Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895

farvbados

a



“SUGAR



Jamaica Defeats
B.G. By 224 Runs

Valentine Bags Seven

By 0. S.
KINGSTON, Jamaica, March 8

JAMAICA today defeated B.G. by the comfortable

margin of 224 runs after 21 minutes of play on

the fifth day of the first Jamaica-B.G. Test. B.G.,

facing a second innings deficit of 510 runs, scored

266 for 7 yesterday and today the three remaining
wickets fell for an additional 20 runs.

“Asturias” Will

Not Come
To W.L

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 8

Two hundred and fifty West
Indians who were hoping to come
to Britain shortly are going to
be disappointed, They were hop-
ing to obtain passages on the Aus-
tralian immigrant ship’ Asturias
which the Ministry of Transport
were considering diverting via
Trinidad and Jamaica on its ré-
turn to Britain in May

They are going to be disappoini-
ed beeause the Ministry of Trans-
port to whom the Asturias is on
hire have decided that there was
not sufficient demand for passages

The Ministry were prepared. to
aivert’ the vessel if 600 applica-
tions were received. Only 250

people applied.

Ramadhin
Wants To Stay

BOMBAY, March 8.

Only Sonny Ramadhin the West
Indies spinner appeared unhappy
to leave when the Commonwealth
cricket team left here for England
to-day.

Ramadhin said; “Lfeel sopyy,to.
leave India which I consider my
home.” \

Leslie Ames the captain, said
that they had had a very enjoyable
trip, Frank Worrell the other West
Indies player in the team, did not
leave with the main party but is
flying back. —Reuter.







MeWatt Injured

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, March 8.

Carlton Reece, wicket-keeper
batsman, was selected to fly to
Jamaica to replace McWatt who is
suffering from an injured finger
and is unable te play in the second
test. A cable from W. M. Green,
the B.G. representative on the
West Indies Selection Committee
said, “It is imperative that we have
a replacement for McWatt due to
injury. He must leave B.G. by
Friday’s plane.”

Kenneth Wishart announced jast
night that B.G._ selectors in
Jamaica recommended Reece and
B.G. Airways are doing every-
thing possible to secure a passage
on Friday’s plane. Passage from
Trinidad has been secured but
passage from B.G. to Trinidad is
still not secured,

U.S. SENATOR KILLED

IN ACCIDENT

WASHINGTON, March 8
Democrat Senator Virgil Chap-
man died today, a few hours after
he was injured in a collision be-
tween his motor car and a lorry,
His death cuts the Democratic
mejority in the Senate to nine.
—Reuter.







SCENE FROM
of the residence
background.

of the

MONDAY NIGHT'S FIRE
Headmaster of St

U.K. condemned over British Guia

W.!. negofiations

CRICKET



|

COPPIN

i€i with his left arm spinners
yesterday, took two more of the
} wickets falling today for 11 more
re finishing with the good fig-

Aif Valentine who claimed 5
|

ures of 7 for 112 in 36.4 overs.
The wicket too helped Valen-
tine’s spinners considerably yes-
terday and today some balls were
jumping shoulder high and others
keeping uncomfortably low. The}.

second Test opens on Saturday



lose first test

FRIDAY,





COMING AROU



Patoir 6 and Rollox 0 resumed
B.G.’s second innings at the over. |
right score of 266 for 7. Valen-
tine completed his over, unfinish-
ed from. the previous day and
Patoir took a maiden over from
Mudie

Senate And House
Should Approve

WASHINGTON, March 8.
ut te The two Senate Committees

4 8s .
iat ee ei eee Madids today voted by 14 to 10 to require
second over, with the day’s play| both Senate and House of Repre-
but six,minutes, old, Rollox hit|Sentatives’ approval of any assign-
weross a shortish ball which kept|ment of American troops to the

low and his centre stump was up-| North Atlantic Pact Army.

rooted for 0 It was a poorsstroke} By the same vote the: Senate
by -a° useful batsman as Rollox| Foreign Relations and Armed Ser-
| with B.G. in such desperate straits,| vices Committees approved the
Trim played out the over and|proposal by Senator Henry Cabot
Patoir faced Valentine again, off | Lodge, Republican, Massachusetts,
driving the last ball of the over|to put the Senate on record as
for a confident*single. saying European nations must
make a “major contribution” to
ground forces under the command

of General Eisenhower.—-Reuter,

Trading Limited In
London Exchange

LONDON, March 8.

Caution and hesitancy remain-
ed. uppermost in. the London
Stock exchange despite the over-
night strength of Wall Street.
Trading was limited, prices were
seldom tested and. only meagre
new account businesS was re-
ported, Changes revealed narrow





Johnson madé a magnificent one-
bend effort to catch Patoir at gully
but failed to hold the ball after
getting his hand to it.

Valentine claimed Patoir’s wic-
ket next over however, deceiving
him with a quicker ball that kept
Straight and low.

The End

Skipper Gaskin, last man in.
took two off an edge from the
first ball from Valentine and two
balls after lifted him high to mid-
on for two and twice hit to back-
ward square leg for 2 and 3 respec-
tively,

Trim pulled Mudie to the square | /*regularity . 4
lag boundary for four and it was | Po Government sf thie
obvious that the intention of the|P4alved by one sixteenth while
last pair was to play free cricket|@#â„¢0ng industrials, textiles and

rayons were helped. Engineerings

as all hope for saving the game improved but the trend of other

had vanished by this time.

groups was to lower. levels.
Valentine had Trim caught at!|Commodity shares showed dull-
gully by Arthur Bonitto playing|ness. Tins remained under the)

forward at one that spun away|influence of the lower price of

and B.G.’s innings closed for 286,| metal. les:

Trim having scored 7 and Gaskin} Oils failed to hold an initial

10 not out. selective firmness, and losses of
half a point were shown. by

The scores:— Japanese bonds.






JAMAICA 18ST INNINGS 273 Changes in gold shares were
BRITISH GUIANA 1ST. INNINGS 162 mainly to, lower levels, but -cop-
JAMAICA'S 2ND INNINGS “" : 3
‘ 3s | pers brightened on some new
b Bonitto... 61 | account buying. —Reuter,
tayley b Valentine se
Persaud stpd. b Valentine 5



Christiani c Goodridge b Valentine
C. H. Thomas c N. Bonitto b
Valentine 5
J. L. Thotnus ec Mudie b Bonitto
Me Watt e¢ N. Bonitto b Valentine.

Officer Injured In

. f s
Patoir b Valentine . 9 Clash With Bandits
Rollox b Mudie a o
Trim c A. Bonitto b Valentine q ASMARA, ERITREA, March 8.
ee etree harika hee Toe]? ACSBeitieh |. officer and, corporal

-| were injured yesterday in a clash

Total with bandits about six miles from

286

Shu Bas

Fall of wickets: 1149; 2157; 3181, ASMara. Both men were brought
4-191; 5—216; 6—241; 7-266, 8—267;|to the British military hospital in
9—269. Asmara last night.

BOWLING ANALYSIS _ The officer with bullet wounds
Oo mM R-_~ win his stomach was said to be
Johnson. . 5 1 5 9 | dangerously ill.
Sere tea 6 i %{| The two men were on- patrol
A. Bonitto 10 0 44 2.When the clash occurred.
Mudie 23 7 60 1 —Reuter.



AFTER THE FIRE



in Castries showing the devastated area. The ruins
Masy’s College (left) with the Methodist Church in the

~

a

MARCH 9,
RACING 2w Be.

U.K. BLAMED FOR SU



1951



and Harroween
new times

ND THE WEND

Allies Move Up In| ‘it. vin

Central Korea

TOKYO, March 8

THE UNITED NATIONS troops attacking East of

Seoul advanced to-day aléng the whole 100 miles of the |at 4 p.m. tomorrow,

Central Korean front, an American Eighth Army spokes

man. said to-night.

But they still will not come up against the main body

of the Communist armies r
offensive.

U.S. Casualties

In Korea

WASHINGTON, March 8.
_» Total American casualties
in the Korea war rose to-
7. to nt: including
8,853 known to have died.
The figure, representing
notifications sent to next of
kin up to March 2, was 1,773
higher than last week’s,
Analysis was: Killed in
action 7,857; died of wounds
911; missing and known to
have died, 85; wounded
33,781; missing—known to
be prisoners 110; missing but
since returned to safety 980:
otherwise missing 8,724. To-
tal army casualties were
43,598, navy casualties 596,
marine casualties 7,838, air
force casualties 416.
—Reuter.

UNEASY FEELING
IN GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, March 8.

Last night fires still leave an
uneasy feeling although Gairy in
an address tonight urged all work-
ers to refrain from violence, But
the strike continues.

Gairy also said he planned to
go to Jamaica to see Bustamante







to get a commission to enquire
into “maladministration of the
authorities handling the strike

situation.”” The manual and men-
tal Workers’ Union has received
$100, contribution from a St. Vin-
cent movement to assist the cause
here,

It was reported from the coun-
try yesterday that 15 . women
armed with cutlasses attacked the
watchman of Calmiste Estate who
retaliated by using a stick. break-
ing the arm of one while the
others dispersed,

H.M.S. Devonshire paid a short
call this morning picking
boat left here. An official news
bulletin scptched the rumour that
the Governor was going to St
Lucia. The Governor and Mr.
Barltrop thi¢d morning again saw
the leaders of commerce, and an
agricultural delegation in connec-
tion with vesterday’s representa-
tion and this afternoon the Execu-
tive Council met to consider the
motrer but there has heen no
official pronouncement yet,



Results At
A Glance

SECOND DAY

NINTH RACE
DEMURE—Lutchman
SUN QUEEN—Yvonet
1. URNS—Crossley
TENTH RACE
CLEMENTINA~—P. Fletcher
HI LO—Wilder.
SOPRANO—O'Neil.
ELEVENTH RACE
APRIL FLOWERS—P. Fletcher
APOLLO—Thirkell,
FIRST FLIGHT—Lutehman
TWELFTH RACE
it HARROWEEN—Lutchman
> LANDMARK—O'Neil.
% SUN QUEEN—Crossley.
THIRTEENTH RACE
1. VIXEN—Yvonet
2. DUCHESS—Hoalider.
4. JEWEL—Crossley.
POURTEENTH RACE
1 “OW BELLS—Holder.
“ CROSS ROADK—O'Neil
& MARY ANN—Yvonet
FIFTEENTH RACE
1 FAIR SALLY—Crossiey
2. ARUNDA—J. Belle
8. NOTONITE—AIL.
SIXTEENTH RACE
1 GUN SITE-—Lattimer; &
P. Fletcher
8 ATOMIC U—Lutchman

#e- Bae

wen

SLAINTE

up a}

eported grouping for a massive

' Front line reports said Commun
ists appeared to be withdrawing
‘their main forces leaving dete:
‘mined pockets of resistance in
| ‘suicide’ positions,

| Teday'’s advances varied fron
| one mile to two miles but the
American’ 25th Division, which
cro, the river 15 miles east of
| t t held South Koreaty
fea 1, reported a gain of three
| miles,

| The 25th Division also claimed
' casualties inflicted in their sector
| totalled 6,000 dead and wounded
}since yesterday with over 300
; prisoners, An 8th Army spokes-
‘man dealing with the front gener-
, ally, said opposition was “light to
moderate.”

| He said Australians and Cana-
|dians of the (British Common
| wealth Brigade a‘ivanced on the
‘central front without resistance
| Earlier reports from the front
jsaid these troops were fighting
j bitterly to dig out deeply en-
; trenched Communists immediately
Inorth of the Yongduri-Hoengsony
| lateral highway to the east of the
American sector.

These reports said Communists
ithrew back every attack

1 On the left flank of the
Americans nearer Seoul reconnais
sgpce missions probed across the
Ham at two points but were
thrown back,

South Koreans Pushed Back

In the eastern sector of the
central front North Koreans
forced South Korean elements

back a short distance

Genera) MacArthur's Commun
ique this morming said Communist
casualties in the past 24 hour
were estimated to have been
among the heaviest of the whole
Korean campaign, Fighters and
medium bombers combined,
American, Australian and South
African air forces, flew 700 sorties
in excellent flying weather today,

Pilots claimed to have killed or
wounded about 500 troops and
damaged or destroyed nearly 100
vehicles carrying troops or sup-
plies.

Superfortresses of the America’
Far Easi air force made a heavy
raid on Chung Chow important
Communist military supply ane
distribution centre about 30 miles
‘north of the Central front line.



' They dropped over 200 tons of
{itigh explosive. They were wv:
| challenged by aircraft or anti
| aireraft fire,

| —Reuter.



| ¢ Japs Will Hang

|

AUSTRALASIA, March 3
An Aus-ralian War Crimes

!Court here today sentenced sev-

}@n former members of the Im-

| perial Japanese Navy to death by

| hanging for mass execution of 24

Australian and allied prisoners
| of war

| Two cher Japanese were sen-
| tenced to lif? imprisonnent and

three to 1 years ‘on the same
| charge the mass execution took

place at Colpang, Dutch T mo:
in 1942

The Court has now sentenced
13. Jovanese war criminals to

death by hanging. They are kep*
jin solitary confinement pending

| ecnfirme jon of sentence by thé
Australian Government.

The Government has not vet
confirmed a death sentence but
has commuted one to life im-
prisonment.

—Reuter.

Meat And Trade Talks
BUENOS AIRES, March 8
British and Argent
appeared satisfied with the openin
phase of meat and talk

which were renewed here thi

ine delegate



rade

| week.—Reuter,

enn

THE WAR









THIS IS WHAT the field looked like during the 15th race yesterday when the horses were coming around the bend by the Drill Hall,



U.N. troops make
further gains

GAR



PRICES FIVE. “CENTS
FRA ICE Queuille asking* for

wa
confidence voté™

DEAL

Cuba Can
Undersell

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 2

CONDEMNATION of the British Government's

attitude in dealing with the West Indies over
the question of sugar contracts is made today by
the Empire Industries Association and the British
Empire League in their monthly bulletin. The
President of the League is former Secretary of
State for the Colonies, Mr. L. S. Amery and among
the Vice-Presidents is Lord Lyle.

Dealing generally with the subject of Canada-We
indies trade, the bulletin tells English readers that the wer








created anomalies which were hard to overcom«
It goes on tt ay th he tua-
’ . tion ‘was> ni ne ed. by.’ the
M.Ps Enquire Into \\°) 8 88 Raitian
> ne | Gover when negotiating
Castries Fires | ioowterm purchase ot West Indian
i} sugar to guarantee puri e of le
, whole crop
Grenada Riot In these cireumstance the bul-
(From Our Own Correspondent) | letin adds, it is not surprising t
LONDON, March 8 Canada hag held herself free to do
Questions relating to the second] the same, But if this procedure
——_ {Castries fire and recent outbreaks | is carried out the effect will be
in Grenaca will be asked in Par-| that Cuba having discharzed her
k ; liament next week United State contract will be
: Castries questions are designed | #ble * nig ! pk the aa aacat
, [ to discover how the second fire | Sugar both in ACA AINE vad
Confidence Vote was able to take such a hold in| “With the result that both prefer
PARIS, March 8. | View of the lessons learned fol | ©)¢* ey jon ee aS areas =
The, formation of a new lowing the 1948 outbreak West Ii die il be no better off
French Government appeared as- They are being asked by Mi t Yn cnet Mig Ment:
(sured tonight when Radical! Peter Smithers, Chairman of the|‘ !
ileader Henri Queuille announced| B-W.1. sub-Committee of the Oppo World Price
}he would ask the Assembly to| Sition Imperial Affairs Committee, rs
iinvest him with. the premiership| He will ask Mr, James Griffith It further said that to call
fin two _ questions scheduyd] the Cuban price “world price” is
He notified the Speaker to} for next Wednesday, firstly what], complete misnomer in these cit
summon deputies to meet to give| measures were taken to improve} eymstances
him a vote of confidence, the efficiency of the fire service The bulletin supperts the view
c in Castries after the first fire, and expressed |} Lord Lyle to his
A Government majority assur secondly, if he will make a state-} ed Queuille they would vote foi] ment onthe second fire on March is no justification whatever fe
3 mig eae tomorrow, thus) 5, the United Kingdom purchase of
virtually uaranteeing the re- “ , ' : ‘sO ions
quisite absolute majority "| Mr, Smithers also refers to the| Pein sugar in these conditions,

Queuille will form his Cabinet
during the weekend. Most ot
his ministers will be the same as
in the outgoing Pleven Cabinet
and will occupy the same posts
with Robert Schumer as Foreign
Minister.

Concessions by Radicals about] request to Mr. Griffiths to review

changes in the election system
appear. to have helped solve the
deadlock that provoked the resig-

nation of France’s _ thirteenth
postwar Cabinet eight days ago. |
—Keuter.

No Gags

THE TIMES and the
commented to-day that th
Argentine Government of t
Prensa would be foolish.

/

The Tinies said the Argentine
[crovernment’s grievance against
‘che paper had still not been pub-

icly disclosed and added: “The
Ciovernment is doing more harm
to its own good name by these
;«cts of oppression, than coulu

possibly be done by the indepen-
ident news reporting it seems de-
{ser .nined to silence”

The article said that with its
bigh standing wherever news-
| Papers are read and compered, La
{4'rensa had done much for the
credit o Argentina in the world.

“Its independent existence is an
weset to the régime that allows it,
and though irritations may come
to authority through reporting
unpalatable truth, authority—in
ary country—is to bear them
gracefully,” the Times ended,
The Yorkshire Post said:

La Prensa’s fault was that it
was a fearless critic of the present
tcgime, It was not a violent critic:
ut it told the truth and that pn





enough.”

It added: “The whole story is be-
ginning to unfold, Absolute Gov-
ernment takes ,ower; it blunders;
mut siace it is committed to the
pretence of infallibility, the only
press if can tolerate is one willing
te play the game of exclaiming
at the splendour of the Emperor's
ciothes—though in fact they may
be non-existent,”

The Post said it was also a lesson
for people in Britain and ended:
“As far as the Argentine is con-
cerned, we hope that La Prensa
may ke restored to life. Its perma.
nent end would be a bad omen for |
the future cf ovolitical life in}
the Republic.’—Reuter,. |





‘Panama Bark
Closed

PANAMA, March 8

| Panama's only private bank, |
|The Panama Trust Company did}
jnot open its doors today follow- |
i Court order last n‘ght to}





| suspend its .cperations temporar-
pily. 1
|. Bank directors had informed
|Panamenian authorities that ite |
feash holding were dangerously
{iow as the result of abnormal
wither als yosterday
| The bank weatherod severe
wm last December, thanks to
Government help but it has beer
reported thet the ¢ nment has
now decided to withdraw it up-



| port —Reuter

| With



Truth Must Be Told

_ (La Prensa has not appeared since news vendors boy-
; cotted the paper on January 26).

whiist one penny-worth of Empire

recent outbreaks in Grenada in a sugar remains unsold

third question in which he says
that the Colony has suffered per-
manent damage to its economy in
view of the diminished confidence
which investors and
others will now view it,
He will couple thig

“The welfare of the British West
Indies is not the responsibility. of
Canada but it is definitely that of
the United Kingdom” the bulletin
concludes “and should such a sit-
mation ginderseiling by Cuba
occur, fhe burden of relieving
Wes 1 itHervemaiaet agteryy
properly fall upon Great Britain,
so that all parties in this triang
ular situation would in the end
Be worse off.”

with a

the provision made for maintain-
ing law and order throughout the
West Indies with a view to en-
suring that there is no repetition
of outbreaks either in Grenada
or elsewhere,



Egypt Will Relax

CAIRO, March 8
Egypt announced today that she
would relax ‘unnecessary formali-

On Press

ties” in the Suez Canal while

maintaining the right to search
LONDON March 8. ships to bar contraband from

reaching Israel,—Reuter,

Conservative Yorkshire Post
e permanent closure by the
he independent newspaper La

a yt te

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



_————.



WINE

—the true spirit of the
grape is accepted the
world over as the right
to






PD BHKOWN

rE Ce. Yy 4
diy ms

i accompaniment
| gracious living.

Paarl Tawny
Wemmersock
Pale Dry Sherry

Distributors

R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd

Make your choice—
K. W. V.
|

ere

ms



PAGE TWO
ab
MERRILI

owne of ¢

f
of

Me CHARLIE E
- Ne York

i, St. Thomas



whe
? November

holida left yesterd for the
vin Puerto Rico, by B.W.1.A
\ rill is a partner of Mer-
*h and Co., and a Direc-
of Patchogue—Plymouth Mills

as, been

ince 1950 on





@ Banker by profession
Seawell to * him off were
Mr. and Mrs, Colles Coe

1066 And All That

PYONIGHT at 8.30 o’tlock in the



Coliege Hall, the pupils of
Harrison College are going to give
us their interpretation of that
well known farce on English His-
tory, “1066 And All That”

Performances of this kind by
the College boys are always of
a high standard and their effort
tonight promises to be no excep-
tion,

Proceeds from the play will
help finance a Harrison College




Sports Team on a visit to Queen's
Royal College in Trinidad

Will Helo Tourism
NTRANSIT through Barbados
yesterday by B.W.I.A. on his
way to St. Lucia from Trinidad
was Mr. George Roddam, Deputy
Manager of Colonial Development
Corporation’s Engineering Division
His headquarters are in Jamaica.
Mr. Roddam has just returned
from a visit to British Honduras

where C.D.C’s projects are pro-
gressing satisfactorily The Cor-
poration, he said, is at present

erecting a 25-bedroom hotel in that
colony which will fill a great need,
particularly for the Tourist Indus-
try.

Mr. Roddam who at one time
used to live in Barbados, told Carib
that he had recently returned from
England where his daughter Sonj2
Mrs, Roddam is at

is at school.
present in Jamaica,
From St. Lucia Mr. Roddam

will visit Dominica before return-
ing to Jamaica,

French Honour
R. JACQUES LEGUEBE,
Consul General for France in
Trinidad has bee awarded the
Chavalier of the Legion of Honour
by his Gevernment. Mr, Leguebe
and his family visited Barbados
for a holiday a few months ago.

Signals Officer
ME: R. S. WILLIAMSON, Area
t Signals Officer, International
Acradio Ltd., stationed at 1.A.L.’s
Head Office in Port-of-Spain ar-

rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. Mr. Wil-
liamson who is staying at the

Hotel Royal, returns to Trinidad
to-morrow .

Maths And French

R. ULRIC CRICK who teaches

Mathematics and French at
the St. Vincent Grammar School,
St. Vincent, left yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.I.A. for Martinique.
For the past few weeks Mr, Crick
was holidaying here with relatives.
He expects to stay two yonths in
Martinique. He is on ‘long leave.

Trinidad Arrivals

MONG ‘the arrivals from Trini.
‘ dad yesterday morning by
B.W.I.A, were Mr. Alfonso B.
de Lima, Mr. Ted Benjamin and
Mr. Cuthbert Marshall Mr.
George de Nobriga arrived from
Trinidad on Wednesday.

New Exhibition

FTPCHE new exhibition at the Bar-

bados Museum, which opens
to-morrow and continues for one
month, will be a retrospective col-
lection of paintings by Harold C.

Connell,
M*: ANSCELL PAYNE was
among the passengers leav-
ing yesterday on B.W.1.A.’s An-
tigua flight. Anscell is on his way
to St. Kitts where he: has been
transferred .to Barclays Bank's
Basseterre Branch.

Transferred

ne a ee



in every
tad



break fast
that builds! Save ’em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

TY Hiloggs

CORN FLAKES
today!

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8 Vew 36 in. EASTER footal
Dress Assortment

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Slipper Satin,

Vial 4606






MAROCAIN,
EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Calling B



MR. CHARLES MERRILL—left
yesterday for the U.S.
Back To Antigua
R. CHARLIE WARREN who
had been in Barbados for
the past six weeks on holiday,
returned to Antigua yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. Mr. Warren
is Manager of Bennett Bryson’s
Bottling Works in St. John’s An-
tigua. He was staying with his
parents Mr. and Mrs. C. S. War-
ren of “Wyndal”, Rockley.
Short Visit
R. JOHN LAW,. representa-
tive of Spencer Kirton
and Co, in Trinidad who was in
Barbados on a short visit, left yes-
terday for Antigua by B.W.LA,.
From there he will visit Jamaica
and British Honduras before re-
turning to Trinidad.

To Study Nursing
ISS NAN GRANNU\M, daugh-
ter of Dr. and Mrs, F. N.
Grannum of “Monteith”, Bar-
barees, is on her Way to England
to study nursing at Clayton Hos-
nital, Wakefield, Yorkshire. She
left last week by the Golfito.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY MARCH 9, 1951



£30 a.m,

7.00 am. The News, 7.10 a.m, News
Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials,
7.25 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m,
What Is Psychology, 7.50 a.m, Interlude,
4.00 a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 8.45 a.m.
Humour, 9.00 a.m.The News, $10 a.m.
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close

— 2.45 pm. 19.976 M.





Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
11.25 a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 11.46 a.m.
World Affairs, 12.00 (noon) The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis 12.15 p.m.
Close Down

4156.40 p.m. 19.76 M.



p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m
Let's Make Music, 6.00 p.m. Merchant
Newsletter, 6.15 p.m. What Is



. 2.64 M. & 312 M



6.35 p.m. Interlude, 6.45 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News, 7,10
p.m, News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian
Diary, 7.45 p.m. Think on These Things
746—11.00 p.m. 31.32 M, & 48.43 M
$00 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 6.15 p.m
English Magazine, 8.45 p.m, Composer of
the Week, 9 p.m, World Affairs, 9.15 p.in,
Let's Make Music, 10.00 p.m, The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m,
Communism in Practice, 10.30 pgm. Melody
on Strings, 10.45 p.m, The Debate Con+
tirues, 11.00 p.m. Ring up the Curtain





LONDON, March 2
A faint winter mist curled
around the trees in the Mal] this
morning when the King held the
third and = largest of the
New Year Investitures. But the
sun came out from behind the
clouds as the crowd collected
outside the newly-painted, gold-
tipped railings of Buckingham
Palace.
Each

carried a
card. “Entry from 10 a.m,” it
read. There were mothers and
fathers, aunts and uncles, sisters.
girl-friends and children, fo
€ach person receiving a decora-
tion is given two tickets for re-
lations or friends,

There are several changes from

person pink
& -¢



pre-war tradition in today’s in-
vestitures. No longer need the
men attending the first investi-

ture of a series wear the expen-
sive Levee dress—knee-breeches,
silk stockings, and buckle shoes
— nor is a tail-coat and topper
a necessity, And in the old days

relatives stayed outside the
palace. Now wartime practice
of admitting two relatives or

friends with each
been continued.

Ot all the Palace functions.
this one has its own, particular
atmosphere, There is none of
the high-pitched excitement of
the Presentation Courts, with
car-loads of debutantes in sweep-
ing hats and fluffy frocks, escor-
ted by fluttered mothers, nor is
there that air of ‘“We-Know-
Everyone-Here” as at the Diplo-
matic Courts. These are the
people who have had their great-
ness thrust upon them.

An Ordeal

For many of them it is rather

recipient has

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ify

an ordeal “V.C’s have
known to say that it was
than winning the thing”

The gates were late in opening
this morning, and the queue wag
restive. A mounted policeman
cantered up and down. A shabby
little man joined the end of the

been
worse

queue. Five minutes later he
wandered away -- perhaps he
thought it was for cheap cigar-
ettes,

“Oh Alf, I wish I hadn't come!
I do honest! Fancy having to go



MAY

lead away. Relations and friends
filed up the curve of the Grand
Staircase, and through the long
glass-ceilinged picture gallery with

dignified Van Dyck portraits.

Scarlet and Gold

State Livery Porters wore scar-
let and gold, red-coated musicians
played persuasive music from the
roinstrel gallery and there were
great rose - erystal chandeliers
hanging from an embellished eeil-
ing. A rather head-masterly

at

and sit all on my own,” a cor- admiral bustled everyone into the
poral’s wife was Saying. “Well, umes of little gilt chairs, or to
think about me, having to go up red silk seats along the wall,
there”, her husband retorted. In another stateroom the recipi-

Small boys had their hair cots were marshalled into the cor-
combed, and were told to “Keep rect order. A small metal hook
still” The lady behind was was attached to each man or
explaining how she bought her woman’s coat, so that the King
Sutfit, can easily hang on the cross or

“And I told Maud I must have
a lhilac hat,” she said. The gates
were opened, and the policemen
checked the pink tickets. An ad-
miral, rather late, strode up with

medal.

The beef-eaters, looking like the
cpening of a Shakespeare play,
raarched in and took their places
in front of the twin thrones below
the Royal Arms of England em-

that quarter-deck lureh, his ladies+})azoned on the crimson draperies

pattering along behind him.

Suddenly the musicians, who had

sun glinted on service insignia }cen faithfully throvgh theie gar-

There were salutes on all sides
“Good morning, Sir!” and “Hullo
there, Jenkins!”

“There was a sort of pinky oF
in Selfridges, but it, didn’t fiff
said the lady behind.

“Decorations on the
please,” said the policeman.

“When do we see the King,
Mummy,” said the small girl in a
red cout.

Then into a marble-and-goid
entrance hall, with its dark red
carpets and indirect lighting round
the frieze, the recipients were

right

SSPSOSS OPS SSS S99 SSS SOS OSS OO SOP IOOOS
THEATRE

FPRID.—SUN. 8.30

ist Port SERIAL

‘“* GHOST
ZORRO ”’

with CLAYTON MOOR
PALMER BLAKE

of

POOR

s

O

R
PLCS ESSE LEP PF PACA

PRID.—SUN. 8.30
‘* TARNISHED ”’

Don't Miss this Double

SAT. 12 P M. MIDNIGHT MAT

‘FIGHTING SEABEES’

“OUT OF THE STORM”



GLOBE

OPENING TO-DAY & CONTINUING









ta ae

(URIYERSAL INTERNATIONAL presents

+ sans STEMART
© Shelley WINTERS |
Dan DURYEA |

Stephen McNALLY

e

with MILLARD



PLUS

FITZ HAREWOOD —

LEROY ALLEN —

Pit 16 House 30





f

PO

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and
Continuing
Universal International
Presents . 3
Yvonne De CARLO
Richard GREENE in

“THE DESERT HAWK”

with Jackie Gleason
and Lois Andrev



Special Saturday Morning
Show at 9.30

“BILL and C00”

AND

“SHERIFF of WICHITA”

Starring
Allan (Rocky) LANE

ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Whole Serial

“DAUGHTER of DON Q”



Starring Adrian BOOTH,

Kirk ALYN
with Leroy MASON
and Roy BANCROFT

Lystav,

fine draping corded crepe

Printed rayon — white grounds

White
5 NEW

(at

in’<5

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SHADES.

ROYAL

TO-DAY At 4.45 ONLY
The All-Indian Film

“SHEHNATI”
Admission $1.00

TO-NIGHT ONLY AT 8.30
Eagle Lion Double

Scott BRADY and
Jeff CAREY in

“CANON CITY”

AND

“MICKY”

Starring Lois BUTLER
and Bill GOODWIN



OLYMPIC

To-day and Te-morrow 4.36
and 8.15

Republic Smashing Double
Ken Murray's Production

“BILL and C00”

AND

“SANDS of 1WO JIMA”

Starring John WAYNE
and. Adele MARA



aa - — So
BEBABEBEBEEEEE &
Lombia,
Tobralco

Robia

Just arrived

Dial 4220

te Roaring Story of the Gun that Won

MITCHELL » Charles Drake +

Screenplay by ROBERT L. RICHARDS and BORDEN CHASE + Directed hy ANTHONY NANN + Produced by AAROM ROSENBERG’



the West!
ome me 5




aS

John Mclntre « Will Geer «Jay, C. Flipper







TONITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

CLAYTON THOMPSON—All the Time

BYRON ROLLOCK—Bewitchod, Bothered, and Bewildered
DORIAN THOMPSON—Wildest Gal in Town

SAM NILES—“Who Put the Whiskey in The Well”
FELIX STRAUGHN—“Lucky Ole Sun”

EDWARD MARSHALL—Four Winds and Seven Seas

GUEST STARS

Globe’s 1st Super-Star

AND

THE LIL MAN WITH THE HORN

8-year-old Trumpeter

Balcony 40 Boxes 54

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The most Beautiful N
with a world-wide

HARDWOOD CHAIRS
$5.

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AN



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

COTTON







To-night

CLUB MORGAN

ight €lub from Miami to Rio
reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
En tertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations

.

den-party repertoire of Tchai
kovsky and Johann Strauss, struck
wp the National Anthem, The King
entered in his favourite uniform
cf an Admual of the Fleet,

The Lord Chamberlain, Lord
Clarendon,—grey-bearded, distin-
guished and 72,—read out the
names. The long line filed past.
Kinights knelt before the King to
be touched on the shoulder by
his sword, The rest paced to a
position some four feet in front
of the King, turned to face him,
bowed or curtseyed after shaking-
een rrernriernnctinae eet,

ee cee en

IG ROYAL INVESTITURE

HAZEL

hands, backed three steps, bowed
erd curtseyed again and left the
room. But many forgot to back
away, intent only on escaping
from this intimidating ceremony,
or so bedazzled by the glory of
speaking to their sovereign. Some
back but forgot to bow-——-then re-
membered half-way to the door!
An Advantage

Service training gave the arm-
ed forces the advantage. There
was the smart march forward
the sharp turn, the firm hand-
shake and the routine faultless-
ly earried out. Behind them the
civilians shambled rather self-
consciously. There was a chuckle
for an Army private who came
in as if the ballroom was the
perade-ground. With arms swing-
ing, route march style he nar-
rowly missed a stationary admir-
al, halted, clicked his heels with
a crack that could be heard in
the back row, and came to atten-
tion in front of the King with @
stamp that made chandeliers
tremble.

The old gentleman beside me
saw his wife in the long line.

“Twenty years on committees’,
be ios, me, “The village ae
uri ecedee the *t €
her a Dame”. He Safety Rope
she’s going to be all right. She
doesn’t enjoy the best of health,
you know . . . she’s been wor-
rying for weeks whether she'd
manage to get here”

I saw a white-haired old lady,
very excited, wesring navy-blue
and button shoes,

“If only she'll take it slowly”
groaned her husband, “She's al-
ways been: so impetuous.”

She took it slowly. Her curt-
seys were steadier than most.



JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs Over NEWSAM’S—Lower Broad Street—Tel. 2684

JUST ARRIVED IN

TIME FOR EASTER

Ladies’ Inexpensive AFTERNOON DRESSES
From $18.50 to $24.50



ec elclliaaalall
————————————————————————
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEES ; TODAY &

TOMORROW at 5 p.m.

TONIGHT to SUNDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Margaret Lockwood, Patricia Roc, Dennis Price

Passionate Color by Technicolor

A Gainsborough Picture, Released through Universal-International

‘“‘ JASSY ”

MONDAY & TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE : TUESDAY at 5 p.m.

“THE COUNTESS OF MONTE CRISTO”

Starring Sonja Henie



WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30



with Michael Kirby, Ol#a San Juan, Dorothy Hart

MATINEE : WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.

James

| in
|

Mason, Rosamund John, Pamela

Kelliino

“THE UPTURNED GLASS”







MATINEE March

TO-DAY AT
EMPIRE



visit










76

EACH,

BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB
PRESENTS

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

A MURDER aas geen
ARRANGED

THRILLER

MARCH 15th & 16th 8.30p.m.

BOX OFFICES OPEN











16th 5.30 SHARP



& A.M.
THEATRE





























THE

FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1951



Beans Are Short

Nearly everyday some house-
wives have been going to the De-
partment of Agriculture in an
effort to get “bountiful” beans
which are imported from the
United States.

A shipment of these
expected shortly and everyone 1s
on the alert. At the moment there
is a shortage of these beans and
some shops which have them are
selling them at a greater price than
they are sold at the Department.

Greater demand by housewives
have aggravated the shortage and
on the arrival of the last ship-

t there was such a rush that
all the beans were sold out quickly.
Late buyers were disappointed.

beans is

There is also a shortage of but-_

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)



TODAY and Continuing Daily

Wemen 4.45 pom.

“THE STORY OF

By Special Request

Ingrid BERGMAN - Bing CROSBY

2 Riz Action Hits fram RKO Radio
2 Biz Action TRAIL STREET” = &

Warner Bros, New Action Hit!

~MIDNITE SAT. 10th

“ANGELS ALLEY”

RKO Radio's Big Action Double!

CRIMINAL COURT

Tom Conway & Martha O'Driscoll



Sovial Guidance Enterprises presents

Leo GORCEY & the BOWERY BOYS

TODAY To SUNDAY 6.30 p.m





ter beans which are grown locally.
Only a few trays contained some
yesterday and it is believed that
the condition of the weather at
the moment is responsible for the
shortage.

RADIO TALKS

RIO DE JANEIRO, March &
Wireless broadcast stations of all
Western Hemisphere countries—
except Argentine—will be repre-
sented at the second General As-
sembly of the “Association Inter-
Americana De Radio” to be held
in Sao Paulo between 19th to
3lst Martech, said Felix Muguriza,
the Association's President. Some
4,000 stations from the American
continent will be represented at
this year’s Assembly, he added.

—Reuter.









(Sorry separate audiences only)

Age-limit 16 years and over

— Men 8.50 p.m.

BOB ano SALLY”

TO-DAY 2.30 p.m
“IN BELLS OF ST. MARY'S”

MATINEE TOMORROW (SAT) 9.30 am, & 130 p.m

“AVENGING RIDER"

Randolph Seott Tim Holt
PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

‘TODAY and Continuing Daily 5 & 8.30 p.m.

“RETURN of the FRONTIERSMAN ”

Color by Technicolor
with Gordon Mec Rae, Julie London, Rory

Calhoun

{A Monogram Double)
& “BLACK MIDNIGHT"
Roddy McDowell & Lynne Thomas



GATETY—( HE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

MAT. SUN. 5 p.m

& BACK to BATAAN

John Wayne & Anthony Quinn

MIDNITE SAT. 10th RKO Technicolor Special !
Douglas Fairbanks Jnr. & Maureen O'Hara in

“SINBAD the SAILOR”

=







WARNING IIS
POSITIVELY No CHILDREN Allowed!
Age Limit 16 YEARS and over!

‘ST HOw Mac TRUTH

CAN YOU STAM?

Gh
A:
err ttt mri la





aD



F

3
ce

Sy IL AT

i





Pett r 77

Are you making

same mistake Mr. end
(Mis. Wright did in be~
| Hipving you tan keen
vour children innocent
through ignorance..?
* Gon’ you believe it?








WOMEN

and Girls 16

years & over
4.45 PM.

MEN

and Boys 16
years & over

8.30 P.M.
Please Remember
UCU EM eae eck ce Be
pathos and tenderness that
will haunt you for weeks!
Ue ee td 7a
PICTURE EVER FILMEDK,

SHOWN TO SEPARATE AUDIENCES: DNLY!?

IN AGREEMENT THAT THIS FILM BE SHOWN ARE... .
The B’dos Board and Film Censors—Director of Medical
Services Doctors and others too numerous to mention!

TO-DAY (FRIDAY 9th) and Continuing Daily
Regular ADULT PRICES ONLY





MURRAY'S

MILK

STO

STRENGTHENING

TO THE LAST DROP

Recommended



-FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED
RECENTLY





STOUTEST OF

by the Faculty

UT

ALL

*







FRIDAY, MARCH 9,

1951

My Impressions Of First Charles Beats
Day Jamaica-B.G. Test Joe Walcott

By O. S.

I WAS not prepared for the spectacle of a tremendous

COPPIN
KINGSTON, March 4,

ON POINTS

DETROIT, March 8.
For some seconds in the fourth

crowd overflowing all vantage points of the Sabina Park round of the World Heavyweight

field here when I made my way to the Press Box yesterday
lay in the first ever British Guiana-Jamaica
ournament on Jamaican soil.

to record the

Intercolonial

I was informed that the takings
passed the £750 mark and this did
not include season tickets. How-
ever it was estimated at 10,000 and
for me, I think that 10,000 was a
conservative estimate.

Green Wicket

What struck me most forcibly
at once as soon as play had started
was the greenness of the wicket
and the amount of bounce which
the bowlers were getting off the
pitch.

This was made to measure for
the fast medium inswingers of
Berkeley Gaskin and the occasion-
al cut back from the leg for which

he is well noted and the cut backs ©
from the off for which John Trim |

is equally noted,

I was not surprised when the
Jamaican openers fell with only 11
runs on the tins but Rickards, with
his high correct backlift and per-

fect balance, stemmed the tide ina |:

most promising manner and was |

unfortunate to have got a really
good one from Gaskin when only
one ball away from the luncheon
interval.

The Headley Pattern

J. K, Holt, Jnr., whom I saw bat
for the first time is like the major-
ity of young Jamaican batsmen
modelled along the lines of George
Headley—two-eyed stance and a
wealth of onside strokes.

He was the model of patience
until he passed forty when he
threw caution to the winds and
attempted to force the pace before
he was out after he had given two
possible chances to B.G, to claim
his wicket. His 63 was only im-
pressive up to 40 but I am expect-
ing much more from him before
the tour ends.

Uncertain

Neville Bonitto, who top-scored
with 82 seemed to me always like-
ly to get out. He is an exhilar-
ating batsman but with no
appreciable restraint on his nat-
ural impetuosity. He would make
a copy-book cover drive off one
ball, sweep to the square-leg
boundary magnificently for four,
and then get one off the inside
or outside edge of his bat.

He is a useful man in a Colony
team but he would be the first
to admit that he is no candidate
for West Indies honours. Binns
is the same indifferent batsman
that I found him to be in Trini-
dad last year. I have not yet
seen him in action behind the
wickets but it is certain that even
if he is good enough to challenge
other candidates for the job of
assistant wicket-keeper, that his
weakness in the batting depart-
ment will weigh heavily against

him.
Mudie’s Duck

Mudie will dab inquiringly at
the ball pitched on his off-stump
or just outside for that matter
but which is moving towards the
slip and more than one slip fields-
man has blessed him for giving
them a chance to bring off a catch
of which every notice and inten-
tion has already been given by
the manner in which Mudie shuf-
fles across his wicket to push at
them.

He played that stroke to a Gas-
kin outswinger and he returned
to the pavilion caught by Leslie
Wight in the slip for a duck.

Johnson’s and Goodridge’s in-
nings will long live in my memory
especially coming after the re-
strained and over careful atmos-
phere of the Barbados-Trinidad
Tests at Kensington,

A Long-Handle Attack

Imagine two tall six-footers
attacking a new ball each with
the long handle and forcing West
Indies pacers like Gaskin and
Trim, who had been on the spot
all day to change their tactics and
set a defensive field to them.

No Edges

Fifty-seven runs in 26 minutes
for the ninth wicket was the toll

-

B. McG, GASKIN
—who took 7 wkts. in the game

they took in a spate of confident
and forceful batting. There were
no edges about their innings either.
They hit the ball. hand whenever
they. got to-the pitch of'it‘and*were
not afraid to step forward and
catch the pace bowlers on the
volley.

One cover drive by Goodridge
off one well up from Trim could
be claimed without any fear of
embarrassment by any first class
batsman in the game today, and
when Johnson bent his long frame
and swept Trim to the square leg
boundary off one knee for four
runs, even the ranks of Tuscany
could scarce forbear to cheer.

ise B.G. Bowlers

For the British Guiana bowling
I have nothing but praise. On a
new green wicket Gaskin and
Trim could do little wrong. Gas-
kin with six wickets for 54 runs
has at once established strong
claims with the selectors as one of
the bowlers for which they must
be a-looking, a man who can move
the ball in the air and at the same
time maintain a good length with
fast-medium pace bowling. Bed-
ser has done this successfully in

the England-Australia Tests in
Australia.
Trim, I think, was unlucky not

to have got a wicket. He still has
considerable fire but seemed more
to be moving the ball to the slips
for yesterday’s play rather thau
cutting it back from the offi as we
have been seeing him do for some
time now.

Patoir, the 17-year-old St. Stan-
islaus schoolboy, will take more
watching before 1 can pass an
opinion about his bowling. He has
a free easy action and gets a good
break, but I do not know whether
the new wicket has been flattering

However, tomorrow I think Gas-
kin and Trim will dispose of Val-
entine and Johnson to end the
Jamaica innings, and then it will
be interesting to see how the B.G.
batsmen will negotiate Hines
Johnson, Goodridge, Valentine and
Mudie on the responsive Sabina
wicket.

Legal Secretary of Malta
Govt. Found Injured

VALETTA, Malta, March 7,

A. G. Lowe, Legal Secretary
to the Maltese Government was
found injured in a Valetta Street
early on Sunday morning, it was
said today.

The cause of the alleged assault
was unknown.

Lowe, who is 49, went to Malta
in 1949.—Reuter,





BACKGROUND TO

BEAUTY






Championship fight here las
night, Jersey Joe Walcott had the
title in his grasp.

Then Ezzard Charles, holder
according to American recogni-
tion, shook off the effects of a
powerful right to the jaw and
came back to win a unanimous
15
retain the title.

Many of the 13,852 fans dis-
with the decision, and one

cateall after another followed the
announcement, but there was no
doubt about Charles’ superiority.

Walcott, who was down to 13
stone 11 Ibs. was the lightest he
has weighed in four years and he
gave Charles, 29-year-old cham-
pion, and an eight years younger
man, a rare scare in that fourth
round. He caught Charles with
a right to the head and Charles
was staggered.

The echampion'’s legs were “rub-
bery” as he fell into a clinch and
held on, Walcott tried to shake
him off in order to land one clear
blow that could have finished the
fight, but he could not do so,

A minute after the blow had
landed, Charles’ head cleared.
From that time onwards, Charles
was more careful; in fact so cau-
tious that sections of the crowd

during several subsequent
rounds. The champion however
piled up points.

Walcott Down

In the ninth round Walcott
opened up for a while and both
boxers exchanged vicious swings.
Then Charles landed with power-
ful rights to the head and a smash-
ing left hook to the jaw. Walcott
went down for the count of nine,
the only knockdown of the fight,

This was a reversal of the fourth
round, and it was now Charles,
who. swarming after his older foe
tried to land a knockout blow. He
got home with a stream of lefts
and rights that made Walcott’s
knees shake but Walcott kept up-

right.
He lasted out to the end of the
fifteenth round and though

Charles appeared to have won by

a wide margin the crowd waited | declared:

rounds points victory and ;

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

M.C.C. Win Match
Against N. Zealand

By Ten Wickets

AUCKLAND, March 8.
The M.C.C. gave a flying start
to their short New Zealand tour
when they beat Auckland by ten
wickets just after lunch on the
third and final day of their match
here.

Auckland were all out in their
second inmings for 168, leaving
the M.C.C. to get 17 runs to win,

ith a boundary off the wi
hit, the M.C.C. made 20 without
Oss.

Auckland began the day need-
ing 85 runs to avoid an innings
defeat.

Wallace alone had the answer
to the M.C.C. spin attack and hit
eight fours in his 68.

Bowling honours went to Roy
‘Tattersall with five wickets for
33.and Doug Wright with four for
88.

AUCKLAND 18T INNINGS 146

M.C.C, ist INNINGS (for 7 wkts. dec.) 298
AUCKLAND 2ND INNINGS

Scott c. Compton b. Wright 12
Dwyer b, Tattersall 24
Coleman b. Wright +. 26
Wattace ¢. McIntyre b. Statham .., 68
Deas ¢, Meimtyre b. Tattersall .... 2
Cleal b, Tattersall os ‘ 5
Burke lb.w. b. Tattersall... 1
Kent stpd. McIntyre b. Wright ...... 10
Clarke tun Out ..... 66 cic ccreeceee
Cleverley c, Parkhouse b. Wright . 3
Cammish not out . sede uee eo.
Extras; (9 b., 2 n.b.) ve
Total . 168
BOWLING
Oo M. R. W.
Warr . 1 0 4 o
Tattersall 28.3 11 33 5
Wright 26 4 88 4
Compton a“ a 1 2 0
Statham ‘ 3 o 12 1
M.C.C. {ND INNINGS
McIntyre net out < wes 12
arr not out 8
Extras; 0
Total (for no wicket) 20
—Reuter.



Pilgrimage

BRUSSELS.
A 43-year-old Brussels house-
wife arrived back home this week
after walking 5,000 kilometres
(3,125 miles) from Brussels to
Rome for a Holy Year visit. She
“Every woman should

tensely for the decision. As each make this trip on foot. I shall do

official was called,
booed, and when all three were in
the ring and Charles was an-
nounced as winner, they let loose
another torrent of jeers.

This was Charles’ seventh de-
fence of the title since he won it
by beating Walcott when the
championship was declared vacant
after Joe Louis’ retirement. Wal-
cott took Charles the full distance
then and he also went all the way
in two fights with Louis for the
championship. He is the first
heavyweight to be given four
chances at the title.

Louis was at the ringside last
night, and plans are in hand for
the former champion to meet
Charles again, They met last Sep-
tember when Charles won on
points.—Reuter,

Table Tennis
At Y.M.C.A.

The following Inter-Club Divis-
ion II Table Tennis games will be
played at the Y.M.C.A. next
week

Monday: Y.M.P.C. vs. Founda-
tiom and Fox vs. Malvern, 6.00



p-m., Lenville vs. Police and
Aquatic vs, Everton 7.30 p.m,
Thursday: Foundation vs.

Aquatic 6.00 p.m., Lenville vs.
Barna and Police vs. Y.M.C.A.
7.30 p.m,

Saturday: Barna vs. Everton 6
p.m,, Y.M.P.C. vs. Malvern and
Fox vs. ¥Y.M.C.A. 7.30 p.m.



Back To School |

BRISBANE.

Australia’s first free school for

barmaids has opened at a Brisbane

hotel. Lectures are being given

by a publican and a business con-

sultant on efficiency, dress, service
and politeness.

TRAM FARES STEADY

BARCELONA, March 7,

Citizens of Barcelona were
fillmg the city’s tramears. agdin
today after winning their 10-day
battle against fare increases im-
posed by the city’s private utility
company.

After a 10-day public boycott
of trams, and demonstrations in-










the crowd|the same thing again next year.”

&

Â¥

To Mothers
who cannot

feed their babies |

Ban On Overtime
Will Be Lifted
Friday

SYDNEY, March 7.

Australian dockers decided today
to lift their ban on overtime from
8 a.m. on Friday.

The Government, two days ago.
proclaimed a state of emergency
on the waterfront under the
Crimes Act, but it was suspended
until the executive of the Water-
side Workers’ Federation reviewed
the overtime ban.

Australian troops had been
warned to stand by ready to go *o
the wharves and do work refused
by dockers, if the ban on overtime
was not removed.—Reuter

Untapped Reserves

NEW YORK, March 7.

