i* Potierv Silver Ivory and I Ralph llrirdi Rhott R.t m. Uley. Open m 4 pnv ai 3 ll~4n III'-vri.F ACCXS-SORIES l> .mpa, lOdie.. Cnnnortion". Patrhir.a KIU. Heel* etc AppU Courten Car air PATHS In Pa White Prln Plate BARNES 'llh matching aultaa. Top ?fl 1 SI Ifn CURTAIN FITTINOS-ro. amarl wln!" %  lylmg. nihi conirol. Valance, and draperiei flv Klrtch. Dial 7* A BARNES CO LTD. ISXSI— LIJI DIAMOND RINGS To QtttU' I4n|lr lone rm**. Cbtw arttlfi. Attr.ctlvnee* Sea Ihrm Wrtv It i* chard %  on. Mc Uregor Street. Phone SMO a M Jt BW MrRR'M'S Jn >ho (tnd Bathroi BM-atled r.dei CO. LTD. recalvod. Tilole WardJMI. 1--.1 aag r. *i*. .^ %  PTSQUI VP.AXATXD WIN* At km Ml we are in %  potltkon lo offer yw riii wine for Ihe Iteatment of Diabctr. 'I Per bol 1 holtlei for JO'-. BRUCE WKATHERllEAD LTD 14 JSI 3i KOI.l.ri' DAY1.ITE MOVIE SCREES %  raae. mod order. Fltt, Civ Pharmacy. U3M Ho. k CURHANTS -Rj.ln. i.l. 40 „rl 'I. C treat. Dial MM. SILVEP We.tn.orr land. Stcrhna Uver Cutlery. SO piece*. Uoorgc and liirlha pollenCan be lean at Y. 'd* Imn or Co. Ltd. 10 limn Stn-.' •tWfl'l*!! HTAINIRSS STEFJ. CUT LERY laititi. n llletlmc won' T..|I l>. tnii'l k>n lendlni Phaim anil heauiv to your home. Knlve.: T..lilr. Mr De-wrt Mc rotka Table Sir Deaaert 4Sr RpooeT.hle !V*c. Itr.^tl 4v Tri Mc. Coffee 2Gc. El* 3S> Jam SSc More Ihan Bfly different piece* In two tx-autlfiil rmdeln — Sec Thi m inid Ihiy CAVK. SHTPHWID %  CO.. LTD IH j.ii -n :n El Eli rr>4total' Value tX piece Flowtred Te.. Sel all IOT tf.M See the* Tod.iv al (i W HUTCHJUSON CO.. LTD 213 91—3n ilr.f Boyal Yacht Club RUM T.P.N rMattDl MI < AH for brcken Jawelrrv. i,-id mm U. colnn. Ittliilaliirer la.le LMd B W I Stamp. (iORRINIIES intlqua Shop w1 si Wn I \-M inn .TAMO i \ IBfd u CABIBREIN STAMP No I* Sa.( Rtreel 11(11 SES rfjACTIVI I -.ih rlofelei .upl. T-l.ph..na -t** %  | Md kii'i r.rctrfct iilnt I i. arntv. M x R.I nil %  •I.. %  papi Black Rock all ca pr oaal a aa to Mr Vero LewH. MARINE GARDENS New RmmaI. 1 hedinoTn" w.lh runnlni wtter, built n I Wanlrotaea and all modern con.en.en. .. l*n| leaae p.eferre.1 Apply Mra Prie.|. "*. Hotel Royal 13 3 11 -I ;MI %  NQAIXtU y..-,.. 'i A %  i in Frtdda E'eclih-it. and wntfi Appl. Pted-ic. fit.pai,i,k MECHANICAL D-ilv. UVekl. lernta Apply Cieact ai an. GOVERNMENT \OIHI LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE %  "..lie i.l Sarfranta Villafr. Chvir.n. tor permi-Ion lo aell Malt Ltquori. c a1 Do_id and atilv ahop with ahodroof altache,i al b Sanivt VUlaie. Chrlal Church, wuh: Iilainct A Dated thi. ai.l day ol March 1091. To -E A McLBOD Caq "olKe Maci.tr*iv, IR.trfct A JOB GRAM Wl lor *(.: B —Th!" ippli.'* pred at a Llce.i.i', C. nit ba be held .11 ce Court. DiMiid A o ddj 2nd dav ol April IMI 1 r A >: i I %  %  Police MafUlratc. Dial A 22 3 91 In | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE ia appliralion of I.HIIW Wharliin *r of Liquor lacerw No. all of 19*1 framed 10 Clarencr Alt It. re-pr-i "I a beard and ahin|le .hop al Villa 1(1 r lttona Hill Si Michael f> uao aald Uquor Licen-e fM ,,i trail build I'-1 in Pinfold rret *• Michael Dated thi. aoth day of Mitch l*M T" E A McIXOD Eaq %  VllCe Maciilrale Dlairlct %  A %  JAMES WIIARTON. for AppllcalHio NB—Thia application will %  K d at a Llcenai-H Court lo lee Court. Dlttrlcl "A" on PrMaM APPOINTMENT OF AN fiat TRAFriC CONTROL OFFICBR SEAWE1 1. AIRPORT Applicatiini' .lit* ii^vitixl I> ippohtttlWIlt as Ctmtrnl OlTlcor at Stowtril Airport Applu;nii-. ihould be not lea than 21 years of nee and hould vious cxpcrienti i.r Fi> I (\nitril. prc4r*lbl) vnth Air Crew HM ;i-> 1'iltit or Nnviiatur Additional %  MCtl WOttM bi i mi%  n( Civil AvistH", LtgutaUotl iind Practice, and of RaKito Alda lo Navigation. Tinappointment is permanent and penslonnl.le. tuhject in medical MBIM and one year's probation Salary scsle f 1.200 x TI x 98—2,160 per annum. Application* t:itir Be. er|nd "X|eriencc, i.-s'lmoniala ih< uld be* Secretarial. Dndeetnwn on or befttre ?4th Uan-h. 19M. I5.3.H—2n ti. E A McLEOli i *-!.. HI %  • %  0 %  Harbour Log In Carliile Bay D. Sch jlpha Ml HOrtai THE FORTRESS CLUB Tlio Annual General Mr.nn %  i Club will I* beti niiinda. Tth in.i. SEE US FOR ESCHALOT STUAR1 k SAMPSON (1938) LTD. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application ol Phjll k ... lor permlotlon t • lell Spirit.. M..1I LNJUOra, 'rdar. 3 244 boa* nel. Cant Siitile Ironi Caleuttn in. Capetown ill r AM it II* %  et Capl i (liilina :ct. Can* I In Touch with Barbados Coastal Station Cabal a..t %  n.i. Mi %  I nitli II fnll.iwinl %  %  Ilartiodo. Ci.a.l Hl.i m.iii.1. v %  Baron ktwray, ; I' ., SS Subadm s %  S Thelma IV. h v ss MaaVPtaUlM, ss Pnet S Nteu* Ai.i'tcidatn. H a Andalucia. SS Alcoa Pirlne' s S Hfl Loch Rvl VENETIAN BLINDS. 1 II melal Itel.uxe Veneliar ire* de hrol? 1 Weal 1 BARNES S. Co, Ltd EASTER FARE COOKING BUTTER per lb or 5 lb. tin PRUNES 51c. IB. RAISINS <: lb. CURRANTS 38c lb. AUSTRALIAN CHEESE 72c. lb GLACE CHERRIES 89c lb. POLAR ICING SUGAR BRIDAL ICING SUGAR SWEET CORN . 36c. pk. 35c pk. 46c. tin YACHT — Y.Wl MMVUy [..InLd an. ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS. CURIOS. JEWELS New Shipment opened THAWS ?r TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH Uf| •- 0Jl R\M1'V. Bv OUtliFOHD I. SPtMCRR D*Tr C.EORC.F. P MKADK. I BH Ch T AIIOCANV VAIIM JOHNSON $ RAI %  % % %  Al. C... %  Kmf I s Bt la Jachai. Cltppjr, Laurenlian F...Cla.ke. Wbaif. SS Ea-n New lln. r Jotnh>. SOT Gen 1 a a M %  % %  s.s Till' MUntic Pm M.I. 1,1. I I ,„. s-; Triton ^ %  Oil I" RATES Or EXCHANGE 113 W IDemand Draft* Mi3" p i % %  • in iBhandit — NEW NATURAL GAS DISTILLING PLANT in-lailed al your Oia Co. lla 9f The -hove Plant will now enaure our Curtomni with recular luppUM ol I'urr Distilled Water WHEN AT ITS BEST T IS HENNESSYS. 'J EASIBI RIGHT... i ANCHOR TABLE BUTTER 8 8c. pkn. SPEdAMM I1ICO ill CREAM. I'DI.II ICE CREAM l"OI..AR ICICLES. I..STER BOOB MOIRS I IIOCOI.ATF BARS II \M TS in Tim. 11AM in Tin. <'ASARI'EP in Bntllf. GRIFFITH'S IIINKI.KV llial I .".I I FURNITURE al Vlunn-Sdvinji I'rim STRBAMIJNP.n ValBtan and -' DTCMbkl 7AM D i.-.t.. %  -HI Dreater-rohet Cheval and %  i.niler Mirror.-Mahogany ami llrey Favour it r .'k BeddCAd. N. pen. in 4 .ire.. (1090 up DRAWING ROOM | M..m.. Bonere. Tub and Poah Pnblce Chair. )12 up—Hlft. ai^l Low back Poldint Eaaychalra TABLES for Dinmi. Kitchen. Seuim. CncktaiH. Radio and Foaey — China. Bedroom and KlUlien Cobln-t. Waffnn^ Laider.— Iran in and wa*hln/ h..rd". T.ibi. and many other | L S. WILSON SPHV ST. DIAL MM Famous the world over for that perfect bouquet and flavour — the result of two centuries experience in selection and blending. Ask for HENNESSYS STOMACH DISTRESS' e..v t.. t.io ftani in I Ml MtB tli* Ba waiei watch il hia. ilten dunk I laxative, not habit formula., you can take il an* time Let Alaa-S#H/er %  %  I i"iti,eitnn rfapn lupplv t.-ilt I) J 9I^T F N ( AlkaSeltzer II MONTREAL. AUSTRALIA. NEW 7F ALAND LINE. LIMITED •M A N z t tvr M s TIIMIIIHIRIJ i. .. Mil Melboiiri.r Eebtuar. wfab,io/ nth. Itrlabane M..,. • '.tni al Baibodoa earlv April. INI Thu vr>*i ha. ample .pace for Hard Eroren and General car*. ''!' accepted on tr.ro.nh ; ||, „| tl lrai..hl,,na„i at Trinidad tor Britlih OuaBM. R-II...!.W ,,!_,„. BH LaBBSBI : i i.iy M'HNPs, UlTltV A CO ITD. Mbl l. COatA v 00 iTIt The M V CARIBBEB' i I Pa.w flier, foe Antigua. Montaar-aa %  SaluaaS Wrdneadav It.t m.i DAEBWixi la and Amb* mn tor st :> t M N M %  BWI. SCIIlM-anUt OWNEM ASHTMIATIn-. IN, Hi |A41 fas, Aicocu Sisam&hipCo. !" i1c. ,. .„. NIW TOR. RFKVICa rass 5^aBVL NEW ORLEANS SERVICT ...II. IPM |>r,„„. -Tr*. '' %  -M" :5rd Ma^h TANADIAN flRRVIUF s Mi \ AIA*OA IH. \s|. "AII.-OA 1-K.NN A NTIt HALIFAX AR-IVri %  TIMF* J*d March Ba rcn nth v iri i\ M nrh ad ADIII &d MiRlHUolMi "AirOA PENNANT BXCO v j'\'tTNr)ta March Ith Sail, for St. John a. llalifn, • March th salb for Si J,.hn A Halifa. ROBERT TIIOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND r.l'I.E SERVICE Ari"I.Y:-|>A CNWTA CO, ITD—CANADIAN SERVICE PASSAGES TO EUROPE ConUi-t AnUlles Produrts. Limiu-d, Husc.iu. Domini*,, for sail hig to Europe. The MMMJ pons of call sre Dublin, London, or Singlo fare 1170, usual reductions for childiin. Hnl'.llil.iii A. M. WEBB Hi. Mil %  MM I Barbadsi Booda ..mi Bh OVCIM-II I uve.ltneiilH nought unil Sold. :i;i Mu III... WHITE TALLOW n:\THAi. HMMiin l'l.i ll.-ri.i I.III. \oiit i: Our Curtottt %  '> U ndl • Bskad to note 11 OUl I'it i Ilr:ui Branch (WcrtlhOp, Dock. Ship Ch.indlrrv .v Stitjar ftCtory SuppliM iftd QBTW ral OflrCv) will not IM opH for butiiiMi i insl. Thi (Ynlral Knipornmi. BiYMd Efti ami I I Station, Trafalgar St., will be open as usual. i CENTRAL KIINDRV LTD. I Both Bottles and Flasks available in a variety of sizes HENNESSYS THREE STAR V.S.O.P over 20 years X.O. over 45 years at all Grocers. Hotels and Clubs AOIH I W bOS '" inform our Curtomtri that our Offlcfl iiaiiiv.;(!. %  tnd Lafnbtr ftrtbi will bo %  |i td on SATURDAY 24th Inst. K ndl;. ping ; .( %  ( %  %  i-tlini'Iv Tin' Bafftr O/orohoUBOl Will remain open ns u-ual. PLANTATIONS LTD. IIIIIIM.I IOU\ mill SIM:H.IITSTO*V\ v,v,::v.:;wss/v.::::;::::


    xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
    REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
    INGEST IEID EYUZ9OZUA_OR8U5C INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T15:58:56Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02539
    AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
    FILES






    :

    ,
    ;
    |
    |



    PHarbad0os





    ESTABLISHED 1895

    Stop Negotiations |
    With Cuba On Sugar |
    Commonwealth Asks U.K.





    LONDON, March 21.
    COMMONWEALTH SUGAR PRODUCING COUNTRIES
    asked the British Government today to abandon negoti-
    atiens with Cuba for 4 bilateral sugar agreement.

    The request was made in a Resolution passed by a
    meeting here of representatives of Australia, South Africa,
    British West Indies, Mauritius and Fiji.

    The Resolution reinforced earlier protests made by
    Australian Resident Minister Eric Harrison and Queensland
    Agent General Leonard Pike against a propesed 2egreement
    that would provide Cuba with a guaranteed market in
    Britain for a minimum supply of 1,500,000 tons sugar for
    three years in return for tariff concessions.

    + It

    was
    to-day
    Minister
    made representations to
    Minister Clement Attlee
    The Commonwealth countries’
    Resolution also asked Britain to
    | join with Dominion Governments
    making

    stated authoritatively
    that Australian Prime
    Robert Menzies had also
    Prime

    Mass Rally
    To Be Staged

    Against Reduction | oe



    representations to

    Canada “in the hope that that

    Of Preferences maintain the full

    Dominion will for £1,000,000... Anthony Brooke used to be Crown

    Kiarry Roy, the dance band ieader: another married Bob
    the daughters of Sir Charles Vyner Brooke, whose family had rv
    years.

    of British Commonwealth

    (From Our Own Correspond*nt)

    under present preferential

    entry

    sugar
    LONDON, March 21 system without commitment for
    An attack designed to cauntes purchase of foreign sugar under
    proposals for reducing Empire

    ¢ re) a bilateral agreement.”
    preference is to be launched in

    Celia 6.—Express.





    Torquay, the current home of The Resolution was sent to four
    trade and tariff talks on March| British Gepagtments concerned— .
    30. Organisers are the Empire| Board of Trade, Ministry of El b th M
    Aaiates Association and Phe Food, Colonial Office and the Za el ay
    British Empire League who last mse Relations Office. a's
    + ‘ : Sugar pro- t state that any agreement V Th Pp F
    gear assisted colonial sug Dr°-|wherety Britain “would avooro| VIGIL Lhe rope
    new contracts with the British definite quotas of sugar was LONDON, March 21
    Government j“contrary, to the provisions of ee aes wy Pal ak ‘Koes
    ‘ the Commonwealth Sugar Agree- fold oie te ih aan ee es
    A ; rall as been plz sq | ment.” man told euter to-day it was
    mass rally has been plannec likely but not definite that



    The Resolution added that the PRESIDENT TRUMAN
    interests of sugar producing domin-
    ions and colonies under the Com-
    monwealth Sugar Agreement
    would be “seriously endangered” | call
    if these negotiations were con-

    and a Resolution denouncing any
    attempt to reduce Empire prefer-
    ences as an attack on the Empire's
    economy will be put forward by
    Lord Balfour of Inchrye. He is
    the newly elected Chairman ol

    Princess Elizabeth would visit the
    Pope, during her visit to Rome
    next month

    Such a visit would be a courtesy
    and an informal one, the
    spokesman added, Princess Mar-

    sion of Korea to resist “stil
    _against other free nations.”





    believe the best way of progres:
    for all of us lies along the lines





    high places”. An American soldier was killed

    THURSDAY, \ MARCH. 22,



    1951.



    CROWN PRINCE RETURNS



    Mr. Anthony Brooke, exiled nephew of the last White Rajah of Sarawak, returns to London, after
    giving up his five-year fight to regain the kingdom which his uncle transferred to British rule in 1946

    Prince of Sarawak. One of his cousins married
    regory,
    Sarawak for more than a hundred

    the wrestier. They were

    Phato shows Mr. Anthony Brooke at Victoria with his wife wa two daughters, Angela 9 and

    U.S. DOUBLE
    ARMED. FORCES

    KEY WEST Florida March 21.



    disclosed today that the

    United States has doubled its armed forces since the inva-

    1 further Communist attacks

    An exchange of telegrams be-

    the Empire Industries Associa-| tirmed. garet was criticised by the Free tween the President and Secre-
    tion. “Any bilateral agreement be-| Church of Scotland in Edinburgh ¢. I. Killed In tary for Defence George Mar-
    Mr. Alan Lennox—Boyd, Chair-| Cuba such as has been suggested} holiday in Italy two years ago. States uniformed forces now
    man of the Conservative Party] would seriously prejudice nego- Rev. Donald Mackenzie said: “I Tok oO Brawl stand at more than 2,900,000,
    imperial Affairs Committee, is} (jations for a new International} think I speak for you all when 1 y About 250,000 of the 2,900,000
    another who will be speaking on} Sugar Agreement” it said. say we deprecate and deplore men are engaged in the Korean
    behalf of Empire producers 1 —Reuter. visits to the Vatican by those in TOKYO, March 21. |war the greater part of them rep-

    resenting army strength,

    < : 9 A a * * King George VI was asked to-|&d two wounded in a brawl in} In Europe there are about 127-
    of Empire development » he told Wages Council Bill day to prevent the proposed court-|Tokyo’s International _ Theatre}000 men of which 97,000 are
    za ae dete wees Te Hay + - | esy visit of his daughter Elizabeth | ¢4rly to-day. army about 20,000 air force and
    place to express t his point o For Further Study to the Pope, and thus avoid an af-| Two hundred Japanese police|the remainder crews aboard
    view was Torquay where trade ‘ bow front to national sentiment.” called out to quell the disturbance,

    and tariff conferences have been

    taki Tata" made 82 orrests.
    aking place”.

    Princess Elizabeth, at present in
    Malta, is to visit Rome with her

    From Our Own Correspondent

    GRENADA, March 21.

    The Empire Industries Associa-|_, After an hour and a half sit-| husband the Duke of Edinburgh see eect pe
    tion are hopeful that delegates to ting the Legislature to-day re-| from April 11 to April 24. A let- Koreans in o dark street. while A

    ferred the Wages Councif Bill to

    ter to the King from the Secretary
    a Select Committee following the

    Batt. will. Aitend Meir Pal ang of the Protestant Alliance said

    they were looking for a place t
    listen. to their call for .sttong . i al

    spend the night.











    i i second reading of the debate on] that news of the visit of the next . : .Jaboard ships at sea.
    Pe principles, The committee of in succession to the “Protestant dedier of nasal eee ee by While exact figures may not be
    seven under the chairmanship of|throne of this realm”, Would be and beer voting ¢ | edie ny used, it may be said the army is
    Mr. C. F, Henville, Attorney] flashed around the world as “Papal with eigen om ORC Une we beginning to approach the 1,400,-
    PLOTTERS FOR TRIAL |General, includes F. B. Paterson,! propaganda of the greatest value.” ’ mt 000 strength figure mentioned by
    J. B. Renwick, R. O. Williams,{ Millions of Britons would be filled| Japanese police officials said |General Omar Bradley, Chairman
    KARACHI, March 21. |R.C. P. Moore, T, E. Noble- Smith} wih “surprise, perplexity, and they believed North Koreans pro- {of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the
    Prime Minister \Liaquat Aliland Captain E, FE. Hughes who] profound sorrow” at the thought| yoked the incident “from political [Congressional Committee _ testi
    Khan told Parliament to-day he|meet to-morrow afternoon to re- lot such a visit, he said—Reuter. | motives”, but General Mac}™Mony last month,
    would bring to trial Major Gen-|port at the full session of the Arthur’s headquarters said it was At the time he spoke, the army
    eral Akbar Khan, Chief of his|Council on Wednesday next , not definitely established whether | total was about 1,200,000, navy
    General Staff, and other alleged| week. Egypt Plans the attackers were Koreans, Many |20d air force strength was about
    plotters despite public and army| Work on the estates continue Koreans live in the area where the }820,000 each the Marine corps
    demands that they should have!normal with only isolated in- Red Sea ‘Defence’ attack occurred,—Reuter, about 170,000.
    been shot without trial. —Reuter. (stances of minor trouble. | oe On Page 3. |
    CAIRO, March 21, | —



    The Egyptian Army Command-
    er-in-Chief, General Hussein
    Farid Bey, has left for the Gulf
    of Aquada at the northern end of
    the Ked Sea to organise “military

    Convent Wall Kills

    Canada Is Democratic 19: Sehkool-tlite

    —GEORGE HUNTE

    MR. GEORGE HUNTE, Assistant Editor of the
    Advocate returned yesterday by T.C.A. after a ten-day
    stay in Canada as a guest of Trans Canada Airlines.

    Shortly after his arrival at Scawell, Mr. Hunte said
    “My trip to Canada was only one of the many examples
    of Canada’s good relations with the Press.

    defence” in this area, according to MILAN, March 21.
    the pro-Government newspaper Thirteen school girls crouching
    Al Misry, under a wall of a convent here to

    The newspaper said this move
    followed reports that Israel had
    established air and land communi-| toppled on to them.
    cations with the port of Elat on| Eleven other girls were badly
    the gulf. Reports said Israel had| injured.
    built a road 125 miles long across 1 . 7
    the Negev desert and had also al Seven of the school girls, pupils

    shelter from violent gusts of wind,
    werg killed to-day when the wall







    bean,
    men are in the United States or

    United States navy ships, in Eu-

    shore instal-

    lations,

    Brace for a few thousand in
    ska, Hawaii and the Carib-

    remaining 2,000,000

    ropeun waters or at



    Radio Bomb
    Dropped

    TOKYO, March 21,
    A six-ton radio-controlica bomb

    was dropped on a rail bridge to-
    day as American superforts made
    a massive
    communications on the
    Manchuria
    Communist
    Superforts also raided three Com—
    munist supply

    the main
    road from
    North Korean
    Pyongyang.

    assault on

    to the
    capital

    centres nearer to



    Canadians whether bli tablished a regular airline to Elat,|@t the Institute of the Sister of : ) re i an
    private enterprise Rg a ne igake nein i be planning| Jesus, were killed outright by tons the battle line Aa en a
    for the Press to inform the pub- to build up Elat into a centre for|0f Stone which crashed on to them communique claimed. —Reuter
    lic, fishing, mining and tourism. The others died in hospital soon

    They do not leave the Press to ; Reuter. | afterwards. ye .. A
    pick up information from offi- Seitnes dik Gk tenesital where Finnish Govt.
    oa Pree, Magen in. the ITALY TO STEP UP | the injured girls were taken, said Resigns
    Trai Pt on al Pee ae SULPHUR OUTPUT {some were in a serious condition pe ‘
    dian democracy. And without ROME. March 21 Reuter. HELSINKI, March 21.
    Canadian democracy the world of ; ‘ —. Finnish Prime Minister, Urho



    Italy plans to expand her sul-
    phur output in view of the strong

    demand on the world merket, anal Britain Closing

    the resultant favourable prospects . ..
    se 3 *
    Six Consulates

    for this Italian industry.
    The Ministry of Industry said it
    LONDON, March 21,
    Britain is to close six of her

    was planned to step up production
    ‘onsulates in China, Foreign

    in the sulphur mines of Sicily
    where. Italy's principal deposits

    Secretary Herbert Morrison told
    Commons to-day. The closed posts

    1951 would be in a worse plight
    than it is.

    It does not need ten days in
    Canada, It needs only half an
    hour in Ottawa to hear the pulse
    beat of a great, virile and pro-
    gressive nation,

    My personal gratitude to Trans
    Canada Airlines for making my
    visit to Canada possible is all the
    greater because of the opportuni-

    are docated —Reuter.



    . 7 r at Ch king, Kumning,
    ty it ‘gave me to breathe if only ATTLEE GOES FOR Gankow Nanking Psingtao pe
    for ten days the same air as a MEDICAL CHECK-UP Amoy, - r

    people standing at the threshold

    It is noted that to-day’s decision
    of a great future.

    arch 2
    etgpeo rs March 2i « leaves only four British consulates

    British Prime Minister, Clement

    Three-Hour Flight Attlee went into a London hospital} hee eee
    to-day for a general medical SMhich is also the seat of the
    Winnipeg is 1,000 miles from checkup embassy.