The American Petroleum Insti-
tute and the American Gas Asso-
ciation jointly announced today
that known untapped reserves of
crude oil, natural gas liquids, and
natural gas in the United States
rose to a record level last year.

The significance of the new addi-
tions to proved reserves they
added, was that they increased the
country’s internal strength. .

The report defined “proved re-
serves” as those reserves cf which
lecation and extent had been
proved and measured.

—Reuter.





France Gets $10m.

Contract From Peru

PARIS, March 7.

France has secured another big
industrial contract in Latin
America, this time to build a
#10,000,000 steel plant with a ca-
pacity of 70,000 tons for pig iron
in Peru.

A spokesman of the French en-
gineering industry announced the
contract to-day. France last week
won a $25,000,000 contract to con-
struct Columbia’s first steel com-
bine in the face of strong German
and American competition.

Other French contracts in Latin
America include: the delivery of
90 railway engines to Brazil; the
first will leave on June 1.

The equipment of a Brazilian
Of Refinery will process 6,000
tons of crude petroleum and will
start operating this year.



Don’t worry ! Cow’smilk can be prepared sothat the youngest baby
can digest it without trouble. The addition of Robinson’s ‘Patent’
Barley prevents the milk forming large clots in baby stomachs,
making it easy for the delicate digestive organs to do their work
thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later
in life. That's why wise nurses and mothers always use Robinson’s

‘Patent’ Barley.






PU ay
Mulia



‘PATENT’ BARLEY

|





The Gift of the year



PAGE THREE



° *

er,

Off To Nigeria

“Temperament, jet inat ‘
and willingness to train hard must ALL OVER THE WORLD.
be a part of any athiete’s make-
up.” This view was recently 2

passed on ‘to British athletes by
MacDonald Bailey, writing in his
sports column in the Sumday Em-
pire News. When I remarked on
it, he said: “I need these things
myself. And Mac is busy training
at the moment before leaving for
Nigeria to compete with athletes
there.

RESEARCH SHIP

REACHES HOBART
HOBART, Tasmania, March 7.
The British research ship Dis-

covery Two has arrived at Hobart
after a five-week cruise of nearly
6,000 miles in the Antarctic.

The leader of the expedition
said the ship reached the outer
pack of ice but could not approach
the Antarctic mainland because of
this ice. |

The ship will sail from Sydney}
for the Falkland Islands by way
of the Pacific on her third voyage
around the Antarctic continent. |





Good mornings begin with Gillette





&
—Reuter =
The Basques who reside
- .
. 8 Now shave off their beards
In Carlisle Bay ith the ‘ c
.
M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietts w t grea est o ease 5
M.V. Caribbee, Sch. Adalina, Sch, Marea
Henrietta, Yacht Caribbee, Sch. Adalina You also should share the
‘ch. Burma D,, Sch. Henry D, Wallace
ich. Lady Noeleen, Sch, Laudaipha, Sch 9,
Enterprise Ss MV Lady Jos Seh improvement they’ve made
‘yYelorama O., Sch. Belqueen, Sch
Philip MH, Davidson, Sch, May Olive, Sch By using ‘ond
Marion Belle Wolfe. the wi erful
ARRIVALS
Schooner Gardenia W,, 48 tong net, Blue Gillette Blade
Capt. Wallace, from Trinidad
SS. Sundial, 1,652 tons net, Capt
Herne, from wee. ae
‘TURES ¢ ~
Schooner United Pilgrim S.. 47 tons Sharpest ever made, Blue
net, Capt, Stuart, for St. Lucia -
M.V. Daerwood, 94 tons net, Capt Gillette Blades are also the most
Mulzac, for St, Vincent
Schooner Emanuel C. Gordon, 63 tons “ ic ee .
net, Capt. Patrice, for Trinidad economical because they last
8.8. Sundial, 1,652 tons net, Capt

Herne, for British’ Guiana, so long. Naturally they are

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Lid
advise that they cam now corm»unicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station:—

M.V. Pathfinder, s.s. Alcoa Partner, s.9
Bayano, s,s, Solster, Planter

chosen by the smartest men of



every country in the world.

Blue Gillette Blades

TRADE ENQUIRIES TO: T.

8.8, 8.4.

Louis Pasteur, s.s, Sunwalt, s.s. Jostvua
Tree, 8.8, Bulkero, s.s, Apollo, 5, Esso
Memphis, s.s. Canabull, 5.5, Oakhill, s.s.

Raban, ss, Castilloceca, ss. Imperial

Toronto, s.5, Regent Tiger, sa. Baochus, GEDDES GRANT LIMITED

#s Craftsman, s.5. Bethore, «5, Esso
Shreveport, s.4, Rio Aguapey &, Esso
Nashville, ss. Comliebank, s.5. Lady
Rodney, 4.5. Rangitoto, ss. Esso Phila-
delphia, as. Republic, 5, Battle Moun
tein, a. Corinquen, s.s, R. F. Me, Connel
s, Colombie, *.s. Hertford, 5.5, Bernieres,

8.8. Loide Chile, s.s, Lugano, s.s. Mormae-
surf, ss. Nidardal, s.s, Nieuw Amster-
\dam, s.8. Del Mar, 8.5. Degrasse, 8.5
Queen Mary, Cristobal, 5.5. Esso
| Newhaven, 38.8. Quadriga, ss. Aleoa
| Polaris, s.s. Araby, 8.8, Alcos Pennant,
ss. Cottica, 8.5. Presidentedutra, ss
Jean, s.8. Lasalle, s.s. Georgia, 5,5, Salinas
and #8. Golfito. |

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Dominica, Montserrat
Antigua, St, Kitts, Nevis, by the MV
Caribbee will be closed at the General
Post Office as under: —

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Retistered Mai!
at 1.30 p.m, Ordinary Mail at 2.90 pin
jon the 9th March.

} Mails for British Guiana by the Sch.
‘Philip H_ Davidson will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:

FACTORY MANAGERS

Tak« this opportenity of obtaining your requis ments in :—
GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 44 in. upwards

MILD STEEL
Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

8.8.



Pa I 1 MM, B
Mage, 10911 Hewisteted Mall W'n.wn CLOTH: —White n Twill
M
Ordinary jail at @ am, om the Win
Maren. At PRICES that cannot be repeated. ;
;
RATES OF EXCHANGE
RCH 8, 1951 *
011/094 pe. CneANABA The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.
toe 62 8/10% pr,
Aan WHITE PARK ROAD, MICHAEL
Drafts 62.65% pr ¥ ne 7
Anne Sight Drafts 625/10 pr
647/10% pr. Cable 40
03 2/1 pr. Currency 61 3/10% pr,
», Coupons 60 6/10% pr
ede ones ewes Silver :



THE LADIES’
EYES WILL
OPEN WIDE

AT THE

BARGAINS

WHICH WILL BE OFFERED
EVERY DEPARTMENT,
ESPECIALLY THE

DRESS GOODS & SHOE DEPT.

AT OUR

IN





cluding the explosion of small
bombs by students, it was an-
nounced yesterday that fares
would be restored to their old
level. —Reuter.




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Aen ae Distributors for Barbados: la



PAGE FOUR

05


Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd. Broad &t., Bridectows.

Friday, March 9, 1951



Extended Powers

THE suggestion made by the Acting
Attorney General at the opening of the
Court of Grand Sessions that the law
should be amended to give Magistrates
jurisdiction to try and dispose of many of
the cases which are tried at the Assizes
will be generally welcomed.

It however focuses attention on a condi-
tion which now exists in the magisterial
courts throughout the island and which has
given rise to much public dissatisfaction.
The number of cases which now come on
the Cause List of these courts take an un-
usually long time to be adjudicated. The
number of adjournments extend the time
between the lodging of the case and its
final adjudication to months.

This causes a loss of time and many days’
pay not only to the litigants but to the wit-
nesses who must attend the court on each
oceasion the case is called vafter adjourn-
ment, The penalty for failure to attend is
detention until the date of hearing and
although this penalty has been rarely en-
forced, Magistrates are entitled to use this
punitive measure to ensure attendance.
Some people travel long distances and at
great inconvenience to attend cases in
which they are litigants or witnesses and
more often than not, the excuse for another
adjournment is the alleged inability of
Counsel to attend on that particular date.

For some time this practice was indulged
in by counsel in Trinidad until one strong
member of the Bench pointed out to Coun-
sel that if they could not attend on a date
fixed by the Court it was their duty to
hand over their brief to some other coun-
sel. :

The present situation can be remedied in
Barbados, and indeed it should be before
any more authority is entrusted to the
Magistrates. It must be admitted that the
proposal to widen the scope of their juris-
diction will not add:to the number of cases
because the same number would have been
lodged for preliminary investigation, but
it would reduce considerably the number
of cases which now find their way on the
Calendar and which occupy the time of the
Chief Justice when they could have been
disposed of otherwise. Another consider~
ation is that it will reduce considerably the.
cost of these trials at the Assizes when hun-
dreds of witnesses must be paid; and
although the administration of justice can-
not be measured in termsof money, its cost
must be a faetor for consideration.

If for no other reason than that it must
focus public attention on unsatisfactory
conditions in the Magisterial courts and
also reduce the length of time in which liti-
gants will have cases hanging over their
heads, the proposal of the Acting Attorney
General should be given immediate and
serious consideration.



Plane Service

IT WAS announced last’month by Brit-
ish West Indian Airways that there would
be some reduction in their schedules of
planes accommodating the islands in the
West Indies. The reduction has now come
into force.

In order to justify the cut in the services
it was given as a reason that the planes
now operate with 55% of the passenger
space taken.

Two days ago a visitor from Trinidad
holidaying in this island received an urgent
cable to return home. Immediately the vis-
itor communicated with the local office of
B.W.1.A. asking for a passage. In answer it
was pointed out that it was quite impossi-
ble to get any passage before Saturday
without communicating with Trinidad and
that even then it was most unlikely. The
hope was held out;.however, that if they
cabled Trinidad it might be possible to get
a passage some time next week,.

In view of the statement made by
B.W.LA. as the reason for the curtailment
of the service, it seems strange that within
a week, visitors from other islands are
being inconvenienced.



Our Readers Say: —





international Bank President EJGENE R. BLACK Discusses:

Investment In Eeonomic


























ECONOMIC development, as a
term, has been much in fashion
recently. As a process, itis nothing
new. In the past 150 years devel-
opment has proceeded very
rapidly in certain parts of the
world—in Western Europe, in
Japan, in Argentina, Uruguay,
Southern Africa, Australia and
New Zealand, and above all, in
North America.

In these countries a high stan-
dard of living has been achieved
and a large store of capital built
up in spite of the great dissipation
of assets in war, particularly the
two World Wars.

In the rest of the world, where
three-quarters of its population
lives, there has also been some
ogress. But progress has real-
iy touched only a fringe. As the
standard of living of the world
has advanced, the gap between the
highest level and the lowest has
widened.

Why this disparity should have
arisen is disputed. Some attrib-
ute it to superior thrift, industry
and initiative; others say that the
less developed nations have been
cruelly exploited. This is a futile
argument, The real question is
how to prevent the disparity from
widening further.

The poorer a country is, the less
it can afford waste and the more
careful it must be to husband its
resourres and use them to best
advantage. Idleness, inefficiency,
and corruption can be tolerated
least of all in a poor country. And
so the most necessary forerunner
of development may well be the
kind of domestic action that hard-
ly. costs.any money at all. Very
often the tax system needs over-
hauling in order that the rich may
bear their proper share of the
burden. The power of particu-
lar labour unions may need curb-
ing. The monetary system may
need tighter control to prevent
inflation.

Of all of the reforms which we
consider to be desirable, reform
of land tenure, however difficult
to achieve, is probably the most
important.

The.need for land reform is
widespread, because the whole
basis of development is the land.
Its effect on development might
be remarkable, for, if people are
freed from the deep-rooted con-
viction that, whatever they do,
they cannot prosper by their own
efforts, they may show initiative
in far greater abundance than we
suspect they possess.

Many U.S, missions have been
sent to less developed countries,
to.take inventory, so to speak, of
the entire nation’s resources and
needs, It is the hope that these
missions will help the countries
to plan their development pro-
grammes efficiently and to obtain
for them widespread publie sup-

port. ;
A programme is not, of course,



IT IS a good old British tradi-
tion that when in doubt you set
up a committee. A committee can
do anything, from providing knit-
ted comforts for refugees to rais-
ing funds to repair the cricket
pavilion roof,

It can also decide to choose the
Supreme Commander of the North
Atlantic — an appointment which
had Mr. Attlee wriggling in the
House of Commons — and drew
from Mr. Churchill the comment:
‘I congratulate the Prime Minis-
ver on how much more he knows
about the subject today than he
did last time it was raised.”

It is all our own fault. During
the war it was the British who
gradually taught the Americans
that you can even plan global
strategy on the committee. system.
The Americans started as reluc-
tant pupils, but they came to see
the merits of the method.

They quickly spotted that we
had generations of experience be-
bind us in the committee game.

Being rapid learners, and adap-
table by nature, they have con-
tinued to perfect their committee
technique since the war.

We, in contrast, have not.

Result’ In the most committee-
ridden organisation of modern
times, the North Atlantic Treaty
Organisation, the British Govern-
ment has made a blunder which
would have brought a blush to the
cheeks of the members of the
perks committee in a small town.

Ask anyone...

There lies the root of the trou-
ble over the “Supreme” naval
appointment.

The Gbvernment blandly as-
sumed that beceuse there are
1%.members on most N.A.T.O.
committees, the opinions of all 12
members carried equal weight,

For example, that Portugal, Ice-
land, or Luxemburg had as much



Development

enough; it has to be financed.
With their small stock of capital
and their low income, it is clear
that the less developed countries
could progress only gradually if
they had to rely on their own
savings alone, however wisely
they might be invested. It would
take decades to make a noticeable
impression on their poverty. In
fact, in countries where the pop-
ulation is increasing rapidly, it
would be all they could do to pre-
vent the standard of living from
falling.

In order to accelerate the pro-
cess Of development, these coun-
tries require capital from abroad.
There is hardly a case in the past
where the early stages of a coun-
try’s development have not been
carried out with the help of for-
eign capital; and almost always
private investors provided the
funds. .

It usually takes a long time for
the very large investments which
have to be made to bear fruit.
During that time the country will
receive little additional income



been Presi-
dent of the International’ Bank for
Reconstructiqn and Development
since July 1, 1949. His long career

Eugene R. Black has

in investment banking included
positions with several leading
American banks, Mr. Black first
became associated with the Inter-
national Bank in 1947 when he
was appointed Executive Director
for the United States. At that
time he resigned his post as senior
vice president of the Chase
National Bank of the City of New
York, The International Bank
was established under provisions
of the Bretton Woods Agreement
of 1944 to make Joans to assist in
the reconstruction and develop-
ment of member nations.

Ss

and may at the same time be pay-
ing interest on borrowed money.
In fact, some investments may
never bear fruit. Human plan-
ning will always be imperfect,
depending as it does on numerous
unknown quantities.

If past experience is any guide,
some peoples can become adept in
agriculture, commerce, or industry
ina remarkably short time, while
others seem to resist change.
However, even if people respond
to education and opportunity and
become proficient, for example, in
some branch of agriculture, they
may one day find their livelihood
menaced. Their crops may be
attacked by disease. The devel-
opment of substitute . materials
may cut off the demand for their
products. Or conditions elsewhere
in the world may be found to
favour production at much lower
cost. The history of agriculture
is studded with examples of un-
foreseeable shifts of this kind.
And similar risks apply to mining,
industry, and even transpo.tation.
But all of these risks have to be



Miaybe This Explains Why
Attlee Heard Churelaill Says ric cicii i xmescin tankers

By ROBERT JESSEL



MR, CHURCHILL: “I con-
gratulate the Prime Minister
on how much more he knows
about the subject today than
he did last time it was
raised.”



voting right as, say, Britain or
France,

But there has never yet been
a committee in which one or two
members did not gradually attain
a dominant position. Think of
your local tennis club, your dra-
matic society.

Not necessarily the richest, or
the most talented. But you find
that someone is listened to with
special respect.

If it is an important committee,
ene takes good care that one’s
celegate is a big enough personali-
ty to be that person,

So no Jebb?

WE SET up last summer a
Council of Deputies to transact the
most important business concerned
with the Atlantic "Treaty — tho
kind of work which Prime Minis.
ters or Foreign Secretaries would
normally have tackled if they had
had the leisure.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1951



——————————

American Socialist Leader NORMAN,












' ; : I. V. SCOTT TO- PECIALS
THOMAS Answers The Question: TS
if em & CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
(e

Is America An Imperialist Omaty OW
Pkgs. LUX FLAKES .................... $24 § 22
noms may be perpetual stagna- ° Ph: LTORAS hie edaas. aes 40 35
There remains the question] THE belief that America is an imperialist]}] Tims NESCAFE ........................5. 82

whether at this juncture the
United States and the other in-
dustrial countries of the world
ean afford the money, which of
course means the goods which it
would buy. The governments of
these countries know the magni-
tude of the defense effort they
are undertaking, what can or can-
not be released for other purposes.
But I would say. that when this
has been decided, very serious
thought should be given to the
disposal of the residue. This resi-
due should be large enough to
make a very great difference to
the less developed countries with-
out affecting our living standards
in any serious way.

power is not merely the result of Communist
propaganda, it is also a hangover from the
past, when the Western powers were guilty
of imperialist greed and arrogance in their
relations with the colonial world.

The issue today is not American imperial-
ism versus Soviet Communism, but demo-
cracy versus totalitarianism, freedom versus
slavery, and America is on the side of liberty
and peace.

As a life-long fighter for the right of every
people to self-government, I have witnessed
over the years changes in the relation of the
Western powers to the colonial world,
changes characterized by a gradual retreat
from imperialism to a good-neighbour policy.

This progress is symbolized by the achieve-

ment of independence by the Philippines,
it ms in ne 7s usefully.| India, Burma, Pakistan, Malaya, Syria,
In times ike, these we mus Pe) | cbanon, Indonesia, Ceylon, Eritrea, Somali-
able is devoted to well-conceived| land, and other colonies. ese people did
productive projects and that these| not win freedom from foreign rule without
Desoces a “e ype ehotoretry ot| Ploodshed, but the indisputable fact is that
thee rane’. the only action con-| if colonialism is not yet dead, it is rapidly
sistent with the basie principles | dying. The former colonial powers recognize
a oe world is striv-|} that colonialism is obsolete, that the social
6 ee aspirations of the people of Asia, Africa, and

hat can we offer the people “1 * :
who live in the less developed | Latin America cannot be denied.

countries in conditions which to
us are barely conceivable?

SAWS—lB8ins., 20ins., 22ins., 24ins., 26ins., 28i i
Sue ween ine . ns., 30ins., 36ins
BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins., 16ins.
PLANES, IRON—9ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

BLOCK

RATCHET BRACES

CHISELS—\in., %in., %4i., lin.
CHISEL SETS of } in,, % in. 1 in. ins.
Git BTONES sire. Sins.

GRINDING STO! , complete—Sins., Gins.
Spare GRINDING STONES—Sins, 6ins.
SAW FILES—3\ins., 4ins., 442ins., Sins.

CLAW HAMMERS
ENGINEER HAMMERS—llb., 1¥2lbs., 2Ibs.

MASON TROWELS & SQUARES
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There is one thing I would like
to emphasize at this point. If we
are going to spare the “useful”
amount, we must make sure that

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,



Since 1945, while imperialism has been
Should we merely offer these} retreating throughout the democratic world




“ 5 > OOOO 6590 8OD
people, who often achieve a dig-|it has been advancing with unprecedented | % ; , “d eT
eee, Brag ty dang:| speed in the Soviet world, Since the end of
cracy and free enterprise and our-| World War IT, Soviet Communism has been
selves as its prime examples? imposed upon a vast area of 5,239,000 square ;

To them, democracy and free i . 5 a
elections are meaningless; govern- miles (13,621,400 square kilometres) inhab

ment is the local tax collector. ited by 582, 411,000 persons now helpless to
The concept of free enterprise | fight for their independence.

is enueey yereee ble ar Z As long ago as 1920 America found that

ee entered land. sum. ;@Ollar diplomacy in the Western Hemi-

cient tools and working capital to| Sphere did not pay. American capitalism,

work it, instruction in how to| even before the rising strength of labour put

T IN 4 & 9.6 cu. ft. of ZERO food space
EFFICIENCY Hermetically sealed unit



An meee i ane. er that restraints upon it, began to realize that it was BEAUTY Finger tip cold control
instruction. And to get them this, :
we have to put as much physical CAPACITY 5-years’ guarantee
> ge aya moral force to work as ‘a ae active American Socialist for more than three
Bee Silty aga, at on || Sehitaet iy arth Sa Belton 1S Bksicty: Idee! Deep Freese for
other time of crisis, U.S President © brief career in the ministry, he entered the socialist
Ryoah. Li i , case . movement during World War I. He has written for £
braham neoln said: many publications and is a popular lecturer in the Home, Hotel or Business.
The dogmas of the quiet past United States and in other countries. Mr. Thomas ECONOMY

advocates what he calls democratic socialism and has

are inadequate to the stormy pres- spent his life fighting totalitarianism in all forms,

ent. The occasion is piled high}
with difficulty, and we must rise
with the occasion. ia our case “

i t thi ‘ : see ei
oe snow. Weal Ahink anew ant |in a different position than British or Euro-

ourselves, and then we shall save | pean capitalism. It was much less dependent
ou CONES « ‘ es upon raw materials outside its borders, and
u Sites a maiine tree, worid it was able to expand markets inside Ameri-
is at stake. If we do not rise to|Can territory. It exported raw materials as
the occasion, we shall fall with it, | well as manufactured goods.

and we shall fall very hard. As far back as the administration of Presi-
dent Calvin Coolidge in the 1920s, the United
States abandoned aggressive support of
American capitalists in Mexico. In the 1930
depression, the American government made

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When selecting your ..

FOOTBALL

OR
TABLE TENNIS
GEAR

visir DA COSTA‘S
where you will find a full’

a in South America. When the Mexican gov-
ew outside the Foreign Service]ernment confiscated outright the oil lands
had heard of Sir Frederick Millar.) owned by American citizens, the United
the British representative, before States did ; a

he wad appointed, or have heard| States not even withdraw its ambassador.
much of him since, It did a thing unprecedented in history—it
_Many people wondered at the| refused to use force to back up economic in-
time whether someone like Glad-| vestment.

Pe sesh eae not have been &) After World War II, when an election tn
On the North Atlantic Defence} Panama was lost by a government which had
Gomnitien Beitr. Feprosnatss granted air fields to the United States, the
ve has been Yr. nwell, A i i
Tix ait Gua ince tag evi en ae tek quietly accepted the
previously sat on an importani|P@0ple’s decision and withdrew from the
international committee. He is an| airfields, valuable as they were to the defense
or out of Parliament the iron in} In granting independence to the Philip-
Pe \hitta of canctee wrapped i! nines the United States did attach conditions
favourable to new American capital invested
in the new republic. Since then very little
new American capital has gone into the Phil-
to have carried sufficient weight | iPPines for the benefit of American investors,
in their respective behind-closed-| but a great deal of taxpayers’ money has gone
Conte coeneanines amen to per-| to the islands in the form of economic aid.
suade six other members to sup-| This is entirely opposite to the Communist
port the British claim to the! theory of American imperialism.

supreme naval command.

You might have thought we had} Since 1945, the United States has spent
an almost cast-iron case. For : ;
Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Holland,| ore than $42,500,000,000 on foreign aid, of
Norway, and Portugal—to men-} Which $36,500,000,000 was given in economic
tion only six countries—had no} aid to reconstruct the war-torn world and to
eater a ae towards! feed hungry people. This money was expend-

eta "el 2 ed without expectation of profit. It is doubt-

ritain’s claim was not) ful that the part loaned ever will be repaid.
mone ot pining’ ok “Cantees This means that every American has contri-
France, Belgium, and Luxemburg] buted an average of $283 to help people
—-our naval stock akroad must| abroad.
have sunk extremely low.

Or are we choosing the wrong
kind of spokesmen for this com-

Cast iron...
NEITHER. of these men seems

RANGE to select from.
e

DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.
Dry

The sapere of this enormous sum has
Spe '-| not made any single government subservient
rise Se ae ae asin tl to Washington. It has not added one inch of
For, as Mr, At said in the| territory to the United States of America. I
House of ve i Po janes challenge anyone to cite any act of co-oper-
was “settle rinciple” ‘ore i 7
Se ee eel lg of the government of the Soviet
Sx fe waa tour comimittes rwen' | mparable to these American expend-
—and not our admirals—who lost| itures. Where Stalin has given any help it
this important action —L.E.S. has been at a great price. There is no example
of Western imperialism comparable to the
economic exactions Russia has made on all
her satellite states; to the Soviet require-





South African Policy

To the Editor, the Advocate,
SIR,—The West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union have taken up cud-
gels against Dr. Malan, Prime
Minister of South Africa, in re-
spect of his recent attack on
Britain’s Commanwealth policy.

Here is the full text of a letter
sent from the Union to the editors
of the Manchester Guardian and
The Times. '

“Sir.

We in the West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union have read with great
interest Dr. Malan’s latest state-
ment on British Commonwealth
policy. We are well aware of the
racial theories of the Nationalist
party of South Africa, and of the
fears of an entrenched minority,
which are their mainspring.. So
too with Hitler. Therefore it is
not surprising that Dr.. Malan
should continue to try to persuade
ihe Commonwealth that they too
share his views.

“We however, have confidence
in the ability of the British people
to the insidious attempts of
Malan to infect them with
his own fear A detailed expo

resist

1
wie

¢ : :
ure of the fallacies in his statement
is, therefore, unnecessary.

“We should, however, like to
point out that Dr. Malan cannot
have his cake and eat it. For he
demands, on the one hand, a prin-
ciple of non-interference in South
Africa’s internal affairs; whilst.on
the other, claiming an equal right
to dictate to the Commonwealth
as to its membership.

‘Further, Dr. Malan argues that
the Commonwealth should be
based on “specific common inter-
ests and a sufficient homogeneity
of cultural and political outlook.”





It would appear that for Dr.
Ma similarity of “skin texture”
ne arily guarantees all these
things. For the whole basis of
his opposition to the imminent
admission of coloured areas to the
Commonwealth is racial. He

ignores the fact that the principles

on which South African policy is
based are, in: themselves, the
negation of everything that the

development of Democracy in the
Commonwealth has stood for his-
torically

we welcome Dr,

fulmination. Fof
coloured members of this
Commonwealth; ourselves’ on the

“Frankly,

latest



2

thresiiold of Dominion Status,
have awaited clarification of this
point for too long. If Britain de-
lays giving a lead in this matter
she may well find that she has
to choose between Dr. Malan and
the countless people, to whom
Democracy means equality, who
can form the basis of a greater
Association of free peoples.

“Britain's Commonwealth policy
is clear, bi-partisan, and on re-
cord. The onus is not on the
Commonwealth to descend to the
essentially Fascist level of Dr.
Malan, Rather, it is on Dr. Malan
to match the principles of the
Commonwealth.”

Your obedient servants,
WEST INDIAN STUDENTS’
UNION.
London, 4
March 2, 1951,
8.3.51



Registration
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In your paper on March
3rd I saw that at the Labour De-
partment where the women are
registered, over three hundred

were registered. by 10.80 a.m. or
Friday, While at the agency in
Queen’s Park, I saw only about
twelve or fourteen taken up to
11 o’clock and the others had to
go away and come back after
breakfast or the next day. The
men had to go three days some-
times, before they were registered,
I hope the officers will be a little
faster by omitting some of the un-
necessary questions they ask,

UNEMPLOYED,
March 7, 1951.



Face On-Coming Traffic
To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—One question, please, Why
does the pedestrian half of the
population of this island insist on
backing the motoring half instead
of facing, especially after cricket
on the road back?

T shal] look forward to an answet
in your next editorial, and I'm
sure the overworked Police De-
partment would be glad of your
help.

A. C

March 7, 1951.

ment that a Russian general be placed at the

|head of the Polish armies; to the Russian
Venn of Outer Mongolia and Sinkiang from
China; to the Russian exploitation of the
Chinese Province of Manchuria.

There is no act of any Western power com-
parable to Stalin’s attempt to crush his hereti-
eal disciple, Tito of Yugoslavia, to Stalin’s
willingness to gamble with the lives of: his
North Korean and Chinese Communists in
order to destroy the United Nations.

American aid has been given to Socialist
Britain and the Seandinavian countries, as
well as to monarchical Greece and capitalist
Belgium, without imposing American politi-
cal or economic ideas upon these countries.
European and Asian Socialists have told me,
all in the same breath, that the United States
should not intervene and should insist upon
| certain conditions as the price of help to some
| countries America has been criticized for
| giving aid to Greece without insisting upon
| drastic reforms there, and has been damned
| for exerting pressure against monarchical-

}reactionary groups. We are chastised for
| meddling and for not meddling in Korean
‘ | affairs. We are damned if we do and damned

| if we don’t.



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FRUIT
i JUST ARRIVED
PEARS
PEACHES | PEARL BARLEY in tins
GUAVAS SCOTCH OATMEAL in tins
GOOSEBERRIES SPAGHETTI & CHEESE
MANGOES MACARONI & CHEESE
APRICOTS JIMKET TABLETS
GRAPES FRUIT CAKE—2-Ib.
PINEAPPLE in sealed Tins
APPLES GROUND ALMONDS
PRUNES PASTRY MIX in tins
OREAM OF WHEAT
FRESH CARROTS and Large and Small
TOMATOES ‘ | GRAPE JUICE in tins.
GODDARDS
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FRIDAY, MARCH 9,

1951



SYPHILIS KILLS |

SYPHILIS AND BIRTH INJURIES were the two main |
causes of Barbados’ very high infant mortality rate of 148 |

in 1948.
were 34.



Co-operatives Want

Study Groups

The Shamrock Credit-Union held
their monthly meeting last night
at St. Patrick’s School, Jemmott’s
Lane, and heard the financial Re-
port of the Treasurer, Miss Gloria
Selby. One of the principal items
discussed was the revival of Study
Group classes.

The Union which is about three
years old, is devoted to co-opera-
tives. The form of co-operation
used is the loaning of money to
members. Each member must
have shares in the, Union, and is
loaned an amount based on the
number of shares that he or she
has.

The Union is composed of about
50 members, male and female,
Catholic and non-Catholic.

Study Group classes were an
important feature of the Union in
its early days, but interest in them
lapsed as time went on. Members
now feel that they should be re-
vived. The classes, of course,
study co-operatives.

Impetus. Given

Impetus to start the Union was
given by Father Sufivan when he
came here from Jamaica a_little
over three years ago. Father
Sullivan is one of the authorities
on co-operatives in the West In-
dies.

Rules of the Union are now in
the hands of the printers, They
were not printed before, because
members were waiting to see
what would be decided about the
Co-operatives Bill when it went
before the Legislature.

President of the Union is Mr.
Conrad Hill. Vice-President is
Miss Theodosia Morris, and Sec-
retary is Mr. Winter Headley.

MORE HOUSES GO UP
IN FLOOD AREA’

In spite of the tragedy which
befell the residents of the Consti-
tution and Delamere Land districts
during the 1949 flood waters, peo-
ple are still moving their homes
to that area, Mr. Lashley of the
Housing Board told the Advocate
yesterday.

Some 13 or 14 houses have been
recently moved to Delamere Land.
Their owners, Mr. Lashley said,
cannot be persuaded to leave the
flood area.

They found in that area some
20 other houses, whose owners
refused to move them after the
flood waters.

During the heavy rains in Feb-
fruary this year, the area was
flooded again, but fortunately, ne
damage was done to the houses.

The residents were scared and
had packed up their furniture,
making ready for quick removal
from the area, The rain stopped
and the water ran off, leaving
the residents still resolved to con-
tinue to live in the flooded area.

When asked whether or not the
Government iniended making
the flooded area a prohibited area,
Mr. Lashley said that he was not
in a position to give any informa-
tion on the matter,

DEATH BY
MISADVENTURE

Death by misadventure was the
verdict returned by a 9-man jury
when the inquiry into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Clarence Hoyte was concluded at
Holetown Police Station. |

The Coroner in the inauiry was
Mr. S. H. Nurse, Police Magistrate
of District “E”. Clarence Hoyte
a 26-year-old fisherman of St.
James was drowned at Paynes
Bay on February 25 and ‘his body
was discovered the next day later
in the afternoon by Lionel Phillips
of St. James. plies

A post mortem examination was
performed by Dr. A. C. Kirton,
P.M.O. of St. Lucy at the St.
James Almshouse.

“SEDGEFIELD” DOCKED

M.V. Sedgefield was docked yes-
terday to have her hull cleaned
of barnacles and seaweeds and to
be painted, :

In the meantime, engineers are
getting ahead with their work in
converting her into a_ passenger
ship.

Judging from the rust and ma-
rine-growths covering the vessel’s
hull, you would think that she was
getting her first cleaning since she
was built six years ago.

She is expected to spend a week
or two on dock,

Pine Landed

The Saguenay Terminals Sun-
dial landed 95,385 feet of white
pine, 650 bags of dairy feed and
15 drums of lubricating oil at Bar-
bados yesterday. :

She brought the shipment of
lumber, from Halifax for Messrs.
J. B. Leslie & Co., Ltd,

S.S. Sundial left port yesterday
evening for British Guiana. She is
consigned to Messrs, Plantations,
Ltd.











The figures for the United Kingdom that vear

These statements were made in
Queen’s Park by Dr. F. N. Gran-
tuum at the current conference of
Publie Health Officers

He said that Syphilis was one of
the chief factors causing infant
deaths, premature births and con-
genital debility. Other diseases
such as diarrhoea and respiratory
diseases caused death in the later
months of infant life, and were
largely due to ‘environmental
iactors.

The diseases which caused deaths
in early infancy operated chiefly
before birth and at delivery. The
two main causes were syphilis
and birth injuries,

“In Barbados syphilis continues |
to take a heavy toll of infant life,
resulting in the, birth of syphilitic
infants, prematurity and congenital
debility. To combat these trage-
dies, the syphilitic mother must
receive treatment in early preg-
nancy. The detection and treat-
ment of this disease can be effect-
ed at ante-natal clinics. Modern
methods of treatment of syphilis
afford the syphilitic mother an
excellent opportunity of giving
birth to a healthy child and safe-
guarding her own health, This
is well illustfated in countries
where the notification and treat-
ment of Venereal Disease is com-
pulsory. In such countries syphilis
has ceased to be a major cause of
infant deaths.





Untrained Midwives

“Another cause of infant
deaths is birth injuries. Some
af these fatalities are inevitable |
but many can be prevented by|
the mother receiving expert}
advice and treatment before de-
livery at ante-natal clinics. Again
many tragedies at delivery are due
to untrained and unskilled
midwives. Such midwives often
constitute a menace to infant and
mother. It is hoped that soon
the “mother gramp” will cease
to exist and the services of prop-
erly trained midwives will be
available to even the poorest
woman. The Maternity Hospital
now affords an excellent train-
ing for midwives. Every preg-
nant woman is entitled to the
services of a proper trained mid-
wife, with the assistance of a
medical practitioner when neces-
sary.

Tetanus Too

“Every year about 25 to 30 in-

fants die of tetanus, again these
deaths are preventable, They
are due to improper dressing of
the cord by untrained midwives
Such loss of life is disgraceful as
it is preventable by simple but
proper technique,
“Bowel disease. such as diarr-
hoea. may be partly due to en-
vironmental conditions and here
the Sanitary Inspector must play
his part by enforcing clean sur-
roundings, i.e. proper refuse and
excreta disposal, fly control etc.
These diseases may also be due
to incorrect feeding etc. and here
the Health Visitor must instruct
the mother.

To combat Infant Mortality,
the following programme is es-
sential: —

(1) Improvement of Environ-
mental conditions,

(2) Special metheds directed
to care of expectant moth~
ers and of the infant.

(3) Health Education,

“The improvement of environ-
mental conditions include im-
proved housing, safe milk and
food supplies and a raising of the
standards of general sanitation
But’ such measures cannot alone
reduce the infant mortality to a
satisfactory level.

“The special method directed
to mother and child, include an-
te-natal clinic to take care of the
mother during her pregnancy, the
delivery service to see her safe
through her delivery and puer-
perium and the post-natal clinic
to instruct her in the care of the
infant and herself up to the end
of infant stage. 7

“And last, Health Education
teaches the mother how to care
her infant, to take an interest in
its development.

Health Centres

These services are the function
of Health Centres. Here the
mother is taught her individual
responsibility to Health and_in-
structed in mother-craft and love
of her child. One of the most
important causes of infant mor-
tality is a lack of family respon-
sibility—the unwanted child. Far
too many children are conceived
haphazardly in Barbados. The
High Infant Mortality of Barba-
dos is Not a safeguard but a dis-
grace to Barbados.

“To reduce this mortality we
must provide the services neces-
sary to care for,mother and child
and to instruct the mother in
mother-craft. In other words we
need Health Centres—the tool of
the Public Health worker.

“Where are our Health Cen-
tres? May we hope that 1951 may
see our first Health Centre and
our first serious attempt to re-
move the disgrace of our high
Infant Mortality Rate.”

eee en eens ttt ape ncenoeiaspaetenpene ee ee peta soem eames siaomne sl pment

ieee iene idence ie einai capeyliheeesiistinemntemaeemanein, sptestisensiialaensenet enter



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

RECORD HREAKER ;



|

\
}

|

|



|
|





HON. V. C. GALE leads in Bow Bells afte winning the Castle

Grant Handicap in record time.





Mobile Radio Expert

Joins Barbados Police

TEN YEARS AGO, Superintendent W. H. R. Armstrong
left Barbados to take up police duties in St. Lucia, Wind-
ward Islands as Assistant Superintendent. Since then he

has been stationed in Trinidad until

yesterday when he,

returned here to take up an appointment as Superintendent

of Police.

Thirty year old Supt.» Arm-
strong is the son of Mr. Donald
Armstrong, a Director of Da
Costa & Co. Ltd. He left Har-
rison College in 1939 and ,joined
the staff of the Royal Bank of
Canada. But he was always keen
on becoming a policeman and in
1941 he

in St. Lucia, Windward Islands.

In 1944 Mr. Armstrong was
transferred on promotion to Trini-
dad as an Assistant Superintend
ent. He was posted to the Mar-
ine Branch where he served’ un-
til.1945 when he was transferred
to the Traffic Branch as Assistant
Traffic Officer.

During. that period he was
largely responsible for the intro-
duction on a permanent basis of
Short Wave Radio Communicatior
into the Force for use between Po
lice Headquarters and a number
of Divisional Headquarters
Country Stations.

Two years later he was posted
as Superintendent of the Port-of-
Spain Fire Brigade until a Pro-
fessional Fire Officer ap
pointed in 1947. He was ther
transferred as Superintendent ir
charge of the Tobago Divisio:
where he was stationed for two
years,

In 1949 he was posted to St.
James Barracks as Depot Super-
intendent and in command of the
Police Training School, the
Mounted, Transport and _ Tele-
communications branches. -

It was during his period at the
depot that Superintendent Arm-
strong was primarily respons'ble
for the introduction and planning
of the new V.H.F. Radio Tele
phene and 999 Emergency sys-
tem which include the mobile
radio patrols.

Efficiency Medal

While at the Depot Supt. Arm-
strong also restarted the Trini-
dad Police quarterly magazine of
which he was Editor.

He was awarded the Colonial
Auxiliary Forces Efficiency Me-
dal for his services in the Ter-
ritorial Forces in Barbados an
St. Lucia in which he served as
an active member from 1931 tc
1944,

Superintendent Armstrong wil’
be in charge of Area 2 of fhe
local Police Force and of the
Police Training School.

Capt. Grant who was at that
staticn will be going to Area 3
and Capt. Parris will take over
Area ! in place of Capt. Farmer
who has gone on a_ training
course.

Before Supt. Armstrong en-
tered the Police Force, one of his
hobbies was radio work. He told
the Advocate yesterday that
when the _ telecommunication
schemes are finished in Trinidad
the cost will be about $80,000.

The Commissioner of Police
said that wnen consideration is
given to the V.H.F. and 999 Ra-
dio and Emergency schemes,
Supt. Armstrong’s services will
come in useful.

and

was



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: was appointed to the
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sistant Superintendent of Police

a



Three Embassies
To Re Set Up

BONN, March 8
West Germany was allowed
foreign diplomauc service when

the Allies revised the Occupation
Statute on Tuesday. Hitherto she
has only had consulates abroad.
Among the first Embassies were
yxpected to be Rome, The Hague,
end Brussels, Among first Lega-
tions are Athens, Copenhagen,
New Delhi, Stockholm and perhaps
Ottawa and Pretoria.

There are other countries. with
whom West Germany has agreed
tc have Consulates, But it was not
believed that their conversion to
fmbassies or Legetions would
quick because of the expense
involved,—Reuter,

Presents Credentials
BUENOS AIRES, March 8.

Russian Ambassador Grigori
Reanv, who arrived a fortnight ago
presented credentials today. He
is the second Soviet Ambassador
to come to Buenos Aires since
relations with Russia were estab-
lished in 1946. The first ambassa-
dor Grigori Sergeyev, retired in
1947.—Reuter,



| telephone, he said,



Market Should Have
Telephone, Radio

Most of the butchers at the
Public Market think that the Gov-
ernment should install aq telephone
and radio at the market. There
is great need, especially for the
telephone, they told the Advocate
yesterday.

They feel that they pay, as it is,
toe much money as rent for the
stalls and Government should be
able to provide them witf the
telephone and radio,

Dr. Stoute, Superintendent of
the market, said that a telephone

| could be very useful in the market.

There is, however, already too
much noise in the market and he
thinks that no radio should be put
there. If the butchers wish ¢
they should
inform him and he would pass it
on to Government.

_The telephone and radio ques-
tions have only reached the dis-

| cussion stage between the butch-

ers,

Christopher Inniss who has beet.
@ Wucche: ii the Marae. NOW LOL
28 years is in ugreement witn wie
View inae a lerepuviie amu radi
Should be put in tne public market,

‘Lnere are two private telepnones
in We market now, but one can-
not always aSk for use of these
telepnones, One of the telephones
iS nept iockea up in a box for

,, ene owner’s convemence and tne

other is sometimes availabie,

Lighting Necessary

What he said was needed in the
the market was lighting, Butch-
eis liave lO use digit somMeUMmes,
but there is no electricity in we
market,

Mr. Springer, another butcher
who has been working in Ue
market tor many years says that
butchers, like other men, ike to
near cricket broaacasts, ‘ney have
lo be dispatching cus.vomers
and cannot get away to listen two
cricket,

There are times when one has
to contact customers ever the
telephone on questions of meai
supply and one cannot always be
a nuisance to the butcher who has
ihe private telephone.

M. B. Freeman who has been
killing animals about the market
for nine years, like the othe:
vutchers,thinks that a_ teiephone
and radio should be installed in
the market.

Another butcher who was about
the market for nine years and who
agrees with the radio and tele-
pare suggestions is Mr, Gordon

These butchers think that tele-
phones and radio are so necessary
that if Government refused to
provide them, they would pool
together to pay for them.



Gruber Wants
Allies To Stay

PARIS, March 8.

Austria Foreign Minister Grub-
em today had a half hour alk
w French Foreign Minister
Schuman at Quai D’Orsay,

Their conversation was _ pre-
Sumed to deal with possible rep—
resentation if the Deputies agree
to place Austria on the Four Power
Talks Agenda.

It was understood that the Aus-
trian, view is that Allied occupa-
tion troops ought not to be with-
drawn while Austrian police and
home forces are inadequately
armed to deal with subversive
activities.—Reuter,



Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites
between the ages of 12—19 to enter
ition.
n length and must reach the Shoré

city not later than Wednesday every week, The best story each week
will ve published in the Evening Advocate and the winner wil) re
eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Title of Story

aan

all school-boys and school—gir!s
for its Senior Short Story Compe-

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words

Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd,



© PURINA

@ FOR POULTRY A
a
a

tH. JASON JONES & CO,, LTD.—Distributors

“See the Difference Purina Makes”

CHOWS ©

ND LIVESTOCK g!

SRE EBECECRBERUEEGE ESBS G
SE BEES.





It’s Here

PERLSTEIN |

DUTCH EXPORT

BEER

Owing to recent heavy demar

hear of its arriva)

Be. a botile
$4.00 a case

Again !!



1ds

we
=

we were entirely oft of stock of
this -popular beer and no doubt
our customers will be pleased to



{ BUY SOME TODAY
(
)

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.,LTD. {)

{

(4

5

P.A. Playing |

Field Gets New
Tennis Court

The Princess Alice Piaying Fieid
had an improved look when the
Advocate visited it yesterday, The
grass waS not as long as it used
to be, and three men were work-
ing with hoes preparing a new
tennis court, Two courts have al-
ready been prepared, one is
marked, the other is still to be
marked. There is also a cricket
pitch which can be played on:

The caretaker said that the men
were working now that the rainy
weather has ceased, They could
do with some more tools, how-
ever, as only three hoes, one lawn
mover and one light roller are
available, Parts of the 14 acre
field still need levelling out, so
that the lawn mower can work
better, The caretaker thinks that
a road roller would be useful for
that purpose.

Another staff of men were put-
ting the finishing touches on the
sea wall on the western side of
the field,

Tennis

By permission of the Vestry of
St. Michael a club is allowed to
play table tennis in the pavilion
during the evening and lawn ten-
nis is also played on the finished
court, A dance was held there cn
Tuesday night, and there was some
cleaning up to be done both inside
and outside of the building yes-
terday morning as a result..

This caretaker has his work cut
out to prevent the drivers of cars
from driving on the cricket pitch
or the tennis courts when they
motor down to the playing field at
night. “Approaching an unoccu-
pied car at night calls for care
and discretion,” he commented.

U.N. May Alter
Meeting Place

PARIS, March 8

The United Nations Assembly
may change its mind about meet-
ing in Europe this year, if not
nuvited to Paris soon, Adolfo Costa
Du Reis, Minister to France, said
here teday,

France, unwilling to hold an
Assembly in Paris because of the
expense and because this is the
election year in France, has not
given a final answer

Costa Du Rels who sponsored
the Assembly Resolution on the
subject, said: “The resolution to
eome to Europe this autumn re-
mains in foree, However contrary
mains in foree, However, contrary
tecisions might be voted soon at
Lake Success,—Reuter,





Eleven Planes Down

HONG KONG, March 8.
Eleven United Nations planes
including a British naval aircraft
were claimed by a North Korean
Army communique to have been
shot down or damaged,in.the first
four days of March, according to a

Peking radio message received

here, |
All planes were destroyed or

damaged by Chinese volunteer

anti-aircraft the

said.—Reuter,

INVESTIGATION

JERUSALEM, March 8.
An Emergency Meeting of the
Israel-Jordan Mixed Armistice
Commission here today agreed to}
send investigation teams from)
both sides to Beit Jinrim. in
Hedron foothills where a 24-hour
battle between Israel army troops
and Arabs took place on Tuesday.

—Reuter,

units, message





-

POSTPONED
LONDON, March 8.

Football matches arranged be-
tween England and Spain in
Madrid on May 27, and in London
on November 28, have been post-
poned at the request of the Span-
ish Football Association, it was
anounced today by the English
Football Association,—-Reuter,



Pl LES Dost ga ses
longer. For quic
relief—treat painiul piles with
medicated Dr, Chase’s Ointment,
Soothes as it heals. A safe home
treatment for over 50 years. 3a

DR. CHASE’S
Antiseptic OINTMENT

“TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

i

}

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See these












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at

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PAGE

FIVE





Butter

and

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The Vitamin 8B Yeast Food

So tasty and so good for you / Tasty because Marmite
gives that rich, appetising flavour. Good because the
B2 vitamins are contained in Marmite — essential
elements to keeping the body fit and free from
illness. Marmite is just as delicious in sandwiches—
watch how children love them!—also in soups,
stews, gravies and all savoury dishes. You only need
a little and what's left in the jar keeps for ages.

Made in England





























TO-DAY’S
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COCOANUT





In every
part of the world

... this is the surest sign






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guarantee of lasting quality, fine
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strength. The World’s leading
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LOCAL
AGENTS’ |}
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CELANESE SLIPS Y :

in white and Peach \\

Sizes $.W., W, WX. &OS \ Ly

$1.71 ah



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 6h 1951
a mm LL TEIN NLT OTT TS, TT LT TE I

BY CARL ANDERSON Sore M Mouth

008e Blood
yt and eeth

Teath's eae Wit ye you is Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Ateoaen stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your











mouth well and save your teeth or

money back on return of empty pac

age. Get Amosan trom rae Chemist
antes srateats

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

QUALITY

j WO fl Yi’, vende 2'MN TE THE OTMSR, NATIVES ARS PERFECTLY ;
- = oF NORMAL! THEY ALL HAVE THE
DOES EVERYONE |N YOUR TRIBE HAVE | | \ J > '
11 8R.. FOUR FACES? Z Weer [Ss oe Te enceely F } j A 77 mt |
ao AR oe i \ ie sive’ A Pee A Oe , P
" ‘ O m 4 oe



FOOTBALL

B GRENADA TOUR 3



AT %
§ KENSINGTON OVAL 3

aye

aekae Ls



% Monday 12th Mar. vs. Carlton

% Saturday 17th Mar vs. ‘Spartan ;
% Monday 19th Mar. vs. Colony %
" Admission
% SEASON TICKETS — $1.50
‘ Obtainable from Carlton
members
DAILY

$ GEORGE CHALLENOR
% STAND - %
} KENSINGTON STAND a/- %
» OPEN STANDS we Ue §
~ GROUNDS Y

STANDS

SUPREME |,

— — SERENE OH EE

IT PAYS YOU “TO ‘DEAL HERE

ge
[SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customer SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only

USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
JEFFREYS REER ;
Per Bottle. 26 18 HEINZ VEGETARLE SOUP 30 27
Per Carton... 4.80 4.24
GORDON’S GIN WHOLE TOMATOES in tins 35 30

$6S6S¢

eee

jee ( CONT SLEEP W

3
PLAY STARTS 5 p.m.



Per Bottle...» == 2:50 2.26
Per Casa. = (CC —~—“‘é2'6.0 FRY’S COCOA i bb. tins 47. 42

eee D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street







en —.
- om 4 ‘ aes

ee



ele eae

“Our Socialist principles 3 “But, on the other hand, our principles
\prevent us supporting +++ paveicutarly German «AND the Z call-up...” prevent us from doing anything to help
rearmament.” Tearmament »..- Mr, Churchill to power...” in t
London Express Service Own.





“BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS | NEW ARRIVALS

HE TELLS

See eee et ceed: 1408 Cnet haw : MeN THEY We THE SCARLET SWORD FLAT RACING SINCE 1900 THE ADVENTURES OF BEYOND THE FOREST
ALL HE DOES IS SIT AN! WATCH HIM OUT-BUT 7 THAT mn peo TELEVIGION - OF ALL MAGGIE’S ? FUL i a ‘ , By By By
Celene. = THis ONE SMOKE -HE pow . A
wore H. E. Bates Ernest Bland By Mark Twain Stuart Engstrand

| The ADVOCATE
| has the Best Books

in town.



DUTCH APPLES
SOUTH AFRICAN BRANDY (Nip) $1.00

CAKE MIX—Vanilla, Chocolate, PURE GRAPE JUICE (tin)_____._..,... Be
. Orange and Ginger ............ per pk. $ .50 2
PEARCE DUFF’S BLANC MANGE

in Strawberry, Lemon, Pineapple,
MOPONTS iii hii sciBeees Satin ccvace per tin .24

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES



BISTO for Gravy oo... 1%} pk. 57 a
TOMATO COCKTAIL .............. pertin 29
DESSERT PRUNES ............... 116 tin .69 & CO., LTD.
1 GRAPES in 1’s ............c05. we per tin .29
If} BOURN-VITA .......... 1 and % 1% tins “YOUR GROCERS”

_ CHOCOMEL tdwiaagetbiichicac Ot OMe _ tins |







OE





k

FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.







The charge for announcements ot}

Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-! ‘ FOR RENT | YMCA
ledzments, and In Memoriam notices is| Minimum charge week 72 cents and! ee ee ee
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over a4)

for any number of words up to 50, and | words 3 cents a word
3 cents per word on week-days and) word Sundays,

4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any age 9 _— aia
up to 50 and 6 cents per w or esc! Loe a 1... ee
edditional word. Terms cash, Phone 2508 Setiened 5 ton ene way
between 8.30 and 4 pim., 3113 for Death | pi.) ggo7 = =e . va =
Notices only after 4 p.m. =

HOUSES



HOUSE: 3-bedroom Od hi
situated Top Rock, untirnlahed. vail
See esata

mon lease. For viewing, Ring
or 8569. .

IN ' MEMORIAM

——
MORRIS—In sad and ever loving memory

week—4 Cents a



on 6 months or 12
4683,
7.3.51—3n

of our dearest Gwen Morris, who died
on_ March 9th, 1949. .
To-day brings back the shock
That just two years ago was wrought
Without farewell or goodbye
You left us with heavy hearts
The wounds in our hearts will never
heal
Your place in our hearts no one ean
fill.
Eldetha Blackman (Mother), Bery] (Sis-
ter), Bernard (Husband), Marva, Barbara,
Maureen, June, Cameron (Childrer).
9.3.51—In

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays,





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR; CITROEN 4 1. 1947 model, one
owner, new tyres, excellent working
order $1,400. For inspection, phone 3213
Evenings. 9.3 51-30

LIVESTOCK
is ee
HORSES—2 y.0, Gelding “Ladyswan”
(Jim. Gackerjack ex Sugar Lady) un-
named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Gackerjack

ex Princess Stella), Apply: J. R.
Eawards. Telephone 2620,

27.2.51—t.f.n
HORSE -- Chestnut 1 yr. old by

Jetsam out of H.B. Mare (Ginger) Dam
of Miss Friendship, Can be seen at Eagy
Hall Plantation. Phone 95—263. By kind
permission of the Stewards of the
B.T.C. this Animal will be offered for
sale at the Paddock just after the 3 p.m.
Race on Saturday 10th March, 1951,
4.3.51—7o

—————

MULE: One (1) iarge Chestnut Mule,
Mare, Cort and Harness, E. A. Daniel,
Baxters Rd Dial 2464. 7.3. 51—tn

MISCELLANEOUS

laa nee

ANTIQUE FURNITURE — Call at Ralph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6,3.51—6n

AMERICAN BRASSIERS: Many fam-
ous brands perfect fitting Brass at popu-
lar prices regular brassiers also strapless,
in art silk, lace and cotton, white and
tea rose. A. and B, Cups 32—38. frony
88 to $1.80 Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street 8.3.51—2n













ANTIQUES, which include a_ good
variety of Glass, China etc. Call in at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.

6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUE CLOCKS — At Kalph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.
——

COAT: Ladies—New, large, black, warm
Coat, recently imported from England
Dial 4043. Mrs, Vernon Smith.

9.3,51—I1n







oT _
COINS—Collection of old silver and
cepper coins, for inspection call 4476.

7.3.51—t.f.n.
———
CLOTHING: Ladies, Gents, Boys.

New and partly worn heavy clothes, also
light clothing. All in perfect condition.
Apply Bungalow 2, White Halil, opposite
Hastings Hotel 9.3,51—In

CHAIRS—Tubular Chairs $9.17 each.
With arms $12.00. At Ralph Beard’s
Showroom, Hardwood Alley. 6.3.51—6n

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51-—-t.i.o
————

GOLF CLUBS & BAGS: One set Gents
and one set of Ladies. At Ralph Beard’s
Showroom, Hardwood Alley. Phone SS:

8.3.51—2n

MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
guished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movab;. partitions, Dial 4476
A. BARNES & \O., LTD.

One DOMO CREAM SEPARATOR—
perfect order, very little used, practically
new. Mrs. Peebles, Bayleys, St. Philip

7.3. 51—3n

POLAR ICE CREAM-—In shilling boxes
every day. Noel Roach & Sons, Speishts-
town. 8.3.51—2n

ee
STEPLADDERS -— 6 tread Steel Step-
ledders $12.94 and 4 tread $9.88, At Ralph

Beard's Showroom, Hardwood Alley.
6.3,51—Bir











od
STAMPS: Two complete sheets of Bar-
pados surcharged One-penny or Two-

pence. Offers P.O. Box 92.
7.3.51-—4 f.n.

—

TO WHOLESALERS ONLY—Stocks of
Enamel Ware which includes; Pails,
Chambers, Bowls, Pie Dishes, Kettles,
Call at Ralph Beard’s Show room, Hard-
wood Alley. 6.3.51—6n

VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your







sizes detiveny 3 weeks. Dial . 4476.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd

13.2, 61—In

YACHT: One (1) 12 ft. Yacht Boat,

in good condition, Diai 2747, C. O

Farnum 8.3.51—tin

YACHT — Yawl “Frapeda" approx.

37% ft. long, with gray marine engine,
Recently painted and in good condition.
Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4569
or 3026. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HELP

eee arene pei enianinpninipseesnnanioensieeeatssnenenin®
A YOUNG MAN with business expe-
rience, as Seoretary for a local Company.
Apply by letter only, to—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
7.3.51—6a









YOUNG LADY with knowledge of
Typewriting and Shorthand. Myrcferable

BUNGALOW: Modern Bungalow,
Belleville, fully furnished. Available from
18th Maren for 3%) months, at reasonable
rent to careful tenants.

at nese eestor eeroe
MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow.
43 bedrooms with running water, built in
wardrobes and all modern conveniences.
Long Lease preferred. Mrs.
Friedman, Hotel Royal, 13.51—4n

THERSISDON, Maxwells Coast. Ful
furnished, 3 bedrooms, Dial 8417 or ae
7.3.51—3n

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays







‘diphinspetinllign ieabenitadisalcciarcaditiGlns
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By order of the Commissioners of
Health, St. Michael I will sell on Friday
March 9th at the yard of the Scavenging
Dept,, Church Village, (1). 1945 Dodge
Truck. (Army Type) complete with plat-

form and in running order. Must be sold
Sale at 1 p.m. Terms Cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer

6 3.51—4n

—_———
AUSTIN 5-TONNER TRUCK 1946 MODEL
We are instructed by the Insurance
Agents to sell this damaged vehicle by
Public Auetion at the General Omnibus
Garage, Nelson Street, at 2 p.m. To-day,
JOHN M. BLADON,
Auctioneer,
2.3.51—Sn,



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 13th, by order of Mrz.
Chaffee (Mac Adam) we will sell her
furniture at “The Rhonda’ Worthing,
which includes:

Dining Table, Upright Chairs, Side-
board, Waggon, Writing Table, Revolving
Desk Chair, Morris Chairs, Reading
Stand, Liquor Case, all in Mahogan,;
2 very good Invalid Wheel Chairs; Metal
Arm-Chair; Pine and Crabwood Book-
shelves, Chiming Clock, Oak Rolied-Top
Desk and Chair, Revolving Bookcases,
Trestle Table, Rush Chairs, Pictures,
Glass and China, Spoons, Forks, Cutlery,
Hall Lantern, Tea and Coffee Services;
M.T. Water Table; Jones Electric Sewing
Machine, Brass Trays ete., Westinghouse
Refrigerator; single Pine Bedstead with
Vono spring, Deep-Sleep and Dunlopillo
Beds, Chest of Drawers, very good Cedar
and Crabwood Presses; old mahogany
Linen Dressing Tables, Washstands all
painted white; Kitchen Utensils, Tables,
Seale and Weights, Garden Tools, Agr.
Spray, Larder, Gas Stove, Steamer,
2-Burner Oil Stove and Books.

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,





Tea
end 12

and $1.80 on Sundays.





TENDER FOR ERECTION OF
BUILDING

The Board of Directors of the YMC A.
a ro oe for Tenders for the
erection a building at He: uarters,
Pinfold Street. e os ;
_ The Plans and Specifications can be
inspected at the Secretary's Office
Y.M.C.A, from Thursday ist March to
eee. Mth March between the
hours ©: a.m, and 4 p.m. daily exce
Sundays. . = "

Tenders must be submitted 1a Sealed
Envelopes and addressed to the Secre-
tary of the Y.M.C.A., Pinfold Street not
later than Noon 2ist March,

Tenders submitted will be opened at oa
Board Meeting to be held at 4.30 P.m. on
the 2ist March,

The Board does not bind itself to ac-
cept the lowest Tender.

HERBERT H. WILLIAMS,
Secretary.
28.2.51—8n
-_—_—_———

NOTICE

PARISH OF 8ST. ANDREW

Applications will be received by the
undersigned up to Saturday March 24th
1951 for the Post of Sexton of St.
Simon's Church at a Salary of $15.00

per month,
C, A. SKINNER,
Vestry Clerk,
St, Andrew.
8.3,51—tn











NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
VESTRY BY-ELECTION
I HEREBY give notice that I have
appointed.the Vestry room near the
Aimshouse at Belleplaine, as the place
where all persons duly qualified te
vote at the Election of Vestryman for
the said Parish, may meet on Monday
March 12th 1951, between the hours of
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to
elect a Vestryman in the place of Darry
Atfield Foster (deceased).
Signed C. A.. Skinner,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Andrew,
3.3.51—8n,



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Vestry of St. Philip hereby notifies
the public that the facilities of the King
George V. Memorial Park can be rented
for dances, amusements, etc.
Applications for hire can be arranged

with the Churchwarden Mr, D. D,
Garner M.C.P., Marchfield, St. Philip,

P. S. W. SCOTT,
Clerk, to the Vestry, St. Philip.
3.3.51—7n



NOTICE

This is to inform the General Public
that A. R. Brome is no longer the Chureh
Secretary of the New Testament Church
of God, nor is he any longer the District
Overseer of the Northern District. He no
longer has any Authority to receive, or
collect funds for the said New Testament
Church of God.

- Rev. J. B. WINTER,
Island Overseer, and Mission Board
Representative in Barbados
9.3,51—3n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE) fePruary,

The application of ELDEEN MAY-
NARD, of Hillaby, St. Andrew, the pur
chaser of Liquor License No. 737, of 1951
granted to ROBERT MAYNARD in res-
pect of a board and shingle shop situ-
ated at Hillaby, St. Andrew, for permis-
sion to use said License at same premises

Dated this 6th day of March, 1951
To:—A, W. HARPER, Esq.,

Ag. Police Magistrate,
Dist. “F".
Signed SEYMOUR GILL.
for Applicant







Auctioneers. | = 8. —Thix application will be consid-
9.3.51.—2n. | ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court District “F'', on Friday the
16th day of March 1951, at 11 o'clock,
a.m.
A. W. HARPER,
REAL ESTATE Ag. Police Magistrate,
Dist, “F",
ich ae No. een sai
treet standing on 2,181 square feet
land. This property is situate at Lower LOST
Jemes Street, opposite James Street!
Church and is suitable for business prem- +
ises, GOLD HORSESHOE PIN set with

Inspection amy day on application to the +
tenant.

This property will be set up for sale by
Public Competition at our Office No. 14, |
James Street at 2 p.m. on Friday 16th!
March 1951, :



YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.
7.3.51—9n t
“LASCELLES”, situate at Worthing

Christ Church, standing on 14,411 square
feet of land. The house is built of stone
and contains, open and closed galleries,
drawing and dining rooms, three bed-
rooms, breakfast room kitchenette and
usual out offices. Garage and Servants
room in yard, Inspection by appointment. ‘
Dial 8394.

The above will be set up for sale at
Public Competition at our office in Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, on Tuesday the lito
March 1951 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors.
7.3.51—6n



WAND: 1 acre, 3 roeds; 6 perches of
land at Lynch's Gap, near Bayley's Pian-
tation, St. Philip. Arable as well us suit-
able for quarrying. Apply —

HUTCHINSON & ere ae
.3.51—t.f.n.

white Pearls. between Worthing Guest
House, Rova! Hotel, Race Track, Bridge-
town or St. John's Church Reward if

returned to Mrs. McCulloueh, Worthing
Guest House 8133 7.3.51—3n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — One (1)
B.T.C. Ticket Series N. 2610. Finder to

return same to W. E. Medford, at W. A
Medford & Co 8.3,51—2n

~Serien ee
please re-





£908. Spring Meeting.

Finder
turn to Advocate Advertising Dept.
9.3.51—1n





~— a samen

“IT HAS IT

IT has style,
IT has Beauty of Colour,
IT has correct modern lines,
IT has durability,
IT has all you want.
IT’s the modern De Luxe
Table Mode! Gas Hotplate
— Priced to sell
See it at your Gas
Bay St.

Showroom,



TAKE NOTICE

THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State of
Ohio’ United States of America, whose trade or business address is The Gwynne

Building, Sixth and Main Streets,

registration of a.trade mark in Part “A”

will be entitled to register the sa’

day of March 1951 unless some person sh

cate to me at my office of opposition of such registration.

seen on application at my_ office.
Dated this 7th day of March, 1951



TAKE NOTICE

(RI

Cincinnati,

Ohio, U.S.A.. has applied for the
of Register in respect of shampoo, anc
after one month from the 8th
all in the meantime give notice in dupii-
The trade mark can be

ime

H. WILLIAMS

Registrar of Trade Marks. ;

8.3.51—3n

SCO

for the

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY. a corporation of the Siate of

Building, Sin
registration of a trade mark in Part “A

ing and cooking fat, and will be entitled
the 8th day March 1951 unless

in St Cincinnati, a
Sixth and Main reets, of Hegimer in of vegetable shorten-

Ohio, U.3.A., has

to register the same after one month from
some person shall in the meantime

one with previous experience in Book- | Ohio, United States of America, whose trade or business address is Gwynne
keeping. Apply in writing to Managing | give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such registration. The
Director of Canada Dny, Pickett St, trade mark canbe seen on application at my office.
9.3.51—30 Dated this 7th day of March, 195i. .
Ea at
egistrar ‘rade Marks.
MISCELLANEOUS £3.51—3n



IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or oe s eee ad-

ini Royal Yacht Clu
ae 20.2.51,—T.F.N.

—<—<—<—

IMMEDIATE eee for proses: a
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniaturer .
old Stamps. GORRINGES,

Bwi
Antique Shop. Dial 4429.

20.2.81.—t.f.n.



TAKE



WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED HOUSE—3 bedrooms
the Beach. From the middle of April or
Ist of May
Co

Used Postage Stamps



9.3.51—





—





Bought, Sold, Exchanged
‘
Cecil Jemmott
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad Street Phone 4563



Write Box F, C/o Advocate

On

NOTICE

IVORY

PROCTERZ & GAMBLE

MADE MH U.BA.





cents per agate tine on week-days
cents per agate line on Sundays.
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days!



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PUBLIC NOTICES | U.S. Basketball





Team Will Tou:

NEW YORK, March 7

The United States amateur Ath-

tletic Union announced to-day that
it had aceeptec an invitation by
the Chilean

all star
and other South American coun-
tries this spring.

A team of ten will be selected on
the basis of performances in the
union

national amateur athletic
championship tornament which
opens at Ballas Texas on March 18.

A coach and a manager will ac-
company the players,

Six countries Chile, Ecuador,
Peru, Paraguay, Argentina ana
Brazil will be visited.

—Reuter.





ATTENTION is drawn to th





|

“Shingles—Red Cedar No. 1 and
0

'

1

COLUMN ONE
' ARTICLE

SHINGLES:
Red Cedar—No. 1 grade

Red Cedar—No. 2 grade

8th March, 1951.

HIPPING

oe .

=
—_——







The M.V
cept Cargo
Dominica,

“CARIBBER” will ac-
and Passengers for
Antigu Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday

|
9th inst.
)





The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
and Passengers only for St, Vin-
cent, Date of sailing to be notified,

BWI. SCHOONER § OWNERS’
ASSOCIA1'ON INC,
Tel. 4047,

|

Ieee

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,

Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and
Madeira—s.s, ‘“Cottica” 2nd, 3rd, 9th
1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th,
Mth. 16th March 1951.

Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam-—-
m.s. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951,
m.s. “Willemstad” 9th, 15th, February |
ise? m.s. “Oranjestad” 9th, 15th March

1,

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and
Georgetown-—m.s. “Bonaire” 27th Janu-
ary 1951; ms, “Cottica” 20th, February
1951; m.s. “Helena” 3rd March 1961.

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guiara, Cura-
cao etc—m.s, “Oranjestad” Ist Pebruary
1951.

Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
dam—m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd 1951.

S. P, MUSSON, SON & CO., ‘D.,

Agents





wh

Canadian National Steamships



SOUTHBOUND
esa
ontreal
“LADY RODNEY”" ~~
“LADY NELSON" ~y
“CAN. CHALLENGER” oe
“LADY RODNEY" ~~
NORTHBOUND Arrives
Barbados
“LADY RODNEY” 27 Mar
“LADY NELSON" 12 Apr
“LADY RODNEY” 10 May

N.B.--Subject te change without notice.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD. — Agents.

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limi

ing to Europe. The usual

ports
Rotterdam,

PROTECT THE LIFE OF YOUR BELTS
with

“FLEXO” BELT DRESSING

Obtainable at...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER

“Good News” for Asthmatica...

A New Guaranteed Remedy for the Relief of ASTHMA

Dr. JOHN'S ASTHMA REMEDY

This skillfully blended preparation, assures you of
* immediate relief in this m
is the result of years of intensive study in Asthmatic

conditions,

Keep a Bottle handy and relieve yourself of the
constant threats of Asthmatic attacks.
Retail Price:—12/- Per Bottle

Obtainable at...



|



|
}

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State o
Ohio, United States. of Americas, whose trade or business address is The Gwynne
Building, Sixth and Main Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A,, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of soap and will j
be entitled to register the same after one month from the @th day of March |
1951 unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at |
my office of opposition of such registratior The trade mark can be seen or appli- |



| cation at my office.
} Dated this 7th day of Mareh, 1951

SaaS,

H. WILLIAMS
Registrar of T

Charle

basketball federation
to send a United States wemen's
basketball team to Chile



World Tennis

Games Continue
VIENNA, March 7.

The seeond of the matches in
the tinal pool of the Swavthling
Cup World table tennis team

championship was being played
here today between Czechosio-
vakia top of group C and Yugo
Slavia top of group A.

Hungary beat Yugoslavia in the
first match last night, so if the
Czechs win today they will have
“= straight fight with Hungary for
the trophy.

They made a good start
taking the first three singles.

Should Yugoslavia win and
then the Czechs beat Hungary,

by

PAGE 8S’ VEN

Ladies Doing| < ——
Well At Polo| “x ers re












With the increased number of
Players it has been found unne-
eessary te elose the Club during



THERE'S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

crop when all the planter players
find it difficult to attend the
games. To fill the gap also there
are at least two or three of the
lady members who have now
reached the point where they ate

good enough to compete in the
men’s chukkas. The Misses A.
Hawkins, D. Hawkins and K.,

Parker—all Queen's College girls \
—are now no longer inners as |
their skill in control of horse and |
ball have proved.

| GOVERNMENT

fence) (Amendment) Order, 1951, No, 8 which will be published
in the Official Gazette of Thursday 8th March, 1951,
2. Under this Order the maximum





Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES

‘ Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings

there would have to be a complete
replay im the final as all teams
would have two points. —Reuter.

Keith Melleville with his new |
mount is going to be a surprise |
in the near future. He always |
had it in him to be a good player,
but could make little progress
with his former horse. Both Nick |--—
Paravicino and Andrew Arthur
would be in the first cight if they
would get animals of greater
height and speed, so it is hoped
that before the next tournament


















NOTICE

e Control of Lumber Prices (De-

starts, these players will be

retail selling prices of |mounted as they reer ys. or

2 Grades” are as follows: — gomery, the big black gelding
pathiicios Shantediaat 2s lows played his last chukka a few

weeks ago and has gone to work
on a Plantation where he will be
more in his element as he never
did like Polo, His owner has re-

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

Children’s skin ailments need the soothing
touch of Germolene Ointment. It re-

COLUMN TWO
Ordinary Retail Price
(not more than)

i ——— —-,placed him with Bisenhower a lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
| broad-chested “charger” who as gives prorection against the entry of
yet knows nothing about the

$34.05 per 5 bundles containing harmful becteria. You will find, too,

game, but gives the impression

that Germolene
1,000 that he fears nothing and is will- abrasions, Di en eat one oa
$26.80 per 5 bundles containing} ins to learn everything ulates the growth of new skin. Keep @
1,000



tin of Germolene handy for family use.
FOR

SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS

IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS
GERMOLENE soothes at a touch heals in record time.



99 HORSES ENTERED
FOR UNION PARK MEET

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 2.
Ninety-nine horses—a _ record
number—have been entered for
the new Union Park Turf Club's | °99%9%99%6%99999999%99109%000949%59999390009000%)

Easter Meeting which is scheduled |

.
to begin on March 24 at Union }
Park. Three entrants are listed |

e
BORDERED SPUNS

9.3.51.—I1n.

NOTICES
FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatlantique

from Barbados, two from British
Guiana and two from Grenada.

Mr. Bertie Creeks “My Own",
three-year-old half—bred chestnut
gelding who won his three starts,
was winner of the two-shilling
sweepstake run in connection with
the two-day Spring meeting of
the Tobago Turf Club at Shirvan
Park, Tobago.

Fresh, Lovely

GREEN ESCHALOT

WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Any Quantity
DOMINICA | MARKETING

SAILINGS TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

COLOMBIE: March 12th
via Martininque and
Guadeloupe

GASCOGNi.: March 31
via St, Lucia, Martinique,

Guadeloupe, Antigua







AGENCY
SOUTHBOUND Dial 4015,
COLOMBIE: March Ist aoe New Styles — 20 Shades
Trinidad; La Guiara, WANTED FOR CASH

Curacao, Cartegena,
Jamaica

Accepting Cargo, Mail

Used & Mint Stamps and Designs $1.44 yd.

of the British West Indies, GOOD e

SPECIAL REMNANTS

In JERSEYS, CREPES, ROMAINES and GEORGETTES in
DRESS, SKIRTS, BLOUSE LENGTHS—at Unbeatable Prices

Passengers PRICES PAID at CARIBBEAN
cee STAMP SOCIETY, No. 10 Swan
at Street, 3.3.61—4n,





R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd.

AGENTS
Phone 3814

= SESS aS ee

BAND CONCERT

By kind permission of the
Commissioner of Police
THE POLICE BAND
“will give a

CONCERT

at HASTINGS ROCKS





tte
uy

A Full Range of Ladies, Gents and Children’s
UNDERWEAR at Unbeatable Prices














Satie Sib - ate Baits TO-NIGHT —————eeeeaaseeseeeseyneemnamneasisistiiesesnenntslbaienncnseasensinenineianaensepananans

Bties Rosen, Santee nar At 8 O'Clock
ar ar. ur. ar j
‘ . In aid of ‘aid v

TA ee eae ee St, Lawrence Child Health MILL SEC ONDS.

16 Apr. 18 Apr) 27 Apr = 97 Apr Centre BOYS’ SHIRTS ME

Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives > a
Barbados Boston St.John Halifax 2 for $1.00 2 for $1.00
. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr. _-
: 14 Apr. 23 Apr. pe 24 Apr WHOLESALE CHILDREN’S VESTS

12 May, 21 May. ~ 22 May LADIES VESTS
All vesuels fitted with cold storage cham. and en

2 for $1.00 nen

CHILDREN’S PANTIES

aales On application to :—



RETAIL

GENTS so 2 for $1.00
LAMPS, Reflector for Shops, One and
Ete. 3 for $1.00 3 for $1.00

Ideal as hand Lamp without
Reflector. Price .,.. $1.80
PRIMUS STOVES and Parts
PRIMUS LANTERNS,
CHUIMNEYS and Parts,

RICYCLE TYRES, TUBES,
ACCESSORIES all at keen
Prices.



—

HOUSE

:
x
S. ALTMAN, Proprietor

LOCALE AE SPE LEED
SST

Chandler's Hardware }/j |

six" 1 Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

Phone 4024,
Tailors and Clothiers

e
Leisure time becomes

THE BARGAIN

30, Swan Street
COCR G Ot styt,

ted, Roseau, Dominia,, fur sail-
of call are Dublin, London, or

COMM LAMM oe

“












FOR SALE
STRATHMORE

Culloden Road.

HEAD LANE. even more

well tailored

pleasant in distinctive

Handsome, 2-storey stone
property with shingle roof
and pine floors, Contains 2
reception, dining room, 4
bedrooms, 3 baths and toi-
lets. Extensively remodelled.
Walled grounds of about
15,000 sq. ft. Pleasant town
residence suitable for Doc-
tor’s Home or Guest House.

ost distressing disease and

a tern Ree

| ——
| John M. Bladen
REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

THES

indivi-
dually cut to measure

SuRey

Tailored as you specify.



GUARANTEED.

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.

in Tailoring

s Mc. Enearney & Co., Ltd.






Foremost name





a
ro



ie



PAGE «1G?



Tih

é AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951 }
F

TATHER: Fine TRACK: Firm|

DALKFITH STAKES—Class A and Lower—si,100
($365, $185, S60)—5!. Furlongs

1. DEMURE 99 + 2.lbs. Mr. S. A, Walcott.
s Jockey Lutchman. |
2. SUN QUEEN . 122 bs. °Mr. J: W. Chandler.

; Jockey -Yvonet.
3, BURNS”. J. D, Chandler.

. Jockey, Crossley
TIME: 1.06%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $5.32; Place: $1.54, $1.94, $1.78

Boon Race

142 Ibs. Hon

‘BORECAST: $37.80. }
LSO RAN: Landmark (120 lbs., Wilder) ; Infusion (117 lbs., Holder), |
epper Wine (127 Ibs., Lattimer).

START: Good, iNISH:. Driving,.1 length, } length

WINNER: 3-yr.-old_ b.f, Winterhelter-Therapia.

TRAINER: Mr. S. Ax Walcott.

Hth Race : BRIDGETOWN HANDICAP—Class F and Lower 3 Y.0
—$700 ($235, $115, $40)—5'4 Furlongs

1. CLEMENTINA



117 )bs. Mr. I, O.°C. Perkins.
Jockey P. Fletcher
2. HIlsLO: =... 121 lbs. Mr. L. J. Sealy. « Jockey Wilder.
8. SOPRANO ....... 115 lbs. ‘Mr. L. E. Fisher. Jockey O’Néil.
TIME: 1.083. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $15.00. Place: $4.42, #6.82,
34.50

$4.50.

FORECAST: $290.00

ALSO RAN: Waterbell (122 Ibs., Crossley); Usher (126 lbs., J. Belle),
Vanguard (124 lbs. Thirkell), Gallant Hawk (108 lbs. Ali)

START: Good. FINISH: | Easy, 2 lengths, } length.
WINNER: 3-yr.-old br.f. Roidan—Fiona.

TRAINER: Mr. I. O. C. Perkins.

1th Race : CHELSEA HANDICAP—Class F and Lowe: 4 ¥.0. and

Over—$700 ($235, $115, $40)—7'4 Furlongs
1. APRIL FLOWERS 122 Ibs
2 APOLLO

Miss K. C. Hawkins
Jockey P. Fletcher.
Miss K. C, Hawkins
Jockey Thirkell.
Mr. F. E. C. Bethell

Jockey Lutchman.
PARI-MUTUEL; Win: $9.74; Place: $2.88, $2.18,

130 Ibs.

3. -FIRST FLIGHT .. 127 lbs.
TIME : 1.353.
#1. 80.

FORECAST: $7.96

ALSO RAN: Cross Bow (128 Ibs., Holder); Miss Friendship (125
Ibs., Yvonet), Epicure (107 lbs., O'Neil); Foxglove (117 lbs., Wild-
er), Little Dear (108 5 lbs., Lattimer).

START: Good. FINISH: Close, neck 14 length.
WINNER: 5-yr.-old hb. b.m. Battle Front-H.B. Mare
TRAINER: Miss K. C. Kawkins

"12th Race : GARRISON HANDICAP—Class B and Lower—-$900

($300, $150, $55)—7\4 Furlongs
1. HARROWEEN .

. 110 Ibs. Mr. D. V. Scott. Jockey Lutchman.

2. LANDMARK . 126 lbs. Myr, ‘V. Chase. Jockey O'Neil,
3. SUN QUEEN .. 126 Ibs. Mr. J. -W. Chandler,

Jockey Crossley.
TIME: 133). PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3.48, Place: $2.20, $3.38
FORECAST: $34.92.
ALSO RAN: Sliainte (130 lbs., P. Fletcher); Aberford (100 +. 13

lbs., Wilder), Nan Tudor (116 Ibs. J.
START: Good.

WINNER :
TRAINER ;

Belle).

FINISH: Very Easy, 4 lengths, 1 length.
3-yr. old gr.f. Harroway-Thyime Wood,

Mr. R. H. Mayers

13th Race : HALF BRED CREOLE HANDICAP—Class G and Lower
$600 ($200, $100, $40)—514 Furlongs

Les ES a 136 lbs. Mrs, G. V. Marshall.

Jockey Yvonet,
Zu CHESS. (0505 525: 123 lbs. Mr. Mr. F. E. Bynoe.

Jockey Holder,
SAeRO IN Beka) ss. snares s 117 lbs. Mr. J. C. Payne. Jockey Crossley.
TIME: 1.093. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $6.16; Place: $2.10, $1.32,

$1.96.
FORECAST: © $13.32.

ALSO RAN: Maytime (107 4. 3 lbs,, P. Fletcher); Wilmar (101
+ 3 lbs., J. Belle), Mopsy (110 + 2 Ibs,, Wilder); Monsoon (118
lbs, Ali), Blue Diamond (121 Ibs. Lixtchman) .

START: Good. FINISH: Comfortable, 1 length 4 length.

WINNER: 6-yr.-old hb. b.m. Foxbrush—Lady Gift.

TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers.

14th Race : CASTLE GRANT HANDICAP—Class D and Lower—$800
($265, $135, $45)—514 Furlongs

“1, BOW BELLS ..,. 126 lbs. Mr. Cyril Barnard. :

Jockey Holder.

2. CROSS ROADS .. 114 lbs. Mr, A. Chin. Jockey O'Neil.
3. MARY ANN 123 lbs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.

Jockey Yvonet.
TIME: 1.07): PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.96. Place: $1.50, $1.56,
FORECAST: $6.12,
ALSO RAN: First Flight (112 lbs: Lutchman).
START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Driving 4 length, neck.
WINNER: 4-yr.-old ch.f. Burning Bow—Felicitas.
TRAINER: Hon. V. C. Gale.

15th Race : SPRING HANDICAP—Class C and Lowc;-—$800

($265, $135, $50)—7!4 Furlongs



1, FAIR SALLY .'... 124 Ibs. Mr. L. J. Sealy. Jockey Crossley.
2. ARUNDA .. 98 + 7 lbs. Mr. M. EB, R. Bourne.

Jockey J. Belle.
3. NOTONITE ...... 114 lbs, Mr. D. V. Scott. Jockey Ali.
TIME: 1.343. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $4.34. Place $1.90, #4.86,

$1.74.
FORECAST: $198.20,

ALSO RAN:,. Miss Panic (112 lbs., Thirkell); Kitchen Front (126 lbs.,
O'Neil) Ability (110 + 6 lbs., Yvonet); Doldrum (98 + 13 Ibs., Hol-
der); Flieuxce (130 bs., Wilder); High and Low (102 lbs., Lutchman);
Fuss Budget (103 6 lbs., P. Fletcher); Court O’Law (124 Ibs., Lat-

timer,.

START: Goad, FINISH: Close, 4 length, neck.
WINNER: 4-yvr.-old bf. Straight Deal—Princess Sally.

TRAINER: _ S. Massiah.

"16th Race : BARBADOS TURF CLUB HANDICAP—Class A and
Lower—$1,000 ($335, $165, $60)—9 Furlongs

1, {SLAIN PE 112 Ibs. Mr. I. O. C. Perkins
Jockey P. Fletcher.
(GUN SITE . - 119 lbs. Mrs. J. D. Chandler.
Jockey Lattimer.
3. ATOMIC II 130 Ibs. Mr. A. Chin. Jockey Lutchman. |

TIME: 1.55}, PARI-MUTEUL: Win: $1.32, $2.74;

(7-yr-old br.g. O.T.C.-Sunrise,
TRAINERS: (Mr, lL. O. C, Perkins. .
. (Mr. J. W. Chandler.

Place $1.96,
$3.52. |
FORECAST: $11.18 |
ALSO RAN: Kebate (108 Ibs., J. Belle); Tiberian Lady (106 +5 Ibs.,
Wilder); Pepper Wine (112 lbs., Crossley).
START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Dead Heat.
WINNERS: \6-yr.-cld b.g. Nosegay—Rubia Linda.

sey Do Ic Every Bime tk



















ET OBLIVIA AND BOY FRIEND
START A SOFA SNUGGLE-AND
IN WALK HER PARENTS, SURE
AS TAXES +.





ay 1 ue NiGuT

SG OBLIVIA FORGOT HER



w
ma KEY, THE OL’ ROUNDERS

OU FE
i ee 4 DIOWT SHow UP
a Til BS A.M sess






bn








BARBADOS ADVOCATE



~ RACING RESULTS | Harroween, Bow |00 0
Bells Set New <‘B’



} Gun Site, an old favourite, had
meet-
first
|Gun Site which is owned by Hon
ible J, D, Chandler is from the
Chandler Stables, and Slainte
owned by Mr. Perkins is trained
by the owner!
P. Fletcher was the most suc-
cessful jockey yesterday, riding
Class Records x0). 32%

ANOTHER DAY of keen racing was witnessed by a
faizly large crowd at the Garrison Savannah yesterday.
Onee again the weather was kind, and the track was firm

and fast.

Two Class Records went by the board. Hai1oween in
the “B” Class company over a distance of seven and a half
furlongs in the Garrison Handicap, beat Pique’s record of
1 minute 33% seconds in 1935, by one-fifth of a second.

Results Of 2/-

Field Sweep

SECOND DAY

NINTH RACE
Prize Ticket Amount
First 0808 $210 49
Second 0333 120,26
Third 1534 60 14
Fourth 1761 30 07
Fifth 1497 - 10 60
Sixth Oli 10 00
Seventh 1559 10 60

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos:
0807, 0809, 0332, 0574, 1533, 1535, 1760, 1762

TENTH RACE
Prize Ticket Amount
First 0428 3315 93
Second 2952 180 58
Third 0098 90 26
Fourth 2526 45 14
Fifth 2982 10 00
Sixth 3261 . 10 00
Seventh 1391 10 00

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets

TWELITH RACE

THIRTEENTH RACE

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets

FOURTFENTH RACE
Prize

FIFTEENTH RACE
Prize

Ticket Amount
First 2412 $476.77
Second 1105 272.44
Third 0604 136.22
Fourth 0242 68.11
Fifth 2594. 10 00
Sixth 0406 10.00
Seventh 0519 ... 10,00
Eighth 0186 10 00
Ninth 1072 10.0
Tenth - 3087 10.90
Eleventh 3476 10.90

ach to holders of Tickets N¢

$5 00 e
2411, 2413, 1104, 1106, 0603, 0605, 0241, 0243.

SIXTEENTH RACE

Prize Ticket Amouw
First (2433 $397

(1639 397
Third 0055 i44
Fourth 2030 72
Fifth 0065 10
Sixth 69

i <.
$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Ne

Nos:
0427, 0429, 2951, 2953, 0097, 0099, 2525, 2527

FLEVENTH RACE
Prize Ticket Amount
First 209% $430 15
Second 2338 245 80
Third 2329 122 90
Fourth 0488 61 45
Fifth 0262 10 00
Sixth 0815 10.00
Seventh 2331 10 00
Dighth 2773 10 00

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos:
2092, 2094, 9337, 2359, 2328, 2330, 0487, 0429.

Prize Ticket Amount
First 1731 $420 21
Second 1624 240 12
Third 3216 120 06
Fourth 2684 60 03
Fifth 1256 10 00
Sixth 2011 10 00

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos
1730, 1732, 1623, 1625, 3215, 3217, 2683, 2685

Prize Ticket Amount
First 0195 $439 98
Second 0082 261 42

hird 1672 125,71
Fourth 2525 62.85
Fifth 2130 10.00
Sixth 0212 10.00
Seventh 3282 10.00
Eighth 2808 10.00

Nos
0194, 0196, 0081, 0083, 1671, 1673, 2524, 2526

Ticket Amount
First 2076 . $466.30
Second 2412 266.46
Third 2039 133.23
Fourth 1248 66.61

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos:
2975, 2977, 2411, 2413, 2038, 2040, 1347, 1349,

os!

00

Da!

2432, 2434, 1638, 1640, 0054, 0056, 2029, 2031.



What's on To-day

Extra-Mural Dept., Univer-
sity College of the West
Indies are organising a
Conference of Health
Officers. in Queen’s Park
-— 9.30 a.m,

Police Courts and Corset of
Appeal—10.00 a.m.

Sale of one 1945 Dodge
truck (Army type) at the
yard of the Scavenging
Dept, —- 1.00 p.m.

Sale 5-tonner Truck 1946
Modei (damaged vehicle)
at the General Omnibas
Garage, Nelson Street —
?.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema will give a
Show at St. Michael’s Bay
Pasture — 7.30 p.m.

Police Band gives a Charity
Concert (St Lawrence
Child Clinic) at the Hast-

ings Rocks — 8.00 p.m.
CUNEMAS:

Plara (Bridgetown) —Women 4 15
Men 5.40 pm, “Story of Bob
And Sally”

Plaza (Oistins) “The Return of the

Frontiersman” 5 00 & 8 80 pan,

Globe “The Gun and the Men

Behind I.”
“Cavon City” &
4.20 & 8.30 p.m
Oiympie “Bill and Coo” and
‘Sands of Iwo Jima” 4.30 & 8.15

“Micky”

p.m,
Roxy “Daughter of Don Q” 4 30
and 8 15 pm.



ee

By Jimmy Hatlo



| “TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING”



added two to the two he got last
Saturday, and is therefore the
most successful jockey forthe
meeting up to now.



Tne other was in the Castle
Grant Handicap over a distance
of five and a half furlongs, when

Bow Bells in B Class company
beat Examiner's record of 1
minute 74/5 seconds in 194f

und equalled in 1949 by the Gam-
bler. Bow Bells’ time was 1 min.
7 1/5 seconds.

Harroween which is owned by
Mr. D. V. Scott was trained by
Mr. R. H, Mayers, and Bow Bells,
owned by Mr. Cyril Barnard is
from the stables of Hon'ble V. C.
Gale.

Yesterday’s programme was
off to a fine start when Mr. S. A
Walcott's bay filly, Demure, car-
rying 101 lbs., beat a field of six.
including the favourite Burns
who had won the B.T.C. Stakes
on the opening day of the meet.

In this opening’ event yéster-
day Burns carried the tor
weight of 142 lbs. Demuré won
the race a length ahead of Sun
Queen,

In the
Mr.
after

Your hair will be
handsomer by far
when you treat it te
“Vaseline’ Hair Tonic.
Just use a few drops
aday.., then see
thé difference!

Buy a bottle today!
Bridgetown Handicap

M. E. R. Bourne’s Usher,
reaching the judge two
lengths ahead of Clementina, had
the misfortune of losing his

Clementina who is owned by
J, O. C. Perkins by whom she is
also trained, therefore became
Mie winner of the event, and the
Forecast and Pari Mutuels booths
paid out their highest amounts
for the day. The Forecast paid
$290.00, and the Pari Mutuels
paid out $15.00.

Gun Site and Slainte dead
heated in the final event of the
day — the B.T.C. Hanaicap —
for first place. In this race a
ding dong tussle ensued between
these two horses and Atomic
down the straight. for home.
Atomic, who in the first event
of the day’s programme was
left flat footed at the Starting

TRADE MARK i
WASELINE is the registeres! trade mark
ef the Chessbroagh Mig.

Go, Condé

Gate after giving much _ trouble,
showed excellent form in this
race and led the field for some
time down the home _ stretch.
Until the horses reached the
judge it could have been any-
body's race, so close together

were the three,

The Weather .
TO-DAY

Sun Rises : 6.13 a.m.

Sun Sets : 6.11 p.m.

Moon (First Quarter) :
Mech 15

Lighting : 6.30 p.m.

High Water : 4.39 a.m.,
5.01 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) : nil
Total for month to yester-

day : .01 ins.
Temperature (Max.) :
83.0° F.



Smile
at yourself

| Temperature (Min.) :

73.5° F.

Wind D'rection (9 a.m.) :
E. (3 p.m.) W.

Wind Velocity : 5
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) : 29.945
(3 p.m.) : 29.862

miles per

—_————$——<—$—

| ——ERNIE'S

TO-NIGHT |



Are your tecth as white as



Please meet at





; a HAIR
place, when an objection .to the j °
winner was sustained, am,

in the mirror...

Are your teeth
as white as hers?
Put yourself to the Mirror Test !
could be? Is your smile as bright
as it should be? The answer is

“Yes !” when you use Pepsodent,
for Pepsodent contains Irium to

We. TS O%C

most successful. owner

Periins was the ]
yesterday,

with two wins to his credit
while he, Mr. S. A. Walcott-ane |
Mr. R. H.. Mayérs also trained |

two each of yesterday’s winners.
Mayers is the most
with five win:

So. far, Mr
successful trainer
already to his credit.

The Field Sweep. reached the|
Highest
amount for the day was $476.77

$400.00 mark five times.

in the Spring Handicap.
The

gramme.

ONIC

MAKE THIS PEPSODENT
MIRROR TEST

TONIGHT — Smile into
your mirror—take a good
look at your teeth,

e- Y)

=~

\o as j
Zu aD fi.

Rey

NEXT —Clean your teeth
with Pepsodent. Do this,
morning and evening, fora
week.











they

THEN—Smile into your
mirror again .. . you'll sec





dissolve the ugly stains that steal | how a week of Pepsodent
i . ns , i h whiter,
S90 Ser whiteness, spoil your smile Se
For The
THE TOOTHPASTE
THIRD ROUND FOOD >
rk
e )
There will be ‘the iP
G
usual CALL OVER \i N
WITH [RIUM *
® % rium is the regi: rade mark of Pepsodint Lrd., for
Cold Buffet as usual Special soluble ingredient the greater cleansing porvar

Â¥-PO 18-392-50

















BATTERY °

4‘ *



WAITING. FOR
YOU

A Fine Range of... ‘

fi EXCLUSIVE TWEEDS, WORSTEDS
and TROPICAL SUITINGS
When TAILORED by US will give you
that look of PERFECTION.

WE «= See the Patterns now on Show!
e

P. C. 8. MAPFET & €0., LTD.









een



\ YOU GET
\ EXTRA LOW COST
OPERATION



PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ¢

<<

DEPENDABLE BATTERIES

FOR 61 YEARS!

LTD., AGENTS.

Police Band again delight-
ed race-goers with a varied pro-

a














PELE LEGS

eo

‘

WILKINSON & HA





g

We have something new in
this de luxe Footwear for
men. A Casual two eyelet
Gibson style in Grey and
brown Suede. Also a Tan
Calf Perrorated Casual.

SHIRTS

AUSTIN REED

STIFF FRONT DRESS

SEMI-STIFF DRESS

SEPARATE COLLAR STRIPED

By

VAN HEUSEN

COLLAR ATTACHED STRIPED

By

AERTEX

SHORT SLEEVE SPORT

AT

ve BOWRANITE

ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT

Tron and Steelwork cannot corrode beneath a coat of
BOWRANITE. Proof against heat or cold. the corrosive
av of big cities, salt spray and sea~water, BOWRANITE
is used by engineers. shipping lines, dock authorities,
and public and industrial contractors evefy where.

YOU SHOULD USE If.

BOWRANITE is

Tough, flexible, yet
made in many dt*active shades,
Stocked in...

Permarent Green, Red, Grey, Black and
Super Black (Heat Resisting)
in tins of Imperial Measure.

mm ONE GALLON WILL COVER 1,000 SQ. FT

"PHONE 4456 e

| \00 SURE OF

|

|

|

|

OVER fel
A

kw

use of DREAM—The Soap
of the Beautiful.

Play safe .
for your romantic moment.
Get a few cakes of DREAM
TOILET
faithfully in

clear skin, radiant
loveliness. i
DREAM is available at toilet goods

counters throughout the island.

non-cracking,

7 EJ

ZI

ES Co., Ltd.

|
FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1951































. be prepared,

SOAP, use _ it
your bath,
and at the wash
soft-smooth-
with

for a
natural

by
Wilson
and

Watson
Ltd.