    Montreal and from. Victoria to He was treated for Duodenal] 4 Foreign Office spokesman
    Halifax is something like 4,000 ulcer three years ago and has re-}saiq to-day that there are fewer
    miles. It took me nearly three cently been suffering some discom-}than 2,000 British subjects in
    hours to fly from Montreal to fort after meals. China of whom some 700 are in}
    Toronto, some 300 miles. To. talk He will spend a short period in|] Shanghai. |

    of seeing Canada in
    nonsense.

    But even ten days in Canada
    is better than no days in Canada,

    10 days is | hospital during the Parliamentary

    | Easter recess.—Reuter.

    FORMER PRESIDENT

    —Reuter.





    the guest of Trans, Canada OF ECUADOR DIES Earth Tremor

    NEW YORK, March 21
    The death was announced to-| UDINE, North Italy, March 21. |
    lay of Dr. Alfredo Basquerizo A strong earth tremor lasting
    | Moreno, former President of Ecua-|several seconds shock the Alpine
    — |dor. He died in a New York hos-jregion of Tolmezzo, 25 miles north
    pital on Monday night aged 91 of Udine early yesterday, delayed
    Dr. Moreno came here a fort-|reports said to-day,
    night ago for medical treatment, No victims or damage

    Airline is probably equivalent to
    30 days as an ordinary visitor.
    Ten days is time enough too to
    form an impression of the vast-
    ness of Canada and to appreciate
    the fact that there is a Canadian
    way of life. Canada does not



    Mr. GEORGE HUNTE

    NO AGREEMENT

    BUENOS AIRES, March 21



    were re-













    talk about democracy, Canada is} With Britain’s special “meat
    democratic mission” to Ar gentina preparin Reuter. ported.—Reuter.
    The Senator for Peterburgh|to leave next week, no agreemen
    goes into a cafeteria and sit on 2| was yet in sight to-day according
    stool next to the butcher bo) |to circles in cl te
    The Canadian House of Parli2-| negotiations which |!
    ment is almost an open house ine on daily here ft e ast
    And the Press in Canada is re-|two and a half wee Reuter
    garded as an essential part of} —- + TORONTO, March 21 approval to the bill setting u
    Canadian democracy REJE ype MAND The work of the Government! a new Milk Control Boar
    Public Relations in Canada is! ae TON, Mat 1 V peeded up on Wednesday) Lieutenant Governor Ray Law
    based on a study of public! The United States State Depart- avert the strike whieh would; sén would be on hand to give}
    opinion and government policies, ment d today that R ! off milk supplies to more’ the Bill Royal assent, minutes |}
    and commercial and trade vo ed can de nd f 1,000,000 people in greate: later, and the Board would then}
    cies ure made to fit in with pre the 670 hold its first meeting with
    vailin pul opir Onte e 7 » Milk Price Associat
    by the public rel ( i le Reuter . xpecte iste final A stril f 1,700



    Keykonen to-day handed his Coa
    lition Government's resignation to
    President Paasikivi, but agreed at
    the President's request to delay
    making it effective until after
    Easter

    Earlier to-day Social Democrats
    had withdrawn their six Ministers
    from the 16-seat Coalition Cabinet
    because Parliament refused yester-
    day tc pass a
    postponing from April 1 to August
    l,a 43 per cent. increase in rents

    They maintained that an imme-
    diate rise in rents would help Com-
    munists in the Trades Union elec
    tions next month, and in the July
    general elections. —Reuter.



    Defend Middle East

    Senator Urges

    WASHINGTON, March 2)

    Democrat Senator Edwin John-
    gon, urged to-day that instead of
    Europe, the United States shoula
    concentrate on defending the
    Middle East with its great oil
    reserves because the Third World
    War might begin in that area
    In a speech prepared for delivery
    he told the Senate, the “eastern
    Mediterranean is not only a feve:

    spot, but it is the foremost
    strategic spot in the world
    Reuter

    ers had been scheduled to start



    this morning, but an appeal by
    Major Hiram McCallum won a
    24-hour postponernent! While
    the postponement was being
    arranged Toronto w setting }





    nething of a preview of what

    Reta







    Government Bill}

    }
    '





    ) eration
    ‘total 48



    “Canada Faces Milk Shortage

    PRICE: FIVE CENTS



    , U.N. Troops Take

    Over Chunce
    rN earing Par

    (By JULIAN BATES).

    TOKYO, March 21

    AMERICAN TROOPS to-day captured Chun-

    chon, last major Communist base south of the

    38th parallel without firing a shot. On the east coast,

    South Koreans were believed to have reached north
    of the frontier itself.

    Chinese had abandoned Chunchon shortly be-

    fore rapidly advancing Allied patrols and tanks
    probed into the city.



    Deputies Still |

    Deadlocked
    Over Big 4 Agenda

    PARIS, March 21
    “Big Four” Foreign Ministers
    deputies failed again today to go
    forward with their efforts to draft
    an agenda for a Foreign Minis- i
    ters’ Conference,

    There was no progress at to-
    day’s fiftieth meeting nor were any
    new proposals or amendment
    tabled, the British spokesman said. |

    Andrei Gromyko, Russian depu- |

    Eighth Army troops had last
    been reported in holding positiong
    | five miles south of the city this

    “Cautious | morning. The last official report
    | of South Koreans on the East Coast

    said they were nine miles from
    ty, set a new Conference record by A y roach” the parallel, after a quick advance
    speaking for twe hours and ” from Kangnung, but observers
    ee including translation believed they had reached the
    ime. }

    Gromyko challenged Western!
    cantention that the acceptance of
    the Soviet proposals on German
    demilitarisation and the reduction
    of armaments would mean taking
    decisions on the substance of these

    Diplomats of sev
    ae teobine’ in Kor mm) ae es! given after the 14 houfs ban on
    ps i ree the location of the

    ae aa petthacee lifted Communist
    United Nations pv were being
    ing the narrow

    troops had
    rear.
    back
    territory

    been
    guards
    into a

    pressed
    policy on

    strip of

    cross

    38th parallel in

    trength



    questions. Representatives of a doze: 95 mils Jong by roughly 10 miles

    Such suggestions were being|countries, fighting in the om deep @ along the central and
    used simply to mislead public paign met United States A eastern fronts. Harried by a for-
    opinion, he said,—Reuter unt Secretary of State Sai inj Ward curtain of jets and fighter

    bombers, rearguards
    scattered resistance
    Stiffest resistance on the war
    front developed north of the South
    Korean capital, Seoul
    munist groups fought
    all attempts to dig
    high ground

    The

    put up only

    Rusk at the State

    Department
    fen hour long

    conference yester



    News despatches widely
    lished " throughout the Uniter
    States quoted informants ag sayin
    that the 38th parallel problem wi
    being broken do

    March 21 As

    Auriol Leaves

    For New York

    PLYMOUTH,

    ul
    eo Here, Com
    stubbornly

    them out of
    vn into twe part

    Communists were reported

    r ; : 1 far as immediate mitita trengthened by elements of the
    , rene 1 President neh Vincent operations were concerned, it third Chinese Field Army in the
    uriol, his wife and Foreign Min- generally recognised that to mountainou region, 25 mileg



    ister Robert Schuman, were we!-
    comed by representatives of King
    George V1, when they arrived here
    this moning en route to the United
    States in the He De France

    Three British destroyers which
    had awaited the liner since dawn

    northwest of
    te and

    Seoul. On the east

    central front, early morning

    9 boundary by to-night
    NEW YORK, March 21 News of the Allied advance was

    tical purposes, United
    forces must cross the pars allel
    keep harassing retreatin; port iid Amoeriean infantry,
    munists, and to find out what they |@dvancing behind a powerful air
    were doing nd artillery bombardment swept

    This was particularly impor-]| merth to occupy a strategic hill
    tant because of the probability of} pes Communists resisted on

    Nation

    Com-! re

    ihion



    a few n.iles off the Devon coast,j: major Chinese Communist’vidges and hill crests for some

    escorted the He De France into|counterattack in the next few/tours but petrol jelly bombs

    Plymouth, weeks it was suggested oreed them to quit their foxholes
    As. the liner approached the Other Washington reports snidjend flee northward.—Reuter.

    harbour, guns thundered a wel-{the United States and its allies

    come from the seventeenth cen-jhad agreed on crossing — the

    tury royal citadel which had once parallel and forming a line

    “MSS Publisher Of “La Prenea”’





    defended the port against the|the waist of Korea without try-}
    French. au , ing to reach the Manchurian Barred From Plane
    After 200 passengers from Lon-|border, These same reports s aid{ 4
    don had boarded the liner, the Britain and other countries h id BUENOS AIRES, March 21.
    Ile De France lay to, until she was snow accepted the view expressed Dr. Alberto Gainza Paz, 50-year-
    ‘ tt ublicly by President Truman] old publisher of the independent

    ready to leave for New York thi
    afternoon, She will then be given
    a salute of 21 guns

    Auriol is ona State visit to
    the United § States. —Reuter

    chat crossing the
    military
    Arthur

    La Prensa, which was
    seized by the Argentine Govern
    ment last night was prevented
    from boarding a plane for Monte

    matter for General Ma
    to decide

    Reuter





    parallel wag | newspaper
    |





    intel video to.day,-R ;
    21 ARRESTED oe eee
    . . ,ye .
    Britain Will Give HONG KONG, March 21
    ‘ ~e Peking Radio said to-day that TELL THE ADVOCATE
    Antigua £300,000 an American directed underground THE NEWS
    espionage organisation in Tient-, DIAL 3113
    age sin had been discovered and 21
    For Storm Dam 8 spies of various nationalities ar- DAY OR NIGHT
    (From Our Own Correspondent) rested, —~—Reuter. 1

    ANTIGUA, March 21,
    Britain is prepared to make a
    grant of up to £300,000 for repair



    and reconstruction of houses
    struck by last September's hurri 9
    cane when two storms within ten
    days hit the Leeward Islands
    chain.
    Making this announcement

    Governor Kenneth Blackburne
    said the amount would include a
    large sum announced earlier,

    It would also include a grant
    of £6,857, for preliminary work
    in London,

    The grant would be conditional
    on owners making a contribution
    in labour.

    Special grants in sterling would
    be made available for hurricane
    damage in the northerly island of
    Anguilla where a few houses were {
    left intact and for rebuilding the
    Secretariat in Antigua

    Spanish. nes
    ) Maintain the
    same High
    Standard of
    Quality as
    ) shipped to

    e
    i West Indies
    ) forthe
    past rea












    )
    )
    }
    }
    j
    {
    |
    {

    The hurricane was the’ worst
    for 80 years. Antigua was shaken
    in January by an earthquake



    Welsh Fusiliers

    Arrive In Jea

    KINGSTON, March 20

    Trooper Dilwara arrived thi
    morning and Janded an advan
    | party of 200 of the First Battalion
    | of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers who |
    are relieving the First Battalion |
    | Roy: al Inniskilling Fusiliers of}
    | garrison duty in Jamaica, |
    |

    |

    }

    |
    |
    |

    The vessel sailed this afternoo:
    for Belize, British Honduras
    where it will land another part
    for garrison duty on the border
    of Guatemala and British Hondu

    EASTER

    ras |

    The Dilwara is due to return
    to Kingston on March 26 when ‘e
    the remainder of+the battalion make at

    will bé landed

    RAIL STRIKE CALLED

    PARIS, March 21 |

    —(CP)



    The fir
    French general

    t major step towards >
    strike came to
    night, when the powerful non
    Cemmunist Trade Union Confed
    Force Ouvriere ordered a
    hours rail strike for
    and Friday .—Reuter,

    GILBEY’S

    Thursday

    \
    Geo
    WP
    ones
    ene
    ~~
    ~~
    mt

    residents flocked t
    milk supplie

    canned

    evening as
    get extra
    resh and

    A
    Both)

    groce! re

    ported enough powdered ind | GARDINER AU STIN& Co., Lid.
    canned milk to last only a short}
    Ane | Agents.



    ERR
    PAGE

    TWO





    Caub Calling

    PEGG, Overseas
    Fredk

    who had been





    ix
    ta.,
    a

    M* B. CECII
    a Representative of
    Sage



    n Barb on hort visit, re
    rned Trinidad yesterday
    afternoon 1} B.W.LA He was

    Windsor Hotel
    is stationed in Trini

    taying at t
    Pe



    Vi
    dad
    First Out of Sixty

    R. DAVID ELIOT, son of the
    late E. C. Eliot former Ad-
    ministrator of Dominica and Mrs.

    g

    Eliot (now Mrs. Bradshaw) a
    Barbadian who left here at the
    age of ten has just joined the

    Royal Navy, He came first out of
    sixty entrants in the sixteen—year-
    old entry examination for the
    Royal Navy. Only twenty-four of
    the candidates qualified.

    David was educated first at the
    Ursuline Convent and then at
    Lodge School before he went to
    England. There he_ spent three
    years at Boarzell, Hurst Green
    where his two young brothers,
    Mark and Henry are doing ex-
    tremely well. He then went to
    Uppingham until last year when
    he decided to make the Royal
    Navy his career.

    David's great grandfather was
    the first Archdeacon of Barbados
    and his grandfather was bern in
    Barbados.

    Twenty Years

    ) BE shown before the sche-

    duled film at the Aquatic
    Club Cinema to-morrow is a two-
    reel featurette “Twenty Years of
    Academy Awards” produced by
    the Academy of Motion Picture
    Arts and Sciences

    It tells the story of the “Holly-
    wood Oscars” and to whom. they
    were awarded between 1927” and
    1947. Brief shots from the films
    which won awards and some of
    the stars are seen. A few of the
    old timers who are seen are
    Warner Baxter, Charles Laughton,
    Norma_ Shearer, George Arliss,
    Janet Gaynor, Marie Dressler and
    several others

    Will See B.LF.
    M® and Mrs. Ted Benjamin
    a? atcompanied by their daugh-
    t Gill were ‘among the passen-
    £ for England last
    ht by the Willemstad. Mr.
    Benjamin will be in England foc

    the British Industries Fair.

    First Clients Return

    s leaving

    E* ROUTE to British Guiana by

    he S.S. Gascogne are Nurs-
    ica

    onous, Callender and
    > in England they
    ying at the Royal
    Nursing and observing










    College

    modern

    d nursing techniques. at
    various London Hospitals, They
    vere the first British Council
    lients last year when the

    Council took over from the Col-
    onial Office responsibility for the
    welfare and accommodation of
    Colonials in England.

    Married in U.S.

    ISS DAISY RILEY, LS.M.,

    formerly Charge Nurse of
    the Eye Department of the Bar-
    bados General Hospital was mar—
    ried in New York on March 14
    to Mr. Edgar Freeman an Express
    Businessman of Long Island.

    BY THE

    HE less food there is, and the

    more repulsive it becomes,
    louder grows the cry of the
    ‘expert’, bidding us not to
    s9 much,

    From an article I take the fol-
    lowing shining words, in the hope
    that they may help others as they
    have helped me: ~—

    Weight for weight, a mouse
    needs far more food than an
    elephant, because its relative sur-
    Jace area is much greater,

    If that does not encourage Fatty
    to give her processed halibut to
    Tiny, then there is no decency
    left in this grabbing world. i

    The Octopus
    C NE of the features of Pro-

    fessor Orfl’s two-way round-
    about is the Octopus. This con-
    sists of a maze of twisting streets,
    thrown out like tentacles to catch
    traffic appreaching or leaving the
    roundabout and 59 spread the
    volume of vehicles over a wide
    area. The ramps and parkodromes
    closest to a roundabout would be



    the

    eat

    inside these twisting streets, so
    that all traffic proceeding away
    from the roundabout would be

    diverted at key—points to the back
    entrance of a parkodrome, while
    traffic approaching the roundabout
    by alternate ramps would use the
    front entrance of the parkodrome,
    Each tentacle-street would bear a
    number, according to the day of
    the week, and this number would
    correspond to another number
    issued to each driver at the parko-
    drome before or after leat ing or
    arriving. 5

    Madness in the Air

    T HAVE always saic

    f 1 that flying
    is the dullest and

    silliest way

    cf wasting time. The airlines
    apparently agree with me. To
    induce people to fly they *have
    lo Wage a war of propaganda If
    one line offers each woman a
    ae of orchids, its rival
    counters with free chs

    A Gwelve-course an raat

    dinner served in

    bed by one firm brovokes another

    Se See eee eee eee
    st New Millinery LADIES’ AND CHILDREN’S
    a

    STRAWS

    In WHITE and Many Latest SHADES
    51 Gauge “ARISTOC”

    ti

    ‘ Nylons

    @i----------- +e.

    aw MEMS HATS
    fine new assortment
    a Latest Shades

    m ONLY 2.40
    a

    Dial 4606






    POCKET CARTOON
    by OSBERT LANCASTER

    “What 1 want ts a straight
    answer to my question—is the
    National Commander, Western
    Regton, under the control of
    the Supreme Commander
    British Railways, or is he
    not?”






    After 33 Years
    RS. DAISY BURNETT
    + companied by her daughter

    ac-

    Miss Dorothy Burnett who had
    been spending three months’ holi-
    day in Barbados left on Tuesday
    afternoon for the U.S. via Trini-
    dad by B.W.I1.A,

    Mrs. Burnett who is a Barba-
    lian had been paying her first
    visit to her home in thirty-three
    years, This was her daughter's
    first visit to the island.

    While in Barbados she was the
    guest of her sister Mrs. Cyrus of
    “Lascelles” Pin., St. James. Mrs.
    Burnett is also a_ sister of Mr.
    J. M. Crick former headmaster of
    St. Thomas Boys’ School and St.
    Silas Boys’ School.

    West Indian Studies Local
    Government

    OR the third consecutive year
    the Lambeth (London) Bor~
    ough Council arranged at the re~
    quest of the Student Welfare De=
    partment of the British Council a
    special comprehensive course on
    Local Government for overseas
    students. The course, which fin-
    ished last week, included a study
    of the Council's housing depart-
    ment, a visit to Lambeth Palace,
    where the Archbishop of Canter-
    bury lives, meetings with local
    government officers as well as
    lectures and discussion groups.
    The West Indian representative
    was Mr, O. D. Marsh, of Jamaica,
    who_has recently been called to
    the Bar.

    * .

    Anniversary Celebrations

    HE LEAGUE of Coloured

    _ Peoples, in celebration of
    their 20th anniversary, held a
    dance in London last week. The
    dance was only a small part of
    the celebrations; there are educa—
    tional and other social events to
    follow. The climax will be the
    Annual General Meeting in April.



    Barbados Holiday

    EAVING ENGLAND on the
    Golfito to-day for his first
    holiday in Barbados since the war
    is Dr. C. B. ‘Bertie’ Clarke, form-—
    er West Indies Test cricketer. He
    will be accompanied by his wife

    whose first visit to the Wést Indies
    this will be. A few days ago Mrs.
    Clarke, who is herself an aftist,
    judged a lecal Art Exhibition held
    in connection with the Festival of

    Britain. When they arrive here
    Bertie hopes he will not be too
    late to get a couple of Zames of
    cricket and possibly re-appear for
    his old club, Spartan.

    Off to U.S.

    EAVING by B.W.1.A. on
    Monday for Puerto Rito on
    her way to the United States to
    weside, was Mrs, Lloyd wife of
    Mr. Lionel Lioyd of the Barbados
    Police Force.
    Mrs. Lloyd will be staying with
    her brother in the United States.

    Area Engineer

    R. BOB GREENE, Area En-
    gineer, I.A.L, left for An-
    tigua on Monday by B.W.LA, af-
    ter spending three days in Bar-

    bados.
    T.C.A. Pilot

    R. AND MRS. JOHN VAL-

    LANCE arrived by T.C.A.
    yesterday to spend ten days’ holi-
    day in Barbados. Mr, Vallance is
    a pilot with T.C.A.

    For Easter

    R. NEVILLE CONNELL.

    Director of the Barbados
    Museum, left yesterday afternoon
    by B.W.1.A. for Trinidad. He has
    gone over for the Easter week-end
    and expects to return on Easter
    Monday.

    Canadian Surgeon

    R. AND MRS. G. M. SPOON-

    ER accompanied by their son

    Charles, arrived from Canada yes-

    terday by T.C.A. to spend

    eighteen days’ holiday in Barba-

    des. They are staying at the
    Ocean View Hotel.

    Dr. Spooner is a Urological Sur-
    geon in Toronto.

    With T.C.A., Bermuda

    RRIVING from Bérmuda by

    & T.C.A. was Mr, Walter

    Jones who is with T.C.A’s Traffic

    Department in Bermuda, Here for

    a short holiday he is staying at the
    Aquatic Club.

    Arriving on the same plane was
    Miss June Clark’s friend, Miss
    Jean Lovie who is an gir steward-
    ess with T.C.A. Her home is in
    Toronto. Miss Clark, who is also
    a T.C.A. air stewardess arrived
    from Canada on Saturday. They
    plan to stay here for about ten
    days.



    WAY...

    to offer free scent, cosmetics,
    manicure outfits, and tea—services.
    Which will be the first line with
    compulsory TV?

    Overall Overalis

    (HARLIE SUET has issued this
    directive: —

    Owing to the increased overall
    price of utility overalls, utility
    overalls sold under the new over-
    all prices will be referred to as
    overall utility overalls, not, as
    hitherto, as utility overall over-



    DINE

    By Beachcomber

    alls, in order to avoid the confu-
    sion between the overall and the
    overall price schedulisation, except
    in cases where the word
    overall refers to one or the other,
    in which case or cases the second
    overall should be used to distin—
    guish the overall price from the
    article referred to as an overall,
    having regard to the use of the
    word overall in both cases, and
    not with reference to an overall
    overall without the word utility
    being inserted between overall
    and overall,



    7

    and DANCE

    at the

    Crane

    Hotel

    EASTER MONDAY 26th MARCH

    19351
    SPECIAL DINNER WILL BE SERVED

    from 7—9 p.m,

    DANCING 9 P.M. — 2 A.M.

    Music by Riche Goodridge and his Orchestra

    DINNER & DANCE
    Admission to DANCE only

    Please make your TABLE

    $3.00
    $1.00
    RESERVATIONS EARLY

    Phone 2220

    iN

    “CHARNOS”
    “MASCOT”

    “MASCOT” Chiffon
    “MASCOT” Rayon
    In Latest Fashionable Shades

    * ELITE”

    Sports Shirts .......... $5.93
    All Popular Shades

    SPORT SHIRTS
    Boys & Youths Sizes only (White) .... $1.88

    EVANS & WHITFIELDS

    CELLULAR

    YOUR SHOE

    {

    STORES





    2.12

    . $1.70
    All Sizes

    Tle.

    Dial 4220

    BARBADOS

    Woman Of The

    ADVOCATE



    Week

    TALLULAH

    @ At 49 she is America’s best-loved radio star . .

    but he» star

    appearance this week was before a committee of Congress, when
    she asked the Government to support a voluntary National Heaith

    Committee.

    From Fredé¢rick Cook

    NEW YORK,

    WHO SAID “ME? I’m as pure as the driven slush?”
    WHO stopped Dr. Kinsey dead in his tracks by agree-
    ing to answer all of his questions if he would answer hers ?
    WHO staggered a fashionable Park Avenue dinner
    party by retorting loudly when someone said how habit-

    forming cocaine was :
    for years.”

    “Nonsense! I’ve been living on it

    WHO—after loving a good punchy cocktail all her
    life—“went on the wagon” the day of Pearl Harbour and
    refused to touch a drop until Hitler and Tojo were licked—

    and kept her word?

    Frank .. . .. ribald

    ALONG Broadway, they would
    have no difficulty in identifying
    her, It’s the woman they wrote
    the song about, “You call every-
    body darling,” the girl who out-
    Hollywooded Hollywood more
    than 20 years ago and turned he&X
    back on it, the one and only
    hoarsely crodaking, outrageously
    frank, florid and unpredictable
    Tallulah Bankhead, “bejtter
    known, darling, if you don’t
    mind, as The Wham from
    Alabam’, a study in perpetual
    motion,”

    To-day Tallulah, at undis-
    closed thousands a week, is un-
    challenged mistress of the Amer-
    ican airwaves. Always ribald,
    often risque, her triumph has
    surprised many who thought she
    would prove too strong meat for
    the unseen audience, This sug-
    gestion she takes with mock
    indignation.

    At 49, Tallulah has lost no
    scrap of her scorpion wit. Cer-
    tainly there is some justification
    for her own claim. “I’ve created
    more gossip than any woman
    since Catherine the Great.”

    Tallulah might, had she chosen,
    have won fame in a quite different
    field—as the Lady Astor of the
    American, Congress.

    Her father was an M.P.
    Speaker of the Lower House.

    Her uncle was the famous
    Senator Bankhead, who died in
    1946.

    No name has stood higher in
    the American Deep South since
    the Civil War than the one she
    rescued from Washington, planted

    and

    firmly in lights on Broadway
    and spread across page one of
    every scandal sheet tabloid in
    America.

    To meet Tallulah, one needs
    all one’s mental armour on
    and then to be prepared for barbs
    that will speed wunerringly to
    whatever chinks may a.

    In a New York night club
    Tallulah once heard two dow-
    agers discussing her in a none
    too flattering way, “Waiter!”
    she said in her most formal tones,
    “please go into the kitchen, pro-
    cure two saucers of cream—make
    it sour cream— and place them
    before those two aged cats over
    there.”

    The waiter looked despairingly
    for help to the head waiter and

    wa rashing around the moun-
    1, ’
    jtain

    She opened the window and
    found an iron object banging
    against the glass. She could not
    get it loose: it seemed to be
    attached by a string. She pulled
    the string as far as it would
    come, tucked the iron object
    under her pillow, and went of

    to sleep.