ASCOT SHOES

We have Oxford styles in
Brown and Black Kid
Two Tones.
British Footwear of
highest grade.

and
The Ascot is
the
Prices From

$12.94 to $15.06 which can-
not be repeated.

| Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET
















To0Oo







AGENTS



Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY MARCH 9, 1151 BARB'.IHIS \n\OC\TF. PAGF. .is CLASSIFIED ADS. TELETHON! IMS Ml IM II NOIMIS end U cent* per %  %  *• 1M en t.W.11 I The cr.jtge for MiMunrvmwiU of Birtri*. Ibmiiri. DMUI. MM.edemcnta. and In Mrmotun no*aea la %  IM on .y number of word, up to to and S rrmi per word for e*ch additional word. Turn, ca.ji } %  *>. DOB Mtwwn IN sad • p-Bi.. 3111 fn Doaik FOR HIM aflm^km Chare* iN*t T] frtla M cent* SHkdayi M woed* — on, wore* 3 centr TC>I tceee—a if trord Sander*. HOUSES %  OUIMIII M BMSS IN MEMOE1AM HOITBtv 3-bedroom modem hou**> MtuMd Top Ifcarh. ufarMUM Avail able immediately or %  month, or 13 month, ktaa* Tn ,„,,-,„.. ,„, .ap MORBIa|,, aod and ever loving memory .i %  > .r deareat Gwen Moin ;. tui die.i v March Mb. IMP To-da* biuiga bark (ha •Pork Thai jurt iwo year* ado ait wrnurht Willaont farewell or anodic < %  You Wi ui With aenvy rliarta The wou-idii "ii heart, -ill neier has! Yot-i peer hi mir heart, no o.ie t* flU. Eidctha tiiachm.-.n Mother t. Beryl • Slier-. Bernard iHuat-Midi. H>rva. Bartur, Veu.een. Jurat. Cameron | HCNQAIOW Modem BoHpvUlo. fullv [jrnlO^d A V 19th Mircn for )>, months, a la FOR MALE Minimum chawce Kerb TJ re"l i Pa cent* SH-idOu* M u-ord. — poor liOrUi 3 rrali a uiord week—4 renr v-ord Sunday*. AI'TOMOTlVi: •MfUxr. f-MhIV.-N,, Bwnga.o.. 3 bedroom, with running water Puni an wardroPoo and all modern ron.antcoce. Long law preferred Apply Mi, Itolrl Royal. 1 1.31-41. Y. M. C A. TINBIB rwB IU(TWN F HBaflBi The Board of Dirottor %  ofibrVUf* |MI1 Applrfpupr, tor Tender* t^r tr. v ^"."^ y bulldHm l Headdn.-trr. nnrold Street The Plans and BpccirVeUona eon ha> I?^** 1 "' "* *rere.,. VMCA f.om Thsr^.y ,* n.„. ,, Weda-aeday IUh Mar,. between BM av'rtV* ' ""' "^ pm 0 "' ( ! l TorMlpri muaf be lubmliied ui SoaMd %  nveiopea and addrearad to Up raaFrotprr of (ha Y.M.C A PinfoUJ SttpM pat lawr than Naaa ;I.I hjppdfc. Tender, -..bmilled w.U bo opened at a Bf,ia Meeiinf to bo held at M p.pj. on ik* ti.t Uuafe. THe Board door not bind llflf Ut arrept the lowvat Tender HERBFrrT II WUXIAICB, %  tJUJ M NOTICE U.S. Haskctball I,-inn Will Tau. NFW YORK. March ; bM 1—lTlir Auileiic UIIKMI pjuMpuneed lo-da^ ihnit had acptex jn .nviUtiun bv %  .i t I n.to.i ^tp|k Wwtafi'< %  South AmetK-an .ounining • LU be NltCapfl on the ba\su o! wrtormani'W m tho national imploui .ithli" chpmpionafiip loarnam^n'. nln h opens at BBIIPJ* Texas on Minh 18 A roach and a manafr will accompany the playon. Six counlne* Chile. PM L P;irauav, Argentina ono Bran] BWl bo vmted. —RfMUr. ^ orld T-nnis Gain< k s Continur VIK.SNA Mar.h 7 The •evcmii of th,matrhr-t IT I Hw Swanhuna Clip Worl.l ui,U> tei nip a. b<-in olpjo.l lay between < ltd xutfo ol $roua A Hungary i>cai YusBMlavia hi the rttsl match last itlaht. so if the Czechs win today thev will hairtj .: straight flfhl with Hungary (oi the trcphy. Thry made a Kood rtart bv taking ihe Ant three slnlp. Should Yugoslav!.! win and Then thp Crechs beat Hnng*y. there would have to be a i Ji-.plt-nrepiay %  ihe fnal an all team* would have two p..in'; —Kratee f.O\K\>H \T MMMI PUBLIC SALES f.Mi < TTW-'KN LIVESTOCK HOBSt.1 : v „ QMma l--d..v. > .| 1 iJrm Gackerjack ex Surar I*d.l ui. earned 1 y o. |etdln| (Jim (;.,(,r-i^i •* Prlncaaa Stplla' Apply: J. a Zoward,. Telephone MIO rrs.ti—t.f n HOKSt; CHrMnut I M old b> Jelaam ,.,.t of H Jl. Mare ittinaeei Dam o' M. mendahlp. Can be MM at Bpa./ hall BlBiitation Phone s -JU n v ku „, permlaaton of the SWwarda of (hP BTC thi. Attlmal -ill be offeiwd (or aalt at Ihe Paddock |UM aller Ihe S p-m, Roee on Saturday loin March. it| 4J.1—Jn MUI.P One l|l ,irpa ChCftm Mate r rt .,„) ajprnaa* E A Baxter* HJ Dial .464 ; atnit MISCELLANEOUS Ulpy Phoi I M AMEI'ICAif RHAfiailTJl Man. lamnur. brand' perfect fit'.lns Brjia al popu. laj prlcea rpfMlfaT br-.Uer. alu Hnpkaa, in on .UK. lac* ,! rollon. white and " " %  A und U C.ip 39-3a Iron. Mr In *1 Modern Dim Shoppp, Broad street a jj.j| j_ ANTIgl'KS, which Include a BOOd wartat) nl tnaai OMM etc cu in halph Hoard* furnuhlm ahowionii Hardwood Alky. Phonp faU .3l—on ANTIQIT CLOCKS — Al Ralph Board-, lirniahmtOwwroon AUay Phono 4aj BATHS In Porcelain Enamel. In White. C.rean. Prunroai with melchimi umta to complete colour ttlltaia. Top %  rod*. A. HAH.M:S a. Co. Lid IS lll-t f.n COATI.adlr^-New. LwgB, I Coat, recently in porter) hoi HUl 4043 Mi. Vrrnon Smlt Ijitie Oeni-. Bo>> worn BfaWy clothe. Ol.i All in peilect eondlllon > ? While II. CHAIRS TiibuLir Chair* (011 each. With am., nt.no. Al Halph Beard • Showroom. Hardwood Alary. SISI-SU CURTAIN riTTINGS—ror amart window atvllnr. Mini control. Valance* anl draper ie*. By Kirarh. Dial *4TP A llARNKS CO. LTD. Igggl IfJ. OOUC1.UBS A BAC*1 One -el Gent. nnd one t ol latdlrAl Ralph Bcord*< Shfrwrooi". lUi.lwr-.d Aim Phone 4CD AUCTION UNDER THE IVCRY HAMMER Health. It. Michael I v lit w|| on Pr'dl" M.,rvh tth al Ihe yard of Ihe aawekrafjasl U-i-l Churxh VUlaar. U isu D^isrm< iA'in> T*pe> cornpu>to with pis'forrr and In runnlns order Mu.t pe mo Sale .1 1 p ii, Term. Caafa VINCBNT ORIFFITII. ? SI Auci AI'STIN VIOVMI IRlCk l-l* atOlltl We ore Inilrueted by Ihe Inn.r.n Aacnt. U> aril thu dani.red vehlt le h> PirblliAI Ion al tha> General Oti.mbo, Oaras* Nelaon nm. nip %  „ Vo-da] JOHN M PI Am.:. Aurlhmaer Hit te. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On Thursday nth by order of Mr< %  hallee (Mac Ao.ni.. -e will ..11 he, urtdMrS al "Thr Rhonda" Wortnina ..'nth ir-ThMlPa. Dtnlnil Table L'prrflht Chair., aideboard. Walton. Wrtttna Tnhi. Deak Chair Morn. Chain. ReadlnK Stand. Leauor Caar all in Mahoaan. ry rood Invalid Wheel Chain.. Metal -Chair. Pine and Crabwood Book Bhetvea. Clumins Clock. Oak Roiied-T. t i. Deak and Chair. Keiolvnts Book €•••'. tie Table. Hu-h Chain. Picture.. > and China. Spooni. Porkr. Cutlery. Tantein Tea and Cnflee Servkea. Water Table. JuneElectric *w|na Machine. Braea Tian etc. Woatinshouw Hetrtaerator. unalr P.ne Bedalead •rtUi Vmin aprlns. Deep'Sleep aitd Dunlopllln Bed.. Cheat of Drawer*, veij pood Cedar >nd Crabwood Preaaaa. old ma hot an v -men Dtruim Tablet Wa.h.iami. all aimed white. Kitchen t'tennila, Table., tcale and Welajht*. Garden TooU. Af Sprav. Larder. Oaa Stove. Steamer, imer OH Stove and Bookie 113* o'clock Term. CASH RKANKBR. TROTMAN •> CO.. Anctrartecrm S3 SI |p PARISH OF r ANBRFW I Application, will be received bv the underaUTncd up to Saturday March .-li i ISSI for the Pott ol Sexton of St klmon'a Church -t Salary Ba ••. ATTKNTION i drawn t. fence) (Amendment | Order. In Ihe Official C.a/cttc of Thui 2. Tinder this Order th. thfl Control nf Lumber Prices t the Kmt eorrc V Memoilal Park can be rented ir dai**-. amnaemehi. Rfa Application* Inr hire can be nrranied 'HI* the Churchwarden Mr. D. D earner M CP. WarchVld. St Philip P K. W SCOTT Clerk, lo the Ve.trv, St. Philip. 3 311-In NOTICE Thli I Inform the General "\ihHe muter the Chwrefi Ihe New Teat.,., i oi t;od. nor l he any longer the Dlatrlrl Cvorreer of the Northern Di.tn.t He .. I longer haa any Authority in receive, nr colie-i fund lor the uW New Tc.t.meni Chin.h nl God Hr-v I It WINTFR. %  •land Overaeer. .xid MiutOn Board Rap t 1 1 st n tatlve In Barttadua t 1 M -3ii LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application ol ELDEEN MAY NABD of HllUbv. Si Andrew. Ihe put chaaei of Liquor Licenoe No 117. of IUI granted lo ROBFRT MAYNAHD in reStt I board aid >hlogli' U".op SSPa< -led at Hillabv. It A REAL ESTATE da> o. To.-A. W. HARPER Eq Ag Pol ice Mat m rate. p pten .' I. ISSI Dial "F". Signed SEYMOUR CHX. foi Applicant NB-T".. applicaimn will be conrld erad at a Llceruinf Couit to be held al Police Couit DLitriet "F on Friday the 18th da* ol March IUI. B i n o'clock. LOST Chun h and Ii -ulUible for burim-w preraInaprrtk>n any d.iv on npphcaltou to Ihe Isij ill Thi. pro ( wr> will be i*t up for aale by Pt. hi if CompetltKin al our Office No 14. Jame. Street at 1 p.m. on Frlda> Hlth' Mnnh ISSI. %  1ARWOOD A BOYCF. Solicitor. 1 Sl-fci GOLD HORSESHOE PIN art with white Pearl, belween Worthing Ouel r.ouae. It..%al Hotel, rtste Track, lludix-Inwti or Ml John) Clmrch ndumed to Mi. McCullc-ieh. Woiihint Gueat iiontc tin 1 3 Bl-Jn MODERN FOLD DOORS—The dlHInrulahed aolutlon to vour apeelal .-cehltecturM problem of door clo-urei. %  rroena. movab: partlUona. Dial 44T6 A BAftNKA A uJ. LTD. One noMO CTCEAM SE PAHAT on perfrcl Older, very little uaed, |nactica.lls I • %  Ml !' %  1' %  "t Philip aTTU'l.AltnCPR %  tread Sleel Stephdderi tIZM and 4 tread IBM. Al Ralph Heard'. Showroom. Hardwood Alley. STAMl-S Two complete .heel, of Baraatdoa nircharged One-penny or Twopence. OfTeir P O Bo B TO WHOIJKALEHR ONLY—Stoeki ot biamel Ware which include. Pall*. Chamber*. Bowl*. Pie Di*hev Kettle*. Call .it Ralph Beard'. Show room. Hardvood Alley. Satl—fn i am YACHT Famum I 3 M lABCFLUtS". l.i.,(.. at WorttlllUI rial C9i>in-h, Undlnt on 14,411 -quare sect of kind The hou.e i* built ol liie mil contain*, open and closed gullerte.. rawing and dining room*, three Iwdooma. breakfa.t room kitchenette and urual out office*. Garage and Servant* i In yard. Impact tan by appoint merit Dial aJP4 The nbtn-e will be net up for tale at Public Coo.petltlon al .,ur office In I % %  %  eel. Br.'lgrlow.i on Tuetday the 13tn ... h 1M at s p m • -ARHINOTI1N A 1F.AI.V HolKiiom JJ1 la SWERPRTAKF TICKET — One ill R.T.C. Ticket Serle. N. SfllO Finder \e return aan.e lo W E \l,-di..,d. at W A iraraaSfdJ C.i 3 51—Jn LAND: 1 acre. 3 .oedr : • perci.e Und al Lynch'-. Gap. ne.ii Bayley'. P •n. St Philip. Arable ai well a. %  able for qunrrvlng rVBBt* HCTCHI.N80N A RANFirjII ••IT HAH IT" IT h .t .le. Beauty nl Colour. aM IT haa u. aaaUMj IT ha all jou l IT r modern ha \ ... %  [., ,V. ..(. (. IT,,,. \ i-, ..: ilav St. Showioom. TAKE NOTICE SHINCI "M Codar— No. I grade lar— No 2 Krwle Slh March, 1951 i 04.*5 per 5 bundle* containing 1.000 >2f.ao per I bumllo> ronlainln. I.0W SHIPPING NOTICES • Hir.TiH at t Cargo and P- %  lha> Club during • n all tinpkaati %  lint u idfti.uit K-itiiclo Till the gap .il-^i tteSrc nre it reasM l"u •>• thret* Ot IrM* lady menibCTs who have now • •4i'h"l tl.i pail > li.-n tiif> ,irgood enough to compriin th> man's chukkas. The Mtsaag A. Hawkins I." 'I. ..-. i, Parker-all Queen's Collejc jirl —are now no longer betinn.'i* aIhelr skill in control ot norte and ball have proved Keith Mellevilk* with hi new mnunl kg going to be I in the near future. He alwayi h.n. it HI him tn he a fjood pl.ivci. but could make little pmiiri; with his foi mer hor*e Both Nick PeUaWet&eO RBBtl Andrew AttarUT would he m the flrirt eight if they would gr* anlmaU <>( height and speed, n It is hoped th.-n lecture the next tournament starts, these players ill Ix: tnuuntivl Munttiiivci i. the lag black gelding played hi* l.i't %  > h\ikka a fe wacfu ago and has gone ,i Plantation white he will he more in his clement ns I i did Bka Polo Hi. omtm hai n %  .n a .:ii aBaanhowai ., lno.i'l-i licsicd "charger" who a* set know nothing nl-iut the iCame, but gfvaa thi im thai h.fear* nothing and I will.•ie to learn everything 99 HORSES ENTERED FOR UNION PARK MEET PORT or-SPAiN. March Ninei> -inivc hmjgi nunilici %  have heen ent'H'.i (01 tinaa*B) tM n Park Turf Club's Easter Meeting whirl, hi M licnnifN BTSMP SOCIETY. No IS Swan Mrsei 1.1.81—an, YEASTVIII 1 THERE'S PAIN RELIEF AND TONIC BENEFIT 1 Yeast \ iic qutcklt aooihcs away he J.U, Isrs, .^-u ralgu, nerve and rbrumatK J pains bui it dot* sorncthing j elsa too I Because of its valuable tonic propen K Yesat VaM helps you to feel brighter, loo* better, ilccp more easily and enjoy asm energy N'm tang you want pain relief take YeastVUc aod get trade bencflt too | We'll soon have that better ASEPTIC OINTMENT Outdren*! ikm ailtDent* oaed the toouung i ix I. of Geraioleae Omtmrot It re. l.evr* in nation, —bduw mrarrriDiaUoa sad gre* eieorei-Uoii agjalnat the entry of harmful bavttrta. Yon w.U Bad. too, di at GiraieeSBe drasni out din rrom cuts, abrauopa, hJiarers ind sore*, sad ataaoulstn the growth of Dew *Ua. Kaaa g \UB of Gersaolerie hand* for family uta. FM SPOTS, HASHES, IURNJ ^IRRITATIONS, alMStONS BAND CO.MFKF By kind permissioi: of t Commissioner of Pollct T II K POLICE BAM) CONCERT at HAKTINGH RfK'KH TO-NIGHT At I O'Cloek t% iioijs.ti.i: and HKTAII. LAMPS, Reflector for Shops, El.. Ideal as hand Lamp without Honertoi IM,,. $| WO PRIMUS STOVKS and Parts PRIMUS LANTERNS. CHIMNEYS and Parta. BrCTCa I TYKES Tt'HES ACCESSORIES nil al kn Pntcc 1ZSJLYACHT Yawl "Frapeda' approx 37S ft, long, with gray marine engine Itccently painted and In good condition Apply-: Vincent Burke. Telephone *WB of WBI. niSI-lfn. Thai THE PROCTER S, e artth pfa.saM cKperience in Booh Seeping Apply in writing to Manag.n, Dtrector 'I Ca-u-ao Dr.'. PlcKett It MISCELLANEOUS IMMEDIATE CASH lor diamond Jewellery, old China lireef and Shefneld Plate. I'riOTM 443 or call at aciRiUNGF-".. ad| U lnli.z Royal Yaeht Club aoilI-TTJ*. IMMEDIATE CASH I leey, gold nuaaet*. c Old W I Sta Antique Shop. Dial 4US 15l rel. I.f.fl TAKE NOTICE t^ISCX) That Tllg PROCTEB A CAMSI.I C Building. Siath and Main Street. Clr-cl 1 Bga lat and will be p sth dasy of March ISSI .ml**, aome peraoi 110. Cnltedl State* of America, whoae trade or Barat • notice in duplicate to me at my office of oppoait ide mark can he teen on application at mv orllca Dated thi* Tth dav of March 1*51 fiit...nlion of the aXata of A A. haa applied lor th.. %  apect of vegeiawle *r>oMenn* after one month from .hall in live ineenllini addre*. 1* The Owynne i ol "Kh reg.rtrstuin The PROTfX?T Till LIFE OF YOUR BELTS with "FLKXO" BELT IHIISSIM, Obtainable at . CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. I'll I HEAD I .AM "Sood TleuiA" ft* OiUunaUa ... A New Guaranlaed Remedy for the Relief of ASTHMA Dr. JOHN'S ASTHMA REMEDY This skillfully blended preparation, assures you of immediate relief in thia most distressing diaeaae and is the result of years of intensive study in Asthmatic conditions. Keep a Bottle handy and relieve yourself of the constant threata of Asthmatic attacks Retail Price:—12/Per Bottle Obtainable at . i v 11 BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hawing. (handler's Hardware Reed 4, Tudor Street Phone 4024. V,v/AVW. '££££*BARGAINS fl BORDERED SPUNS New Styles 20 Shades and Designs $1.44 yd. e SPECIAL REMNANTS in JI:KM:YM casraii. BOHAINE. .„ OEOBOETTE. in nrtrsi SKIRT, ILOU.E ta a af p ., mjaaaaB. nic. A r ^i3SSSjf. ,J,di,v inih shiimuroo* and pine floor* Contains 2 reception, dining room. 4 bitiu-oiiis. 2 hath* and toilet* ExU'ii'ivcU icir.oiW Ui ii Walled grounds of about 15.00* *| ft Pleamml Inwn rasadanc* niltsbie (ot Doctor'! Home or Guest House. M. 11 \l 1 si \ M AGENT MHIOMIl: PLANTATIONS Bfll.IUNi; Phone 4M0 M WIL1 IAMS 1 Tradllara uiMiii TO 11 "> 1 u. the Beech Prom the m.ddli 1 .1 Advocate C II Sl—3.. I sfd Postage Slaaps Cecil Jemmotf TAKE NOTICE IVORY OCTllA OAMIII IT %  Tlir PROCTKB A CAMR1F COMPANY a Bug, liiulc.1 ",j( r u | Ainerira. -h.~e trade pt POM tets, Cincinnati. Ohio eg1ratu>n ol a trade inai k in Pait 'A" nl Begti rorpotatton of i-*•• addreM ,. Tiw Osrraeai .. applied foe tl* 1 riper t of wiaa> and win be enililed to reglMer the aame aOer one month from IhI ome perw^n .hall %  f oppoait Ion of *urh leakPYl c-alkon il in oBke Datad IhH Tth dav ef March 1M1 meantime give notice 1 I Si * : tAaOV Retidrii 'A Tfi'le Charles Mc. Enearney & Co., Ltd. Tin; BARCJAIN HOUSE •I". Swan Slr,-,.( g. AXTHAN, Propriflor %  ''^^yr----:----.---.-.-.-.y.-.-.-.--.-.-.^.-..................... y ,., : ..^ Wm. F0GARTY Ltd. Tailors and Clothiers Leisure time becomes even more pleasant in distinctive well tailored SPORTS CIOTHES Every garment individually cut to measure Tailored as you specify. e PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED. Wm. FOGARTY LTD. The Foremost name in Tailoring



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FRIDAY MARCH 9. 1951 SYPHILIS KILLS SYPHILIS AND BIRTH INJURIES we-c the two main causes of Barbados' very hi^h infant mortality rate ol 148 in 1948. The figures fur the United Kingdom tl i were 34. [MM statemei i were mad Co-o|H*rati\<*s W unt Study (Groups The Shamrock Credit Union held their monthly incvling last night at St. Patrick'* School. Jemmott a Lane, and heard the financial Report of the Treasurer. Miss Gloria Selby One of the principal items discussed was the revival of Study Group classes The Union which is about three >ears old. Is devoted to co-operatives The form of routed is the aoonuaa membrs Ench member must have shares in thc.Uni< loaned an amount based on the number cf shares that he or she has. The Union is composed of about 50 members, male anil female. Catholic and, non-Cathi'lir. SUKU Croup classes WOTa U1 important feature of the Union in its earlv days, but interest in them lapsed as time went on. Members now till that they should be revived. The classes, of course. study co-operaUve*. Impetus Given Impetus to start the Union wan Father Sullivan when he earn* here from Jamaica I little over three years BRO Father Sullivan is one of the authorities on eo—opera lives in the W( I dies. Rules of the Union are now in the hands of the printers. They were not printed before, In-cause members were waiting to see what would be decided about the Co-operatives Rill when it went before the Legislature. President of the Union is Mr. Courad Hill Vice-President l| Miss Theodosia Morris, and Secretary Is Mr Winter Headley. MORE HOUSES GO UP IN FLOOD AREA In spite of the tragedy which befell the residents of me Constitution and Dclamere Land di*tncu during the 1949 flood waters, people are still moving their homes to that area. Mr. Lashley of the Housing Board told the Advacstr yesterday. Some 13 or 14 houses have been recently moved to Dtiamra Land Their owners, Mr. Lashley said, cannot be persuaded lo leave the flood area. They found In that area some 20 other houses, whorefused to move them after the flood waters. During the heavy rains In Feh(ruary this year, the ana flooded again, but fortunately, nc damage was done to the houses. The residents were scared and had packed up their funiltura, making ready for quiik nmoval from the area. The rain stopped and the Wattf ran i D the residents still resolved to continue to live In the flooded area Wh.n ukad whether or not ihr Government intended making the flooded area a prohibited area,' Mr. Lashley said that he was not in a position to give any information on the matter. BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE often infant and that soon vill rease leaned and to DEATH BY MISADVENTURE Death l>v intitdveilturf ' verdict returned bv a 3-man jury when the Inquiry into II stances surrounding the death of Clarence llovie was concluded at llnletown Police Station. The Coroner In the inuuirv wai Mr. S. H Nurse. Police Macistiat. of District %  Clarence llovte ;i 2fl-year-old fisherman of St Jams* *as drowned at Pnvnes Bay on Februarv 25 and "hi:, body was discovered the 00X1 dav later in the afternoon by Lionel Phillips of St. James. A posi mortem cxamin.noai wn nerformed bv Dr. A. C Kirlon. P.M.O of St. Lucy ;d the St James Al mshnusc. "SEDGEFIELD" DOCKED M.V. Sedgefleld was docked terday to have her hi of barnacles and waue be painted. In the meantime, em getting ahead with the converting her into a passenger ship. Judging from the rust and marine-growths covering the vessel's hull, you would think that she was getting her first cleaning since she was built six years ago. She Is expected to spend a week or two o n dock Pine Landed The Saguenav Terminals Sundial landed 84,385 (eel of ft tide fine, G50 bags of dairy feed and H drums of lubricating oil at Barbados yesterday. She brought the shipment of lumber from Halifax for Mess J. B. Leslie & Co.. Ltd. SS. Buadlal left port yesterday evening for British Guiana. She is consigned to Messrs. Plantations, Ltd. II: V N. Gi ..um at the current confi Publk H< He said that Syphilis was one of I factors causing infant deaths, premature births and congenital debility. Other diseases such as diarrhoea and respiratory disease* caused death in the laic months of infant life, and were largely due to environmental 1 actors. a as aa which caused deaths in early infancy operated chiefly before birth and %  %  and With injuries. "In Barbados syphilis continues to take a heavy toll of infant life, resulting in the birth of syphilitic infants, prematurity and congenital debility To combat these tragedies, the syphilitic mother matt receive treatment m g u m.nrv. The data) turn M ment of th %  ueffected at ante-natal clinics Modsjfj of iie.itmi-ni ot •, nhflti afford the syphilitic mother an excellent opportunity of Diving birth to a healthy child and safeguarding her own health. III Is well Illustrated In i where the notification and treatment of \ puhasry i n such counti has ceased lo be a major cause of infant death*. Untrained Midwives CaUl I of mf.nil deaths is birt^ injuries. Some %  if the'e fatatUttaa „r through her delivery and puerpcrium and the post-natal Clinic to instruct her in the rare of the nf nu and herself up to the end if infant stage. "And last. Iloallh Education teaches the mother how to care bar infant, to take aft ll lopment, Health Centres These services are the function of Health Centres. Here thfl -nother is taught her individual responsibility lo Health and Inin mother-craft and lov; of her child One of the rmwt important causes of infant mortality is a lack of family responMbility—the unwanted child. Pal %  oo manv children are conceived haphazardly In Barbados. The High Infant Mortality of llaibaI lafaguard but a disgrace to Barbados. "To reduca this mortality we %  ices necessary to canfog mother and child and lo instruct the mother In mother-craft, in other words sre II e tool o' the Public Health worker •Wheie arc oui Health Centres? May wc hope thai 1951 ma> see our Jirar Health Centre and our first serious attempt to remove the disgrace of our high Infant Mortality Rate Market Should[I1W ti ltphoiif. Radio Most of the uutchers at the Public Market think Rtat eminent should install ., and radio at the market. There a great need, especially for tha %dvacate V lUil.r. ay, as it is. M lot UH *taU* aim Q should able to provide them 1th ihe ti-lephone and radio. Dr. Stoute. Superintended the market, said that a %  could be very useful In the market "">•! Is. however, already too %  ueh BOOM m iiu auh*kat and he thinks that no radio should be put there If the butchers wish r tclenlw.r.e. he said. UM inform blm and he would pass It on to Government. The telephone a"d radio questions have onlv reached the discussion stage between ti Christopher tgUsfcRj I M years ho has beei. un now io. HO\ V C CALL lead*, in Bow Bells alter Grant Handicap In record Ume. inning the Caatle Mobile Radio Expert Joins Barbados Police TEN YEARS AGO, Superintendent W. H. R Armstmno. left Barbados to take up police duties in St. Lucia. Windward Islands as Assistant Superintendent. Since thru he has been stationed in Trinidad until yesterday when ht returned here to take up an appointment as Superintendent of Police. Thirty year old Sup!.Armstrong is Ihe son of Mr. Donald Armslrnng. u Director of Da Costa & Co. Lid. He left Harrison College in 1939 and Joined UM st.ilt of the Royal Bank ol CajUda. Itul he was always keen on becoming a policeman and in 1941 he wai appointed to the Colonial Police Service as an Assistant Superintendent nf POIKV St. Lucia. Windward Islands. In 1VM4 Mr Armstrong was %  d on promotion to Trinidad Bl nn As.MSt.int SupeimtiiH ant He was poied to tha Marine Branch where he served Until IMS when he was transfei-red to the Traffic Branch as Assistan' Traffic Ofneer. Durin g that period he wai largely responsible for the introduction on a permanent basis of Short Wave Radio Communicator inlo the Force for use hetween l"o Uea l!i .Klouarters and a number of Divisional Headquarters and Country Stations. Two years later he was poster' as Superintendent of the Port-ofSpaln Fire Brigade until a Professional Fire Officer was ap pointed in 1947. He was thet transferred as Superintendent i; charge of the Tobago Dtvisiowhere he was stationed for two years. In 1949 he was posted to St irraekg as Depot Superintendent and in command of the Police Training School, ihe Mounted. Transport and Telecommunications branches. It was during his period at the depot that Sii|>crmteiKfent Armsgrenaj vrag primarily respons'bli for the introduction and pli-nuing of Ihe new V II F Radio Te : I %  % %  ... %  %  I tern which Include the mobile radio patrols. KmViency Medal While gt the Depot Supt strong also restarted the Trinidad PoUee quarterly magazine of Which he w:is Bdltor, He was uwarded the Colonia Auxiliary Forces F.nieiency Medal for his services in the T an active member fiom 1931 ti 1944. Superintendent Armstrong wll' IMin charge of Area 2 of Ih. local Police PortC and of th* Police Training Svhool. Cap* Gram who was al that itatif n will lie g'ting to Area 3 and Capt, Pajrrii will taka ovoi ATM I in placa of C^pt Farmer who has gone on a trgJnlral (.. jrai Before Sunt. Armslrong entered the Police Force, one of h hobbies .„, ia-g.d .-juick because of mvolved-Reuter geaamaoi wun UM View ma. .. o ,, ,, %  au i should be jiiit in UH pilOl I m twosjcivau %  in Uie rnarKei now. tun oaM estv not always asa tor BM oi UMaa loMpuonta, Una 01 to... iaaipt IOCJMM Up in ,i DUK t"i tne ownern ^mniK.no: an i in. oiner is sometimes available. Lighting Necessary What he said was needed in th Ihe market was lighting. Butohi-..s uava n uaa agni aogfutaiiaa, .but Uiere Is no elcetriciiy in Uw market. ] Mr. Springer, another bUtafcM WOo has Dfljag) gforRDJh| in tin maraet tor many years gaya thai uulciiers, like OUMr innear crichet brow io u> uispaiening euauMtMn and cannot get away to listen u. I 1 lltvl There are times when one hat to contact cusioiners ovag to. telephone > n %  < supply riiid one cinuul always bt a nuisance to the butcner who h> ine private telephone M. B. Freeman who has been Rilling animals about the marKei for nine years, like tne oihei • utci ic rethinks that a telephone nid radio should be installed in th market. Another butcher who was about the market for nine years and who agrees with the radio and telephone suggestions Is Mr. Gordon Loo. These butchers think that telephones and radio are go necessary that if Government refused Uprovide them, they would pool together to pay for them. Presents Credentials BUENOS AIRES, March 8 Russian Ambassador Grigon Rajanv, who arrived a fortnight ago presented credentials today. He s the ec nd s.-vi. %  : Ajgdsgajga<| I to come to Buenos Aires ginea wts a tk a n a with Russia wan i llshed in 1946 The first ambas>:.lor Gugorl Sergcyev, retlre-l in 1947 -Reuter. P.A. Playing Field Gets New Tennis Court The Princess Alice Playing Fieid had an improved look when the Advocate visited it yesterday. The grass was not as long %  to be, and three men a %  ing with hoc?) preparing a new tennis court. Two courts have already been prepared, one Is marked, the other is still lo be marked Thcr e is also a criikct pitch which can be played on The caretaker said that Uie men were working now that the nuts weather has ceased. They could do with some more tools, however, as only three hoes, vnv lawn mover and one light roller are available. Parts of the 14 acre field still need levelling out, so that the lawn mower can work belter. The caretaker thinks that a road roller would be useful for that purpose. Another staff of men were putting the finishing touches on the sea wall on the wggtggii side of the field. Tennis By permission of the Vestry of Si Michael a cluh is allowed to play table tennis in the pavilion during the evening a nd law n tennis is also played on the hnlshcd court. A dance was held Ihere n Tuesday night, and there was some leaning up lo be done bolh nuide and outside of Ihe building yesterday morning as a result.. TWa caretaker has Ms work nil out to prevent the drivers of cars from driving on the cricket pitch or the tennis courts when thev motor down lo the playing Held al night. "Approaching an unoccupied par at night calls for care and discretion." he commented U.N. May Alter Meeting Place PARIS. March 8 The United Nations AssembU nay change its mind about meetng In Europe this year, if not t.vllerf to Paris soon. AdoHfo Costa Du Relr. Minister to France, said liere today France, unwilling to hold an kit I'm is MCantta of tlii %  pan and because this Is the %  laetion roar In France, has no< %  MII .i Una) answer Cmta Du Rels who sponsored The As*eml ly Resolution on Iho 'ubJecL said "The resolution to come lo Europe this autumn re •nams in force. However contrary nab* >n force. However, contrary Vcisions might he voted soon at Lake Success.—Reuter Gmber Wants Allies To Stay 1,1 ' '% today %  >. i %  it ,e PARIS. March B Austria Foreign Minister Qru had n hall houi talk rlh Flench Foreign Minister Senuman „t Quat ivOrsay. Their con ver sal ton was presumed to deal with possible rc|fresont.ition if the Deputies BgTN to place Austria on the Four Power Talks Agenda. It was understood that the Austrian view If that Allied occupation troops ought not lo he withdrawn while Austrian police and tlOgna fm.es are inadequately armed lo deal with BubTOralva %  CtlvlUo Reuler. Senior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school gh: 'tetween the ages of 12—19 to rircr for its Senior Short Slory CompeItlon. Stories can be on any subject, but should no! exceed BOO word* r. length and must reach Ihe Sbert Story r.dllor Advoeale to. Ltd ""lly not later than Weinesday every week. The best story Mch wMa vill be published in the Evening Advocate and the winner grail re eive a prize of books or Stationery to the vafcf) of 12 0. Send this coupon with your story. SENIOR SHORT STORY tOMFKTITION Biscuits and Butter and MARMITE The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food So tatty and o good for you Tasty became Marmitc gives that mh, appetising flavour. Good because the Br vitamins arc contained in Marmnc — essential elements lo keeping the body fir and free from illness Marmiie is iust as dcbciout in sandwichca— watch how children love them! — also in soups, stews, gravies and all savoury dishes. You only need • a little and what's left in the jar keeps for ages Made In f ngUnd Ekven Pluit<'sDov.n HONO KONG, March B Devan United Nations planes Including a British naval aircraft were claimed by a North Korean Army communique to have been \ %  hoi gown i i damaged u the first' four days nf March, according to a Peking radio message received I bt re All planes were deMl damaged by Chinese volunteer anti-aircraft units, ihe message sald-Rcutrr g/ TO-DAY'S A a ff SPECIAL mk -I COCOANUT m CREAMS -^ AT KNIGHTS — PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN Name Age School Form Home Address Title "f Story . INVESTIGATION. JKKUSAUEM. March 8. An Emergency Meeting of the rdan Mixe,| Armistice Commission here lodny agreed lo send investigation teams from both skies to Beit Jinrlm in rladron foothills where a 24-hour battle between Israel army troops and Arabs took place on Tuesday. ^ — Reater POSTPONED LONDON, March 8. Football rnatehog arrnngasj ba> Englanil and Spam in Madrid on May 27. god in UltAot on November 28. have been pOStpogsfld al the request of tha Span* hth PooabaO Aaaociallon, II was aijwuncad today by tha Bngtaah Football Associalioh —Reater PILES loot* llkl—ftt lalnlul piles wit HiKtimUd lit ( l>ut %  tHntmmt. SJ^Mhr* SS It henl*. A Sufi hunt tresimeat for ovu SO yasra. I) DR. CHASE'S Antiseptic OINTMENT In every part o! the world ... this is the surest sign of excellence in a bicycle Dunlopillo, the original Latex foam mattress is ideal for all climates. The user'i movements cause air to circulate through millions of liny interconnected cells, keeping the temperature down to a comfortabt degree. This hygienic mattress is un iffected by damp heal, and is completely odourless; it resists vermin and pests and doesn't make dust. %  *• the inside secret off modern comfort ECKSTEIN BROS.—Bny Street,—Diatributors PURINA CHOWS FOR POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK ".SPP Ihe Diffvrvncv Purina ,H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--oi.trib.tor.. It's Here Again '.' PERLSTEIN DUTCH EXPORT BEER ISe. a bottle $4.00 a eaae Owing to recpnt heavy demands We wen%  Ihi* populur be-T nnd no doubt ncrs uill !%  pleased to hear of its arrival. Bjtry SOMK STWSFIIII. M'OTT A IO.. 1.1II.



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PAr.E For it BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MARCH , 1SS1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE ----r 1 fr-Ble* kf UM *>< rut-.v. Mimh *. I9.'l THE juijinehiion made l>> the Acting Attorney QMMnl -it the opening, of the Court of Grand Sessions thai the law should be amended to Riv-s Mm jurisdiction to try and dispose of many of the cases which are tried at the Assizes will be generally welcomed. It however focuses attention on a condition which now exists in the magisterial courts throughout the island and which has Hiven rise to much public dissatisfaction. The number of cases which now come on the Cause List of these courts take an unusually long time to be adjudicated. The number of adjournments extend the time between the lodging of the case and its final adjudication to months. This causes a losr. of lime and many days' pay not only to the litigants but to the witnesses who must attend the court on each occasion the case is called after adjournment. The penalty for failure to allend is detention until the date of hearing and although this penalty has been rarely enforced. Magistrates are entitled to use this punitive measure to ensure attendance. Some people travel long distances and at great inconvenience to attend cases in which they are litigants or witnesses and more often than not. the excuse for another adjournment is the alleged inability of Counsel to attend on that particular date. For some time this practice was indulged in by counsel in Trinidad until one strong member of the Bench pointed out to Counsel that if they could not attend on a date fixed by the Court it was their duty to hand over their brief to some other counsel. The present situation can be remedied in Barbados, and indeed it should be before any more authority is entrusted to the Magistrates. It must be admitted that the proposal to widen the scope of their jurisdiction will not add to the number of cases because the same number would have been lodged for preliminary investigation, but it would reduce considerably the number of cases which now find their way on the Calendar and which occupy the time of the Chief Justice when they could have been disposed of otherwise. Another consideration is that it will reduce considerably the cost of these trials at the Assi/rwhen hundreds of witnesses must be paid; and although the administration of justice cannot be measured in terms of money, its cost must be a factor for consideration. If for no other reason than thai it must focus public attention on unsatisfactory conditions In the Magisterial courts and also reduce the length of time in which litigants will have cases hanging OTtf thru heads, the proposal of the Acting Attorney General should be given Immediate and Ktknu enumeration. Plane Service IT WAS announced last month by British West Indian Airways thai there would be some reduction in their schedules of planes accommodating the ishmds in the West Indies. The reduction has now come into force. In order lo justify the cut in the services it was given as a reason thai the planes now operate with 55-/S of the passenger space taken. Two days ago a visitor from Trinidad holidaying in this island received an urgent cable to return home. Immediately the visitor communicated with the local office of B.W.I A. asking for a passage. In answer it was pointed out that it was quile impossible to get any passage before Saturday without communicating with Trinidad and that even then il was most unlikely. The hope was held out. however, that if they cabled Trinidad it might be possible to gel a passage some time next week. In view of the statement made by B.W.I A. as the reason for the curtailment of the service, it seems strange that wilhin a week, visitors from other islands are being inconvenienced. fattMOtioAd Bank President £ JCB rVf R. tLACK Discusses: lii\4-sim<-iii In Economic IK \'lo|IIM'llf I i.nugh; U ha*" lo be financed taken because Ihc price of doing I been much in fashion Will I Mock Of capital nothing may be perpetual %  tagna11 nothinit and their lw income. It is char lion. IB UK I %  I ISi ymxt gstvslthat in*MM developed countries There remain* the npnu'nt hai proceeded very could pi ogress only gradually if whether at thi* juncture the erlaln parts of the ihev had to rely on their own United States and the other inworld—hi Western %  "uro-.w.*. la aavings alone, however wisely duitrlal countries of the world Japan, in Are— Un a, L'ruKuay. they might be invested It would can afford Ihc money, which of Southern Africa. Australia and lake decades to make a noticeable course means the goods whirh it New Zealand, and above all. in Impression on their poverty. In would buy. The governments of North AIT fact, In countries where the popthese countries know the %  UUB-aV In these countries a high stanulatlon Is Increasing rapidly, il tude of the defense eff-nri dard nf living has been achieved would be all Ihey could do to preare undertaking, what can or canand a large store of capital built vent the standard of living from not be re>leased for other purposes, bff great dissipation falling. Hut I would say that tvni ir, particularly the has been decided, verv serious two World Wars. In order to accelerate the prolnoU)(n thou ld be given to the In ihiinrt of the world, where cats ttl development. lne*c coundisposal „f ,h 0 residue. This resithrre-quarters of its population tries require capital from abroad. duf ln0 uld be large enough lo lives, there has also been some There is hardly a case in the psst make a very rest .inference to progress. But progreas has realwhere the early stages of a counlhc i^,, dcvc i oped c ,, un trics wittily tourh.-.i only %  fringe. As the try s development have not been ut affectln „,, Hv:n „ standards t • i, i .%  .!._ II ..~>BJ i-i.t mill, •!,., hr 11 nf f>>r_ standard of living of the world has advanced, the gap between the highest level and the lowest has widened Why this disparity should have arisen Is disputed Some attlU> 'tiperl'ir thrift, industry ied out "with Ihe help of foreign capital; and almost always prints) Investors provided the funds. Il usually takes a long time for the very large investments which be made to bear fruit, ill i ksaj Pssal r. ni'Mf ii Black hi drnl ol Ihe International MH I<" Karon •lrirf-tiq|i and Development %  in. < %  July I. ISM. Hilona mm in iiivHimrni nankins included i...ni.. n < with -everal learttns American bank* Mr Black fir.t became auwialtd with IB* International Bank in 1*41 when ha MI appointed B*ecutive Director lor the United States. At that lime he rrtlined hit poet ai nenior vice president ol the lluw National Hank of the Cm ol Hew York The International Hank waa eaten I lined under pcovialoni of UM Rretton Wood* Aarermcnt of 1*44 to make loan, to aaaut in Ihe reennat ruction and development of member nation* In any serious way There is one thing I would like lo emphasize at this point. If we ore going to spare the "useful" amount, we must m.ke sure that It Is. In fact, employed usefully In limes like these we must be sure that anything we maki able Is devoted to well-conceived productive projects and that these projects are also wall executed. Assistance for development of those areas is the on if action eoosbrtenl with the baur principles which the western world Is striving in maintain. what can we offer the people who live in the kail dtvwtpgd countries in conditions which to us ire barely conceivable? lUve; others say that the During that time the country less developed nations have been receive little additional gDMttgafL This is a futile argument. The real question ll how to prevent the disparity from videning further The poorer a country Is, the less t ran afford waste and the more areful it must be to husband ils resource* and use them to bes/ advantage. Idleness. Inefficiency, .nd corruption can be tolerated I in n i-M.r country. And the most necessary forerunnei of development may well be the kind of domestic action that hardy costs any money at all. Very often the tax system needs overhauling in order that the rich may bear their proper share of the burden. The power of particular labour unions may need curband may al the iame tlmt be payng. The monetary system may lng interest on borrowed money need tighter control to prevent | n (acl( ,„, investments may nflation. never bear fruit. Human planOf all of the reforms which we nln w „, a i WB y S be imperfect, insider tp be desirable, reform depending as it dc >f land tenure, however difficult m known quantitk lu achieve, is probably the most iportant. If past experience Is any guide. i id for land reform is some peoples can become adept in widespread, because the whole agriculture, commerce, or Industry basis of development is the land In a remarkably short time, while Its effect on development might others seem to resist change. be remarkable, for, if people are However, even if people respond freed from the deep-rooted conto education and opportunity and vlctlon that, whatever they do, become proficient, for example, in tfcan < .iiuioi prosper by their own some branch of agriculture, they Abraham Lincoln said efforts, thty may show initiative may one day find Iheir livelihood "The dogmas of the quiet past in far greater abundance than we menaced. Their crops may be are inadequate to the stormy pres%  QgpOCt they possess. attacked by disease The devclent. The occasion is piled high Many U.S. missions have been npment of substitute materials with difficulty, and we must rise sent to less developed countries, may cut off the demand for their with the occasion. As our case is 'o take inventory, so to speak, of products. Or conditions elsewhere new, so wc must thmk anew and the entire nations resources and in lhc world may be found to act anew. We must disenthrall needs. It is the hopethat these favour production at much lower ourselves, and Ihcn we shall save missions will help the countries cost. The history of agriculture our country." to plan then development proIs studded with examples of unTo-day, not the union of the grammes cinciently and to obtain foreseeable shifts of this kind. United States, but the free world fur thorn widespread public supAnd similar risks apply to mining, is it stake. If we do not rise to port. industry, and even transpo. lalion. the occasion, we shall fall with it. A programme is not, of course, But all of these risks hr.e to be and we shall fall very hard. Should we merely offer these people, who often achieve a dignity in life which we might envy, %  sermon on the benefits of democracy and free enterprise and ourselves as ils prime examples'* To them, democracy and free elections are meaningless: government is the local tax collector The concept of free enterprise is equally unintelligible u ,„, „„ means giving them a decent plot numerous of free, unencumbered land, sumnumerous clcn( tooU and W0lking capluI to work it, instruction in how to Improve it and credit at a reasonable rate to lake advantage of that instruction. And lo get them Ihi we have to put as much physlci effort and moral force to work as we can. Eighty-eight years ago, at another time of crisis, U S. President American Socialist Leader NORMAti THOMAS Answers The Question: Is Amerira An Imperialist Power? THE belief that America is an imperialist power is not merely the result of Communist propaganda, it is also a hangover from the past, when the Western powers were guilty of imperialist greed and arrogance in their relations with the colonial world. The issue today is not American imperialism versus Soviet Communism, but democracy versus totalitarianism, freedom versus slavery, and America is on the side of liberty and peac\ As a life-long fighter for the right of every people to self-government, I have witnessed over the years changes in the relation of the Western powers to the colonial world, changes characterized by a gradual retreat from imperialism to a good-neighbour policy. This progress is symbolized by the achieverflMfat of independence by the Philippines, India, Burma, Pakistan, Malaya, Syria. I..-hunmi, Indonesia. Ceylon, Eritrea, Somaliland, and other colonies. These poople did not win freedom from foreign rule without bloodshed, but the indisputable fact is that il colonialism is not yet dead, it is rapidly dying. The former colonial powers recognize thai colonialism is obsolete, that the social aspirations of the people of Asia, Africa, and Latin America cannot be denied. Since 1945, while imperialism has been retreating throughout the democratic world it has been advancing with unprecedented speed in the Soviet world. Since the end of World War II, Soviet Communism has been imposed upon a vast area of 5,239.000 square muH (Kl.621,400 square kilometres) inhabited by 582, 411,000 persons now helpless to fight for their Independence. A-. long ago as 1920 America found that dollar diplomacy in ihe Western Hemisphere did not pay. American capitalism, even before Ihe using strength of labour put restraints upon it, began to realize that it was r V. SCOTT & CO., LTD TO-DAY'S SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE Fkgs. Ll X FLAKES Tina COOKING BITTER lib Tint) Pkgs. %  -1 l l \ s \ • Turns, NESCAFE Pkgr*. MACARONI totally S 14 M .15 sou t .zz M M CARPENTERS SAWS—181ns.. 20ins. 221ns., 24m<. COMPASS SAWS12tnj.. 141ns. BACK SAWS—12 in! 14 Ins lf„ n PLANES, IRON—91ns.. lOin.v, 151ns, ISinj. BI.OCK RATCHET BRACES CHISELS—(tin., Kin.. *l,i., lln. CHISEL SETS of | In., S in. 1 in ins. OIL STONES—61ns., 81ns. GRINDING STONES, complete—Mm., tins. Spare GRINDING STONES— Sins., ins. SAW FILES—3Htns., 41ns., 4Wlns., 51ns. CLAW HAMMERS ENGINEER HAMMERS—lib Hilbs 2lh. MASON TROWELS 1 SQUARES AT TOOLS 26ins., 281ns, 30ms., Sftlni An erdve American Soclalul for more than three decade*. Norman Thoinai wai %  %  lime* candid-to of ihe ftonalui Parly for the US Presidency ri ptan global -.Iralegy on the committee system. The Americans started as reluctant pupil*, but they cam? lo see Of the method. Tlic\ quickly spoiled thai w? lad generations of experience bc1 -Hid iiin the commit Ice game. llt'ing rapid learners, and adapVT'I' la Me by niture. they have continued to perfect their committee technique MIMcttcr choice. On Ihe North Atlantic Defenc Committee Britain's representative has been Mr. Shinwcll. I do not know If he had eve previously sat on an important International commitUt\ He Is an f xtiemely likable person, but In or out of Parliament th* iron in his soul is nowadays wrapped in n cushion of velvet. Cast iron . NEITHER of those men seems to have carried sufficient weight in their respective behmd-clotfldoors committee sessions lo per xuade six other members to support the Brltisli claim to the supreme naval emmnnd You might have thought we had almost cnst-irnn case. For a committee in which one or two remark. Iceland. Italy, Holland, members did rot gradually attain Norwayi ^d l-ortugal— to men. %  dominant po*mo*n. Think of U(m on| B x counlr ies-had no your local tennis club, your draosplratlonB of tholr own towards matic aocicty. the naval appointment. Not necessarily the richest, or ihe most talented. But you find If Britain*.: i l:iim was not that someone is listened to with strong enough to convince these Ask iiitvnne . Thar* lies the root of the trouble ovar ihe "Supreme" naval [•ppoi'itmcnt. The <;>)vernmen,t Mnndly fanned lh:;l beer use there most NATO special respect. II it is an important committee, one lakes good care lhat one's t'elegate is a big enough personality to be that person. So no Jebb ? WE SET up last summer •. asCcuncil of Deputies to transact the most important business concerned House of Common*, thi 1th the Atlantic Treaty — uV> was "settled In prlnclpli Six—to say nothing of Canada. France. Belgium, and Luxemburg --our naval stock fctroad must have sunk extrenn-ly low Or are we choosing in? wrong hind of spokesmen for lh ndttee work? Al the moment it looks very much like it For. as Mr. Attic? said in Uu matter bgion i,n n Wees, the opimong of all l"? kind of work which Prime Mini*any names were nentioned. I wetght. ters or Foreign Secretaries would So il was our committee men For examule. that Portugal, Icemrmnlly have tackled if they had —and lot our admirals—who losi land, or Luxemburg had as much had the leisure. this important aclnm.— L.E.8 Our KeauVr* Say: South Afriran Polity T>> UM Editor, [he AdSIR. Thr West Indian Sludentl' Union have taken up rudagalnst Dr. Malan, Prime Bouth Africa, in respect of his recent attack on tain's Commonwealth polity the full text of | letltr sent from tli< Uiu< thi editors of the Manthrtter OuardUn and The Tlmrs. Sir We in ftM Wrs' Indi.in Student ] interest Dr. Malan's latest <-tal?ment on British Commonwealth policy. Wc are well aware of lhc racial Ihrorics of tl pgrty of South Ah: fears of an cntret which are then n too with Hitler. Theralori no' : lii Malan i .he Commonwealth lhat %  %  "We hi in ttM Di lelalled n\nr. %  ore of the lallatics hi Ml is, therefore, unnecessary. %  nld. however, like to px>int uit that Dr. Malan eannot have his rake and eat It, For he demands, on the one hand, n principle of ww-intcrfrrencc in South Afiii .i |i hirnal gffglnij whilst on H rlntmittg nn equal right lh I %  :--nwealth as to its membi Further. Dr. Malan argues that the Commi nwenlth shoti'd be %  common interests and a sufficient hoino-feneltv of cultural and political ou'look." It would appear that for Dr. Malan similarity of '•km tixturc" %  II these things. For thr whole basts of lOfdtlon to ihe imrunent %  %  !" %  that lh? principles I South African based inc. in lliams> \s 01 %  od for hls'Tranklj IcottM Dr, %  an of this %  .hrc:;'......! of Dominion Status, have awaited clainleation of tins point for too long If Britain deIavs giving a lead in this matter she mi) well find that she has to choose between Dr. Malan and the countless people, to whom Democracy means equality, who can form tho basks of n greater Association of free people*. "Uritnin's Commonwealth policy Is clear, bi-partisan. and on re'd The onus Is not on the Commonwealth to descend to the essentially LFaacist lave] of Dr. Malan. Rather, it is on Dr. Malan to match the Drinelples of the Commonwealth Your obedient servants. WEST INDIAN STUDENTS' UNION. Lundun, March 2, 1951. A 1 51 were registered by 10 30 a.m !•' %  il)> afti un the rood back? i -ii.il; l.xik forward to an answei in yout naat adltorial, and I'm t'.e partmeiU help. A. C. March 7. 1951. orked p ild be glad of youi in a difrprent position than British or European capitalism. It was much less dependent upon raw maU-rijl.s outfdde tt* borders, and it was able lo expand markets inside American territory. It exported raw materials as well as manufactured modt\ As far back as the administration of President Calvin Coolidfie in the 1920s, the United States abandoned acgresaive support of American capitalists in Mexico. In the 1930 depression, the American government made not the slightest effort to collect by force the millions of dollars lost by American bankers in E'outh America. When the Mexican government confiscated outright the oil lands owned by American citizens, the United States did not even withdraw its ambassador It did a thing unprecedented in history—it refused to use force lo back up economic investment. After World War II. when an election Tfi Panama was lost by a government which had granted air fields to the United States, the American government quietly accepted the people's decision and withdrew from the airfields, valuable as they were to the defense of the Panama Canal. In granting independence to Ihe Philippines the United States did attach conditions favourable to new American capital invested in the new republic. Since then very little new American capital has gone into the Philippines for the benefit of American investors, but a great deal of taxpayers' money has gone to the islands in the form of economic aid. This Is entirely opposite to the Communist theory of American imperialism. Since 1945. the United States has spent more than $42,500,000,000 on foreign aid, of whLch $36,500,000,000 was given in economic aid to reconstruct the war-torn world and to feed hungry people. This money was expended without expectation of profit. It is doubtful lhat the part loaned ever will be repaid. This means that every American has contributed an average of $283 to help people abroad. The expenditure of this enormous sum has not made any single government subservient to Wklhington. Il has not added one inch of territory to ihe United States of America. I challenge anyone to cite any act of co-operutiw help of the government of the Soviet Union comparable to these American expenditures Wheie Stalin has given any help it has been at a great price. There is no example ol Weatern imperialism comparable to the economic exactions Russia has made on all uite slates; to the Soviet requirement that a Russian general be placed at the head of the Polish armies; to the Russian theft of Outer Mongolia and Sinkiang from China; to the Russian exploitation of the i Province of Manchuria. There is no act of any Western power comparable to Stalin's attempt to crush his heretical disciple, Tito of Yugoslavia, to Stalin's willingness to gamble with the lives of his North Korean and Chinese Communists in order to destroy the Uritod Nations. American ild has been given to Socialist Britain and the Scandinavian countries, as well as to monarchical Greece and capitalist Belgium, without imposing American political or economic ideas upon these countries. European and As'an Socialists have told me all in Iho sam-> breath, that Ihe United States should not iataVVtne and should insist upon certain conditions as the price ol help to some countries Amei lea has been criticized for . Ithoul insisting upon lhne and has been damned i' r i xerting pn I ntoosdrhica]mc-ldlimand for not meddling in Korean We are damned if we do and damned if we don't. WILKINSON % HAVM.S Co., LtsL SuMetaort To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phone* — 4472, 4687. w-v/.v-v-v, STERNETTE sTIDQT IN 4 & 9.6 cu. ft. nf ZI'RO food space EFFICIENCY H crme ,* ca i| v agaM unit BEAUTY Fin E er tip cold control 5-years' tfiiarantre Ideal Deep Freeze for Home. Hotel or Business. CAPACITY DESIGN ECONOMY WE SOLICIT YOLK PATRONACK DaCOSTA & CO., LTD. ELECTRICAL DEPT. When selecting your .. FOOTBALL OR TABLE TENNIS GEAR VMSMT DACOSTA'S where you will find a full RANGE lo select from. DaCOSTA &. K. LTD. Dry Goods Itept. OMoa 7/vs or FRUITS m VEGETABLES OARDEN PEAS CELERY HEARTS CELERY CUTS KALE 8PIKACH RHUBARB CARROTS CORN CUCUMBER BAKED BEANS FRUIT PEABS PEACHES OUAVAS GOOSEBERRIES MANOOES APRICOTS ORAPE8 PINEAPPLE APPLES I'll UN r.y. ADD A FRENCH YOUR PARTY VIELLi: CURE 3ENEDICTINE rOINTREM! PRUNIEE BRANDY r.RAVEH CLARET CHAMPAONE JUST ARRIVED PEARL BARLEY In Una !COTC!t OATMEAL In Urn r.PAOHETTI & CHEESE MACARONI a CHEESE JIMKET TABLETS FRUIT CAKE—2-lb. in sealed Tin* GROUND ALMONDS PASTRY MIX 111 Uni OBBAM OF WHEAT URAPE JUiCt tV O #* ## I it IBS