    “Lordy, Lordy, Mam,” said the
    horrified Negro porter in the
    morning. “You’se been a-sleepin’
    all night on the end of the light-
    ning conductor.”

    The rest of Tallulah’s party
    were not in the least surprised.

    “Even forked lightning,” they
    said, “knows better than to
    tangle with Tallulah.”

    World Reserved

    —LES.

    B.B.C. Radio
    Programme

    Copyright



    got no help from that quarter.
    He carried out the order. The THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951.
    dowagers left in a huff. 690 am—12.15 p.m. . ..s.. 19.60 M.
    “Tht 9 6.30 a.m, Football Fixtures; 6.45 a.m.
    It ad real ' Sporting Record; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10
    ‘ . . ;am. News Analysis; 7.15 a.m. From the
    THIS sort ot incident lends 348 sin. Preatanuie Parade;
    rich flavour to the atmosphere

    of wild derision and utter confus-
    ion in which Tallulah (“The girl
    with the sleeping-car name”)
    comes to full bloom. She likes

    Listeners’ Choice; 8 a.m. Land and Live-
    stock; 6.30 a.m. Mary Munn; 8,45 a.m
    Plain English; 9 a.m, The News; 9.10 a.m
    from Britain; 9.15 a.m, Close
    11,15

    Home News

    Down; Programme Parade;

    Editorials:
    7.30 a.m. Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m.
    a.m,



    ao 11.25 a.m, Listeners’ Choice; 11.45 a.m.
    nothing better than to be called, | coecial Dispatch; 12 (noon) ‘The News
    as she has been, “the only voleano | j219 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m.
    in the world dressed by Main- | Close Down. ‘
    bocher.” | 4.15--6.00 p.m. 19.76 M.

    " “Vales 4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 5 p.m. Com-
    Tallulah is, to put it mildly, |... of the Week; 8.15 p.m. Scottish
    overpowering. Howard Dietz | Magazine; 5.45 p.m. Melocy on Strir

    ence said of her with an exhaus-
    ted sigh, “A day away from her
    is like a month in the country—
    so restful, and yet so boring.”

    The most improbable thing
    about her is her name, and the
    fact that it is her real one.





    How to Travel; 6.33 p.m, Interlude
    25.64 M. 31.32 M, 48.43 M

    6 p.n
    6.00—7.15 p.m.



    . Programme Parade; 7 p.m

    rs; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15



    The ;
    p.m, We see Britain; 7.45 p.m. Generally
    Speaking

    7.45—11.00 pom,

    31.32 M. & 48.43 M

    8 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m, Sir
    ‘I love it myself, daaarling,” | John Mipeil's | jake Journey: at aati:
    she says, “for nobody knows what Dione: ei8 ‘ti Sing with adh: Bas
    it is all about. It would be per-|),m. Do you Remember; 10 p.m. The
    fect for a barbecue Sauce. It] News; 10.10 p.m. Interlude; 10 15, ote
    ce ¢ FA ~all +| Toke it from Here; 10.45 p.m. Life ip
    pounds ike: Mueer ne cay Britain; 11 p.m. The Music of Sid Phillips
    prayer. But it’s real, daaarling,| 34a nis Band
    it’s real!”
    Chain-smoker CROSSWORD

    TALLULAH is a chain-smoker,
    But
    and

    chain-drinker, chain-talker.
    under the hyperbolic wit

    rapier repartee lurk furious affec-
    tions and instant loyalties that
    make her—to a select few—a

    dependable, unshakable friend o:
    whose word life itself could safely
    be staked.

    She regards Roosevelt as the
    greatest American who ever
    lived, rates Truman. not far
    behind. At a 1948 rally (when
    she worked like a_ cyclone for
    Truman at a time when most of
    his friends had written him off)



    j

    Th
    adic ‘



    Across





    MARCH 22, 1951

    NS

    THURSDAY,

    RATS !

    y "i 1 3 g the next best thing

    MANILA, Feb. 21. Club is doing i eee ;
    They have g need fora Piedad The club is offering a 5 cent re-
    Piper in rat-infésted Ozamis City ward for every rat, dead or alive,









    ilippines turned over to the city Health
    in southern Philippines. raiees any the of oe Sey
    Lacking one, the local Lion's —LN:S.
    JANETTA DRESS SHOP
    Upstairs over NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad Street
    BEAUTIFUL AFTERNOON, COCKTAIL
    ppd ENE ING GOWNS
    Open SATURDAY MORNING until 11.30, Tel. 2684





    —_——

    AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
    TO-NIGHT at 8.30
    CARY GRANT . MYRNA LOY . SHIRLEY TEMPLE
    in “THE BACHELOR AND THE BOBBY-SOXER”

    Commencing FRIDAY 23rd at 8.30
    RKO’s New Picture
    “ADVENTURE IN BALTIMORE”
    Starring :
    ROBERT YOUNG SHIRLEY TEMPLE
    JOHN AGAR
    NO MATINEE ON GOOD FRIDAY.









    ,S” Please Note:















    —

    PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

    TODAY (2 SHOWS) 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M
    ‘EXCEPT GOOD FRIDAY)
    MONDAY (4 Shows) 1.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.tr

    TUESDAY TO THURSDAY — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M,
    Two Hours of Solid Action!

    THE FLAME ano tee ARROW

    Color by Technicolor
    Burt LANCASTER Virginia MAYO — Others







    SAT. & SUN,
    9.90 a.m.,,

    445 & 830 PM

    Good Friday (only) (5 Shows) Starting Times 2.30—4.30—6,30—8,30 and
    10.30 p.m, The Life and Passion of Christ

    PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

    TODAY (Only) 5 & 8.30 P.M Double)
    Johnny Mack BROWN in (Both) - - -

    CODE oF tHe SADDLE & RAIDERS oF THE BORDER

    (Monogram Action

    Goop FRIDAY (only) Starting Times; 2.00 — 4.00, — 6.00, — 8.00 pm
    The First All-Talking Picture of

    “THE LIFE AND PASSION OF CHRIST”

    SAT. MIDNITE 24TH (RKO Radio Double) _
    “WEST of the PECOS” Robert Mitchum & MASKED RAIDERS” Tim Holt

    GATET WY—rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

    LAST SHOW TONITE: 8.30 — (Monofram Double)
    LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT & RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL

    evra ttennriateraheipsiestneeditinanst =e RET van tecencems tra iia Neat te i.
    GOOD FRIDAY (Only) Starting Times: 4.30 — 6.00 — 7.30 — 9.40 pm
    “THE LIFE AND PASSION OF CHRIST”
    Saturday, Sunday, Monday
    Two Shows Daily
    “THE STORY OF BOB AND SALLY”
    Women 5 p.m.—Men 8.30 p.m.
    POSITIVELY NO CHILDREN
    Age Limit: 16 Years & Over

    EMPIRE |

    Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
    4.45 & 8.30

    20th Century Fox Presents





    Midnite Sat. 21th (RKO)
    “TRAIL STREET”
    Randolph SCOTT &
    “THE AVENGING RIDER”
    Tim HOLT.







    ROYAL

    TO-DAY only 4.45 & 8.30
    M-G-M Double —

    Wallace Beery in



    ; ‘ . St art tence, (6
    she wept openly when introduced Bt BRRRET PEL ROTE.OE A Mebtrence,, (6) Burt LANCASTER, Dorothy : ‘i
    to him. Still sobbing, she bobbed _ gale. (3) . : i ' « VIVA VILLA
    in a near curtsy, seized his hand} ,6: Sity*, Sin (ola change. (4.9) | McGUIRE, Edmund GWENN ;
    impulsively and covered it with (7) 11. Mountain range. (U0 é and
    kisses, Mr, Truman blushed | !2- Alienate. (8) as ie)
    scarlet ie 4 ipken ey, "a 6 RIO RITA ”
    3 . . iat & frost it is. ¢ 99

    ey Gongiber (4) 4.6 batty ta «* MISTER 880
    _* . sricket groun ut not . ) i

    Storm-proof 20. Container, (3) | with Starring
    21. A Roy, but not Derek. (3)
    TRAVELLING by train last] 22. Grade nine matertal. (9) Bud Abbott & Lou Costello
    sala 7 Millard MITCHELL and
    autumn between California and Down ‘ ‘
    New York, Tallulah could not] 1}. Bee eS att prop: (7) stat Minor WATSON
    sleep. one hight for something] “ “py “9 *C* © ® SPantah estate ia ra nae 3 eS
    rattling against her window-pane. 3 A& solemn observance (4) i
    A heavy desert thunderstorm| § }Ya'er of bea pace Tay ROXY
    7 No, the R.N.R. for a change.. (8)
    8. Coarse fabric made up of drin!



    THE FAMILY SOAP
    @ Gets skin really clean

    © Banishes perspiration odor

    © Leaves body sweet and dainty

    Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that is
    mild and gentle. for face, hands and daily
    baths. Odex is ideal for family use.








    para

    We shall NOT

    to business on
    SATURDAY, 24th MARCH

    Will our friends

    please note and arrange

    y baile

    NOTICE

    un entretenimiocnto

    de cenar

    be OPENING

    and customers
    their

    shopping and orders accordingly.



    THE BARBADOS
    COTTON





    CO-OPERATIVE

    FACTORY LTD.





    i}

    and sheep. (7)
    9. You find them In the winter of






    life. (8)
    13 It’s ali part of the act. (5)
    16. Greeting. (3)
    18. The dinornis. (8)
    Solution of yesterday's puzzle.—Across
    5. Scan. 9 Cinnamon, 10
    ie) 1S, Waul. 14, Valid 15, Goety
    18 UWusien, 22 Lair: 25
    vender, Down: 1. Scow!
    Enough, 4 Enclosure
    8. Need; 11 Eyen; 12
    Ri nd 17. Hill: 20 Son: 21

    ay Le
    (AB) Ode

    2 BREATHLESS HOURS
    OF EXCITING ACTION
    EVER WITHIN THIS

    THEATRE’S WALLS!

    >



    MPAHES TRHONTITD



    TODAY 2.30; 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
    SAT. & SUN. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
    } MON. 9.380 a.m.; 1.30; 4.45
    | and 8.30 p.m
    | TUES. and Continuing 4.45
    | and 8.30 p.m



    PELAZA Btewn

    (DIAL 2310)

    Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
    4.30 & 8.15

    M.G.M. Double.

    M-G-M Double
    Hedy Lamarr, John Hodiak

    Nelson Eddy in . =
    « BALALAIKA"* “A LADY WITHOUT
    and PASSPORT ”
    “ACT OF and
    VIOLENCE” “ CONGOLAISE ”
    wih

    The Forgotten World of the
    Savage.



    OLYMPIC

    Van Heflin and Robert Ryan.

    GLOBE

    OPENING TO-MORROW & CONTINUING







    SUSAN HAYWARD...

    Tempestuously Magnificent
    As Cherokee Lansing...








    ...who ruled
    men

    with the
    soft touch
    of her

    lips!!

    WALTER WANGER

    Presents



    i
    COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR!

    starring

    SUSAN HAYWARD « ROBERT PRESTON

    Pedro ARMENDARIZ - chit witis-tioyd Googh- Edward Begley ~






    Produced by WALTER WANGER + Directed by STUART HEISLER + Associate Producer i}
    EOWARD LASKER + Screenplay by FRANK NUGENT and CURTIS KENYON
    Suggested by a Story By RICHARD WORMSER «+ An EACLE LION FILMS Release
    PLUS
    LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
    JULIUS SIMMONDS ............ “Embraceable You”
    WEY Pee PITT ch vs cuca e peat “T Wanna Be Loved”
    ARTEL MOORE 0 isc. caved “Dreamers Holiday”
    CHESTER HOLDER .......... “Wildest Gal In Town”
    OTHA TAYLOR ....“Dear Hearts And Gentle People”
    JOE (Chatanooga) CLARK ....‘Bop! Goes My Heart”
    GUEST STAR—PERCY WELCH
    Pit 16 — House 30 — Balcony 40 — Box 54
    TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 Last Showing }
    “THE DOCTOR AND THE GIRL” }
    GLEN FORD — JANET LEIGH \
    NS pa nen a!)


    THURSDAY, MARCH 22,

    1951



    | STR







    1
    | 1. Probtem spots in the |
    | eatkans and Middle East |
    1
    | 2. Yugesiavis's owtist to

    the Mediterranean

    3. Russia's outlet to the
    ! Mediterranean from her
    | Black Sea ports

    4. Oilfields and areas of vita



    qe Strategy in
    si Mediterranean is cone

    trated on keeping open vital
    safe-

    shipping lanes and

    ALGERIA

    importance to Britain and U.S.A.







    1 OA

    the
    en- Middle East.

    Alon,

    Gritish cir bases © Communist countries Au
    i American air bases i) Naval bases

    guarding the oilfields of the

    the North African coast
    lie a chain of sea and air bases

    y





    25 = 7 =
    5 oe ee
    a a até ae er aikie
    SS ate @Fienaica ee
    ee, i 1 ¥
    Y A t eg

    belonging to the Western Powers.
    Malta and Gibraltar are still key
    points of defence.

    Soviet satellite States border



    BARBADOS

    ATEGY IN THE ‘MED’: WHAT IT MEANS
    aN ae Co | I §
    } ! il ; :

    Af SSF

    vep

    Greece and Yugoslavia.
    outlet to the Mediterranean from
    her Black Sea ports is through
    the Dardanelles,

    Russia's

    oe OG thy) 7. SAY

    ADVOCATE mi
























    i) ee

    tat tt fh ae



    /

    ae
    Uh

    London Express Service





    Fishing Industry

    In Barbados

    By C.C. Skeete Director
    Of Agriculture

    During the month the sum of
    $705.21 was repaid on loans; this
    makes a total of $53,699.24 repaid
    over al! loans to date. An amount
    of $6.31 interest was also receiv-
    ed making a total of $660.80 in-
    terest paid to date.

    A sum of $237.00 was issued in
    loans during the month making a
    total of $98,576.29 issued in loans.

    One meeting of the Fisheries
    Advisory Committee was held
    during the month at which four
    applications for loans _ totalling
    $2,054.00 were granted

    At this meeting it was decided
    that in future an amount of 40 per
    cent. of the cost of the boat or
    $400.00, whichever is less, should
    be loaned towards the building of
    a new boat.

    Fishing operations suffered on
    account of the ever changing
    weatner conditions which _pre-
    vailed during the month of Feb-
    ruary. Firstly, fast moving south-
    easterly tides kept the flying fish
    far off the south-east of the Island.
    and a few boats were able to make
    the difficult trip. Then three days
    of very heavy winds which caused
    considerable damage to the sails of
    about fifty boats had the fisher-
    men on the alert. This unusual
    keavy wind was followed by three
    te four days of flat calm, a week
    of rain and a further south-easter-
    ly tide

    It should be noted, however,
    that during the period of heavy
    winds, some boats brought very
    good catches of flying fish, but
    the risk was too great for the fish-
    ermen to take. Dolphin catches
    for the month were above average
    for this time of the year.



    Owing to bad weather condi-
    tions, Investigator found it neces-
    sary to tow back fifteen fishing
    boats during the month. Investi-
    gator also carried out fishing op-
    erations on the south-eastern
    banks off the Island to determine
    the possible duration of the king
    fish season. King fish were pres-
    ent on both Middle and London
    Shallows.

    Flying fish catches were better
    on the eastern coast than on any
    other section.

    It is encouraging to record that
    about thirty to forty flying fish
    boats are using gill‘nets for flying
    fish capture with favourable
    results .



    SAUDI ARABIAN OIL

    CAIRO, March 19.
    Prince Faisal, Foreign Minister
    of Saudi Arabia, said here to-day,

    nationalisation of Persian oil
    “will not affect the future of
    Saudi Arabian oilfields in the
    least”.





    a

    American Column:

    Flashback To A Night
    In 1931...

    From R. M, MacCOLL
    NEW YORK.

    The course of world history
    hung in the balance on a night
    fin December 1931.

    Then Winston Churchill, jump-
    ing out of the wrong side of his
    New York taxi, was knocked down
    by another car.

    He was On his way to dine with
    an old friend, American elder
    statesman Bernard Baruch, But
    he had to go to hospita] instead.

    Now America is a little worried
    over Churchill's friend,

    For Baruch, 80, hurt a leg while
    getting off his horse in South
    Carolina, and was rushed back to
    New York by, plane.

    The counsel of Baruch is still
    regarded as invaluable by Presi-
    dents and common men alike.
    When he speaks the nation listens.
    And with all his great gifts he is
    not aloof but warm and friendly,

    A NEW STIRRING among the
    prospectors of northern California
    has. sent hardened veterans off
    again on the endless search among
    lonely hills and deserts. Gold?
    No—they are after tungsten now.

    It is a basic war material, for
    hardening steel, and Franco's Spain
    has jumped up the price of her
    wolfram (from which tungsten is
    made) from 2,300 dollars (£821) a
    ton last year to 4,970 dollars
    (£1,774) a ton, And even at that
    exorbitant price Spain insists on
    payment in scarce copper, nickel,
    or tin.

    WHILE Barbara Hutton is busy
    down Mexico way, trying to
    divorce Prince Igor Troubetskoy,
    Porfirio Rubirosa, Dominican Re-
    public diplomat and former hus-
    band of tobacco hieress Doris
    Duke, turned up.in New York to
    spend a week on Doris’s New
    Jersey farm, “We are better
    friends than ever,” said Porfirio.

    THE MOST REVEREND Richard
    Cushing, Roman Catholic Arch-
    bishop of Boston, is against letting
    18-year-olds join the army. He
    says they would emerge “immoral,
    dishonest, irreligious, heavy drink-
    ers, gamblers, and just plain no
    good,”

    MAYBE you thought cattle
    rustling a thing of the past?
    Alabama has just had the worst
    year in its history, with 100,000
    dollars (£35,714) worth of cattle
    stolen. And things will get worse
    —meat prices are still rising.

    SAMUEL GROVE stole some
    suits from q Bronx flat, Then he
    went over to Harlem, walked into
    a pool-room and tried to interest
    one of the players in buying
    them. He was arrested. The pool
    player was the man who owned the
    suits. “A small world,” said
    Samue!l sadly.

    PLENTY of people were already
    keen to find new uranium deposits.
    Now they will be even keener. The
    Atomic Energy Commission is

    eS









    JUST RECEIVED

    KING PIN SETS

    For THE FOLLOWING:-

    AUSTIN 7 ELP.,
    FIAT 500
    FORD 8 HP. &

    8 H.P., 10 H.P., 12 H.P.

    10° H.P.

    .

    FORD V 8 CARS
    FORD V 8 TRUCKS













    SINGER 9 H.P.

    ECKSTEIN

    Bay Street

    FORD V8 THAMES TRUCK
    HILLMAN 10 H.P.
    MORRIS 8 H.P.

    & 10 HP.
    & 10 H.P.

    STANDARD 8 HLP., 9 H.P., 14 H.P,
    VAUXHALL 10 H-P., 12 H.P., 14 H.P.
    BEDFORD TRUCKS

    Also
    GENERATOR ARMATURES
    FOR POPULAR MODELS,

    BROTHERS,



    offering bonuses of up to 35,000
    dollars (£12,495) for new ore dis-
    coveries.

    AMERICANS thought they had
    heard all the reasons for divorce.
    Not'so. Giving evidence in a case
    where his wife, Arlynne Mac-
    fadden, alleges cruelty, husband
    Berwyn (son of 82-year-old
    physical culture authority Bernarr
    Macfadden) admitted he threw a
    plate of her salad against the
    dining-room wall,

    “T told her five separate times
    not to put green peppers in my
    salad,” he said. “But when it
    happened again, I threw the plate
    That’s all”.

    SERGEANT Glenn Garrison is
    home from the wars, to Columbus,
    Georgia. He is allergic to wool.
    And his skin just cannot stand the
    G.I. winter undies,

    THE FIRE BRIGADE at Buell-
    ton, California, is worn out. A
    farm blaze lasted more than ten
    hours, because every time they got
    one shed of hay under control
    flaming rats dashed into the next
    shed and touched that off

    THE MAN who played the sar-
    donic barman in “Lost Weekend,”
    Howard da Silya, is in trouble.
    Together with Oscar-winning
    actress Gale Sondegaard, he has
    been ordered to appear before the
    Congress Un-American Activities
    Committee, Says Howard; “They
    want to silence me.”

    Mr. Louis Law
    Visits St. Vincent

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    KINGSTON, March 18.

    MR, LOUIS LAW, Executive
    Secretary of the Caribbean In-
    terim,Tourism Committee arrived
    in St. Vincent by British Guiana
    Airways on Tuesday 13 and was a
    guest at the Blue Caribbean Hotel.

    Mr. Law was taken around by
    Mr. C. G, Huggins—Secretary of
    the St. Vincent Tourist Board—to
    see many places of interest includ-
    ing Touer Hotel, Harbour Club
    the Aquatic Club at Villa and In-
    dian Bay as well as several other
    beauty spots.

    Mr. Law attended a meeting of
    the local Tourist Board and told
    members that St. Vincent had all
    the natural attraction for tourists
    and that at the moment there was
    adequate hotel accommodation for
    them. The important problems at
    the moment, he said, were, first,
    to let people outside, particularly
    in America, know about St. Vin-





    cent, and secondly to provide
    proper transport for people
    to get to St. Vincent. With

    regard to the first, Mr. Law prom-
    ised to give St. Vincent its share
    of publicity in Travel Trade as
    well as in other American maga-
    zines. The transport problem, he
    felt, would best be solved by pro-
    viding a 15 to 20 passenger amphi-

    .

    luse LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP

    You'll feel so fresh and full

    you’ve washed with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap.
    Lifebuoy’s deep-cleansing lather makes you

    fresh and keeps you fresh.

    whole day through.



    New Industrial
    Order Is Here

    Governor of St. Thomas
    And St. John Says

    In his inaugural address to the
    meeting of the eighth Municipal
    Council of St, Thomas and St,
    John last month, Governor Morris
    de Castro said.

    “We have been fortunate to
    attract at least two new industries
    here through our tax exemption
    laws Arrangements are now
    being made for the establishment
    of these industries in our com-
    munity,

    Besides, there have been serious
    enquiries from other industries
    which are now giving considera-
    tion to coming to these islands.

    The advent of this industrial
    order, | believe, might make it
    necessary for us to re-examine
    our labour policies, for the pro-
    tection of both the industries and
    our working people.

    At the time our wages and
    hours act was adopted, no thought
    was given to the type of indus-
    trialisation which is now coming
    to the islands,

    Because of this fact, I feel that

    our wages and hours act may
    have to be revised.
    Within the framework of our

    laws, we should consider, as the
    federal government and many
    states have done, the enactment
    of a provision in our wage laws
    which will create special indus-
    try committees to make determin-
    ations for minimum wages in each

    industry.
    No Economic Serfdom
    Of course, we will have to

    continue the protection of a single
    floor for all wages, and a ceiling
    for hours of work.

    I would like to reiterate my
    policy of being in favour of the
    best working conditions including
    huurs and wages, which we can
    get for our working people.

    We have not had, nor will we
    permit, economic serfdom of any
    kind. We recognise the partner-
    ship of Labour and Capital in a
    democratised, socially sensitive
    and just industrial order.

    We shall expect Labour to give
    an honest day's work for a full
    day’s pay, and we shall expec
    Capital to be fair and just in its
    dealings with Labour,

    In the light of this policy, 1
    shall recommend such revision of
    our wages and hours act as may
    become necessary as a result of
    negotiation with prospective in-
    dustrialists and discussions with
    labour leaders.”

    (A Caribbean Commission Release)



    Dian plane. We also advised the
    Tourist Board on a method of ar-
    riving at a more accurate estimate
    of the value of the tourist trade to
    the Colony.

    Mr. Law returned to Trinidad
    on Friday morning by the Lady
    Rodney, full of enthusiasm about
    tourism in St. Vincent.

    of energy when

    So use Lifebuoy



    Toilet Soap regularly, and keep fresh the pS
    ey

    FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

    WLBT Of 4-11 0-86








    U.S. DOUBLE
    ARM FORCES

    @ From Page 1.

    Truman's announcement was a
    new warning to Soviet Russia that
    the United States “in company
    with other free nations” is deter-
    mined “to. establish and maintain
    world peace”.

    He emphasised the speed with
    which the United States is re-
    building its defences by disclosing
    Marshall's telegram which gave
    the size of the country’s armed
    forces as double what it was on
    June 25,

    “This doubling of our strength
    has been accomplished in less than
    nine months after Communist ag-
    gression against the Republic of
    ae General Marshall wired.

    “For

    your information the
    strength we have already at-
    tained —a total strength in ex-

    cess of 2,900,00—was not attained
    in World War II until more
    than 21 months after our buildup
    Started in June 1940,° following
    the fall of France, and more than
    three months after Pearl Harbour.

    The President took unusual
    steps to seek a world wide dis-
    closure of the progress of Ameri-
    can defences, and the exchange
    of telegrams was radioed around
    the world by the State Depart-
    ments’ Voice of America,

    The _ President telegraphed
    Marshall, “I wish to commend
    you and all your associates in
    the Army, Navy and Air force
    for the strenuous efforts which
    have made such growth possible,

    “This tremendous gain in our
    strength has been made necessary
    by the Jawless aggression of
    Communist forces in Korea and
    by the menace of still further
    Communist attacks against other
    free nations,

    Preservation Of Freedom

    The armed forces we _ are
    building, and the supplies for
    them which our factories, farms
    ana mines are turning out, are
    for the proteetion and preserva-
    tion of our freedom,

    The speed with which we have
    been able to strengthen our de-
    fences should be a source of in-
    spiration and encouragement to
    men everywhere who love free-
    dom, It is evidence of our deter-
    mination in company with other

    free nations, to establish and
    maintain the world’s peace.
    “T am confident that under

    your wise leadership you will be
    wfully supported by the American
    people.”