PAGE 1

FRIDAY MARCH 9, 1M1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE B McO OABKIN —Who look 7 wklt tit the game they look in a spule of confident nd forceful balling. There wen My Impressions Of First Day Jamaica-1M >. Test By O. S. COPPIN „ ,„ KINGSTON, Much 4. I \\A£> not prepared lor the spectacle of a tremendous crowd overflowing all vantage points of the Sabina Park Held here when I made my way to the Press Box yesterday to record the play in the iirst ever British Guiana-Jamaica Intercolonial Tournament on Jamaican soil. I was Informed that the takings passed the £730 mark and this did not Include season tickets. However It wti climated at 10.000 and lor me. I think that 10,000 wo.* a conservative estimate. Green Wicket What struck me most forcibly at once as soon as play had started %  A-IS HM pvamaai of Uu wfteM and the amount of bounce which •he bowlers were getting off the pitch This was made lo measure for the last medium mswlnier* of P a rtW ay Gaskin and the occasional cut back from Ihc leg for which he is well noted and the cut backs from the off for which John Trim is equally noted. 1 was not surprised when the Jamaican openers fell with only 11 runs on the tins but Rickards, with his high correct backlift and perfect balance, stemmed the tide in a most promising manner and VM unfortunate to have got a really good one from Gaskin when only one ball away from the luncheon Interval. The Ileadley Pattern J. K. Holt. Jnr., whom I aw bat for the "rst time is like the majorHe was the model of patience no 1 rr ? ld to sl ?•> orw "<* •"< until he passed forty when he. ca V "* **" boWler m " threw caution to the winds and volley. „ .. attempted to force the pace before O !" OBgr drive by Gocdrldgu he was out after he had given two ofT "I"* w u uu rrom Tnn J coul <> possible chances to B.G. to claim ** claimed without any fear of bis wicket His 83 was onlv !memoBrrassment by any first class press, vr up to 40 but I am expectbatsman in the same today, and ing much more from him before wnen Johnson bent his long frarm the tour end*. and swept Trim to the square leg Uncertain boundary off one knee for four Neville Bonitto. who top-scored %  "'. cvp the ranks of Tuscany with 82 seemed to me alwavs likecould scarce forbear to cheer, ly to get out. He is an exhllarPraise B.G. Bowlers .iting batsman but with no For the British Guiana bowling appreciable restraint on his natI have nothing but praise. On a ural Impetuosity. He would make new green wicket Gaskin and a copy-book cover drive off one Trim could do little wrong. Gasball, sweep to the square-leg ktn w ., n six wickets for M mns boundary magnificently for four, has at once established strong aTM L. £ *£. TK? S. C cU,lm w,tn the selectors as one of or outside edge of his bat hc ^.^ {o| wmcll ^ mugl He is a useful man in a Colony be alooking a man who can move team but he would be the first 'he t in the air and at the samn to admit that he is no candidate time maintain a good length with for West Indies honour*-. Bums fas'-medium pace bowling. Bedis thr mm indifferent batsman scr has done this successfully In that 1 found him to be in Trlnithe En gland-Australia Tests in dad last year. 1 have not yet Australia seen him in action behind the _.. .... . wickets but it is cerlain that even Tnm, I think was unlucky not If he is good enough to challenge •" hsve got a wicket. He itlll has other candidates for the Job of considerable fire but seemed more assistant wirket-keepcr. that his to be moving the ball to the slips %  reakneaa In the batting departfor yesterday's play rather than %  asm will weigh heavily against cutting it back from the off as we him. have been seeing him do for some Mini if's Duck time now Italia will dab inquliingly at Patoir. the 17-year-old St. Stanthe ball pitched on his ofT-stump islaus schoolboy, will take more or just outside for that matter watchlnf before I can pass an but which is moving, towards the opinion about his bowling. He has slip and more than one slip fieldsa free easy action and gets a Bond man has blessed turn for giving break, but 1 do not know whether them a chance to brlrur off a catch the pew wicket has been flattering of which every notice and Intenhim lion has already been given by However, tomorrow I think Gat be a part 0i -IIN aUUSU I makeup." This view was recently Based on to British athleteb) it Donah I r.jtlfv. .tntiug l rUa sports column in the Sunda> Empire News When 1 remarkco on it. he said "1 IsSSd th<< rtivM.-If. And Mac IS busy training at the moment bcfoii' leaving foi Nigeria lo compete *uh .uliletet there. Auckland beg. ing 83 runs to I defeat Wallace alone had the answer it, n to the M.CC. pln attack and hit L ntaiHX'd Kt'SOrVCS eight four* In his 68. rr NEW YORK. March 7. The American Petroleum Institute and the American Gas Association Jointly announced today that known untapped reserves of crude oil, natural gas liquid*, and natural gas in the United States rose to a record level last year The significance of the new add), tlons to proved reserves the\ added, was that they increased the country's internal strength The report defined "proved receives" as those reserves vf which lscallon and extent had bee.. proved and measured, -Heuter. Bowling: honours went to Roy Tuttersall with five wickets for 89 and Doug Wright with four for 88 "ii 1ST INNTNOS IM RESEARCH SHIP REACHES HOBART HOHART. Tasmania. Mar.h 7 The British research ii (•very Two has arrived at Hobart after a five-week cruise of nearly H.000 miles in the Antarctic The leader of the expcditioi. aid the ship reached the nittl pack of ice but could not approach the Antarctic mainland because of this Ice. The ship will tall from Sydney lor the Falkland InlaSSst in way of the pacific on tin thu .•iiiund the Antarctic gantinant —Rrulrr ALL OVER THE WORM) Scott I Campion b Wrlsbl Dw>H b T.lTIr tali Cultiwn b Wrlfhi Wild" r SWrtnltr* H i*lh s n, nm s is so Cteal b Ti aag _-irkc low b T.I1*i-ll Kr.n tlfl Mclul>i* b. Wntht CUrk* Tim .in i CI.-V..I., c Paiklwiiae b W.IBM Cammuh not out F.I.B. %  • I, -' I, I. Total ...... Warr 1 0 TaiurMll M I 11 W light jS 4 i""H,. t 1 Sllatham 3 • M C.C ISO I--M'.,. Mclnl> iK>t out Warr i.t out Kxuu, Total i.-r iw wick*" the manner In -Inch Mudle shuffles across his wicket to push at them. Hc played thot stroke to a Gaskin and Trim will dispose of Valentine and Johnson to end the Jamaica innings, and then It will kin ,e ou p !;': !. V*£i {? I mt res,i w T„ l SiSe%?n?' to the pavilion caught by Leslie batsmen will negotiate Hincs Wight la the slip for a duck. Jonni Johnson'! negotii n, Goodridge. Valentine t and Goodridgc's inMudie on the responlve Sabin nlngs will long live in my memory wicket. especially coming after the restrained nnd over careful atmosfhrre of the Bnrbndos-Trinida • %  -is at Kensington. A Long-Handle AtUck Imagine two tall six-footers attacking a new ball each with Legal Secretary of Malta Govt. Found Injured VALETTA. Malta. March 7. A. G. Lowe, Legal Secretary the long*" handle and forcing West to lhe Maltese Government was Indies pacers like Gaskin and 'ound injured in a Valclta Street Trim, who had been on the spot early on Sunday morning, it was all day to change their tactics and said today. set a defensive Held to them. The cause of the alleged assault No Edges was unknown. Oft) M von runs in 26 minutes Lowe, who is 49. want to Malta for the ninth wicket was the toll in 1948.—Reuter. BACKGROUND TO BEAUTY Table Tennis At YMC.A. The following Inter-Club Division II Table Tennis games will be played at the Y.M.C.A. next weak: Monday: Y.M.P.C. vs. Foundation and Fox vs. Malvern. 6.00 p m 1-envllle vs. Police and Aquatic vs. Everton 7 30 p.m. Thursday; Foundation vs. Aquatic fl.OO p.m Lenville vs. Barna and Police vs. Y.M.C.A. 7.80 p.m. Saturday: Barna vs. Everton 6 .ni Y.M.P.C. vs. Malvern and Fox vs. Y.M C.A. 730 p.m. Back To School BRISBANE. Australia's first free school for barmaids has opened at a Brisbane hotel. Lectures nre being given by a publican and a business conultant on efficiency, dress. sen-Ice %  id politeness. DCSSEAL priming is essential to the painting of all new walls: its. application ensures that the paint drift right and ifcrvr right. Dusaeal seals off the destructive alkalis and moisture always present in new surfaces, and at the same time provides a uniform, non porous bite for the paint coats to follow. It thus prevents peeling and discolouration, permits speedy painting and assures that the paint coat gives the maximum service. /),n,(d MADE BY BERGER PAINTS Slocked by ALL HARDWARE STORES Agent.:— GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Ltd. TRAM FARES STEADY BARCELONA, March 7, Citizens of Barcelona were filling the city's tramcars again today after winning their 10-day battle against fare Increases imposed by the city's private utility company. After a 10-day public boycott of trams, and demonstrations including the explosion of small bombs by students, It was nounced yesterday that Ii would be restored to their old level. — Hester See Us for the following:— 1 & 2 lb. tin C. It t. aWOTton Oatmeal Pxg. Vita Wheat Biscuits Pkg. Weetabix Biscuits Bots. Hcins Sandwkh Spread Boti. Heinz Salad Cream Tins Heinz Vegetable Salsd In Mayonnaise Bots. C. E. Morton Pickle* Tins Lamb Tongues *^" Tins Breakfast Rolls 2 lb. bots. C. Ar P. Table Salt Bots. Cocktail Cherries 1 lb. tin Asstd. Sweet Biscuits I.NCE & Co., Ltd. i. 7. i %  9 Roebuck street. Pilgrimage BRUSSELS A 43-yeurold Brussels housewife arrived back home this week after walking 5,000 kilometres (3,125 miles) from Brussels to Rome for Holy Year visit She declared: "Every woman shoull ke this trip on foot. I shall do the same thing aguir next year. France Gets $10m. Contract From Peru PARIS. March 7. France has secured another big industrial contract In Latin America, this lime to build a uu.000.000 steel plant with n capacity of 70,000 tons for pig iron in Peru A spokesman of tho French engineering industry announced the contract to-day France last week • %  "•ii a $25,000,000 contract to construct Columbia's first steel combine in the face of strong German and American competition. Other French contracts in Latin America include, the delivery of 90 railway engines to Brazil; the first will leave on June 1. The equipment or a Brazilian On Refinery will process 6.000 tins of crude petroleum and will start operating this year. Harbour L*og In Carlisle Bay M i --.'LI M V Hu m . BK. A*U". "el) U-rr Maa r ss t ta. VMM CMS M WI >--t. AdaKn %  n Buini it nri. Hears D ..i .'< !** M.-W.i. H.I, i *M •%  -tomriar S, M.V 1*1Jos. S. h L--clorHui O. Aci> Rriquven. ftrh I'Mllp M Da.id—, svh Mat (Hue Vh '..II mn hr... Wall* AHHl\ \I 'dmotitr OarSenla W. is IMI net, C"M Wll-r rrem TrlnMd SS SkindMl. I.SAT Inn net. Opt %  sri i i,..i, !!...( m To Mothers ^^-(, who cannot fted their babies • Don't worry! Cow's milk can be prepared to that the youngest baby on digesi it without trouble. The addition of Robinson's "Patent" Hsrlcy prevents the milk funning large clots in baby stomachs, making it esiy for the delicate digestive organs to do their work thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later in life Thtt\ why wise nurses and mothcrj always use Robinton'f 'Patent' Barley. ROBINSON'S ••srsarBARLEY ntTAHTUHSH Mrtioonci fnllut IMann H 41 I<>| ii*t. Vapl %  SUMS, loi f* 1 i kfV. Da*raod. 4 lona n*i. Capl liuiiac lot si Van fcMd'i KM1UI C OvrOitii. S3 li.iti Mt, C*|M Paliif* lor T'uml-,1 JS SUndlal. ISSZ l Ship. In Touch With Barbados Coait Station Cble and Wir*lr Wart I>ul.> Ud *VIIK.I Ihry cnri nc lummunH-all -ilh Ihr MkiH 114 -l"lltii..|.SI. thru ll..i(wl. IO.il Hl.ll,,, M.V PHIhSixIrr. . Alrn.. I Hayaiu. .. Sol.lri .. IM.ui., .. I011U P-itfin. *. Shin-.ll. . Jd.hu> TtW. % %  Dulleo. a a AB-II,. ,. Bjkj, Uamphla % %  Catubuli ,. Rattan. .. C-atUlkxor. . Imp*...' Torwilu. • KnWtil T.,./ .a IWlim 1. Cranseuin. 1. <: % % % %  1 .. Slnm.irl. % %  Rui A|..|^t a. Kaao T>aiavllla>. a.* CwnUebanh. aa Ladv II. -IF—' it HJngitolo, %  • r-an %  Kll. dvlphia. a. HrpubIM •• n-<0 a > Eaaa Nounavni >a UliadlKa a.i Akrwa Pnlarla. > a Aiakn. a a Alcoa Prnnaul .. r.Htl.a, aa Pr-aicWMaaliilra .. J,..n I.I>..IN> 11 (,*-l AnUfiaa. Si Km. N*vi> b> III 'HM' W. ill lar rlnard 41 II. Ofltt* aa luadart — I'airrl Mall al 10 %  m )[•• %  .-', ,n.l MM 1 MI p in OfsUMn Ul 1 ..1 SM 1 RATES OF EXCHANGE MAIW-M VAN AIIA Ihulkr.. It., .. 1 tiiiod nwroinga begin with Gillette The Basques who reside in Bar High Pyrenees Now shave nil their beards with ihc greatest of ease; You also should share lhe improvement they've made By using the wonderful Blue Gillette Blade Sharpen ever made. Blue Citllclle Blades are also ihc mo.t aaaMaaOal bMaaai they laii >o long. Naturally they are vhosen by tlic smartest men of every country in the world. Blue Gillette Blades 'UDr riouiiti, TQ; 1 %  -##.. v# 10. V.'f FACTORY MANAGERS T. u.L. .,„„i,nii, .f •butnlat rear rninl. awaM %  1— GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE luaUc frvm 14 In. itmra MILD STEEL n,u Baaaaa. MI !" la an atami BOLTS A NUTS— All Slxa. FILTER CLOTH -Whlta Cotton Twill •u rucsa uu >M b. 1 1 Thm U.IHHAIW.S IlilMHtY I.,.I. WHITI PAaii IOAII SI. Mil 11AEL DIAL UU The Gift of the year NEWKATUWS NIW paionoN NEW MAUTY the only pen with the Mauri wi about the world', moa warned siA •paolTBeatwfiiaar"51"ha,a ramarlnMc new Aaro^neuic Ink Sy,tni. .. aod It', Ihc uro'cat tawaaaaC Toe Aero-meJric Ink Syaam la a wholly i BdentdK jBhod of drawiof In. Holing. uaV • "• KTOJaiauM aUBSal a.l reloaan. loa. lo lhe lhe moa • MM BBaaaaaWaaMBaaM aauafaetory pep performano: ever known. • Mew eLMUAU aaatavom Sea thu beauurut pen and experience in tilky wriliiv lien. Indaad. i, a ah worthy of lhe moa aaaBafaaaaaal —aSslBBaf moat uftvn&d yiflt fivn, Prieea: Wilh Rolled Gold Ca S24.M Wllh Luslraloy Caa *l" A. S. BRYDKN SOMS (BARBADOS) LTD., Oistribators far Barbados TttE LAMES 9 EYES WILE OPEN WIDE AT THE IMIM;AI.VS WHICH WILL Bl. OFFERED IN EVERY DEPARTMENT. ESPECIALLY THE DRESS (.HODS & SHOE DEPT. AT OUR EASTER PARADE HM.IWIM. OX >IOMAV 121 h M ASCII i.v rut: HI 1.1 VEXTLEMEX urtsu 'ind braeitha a alqh ol ralial whan the Flnaat Quality WORSTED. PARSONS' GREY. TROPICAL. KHAKI DRILLS. LINEN and other SUITINGS, aleo SHIH1S ol all daacrlptlona. Includlnq the Famoua SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS or* oHared at auch ataqqarlnqly low pricaa. Ovar S500.000 wocth of New and Stylieh American. Canadian. Enqllah. French. Dutch, Garman and Italian Marchandla* ia placed at your dtepoeal. • HOW LONG CAN IT LAST ? Tb anawec comaa on MONDAY. liTH MARCH. AT 8.00 A.M. whan all roade lead to . N. E. WILSON & CO. Tha Air Conditionad Stoaa oHarinq MEBCHA.NL VISE and SERVICE ol lhe vary beat. 31. SWAN STREET -t





PAGE 1

T\C.T. SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE IK1DAV. MABCH , MM FOR QUALITY & FLAVOUR Sore Mouth Loes Bloody Tooih BlaaaWaf Gatna, >cr> Mowla and Lave ikai *• Trru-h U.. U |a or aarhapa eon* bad "!• thai wll MMT or faMar caiate oor la.it. to rail o*M ad xr ah rmiM* Klicu-MUm and Hrart Tratto A-aaeaii •*•* %  0"* M.>din| the Aral day %  *" and gukkly ll(htil % %  "-"' %  *aaa. %  Mum wall -%  hack a* Worn of %  jwl. K ...i *-* %  •• frawar (• %  !•! r*f Pf.rf..-Tr£ii Ma,*Ik HEALTHY STANDS SUPREME futicura V> SOAP I FOOTBALL GRENADA TOUR AT KENSINGTON OVAL Monday 12 th Max. n. Car lion Tuesday i:Hh Mar. m Colt--. Thursday IMhMai.T' F.mpiro Saturday 17UJ Mar v. Spartan Monday 19th Mar. v*. Colony Admission SEASON TICKETS 11.S0 Obtainable from Carlton m-mbers DAILY OEOEOE CHALLENOR STAND %  2/KENfllNOTON STAND /OPEN STANDS .. 1/GROUNDS .18. PLAT STARTS 6 p.m. PHHMBSBS IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW JEFFREY'S IIEEII Per Bottle 26 .18 Per Carton _4.80 4.24 GORDOVS ..IS,' Per Bottle Per Case USUALLY NOW HEINZ VEGETABLE SOU30 .27 WHOLE TOMATOES in tin. 35 30 2.50 2.26 — 26.00 FHVS COCOA i lb. tins .47 .42 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street The ADVOCATE has the Best Books in town. NEW ARMVALS THE ICARLET SWORD l-LAT RACING SINCE 1900 THE ADVENTURE* Of BEYOND THE P0RE1T B HUCKLEBERRY FINN By Ernest Blond By Mark Twain Stuart Engstrand By a E. Bates The ADVOCATE has the Best Books in town. aaaaaaaapp %  — oote> AB SA YE CAKE MIX—Vanilla. Chocolate. Orange and Ginger per pk. $ .50 PEARCE DUFFS BLANC MANGE in Slrr.wherry. Lemon, Pineapple. mini APPLES SOUTH AFRICAN BRANDY (Nip) $1.00 PURE GRAPE JUICE (tin) „28c Oranfio BISTO for Gravy TOMATO COCKTAIL DESSERT PRUNES CRAPES in l's BOURN-VITA OtOCOMBi per till lib pk. piT tin ... lib tin p*r tin 1 and H tb tins 10 m. tins ALLEYNE ARTHUR





ESTABLISHED 1895

farvbados

a



“SUGAR



Jamaica Defeats
B.G. By 224 Runs

Valentine Bags Seven

By 0. S.
KINGSTON, Jamaica, March 8

JAMAICA today defeated B.G. by the comfortable

margin of 224 runs after 21 minutes of play on

the fifth day of the first Jamaica-B.G. Test. B.G.,

facing a second innings deficit of 510 runs, scored

266 for 7 yesterday and today the three remaining
wickets fell for an additional 20 runs.

“Asturias” Will

Not Come
To W.L

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 8

Two hundred and fifty West
Indians who were hoping to come
to Britain shortly are going to
be disappointed, They were hop-
ing to obtain passages on the Aus-
tralian immigrant ship’ Asturias
which the Ministry of Transport
were considering diverting via
Trinidad and Jamaica on its ré-
turn to Britain in May

They are going to be disappoini-
ed beeause the Ministry of Trans-
port to whom the Asturias is on
hire have decided that there was
not sufficient demand for passages

The Ministry were prepared. to
aivert’ the vessel if 600 applica-
tions were received. Only 250

people applied.

Ramadhin
Wants To Stay

BOMBAY, March 8.

Only Sonny Ramadhin the West
Indies spinner appeared unhappy
to leave when the Commonwealth
cricket team left here for England
to-day.

Ramadhin said; “Lfeel sopyy,to.
leave India which I consider my
home.” \

Leslie Ames the captain, said
that they had had a very enjoyable
trip, Frank Worrell the other West
Indies player in the team, did not
leave with the main party but is
flying back. —Reuter.







MeWatt Injured

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, March 8.

Carlton Reece, wicket-keeper
batsman, was selected to fly to
Jamaica to replace McWatt who is
suffering from an injured finger
and is unable te play in the second
test. A cable from W. M. Green,
the B.G. representative on the
West Indies Selection Committee
said, “It is imperative that we have
a replacement for McWatt due to
injury. He must leave B.G. by
Friday’s plane.”

Kenneth Wishart announced jast
night that B.G._ selectors in
Jamaica recommended Reece and
B.G. Airways are doing every-
thing possible to secure a passage
on Friday’s plane. Passage from
Trinidad has been secured but
passage from B.G. to Trinidad is
still not secured,

U.S. SENATOR KILLED

IN ACCIDENT

WASHINGTON, March 8
Democrat Senator Virgil Chap-
man died today, a few hours after
he was injured in a collision be-
tween his motor car and a lorry,
His death cuts the Democratic
mejority in the Senate to nine.
—Reuter.







SCENE FROM
of the residence
background.

of the

MONDAY NIGHT'S FIRE
Headmaster of St

U.K. condemned over British Guia

W.!. negofiations

CRICKET



|

COPPIN

i€i with his left arm spinners
yesterday, took two more of the
} wickets falling today for 11 more
re finishing with the good fig-

Aif Valentine who claimed 5
|

ures of 7 for 112 in 36.4 overs.
The wicket too helped Valen-
tine’s spinners considerably yes-
terday and today some balls were
jumping shoulder high and others
keeping uncomfortably low. The}.

second Test opens on Saturday



lose first test

FRIDAY,





COMING AROU



Patoir 6 and Rollox 0 resumed
B.G.’s second innings at the over. |
right score of 266 for 7. Valen-
tine completed his over, unfinish-
ed from. the previous day and
Patoir took a maiden over from
Mudie

Senate And House
Should Approve

WASHINGTON, March 8.
ut te The two Senate Committees

4 8s .
iat ee ei eee Madids today voted by 14 to 10 to require
second over, with the day’s play| both Senate and House of Repre-
but six,minutes, old, Rollox hit|Sentatives’ approval of any assign-
weross a shortish ball which kept|ment of American troops to the

low and his centre stump was up-| North Atlantic Pact Army.

rooted for 0 It was a poorsstroke} By the same vote the: Senate
by -a° useful batsman as Rollox| Foreign Relations and Armed Ser-
| with B.G. in such desperate straits,| vices Committees approved the
Trim played out the over and|proposal by Senator Henry Cabot
Patoir faced Valentine again, off | Lodge, Republican, Massachusetts,
driving the last ball of the over|to put the Senate on record as
for a confident*single. saying European nations must
make a “major contribution” to
ground forces under the command

of General Eisenhower.—-Reuter,

Trading Limited In
London Exchange

LONDON, March 8.

Caution and hesitancy remain-
ed. uppermost in. the London
Stock exchange despite the over-
night strength of Wall Street.
Trading was limited, prices were
seldom tested and. only meagre
new account businesS was re-
ported, Changes revealed narrow





Johnson madé a magnificent one-
bend effort to catch Patoir at gully
but failed to hold the ball after
getting his hand to it.

Valentine claimed Patoir’s wic-
ket next over however, deceiving
him with a quicker ball that kept
Straight and low.

The End

Skipper Gaskin, last man in.
took two off an edge from the
first ball from Valentine and two
balls after lifted him high to mid-
on for two and twice hit to back-
ward square leg for 2 and 3 respec-
tively,

Trim pulled Mudie to the square | /*regularity . 4
lag boundary for four and it was | Po Government sf thie
obvious that the intention of the|P4alved by one sixteenth while
last pair was to play free cricket|@#â„¢0ng industrials, textiles and

rayons were helped. Engineerings

as all hope for saving the game improved but the trend of other

had vanished by this time.

groups was to lower. levels.
Valentine had Trim caught at!|Commodity shares showed dull-
gully by Arthur Bonitto playing|ness. Tins remained under the)

forward at one that spun away|influence of the lower price of

and B.G.’s innings closed for 286,| metal. les:

Trim having scored 7 and Gaskin} Oils failed to hold an initial

10 not out. selective firmness, and losses of
half a point were shown. by

The scores:— Japanese bonds.






JAMAICA 18ST INNINGS 273 Changes in gold shares were
BRITISH GUIANA 1ST. INNINGS 162 mainly to, lower levels, but -cop-
JAMAICA'S 2ND INNINGS “" : 3
‘ 3s | pers brightened on some new
b Bonitto... 61 | account buying. —Reuter,
tayley b Valentine se
Persaud stpd. b Valentine 5



Christiani c Goodridge b Valentine
C. H. Thomas c N. Bonitto b
Valentine 5
J. L. Thotnus ec Mudie b Bonitto
Me Watt e¢ N. Bonitto b Valentine.

Officer Injured In

. f s
Patoir b Valentine . 9 Clash With Bandits
Rollox b Mudie a o
Trim c A. Bonitto b Valentine q ASMARA, ERITREA, March 8.
ee etree harika hee Toe]? ACSBeitieh |. officer and, corporal

-| were injured yesterday in a clash

Total with bandits about six miles from

286

Shu Bas

Fall of wickets: 1149; 2157; 3181, ASMara. Both men were brought
4-191; 5—216; 6—241; 7-266, 8—267;|to the British military hospital in
9—269. Asmara last night.

BOWLING ANALYSIS _ The officer with bullet wounds
Oo mM R-_~ win his stomach was said to be
Johnson. . 5 1 5 9 | dangerously ill.
Sere tea 6 i %{| The two men were on- patrol
A. Bonitto 10 0 44 2.When the clash occurred.
Mudie 23 7 60 1 —Reuter.



AFTER THE FIRE



in Castries showing the devastated area. The ruins
Masy’s College (left) with the Methodist Church in the

~

a

MARCH 9,
RACING 2w Be.

U.K. BLAMED FOR SU



1951



and Harroween
new times

ND THE WEND

Allies Move Up In| ‘it. vin

Central Korea

TOKYO, March 8

THE UNITED NATIONS troops attacking East of

Seoul advanced to-day aléng the whole 100 miles of the |at 4 p.m. tomorrow,

Central Korean front, an American Eighth Army spokes

man. said to-night.

But they still will not come up against the main body

of the Communist armies r
offensive.

U.S. Casualties

In Korea

WASHINGTON, March 8.
_» Total American casualties
in the Korea war rose to-
7. to nt: including
8,853 known to have died.
The figure, representing
notifications sent to next of
kin up to March 2, was 1,773
higher than last week’s,
Analysis was: Killed in
action 7,857; died of wounds
911; missing and known to
have died, 85; wounded
33,781; missing—known to
be prisoners 110; missing but
since returned to safety 980:
otherwise missing 8,724. To-
tal army casualties were
43,598, navy casualties 596,
marine casualties 7,838, air
force casualties 416.
—Reuter.

UNEASY FEELING
IN GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, March 8.

Last night fires still leave an
uneasy feeling although Gairy in
an address tonight urged all work-
ers to refrain from violence, But
the strike continues.

Gairy also said he planned to
go to Jamaica to see Bustamante







to get a commission to enquire
into “maladministration of the
authorities handling the strike

situation.”” The manual and men-
tal Workers’ Union has received
$100, contribution from a St. Vin-
cent movement to assist the cause
here,

It was reported from the coun-
try yesterday that 15 . women
armed with cutlasses attacked the
watchman of Calmiste Estate who
retaliated by using a stick. break-
ing the arm of one while the
others dispersed,

H.M.S. Devonshire paid a short
call this morning picking
boat left here. An official news
bulletin scptched the rumour that
the Governor was going to St
Lucia. The Governor and Mr.
Barltrop thi¢d morning again saw
the leaders of commerce, and an
agricultural delegation in connec-
tion with vesterday’s representa-
tion and this afternoon the Execu-
tive Council met to consider the
motrer but there has heen no
official pronouncement yet,



Results At
A Glance

SECOND DAY

NINTH RACE
DEMURE—Lutchman
SUN QUEEN—Yvonet
1. URNS—Crossley
TENTH RACE
CLEMENTINA~—P. Fletcher
HI LO—Wilder.
SOPRANO—O'Neil.
ELEVENTH RACE
APRIL FLOWERS—P. Fletcher
APOLLO—Thirkell,
FIRST FLIGHT—Lutehman
TWELFTH RACE
it HARROWEEN—Lutchman
> LANDMARK—O'Neil.
% SUN QUEEN—Crossley.
THIRTEENTH RACE
1. VIXEN—Yvonet
2. DUCHESS—Hoalider.
4. JEWEL—Crossley.
POURTEENTH RACE
1 “OW BELLS—Holder.
“ CROSS ROADK—O'Neil
& MARY ANN—Yvonet
FIFTEENTH RACE
1 FAIR SALLY—Crossiey
2. ARUNDA—J. Belle
8. NOTONITE—AIL.
SIXTEENTH RACE
1 GUN SITE-—Lattimer; &
P. Fletcher
8 ATOMIC U—Lutchman

#e- Bae

wen

SLAINTE

up a}

eported grouping for a massive

' Front line reports said Commun
ists appeared to be withdrawing
‘their main forces leaving dete:
‘mined pockets of resistance in
| ‘suicide’ positions,

| Teday'’s advances varied fron
| one mile to two miles but the
American’ 25th Division, which
cro, the river 15 miles east of
| t t held South Koreaty
fea 1, reported a gain of three
| miles,

| The 25th Division also claimed
' casualties inflicted in their sector
| totalled 6,000 dead and wounded
}since yesterday with over 300
; prisoners, An 8th Army spokes-
‘man dealing with the front gener-
, ally, said opposition was “light to
moderate.”

| He said Australians and Cana-
|dians of the (British Common
| wealth Brigade a‘ivanced on the
‘central front without resistance
| Earlier reports from the front
jsaid these troops were fighting
j bitterly to dig out deeply en-
; trenched Communists immediately
Inorth of the Yongduri-Hoengsony
| lateral highway to the east of the
American sector.

These reports said Communists
ithrew back every attack

1 On the left flank of the
Americans nearer Seoul reconnais
sgpce missions probed across the
Ham at two points but were
thrown back,

South Koreans Pushed Back

In the eastern sector of the
central front North Koreans
forced South Korean elements

back a short distance

Genera) MacArthur's Commun
ique this morming said Communist
casualties in the past 24 hour
were estimated to have been
among the heaviest of the whole
Korean campaign, Fighters and
medium bombers combined,
American, Australian and South
African air forces, flew 700 sorties
in excellent flying weather today,

Pilots claimed to have killed or
wounded about 500 troops and
damaged or destroyed nearly 100
vehicles carrying troops or sup-
plies.

Superfortresses of the America’
Far Easi air force made a heavy
raid on Chung Chow important
Communist military supply ane
distribution centre about 30 miles
‘north of the Central front line.



' They dropped over 200 tons of
{itigh explosive. They were wv:
| challenged by aircraft or anti
| aireraft fire,

| —Reuter.



| ¢ Japs Will Hang

|

AUSTRALASIA, March 3
An Aus-ralian War Crimes

!Court here today sentenced sev-

}@n former members of the Im-

| perial Japanese Navy to death by

| hanging for mass execution of 24

Australian and allied prisoners
| of war

| Two cher Japanese were sen-
| tenced to lif? imprisonnent and

three to 1 years ‘on the same
| charge the mass execution took

place at Colpang, Dutch T mo:
in 1942

The Court has now sentenced
13. Jovanese war criminals to

death by hanging. They are kep*
jin solitary confinement pending

| ecnfirme jon of sentence by thé
Australian Government.

The Government has not vet
confirmed a death sentence but
has commuted one to life im-
prisonment.

—Reuter.

Meat And Trade Talks
BUENOS AIRES, March 8
British and Argent
appeared satisfied with the openin
phase of meat and talk

which were renewed here thi

ine delegate



rade

| week.—Reuter,

enn

THE WAR









THIS IS WHAT the field looked like during the 15th race yesterday when the horses were coming around the bend by the Drill Hall,



U.N. troops make
further gains

GAR



PRICES FIVE. “CENTS
FRA ICE Queuille asking* for

wa
confidence voté™

DEAL

Cuba Can
Undersell

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 2

CONDEMNATION of the British Government's

attitude in dealing with the West Indies over
the question of sugar contracts is made today by
the Empire Industries Association and the British
Empire League in their monthly bulletin. The
President of the League is former Secretary of
State for the Colonies, Mr. L. S. Amery and among
the Vice-Presidents is Lord Lyle.

Dealing generally with the subject of Canada-We
indies trade, the bulletin tells English readers that the wer








created anomalies which were hard to overcom«
It goes on tt ay th he tua-
’ . tion ‘was> ni ne ed. by.’ the
M.Ps Enquire Into \\°) 8 88 Raitian
> ne | Gover when negotiating
Castries Fires | ioowterm purchase ot West Indian
i} sugar to guarantee puri e of le
, whole crop
Grenada Riot In these cireumstance the bul-
(From Our Own Correspondent) | letin adds, it is not surprising t
LONDON, March 8 Canada hag held herself free to do
Questions relating to the second] the same, But if this procedure
——_ {Castries fire and recent outbreaks | is carried out the effect will be
in Grenaca will be asked in Par-| that Cuba having discharzed her
k ; liament next week United State contract will be
: Castries questions are designed | #ble * nig ! pk the aa aacat
, [ to discover how the second fire | Sugar both in ACA AINE vad
Confidence Vote was able to take such a hold in| “With the result that both prefer
PARIS, March 8. | View of the lessons learned fol | ©)¢* ey jon ee aS areas =
The, formation of a new lowing the 1948 outbreak West Ii die il be no better off
French Government appeared as- They are being asked by Mi t Yn cnet Mig Ment:
(sured tonight when Radical! Peter Smithers, Chairman of the|‘ !
ileader Henri Queuille announced| B-W.1. sub-Committee of the Oppo World Price
}he would ask the Assembly to| Sition Imperial Affairs Committee, rs
iinvest him with. the premiership| He will ask Mr, James Griffith It further said that to call
fin two _ questions scheduyd] the Cuban price “world price” is
He notified the Speaker to} for next Wednesday, firstly what], complete misnomer in these cit
summon deputies to meet to give| measures were taken to improve} eymstances
him a vote of confidence, the efficiency of the fire service The bulletin supperts the view
c in Castries after the first fire, and expressed |} Lord Lyle to his
A Government majority assur secondly, if he will make a state-} ed Queuille they would vote foi] ment onthe second fire on March is no justification whatever fe
3 mig eae tomorrow, thus) 5, the United Kingdom purchase of
virtually uaranteeing the re- “ , ' : ‘sO ions
quisite absolute majority "| Mr, Smithers also refers to the| Pein sugar in these conditions,

Queuille will form his Cabinet
during the weekend. Most ot
his ministers will be the same as
in the outgoing Pleven Cabinet
and will occupy the same posts
with Robert Schumer as Foreign
Minister.

Concessions by Radicals about] request to Mr. Griffiths to review

changes in the election system
appear. to have helped solve the
deadlock that provoked the resig-

nation of France’s _ thirteenth
postwar Cabinet eight days ago. |
—Keuter.

No Gags

THE TIMES and the
commented to-day that th
Argentine Government of t
Prensa would be foolish.

/

The Tinies said the Argentine
[crovernment’s grievance against
‘che paper had still not been pub-

icly disclosed and added: “The
Ciovernment is doing more harm
to its own good name by these
;«cts of oppression, than coulu

possibly be done by the indepen-
ident news reporting it seems de-
{ser .nined to silence”

The article said that with its
bigh standing wherever news-
| Papers are read and compered, La
{4'rensa had done much for the
credit o Argentina in the world.

“Its independent existence is an
weset to the régime that allows it,
and though irritations may come
to authority through reporting
unpalatable truth, authority—in
ary country—is to bear them
gracefully,” the Times ended,
The Yorkshire Post said:

La Prensa’s fault was that it
was a fearless critic of the present
tcgime, It was not a violent critic:
ut it told the truth and that pn





enough.”

It added: “The whole story is be-
ginning to unfold, Absolute Gov-
ernment takes ,ower; it blunders;
mut siace it is committed to the
pretence of infallibility, the only
press if can tolerate is one willing
te play the game of exclaiming
at the splendour of the Emperor's
ciothes—though in fact they may
be non-existent,”

The Post said it was also a lesson
for people in Britain and ended:
“As far as the Argentine is con-
cerned, we hope that La Prensa
may ke restored to life. Its perma.
nent end would be a bad omen for |
the future cf ovolitical life in}
the Republic.’—Reuter,. |





‘Panama Bark
Closed

PANAMA, March 8

| Panama's only private bank, |
|The Panama Trust Company did}
jnot open its doors today follow- |
i Court order last n‘ght to}





| suspend its .cperations temporar-
pily. 1
|. Bank directors had informed
|Panamenian authorities that ite |
feash holding were dangerously
{iow as the result of abnormal
wither als yosterday
| The bank weatherod severe
wm last December, thanks to
Government help but it has beer
reported thet the ¢ nment has
now decided to withdraw it up-



| port —Reuter

| With



Truth Must Be Told

_ (La Prensa has not appeared since news vendors boy-
; cotted the paper on January 26).

whiist one penny-worth of Empire

recent outbreaks in Grenada in a sugar remains unsold

third question in which he says
that the Colony has suffered per-
manent damage to its economy in
view of the diminished confidence
which investors and
others will now view it,
He will couple thig

“The welfare of the British West
Indies is not the responsibility. of
Canada but it is definitely that of
the United Kingdom” the bulletin
concludes “and should such a sit-
mation ginderseiling by Cuba
occur, fhe burden of relieving
Wes 1 itHervemaiaet agteryy
properly fall upon Great Britain,
so that all parties in this triang
ular situation would in the end
Be worse off.”

with a

the provision made for maintain-
ing law and order throughout the
West Indies with a view to en-
suring that there is no repetition
of outbreaks either in Grenada
or elsewhere,



Egypt Will Relax

CAIRO, March 8
Egypt announced today that she
would relax ‘unnecessary formali-

On Press

ties” in the Suez Canal while

maintaining the right to search
LONDON March 8. ships to bar contraband from

reaching Israel,—Reuter,

Conservative Yorkshire Post
e permanent closure by the
he independent newspaper La

a yt te

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



_————.



WINE

—the true spirit of the
grape is accepted the
world over as the right
to






PD BHKOWN

rE Ce. Yy 4
diy ms

i accompaniment
| gracious living.

Paarl Tawny
Wemmersock
Pale Dry Sherry

Distributors

R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd

Make your choice—
K. W. V.
|

ere

ms
PAGE TWO
ab
MERRILI

owne of ¢

f
of

Me CHARLIE E
- Ne York

i, St. Thomas



whe
? November

holida left yesterd for the
vin Puerto Rico, by B.W.1.A
\ rill is a partner of Mer-
*h and Co., and a Direc-
of Patchogue—Plymouth Mills

as, been

ince 1950 on





@ Banker by profession
Seawell to * him off were
Mr. and Mrs, Colles Coe

1066 And All That

PYONIGHT at 8.30 o’tlock in the



Coliege Hall, the pupils of
Harrison College are going to give
us their interpretation of that
well known farce on English His-
tory, “1066 And All That”

Performances of this kind by
the College boys are always of
a high standard and their effort
tonight promises to be no excep-
tion,

Proceeds from the play will
help finance a Harrison College




Sports Team on a visit to Queen's
Royal College in Trinidad

Will Helo Tourism
NTRANSIT through Barbados
yesterday by B.W.I.A. on his
way to St. Lucia from Trinidad
was Mr. George Roddam, Deputy
Manager of Colonial Development
Corporation’s Engineering Division
His headquarters are in Jamaica.
Mr. Roddam has just returned
from a visit to British Honduras

where C.D.C’s projects are pro-
gressing satisfactorily The Cor-
poration, he said, is at present

erecting a 25-bedroom hotel in that
colony which will fill a great need,
particularly for the Tourist Indus-
try.

Mr. Roddam who at one time
used to live in Barbados, told Carib
that he had recently returned from
England where his daughter Sonj2
Mrs, Roddam is at

is at school.
present in Jamaica,
From St. Lucia Mr. Roddam

will visit Dominica before return-
ing to Jamaica,

French Honour
R. JACQUES LEGUEBE,
Consul General for France in
Trinidad has bee awarded the
Chavalier of the Legion of Honour
by his Gevernment. Mr, Leguebe
and his family visited Barbados
for a holiday a few months ago.

Signals Officer
ME: R. S. WILLIAMSON, Area
t Signals Officer, International
Acradio Ltd., stationed at 1.A.L.’s
Head Office in Port-of-Spain ar-

rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. Mr. Wil-
liamson who is staying at the

Hotel Royal, returns to Trinidad
to-morrow .

Maths And French

R. ULRIC CRICK who teaches

Mathematics and French at
the St. Vincent Grammar School,
St. Vincent, left yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.I.A. for Martinique.
For the past few weeks Mr, Crick
was holidaying here with relatives.
He expects to stay two yonths in
Martinique. He is on ‘long leave.

Trinidad Arrivals

MONG ‘the arrivals from Trini.
‘ dad yesterday morning by
B.W.I.A, were Mr. Alfonso B.
de Lima, Mr. Ted Benjamin and
Mr. Cuthbert Marshall Mr.
George de Nobriga arrived from
Trinidad on Wednesday.

New Exhibition

FTPCHE new exhibition at the Bar-

bados Museum, which opens
to-morrow and continues for one
month, will be a retrospective col-
lection of paintings by Harold C.

Connell,
M*: ANSCELL PAYNE was
among the passengers leav-
ing yesterday on B.W.1.A.’s An-
tigua flight. Anscell is on his way
to St. Kitts where he: has been
transferred .to Barclays Bank's
Basseterre Branch.

Transferred

ne a ee



in every
tad



break fast
that builds! Save ’em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

TY Hiloggs

CORN FLAKES
today!

BeueBpeea i
8 Vew 36 in. EASTER footal
Dress Assortment

@ “Cordrosa”

“Invictaray ”
Slipper Satin,

Vial 4606






MAROCAIN,
EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Calling B



MR. CHARLES MERRILL—left
yesterday for the U.S.
Back To Antigua
R. CHARLIE WARREN who
had been in Barbados for
the past six weeks on holiday,
returned to Antigua yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. Mr. Warren
is Manager of Bennett Bryson’s
Bottling Works in St. John’s An-
tigua. He was staying with his
parents Mr. and Mrs. C. S. War-
ren of “Wyndal”, Rockley.
Short Visit
R. JOHN LAW,. representa-
tive of Spencer Kirton
and Co, in Trinidad who was in
Barbados on a short visit, left yes-
terday for Antigua by B.W.LA,.
From there he will visit Jamaica
and British Honduras before re-
turning to Trinidad.

To Study Nursing
ISS NAN GRANNU\M, daugh-
ter of Dr. and Mrs, F. N.
Grannum of “Monteith”, Bar-
barees, is on her Way to England
to study nursing at Clayton Hos-
nital, Wakefield, Yorkshire. She
left last week by the Golfito.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY MARCH 9, 1951



£30 a.m,

7.00 am. The News, 7.10 a.m, News
Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials,
7.25 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m,
What Is Psychology, 7.50 a.m, Interlude,
4.00 a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 8.45 a.m.
Humour, 9.00 a.m.The News, $10 a.m.
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close

— 2.45 pm. 19.976 M.





Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
11.25 a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 11.46 a.m.
World Affairs, 12.00 (noon) The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis 12.15 p.m.
Close Down

4156.40 p.m. 19.76 M.



p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m
Let's Make Music, 6.00 p.m. Merchant
Newsletter, 6.15 p.m. What Is



. 2.64 M. & 312 M



6.35 p.m. Interlude, 6.45 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News, 7,10
p.m, News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian
Diary, 7.45 p.m. Think on These Things
746—11.00 p.m. 31.32 M, & 48.43 M
$00 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 6.15 p.m
English Magazine, 8.45 p.m, Composer of
the Week, 9 p.m, World Affairs, 9.15 p.in,
Let's Make Music, 10.00 p.m, The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m,
Communism in Practice, 10.30 pgm. Melody
on Strings, 10.45 p.m, The Debate Con+
tirues, 11.00 p.m. Ring up the Curtain





LONDON, March 2
A faint winter mist curled
around the trees in the Mal] this
morning when the King held the
third and = largest of the
New Year Investitures. But the
sun came out from behind the
clouds as the crowd collected
outside the newly-painted, gold-
tipped railings of Buckingham
Palace.
Each

carried a
card. “Entry from 10 a.m,” it
read. There were mothers and
fathers, aunts and uncles, sisters.
girl-friends and children, fo
€ach person receiving a decora-
tion is given two tickets for re-
lations or friends,

There are several changes from

person pink
& -¢



pre-war tradition in today’s in-
vestitures. No longer need the
men attending the first investi-

ture of a series wear the expen-
sive Levee dress—knee-breeches,
silk stockings, and buckle shoes
— nor is a tail-coat and topper
a necessity, And in the old days

relatives stayed outside the
palace. Now wartime practice
of admitting two relatives or

friends with each
been continued.

Ot all the Palace functions.
this one has its own, particular
atmosphere, There is none of
the high-pitched excitement of
the Presentation Courts, with
car-loads of debutantes in sweep-
ing hats and fluffy frocks, escor-
ted by fluttered mothers, nor is
there that air of ‘“We-Know-
Everyone-Here” as at the Diplo-
matic Courts. These are the
people who have had their great-
ness thrust upon them.

An Ordeal

For many of them it is rather

recipient has

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ify

an ordeal “V.C’s have
known to say that it was
than winning the thing”

The gates were late in opening
this morning, and the queue wag
restive. A mounted policeman
cantered up and down. A shabby
little man joined the end of the

been
worse

queue. Five minutes later he
wandered away -- perhaps he
thought it was for cheap cigar-
ettes,

“Oh Alf, I wish I hadn't come!
I do honest! Fancy having to go



MAY

lead away. Relations and friends
filed up the curve of the Grand
Staircase, and through the long
glass-ceilinged picture gallery with

dignified Van Dyck portraits.

Scarlet and Gold

State Livery Porters wore scar-
let and gold, red-coated musicians
played persuasive music from the
roinstrel gallery and there were
great rose - erystal chandeliers
hanging from an embellished eeil-
ing. A rather head-masterly

at

and sit all on my own,” a cor- admiral bustled everyone into the
poral’s wife was Saying. “Well, umes of little gilt chairs, or to
think about me, having to go up red silk seats along the wall,
there”, her husband retorted. In another stateroom the recipi-

Small boys had their hair cots were marshalled into the cor-
combed, and were told to “Keep rect order. A small metal hook
still” The lady behind was was attached to each man or
explaining how she bought her woman’s coat, so that the King
Sutfit, can easily hang on the cross or

“And I told Maud I must have
a lhilac hat,” she said. The gates
were opened, and the policemen
checked the pink tickets. An ad-
miral, rather late, strode up with

medal.