    The Defence Department gave
    this country’s Pre Korean armed
    force strength at 1,458,000 men.

    Truman has announced a goal
    of 3,400,000 men as soon as possi-
    ble after June 30, His leaders in
    Congress are making a last ditch
    stand against some attempts to
    place the ceiling at 4,000,000 men
    on uninformed personnel

    Truman’s statement to-day was
    generally considered an_ invita-
    tion to the Allies of the United
    States to speed up rebuilding
    their armaments and their armed
    forces,

    —Reuter.

    / keep fresh all day...!



    no ee

    a
    ee

    ‘

    PPL PP PELE LALA EPPS LPS PES CCS ESSSSE OSSOS



    a LEVER raopvge

    PAGE THREE

    ee

    Industriés
    On Increase

    | General On Trial For





    War Crimes

    | PARIS, March 19 mander, Rameke was living under
    | German ex-General Hermann observation in Paris sut until
    | Ramcke, appeared to-day before a February when he left without

    |
    i
    | French court charged with having
    organised or tolerated atrocities
    According to the 1949 Annual|committed by German forces
    Report on Jamaica, industrial de- under his command in the Brest
    = has taken an appreci-| “pocket” in 1944.

    IN JAMAICA

    warning for Germany

    ing against the “slow

    able stride in that island. The re- The 71-year-old airborne Com- again arrested —Reuter,
    port says that arrangements have
    been made for the construction of
    the cement factory, which is
    expected to go into production in
    1952,

    Both the textile factory and the
    plant for the manufacture of ania!
    concentrates are expected to go
    into production this year. The
    substantial incentives provided by
    the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    agement) Law have also proved
    very attractive to other manufac-
    turers,



    Pioneer concessions have been

    granted for the manufacture of

    bypocrete—a new building mate- Sele tev :
    rial—and for building materials WS, MONROE &CO typ
    made of gypsum; for wire-bound Bridgetown, desta
    boxes for exporting island pro-| Barbades,

    duce; for cocoa powder and cocoa
    butter; for laundry blue, and for
    wooden handles for carpenters’ and
    cultivators’ tools

    There are a number of other
    proposals, some of considerable ‘aise
    5 » : > Distillers
    importance, which are now under ‘
    consideration, the Report states, Leith, Scotland

    These industries, when established,
    will do something towards reliev>|
    ing unemployment.

    Some of them will earn dollars,
    and others will assist in making
    the island independent of import-
    ed supplies of essential materials.

    Good Factories Needed

    As an additional gid to indus-
    trialisation, the government of
    Jamaica is developing an Indus-
    trial Estate in Western Kingston
    on which tactories may be sited at
    moderate rentals,

    Attempts are being made to se-
    cure the services of an industrial
    scientist of high qualifications to
    act as Scientific Secretary to the
    Industrial Development Commit-
    see,

    Thus, concludes the Report, the
    government has already achieved
    substantial results on its policy of
    encouraging industrialisation, a ;
    policy which it intends to pursue TNT Tells qo
    with the utmost vigour. you what Ono tS
    * TONO "' is not only a delicious drink but
    also a food of high nutritive and caloric value.
    It contains all the health-giving and restorative
    elements of pure rich milk—fine chocolate—
    sucrose, and malted grain—with a definite
    addition of Vitamin D.

    It will be recalled that Profes-
    sg Arthur Lewis referred to this
    Jamaica Government scheme in
    his study on The Industrialisation
    of the British West Indies,

    Professor Lewis felt that the Take it cold or hot asa morning drink or a
    trading estate is a very useful in- bedtime nightcap. Children lao te No added
    vention But he eypressed milk is required,

    the opinion that simply scheduling

    an area for industrial develop-
    ment is not enough. He felt
    that an Industrial Develop-

    ment Corporation should be set up
    to erect factory buildings. “What

    “Tono'’ is a complete food beverage.
    the industrialist is looking for is a
    factory building, well planned,

    with public utility services laid hy,

    CHOCOLATE MALT & MILK BEVERAGE
    Fe . “

    on’. r= ~
    Mr, Lewis said “He (the indus- Saree

    trialist) is not impressed by an

    empty piece of ground ” e
    More recent news from Jamai-

    ca indicates that such a Corpora~

    tion is likely to become a reality

    in that island in the near future

    {A Caribbean Commission Release)











    PE

    (PP





    Remember —
    HUTCHINSONS

    The Most Central Shopping Place For :—

    @ GLASSWARE and CROCKERY
    @ ALL TYPES KITCHEN WARE
    @ BEST BRANDS PAINTS and
    @ STOVES and PARTS
    @ BEDSTEADS, SPRINGS and MATTRESSES
    @ GLASS and MIRRORS,
    and many other BARGAIN ITEMS.

    ENAMELS



    G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD.

    Broad Street

    —

    Roebuck Street







    EEL LLLP LPL K

    PROSLSE ECP SEPP POCO

    445%;

    OS

    NOTICE

    OUR OFFICE AND WORKSHOP
    WILL BE CLOSED ON
    SATURDAY, MARCH 24th

    OUR GASOLENE STATION

    WILL BE OPENED TO BUSINESS
    AS USUAL.

    PVOOODOPSSS

    COURTESY GARAGE

    ROBERT THOM. LTD.
    WHITEPARK ROAD.

    *
    -

    After
    ing Press conferences and protest-
    course :
    French justice” he returned by his
    own free will on March 9 and w



    / MACDONALD
    y & MUIR LTD




    POPPE AAP

    £5 oes ‘hOsOsbs SbESO% 1S
    SLSR GELS P ECCS SSPE SLLEL PSE LEEPER PFPADLL PPP ANPP LP LPC VEE

    hold-

    of

    13










    434,6,454,4,¢,6,0, 0
    OGG FFE P SS FEED

    SS

    ¥,

    ao

    POOLE SGLEL SAL IDPISOPPE SE LLP LAS OS SO$

    -
    i sa i ia eta i ith a a It a ik ee
    PAGE FOUR

    BARBADOS





    Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

    Thursday, March 22, 1951



    HARRISON COLLEGE

    DURING the last century the name of
    Harrison College has stood out high in the
    list of public schools in the British Empire.
    It was not merely the name of the school but
    the calibre of her alumni found in almost
    every part of the v,orld occupying posi-
    tions of eminence. It would be impossible
    to reproduce the impressive list but among
    tHose of the past have been Abel Green-
    idge and the late H. B. Gooding while
    among those of the present is a Perman-
    ent Under Secretary of State in the Brit-
    ish Home Office. Sir Frank Newsam.

    But it is not on her past laurels that
    Harrison College hopes to maintain her
    prestige in the world of scholarship.
    Throughout the years she has continued
    to produce scholars who have done re-
    markably well at the universitits and in
    every branch of study. Today it is her
    proud boast that she is still among the
    best public schools in the British Common-
    wealth and Empire. Examination results
    are not the only indices by which a school
    or any other institution can be judged, but
    they serve to indicate a standard of work
    done,

    Recounting the successes of the School
    at Speech Day last week, Mr: Hammond
    supplied the information that “outside the
    United Kingdom Harrison College headed
    the list of examination results of all schools
    in the British Commonwealth including
    the Dominions.” The examiners themselves
    wrote in their report: “It was gratifying
    to note that the standard in Greek was as
    high as in Latin. .... The standard in Set
    Book papers was higher than that obtained
    by schools in England. .... The general
    average of the work in Classical History
    was high and compared favourably with
    the average of most English Schools.” It
    was with pardonable pride that the Head-
    master said, “I know of no overseas school
    in the whole Commonwealth that can sur-
    pass the academic record of Harrison Col-
    lege.”

    Barbadians in every walk of life will
    pride themselves in the fact that among
    the educational institutions of the Empire
    the leading school of this island is classified
    among the best. But that justifiable pride
    becomes empty if nothing is done by those
    who have benefited from their associations
    with her to help her to maintain that posi-
    tion of eminence to which she has attained.
    The former Headmaster Mr. H. N. Haskell
    was never tired in his appeal to Old Har-
    risonians to support education in a tang-
    ible way by contributing those necessary
    adjuncts which contribute to the enjoy-
    ment of the corporate life of the school.
    The most recent contribution is that of
    equipment for the teaching of Biology to
    enable pupils who aim at becoming medi-
    cal students to gain exemption from the
    first M.B. examination while still at school.
    The ever increasing numbers on the school
    roll expresses more eloquently than any-
    thing else, the demand for education at
    Harrison College but there is the underly-
    ing danger pointed out by the Headmaster:
    “There is a third dilemma which pressure
    of numbers produces; the loss of a feeling
    of entity which is an almost inescapable
    result of growth in size.”

    PUBLIC SERVICE

    FOR some time complaints have been
    made of the inconvenience suffered by
    people whose business takes them to the
    Treasury. There is no opportunity to pur-
    chase stamps which must be affixed to
    vouchers.

    In the event of anyone going to the
    Treasury without the necessary stamp
    to be affixed he must first go to the Post
    Office and purchase the stamp before he
    can be paid.

    The same state of things has arisen at the
    Parcel Post Department now removed to
    the Wharf. ‘

    It should not be difficult for the Govern-
    ment to make stamps available at these
    two departments not for general purposes
    but merely to facilitate the business con-
    ducted there.

    The Government sells stamps and the
    departments exist for the purpose of cater-
    ing to the general public who go there for
    business with the Government.

    OUR READERS SAY



    ARBADOS Gp ADVOCATE



    British industry has made fine
    strides since the war; but I give
    this warning: —

    We haven’t done enough. We
    have to wake up, we must inten-
    sify our efforts to improve pro-

    ductivity, otherwise we. shall
    starve.
    Our population of 50,000,000

    can live only by selling its manu-—
    factures abroad in exchange for
    food and raw materials.

    In France, 33 out of every 100
    adult workers produce food. In
    America 18 out of every 100, In
    Britain fewer than five in 100.

    No country is so dependent on
    imports as ours.

    And increasing population and
    industrialisation in overseas coun—
    tries are reducing the quantities
    of food, etc., that these countries
    can sell to us, and forcing up the
    prices.

    TO PRODUCE
    AND REARM

    The problem facing us is:—

    Can we continue to sell
    enough of our goods on favour-
    able enough terms to get the
    raw materials to keep our fac-
    tories working and the food to
    keep our stomachs full?

    Can we produce enough to
    do this and at the same time
    to rearm?



    The answer is, only if we work
    more efficiently .

    We are facing a new world. In
    order to survive as a great nation
    we must evolve an entirely new
    outlook on relations between
    worker and employer.

    We can succeed only if instead
    of the two fighting each other
    they can create a_ partnership
    leading to the highest productiv-

    ity.
    GET RID OF
    THIS FEAR .-

    |
    | Can we do that? I think we



    can. We have travelled some way
    along the road already.

    Workers must get rid of the
    fear that if they work better
    they will work themselves out
    of a job.

    Our curse is that they have
    good memories for bad things—
    especially for the years of unem-
    ployment and wage cuts.

    If the full employment of today
    can continue for ten years, there
    is a hope that the fear of the
    sack—the old basis for discipline
    in industry—will die, and a new
    basis of reason be firmly estab-

    lished .
    DUTY OF THE

    EMPLOYERS

    Trade union leaders now realise
    that they can no longer just fight
    to get the most out of someone
    else’s pocket, but that the only
    way to improve their members’
    lot is to increase their productiv-
    ity.

    Their difficulty is to get this
    across to the rank and file.

    As for employers’ associa-
    tions, they must give thought
    to something more than merely
    protecting their own interests.

    They have to consider how
    private enterprise can work
    best in the public interest.



    By SIR GEORGE SCHUSTER
    (industrialist, banker, and chairman
    of the Government panel on Human
    Factors Affecting Productivity).

    In the nationalised industries
    the Socialists should give a lead
    in creating good human rela-
    tions. They have certainly not
    done that yet.

    Many firms in private industry
    are far ahead of the nationalised
    industries in progressive policies
    for handling human relations.

    I believe that by employer
    and employee agreeing to see
    how they can operate together
    more expertly, and getting rid

    of all restrictive practices,
    there could be an immediate
    30 per cent. increase in Bri-

    tain’s productivity without any
    necessity for longer working
    hours,

    UNIONS AND
    EFFICIENCY



    Lever Brothers have been able
    to put up productivity by 30 per
    cent. just by improving work
    methods.

    Tube Investments have report-
    ed an even bigger advance. There
    have been many other cases, too.

    Nothing is more important than
    that trades unions should co-op-
    erate in this efficiency drive.

    They should have their own
    efficiency experts, as they do in
    America, and themselves force
    laggard firms into line.

    Hitherto the attitude of the
    British unions has been rather
    to protect the weaker brother and
    see that he does not get left be-
    hind.

    But the day for this concentra-
    tion on minimum standards has
    gone. We must encourage the
    man to make as much as he can.

    We need a new race of fore—
    men—the N.C.O.s of industry.
    They must be trained in
    handling people. They must be
    leaders who can take real re—
    sponsibility.

    A recent survey of a large sam-—
    ple group of British industries
    showed that only two-fifths of
    foremen had undergone any sort
    of training for their job, and only
    11 per cent. had received more
    than a primary school education.

    30% bO
    JOB WELL

    I do not believe in long hours
    of work. I think 40 hours of hard
    manual work is enough for or-
    dinary people. Nevertheless in
    times of crisis like the present it
    may be necessary to toil longer.



    BUT before we try to persuade
    people to do this, management
    and workers should see what can
    be done to improve efficiency so
    that every working hour becomes
    as productive as possible.

    At least 80 per cent. of Britons
    are working well. Most men like
    to do a job well,

    Why, then, do we have strikes?

    Tt is not enough to put them
    all down to Communist agitation.
    Communists only get a hold if
    there is a genuine grievance.

    In general, men become dis-
    contented if they think they are
    not getting a fair deal compared
    with other people.



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    If they seek a remedy by strike,
    it is almost always because the
    machinery for handling human
    relations and settling wage ques
    tions is too cumbersome. For this
    the trade union organisations are
    often as much to blame as the
    employers’ side.

    Dockers have been particu-
    larly strikeprone just because it
    is difficult to establish real
    human relations in dock work,
    since the men are always shift-
    ing from one employer to an-
    other.

    But we hear too much about
    strikes. Taking a broad view, our
    workers have been extra-ordinar-
    ily reasonable during the past
    five years. We have been 16 times
    freer from strikes than during
    the five years following the 1918
    war.

    IT MAY BE
    PROSPERITY

    Nevertheless, I agree that we
    are now approaching a very dif-
    ficult time.

    We are in for a period of rising
    prices and rising wages. I am
    not so frightened of this as some
    people are.

    Provided it does not go too fast,
    a period of rising prices is a peri-
    od of prosperity.

    It makes people believe in the
    future, and be enterprising,



    Judged by pro§ts, British in-
    dustry is prosperous today. But
    I think there is still a substantial
    margin for really earning bigger
    pay packets if everybody on the
    job pulls together. What we can
    not afford is bigger pay packet
    not really earned by better pro-
    duction,

    I believe that the current talk
    about workers being hindered by
    lack of incentives is exaggerat
    ed; but I am worried about the
    smaliness of the meat ration.

    Those doing hard physical la—
    bour will feel the iil effects of
    the meat shortage if it goes on
    much longer.

    ANSWER TO
    COMMUNISM



    Let us hope we can get over
    that. The really big task ahead is
    to create the spirit of partnership.

    This requires an entirely new
    outlook on human relations in
    industry, so that all concerned—
    employers, union leaders, and
    rank and file workers—come to
    regard themselves as constructive
    partners in an all-out effort tu
    increase industrial efficiency.

    We have a long way to go be-
    fore that is the general spirit
    of industry; but the experience
    of a few progressive firms makes
    me believe that it is possible to
    achieve.

    I believe this is’ something
    which British industry can do
    better than any other,

    If we can succeed in creating
    such a spirit then we can make
    industrial employment the basis
    of a good life.

    And we shall have found the
    answer to Communism. Once
    again we shall take the leader
    ship of the world.

    London Express Service



    Exit The Typists Who Went “Red”
    To Keep Their Jobs

    despatch from KURT NEIDHARDT, who escaped vecently

    from the Soviet zone, where

    he was an editor of the East

    German Communist News Agency :—

    A million German Communists
    are being “screened” by party
    tribunals in session all over the
    Soviet zone.

    There is one basic test: could
    the comrade be completely trust-
    ed to fight for the Kremlin, if the
    call came?

    Inquiry into the comrades’ fit-
    ness to continue in membershiv
    is not the only aim'‘to the purge
    Its wider purpose is to condition
    party members to regard Stalin’s
    plans of imperialist conquest as
    sacred and inevitable.

    The new Communist parties are
    to be thoroughly indoctrinated
    with the idea that Stalin is the
    sun and centre of the universe,
    not only the greatest living
    thinker and . scientist, but the
    greatest in history.

    If he is all these, it follows that
    he is also the greatest general
    not only of the next war but the
    last war and all the wars preced-
    ing it.

    It is, in fact, Lenin who ts being
    purged,

    Two Moves

    Walter Ulbricht, the trim-beard-
    ed top Communist of the Soviet
    zone—the little Lenin of fas:
    Germany — brought the purge
    directive back to Berlin when he





    returned from his latest of many
    visits to the Kremlin,

    The same hour that a Russian
    plane set him down at a Red
    Army airfield on the outskirts of
    Berlin, Ulbricht ordered a cor-
    ference of party officials.

    Ulbricht talked for two hours
    about his newest directive, Stalin
    is known to have told Ulbrich:
    that two moves must be made in
    Germany:—

    1. To rid the party ranks of the
    Government typists, girl secreta-
    ries, and shopkeepers who flocked
    to join in order to keep their jobs
    or make life easier for themselves;

    2. To build up a party of true
    revolutionaries imbued with Stal-
    inist ideas.

    Ulbricht gave orders for the
    “sereening.” The party member-
    ship card became—officially—‘“the
    most treasured possession of any
    German”; more to be cherished,
    apparently, than ration cards,

    ‘Earn It’

    Now the membership card has
    to be earned. Those who are
    being purged have the theoretical
    chance of winning it back through
    long and diligent apprenticeship
    in the “mass organisations” — the

    omer | testers



    German-Soviet Friendship League
    is one.

    The league will give full op-
    portunity for its members to show
    complete acceptance of Stalin and
    all his works. It will give instruc-
    tions, too, on the latest party lines.

    Those left in the party musi
    also serve an apprenticeship, The
    training course for them is more
    advanced, more strenuous, too.

    Local committees of the party
    —made up of those who have
    won status as teachers—will mark
    the progress of each apprentice in
    a booklet which will record the
    number of lectures attended in the
    week. Absence from two succes-
    sive lectures will require to be
    explained.

    The Genius

    The teaching will represent
    Lenin as a revolutionary, as the
    founder of the Soviet State, and
    as a man who achieved much.
    But it will show him as a pigmy
    beside Stalin, whose genius
    changed one-sixth of the earth,
    not to mention the post-war gains,
    into the Socialist Sixth,

    It is

    _ 4s an extension of the
    Stalinist attempt to charige
    history—-so that the disciplined

    historian of the future will permit
    himself no doubt Whatever that
    Stalin was not Lenin’s pupil, but
    that Lenin was Stalin’s pupil.’

    —L.ES,





    and when ever I goes before Mr,
    Masiah or Mr. Seon, I ent going



    Prison *‘Westlynne,” tongue. I am_ sorry to see
    Land’s End, you here so soon’ again —
    To the Editor, The Advocate, March 16, 1951, and then he does appear so sorry,
    The Story from THE BEE -fol- end he acks more like a nice old
    SIR,—While reading the criti- lows:

    cism in the House of Assembly re
    the Prison and the treatment of
    prisoners in today’s Advocate,
    Friday, March 16, 1951, I remem-
    bered reading only yesterday in
    an old newspaper The Bee of
    Friday, September 30th, 1887, pub-
    lished by Messrs G. Anciaux and
    S..W. Poyer, copies of which you
    no doubt also have, this same prob-
    Jem with criticism faced the House

    of Assembly 64 years ago, and en
    closed is a copy taken from
    “Buzzings” of the comic side to
    the question.

    In this same paper there is also

    criticism of the method of sanita
    tion and the scavengers’ carts, ut
    after 64 years we have at last
    ‘cuvered wagons’, something to be
    proud of, for as the article reads
    -“Dust we are, but unto us doth

    cust return,” for many years.

    Yours truly, :

    M, BAYLEY

    OUTSIDE THE WALLS OF THE
    “ROYAL HOTEL” IN ANCIENT
    TIMES CALLED “GLENDAIRY”
    Stone-walls do not always a prison
    make, nor iron bars a cage.”

    Becky, who has just completed
    her term of one month in, for
    erticles of the peace; has started
    on her way to the city.

    Friend, meeting her: Hi! Becks

    darling, you out once more?

    Becky: Yes child, but I only
    wishes I had to go back next Mon—
    day morning,—Oh! Glanderry is
    the most beautifullest place in the
    whole world, and Mr. Gubenor
    Price is a most blessed old gentle-
    man, his manners is as soft as
    lard, he does speak so kind,—~and
    says child your last lesson had no
    effect, why don’t gOvV
    ern your dirty abusive



    you

    and

    well behaved white woman,—than
    a Gubner,—TI likes to go to “Glan-
    derry, deed I does,”—In the morn-
    ings you get the nice fresh air
    strong enough to blow the teeths
    down your throat, den punctual at
    8 o'clock you has your bath and
    by dat time, tea and breakfast
    comes together, my cousin Johnnie
    (we calls him “three foot goat”
    for a nickname,) used to bring me
    up regular good vittels, and at 2
    o'clock again he was waiting with
    dinner, you doesn’t have the least
    thing to do, only at 6 o’clock you
    has to get the lock turned upon
    you, dats de only wotless ting in



    the whbdle of it—of course only
    females is allowed to talk to
    females, but my dear Titty’ a set
    of courting goes on, but you has
    to be as sly as a cat without claws,
    however, I is out—but ess I don’t
    put Catherine in gaol before 6
    months goes over dis head, you can

    cut off my hair for rat poison

    take no false oath, but I is going
    to do the business for her upon a
    “saliva oath.”

    Friend inquires "with a deal of
    interest: What kind ofa ting a
    eS oath is?

    cky: Child you isent been in
    de world long enough yet, de fust
    hody ever show me how to take
    one of doze oaths was a policeman,
    --you puts your thumb upon de
    prayer book and kisses dat, not de
    book, den you spits and wipes your
    mout, so dat you isn’t swear at
    all but den de Magistrate don’t
    know dat.

    And beyond all question of
    doubt, as long as “Glendairy”
    makes such good terms, and af-
    fords such accommodation for law-
    less peace-breakers and other dis-
    turbances, so long will it remain
    PNed with such vagabonds, give
    them work to do, and see how
    soon the number of peace-breakers
    will diminish,

    “Cepied

    Friday

    from “The Bee” of
    September 30th, 1887.’

    The Cure For Strikes

    And The Only Way Te High Wages



    The Guinness Millions Dispute Throws
    Up Again The Problem

    What Happens To Your
    Money When You Die?

    By BERNARD HARRIS

    ONE of the 18 counsel engaged in trying
    to unravel the tangle of the Guinness mil-
    lions has suggested that it is better to die
    in the poorhouse than to die rich.

    Certainly, if we all ended our days own-
    ing less than £2,000 (at which death duties
    start) we should save a lot of trouble for
    the folk we leave behind.

    For difficulties over wills are becoming
    more frequent.

    Of course it is the millionaire estates, bur-
    dened with duties of 16s. in every pound,
    that give rise to the most spectacular prob-
    lems.

    WIDOW’S WILL

    The problem with the estate of Mr. Arthur
    Guinness is that it is between £300,000 and
    £ 400,000 short of the amount needed to carry
    out his wishes — even though he left
    £ 2,000,000 after death duties. ;

    There has been a deficiency, too, with the
    estate of Mrs. Lavinia Clarissa Keene, 85-
    year-old widow who died nearly two years
    ago.

    eThis charitable old lady left £1,347,000, of
    which death duties took £937,663. More than
    £ 1,000,000 of her wealth was represented by
    50,000 Pearl Assurance shares, valued when
    she died at £20, 5s. each.

    Soon after her death the Socialists came
    out with their plan to “mutualise” industrial
    life assurance.

    Down went Pearl shares to £17, And
    down also went Mrs. Keene’s holdings of
    War Loan and industrial shares.

    The estate was so reduced that it seemed
    there would be nothing left for anybody. So
    it was decided to “nurse” the Pearl shares
    in the hope that the price would recover.

    Luckily for the beneficiaries it has done
    so.

    SACRIFICES

    Another estate which has given rise to
    problems is that of Lord Portal, head of the
    banknote paper firm. He left £2,112,000, of
    which £1,569,000 went in duties.

    On paper his widow would appear to be
    still a wealthy woman. But apparently Lord
    Portal left instructions which could be
    carried out only by heavy sacrifice on her
    part.

    If you have any money to leave it is useful
    to look ahead and see what happens to it
    when you die.

    If you work out roughly what the State
    grabbers will take you will make things
    easier for those who come after you.

    Hardly anything escapes the State net.

    Your executor’s first business is to take
    charge of everything of any value you
    possessed. If there is odd cash in your trouser
    pocket he is supposed to include even that.

    VALUE ALL

    He will instruct your bank manager to rule
    off your account. He will value all your furni-
    ture and house fittings.

    If the amount is small, his valuation will
    probably be accepted; if it is large, a valuer
    will have to agree the figure.

    The local district valuer will check the
    price put on your house. Stocks and shares
    will be taken at the market value on the day
    of your death,

    The rule is “a quarter up”—which means
    that if a share is quoted at 20s.—22s., the
    value will be taken at 20s. 6d.

    Shares in companies with no market
    quotation will have to be valued by the
    secretary or auditor. The figure will later be
    checked by the Estate Duty Office, who may
    call for the last three years’ accounts,

    When your executor has put a figure on
    everything an Inland Revenue affidavit will
    be prepared and checked. Then probate is
    obtained and your executor can go ahead
    and carry out all your wishes—provided you
    have not been too generous.

    TO COURT?

    If you have underestimated the duties pay-
    able your executors may have to go to the
    High Court for advice on how to deal with
    your legacies,

    In the case of small estates this difficulty
    can sometimes be got round by the benefici-
    aries agreeing to take a cut,

    By this time one or two details of your
    will may have appeared in the local news-
    paper,

    Almost certainly there will be friends of
    yours who will say: “I had no idea old So-
    and-So was worth all that.” Or, “I thought
    he would have left more than that.”

    In either case they will be jumping to con-
    clusions. For \published figures are often
    little guide to a man’s real wealth.

    You may be shown as having left £20,000
    gross. But there may be £15,000 of debts to
    come off this.

    : YOUR | GIFTS

    “Net personality” may be equally mislead-
    ing for it doesn’t include the real, estate—
    freehold houses or land—you may have
    owned. Assets owned abroad may also result
    in your wealth being understated.

    Another point which may puzzle your
    friends is that duties appear unduly high in
    comparison with the amount paid on another
    estate of similar size.

    This could be due to your having made
    expensive gifts to your wife or friends with-
    in five years of your death. Duty will have
    to be paid on them though they do not figure
    in your estate.

    ! —L.E.S.



    THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951

    Also PENCILS FOR MARKING GLASS
    ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE





    NOTICE

    Will Our Customers please Note
    that We will not be open for Bus-
    iness on SATURDAY, 24th March
    1951, and arrange their Shopping
    accordingly.

    WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
    Successors To

    C.S. PITCHER & CO.

    PHONES: 4472, 4687, 4251, 4413.

    INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD.
    THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS
    PAINTING REQUIREMENTS

    INSIDE and OUT.



    For the protection and beautification of

    your

    property, we can. offer you

    the following

    WALL PAINTS

    “PROPELLER” DRY DISTEMPER (for exterior walls).
    Supplied in powder form to be mixed with fresh water
    — $6.10 per 4 cwt. drum.

    “LAGOMATT” FLAT OIL PAINT (for interior walls)
    Supplied ready mixed; ¢an be repeatedly washed — $7.12
    per Imperial gallon.

    For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
    followed :—

    Exterior Walls,

    For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least

    ora before painting. Then apply 2 coats of “PROPEL-
    LER”,

    For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
    and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with a mixture of plaster-
    of- Paris and “PROPELLER,” afterwards treating these
    patches with 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL” CEMENT

    AND PLASTER PRIMER. Then apply 2 coats of “PRO-
    PELLER.”

    2

    Interior Walls.

    1. For new work, allow the surface to dry out for at least
    a year before painting, Then apply 2 coats of “LAGO-
    MATT.”

    2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly; clean;
    and fill all holes, cracks, etc., with plaster-of-Paris, after-
    wards treating these patches with 1 coat of “INTERNA-
    TIONAL” CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, Then
    apply 1 coat of “LAGOMATT” if the surface was previ-

    ously of the same shade; or 2 coats of “LAGOMATT” if
    of a different shade.

    TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
    PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED,

    _—-—

    DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acenrts



    DAYS BEFORE
    EASTER
    HOLIDAYS!!

    ®



    FOR YOUR PARTY

    SPECIALS

    Oat Flakes .17 per lb.
    Cook's Paste .06 per tin

    Ice Cream Powder 65 per tin
    Pineapple Crush .48 per tin

    â„¢ HOT
    K ces] CROSS

    Sandwich Bread & Cakes

    ,

    | joeSooeeossosess:



    Milk Fed Ducks

    Canadian Salmon

    Smoked Haddocks, Anchovies
    Carr’s Cream Crackers

    Carr's Cocktail Biscuits
    _Grape Fruit Hearts

    ONLY 1:
    SHOPPING

    ‘

    Dutch Cheese

    Danish Cheese

    Fruit Cake in tins

    Barley Sugar

    FINE LIQUORS

    Gold Braid Rum
    Sandeman’s Wines
    Gilbey’s Gin

    Gilbey’s Wines
    Humbert’s Dry Sack
    Sparkling Burgundy
    Prunier Brandy

    Phone GODDARDS To-day

    SSPE SCESESS SSSOOSSS MOOS SO SOSSSSS

    s
    LHURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951

    em



    Four Named
    Justices Of
    The Peace

    ‘WO PARISHIONERS of St.
    Andrew and two of St. Jo-
    Seph were yesterday made Justices
    of the Peace by the Governor at
    Government House about 10 a.m.
    The two of St. Andrew are Mr.
    E. L. Bannister and Mr. Fred A.
    Ingram. The other two are Mr
    Lloyd Smith, M.C.P., and. Mr.
    “Prince” Walker.
    EVEN more cane fires have
    been reported and the quanti-
    ty of canes burnt was over 40
    acres. In nearly all cases labour-
    ers assisted in saving further dam-
    age to crops.

    At Hothersal Plantation, St.
    John, 154 acres of second crop
    ripe canes were burnt over the
    week-end. They are the property
    of E. M. Taylor and were insured.

    Another week-end fire at Staple
    Grove Plantation, Christ Church,
    burnt an acre of second crop ripe
    canes belonging to Messrs. General
    Traders Ltd. They were also in-

    sured. This brings the number of
    cane fires over the week-end to
    nine.

    On Monday at about 8.30 p.m.
    900 holes of third crop ripe canes
    were burnt at Strong Hope Plant-
    ation. They are the property of
    W. T. Gooding and are insured.

    A fire on the same day at Easy
    Hall Plantation, St. Joseph burnt
    five acres of first crop ripe and
    seven and a half acres of second
    crop ripe canes, The canes belong
    to Messrs. R. &. G. Challenor
    and were insured.

    Five and three quarter acres of
    first crop ripe canes, also insured,
    the property of the Ridge Planta-
    tion, Christ Church, were burnt
    on Monday night.

    On Tuesday night a fire at Small
    Ridge Plantation, Christ Church,
    burnt eight and a quarter acres
    of second crop ripe canes belong-
    ing to G. S. Evelyn. They were
    also insured.

    Six acres of second crop ripe
    canes were burnt when a fire
    broke out at Edghill Plantation,
    St. Thomas, on Tuesday night.
    The canes, which were insured,
    are the property of Messrs. Gen-
    eral Traders Ltd.

    The Police are again asking
    motorists, car and ’bus passengers
    to be extremely careful when they
    throw away their lighted cigarette
    ends.

    T ITS MONTHLY meeting on

    March 17, the Executive Com-
    mittee of the S.P.C.A. decided to
    provide canvas slings for the un-
    loading of donkeys and small
    mules from vessels. The present
    system of tying rope round the
    animals causes unnecessary suffer-
    ing. They were very gratified to
    hear that 80 Elementary Schools
    had decided to form Bands of
    Mercy and to enrol 2,360 children,
    It was felt that children from the
    age of 9 years should be eligible
    for membership and any Head
    Teachers with applications from
    this age group should include
    them in the Band. Membership
    ecards are being printed and
    badges made and details concern-
    ing activities that can be under-
    taken will be sent out as soon as
    possible after the Easter holidays.



    Grenada Canie Yield
    Due To Good
    Rainfall
    DONALD MASON

    Mr. Donald Mason, Produce
    Inspector of the Department of
    Agriculture in Grenada, told the
    Advocate that the cultural opera-
    tions of cane cultivation in Bar-
    bados were not only beautiful,
    but were superior to those in
    Grenada,

    In Grenada, he said that they
    however got the same yield and
    that was due principally to the
    better rainfall’ they got which
    helped them quite a lot.

    In the worst cane belts in the
    colony, he said that they got as
    high as about 80 inches of rain
    per year,

    Mr, Mason who spent past of
    his long vacation here, has now
    gone to St. Vincent to spend the
    Easter Holidays with his rela-
    tives. He was accompanied by
    his wife,

    He said that he was very glad
    to hear that the strike situation
    in Grenada was quite controlled
    and he believed that there was
    going to be quite a reasonabie
    compromise with regard to the
    demands for wages

    Labour conditions in: Barbados
    were not only better than those
    in Grenada, but they were better
    controlled and he thought that
    they could do with some of the
    experience in the general labour
    operations here.



    Assize Jury
    Fail To Agree

    After about an hour’s delibera-
    tion, an Assize Jury failed to agree
    on a verdict in connection with a
    charge of buggery brought against
    St. Clair Foster of Green Fields,
    St. Michael, at yesterday’s sitting
    of the Court of Grand Sessions.

    His Honour Sir Allan Colly-
    more, Chief Justice, presided. Mr.
    WwW. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
    General, prosecuted on_ behalf of
    the Crown. St. Clair Foster was
    represented by Mr. J. aS;
    Brancker.

    The foreman of the jury, when
    asked if the jury had agreed on
    a verdict, informed the Court
    that there was no likelihood of
    that jury reaching a verdict.

    Bail was granted the defendant
    fn ‘the sum of £100 with one
    surety.

    LANDING LIGHTS
    AT SEAWELL

    The landing lights at Seawell
    which were used for the first time
    earlier this week were used again
    last night when a B.W.I.A.
    Special Flight bringing Venezue-
    lans here for Easter arrived at
    Seawell shortly before 8 o'clock.

    B.W.I.A. have obtained special
    permission from the Government



    to use lights during the Easter
    reriod The lights are not yet
    officially in use, but it is expected
    f4hat they will be shortly

    ‘

    -* PRESENT ~



    House Of

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Assembly —

    Pass Voters Resolution

    THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed a
    Resolution approving the Order by the Governor-in-Execu-
    tive Committee made on March 3, 1951, under the provis-
    ions of section 4 of the Special Registration of Voters
    (General Assembly) Act, 1951.

    The proposals in the Resolution make provision for

    66 districts for voters in St.

    Michael, 27 in Christ Church,

    15 in St. Philip, 18 in St. George, 9 each in St. Andrew, St
    Lucy and St. Joseph, 13 in St. John, 11 in St. Thomas. 10
    in St. Peter and 12 in St. James. Bridgetown has 14.

    Mr. G. H. Adams (L) moving
    the passing of the Resolution, said
    that some members might feel
    that the division of the island, as
    done in the Resolution, was not
    as good as it might have been.

    It seemed to him, however,
    that the principle on which Gov—
    ernment had acted was sound.
    “As members knew, Government
    had obtained the service of Mr,
    L. A. Chase who had been re
    sponsible for the taking of the
    last census. With the experience
    which Mr. Chase had acquired
    both from taking the census and
    as Social Welfare Officer, it
    would be seen that Mr. Chase was
    the Government’s best choice.

    Anomalies

    There would be complaints of
    anomalies in the Resolution. He
    thought that was inevitable in
    such a Resolution, but he would
    invite members to draw to Gov-
    ernment’s attention any very seri-
    ous anomalies.

    Mr. Adams _ recalled that the
    island had been so divided as to
    approximate in each district a
    number of 450 voters. There had
    been complaints that that number
    was too small. The small sub-
    committee that had gone through
    the matter—Mr. Chase, the At-
    torney General and himself—had
    been told that the number was too
    small, But they had decided to
    stick to that number following
    further advice, and taking into
    account experiences obtained
    from the Trinidad Elections.

    Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) moved
    that the House go into Committee
    on the Resolution. There could be
    no objection, he thought, because
    the Resolution had to be studied
    carefully. Hon. members had been
    engaged in the consideration of
    the Estimates for the past few
    days and might not have been
    able to pay the attention to the
    Resolution it deserved,

    Speaking for himself he had
    scanned it and he also was aware
    of the various districts in St.
    Michael and some other parishes.
    Being a Commissioner of Health;
    he considered it his duty to have
    this knowledge.

    Trinidad Elections

    He had listened very carefully
    to the hon. member when ‘he
    spoke about the 450 voters and
    what had happened in Trinidad
    during their elections. He too had
    read about the Trinidad elections
    but in Barbados they had the
    highest standard of literacy in the
    West Indies.

    With all due respect to Mr.
    Chase or anyone else who helped
    in making the proposals , he
    would tell hon. members that he
    remembered in 1929 when 1,000
    people had to attend the polls
    there was a_ rush, because in
    those days there was one presid—
    ing officer, that was not the case
    to-day. He had seen in _ St.
    Michael that by 10.30 a.m. with-
    out any rush at all, 450 people
    had polled.

    66 Polling Booths

    He observed, according to the
    proposals, that there would now
    be 66 polling booths. He felt that
    this would entail great expense
    and difficulty.

    Mr. Mottley said that as regards
    the polling at the booths he
    thought that 800 people could poll
    quite easily at any th from 7
    a.m. to 4 p.m. It was hardly likely
    that what had happened in Trini-
    dad would happen here because of
    the comparatively high degree of
    literacy obtaining in this island.

    Mr, J. H. Wilkinson (E) second-
    ing Mr. Mottley’s motion said he
    thoroughly agreed with the argu-
    ment that in Barbados 450 voters
    to a booth was too small. He
    realised that from his experience
    of voting in St. Michael and St.
    James,

    They did not want an unneces-
    sary number of booths and officers
    and hence unnecessary expense.
    They wanted to see everyone reg—
    jster and vote in reasonable com—
    fort. But he still felt that Barba-
    dians were intelligent enough
    that 800 voters could go to one
    booth, and quickly grasp what
    they had to do, even though many
    of them would be voting for the
    first time.

    Mr. L. E. Smith (L) criticised
    the wording of the Resolution
    where it mentioned “Highway
    2a, Highway 3a” etc. He himself
    did not understand these high-
    ways, and he thought it would
    confuse voters as well

    He thought it would have been
    better to stick to the names of the
    roads.

    He did not agree either with
    the way the division into districts
    had been done. He thought they
    would find that in some cases, a
    voter living on one side of a road,

    would have to vote at a booth in
    another district, while a voter
    Ilving on the other side of the
    road voted at a booth near home.

    The question that the House go
    into Committee on the Resolution

    was put and decided in the
    affirmative. ’

    “City Of Bridgetown”

    Dealing with the Head “City of
    Bridgetown”—District 1, Mr. Mil-
    ler (L) suggested that considera-
    tion of that Head and all others
    should be postponed as there
    seemed to be some mistake, He
    felt they would be approving
    something of which they knew
    nothing, He referred to an in-
    stance where he pointed out that
    one district ran into another.

    Mr. G. H. Adams said that any
    person who had carefully exam-
    ined the proposals and would re-
    examine his own arguments,
    could for one moment object to
    ‘the proposals,

    He pointed out that there \/as
    no legal declaration of a road be-
    ing called by a particular name,

    and in some cases it was not
    specifically known where a road
    by a certain name began and

    where it ended, As regards any-
    one being concerned over where
    his particular district was, he
    need not be because all this
    would be pointed out to him by
    the Registering Officer,

    The Delay
    Over and above’ everything
    said Mr, Adams, there were
    numerous people in the island

    who thought that the Govern-
    ment was deliberately holding up
    the passimg of the proposals.
    Only last week he had been in-

    formed by an official connected
    with this thing, that right and
    left he had been told in some

    parishes that the Labour Govern-
    ment did not really intend to in-
    stitute the districts or get the
    matter dealt with before the end
    of the year. He was not prepared
    to accept any blame whatsoever
    for any delay. It did appear that
    some members were playing into
    the hands of their’ enemies.

    Mr. Mottley said that he did
    agree there was no law say-
    ing that Baxters Road was Bax-
    ters Road, or that Government
    Hill was Government Hill, and
    the like, but there was equally no
    law saying that Highway 3a was
    Highway 3a. etc.

    He thought it would be better
    to describe a road by name.

    Mr. Adams replied that where
    instances occurred in the Reso-
    lution where the defining of a
    road was really confusing he
    would accept an amendment.
    Members would find as they read
    further, that les; familiar high-
    ways were defined by name.

    Districts 1—7 inclusive were
    passed,

    “Boundary Line”
    Dealing with District 8, Mr.

    Mottley said that the “Bridge-
    town Boundary Line’ was de-
    fined differently by various Acts.

    Mr. Adams replied that there
    was only one “Bridgetown
    Boundary Line” as defined by
    the Bridgetown, Holetown and
    Speightstown Consolidated Act.
    For the purposes, say, of public
    Health, Bush Hall might be con-
    sidered as within the Bridgetown
    area; but that did not make
    Bush Hall a part of Bridgetown.

    Mr. Mottley said that if an
    enumerator incorrectly defined
    the Bridgetown Boundary Line,
    it would be easy to upset an
    election.

    Mr. Adams replied that all the
    enumerators and other officers
    concerned would be given gen-
    eral as well as specific instruc-
    tions to the proper carrying out
    of their work,

    District 8 was passed, and so
    were all the remaining districts
    in Bridgetown, St. Michael and
    the other parishes were passed



    Approve Erdiston

    Extension

    THE House of Assembly yes-
    terday passed an Address to the
    Governor saying they approved
    of the extension of Erdiston
    Training College. A _ similar
    address was passed by the Legis-

    The House

    lative Council last Tuesday.
    com-|

    appointed a





    mittee to prepare a reply to the}
    Governor’s Message relating to|
    the establishment of a Central
    Milk Depot and Creamery. |
    The House adjourned
    Thursday, March 29 at 3 p.m

    PRISONS



    = Propose D~

    co
    (Hes
    co

    6 Months For
    Larceny

    ELIEZOR BISHOP (36) was
    yesterday sentenced to six months’
    imprisonment by His Honour the
    Chief Justice, Sir Allan Colly-
    more after he pleaded guilty of
    larceny as a bailee as the Court
    of Grand Sessions resumed sitting
    yesterday.

    Bishop, a_ tailor, was given
    cloth to make a serge suit for a
    customer on June last year. The
    value of the cloth was $15 and
    he was also given $6.20 towards
    the cost of making the suit.
    Since that time, Bishop could not
    be found to give either the suit
    or the money.

    Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C. told
    the court that the case had a bad
    aspect about it. Another prisoner
    who had been charged with a
    similar offence at a _ previous
    period, tried to get in contact
    with Bishop through a. letter
    while he was held prisoner, ask
    ing him to come to give false
    evidence. The letter was inter
    cepted, but afterwards Bishop
    still went and gave the same
    evidence, ’



    Guilty of Wounding
    Eudeen Gibson (19) who had

    pleaded guilty of wounding was
    put on probation for 18 months

    She was represented by Mr.
    Barrow. She had no previous
    convictions. The Chief Justice

    said that it was probable that the
    woman whom Gibson wounded
    could have been the aggressor.
    He warned her that if she got into
    such trouble again she might be
    sent to prison.



    Put on Probation

    Forty-four—year-oid Stanley
    Stanton of Reed Street who was
    found guilty of having effected a
    public mischief was put on 12
    months’ probation. Stanton re
    ported to the Police early on the
    morning of December 31 last
    year that he had been robbed of
    money by two men at the point
    of a gun. Investigations proved
    that that statement was not true.

    Mr. Edwards, custqdian. of the
    Salvation Army hostel, gave
    Stanton a good character. Stan-
    ton used to sleep at the hostel.
    A condition of the probation is
    that Stanton must continue to
    sleep at the hostel and not go out
    after it is shut for the night.

    ON £10 BOND FOR
    HOUSE BREAKING

    Ruby Benn was put on a bond
    for 18 months in the sum of £10.
    She pleaded guilty earlier in the



    sessions to house breaking and
    larceny,

    Investigations made by thé
    probation officer showed that

    Benn used to work at the woman
    whose house“she had broken and
    entered, but never used to be
    remunerated.

    The Chief Justice told her that
    he took into account that it was
    her first offence but she could not
    go breaking into people’s house



    Obituary :
    PC Cumberbatch

    The death of Police Constable
    Clifton Cumberbatch took place at
    the General Hospital earlier this
    week. “Hoytie,” as he was known
    throughout the Barbados Police
    Force, was always of a very cool
    and quiet temperament, and was
    a friend to all with whom he came
    in. contact

    He was one of the leading
    marksmen in the Police Force for
    the past few years, and was also
    a member of the Barbados Rifte
    Association. He was laid to rest
    ir. the St. James Cemetery with
    military honours in the presence
    of a large gathering



    TOILET

    LINDEN BLOSSOM e

    IMPERIAL LEATHER °

    PAGE FIVE



    Radio—Telephone
    Sets Being ‘Tested

    THE Police are at present test-
    ing very high frequency Radio-
    Telephone communication
    throughout the island. So far the
    tests have surpassed expectations
    and absolutely reliable two-way
    communication has been obtained
    from the Station with the Police
    vans throughout St. Michael, the
    greater part of Christ Church,
    the whole of St. George and most
    of St. Thomas, parts of St. Joseph,
    St. Philip, St. James and St. Peter.

    When these tests are completed
    ® report will be submitted to
    Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-
    sioner of Police, by Capt. W. H,
    R. Armstrong, who is in charge
    of the experiments. Following
    this the Commissioner will in turn
    submit a report to Government
    concerning the introduction of
    this modern and extremely useful
    system. :
    was loaned to the Police by a
    Jeading British manufacturer o
    V.H.F, sets. The tests will las
    for about eight weeks. This
    equipment is similar to that which
    has been installed in over twenty |
    per cent of the leading English ;
    Police Forces and a very large
    percentage of the Police Forces dH

    '
    '

    , the British Cotonies.

    The tests began on March 14
    when equipment was installed at
    the Headquarters of Area No, 2,
    District “A. In addition, mobile
    equipment was installed in a
    Police van, Tests took place both
    day and night and the equipment
    was actually put to a test in the
    investigation of crime a_ few
    days ago in Spooner’s Hill. It
    saved a considerable amount of
    Police energy which normally
    would have been spent in sending
    men from the scene of the crime
    to the nearest telephone and tele-
    phoning.

    Within the next few days the
    equipment will be removed from
    District “A” to Area No, 3 at Dis-

    trict “B” and subsequently to
    District “D", headquarters of
    Area No. 4. After that it will be

    carried to the. Police Stations at
    Districts “F”’, “E” and “C” for
    the purpose of ascertaining the

    radio coverage in each area.

    Finally tests will be carried out
    to locate a suitable site somewhere
    for the erection of the main trans-
    mitting and receiving Station.
    This site will most likely be at
    Castle Grant or Chimborazo, St.
    Joseph if the final scheme is ap-
    proved by Government. This loca—
    tion is chosen in order to get the
    maximum radio coverage of the
    island and the Station will be un-
    attended but will be controlled by
    radio link from Police Headquar-

    ters at Bridgetown where the
    Control Room for the entire
    Police radio network will be lo-

    cated and from which all patrol
    cars can be directed to the scenes

    of crimes,

    The V.H.F. Radio-Teiephone
    equipment will be installed at
    each of the area headquarters
    also to permit the vehicles at- !
    tached to each of them and to’
    those stations fitted with two-|
    way radio-telephone system, to

    contact direct the area headquar-
    ters to which they are attached,
    without relaying their
    through the Police Control Sta
    tion, These area headquarters will |
    therefore become Sub-control
    Stations for their particular areas,

    wial — “99

    At the Controf Station in
    Bridgetown, and _ provided the
    facility can be made available by
    the Barbados Telephone Co. for
    operation in conjunction with
    their automatic exchange, there
    will be provided, for the use ot
    the general public, the emergency
    telephone system known as 999,

    With the 999 system a member
    of the public, who may require
    the services of the Police,, Fire
    Brigade or an ambulance, will be
    able to get any of these by simply
    dialling nine three times and
    being connected immediately to
    the Police telephone operator, The
    operator will answer by saying
    “Police, Fire or Ambulance” anc
    in turn the person -will tell the
    operator which service is required
    and any other necessary informa
    tion.

    The operator will then, if the
    service required is Police, imme
    diately ascertain where the near-
    est radio equipped patrol vehicle
    is located and will, by the means
    of V.H.F., dispatch instructions to
    the vehicle which will proceed to
    the scene of the 999 call and in-
    vestigate the report.

    “I feel sure that the general
    public will appreciate the useful
    ness of such a service in the pre-
    vention and detection of crime,’
    Capt. Armstrong told the Advo-
    cate.

    He said that this service, to-
    gether with a very extensive sys
    tem of radio-telephone has _ re
    cently been completed in Trinidad
    and the general public have fully
    appreciated: these adequate facil-
    ities and are using them to the
    best advantage.

    “Many cases, of what could
    have been serious assaults, were
    pievented by radio patrol cars in

    answer to the 999 call. In one
    particular instance the 999 call
    was received during the nigh’

    from a resident of Port-of-Spain
    to the effect that suspicious look
    ing people were in a house next

    LUXURY

    SOAPS

    BLUE HYACINTH

    “eee
    eiiee eats tates CR oncaeid cet
    SERB RSE ER ERT ARBREEES

    SAvVAMABLE !!