The beef-eaters, looking like the
cpening of a Shakespeare play,
raarched in and took their places
in front of the twin thrones below
the Royal Arms of England em-

that quarter-deck lureh, his ladies+})azoned on the crimson draperies

pattering along behind him.

Suddenly the musicians, who had

sun glinted on service insignia }cen faithfully throvgh theie gar-

There were salutes on all sides
“Good morning, Sir!” and “Hullo
there, Jenkins!”

“There was a sort of pinky oF
in Selfridges, but it, didn’t fiff
said the lady behind.

“Decorations on the
please,” said the policeman.

“When do we see the King,
Mummy,” said the small girl in a
red cout.

Then into a marble-and-goid
entrance hall, with its dark red
carpets and indirect lighting round
the frieze, the recipients were

right

SSPSOSS OPS SSS S99 SSS SOS OSS OO SOP IOOOS
THEATRE

FPRID.—SUN. 8.30

ist Port SERIAL

‘“* GHOST
ZORRO ”’

with CLAYTON MOOR
PALMER BLAKE

of

POOR

s

O

R
PLCS ESSE LEP PF PACA

PRID.—SUN. 8.30
‘* TARNISHED ”’

Don't Miss this Double

SAT. 12 P M. MIDNIGHT MAT

‘FIGHTING SEABEES’

“OUT OF THE STORM”



GLOBE

OPENING TO-DAY & CONTINUING









ta ae

(URIYERSAL INTERNATIONAL presents

+ sans STEMART
© Shelley WINTERS |
Dan DURYEA |

Stephen McNALLY

e

with MILLARD



PLUS

FITZ HAREWOOD —

LEROY ALLEN —

Pit 16 House 30





f

PO

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and
Continuing
Universal International
Presents . 3
Yvonne De CARLO
Richard GREENE in

“THE DESERT HAWK”

with Jackie Gleason
and Lois Andrev



Special Saturday Morning
Show at 9.30

“BILL and C00”

AND

“SHERIFF of WICHITA”

Starring
Allan (Rocky) LANE

ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Whole Serial

“DAUGHTER of DON Q”



Starring Adrian BOOTH,

Kirk ALYN
with Leroy MASON
and Roy BANCROFT

Lystav,

fine draping corded crepe

Printed rayon — white grounds

White
5 NEW

(at

in’<5

Whitfields}

SHADES.

ROYAL

TO-DAY At 4.45 ONLY
The All-Indian Film

“SHEHNATI”
Admission $1.00

TO-NIGHT ONLY AT 8.30
Eagle Lion Double

Scott BRADY and
Jeff CAREY in

“CANON CITY”

AND

“MICKY”

Starring Lois BUTLER
and Bill GOODWIN



OLYMPIC

To-day and Te-morrow 4.36
and 8.15

Republic Smashing Double
Ken Murray's Production

“BILL and C00”

AND

“SANDS of 1WO JIMA”

Starring John WAYNE
and. Adele MARA



aa - — So
BEBABEBEBEEEEE &
Lombia,
Tobralco

Robia

Just arrived

Dial 4220

te Roaring Story of the Gun that Won

MITCHELL » Charles Drake +

Screenplay by ROBERT L. RICHARDS and BORDEN CHASE + Directed hy ANTHONY NANN + Produced by AAROM ROSENBERG’



the West!
ome me 5




aS

John Mclntre « Will Geer «Jay, C. Flipper







TONITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

CLAYTON THOMPSON—All the Time

BYRON ROLLOCK—Bewitchod, Bothered, and Bewildered
DORIAN THOMPSON—Wildest Gal in Town

SAM NILES—“Who Put the Whiskey in The Well”
FELIX STRAUGHN—“Lucky Ole Sun”

EDWARD MARSHALL—Four Winds and Seven Seas

GUEST STARS

Globe’s 1st Super-Star

AND

THE LIL MAN WITH THE HORN

8-year-old Trumpeter

Balcony 40 Boxes 54

Se



c
=

The most Beautiful N
with a world-wide

HARDWOOD CHAIRS
$5.

ITEM YOU HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR.

ONLY

AN



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

COTTON







To-night

CLUB MORGAN

ight €lub from Miami to Rio
reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
En tertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations

.

den-party repertoire of Tchai
kovsky and Johann Strauss, struck
wp the National Anthem, The King
entered in his favourite uniform
cf an Admual of the Fleet,

The Lord Chamberlain, Lord
Clarendon,—grey-bearded, distin-
guished and 72,—read out the
names. The long line filed past.
Kinights knelt before the King to
be touched on the shoulder by
his sword, The rest paced to a
position some four feet in front
of the King, turned to face him,
bowed or curtseyed after shaking-
een rrernriernnctinae eet,

ee cee en

IG ROYAL INVESTITURE

HAZEL

hands, backed three steps, bowed
erd curtseyed again and left the
room. But many forgot to back
away, intent only on escaping
from this intimidating ceremony,
or so bedazzled by the glory of
speaking to their sovereign. Some
back but forgot to bow-——-then re-
membered half-way to the door!
An Advantage

Service training gave the arm-
ed forces the advantage. There
was the smart march forward
the sharp turn, the firm hand-
shake and the routine faultless-
ly earried out. Behind them the
civilians shambled rather self-
consciously. There was a chuckle
for an Army private who came
in as if the ballroom was the
perade-ground. With arms swing-
ing, route march style he nar-
rowly missed a stationary admir-
al, halted, clicked his heels with
a crack that could be heard in
the back row, and came to atten-
tion in front of the King with @
stamp that made chandeliers
tremble.

The old gentleman beside me
saw his wife in the long line.

“Twenty years on committees’,
be ios, me, “The village ae
uri ecedee the *t €
her a Dame”. He Safety Rope
she’s going to be all right. She
doesn’t enjoy the best of health,
you know . . . she’s been wor-
rying for weeks whether she'd
manage to get here”

I saw a white-haired old lady,
very excited, wesring navy-blue
and button shoes,

“If only she'll take it slowly”
groaned her husband, “She's al-
ways been: so impetuous.”

She took it slowly. Her curt-
seys were steadier than most.



JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs Over NEWSAM’S—Lower Broad Street—Tel. 2684

JUST ARRIVED IN

TIME FOR EASTER

Ladies’ Inexpensive AFTERNOON DRESSES
From $18.50 to $24.50



ec elclliaaalall
————————————————————————
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEES ; TODAY &

TOMORROW at 5 p.m.

TONIGHT to SUNDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Margaret Lockwood, Patricia Roc, Dennis Price

Passionate Color by Technicolor

A Gainsborough Picture, Released through Universal-International

‘“‘ JASSY ”

MONDAY & TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE : TUESDAY at 5 p.m.

“THE COUNTESS OF MONTE CRISTO”

Starring Sonja Henie



WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30



with Michael Kirby, Ol#a San Juan, Dorothy Hart

MATINEE : WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.

James

| in
|

Mason, Rosamund John, Pamela

Kelliino

“THE UPTURNED GLASS”







MATINEE March

TO-DAY AT
EMPIRE



visit










76

EACH,

BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB
PRESENTS

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

A MURDER aas geen
ARRANGED

THRILLER

MARCH 15th & 16th 8.30p.m.

BOX OFFICES OPEN











16th 5.30 SHARP



& A.M.
THEATRE





























THE

FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1951



Beans Are Short

Nearly everyday some house-
wives have been going to the De-
partment of Agriculture in an
effort to get “bountiful” beans
which are imported from the
United States.

A shipment of these
expected shortly and everyone 1s
on the alert. At the moment there
is a shortage of these beans and
some shops which have them are
selling them at a greater price than
they are sold at the Department.

Greater demand by housewives
have aggravated the shortage and
on the arrival of the last ship-

t there was such a rush that
all the beans were sold out quickly.
Late buyers were disappointed.

beans is

There is also a shortage of but-_

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)



TODAY and Continuing Daily

Wemen 4.45 pom.

“THE STORY OF

By Special Request

Ingrid BERGMAN - Bing CROSBY

2 Riz Action Hits fram RKO Radio
2 Biz Action TRAIL STREET” = &

Warner Bros, New Action Hit!

~MIDNITE SAT. 10th

“ANGELS ALLEY”

RKO Radio's Big Action Double!

CRIMINAL COURT

Tom Conway & Martha O'Driscoll



Sovial Guidance Enterprises presents

Leo GORCEY & the BOWERY BOYS

TODAY To SUNDAY 6.30 p.m





ter beans which are grown locally.
Only a few trays contained some
yesterday and it is believed that
the condition of the weather at
the moment is responsible for the
shortage.

RADIO TALKS

RIO DE JANEIRO, March &
Wireless broadcast stations of all
Western Hemisphere countries—
except Argentine—will be repre-
sented at the second General As-
sembly of the “Association Inter-
Americana De Radio” to be held
in Sao Paulo between 19th to
3lst Martech, said Felix Muguriza,
the Association's President. Some
4,000 stations from the American
continent will be represented at
this year’s Assembly, he added.

—Reuter.









(Sorry separate audiences only)

Age-limit 16 years and over

— Men 8.50 p.m.

BOB ano SALLY”

TO-DAY 2.30 p.m
“IN BELLS OF ST. MARY'S”

MATINEE TOMORROW (SAT) 9.30 am, & 130 p.m

“AVENGING RIDER"

Randolph Seott Tim Holt
PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

‘TODAY and Continuing Daily 5 & 8.30 p.m.

“RETURN of the FRONTIERSMAN ”

Color by Technicolor
with Gordon Mec Rae, Julie London, Rory

Calhoun

{A Monogram Double)
& “BLACK MIDNIGHT"
Roddy McDowell & Lynne Thomas



GATETY—( HE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

MAT. SUN. 5 p.m

& BACK to BATAAN

John Wayne & Anthony Quinn

MIDNITE SAT. 10th RKO Technicolor Special !
Douglas Fairbanks Jnr. & Maureen O'Hara in

“SINBAD the SAILOR”

=







WARNING IIS
POSITIVELY No CHILDREN Allowed!
Age Limit 16 YEARS and over!

‘ST HOw Mac TRUTH

CAN YOU STAM?

Gh
A:
err ttt mri la





aD



F

3
ce

Sy IL AT

i





Pett r 77

Are you making

same mistake Mr. end
(Mis. Wright did in be~
| Hipving you tan keen
vour children innocent
through ignorance..?
* Gon’ you believe it?








WOMEN

and Girls 16

years & over
4.45 PM.

MEN

and Boys 16
years & over

8.30 P.M.
Please Remember
UCU EM eae eck ce Be
pathos and tenderness that
will haunt you for weeks!
Ue ee td 7a
PICTURE EVER FILMEDK,

SHOWN TO SEPARATE AUDIENCES: DNLY!?

IN AGREEMENT THAT THIS FILM BE SHOWN ARE... .
The B’dos Board and Film Censors—Director of Medical
Services Doctors and others too numerous to mention!

TO-DAY (FRIDAY 9th) and Continuing Daily
Regular ADULT PRICES ONLY





MURRAY'S

MILK

STO

STRENGTHENING

TO THE LAST DROP

Recommended



-FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED
RECENTLY





STOUTEST OF

by the Faculty

UT

ALL

*




FRIDAY, MARCH 9,

1951

My Impressions Of First Charles Beats
Day Jamaica-B.G. Test Joe Walcott

By O. S.

I WAS not prepared for the spectacle of a tremendous

COPPIN
KINGSTON, March 4,

ON POINTS

DETROIT, March 8.
For some seconds in the fourth

crowd overflowing all vantage points of the Sabina Park round of the World Heavyweight

field here when I made my way to the Press Box yesterday
lay in the first ever British Guiana-Jamaica
ournament on Jamaican soil.

to record the

Intercolonial

I was informed that the takings
passed the £750 mark and this did
not include season tickets. How-
ever it was estimated at 10,000 and
for me, I think that 10,000 was a
conservative estimate.

Green Wicket

What struck me most forcibly
at once as soon as play had started
was the greenness of the wicket
and the amount of bounce which
the bowlers were getting off the
pitch.

This was made to measure for
the fast medium inswingers of
Berkeley Gaskin and the occasion-
al cut back from the leg for which

he is well noted and the cut backs ©
from the off for which John Trim |

is equally noted,

I was not surprised when the
Jamaican openers fell with only 11
runs on the tins but Rickards, with
his high correct backlift and per-

fect balance, stemmed the tide ina |:

most promising manner and was |

unfortunate to have got a really
good one from Gaskin when only
one ball away from the luncheon
interval.

The Headley Pattern

J. K, Holt, Jnr., whom I saw bat
for the first time is like the major-
ity of young Jamaican batsmen
modelled along the lines of George
Headley—two-eyed stance and a
wealth of onside strokes.

He was the model of patience
until he passed forty when he
threw caution to the winds and
attempted to force the pace before
he was out after he had given two
possible chances to B.G, to claim
his wicket. His 63 was only im-
pressive up to 40 but I am expect-
ing much more from him before
the tour ends.

Uncertain

Neville Bonitto, who top-scored
with 82 seemed to me always like-
ly to get out. He is an exhilar-
ating batsman but with no
appreciable restraint on his nat-
ural impetuosity. He would make
a copy-book cover drive off one
ball, sweep to the square-leg
boundary magnificently for four,
and then get one off the inside
or outside edge of his bat.

He is a useful man in a Colony
team but he would be the first
to admit that he is no candidate
for West Indies honours. Binns
is the same indifferent batsman
that I found him to be in Trini-
dad last year. I have not yet
seen him in action behind the
wickets but it is certain that even
if he is good enough to challenge
other candidates for the job of
assistant wicket-keeper, that his
weakness in the batting depart-
ment will weigh heavily against

him.
Mudie’s Duck

Mudie will dab inquiringly at
the ball pitched on his off-stump
or just outside for that matter
but which is moving towards the
slip and more than one slip fields-
man has blessed him for giving
them a chance to bring off a catch
of which every notice and inten-
tion has already been given by
the manner in which Mudie shuf-
fles across his wicket to push at
them.

He played that stroke to a Gas-
kin outswinger and he returned
to the pavilion caught by Leslie
Wight in the slip for a duck.

Johnson’s and Goodridge’s in-
nings will long live in my memory
especially coming after the re-
strained and over careful atmos-
phere of the Barbados-Trinidad
Tests at Kensington,

A Long-Handle Attack

Imagine two tall six-footers
attacking a new ball each with
the long handle and forcing West
Indies pacers like Gaskin and
Trim, who had been on the spot
all day to change their tactics and
set a defensive field to them.

No Edges

Fifty-seven runs in 26 minutes
for the ninth wicket was the toll

-

B. McG, GASKIN
—who took 7 wkts. in the game

they took in a spate of confident
and forceful batting. There were
no edges about their innings either.
They hit the ball. hand whenever
they. got to-the pitch of'it‘and*were
not afraid to step forward and
catch the pace bowlers on the
volley.

One cover drive by Goodridge
off one well up from Trim could
be claimed without any fear of
embarrassment by any first class
batsman in the game today, and
when Johnson bent his long frame
and swept Trim to the square leg
boundary off one knee for four
runs, even the ranks of Tuscany
could scarce forbear to cheer.

ise B.G. Bowlers

For the British Guiana bowling
I have nothing but praise. On a
new green wicket Gaskin and
Trim could do little wrong. Gas-
kin with six wickets for 54 runs
has at once established strong
claims with the selectors as one of
the bowlers for which they must
be a-looking, a man who can move
the ball in the air and at the same
time maintain a good length with
fast-medium pace bowling. Bed-
ser has done this successfully in

the England-Australia Tests in
Australia.
Trim, I think, was unlucky not

to have got a wicket. He still has
considerable fire but seemed more
to be moving the ball to the slips
for yesterday’s play rather thau
cutting it back from the offi as we
have been seeing him do for some
time now.

Patoir, the 17-year-old St. Stan-
islaus schoolboy, will take more
watching before 1 can pass an
opinion about his bowling. He has
a free easy action and gets a good
break, but I do not know whether
the new wicket has been flattering

However, tomorrow I think Gas-
kin and Trim will dispose of Val-
entine and Johnson to end the
Jamaica innings, and then it will
be interesting to see how the B.G.
batsmen will negotiate Hines
Johnson, Goodridge, Valentine and
Mudie on the responsive Sabina
wicket.

Legal Secretary of Malta
Govt. Found Injured

VALETTA, Malta, March 7,

A. G. Lowe, Legal Secretary
to the Maltese Government was
found injured in a Valetta Street
early on Sunday morning, it was
said today.

The cause of the alleged assault
was unknown.

Lowe, who is 49, went to Malta
in 1949.—Reuter,





BACKGROUND TO

BEAUTY






Championship fight here las
night, Jersey Joe Walcott had the
title in his grasp.

Then Ezzard Charles, holder
according to American recogni-
tion, shook off the effects of a
powerful right to the jaw and
came back to win a unanimous
15
retain the title.

Many of the 13,852 fans dis-
with the decision, and one

cateall after another followed the
announcement, but there was no
doubt about Charles’ superiority.

Walcott, who was down to 13
stone 11 Ibs. was the lightest he
has weighed in four years and he
gave Charles, 29-year-old cham-
pion, and an eight years younger
man, a rare scare in that fourth
round. He caught Charles with
a right to the head and Charles
was staggered.

The echampion'’s legs were “rub-
bery” as he fell into a clinch and
held on, Walcott tried to shake
him off in order to land one clear
blow that could have finished the
fight, but he could not do so,

A minute after the blow had
landed, Charles’ head cleared.
From that time onwards, Charles
was more careful; in fact so cau-
tious that sections of the crowd

during several subsequent
rounds. The champion however
piled up points.

Walcott Down

In the ninth round Walcott
opened up for a while and both
boxers exchanged vicious swings.
Then Charles landed with power-
ful rights to the head and a smash-
ing left hook to the jaw. Walcott
went down for the count of nine,
the only knockdown of the fight,

This was a reversal of the fourth
round, and it was now Charles,
who. swarming after his older foe
tried to land a knockout blow. He
got home with a stream of lefts
and rights that made Walcott’s
knees shake but Walcott kept up-

right.
He lasted out to the end of the
fifteenth round and though

Charles appeared to have won by

a wide margin the crowd waited | declared:

rounds points victory and ;

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

M.C.C. Win Match
Against N. Zealand

By Ten Wickets

AUCKLAND, March 8.
The M.C.C. gave a flying start
to their short New Zealand tour
when they beat Auckland by ten
wickets just after lunch on the
third and final day of their match
here.

Auckland were all out in their
second inmings for 168, leaving
the M.C.C. to get 17 runs to win,

ith a boundary off the wi
hit, the M.C.C. made 20 without
Oss.

Auckland began the day need-
ing 85 runs to avoid an innings
defeat.

Wallace alone had the answer
to the M.C.C. spin attack and hit
eight fours in his 68.

Bowling honours went to Roy
‘Tattersall with five wickets for
33.and Doug Wright with four for
88.

AUCKLAND 18T INNINGS 146

M.C.C, ist INNINGS (for 7 wkts. dec.) 298
AUCKLAND 2ND INNINGS

Scott c. Compton b. Wright 12
Dwyer b, Tattersall 24
Coleman b. Wright +. 26
Wattace ¢. McIntyre b. Statham .., 68
Deas ¢, Meimtyre b. Tattersall .... 2
Cleal b, Tattersall os ‘ 5
Burke lb.w. b. Tattersall... 1
Kent stpd. McIntyre b. Wright ...... 10
Clarke tun Out ..... 66 cic ccreeceee
Cleverley c, Parkhouse b. Wright . 3
Cammish not out . sede uee eo.
Extras; (9 b., 2 n.b.) ve
Total . 168
BOWLING
Oo M. R. W.
Warr . 1 0 4 o
Tattersall 28.3 11 33 5
Wright 26 4 88 4
Compton a“ a 1 2 0
Statham ‘ 3 o 12 1
M.C.C. {ND INNINGS
McIntyre net out < wes 12
arr not out 8
Extras; 0
Total (for no wicket) 20
—Reuter.



Pilgrimage

BRUSSELS.
A 43-year-old Brussels house-
wife arrived back home this week
after walking 5,000 kilometres
(3,125 miles) from Brussels to
Rome for a Holy Year visit. She
“Every woman should

tensely for the decision. As each make this trip on foot. I shall do

official was called,
booed, and when all three were in
the ring and Charles was an-
nounced as winner, they let loose
another torrent of jeers.

This was Charles’ seventh de-
fence of the title since he won it
by beating Walcott when the
championship was declared vacant
after Joe Louis’ retirement. Wal-
cott took Charles the full distance
then and he also went all the way
in two fights with Louis for the
championship. He is the first
heavyweight to be given four
chances at the title.

Louis was at the ringside last
night, and plans are in hand for
the former champion to meet
Charles again, They met last Sep-
tember when Charles won on
points.—Reuter,

Table Tennis
At Y.M.C.A.

The following Inter-Club Divis-
ion II Table Tennis games will be
played at the Y.M.C.A. next
week

Monday: Y.M.P.C. vs. Founda-
tiom and Fox vs. Malvern, 6.00



p-m., Lenville vs. Police and
Aquatic vs, Everton 7.30 p.m,
Thursday: Foundation vs.

Aquatic 6.00 p.m., Lenville vs.
Barna and Police vs. Y.M.C.A.
7.30 p.m,

Saturday: Barna vs. Everton 6
p.m,, Y.M.P.C. vs. Malvern and
Fox vs. ¥Y.M.C.A. 7.30 p.m.



Back To School |

BRISBANE.

Australia’s first free school for

barmaids has opened at a Brisbane

hotel. Lectures are being given

by a publican and a business con-

sultant on efficiency, dress, service
and politeness.

TRAM FARES STEADY

BARCELONA, March 7,

Citizens of Barcelona were
fillmg the city’s tramears. agdin
today after winning their 10-day
battle against fare increases im-
posed by the city’s private utility
company.

After a 10-day public boycott
of trams, and demonstrations in-










the crowd|the same thing again next year.”

&

Â¥

To Mothers
who cannot

feed their babies |

Ban On Overtime
Will Be Lifted
Friday

SYDNEY, March 7.

Australian dockers decided today
to lift their ban on overtime from
8 a.m. on Friday.

The Government, two days ago.
proclaimed a state of emergency
on the waterfront under the
Crimes Act, but it was suspended
until the executive of the Water-
side Workers’ Federation reviewed
the overtime ban.

Australian troops had been
warned to stand by ready to go *o
the wharves and do work refused
by dockers, if the ban on overtime
was not removed.—Reuter

Untapped Reserves

NEW YORK, March 7.

The American Petroleum Insti-
tute and the American Gas Asso-
ciation jointly announced today
that known untapped reserves of
crude oil, natural gas liquids, and
natural gas in the United States
rose to a record level last year.

The significance of the new addi-
tions to proved reserves they
added, was that they increased the
country’s internal strength. .

The report defined “proved re-
serves” as those reserves cf which
lecation and extent had been
proved and measured.

—Reuter.





France Gets $10m.

Contract From Peru

PARIS, March 7.

France has secured another big
industrial contract in Latin
America, this time to build a
#10,000,000 steel plant with a ca-
pacity of 70,000 tons for pig iron
in Peru.

A spokesman of the French en-
gineering industry announced the
contract to-day. France last week
won a $25,000,000 contract to con-
struct Columbia’s first steel com-
bine in the face of strong German
and American competition.

Other French contracts in Latin
America include: the delivery of
90 railway engines to Brazil; the
first will leave on June 1.

The equipment of a Brazilian
Of Refinery will process 6,000
tons of crude petroleum and will
start operating this year.



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The Gift of the year



PAGE THREE



° *

er,

Off To Nigeria

“Temperament, jet inat ‘
and willingness to train hard must ALL OVER THE WORLD.
be a part of any athiete’s make-
up.” This view was recently 2

passed on ‘to British athletes by
MacDonald Bailey, writing in his
sports column in the Sumday Em-
pire News. When I remarked on
it, he said: “I need these things
myself. And Mac is busy training
at the moment before leaving for
Nigeria to compete with athletes
there.

RESEARCH SHIP

REACHES HOBART
HOBART, Tasmania, March 7.
The British research ship Dis-

covery Two has arrived at Hobart
after a five-week cruise of nearly
6,000 miles in the Antarctic.

The leader of the expedition
said the ship reached the outer
pack of ice but could not approach
the Antarctic mainland because of
this ice. |

The ship will sail from Sydney}
for the Falkland Islands by way
of the Pacific on her third voyage
around the Antarctic continent. |





Good mornings begin with Gillette





&
—Reuter =
The Basques who reside
- .
. 8 Now shave off their beards
In Carlisle Bay ith the ‘ c
.
M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Gloria Henrietts w t grea est o ease 5
M.V. Caribbee, Sch. Adalina, Sch, Marea
Henrietta, Yacht Caribbee, Sch. Adalina You also should share the
‘ch. Burma D,, Sch. Henry D, Wallace
ich. Lady Noeleen, Sch, Laudaipha, Sch 9,
Enterprise Ss MV Lady Jos Seh improvement they’ve made
‘yYelorama O., Sch. Belqueen, Sch
Philip MH, Davidson, Sch, May Olive, Sch By using ‘ond
Marion Belle Wolfe. the wi erful
ARRIVALS
Schooner Gardenia W,, 48 tong net, Blue Gillette Blade
Capt. Wallace, from Trinidad
SS. Sundial, 1,652 tons net, Capt
Herne, from wee. ae
‘TURES ¢ ~
Schooner United Pilgrim S.. 47 tons Sharpest ever made, Blue
net, Capt, Stuart, for St. Lucia -
M.V. Daerwood, 94 tons net, Capt Gillette Blades are also the most
Mulzac, for St, Vincent
Schooner Emanuel C. Gordon, 63 tons “ ic ee .
net, Capt. Patrice, for Trinidad economical because they last
8.8. Sundial, 1,652 tons net, Capt

Herne, for British’ Guiana, so long. Naturally they are

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Lid
advise that they cam now corm»unicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station:—

M.V. Pathfinder, s.s. Alcoa Partner, s.9
Bayano, s,s, Solster, Planter

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Memphis, s.s. Canabull, 5.5, Oakhill, s.s.

Raban, ss, Castilloceca, ss. Imperial

Toronto, s.5, Regent Tiger, sa. Baochus, GEDDES GRANT LIMITED

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MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Dominica, Montserrat
Antigua, St, Kitts, Nevis, by the MV
Caribbee will be closed at the General
Post Office as under: —

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Retistered Mai!
at 1.30 p.m, Ordinary Mail at 2.90 pin
jon the 9th March.

} Mails for British Guiana by the Sch.
‘Philip H_ Davidson will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:

FACTORY MANAGERS

Tak« this opportenity of obtaining your requis ments in :—
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Maren. At PRICES that cannot be repeated. ;
;
RATES OF EXCHANGE
RCH 8, 1951 *
011/094 pe. CneANABA The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.
toe 62 8/10% pr,
Aan WHITE PARK ROAD, MICHAEL
Drafts 62.65% pr ¥ ne 7
Anne Sight Drafts 625/10 pr
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», Coupons 60 6/10% pr
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THE LADIES’
EYES WILL
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AT THE

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cluding the explosion of small
bombs by students, it was an-
nounced yesterday that fares
would be restored to their old
level. —Reuter.




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PAGE FOUR

05


Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd. Broad &t., Bridectows.

Friday, March 9, 1951



Extended Powers

THE suggestion made by the Acting
Attorney General at the opening of the
Court of Grand Sessions that the law
should be amended to give Magistrates
jurisdiction to try and dispose of many of
the cases which are tried at the Assizes
will be generally welcomed.

It however focuses attention on a condi-
tion which now exists in the magisterial
courts throughout the island and which has
given rise to much public dissatisfaction.
The number of cases which now come on
the Cause List of these courts take an un-
usually long time to be adjudicated. The
number of adjournments extend the time
between the lodging of the case and its
final adjudication to months.

This causes a loss of time and many days’
pay not only to the litigants but to the wit-
nesses who must attend the court on each
oceasion the case is called vafter adjourn-
ment, The penalty for failure to attend is
detention until the date of hearing and
although this penalty has been rarely en-
forced, Magistrates are entitled to use this
punitive measure to ensure attendance.
Some people travel long distances and at
great inconvenience to attend cases in
which they are litigants or witnesses and
more often than not, the excuse for another
adjournment is the alleged inability of
Counsel to attend on that particular date.

For some time this practice was indulged
in by counsel in Trinidad until one strong
member of the Bench pointed out to Coun-
sel that if they could not attend on a date
fixed by the Court it was their duty to
hand over their brief to some other coun-
sel. :

The present situation can be remedied in
Barbados, and indeed it should be before
any more authority is entrusted to the
Magistrates. It must be admitted that the
proposal to widen the scope of their juris-
diction will not add:to the number of cases
because the same number would have been
lodged for preliminary investigation, but
it would reduce considerably the number
of cases which now find their way on the
Calendar and which occupy the time of the
Chief Justice when they could have been
disposed of otherwise. Another consider~
ation is that it will reduce considerably the.
cost of these trials at the Assizes when hun-
dreds of witnesses must be paid; and
although the administration of justice can-
not be measured in termsof money, its cost
must be a faetor for consideration.

If for no other reason than that it must
focus public attention on unsatisfactory
conditions in the Magisterial courts and
also reduce the length of time in which liti-
gants will have cases hanging over their
heads, the proposal of the Acting Attorney
General should be given immediate and
serious consideration.



Plane Service

IT WAS announced last’month by Brit-
ish West Indian Airways that there would
be some reduction in their schedules of
planes accommodating the islands in the
West Indies. The reduction has now come
into force.

In order to justify the cut in the services
it was given as a reason that the planes
now operate with 55% of the passenger
space taken.

Two days ago a visitor from Trinidad
holidaying in this island received an urgent
cable to return home. Immediately the vis-
itor communicated with the local office of
B.W.1.A. asking for a passage. In answer it
was pointed out that it was quite impossi-
ble to get any passage before Saturday
without communicating with Trinidad and
that even then it was most unlikely. The
hope was held out;.however, that if they
cabled Trinidad it might be possible to get
a passage some time next week,.

In view of the statement made by
B.W.LA. as the reason for the curtailment
of the service, it seems strange that within
a week, visitors from other islands are
being inconvenienced.



Our Readers Say: —





international Bank President EJGENE R. BLACK Discusses:

Investment In Eeonomic


























ECONOMIC development, as a
term, has been much in fashion
recently. As a process, itis nothing
new. In the past 150 years devel-
opment has proceeded very
rapidly in certain parts of the
world—in Western Europe, in
Japan, in Argentina, Uruguay,
Southern Africa, Australia and
New Zealand, and above all, in
North America.

In these countries a high stan-
dard of living has been achieved
and a large store of capital built
up in spite of the great dissipation
of assets in war, particularly the
two World Wars.

In the rest of the world, where
three-quarters of its population
lives, there has also been some
ogress. But progress has real-
iy touched only a fringe. As the
standard of living of the world
has advanced, the gap between the
highest level and the lowest has
widened.

Why this disparity should have
arisen is disputed. Some attrib-
ute it to superior thrift, industry
and initiative; others say that the
less developed nations have been
cruelly exploited. This is a futile
argument, The real question is
how to prevent the disparity from
widening further.

The poorer a country is, the less
it can afford waste and the more
careful it must be to husband its
resourres and use them to best
advantage. Idleness, inefficiency,
and corruption can be tolerated
least of all in a poor country. And
so the most necessary forerunner
of development may well be the
kind of domestic action that hard-
ly. costs.any money at all. Very
often the tax system needs over-
hauling in order that the rich may
bear their proper share of the
burden. The power of particu-
lar labour unions may need curb-
ing. The monetary system may
need tighter control to prevent
inflation.

Of all of the reforms which we
consider to be desirable, reform
of land tenure, however difficult
to achieve, is probably the most
important.

The.need for land reform is
widespread, because the whole
basis of development is the land.
Its effect on development might
be remarkable, for, if people are
freed from the deep-rooted con-
viction that, whatever they do,
they cannot prosper by their own
efforts, they may show initiative
in far greater abundance than we
suspect they possess.

Many U.S, missions have been
sent to less developed countries,
to.take inventory, so to speak, of
the entire nation’s resources and
needs, It is the hope that these
missions will help the countries
to plan their development pro-
grammes efficiently and to obtain
for them widespread publie sup-

port. ;
A programme is not, of course,



IT IS a good old British tradi-
tion that when in doubt you set
up a committee. A committee can
do anything, from providing knit-
ted comforts for refugees to rais-
ing funds to repair the cricket
pavilion roof,

It can also decide to choose the
Supreme Commander of the North
Atlantic — an appointment which
had Mr. Attlee wriggling in the
House of Commons — and drew
from Mr. Churchill the comment:
‘I congratulate the Prime Minis-
ver on how much more he knows
about the subject today than he
did last time it was raised.”

It is all our own fault. During
the war it was the British who
gradually taught the Americans
that you can even plan global
strategy on the committee. system.
The Americans started as reluc-
tant pupils, but they came to see
the merits of the method.

They quickly spotted that we
had generations of experience be-
bind us in the committee game.

Being rapid learners, and adap-
table by nature, they have con-
tinued to perfect their committee
technique since the war.

We, in contrast, have not.

Result’ In the most committee-
ridden organisation of modern
times, the North Atlantic Treaty
Organisation, the British Govern-
ment has made a blunder which
would have brought a blush to the
cheeks of the members of the
perks committee in a small town.

Ask anyone...

There lies the root of the trou-
ble over the “Supreme” naval
appointment.

The Gbvernment blandly as-
sumed that beceuse there are
1%.members on most N.A.T.O.
committees, the opinions of all 12
members carried equal weight,

For example, that Portugal, Ice-
land, or Luxemburg had as much



Development

enough; it has to be financed.
With their small stock of capital
and their low income, it is clear
that the less developed countries
could progress only gradually if
they had to rely on their own
savings alone, however wisely
they might be invested. It would
take decades to make a noticeable
impression on their poverty. In
fact, in countries where the pop-
ulation is increasing rapidly, it
would be all they could do to pre-
vent the standard of living from
falling.

In order to accelerate the pro-
cess Of development, these coun-
tries require capital from abroad.
There is hardly a case in the past
where the early stages of a coun-
try’s development have not been
carried out with the help of for-
eign capital; and almost always
private investors provided the
funds. .

It usually takes a long time for
the very large investments which
have to be made to bear fruit.
During that time the country will
receive little additional income



been Presi-
dent of the International’ Bank for
Reconstructiqn and Development
since July 1, 1949. His long career

Eugene R. Black has

in investment banking included
positions with several leading
American banks, Mr. Black first
became associated with the Inter-
national Bank in 1947 when he
was appointed Executive Director
for the United States. At that
time he resigned his post as senior
vice president of the Chase
National Bank of the City of New
York, The International Bank
was established under provisions
of the Bretton Woods Agreement
of 1944 to make Joans to assist in
the reconstruction and develop-
ment of member nations.

Ss

and may at the same time be pay-
ing interest on borrowed money.
In fact, some investments may
never bear fruit. Human plan-
ning will always be imperfect,
depending as it does on numerous
unknown quantities.

If past experience is any guide,
some peoples can become adept in
agriculture, commerce, or industry
ina remarkably short time, while
others seem to resist change.
However, even if people respond
to education and opportunity and
become proficient, for example, in
some branch of agriculture, they
may one day find their livelihood
menaced. Their crops may be
attacked by disease. The devel-
opment of substitute . materials
may cut off the demand for their
products. Or conditions elsewhere
in the world may be found to
favour production at much lower
cost. The history of agriculture
is studded with examples of un-
foreseeable shifts of this kind.
And similar risks apply to mining,
industry, and even transpo.tation.
But all of these risks have to be



Miaybe This Explains Why
Attlee Heard Churelaill Says ric cicii i xmescin tankers

By ROBERT JESSEL



MR, CHURCHILL: “I con-
gratulate the Prime Minister
on how much more he knows
about the subject today than
he did last time it was
raised.”



voting right as, say, Britain or
France,

But there has never yet been
a committee in which one or two
members did not gradually attain
a dominant position. Think of
your local tennis club, your dra-
matic society.

Not necessarily the richest, or
the most talented. But you find
that someone is listened to with
special respect.

If it is an important committee,
ene takes good care that one’s
celegate is a big enough personali-
ty to be that person,

So no Jebb?

WE SET up last summer a
Council of Deputies to transact the
most important business concerned
with the Atlantic "Treaty — tho
kind of work which Prime Minis.
ters or Foreign Secretaries would
normally have tackled if they had
had the leisure.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1951



——————————

American Socialist Leader NORMAN,












' ; : I. V. SCOTT TO- PECIALS
THOMAS Answers The Question: TS
if em & CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
(e

Is America An Imperialist Omaty OW
Pkgs. LUX FLAKES .................... $24 § 22
noms may be perpetual stagna- ° Ph: LTORAS hie edaas. aes 40 35
There remains the question] THE belief that America is an imperialist]}] Tims NESCAFE ........................5. 82

whether at this juncture the
United States and the other in-
dustrial countries of the world
ean afford the money, which of
course means the goods which it
would buy. The governments of
these countries know the magni-
tude of the defense effort they
are undertaking, what can or can-
not be released for other purposes.
But I would say. that when this
has been decided, very serious
thought should be given to the
disposal of the residue. This resi-
due should be large enough to
make a very great difference to
the less developed countries with-
out affecting our living standards
in any serious way.

power is not merely the result of Communist
propaganda, it is also a hangover from the
past, when the Western powers were guilty
of imperialist greed and arrogance in their
relations with the colonial world.

The issue today is not American imperial-
ism versus Soviet Communism, but demo-
cracy versus totalitarianism, freedom versus
slavery, and America is on the side of liberty
and peace.

As a life-long fighter for the right of every
people to self-government, I have witnessed
over the years changes in the relation of the
Western powers to the colonial world,
changes characterized by a gradual retreat
from imperialism to a good-neighbour policy.

This progress is symbolized by the achieve-

ment of independence by the Philippines,
it ms in ne 7s usefully.| India, Burma, Pakistan, Malaya, Syria,
In times ike, these we mus Pe) | cbanon, Indonesia, Ceylon, Eritrea, Somali-
able is devoted to well-conceived| land, and other colonies. ese people did
productive projects and that these| not win freedom from foreign rule without
Desoces a “e ype ehotoretry ot| Ploodshed, but the indisputable fact is that
thee rane’. the only action con-| if colonialism is not yet dead, it is rapidly
sistent with the basie principles | dying. The former colonial powers recognize
a oe world is striv-|} that colonialism is obsolete, that the social
6 ee aspirations of the people of Asia, Africa, and

hat can we offer the people “1 * :
who live in the less developed | Latin America cannot be denied.

countries in conditions which to
us are barely conceivable?

SAWS—lB8ins., 20ins., 22ins., 24ins., 26ins., 28i i
Sue ween ine . ns., 30ins., 36ins
BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins., 16ins.
PLANES, IRON—9ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

BLOCK

RATCHET BRACES

CHISELS—\in., %in., %4i., lin.
CHISEL SETS of } in,, % in. 1 in. ins.
Git BTONES sire. Sins.

GRINDING STO! , complete—Sins., Gins.
Spare GRINDING STONES—Sins, 6ins.
SAW FILES—3\ins., 4ins., 442ins., Sins.

CLAW HAMMERS
ENGINEER HAMMERS—llb., 1¥2lbs., 2Ibs.

MASON TROWELS & SQUARES
AT
















There is one thing I would like
to emphasize at this point. If we
are going to spare the “useful”
amount, we must make sure that

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,



Since 1945, while imperialism has been
Should we merely offer these} retreating throughout the democratic world




“ 5 > OOOO 6590 8OD
people, who often achieve a dig-|it has been advancing with unprecedented | % ; , “d eT
eee, Brag ty dang:| speed in the Soviet world, Since the end of
cracy and free enterprise and our-| World War IT, Soviet Communism has been
selves as its prime examples? imposed upon a vast area of 5,239,000 square ;

To them, democracy and free i . 5 a
elections are meaningless; govern- miles (13,621,400 square kilometres) inhab

ment is the local tax collector. ited by 582, 411,000 persons now helpless to
The concept of free enterprise | fight for their independence.

is enueey yereee ble ar Z As long ago as 1920 America found that

ee entered land. sum. ;@Ollar diplomacy in the Western Hemi-

cient tools and working capital to| Sphere did not pay. American capitalism,

work it, instruction in how to| even before the rising strength of labour put

T IN 4 & 9.6 cu. ft. of ZERO food space
EFFICIENCY Hermetically sealed unit



An meee i ane. er that restraints upon it, began to realize that it was BEAUTY Finger tip cold control
instruction. And to get them this, :
we have to put as much physical CAPACITY 5-years’ guarantee
> ge aya moral force to work as ‘a ae active American Socialist for more than three
Bee Silty aga, at on || Sehitaet iy arth Sa Belton 1S Bksicty: Idee! Deep Freese for
other time of crisis, U.S President © brief career in the ministry, he entered the socialist
Ryoah. Li i , case . movement during World War I. He has written for £
braham neoln said: many publications and is a popular lecturer in the Home, Hotel or Business.
The dogmas of the quiet past United States and in other countries. Mr. Thomas ECONOMY

advocates what he calls democratic socialism and has

are inadequate to the stormy pres- spent his life fighting totalitarianism in all forms,

ent. The occasion is piled high}
with difficulty, and we must rise
with the occasion. ia our case “

i t thi ‘ : see ei
oe snow. Weal Ahink anew ant |in a different position than British or Euro-

ourselves, and then we shall save | pean capitalism. It was much less dependent
ou CONES « ‘ es upon raw materials outside its borders, and
u Sites a maiine tree, worid it was able to expand markets inside Ameri-
is at stake. If we do not rise to|Can territory. It exported raw materials as
the occasion, we shall fall with it, | well as manufactured goods.

and we shall fall very hard. As far back as the administration of Presi-
dent Calvin Coolidge in the 1920s, the United
States abandoned aggressive support of
American capitalists in Mexico. In the 1930
depression, the American government made

SSSSOCSSOSSSSO SOS OOS O SC SSSOSF

a

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DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.

, ELECTRICAL DEPT.
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When selecting your ..

FOOTBALL

OR
TABLE TENNIS
GEAR

visir DA COSTA‘S
where you will find a full’

a in South America. When the Mexican gov-
ew outside the Foreign Service]ernment confiscated outright the oil lands
had heard of Sir Frederick Millar.) owned by American citizens, the United
the British representative, before States did ; a

he wad appointed, or have heard| States not even withdraw its ambassador.
much of him since, It did a thing unprecedented in history—it
_Many people wondered at the| refused to use force to back up economic in-
time whether someone like Glad-| vestment.

Pe sesh eae not have been &) After World War II, when an election tn
On the North Atlantic Defence} Panama was lost by a government which had
Gomnitien Beitr. Feprosnatss granted air fields to the United States, the
ve has been Yr. nwell, A i i
Tix ait Gua ince tag evi en ae tek quietly accepted the
previously sat on an importani|P@0ple’s decision and withdrew from the
international committee. He is an| airfields, valuable as they were to the defense
or out of Parliament the iron in} In granting independence to the Philip-
Pe \hitta of canctee wrapped i! nines the United States did attach conditions
favourable to new American capital invested
in the new republic. Since then very little
new American capital has gone into the Phil-
to have carried sufficient weight | iPPines for the benefit of American investors,
in their respective behind-closed-| but a great deal of taxpayers’ money has gone
Conte coeneanines amen to per-| to the islands in the form of economic aid.
suade six other members to sup-| This is entirely opposite to the Communist
port the British claim to the! theory of American imperialism.

supreme naval command.

You might have thought we had} Since 1945, the United States has spent
an almost cast-iron case. For : ;
Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Holland,| ore than $42,500,000,000 on foreign aid, of
Norway, and Portugal—to men-} Which $36,500,000,000 was given in economic
tion only six countries—had no} aid to reconstruct the war-torn world and to
eater a ae towards! feed hungry people. This money was expend-

eta "el 2 ed without expectation of profit. It is doubt-

ritain’s claim was not) ful that the part loaned ever will be repaid.
mone ot pining’ ok “Cantees This means that every American has contri-
France, Belgium, and Luxemburg] buted an average of $283 to help people
—-our naval stock akroad must| abroad.
have sunk extremely low.

Or are we choosing the wrong
kind of spokesmen for this com-

Cast iron...
NEITHER. of these men seems

RANGE to select from.
e

DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.
Dry

The sapere of this enormous sum has
Spe '-| not made any single government subservient
rise Se ae ae asin tl to Washington. It has not added one inch of
For, as Mr, At said in the| territory to the United States of America. I
House of ve i Po janes challenge anyone to cite any act of co-oper-
was “settle rinciple” ‘ore i 7
Se ee eel lg of the government of the Soviet
Sx fe waa tour comimittes rwen' | mparable to these American expend-
—and not our admirals—who lost| itures. Where Stalin has given any help it
this important action —L.E.S. has been at a great price. There is no example
of Western imperialism comparable to the
economic exactions Russia has made on all
her satellite states; to the Soviet require-





South African Policy

To the Editor, the Advocate,
SIR,—The West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union have taken up cud-
gels against Dr. Malan, Prime
Minister of South Africa, in re-
spect of his recent attack on
Britain’s Commanwealth policy.

Here is the full text of a letter
sent from the Union to the editors
of the Manchester Guardian and
The Times. '

“Sir.

We in the West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union have read with great
interest Dr. Malan’s latest state-
ment on British Commonwealth
policy. We are well aware of the
racial theories of the Nationalist
party of South Africa, and of the
fears of an entrenched minority,
which are their mainspring.. So
too with Hitler. Therefore it is
not surprising that Dr.. Malan
should continue to try to persuade
ihe Commonwealth that they too
share his views.

“We however, have confidence
in the ability of the British people
to the insidious attempts of
Malan to infect them with
his own fear A detailed expo

resist

1
wie

¢ : :
ure of the fallacies in his statement
is, therefore, unnecessary.

“We should, however, like to
point out that Dr. Malan cannot
have his cake and eat it. For he
demands, on the one hand, a prin-
ciple of non-interference in South
Africa’s internal affairs; whilst.on
the other, claiming an equal right
to dictate to the Commonwealth
as to its membership.

‘Further, Dr. Malan argues that
the Commonwealth should be
based on “specific common inter-
ests and a sufficient homogeneity
of cultural and political outlook.”





It would appear that for Dr.
Ma similarity of “skin texture”
ne arily guarantees all these
things. For the whole basis of
his opposition to the imminent
admission of coloured areas to the
Commonwealth is racial. He

ignores the fact that the principles

on which South African policy is
based are, in: themselves, the
negation of everything that the

development of Democracy in the
Commonwealth has stood for his-
torically

we welcome Dr,

fulmination. Fof
coloured members of this
Commonwealth; ourselves’ on the

“Frankly,

latest



2

thresiiold of Dominion Status,
have awaited clarification of this
point for too long. If Britain de-
lays giving a lead in this matter
she may well find that she has
to choose between Dr. Malan and
the countless people, to whom
Democracy means equality, who
can form the basis of a greater
Association of free peoples.

“Britain's Commonwealth policy
is clear, bi-partisan, and on re-
cord. The onus is not on the
Commonwealth to descend to the
essentially Fascist level of Dr.
Malan, Rather, it is on Dr. Malan
to match the principles of the
Commonwealth.”

Your obedient servants,
WEST INDIAN STUDENTS’
UNION.
London, 4
March 2, 1951,
8.3.51



Registration
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In your paper on March
3rd I saw that at the Labour De-
partment where the women are
registered, over three hundred

were registered. by 10.80 a.m. or
Friday, While at the agency in
Queen’s Park, I saw only about
twelve or fourteen taken up to
11 o’clock and the others had to
go away and come back after
breakfast or the next day. The
men had to go three days some-
times, before they were registered,
I hope the officers will be a little
faster by omitting some of the un-
necessary questions they ask,

UNEMPLOYED,
March 7, 1951.



Face On-Coming Traffic
To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—One question, please, Why
does the pedestrian half of the
population of this island insist on
backing the motoring half instead
of facing, especially after cricket
on the road back?

T shal] look forward to an answet
in your next editorial, and I'm
sure the overworked Police De-
partment would be glad of your
help.

A. C

March 7, 1951.

ment that a Russian general be placed at the

|head of the Polish armies; to the Russian
Venn of Outer Mongolia and Sinkiang from
China; to the Russian exploitation of the
Chinese Province of Manchuria.

There is no act of any Western power com-
parable to Stalin’s attempt to crush his hereti-
eal disciple, Tito of Yugoslavia, to Stalin’s
willingness to gamble with the lives of: his
North Korean and Chinese Communists in
order to destroy the United Nations.

American aid has been given to Socialist
Britain and the Seandinavian countries, as
well as to monarchical Greece and capitalist
Belgium, without imposing American politi-
cal or economic ideas upon these countries.
European and Asian Socialists have told me,
all in the same breath, that the United States
should not intervene and should insist upon
| certain conditions as the price of help to some
| countries America has been criticized for
| giving aid to Greece without insisting upon
| drastic reforms there, and has been damned
| for exerting pressure against monarchical-

}reactionary groups. We are chastised for
| meddling and for not meddling in Korean
‘ | affairs. We are damned if we do and damned

| if we don’t.



a

ADD A. LITTLE









VEGETABLES |
GARDEN PEAS | eur ey
CELERY HEA
CELERY CUTS | YOU PAR
KALF VIELLE CURE
SPINACH | BENEDICTINE
RHUBARB COINTREAU
CARROTS | PRUNIER BRANDY
CORN GRAVES
CLARET
BAKED BEANS ‘ CHAMPAGNE ;
FRUIT
i JUST ARRIVED
PEARS
PEACHES | PEARL BARLEY in tins
GUAVAS SCOTCH OATMEAL in tins
GOOSEBERRIES SPAGHETTI & CHEESE
MANGOES MACARONI & CHEESE
APRICOTS JIMKET TABLETS
GRAPES FRUIT CAKE—2-Ib.
PINEAPPLE in sealed Tins
APPLES GROUND ALMONDS
PRUNES PASTRY MIX in tins
OREAM OF WHEAT
FRESH CARROTS and Large and Small
TOMATOES ‘ | GRAPE JUICE in tins.
GODDARDS
4 ko
%
$S09S9S999959999S9955S9555 99 S9SSSSSESOS SSOHSSS OES
FRIDAY, MARCH 9,

1951



SYPHILIS KILLS |

SYPHILIS AND BIRTH INJURIES were the two main |
causes of Barbados’ very high infant mortality rate of 148 |

in 1948.
were 34.