    * PUR

    POULTRY CHOWS

    | git. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pistributors.
    “ SESE UBER RBSERERBSES

    INA

    For these tests the ety aor





    messages

    door, The owner of the house was
    away on vacation. The call was
    received in the “Police Operating
    Room” and immediately relayed
    by radio to two patrol cars a few
    miles away. Within a matter of
    minutes the Police crews of these
    ears were on the scene and had
    apprehended three men who had

    broken into the house and were |
    preparing to steal the owners’
    property. These men naturally

    had no idea that their movements
    had been reported and had it not
    been for the emergency system,
    together with the radio equipped
    vehicles, they may never have
    been detected,” he said

    When the Advocate visited Dis
    trict “A” yesterday a Police Con
    stable at the Station’s Headquar
    ters was in contact with a Police
    van in Bank Hall and then Cod
    The reception was ex
    remely clear, without the slight
    ‘st interference.

    ott —CPLSOS PLP S PF OPES

    GET YOUR ....

    Nestle’s Chocolate Egg in
    Casket 11/- each

    Nestle’s Chocolate Eggs @
    27e., 50c., $1.20, $2.00 ea,

    % Fry's Chocolates in Plastic
    Egg @ $1.22 & $2.00 ea.

    Fry’s Marzipan & Choc. Egg
    in Egg Cup 40c, ea.

    Fry's Marzipan & Choe, Egg
    30¢.

    ea.
    Duck Carriage with Choc.
    Egg 4/6 ea.
    %

    .
    8
    ‘ At. WEATHERHEAD’S

    Also Easter Eggs @ 20c., &
    36c. ea.
    —: Also :—
    Fresh Delicious Confection-
    ery for .

    BASTER

    Meltis Coffee Choc, Mint ¥%
    Creams @ $1.23 box °
    Fry's Princess Choc, @ 94c. 3
    & $1.69 box

    s +
    > Fry's Choc. Almonds 2/- %
    s * ‘s
    s box %
    * Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc. 2/-, 3
    2 3/9 & $1.79 box x
    ® Fry’s Hazel Nut Choc, @

    2 8/- tin x
    Cadbury’s Milk Tray @ 3/9 ¥
    & $1.48 tin %

    Black Magic Choc. $4.06 box |

    Fry's Asst, Choc. @ $1.12
    & $2.21 box 3
    Sadbury’s Asst. Choc, @ x
    5/- & 9/- box g
    Large Boxes of Fry's Choc. x
    @ $4.55 ea. x
    Meltis Favourite Candies @ y |
    $1.02 & $1.85 box %
    Nestle’s Choc, @ $1.19 box





    % Cadbury's Roses @ 3/9 & &
    g $1.48 tin %
    % Cadbury’s Red Rose @ 98e.
    %$ — & $1.80 box 8
    % Salted Peanuts 64c. tin x
    *s Jacob’s Cream Crackers \
    $1.64 tin %
    % Meltis Royal Princess Asst. %
    % $1.85 box %
    % Faney Biscuits in Cello Peks.
    (s — 10e. pk. %
    % Fancy Biscuits in Airtight $
    % — -Pks. 2/- pk. %
    s$ Butler Scotch 2le. pk. &
    % 450. tin %
    % Mougat 34c. pk. & 70c. tin ¥&
    & Royal Scotch Shortbread &
    % $1.36 tin %
    Mars Bars 14e, ea. ¥
    8 Crest Bars 16c. ea. %
    R For the Best of . . . »
    % “EASTER EGGS” x
    ¢ & “Confectionery” Sy
    eS Vint S'S aa %
    % ’ >
    S BRUCE §
    5, i rs]
    § :
    S WEATHERHEAD
    *. %
    % LIMITED %
    % Head of Broad St. x
    >

    " . . ‘
    LPC LLL

    4

    BOVRIL




    MARALYN

    ( muk PLUS ) iy 802. ond {6 02. TINS

    A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT

    9

    introduces

    Maralyn





    10W.



    FRY'S CHOCOLATES

    Plastic Eggs @ $1.22, $2.22 each

    FRY'S CHOC

    Also NOVELTY

    FASTER EGGS
    EASTER CONFECTIONERY

    BLACK MAGIC CHOC,
    $1.15, $2.02, $4.08
    HAZEL NUTS

    Ple., $1.97
    FRY’S PEPPERMINT CHOC.

    Pure, creamy, country milk. . . enriched
    ... flavoured .
    that’s Maralyn Milk Plus! Itis a satisfying,
    nourishing milk drink. It tastes delicious
    . . and the kiddies love it, too!

    . and already sugared —

    a

    ne md gat)








    aS



    7
    )

    — =
    if





    y AND ATTRACTIVE

    EASTER EGGS

    NESTLES CHOCOLATE EGGS
    @ 26c., 50c., $1.20 & $2.00 each



    FRY’S CHOCOLATES Large Boxes
    MELTIS TWIN-PACK, FAVOURITE CANDIES & NEWBURY

    CRYSTALLIZED FRUIT

    SH



    q

    Da a

    | FECUAR d

    FRUITS
    ARP’'S TOFFEE

    $2.40 & $2.72 Box
    vse) 1/8, S/8,- 476

    KNIGHT'S LTD.— au srancues

    —

    the greatest protection
    devised by













    At last! you too can have “ Lifeguard "
    the wonderful scientific discovery thar
    has caused such a sensation, “ Lifeguard”
    is a most powerful germicide yet itis so
    safe that all can use it, Iris vitally necessary
    in any home, You need it to prevent cuts
    and bites going septic and as a safeguard
    against all forms ot infection. “ Lifeguard
    is pleasantly fragrant, non-staining, non-
    corrosive,

    Key danger attag with

    LIFEGUARD.

    THE

    SUPREME

    GERMICIDE AND ANTISEPTIC



    A. 8, BRYDEN & SONS (b'D08) LTD.—Agents







    Same styles |
    in

    Black Patent



    This luxuriously
    passengers.

    It is economical to buy

    Visit our new Showrooms in Pinfold Street and let us demonstrate it for you
    Our Gasolene and Oils

    including Sundays



    and Toes.

    ce

    Dept









    on veerto 4



    Pe

    THE FAMILY CAR

    upholstered Car

    offers

    and economical to maintain

    is now open from 7 a.m

    It is to be remembered that GOOD servicing 1

    gasolene and oil

    LET US THOROUGHLY SERVICE YOUR CAR
    visit

    It will pay you to

    VANGUARD FOR VALUE |

    Platform Soles.
    Sizes 7 to 10

    complete

    comfort in

    as important



    Ae i $6.83 & $6.13

    pha ceded eaeee $6.67 & $7.37

    hepherd & Co, Ltd.

    1, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



    seating for six

    until 10 p.m. every day

    to your car as

    CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LIMITED (

    Pinfold Street, Bridgetown. {




    PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951
    Sara cian niaibieigntiiianiaesiad deans cceLieninsneliaciasundaeta ee a I

    HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON }} ———— ,

    Additional Issue

    Lt $1,500,000
    Nova Scotia Light and Power Company, Limited

    4:% Cumulative Redeemable Preference Shares
    (Par Value $100 per Share)









    These Preference Shares will rank pari passu with the outstanding 6%, 442% and 4% Cumulative Redeem-—
    ble Preference Shares. The rights, preferences, priorities, restrictions, conditions and limitations attaching
    | therto are more fully set out in the offering cireular.
    j “
    i puivapeladaaniieaticeiich
    j : i .
    } In the opinion of counsel these Preference Shares will be investments in which companies registered
    | under The Canadian and British Insuranee Companies Act, 1932, as amended, may invest their funds
    —— — -
    MICKEY MOUSE | CAPITALIZATION
    ee eee ae (After giving effect to the financing referred to in the offering circular)
    he First Mortgage Bonds. . 7 : od ga one’ 4 © oh cheba ee iehanilge—enaretate $14,630,000
    Cumulative Redeemable Preference Shares, $100 par value............ $8,187,200 8,187,200*
    CORES DR Oree. Wb Ne WATE. ok oo eins oa 5s hod ee th ee ee los 300,000 shares 290,948 shares

    $2,430,000 6%, $2,000,000 4% and $2,257,200 442% now outstanding and this issue of $1,500,000 44%2%.

    erat

    (Price: $100 per Share)

    A. S. BRYDEN & SONS @arsapos) LTD.

    CORRESPONDENTS FOR
    | Royal Securities Corporation Limited

    j Montreal Toronto Halifax Saint John Quebec Ottawa Hamilton
    Winnipeg Calgary Edmonton Vancouver Charlottetown St. John’s, Nfid.









    LONDIE





    -———_—_—_-- - — —— See EE nEEAE EEE EERE

    ——— ee SS — : —

    IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE ©

    USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
    Bottles CORONATION WINE Bottles JEFFREY'S BEER 26 .20

    PN seas 144 L.32
    Tins TABLE BUTTER

    Tins P.F. MARTINI
    CRACKERS 175 150

    SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE Bottles MATURED RUM
    BA (a Ce soe _48









    SERTHATS THE THIRD EL
    GAME RUNNING YouNe
    BEATEN ME - GEORGE FH
    <= ERIM GLAD | MARRIED Ir
    RALA MAN WITH BRAINS















    ‘ GOING TO CHURCH THIS
    EASTER? ,



    THE LONE RANGER

    S,
    x

    -- avert R 3

    ne ANYONE WHO LEARNS OUR SOMEONE WAS SHOT . % s

    SECRET HAS TO DIE. USE YOUR i BEYOND THAT DOOR. R %
    GUN, JAKE! g - MAYBE WE CAN SEE x
    = _ . THROUGH %



    YOULL NEED
    A& M

    ‘HYMN & PRAYER
    BOOKS

    We hare a limited Supply

    SOOO SOOO SSSSOCH

    65

    4,

    BRINGING UP FATHER

    i eee

    eae, soe ava
    {evs
    |

    GSOOOOS9OS FOOSS9SG99S9C GGG 9G9F OS

    SOSSSSS SOO P SLOSS SSO




    364

    TELE







    H TELEVIGION SET?
    = IT DOESN'T WORK/

    6)

    FRON

    46

    >
    S
    <
    ©
    %
    J
    =
    ne
    >
    o
    °
    z
    =
    ~~
    nA

    xs

    SSOP LOSSLESS PEELS OSES PP PFOOS

    4



    i THAT WAS JUSTA LOVE-] STOP, CUTTLE! DON'T ‘i
    TAR CUTTLE! Come YOU REALIZE THAT YOU'RE | | BLABBER-
    Ot, WHERE'S THE Vat A DEAD PIGEON IF YOU MOUTH,
    _ ) TELLTHEM? THEYLL KILL| | CURTAINS ! os
    7 44M YOU THE MOMENT THEY ,
    DON'T! DON'T ‘ ~ GET THE MONEY!
    HIT ME AGAIN!

    TOL TELL!
    a ee,







    Frequent servieos
    by British West tn dian






    ; Airways enable you to enjoy short vacation
    'n neighbeuring Caribbean Islands over the

    Eoster holidays. y Make your choice and
    BOOK Now.

    \ A Wi A 5) NOW READY at
    (2) | BRITISH WEST INDIAN Airways =| 2 & B BAKE RIES

    Phome 4567
    B.W.LA., Bridgetown

    SO THATS WHY

    YOU LEFT THE
    CAR ON THE






    ~
    *"
    e
    j
    SE










    THURSDAY, MARCH




















    99

    CLASSIFIED

    TELEPHONE 2508

    1951

    S..





    A D Tea cents per agate line on week-days | nnd a
    ahd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, s

    | ommer r











































    PUBLIC NOTICES | PUHRLIC SALES











    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    | WANTED

    rye .
    v6 cents Sunde











    FOR RENT

    ‘ents per agate tine en 108?)
    cons? per agate line of Si



    charg



    T2 cents 9 cénts Sutidays 24 words —- over



















































































    PAG VEN



    i
    {
    Minimum charge wéeek 72 cents ond; SHIPPING NOTI











































    ; | . ‘
    t ‘crn ye $1.50 o week-da . ee words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a/|
    sininvem oor on tweek-dovs | and $1.80 on Sundays * o7 wortls 3 cents a word week—& Cents ¢| word Sundays. , Lay % (
    . } word Sundays } ¢>
    The churge for announcements of FOR SALE Tee ae HOUSES hoe! tela DISTRESS
    Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- « NOTIC - —_ oy ee OU re ore tied ] i y y
    ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is ; E REAL ESTATE ATTRACTIVE PURNIS
    $1.50 on week-days and $1.89 on Sundays Minimum charge week 72 cents aad | FOCKLEY GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUS SS ee HELP Mn ‘ CONE FUR etee, maT —— . 7
    for any number of words up to 50, and| 96 cents Sundays 24 words — éver 24| THE Office snd Bar will be closed Fath, Rd. Westings, facing Ses. Engtish | Alka-Saittet i
    3 cents per word on week-days and/{ rds 3 cents a word week—4 cents a| on Friday 23rd QMarch ‘Good Frida) ————- Rath with Heater, Suitable one persor ika-Seitzer is so @asy to take... 4 as ; —
    Pp y . ‘ it ; oe cereenaeiatictenmeres ———-_—— | ur couple. Telephone 2949 ccepting Cargo and Pas-
    4 cents per word on Sundays for each! word Sundays. Members wishing to play on this d iudia ont d containing 41.7% LADTOPt quusial Giice Wark with uv 29 eiidens 5 plegfant-tasting. Just drop one . plin argo ¢ as
    additional word. ae core with the Caddy Mas St "Michael sHusted st Britten Hil.| , owledge of @enogtaphy ahd. Typing pr =~ ia See or two tablets into a glass of water, engers for St, Lucia, sailing
    For Births, Marriage or Engagement for Clubs and Caddies or the proces The above will be set up for sale at| APY. In writing to P.O. Box 233] GUMCOURT—Britions X Rd. Drawing,| watch it fizz, then drink it. Not a , s :
    announcements in Carib Calling the ursday public competit a © | Bridgetown. 16.3.51—6n.] dining rooms, two bedroom nant | 5 ’ 7 _ » Ch hie Ss iad G
    charge is $3.00 for any number of words AUTOMOTIVE Seas A + ition at our office in Lucas Re aire tail ap tinenntela T Behen | Sollet and bath, el ot ars t | laxative, not habit-forming, you can Saturday, 24th March, 1951.
    up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each day of Seeaka aati on Eritay, Se 30th | “LADY CUTTER—A lady cutter for our water. “Apply: Misa ¢ eeumnlice r Britto \.| take it any time. Let Alka-Seltzer .
    edditional word. Terms cash, Fhone 2508 ~ CARRINGTON & teat dress-making Department. Proper salary} x Rd pair “4 vuitata ‘sane aalel. indlasatiod Apply HANSCHELL, LAR-
    between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for DeatB/ GAR-—One Standard Vanguard in good 2 . el ; ‘et haticiacal | Se-ie tight pereen, A.B TAYLOR Sor your ac igestion,
    Notices only after 4 p.m. condition 15,300 miles. Apply Denton St. Saviour's Teen Age Clad, "16.3.81—n. | ETH.. Coleridge Street 22.3,51—3n | “Modern Bungalow situated at Brighton, | /44¥¢ 4 supply handy. SEN & Co., Ltd., Agents,
    a Sayers — Phone 3632. 22.3.51—In 7 a “NURSE-MAID — Good refere nies Fe: er Rock S Se Apply on ‘
    —-- The Drawing which showtd take plac > BUNGALOW—Navy Gardens, 3 bed ne he iene ‘ * “| premises to Mr. Vere Lewis,
    BIRTH CAR—1951 Hillman Saloon. Registered | at the St. Saviour’s Boys’ School c| TOMS. every convenience including | Wired. Apply to Mrs. Brian Robinson, yas. N.| Eo beAs a
    under three months, low mileage—Phone | Saturday 2th inst. has been postpone || £arden, water supply. As new, £3,000. |) *MUnlay. _ sit. se anbe Worthing, —- ee - "
    CADOGAN—Mrs. Florence Vant i Peecseiaet ccna fag” ge A ase’ | eats ISS.IAt1n. | ha 130 pm. B1.381—Bn| § bedroomne with runnine wet roan |
    / N—Mrs. Florence Vanterpool, | — ee il all persons who have sold out the » | — inte ———— | 2 ; ‘ hisipiaiea \ Dia ail hod caetieeieeee:
    better known as “Sugar” would like to| CAR—Ope 1938 Dodge Car. $600.00, Can | Books kindly return ther Sata | | By public competition at our office Wardrobes and all modern conveniences. NT |
    ceneuabe dich camitake Ab. Se coed aaa at Seale Sate Wioat wt ee ee fhe by, Satins James’ Street on Thursday, ‘the ‘ong |, THERE is a good job offered in Trinidad] Long lease preferred. Apply Mrs. Fried- MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW | peer = ee; —
    Grand - daughter, born to her grand-| Rd. 22.3.51—2n |Chureh Rotise, Bridgetown Mareh 1951, at 2 p.m for the rignt man, His ability and experi- | man, Hotel Royal. 13.3.$1—t.f.n ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED |
    daught Mr Hyacinth Cadogan, ¢ s . wig | 9145 perch fl ‘ ence must enable him to take charge —— —— = => - ° The M/V “CARIBRBEER”’ i
    aughter 8. Hyacin lOGAN, ON | The Secty., | p22 perches of land at 4th Avenue.| oi ine Phot hic D ell] NEW BUNGALOW-—Ent fee Road (M.A.N.Z. LINE) . wilh
    Tuesday 20th March, 1951. messin 2 oe. “B" SEDAN .«(M. 3) ++ St. Saviour's, | oa Read, Bush Hall, St, Michael Susee Store. Salary “ta copa tn Christ Chucch. Available inimediately pot LiES Op Bonar - ane Pees for
    calle " t t . F ; s . Salary and ¢ ? t t al e : ominica ttigua, Mon
    condition, H. enh St. aw. | toe with the stonewall bungalow | osing with fis value. Dial 4%? Furnished, Fridge, Electricity and water MS. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to Ne and st icitts, Sailing
    DIED a | Inspection on application to th ’ 22.3.51—2n | Apply Frederica FitePatrick Telephone | Mi! Melbourne February 20th, Sydne Wednesday 2ist inst
    ale tore ion to e owner least 2833. 21.3.51—an | Februany 28th, Brisbane March jth, A
    ELECTRICAL , Mr. Joseph Moore between the hours of aa aS | : | riving at Barbados early A a ,
    inimcn—on, Sach Aide, tubs, at nl 4 Bedi NOTICE 9 am. and 5 pm, except Sundays MISCELLANEOUS CHANICAY This Vetsel hay ample apace ‘tor ts The M/V “DAERWOOD” will
    dence, Gilford, Surrey, England, Dr.| ONAN—Lighting Plant, 215 volte . ,For further particulars and conditions i ho eee Dag oe MECHANICAL | Frozen and General ‘ate or. Hard accept Cargo and Passengets for
    Willis ‘Somerset Birch, late Supedtas| 30° sete, ee setts atts, 12-18 volts: | GARDINER AUSTIN & Co. LTD. | of sale appli to — IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel- | ——————---—~— . —- | Cargo accepted on through Bill ané. Peers te at ae
    tendent of the Barbados Mental Hos- | spares. A. Bathes & Go. Lta This office will be closed to busine HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD. __ | lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.| BICYCLES Dally, Weekly and | tading with transhipment at. Tetnidad | {{ vincent toate of we oar te
    eee pier tee | ON, SAUCY March Beth with the exer 16.31—en,| Phone. 4439 or call at GORRINGES, ad: [on Monthly terms Apply Crescent | facips itt, tanshipment “at Teiniaad | [| Vincent” Date of "Departure 49
    REFRIGERATOR — Canadian Genetal| ponan. Airways & Steamshi) | joining Royal Yacht Club Bicycle Dept. Store, 30 Tudor Street. | and Leeward Islands - ry oe
    IN ' MEMORIAM Electric 6 Cub. feet, Pertect working | D°Partment maa | AUCTION Peas | re at re |] Bw. scHooweR owNeRs f
    order. Can be seen at K, R. Hunte & Sore : eetnnienrienernor tf IMMED: | For further particulars app) Rt ia 7
    Co, Ltd., Lower Broad Stre@t, Dial 4611 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC!: lery, Gold fusabta, coins, rainietenas fete oe ee | YURNESS, WITHY a eo. a ' ASSOCIATION (INC)
    JORDAN—In loving memory of our dear 22.3 51—8n (TRANSFER AND. REMOVAL) UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGESs, | )}/; ~~ allan ‘+. One
    mother Etheline Jordan who died on The application of Etheline Lewis Sly. shateusts boik x OE sca Antique Shop. Dial 4429. ‘ia m aia Da COSTA & CO. LTD, | Consignee. Tele. No. 4047
    22nd March 1950. IVESTOC rthur § 2 6 yy. instrue: received, wi sel .2.51.—t.f.n. rinidad, |
    Sad and sudden was the call u K (or Eee roms Sete sr et a oa Thursday 22nd at the office of the Grand Easter Bw nw
    Of that dear one loved by all. 3 2 P= , 1.46 Gleor leve : . eer General Motor Bus Co., Nelson Street WE PAY CASH FOR STAMPS > —= —
    Boothe of tartnt no ards ean ten | Ge Saceatice®: oo Sindy Tempra: | testes nae eee [one Atatin ATO, iowa" doge) ed att Mint slaty of erik Parade je
    a Of the lost one we loved so well named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Geckeriabk next door to C. F. Harrison & Co,, Lid jee Gents ee miles amore a are Tet males mivane Space on — | a centr
    : an (s . . : aS eee oa ce a Nn accide ale at 2 yam. Terns] Covers, Sheets, § s, Surcharge
    Racca Vereen: Mate race ete re Princess Stella). Apply: J. R = tagger el aid License to a stone wall} a Stamps. 1 2 a i. gran ee awards. Telephone 2520, ia pi rpes = posence at Arthut } VINCENT GRIFFITH, CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY,
    Wh Ps 71.2.51—t.f-h, | ost ta acbae Auctioneer No. 10 Swan Street Faster Monday March 26th |
    bM lemei eanach Ran si ag se 17.3.51— 18.3 51—4n
    —_——- ————_—-—— | PUPPIES—Pure Bred Alsitian Puppy.| Dated this 19th day of March, 1951 , : 3-6 pm |
    — 4 Dogs — 3 Bitches. Phone 4144 “Mts GEORGE LEWIS, \ ald of Sunday School Missionary
    For cd ane oo, mee are s Ma Sure 5 TORS, "Hakeiwood”, Barbarees for Applicant | “ ei “oN c titi a it | 4
    f other who left us March } Hill 21.3.51—4n | To:—A. W. HARPER Esq., 1 , 7 i y -_ ee eee me eer N
    Freee the rond.wgas:yateiig. hare Ag. Police Magistrate GoV ERN MENT NOTIC E Refreshment SS EW YORK SERVICE
    a 2 uard

    The hills were hard to climb,
    He gently closed her sleepy eyes,

    And whispered: “peace be thive.”
    David Autiléy Downes, Wilbert C.
    Jordin (Pantma); Elaine Yearwood

    (daughter-in-law), 22.3.51--1n



    PERSONAL



    The public are hereby warned
    giving credit to ahy person or pe





    sons





    whomsoever in my name as I do not hold
    myself responsible for anjrone contracting
    any debt or debts in my name unless
    by a written order signed by me
    SEON WORRELL.
    Fairfieid,

    Black Rock..
    22.3.51—2n

    2X PSG SSSSESSSSSS9OSOY,

    COMPLEXION

    That school-days

    plexion can be retained, if

    2O4

    com-

    you will give the skin this

    simple treatment. Dampen
    the skin with water, sprin-
    kle plain Limolene on, then
    Do

    just before retiring.

    give a gentle massage.
    this
    Very beneficial for those
    who shave ,..

    LIMOLENE 24c. to 72¢. a
    bottle at your dealer



    { WHO, WHAT,
    | WHY?





    Who's Who of Trinidad peo-
    ple, Business Concerns, Re-
    view of Spert and Public
    life.

    The greatest
    publication about
    Trinidad
    On Sale

    at

    ADVOCATE
    STATIONERY

    34
    Broad Street

    L5G GSSGS SOS OVSS SOS OSES

    EASTER
    FARE

    COOKING BUTTER per Ib.
    or 5 Ib. tin









    PRUNES .........- 51c. Ib.
    RAISINS ........- 46c. Ib.
    CURRANTS 38c. lb,
    AUSTRALIAN CHEESE

    72e. Ib.
    GLACE CHERRIES 89c. lb.
    POLAR ICING

    BRIDAL ICING , os Dee :
    SUGAR ........ 3c. pk. {}}% at Money-Saving Prices selection and
    SWEET CORN .... 46c. tin SET IND | Vaiiittes and
    Stools, " s, Wardrobes :
    ANCHOR TABLE ind. Dresertdbes, “Cheval ant blending.
    BUTTER. «4%; . 88c. pkg. 4 smaller. Mirrors—Mahogany anc
    ¥ % hyd bhp oe eee oe
    - SPECIALS = iter
    DR. i ¥
    BICO ICE CREAM, mont, Seraere, Tub ond mosh
    POLAR ICE CREAM, 0S eee, a2 Be eie, and
    . : Sate aa
    artete aaha $50 ane olding asycnairs
    MOIRS CHOCOLATE BARS divine, Cocktail, Kadi end
    PEANUTS in Tins. Fancy — China, Bedroom and
    HAM in Tins. nee: gcompet “4 ro.
    aracers—tLronin: an washing
    CASAREEP in Bottles, beards, Tubs, vane many other
    things.