Co-operatives Want

Study Groups

The Shamrock Credit-Union held
their monthly meeting last night
at St. Patrick’s School, Jemmott’s
Lane, and heard the financial Re-
port of the Treasurer, Miss Gloria
Selby. One of the principal items
discussed was the revival of Study
Group classes.

The Union which is about three
years old, is devoted to co-opera-
tives. The form of co-operation
used is the loaning of money to
members. Each member must
have shares in the, Union, and is
loaned an amount based on the
number of shares that he or she
has.

The Union is composed of about
50 members, male and female,
Catholic and non-Catholic.

Study Group classes were an
important feature of the Union in
its early days, but interest in them
lapsed as time went on. Members
now feel that they should be re-
vived. The classes, of course,
study co-operatives.

Impetus. Given

Impetus to start the Union was
given by Father Sufivan when he
came here from Jamaica a_little
over three years ago. Father
Sullivan is one of the authorities
on co-operatives in the West In-
dies.

Rules of the Union are now in
the hands of the printers, They
were not printed before, because
members were waiting to see
what would be decided about the
Co-operatives Bill when it went
before the Legislature.

President of the Union is Mr.
Conrad Hill. Vice-President is
Miss Theodosia Morris, and Sec-
retary is Mr. Winter Headley.

MORE HOUSES GO UP
IN FLOOD AREA’

In spite of the tragedy which
befell the residents of the Consti-
tution and Delamere Land districts
during the 1949 flood waters, peo-
ple are still moving their homes
to that area, Mr. Lashley of the
Housing Board told the Advocate
yesterday.

Some 13 or 14 houses have been
recently moved to Delamere Land.
Their owners, Mr. Lashley said,
cannot be persuaded to leave the
flood area.

They found in that area some
20 other houses, whose owners
refused to move them after the
flood waters.

During the heavy rains in Feb-
fruary this year, the area was
flooded again, but fortunately, ne
damage was done to the houses.

The residents were scared and
had packed up their furniture,
making ready for quick removal
from the area, The rain stopped
and the water ran off, leaving
the residents still resolved to con-
tinue to live in the flooded area.

When asked whether or not the
Government iniended making
the flooded area a prohibited area,
Mr. Lashley said that he was not
in a position to give any informa-
tion on the matter,

DEATH BY
MISADVENTURE

Death by misadventure was the
verdict returned by a 9-man jury
when the inquiry into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Clarence Hoyte was concluded at
Holetown Police Station. |

The Coroner in the inauiry was
Mr. S. H. Nurse, Police Magistrate
of District “E”. Clarence Hoyte
a 26-year-old fisherman of St.
James was drowned at Paynes
Bay on February 25 and ‘his body
was discovered the next day later
in the afternoon by Lionel Phillips
of St. James. plies

A post mortem examination was
performed by Dr. A. C. Kirton,
P.M.O. of St. Lucy at the St.
James Almshouse.

“SEDGEFIELD” DOCKED

M.V. Sedgefield was docked yes-
terday to have her hull cleaned
of barnacles and seaweeds and to
be painted, :

In the meantime, engineers are
getting ahead with their work in
converting her into a_ passenger
ship.

Judging from the rust and ma-
rine-growths covering the vessel’s
hull, you would think that she was
getting her first cleaning since she
was built six years ago.

She is expected to spend a week
or two on dock,

Pine Landed

The Saguenay Terminals Sun-
dial landed 95,385 feet of white
pine, 650 bags of dairy feed and
15 drums of lubricating oil at Bar-
bados yesterday. :

She brought the shipment of
lumber, from Halifax for Messrs.
J. B. Leslie & Co., Ltd,

S.S. Sundial left port yesterday
evening for British Guiana. She is
consigned to Messrs, Plantations,
Ltd.











The figures for the United Kingdom that vear

These statements were made in
Queen’s Park by Dr. F. N. Gran-
tuum at the current conference of
Publie Health Officers

He said that Syphilis was one of
the chief factors causing infant
deaths, premature births and con-
genital debility. Other diseases
such as diarrhoea and respiratory
diseases caused death in the later
months of infant life, and were
largely due to ‘environmental
iactors.

The diseases which caused deaths
in early infancy operated chiefly
before birth and at delivery. The
two main causes were syphilis
and birth injuries,

“In Barbados syphilis continues |
to take a heavy toll of infant life,
resulting in the, birth of syphilitic
infants, prematurity and congenital
debility. To combat these trage-
dies, the syphilitic mother must
receive treatment in early preg-
nancy. The detection and treat-
ment of this disease can be effect-
ed at ante-natal clinics. Modern
methods of treatment of syphilis
afford the syphilitic mother an
excellent opportunity of giving
birth to a healthy child and safe-
guarding her own health, This
is well illustfated in countries
where the notification and treat-
ment of Venereal Disease is com-
pulsory. In such countries syphilis
has ceased to be a major cause of
infant deaths.





Untrained Midwives

“Another cause of infant
deaths is birth injuries. Some
af these fatalities are inevitable |
but many can be prevented by|
the mother receiving expert}
advice and treatment before de-
livery at ante-natal clinics. Again
many tragedies at delivery are due
to untrained and unskilled
midwives. Such midwives often
constitute a menace to infant and
mother. It is hoped that soon
the “mother gramp” will cease
to exist and the services of prop-
erly trained midwives will be
available to even the poorest
woman. The Maternity Hospital
now affords an excellent train-
ing for midwives. Every preg-
nant woman is entitled to the
services of a proper trained mid-
wife, with the assistance of a
medical practitioner when neces-
sary.

Tetanus Too

“Every year about 25 to 30 in-

fants die of tetanus, again these
deaths are preventable, They
are due to improper dressing of
the cord by untrained midwives
Such loss of life is disgraceful as
it is preventable by simple but
proper technique,
“Bowel disease. such as diarr-
hoea. may be partly due to en-
vironmental conditions and here
the Sanitary Inspector must play
his part by enforcing clean sur-
roundings, i.e. proper refuse and
excreta disposal, fly control etc.
These diseases may also be due
to incorrect feeding etc. and here
the Health Visitor must instruct
the mother.

To combat Infant Mortality,
the following programme is es-
sential: —

(1) Improvement of Environ-
mental conditions,

(2) Special metheds directed
to care of expectant moth~
ers and of the infant.

(3) Health Education,

“The improvement of environ-
mental conditions include im-
proved housing, safe milk and
food supplies and a raising of the
standards of general sanitation
But’ such measures cannot alone
reduce the infant mortality to a
satisfactory level.

“The special method directed
to mother and child, include an-
te-natal clinic to take care of the
mother during her pregnancy, the
delivery service to see her safe
through her delivery and puer-
perium and the post-natal clinic
to instruct her in the care of the
infant and herself up to the end
of infant stage. 7

“And last, Health Education
teaches the mother how to care
her infant, to take an interest in
its development.

Health Centres

These services are the function
of Health Centres. Here the
mother is taught her individual
responsibility to Health and_in-
structed in mother-craft and love
of her child. One of the most
important causes of infant mor-
tality is a lack of family respon-
sibility—the unwanted child. Far
too many children are conceived
haphazardly in Barbados. The
High Infant Mortality of Barba-
dos is Not a safeguard but a dis-
grace to Barbados.

“To reduce this mortality we
must provide the services neces-
sary to care for,mother and child
and to instruct the mother in
mother-craft. In other words we
need Health Centres—the tool of
the Public Health worker.

“Where are our Health Cen-
tres? May we hope that 1951 may
see our first Health Centre and
our first serious attempt to re-
move the disgrace of our high
Infant Mortality Rate.”

eee en eens ttt ape ncenoeiaspaetenpene ee ee peta soem eames siaomne sl pment

ieee iene idence ie einai capeyliheeesiistinemntemaeemanein, sptestisensiialaensenet enter



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

RECORD HREAKER ;



|

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HON. V. C. GALE leads in Bow Bells afte winning the Castle

Grant Handicap in record time.





Mobile Radio Expert

Joins Barbados Police

TEN YEARS AGO, Superintendent W. H. R. Armstrong
left Barbados to take up police duties in St. Lucia, Wind-
ward Islands as Assistant Superintendent. Since then he

has been stationed in Trinidad until

yesterday when he,

returned here to take up an appointment as Superintendent

of Police.

Thirty year old Supt.» Arm-
strong is the son of Mr. Donald
Armstrong, a Director of Da
Costa & Co. Ltd. He left Har-
rison College in 1939 and ,joined
the staff of the Royal Bank of
Canada. But he was always keen
on becoming a policeman and in
1941 he

in St. Lucia, Windward Islands.

In 1944 Mr. Armstrong was
transferred on promotion to Trini-
dad as an Assistant Superintend
ent. He was posted to the Mar-
ine Branch where he served’ un-
til.1945 when he was transferred
to the Traffic Branch as Assistant
Traffic Officer.

During. that period he was
largely responsible for the intro-
duction on a permanent basis of
Short Wave Radio Communicatior
into the Force for use between Po
lice Headquarters and a number
of Divisional Headquarters
Country Stations.

Two years later he was posted
as Superintendent of the Port-of-
Spain Fire Brigade until a Pro-
fessional Fire Officer ap
pointed in 1947. He was ther
transferred as Superintendent ir
charge of the Tobago Divisio:
where he was stationed for two
years,

In 1949 he was posted to St.
James Barracks as Depot Super-
intendent and in command of the
Police Training School, the
Mounted, Transport and _ Tele-
communications branches. -

It was during his period at the
depot that Superintendent Arm-
strong was primarily respons'ble
for the introduction and planning
of the new V.H.F. Radio Tele
phene and 999 Emergency sys-
tem which include the mobile
radio patrols.

Efficiency Medal

While at the Depot Supt. Arm-
strong also restarted the Trini-
dad Police quarterly magazine of
which he was Editor.

He was awarded the Colonial
Auxiliary Forces Efficiency Me-
dal for his services in the Ter-
ritorial Forces in Barbados an
St. Lucia in which he served as
an active member from 1931 tc
1944,

Superintendent Armstrong wil’
be in charge of Area 2 of fhe
local Police Force and of the
Police Training School.

Capt. Grant who was at that
staticn will be going to Area 3
and Capt. Parris will take over
Area ! in place of Capt. Farmer
who has gone on a_ training
course.

Before Supt. Armstrong en-
tered the Police Force, one of his
hobbies was radio work. He told
the Advocate yesterday that
when the _ telecommunication
schemes are finished in Trinidad
the cost will be about $80,000.

The Commissioner of Police
said that wnen consideration is
given to the V.H.F. and 999 Ra-
dio and Emergency schemes,
Supt. Armstrong’s services will
come in useful.

and

was



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vy ~~

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s0D/Doy

: was appointed to the
Colonial Police Service as an As-
sistant Superintendent of Police

a



Three Embassies
To Re Set Up

BONN, March 8
West Germany was allowed
foreign diplomauc service when

the Allies revised the Occupation
Statute on Tuesday. Hitherto she
has only had consulates abroad.
Among the first Embassies were
yxpected to be Rome, The Hague,
end Brussels, Among first Lega-
tions are Athens, Copenhagen,
New Delhi, Stockholm and perhaps
Ottawa and Pretoria.

There are other countries. with
whom West Germany has agreed
tc have Consulates, But it was not
believed that their conversion to
fmbassies or Legetions would
quick because of the expense
involved,—Reuter,

Presents Credentials
BUENOS AIRES, March 8.

Russian Ambassador Grigori
Reanv, who arrived a fortnight ago
presented credentials today. He
is the second Soviet Ambassador
to come to Buenos Aires since
relations with Russia were estab-
lished in 1946. The first ambassa-
dor Grigori Sergeyev, retired in
1947.—Reuter,



| telephone, he said,



Market Should Have
Telephone, Radio

Most of the butchers at the
Public Market think that the Gov-
ernment should install aq telephone
and radio at the market. There
is great need, especially for the
telephone, they told the Advocate
yesterday.

They feel that they pay, as it is,
toe much money as rent for the
stalls and Government should be
able to provide them witf the
telephone and radio,

Dr. Stoute, Superintendent of
the market, said that a telephone

| could be very useful in the market.

There is, however, already too
much noise in the market and he
thinks that no radio should be put
there. If the butchers wish ¢
they should
inform him and he would pass it
on to Government.

_The telephone and radio ques-
tions have only reached the dis-

| cussion stage between the butch-

ers,

Christopher Inniss who has beet.
@ Wucche: ii the Marae. NOW LOL
28 years is in ugreement witn wie
View inae a lerepuviie amu radi
Should be put in tne public market,

‘Lnere are two private telepnones
in We market now, but one can-
not always aSk for use of these
telepnones, One of the telephones
iS nept iockea up in a box for

,, ene owner’s convemence and tne

other is sometimes availabie,

Lighting Necessary

What he said was needed in the
the market was lighting, Butch-
eis liave lO use digit somMeUMmes,
but there is no electricity in we
market,

Mr. Springer, another butcher
who has been working in Ue
market tor many years says that
butchers, like other men, ike to
near cricket broaacasts, ‘ney have
lo be dispatching cus.vomers
and cannot get away to listen two
cricket,

There are times when one has
to contact customers ever the
telephone on questions of meai
supply and one cannot always be
a nuisance to the butcher who has
ihe private telephone.

M. B. Freeman who has been
killing animals about the market
for nine years, like the othe:
vutchers,thinks that a_ teiephone
and radio should be installed in
the market.

Another butcher who was about
the market for nine years and who
agrees with the radio and tele-
pare suggestions is Mr, Gordon

These butchers think that tele-
phones and radio are so necessary
that if Government refused to
provide them, they would pool
together to pay for them.



Gruber Wants
Allies To Stay

PARIS, March 8.

Austria Foreign Minister Grub-
em today had a half hour alk
w French Foreign Minister
Schuman at Quai D’Orsay,

Their conversation was _ pre-
Sumed to deal with possible rep—
resentation if the Deputies agree
to place Austria on the Four Power
Talks Agenda.

It was understood that the Aus-
trian, view is that Allied occupa-
tion troops ought not to be with-
drawn while Austrian police and
home forces are inadequately
armed to deal with subversive
activities.—Reuter,



Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites
between the ages of 12—19 to enter
ition.
n length and must reach the Shoré

city not later than Wednesday every week, The best story each week
will ve published in the Evening Advocate and the winner wil) re
eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6.

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Title of Story

aan

all school-boys and school—gir!s
for its Senior Short Story Compe-

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words

Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd,



© PURINA

@ FOR POULTRY A
a
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tH. JASON JONES & CO,, LTD.—Distributors

“See the Difference Purina Makes”

CHOWS ©

ND LIVESTOCK g!

SRE EBECECRBERUEEGE ESBS G
SE BEES.





It’s Here

PERLSTEIN |

DUTCH EXPORT

BEER

Owing to recent heavy demar

hear of its arriva)

Be. a botile
$4.00 a case

Again !!



1ds

we
=

we were entirely oft of stock of
this -popular beer and no doubt
our customers will be pleased to



{ BUY SOME TODAY
(
)

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.,LTD. {)

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(4

5

P.A. Playing |

Field Gets New
Tennis Court

The Princess Alice Piaying Fieid
had an improved look when the
Advocate visited it yesterday, The
grass waS not as long as it used
to be, and three men were work-
ing with hoes preparing a new
tennis court, Two courts have al-
ready been prepared, one is
marked, the other is still to be
marked. There is also a cricket
pitch which can be played on:

The caretaker said that the men
were working now that the rainy
weather has ceased, They could
do with some more tools, how-
ever, as only three hoes, one lawn
mover and one light roller are
available, Parts of the 14 acre
field still need levelling out, so
that the lawn mower can work
better, The caretaker thinks that
a road roller would be useful for
that purpose.

Another staff of men were put-
ting the finishing touches on the
sea wall on the western side of
the field,

Tennis

By permission of the Vestry of
St. Michael a club is allowed to
play table tennis in the pavilion
during the evening and lawn ten-
nis is also played on the finished
court, A dance was held there cn
Tuesday night, and there was some
cleaning up to be done both inside
and outside of the building yes-
terday morning as a result..

This caretaker has his work cut
out to prevent the drivers of cars
from driving on the cricket pitch
or the tennis courts when they
motor down to the playing field at
night. “Approaching an unoccu-
pied car at night calls for care
and discretion,” he commented.

U.N. May Alter
Meeting Place

PARIS, March 8

The United Nations Assembly
may change its mind about meet-
ing in Europe this year, if not
nuvited to Paris soon, Adolfo Costa
Du Reis, Minister to France, said
here teday,

France, unwilling to hold an
Assembly in Paris because of the
expense and because this is the
election year in France, has not
given a final answer

Costa Du Rels who sponsored
the Assembly Resolution on the
subject, said: “The resolution to
eome to Europe this autumn re-
mains in foree, However contrary
mains in foree, However, contrary
tecisions might be voted soon at
Lake Success,—Reuter,





Eleven Planes Down

HONG KONG, March 8.
Eleven United Nations planes
including a British naval aircraft
were claimed by a North Korean
Army communique to have been
shot down or damaged,in.the first
four days of March, according to a

Peking radio message received

here, |
All planes were destroyed or

damaged by Chinese volunteer

anti-aircraft the

said.—Reuter,

INVESTIGATION

JERUSALEM, March 8.
An Emergency Meeting of the
Israel-Jordan Mixed Armistice
Commission here today agreed to}
send investigation teams from)
both sides to Beit Jinrim. in
Hedron foothills where a 24-hour
battle between Israel army troops
and Arabs took place on Tuesday.

—Reuter,

units, message





-

POSTPONED
LONDON, March 8.

Football matches arranged be-
tween England and Spain in
Madrid on May 27, and in London
on November 28, have been post-
poned at the request of the Span-
ish Football Association, it was
anounced today by the English
Football Association,—-Reuter,



Pl LES Dost ga ses
longer. For quic
relief—treat painiul piles with
medicated Dr, Chase’s Ointment,
Soothes as it heals. A safe home
treatment for over 50 years. 3a

DR. CHASE’S
Antiseptic OINTMENT

“TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

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PAGE

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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 6h 1951
a mm LL TEIN NLT OTT TS, TT LT TE I

BY CARL ANDERSON Sore M Mouth

008e Blood
yt and eeth

Teath's eae Wit ye you is Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Ateoaen stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your











mouth well and save your teeth or

money back on return of empty pac

age. Get Amosan trom rae Chemist
antes srateats

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

QUALITY

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- = oF NORMAL! THEY ALL HAVE THE
DOES EVERYONE |N YOUR TRIBE HAVE | | \ J > '
11 8R.. FOUR FACES? Z Weer [Ss oe Te enceely F } j A 77 mt |
ao AR oe i \ ie sive’ A Pee A Oe , P
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FOOTBALL

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aye

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% Monday 12th Mar. vs. Carlton

% Saturday 17th Mar vs. ‘Spartan ;
% Monday 19th Mar. vs. Colony %
" Admission
% SEASON TICKETS — $1.50
‘ Obtainable from Carlton
members
DAILY

$ GEORGE CHALLENOR
% STAND - %
} KENSINGTON STAND a/- %
» OPEN STANDS we Ue §
~ GROUNDS Y

STANDS

SUPREME |,

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Per Bottle. 26 18 HEINZ VEGETARLE SOUP 30 27
Per Carton... 4.80 4.24
GORDON’S GIN WHOLE TOMATOES in tins 35 30

$6S6S¢

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DUTCH APPLES
SOUTH AFRICAN BRANDY (Nip) $1.00

CAKE MIX—Vanilla, Chocolate, PURE GRAPE JUICE (tin)_____._..,... Be
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FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.







The charge for announcements ot}

Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-! ‘ FOR RENT | YMCA
ledzments, and In Memoriam notices is| Minimum charge week 72 cents and! ee ee ee
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over a4)

for any number of words up to 50, and | words 3 cents a word
3 cents per word on week-days and) word Sundays,

4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any age 9 _— aia
up to 50 and 6 cents per w or esc! Loe a 1... ee
edditional word. Terms cash, Phone 2508 Setiened 5 ton ene way
between 8.30 and 4 pim., 3113 for Death | pi.) ggo7 = =e . va =
Notices only after 4 p.m. =

HOUSES



HOUSE: 3-bedroom Od hi
situated Top Rock, untirnlahed. vail
See esata

mon lease. For viewing, Ring
or 8569. .

IN ' MEMORIAM

——
MORRIS—In sad and ever loving memory

week—4 Cents a



on 6 months or 12
4683,
7.3.51—3n

of our dearest Gwen Morris, who died
on_ March 9th, 1949. .
To-day brings back the shock
That just two years ago was wrought
Without farewell or goodbye
You left us with heavy hearts
The wounds in our hearts will never
heal
Your place in our hearts no one ean
fill.
Eldetha Blackman (Mother), Bery] (Sis-
ter), Bernard (Husband), Marva, Barbara,
Maureen, June, Cameron (Childrer).
9.3.51—In

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays,





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR; CITROEN 4 1. 1947 model, one
owner, new tyres, excellent working
order $1,400. For inspection, phone 3213
Evenings. 9.3 51-30

LIVESTOCK
is ee
HORSES—2 y.0, Gelding “Ladyswan”
(Jim. Gackerjack ex Sugar Lady) un-
named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Gackerjack

ex Princess Stella), Apply: J. R.
Eawards. Telephone 2620,

27.2.51—t.f.n
HORSE -- Chestnut 1 yr. old by

Jetsam out of H.B. Mare (Ginger) Dam
of Miss Friendship, Can be seen at Eagy
Hall Plantation. Phone 95—263. By kind
permission of the Stewards of the
B.T.C. this Animal will be offered for
sale at the Paddock just after the 3 p.m.
Race on Saturday 10th March, 1951,
4.3.51—7o

—————

MULE: One (1) iarge Chestnut Mule,
Mare, Cort and Harness, E. A. Daniel,
Baxters Rd Dial 2464. 7.3. 51—tn

MISCELLANEOUS

laa nee

ANTIQUE FURNITURE — Call at Ralph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6,3.51—6n

AMERICAN BRASSIERS: Many fam-
ous brands perfect fitting Brass at popu-
lar prices regular brassiers also strapless,
in art silk, lace and cotton, white and
tea rose. A. and B, Cups 32—38. frony
88 to $1.80 Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street 8.3.51—2n













ANTIQUES, which include a_ good
variety of Glass, China etc. Call in at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.

6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUE CLOCKS — At Kalph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.
——

COAT: Ladies—New, large, black, warm
Coat, recently imported from England
Dial 4043. Mrs, Vernon Smith.

9.3,51—I1n







oT _
COINS—Collection of old silver and
cepper coins, for inspection call 4476.

7.3.51—t.f.n.
———
CLOTHING: Ladies, Gents, Boys.

New and partly worn heavy clothes, also
light clothing. All in perfect condition.
Apply Bungalow 2, White Halil, opposite
Hastings Hotel 9.3,51—In

CHAIRS—Tubular Chairs $9.17 each.
With arms $12.00. At Ralph Beard’s
Showroom, Hardwood Alley. 6.3.51—6n

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51-—-t.i.o
————

GOLF CLUBS & BAGS: One set Gents
and one set of Ladies. At Ralph Beard’s
Showroom, Hardwood Alley. Phone SS:

8.3.51—2n

MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
guished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movab;. partitions, Dial 4476
A. BARNES & \O., LTD.

One DOMO CREAM SEPARATOR—
perfect order, very little used, practically
new. Mrs. Peebles, Bayleys, St. Philip

7.3. 51—3n

POLAR ICE CREAM-—In shilling boxes
every day. Noel Roach & Sons, Speishts-
town. 8.3.51—2n

ee
STEPLADDERS -— 6 tread Steel Step-
ledders $12.94 and 4 tread $9.88, At Ralph

Beard's Showroom, Hardwood Alley.
6.3,51—Bir











od
STAMPS: Two complete sheets of Bar-
pados surcharged One-penny or Two-

pence. Offers P.O. Box 92.
7.3.51-—4 f.n.

—

TO WHOLESALERS ONLY—Stocks of
Enamel Ware which includes; Pails,
Chambers, Bowls, Pie Dishes, Kettles,
Call at Ralph Beard’s Show room, Hard-
wood Alley. 6.3.51—6n

VENETIAN BLINDS, Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal DeLuxe Venetian blinds, to your







sizes detiveny 3 weeks. Dial . 4476.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd

13.2, 61—In

YACHT: One (1) 12 ft. Yacht Boat,

in good condition, Diai 2747, C. O

Farnum 8.3.51—tin

YACHT — Yawl “Frapeda" approx.

37% ft. long, with gray marine engine,
Recently painted and in good condition.
Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4569
or 3026. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HELP

eee arene pei enianinpninipseesnnanioensieeeatssnenenin®
A YOUNG MAN with business expe-
rience, as Seoretary for a local Company.
Apply by letter only, to—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
7.3.51—6a









YOUNG LADY with knowledge of
Typewriting and Shorthand. Myrcferable

BUNGALOW: Modern Bungalow,
Belleville, fully furnished. Available from
18th Maren for 3%) months, at reasonable
rent to careful tenants.

at nese eestor eeroe
MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow.
43 bedrooms with running water, built in
wardrobes and all modern conveniences.
Long Lease preferred. Mrs.
Friedman, Hotel Royal, 13.51—4n

THERSISDON, Maxwells Coast. Ful
furnished, 3 bedrooms, Dial 8417 or ae
7.3.51—3n

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays







‘diphinspetinllign ieabenitadisalcciarcaditiGlns
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By order of the Commissioners of
Health, St. Michael I will sell on Friday
March 9th at the yard of the Scavenging
Dept,, Church Village, (1). 1945 Dodge
Truck. (Army Type) complete with plat-

form and in running order. Must be sold
Sale at 1 p.m. Terms Cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer

6 3.51—4n

—_———
AUSTIN 5-TONNER TRUCK 1946 MODEL
We are instructed by the Insurance
Agents to sell this damaged vehicle by
Public Auetion at the General Omnibus
Garage, Nelson Street, at 2 p.m. To-day,
JOHN M. BLADON,
Auctioneer,
2.3.51—Sn,



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 13th, by order of Mrz.
Chaffee (Mac Adam) we will sell her
furniture at “The Rhonda’ Worthing,
which includes:

Dining Table, Upright Chairs, Side-
board, Waggon, Writing Table, Revolving
Desk Chair, Morris Chairs, Reading
Stand, Liquor Case, all in Mahogan,;
2 very good Invalid Wheel Chairs; Metal
Arm-Chair; Pine and Crabwood Book-
shelves, Chiming Clock, Oak Rolied-Top
Desk and Chair, Revolving Bookcases,
Trestle Table, Rush Chairs, Pictures,
Glass and China, Spoons, Forks, Cutlery,
Hall Lantern, Tea and Coffee Services;
M.T. Water Table; Jones Electric Sewing
Machine, Brass Trays ete., Westinghouse
Refrigerator; single Pine Bedstead with
Vono spring, Deep-Sleep and Dunlopillo
Beds, Chest of Drawers, very good Cedar
and Crabwood Presses; old mahogany
Linen Dressing Tables, Washstands all
painted white; Kitchen Utensils, Tables,
Seale and Weights, Garden Tools, Agr.
Spray, Larder, Gas Stove, Steamer,
2-Burner Oil Stove and Books.

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,





Tea
end 12

and $1.80 on Sundays.





TENDER FOR ERECTION OF
BUILDING

The Board of Directors of the YMC A.
a ro oe for Tenders for the
erection a building at He: uarters,
Pinfold Street. e os ;
_ The Plans and Specifications can be
inspected at the Secretary's Office
Y.M.C.A, from Thursday ist March to
eee. Mth March between the
hours ©: a.m, and 4 p.m. daily exce
Sundays. . = "

Tenders must be submitted 1a Sealed
Envelopes and addressed to the Secre-
tary of the Y.M.C.A., Pinfold Street not
later than Noon 2ist March,

Tenders submitted will be opened at oa
Board Meeting to be held at 4.30 P.m. on
the 2ist March,

The Board does not bind itself to ac-
cept the lowest Tender.

HERBERT H. WILLIAMS,
Secretary.
28.2.51—8n
-_—_—_———

NOTICE

PARISH OF 8ST. ANDREW

Applications will be received by the
undersigned up to Saturday March 24th
1951 for the Post of Sexton of St.
Simon's Church at a Salary of $15.00

per month,
C, A. SKINNER,
Vestry Clerk,
St, Andrew.
8.3,51—tn











NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
VESTRY BY-ELECTION
I HEREBY give notice that I have
appointed.the Vestry room near the
Aimshouse at Belleplaine, as the place
where all persons duly qualified te
vote at the Election of Vestryman for
the said Parish, may meet on Monday
March 12th 1951, between the hours of
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to
elect a Vestryman in the place of Darry
Atfield Foster (deceased).
Signed C. A.. Skinner,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Andrew,
3.3.51—8n,



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Vestry of St. Philip hereby notifies
the public that the facilities of the King
George V. Memorial Park can be rented
for dances, amusements, etc.
Applications for hire can be arranged

with the Churchwarden Mr, D. D,
Garner M.C.P., Marchfield, St. Philip,

P. S. W. SCOTT,
Clerk, to the Vestry, St. Philip.
3.3.51—7n



NOTICE

This is to inform the General Public
that A. R. Brome is no longer the Chureh
Secretary of the New Testament Church
of God, nor is he any longer the District
Overseer of the Northern District. He no
longer has any Authority to receive, or
collect funds for the said New Testament
Church of God.

- Rev. J. B. WINTER,
Island Overseer, and Mission Board
Representative in Barbados
9.3,51—3n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE) fePruary,

The application of ELDEEN MAY-
NARD, of Hillaby, St. Andrew, the pur
chaser of Liquor License No. 737, of 1951
granted to ROBERT MAYNARD in res-
pect of a board and shingle shop situ-
ated at Hillaby, St. Andrew, for permis-
sion to use said License at same premises

Dated this 6th day of March, 1951
To:—A, W. HARPER, Esq.,

Ag. Police Magistrate,
Dist. “F".
Signed SEYMOUR GILL.
for Applicant







Auctioneers. | = 8. —Thix application will be consid-
9.3.51.—2n. | ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court District “F'', on Friday the
16th day of March 1951, at 11 o'clock,
a.m.
A. W. HARPER,
REAL ESTATE Ag. Police Magistrate,
Dist, “F",
ich ae No. een sai
treet standing on 2,181 square feet
land. This property is situate at Lower LOST
Jemes Street, opposite James Street!
Church and is suitable for business prem- +
ises, GOLD HORSESHOE PIN set with

Inspection amy day on application to the +
tenant.

This property will be set up for sale by
Public Competition at our Office No. 14, |
James Street at 2 p.m. on Friday 16th!
March 1951, :



YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.
7.3.51—9n t
“LASCELLES”, situate at Worthing

Christ Church, standing on 14,411 square
feet of land. The house is built of stone
and contains, open and closed galleries,
drawing and dining rooms, three bed-
rooms, breakfast room kitchenette and
usual out offices. Garage and Servants
room in yard, Inspection by appointment. ‘
Dial 8394.

The above will be set up for sale at
Public Competition at our office in Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, on Tuesday the lito
March 1951 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors.
7.3.51—6n



WAND: 1 acre, 3 roeds; 6 perches of
land at Lynch's Gap, near Bayley's Pian-
tation, St. Philip. Arable as well us suit-
able for quarrying. Apply —

HUTCHINSON & ere ae
.3.51—t.f.n.

white Pearls. between Worthing Guest
House, Rova! Hotel, Race Track, Bridge-
town or St. John's Church Reward if

returned to Mrs. McCulloueh, Worthing
Guest House 8133 7.3.51—3n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — One (1)
B.T.C. Ticket Series N. 2610. Finder to

return same to W. E. Medford, at W. A
Medford & Co 8.3,51—2n

~Serien ee
please re-





£908. Spring Meeting.

Finder
turn to Advocate Advertising Dept.
9.3.51—1n





~— a samen

“IT HAS IT

IT has style,
IT has Beauty of Colour,
IT has correct modern lines,
IT has durability,
IT has all you want.
IT’s the modern De Luxe
Table Mode! Gas Hotplate
— Priced to sell
See it at your Gas
Bay St.

Showroom,



TAKE NOTICE

THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State of
Ohio’ United States of America, whose trade or business address is The Gwynne

Building, Sixth and Main Streets,

registration of a.trade mark in Part “A”

will be entitled to register the sa’

day of March 1951 unless some person sh

cate to me at my office of opposition of such registration.

seen on application at my_ office.
Dated this 7th day of March, 1951



TAKE NOTICE

(RI

Cincinnati,

Ohio, U.S.A.. has applied for the
of Register in respect of shampoo, anc
after one month from the 8th
all in the meantime give notice in dupii-
The trade mark can be

ime

H. WILLIAMS

Registrar of Trade Marks. ;

8.3.51—3n

SCO

for the

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY. a corporation of the Siate of

Building, Sin
registration of a trade mark in Part “A

ing and cooking fat, and will be entitled
the 8th day March 1951 unless

in St Cincinnati, a
Sixth and Main reets, of Hegimer in of vegetable shorten-

Ohio, U.3.A., has

to register the same after one month from
some person shall in the meantime

one with previous experience in Book- | Ohio, United States of America, whose trade or business address is Gwynne
keeping. Apply in writing to Managing | give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such registration. The
Director of Canada Dny, Pickett St, trade mark canbe seen on application at my office.
9.3.51—30 Dated this 7th day of March, 195i. .
Ea at
egistrar ‘rade Marks.
MISCELLANEOUS £3.51—3n



IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or oe s eee ad-

ini Royal Yacht Clu
ae 20.2.51,—T.F.N.

—<—<—<—

IMMEDIATE eee for proses: a
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniaturer .
old Stamps. GORRINGES,

Bwi
Antique Shop. Dial 4429.

20.2.81.—t.f.n.



TAKE



WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED HOUSE—3 bedrooms
the Beach. From the middle of April or
Ist of May
Co

Used Postage Stamps



9.3.51—





—





Bought, Sold, Exchanged
‘
Cecil Jemmott
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad Street Phone 4563



Write Box F, C/o Advocate

On

NOTICE

IVORY

PROCTERZ & GAMBLE

MADE MH U.BA.





cents per agate tine on week-days
cents per agate line on Sundays.
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days!



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PUBLIC NOTICES | U.S. Basketball





Team Will Tou:

NEW YORK, March 7

The United States amateur Ath-

tletic Union announced to-day that
it had aceeptec an invitation by
the Chilean

all star
and other South American coun-
tries this spring.

A team of ten will be selected on
the basis of performances in the
union

national amateur athletic
championship tornament which
opens at Ballas Texas on March 18.

A coach and a manager will ac-
company the players,

Six countries Chile, Ecuador,
Peru, Paraguay, Argentina ana
Brazil will be visited.

—Reuter.





ATTENTION is drawn to th





|

“Shingles—Red Cedar No. 1 and
0

'

1

COLUMN ONE
' ARTICLE

SHINGLES:
Red Cedar—No. 1 grade

Red Cedar—No. 2 grade

8th March, 1951.

HIPPING

oe .

=
—_——







The M.V
cept Cargo
Dominica,

“CARIBBER” will ac-
and Passengers for
Antigu Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday

|
9th inst.
)





The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
and Passengers only for St, Vin-
cent, Date of sailing to be notified,

BWI. SCHOONER § OWNERS’
ASSOCIA1'ON INC,
Tel. 4047,

|

Ieee

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,

Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and
Madeira—s.s, ‘“Cottica” 2nd, 3rd, 9th
1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th,
Mth. 16th March 1951.

Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam-—-
m.s. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951,
m.s. “Willemstad” 9th, 15th, February |
ise? m.s. “Oranjestad” 9th, 15th March

1,

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and
Georgetown-—m.s. “Bonaire” 27th Janu-
ary 1951; ms, “Cottica” 20th, February
1951; m.s. “Helena” 3rd March 1961.

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guiara, Cura-
cao etc—m.s, “Oranjestad” Ist Pebruary
1951.

Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
dam—m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd 1951.

S. P, MUSSON, SON & CO., ‘D.,

Agents





wh

Canadian National Steamships



SOUTHBOUND
esa
ontreal
“LADY RODNEY”" ~~
“LADY NELSON" ~y
“CAN. CHALLENGER” oe
“LADY RODNEY" ~~
NORTHBOUND Arrives
Barbados
“LADY RODNEY” 27 Mar
“LADY NELSON" 12 Apr
“LADY RODNEY” 10 May

N.B.--Subject te change without notice.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD. — Agents.

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limi

ing to Europe. The usual

ports
Rotterdam,

PROTECT THE LIFE OF YOUR BELTS
with

“FLEXO” BELT DRESSING

Obtainable at...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER

“Good News” for Asthmatica...

A New Guaranteed Remedy for the Relief of ASTHMA

Dr. JOHN'S ASTHMA REMEDY

This skillfully blended preparation, assures you of
* immediate relief in this m
is the result of years of intensive study in Asthmatic

conditions,

Keep a Bottle handy and relieve yourself of the
constant threats of Asthmatic attacks.
Retail Price:—12/- Per Bottle

Obtainable at...



|



|
}

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State o
Ohio, United States. of Americas, whose trade or business address is The Gwynne
Building, Sixth and Main Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A,, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of soap and will j
be entitled to register the same after one month from the @th day of March |
1951 unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at |
my office of opposition of such registratior The trade mark can be seen or appli- |



| cation at my office.
} Dated this 7th day of Mareh, 1951

SaaS,

H. WILLIAMS
Registrar of T

Charle

basketball federation
to send a United States wemen's
basketball team to Chile



World Tennis

Games Continue
VIENNA, March 7.

The seeond of the matches in
the tinal pool of the Swavthling
Cup World table tennis team

championship was being played
here today between Czechosio-
vakia top of group C and Yugo
Slavia top of group A.

Hungary beat Yugoslavia in the
first match last night, so if the
Czechs win today they will have
“= straight fight with Hungary for
the trophy.

They made a good start
taking the first three singles.

Should Yugoslavia win and
then the Czechs beat Hungary,

by

PAGE 8S’ VEN

Ladies Doing| < ——
Well At Polo| “x ers re












With the increased number of
Players it has been found unne-
eessary te elose the Club during



THERE'S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

crop when all the planter players
find it difficult to attend the
games. To fill the gap also there
are at least two or three of the
lady members who have now
reached the point where they ate

good enough to compete in the
men’s chukkas. The Misses A.
Hawkins, D. Hawkins and K.,

Parker—all Queen's College girls \
—are now no longer inners as |
their skill in control of horse and |
ball have proved.

| GOVERNMENT

fence) (Amendment) Order, 1951, No, 8 which will be published
in the Official Gazette of Thursday 8th March, 1951,
2. Under this Order the maximum





Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES

‘ Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings

there would have to be a complete
replay im the final as all teams
would have two points. —Reuter.

Keith Melleville with his new |
mount is going to be a surprise |
in the near future. He always |
had it in him to be a good player,
but could make little progress
with his former horse. Both Nick |--—
Paravicino and Andrew Arthur
would be in the first cight if they
would get animals of greater
height and speed, so it is hoped
that before the next tournament


















NOTICE

e Control of Lumber Prices (De-

starts, these players will be

retail selling prices of |mounted as they reer ys. or

2 Grades” are as follows: — gomery, the big black gelding
pathiicios Shantediaat 2s lows played his last chukka a few

weeks ago and has gone to work
on a Plantation where he will be
more in his element as he never
did like Polo, His owner has re-

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

Children’s skin ailments need the soothing
touch of Germolene Ointment. It re-

COLUMN TWO
Ordinary Retail Price
(not more than)

i ——— —-,placed him with Bisenhower a lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
| broad-chested “charger” who as gives prorection against the entry of
yet knows nothing about the

$34.05 per 5 bundles containing harmful becteria. You will find, too,

game, but gives the impression

that Germolene
1,000 that he fears nothing and is will- abrasions, Di en eat one oa
$26.80 per 5 bundles containing} ins to learn everything ulates the growth of new skin. Keep @
1,000



tin of Germolene handy for family use.
FOR

SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS

IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS
GERMOLENE soothes at a touch heals in record time.



99 HORSES ENTERED
FOR UNION PARK MEET

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 2.
Ninety-nine horses—a _ record
number—have been entered for
the new Union Park Turf Club's | °99%9%99%6%99999999%99109%000949%59999390009000%)

Easter Meeting which is scheduled |

.
to begin on March 24 at Union }
Park. Three entrants are listed |

e
BORDERED SPUNS

9.3.51.—I1n.

NOTICES
FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatlantique

from Barbados, two from British
Guiana and two from Grenada.

Mr. Bertie Creeks “My Own",
three-year-old half—bred chestnut
gelding who won his three starts,
was winner of the two-shilling
sweepstake run in connection with
the two-day Spring meeting of
the Tobago Turf Club at Shirvan
Park, Tobago.

Fresh, Lovely

GREEN ESCHALOT

WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Any Quantity
DOMINICA | MARKETING

SAILINGS TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

COLOMBIE: March 12th
via Martininque and
Guadeloupe

GASCOGNi.: March 31
via St, Lucia, Martinique,

Guadeloupe, Antigua







AGENCY
SOUTHBOUND Dial 4015,
COLOMBIE: March Ist aoe New Styles — 20 Shades
Trinidad; La Guiara, WANTED FOR CASH

Curacao, Cartegena,
Jamaica

Accepting Cargo, Mail

Used & Mint Stamps and Designs $1.44 yd.

of the British West Indies, GOOD e

SPECIAL REMNANTS

In JERSEYS, CREPES, ROMAINES and GEORGETTES in
DRESS, SKIRTS, BLOUSE LENGTHS—at Unbeatable Prices

Passengers PRICES PAID at CARIBBEAN
cee STAMP SOCIETY, No. 10 Swan
at Street, 3.3.61—4n,





R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd.

AGENTS
Phone 3814

= SESS aS ee

BAND CONCERT

By kind permission of the
Commissioner of Police
THE POLICE BAND
“will give a

CONCERT

at HASTINGS ROCKS





tte
uy

A Full Range of Ladies, Gents and Children’s
UNDERWEAR at Unbeatable Prices














Satie Sib - ate Baits TO-NIGHT —————eeeeaaseeseeeseyneemnamneasisistiiesesnenntslbaienncnseasensinenineianaensepananans

Bties Rosen, Santee nar At 8 O'Clock
ar ar. ur. ar j
‘ . In aid of ‘aid v

TA ee eae ee St, Lawrence Child Health MILL SEC ONDS.

16 Apr. 18 Apr) 27 Apr = 97 Apr Centre BOYS’ SHIRTS ME

Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives > a
Barbados Boston St.John Halifax 2 for $1.00 2 for $1.00
. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr. _-
: 14 Apr. 23 Apr. pe 24 Apr WHOLESALE CHILDREN’S VESTS

12 May, 21 May. ~ 22 May LADIES VESTS
All vesuels fitted with cold storage cham. and en

2 for $1.00 nen

CHILDREN’S PANTIES

aales On application to :—



RETAIL

GENTS so 2 for $1.00
LAMPS, Reflector for Shops, One and
Ete. 3 for $1.00 3 for $1.00

Ideal as hand Lamp without
Reflector. Price .,.. $1.80
PRIMUS STOVES and Parts
PRIMUS LANTERNS,
CHUIMNEYS and Parts,

RICYCLE TYRES, TUBES,
ACCESSORIES all at keen
Prices.



—

HOUSE

:
x
S. ALTMAN, Proprietor

LOCALE AE SPE LEED
SST

Chandler's Hardware }/j |

six" 1 Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

Phone 4024,
Tailors and Clothiers

e
Leisure time becomes

THE BARGAIN

30, Swan Street
COCR G Ot styt,

ted, Roseau, Dominia,, fur sail-
of call are Dublin, London, or

COMM LAMM oe

“












FOR SALE
STRATHMORE

Culloden Road.

HEAD LANE. even more

well tailored

pleasant in distinctive

Handsome, 2-storey stone
property with shingle roof
and pine floors, Contains 2
reception, dining room, 4
bedrooms, 3 baths and toi-
lets. Extensively remodelled.
Walled grounds of about
15,000 sq. ft. Pleasant town
residence suitable for Doc-
tor’s Home or Guest House.

ost distressing disease and

a tern Ree

| ——
| John M. Bladen
REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

THES

indivi-
dually cut to measure

SuRey

Tailored as you specify.



GUARANTEED.

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.

in Tailoring

s Mc. Enearney & Co., Ltd.






Foremost name





a
ro
ie



PAGE «1G?



Tih

é AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951 }
F

TATHER: Fine TRACK: Firm|

DALKFITH STAKES—Class A and Lower—si,100
($365, $185, S60)—5!. Furlongs

1. DEMURE 99 + 2.lbs. Mr. S. A, Walcott.
s Jockey Lutchman. |
2. SUN QUEEN . 122 bs. °Mr. J: W. Chandler.

; Jockey -Yvonet.
3, BURNS”. J. D, Chandler.

. Jockey, Crossley
TIME: 1.06%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $5.32; Place: $1.54, $1.94, $1.78

Boon Race

142 Ibs. Hon

‘BORECAST: $37.80. }
LSO RAN: Landmark (120 lbs., Wilder) ; Infusion (117 lbs., Holder), |
epper Wine (127 Ibs., Lattimer).

START: Good, iNISH:. Driving,.1 length, } length

WINNER: 3-yr.-old_ b.f, Winterhelter-Therapia.

TRAINER: Mr. S. Ax Walcott.

Hth Race : BRIDGETOWN HANDICAP—Class F and Lower 3 Y.0
—$700 ($235, $115, $40)—5'4 Furlongs

1. CLEMENTINA



117 )bs. Mr. I, O.°C. Perkins.
Jockey P. Fletcher
2. HIlsLO: =... 121 lbs. Mr. L. J. Sealy. « Jockey Wilder.
8. SOPRANO ....... 115 lbs. ‘Mr. L. E. Fisher. Jockey O’Néil.
TIME: 1.083. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $15.00. Place: $4.42, #6.82,
34.50

$4.50.

FORECAST: $290.00

ALSO RAN: Waterbell (122 Ibs., Crossley); Usher (126 lbs., J. Belle),
Vanguard (124 lbs. Thirkell), Gallant Hawk (108 lbs. Ali)

START: Good. FINISH: | Easy, 2 lengths, } length.
WINNER: 3-yr.-old br.f. Roidan—Fiona.

TRAINER: Mr. I. O. C. Perkins.

1th Race : CHELSEA HANDICAP—Class F and Lowe: 4 ¥.0. and

Over—$700 ($235, $115, $40)—7'4 Furlongs
1. APRIL FLOWERS 122 Ibs
2 APOLLO

Miss K. C. Hawkins
Jockey P. Fletcher.
Miss K. C, Hawkins
Jockey Thirkell.
Mr. F. E. C. Bethell

Jockey Lutchman.
PARI-MUTUEL; Win: $9.74; Place: $2.88, $2.18,

130 Ibs.

3. -FIRST FLIGHT .. 127 lbs.
TIME : 1.353.
#1. 80.

FORECAST: $7.96

ALSO RAN: Cross Bow (128 Ibs., Holder); Miss Friendship (125
Ibs., Yvonet), Epicure (107 lbs., O'Neil); Foxglove (117 lbs., Wild-
er), Little Dear (108 5 lbs., Lattimer).

START: Good. FINISH: Close, neck 14 length.
WINNER: 5-yr.-old hb. b.m. Battle Front-H.B. Mare
TRAINER: Miss K. C. Kawkins

"12th Race : GARRISON HANDICAP—Class B and Lower—-$900

($300, $150, $55)—7\4 Furlongs
1. HARROWEEN .

. 110 Ibs. Mr. D. V. Scott. Jockey Lutchman.

2. LANDMARK . 126 lbs. Myr, ‘V. Chase. Jockey O'Neil,
3. SUN QUEEN .. 126 Ibs. Mr. J. -W. Chandler,

Jockey Crossley.
TIME: 133). PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3.48, Place: $2.20, $3.38
FORECAST: $34.92.
ALSO RAN: Sliainte (130 lbs., P. Fletcher); Aberford (100 +. 13

lbs., Wilder), Nan Tudor (116 Ibs. J.
START: Good.

WINNER :
TRAINER ;

Belle).

FINISH: Very Easy, 4 lengths, 1 length.
3-yr. old gr.f. Harroway-Thyime Wood,

Mr. R. H. Mayers

13th Race : HALF BRED CREOLE HANDICAP—Class G and Lower
$600 ($200, $100, $40)—514 Furlongs

Les ES a 136 lbs. Mrs, G. V. Marshall.

Jockey Yvonet,
Zu CHESS. (0505 525: 123 lbs. Mr. Mr. F. E. Bynoe.

Jockey Holder,
SAeRO IN Beka) ss. snares s 117 lbs. Mr. J. C. Payne. Jockey Crossley.
TIME: 1.093. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $6.16; Place: $2.10, $1.32,

$1.96.
FORECAST: © $13.32.

ALSO RAN: Maytime (107 4. 3 lbs,, P. Fletcher); Wilmar (101
+ 3 lbs., J. Belle), Mopsy (110 + 2 Ibs,, Wilder); Monsoon (118
lbs, Ali), Blue Diamond (121 Ibs. Lixtchman) .

START: Good. FINISH: Comfortable, 1 length 4 length.

WINNER: 6-yr.-old hb. b.m. Foxbrush—Lady Gift.

TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers.

14th Race : CASTLE GRANT HANDICAP—Class D and Lower—$800
($265, $135, $45)—514 Furlongs

“1, BOW BELLS ..,. 126 lbs. Mr. Cyril Barnard. :

Jockey Holder.

2. CROSS ROADS .. 114 lbs. Mr, A. Chin. Jockey O'Neil.
3. MARY ANN 123 lbs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.

Jockey Yvonet.
TIME: 1.07): PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.96. Place: $1.50, $1.56,
FORECAST: $6.12,
ALSO RAN: First Flight (112 lbs: Lutchman).
START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Driving 4 length, neck.
WINNER: 4-yr.-old ch.f. Burning Bow—Felicitas.
TRAINER: Hon. V. C. Gale.

15th Race : SPRING HANDICAP—Class C and Lowc;-—$800

($265, $135, $50)—7!4 Furlongs



1, FAIR SALLY .'... 124 Ibs. Mr. L. J. Sealy. Jockey Crossley.
2. ARUNDA .. 98 + 7 lbs. Mr. M. EB, R. Bourne.