    GRIFFITH S

    ROCKLEY
    Dial 4514



    District “D"’.
    N.B.—This application will be consid- |
    ered at a Licensing Court to be held on
    the 2nd April 1951 at 11 o’clock a.m
    i

    MECHANICAL

    BICYCLES—With and without three-
    speeds for Ladies, Gents and children.
    Secure yours now. Courtesy Garage,
    Whitepark Rd. Dial 4391, 22.3.51—6n

    CARRIER BIKBS and Bicycles by

    at Police Court, Dist. “D"
    A. W. HARPER,
    Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “Db”

    22.3.51—it





    Seawell











    Hercules, Silver King. A RARNES. & Tor
    CO., LTD. 20.3.51-t..n. | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
    . awh r = The application of Learnetta Brath
    Royal Typewriter a 4 chal aie waite of Sargeant’s Village, Christ} €xperie
    ' : . aan ‘3, | Church, for permission to sell Spirits. | era) jen
    =.68'~=" | Malt Liquors, &c., at a board and shivgle
    shop with shedroof attached at Sar
    MISCELLANEOUS geant's Village, Christ Church; within
    eee «| Histrict “A’’.
    ANTIQUES—A good assortment of Ah- Dated this 2ist day of March 1951

    -E. A. MeLEOD Esq.,
    Police Magistrate,
    District “A”.

    tiques including o'd clocks, Candles, | To
    Shades, China, Pottery, Silver, Ivory and
    Furniture. In Ralph Beard’s Show Room,

    x 96—



    Hardwood Alley. Open 8 a.m.—4 p.m, JOS GRAHAM accomp:
    21.3.51—4n for Application & dat
    --—— N.B.—This Application Will be consid. | Secreta
    BICYCLE ACCESSORIES — Pumps, fred at a acerca Ccurt to be heid at}
    Saddles, Connections, Patching Kits,| Police Court, District “A’ on Monday |
    wheels etc, Apply Courtesy Garage] the 2nd day of April, 1951 at 11 o'clock !
    Whitepark Rd, Dial 4391. 22.3.51—6n | a.m,

    E. A, McLEOD, |
    Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”,
    22.3.51—In

    BATHS — In Porcelain
    White, Green, Primrose with matching
    units to complete colour suites. Top
    grade. A, BARNES & Co., Ltd.

    26.1,51—t.f.n
    CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-

    Enamel, in

    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE |

    The application of Wharton
    solder of Liquor License No. 684 of 195)

    Louise







    Son, Mc Gregor Street, Phone 2080,

    To:—E. A. McLEOD Esq rh, East





    1951

    22.3.51—3n ‘Police Magistrate, Sch. Mar

    MIRRORS—Just received. Triple Ward- rapes mee :

    . AMES WHARTON,
    robe and Bathroom Mirrors. Polished and y a for ‘Appileation ss. Ss
    Bevelled Edges. G. W. HUTCHINSON & |' yp -This application will be consid-| cotiie, |

    22.3,51—3n a at a Licensing Court to be held 4

    lice Court, District “A’’ on Friday
    PESQUI URANATED WINE—At long |. ; ; t 11 e’clock
    last we are in a position to offer you aha Ber Pe amene ee te

    this wine for the treatment of Diabetes, on
    1¢/6 per bot. 3 bottles for 30/-.
    BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD.

    24.3.51—-3n.

    ROLL-UP DAYLITE MOVIE SCREEN | -——————————— “N
    i» case, good order, Fitt, City Pharmacy. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

    15.3.51--t.f.n. The application of Phylis Atkinson, of

    Schoon

    FE. A. McLEOD,
    Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
    22:3.5%—-N}

    M.V.
    Gumbs,
    Schoon
    Capt, Ol




















    — | foletown, St. James, for permission to

    RASINS & CURRANTS—Rasins 40c. per } gei) Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at i|
    Ib, Currants 40 ¢. per 'b. CC. Herbert, | poarded and galvanized shop attached Cable 2
    55 Tudor Street, Dial 3666. fo residence situated at Trents Cornet | acice th
    21.3.51—2n T gt, James sf er with the
    — - - ate: s 20th day of irch ) Jarbados
    SILVEP Westmoreland, Sterling pp D*e4 {Ps Aire Kea. gk ig
    Silver Cutlery, 50 pieces. George and Police Magistrate, S.S. Tect
    Martha pattern, Can be seen at Y. ‘de District of . Holetown york, S

    Lima & Co, Ltd., 20. Broad Strect.

    JOHNSON,
    21,3.51—3n HOLFORD

    Selilo, S,
    for Applicant. 3

    S.S. Aur

    —












    APPOINTMENT OF AN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL OFFICER

    Applications are invited foi

    cal fitness and one year’s probation



    Harbour Log

    In Carlisle Bay

    dow styling, light control, Valances and} granted to Clarence Als in respect of 4 see eas
    r a t 8) Ser ‘

    draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 board and shingle shop at Villa Rdy| neue 45
    RNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.£.n | Brittons Hill St. Michael for permission | Bayne I
    > Oo id Liquor License &c, at | olive, Se
    DIAMOND RINGS—Two Génts' single | {¢,,°5, fale Elion wes
    stone rings. Claw settings. | Attractive Ra. Seine Pee ane = ian
    prices. See them. Wm. D. Richards &}] pated this 20th day of Mcrch roy

    or, Yacht

    Tannis, for



    ADULTS 6d. CHILDREN 3d



    An enjoyable time for all

    SBAWELL AIRPORT







    appointment as Control Officer





    |
    |
    «| onsite =

    Airport.

    Applicants should be not less than 21 years of age and should
    have previous experience of Flying Control, preferably with Air Crew

    nee as Pilot or Navigator
    owledge of Civil Aviation

    Additional assets would be a gen-

    Legislation and Practice, and of

    Radio Aids to Navigation.
    The appointment is permanent and pensionable, subject to medi-

    FOR

    Salary scale $1,200 x 72—1,776
    ,160 per annum.

    Applications statirg age, education, qualifications and experience,

    anied by testimonials should be sent to The Colonial Secretary,
    riat, Bridgetown on or before 24th March, 1951

    ESCHALOT

    ————————— e

    STUART & SAMPSON
    (1938) LTD.

    15.3.51—2n



    THE FORTRESS
    CLUB



























    The Annual General Meeting ot
    dgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietta the above Club will be held on
    lina, Seh. Marea Henrietta, Sch Thursday 2th instant at 8 p.m

    We » Yacht Caribbe: Sch 22.3.51—1n
    », Laudalpha, Sch. May Se,
    h. Gardenia W Sch. D'Ortac
    line, Sch, Lidia Adina 8., Sch

    D. R.; Sch. Wonderful Coyn-



    Buckaroo,
    ern Eel, Sch



    ). Belquecn,
    ille M. Smith,









    vdalay I, Sch. Blue Nose Mac
    ARRIVALS
    ubedar, 3,244 tons net, Capt
    from Caleutta a. Capetown,
    rom cu , a apetown SPOTLIGHT Is
    DEPARLURES Hata
    “ Zenith, 70 t t, a y
    i British Guiana. ae ey ON YOUR
    "Hi . ons pt, Capt
    a9 lorama » T1 tons pf,
    iiviere, from St. Vincent. HOLIDAY TIME

    In Touch with Barbados | : ~ : °

    Coastal Station

    and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
    iat they can now communicate
    following ships through their
    Coast Station
    illemstad, S.S. Baron Murray,
    us, S.S, Hyreania, 8.8. Mor!
    Polifemo, S.S. Subadar
    S.S. Thelma IV, S.S. Gasex
    S.S. Mauretania, SS











    : z TERI —This application will be consid- | Amherst, Nieuw Amsterdam
    tity nthe Side = peed 3 een a Licensing Court to be held at | Nueva poems on on Ki
    e $ mee OS z i Sour’ strict “FE Holetown, ati |Changchow, 8.8, Loch Ryan, S-
    crate ah ai — nee Police Court, District “E" I , . ; Poe
    ai Dot hthie ca reat dummon tes wiey elie Tuesday, the Brad day of April, 19%6, at Memphis, 88. 8. Rosa, $8.8. Cecilia
    table seting for any" ocension tending |! O'I%K. gy. sung, [Alcon Corals, SS. Alcan Chiper: 5.5
    ane 3 . stained “BR” Holetown, PO ” al Sa ee el
    Knives: Table 69c. Dessert 64c. _ Police Magistrate, Dist. “E oe a. te | Haven, Heler SS. Hermod
    Yorks : Table S4c. Dessert 49c. _— Laurentian Forest, § Siiver Ocean
    Spoons: Table S4e, Dessert 49c. eee Clarkes Wharf, 5.5. Esso New H
    Tea 36c, Coffee 26c. Fag 36c¢ Umatilla, S.S 8.c.T. PLOr

    ee
    T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

    —_

    Jam_ 36e,
    More than fifty different pieces in two
    beautiful models — See Them and Buy
    Them. at
    CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

    ss




    son,
    s.s
    M/S Car
    tan, S.S
    Gallo



    18.3.51—61t









    TEA SETS—Exceptional’ Value. 23
    piece Flowered Tea Set all for $7.99. See |
    these Today at G. W. HUTCHINSON, & /
    co., LTD, 22.3.51—3n

    CANE SUGAR HANDBOOK
    By GUILFORD L SPENCER, D.Sc.
    and
    GEORGE P, MEADE, BS., ChE.
    Revised Edition $20.90 |
    JOHNSON'S STATIONERY.

    cuenta sears
    MAHOGANY VARNISH STAIN
    at | | 64 9/10

    JOHNSON’S HARDWARE | Ee 4/108

    ———
    VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch oat bad Aoe
    all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your

    sizes delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476.

    A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.



    13.2.51—t f.n.



    YACHT — Yawl ‘“Frapeda"” approx.
    37% ft. long, with gray marine engine.
    Recently painted and in good condition,
    Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4569
    or 3026, 27,.2.51—t.f.n.

    ORIENTAL

    SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
    JEWELS
    New Shipment opened

    THANIS

    50% pr.




















    DIAL
    3466

    NEW NATURAL GAS

    installed at your Gas Co, Bay St.
    The above Plant will now
    ensure our Customers with
    regular supplies of

    Pure Distilled Water

    _ oe

    DISTILLING _PLANT



    of two centuries

    FURNITU RE experience in

    Ask for

    ‘1. 8. WILSON

    §

    s \j 7 al

    % SPRY S

    2 SIPRY ST.

    *

    %

    % DIAL 4069

    o

    y

    2 OCPO OPCS SF OBO CSOOD





    Successor,

    RATES OF EXCHANGE

    ase
    DE FEED EDL

    Famous the world over
    for that perfect bouquet

    and flavour — the result















    Rusa; |



    an, S.S
    Atlantic Producer

    ibbee, S.S. Statesman, S.S. Lari

    Triton, S.S. Kurdistan, SS. El

    Morma



    nr

    Je sure
    Yvorthy of notice
    “sy way, with
    will be thrille

    that your appearance is
    Dress your hair the
    A.K, POMADE. You

    with the result

    A.K. POMADE



    CANADA

    MARCH 21, i951

    pr. Cheques or
    Bankers 62 9/1
    Demand
    Drafts @2.15% p
    Sight Drafts 62 6/10
    pr. Cable
    pr. Curréney 61 4
    Coupons 60 7/10°
    Silver 20% pr







    — AT ITS BEST

    randy — /

    WHEN IT IS HENNESSYS.

    Both Bottles
    and Flasks

    available in a

    THREE STAR
    V.S.O.P = over

    X.O.
    at all Grocers, Hotels and Clubs

    — Over









    “Myken" sails g3ra

    February
    eabreeze”

    sails 16th March



    arrives Barbados 6th March,
    arrives Barbados 27th March.





    NEW ORLEANS SERVICE









    S.S. “Runa” satls 15th F y %
    SS. “Alcoa Patriot” sale tn March. arcives arboen aan Marek,
    iineaiedielaaiy OT I Aa
    CANADIAN SERVICE
    SOUTHBOUND

    Name of Ship
    S. “ALCOA PARTNER”
    S. “ALCOA PEGASUS"
    S. “ALCOA PENNANT”

    SAILS HALIFAX ARAIVES
    February 23rd March 6th
    March {th March 20th
    Mareh 2ard April 3rd

    B’DOS

    NORTHBOUND
    8.3." "
    ALCOA PENNANT” ., j *» Due March Sth Sails for St. John &
    ; i , ¥ Halifax
    8. “ALCOA PARTNER ue March 20th Sails for St. John
    & Halifax

    SL iene states.»

    These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

    ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
    APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

    NN Nn om

    PASSAGES TO EUROPE

    Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Domini, for sail-

    ing to Europe, The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
    Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

    a





    = oo +
    —









    SSS LOMO TE
    %,
    A.M. WEBB {i)$ sarsados museum
    x











    STOCKBROKER x eee
    % '
    % EXHIBITION OF
    Barbados Bonds and Shares s
    Oversea Investments ¥ PAINTIN ‘s
    Bought and Sold, *
    x IN OILS, x
    Dial: 4796 Hours 9—3 * BY x
    ial: 479 s 9—é i a
    ‘i ied % HAROLD ©. CONNELL. 3
    33 Broad St. % Open Daily. Sundays. \
    (Over Phoenix), x 10—6. 2—6 x
    ‘ tt total yt otet tte tee”

    )

    \ You will be glad to learn that you can get

    VHITE TALLOW
    ad ABA

    at

    FOUNDRY LTD.

    Pier Head.



    \
    | CENTRA









    % PEP EAE EEE EE LEE A PEA ETE



    t $
    ys %
    ys S
    .

    % q 8
    e ~
    : ri %
    -

    >

    $

    Our Customers and Friends are asked to note
    that our Pier Head Branch (Workshop, Dock, Ship
    Chandlery & Sugar Factory Supplies and General

    CREASE

    Office) will not be open for business on Saturday x
    next 24th inst. x
    S 2 ‘ .
    % The Central Emporium, Broad St. and Gasolene
    %,
    x Station, Trafalgar St., will be open as usual.
    > 4
    ¢ a
    2 x
    @ .
    8 B
    io *
    om
    % >
    ad at at, Et 5G 5%, 4, 0% 4,



    by ty POPOL LEE #549
    OD reporooonnnoeeno ooo eno Cm:

    NOTICE



    Offices, Hardware and Lumber yards. will be

    closed on

    We beg to inform our Customers that our
    :

    SATURDAY 24th Inst.

    Kindly arrange your shopping accordingly. «

    The Warehouses will remain

    :
    x
    usual.
    |

    Sugar open as

    PLANTATIONS LTD.
    BRIDGETOWN
    and
    SPEIGHTSTOWN

    %,
    DOOOOSSCSSCSESLES
    SLOPES SCS CSS OPOOOO SOOO OCOD SGOOOOO SS SOSS A]

    ao
    PAGE EIGHT



    Barbados D
    VISITORS FIGHT HARD —

    TO SCORE THIRD GOAL

    THE COLONY XI de

    feated Grenada in their final

    football fixture at Kensington yesterday evening. by: three
    goals to two in a tame game, '

    At half time the score was 2—-1

    in favour of the Colony.

    Blades playing at inside right
    for the colony opened the scoring
    for the Colony The other two
    goals were scored by Wilkes

    For Grenada, Berkeley and
    Tony Renwick scored,

    The Game

    Grenada defended the goal from
    the northern end and within five
    minutes of play, the Colony scored
    when goal—keeper Steele missed u
    tame shot by Blades the Colony’s
    inside right.

    Shortly afterwards, the Colony
    attacked and Lucas made a good
    first time effort from outside the
    area, but the ball missed the cross
    bar by inches,

    The Grenada front line then got
    going but Tony Renwick on the
    right wing after receiving, kicked
    wide

    Grenada made another attack
    on their opponents’ goal and
    from a pass by Phil Edwards, Ren-
    wick sent in a hard shot from the
    right wing wich goal-keepe
    Smith was forced to deflect ove,
    the bar. Nothing however resulte:!
    from the corner

    Frenada soon found themselves
    two down when Williams centred
    from the left wing and Wilke:
    McLeod the visitors outside lef
    scored,

    Later Gibbons miskicked but
    McLeod, the visitors’ outside left,
    after getting possession, kicked
    wide. The colony missed a good
    opportunity to put themselves
    further in the lead when Lucius
    kicked out a good pass from
    Wilkes.

    Grenada opened their scoring
    when McLeod at outside left ran
    down the field, beat full back
    Gibbons and centred for centre
    half Berkeley to beat Smith with
    a good shot from close up.

    Soon afterwards Grenada
    launched another attack, Phil Ed-
    wards after beating the Colony’s
    half backs, passed to McLeod on
    the left wing who centred, Berke-
    ley- who was on the run headed
    goalwards, but the ball grazed the
    cross bar. The interval was taken
    with the score 2—1 in favour of
    the colony.

    Second Half

    On resumption the Colony were
    first on the offensive but Blades
    their inside right kicked over
    from inside the area,

    It was not long after this that
    Wilkes got possession and beat
    Steele with a hard shot from with-
    lin the area to make the Colony 3.

    Grenada got their second goal
    when full back Gibbons kicked
    across for goal—keeper Smith to
    clear but the latter was not there
    and. Tony Renwick pounced on
    the ball and crashed it into the
    nets.

    The game at this stage grew
    more interesting as Grenada on
    the one hand tried to equalize
    and the Colony on the other tried
    to put themselves further in the
    van.

    On one occasion, McLeod the
    visitors’ outside left sent in a good
    effort but goal-keeper Smith was
    well in position and had no diffi-
    culty in saving.

    Play was now transferred to the
    visitors goal area and their defence
    was kept busy for some time as
    the Colony’s front men tried to
    score,

    The ball was however sent mid

    field and Tony Renwick = got
    possession and raced down the
    field. He sent in a good one

    which Smith saved.

    In spite of some good efforts
    by both teams to score, the game
    ended with the Colony winners
    by three goals to two

    The referee was Mr. L. F
    Harris.
    The teams were as follows:—

    Island: Smith; Gibbons; Grant;
    F, Hutchinson; Cadogan: Gittens;
    Chase; Biades; Wilkes; Lucas and
    Will ams

    Grenada: Steele; R. Renwick;
    Husbands; Knight; Berkelev: Hus
    bands; A. Renwick; Edwards,
    Cummings; Fletcher and McLeod







    Traffie Don't
    No. 10
    e

    Do not stop in the middle
    of the road to take up some-
    one

    Space made available by
    CANADA DRY
    for Safer Motoring.



    They'll Do It Every Time

    No MATTER WHAT THE BEAUTY op
    SAYS, CITRONELLA WANTS HER HAIR
    DONE THE WAY SHE WANTS IT ++









    /. BUT, RUDOLF:
    /

    I SAW IT ON Ty:--










    Vanterpool Victor
    Ludorum

    Robert Vanterpool of Set D was
    declared Victor Ludorum when the
    annual athletie sports at the Boys’
    Foundation School, Christ Church
    ended yesterday.

    Rather big and tall for his age
    Vanterpool also headed his
    division — Division 5 — with . 28
    points. The champion Set was C.
    with 150 points followed by Set
    D, 1044, A-70 and B-67% points.

    The day was fine and the track
    was firm. There were 31 events
    14 of which were. completed on
    Tuesday.

    Perhaps the most thrilling and
    exciting race was the 100 yards—
    in Class I which E. Browne ot
    Set E won. In this race. there
    were tw. false starts but even-
    tually all the boys got off to a
    good start. Browne was a bit
    Jate and about half the distance
    Thomas showed signs that he
    would win but when about two
    yards from the tape Browne with
    a big effort breasted the tape
    before him. Thomas took seeqpjd
    place.

    The time for that race was ten
    and four-fifths seconds. In the
    150 yards Division 5, Robert Van-
    terpool aithough getting off to a
    late start won easily breasting the
    tape well ahead of L. Silver who
    trotted in second.

    Another race which was thrill-
    img was the Old Boys’ Race which
    D, Sealy won. Ten boys entered
    for the race but only four finished

    After the sports Mr. E. Theo-
    belds, Assistant Director of Educa-
    tion, presented the prizes to the
    winners. The Judges were Mrs
    I, J. King, Messrs, K. G. Alleyne
    and L. E. Jones,

    Following are the results of the
    events:—
    1, THROWING THE CRICKET BALL
    (CLASS 2)
    92 yds. 2 ft. Ist—M. King,
    King, 3rd Grosvenor.
    2. RELAY—(Under 14)
    lst—Set A, 2nd Set C, 3rd Set B.
    5S. THROWING THE CRICKET BALL
    (CLASS 1)

    118 yds. 2 ft. 1#t—D, Jones, 2nd E
    Graham, 3rd Eversley and Burke
    4. LONG JUMP—(Class 4)

    12 ft. 5 ins. Ist—H. King, 2nd Moseley,
    Srd J, Clarke.
    5. LONG JUMP—(Class 4)

    14 ft 9 ins. Ist—Waithe, 2nd R. Clarke,
    3rd D, Jones.
    6. LONG JUMP—(Class %)

    47 ft. 2 ins, Ist—C, King, 2nd R
    Grosvenor, 3rd Murrell,
    7. LONG JUMP--(Class 5)

    11 ft, 4% ins. Ist Vanterpool, 2nd
    Silver, 3rd Waterman,
    8. HIGH JUMP--(Class 4)

    4 ft. 2 ins. Ist-—-H, King, 2nd Pilgrim
    and Moseley.
    2. HIGH JUMP—(Class 4)

    4 ft. 3ins. 1st—Simpson, 2nd D, Jones,
    3rd Waithe and Eversley.
    10, HIGH JUMP—(Class 2%)

    5 ft. 0 ins. Ist—M, King, 2nd Thorpe,
    3rd Walrond.

    it, HIGH JUMP

    and. c,



    (Class 5)



    3 ft. 6 ins. let--Vanterpool, 2nd Wate
    man, rd L. Weekes.
    12, 220 YARDS—(Class %)

    Ist~R. Clarke, 2nd D, Jones, 14
    Waithe.

    1% 220 VARDS—(Class 4)

    Ist—J, Clarke, 2nd Gooding, 3rd A.
    Pilgrim.

    ii, THREE-LEGGED RACE—(Over 4)
    lst—Thomas and Browne, 2nd Evervley

    ond Burke, 3rd Brome and Jones,

    1. 100 YARDS—(Class 3%),

    Ist. L, Clarke, 2nd, L. Simpson, 3rd
    J. Waithe, Time 11 4/5 secs
    Fi 100 YARDS-—(Class 4).

    Ist R. Gooding; 2nd H. Pilgrim; 3rd
    A, Pilgrim, Time 1% 2/5 secs,

    16. 1009 YARDS—(Class 1).

    ist E. Browne; 2nd Thomas; 3rd R
    Price Time 10 4/5 sees.

    19, 100 YARDS—(Class 2).

    Ist N. Walrond; 2nd C, King; 3rd C
    Murrell, Time 11 2/5 secs.

    20, 80 YARDS—(Class 5).

    Ist R. Vanterpool; 2nd W. Waterman,
    3rd L, Silver. Time 11 1/5 sees,

    2. LONG JUMP—(Class

    Ist O, Thomas; 2nd B.
    Graham, 18 ft. 10 ins.
    22. 220 YARDS—(Class 2)

    Ist Walrond; 2nd King
    Time 25 4/5 secs.

    28. 150 YARDS—(Class 5)

    Ist R. Vanterpool; 2nd L.
    Waterman. Time 24 2/5 secs
    oo 220 YARDS—(Class 1),

    ist Browne; 2nd Moseley; 3rd Gay
    “. THREE-LEGGED RACE— (Under 14)

    Ist Lloyd and Morgan, 2nd Waithe and
    Clarke, 3rd Blackman and Forde.

    6, HIGH JUMP (Class 1),

    Ist O. Thomas; 2nd, Carttr; trd Layne
    Height 5. ft. 1) in, .
    23. 440 YARDS—(Class 2),

    Ist Wa’rond; 2nd M, King; 3rd C. King.
    28 VISITORS’ RACE.—(Girls)

    ist M. Lioyd; 2nd_ G, Browne.

    29. 440 YARDS—(Class 1)

    Ist D. Lioyd, 2nd A, Price 3rd, 3rd E
    Moseley.

    “0. OLD BOYS’ RACE

    Ist D. Sealy, 2nd C. Morrison, 3rd ©
    Rollins
    31, 880 YARDS—(Open)

    ist D. Lloyd; 2nd E. Mose





    ayne, 3rd R.
    ard Clarke,

    Si'ver; 3rd





    by, 3rd Weekes



    EXTEND CONSCRIPTION

    BRUSSELS, March 21.
    The Belgian Senate Upper
    House to-day passed a Bill ex-
    tending the period of military
    service for Belgian conscripts
    from twelve months to two years.
    The Bill, already approved by the

    Lower House, becomes law.

    —Reuter.

    Registered US Patent Ofles












    BUT THE

    "Then HOME SHE GOES AND SPENDS”
    HOURS DOING IT OVER THE WAY RUDY
    SUGGESTED IN THE FIRST PLACE

    GOOD GRIEF



    GERMAN

    BARBADOS



    coe...



    ADVOCATE



    efeai Grenada In Final Game 3-2

    vs BRITISH



    Hans Bierman, first German to enter a British ring since before the war, seems to be getting the worst

    of his bout against J. Tomlinson of the Cains Club,
    man against his British opponent.

    against the Cains Club by three bouts to two.
    The Germans will also meet the Lyle Boxing Club before returning to Germany.—Express.



    England-N. Zealand
    Test Drawn
    Bailey 134 Not Out
    CHRIST CHURCH,

    NEW ZEALAND, March 21.
    The first of the two Test matches

    between England and New Zealand
    on the present M.C.C. tour ended

    in a draw here to-day. in reply
    to New Zealand’s first innings
    score of 417 for 8 wickets declared,
    England scored 550, and New
    Zealand lost 3 second innings

    wickets for 46 runs before the
    match eaded,

    A feature of the England in-
    nings was a not out century—134
    —by. Trevor Bailey, the England
    fast bowler, who scored with
    delightful freedom after taking
    four and a half hours to reach 50.
    NEW ZEALAND—lst Innings (for

    8 wickets declared) 417
    ENGLAND Ist INNINGS
    Hutton b Moir . 28
    Washbrook ¢ Mooney b Hayés 58
    Simpson c Wallace b Moir 81
    Compton b Burtt 79
    Bailey not out .,. 134
    Brown ¢ Scott b Cresswell 62
    Evans ¢ Hayes b Moir 19
    Bedser.¢ Hayes b Moir ‘ 5
    Tattersall b Moir ‘ 2
    Wright ¢ MacGibbon b Cresswell 45
    Statham b Moir 9
    Extras (imves: 22, legs: 6) 23
    Total 550

    BOWLING ANALYSIS
    Oo. MM R Ww

    Hayes 43° «11 89 1
    MaeGibbou 28 6 “4 «6
    Burtt . 49 23 99 1
    Cresswell ... ° 3300 15 2
    Moir ’ . 56.316 156 6
    Reid 10 1 29 0
    Scott ‘ 2 0 5 0
    NEW ZEALAND 2nd INNINGS

    MacGibbon ¢ Evans b Simpson 8
    Hayes l.b.w. b Washbrook 19
    Cresswell ¢ Evans b Simpson 2
    Moir not out . ° ere 0
    Scott not out ... i
    Extras a
    Total ifor 3 wickets) 40
    —Reuter,

    Ladies Will Enter
    Water Polo Contest

    THE Barbados Water Polo and
    Swimming Association held their
    Annual Meeting at the Aquatic
    Club yesterday evening when it
    was unanimously decided that
    three Ladies teams will be formec
    to enter the 1951 League,

    Over 26 girls have expressed
    their wish to form teams and six

    others are not yet definite, The
    ladies will practise for several
    weeks before they form their

    individual teams.

    With reference to new teams fo:
    the League, Lodge School were
    very keen on entering the League
    but due to lack of funds for trans-
    portation they were unable to
    enter a team.

    Harrison College also expressed
    the wish to enter qa team but as
    several members of the various
    clubs in the Association are pupils
    of Harrison College they would
    only agree to enter g team if these
    players were allowed to represent
    the College with the understanding
    that when they left school they
    could rejoin the clubs they used to
    play for.

    They however stressed the fact
    that they left the matter éntirely
    in the hands of the captains of the
    teams involved and would abide by
    their decision. This matter was
    also referred to the council,

    The tentative

    fixed for the first week in June
    that is, after the Footbal] season.





















    date for the
    beginning of the 1951 season was

    Holkar Wins
    Ranji Trophy
    For Third Time.

    INDORE, March 21.

    Holkar won the Ranji trophy for
    the cricket championship of India
    for the third time when they beat
    Gujerat by 189 runs with 40 min-
    utes to: spare here to-day. Holkar
    Scored 429 and 443 and Gujerat
    replied with 327 and 356.

    Indian Test player Mushtaq Ali
    scored a grand 187 in Holkar’s first
    innings and A. K, M, Rangekar
    hit 97. Gujerat replied gamely
    after losing Test allrounder Vinoo
    Mankad for 11, but a sparkling 234
    by C. Sarawate helped Holkar to
    set their opponents the task of
    getting 546 for victory in their last
    innings.

    Gujerat lost five wickets for 123
    by lunch to-day but in a fighting
    finish they added another 233 be-
    fore their second innings ended in
    defeat soon after tea.

    Allrounder
    a dashing 152
    hours.—Reuter.

    Jass Patel scored
    in just over two





    The Weather

    TO-DAY
    Sun Rises: 6.03 a.m.
    Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
    Moon (Full) March 23.
    Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
    High Water: 3.54 a4.m., 4.11
    a.m,

    YESTERDAY
    Rainfall (Codrington) Nil,
    Total for Month to Yester-

    day : .22 in,
    Tempevature (Max). 84.5 °F
    Tempco ature (Min.) 71.5 °C
    Wind direction (9 a.m).
    N.N.E. (3 p.m.) N.N.E
    Wind velocity 15 miles per
    hour,
    Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.967
    (3 p.m.) 29.889







    DD SS
    1



    but the final result was a win on points for the Ger-
    The German team came from Frankfurt and won their match

    Savannah Club

    Tennis Tournament

    YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
    LADIES’ SINGLES

    Miss Pilgrim beat Mrs, M. Legge 6—0,

    o—1

    MIXED DOUBLES
    ilis Excellency the Governor and Lady
    Savage lost to Mr, and Mrs, F. D. Barnes
    1-6, 2—6,

    Mrs, R. S. Bancroft and P. McG. Pat-
    terson beat Miss Ena Bowen and G. O'N.
    Skinner 6—1, 6—2.

    Miss Ramsay and A, F, Jemmott lost to
    Mr. and Mrs, R. Challenor 75, 6—8,
    6—4

    MEN'S SINGLES

    J. D. Trimingham beat J. S

    0—6, 6—3, 6—1
    MEN'S DOUBLES

    U.N. Roach and P, K
    R. S. Nicholls and T, A, Gittens 6—4
    4—6, 3—6.

    TO-DAY’'S FIXTURE
    LADIES’ DOUBLES

    Patterson

    Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and Miss D. Wood
    vs, Mrs, C. S. Lee and Mrs, C. I, Skinner.

    What’s on Today

    Court of Grand_ Sessions
    —10 a.m,

    Police Courts and Court of
    Original Jurisdiction
    —10 a.m:

    Meeting of the Sanitary
    Commissioners of St, Mi-
    chael—10 a.m.

    Sale, at the office of the
    General Motor ’Bus Co.,
    one Austin, 1950 Model,
    A-70 (damaged in acci-
    dent) —2 p.m,

    Sale—Furniture at ‘“Wast-

    ., field, Pine Hill—2 p.m.

    Mobile Cinema gives a show
    at Checker Hall Pin.,
    Yard, St. Lucy—7 p.m.

    CINEMAS :

    Olympic—'Destination Big House”
    & “South of Rio”’—4.30, 8.15 p.m.

    Aquatic Club—"The Bachelor and
    he Bobby-Soxer"—%.30 p.m.

    Ylaza (Bridgetown)—"The Flame
    and The Arrow’ 2.30, 4.45,

    & 8.30 p.m.

    Plata (Oistin)—‘Code of the
    Saddle” & “Raiders of the
    Border"—5 & 830 p.m.

    Gaiety (St. James)—“Law Comes
    to Gunsight" & “Riding Down
    The Trail—8.30 p.m.

    Empire—“Mister 880°—4.45 & 8.80

    Roxy_-“Balataika’ & “Act of Vio~
    Jence—4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

    Royal —“Night at the Opera” and
    “The Search" —1.30 & 8.30 p.m.











    PRICED TO SELL

    ALLEYNE ARTHURS
    SPECIAL

    RUM



    ¢>

    ‘Tottenha m Hotspurs

    May Tour Argeritina

    LONDON, March 21.

    Mr. Arthur Rowe, Manager of
    the Football League First Division
    Club, Tottenham Hotspurs, said
    u-day that plans to tour Argen-
    tuna during the close of the season
    were still far from definite.

    Tottenham have accepted an
    offer from the Argentine Footbal)
    Association to play six matches at
    a guarantee of £2,000 for each,
    but have not yet been able to
    complete negotiations.

    “We are as anxious as anybody
    to get things’ settled,’ Mr. Rowe
    said, “but they have not told us
    yet where the games will be play-
    ed, or more important, what ar-
    rangements will be made to enable
    us to have them over in this
    country. I hope we shall hear
    something definite soon.”

    ERNIES—

    UNION PARK EASTER
    MEETING





    Friends are kindly asked to
    attend at 5.30 sharp.

    On Thur, March 22nd
    for the Call Over on the
    Ist Day only run on the

    24th March.

    Pari Mutuel Commissions
    executed on any race at the
    meeting

    Usual Cold Buffet
    hors d’oeuvre



    Roach lost te

    Turkey and Ham
    J. N. G. & Sons’ Special

    | Home Made Sausages

    Special Purity French
    Patties and Mince Pies
    Peach Melba.

    Etceteraa, Etceteraa





    THANI

    BROS

    Show you these and more
    for Ladies!
    Anglaise Embroidered $3.04

    up.
    Checked Taffeta
    a yd.
    Spun Silks
    in varieties ...... 87c. up

    $1.37

    Sports Shirts in Plain and
    Flowered for holidays
    Striped and Plain Woollens
    Underwears

    Ties
    Socks etc.

    Shop at

    THANI
    BROS

    Pr. Wm. Hry St.





    OSE

    PLEX

    22

    PESCOLIE,






    COUGHING

    == IS DANGEROUS













    Phone 4267 for

    SWEDISH 6-PANEL DOORS

    Crepe-de-Chine

    in varieties .... $1.14 up
    Sandal Shoes: in Big varie-

    ties
    Felt and Straw Hats
    OUnderwears
    Costumes Jewellery
    ‘Nrist-Watches
    Pocket Books Etc. Etc.

    °

    GENTLEMEN!

    THURSDAY, MARCH. 22, - 1951



    PAPER
    &
    TWINE

    PAPER Per quire of one colour 36 ¢

    Ga II sie 2¢

    TWINE

    Per ball = 27c. 28c. & 47c.
    Porte 3. oe eis

    ON eT” S



    CAVE
    {SHEPHERD

    & Co., Ltd.
    10-13 Broad St.





    The Barbados Mutual Life Assurance

    Society.

    “Will Policyholders and all others concerned please
    note that the office of this Society will not be opened
    on SATURDAY, 24th March.

    Cc. K. BROWNE,
    Secretary.





    Vx 3 x 1%" thick
    TV x 2’8" x 1%” thick

    These are well made Wooden Doors at

    low prices.

    STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

    14” thick, 4’ x 6’, 8’, 10’ long
    3/16” thick, 4’ x 8’ long

    SURINAM PLYWOOD, best quality

    4" thick, 4’ x 8’ long
    %," thick, 3’ x 7’ long

    RED CEDAR SHINGLES
    DOUGLAS. FIR JOISTS & PLANKS



    Phone 4267.

    WILKINSON & HAYNES €O., LID.









    a












    A HALF POMPADOUR, UPSWEEP ;+:
    AND THEN THE BACK SHE ARE NOT funy vive ,
    COMES UPAND OVER BEING WORN : Bu
    IN SORT OF A TODAY ++ LIKE THE: Way 4
    THEY FIXED: I(T
    AT THE BEAUTY




    PARLOR «+



    EMVUELTO EN net
    EN HUEVERA DE PLASTICO
    Y TAMBIEN
    EN HUEVOS DE PLASTICO
    LLENOS DE ALMENDRAS TOSTADAS.

    for EASTER

    ‘3 from

    ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co. tid.

    “YOUR GROCERS"



    TAMBIEN PROVEEMOS UNA SELECCION COM-
    PLETA DE

    CONFITES EN CAJAS LUJOSAS

    GALLETAS “DE COCKTAIL

    GALLETAS DULCES EN LATAS LUJOSAS

    Ro alll .



    ETCETERA ETCETERA EN LA.

    | i,
    : \| Booker's «00s Drug Stores Ltd.
    WASHINGTON a ic; o3 | EROAD STREET and ALPHA PHARMACY (HASTINGS)



    PARA QUE SE ALEGREN SUS, NINOS DEBE
    DARLES UN HUEVO DE CHOCOLATE DE PASCUA
    LLENO CON MARZAPAN—

    COR i St STAYED
    ) " CLR OOKLES LA ELE POE
    { Ne enh he IID ele noe









    ‘
    — — ————








    PAGE 1

    PACI mo BARBADOS ADVOCATE THUBSDA1 H UK II 22, [til Ccmib galiiwf %  in Tnni %  Firnt Out of Sirty M IOi ion >.r UM %  ministrator of Dominica and Mr* E!iol (now Mr*. Bradshaw) a A ho left here nt the iu..t joined The i st out of %  Minium for the %  .he candidate! qualified. David wu rdurated first at the Ursulinc CottVcnt and then at LudRe School before he went to England. Then he -pent three BoarttU, iiu where his two youim brothers. I %  tremcly wall. He then went to Unpuiuham until lasl year when • i t*> make the Royal Navy Mi grandfather was I tad his grandfather wu b#m in Barbados. POCKET CARTOON h% tjxni H l LANCASTI *< I mant .. HUM r '<, ny Uu-iti.K—li !'.'• .Vfi(.iifflC'f"i"i')qi(rr Wr'tr'n R. (mi inieVr lie conl'ij i.r Ul* .Skprfrn* Co B-'fu* HuUitMtp*. or i, '.p "f r Twenty Year* *TVJ UK UiP schr dull %  Aquatic Club Cinema tfl UMITOW li :i IWO Years of AeadoiQ the Acadl Picture Arts HI. •Hnllvi d lo %  hon they were awarded between IB27'jind the Blmi which won awards and some of the stars are neon. A few of the old timers who are *ren an Warner Baxter, Chartea Lauahion. Norma Shearer Cieorne Arlij. Jnnel (iaynnr. Mane I>i %  Will Ser B.I.F. M R. and Mrs. Ted Benjamin %  %  %  I'-itji.'ind last UilknMtad. Hi ill I-' in Enuland for lUah Inrtmtric* Fair. First Clients Return E N ROUTE i„ BHttafa Q llendei and U) England they %  the Royal and J'.hnlques at British Council year when the an the Col onatbUHj for the %  I nfJand, Married in U.S. M ISS DAISY RILEY. I S.M.. formerly Charge IS LnatM o| the Barbados General Hospital wag marMarch 14 lO Mr. r.clR^r Fret-man an Express Businessman ..f i^ng Island. After 33 Years M M DAISY BURNETT accompanied by her daughter Mi • n. roth} Durnell who bad BtMttni three month*' bob daj in Barbados left mi Tuesday afternoon for the I'S via Tnui dad bj u.w.i.A. turnett who Is a Barbadian had been paylni MMI to her home in thim three % %  < si TWl was bar dauRhter's i.i i visit to the island. While in Barbados she was the guaal <-f her sister Mrs. Cyrus of I awell) Pin St. James. Mrs. Burnett is also a sister of Mr. J. M. Crick former headmaster of St. Thomas" Boys' School and St. BUM Bayr School. West Indian Studies Local Government P* ( 'B the third consecutive year r the Lambeth (Ixindon) Borough Council arranged at the renal I of the Btudemt Welfare Department of the British Council a special comprehensive course on Local Government for overseas The course, which fin laned las) week, included a study Of the Council's housing department, a visit to i.ambeth Palace, where the Archbishop of Canterbury lives, meetings with local overnment officer* as well as lecture* and discussion group* TinWest Indian re] n was Mr O. D. Mnrsli, of Jamaica, who has recently been railed -n the Bar. Anniversary Celebrations T HE LEAGUE of Coloured Peoples, in celebration of their xoth anniversary, held a dance in London last week The dance was only a small part of %  he celrln,iiii,iivthen; dto rot hi holiday In Barbados since the war is l)r C B Bertie Clarke, form h heter. He will be accompanied by his wife whose nrt visit to the West IifMes I be. A few days ago atrv Clarke, who Is herself an artist. Indued a Una) Ait Exhibition hel.t In connecHon with the Festival of Britain. When they arrive here BerUa hope* bo will not be too late to get o couple of fames of cricket and |-nisibl> re-appear Cor bis eld club. Spartan Off to U.S. L EAVING by B W I A on Monday for Puerto Itlco on her way to the United State. l< roaldO), was Mrs. Lloyd wife o( Mr. Lionel Lloyd of the Barbados Police* Force. Mrs Lloyd will be staying with hei brother in the United States Area Engineer M R. BOB GREENE. Area Engineer. I.A.L. left lor Aniigna on Monday by HWI.A. alter nnenrling three days in Bur, bnrios T.C.A. Pilot M R AND MHS JOHN VAL1JVNCE arrived by T.C A. yesterday to spend ten day'* holiday in Barbados. Mr. Vallancc 1' a pilot with T C.A. For Easter M R. NEVILLE CONNE1.L Director of the Barbado* Museum, left yesterday af'.crnnon by B W I A for Trinidad. He has %  i for the Raster week end and expectsto return on Easter Monday Canadian Surgeon D R. AND MRS. G M. SPOONER accompanied by their son Charles, arrived from Canada yesterday by T.C.A. to spend eighteen days' holiday In Barbados. They are staying at the Ocean View Hotel. Dr Spooner is a Urological Surgeon in Toronto With T.C.A., Bermudai A RRIVING from Bermuda by T.C.A. was Mr. Walter Jones who Is with T C.A's Traffic Department In Bermuda. Here for a short holiday he is staying at the Aquatic Club. Arriving on the same plane was Miss June Clark's friend. Miss Jean Lovle who Is an n'r stewardess with T.C A. Her home is in Toronto. Miss Clark, who is also a T.C A. air stewardess arrived from Canada on Saturday. They plan to stay here for about ten days. Woman Of The Wee* TALLULAH ) At 4*> -iu is America's best-loved radio star but h.star appearamr this week was before a committee of ( nre. when %  he aaked the Gavrmmmt lo aa-a*ii a velanta/y National HrAllh Committee IroRi l>i-il<'ii body darling." the girl who outT ,, IS ., InddOSH lend. Inllywoodett Hollywood morl,^ flovour t0 (hc ulrnn ,pn C re than 20 years ago and turned he** (if U||i detlS|llfl a u! „„,., confusbaefe on ii. the one and only u> nich Taimiah (-The girl h.^rsely croaking, outraeously V| „, lhc keeping-car name") rallulah Bankhead. "b eit t e r Mng ^^r than to bo caUod. rnrnd"n 's Tb 8 ; 'ir 552 ^*c has been.'the Mdy volcano mind. as The^ Wham from ,., „ ,^, rM dreaM ( hv M ainAlnbanV. a study In perpetual .^wl,, moUon." i-ocner %  eouM not get it IOOM: it seemed to be attached by a strbkf. She puHed tag as far as it a/Otdd come, blend the BTDB1 object under her pillow, and "Lordy. I^irdv, Mam." said the homnrd Negro porter m the morning. "You'se been a-sleepUi' all night on the end of the lightning conductor .' %  The rest of Tallulah's party were not In the least surprised % %  Even forked lightning." they said, -knows better than to tangle with Tallulah World copvrlfihi Reserved —L.E.S B.B.a Radio Programme RATS! MANILA, f. I II >'"' %  '""e * ""' f" """' They bm nr,.: I Plpr in ral-lnff.wd Onmll Cit wrd (or every rat. dnd %  ''"• >n .outhern Philippine. >""> over lo the ci y Ho.llh Cifflcer any time of the day. Lacking one. the local UoBl — I.N.R. li JAXETTA 10HESS XM0PP I'aelaln over NEViSAM'S. Lower Broad SUreet BKAUTIFIL AFTERNOON. COCKTAIL und EVENING GOWNS I Open SATCRDVT MORMMi until 1130. Tel. 2OT4 i a huff ll's real' i u p> Tallulah is. to put II ei Ing Howard To-day Tallulah, at undisclosed thousands a week, is unehallenged mistress of the American airwaves*. Always ribald, often risque, her triumph has surprised many who thought sbfl would prove too strong meat for the unseen audience. This suggestion she take* with mock indignation. | km It myself. riaaarliriK" At 49. Tallulah has lost no sh" says, "for nobody knscrap of her scorpion wit CerH :-. would be pertalnly there Is some Justification feel for a barbecue for her own claim. "Vvm craawrl • I i %  ii 's call t:. more goosip than any woman i ayer Hut It's real, daaorling. ^ince Catherine the Great." i-' rrul "' Tallulah might, had she chosen.Udly, Dieice said of her with an exhausted sigh. "A day away from her i-like a month In the c i t-> resttul. and yet so boring.'' The moat improbable thing about he* is her name fact that it is hei real one. #30 Mr rthl! fixture OtS am %  aortafl H6ra 7 am. TM Nr-. 110 Nrrn AHK1> Mimn. IU am ih. B a.m. Th N**: !• a < %  at: iisi'm ckMo IS a in. Pmirammr I'piadc; II SS am LI t JIM BJH Special OUaaUsh; 11 inoooi Tlw N1110 p.m Nw. Analral*; IMS pm a !jo am avfw Il.te-in^ <-h"li >lack. a an i'i. .:. .. gush Homr Nr.. (m bin IS.W i AQIMTM' I'M'H CINEMA IMembersOnly) TO SIGHT at 8.30 CARY GRANT MYRNA I/>Y SHIRLEY TEMPLE in "THE BACH :L OR AND THE BOBBY-SOXEE" Commencbif FRIDAY 23rd at 8.M HKO-. New Picture "ADVESTlltE IN BALTIMORE" Starring HOBERT YOUNG • SHIRLEY TEMPLE JOHN AGAR ;. Pleaae Note: NO MATINEE ON GOOD FRIDAY. Choh-a: S pm. Coms Wr*. BIS P.m. fcottlH M^arlnr MS P* • p.m. Him >< %  Trawol, BIS p lM-t.iaB.as, SMI M a *• %  %  %  have won fame in a quite different held—as the Lady Astor of the American Congress Her father was an M.P. and Speak-Mof the Lower House Her unclearaa (ha famous Senator Bankhead, who died In ntii name BY THE WAY... *T*HE b %  %  n i in r le I take the fo!'iinuiii words, iii tha hope %  'p' thers ,i thev have hHlMNl me: — %  BJeiobl i NtOkai I tiiau ii i %  BttUe Mir If thai docs not encourage Pattv r ocaaa td halibut u> run. uien there bj no decencv abUni w,.rid ih, Oetapmt O NK ' prn ~ %  '••IV roundThis con%  iiig street.. oul like lenla, j. i] proachlng 01 leaving the i .... %  %  l vehlcj over ; V .-I-I. area rhe ramps and parkodrome* would be inside thMO twlatlBI streets, so that all : ... ., IIK „„.„ fiom the rriutiriabimt would IK 10 the-back entrance Of a | tianic approaching l] H > to 1 111,I us,' tb rront tntrani .* of the narkodromc. %  aehi taai according to -:, •>< %  another uumbei BMAMM in lli,\j r I "•\ V1 I %  '% %  •>• h Brin, "• V" : %  "' Mil"..! V. V %  •',!.. Will, 'I to oAr fpr ( > srent. . wm.-ii iii b. II.. nrai lino wKh mmimitni. 0—rnU tlrtrtilh 'HAni.lE SUKT ha> i.ucil ihls • rlinvliv.. %  %  "i Imlirm,. a, i.rillf,, ,„,,. ra „ ,„.,.,_ c ; % %  jafc ir I Khisfc i i 'id PMUIIM CROSSWORD j—i i Pl./\ r £/% Theatrr-Bridgetown (DM 2310) Tt-'a-SDAV TO THURRDAV I iiiiid Aiiio* : THE FLAME AND THE ARROW Color b< Tech nipfl lor Bin LANCASTER VrntlnU MAYO OH I llaad I rid,. ,,i,1. .^ h.-., •l.illm Tlm>. • 111—I % —r. %  . ,.,* lrm p m Th. l.il> i.id l.nii. nt I fcit.i PLAZA Thelrr—0/r/iV (DIAL 8404) TiiDAV lOnlyi %  • A HK PM illwamai Acu %  u,mWe> Jifhnny MarH IIHOWN n >D"lh> CODE OF THE SADDLE & RAIDERS OF THE BORDER OOOD rmiiAi • %  ,, numm T, !" ,. ;M — %  — ..n — %  • t m Th Fir-, All-Tll,,n PlCirr p( •THK LITE AND PASSION OF CHRIST" liitlETY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMBS LAST Ml OR TUNITK ISO HlHBll t> ,,l,|. LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT & RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL OOOD miDAY *Onl) l.Uttm* Tl~M I .HI — BM — l.la _•>• %  „ "THE LIFE AND PASSION Of t IIIUSJ -tiird".. Sunday. Monday TI> anew i in H.h i 01 nun AND -Mil Woiin-n 3 pm Men III pm rosmvra.v NO c"iiJ>nr,N auaajki Bai BM IRKO. TKAII. -.TRII I Randolph SCOTT A %  New Millinery LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S STRAWS Nylons %  PI MEWS n \is fine Mrw assortment % %  l-alrst Shades %  OM.I -MO In mm and Many I.alesl SHADES 51 Gaujc "AKISTOC" Z.U -CHARNOS" (I.S5, 52.21. 12 M "MASCOT" $ 1.70 "MASCOT" Chiffon lc. „ _, "MASCOT" Ka.von 7 1c. A SlIe In Latest Fashionable Shades •• ELITE" Sports Shirts $.4.11 All Popular Shades < I I I I I \ll SIMMII MIIIC IS lloys & Youths Sires only (White) $ 1.38 EV41VS & WHITFIELDS Dial 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 We shall NOT be OPENING to business on SATURDAY, 24th MARCH Will our friends and customers please note and arrange their shopping and orders accordingly. THE HAIIII \IMIS I O-OI'I II % I IVI lOITO.Y mioin I III. TODAY 2 30; 4.45 A S.30 p., SAT. & SUN. 4 45 & 8 30 p.m MON P.M a.m.; 1 30; 4 45 and 8 30 p.m TUES. and Continuing 4 45 and 8.30 p.m. PL4Z4 •.I (DIAL tSM) JULIUS SIMMONDS "Embraceable You" ALVA ARTHUR "I Wanna Be Loved" ARTHUR MOORK "Dreamers Holiday" CHESTER HOLDER "Wildest Gal In Town" OTHA TAYLOR "Dear Hearts And Gentle People" JOE (Chatanooga) CLARK "Bop! Goes My Heart" GUEST STAR-TERCY WELCH Pit IS — House .10 — Balrony 40 — Box .41 TO-DAY 5 & N.30 Last Showine "THE DOCTOR AND THE GIRL GLEN FORD — JANET LEIGH