Jockey J. Belle.
3. NOTONITE ...... 114 lbs, Mr. D. V. Scott. Jockey Ali.
TIME: 1.343. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $4.34. Place $1.90, #4.86,

$1.74.
FORECAST: $198.20,

ALSO RAN:,. Miss Panic (112 lbs., Thirkell); Kitchen Front (126 lbs.,
O'Neil) Ability (110 + 6 lbs., Yvonet); Doldrum (98 + 13 Ibs., Hol-
der); Flieuxce (130 bs., Wilder); High and Low (102 lbs., Lutchman);
Fuss Budget (103 6 lbs., P. Fletcher); Court O’Law (124 Ibs., Lat-

timer,.

START: Goad, FINISH: Close, 4 length, neck.
WINNER: 4-yvr.-old bf. Straight Deal—Princess Sally.

TRAINER: _ S. Massiah.

"16th Race : BARBADOS TURF CLUB HANDICAP—Class A and
Lower—$1,000 ($335, $165, $60)—9 Furlongs

1, {SLAIN PE 112 Ibs. Mr. I. O. C. Perkins
Jockey P. Fletcher.
(GUN SITE . - 119 lbs. Mrs. J. D. Chandler.
Jockey Lattimer.
3. ATOMIC II 130 Ibs. Mr. A. Chin. Jockey Lutchman. |

TIME: 1.55}, PARI-MUTEUL: Win: $1.32, $2.74;

(7-yr-old br.g. O.T.C.-Sunrise,
TRAINERS: (Mr, lL. O. C, Perkins. .
. (Mr. J. W. Chandler.

Place $1.96,
$3.52. |
FORECAST: $11.18 |
ALSO RAN: Kebate (108 Ibs., J. Belle); Tiberian Lady (106 +5 Ibs.,
Wilder); Pepper Wine (112 lbs., Crossley).
START: Fairly Good. FINISH: Dead Heat.
WINNERS: \6-yr.-cld b.g. Nosegay—Rubia Linda.

sey Do Ic Every Bime tk



















ET OBLIVIA AND BOY FRIEND
START A SOFA SNUGGLE-AND
IN WALK HER PARENTS, SURE
AS TAXES +.





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SG OBLIVIA FORGOT HER



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



~ RACING RESULTS | Harroween, Bow |00 0
Bells Set New <‘B’



} Gun Site, an old favourite, had
meet-
first
|Gun Site which is owned by Hon
ible J, D, Chandler is from the
Chandler Stables, and Slainte
owned by Mr. Perkins is trained
by the owner!
P. Fletcher was the most suc-
cessful jockey yesterday, riding
Class Records x0). 32%

ANOTHER DAY of keen racing was witnessed by a
faizly large crowd at the Garrison Savannah yesterday.
Onee again the weather was kind, and the track was firm

and fast.

Two Class Records went by the board. Hai1oween in
the “B” Class company over a distance of seven and a half
furlongs in the Garrison Handicap, beat Pique’s record of
1 minute 33% seconds in 1935, by one-fifth of a second.

Results Of 2/-

Field Sweep

SECOND DAY

NINTH RACE
Prize Ticket Amount
First 0808 $210 49
Second 0333 120,26
Third 1534 60 14
Fourth 1761 30 07
Fifth 1497 - 10 60
Sixth Oli 10 00
Seventh 1559 10 60

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos:
0807, 0809, 0332, 0574, 1533, 1535, 1760, 1762

TENTH RACE
Prize Ticket Amount
First 0428 3315 93
Second 2952 180 58
Third 0098 90 26
Fourth 2526 45 14
Fifth 2982 10 00
Sixth 3261 . 10 00
Seventh 1391 10 00

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets

TWELITH RACE

THIRTEENTH RACE

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets

FOURTFENTH RACE
Prize

FIFTEENTH RACE
Prize

Ticket Amount
First 2412 $476.77
Second 1105 272.44
Third 0604 136.22
Fourth 0242 68.11
Fifth 2594. 10 00
Sixth 0406 10.00
Seventh 0519 ... 10,00
Eighth 0186 10 00
Ninth 1072 10.0
Tenth - 3087 10.90
Eleventh 3476 10.90

ach to holders of Tickets N¢

$5 00 e
2411, 2413, 1104, 1106, 0603, 0605, 0241, 0243.

SIXTEENTH RACE

Prize Ticket Amouw
First (2433 $397

(1639 397
Third 0055 i44
Fourth 2030 72
Fifth 0065 10
Sixth 69

i <.
$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Ne

Nos:
0427, 0429, 2951, 2953, 0097, 0099, 2525, 2527

FLEVENTH RACE
Prize Ticket Amount
First 209% $430 15
Second 2338 245 80
Third 2329 122 90
Fourth 0488 61 45
Fifth 0262 10 00
Sixth 0815 10.00
Seventh 2331 10 00
Dighth 2773 10 00

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos:
2092, 2094, 9337, 2359, 2328, 2330, 0487, 0429.

Prize Ticket Amount
First 1731 $420 21
Second 1624 240 12
Third 3216 120 06
Fourth 2684 60 03
Fifth 1256 10 00
Sixth 2011 10 00

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos
1730, 1732, 1623, 1625, 3215, 3217, 2683, 2685

Prize Ticket Amount
First 0195 $439 98
Second 0082 261 42

hird 1672 125,71
Fourth 2525 62.85
Fifth 2130 10.00
Sixth 0212 10.00
Seventh 3282 10.00
Eighth 2808 10.00

Nos
0194, 0196, 0081, 0083, 1671, 1673, 2524, 2526

Ticket Amount
First 2076 . $466.30
Second 2412 266.46
Third 2039 133.23
Fourth 1248 66.61

$5 00 each to holders of Tickets Nos:
2975, 2977, 2411, 2413, 2038, 2040, 1347, 1349,

os!

00

Da!

2432, 2434, 1638, 1640, 0054, 0056, 2029, 2031.



What's on To-day

Extra-Mural Dept., Univer-
sity College of the West
Indies are organising a
Conference of Health
Officers. in Queen’s Park
-— 9.30 a.m,

Police Courts and Corset of
Appeal—10.00 a.m.

Sale of one 1945 Dodge
truck (Army type) at the
yard of the Scavenging
Dept, —- 1.00 p.m.

Sale 5-tonner Truck 1946
Modei (damaged vehicle)
at the General Omnibas
Garage, Nelson Street —
?.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema will give a
Show at St. Michael’s Bay
Pasture — 7.30 p.m.

Police Band gives a Charity
Concert (St Lawrence
Child Clinic) at the Hast-

ings Rocks — 8.00 p.m.
CUNEMAS:

Plara (Bridgetown) —Women 4 15
Men 5.40 pm, “Story of Bob
And Sally”

Plaza (Oistins) “The Return of the

Frontiersman” 5 00 & 8 80 pan,

Globe “The Gun and the Men

Behind I.”
“Cavon City” &
4.20 & 8.30 p.m
Oiympie “Bill and Coo” and
‘Sands of Iwo Jima” 4.30 & 8.15

“Micky”

p.m,
Roxy “Daughter of Don Q” 4 30
and 8 15 pm.



ee

By Jimmy Hatlo



| “TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING”



added two to the two he got last
Saturday, and is therefore the
most successful jockey forthe
meeting up to now.



Tne other was in the Castle
Grant Handicap over a distance
of five and a half furlongs, when

Bow Bells in B Class company
beat Examiner's record of 1
minute 74/5 seconds in 194f

und equalled in 1949 by the Gam-
bler. Bow Bells’ time was 1 min.
7 1/5 seconds.

Harroween which is owned by
Mr. D. V. Scott was trained by
Mr. R. H, Mayers, and Bow Bells,
owned by Mr. Cyril Barnard is
from the stables of Hon'ble V. C.
Gale.

Yesterday’s programme was
off to a fine start when Mr. S. A
Walcott's bay filly, Demure, car-
rying 101 lbs., beat a field of six.
including the favourite Burns
who had won the B.T.C. Stakes
on the opening day of the meet.

In this opening’ event yéster-
day Burns carried the tor
weight of 142 lbs. Demuré won
the race a length ahead of Sun
Queen,

In the
Mr.
after

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Bridgetown Handicap

M. E. R. Bourne’s Usher,
reaching the judge two
lengths ahead of Clementina, had
the misfortune of losing his

Clementina who is owned by
J, O. C. Perkins by whom she is
also trained, therefore became
Mie winner of the event, and the
Forecast and Pari Mutuels booths
paid out their highest amounts
for the day. The Forecast paid
$290.00, and the Pari Mutuels
paid out $15.00.

Gun Site and Slainte dead
heated in the final event of the
day — the B.T.C. Hanaicap —
for first place. In this race a
ding dong tussle ensued between
these two horses and Atomic
down the straight. for home.
Atomic, who in the first event
of the day’s programme was
left flat footed at the Starting

TRADE MARK i
WASELINE is the registeres! trade mark
ef the Chessbroagh Mig.

Go, Condé

Gate after giving much _ trouble,
showed excellent form in this
race and led the field for some
time down the home _ stretch.
Until the horses reached the
judge it could have been any-
body's race, so close together

were the three,

The Weather .
TO-DAY

Sun Rises : 6.13 a.m.

Sun Sets : 6.11 p.m.

Moon (First Quarter) :
Mech 15

Lighting : 6.30 p.m.

High Water : 4.39 a.m.,
5.01 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) : nil
Total for month to yester-

day : .01 ins.
Temperature (Max.) :
83.0° F.



Smile
at yourself

| Temperature (Min.) :

73.5° F.

Wind D'rection (9 a.m.) :
E. (3 p.m.) W.

Wind Velocity : 5
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) : 29.945
(3 p.m.) : 29.862

miles per

—_————$——<—$—

| ——ERNIE'S

TO-NIGHT |



Are your tecth as white as



Please meet at





; a HAIR
place, when an objection .to the j °
winner was sustained, am,

in the mirror...

Are your teeth
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Put yourself to the Mirror Test !
could be? Is your smile as bright
as it should be? The answer is

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for Pepsodent contains Irium to

We. TS O%C

most successful. owner

Periins was the ]
yesterday,

with two wins to his credit
while he, Mr. S. A. Walcott-ane |
Mr. R. H.. Mayérs also trained |

two each of yesterday’s winners.
Mayers is the most
with five win:

So. far, Mr
successful trainer
already to his credit.

The Field Sweep. reached the|
Highest
amount for the day was $476.77

$400.00 mark five times.

in the Spring Handicap.
The

gramme.

ONIC

MAKE THIS PEPSODENT
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|
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PAGE 1

SitTtata ESTABLISHED 1895 KRIPAV. MAJ "11 PRICE Fl' s,l t \\l U.K. condemned over /•mr'lfFT Britiih Guiana „ .,<,.., Bow 0e, 9 and Harroween •iiii,v \ %  > U.N. troops make%  %  a\fp Queuille atUa fctoi-e ! KINQfJTON. Jamaica, March 8 JAMAICA today defeated B.O. by the comfortable, margin of 224 runs after 21 minute; of play onl the fifth day of the first Jamaica-B.O. Test. B.O., facing a second innings deficit of 510 runs, scored 266 for 7 yesterday and today the three remaining wickets fell for an additional 20 runs. "Asturias^Will Not Come ToW.1. < 0*11x4. A KOI Ml Till: lil.Mi LONDON. March 8 Two hundred and t"i11• %  y,|.> I.idians who -MI, h<.|,mg to come U iiltata .tartly a IT |oiiw io bC disappointed. Thev a >ns< to obtain passages on iho Ainu 'i.itian immigrant ship AotwrUs which iho Ministry or rtenapor; were considering dlvcrtln,; vu Trinidad and Jamaica %  turn to Britain in May The> arc goinu to be disappointed bt oa ta*) DM Mumtiv of Tram porl to whom the Asturlas is en, %  lh,u there \va not sufficient demand for passage" The Ministry wore prepared to oivcrT the vesj-cl if 600 application! wt-ie i.-ueived Only Mn tropic applied. Ramadhin Wants To Stay BOMBAY. March 8 Only Sonn.v R,,madhm the West Indies spinner appeared unhappy '." leave when the Commonwc.iltli cricket team left here for England to-day i f con; home." leave India which uder my Leslie Ames Ihe captain, said that they had had a very enjoyable trip. Frank Worrell Ihe olher West Indies player in the team, did not leave with the main party but is living hock — Renter McWatt Injured • ttmm Opr ".CWfI*SS*SfaU GEORGETOWN, March 6. Carlton Heeic, wicket-keeper batsman, was selected to fly to Jamaica to replace McWatt wno is .suffering from a n injured linger and is unable to play in the second test. A cable from W M Green, the B-G. representative on the West Indie* Selection Committee .said. "It Is imperative that we have a replacement for McWatt due lo Injury. He must leave B.G. by Friday's plane." Kenneth Wlshart announced last night that B.G. selectors in Jamaica recommended Heece and B-G. Airways are doing everything possible to secure a passage en Friday's plane. Passage rtoir. Trinidad has been secured but passage from B G to Ti still not secured. U.S. SENATOR KILLED IN ACCIDENT WASHINGTON. March 8 Democrat Senator Virgil <_"haf%  he was injured in a collision between Ml BlotOI cat and a lorry. ,ih cuts the Democratic %  jnritv In Ihe Senate tii nine —Rcalrr Aif Valentine who claimed 5 for iI'll arm spinner-tOOk tWO more of tn. wtdnta Killing today for II more run Onuhlni vwth the good ng I'tes of 7 for 112 In 36.4 overs. The wicket too helped Valen. i mem considerably ye.. 1 today some t thOUldOT hiifl: Ukd others keeping uncomfortably low The DMOnd Twt opens on Saturday I'atolr 6 and Pollox 0 I D.G.'s second innings at the 0V< I right score of 268 for 7 .,!... tine completed his over, iinflnish1 •d fi.nii the previous day and Palolr took a maiden over from Mudie Skinner Hoi itto kept on his slow left arm attack. In Mudlo's second over, with the day's play %  unute, old. Rollox hit (cross a shorti.'li ball which kept! low SIMI hi(ciitrc -tump was uptouted for 0 It was a poor-stroke lv a useful batsman as Hollo* dh B B. in such desperate straits. Trim played out the over and Patoir faced Valentine again, off driving the last ball of the ovei for a confident* single Johnson made a magnificent onehand effort to catch Potolr at gully but f.iiicd tulled Mudie to the square log boundary (or four and it was obvious that the intention of th-.last pair was to play free cricket fi all hope for saving the game lad vanished by this time. Valentine had Trim caught at gully by Arthur Bonilto playing forward a', one that spun away and B.G.'s tarings rlosed for 288. Trim having scored 7 and Gaskin lo not out. The scores: IAMAI4A 1st INSISi.;;* f KIT I-II rilUM i-[ INMM,. ,.. %  i >i MI I .'\|i DfNIMQI >W i nairi-ii nciANAs ;ND IX.MKUH WllKI lb w. b nn>il1(a at %  Ujlcy b Valrnlin B Ponwud itptl b Valmtlnr 5 Chmtiani b v i %  Tr.rn c A. Ikiilltu I, V.ilrrill <• <-. ikln not out %  h ?. Ill 2 Kb I Total BoWI.ING AMALTBU Senate And llon-r Should Approve WASHINGTON. March 8. The two Senate Committees today voted by 14 to 10 to require both Senate H nd House of Representatives' approval of any assignment of American troops to the North Atlantic Pact Army. By the same vote the B—t* Foreign Relations and Armed Services Committees approved the proposal by Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Republican. Massachusetts. to put the Senate on record as savin,; European nations must make a "major contribution" to ground forces under the command of General Elsenhower. -Beater. Trading Limited In London Exchange LONDON, March 8. Caution and hesitancy remained uppermost In the London Stock exchange despite the overnight strength of Wall Street Trading was limited, prices %  % % %  seldom tested and only meagre new aceoun' business was rcChangM rcveide-d narrow ImgularNy. British Government funds halved by one sixteenth while among industrials, textiles and rayons wore helped. BOfda unproved but the trend of other groups was lo lower levels Commodity shares showed dullness. Tins remained under the influence uf the loWCfl pn< •• <>f metal. Oils failed to hold an In'tial .elective lirmncss. and losses of half a point were shown by Japanese bonds. Changes In gold shares were mainly to lower levels, but-coppers brightened on some newaccount buying. Allies Move Up In Central Korea TOKYO, March ft THE UNITED NATIONS iroops attackin,; E-il ui Seoul advanced to-dav alone |h <' whole ltw miles of ilio Central Korean front, an American Eighth Armv man aaid to-night But they still will not come up against th.main bodj of the Communist armies reported grouping i<: %  m offensive. Officer Injured In Clash With Bandits ASMARA. FJIIT;(KA March 8. A British officer and corporal were injured yesterday in a clash with bandiu about six miles fron. Asmara. Both men were brought to the British military hospital in Asmara last night. The officer with bullet wounds in his stomach was said to be dangerously 111. The two men were on patrol when the clash occurred. —Renter \l IIH mi: I llll U.S. Casualties In Korea WASHINGTON. March B Total American casualties in the Korea war rose loa Jo 52.44g. Utsmudteg 3 known to have died. The figure, representing notifications sent to next of kin up to March 2. was 1.773 higher than last week's. Analysis wasKilled in action 7.857; died of wounds 911; missing and known to have died. 85; wounded 33,781; missing-known t<. be prisoners 110; missing but since returned |<> safety SflO otherwise missing 8,724. Total armv casualties were 43,598. nav> casualties 59\ marine casualties 7.838, air force casualties 418. —Reuter UNEASY FEELING IN GRENADA ifsssa or on OHINMhWI GRENADA. March 8 Last night fires still leave an uneasy feeling ilthough Galr y in an address tonight urged all workers to refrain from violence. But the strike continues. Oalry also said he planned t" go to Jamaica to see Bustamante to get a commission to enquire Into "maladministration of the authorities handling the strike situation." The manual and mental Workers' Union has received $100. contribution from a St. Vincent movement to assist t ihi icntral front North Koreei Mlth Korean 1 :-.irk .1 >• %  I t ti: %  I kH %  hfl v C'ommun.(pie tins morning said Communist > peel 24 hour.; 1" il.IV, IX' imtitiK \'. e In. iv , %  %  l u>.. wlnii! Korean campaign. Fight medium bombers combined, American. Australian and Sou'h African air forces, flew 70 %  nt flrliuj weed 1 Pilots claimed to have Rtlle I Of snaundi d aboot S00 t' %  1 early 100 vrhiclsw carrying troops or supplier Superrortreasea of u*v \ 1 raid were taken lo improve • liey of the fire service in Castries after the Rnt fire, and il. if he will make „ staleinen! on 'he BtCond Drg 5. MiSi 1,11 hi recenl outbreeJa in Otenada in ., third question in which he sayf that the Colony has suffered ierrnanenl damage (O its economy iii view of the diminished onBdMcgpH with which tnve-tors apo otlM-n will now VfctW >' He will roupl,. this with n request In Mr tVulUhl lo M V t fU Ing law and order throughout the West Indies with a view '.. an fining th.it there hi no r e petition of outbreaks etthi 1 ID Orenadl or rUcwiii ti.ni wa %  1 Wi Indian %  % %  1 In ih. 1 p lul%  'i be 1 both In 1 %  1 I that both pre) %  the 1 oft I %  w.-ui Price thai to call 11 e Cul 11 %  %  %  %  %  %  I ion ii of Empire I "The weifan <>f tin* Brltash W I Indies : not tl Canada but 11 I 1 '.uch a sliest' dwj RICH af relun — t" laiieseerssii ixmhjaanM^^-W % % %  lTritnn7. %  %  Truth Must Be Told No Gags On Press LONDON March 8. Tin; TIMKS and tho Conservative Yorkshire I'MI commented to-day that the permanent closuiv by the i tine (iovernment of the Independent newspaper La I'rensM would he foolish (La 1'rriK.a nM not appeared since news vendors boyCOttad Hie ptpei on January 26). Bgypl W ill Relax CAIRO. March 8 Egypt announced today that she would relax "unneiieigii fortnallties" In the Suez Cannl while maintaining the right to search ships to bar ed reaching Israel. Reuter. 7 Japs Will Hang ACSTHA1.ASIA M I An A i.. Court here todav sentenced sovn former member* of ihr [mpeiial Jaoanese Nav* -< %  • Australian and i Ille t prisoners of war. Two i hrr Jannneee were sentenced 'O llf I •Jiree tc Ij >e..t chart,*' M" itsen tooa %  ;. Dutch T moi in IW2 The "uu has now .'^ntenced %  nt s* war criminals to are ke|i* hi solitary confinement (teniing %  i n %  Australian Govegi Tne Government has not vet ronflrmerl Tnc llmsa said ihe AreenUnwnn* ntl irifvanctagainst II not been pub doled; "ThCiovei intent is doing more harm .' %  by tbeea ion, than couiu i be done by the ladeCM •, neni a* a r* oortuu II teems de,. The article nld that with it* l-tgh standing wlierover news1.1. i are read and compared, La 1 reege rauah for the trc country—la to bear their gra'-efully/ the Ttaaee ei The larkhldre Taal H i..i rreaaa'i i mil was that it F tl pn 'tgime. it was not %  vioiim erltie inth and that wasi he eshole story b> i>e%  i.nfoM. AAeotute <• %  lahee nowei: it i>uuwi<*i it i eon mtllt iibtllty. Ihe only ptr-u il can lolorata is one willing Uj play the game of exclaiming tsj uch m lift they may i Latent I %  %  ,>-. i %  in Brit tin II Argentine is concerned, we hop'.* that La rwi .i i %  et I M ii a o ild be i b >i omen loi the fntuic '\ DOlUleal hf. levlee -il-M I www vi(Mi\l Mi.IllURi; in Caatrles show inc the devastated area The ruin* ei the re eai gi ioi 11 th< Beecaaaetei -i M M.. > t ,II( i c fu iih the Meesweael t hurch in the barkgrvund. ...I*. • II HUK—l N.U. MllUMTI-411 •IXIIIMS \l oi N im -i.i.,-,., si MMI %  llellkn ATOMIC U-L.Uk>>*> pn —Henler. Me.l And TrTde Talk. BUENOS AIRBI M Britain wid Ai appeured satiined with pha*e of meat and tr.de talk. which were renewed mk.-lnw. TELL THE ADVOCATE THE NEWt RING llll DAY OR Mint Panama Bunk Closed V \ Mirrfi 6 itc bank,! i>anv did not 'pen its djors today follow1 %  suspend its i.ptr.itn.n* len.pora:'I Bonk dirotors b.id ien authorities that it-, .itgerousl. low as the result of abnormal %  %  Government help bul if h^s ^eeii roported th?t the Government has now decided to withdraw port—Outer WINE — the true spirit of the grape is accepted the world over as the right accompaniment to gracious living. Make your choice — K. W. V. Paarl Tawny Wemmersock Pale Dry Sherry Oiilr.buton It M JONfS & Cc Ltd



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PAGE tlGlir BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MARCH . 151 RACING RESULTS M OAaUUSO* MVANNASj ISH7K8DAY. MARCH 8. IM1 ATHF-K TRACK Fi: Ra.e KM Kl ll)i --I \KI 1*301 *l5. S68>—5 and Lower—SI.160 I'tirlm*. 1>KM< RI 1 MH gan I2r lh> Mr J HI II... Ron Walcntl. JOCke) Lutchman Jocfcej Ron J D Chandler. Jm-kcv* Crosslev *u\ I Mf PABI-M1 H Kl, Win $5.31: Place SI 54, SI 04. St 78 Ai SO I .fusion (117 It* Feppei Wine mar). ST.Mtr FiNISH Driving. 1 length. J length llh Hjf, ; i llftllPt.HOU V IMMHi tl' ( I,.. F -mi Lewer 3 V O —8780 (8333. 3119. M)—5, Farioni. ktENTTNA 7 1b*. Mr I, O t IViku. Jockcv P. Fletcper 12] lb*. Mr. L J. Staiy. Jwkrv Wilder. 115 lb* Mr. L E. ttMiar Jockey 0 PABl-Mt Tl'EI WinI50U. Place54 42. 82. B Hi-i.n S> I'ftAM) t 08|. 84.SO. KOBECA.ST s21*0 00 AISO KAN. Water bell i 122 lb*., Crosslev j: Usher (128 lbs J Hello. Vangu-ird (124 lbs. Thirkell i. Gallant Hawk .108 lbs. AID START FINISH law, I length*. 1 length, i i KoiO-n Fiona. ntAINSR Hi i o ( perking llth Kacr i 111 I.si \ HANIIH Al-Claae as* Uwr 4 Y O Over—8188 IK3S. SUV 848) —T' ; Fnrlong. l APRIL FLOWBR9 122 lbs 2. APOLLO ... ISO lbs. 3. Fifisi ii nun ill u> MlM K C Hawkins Jockey P Fletcher Miss K. C. Hawkins Jockey Thirkell Mi r I C Hcthcll Jockcv Lutchinan. TIMS .I-.' PAIU-MLTUEL Win $9 74: PlaceS2.88 S2 18. 41.80. rORBCAST$7 96 ALBO BAN: Cms.-. Be. (129 lb*. Holder). Miss Friendship (125 I), Bplcl 0 Ni'ili. Foxglove (117 lbs.. Wilder |, I title Ui;.r <|U B lbs. Laltimcri START: (IOTHI. FINISH Clone. nccK U Jrnth WINNBIt: 5-yr.-old hh b.m Baltic Front HB Marc rRAINER Mlsi K -' K. Harroween, Bow Bells Set New 'B 9 Class Records A OTHER l>AY of keen racing */ WltnMWd bj I UM> large crowd at the Qcrriton Savannah yesterday. Onttagain t! WM kind, and the tr.ck was firm and T. Clai % %  rd wen by the board, Hat tow n in Ihe "B" Cliaa company OVr a ui.-Iance of seven and a halt lurlonKs :*i the Garrison Handicap, beat Pique'.record ol l minute :'3\ acconda la ittft, by one-tilth oj a Tne other was In the Castle Grant Handicap over .< distant of five and a half furlong*, when iaii HCII. in B cuss compeaj beat Exai %  %  rd "I i minute 7 4 5 seconds in 194* und equalled in 1949 by the Gambler. Bow Bells' time wai I mln. 7 I' 5 seconds HaiTowfaa v/nkk t$ owned b> Mr O V Scott was trained bj Mi. B H. Mayers, and Bow Bells. owned by Mr. Cyril Barnard is Mables of Hon'ble V. C old fa Ml Reaults Of 2/Field Sweep %  first with M Ualnti I*" I owner yesterday, %  I A. Walcott an.! R !i M..- n alao trained h of yesterday's winners c J i> Chandler owned by Mr Perkins is I. i by the ssful trainer already to his credt; y rr was the most sueThe Field Swevp reached th day. tiding (40o 00 mark five times Higher. Ihraa winners Jockey Lutchman amount foi the day was S478 ~ addjad two to Ihe two he not last in the Spr.ng Handicap Sauirdaj. and i^ therefore Iha the Poocc Hand again delight ihe i r^•ce-8 | >• meeting up to now gramme. LOOK YOUR BEST E SURE OF ^Aitruau vi r*ai wr HB* (INK DAV ; %  iss n m i .1 '. (Idle IIMII MM 1 TUI'I a sssi IMI %  I I W M II a*cr. 12th Ruir OAflUUtON HANDICAP—Clasa B and Lower— %9— (83*0 tisa. S5S—7'j FarlMiga I HAlCROWEEN 2 LANDMAliK :i SUM L'EF.N 110 lb. Mr D V, Scott Jockey Lutchman. 128 lbs Mr V Chase. Jockey O'Ncil. i2 Iba, Mr J w chandler Jockey C'rosslcy S3 48. Pltce; $3.30. $3.38 ran IUJ PARI-MUTUEL FORECAST: S3 92 ALSO RAN: Sialnte (130 lbs.. P Fletcher); Aberford (100 I! lbs. Wilder). Nan TJOe* (MR lbs. J. belle). START Good FINISH Veiy Easy. 4 lengths, 1 length S-yi old grj Hanoway-Thyime Wood. TBAINEK M.. R H. Mayers. 12th R.HALF BIIH) < RIOLF HANDICAP—t'UsCi and Lower t9— (StSO. H00. SIIH—5' %  Furlonii. I VIXEN 138 lbs Mrs. G. V Marshall. Jockey Vvonet. 2. DUCHESS 123 lbs Mr Mr F E Rvnoe. Jockey Holder. Mr. J. C. Payne. Jockey Crosslev. Win: $6.16: Place $2.10. $1.32. 117 lbs. PARl-MrTl'FI. 3 JEWEL TIME: 1 09J. FOBECAST H3 32 ALSO RAN \l .vim,(107 3 Ibv, P. Fletcher); Wilmar < I0t i 3 ]i.v. j Relic), Mopsy (110 j 2 lbs.. Wilder). Monsoon (118 lbs. All). Blue Diamond (121 lbs. Litchman). START Good. FINISH" Comfortable. 1 length ) l.i.gth %  -eld hb. b.m. Foxbrush-Lady Gift. TRAINER: Mr It. 11. Mayers Iff* Bae* CACTIK GRANT HANDICAP -Claaa D and Lewer—M0 t*265. $135. $4$)-5' J Farleng. : HOW BELLS J CROSS ROADS MAKY ANN .. Mr. Cyril Barnard. Jockey Holder. Mr. A. Chin. Jockcv ON, l\ Mr F K C Bethell. Jockey Yvonel Win $1.96. Place: $1.5(1. SI 56 TIME 1.071 I'AHl-MUTUEL iolti:< AST S(l 12. ALSO HAN Pint Flight (MI ll. Lutchman). ^.'w-,, K" ly G ? oc, L FINISH Driving 1 length, neck. l-\r-nt,l ch.f. Burning Bow-Ffllcitas. TRAINER Hon. V. c Qa 13th Kacr SPRING HANDICAP—Class C and Uac'-IUO (S?65 lUS. 85a;-7i. Furlenia I PAIR SALLY 124 Ihs Mr L. J Scaly. Jockcv Crosaley. 2. ARUNIJA 98 | 7 Ihs Mt M. F. R. Bourne. 3 NOTON1TE 114 lbs. Mr. D. V, Scott ^ Jockcv Al TIME: _! 31.' PABI-MUTITKL Win M 34. Plg-e Sl.W. 't4.8 FORECAST SIM) 20 AI^O RAN:. Miss Panic (112 lbs.. Thirkell ; Kitchen Front (126 lbs., kbilii 110 t 8 lbs., Vvonet). Doldrum (98 i 13 lb* Holder); Klieux.-* (130 bs-, Wlldr). High and Low (102 lbs., Lutchm.-in I; FUSS Budget < 103 (. |bl I' F. .-tclicri: Court OL.iw (124 lbs., Latin. | SEftSTi, Good FINISH: Close. '. length, neck WINNER 4-vr-old b.f. Straight Deal-Princess Sally. TRAINER: S. Maasiah. I8UI R'f : BAItBAIMIS TI'RF CUB HANDICAP—Clam A and Lewer—S1.08 ($335. $185. $60)-9 Furlanga : ISLAINTE 112 iba. (Cl'N SITH . 119 lb> Mr> Mi I. O C Perkins Jockey P Flctctur D Chandlar. Jockey L,ittim< i 3. ATOMIC II 131) Ibfc. Mr. A Chin Jockcv Lutchman THIS i BS PARi-inrrsuL tru %iM %  • n pta. H u a %  i (101 lbs.. J Iklh-i; Tibcnan Ljdy <108 .5 lln.. Wlldei i: l II.' Ibi Crossley' START F. %  Good FINISH: Dead Hc.it WINNEI 8 t i %  %  \. %  ; gu Rubia IJnda. I i -old lir.t O IT.-Si rinse TBAINERJ in c Perkins. (Mr, J w Chandler. %  rin i-i ,•.,.,. I! FUih mo. ujt. isxj. ....i. raurth Fifth Klklh Sve-il" Eiirhih Yes erday*! prograinme was ofT to a fine sU.tt when Mr S A Walcott's bay filly, Demure. ,.nrying 101 lbs., beat a field of six including Ihe favourite Burns A>M>M win. had won the B T.C Btakta *?lt 5 "" the opening da* of the meet M at In till* opening' event yCSterts I* day Burns carried the Ml '•! weight of 142 Iba Demure won iiS the race a length ahead of Sun %  I. No. Queen. as. KOi | n the Bridgetown Handicap Mr M E R Bourne's Usher. after reaching the judkc two \SiTs ,n 8ths ahead of Clementina, had SB w the misfortune of losing his in so place, when an objection to the "AM winner was matt io m Clementina wh is owned by is as J. O. C Perkins by whom she is also Iniined. t'feetore became trie winner of the event, and the Forecast and Pan Mutuels boolbs paid out their highest amounts Am.ni for the dav The Forecast paid •gj" $300.00. and the Pan Mutuels J35iJ paid out $15.00. •o n Gun Site and Slaintc dead %  J*" heated in the final event of 0w ki> NT 1 %  M IMISTI ISJTH a.tt i. net. :*>n ll>l %  TIISTK K\ i lace and led the field for time down the home stretch Until the horses reached the judge it could have been anybody's race, so close together were the three Tin..I Four Hi SS M ra-fi t IS13. im Mil IBM IU tl ISM Ml HI i hokSrf* of Ti. I—lNM M13. SSSI SM. I3T. |]t. aaaai I Ttiird Foui II. gmh Mam '-h-.. Ninth I. ,," tlfl'lil in riisiTM Raca Tl.l.l 1412 1109 0*M OSIS S1SS IO;I S4TS T7 171 H a %  MIS ia HI D li l imldfi ol T.. ... N Mil. MIS. ii4. noa. aan. sau. ni uu %  iv 'i i MM RAM I'n i ittn gan i _, 'isaa m u nut 0V3 144 K Fourih Tl H Finn iwa* l0 oo suth .saw io no m m aca t* hoi Ro,ks — -. MI |, in I IN* HS teas IIMJ.,1 ..,-.,. i .-. MM --,,,. -i,,, a( n„b AnS Sll>" %  < %  lOteUsal Th* %  •lain -I thThey' ll Do U Ever y Time KCT OBLIVlA A*0 BOy FRICN0 SWRT A SCFA SSJSSLE-zIND W *u< HE? BARENTS, SuRE AS TAXESThe Weather TO-DAY San Rises : 6 13 a m. Sun Sets : 6 II p m Moan : 83 8* V Temperature (Mill.) I 73 5* F. Wind D.eclion (!) am > E (3 p m ) W Wli.d Velirll> : 1 miles per hour Barometer (9am) (3 p m > : 28 882 C. B. RICE & CO. Th* CITV CAHACiF TltADiNC. WAITING FOR t III V'.I-NTS ^ T | YOU 1 A Finr K.nuiof %  . l| EXCLUSIVE TWEEDS, WORSTEDS [ :,ml TKIII'K'AI. SI'lTINOS 1 When TAILORED bv US WlH 1'ivi' vou that look ..I PERFECTION. \ V< £ %  J^SM IhifmUtna nou on Show '. 1 aW • 3 11*1 P. ('. S. MAFFEI & (0.. 1 ID. %  SSSSSSJI "TOP SCORERS IN 1AIL0RIM, i <*0<-O<.''-*-*v ^E BOWRANITE AM I-CORROSIVE PAINT Iron and steeluurk tannot corrode beneath a coat of HinMiVMll Prnof aaainsl heat er cold, the corroalve a. ol hi ellles. salt spraand sea-water. BOWR \NITC is used hv rni ii" II shlpplns; lint i. JaHlhnrllle*. ar.il publii' and industrial ronlrac'ari rvtr-. M hm* YOI SHIM I II ISP IT. TOO Tough. (lr\;ble. yet ncu-crackini, BOHRANITi: H made In minv Jt'. active shade-. stocked In . Permaient Green Red. firry. Blark and Super Blark • Heat Keslstins I in tins of Imperial Messurc. Par ()\f Q \l I.US Will ( OX 11 1,080 SO. FT. TOONS 4456 9 AC.CNTWILKINSON & HWNES Co., Ltd.



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PAG I TWO HAKRADOS ADVCK.TI. rUDAT, MARCH , 151 CoAih Catling BIG ROYAL INVESTITURE M K CHARLIE K MBRBILL <-* I Canr%  %  %  %  n .iT 'i %  I %  1066 And All Th.l T HT el S.JO oVIw k in the College H..1I. Hi. puplb of u> their interpretation ol thai >.eii knoa :nMJ Ana Ait M this kind by eg* boys arc always of a high, standard •romlees to lx tion. Proceeds Inm thr play will help finance SporU Team on a visit Royal College in Tl la Will Helo Touriim i ~1 yesterday by B W. 1 A. on his n Trinidad (Jcorgc Rodriam. Deputy Manager o( Colonial li 1 %  Mr. Roddam haj. ,us\ returned from a vfcirl to BrlUatl HondtllW wh*re C.l ecta" are pro— itf-siru; ; ,.'iM... tin ily Ttn t\>i poration, he said, %  at presen" erecting n 25-bedroom hotel M HUH colony which will till u great need. particularly for the Touri't Indus* iry. Mr. Roddam who u t BM time used to live in Barbados, told Carib that he had recently returned from England when' his daughter Son).1* at school. Mrs. Roddam is at present in Jamaica From St. Lucia Mr Roddam %  Dominica before return. is jaxMiea French Honour M R. JACQUn aWaUaVaL i ) QanaraJ for France in Trinidad hat bean u warded the Chevalier ol the I^ceion of Honour ;i Leguebe 1 for a holiday a few months ago. Sifrnrtlr Officer M R R. S WILLIAMSON. Area ill Officer. International .it 1 A L.'s : Spain arned trom Trl morning by IJ.W I.A. Mi Williamson log at the Hotel Ro .. Ttfaidad to-morrow. Maths And French M R. ULRIC CRICK who i.cl>. Mathematics and French at the St. Vincent Grammar School. St. Vincent. left yesterday morning by U-W.I A. for Martinique pagt few weeks Mr. Crick laying here with relatives. H expects to stay two months in Martinique He It on long leave. Trinidad Arrival! A MONG thaardvaai %  dad yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. were Mr Alfonso U. %  i. Mi Tad B< %  %  :\. i rl M irahall, Mr. Nobrlgji arrired fn n Trinidad on Wednesday. New Fxhibition T HE new exhibition at the Bay. bados Museum, which opens to-morrow and continues for one month, will be .i rwtcaeoectlya colicctinii ol paintings by lljmld C. ConncD. Tramferred M R. ANSCaU. PAYMI WM among the passengers leavb relay an u.W.LA.'s An%  III IH'C-I ;ivs Bank's Basseterre Branch. %  l> II \/l I LONDON, Mi A faint winter miai .. inauDd the trees, la lha M,.II thi %  '" ••'•>'*** "V.crs hav momma, when the Km* held the *""*'" '" third — and largest e r the '"l'' "'" Bui the Tnc "'• OUM out from behind the"" %  ••"* cloud: BM crowd collected %  mounted olta •* % %  -X ,„m,i!, A M bemeU the end aff tiai Su "' ' v ry P r, "V worc car memr.-rtd half-way to the floor Fiva minute,. | u ier h* •" %  ld *<> l< *' .d-eoalad musicians A „ Advantage red away — pcrb-ua lio ve mu *' c ,,om tnl> Service training gave the arnv thought ii wjg for .1. jalkry and there were ^ f,„ees the adwantnga. Then *re*t rose %  aTyatal chandeliers WM hp (maJt naarch forward and uncles siater>. " h Ai( l Wlhh badnt coma! ^ngir lfc from an embellishedlaaUIhe sharp lurn the firm handgtrl-f lends and children fui "' '"' %  K ;u > ^av.ng to go <". A rather head-mutatb ,h.ge and the routine fauUlesgSeh ier n ^ivuS^ T^ccarT • I 1 -wn.a cor-omhai buMlao everyone into the lv Mrrled ^ f^^ lMm the two tickets for reP 0 !" 1 '* [ "'*~ ."' *!* *'" ( f ai,< .? r *• eMhans s h a mb l ed rather -efUpped railings ot i Each person carried a Iry from 10 at taad. There were mother: %  ftak %  and laHon," o k r7r'icnds ""** "" "" >hU.k"bouV me. hovmi'to gj i along the wall consciously There Thruire several ehannes from 'here', her husbji. %  •.-teroom the recipif or an Army private who en p.e.w.r i.,d.ti m icdS?,T s !" !> ** "** "r hW cnU wa ca mafrt ^fchj ia th ^aora, as ,f the ballroom w., the vcatlUirs \n longer need the embed, and wore told to Keep raai order A small metal hook r*rade-ground With a men attcuuing the llr^t mvesli'" %  "" .The lady bchuul a lure, ol a serlea wear the expenaupjaining how she bought her Mve Le\ee dress—knee-breeches. o'nt silk stockings, and buckle shoes Means Are Short Nearly everyday some houserregfl h^vc been going to the Department of Agricultu" %  aTatl % %  K"t "bountiful* beans which are imported from the A shipment el expected shortl) on the alert. At I u a -.ht.it.ig.%  : aome shops which have Uaata nnselling them at a great*! | they are sold at the f>. dreater demand by housewives have aggravated '.he IBM on the arrival of the L roent Ihere was such a rush that aUlhc beans were sold out qu.ckl-. Late buyers -s-ere disappointed. There is also a *hortare rf n"T— nor la a tail-coat and toppei 'And I told Maud 1 must have hat," she said. The gales :alaS5 l, f k S *"_!* MR CHARLEA MERRILL l-'lyi-.trrdtiy for the U Back To Antigun M R CHARLIE WAHIIKN arho had baaaj in Uarbados for the past MX weeks on holiday, returned to Antigua yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. Mr Warren is Manager of Bennett Bryson's liottling Works in St. John's Antigua. He was staving with his parents Mr and Mrs C S Warren of "Wyndal". Roekk. Short Visit M R JOHN LAW, rap Uva of Spencer Kirton and CO. in Trinidad wl a Barbados on a short visit, left reglerday for Antigua by H.W.I.A. Kri'iit there he will visit .1 n .ii< | and Ilritish Hondtiras t>cfore rrlurnina lo Trimdail. To Study Nursing M ISS NAN GRANNUM, daughter Of Dr and Mrs. F. N. Grannum el "Montallhj Barbareoa. Is on her way M to study nursing al Clayton M i Altai, Wakeneld, Yorkshire. She left last week by Ihe Goitito. Now wartime <>l admitting two relatives or friend* with eech recipient has i^-en continued I >l 11 the Palace functions thai n* has its own. partirtda i i rtere. Tlwre ".. iMgh-piteheil excitement the Presentation Courts, with c..r-|.>adJ of debutantes In sweeping hats and fluffy frocks, eseor t.d by fluttered mothers, nor U there thai air of "We-KnowK very one-Here" as at Ihe Diplomatic Courts. These are tht peeejp) who have had their greati.es* thrust upon thci> An Ordeal For many of them it l* rathe ttached to each man cr i„ t route march style he m '•man's coal, so that he King r ,. w i v missed a stationary adm an e&slly hang on the cross or ,1, halted, clicked his heels w! .cdal a crack that could be heard The beef-cater*, looking like lh !" the beck row. and came to attenlening of a Shakespeare play, turn in front of the King with l lurched in *n£ took their places stamp that made chandelier* ,.i front of the twin thrones below tremble. gjg *^J^ ^ P . lha Koval Arms „f England emThe old gentleman beside ,.m „ ,'i t-Li ?'J?'* ^ lBunrt ,m ,ne """son drapenes uw his wife in the long line panning; along behind him. Tfw Suddenly the musicians, who hsu "Twenty rears on committees-. V'' hl1 %  -hfully MPUH sK-., ,. ,. told me 'The village i %  were salute, on all repertoire of Tchai furious Dec-Au^v didn't mnone of 0< "^ ,nomi "KSir an 1 ""ullo i OV sky and Johann Strausn. fitruek her a Dome". He aaT "1 hop* mem ol ,n#r '' Jenkiru!" ^ ,., ihe National Anthem. The Kins she's going to be all right. She There was a sort of pinky ooE rntnd in his favourite uniform doesn't enjoy the best of health. n Selfrktgei, hut it didn't n^ , ail A rtgtji ._ said the lady behirul. "Oecoralions on the please," said the policeman. "When dn we see the Kuuj. Mummy." said the small girl in ( Adniiial of the Fleet. you know he' been int i .. ii n v f.W a.m — ii.u BJB. I" Tea am. Th# Nm. fjj AMlyilir. T IS • .11 | 51 a.m. hninmmr l^irni Mh.l I. P>vt)K>l.i l.SB • %  ••m. IMntti' I 1 n„ Paiad*. it ..m Prea w — ilr.. 1100 noon> :i 10 p.m Newi A Ii 11II P i I ll-JS n Wi.U I H Narv N~Mtr. B IS p I iiciuiloic tN-lll pm. -VM M. a nut Nn. Aniitip. i is PH. aim InSHHt |>iarr. 7 6 p.m. Thlnh i Tnw Thlnai %  On pnv llodk. Nvwaraal. l r.KlL.lL Maaailn* B. p.m. CompoMi Ihr Wrck. |> "i W..(M Aflanv S IS rum -UN a k •.rl saillAl. GHOST ZORRO The Lord Chamberlain, Lor. except ArRenime— L1I t enable of the %  Association Inle; Americana Do Radio** to be held in Sao Pnulo between 18th to Sill March, said Felix Mugurum. the Association's President Some 4,000 stations from the American continent will be represented at ft Assembly, he added —Renter *V//y'/AVAV*V*V*V/V*V^V//^/AV//*V*V/V^v.v-',', GLOBE OPENING TO-DAY & CONTINUING •W' Mooring Star;/ oflJirf/un llial It'otl Ihr War.' JamesSTEWART SW! WINTERS DanDURYEA WlNCHESTI J.WKTT.t IMESS SHOP r~Lit Dm NEWSAM'RLwr Br~l Slrel—Trt. S4 Jl *T ARRIVKD IN TIMF FOR 1 wl 1 II Indies Inexpensive AFTERNOON DRESSES I'rom $18.50 to $24 50 AOIATII CLUB CINEMA I Mn h n Onh/I ^ MATINBCS TOOAY & TOMORBOW •! B p m TfmonT lo RL"WOAV MaiaiHl Lockwood. PatrleU not. Denma Price i. "JASSY" nlnt by Tvehnleolor BoraUfl* Pluiirc RolcawHl ihruush Unlvcrul-liiie PLAflBA Tlielr TODAY ••>" < mQISTlN (DIAL 8404) RETURN ol the FRONTIERSMAN • ilh OOreon UiB*. Julie Ixnidini. Boty Cathoun MIDMITE HAT. leih iA Mnt>ram D-^blr. Leo OOBCr.V A eBI BOWERY BOYS a 'BtAi B WIDNICHT %  ANCIILS ALLBr" Rodav M.-Dt-well l.w.ie T'CAIETT — [THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES RKO Radio Bis Action Double' TODAY T-i SUNDAY %  3D i> % %  < MAT SL'N S p 11. CRIMINAL COURT 4 BACK to BATAAN Tom Conway %  Martha O'DrUcoll J-hn Wayne S> Awl"on> Quinn M1DNITS SAT 1Mb RKO Te ( hiiitolor Speeial Douila. laKhank. J* Ma... .. ml.... ^_"_"A" "" "" nlt THE COUNTESS OF MONTE CRISTO' Mh Miphaal Kirl m, DoroOiy Hart Maton. Rosamund John. Par t SSO Krllnno in ••THE UPTURNED GLASS' WAMPlBmttl POKITIVKIA Ra i HIIIIHI^ M w n il A((e Limit 16 YEARS und over MTAwmmWn CAN KM STAND? a., ta, ..! %  ,s. f,v Wnasa aU e toll IKIM It mmwmt THRILLER MARCH 15th & 16th 8.30 p.m. MATINEE March 16th 5.30 SHARP %  BOX OFFICES OIl \ TO-DAY AT a A.M. EMPIRE THEATRE IN AGREEMENT THAT THIS RLM RF SHOWN Wt. The B'do* Board and I'llm Crnsorv-Dlreetor of M.-.li. •! Services Doctors and ether* too numrrou. to mention! lO-lltl Th brt.l.l.,1 th.l build.I S.vi tm and Swap 'am ... 40 Card< in lh* Serin. CORNFLAKES today! OIPIIIK TO DAY 2 St • 30 and t'onttnuint Universal International Presents .... Yvonne IX' CARLO R'charcl GREENE in • THE DESEIT HAWK with Jackie Gleason and Lois Audit ^ serial SaUrday Maraliu Show at a.sa Mil. and ((Ml AND SHERIFF d WICHITA" Starring Allan (Rocky) LANE BOXY Last Two Shown i.. a %  > 4 SO R 15 Republic Whol. "DAUGHTEK alDONO" Starring Adrian BOOTH, Kirk ALYN with Lavn MASON and Hoy BANCROFT HOYAI TO-DAV Al 4.15 ONLY Thr XII .ml,,, Film S II E II N A I \..I.,I.-..„ lion TO-NIillT ONLY AT .30 Eiislr Lion Doublp . Scotl BRADY and JcfT CAREY in tANON (ITV AND %  CO" Starring Lou BUTLER alM Bill COODWIN OLYMPIC To dav and T< and a 15 Republic Smashing Double Ken Mitin.'s I't i>iltn nn %  BILL and OH" AND "SANDS ollWO JIMA Starring John WAYNE di>d AIOIU. \\ T '"i,;?i?''„ """"'"". " '!> ""> !" l Rio liiF'i a l0OHd-lfffd reputation for flood /ood Music, Dancing Entertainment throughout the night Dial 4000 for rtMrvaliom (FRIDAY 9th) and Continuing Daily .'.,--"I-" ADULT PRICES ONLY W^uW^utTWm-mtTwTm *New 36 in. EASTER ; r otal L !" bi a Robia ,v 4 , Lystav, I obralco Wress Assortment Juil miM I "Cordrosa" fine draping corded crepe Invictaray Printed rayon — white grounds Slipper Satin, white |a wh..i,.ids) MAROCAIN, in 5 NEW SHADES. EVMS & WHITFIELDS ^jfeass^P" "1\ HARDWOOD CHAIRS OXI.V 8.7.76 EACH. AN ITCM YOU H*VC JffN WAITING lot I III U All II IMS I'O-OPI H Mill fOTTO.X I At TOHi LTD. Dial 4606 Dial 4220 MURRAY'S MILK STOUT THE STOUTEST OF ALL STOUTS STRENGTHENING TO THE LAST DROP Rt'mntntvitdrtl by the Far-ulty • FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED RECENTLY HMW; CO.. I.TO. A*rnt I *> 1